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mw 




THE 

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

PART III 

GRENFELL AND HUNT 



EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND - 

GRAECO-ROMAN BRANCH 

THE 

OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

PART III 

EDITED WITH TRANSLATIONS AND NOTES 

BY 

BERNARD P. GRENFELL, D.Litt., M.A. 

HON. LITT.D. DUBLIN ; HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBBRG ; FELLOW OP QUBKN'S COLLEGE, OXFORD 

AND 

ARTHUR S. HUNT, D.Litt., M.A. 

HON. PH.D. KOENIGSBERG; FELLOW OF LINCOLN COLLEGE, OXFORD 

WITH 8IX PLATES 



LONDON 

SOLD AT 

The Offices of the EGYPT EXPLORATION FUND, 37 Great Russell St., W.C. 

and 8 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass., U.S.A. 

KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRtfBNER & CO., Paternoster House, Charing Cross Road, W.C. 

BERNARD QUARITCH, 15 Piccadilly, W. ; ASHER& CO., 13 Bedford St., Covent Garden, W.C. 

and HENRY FROWDE, Amen Corner, E.C. 

1903 



PA 
.02 




JjnOAv/jJtV « tcl w> 



JrtXAv/jjtY * t( 



'/' ,';:>!•■; oJiCOi Liu* at y» 

OXFORD 
HORACE HART, PRINTER TO THE UNIVERSITY 



FACE 



•£&& 



\» 



In accordance with the chroiiolpgical arrangement adopted by 
us in the publication of the Oxyrhynchus Papyri, the present volume 
is devoted to second century texts, with the exception of the theo- 
logical and some of the classical papyri. The selection of documents 
here published in full or described probably represents less than- half 
the second century material discovered in 1897, but it is our intention 
in future volumes to deal with successive centuries up to the sixth, 
and then to return to the older papyri temporarily passed over. 
In the spring of this year excavations at Oxyrhynchus were resumed, 
and another large find of papyri was made, including a certain number 
of the late Ptolemaic period. These, together with a selection of 
the more important literary texts from the new find, will be published 
in Part IV, which we hope to issue within a year. 

In proportion to the space in the present volume occupied by 
the literary fragments our debt is the greater to Professor Blass, 
to whom is due the identification of several of the classical pieces, 
and to a large extent their reconstruction, together with many 
suggestions in the commentary. Mr. J. G. Smyly has rendered us 
much assistance, especially in connexion with questions of ancient 
mathematics ; the help which we have received on special points 
from other scholars is acknowledged in connexion with the individual 
papyri. 

BERNARD P. GRENFELL. 

ARTHUR S. HUNT. 
Oxford, 

June, 1903. 



a 3 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

Preface v 

List of Plates vii 

Table of Papyri viii 

Note on the Method of Publication and List of Abbreviations xi 

TEXTS 

I. Theological (401-407) i 

II. New Classical Fragments (408-444) 13 

III. Fragments of Extant Classical Authors (446-463) .... 84 

IV. Miscellaneous Literary Fragments (404-470) 123 

V. Second Century Documents : 

(a) Official (471-476) 147 

{6) Returns (airoypa^a/) (477-483) 161 

(c) Petitions (484-488) 174 

(rf) Wills (489-495) .187 

(e) Contracts (496-609) 208 

(/) Receipts (510-518) .241 

(g) Accounts (519-622) 254 

(X) Private Correspondence (523-533) 260 

VI. Collations of Homeric Fragments (584-573) 274 

VII. Descriptions of Second Century Documents (574-653) . . . .279 

INDICES . 

I. New Literary Fragments 291 

II. Emperors 304 

III. Months and Days 305 

IV. Personal Names 305 

V. Geographical 313 

VI. Religion 316 



CONTENTS 



vn 



PAGE 

V1L Official and Military Titles 317 

VIII. Weights, Measures, and Coins 318 

IX. Taxes 319 

X. General Index of Greek Words 319 



LIST OF PLATES 

I. 408 recto, 405, 406 verso .... 

II. 408, 408 (Col. iii) 

III. 408 (Col. ii) 

IV. 404 (*)/-*•/<?, 410 (Cols, i-ii), 445(a) 

V. 412 

VI. 420,446,447,455 



at the end. 



TABLE OF PAPYRI 



401. Gospel of St. Matthew i-ii . 

402. First Epistle of St. John iv 

403. Apocalypse of Baruch xii-xiv (Plate I) 

404. Shepherd of Hermas (Plate IV> . 
405-406. Theological Fragments (Plate I) 

407. Christian Prayer 

408. Pindar Odes (Plate II) 

400. Menander KdXa£ (Plates II and III) 

410. Rhetorical Treatise (Plate IV) . 

411. Life of Alcibiades 

412. Julius Africanus Keoro/ (Plate V) 

413. Farce and Mime 

414. * Philosophical Fragment 

415. Isaeus? 

416. Romance? .... 
417. m Romance? .... 

418. Scholia on Iliad i 

419. Euripides Archelaus . 

420. Argument of Euripides' Electra (Plate 
421-484. Poetical Fragments 
435-444. Prose Fragments 

446. Homer Iliad vi (Plate IV) . 

446. Homer Iliad xiii (Plate VI) . . 

447. Homer Iliad xxiii (Plate VI) . 

448. Homer Odyssey xxii and xxiii 

449. Euripides Andromache 

450. Euripides Medea 
451* Thucydides ii . 

462. Thucydides iv . 

463. Thucydides vi . 

454. Plato Gorgias .... 

466. Plato Republic iii (Plate VI) 

466. Plato Republic iv 



VI) 



A.D. 

5th or 6th cent. • 

Late 4th or 5th cent. 

Late 4th or 5th cent. . 

Late 3rd or 4th cent. 

3rd cent. 

Late 3rd or 4th cent. 

Early 2nd cent. 

2nd cent. 

2nd cent. 

5th or 6th cent. 

225-265 

2nd cent. 

Late 2nd or early 3rd cent. 

2nd cent. 

3rd cent. 

Early 3rd cent. 

Late 1st or early 2nd cent. 

2nd or 3rd cent. . 

3rd cent. 

2nd or 3rd cent. . 

Late 1 st to early 4th cent. 

2nd or 3rd cent. . 

Late 2nd cent. 

2nd or early 3rd cent. . 

3rd cent. 

3rd cent. 

3rd cent. 

3rd cent. 

2nd or 3rd cent. . 

Late 1 st or 2nd cent. . 

2nd cent. 

3rd cent. 

Late 2nd or early 3rd cent. 



PAGE 

1 

2 
3 
1 

10 
12 
*3 
11 
26 

3i 

3.6 

4i 

57 

59 

60 

61 

63 

65 

66 

67 

76 

84 

9* 

93 

94 

101 

103 

103 

104 

105 

105 

109 

no 



TABLE OF PAPYRI 



IX 



467. Aeschines In Ctesiphontem . 

468. Aeschines De Falsa Legation 

469. Demosthenes Contra Aristoeraiem 
460. Demosthenes De Pace 
46L Demosthenes De Corona 
462. Demosthenes De Corona 
468. Xenophon Anabasis vi 
464. Astrological Epigrams 
466. Astrological Calendar 

466. Directions for Wrestling 

467. Alchemistic Fragment 

468. Medical Fragment 
468. Grammatical Rules . 

470. Mathematical Treatise 

471. Speech of an Advocate 

472. Speech of an Advocate 
478. Decree in Honour of a Gvmnasiarch 
474. Circular to Officials . 
476. Report of an Accident 

476. Report of Mummifiers 

477. Registration of an Ephebus 

478. Selection of Boys (inUpurit) 

479. Census-Return .... 

480. Census-Return .... 
48L Property-Return 
482. Property-Return 
488. Application for Leave to Mortgage 
484. Petition to the Strategus . 
486. Notification to the Strategus 

486. Petitions to the Epistrategus and Praefect 

487. Petition to the Epistrategus 

488. Petition to the Epistrategus 

489. Will of Dionysius 

490. WillofTastraton 

491. WillofEudaemon 

492. WillofThatres. 
498. Will of Pasion and Berenice 
494. Will of Acusilaus 
496. Will of Petosorapis . 

496. Marriage Contract 

497. Marriage Contract 



A.D. 

and cent 

3rd cent. 

3rd cent. 

Late 2nd or early 3rd cent. 

3rd cent 

3rd cent. 

Late and or early 3rd cent 

Late 3rd cent. 

Late and cent 

and cent 

Late 1 st or early and cent. 

Early 3rd cent. 

Early 3rd cent. 

3rd cent. 

and cent. 

About 130 . 

138-161 

184? 

183 



and ceni 

133-3 

13a 

157 



13a 
99 



109 



181-9 
127 



108 

138 
178 

Late and or 3rd cent. 

117 

124 

126 



130 

Early and cent. 

156 



Early and cent. 



PAGE 

no 
in 
112 
116 
117 
118 
119 
123 
126 
137 
138 

139 
140 

Mi 
147 
151 
155 
156 

159 
160 
161 
163 
167 
168 
169 
170 
172 

174 
176 

180 

183 
184 
187 
190 

193 
196 
199 
201 
206 
208 
212 



TABLE OF PAPYRI 



A.D. 



498. Contract with Stone-cutters 

499. Lease of Land . 

500. Lease of Domain Land 

501. Lease of Land . 

502. Lease of a House 
608. Division of Property . 

504. Sale of Catoecic Land 

505. Sale of a Courtyard . 

506. Loan of Money upon Security 

507. Loan of Money upon Security 

508. Security for a Debt . 

509. Modification of an Agreement 

510. Repayment of a Loan 

611. Acknowledgement of a Loan 

612. Payment for Fodder . 
618. Receipt for Sale of Confiscated Property 
614. Receipt for Salary 
616. Receipt for Taxing-Lists . 

616. Order for Payment in Kind 

617. Receipt for Payment in Kind 

618. Receipt for Payment in Kind 

619. Account of Public Games . 

620. Account of a Sale 
62L List of Objects . 
622. Account of Corn Transport 
628. Invitation to Dinner . 
624. Invitation to a Wedding-feast 
626. Letter .... 

626. Letter of Cyrillus 

627. Letter of Hatres 

628. Letter of Serenus 

629. Letter to Athenarous . 
680. Letter of Dionysius . 
581. Letter of Cornelius . 
682. Letter of Heraclides . 
688. Letter of Apion . 
684-578. 
674-668. 



Homeric Fragments . 
Miscellaneous Documents ' 



and cent. 

121 



130 
187 



164 

118 

Early 2nd cent. 

2nd cent. 

M3 

169 

102 

Late 2nd cent 

101 

103 

173 
184 
1 90-1 

134 
160 

130 

179-180 
2nd cent. 

143 

2nd cent 

2nd cent. 

2nd cent. 

and cent. 

Early 2nd cent. 

2nd cent 

and or early 3rd cent 

2nd cent. 

2nd cent. 

2nd cent. 

2nd cent. 

2nd cent. 

Late 2nd or early 3rd cent 

2nd-3rd cent. 

2nd cent. 



PAGE 
214 
217 
218 
221 
223 
225 
227 
23O 
33a 
336 
338 

239 
241 
242 

«44 

249 
250 

251 
252 

253 
254 
255 
257 
258 
260 
261 
261 
262 
263 
263 
265 
266 
268 
269 
270 

274 
279 



1 The texts of 574 verso, 589, 599, 609, 610, 611, 618, and 614 are given in full, and large extracts 
are made from 574 recto, 577, 580, 588, 597, 688, 640, 642, and 658. ^ extracts 



NOTE ON THE METHOD OF PUBLICATION AND 
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 

In the following pages the same general method is followed as in preceding 
volumes. Of the new literary texts a few are printed in a dual form, a recon- 
struction in modern style being appended to a literal transcript. In most other 
cases, as well as in the fragments of extant authors, the originals are reproduced 
except for division of words, addition of capital initials to proper names, expan- 
sion of abbreviations, and supplements, so far as possible, of lacunae. In 413, 
however, accentuation and punctuation have been introduced for the sake of 
greater clearness, and this system has also been adopted with the majority of 
the literary fragments in the ' miscellaneous ' section (IV). Additions or 
corrections by the same hand as the body of the text are in small thin type, 
those by a different hand in thick type. Non-literary texts are given in modern 
style only. Abbreviations and symbols are resolved, the latter being all of 
the common land. Additions and corrections are usually incorporated in the 
text and their occurrence is recorded in the critical notes ; in the few instances 
where it was desirable to reproduce alterations in the original, a later hand is 
distinguished, as in the literary texts, by thick type. Faults of orthography, &c, 
are corrected in the critical notes wherever any difficulty could arise. Iota 
adscript is printed when so written, otherwise iota subscript is used. Square 
brackets [ ] indicate a lacuna, round brackets ( ) the resolution of a symbol or 
abbreviation, angular brackets < ) a mistaken omission in the original ; double 
square brackets [[ J mean that the letters within them have been deleted in 
the original, braces { }, that the letters so enclosed, though actually written, 
should be omitted. Dots placed within brackets represent the approximate 
number of letters lost or deleted. Dots outside brackets indicate mutilated 
or otherwise illegible letters. Letters with dots underneath them are to be con- 
sidered doubtful. Heavy Arabic numerals refer to the texts of the Oxyrhynchus 
papyri published in this volume and in Parts I— II ; ordinary numerals to lines ; 
small Roman numerals to columns. 



xii LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS 

The abbreviations used in referring to papyrological publications are prac- 
tically the same as those adopted by Wilcken in Archiv I. i. pp. 25-28, viz.: — 

P. Amh. I and 11= The Amherst Papyri (Greek), Vols. I and II, by B. P. 

Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 
Archiv = Archiv fur Papyrusforschung. 

B. G. U. = Aeg. Urkunden aus den Konigl. Museen zu Berlin, Griech. Urkunden. 
P. Brit. Mus. I and II = Catalogue of Greek Papyri in the British Museum, 

Vols. I and II, by F. G. Kenyon. 

C. P. R. = Corpus Papyrorum Raineri, Vol. I, by C. Wessely. 

P. Cairo = Greek Papyri in the Cairo Museum, Catalogue by B. P. Grenfell and 

A. S. Hunt. 

P. Fay. Towns = Fayftm Towns and their Papyri, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, 

and D. G. Hogarth. 
P. Gen. = Les Papyrus de Genfeve, by J. Nicole. 
P. Grenf. I and II = Greek Papyri, Series I, by B. P. Grenfell ; Series II, by 

B. P. Grenfell and A. S. Hunt. 

P. Oxy. I and II = The Oxyrhynchus Papyri, Parts I and II, by B. P. Grenfell 

and A. S. Hunt. 
Rev. Laws = Revenue Laws of Ptolemy Philadelphus, by B. P. Grenfell, with 

Introduction by the Rev. J. P. Mahaffy. 
P. Tebt. I = The Tebtunis Papyri, Part I, by B. P. Grenfell, A. S. Hunt, and 

J. G. Smyly. 
Wilcken, Ost. = Griechische Ostraka, by U. Wilcken. 



c 



I. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 



401. St. Matthew's Gospel, I — II. 

7 x 9-5 «*• 

These few verse3 from the end of the first and the beginning of the second 
chapter of the Gospel according to St. Matthew are contained on part of a leaf 
from a vellum book. Unless the text was in double columns, which would make 
the book a very unlikely shape, the leaves were unusually small in size ; for 
though the columns are incomplete at both top and bottom only two or three 
lines are missing between the last line of the verso and the first of the recto. The 
handwriting, which is in well-formed slightly sloping uncials of medium size, may 
be assigned to the fifth or sixth century. It is somewhat faded, and a second 
hand has here and there rewritten letters and lectional signs with a darker ink, 
besides correcting mistakes made by the original scribe, who was not very careful. 
To judge from this fragment, the text followed by the MS. was a good one, 
having affinities with the Codex Sinaiticus. We give a collation with the text 
of Westcott and Hort and with the Textus Receptus. 



Verso. 



Recto. 



[airo r]u>y [ap]ap[Tia>v av 
t&v tovto 8e o\oy [y€yov€v 
i'va ir\rjpa>6rj to prfcOw v 
no kv 8ia rov 7rpo0iyT[oi; Ac 
5 yovros iSov 17 [[0]] irapQzvos 
ev yaorpi c£c« Kai tc^ctc 
vv Kai Ka\c<rov<ri to ovo 



[wxricev] a^rrfv ca>s ov 6 
15 [t€K€V v]v Kai e^aXc<rc[f to 
[ovo]jia avrov Iv too & 
Iv ywvrjOemos «> By 
0Acc/i 7-17? XovSaias cv 17 
fiepais Hpa>8ov tov /9a<n 
20 Acq)? i'Sov payoi airo ava 



B 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

pa avrov Ejijiavovr]\' 6 roXnv irapzyevovro us 

\w\riv ueOepunveuoue v s % • K 

[0€is o€] I[ai\<rnd> ano rov vn v * r* 

u J L J #r Ta)y IoVOaiCOV €L[OOfJL€V 

\V0V €irOlT)]<T€V CDS ITOWT r * 

L fJ r 25 yap octoi/ ro[v aortpa €v 

1 ^ ^ " a [tJi; ayaro[Aif 



i. The supplement at the end of the line hardly fills the available space. 

5. Above and below the superfluous 6 are short horizontal strokes by the second hand. 

6. re£crc is for tc£*tm ; the final f has been partially rewritten by the later hand, but 
was also apparently the original reading. 

7. KoXfo-ouart : Kakicrowrtv W-H., with most MSS. 

10. cyfp[*4c : so NBCZ, W-H. ; b*y*p6*\s C'DEKLM, &a, T-R. 

n. The spacing suits Ac] I>W> (NKZrA, &c.) better than de o] i[o»]<n^ (BCDELM, 
&c.,T-R.; [JJW-H. 

14-5. Tne vestiges are indecisive between vu>* (NBZ, W-H.) and top vio* ovnjf tw 
vpiuToroKop (CDEKLM, T-R.), since with either reading the letters av would come where 
they appear to do in L 14, and there is not enough at the beginning of L 15 to show 
whether the word to which w belongs was abbreviated or not 

15. Or perhaps cjeaXtorc [to, which would suit the length of the line rather better. 

2 a. The final r of \tyomc seems to have been accidentally omitted by the original 
scribe. 

23. The correction of rrx&<r is by the second hand. 



402. First Epistle of St. John, IV. 
8x5-2 cm. 

A fragment of a leaf from a papyrus book, written in a clear semi-uncial 
hand towards the end of the fourth or in the fifth century, and containing part 
of 1 John iv. 1 1-7. The usual contractions found in biblical MSS. occur, and 
a horizontal stroke at the end of lines is used apparently to indicate abbrevia- 
tions. The text is curiously corrupt, considering its early date, and bears 
evidence of extremely careless copying. 

Recto. Verso. 

0s Tairpi<T€v rj[jias /cat tf/ieis airtoraXKty] rc[v viov ot»Tti 

o<fd\oficv aX\Tj[\ovs ayairav pa rev KO<rp]au [os ear opoXo 



403. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 3 

ovStis ironoTC i\*0€aTcu Vl^V on It]]? €<mv [i/]y rov [ 

tovciv tav ayair[<ofi€i> aXXrj 0v 09 ev] avrco fifvti teat 

5 \0VS 6s €(p) fJ/JLLV [fJL€V€l KOI T) CL 5 09 €P <Zv]rOO €OTlV KCU 7]/JL€l9 

[yanri] avrov rfereAeta/ici'i? €yva>Ka/A€]v Kai ircmorevica 

fi€V ttjp] ayairrjv r\v syji o \0s 
€v rjfuv 0]$ a[y]a7rTj eoriv #ca~ 
fievmv e]i> rrj ayawrj tv ra> 
10 day fi€V€L Kai 0]y ev avToa [/i]e 
€v tovtoo T€r]€X[€ia>rai 



Recto. 1. Txmpurtv is corrupt for ijyamjor**. 

3-4. Btbv ovdeiff iranrorf rtBtarat is the order of the MSS., but the supplement at the 
end of 1. 2 is already long enough, and towp is an easy corruption of tow 6v. 

Verso. 4-5. Instead of rat aMs cV ry &$, the reading of the MSS., the papyrus seems 
to have *<u 6 Btbs l* avr$ cotiv, i. e. a repetition of the preceding words with the substitution 
of Am* for fuvt i. is of WW is written above the line, owing to want of space^ 

7. The scribe seems to have mixed up the contractions x? and 0* fafc is the 
reading of the MSS. 

8. koT stands for koL 

10. After cV avry N and B have ftci*i which is omitted by. A, the other MSS. being 
divided. It is not certain that a letter is lost after <nra, but since *v is required to fill 
up the lacuna in 1. 11, and the horizontal stroke is used by this scribe merely as a sign 
of abbreviation (cf. 1. 8), [^(rc i) is more probable than c~ i. e. cV. 



403. Apocalypse of Baruch, XII-XIV. 

14x11 cm. Plate I (recto). 

Of the numerous theological works of an Apocalyptic character composed 
shortly before or after the beginning of the Christian era, one of the most 
interesting is the Apocalypse of Baruch y which like many other apocryphal works 
is preserved only in a translation from the Greek. To the recovery of a con- 
siderable fragment of the Greek original of the Ascension of Isaiah (P. Amh. 1. 1), 
previously known in its entirety only from the Ethiopic version, now succeeds 
a small fragment of the Apocalypse of Baruch in the language from which 
the extant Syriac translation is derived, though whether the Greek text is itself 
derived from Hebrew is disputed. Prof. Charles, who has published the latest 
and fullest edition of that Apocalypse, is strongly in favour of a Hebrew original, 

B 2 



4 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

but his reasons are not very convincing, and the present fragment illustrates the 
precarious character of arguments based on retranslations into a supposed original 
through a version which is itself not extant. 

The papyrus is part of a leaf from a book, written in brown ink in a large 
slightly sloping uncial hand of a moderately early Byzantine type, probably 
not later than the fifth century, and perhaps as early as the end of the fourth. 
The high point is frequently used, and there is a tendency to increase the size 
of the initial letters of lines. The text, so far as can be judged from the very 
imperfect condition of the lines preserved, is not very good ; one certain error 
(liapTvfx/j<ravT€s for i/jtapnjcrawfy in 1. 38) of the first hand has been corrected 
by another person, and fxeaij^pla is mis-spelt ptcreuPpCa in 1. 4. The curious 
tendency to omit the definite article (cf. 11. 16 and 24), which produces a certain 
harshness, is, however, not likely to be due to the scribe. But in spite of its 
smallness the fragment is of much interest as affording for the first time a direct 
opportunity of testing the fidelity of the Syriac translation. The impression 
created by a comparison of the two versions is that the Syriac translator was 
much less accurate than, for instance, the Ethiopic translator of the Ascension of 
Isaiah. In one passage (11. 6-8) he has expanded the three verbs of the Greek 
into six by adding a synonym in each case. In another he seems to have 
misapprehended the meaning of the Greek, and to have introduced an idea 
which is quite inappropriate to the context (cf. note on 11. 25-7), 

The references at the side of the text and the translation of the Syriac 
version are taken from the edition of Prof. Charles, whom we have to thank for 
several suggestions in the reconstruction of the fragment. The first ten lines 
of the verso are the conclusion of a prophecy of Baruch against Babylon 
(i.e. Rome). The recto is part of a prophecy against the Gentiles by ' a voice 
from the height,' and is a passage which has caused commentators much difficulty, 
but which the Greek helps to explain. 



Verso. 



[ 17 letters aXka t]wto oio[i/] xii. 1 

[oiojicu e/x» kcu \a\r]]<ra> npos <re ttjv 

[yqv ti\v euoSovaav o]y iravrore /iccre/* a 

5 [flpia airoKcuei ovS]e to 8li]vck€S ai am 
[m rov rjXiov \a][Lirov<TW irat av jitj npoa 3 



408. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 5 

[Sotca yaipriveiv] /iTj8e en[i] noXv KaraSiKa 

[{e aXrjdcos yap ev] Kaipco egvirvHrOrjaeTai 4 

[irpos (re ti opyri q wv xrrro r]#f jJLOKpo&vp[i] 
10 [as m xaXivo) Kare\erai Kai] enr&v tovtcl 5 

[evrjorevaa rjpe]pa$ { Kai eyevero fie xiii, 1 

[ra ,ravra oti cyoo] Bapov% ioTrjKei* em to 

[opos Slcou kcu i8ou <pa>v)Tj efaXOev c£ V 

[yfrovs Kai eiire poi avdfara em tous no- 2 

15 [8as aov Bapoux Kai aKove] rov Xoyov i'oyy 

[pov Oeou 



Recto. 



•[ 

mri[ 11 

ra eOvq ko[ 14 letters Karaira 
20 Ttivavres rrjv [yrjv Kai KaTaxprjca/ievoi 

roty ev avrrj KTiafj[a<ri v/iei? yap evep 12 

yerov/ievoi aei % rj^alpioreiTe aei 

Kai aireKpiOtfv Kai eiiro[v i8ov aire8ei xiv. 1 

£a? fioi Kaipoav ra£w tc{ai to /leXXov 
25 [e6\ea0ai 9 Kai €t7r[e]f y{o]r [oti tnr eOvuv 

yrr^yexOrja^rai r\ vno aov Xe^Oeiaa 

irpa£is Kai wv [ot8a oti ttoXXoi ..... 2 

a 
eiaiv 01 /iapTvprjaav[T€S Kai 

efyaav Kai eiropevOrfcaav e/c ko<tjjlov 

30 oXtya 8e 7repi[eorai eOvrj ev exeivois 

tols Kaipoir oi[s ovs ernes 

Xayow Kai ti ir[\eov ev tovtco 17 Tiva yei- 

pova r[o]ur[a>i' 



2-5. 'But I will say this as I think, and speak against thee, the land which is 
prospering. Not always does the noonday burn, nor do the rays of the sun constantly 



6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

give light' The Syriac here agrees verbally with the Greek, for the equivalent of tA 
hrjP€K€s which is translated as an adjective by Prof. Charles, who supplies ' always ' with 
the verb, is, as the Greek shows, to be constructed adverbially. 

6-8. 'And do not thou expect to rejoice, nor condemn greatly.' The Syriac has 
' Do not conclude or expect that thou wilt always be prosperous and rejoicing, and be not 
greatly uplifted and do not oppress ' (the last verb emended by Prof. Charles to ' be not 
boastful'), thus duplicating all the three verbs of the Greek, but no doubt wrongly. 
KarabiKc{<Tii9 is equally possible in 11. 7-8. 

8-10. 'For assuredly in its season the wrath will be awakened against thee which 
now is restrained by long-suffering as it were by a rein/ This agrees with the Syriac. 
Prof. Charles translates 'which now in long-suffering . . .'; but the traces before fuucpo- 
$vfi[ias are incompatible with cr, the second letter being either s or c 

10-6. 'And having said these things I fasted seven days. And it came to pass 
after this that I, Baruch, was standing upon Mount Zion, and lo ! a voice came forth 
from the height and said to me " Stand upon thy feet, Baruch, and hear the word of 
the mighty God." ' Here too the Syriac shows no variation. For the omission of the 
definite article before taxypov cf. 1. 24 Kaipvp rafris. 

18. om{: the first letter may be <r, and the second v but not r. The Syriac version 
of w. 10-1 has ' They were therefore chastened then that they might receive mercy. But 
now, ye peoples and nations, ye are debtors because all this time ye have trodden down 
the earth, and used the creation unrighteously.' 

21-2. 'For ye were always being benefited but were always ungrateful.' The Syriac 
has ' For I have always benefited you and ye have always denied the beneficence/ which 
differs by the introduction of the first person, and the use of an active instead of a passive 
verb in the first half of the sentence. Prof. Charles notes that the order of the words 
in the Syriac is unusual, and a corruption may be suspected. 

23-5. 'And I answered and said "Behold, thou hast shown me the methods of the 
times and that which will be." ' The Syriac differs slightly by having a singular word for 
To£ftr and by inserting ' after these things ' after ' will be.' 

25-7. It is clear that the Greek and Syriac here diverged from each other. The 
Syriac has ' and thou hast said unto me that the retribution which was spoken of by thee 
will be of advantage to the nations.' As Prof. Charles acutely remarks, the idea of 
a remedial chastisement of the Gentiles seems out of place, and something is probably 
wrong with the Syriac text. The verb found in the Greek, wro*x07<™Ta<, does not suggest 
anything like 'be of advantage to,' and taken in conjunction with irpafrs the meaning 
'endured' is in every way more satisfactory. Of the two doubtful letters at the beginning 
of 1. 26 the second could be «-, 17, or », but the first, if not v, can only be p, and pi) or 
p[o]i is very intractable, while a compound of 0cp» is required. The phrase 'will be 
of advantage to,' to which Prof. Charles objected, may therefore be regarded as an error 
of the Syriac translator. In some other respects Prof. Charles seems to us to have 
slightly exaggerated the inconsistencies in chapters x-xiv ; cf. p. 24 of his edition. «up&r 
T-rijciff does not seem an impossible description of the prophecy in ch. xiii, and if ' the 
retribution spoken of by thee ' is first mentioned by the cities, not by God, nevertheless 
it occurs in a speech put by the 'voice from the height' into the mouth of the 'pros- 
perous cities,' of whom the abrupt mention (cf. ibid, p. 22) is not so very surprising 
after a section devoted to Babylon and the 'land which is prospering.' 

27-32. The Syriac has • And now I know that those who have sinned are many 
and they have lived in prosperity and departed from the world, but that few nations 
will be left in those times to whom those words shall be said which thou didst say.' 
The Greek does not materially differ. In 1. 27 there is room for a word not expressed 



404. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS 7 

in the Syriac, but p*v (corresponding to o\iya dc in 1. 30) would perhaps be sufficient. 
A phrase meaning * in prosperity ' is required at the end of 1. 28 ; but it is difficult to find 
a word short enough if 01 is the article, so it should perhaps be regarded as the relative, 
when there will be no need for km. The erroneous reading of the first hand fiaprvprjiraprts 
is corrected to aftaprtiaavrts by a different writer who used much blacker ink. In 1. 31 
\9xO1jaovrai is rather too long for the lacuna. Perhaps epci m. 

32-3. The Syriac has ( For what advantage is there in this or what (evil) worse than 
what we have seen befall us are we to expect to see ? ' 



404. Shepherd of Hermas. 

Fr. (c) 7-8x5 -3 cm. Plate IV (Fr. (c) recto). 

Three fragments of a leaf from a papyrus book, inscribed on both sides in 
a sloping uncial hand of the late third or fourth century, the surface of the verso 
being much damaged. No line is complete, and indeed very few complete words 
are preserved, so that all the greater credit is due to Mr. V. Bartlet for recog- 
nizing the scraps as belonging to the lost Greek ending of the Shepherd of 
Hermas {SimiL x. 3. 3 — 4. 3). They thus form a useful supplement to P. Amh. 
190, Fr. (h) verso, another papyrus fragment of the missing Greek portion of the 
same work, and demonstrate with equal clearness that Simonides' version of the 
last leaf of the Athos codex was a forgery ; cf. P. Amh. J90 introd. 

The text of the present papyrus seems to have differed in many points of 
detail from those which were the basis of the extant translations of the last 
chapters of the Sitnilitudines % and only a few lines on the recto can be restored 
with any approach to certainty,. while the verso is for the most part illegible. 
Fragments (a) and (6) all but join each other ; but there seems to be a narrow 
lacuna between the bottom of Fr. (6) and the top of Fr. (c), causing the loss of 
a whole line on the recto. In Fr.(<r) the ends of 11. 18-33 are preserved, and since 
these are by no means even the number of letters lost at the ends of 11. 11-17 
may vary from 0-3. .We have reconstructed 11. 15-31 on the hypothesis that 
about 11 letters are lost at the beginnings. From the lines of breakage in 
Frs. (a) and (b) it is probable that the lacunae at the end of 11. 4-8 are of the 
same size as those in 11. n -17, and that the lacunae at the beginning of 11. 3-6 
correspond to those at the beginnings of 11. 15-33. 

We are indebted to Mr. V. Bartlet for several suggestions in the reconstruction 
of the fragments. 



8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Recto. Verso. 

Fragments (a) and (b). 

[ €V K]& €CLV \jl€P OVV [ )l{. .]lfl[ 

[icaOapov tov oC\kov <rov e[t//x»<n [••■]• [*] 1 • [*M 
[jiera <rov rrapa]fi€Pova'i[v cav $€ 25 [. . .]X[.] [ 

[ >rt?«OTrrf Hr»& •] • • ?M 

5 [ anoxyoprjaova-iv . [. . [,]t/ . €<r[. •]«••[ 

[. • . . at yap ira]p0€j/[<H] atnfai [.]yp . [ 

[14 letters a)yairwnv t[. . [••]••[ 

[10 „ Acya) avrm] €\n[i](<p [JS 30 [..].[ 

9 [19 v fr? - [• • » [•]••• [-M 

1 line lost. [•]•?"•?[ 

Fragment (c). [.] . . [.]* . [ 

11 [14 letters ]rat ets r[, . [•]••• JT4 

[ „ ]<rai axnrcjp Ac 35 [.] . tiv [ 

[ovtos co irap€8a>K]a$ /*€ ov [/*€/* [.] . rjy . i<r . . [ 

[0crcu pc ovfc a]vrcu pe/nfiov [. .]a> . ayy€«{ 

15 [rai fit Xey€£ r]a> iroifiwi oiS[a . . [.jowa • o-/x[ 

[on 8ov\o$ to]v 0v (JeAc* fi^y X[.] ax[ 

[icai TrjprjaeL ra]s eiroAa? i{a]v[Ta$ 40 a>y #[17] 8vya/x[evoi 

[jccu ray *rap0€]i'ot/y «> KaOaporq zvoyoi yeirfomai tovtov tov 

[ti KaraaTTjaei r]avra €i[rr)u>v ra> ai\ji\aro9 *roi[e«T€ ovv 

20 [iroipc^i iraAi]? 7rapeti[a)]K€v /x€ 
[/cai ray ira/>0€]i>oi/y KaXeaa? 
[ A]€y€* cwrat? 

1-22. The extant versions of this passage (Simil. x. 3. 2-5) are as follows : (1) Versio 
Vulgata : . . . et omnes hdbentes gratiam apud dominum. igitur si habuerint domum tuam 
pur am, tecum permanebunt ; sin autem pusillum aliquid inquinationis accident, protinus a domo 
tua recedent. hoe enim virgines nullam omnino diligunt inquinationem. dico ei: Spero me, 
domine, placiturum eis t ita ut in domo mea libenter habitent semper, et sicut hie, cut me iradi- 
disti, nihil de me queritur, ita neque illae querentur. ait ad pastor em ilium : Video, inquit, 
seroum dei velle vivere ei custoditurum haec mandata, et virgines has habitatione munda conlo- 
caturum. haec cum dixisset, iterum pastori illi me tradidit, et vocavit eas virgines et dixit ad 
eas . . . 



404. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS . 9 

(2) Codex Palatinus : . . . el cunctam habehtes graham apud dominum, si ergo habuerinl 
domum tuam pur am, tecum permanebunt ; sin autem in aliquo spurcafuerit domus tua,prolinus 
recedunt a domo tua. hae enim virgines spurcitiam non amant. et ego dixi : Domine, spero 
me placiturum eis ita [ut] in domo mea libenier et semper habit ent. et sicut hie, cui me tradi- 
disti, nihil de me queritur, ita neque illae virgines aliquid de me querentur. deinde ait ad 
ilium pastorem : Scio hunc mandata custodire, el virgines has in habitationem mundam conloca- 
iurum. haec cum dixisset, rursus eidem pastori me tradidit, et virgines illas vocavit dixitque 
ad illas . . . 

(3) Versio Aethiopica Latine : . . . et habent gratiam apud dominum. et simul atque 
invenerint pur am domum tuam, permanebunt apud te; si autem paululum immunda fuerit 
aliqua re, protinus derelinquent domum tuam, nam omnino non desiderant impuritalem illae 
virgines. et dixi ei : Confido, domine, me placiturum eis ut laetanles habitent in domo mea 
semper ; sicut tile cui me tradidisti nihil habel quo increpet me, sic illae nihil habebunt quo 
increpent me. et dixit pastori : Scio vitam velle servum domini, el servaturum esse haec man- 
data, et virginibus placiturum in puritate. etpostquam rursus tradidit me, virgines vocavit et 
dixit eis . . . 

4. The word in this line ought to correspond to pusillum (cX^ioro* n) t inquinationis 
(pvwapop), or accident (yrvi^cu or arvpPri), but the vestiges are very intractable. Those of the 
third letter suit a better than anything else, but unfortunately no occurs elsewhere in the 
papyrus. The fifth letter is very uncertain ; X is possible, but not 9. The last letter of 
the line is represented only by the bottom of a vertical stroke and may be 1. Neither 
pvwapop, fuafxnf, iwcpow, ovp&ri nor \afifiawow are admissible. 

5. Possibly anox^i>pT)<Tov(nv a[iro \<rov. 

7—8. Perhaps vavrairoo-iv ovk afyairwip ifapl pvnapoTTjra, but the substantive in L 8 no 
doubt corresponded to the adjective in 1. 4 which seems not to have been pvtrapfo. 

1 1 . Perhaps T€tu]ras as t\ov atwva JcarowCTj]oru. 

15. oU{a: the d has been corrected from 1 (?). The papyrus thus agtees with the 
Codex Palatinus and Ethiopic version {scio) against the Vulgate (video). 

18. tv Ka$apoTT)\[Ti : so the Ethiopic in puritate; the Latin versions have habitatione 
munda or in habitationem mundam. 

2 a. The word or words lost at the beginning of this line have nothing corresponding 
to them in the versions. 

40-2. The corresponding passages of the versions (Simil. x. 4. 3) are as follows : — 
(1) Versio Vulgata : qui novit igitur calamitatem huiusmodi hominis et non eripiteum, magnum 
peccatum admittit ei reus fit sanguinis eius. faciie igitur, &c. (2) Codex Palatinus: [qui 
novit ijgilur] angustiam eius et non redimit eum magnum peccatum admittit et fit reus sanguinis 
nus* (3) Versio Aethiopica Latine : qui autem novit adfiictionem eius qui ita se habel nee 
salvat eum, magnum peccatum admittit et fit occisor eius. The papyrus differs from these 
considerably ; not only is the plural (€w>x<h) found in place of the singular (reus), but the 
remains of 1. 40 do not in the least support anything like magnum peccatum admittit. 
Apparently the papyrus omitted that phrase and in its stead had a participial phrase 
depending upon the preceding words which is not represented in the translations, y of 
yc ufomu has been corrected, probably from p or d. 



io 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



405-406. Theological Fragments. 

Plate I (406 and 406 verso). 

We here group together fragments of two different theological works, 
which we have not been able to identify, both containing quotations from the 
New Testament. 

405 consists of seven fragments written in a small neat uncial hand, which 
is not later than the first half of the third century, and might be as old as the 
latter part of the second. The ordinary contractions 6s, j(?, «?? occur ; and it is 
clear that the use of these goes back far into the second century. Besides its 
early date (it is probably the oldest Christian fragment yet published), 405 is 
interesting on account of a quotation from St. Matthew Hi. 16-7 describing the 
Baptism, which is indicated by wedge-shaped signs in the margin similar to 
those employed for filling up short lines, e. g. in Fr. (a) 11. 9 and 13. 

406 is part of a leaf from a papyrus book and contains the quotation from 
Isaiah vi. 10 also found in Matthew xiii. 15 and Acts xxviii. 37. The citation 
appears here in its New Testament form, omitting the avr&v after &crCv found 
in the LXX version. The large and upright uncial hand is comparable with 
that of 25 and 224 and is probably to be assigned to the third century. Besides 
the ordinary contractions we have corppos for ivravpotpdvos in 1. 21. 



405. 



Col. i. 



to 



Fr. (a) 8.3 x 4-8 cm. 
Col. ii. 



Plate I. 



] . . [. . 

] • /"» «0 • [•] 

]cu emdt 
5 ] . yvwrros 

]ov 
frov 

} 
10]. 



15 too P[a]ir[T 

> or avtcofcOrjo'av 01 ovpavoi 

: > Kai t&t/ [to rrva rov Ov Kara 

> flaivov C0[<T€l TT€piOT€pay 
>€pyOpLiVc{v €7T CLVTOV Kai 

JO >l8w <f>C0[v7] €K TCOV OVpCtPXDV 

>\€you<ra [ ay a 

>7rrjTos [ 
yap tot . [ 



30 ]wc[ 



to 



]aav . [ 



405-406. THEOLOGICAL FRAGMENTS n 

)oXi [ 
35 ] . o/*.[ 



Trow 


top [I]ijy [ 


]*« 


25 aXAoy 5c [ 


] 


Ov <ran[rip 


. 


P!*M 



]iroy oi/t[ ]ww . [ 

]yoi> av[ ] . . • 0[. . .]p #ca[ 

] . kcu av[ 50 ] . [. .] . [.Jprw €kk[ 

40 ] irpotftrfiT ] OTOt/tftyof 

]y /cat wro[ ] . 7r[ 

]o-ayy€A[A]o[ .... 

] 7?PM 

] w Kai tc[ (/) 

45 ]™> . [ .... 

55 ] . . awoy ic[ 

Jiyroi/a- . [ 

M 



16-22. Owing to the number of variations in the text of this passage (Matt. iii. 16-7) 
and the irregularities of the papyrus with regard to the ends of lines, as shown by Col. i, 
some of the restorations are rather doubtful. Both ovpavoi in 1. 14 and ovpawp in 1. 18 
may have been contracted. In 1. 15, if m*vpa was written out in fair, r6 and roG, which 
are omitted by N and B, may have been also omitted by the papyrus; and that km, 
which is found in some MSS. before ep\6^€Pou i was not in the papyrus is fairly certain. 
The supplement in 1. 17 is rather short. The only known variant which would be longer 
is np6s for #V, found in several cursives. In 1. 1 9 there is certainly not room for the best- 
attested reading ovrfc cVn* 6 vl6s fwv 6 ayanrjros: either the papyrus agreed with D in 
reading <ru u for oZtos cow, or else 6 vl6s pov was omitted or placed after dya7rgr<fc. 



12 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



406. io»i x 7-5 cm. Plate I (verso). 

Verso. Recto. 

iraxyi{0]7i yap [tf KapSia rov ] <j>Tjai 

Xaov tovtov #c[«u row axriv ].. oo- ... /coo 

(3ap€&9 tjKot{aav Kai rovs 15 ] . a 

o<f>6akpovs a\yra>v €Kap ]<ry •[•]•• tO "*?? 

5 fivacw fir] h[ot€ i8co<riv roit ] . aXXoOw XaXoo 

o<p6a\fJLois atfrw Kai roi9 a> ] avrcov yap 

aiv aKov<raxri[u Kai rr\ Kap8ia ]••/?[ 

ovvaxriv Kai djnorpetycixnv 20 ]arrrov vios Qv 

#ca[i] i\a]<ropai a[vrovs ]os ear pros Xs 

10 7(. . .]€ X [.] . [-]0i€[ frf ]go 

I. • • • |c*J« • •JOI'l* •••••■••••• , # . . 

[.....'... -H 

6. av[ra>F is found here only in a few inferior MSS. 



407. Christian Prayer. 



14-5x15-7 cm. 

A short prayer written in rather elongated and ornate, though not very 
regular, uncials, which we should assign to the end of the third or to the fourth 
century. On the verso is the title 'A prayer/ and below a brief memorandum 
of some amounts in cursive. 

0eos 7rairr[o]fcpaTd>p iroirjaas top aupavov 
kcu rrjv ytfv Kai rr\v OaXarrav Kai itavra ra cy avrois 
PorjOrjaoy poi tXcrjaov pc [[«£]] egaXi^ov pov ra? 
. apaprias <raxrov pc tv rco wv Kai ev tod ptXXovri 
5 ai&vt 81a rov Kvptov ko[i] awTrjpos rjpcov Irjaov 

Xpaarov Si ov rj 8o£a Kai to Kparos €t? rovs aioovas 
twv aicova>[v] aprjv 



408. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 13 

On the verso 

(SpaxjjLai) 'Bp\? - 
10 xM ) H T P ) € W/"*" ?> 

'O God Almighty, who madest heaven and earth and sea and all that is therein, 
help me, have mercy upon me, wash away my sins, save me in this world and in the 
world to come, through our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, through whom is the glory 
and the power for ever and ever. Amen.' 

1. o iroopra? k.tX : the phrase is from Psalm cxlvi. 6; cf. Neh. ix. 6, Apoc. ziv. 7. 

3. c£aXi^roj' k.tA. : cf. Ps. 1. 9 vatras r&s dvofdas pav efdXet^or, &C. 

10. The meaning of x»p( ) is doubtful; with Xirpai immediately following, it is 
unlikely to be the liquid measure found in the forms dtx*pow and rpix*po* in B. G. U. 248. 
26, 531. ii. 5. x*K c or x»p(ls) is more probable. 



II. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 

408. Odes of Pindar. 

Fr. (a) 13 X 15 cm. Plate II. 

FOUR fragments of a lyric work in Pindaric dialect written in medium-sized 
uncials, with a few corrections and marginal notes in various hands. On the 
verso are some money accounts in a second century cursive. The writing on 
the recto> which bears much resemblance to that of the semi-uncial contracts 
from Oxyrhynchus of the Domitian-Trajan period (e. g. 270), belongs to the early 
part of the second century or even to the end of the first. Sub-divisions of the 
poem are indicated by paragraphi, while an elaborate coronis apparently marks 
the beginning of a new poem, as in the Bacchylides papyrus ; the high stop is 
employed, and occasional breathings, accents, and marks of elision and quantity 
occur. Fragment (b) probably belongs to the second column of fragment (0), 
and since this arrangement accounts for forty-eight lines in this column, it is 
unlikely that more than two or three, if any, lines are lost between those two 
fragments. The position of fragments (c) and (d) is obscure. 



14 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS .PAPYRI 



The authorship of the piece is made certain, as was perceived by Blass, 
by the correspondence of the last line of fragment (6) ]u UkQwos vn[ with the 
beginning of Pindar, Fr. 335 (Christ), a quotation in Plut. Quaest Symp. vii. 
5. % (cf. De soil, anitn. 36) of a passage in which the poet compares himself 
to a dolphin : — 6 Ilivbapos <f>ri<n KCKurijo-Oai irpbs (for]v iXlov bck<f>Zvo$ vn6Kpi<riv rbv 
piv &kv\xovos ttSvtov h TrcAdyei avk&v iKlvr\<r*v ipardv fiikos. Another extant 
Pindaric fragment (200) occurs in 11. 58-9 ; cf. note ad loc. Dismissing the first 
twenty-two lines, of which the merest fragments remain, we have in 11. 23-42 
most of the last antistrophe and in 11. 43-54 part of the last epode of one poem, 
and in 11. 54-69 part of the first strophe of the next. The subject of the anti- 
strophe, which has suffered much damage through the obliteration of the ink 
in the latter parts of several lines, is the vengeance taken by Heracles upon 
Laomedon. Though the general thread of the construction in 11. 23-35 has yet 
to be discovered, their restoration is a by no means hopeless undertaking, for 
the vestiges of letters in the effaced parts are generally sufficient to verify the 
right conjectures when they are made. The second poem has in the margin at 
the beginning traces of what seems to have been its title, but these are too slight 
to give a clue to the subject. The first strophe contains an interesting tribute 
by Pindar to one of his predecessors in the field of lyric poetry, which may be 
compared with the conclusion of the recently discovered Persae of Timotheus. 

In this, as in the other new classical fragments, many of the restorations of 
lacunae and suggestions in the commentary are due to Blass. 



w 



Col. i. 



]TTOI 
]CIA€[. .] . 

]6n 

]4>A 

] 

]■ 
].. 
mi • • j 



10 ].[...] 

]M€T€P*J 

JOOITTOAAON i»mrr*vi>a[Ty* 

]QNT€N 
14 ]NTPIXA- 

6 lines lost. 
21 ]A 



Col. ii. 
♦ Ml[ 



TOITTPOTA[. JNAICANAf 
Z0JT0rAM4>! . QYT*T • [ 
2$ HPAKA6HC- AAIAI[. ..]..[ 



toi irpoi'5[cb]i' atcrav 
(01 t6t d/uf> . . . 
% HpaK\iris. a\lai . . 



408. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



*5 



NAIMOAONTAC[.]Y[. JHqj . [.] . f 0€N 

eoyoi4>YroNON ]•[.].-. 

nANTCONrAPYTTfJPBJQC^N . . C§«J>A[ 
YYXANKeN€a)[.]€M€[.] . . PYK . * . . [ 
30 AA0)N5€N0M[.]I5TAB^C!AH[. .] 
0CATA[N J0AAI Al K0T€0)[.]e^\[ 
APXAJTT1TAIT€[.]AA0Y 

nieeTonAYc?^ [. .] . p/y\[. jiAAeg . . qj 
rAPC6A[.]rYC4>^pAra)N . yj . MY 

35 TA€KABOA€4>OPMirrO)N • 
MNACeHeOTITOIZA0€AC 
nAPOY€NrYAAOIC€CCATOA[.]AKT» 
BO)MONnATPIT€KPONia)»TIM!€AN 
TinePANige/AONAIABAIC • 

40 0T6AA0M6A0N 

Tinenpa)M€NO j h p*€tq 

MOPOIOKAPYi- 



vat fio\6vras . . . 

Oovoi <f>vyov . . . 

ndyroDv yap iru[i)pf}iQS . . . 

^V\kv K€V€&[v] € . • . 

\aS>v £€i>o8a[t]KTa fia<n\rj- 

09 draaOaXta Koreco[y] Oa/ia 

apyayira re [A]d\ov 

nlOero irawcr . . . 

ydp <rc \[i]yv<r<l>apdy*ov . . . 

ra, licafJSXe, (popjJiCyyow. 

fivdaOrjO' &ti ra {aOias 

Ildpov kv yvdXoi? iaaaro &[v]aicn 

(Jv/ibv irarpl re Kpovtm npAiv- 

ti iripav laO/ibv Siafiak, 

St* Aao/iiSov- 

n irerrpcofievoL Ijpxero 

pSpoio K&pv£. 



H[.]rAPTOTTAAAI4>ATON[.] . . . 


. QN 


17 • yap rb ira\at<paTov ov 


efKeCYITQNOYC 




€?/c€ <rvyy6vovs 


45 TP€IC1T[. .] .e<J>[.]NK?**Mtf . . 


P..TA|[ 


rpcis K€<f>aXav 


€niA[ ]AJMA[. .] . [. 


...].[ 


im8 . . . 


<*) 






AAAA[ 




dXXa ... 


T€MAXA[ 




r€ /*ax4- • • 4- 


PO)0)NA[ 




p&nv a . . . 


50 AAXONK[ 




\dypv K . . . 


NON€r(0[ 




vov iya> . • . 


OPriOICA[ 




ipytois a . . . 


53 AYHOYH[ 




av£ ... 


]*«AIQA[ 




a/oA . . . 


]. > Tiia)N[ 




1<W • . . 


]«9 AOIA[. . JAIAPMONIAN 




doi8[av K]al dppovlav 



i6 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



>* AY . [ ]TT€4>PAC*[ 

T0)[ ]KPO)NTIC[ 

n[ ]OYKOAO)[ 

60 N[ ]PAYCONIA[ 

Al[ ]ICAN? . [ 

OION[.]XHMAAir[ 

K€c6[.]6nTTAIHO[ 

AnOAAO)NIT€KAI[ 

65 APM€NON'€rO)M[ 
1TAYPAM€A[.]Z0M€ISI[ 
[. . .]CCAPrONAM<t>€nO)[ 
[. . .]OMAITTPOCAYT*[ 
[. . .]YA€A*IN0CY1T[ 

70 ]av£io[ 



].[ 

]NOCA [ 
]AT€C [ 

1 
]ANAHTTO[ 



av . [. . . i]rr€<f>pd(Ta[To 

tS[v . . Ao]KpS>v tis [01 t dpyi\o<pov 

7r[ip Ze(f>vpi]ov Ko\d>[yay 

v[dov<r 6irh]p Av<roi>(a{s dicpas, 

\i[irapii n6\]ts, &v0[rjK€ 8k 

otov [Sfayp* **y • • • 

Kes otov irarfc[va 

'AirSWavt re koI . . . 

&p/i€VOv. iya> /j\hv kXvqdv 

na€pa fi€\[i](ojjL€i'[ov riyyav 

[y\a>]<r<rapyov dfji<f>4nco[y ipe- 

[6t£\oiiai npb? avrh[v i- 

[\to]v SeXtfuvo? irn[6Kpi<TLV 



(d) 

]PTON[ 
]A[ 



n. The supposed Al at the end of the line are really more like N. 

12. fiavrtvfuJ[T]ui¥ is written in a semi-uncial hand in the margin between 11. 12 and 30, 
and so far as its position goes might refer to either. Probably it and the marginal adscript 
at the beginning of the new poem (1. 55) were due to the same person, who may be identical 
with the writer of the main text. The note below 1. 69 is almost certainly in a different 
hand, and the corrections in 11. 31, 32 and 63 seem to be by a third person. 

30. BACIAH[ : either Paaik?j\os or /3a<nAi)[o$]| & can be read, (tvodaucnji occurs in Eur. 
Here. Fur. 391 as an epithet of Cycnus, who was killed by Heracles. But here the ' king 
who murders strangers ' is Laomedon ; cf. 1. 40. 

32. The c founder of Debs' is no doubt Apollo. 

33. The doubtful € after TTAYC may be A. 

34. ftapvoxfxipayos occurs in Pindar, Is/A. 8. 47, and tpuripdpayo* is found in the Homeric 
Hymn to Hermes, but tft}yv(r<t>apayi# is new. 

36-42. ' Remember that he set up an altar in the dells of holy Paros to thee, the king, 
and to his honoured father, son of Cronos, having passed over the isthmus to the other 
side, when he came a herald of fated doom to Laomedon.' 



409. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 17 

36. iipa<r6rj& is for fipaa&rjri, Apollo being addressed ; cf. 1. 35 UafrSkt. The subject of 
ttnran is Heracles, who, according to Apollodonis ii. § 99, came to Paros when on his 
quest for Hippolyte's girdle, after which enterprise he went to Troy, narpl Kpovty means 
Zeus; cf. 01. 2. 13 Kp6vi« not 

55 ^Q- ' • • • son £ an( ^ harmony . . . were devised by one of the Locrians who dwell 
beside the white-crested hill of Zephyrium in furthest Ausonia, a rich city; he dedicated . . . 
a single paean meet for Apollo and . . . : I hearing his brief melody, plying an art of ceaseless 
words, am moved to song like a sea-dolphin . . . 

55. Perhaps , I«i{«m>, but *Io<W would be the form expected. In the marginal adscript 
the doubtful fi in the first line might be d or X preceded by another letter, and the doubtful 
a might be o, while a narrow letter such as t may have been lost between them. For v]p[r]oc 
there is not space enough. Instead of mj in the third line «u is possible, and the last word 
may be , A*«5]XX(*w) ; cf. 1. 64. Pindar wrote several fyuw to Apollo ; cf. Pausan. x. p. 858 
Ka6*{f<T6al rt t6p nlv&apov na\ $dcu> 6ir6aa r&v qaparvv *j *Arr6\Xoopd tarty. 

58. The reference is to Xenocritus (or Xenocrates) who invented the Locrian mode 
(AoKpurrt) ; cf. Westphal, Mitrik der Griechen, I. p. 286. For the restorations of this line 
and the next cf. Pind. Fr. 200 quoted by the scholiast on 01. x. 17 rpax*la dc tbc&rw Xryocro 
(Locri) XtxfMtis cfiau ml ciridaXaowdtof aMs yap ifairur of r apytktxfxtv nap Z«fn>piov Ko\&var. 

60. AOYCYne is rather long for the lacuna, and possibly KOAO)|N[ANYTT€]P should 
be read. 

61. AN6 . [ : above A is what may be a mark of quantity, probably °. 6 can be read 
in place of 6. 

62. For [£]gi7pa cf. Pind Fr. 124 iparav &XVP aoAav. 

63. For the form vatfy{va cf. Bacchyl. 15. 8. 

67. For iptBtCpiuu cf. Plut. Be soil. anim. 36 d«X</>Iw n^apoc ajrcucafav iavr&v ip*6iC*o4ai 
faaw (aktyw 6*\(f)h«x vn6Kpuriv jct.X. The next words would be expected to be np6s dotday 
(cf. the quotation as given in the introd.), but instead of this the papyrus has TTPOCAYTA[ , 
the last letter being extremely doubtful. Possibly avra[p is corrupt for aoM»: if not, it must 
refer to aoMv in 1. 56. 

70. This note probably refers to 1. 53. 



409. Menander, K6\a£. 

2i*5 X 34*i cm. Plates II and III. 

A notable increase has been effected during the last few years in the 
fragments of Menander, the discovery of the Geneva fragment of the T€<opy6s 
being rapidly followed by that of the Oxyrhynchus fragment of the Il€piK€ipoixivrj. 
Another welcome addition is now made by the following considerable fragment 
of the K6\a£ 9 a comedy previously represented only by a few short quotations, and 
some mutilated lines in P. Petrie I. iv. 1 assigned with much probability to this 
play by Blass (Hermes, xxxiii. p. 654, Rhein. Museum, lv. p. 102). The identifi- 
cation is established by the fortunate occurrence in the papyrus (11. 42-4) of 

C 



18 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

three lines quoted from the K<J\a£ by. Stobaeus, FbriL 10. ai (Fr. 394 of the 
Menander fragments in Kock's Fragmenta Comicorum) ; while another line 
and a half formerly placed among the ibrfXa bp&fiara (Kock, Fr. 731) occur in 
11. 49-50. 

As is well known, this play was utilized by Terence in his Eunuchus, a fact 
which he himself states in the prologue (11. 30-2) : 

Colax Menandri est: in ea est parasitus Colax 
et miles gloriosus. eos se non negat 
personas transtulisse in Eunuchum suam, 

the 'parasitus' Gnatho representing Menanders SrpovOlas, and the 'miles 
gloriosus,' who in the K<J\a£ was called Bias (cf. 1. 3a), appearing as Thraso 
(cf. Kock, Fr. 393, Plutarch, Mar. 57 a). But not much can be inferred from 
this concerning the plot of the KrfAaf, since the Euntichus was the product of 
a contaminatio of two Menandrian dramas, the second being the Evvovxos ; and 
where Terence was following the one and where the other cannot be accurately 
determined. Unfortunately on this point the present papyrus, notwithstanding 
its length, does not bring much enlightenment. Throughout the first column 
the beginnings of the lines are lost ; and though different speakers are occasionally 
distinguished, and the sense of a line or two may here and there be caught, 
it is impossible either to follow the course of the dialogue or evolve a connected 
idea of the action. In 1L 1-13 the speaker is possibly Struthias, the parasite, 
and a comparison with Terence, Eunuchus ii. 2, would then suggest itself; but 
the resemblance, if indeed there can be said to be a resemblance, was not more 
than a general one, A closer parallel is obtainable between 11. 11-3 and Terence, 
Eunuch, iii. 4, a speech by Antipho. Lower down in the column other characters 
appear and the names Doris and Phidias (11. 18-9) are mentioned; perhaps 
therefore a change of scene occurred in the course of this column, and the 
transition may be marked by the space between 11. 13 and 14. Column ii, which 
succeeds without a break, is in a more satisfactory condition. Probably a new 
scene opens at 1. 39, from which point as far as 1. 53 we have a dialogue between 
two persons who are walking in the street followed by a slave carrying wine-jars 
(1. 47). One of them is infuriated by the sight of the parasite, Struthias, whom 
he declares (11. 45-53) he would like to unmask in the open market-place. 
Below 1. 53 is a coronis and a short line ; and then another dialogue succeeds 
in which the speakers are the familiar young man (A.) and his tutor (B. ; cf. 1. 55 
Tyxtyqutf), the latter of whom makes a speech of some length upon the iniquities 
of the race of parasites (11. 55-63)* It would at first sight be natural to suppose 
that a change of scene occurred at L 54, and that the short line is a stage 
direction. But what remains of 1. 54 does not seem to suit this view, while 



409. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 19 

on the other hand it can be easily connected with what follows ; and, moreover, 
the speech of the tutor would succeed so appositely upon the outburst in 
Ik 45-53 a* to g* ve strong support to the hypothesis that the speakers in the 
upper half of this column are the same as in the lower. Line 54 must then be 
assumed to be defective. In the third column a different and apparently more 
dramatic scene opens, the transition to which is lost with the first few lines. 
This column is detached from the preceding two, but that it followed them 
immediately is rendered almost certain by the fact that this accords not only 
with the recto, where we have the correct amount of margin, but also with the 
verso, which has been used for an account. The break in the papyrus separates 
the figures of a column from the items to which they relate, and though the 
latter are too much defaced for the connexion to be established with certainty, 
the coincidence of the lines with the figures and the width of the resulting column, 
which exactly corresponds with that following it, suffice to make this relation 
of the fragments extremely probable. There is then hardly room for doubt that 
this was the next scene of the play ; but although twenty lines remain, of which 
not more than a few letters or syllables are missing, the situation is very obscure. 
There is apparently only one change of speaker (1. 89) ; the soldier Bias, a leno, 
and a girl seem to be involved ; but their relations are not made clear, and the 
Eunuchus seems to provide no definite clue. The mention of orpaiwcu in 1. 8a, 
with the passage in the next speech (11. 91-4) c If he perceives it he will come 
bringing sixty comrades, even as many as Odysseus took with him to Troy, with 
shouts and threats/ may recall the scene {Eunuch, iv. 7) where Thraso with his 
comrades prepares to attack the house of Thais, a passage with which Blass also 
connects the Fayflm fragment referred to above ; but it is difficult to work out the 
analogy. 

The MS. is written in rapidly formed medium-sized uncials which we should 
assign to about the middle of the second century. This date is also indicated by 
the two marginal notes, one of which is of some length, written by the original 
scribe in a„ smaller and more cursive hand, and also by the accounts already 
mentioned on the verso, which are not later than the first half of the third 
century, and may belong to the end of the second. Changes of speaker are 
marked by double dots and paragraphi as in the U€piK€ipofj.4vr] fragment (211) ; 
stops are frequently added, the high point as a rule being used, though the 
middle (so apparently at the ends of 11. 6 and 35) and low point (1. 44) also occur, 
and accents, breathings, &c, are found here and there: most or all of these 
lection signs are by the first hand. The text is but mediocre in quality, for in 
addition to minor errors half a line may be missing at 1. 54 (see above), and the 
blank space after 1. 13 is suspicious. 

C 1 



20 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Col. i. 



].[ 



]0)NTO)NnAT?[. JNHM6N0C 

]CYQNO)CnACINAO[.ffl.] 

]eninPA=€!CTiiiiA[.]- 

5 ]IKIAN€MOIK€NHN 

] . TTAIAAPION- [.]YTOCTPO«>HN- 

]NAIOIKHTAICTigiSI- 

]MIMONTYXONlCO)C 

](tf NAeAia)C0Y[.]0)C4>0APA • 
10 ]T0M0in[.]HT€0N 

]YNOAOCH/y\0)Nr?[.]y€TAI 

]€CTIAT<i>PA€C[.]QTHC 
]A€X6CeA!€|[. . JMOI 



] . AA6IT0 . [J6NTH • [• J 
15 ]/yvnPONHAOHHIM€rAN- 

]N • 6IA6MHTPI0N 
]A|NIAN- ArPIANAre 
]*PA : NYN€ra>AO>PIC 
]N*€IAIA:eAPP€IN- fMOl 

20 ]C€M[.]CTAYTHCM€A€I 
}€inHI*AHNA<l>ON- 

]NA0HNACa)Z€Me 
] KP§]BO)CTAnATPIA 
]YCAYTQ[.]C-nO[l]|A€»C- 

25 ]QYCI : TIA€r€ICAeAI€ : 

jno n HPOiCTOYceeoYC 

]NArAeONnPATTOM€N 

]t€P0)NAYT0Cn0T6 

]ON'TTHPANKPANOC 



&fUHp€l T 0kv\0W 
TMHTTpaTiOt* 

30 ]0N • AI[A]|BOAIAN • KOAION *"**" 
]YXHCONOC«>€P€l • 
JAIONHCBIAC 
]N€MON : T0N6N6AAI 



]a>i> r&v irar^pw /fc/i^/tfror 

]<rvov &s iraaiv 8o[t^}\ 

] iirl irpd&€is nv&[s] 
5 6\Utav i/iol Kevijv 

]. nouSdptov \a]vrhs rpo^v 

]v 8ioucr)TaTs tktiv 

]8cu/iov rvyhv taws 

]oov dOXfas ot[r\i» a^iSpa 
10 rov]r6 fioi ir[o}qTiov 

<t]vvo8o$ ii/i&y y[ttyverai 

] iaridrap 8eo[ir]&nis 

] Sex^o-Ocu cl[iri] poi 

] . a Set to . . €VT .... 
ig TrXotfrp \a)impov fj S6£n piyav 
]v el 8k fiij rplrov 
]aiviav iypiav Aye 
]apa. B. vDv 4ya> Awph (w *-) 
]y $ei8(a. A. Oapptiv kpol 
20 ]<r€/i . 9 ra&nis fiiXei 

] etiry <p\jva(f>ov 
Siairoiy 'A0r)va <r&{£ /*€ 
olb* d]icp€ifi&s T* TT&TpWL 
To]i>s abi[o6\r n6\€i9 
25 ]oi/<n. B. rt Xtycis &0\i€ m , 

A. ] irovr)poh rods Oeoite 

]y dyaOby irpdrro/iw 
Si/ioiptrrjS ] <fxpa>v aMs nore 
]<w, irJjpcw, Kpdvos, 
30 ]ov, SifioXtcw, K<p8iov, 

dryxfl* ho* ftp* 1 * 
kg\at<f>VT)S Btas 
]v ifi6v. A. rhv hOaSt 



r&r <rrpaTurr(S*r) 



409. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 21 

Col. 2. 
[ ] . . /y\[.]yoYNTAnePYCi[. .]*ei • 

35 [ ]HtfAIATPIBHN1TAP|[. . .]CAf- 

AIT . [ OQISI • CKO>n[.]OM€NOY[. . .] . CTT . [ 

€Y1T[. ]J! . ONTATTA[.]A€C- €X0M6[ 

OTIO[ ] . . [JHgO[. .]C0€N[.]OIXOMAI : 

f]K[ ]KAT€nTHK€NnQe€[ 

40 TTQA[. . .*. ]NHCATPATTHNHC[ 

. . [. ]»JieCTIAHAOC€CTI : TTO>C : 

OY0[ .]€NTAX€a)CAIKAIOCO)N • 

OM€[. ]€reiKAI*€IA€TAI • 

OA €T[. ]NT'€N€[.]P€YCACnANT[ 

45 0)CAAI[ ] : OMNYCOTONHAION 

6Fmh*€[ icpnice'eBMizuMOY 

TA0AC[.]A[ ]HNYTTONOIAKPAITTAAHC- 

€BOO)[ ]*pAK0A0Y8a)N€NAr0PAI • 

AN0PO>n[. .]?[. . .]NTTTO)XOCHC0AKAIN€KPOC- 
50 NYN[.]A€TTAOY[. . . JA€reTIN€IPrAZ0YT6XNHN • 
TOYTOj[.]AnO^P[. .]AITTO0€N€X€ICTAYTA- 0YKATT61 

€KTHC[. ] . 0)C€' TIAIMC[.]€ICKAKA" 

Tl AYCIT6A?) HMJ N ATT04>AI N€l CTAAI K6I N 

^eicecTH* .[.].. [. .] 

55 AIOYTAnAN[.]A[JOAO)A€TP04»IM€nPArMATA 

APAHN[.]era>c:[. ..]... nocacanactatoyc 

nOA€IC€[. JAKj\[. .]OYTATTOAO)A€K€NMONON 
TAYTAC- ONYN[.] . .*. . . ON€H€YPHK6ra)' 
OCOITYPANNOinCpnOPOCTICHreMCON 
60 M€rAC- CATPAn[.\]tPQYPAPX[.]COIKICTHCTOn[.]Y- 
CTPATHTOC- OY[. . .]AAAATOYCT€A€0)CA€ra) 

AnOAO)AOTAC[ ](?YTANHPHKANMONON 

01 KOAAK6C • Oyn[.] . 6ICINAYTOICA0AIOI 

COBAPOCM€NOAOrOC • OTIA€TQYT€CTINTTOT€ 

65 oY KQiAercorg •• ithcticankpinackakcoc 

€YNOYNYnOAABO[.]TON€ni90YA€YONTACOI 
KANMHAYNHTA[.] : TTACAYNATAIKAKO)CTTO€IN 



Col. ii. 

fj[k]v ovv ra iripwi . . ail 

35 r\v SiaTpififjv irapi . . . era? 



22 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

air ov aKam[T]ofihov . . . . <nr . • • 

cvtt t* . ovra ira[t]S*s €Xo/x€ . . . 

ono rjs 8[m}r$€v otxpfiai. 

A. rt k Karkim\K*v ir60€[v; 

40 iroX fj trarpdirr\v j) c . . . 

v ' iorl SijXSs iorr B. ir&s ; 

A. ovfyls iir\o6rrj<r]€V raxicos Sticatos &v 

6 pi[v yap avrip avXX](yu Kal felSerat 

6 Sk 7[bv irdXat nypot/]vr iveSpefoa? irdvr [fx«. 

45 B. &$ ASi[kov ctires.] A. Sfivvoo rbv ijXtov 
el pfj <f>c[p<Dv 6 irat\s Sirtaff i(3dSt{i pov 
ra Bda[t]a [teat ns] fjv vnSvoia KpaiirdXrjs, 
i(36a[v &v ev&df ir]apaKoXovd&v iv dyopqi* 
&vdpam[€, n]i\puat]v nro»xbs fjada Kal vticpSs, 

50 vvv\t\ Sk wXoi/[T€fr] Xiy€ r(v % elpydfav rixyrjv 

to0t6 y dir6icp{iv]at, ir60€v J?x €i9 rafhr \ ovk dirtt 
iic rfjt [. . . . iri]pwr€ ; rt StSdo[K]tts Kaxd ; 
rt XvatreXetty) f)/xiv dmxfxitvets rd8tK€tv ; 

B. €& iartv ... 

55 Si 0$ ra ndv[T] d[7r]6\a>\€, TpSfape, irpdypara 
dpSrjv, [X]lyo> a[ot .]...?• Seas dvaardrovs 
irSXeis l[6p]aKa[s, t)o9t diroXd>X*K*v p6vov 
rafcas, h vQv . . . . o . . ov i^eSprfK cy©* 
Scot rvpavvoi irdmoff, Sorts fjytfi&v 

60 /icyas, varpdiifasi], <f>povpapx[o]s, oUtori)s r6n[o)u 9 
arparrjy6s t oi [yap] dXXa rod? rcAcooy Xey<o 
diroXnXfcas [v€v, rjoOr dvjjprjKev p6vov 
ol kSXclkc? ot ir[dp]et<riv(}) avroi? dOXioi. 
A. aofiapb? piv 6 XSyos* Srt Si ro€r itmv irorh 

65 oifK oVf fyaoy*. B. ir[a]f rts &v Kptva? kok&* 

ctivovv vnoXdl3c{i] rbv imfiovXctiovrd trot. 
A. kAv pi) Stivr)ra[i;] B. ira? Svvarat Katccbs iroetv. 



409. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 23 

Col. iii. 

About 10 lines lost. 

[• ] • • • [ 

.[.....].. [.]CAYT0Y[ 
80 0T[. JP0CBIANM6 . . [ 

t". . [.jneiQTf.K^PHceiq 

M[.]T*TCMY€9[.]T€P0YC . [JCTPATE 
0Y[. .]APA4>YAAH€I • TTA|A€C' €KT.PIB0[ 

HTOjnoeoYTocHCYnicT€YeeiCA[ 

85 YTT?ISIAN[. .]ONT€MH0€NCii>NnO?|[ 

AO^AC- €X€ICT0NANAP»A4>YAAKT0N • €[ 
Ta)NnPATTOM€NO)NTHCOIKIAC- 0T[ 
B[.]Y^HIAI0IKH6HC€TAITAA0inAC0r 

[3by^[. . . .]9 . . HC*AN€POC- 0YA€IM0J[ 
90 €^ON[.]€C€NT[. . .]X€PCINAAAOAOYA€€ISI[ 

a)N?|eoreiTO)N • AM€ANAiceHe'OM[ 

nPOt?ICIN€HHK[.]N0€TAIPOYCnAPAAAB[ 
[• .]QY[.]OAYCCeYCHAe€N€ICTPOIAN€XO)[ 
[. JCf)NAn€IAO)N • ANC6MH- MACTIHA 

95 [ ]€nPAKACnA€ON€XONTIXPYCJO[ 

[ ] . . TI[.]^na)Aa)MATOYCAO)A€KA[. JOYf 

[. . . . .M.]NO[.]AIATOYTON- HNIAAAMBAN6IJI 

[ ]]A€KATP€ICMNAC€KACTHCHM€PAC 

[ ]H€NOY- A€AOIKAAOYTO)AAMBAN€IN 

100 [ ]AOYrAPAPTTACONe'OTANTYXHI 

[. ]AIKACOMAI* nPArMA0€HO)' MAPft 

]a<nvavaKro<r TOVfii\i]aioi{. *]Tvay[. . .]o<nroXkoio'<poSga 
]a>vKa>fJLco8ioyp"" fi€fiv[. .] T €yev€Toy irayKpaTiao* Kpa[ 
]vKa6avrovrjya{. .]aarolf K'irvy/JLr)i€paTO<r0wr)O'8£. . . 
105 ]>~Ta>vo\v/jLmovi* irpoOtKr pi? oXvpn* <f> a[. •tyayaft 

]oiu\r)<no<r ? rrjvncpioSovaKoviTei 

Col. iii. 

9 avrov ... 

80 • [ir]pbs fiiav /x€ . . . 

t . . . mi<r . . xvpfoei cr . . . 

I^Tani/jL^eff [ijrepovs [Sij] orpai[i<&Tas, fiaStes 



24 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

od[y n]apa<pvXd£ei- iraitits, kKTp((3c{ificv dv. 

jjroi iroff oUtos fj <ri> marevOu? X[6yoi? 
85 inr*varfri]ov re firjOkv 5>v 7T0€t[y noeiv 

86£a? ej( €t9 T ^ v & V $P diftuXatcrov, %{KT<mov 

t&v irpaiTopivoov, rr}? oUtar 8r[av 8k oi> 

povXfl, 8iotKT)6Jjo'€Tai rk Xoiird <roi* 
B. [w]ov 8 . . . . . . rjs <pav€p6s ; oi Xi/ioi, [fiCop 
90 Ixoi^rjcy kv r[dis] X € P <r ^ v » dXXo if o&8k ev; 

ivtiff 6 ycfcw dXX' kdv ataBrjff 8p[cos 

irp6o-€i<nv itfrcovff iratpovs irapaXa(3[w t 

[8<r]ov[9] 'OSuaaeds fjXOev h Tpotav i%<x{v 9 

[fJ6y&v direiX&v " &v <re pft" " paoriyfa, 
95 [tyhv irfapafcas irXiov iypunt yjwrhfy? 

n[d\8a ira>X&; /xi rods SwSe/ca Ocofc 

[diraT£\p[e]v<j{5] 81& tovtov' fj /it kXdpflavw 

1 8iKa rpefy pvas iKdartjs fl/iipa? 

[napd rod] £ivov* 8k8ouca it o$tw Xapfidvciv 
iofr Xov yh,p dfmdaovff irav rvyp 

SiKdaojiai, irpdypaff <■£<», fidpr[vp€$ 

] " 'AarvdvaiCTor " rod MiXrjctov £A<r]rvdi{aKT]os iroXXol <r<p68pa 
rjfif K<x>fi<p8ioyp(d<f>ODt/) pepv[r)v]r(cu). kyiv*7{o) y(dp) irayKpaTiaorftf) 

Kpd[7(lOT0S) 

t£\v Kaff avr6r, ^yce[vC]aaTO 8(h) K(al) irvy/ifji. 'Eparoo-Okvqs it ^y t$ 
105 . r&v 9 OXv/i7rtopiK(&v) irpoOels pi^ 9 OXvfiirt(d8a) <Hrja(vy 'A[or]vdva£ 

6 MiXfoio? ? rfjy ntptoSov dicoviTet. 

4-8. Blass suggests the following restoration of this passage : [«W yhp t(*r\*wr*v] M 
npafrts rtv&s J [6 irarf)p xarcXnrcy oj&Mii' gfuA Kcvijv | [jcal . . . hi] naibaptoV avrU rpotpfy* \ [hropt- 
adfurjw. iijP pep (sc. oUlav)] biouorrats rtaiu \ [farrpe^* • • . 

10. n[o]rjrtoy: cf. 11. 67 and 85. The Attic form is also preserved in the Utpucapofuvrf 
papyrus, 211. 2. 

13. The blank below this line may indicate a change of scene (cf. introd.), but it might 
also mean that there was some omission at this point ; cf. 1. 54. 

18. Aoopip : there is no doubt about the reading. Either Avpic is an adscript concern- 
ing the speaker (cf. 211) which has been incorporated into the text or we must suppose 
the loss of a foot at the end of the line. 

23. There is a blank space before K in which there are no traces of ink, though K is 
clear enough ; but it is possible that the ink has scaled off. 



409. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 25 

28. dipoiptnp : the meaning of the word is explained in the marginal note ; it is equi- 
valent to the Latin duplicarius. 

31. The line probably ran *vv\ d« ravra wopt artyxfr **rA«, as Blass suggests. 

39-67. A (a young man). ' What . . . has swooped down on us and whence is it ? 
. . . mat he is a knave is evident. 
B (tutor of A). How? 

A. No honest man ever grew rich quickly. For while he is putting by and living 
thriftily, the man who lays a trap for his patient watchfulness gets everything. 

B. How unjust it is what you say. 

A. I swear by the sun that if the slave were not following me carrying the Thasian 
jars and there were no suspicion of my being drunk, I would at once pursue him in the 
market-place crying: "Fellow, last year you were poor and an outcast, but now you are 
rich. Say what trade you have been working at ; answer me this, whence have you got all 
this ? Won't you be off . . . somewhere else ? Why do you teach men wrong ? Why do 
you declare to us that there is profit in evil-doing ? " 

B. There is one character, my boy, only one which has brought utter ruin upon the 
world, and so I tell you. This alone it is that has ruined all the cities which you have seen 
laid waste, as I have now discovered. All the tyrants, all the great rulers, satraps, captains, 
founders, generals — I mean those who have come to complete ruin — this alone has been 
their destruction, namely the miserable parasites who attend them. 

A. That is a violent speech ; but I am not sure what is the meaning of this. 

B. Any one might be so mistaken as to suppose the man who was intriguing against 
him to be his friend. 

A. But if the intriguer is powerless ? 

B. Every one has power to do evil. 1 

34. The supposed point after €1 may be a vestige of another letter. 

39. ri i{qk6v . . . would be suitable, but it would then be quite impossible to get two 
more feet into the remaining space, which seems in any case almost too short for the 
exigencies of the verse ; but something may have dropped out. 

42-4 = Stob. Flor. 10. 21. ovOtis is also found in the Parisinus; ovbcls Kock. avr$ 
in I. 43 is the reading in Stobaeus, but <M is a probable correction. 

49-50 = Eustathius 1833. 58. Grotius' emendation of vvv to wvi is confirmed by the 
papyrus. 

52. & rrjs [irrfXcw is an obvious restoration, but it seems impossible to get so much 
into the lacuna ; ayopfc is also too long. 

54. For a discussion of this passage see introd. 

58. The vestiges would suit OIKON, and t vvv kot oUop is a just .possible reading. 

62. ANHPHKAN must be altered to dvjjprjKcv; the mistake was a natural one, with 61 
xSKwctt in the next line. 

63. To find a restoration of this passage which at once suits the sense and the papyrus 
is not easy, ot ndpcuriv naturally suggests itself, but the letter after is almost certainly Y, 
not I, and before 6ICIN the traces would be consistent with the tip of a letter like A, A or M 
but hardly with P. On the other hand, . . . tuny seems a fatal obstacle to the alternative 
of making a&ku* refer to the rvptwvoi, &&, and reading obs . . . avrols Ztikioi. 

89. \ifioi : ' starvelings ' as in Poseidipp. Fr. 26. 12 (Kock, iii. 343) Kviuwmpiaras irwrat 
4 Xiftovf KaA&r. For [fUo*\ fy 0, { r ]« iv r[aw] xcfxriv cf. the compounds curox*ipo&iwTos and Aro- 



26 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

92. ttfKovff: cf. Apollod. Epit 5. 14 *ls rovrw (the wooden horse) *Od. eio-fX&cr ntWti 
ircvTTjKovra row dpiarovs, 00s dc 6 tt)v /wcphv ypdyfras *lXiada (fao-i, rpurxiXfow. 

96. In the right margin opposite this line are traces of a marginal note, but it is hope- 
lessly effaced r4[d]8a is the name of the girl who is referred to by ipip in the previous 

line and is the subject of 11. 97-9. A paragraphia may be lost between 11. 95-6 and there 
is very likely a change of speaker at this point. 

97. The final letter may be I, but some correction of the latter part of this line is in 
any case necessary. 4 *"" &afifka*v is a simple alteration. 

102-6. 'AaTwboKTos must have occurred in one of the lines lost at the top of this 
column, the note being added at the bottom to explain the reference. For Astyanaz cf. 
Athen. X. 413 a 'Aarva»a( V 6 MiXtytnof rpls 'OXvftfrta vucrja-as Kara to t£ijs irayKparioy. AthenaeUS 
tells a story of his eating a dinner which was intended for nine persons. 

103. /: this abbreviation of y6p is the same as that found in the papyrus of the 
*ABrjvaUop jroXire/a, like those for df and km in 1. 104. 

104. *Eparo<r6*vf)s : i.e. Eratosthenes of Cyrene, the librarian at Alexandria under 
Euergetes I and Philopator. His 'o\vpmovUat is referred to by Athenaeus iv. 154 a, 
Diog. Laert. viii. 51. 

105. The letter before t»v was the figure giving the number of the book. 

106. r^y wtpioto*: i.e. the four great public games; cf. e.g. Athen. x. 415a fr'nap* M 
rljy ncpio&or dcxdw. 



410. Rhetorical Treatise. 

25-4 X 23-2 cm. Plate IV (Cols. i-ii). 

A treatise on Rhetoric in the Doric dialect is something of a surprise, 
but that such was the character of the work from which these fragments are 
derived admits of no doubt. The dialect, though occasionally corrupt, is the 
same as that found in the fragments of Archytas of Tarentum and other 
Pythagoreans, and in the anonymous AiaXifas 'Hflucaf, the composition of which 
is attributed to the beginning of the fourth century B.C. (cf. Mullach, Fragtn. 
Phil Graec. i. pp. 544 sqq. ; ii. pp. 9 sqq.). To the same period and probably 
to the same school the present treatise is also to be assigned. The precepts 
inculcated by the writer are of a simple and practical character, and their 
principal object is the attainment of /xeyoAoir^irfta, which, as we also know from 
Quintilian {Inst. Or. iv. 61-3), was specially included among the narrandi 
(cf. 1. 15 iv hi [rot] diayijrei) virtutes by certain authorities. Poetical quotations 
are freely introduced, a circumstance which forms another connecting link with 
the AiaXi&i? ; cf. Mullach, op. cit. i. pp. 546, 548. 

The greater part of four consecutive columns is preserved, the first of these 
being practically complete. They are written in a neat, rather small, round 
uncial hand which we should place in the latter half of the second century A.D., 
though the contents of the verso, a series of epigrams (464) in a semi-uncial 



410. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



27 



hand, appear to be of a considerably later date. The columns lean over rather 
markedly to the right. Quotations usually, though not always, project by a letter 
or two into the left margin, as in other papyri of this period (cf. e.g. 220). The 
text is not very good, and in several passages the corruption has gone considerably 
deeper than the mere debasement of the dialect. 



Col. i. 

KAIAAA0ITIN6C 
T€AHI0)C0NTIKAI 
4IK€NTAIA€E6ITAI 
APXACTAN€<t>0A0)N 

5 KAiMHrerPAM/we 

NAICAOKHIXPHC0A1 
[. .]AAAAIAIO)TIKAIC 
[. .]IMHA€NO>CAKP€l 
[.]0)CAAA0)C0I0M€ 

10 [.]0CKAIAKAK00)CA€ 
rHI.HTO)NAHKACTH 
[.]d>NHAAAO)NTIN(B 
[.]tfM€NT0ICTTP00IMI 
[. JCTAYTAXPHCIMA6C 

15 [. JI€IK€IAN€NTI€NA6 
[. .]AIHrHC€ITO)NTTPA 
[. .]ATa)Na)CT6B€AT€l 

[. jsAiMerAAOTTPene 

[. . .]P0NT0H60C4>AI 
20 [. . J0AITAA6XPHCIMA 
[. .]/V\HCAC0AIA€ITON 



[.. 


, JfONKAITTPCOTON 


[•■ 


JTANICXYNMIKKA 


[.. 


. .]AAIKHMATO)N 


95 [. 


. . .]N(}>€NT0ICAI 


[.. 


. . .]HP€CCIMH«I>A 


[.. 


. . .]€IAHM0N0)C 


[.. 


— ]ica*6[. .]Aonpe 



Kal dXXoi nvls 

r£ d£iwrovri. Kal 

at k kv rat \i£u rai 

(tear) dpyhs rap i<p68a>v 

Kal /lij yeypappe- 

vats Soktji xprjaOat 

[tis] dXXi. ISuvriKais 

[Ka]l fir)8kv a>9 dxpiffiias e/)- 

[8\a>s aXX' a>y olo/i*. 

[p]os Kal a/caAfocby Xc- 

yiyt fj t&p SiKaoTJj- 

\pfi>V 1j d\\C0P TIP&P. 

[i]p pip rots irpootpt- 
[oi]s rafira xprjat/Jia is 
[iir]i€tK€idp ipri. iv 8\ 
[rat] Siayfott t&p npa- 
[yp)&Tcav <8(jt€ /JcXrt- 
[op] Kal p6ya\o7rpi- 
[orejpop tI fjdos <f>at- 
[v€<r]6ai rd8e \pr\(Tt\La* 
[fii]fjL7J<ra<r6at Set rip 
. ... op Kal irpdrov 
\ji\v] rhv Itrypp piKK&p 
.... dSiKrjpdTav 
. . . . vw Iv rots 81- 
[Kacrr]r]p€a(Tt pif $a- 
. . . . 61 Sfj fi6v&s 
is /i€[ya]Xo9rpc- 



28 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



[ ]POCTT[. ,]€NKAI 

30 [ ]AAAON 

[ ]TQYCANTIA§ 

Col. 11. 

6 lines lost. 

P*A[ 

TT€PI[ 

40 n€PITT[ 

TTAN[.] . [ 

B*]CON[ 

ANCOM . £Y[ 

TT€PIO)N[. . JM€[. . 
45 [J • P • [.]TOICAIAA§r?TAI 

KAI0TIKAHI0)NT1 

TOYTOM€rAOION 

[,]YA€IXPYC€IHA4>P0 

AeiTHeiAocepizoi 

50 [JYAOCAAAINOCOYAOC 
A4>HT0P0C0YA0CA 
6HBAICAir[. JTIAC 
KAIOCAYAM[. J0CT6 
KONICT€TTAPM€l 

55 rMATM€OIO[. . .] 

PANO)€CTH[. ] 

KAI€TTIXeO[. 

KAIC04>0KAH[. . . . 
T€|[. .]NOYA?[ 

60 A . *4>AN[ 

[. . 0*TTAPA[. 

Col. ill. 

[ mu . 

[ 1 . HTON 

[ ]y/y^zoM€N 



[iri<rr€]pos rr[. .]w Kal 

aXXov 

t&s dvrCK^yovra^ 



nepl 3>v . . . /i€ . . 
. . p . . row 8ia\iy€Tcu, 
Kal 1m k a£i&vri, 
toOto piya, olov 
u [o]iS *t XpMnto 'A<f>po- 
Btra cftoy kptfai" 
«[o]v& ova \davo? ovSbs 
d<prJTopos" "odf Sva 
ejftas Aly[vir]T(as" 
Kal «6<ra ^dp[a$]6s T€ 
k6vis t€." wapakU 
y liar a 8k oh{v " oi-] 
pavf i<JTTJ[pi£e Kdprj] 

Kal inl xH" 1 P*b*" 
Kal 2o<poK\f)[? . . . 



6a]viid(o^v 



410. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 

65 [ ]!T€POIMj5kN ircpoi fibv 

[ ]€ICT€KAIKAY 619 T€ Kal k\v- 

[ ]AA0TTP€TT€CT€ . . . /i€y]aXoir/>€ir€OT6- 

[. ]ANTA4>AIN€ pov . . . ir]dvTa 0a6>€- 

[. ]$\A(})NAI 

70 [ 1M€NAT[. J . . . £] 

[. .]A€MHA€NAICXPON [n] ft fMrjS^y ahxpbv 

[.]HA€TTPOn€T€CM€ [/Kfoft frponcrh <We- 

[. JA€r€KAirAPMIK [m] \(yv kclL yip /uk- 

S[.]TT[.]€TT€CTOTOIOY *[o>r[p]€ir& rb toloO- 

7S [• • .]K[.]IAKOAACT(D; [tov] jc[a]2 &ko\&<tt* 

He€0CT0A6<l>€Yr€IN ijOcor rb ft ty&ytv 

T^CAICXPOAOHACMe T&S al<rxpo\oy(as /*€- 

T[. JOTTP€TT€CKAIKOC y[a\)tmp€irh Kal /c&r- 

MOCAOrO) • M€TM€ /tot \6yct>. /ierh ft 

80 TAYTATTANTAOTIAIA raOra ir&rra Sri 81a- 

[.]*CM€TATINOCYITO y# fieri rurot toro- 

[.]€CIOCXPHCTACAIA [Ofoios XM* 7 ** * ia " 

[.]§OKAIAIANOIACHAI [y]io Kal Siavotas t\ ft. 

• [. .]0)M€NOCTIHOI . . . 4/icirfr n ^ oU 

85 [. . JNOCHXPHIZCO[.] [<fic>of ^ XPK<»M 

[. . . .]0>[.]M[. ] 

6 lines lost 



29 



Col. iv. 
rriNOicrcocAeno 

NHPG)CM€M4>OM€ 
95 NOCOTTOIOCKPHNA|T[. 

KAI€TTAINH[. 

4>HHIM€ICH|CHA[ 
CnAZHIHXPHZOITOI 
OYTONT€YnOAAMYOY- 
100 TAIH/V\€N • OirAPTTOA 
AOITCOCOMOIOOCAITO 



mvois, rcta ft iro- 
vrjpcbs iK/upS/ie- 

w 6iroia>9 

Ka €iraiyr}[i9 1j /lif*- 
<pTji 1j picrrjis 1j d- 
aird(r\i {1j XPii ot ) rot " 
odrov rk {uroXap'^ovv- 
rai 1}pw. rol yip iroX- 
Xol ra>9 6/iofos diro- 



3° 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



A6XONTAI00AHKAI 
THNO€[.]PHT[. JOY 

nconoTH[ ]rei 

105 NO)CKO)N[ ]0Y 

TOC€CTIN[ ]HA€ 

TAIZYNO)[ ]A? . 

TOYTOIC . [ 

€CTIAKAJ[ 

no M€N€CT[ 

A€r€NON[ 

ni€IK€0)[. 

npenec4»\[ 

KOINONA€[ 

US TTI6AN0THT[. 

ONrAPMH€niB?[. . 
A€YKHM€NAAAAY 
TOCX€AIAZ€NTO€ 
niA€AAC0AI€CTIAO 

120 KAMINTATOIAYTATTO 
TinOIO)COCX€A[. J 
A€KAITTANTO€IP[.] 
N[.]KONM€rAA[ ] 



Styovrar & 8fj teal 
rrjvo tft]p7)i[ar] " oi 
it&enoT ^[/x6ri;<ra,] yt- 
VOMTKtoV [Sti toi]ov~ 
rfc ktrnv [olanep] $&€- 
rou £vv<i{v. n . . . 
To&rots . . . 
i<m . • . 

f£v i<n[i 

\iy*v oi{ c- 

TTpcnh <fxx[(v€TaL 9 
Koivhv 8 [cari ttoti 
mdavbraz\a tovto* oT- 
ov yhp fifj €7ri/3€[/3a>- 
XtvKTJfitv d\\' ai- 
To<r\€8id^ rb €- 
niXeXao-Ocu. fort 8' 8- 
tea . . . rh rotaSra iro- 
tlttouo. vyetftv] 
$k Kal irav rb €tp[ah] 
l^fybv /icyaX[o7rp€|7rcy 



1-20. ' . . . And others will esteem you ; and also if in speaking at the commencement 
of the address of ingratiation one appears to use common phrases and not written ones, and 
speaks of nothing as a matter of certain knowledge, but of opinion and hearsay, whether 
from the jury or others. Such are the points in the exordium which are useful as 
giving an impression of fairness. In the narration of facts, the following directions serve 
to produce an appearance of a superior and high-minded character.' 

1. kcutoI buuurnifHs perhaps preceded; cf. 11. 11-2. 

4. ty&w: ?<po&>s was a technical term in Rhetoric, corresponding to the Latin 
tnsinuatio; cf. Cic. De Invent, i. 15. 20 'insinuatio est oratio quaedam dissimulatione et 
circumitione obscure subiens auditoris animum,' and ad Herenn. i. 7. 1 1. 

5. Kal is not wanted and is perhaps corrupt, and the construction of ytypafifupais is 
difficult. Something may have dropped out as in the previous line ; cf. also 1. 8. 

22. The letter before ON must apparently be either € or 6. 

29. The doubtful IT may be H and ^j*]** is a possibility. 

31. Above the supposed 6 at the end of the line is what looks like a curved stroke 



411. ■ NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 31 

in different ink which might represent Y or X ; but it is perhaps meaningless. The only 
other abbreviation used in the papyrus is the horizontal line representing N. 

38sqq. The intelligible part of this column is mostly occupied with quotations. 
Lines 48-54 are from Iliad ix. 389, 404, 381, and 385, and 11. 55-7 from //. iv. 443; 
Kokkoe *piC<* is the ordinary reading in ix. 389 instead of ctfto* «ptfoi. We have not 
succeeded in identifying the citation from Sophocles in 11. 59 sqq. 

71-85. 'Moreover take no pleasure in making indecorous or insolent statements, for 
that is mean and a sign of an intemperate disposition, while the avoidance of abuse is a 
mark of high-mindedness and an ornament of speech. Next to this, in all your narration 
you must have a good object and a good intent, whether you are . . • or expressing an 
opinion or desire.' 

72. dftf[a*]: or a3«(c)[w] or a&[»*]. 

80-1. AlAf.lAC cannot be right, and &a[y]j5 (= dtrjyjj) is a simple correction, which is 
confirmed by &a[y]«'o in 1. 82. 

93-107. '. . . and blaming the wicked. For men will suppose that you resemble 
whomever you praise, or blame, or hate, or welcome. For most men approve of their like. 
Hence the saying "I never asked, knowing that he is like those whose company he 
enjoys." ' 

93. a»6pv>\rivois1 

95-6. Something has evidently gone wrong with the text ; Blass suggests diroiW yap 
Bfjw aUi kg. At the end of the line C might be read instead of IT. 

98. XPHZOI must be a mistake, and probably more is wrong than the mood, for 
Xpifo in the sense of xpi 'converse with* does not seem very likely. Perhaps XPHZOI has 
got in here from 1. 85. 

103-7. The quotation is from Euripides' Phoenix, Fr. 803. 7-9 flow tf 6fukS>p ffUrm 
kokois dyrjp ov ir&rror r}pa>Tt]<ra #c.r.X. 

114-23. 'This conduces also to persuasiveness ; for to have forgotten produces credit 
for absence of malice and for spontaneousness. Occasionally this is to be simulated. And 
almost all irony is high-minded.' 

120. MIN is here a vox nihili\ no doubt it represents some other word or words, 
though the sentence would run quite well if MIN be simply omitted. Blass suggests con tf 
faa ptfi tldijiup to rotavra, ' Sometimes pretend not to have even a knowledge of such 
things/ 

122. c2p[o>]i{t]Koj' is used in the Aristotelian sense as opposed to dXafowia. 



411. Life of Alcibiades. 

21-6 x 18 cm. 

A leaf from a vellum codex of a historical work, written in double columns 
in a calligraphic uncial hand resembling that of the Codex Alexandrinus. The 
fragment was found with papyri of the later Byzantine period but is certainly not 
later than the sixth century, and more probably it is to be assigned to the fifth. 



32 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



The leaf is a good deal worm-eaten, and the writing being on very thin vellum 
has a tendency to come through on to the other side. There are no lection- 
marks of any kind, nor are initial letters of lines larger than the rest. N at the 
end of a line is generally represented by a horizontal stroke. 

The fragment, which despite its brevity covers the period from the mutilation 
of the Hermae to Alcibiades* arrival at Sparta, clearly belongs to a life of 
Alcibiades rather than to a general history. This fact, coupled with the use 
of such a phrase as itopxfaaaOai t& fiv<rnjpia (11. 25-6), which is found in Lucian, 
Achilles Tatius, and other late writers, indicates that the work in question 
was a composition of the Roman period. Thucydides is the principal authority, 
several phrases from him being incorporated ; but that he was not the exclusive 
source is shown by the mention of IIovAvrW, whose name is recorded by 
Andocides (De Mysteriis, p. 7, Reiske) and Plutarch (Alcib. 19, 22), but not by 
Thucydides ; cf. 1. 57, where the papyrus comes into conflict with Thucydides. 
There is no reason to think that the writer borrowed from the much more 
detailed narrative of Plutarch, whom it is as likely as not that he preceded. 

So brief an account of well-known events could hardly be expected to 
contain new historical information, but the papyrus is interesting as a specimen 
of one of Plutarch's rivals in the sphere of biography who must have enjoyed 
considerable vogue for a time. There are a few errors on the part of the copyist, 
but the style of the fragment is fairly good. The sympathies of the writer were 
obviously on the side of Alcibiades. 



Recto. 



Col. i. 
3 lines lost. 
a[ 15 letters 

5 ovko[ 

09* ov [ ]••/*© 

vov a[Wa] kcli <rvi{$€ 
Tyv [Tvp]awiS{a] v[o 
Iu£c[v]t€s avapL 
10 fj[y]r]<TK0fi[€]poi y* 

p 

(DfMOTTJTOS fJLTJWTOtt 

fieyaXois tfrrovv 



Col. ii. 

[k\cli KpiOrjvcu [npo] rov 
<rrf[a}rriye[iv rjtifcv 
c[l] Karrjyop[oi 8* €?]!' 
or[a]iTO /iiy [Karacryfeiv 

35 K€\€V0V[T€? TCL9 c]X 

mSas ny[y ] . 9 

fit] ao7r[ ff]apa 

<rK€vrj a[ ] • € 

[.]ov irpafaov /lev $]$ 
40 [e]rr€i8Ti M{airrivei$ r]c 
kcli Apy€i[oL 

TfjS €l[. 0W€ 



411. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



33 



tov? ravra SeSpaKo 
15 ra? fiaXiara Se AXki 
fJia8r]v ei> wro^ia^s) 

Cl)(OV €K TOV <f>pOVr] 
flCLTO? KCLl TOV o£l<0 
pCLTO? T€K/iatpO/l€ 

20 vol tov avBpa peya 
\a>v opey€ar0ai npa 

ypCLT&V KCU T19 €/lfJ 

ware Trepi t&v pcv 

Ep/JUDV OV$€V (fxiO-KCO- 

25 5e egopxtjaaaScu Ta 
pvorrjpia cv ti; IIov 
Xvrtcopo? OLKia TO" 
AXKifJtaSrjv Se 
€19 ttjv €KK\rjaiap 

30 napuov airtkoytiTo 



orpaT[€Vov 

Kai TOT€ [tV Ta]t[s] A[6.tj 
45 vais Trq{pt)aa]v eirti 
ra ei^rey] a>y 01 AOrj 
vaLot €[mO]v/iovv 

T€S l[0V €K]ir\UU U? 

2uc€[\iav] Tiyy aiTias 
50 acf>rj[ao]uo-Lv oim»y 
ovv €Kir\€vaa? A\ki 
fJta8t)? noWa Kai 81 
icata papTvpa/i€v[o]9 
/iff npoae^eiv tclis 
55 8iafio\ai? KdTtirXcv 
&€v es XiKtXiav Kai 
c^8ov iraara? ray € 
K€L KCLTOiKovara? [ir]o 
Xcis enoLrjaaTo <pi\as 
60 81a tt\v irp[o]y avrov 



Verso. 



Col. iii. 

£€f[iav] T€ Kai [o-lffora^aiv 
€i[i 8* avr]ov irepi Kara 
\Ta}[vTjv or]paT€Voi^T]of 
€[ir€ycv]€TO ra €[v T]ai9 

65 A[6t]vaii\ 01 yap ovko 
<f>a[vrai 8i€]f3a\\oi> av 
to[v iraXtv €t]? rqv €* 
tfXrjo'iav €tt«] ttj icepi 
[kotttj tcdv] Epptov {{cll 

70 [ ] av\\oya> . [ 

f ] irpoy ra? 

[ ]avra>v 

[....]...[.. .] AOrjvaioi 



Col. iv. 
3 lines lost 
t . [ 13 letters ]a 

95 K€[ 8ov]pl(DV 

KaK€i&[€]y [a.7r]o8pa? a? 
[iT€]Xorroi'i{iy<r]ov €ir\cv 
[<t€]j> avrop[aTo]f irpo? 
[A]aK€8atpoy[i]ov9 Kai 
100 trap €k\€]ivol$ €8[rf]/itf 
yoprjacv vartpov 

TCDV KaKGDV <OV €lp 

yaaaTo Ttfv UcXotto" 
vqaov a7ro\oyovfjL€ 
I05 V09 OTl 7rapi8ovT€9 



34 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



[...]... [. .] TIVCLS tSt) 

75 <rav tcai [Av8o]fci8t)v 

TOV pt)T[0pa] C7T€/£7TO" 
& €W A\*{lf}La]87)V 

vavv ti\v [Ka\o]ufjL€ 
vr\v XaXa\}itvta\v tjti? 
80 ciQ)flc(t) ra^iarrj] r ova 
a scat 8tj/ioa[i\a9 [€]m 
/ieXcias Tiryxav[o]uo[a 
npos tcl? o£aa? virq 

perew \P aa * ^ L ^ Ki 
85 PiaSrjs 8m KaXov/iwo? 

€19 Kpioiv rjmoTaTO 

irpoKareyvcoKora? 

rj[8\rj reus AOrjvcuov? 

tcai rrjy airoXoyiav 
90 ovk avaiitvovvras 



avrov m/irjaav Ni 
Kiav Kai TrporptTTo 
fievos tovs AaKtScu 
povLovs ftorjOav 

no rot? 2 iKcXicoTais av 
TiKpv? Xcycov a? u 
/iff PorjOrj<rou<ri ica 
ra Ta\o$ nkqpOHrov 
fnv oi AOtjvaiot ra? 

115 eXmSa? tcai irAci 
oTtjy opfit]v €i>€/Sa 
Xe rots AaKtSaipo 
viots er[i] 8e kou avy 
cftovXevce Jc/tcXct 

120 ay €7riT€i\i<rat tois 



'(The Athenians) considering that (the mutilation of the Hermae) was not only 
an (outrage) but a conspiracy to establish a tyranny, and recalling the brutality of the 
Pisistratidae, sought to discover the authors by large rewards for information, Alcibiades 
in particular they held in suspicion, judging from his pride and position that he was 
ambitious of a great career. An informer gave evidence in no way bearing on the 
Hermae, but accusing Alcibiades of having betrayed the mysteries at the house of 
Pulytion; whereupon Alcibiades came forward in the assembly and defended himself, 
demanding that the case should be decided before he became general. But his accusers 
resisted, urging the people not to delay the prospects of the (expedition) . . . , firstly 
because bom Mantineans and Argives were joining in the expedition (owing to him) and 
were already present at Athens, and secondly because they knew that the Athenians, in 
their desire to start for Sicily, would acquit him. Such were the circumstances under 
which Alcibiades departed, after making many just protestations that they should pay no 
attention to slanders; and having sailed to Sicily he won over nearly all the cities settled 
there through their friendly intercourse and relations with him. But while he was still 
with the expedition at Catana, the events at Athens intervened; for his calumniators 
again accused him before the ecclesia of the mutilation of the Hermae, ... the Athe- 
nians imprisoned amongst others Andocides the orator, and sent to fetch Alcibiades 
the ship called the Salaminia, which, on account of its great speed and because it was 
equipped at the public charge, was usually employed on sudden emergencies. Alcibiades 
however, on being summoned for trial, was aware that the Athenians had already 
condemned him in advance and would not wait for his defence, and (accompanied 
the Salaminia as far as) Thurii, where he took flight and sailed to the Peloponnese, 
voluntarily surrendering himself to the Lacedaemonians. There he subsequendy made 



411. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 35 

a public speech in defence of the injuries which he had inflicted upon the Peloponnese, 
alleging that they (the Lacedaemonians) had passed him over and honoured Nicias, and 
urging the Lacedaemonians to help the Sicilians at once on the ground that, if they 
failed to assist them speedily, the hopes of the Athenians would be realized. He inspired 
the Lacedaemonians with the strongest desire for war, and further advised them to make 
a fortified outpost of Decelea . . . ' 

9*i2. Cf. the digression of Thucydides upon the Pisistratidae at this point (vi. 54-9). 

pijyvrpois ficyoXoif : cf. Thuc. vi. 27. 2. 

16. xmoyfruuls): wro^fy is less likely, both on account of the hiatus and because 
iota adscript is elsewhere omitted in this MS., as usual at this period. 

23. v*pt top fuv Epp»v ovdtw: cf. Thuc. vi. 28. 1. 

25-7. Cf. introd. 

34. KanurxjfHvl cf. Thuc. vi. 29. 3 Karoo-^cty rfjv avayuyj)*. 

40-3. Cf. Thuc. vi. 29. 3 and 61. 5 ovx ?*urra rovs Mamrcar ml 'Apyttout fiov\6ptrot 
wapapcurtu, til imbov po/u'forrf? ntio&jpai crff>i<ri gvoTpaTeuctv, and Plut. Alcib. 19. The doubtful 
1 in 1. 42 can be *. 

48. <n*K is a little short for the lacuna, in which there is room for one or two 
more letters. 

57. *x*&o* naaat: this statement is in flagrant contradiction with the facts recorded 
by Thucydides, vi. 50-2, from which it appears that the Athenians met with little support. 

Cf. Plut. Alcib. 20 nkiwras #fe ItwXW npwnjyaym Kardvrjv SKko di ov&lv ?irpa£tf p*rd~ 

ITtflVTOf K.T.X. 

61. Above this line are some traces of ink, perhaps the number of the page. 

62-3. Cf. Thuc. vi. 53. 1. % 

74. The vestiges do not suit [dKK]avt [r<]. Possibly [««] aXXjovr], though this too is 
not satisfactory. 

80. ««&(() : the correction seems necessary, for the perfect used as a present could 
not be true of the period at which this work was composed. The fact that the Salaminia 
required an explanation is an indication of the late date. The division owr\a is noticeable, 
for the MS. elsewhere follows the ordinary rules concerning division of words. 

95. 6ov]pM>r: cf. Thuc. vi. 61. 6. 

96. amdpas *is Ufkorrowrjaow : cf. Plut. Alcib. 23. 

IOI. wmpow: cf. Thuc. vi. 88.9 'AXiei/foid?* . . . irtpatufols t6t cvOvs M nXolov QofmjytKoy 
4t rip Oovplat it KvXKffvtjp rrjs 'HXftaf trp&rov, hr*tra vartpov & r^¥ Aaiudaipopa. There 18 
some corruption in 11. 101-2, for t»j> kok»v has nothing to govern it. Unless the loss 
of some words be supposed, the simplest alteration is to read xnrtp for wnpov. 

105-7. Cf. Thuc. vi. 89. 2 (speech of Alcibiades) kq\ 8um\ovvr6s pov npoBCpov vp*is 
trpfo 'A&rjraiovs jcaTaAAa<r<r<fywyo* roit p*v spots egd/wir dwapnw di tK*fa»v npatavrcs, c poi be aripiav 

mpUBm. Thucydides does not mention Nicias by name in this passage ; for the circum- 
stances see Plut. Alcib. 14. 

I07-20. Cf. Plut. Alcib. 23 U piv 9v$vs ifripyaaaro pt'Xkoms koi cunfiaXkopJwovs fiotfiuv 
2vpa$oovaioif ryclpas kq\ irapo£vvas wipfyai Tvkimrop . . . , mpow bi kuhut rbv avrMw viktpov M 
rovt 'AApofovr, to d< rpirov koX piytarov iirtrttx^ai AfCfXctar, the source of both passages being 

of course Thuc. vi. 89-92. 



D % 



36 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

412. Julius Africanus, Keorot. 

26-5x22*3 cm. Plate V. 

Two columns containing the conclusion of Book xviii of the Keorof of 
Julius Africanus, as is expressly stated in the title preserved at the end. This 
title clears up at once two moot points concerning the KeoW. Joseph Scaliger 
(Anitnadv. in Chran. Eusebii) in spite of the unanimous testimony of antiquity 
distinguished between Sextus Africanus the author of the Kcorot and Julius 
Africanus the Christian chronographer and friend of Origen. This view has 
found little favour with subsequent critics, and is controverted at length by 
H. Gelzer in his recent book on Africanus. Its baselessness is finally proved 
by this papyrus, whose testimony must carry the utmost weight in view of the 
fact that it is separated by little more than a generation at most from the floruit 
of the author. The chronological work of Africanus was brought down to the 
year 221, and the Kcorot are supposed to have been composed subsequently; 
while this MS. is anterior to the year 275-6, since on the verso is a document 
dated in the reign of the Emperor Tacitus. Secondly, a doubt has existed 
a£ to the number of the books of the Keorof, which is given by Photius (BibL 34) 
as fourteen, and Suidas (s.v. 'A$pi*.) as twenty-four ; Syncellus, who speaks 
of the work as ivvcifiifikos (p. 359 b\ no doubt only knew it in an incomplete 
copy. The similarity of the figures fourteen and twenty-four naturally suggested 
that the difference was due to a clerical error, but there was no reason to prefer 
one to the other. We now know that there was an 18th book, and may 
accordingly accept the higher figure. 

The KeoTof are described by Suidas as olovel </>wi/c<i, txovra Ik \6yav re kclI 
iiraoibtov koI ypairr&v tuhov xapaKrrjpcav idurcis re «cal dXXoCwv ivcpya&v. A number 
of excerpts have survived dealing with military matters, the care of animals, 
and agriculture (Math. Vet., ed. Thievenot, pp. 275 sqq.), and on the latter subject 
large extracts are embodied in the Geoponica, The present fragment exhibits 
another side of this multifarious composition, being concerned with a question 
of literary criticism. The author produces twenty-seven lines, mainly consisting 
of a magical incantation, which were to be inserted in the passage in Book xi of 
the Odyssey where Odysseus calls up the ghosts. For these new lines definite 
authority is cited, references being given to MSS. in Palestine, Caria, and Rome ; 
and a doubt is expressed as to whether this * precious product' was cut out 
by the poet himself or by the Pisistratidae ! We do not suppose that Homeric 
scholars will be inclined to accept either of those alternatives. They will 



412. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 37 

perhaps be more likely to include this passage in the list of things which 6 avi)p 
ovros h tois KcffTotff ovtov TcparoXoyti kclI bUfcurt. (Psellus, ap. Math, Vet. p. xvi). 
Nevertheless it affords a valuable insight into the writer's methods and standards 
of criticism ; and though.we may not admire his judgement, there is no ground for 
suspecting his facts. Of especial interest is the statement (11. 65-8) that he had 
arranged a library in the Pantheon at Rome 'for the Emperor.' According 
to Syncellus (loc. cit) the KcoW were dedicated to Severus Alexander, from 
which Gelzer has inferred that Africanus was on a footing of friendship with the 
imperial house, a conclusion to which the new autobiographical detail of the 
papyrus gives strong support. 

The MS. is written in well-formed round uncials of medium size, and being 
dated within such narrow limits, its palaeographical evidence is of much value. 
To suppose an interval of ten years between the writing of the literary text 
on the recto and the cursive document on the verso would be a very moderate 
estimate. The date of the former therefore is fixed with certainty in the period 
between the years %%S and 265 A.D. But notwithstanding its proximity in time 
to the author the text is far from being a good one; several lines of the 
incantation especially are clearly corrupt, and one of them is incomplete. In 
these circumstances little weight can be attached to the variants from the ordinary 
text in the quotations from Homer. The two columns are numbered at the top 
respectively 35 and 36 ; thirty-four columns had therefore preceded, and if, 
as is most probable, these all formed part of the same book, its total length would 
be about 1530 lines. 

Col. i. 
Ae 

[T0U9 S €7T€t €V)(<D\TI<r]l XuTtJO'l T€ €$l>€a PC/C/MW 

[eXXurafirji/ ra) 8e firjXa Xa/3a>v aTrcfctporo/tqcra 
[c? floQpov pec] 8 aifia K€Xaivt<f>€$ ai 8 aycpovro 
[yfrv\at \m c£ e/>€]jSei/? vzkvmv KaTartOveiCDTW 

5 [wfKJMU T T]tO]€Ol T€ TToXvrXrjTOl T€ y€/>OIT€? 

[napStyiKai r] araXai i/eoirtvOe awrov €^ov<rai 
[noXXoc 8 ov]rafi€Uo[i y]aXKript<T<Tiv €yytirivt.v 
[av8p]es [Ap]t]i<f>aToi f3[€J3]por<Dfi€va Tev%€ c^oircy 
[01 iroXX]oi napa fioOpov €<poiTCoy aXXoOcv aXXo? 
10 [0€<r7T€]<ni7 ta^rj €/*€ & j(Xcopoi/ 8eo? rjpu 

[avrap] cya> £i<f>09 o£v c[p]v<r<rafievo? napa p.r\pov 
\?)pr\v o]v8 etcoi/ vtKvcov ap.*vr\va Kaprjya 



38 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



»5 



20 



25 



30 



35 



40 



cufiaro]? aaaov tfiev kai aptifiopevof ciro? rjv8a>v 
] a 8ci irotrjarai iprjKev 

a 

a> irora]/ioi /ecu yaia koi 01 imei/tpO* Kapovr^e^ 
av6pa>]irov$ r[i]v€a6ov oris k €ir[i]opKov opoaarj 
v/tcis] paprvpoi eorc rcAetere 8 a/i/uv aot[8rj]v 
rjXOov] xprfaofiwo? a>? av €i? yaiav Tkclvoo 
Trj\€/i]axpv yc ov cXeiirov eiri koXttokti t\iOij\wis 
T€Kvo\tr €/iov Toirj yap apurrq r\v €iraoi8[ij 
] a 8ei eiracai Xcyei 

KXvOl] fXOl €lfJL€LTT]$ KCLI CTTlCKOTTOS CVOTTcf. . Av]ovf}l 

]avXXtira€ iraptweTaaxn 0o€i[. . .] 

.]fi€i apira£ 8evp euirXoKape ydovu Zev 
•]ai Saxrapevoi Kpi\i\var* rr\v8 *iraoi8i\v 
.]rj kcu y6a>v irvp a<f>6iTov HXi€ Ttirav 
• .]*aa Kai $6a Kai $pr\v Ofioaaxroo 
. .]&» 7roXvT€ifi€ Kai A(3Xava0a> noXvoXfie 

. .]o8paKOVTO{G)V€$ €1<TL )(6oV €01] KapUT) 

. .]a ir€pij3a>r€ to koc/ukov avvo/ia 8aipa>v 
. .] Kai yppiM Kai (pa>r avspxav nayepapKTCov 
.]ai evKparcia iravroov npofepeoTep cpoi <pprjy 
.] . CDgiev Kai <f>aau Kai aiov&y 
.]y€a Kai airrjpiora koi irvp KaXXiaitca 
. .] . s \0ovia Kai ovpavia Kai ovtipn 
. .]? Kai arcipio 
roia8\€ fiev irapa fioOpov eyoop ji'icra napaojas 
eu yap] €p€fiprjfirjy KipKrjs vnoOfipoavva[a>]y 
17 ro<ra (pjappaKa oiSw oa[a] rptfei evpeia yOwv 
rjX$€v 8c] pcya Kupa Xeop[T]opa\ou AyepovTos 
Kqokvtos] Af)0t] T€ IIoXv<f>X€y€6<x>v T€ fJLtyiOTO? 
koi veK)w>v crroXor a/i[<fn]irapi<FTaTO koi irapa fioOpov 
npoar-q 8]* yjrvxrj EXirrjvopos tjXOev eraipov 



412. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 39 

Col. ii. 
ra 6 e^iyy €*t ovv ovt&s c^op 

45 OVTOS 7rOL7)TfJ9 TO 7T€pL€p 

yov Tiyy emppr](T€cos ra aXka 

8lcl to Tt]$ V7ro$eo-€a>s a£too 

pa a€a'imrrjK€v eiO 01 Hturi 

orpaTiSat to, aXXa crvvpairTO~ 
50 T€9 €irr\ Tavra airea^taav 

aXXorpia tov aroi\ov ti;9 

iroiTjatas cK€i[va] erwcpu 

vavT€% eir[i] iroXAofi]? eyw 
^aT€ Kvrj/ia [7ro]At/T€[X]€(rT€ 
55 pov eirciif[r}]s avrof evrav 

Sot KaT€Ta£a ttjv re [.fyv ovv 

iraaav xrrroQtaiv avaKti 

pwqv e[v]p€<reL? €v T€ toi? 

apxciQtf Trjs apycuas ir[a]r/M 
60 809 /coXo)j/€[m]y [A]l\lci? Earn 

Ta>\€ivrjs ttjs IIa\aiOT€ivrj[s] 

Kav Nvo-t) ttj? Kapias /i € XP l 

$€ TOV TpLCKaiStKCLTOV €V P(tt 

firf irpoy Tais A\e£av8pov 
65 Ocppai? €v ttj tv IlavOciM 
PipXioOrjKr} Ttj KaXrj i\v av 

TO? TipXITtKTOVTJO'a TO) $€ 

/7a<rra>. 

IovXlov A<f>piKavoy 

70 K€OT0f 

1-10 = Odyssey xi. 34-43. 

4. Karanfawrmv : so most MSS. ; Karare&^urur Lud(wich) with Aristarchus. 
5-1 o. These lines were athetized by Zenod., Aristoph., and Aristarch., and are printed 
in small type by Lud. 



40 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

6. woircudc acoTov : v«mtv6ia &vp6v MSS. awrov is unintelligible here. 

7. x]aX*i7pfcr0-ti' : the doubled *<r is also found in FGT ; 1. xfatW*™* 
9. itapa : so T ; irtpi other MSS., Lud. 

1 1-3 = Odyssey xi. 48-50. 

11. [avrap] ey« : the same reading has been entered by the second hand in the margin 
of F; avrw hi other MSS., Lud 

13. km aptifikjfi€vos tiros ipv&W : irpiv Tetpftrlao irvBtaBai MSS, The Variation of the 

papyrus provides an introductory formula for what follows. 

14. Neither here nor in 1. 21 was apparently, anything written before a d«, which 
in both cases is preceded by a short blank space. 

15-7 = Iliad iii. 278-80, with « for koi in 1. 15, and rcXetfrc k.tX. replacing <£vX<Wcr« 
b* opKia mora. 

16. ifi]* aBov: riwaQov (so Lud.) or tIwvoBow is the reading of most MSS.; rtWflop 
does not seem to be found elsewhere. 

19. Cf. //. vi. 467 <5 irdir np6s k6\ttov cvfjbvoia TiBrpnjs. 

22-36. For this incantation cf. the magical papyri, e. g. Wessely, Denkschr. der Wien. 
Akad. Ph.- Hist. CI. xxxvi, xlii ; Kenyon, Catalogue I. pp. 62 sqq. But the analogy does 
not extend beyond a general resemblance and the identity of a few names, e. g. Avovftts 
and *Bcl AffkavaBo in 1. 28 is a variant of the form common in the magical papyri 
AffkapaBaXfia. curi in L 29 is a mistake for cir». In 1. 31 wartp apicrov can be read. 

39 = //. xi. 741, with oidtv for gbrj. 

43 = Od. xi. 51. 

44-68. ' . . . and so on. Whether then the superfluous part of the incantation stood 
thus and the poet himself passed over it on account of the dignity of his work, or whether 
the Pisistratidae, when they combined the various poems, cut out these verses judging 
them to be alien to the march of the poem, I should much like to know. I have myself 
set them down here as being a most valuable product of the epic art (?) ; and you will find 
the whole work preserved in the archives of your (?) old home, the colony of Aelia Capitolina 
in Palestine, at Nysa in Caria, and as far as the thirteenth verse at Rome, near the baths of 
Alexander, in the beautiful library at the Pantheon which I myself designed for the Emperor.' 

44-6. This passage may be construed as it stands by taking *x ov • • • TO **p*pyw 
as an accusative absolute, but the order is then very awkward, and ra aX\a ought not to 
mean the same as to ntpapyop. A much simpler construction is obtained if ra ak\a is 
omitted ; the words may have come in from 1. 49. 

53*4- We take *yw»v as equivalent to & *y*w, and suppose the loss of a conjunction 
after <n<; be may easily have dropped out after the preceding re. Perhaps the sign in the 
margin opposite this line indicates that there was some omission. 

55. firf«(ij]ff, if right, is for «ruc[i}]f, SC. tcxi^ or iroirjatcas. filaSS Suggests Ar(4)fMc[»]** 

but there does not seem to be room in the lacuna for o>. 

56. This is another difficult passage. The letter after r in the mutilated word must 
be either c or o, and there is not room for more than one letter, which ought not to be 
a broad one, in the lacuna ; n?? r <{p})t> is therefore not suitable. Blass suggests njv re 
(or to) \o-yjv, taking the person addressed in t[vfy€(rtis (1. 58 ; 1. ^ytyaus) to be a Jew to 
whom this Kccmfc was dedicated and the author of the work in question. This suits np 
apxeuas ir[a]rpidog, which would then mean 'your old native country ' ; though the supposition 
that the author required to be told where his own work was to be found is not quite 
satisfactory. To understand n?f apxatag ir[a\rpUhs as the native laind of Africanus himself, 
unless the phrase is interpreted in the unnatural sense of ' the country in which I used 



413. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 41 

to live/ referring to his settlement at Emmaus-Nicopolis, would of course involve the 
inference that he was of Syrian origin. This has already been maintained by Valesius 
(AdnoL in Euseb. H.E. p. 113) and others, though on grounds quite insufficient to over- 
ride the statement of Suidas that Africanus was a ^iXoVo^ot A//3w, On the other hand 
Gelzer's argument (op. cif., Einleitung) in support of this testimony, namely that Africanus 
knew Latin, seems hardly more conclusive on the one side than Africanus' probabl? 
knowledge of Hebrew on the other. 

60. [A]*Xtas- KaniTwXuvrjs : the name of Jerusalem after its restoration by Hadrian. 

64. AXcfoydpov : L e. the Emperor Severus Alexander. 

65. Uav6*ui>: the famous Pantheon built by Agrippa and restored by Hadrian and 
other emperors. 



413. Farce and Mime. 

22-9x4^-3 cm. 

Both sides of this remarkable papyrus are occupied with literary com- 
positions of an unusual type. On the recto are three columns, of which the two 
latter are almost complete, of a low comedy or farce, written in a good-sized 
semi-uncial hand, the dramatis personae being carefully distinguished and stage 
directions added. Adhering to the right of the third column about halfway 
down is an uninscribed fragment of some size, showing that the work did not 
extend beyond half a column more at most. On the verso are, firstly, two 
columns in a much smaller and more cursive hand, preceded by a few letters 
of a third upon the projecting fragment already referred to, from what may 
best be described as a mime, which is mainly, at the least, a monologue. The 
second of the two complete columns is shorter than the other, and there are 
some 6 centimetres of blank space below it* Secondly, adjoining this to the right 
is another column of dialogue in the style of the recto, and with the same 
characters, written in a somewhat larger and more careful hand, but evidently by 
the same person who was responsible for the foregoing mime. This column 
was intended to supersede the latter portion of the first column of the recto ; 
cf. note on 11. 30-6. To assign both sides of the papyrus to one scribe is out of 
the question, but we are not inclined to think that the two documents were 
separated by a considerable interval of time. The hand of the recto we attribute 
with little hesitation to the Antonine period ; that of the verso no doubt falls 
within the second century. 

As we have already seen, the MS. apparently was not continued more than 
a few lines beyond the third column of the recto, if it did not actually end 
at that point. This fact is quite in accordance with the internal evidence, for the 



42 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

impression given by the lower part of this column is that it is the exodium 
or conclusion of the whole piece. Metrical passages are introduced, a system 
of Sotadean verses in 11. 88-91 being followed after a short interval by a series of 
trochaic tetrameters (11. 96-106) ; and there was an accompaniment of music and 
dancing (cf. 11. 88-9, 9^-3). The close of the play is also probably indicated 
by the word icaraoToX?/ in 1. 95, which heads the concluding section. The scene 
is the coast of a barbarian country bordering upon the Indian ocean (cf. 11. 88-91), 
and the subject is the adventures in those remote regions of a party of Greeks 
chief among whom is Charition, the heroine of the drama. Such themes are 
familiar from the pages of the early Greek romances, and the plot of this piece 
seems to have run on lines very similar to theirs. Charition had not improbably 
been carried off in the usual way by pirates, and had so come into the hands 
of the barbarians, whose Greek-speaking king (cf. 11. 88sqq.) is one of the 
characters of the play. She had apparently taken up her abode in a temple 
(cf. 11. 215, 225); and the present fragment describes her rescue by her brother 
and others who had arrived by sea, and who succeed in effecting their escape after 
making her captors drunk. Professor Crusius, to whom we are much indebted 
in the reconstruction and interpretation of this papyrus, acutely suggests that the 
position in which Charition found herself placed may have been similar to that 
of the heroine in the romance of Xenophon of Ephesus, Antheia, who in order to 
repel the advances of the Indian prince Psammis represented herself as dedicated 
to the goddess lsis (cf. 1. 88 0€a SeAijwy, and 1. 106 rr)v aijv irptf[<nroXoi;]), and lived 
for some time in that capacity under Psammis' protection (EpAes. Hi. 11). A large 
number of characters are introduced. Besides Charition, whom the stage 
directions call A, her brother (r, cf. 11. 97-9), and the barbarian king, called 
/ta<r(&Acifc), we have the buffoon (B) who largely supplies the comic element. This, 
as might be expected, is often of a coarse kind. B is of the Greek party and does 
not understand the barbarian language (cf. 11. 58, 66) ; but some non-Greek words 
are assigned to him in 11. 75 and 79-80. Another well-identified character is A, the 
captain of the ship (1. 101). The personality of others is less easy to ascertain. 
In the fourth column of the verso $-, who goes to fetch the ship, seems to belong 
to the brother's party, and is consequently to be distinguished from the speaker 
in 11. 70-1 and. 74, who uses only the barbarian language, but is designated by 
a symbol which might otherwise be supposed to represent £. It is, however, 
formed quite differently from the ? on the verso, and is more like the sign for 200. 
Z, who figures only in 11. 31 and 71-3, is another barbarian. There remains 
#coi( ), whose remarks are also with one exception (1. 104) in the barbarian 
tongue. We are indebted to Prof. G. Wissowa for the suggestion that the 
abbreviation is to be expanded xot(vjj), • all ' or * altogether/ referring either to 



418. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 43 

the body of the barbarians or of the Greeks as the case may be. This hypo- 
thesis satisfies all the conditions, and accounts for the appearance of #c<u( ) 
in 1. 104, which would on any other view be a difficulty. In 11. 195 sqq. a party 
of barbarian women, who have just returned from a hunting expedition, is 
introduced. They are armed with bows and arrows, and nearly succeed in 
shooting the buffoon (11. 207-8). 

Apart from the distribution of the various parts the MS. includes a number 
of symbols and abbreviations which are to be interpreted as stage directions. 
The commonest of these are a r with a dot and a horizontal dash above it 
(in 1. 211 there is no dash), and a pair of short strokes curving towards each 
other at the centre (e.g. 1. n) which is sometimes followed by a straight stroke 
(e.g. 1. 39). The t (which we print simply as r) is probably to be connected 
with the music, and might stand for r(vfnraviafjL6s) ; cf. 1. 92 r(v/AjraiH(r/ids) iroA(ifc), 
Kpava(is) t 11. 69 and 95 where r is similarly combined with tto\( ), and 1. 87 
liyiAvaviayAs) (ircw<W ?). The two curved strokes, which sometimes stand before 
or after r (e.g. 11. 65, 72), but more commonly are by themselves, may also have 
a musical signification, or may refer in some other way to the accompanying 
action; their use is not like that of mere marks of punctuation. The word 
vopb(ri) which is repeatedly associated with the remarks of B, the buffoon, seems 
also to be of the nature of a stage direction ; cf. 1. 22 ircpdfcrai) 1 . The speeches 
in the barbarian language are usually written continuously, like the Greek, 
without separation of words ; but in one passage (11. 61-4) the words are divided 
by points, while in others the insertion of one of the symbols described above 
serves a similar purpose. The language is no doubt to a large extent of an 
imaginary nature, but it may include some genuine non-Hellenic elements; 
cf. note on 1. 83. 

The mime of which two columns are preserved upon the verso of the 
papyrus is of a simpler character. The chief figure here is again a woman, upon 
whom the action centres throughout ; most of the other actors are slaves. The 
motive of the first scene (Col. ii) is that of the fifth mime of Herondas, the 
(t)\6tvjtos.' The young mistress* makes proposals to one of her slaves, Aesopus 
(1. 115), to which he declines to listen, whereupon she orders him to be put 
to death along with a female slave (? Apollonia, 1. 120) whom she supposes to be 
the object of his affections. These cruel commands, however, are not actually 
carried out, for the male slave manages to escape, and his assumed paramour is 
only placed in confinement. In the next scene (Col. iii) the bloodthirsty 
mistress is engaged in plotting the death of an old man, to whom she appears 

1 Cf. £. Littmann * £in arabisches Karagot-spUr in the Ztitsch. der Deutschtn Morgenland. 
Gtsellschaft for 1900, where the catch-word of the buffoon is ' Scheiss.' 



44 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

to have been unhappily married. Her accomplices are two slaves, Spinther and 
Malacus, who also figured in the previous scene ; and a ' parasite ' acts as a go- 
between. The column ends in a rather obscure manner without her nefarious 
purpose having been accomplished, and the piece seems to have been left 
unfinished. 

Whether at any point in these two columns the monologue of the mistress 
is interrupted by other speakers is a matter of some doubt. The sentences 
are in the original divided off by an oblique dash (see the critical notes) ; and 
at two points (at the end of 1. 117 and in the middle of 1. 185) the dash is 
preceded by three short horizontal strokes. Possibly this sign should be inter- 
preted as an indication of a change of speaker, which would in either case suit 
the context. Thus in 1. 117 KvpC would = KvpCa, the natural mode of address 
from a slave to his mistress; and in 1. 187 binora implies the entrance of 
a new character (the old husband ?), to whom may be attributed the words oval 
/Aot. But if so the scribe was not consistent in the use of this sign, which should 
have been repeated when the previous speaker resumed ; and if omitted in these 
cases, it may be absent entirely in some others where an interchange of speakers 
might be supposed to occur, e.g. 1. 17a to ttolop, 1. 178 at irm ; /ywiAi<rra, k.t.\. 
But this is not necessary, and we do not feel satisfied that the other two 
passages cannot be explained on the hypothesis that the piece is a monologue 
throughout. 

With regard to the date of the composition of these two productions, Crusius 
considers that the mime belongs to the Roman period, while the farce may 
be rather earlier, though not a product of the better Hellenistic age. Their 
literary quality cannot of course be ranked very high, but they are not devoid of 
merit. The situations disclosed in the farce shows some skill in construction, 
and when on the stage may have been amusing enough even without the coarser 
elements; while the mime, though without the accompanying action it is 
sometimes obscure, has considerable vigour and dramatic force. Not improbably 
these two pieces were once performed in the theatre of Oxyrhynchus, and they 
may be regarded as typical of the performances upon the provincial stages 
at this time. In short, they afford a most interesting glimpse into the music-hall 
of the period immediately following that which is represented by the Alexandrian 
Erotic Fragment (P. Grenf. I. 1). 

Col. i. 

Jcofliyy 7rop8fju /8<£Ac 20 K](ZT€i8av avr&v 

] . B. iropSijv ]\aParral 



413. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



45 



10 



*5 



]ai SoKovai airoTpoTTal 
]v kmTrjSciov Svra 
]aa-qv roaavra yap 
] . . Sri kv T& rrpa>KT<p flOV 
]v n€pi(f>€pQ}. Kvpia IIop8rj 9 kav 81a 
]v dpyvpav ere Troirjaa? 

] 

] . dbroL napayuvovrai. r 
] . Koi(vjj). afiopaTOv z 
]jia\a\ayafipov8tTTaKOTa 

aSiva 

]paaa^o8o>(Ta^fia7rpovTLvva 

]..[..*. .]q^Kparuimya 

[[ ]tt>cra&a[.]J]xapv/ia I 
6 7TP<d]kt6$ pov dir€a<f>rjva>- 
rai kv t]& rreXdyei %€i- 

p&v ]ai ipcypbv 



] t irkp8(€Tai). B. 
]ov iropSijv 

]p€V<0 

25 ]r)v <rov noirjaas 

? 8vv]aaaL fjtoi ehrtiv 

W&Xlfaov TTOTCLflbv 

] . pos ttjs iropSfjs 

] KCKpvpp€VO$ 

30 aityyatpt pot \e\vfiiv(<p) 

] R XdXu 0a- 
]a. Z. XeavSa 
]opai auras 

] 

35 ] aXcppatcaZ 

1": 
At the bottom, in the reverse direction 

rd ffow 4) At |uv[ 



B. 

40 B. 

r. 

B. 



45 



50 



B. 
B. 

r. 



Col. ii. 
8ok& \otpi8fov Ovyaripes d<rt' kya> Kal rat/ray 

aVoAt/cra). r 7rop8(fj). Kot(vj}). at appivOi Z — r 
Kal avrai *fr rbv VdiXu^ov nefevyaai. 
Kal pdXa, dXXa iroipa^capeOa [(\&y owO&pev. 
Kvpia Xaptriov, iroipd(ov kav SwrjOfis ti 

t&v dva6r)pdr<ov rfj? Ocov paX&aai. 
€v<f>rjfi€r ov 8*T tov? acoTrjpta? Stopkvov? /*€- 

(t UpoovXCa? Tavrqv napa Oc&v airuaOai. 

7T&9 yap vnaKOvovai rah €v%ais irovijpta 

rbv eXeov peXXovre? irap[^]a6ai ; ra rfjs 

Ocov 8ei fiiy€iv <5<r/a>y. 
<rv pi) dirrow kya> dp&. A. pi) 7rai^€, dXX' kav irapa- 

yivoovrai 8iaic6v€i avrols rbv olvov a\K]parov. 
kav 8i pi) OiXaxnv oira>s irefciv; 
pcope, kv [r]ovrots tois riirots oho? [ov]k <ovct[o9, 



4 6 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



55 B. 

r. 

Baa(iX€te). 

r. 

60 Bao^iXcfc). 
Baa{i\€v$). 



65 B. 
B. 
B. 

Bd(T(l\€VS). 

r. 

70 q. 

z. 



Xonrhv [Sk] iav toO yivovs 8pd£cc[v]Ta[i] &irtp dforf[i]- 

Oovvt[es] Atcparov irebovaiv. 
iya> avTOi? koX rijv rpvyiav 8iaKo[v]u>. 
airol 8\ oStol XcXovpivot /*€fi r&v [ ] 

rrapayetvovrat. r dvair€a( ) r Seoy r . . . [. .]o<raXX . [. 
fjpadt?. Koi(vjj). /3pa0€i?. B. rt Xeyot^ai; 
cfr ra ptpiSid fao-i Xdx&pw. B. Xdx<e[p]€v. r 
oTovKcnaipofieXXoKopoKr]. B. fidaK, dXaqre. 
[P]paOi€ Z t /3*PT Kovfa* 8a/iw irerptKU* 

iraiCTer Koprapts* fiepr}' laXepao* 8eira>/i€v(t 

irtTpcKioo SapvT* Kivfr ira£w fc/Sijr AoXa> 

fiia m fipaSir icorrooy. Kotlyjj). *orra>?. 
kottw 6/i&9 XaKrCaatro. Baa(tXefc). C°Ti T r 
rt Xiyovat ; T. irciv 80s raxcas. 
6kvu$ ovv XaXeiv; tcaXrjfiepe, X a *P € ' - T 
fcio-ovKopfioarjlk. t B. i f fifj vyialvcov. 
iSaph iari, fidXt ofoov. r iroXffis). 
aKaXfiaKaTafJairTupayov/t/tt. 
Tovyov/ifiL Z vetctXtKcOpco. q. eirovfleXXcTpa 

\ovirrepayovfii. B. at Z /*% &i\8ioLir irafoaaOe. r Z 

at Z tI iroi€?T€ ; Z. Tpaxovvreppava. 

39. at Pap. 57. Mv Pap. 68. a Pap. 



75 B. 



80 



Ba<r(iXev$). 
B. 

Bao\iX€v?). 
Koi(vfi). 



Col. iii. 

ftovXXiTiKc&ovpfJaX rrXarayovXSa Z j8i[ 

anyXevKaaap. r B[a<r(tXcvy).] \opfiovop(io6opfia[ 

Tovfii<ova%i(8s<nriT nXarayovXSa Z Pj[ 

<T€o<rapax^ r Ba<r(iX€i5y). [. . .]opa8a> Z crarvpf 

ovapecrapeav/JLyfrapaSapa Z W I ta I 8a[ 

papOa Z papiOovpa eSpaXpai Z pc£0o[ 

Oapovva fiapOa Z papiOovpa. r . [. . . •\rvv{. . 
fidXTTiviaKovpovKOVKOvfti Z — Kapatco . [. .]ga. 
a/3a. Bao\i\€v$). (afiefe ; — £a/9iA*yi£<w/i/9a. 2To[£(i>fl).] 
a£a ot/j/[ 



413. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 47 

B aa(i\€vs;). nayovpftprjrtKaTepavovapftprjTovovepi. 
Kot^pff). iravou/ji(3pT]TiKaT€fiavovan(3pT]TOvov€vi 

85 7rapaKOVfil3pT}TiKaT€{p]avovapf3pi]Tovou€i>i 

o\v<ra8L(a7rap8airi<rKovm<TKaTt{iav Z (?) apcipav[ 
piSaov Z — wiraTu[.]a Z — t c'. 
Bao(t\€vs). [fi£\pfiapov dvdyoa yopbv dirXerov, 0€a ScXfarj, 

irpb? fluOpbv dvirtp ft rj pari ftapftdpm [irpoftaivw. 

90 *Iv8&v 8i npSpoi npb? I[c]p60povv 86t* Z [ ^ w 

[2]rjpucbv l8(co? OeaoriKbv fir} pa irapq\[.] . . [ 

r 7toX(w), KpoO<r(is). Koi(yji). o/waof.] B. rl irdXi 
Xiyovai ; 
r. Spxycrai <f>Tj<ri. B. ir&vra ra r&v (dbvToov. r irop8(tf). 

[T] &va{SaX6vT€$ airrbv rats Upals {cbvais Kara{8Jj<ra)r€. 

95 r *roX(tfy). KaraaroXrj. 

B. oSroi pkv rjSrj rjj piOff ftapoOvrai. 

P. liraiyA* <rv 8i, Xaptnov, 8e€po ?£a>. 

4. %<)[/>', <W]€X0£, Oaaaov Airavff Irotpa Tvyy&fifi ; 

r. irdvra yf(£]/j* rJ TrXoib*' dp/iet fl-X^o-roy ri piXXtTt ) 

100 <jo2 [Xcjyao, ir pooped, irapdftaXc Scyp' dycov iij[v vaOv rayy. 

J. iav 7jf/>]ahro? iycb 6 KvftepyfJTrj^ KeX€v<ra>. 

B. rrdXi XaXefr, Karaarpo^eO; 

diro[X](ira>p€v airrbv <(£a> KarafyCXuv (rbv) 7rvv8[aKa. 
r. tviov km\ irdvrc?; Koi(vxj). <Lv8ov. A. & rdXaiv [iycb w - 

105 rpSpos iroX6$ p€ rfjv wavaOXtav KpartT* 

€vp€vtjs 9 8icrrroiva, yttvow crSfc rijv afjv irpfiairoXov. 

. 81. o of «w/3i con. from v. 87. * Pap. 94. Upais Pap. 101. 1. np&rus? 



Verso. Col. 11. 

^dxrwpai. ip& v€v irai8(iov) 

ai]rbv tva p* fteivrjoy. r( odv 

p£\ariyas; 8ov\c npoaskOwv 

no I ] <fxu8p6v. paoriyta, cya> 1) tcvpla 

a]foo€. xcXcugd Kal ov y(v€tai; oi> OiXeis 



48 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[ ]8iv€<r( ) iroCrjotyi'). # . • [• *]v t&? pdariy{a9) 

[ ]ar{ ) ir6rjo(ov). ov8k ari> OiXcis ; noiScs, roi>9 

[ ] ovScv ylvtrat ; 8b? &8e t&? pdoT€cy(as;). 

115 [ ]€arrjK€v Afo<»ir(o?) 6 r^v 8ovX(rjv) Kara8c£6(fi€V09:) 

[• Of . 1 ^ • • •] • fT?? €Lpaaa{ ) atn( ) iKTivdftare)' ISoO. 
[itypC el 84 a[e] <TKdiTT€iv c/ceXei/o^), c/ 8 dporpiav, 

?&vt<w ovv tSjv Ir ry dypf tpyw ytvo/iiy(o») 

[c(] 81 XlO(ovs) pa[a]Td{[€iv) t& ywaiK€((<p) yci<€i) avvreOpapp^vtovl) «"* *°l **•(«) 

[djXiy^rT^c), iroyjip((av) rlva /livfeis), Kal ai>x( € fy, *«« roCro cri>^ rjj i^^ 

7ra>X(a>) 
1 20 'AiroX\(a>vta) ; (Sore, TraZ^cy), ovvXa{l6vT(€s) rovrov ?X/C€T* on ri)i> 

7r€irpa>/i€VT)v. irpodytrc vdv KdK*lvr\v d>s iariv 

Trecfxipcopevr]. ifiiv X(ya> dnayaySvres avrobs 

Kara d/KpSrtpa rh dKpa>Trjpi[a k]clI rd irapaKttptva 

8kv8pa irpocr8Jj<raT€, paKpav 8ia<nr[£\<ravr€9 
125 dXkov dtf [d]\\ov teal (HXeirere /xif 7ro[rc] r£ irip<p 

Selfare /ffl ttj9 dXXJjXcov 6yjrea>9 [rrX]r]<rOcirr€? 

peff f}8ov[rj]? dnoOdvaxri. <r<paytd(ravT€? 81 avrobs 

np6s fie ?o-a> dvrare. elprjKcc 4yo> & iv8ov ctV- 

€X€v<ropa[i.) rl Xcycrc £#[«&]; tvripi) o[l] Otol ipiv 
130 €<pavrd(r0(7}<rai>), [ic]al vptis i(f>o^rj6[rir]€ ; Ka[l] . . . v{ ) ao[.]yr( ) 

yeySvact ; [*]y<J> [£]/*«' Karayi ..[..,] c/ccfyoi 

€/ Kal 6fia[s] o\ie]<f>vy€v rods 4/>€[o]^[i/X]aKar oi pif XdOaxri. 

vvvl Sk rots $€019 dirapa<r(6)ai fiovXopai, SniyOrjp* 

Spoaov kiriir . . <r wopcya. Xflyjcrc 

135 t4 irpb* rd[s] Bycria?. kirtiSdv ol Ocol Kal in dyaOS 

f^piv <p<x{(]v€<r6ai piXXoo(<riv) a>y irpoaiytfpvres) ifpv^o\are) 

roi>? 0€ori[ff.] paoriyla, oi OiXfeis) irouiv rd imra<r<r6p^ya) ; 

rl yiyov* [. ^iaivr\ ; €ia€X06trr(€9) tScre rk kariv. 

rl <f>T](nv [. .]6ivapa ; i8ct€ pi) [ic]al 6 inrepjipavo? 
140 law iarl. iptv Xeya> aTraXXd{£a]vT€S rafcriv ira- 

pd8oT€ t(o&] 6p€o<f>vXa£i Kal siirart kv 7roXX£ ai8^p<p 

Trjpeiv €[n]ip€X&9. %XKcr€, <ri;p€T€ f dndy^rc. 

Kal i{p]cT[s 8\k €K€ivov dva(r\ri{travT^ diroaQa- 

[yidaavrh r]e 7rpo/SrfXcr€ tva [ly}& airrhv veKpbv t8ct>. 



413. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 49 

145 [J?X0€T€ 2irt]vOJ}p f MdXaKt, fief i/iov' i£iov<ra 

[ dicp]i(3&s vvv l$*lv ireipdcopai el re6v7jK€ 

[ S]jra>9 /ifj irdXiv rrXayfj /i fpiy. &8e p\v 

[. ]*?/"*' r ^ «&&• €€> lb\o]v oiros 9 at raXat- 

[ncope ] fjOeXt? o6r<o finf>r\vai paXXov ff kpk 

1 go [QiXcTv; Kt^ptyov Sk xaxpbv ir&s dirodvpopai ; v€Kp<p 

[ ] . € yiyovev, fjprai naaa epis. dvdiravaov 

[ tc]€K[a]f)fi£va? <j>pera$ 



Diagdhal dashes occur in the papyrus after the following words : — 107 ][wr»fuu and 

nmfyov), 108 fkunjoi), 109 /lajoriyar, no <f>aidpop (before and after). III yutrai, 112 
noirjo{oy) f 113 irorfoov), 114 paoTfty(af), 117 c«fXfvo(y) and aporpiav, 1 18 ^trjra^fiy), 
122 waJHipvpirrj, 129 «Xcv<rofui[i], 130 ftfkurao^ijow) and c^o^i^^rjc, 131 ytyowuri and 
Koran ••[••]> 1 33 mriv6rjp t 134 opoaov and . . . tvoptva, 1 35 dvcruif, 1 37 0fow and cn-iracr- 
ffdfic(ya) y 138 j^atw; and «mv, 140 ccm, 1 42 «[ir]ififX«r and airayfTc, 1 45 «/*ov, 1 47 */Mf, 
148 ff. 116. cdov =' Pap. 121. n(irpufi€vrjr Pap. 



Col. iii. 

Smi'Ojp, irSOw aov 6 6<f>0aX/tb9 fjpiparai; &8* Avto 
ovvdaeXOe poi, paariyta, 8nm olvov SivX(aa>. cfo-eXfe, 

155 cfacA&j fiaoriyfa* && irdp*X0€. nor ana ncpnraTtts; 

&8e orpitfxw. nod cod rb fjpiav rod xira>v((ov) f rb ijpiov ; 
iya> <roi ndvra nspl ndvrw diro$wra>. o$ra> pot 
848oktcii, MdXaKv ndvra? dveXovaa Kal ir&Xfoao'a 
ra bndpyovrd not nor* x&ptataOai. vdv rod yipovr(o9) 

160 ivKparijs 6iXa> ytviaftcu) nplv n rovricov) imyvor Kal yap tvKalpco? |[<r . . o]] 
?X<* <pdppaK0v Oavdaipov t per olvoptXiros diTjOrjo-aaa 
Acoaw avrip nuv. &are nopcvOel* rjj nXarta Ovpa icd- 
Xeow avrbv <&y inl SiaXXayds. dneXOSvres Kal fjpcfr 
r$ napaa(r<p ra ntpl rod yipovro? npovavaO&ptOa. 

165 naiSlov, nar rb roiodrSv ioriv, napdcirv 0&T09 rfr iorifv); 
afm\ Si ; rt oSv avrjj kyivero ; d\7TOK]dXvyjrou tva i8o> 
airrfy. yjxtav aov iyv. rb rotodr6v kariv, rrapdairr 
/tcravofoaofa) 0eA(a>) ry yipovr[C) 8ia\Xay(fjvcu). noptvOtl? ovv 
tSe avrbv Kal Ay* irpbs ipi, iyi> 8i tlatXOowa ra npb* rb 

E 



5 o THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

170 ApKrrov ipiv iToipd<r[<D.] knaiv&, MdXaice, rb rd^os. 
i[b] (fxipficiKov ix €l9 avvKtKpapkvov Kai rb dpiarov 
f[rot]/i6v kari ; rb iroiov ; MdXaice, Xaffe ISov olvSptXi. 
rdXat, 8ok& iravSXfipirros yiyovw 6 irapdairor rdXas, yeXf* 
o[vi/]aKoXovOJj<j[a]T€ avr& pi) teat tl irdOy. tovto p\v &9 

175 iP[o]vX6pr]y T€i[i]X€arar d<r€X6[6v)r€9 irtpl r&v Xotir&v 
d<r<j>aXioT€pov {ZovXeva&peOa. MdXaice, irdvra ijpiv Kara 
yv&pr\v npoK€)(&pr]K€, kav en rbv yipovra dvkXoaptv. 
7rapd<riT€, rl ykyovtv ; at irw ; pdXiara, ndvrw yap 
v[v]v €VKpar)j9 ytyova. dya/iev, irapdair*. ri ofiv OkXw ; 

180 SirivOrjp, kirtSos poi <\>byov ixavSv. napdo-iT*, <f>oflc{v)fiai 
pfj yeXdaco. k<u kolX&s Xcyctr Acya> rt p€ Set Xkyuv. 
ird[T]€p Kvpt€, tIvi ft* jtaraXcfirctff ; diroXd>X€icd pov t^v 
irappiio{tav) 9 rfjv $6£[av), rb kXeuOkptov 0a>?. aH pov fj9 6 tcvpios. toAtm 

R6ycw AXrjOan ov \iyw 

dipt? eya> avrbv Gpr\vr\<r&. oiai <roi, raXalircope, dicXrjpc, 
185 a[Xy]eivi, dvaif>p&8irv ovai aor otiai pov oTSa ydp <rc Saris 

ti[. .]i cf. SirivOjp, £6Xa knl tovtov. 65tos irdXiv ris kariv ; 
pkvovai a&oi, Skoirora. 

Diagonal dashes occur in the papyrus after the following words: — 153 17/ic/Mmu, 
155 fiaoriyta and irapfA0e, 156 orpc<f>ov and x tTWW ( 0l ')» 1 57 otoSoxto), 159 X ui P urta ^ ai * *^3 
dtaWayas, 164 irpoowadufwda, 1 65 irai, 7rapa<riT< 9 and tari{y) t 166 dc and eytvrro, 167 01*171', cga, 
and napaaiTt, 168 &aXXcry(jji*u), 170 cro«fiao{a>], 171 ovv&icpaptpov, l*J2 con, ttoiov, pakcucc, and 
otvofUki, 173 rrapaairos, 1 74 vaStf, 176 /SovXtvow/xcla, 1 77 aifAotf/ACV, 1 78 ycyovtv and nus t 
179 ycyopa, napaatrt, and Ot\ns (after $tk€it two dashes), 180 1*0*0*, 181 ycXacro*, Xfycir, and 
. Xryftv, 182 JcanoXcurfir, 183 irapp^cav), 5o{(av), <f>a>e, and ffv/xo*, 1 84 Bprivrjow, 1 85 /■"My 1 86 
Totm>y and amy. 1 58. Final a of aieXowra corr. from ai. 181. kcu corr. 183. tf of 

f\fv$€piov corr. 184. a</x P rya> av over an erasure. 185. <ro* = Pap. 



Col. iv. 

9. #ci/pia Xaptriov, <ruy\aip€ tovt[cdu pot 

XeXypkvip. 
190 -4. peydXoi 0/ 0eo£ 

fi. TTOibt dcof, p&pk\ rropSJj. 

A. navcrai dvOpwr*. 



413. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



5i 



»96 



B. 

200 "A\(\rj). 
'A\(\ti). 
B. 

B. 

205 A. 

B. 

A. 

B. 
210 
A. 

Kot'sff). 
•yw( ) ^. 

«5 



220 



fi. 
A. 



avrod fi€ €yJ€X€<r06, eycb 8k irop{cv- 

Oth |[7roi^(ra>]] ri irXoiov fyop/iov [ 

noijjcrw. 
jrop€votr ISod yap koX al ywauccr [ 

avr&v dwb Kwriyfov irapay(vovi{ai. 
oti, mjXka To£iKa iyovai. 
Kpavvov. *AX(Xrj). XaXXe. 
XatraXiavra XaXAc afi . • aiyfi[ 
KoraKcos avafi . laxrapa. 

\a(p€T€ Z 
XaanaOia Z 
at Kvpla, ftojOei. 
aXefiatca Z Koifyfj). aXcfiaica. [ 
irap fjfi&v kart ovk 17X600 pa rfjv 'Affivriv. 
raXatncope, 66£a<ra( ae 7roXifAi[o]p 

chat nap 9 iXtyov kr6^€vaav. [ 
irdvra fioi Katcd* OiXeis ovv ko[. . . .]r[. • • 

cfr rbv W&Xiypv iroTapiv ; [ 
a>? OeXeis. r fi. iroplHfi). [ 
fuvei. 
Kvpta Xaptnov, Karap)(fjy [/SAItto) rou 

dvifiov (Sore ij/iay 7re[/)(£<ravra? 

ri 'Iv8ucbv niXayo? im[o<fwy€iir 

<S<jt€ tlmXOovva ra a€[avrfj9 dpop, 

Kal kdv Tt Svyjj t&v drfaOfipdrmv 

TTJ$ 0€oO fidoTavoy. [ 
o[a>]<p[p6]vT}<rov, dvOpo&ire* o[v Set robs <ro>- 

rrjp(a[s] Seo/iivovs /i€r[a UpoovXfas 

rairnjy dirh Oc&v air^iaOat. 

ir&S yap inraKovaovaw av{r&v itovif- 

pta rbv iXeov imawa>ii[ivw ; 
ai> /if) dirrou, cy<» dp&. [ 
rotwv ra o-cavrijf ipov. [ 
ov8 kicttvwv yjxtav iy&> fi6v[ov 8k rb irptoah 

irov rod irarpbs Ocdo-a<r$[at. 
E 2 



52 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



<?. et<re\0€ rotwv ai> 8k 6\jrofA . [ 

SiaKOvrjafl? aKpaT€OTtp[ov rhv olvov 
230 818069, avrol yip otrot irp[oaip\ovrai. 

208. Second o of okiyop corr. from a. 

7-8. nopbr)]v . . . ihv bw[<ra>$S> or, as Blass Suggests, 4b* biafyvyw rbv xlvhwo^l The 

buffoon, who is evidently the speaker, apparently vows to erect a silver statue of his patron 
saint Uop&fi if he escapes from his perils. 

10. ofoo* are the barbarians, who are seen approaching. 

13. The correction may be by the hand of the verso. 

1 9. £pcyi*6v m *pvyp6p; cf. Etym. M. cpex/ifc km cpcypts* naph rb cptvya tp€vyfi6s' be \ty*rai 
kcH tpcyp6s. 

27. ¥&ki]xop norafi6v : cf. 11. 40 and 210. The name is formed from ^«X&. 

30-6. These lines are enclosed in the papyrus by a circular stroke which passes 
through 1. 30, and there can be no doubt that it was intended that their place should 
be taken by Col. iv of the verso. This is indicated by the note at the bottom, 
which is in the same handwriting as the verso. The fact that in relation to the foregoing 
column the letters of the note are upside down is unusual, and rb cgo> would be expected 
rather than rb ttr» ; but rb «&r« would represent the point of view of the writer of the 
mime, and the practical identity of 1. 30 with 11. 188-9 adds a conclusive proof that 
the column on the verso was meant to be inserted at this point. Line 30 is accordingly 
to be restored KvpLa Xapiriov <rv]px<up* y the speaker being $• as in 1. 188 ; it may also be 
noted that the word aKtppaxa found in 1. 35 also occurs in 1. 205 in the scene with 
the barbarian women, to whom afirdr in 1. 33 probably refers. § ** /**«{ in the footnote 
is obscure ; fj suggests that the longer passage on the back was an alternative draft. 

31. 0a[<r4Xfw? 

188-230. ' F. Lady Charition, rejoice with me at my escape I 

A (Charition). Great are the gods. 

B (buffoon). What gods, fool? • • • 

A. Cease, fellow ! 

F. Wait for me here and I will go and bring the ship to anchor. 

A. Go ; for see, here come their women from the chase. 

B. Oh 1 what huge bows they have 1 

A woman. Kraunou. Another. Lalle. 

Another. Laitalianta lalle . . . 

Another. Kouakos anab . iosara. 

B. Hail! 

All. Laspathia. 

B. Ah! Lady, help! 

A. Alemaka. All. Alemaka. 

B. By Athena, there is no . . . from us. 

A. Wretch, they took you for an enemy and nearly shot you. 

B. I am always in misfortune. Will you then ... to the river Psolichus ? 
A. As you like. (Brums.) B. • • * 

All. Minei. 

F. Lady Charition, I see the wind is rising, so that we may cross the Indian ocean 



413. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 53 

and escape. So enter and fetch your property, and if you can, carry off one of the 
offerings to the goddess. 

A. Prudence, fellow I Those in need of salvation must not accompany their 
petitions to the gods with sacrilege. For how will the gods listen to men who try to 
win mercy with wickedness ? 

B. Don't you touch, I will fetch it. 
F. Well, fetch your own things then. 

A. I do not need them either, but only to see my father's face. 

F. Enter then ; and do you serve them . . . and give them their wine strong, for here 
they come.' 

198. ofl is evidently an exclamation, like ofa. 

204. At this point the women begin an attack on the buffoon, who cries out to 
Charition for help. Charition accordingly intervenes with the word ' alemaka ' (1. 205), 
which is repeated by the rest and apparently has the effect of restoring peace. 

206. ovk qXctt makes no sense and seems to be corrupt; there was perhaps some 
play on akt/uuca in the previous line (cf. 11. 92-3). ov Kjjktiv might be read, but this hardly 
improves matters. 

213. The marginal note seems to refer to this column, to which it is closer than 
to Col. iii of the mime ; but the meaning is obscure. ay&p(la) or ayvv(i<Ttia) would suit 
the upper part of the column, but is hardly apposite at this point. 

216-25. Cf- U* 4 2 ~9> where the same request is put into the mouth of the buffoon, 
Charition again declining in words almost identical with those used here. 

228-30. Cf. 11. 52-7. 

38-106. ' B. I think that they are the daughters of swine ; these too I will get 
rid of. (Drums, * * *). 

AIL Ai arminthi. (Drums.) 

B. They also have run away to the Psolichus. 

C. Yes ; but let us get ready, if we are to escape. 

B. Lady Charition, get ready if you can to take under your arm one of the offerings 
to the goddess. 

A. Hush I Those in need of salvation must not accompany their petitions to the 
gods with sacrilege. For how will they listen to the prayers of those who are about to 
gain mercy by wickedness ? The property of the goddess must remain sacred. 

B. Don't you touch ; I will carry it. 

A. Don't be silly, but if they come serve them the wine neat. 

B. But if they will not drink it so ? 

C. Fool, in these regions wine is not for sale. Consequently, if they get hold of this 
kind of thing they will drink it neat against their will (?). 

B. I'll serve them lees and all. 

C. Here they come, having bathed, with . . . (Drums.) ... 
King. Brathis. All Brathis. B. What do they say ? 

C. Let us draw lots for the shares, he says. B. Yes, let us. 
King, Stoukepairomellokoroke. B. Back, accursed wretch ! 
King. Brathie. (Drums.) Bere konzei damun petrekio 

paktei kortames bere ialero depomenzi 

petrekio damut kinze paxei zebes lolo 

bia bradis kottos. All. Kottos. 
B. May you be kicked by ' kottos.' King. Zopit. (Drums.) 



54 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

B. What do they say ? C. Give them a drink, quick. 

B. Are you afraid to speak then ? Hail, thou whose days prosper 1 {Drums) 
King. Zeisoukormosede. {Drums.) B. Ah ! Not if I know it ! 

C. It is watery ; put in some wine. {Much drumming.) 
G. Skalmakatabapteiragoumi. 

H. Tougoummi nekelekethro. G. Eitoubelletrachoupteragoumi. 

B. Ah I None of your disgusting ways 1 Stop I {Drums.) Ah 1 What are you 
doing ? H. Trachountermana. 

G. BoullitikaloumbaV platagoulda bi[ 

B. Apuleukasar. {Drums.) King. Chorbonorbothorba toumionaxiz- 

despit platagoulda bi sesorachis. {Drums.) King. . . . orado satur[ 

King. Ouamesaresumpsaradara ei ia da[ 

B. Martha marithouma edmaVmaV maVtho ....... thamouna martha marithouma. 

{Drums.) tun[ 

King. Malpiniakouroukoukoubi karako . . . ra. 
All. Aba. King. Zabede zabiligidoumba. All. Aba oun[ 
King. Panoumbretikatemanouambretououeni. 
All. Panoumbretikatemanouambretououeni 

Parakoumbretikatemanouambretououeni 
Olusadizapardapiskoupiskateman areiman[ 
ridaou oupatei . a. {Five drummings.) 
King. A boundless barbaric dance I lead, O goddess moon, 
With wild measure and barbaric step ; 
Ye Indian chiefs, bring the drum (?) of mystic sound, 
The frenzied Seric step . . . {Much drumming, healing) 
All. Orkisf.]. B. What do they say again ? 

C. He says, dance. B. Just like living men. {Drums * * *). C. Throw him 
down and bind him with the sacred girdles. {Much drumming. Finale.) 

B. They are heavy now with drink. 

C. Good ; Charition, come out here. 

A. Come, brother, quickly; is all ready? 

C. Yes all: the boat is at anchor close by; why do you linger? Helmsman, I bid 
you bring the ship alongside here at once. 

D {captain). Wait till I give him the word. 

B. Are you talking again, you bungler? let us leave him outside to kiss the ship's 
bottom. 

C. Are you all aboard? All. Aboard. A. O unhappy me I A great trembling 
seizes my wretched body. Be propitious, lady goddess ! save thy handmaiden I ' 

42-9. Cf. 11. 216-225, note. paA&rai is a new verb formed from poXy, and a comic 
equivalent of /Wrdfcip (cf. 1. 218). In 1. 47 /icXXtfirw must be read for pcXAovm. 

53. &n€p does not seem right, and there may be some corruption, p is quite 
uncertain, and perhaps or-ci was written twice by mistake ; but a broader letter would be 
expected. Kamtp would give a more suitable meaning. 

57. The latter part of this line after irapayekomu seems to be filled with stage 
directions. Above the doubtful ov of dcov is a stroke like an accent, which may indicate 
an abbreviation. avama{ ) is perhaps for <bairai<r(rtjc<fc). 

67. This remark is addressed to one of the barbarians. 

70. The words should perhaps be divided tncaXpa *ard/9a(?) wTHpayovfu; cf. 1. 72 where 
mt{i)payovfu recurs. On the speaker here and in 11. 71 and 74 cf. introd. p. 42. 



413. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 55 

75-80. The distribution of the parts in this passage causes some difficulty. B., the 
buffoon, elsewhere speaks Greek only, and appears not to understand the barbarian 
language. Yet in 11. 75 and 79 he is assigned non-Greek speeches, and the speaker who 
intervenes either at the end of 11. 75 or 76 may also be B. It will be noticed that in 
either case there is a near the end of the line ; but in both instances the letter 
following is closer than it should be if the p was meant to represent the character. 
If the attribution of 11. 75 and 79-80 to B. is correct, he may be supposed to be 
emboldened by the conviviality of the barbarians to address them in a meaningless jargon 
intended to imitate their language. 

82. At the end of the line we should perhaps read ov(c)j{i, as in 11. 83-5. 

83. Assuming that it is worth while to attempt to bring the barbarian language in this 
piece into relation with any known speech, the key is possibly to be found in late Pali or 
old Prakrit. We owe to Dr. G. A. Grierson the suggestion that in the present passage, 
for instance, navwpppffri may represent pano amrta, ' drink ' (or * life ') and ' nectar/ which 
suits the context remarkably well. Similarly he would connect oXfft(/i)axa in 11. 35 and 205 
with the Pali alam ' enough/ ' stop/ -ka being a substantival suffix which an ignorant Greek 
might use incorrectly. But we must leave the consideration of this question to Sanskrit 
scholars. 

89. 1. &VCTOV? 

90. {i^pMpovp, though a new compound, seems certain; cf. \1yv6pow, &c. Some 
syllables are missing at the end of the line, and a substantive is required to complete 
the sentence; perhaps -nmapov followed by a long syllable. 

91. [tfypiriv (Crusius) is very attractive, though it hardly fills the available space. At 
the end of the line the doubtful X may be *. 

93. tyfflvc* reproduces the sound of the barbarian op**o{.]. 

94. B, is probably still the speaker. 

96-106. The verses with which the scene closes are trochaic tetrameters, but the 
text seems faulty in places, and some alteration is required to reduce the metrical system 
to order. Thus 11. 98 and 104 are each a syllable short, and 11. 101-2 are considerably 
too long. Crusius suggests that in 1. 101 6 Kufkpurifnit is a gloss on iy&; and if these 
two words be omitted and n[p]i>Tm (for npurot) and *y& transposed, the metre is restored. 
Line 98 may be amended by reading ? pa (or &pa) vav& t which also improves the sense. 
The iambic trimeter in 1. 105 is unexpected, and a cretic may be lost at the beginning; 
but it is perhaps better not to demand exact regularity, especially since 11. 95-6 are also 
not trochaic tetrameters. 

95. KoracjToAi} in the original is written after the manner of a title in larger letters, 
with little dashes above and below. It is probably equivalent to Karacn-po^, as in 
Schol. On Aristoph. Pax 1204 rijv di Kara(rro\^p rod bpaparos tnolijatP 6poiav tou 'Axapvcv<ri, 

100. The first letter may be ir. 

116. The word before avr{ ) seems to be some part of either apaaanv or rapaovctv. 

117. Kvpi may be either xvpu or ntpia according to the view taken as to whether 
a change of speaker occurs at this point; cf. introd. It is not quite clear where the 
words added above 1. 118 and in the margin were intended to be inserted. Crusius 
supposes that navr<ov oZp . . . <rvvTi0pawi(*v»p) is resumptive of the previous conditional sen- 
tences, to which the apodosis is icewfc . . . tydw;, the general sense being ' If women had the 
hard work to do that I have, you would be as little inclined to love as I.' <r[c] after *l hi is 
quite doubtful; the fibres of the papyrus are displaced. 

119. There is barely room for an a at the beginning of the line, and the supposed a 
of avx(t?*) is more like o. 



56 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

120-152. ' So seize him, slaves, and drag him off to his fate; now bring out her also, 
gagged as she is. I bid you take them away to the two promontories, and bind them to 
the trees that lie there ; then drag them far apart and take care that you keep each out 
of the other's sight, lest they die happy feasting their eyes upon each other ; and when 
you have slain them, come in to me. I have said ; and I will go within. What do you say ? 
The gods have really appeared to you, and you were afraid ? . . . Although he has escaped 
you, they shall not elude the desert guards. Now I wish to propitiate the gods, Spinther. 
Swear . . . say the sacrificial prayers. Since the gods are about to appear to us auspiciously, 
sing the praise of the gods in expectation. Knave, won't you do as you are told ? What 
has happened . . . ? Go in and see who it is. What does he say ... ? Look, lest the 
proud one too be within. I bid you remove this woman, and hand her over to the desert 
guards, and tell them to load her with iron and keep her carefully. Take her, drag her 
off, away with her ! And do you search for him, and having slain him, cast out his body 
that I may see him dead. Come, Spinther and Malacus, with me. I will now go out 
and try to see with certainty if he be dead, that I may not again be carried away 
by strife. Thus will I address him (?). " Ah, see him here 1 Oh, poor wretch : would 
you be thus cast out rather than love me ? How shall I mourn him as he lies deaf to my 
voice ? ... All strife is over ! Cease ... I will ease my ravished heart (?)/' ' 

1 30-1. The displacement of the fibres of the papyrus at the ends of these lines much 
interferes with their decipherment. At the end of 1. 131 the letters *« . 01 are certain, 
and cVctyoi seems almost inevitable, though the singular QUtyvyw is awkward. It appears, 
however, from 11. 140 sqq. that only the male slave had escaped. In 1. 130 a</>[a]w(oi) 
would suit the context, though not the traces on the papyrus. 

138. hmvri seems certain and is perhaps for pai'm, but this is not very satisfactory. 
ri yeyop^p c]«f fop cannot be read. 

139. 6 vTrcpfrfyavos seems to mean the slave who had scorned his mistress's attractions, 
and who had evidently succeeded in effecting his escape ; cf. 1. 143 cVcuw dwiftrfcavrcf. 

147-152. It would at first sight appear from this passage that the slave had actually 
been caught and put to death, and that the sight of his dead body had filled his mistress 
with remorse. But the analogy of 11. 181 sqq. suggests that this lament may be only 
imaginary, — a forecast of what would be appropriate when the occasion came. /uWi 
owl in 1. 187 is also in favour of this explanation. 

152. The first word is very uncertain. The doubtful p is more like 7, and ]&?[ might be 
read for ]c*[, but UfayiUvas does not fill up the space. jc]fir[Xa]<r/MW is also unsatisfactory. 
At the end of the line dp& hardly seems right. 

153-87. 'Spinther, whence that crest-fallen look? Come up to me here, knave, 
in order that I may strain some wine. Come in, come in, knave ; come here I Where 
are you walking from ? Turn in here. Where is the half of your tunic, the half of it, 
I say? I will pay you in full for everything. This is my resolve, Malacus: to kill 
them all and sell their property, and then to withdraw somewhere or other. Now I wish 
to get the old man into my power before he has any idea of this ; and I conveniently 
have a deadly drug which I will mix with some mead and give him to drink. So go 
to the broad door and call him as though for a reconciliation; let us too go, and 
communicate the affair of the old man to the parasite. Ho slave I The case is this,, 
parasite. — Who is this? And she? What is the matter with her then? Unveil her 
that I may see her. I require your help. The case is this, parasite. I have repented 
and wish to be reconciled to the old man. Go then and see him, and bring him to me, 



414. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 57 

and I will go in and prepare your dinner. — I commend your speed, Malacus. Have you 
got the drug mixed and is the dinner ready? What? Malacus 1 here, take the mead. 
Unhappy man, I think the parasite is panic-stricken. Unhappy man, he laughs I Go 
along with him lest anything happen to him. — This has been done as I wished ; let us 
go in and deliberate more securely about the rest. Malacus, everything has gone as 
I intended, if we also make away with the old man. Parasite, what has happened? 
Ah, how? Certainly, for I now have them all in my power. Come, parasite! What 
do you want then ? Spinther, give me poison enough. Parasite, I am afraid I shall laugh. 
You are right. I say — what ought I to say ? My father and lord, to whom are you 
leaving me? I have lost my freedom of speech, my glory, my light of liberty I You were 
my lord. — Thus let me mourn him (though I speak not truly). — Woe to thee, wretched, 
hapless, miserable, loveless one 1 Woe to you, woe to me 1 For I know who you are. 
Hateful Spinther, bring the block for this man ! Who is this again ? — They are still safe, 
master I ' 

154. The letter before <r in &vX/<ra» looks more like 17 than *, but divX/ow must in any 
case have been intended. 

166. A female character enters at this point, but there is no clue to her identity. 
Xfxia* <rov *x« may be addressed either to her or the parasite. 

173. nav6\fjfAnro£ in the sense of namcds appears to be a new word. wavdkinumn 
might equally well— perhaps better — be read, but is more difficult. 

184. &<jxs is very doubtful and hardly fills the available space, but the letters at the 
beginning of this line, being over an erasure, are larger than elsewhere. 

185-7. On the interpretation of this passage see introd. p. 44. 



414. Philosophical Fragment. 

Fr. (a) 14*3x11*8 cm. 

Several fragments from a work of a philosophical nature, written in a good- 
sized and well-formed hand which seems to be a rather early specimen of the 
oval sloping style. In the formation of the letters and general appearance this 
MS. bears a decided resemblance to 26, and probably falls within the second 
century rather than the third. Columns iii and iv are on a detached piece 
of papyrus, but very likely succeed Col. ii immediately. The subject under 
discussion is poets and the poetic faculty. There is no indication that the 
treatise was cast in the form of a dialogue. 

(a) Col. i. Col. ii. 

[• • .] avOpamov ov [/c]aAa>i> kcu aioyjp&v 

[. .]# irovripav 7) irepi rcov 8iKatco[i> 

[. • . .]0ar rjKiora' 8 av ko[l a]&/ca>j/ 7T€/j[i 



58 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[ti]s yeo? w roiov 20 to&v 6€iw nt/fa. t&v 
5 [ T0V ] TM eriTTiScv • cp Ai8ov- ntfp]i yo[ 

[ot] ntpi 8e rmv not vrjf av6pa>[n<x>v 

[rjr]a>p i\v typ yw> ^vM ^-M* • • • 

[prj\v Xc£o> tjStj yap /larw cik[. . . . . 

[no\]\<ov rjKovaa 25 ow[. .]<nj{ 

10 [o>y] cany wf>€\ip[ov <T0ai a[ 

[to]i$ 7T0lfJ/iCUriV TT€p t[ 

[• . .]uv a 01 npore notrfl 

[pot Ka\rs\inov [. .]&[. 

[. . . ya]p an avrw 30 *r[ 

15 [ }av tivai a[ 

[• }ioi , . , , • 



(b) Col. HL 

[n]po*m . [ 

t[i] Trep*. r[ 

Ttw npt[ 

35 tov aKov<ra[t] koi not 
177179 pot S{ok]€l a 
no noi[i]Tou a]/i€t 
v&v av ycv€<r6ai m 
arqp S[e ) 

40 ava €[. ] 

H..[ 



45 



50 



55 



CoL iv. 

H 

T07r[ 
TOIS [ 

<T€tq[ 

fori 

yap S[ 

7T0\X[ 

Aeyof 

f[ 

• ian[ 

Kat c[ 

rotar[ 

omc{ 
•• • • * 



415. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 59 

W W> W 



]<r«nra[ 


]«•[ 


«l 


] XW .'[ 


]ra' tivai va[/> 


M 


60 £]«£(? «wt{ 


65 ]<T€i 7T6y9ia[ 


Xwytf 


jrot/y |w[ 


]?«?[ 


(end of column) 


]<wa[ 


• 





(/) ig) 

70 ]ty«( ]• 

]«Xto[ ]<«; 



3-13. 'A young man would not practise such a thing in the least. As for the poets 
I will state my opinion concerning them. I have often been told that it is useful to be 
acquainted with the poems which are legacies of the past.' 

3. The stop after ipucrra, which is naturally connected with av, is misplaced. 
1 1-2. Blass suggests vouipturw [cy|rux]fty 9 but though there is a small lacuna after 
woifjfuunv 1. 1 1 is already long enough. 

5 a. The meaning of the sign in the margin opposite this line is obscure. 



415. Isaeus ? 

io-4 x 3-9 €WL 

A fragment from a lost speech of an Attic orator, which, if the restorations 
proposed by Mr. Smyly in U. 6-8 are correct, is to be identified with the oration 
of Isaeus against Elpagoras and Demophanes. Not more than about half 
a dozen letters appear to be missing at the ends of the lines. The handwriting 
is a small and neat round uncial, which may be attributed to the second 
century. All three kinds of stops occur (the middle point in 11. 10 and 15) 
and occasional accents, which may be by the original scribe, 



60 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[t]va u8r)i[e] a> av8[p€$ AOrjvai npoTtpov re ir[ 

01 oti avayica(ofj{€vo$ rov Kai ei> rrji aya<pi[aei . 

aymva tovtovi [aycovi [atyOpamos fi€Tp[ios kcu 

[(]o/icu. rovro npa>[T0v v 15 [€7r]i€iKTjS' €i ti €[.... 



5 [ji]as fJovXopai 8i6\a£ai [. .]oi Xafiav Siktjv [. 

[ei] yap €^ov\rj6rja[ay EXira [. .]o* {ZovXoivto* o\. . 

[yop]a? ovroai kcu Arj[p.o(f>a [. .]i> Kai many ct{. . 

[vrjsi] cm to ewpa [ [•]?*[• • •] <<rTay * ar [' • 

9 Aa0€w ot/dcy, a . [ 20 €/ia>[. ,]av rot[. 



10 vol- a>s (arnica it{ aw k[<x]l anoSi8ope[. . . 

7rpov[Ka]\eo-afiTj[y [ ]f /cat €i ri t[. 



6. The traces after c/SovXi^ would suit any round letter «, 0, o, <r or <f>. The plural 
in 1. 10 suggests that tfiw\rfiifa[a» should be read, in which case Ai?[ in 1. 7 must be another 
proper name. 

9. The meaning of the semicircular signs placed below the line on either side of 
XaBtiy oufe y is obscure. 

1 1-3. For the lacunae at the ends of 11. 1 1 and 13 Blass suggests yap avrovs and oln or. 



416. Romance ? 

12x9*5 cm. 

On the recto of this papyrus are parts of two columns of an alphabetical 
vocabulary, written in sloping third century uncials. The portion preserved 
deals with words beginning with or, e.g. <rrfi<f>os 01 opa[, orptQti c\ar[, <rrpa>f*a e(rra[, 
cr[r]ci/9et apri, [crrJiXtfci favp^, Irrjvia ri ai{. On the verso of this is the fragment 
printed below which seems to come from some romance. This is written in 
a late third or early fourth century semi-uncial hand, with stops and occasionally 
other lection signs. Paragraphi apparently occur below 11. 9, is, and 15, showing 
that not more than a few letters are lost at the beginnings of the lines ; possibly 
indeed there is nothing missing in front of 11. 4-5. But there is no sign of the 
termination of the lines to the right, and a connected sense is not attainable. 
Lines 8 sqq. describe a supernatural appearance of some deity. 



]iro[. .]«X €0) .<K 
]v0ou eis rj/ias x[P) r t (rr0S € 0M r 9 [• • • Ort» • •]#[ 



417. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 61 

]v€V€iv capaTos /i€XP l T6 ^ wy "hlY Tt]<r$c[ 
] 8ia8o\ov rov vai8a KaraAcyJcji- kcu 8rj[.]ot irapa[ 
5 ] . irapov €^rrj(f>i<TTai yepay [*]KaTov kcu fleya tc[ 
|[ ] • < r< *']l pr\Kvvoptvov cj[.]ripi[.)rova . . . €p[ 
A&]K\r]iriov npoadoKa cmcnrcpxorra it . . iv . . t*X[ 

]a»> capa deoy nva <rKortaia> irpo . . v . . . ci[ 
] ircvOiKTjv Kat <pp€tf([a>]8rj c^oira [otyiy [.]•?•[ 

10 ]Tpofit)(ra9 £ timv tTaipot m €<r0' ourof •[•]••[ 
] nevdaXeos apa Kat Karav . [.}tikos [.]*[ 
] • a Scor €Kr€p\€Tcu €iirovra>v [ ] . . . [ 

]°XRT avyjpripov 8 €(i<f>aiv[<it>]v oyfity [...]. [.] . [ 
]€ivaf KaTappTjgapevos rrf[v] cof iffra .] . [• .]i[ 
15 ] npo<r€8pafi€v avw kgli . pv . [ 

] a> /*<u raw apapTtjOevTcov c[ 
r]oi/ acopaTos aiKi£opwov ..[... .]#[. .jy/Jf 
€t/]a>^ot;/i€^of cv CO € $€4 /f€#C . € • rtv[ 
]*[i]v tols iaa$ ava&foy/xfcjyay oXco[ 
20 ]pavTcvra r\piv i\ <f>v<ris .... ficaf.] . [.] . c[ 

]rtv ?/*[ ]6<rra>Ta9 [. . .]« fyiro[.]j[.] • . &[ 

]a0[. . . .]a>X €T0 ' Ka i W €l X? • * * a ^[ 



15. There is a light and apparently accidental stroke drawn diagonally through avra. 
19. Or perhaps ]cv rat. 

21. The diaeresis and rough breathing over t are somewhat doubtful. The breathing 
over a) in 1. 18 is rather different. 



417. Romance ? 

14-3x9-7 ^»( Fr *)- 

Parts of two columns, with some small detached pieces, from a prose treatise 
of a rather uncertain character. Col. ii, which contains twenty more or less 
complete lines, is concerned with a woman named Theano whose son was carried 
off from the Scythians by a certain Hippasus (?). Theano, after being assured 



62 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



in a dream by ( the goddess ' that she would recover her son, went to Oropus 
with Eunice, apparently a friend. This looks rather like a fragment of some 
romance ; or it might perhaps be the work of a scholiast or mythologer — though 
the characters are otherwise unknown to fame. The text is in a rather small 
round uncial hand strongly resembling that of 404, and probably dating from 
the earlier decades of the third century. The high and middle stops occur. 



w 



Col. 



Col. ii. 



10 



i5 



M-] 


1 • [• >Y»9 


]/ievr t 


f kclO oca 


*" 


MTO TOV or[. 


]?• 


o>9 8 ov8*p 


]v<o 


TOVS fl€V 




] 




]? 




]?■*« 




]at 




)*V 




yv 




]ati8€ 




]up 




]/ior 




]l" 



]K(V 



(6) (Top of a column) 
]V<"C . [.]rf 

]pTO CV0[ 

]n<rw . [ 
45 ].[ 



[•W ] • [ > 

20 EvpeiKrjp ciroirjaaTO' 
rjy St cam) rj Occam fit) 
Ttjp t[o]i/ iraitios tov Iotov 
op [...]. [2]kv0o>p Imra 
o[o)$ c{iy]p<ikoDTOv uXrjfei 

25 apnaytpros $€ carrov ov 
k €veyicov<ra rr\v ovfi<f>o 
pap items €y[€OT]i| [ic]a 
t opap nyy Ocov [\\popop 

30 Tp^yfrap' rcA^Jifratof & zee 
Aci/ci airr^ ri 0€o* airaX 

ya[.] a>y [% t[o]v 7ra[t]4a 
aufojAq^ro/iei'q* 9 5c ire 

35 [P'X]^ 7 ? 5, ovcra irapaXafiou 
[<ra t]tjp EvpeiKtjp yet 
[. . . ► w il[0i;]iw 6iri Tiyfi' 
[/2]pa>7roy /cat ro to[i/ -4/x 
[0t]a/KO> P€ . . [. .]i> . [. . . 

40 [. .) €7T€l Cy€p[€T]0 t[ 



418. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 63 

(c) W 

9 • • • • • 

]K<U..[ W 

[ ] ]•[ 

50 M ... 



23. The traces of the letter before [Sunday would suit v or *, but not a, o or *. [t«]v 
suits the lacuna better than a preposition, but then a title instead of a proper name is 
required after [2]kv0«*; tmra[p]x[o]f, however, cannot be read. 

39. The vestiges following /*«* do not suit upop very well, but ptm Uf{ov is a possible 
reading. 



418. Scholia on Homer, Iliad I. 

27-7 x 12 cm. 

An imperfect column of a commentary upon Book I of the Iliad, written 
in a large and clear cursive hand at the end of the first or early in the second 
century. The information provided is principally of a mythological character, 
and since 1. 399 is discussed immediately after 1. 264 the papyrus very likely 
consists of a series of excerpts. There are very close resemblances to Schol. A, 
which in several passages exhibits an inferior text ; and considering the early 
date of the papyrus it is not unlikely that the commentary in question was one 
of the sources used in compiling the scholia in A which give mythological 
details. It shows traces of Didymean influence (cf. 1. 24, note), but was 
probably derived directly or indirectly from Apollodorus (cf. 11. 9-22, note). 
The lines commented on are for the sake of clearness printed in capitals. 

[ 11 letters yvtyaiicar oOw avrovs [01 Aa (i. 263) 

[iriOai KaTaara]vT€S €i$ noXtpov eic rev [JT17 
\X10v opovs 8io»]Kov<rt €is MaXcuay opos rr^s 
[Il€\o7rovvT)cro]Lf ottov Hpa/cXy? avrovs &c[ 
5 [<f>0upcv rfv 8]e IletpiOovs irais Atos Aia [ 

[yap ] 8iaTp€i/3otxra Aii /X€ra/3a[[A]]Xo^[ 



64 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[n tt\v <pu<Tiv €i]9 imtov €/ityri Kai IIapidov[p 

\*y*VV7l<T€v\ 

[KAIN6A T €=AAIO]N T€ KAI ANTI06ON TT0AY4>HM0N 264 

10 [0 Katvtvs EXarov] fitv naif Aanidw 8e fJa<ri\€[v9 
[irpoTtpov nap0€]vo? onr/ran/? cyeyero- $[. . 

[ fiiya>]Tos avrtf ITocn&woy airrj<ra\ji€ 

t 
[irq ptrafiaktw ^Ja^jfeijay arparos yeivsrai* y[w 

[vaioraros & tJcdf tcaO tavrov vwapgas rov [ 

15 [ Tijff riytyovias ovk efJacrTactv €£«{t€ 

[Auras 8e Kai to]u$ Otovs trap oxffiev tiroiy 
[craro Kai irare irrffeas aKovriov ev [/icoy rrj 
[ 13 letters ] ayopa tovto Otov 7r[p<xr€ra 
[£e vopi&iv Zci/Jy 8* ayavaKTrjcafc Kwrav 

Of 

20 [poif iro\€fiovv]Ta Katncp aTpfJoJrofv ovra vtto 
[X €l P lw *iroiri<r€]ir cAarat? yap ko\l Spvaiv 
[01 Kevravpoi] aurov Tjptaay €19 [yrjv 
OTTTT[OTe MIN] H[YN]AHCAI OAYMniOl H[G€]A[ON AAAOI 399 

ypa(p[ov]<ri tivgs Kai $oi/3os AttoWcov <f{a<ri yap 

25 ori Aios eirurpareorepoi' ^pwp€uov [rrj rcov 

$€<ov fiavikua ILxn&w re Kai Hpa Ka[i AiroX 
\<w €iT€flov\cv<rav avrw ©em 8* yvovaa [irapa 
NrjpcMf rov varpos 0? fiatms rju SrjXoi tg>[i Au 
n\v cmpovXrjy Kai avpfia^ov irapaSiSwri i\ov 

30 Aiye&va tKarovyjEipov IIo<n8<wo$ naiSa [ 

Zeis? 8* Hpav par e8rf<rcv IIo<ti8covi fc ic[ax 
[AiroXka>]yi Trpo<rraa<TU OrjTtvcai AaopeSoifri 

3. 1. MaXcay. 26. <r of /SaaiXcca COIT. from X. 28. o of os corr. from fi. 

30. 1. Aiyatara. 32. a of BrjTfVfrai COIT. from t. 

1-8. Cf. Schol. A on 1. 263 . . . vPpl&t* o\rai raw 'EXAiywdw* napqaav yvvauc&V &$€¥ 
ol haniBat avoradijp fjutxtedptpot biMKOwrur avravs els MaX/av Spot rrjt TL*\oirovvT)<rov. tj 6* run 
AyaarTp€<f>OfUvrj prra0aX6vri rfjv <f>v<rw *ls tmrop iitplyrf Kai top irpotiprjptvop eyfprrjat IltiplBovv 
bs o»popda6rj wr6 rov vcpUkut tirirp 6pota>6<vTa rhv Ata ip rf guyrwrBat rjj fuprpl avrov. The 
papyrus omits the explanation of Pirithous' name, but is much more explicit regarding 
his parentage than the scholium, in which 7 & has nothing to refer to, while ru* makes 
no sense and is probably corrupt for Au. 



419. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 65 

9*22. Cf. Schol. A on 1. 264 6 K«wvj 'EXdrov pip fy nais AamO&p be fkurtkevs, 
rrpoWepop fjv napOevos evnpenr]s t piyivros be avrjj Uoaeibrnpos alrrjaapipif perafiaXelp tig avbpa 
fj vearts aTparros yiverai yewaidraros t&p Kaff avrbp vnap£as. Kai bfj wore nrj(as ok6vtiop eV ry 
pcorurarqp rrjg ayopas Qeop tovto irpoccrafrv apidpup. di fjp alriav ayavwrrr)<ras 6 Zevs rtpupiap 
rrjt aaefOeias nap* avrov tl<rcirp6£aro* pa^&ptpop yap avrov rois Kevravpois Kai Srpearop tvra 
vwox*ipu>9 *irolt)<r*' /SaXojrrc? yap avrbv oi npoeiprjpevoi bpvai re xa\ eXarais tfpetaap els yrjr. This 

is almost identical with the papyrus, but is more compressed in some parts and more 
expanded in others. As before, the papyrus exhibits the better text, (1) by avoiding the 
repetition of ?* in the first sentence, (2) by having vtavlas in place of fj veavis which is 
detrimental to both sense and construction, and in the light of the papyrus should 
be corrected to vtavlas, Blass suggests b\ia | 3c to koXKos for the lacuna in U. 11-2, and top 
[/if \yap oyKOP for that in 11. 1 4-5. 

In the epitome of Apollodorus I. 22 (ed. Wagner, p. 181) the story of Caeneus is 
related more briefly : ort Kawevs npoWepov Ijv yvvi\ % avveXOopros be avrj Tloatib&pog rfTfio-aro drfjp 
ytpeaBai OTpoDros' bU> Kai ep rjj irpbs Kevravpovs paxfl Tpavparwp Kara<f>pop&p iroXkovs rap Ktpravp&p 
curaikevev, ol be Xotiroi nepiaruvres avrip iXarais rvnTOpres fyoxrav els yrjp. The version of the 
papyrus may well represent another epitomizing of Apollodorus. 

24. It is remarkable that the variant *ot£o? 'An-JXXw in place of UaXXas 'aBtjvt) occurs 
in I. 400 not in 1. 399, and that the story of the conspiracy of Hera, Posidon, and 
Apollo against Zeus follows as a kind of justification for the variation. As Apollo played 
an important part in the legend, this order is really more logical than that found in 
Schol. A, which first gives the story of the plot in connexion with 1. 399 and then 
discusses the variant Qoi&os 'AnrfXAap, which is ascribed to Zenodolus but rejected as 
inappropriate. The account in Schol. A is as follows : — Zeits irapaXapwv rijp cV olpavy 
bioiinjviv vtpio-o-m tji Trappqaia *xP*l TO iroXXA avOdbt) btarrpao~o-6pevos. Iloareib&v be Kai *Hpa ical 
'AmSXXav Kai 'A&rjva c/SoiJXoito avrbv b^aavres imordfru, 6ms be axovoava irapa rov narpos 
NtypcW (fip yap poms) t^p &tos erri&ovXrjv tfanevae irpos avrov enayopeprj Alyaivva (pofirjrpov tup 
em(Zov\ev6vTa>v $eS>p 9 Ijp be OaXdo-atog baiptop ovros ko\ t&p irarepa Uocreibvva Kareppdftevev. 
wcowras be 6 Zevs Oertbos Tfjp pep °Upav ev rois naff avrov beo'pois tKpepacre, Uoveibuvi be Kai 
'AfrriXXaw tt)v irapa Aaopebovri Bqreiap e^rrfyio-aro rj be Qe'rtbi rrjv 'A^iXX^wt nprjv els ra ptra, 

Tavra trapuwraro. itrropel Aibvpos. The parallelism between this and the papyrus is 
marked, though the papyrus is somewhat shorter and varies the phraseology. The 
mention of Athena in the scholium, but not in the papyrus, is due to the slightly different 
point of view from which the legend is brought forward. If the scholium gives the actual 
words of Didymus, the papyrus would seem to be a secondary commentary based upon 
his notes ; but on the other hand the papyrus may express Didymus' language more 
exactly, and the scholium be an expansion. 



419. Euripides, Archelaus. 

9«2 x 4-6 cm. 

A narrow strip containing parts of sixteen lines from the Archelatis of 
Euripides, written in round rather irregular uncials of medium size, which are 
of the second or third century. The identification of the fragment, which we 
owe to Blass, rests upon the coincidence of what remains of 11. 8-9 with a quota- 

F 



66 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

tion from the Archelaus in Stobaeus, Flor. 7. 5 (Fr. 275, Nauck). Lines 1-13 
are trochaic tetrameters, which are succeeded at 1. 13 by a \optK6v. Several cor- 
rections have been made in the text, perhaps by the original hand, to which also 
the stops and occasional accents, &c, may be due. 



]v /*€*/ [ ]v' €i 8 evrvxns [HK 

]povT)fiq{ Jccrroo to \011rov [ 

]kt€Ivovt dyjjniGTOv ? a]v8pa ypri 81a jooy [ 

? avi]apa>$ e/teAAe rr[ ]y apepaf 

5 J?0w va fX9 r $. 1 S ] c * Y a R ai ™>X a [ 4 

]{} ayai *«*«£ *[ y ^ ^j 

jra> nai npo{ia\X[€ 

ev 8* aoi fio]vov TTpotfwvZ [jiri in ScvXtiav nor€ 
t 
fay CJCCDy] €A0q9 itapov <ro[i KarOavciv cXevOtpcos 

10 ]ra>y €<roofl€J[j']J /ca[ 



420. Argument of Euripides' Electra. 

l S'1 x 9*2 cm. Plate VI. 

A fragment of a brief account of the recognition of Orestes by Electra 
through the intermediary of an old man, and almost certainly part of a hitherto 
unknown viroOcais of Euripides' Electra, covering U. 341-584. The verso has 
been used for writing an account in a cursive hand of the late third century. 
The writing on the recto, which is of a common type (cf. Plate VI), probably 
dates from about the middle of the same century. 

...[..].. tovs av8pas eiaayay [tov Op€cm]]v 8 ovk €fi€\[\ey 

fi . [. . .)nv 7T€Vtxp<x>v per aXK a[A [ a]AA (ofioXoyrjaeu a[. . . . 

Xorpicop gtvian/ fitOtgoyras [av 15 [ \% letters ]ys ap[.]a>ua[. . . . 

tos 8* j[a] npo<r<f>opa Ttj oirovSt] ko [15 „ ] • <r . tg[. . . • 



[ 


1 6 letters 


I'M* • • 


[ 


>7 


» 


jMTf. . . 


[ 


17 


»» 


]v(ia[. . . 


20 [ 


18 


J» 


]etf &{. . 


[ 


17 


» 


]tf tovt(. 


[ 


18 


» 


ty«j>«7fai 



421-434. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 67 

5 fJLitov aTrqXOtv TrvOojiei/of 8e i\o € 
^y[°]f ? irpevPvTrjf Toy Op€<rn][v 
[..].. Operas rjXOw HX€f^r)p[a 
&€v[ta] (f>€pa>y a tols tear aypov fit 
cr[0*o]f[y] 17 x&pa npoiica ScopaTcu 0c 
10 aaajicvos Se rov Op€<rrr)v icai \po 
[09 <rrjiia]vTr)pa9 apcpcy'/cas 
8ua-a[<f>€L n]f>os rr\v HXtrijpav 



1-14. '(Auturgus wished) to introduce the heroes to his house to partake of a poor 
but . . . hospitality, and himself went off to fetch offerings suitable for his zeal. The old 
man who had brought up Orestes hearing of the matter came bringing for Electra such 
gifts as the country freely presents to rustic hirelings, and seeing Orestes and declaring 
the marks on his skin revealed him to Electra. He made no delay . . . but confessed . . .' 

2-3. a[A]Xorfu<ov : no other reading seems possible, for not more than one or two 
letters are lost in the lacuna, but aXkvrpiwv is not satisfactory as the antithesis to ncvtxpvr. 
The reference is apparently to EI. 362-3 toi yap *l irfap fyw, otiroi to y lj6os &voy*P€t 
napf^ofuu : cf. ibid. 420-32. 

4. In El. 408-31 Auturgus is sent by Electra to fetch the irpw/Svnys, and directs 
Electra to attend to the strangers. But this discrepancy can hardly outweigh the marked 
agreement in other respects between the papyrus and Euripides' drama. 

11. <rty*a]in7p<w : xvp ***!? »s the word used by Euripides, El. 572. 



421-434. Poetical Fragments. 

We, here group together a number of miscellaneous fragments in verse, 
which do not seem to be extant and which are too small to be of much value. 
Of these four (421-8 and 434) are in hexameters, three (424-6) are lyrical, 
seven (427-38) are in iambics, chiefly comic. 

421 consists of the ends of nineteen hexameter lines written in a second 
century uncial hand with occasional breathings, accents, stops, and marks of 
quantity. The subject of the fragment is the parentage of Bellerophon and 
the gift of Pegasus (who is not mentioned by Homer). There are no indica- 
tions that the poem was a late epic, and several phrases suggest Hesiod as the 
author. 

422 contains parts of eleven much mutilated hexameter lines, written in 

F 2 



68 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

rather large and well-formed uncials of the square sloping type, and dating 
probably from the third century. A battle scene is apparently being described ; 
Heracles is mentioned in 1. 9 and part of another name occurs in 1. 4. The 
vocabulary suggests that the fragment comes from some Alexandrian epic. 

423 is a strip from the bottom of a column, containing on the verso parts 
of thirteen hexameters in a large and rather rough uncial hand apparently of 
the third century. The recto of the papyrus is blank. The high stop occurs 
several times and marks of elision and accents were used. The subject of the 
fragment is obscure ; a reference to the Nile is noticeable in 1. 13, while Hermes 
is mentioned in 1. 4. 

424 contains a fragment of three stanzas in Sapphic metre, probably by 
Sappho herself, written in a heavy uncial hand of the third century resembling 
that of the Oxyrhynchus Sappho fragment already published (7). Accents and 
stops are found, the high point in 11. 6 and 10, the middle point in 1. 5 (?). The 
form &.T4pcu$ (=ir4pas) in 1. 9 is of some interest, since the a was hitherto doubtful 
for the Lesbian dialect; cf. Meister, Greick. Dial. p. 41. 

426 is a short extract from some lyric poem copied out as a school 
exercise. This is indicated partly by the character of the handwriting, which 
is a large irregular uncial, partly by the fact that the papyrus is complete 
in itself; and the inferior spelling points to the same conclusion. Below the last 
line are a series of dashes. The excerpt is of the nature of an invocation such as 
might have come at the beginning of the poem, which does not appear from this 
specimen to have been of a very high-class quality. The metrical scheme is 
*^ - **^ - - ow-. The date of the MS. is second or third century. 

A more valuable fragment is 426, a long narrow strip containing parts of 
thirty-two lines from a lyric poem in dactylo-epitritic metre and Pindaric style, 
which is not improbably to be attributed to Pindar himself. Unfortunately the 
piece is so mutilated that little can be done in the way of restoration, though 
a few lines in the middle which concern Melampus are intelligible. The text 
is written on the verso of the papyrus in a rather uncultivated uncial hand which 
may be assigned to the third century ; on the recto is part of a cursive document 
dating from the latter half of the century preceding. 

427 is also a fragment of some importance. It consists of the latter parts of 
the three closing lines of a play, below which is the title ]avovs \ ]iroyopia. There 
can be little question that Blass is right in reading this ^AvrL<f>]ivovs [ 9 Av0pa>]voyovCa, 
and that the papyrus furnishes another example of the dangers of rejecting definite 
ancient evidence on a priori considerations. A ®toyovla of Antiphanes is men- 
tioned by Irenaeus (ii. 14), who gives a lengthy excerpt from it ; this, however, 
was rejected by Meineke (i. pp. 3 ? 8 sqq.), who maintained that it was derived from 



421-484. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 69 

the Birds of Aristophanes, and Kock accordingly omits the extract given by 
Irenaeus from his collection of the Comicorum Fragmenta. But it can hardly be 
doubted after the actual occurrence of the title 9 Aim<f>&vovs 'AvOpairoyovCa that the 
testimony of Irenaeus concerning the Gcoyovta of the same writer is perfectly 
trustworthy ; though- whether they were two distinct works, or one work known 
by two names, remains uncertain. The text is written on the verso of the papyrus 
in a square or oval sloping uncial hand (cf. 420) of the third century ; on the 
recto are parts of three lines in second century cursive. 

428 contains the ends of nine iambic lines of a comedy, or possibly a 
tragedy, written in a small semi-uncial hand, which is more likely to belong 
to the second century than to the third. A short diagonal dash at the top 
of the line is used as a mark of punctuation. 

429 is another comic fragment, containing the beginnings of fourteen iambic 
lines written in a large and handsome uncial of the square sloping type 
characteristic of the third century ; cf. 420. On the verso is part of a document 
in cursive dating from the end of the century. A paragraphus below 1. 9 marks 
a change of speaker. In 11. 10-2 a marriage is being arranged, which may 
indicate that the conclusion of the play was not far off. A very deep margin at 
the top of the column is noticeable. 

430 consists of parts of eight lines in comic iambics from the top of a column, 
written on the verso of a second or early third century account Marks of elision 
and high stops occur, but no breathings or accents. The writing on the verso is 
probably but little later than that on the recto. 

481 consists of parts of twelve lines of a dialogue in comic iambics, written 
in an uncial hand resembling the square sloping type, but more probably second 
century than third. Changes of speaker are indicated by paragraphi and, when 
in the middle of a line, by blank spaces. 

482 contains the beginnings of seventeen lines apparently from a comedy, 
written in a small uncial hand upon the verso of a second or early third century 
account. A correction in 1. 15 and marginal notes opposite 11. 2 and 8 have 
been added in a more cursive hand, but probably by the original scribe. Changes 
of speaker are indicated by paragraphi and, when in the middle of a line, by 
double dots (cf. 409). The marginal notes* seem from their position to refer 
to the speakers, but the names ( c P]ijtopik(os) or />]tjropiK(o5) and " Apl<f>(p&p) or 
9 Apt<f>(pdbris)) are curious. The writing on the verso may be assigned to the 
third century. Between 11. 13 and 14 is a blank space sufficient for two lines. 

488 contains the ends and beginnings of iambic lines from the upper parts 
of two columns. The MS. seems to have been of a magical character, giving 
directions for a series of spells or incantations, the objects of which are indicated 



7 o THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

by short marginal notes ; cf. 11. 22, 28, and 33. The hand is a small semi-uncial 
which may be of the end of the second or more probably of the first half of the 
third century. 

434 is apparently a fragment from a hexameter poem, perhaps a Opfjvos 
or hriT&ff>ios. Groups of a few lines (usually four) are separated by a shorter line, 
which may have contained a refrain. Parts of two columns remain, written in 
rather large coarse uncials, probably of the third century. On the verso is 
some more writing in a similar but more cursive hand. 

42L 7-8 x 4-7 cm. 

] yc0€Xt;ye/)€Ta Zev[? 

]7TO<T€[ K]ap7](lTl \L1\ 7TOT OTTOofoaL ? 

]X ov y[ Jjtoi; 2urv<p(8ao 

IIav]8uovi8ao ep] ayKotvr)i<n fiiya[<Ta ? 
]d£a.TO UaXXay AQr^vq 15 ] apvjiova B€\\[€po<f>ovrt]p 

5 ]f € Y a P laa 0* ol(n )$ Tr l l €7r a7re(poi>a ti[ovtov 
€i]fjLaTO$ apyvfeoio ira]T7)p nope nrjyaa-c[v vtnrov 

Tjf ano €1809 dtjTO' ]/iu> errr€[To ? 

]r]$ TT€iprj<raTO /3ov\a[i$ ]Etirata\[ 

Aio\$ voov aiytoxpio ...... 

10 ]i7/£€Pos fj\$€ yvva[iK 

3. Blass suggests Ev/wwyzi; Nto-ou Bvyanjp at the beginning of the line, comparing 
Hyginus, Fad. 157, where Euiynome (called by Apollodorus I. 85 Eurymeda) is said to 
have been the mother of Bellerophon. Lines 4-15 refer to the wooing of her by Glaucus 
son of Sisyphus and father of Bellerophon. 

6. Cf. Hesiod, Theog. 574 dpyv$ig cVAjri. 

7* Cf. Hesiod, Scut. 7—8 tt}s *ai mr6 Kprjdtv PKt(f>apw¥ r aw6 Kvcanaw toiow arftf oUv re 
nokvxpwrov 'A^po&np . 

12. Probably www K^piiart : cf. //. x. 205. 

17. na]rrip: i.e. Posidon, who gave him Pegasus. For the different stories concern- 
ing Bellerophon's parentage cf. Schol. Pind. 01. xiii. 98 r<j> p.lv Adyy 6 BcXXcpo^&rr?? rXovxov 
*<rriy rj tf akijfciqL Iloaiibcovos. 



422. 12-8x17^1. 

]afia>i TtrawoTO 7rapr]op[o$ . . . .Jotcm 
] . . . Kai[o]io roic[.]freXi . [.]t/jv[.]d[. . .Wo 



421-434. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 71 

]u8ao Sa'typova tjj[. . .] . va 
5 6a]varoio KarcXXafiw aXXiros aura [ 

] fl€V €Tl (<*XDV [dfrcpVKdVC X a Pf[^ y 

] . k . . oXxf. •] . o[.] KarOero fiv6c[ 

]irp{ , .]XX€ftcy via 

] . . . . f«r[.]f HpaKXrja 
10 aS]St]KOT av ijfiara juifjrfei 

] . art 5[[c]]iKi7<raKT[.] 



1. Mr. T. W. Allen suggests that the line may be completed nap nor]afuoi . . . ayx 
Oyxri\rr<oi. The second supplement is too long for the lacuna, but the repetition of the 
letters y\ might have caused an omission in the papyrus. 

5. Cf. II. xxiv. 428 cV 6avarot6 irtp atay. oXXtroj is for Skurros like ndKvkkiros for 
iroXvXAurrof in Callim. Ap. 80, Del. 316, &c. 



428. 9*8 x 6*6 cm. 

]o<T€v/i€v^. .] . [ ] Koi avTO? lyooyc [ 

]fiv0cov P17T179 ko[ Jrcpois tov aoi8o[v 

]f yap aOavaroi- [ 10 ]Xo? a/i/ic' a/i t)Xv0[ 

]5* Ep/itias pa[ ]aipa>v avcfJrjs y[ 

5 ]f W i0 $< o P 0V °/4 JoTjAy&iw a/t^a c[ 

] tttcdxoi' €X0jt[ n]Xriii(ji)vpa>v NiXos &c[ 
]oy ofio<ppoavv[ 

3. What we have supposed to be a stop might perhaps be the top of the cross-bar 



of a 



T. 



424. 6x3-1 cm. 

]at<r€ir[ ]v arepcu? /i^ 

] . at[ 10 ]tj <f>pcvaf eu\ 

]kou[ ]a rot? fiaK<z[ 

]at " ] 



72 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



]X*S - <rvvirjfi[ 
] . lyy KaKOTaTc[$ 

]fL€V 



]?[ 



426. 



"•4X9-5 <■>»• 



[v]avrat fivOoicva 
[r]oSpofjLoi aXioov Tpt 
raves vSarcov 
KCU NlX<OT€ yXvKv 

5 Spofioi ra yeXcov 



ra ir\€ovTC$ vBar-q 
rr\v (TVVKpidLV aira 
re <f>i\oi ireXayovy 
kcu NtiXov yovi 

10 flOV 



1 Ye sailors who skim the waves' depths, Tritons of the briny waters, and Nilots 
who sail in happy course upon the laughing waters, tell us, friends, of the formation (?) of 
the sea and of the fruitful Nile.' 

4. NiAiDTf is for NccX&raf. The second v of yXvxv is corrected from *. 
6. 1. vbara. 



426. 



243 x 5 «*• 



10 



]ra 7rv6oa[ 

]07T€A€47r[ 

K]e\aj<T(v $oi/3o? [ 

] TToXtfiaiVSTOV y[ 

] €K vaov re Kai nap[ 

]i 8 €vi \<x>pa 

] • Kcaev rav(v)<f>vXXoy [ 

j/oi^a? tXcuas 

] <f>aatv €19 

]X6T €V $€ X/M>p[0H 

]cy c£ aXiKcoy T€fi[ 
]9 c£ Apyevs McXa#[7roi/y 

a 

]p o/iaOaoviSas 

]pov re IlvOaci kti<t€[ 



20 



25 



3° 



JX^S" Ttfiaa- AnoXXcop 
]y iV ayXafcu 

]€u<r[t ?] Kai fioXnai Xiy[€iai 

]0V€9 <0 aVQL TOl[ 

]ti ot; 5* oX[£oi>? 

]6vai[ 
]avopa[ 

]<r<ra>va{ 

] €7TlfJo[ 

]<r6ai &o[ 
]Xa>i> re[ 

] . T€V€0[ 
]K(OflC0[ 



421-484. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



73 



x 5 ] T€/i€Uos (aOeov 

]ay airo pi{a$ to & \p[ 



] 8c toht[ 

]otircX[ 



12. c of apytvs corr. from o. 13. a of paB corr. from o. 

10. fv dc xporfau • cf« Pindar, Py/fc. iv. 291, &c. 

13. afiaBaovidas is for 'A/ivdaorftor, the patronymic of Melampus ; cf. Pindar Fr. 179 

\xfxxunfi d' *Afiv&aovi&ai<rur iroucikov cft^/xa. 

14—7. BlasS restores these lines /Sajprfy re nvtfact ma^v | xal] rtfuvot (dfcov | [w^Ja? cwrA 
p/frs* tA dc xp[vctcmmVuif | fffyw r^W 'AfrrfXXcw, comparing Pind Nem. VI. 35 an6 ravras dtpa 
narpas and 01. ix. 69 f^x wff Ttfia<rtp. For ptfa in the sense of j/^j cf. 0/. ii. 50 o$*v 

OTrfpfxaros 4>x 0PTa pi( av > 

18. ayXaim may perhaps contain a reference to Aglaea who was the wife of Amythaon 
according to Diod. Sic. 4. 69. 



427. 



9-9 X 6.7 cm. 

] avSpcs oi ytycvrificvoi 
] names tvpoooTODS a/ia 
top] fiiov 8ia£*T€ 



AvTuf))avov$ 
5 AvOpcofroyovTa 

1-3. The sense seems to be ' You shall all enjoy prosperity if you applaud my play/ 



428. 



5*1 X 5 cm. 



]Ka6 V [.) 
]oi<riv ij [<f>]pa<Tw 
]o? ck\t)[6]t)s f}apf3apo? 

5 ] . s* r\ 8 *£ovaia 



(Ae}ra<t>€pov<Ta tovs vopovs [ 

]0V<TIV €V/l€V€lV 
Jf WTOS OpOVOf 

]pa 4 



420. 



Kai Ttf , [ 
OV0US v[ 



16 X io«4 cm. 



tflOl 8 €TT€$[ 

iva. Tas Ovpas [ 



10 iratSdov e*/r apc[T<o yvrjaiw 



74 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



€iy apTra[y 
oi;/c oiSa 8 . [ 



€0 i?/*r€p o irarrfcp 
ra (fuXrar a> irai x[ 

[<Z]\\0VTC[* . . .]£(>[ 

npoT€p . [ 



7. The doubled dots at the top of the line after «c are remarkable, for neither 
a change of speaker or a stop seems at all likely at that point 

10. Cf. 211. 38-9. 

11. €<f> Tfiirfp : SC. irpouci? 



480. 5x4-7^- 

]<pv fiev avSpcs ov[ 
] trap ai/r[.]y a8iK7jocc[ 

]l/l Tl OdTTOV OV0[ 

]ap cvOv? ovtos am [ 
5 y>p<r€v avrov e*[ 
]orp€yjra9 iraXiv np[ 

]r<OV Oiy€T €/C TIJff [ 

]cua[ 



481. 6x6*2 cm. 



[ 15 letters ]«[ 



482. 



a£ios €iraiv€i<r0at 8p[ 



]rjTopiK( 



]*P«K 



10 



ov firj Sicupvyriis irco[ 

8 letters ] 0iy/« T17 pcy[ 
8 » yicwjv oik[ 

6 „ /zcJra/xeXei /*oi [ 
8 » ] • V • f ^rap[€\ 

10 „ ]?j or ^^.4 
i° » ] «/" [ 



15 



12-8x3 r«. 



/cai toi{ 



) wroi /*[ 
toiovt[ 
avSpes [ 
toiclvt[ 
ra8e£i[ 

K€Kpafl[ 



) avrrj : p[ 

tca\\i[ 
. Kaivai[ 

KCUTOl[ 

[ 

[ 

ov yap yi{ 

o\icna[ 

air\r)OT[ 



ov 8 ov\ [ 



421-434. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



75 



ie[ 


10 letters 


]t (t/tt p[ 


[ 


10 „ 


]< K 


[ 


i° ,, 


]*•[ 



481. 3. Second t of diafpvyrfts inserted later. 



438. 



8-7 x 9 cm. 



Col. i. 

}aXct CV VOM TC\c[. 

"] 

yv]vai£i tc 

] itovtov OcXtjs 

7Tp]OT)8lKT]KOTa? 

5 ]?MW[ 

3 lines lost. 

]*™TP* • [• • 
10 ] iSiov Ocov KaXcb 

}€iprjs rtva 

]ay rpis 8<o8cica 

. ]poi$ avOctriv 

]jfia aiMyScov yaXa 

15 W avpoopiSa 

]y cm ^vXooy 



Col. 11. 



20 



cap <S[ 
<r(f>pay[t 

(h/w-Ka irav<rq[ 

[ 



fififfrj 
Opov 



4 lines lost. 
Epfirjy kik\t}[<tk 

orvyrjTov aval na[ 
KOirpco 7Ti0t]k[ov .]/?[ 
30 a(f>payci8a jr\v ttXovti[ 

Xpurov 8c /mxUpkW 
crcpcD 8c vcKpas . [ 

ctcOpovs 8c iroiciv [ 
cnav OcXrjs cvicc<f>a{Xov 
cyfrci <rvy[. . . .] . ow[ 



€K0p 

woiai 



35 



]nrrfv tcaXaov 

]goy Svafias opa> .... 

]? ?r*[ 

1. This line, which protrudes above the opposite column, is perhaps a marginal note, 
and there may be nothing lost between 11. 1 and 2. The upper fibres between these two 
lines have been torn away. 

9. Probably anorptntiv in some form. 

22. The stroke above the marginal note is really over the ra rather than the o, 
but this gives no word. If Bv/wv is right the word beginning *a was completed in the next 
line (ra|[miravo»y ?) ; cf. the other two marginal notes. 

29. pttorjBpop : cf. Lucian, Dial. Meretr. 4. 5 m ftc *at rovr6 pc <r<j>6&pa rcrrA rijs Qoiptoos 



76 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



t6 fttOTjBpov t&tbafrrro, rrjprjcraa-av r& Xx vos * trr ^ p ^ifoktwoi apavpairaarav emfifjvcu fuv ry apurrcpf 
€Kiivrjs rbv iphv b(£t6v> ry de£up dc t6v aptartpop cptrakiy, koi Xryf tv, 'Eniftcprjicd <rot «u imtpavv dpi. 

33. 1. fxfy( ov O and tx^povs* 

34*5- Cf. Antiphanes Fr. 273 oW J^w */>«a ovtf tyictyakov. n/^« -. r^c, from the form tyc*. 



484. 



12-5 X 8-6 rra. 



CoL • 



]ror 

]Tpif}0V 

5 ] . T? 

]• 



Col. ii. 



.4 



coXcro /Lti7[ 

[ 



20 [. 



■5[. 



.]youavT[ 

]€KTOP€lX[ 
.]0TV7T0V X[ 

k 

.]o7r^aix[ 
.jvocrww . [ 
. .]rj\aro[ 
. .]t/<rapo[ 
.] . ['. .]«rp[ 



toi/ Si[. . . .](r . [ I 

XXa>pa[- • -W I 

10 ovtcm [.]pXw[ I 

coXero x®^ • [ ... 

w/Hfwfyopov [ 
28. There may have been a blank at the beginning of this line. 



435-444. Prose Fragments. 

Under these numbers are included a variety of small prose fragments which 
we have not succeeded in identifying. Two (486-6) are historical, three (487-0) 
of a philosophical character, the remainder, with the possible exceptions of 441 
and 444, are oratorical. 

486 contains parts of two columns written in an informal uncial hand 



435-444. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 77 

probably towards the close of the second or in the first half of the third century. 
The Corcyraeans are mentioned in connexion with some one whose name began 
with Atj/ao, and who persuaded them to provide a talent (of silver) ; and there 
seems to have been some question of a marriage. 

486 is a third century fragment from the bottom of a column, written in 
square sloping uncials (cf. 420 and 447) of good size. The general sense of 
11. 5-10 is fairly clear, and the passage is evidently part of a description of some 
distinguished general, which might come either from a biographical monograph 
or from a more comprehensive historical work. 

487 comprises parts of fifteen lines from the bottom of a column, the subject 
of which seems to be the practice of surgery, though it is not clear whether 
the fragment belongs to some professedly medical treatise or to a philosophical 
work of a more general character. The hand is a medium-sized sloping uncial 
probably dating from the third century. 

488 consists of parts of twenty-three lines written upon the verso of a second 
century account in a semi-uncial hand, also of the second century. The first 
line, which is shorter and apparently in a more cursive hand than the rest 
and has a space below it, is more likely to be a marginal note than the title 
of the work, which seems to have been of a philosophical character, the author 
using the first person very frequently. 

489 is written on the verso, the recto having only a diagonal stroke such 
as is found in accounts. Parts of fourteen lines are preserved, written in rather 
small third century uncials of the usual type ; cf. 420. A breathing and elision 
mark occur. The fragment comes from a philosophical writer, apparently 
not Plato. 

440. Two fragments which were found together and are apparently in the 
same hand ; but whether they belong to the same MS. is doubtful, for the 
papyrus of (b) is somewhat thicker than that of (a), and (b) has on the verso 
parts of six lines written in a good-sized uncial hand, while the verso of (a) is 
blank. The writing on the recto is a third century uncial of a common type 
(cf. 447). (0), which was a carefully punctuated papyrus, is probably a fragment 
of an orator. 

441 contains the ends and beginnings of lines from the upper parts of two 
consecutive columns, written in a small sloping hand probably of the third 
century. The use of the second person plural (1. 16) and the occurrence of the 
name Philip (1. 20) suggest a rhetorical composition; but it might also be 
inferred from the short line at 1. 19 followed by a name in the genitive case 
that the MS. comprised a collection of i^o^Oiyiiara or anecdotes. 

442. A long strip containing the latter halves of lines from one column and 



78 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

a few letters from the beginnings of lines of the next. The piece seems to be in 
the oratorical style, but it is too mutilated for trie drift to be caught. 

443 is apparently a fragment of a private oration, and contains the beginnings 
of twenty-four lines written in a round uncial hand of a calligraphic type ; it 
more probably belongs to the second century than to the third. The low 
and high points occur in 11. 4 and 6 respectively. 

444 is a fragment mentioning Philip and the Macedonians, but whether 
it comes from a public oration or from a historical work is uncertain. The 
handwriting is a medium-sized uncial of the second century, probably of the 
early or middle part of it. 

436. 12-5 x io-8 cm. 

. . . *]pw ot 8e KepKvpcuoi rav vwrepa yevo[ 

Ta aKo]v<ravT€[s] tov pev Arjfxo avr)Kov<ra$ iref 

V €irrj[v]ovi/ Kai 81 cvOu [•]f /1 7 ,/ [ # "}v a f[ 

fiias] €i\ov *8o<rav T€ to to, 20 [.]ot[ 
5 \clvt\ov irpo0v/ia>? Kai kcl .... 

• • • •]?? ^ ff avTOV Tr l* irapfe 
vov .]r . (f>v\aKa too 8 uvai 

}ovro . . 1/. .]ai/ia . . ai 

. • . . .]0iyf[ ]tov ya/iov 

10 . ... .JcAiycrapf ]6*v to 8c 

]a8*£a[ ]ra aXXa 

15 letters ]*€ KaKai 
tyo-ayl ]do9 

> k ] f 

15 ] *<" 6t{ ]ku 



.]«.o{ 



436. iox5-5<™« 

• • . . • 

W ] • R[ 

]iv <p[ i]mro? o[ 

]r}o-€yT[. . , ,]ir€ €i<ra . [ 



485-444. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 79 

]tcu irpo<Tc[ m . . ,]<p vpv[ 
5 ]ai i<ryyf{o]s koli efin^Sos? 
) kcu /i€/iyrj/i€V09 c[ 
c]y Ac roiy [ar]TpaT€iai$ [ 

]ETai9 V1T€p€l)(€V tc[ 

JTay Kai Xmros avrov [ 
10 ]to imrucov rayjia ihr[ 
]tv axrrc afi<f>0T€pc{ 

]...[.. .]>/«[ 

<r]rpar[ 
15 ]XAa<r[ 

4. Apparently not yvfu{. 

7—9* BlasS 8Uggest8 [ajr/MrfiAir [avros re t«us apjcrcur virfpcigfi' TC { v s aXkws ira*]rw. 

/ 
487. 8.7x7-1 f/w. 



]ovirX[ 

]y ya/> to[ 
5 ]&*yM 

] . . [ 13 letters jfaarcDi' [ 

] • M ] • [• - ri)\i6ux>v t[ 

r]€Tairrat «> raw axnoai irapa[ 
]Xctr /Z7;5c Oavaaipov <f*[ 
10 JiJiJopax /*i/#€ aAAo rt ir[ 

]0 api(TTO\€ipOVpyOS O0€l[ 

] napajivOrjTUcos aval o<f>€i[\€i 

] • /?[•] • ^ ] Ci,fa Y a P 

15 ]ai c[ 13 letters ]x €l P 0V f[v 



8o 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



438. 



"•7 X 3-5 cm * 



io 



Iff? 

]y vapo\n\ 
]yy re Kai w • [ 
] €vo/it<ra ovv [ 
]iy oi ra apio\r]a [ 
<f>ik6\<T0<f)Ti<TavTZ$ Trfiy 
] <pi\ocro<piav axj[ 
]ovra €irtoTa<r[ 
k]cli iroOev Kai tivc[s 
} . io$ top Tpono[v 
] . /i€v yap irpoo[ 



yje^axr/ca) eiccp[ 
] fJovXofitrov . [ 
}ura p*v €VKaip[ 
15 ]r€pov S€tx0rj<r[erai 
]ra Ti$€fiai Kp[ 
] ravra irpa>r[ 

]V€IV flTJ0€v[ 
]V€PCU Ka[ 

20 ]vtg> ao[ 



14—5* Tav]ra p*p tvtcMp[or*pow wr]r*pov ? 



489. 



6»8 x 3-6 cm. 



]g em6v/Jiia[ 
]y fisv Kai <}[ 
]pr] Kai </>i\oy . [ 
*\{\vOtpov top [ 
]a€iv iro\€fico[ 
]&€ a6\a>v Kai . [ 
] ravra e/wrc? j[ 



]a> ait /zcj/ ai^€/9[ 
jeiyai* /cat 7rpo<nr[ 
10 jccr/tei/at 7raKra)[j/ 

]0)V €? CipTjVT] ko[ 

]atf apyoi ra tov ir[ 
]a* o<ras 8c p[ 
]o\oya> 8a . [ 



440. (a) 6*2 x 4-2 cm., (t>) 3a x 2*6 cm. 



]#«cu[. . . 



15 wr]«/>^«Xj7[ 



435-444. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



81 



]kcli ..[... 
5 ]ova>y kcli 
]v eyco Se tov 

]<r6ar fici 
}rot Tas T&- 
xo ]f3ov\w ra 

] . CLT . VT<»~ 

] .'• . [. 



]awri7T[ 
] . cavtir . [ 
] . Toowcrcwf 



441. 





8-8 x 5-7 *»• 






Col. i. 






Col. ii. 


> 




15 


ayiyp rotaj 


]/ca 






8€<r0€ €11T0{ 


]« 






ayaOos kcli jj 


]ai 






iroAAoi/? cX[ 


6 jp 






aanapra [ 


]« 




20 


$i\imrov [ 


]€(9 






pwpwrjv t{ 


1? 






wro\€ipiov [ 


]iOV 






ra </>ap/ia[K 


IO ]£^€J/ €/C 






ILtvi\v t[ 


]vrairei 




25 


coy eiSey cr[ 


]vvo/i€Prj 






/cat x a P ly [ 


]• 






ra /*iy& • [ 


]/C09 






[. . . . .M 



io. c of ]tfcv corrected from o or w« versa. 
19. There is a blank space before the lacuna. 



8a THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

442. 



10 



15 

20 



»5 



30 





22-6x6-3 cm. 




Col. 1. 




Col. ii 


]€*&/* 




irc[ 


J€ia9 iiclK 




*i 


]piav tov ira 


35 


4 


]opwos TIS 




<ra>[ 


]o? jieifov 




*f" 


] circp Qt ira<r 




*?[ 


) . xa/wi' Ar •] 




Tf[ 


] r r, 8ia<H. .) 


40 


T«( 


]*6a Kai 8 . [.] 




«[ 


]Xoi/ rj KOi 




Oflf 


a]8ucov/iwoi 




Tfflf 


Jv/W cjcor 




T0[ 


]tr apy^aOai 


45 


ra{ 


]fi€i>oi irav 




?# 


]ai jrottir 




TO) • [ 


]t€$ <rov rvy 




*f[ 


] irpos rjfias 




».[ 


]i QiXous 


50 


iuv [ 


]ov Stawo 




STOlf{ 


]ku<rOai 


* 


irewf 


]ai ap X o* 


• 


tij<t.[ 


}ai» rj8 . <r 




aX[ 


]uwo<rov 


55 


,o[ 


Jjyonycrii 




[ 


]y Ev[p](tTrT]9 




[ 


] . & 0iy//4 




[ 


0]eo0iAe<r 




•tf 


]o? fiovois 


60 


»/>•[ 


]y wrap 




/ic* [ 


]ai 0tAoi 




koAA[ 


]0t €VKO> 




6apo[ 


t]rriv axr 




/lev [ 



485-444. NEW CLASSICAL FRAGMENTS 



83 



24-5. BlaSS Suggests *ra<r]i7* T17* A[aiat kqi rff\f E^p]umrjs. 

52. The occurrence of an asterisk in a prose work is noteworthy. This sign was 
used to mark passages which were found elsewhere, but were rightly placed as they stood ; 
cf. 446. 490-2. 



448. 



14.5 x 4 cm. 



ov civai [ 
€vepy€<ri[ 
fiiaOov k[ 
<r$ai. 0T€ c[ 

5 pT]<T€l> €V [TG>1 SlKCL 

orrjpim* k[oi /irjy 
rj yc a8e\<p[T] avrov 
rj ofiofiT)7{pia Kai 

o a<$eA0[o? 

10 Kai vw [tcov avay 
kcludv a[r€po/i€vot 
TT€pupyo[vTai Kai 



nap vpmv [Kai raw 
tvTvyyavo[vT<x>v 

15 Kai €\€T]ac[v7a>y 
to avayKa[iov wo 
pi(o/ievo[i Kai 7roX 
Aa/a? €\6o[vre? € 
m top Kytyiaoyc ? 

20 vous fiv\[cova ovk 
[awrj\\a<r6ri[<rav 

[• M 

[• • •$• • 04 
[ ] • f 



444. 



11-3x2-1 cm. 



]-rrf 

]ia KaTa[ 
]aiova>v [ 
Jwcay Kar[ 
5 MaK\e8ova>v [ 
]ov<nv ov[ 

]Kf*DV TOB[ 
]0I9 €fLfi£ 

] • ™£[ 



10 



]ova>v [ 
]avriv[ 

] • W"7[ 
t]om $i\iir[irw 
]a\a(3co[ 
15 /u]<rOo<f>opc[ 

] MaKtSo[u 

TT0X]€fJLLOV9 [ 

]to>v[ 
]/i€pa[ 



G 2 



84 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

III. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL 

AUTHORS 

445. Homer, Iliad VI 

Height 305 cm. Plate IV (Fr. a). 

Of the numerous Homeric papyri of the Roman period which have been 
discovered, very few present so many points of interest and importance as the 
following fragments of the sixth book of the Iliad, written in a medium-sized 
uncial hand with critical marks and occasional marginal notes, and containing 
parts of 11. 128, 134-7, 148, 173-94, 199, and 445-end. While the critical marks, 
which include the diple, antisigma, and asterisk, are all due to the first hand, 
in the marginal notes two or three hands are probably to be distinguished, 
though owing to the paucity of the material for forming a judgement it is 
impossible to classify them with certainty. To the first corrector, whom we 
will call A and who employed a small semi-uncial hand, we should assign 
the notes on 11. 128, 148, and 449, together with all the superscribed variants. 
To the second (B), who wrote a small more cursive hand, belongs the note 
on 1. 464 ; and to a third (C), who wrote a larger cursive, that on 1. 478. The 
figure at the end, giving apparently the number of lines in the book, is cursively 
written but apparently by the first hand, and it is possible that either A or B 
(but not C), is also identical with the original scribe. The question is, however, 
not of great importance, for there is certainly no appreciable difference of time 
between the writing of the text and the addition of the scholia and interlinear 
readings. The first century is out of the question as the date of the papyrus, 
and both text and notes suggest the second century or the beginning of the 
third. Breathings and accents are occasionally, and elision-marks generally, 
used, and the punctuation is careful, the high point being employed, except 
in 11. 477 and 496, where the middle point occurs, indicating a slighter pause. 

In its disposition of critical marks the papyrus as a rule accords with the 
Venetus A, but there are some divergences ; cf. notes on 11. 183 and 189. The 
marginal notes are, however, very scanty compared with Schol. A, though such 
information as they give is of considerable value, since they are all concerned 
with various readings. Most of these notes record differences between the 
papyrus and the koivyj or generally accepted text, which is occasionally mentioned 
in the extant Homeric scholia, but not in connexion with these particular 
passages. Besides the readings ascribed to a definite source in the marginal 



445. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 85 



notes, other variants are inserted between the lines without any indication of 
their origin. Since they are sometimes rare, sometimes the common readings, 
it is not probable that they were all derived from any one text. 

The papyrus, which is remarkably free from errors and has more affinity 
with A than with any other extant manuscript, presents in spite of its extremely 
mutilated condition a number of important readings which are either altogether 
new (see notes on 11. 487, 494, and 523), or are known to have existed only from 
scholia (1. 1 87), or from quotations in other authors (1. 493). Of these, one (ttoo-i 
fidKiara b* ifioi instead of itaaiv ipoi hi fiiktara in 1. 493), is distinctly superior to 
the traditional text, and affords one of the rare instances of an emendation made 
in the text of Homer by a modern editor being confirmed by a papyrus. 

In our commentary upon this papyrus we owe several suggestions to 
Mr. T. W. Allen, who has also very kindly placed his own collations at our 
disposal. Our collation is with the text of Ludwich. 



(a) 



Col. i. 



128 



J 1J KO(lV1|) 



'34 



137 



AuKo]yf)y[o]y 

(f>0/3T]6€]lS 
K0\7r]G> 
OflOK]\T]l' 



Col. ii. 
wpdfypovem /up Ti€v 173 

) > €WT]fia[p £€m<r<r€ Kai tvvza 

aXA* ir€ Srj [SeKarrj 175 

> Kai TOT[€ filV €pC€lV€ 

otti pa [ot yapfipoio 

> avrap €7r[« 8tj <rqpa 
[ rrpcorov fiev pa Xipaipav 

TT«f){v€p€P tj S ap vr\v 180 

> 7rpo<r[0e Xecoy omOcv Se SpaKoov 
8tiv[ov ano7rv€iov<ra 

Kai TT)[v p€V KaT€TT€<f>V€ 

Scvr^pov av XoXvpoHTi 

KapTurrrjv Srj [ttjv ye pa\rjv 185 

> TO Tpirov av [KaTarcQvev 
a 

T&t 8 dp' €TT€p[xOfl€VCQl 

KplVOLl [tK AVKIT]9 

ci<r€ ^o[\ov toi 8 ov ti naXiv 
iravTa{s yap KareireQvtv 190 

aXX* Src 8tj y[i]j>[a>o-Ke Ocov 
avrov p[iv] Kar[cpvK€ SiSov 8 



86 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

8a>K€ Si 01 ti/j{t]$ fJao-iXrjtSos 
148 aprfli al ^(0^)0,,™^ >Kal P& y oi AvKL <k rc/icvos ra/ioy 

4 lines lost 
> [17 8 CT€Ac avriOcop HapnrjSova 199 

(*) Col. HL 

445 aici kcu wpcoTOKTi per a Tpotxaai paytaOai 

apw/iwos nccTpos re peya irXco? 17^ cpoy ayroy 

[«/ yap cya> to$€ 018a Kara (f>p]eva kcci Kara Ov/iov 

[e<r*€Tai r\pap or av wot o\cd]\tj IXios I'pt] 

[Kat Ilpta/ios Kai Xao* a^Xi]* Upiapoio- 8o(^)K0^ov^/y(«vucV) 
450 [aXX ov pot Tpaxw roaaov fceXJet aXyo? <muraa> 

[ovr avrrjs E Kafir] s ourt IIpia]poio avaicror 

[ovt€ Kao-iyvT)Ta>v 01 k*v iroXw] re /cat €a6Xoi 

[ev KoviTjiai wco-oicv vw av8]paai Qva-pwetao'iv 

[oaaov <rev o]tc k[w] rty A\aia>v \oXk[o^lto>v(ov 
455 [8a]Kpvo€<r<rav ayrjTai eXevOepov rj[/iap airovpa? 

[ica]i kcp €v ApytC ovaa irpofJY]] d*XXi7? io[tov vtfnivois 

[xat K€v vScop (f>op]€Oi9 MtaoytSos rj [Tirepcirjs 

[noXX a€Ka{op€v]rj' Kpareprj 8 €iru<[€io-€T avay*i\ 

[tcai wort tis €tirr]t<r]iv i8a>v Kara Satcpv xcouaav 
460 [EiCTopos rjSe yvvrj\ iy apiortvecK* paj^eaOai 

[TpcKov twwo8apa>]v ore IXiov ap^epa^ovro' 

[ay wore tis e/)€€i ao]i 8 av irtov eo-crcTai aXyo? 

[X T 1 T€L toiouS avSpos apx)v]tiv SovXiov rjpap' 

[aXXa pt Tt6vrt&Ta yyrq Kara] yata koXvutol ij k(oivt|) TtOvti&ra 
465 [wpiv yc ti 0*179 T€ £0179 aou eX^rjBpoTo wvOi&Oar 

[a>? uw&v ov iraiSos opt£ar]o <f>ai8ipos Etcroop' 

[ayjr 8 iraty wpof koXttov €v(£\voto 74^171/179 

[zkXivOti layoDv warpos (piXov oyjn]v aTv^Ous 

[Tapftrjo-as \aXtcov re t8e Xo<f>ov t]wwio^aiTtiv 
470 [8*ivov air aKporaTrjs KopvOo? v]cvovra vorjo-as* 

[c/c 8 cycXaow waTtjp re 0tAo? k]at woTvia prjTfip[*] 

[avriK airo Kparos KopvO ciXcto <f>]ai8ifios Ekt&p* 



445. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 87 

[koli Ttjv fiw KaT€0T]K€i> evi x$o]vi ira/i</>avoaHrair 
[avrap y ov qUXov viov «r« fcuat m/X* re X e P <riv ] 
475 [carer CTrcvfa/zeroy An r aXXoio-iv re $]courir 
[Zcv aXXoi T€ 0€Oi 8otc 8ri kcu Tov8e y€vc]<r0cu 

fl¥i 

[iraiS €/io]v ©9 /cat eya> irep apnrpciria Tpco€<raiv 

[a>& /Siiyr ayaOov re *ai lAiou i]0[t arajo-afctji'* ij k?(ivi|) P"|[v t]' 

] «tx(«t) 
[kcu irore m €Lrrrjiai irarpos y o8]c iroXXov aptivwv 

4 So [c* iroXtfiov aviovra fepoi 8 €]vapa ftpoToevrcr 

[ffrctra? &/ior apjpa X a P €C ] 1 7 ^ € 0P €,,a W^IP* 

[a>9 euro? aXo^oio ^iXq? cr] xepviv edrjKtv 

% lines lost 
485 \x €l P l T€ P lv ^ar€/)€^€j/ ciroy r €0ar e/c] r ovopa(v 

[Saifiovir] fiij fioi ti Xirjv aJtax']fc? [Ov/im 

Tl 

[ov yap tis /i virep aurav avr\p A]C8t Trpoiayjrer 
[fioipav 8 ov nva typi ir€ipvy/i€]yov Cfipwat avSpcoy 
ov kolkov ovSe ptv to-OXov mrfjr ra irpctvra yevrjrai 
490 >*£aXA €C9 oikov tovo-a ra a avrrjs ep[ya tco/iifc 

•jgiarov t lyXa/cariyf T€ koli a/i<f>tiro[Xoio'i iceXci/c 

•fccpyov eiroixcvOar iroXtpos 8 ai^Speaai pcXrjau 

V 

tract paXiara 8 tfioi rot IX1&1 cyyfcyaacnr 

4at[8i|&ot Eictu»p 

[a>y a]p[a] #awnj<r]« /copi/fl* etXcro x^'P' w«X €i1 7 £ 
495 [nnrot/]pij' a aXo^oj 5e 0iXiy ot/cor [& f}cf3r)K€i 
[€ir]poiraX*£o/*€i'i/. OaXepov Kara [Satcpv \€ovaa 
aiyfra 8 twtiff ikclv* 80/iovi €& j>flu[€Taoiras 

[E«CTO]/JO[9 

500 [a]x ^cy 

2 lines lost 

504 aXX [ y 

a lines lost 
507 > [&<r/zo*' 



88 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



€ia[0a>9 
kvSioco[v 
510 >a>/i[oi$ 

% lines lost 

"4 lines lost 
518 >i\fivL rj [ 

520 tov 8 aira[iJL€il3ofi€vo9 * 
8aip6vi [ovk av ris 
zpyov ari[/irj<r€is 
aXA alccafy 

525 7rpo9 T/wx^" 
aAA* lo/icv [ 
Scsirji erro\ypavioi<ri 
KprjTTjpa a[rti<ra<r0at 
€K TpoiT)? €[\a<TavTcct 

lAi[a&>9 { 

128. The marginal note refers to the ancient variant ovpa»6» for the common reading 

twpapov. Schoh A has (reading olpavov in the tett) ovrar 'Aplarapxof ofov KarafitBrjKas rb» 

ovpav6K bib &th tov r ypaffnt, kot ovpavfo. The reading of Aristarchus is found in several 
families of MSS. ; whether the text of the papyrus had ovpapop is uncertain! 

148. The marginal note presents much difficulty. &pn was according to Schol. A 
the reading of Aristophanes, while the nominative &pyj is found in nearly all the MSS. 
and is preferred by Lud. The iota before <u apx(aun) apparently belongs to the main 
text (which therefore agreed with Aristophanes), not to the note, and since cu apjfauu) 
would most naturally refer to the reading of Aristophanes, we should expect the authority 
for the other reading uprj to be given by the intervening word or words. But it is not 
easy to interpret the meaning of o ijW*. The reading of the first letter is by no means 
certain, for the o is larger than the usual omicron of this scribe and might represent a 0, 
and it is moreover placed underneath the x of apx(auu), which is above the line. But the 
following 17 has been corrected from o apparently, so that what 6eems to have happened 
is that the scribe first wrote apx okov" and then converted the o into 17, inserting o in the 
blank space underneath the *. The obvious division 9 *o(u^) is open to the objection that 
the o after k is not written above the line as in the marginal notes oh 11. 128 and 478. 
Mr. Allen suggests & q m>(u^) v(jro)<7(rcXA«i), comparing the use of vnwrToXfj in Anecd. 
Bek. II. p. 600 for the ' omission ' of iota. The scholium would then mean that the 
ancient copies read &/?% but the common reading was &py with no iota. This gives very 



445. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 89 

good sense, but v 9 is hardly the kind of abbreviation of vnwrcXXci which would be expected 
on a papyrus of this period, and the construction of 6 (sc. the 1 of mprji) is somewhat diffi- 
cult. rjKova( ) as one word, however, suggests nothing but the first aorist of d*ovo>, 
and though it is noteworthy that in Schol. A on this line 0*01*4 occurs ChpurrocfMv^s 

ypdffxi rjjXc&torra mi circ rap ^vXXttv oxovti kq\ rd &pQ fura rov i ypa<f*i Kara boriKrjv), o ificowrfav) 

or t rfKowr(ap) here makes no sense, and for t #«wa(a), ' as I heard/ there is no parallel in 
scholia of this character. 

174. For the diple before this line cf. Schol. A 7 oWXi}, on M<f>op6s «m irpoc rd* 
Ma dpt0p6v. The papyrus adds an antisigma as well ; cf. the explanation of this sign 
in a grammarian op. Dindorf, Schol. I. p. xlvi rd & dnrltriyna ko\ al &vo oriypal Stop Kara rd 
iffis Si£ f to avrd v6r}fia Ktiptvov. 

176. A has the diple against this line with comments upon roVc piv cpc'cu* and vrjpa. 

178. A has a diple against this line, but no comment 

181. The diple before this line, like that before 1. 186, has a dot above it and 
possibly is meant for a otoXi} mpwrnypipti, which should have a dot below as well. That 
sign was used to denote the readings or transpositions of Zenodotus, Crates, and 
Aristarchus. But since A has an ordinary diple against 1. 181 with the remark 6Vt h *2>pa 
if x/fiaipa, and none at all against 1. 186, and since no variation of reading among the 
ancient critics is recorded in connexion with those two lines, it is more probable that 
the diple with one dot has the same meaning as the plain diple, or at any rate means 
something different from the oWXfj ntpuanyiUvrj. 

183. Here the Ven. A has a diple with the remark on otdiv mp\ rrjs Kara rd* uffyatrop 
{(Tropins ip(fmiv€t. Possibly the diple which is found in the papyrus before L 186, where 
the Ven. A has none, has been misplaced and should have preceded 1. 183. But there 
are several instances of divergence between the papyrus and A with regard to the diple ; 
cf. note on 1. 189. 

187. The reading of the first hand ar<pxop*vv is ascribed to #XXo* by Schol. A, 
but is not found in any MS. The reading of the corrector antpxofitpn (ascribed to 
Aristarchus by Schol. V) occurs in the Lipsiensis and apparently in Mr. Allen's L 20. 
It is curious that the papyrus seems to ignore mpxofupu, the ordinary reading and 
that ascribed to Aristarchus by Schol. A. It is now clear that the variant m<pxoyL*vu> 
(which is not even mentioned by Ludwich or Monro and Allen) rested on considerable 
authority. 

189. The papyrus has no diple before this line and 1. 191 where they are found 
in the Ven. A. 

194* Cf. Schol. A 7 otaXty oVi napervpokoyti rd rtftevop airo rov rtptlv na\ afoplaai. 

199. For the diple cf. A, which has a comment on the parentage of Sarpedon. 

449. The scholiasts have no note on the reading cvp/AcXiu on this line, but cf. Schol. A 

On B. 461 ('Ao-ia iv Xrift&iri) 'iaitm) ycpticr) naBoixra' rd yap vyits ivriv 'Actce* &s 'Arpftdca. dtd 
Xtfplff rov 1, Schol. T ibid. , • . iv y*w*J7 ovV avrb fVcXiprrcop ko\ ^cooir rov l&ra, cos rd cv/*cXta» 
Uptdfioio, m 'HpadWd? iv rfj koBoKov kq\ Uroktpalof iv r<j> ircpl <rwa\oi<f>rjs, and Schol. D ibid, rd 
A(rta) ipravOa ytviKrjs irraxrtas fori. SBtv ovk fy« rd l . . . as cvptXias tifUKm Upidpoio . . . ovras 

w Qpos ip t$ 6p$oypa<f)i(f. The papyrus had rv/ipcXu» (genitive) in the text with most MSS. 
Mr. Allen informs us that besides A, his D, V 16, and P, and probably a few more have- 
€Vftfit\mt, and this reading is indicated by the remark &o(ruci)) j*(c)r(d) rov T. The papyrus 
seems unique in calling cvwuXiw dative, perhaps from false analogy with 'Ao-um {v. sup.), 
which in spite of the scholiasts is probably to be interpreted as dative. 

The dash after 4 is apparently a mark of punctuation. Whether y(*w*?/) (if that be 
the right expansion of y in the text) fVfyuXuuo means that cv/a/mXio is to be regarded 
as a genitive, equivalent to cv/apfXioto, or that there was a variant rvppcXtoio, is not made 



90 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

clear. evp/ifXtoto, though it does not scan, is actually found in one MS.; but the first 
hypothesis is more likely, though tvfipeXunt would be expected. 

456. 'Apytt iovaa Lud., the MSS. being divided. np<k (Lud.) is the reading of all 
the MSS. except one at Vienna (W) in which np6s is corrected to np6, as here. 

464. Over v of KoAwrrot is a circular mark resembling the sign for a short syllable. 

The marginal note here is in a more cursive hand than that employed in the other 
cases. The vulgate does in fact read Tf6Wu»*; cf. Schol. A on H. 409, I. 633, P. 161, &c, 
from which it appears that Aristarchus read rtBv^m. So far £XXoi has been the only 
source assigned to the form redrewr, which is read in the majority of the MSS. 

475. 6]ioiaiv : Bfoiat Lud. 

477. Cf. A, where #n is superscribed above dpurptrrta, the reading of other MSS. 
and Lud. 

478. After the lacuna following /3mj is a spot of ink at the top of the line, which 
we have considered to represent an elision-mark after t. If this is correct, the note 
probably refers to the alternative readings frV r dya06v (the best-supported reading, 
so Lud.) and #y dya66v (so many MSS.) or pit}* aya$6v rt (ascribed to SKXot by Schol. A). 
Of these jSc'?* aya$6v is that most likejy to have stood in the text of the papyrus, since 
ftiqv t is recorded in the margin and the reading 0iV dya66v ™ ignores the digamma before 
'iXi'ov, whereas in I. 493 the papyrus preserves a digamma which is ignored by the MSS. 
But it is possible that after &uj[v there was no r and that the spot of ink represents 
a stop or is even accidental. Then the marginal note may refer either to ^v r in the 
text or to /Soijy (or fioqv r\ a reading found in D, two Vienna MSS., and Mr. Allen's N 4. 
The fact that the scholia do not mention fhqv but comment on the position of re is in 
favour of the view that the note here referred to a variation concerning re, not &irjr. 

479- tyK®*) over th e ' me refers to the variants y ode (Aristarchus) and d' o y* (the 
reading of nearly all MSS.). It is quite uncertain which of the two was found in the 
text of the papyrus. 

485. Above the last two letters of owywfe are traces of ink which apparendy indicate 
something superscribed. The only variant known is 6v6pa(<v y and the vestiges do not 
suggest either v or a horizontal stroke meaning v. 

487. The it of frpoio^rci has been corrected from a(?). The variant nporu^rti inserted 
above the line is not recorded in connexion with the present passage, but in Q. no there 
was an ancient dispute whether npouhmo or wportdnrn was to be read. 

490-2. For the asterisks before these lines cf. Schol. A on 490-3 reWopo-« otIxok 

i(rj9 curup'urKOi ira/xucciirai 0Y4 vv» ptv 6p0£>s Ktlvrat kol np6 r&» rij* pvr]<rnjpo<l>oviat (<£. 350) fV 

dirjja pa^vbiq xfjs 'odwratias (356-9) ovcro. The papyrus omits the asterisk before 1. 493. 

493. ircuri fidkiara d cpoc roc iXtou: this reading, which is superior to that of all the 
MSS. (and Lud.) ira<ru> c/iol fie pakurra ro\ 'lXu$> because it preserves the digamma before 
'IXty, is found in Epictetus, Diss. III. 22, 108, and had been restored in the present 
passage by Hoffmann and Bekker, comparing a. 359, X. 353, and 0. 353. For another 
example of a conjecture in the text of Homer being confirmed by a papyrus see P. Grenf. 
II. p. 11, where in *\ 198 Nauck's conjecture faa d§ *ipis instead of the MSS. reading 
«0«c'a A* *i/w is found in a third century b. c. papyrus. It is noticeable that there, as here, 
the papyrus preserves a digamma which had been ignored by the MSS. 

cyrfeyaatrtv : cf. A, where tOO v is Superscribed, iyytydatrtv Lud. 

494. At the end of the line <}>atbtpos 'Etcrup is the reading of all the MSS. and Lud. 
For the variant x € [ l P l irax<irji cf. *. 403, where noXXar % A6rjmj is found in the Ambrosianus 
and a Vatican MS. (cf. Schol. A iv «!XXy noXX^s X^Jw;) in place of the ordinary reading 
Xfipt irax*ijj. x (l pi * a x ( w would suit just as well as <f>aidtpos "Ekto»p here, for <tx»vr)<rat could 
not refer to any one but Hector. 



446. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 91 

507-9. The papyrus omits the asterisks which are found in A against these lines, 
but has the diple against I. 507, as in A. 

510. «»fi[otf: in the margin before this line is what looks like the top of a critical 
mark, of which the rest is lost. A has a diple against this line. 

518. The smooth breathing above the initial 17 is uncertain, but the vestiges suit that 
better than a circumflex. There is a diple before this line in A. 

521. The d and p of faffum [ have possibly been corrected. 

523. aXX ok*J[v: akkh U»v MSS. Cf. 0. in, where Rhianus read aUowa for axcWa. 
This error (aU&v for dxfW) is not uncommon in MSS. axcW makes good sense here. 

527. o of €Tro[vpaviQuri is corrected from 1. 

529. Below the coronis is a number, apparently referring to the lines in the book. 
If 525 is correct, Book vi in this papyrus was four lines shorter than in our texts. But 
in view of the carelessness of scribes in numbering successive hundreds of lines (cf. 228), 
not much reliance can be placed on the figure here, though cf. 448. 302, note. 



446. Homer, Iliad XIII. 

1 8-4 x 4«3 cm, Plate VI. 

A narrow strip of papyrus containing parts of 11. 58-99 of Iliad xiii. 
The scribe was unusually careless, and the fragment has no critical value; 
but palaeographically it is interesting, since a portion of a cursive account on 
the verso of the late second or third century supplies an approximate terminus 
ad quern for the date of the literary text on the recto. The latter, written 
in a square and upright uncial hand, may be placed near the end of the second 
century. 

[coKvnopwv et kcu fiiu 0]Xvp[mo9 ovtos eyupu 
[17 Kai <TKT}7rai'i<D yaifio\os] €y[vo<rtyaios 
60 [a/i<f>OT€pa> K€Koira>$ 7t\]t)<tcv p[ev€os Kparepoio 

[yvia 8 e$r]K]€[y cXatypa rcaxSay [Kai yjeipas vntpOev 
[at/ro? 8 a»? t ijpfif^ a>K]wr(T)€pos oopr[o irtTwOat 
[09 pa t aw aiy]iXiwos W€r[p]rj9 we[pi/irjK€09 apOu? 
[0/0/1170-17] noSioio 8ia>K€iv op[v€ov akXo 

65 [a>? euro tw] i/«£c IIo<T€i8amv [cvoaixfkav 

66 [touv 8 €yp]m wpoafcv OaXrjos [ra\v9 Aias 
68 [. ] 0ea>i> oi OXv/twov [exown 

[parra €i8o]/icvo9 tccXerai ira[pa prjvai giaxevOai 
70 [ovS yc KaX\a]s cart Otowpcwos oi[oopkjtt]? 



92 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[t>X vla Y a P] peTowHiOtv iro&w [tjS* Kvqpacov 
[pei €yva)i/] amovros apiyvcnt\oi 4c Otot trep 
[icai 8 c/ioi a)vT(o Ovpo? cvi aoTfyOevo-i <f>iXoi<ri 
[paXXov €(f)o]pfiaTai noXcpifeiv rjSe (laysaOai 

75 [patpcocoat] 8 arepOe noSes rj [x* l P*S vircpOt 

[rov 8 aira]/JL€il3oparo9 [rr]p[o<Te(f>rj TtXapcovio? Aias 
[ovtcd wv k]cli €/ioi irepi 8oup[an X €L P es ^airroi 
[paipaxriv] kcll pot pevos [copopc pcpdc 8c irowiv 
[ecrovpai ap)<poT€poi<ri pevoi[vcoa) 4c tcai oios 

8o [EfcropL npidjptiSrji aporov [ptpa&ri pa\€<r6ai 
[a>y oi pev Toi]avra irpos aXXrjX[ou9 ayopeuov 
[Xapprj yrjOo]<rvvT] ti\v a<f>Ly [0coy cpfiaXe 6vpa> 
[roQpa 4c to]vs omaOw yair)[o)(09 <op<rsv Ayaiovs 
[ot irapa vr)v<r]iv Qor\<jiv [avvtyvypv <f>iXov rjrop 

85 [tgov p apa 7 ap]yaXeco Kap[ar<o <piXa yvia XcXvvto 
[kcu <T<f>iv a^of] Kara Ovpov [tytyvtro SepKoptvoicri 
[Tpcoas 701 p€y]a 7*1x09 VTT€KK[a.Tefiri<rav optXco 
[7ovs 01 y €La-opo]a>vT€9 V7T o(f>pvo[i SaKpva Xtifiov 
[ov yap €<pav] favfccOai wrep k[o,kov aX\ woaixOw 

90 [peia p€7€ia]ap€vos Kpa7*(j>)a[? wrpuvt <f>aXayyas 
[TtvKpov c]7rt npooTOV kcli [Atjltov rjXO* kcXcvw 
[IlrjveXtcov 6] rjpcoa Qoa[v]7a tc [Ar}nrvpov tc 
[Mrjpiovriv] 7€ Kai Airr[i\Xox<>[v prjoTCopas ai/nyy 

[• > • [ 

95 [ai8o>? Apyc]ic[i Kovpoi vtoi vppiv cya> yc 
[papvaptv6\i<ri [n€7roi0a o-aaxTtpevai pea? apas 
[c£ 8 vpus iro]Xcp[oLo ptOrjacTe XtvyaXtoto 
[wv 8ij ciSefrai [r]pap vno Tpaxaat Saprjvai 
[a> iroirot 17 p]e[ya Oavpa 708 o<f>daXpoi<riv opcopai 



61. rc»dap is a mistake for nobai. 
64. no&ioto is a graphical error for n-cdcoto. 

66. eyy]a> npoadtv has been corrected from cyv]m iro<r$€v 9 probably by another hand. 
68. The omission of 1. 67 may have been caused by the fact that both it and 1. 68 
begin with the letters at. But something has also gone wrong with the beginning of 



447. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 93 

1. 68, for it is impossible to get Aiav «r«i nt vm into the lacuna, which is of the same size 
as that in the preceding and following lines. 

71. fi€TonurB* ¥ : 1. furoniaB*. 

73. The doubled <r in o^nfyoWi is probably a mere accident, since the iota is already 
long by position; the passage is therefore hardly parallel to e.g. P. Brit Mus. 732 JL xiv. 
1. 183 rpiykijva fifio[pot]na (Journ. 0/ Phil. xxvi. p. 49). 

75. 17 : Kai MSS. 

80. Uptoj/Midi/i : 1. npiajpidip. 

82. yrjOo]<Tvvrj is of course another blunder, due to the termination of the preceding 
word. 

83. onurBtv : similar mistakes (for SmBip) occur in DG (©W6V*) and Vrat. A (0W6V). 

84. vrjvo]LV : 1. vt)Vo}l. 

87. v7T(K)<{aTtPr)(rav ; {mtpKari^frw MSS. On the other hand in 1. 89 the papyrus 
has virfp t{axov(?) in place of the regular for' « kokov. The variation is no more than 
a graphical error. 

89. vtrtp n[aKop : cf. the previous note. 

94. No variant is known in this line, which should be tow 3 y inorpvwv hrta 
irrtp6iyra npoaijvda. It is quite impossible that twelve letters should have stood in the 
papyrus before ]•»; perhaps the scribe confused the two omicrons and wrote tow orpviw. 



447. Homer, Iliad XXIII. 

7-3 X 4-2 cm. Plate VI. 

The following small fragment from the twenty-third Book of the Iliad, 
has, like the preceding papyrus, a palaeographical interest. The text on the 
redo, written in square slightly sloping uncials, represents a common type of 
literary hand (cf. especially 26) ; while on the verso is part of an account in 
cursive which is not later than the beginning of the third century, and more 
probably belongs to the second. It is, therefore, not at all likely that the MS. 
on the recto was written later than the latter part of the second century. A few 
accents &c. occur, apparently added by the original scribe. 

[tci\€i wro] Tpaxav [tvT}ywtcDi> airoXecOai 
[aXXo & tol €]/>€0> j?a[t €(f>fi<ro/iai at #rc iriOriai 
[/it] €/i]a <roov airdv[tvO€ TiBrj/icvat out* A^iWev 
[aXX ofio]v a>y €Tpa(p[r) . . . cv vfitTtpoiai 8ofiot<riv 
85 [€VT€ fi€ t]vt6ov €ov\tcl Mcvoitios *£ OirOCVTOf 
[rjyaycv] vfjterepoy [S aySpoKracrtijs vrro Avy/0179 
[q/xajrt t&i ot€ 7rat[Sa KartKravov AftQiSa/iavTos 
[vrj\iriov ovk €0cA[a>j/ a/i(f> aarpayaXoun x°^ a) ^ € ^ 
[w0)& /i€ 8€£a/i€[vos *v Swfiaau' tmrora JTifAew 



94 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

90 [€Tpa]<f>£ T €1>$UK€C09 [KCU <TOV OtpOLTTOVT 0VO\kr\VtV 

[coy 8t] kcli [oarea] voo'Cv [o/jltj aopo? ajupucaXuirToi 



84. trpa<f{ti . . . : the papyrus may have read (rpafav n*p with ADHS, &c, or rrpafaiitv 
with CEGL and Brit. Mus. Add. MSS. 17210 (6th or 7th cent.) ; rpd^o/icV irep La Roche. 
88. [vrj}mo» : so D Vrat. d; pfpnos (so La R.) or yipr/ov other MSS. 



448. Homer, Odyssey XXII and XXIII. 

Height of Column 29*6 cm. 

The following fragments are from a roll comprising Books xxii and xxiii of 
Homer's Odyssey. Of the twenty-second Book portions of seven consecutive 
columns remain, covering with some intervals 11. 31-317* Book xxiii is repre- 
sented only by two small pieces from a couple of columns, nine intermediate 
columns being wholly lost. The text is on the verso of the papyrus, the recto 
having been previously utilized for a prose literary work which has been carefully 
cleaned off— unfortunately so effectively that the writing is quite illegible. 
The letters here and there traceable are formal rather heavy upright uncials 
of good size, probably not earlier than the third century, to which the hand 
of the verso may also be attributed. This is also upright and rather large, 
but lighter and more ornate. Accents, breathings (usually acute-angled), marks 
of elision, &c, and high stops have been added with some frequency, mostly by 
a second hand, which has also introduced some corrections into the text ; the 
marks of elision, however, seem to be mainly due to the original scribe. The 
system of accentuation is generally similar to that found in 228, the long papyrus 
of Iliad v ; in oxytone words, however, all the syllables except the last bear 
a grave accent (though not in xxii. 184 evpv y€pov) 9 as in the Bacchylides papyrus, 
whereas in 228 only the penultimate syllable has the grave accent. As in 228, 
perispome words followed by enclitics become oxytone. In the case of diphthongs 
the second vowel is usually accented, while in 228 the reverse is the case, but the 
writer was not very careful, and it is sometimes a matter of doubt for which 
letter an accent was intended. A peculiarity is the method of writing the 
accents, which are as a rule nearly, and sometimes quite, horizontal. 

The papyrus shows on the whole a good text, which is of interest on account 
of some agreements with X (Vindobonensis 133), or U (Monacensis 519 B), 



448. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 95 



or both, against the rest of the MSS. Our collation is with the edition of 
Ludwich. 



Book xxii. 



Col. i. 



Col. ii. 



[lOTCCf] €Ka<TTOS [ . 

[av8p)u KaraKT^jivai 
[ooy 8$ <r<f>tv k[cli 
[tovs] 8 dp i)7ro8[pa 
35 co tcvv€9 ov /i [er 
Srjfiov [arr]o T[pcsxn>v 
8fjLoorji[<TU>] tc y[v]v[at£ t 
aurov 8e £cSoito[9 

0VT€ 0601/9 8€foav[T€S 

40 [o]vri rtv avQpuiruv [ 

[v]vv topur Kai ir[a]<riv [ 
42 [coy] <fxiT0* tou9 8 a[p]a irai^ras 

44 [Evpvpa^os 8e piv otc[$ 

45 [* l ^y $V 06Wew 10{aKri<nos 
[Tavr]a /i€v afot/ia eiir[a? 
[noXX]a ptv €i> p€yap[oi<rtv 



a\]To 8 [«tt avroD So 

0]8v<r<r€[vs 
irap]a pa(ov 

] Tpane[{ri 

X]€V€J/ €[/>£*£€ 85 

yOctya TV7TT€ /*€7W0> 
a]fl<p[OT€pOl](TlP 

o<f>6aX]poo[y] 8 9 €\vt a\Xv9' 
k]v8aX(/ioio 
o]£u go 

} #*i 

XaXtcTjpei] Sovpt 
€X]a<r<r€ 



Col. iii. 



[kcli 7riov]pas k[vi>€cl$ ^aX/cypcd? nrrroSaatia? 

[P\n & <p[€]p(DV p[a\a 8 a>K<z <f>i\ov narep etaaQiicavw 

[a]uro9 8* npoofrurra ntpt yjm Svaero yaXKov 

tot 8 avTCQ? t(od 8jmm>€ 8u€<r0t]v Ttvyta KaXa 

"5 cotccv 8 ap<f> 0[8voya 8at<f>pova notKfXopr}Tr]v 
[a]urap <S y o<f>pa [fiev avrao a/wv€<r6ai taav tot 
[r]6(f>pa pvr](n{7]pa>i> tva y at€t a> eyt ouccd 
[/3a]XA€ TtTuo[Kopci>o9 rot 8 ayytartvot tntirrov 
[a]vrap tirtt A^c^firoy tot oiortvovra avaxra 

120 [to]£ov fiw ir[pos oraOfiov €vara0€os jicyapoto 



96 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[s\k\uv €<rTa[fi€vai irpos cvania irap<f>avo(ovTa 
[a]uro9 8* ap<f> co[fioi(ri aatcof 0€]ro TferpaOzXuiivov 

[k]paTl 8 C7T t[<t>6lfJL0i> KVV€7j]l/ €l^TVKTOV €0TJK€y 

[ilpnrovpw [Suvov 8e Xo<f>os] Ka0v[7T€p$€y cvevev 
125 [eiJAero 5* d[\Kipa 8o]vp[€] Stfto] K€K{opvdp.€i>a \o\kci> 

Op<j[o0v]pT] $€ [ri? €0"]/c[€]l> [[o]Jv$/Xlfr[a> €?£ TOLX** 

aK[po]raToy tie 7i[ap ov]8ov €VOTa[deo9 peyapoio 
j\v 0809 €9 Xavptj[y <ra]v(8€9 8° cfxo" €pt]o9 €[urai 
ti\v 8 08v<r<rcvs <f>p[a(€]<rOai aifoyti 8s]ioi> v<f[op{Jov 

T 

130 *o{[/?]]€fir ay\ov Ti/[y pta] 5* [oC]ri y^wer] €<f>op/irj 

tois 8* AyeXem p[eT€€in€^ €[iro9 ir£\vr*(r<n 7T[i<f>av<TKon' 
o» (piXoi* ovk av 8rj [tis a\v [opcroOvprjv a]vaf3a{i7] 
[ica]i 4i7TOt Xaoiat porj 6* afjcurra yevotTo 
[t]co kc ra\ ovto? avr\p vxfp varara To£a<r<rcuTO 

135 [tov] 8 avT€ 7rpo<T€€t7T€ M€[Xav6io? atnoXos atyoov 
[ov na>]s ccrr' AytXae Aibrp[e<t>€9 ayyt yap aivoa? 
[avXijs] tcaXa Ovpcrpa kcu apy[a\€ov aro/ia Xavpys 

V 

[Kai x €l ]s iravras epvKoi a^ji^jjip 0? r aXicipos €irj 



Col. iv. 

[aXX ayeO v/iiv Tev\c] cvtbcu 6<»priy6rjvai 
140 [ex OaXa/iov €v8op yap] oio/tar ovSi irr\ aXXrj 
[T€V\€a KarOtaOriv 08v]cr(T€V9 teat <f>a(8i/io9 vior 
[cos tnr&v ave{Jai\i>e MtXavOios. aiirSXo? aiycov 
[es OaXa/iovs 08var]fjos ava p&yas ptydpoto 
[evOtv SotSeica /i]€v o-dic* cfcXe rScrca & 8\ovpa 

145 [Kai To<r<raf Kvvta?) xaXicfjpeas [i]7nro5j[f]J<r€/[a5 

[fit] 8 i/ievai fiaX]a 5* &Ka <fxpcc[v pv]r^jrrip(riv c&wtc 
[tcai tot OSt/crcnyo]? Xtiro yowaT\a Kai <f>tXov rjrop 
[a>9 nepifiaXXofieyovs '£[8* Ttvyea xepai t€ Sovpa 



448. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 97 
182 [*vO vjrcp ov8ov 6j3a]ii/€ MzXa[v6m auroXo? aiycoy 

[rrj €T€pTl fl€V X €£ P] 1 fefXW Kaklty TpvfaXtLCLV 



Col. v. 

[ttj 8 fT€]prj [<ra/co]y ct/ptf ycpov iren[aXaypwov afy 
185 [Aasprifo r}p[ax)S 0] Kovpifav <pOp€[€<TK€ 

X 
[8rj tot]€ y [rjSrj K€t]ro' pa<f>ai 8c iXvvr\o ipavrtov 

[too 8 ap] €ii[ai£ap]6' tXtTrjv ipvaav [t€ piv €£<ra> 
[tcovpig] cv [8a7T€]8coi 8e X a f JLal P a K oy <*yyvp*vov Ktjp 
[crvv 8c iroSas xl 6 */*** T€ ^ €0V 8[v]p*X[y€i Seapco 
190 [«/ paX a7rooT]/5€^raKr[€] 8iap7i[€p€9 a>y ttceXevac 

19a [(T€LpT)V St] 7rX€KTTj[v €$ CLVTOV irtlpTJVCLVTC 

[kiov av vty]rjXriy [tpuaav ncXaaav T€ Sokokti 
[tov 8 ariK]€pT{o]p€[a>v 7rpoo-€<f>7)? Evpai€ ovfi&Ta 
195 [wv pw 8]r) /i[a]Xa [ir<iyyy MtXavQi* wktcl <f>vXa£€i9 
[€vvr] €vi paX]aK7j [KaraXcypevos coy <re coikcv 

Col. vi. 

230 [<r]rj 8? ijXcd ftovXrj 1 TIpia[pov 7roXi]y cvpvay[via 

[ir]a>? 8rj wv ^rjfijje aiv y[e 8opov Ka]i KTtjpa[6 ucaveif 

o 

dvra pvTi<TTripa>v [[a]]Xo0[i7>€a£ aX/a/xo]? €iva[i 

aXX* aye Scvpo ir&rov n[ap *p iara]ao kcli 18c epyov 

c 
6<f>p' iSrjs 6169 toi cj> a[v8pa<ri 8v<r]pw€€o[<r]L 

235 M€VT&[p] AXKiptSrj? €V€py€<rias a7roTH[v€]iv 

17 pa* kcli o[v\ no* irayyy StSov ercpaXicla [vt^cqv 
aXX €T dpa <r$[€V€$\s T€ kcli [a]XKrj9 Mfig^Tifc]* 
iiptv O8va[(rfjos:] t\S Viov [ic]v8aX(pc[io 
awry 5* ai6aX[o€VTo]s [a]va peydpoto [peX]a[0pov 

240 [ctfer av]ai£a[(ra x<X]i5oj>[£ cwc^Xi; d[vr\rfty 

[pvrfar]qpa[s 8] a>Tprfy]€ Aa[pa]<rTop[i8]ri$ A[y€]Xaos 

A 
EvpVVOpOf T€ KCLI Ap<f)ipt[8)oOV [[Mj^/KOTTT^Xc/ZOS' T€ 

H 



98 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

IIu<rav8po$ re IIoXvKTopi[8ri]t IToXv/Sos" T€ 8[a(]<f>p(DV 
01 yap fivrjaTTjfxov a[p]erq €<rav *£oj( dpi<n[o]i 

rttpt re 
245 0<r<TOl €T €(G>OV [[T€]J ^V^COH/ €fia\OVTO' 

roi;y 8* rjSrj eSapao-ae [P]hs koli rappee? €ibi 

tois 8 AytXtcos fi€T€€nr€f €7ro9 itavTto'O'i n[i<f>avo , ]fcot>v 

<o <f>iXor tjSt] cr^rjau avi\p 68c %€ipa9 aairrov[$ 

teat 8tj 01 Mevrobp pev s$t\ Ktva €t^y]pa[Ta] evrrw 

250 [ot 8] 0101 Xuttoptcli em irp&rrjvi [0]vp[i]O'i^' 

tod v]vv prj 5* apa Traircy cohere 8ovp[ar]a fiaicpa 
aXX ay]eff a e£ nparrov aKovriaar at K€ noOt [Z]eus 
8a>rj] 08va-a"q[a] f}\[fi]<rOai kcli kv8o9 aperOai 
rcov 8] aX[Xcov ov kt)8o]9 eirrjv bvros ye n€<rrj(rr 

255 [o>$ e<fxi6 01 8 apa navre? aKo\vri<rav toy ttciXevae 

upsvoi ra 8* iravra €f]o><ria 0tjk€v AOrjvi]' 

tow aXXos fiev oraOpoy €v]<rra04os ptyapoio 

fJtpXrjKti aXXo? 8e Ovprjv irvKi\v&$ apapvlav* 

aXXov 8 €1/ toi\cd pcXirj nwc ya]XKofSdp*ia- 

260 \avrap cirti 8rj 8ovpar aXtvavTO p]yr]OTripoi>y 

tois apa pvOoav rjp^€ noXvrXa? 810]? OSvovcvs- 
a> (piXoi tj8t) pzv Ktv eycoy eirroipi] tcai dppt 
jivrjarrjpcov €? opiXov aKoyri]<rai 01 pepdaaiv 
rj/tea? c£wapi£at em 7rpor€poi<r]i tca/cocai 

265 [cos e<pa6 01 8 apa iravres aKovri\vav o£ia 8ovpa 
avra titvvko/iwoi A-qpoTTTo]X€pov pzv 08v<ra€v$ 
Evpva8rji> 8 apa TrjXtpaxos EXa]rov 8e ctv(3cottis 
IIeiaav8pov fi* ap €7T€<f>v€ (3oa>i> €tt]i(3ovk6Xo9 avrjp 
01 fJL€v €W€i0 apa iravTts o8a£ e]Xov avirerov ovSa? 

270 [pvTjoTTjpes 8 avtytopi\vav peyap]oio pv\ov 8* 
toi 8 ap cwrjigav vckvwv 8 e£ cyx*] cXovro 
aim? 8* purjorijpcs aKovrivav o£e]a Sovpa 
i€/i€voi ra 8e noXXa €TO>aia Otjkcv] AOrjvrj 



448. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 99 



Col. vii. 
[ra>]v 8 aXXos pev [ . 
2 75 [P*fik)riK€ur aAAo? & [ 

[aXX]ov 8 €V TOl^CD fJL€\[l7J 

[Afi(pifjLt8}a>v 8 apa Tti[Xepa\ov 

[XiySrjy a^cprjy 8c p[tVOV 

[KTtiai]mro9 8 Evp[aiov 
280 [<opo]y eireypatyfy 

[to]l 8 avr ap<f> Oft/Jo- J<nya] 8a[i(f>pova 

[p]vr]<m]pctH> [cy opt]iXo[v 

[e\vQ out Evpv8[apavr]a /3a[\€ 

[Afi<f>]ip€8oin-a [8c Trj]\€u[axos 
285 [KTT)(ri7r}!rov 8 a[p €ir€]ira fi[oot>v 

/3€{J[\i]k]h 7rpc[? arrj]0o9 en[tvxoptvo$ 

00 II[o\v]0cp(ru[8T) iro\)t^K€pTop€ 

ehccov a<f>pa8i[r)$ 

pvOov €ir[iTp€yfrat 

290 TOVTO TOl [ 



rjpine 8e [ 

8rj rot A[0rjuairj 

[vtyoOev c£ o[po<f>Tj? 

[o]i 8 €<f>€{Jo[m-o 

300 [r]as pev 7 a[ioXo9 
c 
onpqi tv iapiV7) b[r€ 

01 8* t»s t aiyvmc{i 

*£ optmv c\0ovt[€S 

Tai piv t tv irt8m [ 

% 

305 01 84 T€ ToJ[p]J oXCKOV<j{lV 

ycLvcrat ou8* (pvyrj [ 
coy apa to[i] pvr]OTTip{a$ 
rviTTOv [^itrrpo^a^yiv 
KpdrcDV Tvrrrop[eva>v 
310 Atia>8r)s 8 08ua[rjos 
K[a]i piv Xt[<r]a[op]ev[o9 



aimO«o [ 






y[o)uvo(y)p[ai 


17 pa /Soap [ 






o[v] ydp ir[a> 


ovra Aap[aaropi8r]y 






€l[7r]€l[v 


T[i7]Xe/iax[off 






315 v[av€<rKov 


Sovpt p*[<roi> 






aXX[a 

TO) [ 


9 


columns lost. 


Book xxiii. Col. xvii. 




Col. xviii. 


185 avro]s eneXdcw 




230 


c 
TT€l0l9 8rj pcv [ 


x<»p]w 






w <f>aro' t& 1 5* c[ti 


] ov8c pdX* rjfioo[v 






tcXai* 8* €\<ov a[Xo^ov 


a"q]fia rtTVKTai 






&y 9 *&r av a<nr[a<rios 


ov]8e Tit aXXo? 






tof T€ IIo<T€i8[aoi>v 



H 2 



ioo THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

190 €pK€o]$ wtos 235 paurrj €n€iy[oii€PTjy 

] 1/t/rc K€ian/ iravpot 8 e£*<f){vyov 
] otbpa T€\e<r[<ra rr\ r 

el **a ^XVHMl L 

^ V a[(r]7ra(TL0L & ^[ireflav 

apap)via\? r . , 

r rj L [a>J? apa Trf aafiraoro? 

240 [Jjctpqr 8 oti ir[a> 

icat fa; k oSv\po/i€voi(n 

[u] /ITJ dp d\[\ €VOT]<T€ 

xxii* 35- v of kvp€s has been corrected, the scribe having begun to write a round letter. 
37-8. These two lines are transposed in a number of MSS. 
37. re: so U (r«) Eust. ; 3e' Lud. with other MSS. 

44. The papyrus agrees with the majority of MSS. (so Lud.) in omitting the line 
iraim)V€v b* e*a<rro* £7177 <f>vyot alirvv SktBpov found in DLW. 

87. a]fi<f>[oTipoi\<riP : dp(f>oTtpoicn MSS., Lud. 

88. vs of a^Xur has been corrected by the original scribe from ev, i.e. he began 
to write a^Xew. 

114. av of avrus is over an erasure of «, by the first hand. 
119. The correction is probably by the second hand. 

128. fvr]ot e[i<roi : SO XU, " ivrhs " tj " hbov itatu" Eust. ; c$ apapwtu Other MSS., Lud. 

129. 1. oJWrv* ; cf. 141, 281. The e of &e]iov seems to have been deleted. 

130. tartar : so Lud. with H, and GP (e\); cf. Aristarchus a. 701. Other MSS. 
vary between ioramr, lor&r, i<rra6r\ and cVredr . The p (or <f>) written in place of r by 
the original scribe was a mere blunder. 

ayxov ufe : ayx°v is not found here in any MS. ; 8y\ °^i f * s * ne ordinary reading. 

141. 1. obvatvs: cf. 129, 281. 

186. dc AeXvpro: The manner in which the correction has been made without the 
addition of any elision-mark indicates that the corrector read fe AeXwro (so FZ) rather than 
y eXeXviro (other MSS., Lud.); cf. xxiii. 192. 

192. The omission of the line vl6s Aaeproo, nokvrXas Kos 'odwrtnfc is in agreement with 
the majority of the MSS. ; so Lud. 

233. iara]ao: so FDULWP; larao Lud. with H, cf. Did. K. 291. 

245. The corrector has only actually crossed through the e of rt 9 but no doubt the 
r was meant to be included, e of epaxovro has been corrected. 

250. 0101 apparently has the rough breathing, as in FH ; 1. oToc 

251. ^ after w is peculiar to the papyrus. 

252. a is a mistake for oL 
254* frtatfirt: iF*<rg<rur Lud. 

255. eaeXewe: SO X (-<re*) ; (VeXcvev other MSS., Lud. 

257-9. Lud. prints these lines in small type comparing Eust. nvts »/3cXc(rav »t 
ravTokoyovvrat. 

264. KOKouril Kcutounp MSS., Lud. 

274. [to)]v a : am. b MSS., Lud. ; cf. I. 251. 

275. [/Sc^Xjipceut: so U and Bekker : 0e/3Xi}«w Lud. with other. MSS. 

278. aYprjv: SO U (first hand) and X ; cf. Eust 6tj><vkw re teal dpptvueus Xeyerai ptyfa 
Karl rh dyriypa^a. fcpov Lud with Other MSS., Ariston. P. 599. 



449. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS ioi 

281. In connexion with the deleted first <r in odw[[(r]][<nya it may be noted that 
'odwo^a is found in F, while the second hand has added a second <r above the line 
in H; cf. 1. 129. 

287. woX]v[«teprofi€ : so M ; ffnkoKtprofu other MSS., Lud. 

302. The marginal y as usual marks the 300th line; cf. 228, &c. Its position 
opposite 1. 302 here is accounted for by the omission of 11. 43 and 191. 

307. The second 17 of pwycm^a* has been corrected. 

xxiii. 192. ofypa Tt\to[<Ta: so Bekker (second ed. 1858); typ rrcXco-o-a Lud. with most 
MSS. Cf. xxii. 186. 

2 37- 7 in Mftoftcpoi has been corrected from «. 



449. Euripides, Andromache. 

Largest fragment 9 x 7 cm. 

These fragments of a single column from the beginning of Euripides' 
Andromache provide what appears to be an early example of the use of the 
book form (cf. 459). The writing — a medium-sized not very regular uncial, 
probably of the first half of the third century — is on the verso of the papyrus, 
while on the recto in the centre of the page are the letters prj[ or pi . [ with a short 
horizontal stroke above them and a lacuna sufficient for another line below. 
These letters may represent a number or perhaps a title, e.g. prj[<ris ' Avbpoii&x*!** 
Supposing this MS. to have been a codex the size of a page would have been 
about 28x14 cm. The text seems to have been a fairly good one. An 
otherwise unrecorded variant occurs in 1. 2J. 



5 [^X^tos" ci> ye root npiv Ay8po/tax]rj xpovw 

6 y[vv 8 €i T£y a\\rj Svorv^oraTij y]vvrf 
8 lyrty iroo\iv ptv Etcrop €£ -4x*^ 6a> ]* 

Oavovr €o[€i8oi> ircuSa 8 ov tikt]odi 7ro<rci 
10 pt<f>€vra 7r[vpya>v Aotvclvclkt an op\0mv 

€7TCi TO TpOl[ctf €l\ov] EXXtfVtS TTt8oV 
avrrj 6[c SovXr] wv €]\€v6*pa[T]aTCI>V 
oikcov v[ofJLi<r6ci(r] EWab* €L(ra(f>€iKopr]y 
twi wi<rico[TT]i N€oirT]o\€fia>i Sbpos yepar 
15 Sodeura' \c[ia9 Tpa>t]Krjs c£aip*rov 

$0€ia9 8* [TTjcSe kcli] woXcwf $ap<ra\ias 
<riyX°l n \. a yaLC0 ] • P iV V Oa\a<r<ria 



102 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Hr)\ti £[vv(oiKti xo*pi? ajvOpamcov ©€7^i]y 

<f>€vy[ov<r ofiiXov BccraaXo]? 8c i{«]y X€a>[y 
ao 0[€Ti]8[€iov avSai deaf] \a.p[iv vvyL^€Vii]ai[<oy 

c[vO oikov 6<rx€ T]ov8e 7i[ai? A^l\X]€[<09 

ITfqXca 8 ava<r<r€\iv yiyy cat $a[p<ra\ia9 

{[cdvtos yepovros] cKryirrpov [ov OcXodv Xafteiv 

[jcaya> 80/1019 roi&\8 apcreva €vt[ikt<o Kopov 
25 [ir\a6*i(r A^tXXeois] iraiSi StoTrorfyt 8 e/xau 

[icai irpiv pcv tv Kaic]oiai K€ifi€v[rjv o/xa>9 

[€X7T«9 ft act irpoo-rjyc t]€\0€Vt[o9 tckvov 

28 [aXKTJV TIV €Vp€LV Ka7Tl]KOVp[r](TlV KCLKCOV 

30 [tov/xov napcoaa? 8€Ottot7)]$ 8[ovXov X*)(09 

[kclkoi? irpos avTrjs o-x€tX]iois eX[avvopai 

[Xeyct yap coy viv <f>apfJLa]K0i? K€Kp[vpp€vois 

[nOrjii awaiSa /cat iroaei] /teiaovp^vrjv 

[avrrj 8* vaiciv oikov avr] avrrjs 0[eXco 
35 [tov8 eicfiaXovaa X€Kr]pa rd rfeivijs (3iai 

[aya> to irpcorov ov% *kov\t ^Se^afirjv 

39 [aXX ov a<f>€ ir€i$a> fiovXerai 8* p]c Ki[av€iv 

40 [irarrjp T€ Ovyarpi MtvtXtw cr]vv8pa[i raS* 
[kcli vvv kqlt oucovs cor airo ^7r]apri/9 poXco[v 
[err avro tovto Seifxarovpt^r] 5* cyar 

[Soficoy napoiKov OctiSos ciy a]vaKTOpov 

[daaaco to8 eXOova- rjv fi€ KcoX^arji daveiv 

45 [UifXet/y T€ yap viv €Kyovoi re] il^Xecor 

[ae/fot/cnj' ep/irjvevpa Nrj]pr]i8os yaficov 

[09 8 cart 7rat? /zoi /zopo? i^rj tKirejnrco Xa$[p]ai 

[aXXovs €S oucovs \ut\ 6cw]rji $o$ovpivr\ 

On the recto 

PR 

6. The papyrus omits 1. 7 as found in the MSS. cpov vtyvw tj y^arrai trorc, which 
the scholiast states was an insertion of the actors. The verse was rejected by Valckenaer 
and is bracketed by W(ecklein). 



451. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 103 

IO. pvficvra : SO AEP; pt$6ivra LB, W. 

1 7. yaw ire3f is the ordinary reading. The papyrus variant was considerably longer. 

24. apam : the elision is not elsewhere neglected in the papyrus. 

27. TJtx&irrfoff : a new variant ; vuBivros MSS. 

35. The accent and the fact that a wider space than usual is left between rd and * 
show that the scribe did not understand raKtimfs to be a crasis, which is of course necessary 
for the scansion. 

47. The scribe regarded vntKnipirv as two words. 



450. Euripides, Medea. 

4iX5-3««. 

A fragment from the top of a column, containing parts of lines 710-5 of 
Euripides' Medea, written on the verso of the papyrus. On the recto are two or 
three mutilated lines of cursive, of the second or third century. The literary 
text on the verso, which is in a somewhat rapid, sloping uncial hand, may be 
assigned to the third century, 

710 [yova]TCw T€ t<w <ra>v iK€o[ia T€ ytyvo/iai 

[oucTJeipov oiKreipov //€ [ttjv SvaSatfiova 

[kcu fi\rj fi cpxifiov €KTT€<rov[aav €i<ri8rjs 

[Sc^ai] Se xupttfj^ Kai 8opo[is etfxoriov 

[ourcojy e/wy <roi npos Occw [T€\e<r(popos 
7*5 [ycvotjpo na[i]S(oy Kai ai/r[oy oXfiio? Oavois 



713. dopo[<r : the papyrus thus agrees with the MSS. reading; flo/w»v Prinz-Wecklein. 
714-5. These two lines were excised by L. Dindorf and are bracketed by Prinz- 
Wecklein. 

715. Kai avr[ot: the reading is fairly secure; 1. navrfa. 



451. Thucydides II. 

7 X 3-4 cm. 

A small fragment from the top of a column containing parts of 10 lines from 
the end of Chap. 73 and the beginning of Chap. 74 of Thucydides, Book ii. The 
text, which is written in a third century uncial hand of rather small size, shows 



104 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

a slight divergence from the usual order in 1. 9. How exactly the lines were 
divided is not certain ; the distribution proposed below is fairly satisfactory, 
though the lacuna at the beginning of 1. 2 is somewhat overcrowded. 

o7Ci77nroi/<r]i T[e] vfi€t[u npos rcov op 
kcdv ov9 ot 7r]ar€/>€? <op[oaav firjStv veco 
T€pt{€tv] 7T€pl tt\v i\ypfiayiav 
Toiavra] t&v 7rp€<rp€[<op anayyuXav 
5 to>v 01 II]\aTaiTjs €pc[v\€vaavTo AOrj 
vaiovs fi\rj 7rpo8iSop[ai aXX aveytaOai 
Kai yrjv] T€/JLvoficvT}[v €i Sei opwvras Kai 
aXXo ira]o-\ovra9 oti a[v £vpf}ait] e£ 
tXOeiv T€ €]n firjSeva [dXXa ano rov 
10 T€i\ov$ a7TOKpi]va<r6a[i 



1. v(xti[»: vy.lv H(ude). 

5. njAarfiijff : so H. with B ; UkarauU CFMG. 

9. c]rc prjbtva : prjbtpa In MSS., H. 



452. Thucydides IV. 

7 X 3-8 cm. 

This is another scrap from Thucydides (iv. 87) written in medium-sized square 
uncials which we should assign to the end of the second or to the third century. 
The identification of the fragment — due like that of the preceding and following 
to Blass — was rendered the more difficult by the fact that alfivnarov in 1. u, 
which is the only uncommon word in the text, is a new variant found in no MS. 
Another otherwise unrecorded reading occurs in 1. 3. 

• . • . 

€fjL€$a] iravaa[i fc fiaXXov c ir€\pu8oip[€V irpos ravra 

T*po]v$ airei^SovTt? roi/y (3o]vX€v<r0ai €V Kai ayoavi 

7t\]uotov? a[v aSiKOifiev a]ao-0ai tois re [EXXqaiv ap 

€t] ^vfnr[aaiy avTovopi 10 £ai irpwrov €X[tvOcpias 



454 FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 105 

6 av\ eiri<f>tfj>ovT€$ upas k]cu cupvT)<n[ov 8o£av 

To)us €ua^riou/i€Vov9 Ka]ra0[€]<r0ai # *o[i 



3. irXWrovf : nktlopas M[G], ttXciW H(ude) with other MSS. 

8. /9ojvXcvf<r&u • , • aya>vur]a(T6ai : /SovXcvftrdf . . . dytopla-aaSf MSS, H. The infinitives 
in the papyrus may be due to a confusion of the construction or be merely a case of the 
common interchange of at and c 

10. It is not certain that fu began the line, since the papyrus is broken away imme- 
diately before the £ ; but the division of the lines proposed in the text works well on that 
hypothesis. 

11. mfimj<rr[o¥ : didiop MSS., H. 



453. Thucydides VI. 

8-7 x 3 cm. 

A fragment from Thucydides, vi. 32, written in an upright uncial hand of 
medium size which may date from the early part of the second century or even 
from the end of the first. The text coincides so far as it goes with that of Hude 
except for the use of a- in place of £ in 1. 9. 

rcy 8e KCU Te\]€[a><rav pa tc&v] avfifia^o^p ovvc 

T€$ ras <nrov]8a[$ avrj 10 Xcycro] riirayovro [a<f>i 
yovro kcl]i €ir[i] K€p[a>9 ro K€<r0ai] €? 8e ra? 2vf>[aicou 

irpwTOv] €Kir\€ua[currcs aay ijyJycAAerfo [i€v iro\ 

5 a/iiXXa]u TjSrj li*\xp l ^*y* XayoO^y ra 7T€[/h rov evi 

VTJ9 €ir0l]0VVT0 KCt[l 01 [irXoU OV /l€UTOl €WtOT€V€To] 

fitv €9 rrj\v KepKvpa[v evOa 15 eiri iroXvv \povo]v [ 

ircp Kai] ro dXXo orp[ar€v ...... 

454. Plato, -Gorgias. 
27-5 X 14-5 cm. 

The recto of this papyrus contains part of a money account in Latin, written 
in a good-sized cursive hand of the second century. On the verso are parts 
of three columns containing pp. 507-8 of Plato's Gorgias> written in a medium- 



io6 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



sized uncial hand of the middle or later part of the second century. Stops are 
occasionally found, a high point in 11. 62 and 87, and a point opposite the middle 
of the preceding letter in 11. 50 and 11 8, though whether these were really 
intended to represent a different pause is doubtful. There are a few corrections, 
sometimes in a different hand. Being the first papyrus of part of the Gorgias to 
be discovered, the fragment is of considerable interest, though the text is not very 
good. There are numerous minor variations from the later MSS., but most of these 
are clearly wrong ; cf. notes on 11. 9, 18, 34, 40, 79, 105, and 116. It is noticeable, 
however, that in one passage (1. 51) the papyrus agrees with the text of 
Iamblichus and Stobaeus against the readings of the MSS., and that in another 
(11. 1 13-5) it removes a slight difficulty where an error in the text had already 
been suspected. It is also a matter of some importance for the textual criticism 
of Plato that in two places (11. 48 and 105) the papyrus supports the Vindobo- 
nensis against the other MSS. The conjectures of various scholars in the 
part covered by the fragment gain no support from it, and even in a passage 
where aOXioi clearly seems to have dropped out of the text before or after oi 
aOXioi, the papyrus agrees with the later MSS. in omitting it ; cf. 1. 76, note. 
We give a collation with the text of Bekker (1826) ; but for the readings of 
the MSS. and of Iamblichus and Stobaeus we are indebted to Prof. J. Burnet, 
who has very kindly placed his collations of this passage at our disposal. 
B = the Clarkianus, T = cod. Ven. Bibl. Marc. App. class. 4. 1, F = Vind. 
suppl. gr. 39. 



Col. i. 



ko]l 
[irrroficvovra Kaprcpuv] 
[onov 8u cdotc] iroX[Xrj avay] 
[ktj o> KoWik\€]i9 rov <r<» 
5 [<f>pova axnrep] SirjXOofitv 
[Sucaiov ovra] Kcu avSpti 
[ov Kai octov dtyaOov av 
[Spa etvai rcAcjO)? rov fc 

[ayaOov €V re K]ai KaAjop]] 
10 [irparruv a av] npaTTtj Toy 



[S «/ irpaTT0VT]a fiaica 
[ptov T€ Kai €v8\aipova 
[aval rov ie] irovr\pov 
[icai koko>$ irp]aTTOvra 
15 [aOXioy ovtos] 8 av tit) 

[0 wavTiw eXj®" r i a> ] 
[aa><j>povt. aKolXaaTO? ov 
[av tnrjvtis cya>] fisv ravra 
[ovt<o TiOep]at Kai (prj 
ao [fit ravr dXrj]6rj c[iv[ai 
1 line lost. 



454. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL. AUTHORS 107 



Col. ii. 



3 lines lost. 

25 a[<rKrjT€OU aKoXaviav 8c] 0[et/] 
icr[cov cos c%ct no6\o]v €Ka<r 
ro[? rj/xav icai irapa<r]K€vaoT€ 
ov [fiaXiora ficv iirj\ Sctadai 
rov icfoAafecrdai cav] 8c 8c 

30 rjOrj rj [avros tj aXXos] ns rcov 
oikcicb[v rj i8icot]t)$ tj no 
Xit cm6{cTcov 8ik]t)v KCLl 
KoXaorcov [ci fieXX]ci cvSai 
pa>v ovros ^ivai c]fioiyc 

35 Sokcl <TK07r[o$ civ]ai irpos 
ov fiXcirovr[a 8ci] (r\v Kai 
navra cis rotfro ra av]rov avv 
rcivovra kcl[i ra rrj9 iroXc&s 
ottoos 8iKato[ovvT) irapcarai 

40 Kai 8iKOioa[vvrj tod /icXXov 
n fiaxapKo [cacaOai o]vra> 
irparrciv [ovk ciri6\v[iias 
cnvra a[KoXaorovs] civai 
Kai raxrra[s ciri\cipo]vvra 

45 irXrjpovv [avrjwro]v Ka 

m 

kov Xrjar[ov fiiov {fovra 
ovr[c yap av] aA[A]ct) ay 6 pea 



ttco [npo]a<f>iX[rjs c]irj roi 
cwr[oy] ovrc %©•] koivco 

50 vci[v yap a8vvar]os m ora> 
yap p[rj evi Koiv]u>via <f>i 
Xia ovk av cit)[*] <paai 8c 01 
aocpot co KaXXiicXcts Kai ov 
pavov Kai yrjv Kai Ocovs Kai 

55 avOpanrovs rrjv koivmvi 
av avvcyciv Kai tfuXiav 

Kai KOCfllOTTJTa Kai (TO) 
(ppOOVVTJV KOI SlKCtlOTT] 

ra Kai to oXov touto 81a 
60 ravra Koa/iov KaXovaiv 
a> craipc ovk aK[o]o-/iiav 
ov8 aKoXaaiav av 8c fioi 
8qkci$ ov irpoac\civ rov 
vow rovrois Kai ravra 
65 cr[o]0[oy a*]v['] dXXa XcXrj 
6c [ac] ori rj tcroriyy 17 y€ 
cs[/icrpi]Ktj Kai cv Ocois 

* 

Kai c[y a]p0pcon[ois /icya 

8vv[arai ov 8c nXcovc£i 
70 a[v 

• [ 



Col. iii. 



2 lines lost. 
ov 8[iKatoavvrj9 Kai aaxppo 
75 <n/^[y tcrrjact cvSai/iovcs 
01 cv8ai[fiovcs KaKias 8c 01 
adXioi 17 [ci o]vro$ [oAijtfijs co- 



st, lines lost. 
p[c6a rt nor carriv a av c/ioi 
100 ov€[i]8i{[€is apa jcaAco? Xc 

ycrai 17 ov [cos apa cya> ov% ot 
09 r apt [fJorjOrjo'ai ovrc c . 



io8 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



tiv <TKen\re\ov ri r[a ovpfiai 
vovtol i\a\ irpoo-6e[v o> KaX 

80 XiKXeis [ovpfiaivei iravra 
€<p [o]i$ ov [pe rjpov ei <nrov 
8a(a>v [Xeyoipi Xeyovra 
on Kaj[rjyoprjT€oy eit] Kai 
avrov k[cm vieos Kai erai 

85 pov eav [n aSiKtj Kai ttj prj 

TOpLKTJ [€7Tl TOVTO XPV^ 76 

a 

ov Kai II[a>Xoi> aioyyvr) <o 
ov avy\cc[peiv aXrjOrj apa 
rjv to ei[vai to aSiKeiv TOV 
90 a8iK€({<r0ai o<ra> irep aiayi 

OV T0O-0[VTCI> KCLKIOV Kai 

tov peX[Xovra opOw prj 
TopiKov [eaeo-Oai Sucaiov 
apa 8ei e\ivai Kai emorrjpo 
95 va tmv [SiKaicov av Top 
yia[v] €017 [IIcoXos 81 aivyy 



fiavr<o o[vt€ raw (f>iXo>v 
ovSevi o[v8e t<dv oik€ig>v 

105 ov8e accural €K raw peyiv 
t<ov Ki[v8vva>v eipi 8 c 
m ro) pc[vXopeva> caoircp 
01 aT€ip[oi tov edeXovros 
av re tvh[t€iv ftovXrjTai 

no to veaviKov 8rj [tovto 

tov aov Xoyov em [Kopprjs 
eav re xprjpaTa a[paipeia 
dai eav r €Kf3aX(t[v en ttjs 
7roXea>y eav Te to \evyarov 

115 anotcretvai Kai o[vtg> 81 
aK€ia6ai tovtcc[v 8rj cua 
\iorov cotiv a>y [0 <ros Xo 
yoy. 8e 8rj epos [os tis 
TroXXaKLS pev tj[8rj eiprj 

120 rai ovSev 8e Kco[Xv€t Kai 
en Xey[eaOai ov] (f[ijpi a> 



9. tcakov, the reading of the first hand, is a mere error. 
18. imp: ftiw ofo MSS., Bek. 

20. ravr aXrj^rj f[i]i(ai : ravra d\rj$rj BF Stob. ; aki]$fj ravra T ; ravr aXrjBrj Bek. 
27* fra/xwJcevaoTCov : SO BTF Iambi., Bek. ; fra/XHnccvaorco* lavrov Stob. 
28. fu;] &€i<r6ai: lufdip bu*0ai MSS., Bek. But 15 letters would be too much for the 
lacuna, which should contain 12 or 13. 

30. if [avros : so BTF Stob., Bek. ; avros Iambi. 

34. ovtos tltvai fjuoiyc : that o&ros fpotyc MSS., Bek. 

35. o okott[o£ : so BTF Iambi., Bek. ; ammoi Stob. 

37. ra av]rov : so BTF Stob. ; tovtov Iambi. ; «m tA avrov Laur. 85, 6 and Bek. 
40. ducaioo[vvfi : this is repeated from 1. 39 by an error for (raxfrpoavm), the reading 
of the MSS. 

ficXXoir]ri frnxapuo : paicapiy pcXXom MSS., Bek. 

44. rovrofff : so TF Stob., Bek. ; ravra B Iambi. It is unfortunately impossible to say 
which was the reading of the papyrus. 

46. The two dots indicating the 1 of \jjiotov are so high above the line that it is 
probable that the 1 was a subsequent insertion. 

47. aX[A)a> : so BTF Iambi., Bek. ; 5XA»* Stob. 

48. irpo]<r$cX[i7ff «]«; : so F Iambi., Stob.; uyxxnJxA^ av cu; BT, Bek. 
51. yap : so Iambi., Stob. ; ftt BT, Bek. ; om. F. 



455. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 109 

52. a« : y Bek. 

63. ov : ovd< Bek. 

66. 11 laoTtjs: so BTF Iambi., Bek. ; farfnp Stob. 

68. The MSS. have y£y* dwarai. Above the end of the line is a horizontal stroke 
which we have considered to be the cross-bar of r (i. e. t[i), inserted probably by the 
J second hand. 

j 76* oil a&kux: so MSS. ; SffKuH. ol afttoi Bek., adopting the conjecture of Heindorf. 

1 77. cajriv: cVm Bek. 

I 79. wpwrBf[v a) KaX]XucX«r: np6<r6cv eVciyo & KaXX/xXctr MSS., Bek. There is room 

I for one or two more letters in the lacuna, but not for ckwhu 

1 105. ovde <ru[aai : SO F ; ovd* cirowai BT, Bek. 

113. t €*jSaXf *[* : t€ (KpaXXtiv MSS., Bek. diroKTttvai (1. 115) has been altered by 
Badham to anoKTtwvvai (ccrroKTtivvvai Schanz) in order to balance hfiaWup. But *Kfktktt* in 
the papyrus supports the aorist infinitive there. 

Il6. rovru\y\ iravrop MSS., Bek. 



455. Plato, Republic III. 

9 x 6-6 cm. Plate VI. 

A fragment of the third book of Plato's Republic, p. 406, written in a not 
very regular uncial hand of medium size. On the verso are parts of nine lines 
of a document in late third or fourth century cursive ; the writing on the recto, 
which is somewhat late in style, may accordingly be assigned to the middle 
or latter part of the third century. Changes of speaker are marked by the usual 
double dots. There are practically no variants from the text of Bekker. 

• • • • • 

] €i ye evvoei[$ 10 [Srj9 y]evo/i€i/o$ pu£as 

[eiffov] on rrjt naiSay[a> [yvp]yaartKrju i'aTpiicq 

[yiKfji t)ow voarjfiar[<ov [aTpreicvaia* 9 irpomov 

[rcamj^ rr\ wv laTpufyi [/*]** *«* paXiara €<lvto[v 

5 [npo] rov A<rK\rjma8[cu [{\irtira a\\ov$ var€po[u 

[ovk c]xp&vro a>s (f>a[<ri 15 [iro]AAot/y : irrji 8rj €<p[rj : 

[irpt]p HpoStKoy yei{<E [pa^cpov qv S eyo> rov 

[aOai] HpoSiicos St 7ra[i [Oa]varov a[i/]rat iroirfpas 

[Sorpyfirjs (ov Kai vocco [irapa]Kc[\ov6a>v 

• • • • • 

1. €i yt : «y Bek., but the reading here is uncertain. 



no THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

456. Plato, Republic IV. 

5.8 x 7 cm. 

A small fragment from Plato's Republic^ IV p. 42a D, written in a medium- 
sized uncial hand probably towards the end of the second or in the early part 
of the third century. A change of speaker is indicated, as commonly, by double 
dots. There are no variants from Bekker's text. 



[rat €K tcov €i]kotcw 8iir[\a 
[<riots] T€ teat Tpnr\a<rtoi[? 
[avT<ov /i]a\ovyrai : avv[ 
[\<oprj<ro/i]ai aoi €<f>rj 8o[ 
5 [*€<? yap p]ot opOcos Xeyeiv [ : 
[ti 8 av] irptafltiav irc/i 
[yfra]vT*s ciy rr\v erepav 
[no]\iv TaXrjOrj ctTrco 
[<riv] on rjfieis ptv ov 
io [8c]v xpvauo oi{5 apyv 



457. Aeschines, In Ctesiphontem. 
134 x 73 cm. 

A column from a roll containing the speech of Aeschines against Ctesiphon, 
written in a round uncial hand of medium size probably in the second century. 
The part preserved corresponds with § 167, and shows an interesting text with 
several readings not found in any of the existing manuscripts ; while a claim for 
the consideration of these is made by the fact that the papyrus agrees with the 
best group of MSS. in a crucial passage (11. 13-5). Our collations of this and 
the other oratorical fragments are with the Teubner editions of Blass. 

axrrrep ras /3e\ov[a$ 81 [van <r]v yap av Kcofirjv 

upovaiv ravra 8c t[i § 167 15 airoorriMias av y[ap] av 

[eanv a>] KivaSo? prjp[a npo<rt\[6]oi? prj oi[t w]pos 



458. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS in 

ra rj 6[a]ufiaTa [kcu ira [iro^tv aXXa irpos [ouci 

5 \iv ore kvk\q> nepiSti, [av o)itov kw8vv{o$ nape 

vw acairrov em rov [<r]riv aXX u /lev [irov 

prjfjLaTos eXeye? a>s ay 20 [xp]Vf laTa ava\[t)o[K€ 
TtirpaTTW A\t£av [ Tal ] 7rpo<rica0[i(]T)o[€i npa 

8pa> op,oXoy[<o] ra A[cc]kco [£i]i/ S[e] avSpos ov ir\pa 

10 vuca ov<n"q[a]a<r()[a]i [£ € ] L * * av & auropa^ov 

poXoya> BeTToXorf? icai [ti otypflr] ayay irffroa 

Ileppaifiov? a(f>i[(rravai 25 [noi]rj<T€L teat a€avr[ov € 
[av 8e]rraXot/9 a<f[iara [m t]o ytfavriptvov 



1. di]tipovcrir: btttpovot B(lass). 

2. Considerations of space make r[< (B. with ekl Dionys. Dem. c. 57) much more 
probable than t{«i*>5 or t[i|w. 

10. crvoTi7[o-]ao^a]t : trvoTrj<rcu MSS., B. 

13-5. The papyrus here agrees with ekl (followed by B.). Other MSS. omit <rv 
ykp . , . airooT^crcuiff or read av Qtrrakovg oiroorijcrf tar. 

1 8. vap^a]rtv : irp6atartv MSS., B. 

21. npoaKa&[i(}no[fi : there is not room for *<t6 in the lacuna after npovKaO, and not 
more than four or five letters are wanted at thfi end. of the line. It is therefore probable 
that the papyrus read irpoo-iradtfiprct (Lobeck, Bekker, Franke, B.), frpocodtftaw (Zonar. 
1 1 69) or wpoKa0€(f)<r*i (V); irpouKa6L{us (or -ftp) ftr ehkl, irpo<rica6fOTT)<rj] df, irp<xr*adf<rdjprj/ 
other MSS. Above the line to the right of the 6 is an oblique dash like an accent. 

23. 8t : y B. 

24. ayaw 7rp(o<Tjro<]?j<m : irpotnroti)0'ii MSS., B., omitting rryav. 
25- o-favr[or : (rairrcJv MSS., B. 



458. Aeschines, De Falsa Legations 
Fr. (a) 7.3 X4-6 cm. 

Three fragments written in a good-sized uncial hand of a common third 
century type (cf. 447), comprising parts of §§ 21, 26-7, and 29-30 of Aeschines' 
oration De Falsa Legatione. The text contained several errors, which have been 
corrected in a small uncial hand, probably that of the original scribe. 

(«) . w 

§ 21 [o]ti XPV taycifp »?/*«? ..... 

tcov avinrp[€<rf}€a>v too[v Sokovvtcdv av 



J 12 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Kai Ki/juovc[s curov 

o [o 

T09 on <fx>/3€i7[ai prj 81 
5 KaLo\oyovfi€v[o$ ircpi 
ycvoiro t)/mc[v o $i 
Xunros irriya[$ 8c 8tj 
[\]oya>v a<f>0ovo[v9 c 
\XCi]v cnrjy y[cXXcTO 

IO [TTCpl] TOW 8lK<x{lG>V TOW 
[vTTCp] A/X(fj[i]7ro\[€C09 



tois eip[ai (ptXcoy II av § 27 

aavic[v 8 art rr\v ap 
Xtjv afyrcov kcltiov 

<pvya8[<K fitv ovros 
5 TOS TO) [KCUpa> 8 1<T 



{c) 

• • • » 

fiayiav €ir]o*j^<raro 
*at iraAi]p a>y n[cp8ucica? 
cis rrj\v apxvi 1 ' Kara 
era? t/]?r€/> i4/£[^i7roXe 
5 a>y €7ro]Xef«i7[<r€ ny iro 

Act gat r]i; Vp[cTepa rj § 30 

a* 
8lKTJfl€]pr]U [ofJLCOS <pl 



(a) 1-2. ^/iar r£y crvpnpca&ov is the reading of the MSS. (except one which omits r&» 
orv/nrp.), but is omitted by B(lass), following Taylor. 

4. <fx>&oWo is the reading of the MSS. and B. 

7. The MSS. are divided between Ac, &} (so B.) and M &}. What the papyrus read 
is uncertain ; for in the corresponding lacuna at the end of 11. 4, 5, and 9 six letters are to 
be supplied, but in that at the end of 1. 6 only four. 

8-9. a<f>6on{vs tx €i ] p : om - 'X"* B« with one MS. ; the other MSS. have ?£«* a<f>06vovf 
or a*l>66vovs ex*"*, except one which places cx«v after cmnrAXrro. 

(3) 1-2. avroiff : avTTjs B. with most MSS. 

5. <j>vyat{os fuv ovros supplied above the line had obviously been omitted through 
homoioteleuton. 

(c) 6-7. rfjv vpcrtpap ifiuniiL€WP is the reading of all the MSS. and B. 



459. Demosthenes, Contra Aristocratem. 

20.5x14-3 rm. 

A leaf from a papyrus book containing pp. 657-9, §§ 1 10-19 °f Demo- 
sthenes' speech against Aristocrates. The hand is a small sloping uncial which 
we should attribute to the third century ; this is, therefore, an unusually early 



459. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 113 

example of a classic in codex form. Several alterations have been made in the 
fext, some of which may be by the original scribe, while others seem to be 
by a second hand ; to the latter probably are also to be attributed the occasional 
marks of punctuation, breathings, and elision signs. Neglect of the principle of 
elision is, however, very common in this MS., the divergences of which in this 
respect from the text of Blass are omitted from the collation given below. 

Verso. 
[7rAe*a>] ku[l <f>]iXo$ eivai Oavpafciv <prj<rc[v<riv cya> 8 ovk a 

a 

[iropw] p&v [u]w€iv iroXXa pot Soku paXXou ay ti[? i8a>v 
[air]*0T€ij> [€i]kotw tj tovtois morev&v etctwop *a[v fie 

v 

[ya] ytyv€[<r]6ar ov prjv aXX 9 6 pa[Xi]ora irpoytipov €\[a> tovto 
5 [*/>]«• i[ot€ 8]r)irov $i\[i]mrov a> [av8]p*s AOrjvatoi rot^rovi 
[tov M]aKe8ova % a> n[oX)u 8t)h{ov p]a,XXov cXvaiTtXci r[as c£ a 
[irao-qs] MatceSovia? irpoa-oo\ovs] a&a>? \X]ap(iavuv [tj pe 

[to. Kiv$\vva>v ras en Ap,<f{nro]X€W kcli ypriaOcu (f[iXois 

V|lflV 

[atp€TG>}r€p{o]v rjv avr<o i{oi9 naT)pucoi9 17 0erra\oi[9 01 tov 
10 naj[€p avTo]v 7t[ot]c €£[€j8aXoi>] avev fle tovtov kclk^lvo €<t 
tiv t8ci[v vfi€is /i€v a) av8p]e? Adrjvaiot ovScva [irpov8a> 
Karc 7r[<o7TOT€ tcdv <f>tXa>v 0€]TTa\oi &€ ov8[eva namoO 
[ovriv ov aXX o/iooy ovtms €\ovt<ov to]i^t<ov /wcpa] 
[XapftavHv kcli tovs amarovs <f>t\ovs] k<x[i] to ki[v 
15 St^vtveiv avn tov per ao-tpaXeta? (rjv 6]paT€ wporj[prj 

\pc]y[ov avTov ti 8rj ttotc] to [o]i[tiov ov yap 8]q Xoyov y[€ to 
[ir]pay[p ovraxri irpo])(c[ipo]v ex** o\tl a> av8p& AOrjvaiot 
Svoiv a[ya6oLv o]vroiv iraciv av[0pomot$ tov ptv rjyov 
[pevov] ko[i pcyialpov navTcw tov €[vrv\€iv to]v 8 [eXjar 
20 [tovo]$ p[ev tovtov t<o]v & [a]XXfl»> p€yt[vT0V tov *]aXa>? fiovXtaa 
[cBai] oi^j( apa rj #cri;]<riy irapayiyv^rat tois] avdpamow ov 
8 €[x*i tcov 61/ irpa]TTovTa>v ov8'[€i$ o]pov ov8t TcXeirrrjv 
Tt)[$ to]v ij[X]e[o]y[€]KTeiy emOvpias 81 oirep ttoXXoi noXXa 

k[i? p]*t([o]v[<»]v tmOvpovvT*? Kat Ta irapovra ancoXe 

I 



H4 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

25 [aa]v [k]cli ri 8^1] QiXunrov Xcycfijy 17 Ttva aXXov a\X rra 
[r-qp av\ros K€p<rop[\]€irTov Korvr r\viKa pev (rra<ria(ois 

(IV 

[wpos] rivas np[€<r]p€i9 irepira>v atravra iro^jratov^ e 
[roip]os r\v* Kai tot[€] rj&davero <os aXwiTeXes to rrj noXu 

t 81) x oi 

n[o]X€fjLev eortv [€]7ret 8 wp cavrco rr\v OpaKrjv ^X 61 '! Ka 

it* 

30 [TtX]ap(iave ras TroXeiy rjSuci ptOixov enapcovi /iaXi 

[or]a #[«]*' €£9 avrov €tra /cat eiy V/iav ttjv x<opav ejroiuff 
[u<p cai/r]a>° to it pay pa aprj\av[o]v rjv tq>v yap Virep tov 

Recto. 

[ttX€ov€kt]€Iu €7n\€tpovvTO)v ols ov xfiv °] v Ta Stuaxeptara 
[ra] ctcaoros eiooOev XoyifccOar aXX' a jcarfopdjaxra? 6\ianpa 

35 [£e]rar «ya> Srj Seiv vp[a]s oi[pa}i tovtov tov [r]po7rov [jScjSov 
[X€v]aOai oncos av p[cv a yjp]-q ire[/>]i vpcov yi[yvlp>aKrj [Kepao 
[jSXcJTrriyy prjSev v[<f> vp]cov ao\iK]rfacTai' [av S\ [a]Xoy[a# aSi 
[ku]v €iri)(CipT] prj [pci]£cov [ejara* tov Sucrjv [Sovvai ava 
[yv]uHropai 6* p>]A" ,/ t\r]v €7riaToXrjv rjv ot€ a[<f>uorr)KU 

40 MiXtokvOtj? Kotv[? €ir€fi]yfre' tcai i\v ore v[aaav e^oov 
[t]tjv apxyv n€pyfra[s Ttp]opa)([cD] Ta ytopLa [vpo&v cfei 
[X]e* Xcye [ e]7rcor[o]Xeu [ 

TOiWV 

[tou]to a) avSpcs A0[rjvaioi to irapa8ciyp]a €<opaK07[€$ 

[av €]flOl TT€lO-6rj[T€ ] . €i8oi[c$ OTl 

45 [$iXnriros ot€ /icv ApfairoXiv €woXiopK€i iv vpiv na] 
pa8a> noX[iopK€Lv €(prj €7T€l8t] 8 tXaftev Kai IloriSaiav 
7rpoo-a<p€i[X€To €Kuvrjv r-qv mariv ftovXrjaerfO €X u [ y 
Tjv7T€p [irpo? toi/?(?) AawSaipoviovs itot €tw]€iv <f>a<Ti 

^iXoKpaTT|v t]ov 

[I<f>iKpaTt]v E(pta]kTov ko[i ya\p € r K€Lvov <f>avi\v *£aira 
50 [tcovtwv ti t<ov A]aKe8ai[po]vuov *[ai irporfavovTcov 
n[ioriv rjvnva] flovXerai Xappav^iv €nre]iv on mart 
av ot€Ta[i yev€a)6ai povrjv [c]* 8et£[€iav o]7ra)9 av a8i 

7*a« 

K€iv flovXtfvTai prj] Svvrjaovrai [tiret oti] PovXrjaovrat 



459. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 115 

[[a&jcew']] €1/ €i8evar €a>ff av ovv 8\yva>vrai\ mortv ovk €t 
55 var ravrrjv eav e/ioi \pri<rOe <rvfi[f3ov\)a) 0[t/A]a£crt rrj 
moriv npos rovTovt rov Qpaica kcu firj /3ov\r][<r0]€ ciScvai 
riva av et ircurr)? ap£tiev BpctKrjs ir[p]o9 Dpa? vyoir) Y yc * 
fLf\v % on roiwv dkco? ovSt vyia'vovroov c<ttiv avOparrra* 
Toiavra ypa<f>uv yfnjftapara t^at] SiSovai r[t<ri] roiavras 
60 Scopeas Kai tovt *k noWcov paSiov [yvlp>var i[arc y]ap Srj 
rrov irdvTts a> avSpes AOrjvaioi t[ov\to 0/101007 ^po]i on 

wo 

rov Korvv wore cjc^iw €7r<W7[<ra]<r0€ Xirrjv Stj\[o]v 
a>y Kar ckuvov rov \povov evv[o]uv fjyov/icvoi [[*«*]] 
[[fVcXoy]]- Kai prjv Kai ypvaois o\r)e<l>avois €<TT€0[a]yoi;T€ ov 
65 if av €i y€ *yOpov rjytio-de' aXX o/*a>y €W€i8tj i*[o]yr)f)of 
Kai '0€Ot? €%$pos rjv Kai peyaXa i)pa$ rj8iK€[i rovs a]ir[o] 

5. a) [a*ty*s : om. » B(lass), with SO, 

8. f£ ApQuroktw, the alternative reading here, is found in all the MSS. 

9. vfiiv or fffxiv is read in the MSS. 

10. op€v ft* : avtv yap B., with the MSS. 

1 6. TO [a]l[T«OI» I TOITIOU B. 

20. At the end of the line j8otA«ra[<r0ai] was apparently written for /SovAcvowoVu. The 
papyrus is rubbed, but there does not seem to be room for the w. /SovXcwo&u MSS. 

21. Considerations of space make it very improbable that the final a of apa was elided, 
asB. 

23. The numeral 16 in the margin marks the beginning of a new chapter or section ; 
cf. P. Grenf. II. 11. ii. 4. 

24. xm ra : Om. Kai MSS., B. 

26. araa-iaCois is a mistake for trrao'tafa. 

27. What was first written after anavra apparently makes no word; the scribe perhaps 
had nffiirw still in his mind. 

29. tortv: om. B., with the MSS. The correction omfy is in accordance with the 
usual reading ; cVctddv FS. 

fxot: so B., with most MSS.; ?x €t Ov; ci^cy, which was first written here, is the 
reading of Wolf and Dindorf (f ?x«). 

32. [vff} €avr]u : so krsv; [*avro]v (B., with S Ac.) would not fill the lacuna, and the 
vestiges suit « better than v. 

40. ore : so MSS. ; B. omits ore, with Dindorf. 

41. *£ctX]*: c'£fiXcv B. 

42. Xfye : om. MSS., B. 

43. [tov]to toiwv: tout B., omitting tocW with the MSS. 

44. nturOrfcr* I SO rsv ; V€i0r)<rfo B. with pr. S, AY. 

KaKiivo, which is all that intervenes in the MSS. between nu<r6ri<r& and etoom, does not 
nearly fill up the available space. 

48-9. The MSS. vary between *AoKpani» (SYO) and 'tyucpanpr, and all have fatp 

I 2 



n6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

<f>ao\ npos Aox. It would be possible to read **Xo at the end of 1. 48, but then the lacuna 
at the beginning of the following line is not satisfactorily filled, and the position of the 
overwritten r]av is unaccounted for. Moreover the traces on the papyrus suit <£o«ri 
much better; and we therefore suppose that this word was placed later in the sentence, 
its loss perhaps being compensated for by the insertion of tovs before Aoxc&ufioytow, and 
that lcf>iKp<rn)p E(f>ia\Tov (which is preferable on account of the space to frXoicp.) was 
originally written at the beginning of L 49, *iAo*/>. top being subsequently inserted above 
the line by the corrector. 

53. y a€t which is inserted above the line is the reading of the MSS., which also omit 

ahucfiv after /SovAqowrai. 

55. (av : av B. 

56. tovtow : so krsv ; tovtov B., with other MSS. At the end of the line ffavkfjafc 
seems to have been written for fknikqwirfo ; there is not room for j8oi/Ag[<w]0. 

57. nva av ft iraorjs apfcuvi this is the usual reading; tiV h» vaayjs <tp£as B. (ap£as 
S in marg.). 

58. avBpwTtov is bracketed by B. 

60. da>p*as : baptuls B. 

63-4. The words km ifnkov, which have here been crossed through, are omitted in S. 
They are accepted by B. 



460. Demosthenes, De Pace. 

io«8 x iO'2 cm. 

Parts of two columns from a copy of the ittp\ Elp/jvrjs of Demosthenes 
(pp. 63-3, §§ 21 and 33), written in good-sized square sloping uncials (cf. 447), 
probably near the beginning of the third century or even somewhat earlier. 
An angular stroke is used to fill up a short line in 1. 5. A noticeable variant 
from the ordinary text occurs in 11. 5-6. 

Col. i. Col. ii. 

10 [to>]p ovt€ 8?7j8aiou[? ou 
[t€ top] $i[\nnrov] pe[yav 
7T€}irpa yiyvtvOai ravra y[ap 

[Krai irpos tie ripr}]? tca[i [7r]avr €0 avrovs rj[yovv 

[8o£ai> aicr\yi<rra ct yap to rrjs UvXaias 8 [c7T€ 

[/At] irapr)\6]e $i\i7nros 15 Ov/iovv kcu tmv [gv 

5 [ovSev av a]vrois K€p [JcX]0[oiy 7rXeo]i{cicriy 

[80$ r\v ravra] 8 [o]vk tfiou jxcltcov 8vol[u 

[Xovro aXXa] ran rov Op\o Kvpioi y€V€<r0[ai r<o 



461. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 117 

[jicvov kcll) rr\v Kopco 8c twtcov y\i\ctr6{ai 

[vciav 20 [r]a8c arvvKarcirpa^av 

[tow] toivvv X8mv 

[c]vc\ cvpfaacTc 



2. The vestiges at the end of this line give no real clue to the letters, and it is 
impossible to determine whether the papyrus agreed with S in reading irorpa*To/ re against 
the Kakktara ir&rpcucrai of Other MSS. 

5-6. ovtev fa avroU e&fcfi thai is the reading of the MSS. 

6. c/9oi{Xoito : so V ; rjflovXorro other MSS., Blass. 

13. enrrovs : lavrovs B. 

14. The papyrus agrees with S (so B.) in omitting efrai, which is found in other MSS. 
after ijyovvro. 

17. There would be room for from three to five letters after &vo{v, but it is difficult 
to see what could have been added here. Perhaps there was some correction. 
22. [«jytx : *****' B- 



461. Demosthenes, De Corona. 
7-5 x 5-S cm. 

This fragment from the top of a column contains part of Demosthenes' 
De Corona^ p. 327, §§ 7-8, written in rapidly formed sloping uncials which are 
more likely to date from the third century than from the end of the second. 
An unknown variant occurs in 1. 9, but the passage is mutilated. 

[tod fevyovri napc\0c]ip ci #1/ 
[tw] 8tKa(oi^r\»v t//i»~ 
[cKaar]o9 rr\v irpos tovs 6c 
[ovs cv]<rcficiav Stacpv 
5 [Aarr]©!' Kai ra rov Xcyov 
[to? v&]T€pov Succua cvvo 
[iKcas] npoa8c£aiTO' Kai 

c 

\irapa<r]xa>v avrov urov 

[k<u . .] . lov ap<fxncpois 
10 [aKpoar]t]v outcd i[ri\v 81a 



n8 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



[yvcoaiv] iroiT}<r€[T]ai ncpi 
[airavTCoi]v p€\\\a>]v Se 
[rov t i8io]v (3iov [rr]avros 
[a>? €ouc]€ \oy[oi> 



2-3. vfutp [ciuurrjo? : tfcaoros vpup MSS., B(lass). 
4. dio^t(Xarr]ay '. (frvXarrnp B. with S pr, L. 

7. irpoafcgaiTo I trpoa&gerai MSS., B. 

8. The interlinear c is by the original scribe ; aMv B. 

9. The MSS. have ta-ov *a\ koip6p, and xocyoy is probably the word here inserted (by 
the first hand) above the line. The adjective first written certainly ended in -cor, and the 
vestiges of the letter before would suit a, &, X, or o : ? op]owp. 



462. Demosthenes, De Corona. 

17-7x8.6 cm. 

Parts of two columns containing portions of §§ 25-8 (pp. 233-4) of the De 
Corona, written in a good-sized third century uncial hand resembling that of 223 
and 420. There are a few variants, but the text of the papyrus is a poor one. An 
erroneous reading in 1. 28 has been corrected in a different hand. Two kinds of 
stops (the high and low points) occur, and a wedge-shaped sign of varying size 
is used for filling up short lines. 



Col. i. 



Col. ii. 



[v7T€p V/JLCDV KUl TO T]lJ 

[no\€i ovfufxpov {fa 
[tchv €ya> /lev roi\wv 
[eypa^ra $ov\z\xq)v airo 
5 [nXttv rt\v Twfysrrqv 
[tovs ir/>€<r/3€t]? em tovs 
[tottovs cv ois] av ovra 
[$i\imrov mi\vOavov 
[tcli ovtoi 8 o]i/5c ypayfra' 
10 [tos €/iov Tav]ra noiciv 



[ot opKoi teat /iff npo 
X[a(3a>i> tKuvos tovs € 
ir[iicaipov? tcop tottcov 
Kvp[io$ rrjs SpaKTjs Kara 
25 arairi [/U17& iroWoav 
/iw Xprj[/iaToi>y ttoX 
\<w 8e c^TparionToav 



468. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 119 

[rjOcXtfaay] ti 8c tovto § 26 fi^cv8rffrropri[<ras etc tov 

[rfSwaTO co av)8p€$ AOtf tw paSi[oos tois Xoirrois 

[vaioi cya> 8i\8a£a>' $1 30 cmycip{oiri it pay pa 

[XinnoD pLc]v t\v ov/i aur cira [tovto pcv ovyi § 28 

15 [pcpov o>9 7t]\ciotov tov Xcyct to ^[tjcfuo-pa ov8 a 

[p*ra£v] xpovov yc vaycivo^aKu a 8c /Sou 

[vcaOcu Testy opKoav v Xtvcov €yo> ir[poo-ayav 

[ptv 8c ooy] ikayiarov 81a 35 tovs Trpca@{cis ooprjv 
[ti oti vpcts] a<f> ijs ripe 8uv. tov[to pov 81a 

20 [pa? co/ioa]aT€ povov aX fldXXci aXX[a ti c\pt]v 

8-9. mfyOawovWcu, : ]. irvvBdvwvTai. After this the papyrus Omits xal tovs opKovs diroXap- 
/Sdyccv (MSS., Blass). 

II. TOVTO I TOVT B. 

19. vfius fttp ovk d<f>* J}f vfufoaff fffitpas p6rov B., with MSS. 

28. ylmtdrryofnuras, the reading of the first hand, has been corrected to cviropmras 
(MSS., B.). 

36. toi(to pov : tovto bt fiov B. (following Isidor. III. 259), who alters expn* in the next 
line to xpw* 



463. Xenophon, Anabasis VI. 
Width of column 5 cm. 

Part of Xenophon's Anabasis VI. vi. §§ 9-24, written in narrow and rather 
short columns ; the lower portions of seven are preserved. The handwriting 
is a good and apparently rather early specimen of the square sloping style, 
and may be assigned to the end of the second or the first half of the third 
century. The middle point occurs irregularly and the common angular sign is 
used to fill up short lines. Our collation is with the edition of Gemoll (Teubner, 
1900), supplemented by that of Dindorf (Oxford edition, 1855); for some 
additional information concerning the readings of D and E we are indebted 
to Mr. E. C. Marchant. 

For purposes of textual criticism this papyrus is of considerable interest. 
The MSS. of the Anabasis fall into two well-defined divisions, a small group 
headed by the Parisinus (C), and a more numerous group, generally recognized 
as inferior to the other, but containing readings which all editors accept. The 
peculiarity of the papyrus lies in the fact that it combines lections characteristic 



120 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



of both classes of MSS. Thus, while agreeing in several cases with the 
superior family against the inferior, it shows six instances of agreement with the 
inferior class against the superior where the latter is plainly wrong. The same 
characteristic of partial coincidence with both groups was traced by Dindorf 
(Preface to the Oxford edition of 1855, p. viii) in the quotations from the 
Anabasis in Athenaeus. This however is a debateable point and need not be 
insisted upon. In any case the papyrus may be taken to represent not un- 
fairly the tradition of the first few centuries of the Christian era; and it becomes 
very questionable whether modern critics have not carried their preference for 
one group of MSS. somewhat too far. Gemoll, for instance, makes it the principle 
of his recent edition only to have recourse to other evidence where the reading 
of C is patently erroneous. This is no doubt a convenient and practical 
method ; but its defects should not be lost sight of. 



Col. i. 

A]aKc6[aijio 
[viol {\vrav6a iro 
[v]t)pov cSokh TO 
[ir]payfia eivai tois 
EXXrja-ip kcu tScov 
to firj irouiv rav 
Ta 8 ovk av aWas 



e<p7j yevcaOai ei 

[p]ri TIS €#C&»(T€l TOV 

10 ap^avra (3aX\€[ii> 



Col. ii. lost. 
Col. iii. 

§10 cy]o> /i[eu 

[ovv aTTo\]va> [kcu v 
[pas tt}?] aiTia[s kcli 
[Ay]a<nav av a[v 
15 [to?] Aycuria? <f>i]o[r)i 

[cp]€ Tl TOVTtoV at 

[tio]v €ivai* Kai tea 
[Ta8]iKa(co €/iav 

[TOV] €1 €y0) 7T€7/0<>/J[o 



§15 



Col. iv. 



Col. v. 



20 



€ao/i€0]a aX[X 

[tod]v E\\r}vi8a>i> 
[no\]€a>i> fi€Ta too 



§17 



K]ai vp[ei$ fi€v 

30 [flTJ €K]S<OT€ [fit € 

[yen Se €]fiavroi> [coa 
[rr€p B€]yo<pa>[y Ac 
[yei Tr]apaoy[7]<ra> 
[Kpi]vavri K\ksav 



§ x8 



468. FRAGMENTS OF EXTANT CLASSICAL AUTHORS 121 



[ra av\aaras tirrev 
25 [Aya<r]ia^ cyo> o> av 
[8pes oyivvp[i 0*] 
[ovs kcu 0]ca? 1/ \jifi]v 



35 [8pa>]i on av (3o[v\ri 

[TOLL] TTOir)<TCU TOV 

[tov] ev€Ka pyre 

[7T0X€]ft€lT€ A<ZK€ 

[8aip]oviois acofc 
40 [aOe re] ao[<p]a\m trot 

[$€\€]l 6*[a]oT0y GVfl 

[ir€/i]^ra[T]€ ficvroi 
\jioi v]/j[a>]u avroov 



Col. vi. 



Col. vii. 



[rnyo}t [eire/i^v] 1/ 
45 \j*as] V or\pa]ria rrpoy 
[<r€ a>] K\€av8p€ /cai 

[tC€\€V]0V<Tl CT€ €(T€ 

[irav]ras amai Kpi 
[vavr]a a€ avrov 

[f3ov\7]]i ut€ e[va Tl 
[va rj 8]vo kcu rr[\ci 



§ 20 [tov to]v avSpa 

[kcci irat]eiv /ccAfet/ 

55 [aa? AtQymrov [tov 
[tov /i]cv ya[p 018a 
[avSpa] aya0[ov ovra 
a[ip€6€]vra vtto [nys 
o[TpaTi]a$ ap\eiv 

60 r[iyy irtyniKov 
[ropov] ri$ t}iTri<ra 
\ji€$a napa] Tpane 



[{ovvTi&v €]d> [a>]i 



§ 22 



Col. viii. 



65 [Orjvai eis Ttj]v 
[E\Xa8a to]vtov 
[ovv] toiovtov \ov 
[to, a]<pu\ofirjv « 
8* ov i/ycy 1/ aWos 

70 tls todv 7r[a]pa <rov 
kcu /irj tcc[v] ira[p ij 



§*4 



122 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

3-4. r6 npayfia cMice* is the reading of ABCE (so G(emoll)), the other MSS. having 
tdotul rb irpaypa cjccivo. The papyrus thus follows the order of the latter, while agreeing 
with the former in omitting intlm. 

5. EXXijow : "EAXiyoi MSS., G. 

15. faofai : so D ; the papyrus may of course have had the ungrammatical faviv found 
in ABCE, but it is unlikely. 

16. ti: so BCE, G. ; nv6s D and the ' deteriores.' 

18. €fun{Tov] : so E and the ' deteriores/ G. ; iavrov ABC. 

24-5. tivtp [Aya<r]ia* : this is the order of ABCE ; the other MSS. transpose the words. 

30. €ff]da>re [pc : since a single letter after «*]d»Tc would make an unusually short line, 
it is probable that the papyrus read [pc, with ABCE. These MSS., however, have Utor* 
(« b<rr4 B) for ticd2>T€ 9 which the papyrus rightly reads with the ' deteriores/ This is a good 
instance of the eclectic character of the present text Acd&rc' /ic G. 

35. on : so ABCDEFH ; t other MSS. 

38. [iroXc]^tT< : so ABCE ; iroAf/ifjr* the ' deteriores/ 

39. <TG>(^a0t : the reading of the ' deteriores* ; a»(oi<r$€ G. with ABC (<ra>(our6ai A). 

40. not: fro* DFHIKTZ (so G.), Skov ABCE, fan other MSS. 

43. The papyrus certainly agreed with ABCDEHIKL in reading /mm, which other 
MSS. omit. 

47. [«cf Xcvjowi : Uiktva* ABCE, G. ; Kcktvawri the other MSS. (xcXtvo-ovo-t L). 
«t« : so G., with the ' deteriores ' ; «n ABCE. 

50. tap I 1. av. 

52. kcu: so D; 1j mi other MSS., G. 

57-8. The papyrus has omitted &i$unrop Ac oi&a, which is found in all MSS. after 5m 
and is necessary for the sense. The error was perhaps due to the homoioteleuton of ocda 
and ovra, assisted by the fact that oiba had just preceded. It is noticeable that the omitted 
words are together just the length of one of the papyrus lines. We may then assume 
that the archetype followed the order found in ABCE o&a alp^Bivra : clptBivra 6foa 
other MSS. 

6l. rjiTT)(T<£jj*6a : rjTurdfuOa ACE. 

69-70. tfyts rj aXkos nsl f/yj aXXw rf t« A ($y§) BCE; fas ^ SKkos its G., with 
the ' deteriores.' 

71. Km fxrj: so again the ' deteriores ' and G. ; 5 «u ABCE. 



464 MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 123 



IV. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 
464. Astrological Epigrams. 

254 x 23-2 cm. Late third century. 

The following series of epigrams is written upon the verso of the papyrus the 
recto of which contains the fragment of a rhetorical treatise in Doric dialect (410). 
They are in hexameters or elegiacs and of Varying length, the longest preserved 
not exceeding six lines. Unfortunately the papyrus is both broken and rubbed, 
and the difficulties of decipherment are increased by the character of the hand, 
an irregular sloping semi-uncial of about the end of the third century, and by 
the badness of the Greek. Thus but one of the epigrams (11. 12-6) is really 
intelligible, and that first requires some emendation. Enough however remains 
to show that the collection, or at least this part of it, was primarily astrological 
in character; see e.g. 11. 5, 13-6, 48, 58. Prefixed to each epigram is a short 
heading giving the subject of what follows, the prevailing topic being the family 
— healthy or unhealthy children (11. 12-23), childlessness and its opposite (11. 40- 
50, 57 sqq.). The literary merit of the composition is small. The several verses 
are often written continuously, and the lines are irregular in length. Marks of 
elision are occasionally inserted, and a stop occurs at the end of 1. 46. 

Col. i. 
kcli rov €7r[ 

T€p€<TU [ 
Ofl[ 

5 [c]i Se kvov . [ •] • • vl l v *?.' *[ 

[.]#ca aXXcou SovXov? Tov<rS€ voet £ . [ 

[Ka]ra cji(ia<rt[a>]s 
ic[.]icp ...*«.[. .]g[ \ip[.} . 0w ji[ 

ayaOas 8 4RV 9 €iri ji* *]^ a [ 
10 p[. .] . art? cotiv /Sc/S ..[..].. 0av[ 
T€ . [.]oi<rt 



124 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

rrepi fipe<f>ov$ £r\v . [ 

avrap errqv $aelW Kai <fxx>9 [. • . .]a-t}[ ] 

vr\ Aia KrjeXios tovtov iSaxri r[oKo]v faov teat [....]. ov 
15 \cyofi€i> rode todu 8e <f>ai\<w 

aWoTplODV OVTCOV KplTTOV [J]<f>OlTO0€\[. . . .] 

ir€f{i] &pc<povs axprjorov 
et 8c kolkoi too\* Kc]prpov €7riKpaTCU0VT€? € TW°? y 
{icv ovv 8v[. . 7r]po8ofi . crcpos 17 . • [.] . vcvaoxri 

20 kclkoi irav vcu[. . . .] . aAAo . /ecu firjSet? a[ ] . /ia 

toiovt euri 8oia[ ] €Kf3o\ifiov re Kai «[.]. .[. . .] . ov 

ye eojivv[. . .] . f>o<f>t\oy[ 

€i ft oXoot t' ayaOoi re ej>rf 

eviropoy [ 
«5 (opevov [ 

kcu rraXiv Slpov o/io{ 
Kat itakiv [a]irpay/io[v 
kcu Ta<f>i8[. *]y8y[ 
ovrm ads irpo[ 

30 . [ 

ffxuv&v rj<rr[ 
yevcats em\a[ 

Col. ii. 

[ no letters ]0o>/b[ 

[ „ „ ] aXX e[ 

35 [ ] . XX4 

[ H-[ 

[€l] 8t /IIP SIpOV OflV^. . . .] . <TKp . [ 

[&\rova\as cv vaioTTjri [. .]ei kl . [ 
[. .]s aras re fiapeia? aAX ci{. .]*xa^ • [ 
40 no\vT€Kv'ov [ 

[. ,]CLV01 Tl T€Kl>(Dl> apiOfiov €o[ 
[. .]«? K€VTpot$ ei/owerot? (3\err[ 



464. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 125 

8i]\ovfJL€vos eoriv apiSjjX . . [ 
oa-aoi viroyOovia t€ Ka[t 
45 vov ftapTvpci jyy pcTO\[ 
8rj\ov<ri (3€/3cuoy. [ 

cct€k[vov 
€t [8] aorpov «ri8oy[ 

€l8oPT€9 T\ KCU ITVp [ 

50 (Tyr^ia av tovto vo^t ] 

[Pp]€<(xn^s 
€i ff auras tovt&v [. . . ,]racra[ 
Saxrei ir\t}v aflefJatoTaTat roiyap t[ 
a<fti]K€<rOcu tpfipvov €KCKOT€i tj<t^ 
55 <paos tScv aK-qpiov coxf K0U avr • [ 

€01]K€ TOT€ 

€XOVTO$ Tcwa [ 
€i 8 aoTTjp ayaOo? /uiprvs <fxi[i\y . [ 
[. . . .]jBA[. . . .]ats aXoxois 1/ KaTq[ 
60 .[..]• kvvodv ii€TO\otf cvSopcy o[ 

..[.]. faapcirixi ] • • • [ 

[. . • .)fivri€To[ 

4. A letter may be lost before op[ but this is unlikely. 

5. kvov is probably for Kvw, the dogstar. 

1 a. Cnac{vTot cannot be read ; perhaps ft* ^Xkorros. 

15. 0aiXa»r : (fxuty&p was probably the word intended. 

16. The latter part of the line appears to be corrupt. [.]^oi is probably [?]$v, with the 
common interchange of <h and v. to$<\[ is more difficult ; the sense requires something like 
rb Baruv, which may be supported by another case of confusion between X and » in 1. 15. 

18. 1. cmKparcovT€f \ cf. Ptolem. CentiL p. 2l6 d, &C. tmKparrjTtop darf)p. (Tifuop at the 

end of the line is quite doubtful, the supposed /* being too cramped. Moreover something 
is wrong with the beginning of 1. 19, which does not scan. 

21. The meaning of the horizontal stroke above the final 1 of curt is obscure. It is 
unlikely that p would be represented in this way in the middle of a line. 

26. Qpop : cf. 1. 37, where Horus apparently recurs ; but the context is equally obscure. 

31. <t*nv<Bv is very likely a nomm ftroprium, i.e. Saturn. 

38. vautrtjri is for v*6njri* 

50. vo^i] : cf. 1. 6. 

58. r of paprvs has been corrected from p. 

60. kvjw is perhaps for koiv&w; cf. note on 1. 16. 



126 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

465. Astrological Calendar. 

Height 26-5 cm. Late second century. 

The recto of this long but imperfectly preserved papyrus contains a list 
of persons with their ages, written in second century cursive. On the verso 
is an astrological calendar in an uncial hand which we should also ascribe to 
the second century rather than to the third. There are parts of nine columns 
in all, but of these only the first is tolerably complete. We omit the second 
and ninth, and those parts of the other columns which are too fragmentary 
to yield any sense. 

The scheme of the calendar is as follows. The year is divided into weeks 
of five days, instead of the more usual seven or ten. Each of these weeks of 
five days corresponds to the sixth part of one of the signs or constellations of 
the zodiac. Lines 10-44 refer to Pharmouthi 16-20; the details concerning 
Pharmouthi 30-25 probably began in Col. ii and were continued in one or more 
columns which may have been lost between Cols, ii and iii. Lines 60-98 refer 
to Pharmouthi 26-30, 11. 99-134 to Pachon 1-5. With 1. 135 begins the account 
of Pachon 6-10, as is indicated by the remaining letters Yla\x<*v 9 tm t ; this 
continues up to 1. 196. The account of Pachon 11-15 occupies 11. 197-212 
and perhaps Col. viii as well. The same formula is followed in the entries 
concerning each group of five days. First comes a brief astronomical statement 
of the relation between the part of the month under consideration and one of 
the signs or constellations of the zodiac, probably, as Mr. Smyly has suggested 
(1. 11, note), the constellation which was rising just before dawn during that 
period. Next we have the name of the presiding deity who is sometimes male, 
sometimes female, and the interpretation of it, generally introduced by the 
phrase firjvvei \4yvv 8tl (eg. 11. 13 and 200). This is succeeded by a detailed 
description of the tvttos of the divinity, who is represented as a statue, partly 
human, partly animal. Then follows an elaborate account of the omens, signs, 
portents, and favourable and unfavourable influences, characteristic of the period 
presided over by the deity in question, which is introduced by the words 
brjkol ovv, and concludes with a statement of the particular form of sickness 
(&pp<&oTTina) peculiar to the period. To this account of the presiding deity 
is in one place (11. 159 sqq.) added a description of her son, which proceeds 
on the same lines as that of the goddess herself, and ends with directions for 
making medical prescriptions (11. 190-6; cf. 1. 195, note). 

The papyrus, which bears distinct marks of its Egyptian origin (cf. the local 



465. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 127 

references in 11. 25 and 222), presents a striking resemblance to an astrological 
fragment from Egypt now at Munich, recently published with a commentary 
by Boll (ArcAiVy I. pp. 492 sqq.). The Munich fragment, which is written 
on vellum and is several centuries later than the papyrus, also gives a list of 
deities with an account of the signs, events, and sicknesses associated with them, 
but is arranged on a somewhat different plan, the deities being connected not 
with particular groups of days, but with various stars or constellations, which 
are numbered so as to form a series. Both the Munich and Oxyrhynchus 
fragments recall in many details the technical phraseology of astrologers which 
is known from the Tetrabiblos of Ptolemy and the fragments of Porphyry; 
cf. the references given by Boll for the Munich fragment (Archiv, I. p. 498) with 
the parallel passages in the papyrus, which supplies more astrological and less 
astronomical information. Dr. Boll, to whom we are indebted for several valuable 
suggestions and references, observing that the god of the nth- 15th degrees 
of Pisces is the second, not, as might be expected, the third (L 199), infers 
that a distinction is drawn in the papyrus between (1) the superior Ocoi who 
preside over each ten days, but more especially over the first five, and 
of whom the first mentioned in each month seems to be described as the 
god of the month (1. 105), and (2) the inferior divinities called Kparaioi (1. 1 2) 
or fjyov^voi (1. 20, note) who preside over the 6th-ioth, i6th-20th, and 26th-3oth 
days in each month. The superior deities he identifies with the Egyptian 
decans, whose fantastic names, known from Egyptian inscriptions, Greek and 
Roman writers, and magical papyri, have a resemblance to those of the divinities 
mentioned in the papyrus (11. 13, 160, and 200), especially, as Mr. Smyly has 
pointed out (1. 200, note), in one instance. 

With regard to the Kparaioi the only source of information hitherto 
known was a remark by Porphyry in the letter to Anebo (Euseb. Praepar. 
Evang. iii. 4), referring to Chaeremon (who wrote in the time of Nero) Xaiprjiuav 
fxlv yap Kal ol &AA01 ovb* &\\o rt irpb tQv 6pwp.iv(ov k6(t\mdv ffyovvra^ iv ap\rjs \6y<p 
TiOipevoi tovs AlyvTrrCoiP ovb' ikkovs Ocovs irXriv t&v irXavrjT&v \*yo\iiv<*v Kal t&v 
oviLirXrjpovvTtoV rbv (tpbiaKov Kal ocoi rot/rots napavaTi\Kov<n r<£? re ei? tovs btKavovs 
rofxas Kal tov9 wpoo-KOirovs Kal rovs \cyop.{vovs Kparaiovs fjyepdvas &v Kal ra dvofxara iv 
rot? 2aXn€Vi\iaK0is (piptrai Kal tftpaimat -naQ&v Kal ivaroXal koI bvatis Kal /xeAAoVrcoi/ 
<r7HA€iu<r€t?. This description of the SaAfteiuxiaiccf, as Boll remarks, corresponds 
so clearly with the contents of the papyrus that the latter is to be regarded 
either as a fragment of the 2aA^mx taK£ * or as derived from it through an 
intermediary author. The Salmenichiaka (or Salmeschoinaka), which according 
to Iamblichus were /x<?poy tl ppaxirarov t&v 'EpuaiKQv biardgtoov, must have been 
written not later than in the second century B.C., for the astrological treatises 



i 2 8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

of Neehepso-Petosiris (about ioo B.C. according to Kroll) are based on them. 
The explanation of the remarkable title 2aXM«>ixiajc<i is a difficult problem ; cf. 
Boll in Zeitschr.f. Aegypt. Sprache % xxxix. p. 15a, and his Spkaera, pp. 376 sqq. 

This view of the early date of the Salmenichiaka is confirmed by a study 
of the papyrus. Though the scanty astronomical details probably afford no 
indication that the present arrangement of the text is earlier than the end of 
the second century (cf. 1. 11, note), there are other grounds for supposing 
that it is based on much older material. It is noticeable that there is nowhere 
any reference to the Romans, or even to any titles or institutions peculiar to 
the Roman period in Egypt ; while the frequent mentions of /3a<riXcZy suggest 
a Ptolemaic background. 

The text contains numerous errors, and the archetype from which the scribe 
was copying seems to have been in parts illegible or imperfect, for he sometimes 
leaves blank spaces indicating a lacuna ; cf. 1. 24, note. 

(a) Col. i. 

Parts of 9 lines. 

10 $ap/iov$[i] dirb i<? &>y ac. 

vSpoyfxp 8 kariv fieh $appov[0t] dirb -c? 

&>y k. 6 8k Kparatbs avrov, Svofia av- 

T$ iariv NefiHy prjvfei \iycov 8ti 08- 

t6s ktrnv 6 triples] t&v iro\€\jx)oov Kal tov 
15 \6you, 6 two? avrov dp[Sp]ia? 6p06s, 

rb irp6<ramoi> yvwfe, (3aa[C\]riov (yonr 

inl T^y #c€0aX^y, cfr 8i TtoirCaa 7rp£<ra>- 

irov i\ODv Sfems, irripvyas i^oav &Jo, 

ir68as Xloiroy, iypvros [layalpas 8, Tit 
20 npSoxorra \pvaa. SyXoi ovv in 6 fjyovfievos 

fiw/ivqo-eiTOTrco? icaicd, iarat TroXeftoy drj- 

8la pdyr) teal Harcu irpbs tovs 8\\ov? koivo- 

\oyovp€vo($) £y <pC\o?. (oral 8i inl rrjs dp- 

Xfjs {av)rov dnoardrrfs, Kal 7r[£]Xe/to[y i]arat 
25 Kal dirokovvrai iroXKal ir6\ets riyy [Al]yifar[To)u 

[teal] 8i[& r]bv dwoardTrjUy ri' ykp <ri//*€[i]a rod 

[Kai]p[oO] iro\4po(y) iorlv Kal drj8(a? Kal [fidxtf? 



465. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 129 

[• . .]o[. .}a>v dncb\€(i)a earai. iv [8]k ry K[aipf 

tovt<p noXXol fiiccHTOwai dnb [r]oO Xav[. . • , 
30 Tivks 81 (wrovrai pSovre? teal ^xM^e- 

voi Tivkt 8k Kal <&8ol iv Upot? Tivkf 8[k iv 

ov/moo-tois $8ovt€S ttfcpcovoi Kal jcoAa>[? 

dnaXXdo-aovo-iv. otrros noiu dnb X&yov rbv 

viK&vra viK&aOai Kal tIv vik&jicvov 
35 vikSLv Kal noXXol (Shtiv Xa/ifidvovTcs i- 

yfr&vta Kal dnoypa<f>6p€voi Kal Xoytiiov- 

[tcs d]v6pwnov9 a n(na>Kav 9 nvks 8k dnb 

[• • • -b? t&viy Oepan€[v]ovTc[s.] o$to9 not- 

[€?.•. xpo]Xa(v£i]v 81a rb rby iva n68a 
40 [ ]ov y€v£a6[a]i. rb 8k dpp&oTTj- 

[fia rod Kaipo]v irept ra tvrtpa Kal rh anXdy- 

[\va Kal noXX]ol Odvaroi iaovrai. ofrros 

[nout ras] dppaoorias dnb 6*&v x&Xbv 

44 [Kal ] Kal n6vov n€pl t^v 

Parts of % lines. 

l6. I. fiaatkiftop or /3a<rtXrior. Cf. p. 135. 1 9. Ll^ar. 40. h of to C01T. from v. 

Col. ii. Parts of 13 lines. 

(b) Col. iii. 

60 [ioriv 6 K)6pio(s) <f>Xoy6f. 6 vfaros aifrov] 

[dv8]pihs ipObs npSaoanov iypv [. . .] 

[c/y] 8k T(onio-a> ^oipt8to[v] fytov np[. . .] 

[. . .] tpLnpovOtv Kara rb np6awnc[v €\]<ov 

[/ia%]aipas iv rai(f) \€palv 8 Kal to \ . it • 
65 [. • 1)] 8k yXaxraa Kal rb npfoconov nyp. 

[8riX]oT oSv 8ti 6 Katpbs oZtos ito:h noX- 

[Xoi>9 PC]ov ctipcTv 81a toG orSparos, ttoX- 

[Xol 8k] rvvJjyopoi frcpoi 8k payiKo[l] noX- 

[Xol 8k <b]8ol Oc&v Kal ftaaiXicov k[o]1 noX- 
70 [Xol ippTj]v€is SiaXiKTtov Kal noX[X]o[l] iv- 

K 



130 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[. . . • fie]yoi teat rSnov Ik rfmov /*[€]raj9a£- 
[vovrts k\al iroXXh, ktoojiwov? aif[.]v . • ? 

[ ]£qcrai irons €#cti7To[.]t . o[. . .]o* 

[ ] diro<pdyovrai iroXXol S[k] koI 

75 [ ]yrts tA dXX&rpia noXXod? na- 

[ k]clI iroXXoi)? piywpivw? 

[rah . • >]cu$ rj rats prjTpviats Kara- 

[ ] aimts* o$tc[s] 8 Oeb? notu dp\i- 

79 [ l\v 8k ry [tccu]p<p rovry ir[o]XXoJ 

Parts of 19 lines. 

99 [ Ilayo&v dirb a la>y] 6. 

100 [l\6imv 8 iart pels Haya>v 9 r]oyrov dirb a 
[la>? € 8 iari npSro? Oebs tS>)v tyfHmv 
[ 22 letters ] . ro kartv 



62. x of x<xp*&o[v] corr. from 1. 



Col. iv. 

103 o"rjfia[iv . . .] rot/? 8k (3op€ioT€poi{s] tov~ 
rw[ ] dirtShcov? olovl iroXept- 

105 ov$ of o)vv 0cA rod prprbs a(f>0vv 

<rtvr[ ]iv ifrx% r *X yr l*> kolKwoa 

8k a[ ] Spaais toO fjXtov. 6 t6- 

no? [airrj? dy]aXpa icvdvov dXijOivoO yv- 
[y]fj t^a6rjpiy]ij tnl BpSvov, 6</>0dXpoi>? 

no iyox{(Ta ha . ]rr6<fxw kol\ tva TvQ&vos, 
rb Tj[p6amrov\ ypvo-odv, rij \tipas irpb? 
t$ <j(. ♦ . . iaT]o\i(r/iiyri t ftaatXrjov lx ow " 
<ra rfj [KC<f>a\jj.] SrjXoT otiv 8rt 8 Kcupbs 08- 
to? 7r[oi€i ypdp]para KtKpuppiva noX- 

1x5 \oi>? [ ] dydpconovs pcopoi>? 

&$ lS[tcoTiKo]dt rfjy tyx'ti 1 '* «8w Y&[p 
noic[i koI dypa]ppdrovs 9 iroui 8k nd[Xiv] 



465. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 131 

robs [KaT€i86]ras ri ypd/i/iara \€la[y] 
S[i]a<p[ipovTa t$ yivtt drrb toUtou Kal 

120 row i[ ]v, k[o]1 rroXXol Upoypafip{a- 

rets \<jovrai . .]?(tt(. .] . roi Kal ttoXXS>[v 

d filc[s i]ora[t. o5r]oy 6 6*[b]g noiu 

Parts of 22 more lines. 



Col. v. 

145 Kal ?£a>. h [8]i t$ #ratpf> rot$ra> 0/ &v8p€$ 
KaTa<f)€pc{v(r]i c[/]y r&? yt/yaiiccy, 7roAAox? 
& reicj'a [iirtyJlVcrai, #ca2 €& dparj? avr<p 
i£ avr&v \xprio]t/i€6o*i ra 8\ Xoiira dno- 
OavciTai ko[1] dpaeviKd. ofrrof note? rah 

150 SovXais €in[. .]rc<r6ai rats iSiai? Kal yev- 
vSktiv avrol [rjcjcpa Kal tolvtcl Kvpuvati 
i&v fiio&v avTwv {teal raw) iXevOkpmv yv- 
vcuk&v. o$tos rroiH ray ywaiKts d[r]6Kov$ 
yivcaOai Kal T€Kvo7rouT<r0ai Ircpa rftjeva 

155 Kal Kvpufaiv airra r&v flioov avra[fc. rb 8i 
dppdxrrTjpa rb kv t$ Kaip<p rrcpl ro[i)y .... 
fiovs Kal Tray<Tora( ). ovtos iroiti c[ 

dTTQ&Vr\<TKUV. 

6 8k vib? rrjs &£[?] #yo/xa atfrp cotii/ [. . . . 
160 ra>p<r€i'0'i7[.]€ur<»oi/oi/atyi. (jirjvi)€i) toOto [Xeyov 
alvoX&yo?. 6 rviros airroO dv8[pias 
XtovTonpfoomos Ocov rp(\€S tntifiirrpov ? 
€X<»v iv [r]jj dp[i(r]r€[pf Kal 10 letters 

h rjj &£[*£] TrpSaafjrov 01/- ? 

165 pi KopKoStXoy . . [ 

Parts of 4 more lines. 



146. L ywaucae. 148. r of aura corr. 1 52. yvvaucoof Pap. 153. L yvpaucas. 

160. Second o- of mpatvari . . . corr. from r. 

k a 



132 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Col. vi 

170 ra iv 6v£[ii]aTt Kal dirb airr&v dXXot 1^77- 
aovrai. 6 8i Kcupbs ovto? dp\i€pi<ov. 
ofrro? noici Upoypapfiarus rroX- 
\oi)$ 0€&y Kal fiaaiXecov teal iicdoTov rijv 
noXvxpovtav. ofrros iroiel (3a<riXia 
175 c<rOai noXXa Kal rrpbs Tofc itotc dv- 
tiSikovs Kal irpb* 01/y iv ainfp i<n{i]v 

Kal ftao-iXtfas ftactXcd? Kal rb xapfoaOai 
Kal riy ttSXw. odro^ it]oicT t&rxrj/iovuv 
roi>9 dvOpdmws Kal [ayoxdfcaOai rod KaX&$ 
180 typvTos Kal TT€pl toD Oeoy, o$t[o$] ttoici rbv 
flaaiXia napa r&v dXXav (3ao[t]Xia>v ra 
nXeiara yppriyovvrav &<rn[€]p [i]v d\Xa>i 
Kaipip c(fp)riTai rods 8[i]8c[.] ....[.-]? l^dXXov 

orepov iroici . . [ ]at iv 7roX- 

185 XoU crrjfiahet [.]..?[ ]ov \a~ 

Parts of 4 more lines. 

177. « of first km con. from /9. 

Col. vii. 

190 a>? Kal KpiOfjv X^fiC 1 ] 9 Ka l *{ 

Orjvat §6/ioiCDS Kal Kpi0)i[v ]] 

rbv \uXbv ifcnkaov *ip[ 

i<p 9 fjpipas 8 dXXo dir<m[ 

6 ioriv inroardOprj Kal [ 
195 a>? dXevpov Kal fiiXi 8o[ 

8' KaXd ioriv X(av. 

Hay&v dnb ta fa>? [i\e. 

iy6fa>v 8 ioriv (jith) najfiv dnb la lots i€ 8 [t- 

artv StVTCpos Otfb]$ t&v ix&vav. Svo/ia [a]u- 



465. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 133 

200 Ty iartv T€t[. . .]wa[.]c[.]ij, fflri>^i] Acfyja)!' 
otros fj\ios i[irci]8[)l &v]aTera\Kcv. 6 t&itos 

abrod 6<pis . [ x]pv<ro€s teal xeXdyrj 

yvvaiK[o}iTf>[6<rG>7ros rpt^as fywaa dvOpanrou. 

SrjXot [ovv 6ti ] 6 h Tf Kcupy [iro]trj- 

205 act tt)<j[ . k]clI rfj irarptfa ir[o]XX& 

dyadic k[clI ] rod irarphs [ ]v 

Parts of 6 more lines. 

191. opoMK k.tX enclosed in round brackets. 04 of opou»t corr. from «• 

Col. viii. 
8 lines lost. 

«i **) [ 1 • • [ ]r*M 

ao^&lty iv '.Ep/xoO n6\u rtjt fJt[cydXr]i. dfiros 6 
0cta noui yrjpas iroAd 4W x[afjt]<p6jj r&t yrjpcu, 
oCror noiei Kvprods fj Kal dnb dppa>ar7JfiaT09 

225 KafupOfjvai, o&ro? iroiei vdvovs rfinwtfai, 
euros ripara 6fjtoioei8fj KavOdpot, odros 
ftfj t^pvra 6<f>6aXfiov9, olnos S/ioia kt^vi, 
CVT09 fioytXdXa, ofrros Ka><f>d, ovror va>8d, 
o8r{oy] iroiti ri [w]d$ri roifc dv8pd<nv mytfr 

230 a[0cu Kp]vf3r} Kal [frdfiiy KtvalSovs Qavtpobs 
Parts of 8 lines. 

Col. ix. 
Parts of 1 a lines. 

11. v&poxfy: 1. vbpoxtov, cf. 1. 198 IxBvw. 'From Pharmouthi 16-20. From 16th- 
20th of Aquarius, which (sc. fy'dtov) is the month Pharmouthi.' The interpretation of the 
astronomical data in the papyrus turns upon the question whether by topoxoov, lx6t»w k.tX the 
signs or the constellations of the zodiac are meant *. We are indebted to Mr. J. G. Smyly 

1 For those who are unfamiliar with ancient astronomy we quote Mr. Smyly's explanation of the 
difference between the signs and constellations of the zodiac. * The constellations of the zodiac are twelve 
in number, represented by somewhat arbitrary figures of men and animals, of unknown antiquity ; they are 
irregular in sice and position, and some consider that in Egypt they were connected with the equator rather 
than with the ecliptic. The signs of the zodiac, on the other hand, are exactly equal in size, each con- 



134 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI . 

for the following valuable note upon the passage. His explanation of the relation of 
the zodiac to the Egyptian year is not only new but serves to clear away many difficulties 
and apparent inconsistencies arising from the various references to it. ' It is clear from 
1. 100 that Pisces began with Pachon i ; thus the compiler of the calendar identified the 
months of the Egyptian year with the signs or with the constellations of the zodiac : Thoth 
= Cancer, Phaophi=Leo, Athur= Virgo, Choiak= Libra, Tubi= Scorpio, Mecheir= Sagit- 
tarius, Phamenoth= Capricorn, Pharmouthi= Aquarius, Pachon = Pisces, Pauni = Aries, 
Epeiph= Taurus, Mesore= Gemini. At first sight this would seem to indicate a tropical 
solar year beginning with the summer solstice on Thoth i, the months being determined 
by the signs of the zodiac through which the sun was passing. There is, however, very 
little evidence for an Egyptian year which began at the summer solstice and much for one 
beginning at the heliacal rising of Sirius, and in the second century these dates differed by 
nearly a month, the solstice taking place on June 24 (Julian) and the rising of Sirius on 
July 20 (Julian). It is therefore much more probable that the year in question was a 
sidereal year regulated by the heliacal rising of Sirius (cf. the circumstance that in all the 
lists Sothis was the first decan of Cancer), and that the month in relation to the zodiac 
was determined not by the sign through which the sun was passing, but by the constellation 
which was the last to rise before dawn. The decans would thus be kpovKonovvrts at the 
birth of the days over which they presided, and this suggestion is confirmed by the fact 
that in P. Brit. Mus. 98. 15 the decans are called 6L Xa/iwpol \? vpoaicSnui. If the calendar 
refers to a year of this kind the five intercalary days must have been taken into account, 
as well as a sixth intercalary day every fourth year ; but these days were always regarded 
by the Egyptians as outside the year, and did not interfere with the convenient but 
inaccurate practice of dividing the ecliptic into 360 degrees, each of which corresponded 
to one day. Moreover the difficulty is considerably diminished if, as is probable, the 
decans are regarded not as fractions of the circle of the ecliptic, but as stars or groups 
of stars rising just before dawn. In this calendar the intercalary days would not have been 
under the presidency of any of the thirty-six decans or their xpataiol, but each of them 
would have been dedicated to one of the five great gods of the Osirian circle, Osiris, 
Aroueris, Typhon, Isis and Nephthys, who were said to have been born on those days. It 
has long been a matter of dispute whether this year, supposing it to have existed, was divided 
into months bearing the same names as the months of the ordinary annus vagus. The 
papyrus seems to indicate that this was the case ; but its late date prevents the evidence 
from being conclusive, for it may well have been drawn up by someone who was acquainted 
with the two traditions that the Egyptian year began with Cancer and also that it began 
with Thoth 1, and who combined his information by identifying the two years. 

It is just possible to explain the papyrus from the usual point of view that the month 
is determined by the sign of the zodiac through which the sun was passing, but this involves 
very great difficulties. In the Pseudo-Gemini Calendar ium (Wachsmuth's ed. of Lydus, 
p. 183) we find rov d< vbpoxfov dumopwfrai 6 rjXios iv Tjpipau X. These thirty days correspond 
to Jan. 23-Feb. 2J on the Julian calendar, and since Pharmouthi 16-20 on the. same 

taining 30 degrees of the ecliptic ; they are measured from the spring equinox, which is determined by 
the intersection of the equator and the ecliptic. The position of this point among the stars is not fixedi 
but slips slowly backward along the ecliptic ; this is the precession of the equinoxes. With a most on* 
fortunate lack of imagination astronomers since the time 01 Ptolemy have called these divisions by the same 
names, as the constellations, which often gives rise to great confusion unless we know definitely which is 
referred to. Thus at present the vernal equinoctial point, though retaining the name " First point of Aries," 
is not in the constellation of Aries, but owing to the precession has shifted about 30 into the constellation 
Pisces. The constellations of the zodiac however (apart from variations in size) very nearly coincided with 
the signs in the second century of our era.' 



465. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 135 

calendar correspond to April 11-15 the sun cannot have been in Aquarius during those 
five days if the papyrus was drawn up according to the Alexandrian (i. e. Julian) calendar. 
But especially in astrological calculations in papyri of the Roman period the calendar 
kmh tov* apxalovt is frequently found (cf. P. Oxy. II. p. 138), and if we suppose that 
that reckoning was employed by the writer of this papyrus, we find that the sun was 
in Aquarius during Pharmouthi 16-20 from a.d. 196-291. Similarly with regard to the 
corresponding entry concerning Pachon 11-15 (1. 198), the sun would on the calendar 
Kark rovt apxaious be in Pisces during those five days from a.d. 168-268. These dates 
are only approximate because the time at which the sun enters the signs of the zodiac 
varies (in the Julian calendar) from century to century.' 

12-42. 'The presiding deity of that season, his name is Nebu, of which the 
interpretation is that he is the lord of wars and of reason. He is represented by an 
upright statue with the face of a vulture, wearing a diadem upon his head, and with 
the face of a serpent behind, having two wings and the feet of a lion and holding four 
swords, both faces being of gold. He signifies that the governor will . . . evils ; there shall 
be war, dislike and battle, and he will take counsel with the people as a friend. And 
during his rule there shall be a rebel and there shall be war, and many cities of Egypt 
will perish on account of the rebel, for the signs of the time are of war and dislike and 
battle, and there shall be destruction (of many?). In this time many shall live by 
stealth (?), and some shall live by singing and dancing, and some by chanting in the 
temples, and some by singing at banquets with sweet voices and they end well. This 
deity causes by reason the conqueror to be conquered and the conquered to conquer, 
and many live by receiving gratuities and registering and collecting from men what 
they have drunk up, and some live by ... as servants. He causes men to be lame 
because one foot . . . The sickness in this season is in the intestines and bowels, and 
there* shall be many deaths. 9 

16. /WtAi-o*: cf. the description of the 35th decan quoted in 1. 200, note. For the 
Ionic (?) form cf. 1. 1 1 pc /* and 1. 30 (pxravTau 

20. 6 riyoCfjxrot : Boll refers this to the presiding deity ; cf. the KparauA -/yf/uSw in the 
passage from Porphyry quoted in introd. But 6 rjyovfjxvos seems to be the subject of foro* 
. . . Koi¥oXoyovfX€vo(t) in 1. 22, and though the corruption in 1. 21 renders the whole passage 
uncertain, an earthly ruler seems to suit the context better. 

24. (ov)rov: before row is a blank space indicating a lacuna in the archetype or 
some letters which the scribe could not read. Similar omissions occur in 1L 152, 160, 161, 
174, 175, 176, 183, 184, and 198. 

28. Perhaps [mil ir]o[AX]»r. In the next line there is not room for Xa^&umv, but it 
may have been abbreviated. The reading \m{ is however very uncertain ; and we should 
rather expect a verb referring to singing or dancing. 

35-7. The meaning seems to be that men will be forced by tax-collectors to disgorge 
what they had already spent. 

60-72. • He is represented by an upright statue with the face of a ... , and of 
a young pig behind, having a . . . before upon his face, and holding four swords in his 
hands and . . . His tongue and face are fire. He signifies that this season causes 
many to make their living by the mouth. And many shall be advocates and others 
magicians and many singers of gods and kings and many interpreters of languages and 
many . . . and changing from place to place/ 



136 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

60. [mvvci Xeywy fa ofafc] is to be restored before [i<m» on the analogy of 11. 13-4. 

100-1. The lacunae are restored on the analogy of 1. 198-9. 

105. a<t>Qvv is perhaps the name, or the beginning of the name, of the goddess, and, 
if mvhs (2)a(f>6{rw be read, may be connected with Soair^/, the name of the 35th decan in 
the MS. of Hermes Trismegistus quoted in the note on 1. 200. 

107-20. ' She is represented by an image in real lapis lazuli of a woman seated upon 
a throne having one eye like that of . . . and one like that of Typhon, her face being 
of gold and her hands adorned (?)..., having a diadem upon her head. She signifies that 
this time causes hidden writings to . . . many foolish men, being unskilful in mind. For 
this season also produces men ignorant of writing, and again those who know writing 
very different in character from this kind and from the hieratic {?) writings.' 

1 10. .JmxfHus : possibly the genitive of Tv<f>w or Tvo>«>cw was intended, 
112. Perhaps ofn}^(e)*, c'orjoXio-fifVi; then meaning ' folded.' 

I20. Boll Suggests ^€partK&]p. 

145-65. 'In this season men fall upon women, and many children are born, and 
there shall be one male child of them which shall be of service to him, but the rest shall 
die, even the male children. This season causes men to have intercourse with their own 
female slaves, and they beget children, and these shall rule the lives of their fathers and 
of the free women. This god causes women to be childless and other children to be 
begotten and these to rule their lives. The sickness in this season is in the shoulders (?) 
and . . . The son of the goddess, his name is . . . torsense . eutoououophi, which means 
terrible speaker. He is represented by a statue with a lion's face, the hair of a god, 
holding a sceptre in his left hand, and in his right . . . , with the tail of a crocodile.' 

146. There is not room for «arao>fpo[in-a]i. 

147. avry, if it is not superfluous or a mistake for ovi-ofr, sc. row cu&pdot, seems to 
refer to the presiding deity. 

154. enpa: i. e. born of other mothers ; cf. Eur. Medea 639 mpou M Xckt/xh*. The 
contrast is between the fruitfulness of the slaves and the barrenness of the free women. 
156. Probably rt[vs &\fwvs or roJt* 6<f>0a\\iwvs. nav<roTa( ) in L 157 is corrupt. 
164. ov]ph KopKobLXov : cf. Boll, Sphaera, p. 295. 

171-83. 'This is the favourable time for chief-priests. It produces many sacred 
scribes of gods and kings and gives long life to each. It causes a king to bestow many 
favours even upon his former adversaries and upon . . . , and cities also to bestow favours ; 
it makes men behave well and aim at virtue especially with regard to the god. It causes 
the king . . . from the other kings who give him great support, as has been said in 
connexion with another season . . . ' 

This section is obscured by the frequent omissions of words or letters. «r6Vu in 
1. 175 may be (jcapifyalku (cf. 1. 177), though rots would then be expected rather than 

irpbs rovt. 

180. rot) 6Vov : food is more probably general than the particular deity presiding over 
this period. 

195. as is the termination of Spolm: cf. 1. 191. For the insertion of these medical 
recipes in 11. 190-6 cf. the descriptions of the decans quoted in note on 1. 200. 



466. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 137 

195-6. Probably &6[s i<p i\\upas | d. 

198. Cf. note on L 24. A blank space is left between itrrlv and Haga?. 

200. Tct[. . ,]u<ra[.lf[.]iy : Mr. Smyly suggests T«r{t/ia]u<ra[.]f[.]i;, comparing the descrip- 
tions of the decans in tne sign Pisces as given in a MS. of Hermes Trismegistus De Mensibus 
ad Asclepium (Pitra, Anatecia sacra et classic a y v. 2. 279), a passage which corresponds in 
a remarkable degree with the descriptions of the decans in Pisces found in the papyrus : — 

TCTopros kcu rpuucoorfc dcjeojdff ixBimv vp&rot. ovtos Hvofta fyci Trrifta koi tfanv foSpomos «oroXi- 
apfvos Skos Ifiartov Kvav€vov t 9x*i &* *<& xolpov bopdv, irtpufavpivos atrb t&p paorwv ca»? t&v doTpayakav, 
l^cor & eV rfj dc£i$ x €t P* vdptV«i;v, r^v de cvcowpov cx«jr Ksxakotriunpr ira/xfc r6v prjpSr. Kvpuw bi 
r&w irob&v ofr <cai cpmirrtt dnooTTjpara* yXvyfrov otv rovrov cV X/dqt prjpvWy jcal v?ro0cif {krravrjv 
wtptar€p€&pa KaroKkcurov cV cf jSovXri *al <j)6pti. 

ntpurros xa\ Tptatcotrrbs dcKawfc. ovtos Spofia fycc 2ocnr$i popfyty dc avSpvmov. tart & yvpvbs 
K€pifM\cuov /leWot e^cDrctfc tnrA rdv d/iav cp ri <5;ri<ra) jeal cV pey tjJ &£*? x fC /^ *X a>v MpKnojr, iv hi 
T$ apumpfc wpoaif>4p»p t6v \txav6v ddxrvXoy &? eVl ni ordfia kcl\ eirt rip jee^aXi}? fy*** /SacriXccov. 
yXO^roF off? jct.X. 

cVrof mil TpiaKoorbf bounds. o&ros Spopa fy« 2i/p», ?<m d<f>ayffs Kctkovpitpos bpaK&v 
(nrttpoft&Tjt, nvyava fyc** * n ^ &* *!* Mfa&ijt /SaaiXciov, yXityw ofo jc.t.X. 

The name of the second decan in Pisces according to the papyrus is very likely 
connected with the name of the first decan according to Hermes, while the description 
bears great resemblance to that of the third. Similarly the name of the first decan of the 
papyrus ((2)a<£&W; cf. note on 1. 105) may well be connected with locnrfi, the second 
in Hermes' list 

222-9. 'This deity causes long old age, until a man be bent by old age; he 
produces hunchbacks or makes men bent by sickness, he causes dwarfs to be born and 
monstrosities shaped like a beetle, and persons with no eyes and like a beast and dumb 
and deaf and toothless . . . ' 



466. Directions for Wrestling. 

13*5 X i8»3 cm. Second century. 

This papyrus consists of a series of short sections giving directions for 
performing certain bodily gestures, and in each case ending with the verb irkc£ov. 
As Mr. Smyly suggests, the purpose of these directions no doubt relates to the 
different grips in wrestling. That instructions in the palaestra were given in 
this way is shown by two curious passages, Lucian, Asinus 9-10 (pp. 576-8) 
and Anth. Pal. xii. 306. airSs in 11. a$ and 30-1 means f your opponent,' and 
avrif in 1. 19 probably refers to the hand. 

The papyrus, which we should ascribe to the second century, is written 
in a good-sized uncial hand with a tendency to link the letters together by short 
horizontal strokes. Parts of three columns are preserved, of which we print the 
first two, keeping the punctuation of the original. 



138 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Col. i. 

]a<rar ad irapava- 
] irp6f3a\e teal irXc- 

iov ] 

rij]v 8t£iav ad /ca- ao 

5 ] ad fotyov ad dvti- 

fi]€Taf3a\oO' ad irXl- 
iov ] 

fyftfcov ad 6K0V- 
] . aov rhv irSSa 25 

10 ] t))v X € V a ' °^ 

a]d pera8i*pdaaf 

ir\i£ov] 

] . at &pas fieTdOts 
] tov cwbw/iov 30 

15 *]* yevttov ip- 

]ra rod iripov 



Col. ii. 
napdOss rh piaov teal €/c *€- 
#aX?}f 777 ^€^ta ir\i£ov 



ad irepfder ad &n airily dir6- 
\ap€' ad Staphs w\i£ov 

ad irrr6f3a\€ rt)v 8€$tdp[' a]d 
c/y ft {nropdWa ir€/K[0€i]f 
Kark nXtvpod rhv €i[d]w- 
pov f36\€- ad dnSfiak* rjj €i> 
oavvpxp' ad avrhv perafj&s 
ir\i£otr ad p€Ta(3a\ov' ad jca- 
rh, r&v Svo ir\i£ov 

ad fidkt ir68a m ad 8td\afJ[€' ad €- 
infills dvdKka* ad irpoar[its 
dvdveve Kal c/y avrb[v . . . 
Xov Kal airhv «£iti#X[. . . . 



17. ft offuaov corr. from it, 19. viroXa0f Pap. 

30. ? ficra0a|Xo£ ; cf. 11. 6 and 26. 



22. 6 vjto/SoXXci Pap. 



467. Alchemistic Fragment. 

123x8-1 cm. 



About A.£. 100. 



The subject of this fragment is some process in which silver seems to have 
been the principal element, but the treatment described is obscure. The text 
is in a round uncial hand of the end of the first or early part of the 
second century, and the fragment comes no doubt from some treatise of 
a scientific or pseudo-scientific character. 



a (ovaiv. iart 8k 4- 
[p]otot Ttjt ytvopi- 



[. . . .)utov pept) irpbs 
[rb] irpSrepov perpoP 



468. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 139 

[v]tji rots (TeXrfvafoi? [. . .] tyc kv airr&L 

[.] . rjpai rovrov €.[.." 15 [rh dp]yijpiov lay 
5 [.]ay &<rr€ yw€<rOai [. . . .]ot/y xp&iui vx^i 

[k]otv\7jv ajirj£ov [••••]. y KaOapdt /jlo- 

[<r]TVTTTTjpLav tjv ol [..-.. .] /lipos a aarj 

[/3a]<p€t9 yp&vrai ko- [. . . . .]ol<tc . ififta- 

[rtJJXiyy {fiiiurv) /itTp&v 20 [A . . . .]/x . [. . .]? itajjU 

10 [..].* /cor(tJX)7y) tfrf rpfyas [y ]•[••• 

[ira2] p(£a,9 irdXiv pua- . . . . 

I. f| aft'owny ? 

4. Perhaps [a$w<n, but the context is difficult. 

9. iitrp&v or fierpav?: but there seems to be no reason for the genitive plural. 

II. fu'<r[yf to]vtov (with [mX\ cfe in L 1 4) or f"'cr[xw a^rov? fu<rv is precluded by the 
division of the word after cr. 

16. ]ow : the r, if it be *, was added later, [xpw}™ might have been expected. 



468. Medical Fragment. 

9-6x8-7 cm. Early third century. 

This fragment contains the upper part of a column of a medical treatise, 
written in a well-formed square uncial hand of medium size, probably in the first 
half of the third century. The subject under discussion is 8v<rov/>fo, the symptom}* 
and treatment of which are also described in various passages of the ancient 
writers on medicine. 

\af L .]y otirm ol iratSes $v<rov- 
povaiv ov jiSvov inciS)) 
<rr*v<i rh dyyeta dXXa ko\ 
iwcidij AvOpwros t# 
5 irp&rg top fipcp&y 
OcpH&raros 17; wXc[f|f[Tj7 
dtpnaata (pptryofiivfov 
Kal fapaivo/iivuv [top 
byp&v. 6 $1 T€0aXa<r<ra{fii* 
10 vos ch p\v KoiXias vn[o- 



140 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[81] a6pr\tnv dOcros t<rra[i 

[ vtypaiv<t{v 

f. )ims [ 



I. Cf. Galen, vtp\ Eforo/jftnw iii (Ktthn, Med. Gr. xiv. p. 571) tovto Ac koI irat&ita ju) 
dwafjJpots ovprjaat noiu. The word bvaovpuv is found in Aretaeus, Xpov. UaB. ii (KUhn, Med. 
Gr. xxiv. p. 141) ; dvmvpuu* is the commoner form. 

9-10. Cf. Athen. i. 32 d ol 8* ifrtfAtiktartpow TtBakarTvptvoi dboi wcpauraXoi tc <l<ru> *a\ 
Koiklas \vowTi*. 



469. Grammatical Rules. 

8*5 x io-5 cm. Early third century. 

This papyrus, which contained on the recto official correspondence (in which 
the form vavplas occurs) written in a fine almost uncial hand of the second 
century, had been cut down so as to form a long narrow strip before the verso 
was used for writing a series of grammatical rules in several columns. Of these 
one column is completely preserved, and there are the beginnings of lines of the 
next, written in an irregular semi-uncial hand of the third century. The rules, 
which are of an elementary character, deal, so far as the fragment goes, with 
the conjugation of the contracted (or, as they are called, ' perispome ') verbs. 

rod wpoo-wrrov 81k rfjs ai 81- 
<p06yyov, irpooypa<fx>fji£vov 
8k rod 1 fifj <rvi>€K<f>a>i>ovfjL€'> 
vov 8( 9 otov ycAS ycApr yc- 
5 Ajt. ol p&vroiyt AloXtts npo<r* 
(fxn>yoO<ri yeXcc? km! £o€? \iyov~ 
TO. KCLT<t 8\ rbv irapararucbv 
Karh }ikv rb np&tou irp6<ramov 
8ih rod w tKcpipcTai iirl 8ev- 
10 ripov teal rph\oty irpoo&nov 8ih 
rod a, otov iyi\w tyiXat iytXa* 



470. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 141 

ij 81 rpirr\ t&v ircpi<nra>/iiva[v] 
\jl\riii&T<ov ov(vy(a €K<p€percu Ka- 
rh. rhv hcor&ra yjfJi\vov inl &i/- 
15 ripov teal rptrov npoawrov 8ui 
rfjs 01 8t<p66yyov, olov xpv(r& 

1. Over <u is a horizontal stroke ; so 1. 3 4, &c. 1-2. b«f>6oyyov Pap. ; so in K 16. 

6. 1. ytXms kq\ /SAw. 8. Kara over an erasure. n. fX of *y*\as corr. from y. 

13. a of «a corr. 

' (The second conjugation of circumflex verbs in the present tense forms the second 
and third) person by the diphthong <u, the 4 being adscribed but not pronounced together 
(with the a), as ytX& ytXms ycXai. The Aeolians however pronounce it ycXau and /Soatp. 
In the imperfect the first person is formed by «v and the second and third by a, as eycXw 

rycXaf rycXa. 

The third conjugation of circumflex verbs in the present tense forms the second and 
third person by the diphthong o», as xpv™ (xpwofc gpvcrot).' 

5-6. Cf. Joannes Gr. (Meister, Griech. Dial. i. p. 176) rrjs bonipas wCvylas r&* 
nepitrwaiuvw t6 1 iv\ dcvrcpov Kal rpirov npoa&nov dytK<f)a>vrjTov hv napa rats SWaa diaAcjcroig 
fc^wcirac olov /9oat? fiocu yckais ycXai Pi'jau? iuW. 



470. Mathematical Treatise. 

1 6» 7 x 19 cm. Third century. 

A leaf, of which the top is lost, from a papyrus book written in double 
columns on a page, and containing apparently descriptions of astronomical 
instruments. The writing is a medium-sized semi-uncial of the third century. 
The high stop is found, and a comma-shaped sign is used occasionally for filling 
up short lines. For the interpretation of this papyrus we are indebted to 
Mr. J. G. Smyly. 

Lines 1-3 1 are the end of a description of a Tttvvtvrqpiov, of which instrument 
Eustathius {ad Od. p. 1397) says Kal Sri Hkfowv ttji; r&v tf€<rcr»i> rfpeaw AiyvimW 
ivarCOriaiv iv <Palbp<p kiytov avrovs itptinov ipiOpdv tvp&v xal ycoaynTpLav Kal aarpovofilav 
In bi ircrreiair re Kal Kvpelav Kal bit ypipjiara' Kal Sri oi rov TW&twvo? iirofivqiMTto-fiol 
oi ryv ira/>' "EAArjo-t wrrcCav <nniav$rjval <£a<rt fori YI\&tmos AAAci t$iv rov ktyoyAvov 
iroTcvnipiov. Karayp&fcaOai yip n itXivOCov &o"ircp iv tj} irerrcvTiKrj irai&t$ bi oi tA 
KivrjfxaTa rov fjkCov Kal rrjs crekrjvris In bi koX ra ^AAeiimftd irpayfxaT€vovrai oi Alyvjmoi. 
The details are rather obscure ; and the difficulties of the technical phraseology 



142 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

are increased by the inaccuracies of the papyrus, which throughout contains 
frequent errors especially with regard to numbers. These have strokes, either 
horizontal or slanting, over them, but no distinction is maintained between 
ordinary numerals and fractions. A mention of a fil&Kos occurs in 1. 24, which 
probably refers to the books of Hermes (cf. note ad be), perhaps the authority 
upon which the present treatise is based. 

Lines 31 to the end are concerned with the construction of a i>po\6yiov 
or time-piece, shaped something like a flower-pot. The figure, which in 1. 35 
is called a 6\ptaKos, appears to be a frustum of a right cone, of which a 
vertical central section is a quadrilateral, having two sides horizontal and 
parallel, and the other two inclined at equal angles to the horizon. In the 
present case the length of the upper line is 24 ftforvAoi, that of the parallel 
lower line or base (irvd^v) is 12, and the vertical depth is 18. The operations 
performed in 11. 38-46 are (1) add together the lengths of the top and base, 

XX X 

(2) divide by 2, (3) multiply by 3, result x, (4) find -, (5) find -, (6) multiply - 

3 4 4 

x 
by - f result y (for the nature of the last process cf. L 45, note). The lines 

lost between 11. 46 and 47 probably contained a statement that if a series of 
horizontal lines were drawn across the original figure at distances of 1 dtixrvAo? 
from each other, there would be 19 such lines and 18 figures of the same kind 
as the original (since the height of the figure is 18 &oktvAoi). The lengths of 
the lines will form an arithmetical progression, each line being § bixrvKos shorter 
than the preceding, i.e. they diminish Kara blpoipov (1. 48). These quadrilateral 
figures are all subjected to the same process as the original, but the writer 
displays considerable ingenuity in varying his expressions. Probably the vessel 
was filled with water, and time was calculated by the nearly uniform descent of 
the surface caused by the water running through a small hole in the centre 
of the base. 

Recto. 
Col. i. Col. ii. 

(fxorh [ [11 letters ]/>i#. . *a- 

fi€raOc[ Odncp ydp rot ov . [. . . 

*w dirb i[&v . .] x°*P[** v fMflXos Xcyci *•••[• wc- 

&v ( pkv d<nv /liXavtf? 25 pi rrj9 QcpvatifecDS [. . . . 
5 ££ \€vkol Kal irdvTts kv- 8i6irep Kal t^v fi{. . . 



470. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 



H3 



vb* irpoariyopfav typvaiv, 
oSra>s, ic *? i( lr l L & K Ka 
k(J tcy k8 kc k<> k( kti 
k$ X, yctvovrai t£ , k 

10 r^v Xeyo/iivijv iy t$ 
ir€<r<r€VTTipi<p Qopcop, 
tarty *flpw oucos, h ov/i- 
irkfjpwrtv X \a>p&y 
[/]f rbv dpiO/ibv r&v ^- 

15 /icp&v rrjs avvSSov. 
To6rf\v 8k rijy \d>pav 
ov p(Ta<pipovaiv yjtrj<poy 
iirtiS)) Kal iv rjj avvoSiKJj 
fj/Jiipa d<f)d>Ti<rr6s €<r- 

20 nv i\ atXJjvTj. d<f> &v dp^ 
O/a&v ihv dfcX&pai 



rjj Qepvovtpi Otav [. • . 
• /ityiarqv Xiyova[iv d- 

irb rijs /leydXrjs nfg[. . 
30 a* rijv irpoariyopiav %\[ov- 

T€ff. rbv 8k r&[v A- 

poXoyiw dptOphv ttJ9 [kol- 
TCurKcvijs oGtods d[iro- 
8i86aaiv, rb p,kv &va> [ 

35 dX/ifoicov SatcrvXooy [k8 

7toiovvt€$, rbv 8k irvO/iip[a 
ifi SoktvXodv, rb fldOos 8{a- 
ktvXcov it], Hlv irpo[<r$&- 
/icv rods k8 SarfrifXovs 

40 rots i(l t[ov irv]$p[(vos 
(<royra[i SdtcrvXoi Xt, 
3>v rb (fi/iurv) iiy, iirl y yetvov- 
rat 81a rfjy irepifeptav 
v8 } toGtw rb rpirov itj, 

45 rb 8* ty (fifjtiov). iroici n\ iirl 17 
ydvvrai p/iy, iroiti ofrrw 28. 

XI. <f>opvp' Pap. 17. <r of iifTcuJHpQwnv COIT. from p. 43. ir of n*fH<f>4piap corr. 



Col. i. 



Verso. 



CoL ii. 



[• • •]£ »f[. . . -K 

[. . .]if #c[a]rA 8(/ioipov. yet- 

[perjoi oSv irpomj ypa/A- 
50 [/iff •]•[.. .] k8, &[[a]]irXa<na<r- 

[Oiv]ros rod dpiO/ioO yd- 

[v€t)ou /it], 2>v d(f>€X€ rb 

[ft' t Xo]iiral p(y \ to6tg>v 

[to] tf/iurv) {k'\ Jt(y)j8', iirl rb rptrov 
55 [ycfr]€rai oa, rb 8k y icy 



[iirl y ye/ycjrai £c, rb [y 
70 [nap,] 7[b 8* 1^, {raiafi} 
iirl Kaf}', ytvtrai cifi', 
&y dfeXe iiiav, Xoinal 
81 fi'. 6 tcay , ShrXaxrov 
fifiP', d<peXe £', Xoinal /i/9, 

75 ft fipuru k&9 i*l 7 Y*(- 
vtrai fy, rb y ica, rb 
riraprov icft'iff, iirl 



144 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



[Setjrcpov, rb 8k 8* i( &v- 
[r*p]ov ifi', yttverai nfi'. • 

[fj 8]k Scvripa x^P a ^ 0T ^ 
[8]aKTv\a>v Kyy Kal &- 

6o [n\a]<ri[ao]Oiwos yctyc- 
[rai pfafi'y AfeXs rb j8' 
[rfjf] <n^<r]roXf}9, Xotnal /i<? 9 
[rb] (ii/iKTv) K[y, cirl y] £0, &v rb 
[y *]y, r[J 8k 8* i]fS', km ty 

65 [ycij^crjat] TL€ (Ijjtiov) l€, i£ $>v 
[a*0€]A[€ rb /]$•', Xoinal rep- {ffiiurv). 

*?•[••••] T v rpfrv y w- 

fi[g €]ta[i]y 8<£ktv\oi k(1(J' 



pa ytivtrai roffift \ &- 
<pe\c af¥ Xotnal t$8'. 

80 $ /cj8', pS* dfaipcOev- 

tos rod Sipotpov, rb (fipiov) 
icy, iir[l] y £a, ri y {eiri} 
icy', rb V i*V, 4ir2 jcy 
riff , £<f>€X€ (J ((j/Hau), Xoiiral 

85 rb (fipurv) iff. { dptOpbs k8 
19 ft, d(paip€i {?, Xoiiral 
XOy' 9 &v rb ijptov ic/P. 



3-5. The numbers are very unintelligible as they stand. If £ be read for f in 1. 4 
and i hi for £& in 1. 5, there may be some reference to the sixty dark nights and the sixty 
bright days in the space of two months. Cf. the amypa of Cleobulus (Diog. Laert. i. 90), 
fopcrat A* avrov *v rois Uap(f>ikTjt vnopvfipaat ical aivtypa roiov' 

Efff 6 Trarrjp, trailer dvoKuid*Ka t ray dc f*aoTq» 
iraldcff bU rpiaKOPTa diav&ixa ttdot t^pwrac 
al fiiv Xcvfcai tfatriv ldtuf 9 al & avr* fitkcuvai 9 
dBdparot M t covoxu dirofflivvBovviv dnaacu. 

lore dc 6 cVunmfc. 

5. kv*6s npoatiyoplcw: there seems to have been a series of summations of consecutive 
numbers, of which a specimen is given in the following lines: — 15 + 16 + 17+ etc. 
+ 30 = 360. In the Codex Cizensis of Nicomachus Gerasenus is a series of wpoPK^para 

dptdprjrutd of which the first is headed row Kvvfc. boBivrvv airo povdtos brovwvoiiv dpitipv* 
•<t>(&js fvpclv foot iariv 6 aipiras, ' Given any number of consecutive figures starting with 
unity to find their sum.' This problem is generally assigned to Diogenes Cynicus (ximfc). 
Perhaps arithmetical progressions went by this name. 

9-15. 'up to the place in the ncaacvrrjpwv which is called Phoror, which is the 
house of Horus, and extends for 30 complete x»pa<, making up the number of days from 
conjunction to conjunction/ The real period from conjunction to conjunction is about 
29^ days. Without knowing more about the construction and use of the vunnvriipvov 
it is difficult to say what ov peruipipovviv yfnjfav in 1. 17 means. The reason assigned 
in 11. 18-30 is that on the day of conjunction the moon reflects no light from the sun. 
*Qpov oucos is a translation of $op»p which = Egyptian Per-Hor ' house of Horus.' 

24. /9t/3Xof : the reference is very likely to the books of Hermes; cf. Gem. Alex. 
Strom, vi. 4 p*rh dc rbv y&ov 6 a>po<TK<hros copo\6yt6v re putra x'l/x* *<& <fx>ipuca darpdkoyias ?X<° P 
<rvp&o\a npfcurur, tovtov to. dorpokoyovpeva rSav *Epfiov fk&kioay rfoaapa Zrra t6v dpiBpbv dii bib 
ordparos tyi* XPli &? r ^ M« v ^ 0Tl n *pi t°v buuc6(Tpov tS>v dn\avS>v <f>auK>pivwp &trrpvw 9 r& dc n*p\ 
r&v aw6do)v Kai iJNmtrp&v rjkiw Ka\ af\f)vrjt f t6 d* Xocir^y ntpi t«v dvarokmv. The mention 



A 



I 



470. MISCELLANEOUS LITERARY FRAGMENTS 145 

of the upo\6yiov and the awodoi and tjmuriun of the sun and moon affords a noteworthy 
point of contact with the papyrus. 

25. &€pvav<f>€M : apparently another division of the irco-acvr^piov like *op»p in 1. 11. 

31-46. 'The calculation of the construction of time-pieces is thus given. Make 
a SKplvicos with an upper line of 24 ddxrvXot, a base of 1 2 &i«TvXoi, and a depth of 18 ddxrvXot. 
If we add the 24 doicrvXoi to the 12 AdxrvXoi of the base the result will be 36 Mumtkoi; 
£ of this is 18, multiplying, on account of the round surface, by 3 we obtain 54; £ of this 
is 18, ^ is 13! ; 18 multiplied by 13^ makes 243. 1 

45. L trow? 117 M iy («7/uav) Spy. The last process consists of the multiplication of the 

(X X\. 

- and -J • though it is incorrectly performed here as in the corre- 
3 4 7 

sponding passages of the various ypafipal. In the first ypafififj (1. 57) 23$ x i7f = 420^, 
for which the papyrus has 300^ (cf. note ad foe); in the second (11. 64-5) 23 x 1 7 J = 396 J, 
for which the papyrus has in 1. 65 315^ A, but cf. 1. 66, where the total 396^ is reached; 
in the third the product is lost; in the fourth (1. 71) 16J x 21$ (as is expressly indicated 
by the papyrus) makes 3523*5, for which the text has 5^ ; in the fifth (11. 77-8) 21 x 15J 
= 33°f» *° r which the text has 37o|; in the sixth (11. 83-4) 2o£x 15 J = 3 10^, for which 
the text has 300^. 

The whole process may be explained in this way. 

Let AB and CD be two successive ypafipnL Half of * 

AB + CD is the length of EF drawn halfway between A rn r-t B 

the two lines. This is multiplied by 3 dtA rrjv ncpi<p*piav 
(!• 43) : if the writer took the ratio of the circumference 
of a circle to its diameter to be 3 instead of ir, the result 
will be the circumference of the circle described on EF 
as diameter. This is divided by 3 (i.e. by n), giving 
the diameter again. The diameter is then multiplied 
by a quarter of the circumference (in modern language 

2r x — = wr* t where r is the radius), giving the area of the circle. If now the writer 

made the specious but incorrect assumption that the volume of the frustum of the cone 
contained between the planes AB and CD was equal to that of the cylinder of equal height 
standing on the circle described on EF as diameter, then since the distance between AB 
and CD is 1 &i*rvXo* he would have regarded his result as the volume expressed in cubic 
&fervXoi. The error arising from this assumption is comparatively small in the present case. 
If the instrument in question were a water-clock, a knowledge of this volume would be 
of great importance. 

46. vom ovtcos 2d: the meaning of this number, which corresponds to the revised 
totals in 11. 66, 73, 79 and 85 after a certain deduction has been made from the totals 
obtained previously (cf. 1. 45, note), is obscure. 

4*H>7« ' The first line is therefore 24 danrvkoi in length ; twice this number is 48, 
subtract §, the remainder is 4 7 J, half of this is 23$, this multiplied by 3 makes 71, 
£ of this is 23$, and £ is i7|, total 420^.' On the relation of this figure to the original 
one see introd. 

50. There is not room for SoktvAw* written out, but the word may have been 
abbreviated. The process of doubling the upper side and then subtracting \ is equivalent 
to adding together the lengths of the two opposite sides ; cf. 11. 38-40. 

54. The reading of the first two letters is very doubtful, but the sense is made certain 
by a comparison with the parallel passages in 11. 75 and 81. Mt6 rplrop, as the arith- 

L 



146 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

metic in the parallel passages (cf. 1. 45, note) shows, is a mistake for in\ y, i. e. multiplica- 
tion by 3. This abnormal use of an arithmetical term is immediately followed by another, 
dcvrfpov instead of Mfioipov for £, and the occurrence of these irregularities is traceable to 
the incorrect verbal interpretation of the figures y and 0. The method of expressing f in 
1. 56 (| + xV) * s a ^ so unusual. 

57. riff : 1. v«'0',cf. 1. 45, note. The confusion of v and r is easy and the space left 
between r and 1 points to an omission. 

58-66. ' The second figure consists of 23J AacruXoc, twice this makes 46^, subtract § 
for the contraction, the remainder is 46, \ is 23, 3 times this is 69, J of this is 23, 
£ is 17 J, this multiplied by 23 makes 3<)6§, subtract ^, the remainder is 396^.' 

The process up to L 64 is the same as in the previous figure. The numbers in 11. 64-7 
are clearly very corrupt, but if «y in 1. 64 be corrected to icy the result becomes intelligible. 
1 7^x23 gives 396f, i.e. rtepip, which has been corrupted to ru ((Siumr) iY; but after 
subtracting the last fraction trie total in 1. 66 is nearly correct ; cf. 1. 45, note. 

62. [rrjs] <n/ L cr]roXi}f : this means that § 3d*crvAo* is subtracted because each ypa^rj is 
both shorter than the one preceding and larger than the one following by \ daxrvXor. 

69. About eight lines are lost at the top of the column, which may be restored 

diTrXaxrov yiverai pry , a<f>€k€ ff, \onrat fibf?, hv rb fjfitav «/3y en\ y £f, t6 y «/9y', r6 & iff^iff, cWi 
ft/9y ytverai rodift. d k/3, biiikwrov /id, ctycXc ft, \011rcu fiyy, T & W l(ru *°& K.T.X. 

70-1. The figures, as usual, are very corrupt; i6^x 2i§ = 352^, instead of which 
the text has in 1. 71 5^. The correct figure rvftiff seems to have been transferred to 
1. 70 and there to have been corrupted into the meaningless raurP. Though the final & 
is not certain, r& Xaa cannot be read, even if it made sense. The figures 4^ in 1. 73 
are a continuation of the original error 5^ for 352^ ; cf. note on 1. 45. 

73. At this point the writer becomes more concise ; e means the fifth y/wfw, which 
is 2i£ daxrvXoi in length. The usual .operations are performed correctly as far as 1. 77. 
In 1. 78 fta is an error for ox, and 370 J should be 330I; cf. note on 1. 45. The number 
at the end of 1. 79 should probably be 329^. 

80-1. 'The sixth (ypafiprj) is 2o| (doxruXoc), which become 40$ when the § has 
been subtracted/ This is a short way of saying that when all the operations up 
to the subtraction of the § have been performed, the result is 40I (20^x2 =41^; 
4i£-S=4o|). 

82. The superfluous M before icy is obviously due to the occurrence of M *y in the 
next line. 

&4* *5ix 20J = 3103*2-, for which the text has either 310I or 300^; cf. 1. 45, note. 

85. The seventh ypafipti is 20 ddtcrvXoi long. #ed w is a corruption of * followed by 
tlwXwrov or bmhaaiavBivTos, 

87. ic is an error for t$. 



471. OFFICIAL 147 



V. SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS 

(a) OFFICIAL. 

471. Speech of an Advocate. 

305 x 4^-5 cm. Second century. 

This long papyrus, written in a semi-uncial hand and elaborately punctuated 
like a literary work, contains part of a speech of an advocate directed against 
a person whose name is apparently Maximus. The precise point at issue is not 
clear. There are accusations concerning money-lending, and some question 
connected with the holding of the office of gymnasiarch arises, but the greater 
part of the speech consists of an outspoken denunciation of the relations of 
Maximus to a certain boy. That Maximus was or had been a very high official 
is shown by several passages ; cf. the references in 1. 54 to the regal state 
assumed by him, in 11. 66-72 to the crowd of clients, in 11. 95-7 to petitions 
made to him and his power to confiscate property, and in 11. 124-30 to his 
journeys throughout Egypt. These allusions suit no one so well as the praefect 
himself, and the view that Maximus had been praefect of Egypt is supported by 
1. 22, where i[ir}apxclas * s the most probable reading. On this hypothesis the 
icSpios whose Tfyri is appealed to by witnesses in 1. 65 and before whom this 
speech was delivered, was more probably the reigning emperor (cf. 1. 32, where 
iriJ/uos means the emperor) than the praefect in office. Whether however this 
speech was really delivered or is a composition in the style for instance of 3d 
(cf. Bauer, Arc/riv, I. pp. 29 sqq.) may be doubted. It is difficult to imagine the 
circumstances under which such violent accusations would actually be made, 
and unfortunately the identity of Maximus is far from clear. The only second 
century praefect known to have borne that name is Vibius Maximus (a.d. 103-7), 
but the papyrus probably belongs to the age of Hadrian or the Antonines. 

Out of six columns the first (not printed) has only the ends of a few lines, 
while the sixth has lost the ends of lines, and the second and fifth are disfigured 
by considerable lacunae. Two kinds of stops, the high and low point, are 
employed and one or two accents and breathings occur. The papyrus has been 
subjected to much revision, additions to or recastings of the main text being 
appended at the bottom of Cols, ii-v by a different hand. The position at 

L 2 



148 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



which the alterations were to be made is indicated in one or two instances by 
critical marks. 



Col. ii. 
Kal [t&v] dpyato&v a7ro[<rr€-] 

) p€?T[ai ir]po<r0jj<ra> n Kvpie 
ir€p[l ov] 6avfid(T€L9 oT/iai Kal 
dm[arrjo]<Eis fa>9 &v ri ypd/i- 
5 p[ara dvoL\yv^y^/i€v* tSkov kcl- 
T€Kf>€ivcv off /JLrjSiirco xp6- 
vov \af36vres iviot rb Sdvei- 
ov 1j<rav. ri $r\(Tiv\ diroSr)- 
\jiovvt]e$ ^yvo^<rar€ riy 

10 [ir]*pl toUtodv ytypcLfi/JLe- 
va? vp[€i]v imoroXds; £/i€i- 
vov & aSrai Kal <ra<f>£o?€- 
pop rijv irepl tovto dxpci- 
fitiav Kal rijv km/ieXuav 

15 Ma£(fi[o]v SrjXwrouariv. 
6 plv yip TtXcvrdios {mo- 
pvflfia{T]t<rfibs [e}m<r<f)pa- 
ytfct rijv SovXtjv avrov 
Kal rbv tpoma rbv irpb? 

20 rb fiHpd[Ki]ow . . . /?o/xc- 
va>v yap iireitiav diraX- 
[X]ayrji rjjf i[ir]apx*ta$ *lra 

[ ] T0i>9 T6K0VS 

[• • • J • 6Tct[.j7ra . . o . 

25 [ i« letters ]•[••.] 
[ »» » M l ] **<> 
[ „ „ )v &*8o- 

\X ] • f/> && t4s 

[ yv/iva]<napxfas 

30 [«r«]ri7/M7Ta[r]f cfr jilv 



Col. iii. 

37 vbs c [oral] yvpvaa(ap^o[s 
rb Si Ivarov Kal ffiVco- 
arbv 'Av€(ktito? [yvpva- 

40 (Tiapyjiazi. raih[a Sh e#c 
Tiros ali\C]a$ <r[. • . • . 
#ca$; i£airarr)G{rjvaL\ 
fj Kal &>/)€&[? Xafluv] 
<f>jj<ru9; ovv<f>e[p€t rot- 

45 wv To8XaTTo[v p6v]ov 
ifioXoyuv. fifi€is tf oih- 
k etXtjcfrevai ae ptaObv 
[dXXa. 8c]8a>Kevai <j>apiv. 



t[C] yhp iirTaKaiS€Ka€Tfj9 . 

50 [ir]ai? iraaav fjpipav liki- 
nvti napa ao[(;] to6to>v 
%Kaoros iadKis rj£id>0r] 
fi€Ta\a{icii> lortdaccDS, 
[o]v8i yap fia+Siw cjrjSao-t- 

55 XiaOeh &ira£ rh Toiati- 
ra fyapifav, tov naTSa 
i6pcuc€v iv t&l [a]uv7roai- 
a>i Kal /icrA tov n[a)rpbs 
Kal p6vov. 46paK€ 8h Kal 

60 [PX]ip/ia dvaitryyvrov 
Kal Siairofiirks dvcuayfiv- 
rov(f) ipaar&v 8a[.]eia>v. 
rt Sk iraaav fip([p]av 1^ 
[<r]rrd{€To; /lapTvpourat 

65 Kvpie rfjy oijp rOyriv 
[cT] /ifjv dvajievSvrwv 



471. OFFICIAL 



149 



35 



[rb] iv[v*aKai8]kKaTov 

[(]to9 t[ov] Kvptov BepveiKta- 

[..].. oA .. . yf vat . . t» rfiy i w tiroTt 
[....].. [.] ic[al Y]u|i,va<ndpxtt»v Kal fpa- 

[Jm-n^rfiv — ].[...] [. . . 



a6r 



|[ij/*]]a>i/ rbv dairaafiip 
Traces of 4 lines by the second hand. 



5. pry* above the line. 6. ^v Pap. 8. rjaar Pap. 11. tmarokag' Pap. 15. 
AtyXttaovo-u'* Pap. 20. papaKtoV Pap. 29. yvfi)«i]<rui/>;(<4iff° Pap. 30. cwVJnjpTTafi]** 

Pap. 40. (Ttapxn<Tti t Pap. 42. gar' r(airan7^i7vai]' Pap. 44. <fa<r*is* Pap. 46. 

opoXoyriy* Pap. 48. 0a/x«y Pap. 51. <r[o*]- rap. 53. «mao-CMf. Pap. 1. cWidcrcw. 

56. c;pipi{ov. Pap* 58. on* . . . irarpos" Pap. 59. /mvov* Pap. 62. dof.jfiW Pap. 

63. i^<r]iraf€TO* Pap. 65. tv**/!*. P a P» 



Col. iv. 

72 *a2 OvpavXavvrcov ha t[ov 
koit&vos k£i6vra rbv 
irai8a iopatcivai p6v[ov 

75 Hy* 7 ]] <rt/j/j8oXa htiKvtivra 

rrjs irpbs TOVTOV 6[IU- 
A/iay. <?7ra£ yi/> h €0€t tt)S 
a{l<r])(i}v7is yepSficvov 
tfifiopipoi' Kal irXovanov 

80 pupdictov kOpVWTCTO 

Kal k£6fip^(\<Ev <Sot€ Avti- 
KpV9 indtrroDv awirai- 
(uv Kal ([pfflprfjaOai r&v 
%€ip&v [Ei]riixov rod jcoi- 

85 rwdrov Kal yiXwra 
iro\i>i> Kal avufiivov 
iv pivots toT$ d<nra{o- 
fiivots ytXav. J\v 8\ oi- 
k daUvcrov, (Sore Kal 

90 cTTiStigis J\v ain&n. irpbs 
rods 8ay€i(ofiivous 
a hrparrtv. rt oSv d Ka- 



Col. v. 

[i]v Otdrpy Ka6iaa[vra 
napiS&Kas €& 0[d]y[aTov 9 
dyevtiov Si Kal o[. .] . . v 
in Kal *tipc{p<f>ov p]ctpd- 

110 kiov kv tSa [irpai]ra>pC(pi 
rraaav j)^[€]/ja[i/ Trj]f>&y 
oifKiri 2ir€[iir€9 [iirl ra 
8i8a<rKaX^i]a Ka[l] r[A? irpo- 
<TT)Kov<ra? rois y[<Eavi)a[i$ 

115 TpifJ[d]s. ir6a<p 8i[kcu6t€- 
pov fat ifiifiyjroo t^v . . . 
ra[v]ra 7ra[i]8aycoy[ovv- 
ra iraripa Kal . [ 

• [ M 

120 [ ]f*r[»] • ?( 

#V^. ...J i....7.|. .... 

xt — ] • • • 'x[-> • • [ 

*al f[. . .] [. • • 

ir€/>[i]7ra[T]€?$ SXrjv [rflv AU 
125 yvm\ov adv] /iup[aK(<p. 



oti ftfiy e/y [rb] roG . [. 



J 5o 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



Tiy0i)s <ri> Kal virepav- 

oXA'Wv 
[<r]rripos ovk eK&Xves; paj/]J 

95 jilv irivrjs ivOpomos 

[h] evrek&aiv IfiartoLS 

krHfyrf- <roi ri\v ova lav 

avrov Kal rrjs yvvatKbs 

Kal t&v irepl airrbv dva- 

ioo Xrj^ff^pOrjvai KeXevei? Kal 

rhv ovk iv XevKous kaOrjaiv 

TOona[.]T[o]y 6cur/pov [[t6kov]] 

irX^ptj 
tovtow t6kov JirovJ r6 o-uja- 

Kal tj troop 

wX ie!l "HI TU« II P<D 

105 [. . .]rrpum« -rife [. .]wv . |ia T f[. .] 

72. Ovpavkovmtov Pap. 74. topaKtvaT Pap. 76. ofietXias' Pap. 8 1. ffv/3/Hff]*** 

Pap. 84. KoiTG>t>€tTOv' Pap. 88. TcXav' Pap. 89. tunn>croV wrrt Pap. 90. 

1. avrov. 92. fir/jarrc** Pap. 93. vir*pav[cr n;fW Pap. 94. cxaXvcs* Pap. 97- 

o-ot* Pap. 100. KfXevcir* Pap. 115. rptfyar Pap. 122. * ... Pap. 129. <roi. 

Pap. 130. ^€i" Pap. 132. iraprjv* Pap. 135. jpurcif Pap. 



ayopatov KpiTrjf>[(ov firj/ia ? 
&rra*ai$€Ka€T[i)? waff e<r- 

130 0ci *a2 €i/ n.r}\ov<r[<p [Kal 

Sirot nor IjaOa fii([. . . . 

K- 
(ru[[vj]7ra/>^v; ol flip [&W01 

X irdvres TT€puordfi[e6a 

t&*9 T€ dTro8r)fiia[$ Kal 

135 tA? KpiaCl? CDOT6 fl[. . . . 
x ol jjiJv dX[Xo]t irdvTct mp[iurrd- 

|U0a Td[f d]iro6t|)il[af 

dirio-^agcv t[. 



Col. vi. 



140 . j{ ] . . naf.] . [ 


150 G&jxaTi Ktxprj 


dfia yap Tfjy eMrcjSfe/aj/ 


r}£i<ib6T) irap[ 


Ma£t/iov cnc&rcr . [ 


T&V toiovt\<ov 


/M(T€ KaX\l[p]€lK69 j[l9 T&V 


crmv a<p[ 


dirb Movadov <j>i\[o€r6<fxDv 


Kptiveiv . [ 


M5 dp£as & Kal ri)v . [ 


155 ai)r&. 6ap[ 


dpxiSiKaar&v ao\ 


rfjv €7nor[ 


Ka kirl jt<u&[ 


ice rfjv arj[ 


iinrsipta &[ 


T17<T€7t[ 


d\\m Si ovk[ 


epyo[ 




160 [.]£ 


142. o-KofTci* Pap. 


155. avrcu* Pap. 



472. OFFICIAL 151 

2. The critical mark opposite this line perhaps indicates that the adscript at the 
bottom of the column was to be inserted at this point. But from internal evidence 
the adscript would seem more appropriate to 11 21-32, where the yvfivaatapxla is referred 
to. There is also a v-shaped mark opposite 1. 7. 

2-1 10. 'I will add a fact, my lord, which will, I expect, excite your wonder and 
disbelief until we read the documents. He condemned people to pay interest for a period 
at which in some cases they had not yet even received the loan. What does he say? 
Owing to your absence you were ignorant of the letters written to you about this? 
These letters will still better and more clearly exhibit Maximus' exactness and care in this 
matter. For the last memorandum confirms (the question of) his slave (?) and his love 
for the youth. . . . Up to the 19th year of the Emperor Berenicianus will be gymnasiarch 
and in the 29th Anicetus will hold that office. What reason had you for (suppressing ?) 
all this ? Will you say that you were deceived or that you took bribes ? It is best to 
acknowledge only the lesser fault. But we assert not that you took a reward but that 
you gave one. For why did a boy of 17 years dine with you every day? Each of 
these witnesses whenever he was invited to join the banquet (it was not easy when once 
you had assumed regal state to obtain such favours from you) saw the boy at the party, 
both with his father and alone, and each saw the shameless look and shameless goings 
to and fro of the lovers. . . . Why did he greet him every day ? They bear evidence 
swearing by your Fortune, my lord, that while they were waiting to salute him and 
gathered at the door they saw the boy coming out of the bed-chamber alone, showing signs 
of his intercourse with him. For when once accustomed to his shame this handsome 
and rich youth gave himself airs and became so impudent that he sported with and clasped 
the hands of Eutychus the chamberlain in the presence of every one and laughed long 
and freely in the middle of the clients. He was not stupid, and even showed off to 
the borrowers what he had been doing. Why then did not you with your modesty 
and extreme austerity stop him ? If a poor man wearing cheap clothes asks you a favour, 
you order his property and that of his wife and friends to be confiscated, and the man 
who took his seat at the theatre without wearing white garments you delivered to death, 
whereas a still beardless . . . and handsome youth you kept all day in the praetorium and 
did not send him any longer to the schools and the exercises proper for the young . . . you 
travel about the whole of Egypt with the youth. Did not a boy of 17 years accompany 
you to the judgement-seat in the public court ? Why then was he by your side both at 
Memphis and at Pelusium and wherever you were ? • . / 

18. rfiv bovXtjp aiirov is very obscure; an abstract substantive to balance tpwra would be 
expected. 1. hovktinvl 

20. The vestiges do not well suit afutfofuvov. . 

s 41. a[*a-u»nrj\Kas ? 

62. da[.]fifl»v: the second letter might be o, but it is difficult to escape from da[i>]fu»j' 9 
which however yields no sense. 



472. Speech of an Advocate. 

3°'5 X 35*5 cm. About a.d. 130. 

This papyrus contains the concluding part of a speech in defence by an 
advocate. The first column, which consists only of ends of lines, is not printed, 



152 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

the second and third are practically complete. The orator's client was a woman 
called Hermione, against whom various charges of attempted poisoning, and 
fraud in connexion with a supposed mortgage, had been brought by a man whose 
name does not appear here, but was Sarapion, if, as is almost certain, 486 is 
concerned with the same dispute. An epistrategus is mentioned in the first 
column, and it is probable that the proceedings took place about A.D. 130 before 
Claudius Quintianus at the trial mentioned in 486. 8 and 26, from which passages 
we learn that the epistrategus referred the case to the praefect. The handwriting 
of the papyrus is very like that of the Petition of Dionysia (237), written in the 
reign of Commodus, and this copy of the speech may have been made some 
years after it was delivered. 

Col. ii. 

avTrj. Kal yhp dirb rfjs kicdvov oiictas IgeXrjXvOei ir€(f>appaK€va-0ai 
Alfy<tt]j/ Kal dir[b] p\v rrj? 'Eppioi'tjs oUtas k^toav ofir ity\ 
irp6s nva alaOio'Oai ovSevb? oil? SXcds inSvotav oi&splav iay^v^ 
dirb 8\ Ttjs iavrov re Kal rod kXripovoptiv piXXovro? viov 
5 irporjXOc 7T€<f>appaKa)a6ai Xiya>v. et\€v l^ v °" v air ^ as ' T °v KaL 
afrrb? i[av]r£ Trpoo-wwKelv <f>dppaKoi> Ay Kal dXXoi noXXol rbv 
Odvarov rod {rjv irpoKpdvavres, Kal yap iirb 8av€iar&v aSAAu- 
ro Kal rjirSpei. €i 8* dpa tis Kal eirtfiovXtvcrev avr& 6 vlb? €mri]8a- 
6raro9» 8ih rt 8' eirrjv€VK€v rb h'KXr)pa Tavry SfjXov. Svvarai 

10 /i\v yhp Kal dXXa rivh XeXonrrjaOai irapa rbv rfjs irpovotas ^p6vov 9 
8ia8iKwai 8k rb it pay pa Sri Kal ifaXortiirci avrfjv pfj iirtara/iivrjv 
Kal dvSpa p\v avrfjs iavrov tKdXet, ovk dgtovpevos 8i ravrrj? 
rf}$ irpoarjyoplas inf atirrjs Kal ipwriK&s ijXyei Kal imffiv iavrcp 
rafirrjv ovk {fOeXcv. khv Xiyaciv SovXov HjidpaySov dvtvpsrov 

15 ye[y ]oviyai airrbv alriav iypvra rod rijv mcrriv K€KXo<f)ivai 9 

qbrj[o]ly & odv Kal irtartv yeyovivai iva KXeirjj, ov Svvarai yhp kckAc- 
$0ai rb prjS' dp\fjv ycvS/ievov /iff Svvarbv 5* ctvai fiySt 
irtariv y€yp[d]<f>6ai. afire yhp ij dyopda(aa)a ypdp/iara jj8u afire fj vvv 
ivKaXovphrj *Eppi6vT] y afire £ivo? oiSels dXXrjs Karaypa<f>etaii$ 

20 ir(ar[i]v irq^p (\avrov SiSaxri. ware Kal irapa rtvos &v etirot r)jv mariv 
ioxrjKivar, irapa iravrbs yhp &Kvpo$ rjv. e/ 8c diriSpa SovXos 
ov8iv Svvarai roQro Karh Seaworov. in pivroi ircpl tov 
fiySe irloriv dvai Kal fj vo/ifj avvfldXXcrai. r&v yhp iv irlarei 



472. OFFICIAL 153 

Karaypa^ivrcnv tJ Svopa p[6]vov c/y rods \ptfpaTiapovs m 

25 irap^0]£yra>v 9 ovkcti 8 dvrnroiovpkvcbv 3>v KaT€ypd<f>rjaay 

4 fj.lv dyopda{ao)a <f>av€pd io[Ti]y Kal dvTnr*iroii\pivi\ Kal d<f> ofcrcp 
rjy6pa[a]€ [K]ap7rovpiv7j, 6 8 d<f> ovwep ireirpatce ovk£ti dXXa Kal 
t&v Trjs prjTpb? t$iv [ot\KOvojitav &$ irpovoTjTfjs iroiovfievos 
to6toi[s 8k] iux[€i]p&p. kav Koivbv 6poX6yrjpa Xiyaxri yeyo- 

30 vkvai Ttjs Ovyarpbs irpbs rfjv t Eppt6vr)v iKarbv ircvTrJKOVTa 
K€pafifa[v] Kal dirb Totiroav 5>v rjySpaaw KTt\pdrdov <f>ap\v 
tovto [ira]v prjSkv dvcu irpbs rbv Karffyopov. ov yap *t ti iirpafct 
Ovydrrjp irpbs rty pi\ripa to€to adroit els ovKofavrtav e&prjpa, 
6fux>9 8k o6t€ r&y avr&v yjp6vmv ov8k tovto dXXa /i€T hi- 

35 avrtyy] ivyvs 8fj oSt€ i^aTb]v irevTJjKovTa Kzpapimv yppr\yia 
irpbs ntor[i\v Tcaadpav TaXdvr&v o&Siv €<m, Tavra yap pdvoy 
ivfe ktrnv tSkos. dXXa fifty . vra>v mareoas nepl tovtw 
o6<rqs irapa rp SokoOvti ireirpaKwai hipa dv iavrfjy ypdp- 
jiaTi fj 0[vy]dT7)p KaTi\vyia t& 8tj poo-fa ptWrjaovo-a d<f>aipe- 

40 Ofo^jrOai 6]rr6T€ iKeivw iSSicct; dXXa Kal rb r§9 [x o P]V7^ toioOtov 

1[v [tQ yap t Eppi]6vji rpris naiSt? rjaav, 'A<f>po[8 ]v, Aiowaia, 

r[ ]v Trjs Aiowcrlas rb irpc[ ] 'EppiSvr) 

[ 14 letters ] tKoraaiv to€ prjy . [ ] . e v 

[ *6 » )y<r [ 17 letters ftepov 



Col. iii. 

45 t&v iratS&v Tod Trpeafivrepov, 
iStrjOrj jf Atowata ttjs prfTpbs 
pfj iirl pSvois avrfjv diroXtiruv 
Toft SiaTTjyrjvat <f>6daa<ny 
dXXd ti Kal napaa^ety ay iirl 

50 ivl p6v<p <ra\€vovaai>, Kal ^ pkv 
'EppiSvrj 8(8oHriv avrfj ty ijpiov 
TdXavrov. ^ ^ t va l 1 ^ Ka i (&<?& 
ff p^Ttjp TOVTW areprJTai SiSaxrt 
dvrl t6kov KaT kviavrbv t^v 



154 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

55 yoprftiav ra{nt\v teal tovto avrb 
yiypairrai Karh rb Koivbv 6fio\6- 
yrjfia. 

6. c of <[au]ro> corr. from a. io. 1. XtXviripr&u. ii. dt above the line. 13. 

Second » of tpwucw above o. 14. lytfcXci/ 7 Pap. 15. KfieAo^cwu" Pap. 22. w ofmpi 
corr. 29. ]fH»M 7/ Pap. 32. « corr. 48. iv of Qticuraaw above w very cursively written. 
56. #ro of kowov corr. from j>*. 

1 For it was from his house that he came out saying that he had been poisoned, 
and when he came out of Hermione's house he neither told any one that he noticed 
anything nor had the least suspicion, but it was from the house of himself and his son 
and future heir that he came forth saying that he had been poisoned. He had indeed 
reasons for administering poison to himself which many others have had in preferring 
death to life ; for he was ruined by creditors and at his wit's end : but if any one really plotted 
against him, his son is the most likely person. Why he brought the accusation is now 
clear. He may indeed have had other troubles during the period of his stewardship, but 
the case shows that he was jealous of her without her knowledge and called himself 
her husband, but since she did not vouchsafe him this title, he suffered like a lover 
and did not wish her to outlive him. If they say that the slave Smaragdus has disappeared 
being himself accused of having stolen the mortgage — he only asserts that a mortgage 
was made in order that it might be stolen ; for it is impossible for that to have been stolen 
which neither ever existed at all nor could exist, nor can a mortgage have been drawn up, 
since neither the buyer knew how to write nor the present defendant Hermione, nor does 
a stranger when another woman is registered as mortgagee himself issue a deed of 
mortgage. So from whom could he say that he had received the mortgage? From 
whichever quarter he did so, it was invalid. And if a slave has run away, this is no 
argument against his master. Moreover the division also helps to show that there never 
was any mortgage. For persons who are registered as mortgagees have only their name 
inserted in deeds and do not claim the property which has been registered in mortgage, 
but the buyer has clearly claimed the property and been in enjoyment of it ever since 
she bought it, while he since he sold it has no longer been enjoying it, but administering the 
property of the mother as a steward and attacking my clients. If they say that a joint 
agreement was made between the daughter and Hermione for 150 jars, to be produced 
from these vineyards which she (Dionysia) bought, we assert that all this has nothing to do 
with the plaintiff. For if the daughter did make an agreement with the mother, this 
does not afford them an excuse for calumnies. That however did not happen at the 
same period, but nearly a whole year afterwards, and the provision of 150 jars is nothing 
as security for 4 talents, for they are the interest upon only 1 talent. Again, if there 
had been security given to the supposed seller, would the daughter have pledged herself 
to the State by another deed when she was liable to be deprived of the property whenever 
he chose ? The facts about the provision are as follows : Hermione had three children, 
Aphro . . . , Dionysia . . . Dionysia entreated her mother not to leave her with only what 
had already been used up, but to give her something since she was dependent upon only 
a single resource, whereupon Hermione pays her \\ talents. But Dionysia, in order that 
her mother may not in her lifetime be deprived of that sum, pays instead of interest every 
year this provision, and this very statement is contained in the mutual agreement.' 



473. OFFICIAL I55 

9. rainy: in the translation we have connected this with brjkov, but it may be dependent 
upon twrjiKWKcv, sc. Hermione. 

10. irpovoias xpfoor means the period when the accuser was acting as npovorjrtjs of 
Hermione ; cf. 1. 28. 

11. avT7]¥i Hermione is the last person mentioned by name, but seeing that she was 
old enough to be the mother of three children, it is perhaps more probable that the person 
meant is Dionysia, who is the dyopdaaa-a of 1. 18 ; cf. 1. 31 and 486. 4. 

15. irumv: for the point at issue in connexion with this supposed document cf. 486. 
4-8 and 22-4. Dionysia claimed to have bought a vineyard from the accuser's father, 
while the plaintiff asserted that it had been only mortgaged to her, and accused Smaragdus, 
the slave of Dionysia or Hermione, with having stolen the bond of mortgage. 

25. ovKfTi: the context requires otfirw. Perhaps ovrin has been introduced from 1. 27. 

28. Tijff firjrp6s means Hermione, as distinguished from 'the daughter' (Dionysia); 
cf. 1. 30. 

36. These four talents seem to have been the sum which, according to the accuser, 
Dionysia had borrowed from Hermione and advanced to him upon the security of the 
vineyard, and the 150 jars of wine were according to him interest upon the money 
borrowed by Dionysia. To this the orator replies that the 1 50 jars were paid by Dionysia 
to Hermione as interest upon a talent and a half given her by Hermione. 



473. Decree in Honour of a Gymnasiarch. 

21*4 X 29.6 cm. a.d. 138-160. 

A resolution, dated in the reign of Antoninus Pius, of the magistrates and 
people* of Oxyrhynchus, together with the resident Roman and Alexandrian 
citizens, to honour a gymnasiarch by setting up a statue, a full-length portrait, 
and three shields. Owing to the loss of from 30-40 letters at the begin- 
nings of lines, the name of this individual is not known. The enumeration 
of his public services mentions his ' unstinted provision of unguents/ his con- 
tributions to the fund for theatrical displays (cf. 519), and his restoration 
of the baths and ' greater thermae ' ; cf. P. Amh. 70, a letter of the magistrates 
of Hermopolis concerning the expenses incurred by gymnasiarchs. 

Though writing a large and handsome semi-uncial hand, the scribe seems to 
have committed several errors. 

1 ['Etovs AvroKpdropos Kaiaa]po$ Titov AiXiov ASpiavov \!A]vra>- 

[v\ttvov Stftaorov Evaefiovs prjpb? Kaurapdov ipSSfijj kcu tiicdSi, 

2 [<E$o£e tois rfjs Aa/nrporrfri-js ir6\€a>? r&v 9 0^vpvy\]iT&v dpypvvi kcu ry 

SrjfKp [ical 'Ptyfiafav teal 'AXcgavSpiav toi? TrapcmSrjfiovar eirti 

3 napaSovs iavrbv] c/y iicovaiov yvpv[a<r]iapylav e[. . . .]«/>« iroXit irpo- 

Bvfi&repos £(f>6rj dXeippdrcop d<f>06v<p Xoprj- 



156 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

4 [yta Kal ]ats ltpbs rb wXiyfpjIararoj/ rd re [6e]a>piKa ^prj/xaTa 

dfi(fiirra>[s] eiriSiSaxri Kal rfjy t&v fiaXa- 

5 [vuoav ] /ijpos Kahoi rrj[?) t&v [ia{6va>v Otpfi&v em/itXcta? 

el? avrbv tXdovarjs fi€ya\o<f>p6vct>s 

6 ]a>v Sirjfiapfj]* € . . . . orc[. .] irXcCovi irapa rijv irp&- 

rrjy dK/ifjv iroXXa irapopacrOai 

7 ] . ctvvtco &&i]ov rfji IjXucfa Kal rty rod Xonrov {Jiov 

<f>iXoTifi(av 9 Ti/ifjaai airrbv dvSpidv- 

8 [ti ]ffia> Kal Ypa<fx}[t]9 SXov rod a&fiaros Kal damSeicov 

Tpi&v dvaOiati iv rot? rrjs 

9 [irSXtcos ] 

1. o of titov corr. from 1. 7. t» corr. from wpo or vice versa. 

2. For the supplement cf. B. G. U. 362. v. 1-2. Xaptrpordnis here is uncertain, for 
such honorific adjectives are not elsewhere applied to Oxyrhynchus before the third 
century, when it had a municipal constitution like other fujrpowSktis of nomes. 

3. t[ }ipa : probably 4» t§ x >fo, i. e. xp**- 

akciiAftaruv : cf. ^ikarlfung akttyom in an inscription in honour of a' third century 
gymnasiarch published by Milne, Journ. Hell Stud. 1901, p. 284. . . . Xijptui in P. Amh. 
70. 7 is no doubt SXrjppa or SXtippa. 

5. /m£W Stpp&v: 'Atytavb 6*ppd at Oxyrhynchus are mentioned in 54. 14, but were 
probably distinct from the p*i(ova. 

7. The beginning of this line seems to be corrupt. 

8. For acnrt&a in conjunction with dv&puums and dyakpara cf. 6. G. U. 362. x. 6. 



474. Circular to Officials. 

34*6 x 18-5 cm. a.d. 184 ? 

This papyrus contains copies of three letters written by a high functionary, 
Plautius Italus, to various officials. The first (11. 1-8) is addressed to the 
strategi and basilico-grammateis of several nomes, which were apparently 
enumerated in 11. 8-9, and directs their attention to the following letter (11. 10-30) 
from himself to the strategus of the Tanite nome, reprimanding him and the 
basilico-grammateus for peculations. This is succeeded (11. 31-41) by another 
letter to the same set of officials as those addressed in the first, forbidding 
in more general and peremptory terms the practice of diverting the imperial 
revenues to the c salaries ' of the principal revenue-officers of the nomes. The 
third letter is complete, but a large portion of the first two is hopelessly illegible 
owing to the staining of the papyrus. The circulars were issued on December 16 



474. OFFICIAL 157 

in the 25th year of an unnamed emperor, who must however be Commodus 
or Caracalla, since none of the others reigned so long. The handwriting, which 
suggests the second century rather than the third, is in favour of the earlier date. 
What position Plautius Italus held is not certain. If the reigning emperor was 
Commodus, it is possible that he was the praefect in A.D. 184, but this is not 
very likely, since Longaeus Rufus was praefect in May 185 (287. vi. 15, cf. 
P. Amh. 107), and Veturius Macrinus in July 181 (De Ricci, Proc. Soc. BibL 
Arch. 190a, p. 67) and perhaps in May 183 (B. G. U. 847). December 16, 216, 
falls in the praefecture of Valerius Datus (De Ricci, 1. c. p. 100). It is more 
probable that Plautius Italus was dtotKqrq? or perhaps t&ios \6yos. Since his 
letters are addressed to officials of nomes in the Delta as well as of, pre- 
sumably, the Oxyrhynchite nome, it is hardly possible that he was an 
epistrategus. 

n\aifrto[?] 'IraXb? or/^aTiyyofy) teal fia<ri\(ucoi$) yf^a/i/iar^va-i) 
vo/jl&v t&v i7roy€ypa/ifi(voa[y \aHp€tv) 9 
rf}$ ypafetarjs inf kp.60 iTTtOTo\rj[s 
'Xapanicovi r£ rot; Tavtrov i>ojic[v 
5 ?T/??rny?. £ T ^ iyrtypa<j>ov imkrafca &r[a>? 
teal pitch tlSrJT* Kal ri K€K€Xevafi(va [. . 

™ Iff? • • 7R [• ■ 

(hovs) *€ 16 letters [..]..[.. 

BovP(aar(Tov) 2% letters 

10 cr 35 letters 

6ai jrirai fva d\Xa irpor^. . . 

Sia . . . ovra v SupKurai r[. 

aura iv a^[i^yraT6s re ko/jli- 

15 (avr . . . 6(f>€iXofi€^[. .]...[ 

ra . . . . joy K€Ke\ei^o]fity[ 

iv . . Tijaas 81k rod dp[y]upiK{ov \6yov tov 

$a[fi]0i fx-qvhs ra> j9a<r[iA(tJC$>) ypap]/JLareT 

[..].. tov kS (eroi/s) dpy(vptov) (raXavr ) .[....].. . 
20 irofyaov. c/ 8k fit) 8rjXa>9 [Kal ip- 

irpoBia/Juos rh Seovra [. . . . 

etcuyos €t9 dircUrrjaiv oroi [ 



158 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

/xeTeScotcev, Kal ovSiv icrnv rb 

KaXovptvov oyjrt/JLcos vir avrov Trcpi- 
25 ytypappivov, iiria^u dv rfjv S6aiv 

tov (frOdaavTOS avT<p inrb aov k£ o- 

SiaaOfjvai dpyvptov. Kal <f>p6vri<rov 

e/y rb i£fj$ fiTjSkv napa ra ovvKtyto- 

prjpiva ydvtaOai. 
30 (erow) K€ Xoiatc K. 

£\\tjs. nXavrios 'IraXbs aTp(aTrjyoisi) Kal 

(3a<n\(tKois) yp(afifiaT€vcrt) t&v VTroycypappivtov vopvv 

yatpuv. kmrvyydvtov rofy dpyvpiKoh 

\6y019 KaTtXafJSfirjv kvlovs t&v ot partly &v 
35 Kal fiacrikiK&p ypapparioDy aaXdpia 

\p6vov rivbs Si iavr&v dveXopivois 

dftovXta pdXXov 4j iretOoT r&y iraprjyycX- 

fiivoov xpoofiwoif, KdKefaoi? p\v ra Siovra 

iirioTuXa, Kowf} Si ndai Sevrcpov tovto 
40 npocrayopcvcQ dvev rod hnrpaitr\vai 

pi) efairreaOai tov KtjptaKov xprjparos. 

13. 1. oWxcircu. 36. 1. ot*\ofi€vovs. 38. ]. x/w/ifVovf. v of /icy COIT. from r. 

20-7. The sense of this sentence, which stands between two imperatives, is very 
obscure. Jkmvos in 1. 22 and avrov in 1. 24 refer presumably to the basilico-grammateus, 
who is also the subject of max*** After <roi in 1. 22 three or four letters may be lost. #ral 
ovdtv — jrtpiycypaiLptvov seems to be a parenthetical remark. The unauthorized payment to 
the basilico-grammateus in 1. 26 is further explained by 11. 35 sqq., since 1. 38 probably 
refers back to the second letter. 

31-41. '(Copy) of another (letter). Plautius Italus to the strategi and basilico- 
grammateis of the hereinafter-mentioned nomes, greeting. On examining the accounts 
of the money revenue I discovered that certain of the strategi and basilico-grammateis 
had paid themselves salaries for some period on their own responsibility, in defiance 
rather than obedience to the proclamations. Thereupon I sent them a suitable admonition, 
and I now make this second order applying to all that the imperial moneys are not to 
be touched without leave/ 

41. Kvpuucov xpw aro * : i- e. the revenue of the Kvpuucbs Xoyo?, on which see P. Meyer in 
Festschr. zu O. Hirschfeld p. 139. His view that Kvptwcfo \oyos =/iscus (oWftycw) as 
opposed to fttoff \6yos is true in most instances, but a notable exception occurs in P. Catt. 
v. 17 (cf. Archiv, III. 1), where the bona vacantia of a soldier who had died without heirs 
are appropriated by the idiologus Julianus us rbv Kvpux^bv \6yor. 



475. OFFICIAL 159 

475. Report of an Accident. 

28*7x9 cm. a.d. 182. 

A letter from the strategus Hierax to one of his vTnjp^rat, enclosing a copy 
of a report sent him by a certain Leonides with regard to the death of a slave, 
who had been killed by falling from an upper story while watching an enter- 
tainment given by dancing-girls. The strategus orders the irnipirq? to view 
the dead body in company with a public physician ; cf. 61-2 and 476. 

*Itpa£ oTparriybs 'Ofcvp/vyyjeiTov KXav- 
8iq> 2cprjv<p tintipiTfl. r&v SoOiv- 
touv jioi /3i/3\i8i[a>]i' i{n]i AewtSov 
rc[v] k(cu) Hcptfvov rb tcrov iircoriXXtTal <roi, 
5 6Va>? irapdkaficby Sij/iSaioy larpbv 
€ir[i]6€a>prf<rT)$ rb SrjXovfitvov i/€- 
Kpov a&fia kcu irapaSovs eh icqStt- 
av hyp<£<fw9 airocfxiatis irpoaifwh 
prj<rriT€. (and hand) <r€o[ri]/i(€la>fiai). 
1st hand. 10 ((rousi) icy [M]dpKov AvptjXtov Kofip68ov 
Avrcavlvov Kataapos rod Kvplov 
'A6i>p (. 

3rd hand. 'Icpaxi orpa(riyyS) 

iraph AemviSov rov kcu [Hcprjvov \]pr]- 
15 tiaTl{ovTo$ fXTfrpb? Ta6pio[s] dnb Sc- 
viirra. 6yft(]a9 rrjs SuXOotofas] &c(t)i7? 
i*fyri}s otioys iv rg Htvfyrra teal Kpo- 
TaXiorpiScw XuTOvpyo^a&v Karh to 
<£6o$ irpbs oUtq, ITAoimWo? rov [yaji- 

20 flpOV flOV ...[.] ToSJjfLOV 

'Eira<f>p68€iro? SovXos airrov &s 
(h&v) 17 fiovXrjOeh airb rov S&fiaro? 
ttjs avrrjs oucias irapaic&tyai Kal 
BedaaaOai r&r [Kpo\raXiarplSas 



160 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

25 €ir€<r€v teal eT€\e[v\Tr)<rev. 0$ \d~ 

piv imStSofc rb fliflXetSiov [dg]i& 

kav So^u aoi dnoTd^at iva t&v irepl 

<rl iTrrjp€T&v el? rfjy SwiiTTa 

&ra>9 rb rod ' EiraQpoSebov cr&fia 
30 Tt5j(i7 rrjs 8eov<rTi9 n€pioTo\[rjs] Kal 

KaraOiaem. (frovsi) Ky AvroKpdropo? 

Kafoapos MdpKov AvprjXtou Kopp68ov Avrmvtvov 

Heftao-Tov 'Ap/ieyiccKoD MrjSucov JJapOiKov 

SappariKov Teppavucov Meyiarov 'A6i>p {. 

35 AtcoviSris i Kal Hcpfjvo? €iri[S]iScDKa. 

4. 1. tWoroXrai. 6. to corr. from top. 

' Hierax, strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome, to Claudius Serenus, assistant. A copy 
of the application which has been presented to me by Leonides also called Serenus 
is herewith sent to you. Take a public physician and view the dead body referred to, 
and having delivered it over for burial make a report in writing. Signed by me. The 
23rd year of Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antoninus Caesar the lord, Athur 7. 

To Hierax, strategus, from Leonides also called Serenus, whose mother is stated 
as Tauris, of Senepta. At a late hour of yesterday the 6th, while a festival was taking 
place at Senepta and the castanet-players were giving their customary performance at the 
house of Plution my son-in-law . . . , his slave Epaphroditus, aged about 8 years, wishing 
to lean out from die bed-chamber (?) of the said house and see the castanet-players, 
fell and was killed. I therefore present this application and ask you, if it please you, to 
appoint one of your assistants to come to Senepta in order that the body of Epaphroditus 
may receive proper laying out and burial/ Date and signature of Leonides. 

8. trypans : or perhaps epypafavs. 

22. dayiaro?: d&pa here clearly indicates a room on an upper floor, and probably 
means the same as dayumoy, i. e. a bed-chamber. 



476. Report of Mummifiers. 

9-8 x 6«3 cm. Second century. 

A report addressed to the strategus by two ivra<t>ia<rral who had been 
commissioned to examine the cause of a death which had taken place. Cf. 51, 
a similar report by a public physician, and the preceding papyrus. 



477. DECLARATIONS (diroypa^ai) 



161 



$a>Kia>vi <TTp(aTriy<{>) 

waph Ocbvio? $\&pou 

pr\rpbs IlToXcpas 

a? (fa&v) Ac ov{Xfj) Kapir(<p) dp(icrr€- 

p<p) Kal G<&- 
vios nera&ros ptfrpbs 
TaovrJTOS d>9 (fa&v) £ ft darjp(pv) 
dp<f>OT€pwv &n 'O^i/ptfy- 
X<dv tt6\€co9 ima<f>t- 
aar&v. TJ7 6y€OT»<ri7 



10 fjpepp irrcTpdirrj/iw 
frrrb aov Sib % HpaK\etw 
inrtipirov kmBtiv <r&- 
pa vtKpbv 'Amos II av- 
aios dirb tj}s avrfjs ir&- 

15 X[€]a>y Kal Trpoo-favfjaai 
\rty mpl rb ai]rb SidBeaiv. 
[lm86pT€$ odv\ rb airrb <r&- 
[pa kv Tjj oUta] avrod Itj[i 



11. di of dia corr. from r. 

'To Phocion, strategus, from Thonis son of Florus and Ptolema, aged about 
35 years, having a scar upon his left wrist, and from Thonis son of Petaus and Taoues, 
aged about 62, with no distinguishing mark, both of Oxyrhynchus, mummifiers. To-day 
we were commissioned by you through your assistant Heracleus to inspect the dead body 
of Apis son of Pausis, of the said city, and to report the circumstances of the case. We 
therefore inspected the said body at his house . . . ' 

18. The papyrus probably continued cir[< nuprfm r<j> avr$ vrniptrn tvpofuv; cf. 51. 
12 sqq. 



(6) DECLARATIONS (dnoypa<f>a(). 

477. Registration of an Ephebus. 
15-7x11-3 cm. 



a.d. 132-3. 



This interesting papyrus is an application addressed to Marcus Claudius 
Serenus, exegetes and holder of a variety of titles, and to other Alexandrian 
officials, from Ammonius, a citizen of Alexandria, who wished his son to be 
registered among the ephebi of the following year. At Athens the boKiiiatrta 
and enrolment of ifapoi took place at the age of 18, when they were 
received into their tribe and deme, and attained their legal majority, though 
they did not obtain full civic rights until the age of ai. At Alexandria 
it appears from a Tebtunis papyrus of the reign of Trajan that admission 
to the ranks of the ifafioi was possible at a much earlier age, when the 

M 



i62 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

assumption of legal rights would be out of the question. We also learn from 
the same document that the tyrifiot were registered in numbered aviiiioplai. 

Mdptc<p K\av8[i}cp Heprjv<p v€a>K6fxp rod 

fieydXov SapdmSos r&y KsyikiapxriK&rtov 

ytvofitvo) hrdpytp (nre/jpq? irpwTTjs 

Aafiaa[K\riv&v Kal dpxiyecopycp Upu ifayriTJj 
5 Kal Tois Kaiaaptiois Kal toi[s] £Wot? irpyrdvcai 

irapa. 'App<Dv(ov i[o]y G&dpo? rod 

Hapanicovos U/)(wra7r[7r]o<r€j8a((r)r€/bi; rod 

Kal J A\6atia>s t[&]v rb [ir]i/iwToy ii[o]? • 

Aofiiriavod [h]<f>r}fievK6Ta>v. fiovXfh 
10 pcvos iaKpuvai c/[s] rods rb laibv dfcroh 

KaiSeKaTov if[o]9 Airr[o]Kpdropo9 KaUrapo? 

Tpaiavov ASpiavoO SefJaorov €<j>rjl3ov$ 

rbv y*yov&i\a] fioi ix rfjs dStXQrjs fiov 

Bavfiaptw dcn\rj[\s fj /ji[€]HjXXa\€v vibv 
15 NuXd/ifiwa d£t[a>] $/ia$ ovvrdgai 

T0T9 irpbs to&t[oi]$ od<rt Xafioval /i[o]v 

X*ipoypa<f>la[v /i€0* 6pk]w dXrjOrj eTyat 

ra irpoKcffi^va ypdyfra]t ofs KaOrJKti 

ypqiiaTifew pot . . . .]vvti Ta irpbs 
20 rii[y 16 letters ]uav rod 

[irpoycypa/JL/JLevov fiov] vlod NctXdp- 

[pan'os Kal • . . .] rp re ko<t- 

[wni * a * T $ yvfivaaidp]x<p rots 

[ cl(TKp?v]ai h rob? 

25 [ty40ovr ]awr( > 

2nd hand. [N€t\d/ificw 'Afi/juwbv 2<f>r]]f3os dir 'O^ypvyyoav) [jr6X{ta>$) 

[ ) 

' To Marcus Claudius Serenus, neocorus of the great god Sarapis, ex-chiliarch, late 
praefect of the first cohort of the Damascenes, chief of the cultivators, priest and exegetes, 
and to the Caesarii and the other prytaneis, from Ammonius son of Theon son of 
Sarapion, of the Althaean deme of the Propapposebastian tribe, who became an ephebus 
in the 5th year of Domitian. I wish to enroll among those becoming ephebi in the 
coming 18th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus my son Nilammon 



478. DECLARATIONS {airoypa^ai) 163 

by my late sister Thaubarion, citizen, and therefore request you to instruct the officers 
concerned, on receipt of my declaration on oath that the foregoing statements are true, 
to write to the proper officials <o deal with my case on my (proving the descent) of my 
aforesaid son Nilammon, and to (communicate with) the cosmetes and gymnasiarch . . . 
to enroll him among the ephebi . . . ' 

3. cirdpx<p cnrcipij* irp*mjs Aapa^ifyvw : cf. B. G. U. 73. 2-3. &C 

4. apxty«*>py$ : a novel and, in this context, unexpected title ; but the reading seems 
clear. Cf. 513. 11, note. 

5. Kaurap<lots : if these are officials the title is apparently not otherwise known. A 
Caesarian tribe (? at Alexandria) occurs in 373, but if members of one particular tribe were 
being addressed, the Propapposebastian (1. 7) would be expected, though cf. 513. 1, note. 

7-8. On the tribes and demes of Egyptian n-rfXti* see Kenyon, Archiv, II. 70 sqq. *, 
who clearly shows by the aid of a British Museum papyrus that these doubled epithets 
connected by A «« refer respectively to the tribe and deme of the person to whom they 
are applied. npoirainro<rr/9a<rrctof (cf.- 497. 20) is known as the name of an Alexandrian 
Qvkri from an inscription published by Jouguet in Bull. Corr. Hell. xx. 398. Cf. 513. 
1, note. 

1 9—20. Perhaps JW]vm ra irpAr rrfv . . . ayx L<TT ]*' ulv or some such phrase. 

22 sqq. The cosmetes and the gymnasiarch are no doubt the officials at Oxyrhynchus. 
The wish of the petitioner was that after the completion of the formalities at Alexandria 
the local magistrates should be communicated with, and the status of the boy thus 
established. 



478. Selection of Boys (inkpions). 

26x6*1 cm. a.d. 132. 

An application addressed, as usual at Oxyrhynchus in such cases, to the 
/9(/3Xto^v\cuc€9, by Dionysous, a freedwoman, requesting that her son, who had 
reached the age of 13, might be placed on the list of privileged persons 
who paid a poll-tax of only 1a drachmae, and stating the grounds of the claim. 
The evidence of this papyrus was utilized by us in a discussion of the whole 
question of iirlicpivis in P. Oxy. II. pp. 217 sqq., to which the reader is referred. 
Since the publication of that volume the subject has been treated at length 
by P. Meyer (Heerwesen der Ptolemder und Romer, pp. 109 sqq.), who however 
had not the Oxyrhynchus documents before him, and could only refer to them 
in an appendix (op. cit. pp. a 19 sqq.), and by Wessely (Siteungsb. der Akad. 
der Wissensch. in Wien, Bd. CXLII. ix), who gives an elaborate recapitulation of 
the evidence in the light of the Oxyrhynchus papyri. The results of the latter 
are on the whole in agreement with our own — more so indeed than he himself, 

1 The mutilated name of a deme at Antinoe on p. 72 (V. 1) is to be restored rcrc[d/)x«of , as is shown by 
a third century Oxyrhynchus papyrus. 

M % 



164 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

owing to some misunderstanding of our position, appears to realize. That the 
general sense of iirUpia-is is ' examination/ ' decision/ requires no special demon- 
stration, and the term of course is, as we remarked (P. Oxy. II. p. 320), a relative 
one. But in connexion with the poll-tax iirUpia-is and its cognates acquired 
a technical signification, being used of the process by which persons of a certain 
status were partially or wholly relieved of liability to that impost. P. Meyer 
however goes much too far in asserting that imKeKpipivos implies total exemption 
from the poll-tax, a view which he somewhat perversely tries to maintain 
{op. cit. p. 231) in the face of our statement of the evidence derived from the 
present text. It is abundantly clear from 11. 9-10 and 31 below, that persons 
who enjoyed the privilege of paying less than the regular amount of the tax 
went through a process of iirUpiw, and were just as much iiriKCKpiixipoi as those 
who were entirely exempt. 

'ABplcovL Kal ZcotXoot 
Pip\io<pv\(a£L) 

napa Aiovvcrovros direXev- 

6ipa($) Aiowcrtas Aiowarlov 
5 roO Kal Xprjarijiov Aiowcrio(v) 

dw 'Ogvptiyytw irSXea)? 

pera Kvptov EvSalfiovos Mevotr{ov) 

dirb ttjs avTrjs nSXeas. Kara 

ra KeXevaOevra nepfj) irn- 
10 Kp(<rea>$ r&v (TpiarKaiSeKaer&v) el c£ <£/*• 

<p[oT]epa>y yovetov /iTjrpovro- 

Xeir&v (ScoStKaSpdxfMDv) elalv SrjXS) rbv 

vidv fiov nrdWiv $&mvo$ 

rod IItoXXiSos dvaypatySjievov) kit d/x- 
15 <f>68ov ApS/xov OorjpcSos 

rot) K|Ai]Xl|fcOv &% Xfy(<0 
npoarpefirjKivai eh rods 

{jpurKaiSeKaereis) t$ SieXOSm i<y (erei) 

'ASpiavov Kalaapos rod Kvptov 

Kal yeyovevai rbv roHrrov 

20 irarepa Qdoava IIt6X\i8o$ 

tov $doovo? /irjrpbs 'A6tjv&9 

fifirpoTToXeirriv (ScoSeicdSpaxjiop) Si &po- 



478. DECLARATIONS (airoypa^ai) 165 

\6yov \aoypa<f>ia$ ty (erovs) 
'ASpiavov Katarapo? rod tcvptov 
25 dp(f>6Sov rod avrov, ty Kal T€- 
reXevrrjKivai, Kal rhv rrjs 
<rqpaivophr)$ pov irarpah 

veforjs Aiowcrias naripa 
Aiovvaiov rhv Kal Xprjaipo{v) 
30 Aiowartov dirb rfjs av{rrjs) ir^Afccoy) 
dpotm (SwStKdSpayjiov) Si kmKptaea(s) 
( (irovsi) 6tov Tpaiavov dp<f>6So(y) 
Avklcdv Uaptpfiokrjs, 

by Kal T€T(€\)€UTTIK€Vai *V 

35 inepeTio'iy, Kal 6pvva> 

AvroKpdropa Katarapa Tpaiavbv 

ASpiavbv Xtfiaarbv dXrjOrj 

thai rit, npoyeypappiva. 

(trow) iC AvTOKpdropos [Kaiaapos 
40 Tpa(ia)voO 'ASpiavov 2*fi{a<rrov 

Tvpi ty. Aiowaovs dfaXtv- 

Oepa Aiowatas Aiovxf^iov 
rov Kal Xprjaipov €iri[SiSa>Ka 
Kal 6pa>p€Ka rbv b\pKov. 
45 EvSatpcDv Me voir ov imyi- 

ypappai a&rrjs Kvpios Kal iypar 
yjfa {rrr\p avrrjs pfj elSvirjs 
ypdppara. 



2nd hand KaT€xa>p[t<r6fj 

50 troys i@[S6pov Kal Setcdrov 



1. o oiabpuovt, corr. from f. 2. Second p of 0</9Xio$vXa(i rewritten. 14. «r a 

corr. from dpop. 17. iy in (rpuriuudefcacrfif) corr. 23. ty corr. from id by the second 

hand (?)• 44. I. op&poKa. 



166 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

'To Hadrion and ZoVlus, keepers of the archives, from Dionysous freedwoman of 
Dionysia daughter of Dionysius also called Chresimus son of Dionysius, of Oxyrhynchus, 
with her guardian Eudaemon son of Menoetes, of the same city. In accordance with 
the orders concerning the selection of boys 13 years of age when their parents on both 
sides are inhabitants of the metropolis rated at 12 drachmae, I declare that my son 
Ptollis son of Phaon son of Ptollis registered in the quarter of the Square of Thoe'ris 
(interlinear note "the Kmelemus (?) quarter, as he says") has reached the age of 13 years 
in the past i6ih year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord, and that his father Phaon son of 
Ptollis son of Phaon, his mother being Athena, was an inhabitant of the metropolis rated 
at 12 drachmae as shown by a uniform poll-tax list of the 13th year of Hadrianus Caesar 
the lord at the said quarter, and is now dead, and that the father of my aforesaid patroness 
Dionysia (interlinear note "he does not agree"), Dionysius also called Chresimus son 
of Dionysius, of the same city, was similarly rated at 12 drachmae by the selection of 
the 7 th year of the deified Trajan in the Lycians' Camp quarter, and died at an advanced 
age ; and I swear by the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus that the foregoing 
statement is correct. The 17th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, 
Tubi 13. I, Dionysous, freedwoman of Dionysia daughter of Dionysius also called 
Chresimus, have presented the declaration and sworn the oath. I, Eudaemon son of 
Menoetes, have been appointed her guardian and wrote for her as she was illiterate.' 

10-2. It is noticeable that the further qualification specified in the parallel passage 
of 258, e'(ir)ra(?) [t)rq cVi rov avrov dp<l>6fov f is here omitted. But not improbably the 
interlinear notes on ll. 15 and 28 have some reference to such a restriction. 

15. The adscript added below this line by a different hand is a note by an official 
remarking some inconsistency between this statement of the &n<f>ohov in which Ptollis lived 
and his own assertions. The question had an important bearing on the consideration of 
the claims for exemption, for it appears from 258. 9 that a certain permanence of residence 
was required; cf. the previous note. A similar interlinear insertion occurs in 1. 28 in 
connexion with the evidence on the mother's side. 

22. M 6(io\6yw \aoypa<f)ias : the meaning of this is obscure. So far as the present 
passage goes 6/iokayos might here have its ordinary sense of • corresponding,' the meaning 
being that the poll-tax list of the year referred to corresponded with the statement in the 
text that the father of Ptollis was a pippofroAi'np fodticdbpaxpos. But this interpretation 
is not satisfactory in another case of the use of the phrase in B. G. U. 618. 13 eV(?) pc» 
6fxo\(6yov) \aoyp{a<pias;) &vdp*s d — for so no doubt the passage should be read on the analogy 
of the present papyrus — , which occurs in a list of individuals who were responsible for 
work on the embankments. The term 6p&koyos is also applied to persons, when it perhaps 
has a technical signification : — e. g. B. G. U. 560. 20 y*»pyovvr*f 6p6koyot <Mp*s, P. Brit 
Mus. 259. 1 90-1 €n\ t6 avrb (the preceding list being specially concerned with the poll-tax) 

at{d(pts)] x[. .] &» SfxSkoyoi &fd(ptt) x[. • , P. Brit. Mus. 260. 1 4 2-3 *ai rm a (em) Ovtairacriapov 
dn6 £f(w* ?) jto[. . .) avv rots rrarpdai iv 6fi6X{6yois) avn\(r)nfxtvot) t and &rr«s cf 6ftoX{6yois) (or 
6no\(6yy)?) \aoyp(a<t>uf) in a Vienna papyrus described by Wessely in his Studien s. 
Palaeogr. und Papyruskunde, I. pp. 9-1 1. Wilcken (Ost. I. pp. 253-5), who quotes Cod. 
Theodos. xi. 24. 6. § 3 qui vicis quibus adscript! sunt der elicits et qui homologi more gentilicio 
nuncupantur ad alios seu vicos sen dominos transierunl, supposes that 6prfXoyoc were 
a particular class of cultivators ; but though that explanation would suit B. G. U. 560. 20 
it clearly cannot be brought into harmony with the passages in which 6fwKayos is connected 
with Xaoypafpla. There is more to be said for Wessely's view, who supposes the dfidXoyoc 
to be domiciled strangers subjected to the poll-tax, and refers in support of his theory to 



479. DECLARATIONS (aTroypaQai) 167 

the extract from the Cod. Theodos. given above. This explanation would well accord 
with P. Brit. Mas. 260. 142-3 and the Vienna papyrus, in which Jews are concerned. 

But how is it to be applied to the 6pSkoyos \aoypa<f>ia here, in which fujrpowdKiTM dttdcxadpaxpoi 

figure ? A better interpretation of <5fuftoyor in all these passages has been suggested to us 
by Mr. Smyly, who would translate it ' assessed at the same rate,' i. e. in the present case at 
1 2 drachmae. This explanation would account for the variations in the use of the term, 
the meaning of which is relative to the context in each instance. 

26sqq. This passage combines with B. G. U. 324 to show that slaves were placed 
on the same footing with regard to liability to the poll-tax as their masters ; and we here 
learn that liberated slaves at least could even transmit their privileges to their children. 

28. For the insertion above the line see note on 1. 15. 

35. cV wrcpcTcW: i.e. above the age of 60, when men ceased to be liable to the 
poll-tax. The word vircpcTip appears to be not otherwise known. 



479. Censu s-Return. 

20.5 x 6-9 cm. a.d. 157. 

An unaddressed notice from a woman, Demetrous, expressing the wish that 
her grandson should for the future be registered at her own house. The year 
in which this papyrus is dated was not a regular census-year; the document 
was therefore supplementary of a previous return, and necessitated by the change 
of residence on the part of the boy in question, who was now living with his 
grandmother instead of his parents. 

Ilapa ArjprjTpovros 15 'Avrwfaov K[a]icrapo9 

'Afl6lT09 TOO $lAo- TOV KVpiOV (€7W) TJ. 81b €- 

£tvov iLtrh Kvpiov tov irtS&pi rb inSpvri- 

vtov ApSiros 'AnepA- pa cby Ka6rJKCi. (frovs) k 

5 T09. fiovXopai ay ay pa- AirroKpdropos Kataap[os 

qtfjvai dirb tov vvv c- 20 Ttrov Atktov ASpiavod 

irl rod inr&pxovrSs 'Avrwvivov Hcpaarov 

poi pipovs oltcias Eiaefiovs 'Eirtl<f> €. 

bf dp<f>6Sov ApSpov 2nd hand. ArjptiTpovs 'A/161T09 

10 GorjpiSos rbv tov imSiSai^a. 'Ap6i]$ 'Airs- 

7rpoyeyp(appivov) pov vtov 'Apoi- 25 p&Tos §iriyiypap]pai 

to? vtov r ilpov ptjripbs) rfjs prfjpSs pov K]vptos. 

*HpaK\ov(TOsi) AppatOov 6v- *Eppa{v ?y/>«- 

ra c/y rb cpcoriy k (fros) [^a . . . 



168 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

4 From Demetrous daughter of Amois son of Philoxenus, with her guardian her son 
Amois son of Aperos. I wish that Horus, the son of my aforesaid son Amois and 
Heraclous daughter of Harbaithus, who in the present 20th year of Antoninus Caesar 
the lord is 8 years of age, should henceforth be registered at the house of which I own 
part in the quarter of the Square of Thofiris. I therefore duly present this memorandum/ 
Date, and signatures of Demetrous and Amois written for them by Hermon. 



480. Census-Return. 

"•5x6-3 cm. a.d. 132. 

The concluding portion of a census-return (nar oUlav iiroypa^rj) on oath, 
written in A.D. 13a, but following the formula of the early first century 
Oxyrhynchus census-returns ; cf. 255. The description of the writer's family 
and abode is lost ; the property described consisted only of an uninhabited 
house. 

kif &fi<f>68ov] 

Mvpo/3[a\dy]oy [ol]ic((av) Kal XP r l <n ifiP la ^ 

irp&r{€pov) o[v(tov)\ narpSs p[o]v koivoo- 

yacby irpbs KXecova Atowfaiov) 
5 Kal AWovs €i? t [o]&Sch diro- 

yp(d<f>*Tai) oiSk KaraytfytTOi). 

Kal bpvvo AvroKpdropa 

Kafoapa Tpatavbv *A8[p]tayby 

Scffaorbv e£ iyi(oOs) Kal kif a- 
xo XrjOfctas) im8t8a>K(evai) rljv TTpoy^ypappiyqy) dno- 

yp(a<j>ijy) Kal ptfrfc) hrt£evov /xiJt(€) 

l P<»p(aiov) firjiic) 'A\€£av8(p(a) p^r{€) Alyv(imoy) 

/JL$T(e) dir€\€v(Ocpoy) /*^t(€) SXkoy 

firjSiva oiK^iy) fj dnoytfdfeaOai) 2- 
15 £a> r&y 7rpoy{eypappiyci>y) fj ivoyps 

drjv t$ 8pica>. (frot/s) i£ 

AvTOKpaTopo? Kahrapos 

Tpaiayov ASptayoD 

Stpaorov 9 A6bp k6. 



481. DECLARATIONS (awoypafai) 169 

2nd hand. 20 Xaiprj/jLcw Xaiprjfiovo^ 
emSiScDKa Kal 6p&- 
fjiOKa rhv Sptcov. 

2. o of fivpofi corr. from 0. 7. L o/uw*. 

'(I register) in the Myrobalanus quarter a house and fixtures which previously 
belonged to my said father in common with Cleon son of Dionysius and others, in which 
no one is registered or lives ; and I swear- by the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus 
Augustus that I have honestly and truly presented the above return, and that neither 
stranger nor Roman nor Alexandrian nor Egyptian nor freedman nor any one else dwells 
or is registered in it except the aforesaid, or may I be liable to the penalties of the oath. 
The 17th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Athur 29. 
I, Chaeremon son of Chaeremon, have presented the return and sworn the oath.' 

3. If o[v(tov) is right, tov seems to have been omitted. 
9. «£ vyi(ow) : cf. P. Amh. 68. 33. 



481. Property-Return. 

I 5"5X9«*« a.d. 99. 

This and the following papyrus are examples of the periodical returns 
of house-property similar to P. Oxy. 72, 247-50 ; cf. P. Oxy. II. pp. 177-9. 
It is noteworthy that 482 is dated in A.D. 109, or just ten years later than the 
present document; and there is thus evidence for a series of four general 
registrations of real property separated by periods of approximately ten years, 
namely those in A.D. 80, 90, 99, 109, while another occurred in A.D. 129 ; cf. 584. 

• • • • • 

[t]o>[j/ far '0%up&yya>v\ ir6\[c<»s. tov hdrov irou? AofiiTiavov 

d7rc[ypd(f>ofiai o£]ra>? jc[ar& faroypa<j>rj$ iir ifiol fi6va> 

rh n\po<FT€Tay/i£]va tJ {{irdp- via Kal KktipovSfitp. (frow) /9 

\ov fioi *[k ri)v] k[v]€(rr&a[ap AvroKpdTop[o9] Kafoapos 

5 fy^jpfov & TV pt)Tpo7r[6\€i 20 NtpoCa Tpaiavov HcjUaaroO 

in 9 d/i(f>68ou . . . . ApSfiov 2[a- ' Ttpiiavucod firjvb? Kcucraptiov 

{ 2a}pdm8o9 otov tf/ti- iiraycQiemv) 8. (2nd hand?) 'Hpa? *HpaTo$ tov 

ov fitpos oUtas Kal aWpiov 'Hparos eiri8i8ct>Ka rfjv 

Kal iTtpcov xprjaTTjptanf Kal diroypa<j>rjv. 'A/toiTas Tpa>tK{ov) 



170 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

10 tiorSSay teal e£6Scoi> K<LTr\v- 25 eypayf/a toirlp avrov /*i) €i86t[o9 
TrjKh cf? ji* c£ 6v6fjLaTo? ypd/JL/iara. (trovs) j8 AvroKpdropos 

rod irarpSs fiov ^Hparos tov Katcrapos N€poH[a Tpa]iavov 

*HpaT09 firjTpbs Tv€<j>ep&- XefiaoToQ TtpfiavLKOv lfjl(vbs) Kaiaapdov 

[t]os dirb i[ij9 a]6rrjs 7r6\e[a>s enayofaeyw) 8. 

15 T€T€\€[vrqK6r]o9 npb rrjs 

8. at of wBpiov corr. from *. 15. Second r of rfreXffvnyrorjor corr. from A. 

2-29. ' I hereby register in accordance with the decree the half-share belonging to 
me at the present date at the metropolis in the quarter of the Square of Sarapis ... of 
a house and yard and other fixtures and entrances and exits, which share has devolved 
upon me from my father Heras son of Heras and Tnepheros, of the same city, who 
died before the registration of the 9th year of Domitian, leaving me his only son and 
heir/ Date and signature of Heras written for him by Amoitas. 

6-7. The scribe apparently thought that the letters 2a at the end of 1. 6 were not 
sufficiently clear, and so rewrote them in the margin of L 7. The word before Hium> 
is very probably pAtov. &o0 pcytWov is hardly possible, and that formula is moreover 
unusual in reference to a bp6pos. 

15-7. irpb irp . . . dnaypa<l>rjs : the implication is that the property had been registered 
in the 9th year of Domitian (a.d. 90) in the name of the son; and we may also infer 
that no general registration had intervened between that occasion and the date of this 
papyrus. Cf. on the latter point 248. 32, where there is a similar mention of the dnoypaQri 
of the year 63-4 in a return of a.d. 80 ; though the conclusion that no general registration 
had occurred between those two dates is in that case more doubtful. 



482. Property-Return. 

23*5 x6«7 cm. a.d. 109. 

A return of property, probably addressed to the fiipXio^vXaKes, written ten 
years later than the preceding papyrus. Cf. 636 and 637, which are similar 
returns made probably in the same year, and 481 introd. On the verso in. 
a different hand is a list of persons with their respective fathers', grandfathers', 
and mothers' names, headed ¥«00co>? k<L(tolkoi ?). 

• . • • • 

Xcoph $>v direypayfrd- fiaiov /xiyT/afoTc- 

fiyy koI iriirpcuca 25 kohtios 'ApOo&vtos 
Kal vvv kirl toG irapov- drib rrjs avrrjs tt&c- 



482. DECLARATIONS {awoypax^ai) 



171 



10 



T09 to bitdpypv fioi 

Xci) rpirov pipos /uc- 
p&v Svo dirb pep&v 

T€<T<T<£pCDV 6lTQ0V 

dirb pcp&v trim 
KoivwiKTJ? oUlas 
Kal ttjs Trpoaovarjs 
€K tov dirb v&rov 
pepovs avXfjs Kal irt- 
p&v xprjOTTjptcov Kal 
15 etaSScoy Kal e£6- 
6\oy Kal t&v ovv- 

KVp6vTG)V 6vTQDV 

kv imrtK<p oraOpy, 
KarrivTTjKbs ef? pc 
20 &pa dXXoi? c£ 6v6pa- 
tos tov irarp6? pov 
Aioyzvovs ITtoXc- 
paiov tov IIto\€- 



<k>$ TcrcXcvriy/co- 
tos dfcoXovOcos 
i ircpmv c0cro 
30 81a tov iv Tjj avrjj 
nSXei dyopavopzt- 
ov T<p Tvffi prjvl 

TOO Ttp&TOV €T0V9 

Ocov Ncpotia BiaQrj- 
35 *J7> *<f> V K <d dptTa- 

$€T<p €T€Xct5ra. 

Kal 6pvvGo AvTOKpdropa 

Kafoapa Nepovav 

Tpatavbv Xtfiaorbv 
40 TeppaviKbv AaKiKQv 

pi) iyfrewrOai. (Iroi/y) tfl 

AiroKpdropos Kataapos 

Nepova Tpai(a)yov Xtfiaorov 

TtppaviKov AaKiKov 
45 Tvfa irj. 



1 (I register), apart from what I have previously registered and sold, now at the present 
time the third share which belongs to me at the village of Senemeleu of two shares out 
of four shares out of five shares of a joint house and the court adjoining it on the south 
side and other fixtures and entrances and exits and appurtenances, situated in a cavalry 
soldier's quarters, which share has devolved upon me with other property from my late father 
Diogenes son of Ptolemaeus son of Ptolemaeus, his mother being Tekosis daughter of 
Harthotfnis, of the said city, in accordance with the will which he drew up in his lifetime 
through the record-office at the said city in the month Tubi of the first year of the deified 
Nerva, which will was unchanged at his death. And I swear by the Emperor Caesar 
Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus that I have given no false information.* 
Date. 

2. Kal ircV/xuea : the point of this is that when land was about to be alienated, notice 
had to be given to the £</9Xi«£vXaic« ; cf. 483 and 237. viii. 37, note. 

6-9. This passage is a good illustration of the minute subdivision of house and land 
property, the fraction of the whole house owned by the writer being only ^. 

18. cf bnrtxy oraBpyi cf. 506. 24, where a bnruAs tcXijpos is mentioned (on the 
distinction between <rra6p6s and *A%w see P. Tebt. I. p. 45), and 504. 9, where <V rov 
hnriKov followed probably by some word like AoyMmjpiov occurs. These instances show 



172 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

that the old military organization of «itouk» in the Fayum (cf. P. Tebt, I. pp. 545 sqq.J 
still survived to some extent in the Roman period; cf. P. Meyer, Heerwtscn, p. 106 and 
note on 488. 5. 



483. Application for Leave to Mortgage. 

24*3 x io«7 cm. a.d. 108. 

An application, addressed to the /9i/3Aio$vAa£ by a certain Achillas, of 
a similar character to B. G. U. 184 and 379 and P. Brit. Mus. 299 and 300; 
cf. P. Oxy. II. p. 180, where part of this papyrus is quoted. There is however 
this difference between those documents and 483, that in them the applicant 
wished to part with his land, while here he apparently wished only to mortgage 
it; cf. 1. 11 of the Florence papyrus published by Vitelli, Athene e Roma iv. 
73 sqq., and 588. 488 is also noticeable for containing at the end a letter from 
the Ptfi\t.o<t>v\a£ to the agoranomi authorizing the drawing up of the contract 
required. 

[ 18 letters ] pvrp[b]f To[ 

[12 „ ].[.].. 81a rod ia[v]rod . [ 

[ ] Ufijw? Aibs Kal "Hpas K<x[l 

[ ra]s ifirapxpHaras poi nepl Kcfyirjv • . . 

5 [. . . ttj]9 d7rrj\[i(OT0V ro7r]a[p])((a? €/c rod Zi\v\o8&pov 

[ >..[.. .]?« *M/?[°>' * «to[i]/c<[ic ...... 

Vestiges of 5 lines. 
12 rpidKo[p\ra iro[i]/jaaarOa[i ?]a>y ""^[irrjiyj [iirayojii- 

ywp /*[i?M^]* Koxarapeiov rod 8tfyr]ipov [Kal ukov- 

r[o]d er[o]vs Tpaiavov K[al&]apo$ rod Kvpd[ov rSicov 
15 Spayjuaiov iKdarrjs fivas Kara p\r\va dirb 

rod i£rjs prjvbs QapfiovOi tv kcu 8iop0[a>oxo 

[*M'] OVVK\[€l&]ll<p iKdoTTJf 8o>8€Ka[jirjvOV, 

im8t8[o]jii [r]b inr6py[rj]/jLa forcos air imofretkys 
rofc rrjs fi7]Tp07r6\ea>9 dyopap6/to[i9 odai 
20 Kal fivrjpocn reXa&crai rbv xpT)/ia[rur/Jibv 
&9 KaOrJKtt, Kal [6]/ivvcd Ocov? 2€J3a[oToi>s 
Kal rfjv AvTOKpdropos Kataapos NepoH^a 



488. DECLARATIONS {anroypa^ai) 173 

Tpaiavod Hcpaorov TtppaviKov AaKi[KoG 

tvxtjv teal Toi>? irarpcpovs 6eov9 elyai 
25 riy irpo9t{€ifi]£vas apoipas dStas pov Ka[l 

Kadap&s d[irb ir\d<ni$ KaTo\rj[si] 8i]p[o]ar(as t[€ 

koi l8io8i[Ktjs] €19 ri^v iv*oT(b<rav fipipa[v. 

[erovs] ivStudrov AvroKpdropo? Kaiaapo? 

Ncpova Tpaiavod 2ef3a<rrov I\*]p{pa]viKov 
30 Aokl[koS\ $ap€v&0 S'cjSaor^. (2nd hand) '4x*^*? 

AiSvpov iirtSiSwfca teal 6p6potc[a] rhv Spicov. 
3rd hand. Hapairtcov 6 ovv Otcovi f3vf3\io<f>v\(a£) dyopaviKjiois) 

prii{po)tr6){€a>$) \a((p€uS). t\€i 9 A\i\\a9 kv &TToypa<f>fj rir dpoti- 
pa? ?£, 81b iiriTcXetT* a>9 KaOrj/cfai). (tov9 [[€?&]] 
35 ivSetcdrov Avrotcpdropof Kafoapos Nepova 
Tpaiavov S^aarov Ttppavucov AaKiKov 
$ap€va>6 kO. 

3. p o( rjpas COIT. 13. d of dc[vrVpov C01T. from r. 18. 1. eirtdi'd[tt]pi. 22. v of 

ttjv corr. from <r. 27. First 1 of i3«o&[»7s] corr. from d. 1. idiar^xip]. 31. 1. cirtdcdaura. 
34. « of f£ corr. from £, 

' (To Sarapion, keeper of the public records, from Achillas. . • . Wishing to mortgage 
to) . . . through his ... , priest of Zeus, Hera and . . . , the (6 arourae) of catoecic land 
which I own near the village of ... in the eastern toparchy in the holding of Zenodorus 
. . . (on condition that the repayment is made) by the 5th intercalary day of the month 
Caesareus of the 22nd year of Trajanus Caesar the lord, at the interest of 1 drachma 
for each mina per month dating from next month, Pharmouthi, which I will pay off at 
the conclusion of each twelvemonth, I present this application in order that you may 
instruct the agoranomi of Oxyrhynchus, who are also recorders, to execute the deed 
in the proper way. And I swear by the deified Augusti and by the Fortune of the 
Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus and my ancestral gods 
that the aforesaid arourae are my own property and free from all liability either public 
or private up to the present day. The nth year of the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus 
Augustus Germanicus Dacicus, Phamenoth dies Augustus. I, Achillas son of Didymus, 
have presented the application and sworn the oath. 

Sarapion, joint keeper of the records with Theon, to the agoranomi of the metropolis, 
greeting. Achillas has the 6 arourae on the register. Execute the deed therefore, as 
is fitting.' Date. 

3. Upiw Atbs km *Hpas ko[\ . . . : very likely these deities are in a Graecized form the 
triad commonly worshipped at Oxyrhynchus, Sarapis, Isis, and Thoe'ris (e.g. 46. 8). 
Sarapis and Zeus were often identified (cf. Milne, Journ. HtlL Stud. 1 901, p. 277), and 
Isis might well be identified with Hera, whose worship is rarely mentioned in Egypt 
(Milne, I.e. p. 289). Thoe'ris was perhaps identified with Athena; cf. 679. 



174 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

5. Zrji{Mpov . . . k\tjp[o]v: cf. 47. 18. Our contention (P. Oxy. I. p. 102) that the 
persons who gave their names to ickvjpoi were the original grantees has recently been 
disputed by P. Meyer (Heerwescn, p. 107), who wishes to make them the owners immediately 
preceding the actual ones. This view that e.g. U tov MciwWbv xXqpov (46. 10) means 
no more than rat vpartpov Mevom'ov is not only very unlikely in itself and ignores the 
preposition cV which indicates that the MfHuriov Kkijpos was larger than the area in question, 
but it altogether fails to account for the following facts (i) the uniformly Greek character 
of the names, (2) the absence of women, (3) the frequent insertion of nationalities (e. g. 

ArjfjLTjrpiov MiXtjtriou 270. 17) ]<w Avdtov 265. 40; cf. 506. 24 IlroAffiaiot/ Ucpcrov hrniKov ic\r]pov\ 

(4) the common occurrence of the same Kktjpoi, e. g. that of Drimacus (250, 265, 344). 
On the other hand all these facts point to the Ptolemaic origin of the persons who give 
their names to «Ai}p©t, which, seeing that the Ptolemaic organization of catoecic land 
still survived to some extent (cf. 482. 18, note), is in no way surprising. 

30. QaiuvM ScjSaor^: probably the 29th; cf. 1. 37, which was most likely written on 
the same day, and 289. i. 2. On fa'pai Itfkurrai see P. Oxy. II. p. 284. 



(c) PETITIONS. 
484. Petition to the Strategus. 

I7X4-3 CM. A.D. I38. 

A petition sent to the strategus by Pausiris, who had been accused of fraud 
by a certain Didymus, requesting that a copy of the present libel/us should 
be served upon the son of the accuser in order to compel his attendance at 
the next sitting of the praefect's court {conventus). The papyrus follows nearly 
the same formula as B. G. U. 226 and P. Brit. Mus. 358, on the juristic aspects 
of which documents see Mitteis, Hermes ', xxx. p. 572, and Wenger, Rechts- 
historische Papyrusstudien, pp. ic6 sqq. 

The praefect mentioned is Avidius Heliodorus, whose tenure of office 
is thus carried back to January 138, a circumstance which necessitates a recon- 
sideration of the date generally assigned to the praefecture of Valerius Eudaemon ; 
cf. note on 1. 22. 

In the upper margin is an insertion by a different hand, perhaps a number. 

'A7ro\ivapi<p orp{aTrjyy) payycXtav napayi- 

iraph IIava(pio9 20 yrjrai faw Hlv 6 



484. PETITIONS 



175 



Ilenriptos dirb jccS- 
5 firjs StyOa Kara- 
yiyofji£v<p kv JV[€- 
/lipOl?. €XT€i A[t8v- 

/*[o]y 'Aji6n[o]9 &- 
coraX/ccy p[o]i a>? 

10 hcSpevoram Al- 
Svfiov vtbv av- 
tov irepl irvpov d£i- 
& fi€Ta8o6rjvcu 
avr<p t& via AiSv- 

15 ^ rovfe rod iiro- 
fivrjfiaTo? dvri- 
ypa<f>ov Sirw (- 



KpdTiaro? fjye/xcbv 
AviSlo? 'HkiSSwpos 
in dya$<p rbv vo- 
fxbv 8ta\oy((riTai 
25 fj SiKaioSoTJj Kdl 
TrpocKCtpTeprjo-r) pi- 
yjpi Kpiceoof Iva 
<f>avjj rb y€yov6s. 
(frouff) kP AvTc[Kp]dropo? 
30 Kafoapo? Tpaiavov ASpiavov 
SefiaoTOV Me%dp y. 
2nd hand navcipi? ncrat- 
p[io]s kiri8k8mKa. 



5. 1. Korayiwo^pov. 
from d. 



24. di of diaXoyi{tjrai corr. from p. 



33. t of eiridfdflMca COrr. 



' To Apolinarius, strategus, from Pausiris son of Petsiris, from the village of Sephtha, 
living at Nemera. Since Didymus son of Amois has delivered to me an accusation 
charging me with defrauding his son Didymus in connexion with some wheat, I request 
that a copy of this memorandum be served upon his aforesaid son Didymus in order 
that he may have a written notice and appear wherever his highness the praefect Avidius 
Heliodorus holds his auspicious court for the nome or administers justice, and that he may 
attend until the trial takes place so that the facts may be proved. The 22nd year of the 
Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Mecheir 3. I, Pausiris son of Petsiris, 
have presented this memorandum.' 

22. The earliest mention of Avidius Heliodorus as praefect has hitherto been in 
March a.d. 139 (cf. de Ricci, Proc. Sec. BibL Arch. xxiv. p. 64), and the previous year 
has generally been assigned to Valerius Eudaemon (40. 1 ; cf. P. Oxy. II. pp. 173-4)1 
who was praefect about the end of Hadrian's reign or early in that of Antoninus. 484 
now shows that Avidius Heliodorus was already praefect on Jan. 28, 138, and it is no 
longer possible to suppose that the date in 237. viii. 7 (four «0 foov 'Adpuunv Mrxrlp *, 
i. e. Feb. 14, 138) refers, as we suggested, to the proclamation of Eudaemon. This being 
so, it becomes practically certain that the date in 287. viii. 18 (ft-ow t 6*ov Atkiov 'Avrwlvov 
'Entity icd) does, as is indicated by the arrangement in the papyrus, refer to the proclamation 
of Eudaemon, who was therefore praefect on July 18, a.d. 142. This conclusion produces 
a conflict between 287. viii. 18 and B. G. U. 113. 9, where if the editor's reading is correct 
Avidius Heliodorus is still praefect in the 6th year Pachon 21 (May 16, a.d. 143). 
But the reading of the crucial figure in B. G. U. 113. 9 is doubtful, and if y be substituted 
for g- the whole difficulty is removed and Valerius Eudaemon takes his place between 
Avidius Heliodorus (a.d. 138-ifi) and Valerius Proculus (a.d. 145-7), being no doubt 



176 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

identical with the Eudaemon who tried the case recorded in P. Cattaoui iii. 16-iv {Bull, 
del? Inst, di diritto Rom. viii. pp. 155 sqq.; cf. our revised text in ArcAiv, III. 1), on the 
3rd intercalary day of the 5th year of Antoninus. 



485. Notification to the Strategus. 

30-5x12 cm. a.d. 178. 

Copy of a notification addressed to the strategus by Serenus, a freedman, 
of the fact that he had brought before the archidicastes a claim for the recovery 
of a debt, and that that official had authorized the strategus to forward this 
claim, of which a copy is added, to the alleged debtor — a proceeding equivalent 
to a summons to appear for the trial of the case. Appended at the foot are the 
authorization of the strategus that the claim should be duly forwarded as desired, 
and a corresponding acknowledgement of receipt on the part of the defendant. 
Similar documents are B. G. U. 578 arid 614, the legal aspects of which have 
been discussed by Mitteis (Hermes, xxxii. pp. 644 sqq.), and Gradenwitz 
(Einfiikrung in die Papyniskunde, pp. 35 sqq.), and especially 888, the text 
of which admits of several improvements (see the notes below). The dispute in 
the present instance was concerned with a loan of 900 drachmae on the security 
of a female slave from Serenus to Sarapias, a woman living at Psobthis which 
we learn from this papyrus was the name of the metropolis of the Small Oasis 
(Bahriyeh). Cf. 592. 

Bicovi orpa(Tr)y<{>) 

iraph Stprjvov dweXtvOtpov 'AnoXXtoviavov Sapanuo- 
vos dn '0£vptiyx<»v TroAew?. ov inSpiaa ira(pb?) rod jraraAoy/o(i/) 
XPnp(cLTicrfJLov) ktmv dtrriypfa^ov)' AvtcovIvos 6 Kal IIovStjs 6 fcpe&s 
5 Kal dp\iS{ucaar)isi) '0£vpvyy*iTOv orp(aTTiy<p) ^aipeiv). Tod SeSopevov 

&jrojivfjp(aTOs) 
dvriyp(a<f>ov) ptTaSoOrJTco &$ in^K^iraCy eppaxro. (frovs) 16 AvprjXuw 

9 Avtg>v((vov) 
Kal KoppSSov r&v Kvptoav HcfiaoT&v $aS><f>i £ 2apair(iG>v) 
[..].( ) - . ( ) [or]ea(Tipeia>pai). 'HfaurruDV 6 k(gu) 2apair((a>v) iypatya). 

'AvT&vtinp ry Kal 
IlotiSevri Upu dpxiSiKaorjj Kal npbs rjj ImpeXtta 
10 r&v x$ri)p,aTi<TTS>v kol) r&v &XXo»v Kpirr\piav napic 



485. PETITIONS ill 

i 
i 



2€f>[rjvcv dncXfaOkpov 'AiroXXa>v{iav)ov Sapairioovo? dif ['0]£i//ri/y- 
\<e[v n6\e]a>9. kSdvucra Kara 8rjp6<Ttov \pTjpaTicrpbv 
y€ypap(ji)ivov 8ia rod kv rg avrfj '0£vpvyx<ov ir6X*i pvrjpo- 
vdov T<p 8uX06vri it] (2tu) prjvl XtfiaoTco ta Sapamd- 

15 81 IIoSoovos rod "Slpov prjrpb? Oaf) a 109 dirb WojSdco)? 
TfJ9 prjrpoiroXcas rrjs piKpa\s] 'Oacreeoff dpyvpiov 8[pa- 
\pas kvaKoarias K*<f>aXaiw t6kov Spa^jiiaiov iKaor^s 
pvd$ Kara prjva rod 8k KeQaXaiov X prjvbs Kcucrapeiou 
rod avrod [8]i€\06vtos irj (Irot/y), 8t]\q>6€vto9 kav pfj diro- 

20 8<p kv rfi irpoOearpia pkvtiv irtpl kpk Kal rods nap 9 e- 
poO peraXrjptyopivovs dvri re rod K€<f>aXaiov Kal 3>v 
[ka]v pfj dir[o]8oi tokcov tj)v Kpdrr\<nv Kal Kvpetav 
Ttj9 inrap)(o6crrjs avrfj 8ovXrjs SapamdSo? [t]6t€ otfaris 
a>? (crap) K€ k<f> oh dXXots rb 8dvuov 7repik\u Kal al kv av- 

25 r$ kvytypappivai irepi re Spaa pod Kal Qavdrov rfjs 
SovXrjs kirl rjj e/xg daQaXeia SiaaroXal jrepii^ovo-t. 
rfjs 8k irpo6€(Tpia$ SieXQovarjs Kal rfjs dnoSoatto? 
poi pfj yevopivrjf d£i& crvvrd£ai ypdyfrai t$ rod 'Ogvpvy- 
X*irov arpHarriy^) km8ov(yai) rovrov dvrtyp(a<f>ov) rjj 2[apa]md8i kav 
ircpifj, €i 8k prj, KXrjpov6pot9 

30 [a]i[r^]y T€Xu[o]i9, kav 8k ko\1] d<j>t)Xit^*9] ©crt, vopipots av- 
r&v kmrponots &v ra Svopara kirl r&v [r6]rroi>v 8rjXa>- 
Ot)<r€Tai } iv tlScocri Kal noirjo-ODvrai poi rr)v d7r68ocriv 
r) u8axri \pri<r6pt[v6v pe] rots dpp6£ov<ri 7T€p[l k]ji{ia8*t- 
as vopipois &s K[aOtjy€i. (frot/ff) i0 Avprj[Xi)a>v Av[r]u>vivov 

35 Kal Kopp68ov rS[v KVpuo]v Stpaor&v $a[&<f>i . .] o[rp]a(rriyoC) 

o[v]vrd§avT09 . . [ ] perdSooriv kvea .[.... 777 

[2a]pamd8i iff ko[0tjk€i. (irovs) 16 AvroKparSpoov 
Kaiardp(ov MdpKo(y) A[vpt]X(ov 'Avravivov Kal Aovklov 
AvprjX(i)o{v) Kop[p68ov] 2*fi[a<rr&v 'AppeviaK&v 

40 MtjSik&v HapOiK&v [TtppaviK&v SappariK&v 

[M€yt]aT(ov 9 A0vp id. [(2nd hand) Sapamas II68a>vos 
[e]<rx<>v toAtov to[v uiropvijp(aTos) dvriy ffafav). (?rot/y) 10 
'AvtoovCvgu Kal K[opp68ov r&v tcvpiav 

N 



178 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

AvT0Kp[a]T6p<Dv /jLT)[vbs 'AQbp Mov- 

45 aaios 6 Kal IIav(r€ipicc[v toO kmyi- 

y[p]a/JLfJLai aArrjs Kvpios avf • [ 

[fifth t[oO] arpaTrjyov Kal lypa^a {{nkp avrrjs 
\ji]ij cISikitj? ypdpp[ara m 
3rd hand Xvpfoy imtypirris) p[er£8a>Ka t& 6ir6- 
5° RYTfj 10 ') SapamdSt a>? [irpSicciTCU* (trous) 16 

p[rj]vbs 9 A[0dp . . 

In the left margin opposite 1. 6 are three strokes (apparently not letters), 
and opposite 11. 10-15 

pera kv(j>iov) 
EvSaipo^yo?) 

xMiiartCovros)] priT{pfc) 
55 f J««7? 

w6\(ca>s) 

22. 1. djrody. 28. o£vpvyx€i T rov Pap.; the second o apparently corrected. 29. 

m&ov{pai) toutov <nmyp{atf>op) added above the line. 55. Ttprp Pap. 

' To Theon, strategus, from Serenus, freedman of Apollonianus son of Sarapion, of Oxy- 
rhynchus. Appended is a copy of the official response received by me from the record office. 
Antoninus also called Pudens, priest and archidicastes, to the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite 
nome, greeting. Let a copy of the petition which has been presented be served as follows. 
Good-bye. The 19th year of the Aurelii Antoninus and Commodus the lords Augusti, 
Phaophi 7. Signed by me, Sarapion. I, Hephaesdon also called Sarapion, wrote (on his 
behalf). To Antoninus also called Pudens, priest, archidicastes and superintendent of 
the chrematistae and other courts, from Serenus, freedman of Apollonianus son of Sarapion, 
of Oxyrhynchus. I lent in accordance with a public deed, written in the record office at the 
said Oxyrhynchus in the past 18th year on the nth of the month Sebastus, to Sarapias 
daughter of Podon son of Horus, her mother being Thae'sis, of Psobthis, the metropolis 
of the Small Oasis, the capital sum of 900 drachmae of silver with interest at the rate of 
a drachma on each mina monthly, the capital to be repaid on the 30th of the month 
Caesareus in the same past 18th year, with the proviso that if she did not repay the money 
on the appointed day, instead of the capital sum and any interest that was not paid I and 
my assigns were guaranteed the possession and ownership of her slave Sarapias, then aged 
about 25 years, with the various conditions contained in the loan and the provisions therein 
written for my security concerning the flight or death of the slave. The appointed term 
having elapsed and the repayment not having been made, I request you to give instructions 
for a letter to be written to the strategus of the Oxyrhynchite nome to present a copy of 
this petition to Sarapias, if she is still living, and if not, then to her heirs being of age, 



485. PETITIONS 179 

and if they are minors, to their lawful guardians, whose names will be ascertained on 
the spot, in order that they may be informed and may make repayment to me or else 
may know that I shall take the proper proceedings to which I am entitled for entry 
upon possession, as is right. The 19th year of the Aurelii Antoninus and Commodus 
the lords Augusti, Phaophi. The strategus ordered that a copy should be served in the 
proper manner upon Sarapias.' Date. (Signed) ' I, Sarapias, daughter of Podon, received 
a copy of this petition/ Date. ' I, Musaeus also called Pausirion, son of . . ., am registered 
as her guardian having been (appointed) by the strategus, and wrote for her as she was 
illiterate. I, Syrion, assistant, served the petition npon Sarapias, as aforesaid/ Date. 

3. ov cir6pura x.r.X. : in B. G. U. 578 and 614 the formula used is ov naptKopura aird 
haXoyrp dtffio<nwr€<as. In connexion with KaraXoyioCu) here it may be noted that in B. G. U. 
614 the copy of the petition to the apxiducaorqc is headed ypa<f>n <caraXo[y]«t[ov, indicating the 
office where it was originally drawn up. In the present case the reply of the dpxi&ffacmjff 
to the petitioner seems to have been issued through the same medium. 

7. The letter of the archidicastes is in B. G. U. 578 signed, as here, by two persons 
whose titles are not given ; cf. B. G. U. 888. 4, where the corresponding signatory is the 

vopoypa<pos ayopas. 

28. w ycro/icVip : so no doubt B. G. U. 888. 18. 

29. tovtov dtrrlyp(a<j>ov) : the present papyrus is the actual copy made in accordance 
with this request, as is shown by the fact that the docket of the strategus (11. 34-5) is in 
the same hand as the body of the text, as well as by the frequent abbreviations (cf. 
especially 1. 1). 

31. circ top [rojirvv &r)\<o$r}<r€Tai : di7Xa>d{q]<r[cra]4 is similarly to be read after toVow in 

B. G. U. 888. 21. In 1. 8 of the same papyrus we should suggest J . . 09 rov Mwrrou. 
o$ciXo/*cM>i', in 1. 13 iirl or *<f>' {{n]ak\aypa<n (cf. B. G. U. 86. 12, &C.), and in 1. 26 2c/9(a<rrj7) 
for (T€a(jj^€ia>fuu). 

33. c']p/3adciar : cf. B. G. U. IOI. 1 5— 6 pff cfclwu dc poi XvrpSxrai firj&i cp&afovuv, and 
Etym. M. p. 334. 35 ifipartv<rai teal tpfiartia' (<mv f) wvX Xeyo/xcVi; dtA rot) d cpjSadi'a, to top 
otocMJT^v (fifiaT€vaai xai tlaekBtiv cic ra KTTjiiara rov imoxpcov cVc^u/wafojrra rh bdvaov. 

34-5. In B. G. U. 578. 1 the corresponding formula is [Afifunnos arp(anryor)] 
'Apo-iffoiTov) ['HpjaxXct'dov fitpid(os) *H/k»w vnrjp€Tjj. fxtrab(or) cVuiri(oi') &s koB^k^i) rots 
irpwrrerayp^pois) a*oXo£[6W]. The present passage is more compressed, probably because 
the document as far as 1. 41 is a copy of the original; cf. note 1. 29. The word after 
tr[v]vro^opTOf is perhaps nc[iua$at] and cyco- suggests ivtarwTjj, but the reading is very 
doubtful. 

44-7. The Kvpun here associated with Sarapias is different from the person who 
acted in that capacity when the loan was contracted ; cf. 11. 52 sqq. This circumstance 
explains the statement in 1L 46-7 that the second icvpios was assigned faro rov orpaniyov. 
For the competence of the strategus in the appointment of guardians cf. 56. 13-5, and 
the Geneva papyrus discussed by Erman in Zcitschr. d. Sav. Stifi. xv. 241 sqq. For 
some reason — whether from death or other cause — the original guardian of Sarapias was 
not available, and a new one therefore became necessary. 



N 2 



180 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

486. Petitions to the Epistrategus and Praefect. 

34.5x267 cm. a.d. 131. 

This petition to the epistrategus, enclosing a petition to the praefect with 
his answer, is concerned with the same subject as 472. Dionysia and Sarapion 
had had a dispute concerning the ownership of some land which Dionysia claimed 
to have bought from Sarapion's father, while Sarapion asserted that she held 
it only on mortgage, combining his claim with a charge of poisoning against 
Dionysia's mother, Hermione. The matter came before the epistrategus Claudius 
Quintianus, who referred it to the praefect and ordered the rival suitors to 
proceed to Alexandria. Dionysia complied with his instructions, but not 
Sarapion ; and after waiting some time in vain, she petitioned the praefect Flavius 
Titianus to give her permission to return home (11. 18-36). To this the praefect 
replied by referring her back to the epistrategus, who by this time was Julius 
Varianus (11. 37-8). Accordingly Dionysia wrote to him re-stating her case, 
and enclosing her previous petition and the answer to it ; and reiterated her 
request for leave to return to Oxyrhynchus and for the case to be decided there. 
On the verso in a small cursive hand is the rough draft of another petition 
of Dionysia on the same subject, but too much obliterated for continuous 
decipherment. 

'IovXfy Ovapiavip iniar partly '<p f E7rr[a v\op&v Kal 'Apaivo€ir[ov 

trapa Aiovvaias rrjs Xai[p]rjpovos /irjrpb? 'Ep/utyr)]? rrjs Xcuprjftoyos r&v 
dirb rfjs /ArjrpoTrSXeoos rod 9 0^vpuy\€irou vo/jlov. ivardar^s p[oi] dpipi- 

cos irpbs Xaparricovd riva M[v]r)[<ri6i]ov Saris 8 Tjy6pa<ra t^rij]fia d/i- 

ir€\i[tc]bv Kal (reinfect 
5 cSdcpt] irapa rod irarpb? <*yr[o]v fr* dirb rod ta (<£rov$) x A8piap[oO] 

KaUrapos rod icvptov dpiO/irj- 
aaaa airr<p tc t£ ^ar[p]l [Kat ri\[i] 8av€[i]<rrj} afyrov rfjv atyiHfwvrj- 

0€i[<ra]v Tifi^v 
Kal \a/3ov<ra rbv KaOrJKOvra rr}s dbvfj? 8rj/i6a , i[ov yfifi/ia]ri(r/iby eXcycp 

kv 11 Caret 
fit €)(€ur airrd, dtcovaa? KXavSios Kvivnavbs [6 y€v6/ic]vos imvrpdrri- 

yo$ [tfjrrcp- 



486. PETITIONS 181 

i0€TO ivl tov Kpdnarov [fiy]<Ep6va. Kaiycb p\v erfr]oT€ 7rpo<TK<xpT€pa> 

Ty [t]oG 

xo fjyepSvo? fHj/JLCLTi, rod 8k [dv]Ti8iKov dvtmaTpcirrfio'avTOs Kal pfj irapayt- 
vopkvov dveSwKa rp [Kp]aT(oT<p fjy€p6vi dva<f[6]piov oi dvriypa^o\v 

£a i^LOTOpovaa rffy €*[.] . . t[o]v irpdyparos 8id0*<rtv Kal dyincpyfri pe 

iir[t\ ak 
rhv Kvpiov KptOrjaopivrfar. in]€i ovv 6 dvrCSiKO? [o]i8k vvv rrdpeariv i) 

8k [Ka- 
rcunropa iiretya teal ij im/i[i]k€ta t&v irrrb tov rror[a]pov Trapcureovp- 

pkvcov 
15 XPvt* 1 I* 00 T V* rrapovo-(a[s] d£i& kav 86£g <roi kmrptyai pot dvarrXtd- 

aai tcpi- 
Orjo-opevrjv bnb aov iirl t&v t6ttcov, iv & tvcpyeTrjpivTj. 8l€Vtv\€1. 
iariv 81 off €7re8a)K[a rp Kpa}r(oT<p fiytpSvi dvafyoplov dvriypaQov 
[T]ito> $Xaovta> TiT[i\ai\& r]p Kpardrnp iiytpSvt 

irapa Aiowvias rfj? Xaiprjp[o]vo$ prjrpbs 'Eppiov-q? t&v dirb 9 0^vp6y\a>v 

7r6\€OD?. 

20 Saparruov ris MvrjaiOeov dn[b r]rj$ avrfjs nSXcco? iir[l] KXavSCov 
Kvtvr[i]avov tov 
yevopivov itriarpaT^yov [t&v] 'Eirra vop&v t# vwrpi pou 'EppiSvy 

<P<xppa- 
tctlas kvKaX&v Kal irepl ifna[p^S\vTcnv tiv&v iXoyoiroirjaaTO o>y £ttoot€AA6i'- 
tcov airr<p &v iyia fj Aiow\at\a KaTa 8rjpo<r(ov9 r}y6pa<ra XP^paTi- 

apov? dpi- 
Op-qaaaa Tipfjv ain&v r[p] najpl airroO W€pi6vrt Kal Saveiarais tov 
o[v]toG 
25 iraTpbs trap 9 oh fjv Ta 8t]X[o]vp€va KTJjpaTa iv uiroOrJKy KpaTOvpeva 

<f>daK(ov KaTa irhrnv ..[..]. eyyeypdcpOai, Kal Tfjv SXrjv virSOeaiv virep- 
0€pivov rod i7narp[aTrjyo]u kirl a\ Tbv evcpyiTtjv t^v pkv pi\Ti- 
pa pov ovveflri diro6ay€i[v] irpb Ttj9 M07?, Iyd> 8k ficrorc €K tt}s tov 
im<rrpaTJjyov imaroXrj[s] pcra toG Hapamcovo? KeXevaOeiaa KarairfAcv-] 
30 crai ivOdSc KaT^jvrrjaa t\ov 2]apatr(a>vos pfj ImarpatpivTos <6ot€ icfara-] 
7rXev<rai. iircl oSv iv0d8{e] pot SiaTpifiovoTj dirrjvyiXri Ta ipa irdrfra] 



182 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Ik rrjs imepfiapovs dva[flda]cct>s tov Upcordrov NiXov diro\a>\iva[i\ 
kiro'uad t€ k[oX eSd^rj Kal] x&fiaTa, irapaicd\& <rc, fjy€/ia>v Kvpie, [t]o& 
dvriSiKo[v oiSi vvv irap6]mos, kmrptyai fioi dvanXcvaai tva rh €[/xa]u- 
35 rrjs Strata A<££a>, pi) (rii\v rots ifirdp-^ovtri pov Kaycb XeipS ovvairoXtopai, 
[tv <3 efcpycTTjfiivri.] 8i€vrv)(€i. (erovs) ir 'ASpiavov Kaiaapos $aatyt if}. 
[ 1 8 letters ]? €%€i ivrvye r& €7ri<rrpaT^y<p diroSov- 

[<ra 16 „ ] 

II. I St o of -ycvopivov corr. from a. y of arriypa<f>ov COtT. from d. 2 2. 1. uiroarcXXo/ArvMV ? 

c To Julius Varianus, epistrategus of the Heptanomis and Arsinoite nome, from 
Dionysia daughter of Chaeremon, her mother being Hermione daughter of Chaeremon, 
inhabitants of the metropolis of the Oxyrhynchite nome. A dispute arose between me 
and one Sarapion son of Mnesitheus, who with regard to a vineyard and some corn-land 
which I bought from his father as long ago as the nth year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord, 
having paid to his father himself and to a creditor of his the price agreed upon and having 
received the regular official contract of the sale, declared that I held this land on mortgage. 
Claudius Quintianus who was then epistrategus heard the case and referred it to his 
highness the praefect. Thereupon I attended at the praefect's court, and when my 
opponent paid no attention and failed to appear I presented his highness the praefect 
with a petition, of which I have appended a copy, narrating in full the state of the affair ; 
and he sent me on to you, my lord, to have the case tried. Since my opponent even 
now is absent and the time for sowing is imminent and the repair of what has been swept 
away by the river requires my presence, I beg you, if it please you, to permit me to sail 
back and have the case decided by you on the spot, that I may obtain redress. Farewell. 
The copy of the petition which I presented to his highness the praefect is as follows : — 

To his highness the praefect Titus Flavius Titianus from Dionysia daughter of 
Chaeremon, her mother being Hermione, inhabitants of Oxyrhynchus. A certain 
Sarapion son of Mnesitheus, of the said city, charged my mother Hermione before 
Claudius Quintianus, late epistrategus of the Heptanomis, with poisoning, and at the same 
time invented a claim with regard to certain property of which he said he was defrauded, 
but which I, Dionysia, bought in accordance with official contracts, having paid the price 
of it to his father when he was alive and to creditors of his said father who held the 
land in question on mortgage; and he asserted that it had been registered in security. 
The epistrategus referred the whole case to your beneficence, and it happened that 
my mother died before the trial, while I thereupon in consequence of the letter of the 
epistrategus ordering me and Sarapion to sail down to Alexandria presented myself here, 
but Sarapion has paid no attention to the instruction to sail down. Since therefore news 
has reached me while staying here that all my property has been lost through the 
excessive rise of the most sacred Nile, both buildings, lands, and dykes, I entreat you, my 
lord praefect, in the continued absence of my opponent, to permit me to sail back in order 
that I may obtain justice (there) and that I may not in addition to the loss of my property 
also perish of hunger, that I may obtain redress. Farewell. The i6th year of Hadrianus 
Caesar, Phaophi 12. (Endorsed) If this is true, petition the epistrategus, delivering (to 
him a copy of this).' 



487. PETITIONS 183 

7. ^fi6a{w xp«7/ia]rMr/A(Sr : i.e. the contract drawn up in the presence of officials at the 
registry office ; cf. 99. 2. 

37-8. These two lines which contain the answer of the praefect to the petition 
may be restored on the analogy of e. g. P. Tebt. I. 43. 44 [Acown?. *l ourw]* fyw Irrvgc 
ry intarparrjyt^ cmvdotfaa t6 a*a<f>6pioy]. 



487. Petition to the Epistrategus. 

12 x ii*5 cm. a.d. 156. 

A petition, written in very bad Greek, to the epistrategus from Nicias, who 
wished to be relieved of the duty of acting as guardian to two minors. 

SrariXfy Ma£tp<p to Kpar(ora>t 

imorparijyip 

irapa NikCov *ApirdXov dn '0£vp[v t yx)u>y f6- 

Aew. 6 rrjs ir6Xtfa>s] y[p]cip[pa>)revs X^pfjvos 
5 €7T€[5]awc€ pc eh imrpoTrijv d<f>f]X(t^ca]y y[l]oiy 

A[i]oi>v<r(ov Acapimvos 6vras [&]$ alr&y [c]&o- 

at iriyr* Kal prirk\y\a irpbs yivovs c* irarpb[$ 

fj p-qrpbs avr&y dXXorc i\6vrmv rov? iic 

{k\ rrjs ovyywtas avr&y Svvapivovs ra rr\s knt- 
10 rp[o]!rrjs avr&y Sioucfjae. kpov r€ KarafJaprj- 

Of[y]To$ h rah Xirovpytais teal yjpataxrrov yevo- 

pkvov Scope, tcvpiai, lay aov rjj Tv\fl &ȣ#* KeXeOo-at 

ry <rrpaTTiy$ aliravayKdae rby ypappan rfjs w6- 

Xc[a)]s £[A]Aoj> dv[r] kpov Karaoradrjyai r§ r&y d- 
15 (pTjXticooy imrpo7rjj{y} Snrw 8vyrj0& rg y*{y*\opyt- 

a pov irpovevKcpiy irpbs [rb] SCyacOi pe Kal ra 

Ik{k\ rrjs yftas kv ipv 6<f>XJjpara dnoSovyai 

Kal pij perayaar^aijjs) pe r&y i8ia>v rrjs l[8]las {ye- 

vope) e[T]y co ei{y}epyerrjpevo9. 8ievr6\ei. trovs 
20 eUoaroO AvroKpdropos Kafoapos Ttrov AtXlov ASpiayod 'Ayrafytyov) 

2efJa<rrod Ev[<r]€f2ods prjybs % A8piavov 117. Nik (as 

£Apir)&Xov em[8}48<i{K]a. 



184 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

I. 1. r«j>. 6. 1. 3pto)v [w]ff crcoi/. 7. 1. pifiiva. io. 1. diotxTJacu. II. 1. xpcaorov. 

12. 1. dco/uu xvpic . . . ddftf. 1 3. 1. eirapayxao-ac r^r ypapfiarea. I5~6. 1. ycvpyiq. fiov 

rrpo<T€VKatp€tv . . . bvvaoOai. 1 7. 1. cfto/. 18. i&w ri;p c[d]<a? Pap. 

' To his highness Statilius Maximus, epistrategus, from Nicias son of Harpalus, of 
Oxyrhynchus. The scribe of the city, Serenus, appointed me guardian of two minors, 
sons of Dionysius son of Dorion, aged about 25 years, who neither on their father's nor 
on their mother's side had any other persons who from ties of kinship could undertake 
the business of guardianship. Since I am weighed down by my official duties and have 
incurred debts, I request you, my lord, if it please your fortune, to instruct the strategus 
to compel the scribe of the city to appoint some one else in my place to act as guardian to 
the minors, in order that I may be able to attend to the cultivation of my property 
and be enabled to pay the debts to which I have become liable in connexion with my 
office, and that you may not make me an outcast from my property and home, so that 
I may obtain redress. Farewell. The 20th year of the Emperor Caesar Titus Aelius 
Hadrianus Antoninus Augustus Pius, the 18th of the month Hadrianus. I, Nicias son 
of Harpalus, presented this petition.' 

1. Statilius Maximus is also addressed in B. G. U. 340, which document was written 
probably some years later than the 12 th year mentioned in L 5, since 487 is dated in the 
20th year of Antoninus. 

5. afaXUw : that persons aged twenty-five should be still minors is rather remarkable, 
but cf. 491, where the testator provides that his sons should have a guardian until the age 
of twenty and should be unable to alienate their inheritance before the age of twenty-five 
(491. 6, note), and 495. 10. 

18-9. The writer has confused two constructions m perayavTaTos . . . ytwpcu (ym/u) 
and fitj furavaarrjaps fit. 



488. Petition to the Epistrategus. 

26*5 x 15-5 cm. Late second or third century. 

A petition from a woman whose home was in the Apollonopolite nome 
and who had bought some land in the Antaeopolite nome. The scribe of the 
local komogrammateus, the official specially concerned with the land-survey, 
had entered her purchase in the survey-lists at more than an aroura in excess 
of the correct amount, and the petitioner appealed to the epistrategus to set 
matters right. On the verso in a different hand is a message, probably written 
in the office of the epistrategus and apparently directed to a local official pf the 
Antaeopolite nome, which calls attention to the petitioner's claim. The petition 
has been gummed on to another document on each side; the beginnings of 
a few lines of the right-hand one are preserved. 

'IovXhp 'Iov\iav£ ry Kpariar<p 

km<TTparfiy<p 
traph StvcpCfiios Oopraiov fiera Kvpiov 



488. PETITIONS 185 



rod vlov Wdiro? npeafivTipov Ac/i&tos 
5 dnb Ka>prj9 'IjStWos Nepva rod 
'AwoXXmyoTroXtCrov k6tco t6itcdv. 
kdbitrjpai, Kvpie, In irpb woXXov yjpivov 
napa AttoXXcqviov koI AtSvpov 
dp<f>oripo>v 'tlpiykvovs dirb A6koov 

10 irSXtoo? airiKa? dpovpa[$] nkvre 

rkraprrov kv fc\Jjp<p Acyo/x(ei><a>) Ataypa<pij$ 
kv ircStois KprJKcws Kcoprj? rov 
'AvraionoXttrov vopov. 'AprepiSco- 
po$ Si n$ ypappartv? K<opoypap- 

15 parkoos rrjs Kpiiceo&s oiic otS' Sttcds 
irapkypa^fkv \i\ }/*[[«]]€ irXkov rrj? 
inrooTdo-etoS pov kv S\y dpovpjj pip 
Kal trpbs tear tros Ka[l] k/c roHrrov 
oifK iXtyrjv f}\df}f)V vnocpkpu /ic. 

20 Kara rb dvayicaiov ovv rov dvOpcb- 
ttov kmiceipkvov pot KivSvvtti- 
ovaa kvKaraXeiyf/ai r)i[v .] . . iv 
irpo<r<p€vya> col r&t Kvpico Kal ndv- 
tcov f3orj0q> Kal d£ia> kdv aoi 

25 86£y KtXtvaai rati rov vopov 

or partly £>t [r]ijv Skovaav irapaypa- 
<pfjv &v tyco dpovp&v Kaff as 
i\<o daipdXcias 7rpovof}<rai yu- 
vtaOai Kal pfj KaK&s pc trapa- 

30 ypd<p€aOai vwb rod Kmpoypappa- 
rlcor, Kal yap Kal irkpvct wpb? roti- 
rots Ircpd pe jca*a>? irapiypa- 
^rcy, tv* c5 PcPoqOriiikw]. 
2nd hand [ 2c]v<pifiis Qopraiov 

35 [pcra tcvpiov Vdir]os trp^o-pvrkpov) Aa/i&ros 
[imSeSo&Ka. ] 



186 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

On the verso 
3rd hand eh \tipas 

'AvraxmoXtfTov) 
fjL€/jL<f>€Tat yp{afipaTea) Ka/ioy/^a/u/iarca?) 
40 ircpl kclktjs irapaypa<ptjs, 
d£ioi rfjv Siovaap 
7rapaypa<pfjy ywicOai. 
4th hand pfjSeybs €TT€^op{iyov). 

1. iovXitt tovXuuw Pap. 3. Second a of wapa corn from <r. 4. ifauros Pap., a corr. 

32. First € of iraprypa^fy COIT. from a, 43. /uj COIT. 

'To his highness the epistrategus Julius Julianus, from Senphibis daughter of 
Thortaeus, with her guardian who is her son Psais the elder, son of Lemos, from the 
village of Ibion Nemna of the lower toparchy of the Apollonopolite nome. I bought, 
my lord, a long time ago from Apollonius and Didymus, both sons of Origenes, of 
Lycopolis, 5^ arourae of corn-land in the holding called the Diagraphe in the lands of the 
village of Krikis in the Antaeopolite nome. But a certain Artemidorus, scribe of the 
komogrammateus of Krikis, somehow registered me as having more land than I actually 
possess by one whole aroura and more in each year, and in consequence inflicts much loss 
upon me. I am therefore compelled, since the man oppresses me and I am in danger 
of abandoning the (land ?), to take refuge with you, the lord and helper of all, and I beg 
you, if it please you, to order the strategus of the nome to see that the correct registration 
is made of my land in accordance with the securities which I possess, and not to let 
me be falsely registered by the komogrammateus, for last year also he made other false 
entries in his register concerning me besides this, that I may obtain relief. I, Senphibis 
daughter of Thortaeus with my guardian Psais the elder, son of Lamos (sic), have presented 
this petition. 

(Deliver) into the hands of ( )of the Antaeopolite nome. She accuses the scribe 

of the komogrammateus with making a false entry and requests the correct entry to be 
made ... 

16. After napeypa^tp the scribe began to write a word commencing 17^1, either fj/wr or 
jfutrv, but changed it to p* without, however, erasing the initial 17. 

17. p*£ ml irp6s : cf. 68. 24, P. Amh. 79. 32, &c. 

22. Neither y^r, oI]kio» nor Krlfjat* suits the vestiges and spacing. 

37. The name of an official would be expected, but nothing is lost after *U x«pa*. 

43. The relation of this line to the preceding is not clear. Above the * of firfiwvfc 
is what looks like o, as if the scribe had first written m&°* The doubtful sr of *'ircxop(ciw) 
may be p ; but perhaps fujBtvhs en<(p)xofx(fpov) * if no one objects ' should be read. 



489. WILLS 187 

(d) WILLS. 

489. Will of Dionysius. 

35-5 X24.2 cm. a.d. 117. 

Will of Dionysius son of Harpocration. The testator bequeaths to his 
wife Diogenis an apartment rent-free in a house belonging to him, together with 
the furniture of the whole house and his slaves. After the death of Diogenis 
the whole property is vested in their son, who presumably was to inherit during 
his mother's lifetime whatever was not expressly reserved for her, though this 
is not definitely stated. The papyrus is dated in the reign of Trajan, and the 
number of the year, which is lost, can be fixed by the occurrence of the title 
Parthicus, which was assumed by that emperor in his 20th year. On Aug. 
27, when the papyrus was written, Trajan had, as a matter of fact, been dead 
about three weeks. This and the following wills, except 494, are written across 
the fibres of the papyrus ; cf. 583, 634, and 646-52. The seals of the testator 
and witnesses were attached to the outside of the roll, but these have not been 
preserved ; cf. P. Tebt. I. 104 introd. 

[*Etovs cikootov AvT0Kpa.T0p6\$ Kafoapo? Nepotia Tpaiavov 'Aptarov 2?c- 

fJaarov TcppaviKov Acckikov IlapOucod fifjvbs Kcu<rap€[(o]u irrayo- 

(jiivcov) S S'c/fafori/), 
[iv t 0^vpvy\<ov iroXti rrjs OrjfiatSo?, d}yaOjj rO^-qi. 
[rdSc SuOero vo&v] teal <ppo[v&v Aiov]v<tio$ ApTrotcpaTtcovos rod Saparrtevos 

/JLTjTpbs ' EaopaSiros dir 'O£vp&yx<ofiv TrSXew kv dyvia. 
[kip' tv p\v ircpfci/ii] \f{ivov r&v l8(<o]v Kvpiov thai Kal yjpavOai teal 

oUopofiuy trcpl avr&v Kal peTaSiariOeaOai Kaff hv kav aipcopai 
5 \rp(mov. pera Sh rcXevHjv pov] (rvv\onp& i\ uv r ^ v ^vvovtrdv A">* ywaiKa 

Aioyevltia UroXepatov dirb rrj? avrrjs irSkea? k<f> &v irtpi- 
[cort yjp6vov hoLKt]<Tiv Kal] yjprjviv X^pi* kvoiKiov otico[v] iybs o5 lav 

avrfl alpfjrai d<f> fjs ex* * 7r> dp<p68ov Poppa KptjnelSos 
[XiOivri? oUta? oi>v k£68f Kal] c[/]<r65a>, 1}ti9 Kal !£« \pr\<nv i<p f tv ircpi- 

€<m \p6vov r&v in 9 kpov drroXtHpOTjcofiimv tv tc tSU 
[avr<p oiK<p Kal kv rjj oIklol <J7C€t/]c3i> Kal kirtirXmv Kal SovXetav Kal 

dnoipopas rrjs SovXrjs pov 'IXapoOros Kal t&v k£ airrijs 



188 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[eKy6va>v Tpefyopevwv Kal ipar\i{opevwv &ir avrr}? rrjs AioyevtSos. pera 

8e Kal rfjy avrf}? TeXevrffv etvat ra irdvra pov 
io [jiSvodv t&v i£ dXXrjXav TeKv]cov 9 oh renvois f)p&v ovk k£earai ra dn 

kpov eh a&Tovs kXevaopeva Iripois pepi£eiv el 
[pi} povQ iKaarji avT&]v yevea Kal prjSevl k£e<rra> t& Ka06Xov kirepxeaOat 

Tjj yvvaiKt pov Aioyevi8i irepl prjSevb? t&v 
[kv tjj BiadriKji irdv]Ta>v fj dirorlveiv rbv eireX[evaop]evov iirtrlpov 8pa%pas 

X^tXia? Kal eh rb Srjpfoiov ras tea?. 
[fj SiaOrJKtj Kvpia. (and hand) Atovvaios t A]piro{v)xpaTta>vos toQ 2apa- 

TTtWo? TT€7ro(rjfiai rfjv SiaO-qKr^v Kal ovv\op& fyetv pera Tfjv 
[TeXevrrjv pov t^v yvvaiKd pov] AioyeviSa TlToXepaiov k<p } hv nepUart 

ypSvov ivohrjaiv Kal Xfi^ aiy X°P € '* ^ vv ' 
15 [kiov oXkov ivbs oi kav airfj al]pfJTai d<f> ijy f^[a> kv r]fj f$op(p)a Kprj- 

ni[8t Xydlvrjs oiKias kv jj e£[o8o?] Kal fo[o]8os, jJTis Kal 
[H €t Xpy aiv *$ ^ y 7r€ P^ 60Ti \p\6vov t&(v) inf kpov diroXi<f>6ri<ropeva>v kv 

rf> avT<p oiK<p Kal kv rfj oUla aKev&v Kal knt- 
[irXcov Kal SovXeCav Ka]l dirocpopa? SovXrjf pov [ I]Xapov{To]s Kal t&v e£ 

avrrj? eKySvav Tpetpopevav Kal IpaTifape- 
[vodv 6ir avrfjs AioyevlSos.] peTa 8k Tfjv avrfj? TeXe[vrfjv e]tvat Ta 

irdvTa pov p6va>v [t]&v [k£ dXX]jXcov f^Kvcov \v\oh T€[k- 
[vois ijp&v ovk k£(<rrai Ta dir k]pov eh avrovs eXevaSpeva iripoif pept{eiv el 

pfj p6vg iKdory avT&v yevea 
20 [&$ wpSKeiTOi. dpi eT&v . • ov]X)) ySvaTi dpiarep& Kal eariv fiov % 

acppayls HapdmSos. 'HpaKXrj? 6 Kal 'Atrtwv 'Anfavos typa- 
[y^a inrep avrov pfj elSfrros ypdp]para 9 (eT&v) X( ovXtj noSl dpitrreptp. 

(3rd hand) nXovrfov Brjaios Aioyevov? tov 'AnoXXcovlov dirb 
[ttjs avrfjs 7r6Xem /iaprvp& r]# tov Aiowaiov SiaBrJKfl Kal el/il h&v 

TeaaepdKovra irevre ovX(ij) y6(yan) 8c£(i<p) /c[at 
[eariv pov fj acppayh (4th hand) . .])(h>v AvKptevos toO *Ep/io- 

yevov? dirb ttjs avrfj? ir&Xea>s paprupw rg tov Aiowaiov SiaOrJKfl 
[Kal el/il (eT&v) • . oirXfi) Kal i]<mv pov i) <r<ppayh 'Epp[o)p. 

(5th hand) IleSav KaXXiarpdTov tov 'AXe£dv8pov dirb ttjs avrrjs 

trSXecof paprop& 
2 5 [ T V T0 $ Atowctov SiaOJjKj) Kal et\pl (eT&v) X9 ovfXfj) yHyaTi) 8e(£i<p) Kal 



489. WILLS 189 

iariv p[ov fj a<ppay]h % H\iov "Appxovos. (6th hand) App&vis *Hpa- 

tcXctSov tov IlToXcpaiov 
[dirb Ttj? avrfj? ir6\ea>s p]aprvpw tjj tov Aiowaiov 8ia6rJKg Kal el/il kr&v 

cftrcxn irivre oiXfj 6<ppv*i 
[8e£ia Kal itmv fMov fj acppayh] ApiroyjpdTOV. (7th hand) Ilav^wris 

Aiowaiov toQ koI 'Apoivopepiov dirb rrjs avTrjs nSXtco? 
[paprvp& 777 tov Aiowaiov 8iadrj]Ky Kal dpi It&v Tpidxovra Svo ov\ff 

dvK&vi dpiarepS teal iariv pov fj acppayh 
[ 2% letters 8th hand ]oy tov % HpaK\*i8ov prjrpbs Aiowaias r^y Kal Sap- 

{JovTOS dirb ttjs avrfjs ir6\€<o$ paprvpeo 
30 [rg tov Aiowaiov SiaOrJKjj k\o\ cip[l] (€tSp) \e darjpos Kal iariv pov 1) 

a<ppay\$] 'HpcucXiovs. 

[9th hand pv]r]poi>ciov 'Ofcvpdyyfov) ir6\(em) 

(crow) k AvTOKpdropo? Kaiaapos Nepova Tpaiavo]v Aptarov SefJaorov 

TtppaviKdv AaKLKov IlapOucoO iirayofjiivcuv) 8 2cfla(oTJj)* 
SiaOtjfcr] Aiowaiov ApnoKparicovos to]v 2apairiot>vo{$) prjrpbs 'Eaopa6iro$ 

dir 'Oftypvyxpop) ir6\(eco$). 

On the verso 
(tTovsi) k AvroKpdTopos Kaiaapos Nepotia Tp]aiavoO 'Aptarov Xtfiaarod 

35 AatciKov IlapOiKoQ Kaiaapuov iirayo(piva>v) 8 2]€fia(aTJ)) [&]?- 

6{%fri) Aiowaiov ApnoKpai[ico{yo9) toV 2]apairi<o(vo?) 

[p*ir]$bs] 'Eaopa6iro9 dn* 'Ofcvpffiyytov) *r6A(€a>y). 

8. Tkapovros Pap. 12. ivas Pap. 1 3. 1. <nryx<»p&. 1 4. 1. gupls fVouct'ov. 15. 

Jtrodos Pap. 17* ifwxrifo/i€[v<»r Pap. 24. Final s of orfpayis COIT. 29. era of 

aapfiouros COIT. from anro. 

* The 20th year of the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Optimus Augustus Germanicus 
Dacicus Parthicus, the 4th intercalary day, dies Augustus, of the month Caesareus, at 
the city of Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid, for good fortune. This is the will, made in the 
street, by me, Dionysius son of Harpocration son of Sarapion, my mother being Esorsois, 
of Oxyrhynchus, being sane and in my right mind. So long as I survive I am to have 
power over my own property, to use it and make any Arrangements or other disposi- 
tions concerning it in any manner I choose. But after my death I concede to my 
wife Diogenis daughter of Ptolemaeus, of the same city, for her lifetime the right to dwell 



188 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[tKySvcw rpecpopivoDV Kal lpar]i{opiva>v &ir avrrjs rfj? AtoyevtSos. pera 

Si Kal r^v avrfjs TeXevrfjv etvai ra irdvra pou 
10 [pSvcov r&v c£ dXXrjXnv T€Kv)x>v, oh renvois ffp&v ovk igiorai ra air 

ipov eh avrobs eXevaSpeva irepois pep({eiv el 
[/iff p6vy iKaarji avr&]v yevea Kal prjSevl e£e<rra> ry KaOSXou enepxeaOat 

rfj yvvaiKi pov AtoyeviSi wept prjSevbs t&v 
[ev r# SiaOrJKy ndv]rcov fj dirortveiv rbv eireX\ev<r6p]evov imrtpov 8 pampas 

XftXCas xal el? rb 8rjp6<riov ras foa$. 
[fj SiaOrJKt] Kvpta. (and hand) Atovtiaiof % A^mo\v\\partfAvo? rod 2apa- 

mmvot irewoirjpai rfjv 8ia6rJKT]v Kal ovv\op& e\eiv A***"cb r ^l v 
[reXeirrijv /iov Hjv yvvaiKd pou] AioyeviSa UroXepatov c0' hv irepieori 

yjpSvov kvoiKT\(Jiv Kal Xprjviv \opels iw- 
15 [kiov ofcov ivbs cUf eav avrfj at]prJTai &<f> if? ?;([a> ev t]tj f$op(p)a Kpt]- 

iri[8i X]i6ivi]? ohctas ev # e£[o8os] teal to[o]8o9, fjris Kal 
[H €l XP*l (ri1 ' fy' ^ y ncpfevT 1 XPY* V0V T ®( ,, ) for €/ x< w diroXuftOrjaopevw iv 

rep a&rtp oiKcp Kal ev tjj oUta CKev&v Kal in(- 
[ttXcov koi SouXetav Ka]l diroipopas SouXtjs jjlov fI]Aa/x>i/[To]? Kal ray *:' 

avrrjf eKySvwv Tpe<popeva>v Kal ipari{op.e- 
[va>v for avrfj? AtoyevlSos.] jiera Si rfjv a&rrjs reXe[vTfjv t^ha* 

irdvra pov p6va>v [t]£i/ [i£ dXX]rj\a)y f^e]Kv<ov \v\oh tc[ac- 
[vois ijp&v ovk e£(orai ra dif k]fiov els avrovs eXevatpeva erepois //*. 

pfj p,6vrj iKdoTg air&v yevca 
20 [<&? irp6K€iTai. elpl ir&v . • ov]Xij y6van dpiorep& Kal ?*-. 

<r(ppayls 2apdiri8o$. 'HpaKXrjs 6 Kal 'Airi&v 'Anfovos 
[yfra inrip avrov /x^ elSfoos ypdp]para 9 (ir&v) X( ovXy - 

(3rd hand) IIXovticqv Brjaios Atoyivovs rod 'Airo\>< 
[ttjs avrrj? irSXem paprvpw r]jj rod Aiowaiov SiaO ' 

reaaepdKovra nevre oiJX(^) yHyari) Se&iS) Kal 
[eoriv pov fj *<f>payh (4th hand) . .]%ia 

yevov? dirb rr\s avrrjs 7r6Xea>s paprvpo) rfj 
[Kal elpl (ir&v) . . ovXffj) Kal e]<mv 

(5th hand) IleScov KaXXiarpdrov rod 

ir6Xew papTvpw 
25 [rg tov Aiowo-lov SiaOrJKrj Kal ei\pl (hay. 



/LCOV 



I 9 I 




ov 



l<f> 81/ p\[v w€piup]i 
nav h khv (JovXcopcu 

•71V 

•rrjaa) /caraX[cnra> Kar]a 
pov UtToaipios 

.. rij rot5(roi;) yeyea, rb 

9 [. . . . Tonapytas 

:f>ii> Arpias /irjTpbf 
i k£68<ov teal a kav £\\[a 
kav 8\ crv/ifjjj rbv Aiovvaiov 

is eyyiard pov yivovs t[vra?. 

raXeinoi). f) SiaBrJKTj Kvpta. 
ATpia>[s naro]irjpai rijv 8iadtf[Krir 
Aioi/v<ri<p Ua- 
. .,jpb?} 'Afi/jLoovoOros d[<prj\tKi rb h 

v irpb? 
a kav d\\\a dtyoXitrco irdvra. [lav 

ISldOcTOS T€\€VTTJOJl 

vrov k\[€v<r6p]€va €& tovs &y[yicrra pov 

eipl er&v . • ov- 
rj <r(f{payh] 8paKo{vr6)pop(pos [ 22 letters 



_ . -<x>v X oifXfj [Kara] prjpbv dpi<rr€p6\v. 38 lettefs 

.cou pi) u86t[odv y]pdppara Kal ct[pl ir&v 34 letters 

T7J9 avrfjs ir6\ecos paprrvpA [rg rfj]$ Taarpdratvos 
-ipl It&v 10 letters koI ioriv pov fj a<ppayh 
-ou. (4th hand) 'Apiorcov 'AprepiS&pov tc[v . . .]tvos drr[b] 
"<* nSXem papTvpw rg rfjs Taorpdravos 8ia6rJKj] Kal 
ouXfl y[6tyan 8c£io Kal [iari]y {) acppayh Kp[ 16 letters 
Tnd dirb rfjs avrfjs tt6\€cd9 paprv- 



192 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

1 8 pS> TJj rfjs T\aa\rpdT(x>vos [8i\a0rJKy teal cl/xl (er&v) y[. oi\]fi tnr[b] yivciov 

8€£[ibv Kal iariv pov f) a<f>payh (6th hand) rod 

19 2apairi[o>)vo$ paprvpeo [r]g rfj? TourrpdTOo[yos] SiaOrficy Kal ct[/ii ItS>v 

Kal ioriv /jlov fj o-eppayh 

20 (7th hand) 'Airfoy ...[...] joy 'AttIg{vo$) d[ir&] rrjs [avrfjs] 7r[6Aea>? paprupSb] 

TJj Trjs [Tcurrp&Ttovos SiaOrJKfl Kal dpi (It&v) Kal iariv 

21 pov fj <r(fipa]y[l]s [..].. t[. . (8th hand) . . .]om/ 6 twos [ PV r P$f 

BaiSos dirb rfjs a{iTijs tr6\€<»s paprvpeo r§ rrjs Taarpdrcoyos SiaOrJKy 
Kal dpi (kr&v) 

22 Kal lirnv pov j) [<r<p]pa[yh ] "IaiSos. 



x. c after x ota x added later by the 2nd (?) hand. 2. ire of ntwptos over an erasure. 

4. Second o of ^iXooropyiair corr. from p. 17. 1. dcfif. 22. Tatbos Pap. 

'The 9th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Choiach 5, 
at the city of Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid, for good fortune. This is the will made in the 
street by me, Tastraton daughter of Psenosiris son of Atreus, my mother being Penuris, 
of Oxyrhynchus, while sane and in my right mind, with my guardian my cousin . . . 
his mother being Taamois daughter of Zoilus, of the same city. So long as I survive 
I am to have power over my own property, to make any further provisions or new 
dispositions and to revoke this will. But if I die with this will unaltered I leave on 
account of his affection towards me to Dionysius son of Panechotes, freedman of Petosiris 
... his mother being Ammonous, of the same city, who is now a minor, if he live, and 
if not to his family, the . . . share belonging to me joindy with my father Psenosiris son of 
Atreus and Spokis in the village of Kriethuris in the . . . toparchy, of a house and court 
with entrances and exits, and all else that I leave in any manner whatsoever. If Dionysius 
happen to die childless and intestate the property devolving upon him from me shall 
be sent to my nearest relations ; but to no one else do I leave any of my property. This 
will is valid.' There follow the signatures (1) of the testatrix and her guardian, written 
for them by a third party, (2) of the usual six witnesses with details of their ages, 
distinguishing marks, and seals. 

3. For the supplement at the end of the line cf. 492. 4. 

5. wpdff [\ifla, or some other quarter. 

6. The supplement is taken from 105. 6. 



491. WILLS 193 

491. Will of Eudaemon. 

22*7x39 cm. a.d. 126. 

Will of Eudaemon son of Thonasuchis bequeathing his property to his 
three sons. Two of the sons, who were at the date of the will not yet 20 
years old, are placed under tutelage until they attained that age (cf. note on 1. 6), 
and are also prohibited from disposing in any way of their inheritance before 
reaching 25 years. 

1 "Etcvs HtK&TOV AuroKpdropo9 Kaicapos TpaiavoO ASptavov HeffaoroO 

pijvbs Kai<rap€iov kirayopiv&v €, kv 'O^vpvy^fov nSXct rrJ9 BrjfiaiSofi 
dyaOjj t4xv. 

2 rd8e SieOero vo&v teal <f>pov&v EvSaipxov Sa>vaav\io^ rod Owvio? prjrpb? 

Barj<ri09 dirb *0^vpvy)(cc[y 7r6]Xc<»9 na<TTo<p6pos GorjptSo? 0ca? ptyiarrjs 
Kal *I<n[$Jo? . <r . p ...[.. . Kal t&v dXXa>v Ot\&v rod 

3 Upov rod Svtos kv KtofiQ Movyiv&p, kv dyvif. k<f> bv p\v ntpUipi 

Xp6vov ex uy /*W T ^ v ™ v IMvv k£oi^<ri]av 8 kdv fiovXcopai kmrtXeiv 
Kal fi€Ta8iaTi6e<r6cu Kal dtcvpodv rfyv SiaOrjKrjv] ra&njv 

4 i ff dv kniT€\k<ra> Kvpiov imdp\uv. iav S kwl TJjSt rfi SiaOrj/qj 

TeXevrfjow) KXrjpovS/iov? dnoXtinfa T]oi>? viov? pov S&viv Kal *S2pov 
Kal EvSaipova roi>s rpus prjrpbs To, . . [. . . Apirarjato^] roG Kal 

5 "tlpov i£ taov iKauTOv $ ain&v kav $7, €i 81 pf\> ra toUtou TCKva, &v 

kdv dnoXCnoD oiKOjrtScov Kal k8a<f&v Kal SovXlkcov acopdrcov, p6vov Si 
rbv B&viv &v kav alpfjrai [ ] • • • irw- 

6 Totoav irdvTcov knl t$ rbv airrbv G&viv dnoSovvat a iav <f>av& 6<p€(Xa>v 

yjpka Kal Sovvai rots dStXipoft o[v]tov *(lp<p Kal EvSalpovi kav p\v 
3><ri d/ia Tjj TeXcvTJj pov 7T€Tr[X]pp<oK[6T€9 etKoai I717 per] kviav- 

7 rbv tva rfjs TtXtvrfjs pov, kdv 8k pfj axri roaotirw kr&v iKar(p<p Brav 

TrXrjpdxTjj ra cikoo-i irq, 8pa\pds ntvraKOO'tas, d>9 thai dp<fx>T€pa>v 
Spayjias \iXlas, ovk k£6yro? [roh airroh °ilp<o Kal] EvSai- 

8 povt ov8 &tiviovv avT&v ra kXwoSpcva €iV avro{ib]s k£ 6v[6]par69 pov 

ncoXuv ov8 {nroriOeaOai [ov]8 dXXm Karayjxr\paTi^w d^pt ixdrepos 
avT&v irXripdarQ Iriy cf>c[o<ri irevre. kdv 8\\ tcAcu- 

O 



II 



194 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

9 rrjam ovSinco TriTrXfj (^okStwv r&v avr&v "Slpov kou Ev8a(pov[o]$ eriy 
cftroo-t eTvai rovrow ixaripov d\xpi ^rX]iypcSo"27 irr\ ukovi inirponov 
r6v t€ d8eX<f>bv a[v]r&v 9&v[C\v kou rb[v Kara ptfrip]a irdir- 

10 irov 'Apirafjo-iv rbv Kal T flf{o]v Bd>vios. iav Si rivi r&v rpt&v vl&v ovpfljj 
driwcp r^Xtvrrjaai ?oto> rb ro[vr]ov pipos r&v ncpiSvrav avrov 
dlkX(p&v c£ foov, irapa & radra pi) [ofays prjSevl r<p ko\06Xov 

i i i£ov<rtas irapaflaivuv rbv S\ irapafjTjoSptvov dnorCvciv r& ivpivovri r6 re 
fiXdfio? Kal imn[pov] dpyvptov Spa^/ia? XfV** Ka ^ € U\* T ^ ?!W?[*" 
aiov ra]$ f?"?s> * cl\ prjSlv $q\aov Kvpta pivav r]a 

12 npoKttpcva. i) SiaOrJKrj Kvpta. (and band) EvSatpxov Oo>vaav\tof ire- 



notrjpai rfjv [Sia]6^Krjv #c[ai] Ka[raX€C]7r<o p[era rijv rikwr^v KXtfpo- 
v6pov? rovs 

13 vlovs fiov B&viv Kal T fipov Kal EvSaipova e£ Icfov 3>v iav dnoXC[n<o] 

oUonUktv Kal i[8a]<f>&v *{al 8ovX]a>y [afa/idroyy [p6]y[ov Si rb]v 0[&]v[iv 

14 r&v Xom&v pov rrdvrwv inl r& avrbv .diroSodvai (&) &v 6\f>€iXa> Kal 

8ovv[a]i Tf "fipa Kal ExfSatpovti [i]Karigm inav Sxri i[r&v k 
8pa%pa]? [n]cv- 
ig Taxoatas, ovk i£6vro$ r£ "fipw Kal EvSaipovu a ipipiaa airroTs ncoXav 
ouSi vTToriOzaOai &yjpi ^icdr€f^09 TrXrjpwry irrj cficocri 

16 nivre, pi\pt & T0%r€ *tvai avr&v eirirporrov rbv B&viV Ka[l rb]v Kara 

prjripa irdmrov 'Aptrarjo'iv rbv K[al *f2pov.] i&y Si rt[f 

17 r&v rpi&v T€Xcvrj(rff lor© rb pipos avrov r&v dStXai&v airr[ov i]£ foov 

&s irp6Kirai. dpi (ir&v) £a [ov]Xij 7rrjxi *e[^iy Kal] ea[r]iv 

18 /tot; ^ 0"0/>ay r L iy] 'AOyvas. (3rd band) Kvpos Kvpov rod AtSv/iov dnb 

rfjs avrrj9 [7r&]Xea>s [pa]pTvp& ly rod EvSai/iovo[s 8ia6rJK]y Kal [dpi 
(ir&v) . . ovXff .... 

1 9 Q4Li*$ * a ]i [i<rr}iv pov ^ <r0pay«y Tfyris Kv^peoyrrfs. (4th hand) Sia>v 

ZntXov rod B(o>vo[i\ dnb rrjf avrrjs nSXcns paprvpA r[g rod 

Ev}8a[{fiovof SiaOrjKij Kal 
ao el/il ir&v rpidKovra ivvia ovXr} noSl &£<$ Kal fori pov 1} o-<f>payls 

UtiXrivoO. (5th hand) Tlepydf Brjaarof rc[d ]•[••• o\vb rrj* 

airfjs n6- 
21 X«d? [paprv]p& rjj rod EvSatpovos SiaOrjK]] Kal dpi ir&v rpidxovra 6ktq> 

ovXi) prjXo> 8e£[t]& [Kal iariv pov ^ aq^payh . . . 



49L WILLS 195 

22 . . . . [ (6th hand)] .[..].. 09 Qo/iiruSio-jos tov Ko/iodmos /laprvpA 

rfj tov EvSai/iovos 6\ia0rJKy teal ci/il (kr&v) . . 

23 [ovXff d]oTpayd\(p apicrrepco Kal Ivtiv i\ <r<f>payh 2apdm8o9. (7th hand) 

Q&vis Ila/i/fl 18 letters 

24 [paprrv]p& rfj tov EiSaifiovos StaOrJKfl teal dpi {krS>v) [.] . o[v]\J) prjty 

(8*)i* L V KaL *o\tiv fiov 1} a<f>pay\$ 

25 8th hand [ 12 letters ] tov *tlpov papTvp& tjj tov EvSaifiovos 81a- 

Otjkjj xal €ipi (fa&v) A<r ov\Xfj) fiivl /icoy [ical iariv po]v $ a(f>payh 
'AOrjvas. 

26 9th hand ] /ivrj/JLOV€(o(y) 9 0£vpH$yxpi>v) n6\(e<D$). 

27 [(erovsi) 1 AvTOKpdropos Kataapos Tpaiavov % ABpiavov Sffiaaro^p Kaiaapetoy 

iirayofjiiviov) €, 

28 [SiaOrjKti EvSaifiovos 0a>va<ru\ios tov Ocovios firjTpbs Oa]rj<rio9 dnb 

'OQyplyyx&v) 7r5]X(€a)y). 

2. v of 6<Apa<rv\iot COIT. 7. <r of roo-ovrw corr. from r. o of orap corr. 17. a of 

co-ov added above the line, and <r corr. 24. {of £«» corr. 

' The 10th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, the 5th inter- 
calary day of the month Caesareus, at Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid, for good fortune. 
This is the will made in the street by Eudaemon son of Thonasuchis son of Thonis, 
his mother being Tha&is, of Oxyrhynchus, shrine-bearer of the most great goddess 
Tho€ris and of Isis . . . and the other gods of the temple at the village Mouchinor, 
being sane and in his right mind. So long as I survive I am to have power over my own 
property, to make any further provisions or new dispositions I choose and to revoke this 
will, and any such provisions shall be valid. But if I die with this will unaltered I leave my 
sons Thonis and Horus and Eudaemon, all three sons of Ta . . . daughter of Harpa&is 
also called Horus, each of them, if he lives, and if not, his children, as co-equal heirs 
of all the buildings, estates and slaves that I may leave, but Thonis alone of all . , . what- 
ever that he chooses on condition that the said Thonis pays any debts which may be 
proved against me and gives to his brothers Horus and Eudaemon, if they have at the 
time of my death completed 20 years, one year after my death, and if they are not so 
old, then to each of them when he has completed the 20 years, 500 drachmae, making 
for both of them together 1000 drachmae; and it shall not be lawful for the said Horus 
and Eudaemon nor for any one of them to sell, mortgage or otherwise dispose of what 
will come to them from me until each of them has completed 25 years. And if I die 
before the said Horus and Eudaemon have completed 20 years, their brother Thonis 
and their maternal grandfather Harpae'sis also called Horus son of Thonis shall be 
guardians of each of them until he completes 20 years. If any of the three sons 
happen to die childless his share shall belong to his surviving brothers equally; beyond 
this no one at all shall have power to disobey these provisions and any person so doing 

O % 



\tf> THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

shall forfeit to the party abiding by them the damages and a fine of iooo drachmae of 
silver and to the Treasury an equal sum, and the foregoing provisions shall none the 
less remain valid. This will is valid/ Signatures of Eudaemon and six witnesses with 
details of their ages, distinguishing marks, and seals, and docket of the record office at 
Oxyrhynchus. 

a. gal Sopdirtdof would be expected after *\<ribos (cf. 46. 8-9, &c), and Zapdnfjlos might 
indeed be read, but there is then no room for «u. 

6. tUoai frr) : cf. 11. 7 and 9. But though Horns and Eudaemon were to enter on 
possession of their inheritance on reaching 20 years they were not to alienate any part 
of it until 5 years more had elapsed. There is, however, a discrepancy here between the 
body of the will and the signature, where it is stated (1. 16) that the brothers were to 
remain under tutelage till the age of 25. This difficulty might be evaded by supposing 
that fi*xP l &' T< * Te refers back to j[tG>* k in 1. 14, but that is certainly not the natural 
interpretation. Possibly therefore *uco<ri (imrc) should be read throughout. 20 is the 
age when the period of tutelage terminated in another case (495. 10), but in 487. 5 we 
find a guardian being appointed for youths of 25. 

492. Will of Thatres. 

23-8 x 38-5 cm. a.d. 130. 

In this will Thatres daughter of Ammonius leaves as her heirs two half- 
brothers, whose relationship, if any, to herself, is not stated. The father of one 
of the brothers is expressly excluded from a house which formed the principal 
item in the property. 

1 "Etovs j[c<r]o'af>[€0'Kai8€Kd]Tov Avrotcpdropo? [K]at<rap09 Tpaiavov 'ASptavov 

XcfJaoTov M€\€ip Ktj, h 9 0£vpvyxo>v n6\ci rtjs Qfifiafifios,] dyaOjj 

2 [T]d8c 8i10c[to voov\<ra Kal <f>poiov<ra Oarpfj? 'A/ip&vtov rod Xapairicovos 

firjTpbs To-evOorovfJLio? rS>v dwb rod Tpvcfxovos 'Ia[(o]v rfjs Kdra> 
ronap\ta[s\ KaTayctvop4vTi iv 'Ogvp&yx&v nSXet pcra Kvpiov rod 
Trjs dyetytas a[{rrfj$ 

3 t HpaK\ot[T09 2ap]airia>vo$ rod Sapairtcovos fiTfTpbs Tavadjp]t09 rrjs Kal 

SapanovTos vtov '/2/hWo? rod Kal Oicovos 2ap[a]ir([co]vo$ rod 
[•] • • K*] • fW ™ v dwb.'Ififavos 'A/ifuovtov rrjs avrrj? Kdrco roirap- 
yias *[" dyvi$. 

4 i<f> tv p\v [wc]pUifu yjpivov %X €iv [A* 6 T ]h* r ** v f[?h>]v *£ov<r(av nap & 

lav f3ov\ot>/iai ntpl avr&v emTcXctv Kal ii*ra8[ia\Ti0*<F0ai [k]al 
n[pb]s dKvpoaaiv Ayttv TJjvSc rijp [8]:a0rJKr}p i Hv €7rircX€<ro) Kvpiov 
birdffativ. 



492. WILLS 



197 



5 kap 8e km ratfry] 777 SiaOrJKf) reXevrrjaa) prjSey kmreXkaatra KaraXehrv 

K\rjpov6pov$ IlroXXuDPa Gecovo? [rod] IlTo[X]k[t]oi{po$] p[rj]rp[b]? 'Iaa- 
pevros ttJ9 Bf[(Di>]o$ [ko! r]by rovrov i[pop]rjrpiop dScXQbp [Gicova 

6 Gicopos rov Gka>po? rod Kal 'AwoXXcopiov rod Gk\(OPo]? dpQoripovs dn 

'0£vp6y)(oi>v wSXem Kara ffriXooropyiap koip&s [i]£ foov iKdrep[o]p 
a[i]r&y kap tfj, el 8e fitf, ra Tofa[ov] rewa, rij? im[a]pxov<rtj9 poi 
kp rjj afyrjj 

7 '0£vpvyx<»v nSXei kit dp<f)68ov 'Imrecop IIapep(3[o]Xfj$ olida? kcu alOpiov 

Kal avXfjs Kal xprjarrjpfop kcu &p kap dnoXfcco SovXcop <Tcopd[ra>v] 
Kal iXXcop Kaff 6p8[ri]irorovp rptmop 7rapj[o](a>y ndynoy, o&k k£6p[ros 

8 tois airoh KXijpopSpots pov r& Ka06X[ov Tr\apa8ey^ea-6a[i eh rty SrjXou- 

peptjp pov oltciav rbp rod irepov avr&v Gea>p[o]s narepa &[kc&va] 
Gtcovos rod Kal 9 AiroXXa>[vlo]v rod Geoopos pijrpbs 'EXeprjs k<f> 6X01/ 
rb[p rfj9 

9 fafjs ai{rod] yjpbpop rrapevpevei o[v]8[e]pi$ (<S£)X\ov 8k oiSepl napaflatpip 

ri r&p iir kpod 8tareraypep<op fj x&ffj^ rod ra\y\fia] pepetp tf{[pta] 
. . . eKrefoi 6 km\eip[S\p wpbs dOerrjaip ri ro£ra>p dyeiv ktnretpov 
8pa[yjias 

10 y^eiXtas Kal [c]i[y rb] 8rjp6ciop ras foas Kal prjOep Jjaaop, dX(X)<p 8[e 

o]v8epl oiSep rS>v kp&v KaraXeiir<o. 4 SiaOrJKTj Kvpta* (2nd hand) 
Garpfj[s] 'Appcoviov rod Xapanfavos iremrrjpa(i) ri)v 8ia[0rj- 

11 Kt]v Ka[l K]araXehrot> pera rfjp reXevrljp pov KXypopSpovs IIroX(X)ia>va 

[G]ea>p[o? r]od UroA(A)/Woy prjrpbs Eiaapevros Kal rb[p 

12 rovrov dpoprjrpiop d8eX<f*bp Gewpa Gtcopo? rod Gea>po? rov Kal 9 AitoXX<p- 

vtov koip&s k£ foov fj$ tycfi km 9 Imrea>p Ua[pep- 

13 fioXfjs [o]tK(as Kal kOptov Kal avXfjs Kal S>v kav dnoXfcco SovXc&v vwpdrcw 

Kal dXXoov Kaff iv8i\irorovp rpfn^ov 

14 rrdvr&p, ovk k£6pra? avroi? r& kclOSXov napaSk^aOai eh rfjp oUiav pov 

rbv rov iripov a&r&v Gewo? na[re- 

15 pa GkcDva Giapo? rov Kal AnoXXcopiov kfi SXov avrod rbp rfjs fa*}* 

XpSpov, km 8* ndvrcov coy npSKeirat* *(?)P*l (kr&p) oy 

16 ovXfj Kapircp 8c£i& Kal itrnp pov ij acppayh T Ia , i9. K flpia>p 6 Kal Gicov 

Xapairfovos 'Anfovos 6 rrj? dye^ta? airfjs vibs €- 

17 myiypappe afrrfj? (jcdpioi) f^a]l eypayfra tnrep avrfjs pi) elSveiris ypdp* 

para Kal elpel kr&v p ovXft] irapa KapObp dpio-repo[v 



198 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

18 6<p6aXpov. (3rd hand) 'Airtcov ZcoCXov rod 'Airtevos firjrpbs NtiXapovro? 

dir '0£vpvyx&v ir6X[ea>]9 fiaprvp&i tq rfjs BaTprjros SiaS[rJK\^ teal 
. elyX {kr&v) fiS oiXfj irr[b 

19 ykvtiov teal iariv fiov if <r<ppayh Hapairi*. (4th hand) $d\ay£ Aioyk- 

vovs tov Kal $d\ayyo$ 'ApirdXov dirb [rrj]s [alfirrjs irSXem paprvp& 
777 rfj? BarpfjTos 8ia6rJK]j{v\ teal €(t)/i€l ir&v T€<r<ra~ 

20 pdxovra ovXfj drnKVTjfihp 8e£i$ teal ioriv fiov 1) <r<ppayh 'Apiro^pdrov. 

(5th hand) t Hpas emKaXov/i€vo[s] Tdios Kivajos dirb rrjs avrfjs 

irSXew fjtaprvpco 777 rfjs SarpfiJ- 
ai [to]s SiaOrJKf] teal el/il It&v /*€ ovXfj dvTiKvrj/iloM &£*$ teal ioriv fiov ij 

<r0/>a[y]i[?] <J>tXo<r6<f>ov. (6th hand) 'AnoXXcovios 'AaKXrjiridSov tov 

'AiroXXowtov dirb rijs 
32 aurfjS nSXem fiaprvpS> TJj ttjs GarpfJTos SiaOrjKjj teal tl/il kr&v IftSopJj- 

Kovra ovXfj napa t^a]y[0]bv rbv htcrbs 8e£tov 6<p6aX/iov teal [i&friv 

fiov $ c(f>payh % EpfioO. (7th hand) Bia>y 'AyaOefrvov 

23 [rov\ Btyovos] dirb rfjs avrfj? ir[6]Xeoi>? paprvp&t t{j tt}$ BarprJTOf &a- 

OrfKff teal elfil &$ (er&v) £a ov(Xty dvriic{vrjiiia>) d[picrr{epS) teal] 
iariu fiov f) [<r]<f>payls HapdmSo?. (8th hand) 2ap[airt\a>y $€pctc<f>io9 
6i<r€i IIo .[ 

24 [.,.]..[... .]s dirb rfjs avrrjs irSXem fiaprvpok rff rfjs BarpfJTOf &a- 

OrfKji teal elfil (ir&v) X? darj/ios [teal iort]v fiov ^ o\<p)payh AOrjva?. 

[ /fyM?™ "- 

1. kij added in a different hand above the line. 9. I. (a)XXq>. 10. L ir€irolijpa(t). 

12. Third o of ofw^ijrpiov corr. from a. 13. 1. alBpiov. 14. 1. r'fWor. 16. 1. Araye- 

ypapfuu. 17. First v of KavBov corr. from 6. 22. ov of wXiy corr. 

'The 14th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Mecheir 28, 
at Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid, for good fortune. This is the will made in the street 
by Thatres daughter of Ammonius son of Sarapion, her mother being Tsenthotoumis, from 
Ision Tryphonis in the lower toparchy, now living at Oxyrhynchus, being sane and in 
her right mind, with her guardian the son of Thatres' cousin Heraclous daughter of Sarapion 
son of Sarapion, her mother being Tauseiris also called Sarapous, Horion also called 
Theon, son of Sarapion son of ... , from Ibion Ammonii in the same lower toparphy. 
So long as I survive I am to have power over my own property, to make any further 
provisions or new dispositions I choose and to revoke this will, and any such provisions 
shall be valid. But if I die with this will unaltered and no further provisions made I 
leave on account of their affection towards me Ptollion son of Theon son of Ptollion, 
his mother being Isareus daughter of Theon, and his brother on the mother's side Theon 



493. WILLS 199 

son of Theon son of Theon also called Apollonius son of Theon, both of Oxyrhynchus, 
if they live, and if not, their children, as joint and equal heirs of the house, court, yard 
and fixtures belonging to me at Oxyrhynchus in the Knight's Camp quarter, and any 
slaves which I may leave and all other property of any kind whatever; and it shall 
nowise be lawful for my said heirs to receive into my house aforesaid the father of the 
second Theon, namely Theon son of Theon also called Apollonius son of Theon, his 
mother being Helene, for the whole of his life under any pretext, nor for any one else to 
disobey any of my dispositions, and the person attempting to set aside aught of them 
shall, while not disturbing their validity, forfeit a fine of 1000 drachmae and to the 
Treasury an equal sum and none the less (shall these provisions hold good); and I 
leave none of my property to any one else/ Signatures of Thatres written for her by her 
guardian Horion, and of six witnesses in the usual style, and docket of the record office. 

3. The mutilated name is not 'AmW>r, as would be expected from 1. 16. 

9. The vestiges before Act«<ti do not suit It*. 

10. For the ellipse of wpm \U**\» r& vpoytypa/ifUva cf. 504. 3a. It may here be partly 
due to the writer's recollection that this same clause had already preceded in the line above. 

20. The name after cYr<raW/Mi'o[r] is perhaps all one word ; the doubtful * may be p. 



493. Will of Pasion and Berenice, 

1 1-3 X 25*9 cm. Early second century. 

The following will is peculiar in being a joint deed by a husband and wife, 
who both have property to dispose of. The beginning is lost, but the remaining 
clauses suffice to show that the survivor of the two was constituted the heir 
of the other, with power to divide the whole property among the four children 
of the marriage ; but the wife is, in the event of her outliving her husband, 
expressly authorized to retain the ownership if she chose to do so. The papyrus 
was probably written in the reign of Trajan or Hadrian. 

ire[ 48 letters ]w . [ 13 letters ] . . . [ 10 letters ]«[..]•• ti/i[. . 
fi . [ 1 % letters ] . [ ]?*[•• -]«ww • [ aa letters ]t« ...[....]. 

/i€fi€pi<rfi(w[v . . .] e$a<f>a>v t^p kv- 
p*[tav Kal r&v] oUoniScov rijv kvolKr\<riv [. . . .]iv f kfcoxfoias otijayf T<p &</> 

fl[p]&v iiritfaavTi kdv T€ fiovXrjTai ncoXeTy 
rd [tc tSta k\al i\h] toD wpoT€\€v(Ttf)o'avT09 SovXa aA/iara 1frc{i] rh. S\a 

i) Kat nva airr&v Kal rfj Tofonv Tipfji [ ]??[< r - 

S Oai[as ]frat 8a8dvas iK<p[o]pds Kal *iy&[/a]$ rod vp<ff€\*v(Tfyr[a]vTOS 

(Tcopareiov Kal ypt&v dnoSaxri?, 6ff[ota>9 



200 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

8k [i]£f[wai r]fi« imffiaavTi d<f ^/*]a>i> 8iardw€iv rois ycyovSat ijptiv i£ 

dXXtjXw TeKvois Sapawp Kal 'AnoXXw[v(<f> 
Kal Aioyiv[<Ei] d<f>fXiKt [Kal ] dcprjXiKi rd T€ t8ia Kal ra rod 

7rpoT€\€v(jTJ)<ravT09 (and band) i8d<f>rj Kal ra Arrpara r&v acopdrcov 

Kal rh [dXka 
( ist hand ) &9 eav avr&t r&i hm£1fcrav]n 8okj} i<f> &i kav alpfjrai pcpi- 

o-p&i, inl 8k rfjs yvvaiKbf BepwiKTj? iav aMj ircpfig dvai 
lav fiovXrjTai Kvp[tt]ay [dv€]pno8iOTWi pi) oHo-fjs pfjScvl r&i Ka66\ou 

*£ov<ria? irphs dOtTTjo-iv rt ro6r<ov dytiv fi[t]8i rt 
10 inrcvavrfos it[oicTv i) rijv t<f>o86]v Sxvpov thai in Kal kxrheiy rby^hrt- 

ytipfoavra vapafiaivuv ri tovtcdv fj ^rr[c]X[ei;<r6- 
pevov r&i ii^itfravTi d<f> Jip&v] Kaff iKd<m\v i$o8ov rd t€ fiXdfio? Kal 

iirlripov dpyvptov 8pa%pa$ 8iaxiXta[? 
Kal eh rb 8r]p6o{ioi> ra? i<ras, X**]/"? T0 " Ka * T & npoycypappiva tcvpia 

thai. 4 8ia0rJKT] Kvpla. pdprvpes 8* cblv A6%o? 
A6\ov rod Xapairfoifos] ko[1 2a]pair(a>v Hapamcovos rod IIaa , t<ovos Kal 

nXovrloov KpartCvov rod Ai\pi\rpiov Kal Ev- 
8aipmv 6 Kal 9 Ap6is 'ApSiros rod Xapawuwo? Kal 'AnSXXo&p Aioyzvovs rod 

Bicovo? Kal Ai6<f>avTos Ai6\f>avros rod Av\€io(v ?) 
IS o/ If dnb rrjs ' a&rfjs 7r6X€(D9 h dyvi$ rjj a&rjj. (3rd hand) Haatnv 

2a[pa]irfap[os] rod IJWiWofy ir]eno(tjpai oi)v rjj yvvaiKl 
Btptvltqj r^v SiaBJJKtjv koI KaraXhm ptfr]a rf/[v rtX^vrflv *[h]cu rov 

dc<f{aX&9 TT€pi]6vT0? ra rod irpcore- 
X€vrrja[a]vTO$ dnoXtKpBrjoSpwa atriKa [e8d<f>rj Kal oiK6ire8a] Kal €ij[mXa 

Kal a-Keyh] Kal ev8op€[v)e(av 
[Kal ywfyara Kal yvv(a)iKctov Kocrpov in 8k *[al 15 letters ] 

vovt\. , ] • Kal ra kvoUia 

[ 11 letters ] [ 20 letters diroXet^Briaopi^oy otJKoniSap 

Kal SovXmv 
20 [ 60 letters ] Sandra? €K<f>o[pas 

[ » » ] *?? ™" [ 

[ « >, ]ra T€ip[. 

[ » » >-[. 



494. WILLS 201 

3. c of €vouai<rtp COrr. from o. 5. . . .]« COrr. from . . .]a. 1. dafrapa? . . . czTro^o-ftf. 

8. 9 of Tiys corr. from f. 9. 1 of n corr. from c • * of ayew corr. from v. 1 1. * of *a0 
corr. from r. 12. c of paprvpn corr. from a. 14. 1. Aufy. Auxpaprov. 16. 1. irporc- 

\*vrrjo[a}vrot. 

2 sqq. * . . . shall have the ownership of the estates and right of domicile in the 
buildings, the survivor of us, if he pleases, having the power to sell all or any of the slaves 
belonging to himself or to the one of us who first dies, and with the purchase money 
to defray the expenses of the funeral and burial of the body and pay the debts of the 
deceased, and the survivor of us shall similarly be permitted to devise to the children 
that have been born to us, Sarapas and Apollonius and Diogenes and ... > the last 
two being minors, the estates, unsold slaves and other effects belonging to himself or to 
the one who first dies in such manner as the survivor thinks fit and with any division 
he chooses, but the wife Berenice if she survives shall if she will have the undisturbed 
ownership, and no one at all shall be permitted to set aside aught of these provisions 
or to do anything opposed to them, but the aggression shall be invalid and the person 
attempting to disobey them in any respect or making aggression upon the survivor 
of us shall forfeit for each aggression the damages and a fine of 2000 drachmae of silver 
and to the Treasury an equal sum, the foregoing provisions at the same time remaining 
valid. This will is valid. The witnesses are Lochus son of Lochus son of Sarapion, 
Sarapion son of Sarapion son of Pasion, Plution son of Cratinus son of Demetrius, 
Eudaemon also called Amois, son of Amois son of Sarapion, Apollon son of Diogenes 
son of Theon, Diophantus son of Diophantus son of Aulius, all six of the said city, in the 
said street/ Signature of Pasion the testator. 

5* cf. B. G. U. 183. 24, 326. ii. I €KKc[iu\a0r}vai ir€pHrr[a\]rivai t§ c/iairrojv] dc\« tjJ <f>povritii 
km rvcrr/Sc ig to* [K^t)pop6fxwv pov. 

18. ycrfyara: cf. 494. io; but this is only one of several possibilities. 



494. Will of Acusilaus. 

39x23*2 cm. a.d. 156. 

This long papyrus, which is in an excellent state of preservation, gives 
a copy of an elaborate and more than usually interesting will. The testator, 
Acusilaus, after conferring freedom upon five of his slaves, 'in consequence 
of their goodwill and affection/ leaves his son Dius heir to his property, subject 
to a life-interest reserved for Aristous, the wife of Acusilaus. The document is 
not the original will, but an official copy made at a later date ; cf. 1. 25, note. 

A noticeable palaeographical peculiarity in this papyrus is the sigma, which 
is of a square shape, consisting of two horizontal strokes joined by an upright 
one with a slight inward curve to the right. 



202 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Avrtypa<j>ov. trovs ivveaKoiStKdrov A&roKpdropos Kafoapos Tirov AiXio[v] 

ASpiavov 'Avrcovivov Hefiaorov Evatfiods 
prjvb? TtppaviKttov A, kv 'Ofcvp6yya>v 7r6Aei rfjs BrjfiatSos, dya6jj riixv* 

rd8* SuOiprjv vo&v Kal (ppovcov 
'AKovvtXaos Aciov rod Atowaiov rod Kal 'AtcovaiXdov prirpbs Aiowaias 

Biot>vo$ an '0£vpvyxo>v ttSXkos kv dyvif. k<f> bv pkv ir€- 
pteipi yjpdvov $X €LV f* € T ^ y ™ y iM (ot ' i£ov<r(av b kav fiovXoopai kmreXctv 

Kal p€Ta8iaTt0€<rOai Kal dxvpovv rijv 8ta- 
5 OJjktjv rairrriv, b & &v kmreXkaoy Kvpiov inrdp\uv. kav 8k knl ra&ry 7# 

SiaOrJKfl reXevrrjao) kXeffltpa d<f>irjpi itirb 
Ala rijv *H\tov Kaf etfvotav Kal fyikooropytav SovXd pov a&para Vcva- 

povviv rbv Kal 'Appnvtov Kal 'Eppav Kal 'AttoXXco- 
vovv rijv Kal Arjprjrplav Kal Ovyarepa avrfjs AioyevCSa Kal dXXrjy pov 

8ovXt]v A[i]oy€y([8]a, KaraXtinco 8k 777 yvvaiKl 
pov ota-fl pov Kal dveyjrif 'Apiorovri rjj Kal 'AwoXX&vapup 'HpaK\e(8ov 

rod Aiowaiov rod Kal 'AKovnXdov prjrpbs *Hpa(8os 'A- 
\c£dv8pov €vvoovo-y pot Kal iracrav irtariv poi kv8HKwpivy a kav diroXina) 

timrXa Kal aKcvrj Kal yjpuaia Kal ipdna 
10 Kal Koapa Kal irvpbv Kal Soirpca Kal yevtfpara Kal kv8op*vstav iraaav 

Kal 6(f>€LXrjpara tvypa<pa koI dypacpa, 
KXtjpov6pov 8k dnoXebrco rhv yeyov&ra pot Ik rrjs irpoyeypappivrjs pov 

yvv[a]iKbs 'Apicrrovros rfjs Kal il?roA[Aa>- 
vapiov vlbv Actov kav $7, ci 8k pr\ y ra rovrov rtKva, 3>v lav diroXtirco 

imapyfivrnv Kal ircptov SovXcov o[ot>p]d- 
rcov Kal r&v dirb rod vdv kvopev&v kx r&v npoycypappev&v BrjXei&v 8ovXa>v 

iKy6va>v 9 &v nav- 
twv rf)v xpfictv Kal npoa-68ovs ndcas pera ra 8rjp6<na 2£ei ij aMi yvrq 

pov 'Apiorovs 4 * a * 'AnoXXay- 
15 vdpiov knl rbv rrj? fafjs avrfjs \p6vov Kal rfjv SovXdav Kal dno(f>opa$ 

r&v pera [[. . .]J reXevrjv po[v 
iXevOepovpevoov SovXcov acopdrcov. j} 6^ airij yvvrj pov XWYfo* 1 T V V ^V 

pov Jc/ip eh 8[t]a[rpo- 
$i)v avToG Kal rfjv dXXrjv Sandvijv Kara piji{a] kv '0£vpvyxo>v ir6\u 

nvpov pirpfp i£to8iaarriK& .... 



494. WILLS 203 

dprdfias Svo Kal Spa^pa? i^Kovra Kal vnip IpaTiapov Kaf eros 8payjih$ 

SiaKoaCas, 777 & airr% 
yvvatid 'ApioroGri 777 Kal 'AiroXXoavaplcp k£i<rra> Si avrrjs ira>\€ti> teal 

V7roTi6e<r6cu a lav aiprjrai 
20 d(f> 5>v iav diroXina* t$ vUp pov Ad<p vnapxpi^rco]? teal ccopdroov Kal 

tcaraxpaadai c/y rb 
tSiou X • [•] • ? T0 *s ipireaovpepois ijroi €K updo-em Kal i£ itiro07JKijs dp- 

yvpCois. fj ff avrl) yv~ 
vi\ pov 9 Api[<r]T0vs % Kal 'AiroXXwdpiov dwo8cb(ru ndvra a kav <f>avS> 

6<fxtk<w, Svau Si 1) 
yvvrj pov xal pera reXevrfju atirrjs 6 vlfc pov Auos rois SovXois pov 

Kal dir€\*v$ip{oi]$ eh 
evco^tap airr&v fjv irorf<rovrai ir\rj<rioy rod rd<f>ov pov Kar 2ros rjj 

ytvtdXta, pov i<f> $ 81- 
25 (n€iv dpyvpiov Spayjpas iKarSv. 8aa 8> hr inrb rb €K86aipov rfjs 81a- 

OJKrjs ypdifrco ifroi d<f>aipov- 
ptvSs ti fj npoaSiaTdaacoy f) iripois \api(6pevo9 fj Kal dXXo n fiovX6- 

pevos Kal avra fora> Kvpia 
coy 8 *1v[<*]t TV SiadrJKy ivyeypappiva, irapa Si raOra pfj otiaris prjSevl 

rep Ka66Xov ££ov- 
<r/ay napaf}atvu[v, rbv] Si irapafifioSp^vov ktcrlvuv t$ kppivovTi t6 re 

fJXdfios Kal imrtipov 
dpyvpiov rdXavra Svo Kal €19 rb SripSo-iov ra taa Kal prjSiy [$]<row 

phuv Kvpia ra npoKtipeva. 
30 ij SiaOrJKTj Kvpia. 'AKov&tXaos Adov 6 npoycypappevo? mirolrjpai rfjv 

StaOrJKTjv Ijs SXov rb a&pd 
iortv pov l8i[6y]pa<f)[o]y inl iraa tois irpoK€ipivo[i9,] Kal dpi (It&v) pq 



oi(Xi)) iro8(i) Stffjiy) ko[1] $ar[i]v pov i) a<f>payt9 Savior 
and hand AtSvpos 9 0wdxf>pio$ rod Kal Xaiprfpovo? 'Hp68ov dn* '0£vp6y[x<o]v 

nSXcws Ts r&v 
paprvpTjadrrw rg npoKip^yjj 8]ia6rjKjj kyvmpiaa t*\v ISiav pov o*<f>payi- 
Sa oSaav yXvpparo? 'Eppov Kal ia^pdyiaa r# airy a<f>payl8i. (3rd hand) 

'AaKXrjmdSrfS 



20 4 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

35 EvSaijJLOvo? tov 'Ao-KXrjiridSov dn 'Ofypvyxcov n[6]X€a>? cr[€]/)[o]y t&v 
jjLaprupTj<rdv- 
T<oy rg irpoKet/xeyjj StaOrJKjj iyv&piaa t^v I8iav fiov <r<f>p[ay€]t8a odaav 
yXfy/iaros Xapdm8c{s] Vcai i<r<f>pdyi<ra rfj airrfj <r<f>payu8i. (4th hand) 

Al8v[xo$ AiSvpov 
tov 'Ev0i(rfio[v] dyopav6/i[o]s ttjs 'O^vpvy^iT&y nSXtas irepos t&v 
fiaprupTjadvTCw 177 airfj SiaOrj/cfl €yv<op[t]<ra rijv I8iav fiov <r{o-}<ppayi8a 
40 oStrav yXti/i/iaros 9 Air6XX<ovos Kal €<r<f>pdyura rg airy <r<ppay?8i. (5th hand) 
'AckXtj- 
irtd8f)s f A<rKXrj7i[i]d8ov tov IIav<rip[i]a>i>o$ dirb Ttjs avrfj? nSXcw cTtpos t&v 
\jjLapTvp7jadpTa>]v t# avrfj StaOrJKfl eyv&piaa rfjv IStav /i[o]v <r<p{p]ayei8a 
[ovaav yXH/ifia]T0S 'HpaicXiovs Kal i<r<f>pdyi<ra Tjj avrfj a(f>payi8a. 

6th hand }irpo]€T€0rj <j- (Jetovs) 'AOtp. 

2. Brjfiat&os Pap. 3. ayvla Pap. 4. ibwv Pap. 5. vnapxciv . . . vno Pap. 

8. First 1 and r of apurrovri added above the line, rjpaldos Pap. 9. Xpartn Pap. 12. 

viov Pap. ; SO in 11. 16, 20, 23. vtrapxovrav Pap. ; SO in 1. 20. 18. virep IpaTtapov Pap. 

19. vnoriOtvai Pap. 21. X&top Pap. VTroBrfKrjs Pap. 25. viro Pap. 31. 

i$ioypa<t>[oy Pap. o of Bcaviot corr. from o». 32. X of iroXcwr corr. 33. ilka* Pap. 

40. 7T of anoXkuvos and Second <r of *oxf>payura COIT. 42. f 1 of <r$[p]cry*ida rewritten. 43, 

l. <r<f>pay*idi. 

'Copy. In the 19th year of the Emperor Caesar Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus 
Augustus Pius, the 30th of the month Germaniceus, at Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid ; 
for good fortune. This is the will made in the street by me, Acusilaus son of Dius 
son of Dionysius also called Acusilaus and of Dionysia daughter of Theon, of the city 
of Oxyrhynchus, being sane and in my right mind. So long as I survive I am to have 
power over my own property, to make any further provisions and alterations I please 
and to revoke this will, and any such provisions shall be valid. But if I die with this 
will unchanged, I set free under sanction of Zeus, Earth and Sun, for their goodwill and 
affection towards me, my slaves Psenamounis also called Ammonius and Hermas and 
Apollonous also called Demetria and her daughter Diogenis and Diogenis, another female 
slave of mine. I bequeath to my wife and cousin Aristous also called Apollonarion, 
daughter of Heraclides son of Dionysius also called Acusilaus and of Herais daughter 
of Alexandras, being well-disposed and showing entire faithfulness towards me, all that 
I may leave in the way of furniture, effects, objects of gold, clothing, ornaments, wheat, pulse, 
produce, and all my household stock, and my debts, recorded and unrecorded. I leave 
my son Dius by my aforesaid wife Aristous also called Apollonarion, if he lives, and if not, 
his children, heir to all the property that I leave and to my other slaves and the offspring 
that may hereafter be born to the female slaves aforesaid; but my said wife Aristous 
also called Apollonarion shall have during her lifetime, after the taxes are paid, the 
use of and all the revenues from the whole property, together with the service of and 



494. WILLS 205 

profits from those of them who are to receive their freedom after my death. My said 
wife shall supply to my son Dius every month at Oxyrhynchus for his sustenance and other 
expenses two artabae of wheat by the measure used for payment . . . and 60 drachmae 
and for clothing 200 drachmae yearly. My said wife Aristous also called Apollonarion 
shall have the right to sell and mortgage on her own authority anything she chooses 
of what I leave to my son Dius in property and slaves and to use for her personal 
requirements the money accruing from the sale or mortgage. My said wife Aristous 
also called Apollonarion shall pay all the debts that may be proved against me; and 
my wife, and after her death my son Dius, shall give to my slaves and freedmen for 
a feast which they shall celebrate at my tomb on my birthday every year 100 drachmae 
of silver to be spent. Anything that I append to the official copy of the will, whether 
cancelling or supplementing or making bequests to other persons or with any other 
purpose shall also be valid as if contained in the actual will ; beyond this no one shall 
have power to disobey it, and anybody who does so shall forfeit to the party abiding 
by it the damages and a fine of 2 talents of silver and to the Treasury an equal sum, 
the above provisions remaining none the less valid. This will is valid. I, Acusilaus 
son of Dius the aforesaid, have made this will, the whole of which with all the above 
provisions is in my own writing. I am 48 years of age and have a scar on my right foot, 
and my seal is an image of Thonis. I, Didymus son of Onnophris also called Chaeremon 
son of Herodes, of Oxyrhynchus, one of the witnesses to the above will, recognized my 
own seal which is a figure of Hermes and sealed with the said seal/ There follow similar 
signatures of three other witnesses, whose seals represented respectively Sarapis, Apollo, 
and Heracles. 



5-6. im6 Ala Vjju "HXiov : cf. 48. 6, 49. 8 ; another instance of the manumission of 
a slave by will is B. G. U. 326. 17. 

21. The word after idta* could not be read as xfify** ^ ven H m » s were otherwise 
suitable, x^p}^ would be possible, though not very satisfactory. 

25. vn6 t6 cV&focpoj' : cKtowripa are mentioned in 84. ii. 6, where the keeper of the 
'Nanaeum' is ordered not to give them without authorization from the Library of 

Hadrian : — 6 tiriTTjpTjTr^t] row Savatov f^JfT^i ra iMcrifia di&$ra> /i^Tf (T^VKfyaoJku. cn^r]pcir*Ta 
ftqr[c a]XXo r* olKOPOfitira irptv ainy cirtoTeXX^rjai k.t.X. There the MSaifia appear to be 

official copies of the deeds deposited in the archives ; and in the present passage (cf. also 
495. 15) the word has the same meaning, as is indicated by the contrast drawn between 
the cTc&fotftoj' and the actual dia^icrj. It is indeed most probable that this papyrus was 
itself an cVdoo-tpoi', for it is stated to be a copy and yet is signed by witnesses, who state 
that they had recognized the seals which they had affixed to the original document. We 
must then suppose that testators were permitted to use such official copies of their wills 
for the purpose of adding codicils without being put to the trouble of withdrawing and 
cancelling the original deeds. This however was of course sometimes done ; cf. 108-7, 
which refer to the absolute revocation of wills. 

27. fa iv 777 or W cV uvrf) rij would be expected but was certainly not written. The 
phrase recurs in 495. 16, but in a mutilated form. 

31. e&vtos: the mythical guard of the Canopic branch of the Nile ; cf. Hdt. i. n 4-5. 
Probably 'EpKovuirov in 884 refers to him. 

38. 'ofvpvyxiTow : this is an early example of the form 'Otvpvyxir&v irfkis which is 
not found in common use before the third century. 478. 2 is in fact the only other 
instance in this volume. 



2o6 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

44. irpo]«T«0i7, if correct, presumably refers to the publication of the contents of the 
will after the testator's death; but the note may merely record the date at which the present 
copy was made. Perhaps vapyriBq, ' deposited/ should be read. 

495. Will cf Petosorapis. 

9*7x34 cm. a.d. 181-9. 

This will is much mutilated, but possesses an interest as a specimen from 
a somewhat later period than that to which the preceding group belongs ; and 
its general tenour remains fairly clear. The testator Petosorapis leaves as his 
heir in the first instance his son Epinicus, a minor; and appoints his sister 
Apollonous to administer the estate, and take charge of Epinicus until he reached 
the age of 20 years. It may be inferred that the mother of the boy was 
either dead or had separated from her husband. A certain part of the property 
is appropriated to Apollonous herself, who was to pay the testator's debts I 
and the stipulation is made that she should not be asked to render an account 
of her trusteeship. A minor legacy was apparently made to a nephew of 
Petosorapis. 

1 [*Erot/y ] Kal ukootov AvroKpdropo? Kafoapos MdpKov AvprjXtov 

KoppSSov 'Avtmvivov ScfJaorov 'Appeviaxov MrjSiKoQ HapOiKov Sap- 
paTucov TsppaviKov Meytorov 'Eirel<f> 0, kv '0&{pvyyG>v) irSXfet) r§ff 
erjftaCSos), dya6(jj) T^XQ. 

2 [t<£$€ 8ti0€TO vo]&v Kal <f>pov&v nerocopams IleTocropdmo^ rov 'Ettivukov 

prjTpbf XapamdSos &ir '0£vpvy)(a>v nSXe&s kv dyviji. k<f> tv p\v 
irtpUtpi yjpSvov fyciv fi€ rfjv r&v i&ttov kfcovaiav t kav j8(W- 

3 [Xcopai kclt avr&]y kmreXav Kal dvatpcicrOat fj dtcvpovv tJjvS* rty 8ta~ 

Qr\Ki)v [d]v€fi7ro$ioT<DS h $ av kirircXkaa Kvpiov xmdpytiv. kav h\ 
knl raOrxi rjj SiaOrJKjj reXarr^cco prjSlv kclt avr&v kmreXk- 

4 [<ray KXrjpovSpov] a7r[o]A€6ra> rbv vl6v p[o]u. 'EnivtiKOv pffTp[b]9 [*]XVR9 • Ff 

[dirb] Tfj9 [a]fof}s nSXecofc kav £]p, e/ 8\ prj, a kav ?x[tf riKv\a Kal 
ra kir€<r6/i€vd poi Irepa rtKva 1j kav pf) yivyral poi crepa riKva 

5 [ 35 letters ] . . . [ ] . [ 12 letters ]a irdrt[a ) 

rod inrdp)ftov\T6s poi n[p]6j€pov *Epp(ov yjpfr\part(ovTO^ prjrpbs 
'!?}[• ']?i° • • ty avT i IliXa \niXa] €#c toG 

6 [ 55 letters rots e<ro]p£vot[s ] kxySvois Kal &v kav [d]rroXi7Ta> knt- 

[ir]Xa>y K[al] <tk*v&v Kal hSoptveta? Kal <5$aAj7#<fT[a>]i> 



495. WILLS 207 

1 [ 59 letters ] d8€\<f>j} ^AiroXXcovov}ri lav ircfitljj, c/ 8i pj, [t$ avrS 
via p[o]v 'EmvtUcp ra 8k (ncevrj kou ImirXa teal AXXa 6vra ev rpial 

8 [ 58 letters d8]e\<pi8[ ]y kcl\ rbv avrbv vl6v [po]v 'Emveucov 

[%]v r€ e£*8pa teal KeXXjj 177 kirdvto rod nvX&vos teal iy 8\<p 

9 [ 60 letters ] koX 8i[ c£ &v] diriXiirov avrjj dir[o8i\86vai Sea iav 

(pavco 6(p€i\a>v teal i£ov<r(av avrijv *X UV i • • • • * V Q V 

10 [ 60 letters }upov(r . [. . . rbv av]rbv vl6v p[ov . .]c[ ]tjv trap lavrjj 

8icuT&/i€vov /li^pi ov yhijTai ir&v ttico<n irpSvoiav iroiov- 

11 [pivrjv 52 letters i£ 6]v6paTd\s fiov 8ia8i£]riTCU <rvv[ ov<r]av ra 

i£ avr&v 7T€piyuv6fiwa teal SiaTpifovvav avrbv i£ avrcov [. .]y 

1 a [ 62 letters ]eir . [ ]<rci eh avrbv pv T P LK fi (piXooropyia, Ijns 

dnoKaTaaTrjo-u airrZ ytvopzvcp rfj? irpoK€ipiv[Ti$ 

13 [1)\iKias 54 letters Jai'Tf ] &v lav «£ 6v6paros fiov 81a- 

Sifarai ficff a iav eh airbv dvaXaxru, nap 1}s otfrc XSyovs ov\t€ 

14 [ 61 letters ]fj?«[ ]fl avr£. rfjv 1? avrijv dSeX^rjv fiov 

'AnoXXmvovv irpSvoiav rroifoaaBai fiovXopai rod cmrpS- 

15 [nov 45 letters Sera & dv vwb rb ck8]6ctip[ov rat/riyy r]fjs 8ia6^JKij9 

ypdyfra) rj) I8ta pov \ €l P L tf TOt d<f>aipovfi€v6$ n r&v irpOKupivcov i) 
Trpo<r8iaTd<r- 

16 [o-cov fj Iripois xapi{6pevos fj teal dXXo rt (SovXSfitvos koI avra eara> 

Kvpta] d>s [. . . . rjj 8iaO]rJKfl ivy*ypapp[i]va, teal pfj e£civai prj8evl 

t$ KaOSXov irapevytipttv tois vif ipov Sta- 
ll [T€Tay/iivoi9 51 letters ]/i<[. . . . im]rtpov Spayjihs rpi[ax]^Xias koI c/s 

rb 8r)/i6(rtov ra? faas koI prjOlv fjaaov pkvtiv Kvpia ra inr I pod 
18 [SiaTtraypeva. ^ SiaOrJKTj Kvpta. 



a. ayvla . . . lb™ Pap. 3. vnapxw Pap. 4. vtuw Pap.; so in 11. 7, 8, 10. 15. 
Idia Pap. 16. Sir Pap. 17. tow Pap. 

5* [rqv yvrfciav fwv dbtXQijw 'AiroKKwovra ? 

8. Either ab]t\<j>U{ovp or dd]i\(fH^rjp. 

10. Perhaps p[ov €x) € [ LV avrfiv. fupovt is possible instead of ]»powr at the beginning of 
the line. 

15-6. Cf. 404. 25-7. We do not fill up the lacuna after «>* [ owing to the uncertainty 
of the reading in 484. 27. 

17. y*[ may represent some word like vapaPrjird^tfov or cn*\iwro^u[vo* t or ry ipyfyom ; 
cf. 494. 28. The former alternative is preferable on account of the space. 



2o8 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



(e) CONTRACTS. 
496. Marriage Contract, 

21 x 75.5 cm. a.d. 127. 

A contract of marriage between Sarapion son of Eudaemon and Thais 
daughter of Sarapion, written on the recto of 84, the important edict of Flavius 
Titianus concerning archives. The ends of the lines, which are of extreme 
length, are lost throughout the papyrus, which has also suffered considerably 
from decay and discolouration ; but the lacunae can almost always be restored 
by the aid of 265, 407, and the Fayftm contracts at Vienna and Berlin, and the 
sense is seldom in doubt. The result is a practically complete specimen of an 
Oxyrhynchus marriage contract of this period ; the provisions have a general 
resemblance to those of documents of the same class from the Fayflm, but there 
are marked differences of formula. The chief clauses are: — (1) specification 
of (a) the dowry of Thais, comprising various articles of jewelry and dress and 
1800 drachmae provided by her father, and a female slave presented by her 
grandmother (11. 3-6), (b) the property brought into the common stock by 
Sarapion (11. 7-8) ; (2) conditions of divorce (11. 8-10) ; (3) provisions in case 
of the decease of either party (11. 10-16). Cf. also 603-7. 

1 "Erovs IvSeKdrov AvroicpdTopos Kataapos TpcuavoQ 'ASpiavoQ SefJacrroO 

$[a]pp[o]vOt k8, cp 'Ofcvpfryywv n6\€i rfjs GijfiatSos, d[ya]0jj [tv\xV> 
i[jrl 'Io]v\(as 2[cf}a}oT[fjs kv dyvia.] 

2 ifciSoro Sapanuoy Sapanfovos tov Sapanfovos tov Sapanfovo? pilTf{b)s 

Ga[C]8os Xapanmvos dnb [O]£vpv\y]xoa[i/ 7r$A]€a>y rfjy [ijarfrov] 
6v[y]aT€p[a] 8ai8a /^Jl[r]pi[9 . . .]of. .]#*[. , .] SapaTr[t]o^yi Ev8]aipopos 

tov 8ia>y[o9 fflTpb]? 'Hparos ti}[s iirj\Tpb$ A[i8o]vro$, 

a[niy€L 8k ya/i&v vapit Xapaniwvos rdv irarpbs 

3 [k\al IkSotov . . . T£a>p tffOyoy pvaiaitov rpmv /cat rerdprcoy Sii^a] Teacrdpcoy 

iJ/i[r|a-o[v9] n€p[ov]e(l)8tov T^rdprmv <5k[t]o> [..].. [•$*w rcrrf/wcw t£ 
&\v(T€i8i[o]v i\ov yXwpovs y[. .]tovs M[0o)y tov yjpuatov dyovTo? 
T€Td[pTa$ .... fJD/iurv a>y that irrl rb [ainb yjpv<rto]y crrai 
'0£vpvyx*[T[ji fivaiaia irivT* koX TtrdpTa? 



496. CONTRACTS 209 

4 [ko]1 ipartmv ovvOicctf 8tq (was 8vo o-avSvKivyv fa>8tvr\v . ariov irdXQ^iov 

tt&vtcl [8]k kv ovvTiprjaet d[p]yvplo[v] 8pa[x]pS[v] ircvraKoo-fav i£rj- 
K[o]vra [K]al dpyvpiov Spaxpfo %[i]Xia[s i]KTaico<r(a$ l^KOvra a{? 
e]Ivai §n]l i{b] avrb rfjv SXrjv (fxpvijv [dpyvptov] ScfJaorod vopi- 
<rpaTc[9 Spaxfia? T€TpaKi<rxi\ia9 iKarov, Kal ij 

5 [t§?] yapovpkvw pdpprj 8ah JSapanimvos prj[r]pb$ 'HpcucXotfro]? dnb rrj? 

airfjs 7r[6\€Q)y] peri Kvpiou rod lavrrj[s] pkv iripoy vlov rod 8k 
€kS6tov yvrja-iov d8eX<f>ov 2apairta>vos [Sa]f)anf[co]yq9 [8]poXoy€i kv 
dyvtijp] r# airrfj kySovvai rffv Sa(8[a k\al 8t8oxri 77/ [av]rjj GatSi 
. [ Ka\- 

6 [Ait^x*?* *ai [t]Sov kaopkv&v i£ avrfjs kKy6vo>v rt)v (8k) SovXtiav Kal dn[o]~ 

<f>opa9 avr[rj9] ovvefci 8 yap&v [. .] . p[. .]po>v rg yaporfji]ivy k<f> 8cov 
ovvtiai d\\rj[\oi]$, [6]uk k£6vro? r[y] y[apov]v7[i . .]€Ti<r0at rfjv 8o6X[rj]y 
dy[e]y rfj[? 12 letters ]y qySi ti 7rpqo-<f>€p6p[€vov oUtav 

7 [Kal] atOpiov K[al] aiXfjv Kal rh. ra{nr\$ XPV crT1 lP ia Kal SoOXa <r<opara 

Sapanovv [Kal] NiKapovv Kal rh rrjs N[iKa]povro9 tKyova 2apa- 
irovv Kal KepScova Kal ^E7ri\]appop Kal rh k<r6pcv[a e£ a]vra>v j) 
£X(X)a>v €/<{y]ova *[a]2 b\ khy 77?$* rovroif C7r]iyri7<nyrai 1) wpoa-K . 
[ ir&Xeiv ovSk inroTiOeaOai ovSk dXXms KaTayprj- 

8 [pafrtfcw yapls cvSoKOvarjs rrjs yapovpivrjs. ovpfito&roxrav oSv dXXrj[Xo]i9 

dp£pirra>[s ol y]apovvT€S Kal X ^ 7 ^^ 70 ^ ^ yap&v TJj yapovpivy rh 

[8]iovra Kara 8vv[a]pLiv 9 k[h]v 84 n 8ia<f>€pa>vra[i] rrpbs dXXrjXovs k[oI 

PovX]tjtoi f) yapovpivrj d[7raXXda , a , €a , 0at dirb rod yapovvros exrct- 

9 [8hv] ij dnaXXayij [y]ivijrai (Jj) y&poi{pi]yri pkv drrooirdTco rfjy 8[o]yXijv 

KoXXltvx^] Kal ra koSptva k£ a\rri}S tKyova Kal [d]no86r<o 8 yap&v 
ry €k86tu kkv ir€pirj{v} f ci 8k pJ\, rg yapovpivy riy tt}$ ijxpvrjs 
8[p]axpas T€T/}aK[«rx*A]/(X9 iKarbv Iv i)p€pa[i? d<f> Jjs khv dirairrjOjj 
i) dtroreta'dTco ptff ijpioXtas 

10 [. . .] &aara Kal . . ra8f kiv yivyrat. khv Sk ivicyo[si] 

ovaa f) ya[pov]piv7j dnaXXayjj Saxrei airy 8 yap&v &XXas c& Xoyov 
Xoxtlas Spaxpfc i^Kovi[a. (r]vv<f>€pop€ycov 8 a&r&v cfiy p\v vytia, 

khv 8[k] 3 riva r&v yapovPT<e[v reXevrrjaai kx* T< ° 

8 ya- 

11 [p&v] rfjv Kara t&v iavrov €£ot^at]av & kfar alpfjrai imT€Xtfi]v Kal oh 

P 



210 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

kav f}ov\ri[Tai\ p€pifci[v t ] kav 8\ prjSiv [k}iriT€Xko-i} ctvat Kal aura 
pcra TtXevrijv avrov t&v i£ dXXJj[X]a>v [t](kv*{v.] d 8k Ijv [6] 
ya/i&v npfrrepo? [T]€T€A[€]i/rJ7ic[a>]? kykra fj ya/iov/iht] [ 
i a [....] &rra> fi yapovpkvrj Kara to f}p[i<rv] i) 6 eyy ktto? Kal i imb rod 
yapovvr[osi] KaTa<TTa6r}a6p[(E\vos Kara rb trtpov rjptav dp<p6repoi 
kirlrponoL, (r&v) tckvoov irapa 77/ fflTpl 8ian[o]upkvcov &>? fjXiKia? 
yfy]nvT\a]i. kav 8i prjSkva 6 yapJ&v r^y f)pio-t([as kmrpoirrj? br(- 
rponov Karaarrja-jj Iotod p6vrj fj yapovpkvrj 1} 

13 6 [fyyurro?, ovSevl k£6m[o]s €Kj8rf[XAe]p airfjv rrjs kiriTpoirrjs ov8\ pip[ov]s. 

kav 8e r) yapovpkvrj irporipa TtXevrrjajj TkKva>v afoot? pi) Svroov k£ 
dXXrjXa>v r) Kal t&v ycvopkvatv ptTaXXa£dvra>v drkKvmv anoSbrw 6 
yap&v ra c[y fepvfj dpyvplov 8pa\pas Terpa- 

14 Kia-^tXla? Ikoltov kv r)pkpais i$jj\KOVTa Kal dvaTrcprrko-Ow €is Toir? avrovs 

ircpl tt)v yapovpkvrjv ra dXXa avrrjs irdvra. kav 81 axrai$ra>? 6 
yap&v [ir]p[6]T€pof TeXevrrjaj] i[(k]vw o[v]tois pr) Svtcov k£ &XXfjXa>v 
r) Kal t&v ycvopkv&v kmp€Ta\XXa£dvTW drkKvcov 

15 dwoairdaaaa tt)v SoUXrjv KaXXtTv\rjv Kal Ta koSpeva k£ avrfjs %Kyova 9 

&>? 8' &v KOfiio-TjTai KvpicvkroD wdvTCDv, kirl 8i iraa&v t&v SiaarroX&v 
kKXoyrjs otiarj? nepl Tr)v yapovpkvrjv kav atp&rai k\€iv Ta irpoKttplva 
kv <f>€pvjj yjpvala [dyovra Tijv airrr)v dXKfjv r) rfjv foyv ovvrtprjaiv 

16 Tijy irpd£ea>? yivopkvrjs tjj yap.ovp.kvri Kal tois avrrjs kx re to€ yapovvros 

Kal (K t&v v7rap\6vT<ov avrcf ir[d]vT&v Ka66n irpb? dXXJjXov? ovvc- 
X&prjGav. yva>arrr)p dp^orkpeov (2nd hand) A[C\oykvrj$ *IkpaKos ypap- 
p{aT€vs dir]b ttjs avrfjs rrSXc&s kv [dyvia tj} avrjj. 

4. rjv of aat^VKivTjp COXT. from as(?). 5. fi of fiMpos COIT. from r. IO. k of kcf 

COIT. and v COIT. from f. 12. p Oinapa corr. from r(?). 1. biaiT<*iuv<av. 15. 1. aiprjrcu. 

1 The nth year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus Hadrianus Augustus, Pharmouthi 24, 
at Oxjrhynchus in the Thebaid, for good fortune, on the day of Julia Augusta, in the 
street. Sarapion son of Sarapion son of Sarapion son of Sarapion, his mother being 
Thais daughter of Sarapion, of Oxyrhynchus, has given in marriage his daughter Thais 
whose mother is ... to Sarapion son of Eudaemon son of Theon, his mother being Heras 
daughter of . . . and Didous, who has received from Sarapion, the father and giver 
of the bride, a pair of . . . weighing 3 minae 14^ quarters, a brooch of 8 quarters, 
a ... of 6 quarters, a chain with 3 green ... of stone, the gold weighing [.]£ quarters, 
making altogether on the standard of Oxyrhynchus 5 minae . . .quarters, also 2 dresses, 
2 girdles, one red the other rose-coloured, a . . . and a mantle, together worth 560 silver 



496. CONTRACTS an 

drachmae, and i860 silver drachmae, the total value of the whole dowry being 4100 drachmae 
of silver of the Imperial coinage. Besides this the grandmother of the bride, Thais daughter 
of Sarapion and Heraclous, of the same city, with her guardian who is another son of hers 
and the full brother of the giver of the bride, Sarapion son of Sarapion, acknowledges 
in the same street that she has given away Thais in marriage, and she confers upon the 
said Thais (the possession of the slave) Callityche and her future offspring, the services of 
and the profits from her to be shared by the husband with the bride so long as they live 
together; and it shall not be lawful for the husband to . . . the slave without his wife's 
consent nor anything that is brought to him by his wife, nor to sell or mortgage or 
otherwise dispose of his property namely a house, yard and court and its fixtures and his 
slaves Sarapous and Nicarous and the children of Nicarous, Sarapous and Cerdon and 
Epicharmus, and the future offspring of them or others, or any additional property which 
he may acquire, without the consent of the bride. Let both live blamelessly together, and 
the husband shall supply the bride with necessaries in proportion to his means ; but if any 
difference arises between them and the bride wishes to separate from her husband, as 
soon as the separation takes place the bride shall withdraw the slave Callityche and the 
children that may be born to her, and the husband shall repay to the giver of the bride 
if he survives, and if not, to the bride herself, the 4100 drachmae of the dowry within . . days 
from the day on which they are demanded or forfeit this amount increased by one half . . . 
And if the bride is at the time of separation in a state of pregnancy the husband shall 
give her on account of the birth 60 drachmae more. When they come together may they 
enjoy health ; but if either husband or wife should chance to die, the husband shall have 
power over his own property to make any further provisions he pleases and to divide 
it among whom he will ; but if he makes no further provisions the property shall after 
his death belong to their children. If the husband dies first the bride shall have . . . 
and she or her nearest relation on the one part and whoever shall be appointed by the 
husband on the other part shall together be guardians, the children being brought up with 
their mother until they come of age. If the husband appoints no guardian for the one 
part of the guardianship the bride or her nearest of kin shall act alone, and no one shall 
be permitted to deprive her of the guardianship nor any part of it. If the bride dies first 
without their having any children or when those that have been born have died childless, 
the husband shall repay the dowry namely ... the 4100 drachmae of silver in 60 days 
and shall send to the said relations of the bride all the rest of her property. Similarly 
if the husband dies first without their having any children or when those that have been 
born have died childless, the bride shall . . . and withdraw the slave Callityche and the 
children that may be born to her, and until she has recovered them she shall have control 
over the whole property, and with regard to all the provisions the choice shall rest with 
the bride to have either if she prefers the aforesaid gold ornaments included in the dowry 
at the same weight or their equivalent value, and the bride and her agents shall have the 
right of execution upon both the husband and upon all his property in accordance with 
their agreement with each other. The certifier of both parties is Diogenes son of Hierax, 
scribe, of the same city, in the same street.' 

I. c[iri 'lo]uXicw 2[€/3a]err[jj* : cf. 604 and 284. 21 K[aiaap]iiov u 'louX*? It&aaffit, and 
note ad lac. 

3. Apparently not cVarfov frvyos. The mutilated word after &(r]» is possibly 
[<5X]vo{«(|oto, but the vestiges do not suggest this. 

X^wpovs x[. ,]rous : cf. C. P. R. 24. 5-6 ctarta* frvyos . . . to dt trtpov biaxkvpov. 

4. The whole dowry of Thais came to 4100 drachmae (11. 9 and 14), of which 560 

P 2 



212 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

are accounted for by the articles of dress and 1800 were paid in money, leaving 1680 to 
be accounted for by the value of the jewelry. Since a iivauuov contained 16 riraprai (9. 
verso 16), the items in 1. 3 make 4 fwitma 13 rc'raprac + the number of rtraprai in the 
iXvaLdiov. A fivataiov of gold is converted into a 88 silver drachmae in C. P. R. 12, and 
at the same rate 1680 drachmae would represent 5$ p»aidia. If the figure lost in 1. 3 
before rj^mrv was &«Va (no higher figure is possible), the total weight of the jewelry was 
5^ pvaiala. The difference is due to variation either in the rate of exchange or in the 
weights. 

6. ttjv (&) SovXtUw : in the translation we have supposed that the genitives KoXXit^'x^c 
k.t.X. depend on a word like Kvpttav lost at the end of 1. 5, but rfjv dovXctov may be the 
word on which they depend (cf. 480. 8), in which case a relative (& or d) must be supplied 
in the lacuna before oW£« in 1. 6. 

vpwnf>tp6ij[fyop : irpoa^iptaOai is the word commonly used of property brought to the 
husband by the bride, e.g. in a first century fragment of a marriage-contract ttjv fopy^* 

vpwr<i>fpoyL€vr)v. 

7. For the supplement at the end of the line cf. e. g. 401. 8. 

9. For the supplement at the end cf. 407. 16. 

10. Some such word as <ntp&rj is required before nva ; cf. 407. n. 
1 a. ftrro fx6vrj k.t.X. : cf. 265. 29. 

13. tA c[ir <p€ P yjj : cf. 1. 15. Or e(i*x0cVa may be read; cf. C. P. R. 27. 18. 

15. haaroXvv: sc. for the recovery of the dowry; cf. 407. 18. Cf. for the supplement 
C. P. R. 22. 23, 27. 19. 

16. yvaxrnjp: cf. a Vienna papyrus cited by Hartel, Gr. Pap. Erz. JRainer, p. 66 
ry ftovXcvrjj 'Avtukhcov ry ycpo/tcr^ fiov yvaxrnjpi h rjj iwucpitrti, and B. G. U. 58 1. 1 3 (a deed 
of surety) t6p dc irpoycypapistvop . . • yvwpifei Aovkios 'Oicrdvios Aoyyos dno\vaip.os dn6 or pare las. 
The yvwrnjp of a person was a witness of his or her identity. 



497. Marriage-Contract. 

1 1.5 x 14-1 cm. Early second century. 

Contract of marriage between Theon and Ammonous, written in very long 
lines across the fibres of the papyrus, probably in the reign of Trajan or Hadrian. 
Though a mere fragment of the whole contract, the sense and construction 
are intelligible throughout, for the missing portions at the beginnings of the 
lines can be largely restored from the other Oxyrhynchus marriage-contracts 
of this period (265 and 496), and the Ptolemaic marriage-contracts from the 
Fayflm (P. Tebt. 104 and Archiv, I. p. 484). At the end are the signatures of 
the bridegroom and the bride's father, and of a third person who seems to have 
been concerned in receiving the dowry, but whose relation to the contracting 
parties is obscure. 



497. CONTRACTS 213 

1 ] . . [. .yiw 

2 nc&XcTv ov8k &7roTiOc<rOa]i ov8 [&XXw K]aTa\pripaTi^€iy 

3 [X^P* 9 ev8oKo£<rqs rfjs Appa>vovro9 Iff™' Kara (t&) avrit prjSk 

'AlfipifavovTi i££<rTa> dirSicoi- 

4 [tov prjSk A(f>rjfi€pov ytveaOai dnb rrjs Beoovos oikicls prjSk dXXcp dvSpl 

avvuvai pr\8k aiayyvuv Bioova 8<ra </>ep€i al<rxy]vriv di/Spl prjSk <f>0€Lptiv 
rhv Koivbv oIkov. Ihv 

5 [Si n 8ia<pepcovrcu wpbf dXXrjXou? teal /3ov\i]Tai Appoovovs diraXkd<ro-€<r0ai 

dnb BtaHtos kqlI ttj$ <f>€pvrj]s rfjy ditatri\fnv irouiaOat 

diroXiirovaa Bi<wa 

6 [ diro86rra> avr% Bia>v r&9 Spa^pas K]o<r(a9 kv ij/i€- 

pais l^Kovra d<f> fj? kav diramjBrj. ka[v 

7 [8k Appxnvovs ftotiXrjTcu rrjs <f>]cp{v]fj$ rfjv d[7r]aCrrj[a]iv 

iroiuvOai faroo dvrl rairnjs p6va>v r&v i£a- 

8 [Koaioov Spayji&v ]kov xpprjyetTCb 6 avrbs Bioyy T019 t£km9 

rh irpbs rfjv Siarpofflv 

9 [ khv Sk pera tov d]n dXXrjXcw ^capiapbv ovpfifj rh 

c£ dXXrjXw riKva peraXXdgai 

10 [ diro86T<x> B£ot>v Xai]p[ijpo]yi khv {jj d 8k pfj rois ratJriyy 

iiryiara yivovs o5<ri t^v fepvijv 

11 [ical 1) ixrorc/iraro) ptff fjp]io\(a9. <Tv[v]<f>€pop€van> 8 avr&v 

cm; pkv Ayeia, iav Se tjl\vi avr&v (rvpfijj reAci/- 

12 [rrjaat t&v kaopkvoav airrois i£ dXXrjXcD]v [t\&kv<ov $ Tivnv av- 

t&v d(f>f]XiKa>y Svtcov !<rra> 'AppcovoV? kcu 6 irrrb tov B(a>vos 

13 [KaTacrraBrjaopcvo? Zkciotos /caret rb tfpiov dp<p6r€pot kirtrponoL t&v 

t£kvo>v] SiaiT&pevcov irapa t§ [p]rjTpl pe\pi tov €iy i)Xuc(av eXOeiv. 
kav 8k pr}0€i? npb? t§ 

14 [ KaTcurraOfj ] lyXSyioTo? TovWmv koX [t]&v Kar<iXeL(f>0ri(Topiv[(cv\ 

avTols. kav 8k Appoavovs irporipa 

15 [TeXevTrfay TtKvmv ovtoTs pfj Svra>v i£ dXXtfXcDV 1) real X\iit6vtg>p 

diro86rra> Bicnv ry Tavrrjs irarpl teal €#cfl[6r]|7 Xaip-qpovi khv wcptrji, [el 

16 [Sk pi}, Tots TavTTjS eyyiarh yivovs ovai Tfjv fepvfjv kv fjpepais d]if> 

^5 khv diraiTTjOfj fj dnoreiadTct) ptff iipioXtas. khv 8k [6 B€\a>v irpfh 

T€f[0]9 TcXeVTTJOTJ 



214 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

1} [t€Kvg>v clvtols /ifj Svtcdv e£ dWrjXcoit KOfu<r]a/iivrj 'ApjUDvov? irp&rr\ 

rijy (fxpvfjv Kal Ta dXXa o&ttjs diravra [c]k tov utto[. . . 

18 [ knl 8k naa&v] t&v irepl rfjs d7raiTTJ<T€a>s Kal 

dva/cojJuSrjs rfjs fepvrjs SiaaroX&v 1) irpagts [earco 

19 ^Aymmvodri Kal tois airrijs €K tov &€<wof Kal ix t&v ifrrap\6yra)v avr& 

TT&vTCbv KaOdrrep iy Sky]? KaQbm npbf dX[X}jjXov$ ovv€X<bpr)<rav, ttjs 
tov SaKTvXiov cyAoyi}? otf- 

20 [cnyy nepl Appatvovv lav alpfJTai (2nd hand) 8imv ] tov \?A]%iX- 

A[ta»?] nponamroa€pd\a]Tios 6 Kal AXOauvs /irjTpbs Arj/xrjTpfas 

21 [iya> Tfjy fepvijv (3rd hand) XaipJjpav ]or 6 Kal 'AXOetit? 

, iK8iSo/iat t^v BvyaTipa p[ov 

22 (4th hand) ] Sapairtovo? toO 'AprtfiiS&pov Ai£i/i$rpios ^al 

23 8paxp]fc K€(f>aXaiov i<f> vp&v Ik nXrjpov? brl irao\i 

24 [tois TrpoKCt/ievoi? ]oy typatya vwkp airrod (3pa8(a ypd<f>o[vTos. 
«5 ] • • ?rf 

On the verso 
26 ] k/3, yafUK^j) 9 Aiipa>vov\Toi) irpfii) Sioava. 

21. 1. 'AX&ucvr. 23. 1. a(f> vp&p? 

17-8. After [iy tov the papyrus probably proceeded vnb [tov OcWw an6Kft<t>6rf<rofupov . . . 

20. UponavirwT<pc{<r)ru)s 6 <ul % A\6auvt: cf. 477. 7-8, note. 

22. Av&uTT/xof : spelled Aufc/uprfpcio* in 201. 6 where the deme name is Ajpcu*. 



498. Contract with Stone-Cutters. 

17-8 x 8-7 cm. Second century. 

A contract by which two stone-cutters agree to supply the stone required 
for building a house at Oxyrhynchus at different prices according to the size 
and nature of the stones. Food was to be provided for them while they were 
engaged upon the work, and wages were guaranteed to them if their services 
were required by the builders, but the ornamentation of the stone is excluded 
from their duties. The stone was to be brpught from the 'northern quarry/ 
which is still a noticeable feature a little way to the north of the site on the edge 
of the desert. The papyrus supplies several new technical terms connected with 
stone-cutting. 



♦ 498. CONTRACTS 2rs 

'AvTiypatftov. Avrcovip AaKXrjmdSi 

Tfj kcu Kvpta Sia AnoXXoivtov emrpS- y 

ttov napa AckXcltos 'AX(£dv8pov 

Kal AttoXXodviov 'AjiSitos prjrpb? 
5 Tatpios dfi<f>0T€p<Dv drr 9 0^vpi6y\<ov 

7r6\€co$. €iri8ex6fi€6a Xafclav 

t&v oUoSopovpivoav Xi0a>v kv- 

fioav Ka/irjXiK&v dirb fiopivfjs \aro- 

fiia? els oUiav aav ri}$ 'Avrwtas 
io in dp<f>68ov Ilapficvovs HapaSti- 

aov piaOov ttjs Xafcias t&v p\v 

•e£<oT€pa> Xl6w Ktiflow *a/*?/Ai- 

k&v d>$ t&v Sitca l£ Spa^fi&v T€<r<r[dr 

pa>v [t]&v SI i[a]a>T€piata>v &9 t&v 
15 Tp[idK]ovr[a Spa]\n&v Teacdpcov Kal 

t&v [d]vrifiXriii&T<ov <6y t&v iKarbv 

XiOwv Kvfiwv KaprjXitc&v Spa\/i&v Tpi- 

&v Kal K€(f>aX€iT07rapa/jLrjK&v €£a>r[e- 

piai<ov XcOcov kv/3<dv KapTjXlK&V <&? 
20 t&v Se/ca t£ Spayji&v 6kt&> Kal €<ra>- 

Teptalmv A/Aw Kvfioov KajJLT]XiK&v 

K€<f>a\€tT07rapa/lT]K&V &9 t&v t/h- 

aKOVTa Spayji&v 6kt&, neXeKrjftd- 

toov XiOcov [/c]uj8a>i> Ka/lTjXlK&V a>? T&[v 
25 ir€VTJJKov[Ta S\payji&v Tcavdpav Ka[l 

ireXeKrjjjLdifov] KC<pa\€[i)ro7rapapr]K&v 

Xi6<x{v Kv]f$a>v [Ka]/iTfXtK&v »? t&v ir€v- 

t/J9^o]vtu Sp{a]x[ii&]v 6kt<x>. t& Si npoKd- 

fitva irdvra a[. . . Xa]£[€tJ<ro]/iej' <*&$€- 
30 pias wpb? 4/«[* y ] o^ 01 !* 5[o]<rfMwr[o]«J(r6- 

a>9, Xrj/iyfrtTai Sk ftcaoro? fjji&v irfdo-- 

Trj? Jipipa? 1}s ihv ipydfyTai Ka[l &p- 

tov Iva Kal irpoatfrdytov. iitv Sk XP 6 ^" 

av i\o)ai ol obcoSSpot imovpyias Xa£i- 



216 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPHRI 

35 K VS 4/* € fr ATrovpy^aofJiey 1} kclI m ij- 
fi&v €Kaoro9 \a/ipdy<oy i[K]dcrrr]$ 
flfiepa? fiiaOov vnovpyfa? SpayjLfc 
rio-o-apas teal £/ca<rro? f)pS»> dpouns 
iicdamjs fjpipas dpnrov Iva teal irpo<r- 

40 <pdyi[ov. p]ixP l ^ Seuripas KCtl utedtios 
{tfJxpt] §) 8cvT€pas Kal iU&Sos) rod 
[Svtos fL]jirftos] 'EirclQ €£6vtos aoi iripois 
[/i€Tafii<rOov]v rfjy a&rfjv \a£c(av 
[rijp raw TrpoKtCyitvoav XtOcov Kv/3a>v 

45 [KafiT]\iK&v drrb (3o]pivr}s Xaropla? 
[ 19 letters ]av aov /i€0[. . 
[ 30 „ jy us iipc[pas 

[ Kvpia ^ €7ri]&>x^. Irot^y 

[ 26 letters ]a[- « 



2. * of m/pia corr. from a, 26. /a^jcm Pap. 

1 Copy. To Antonia Asclepias also called Cyria, through her guardian Apollonius, 
from Asclas son of Alexandras and Apollonius son of Amois, his mother being Tauris, 
both of Oxyrhynchus. We undertake to cut the squared building-stones transportable 
by camel (?) from the northern quarry required for the house of you, Antonia, in the 
quarter of Pammenes' Garden, the rate of wages for the stone-cutting being for the outer 
squared camel stones at 4 drachmae for 16, for the inner ones at 4 drachmae for 30, 
for mrriffKrifWTa at 3 drachmae for 100 squared camel stones, and for oblong corner-stones 
at 8 drachmae for 16 outer squared camel stones and at 8 drachmae for 30 inner squared 
camel stones, and for chipped squared camel stones at 4 drachmae for 50 and for 
chipped oblong squared camel corner-stones at 8 drachmae for 50. All the aforesaid 
stones we will cut, but no ornamentation shall be required of us. Each of us shall 
receive for each day that he works both a loaf and relish. If the builders have need 
of our services in stone-cutting, we or one of us will provide them, each of us receiving 
as wages for each day's services 4 drachmae, and likewise each of us on each day a loaf 
and relish. Until the 22nd of the present month Epeiph you have the right to transfer 
to others this contract for cutting the aforesaid squared camel stones from the northern 
quarry . . / 

8. KaprjkiK&p : the adjective is new. The point of it seems to be that the stones were 
not to be too heavy for a camel to transport them. 

16. [a\vTiffKT}fiara)p: these stones being the cheapest were presumably the smallest, and 
may have been used for inserting in vacant spaces between the larger ones. 



499. CONTRACTS 



217 



23. irt XtKTjfurrur : the stones under this heading are divided into two classes, ll. 24-5 
apparently corresponding to 11. 12-5, and 11. 26-8 to 11. 18-23. The mXcKrjfxara were 
much dearer than the ayrt/SXtyuira, but. cheaper than the others. 



499. Lease of Land. 
305 x 6.5 cm. 



A.D. 121. 



Lease of io£ arourae of land at the village of Senepta for one year, at the 
rent of 36 drachmae per aroura. The crop, which in the preceding year had 
been corn, was to be grass, of which part was to be employed for grazing, part 
was to be cut for hay. Other leases in the present volume are 500-2, 500, 508, 
680, and 640. 



'Ejjli<t6cd<t€v Tpvtfxw 'Apiordv8p{o]v 
Kal Sapanicov 'HpwSov t&v air 'O- 
£vpvyx<t>v 7r6X€Q)y 9 Airo\\a>vi<p 
"flpov t&v dirb K(o/jltj9 2€viir[T]a 
5 IIiparj9 rfjs imyovi}? c/y rb kv- 
eorbs Iktov ero? % A8piavov 
Kafoapo? tov Kvpiov dirb t&v i>~ 
irapybvT&v avrois wept rfjv av- 
Tfjv K&prjv Ik tov A(a>vo9 Kkr\- 

10 pov ra$ dirb imicaXdpov dpovpas 
Sitca fjfuovj &v ytroves dmjkha- 
tov Ai.Bvp.ov (yorov) t&v irpoytypa/i- 
pAvoav ^oppd t&v avT&v 
Xifibs SevOov IIoTd/icovo?, 

15 &ot€ £v\a/ifjaai y6prrov el? Konijv 
koi lirivo/ijjv, <p6pov iKdoTTjs 
dpovprjs fiTjSepids y€cofX€Tpias 
y€V0fiivrj9 dva dpyvpiov Spa- 
X/*&? rpidKovra t£ didv&vva 

20 iravTbs KivSvvov, t&v inrkp rrjs 
yr]9 8rjfxo<r(oov Svrav irpbs rbv 
[fiy/iiaOoDKoWa, t>v Kal Kvpievtiv 
t&v Kapir&v coo? dv tov <f>6pov 



Kop(<rr]Tai. ttjs Si /ucdoxrea)? 

25 ficfiaiov/iivris d[wo]S6r€i> 6 fi€- 
/uaOco/iivos r[bv <f>6pov] r$> 
Ilavvi prjvl toD a[vrov] ctov9, 
8 6* dv Trpo(To<f>€i\[iajj] dirorei- 
adrco fieff J)/u[o\(a9, K]al 1) irpa- 

30 £ 19 caroo t& fielfiiaOcoilKori 
[&c re] tov [avrov 9 Atro\]\covtov 
Kal eK t&v imapypvrw atir<p 
wdvroDv KaOdnep ky 8(kt]9. 
Kvpla fj /ifoOcoo-ti. (crow) Hktov 

35 A&TOKpdropo? Kai<rapo9 Tpatavov 
'ASpiavov Sefiaorov 8a>6 kc. 
2nd hand Hapairfav 'Hp&Sov avv- 
p€pi<r0a>fiai ras npo- 
K€tp4vas dpovpa9 

40 SiKa ^p[i]av fMTjSe- 

flLO.9 y€<0fJL€Tpia9 

ycvojiivri? dva dpyv- 
piov 8pa[x\jia9 Tpid- 
Kovra t£ KaT Apovpav 
45 &9 irp6K€iTai. yjp6vo9 
6 avros. 



218 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

On the verso 

'Airo\\cwic(v) 

fll(<TdcD<Tls) Is Tb q- [(€TOj).] 

5. 1. ncpo?}. 10. c of emKaXapov corr. from a. 

' Tryphon son of Aristandrus and Sarapion son of Herodes, inhabitants of Oxyrhynchus, 
have leased to Apollonius son of Horus, of the village of Senepta, Persian of the Epigone, 
for the present 6th year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord from their property at the said 
village in the holding of Dion the io£ arourae upon which corn has been grown, of which 
the adjacent areas are on the east the land of Didymus, on the south that of the aforesaid 
lessors, on the north the same, on the west the land of Seuthes son of Potamon, which 
land is to be cultivated with grass for cutting and grazing at a rent for each aroura, 
without a survey being made, of 36 drachmae of silver, guaranteed against all risks, the 
taxes upon the land being paid by the lessor, who shall be the owner of the crop until 
he recovers the rent. If this lease is guaranteed, the lessee shall pay the rent in the month 
Pauni of the said year and shall forfeit any arrears increased by one half, and the lessor 
shall have the right of execution upon the said Apollonius and upon all his property 
as if in accordance with a legal decision.' Date and signature of Sarapion. 

10. an6 hrucak&iwv : c£ Wilcken, Archxv, I. p. 158, P. Amh. 91. 22, note, and P. Tebt 
115. introd. 

17. /iqfefuaff ytnfitrpias yawpc'in?? : the point of this clause is that ioj arourae were 
accepted as the accurate amount of the land, and there was to be no fresh survey which, 
if it brought out a different figure, might affect the rent to be paid. 



600. Lease of Domain Land. 

26x9*7 cm - A * D « x 3°* 

An application addressed to the strategus of the Athribite nome by a number 
of persons who wished to lease jointly, for one year probably, some domain land, 
offering a higher rent than that paid by the former lessees. Cf. 270, a similar 
application addressed to the basilico-grammateus, C. P. R. I. 32, 339, B. G. U. 
640, and P. Brit. Mus. 350. The papyrus has been gummed on to a series 
of documents, and is numbered at the top 13. 

'7 
and hand flcpa^u orpaTTjyjp 'AOpiff^irov 
[7rap]A "tlpou V^vofida'6i[os k]oX 
[N€K](f>€p&9 SaicrovTos *a[2 . .]c- 



500. CONTRACTS 219 

[ !*?[ }**<!><*[ 

Vestiges of three lines. 
10 [12 letters ]ov[ 

a[. i]ov8a(a{v] €iprj[p]ivmv Kal 

'EWrjvcov . [. .]r]povofiiTG>v irepl 

Terdfov Srjpoa^as) yfjs dva (rrvpov) (iprdfiai) f3 

(dpoipas) k& Kal inrip €7n[0]€/iaTO9 
15 r&v Sktov (uvpov) (dprdfiasi) € Kal wept ¥[e- 

yap<ri(rj(riy) tov Qdxrrov dirrjtyu&Tov) Srjpoaias 

yrj9 dva (nvpov) y (dpoupav) a, Ay Kal /iefrp^- 

copcv i£ dXXrjXeyyvTj? c/y to 

[Stfl/ifoiw iy via>v [y€]prjpdra>y 
20 tov av\rov) k (Irot/y) 'ASpiavov Kataap[o]$ 

rod Kvpiov. 

(cToi/y) t€ AirroKpdropos Kafoapo? 

Tpaiavod ASpiavov Stftaorov 
$aa><f>t €. 
25 3rd hand [ r f2]po$ YtvopoiOaros Kal NeKfep&s 

[8]cu<tovto$ dnb kgo/it}? SwcicOouKp 

tov G&OTov dirrjXt&Tov fjL€fX€<r- 

6a>pc6a riy 7rpoKipeva9 dpovpas 

el/coat riTapT[o]v irtpl Terdtyov Stj/jlo- 
30 [<rias yrjs dva uvpod] dprdfias Svo Kal 

[inrip imOi/iaTo]? t&v SXcov irvpov 

[dprdfias irivrc Kal] nepl Wevapaifjais 

[Srjpoaia? dpo]t<p$ yrj$ dva nvpeffi 

[dprdfias rpetf Apovpav px\av Kal ptTprjao- 
35 [per 20 letters ] . fi>a>y 



4. 1. [Nffc]$€p£roff. 14* vff-cp Pap. 27. 1. p€itur6»p*0a. 32. 1. ¥tvap<rirj<rtv. 

1 To Hierax, strategus of the Athribite nome, from Horus son of Psenobasthis and 
Nekpheros son of Thaisous and . . . and the rest . . . (We wish to lease) 20J arourae 
of public land near Tetaphou at 2 artabae of wheat for each aroura, and for the addition 
upon the whole land 5 artabae of wheat, and near Psenarsie'sis in the eastern part of the 
Thostian district 1 aroura of public land at 3 artabae of wheat, which rent we will 



220 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

measure upon our mutual security into the public granary from the new crop of the said 
15th year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord. The 15th year of the Emperor Caesar Trajanus 
Hadrianus Augustus, Phaophi 5. We, Horus son of Psenomoithas and Nekpheros son 
of Thaisous, of the village of Sinekthoieku in the eastern part of the Thostian district, 
have leased the aforesaid 2o£ arourae of public land near Tetaphou at 2 artabae of wheat 
and for the addition upon the whole land 5 artabae of wheat, and near Psenarsigsis 
1 aroura likewise of public land at 3 artabae of wheat, and we will measure . . . ' 

1 1-2. The genitives in these lines probably refer to the previous lessees; cf. 270. 8. 
o[. i]ovbal<a[v seems to be the termination of a compound word expressing a particular class 
of Jews. There is room for one or two more letters in the lacuna before tlprfoitfpuv, but 
the writer frequently leaves spaces between words. In 1. ia the termination -irw of 
yjporofUTcov suggests a place-name. 

13. 6i}fio<Ti(as) yrjs : in Ost. I. p. 646 Wilcken adopts the explanation of 'public land' 
proposed by Viereck (Hermes, xxx. p. 119) that it means land belonging to the commune 
('Gemeindeland) as opposed to PaaiXucrj yrj 'domain land'; but in Archiv, I. p. 157 he 
speaks of P. Brit. Mus. 335, which is an application for a sub-lease of ^fuxrla yrj, as 
if that papyrus referred to ' Domanialland,' i. e. as if biptxria yrj were the same as Paaikuer). 
There is, we think, no doubt that the first theory is incorrect. The use of 69/100-10? in papyri 
in connexion with Xoyor, Tooirffa, and y€»py6s, where it corresponds in the first case to 
Kaio-apos or Kvptwcfc (cf. Ost. I. p. 645) and in the other two to paaikucAs, renders such 
a contrast between dtipfotos and /Sao-iAucof as is required by Viereck's theory very improbable. 
When we hear of land belonging to a ' Gemeinde,' as e.g. in P. Gen. 16, C. P. R. 39 and 
41, it is never called drjpoata, but land airo ™>v wcXitikqv \6yov or rrjs Kufujt. These instances 
all belong to the third or fourth century, and it is not at all likely that there were enough 
' Gemeinden ' previously to account for the frequent mention of bnpwria yrj before the reign 
of Septimius Severus. It is far more probable that d^crior in the phrase d^fuxrta yrj has 
the same meaning as in the phrase dwioVio* yf<a>py6s (cf. P. Brit. Mus. 256 (e) 1-2 drj^uxriois 

yttopyois tls r)v ycvpyovai f$aai\ucr}[»] /ecu Uphv kc\ erc[p]av yrjv) and, that drjftoala yrj included 

(kunkucr) yrj, without however superseding the older term in the manner in which the Roman 
tyfioata rparr€{a superseded the &a*i\ucr) Tpam{a of the Ptolemies. The evidence on which 
attempts have been made to draw a real distinction between brjfuxria and fruriXucr) yrj is 
extremely slender. In B. G. U. 560. 21 d^/too-to and ovauncrj yr) are coupled together, but 
there ^jfioala in the sense of the Crown lands of the Ptolemaic kings makes a better contrast 
with estates acquired by the Emperors from private persons than drjfuxrla in the sense of 
* Gemeindeland ' ; and it is quite uncertain that the Paatkucr) yrj mentioned two lines later 
is intended to be distinguished from the previously mentioned ^fuxrla, B. G. U. 188. 
33, where the editors read vy Kkfapovxtas) pa(<rtkuajs) dri(fuxriat) 9 if dr^fuxrla^) is right (which 
is extremely doubtful ; fo^pocrfop), sc. for the typJtTia, is preferable), would rather tend to 
show that drjpwTla yrj coincided with paa&iKr) than that it was something different. In 
B. G. U. 285 where arourae firffunrlov are distinguished from arourae /9a<nX(c«ip), it is 
not certain that land at the same village is meant, nor is it at all clear that tojfuxriov is 
there feminine, as would seem to be the view of the maker of the index to B. G. U. 
Under these circumstances we abandon the view expressed in P. Fay. Towns 88 introd., 
since there is no reason for departing from the natural meaning of ftuicfoior at this period 
or for regarding ^rjfuxrla yrj as anything but a general term for land belonging to the 
State, i. e. the imperial domains '. 

1 Cf. also the recent discussion of 89/iorfa yrj in Festschr. zu 0. Hirschfcld, p. 140, by P. Meyer, who 
comes to the same conclusion as that expressed here. 



501. CONTRACTS 221 

14. «r4[0V/*aroc : for this word in the sense of 'higher bid' cf. P. Arah. 85. ai and 
Wenger, Archiv^ II. p. 61. 

16. Oiuorrov: the supposed <r both here and in L 27 is somewhat different from the 
form of that letter employed elsewhere in the papyrus. In the present passage ewiVou 
could equally well be read, or possibly Oo^rov, but in 1. 27 neither of these forms is 
possible. 

26. The termination of the village-name is very cursively written, and might be -kov 
or -fwv. 



501. Lease of Land. 

29*6 X7»2 cm. a.d. 187. 

A brief description of this lease of a half share of five arourae in the 
Oxyrhynchite nome from Heraclides and Sarapion, acting through their guardian 
Hermes, to Harmiusis was given in Fart I. 166 ; but since the formula presents 
some novel features both with regard to arrears of rent from the preceding 
lease and the use of the word Oiyua (cf. 516-8), we give the text here in full. 
The papyrus is in the Bodleian Library, MS. Gr. class, c. 47 (P). 

'E/ii<r0wa€v 'HpaicXetSrjs 

6 Kal Aioyivrjf Kal Saparrfov 6 Kal 

Aioyivri? d/i<f>6repoi Aioyevov? 

yviivaviapxqiravTts rfjs 'OfcupvyyffDv) 
5 irSXtos Kal a>? xprjpaT(£ov<ri Sia 

'Epfiov emrpoirov 'Appivaei 'H/oa- 

T09 fiijrpbs Ta<f>€t(3i09 dirb Tar^iva- 

kltwov ch en; riaaapa dirb rov 

ivear&ros k( (Irot/y) dirb r&v inrap\6vro>v avrois 
10 rt€pl Taafintfiov ix rov $iXovet- 

kov Kal Xaparof KXrjpov tf/iiov pepo? 

koiv&v irpb? Ar\pi\rplav 'Avrtpdyou 

Kara rb irtpov tffuov dpovp&v nitrre 

Kal yfriX&v r6n<ov &ot€ tnrtipai Kal £v\aprj<rai Kar tros 
15 {Kar iros) rb pkv if/iiov nvpep rb 8* dfA- 

Xo ijpiov x\a>poT? drrordKrov rod avrov 

f)jii<rov$ pipovs im rfjy rerpatrtav 



222 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

tear croy irvpod kv Oepari dprafi&v 

dfcrcb real Spaxji&v reaaapd^ovra). ipo~ 
ao Xoya Si 6 /i€/iKrOa>/iivo{i\s 6<f>€(- 

Xeiv rots y€Ov\ois Xonroypa<f>(av 

rod avrov k8d<f>ov$ 7[o]y irqgtXOSv- 

T09 €rot/y irvpov dprdfiafc] T/>€?y, &v 

Oipa dvaS6o~€t 6 p[€]pi<rO<Qpev(p9) 
25 t$ faeor&Ti €tu &pa r& tS>v cV 

(ftopCoov Oipari dtcivSvva 

irdvra navTos KivSvvov. ihv Si 

T19 rots i£fjs ereai Afipoyros yivr\- 

rai irapaScxOfotTai ry pcpi- 
30 aOcopivcp, r&v rrj9 ytj? Kar fro? 

Srjpoa-iooy b*\na>v irpbs tov9 y€Ovx(ovsi), 

069 Kal Kvpieveiv r&[v\ t^apir&v 

€Ct>9 T& KOT €709 6(p[€i\6p€i>a 

Kop(<rcDVTCU. fSt$[au>vpivq$ 
35 Si rrj9 pi<r06[(r€W /xct/jc/to) 

6 pepiaOfapivos) r[ 15 letters 

iStais dy[ „ 

Kar fro? ira[ ,, 

€T€i Kal r&? r[ ., 

40 Oipa k[ „ 

[d]iroS6T<x> Kar [fro? 

4 lines lost. 
46 Kal €/c r&v vnap\6vrmv aitT<p irdv- 

t<bv. icvpia ii piaOcocri?. (erovs) k{ 

AvTOKpdropos Kaiaapo? Mdptcov AvprjXfov 

KoppSSov 'Avrcwtvov Evert/Sods Eifrv\ovs 
50 SefiaoTov 'AppcviaKov MtjSlkov IlapOtKov SappariKov TtppaviKov 

McyioTov BpejavviKov $a&<f>t iS. 
2nd hand 'Eppfjs <r€<rijp{€i<x>pai). 

9. <nro top vnapxorroav COIT. from to vnapxov. 14. k<h yf/i\(ai/ T<ma>p above the line. 

17. First rr of TCTpatTtav corr. from p». 



502. CONTRACTS 



223 



'Heraclides also called Diogenes and Sarapion also called Diogenes, both sons of 
Diogenes and ex-gymnasiarchs of Oxyrhynchus, and however they are styled, through 
their guardian Hermes, have leased to Harmiusis son of Heras and Taphibis, from 
Tischinakitoou, for four years dating from the present 27 th year out of their property 
at Taampemou in the holding of Philonicus and Charas a half share of five arourae and 
the vacant spaces, owned by them in common with Demetria daughter of Antimachus with 
respect to the other half, to be sown and cultivated in each year the half with wheat 
and the other half with green stuffs, at the fixed rent for the said half share in each year 
of the four years' period of 8 artabae of wheat on deposit and 40 drachmae. And the 
lessee acknowledges that he owes to the landlords arrears upon the said land for the 
past year 3 artabae of wheat, which he will pay as a deposit in the present year together 
with the deposit of the rent, guaranteed completely against all risks. If in the succeeding 
years any of the land becomes unirrigated, an allowance shall be made to the lessee, 
the landlords being responsible for the annual taxes upon the land and retaining the 
ownership of the produce until they have recovered their yearly dues . . . ' 

16. xXttpofr: i.e. x<5pTor and apaxas chiefly; cf. P. Tebt. I. pp. 563-4. 

18. iv Bifwrt : i.e. die corn was to be deposited in the State granary to the credit of 
the lessor ; cf. 616. introd. 

34-41. Cf. the parallel passage in 10L 26-34, which is somewhat more detailed. 
The meaning is that the lessees actually paid the d^wo-ia to the State, but a corresponding 
deduction was made from the rent. at{ in 1. 37 is perhaps dj^Xupao-i, in which case l&Uus 
is a mistake for tdiW. &{irdpais (cf. 101. 31) cannot be read. 



502. Lease of a House. 
255 x 6.7 cm. 



A.D. 164. 



Lease of a house and its appurtenances at Oxyrhynchus for eighteen months 
at a rent of aoo drachmae per annum, the tenant being bound to deliver up the 
buildings in good repair at the end of the lease, and the landlord being respon- 
sible for the police-tax and brick-tax (cf. 1. 43, note). 



'EpiaOaxrev Aiowala Xaiprjpo- 
vos fierce KVptov rod vlov 'Airloavos 
tov Kal Aiowaiov Aioykvovs Upicos 
$avoT€ivrj$ ZefiaoTTJs dp<f>&r€poi 
&if '0£vpvyxa>v TTJXeo)? IlToXepa 0€- 
ct>vo9 'AvrivoiSi Sia 'IovXSros AiSv- 
pov 0£a€i ArjprjTptov rod Kal 'AiroX- 
\cw(ov drr 'O^vpvyypv 7r6Xea>y i<f> i- 



iKarbv Kal xpdaQw avv Tois nap' aih 
30 rfjs Tofc piaOovpevoi? avrjj &s irp6- 
KUTai kirl Thy xp&vov aKcokvrcos, 
ptff tv napa86ra> KaOapa dirb #co- 
irpfov Kal its irapcCXrjfev Qvpas Kal 
k\w irdvwv T&y T&rrcov Kal tov 
35 irpOKtipivov <pp(aros Tpo\€X\iav 

<ri>v oypivtcp kclivZ Kal ras otfera? Xrj- 



224 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



viavrbv Iva Kal prjva? ££ dub vcopt]- 
10 via? tov 6vto9 prjvbs $apwa>6 

TOV kv€OT&T09 T€T&pTOV CTOl/S T&V 

tcvpicov AvroKparSpcov 'Avravlvov 

Kal Ovrfpov r))v imdp^ouaav avrjj wpo- 

rcpov rod e£ai>€\jr(ov abrrjs Xatprj- 

15 /iovos 'Avrivoiw kv *0£vpir/X a>v n & m 
\ei kir dp<p68ov Tepyevovdttos 01- 
kIolv Kal avXfjv Kal atOpia 8vo &v kv 
t$ iripca karlv <f>p£ap Kal rfjv npoa- 
ovaav rjj oUta wapaSpo/iCSa Kal 

20 frepa xprjorrjpia Kal efooSov Kal c£- 
o8ov, kvoiriov r&v piadoupivcov 
&$ rod kviavrov ivbs [[a>s rod kviav- 
rov IvbsP^ dpyvptov Spayji&v Bioko- 
aioav. ttJ9 SI fiKrOaxretoS fiefiaiov- 

2 S P*viS diro86ra> i) /4€/ii<r&»/*€- 
vi\ rjy fi€fii<r6a)Kvfy kwl avv- 
K\€i<rp<p iKdart]9 k^ayJ\vov ra$ 
alpQvvas r&v kvoiKfav Spayjia? 



rods XiOtvas 860 vSpi&v Kal SXpov 
fj diroTuadrta oS kav ptj wapaS& 
r))v d£iav Kal t kav irpoaofeiXkag k- 

40 voIkiov ptff fjptoXias, Kal 1) irpa£is 
?oto) 777 lie/iiaO&Kvfy <£k t€ rijs 
fi€fii<r6cofievr]$ Kal c/c r&v bnapxpv- 
twv ainyi irdvra>v 3 roD <f>u\dKTpov 
Kal irXivdevopivrjs Svtcdv npbs 

45 r h v pcfwrOcDKvTav. KVpta 1) pt- 

<rdm<ri$. (Jetovs) 8 AvroKpdropo? Kaicrapos 
MdpKov AvprjXtov 'Avrowtvov 
2cf3aoTOv Kal AvTOKpdropos Kaiaapos 
AovkIov AvprjX(ov OMjpcv Xcfiaorod 

50 $ap€vob6 e. (2nd hand) 'Airfov 6 Kal Aio- 
vvvios kmyeypappcu 
rfjs prjrpSs fiov Kvpt- 
0? Kal /ic/iiaOwKa 
<ri>v T0T9 kirdva ras 

55 *v H? avXjj KeXXas. 
\p{6]vos 6 avrSs. 



3. Upcm Pap. 6. avrivoi&i . • • tbuXoro? Pap. 1 3. 

17* • of ow corr. from *. 22*3. o>* rov . 

26. pifuativKVit] Pap.; SO in 1. 41, and 1. 45 /ityuo-flowcvlav. 



vvapxovawf 
. . evos with 

37. vbpUMf 



2. viov Pap. 
Pap.; so in 1. 42. 
dots above. 
Pap. 

'Dionysia daughter of Chaeremon with her guardian her son Apion also called 
Dionysius son of Diogenes, priest of Faustina Augusta, both of Oxyrhynchus, has leased 
to Ptolema daughter of Theon, of Antino€, through Iulas son of Didymus, by adoption 
son of Demetrius also called Apollonius, of Oxyrhynchus, for one year and six months 
dating from the 1st of the current month Phamenoth of the present 4th year of the lords 
and Emperors Antoninus and Verus the house which she owns, and which previously 
belonged to her second cousin Chaeremon, of Antino€, at Oxyrhynchus in the Temgenouthis 
quarter, with the court and two yards in one of which is a well, and the portico which 
adjoins the house and the other fixtures and the entrance and exit, at a rent for the 
premises leased of 200 silver drachmae a year. If the lease is guaranteed the lessee 
shall pay the lessor at the conclusion of each period of six months the proportionate 
amount of the rent, 100 drachmae, and shall together with her assigns have die use of the 
premises leased to her as aforesaid for the appointed dme without hindrance, and thereafter 
shall deliver them up free from filth and with the doors and keys received by her of all the 
premises, and the reel of the aforesaid well provided with a new rope, and the two existing 



508. CONTRACTS 225 

stone presses with the water-pitchers and trough, or shall forfeit the value of anything 
which she fails to deliver and any arrears of rent increased by one half, and the lessor shall 
have the right of execution upon the lessee and upon all her property, the lessor being 
liable for the police-tax and brick-making tax. This lease is valid. The 4th year of the 
Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus and the Emperor Caesar Lucius 
Aurelius Verus Augustus, Phamenoth 5. I, Apion also called Dionysius, have been 
registered as my mother's guardian, and have leased together with the above-mentioned 
premises the chambers in the court. The same date.' 

37. vdpi&p km Skfuw: the genitives depend loosely upon Xrjvcvs, as if furd had been 
written. 

43. <t>v\6icTpov Ka\ irXiyfovofitvTjs : the form <f>v\aKTfx>v for the police-tax is also found 
written out in P. Cairo 10429 (Goodspeed, Univ. of Chicago Decennial Publications, V. 
No. 10), where it is coupled with \aoypa<f>ia. irXulcvo/icVi? (cf. 674) is clearly also a tax, 
and probably the payments vn«p ir\i»6( ) in some Theban ostraca of the second century 
(Wilcken, Ost. I. p. 280) are to be identified with it. It was very likely a payment in lieu 
of providing so many bricks to the government and may well be a variant for the vav&io* 
tax, on which see P. Tebt. I. p. 337. The fact that in one of the ostraca the tax Wp 
irXivOUvofUvjjf) is calculated upon the aroura would be in keeping with such a view. In 
the Fayiim the manufacture of bricks seems to have been a government monopoly ; cf. 
P. Fay. Towns 36. introd. 



503. Division of Property. 

9*5x24 cm. a.d. 118. 

An agreement for the division of a house and court at the village of 
Kerkethuris between four persons, of whom the first, Epimachus son of Harsiesis, 
received $ of the property, his two cousins Epimachus and Petosiris each £, and 
the paternal aunt of the three, Sepsarion, £>. A free space was to be left as an 
tlaobos to the several parts, apparently on the east side of the court. 

[*E]tovs Setrripov ^ AfcoKpdropos Kaiaapos Tpaiavou ASpiavov SefJaarov 

'Emty i£ €[•/ 'O^vp&yx&v) wfofc*) rrjs [Bri^aiSos). 
[dfio\oyov]<riv d\\rj\ois 'Enlpayos 'Aprr/jo-ios toO* 'Empdyov firjTpb? J 17/197-0? 

Kal ol dvctyiol f Err(pax[os 
Kal IttTOvupis dfi<p[6r]€poi Aiowaiov rov ' Em/id^[o]v prjTpbs BarprJTOS 

Kal f) ir&vTtov avr&v npbs irarpbs tti[01s 2*- 
ijrdpiov 'E[ir]ipdxov rod Aiowaiov prjrpbs QarprJTOs ndvres air 9 0£vp6y- 

ya>v rr6\eco$, 1) 81 X^dpiov peTcc tcvpiov [ 

5 'Epparos Bicwos iv ayt/ip SiypfjaOai irpbs iaxrrovs i£ cvSokovvtgw iirl 

toO irapSvros r^v imdp\ovaav avro![s 

Q 



226 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

kv Kcopjj KepKeOvpei oUlav Kal avXfjv kv $ <f>otviKcs rear apes, &v irdvr&v 

pircori ry /j[Iv 9 Eirifid\<p 'Aparfaios fii- 
prj Svo dnb pep&v wore, t$ & 'Eiripdx<p Kal Hcroo-cl/M dp<f>orepot9 

Aiowaiov k£ taov piprj Svo 9 [rfy Si Heyjrapip 
[Empdyov p]tp{o]s tv> Kal KCKXrjp&aBai rbv pkv 'Eiripa^ov ApcL^cnos ra 

iavrov peprj Svo e/c rod d[wb Poppa pkpovs 
[ 15 letters 8iarcivov Xifia] kir dirrjXidrrjv kwl rb irepas r&v SXcdv 

rfacov, [r))v S]i 2[*y}rdpiov 'Empti.- 
10 \yov kypptws fi€ra rhv 'Ent]pLay[o]v Aparfaios kirl v6rov Siareivov Xifia 

krr dirr)Xi&rr)v kirl rb irkpa[s r&v SXodv t6- 
[ttcov, Kal] rhv Ileroaeipiv iyopevcos p.tra rtjv X^dpiov kirl virov rb 

iavroG pipos tv Si[aruvo]v Xifia k[ir &m>iXi- 
[&rrjv kirl] rb iripa? r&v tlXnv rfacov, Kal Tbv 'Eiripayov Aiovwiov fyo- 

ptvcos perk rbv dSeX<f>bv avroG Il€TO<r[eT- 
[piv Aiowaiov] ipoioas rb iavrov pipos tv Siarcivov 6potcos Xifia kn 

diTT)Xidmiv kwl rb [ir€]p[a]y r&v SXodv t6tt[<dv 
[ ] . avr&v avv rois avvcpirtaovpivois efr a KCKXJjpayrai 

<popr(oi? r&v reaadpcov ^oivIkodv avv 
15 [ ] . €& ra rod 'Empdyov Kal Ilerovttpios dpfyorkpw 

Aiowa-tov peprj . [. • . d]/x<poT€pa{v 

[• • • <rvyxa>po€a]i Sk oi dpoXoyovvrts f/caoroy Kara ra npoKtCpeva avrov 

pipr\ *tao[Sov 16 letters 
[ dmiXi]drov rrj? 8Xrj9 oUlas Kal aiXfjs pipovs irXdrov? XifJb? 

kn dmjXidyrriv irglx&v 15 letters 
[ kirl rb 7r]cpar r&v 8X<ov r(ma>v eh tjv efooSov k£iarai 

avrols dvuvat as kav alp&[vrai .... 
[ 20 letters ]iav Si 1}? elaoStvo-a fieaoro? avr&v *k fi6va & KeKXrjpco- 

[rai] a>? irp6K*irai, Sioi[K€iv 81 
20 [iKaarov avr&v Kal Kpar*i]v Kal tcvpieveiv &v XkXov\€v c/s rbv aUl 

\p6vov [ iJKar^p ..... 

[ 31 letters prjSkv] kvKaXtiv dXX[qXois Kara pr]Si]va i{p(mov 



6. fi of fj[t¥ corr. from c ? 7. io-ov Pap. 12. k of km corr. from to. 14. v of 

<rvp COIT. 1 8. <tv of amvat COTT. 



504. CONTRACTS 227 

504. Sale of Catoecic Land. 

33-2 x 13*5 cm. Early second century a. d. 

Contract for the sale of 6§ arourae of catoecic land in the Oxyrhynchite 
nome for 1000 drachmae, the seller being Aphroditous, a freedwoman, acting 
with her husband Adrastus as wpios, and the buyer being Flavius Apion. The 
adoptive mother of the seller, Thaisous, who seems to have had some rights, 
of ownership over the land, appends her consent. The formula of the papyrus 
differs somewhat from that found in similar contracts from the Arsinoite and 
Heracleopolite nomes (e.g. C. P. R. I. 1 and 6). The contract is dated in the 
third year of an emperor who was probably Trajan or Hadrian, and is written in 
a small cursive hand with several mistakes of spelling and grammar. Cf. 683. 

"Erovs rptrov AvroKpdropoe Kafoapc[? 30 letters 

ly, kv 9 0£vpvyx<w [n6\€i rrjs 8r]f3ai8os. 
6p[o]\oy€i 'A<f>po8iTovs f) Kal Arj[papod? drreXevOipa 'EiriKpdrovs 
' Ett{i]kp<£tov9 rod t HpaK\ei8ov dnh ^O^vpvy^v iroXecos Kal Oiaei 6vydrrjp 
5 'Eirucpdrov? teal rrjs roHrov y[v]v[aucb? Qaiaodros t§s Kal Gafoios 
m *HpaKX*t8ov 

p{c)ra icvptov rod iavrrj? dv8[p]bs \A8pdarov 19 letters ptirpbs 
Ev8aipovi8o$ dnh $iXovikov t\ov 15 letters $Xaovi<p 'Ant&vi 
Kal o>y yjpripart^i & dyviac na[pa]K[€)(a>p7jKhat 18 letters 
pevo$ 81a r&v Ik rod Imrucov o\.]o . . Xio[ 35 letters 
10 rots KaraXoyivpols vnoppr)p[d\r<»y ra[s] irnfapypio'as avrjj wcpl W&fi6iv r§r 

dwriXudiTov roirap^ias €/c rod IlroXcpaiov rod Q€o86r[ov rod 

Aprip&pos 
irp[o]o'0epaTO$ KarvriKtjs yrjs dpovpas t£ 8ipypo[v &p ol y€t}r[ov€$ 810), 

r&v irepl avr&v irpoKr-qaew oUovopi&y SrjXodrrai rfjp vnap[ 

ry $Xav{y\i<p 'Anicwi Kal iy(y)6voi$ Kal rots nap' avrov irapaXriptyopfoois 

15 [al na]pa\a}povfi€voi dpovpai $£ 8ipvpov oi)v rots d\Xoi$ O7jpiot[ 

8yo $ . . 7T04S icvptm rbv rrdvra yjpSvov aKoXovOcos row irepd rc[vra>y 
Tr[poav]aypa<f)o pivots Kal emrraXpivois, [d]v6' off airio^v 1) airr^ 'A[<f>po8i- 
[ro]df irapa rod $\av{y)lov 'Air twos irapax<npr][r]iKod dpyvpiov J}*fiao\roQ 
vopfo- 

Q a 



f 



228 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[jiaros] xuXi&v 8f{ayji\S>v etc' nXtfpovs prjOhv napaavvypa^-qcrc^jav 

20 [ .] . a . oy . . rty SpoXoyovaay 'A(j>pa>8irovp rf)v Kal Arjpapodv [Kara rtjv 

[bpoXo]ytav ratirrjv prjSi pipos rpwrrcp firjlkvcl dXXa Kal navi[ 

[. . . nap(\£ao-Oai T<p $Xa[v]ia> 'AnCoapi Kal rois nap 9 avrod ras napayo*f{ov- 

pivas 
[apovpas If S](pvpov 81a [n]dvrov plv f3[€]fiia$ dn(b n)dvro>v ndvjj [{i]^fiaiwr€i 
*{a]6apa$ dnb ndvrcov 6\rj]/ioaio)p Kal r&v [<£AA]ow> TcXtapdifoty ndv\ra>v dnb 

ag j[&y tyirpoaOcv \p6vcov p^XP €i wte K[a\iaapdov knayopkvw [nipnrrj? 
rod 8ieX66i>TO$ 8evr€p[ov] irovs Kal airrod rod Stvi\ip]ov croi/y 81a r[b ra Kap- 
nia ra dirb rod evear&rfa n]€p€tyiv6p€va thai rod $Xav{y}[ov'Ani[a>vos, 
wgfijy [8]y teal tarat ra dirb [Boo]0 rod heor&ros [2]rot/y SrjpScria. I[iy Se ri 
rotfro>v [1)] 6poXoyovo[a] irapaovyypacj>jj dxvpov [eor<o] Kal npoo-a[n]or[iv(ra) 

30 ry $Xav{y}f<p 'Awicdvi 1j i[o]i9 nap 9 airrod /caff iKdari\v i<f>o8oi> ri re 
0[XdPos 
Kal in(npc[p] dpyvptov Spaxjias \1XCa9 Kal €19 rb SrjpSaiov ras [iras, 
Kal pr)6\v 1}aaov* ovvwSokT Si naai roh npoyeypappivois Jf ^A<f>po- 
Sirovros rrjs Kal Arjpapovros arjpatvopivri Oiau prjrrjp Gaiaovs 1) Kal 

&ar\vi{$ 'HpaKXei- 
Sov rod 'OXipnov prjrpbs 'HpaKXtias dnb rrj? prj[r]p07r6X€a>9 rod 
% HpaKk\*onoXt- 

35 rov pera Kvpciov rov roQ npoyeypappevov Kal p[€r]qXXax&ro9 atirf}[$ dv- 
Spbs rij? Si 'AcppoSiTovros t§9 Kal Arjpapovros narpbs 9 EntKpdr[ov9 rod 
Kal 'Anlcovos 6poprj[r]piov d[8e]X<f)ov t Hp[aKX€t8ov] 'EniKp&roys t) Kal [inl 
rotirois ovvexebpTjaev. tevpta 1) 6poX(oy)(a. (2nd hand) 'A(f>po8iroDs 4 

K(al) Ar)p{apov$ 
dniXevQtpa^) 'EniKpdrov? rod ic(al) 'Aniavos *EmKpa\rov$ 

40 Kal 0l<n Ovydrrjp avrov Kal rfjs yvvaiKbs airc[d 

Garjaios rijs tc(al) Bataovros redupat rijv 6po\Xoy{tav) 
Kal napaKC)(cbpr)Ka t$ q>yr<p $Xavl<p ['Anfavi 
ra? imapyovaas poi ncpl WS[P]b\ip) dnrjXi&rov 
ronapytas Ik rod IIroX(cpa(ov) rod B€oS6i[o]v rovS . . [. . 

45 Apripwos npoa6iparos KaroiKiK[rjs yr\s 

dpotipas If Sipoipov Kal dir[iya>] rb napayix^pririK{bv) 
dpyvp(o[v] 8payjia$ yeiXia? Kal ftefiaicoaco i[nl 



504. CONTRACTS 229 

rots ir[p]oKi/ic[v]oi[9] naau "ABpaaros ...[..]....[... 

kmyiypappai rr}? y[vv]aiic6f fi[ov K]tif{io$ 
50 Kal typayjra inrip aifrfjs /if) cM(v/a9)] yp6.pp.ar a. 
3rd hand Gaiaovs ^ K[al] Oarjai^ *HpaK\d8ov t[o]v [OXvpfirov) 

<rvv€vSoK& ovaa ttjs 'A<j>po8tTo(h[o$ 

ttjs Kal Ar)papovTO$ Oiaci p^Trjp. *H[paK\e(- 

8rjs 'Errucpdrovs d rov 9 EmKp(drovsi) rrarpbs [&Sc\- 
55 <f>bf tmyiypappai airrrjs icvpios k\olL typa- 

^a imkp a&rfjs p)j dSvtas ypdp[para. 

1st hand(?) [A<j>]po8uTovs a>y (h&v) tea t{ ) d<rrjp[oi) 

^[Jj/jaorofff] a>? (fr&v) \/3 t( ) d<rrjp(os) 

^Airfav] &s (kr&v) 1* i( ) darj[/i(osi) 

60 ®L a K*M*] &* (*tS>v) /*€ i{ ) vd(\))) napa 6<p0(a\- 

pov) dp(ioTCp6v) 

['HpaK^tiSrfa) &s (h&p) irj <( ) o6(\})) nap[a] ft . . 

9. Not \oyun[fjpiov. II. I. Torrapx*af« 12. 1. KarotKitajs . . . &ipotpo[v. 1 5. I. [rd* 

n<JpcLXoopovpivas apovpas If Mfwipov. 17. 1. rirf<rraXfi/voir. 1 9. 1. x^'"** 21. 1. Tp6ir<p. 

22. 1. irapc]£c(rdai. 23. 1. djiftotpoy ddi [ffjavrof pev /9[c]/9a/af. 24. or of d^jfuxruw COIT. 

33. arjiuuvopcvri above the line. 

' The 3rd year of the Emperor Caesar ... at Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid. Aphro- 
ditous also called Demarous, freedwoman of Epicrates son of Epicrates son of Heraclides, 
of Oxyrhynchus, by adoption daughter of Epicrates and of his wife Thaisous also called 
Thaesis daughter of Heraclides, with her guardian her husband Adrastus son of . . . and 
Eudaemonis, of Philonicus in the . . . nome, agrees with Flavius Apion however he is 
styled, in the street, that she has ceded to him ... the 6§ arourae of catoecic land which 
' belong to her near Psobthis in the eastern toparchy in the additional holding of Ptole- 
maeus son of Theodotus son of ... , of which land the adjacent areas are stated in the 
documents dealing with the previous ownerships, and that she delivers to Flavius Apion, 
his children, and assigns the 6* arourae which are ceded, together with the other . . ., 
by a valid deed for ever in accordance with the returns and orders concerning them, in lieu 
of the sum received by Aphroditous herself from Flavius Apion for the cession, namely 
1000 drachmae of Imperial silver coin, in full, and that the contracting party Aphroditous 
also called Demarous will not violate this contract or any part of it under any circum- 
stances, but will deliver all the 6§ arourae ceded to Flavius Apion and to his assigns for 
all time with every guarantee free from all public imposts and all other taxes from 
previous times up to the 5th intercalary day of the month Caesareus of the past 2nd 
year including the 2nd year, because the produce of the present year belongs to Flavius 
Apion who shall be responsible for the public imposts from Thoth of the present year. 
If the contracting party violates any of these provisions, her action shall be invalid and 
she shall in addition forfeit to Flavius Apion or his assigns for each aggression both the 



230 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

amount of the damage and a fine of 1000 drachmae of silver and to the State the like 
sum, and nevertheless the contract shall be valid. The aforesaid adoptive mother of 
Aphroditous also called Demarous, Thaisous also called Thae'sis daughter of Heraclides 
son of Olympus, her mother being Heraclea, of the metropolis of the Heracleopolite 
nome, with her guardian Heraclides son of Epicrates brother on the mother's side of 
her above-mentioned and deceased husband and father of Aphroditous also called 
Demarous, Epicrates also called Apion, gives her consent to all the aforesaid provisions 
and conceded the land upon these terms. This agreement is valid.' Signatures of Aphro- 
ditous written by her guardian Adrastus, and of Thaisous written by her guardian Heraclides, 
and a list of the persons concerned in the contract with their ages and distinguishing 
marks. 

7. QikovUov : a funerary inscription concerning an inhabitant of a village bearing this 
name was found by us at Hlbeh in 1902. 'UpaKKtovoXirov should very likely be restored 
after r[ov. 

9. i**vos may be the termination of napax»p<n>\p*vos referring to Flavius Apion. For 
hnrucoi araBpoi at this period cf. 482. 18, note. The sense of 11. 9-10 corresponds to 
C. P. R. I. I. XI [<Vtr«r€]Xf[iC€Ww ttjp] Urokcfiai&a ras (Is rbv Maputo, [ftta r]ov kotoikikov \oyt~ 
tmjpiov rmv irapafxc jguptyif irey apovp&v rpt&v ottovofuas, 

12. irp[o]<rS«paros : the technical meaning of this variant for the usual word kAjJ/xw 
is obscure. mi cannot be read after rov in 1. 44. 

13. vpo*TT)<J€w : cf. C. P. R. I. 187. 6 m$m al fr*p\ ovtwp frpoicrqawis ircptcxovo-t, and 4. IO 
hv ra pcrpa *al ras yctrvias dca rav irpoKTrjTtKW rcYaxrai, where the editor wrongly reads 
<nrpOKkijTiK&v. 

rffv \map[. . . : no word but vndpx*w in some form suggests itself, in which case rip 
refers to the land. But though the construction of 11. 13-6 is difficult (ras napax^povptpas 
dpovpas must under any circumstances be read in 1. 15), it is probable that r^v \nrap[ refers 
to Aphroditous, meaning * having delivered ' and that wrap[ is a mistake for virep[, 

32. fUfBiv 1j<r<ro¥ : for the Omission of icvpia pcvtiv ra irpoytypapptva cf. 492. IO. 

57. The abbreviated word which follows the age in each case (cf. 633) is very 
cursively written, and might be read cmyi or airoyi. The last letter is certainly 1 not p. 



505. Sale of a Courtyard. 

1 1 x 47 cm. Second century. 

Contract for the sale of 50 square cubits or -^ aroura (nearly 14 square 
metres) of a court attached to a house at Oxyrhynchus from Ophelas, acting as 
the representative of Artemidorus, to Eudaemonis, the price being 500 drachmae 
of silver. 

1 'fli/xXa? 6 koI Bt}<ras Sapairaros prjrpbs 'AiroWotn«rij{T]os airh 'Ogvp&yx&v 
n6\€G>9 ovoraOd? irrrb 9 Aprcpi8cbpov 'Apcwicos rod 'Apreparos prjTpbs 
BaKcopio? 'Aptvvicos drrb rijs avrrjs n6\ecos 



505. CONTRACTS 231 

2 Kara avorariKbv ytvbpsvov Sia rod iv t# avrfj nSXei pvr\pov*tov ry 

ivtor&ri fiTjvl oi dvriypafyov inrSiceiTai EvSaipoviSi rp Kai UXou- 
T( £pXfl XP r }f iaTl C°v (T l] M T pfo XivO&vio? IltKvaios 

3 Kai rjj ravrqs prjrpl Sivdavti Hetf/o-to? prjrpbs TttvKtyodros dp.<f>oripai$ 

dnb Tardea)? c£ f<rot; ixaripa fiera tcuptov rg /^y EuSaipovtSi rjj 
Kai nXourdpffl 'A/i/icdpiov rod Kai Aio- 

4 w[<r/]oi/ 'Afificoviov prjrpbs 'Apdaios dnb 9 0£vp6yx<w nSXeco? t$ Si XivO&vei 

rod dpoyvrjatov avrijs d8eX<pov Haxvotifiios \atpeiv. 6poXoy& 
irenpaxivai vpuv difb rrjs 6nap\ofi- 

5 <n/y r<p afrrip avveoraK&ri pe 'Aprepi86p<p iv rg avrjj n6Xei in dp<f>6Sou 

Ilafiphovs IlapaStfoov narpiKtjs oUlas Kai aldptov Kai rq? npocr- 
oijarj? avXrjs dnb rrJ9 avrfjs avXfjs ck rod dnb 

6 dnr]Xi[a>]rov ratirri? pipovs ip(3a8od nrj\€if ntvrrJKovra Siardvovras ftoppa 

inl vbrov inl rb nipas rfj? 8Xrjs avXfj? dnrjXt£rov{v\ 8k inl Xtfia 
piyjpt c[S] nXrjpcodaxriv oi avrol ip.fia8od 

7 ir*)X €l * nevrrJKOvra* ytirove? r&v avr&v naXovpivav 6/ittv irn ipov dnb 

rfjs avXrjs inl ronoOea-Ca nrj^&y reaaapaKovra p&rov Aioyivovs Kai 
£XXcov fioppa Sapantevos xprjfia- 

8 r((ovros prjrpbs Gaiaovro? dvqXiwrov Aovkiov t Epuvv(ov Kpe(<nrov Kai 

£XXo*v Xifibs ol Xomol rrj? atirrjs avXrjs rol\oi. ra? 8k ovvntfyrnvr)- 
pivas npb? dXXrjXovs irnkp nprjs r&v airr&v n&Xou- 

9 piya[v vpu)v in ipod inl rono$ta(a ip.f3a[8od n]r)\&v n€vr^KOvra dpyv- 

piov 2ef3[a<rrod] voptcrfiaros Spayjias nevra[Ko\<rta$ avrMi dniayov 
nap ip&v 81a \eipbs €K nXfoovs &<nrep 

10 o[ 1 a letters ]car[ ]tw[ 21 letters ]ri .[ 19 letters ] . . 

[ ] • . tov /i[ ra)v inl r[on]o0€O'ta i/i[fia8ov nn]x&v 

nvn{\Kovra [.] . 1 



3. lo-ou Pap. 4. Vfiii¥ . . . vnapxovaTfs Pap. a of <mo rrjs COrr. from v. 5. 1. 

ApT€fubwp<p. 6. ov of ainjXi[fl»]rov COrr. from 9. 7* vp*iv vir Pap. 1. irtrrrfKovTa for 

TCovapaKorra, v of rorov CO IT. from d. 8. GaUrovros . . . vwtp Pap. 9. vn • . , v/mn> Pap. 

1 Ophelas also called Besas son of Sarapas and Apollonous, of Oxyrhynchus, appointed 
as a representative by Artemidorus son of Amenneus son of Artemas, bis mother being 
Thakoris daughter of Amenneus, also of Oxyrhynchus, by the terms of a deed of 
representation drawn up through the registry-office at Oxyrhynchus in the present month, 



232 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

of which a copy is appended, to Eudaemonis also called Plutarche stated as the daughter 
of Sinthonis daughter of Pekusis, and her mother Sinthonis daughter of Pekusis and 
Teenkegous, both of Tanais, jointly, each with her guardian, in the case of Eudaemonis 
also called Plutarche, Ammonius also called Dionysius son of Ammonius and Harasis, 
of Oxyrhynchus, and in that of Sinthonis, her full brother Pachnubis, greeting. I acknow- 
ledge that I have sold to you of the paternal house and yard and adjoining court which 
belong to the aforesaid Artemidorus, whom I represent, at the said city in the quarter 
of Pammenes' Garden, of the said court in the eastern portion of it 50 square cubits 
extending from north to south as far as the end of the whole court and from east to west 
as far as the said 50 square cubits reach. The adjacent areas of the portion of the court 
sold to you by me, by survey 50 cubits, are, on the south the land of Diogenes and 
others, on the north that of Sarapion stated as the §on of Thaisous, on the east that of 
Lucius Herennius Crispus and others, on the west the remaining walls of the said court. 
The sum mutually agreed upon between us as the price of the said land sold to you by me, 
by survey 50 square cubits, namely 500 drachmae of Imperial silver coin, I have received 
on the spot from you from hand to hand in full ... ' 

3. TfcwcryovTOf : or TccwayCroff. 



506. Loan of Money on Security. 

(a) 16 x 17-7 cm., (6) 10.7 x 14*2 cm. a.d. 143. 

Contract for the loan of 1000 drachmae for two years and nine months 
at 6 per cent, per annum, from Sarapion to two sisters called Thatres and 
Teteorion, and their mother Demas, upon a mortgage of i$f arourae of land 
belonging to the sisters. The document being a copy of the original deed the 
signatures are omitted. For other examples of loans upon security cf. 507, 
P. Brit. Mus. 311, and the Florence papyrus cited on p. 173. The papyrus is in 
two pieces of which the exact relation to each other is uncertain, besides a small 
detached scrap. 

(a) 'Avrtypa<f{o]v. crot{y] i(386pov AvroKpdropos Kataa{p)os Ttrov Atktov 
'ASpiavov 'Avtg>vI[pov 
HefiaoTov E&acfioGs firjvbs ASpiavov kv 'Ogvp&yxav ir6\€i rijy Qr)f}ai8os, 
iSdvaaav Hapairfov 'Hp&Sov rod 'E£aK&vro[s d]ir '0£vp£yx<a>v ir6\€<v{? 
prjTpbs Ka[i]x{i]\\(a9 IL&AAq? GarpfJTi Kal Terecopfy d/ufxyripais 'AnoWao- 
5 vlov rod [....]. 09 Kal rjj tov{tov}tg>v wrpl At) pan 'AiroW&vtov rod 
Ilav*- 
X«roi; firj[T]pbs $iA<»7c/5ay, rais rptal dirb KJbprjs IIi\a Ilepadvais, 
iicdoTy 



506. CONTRACTS 233 

firra fcvpt[o]v Oarprjn pkv rod dvSpbs Ilcrdjpios 'A/i/icavaros rod 2ayd6ov 
/irjrpbs IIav€\(&ri8os dir '0£vpiryx<»v irSXtw, Ter€(opt<p 8k rod irpbs 

/iijrpbs 
Odov IIav€\(oorov 'ArroWcoviov prjrpb? $iXot>r(pa$ dirb rijs irpoKti/iivrjs 

10 II(Xa, Arjpdn 8k rod irpbs irarpbs airrrjs ddov 'Arpfjros IIav€)(€orov rod 
'AiroX- 
Xmvtov dirb rfj9 avrrjs IliXa, iv dyvia dpyvptov Sefiaorod vo/ita/iaros 

8pax/ifo 
XiXtas KupaXaiov ah [o]&8kv irpoo-fJKrat t6kov rpt<*>fto\e(ov fedoras /tva? 
rod firjvbs iicdorov dirb rov ivtor&ros /irjvbs *A8piavod. dnoS&raxrav 8[k 
al 8e8ai{€]i<TfjLtvat rp 8t8av^C\K&n rbv /ikv [t]6kop iirl [otyvKktKTpcp 

15 [i]icdoTri$ ScoStKapJjvov, rfjs irt[<r}r€ct>9 ircpl ri[v] 8c8a[v)u[K6}ra o6<tt)$ 
n€pl &v §a]v ftii iiri<f>(pcNri airrod at 8€8av^i]a/xiva[i] y[p]d/i/iara 9 
rb 8k K^<pd\\aiov rjj rpiaxdSi prjvb? Kaicrap[{\lov rod kvdrov J?rot/y 
'Avravivov Kafoapo? r[od tcv]piov &pa roh rS[v Xoiir]&v pn\v8>v kv[v*a 
tSkois x^P^ iHrcpOiacm. c/ 8k firj, [<T]wxcopovcri {j r€ Garprjs Kal TctccS- 

20 p[to]y /livciv irepl rbv 8c8av€iic6ra Kal rods irap' airrod fitTaXrjfi- 
yfrofihov? dvrt T€ rod K€<f>aXatov Kal &v iav fifj diroXdfJg tSkcop 
dirb rod rijs diro86<rca>s yjpivov rfjv Kpdrr\<nv seal Kvpdav efr i[b]p 
aUl xpSvov r&v inrap\6vr<iov airrais i£ foov ircpl rfjv aMjv IliXa 
€* rod AlokXsov? Kal IlroXefiatov Tlipaov ImriKoO KXrjpov rplrov pA- 

25 pout rb nplv d/iireXiKod icrrj/iaros wvd 8k x*p<rap.iriX[ov\ €K rod 

dirofiopf{o}rdrov fi€[/>]<w[y ro]d airrod rpirou ptpovs dpovpa pla fjp{iov] 

rirap- 
rov rerpaKai€£r)K{o<rrbv (rbv r]oh ivodai irdat, [&v ycCrovtf] v6rov [2}rc<l>dv[ov 

[. .]o • rrjros rod . [ Kal 0]arprjs irpoKty[cvri 9 AiroXX<n>v](ou ftoppa rod [• . 

[••]••• apnov ko[1 d7TT]\i]d>Tov 8i<op[v£ r&]v airr&v ko[1 

30 [rod Sr€]f>dvou Xi{J[bs 14 letters ]t/ d8€\<po[d ] . . rov fm . [. • 

[ ]«<rTot/ ayrco[ 16 letters ]ay rpiro . [ 30 letters 



(b) [ 34 letters ]g[.] . [ 

[ 34 » ]«{ 15 Otters ]ai #[. 

[ 17 letters ]/i€vai? [ ]yi iirl r[ ]ra 



234 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

35 [ 15 „ ] Kal kndva[yKov irapi£a<r]6cu r<p 8c[8av€iK&ri $] Toh 

nap airov ravra 81a ir]avrbs flSJiaia dirb ir]drfrm]v irdcrij f3^/3aia><T€i tea]] Ka- 
dapdv dwb irdarjs ye]a>/>y[£]ay (3a[<Ti\iKrjs] teal [o&ai]aKrjs yijy *[a2 iravrbs 

€fj5[o]l/9 

15 letters ]yy dnb 8k 8[r]po<T(]a>v Kal T€\€<rpd[TG>v irdvra>]v 
dirb t&v kir\dva> xp6va>v pe^pi tov tt}$ Kvpcta? XpSvfov, ?a>y 9 dv dir]o8&- 

40 [aiv at 8e8av]ci<rfiivai ry SeSavtiKSn rb Kc<f[d\]aiov Kal rod? t6kov$ 

ovk l£uvai t]§ OaTpfjn Kal TcTGoptcp radra ir&Xtiv otiSk inroTidtaOai oif- 
8' dXX&s KaTa\yjpriiiaTl£uv ov8\ diroypd<fxa6at nva hrl t&v <£[[. . .^yp&v, 
kfcovatas oS<r]rj9 ry 8e8av€iK&n fisra rbv \pivov ^ diroXa/ifidvovTa 
Kvptevuv] TO&rcoy dvri re tov K€(j>aXa(ov Kal 5>v kav pfj diroXdf3g t6k<ov 

45 [rpMo/JoXe/a)]*' Kal t&v Kal tov inr*pir*v6vros \p6vov law T/^ja^oXeww, 
Tfjv 8k rrpa£i]v irotttaOai &c T€ t&v 8t8avuan*va>v aXXr^Xevyvcuv oih 
(j&v e/y hc]riaiv Kal i£ %[$) lav avr&v aiprjrai Kal €K t&v irpoKei/ii- 
voav andvjrtov Kal eie t&v dXkuv itrrapx^vroiv avrais irdvrmv ko- 
Odnep iy SC]ktj9, 1£6vto? t<}> StSavciK&ri bnbrav aipfjTcu KaToyfjv 

50 [avr&v ]x*<ra[o-0]ai irpb tov t&v ivKTrjawv fZipXiofaXartov irpbs Tb av- 

t ] /i[fl l\]aTTOVfi€vov tov a&roO 8e8avuK&ros kv r§ irpdfcu 

&v dfXXw 6]ij>€i[X€i] avr<p [ij] T€ QaTprj? Kal T*T€&piov Kaff %Tepov 8d- 
vtiov y*yov]bs 81a toO ai{To]d /ivrffiovctov r[p] ivtor&rt fttjvl 'ASpiavip 
]a*€a>? Ttjs fMT][Tpb]$ iirl imoOffKn tois irpoKCtpivais aciTiKah 

55 [dpovpais Sfyca Ttaaapai ij[^C]jH dpyvpiov TaXdvrov ivbs Kal 8payjt&v 
i£aKoaia>v 
[K€<f>a\a(o]y Kal t6kwv, d[XXd] uvai Kvpiov a>? nepii^i, Kvpia ff vvvypaQij. 

On a detached fragment 

57 ] . [ 

] . aTa>v\ 
ia]y /3ot5X[i7rett 

On the verso an effaced line. 

2. 6t)&aibos Pap. 3. 1. ibavtiat*. 7. trtttvpios Pap. If. ayvta Pap. 12. 1 of 

frpoo-rjKrai com 1 6. Final a of y[p]afi/iara COrr. from oy. 19. vir*p6c<T€»s Pap, 20. 

Second r of p*vuu corr. 23. virapxovruv Pap. 25. v of apn-fXixov corr. from v, 26. 

1. apovpas utas *.r.A. 41. xp of BarprjTt Com from prj. ihrort6ta$at Pap. ^c COrr. 42. mv 

of r«v above ov which is crossed through. 45. virrpiraroiTor . . . law Pap. 46. First * 
of aX\rj\(vyvmv corr. from v* 54* vfrodifKfj Pap. 56. 7 after *vp<a above the line. 



506. CONTRACTS 235 

'Copy. The 7th year of the Emperor Caesar Titus Aelius Hadrianus Antoninus 
Augustus Pius, the of the month Hadrianus, at Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid. Sarapion 
son of Herodes son of Exacon, of Oxyrhynchus, his mother being Caecilia Polla, has lent 
to Thatres and Teteorion, both daughters of Apollonius son of ... , and to their mother 
Demas daughter of Apollonius son of Panechotes, her mother being Philotera, all three 
Persians from the village of Pela, each with her guardian, of Thatres her husband Peteuris 
son of Ammonas son of Sagathes, his mother being Panechotis, of Oxyrhynchus, of 
Teteorion her maternal uncle Panechotes son of Apollonius and Philotera, of the aforesaid 
Pela, and of Demas her paternal uncle Hatres son of Panechotes son of Apollonius, of the 
said Pela, in the street, a sum of 1000 drachmae of Imperial silver coin, to which nothing 
has been added, at the interest of 3 obols for each mina per month dating from the present 
month Hadrianus. The borrowers shall pay to the lender the interest at the conclusion 
of each twelvemonth, the lender having security for everything for which they do not 
produce his written receipt, and the principal on the 30th of the month Caesareus of 
the 9th year of Antoninus Caesar the lord together with the interest for the remaining 
9 months without any delay. If they fail, Thatres and Teteorion concede that the borrower 
and his assigns in place of the principal and of all interest which he may not receive shall 
from the time when the payment falls due have the possession and ownership for ever 
out of the land owned by them in equal shares near the said Pela in the cavalry-soldier's 
holding of Diodes and Ptolemaeus, Persian, namely the third part of what was previously 
a vineyard but is now dry vine-land, in the most northerly portion of the said third part 
iff arourae with all their contents, of which the adjacent areas are, on the south the land 
of Stephanus . . . and Thatres the aforesaid, daughter of Apollonius, on the north . . . , 
on the east a canal . . . and the land of Stephanus, on the west . . . ; and (the borrowers) 
are compelled -to deliver this land to the lender or his assigns guaranteed for all time 
against all risks with every guarantee and free from obligation to cultivate Crown land or 
Imperial estates and from all kinds of imposts and all State requisitions and taxes dating 
from previous times up to the period of Sarapion's ownership. And until the borrowers 
repay to the lender the principal and the interest, Thatres and Teteorion have no right 
to sell this land or mortgage it or dispose of it in any other way or register any one 
as owning it, while the lender has the right at the expiration of the term of the loan, if he fails 
to recover it, to assume the ownership of this land in place of both the principal and 
whatever interest at 6 per cent, he may fail to recover and interest for overtime at the 
equal rate of 6 per cent., and to make an execution upon the borrowers who are security 
to each other for payment and upon whichever of them he chooses and upon all the aforesaid 
land and upon the rest of their property as if in accordance with a legal decision, the lender 
having the right whenever he chooses to register his mortgage at the property record- 
office . . . , and the said lender shall incur no loss in his right of execution for the other 
sums which Thatres and Teteorion owe him in respect of another loan drawn up through 
the said registry-office in the present month Hadrianus for which their mother is security 
upon the mortgage of the aforesaid 14^ arourae of wheat-bearing land, namely a principal 
sum of 1 talent 600 drachmae and interest, but all the provisions of that deed are valid. 
This contract is valid/ 

24. n/pcrov iirrrwfov xkfipov: cf. notes on 482. 18 and 488. 5. 

37. ycjttfryftjar fk[<Ti\tKiJ9] *aJ [o£<n]a*?jr yfjsl cf. P. Amh. 95. 4, where fiaaiXiKrjt alone 
is found in a similar context. We there suggested either yjj* or ytvpyias as the word to be 
supplied, and Wilcken (ArMv, II. p. 132), comparing C. P. R. 6. 16 where yrjs is found, 
decided in favour of the first alternative. The present passage shows however that, though 
0acriXunp refers to yrjs, ytopyias when not expressed is to be understood ; cf. 677 and 638. 



236 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

42. For the restoration of the lacuna cf. 491. 8. P. Brit. Mus. 31 1. 13-4 should 
similarly be restored SKKw [jrora^tyiajrto-at. 

44. Kvpttmiv is rather short for the lacuna, which admits of one or two more letters ; 
but cf. 270. 30, &c. 

54. Probably [f£ cyyvg]<rc»f Or [*£ <Wea>]<rca>r. 



507. Loan of Money upon Security, 

19-7x8.7 cm. a. d. 169. 

An acknowledgement, addressed to Diogenes, a gymnasiarch of Oxyrhynchus, 
by Harmiusis, of the loan of 260 drachmae at 12 per cent, interest per annum. 
The money was employed in the purchase of hay, upon which the creditor 
was by the terms of the contract given a mortgage ; cf. 606. In the left-hand 
margin are some notes in a different hand, which seem to have no connexion 
with the loan and are not reproduced. 

On the verso is a draft of a contract (509). 

'Apfiivo[is 

dirb rod o[ 

Aioykvti 2apair[ia>vo$ 

rjyopayofiT]K6[Ti ivdp^p yvfiva- 
5 <Tidpx<p rijs 9 0£u\p6yx& v ir&Xtw vt- 

coK6p<p Tvxri[$ yalpuv. 6- 

fio\oy& irap€i\[r)<p£vai iraph (rod dp- 

yvptov 8pay(ji[h$ SiaKoafas igrjicovra 

K€(f>a\a(ov ah [ovSkv npooiJKrai t6kov 
10 Spayjwxiov iKdarrj[9 fivas rod /xiy- 

vbf iicdorov dirb rod \6vros firjyb? 

$apfio€6i. dnoSd>a[a> 8k rb Ke<f>d- 

Xaiov <ri)v T0T9 t6k[ois t# rpiaicdSi 

rod $a/i€v[i>0 rod €l<r]i6vro9 
15 Sacdrou iroife AiptjXijou Avr&vhov 

Kahapos rod rcrfpiov \(opl}9 irrrepOe- 

<T€a>y, c/ 8i /i)j [cierej/cra) aoi /itff ^" 

fiioXias ai>p roh koI rfj? imtpyjpovu- 

as foots 8pa[x]/iia(oi$ r6/coi? iKda- 



507. CONTRACTS 237 

20 717? fivas /caret /^ya, rrjy npdgecos 

aoi otiarjs ?#r re c/iou ac a J 4ac T<Si/ i/7ra/>- 

X&rwi' poi ir[d\vrci>i>. t&s Si 

irpoKupivas Spayjias Siaicoatas 

k£rJKovra KaraTiOti/icu e/y ow- 
25 cDpfjp \6prov dirorffiOrjaopivov 

kv $ (x<a> kv /iiaO<&a€i KapT)\S>- 

vi 2ifitkca>$ kv rjj *0£vp&y)(a{v] iro- 

\€i, Svirep \6prov ovk k£korai pot 

fiaordgcu ovSt ircoXtiv oiSi inrori- 
30 OcaOai dxpi 0$ drroScb aoi rb tce<f>d- 

Xaiov Kal roi>9 t6kov9 Sice rb bnivyv- 

6v aoi dvai. khv 8i ti? k(v8vvos 

ov/iffy rod avroD \6prov ovSkv 

fi\d(3os k£aKo\ovOJj<Ti aoi 8ib rb 
35 uvai rb dpyvpiov ai>v rois t6kois 

dictvSvvov navrb? KivSvvov. tdipi- 

ov rb \€ipt[y]pa(j>ov Siaabv ypa<f>\v 

iravTa\ri k[iri\(f>€p6ji€vov. 

(trout) 6 AvroKpdropos Kataapos 
40 MdpKOV Aiprj[\(]ov 'Avtcovivov StfJaarov 

[X]ap/iaTiKo[v M]tj8ikov IlapOucov Meylarov 
[$appov6i . .] 

29. 0a of fkurrafru COIT. 31. vntvyvov Pap. 

1 Harmitisis ... to Diogenes son of Sarapion, ex-agoranomus, gymnasiarch in office 
at Oxyrhynchus, priest of Fortune, greeting. I acknowledge that I have received from you 
the sum of 260 drachmae of silver to which nothing has been added, at the interest of 
1 drachma upon a mina for each month from the current month Pharmouthi. And I will 
repay the principal with the interest on Phamenoth 30 of the coming 10th year of Aurelius 
Antoninus Caesar the lord without delay, or if I fail I will forfeit the amount increased 
by one half together with interest for the overtime at the same rate of 1 drachma a month 
for each mina, for which you are to have the right of execution upon both myself and 
all my property. The aforesaid 260 drachmae I have employed in buying up hay which 
is to be stored in the camel-shed of Similis at Oxyrhynchus which I have on lease, and 
it shall not be lawful for me to remove or sell or pledge this hay until I repay you the 
principal and interest, because it is mortgaged to you. And if any accident should happen 
to the said hay no damage shall accrue to you, because the sum and the interest are 



238 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

guaranteed against all risks. This bond, of which there are two copies, is valid wherever 
produced. The 9th year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Antoninus Augustus 
Sarmaticus Medicus Parthicus Maximus, Pharmouthi . . . ' 

9. alt [ovtiv wpwnJKTtu : cf. 269. 5, 506. 1 2. 

13- tv rpioxcAi : loans were usually repayable on the last day of the month ; cf. 269. 5, 
506. 17. 

26. Kafitjk&vt; cf. 533. 22 and B. G. U. 393 , a lease of a ra^A^r. 



508. Security for a Debt. 

13-3 xii'i cm. A. d. 102. 

A contract between Stephanus and Heraclas, by which the former apparently 
accepts liability for the repayment of two loans from Heraclas to Rufus and 
Diodes, but the papyrus breaks off before the details of the transaction are 
made clear. 

"Erov? ni/inrou AvroKpdropo? Kafoapos 

Nepova Tpaiavov Sefiaorov TtpfiaviKov 

\ji]f)vbs KaiaapeLov A, kv 

*0%up{rfy<w irSXet rrjs &t]/3ai8of. 
5 dfioXoyei Srtifxwos 6 teal 'AjjlSi? Saxrifiiov 

rod AnoX\o<pdvov9 firjrpbs IlroXXapovro? 

Xcuprjfiovo* rS>v air* 'OfcupAyx&v nSXeax 

'HpaxXari *HpaKX(arosi) rod 'ApOvvios /irjrpbf 

4r]fjLT)TpovT09 dvb rfj? a&rfjs n6\c<D9 h d- 
10 yviq. ycyovivai kif 6y Spar 09 rod 6/ioXo- 

yovvros 2r*<f>dvov Kara nttrriv Sdvtta 860 

[[.]] 2>v U rod 181ov 6 'Hpa/cXa? iSdveiw 81a 

r[o]D h rf) airrfj wSXti /anj/ioveCov, Kara 

li\v rb irp&rrov ry Me^elp jjltjvI rod fi (jhous) 
15 [T]paiavov Ka(<rap[o]f rod tcvptov *Poi(fo Auh 

[k]Aco? rod JiokX€[o$] /irjrpbf Jidvprj^ 'Pov* 

<f>ta>vo9 dpyvpiov Upayjubv rerpaKovlcov 

irerrJJKovra hvrSKw l<f> inoOiJKjj r&v Si* 

a rod avroG 8av*iov SfiX&Oivrwv rod 



509. CONTRACTS 239 

20 'Po£<f>ou ivyainv, Kara Sh to frcpov ry T0- 

fii fLt\v\ tov kypptvov rptrov irovs ry 

tov *Pot<pov dpoyvrjabp dS€\<f><p AiokXu 

SXXcov dpyvpiov [8p]ayji8>v TtrpaKoawv 

Biica ?£ tcc<f>a[Xa(ov i<f>'] irrroOrJKfl r&v [81k 
25 tov avrov 8t)[Xo)0£vt<d]v kvy atony, &n[€p 

S&vtiA iai[t irapa ry 'HjpatcXqi, $ kcu QicT- 

[vai 



2. Tpaiapov Pap. ; so in 1. 15. 3. X by 2nd band. 4. fafiatios Pap. 8. on 

ripaKk(aros) by 2nd hand. 9. ayvia Pap. 12. i&iov Pap. 14. First c of wy> corr. 

from 9. 20. m of tvyawv corr. from c by 2nd hand. 

1 The 5th year of the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus, the 
30th of the month Caesareus, at Oxyrhynchus in the Thebaid. Stephanus also called 
AmoVs, son of Sosibius son of Apollophanes, his mother being Ptollarous daughter of 
Chaeremon, inhabitants of Oxyrhynchus, acknowledges to Heraclas son of Heraclas 
son of Harthonis, his mother being Demetrous, also of Oxyrhynchus, in the street, that 
he, Stephanus, the contracting party, has become security for two loans which Heraclas 
lent from his own money through the record-office at the said city, the first being in the 
month of Mecheir of the 2nd year of Trajanus Caesar the lord to Rufus son of Diocles 
son of Diocles, his mother being Didyme daughter of Rufion, for 450 silver drachmae 
bearing interest secured upon a mortgage of the real property of Rufus stated in the loan, 
the second being in Tubi of the following 3rd year to Rufus' full brother Diocles for 
416 more silver drachmae upon a mortgage of his real property stated in the loan, which 
loans are in Heraclas 1 possession, and Heraclas has the right . . . ' 



500. Modification of an Agreement. 

19*7 x 8<7 cm* Late second century. 

This draft-agreement, in which the names of the principal parties arc not 
given, is a modification of a previous contract by which the writer had appointed 
a representative to collect a debt owed to him at Alexandria. The debt having 
been paid in the meantime, the writer now limits the duty of his representative 
to issuing a receipt for it. For contracts appointing representatives cf. 04, 07, 
and 261. The document is written on the verso of 507. 



240 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Tk rm Xa£pei[v.\ rp heor&aff fjfii- 

pa avvioTTjird <r€ [icar]4 Stj/jlSo-lov XPW 1 " 

Tic/ibp 8ia rod [i]v{6)6.8e dp^elou dirai- 

rf\<rovra Tdiov Mi/Jj^fiuoy K[o]pvo€- 
5 Oov rbv teal IIo\v8€vkt)v 6vra h 'A\e£av- 

8p€ia rb tear i/ii ij/iiav pipo? r&v 6<fxi- 

Xo/iiv&v inf avrov ry KXrjpovojjLTjaav- 

n inrb rod airrod irarp6$ /iov a5cA0t- 

8<p [a)vrod c H/)a/cXc% t$ xal 'Afioirp, 
10 rvy[xd]v<D Si ir€ir\r)po<j>oprifiivo9 

T0T9 6<f>€i\ofiivoi9 fioi, 6fio\c[y& 

rb{v) avcrraTUcbv neirvrjo-Oal o[o]i 

irpb* rb f^^vov riju diroyfty] 

iKSoOijt^a^ai inrb ac[d r]oi? 8rj/ioa(o(i9) 
15 firjSev \apj3dvoPT(o9) teal diro\€- 

aai riju iiroOtfKrjv, 81a rb i/ii 

&s irpSiccirai ifSt) direo-xt)- 

Ktvai KaO' a iie86/irjy 1816- 

ypa<f>a yf[d/i/i]ara, teal /ifj8iv 
20 hicaktiv 7rc[/)i pr}\8tvbs air\&$. 

4. ya'tov Pap. 12. 1. nerroujirdat. 1 3. Final v of \mvov corr. from e. 

' A to B, greeting. To-day I appointed you by a public deed drawn up through the 
record-office here as my representative to collect from Gaius Memmius Cornutus also 
called Polydeuces, who is at Alexandria, my share of the sums owed by him to my said 
father's heir, his nephew Heraclides also called Amoitas, but it happens that I have been 
paid the debt in full. I acknowledge that the contract of representation has been made 
with you for the sole purpose of your issuing a receipt to the officials without receiving 
anything, and for cancelling the mortgage, because I have, as aforesaid, already received 
the money as stated in the autograph receipts which I have issued, and I make no 
claim on any matter whatever/ 

7-9. The relationship of the different persons mentioned in this contract is rather 
difficult to make out, especially owing to the omission of the names of the principals. 
Apparently the father of the man who speaks in the first person had bequeathed certain 
sums owing to himself at his death to his nephew Heraclides with the stipulation that 
half of them was to be paid to his son. rod avrov in 1. 8 refers to the father (of ro), 
whose name would be given in the actual contract, avrov in 1. 9 also refers to the father. 



510. RECEIPTS 241 

(/) RECEIPTS. 

510. Repayment of a Loan. 

I 4-5Xi3'5 **• a.d. 101. 

Acknowledgement by Artemidorus of the sum of 47a drachmae, being the 
repayment of a loan to Dionysius and his wife, together with the interest and 
other expenses connected with the transaction. 



rovroy . . . [ 20 letters ]v[ 10 letters 
vov prjrpb? Ta[v]<r€ipios rfjs [. . .]a>7T . [. .] dirb W&fiOtm 
dvrjXicarov per a KvpCov rod avrod dvSpbt Aiowaiov 
iv dyvia diri^iv nap aur&v dpyvpiov Htfiacrrov vopfo- 
5 /mclto? 8pa%fia9 rerpaKoo'tas i/38ofiJJKOvra Svo kc- 
<f>aXa(ov as iSdveiaev avroh Kara 8avetov ovvypa- 
fflv r^v T€\€ia>0€Ta , av Sia rod iv rjj avrfj '0£vp6y- 
\odv 7r6\€i /iinj/iovcCov r$ rptroy Iti Tpaiavov Kafoapo? 
rod Kvptov firjvl Kaiaapeicp eh dir68oaiv irip.wrr\v 

10 kirayopivoov rod l£rj$ rerdprov irovs inl {nroOJJKfl roh 
vndp\ov[a]i ra> Aiovvatcp iv rjj irpoKeifiivy W&fiOci 
f)p[r\ar€i pepei yfretX&v rbiroav Kal pipean oUtas 
avfiirtirrtoKvh]? Kal r)p(<rei pipa ire pas oUtas 
Kal r&v ravrrj? xprjorrjpbov Kal pepeari ire pas ot- 

15 tctas Kal avXrjs Kal yfreiX&v rfmtov Kal irp&repov 

KXavSiov Oicovos iv rg avrfj ¥a>j80€[i] oUta Kai aiOphp 
Kal iripoif Xpr}OTr]p(ois* 81b Xvaiv iroiovpevos 
6 9 Apr€fii[8co]pc[s] rfj? vnoOrJKrjs avr60i dva8i8o>- 
K€V oh 6poXoy€i rfjv iirifyopov rod 8av*tov 

20 avvypafflv Kal ra r&v reXwv oijp/3oXa eh dKi- 
paxriv, irpoara7T€o-)(7}K€vai 8i nap avr&v Kal rovs 
rod avrov Ke[<p]aXa(ov Hkovs Kal & dujjrrirai ri- 
A17, /tijrc avrbv 'Aprtpi&opov prjV dXXov inrip 

R 



242 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

avrov kvKaKuv /itj8 9 iyKa\€<r€iv fiyo" otc- 
25 [\€v<TC<r6ai oh 6]/io\oy€i /irj8i [[re]) T0T9 trap airratv 
[ 23 letters ] • • • *[•]??"/ • [• • 



5. Second a of rerpoKoa-ias corr. from o or or. 7. cv corr. from re. IO. o of crow 
com from t. 13. c of fupti corr. from a. 18. Second a of apaMc&icw corr. from c 

22. First v of avrou corr. from a. 23. 1. /«;&€ for fup-€. 

1 . . . her mother being Tausiris daughter of ... , from Psobthis in the eastern 
toparchy, with her guardian her said husband Dionysius, acknowledges the receipt from 
them (the agreement being made in the street) of the capital sum of 472 silver drachmae 
of the Imperial coinage, lent by him to them in accordance with a contract of loan 
executed through the record-office in the same city of Oxyrhynchus in the month Caesareus 
of the 3rd year of Trajanus Caesar the lord, and to be repaid on the 5th intercalary day of 
the following 4th year, on the security of property of Dionysius in the aforesaid Psobthis 
consisting of a half-share of some open plots of land and shares of a house that has 
fallen in and a half-share of a second house and its fixtures and shares of another house 
and court and open plots and the house and yard and other fixtures formerly belonging 
to Claudius Theon at the said Psobthis. Artemidorus accordingly in release of the 
mortgage has forthwith handed over to the other parties to the agreement the binding 
contract of loan and the tax-receipts to be cancelled, and acknowledges the further receipt 
from them of the interest upon the capital sum and the taxes which have been demanded 
from him, and that neither Artemidorus himself nor any other person on his behalf either 
makes or will make any claim or will proceed against the other parties to the agreement . . .' 

3. For the omission of roirapxla after amjXi&Tov cf. 533. 17. 
7. rcAfcodficrap : cf. 289. 9, note. 

19. rfjy eirl<f>opov tov davtiov <rvvypa(f>fip I cf. 266. 1 4 ?j]s (sc. ovyypa(f>rjf) ttjp erri<fx>pop 
aMBcv dradc&MfVtu. This use of arlfopos is derived from the common formula at the end 
of contracts of loan Kvpla fj 6fwkoyia namxjq ciru^cpo/icVi; Kak irarr\ r$ im<f>*pom (cf. 269. 
12, &C.). 

20. TfXwv: the tax on mortgages is meant; cf. 511. 4-5, note. 



511. Acknowledgement of Loan. 

13-3 x 7 «»• A.D. 103. 

A receipt for 16 drachmae lent by Didymus to Harmiusis to enable the 
latter to pay the amount of the tax upon a mortgage. The loan was only 
a temporary accommodation, to be returned immediately. The writing is across 
the fibres of {he papyrus. 



511. RECEIPTS 243 

'Apfiivo-is 6 Kal 'HpatcXd? 

A[i]8vfico Sapantevos 8tj/jlo- 

ate d(f>po8(iaia<rrji ?) yatptiv. e\a> 

irapa aoO Xirrrbv riXos 
5 6Tro$rJK(rf)t rfj? kirl rod 

y (?rot/y) Tpaiavov Katcrapos 

rod fcvpCov dpyvpiov Spa- 

XP&9 SiKa *£, / (Spax/iai) *r, &s 

Kal diroStoaco aoi iirl 
10 r&y rbnrwv ycvSficvos 

dvwr€p04r(os. 

(trow) ( AvTQKpdropo? 

Kalaapot Ntpova Tpaiavc[v 

2€J3acrro€ TepfiauiKoO 
15 AaKiKod Qa>0 q. 

2. » of ^ifjunrw above the line. 4. 1. \0tn6v. 5. « of im-o^*^)* above the line. 

11. r of <wm*p8rr<»s above the line. 15. 6<o of &»6 over an erasure. 

' Harmiusis also called Heraclas to Didymus son of Sarapion, keeper of a public 
ctypftaiop, greeting. I have received from you the remainder of the tax upon a mortgage 
of the 3rd year of Trajanus Caesar the lord, namely 16 drachmae of silver, total 
16 drachmae, which I will repay to you when I arrive on the spot without delay. The 
7th year of the Emperor Caesar Nerva Trajanus Augustus Germanicus Dacicus, Thoth 6/ 

2-3. btjfuxrl^ a<f>pod(tcrta<njj ?) : the papyrus is rubbed and the reading somewhat 
uncertain, but though itypoJWiacrr^ does not seem to occur elsewhere it is a likely enough 
word. On the afoodicria of the Ptolemaic period cf. P. Tebt I. 6. 29, note. The present 
passage supports the view that the. supply of hcupai in Roman times was a monopoly of the 
government; cf. P. Grenf. II. 41 and Fay. Towns, pp. 149 sqq. 

4-5. reXof vtroOrjK^: c£ 848, 510. 20. The amount of the tax upon mortgages, 
which is also known by the more general term cycvftXtoy, is shown by 248 to have been 
2 per cent, payable by the mortgagee. 

6. y (how) : the receipt being dated in the 7th year, Harmiusis' payment was four 
years in arrear. This seems a remarkably long period, but the figure before (frow), 
though nibbed, is certainly y and not ?. 



R % 



1 



244 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

512. Payment for Fodder. 

11.5x10.3 cm. a.d. 173. 

An acknowledgement to Apion, an ex-gymnasfarch, from Dorion, an ex- 
exegetes, that he had bought green-stuff produced by Apion for 1720 drachmae. 
Of this sum 600 drachmae were paid to Apion, and the rest was to be paid 
to the agents of the heirs of Aurelius Antiochus, who were no doubt Apion's 
landlords and thus received approximately § the value of the crop. 

A<op(a>v ifayrjTtvo'a? Kal <&? XP9~ 
/tar/]fo> 'Airfavt r$ Kal Atowaico yu- 
pvamapxftaravTi) koI d>9 XPW ar (^ C£9 ) X a ^* l, '• ^7^ 
paaa napa aoO a ?X € '* ^ v hwQ&vi \Xoopa 
5 ivrbs irepix&paTOS Sa/i^ov\tuov Ac- 

yofJiev[o]u {Spayji&v) 'AyjtK, i£ 2>v perefiaX^- 
/irjy <tol (8pa)(jia$) % raj 8i Xoinas (8paxjias) *ApK /i€Ta- 
flaXov/iai irpay/iaTtvraif KXripovS/uov 
AvprjXtou 'AvTiSxpv dtcoXovdoos rfj e/y 
10 <ri fiicrOcocri, Kal rijv to6t<dv diro^fjv 
dvaSdxTCD aoi. (Ztovs) ty AvprjXtou 
'AvTwtvou Katcrapos rod tcvpiov 
$afi€t>wO ifi. 

4. v of <rov corr. from «. 

'Dorion, ex-exegetes and however he is styled, to Apion also called Dionysius, 
ex-gymnasiarch and however he is styled, greeting. I have bought from you the green- 
stuffs of the land which you have on lease within the surrounding-dyke called that of 
Sampsouchinus for 1720 drachmae; of which sum I have paid you 600 drachmae and 
will pay the remaining 11 20 drachmae to the agents of the heirs of Aurelius Antiochus 
in accordance with the terms of your lease, and I will deliver to you the receipt for them. 
The 13th year of Aurelius Antoninus Caesar the lord, Phamenoth 12.' 



513. RECEIPTS 245 

513. Receipt for Sale of Confiscated Property. 

34.2x11-7 cm. a.d. 184. 

An acknowledgement from Diogenes to Serenus of the receipt of 705 
drachmae 3 obols 3 chalci. This sum had been paid by Diogenes to the State 
in A.D. 181 as the price (including extra payments) of some confiscated house- 
property, which had been sold to him by the strategus at an auction. Two years 
later however a much higher bid for the .property, amounting to three times 
that of Diogenes, was made by Serenus, to whom it was assigned by the 
dioecetes, the arrangement of the strategus being thus overridden. In the present 
document Diogenes acknowledges that he has been repaid by Serenus the sum 
which he had expended on the purchase. The papyrus throws some interesting 
light upon the methods of the government in dealing with confiscated property, 
and incidentally provides important information with regard to the banks at this 
period ; cf. notes on 11. 7 and 37. 

[Aioytvrjs 6 teal Aiovvarios SjaparrloDvo? tov 'Epptov [$v\a- 

£c6[a]k[d<T(rao9 6 ku]1 fA\0a]ici>9 2cpjp<p QiXtaKov rod 2[apa- 

irfovo? fJLTjrpb? *EXivris An 9 0£vp1ryxa>v nSXecDS x[a(p€iv. 

€7T€i €Kvpa>0rju Airb N€/i€<riavov rod OTparriyJj- 
5 aarrof tov vo/ioG ry Scvripy teal €ikoot& 

2ti AiprjXiov Kop/i68[o]v 'Avrwtvov 

Kataapo? rod fcvpiov firji/[l f A]8piavov dnb dirpd- 

tow TTjs 8ioiKTJa€a>? olrfjav] Kal aXOpiov Kal av- 

Xfjv aifv xptiOTTjpbis b\vra kn] dfi<f>68ov AvkUhv 
10 nap€fif}o\rjs irp6r€p[ov Sapalprtcovos yevoptvov 

[•] • !7 € • [']Y 0V T€Ta P T [ ] ™ v TV* ovvTCi/irj- 

[(T€]a>? 8payjiS>v i£aK[oa(a>v k]clI t&v lirofiivw, #c[ai 

[Ta6]Tas 7rap€ypd(f>rjy inb i[ov tov] vopod flaaiXiKov 

[ypap]paT€C09 IlepiKXiovs a[i>]v 7rpo<r8taypa<pofjL€v[oi? 
15 \kv] 8paxpcu9 ifcdKcxrtais rpi&Kovra inra Tpio>(36Xo> 

[&]fxotco9 Kal inr^p t6kov 8evrepov Kal cIkocttoD (tqvs 

[8p]a\{fias) Tpi&Kovra ivvia rprnfioXov i\p.i<*$kX{iov) %aX(Kovs!) r[/>?y] Kal 
TptTOV Kal €//c[o- 

[aro]D irovs 8payjihs cfico<n 8kt& 6floX(oi>s) 8io [fj]/iio>l3€X(iov), ytvovrai t6- 



246 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

[/coir] 8payjial i^Kc[y]ra 6kto> %aXKot rph, Suypa^a 8\ us rb 

20 [Sri/i]6aioy riy rfj? Ttipfjs rrj? oUtas uiviravri 
[8p]ayjih$ IfcaKoatas TpidKovra iirrh Tpi&floXov 
[dfJLo](a>? Kal Thy t&kov rbv [6]v[6]/iaT( fiov irapaypa- 
[<p(]rra 6v(ra) i'v Spayjiais ltfrfo]rra 6kt&> xoXkois rpiai, &v 
[ko\1 to\ avpfioXa inl vnoypa<pfjs pov tov Aioykvovs tov 

25 [k]oI Aiovvaiov dviSatca o\ol ry S]^p7]y<p Ivetca tov v- 
[n]€pl3e(i\f}<T0ai t^v TrpoK*iyAvr\v oUiav imb aov 
[to]9 Scprjvov Kal dvafiefit(fi£)a6ai eh 8payjihs ^uXtas 
[6K\raKoatas Kal napadeSfoOat aoi raArr\v 4£ iirioro- 
[Xfjs t]oG Kparlarov 8ioikt)tov Ovcari8iov 'P[o]v<l>€tv[o]u 

30 [.....]. [•]? roG o[T]paTriyjjo'arro9 t$ ivear&ri Tci[d]p- 
[t]<» Kal eUoorip irei Mtytip TpiaKa8i r&v 8pa\p&v 
[X\€i\ta>v dKTaKoafov Kal r&v iiro[fi]ivw Kal rbv 
(3aai[\i]Kbv irapa[y]€ypa<f>£i/ai <re aKoXovOcos $ pe- 
t£8g>K€v irpoaypdtjxp /lerit rfc 8iaypa<f>ctaas vir ipov 

35 [8]pax/JL&? IfcaKoaias t3ls Xoiirto 8payjihs \eiXCas 81a- 
Koarias Kal rk tovt<ov irpoar8iaypa<p6p€va, SpoXoyA 
[jcjarek irpoa<jxivrjaiu 'Empdypv da\oXovpivov cov^y rfjs 
[iir]l rod npbs 9 0£vpvy\oiv nSXei Sapairctov Tpairefys anw- 
[XqK]kvai fie iraph aov &s 8iiypa^a <J>y irp&K€iTat vntp fikv 

40 [ri/ifj]? Kal npoa8iaypa<po/iiv<»v Spayyifc l£aKoaia$ Tpid- 

[Kov)ra inrit (rpu&floXov) virip 8e t&kov 8pa^fihs IfcfJKovra ojctcd 
[j(olX(ko€s) TpTs,] riff iirl Tb airrb Spayjifa iirraKoalas irivrc Tpi&fioXov 

XoXkoOs 
[t/>Zt, Kal prj]8ey aoi IvkoXuv prjSi kvKaXiauv /iJJt€ 
[irepl to]vWo>v fJii]8i ire pi AXXov prjSeyb? dirX&s pi\pi 

45 [ttjs €v]€OTo>o'T)s, Kal kdv tis CrJTrjai? nepl toUtov irpbs ak yc- 
[vrjTai] 1j toOs iraph aov fieTaXrjpyjropiyovs iyi> airbs Tod- 
[to dv]a8i£o/iai. napebv 8k 8 irarfp pov Sapamcov 'Eppiov i\oD 
['Epfihv S]ooo-iK6apio9 6 Kal 'AXdcucds [[6]] €v8c[k]€i to[i\9 
[frpoK]€i/i4poi9. icvpta fj diro^fi. ((tovs) k8 AvTOKpdropos Kahrapos 

50 [MdpKo]v A[vp]rjX(ov Ko/i/iSSov 'Avtcovlvov SefJacrrov Evccfiovs 
\Ap/i€vi]aKoD Mrj8iKov IlapOiKov SappariKov TeppaviKov Mtyurrov 



613. RECEIPTS 247 

[......] (2nd hand) Aioykvq? 6 Kal Aiovvaios Hapanicwo? 4>v\a£i6a- 

[\d<r<rc]ios 6 Kal 'AXOaievs dnioypv napa tov Heprjvov ras 
[irpotceifiivas] itrl rb avrb 8pa\pa? lirraKoarlas 
65 [vim-* Tpi]d>fio\ov x<x\kovs rpefy irX^pi/y Kal oti- 

[8kv aVT]§ hKaX& OVT€ 7T*pi TOVTOV 0VT€ ITCpl £X\0V 

[ov8€]vb9 &7r\&s &9 irp6ic€iTai, Kal idv ti? C^tti- 

[019] ncpi tovtov yivrjTCLi irpbs avrbv 1} tov? clvtov 

[iya>] ainhs to9t[o] dva8i£ofiai. (3rd hand) Seprjvos $i\(<tkov tov %apa- 
60 [iri<x>vo$] prjTpbs x E\ivr][$ e]v8oK& T019 npoicei/icvois #c[ai] iayov to, 

[<riifij3]o\a l<f> torofypa^y] <rod [<fcy npSJKUTcu. (4th hand) Sapcnrfav 

^Ep]ntov tov 'Ejj[/i(ov 2aHnK6a]pios 8 Kal [AX- 

[0]ai€vs €v8c[k& iraat rofy irpo]K€ip€[vois. 

(5th hand) [ f E]7T€l<p 8.[ }.t koXX .[ 

65 K€Xprj(jidTiOTai?) [ J 

7. 1. 'Ajftpuwy. 14. ovs of ircpixAcot* COIT. from »*. 1 9. c of duypa^a COIT. from cu 

28. o of napadtdovBcu corr. from a, 29. 1. Ovcmdiov. 46. v of fieraktjfi^ofuvovs COIT. 

from r. 

( Diogenes also called Dionysius, son of Sarapion son of Hermias, of the Phylaxitha- 
lassian tribe and Althaean deme, to Serenus son of Philiscus son of Sarapion, his mother 
being Helene, of Oxyrhynchus, greeting. Whereas I was assigned by Nemesianus, then 
strategus of the nome, in the 22nd year of Aurelius Commodus Antoninus Caesar the lord 
in the month Hadrianus from the unsold property of the Treasury a house, yard, and 
court with the fixtures, situated in the quarter of the Lycians' Camp, previously owned 
by Sarapion, late . . . , at 600 drachmae according to the valuation and the extra payments, 
and whereas I was registered by the basilico-grammateus of the nome, Pericles, as owing 
this sum together with the additional payments, making 637 drachmae 3 obols, and likewise 
for interest for the 22nd year 39 drachmae 3^ obols 3 chalci, and as interest for the 23rd year 
28 drachmae 2^ obols, making a total of 68 drachmae 3 chalci for interest, and whereas 
I paid into the public bank for the price of the house in all 637 drachmae 3 obols and 
likewise for the interest debited to me the sum of 68 drachmae 3 chalci, the receipts 
for which payments with the signature of me, Diogenes also called Dionysius, I have 
delivered to you, Serenus, because you have made a higher bid for the aforesaid 
house and have raised the price to 1800 drachmae, and the property has been made 
over to you by a letter of his highness the dioecetes, Ventidius Rufinus . . . , ex-strategus, 
in the present 24th year on Mecheir 30 for the 1800 drachmae and extra payments, 
and the basilico-grammateus has debited you in accordance with the supplementary 
note which he has issued, after reckoning the 600 drachmae paid by me, with the remaining 
1200 drachmae and the additional payments: I acknowledge that in accordance with 
a communication of Epimachus who farms the bank at the Serapeum at Oxyrhynchus 
I have received from you the sums which I paid as aforesaid, for the price and the 
additional payments 637 drachmae 3 obols and for interest 68 drachmae 3 chalci, making 



248 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

a total of 705 drachmae 3 obols 3 chalci, and that I neither have nor will have any claim 
against you with regard to this or any other matter whatever up to the present day, 
and if any action is brought against you or your assigns with regard to this, I will 
take the responsibility upon myself. My father Sarapion son of Hermias son of Hermias, 
of the Sosicosmian tribe and Althaean deme, being present consents to the aforesaid. This 
receipt is valid. The 24th year of the Emperor Caesar Marcus Aurelius Commodus 
Antoninus Augustus Pius Armeniacus Medicus Parthicus Sarmaticus Germanicus Maximus 
... I, Diogenes also called Dionysius, son of Sarapion, of the Phylaxithalassian tribe and 
Althaean deme, have received from Serenus the aforesaid total of 705 drachmae 3 obols 
3 chalci in full, and I have no claim against him with regard to this or any other matter 
whatever, as aforesaid, and if any action is brought against him or his in connexion with 
this, I will take the responsibility upon myself. I, Serenus son of Philiscus son of 
Sarapion, my mother being Helene, consent to the aforesaid provisions and have received 
the receipts with your signature as aforesaid. I, Sarapion son of Hermias son of Hermias, 
of the Sosicosmian tribe and Althaean deme, consent to all the aforesaid porvisions. 
Epeiph 4, executed . . .' 

I. [«vXa]£id[a]X[dcnrcioff 6 kol), ['AX6a]icvr : cf. 1. 52 and 477. 7-8, note. It is curious 
that the father of Diogenes belonged to a different tribe; cf. 1. 48 sjaxnK&rptof 6 *a\ 
'Wdauvt. Since the Phylaxithalassian was in all probability an Alexandrian tribe (cf. 
Kenyon, Archvo^ II. p. 78) it is most likely that the Sosicosmian was also Alexandrian. 

7. chrpartav -rijs diot*i)<re<»f : the present passage serves to explain B. G. U. 18, a papyrus 
which caused Wilcken some difficulty ; cf. OsL I. pp. 505-6. The eV an par on xmdpxowa there 
were no doubt, as here, confiscated land and houses, and the commission appointed by the 
basilico-grammateus was limited to the assessment (cn/vri^o-aaAu B. G. U. 4; cf. 1. n, 
here) of this particular kind of property and has no reference to a valuation of private 
property in general. The oi/prt/upru was a kind of reserve price serving as a basis for 
higher offers; cf. the distinction drawn in 500. 13-4 between the regular rent of fyfuxria yrj 
and the arifapa or increase. 

II. The vestiges of the first word would suit [dp]x*yc»[/i]yov ; cf. 477. 4. But we 
hesitate to introduce that rare and curious tide here, especially as rrrapr[ is quite obscure. 

12. For brofjJvup in connexion with the purchase of confiscated property cf. P. Amh. 97. 
14. We explained the in6^va there as referring to the np6<rodot y or yearly payment to the 
State, mentioned in. P. Brit. Mus. 164. But it would also be possible to refer the h?6^va 
to the irp<xrkaypa<t>6iitva and t6k<h which are added on here in 11. 14 sqq. to the original 
600 drachmae of the avmlfirjatt. The npoadiaypa<f>6fuva here amount to 6£ per cent on the 
600 drachmae. 

16. t6kov: though Diogenes bought the property in Hadrianus (Choiak) of the 
22nd year, he seems not to have paid the purchase price until towards the middle of 
the 23rd year. Hence the necessity for interest. 

37. dtrx°* av l JL ** ov *> v n* *%* • • • Tpancfo : this passage which clearly indicates that the 
bank at the Serapeum was farmed out by the government throws quite a new light upon 
the relation of the State to the banks in the Roman period From Rev. Laws lxxiii sqq. 
it was known that under the Ptolemies the banks other than the fkurdugal rpamCai were 
farmed out by the government; cf. Wilcken, Ost. I. p. 635. But in the absence of any 
indications in the Roman period that the banks called by names of individuals were 
anything but private banks, it has generally been supposed that the bank-monopoly 
enjoyed by the Ptolemaic government had been abolished (cf. op. cit. p. 647). But it is 
clear that in the case of this bank at any rate the privilege of administering it had to 



514. RECEIPTS 249 

be bought from the government ; and it is noticeable that in 81. 8 sqq., written four years 
later than 513, tmrrjprjTni of the bank at the Serapeum are mentioned, and the Epimachus 
who issues the vvfox*™ (91. 11) is probably identical with the Epimachus here. Since 
tmrrjpriTai are commonly found in connexion with »w/ (op. cit. p. 599), the two papyri 
point to the same conclusion, and raise the problem how far the banks which are simply 
called by the name of an individual were really private. The bank at the Serapeum 
is mentioned in previous reigns (cf. 98. 8, 264, 7) under the names of different persons, 
and more probably they were either the daxokov^evoi or the cn-m^Mp-ai of it than the owners. 
If this be granted, the persons who elsewhere give their names to banks may well be 
to a large extent, if not wholly, in the same position, and the condition of the banking 
business in the Roman period would not differ very much from that in the Ptolemaic. 
One change however can be traced; the drjfiwria rpairc{a plays a less important rdle in 
Roman times than the paaCKucfj rpmrtfa had done previously, for most private trans- 
actions were in the Roman period conducted through the ZdionKat Tpairt(<u (cf. 305), whereas 
under the Ptolemies the existence of banks other than /WiAikcu is only known from the 
Revenue Papyrus. A tax called Tpmr(*Ci>Tuc6v ?) occurs in 674, being perhaps a charge for 
the maintenance of the official banks. 



514. Receipt for Salary. 

6-4x12 cm. a. D. 1 90-1. 

A receipt for an dyfr&viov of 400 drachmae, addressed to twa collectors of the 
corn-revenues by an unnamed person who was very likely a (woAoyos, since 
he undertakes the registration (Karaxvpurpfa) of the account-books ; cf. 516. 
The writer has made so many erasures and interlinear additions that the con- 
struction is in parts obscure. The papyrus was written in the 31st year of 
Commodus. 

1 NtCXcp XprfaiaTi{ovTi) fiijT^iy) Xorffiioi) koI T<p <rbv ai{r^) dircurriT(ji) 

ai(riK&v) 

2 <f>6pcov r&y iv TaXai> ^ix6vTa>yft irtpl Sivapi 

7€H}/i(otoj) rod 9i*k($&vroi) K (Jtrovi) 

3 x a &P €ly y % a X 0V na P ty&v tinkp* i^aviov apyv{ptov) (Bpayjihs) v, 

4 rod Karax<opKr/Jt(pv) rS>v fJif}\{ta>v) ftovr teal rrjs .dwatiftirmtfft 

W?v 

5 py irenolri/iai irpoxiptfas ?) &ir(Lp) rrjs a iv TaX(aa>) ?x<<ito? ?) w(*/k ?) 

Sivapir &r(oy)]] 
[[7r/ody i/iaf^ 

2. tv below OTT9 which is crossed through. 3. v/mot Pap, 



1 



250 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

* To Nilus, stated as the son of SoeYis, and bis colleague in the collection of the corn- 
revenues due at Talao and in the district near Sinaru for the produce of the past 30th 
year, greeting. I have received from you as my salary 400 drachmae, I being responsible 
for the registration of the books/ 

2. It is not clear with what wr(«» is to be connected. The analogy of 1. 5 suggests 
that it governs iw, but from its position after 6<f>€iX6»n{t»v) it would seem to refer to 

ycvrj^fiaros). 

5. a with a stroke over it may be either ai(roO) or {np6rtpop). 



515. Receipt for Taxing-Lists. 

U-7XI4-6"** a.d. 134. 

A receipt issued by the keepers of the public record-office at Oxyrhynchus 
to the sitologi of certain districts in the nome, stating that they had registered 
in the records various account-books of these officials. Cf. P. Amh. 69, 
a statement by sitologi that they had registered (KaraxvpCfav is used as here) 
their account-books with certain officials appointed to take them to Alexandria. 

$tA(o7to? Kal 'HpwSrjs f}if3\(io<pv\atC€9) &y/£o(<nW) \6yav Xaipftjiovi) Kal 

IlairtHyrSnrC) aird\(6yois) 
Movtp(ov) t6V(w) Kal 'HpaK\(€l8g) cri(ToA6yy) Styyt^ ) t6Vt(o>p) Kal 

Aioinfabp) yeuofi(iva>) Mf/i( ) rbnipv) yatptiv. 
KaT€X<oplaOfj jjfieur 81a 'AttoHXodv'lov) yp(afipaT€<os) tj} X rod $afi€vwO rot) 

irj (crot/y) 
K A8piavod Kalaapos toD Kvplov iKdarrjs airoXfpytas) Kar &v8pa oywXj- 

(paxrecos) 
5 (nvpov) yarijp(aTos) i£ (Jfrot/s), Kal Xaiprjp(cov) Kal IlaircHyr&i) J&ovipipv) 

r(m(wv) Kal 'Hpakkfatdtis) 
2iry*( ) r6a(wr) [rd] firjviafoy M K€<pa\ato(v) rod M*y*tp, Kal 6 XaiprjQiaw) 
Kal IIairc(w&si) pdvoi Movlp{ov) r(m{a>v) Kal pt]yiaio(y) $a/icv&>0 Kal 

fi€Ta\6yio(y) 
Kar dy8pa ia8o\rj9. (2nd hand) Oea>y ypHapiiartbs) a€<ri]Qi€(oopat). 

1 Philiscus and Herodes, keepers of the public records, to Chaeremon and Papontos, 
sitologi of the Monimus district, and Heraclides, sitologus of the Sink . . . district, and 



516. RECEIPTS 251 

Dionysius, ex-sitologus of the M . . . district, greeting. There has been registered with us 
through the scribe Apollonius on Phamenoth 30 of the 18th year of Hadrianus Caesar 
the lord the detailed list for each sitologus-district of the supplementary payments of 
wheat-produce for the 17th year, and by Chaeremon and Papontos for the Monimus 
district and by Heraclides for the Sink . . . district the monthly summary for Mecheir, 
and by Chaeremon and Papontos only for the Monimus district both the monthly summary 
for Phamenoth and the secondary detailed list of receipts. Signed by me, Theon, scribe.' 

2. 2<i7*( ) roir(»y) : no doubt identical with 2iwc( ) in 517. 6. 

Mf/i( ) : the second letter is more like *, but the /* above the line is fairly certain, 
being just like the second p of MowV(ov). 

3. Apollonius was probably the scribe of the sitologi, since the scribe of the 0i£A«x£v- 
AoKfff, who appends his signature at the end, is called Theon. 

7. fA€Ta\oyin{v) : this word, which is new, would seem to be connected with the phrase 
fura \6yop which occurs in Fayum tax-receipts (cf. P. Fay. Towns 53. 2-3, note), and 
to indicate a second tax-list giving the details of the individual payments, as contrasted with 
the fujmuov which only gave the totals. 



516. Order for Payment in Kind. 

i8«3X9-i cm. a.d. 160. 

Authorization addressed to the sitologi by Dionysius, a victor in the games 
and late exegetes, for the payment to Apion of a quantity of wheat. 619-32 
are a series of similar notices to the sitologi, another specimen of which is 88. 
These aworoAiicd (cf. 533. 4) appear to be, so far, peculiar to Oxyrhynchus; 
and clearly indicate that the sitologi, besides receiving dues to the government, 
undertook the storage of grain for private individuals, the public granaries thus 
presenting the closest analogy to the public banks. The correlatives of these 
orders on the sitologi are found in the receipts issued by them stating that 
a certain payment had been made, e.g 617-8. Those two documents are clearly 
concerned with private transactions, notwithstanding the opening formula pcpl- 
Tpri(vrai) efr to br}fx6<nov ; and they show that caution must be exercised in the 
explanation of other sitologus receipts from the Fayum and elsewhere, which 
need not refer to payments to the government of rent or taxes in the absence 
of an express statement to that effect. Cf. also 501. 18, 34, 36, and 533. 24. 

Aiovvaios Qatitrrov rod kolI 
'Ajjufxhvos t&v UpoviK(Siv) 
Kal ifayrjTevK&Tfov) rfj? 'Ofcvfa&fXfDv) 
w6\€G)$ Slit t I2pia>yo9 ypa/ipaT^im) 



252 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

5 <rtroA(6yois) fJL€<TTjs r<yn{ap\(as) KepKev(pdb<r€<os) r(m(c(iv) 
yatpnv. 8iaore[\aT€ 

&9 ?X €r * l JL0V * v Q*P aTl 

irvpoG yevrjft(aTOsi) rod 8t€\(06vros) fey (Ztovs) 
'AvTwdvov Kaiaapos rod Kvpiov 
10 AirUavi 'Airhovo? dprd^ai) 

cfccxn 7T€it[€] tf/JLiov xof(wcas) evvea, 

/ (dprdfJcu) kc (fj/iiov) \(o(vik€s) 0. (ctovs) k8 Avrcovdvov 
Kataapo? rod Kvptov 'AOvp tea. 
2nd hand 'Airitov 'Airfafyos) kirfjvsyKa. 

'Dionysius son of Faustus also called Amphion, a victor in the games and sometime 
exegetes of Oxyrhynchus, through Horion, scribe, to the sitologi of the district of 
Kerkeurosis in the middle toparchy, greeting. Supply to Apion son of Apion of the wheat 
belonging to me from the produce of the past 23rd year of Antoninus Caesar the lord 
which you have on deposit 25^ artabae 9 choenices, total 25^ art. 9 choen. The 24th year 
of Antoninus Caesar the lord, Athur 21. (Signed) Presented by me, Apion son of 
Apion/ 

2. tvv UpomK^&v) : a UpoyUrjs or victor in one of the great games had special privileges ; 
cf. 59. 12-3, where a Upovuajs claims exemption from the duty of attending the praefect*s 
court at Alexandria, and P. Brit. Mus. 348. 6 tS>p Upovuc&v *cai art\&p. 

5. KtpK*v(pwrt»s) : cf. 625, where the name is written out. 



517. Receipt for Payment in Kind. 

10-5x5-6 cm. a.d. 130. 

Copy of a receipt issued by a sitologus and others stating that 30 artabae of 
wheat had been transferred from the account of Papontos to that of Sarapion. 
As explained in the introduction to the preceding text, both this papyrus 
and 518, which is similar in contents, have, every appearance of referring to 
transactions between private individuals; and they are to be regarded as 
certificates from the sitologi corresponding to orders for payment such as 516. 



J Cf. 612-7. 



¥c6/M(€<»9), 8i€<rrd\(Ti<rav) t$ 18 (Ira ?) 

dirb Swii^Ta) (dprdfiai) A, 
Mcfi€Tpr](irrcu) els rb 8rfp(6aiou) 



518. RECEIPTS 253 

(irvpov) y€rrjfi(aTos) 18 (erovs) 'A8piavov 
5 Kaiaapos tov Kvpiov 

Stii Qitovos o-iTo\(6yov) 2iyx( ) 

Kal iLurOani&v) 'HpcucXcldfau) 

*Avriov 'flpov Kal Hro\- 

Aar[o]? Sapairt[a>]yt 
10 'Hp&Sov dirb Oipaifps) 

IIairovT<ic>T(o$) Aoapo6(£ou) 

y€<opy(pd) {irvpov) (dprdfiai) rpi&KOv- 

ra irivTt, / (irvpov) (dprdfiai) Ac. 

r f2po$ 81a 2r€<pd(vov) yp(appaT€cos) <r€<rrj(ji€(a>ftai) 
15 ras tov (irvpod) (dprdfias) rpidicov- 

ra iriwe, / (irvpov) (dpTdfJat) Ae. 

ITroAAa? 81a At6pov 

ypapfjiari&s) atoyfietoofiai 

riy tov (irvpov*) (dprdfiasi) rptdKoirra 
20 new*, / (irvpov*) (dprdfJai) Ac. 

1 Psobthis, paid in the 14th year from Senepta, 30 artabae. Measured into the public 
granary, from the produce of the 14th year of Hadrianus Caesar the lord through Theon 
sitologus of Sink . . • and Horns and Ptollas, lessees of Heraclides son of Antias, to 
Sarapion son of Herodes out of the deposit of Papontos son of Dorotheus, cultivator, 
35 artabae of wheat, total 35 art. of wheat. (Signed) I, Horus, through Stephanus, 
clerk, have certified the 35 artabae of wheat, total 35 art. of wheat. I, Ptollas, through 
Diomus, clerk, have certified the 35 artabae of wheat, total 35 art. of wheat' 

1-2. Whether these two lines have any connexion with what follows is uncertain. 
They appear to have been written by the same hand as the rest of the text, but this fact 
does not establish any essential relationship since the handwriting of the signatures in 
1L 14-20 shows the receipt to be only a copy. 

6. 2<yic( ) : SC t6tt(ov ; cf. 515. 2. 



518. Receipt for Payment in Kind. 

10.7 x 8«9 cm. a. D. 179-180. 

Receipt for a payment through the sitologi of 4 artabae of wheat to the 
credit of Sarapion ; cf. introd. to the preceding papyrus. 



254 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

Me/iftrpijirrai) h to SrjQioaiov) (irvpov) yevftjiarosi) [rolp SieXQBSvrosi) 
10 (SFroi/y) AiprfXfaw 'Avravtvov 
teal Ko/i/i68ou Kaiardpoov r&v 

Kvptonv 81a at(ro\6y<ov) XiPUsi) r[o]ir{apxiasi) 'Enj[ ) r6ir(i»v) 
5 Sapo{ir](a>vi Xapivtov Oipfarosi) (dprdfiai) 8 

/ (irvpov) (dprdfiai ?) [8.] (and hand) Jioy(ivfjs) a^roXoyos) (retry p^fa/icu) 
ri* tov (irvpov) (dprdfiai) 8. 

6. (irvpov) after rov corr. 

* Measured into the public granary from the produce in wheat of the past 19th year 
of the Aurelii Antoninus and Commodus, Caesars and lords, through the sitologi of the 
district of Epi ... in the western toparchy to Sarapion son of Charisius a deposit of 
4 artabae, total 4 art. of wheat (Signed) I, Diogenes, sitologus, have certified the 
4 artabae of wheat' 

6. &ioy(anjs) : or perhaps A?o?. 



(g) ACCOUNTS. 

51& Account of Public Games. 

(a) 8-9 x 6 cm. f (b) 1 i-i x 6-6 cm. Second century. 

Two fragments, apparently in the same hand, though the writing is a little 
larger in one case than in the other, from accounts of receipts and expenditure 
in connexion with the public games at Oxyrhynchus. (a) gives a list of 
payments on Mecheir 23 for a theatrical entertainment, including the high sums 
of 496 drachmae to an actor, and 448 drachmae to a Homeric rhapsodist, besides 
payments for music and dancing. The other fragment (b) contains the end 
of a list of receipts which amounted to 500 drachmae 1 pbol in all, the exegetes 
and cosmetes contributing 95 drachmae 1 obol. There follows (11. 4-13) a list of 
payments in connexion with a religious procession (icaywurfo), which amounted 
to 124 drachmae 96 obols, the silver and copper being, as often, added up 
separately, and then (11. 14-6) another list of payments to gymnastic performers. 



L &irc666r] 
Megilp) Ky 



520. ACCOUNTS 255 



6fiT)pi<rrjj (8paxjtat) vfitj, 
5 xal tiirlp fi<n^(r]i[KTJs (8pa\ftat) . 
[i]pXH<rrS [(Spaxjiat)) g[.]* 



<*) 

air . . [. . . ira]p<k rod 4£i7(yiyTotf) {Spayjiat) /ifl, 

irapit, rod KwrfiriT^ov) (Spayjial) vy (fipLi&fiiXiov), 
' / (fy^XA 1 *^) <j> (6/3o\6$). 

10 L dvrj\(&OTi(rav) KcopaoraTs Nct\(ov) (Spatial) #c, 

K<»fia<rrats Ot&v (8paxn<u) v<>> 

ltnroK6/jLoi9 {Spayjiat) i<? 9 

Upo8ov(\ois) 18 6ftp\ol) n8, 

7r\ov{ ) Upo$ov(\oi$) (Spaxficu) #c, 

15 KJpvKi (Spaxfidl) 17, 

o-aXiriKTJj (Spayjial) 8, 

irat8tois dplarou 6f3(o\ol) <r, 

naX/i&v 6$p\ol) 9, 

/ L (*/ wt XA £aJ ) P kS iftpXol) <p. 
20 [. .] . a( ) TravKpaiiiaoriJ) {8payjtat\ . [. . 

[. .]avtovt dvray(<ovi<TTJ)) (Spayjiat) [ 

[. .] . vt wSktji /ifi.( ) i[ 



1. L (cf. 11. 10 and 19) is the sign for subtraction. 

14. Though v is written above the line, wXov was perhaps meant 

18. iraXp&r : probably from a Graecized form of palma. 



520. Account of a Sale. 

22*4x17 cm. a.d. 143. 

Report of a sale of articles from a miscellaneous store (iravTov<&kioi>) be- 
longing—or lately belonging — to a man called Chares. The fact that the report 
is rendered to three overseers (imrripriTaC) and that the result of the sale was paid 



256 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

over to them renders it extremely probable that the goods had for some reason 
been confiscated by the government, and sold by auction. For ivmjprjral in 
this connexion cf. B. G. U. 49. 5 iw^rfpririis) y€vr\p.{aToypa<^ovpAvonv). The account 
was originally glued on the left side to another document, now lost. 

1st hand k£, iravron(o(>ktov) X<£prjT(osi). 

2nd hand (?) irpoardvytkpLa iramoirot>\(tov) \a . [. . 

Xdprjros 'Appcovicovi Kal *H<paiOTai 

Kal AvKapiCDPi eniT7jpriT{aisi) (erovs) <r 
5 'Avrnveivov Kaicrapos rod Kvptov 'JEwc^^ [. . 

Nukvtos rapi)(l<£(v) 8nr\(S>v) fi [(Spa^pal) ft 

AiSvfiov n\eKT&(v) <r [(Spaxjiat) 
) 8£ZTfc»). KToXtpaiov rapi X t*(v) 8tn\(ov) a [(tya^) «> 

'Afi/Aa>v[aTo]$ Tatov KepKwrjr^ ) x?( ) &7? • • ( ) [ 
10 9 IovXai[os] oTif}d8a>v y [ 

Heparo? rapixfcfy) 8tir\(&v) (3 [(Spa^/ial) ft 

Sapanfovos yvpem (dprafi&v) j8 [ 

iripov Sapamwos ircXfaty) <f>opT[i]oo{v) y [ 

tov avrov <ri8tf(pov) ripy(a<rpivov) pii&v) fi {8pa\pal}) [ 
15 TlapSSov <ri8rj(pov) ijpy(a<rp€vov) pv(ov) fi [Specified 

'Apttov yfridOw k8 [ 

'IonS&pov iroS&y k\€iv&i> <? [ 

tov airrov 7rop<f>vpio(y) oTarrfoxw) 8 [ 

!4/jrcD<r«(o)y irXcKT&'yy) ifi (Specified) [ 
20 Mcopov Kvproav irXtKriHy) 17 {Spayjril) a (&Po\b$ ?), 

'IaurovT&Tos rapi\ioy(p) 8m\(&v) fi (Spaxjial) ft 

'Hpd>8ov arpofielkafy) v (Spa^jifj) a (rpt&fJoXov ?). 

at Kai p,€T€/3\fj0(r}o-ai>) 'Appoovtcovi Kal * H<f>aicrT[ff) Kal AvKaptotfyi) 
kmrr][j>TiTals). 
3rd hand 25 K\avo\io$) Aiovvaios aeo^jicioopai), 

3. \ °f JWP" * corr * from X (?). 

1 The 27Q1, Chares' emporium. Report of the emporium ... of Chares, to Ammonion, 
Hephaestas and Lycarion, overseers, in the 6th year of Antoninus Caesar the lord, 
Epeiph . . Nicus, 2 double jars of pickled fish 2 drachmae ; Didymus, 6 ropes • . . ; 



521. ACCOUNTS 257 

Ptolemaeus 1 double jar of pickled fish 1 drachma (marginal note ' 2 obols too little *) ; 
Ammonas son of Gaius, of Kerken . . . ; Iulas 3 mattresses . . . ; Seras 2 double jars of 
pickled fish 2 drachmae ; Sarapion 2 artabae of meal . . . ; another Sarapion 3 loads 
of ... ; ditto 2 minae of wrought iron . . drachmae ; Parodus 2 minae of wrought iron 
. . drachmae ; Arius 24 mats . . . ; Isidorus 6 couch-legs . . . ; ditto 4 staters of purple 
. . . ; Hartosis 1 2 ropes . . drachmae ; Morus 8 plaited fishbaskets 1 drachma 1 obol ; 
Isipoutas 2 double jars of pickled fish 2 drachmae ; Herodes 50 wicks 1 drachma 3 obols ; 
total 34 drachmae 1 obol (marginal note ' making 34 drachmae 3 obols '), which sum 
was paid over to Ammonion, Hephaestas and Lycarion, overseers. (Signed) Certified 
by me, Claudius Dionysius.' 

2. The mutilated word at the end of the line is not XeyopcW. 

6. diirX(oy) : cf. 141. 5 (of the Byzantine period), where the toirXow is a measure of 
wine. The form dtirXoKepa/Ao? or &w\oK*pdiuov is found in Wilcken, Ost. II, 1166. 4-5, and 
this may also be meant here. 

9. KfpK€mrr{ ) apparently gives the name of the place at which Ammonas lived. 
The word after x«( ) does not seem to be &mtX(«i>). Possibly x» should not be separated 
from the following letters. 

13. o-eX(o»(y): an Unknown word, but cf. Hesych. trakia' irXcypa KoAo&p ZfJiotov t cVi ttjs 
K€<f>akfjs <f>opov<rtv at AaKawai, 



521. List of Objects. 

1 7*5 X 5-8. Second century. 

Part of a list of articles, which is of interest on account of some rare words. 
Statuettes or shrines of Isis, Osiris, and Harpocrates are mentioned, and the list 
perhaps refers to the property of some temple ; cf. the mention of tti&rai (?) 
in 1. 10. This supposition is strengthened by the contents of a fragmentary 
account on the verso in which occurs a payment of 800 drachmae y€V€]<r(oi>(v) Ocov 
Ov€(T-n(a<riavov) and another amount ] y€iwia>(i/) Qtov Nepova ah[ (cf. B. G. U. 1. 9, 
393. x. 9, &c). To the left of the list on the recto are a few letters of the ends of 
lines of an account in a different hand. 

A[6yo? /3<£8i\\o? <TtS[rjpov9 

*I<rt8€{s] \[ K€ XP V ~ Kapntvos ai8r][pov? 

o-cDfiivov Ka[ 'Apno- 15 Kal npotreyiveTO [h t& . tru . . . 

Kpdrr]v Kcy^pvatofiivov vafo- Kaiaapos tov [icvptov 

5 Ktov 'Oar€fpi8[o9 QtdXrj X a ^ K *1 [ 

'OorclpiSos £v)s{(vov £v- iSpfjv ^aXi^oG 

\ova(<TKiov [ OvfitaT^piov [ 



258 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

£v\lvov K€)(lpv<ra>fi€vov 20 \v\y(a atov [ 
tori 8k hv [ KdXafio? ai>v [ 

10 vnh 18iob{t&v(?) yaXaKTo[ 

K€ {aprdfiai ?) yakicovy [ /i€va<n[ 

y\axror6Kopc{v yaAa*T[o]$ 



7. Xovcuo-Ktov Pap. 

6. £v\opai<rKiov is a new compound. 

11. 25 artabae seems rather an incongruous item, but we can find no alternative. 

13. pMXkos occurs in Suidas, but the meaning was unknown. L. Dindorf remarks 
(ap. Stephanus s. voc.) nisi potius nomen est proprium factum a fMAws . . . corruptum videri 
potest ex pddtpos. The present passage disposes of this criticism by showing conclusively 
that /Sa&XXof means a vessel or instrument of some kind, in this case made of iron, and 
Mr. Smyly is no doubt right in identifying it with the Latin batillum or batillus, ' shovel ' ; 
cf. the mention of 'tongs' (ko/>kiW) in 1. 14. 

18. vdprjp is for v&ptfov. 

22. ya\cucro[ is probably a compound word meaning a receptacle for milk; it recurs 
in 1. 24. 



522. Account of Corn-Transport. 

30-8 x 18 cm. Second century. 

An account, probably rendered by an official to his superior, of expenses 
connected with the dispatch of several boat-loads of corn by river, no doubt 
to Alexandria. The papyrus is written in a large cursive hand, resembling that 
of 520. 

Abyos diro<rr6\ov Tpia8i\<f>ov 

(nvpov) (dprdflat) Tv €#c (Spayji&v) tea {8pa\fiat) yjnfJ. 

ry ai{rf) a>y t(&v) 'A (aprafiS>v) [8payjxS>v) 8 (ppayjicu) if}. 
<popirpo(y) (nvpov) (dprafl&v) poa /3aoTax#(«*ow) k^axrei yfoypov) 
5 &s r{&v) p (8payji&v) 8 (Spayjial) $\ 

Tip(fjs) Kepfa/iiov) ir€/Kf>b\ivT09) vnr)per(ai$) teal <rr/3(aT£^T#) (8payjia?) rj 
(6po\6s). 
irp€<rflv(T€pois) */20€(a>s) iirfep) imrb\ov) kpy{ar&v) ta 
ipfJoXevomfov) (Spajyial) ? (6(3o\ol 8v*o). 



522. ACCOUNTS 



259 



'A$6yyfeC) Or]<ravpo<pv(\aKi) ini}p) <tya>(iaW) r&v 
10 dnb Tvfii £X(Xai) {&P a Xl laL ) ir l m 

/ dvifkipparoi) (8payjial) ^r££ (rpiobl3o\oi>), 3>v rb (fjpiav) 

diroar6\(ov) '{lpta{yo$) 'Appafytov) (dprdfJai) *A<f> 

Kal diroar6\(ov) IIav<ri(pio$) > AnoX(Xcop(ov) (dprdflat) 0, / (dprd/3ai) *B, 
Ik (jSpaxjt&v) tea (SpaxjiaT) i/jc. 

15 vaurudipv) 'tlpfovos Kvfie(priJTOv) al 8o0(u<rai) ^{Spax/iat) i/j] (Spaxpat) 17. 

Tip(rjsi) K€p{ap(ou) ir€p<f>0(ivros) imripkr{ati) Kal <rrp{aridyrQ) (Spayjiat) 17 
(oj9oX&). 

riplfjs) &X(Xcoi>) K€p(apuov) ir€p<f>6{$vrmv) vafo{atj) (Spaxpal) i? (6{3o\ol 860). 

r4 K^ y ) ^y^dvedv) rots a{{rois) xKP** ?) &pr(<*>v ?) (TtTpd>(3o\ov). 

irp€<r(3i4jipoisi) *f2<j>€co(si) farfip) /u<rO(ov) kpy(arS>v) ( fl~€/*]| 
20 €p{io\(<ev6vTcov) (Spaxpal) 8. 

ipyftry) a {nrtjp(/)ro€yr{t) napoc rb (fi/uav) (a/wrf/fyy) Kal dva- 

(3dX\ovr(i) <r€iT(oy) f)p(€p&r) y (jipfows) (Spayjial) €. 

/ dvrjX(oipLaros) (SpayjiaT) i/£<r, $>v rb (tf/iiov) 

/ inl rb av{rb) dvrjX(<oparos) {SpayjiaX) 'AUkij (Tpi&fioXov), &v rb (Ifpuov) 
25 (Spaxpat) x'8 (iPoXol 8vo). 

AuxTKopaity &v \6y{ou) 8&(a)€i 6f}(oXol) y. 

rtp(rjs) K€p{apioov) P dra\co6(€i>TCor) fjpetv pivots 

dirb $apt(va>0) k{ ?a>9 $app(6v0i) i€ (Spayjiat) 1? (6/3oXol 860). 

\€7r( ) 8air{dvr]i) (rify) np(ff) iXaiov r&v av(j&v) 
30 fipLcp&iy) (Spax/ial) 17 (t€T/k»j3oXoi/). 

[diroarS^pv) [. . X ) [ 



from cr(?), 



5. d corr. from §■. 17. 1 of «$■ corr. 20. d corr. from *. 26. « of JWaVi corr. 



'Account: — for the vessel of Triadelphus 3400 artabae of wheat at 21 drachmae 
(per 100) 712 dr. To the same at 4 drachmae per 1000 12 dr. Carriage of 171 artabae 
of wheat transported ... the drying-place at 4 dr. per 100 6 dr. Price of a jar (of wine) 
sent to the assistants and soldier 8 dr. 1 obol. To the elders of Ophis for the wages 
of 1 1 workmen employed in lading 6 dr. 2 obols. To Aphunchis, guard of the granary, 
as his salary since Tubi 18 dr. more. Total of expenditure 762 dr. 3 obols, of which 
£ is (381 dr. i£ obols). For the vessel of Horion son of Ammonius 1500 artabae and 
for the vessel of Pausiris son of Apollonius 500 artabae, total 2000 artabae, at 21 dr. 
(per 100) 420 dr. Payment to Horion, pilot, the sum given, 8 dr. Price of a jar sent 

S % 



260 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

to the assistants and the soldier 8 dr. i obol. Price of 2 more jars sent to the sailors 
16 dr. 2 obols. Price of vegetables for the same, without bread, 4 obols. To the elders 
of Ophis for the wages of 7 workmen employed in lading 4 dr. To 1 workman assisting 
beyond (?) the \ artaba and embarking (?) corn for 3 J days 5 dr. Total of expenditure 
466 dr., of which £ is (233 dr.). Sum of the whole expenditure 1228 dr. 3 obols, of 
which £ is 614 dr. 2 obols. To Dioscoras 3 obols, for which he shall render an account. 
Price of 2 jars expended upon us alone from Phamenoth 27 to Pharmouthi "15 16 dr. 
2 obols. Expense of . . . together with the price of oil for the same period 8 dr. 4 obols.' 

I. Triadelphus, like Horion son of Ammonius and Pausiris, was probably the owner 
of an arr6aTo\ov. The payments in 11. 2 and 14, which are at the rate of slightly more than 
1 obol per artaba, seem to be the charge for transport to the vessel's destination, probably 
Alexandria. Why in the first case there was an extra payment (1. 3) of 4 drachmae per 
1000 is obscure. The calculation of the 712 and 12 dr. is not quite accurate. The 
correct figures would be 714 and 13$. 

4. cfuo-ci : if this word is not corrupt, it would seem to be a technical term connected 
with the fuller's trade. 

6. (rrp(aTM>ru) : for soldiers accompanying the corn-vessels as cmVXooi cf. 276. 9. 

II. The figure after hv r& (fa™) has not been filled in ; cf. 11. 23-5. 

15. pavrue(ov): this if correct means a payment to a vavrrjs. Perhaps vavrue($) 
(masculine) should be read. Horion ' the pilot ' is probably different from the Horion in 
L 12. 

18. tyr(a>p?) : cf. 498. 31, &c. 

2i. waph rb (rjfuav) (dprd^rjs) is very obscure. The order is in favour of constructing 
it closely with vnrfp(()rovvr(i) t and against making it mean 'in addition to the £ artaba 
received by the workman/ 



(A) PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE. 

523. Invitation to Dinner. 

5-5 X 8.4 cm. Second century. 

An invitation to dinner, similar to 110. As usual, the name of the guest 
is not given. 

'JBpcDrjE <re 9 Avt&vic($) IlTo\€fi(aiov) 8iirvrjo{aC) 
trap airr&i e/y KXeturjv rod tcvptou 
2apdm8os h rots KKavSfJov) 2apairtcti(yos) 
Tiji t? d-rrb a>pas 0. 

'Antonius son of Ptolemaeus invites you to dine with him at the table of the lord 
Sarapis in the house of Claudius Sarapion on the 16 th at 9 o'clock.' 

2. *ls xXilmjif ic.r.X. : cf. 110. 2. 



525. PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE 261 

524, Invitation to a Wedding Feast. 

3*5 X 6-4 cm. Second century. 

An invitation to dinner in celebration of a marriage ; cf. HI and P. Fay. 
Towns 13a. 

aai els rot>y ydftov? r&v r[€Kvo»v 
iavrov iv rg 'Ioxygtafyosi) a[tipiov 9 
Ifris iarlv A, dirb Spat [0. 

' Dionysius invites you to dine with him on the occasion of the marriage of his 
children at the house of Ischyrion to-morrow, the 30th, at 9 (?) o'clock.' 

4. &pat [B : the usual hour (about 3 p.m.) ; cf. 523. 4, &c. 



525. Letter. 

14^6 x io»7 cm. Early second century. 

The following letter, though complete, lacks both the customary greeting 
at the commencement and address, and the names of the recipient and sender 
therefore do not appear. The latter complains of the trouble he was having 
in going by river past the Antaeopolite nome, and instructs his correspondent 
to make a certain payment. 

'O napdirXovs rod 'AvraioiroXirov 
oyXrip&rarSs iariv Kal KaO' &a<r- 
rr\v fjftipav fiapoOfiai 81 avrbv 
teal Xclav t$ irpdyftan Kara.%60- 
5 pai. ihv 8ijj r<p d8*X<p&i rrjs fiy- 
rpb\s] r&v vl&v 'A^tXXd 8o0rjvai 
airo[v]8dpiov KaX&t noirj<r€i9 801)9 
Xa{ro]0 irapa Sapairfovos ck rod 
k\iiod) \6yov. /i€fivrj[a]o rod init- 
io r[*Xtov] "IaiSos rov iv rok 2apo> 



262 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

'The voyage past the Antaeopolite nome is most troublesome; every day I am 
burdened on account of it and I am extremely worn out with the matter. If a gratuity 
must be given to the brother of the mother of Achillas' sons, please get some lotus (?) 
for him from Sarapion at my expense. Remember the night-festival of Isis at the 
Serapeum.' 

7. trrrtiypaptov : cf. 610 and 101. 19, where in a lease 12 drachmae <nrovb^ are an item 
in the rent. An additional payment of some kind is there meant, but the precise signific- 
ance of the word is not clear. In 653 tmovbii is coupled with cMpoipa and Jvapovptop, 
which suggests that the charge ' for a libation ' was primarily imposed upon vine-land (cf. 
Rev. Laws xxxvi. 19, where the «m;, i.e. mroftMpa, is devoted W[r] ityv] Ovaiav Ka\l] ty* <nr[o]*- 
d^y}), though, as 101 shows, its application became extended. 

10. There would perhaps be room for rijs in the lacuna before *l<rt&>r. 



526. Letter of Cyrillus. 

162 x 1 1-9 cm. Second century. 

This letter is badly written and obscurely worded, and the writer was 
evidently a person of little culture. It contains a brief apology for a departure 
occasioned by the desire to recover a loan. 

Xaipois Ka\oKaip€, dvafikvo* oi>v [r& op- 
KvptWSs <r€ npoaayo- 10 \r]ar^* € * Ka * /**) tf?*- 

pevco. oiic ijfirjv ana- f}ct/€ iyi> rov \6yov 

Ofjf d\6yco$ ae Kara- /iov ov Trapkfitvov. 
5 Xefmu, oti yip rts \av- €M\€i. 

fJdwv rov Tv(3i rhv 

tSkov S€KanXo[vv] *€- On the verso 

(pdXaiov ko/ic(([€i. d\\a [d)ir6(8o9) Ka\oica(p<p. 

9. 1. ava&aivn. 10. 1." ajW ]£cuvc. 12. 1. irapi&aivov. 

€ Greeting, Calocaerus : I, Cyrillus, address you. I was not so unfeeling as to leave 
you without reason; for though a man gets his interest in Tubi tenfold, he still does not 
recover his capital. I am going up with the dancer ; even if he were not going I should 
not have broken my word. Farewell. (Addressed) Deliver to Calocaerus.' 

5-8. The meaning is that no amount of interest will satisfy a man who desires 
the repayment of the capital sum. 
9. 6p)w<rTjj : cf. 510. (a) 6. 



528. PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE 263 

B27. Letter of Hatres. 

8*2 x 139 cm. Second or early third century. 

A short letter from Hatres to his brother Heras, telling him to &nd and 
fetch a certain fuller if he required the tatter's services. 

ilr/wjs t Hpan r& d8e\<f><p yatptiv. 
KaOm kverttka pot ncpi Htprjvov 
rod yva<pia>$ 6 ovv€pya{6/ievo9 pcra 
$i\£ov, «/ p\v yjpttav avrov i\ci9 nip- 
5 tyov inripiTqv lif airrbv o-Jj/iepov, ijns 

iarlv 10. {lirtl yap iy& a&rbv /carl^©} dk(\)' &• 
pa pi) dptXJjarys, enel yap iyin airbv *a- 

T€J(<0. 

epp&<rO(ai) €#xop(ai) ev irpdrrovr^a). 
On the verso 

10 &ir6b\os) [H]gan. 

3. 1. rot) avpfpya(ofupov. 5. tjv of vrniptrvjv co n*. from ov. 6. After o at the end 

of the line a round bracket. 

'Hatres to Heras his brother, greeting. In accordance with your instructions con- 
cerning Serenus the fuller who is working with Phileas, if you have need of him send 
a servant for him to-day, the 19th. Do not neglect this, as I am keeping him. I pray 
for your health and prosperity. (Addressed) Deliver to Heras.' 

6. The round bracket at the end of this line (cf. critical note) appears to indicate 
a wish on the part of the writer to cancel the first cVci y6p . . . xar«'x«>, which is superfluous; 
but he should have been more explicit. 



528. Letter of Serenus. 

18 x 12*8 cm. Second century. 

This curious and amusing letter, written in very bad Greek, is from Serenus 
to his sister (and probably wife) Isidora, who had gone away, but whom the 
writer wished to return. 



264 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

HepTjvos EfotS&pa [t# cWeA- 

<f>jj teal Kvpia ir\aiai\a \aip€iv* 

npb p\v irovrbs €if\ofi[a( <re byiat- 

v€i{v) Kal tcaff iKdorrjs [fyi€/>a]y ko[1 
5 6^{i)as rb npoa-KVPTjfid <rov irv& 

irapa t# <r€ <f>i\ovcrjj Sorjpi. yivfarKHv 

<T€ 0€\a> d</> &9 i{K}^rj\0€9 dif kfiov 

nkvOos fjyovfirjv wKrb? icXi&v 

ijfiipas 8k TT€vO&(y). if} $a&<f>i d<f> 8re 
10 eXovadfirjy per itrov ovk eXovadprjy 

OVK ij\lfl(jl)€ P>*XP €L l P 'AOvp> K«2 ?7T€/l- 

<rd$ fiv imaroXa? Svyapivov \idov 

aaXeyae, ovtcos v \6yv aov KaiKivrj- 

k&v /£€. olvt^\v\ r% Spa dvrkypa- 
15 yfrd av Kal ZSootca 777 x/3 ftcra t&v 

ow imoToX&v i<r{<r}<l>payi{fi£va. 

X<K>/>€t? 8k t&v amv \6ycov Kk ypa- 

li(ji)dra>v 6 KSXofios 8k irbpvqv /ie went- 

r)K€v, IXeye 8k Sri $ircft<r£ fiv <f>d<r€iv 
20 f) yvv/j <rou 8ti avrbs iriirpaKtv rb &\v- 

aiSiov Kal avrb? KarktrraKi /i€ €[/]? rb 

irXvv* toAtovs tovs XSyovs Alyc*? ijua 

prjKCTi [[0]J7rcoT€t/0a> fiov rfjv ivl3oX[rjv. 

i8ov 7ro<rd{p}K€i9 tire/iaa inl <r€. ipxfl [«&"€ 
25 ovk ipxQ 8rj[ko<r6v py. [ 

On the verso 

dirSSos El<ri86pa ir[apa) Scpfyov. 

2. 1. irXc(or[a. 5. 1. iro<&. 6* 1. ytPwrKttv. 8. L JcXatW. XI. 

1. fk€tfi(jx)cu . . . ftrep^ar; cf. 11. 19 and 24. 12. 1. fun . . . dwapevas. 1 3. 

1. craXevo-cu . . . ol \6yoi <rav k*kIvt)ko». 14. 1. &p$. 15. 1. <roi. If. 1. Kai. 1 8. 

1. ntnolijKw. 19. L fiot. 22. 1. n\otou . . . ?ya. 24. « of €&ov COrr. from o. 1. Mow 
ircxraKiff. 25* 1* drj\<x>a6¥ fioi. 26. 1. 'io-idap?. 

1 Serenus to his beloved sister Isidora, many greetings. Before all else I pray for your 
health, and every day and evening I perform the act of veneration on your behalf to 
ThSeris who loves you. I assure you that ever since you left me I have been in mourning, 



529. PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE ' 265 

weeping by night and lamenting by day. Since we bathed together on Phaophi 12, 
I never bathed nor anointed myself until Athur 12. You sent me letters which would have 
shaken a stone, so much did your words move me. Instantly I answered you and gave 
the letter sealed (to the messenger) on the 1 2th, together with letters for you (?). Apart 
from your saying and writing " Colobus has made me a prostitute/' he (Colobus) said to 
me, " Your wife sent me a message saying ' He himself (Serenus) has sold the chain and 
himself put me in the boat/ " You say this to prevent my being believed any longer with 
regard to my embarkation (?). See how many times I have sent to you 1 Whether you 
are coming or not, let me know. (Addressed) Deliver to Isidora from Serenus.' 

23. The IpiSoX? seems to refer to 11. 21-2, but the point of the allusion is obscure 
in both cases. 



529. Letter to Athenarous. 

i2«2 x 8-2 cm. Second century. 

A letter to a woman called Athenarous, announcing the dispatch of oil and 
fruit The writer, whose name is lost, seems to have occupied some official 
position, for he mentions that he was about to accompany the praefect to 
Coptos. 

• ••••• 

irpb fi\v [irdvrw ^iyopat <r€ 10 reaaapas teal vol icoTtJ- 

byiaivtw. K6p[ta]ai Slit, K{£]p~ Acts Svo. Aairacat crov 

8cwo$ &ot€ Aiowafa t))v firjripa Kal 

XptfLaros KorvXas 8 Kal Marpiv Kal ra riicva 

5 a<f>vp(8iv Tpayrffidiwy afrrijs Kal roi>? <f>i\ovv- 

iyoav dplO/iia <H)Ka p 15 r<£? ere wdmras. €ya> & 

Kdpva p Kal k\alov ^phs ds Kbirrov fitra rod 

{jpiov & 8dxrw T§ av- ^y^fiSvos dfii 

Tf Atovvvbp KorvXas ..... 

On the verso 

] €}9 ra Havvaviov y*vop.i- 
vov ypapiiayi&s irSXecos 'AOrjvapoyTi -K*f/?- 
20 Sctfyos). 

6. 1. t X ow. 

'First of all I pray for your health. Please receive through Cerdon for Dionysius 
4 cotylae of unguent and a basket of dessert containing 100 figs, 100 nuts, and half 



266 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

a chous of oil, of which you will give 4 cotylae to the said Dionysius and keep 2 cotylae 
for yourself. Greet your mother and Matris and her children and all who love you. 
I am going to Coptos with the praefect (Addressed) To the house of Pausanias, ex-clerk 
of the city, for Athenarous daughter of Cerdon/ 



530. Letter of Dionysius. 

19-8 x 12-2 cm. Second century. 

A letter from Dionysius to his mother Tetheus, chiefly concerned with 
money matters. The writer states that he has paid certain taxes, while some 
others for which his mother was being troubled had been omitted by an over- 
sight ; and he announces the dispatch of 11a drachmae, 108 of which were, to be 
devoted to the redemption of his wardrobe from the pawnbroker. The letter 
is written in a well-formed uncial hand with occasional lapses into cursive. An 
example of E formed with three distinct strokes occurs in 1. 13. 

Aiov6o\io$i\ Te0[edTi] tjJ* [f"PY>]2 y[a(peiv. 
ire pi &v pot ypd(f>ei$ iiriaroXfjy iraa&v 

€KOfil<T<£flt]V W[€]/M 8k TS[V *)&$& {r[&V 7t]u- 

p&y] 8>v <re dirjJTTjKap ol wpdrfro]p{e]9 6p6^oyol (?)] 
5 el<rt epk 8k eXeXJjOei 8iaareXX[et]v rt, r[b 8k] 

vavfilov kcu ra dXXa irdvra irXrjpri 8ieypa- 

yfra. rb 8k irpaypdnov irepl od (ypayfra Gecoyi 

pi) peXeroo <roi el pi) reTeXearcu iirl pdrr)[p 

8k r&i tov Havaiptevos roaoirrov yjpSvov Trpoc- 
10 Kaprep[& • ,]u8e ana . /*[.]{ ci>[. . .]e6t). ic6pio{ai 

-rrapa X{aipYJpovo9 t[o]v Kopt(ovr6s <ro[i] rb [ent- 

ot6Xiov dpyvptov 8 pampas itcarbv 8eic[a 

8vo, i£ $>v 8&<r€i9 Hapairtevi r&i <f>tX<o{i 

t&i rov 'Awel \vTpdxraa& pov ra Ipdna 
15 8payji.as licarbv fcal eh X[6]yoi> t6kov 

8payjias 6ktq> koI aol eh 8aitdvi\v rrjs 

loprrjs Spayjihs Teaaapas. el irXelov 8e pot 

7rap€Kei[To] trdXiv <roi dneordXiceiv, /cat 

tovto ire\p)rr<w Ke\prjpai. diroSovaa odv 



530. PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE 267 

20 airr&i dnoX'fjfiylrjf ra l/idna iy(i)rj Kal 

iv d<r<pa\d iroirjoyis. /iff dyoavt* 8k irepl 

flfi&v, oA6\v yap <f>av\ov irepl fi/ias eor[i]v 

Kal avfi(p<ovov/i€v dWrjXois. dcnrdfcrat <re 

Octtpa?. dcnrdfav ra naiSia 'Airtowa tc[al 
25 dSe\(f>bv 'Eppar(nv, Aiowrav, ropf wf/?[*] N[i- 

ktjv Kal Gaurovv rfjv fUKpdv, r[o]bt irept [ 

ra irdvras, x Hpav Kal rods avrov, Aeovrdv rbv 

imepr\$avov Kal rods ainov, rods ircpl Taa/i6iv, 

[Gcpl/iovOdptov. ?/>/x»(<ro). lirj{vbs) Kaurapttov k. 

In the left hand margin, at right angles 
30 nepl ravrw ovv poi evOecos /iera rfjv ioprfjv irifiyfreis <f>d<Tiv el rbv \ a ^' 

Kbv CKOfiio-a Kal el dneXafles ra i/idria. Aairaaai Aiowrav Kal Gewa. 

On the verso 

TeOevri fflTpL 

2. L tmorok&v. 8. c of et corr. 14. t/uma Pap.; so 11. 20 and 31. 17. 

1. toprrjt. 

' Dionysius to Tetheus his mother, greeting. I have received all the letters concerning 
which you write, and with regard to the wheat which the collectors have demanded from 
you it is admitted (?), but I had forgotten to make any order for payment; I have 
however paid in full the naubion and other taxes. Do not be concerned that the matter 
about which I wrote to Theon has not been carried out and that I have so long been 
engaged with Pausirion's business to no purpose . . . Please receive from Chaeremon 
the bearer of this letter 112 drachmae of silver of which you will give to my friend 
Sarapion son of Apei 100 drachmae and redeem my clothes, with 8 drachmae on account 
of interest, and keep 4 drachmae for yourself for the expenses of the festival. If I had had 
more I would have forwarded a further sum ; 1 have borrowed to send even this. So pay 
him the money and get my clothes back safe, and put them in a secure place. Do not be 
anxious about us, for there is nothing the matter with us and we are at harmony with each 
other. Theonas salutes you. Salute the boys Apion and his brother Hermatois, Dionutas, 
those with Nice and the little Thaisous, all those with . . . , Heras and his household, 
Leontas the proud and his household, those with Taamois, and Thermoutharion. Good- 
bye. The 20th of the month Caesareus. (P.S.) Send me word about this immediately 
after the festival, whether you received the money and whether you recovered my clothes. 
Salute Dionutas and Theon. (Addressed) To my mother Tetheus/ 

4. 6fiSK[oyoi] : it is difficult to see what other supplement can be found for the lacuna, 
in which there is not room for more than four letters ; of irvpot is probably the subject 
rather than of irpdxropcr. For 6fiSKoyos in connexion with the poll-tax cf. note on 478. 22. 

10. Perhaps o]£& &na£ f«[o]*. 

14. Cf. 114, another letter illustrating the pawnbroking trade at Oxyrhynchus. 



268 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

531. Letter of Cornelius. 

2 i «5 x 1 1 • 7 cm. Second century. 

A letter from a father to his son, giving him good advice, and announcing 
the dispatch of clothes and money. 

KopvrjXios 'IipaKi t& yXvKVT&rm u/y 
yafptiv. 

ijSi&s ere dafra£6/i€0a irdvrts ol kv olkcoi kcu 

robs fier eirov irdvras, irepl o5 poi iraWdtctis 
5 ypd(f>€is dvOpdmov pijSkv irp<xrrroii]0{j$ 

co)9 kn dyaO& irpbs crc irapayivopai <rbv Ov- 

rjorefocp /i€Ta Kal t&v 6vq>v. iav yap Oeol d£X<D- 

<ri Tdyiov irpbs <ri 1j£<» /i€Ta rbv Msyslp pfjva 

kirsl kv \epalv ?xa> iircigipa epya. Spa prjSe- 
io vl dvOpdmwv iv 77/ oUla irpo<ncpo[6]<rii$ 9 d\Xa rots 

{JiftXtois <rov airrb pSvov npiaeyfe] <f>iXoXoy&v 

Kal dir abr&v 6vrj<riv €^€£S. K6p[i\<rai Slit 'Ov- 

voxf)pa ra tfidrta ra \evica rk Srfy]dfi€va 

/jL€ra t&v irop<pvp&v <fx>p€i<rdai <paivoX(a>v, 
ig ra dXXa pera t&v povptrivav typeo-cis. 

Slit 'Avovfia Trepyfrco <roi Kal dpyvpiov Kal 

iiriprjvia Kal rb dXXo fcvyos t&v voyehtov. 

rots 6yfrap(oL$ e£rjXXa£a$ fipas, ro&r<ov Kal rijv 

rififjv Si 'Avovfia wepyjfco crox, pivroiye 
20 cW irpbs ai eXdfl 'Avovfia? dirb rov aov \aXKoO rb 

6yfr6vi6v aou Kal t&v a&v kfcoSiaaov 

cW iripyfra. fori Si tov Tvfii prjvbs 

<rol b 0e\€is, $pov(p<p (Spax/iai) i?, tois W€pl 9 A(3d<rK(avTOv) 

Kal Mvpcovi (Spa^fial) 0, %€Ko6vS<p {Spayjial) i(3. irc/i- 
25 yfrov $p6viftov irpbs 'Aa-KXi]irid8rjv ip&i 

6v6/iaTi Kal XafJerc* nap' airroO dvri$&vi\- 

a-iv ^y typayfra airr& eirioroXfjs Kal nepyfrov. 



582, PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE 269 

ncpl $>v dcAct? 8tJ\<o<t6v poi. ippotxro, riicvov. 

Tvfii i<?. 

On the verso 
30 % IkpaKi [6]i£bi dirb KopvqXio^y) irarpte. 

4. Second a of iravras COrr. from c. 1. iroXXo*if. 6. 1. napaytwafAOi. 12. n* 

of an- corr. from v. 18. t»* of Twraw above the line, 20. avovfas above the 

line. 30. ic/xuci Pap. 

' Cornelius to his sweetest son, Hierax, greeting. All our household warmly salutes 
you and all those with you. Regarding the man about whom you write to me so often, 
claim nothing until I come to you auspiciously in company with Vestinus and the donkeys. 
For if the gods will I shall arrive quickly after Mecheir is over, since at present I have 
urgent affairs on hand. Take care not to offend any of the persons at home, and give 
your undivided attention to your books, devoting yourself to learning, and then they 
will bring you profit. Receive by Onnophris the white robes which are to be worn with 
the purple cloaks, the others you should wear with the myrtle-coloured (?) ones. I shall 
send you by Anoubas both the money and the monthly supplies and the other pair of 
scarlet cloaks. You won me over by the dainties, and I will send you the price of these 
too by Anoubas; until however Anoubas arrives, you must pay for the provisions of 
yourself and your household out of your own money, until I send you some. For the 
month of Tubi there is for yourself what you like, for Phronimus 16 drachmae, for 
Abascantus and his companions and Myron 9 drachmae, for Secundus 12 drachmae. 
Send Phronimus to Asclepiades in my name, and let him obtain from him an answer 
to the letter which I wrote to him, and send it. Let me know what you want. Good-bye, 
my son. Tubi 16. (Addressed) To my son Hierax from his father Cornelius.' 

15. iiovpalwv: nvp<rlwv seems to be intended, but pApivov (' mulberry-coloured ') occurs 
as an epithet of a aovfipixonaWiov in C. P. R. I. 27. 8, and may be the word meant here. 

18. The punctuation and meaning of this line are a little difficult. Of the known 
meanings of efoXXao-a-eiv that of ' amuse ' seems to be the most suitable and we refer tqvtw 
to the <tyapta, making it depend on ti^v. If tovtw is connected with *&jKka£as it must 
refer to the cloaks, and the sentence means that these were in exchange for the tydpia. 

19. For pcVnuyc as the first word of a sentence cf. P. Amh. 135. 11, where a comma 
should be placed after dycnrAf tr. 



532. Letter of Heraclides. 

2 1 -5 x 1 o cm. Second century. 

A letter from Heraclides to Hatres, reproaching him for not sending 
ao drachmae. The letter is on the verso of the papyrus, the recto containing 
parts of nineteen lines from a taxing-account. 



270 



THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 



'HpoucXeiSrjs UrprJTi 

y€ypa<f>€vai aot 8ta %ar\rov 
5 dvairi/i^ai tcl? (Spaxjxas) k, elSa? 
8tc airrSOi fJL€Te(3aX6/ir)v 
rofc KOIVWVOIS fiOV av- 
rds, dXXa dvi/ietvas rhv 
roaodroy yjpSvov fii} dno- 
10 dot;?. dvayKaias oSu t§ 
dva8i86{v\vri aoi rd im<rr&- 
Xiov tovto ev6£a>9 



dirSSos oVa>? K&fii 
&<tkvXtov 7roiTJ<ry$. 

15 Spa oSv fifj dfAAa>? irpd£v$ 
[[/^]] Kal iroitfayf /xc wpbs 
ah eXdttv <rvvfrt\Tri<TOv- 
t& <roi. Kal yap kv Ilaah- 
fi€i t6t€ <t€ evpov Kal 

20 fSov\6fi€v6v .ere <f>iXav- 
6pa>n6^rri^<rai ovk d- 
vkpuvas iirb kokov 
aw€i86ros kotcxS- 

fl€VOS. 



3. ft of cdci corr. from 4. at above «n, which is crossed through, 
the line. .20. 1. ^tkapOpwnjam. 22. v of kokov corr. from s. 



15. p of ow above 



c Heraclides to his dearest Hatres, greeting. You ought without my writing to you 
to have sent me by Sa€tas the 20 drachmae, for you know that I paid them here to my 
partners ; but you have waited all this time without paying me. Be sure therefore to give 
this* sum at once to the bearer of this letter, that you may save me too from trouble. Mind 
that you do not fail and thereby cause me to come to you and dispute with you about it ; 
for indeed I found you at Paomis the other day and wanted to welcome you; but you would 
not stay, being oppressed by an evil conscience/ 



588. Letter of Apion. 

26 x 27*5 cm. Late second or early third century. 

A letter from a father to his son and another person, giving them directions 
on various matters of business. 

'Airfov 'Airfavi t&i vl§ Kal t £lpia>vi t&i faXTdrcp irXctcrra \aipeiv. 

irpb T&y SXwv €0\o/iat ipa? vyiaivtiv ptTa t&v tskvcov Kal avyfifav. Sera 

8ta ttjs iripas hriaroXrjs zypatya Iva pi) ra avra ypdtyo Kal % £lpUmi 

ypd<poo. Sierrepyfrdprjy fl- 
/**[']" ^M^ EvTvypvs rod dwb 'Icriau Tpv<fxwo? SiacroXtKa y, /3 pkv irpbs 

ye&pyote Ma£(- 



533. PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE 271 

5 pov, t4 [Si] dXXo irpi[s] Aioy[e\i/Tjv rhv tov BeXerj . ( ), tvOicos Srjpoatdh 

aar€ airrk irpb tov 
$a&<f[i t]va p)j exirpMeapa yevryrat. kWepa & &veireptf>Ori Havey&rji 

vopiKtp nap 9 ov 
KO/f[((]ea'0€ Kal 8&re atrip (8payjih$) £8. ri \opTO<nreppov ira>\^aaT€ iced 

wCOeaOe 
tov 9 0[.]<p[.]Krj el xp[e(]ay fyei tov dirb TapirireL al irp6ao8oi pov at 81& 

r&v yea>py&v 
8ia<rr[a\]eio , a{i] fj irapk r<p Tapei<p e[v ir\apa6ecret Xoyicrd^raxrai/ fj ev 

d<r<f>aXei [^]ro> 
10 iraph [toi]s yempyois iva Oe&v 6[eX]6yra>y tciv dveOaxn pff ty^pev irepmXo- 
k^v ir\p]b$ rbv dvrlSucov, ^ 6 k(v8vvo$ avrStv ^fra> irpbs tovs yeapyoffc. 

t^v ot- 
Kiav T[. . ] . (Jiov pi) pio-dcbo-fl? pr\8evl el ptf n(vi) yvvaucl peXXovoy h 

airry ol- 
KeTv • [. . . .]aT(.] . /?[.]t€ •[...] yi/> -[. »]ov iarly Toia6\r]f]v oUiav irapa- 

[fl]dXXe[i]v veavia- 
kois t[y]a pi) iywpev aTopd\ov[s] prjSe <f>66vov. etnare Za>iX<p ry dirb 

Sevro) 
15 yempyip Sr[t] tartl ret* awOJJKas <f>p6vrtaov roG x^koS- tfaciTe kou tois 

8i8v*poi$ in irpo- 
vorjo[a]TC rod Kepparfov, dpofos Kal 'ArroX\a>vi<p Kal Aiovocrup ehv Icryparire 

Trepyjrai 
eh IIa{l3e]pKr) dm)Xi<»Tov irpbs Ilavaipiv rbv 6vt)XdTiiv in KaO&s <rvve- 

rd£a*0e 
pot 8ovvai Kepdpia otvov Kal ha TTjptfcraxn avr&v rfjv 8e£idv. irapd\a(3e ira- 
pk 'ApO&vios lepew r&r tov (nvpov) (dprdfiasi) k Kal iraplt ZcaiXav tov 

yewpyoO Tijs XevTG) Ay tflxpiy- 
20 Tai irap epoO irvpoG (dprdfiasi) €. iirtcrKeyfraaOe i/c toD Xoyiorrfplov tov 

vrpafrriyoO) iiriOToXfiv) tov SioiktjtoO 
kirl Tod 0cb0 prjvbs ypa<f>eurav vepl tov ivSpaTa irepQBijvai dvr epoO ek 

KXrjpoy Trjs irpaKTO- 
petas. etiraTe Xeprjvcp T<p ev r^ KaprjX&yi in .irpovSrjcrov rod x^^ ^* 

ettrare *Eppt$, 



272 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

T<p t[ov 'Ia](ov Ilayya ypapfiarel irpaicrSp&y dpyv(piK&y) Sri StdortiXov 

by 6<f>€ik€i$ fioi irvpby fj 
bv k[hv 8]oKi/ips: 'BpaKXetSrjs € 22p/za/o7cfo]u diro86ra> tcls tov (irvpoD) (dp- 

rdpas) <T ev Oipari. c[f)irar€ J*o- 
25 yvcrhp 'Eiri/idxov apyjLzpartvaairn Sri kyirvy^ov to5 StoucrjTJj &€/ca rrjs 

7rpo(r68ov 
Xva na[pa]8€x6v c ** T ^ &<t>Xrnia Sapawteyos Qavtov. doirdacurOe Srartay 

rfjy Ovyaripa fiov 
Kal 'Hp^afycXeiSrjy real 'Amava robs vlovs pov. dairdcrcurOf rhv peucphv 

Xeprjyoy Kal Konpea 
kcu rc[i)]s fjfJL&y TrdvTas kclt 6vopa. d<nrd(ovrai vpas 'A/idpayros Kal 

Zfidpaytios. 

ipp&aOai d/ias €{f\opai. 
On the verso 
30 dir68os 'Airtuvi vim Kal % ilplmvu 

3. a ttjs above the line. v/xc[i]y Pap. 6. voyuxv above the line. 21. aw *pov 

above the line. 22. op of trpow/o-ov corr. from <u. 28. <&v n corr. 

'Apion to his son Apion and his dearest Horion, many greetings. Before all else 
I pray for your health and for that of your children and wives. All that I wrote in the 
other letter, in order that I may not repeat it, consider that I wrote also to Horion. 
I have sent you by Eutyches of Ision Tryphonis 3 orders for payment, two for the 
cultivators of Maximus, the third for Diogenes son of . . . Issue them at once before 
Phaophi that they may not be later than the due time. Others were sent to Panechotes 
the lawyer; get these from him and pay him 64 drachmae. Sell the grass-seed and ask 
. . . whether he wants the man from Tampitei. Let my revenues which are paid through 
the cultivators either be placed on deposit at the store-house or be kept in safety in the 
possession of the cultivators, in order that if the gods will, we may, if they are neglected, 
have no complications with our adversary, or the cultivators must bear the risk. Do not 
lease the house of ... to any one except to a woman who intends to live in it, for it is 
(wrong) to expose such a house to youths, that we may not be caused vexation and 
annoyance. Tell Zoilus the cultivator from Sento that in accordance with the agreements 
he must look after the money. Tell the twins also to be careful about the small change, 
and likewise tell Apollonius and Dionysius if you can send to Paberke in the eastern 
toparchy to Pausiris the donkey-driver, that, as they arranged, they are to pay me the jars 
of wine and must keep their pledge. Get from Harthonis the priest the 20 artabae of 
wheat, and from Zoilus the cultivator from Sento the 5 artabae of wheat which he borrowed 
from me. Look out at the office of the strategus a letter of the dioecetes written in the 
month of Thoth about the substitution of other names for mine in drawing lots for the post 
of collector. Tell Serenus at the camel-shed that he is to take care of the money. Tell 
Hermias, scribe of the collectors of money-taxes at Ision Panga, that he is to issue an order 
for the wheat which he owes me or for the amount which he approves. Let Heraclides 



533. PRIVATE CORRESPONDENCE 273 

son of Hermaiscus pay the 6 artabae of wheat on deposit. Tell Dionysius son of 
Epimachus, ex-chief-priest, that I petitioned the dioecetes about the revenue in order that 
a reduction might be made in the fine of Sarapion son of Phanias. Salute Statia my 
daughter and Heraclides and Apion, my sons. Salute little Serenus and Copreus and all 
our household individually. Amarantus and Zmaragdus salute you. I pray for your 
health. (Addressed) Deliver to my son Apion and Horion.' 

3. kcX 'Opfow ypd<f>a seems to be a compressed way of saying X/y» mil 'QptWc 

ycypaxftevai. 

4. For an example of a faurroXucrfy see 616. 

5. BtXci? . ( ) : above 17 is what looks more like a rough breathing than any letter. 

14. vTOfidx<n{s]: this use of the word in the metaphorical sense of the Latin sfomachus 
seems to be new. 

17. Udfityicq mrtjkwrov : SC. roirapxias; cf. 101. 4-5, and for the omission of roirapxta 
610. 3. 



1 



VI. COLLATIONS OF HOMERIC FRAGMENTS 

(The collations of //. i-xii. and the Odyssey are with the text of Ludwich, those 
of //. xiii-xxiv with that of La Roche.) 

(a) Iliad. 

534. 12-9 x 1 8-8 cm. Bottom of a column containing parts of i. 1-15, with stops 
and occasional accents. 15 cAwo-cro. Third century, written in good-sized 
sloping uncials. The first column, as often, was a short one. 

585. 1 1-5 x 5-2 cm. Fragment, containing about 1 o letters in a line, of i. 43-59, 
with stops, accents and breathings. 57 € of riycp]$cv above o erased. Third 
century, written in good-sized irregular uncials. 

536* 16-5x3-3 cm. A few letters from near the ends of i. 127-147 from the 
bottom of a column, with accents, &c, written on the verso of a second or 
third century account. Third century, in medium-sized sloping uncials. 

587. 9 x 8*9 cm. Ends of i. 215-220 and beginnings of i. 250-266 (omitting 
265), with elision-marks and paragraphia Second or third century, written 
in irregular uncials. 

538. 107 x 10 cm. Upper part of a leaf from a book containing on the verso 
the beginnings of i. 273-297 and on the recto the ends of 318-342, with 
numerous stops, accents, breathings, elision-marks and a paragraphus. 273 
fi€v inserted over the line by a second hand. 274 *|[e]|i0€<r0€. 277 IlqXc&q' 
0cA[c. 294 vve^ofim (apparently). 322 AxtAAqo? (so probably in 1. 319 
Ax*AA[iji). 327 Oav. 328 t\v of txio-Otip above eu erased. 329 Final 4 of 
/AcAatVqt added by a second hand. Third century, written in small upright 
uncials. 

539. 5-2 x 37 cm. Parts of i. 575-5 8 3, having from 2 to 10 letters from the 
middles of lines. Second century, written in good-sized round uncials. On 
the verso parts of 8 lines of a scientific literary work of some kind. 7 ]a 
lurafioka I [. Late second or third century. 

540. 11*9 x 16 cm. On the recto parts of a second or third century account 
and of an obliterated document. On the verso from the top of a column 
ii. 672-683, 672-9 being practically complete, with numerous accents, &c. 
672 and 673 Nctpcw. 672 r added above the line by a second hand. 673 



VI. COLLATIONS OF HOMERIC FRAGMENTS 275 

ijA[0]«j. 676 Ntiovpov. 6yy s of wj|[o]|<row added above the line. 680 t&[v 
fa. 682 Tfi|x[ c ]|fr' *vcv*P°vto. Third century, written in large uncials of 
the oval type. 

541. 8.1 x 67 cm. Beginnings of ii. 859-873, with accents, &c. 858 Mii[\]rjTov. 
Third century, written in medium-sized sloping uncials. 

542. 238 x 8 cm. Part of a leaf from a book containing on the recto the 
beginnings of Hi. 371-393 (389 being lost) and on the verso the ends of 394- 
418 (4*3t4 being lost), with accents, &c. 378 p€i\jr\ 404 a of aytvOat, above 
c. 406 KtkevOovs. Third century, written in medium-sized rather irregular 
uncials. 

543. 9 x 2-5 cm. Fragment containing a few letters from the ends of iii. 361- 
377, on the verso of a second century document. 364 v of €v]pw above o 
erased. 374 17 of A^/>odi]rrj above cot erased. Late second or third century, 
written in a semi-uncial hand. 

544. 9*4 x 3*1 cm. A few letters from the ends of iv. 182-198, with occasional 
accents. 186 v\n€V€p$€v by a second hand. 195 Ax<u]a>i/. 196-7 omitted. 
Third century, written in medium-sized sloping uncials. 

545. 9 x 4-2 cm. A few letters from the beginnings of iv. 478-490, with occa- 
sional breathings and elision-marks, written on the verso of a second century 
document. 483 v of £v above /x erased. 485 After tt\v /ac a correction. 
487 opposite this line in the margin Kar(a>?). Second or third century, 
written in good-sized upright uncials. 

546. 5*6 x 8-4 cm. On the recto beginning of an early second century taxing- 
list. On the verso a few letters from the ends of vii. 237-244 and beginnings 
of 264-273 from the tops of two columns, with stops. 237 avbpo]KTo<rias. 
239 (civ of iroAc/itfcti; above <m\v erased. 268 $ above v of bcvrepop. 269 
€7r4&«i*7<ray. 272 aa-mbi cvxptptyfcis. Second century, written in a semi- 
uncial hand. 

547. 1 1-6 x 2i«8 cm. Ends of vii. 324-336 and beginnings of 357-363 from the 
bottoms of two columns, with accents, &c. 330 fc above the line. 333 
jcarafceiojxep. 359 b corn to b\ Second or third century, written in medium- 
sized round uncials. 

548> 167 x 8*8 cm. Part of a leaf from a book (numbered on the recto and 
on the verso 1) containing on the recto the earlier parts of ix. 235-268 and 
on the verso the latter parts of 269-301, with numerous accents, &c. 236 
<r$ip. 245 € of qjxciir corr. 246 First of $0i<r0at above c erased, ev. 249 /xcr' 
6vi<r0\ 253 *0cf?jff. 254 K&pros corr. from Kparos. 255 e of kc above at 
erased. 256 c of i<r\€iv above the line. 259 cwc'tcAAc corrected to tvlrikX o. 
260 iravto. 264 First v of amipovs added above the line, s of rpivo&as corr. 

T 2 



276 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

268 epire£fi[oto. 270 Second a of ay.iy.ova above the line. 272 €^[[c]]4Ka>v. 
274 Kat €7rt. 276 rj€ yvvauctov. 277 avrt]xa [ra]]. 286 p of yeyapta corr. and 
t adscript added above the line. 288 ft of av&ebvov corr. 290 t of iHji added 
above the line. 291 c of irrokUOpa corr. 293 Second a of £a0&? corr. from 
17. 296 -nokvppr)v€s. 297 Second t of dwrljyqio-t added later, rtjpqorowmr. 
Third century, written in medium-sized irregular uncials. 

549. 9-3x10-8 cm. The middle parts of xi. 39-52 from the bottom of 
a column, with a few breathings, &c. 40 ajxtytore^ce?. 41 Second $ of 
ay.<t>i<f>a\ov added above the line. 45 cfcftowrqo-ap. 51 yer. Late second or 
third century, written in medium-sized round upright uncials. 

650. Fr. (6) 17-8 x 10.3 cm. Two fragments containing a few letters from the 
ends of xi. 505-516 and 521-547 and the earlier parts of 555-567 and 572- 
602, with stops and occasional accents, &c. 525 a]vbp*s for avrot. 563 a>? 
pa tot ay<t> Aiavra (a new reading). 564 TfqXcjcXetroi. 583 €\k€v with t added 
above the line between c and X by a second hand. 595 njXc for arij 14 
(a new reading). 600 cicmjicci. 602 In the margin opposite this line 
a critical sign -s-. Second century, written in small neat round uncials. On 
the verso traces of some second or third century cursive writing. 

551* 24*5 x 25-8 cm. Parts of two columns, of which the first is much mutilated 
and the second nearly complete, containing xiv. 227-253 and 256-283, with 
occasional stops. 232 ovoyaCe. 247 toijxqp. 249 eircifxra-cp. 254 Ml * 06 * 
259 [[5]]fi7|Tci/>a (yrjreipa is mentioned by Eustathius, but not found in the 
MSS.). 267 tOu 269 omitted. 271 oyoaov aarov. 272 Tro\vpoT€ip[av. 
374 *(?) of wwcs above the line. 275 v of yuav above the line. 276 
om. t. 278 vo of ovoyi\v{€v corr. 282 ?rpij<r<rowa, ra being added by 
a second hand (?) above vs erased. Second century, written in a medium- 
sized formal round uncial, the archaic form of Z (X) being employed and 
E being formed by three distinct strokes. 

552. 7*7 x 2-8 cm. A few letters from the ends of xvii. 80-94, with stops. 
Second century, written in medium-sized round upright uncials. 

553. 14-1 x 2-5 cm. Fragment of a leaf from a book containing a few letters 
on the recto from the middles of xix. 97-117 and on the verso from the 
middles of 132-151, from the tops of two columns, with accents, &c. 
114 Xt]ire. 134 is omitted. Third century, written in medium-sized sloping 
uncials. 

554. 8-3x6*1 cm. Beginnings of xix. 251-259 from the bottom of a column, 
with stops and occasional accents, &c 251 x cl rf l » Third century, written 
in medium-sized oval uncials. 

555. 3-2 x 4 cm. Parts of xix. 417-421, with accents, &c. 418 s of ^«r]^crayroy 



VI. COLLATIONS OF HOMERIC FRAGMENTS 277 

added above the line. 419 <r of irpoofato above the line. Third century, 
written in medium-sized rather irregular uncials. 

556. 8-6 x 3-1 cm. A few letters from xx. 241-250 from the top of a column, 
with occasional stops, &c. Final 4 of vortujirji added above the line. Second 
or third century, written in a careful upright hand of the oval type of 
uncials (cf. 26). 

557. 6 6 x 6-2 cm. Beginnings of xxi. 372-382, with accents, &c, written on 
the verso, the recto being blank. Third century, written in good-sized 
uncials. 

558. 13-5 x 126 cm. A few letters from the ends of xxii. 1 15-134 and from 
the beginnings of 143-160, from the tops of two columns, with numerous 
accents, &c. 118 4 of ittoXls corr. 121 was apparently omitted. 150 
yeu{crai. 156 t« vp[iv. Late second or third century, written in medium- 
sized round upright uncials. On the verso part of a third century letter 
beginning ricKvAXofs] 2epi}i{<j>. 

559. n-8 x 12-6 cm. Latter portions of xxii. 1-18 and beginnings of 40-57, 
with numerous accents, &c, from the tops of two columns. Second century, 
written in small neat round uncials. 

560. 5'8xi8-6 cm. A few letters from the ends of xxiii. 775-785 and most 
of 834-847, with occasional accents, &c. 836 r of €<f>ar corr. from $. 
847 VTT]*pTn[a}ro (a new reading) tol 5' €/3oijcrai\ Third century, written in 
medium-sized sloping uncials. 

561. 10 x 6-2 cm. On the recto beginnings of 3 lines in third century cursive. 
On the verso a few letters of xxiv. 282 and 286 and the beginnings of 
318-331 from the top of a column, with numerous accents, &c. Late third 
or early fourth century, written in round upright uncials. 

(b) Odyssey. 

562. 12*2 x 7 cm. Latter portions of i. 131-145, with occasional accents, &c, 
from the top of a column. Third century, written in sloping uncials of the 
oval type. 

563. 8-7 x 4«3 cm. Ends of i. 432-444, with occasional accents, &c, from the 
bottom of a column. At the end part of the title Obv<r<r)eJ(a]s. Second 
or early third century, written in small round uncials resembling 406. 

564. 9*7x4*2 cm. Beginnings of ii. 315-327, with numerous accents and 
marks of quantity, &c. Second or third century, written in medium-sized 
irregular uncials. 

565. 8.3 x 67 cm. Earlier portions of iv. 292-302, with numerous accents, &c, 



278 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

from the top of a column. 292 01 ra y[. 297 ai0ow<nji. Second or third 
century, written in large narrow uncials of the oval type. 

566. 153 x 45 cm. A few letters from the middles of iv. 685-708, with 
occasional accents, &c, from the top of a column. Third century, written 
in medium-sized uncials of the oval type. 

567. 6«9 x 27 cm. A few letters from the ends of iv. 757-765, with accents, 
&c. Third century, written in medium-sized sloping uncials of the 
oval type. 

568. 14-3x81 cm. A few letters from the beginnings of xi. 1-20, with 
accents, &c, from the top of a column. In the left-hand margin the title 
of the roll O&twnreias | A ft. Third century, written in medium-sized sloping 
uncials of the oval type. 

569. 8*2 xn ; 2 cm. On the recto parts of 8 lines of an account (?) in second 
century cursive. On the verso parts of xi. 195-208, with occasional 
accents, &c. 207 1k[*\)ov /cat. Second century, written in a small semi- 
uncial hand. 

570. 1 1-4 x n-8 cm. Parts of xiv. 50-72, 52-6 being nearly complete, the 
rest having lost the earlier portions, with occasional accents, &c. 54 paAtcnra 
0cA«9. 65 ac£c[t. Second century, written in medium-sized round upright 
uncials. 

571. 7*1 X5-I cm. A few letters from xvi. 1-8, with numerous accents, &c, 
from the top of a column. 1 ic]Ai<r4ij4y Oftu|[<r]]<rc[i;s. Late first or second 
century, written in good-sized round upright uncials. 

572. 28.9 x 12*2 cm. Parts of two columns containing a few letters from the 
ends of xviii. 1-35, and the earlier portions of 56-93, with considerable 
lacunae ; numerous accents, &c. 2 t adscript of fufpyijt inserted by a second 
hand. Similarly in 56 Ipui. 58 c^ar. 65 E[vpvfia]xps T{e kcli AjrJr&Voo?. 
66 <^ot\ 78 aA[ (so apparently, not Aj{tivoos) 12 letters ] tvfynrtv. Third 
century, written in a small neat uncial hand of the oval type. 

578. 15x7-8 cm. On the recto part of a document in thini century cursive. 
On the verso beginnings of xix. 452-471, with accents, &c, from the bottom 
of a column. 456 Obvaofaos. 465 Uapp^a-ov. Third century, written in 
small sloping uncials of the oval type. 



VII. DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY 

DOCUMENTS 

574. 3-9 x J 3*2 cm. On the recto part of a list of payments for taxes, &c, 
mentioning fiaOn&v e (bpaxpcu) to (rrryx^oAop), fa<rixo<f>v\(aKia$) (6fio\6$) 
x(oXkoi) £, / <rv(\ji)Tta{y) (bpayjuxL) *« (ircVT&ISokov) [x(oAkoi) j3. fi€pi<rfwv 
7T\f.v$€Vo^4vrj9 t€ (Itovs) riafifX€(yovs) TIapabt(<rov) fia6\xov a 'EpfiaCov y3a0fio({5) 
a Aprf/x(ov) 0o[tJpi8o9 . • . , r/MHr(€£iriKo£ ?) *« (Irovs) $aatyi ((5/3oAoi difo), . . . i/uijs 
Sapairaros dovAov 'ATroAAawfov KAavdlov Ar/jun^r/Hou &vaypa]<f>ofxivov iitl Ap6fiov 
Gorjp&os (&pctyjJL*l) a (tctp<o/3q\ov) (q/xta>/3&toi>), Trpo(rb(iaypa<f)6pi€va) (6(3o\6s). 
For vkivOevoiUvri, here connected with fiaOiiot, see note on 602. 43. 
T/KMrcCiuKcfo is also new, and is perhaps a tax for the maintenance of the 
official bank ; cf. 613. 37, note. For bcvuoQvXaida cf. P. Fay. Towns - 
53 introd., and for the pig-tax 288. Second century. 8 nearly complete 
lines. On the verso an extract from a narrative of the preservation of 
Eurypylus by Patroclus (cf. //. xi. 575 sqq). The text is UirpoKkov 
pLa6rj<r6pL€vov t(s cli|, 6 hi iiriKvfc (1. imyvovs) koX airo\v6fi€vos riji irapara^ta)?, 
EvpwrvKip <rwavT% by k<j\ As Ik ttjs irAqyq? iypvros (1. -to) iirayayvv *U r^v 
inelvov o-Krjvijv ciarcu. rrjs rj. 'AxtAActa lirefii/rei' is to be supplied at the 
beginning, probably from a previous column. Second century, written in 
a semi-uncial hand. 5 lines. 

575. 1 1 *2 x 7-8 cm. Acknowledgement addressed by Hatres son of Kouphateus, 
Dionys(ius) son of Prometheus and a third person to Sarapion, stating that 
they owed him as a year's rent for 3 arourae 2 artabae of wheat, z of lentils 
and 7, of barley, in addition to 1 artaba of wheat and 1 of barley for seed (?), 
concluding with the signature of Hatres. Dated in the fourteenth year 
of Trajan, Phaophi (a.D. no). Written in very corrupt Greek upon the 
verso, the recto containing only the title. Practically complete. 19 lines 
in all. 

576- 30-1 x8-6 cm. On the recto a lease dated in the tenth year of Trajan, 
incomplete and much obliterated. On the verso a letter from Diogenes 
to Demetrous, nearly complete but obliterated in parts, the address being 
written on the recto. Early second century. 33 lines in all. 

577. 17*6 x 7-6 cm. Contract for the sale of | of a varpiKbp yApot of a house 



\ 



280 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

in the quarter TlawUvovs Ilapablaov by Sarapion to Synistor and Zoilus. 
The formula follows the Ptolemaic style (cf. 99) : — Date ; tfv 'Ofu/rifyxow 
7rrfXet tijs GhfPaCfios tif ay{opav6n<i>v . . . [it^ptavro . . . irapck 2apa[iiCcc]ifos . . . iv 
A[y]tu$ b(\jxoi,po)v [xipos . . . Kal avr6$€v avi\€tv rbv JLapaitlwa . . • ret; <rvf»rc^a>- 
vrjiiivas vvip Tifirjs . • . ipyvplov bpayjxas biaKO<rlas in irXijpow \a(\Kov) (rciXarra) 
ic, irwXei Kal [/Sjt/tatoi Xapairt<a[v to] btpoipov ikipos . . • h Kal irap^crcu KaBapbv 
airb airoypa<f>rjs ir&arjs Kal airb y€<opy(tas) PaaikiKTJs Kal ov<naKrjs Kal iravrbs 
cl&ow bia iravrbs iv iyvta rfj avrjj. Signatures of the buyers. The 300 silver 
drachmae are converted into copper at the usual ratio of 450 : 1 ; cf. 
P. Oxy. II. p. 187 and P. Tebt. I. p. 600. Dated in the second year of 
Hadrian, Tubi (A.D. 118). Nearly complete. 35 lines. 
678. 13-1x9-2 cm. Beginnings of 15 lines from an account of judicial 
proceedings mentioning Scin-tcwd? vo[ai[kos and 4>Xaovioy Ilpla/xo? 6 dtic<uo&d[rq?. 
Second century. 

579. 4-8 x 107 cm. Beginning of a document addressed to Apolinarius, 
strategus (cf. 484. 2), and Hierax, basilico-grammateus, by Teos and Thonis, 
r&v air' *0£vptiyx(<av) iroX(€a>s) UpoT€KTOv<av 'AOrivas <s)orfcpibo$ ? (cf. 483. 3, note). 
Written about A.D. 138. 6 lines. 

580. 4*2 x 16-5 cm. Parts of two columns containing official returns giving the 
names of persons eligible for holding various offices, the opening sentence 
being lost. The first has . . . eU imn}]p[ij<ru>] t&v Kara (corn from irapa) (f>v\a- 
ktjv b€<rp.t(i>v bCb<afu rbv faoyeypaiifiivoty) ivra eiiropov koI [imTrjb)eiov . . . ; the 
second . . . roft vpoovai (i.e. the persons addressed) els tiriTrjpvi<nv <f>6pov 
Qpaypiov Ua€/3vO€Q)s d&ayu robs imoy€ypap.p.ivovs Svras #c.r.X. Second century. 
11 lines in all. 

581. 147 * 6*3 cm. Conclusion of a notification addressed to the agoranomi of 
Oxyrhynchus by (Caecilius) Clemens (cf. 241), asking them to register 
a sale of which the value was 10 talents 3000 drachmae. Cf. 241-2. Dated 
in the second year of Imp. Caes. Nerva Trajanus Aug. Germ., sixth inter- 
calary day of Caesareus (Aug. 29 A.D. 99). 17 lines. 

582. io-6 x 146 cm. Letter from Demetrius to his brother Heraclides, 
beginning ivefisjfi croi bia llenripios bio araTrjpas Kal 6kt&) SfioXovs koI Akovi 
rvpta' i£rjra<ra tv€Ka tov &XXov \o\kov koI tov ovpfSSkov. ipaOov 'Xl/nWa ic\r^ 
nival vap ifiov &ar€ aol iv (bpaxpals) u? &o[t€] els biaypa^v Kal kiyovra bebuKwai 
Tjj p.tiKp<i avv T<j> avpfioXy tspb . iroXXov. Address on the verso. Second 
century. Incomplete. 14 lines. 

583. 13-6 x 19.8 cm. Will of a woman leaving her property in the first instance 
to her husband Plution, and in the second to his two sons who had been 
adopted by herself, with a legacy of 100 drachmae to his daughter. Cf. 



VII. DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS 281 

489-93. Dated in the fourth year of Hadrian (a.D. 119-20). Incomplete, 
the ends of lines and most of the signatures being lost. 18 lines. Written 
across the fibres. 

584. ii*6 x 7-9 cm. On the recto an diroy/xx^i] of property at Pela addressed to 
Theon also called Ptolemaeus (cf. 76. 1) and Tryphon, /3i/3Ato$i/Aajc€9, by 
a woman in accordance with a decree of the praefect Flavius Titianus. 
Written about A.D. 129 ; cf. 76 and 481. introd. Incomplete, the end being 
lost and the ink much obliterated in parts. 18 lines. On the verso a similar 
&iroypa<t>ri addressed to the same p(.j3\io<pv\aK€s by Harthonis, concerning 
house-property at Oxyrhynchus. Written about A.D. 129. Nearly com- 
plete. %% lines. 

585. 12-6 x 9*3 cm. Conclusion of a horoscope, the date being lost except the 
hour of the day (the ninth). The sun and Mercury were in Aquarius, 
Saturn in Scorpio, Jupiter in Pisces, Mars in Sagittarius, Venus in Aries, 
the moon in Capricorn, wpoo-Koiros Icrxara Aibvfuov. Second century. 9 lines. 

586* 16x16-1 cm. Receipt for a month's d\jr<&viov addressed to Socrates by 
Nemesion iiriKokovixcvos. "AA/a/xoy, written in rude uncials. Dated in the 
sixteenth year of Imp. Caes. Nerva Trajanus Aug. Germ. Dae. (A. d. 11 3-3). 
Practically complete. 9 lines. 

687. 18-8x8-3 cm. On the recto beginnings of the last 12 lines of a letter. 
On the verso ends of 14 lines of another letter, and on a narrow strip joined 
to this 22 lines of a third letter (beginning **fy(<f>) r$ <rnovbauoT&T<p /xov <£&<p), 
nearly complete but having lost the end. Second century. 

588' 24*5 x 1 1*5 cm. Two documents glued together, of which the first is part 
of an application to the fit/3\io<t>v\aK€9 for leave to alienate or mortgage 
2 arourae, which are declared upon oath to be free from all encumbrances 
(cf. 483. 18 sqq.). Dated in the eleventh year of Trajan, Phamenoth (a.d. 
108). Incomplete. 37 lines. The second document consists of the begin- 
nings of 30 lines of a contract for the Ttapaxd»pr\<ns of 2 arourae of catoecic 
land, similar to 604. On the verso $>ayn(v(*Q) a. 

589- 6*2 x 11 cm. Beginning of a letter, written in a good-sized uncial hand of 
the second century. The text is Zlofnr&vios Seim/juavdy 'Airtow ^TrioWimyi 
t&v irapa itora\xbv lba<f>&v (a new title) rait $iArrfra>i \alp€Lv. fjv Jfircjuu/ra? 
Ma-Kcyfriv Ka>p[Qv] rwtav . . . Address on the verso. J lines. 

590. 1 6*3 x 7*5 cm. Conclusion of a lease with most of the signatures of the 
lessees. The land was leased for three years at the annual rent of 
36 drachmae, 3 artabae of wheat and 6 of barley, and £ artaba of barley for 
TTpoffTariKdv. Dated in the sixteenth year of Trajan, Athur (a.D. 113). 
27 lines. 



282 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

59 L 4-5 x io*5 cm. Full name of Hermias son of Spartas. Second century. 
Complete. 3 lines. 

592. 51x91-5 cm. Beginning of a petition to Sarapion, yevopivy -npvraviKy 
ipX 0VT ( l ) k/** * a * &px&iKCL(njj ica[l irpbs 17} ^m/xeJAcfy r&v \pr\\iari<rrw kcX t&v 
i\ka)v KpirqpCtov, from Herals, referring to a dispute with Marcus Antonius 
Asclepiades about an i<r<f>d\€ia for a sum of money. Above the petition is 
the last line, tov b€b[opipov v-noy.vri\xaTos . . . , of an official letter (probably to 
the strategus) covering the petition, which thus formed part of a series of 
documents arranged as in 485 ; cf. especially 11. 5 sqq. Dated in the seventh 
year of Hadrian (a.d. 123-3). IO lines. On the verso 6 incomplete lines 
from a list of names. 

593. 15-1 x 8-5 cm. Lease of 2 arourae at NfiicocnyxiTov iitoUuov Ik tov FlroAtjxafov 
gal <Pi\C<tkov Kkrjpov from Thrasyllous to Sarapion for four years and four 
inundations (fipoxaL) at an annual rent of 8 artabae of wheat and 32 drachmae, 
the land to be cultivated with any crop x*>pi? Jcrdrecos nal 6xop*v€lov (cf. 101. 
12). Title on the verso. Written in the thirteenth year of Aurelius Anto- 
ninus (A.D. 172-3). Incomplete, the end being lost. 29 lines. 

594. 7-2 x 15*3 cm. Conclusion of a petition mentioning the praefect Sempro- 
nius Liberalis (AifickAptos). Dated in the twenty-second year (of Antoninus), 
Tubi (a.d. 159). 6 incomplete lines. 

595. 5*3 x 1 1.6 cm. Beginning of a monthly return of receipts (wvialos <rmic&p) 
by the sitologi /*6r*j9 roir(apxCas) Tlirvrj t6-k(v>v). Written in the nineteenth 
year of Antoninus (a. D. 156). 4 lines. 

596* 6*3 x 12-9 cm. Horoscopes of two persons. The first was born in the 
thirteenth year of Antoninus Mexcip 17 els $ &pas e wkt6s ; the sun, Mercury 
and Venus were in Capricorn, the moon in Pisces, Saturn and Jupiter in 
Aries, Mars in Sagittarius, &poo-k6ttos in Libra. The second was born in the 
second year of Antoninus 4>a/i[ei>a>0] k ch a &pas h wktos, the sun being in 
Pisces, the moon in Gemini, Saturn and Mercury in Aquarius, Mars and 
Venus in Taurus. Written about A.D. 150. Nearly complete. 17 lines. 

597. 12.8 x 6 cm. Letter to Macer, strategus of the division of Heraclides in 
the Arsinoite nome, from a irpiKTwp ipyvpiK&v [tiv)u>v ica)/x<Si>, continuing &irb 

t&p [ ] cfc if[C]9{pLTj(Tiv) <PafX€(v<*6) avvayofjUvtav) [vapoi tQv ?] 'Pa)/xa£a)i> koI 

ivnriKpCr<av [ ] $#A« ras tQv IrnKplo-caiy [ ] . i/xa>j> ivb (bpaxp&v) 'Af*/? 

(dpokov) (fmiwpcktov) [. ] 'AAij, i0 (Itovs) opLofos [. ,] / {bpaxfud) 'Hp 

(6/3o\6s). Second century. 10 lines, of which the beginnings are lost. 

598. 9*4 x 14*2 cm. Beginning of a letter, which was left unfinished, from 
Andronicus to his father Statilius Phanias. Second century, written in 
irregular uncials. 5 lines. 



VII. DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS 283 

599. 5-1 Xi3*4 cm. A short letter written across the fibres: — IlroAc/uui&ot rm 
Kajxnrlrryt rm <t>(\oai. firjbiv \iy€ vepl ov o^elAct? pov Xoyapibtov t&v vXigrptmv 
((os bdajis avrcoi (1. aim!). Late first or second century. Complete. 3 lines. 

600. 33-3 x 14-5. P. Cairo 10004. On the recto parts of two columns giving 
measurements of land and buildings. Early second century. Incomplete 
and much effaced. On the verso a similar document. Dated in the 
sixteenth year of Hadrian (a. d. i 3a). Complete. 1 8 lines, partly obliterated. 

601- 17-7 xi i«8. P. Cairo 10005. Letter addressed to the agoranomi of 
Oxyrhynchus by an official* (cf. 106-7), stating that Harpocras had received 
back from the public archives the will which he had made four years before. 
Dated in the nineteenth year of Trajan, Epeiph (a.D. 117). Nearly com- 
plete, but broken at the top. 13 lines. 

602. 23-8x13-9. P. Cairo 10010. Letter from Dionysius to Heraclides, 
ypofifioreifs arparqyov 'Oci<rea>? 07j/3aftoy, stating that he would procure a boat 
(irAotop), and inviting him to come and stay until the boat (irkoiaptbtov) was 
found. Address on the verso. Second century. Complete. 11 lines. 

603. 18.5 x 18.5 cm. Marriage-contract, in which the husband (who speaks in 
the first person) acknowledges the receipt of the dowry and irap&fapva, and 
promises not to alienate his house-property without his wife's consent (cf. 
496. 7-8). In the event of a divorce the irapdtficpva were to be repaid 
immediately anti the dowry in sixty days, with an extra allowance if the 
wife was fyKvos (cf. 496. 10). Written in a semi-uncial hand in the sole 
reign of Marcus Aurelius (A.D. 169-176). Incomplete, the earlier portions 
of lines being lost throughout, besides other lacunae. 39 lines. 

604. 8.1 x 137 cm. Parts of 13 lines from the beginning of a marriage- 
contract, written (across the fibres) M lovAfoy 2e0aorrj}y. Early second 
century. 

605. 17x9-8 cm. Part of the conclusion of a marriage-contract with the 
signatures. Late first or early second century. %i incomplete lines. 

606. Height 3*5 cm. Parts of 8 lines from a marriage-contract, written across 
the fibres. On the verso parts of % lines of the title. Late first or early 
second century. 

607- 16-8x9 cm. Parts of 1 1 lines from the conclusion of a marriage-contract, 
another column having probably preceded. Written in a good-sized round 
uncial hand in the fourteenth year of an emperor, probably Trajan (i.e. 
A.D. 110-1). 

608. &3xn»8 cm. Letter from Horion to his sister Taeoukon(?) Address 
on the verso. Second century. Nearly complete, but much obliterated in 
parts. 25 lines. 



284 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

609. 6 x 7.3 cm. An order for payment : — A4£cu irapb Sa/wirfofifoy) to(v) 
'Atto\X(i)(v(ov) bpa\fia(s) i&rJKOvra &<p &v t6 £irt&Jcaro(i>) (sc. bidortikov ? ; cf. 
610). Second century. Complete. 4 lines. 

610- 4-6 x 7*4 cm. Another order for payment in the same hand as 609 : — 
Ai£ai iraph At&vfxov tov 2apairla>(i*o?) (bpa^jxas) pt/3, ttjv bi <nrovbri(v) yfourai, 
t[6 bi ? i]mb4KaTo(v) bi&arru\o(v). Second century. Complete. 4 lines. 

611. 151 x 6*7 cm. An official order, written in very bad Greek. The text is 
Ilpds \rn6pLin\<nv bi£ai rot fiifiXla irapa 'AiroWmvCov i<r<f>payurp.(ha) ra ovpLfiok{k}a 
TTp6crc\0c 'AyadoxAe? l\(ov avrov <r6fifio\a [ficrp] r<p tov pcrpcq 2ap<nr&p.puovt, \dpiv 
tov TCT&prov vp&TOv cUaoTetActra) 2apa7ri/x/i0)i; irpb tovv (1. ov hv) 'AyafioKXrjs 
diaorcfXiy. Second century. Complete. 13 lines. 

612. 9*3x12*1 cm. Receipt issued by the sitologi of the eastern toparchy 
Ta/xir(crl) t6tmv for 15I artabae of wheat ja*'(w) £u(<rn|>) xaraA( ) paid by 
Ptolemais ; cf. 89, 90, 287 and 617-8. Dated in the reign of Trajan, who 
has the title Dacicus (a.D. i 03-1 17). Incomplete, the beginnings of lines 
being lost. 7 lines. 

613. 6-4x12 cm. Receipt for 1 artaba of wheat paid out from the deposit 
of Diogas, with the signature of the recipient. The text is Atc<rr(dXTi) 
(irvpov) y€vrjfi(aTos) 117 (trovs) 'AvtmvCvov KaCaapos tov Kvplov 61(a) o-iroX(oy»i») 
&v<a Toirapx(las) Movtp(ov) T(?7r(a>v) Atoyas 'AfxoiT(oy) Aoi7r(di>) Oip{a) (ipT&fZri) °- 
(2nd hand) QiXogtvos 6 koI QiXCvkos Aiowclov iirrjvtfy]Kd koX bihrrikov pot r^i* 
iv ivopjaros AioyaTos 'A/xo(i)t(os). Cf. 616. Written about A.D. 155. Com- 
plete. 6 lines. 

614. 10*9 x 7*8 cm. Receipt for 30 artabae of wheat paid out by sitologi to 
Asclepiades from the deposit of Heraclides. The text is Aitcrrikfao-av) 
(irvpov) ycvrjp^aros) tov r3tcA(0oVro?) id (Itovs) AvpqXtmv 'Avrwvtvov kclI K[6^ipL6bov 
Kat<rip(t)v r&v KVpU&v 81(a) <rt(roAoya>i*) &v<a TOTi{apylas) QdaficaiS T6ir(mv) diro 
61p(aT0s) 'HpaxAcftov 'Ivtbtopov ' AaK\r)indbTi rf kclI Evbatpiovi 81(a) ®iobdpov 
tov ical 'ApLfxwtov 0ip{aros) (dpr<£/3ai) A, / apr<£/3(at) TpidKOvra, 'Eirfpaxo? 
fior)(6b$) <rc(rq(p.€ia>pLai). /crfX(\7//xa) 6. Written in A.D. 1 79-80. Complete. 

13 lines. 

615. 7*3 x 16 cm. Receipt, similar to 614, for 65 artabae paid out by the 
sitologi of the eastern toparchy. Written in A.D. 179-80. Nearly 
complete. 5 lines. 

616. 11*9x11*3 cm. Receipt, similar to 614, for various amounts of wheat, 
making *]\ artabae 8 choenices in all, paid out by sitologi to Ammonius, 
with the signatures of two persons not previously mentioned (sitologi?) 
authorizing the payment (bid<rrct\ov). Written about A.D. 162. Incomplete. 

14 lines. Written on the verso, the recto being blank. 



VII. DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS 285 

617. 14-8 X 74 cm. Receipt for 6J artabae of wheat paid (8ieor(<{Aij) efc rb 
typoo-iov) ivd 04fi(aTos) Atow^a-Cov). Cf. 517-8. Written in A.D. 134-5. 
Complete. 7 lines. 

618. 8-4x5 cm. Similar receipt for %8 artabae. Written in A. D. 179-80. 
Incomplete, having lost the beginnings of lines. 8 lines. 

619. ao x 1 7-3 cm. Authorization, similar to 516, addressed to the sitologi 2*o> 
t6tt((ov) by Sarapion, for the payment of various amounts of wheat to 
different persons. Cf. 516. introd. Written about A.D. 147. Complete. 
15 lines. 

620. 9-8x7-9 cm. Similar authorization addressed to the sitologi &iw 
roirapxCas 2ko> (?) roimv by Dionysius for the payment of 12$ artabae 
to Epimachus through Demetrius also called Theon, concluding with the 
latter's signature Aitybrijrpcoff 6 koL ®4v(v) imivcyK(a) koI lariv avrov ra 
Trpoycypaix(n4va). Dated in the eleventh year of Antoninus, Thoth (A.D. 147). 
Practically complete. 40 lines. 

621. 8-4 x io*2 cm. Similar authorization issued by Dionysia to the sitologi 
Taapiriitov (sc. t6ttq>v) for the payment of % artabae. Written across the 
fibres in A. D. 163-4. Nearly complete. 12 lines. 

622- 14-4 x 7-4 cm. Similar authorization issued by Dionysius and Apollonius 
for the payment of 60 artabae in alL Dated in the second year of 
M. Aurelius and Verus, Athur (a.d. 161). Nearly complete. 19 lines. 

623. io-6 x 7-6 cm. Similar authorization issued by Dorion, Saurtmbrjuo? 6 koX 
[El\]d$vtos, for payments to Amois and Thoteous. Written about A.D. 146. 
Nearly complete. 14 lines. 

624. 107x5-5 cm. Similar authorization issued by Isidora for the payment 
of 11 artabae 8 choenices to Herals. Dated in the twelfth year of 
Antoninus, Thoth (a.d. 148). Nearly complete. 15 lines. 

625. 9-1x117 cm. Similar authorization issued by Theon, Elpr)vo<f>v\&iaos 
6 koI 'AA0a[i]e&» to the sitologi ploys roirapxlas Ke/9Kcv/>«i<rea>? roimv for the 
payment of 3! artabae to Hephaestion. Dated in the twenty-second year 
of Hadrian, Phaophi (a. d. 137). Complete. 10 lines. 

626. 8x7-6 cm. Similar authorization issued by Heraclides to the sitologi 
of the eastern toparchy Taainri(jx)ov (cf. 621) for the payment of 5 artabae 
to Zoilus. Written in A.D. 166-7. Nearly complete. 11 lines. 

627* 10 x 8*i cm. Similar authorization issued by Alexandras for the payment 
of 50 artabae. Dated in the twelfth year of Antoninus, Phaophi (a.d. 148). 
Practically complete. 9 lines. 

628. 9*4 x ii-i cm. Similar authorization issued by Diogenes and Chaeremon 
for the payment of 3a artabae to Andronicus. Dated in the twenty-second 



1 



286 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

year of Antoninus, sixth intercalary day of Mesore (Aug. 29, A.D. 159). 
Practically complete. 7 lines. 

629. 13-2 x 77 cm. Similar authorization issued by Idomeneus for the 
payment of if artabae in all. Dated in the twenty-third year of Antoninus 
(A. D. 159-60). Written across the fibres. Incomplete. 18 linea 

630. 1 J XJ33 cm. Similar authorization addressed to the sitologi 0w\0ea>y 
/x^oTjy (sc. roirapxCas) by Achilleus for various payments. Written about 
A.D. 161. Practically complete. 13 lines. 

631. 11.8x57 cm. Similar authorization addressed to the sitologi of the 
middle toparchy Ktptctvpw kcu IHtwi tottuv by Alexandrus for the payment 
of 20 artabae to Theon. Dated in the twenty-second year of Antoninus, 
Thoth (a. d. 158). Complete. 12 lines. 

632. 8*6x11*2 cm. Similar authorization addressed to the sitologi 2tvr<* 
roV(a>v) by Chaeremon for the payment of 2 artabae to Apollonia. Dated 
in the twenty-third year of Antoninus, Phaophi (a. d. 159). Nearly 
complete. 8 lines. 

633. 117 x io*8 cm. Fragment from the conclusion of a contract for the sale 
(Tiapax<*pri<ri$) of i££ arourae (ij A xV> being the half of 2% J J) of catoecic 
land at Movlpov titoUiov Ik tov Nutavbpov ko\ &Wwv KkJjpov for 900 silver 
drachmae to Demetrous, who was under age, through her father, with most 
of the signatures. Cf. 504. The land was to be delivered free airb ycvpytas 
/SacrtAifcq? [kcu oi]aiaKrjs kclI Upas ical iripov Ttvbs dbovs ; cf. 506. 37, note. 
Early second century. 25 lines. 

634. 238x20.4 cm. Will of Aunchis daughter of Isas. The testatrix 
bequeaths her house-property, &c, to her husband Abascantus, giving to 
Tycharous, the slave of Diogenes, for her lifetime the right to live in the 
house and probably a sum of money. If Tycharous was freed within 
a year from the death of the testatrix, Abascantus had to give her 
500 drachmae more. If she was freed after that date or not freed at all, 
other provisions were made. There follow (1) the signatures of Aunchis 
and the usual six witnesses, the seal of the sixth witness being irpovop.fi 
'EvKavd-TTov (cf. 494. 31, note), (2) the docket of the /xotj/kovcmw, (3) the date 
and title ; cf. 489. Dated in the eleventh year of Hadrian, Neos Sebastos 
(a. d. 126). Incomplete, the latter halves of lines being lost, besides other 
lacunae. 30 lines. Written across the fibres. 

635. 14-5 X 145 cm. Parts of 28 lines of a petition ]<p IdvKry iv&pxv Alyuirrov 
by Ammonius and others, beginning . . . ImbuKapitv UaKTovpLrjC}^ M&yvy 
rip TjycpLov€v<raim pifikcibiov Kal irvxoficp ... A date in the joint reign of 
Marcus Aurelius and Commodus (probably the date of the petition itself) 



VII. DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS 287 

is mentioned in 11. 8-9. A copy of the previous petition referred to follows 
in 11. 12 sqq. rd ivrlypal^ov rd virortTaypivov. 2<m 8^' Ttry II aKTOVfi-qCy 
Mdyvy. ... It is clear from these indications that Sanctus entered office 
at some period later than March 28 A. D. 177, when it is known from 
B. G. U. 525 that T. Pactumeius Magnus was praefect, but prior to the 
death of M. Aurelius in March A.D. 180. His successor was very likely 
the Flavius Priscus(?) mentioned in B. G. U. 12; cf. P. Meyer, Beitrdge 
zur alten Geschichte I. pp. 477-8. 

636. 105 x 8-8 cm. Supplementary return of property addressed to Sarapion 
and Sarapiades, fiip\io<pv\aK€s 9 by Ptollis ; cf. 72 and 481. The formula is 
Trpoo-cnroyp&QopLai . . • iUaiov rplrov fiipovs oUCas . . . /x€ra7T€irra>Jcdra>[i'] ds avrifv 
(sc. the writer's wife) . . . iiro imrpoBia-iiov lavctov. The first and sixth years 
of Trajan are mentioned, and the return was probably made in A. D. 109 ; 
cf. 481, introd. and 483. 32. Incomplete, the end being lost. 24 lines. 

637- 13x7-5 cm. Return of property, similar to 481. The formula is intoypi- 
<f>ofxat ofows Kara ret TtpoarvrayyAva rb KarqjrrqKbs cts fie i£ dvofiaros rod irarpds 
. . . fxif iiroypayfrajUvov, ixoXovOm fj ireirofqrcu irepl jcaraAetyea)? SpoXoytq bia 
ypa<f>lov TaXaw . . . The twelfth year of Trajan is mentioned and the return 
was probably made in A. D. 109. Incomplete, the beginning and end being 
lost. 21 lines. 

638. 1 1 -a x 77 cm. Conclusion of a declaration apparently similar to 76, the 
best preserved portion relating to the terms upon which the property was. 
inherited ; cf. 75. 29 sqq. iirofiovvai . . • rhv T^poy€y]pa\xp.ivov ptov AbcXQov . . . 
bpaxfias <ffc<xr[t Kal] IvoiKtlv Typ fxiyrepa rjfxQv crvv fjfitlv iv fu£ iw irpoycypafxfjdv&v 
oIklQv oUta eVl top rrjs (a>ijs airrijs yj>6vov i<tf bv kcl\ btarp4(f>€iv fjpbas aMjv. Kal 

. ipLvvu K.rA. Dated in the sixteenth year of Trajan, Athur (A.D. 112). 
30 lines, much obliterated. 

639. 19-8x11 cm. Lease of an ikawvovap&bciaos [iv] $ <pvvciKc$ Kal eVepa 
iyp6bpva (1. QoIvikcs . . . btpoSpva) at Psobthis in the middle toparchy by 
Sarapion and Exacon and their mother Caecilia Polla (cf. 606. 3-4) to Horns, 
a Persian of the Epigone, for three years from Tubi of the seventh year of 
Trajan, the annual rent being 160 drachmae, paid half in Athur and half in 
Choiak, and 3 artabae iKXcKTtjs . . . Written in the seventh year of Trajan 
(a. d. 103-4). Incomplete. 40 lines. 

640. 1 a- 1 xi i-6 cm. Conclusion of a lease of land, ending rrjs hi fuaOtiaeus 
Pcfiat.ovp.linis per/>elra> 6 /xefU<r0a>fie'i>off threp rod juie/xio-da>Jc<{r(os) els t6 br)(pi6<riQv) ri 
icot' eros air<$ra#cr[o]i; Kal and r&v irpoKtipivoav rijs ir/jox/oifcreaw irvpov apr&fias dlica 
<$*Ta>i r<j> pip ivcor&Ti erei apr&fias ireWe t$ hi 1<ti6vti Irei ipri^as Wica Tpeis, Sv 
vdmw kclt irot bd<T€i T<p f£e/u<r0a>fctfri rd dip-a KaOapbv ivd Triors bairainjs fj 



288 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

&irana&T(ti b iav ii[p]o(ro<f>€t\lari /i€0' q/uuoAiia?, xal fj irpa£t? jc.t.A. Dated in the 
fifth year of Hadrian (a. d. 120-1). 23 lines. 

641. 26-1 xy-6 cm. Notice from Dio[nysius] (cf. 346) to the agoranomi con- 
cerning the cession (?) of 5 arourae of catoecic land; cf. 47-8. Dated in the 
fourth year of Trajan, Neos Sebastos (a.d. 100). Incomplete, being in two 
fragments of which the first has only the beginnings of lines. 25 lines in all* 

642. 207 x 143 cm. Conclusion of a letter from Anoubion son of Julius, 
y(v6(JL€vo$ ypa/x/xarcvy fcioi/ojceooy, to a high official, ending #ca! rjpius i{v)v AiroAai/- 
oxajxci? r<p XPyvf*? ty&v qfc*> np& vavrbs yap TTttppovTUafxev rrjs Trpds vfias Kal tovs 
SfxoCovs vpclv ayaOovs evvotas Kal aperrjs rj t&v &X\oav a-ndvrcav, ippwro, Kvpic. 
Second century, written in a large semi-uncial hand. 12 lines. 

643. 9-3x14-8 cm. Upper portions of two columns of an account of pay- 
ments for various purposes, the silver drachmae and copper obols being kept 
distinct. vavXonicfjs (tyaxfiai) tf (or it ?) occurs. Second century. 13 lines 
in all. 

644* 23-2x197 cm. Letter from Dionysas to his sister Nice, asking her to 
send him a letter iirl rd Bovkc<£c{Ai(o)i>, &c, written in rude uncials. Second 
century. Incomplete. 24 lines. 

645. Fr. (a) 12-4x9-6 cm. Two fragments, containing the latter portions of 
lines of two letters, the first (8 lines) to the writer's sister, the second, which 
is much longer, to his brother Enthesmus with reference to farming 
operations, &c. 

646. 22 x 18 cm. Will of Plution son of Ischyrion, written in the reign of 
Hadrian (A.D. 1 17-138). The testator bequeaths his house-property, &c, 
to his sons, of whom one was tvi}kt£, another £<£i}Ai£, in equal portions, except 
• . •]? £vktvris pcy&kris Kal fcAelpq? aKavOtvrjs <rbv yakabply xal larov ycpbiaKOV . . • 
xal M<ppov \rerp\ais6hov xai KovpiKov £vktvov a tarai koX Iktoktov tov . . . a^qXtico?, 
and there are other legacies to his wife Sarapous and to the nurse of his 
children. At the end are the signatures of the testator and six witnesses, 
two of whose seals are Au5[y] and e Apir{o}v*cpdrov respectively, docket and 
title ; cf. 489-495. Written across the fibres. Incomplete, having lost the 
beginnings and ends of lines. 33 lines. 

647. 15*2 x 8*4 cm. Beginnings of lines of the will of a woman, dated in the 
eighth year of an emperor. Early second century. 18 lines, the writing 
being across the fibres. 

648. 28 x 8.6 cm. Fragment of the will of Sarapion, written in the reign of 
Hadrian (A.D. 117-138). The village (?) of *aA/3c£ is mentioned. Parts of 
43 lines, written across the fibres. 

649. 26-2x15-1 cm. Latter portions of lines of the will of Heracles son of 



VII. DESCRIPTIONS OF SECOND CENTURY DOCUMENTS 289 

Sarapas, leaving his property to his two sons Sarapas and Petosarapis who 
have to make a payment to Zoilus. The seal of one of the witnesses is 
'AOrjvas. Early second century. 27 lines, written across the fibres. 

650. 7*7 * x 3'6 cm. Parts of 1 1 lines from the beginning of a will of a woman, 
written in a small semi-uncial hand across the fibres in the late first or early 
second century. 

651. 12 x 12-2 cm. Beginnings of 13 lines of the will of Amois, dated in the 
eleventh year of Hadrian (a. D. 126-7). The testator leaves his property to 
his children, a guardian being appointed for them, if minors, until they 
reached rrjs Kara vopovs ffkiKias (i. e. twenty-five years probably ; cf. note on 
491. 6). Written across the fibres. 

652. 7 x 12*5 cm. Ends of 12 lines from the will of a woman, written across 
the fibres. Early second century. 

653. Height 227 cm. Two fragments of a long roll, the first (a) containing 
two columns of a list of payments for aTt6p.oi{pa), Hapov(piov), pav(\ov?) 
<f>o(pTla>v?), and <movb{ri) (cf. 525. 7, note), by various persons for different years 
ranging from the twenty-first (of Antoninus) to the third of Marcus Aurelius 
and Verus (a.d. 162-3). 4^ lines. Fr. (6) contains the ends of 16 lines 
of another column of the same taxing-list, and on another selis in a different 
hand an account of a trial held before the praefect L. Volusius Maecianus. 
The surface of this selis is much damaged and much of the writing of the 
upper portion has been obliterated. The dispute arose in connexion with 
a mortgage upon the property of Voltimus which had been seized by the 
creditor, Sempronius Orestinus. The advocates Isidorus and Crepinus 
(1. Crispinus ?) appear for Orestinus and Voltimus respectively, and a previous 
trial before the chiliarch Honoratus is mentioned. Lines 1-2 'E[£] v7to/kotj- 
/x(ario-fx<ui>) AovkCov OvoKovtrlov Ma[iKi]avov [(Itovs) k . ' Avto>]vIvov Ka([<rapo]s 
to[v Kv]pCov . [. . .]o, .... «F€[. .]....[.. .]ov 'IouAfov 0[i]o\rCp.ov [ip ?] TlapaiTovly 
tov Kal xnraKOVo-avTOS, vaf{6]vTos ^€pu{p<av[\ov 'Opeorfoov [t]ov StpirpcDvtov 
[T]apavrCvov . . . Lines 9-10 . . . rrjs Ko[Aa>]i>€fos .... [ir]/)ay/xa jjv ivOAb* flyeotfcu. 
9 l<nbd[pov prj]ropos virip 2,€pTTp[<ovlov 'Opcorfoov aTto\Kpwap.ivov M Sc/xirpawlou 
'Ovop&rov \i\idp\ov rjprjarOai to t: pay pa Kal KaraKCKptaOat rhv OvoAujaov. In 
1. 14 9 lov\tov <blbov ypapparim occurs. Lines 18 sqq. . . . 'Opcorfoov Xiyovros 
voplpo[i}$ Kexprjo-Baiy MaiKiavds clirev " rav[ 1 8 letters fc]e'p&ov[? . . . .] 4>tAet 
ytlvtaOat. \iyerai <roi, wept p&v rov bavlov (rvv€<mjK[€]v m inpivtv 6 X&fapxfa] 

. . . [ ] . TrokXy wA[f|ov€ff dartv rj rb b&vtioV a-n6\afl* rb bivciov Kal 

iirobos tos iiro07Jicay." 'Mbvpos elTW " [. . . .]vr? . [ ) . <n aircvtyKaficOa 

Tt&vra tci tovtov \<ap(a' biKaCoas tovto irpbs fjpas Afyerai. ivTvx<fvT<ov b4 rivmv 
[xal kcy]6vTa>v [ ] Ko\<ovclq tye^AeVflai Kal &§b)ov [frjavioray ci/ai, 'Ouoparo* 

U 



} 



290 THE OXYRHYNCHUS PAPYRI 

(KtXtvcrev avrci vpaOfjvai." Maaaavd[s cT^V "<ri> rb [biviov A]<i/te Kal ire pi r&v 
Xovn&v fJLT) 4ip6vTi(€. 9 'l<rlb<apo$ elireV (< Kal tovs tokovs ivoborai" MaiKtavbs 
etirev* a [av rajuras *capir[ot)." 'l]<rtd<£pov Xiyovros jxi) KtKapvwirOai, Mauciaiw? 
eTirev' " av eve/Siibevaas. elre ovv irdpeiaiv ol avrCbiK[oi] elre firj vdpeiai, bLKCUTTrjV 
\rfpL\j/ovraL bs irapaKokovO&v tt}i % Ovopirov KpCaei tt\v Kaiwiririi' i^eriaei tva fi/jre 
6 bcuH<rni[s KapTr]u}$y \ir^re 6 xpe<&arri$ 9 ixribirepos be iv tcipbtk yivqrat" 'Opeortvov 
vd\iv \4yovros jm) eli/ai nap iavry ra irndpxovr[a,] Matxftjai'd? elver " $i[\]u>v 
Kal p.r) OiXoav airoKara(TTTJ<r€is avr&. Sirep ihv p.rj iroirjajjs ov p.6vov KaraKpiBrjaei 
i\ka koI baprja[et . . .] pl6i{o]v el Tim be &AA01 ivdxpvs eawols poptCovaiv elvai 
ras vTToOrJKas avrol oxj/ovrat. 24 letters [8i]icaoTTji; Xafielv" KprjitcCvov Xiyovros 
u bv iav av bys" MaiKiavbs etirev' " 6 x*^ a PX 0ff ^ v f^eTairipuretv biKa[io]oiiev. n 
The remains of the date show that the trial took place before the end of 
the reign of Antoninus Pius, and the praefecture of L. Volusius Maecianus, 
which has been the subject of much dispute (cf. P. Meyer, Hermes xxxiii. 
p. 262 and Stein, Oesterr. Jahreshefte ii, Beiblatt Col. 107 and ibid, iii, 
Col. 222), therefore began before May A. D. 161. The supposed praefecture 
of Postumus (B. G. U. 388) in A.D. 161 may now be finally dismissed 
(cf. P. Meyer in Beitrdge zur cdten Geschichte I. p. 478), but some doubt 
is thrown upon the date assigned by De Ricci (Proc. Sac. BibL Arch. 1902 
p. 65) and P. Meyer (1. c.) to the praefecture of T. Furius Victorinus, since 
the praefecture of L. Volusius Maecianus may occupy the whole period 
between the prefectures of M. Sempronius Liberalis and M. Annius 
Syriacus. 29 lines. 



INDICES 



I. NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS. 



a 418. 68. 

afkfjaioraros 464. 53* 
*A&\aya6a> 412. 28. 

dya66s 409. 27 ; 418. 135 ; 

441. 17; 464.9, 23,58; 

465. 206. 
ayaXua 465. 108. 
ayapaKT€ip 418. 19. 
ayairav 404. 7. 
ayytlov 468. 3. 
dyyc'XXfiv 405. 42 (?). 
&ytw 418. IOO, 169, 179. 

8y* 408. 17. 
dyicowj 421. 14. 
ayXafo 426. 1 8. 
^yo/xJ409. 48; 418. 18. 
aypduparos 465. 1 1 7. 
tfypw 408. 17. 
<W<fc413. n8; 420.8. 
ayw* 416. 3. 

dy»i{ ) 418. 213 marg. 
aymwi&afoai 409. 104 J 415. 3. 
^ci* 465. 30, 32. 
adcty 422. IO. 
dfcX^i} 448. 7. 
adcXtfxfr 418. 98 ; 448. 9. 
dducctv409. 53; 480. 2; 442. 

11. 
adtKtjfia 410. 24. 
Stomas 409. 45 ; 414. 19. 
del 403. 22. 
aWtW 412. 37. 
arjdia 418. 72 ; 465. 21, 27. 
mjvat 421. 7. 
a^awrop 423. 3. 



d0cror468. 12. 
*Atfr;ra 409. 22. 

'Atijm 411. 44, 65 ; 417. 37. 
•AAywuos 411. 46, 73, 88, 1 14 ; 

415. 1. 
'Adj** 413. 206 (?); 421. 4. 
<i%a467. 4(?)- 
&0kLot 409. 9, 25, 63. 
20X0* 439. 6. 
at 418. 72, 73, 148, 178, 

204. 
at K€ 410. 3. 
Alyalav 418. 30. 
alyioxos 421. 9. 
ATywrroy 465. 25. 
m Aidrj S 414. 21. 
aUi(uv 416. 17. 
AtXwx Ka7TiTa>Xira 412. 60. 
aipa 404. 42. 
alvo\6yos 465. 1 6 1. 
, AtoXfvt 469. 5. 
alo\os 408. 54 (?). 
afci* 418. 49, 151, 152, 224, 

225; 466. 13. 
ataa 408. 23 ; 422. 5. 
aladaptaOai 409. 9 1. 
aitrxpokoyia 410. 7 7* 
alo-xpts 410. 71 ,* 414. 17. 
Auramos 413. 1 1 5. 
airficr&u 413. 45, 221 ; 418. 



12. 

> / 



curia 411. 49. 
alxfuSKcaros 417* 24. 
aU>* 407. 5-7. 
cueripiQs 464. 55. 
U 2 



&kr)pos 418. 184. 
cunSXtHrrof 410. 75- 
oKovtrtt 409. 106. 
ok6vtiov 418. 17* 
a/covcti' 410. 10 (Doric Perf. 

aieaic<M&*); 414. 9, 35; 

435. 2. 
oKparos 413. 50, 54, 229. 
aicpi&as 409. 23; 410. 8; 

413. 146. 
axpwnipicv 413. 123. 
dm-ir 403. 5. 
SkaoTOS 413. 60. 
dXyciwfc 418. 185. 
'AX«(ajtdpoff 412. 64. 
aktvpov 465. 195. 
aXi^twfc 465. 108. 
SXios 408. 25, 68 ; 425. 2. 
'AXiujSidtyff 411. 1 5 el SdCp. 
aWrjkovs 413. 126. 
aXXirot 422. 5. 
aWofov 406. 17. 
SKkos 405. 25; 409. 90; 

410. 1, 12, 30; 412. 46, 

49; 413. 125, 199-201; 

437. 10; 464. 6, 20; 

465. 170, 182, 193. 
dXX6r P u>s 412. 51 ; 420, 2 ; 

464 16.; 465. 75. 
aXoyiaros 413. 1 1 9. 
Skoxos 464. 59. 
dfta 416. 11, 22; 423. 10; 

427.2. 
dpapravtiv 403. 28; 416. 16. 
apapTia 407. 4. 



1 



292 

dfjuivav 414. 37. 

Apri" 407. 7* 
4ppi412. 17; 428. 10. 
'Afjivtiaovldi)* 426. 13. 
apvpw 421. 15. 
dfKptntiv 408. 67. 
'Afiftdpaos 417. 38. 
&p<f>i7rapioTa<r6ai 412. 42. 
d^rcpar418. 123; 486. 1 1. 
fy<£a>423. 12. 
dvc&atvav 428. 11. 
dvay|3c£XX«fty 418. 94. 
<Wy«* 413. 88. 
dfayffaffti' 415. 2. 
diayicacor 443. 10, 1 6. 

foaMx«rO ai 416. x 9* 
dvafip-fii' 418. 143. 
dw^pa 413. 43, 217. 
duai/mit 409. 62; 418. 158, 

177. 
dvaKuaBai 412. 57. 
fotutkav 466. 29. 
dyArpurtr 415. 13. 
dpapjwv 411. 90. 
&patxifiVT)<rK<o-6ai 411. 9. 
dvoyrvfiv 466. 30. 
&a£408. 37; 419.6; 423. 

20. 
dvanavuv 418. 1 5 1 . 
d»aw«r{ ) 413. 57. 
dvdorarot 409. 56. 
dwxrtMuv 465. 201. 
dMmoVVnt 408. 61. 
ara<t*fxw 420. II. 
dya^prf&rof 413. 1 85. 
•Aptotic 411. 75. 
andpuif 465. 15, 61, 161. 
fotpoc 412. 31 ; 418. 214. 
«Wor 413. 89. 
<**•}««* 435. 18. 
dn}p 409. 86 ; 411. 20 ; 414. 

39; 415. 1; 419. 13; 

420. 1 ; 427. 1 ; 480. 1 ; 

482. 4; 441. is; 465. 

M5- 
&4or 438. 13. 
di4p*irim 410. 93 (?). 
*Ai4jNMroyoa>ta 427. 5. 
Jt*6pvwos 409. 49; 412. 16; 

418. 192, 219; 414. i, 



INDICES 

22; 415. 14; 465. 37, 
115, 179, 203; 468. 4. 

dviap&s 419. 4 (?). 

avurravai 403. 1 4. 

'Avov&ts 412. 22. 

dvrar 418. 1 28. 

drriducot 465. 104, 1 75. 

&rrixpvt 411. IIO. 

avriXryriy 410. 31. 

' Avri<f>dyT)t 427. 4. 

&»413. 153; 470. 34. 

&(ios 431. 2. 

a^ioOy 410. 2, 46; 411. 32. 

af'^^411. 18; 412. 47. 

doid^OS. 56; 412. 17. 

doiMs 423. 9. 

dnayiiv 413. 122, 1 42 ; 574. 

dnakkdaaitv 413. 1 40 ; 417. 
31 ; 465. 33. 

dnapdaQcu 413. 1 33. 

Aim 413. 98; 482. 13. 

dnardv 409. 97* 

dmiBuv 418. 53. 

dnttkuv 409. 94. 

dmiptov 421. 16. 

dircXavvtiv 443. 2 1 . 

aircpvcavfiv 422. 6. 

dn€px€<r?ai 413. 1 63; 420. 

5- 
am^iora (?) 412. 34. 
dmtptu 409. 51. 
&rXfro* 413. 88. 
(hr\i)(rros 432. 16. 
aro/3dXXfty 466. 24. 
diroypdfaaBai 465. 36. 
airodfUEvvvai 403. 23. 
dirodf xccrAu 410. IO I. 
riirod«ddVai413. 1 57 ; 415. 21 ; 

470.33. 

dfro&oyxurffcij' 411. 96. 
<tirodvpc<r0aft 413. 1 50. 
dwoBmpKttp 413. 127; 465. 

148, 158. 
diraraXunrar 413. 1 66. 
ara-ptarAii 403. 23; 409. 

5«- 
<SiroXa/i/9ai«u' 417. 34. 
airaXciirfcy 413. 103. 
dfnXKvpm 409. 55, 57, 62; 

413. 182; 465. 25. 



'AirrfXXcMt 408. 64; 418. 24, 

26, 32; 426. 17. 
*AiroXX«ma 413. 1 20. 
cmdkoytiaBai 41L 30, 104. 
dirokoyia 411. 89. 
diroXwiv 413. 39 ; 574. 
aff o orar i yg 465. 24, 26. 
amxr^ayiaffU' 413. 1 4 3. 
anwnfnfpow 413. 1 7. 
airarx4>t)> 412. 50. 
anorpont) 413. 3. 
caro<t>aycv0ai 465. 74. 
dir<xfxiiir€i9 409. 53. 
dnoxvpciv 404. 5. 
dwpayfuov 464. 27. 
irrreaBai 413. 49, 224. 
dnwXcia 465. 28. 
dpapivKxiv (&pfi€yos) 408. 65. 
dpatratuf 418. 1 1 6 (?). 
'Apyclos 411. 41. 
dpyCKcxpos 408. 58. 
*Apyw 426. 12. 
dpyw 439. 12. 
dpyvptow 467. IS* 
dpyvpovs 413. 8. 
dpyvifxos 421. 6. 
<VV 409. 56. 
dpcr* 436. 8 (?). 
"A/»p 464. 9. 
dpttipdt 464. 41; 470. 14, 

20, 32, 51, 86. 
dptoTcptfr 465. 163. 
£purroi>418. 170, 171. 
(Lpurros 438. 5 ; 412. 20. 
dpiaro^€ipovpy6{ 437. 12. 

'Ap^wv?) 482. 8 w<7/^. 
Sppana 408. 56. 
5poro* 429. 10. 

dpOTfHWf 413. 117. 

dpirayt; 429. 4 (?). 

<lpirri£cu> 409. ioo; 417. 25. 

4p*a{, 412. 24. 

dpp4HTTT)fia 465. 40, 156, 224. 

dppwrria 465. 43. 

dpmwtds 465. 149. 

j^xnp 465. 147. 

3pn 416. introd. 

dpX<uos 412. 59. 

<ty>XCt9 442. 13, 21. 

«PX«o* 4x2. 59. 



/. NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS 



293 



ipxv 410. 4 ; 465. 23. 

apxny** 1 )* 408. 32. 

dpx<fpcvr 465. 171. 

dpxiTfKTovcip 412. 67* 

Apuyii 422. 3. 

* Atria 442. 24 (?). 

•AfncXiprtd* 416. 7. 

aairdfraBcu 410. 97. 

3<nrapTos 44L 19. 

aon}p 464. 58. 

Jorpw 464. 48. 

'AoTvavaf 409. 102, 105. 

da<j)d\€OTtpo£ 413. 176. 

drao-0aXJa 408. 31. 

&T€ 412. 54. 

arrow 464. 47. 

At; 464. 39. 

<troKO£ 465. 153. 

arporrot 418. 13, 20. 

arvx^ 409. 31. 

Avaovia 408. 60. 

aurdp 464. 1 3. 

avrUa 415. 10. 

avTOfjurros 411. 98. 

avroa-^fdidfrcv 410. 1 1 7. 

avrov 413. 1 93. 

avx*i*> 413. 19. 

ai>xwpos 416. 13. 

d<£aipc ty 470. 21 */ JO#. 

aty&ro* 412. 26. 

a<t>6w ((2)a^AW) 465. 105. 

tyiivw 411. 50; 413. 184. 

ctyiKV€t(T$ai 464. 54. 

*A<£pixavdr, 'lovXiog 'A<£. 412. 

69. 
d^vXaicror 409. 86. 
axfrmoros 470. 19. 
d^apMTTftJ' 403. 22. 
*Ax*p»v 412. 40. 
*XP7<nro* 419. 3 (?); 4e4. 17. 

/3adcf«** 409. 46. 

frBos 470. 37. 

0aimif412. 29. 

/SdXXccy 413. I, 69; 466. 24, 

28. 
/3ajm<rT)}* 405. 15 (?). 
Papfapos 413. 88, 89; 428. 3. 
fiapthf 413. 96. 
Bapovg 403. 12. 



fiapvs 464. 39. 

/SacrtXcta 418. 26; 465. 1 77. 

fHacriktiou (fiaatkrjop) 465. 1 6, 

112. 
Pwr&tvs 408. 30; 413. 58 

et saep.) 418. 10; 465. 

69, 173, 174, 177, 181. 
/Sacra 413. 60. 
Pa<rrd{ti» 413. 1 1 8, 218; 

418. 15. 
pa<t>€v S 467. 8. 
/ft/Saw 464. 46. 
BcXXc/MM^din^ff 421. 15. 
/ScXuW 410. 17. 
/3?fia 413. 89, 91. 
0/a 409. 80. 
Bias 409. 32. 
PipXio&iKT) 412. 66. 
#0Xo* 470. 24. 
/Stycty 413. 108. 
/9/or 427. 3; 465. 67, 122, 

152, 155- 
&iova$ai 465. 29. 
i3X«r«cy 413. 125; 464. 42. 
PkwTKfUf 408. 26. 

/Soay 409. 48, 94 ; 469. 6. 
falBuv 407. 3; 411. 109, 

112; 413. 204. 
ftBpos 412. 37, 42. 
jSopctdrtpor 465. 103. 
&ov\«T6ai*09. 88 ; 418. 133, 

175; 415. 5, 6, 17; 488. 

*3- 
frwXrvco-dai 413. 176. 
PovXr} 421. 8. 
0ptyo*464. 12, 17, 51. 
PvBoKvpar6dpofws 425. X. 
0»M<fe 408. 38 ; 426. 14(F). 



yata 412. 15, 1 8. 

ydXa 433. 14. 

ydpos 435. 9. 

yflrwv 409. 91 ; 429. 7 

ytXap 418. 173, 181; 

5; 469. 4, 6, 11. 
ytWoi/ 466. 15. 
ytptais 464. 32. 
yivpaukaros 418. 1 3. 
ycway 465. 150. 



425. 



yivos 413. 53, 118; 465. 

119. 
ytpas 416. 5. 
ycpvv 413. 159, 164, 168, 

177. 
yfj 407. 2. 
yrjpas 465. 223. 
yiynoBai 403. II ; 404. 41; 

409. II, 103; 413. 106, 

in, 114, 118, 131, 138, 

151, 160, 166, 173, 178, 

179; 414. 38; 417. 40; 

418. 11, 13; 427. 1; 

465. 40, 154; 467. 2, 5; 

470. 9 et saep. 
yvyv»<nc(tp 412. 53 ; 418. 27 ; 

438. 12. 
ykvKv&pofiog 425. 4. 
ykwrva 465. 65. 
yXwnrapyof 408. 67* 
ytwprj 418. 177 ; 414. 7. 
ypwrr6s 405. 5. 
yovtj 414. 21. 
y6mpoi 425. 9. 
ypappa 465. 1 14, 1 1 8 ; 470. 

49, 68. 
ypd<t>€iv 410. 5 ; 418. 24. 
yvakop 408. 37. 
ywaiKtios 413. 1 1 8. 
yvpaiKonpfoamos 465. 2 03. 
yvpf] 418. 196, 199; 418. 1 ; 

421. 10; 433. 2; 465. 

108, 146, 152, 153. 
yty 465. 16. 

baipmv 412. 30. 

bai<t>pw 422. 4. 

ddjcrvXoc 470. 35 et saep. 

Muvat 409. 99. 

btiypa 487. 5 (?). 

Ac ucnwu 413. 126; 438.15. 

*»(' must') 409. 14; 410. 

21; 413. 44, 48, 181; 

416. 18. 
fc u> (' bind ') 411. 74 ; 418. 

d«£r 414. 60 (?). 
duatim 413. 44, 220. 
tota 416. 5. 
dcicarpciff 409. 98. 



294 



INDICES 



AckcXcmx 411. 119. 

d(\(j>is 408. 69. 

tov&pov 413. 124. 

dc£ufc 465. 164; 466. 4, 18, 

21. 
too* 416. I2(?). 
fe'anroiva 409. 22 ; 418. 106. 
fanraYiif 409. 12; 413. 187. 
fcvpo 413. 97, 98, 100. 
dcvrcpoc 465. 199; 469. 9, 

14; 470.56, 58. 
dcxco^" 409. 13. 
dfj 410. 27, 102 ; 411. 39 ; 

417. 33- 
Arjkoi 408. 32. 
&tj\os 409. 41. 
dtjkovv 418. 28; 464. 43, 

46; 465. 20, 66, 113, 

204. 
brjiifjyoptiv 411. IOO. 
Aty/io . . . 485. 2. 
drjfx6<Ttos 411. 8l. 
ArjficxfxivTjt 415. 7 (0* 
Ata 418. 5. 

btaPalvuv 408. 39 ; 466. 20. 
fcaflaXXct* 411. 66. 
baPokf, 411. 55. 
dtayrir 427. 3. 
diado^or 416. 4. 
dtaftoifij' 413. 50, 55, 229. 
buikapfiavtiv 466. 28. 
dcaXc'yft" 410. 45. 
AtaXfJcro? 465. 70. 
diaXXayf) 413. 1 63. * 
diaXXdo-o-cip 413. 168. 
duivoia 410. 83. 
bwaafalv 420. 12. 
duunrav 418. 1 24. 
buxTpifbiu 418. 6. 
barpi&Ti 409. 35. 
biatyptiv 465. 119. 
diafavyav 413. 132 ; 431. 3. 
&ia<f>0*tp€iv 418. 4. 
«i£oX/a 409. 30. 
&ibd<rK€iv 409. 52 ; 415. 5. 
dtdoum 412. 25 ; 418. 66, 90, 
114, 162, 230; 485. 4; 

437. 10 ; 464. 53 ; 465. 
i8 3 (?). 

tiTjytluSat 410. 80, 82. 



tiffyrj(ris 410. 16. 

hrfltlv 413. l6l. 

bvr)V€Kr)s 403. 5. 

dtjcafccrdai 409. IOI. 

dtVoior 409. 42 ; 411. 52 ; 

414. 18. 
bucaarfip 410. II, 25. 

blKCUFTtlpiQV 443. 5* 

fttfti? 415. 16. 
dtfioipirrjs 409. 28. 
blpoipot 470. 48, 81. 
dim* 422. 11. 
dtoucfiy 409. 88. 

&UHKrjTT}S 409. 7* 

di6*ircp 470. 26. 
dtirXao-tdfcu' 470. 50, 59. 
dwXoi/y 470. 73. 
dtn-Xow 409. 28 Mtf/g'. 
divXiCfiw 413. 154. 
dfyGoyyos 469. I, 16. 
dt^jcftv 418. 3. 
Jo/tfL 409. 3, 86 ; 410. 6 ; 

413. 3,38, 158, i73» 2 o7; 

414. 36. 

&(« 407. 6 ; 409. 15; 413. 

183. 
dovXet'a 419. 8. 
00VX17 413. 115 ; 465. 150. 
doOXof 413. 109 ; 464. 6. 
d/xworrofooi/ (?) 412. 29. 
dpav 411. 14. 
dpdaataOai 418. 53. 
bipatrBai 404. 40; 409. 67 ; 

418. 26, 42, 217. 
duo 465. 18; 466. 27. 
oWpq 433. 18. 
tivauvptlv 468. 1. 
dAfojca 409. 96; 433. 12. 
dcopfiadai 420. 9. 
Aupis 409. 18. 

lavro£, avrov 409. 104 ; 418. 

14- 
cyK€<f>a\ot 433. 34. 
tyKpartia 412. 32. 
tyKparrjs 413. 160, 1 79. 
?y«yc 409. 65 ; 423. 8. 
(7 413. 148. 

cfco-dat (caa-aro) 408. 37. 
Mn» 411. 80. 



?Aw403. 19. 

ccdevai 404. 15; 409. 65; 

410. 8; 411. 46; 412. 

39; 413. 185; 415. 1; 

429. 6. 
ci&os 421. 7. 
c2^a 421. 6. 
tifAfirrjt (?) 412. 22. 

€^7 439. 11. 

tlpWWKOS 410. 122. 

cfc 409. 54, 97; 419. 8; 

465. 39, no, 147; 470. 

72. oM iU 409. 90. 
tlaayav 420. I. 
*la*pX*<rOcu 418. 1 28, 1 38, 

154, 155, 169, 175, 216, 

228; 416. 12. 
€l<ropav 464. 48. 
ftcr« 413. 37. 
cfrc 412. 44, 48. 
(kcuttos 409. 98 J 465. 1 73. 
*Kar6yx<ipos 418. 30. 
*WoV 416. 5. 
€Kfl6\tflQ£ 464. 21. 

€Kdix«r6ai 418. 193. 

Aw! 411. 57. 

«*«0ci> 411. 96. 

(mIvos 411. 100; 412. 52; 

413. 121, 131, 143, 226; 

574. 
eicrifMkos 408. 35. 
tKKXrjaia 411. 29, 67. 
fWccfftv 465. 192. 
«WXc fr 411. 48, 51. 
€KTUfda<rtip 413. 1 1 6. 
Iktottos 409. 86. 
trrp&ip 409. 83. 
U$€p€u> 469. 9, 13. 
«W 419. 9 ; 442. 12. 

ikaia 426. 8. 

tXdrtf 418. 21. 

Am* 407. 3; 443. 15. 

ffXco? 418. 47, 223. 

fkcvBtpios 418. 183. 

cXfv&por 419. 9 ; 439. 4 ; 

465. 152. 
eX*«i/413. 120, 142. 

'EXirayoprff 415. 6 (?). 

cXttt'fftj' 404. 8. 
A™ 411. 35, 115. 



1. NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS 



295 



Ip/SoXXfci' 41L 116; 467.19- 

flifkuris 464. 7* 

Ififipvov 464. 54. 

t$ifi4v€iv 428. 7* 

4i<fe 409. 33 ; 412. 20. 

?/urcdor 486. 5. 

2fiirpo<r0€v 465. 63. 

tltifraitHip 416. 13. 

7vdoir413. 104, 138. 

€P*dp*v*iP 409. 44. 

cVdeitf 409. 34. 

cVi 426. 6. 

fWravat 411. 33;* 469. 14. 

fvoxoff 404. 41. 

tvravBol 412. 55. 

twrtpop 465. 41. 

cVroXi} 404. 17. 

orpcimv 417. 29 (?). 

€mryxavtuf 443. 1 4. 

€£ai<t>yr)s 409. 32. 

€£dk<i<jxtv 407. 3. 

j$<px<(r6ai 403. 13; 405. 17. 

cfrvpuriuiv 409. 58. 

c'£rvrt X»f«v 418. 15. 

€&)Kovra 409. 92. 

c'«* 412. 44. 

c'ltmii 413. 145. 

*£opx?ur6<u 411. 25. 

cfwerta 428. 5. 

<$$*<»* 426. 17. 

ipmpfaiw 403. 8. 

?f»413. 97, 103; 465. 145. 

€irfaiv412. 21. 

tnaipflp 410. 96 ; 413. 97, 

170; 431. 2; 435.3. 
cird* 433. 34. 
ciraotft} 412. 20, 25. 
fVcftddv 413. 135. 
cnutii 411. 40; 465. 21; 

468. 2, 4 ; 470. 18. 
rirctra 411. 45. 
cir^y 464. 1 3. 
cVi, eVi iroXv 403. 7. 
c'irijSaiW 466. 28. 
cVi/3ovXrvcty 409. 66; 410. 

116; 418. 27. 
em/Sot/Xi? 418. 29. 
fitiyiyvfaOat 41L 64; 465. 

M7- 
artytywfarfffu' 418. 160 ; 574. 



aridc&foic 413. 1 80. 
ffiricciecca 410. 15. 
fWtxfc 410. 1 1 1 ; 415. 15. 
im&vp€iv 41L 47. 
iniBvpia 439. I. 
/ir^ 412. 55 (?). 
cirucpareiv 464. 1 8. 
tiriKparitrnpos 418. 25. 
rniKpiptip 412. 52. 
ririXai'Au'fcrdai 410. 1 1 8. 
€irifu\(ta 411. 8l. 
empcXw 418. 142. 
iniopKos 412. 16. 
iTTipprjats 412. 46. 
eirlo-Kotros 412. 22. 
faunratrBat 413. 223. 
twunr€px*iv 416. 7* 
eiriaravBat 411. 86. 
cmraaat ip 413. 1 3 7. 
immxlfav 411. 1 20. 
€ititt)&€ius 413. 4. 
brtTTjfciHiv 414. 5. 
€m<ppd(f<rdai 408. 57. 
ciror 412. 50. 
(/»y 413. 107. 
*EparwrB«vfjs 409. 104. 
€pya(€*$at 409. 5 1 ; 411. 102. 
*pyo*413. 118; 420. 5 (?)» 
€pryp6e 413. 1 9. 
cpc0i(<v6ai 408. 67. 
tpdbtip 418. 22. 
fpcr 413. 147, 151. 
'Bppcias 423. 4. 
€pprjp€vs 465. 70. 
'Eppip 433. 27. 'Epftai 411. 

24,69. 
'EppoC nSXts f) fuyakt) 465. 

222. 

Zpx*<rOai 408. 41 ; 409. 93 ; 

419. 9; 420. 7; 421. 

10 ; 423. 10, 12 (JXidov); 

443. 18. 
fpw 439. 7. 
Artif tr 467. 1 (?). 
cV%416. 14. 
ccmarap 409. 12. 
e<ra>413. 128, 140. 
«<r«0€ 419. IO. 
^■aipop 409. 92 ; 416. 10. 
cr<pot 409. 82; 413. 125; 



433. 32 ; 464. 19 ; 465. 
68, 154; 466. 16. fapot 
424. 9. 

€T€pO>(T€ 409. 52. 

?rt411. 62, 118; 413. 177; 

422. 6. 
€TOifAa{(iv 418. 41, 42, 170. 
hotpot 413. 98, 172; 442. 

50(?). 
ivfoi* 464. 60. 
cvrpytcrta 443. 2. 
iucpytTclv 403. 21. 
cWw^i 435. 3. 
tvBvs 430. 4. 
e^jcoi/w 413. 160; 438. 

14. 
tvpfvrp 413. I06. 
Evw'107 417. 20, 36. 

tvvovt 409. 66. 

ciVX&capo* 412. 24. 

tCnopos 464. 24. 

€vnpcnf)s 418. 1 1. 

rvptVfff ty 404. 2 ; 412. 58 ; 

465. 67. 
EvpOTTvXo? 574. 
(vpvr 412. 39. 

€VpGKJT6i>S 427. 2. 

evavvcTos 464. 42. 
€v<rxTjpor*tv 465. 1 78. 
curves 419. 1 1. 

€V<t>T)pUU 413. 44. 

€$<f>G>vos 465. 32. 

f^ 413. 46. 

tv&pvpo* 466. 14, 33, 34. 

*va>X«v416. 18. 

c^odor 410. 4. 

?<f>oppoe 413. 194. 

?X«* 409. 37, 44, 51, 86, 

90. 93i 95i 101 ; 411-17; 
412. 44; 413. 161, 167, 
171, 198, 226; 414. 7; 
416.9,22; 423.6; 435. 
9; 464. 55, 57; 465. 
16, 18, 19, 61-3, no, 
112, 163, 180, 203, 227; 
467. 16; 470. 6, 30; 



467. 16; 470. 6, 

574. 

tprfr 433. 33 and marg. 

11* 433. 35. 

tip 467. 14. 



y6p6\ 



296 

CaBtos 403. 36 ; 426. 15. 
Ztvt 412. 24 ; 418. 5, 6, 19, 

25,31; 421*9, 11. 
Zttypunr 408. 59. 
ft? 403. 29; 404. 16; 413. 

93; 418. 9; 464. 12; 

««• 3°> 35, 38. 
(tjTitv 411. 13. 
flfcw; 413. 94. 
fflnvvnu 413. 107. 
C<*fr422. 6; 464. 14. 

fjyeiatiai 465. 20, 170. 
i7y«/M»ui418. 15. 
^yf^ 409. 59- 
rfiiw 410. 72. 

^411.86; 413.96; 414. 

8. 
rfiovr\ 413. 127. 
$Aw 410. 19, 76. 
rftuara 414. 3. 
'HAfKT/xz 420. 7, 12. 
fatfio* 437. 7. 
9Xi£(?)426. 11. 
#X»r 409. 45; 412. 26 

fHXior) ; 404. 1 4 (^W) ; 

465. 107, 201. 
?/mp 422. 10. 
i}m«P« 408. 1 1 ; 409. 98 ; 

419. 14 ; 465. 193 ; 468. 

5; 470. 14, 19- 
fiiupovv 413. 153. 
fount 413. 156; 467. 9; 

470. 45 et saep. 
rprdtopos 423. 5. 
*Hpa418. 26, 31. 
'HpaKkrjg 408. 25; 418. 4; 

422. 9. 
9/mk 408. 48. 
jfroi 409. 84. 

daXacro-a 407. 2. 

^aXa<r<rovif 468. 9. 

6ap& 408. 31. 

$w6<rifjtog 413. 161 ; 437. 9. 

0cWo* 422. 5 ; 465. 42. 

Bappup 409. 19. 

e&atos 409. 47. 

Baavov 413. 98 ; 480. 3. 

6avpa(<u> 410. 64. 



INDICES 

0td 413. 88 ; 465. 105, 159 ; 
470. 27. 

ec»* 417. 21. 

Otaadat 418. 227 ; 420. 9. 

&taaru6s 413. 91. 

draw 414. 20. 

#X«f 404. 16; 413. 51, 
111, 113, 137, 149, 160, 
168, 179, 209,211; 433. 

3,34. 
6*6s 404. 16; 405. 26; 

406. 20 ; 407. 1 ; 409. 

26,96; 413.45,129,135, 

137, 190, 191, 221 ; 416. 

8; 418. 16, 18, 26; 421. 

5; 433. 10; 464. 8(?); 

465. 43. h 6t6s 413. 43, 

48, 218; 417. 28, 31. 
fcuifHXfc 4A2. 27. 
fopaveiKiw 465. 38. 
Bt'pfiai 412. 65. 
fappaoLa 468. 7. 
fcppoTarus 468. 6. 
eint 418. 27. 
Brjrcvtt* 418. 32. 
dvrpKtip 418. 146; 464. 

i6(?). 
Bpijt6s 426. 23 (?). 
Oovptot 411. 95* 
Opnvup 413. 184. 
Bpk 408. 14; 465. 162, 

203. 
6p6vos 428. 8 ; 465. 109. 
Ovydrrjp 418. 38. 
0vp6s 433. 2 2 jRa/g'. 
0upa 418. 162; 429. 9. 
<Wa 413. 135. 

laaBai 574. 

«W 413. 91 ; 433. 10; 465. 

150. 
ldta>Tuc6s 410. 7 ; 465. 116. 
l&ov 413. 116, 148, 172, 

196. 
tivai 408. 44. 

Up<rypappar€vt 465. 120, 1 72. 
Up66povs 413. 90. 
2«/kJi/ 465. 31. 
Up6s 413. 94. 
Upo<rv\ta 413. 45, 220. 



'faprot* 405. 24 ; 407. 5. 

ucaKcr 412. 18. 

Ua»k 413. 180. 

Ums 417. 27. 

'ivfaor 413. 215. 

IMs 413. 90. 

'iouXior 9 A<f>pacap6s 412. 69. 

'brmuro* 417. 23. 

Imntcos 436. 10. 

anrar 418. 8 ; 436. 9. 

Ia6ft6s 408. 39. 

uros 416. 19 ; 421. 5, urms 

409. 8. • 
Urropai 408. 12; 413. 115; 

416. 2i(?). 
'I«mfc417. 2 2. 

laxvpo* 403. 15 ; 436. 5. 

hrxvs 410. 23. 

IxOvs 465. 1 01, 198-9. 

KtMtrtp 470. 22. 

jcada/xfr 467. 17. 

KaBaponjs 404. 1 8. 

taBrjadai 465. IO9. 

*a6i(ft» 419. 6. 

Ka&OTavai 418. 2. 

KaBopav 413. 20. 

«it«fc482. Il(?). 

Katfrcp 418. 20. 

jcaxpoV 403. 8, 24, 31 ; 465. 

27, 28, 41, 66, 79, 113, 

145, 156, 1711 183, 204. 
ffomfc 409. 52, 65, 67 ; 411. 

102 ; 418. 209 ; 464. 18, 

20; 465. 21. 
kcik6tt)s 424. 7* 
koXuv 404. 21 ; 411. 78, 85 ; 

413. 162; 428. 3; 433. 

10; 465. 106. 
KdXrjfifpos 416. 67* 
KaXXuuxa(?) 412. 34. 
jcaXcfc 412. 66 ; 414. 1 7 ; 413. 

181; 433. 17; 465. 32, 

179, 196. 

KOfUVOS 467. 20 (?). 
Kapvttv 412. 15. 

KdpiTT€lV 465. 223, 225. 

KauOapos 465. 226. 
KaniTooX'iva, Atkla K. 412. 60. 
Kapa 421. 12. 



/. NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS 



297 



Kapttrj (?) 412. 29. 
Kapia 412. 62. 
icord, icarA ra^or 411. 113. 
fcaTodf u> 413. 91. 
Karadc^ca- &u 413. 115* 
garaduedf ciy 403. 7. 
KOTO0VTI<TKg& 419. 9* 

KardkaiifMuHW 422. 5. 
miraXryfty 416. 4. 
icaraA«Trcu>413. 182 ; 414. 13. 
Karajn? 411. 62. 
Karairarciv 403. 19. 
JcaranXctv 411. 55. 
ffarairripro'ct)' 409. 39. 
Karapprjyvvrai 416. 1 4. 
*arapx7 413. 2I 3- 
Korao-ffcvq 470. 32. 
iraraoToAty 413. 95. 
K<rra(rrpo<f>cvs 413. 102. 
Karardatrtuf 412. 56. 
JcararidcMu 422. 7. 
Kara<f>4p4iv 465. 146. 
xara^tXcu' 413. 103. 
jcarcidcrai 466. 1 18 (?). 
kcct*x<w 411. 34. 
Karffyopos 411. 33. 
jcarotxftv 411. 58. 
KiifHiv 413. 152. 
fceia&u 413. 150. 
KcXfucut 411. 35; 413. 10 1, 

in, 117; 417. 30; 426.3. 
Ktp6s 408. 29 (*o*<fe) ; 409. 

5; 413. 118. 
Ktrrpav 464. 18, 42. 
Ktpavrvvat 432. 7. 
Kf/Mcvpcuor 436. I. 
Kf<n-& 412. 70. 
K€<f>aXfj 408. 4S; 466. 17; 

466. 17. 
K*jpv( 408. 42. 
KjJ^uroywnjf 443. 19 (?). 
KiK\r)<rK€tv 433. 27. 
KUKudos 466. 230. 
K/por 412. 38. 
mxXi'a 468. 10. 
KomoXoycii' 466. 22. 
Kouxfc 410. 114. Kotvjj 413. 

11 et saep. 
*JXa£ 409. 63. 
ffrfXiror 412. 19. 



ffoXAntia 412. 60. 

ffoXAn} 408. 59. 

Koy&lcw 420. 4. 

ff<br/x>r 438. 29. 

xocr/umfc 412. 30. 

xrfcr/ioff 410. 78. 

kotu* 408. 31 ; 464. 54 (?)• 

«orvXi/ 467. 6, 8, 10. 

icpatiraXf? 409. 47. 

Kpfoos 409. 29. 

Jtparaufc 465. 12. 

Kpartiv 413. 105. 

Kparurros 409. 103. 

icpaTop 407. 6. 

xpciaaw 464. 1 6. 

xptd? 465. 190, 191. 

icplvciw 409. 65; 411. 31. 

Kpiats 411. 86. 

xpomftfiXor 465. 165. 

K/xW 408. 38. 

xpovais 418. 92. 

*e/w0i} 465. 230. 

Kpv7rr€iv 418. 29; 465. 114. 

KraaBai 465. 72. 

rrciVciv 419. 3. 

im}w 465. 227. 

#crtf€iP 426. 14. 

mV/za 403. 21. 

Kvaros 465. 108. 

KV^€ptnjTTJS 413. I O I . 

Kwyfia 412. 54. 
jcDfia 412. 40. 
Kvyriytop 413. 197* 
Kvpitvtur 465. 151, 155. 
*vp«>* 404. 1 ; 407. 5 ; 413. 

182, 183; 465. 14, 60. 

Kvpia 413. 7, 42, no, 117, 

188, 204, 213. 
Kvpr6s 465. 224. 
kv<t6os 413. 118. 
kiW464.5, 6o(?); 470.5- 

Jty&oy 409. 30. 
jnyifdioy/xtyo* 409. 103. 
««*£& 413. 150 ; 465. 228. 

Xayxavfty 408. 50 ; 413. 59 ; 

429.5. 
Acuc*bcup6vios 411. 99, 108, 

117. 
\aKTi(cu> 418. 65. 



XaXciv 408. 3; 406. 17; 

413. 31, 67, 102. 
\appav€u> 409. 28 marg., 97, 

99; 413. 172; 415. 16; 
417. 24; 444. 14(F); 
466. 35. 

\upv€iv 403. 6. 

\apnp6s 409. 15. 

Xaj>dai*i* 413. 132 ; 415. 9. 

Aaopibov 408. 40 ; 418. 32. 

Xarfr 408. 30. 

Aam'&u 418. 10. 

Xcyccv 403. 10, 23, 25 ; 404. 
19, 22; 409. 13, 21, 25, 
50, 56, 61 ; 410. 10, 73, 
103,111; 411. in; 412. 
14, 21; 418. 26, 58, 66, 
92, 100, 122, 128, 129, 
134, 140, 141, 181, 184; 

414. 8, 51 ; 416. 10, 12; 
425. 7; 464. 15; 465. 
i3> 183, 200; 469. 6; 
470. 10, 24, 28. 

\tintip 412. 19. 

Xc'£cf 410. 3. 

XtovTopdxos 412. 40. 

Xfoprofl/xhranrof 465. 1 6 2. 

Xevxcfc 470. 5. 

Xc'a»> 465. 19. 

X/ay 465. 118, 196. 

Aij&T) 412. 41. 

Xtyvr 426. 9. 

\iywr<f>dpayos 408. 34. 

Xt4off413. Il8. 

Xi/ufe 409. 89. 

\1nap6s 408. 61. 

\oy*vtiv 465. 36. 

Xrfyor 403. 15, 32 ; 409. 64, 

84; 410.79; 465.15,33. 
Xotiror 409. 88; 413. 175; 

419. 12; 466.148; 470. 

53;/ saep. \011r6v 413. 53. 
Aojtpfe 408. 58. 
\ov€ip 413. 56. 
\vcip 413. 30, 189. 
XvaiTfXfiv 409. 53. 

pA 409. 96 ; 413. 206. 
payiic6s 465. 68. 
fuupraAu 413. 138(F). 



298 

ftoxfip 424. 1 1 (?). 
Majcrdcov 444. 5, 1 6. 
fiaKpdv 418. 124. 
paKpn&vpla 403. 9. 

poXa 413. 41 ; 422. 3. f*SX- 

Xov413. 149; 442. 2(?); 

465. 183. paXurra 411. 

15; 413. 178. 
MdXaros 413. 145, I58 } 170, 

172, 176. 
MaXe'a 418. 3. 
paXovp 418. 43. 
yuavSaveip 428. 4 ; 574. 
navrevfia 408. 12 marg. 

fuurrrvr6s 416. 20. 

Mavrii* w 411. 40. 

fiavTis 418. 28. 

paprvpur 464. 45. 

paprvptvtiai 411. 53. 

paprvpos 412. 17. 

paprt/r 409. 101 ; 464. 58. 

patrriyias 409. 94 ; 413. I IO, 

137. 154. 155- 
peum£ 413. 109, 112, 114. 
ftdxaipa 465. 19, 64. 
paw 408. 48; 465. 22. 
fuyaXonptnrjs 410. 1 8, 28, 67, 

77, 112, 123. 
firyaff 409. 1 5, 60 ; 410. 47 ; 

411. 13, 20; 412. 40; 

413. 190; 465. 222; 

470. 29. gulfa* 442. 5. 

/^V*TTo ff 412. 41; 470.28. 
/iffy 413. 96. 
p*is 465. 11. 
MfXdpirovff 426. 12. 
/iAar 470. 4. 
/xAcci> 409. 20. 
fiAc 465. 195. 
fi*\i(f<r8ai 4 OS. 66. 
fiflXXnip 407. 4 ; 413. 47, 99, 

136; 419. 4; 420. 13. 
pt'ptpcaOai 404. 14 ; 410. 94, 

96. 
pfW418. 48, 119, 187. 
pivroiyt 469. 5. 
fupidtov 413. 59. 
fifjw 467. 12, 18. 
ptarfpfipla 403. 4. 
jifW 466. 17. 



INDICES 

ftcra/3aiWiv465. 71; 466.25. 
/ura/SdXXeiv 418. 6 ; 466. 6, 

26, 30 (?). 
prra&okos 539. 
prradicpap 466. II. 
(urafUXtw 481. 6, 7. 
ficra vof iv 418 .168. 
fterair*fiirnr 409. 82. 
ptranQepai 466. 1 3. 

p*Ta<f*p<u> 428. 6 ; 470. 17. 

P*t*x*ip 420. 3. 

iUtox * 464. 45, 60. 

/*«y>f iv 467. 9 (?). 

fUrptos 415. 14. 

ftcrpoy 467. 1 3. 

fic^pt 412. 62 ; 416. 3. 

fiifris 410. 8, 71; 464. 1, 

20. 
jufAfr 409. 85 ; 438. 18. 
fuJKos 422. 10. 
prjKvptip 416. 6. 

pp (fiav) 408. 65 ; 410. 65. 
PW (' month ') 465. 105. 
prjvvuv 411. 22; 465. 13, 
200. . 

flTJWTpOP 411. I 2. 

lump 417. 21. 
prjrpvid 465. 77* 

fM7w«ii418. 8, 12 ; 421. 14 ; 

467. 11. 

fJUKKOirpC7TT)S 410. 73. 
fllKKfc 410. 23. 

MiXfjaios 409. I02, 106. 
pip*L(T6cn 410. 21. 
pifuni<rK*tr6ai 408. 36 ; 409. 

2, 103; 412.38; 486.6. 
M«r . . . 467. if. 
purttp 410. 97 ; 413. 186. 
plarjSpov 433. 28 marg. 
piaBtos 420. 8. 
pia$6s 409. 28 *ftzr£. ; 443. 

3- 

pta6o<t>6pos 444. i5(?). 

pi<a 409. 98. 

/ioytXaXof 465. 228. 

pokmf 426. 19. 

/*<foos 409. 57, 62 ; 410. 27 ; 
419. 8; 442. 28. ptvov 
411. 6; 413. 184, 226; 

468. 2. 



fufpor 408. 42. 
pvSot 422. 7 ; 423. 2. 
pvXa>i> 443. 20 (?). 
pwrrripwu 411. 26. 
papcfc 413. 52, 191; 465. 
"5. 

va.uv 408. 60. 

vavof 465. 225. 

va6s 426. 5 ; 433. 1. 

vavpaxta 440. 2 (?). 

yaw 408. 26 ; 411. 78. 

ravTtjs 425. I. 

vtapias 418. 1 3. 

N€^465. 13. 

v€Kp6s 409. 49 ; 413. 144, 

150. ptKpd 433. 32. 
v*kvs 412. 42. 
w'or 414. 4. 
pt6njt 464. 38. 
Pfv€tp 464. 1 9. 

P€tf^\rjy€p€T7JS 42L 11. 

inj 464. 14. 

NtyKuf 418. 28. 

w*a* 465. 34, 35. 

Nuc&iff 411. 106. 

NSW 423. 13; 425. 9. 

NiXamp 425. 4. 

popi(€ip 411. 8 ; 438. 4. 

voup 464. 6, 50. 

v6pos 428. 6. 

povs 421. 9. 

vv/i^i/ 434. 15. 

pvp<po<f>6f)os 434. 13. 

*C* 403. 9, 27; 407. 4; 
409. 18, 58; 418. 107, 
121, 146,159, 179; 443. 
10. pvpI 409. 50; 413. 

r 33- 
^£433. i 9 (?). 

va>Me 465. 228. 

Nwra 412. 62. 

frp'ta 411. 61. 
£cVta 420. 3, 8. 
fcvodaump 408. 30. 
£*poe 409. 99. 
frpaipup 468. 8. 
#Xo*418. 186; 433. 16. 



/. NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS 



299 



% 0&v*<r*vs 409. 93. 

Z6*p 418. 1. 

oUatiai 410. 9, 84. 

oiVa 409. 5, 87; 411. 

otKttrnis 409. 60. 

oW 404. 2 ; 470. 12. 

oiixSpcXt 413. 161, 172. 

©tow 418. 50, 52, 69, 154. 

0/01*1 465. 104. 

ow 403. 2. oto* 408. 62 ; 

410. 47, 55, 115; 469. 

4,11,16. 
010s 408. 63. 
otx«rSai 409. 38; 416. 22; 

480. 7. 

OKa 410. 1 1 9. 

oW* 413. 67. 

&/3o*426. 2i(?). 

oAi'yof 403. 30 ; 413. 208. 

6\\vvat 434. 11, 16. 

6X/iiV«tor 470. 35. 

oXo«fc 464. 23. 

'OXvpiudf 409. 105. 

'OAv/jwnovtioys 409. 1 05. 

o/ipvfiv 409. 45; 412. 16; 

413.134. 
6fiow€idfjs 465. 226. 
opocof 410. 101 ; 465. 227 ; 

467. 2. 
6fio\oy*iv 420. 14. 
Spoprjrpios 443. 8. 
OftoiraKTo) (?) 412. 27. 
6fl<Xf>pO(TVVT] 423. 7* 

3/mk 409. 91. 

3»ap 417. 28. 

Syftpos 412. 35. 

tvofia 412. 30 (otivofja) ; 465. 

12, 159, 170, 199. 
foot 409. 31. 
oW«w 413. 129. 
o^ f 411. 83. 
on-citciP 421. 12. 
©W0f(*) 409. 38, 46. 
omV« 465. 17, 62. 
6woiot 410. 95. 
faov 418. 4. 
oira>r 413. 147, 154. 
^409. 57; 413. 138,139, 

144, 146, 166, 169; 416. 



8; 433. 18; 441. 25; 

464. 14, 4 9 (?), 55. 
Spatris 465. 107* 
Zpyta 408. 52. 
oprytatiai 411. 21. 
6f*o<f>v\a£ 413. 132, 141. 
'Opctmjs 420. 6, IO, 13. 
o>6Vfr 465. 15, 61. 
Spfu'tv 413. 99. 
o>/ii} 411. 116. 
6puvvat 480. 5* 
3por 418. 3. 

6px<i<r6m 413. 93 ; 465. 30. 
Mmt 418. 48. 
6W 409. 56, 59, 93 ; 412. 

39; 489. 13; 464. 44- 
6Wp 442. 6. Snip 413. 53. 
00-riff 409. 59, 64 ; 410. 80 ; 

411. 79; 412. 16 (5m); 
418. 185. 

dray 409. 87, IOO. 
art 408. 40 ; 443. 4. 
off 413. 198. 
ol fjJi 413. 132; 481. 3. 
ofa/413. 184, 185. 
ovdefr 409. 42; 429. 3. 
owcf'ri 434. IO. 
o£p<S465. 164(F). 
ovpavws 412. 35. 
ovpavos 407* I. 
oUprjais 468. 12. 
ovroai 415. 3, 7» 

ouru(f) 409. 9, 99 ; 411. 50 ; 

412. 44; 418. 51, M9> 
157; 464. 29, 52; 468. 
1 ; 470. 7, 33, 46. 

<tyc&«*487. 12(F), 13. 
<tydaX/*<fc413. 153; 465. 109, 

227. 
&<f>is 465. 1 8, 202. 
tyvpa 408. 62. 
fyXor 466. 22. 
tyi* 418. 126; 416. 9, 13. 
ctywwof 465. 35. 

vayipapKTOt (?) 412. 3 1 . 
irayKpariaoT^r 409. 1 03. 
na6os 465. 229. 
iraiddpwp 409. 6. 
iraidfop 413. 107, 165. 



iratfrtv 413. 49. 
navjtov 408. 63. 
vaU 409. 37, 46, 83 ; 418. 

113, 120, 165; 416. 4; 

417. 22, 33; 418. 5, 10, 

30; 419. 7 ; 429. 10,12; 

431. 8; 468. 1. 
iraXat 409. 44. 
UaXauTTivti 412. 6 1. 
vaXaifPnros 408. 43. 
fraXt 413. 92, 102. 
naXtu 413. 147, 186; 430. 

6; 464. 26, 27; 465. 

117, 230; 467. 11. 
riaXXdr 421. 4. 
irayddXtor 413. 1 05. 
nayoWi'o'qr 421. 3. 
TJapOtiov 412. 65. 
irayrfXiprror (?) 413. 1 7 3. 
TravTOKparwp 407. I. 
irairoTf 403. 4. 
frapa, irap* oXiyop 413. 208. 

trap ovdcV 418. 16. 
irapa/SaXXfir 413. IOO. 
napctyiyvcatiai 413. IO, 49, 57* 

197. 
flrapadccypi 410. 54. 
irapadcddvai 404. 1 3 ; 404. 

20; 418. 140; 418. 29. 
irapaxcio'&u«413. 1 23. 
irapaKoXovStiv 409. 48. 
napaXappdtHtv 409. 92 ; 417. 

35-, 

wapofUvtip 404. 3. 
-napap.v6rjriK6i 437. 1 3. 
a-apaWor 413. 1 64, 1 65, 1 67, 

173, 178-80. 
trapavKfvi) 411. 37. 
irapara£ts 574. 
iraparioVwu 466.. 1 7* 
naparaTiK6s 469. 7. 
napa<f>v\a(r(T*iv 409. 83. 
naptim 409. 63 (?) ; 411. 

45; 416. 5; 419. 9; 

438. 2. 
napcpx*o-6ai 413. 155* 
Trapcvpcrav (?) 412. 23. 
napcx*<r0ai 413. 47. 
vapBfPos 404. 6, 18, 2i; 

406. 43; 418. 11; 436. 6. 



300 

napupcu 411. 30. 

irapurrducu 412. 37. 

irapopav 411. 1 05. 

TLaposlOQ. 37. 

vappfjtria 418. 1 83. 

irar 407. 2 ; 408. 28 ; 409. 

3, 44, 55, 65, 67 ; 410. 

68, 80, 122; 411. 57 ; 

412. 32; 413. 93, 99, 

104, 118, 151, 157, 158, 

178, 209; 427. 2 ; 436. 

9 (?); 489.IO; 442.14; 

464. 20 ; 470. 5. iravrw* 

428. 4. 
naa\fiv 413. 1 74 
icarrip 408. 38 ; 

418. 182 



o~, 409. 2; 

4121. 102, 227; 418. 28; 

421. 17; 429. 11; 465. 

206. 
irarpis 412. 59 ; 465. 205. 
UttrpoxXos 574. 
iruvcu'413. 72, 192 ; 438. 22. 
iravpos 408. 66. 
Ilaxa)*' 465. 99, 197, 198. 
n*i0**0ai 408. 33. 
irtipa<r6ai 421. 8. 
UtipLBovs 418. 5, 8. 
ncio-urrpart'&u 411. 1 1 ; 412 

48. 
mkayos 413. 1 8, 215; 425. 

8. 
Uf\o7r6vvTjaot 411. 97, 103. 
nt/iimp 411. *j6. 
vtpGaktos 416. II. 
ttcvSikos 416. 9. 
rrevtxpos 420. 2. 
ircwpwfiivos 408. 41. 17 ir«rp«- 

/**V»7 413. 121. 
irc> 422. 3. 
n-c/Kiy 408. 39. 
frcpav413. 214. 
rripdtadcu 413. 22. 
ircpiftoros 412. 30. 
nepmvai 403. 30. 
ncpiipyos 412. 45. 
VfpupX*(rOai 443. 12. 
irrpurofrg 411. 68. 
ircpio&os 409. 106. 
jrc/Hfrarur 413. 1 5* 
ntpiairap 469. 1 2. 



INDICES 

TrtpiTidfvai 466. 19, 22. 

7T<pi<t>€p€lV 413. 7. 

ircptfapla 470. 43. 
ir*piX<*PV 417. 34. 
n/paifg 440. 3. 
frcpvo? 409. 34, 49. 

7T€a(T€VTr]pLOV 470. II. 

irrrc<rdai 421. 1 8. 

D^yacroff 421. 1 7. 

nrjypvvai 418. 1 7. 

mjXiKos 413. 198. 

Tr^pa 409. 29. 

mBav&rip 410. 115. 

nUhjKot 438. 29. 

7rtfirrXawu 413. 1 26. 

9rtvcty413. 51, 54, 66, 162; 

465. 37. 
mirpd(TK€iP 409. 94. 
moTfvciw 409. 84. 
TTIOTIff 415. 18. 
frXavav413. 1 47. 
irXarw 413. 1 6 2. 
irX«r 411. 97 ; 425. 6. 
frXcxccv 468. 2 <f/ Jtf^. 
7rXcvp<5v 466. 23. 
irXca>y 405. 32 ; 409. 95. 

rr\t'i<rros 411. 115; 485. 

182 ; 468. 6. 
Trkrffti 574. 
nkrifip,vp€iv 423. 13. 
irX^p 464. 53. 
irXtyww 411. 113. 
nXtja-lov 413. 99. 
nkotop 418. 99, 194. 
irXovrctv 409. 42, 50. 
iro'&v409. 39, 51 ; 413. 153; 

438. 9. 
iroielu 404. 42 ; 407. 1 ; 

409. 10, 67, 85; 411. 

59 ; 412. 14 ; 413. 8, 25, 

73, 112,113,137,193-4; 

414. 52 ; 417. 20 ; 418. 

2i(?); 433.3$ and marg.; 

442. 14; 466. 33, 38, 

66, 78, 114, 117, 122, 

149, 153, 157, *7*, 174, 
178,180,184,204,223-5, 
229 ; 470. 36, 45, 46. 

Troirjfia 414. 1 1. 
iroirjo-is 412. 52. 



itohft}* 412. 45 ; 414. 6, 35, 

37. 
ffoi/xii* 404. 15. 
rroios 413. 1 72, 191. 
fl-oXf/uuVcrof 426. 4. 
iroXr/mi' 418. 20 (?). 
noXffuot 413. 207 ; 444. 1 7 ; 

465. 104. 
n6\(fAos 418. 2; 439. 5; 

465. 14, 21, 24, 27. 
v6kts 408. 61 ; 409. 24, 57 ; 

411. 58; 465. 25, 178, 

222. 
9roXXairtff 443. 1 7. 
froXvoX/Sof 412. 28. 
troXw 403. 7; 408. 12; 

409. 102; 410. 100; 

411. 52; 412. 53; 413. 

69, 92, 95, 105, mi; 

414.9,50; 441.18; 465. 

25 etsaep. 
iro\vT*Kvos 464. 40. 
iroXvrrXcoTfpor 412. 54. 

TToXvTlfJLOS 412. 28. 

Ilokv<p\*yf0a>v 412. 41. 
ito\v\pavia 465. 1 74. 
vovqpia 413. 46, 1 1 9, 222. 
novrjp6s 409. 26 ; 410. 93 ; 

414. 2. 
tt6vqs 465. 44. 
n6rros 421. 1 6 ; 438. 3. 
nopdrj 418. I et saep. 
TroptIv421. 17. 
irop€Vf<rdm 408. 29; 418. 

162, 168, 193, 196. 
iropifcotfat 448. 1 6. 
noffftd&p 418. 12, 27, 30, 31. 
irorapAs 412. 1 5 ; 413. 27, 

210; 422. i(?) 
irorair6s 413. 155. 
nor* 409. 28, 64, 84 ; 418. 

125, 159; 419. 8; 421. 

12; 465. 175. 
wov 409. 89 ; 413. 156. 
vov 413. 159. 
UovXt/rtW 411. 26. 
irow 403. 14 ; 465. 19, 39 ; 

466. 9. 
wpayfia 409. 55, 101 ; 410. 

16; 411. 21. 



/. NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS 



301 



npSfa 403. 27 ; 409. 4. 
vpaaativ 409. 27, 87. 

VfHCrfivTTJS 420. 6. 

vpi* 418. 160. 
irpoaycw 413. 121. 
npoaiiKflv 433. 4. 
frpo0dXXctv 413. 144; 419. 

7 ; 466. 2. 
vpOoins 464. 19 (?). 
vp66vpo* 435. 5. 
wpooca 420. 9. 
npowrrdvai 466. 29. 
irpoxaXfiv 415. II. 
irpoKarcryiywaKav 411. 87* 
vp6fio£ 413. 90. 
npooiptop 410. 13. 
irpoopav 408. 23. 

TTpOV€TT]£ 410. 7 2 * 

jrfxfc, trpiff /Sun* 409. 80. 
vpoaavari6f<r6ai 413. 1 64. 
vpoaypaffrcw 469. 2. 
vpoo&b 413. 124. 
vpovdoKav 403. 6 ; 416. 7. 
irpoa<px*<r6ai 413. 109, 230. 
npoat'xfiv 411. 54 ; 413. 136. 
vpoaivxq 407. 8. 
npooTjyopia 470. 6, 30. 
irpomtvai 409. 92. 
vpoairouurBai (iroror.) 410. 

I20. 
ir/MNnroXoff 413. 1 06. 
vpoardaatw 418. 18 (?), 32. 
vpooriBivai 470. 38. 
vpo€rrp*x tlv 416. 15. 
vp6<nf>opos 420. 4. 
vpwtffxuHniv 469. 5. 
irptaumov 413. 226 ; 465. 

16, 17, 20, 61, 63, 65, 

111,164; 469. 1,8,10,15. 
vp6rtpos 414. 12; 467. 13. 

wpdnpov 415. 1 2. 
vpcr&vai 409. 1 05. 
npoTpariir 411. 107. 
vpo$cp*OTtpog 412. 32. 
irpo<t>7]np 405. 40. 
irpofawuv 419. 8. 
rrpoxvpciv 418. 177- 
irpwrnfc 413. 6, 17. 
npvpcvs 413. 100. 
*rpwro*413. 101; 438. 17 (?); 



468. 5; 469. 8; 470. 

49. irp&Top 410. 22 ; 411. 

39 ; 415. 4. 
jrrcpvf 465. 18. 
irr»xcfc 409. 49 ; 423. 6. 
mryl(*<r6ai 465. 229. 
frvypi} 409. 104. 
UvOatvt 426. 14. 
msl/iip 470. 36, 40. 
irvvda£ 413. 103. 
m>v0ca**6cn, 420. 5. 
irvp 412. 26, 34 ; 464. 49 ; 

465. 65. 
irwXciv 409. 96 ; 4J.3. 158. 
iroXor 413. 119. 
trwrorc 409. 59 ; 410. 104. 
ir«fc 409. 41 ; 413. 46, 150, 

178, 222. 

film 469. 13. 

'Ptp-opunfc 432. 2 wtfr^. (?). 

ptjr6s 423. 2. 

p^ro»p 411. 76. 

pt'fa 426. 16. 

pivrciy 413. 149 ; 466. 5, 8. 

pv6fi6s 418. 89. 

•p*M»? 412. 63. 

lakaiuvla 411. 79. 

ararparrrjs 409! 40, 60. 

<rcavrov 413. 2 1 6, 225. 

2c0a<mfc 412. 67. 

(Tilptot 412. 36 (?). 

(TfXrjvaios 467. 3. 

(rcX^ 470. 20. ScXipti? 413. 

88. 
(TTjpaufiv 465. 103, 185. 
oTjparrrjp 420. II. 
(jTjpciov 465. 26. 
StyMiafc 413. 91. 
(rforjpos 413. 141. 
SuccXla 411. 49, 56. 
SuccXiunp 411. I IO. 
2i<rv<pib)s 421. 13. 
aurvw (?) 412. 33. 
(TUMi-ay 412. 48. 
arKQirrttp 413. 1 1 7. 

<TK*\VT) 574. 

iric^iiTpoy 465. 162. 
<rKhfp6g 413. 118. 



<r«oruubf 416. 8. 

2kv% 417. 23. 

(TMX*u> 467. 6. 

(TKwrrtuf 409. 36. 

<rofiap6g 409. 64. 

<rfo 418. 106. 

So^ocXijr 410. 58. 

antvktp 433. 1 4. 

Sira^p 413. 133, 1 45, 1 53, 

180, 186. 
tnrXayxPov 465. 41. 
cnrovdi? 420. 4. 
aravpovw 406. 21. 
orfwfr 468. 3. 
artptadai 443. II. 
oTfi/3« (?) 416. introd. 
crn}** 465. H2(?). 
Irrjvia 416. introd. 
anXBti (?) 416. introd. 
orrtyor 416. introd. 
(rrdixos 412. 51. 
<rro\i(*(r6at 465. 112. 
otAot 412. 42. 
cmJ/ia 465. 67. 
oropaxr) 464. 38. 
oroxd&adai 465. 1 79. 
orrparria 436. 7. 

(TTpOTtVCLV 411. 63. 

arparrjytiv 411. 32. 
vrpanrrfg 409. 61. 
arpaiwip 409. 28 marg. % 

82. 
(rrptyciv 418. 156; 416. 

introd. ; 480. 6. 
trrp&fui 416. introd. 
oTvwrrfr 438. 28. 
tmmTJjpia 467* 7. 
ovyyovos 408. 44. 
avyKpuris 425. 7* 
<rvyx<up<w 413. 30, 188. 
av(vyta 469. 13. 
ovtuxfxirnjs 411. 65. 
<rvXXap0di>fU' 418. 120. 
ovyictpavvvpat 413. 1 7 1. 
cn/XAcyfty 409. 43. 
crvXXoyor 41L 70. 
trvpfiovXtvtip 411. Il8. 
avfifMX ^ 418. 29. 
avptras 412. 56. 
cn/fifrXtypOTtt 470. 1 2. 



302 

avfi7r6ariov 465. 32. 
ovptfiopd 417. 26. 
uvvatdkovOtiv 413. 174* 
ovvaprav 574. 
crvy*urc'px*<rdcu 413. 1 54. 
<rw€K<f>Q>}Kiv 469. 3. 
avviffopoi 465. 68. 

(TVvBtTOS 411. 7* 

avtnivai 424. 6. 
(rvvoducos 470. 18. 
wvodor 409. 11 ; 470. 15. 
o-uvrpc<f)itv 418. 118. 
avpupis 433. 15. 
avp€ip 413. 142. 
avppanrtip 412. 49. 
ffwrofftf 411. 6 1 . 
(tvotoAi; 470. 62. 
<rucrrpctTCi>fiv 411. 42. 
a<£ayidff«> 413. 1 2 7. 
aifrodpa 409. 9, 102. 
<r<t>payls 433. 21, 30. 
crxcdoV 410. 121 ; 41L 57. 
<rxw a 464. 50. 
<ra»fciy 407. 4; 409. 22; 

413. 41, 106. 
<rS>fia 415. 8(?); 416. 3, 17. 
v&os 413. 187. 
trc&TT)p 405. 26 ; 407. 5. 
aomjpta 413. 44, 2 1 9. 
<r<xKf)povtLv 413. 219. 

raypa 436. IO. 

rakninvpos 413. 1 48, 184, 

207. 
raXatrrop 435. 4. 
TdAas 413. 104, 173. 
ravUaBai 422. I. 
TaytyvXXor 426. 7. 
rd£if 403. 24. 
nwnreir 437. 8. 
raxcwr 409. 42; 413. 66. 

ra^Mrrof 411. 80. 
rd^of 411. 113; 413. 170. 
TtKfuuptaBai 411. 19. 
rc'icnor 412. 20; 464.41,57; 

466. 147, 151, 154. 
rfjeyDiroMiy 465. 1 54. 
TtXfip 412. 17 ; 413. 175. 
TcAcvrtuoff 417. 30. 
TfXear 409. 61. 



437. ii] 



INDICES 

rtXor 416. 3. 
r</xcvo( 426. 15. 
ripas 465. 226. 
:Tcr . . . 465. 200. 

T€TOpTOS 470. 77' 

Tf X pji 409. 50; 

465. 106. 
TrjXtpaxos 412. 1 9. 
rfjvos 410. 103. 
ri7pciy409. 44; 413. 142. 
TiOepai 438. 16 ; 464. 56. 
rUHjvri 412. 19. 
TiKTtiv 465. 225. 
rifiap 411. 106; 426. 17; 

464. 18 (?). 
Tipfftis 408. 38. 
tiW*412. 16. 
Tit<£* 412. 26. 
rwyap 464. 53. 
ro/jrvv 413. 228. 
rotor 412. 20. 
rot6a&€ 412. 37. 

roiovTos 410. 74, 98, 120; 

413. 165, 167; 414. 4; 

432. 3, 5; 464. 21. 
t6kos 464. 1 4. 
ro£cvcu' 418. 208. 
ro£iKo'f 413. 198. 
toW 409. 60; 413. 52; 

465. 71. 
Toaovro* 413. 5. 

rorc 408. 24 ; 411. 44 ; 464. 

56. 
rptts 408. 45. 
rpi<f*tv 412. 39; 420. 7. 
rpt)3«i/434. 4; 467. 10. 
rpis 433. 12. 
rpio-jcatftcjcaror 412. 63. 
rpiros 409. 16; 469. IO, 12, 

15 ; 470. 44, 54, 67. 
Tplrtav 425. 2. 
Tpota 409. 93. 
Tpofteiy 416. IO. 
rpo/ioj 413. 105. 
rpoVor 438. IO. 
rpo<pfi 409. 6. 
rptyipas 409. 55. 
rpuyfo 418. 55. 
rvyxavtv* 409. 8, ioo; 41L 

82; 413. 98; 442. 16. 



{vfiirapiepfc?) 413. io etsaep. 
viros 466. 15, 60, 107, l6i» 
201. 



rwroff 

201. 
Tvpapvis 411. 8. 
rvpawor 409. 59. 
TvQwv 465. IIO. 
rv^ 419. 15. 

uyuuVw 413. 68. 

vypaip€iv 468. 1 3. 

i7fx5y 468. 9. 

vbapfp 413. 69. 

vdpoxoos 465. II. 

vfop 425. 3, 6. 

v&fc 406. 20; 422. 8 ; 465. 

159- 
vfu*ip 413. 136. 
vnoKovtiv 418. 46, 222. 
inrdpxti* 413. 159; 418. 14. 
vnevapriop 409. 85. 
wra*p6V 412. 1 5. 
vntpPtos 408. 28. 
virfffiaXr) 440. 1 5. 
vircpc^civ 436. 8.' 
vwcpr)<f>apos 418. 139. 
vmjpertlp 41L 83. 
wro/3dXXfu> 466. 21, 22. 
w«*6W410. 81; 412. 47,57. 
xmoBrjfKxrvpij 412. 38. 
imfapuris 408. 69. 
vnokapfiavtiv 409. 66; 410. 

99; 466. 19. 
virdwia 409. 47. 
vrroarddfjLT) 465. 1 94. 
imwf^petp 403. 26. 
VTTOifxvyfty 413. 2 1 5. 
vmxfapd 468. IO. 
vnox*Lpios 441. 22. 
v9rox6\Svio$ 464. 44. 
xmo^ia 41L 16. 
varcpop 41L ioi(?); 438. 

. i5(?)- 
w^or 403. 13. 

*<u'6W 464. 13. 
o>ofiror 464. 15(F). 
(fxuip6s 413. no. 
<fxrfrc<rOai 410. 19, 68, 113; 

413. 118, 136; 416. 2; 

464. 58 (?). 



/. NEW LITERARY FRAGMENTS 



303 



tydwv (*auw?) 464. 31. 
(fxivai 406. 13; 409. 105; 

413. 59, 93, 139; 418. 

24; 426.9; 481.4; 440. 

7 ; 442. 26. 
<txu«p6s 409. 89 ; 466. 230. 
<f>arra(fiv 413. 130. 
<l>dot 464. 55. 
(fnppaKOP 412. 39 ; 418. 161, 

171; 441. 23. 
QapiiovBt 465. 10, 11. 
<£a<nc (?) 412. 33. 

<f>d<TKttP 411. 24. 

itfxibcadai 409. 43. 
♦ei&at 409. 19. 

<f*p*u> 409. 28, 31, 46 ; 417. 

26 ; 420. 8. 
tepvoufHs 470. 25, 27. 
<t»vy*ip 408. 27; 410. 76; 

413. 40. 
*da 412. 27. 

OtXiinrof 441. 20 ; 444. 13. 
c^tXoy . . . 489. 3. 
JMXot 411. 59 ; 425. 8 ; 442. 

18, 30 ; 465. 23. ret <f>ik- 

rara429. 12. 
^iXocro^c&r 438. 6. 
<f>tX<Hro<f>ia 438. 7. 
ifAfwvp 413. 122. 
QkrivacjxK 409. 21. 
*X# 466. 60. 
<J>o0€ur&u 413. 130, 180. 
*oT0os 418. 24; 426. 3. 
tfxW 413. 180. 
^5p/«yf 408. 35. 
*op£p 470. 11. 
<t>pd((iv 428. 2. 
^* 412. 32; 413. 152; 

424. lo. ♦pi;* 412. 27. 
^putA&p 416. 9. 
<t>p6*rHm 411. 17. 
<f>povpapxot 409. 60. 
^pvyfiy 468. 7. 



4>t/Xa£ 435. 7. 
$ufu'464. i6(?). 
(pvais 416. 20. 
(/x»^ 403. 13. 

<^r 412. 31; 413. 183; 
464. 13(F); 470. 1. 

Xaipcur 413. 67, 202. 
X^pins 414. 59. 
XapifcaBat 465. 1 77. 
gapf 441. 26 ; 442. 7. 
Xaplriop 413. 42, 97, 188, 

213. 
Xdpprj 422. 6. 
Xarth> 422. 3. 
Xrtfu»»413. 18. 
Xc/p 409. 90; 465. 64, 

in ; 466. 10. 
X*tpmtpy6s 487. I5(?). 
Xf/p«v 403. 32. 
XfXwi? 465. 202. 
X*W 412. 24, 35. 
x6*» 412. 26, 29, 39. 
Xtratyiov 413. 1 56. 
xX«p<fc 434. 9. 
xoiptdiov 413. 38 ; 465. 62. 
Xoprjyti* 465. 182. 
Xopw»(?)412. 31. 
X op<k 413. 88. 

Xpfta 411. 84 ; 413. 167, 226. 
X^419. 13; 428. 4. 
XPiC*» 410. 85, 98. 
XM<r&" 410. 6; 412. 18; 

418. 25; 467.8. 
Xp*i<np*v€iv 465. 148. 
Xpfripos 410. 14, 20; 468. 

II. 
XPnorfa 410. 82 ; 416. 2. 
XptW438. 31. 
Xpurrcfc 405. 34 ; 406. 21 ; 

407.6. 
Xpfoo* 417. 28; 426. 10; 

469. 14. 



Xpvaiop 409. 95. 

XpvovK6pjp 426. 16. 

Xpvaovv 469. 1 6. 

Xpvaovs 465. ill, 202. 

XP&pa 467. 16. 

XP»* 420. 10. 

Xv\6s 465. 192. 

XuXauftp 465. 39. 

X«X<fe 466. 43. 

X&pa 420. 9 ; 426. 6 ; 470. 

3> *3i 16, 58. 
X«pe«y409. 81; 487. 11. 
XOpi&aOat, 413. 1 59. 
X»ptr 466. 190. 



*#£«> 416. 5. 
^ifaoff 470. 17. 
^rvx'7 408. 29; 465. 106, 

116. 
VAAtxof 418. 27, 40, 210. 

&413. 104; 416. 10; 426. 

20; 429. 12. 
& ftoi 416. 16. 
&*413. 114, 147, M8, I53> 

155, 156. 
?&fe 465. 31, 69. 
fyof 465. 156(F). 
u>p6rr)s 411. 1 2. 
arfurtfai 409. 91. 
&wtos 418. 52. 
vpo\6yiop 470. 31. 
*Qpo* 464. 26, 37 ; 470. 12. 
'tywinfe 417. 38. 
a* (exclamation) 409. 45. 
*r 574. 
it fo 412. 18. 
&nrcp 404. 12 ; 465. 182. 
&<rrt 410. 17; 413. 120, 162, 

214, 216; 436. 11; 467. 

5. 
a<t*\Lpos 414. 10. 



! 
304 INDICES i 



II. EMPERORS. 
Vespasian. 

fcbt Ovt<rwaariap6t 52L introcL 

DOMITIAN. 

Ao/uruwJr 477. 9 ; 481. 1 6. 

Nerva. 

$€os N/pouas 482. 34 ; 621. introd. 

.Trajan. 

Avrotcp. Kaur. Ncpotw Tpaiavfe " Apumw Sc/Saarfc Ttpficunxos Aajcucfa Ilap&mfc 489. I, 32, 

34- 

Avrotcp. Kaur. Ne/xwar Tpaiayfa 2c0. IVpf*. Aax. 482. 37, 42 ; 483. 22, 23, 35 ; 511. 12 ; 

686; 612. 

Avrotcp. Kaur. Ncpotw Tpaianfc 2*0. Ttpfi. 481. 1 9, 26 ; 508. I ; 681. 
Tpauvfa Kaur. 6 «vp«w 483. 1 4 ; 508. 15; 510. 8 ; 511. 6. 

Hadrian. 

Afroffp. Kaur. Tpajavfa 'Aftpuvfc 2*0. 477. ii ; 478. 36, 39 ; 480. 8, 17 ; 484. 29 ; 
490. 1 ; 491. i, 27 ; 492. 1 ; 496. 1 ; 499. 35 ; 600. 22 ; 603. 1. 
'Adpiayfa Kaur. 6 tcvpiot 478. 1 8, 24 ; 486. 5 ; 499. 6 ; 500. 20 ; 615. 4 ; 617. 4. 
'A&puufa Kaur. 486. 36. 

Antoninus Pius. 

AvToicp. Kaur. Tiros AZXior 'A&puxpos 'Arrwunt 2*0. Ewr*07* 473. I ; 479. 1 9 ; 487. 20 ; 
494. 1 ; 506. 1. 

'AwTtrnwot Kaur. 6 Kvptoe 479. 1 5 ; 506. 1 8 ; 516. 9, 13 ; 520. 5 ; 618 ; 658. 
*avoro*i Zc/Saor^ 502. 4. 

Marcus Aurelius and Verus. 

Avrotcp. Kaur. Mdptcos Avpfjktos 'ArrtM'tvor 2f0. teal Avrotcp. Kaur. Aovtctot Avprjktos Ovrjpos 
2*0. 502. 46. 

ol KvpUA Avrotcp, *AvTUPt*ot <cal Ovrjpos 502. 1 2. 

Marcus Aurelius. 

AvroKp. Kola. Mdp*o* AvpqXio? 'Aprvpufos 2*0. 2app.. Mi/d. Ilapl. Meytaros 607. 39. 
Avprjkios 'Apravlvos Kaur. 6 Kvpu>? 607. 1 5 ) 512. II. 

Marcus Aurelius and Commodus. 

Avrotcp. Kaur. Map*o? Avp^Xtor *Aira»tvof «ai Aowno? Avprjkiot Kc^uio&ar 2*0. 'Apfu Mijd. 
Ilapd. Tcpu. 2app.. Mcyurroc 485. 37. 

AvpffXtot *Avrmpt¥Ot teal K6ppodos Kaur. ol icvpioi 518. 2 ; 614. 
Avpfjkun *Aprwnpot rat Krfuuo&w oZ JcvpuM 2*0. 485. 6, 34. 
'Avrvvivos icai K6fipodot ol jcvpta* Avrotcp. 485. 43. 



IV. PERSONAL NAMES 



3P5 



COXMODUS. 

AvroKp. Kaur. Mapjror AvprjXios KSfipobos 'Ajtw^w Evoy0. Evtvx. Scj3. 'App. Mrjd. Hapd. 
2app. Tfpfi. Mtyioros BptrawucSs 501. 48. 

AvroKp. Hour. MftyMco? AvpqXtor K<$/j/*odo? 'Avronnvos 2cj8. Evo-^9. 'Apft. Mifd. IIap4. Sap/i. 
Tcpfu Mry«n-o$ 513. 49. 00*. Ewrc/9. 475. 3 1 ; 495. X. 

MapKos AvprjXtos Kd/tfiodor *Arra>pivos Kaur. 475. IO. 

AvpgXtor K6pfiodos 'Avtuvukk Kaur. 6 Kvpiot 513. 6. 



&ol lifaurroi 483. 21. 



6 icupioff 471. 32. 



Egyptian. 

'Atop 
Xoiok 
Tw/9» 

Qappov&i 

Hax<i>v 

JJavvi 

'EflTCtty 
Mf(TOpiJ 



IIL MONTHS AND DAYS. 

(*) Months. 

fioman. 
2«j3acn-o> 485. 14. 



N«w 2*0a<nr<k 634 ; 641. 

'A&pcoKfe 487. 2p; 506. 2, 13, 53; 513. 7. 



YcppavtKiios 494. 2. 



Kaicrapfco* 473. i; 481. 21, 28; 483. 13; 
485. 18; 489. 1; 491. 1, 27 ; 504. 25; 
506. 17; 508. 3; 510.9; 530.28; 581. 
€iray6p*pai 9/Mpat, & 481. 22, 29; 489. I, 32, 35. c 49L i, 27 ; 504. 25; 510. 9. 

$-581; 628. 



(3) Days. 

'lovXia 2c/3mrri} (Phannouthi 24) 496. 1 ; (uncertain) 604. 

2€/3aon7 (Phamenoth 29 ?) 483. 30; (Caesareus 4th intercalary day) 489. 1, 32, 35. 



IV. PERSONAL NAMES. 



'AfrivKavTos 531. 23 ; 634. 
'Ayadfro* son of Theon 492. 22. 

'AyadojeXi?* 61L 
"Abpaarot 504. 48, 58. 



'Adpt'w /3i0X«xf>vAa£ 478. I. 
'AAyw 478. 21. Cf. Index VI (a). 
'AOtpapovs daughter of Cerdon 529. 19. 
*A«a»<rtXaor also called Dionysius 494. 3, 8. 



306 



INDICES 



'AKovtrikaof son of Dius 494. 3, 30. 
•AAcfov^por 489. 24 ; 494. 8 ; 498. 3 ; 627 ; 

681. 
"AXffi/iof, Nf pfcnW fatxa\ovfi€vos "AX*. 586. 
'Aftdfxnrroi 688. 28. 
'Apewtvs 505. I. 
'A/icwcvr son of Artemas 505. 1. 
^Afi/Moy 489. 25. 
'Ajifuwar son of Gaius 520. 9. 
'Afifuvvar son of Sagathes 506. 7. 
'Af^uoKOff 505. 4 ; 622. 12 ; 616 ; 685. 
'AfifUnrun also called Dionysius, son of Am- 

monius 505. 3. 
'Appwnos also called Psenamounis 494. 6. 
'App&vtos son of Sarapion 492. 2, 10. 
'Apfi&vios also called Theodoras 614. 
'Afipvvtos son of Theon 477. 6. 
'Appvnns son of Heraclides 439. 25. 
'Appntnw imrrjprfTip 520. 3, 24. 
'Appwvovs 490. 9. 
'Afifuwovr daughter of Chaeremon 497. 3 et 

saep. 
'AfUHvofjJptos also called Dionysius 489. 27. 
'A/ifa 484. 8 ; 498. 4 ; 618; 628 ; 651. 
'Afi&r son of Aperos 479. 4, n, 24. 
'Afufa also called Eudaemon, son of Amois 

498. 14. 
'Aprftr son of Philoxenus 479. 2, 23. 
'Afufc son of Sarapion 493. 14. 
'Afufo also called Stephanus, son of Apollo- 

phanes 508. 5. 
'Apoira? also called Heraclides 509. 9. 
'Apoirar son of Troflus 481. 24. 
*Afitf>i»p also called Faustus 516. 2. 
9 A»dp6piKos 628. 

*Ardp6vucos son of Statilius Phanias 598. 
t A»Urrros 471. 39. 
'Avov/Scw 531. 16, 19, 20. 
'Apov&Ioop son of Julius, ex-scribe 642. 
Ww 617. 8. 
% AvrlyLaxos 501. 12. 
'Ayrioxoff, AvprjXios *Avt. 512. 9. 
'Ajrwca *A<ncX?irMw also called Cyria 498. 1, 9. 
'AvrwuxK also called Pudens, archidicastes 

485. 4, 9. 
*Apt&vios, MapKot 'Ayr. 'Ao-JtXipriadifff 592. 
'Amayior son of Ptolemaeus 523. 1. 
'Aoi/i'diof 'HXwfowfw praefect 484. 21. 
'Am 530. 14. 
'Airtp&s 479. 4, 24. 



9 Airc« son of Pausis 476. 13. 

'Aniw 489. 2; 490. 20; 492. 1 6, 18; 

516. 10, 14 ; 680. 24 ; 688. 1. 
'Airfor son of Apion 516. 10, 14; 588. 1, 

30; 588. 27. 
'As-tar also called Dionysius, ex-gymnasiarch 

612. 2. 
'AvW also called Dionysius, priest, son of 

Diogenes 502. 2, 50. 
*Avu»v also called Epicrates, son of Epicrates 

504.37,39. 
'Airtiur Arto-KCRTi;? 589* 
'AiriW also called Heracles, son of Apion 

489. 20. 
'AwUtv, tikaowoc 'A*. 604. 1 4 et saep. 
'AnUo* son of Zoilus 492. 18. 
'Avokwapws strategus 484. 2 ; 679. 
'AmSXXw 494. 37. 
*AmfXX«r son of Diogenes 498. 14. 
'AwoKkwapto* also called Aristous, daughter 

of Heraclides 494. 8 et saep. 
'AnakXuvta 632. 

'AiraXA<»wawfr son of Sarapion 485. 2, 11. 
'AjraXAcmoc 489. 21; 490. 15; 492. 21; 

498. 2; 506. 4, 9, 28; 522. 13; 588. 

16; 609; 611; 622. 
'AjroXXwtof son of Amois 498. 4. 
'AfraXAttMOff son of Asclepiades 492. 21. 
'AiraXXwior son of Claudius Demetrius 574. 
'AnoKk&rtot also called Demetrius 502. 7. 
'AiraXXamoff son of Horus 499. 3, 31, 47. 
'AsroXXt&itoff son of Origenes 488. 8. 
'AiroXXi0KO0 son of Panechotes 506. 5. 
*An6Xkmvws son of Pasion 498. 6. 
'AiraXXttKo* also called Theon, son of Theon 

492. 6, 8, 12. 
'Ao-oXXowotiff 506. I. 

'AjroXXttnofe also called Demetria 494. 6. 
'AsroXXvvovs daughter of Petosorapis 495. 7, 

M. 
'AiroXXo^ayi;^ 508. 6. * 
'Apaatg 505. 4. 
'ApfruBos 479. 13. 
"Apttos 520. 16. 

'Ap&mc 482. 25; 508. 8 ; 584. 
'ApSuvis priest 533. 19. 
'ApiaratApos 499. 1. 
% Apurrovs also called Apollonarion, daughter 

of Heraclides 494. 8 et saep. 
*ApUm»9 son of Artemidorus 490. 16. 



j 



IV. PERSONAL NAMES 



307 



'Ap/uCo-tf 507. i. 

'Apfuvra also called Heracles 511. 1. 

'Apiuwris son of Heras 50L 6. 

'Apnaxjins also called Horus, son of Thonis 

491. 4, 10, 16. 
"ApraXof 487. 3, a a ; 482. 19. 
'Aptmcpas 601. 

'Aprocpanp. See Index VI (a). 
'Aproffpaiw son of Sarapion 489. 3, 13, 33, 

35- 
'Afxriipis son of Epimachus 508. a, 8, 

10. 
'Aprv/uxt 505. I. 
'Apmiufopos 490. 16; 497. aa ; 510. 18, 

23- 
w Aprtpt&*pos son of Amenneus 505. 1, 5. 
*ApT€pid»pos scribe of komogrammateus 488. 

13- 
*ApT€fia>p 504. II, 44. 
'Apr&ais 520. 19. 
'Ao-xXor son of Alexandras 498. 3. 

'AaKkTjviabrjs 494. 35; 681. 25. 
'AarjeXipriadi?* son of Apollonius 492. 21. 
9 A<TKXrjiriddr)s son of Asclepiades 494. 40. 
'AaKXrjirid^t also called Eudaemon 814. 
'AottXiprta&p son of Eudaemon 494. 34. 

t AaK\rjvidSr}s ) MapKos *Avra>vtot *A<tk. 692. 

'AoirXi^nad^ff son of Pausirion 494. 41. 
'AaicX^rinf, 'AjrraWa 'Ao-ir. also called Cyria 

498. 1, 9. 
'Arpcw 490. 2, 5, 8. 
'Arpjf 527. 1 ; 532. 1. 
'Arpijs son of Kouphateus 575. 
'Arprjs son of Panechotes 506. 10. 
Afyxtr daughter of Isas 684. 
ACW493. 14. 
AvprjKios % Avrioxos 512. 
9 A<f>pod . . . child of Hermione 472. 41. 
*A<ppo&Tovs also called Demarous 604. 3 

et saep. 
*A<f>vyxv 0rj<ravpo<f)vka£ 522. 9. 
'A X iXXar 625. 6. 

'AxiXXaf son of Didymus 488. 30, 33. 
'A X iXXfw 497. 20 ; 680. 



BrXn; . . . 588. 5. 
Btptvua) 498. 8, 16. 
Btp€Puuav6s 471. 32. 
Btfaas 491. 20. 



Brja-as also called Ophelas, son of Sarapas 

505. 1. 
Bijais son of Diogenes 487. 21. 

Vatot 520. 9. 

rdws KiMQTOf, 'Hpav firucakovfjupot I\ 492. 20. 

r<uo* MJiquos Koppovrot also called Polydeuces 

609. 4. 
r$494.6. 

Arjpapovt also called Aphroditous 504. 3 

et saep. 
fypas daughter of Apollonius 506. 5, 10. 
Aff/Jjs 603. 2. 

Arjprjrpia 497. 20. 

Arjfjujrpia daughter of Antimachus SOL 12. 
Arjprjrpia also called Apollonous 494. 7. 

Arjprp-pios 582. 

Awujrpift? also called Apollonius 502. 7. 

ArifLrfTpwgf KXavdios Aijfi. 574. 

Arjprjrpios also called Theon 620. 
Ajy^j/rpovr 498. 13; 608. 9; 576; 683. 
AfiiujTpovs daughter of Amois 479. 1, 23. 
At&ovs 496. 2. 

Aidvpfj daughter of Ruphion 508. 16. 
Atdviws 488. 31; 491. 18; 499. 12; 502. 

6 ; 520. 7. 
Aidvfiof agoranomus, son of Didymus 494. 

37. 
Aidvpo* son of Amois 484. 7. 
Aidv/MK son of Didymus 484. 10, 14. 
Aibvpos son of Enthesmus 494. 37. 
Ai&vfMos son of Onnophris also called Chaere- 

mon 494. 32. 
Aftvpas son of Origenes 488. 8. 
Afavpos son of Sarapion 511. 2 ; 610. 
Auryas son of Amois 618. 
Aioytwyff SOL 3; 502. 3; 606. 7; 676; 

628; 634. 
Auryivrfs son of Apollonius 489. 21. 
Auryfrqe son of BeleS . . . 688. 5. 
Aiaybnjt also called Dionysius, son of Sarapion 

518. 1, 24, 52. 
Aioyanjs gymnasiarch, son of Sarapion 507. 3. 
Aurytvns also called Heraclides, ex-gymnasi- 

arch, son of Diogenes 50L 2. 
Aioyanjs son of Pasion 493. 7. 
Aurycvrjs also called Phalanx, son of Harpalus 

492. 19. 
Awybnp son of Ptolemaeus 482. 2a. 



X 2 



"1 



3 o8 



INDICES 



Aioyanjt also called Sarapion, ex-gymnasiarch, 

son of Diogenes 501. 3. 
AioytVi7f scribe, son of Hierax 496. 16. 
Aioyewjr sitoIogUS 518. 6. 
Aioytnjs son of Theon 498. 14. 
Atoytvig 494. 7. 

AioytpU daughter of Apollonous also called 

Demetria 494. 7. 
Aioywis daughter of Ptolemaeus 489. 5 et 

saep. 
AioKkfjt 508. 24; 508. 16. 
Awickrjs son of Diodes 508. 15 ; 508. 22. 
Aiopos scribe 517. 17. 
Atowvaat 644. 
Aiovwria 621. 
Atomcr/a daughter of Chaeremon 472. 41, 

42, 46; 486. 2, 19, 23; 502. 1. 
Atawala daughter of Dionysius 478. 4, 28, 

42. 
Aiowo-ta also called Sambous 489. 29. 
Aiotwria daughter of Theon 494. 3. 
Aiovvaios 478. 5, 30 ; 480. 4 ; 503. 4 ; 510. 

3, 11; 524. 1; 529. 3, 9; 580. 1; 

583. 16; 602; 613; 617; 620; 622. 
Aioiwriof also called Acusilaus 494. 3, 8. 
AtoriHTios also called Ammonius, son of 

Ammonius 505. 3. 
Aiovtoios also called Amoinomerius 489. 27. 
Aiovvo-tos also called Apion, ex-gymnasiarch 

512. 2. 
Aiowwnos also called Apion, priest, son of 

Diogenes 502. 3, 50. 
Aiovvatos apxuparcvovs, son of Epimachus 

533. 24. 
Aiovvartos also called Chresimus, son of 

Dionysius 478. 4, 29, 42. 
Aiowaios also called Diogenes, son of Sara- 
pion 513. i, 24, 52. 
AtoFvcnoff son of Dorion 487. 6. 
Atowvtnot son of Epimachus 503. 3 et saep. 
Aiopvatos (ariTTjprjrr)s Kardkoxurp&p) 641. 
Aiovwrios son of Harpocration 489. 3 et 

saep. 
Awpvatos UpoviKrjs #c.r.X., son of Faustus also 

called Amphion 516. 1. 
Aiovwrior, KXovdtor Atov. 520. 25. 
Atowvanor son of Panechotes 490. 4, 8, 10. 
Aiovvaios son of Prometheus 675. 
Aiovva-ios sitologUS 515. 2. 
Awpwtovs 478. 3, 41. 



Aiowrat 530. 25, 3 1. 

Awe son of Acusilaus 494. 12, 16, 23. 

Aios son of Dionysius also called Acusilaus 

494. 3, 30. 
Atoaxopas 522. 26. 
Autyairo son of Aulius 493. 14. 
Aufyamt son of Diophantus 493. 14. 
Aiw 499. 9. 
Aeopiup 487. 6 ; 623. 
AnpLw ex-exegetes 512. 1. 
A»p66*os 517. 11. 

c EX/r»7 492. 8 ; 513. 3, 60. 

"Ei4f<r/iOff 494. 38 ; 645. 

'ErKOMMnw 634. 

*E£ox&r 506. 3. 

*E£a*S>v son of Herodes 639. 

'Eira$prfdtrof 475. 21, 29. 

'EmKpaTTjs also called Apion, son of Epicrates 

604. 3 et saep. 
'EirucpdTTjs son of Heraclides 504. 4, 37, 54. 
'Ewiiiaxo* 533. 25 ; 620. 
*Enlpaxos banker 518. 37. 
*Empaxos frotjdbs ariroktyuv 614. 
'Eninaxos son of Dionysius 503. 2 et saep. 
% Etripnx°* son of Harsigsis 503. 2 et saep. 
'EniPttcos 495. 2. 

'EiriWor son of Petosorapis 495. 4, 7, 8. 
'Enlxappos son of Nicarous 496. 7. 
"Epcmof, Aovkios *Ep. Kpiawot 605. 8. 
'Eppaia-Kos 533. 24. 
'Eppas 494. 6. 

'Epp« son of Theon 603. 5. 
*Eppar6is 530. 25. 

'Eppajs 601. 6, 52. Cf. Index VI (<z). 
'Ep/iiW 495. 5 ; 518. 48, 62. 
'Eppias son of Hermias 518. 1, 47, 62. 
'Eppias scribe of irpaKToptg 583. 22. 
'Epplm son of Spartas 591. 
'EpiuAtnj daughter of Chaeremon 472. 2 et 

saep.; 486. 2, 19, 21. 
'Eppoyani* 489. 23. 
*Ep/i»r 479. 27. 
•E<nyxr«fe« 489. 3, 33, 35. 
Ev&upovts 504. 7. 
Evdaipovis also called Plutarche 506. 2, 3. 

Evdaipov 485. 53. 

Ev&aipw son of Asclepiades 494. 35. 
Ev&aipnv also called Asclepiades 614. 
Evdaifi»r son of Eudaemon 491. 4 */ w#. 



IV. PERSONAL NAMES 



3°9 



Eldaipuw son of Menoites 478. 7, 45. 
Ev&alfiw vaarofopos, son of Thonasuchis 

491. 2 et saep. 
Ev&aifiup son of Theon 496. 2. 
Evtvxv 633. 4. 
E&rvxos chamberlain 471. 84. 

tots. See Index VI (a). 

Zipri&vpos 488. 5. 

ZfiApaydos 583. 28. 

ZwiXos 490. 3; 588. 14, 19; 577; 626; 

649. 
ZaiXor son of Apion 492. 18. 
Z«mW PtPkuxfrvXat 478. 1. 
Zt^Xw son of Theon 491. 19. 



c HX«fta»po?, 'Aovftto* 'HA. praefect 484. 21. 

"HXiof 489. 25 ; 494. 6. 

"Hpa 483. 3. 

"Hpair 592 ; 624. 

'Hpais daughter of Alexandrus 494. 8. 

'Hpaxkas also called Harmiusis 511. 1. 

'lipomas son of Harthonis 508. 8. 

'HpaxKas son of Heraclas 508. 8, 12, 26. 

"HpoxXfia 504. 34. 

'HpdcXfUK VTnjperrjs of StrategUS 476. 1 1. 

'H/xucAct'V 489. 29 ; 504. 4 ; 532. 1 ; 582; 
626. 

'HpaxXc&ip also called Amoitas 509. 9. 
'HpaKkiidijs son of Antias 517. 7. 
'HpcueXcftip son of Apion 533. 27. 
'HpueXcftip also called Diogenes, ex-gymna- 

siarch, son t)f Diogenes 501. 1. 
*HpaKkfldrjs son of Dionysius also called 

Acusilaus 494. 8. 
'HpoxXcttip son of Epicrates 504. 37, 53, 61. 
'HpakXrftys son of Hermaiscus 538. 24. 
"HpaxXci'dip son of Isidorus 614. 
'HpaKkcUhp son of Olympus 504. 5, 33, 51. 
"HpojcXctdi?? son of Ptolemaeus 489. 25. 
'HpoxXc /ftp scribe of strategus 602. 

'UpaKktidrjs sitologUS 515. 2, 5. 

'HpoicXip 489. 30; 494. 43. 

'HpoxXip also called Apion, son of Apion 489. 

- 20. 

'HpaKkrjs son of Sarapas 649. 

"H/xucXow 496. 5. 

'HpoxXovr daughter of Harbaithus 479. 13. 

'HpaxXovs daughter of Sarapion 492. 3. 



'Upas 481. 23 ; 496. 2 (woman) ; 501. 6 ; 
527. 2, 10; 530. 27. 

'Upas mucakovfuvos Tdios Kivaros (?) 492. 20. 

'Upas son of Heras 481. 12, 22. 

'Hpvfys 494. 32; 499. 2, 37; 517. 10; 

520. 22. 
'Hpvdrjs pi&\uxf>v\at 515. I. 

'H/xtf&p son of Exacon 506. 3. 
'Hfaurrivv 625. 

'H<£a«mW also called Sarapion 495. 8. 
'HKfxuoras imrfipnrrjt 520. 3, 24. 

Gmjais 485. 1 5.; 491. 2, 28. 

emjiTit also called Thaisous, daughter of 

Heraclides 504. 5 et saep. 
Bais 490. 21. 

Oals daughter of Sarapion 496. 2, 5. 
Oaurovs 500. 4, 26; 505. 8; 530. 26. 
eaurovs also called Thaesis, daughter of 

Heraclides 504. 5 et saep. 
eax&pis daughter of Amenneus 505. 1. 
earpfjs 603. 3, 4. 

earprjs daughter of Ammonius 492. 1 et saep. 
Barpffs daughter of Apollonius 506. 4 et saep. 
Qavfidpiov 477. 14. 
Of6da>pos also called Ammonius 614. 
ecddoror 504. 11, 44. 
OtppovOdpiov 530. 28. 
e*to» 490. 21 ; 491. 19 ; 492. 5, 6, 8, 23 ; 

493. 14; 494. 3; 496. 2; 497. 4 '' 

saep.; 502. 5; 503. 5; 530. 7, 31 ; 

625; 631. 
Of ay son of Agathinus 492. 22. 
e*a>j> also called Apollonius, son of Theon 

492. 6, 8, 12, 15. 
GcW 0i0Xfo4>vXa( 483. 32. 
G«w also called Demetrius 620. 
GfW also called Horion, son of Sarapion 

492. 3, 16. 
GcW, EXavdios G. 510. 1 6. 
GcW also called Ptolemaeus, 0t3Xio$t/Xa£ 584. 
Gear son of Ptollion 492. 5, 11. 
Glair son of Sarapion 477. 6. 
GcW scribe 515. 8. 
GcW sitologus 517. 6. 
G«W strategus 485. 1. 
GcW son of Theon 492. 5, 12, 14. 
Geo)!/ son of Theon, also called Apollonius 

492. 6, 8, 12, 15. 
Occur son of Zoilus 491. 19. 



3io 



INDICES 



e*a>pas 630. 24. 

So^ptf. See Index VI (a). 
BopRttiiais son of Komoapis 491. 22. 

Oopnuos 488. 3, 34. 

Gmovs 623. 

GpcurvXXot/r 598. 

Gttvacrvxtr son of Thonis 491. 2, 12. 

e&pis 491. 2, 10; 494. 31. 

BSh*S OpXlTfKTtOV 579. 

G»w son of Eudaemon 491. 4 et saep. 
es>pie son of Floras 476. 2. 
e&m son of Pamm . . . 491. 23. 
e&ns son of Petaus 476. 4. 

'ldofxtptir 629. 

'Upd 486. 55. 

*Uf>a£ 496. 16. 

"Icpa£ basilico-grammateus 579. 

'Icpa£ son of Cornelius 631. 1, 30. 

*lcpa£ strategus 500. 2. 

'iXopovr 489. 8, 17. 

'iovXoc 520. 10. 

*lovXar son of Didymus 502. 6. 

'IovXuwfc, 'iovXtos 'lot/X. epistrategus 488. 

'IovXmw 642. 

'IovXio* 'IovXiawfc epistrategus 488. 1. 

'iovXioc OvapcoKfc epistrategus 486. 1. 

'IouXu* OvAn/ioy 653. 

'lovXioff *i8as scribe 653. 

'laapcvs daughter of Theon 492. 5, 1 1. 

'low 634. 

'lai&vpa 528. I, 26 ; 624. 

9 I<r&*pos 520. 17; 614. 

'latdupos prjrvp 653. 

'icrorovraff 520. 21. 

•fcw. See Index VI (a). 

'lo-xvpiwv 524. 3 ; 646. 

'iraXcfc, nXaurtoy "Ir. 474. I, 31. 

KauciXla IL&XXa 506. 4 ; 639. 

KaXXiVuu* 471. 143. 

KdXXlarparos son of Alexandras 489. 24. 

KoXX«n;x»7 496. 5, 9, 15. 

Ka\6tunpos 526. I, 14. 

Kcpdap 529. 2, 19. 

Kcpfoy son of Nicarous 496. 7. 

Kuw(?)492. 20. 

KXavdio* ArjfifjTpios 574. 

KXavdtor Aiopiktios 620. 25. 



KXavfoo* G«W 510. 16. 

KXavdios Kvunnav6s epistrategus 486. 8, 20. 

KXav&or, Mdptcos KX. 2*pfj*os exegetes &c. 

477. 1. 
KXav&or lapairiap 523. 3. 
KXaufttor Scp^iw vtnjpenjs of strategUS 476. I. 
KXcw son of Dionysius 480. 4. 
KX^f, (KouctXiof) KX. 681. 
KSKofiot 528. 18. 
Kopoams 491. 22. 
Koirpw 533. 27. 
KoprrjXios 53L I, 30. 
KopyoGror, Tdior Merino* K. also called Poly- 

deuces 509. 4. 
Koxxf>aT€V£ 575. 

K/wruw son of Demetrius 493. 13. 
Kprjirtivos (1. Kpunriros ?) 653. 
Kpi'cnro?, Aovjriof 'Epc'mo* Kp. 505. 8. 
Kvarwmfe, KXovdiot K. epistrategus 486. 8, 

20. 
Kvpui also called Antonia Asclepias 498. 1. 
Kv/nXXoy 526. 2. 
Kvpof son of Cyras 491. 18. 
Kvpot son of Didymus 491. 18. 



4. 35- 



35- 



Aofi£>s or Ac/iS? 488. 
Aforras 580. 27. 
Acwttip also called Serenus 475. 3, 14, 
Atfhpaku, 2€fM,wp»ptos Ac/3, praefect 594. 
Aovkios 'Eprmos Kpiairos 605. 8. 
Aovkios Ovokwrios Mouuop6* praefect 658. 
A6xos son of Lochus 493. 12. 
A<5xoff son of Sarapion 498. 13. 
AvxnpcW emrrjptirrfs 520. 4, 24. 
Avxpiuv son of Hermogenes 489. 23. 



McSyiw, Tirw najmw^u* M. praefect 685* 
MoiKiowfc, Aovxio£ OvoXvtriof M. praefect 668. 
Moitcp strategus 597. 
Mrf&fioff 533. 4. 

Md£ftot (praefect?) 471. 15, 142. 
Mdfrfios, SrartXio£ m. epistrategus 487. 1. 
MdpKOt 'AjtAwuw 'Aaickipriadrjf 592. 
Mopjcor KXavdto* Scp^vor exegetes &c 477. I. 
Marptf 529. 13. 

Mtfifiios, rdios M. Koppoimx also called Poly- 
deuces 609. 4. 
Mevolrtis 478. 7, 45. 
Myi7o-/^FOf 486. 4, 20. 
Mawrwot also called Pausirion 485. 44. 



IV. PERSONAL NAMES 



3" 



Mvpuv 631. 24. 
Mfipof 520. 20. 

Ncikvf 520. 6. 

NftXdfifiMv son of Ammonius 477. 15, 21. 

NfiAopov* 492. 18. 

NciXof 486. 32 ; 619. 10. 

NciXor son of So€ris 514. 1. 

Nc K^rp&r son of Thaisous 500. 4, 25. 

Nc/uuatowfc strategus 513. 4. 

Nt/ifcr/ar hruuikovptpos "AXtupos 586. 

NucwtyMw 683. 

Natapovff 496. 7. 

NU0763O. 25; 644. 

Ntxfar son of Harpalus 487. 3, 21. 

"OXv/un* 604. 34. 

'Opoparoty Sffurpwior 'Ov. chiliarch 663. 

'Owwfrn* 681. 12. 

'Oviritypi* also called Chaeremon, son of 

Herodes 494. 32. 
*Op€aTuwf, 2€fAnp»9tos 'op. son of Sempronius 

Tarantinus 653. 
'Ocriptr 521. 5, 6. 

Ovapuwk, 'lovktos Ov. epistrategus 486. 1. 
Ovevridios 'Poixfnvos dioecetes 618. 29. . 
Ovrj<rripot 53L 6. 
OvrfXripoc, *lov\iot Ov. 663. 
OvoXwruw, 'IovXior Ov. Maauawk praefect 653. 

UcucTovfiriios, Tirof n. Mayw praefect 685. 

Happ . . . 491. 23. 

Ilmx&n)* 490. 4, 8. 

navfx&np son of Apollonius 506. 5, 9, 10. 

nai«x«rip son of Dionysias also called 

Amoinomerius 489. 27. 
Ucokx** 7 !* voiuk6s 538. 6. 
naj*x&m 506. 8. 
iLnropi-Mf son of Dositheus 517. 1 1. 

Uaxowrms sitologUS 515. I, 5, 7. 

Udpodos 520. 15. 

Dao-fop 498. 1 3, 1 5. 

UatrUav son of Sarapion 498. 15. 

Uavacanas scribe of the city 629. 18. 

Uavatpis 688. 17. 

Uauaipts son of Apollonius 522. 13. 

Efovcriptf son of Petsiris 484. 3, 32. 

Uawripiuv 494. 41 ; 530. p. 

Uawnpimw also called Musaeus 485. 45. 

Umknt 476. 13. 



naxrovfitt son of Pekusis 505. 4. 

Ilcfo* son of Callistratus 489. 24. 

IlcffvXXor 558. 

Uticvait 505. 2, 3. 

Utfipas son of Besas 491. 20. 

Ef/jucXfj* basilico-grammateus 513. 14. 

Utravs 476. 5. 

ncrfvpiff son of Ammonas 506. 7. 

Tlmaipts 490. 9. 

Urroutpit son of Dionysius 503. 3 et saep. 

Ufrovoparis son of Epinicus 495. 2. 

llcrocmpavtr son of Heracles 649. 

Urro<ropams son of Petosorapis 495. 2. 

nrrtripir 484. 4, 32 ; 582. 

nXavrios 'iroXo* 474. I, 3 1. 

nXovrapxn also called Eudaemonis 605. 2, 3. 

IlXovriW 475. 19; 588. 

Hkovrlnv son of Besis 489. 21. 

JXXouTiMw son of Cratinus 498. 13. . 

Tfkovriwp son of Ischyrion 646. 

nrfdw son of Horus 485. 15, 41. 

UoXv&vktjs also called Gaius Memmius 

Corautus 509. 5. 
Hofiir&ptos 2rtrripmp6s 589. 
Uordpuv 499. 14. 
Uov&rjs, 'AvTuvivof also called P., archidicastes 

485. 4, 9. 
npca/ior, 4XaotMor Dp. dueaioftonp 578. 
Upopjj6tvs 575. 
IlroXcpa 476. 3. 

OroXf/xa daughter of Theon 502. 5. 
IlroXcfuuor 482. 23; 489. 5, 14, 25; 506. 

24; 620.8; 523. 1; 593. 
llTokf/juuos of Canopus 599. 
nToktpaios son of Ptolemaeus 482. 22. 
nroXf/Muoff son of Theodotus 504. 1 1, 43. 
UroXtpmos also called Theon, 0«0Xio0vXa£ 684. 
UroXtpaU 612. 

UroXkapow daughter of Chaeremon 508. 6. 
ni-oXXa* 517. 8, 17. 
OnSXXir 686. 

ilrrfXXtf son of Phaon 478. 13, 14, 20. 
nroXX/otr 492. 5, 11. 
IItoXX/gw son of Theon 492. 5, 1 1. 
ILiXXa, KaiKtkia U. 606. 4 j 639. 



'Pov^ivof, ofrrWdior P. dioecetes 513. 29. 

'Pov^uW 608. 16. 

"Potyo? son of Diocles 508. 15, 20, 22. 



312 



INDICES 



laydBrjs 606. 7. 

26yKTos praefect 635. 

Za^rar 532. 4. 

2aftfiovs also called Dionysia 489. 29. 

Sapandppxov 611. 

2aparras 505. I ; 574 ; 649. 

Saparras son of Heracles 649. 

2apairag son of Pasion 493. 6. 

SapoTTcadqf 0t/9Aio<£vAa£ 636. 

Sapaflrca* 485. 23 ; 494. 2. 

Sapamds daughter of Podon 485. 14 et saep. 

lapanit. See Index VI (a). 

SapoiriW 477. 7 ; 486. 2, 7, 11 ; 489. 3, 13, 

33> 35,* 490. 19; 492. 2, 3, 10; 493. 

13, 14; 496. 2, 5; 607. 3; 611. 2; 

513.2, 10, 59; 520. 12, 13; 525. 8; 

575 ; 577 ; 593 ; 610 ; 648. 
2apania>v son of Apion (?) 492. 3, 1 6. 
2apamuv son of Apollonius 609. 
Za/xnriW son of Artemidorus 497. 22. 
Sapairiav archidicastes 592. 
Sapanlop 0i0\io0vXa£ 488. 32 *, 636. 
2apatri»v son of Charisius 518. 5. 
ZapoirtW also called Diogenes, ex-gymnasi- 

arch, son of Diogenes 501. 2. 
2a/xwriW son of Eu daemon 496. 2. 
2aparrUav also called Hephaestion 485. 8. 
2apania>v son of Hermias 513. 1, 47, 61. 
Sa/xnriW son of Herodes 499. 2, 37 ; 506. 

3; 617. 9; 639. 
7,apaniA>v, KXavdcor S. 523. 3. 
laparrfov son of Mnesitheus 486. 4, 20, 29, 

30- 

2apairu»r SOn of Pasion 498. 1 3, 1 5. 

ZapoirtW son of Phanias 533. 26. 
SapoirtW son of Pherekphis 492. 23. 
Xapairluv son of Sarapion 492. 3 ; 498. 13 ; 

496. 2, 5. 
lapanicop strategus 474. 4. 
Zapanioov son of Thaisous 505. 7. 
Zapcnrovs 496. 7 ; 646. 
Za/xnrovr daughter of Nicarous 496. 7. 
2apmnvg also called Tausiris 492. 3. 
SfiAiptfe 491. 20. 
2€koMos 531. 24. 
2*tiirpuvtos AifapaXis praefect 594. 
Itpirp&wog 'Ovoparos chiliarch 653. 
tofurpupios 'Optaripos son of Sempronius 

Tarantinus 658. 
Sf/iirpwios- Tapavriyos 663. 



Vtvnapbs vofjuxts 578. 

2tpxfiifits daughter of Thortaeus 488. 3, 34. 

Scimfuovrff, Uopnupios 2. 589. 

2f pas 520. II. 

2*prjvot 485. 2, 11 ; 527. 2 ; 628. 1, 26 ; 

530. 13 ; 533. 22, 27 ; 558. 
2€ptjpot, KXavdtos S. vmjprrrfs of StrategUS475. 2. 

2({rijvos also called Leonides 475. 3, 14, 35. 
2€prjvos y Maptcos KXavdws 2. exegetes &c 477. 1. 
Sc/tym son of Philiscus 613. 2 et saep. 
2<f»jvos scribe of the city 487. 4. 
2€v$rjt son of Potamon 499. 14. 
Sc^aptop daughter of Epimachus 60S. 4 et 

saep. 
ZtfiiXif 507. 27. 

Sivftmr daughter of Pekusis 505. 2, 3, 4. 
2papaybos 472. 1 4. 
So^pif 514. I. 
Inapras 691. 
2irAu*(?)490. 6. 

Zrorui daughter of Apion 633. 26. 
SrariXcor Ma£t/ioj epistrategus 487. 1. 
2raWXior *awW 598. 
2rc</xmw 506. 27, 30. 
Srf^ayor also called Amois son of Sosibius 

508. 5, 11. 
2T€<f>apos scribe 517. 14. 
2t/W<rrop 577. 

SvpiW vmjprnjs of strategus 485. 49. 
Zoffponp 586. 
2a><Ti&tos son of Apollophanes 608. 5. 

TaafiSig 530. 27. 

Taafi6is daughter of Zoilus 490. 3. 

Totjovkoop (?) 608. 

Taoxnjs 476. 6. 

Tcurrparcop daughter of Psenosiris 490. 2 et 

saep. 
Tavpis 475. 15 ; 498. 5. 
Tavaipis 510. 2. 

Tavcriptf also called Sarapous 492. 3. 
Ta^« 601. 7. 
Tccittryot/f (?) 506. 3. 
Tclffr 580. I, 32. 

T*K&tns daughter of Harthonis 482. 24. 
Trrtapiop daughter of Apollonius 506. 4 et 

saep. 

Tf&r UpOT€KTO>P 579. 

Tcriowfc, Ttror tXaovto* T. praefect 486. 18 ; 
584. 



V. GEOGRAPHICAL 



3*3 



Titos noa-ov/iipo; Mayros praefect 635. 

Tiros *\aovios Titiop6s praefect 486. 18; 684. 

TrtfapS* 481. 13. 

Tpia&*\<t>os 522. I. 

Tpvfov /3i/3X(o0vXa( 584. 

Tpi*t>av son of Aristandrus 599. 1. 

Tputkos 481. 24. 

TvcvBorovpis 492. 2. 

Tv X apovs 684. 

Tvxi; 491. 19 ; 607. 5. 

*dkay$ son of Diogenes also called Phalanx 

492. 19. 
*aXay£ also called Diogenes son of Harpalus 

492. 19. 

Qavias 533. 26. 

*owaf, SrariXioff #a*. 598. 

^aurroff also called Amphion 516. 1. 

*a»p 478. 21. 

♦aw son of Ptollis 478. 13, 20. 

topirfts (?) 492. 23. 

*i'&v, *iouXio( *. scribe 653. 

♦iXc'a* 527. 4. 

*iXiV*of 593. 

*iXtWo f pip\u*t>C\a( 515. I. 

*iA/<r*off also called Philoxenus, son of Diony- 

sius 613. 
♦iXi'o-KOf son of Sarapion 513. 2, 59. 
tiXrfurixor 501. IO. 
$iX<$£cK>f 479. 2. 
*iX(^€Kor also called Philiscus, son of Diony- 

sius 618. 
*iX«T€pa 506. 6, 9. 
$Xaovu>? Uplayuos ducaio&orqr 578. 
*Xaovu* , Trroff *X. Tmanfr praefect 486. 1 8 ; 

684. 
*X«/xw 476. 2. 



*p6»mos 531. 23, 25. 
taMuw strategus 476. 1. 



XatpfffMv 480. 20; 486. 2/19; 497. 10, 
15 ; 502. 1, 14; 508. 7 ; 580. 11 ; 628 ; 
682. 

Xatpr)fAa>¥ son of Chaeremon 480. 20. 
XaipfiiAw also called Onnophris son of 
Herodes 494. 32. 

Xmpriiunr sitologUS 515. I, 5, 6. 

Xapas 501. IO. 

Xaprjs 520. I, 3. 

Xapivtos 518. 5. 

Xpfaifws also called Dionysius 478. 4, 29, 43. 

*<us son of Lamos or Lemos 488. 4, 35. 

fcya/covycr also called Ammonius 494. 6. 

*€vo&ur6is 500. 3. 

*cw)/io4^af 500. 25. 

fnpovlpis son of Atreus 490. 2, 5, 8. 

'Qpiytvris 488. 9. 

'Q/jiW 522. 15 ; 582; 608. 

'fipcW son of Ammonius 522. 12. 

'QptW son of Apion 533. 1, 3, 30. 

'cipiw scribe 516. 4. 

'Qpfop also called Theon, son of Sarapion 

492. 3, 16. 
*Opot 479. 12 ; 485. 15 ; 491. 25 ; 499. 4 ; 

517. 8, 14 ; 587 ; 639. 
*Qpos son of Eudaemon 491. 4 et saep. 
*Qpos also called Harpaesis, son of Thonis 

49L 5, 10, 16. 
*Qpos son of Psenobasthis or Psenomoithas 

600. 3, 25. 
'Q<t*\as also called Besas, son of Sarapas 

505. 1. 



V. GEOGRAPHICAL. 
(a) Countries, Nomes, Toparchies, Cities. 



•ABpipinis 500. 2. 
Pdyvrmos 480. 1 2. 
Alyxmros 471. 1 24; 635. 



'AXcjcbtdpua 509. 5. 
*A\€$apdp€vs 473. 2 ; 480. 12. 
'ArraumokiTrjs 438. 1 3, 38; 525. 1. 



3M 



INDICES 



'Arrunxvs 602. 1 5. 
'Amwois 502. 6. 
'AirokXvvoTrokiTTjf 488. 6. 
'Ap<riwo4Tip 486. 1 ; 597. 
]a . covdaSot 500. II. 

Bov/Smrrtnp 474. 9. 

Aapatriajvoi 477. 4. 

*EXX?r 500. 12. 
'EwtA poftoi 486. I, 21. 

'HpucXfttov /jt/mV 587. 
'HpaxXroiroXinp 604. 34. 

e 7 /3ai'c 489. 2 ; 49L 1 ; 492. 1 ; 494. 2 ; 
495. 1 ; 496. 1 ; 508. 1 ; 606. 2 ; 608. 
4; 577. 
"Oaro etfiaidoe 602. 

Karmtrt'njs 699. 
Karwtrtra 668. 
Kdwm 529. 16. 

Avkioi, Avc&w Ilapcp/SoX? 478. 33 ; 518. 9. 
Avow wrfXir 488. 9. 

Mc/i^ir 471. 129. 

/M/& 697. 

tujrp6w6ku 481. 5, 19; 488. 33; 486. 16; 

486. 3; 604. 34. 
pucpb*Oa<ris 485. 16. 

NctXc* 486. 32 ; 519. 10. 
pofrfs 474. 2, 4 ; 484. 23 ; 486. 1, 21 ; 618. 
5, 13- 



"Oaats Otfiaidos 602. 

"Owns iwcpa 485. 16. 

'Ofrpvyxinp 476. 1; 485. 5, 28; 486. 3; 
496. 3. 

% 0$vpvyxtri» irrfXcf 478. 2 ; 494. 38. 

*o|upuy X a>y mSXit 476. 7 ; 477. 26 ; 478. 6 ; 
48L 1 ; 486. 3, 11, 13, 55 ; 486. 19 ; 
487. 3 ; 489. 2 ei saep. ; 490 1, 2; 491. 
1, 2, 26, 28; 492. 1 et saep.) 494. 2 <?/ 
J0#. ; 495. i 9 2; 496. 1, 2; 498. 5; 
499. 2 ; 60L 4 ; 602. 5, 8, 15 ; 608. 1, 
4; 504. 2; 605. 1, 4; 606. 2, 3, 8; 
807. 5, 27; 608. 4, 7 ; 510. 7; 613. 3, 
38; 516. 3; 577; 584; 601. 

UapaiT6nop 653. 

Ufp<nj£ 606. 24. n. rip myovyr 499. 5; 

689. 
Utpaiwr) 506. 6. 
UsjKowriov 471. 130. 

( P«fiaibff 478. 2 ; 480. 12; 697. 

Tartnp sopor 474. 4. 
roirapxw* &m 618; 614 ; 620. 

am/Xuwrov 488. 5; 604. II, 43; 

510. 3; 533. 17; 612; 615; 

626. 
Bwrrov ainjkuarw (roVor ?) 500. 16, 

27 (Athribite nome). 
kotv 492. 2, 3. 
Xi06> 518. 4. 
^017 516. 5; 695; 625; 630; 

631; 639. 

V*P$is fujTptjrokit rigs fuxpos *06tnms 486. 15. 



'Em( )618. 4. 

e&Xfa 630. 
G»<r0if 614. 



(b) Villages and fcrofoa. 

*\<tuo9 Tfnxfwpor 492. 2 ; 638. 4. 



'l&lm* % Kmi»wiov 492. 3. 

9 ipim> Nffuu 488. 5 (Apollonopolite nome). 

*I<rio»> Uayya 533. 23. 



K*pK*6vpis 603. 6. 

Kfpmyi7r( ) 520. 9. 

K*pKtvp»p 63L 

Kcpcrv/MMre 516. 5 ; 625. . 

Kpipctr or KpUis 488. 1 2, 1 5 (Antaeopolite 

nome). 
KpuBvpis 490. 5. 



V. GEOGRAPHICAL 



3*5 



Mc/i( ) 615. 2. 

Mowifwv (faoUtow) 616. 2, 5, 7; 618; 683. 

Mwxwvp 481. 3. 

Nf^'pa 484. 6. 
Nutoorpdrov (JimUtor) 588. 

UafrpKTj 688. 17. 

Ilatf/Sv&f 580. 

IIa£fttff 582. 18. 

nc'Xa 485. 5; 506. 6, io, 1 1, 23 ; 684. 

Utrtnj 586 ; 681. 

Zcvi/uXtv 482. 5. 

Sowra 475. 15, 17, 28 ; 488. 4 ; 617. 2. 

2cyr4 683. 14, 19; 632. 

2c>fo 484. 5. 

S«y«( )515. 2,6; 617.6. 



Sanapv 514. 2, 5. 

Sutcdocfirv (?) 600. 26 (Athribite nome). 

2*A 618 ; 620. 

Tao/iirc/iov 501. 10; 621; 626. 

TaAaA 514. 2, 5 ; 637. 

Tapnmi 533. 8 ; 612. 

Tawit 505. 3. 

Tcntyw 600. 13, 29 (Athribite nome). 

Turj(u>airiTOOv 60L 7. 

*4A<wfeov 504. 7 (Heracleopolite nome ?). 

¥aX04 648. 

*««^(ri§erK 600. 1 5, 32 (Athribite nome). 
*600« 482. introd. ; 504. 43 ; 510. 2, 1 1, 
16; 617. 1; 688. 

'ityif 522. 7, 19. 



(c) Kkfjpoi. 



Ataypa^iyr 488. II. 

AmmXcouc /col IlroXcfuuou Ucpow fanrucfo k\. 

506. 24. 
Aiuros 488. 9. 

Zpe&pov 488. 5. 



Nucavfyov 688. 

IlroXf/iaiov rov QttMrov rot) 

irpfofofia 604. 1 1, 44. 
nroXffia/ov ml *iAiWn> 588. 

4iAoW#gov col Xapam 601. 10. 



• . 'Aprt/unfos 



(d) ipapoba. 



Boppa Kfnprtdot 488. 6, 15. 

A^/iov eotyHoo* 478. 15; 478*9; 674. 
ApSfiov lapdwibos . . . 48L 6. 

'Eppauw 574. 

'linrctM' nafHtfokfjt 482. 7, 12. 

Kfu/kifuv (?) 478. 16. 



Avk£«i> IlafKiiPotijs 478. 33 ; 518. 9. 

Mvpo/SaXdvov 480. 2. 

nawttSwiwlIapafefrov488. io; 605.5; 674; 
677. 

TtpytwovOtm 502. 1 6. 



fidkwma 473. 4. 
Bovct^dXioy 644. 
ftc/fopa fy>f*a 473. 5. 



(e) Buildings, &c. 

Mowruov 47L 144. 
mplx*pa lapfyavxfaav 612. 5* 
2apavuu>p 618. 38 ; 625. 10. 



316 



INDICES 



'AA&ucw 497. 21. 
Aif(ifitjT6piot 497. 22. 

Elprjvo(f)vXcuuos 6 koi % AX6cutvs 625, 

KaurdpcuH (?) 477. 5- 



(/) Tribes and Demes. 

npo7ramroa'€pdtrrtio£ 6 Kai *A\0at*vs 477. 7 > 
497. 20. 

2oxriK<fo7uoff 518. 48, 62. 
2«MT«c<J<Tfiioff 6 ml E2Xcitfvior 628. 

$uXa£i4aXd<r<rfio? 6 km Wkdauvs 518. I, 5 2, 



VI. RELIGION. 
(a) Gods and Heroes. 



'A6ijva 491. 18, 25; 492. 24; 579; 649. 

Cf. 488. 3, note. 
'A/i/io*, "HAiOf%i. 489. 25. 
'AfT&Xw 494. 37. 
'AprroKpdnjs 489. 27; 490. 16; 492. 20; 

621. 3 ; 646. 

ri} 494. 6. 

'Eyicavamos (=6«wj?) 684. 

'EpWff 489. 24 ; 492. 22 ; 494. 34. 

Zcw 488. 3; 494.6; 646. 

H\tos 494. 6. "HX.*Awu»y 489. 25. 

Hpa 488. 3. 

'H/nucX^ 489. 30; 494. 43. 



&a 491. 2. 

&<fe 488. 24; 491. 2; 519. 11; 581. 7; 

633. 10. Cf. Index II. 
Omjpis 478. 15; 479. 9; 491. 2; 528. 6; 

574; 579? 
G«w 494. 31. Cf. 'EyKoyanos. 

*Icro 490. 22 ; 491. 2 ; 492. 16; 521. 2 ; 
525. 10. Cf. 488. 3, note. 

NccXof 519. 10. Cf. 486. 32. 

'Ovipts 52L 5, 6. 

lapam* 477. 2 ; 481. 6 ; 491. 23 ; 492. 19, 
23 ; 494. 37. Cf. 488. 3 and 491. 2, 
notes. 

SciXiyvfo 49L 20. 

Titf 491. 19 ; 607. 5. 



apxi*par*wra$ 688. 25. 



Up*vs 477. 4 ; 588. 19. Up. koI dp^iducocrrip 
485. 4, 9 ; 592. Up. Ai6s mfHpas teat . . . 
488. 3. ftp. ^aiHrrimjs 2*pa<rri)s 502. 3. 



(£) Priests. 

pc»n6pos rod fuyakov Sapcurtdos 477. I. **«*. 
Tv*^ 507. 5. 



vaxjTotypos QoTfpi&os 6tas pryUmjs tau "latdos 
k.tX 491. 2. 



fc) Miscellaneous. 



ytv(<ria 6eov Ovtaircuriavov 621. introd ytv. 
Ocov Nepova 62L introd. 

Upa (sc. 77) 688. 
icp&ovXo* 619. 13, 14. 



Up6v 491. 3. 
UpoviKijs 516. 2. 
Ifporcfcrw *A6rjvas 679. 

wm-eXfoy 'IoiAo* 525. 9. 



VII. OFFICIAL AND MILITARY TITLES 



317 



VII. OFFICIAL AND MILITARY TITLES. 



tryoparffH* 483. 19, 32; 494. 38; 577; 

601; 641. vyo/wwfw^w 607. 4- 
airaiTTjrrp 514. I. 
<?p£jf 471. 145* 
dpXiy«x>py6s 477. 4* 
apxt&uuurnis 471. 1 46. 2apcnri»r fcpfw mil 

apXtd. (a.D. I22-3) M2 « 'Afwwiw 4 koX 

Ilovftip icpfw ral apx^ ( A * D * x 7 8 ) 485. 

4, 9- 
dpx»i> 478. 2 1 592. 

/ScuriXiicfr ypa/ipar«w 474. I, 18, 32, 35 ; (om. 
ypajifiarcw) 518. 33. 'I«pa£ (c. A. D. 1 38) 
578. IIf/MitAJp(A.D. 181) 518. 14. 

PiPKu4v\a$ 478. 2 ; 488. 32 ; 515. 1 ; 584 ; 
588; 686. 

Potj66 s 614. 

ypappanvs 471. 34; 406. 13; 515. 3, 8; 
616. 4, 14, 18 ; 653. /SaaiXuc©* yp. See 
/SacriXiwfc. yp. toourijoTO* 642. yp. *«po- 
ypamuirtm 488. 14, 39- yP- *«**<•* 487. 
4, 13; 528. 19. yp. *rpa*T<fp«M» dpyvpiKuv 
538. 23. yp. arparrjyov 602. 

yvfivafriapxricras 501. 4 J 512. 3. 

yvpwuriapxos 471. 34, 37 5 477. 2 3 >* 
607. 4. 

drjfuhnos 509. 14. &W*. a^podwruwrr^s (?) 

611. 3. fyf*. Iarp6s 475. 5. 
dtmuo&fa;?, *Xaowor Uplapoe (2nd cent.) 578. 
dioaapT/ff 583. 20, 25. Otorffluw 'Ptavfcuet 

(a.d. 184) 518. 29. Cf. 474. introd. 

{(rjyrjTWKus 516. 3. 
*(ijyijT€iKras 512. I. 

Jftmfr «7.4; 619. 7. 

Zirapxos Alyvnrw. See Tyf/MM*. 

tirapx * <nr*ipijs irpwrrjf AafMaaiapwv 477. 3. 

rrruTKamjs t&p irapa itorapbv iba$<*v 589. 

arurrpdTTjyos, KXav&or Kvariawfc (c. A. D. 130) 
486. 8, 20, 27, 29, 37 ; cf. 472. introd 
'IouXw Ovafnap6s (a.D. 131) 486. I. 2ra- 



r/Xioff Ma&pos (a.D. 156) 487. I. 'iovXcor 
*IovXiaw$ff (late 2nd or 3rd cent.) 488. i. 
eiriTTjprjrrjs 520. 4, 24. cirir. yvfivavuipxlas 
471. 30, 36. 

fjytftoveuo-as 635. 

Tjytp&v 529. 17* TTrof *Xaovior Tftruwfa 6 «p<£- 
run-off ijy. (a. D. 131) 486. 9, 10, II, 17, 
18, 33; 584. 'Aovidccw 'HXtofapo* 6 Kpa- 

TUTTOS Tfy. (A. D. I38) 484. 21. SffWT/XWWOf 

Aij&paXw (Ai/9cXdpcov) (a.d. 159) 594. 
Aovjaof OuoXownof Mauuawfc (c. A.D. 160) 
653. Tiros naKrovuffios Mdyvoe (c. A.D. 
177) 885. ]off Sayxro? cnrapgoff Acyvirrov 
(a. d. i 77-180) 635. Ma&ios (praefect ?) 
471. 15, 142. 
TjyopapoprjKvt 507. 4. 

&j)(ravpo<f>vka£ 522. 9. 

larpfc, brjp6<Ttof for. 475. 5. 

Kaurapuos 477. 5. 
jctxtXcapxqiuta 477. 2. 
KoirapiTTjc 471. 84. 
Koo-fujrris 477. 22 ; 519. 8. 
K<»fioypafJifiaT€Vs 488. 1 4, 30, 39. 

iu*ifu»p 483. 20. 

ropfafc 588. 6 ; 578. 

wpaKTwp 630. 4. irp. apyvpuc&w 633. 23; 

597. 
vp**PvT*pot 522. 7, 19. 
irpvrayucfc 592. 
npvrayis 477. 5« 

iwoXfy* 615. 1, 2 ; 516. 5 ; 517. 6 ; 518. 
4, 6; 695; 613-6; 619-21; 625-6; 
630-2. 

(rrparrjyfjiras 518. 30. Nepwiawfc (a.D. l8l) 

618. 4- 
vrparnyt* 474. 1, 31, 34; 487. 13; 488. 



3i8 



INDICES 



26; 533. 20; 602. trrp. 'Atipt&irav, 'Upa( 
(a. D. 130) 500. 2. arp. rrjs 'H/xucXcttou 
ptpldos rou *Apa-ivoirov t Mdxtp (2nd Cent.) 
597. orp. 'Ofvpvygfrov, * Anoktpapto* (a. D. 
138) 484. 2 ; 579. 6cW (a. d. 178) 485. 
J » 5. 2 9> 35» 47- '^P * (a. d. 182) 476. 
1, 13. tfowcW (2nd cent) 476. 1. arp. 
TaWrov, tapairU* (a. D. 184 ?) 474. 4. 



crrpariarip 522. 6, 16. 

vrniptrtp 476. 2, 28; 476. 12; 486. 49; 
622.6, 16; 627.6. 

X&iapxos 658. fffjpXcapxiprAt 477. 2. 
Xpqparurnit 485. 10 ; 592. 



VIII. WEIGHTS, MEASURES, AND COINS. 
(a) Weights and Measures. 



Spovpa 483. 25, 33 ; 488. 10, 17, 27 ; 499. 

10, 17, 39, 44; 600. 14, 17, 28; 501. 

13; 604. 12, 15, 23, 46 ; 606. 26, 55. 
ipr&ffii 494. 18; 600. 13, 15, 30, 32, 34; 

501. 18, 23 ; 516. 10, 12 ; 517. 2 et saep. ; 

618. 5, 6; 520. 12; 52L 11 ; 522. 2 et 

saep.; 538. 19, 20, 24; 613-4; 640. 

difrXovr 620. 6, 8, 11, 21. 

tupdfuop 472. 31, 35; 622. 6, 16, 17, 27; 

583. 18. 
Korvkt) 529. 4, 9, 10. 

Xlrpa407. IO. 



pirpw *£otka<TTuc6r 494. 17. 

icoraX( ) 612. 
pm 520. 14, 15. Cf. (d). 
p»auuo9 496. 3. 



fu fvoT^r 



irijxvr 503. 17; 605. 7. ipfa&ov injx- 605. 
6, 9, 10. 

oraBp&s 'Ofvpvyxinp 496. 3. 
errand 620. 18. Cf. (4). 

rrrdprrj 496. 3. 

gou^l 516. II, 12. 
Xovs 529. 7. 



(£) Coins. 



dpyvfHKtb 474. 17, 33 ; 683. 23; 697. 
6pyvpu» 474. 19, 27; 485. 16; 49L 11; 

493. 11; 494. 21, 25, 29; 496. 13; 

498. 18, 42; 502. 23; 604. 31, 47; 

606. 55; 507. 7, 35; 508. 17, 23; 511. 

7 ; 514. 4 ; 580. 12 ; 681. 16 ; 677. apy. 

2tfkurrov poplaparot 496. 4; 604. 18; 

506. 9 ; 506. 1 1 ; 510. 4. 

bpa X M 407. 9; 485. 16; 489. 12; 491. 7, 
ii, 14; 492. 9; 498. 11; 494. 18, 25; 
495. 17 ; 496. 4, 9, 10, 13; 497. 6, 8, 
23; 498. 1$ el saep. ; 499. 18, 43; 501. 
19; 502. 23, 28; 504. 19, 31, 47; 605. 



9; 606. 11, 55; 507. 8, 23; 508. 17, 
23; 610. 5; 511. 7, 8; 512. 6, 7; 513. 
12 et saep. ; 514. 4 ; 519. 3 et saep. ; 520. 
6 et saep.; 622. 2 et saep.; 680. 12, 15, 
17; 531. 23, 24; 682. 5; 583. 7; 574; 
677 ; 682 ; 597 ; 609 ; 610 ; 688 ; 642. 
bpaxpuuos t6kos 483. 15; 485. 17; 507. 10, 
19. 

tpu&kuv 513. 17, 18; 519.8; 574; 697. 

Ktpp6nop 583. 16. 

pm 488. 15; 485. 18; 606. 12; 607. 10, 
20. Cf. (a). 



X. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS 



3*9 



qjSoXfe 618. 18; 519. 10; 520. 20, 33; 
522. 6 efsaep.; 574; 582; 587. 

mrrafiokov 574. 

ararrjp 582. Cf. (a). 

TaXajrror 472. 36, 52; 474. 19; 494. 29; 
606. 55 ; 677. 



TtrptpoXo* 522. 18, 30 ; 574. 
TputfrSkfios t6kos 506. 12, 45. 
rpu»0oXoi> 518. 15, 17, 21, 41, 42, 55; 620. 
22, 23 marg. ; 522. 11, 24. 

X oXk6s 580. 30; 681. 20; 688. 15, 22 ; 677; 

582. 
XoXjcow 513. 17, 19, 23, 42, 55; 674. 
Xpwrio* 494. 9 ; 496. 3, 15. 



IX. TAXES. 



an6fUHpa 668. 

dpyvpucd 588. 23 ; 597. 

0a0/«fc574. 

dcapo^vXaxia 574. 

bjfuhria 494. 4; 499. 21; 501. 31; 504. 
24, 28; 506. 38. 

fftor 506. 37 ; 577 ; 688. 
cnapovpiop 658. 
iv&Karor 609 ; 610. 
Mfuva 518. 12, 32. 

Xaoypa<f>la 478. 23. 

waufko* 580. 6. vauflias (gen. ?) p. 1 40. 
*aO(Xor?) <£o(pW*r?) 668. 
iwXttrun} 648. 
iwri«fr(?) 622. 15. 



irXu&vofjLtwrj 602. 44. wX. paBpov 574. 
wpoaburypa&iuw 518. 14, 36, 40; 574. 
wpoararucdp 590. 

a-truca 695. 

OYttJcfa $4pOff 514. I. 

cnrovdi? 610; 658. 

rcXferfia 504. 23 ; 506. 38. 
TvXof vmWjKTjs 511. 4. 
rpaw(ffiTi«$ir?) 574. 

w/n}574u 

vno&f)KT)t rcXoc 611. 4. 



^poc 499. 16, 23, 26. 

<£. <f>payfxov 580. 
(fwXoKrpow 502. 43. 



(rtrucof <^>. 614. I. 



X. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS. 



aPovKta 474. 37. 
3fyox°* 80L 28. 
dya*** 484. 23 ; 489. 2 ; 490. 1 ; 491. z ; 

492. 1 ; 494. 2 ; 495. 1 ; 496. 1 ; 581. 

6; 642. 
Syw 490. 4 ; 492. 4, 9 ; 498. 9 ; 496. 3, 

15; 658. 



ayatux 471. 108. 

ayro* 489. 28. 

ayvoci* 471. 9. 

cJyopdfciir 472. 18, 26, 27, 31; 486. 4, 23; 

512.3. 
dyopauw 471. 1 27. 
ayopapofua^ 507. 4. 



1 



320 



INDICES 



ayopavoptiop 482. 31. 
dyopav6fios. See Index VII. 

&ypa(fx>s 494. IO. 

ayp6s 606. 42. 

ayvia 489. 3 ; 490. 3 ; 491. 3 ; 492. 3 ; 

498. 15 ; 494. 3 ; 495. 2 ; 496. 1, 5, 16 ; 

508. 5 ; 504. 8 ; 606. 1 1 ; 608. 9 ; 510. 

4; 677. 
ayowiap530. 21. 

adcX^477. 13; 495. 7, 14; 528. 1. 
M*X<f>idovs 495. 8 (?) ; 509. 8. 
dtoXtfxfc 491. 6, 9, 10, 17 ; 492. 5, 12 ; 496. 

5; 508. 12 ; 504. 37, 54 ; 505. 4 ; 606. 

30; 6O8.22; 626.5; 527.i; 680.25; 688. 
ddia&ror 490. 6, 10. 
atl. See aid. 
dOenja-Ls 492. 9 ; 498. 9. 
alec 508. 20; 506. 23. 
aftptor 481. 8; 491. 7, 13 ; 496. 7; 502. 

17; 505. 5; 510. 16; 518.8. 
alfxlu 489. 4, 6 ; 491. 5 ; 498. 8 ; 494. 19 ; 

496. 11, 15; 497. 20; 502. 28; 508. 

18; 506. 47, 49; 658. 
ahrdar«r0ai 472. 3. 
olcrxyiKiv 497. 4. 
alaxvyrj 471. 78 ; 497. 4. 
a2Wa 471. 41; 472. 5, 15. 
oKdrBwos 646. 

dicMvvot 499. 19; 501. 26; 507. 36. 
*W ^78. 6. 
okoXovBus 482. 28; 504. 16; 512. 9; 518. 

33; 687. 
dxovfip 486. 6. 
d*fH/9«a 471. 13. 
aKf>6dpva 689. 

favpos 472. 21 ; 498. 10; 504. 29. 
dicvpovp 491. 3 ; 494. 4 ; 495. 3. 
aKvpaaic 490. 3 ; 492. 4 ; 510. 20. 
d*»Xvra>r 502. 31. 
akyttv 472. 1 3. 
SkupiM 478. 3. 
a\€i<f)up 528. II. 
dXq&ia 480. 9. 
cJAijfl}* 477. 17; 478. 37. 
aXXa /ii}* 472. 37. 
aKkfjKr/yvrf 500. 1 8. 
dXXqXcyyvo? 506. 46. 
dXXJXow 489. 10, 18; 498. 6; 496. 6, 8, 

"f *3» *4> 16 ; 497. 5 et saep.; 508. 2, 

21; 605. 8; 580. 23. 



£XXo? 471. 132, 136; 472. 6, io, 19; 474. 

12, 31; 477. 5; 480. 5, 13; 482. 20; 

485. 24; 487. 14; 490. 6, 7, 10; 491. 

2 ; 492. 7, 9, 10, 13; 498. 8; 494. 17, 

26; 495. 7, 16; 496. 7, 10, 14; 497. 

4; 501. 15; 604. 15, 24; 505. 7, 8; 

506. 48, 52 ; 608. 23 ; 610. 23 ; 518. 44, 

56; 522. io, 17; 580. 6; 531. 15, 17; 

588. 5 ; 582 ; 688 ; 642 ; 65a *XX»r 

471.149; 496. 7; 497. 2; 506. 42; 

582. 15. 
SX\ot( 487. 8. 
dXrfyaw 526. 4. 
aXvo-idioy 496. 3 ; 528. 20. 
d>a 471. 141 ; 482. 20 ; 491. 6 ; 501. 25 ; 

506. 18. 
dptirvv 471. 1 1. 
dfuXtiP 627. 7. 
dpcpTTTus 478. 4 ; 496. 8. 
dfirrdBrros 482. 35. 
a>rcXtff<fc 486. 4 ; 506. 25. 
dfjL<f>i<rf}rrrri<ns 486. 3. 
Xn4>odop. See Index V (d). 
dfiiponpos 476. 7 ; 478. 10; 488. 9 ; 49L 

7 ; 492. 6 ; 496. 12, 16 ; 497. 13 ; 498. 

5 ; 601. 3 ; 602. 4 ; 608. 3, 7, 15 ; 505. 

3 ; 506. 4. 

ava/Sauwu' 526. 9, IO. 

dvafiakktip 522. 21. 

oJttfWi? 486. 32. 

dpajS^Safftr 518. 27. 

dvaytypoKTKtiP 47L 5» 

dvayKalot 488. 20. awry«ca/a)f 582. IO. 

dvaypd<p€iv 478. 14 ; 479. 5 ; 574. 

ayadexccr&u 518. 47, 59. 

dvadttevai 486. 11 ; 501. 24; 510. 1 8 ; 512. 

11; 518. 25; 582. 11. 
dm6«n* 478. 8. 
dvatpup 474. 36 ; 495. 3. 
€UKuo , xy* TO s 471. 60, 61 • 
dvaKojubf) 497. 1 8. 
avaXafijSaVciy 47L 99. 
dixAiaKuv 495. 13; 519. 10; 522. 27. 
dvaXco/ia (di^X»fui) 522. II, 23, 24. 
aVapcW 471. 66 ; 582. 8, 21. 
aVaircfiirffiv 486. 12 ; 496. 14; 582. 5; 583. 

6. 
dyarrXfiv 486. 1 5, 34. 
aVa0o>toi' 486. II, 17. 
avdptds 478. 7. 



X. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS 



321 



asHpno&ioToos 493. 9 ; 485. 3. 

dpttrUpiTot 597. 

apfirtaTpfirrcu' 486. IO. 

&*v 474. 40 ; 496. 6. 

dvtvprros 472. 1 4. 

avf^ufc 480. 2, 12; 482. 2, 16; 484. 8; 

60S. 2. 
ayffp 472. 12 ; 487. 4 ; 604. 6, 35 ; 606. 7 ; 

610. 3. 
<Lv6p»nos 471. 95 ; 488. 20 ; 53L 5, 10. 
cWmu 471. 86 ; 60S. 18; 688. 10. 
arraywKrrrjs 518. 21. 
ayripXrjfM 488. 1 6. 
a*Tiyp6xf*iv 528. 1 4. 
dyriypa(f>op 474. 5 ; 484. 16; 485. 4, 6, 29, 

42 ; 486. 11, 17 ; 484. 1 ; 488. 1 ; 505. 

2 ; 506. 1 ; 635. 
dvribuu* 486. IO, 13, 34; 538. II ; 653. 
dvriKvrjpiov 482. 20, 21, 23. 
awrucpvs 471. 81. 
dvTtnouiv 472. 25, 26. 
am*t>vvT)<Tis 581. 26. 
avwr*p$€Ta>s 511. II. 
&» 613-4; 620. 
aft'a 502. 39. 
&$u>s 473. 7 ; 474. 14. 
a£u>vv 471. 52, 151; 472. 12; 475. 26; 

477. 15; 484. 12; 485. 28; 486. 15; 

488. 24, 41. 
dirayycXXcut 486. 3 1. 
anaBrjs 526. 3. 
antuTtiv 486. 9; 487. 6, 16; 608. 3; 510. 

22 ; 580. 4. 
Arainjcnc 474. 22 ; 487. 5, 7, 1 8 ; 514. 4. 
dnaiTTjrrjs 514. I. 
awaXkayrj 496. 9. 

diraXXaowa' 471. 22; 496. 8, io; 497. 5. 
&ira$ 471. 77. 

<W 471. 82 ; 497. 17 ; 506. 48; 642. 
aw€\€v6tpos 478. 3, 41 ; 480. 13 ; 485. 2, 

11 ; 480. 4, 9 ; 484. 23 ; 504. 3, 39. 
an<x"v 486. 2 ; 504. 17, 46 ; 505-9; 608. 

17; 510.4; 613.38,53; 577. 
ajrnXumjt 483. 5 ; 488. 11 ; 500. 16, 27 ; 

503. 9-1 1, 13, 17; 504. 11, 43; 505. 

6, 8 ; 506. 29 ; 510. 3; 583. 17. 
amaruv 471. 4. 
dirXfo 508. 26 ; 513. 44, 57. 
orrcJ, d<f> fa 628. 9. &<t> as 528. 7. 
dnoftoppfoaros 506. 26. 



awoypdfaip 480. 5, 14; 481. 2; 482. 1; 

506. 42 ; 637. 
tt7roypa<f>Tj 4tS0. 10; 481. 17, 24; 483. 33; 

577; 584. 
curo&riitHv 471. 8. 
amtoipia 471. 134, 137- 
dtroMrfwu 485. 19, 22 ; 486. 37 ; 487. 17 ; 

481. 6, 14 ; 494. 22 ; 496. 9 ; 496. 9, 

13; 497. 6, 15; 499. 25; 501. 41; 

502. 25; 606. 13, 39; 507. 12, 30; 

511. 9 ; 519. 1 ; 526. 14; 527. 10; 528. 

26 ; 530. 19 ; 582. 9, 13 ; 583. 24, 30; 

638; 653. 
airodi&pdaKti* 472. 21. 
djrrf&xn? 485. 27, 32 ; 483. 5 ; 506. 22 ; 

510. 9. 

ano0vrj<TK€iv 486. 28. 

anoKoBiiTTapat 485. 1 2 ; 658. 

dmhcoiTor 487. 3. 

arroKpivfiv 653. 

a7roXa^3awiv 506. 21, 43, 44 ; 630. 20, 31 ; 

653. 
djro\av€iv 642. 
atrokflnap 472. 47 ; 488. 7, 16; 490. 6, 10 ; 

491. 4, 5» 13; 492. 7, 13; 493. 17, 19; 
' 494. 9, 11, 12, 20; 495. 5, 6, 9; 497. 

5>7- 
airokXvpai 486. 32. 

dnokvcir 508. 1 5. 

cMpotpa 658. 

cmoptiv 472. 8. 

dirwrrrav 486. 9, 1 5. 

dnoor&Xttv 530. 18. 

atnxTTcpii* 47L I. 

dn^oToXoy 522. I, 12, 13, 31. 

amxr^dffir 471. 1 38. 

afrrfraxror 601. 1 6 ; 640. 

dtroraaafur 475. 27. 

airori^fnu 507. 25. 

dfroriyriy 489. 12 ; 481. II ; 496. 9 ; 487. 

ii 9 16; 499. 28; 502. 38 ; 640. 
dirctyaaif 475. 8. 
dno<t>*p*ur 658. 

dno4>opd 488. 8, 17 ; 494. 15 ; 496. 6. 
dwoxn 509. 13 ; 512. 10; 513. 49. 
faparos 498. 7 ; 513. 7. 
Spa 472. 8. 

dpyvpiKot 4H±. 17, 33; 533. 23; 697. 
dpyvpio*. See Index VIII (5). 
ap€r^642. 



1 



3 22 



INDICES 



dptBfifht 486. 5, 23. 

dptBfujtrig 697. 

dpl6ptos 529. 6. 

aptortpSs 476. 4 ; 489. 20, 21, 28; 490. 

13; 49L 23; 492. 17, 23; 504. 60. 
Spurrop 519. 17. 
ippAfrw *86. 33. 
Ipovpa. See Index VIII (a). 
aprci&Tj. See Index VIII (a). 
&proi 498. 32, 39; 522. 18. 
apX<uos 471. 1. 

fyx«j> 47L 145 ; 478. 2 ; 592. 
apxtlov 509. 3. 
to$ 472. 17. 

&px i y*"py4* 477. 4. 

opxftducaorip. See Index VII. 

dpxuparcvuv 588. 25. 

a<n7/*>f 476. 6 ; 489. 30 ; 492. 24 ; 504. 57, 

58, 59- 
&r*vXrof 582. 14. 
acnraffo-(9ai 47L 63, 87 ; 529. 11 ; 580. 23, 

24, 31 ; 531. 3 ; 588. 26, 27, 28. 
daira<rp6s 47L 67. 
axTKikow 478. 8. 
atrrSs 477. 14. 
darpayaXoe 49L 23. 
Arwwrof 471. 89. 

Ar^dXtia 485. 26; 488. 28; 592. 
a*<t>a\r)s 580. 21 ; 588. 9. dtnf>ak»g 498. 16. 
ao-xoXcto-dai 818. 37. 

Sr«KPot 490. 6, 10; 491. 10; 496. 13, 14. 
av\r, 482. 13; 490. 6, 10; 492. 7, 13; 

496. 7 ; 502. 17, 55 ; 508. 6, 17 ; 605. 

5,6, 7, 8; 510. 15; 518.8. 
aBpiov 524. 3. 
atn-Mtr 577. 

aMdt 505. 9; 510. 18; 582. 6. 
oWj, ciri r6 avr6 496. 3, 4 ; 518. 42, 54 ; 

522. 2*4. 
tyaipu* 472. 39 ; 494. 25 ; 495. 15. 
<ty?Xi£ 485. 30; 487. 5, 14; 490. 5, 9; 

498. 7; 497. 12; 646. 
&t>Tjn<pos 497. 4. 
&<p$ovos 478. 3. 
tytW 494. 5. 
a(Ppo&urtacTTT)s (?) 511. 3. 
5xpi 491. 8, 15; 507. 30. 

/ScftXAo* 521. 13. 
0a0p6* 574. 



/SaXaytiby 478. 4. 

fraptlv 525. 3. 

paaCKiKt) yvj 506. 37 ; 577 ; 688. /WiXarAi 

ypaptxaT€vt. See Index VII. 
frurrdttv 507. 29 ; 522. 4. 
0c/3cuor 504. 23 ; 506. 36. 
frPatow 499. 25 ; 501. 34 ; 502. 24 ; 504. 

47 ; 677 ; 640. 
jSe/SatWir 504. 23 ; 506. 36. 
/3$/ia471. 127; 486. 10. 
/3i/3Xidiov 475. 3, 26 ; 685. 
ft9X/o» 514. 4; 581. 11 ; 611. 
Pi&kuxpvXaiciov 506. 50. 
/3i/3Xio$vXa& See Index VII. 
#o* 478. 7. 
/9Xa&7 488. 19. 
/9X43or 491. 11 ; 498. 11 ; 494. 28; 504. 

30; 507.34- 
p\t'wa 471. 60. 
/3oi^««r 488. 33. 
porj&k 488. 24 ; 614. 
/9op<«fc 498. 8, 45. 
Poppas 489. 6, 15; 499. 13; 608.8; 505. 

6, 7 ; 506. 28. 
favUvBai 475. 22 ; 477. 9 ; 479. 5 ; 490. 

3; 491.3; 492.4; 498. 3, 9; «*. 

4; 495. 2, 14, 16; 496. 8, 11; 497. 5, 

7 ; 506. 59 ; 682. 20. 
Ppa&vs 497. 24. 
Ppaxho* 490. 12. 
Ppoxti 598. 

yaXaicro^[ 52L 22, 24. 

yapPp&s 475. 19. 

yap** 496. 2 ;/ JO*/. 

yaputfc 497. 26. 

yd/*or 524. 2. 

71/™ 499. 11 ; 504. 12 ; 605. 7 ; 606. 27. 

y*\ar 471. 88. 

yfom 471. 85. 

yci*<£489. 11, 19; 490. 5. 

yn« toy 490. 18; 492. 19. 

y€v<0kios 494. 24. 

ytwVia 521. introd. 

yaqpa 498. 18 ; 494. 10 ; 500. 19 ; 614. 

3; 515. 5; 516. 8; 517. 4; 518. 1; 

618-4. 
yews 487. 7; 490. 7, 11 ; 497. 10, 16. 
ytovxot 50L 31. 
ytpduucfo 646. 



X. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS 



3*3 



ytcofurpia 499. 17, 41. 
ytupyia 487. 15; 506. 37; 577; 688. 
yrapyifc 517. 12 ; 588. 4, 8, 10, 11, 15, 19. 
yi} 499. 21 ; 501. 30. r»j 494. 6. PcutiXikt) 

yfj 506. 37 ; 577; 688. bwovia yfj 500. 

I3» *7> 30. 34- M W e8S - «*™««4 y? 

604. 12, 45. ovtruucrj -ft 606. 37 ; 677 ; 

688. 
yLyntrBai 471. 78; 472. 15, 16, 17, 29; 

474.29; 477. 3, 13; 478. 19; 484. 

28; 485. 28; 486. 8; 487. n t 18; 

488. 28, 42 ; 498. 6 ; 494. 11 ; 495. 4, 

10, 12 ; 496. 9, 10, 12, 13, 14, 16; 497. 

4; 498. 18, 42; 501.28; 505. 2; 506. 

53; 608. 10; 511. 10; 518. 10, 18, 45, 

58; 615. 2; 529. 8; 588. 6; 692; 

642; 658. 
ytyyaxrKfw 528. 6. 
ykvicvs 581. I. 
yXvfxfia 494. 34 et saep. 
ykaao^Konov 521. 12. 
yv<xf*vt 627. 3. 
7*90-40? 496. 5. 
yiwpifcu' 494. 33 et saep. 
ywcrrijp 498. 16. 
yorcvs 478. 11. 

yoVv 489. 20, 22, 25; 490. 17. 
ypdfifia 471. 4 ; «2. 18, 38 ; 478. 48 ; 48L 

26; 485. 48 ; 489. 21 ; 490. 14; 492. 

17; 50^. 50, 56; 506. 16; 509. 19; 

528. 17. 
ypapparcvs. See Index VII. 
ypd<f^ip 471. 10; 472. 18, 56; 474. 3; 

477.i8; 478.46; 479.27; 481.25; 

485. 8, 13, 28, 47 ; 489. 20; 490. 14; 

49a 17; 494. 25; 495. 15; 497. 24; 

604. 50, 55 ; 507. 37 ; 630. 2, 7 ; 581. 

5, 27; 582. 4; 588. 3. a 1. 
ypa<t*iav 687. 
ypafa 478. 8. 

yvit*a<riapx<ir 471. 39 J 601. 4 ; 512. 3. 
yvfmurtapxia 471. 29, 35 ; 478. 3. 

yvfuwrlapxot. See Index VII. 

yvpaiKftos 498. 18. 

yvrf) 471. 98 ; 489. 5, it, 14 ; 498. 8, 15 ; 

494. 7, 11, 14, 16, 19, 21, 23; 504. 5, 

40, 49; 528. 20; 588. 12. 
yvpis 520. 12. 



iarrvXtor 497. 19. 



doWftu' 471. 91 ; 485. 12 ; 506. 3 et saep. ; 

508. 12; 510. 6. 
ddvttov 471. 7, 62 (?); 485. 24 ; 506. 52; 

508. 11, 19, 26; 510. 6, 19; 686; 668. 
dapturnjs 472. 7 ; 486. 6, 24 ; 658. 
dandvt) 498. 5, 20 ; 494. 17 ; 522. 29 ; 680. 

16; 640. 
btiKruvai 471. 75. 
dciV 525. 5; 582. 3. &<»» 474. 21, 38; 

475. 30 ; 488. 26, 41 ; 496. 8. hmOai 

472.46; 487. 12. 
detirrov 471. 50; 628. 1 ; 624. 1. 
ocKcnrXouf 526. 7. 
S<£«fr 489. 22, 25, 27 ; 490. 12, 17, 18 ; 491. 

17, 19, 20, 21, 24; 492. 16, 20, 21, 22; 

494. 31; 588. 18. 
bcpc ip 668. 

biapios 680. 

fc<rpo<f)v\aKia 574. 

&€<Tn6njs 472. 22. 

tempo* 471. 102 ; 474. 39. 

df'xtoBtu 609-11. 

6>>XoO* 471. 75; 475. 6; 478. 12; 485. 19, 

31 ; 486. 25 ; 492. 8 ; 504. 13 ; 608. 19, 

25 ; 528. 25 ; 631. 28 ; 697. 
dqXw 474. 20. 
bijfjLos 473. 2. 
bffp6atos 609. 14. to fyp. 472. 39 ; 489. 12 ; 

491. 11; 492. 10; 498. 12; 494. 29; 

495. 17; 500. 19; 504. 31 ; 518. 20; 
517. 3; 518. 1 ; 617; 640. (ri) VoVia 
494. 14; 499. 21; 501. 31; 504. 24, 
28 ; 506. 38. 617/*. ctypoduTtavTric (?) 511. 3. 
&/M- 71 500. 13, 16, 29, 34. oV. Iarp6t 
475. 5. Atyi. Karoxn 488. 26. o)pi. Xoyoc 
615. 1. 6V. xpnparwpt* 485. 12; 486. 
7, 23 ; 509. 2. 

fypoatovv 588. 5. 

hwyp&<t*tv 813. 19, 34, 39; 680. 6. 

tiaypa<f>Tj 488. 1 1 ; 682. 

dtadeunwty 472. 1 1. 

diaocxrffAu 495. II, 1 3. 

ha&oxos 471. 27. 

fltaoW 476. 16 ; 486. 12. 

bta&iKn 482. 34 ; 489-95 saep. 

buupuu 503. 5. 

dtairay495. 10; 496. 12; 497. 13. 

ouiXoyiffotfat 484. 24. 

diofiapraptiv 478. 6. 

dunrr/nrtiv 588. 3. 



Y % 



324 



INDICES 



bunropirfi 471. 6l. 

SuntWXW 484. 8 ; 516. 6 ; 517. i ; 580. 5 ; 

583. 9, 23; 610-1; 618-4; 616-7. 
faun-oX? 485. 26; 486. 15; 487. 18. 
buurroKiK&v 588. 4. 

dcordao-cty 482. 9 ; 488. 6 ; 485. 16, 18. 
diorciyciv 508. 9- 1 2 ; 505. 6. 
butn)Kti* 472. 48. 
butnBmi 488. 3 ; 480. 2 ; 481. 2 ; 482. 2 ; 

484. 2 ; 485. 2. 
bu*rp€tf>€tp 485. 1 1 ; 688. 
dtarpifitiv 486. 31. 
diarpo<t>T) 484. 16; 487. 8. 
duxfrtpciv 486. 8 ; 487. 5. 
didocrxaXribv 471. 1 1 3. 

hM«u 472. 20, 51, 53 ; 485. 5 ; 481. 6, 14 ; 
484. 22 ; 486. 5, 10; 522. 15, 26; 525. 

6, 7; 528. 15; 528. 8; 580. 13; 588. 

7, 18; 580; 582; 582; 588; 640; 
658. 

M&vfwt 588. 15. 
dun-civ 484. 24. 
dUpx«<rSat 475. 16; 478. 17; 485. 14, 19, 

27; 504. 26; 514. 3; 516. 8; 518. 1; 

614. 
bi€vrvx*iv 486. 16, 36. 
dueaio&urcu' 484. 25. 
duuuo&6rT]s 578. 

dUcuos 471. 115; 486. 35; 686. duuuW 658. 
duauovr 658. 
ducaoTTjs 658. 

dim; 486. 28; 487. 19; 488.33; 506. 49. 
bipotfjos 577. 

d«5 478. 16; 488. 34; 610. 17. 
dioueciy 474. 13; 487. 10; 508. 19. 
boUijvu 518. 8 ; 642. 
duHKijrrft 518. 29 ; 588. 20, 25. 
dtopOovv 488. 16. 
din\ovp 520. 6, 8, 11, 21. 
&ht(j6s 507. 37. 
bfypos 646. 
dia>pv£ 506. 29. 
doiul* 472. 38, 40 ; 478. 2 ; 475. 27 ; 486. 

15 ; 487. 12 ; 488. 25 ; 488. 8. 
doKipav 588. 24. 
&W 474. 25. 

dovktia 488. 8, 17 ; 484. 15 ; 486. 6. 
bov\uc6s 481. 5. 
dovX<*471. 18; 472. 14, 21 ; 475. 21 ; 485. 

23, 26; 488. 8, 17; 481. 13; 482. 7, 



13; 488. 4, 19; 484. 6, 7, 12, 13, 16, 

23; 486.7,9, 15; 674. 
&paKorr6f*op<f>ot 480. 12. 
bpaapds 485. 25. 
bpaxri- See Index VIII (3). 
dpaxtiuuos 488. 15; 485. 17; 507. 10, 19. 
bvwapxs 486. 8. 
bvmtrdai 472. 9, 1 6, 22; 487. 9, 15, 16; 

528. 12; 53L 13. 
dvvarfc 472. 1 7. 
dudccadpax/ior ^78. 12, 22, 3 1. 
&»dcKa>P'Of 488. 17; 506. 15. 
tepa 475. 22. 
d»p*a 47L 43. 

ryyaia 508. 20, 25. 

cyyow 504. 1 4. 

fyypatrros 484. 18. 

cVy/xtyc4*486. 25; 486.26; 484.27; 485. 

16. 
tfyypa4>o£ 484. IO. ryyptyow 475. 8. 
IVyt«n-off 486. 12, 13. tryyurra 480. 7, II ; 

487. 10, 16. 
07W 472. 35. 

eyicaXfcr 472. 1 9 ; 486. 22; 503. 21; 508. 

20; 510. 24; 518. 43, 56. 
eyjcaraXeiirw 488. 22. 
eyxXtyia 472. 9. 
fyimjats 506. 50. 
fycvo;486. 10; 603. 
eyx €i P* i¥ 472. 29. 

flatfw 486. 5, 33 ; 481. 5, 13 ; 483. 2, 7, 1 7; 

588. 
tBos 471. 77 ; 475. 19. 
M*k€ur 472. 14. 
€lUr<u 472. 18 ; 474. 6 ; 478. 47 ; 481. 25 ; 

485. 32, 33, 48; 488. 15; 488. 21; 

480. 14; 482. 17; 504.50,56; 532. 5. 
c»o*506. 37; 677; 638. 
fit, ch ra Uavatmov 528. 1 8. 
<l<rbo X h 516. 8. 

tlaUvoi 477. 11 ; 607. 14; 640. 
<l<TKpuKur 477. 10, 24. 
cfcro&vfu' 508. 19. 
cfrofa481. 10; 482.15; 488.7,15; 480. 

6; 502. 20; 508. 16, 18. 
fire 528. 24 ; 653. 
Uaaros 471. 52; 48a 15, 17; 435. 17; 

488. 11,19; 48L 5 ; 483. 1 1 ; 486. 10 ; 
487. 13; 488. 31, 36, 38,39; 488. 16; 



X. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS 



3 2 5 



502. 27; 60S. 16, 19, 20; 504. 30; 

606. 6, 12, 13, 15; 507. 10, 11, 19; 

515. 4 ; 525. 2 ; 528. 4. 
iKOT€po£ 491. 7, 8, 9, 14, 15; 492. 6; 508. 

20; 505. 3. 
cV0<iXA«u< 496. 13. 
&0a<nXt'ffu> 47L 54. 
tvyovos 489. 9, 17; 494. 13 ; 495. 6, 7, 9, 

15. 
iiAMvat 496. 2, 5; 497. 21 ; 509. 14, 18. 
iMviixos 494. 25; 495. 15. 
f/cWn;* 496. 3, 5, 9; 497. 15- 
tf'jccti'off 472. 1. 
€k\€kt6s 689. 

eVcAoy9 496. 15; 497. 19. 
*Kk6yurros 497. 1 4. 
hovaws 473. 3. 
€Ktrp63t<rpos 588. 6 ; 686. 
ftcorairtr 472. 43. 
IKTOKTOS 646. 

fWmr 492. 9 ; 498. 10 ; 494. 28 ; 507. 17. 

fxTMrif 506. 47. 

*kt6s 492. 22. 

Iktotc 486. 9, 28. 

cx^opa 498. 5, 20. 

{x$6pu>v 501. 25. 

IXatoy 522. 29; 529. 7. 

cXatttt/orrapadfUTOS- 689. 

ikaaaovp 506. 50. 

ikatro-up 471. 45. 

ikcvBcpos 494. 5. 

i\tv$€povv 494. 16. 

ip&afaia 485. 33. 

iyftakvfiv 658. 

iyftatev 505. 6, 9, 10. 

c/j/SoXciW 522. 8, 20. 

4i£oX4 528. 23. 

<Wi***" 491. 11 ; 494. 28. 

iptrupia 471. 148. 

cfurim-riy 494. 21. 

<pirpo3tapvs 474. 20. 

ffiirpoaBcv 504. 25. 

cy 9 cV rote KXav&ov 528. 3. 

from 495. 5. 

Zvapx°s 507. 4. 

Mtucvvwai 494. 9. 

^/xm/a 403. 17; 494. 10; 495. 6. 

fa&fmxi* 484. 10. 

cVfuxu 506. 27. 

mica 518. 25 ; 583. 25; 582. 



cVfjXif 646. 

Made 486. 30, 31 ; 509. 3; 653. 

cYcavrcfc 472. 34, 54; 491. 6; 502. 8, 22. 

tvtos 471. 7 ; 474. 34. 

cWrdvai 486. 3. iwtor&s 476. 9 ; 479. 1 4 ; 
481. 4; 488. 27; 499. 5; 501. 9, 25; 
502. 11 ; 504. 27, 28 ; 505. 2 ; 606/13, 
53; 509. 1 ; 513. 30, 45; 640. 

cVoifffii' 638. 

ivotKtjo-is 489. 6, 14 ; 498. 3. 

cWjaov 489. 6, 14; 493. 18; 502. 21, 28, 

39- 
1vox°* 480. 15; 658. 
IvraQiaorfff 476. 8. 
€VT(X\€IV 527. 2. 

iVTOKOS 508. l8. 

tmfc 512. 5. 

im7Xw» 471. 97; 486. 37; 683. 25; 

653. 
jfrucokovBciv 507. 34. 
cfaXXdcrcreiv 581. 1 8. 
i(aprjvos 502. 27. 
ifra*i\nos 502. 14. 
ifrmarav 471. 42. 
#apra> 471. 83. 
1£<V 495. 8. 
ffffrtu 489. 10, ii, 19; 491. 7, 15; 492. 

7, 14; 493. 6 ; 494. 19; 495. 16; 496. 

6, 13; 497. 3; 498. 42; 503. 18; 606. 

41, 49; 607. 28; 608. 26. 
i&px«r6ai 472. 1 ; 628. 7. 
e'£craf«i'582; 663. 
€$rjyrjT€vay. See Index VII. 
t&ryn*h** See Index VII. 
{$7*474. 28; 483. 16; 501. 28; 510. 10. 
f'ftcwu 471. 73 ; 472. 2. 
ffwrro/ttiv 486. 1 2. 
«£o&idfc tv 474. 26; 581. 21. 
((odtcurriK6t 494. 1 7. 
^o^oj: 481. 10; 482. 15; 489. 7, 15; 490, 

6 ; 502. 20. 
<£ov<rfa 490. 3 ; 491. 3, 11 ; 492. 4 ; 498. 

39; 494. 4, 27; 495. 2, 9; 496. 11; 

606. 43. 
l£vft>tfc(i> 471. 81. 
?{• 480. 14. 
^axTfi (dative ?) 522. 4. 
tfartptaios 498. 18. 
c£wrepa> 498. 12. 
ioprnj 475. 17; 680. 17, 30. 



326 



INDICES 



hray*tv y itray6p*vcu qpepai. See Index III (a). 

rrrd* 491. 14. 

cTrawryjcaffi* 487. 1 3. 

hrarayKOS 606. 35. 

ardrw 495. 8 ; 502. 54 ; 506. 39. 

tnapovpiov 658. 

cirapxia 471. 22. 

Inapxor. See Index VII. 

cVfi 473. 2 ; 484. 7 ; 486. 13, 31 ; 518. 4 ; 

527. 6, 7 ; 581. 9. 
arfiyrur 486. 14. 
«m8a* 471. 21. 
Arrirat 495. 4. 
iir*l(ipos 531. 9. 

hr<px«r&cu 489. II, 12; 498. 10; 510. 24. 
hnohai 471. 128; 518. 12, 32. 
Ai-wip 474. 25 ; 488. 43. 
hn r6 avr6 496. 3, 4 ; 513. 42, 54 ; 522. 24. 
Ari0ovX«i«<» 472. 8. 
€viyotrr) 499. 5 ; 639. 
6r<yptycti> 478. 45; 479. 25; 485. 45; 

490. 12 ; 492. 16 ; 502. 51 ; 504. 49, 55. 
Artdcifw 471. 90. 
cmbtKarov 609 ; 610. 
IntMxifrBtu 498. 6. 
cirtdi&fau 478. 4; 476. 26, 35; 478. 43; 

479. 16, 24; 480. 10, 21; 481. 23; 

483. 18, 31; 484. 33; 485. 29; 486. 

17; 487. 5, 22; 488. 36. 
hnJboxj) 498. 48. 

hnfiv 472. 13 ; 498. 3, 6, 8, 11. 
Ar#f/xa 500. 14, 31. 
hnfavpciv 475. 6. 
cnuuSXapot 499. IO. 
arucaKup 492. 20 ; 586. 
cnuuiaBat 488. 21. 
hrUpurts 478. 9, 31 ; 597. 
hrtKTaoBm 496. 7« 
mifUXua 471. 14; 473. 5; 485. 9; 486. 

14; 592. 
trrtfieraXXaaativ 496. 14. 
finpqytor 631. 17* 
hrunfirj 499. 1 6. 
iwtfrvos 480. 11. 
fcrwrAa 489. 8, 16; 498. 17; 494. 9; 495. 

6,7. 
inuTKamjs 589. 
arfojcf^ftf 589. 
hruTKonti* 633. 20. 
tvumur&u 472. 11. 



ArurrcXXfU' 474. 39; 476. 4; 483. 18; 

504. 17. 
fnnrrokri 471. 11; 474. 3; 486. 29; 613. 

28 ; 528. 12, 16 ; 530. 2 ; 631. 27 ; 583. 

3, 20. 

imardkiov 530. II ; 532. IK 

faurrpdnryos. See Index VII. 

€marp€<f>€uf 486. 30. 

Jm<T<f>payi(eiv 471. 1 7. 

cfrircXfly 483. 34 ; 490. 3; 491. 3, 4 ; 492. 

4, 5; 494. 4, 5; 495. 3; 496. 11. 
fW^or 472. 8; 580. 

tntrripTjais 580. 

mrrjpTjTTit. See Index VII. 

eniripov 489. 12; 491. II ; 492. 9; 498. 

11; 494. 28; 495. 17 ; 504. 31. 
ArtrpcVciy 474. 40; 476. 10; 486. 15, 34. 
arirpoin) 487. 5, 9, 15; 496. 12, 13. 
eirirpovros 485. 31; 49L 9, 16; 495. 14; 

496. 12 ; 497. 13 ; 498. 2 ; 601. 6. 
eniTvyxavit" 474. 33. 
^r^>ur472.9; 606.6; 607.38; 616. 14; 

618. 
M<f>opos 510. 19. 
cYrixripcu' 492. 9. 
tiroUiov 486. 33 ; 593 ; 683. 
&rrajaudfKacrqr 471. 49, 1 2 8. 
cpaoTip 47L 62. 

ipya&v&u 498. 32 ; 520. 14, 15. 
ipyanjs 522. 7, 1 9, 21. 
ffpyoy 53L 9. 
1px«r6at 478. 5 ; 489. 10, 19 ; 490. 7, 11 ; 

491. 8; 497. 13; 628. 24, 25 ; 531. 20; 

582. 17. 
?/m»? 471. 19. 
f/wrav 623. 1 ; 524. 1. 
cpamx&ff 472. 13. 
ArAp 471. 101. 
itrrUuns 471. 53. 
tfaxara 585. 

iawrfpuuos 498. 14, 20. 
errpoff 472. 38 ; 48L 9 ; 482. 13 ; 488. 32 ; 

489. 10, 19 ; 492. 8, 14; 494. 12 etsaep.\ 

495. 4, 16; 496. 5 (?), 12; 498. 42; 

501. 13; 502. 18, 20; 606. 52; 508. 

20; 510. 13, 14, 17 ; 520. 13; 533. 3, 6; 

683; 639. 
tfri 471. 109; 472. 22; 486. 5; 488. 7; 

498. 10, 18. 
h-os passim. 



GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS 



3*7 



tv 527. 9. 

fMoMut 496. 8 ; 497. 3 ; 603. 5 ; 618. .48, 

60, 63. 
evtpyercur 486. 1 6, 36; 487. 19. 
cfopyrrn* 486. 27. 
€i>$€»s 680. 30; 632. 12; 633. 5. 
rfnopfat 471. 79, 109. 
cfoocu' 494. 9. 
ttivota 494. 6 ; 642. 
cihropas 580. 
cfyy/ia 472. 33. 
rvpio-K€iv 582. 19. 
€vo-<Ptia 47L 141. 
*vT*Aq* 471. 96. 
rtrvx*'' 626. 13. 
f0X«rAu 527. 9 ; 528. 3 J 529. 1 ; 638. 2, 

29. 
cvo»xta 494. 24. 
(<f>airT€Uf 474. 41. 
€<t>r}p€V€ir 477. 9. 
tyij/Sos 477. 12, 25, 26. 
S^odor 493. 10, 11 ; 604. 30. 
e^opa* 476. 12, 17. 
*xw472. 3, 5, 15, 21 ; 483. 33; 484. 17; 

485. 42 r ^86. 8, 37; 487. 8; 488. 27, 

28; 489. 5, 6, 7, 13, 15, 16; 491. 3; 

492. 4, 12 ; 494. 14 ; 495. 2, 4, 9 ; 496. 

3, 10, 11, 15; 497. 21 ; 498. 34; 601. 

26; 508. 21; 61L 3; 512. 4; 518. 60; 

614. 2, 3, 5; 516. 7; 527. 4; 629. 6; 

63L 9, 12; 688. 8, 10, 14; 682; 611. 

ixo/uvus 603. IO, II, 12. 

<»* 471. 4; 496. 12, 15; 499. 23; 501. 

33; 506. 39; 522. 28; 581. 6, 20, 22 ; 

599. 

frvyof 496. 3; 531. 17. 

(rjkorvnw 472. 11. 

fiF 472. 7, 52; 490. 5; 491. 5; 492. 6; 

494. 12; 495. 4; 497. 10. 
{fans 513. 45, 57. 
M 492. 9, 15 ; 494. 15 ; 688. 
far? 496. 4. 

$ (cf) p^ 471. 66. 
rjytiirtiai 528. 8. 
riy*fxopiv€iv 635. 

Tjy*fu»9. See Index VII. 
9*f«f 531. 3. 
4%7 509. 17. 



?&>* 642. 

?««* 531. 8. 

ijkuda 473. 7 ; 495. 13 ; 496. 12 ; 497. 13 ; 

651. 
rjfUpa 471. 50, 63, in ; 476. 10; 481. 5; 

483. 27; 496. 9, 13; 497. 6, 16; 498. 

3 2 > 37, 39, 47; 609. 1; 622. 22, 30; 

626. 3 ; 528. 4, 9. 
iJfuoXui 496. 9 ; 497. 11, 16; 499. 29; 502. 

40; 507. 17; 640. 
fjUKuPfkiov. See Index VIII (3). 
i]<T<r<av 491. 1 1 ; 492. 10 ; 494. 29 ; 495. 

17; 504. 32. 
Ifroi 493. 4; 494. 21, 25; 495. 15. 

Oopotos 471. 107; 472. 7; 485. 25. 
Bavfid(uv 471. 3. 

0*6. See Index VI (a). 

foao-Bat 475. 24. 

eiarpov 471. 106. 

Sttos 506. 9, 13. 

dcXciv 528. 7; 531. 7, 23, 28; 583. 10; 

653. 
depa 501. 18, 24, 26, 40; 516. 7; 517. 10; 

518. 5; 583. 24; 613-4; 617; 640. 
6<6s. See Index II and VI (a). 
BtpyA 473. 5. 

&W 492. 23; 502. 7; 504. 4, 33, 40, 53. 
ticupucds 473. 4. 
#7X1*494. 13. 
6rj(ravpo<fM\a£ 522. 9. 
Qpirrmw 471. 80. 
Bvyinjp 472. 30, 33, 39 ; 494. 7 ; 496. 2 ; 

497. 21 ; 504. 4, 40 ; 533. 26. 
Bvfuartfpiop 52L 19. 
Bvpa 502. 33. 
Ovpavktiv 471. 72. 

Iarp6s 475. 5. 

ldt6ypa<f>os 494. 3 1 ; 509. 1 8. 

Sftior 483. 25; 487. 18; 489. 4; 490. 3; 
491. 3; 492. 4; 49a 4, 7; 494. 4 '' 
j<*#. ; 495. 2, 15 ; 601. 37 ; 508. 12. 

IbwTfJS 52L 10. 
teumxcfc 483. 27. 
Idov 628. 24. 
Up6dov\os 519. 13, 14* 
Up*vs. See Index VI (3). 

UpovUrji 516. 2. 
tyxfr 491. 3. 



328 



INDICES 



ltp6s 486. 32. Upd (sc. w) 633. 

UpOTtKT0)V 579. 

linriCw 489. 9, 17. 

Iftarwv^TL 96; 494. 9; 496. 4; 530. 14, 

20, 31 ; 531. 13. 
Ifiartap6s 494. 1 8. 
tva 484. 27; 485. 32; 486. 16, 34, 36; 

487. 19; 488. 33; 528. 22; 538. 3, 6, 

10, 14, 18, 26; 653. 
fannjufe 482. 18; 504. 9 ; 506. 29. 
lmrotc6fxos 519. 1 2. 
brdm 598. 
taot 489. 12; 491. 5, 10, n, 13, 17; 492. 

10; 493. 12; 494. 29; 495. 17; 496. 

15 ; 503. 7 ; 504. 31 ; 505. 3 ; 506. 23, 

45 J 507. 19. t6 taw 475. 4. 
Urros 646. 
laxyftP 583. 16. 

caAnrrp 497. 19; 499. 33; 506. 48. 
KoBapds 483. 26 ; 502. 32 ; 504. 24 ; 506. 

36; 577; 640. 
koBtikmw 477. 18; 479. 18; 483. 21, 34; 

485. 34, 37 ; 486. 7. 
KaBlfriv 471. 106. 
KaBurrdvai 487. 14; 496. 12; 497. 13, 14; 

528. 21. 
koBoXov 489. 11; 491. 10; 492. 8, 14; 

493. 9 ; 494. 27 ; 495. 16. 
ko66ti 496. 16 ; 497. 19. 
KaBms 527. 2; 583. 17. 
Kaly&p km 488. 31. 
«ut0i 473. 5. 
Kauf6s 502. 36. 

*a«fc 488. 40 ; 532. 22. kok&s 488. 29, 32. 
KaXapos 521. 21. 
koXcZp 472. 12 ; 474. 24. 
jcaA&r 525. 7. 
KafAij/KiKSs 498. 7 */ A7^. 
wi/iiyXiv 507. 26 ; 533. 22. 
kov66s 492. 17, 22. 
Koptuvot 521. 14. 
KOfmuov 504. 26. 
xapinfc (crop) 499. 23; 501. 32. 
Kapn6t (wrist) 476. 4 ; 492. 16. 
Kaptrow 472. 27; 653. 
icdpvov 529. 7. 
Karafiapw 487. 10. 

KarayiyvtrBat. 480. 6 ; 484. 5 ; 492. 2. 
Karaypd<fxty 472. 1 9, 24, 25. 



KaraBtfTis 475. 3 1. 

KOTCUCpUKUf 471. 5 > 653. 

«araX( ) 612. 

KaTakafificuKW 474. 34. 

jcaraXciirfiy 490. 4, 7, 8 ; 491. 12 ; 492. 5, 

10, 11; 493. 16; 494. 73 497. 14; 

526. 4. 
Karakciylns 637. 
Karakoytiov 485. 3. 
KaraXoxur/ufc 504. IO. 

Karayra* 481. IO ; 482. 1 9 ; 486. 30 ; 637. 
Kara$v€W 525. 4. 
KorairXcu' 486. 29, 30. 
KaraoTTopd 486. 1 3. 
KarariBtvai 507. 24. 
KaraxprjcrQai 494. 20. 

KnraxpmiaTi(*iv 496. 7 ; 497. 2 ; 506. 42. 
Karax»pt(*i* 478. 49 ; 515. 3. 
Karax»puri*6s 514. 4. 
jcarcyyuay 472. 39. 
xarcxciy 527. 6, 7 ; 532. 23. 
Kttrrjyopos 472. 32. 
Kanpprjs 471. 92. 
xaTuuruafc 488. 6; 504. 12, 45. 
jcaroueoff (?) 482. in trod 
xarox^ 483. 26; 506. 49. 
*car« 488. 6 ; 492. 2, 3. 
KcXfvciy 471. 100; 474. 6, 16; 478. 9; 

486. 29; 487. 12; 488. 25; 653. 
KcXAa 495. 8 ; 502. 55. 
wpdpw 472. 31, 35; 522. 6, 16, 17, 27; 

538. 18. 
Kc'pdor 653. 

KtpfMTtOV 583. 1 6. 

re^aXaiov 485. 17, 1 8, 21 ; 497. 23 ; 506. 

12, 17, 21, 40, 44, 56; 507. 9. 12, 30; 

508. 24 ; 510. 5, 22 ; 515. 6 ; 526. 7. 
Kt<PaXiTonapafirjKrjs 498. 1 8, 22, 26. 

vjbia 475. 7 ; 493. 5. 

K*jpv£ 519. 15. 

KuAimviw 488. 21. 

Kivdwos 499. 20; 501. 27; 507. 32, 36; 

538. 11. 
Kivtlv 528. 13. 
Kkaitiv 528. 8. 
jeXci'f 502. 34. 
Kktirrtiv 472. 15, 16. 
KKripovoptiv 472. 4 ; 609. 7. 
K\rjpov6fios 481. 18 ; 485. 29 ; 491. 4, 12 ; 

492. 5, 8, 11 ; 494. 11 ; 495. 4 ; 512. 8. 



X. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS 



329 



Kktjpos 488. 6; 488. 11 ; 499. 9 ; 501. 11 ; 

506. 24; 588. si ; 598; 688. 
Kkrfpovv 508. 8, 14, 19. 
kXLvtj 520. 7 ; 528. 2 ; 646. 
jcoivor 472. 29, 56; 497. 4- * oi *fi ±74. 39- 

kouws 492. 6, 12. 
KouuM'tKcfc 480. 3 ; 482. 10; 490. 5, 9. 
jcouwfo 582. 7* 

KOtTOV 471. 73. 

ffoir<0i*{Ti7f 471* 84. 

in$XXi7pa 614. 

jcoXwcia 658. 

koiuCuv 474. 14 ; 496. 15 ; 497. 17 ; 499. 

24 ; 501. 34 ; 526. 8 ; 529. 2 ; 580. 3, 

10, 11, 31 ; 581. 12 ; 588. 7. 
xoirq 499. 15. 
Kfaptop 502. 32. 
x&r/ia 494. 10. 
Kwrfujrrjt. See Index VII. 

KoviKmoirjais 498. 30. 

nfopos 498. 1 8. Cf. rfapa. 

Korvktj 529. 4. 

Kovpuc6p 646. 

Kpartiv 486. 25 ; 503. 20. 

fcpdnjais 485. 22 ; 506. 22. 

Kpfourros 484. 21 ; 486. 9, 11, 17, 18 ; 487. 

1 ; 488. 1 ; 518. 29. 
K/uVrut 471. 154; 486. 13, 15; 658. 
Kpiatt 471. 135 ; 484. 27 ; 658. 
Kpirfipiw 471. 127; 485. 10; 592. 
KporaKiarpit 475. 1 7, 24. 
imjpa 472. 31 ; 486. 4, 25; 506. 25. 

Kvfrpcaynit (gen.) 491. 1 9. 
KufrpvijTrit 522. 15. 

ffv/9o* 498. 7 ;/ *k/. 

jrvpffta 485. 22 ; 498. 2, 9; 506. 22, 29. 

Kvpicuc6s 474. 41. 

KvptciSuv 496. 15; 499. 22 ; 601. 32 ; 508. 

20 ; 506. 44. 
Kvpiot ('guardian ') 478. 7, 46 ; 479. 3, 26 ; 

486. 46, 52 ; 488. 3, 35; 490. 2, 13; 
492. 2, 17 ; 496. 5; 602. 2, 52 ; 608. 
4 ; 504. 6, 25, 49, 55 ; 505. 3 ; 506. 7 ; 
510. 3. 

Kvpioe ('lord ') 471. 2 et saep. ; 486. 13, 33 ; 

487. 12 ; 488. 7, 23 ; 489. 4 ; 528. 2 ; 
628. 9 ; 642. Cf. Index II. 

rift" (' valid ') 489. 13 ; 490. 7 ; 491. 4> 
ii } 12 ; 492. 4,.io ; 498. 12 ; 494. 5, 
26, 29, 30 ; 495. 3, 16, 17, 18 ; 498. 48; 



499. 34 ; 501. 47 J 502. 45 ; 504. 38 ; 

606. 56; 507.36; 518 49. «v/xW504. 

16. 
Kvpovv 518. 4. 
KVpTOS 620. 20. 
icwXvfiv 471. 94. 

KU>pa(TT7\S 519. IO, II. 

**w 482. 5 ; 488. 4 ; 499. 9 ; 689 ; 597. 

Cf. Index V (6). 
Kvpoypapparw. See Index VII. * 

Xayxdvtuf 508. 20. 

Xo/iftfrft* 471. 7, 43, 47 ; 477.' 16 ; 486. 7, 

35; ±98. 31, 36; 609. 15; 526. 5; 

581. 26 ; 658. 
\ar6dpcu> 580. 5. 
Xa£«a498. 6, II, 43. 
\a$€ixiv 498. 29. 
XaftxcJr 498. 34. 
\aoypa<t>ia 478. 23. 
XarofUa 498. 8, 45. 
\a\ovw 622. 18. 
Xcy«i> 472. 2, 5, 14, 20, 29; 478. 16, 28; 

486. 7; 488. 1 1 ; 600. 1 1 ; 512. 5 ; 528. 

19,22; 688.14,15,22,24; 682; 599; 

668. 
]Xciirciy 497. 15. 
XtiTovpytiv 475. 18. 
XuTovpyia 487. II. 
X«r( ) 522. 29. 
\€vk6s 471. 10 1 ; 581. 13. 
Xijwfc 502. 36. 
Xiay 525. 4. 

Xtfuwt 489. 7, 15 ; 502. 37. 
Xi'do* 496. 3 ; 498. 7 et saep.; 528. 12. 
XifuSr 486. 35. 
XiVpa 407. 10. 
Xty 490. i 4; 508. 9 */ *z#.; 505. 6, 8; 

tf 06. 30 ; 518. 4. 
Xoyapi'dtoy 599. 
Xoyifav 588. 9. 
\oyurn)piov 588. 20. 
Xayotroi€U» 486. 22. 
Xrfyor 474. 17, 34 ; 495. 13 ; 496. 10; 515. 

1 ; 521. 1 ; 622. 1, 26 ; 525. 9 ; 526. 1 1 ; 

528. 13, 17, 22; 530. 15. 
Xotmfe 478. 7; 491. 14; 500. 5; 505. 8; 

506. 18 ; 511. 4 ; 512. 7; 513. 35 ; 618-4; 

658. 
Xouccy 528. 10. 



330 



INDICES 



\ox*ia 496. 10. 
Xtm-cur 472. io. 
\wris 510. 17. 
\vrpow 530. 14. 
\vX*iov 521. 20. 
\*>t6s 525. 8. 

fiaXXoy 474. 37. 

fid^fu; 496. 5. 

pav6av€iv 582. 

Itaprvpclv 489. 22 */ ra#. ; 490. 15 et saep. ; 

491. 18 et saep. ; 492. 18 et saep.; 494. 

33 \etsaep. 
fiaprvpt<r$ai 471. 64. 
pdprw 493. 12. 
fx6rj)v (<hr\ p.) 530. 8. 
peya\o<t>p6p<as 473. 5* 

firyat 477. 2 ; 49L 2 ; 646. 

pcifav 473. 5. 

fuipeuao9 47L 20, 80, 109, 125. 

ftcXfti> 530. 8. 

ftcXXfcv 472. 4, 39 ; 533. 12. 

/i//i<£c<r&u 47L 116; 488. 39. 

pc* ofo 472. 5. 

paw 485. 20; 49L 11 ; 492. 9; 494. 29; 

495. 17; 506. 20. 
furroi 472. 22. 
fUmoiyt 531. 19. 

lupiCcw 489. 10, 19 ; 491. 15; 496. 11. 
(upurpfo 498. 8 ; 574. 
fUpot 478. 5 ; 479. 8 ; 481. 8 ; 482. 6, 7, 9, 

13; 490. 5, 9; 491. 10, 17; 496. 13; 

501. ii, 17; 503. 6 et saep.; 504. 21; 

505. 6; 506. 24, 26; 509. 6; 510. 12, 

I3» x 45 677; 63a 
pcW 471. 87 ; 491. 25 ; 516. 5 ; 595 ; 625 ; 

630. 
fMTa/SrfXXfUf 512. 6, 7 ; 520. 24 ; 532. 6. 
firrabuxTiMvai 489. 4 ; 490. 3 ; 491. 3 ; 492. 

4; 494.4. 
fifradtMiiai 474. 23 ; 484. 13 ; 485. 6, 49; 

513. 33. 
[ttrd&wTis 485. 36. 

furakafifimip 471. 53 ; 506. 20 ; 513. 46. 
pcraXXd<r<rccir 477. 14; 496. 13; 497. 9; 

504.35. 
ftrrd\6ytop 515. 7* 
ptTapurOow 498. 43. 
pcrawtmn>a4 487. 1 8. 
fiMTtmifjartuf 658. 



fummiwrtuf 636. 

prrvtrat 503. 6. . 

/urfpxfff-Au 485. 21. 

/urpfiv 500. 17, 34 ; 501. 35 ; 517. 3 ; 518. 

1 ; 640. 
/MTpo»494. 17; 612. 
P*\pi484. 26; 49L 16; 495. 10; 497. 13; 

498. 40, 41 ; 504. 25 ; 505. 6 ; 506. 39 ; 

518. 44; 628. 11. 
fu^fir 480. 14; 487. 7; 488. 43; 489. 

11 ; 491. io, 11 ; 492. 5, 10; 498. 9; 

494. 27, 29; 495. 3, 16, 17; 496. 11, 

12; 497. 13; 499. 17,40; 503. 21; 

504. 19, 21, 32 ; 509. 15, 19, 20; 513. 

43, 44; 531. 5, 9 ; 538. 12 ; 599. 
M ter» 471. 6. 
fujKtri 528. 23. 
/a^Xov491. 21, 24. 
my, aXXA fitjp 472. 37. $ (f?) fifjp 47L 66. 

06 /apt 471. 126. 
yJ)v ('month') 481. 21, 28 ; 482. 32; 483. 

I3» *5, l6 ; 485. 14, 18, 44, 51 ; 487. 

21; 494. 2, 17; 498. 42; 499. 27; 

502. 9, 10; 504. 25; 509. 2; 506. 2, 

13, 17, 18, 53; 507. 10, 11, 20; 508. 

3, 14, 21; 510. 9; 513. 7; 530. 29; 

531. 8, 22 ; 583. 21. Cf. Index III (a), 
(irjviaiop 515. 6, 7 ; 595. 
mp6s 490. 13. 
lurrrip 472. 28, 33, 46, 53 ; 475. 15 ; 476. 

3, 5; 478. 21; 479. 12, 26; 481. 13; 

482. 24 ; 483. 1 ; 485. 15, 54 ; 486. 2, 

19, 21, 27 ; 487. 8; 489. 3, 29, 33, 36; 

490. 2, 4, 5, 9, 21; 491. 4, 9, 16, 28; 

492. 2, 3, 5, 8, 11, 18 ; 494. 3, 8; 495. 

2,4,5; 496.2,5; 497.i3,20;498.4; 

501. 7 ; 502. 52 ; 503. 2, 3, 4 ; 504. 6, 

33, 34, 53 ; 305. it *> 3> 4, 8 ; 606. 4, 

5, 8, 9, 54 ; 508. 6, 8, 16; 510. 2 ; 513. 

3, 60; 514. 1; 525. 5; 529. 12; 580. 

1,32; 688. 
pip-puufc495. 12. 
pip-pAroXu 481. 5, 19; 483. 33; 485. 16; 

486.3; 504.34. 
prjTponcXiTTjs 478. II, 22. 
fit*p6s 485. 16 ; 530. 26 ; 533. 27 ; 582. 
fitftos 519. 3. 
fitfi*fi<TK*tv 525. 9. 

juirAfc 47L 47 ; 498. 11, 37 ; 622. 7, 19. 
fwr6wv 499. 1, 22, 25, 30 ; 500. 27 ; SOL 



GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS 



331 



1, 20, 24, 36; 502. 1 et saep.\ 533. 12 ; 

640. 
luvBwnv 499. 24, 34 ; 50L 35, 47 ; 502. 24, 

45 ; 507. 26; 512. 4, 10; 640. 
fiiad<oTT)s 517. 7* 
fiFo. See Index VIII. 
pvauuQv 496. 3. 
fimjuoptlov 485. 13 ; 489. 31 ; 491. 26 ; 492. 

25 ; 505. 2 ; 506. 53 ; 508. 13 ; 510. 8 ; 

634. 
/u^fuuy 483. 20. 
?6pos 471. 45, 59. 74; «2. 24, 36, 47, 50; 

481. 17; 489. 10, ii } 18, 19; 491. 5, 

13; 496. 12; 497. 7; 503. 19; 509. 

13; 515. 7; 622. 27; 531. 11; 653. 

flOXHTUcfl 519. 5* 

pvpovKK (jwvpatvos) $31. 15. 

vai<rtuo¥ 521. 4. 

vavfilas (gen. ?) p. 1 40. 

vavfkov 530. 6. 

vav(Xoy?) 653. 

yavXoortxT) 643. 

vavrqs 522. 17. 

pavructv 522. 15. 

vtavias 471. 114. 

pcaviaicos 533. 13. 

wKprfr 475. 6 ; 476. 13. 

vtofufvia 502. 9. 

rcof 500. 19. 

•*©*<$/** 477. I ; 507. 5. 

votlv 489. 3 ; 490. 2 ; 491. 2 ; 492. 2 ; 

494. 2 ; 495. 2. 
w/*$ 472. 23. 
pofu&ut 653. 
»ofu*off 533. 6 ; 578. 
v6/ufiot 485. 30, 34 ; 653. 
p6fturfia 496. 4; 504. 18; 505. 9; 506. 

11 ; 510. 4. 
v6fios 651. 
vofi6s 474. a, 4 ; 484. 23 ; 486. 1, 21 ; 518. 

6, 13- 
p6tos 482. 12 ; 499. 12 ; 503. 10, 11 ; 505. 

6, 7 ; 506. 27. 
wrrcXtoy 525. 9. 
w 479. 6 ; 482. 3 ; 486. 13, 34 ; 494. 13 ; 

642. 
wwl 490. 5 ; 506. 25. 
wf 528. 8; 596. 



£'k»472. 19. 
(vXafiap 499. 15; 501. 14. 
IvAivot 521. 6, 8 ; 646. 
£v\oval<TKiou 521. 6. 
£v<rr6s 612. 

6po\6s. See Index VIII (6). 

oUv&u 471. 3. 

oUuv 480. 14; 583. 12. 

obcia 472. 1, 2; 475. 19, 23; 476. 18; 

479. 8; 480.2; 481.8; 482. 10; 489. 

7, 8, 15, 16; 490. 6, 10; 492. 7, 8, 13, 

14; 496. 6; 497. 4; 498. 9; 502. 16, 

19; 603.6,17; 605. 5; 510. 12, 13, 

14, 16; 513. 8, 20, 26; 681. 10; 688. 

11, 13; 636; 688. 
olKodofitlv 498. 7. 
oUMfios 498. 34. 
cIkovoiuIv 489. 4. 
oUovofua 472. 28; 604. 13. 
o«W#&oi> 491. 5, 13; 498. 3, 17, 19. 
dUos 489. 6, 8, 15, 16 ; 497. 4; 53L 3. 
otvos 633. 18. 
okiyos 488. 19. 
6\kt) 496. 15. 
<5XAwtu 472. 7. 

oKfws 502. 37. t 

Skot 471. 124 ; 478. 8 ; 486. 26 ; 488. 17 ; 

492. 8, 15 ; 493. 4 5 494. 30 ; 495. 8 ; 

496. 4 ; 600. 15, 31 ; 503. 9, 10, 12, 13, 

17, 18 r 506. 6. oX«f 472. 3.' 
6firjpt(TTr)S 519. 4. 
(S/mXui 471. 76. 
a/awt* 478. 35, 44 ; 480. 7, 21 ; 482. 37 ; 

483. 21, 31; 638. 
6furyvr)aios 505. 4; 508. 22. 
ofuxot 642. cSjiouDff 478. 31 ; 498. 5 ; 498. 

38; 503. 13; 613. 16, 22; 533. 16; 

597. 
SpoXoyt'ip 471. 46; 496. 5; 503. 2, 16; 

504. 3, 20, 29 ; 605. 4 ; 607. 6 ; 506. 

5, 10; 509. 11 ; 510. 19, 25; 513. 36. 
6fio\6yrjfta 472. 29, 56. 
Spokoyia 504. 21, 38, 41 ; 637. 
6p6koyos 478. 22; 530. 4. 
Sfiofiffrpios 492. 5, 12 ; 504. 37. 
6fUH 472. 34. 
ovrjXdrrjt 533. 1 7. 
friprtr 531. 12. 
fro/ia 472. 24; 481. 11 ; 482. 20; 485. 



33 2 



INDICES 



31; 491. 8; 495. u, 13; 508. 10; 

513. 22 ; 631. 26 ; 533. 21, 28 ; 618. 
ftm 581. 7. 
07T04 trorc 471. 1 3 1. 
Sirfca* 506. 49. 
6js6t( 472. 40. 
Sirov 484. 20. 
&r«*474. 5; 476. 5, 29; 488. 18; 484. 

17 ; 487. 15 ; 488. 15 ; 532. 13. 
6pap 471. 57, 59> 74 ; 478. 3 ; 527. 6 ; 581. 

9; 532. 15; 658. 
6p66s 490. 16. 

op** 477. 17; 478. 44; 480. 16, 22. 
opxn<TTV* 519. 6 ; 526. 9. 
Sadtcis 471. 52. 

6<r&rjiroTovv 490. 6; 492. 7, 13. 
fro* 494. 25 ; 495. 9, 15 ; 497. 4 >' 632. 2. 
ocnrtp 605. 9 ; 508. 25 ; 653. 
fovptw 494. 10. 
&rm 486. 4 ; 489. 7, 15 ; 495. 12 ; 624. 

4 ; 527. 5. 
Sotutovv 491. 8. 
Arc 528. 9. 
ovdft'r 472. 3 ; 474. 23 ; 480. 5 ; 490. 7 ; 

492. 9, 10 ; 496. 13 ; 498. 29; 506. 12 ; 

607. 9, 33; 518. 55, 57; 580. 22. 
ovdaru 491.19. 

ovKtri 471. 112; 472. 25, 27. 
ovXg 476. 4 ; 489. 20 */ saep. ; 490. 11*/ 

*<*#.; 401. 17 et saep.; 492. 16 et saep.\ 

494. 31 ; 604. 60, 61. 
ofcria 471. 97. 

owruuaj yrj 506. 37 ; 577 ; 638. 
ofrw, ravrg 472. 9. ourw 478. 28 ; 481. 2 ; 

628. 13 ; 687. 
tydW 474. 15 ; 491. 6, 14 ; 494. 22 ; 495. 

9 ; SOL 33 ; 506. 52 ; 509. 6, 11 ; 614. 

2 ; 583. 23 ; 699 ; 653. 
tyctXiy/ia 494. 10 ; 495. 6. 
tydaXfi* 492. 1 8, 22; 604. 60. 
fykwa 487. 17 ; 588. 26. 
<S#w 489. 26. 
&Xhlp6s 526. 2. 
6xopivwv 598. 
tydpioy 53L 18. 
oijrt/MW 474. 24. 
tyior 475. 16; 528.5. 
o^wwov 514. 3 ; 622. 9 ; 531. 2 1 ; 686. 

rrayKpartaoTTis 619. 20. 



tnudayaiyf fr 471. 1 1 7« 

nai&iov 519. 17; 530. 24. 

Irak 471. 5<>i 5 6 > 74i 128 ; 472. 41, 45. 

nakty 630. 1 8 ; 658. 

iraXXiov 496. 4. 

JraXfu;(?) 519. 18. 

muraxtj 507. 38. 

irarrouv 491. 5 ; 492. 7. 

irayroirtfXcoy 520. I. 

irdmroff 491. 9, 16. 

irapa&aivfiv 491. II ; 492. 9 ; 498. 10 ; 494. 

28; 526. 12. 
napa&aWftv 583. 1 3. 
irapayytXia 484. 1 8. 
napayyf\\(tv 474. 37- 

impayiyvtaQai 484. 1 9 ,' 486. IO ; 531. 6. 
vapaypdfriv 488. 1 6, 29, 32 ; 513. 13, 2 2, 33. 
irapaypa<f>ri 488. 26, 40, 42. 
uapMx*(r8ai 492. 8, 14 ; 501. 29; 538. 26. 
frapadi&W 47L 107 ; 473. 3 ; 476. 7 ; 502. 

38; 513. 28. 
irapadpofiit 502. 1 9. 
napdtieoit 533. 9. 
irapaxaXciy 486. 33. 
wapoKturBtu 530. 18. 
napoKokovBtiv 663. 
frafKucvfTTftv 475. 23. 
irapa\ati&dp*u> 475. 5 ; 502. 33 ; 504. 14 ; 

607. 7; 538. 18. 
nap6n\ovs 525. I. 
irapaavptiv 486. 1 4. 
irapaovyypatfKtv 504. 19, 29. 
irapafapva 608. 

rrapax<op€u> 504. 8, 1 5, 22, 42. 
irapax^prjrixSi 504. 1 8, 46. 
trap*yx*ip*ur 495. 1 6. 
wafKUKu 482. 3 ; 486. 13, 34 ; 503. 5 ; 513. 

47; 653. 
naprmdij fitly 473. 2. 
napcvpiatt 492. 9. 

irap* x <w 472. 49 ; 504. 22 ; 506. 35 ; 577. 
napthai 472. 25. 
napopav 473. 6. 
irapovaia 486. 1 5* 
irar 471. 5<>> 63, in, 133, 136 ; 472. 21, 

32 ; 474. 39 ; 483. 26 ; 486. 31 ; 488. 

23 ; 489. 9, 12, 18; 490. 6, 10; 491. 

6, 14; 492. 4, 7, 14. *5; 494-9, 10, 13, 

14, 22, 31 ; 495. 5; 496. 4, 14, 15, 16; 

497. 18, 19; 498. 29; 499. 20, 33; 



X. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS 



333 



501. 27, 46 ; 602. 34, 43 ; 503. 3, 4, 6 ; 

504. 16, 23, 25, 32, 48 ; 506 27, 36, 37, 

38, 48 ; 507. 22 ; 518. 63 ; 528. 3 ; 529. 

I, 15; 530. 2, 6, 27; 531. 3, 4; 583. 

28 ; 577 ; 640 ; 642. 
vavTjp 471. 58, 118; 478. 20, 28; 480. 3; 
• 481. 12; 482. 21 ; 486. 5, 6, 24, 25; 

487. 7; 480. 5, 10; 492. 8, 14; 496. 

2 ; 497. 15 ; 503. 3 ; 604. 36, 54 ; 506. 

10; 609. 8; 613. 47 ; 531. 30; 687. 
natrrotypos 491. 2. 
narfH*6s 505. 5 ; 577. 
irarp&vuTcra (irarp&mcra) 478. 27. 
narpyos 483. 24. 
nt&ov 488. 12. 
*€*$& 474. 37. 
flrfXcfftyia 498. 23, 26. 
ntfimip 471. 112 ; 490. 6, 11 ; 622. 6, 16, 

17; 527. 4; 628. n, 19, 24 ; 530. 19, 

30; 631. 16, 19, 22, 24, 27; 533. 16, 

21; 682; 589. 
«wjs 471. 95. 
fr€v6flp 528. 9. 
nMos 628. 8. 

nipat 503. 9, 10, 12, 13, 18 ; 605. 6. 
irr/Hytywrtfai 495. II ; 504. 27. 
mptypAtfitw 474. 24. 
frc/Mccyai 482. 29; 486. 29 ; 486. 24 ; 489. 

4, 5, 7> M, 16; 490. 3; 491. 3, 10; 

492. 4; 493. 8; 494. 3; 495. 2, 7, 16; 

496.9; 497. 15. 
ircpccxccy 485. 24, 26 ; 506. 56. 
ncpwrravai 47L 1 33, 1 36. 
ircfMirarciy 471. 1 24. 
ircpiirXotcT) 533. 10. 
irtpurroKt} 475. 30. 
irtpix<*pa 512. 5. 
irtpovibiov 496. 3. 
vtpwri 488. 31. 

irfaw 491. 17. Cf. Index VIII (a). 
mrrpaaKtiv 472. 27, 38; 482. 2 ; 505. 4; 

528. 20; 653. 
nlnrtuf 475. 25, 
irurrcvftv 528. 33. 
fficrru 472. 15 et saep. ; 486. 7, 26 ; 494. 9 ; 

506. 15; 508. 11. 
?rX<W 503. 17. 
wkwra 528. 2 ; 533. 1. 
irXc/ar 478. 6 ; 488. 16; 580. 17; 668. 
irktKTT} 520. 7, 19, 20. 



irXtxfffc 520. 20. 

irXiJpijff 471. 103; 478. 4; 497. 23; 504. 

19; 505. 9; 613. 55; 530. 6; 577. 
nXrjpovv 491. 6, 7, 8, 9, 1 5 ; 605. 6. 
n\r)po<t>op<iv 509. IO. 
nXipriov 494. 24. 
ir\uf$€vofji€vrj 502. 44 ; 574. 
rrXoiapibiov 602. 
trXoIw 528. 22 ; 602. 
irXow (?) 519. 14. 
irXovaios 471. 79* 
noulp 472. 28 ; 474. 20; 483. 12; 485. 

32 ; 489. 13 ; 490. 8; 491. 12 ; 492. 10 ; 

493. io, 15; 494. 24, 30; 495. 10, 14;' 

497. 5, 7 5 606. 46 ; 509. 12 ; 610. 17 ; 

514. 5 ; 525. 7 ; 528. 5, 18; 530. 21 ; 

582. 14, 16; 637; 658. 
irrfXiff478. 9; 476.14; 478.8,30; 481. 

14; 482. 26, 31 ; 486. 20; 487. 4i *3 ; 

489. 5 et saep.) 490. 3 et saep.] 491. 18 

et saep.) 492. 19 et saep.; 493. 15; 494. 

41 ; 495. 4 et saep. ; 496. 5, 16 ; 505. 1, 

2, 5; 508. 9; 529. 19. 9 0$vpvyx»* or 

'ofrpvyxiTw vraXif. See Index V (a). 
froXXaffiff 531. 4. 
iroXw 471. 86 ; 472. 6 ; 478. 3, 6 ; 488. 7 ; 

682; 663. 
7ropi(*iv 485. 3. 
iripvri 528. 18. 
mpffifHov 520. 1 8. 
7rop<f)vpovs 531. 14. 
jrooxuus 628. 24. 
wfoot 471. 115. 
irora/ufc 486. 1 4 ; 589. 
novs 489. 21 ; 491. 20; 494.. 31 ; 62a 17. 
npaypa 472. 11 ; 486. 12; 525. 4; 658. 
wpayfxarfVTTjt 512. 8. 
irpaypartov 530. 7* 
vpair&pio* 471. IO. 
vpaKToptia 533. 21. 
*poKT»p 530. 4; 688. 23 ; 597. 
npa$t9 496. 16; 497. 18; 499. 29; 502. 

40; 506. 46, 51 ; 507. 20; 640. 
rrpaa-ts 494. 21. 

ffjw<raw471. 92 ; 472. 32 ; 527. 9 ; 532. 15. 
rrfx*pvT€pos 472. 45 ; 488. 4, 35. Cf. Index 

VII. 
nptatrBtu 577. 
npiv 506. 25. 
irpoavaypa<f)*tp (?) 504. 17* 



334 



INDICES 



irpoypdfrw 477. 21; 478. 37; 479. 11; 
480. 10, 15 ; 493. 12 ; 494. 11, 13, 30; 

499. 12; 504. 32, 35; 688. 
npoweu 580. 

npotpxwBai 472. 5. 

trpo$tafua 485. 20, 27. 

trp66vpos 473. 3. 

npoKturtm 477. 18; 483. 25; 485. 50; 489. 

20; 490. 11; 491. 12, 17; 492. 15; 

494. 29, 31, 33, 36; 495. 12, 15; 496. 

15; 497. 24; 498. 44; 499. 38, 45; 

500. 28; 602. 30, 35; 503. 16, 19; 
504. 48 ; 506. 9, 28, 47, 54 ; 507. 23 ; 
509. 17; 510. 11; 613. 36, 39, 49* 54, 
57,60, 61,63; 640. 

trpoKpirtw 472. 7. 

trp6KTT}<ris 504. 13. 

wpo**h> 488. 28 ; 538. 15, 22. 

vpcmnfrrit 472. 28. 

trp6wota 472. 10 ; 495. 10, 14. 

np6s, tad np6s (adv.) 488. 18. 

wpoouyytkpa 620. 2. 

vp<xray9t9 506. 12 ; 507. 9. 

wpoaayopcvtur 474. 40 ; 526. 2. 

npocratrtxtuf 510. 21. 

irpoaaKoypaffxtv 636. 

vpovcaroriv*iv 504. 29. 

rrpo<rf}au*w 478. 1 6. 

Wfxxryiytna6cu 62L 15. 

np6<rypa(f>ov 513. 34. 

wpo<rlkaypd(f>€Uf 613. 1 3, 1 4, 36, 40; 574. 

vpwrdutratrattp 494. 26; 495. 1 5. 

vpoaupai 482. 11 ; 502. 18 ; 506. 5. 

npoo-cpxtvBai 611. 

vpoatvKaifm* 487. 16. 

npwrix*iP 581. II. 

trpoarjyopia 472. 1 3. 

irpovrjKw 471. 113. 

npfofopa 504. 12, 45. 

npoaKoprtptuf 484. 26; 486. 9 ; 580. 9. 

vpo<TKp6vuv 531. 10. 

trpoo-KVvrjfia 528. 5. 

np6<rodot 494. 14; 583. 8, 25. 

np<xro<txi\tu> 499. 28; 502. 39; 640. 

nfxxmouu' 531. 5. 

frpooravmw 481. 3 J 637. 

WpOOTOTtK69 590. 

npoariBtpoi 47L 2. 
vponl>6ytQ* 498. 33, 39. 
npo<npipav 472. 6 ; 496. 6. 



trpovJKvycw 488. 23. 

wpoa+m™* 475. 8 ; 476. 15. 

fFpwr^iunfait 513. 37. 

irporfXcvrojr 493. 4, g, 7, 16. 

«/x$r«po* 480. 3; 495.5; 602. 13; 610. 15; 

513. 10. 
wp6rrpof 496. II, 13, 14. 
wfxm&rat 494. 44. 
w P°XP tia 514. 5. 
TfrixpW 1 * 640. 
vpvrcurucfo 592. 
upt/ram 477. 5. 
irvKTrp 519. 22. 
m/X** 495. 8. 
irw&u*<r&u 533. 7. 
*vp<k 484. 12; 494. 10, 17; 600. 13, 15, 

I7> 3°> 3*» 33; 501. 15, 18, 23; 615. 5; 

616. 8 ; 517. 4 ;/ **#.; 518. 1 */ *i#. ; 

522. 2, 4; 530. 3; 638. 19, 20, 23; 

613-4; 640. 
flroXfut 491. 8, 15 ; 493. 3 ; 494. 19 ; 49a 

7 ; 497. 2 ; 605. 7, 8 ; 506. 41 ; 507. 

29 ; 533. 7 ; 577. 
inwror* 47L 33. 

fallos 471. 54. 

pifrop 653. 

pit 491. 25. 

p&kvos 496. 4. 

p»inrv*u, Zppwro 485. 6 ; 530. 29 ; 531. 28*; 

642. ippwrBat tCxopcu 627. 9. *pp* v/uic 

cfy. 533. 29. 

aakdptoy 474. 35. 

<raktv€t» 472. 50 ; 528. 13. 

a-aXniKTTjs 519. 16. 

oxvdvMroff 496. 4. 

aa^rp 471. 1 2. 

(TcXt'ov 620. 13. 

ai7/ia(Vcur 478. 27 > 504. 33. 

<rr)p*iO\>v y afarjpttwfuu 475. 9 ; 485. 8 ; 501. 

52; 516. 8; 517. 14, 18; 518. 6; 620. 

25; 614. 
<rqpipov 627. 5* 
albjjpos 620. 14, 15. 
atdrjpovs 521. 13, 14. 
aiTuc6f 486. 4; 488. 10; 493. 17; 506. 

54 ; 514. 1 ; 595. 
atrokoyla 515. 4. 

(Tiro\6yos. See Index VII. 



X. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS 



335 



trlros 522. 22. 

owwof 489. 8, 16; 483. 17; 494.9; 496.6, 7. 

vkottOv 471. 142. 

omtpa {awtlprj) rrpwrj bafxaaKTjvvv 477. 3. 

omipew 601. 1 4. 

airovdapiov 525. 7* 

<nro»&7 610 ; 653. 

cnrovdaio? 587. 

crradpfr 482. 18 ; 496. 3. 

crarrip 520. 18; 582. 

anp*i» 472. 53. 

crnjSar 520. 10. 

ardfiaxos 538. 14. 

orpanjyciy 513. 4, 30. 

<rrpaTTjy6s. See Index VII. 

<TTparurrT)s 522. 6, 1 6. 

arp49cAor 520. 22. 

ovyyinta 487. 9. 

<rvyypa<t>ri 506. 56 ; 510. 6, 20. 

(rvyKktiaiuis 483. 17; 502. 26; 506. 14. 

ovyKvptiv 482. 16. 

*vyx»fxu> 474. 28; 489. 5, 13; 496. 16; 

497. 19; 508. 16; 504. 38; 506. 19. 
avCrjTtuf 532. 17. 
ovkov 529. 6* 
arvKtxtxjurrLa 472. 33. 
avpfrdvtu, 486. 28 ; 490. 6 ; 491. 10 ; 479. 

9, 11; 507.33. 
avp/SaXXcuf 472. 23. 
<rvp0ioff 533. 2. 
ovpfitovv 496. 9. 
avpfioKov 471. 75 ; 510. 20 ; 518. 24, 61 ; 

582; 611. 
(TUfipurBow 499. 37. 
avfimU{fUf 471. 82. 
<rvfurap€tv<u 471. 132. 
vvfaras 513. 20; 674. 
avfuriVrfiv 510. 13. 
arvpMXripfjt 471. 103. 
av/nrXityMMrir 515. 4. 
avfjar6aio¥ 471. 57. 

<rvpxf*p€ u> 471. 44; 496. 10; 497. II. 
myijtami' 486. 6; 505. 8 ; 530. 23; 577. 
vwaytur 597. 
trvMnroXXwm 486. 35. 
mmi&vat 582. 23. 
aw wu 489. 5 ; 496. 6 ; 497. 4. 
evpepwinrcuf 503. 1 4. 
avptpyd(t<r$at 527. 3. 
awfvdoffcti' 504. 32, 52. 



ow*x*w 496. 6. 

<rw$t<ris 496. 4. 

ovpoijki) 533. 15* 

crvvurrawu 505. 1,5; 509. 2 ; 653. 

avmtr<niv 477. 5 ; 485. 28, 36; 583. 17. 

<rvprlfirj<ris 496. 4, 15; 513. II. 

(rwo»wj 507. 24. 

crvararuafo' 505. 2 ; 609. 12. 

*<f>payi(w 494. 34 */ ***/. ; 528. 16 ; 611. 

<r<t>p€rylt 489. 20 ;/ **#. ; 490. 12 et saep. ; 

491. 18 et saep.; 492. 19 el saep. ; 494. 

31 et saep. 
a<t>vpi&io* 629. 5. 
axoivioy 502. 36. 
ropa 47L 150; 473. 8; 475. 7, 29; 476. 

12, 17; 491. 5, 13; 492. 7, 13; 493. 

4, 7; 494. 6, 12, 16, 20, 30; 496. 7. 
<ra>ftar*iop 498. 5. 

rakavror. See Index VIII {&). 

rafUlov 583. 9. 

raplxiov 520. 6, 8, ii, 21. 

ntyof 494. 24. 

raxis, raxl»9 531. 8. 

t«*w 489. 10, 18; 491. 5; 492. 6; 493. 

6; 494. 12; 495. 4; 496. 11, 12, 13, 

14; 497. 8, 9, 12, 13, 15, 17; 624. 2 ; 

529. 13 ; 581. 28 ; 538. 2. 
rcXciy 530. 8. 
rcXcior 485. 30. 
reAfiow 483. 20; 510. 7. 
rcXcir/ia 504. 24 ; 506. 38. 
TiXcvraios 471. 16. 
rtXtvrav 475. 25; 478. 25, 34; 481. 16; 

482. 27, 36; 490. 4, 6, 10; 491. 4, 8, 

10, 17 ; 492. 5 ; 495. 3 ; 496. 10, 11, 13, 

14; 497. 11, 15, 16. 
rrXcvri? 489. 5, 9, 14, 18; 490. 8; 491. 6, 

7, 12; 492. 11; 498. 16; 494. 15, 23; 

496. 11. 
rcXor. See Index IX. 

nrdpTri 496. 3. 

rerpatrla 501. 1 7. 

TfTpaxcuf^tjKoardp 506. 27* 

rcrpajrow 646. 

nTp6/9oXoy 522. 18, 30 ; 574. 

iritis 503. 3. 

TJfpciv 533. 18. 

tiBokh 482. 29 ; 504. 41. 

rifiay478. 7. 



330 



INDICES 



riM 486. 6, 24; 498. 4; 505. 8; 513. 20, 
40; 522. 6, 16, 17, 18, 27, 29; 581. 19; 
577. 

t«W 471. 44. 

ToiovTOf 471. 55, 152; 472. 40; 588. 13. 

rotgof 505. 8. 

tA«* 471. 5> 23, 102, 103 ; 472. 37, 54 ; 
483. 14; 485. 17, 22 ; 506. 12, 14, 19, 
21, 44, 56; 507. 9, 13, *9> 3 J > 35 ; 510. 
22; 513. 16, 18, 22 ; 526. 7; 530. 15; 
653. 

roirapxia 483. 5; 504. 11, 44. Cf. Index 

v(«). 

Tono0€<rta 505. 7, 9, 10. 

Trfiro* 485. 31; 486. 16; 488.6 ; SOL 14; 

502.34; 503.9, 10, 12, 13, 18; 510. 

12, 15 ; 51L 10; 515. 2, 3, 5, 6, 7; 516. 

5; 518. 4; 695; 612-4; 619; 620. 
ToaouTor 471. 102 (?) ; 491. 7 ; 530. 9 ; 

532. 9. 
t6t€ 485. 23 ; 491. 16 ; 532. 19. 
rpayrjpa 529. 5* 
Tfxhr€(a 513. 38. 
Tpan(e(iTuc69 ?) 674. 
T/»$ci)>489. 9, 17. 
rpuMK&s 507. 13 ; 518. 31. 
rp#i\ 471. 115. 
TpWKaid€Ka*TTis 478. IO, 17* 
rpu&okuos 506. 12, 45. 
tjm40oXoi>. See Index VIII (3). 
rp&iros 489. 5 ; 490. 6 ; 492. 7, 13 ; 503. 

21; 504. 21. 
rpoxfXXc'a 502. 35* 
rvy^atviv 475. 30 ; 509. 10 ; 635. 
rvpiov 582. 
ruxv 47L 65; 483. 24; 487. 12 ; 489. 2 ; 

490. 1 ; 491. 1 ; 492. 1 ; 494. 2 ; 495. 

1 ; 496. 1. Tvxn 491- 19 ; 507. 6. 



vyf/a496. 10; 497. 11. 

vytaiixw 628. 3 ; 529. 2 ; 588. 2. 

vyujs 480. 9 ; 530. 20. 

vdptloy (vdpjjv) 521. 18. 

v&pta 502. 37. 

m*h 574. 

vl6< 472. 4, 8 ; 477. 14, 21 ; 478. 13 ; 479. 

4, 11, 12; 481. 18; 484.11,14; 487. 

5; 488. 4; 491. 4, 10, 13; 492. 3, 16; 

494. 12, 16, 20, 23; 495. 5, 7, 8, 10; 



496. 5 ; 502. 2 ; 625. 6 ; 631. 1, 30 ; 

533. 1, 27, 30. 
vkiarpw* 599. 
viraffoufu' 653. 
vndpxuv 479. 7 ; 481. 3 ; 482. 4 ; 483. 4 ; 

485. 23; 486. 22, 35; 490. 5; 491. 4; 

492. 4, 6; 494. 5, 12, 20; 495. 3, 5; 

496. 16; 497. 19; 499. 7, 32; 501. 9, 
46 ; 502. 13, 42 ; 508. 5; 504. 10, 43; 
506. 4; 506.23,48; 507.2i; 510. 11; 
663. 

virryywof 607. 3 1. 

xnrtvavritos 493. 10. 

virtpavoTTipos 47L 93. 

wr#p/SdXAfi* 513. 25. 

vircpfiiaprjs 486. 32. 

vrr(pTi<f>apos 530. 28. 

vm'pfoats 606. 19; 607. 16. 

vTrtpirlirrtw 506. 45* 

vn-fprtdcW 486. 8, 26. 

vmpxporcla 507. 1 8. 

vmjpertlv 522. 21. 

vnqprnis 478. 35; 485. 49. Cf. Index 

VII. 
xmoypa<f>eip 474. 2, 32 ; 580. 
\nroypa<f>ri 513. 24, 61. 
V7r60fais 486. 26. 
vvoBtjktj 486. 25 ; 494. 21 ; 506. 54 ; 508. 

18, 24; 509. 16; 510. io 9 18; 511. 5; 

658. 
xnroK€ta$ai 485. 6 ; 505. 2. 
V7r6ptnjfxa 479. 17; 483. 18; 484. 15; 485. 

5, 42, 49 ; # 604. 10; 692. 
vtrofunrjpaTM-fxos 471. 1 6 ; 653. 
vir6pyr](Tit 611. 
vmfooia 472. 3. 
xmSoraais 488. 1 7* 
vrrooTfXXfw 486. 22. 
vnordaanv 474. 5; 486. 11 ; 685. 
vfTorcdcW 49 L 8, 15; 494. 19; 496. 7; 

497. 2 ; 506. 41 ; 607. 29. 
vtrovpytip 498. 35. 

vROvpyia 498. 34, 37. 
vno^tpav 488. 19. 
vcryuw 53L 1 7. 

</>aiW 484. 28; 491. 6; 494. 22; 495. 

9. 
<t>cuv6kioy 58L 14. 



X. GENERAL INDEX OF GREEK WORDS 



337 



4>drai 471. 8, 44, 48; 472. 2, 16, 31. 

<fxtv*p6s 472. 26. 

Qapfuuula 486. 21. 

<f>appaK€V€ip 472. I, 5. 

<f>dpfiaKOP 472. 6. 

<£a<7tr 528. 19 ; 580. 30. 

<t>d<rKtiv 486. 26. 

0avXo* 580. 22. 

fapciv 497. 4. 

*c^ 486. 4, 9, 13, 15; 497. 5> 7» 16, 17, 

18, 21. 
<t>6d*iv 472. 48 ; 474. 26. 
<f>6<tp€ip 497. 4. 
^Afaw 588. 14. 
^taXi; 521. 1 7. 
<f>t\aw6p<»rrftv 582. 20. 
$*«* 528. 6; 529. 14; 658. 

<f>i\o\oy€ur 581. II. 

#A<* 580. 13; 582. 2; 588. 1 ; 587; 589. 

599. 
<t>ik6<To<f>os 471. 104; 492. 21. 
<}»ko<rropyLa 490. 4 ; 492. 6; 494. 6; 495. 

12. 
<f>f\oripla 478. 7. 
^ofrif 508. 6, 14; 689. 
^opfly 581. 14, 15. 
<p6prrpov 522. 4. 

$4>of 499. 16, 23, 26; 514. 2; 580. 
fapriov 503. 14; 520. 13; 658(?). 
<j>payp6s 580. 
<fr*'ap 502. 1 8, 35. 
if>pov€h 489. 3 ; 490. 2 ; 49L 2 ; 492. 2 ; 

494. 2 ; 495. 2. 
frarifrat 474. 27; 588. 15; 642; 658. 
</>uXa*i7 580. 
<f>v\aKTpov 502. 43. 



Xafcu>474. 2, 33; 488. 33; 485. 5; 506. 

45 507. 6; 509. 1; 511. 3; 512. 2; 

518. 3 ; 514. 2, 3 ; 515. 2 ; 526. 1 ; 527. 

1; 628. 2; 680. 1; 681. 2; 582. 2; 

588. 1 ; 689. 
XaXcSd/Hoy 646. 
XoXko* 680. 30 ; 581. 20 ; 588. 15, 22 ; 677 ; 

582. 
xaXicovr 52L 11,17,18. Cf. Index VIII (6). 
Xapifa&u 471. 56; 494. 26; 495. 16; 

610. 
Xap* 475. 25 ; 611. 



*ftp471. 84; 488. 37; 495. 15; 505.9; 

681. 9. 
X€tpoypa<pta 477. 17. 
XttpJypaff>ov 607. 37. 
X*pvdfin*kos 506. 25* 
X&tapx*iv 477. 2. 
X&iapx°* 653. 

xA«/xfc 496. 3 ; 501. 16 ; 512. 4. 

Xoiw£ 516. 11, \2. 

XopTjy*:* 494. 16 ; 496. 8 ; 497. 8. 

xopnyi* 472. 35, 40, 55 ; 478. 3. 

xtyros 499. 15 ; 507. 2g, 28, 33. 

XoproavcpiAOv 588. 7* 

Xovs 529. 7. 

X^€ia473. 3(?); 487.17; 498.33; 527. 

4; 533.8. 
xpcor 491. 6 ; 49a 5. 
XP*»<mif 487. 11 ; 653. 
XPBbw 486. 15. 
Xpwa478. 4, 41. 
XprjpartCup 475. 14; 477. 19; 486. 54; 

495. 5; 501. 5; 504. 8; 505. 2, 7; 

512. 1, 3 ; 613. 65 (?) ; 614. 1 ; 616. 6. 
XPiiutrurpfa 472. 24 ; 483. 20 ; 485. 4, 12 ; 

486. 7, 23 ; 609. 2. 
Xpi]paTi<rTT}s 485. 10 ; 592. 
xwr&u (' borrow ') 580. 19 ; 583. 19. 
XP$*Au('iise') 471. 150; 474. 38; 485. 

33 ; 489. 4 ; 502. 29 ; 663. 
XPi<m 489. 6, 7, 14, 16 ; 494. 14. 
XprjaTTjpiov 480. 2 ; 481. 9 ; 482. 14 ; 492. 

7; 496. 7; 502. 20; 510. 14, 17; 

513. 9. 
XPW& 642. 
XfMfta 529. 4. 

xptrot 471. 6 ; 472. 34 ; 474. 36 ; 488. 7 ; 
489. 4, 6, 7, 14, 16; 490. 3; 491. 3; 
492. 4, 9, 15 ; 494. 4, 15 ; 495. 2 ; 499. 
45; 502. 31, 56; 503. 20; 504. 16, 
25 ; 606. 22, 23, 39, 43, 45 ; 580. 9 ; 

682. 9 ; 638. 

xpvtriov 494. 9 ; 496. 3, 15. 

Xpvaovp 62L 2, 4, 8. 

X&pa 486. 33. 

X«pt(y(?) 407. 10. 

X*>plov 653. 

X<opfr 482. 1 ; 489. 6, 14; 492. 9; 498. 

12 ; 496. 8 ; 497. 3 ; 606. 19 ; 507. 16; 

522. 18 ; 528. 17 ; 582. 3 ; 598. 
Xvpurpfc 497. 9- 



338 

^tv&ccr&u 482. 41. 
ifriafos 520. 16. 
ifr<\6s 601. 14 ; 510. 12, 15. 
^vy/«fc 522. 4. 

mpttaBai 488. 7. 



INDICES 



&>vti 486. 7 ; 518. 37. 
fya 528. 4 ; 524. 4 ; 528. 14 ; 606. 
bptHntfaos 585 ; 596. 
wravrw 496. 1 4. 

&ot< 47L 81, 89, 135 ; 472. 20 ; 486. 30; 
499. 15 ; 501. 14 ; 529. 3 ; 582. 



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