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Full text of "The Pacific Coast business directory for .."

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„ SAN FRANCISCO PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1223 03529 3951 




Accession 



917 • 9 P199L- 



1898 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY 



Form 3427 — 5000 — 1-48 




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PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRE 



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PORPORATinM 




917.9 P199L"- 



1898 



NOT TO BE TAKEN FROM THE LIBRARY 



FORM 1427-5000-8-46 



DOING BUSINESS IN AMERIC 



0:1^0^^ aig 



GEJ^EfRAL AGEJ^TS, 



316 CA.LIFORNI^ ST 



ADVERTISINGDEPARTMENT. IH 



Established 




18 6 0. 



Dewey & Co., 

PATENT SOLICITORS 



-FOR THE- 



united states and foreign countries, 
And Experts in Patent Cases 



Conduct Interference Suits, and attend to all matters 
connected with Patents. 

Pamphlet Circulars containing Legal Points and Valuable Informa- 
tion for Inventors and Patentees, sent Free on receipjE of a Postage 
Stamp. 



OFFICE OF THE 

MINING AND SCIENTIFIC PRESS ni PACIFIC RURAL PRESS 

No. 224 SANSOM STREET, 

Southeast Corner of California, San Francisco. 

BRANCH OFFICES in Washington, D. C, Paris, London, 
[elbourne, and in other Foreign Cities. 

L. T. DEWEY. W. B. EWER. GEO. H. STRONG. JNO. L. BOONE. 



iV PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PACIFIC ROLLING MILL CO. 



CAFXTAZ. STOCXS, - $1,000,000. 



Established for the manufacture of Kailkoad and Merchant Irok. Every variety o. 
Shafting, including all sizes of Steamboat Shafts, Cranks, Pistons, Connecting 
Rods, Etc. Car and Locomotive Axles and Frames, and Hammered Iron of 
every description and size. 

3 and 5 FRONT STREET, - San Francisco, Gal. 

Orders addressed to PACIPIC ROLLINS MILL CO., P. 0. Boi 2032, will lave miediate attenM 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR SCRAP IRON. 

PRESIDEJ^T, WM. ALVORD, 

VICE-PRESIDEJfT, . - - - L. B. BEMCHLEY, 

SUPERIJ^TEJ^DEJfT, - - - - B. P. BRUJfER, 

SECRETARY, - - - . - SAM'L I. C. SWEZEY. 



FAICnC on. ANOJEAD WORKS. 

CliPITAL STOCK, - - $600,000. 



Established for the manufacture of Linseed, Castor and other Oils, and of White 
Lead, Zinc and other Paints. Works are now in operation, and prepared to furnish Oils 
of first quality, and quantity sufficient for the supply of the Pacific Coast. Also, Oil 
Cakes and Meal in quantities required. 

Highest price paid for Flax Seed and Castok Beans, delivered at the Company's 
Works, King Street, near Third. 

OFFICE-3 & 5 FRONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 

Orders addressed to •'Pacific Oil and Lead Works," P. O. Box 1443, will have 
immediate attention. 

President, - - - - - - JOHN BENSLET, 

Vice-President, - - - - - - D. 0. MILLS, 

Manager, L. B. BENCULEY, 

Secretary, SAM'L I. C SWEZEI. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



O REG^O INT 



Steamship Comp y 




(BEJ^ HOLLAQJY, (President, 
WILLIAM J^OfRfRIS, Agent, 
J. (Z). (BILES, Secretary, 



San Francisco. 



a a 



= (Portland, Oregon, 



DISPATCH STEAMERS TO THE FOLLOWING PLACES: 

PORTLAND, Oregon; 

SITKA, Alaska. 



UJl^ 



^HiE^li 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



VI 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




J ^ 




k 




STEAMSHIP CO. 




pteau] 


ei 


'0 ai^d jsa 


li Ve^^el^ 


RUNNING TO VICTORIA (V. I.) AND PUGET SOUND PORTS. 


HALF MOON BAY, 
PIGEON POINT, 
SANTA CRUZ, 
SOQUEL, 
APTOS, 
SALINAS, 
CASTROVILLE, 
WATSON VILLE, 


PAJARO, 

MOSS LANDING, 

MONTEREY, 

SAN SIMEON, 

CAYUCOS, 

SAN LUIS OBISPO, 

POINT SAL, 

GAVIOTA, 


CARPENTERIA, 
SANTA BARBARA, 
MOOR'S LANDING, 
SAN BUENAVENTURA, 
HUENEMB, 
SAN PEDRO, 
(L0 3 ANGELES,) 
ANAHEIM aad 
SAN DIjlSGO. 



O in lET" I O IB 

No. lO market St.^ Up 



ADVERTISEMENT DEPARTMENT. Vll 



COMPANIA A VAPOR 

DEL 



OOXaOR^SiOi 



a 



-* — •- 



La Compania Tiendra Comunicacion con los 
Puertos de Mejico y Arizona. 

PARA MAZATLAJV, LA PAZ, GUAYMAS, MAGDA- 
LEJVA BAY, CABO DE SAJ^ LUCAS, Y 

EL RIO COLORADO 

TOCANDO A LA PAZ DE IDA Y TUELTA. 

Linea Regular para los Puertos de Mejico. Saldran 
cada 20 dias llevando carga a precios reducidos. 

1& fl¥@EI¥i ¥Af OS IIWIISI, 

OAPITAN, - - - "WILLIAM METZGER. 

Ill lA¥fiail?CI 



OAPITAN, - - - A. N. McDONNOUGH. 

< « » 
.A. Gr x: 3Nr C X .^SL. S : 

MAZATLAN, MEXICO, Sr. KELTON. 

LA PAZ. MEXICO, -- " VIOSCA. 

GUAYMAS, MEXICO, » WILLARD. 

FORT YUMA, ARIZONA, - - ' FINGAY. 

EH REN BERG. ARIZONA, " FISHER. 

MOHAVE, ARIZONA, " HOOPER. 

El pasage se ha reducido mucho, y hay la mayor comodidad abordo para pasageroa. 
Para informarse, tocando fleie y pasage ocurrase a 

B. M. HARTSHORNE, President 

COLORADO STEAM NAVIGATION CO. 

6 1 Caile de Front. 



viii PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



WELLS, TARSO &. CO. 

Exchange, Banking 



-? .^^isriD I — 



EXPRESS COMPANY. 



ORGANIZED 1852. CAPITAL, $5,000,000- 



PRINCIPAL OFFICES: 

No. 61 King: Wm. Street, .... London. 

No. 33 Rue du Qiiatre Septembre, • - • • Paris. 

No. 65 Broadway, .... - New York. 

N. TV. Cor. California and Montgomery Streets, - - San Francisco. 



EXPRESS LilNES 

TO ALL PARTS OF CALIFORNIA, NEVADA, UTAH, WYOMING, COLORADO, MONTANA, 

NEBRASKA, KANSAS, OREGON, WASHINGTON AND IDAHO TERRITORIES, 

BRITISH COLOMBIA, LOWER CALIFORNIA, AND MEXICAN PORTS, 

NEW YORK, ATLANTIC STATES. AND EUROPE. 



BILLS OF EXCHANGE AND TELEGRAPH TRANSFERS 

On New York, Boston and Montreal, payable in the principal cities of the United States 

and Canada. Also, Bills on London, Dublin and Paris. Letters of Credit 

issued on our New York House, exchangeable for Circular 

Letters, payable in all parts of Europe. 



COLLECTIONS AND COMMISSIONS 

Of all kinds executed, and General Express Business attended to promptly in all parts of the 
United States, Europe and Canada. Orders for Passage furnished from Queens- 
town, London, Liverpool, Hamburg and Havre to New York. Also 
from New York to San Francisco — Overland or by Steamer. 

LLOYD TEVIS, President. 

J. B. HAGGIN, Vice-President. 

JAMES HERON, Secretary. 

H. S. KING, Treasvirer. 

J. J. VALENTINE, Gen'l Supt. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



IX 



T :e3: EJ 




San Francisco. 



D. O. MILLS, ---...-- Peesident 

THOMAS BKOWN, Cashier 

-A. G- E UNT T S . 

Id New York, Agency of The Bank of California, - - 12 Pine Street 

In Boston, ------ Tremont National Bank 

In Ohica.go, -.-..- Union National Bank 

In St. Louis, ----- Boatman's Saving Bank 

In London, China, Japan, and India, - The Oriental Bank Corporation 

The Bank has Agencies at Virginia City and Qold Hill, and Correspondents in all 
the principal Mining Districts and Interior Towns of the Pacific Coast. 



LETTERS OP CREDIT ISSUED, available for the purchase of Merchandise 
throughout the United States, Europe, India, China, Japan and Australia. 

DRAW DIRECT ON 



LONDON, 

DUBLIN, 
PARIS, 

ST. PETERSBURG, 
AMSTERDAM, 
ANTWERP, 
HAMBURG, 
BREMEN, 
BERLIN, 
LEIPSIO, 
VIENNA, 



COPENHAGEN, 
STOCKHOLM, 
CHRISTIANIA, 
QOTEBORG, 
LOCARNO, 

MELBOURNE, 
SYDNEY, 

AUCKLAND, N.Z., 
HONGKONG, 
SHANGHAI, 
YOKOHAMA. 



FRANKFORT O-M. 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTOF Y. 



London and San Franoisco Bank, Limited 

[Incorporated under the Joint Stock Companies' Acts of 2862 o^^ 1867 — Great Britain.) 



CAPITAL, 



$5,000,000, GOLD, 



Of which $3,000,000 is fully paid up. 



HEAD OFFICE, 22 OLD BROAD STREE T, - LONDON. 

FREDERICK RODE'WAIiD, London, Chairman. 

£. H. GREEN, (late of Russell & Sturgis, Manila,) London, Deputy Chairman. 
HENRY GOSCHEN (of Frnhliug & Goschen.) 
J. F. FliEMMICH (of Fred. Huth & Co.) London. 
JULIUS MAY (late of San Francisco,) Frankfort-on-the'Main. 
J. S. MORGAN (of J. S. Morgan & Co.) London. 

JOHN PARROTT (of the late firm of Parrott & Co., Bankers,) San Francisco. 
ROBERT RYRIE (of Gladston, Ewart & Co.,) London. 
BARON H. de STERN (of Stern Brothers,) London. 

RUDOLPH SULZBACH (of Sulzhach Brothers,) Frankfort-on-the-Main. 
Manager. - R. D. PEEBLES. Secretary, - ARTHUR SCRIVENER. 



London Bankers— Bank of England ; London Joint Stock Bank. 



San Francisco Branch, 

MILiTON H. I^ATIIAjn, President. 
JAaiES n. STREETEK, Manager. 



424 California Street. 

CA9IIEO 9IARTIN, Ass't ITIanager. 
fVIIililAIH .MACKINTOSH, Accountanf. 



This Bank is prepared to grant Letters of Credit available in any part of the world; to transact every description 
of Banking and Exchange Business, and to negotiate California and other American Securities. 

in Europe. 
San Francisco, Cal, January, 1875. MILTON S. LATHAM, President. 



AGENTS AND CORRESPONDENTS. 

The following are Agents and Correspondents, on any of whom, as also on the Head Office of the BanR' 
Letters of Credit will be granted, and Drafts drawn: 

Australia and New Zealand— Union Bank of Australia; 
Bank of New South Wales; Victoria; New S"Uth 
Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, New 
Zealand. 

Ireland— Provincial Bank of Ireland; Armagh, Ath- 
lone, Belfast, Ballina, Banbridge, Ballymena, Bandon, 
Ballyshannon, Cork. Clonmel, Coleraine, Cavan, 
I'ootehill, Carrick on Snir, Carrick on Shannon. Clog- 
heen, Dungarvan, Dungannon, Drogheda, Euniskill- 
en, Enniscorthy, Ennis, Fermoy, Galway, Kilkenny, 
Kilrush, Limerick, Londonderry, Monaghan, Wallow, 
Newry, Nenagh, Newcastle (Co. Limerlck\ Omagh, 
Parsontown, Sligo. Strabane, Skibbereen, Tralee, 
Templemore, Wexford, Waterford, Youghal. 



London— London Joint .Stock Bank; Friihling & Gos- 
chen; Fred Huth & Co.; J. S. Morgan & Co. 

New York— Drexel, Morgan & Co. 

Boston— Third National Bank. 

Philadelphia— Drexel <fe Co. 

Paris— Drexel, Harjes & Co. ■ 

Berlin— Deutsche Bank. 

Vienna— Schoeller & Co. 

Frankfort-on-the-Main— Gebrtider Sulzbach; Bank of 
Saxe Meiningen. 

Hamburg— John Berenburg. Gossler & Co. 

Dresden— Robert Thode & Co. 

Rome— Plowden, Cholmeley & Co. 

Amsterdam— La Banque de Credit et de Dfip6t des 
Pays-Bas. 

Antwerp— Nottebobm Brothers. 

Naples and Florence— Anglo-Italian Bank. 

Genoa- Henry Dapples. 

Milan — A. Comerio. 

Valparaiso and Lima— Fred. Huth, GrOning & Co. 

China and Japan— Chartered Mercantile Bank of India, 
London and China: Comptoir d'Escompte de Paris; 
Deutsche Bank. Hongkong & Shanghai B'g Corp. 

Manila— Russell & Sturgis. 

River Plate— Mercantile Bank of the River Plate, 
Limited. 



The undermentioned are Correspondent* 
ortlie Bank: 

English Bank of Rio de Janeiro, Limited, Rio de 

Janeiro. 
Alzuyeta Brothers, Aeapuico, Mexico. 
Southern Bank, New Orleans. 
Union National Bank, Chicago. 
Gillmore, Dunlap & Co., Cincinnati. 
Lucas Bank, St Louis. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xi 



Incorporated in Geneva, Switzerland, January 20th, 1873. 



HEAD OFFICB Ilff GBIffEVA. 



OAHTili, • - • f WO MimOI SOLMIS 

ONE MILLION PAID UP. 



President, - - - HJENRY HENTSCH. 

FRANCIS BERTON, ROBERT WATT. 



SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH 

Successors to Messrs. HENTSCH & BERTOISr, 

527 0Xju^ir sa?fL£::Eia7. 



This bank is prepared to grant Letters of Credit on Europe, and to Transact every kind 
of Banking, Mercantile and Exchange Business, and to Negotiate American Securities in 
Europe. 

DEPOSITS RECEIVED. 

BILLS OF EXCHANG-E ON 



New Terk, 


Berlin, 


Chaux-de-Fouds, 


liiveriiool. 


Fran it fort. 


Kololiiiirn, 


Itondon, 


Geneva. 


I<aunaniie, 


Paris, 


Zuricii, 


Badeii, 


liyoni). 


Basel, 


Cliiir. 


Bordeaux, 


St. Uall, 


atliaftliaasen. 


9lHrKeille«, 


Wiiiterttanr, 


Fribuurg, 


UruiiNclH, 


Bern, 


liueeru. 


Hani burs:. 


Neuchatel, 


Aaraii, 


Bellinzoiia, 


JLiUganu, 


Meudrlaio 


Iiocarno, 


'I'urin, 


Aliian, 


Ulorun, 


Oenua, 


Bonia. 


Florence, 







An ASSAY OFFICE is annexed to the Bank. Assays of gold, silver, quartz ores and 
sulphurets. Returns in coin or bars, at the option of the depositor. 

Advances made on bullion and ores. 

Dust and bullion can be forwarded from any part of the country, and returns made 
through Wells, Fargo & Co., or by checks. 



Consul for Switzerland and Portugal, FRANCIS BERTON. 



XU PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORY. 



VSo^. fi. ^sJi<Sy & Co. 



ITos. 116 AXTD 118 CAZ.ZFOB.1TZA ST. 



Si&H F^i&M^lS^O, ^fi&&9 



iisvd::E>or^'X'Ei=i.s of 




LATE i: 



SHEET COPPER, ZINC, 



AND ALL KINDS OF 



PLXJJVnBING^ GJ^OODS, 



»' 



simM,mw steSiksi, si]^o^ s^O'X' 



X: ^* C , JES'P G 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Xlll 






^MANUFACTURERS OF:^::^) 






AlTD HA? ROPE. 



--A-IliSO- 



Tarred American Hemp Cordage, 



IN ALL ITS VABIETIES, 



Packing Yarn, Spun Yarn 



J. D» FARJFIEImIm^ Agent. 

SAN FRAKCXSOO, OAL. 



Xiv PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




II. m.JL 

OF SAN FRANCISCO. 

Ci^PITiLL, - $750,000, OOLD. 



I^lre 6113.C5. Is/LsiTliCLG Ins-u.r£Ln.c©. 



(THE CALIFORNIA^ LLOYDS') 

ESTABLISHED IN 1861, 



CASH CAPITAL, 
ASSETS EXCEED 



$750,000, Gold. 
$1,000,000, Coin. 



Fair Eates, Prompt Settlement of Losses, Solid Security. 



3>XZ1.£3 070X1.8 s 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



J. Mora Moss, 
Moses Heller, 
M. J. O'Connor, 
Daniel Meyer, 
Antoine Borel, 
Joseph Seller, 
I. Lawrence Pool, 



Nicholas Luning, 
Charles Baum, 
M. D. Sweeny, 
Gustavo Touchard, 
Geo. C. Hiekox, 
J. H. Baird, 
James Otis, 
N. G. Kittle, 



R. S. Floyd, 
Adam Grant, 
Charles Kohler, 
W. C. Ralston, 
A. Weill, 
J as. Moffitt, 
Jabez Howes, 
N. J. T. Dana, 



John Parrott, 

J. Baum, 

Jos. Brandenstein, 

C. Ducommun, 

T. Lemmen Meyer, 

T. E. Lindenberger, 

I. Steinhart, 

Bartlett Doe. 



SACBAintENTO, 

Edward Cadwalader, L. A. Booth. 



aiABXST'Il.IiE, 

L. Cunningham. 

NEW YORK, 

J. G. Kittle, Benjamin Brewster, 

GUSTAYE TOUCHARD, President. 
ir. G. KITTLE, Yice-President. 
CHARLES D. HAVEN, Secretary. 
QEOnaE T. BOHEN. Surveyor, JAS. D. BAILEY, General Agent. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XV 



M4M®lim©«®SlMl' 



Fire Insurance 



C0MPAXT7. 



SWISS LLOYD 



'^■#^W»M 



"'Wlf ^'** "iWpmf "il 



COMFAXTTT. 






General Agents, 
No. 13 MERCHANTS' EXCHANGE, 

425 CALZFOHXTZA STREET. 



Xvi PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



NORTHERN ASSURANCE CO 

OF LONDON AND ABERDEEN. 



Subscribed Capital, ■ ■ • $10,000,000 

Accumulated Funds, • - • 6,750,000 

Annual Fire Premium, ■ - 1,180,000 

LOSSES PROMPTLY PAID IN U. S. GOLD COIN. 



T^. Zi. BOOISSK, ... Agent, 

319 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

The Policies of this Company are not only guaranteed by the Capital, but also by the 
unlimited personal responsibility of nearly one thousand shareholders. 



EOTAL MAIL STEAM PACKET CO. 

Notice is liereliy given tlial arrangemenis have lieen entereil inio between tie 

ROYAL MAIL STEAM PACKET COMPANY 



-AND THB 



PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY, 

FOR the forwarding of treasure to the Bank of England, and to the 
Bank of France, in Havre, by the steamships of the two companies, 
by means of through bills of lading, to be granted by the commanders of 
the Ships of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, for delivery to the 
Agent of the Royal Mail Steam Packet Company, to be sent across the 
Isthmus, and embarked on the Ships of the R. M. S. P. Co. For parti- 
culars as to through rate of freight, apply to the undersigned. 

Arrangements can be made for the shipment of Gold and Silver Ores 
from Aspinwall by the Company's Steamers, on favorable terms. 

The Steamships of the R. M. S. P. Co. leave Aspinwall for Plymouth, calling at St. Thomas, on the 6th 
(7th when there are 30 days in the previous month,) and 22d of each month. 

Passages, at reduced rates, can be secured on application to the undersigDed, who will give any further 
particulars that may be required about the Company's business. 

"W. u. :soo'K"F7fi. 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XVll 





utual pnsurance jKompany, 

406 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

ITezt Door to Bank of California, San Francisco. 



5*if(5^ i]\f^iri(axc5s^. 



CAPITAL, - - 
CAS H ASSETS, 



$300,000.00 
$57 1,229.04 



J. p. HOUGHTON, President. 

George H. Howard, Vice President. H, H. Bigelow, General Manager, 

Chas. K. Story, Secretary. E. H, Magill, General Agent. 



X>XZ=«.Z3CX*OZl.S. 



San Francisco. 

George H. Howard, 
John H. Redington, 

J. F. HorGHTON, 

W. M. Greenwood, 
Geo. S. Mann, 
Cyrus Wilson, 
W. T. Garratt, 
C. "Waterholtse, 

A. P. HOTALING, 

A. Block, 
A. K. P. Harmon, 
C. L. Taylor, 
R. B. Gray, 
Robert Watt, 
John Currey, 
L. L. Baker, 
W. P. Whittieb, 
C. C. Burr, 



V. D. Moody, 
E. M. Root, 
W. H. White, 
J. L. N. Shepabd, 
G. S. Johnson, 
W. O. Wilson, 
Chas. R. Story. 

Alameda Co. Branch. 

John A. Ledden, 
Chauncy Taylor, 
A. C. Henry, 
RoBT. S. Farrelly, 
Joseph Becht, 
Joseph B. Marlin, 
W. B. Hardy. 

Brass Valley. 
William Watt, 



Sacramento. 
Mark Hopkins, 
D. W. Earl, 
Julius Wktzlar, 
Jas. Carolan. 

San Jose. 

T. Ellard Beans, 
B. D, Murphy, 
A. Pfister, 
J. H. Dibble, 
J. S. Carter, 
Jackson Lewis, 
Jacob Rich, 
N. Hayes, 
J. J. Denny. 

Stockton. 

H. H. Hewlett, 
Chas. Belding, 



J. D. Peters, 
A. W. Simpson, 
H. M. Fanning. 

Marysville. 
D. E. Knight. 

San Diego, 

A. H, Wilcox. 

Portland, Oregon. 
W. S. Ladd, 

C. H. Lewis, 

P. Wasserman, 

B. Goldsmith, 
L. F. Grover, 

D. Macleay. 

Virginia City, Nev. 
John Gillig, 
Isaac Requa. 



XVlll 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



JAMES LINFORTU. 



JOHN BENSLEY. 



L. B. BENCHLEY. 



LmronTH, Kellogg & Co. 

Harclware,Agricultural Implements 

MINING TOOLS, IRON, STEEL, ETC. 



Powell Tool Go's 

Axes and Edge Tools. 



GENERAL AGENTS FOR 



Norwich Lock Co. I 



Black Diamond Files. 



foolwortliHaiilleWoiis. 




Pitt's Threshers. 



Enssell's Mowers anfl 
Reapers. 

Wooj's Mowers & Reapers 



Clipper Mowers. 



fiarJen City Plows anl 
Ramsey&Co'sFnmps.BclIs ij|K W^iH^Bl CuMlors. 

Hytlranlic Earns. ^B^^^mBP FrieSman Harrows, 

STUDEBAKER WAGONS, 

ORDERS RESPECTFULLY SOLICITED. 



MOEEIS SPEYEE & CO. 

No. 13 Merchants' Exchange, 

425 CALIFORNIA STREET, 

Draw on JVew York, London, Paris, Hamburg, Bremen, 
Berlin, Frankfort, Vienna, 

A.IC3D OXHEIt CITIES IHST BXTR,OI»B. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XIX 



GEORGE HOWES. JABEZ HOWES. 

GEORGE HOWES & CO. 




COMMISSION MERCHANTS, 

302 CAZiZFORlTZA STRSBT, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



IsT El AA7* -^ O 1=1- Kl, 



DISPATCH LINE 

CLIPPER SHIPS, FOR XEW YORK. 

^ . » ♦ » ■ ^ 

Agents for Sutton «£ Go's 

Clipper Ships, from New York 

T O 

Si^N" FRA.]SrOISOO. 



XX 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



SAN FRANCISCO SAVINGS UNION 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET, CORNER WEBB. 

DEPOSITS ■ ■ ■ $6,918,790 

Guarantee Capital and Reserve Fund - - - - - 230,781 



IDII=LEIOTOr=LS. 



JAMES DE FREMERY 
ALBERT MILLER 
C. ADOLPHE LOW, 
GEORGE C. POTTER. 

Cashier and secretary 

survkyor - • 

Attorney 

Auditor > • 

Accountant 



CHARLES BAUM' 
CHARLES PACE. 
ALEXANDER CAMPBELL, Sen. 



Pbesidknt, 
Vice Prrsident- 

WASHINGTON BARTLETT, 

DENIS J. OLIVER, 

LOVELL WHITE 

JOHN ARCHBALD 

HENRY C. CAMPBELL 

- THEODORE LCESSEL 

J. A. LANGSTROTH 



Receives Deposits and Loans Money on Real Estate Security. 

Country remittances may be sent by Wells, Fargo & Co., or by Checks of reliable parties, payable 
in San Francisco, but the responsibility of the Union commences only with the actual receipt of the 
money. The signature of the depositor should accompany the first deposit. No charge is made for pass- 
book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours, 9 A. M. to 3 P. M; open Saturday Evenings from 64 to 84. 



A. CRAWFORD & CO. 

Ship Chandlers, 

25 and 27 MARKET STREET, 

Tbe BLACK DMOi COAL MINM CO. 

AND THE 

BELLINGHAM BAY COAL COMPANY. 



Steam and House Coals by the Cargo, and to Ships 

and Dealers. 

Office on Spear Street, at Rincon Wharf. P. B. CORNWALL, Pres't. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXI 



mt nmt 



r^.a. 



^\ J 



^1 ^^ 






INCORPORATED 12TH APRIL, 1859. 



Office, N. E cor. Montgomery and Market Streets, 



S^£T ^Etiksrcisco. 



The objects for which this Association is formed are, that by its operations, the members thereof may be 

enabled to find a 

SECURE & PROFITABLE INVESTMENT FOR SMALL SAVINGS 

And may have an opportunity of obtaining from it the use of a moderate capital, on giving good 
and sufficient security for the use of the same. 

President, M. D. S"WEENY. Vice-President, C. D. O. SULLIVAN. 

Treasurer, EDV^TARD MARTIN. Attorney, RICHARD TOBIN. 

Any person can become a member of this Society, on paying an entrance fee of TWO DOLLARS, and sub- 
scribing to the By-Laws. 
Deposits can be made of any sum, from Two Dollars and fifty cents to any amount. Loans madeonsecur- 
ity of Real Estate within the city and county. 



J. EVERDIISrG & CO. 

Commission merchants. 



isTO. 43 oij.^i.~5r st:e=iee'T', 



Belo-w Dru.m.m, 



SAN- FRA.NCISCO. 



OEALER^S IIV OR,EGOIV F»R,Or>XJOE. 

AGENTS FOR IMPERIAL. AND HARRISBURC FLOUR MILLS. 

Wheaten Starch of our own Manufacture always on hand. 



EDWARD MARTIN. 



[ABTiif ^ mm 



D. V. B. HENARIE. 



-WHOLESALE DEALERS IN- 




WINES AND UQyORS 

40S FROITT STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



Xxii PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTOF Y. 



THE GERMAN 

SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY 



GUARANTEE CAPITAL, - $200,000. 



$a$ CAtSW€inn$A $ta«l:t 



Office Hours, from 9 A. M. to 3 P. M. Extra hours on Saturday, from 7 to 
8 P. M., for receiving of Deposits only. Loans made on Real Estate and other 
Collateral Securities, at current rates of interest, 

GEORGE LETTE, L. GpTTIC, 

SECRETARY. PRESIDENT 



JOHN SAULNIER, Bordeaux. P. LACLAVERIE, San Francisco- 




p iiiiiaivp 

GROCERIES, DRUGS, ETC. 
No. 406 BATTERY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



r-^^yDEALER IN,=^-> 



CALIFOEmA Wiro, BEAHDIES, Etc. 

The production of his own Vineyard, at Vina, Tehama County. 

GEO. Hi^MLIlSr, - Iilanager. 

DEPOT, 414 MARKET ST., COR, SDTTER, M FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXlll 



MasBilc SaTiifS aM Loai Bai 

GUARANTEE CAPITAL, $150,000. 



OFFICE, 6 POST STREET, (MASONIC TEMPLE,) SAN FRANCISCO- 
Incorporated Novembor 4th, 1869. Commenced Business February 12th, 1870. 



Term and Ordinary Deposits received in any amount, from one dollar and over, and from persons of all 
classes, male or female, old or young, lodges, churrlies, and other associations, trustees, administrators and 
executors. Loans made on approved security. Capital and Reserve Fund. S17o.847.7I. Rate of lust dividend— 9,'^ 
per cent, per annum on Term Deposits; 7'-^ per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposit^. Number of Deposit ac- 
counts, 3261. Certificates of Depo.sit issued payable in New Yorlt. Philadelphia, Boston, and the principal cities of 
the Atlantic States and Cauadas; also, London, Paris, Hamburg, and all the principal cities of Europe. 



oi^iF^i o EJ :e=ls. 



WILLIAM H. CULVER, 
FRANCIS SMITH, 
HIRAM T. GRAVES, - 
LEONIDAS E. PRATT, 



President. 

Vice-President. 

Secretary. 

Attorney. 



UBO^^IF^TZ) OF" XDIF\EOTOIR.S. 



Leonidas E. Pratt, 
Calvin H. Wetherbee, 
John F, Snow, 
Wm. T. Garratt, 



William H. Culver, 
George Robins, 
Hiram T. Graves, 
Frank Eastman, 
James Simpson, 



Caleb S. Hobbs, 
Francis Smith, 
JoNA. Kittredge, 
Peter Dean. 



OfSce Hours from 9 A. M. to 3 P.M., daily. Extra Hours on Saturday, from 7 to 9 P.M., for receiving Deposits 
only. Loans made on Real Estate and Collateral Securilies at usual rates of interest. Certificates of Deposit 
issued, transferable by endorsement. Remittances from the interior, through any of the usual channels, may be 
sent, the Bank not being accountable for their safe delivery. The signature of the Depositor should accompany 
his first deposit. A pass-book will be delivered to the agent by whom the deposit is made. Deposits received 
from One Dollar upwards. 



C3-Xj.A-SC3-0"W" 

IRON AND METAL 

IMPORTING CO. 

Nos. 22 and 24 Fremont Street 



8.A.TSr FRi^NOISOO, OA.L. 



GSpOROERS e01_ICITED-= 



V^M. MeCRINDLE, - - Manager. 



XXiv PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



IKEARINi: AND FIRXS. 



THE 



CALIFORNIA INSURANCE CO. 

Office, No. 318 California Street, 



One Door East from Sansom Street, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



ORGANIZED FEBRUARY, 1861, 

CAPITAL, Paid tip in Gold, - $300,000 
ASSETS^ January ist^ 1875, - 506,556 



••* ^ • »■ ^ 



C. T. HOPKINS, Pres't. H. B. TICHENOR, Vice-Pres't. 

Z. CROWELL, Secretary. 



THE OLDEST OF ALL THE LOCALS. 



THE SAFETY INKSTAND. 




CARTER I WHEELER, 

Agents for Eastern Manufacturers, 

636 SACRAMENTO STREET, 



Aseits OB tie Pacific Coast for the 

SAFXSTir INKSTAND. 

A I.ARGI: STOCK OF 

«m3S3$S0l7^S C«.3:p AI7S> fX%.^j 

AND EMERSON'S BINDERS 

Constantly on Hand. Liberal Inducements Offered to the Trade. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXV 



M 



m^'j^M 



w 



tumMmmmm^ 



^m> K m^m:^m 






!f*j*ii»j 



X.OSSSS r^xx> zn (O'-ox-X) c^xm 

IMMEDIATELY AFTER ADJUSTMENT. 



GEORGS MARCUS & GO.^ Agentsp 

304 CALIFORNIA STREET. 



iP 



oix][^mm 



V 



r^r^IMPORTER OF=5^ 



Hops, ani all Mi of Brewers' lalerials 

Corks, Irish Moss, Isinglass, Faucets, Taps, etc. 

Agent for the "PIONEER MALT HOUSE/ 

609, 511 and 513 SACRAMENTO STEEET, 



Up stairs, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



W. E. STRAUT. 



W. J. HAMILTON. 



Illi' 



Importers and Dealers in 



Carriage and Wagon Material, 

OAK, ASH AND HICKORY LUMBER, 

N. V. COR. SACRAMENTO AND DRUUM STREETS, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



XXVI 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 










204 & 205 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 



AGENTS FOR 



c^. REGULAR DISPATCH LINE, ^^ 



i^v; 



s^iw lifc lili 



ilS 






»W»»i^ "W »5»s 



Liberal advances made on consignments of wheat, cotton, lumber or any 
staple merchandise to our foreign correspondents. Constantly in receipt of 
fresh invoices of Coffee, Sugar, Molasses, Rice, New Bedford Cordage, Duck, 
Lanfaii-'s Oysters, Oregon Flour, etc. 



m 



IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF 



jU'iimii 



FORBICIT and DOMESTIC 

DRY aOODS, 

Clothing, Gentlemen's Furnishing Goods, 

HOSIERY, WHITE GOODS, BLANKETS, ETC. 



BETWEEN FRONT AND BATTEET, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXVll 



RODGERS, MEYER & CO. 

ROBERT RODGERS & CO. 

LIVERPOOL, 



■ ■ 






rcMS, 

GRAIN SHIPPERS. 



Draw Exchange on Kurope. 

gaimIfornia miiiiiS, 

N. W. Cor. Howard and Spear Streets, 



SAWING AND PLANING ! 



im 



IVtiVNUFACTURERS OF 



BLINDS, DOORS, &c. 

ADAMS, BLINN & CO. C. J. PRESCOTT. J. D. TANEY. JAMES TANEY. 



XXViii PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PHILADELPHIA 




Corner of Second and Folsom Sts, 



I take the present opportunitj of thanking my Friends and Customers 
for the liberal support heretofore extended to the 

PHILADELPHIA BREWERY 

And notify them that I have added to my Establishm' 

NEW AND EXTENSIVE BUILDINGS, 

By which I hope, through the greatly increased facilities now 
possessed by me, to furnish, as usual, 

That shall not only equal that previously furnished by me, but convince them 
that I am determined to merit their continued patronage and support. 

JOHN WIELAND. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXIX 



CSAtt* row©*:*!* 

The Safest Blasting Agent Extant. 

FIRE WILL NOT EXPLODE, NOR WATER DESTROY IT. 

GIANT POWDER No. 1, - 75 CENTS PER POUND 

Is superior to any other in extreraely hard and -wet rock, 
iron, copper, etc. 

GIANT POWDER No. 2, - 50 CENTS PER POUND 

Stands unrivaled in Medium and Seamy Kock, Lime, Marble, Pipe Clay, 
and in Coal, Sulphur, Cement and Gravel Bank Blasting. 



% I 



GENERAL AGENTS, 

OFFICE 210 FRONT STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



First Premimn awarded wliereyer eiilMted— Fair of Mecliaiiics' Institute, 1865-8-State Fair, 1868. 
ESTABLISHED, 1856. 



CHARLES BERNARD, 

MANUFACTUEER AND DEALER IN 

FAMILY CHARTRES COFFEE! 

ALWAYS ON HAND. 

AND SPICES OF ALL KINDS. 

Also, SALERATUS, CARBONATE OP SODA, CREAM OP TARTAR, 
AND BAKING PCWDER. 

Corner of Gold, between Jackson and Pacific Streets, SAN FEANCISCO, CAL. 



XXX PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



CORDA&E MANUFACTORY, 



ESTABLISHED 1856. 



Constantly on Hand, a Large and Complete Assortment of 




WHALE LINE, BALE ROPE, TARRED MANILA ROPE, 

ETC., MANUFACTURED FROM 

PURE MAN^ILiV^ HEMP. 



OFFICE AT TUBBS & CO., 611 and 613 FRONT STREET. 

]\XA.rVXJFA.CXOIiY^ AT THE POTREFtO. 



STENCIL PLATES 

RUBBER STAMPS, 

RUBBER PRINTINQ WHEELS, 

AND BURNINQ BRANDS. 



R M. TRU^WORTHY, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



STENCIL PLATES, when handsomely executed, present the cheapest and beat mode of advertising that 
can be adopted. This is the experience of all who use them. 

STEXCIL PLATES OF EVJ5KY PATfERX cut at this establishment in a style unequaled by any other 
workmen in California. 

Meichants and others are Invited to call and examine specimens in proof of the above assertion. 

Orders from abroad, as well as those given in person, promptly executed and forwarded. Parties sending 
orders by letter are particularly requested to write plainly and give the exact space they wish the 

LETTERS TO OCCL'PY. 

By close application and superior execution of work during an experience of thirteen years, Mr. TRU- 
WOKTHY has extended his business to its present proportions. His present facilities for rapid and tasteful 
execution of all work in his line are far superior to those of any other in this State or in the Union. 

Having purchased all the late John Hail's Stencil Tools, Plates and Impressions, and everything pertain- 
ing to his business, I am prepared to furnish his customers with fac-similes of his work. 

BRUSHES, INK AND M AJEIKINQ POTS FOR SALE. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXI 




MANUFACTURERS OF 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

WOOD AND WILLOWWARE, 
TWINES, LINES, SHOE THREADS, 

CLOTH-WRINGERS, 

CHILDREN'S GIGS, TOY WAGOHS, ETC. 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION, 

253 Washington St. 315 Sacramento St. 

NEW YORK. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



SAWING & PLANING MILL. 

D. A. Macdonald. 1 ^-♦•.♦►•-•^ I j^ H, Macdonald. 

JoSKPH McGiLL. J (. H. Chapman. 

[MANUFACTURERS OP 








5 UXXWIXXJM, O^JJXXll^M XX1.,U XaUUJJirXllUM, 

217 to 225 Spear St. and 218 to 226 Steuart St., 

Between Howard and Folsom, - - - SAN FRANCISCO. 



FOR BUILDINGS, CONSTANTLY ON HAND, AND GOT UP TO ORDER. 



XXxii PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



BEAVERS, BROADCLOTHS, 



-AND- 



N08. 628 AND 630 SACRAMENTO STREET. 

BET. MONTGOMERY AND KEARNY STREETS, - - SAN FRANCISCO 



John M. Johnson. Pem. B. Hohton 

J. C. JOHNSON & CO. 

Importers, Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in every description of 

Harness, Saddlery, Harness Hardware, 

IiXZATHSR, ETC., ETC. 

Mexican Saddles, Bridles, Bitts, Reins, Spurs, Whips, Lashes, Martin- 
gales, Robes, Halters, Collars, Horse Blankets, Ladies' Saddles, 
Leather, Buckles, Horse Brushes, Patent Leather, Curry- 
combs, Cinchas, Chamois Skins, Tacks, Saddlers' 
Tools, Ra-whides, Stirrups. 

AGENTS FOR "KIRBY'S SANTA CRUZ" LEATHER, 
104 AND 106 FRONT STREET, NEAR PINE, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXXlll 



H. A. PIRATE. 



'WM. B. COTBEI<. 



IMPORTERS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN 

DOUBLE GUNS, RIFLES, 

PISTOLS AND TRIMMINGS, 

FO'WDEZl, SKOT, ZiS^D iiXTD CAPS, 



NEW "WORK MADE TO ORDER, AND REPAIRING EXECUTED IN 
THE NEATEST MANNER. 

-AGENCY OF- 

510 Sacramento Street, near Sansom, 



RIFLES, PISTOLS AND CARTRIDGES. 



JS.A.TJXJ db CO., 

CARRIAGE MANUFACTORY, 



S. W. cor. Sterenson & EckerSts., SaiiFran'co. 



Make to order all kinds of 
CARRIAGE AND BUGGY WORK, 

Express and Thoroughbrace Wagoos ; also, Track and Koad 

Sulkies, and a general assortment of new and Second- 

Eand Wagons on band. Jobbing done with 

neatness and dispatch. 




J. C. JOHNSON <£ CO., 

Importers, Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers In every description of 

HARNESS, SADDLERY. HARNESS HARDWARE, 

WHIPS, LEATHER COLLARS, ETC. 

104 AND 106 FRONT STREET, NEAR PINE, 

John M. Johnson. SSLZX Jf 'STStZXCiLSCOa Fru. B. Horton. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR KIRBY'S SANTA CRUZ LEATHER. 



xxxiv 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




BOOK, CARD AND FANCY 



JOB PRINTER, 



Near Sansom, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



Every style of work required by Merchants, 
MechanicSjLawyers, Insurance Companies, Banks, 
etc., correctly, tastefully, speedily and elegantly 
executed at this long-established House. 

The proprietor has added every desirable im- 
provement in 

PRINTING, TYPE 

AND MACHINERY 

That the business demands. Novelty and orig- 
inality of design in the execution of 

fi^^i}i & ^^f^cr JOB f^^^i;K^iKG^ 

Will receive his prompt attention, and he hopes by fair dealing 
and low prices, to suit all who may favor him with their patronage. 




J 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXXV 



WATERHOUSE & LESTER, 



XIkZZ»C^£1.1«X;]EI.S OX" 




_A_rxca. £tll Is-inds of 



COACH, CARRIAGE AND WAGON MATERIALS, 

Carriage and Wagon Axles and Springs, 



Ciirflm^® Mafiwaf© mii 




Sole Agents for the Facifle Coast for 



CLARK'S ADJUSTABLE 



iCarriago tJmbrolla 



CARRIAGE AND BnSGY BODIES. 



PA-TEINTT TV HEELS, 

Nos. 122 and 124 Market St., and 19 and 21 California St. 

17, 19 and 21 SEVENTH STKEET, BETWEEN I and J, 
s^^oi=L-A.iiviE:isrTO. 



121 and 123 FRONT STREET, - NEW YORK. 



XXXVl 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



OCCIDENTAL FOUNDRY 

137 St 139 7ZB.ST STREBT. 



STEIGER & KERR, 



(S> 



IRON CASTINGS OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS AT SHORT NOTICE. ALL 
ORDERS PUNCTUALLY EXECUTED IN TIME AGREED ON. 
PARTICULAR ATTENTION PAID TO MAKING SUPE- 
RIOR SHOES AND DIES. 



AmOBTO THE SPECIAI. CASTINOS OF THIS FOVlWDRir ARE THE 

caijIiAHan gratx: bar, 

rOf Superior 9Ier Jt for Burning: Screening. 

Stratton's Jack Scre-ws, of all sizes; superior, compact and eflfective 

Horse-Povirers, Pumps, Agricultural Castings, Ingot Moulds, 

Hepburn Roller Pan, Assaying and Refining Retorts 

and Kettles, and a great variety of other 

and special Castings. 



STEIQER & ZERR, 



Proprietors. 



SASH, BLIND AND DOOR FACTORY 



IST 



le, lit SAIl nSllT, 



ORDERS FOR WORK SOLICITED. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. XXXVll 



THOMAS THOMPSON. THOBNTON THOMPSON. 

THOMPSON BROTHERS, 

EUREKA FOUNDRY, 

129 and 131 BE ALE STREET, 

Between Mission and Howard, San Francisco, Cal. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Castings of Every Description. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1858. 

PIR5T PREMIUM INDUSTRIAL 

GALVANO-PLASTIC 

BRONZE, GOLD AND SILVER 

Bet. Taylor and Jones Sts., San Francisco. 

ORDERS FROM THE COUNTRY FROMIFTLY ATTENDED TO. 



SllTer Medal awarded by the Bleclianics' Institute In I8G4, 1865 and 1S68 fl>r tlie 
best OalTanO'PInMtlc Bronze, Oold and Silver Plating Work. 



XXX VUl 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TKU2J:iiXT S. CZiAHXI, 

(3::^ Solo .A-gent fox* tlio I^stcilio CDostst. =5:^2) 

Patented Dec. 17, 1872; Feb. 25, 1873; Sept. 16, 1873; Nov. 11, 1873; 

Sept. 1, 1874. 



For Strength, Lightness and Durability, unsurpassed. The only Mattress that can be tight- 
ened or loosened at pleasure. 




EVERY MATTRESS GUARANTEED FOR FIVE YEARS! 

Mattresses manufactured to order, of any size required; also, Hospital Beds and Hotel Cot& 
* A Liberal Reduction made to Dealers and Hotels. 

0FFICE,-919 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 



i=^ioi\rEE:F^ 




3S3 & $ss rmmf^ bt., wai^ mm. 



Brussels and Ingrain - 5 cents per running yard. 
Velvets, Wilton, and all others, 6 '' " " " 



Orders left in our Boxes at any of the following places will be promptly attended to 



N. W. Cor Clay and Dupont Streeets. 
N. W. Cor. Jackson and Stockton " 
S. E. Cor. Montgomery and Pine " 
S. W. Cor. Bush and Stockton " 

N. E. Cor. Geary and Taylor «< 

S. W. Cor. Montgomery and Post " 



S, E. Cor. Howard and Third Streets. 
N. W. Cor. Second and Folsom " 

S. E. Cor. Third and Bryant " 

N. W. Cor. Market and Kearny " 

S. W. Cor. Sutter and Powell <' 



Address Orders : J. SPAULDING & CO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XXXIX 



IKIINXSRS' FOITNDRir. 



— AND — 



on 



i 



m^ 






CO-OPERA-TIV^E, 
ANGELL, PALMER & CO., Proprietors. 

J\ros. ^47 to $59 First Street, • SAJV FUJJVCISCO. 



THIS ESTABLISHMENT IS NOW MANUFACTDRING 

MACHINERY & OA.STINGS 

Of all kinds, at lower rates than ever before. We can turn out work to better advan- 
tage and at less prices than any other shop on this Coast or elsewhere. 



WILLIAM BROWN, 

222 Jackson St., San Francisco. 

SAAV SMITHING 

G^AND REPAIRING. ^^ 

AGENT FOR 

H. Disston i Sons' 

miiii Hi 

CIRCULAR SAWS. 




Butcher8' Tools for Sale; Sheet Metals 
Cfut to Pattern. 



xl 



Pacific coast business directory. 



H. SPRECKEIJS. 



C. BIANOEliS. 



ALBANY BREWERY, 

SPRECKELS & CO., - Proprietors. 



m 



m 



^ 








m 
m 



756 & 758 HOWARD STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

This ostablisliment has been recently enlarged for the third time, and now possesses facilities unsurpassed 
by any competitor for the productioQ of 

TO SUPPLY THE I^^CREASING DEMANDS OF THE PUBLIC. 
F. HAeEMAMN. D. BROMMER. 



.i3L. IVi: O X=L IEj Xj 

liA FliOR D£ liA MARIPOSA, 



635 PAOIFIO ST., 




SAN FRANCISCO. 



AND LA FLOR DE LA CORONA 

CIGAR AND CIGARITOS MANUFACTORY. 

Have constantly on hand a lot of YELLOW and WHITE paper Cigaritos of the best quality, at the 

lowest rates. Cigaritos of La Viuda do Garcia, La Ulonrradez, Cabanas, Figaro, etc. 

Orders from the interior promptly attended to. 




A. PALTENGHI, 

Ho. 1029 MARKET STREET, 

Between Sixth and Seventh Sts. SAN FRANCISCO. 

DKALER IN 

MARBLE OF ALL KINDS, 

ALSO 

j"'"! Mantel-Pieces, Monuments, Gravestones, 
"" Marble Slabs, Etc. 

Scnlptare and Ornanieats made to order. 

Also, MarDle Fountains, Staines, Etc., Etc. 



ADVERTISINGDEPARTMENT. xli 



D. B. HINCKLEY. L. C. MAKSHUTZ. 



AND IRON T?irORKS^ 

OFFICE— N. E. CORNER OF FREMONT AND TEHAMA STREETS 

Works, Fremont, Beale and Tehama Sts., San Francisco, 



HZXTCISLE7 c& CO., Proprietors. 

Manufacturers of Locomotives, Steam Engines, Quartz Mills, Flouring Mills, 

Saw Mills, Water Wheels, Brodie's Improved Crusher, Varney's 

Amalgamator, and all kinds of Iron and Brass Castings. 



SHOES & DIES OF SUPERIOR QUiLITT AT LOWEST PRICES. 



«HII 



Of every description, and of the Best Material and Workmanship 

0"os:e3:xj^^ i3::BisriD"3r, 

MANUFACTUKER OF 

Automatic Ors Feeders, Steam Engine Clo7eniors, and Cirenlar Saw Mills. 

Agent for Blaisdell & Go's Patent Drill Press, with quick return motion, and other First-Class Machinists' 
Toolt. Dealer in New and Second-Hand Engines, Boilers, and Machinery of all kinds. 



3SrO. 32 IF^FLBIMIOnsn? STR-EET,^ 



REFEREN'OES: 



Eureka M. Co., Overman M. Co., Virginia City, Nev.; Camp Floyd M. Co., Utah S. M. Co. ,Utah; Falk & Miner, 

Eureka; J. M. Brown, HoUister; Gazos Mill, Pescadero, Cal.; also, Bancroft & Co., Yolo Mills, the Union, 

Golden Gate and Fulton Iron Works, of this city. 



COLUMBIA FOUNDRY, 
133 and 135 BEALE STREET, 

Near Howard, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Manufacturer of House Fronts, Sash Weights, 
and Machinery Castings of all kinds. 



xlii PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



STEERING ^^ WHEELS 




On Hand and ^ SS^^^bbb Madeto Order. 

No. 322 iMain St., between Folsom and Harrison. 



ID. 131 XT s I nxr G- , 

TOOL -MAKER & MACHINIST, 



MANUFACTURER OF 



TOOLS FOR MOULDING, SHAPING, TURNING. ETC. 

121 FREMONT STREET, NEAR MISSION, (Opposite Mechanics' Mills), 



MACHINERY REPAIRED AT SHORT NOTICE. 



PORTLA.ISrD 

311 and 313 Mission Street, 



T. J. MOYNIHAN. J. AITKEN. 



HIGH AND LOW-PRESSURE BOILERS of all kinds built according to Drawings 
or Specifications, and SHEET IRON WORK executed at the shortest notice, on the most 
reasonable terms. Repairing promptly attended to, and at reasonable rates. 



AGEJ^T FOR ROBIJiSOX'S GOYEBJ^MEKT LOCK VALVE. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. xliii 



MANUFACTURED IN ALL THE PRINCIPAL CITIES IN THE EAST I 

SUPERSEDE ALL OTHERS WHEREVER INTRODUCED. 




Wffi« iMI^ 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Patent later Closets 



AND DEALER IN 



PLUMBERS' MATERIALS 

JACKSON FOUNDRY, No. 21 MONTGOMERY AVE., 

Between Washington & Jackson Sts., San Francisco. 



O-eo. DVC. "Wetlxerloee, 

-^TURNING. SAWING AND PLANING.'^ 

213 MISSION STREET, (UPSTAIRS). 



Printers' nortlslne. Printers' Reglets, Carriage IFork, Agrlcnltnral yVorU, Piano and 
Billiard Table Work, Bee Hives and Bee Hive irtaterlals, 

G^^SPECIALTIES OF THIS ESTABLISHMENT.=^:::Z5 



Orders for Printers' Reglets, Bee Hives and Comb Frames, solicited from all parts of the Pacific Coast, 

and promptly attended to. 



G. & ^W. SNOOK, 

Plumbers, Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron Workers, 

No. 427 PINE STREET, BELOW KEARNY, 



Pumps, Lead Pipe, Stoves and Tin Ware of every variety 

Constantly on hand and for Sale at the Lowest Prices. 
TIN KOOFING and all kinds of Jobbing done at the shortest notice and in the best manner. 



xliv 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



A 



I 



t) 



814 rOUKTH STKEET. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



"WILL BE PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 

BBRGIN & BKNH^ - Proprietors. 



FIRST PREMIUM 



M 1 



519 MONTGOMERY ST. 

Bet. Clay and Commercial, 




ARCHITECTURAL AND ORNAMENTAL 



'AND COMPOSITION ORNAMENT MANUFACTURERS, 



JP 



O^LIFORN"IA. MILLS, 

CORNER OF HOWARD AND SPEAR STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO. 



'\PS7'J^FL1>^:E11FL c«3 



Manufacturers and Dealers, Wholesale and Retail, in 




Self-Fastening 
Bed-Spring. 



isjSpUfliQlsterj Tacks, Twine, Sic. 



Our long experience in the manufactory of sprinjfs, 
together with a cash system in purchasing, enable 
us to sell a better spring for less money than any 
other dealer on this coast. We use the best Steel 
Wire, manufactured to our order. 

Send for Price-List and Circulars. 

147 New Montgomery St. 




Double-Spiral 
Bed-Spring. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



xlv 



31j E3 O I=> O I.. ID KIXJH, 

(Formerly of the U. S. Mint. S. F.) 

ASSATEE i& lETALlOEGICAl CHEiST, 

OPPOSITE THE OLD U. S. MINT, SAN FRANCISCO, GAL. 



D. CALLAGHAN. A. T. CORBUS- 

D. OA.LLA^aHA.]Sr & CO. 

IMPOBTEBS AND MANnFACTUREBS OF 

DONNOLLY & GO'S CALIFORNIA PREMIUM YEAST POWDERS, 

And Callaghan's Pure Cream Tartar, Callaghan's Pure Bi-Carb-Soda 
and I X L Saleratus. 



FACTORY, No. 121 FRONT STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 




GROSH&RUTHERFORD 

Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in 

FLOUR 

Nos. 143 & 145 FIRST ST. 

COR. NATOMA, 

G^SAN FKANCISCO.=^^ 

SAMUEL GROSH. T. L. RUTHERFORD. 



IMPORTER & DEALER IN HDMAN HAIR 

No. 25 NEW MONTGOMERY STREET, 

Under the Grand Hotel, 



SAN FEANCISCO. 



All kinds of Hair Work neatly done. Also, manufacturer for the trade of IMITATION 
HAIR, WATERFALLS, PUFFS, CURLS AND ROLLS. HAIR JEWELRY manu- 
factured in a neat and modern style; also, MILLINERY in all its branches. Ladies' Hair 
Dressing done in all styles. Ladies' Hair Shampooing. 



xlvi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




■ 
M 

J ^ **J h- 

S WW 
w^5l> 

rt O K O 

wggn 

Hi W 



The manufacture of Puraping Machinery has been our specialty for the past twen- 
ty-six years. We are the Pioneer and largest manufacturers in this line on the Pacific Coast, 
and we say, without the least fear of successful contradiction, that for Beauty, Simplic- 
ity, Convenience, Durability and Economy, these Machines are unequaled. 

We have received all the FIRST PREMIUMS awarded by the Mechanics'Insti- 
tute in this City, in our line, for the past nine years, and every lirae previous when we 
exhibited in competition with others, for which we have our Diplomas to show. 

FACTORY, CORNER MARKET AND BEALE STS., S. F. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



xlvii 



If 



m e 



£ 



^MM^ 



First Prefflinffl ffinHills ui Horse-Powers. 

The Simplicity and Perfection of these Machines is the result 
of 26 years' experience in California. 



These machines are designed for all pur- 
poses, such as pumping -water for Irriga- 
tion, Watering Stock, Chopping Feed, 
Churning, Sawing Wood, Running Machin- 
ery for Manufacturing, Mechanical or 
other purposes. 




Designed especially for the use 
of Dairymen. • 




ALL WORK GUARANTEED. 

I^rSEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULARS AND PRICE LISTS.-«« 

Factory, Cor. MARKET AND BEAIE STREETS, S. F. 

■W. I. TTJ3TI3Sr. 



xlviii PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




Patented March 16th, 1875, by A. H. SouTffWiCK, who is now furnishing supe- 
rior Mills at reduced prices, warranted for five years. 





There has never come before the people of California an invention that so 
completely satisfied every one as does the Turbine Windmill. 

This mill is the favorite with all classes. It is admired by all, and should 
the price be reduced to the same figure as other mills, every one would have 
one. Even now, there are hundreds who order the Turbine (who would not 
have any other) on account of their beauty and many advantages over other 
mills. 

And then the price is not so great, when you take into consideration the 
fact that the Turbine is warranted for five years, and it will cost you nothing 
for repairs during that time. 

I have been told by windmill men that they " made more money in re- 
pairing than in building mills." In that respect they have the advantage of me. 
I have never made a dollar on repairing my mills yet, neither do I expect to, 
for I will repair for nothing, if they need it within five years. 

A. H. SOT7TXZ^VZCII, 
SECOND STREET, BET. BROADWAY AND WASHINGTON, OAKLAND 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



xlix 




^^ THE 

ITDRBINE WINDMILL 



Is the result of constant study 
and experiment for many years 
on the part of the inventor, who 
has devoted his whole time ex- 
clusively to the subject of Wind- 
mills for eight years. 

Since coming to this coast,now 
over two years ago, the Inven- 
tor of the TURBIlSrE has ap- 
plied himself diligently to thoroughly adapt his mill to the 
wants of this climate, and has made several useful im- 
provements to accomplish that end, and although much 
improved, the mills have been reduced in price. 




For Cirovilar and Price List, Address 



A* n* &0nvmw$'on 



P. O. BOX 25, OAKLAND. 1385, SAN FRANCISCO. 





PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Importer, Dealer and Manufacturer of 



IRON AND STEEL WIRE ROPE, 

G^AND WIRE OF ALL KINDS.^^) 

ESTABLISHED, 1857. 
OFFICE -A.3SriD IDBI»OT, 

Nos. 113 AND 115 PINE STREET, - SAN FRANCISCO. 

Sole Proprietor of the 

Patent XSndless Ropeivay 

(Wire Tramway), for transporting Ores, etc., over mountainous places. 



Agent for Pacific Wire and W. R. Manufacturing Company, of Cal. 

AND OF 

RICHARD JOHNSON & NEPHEW, Wire Manufacturers, of Manchester, England 



MIXING COMPANIES, FERRYMEN AND SHIPMASTERS 

Are informed that Wire Rope can be furnished them considerably under the cost of Hemp or Manila, of 
eoual streneth Wire Kope does not stretch or shrink by change of weather, it weighs 40 per cent, less 
than lieuir i^'less than one-halt the diameter; is easily spliced under all circumstances ; is as pliable tor 
equal strength; and is from four to five limes as durable as lUe best Memp or Manila Kope. 

For Hoisting from Deep Mines, the economy of its application is immense. 

The Wire from which my Ropes are made is manufactured in San Francisco, by the 
Pacific Wire Msinnfacturing Company, from the very best of Stock. 

jjj'oTE —STEEL WIRE ROPE weighs about six-tenths of Iron Rope, or one-third of Hemp of equal 
stren-'th its extreme lightness saves largely in ireight to remote places, and its great durability recom- 
menos it for hoisting purposes, etc. See table of compiarative weights, strength, ana sizes ot 



S«eel Wire Kope. 


Irou Wire Kope. 


Hemp Rope. 


Working 


Circumfer'nce 


Wt. per 100 ft. 


Circumfer'nce 


Wt. per 100 ft. 


Circumfer'nce 


WU per 100 ft 


load ot each. 


2 inch. 


tiOlbs. 
100 •' 


2>^ inch. 
3>'2 '• 


100 lbs. 
180 " 


8>^ inch. 

»>4 •' 


lot) lbs. 
^8i •' 


3,300 lbs. 
7,000 •' 



ENDLESS WIRE ROPEWAY, 

(Wire Tramway) secured by numerous patents. 

By means of the Ropeway, ores, rock and other material can be transported over mountainous and diflS- 
cult places, where it would be impossible or exceedingly expensive to build a road. It can deliver from 
five to titty tons per hour, according to capacity; and being carried upon posts above snow and other ob- 
structionsi can be used when other modes of transportation would be impossible. 

A. S. HALLIDIE, 113 and 115 Pine Street, San Francisco. 

Circulars sent on application. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



li 




Incorporated April 30, 1868. 



Capital, fi 1,000,000. 



Location of Works, corner Beale and Howard Sts., 

CAR WHEEL MANUFACTURERS AND FOUNDRYMEN. 

All work in their Line attended to with promptiess and dispatch. 

•«* » 

DIRECTORS. 
JOSEPH MOORE, WILLIAM NORRIS. JESSE HOLLADAY, 

JAS. D. WALKER, W. H. TAYLOR, J. B. HAGGIN. 

WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, Presidaht. JOSEPH MOORE, Superintendent. 

LEWIS R. MEAD, Secretary. 



niTE 



m^e 'mMTT^ 



Importer and Dealer in all binds of 



Maitel Clocks, FIm FrtKli Brmits, and PlnilieB' Ware, 
122 AND 124 SUTTER STREET, NEAR MONTGOMERY. 



Iron Pije, all Sizes, for BasJateraM Steam, 

IN LOTS TO SUIT, TOGETHER WITH 

ELBOWS, TEES, RETURN BENDS, STOP COOKS, PLUGS, 
BUSHINGS, NIPPLES, ETC., ETC. 



Buildings Fitted np IV^lth Oaa and Water Pipes. 

Rubber Hose, Hose Bibbs, Hose Pipes, etc. Plumbers' Basins, etc., etc. 
Copper Boilers, Bath Tubs, etc. 



Hi PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



9 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Ships' Stoves, {suitable for Vessels of from 20 to 2,500 tons,) 

Ships' Water Closets, Binnacle Lamps, Side Lights, 

^-c. ^c.. Tin, Copper and Sheet Lron Ware, etc. 

Agent for 0. K. FOUNDRY, 228 Main Street, San Francisco. 

MANUFACTURE ALL KINDS OF 

LIGHT & ORNAMENTAL CASTINGS, STOVES, ETC., ETC. 

SMOOTH CASTINGS A SPECIALTY. GRATES & FIRE BACKS FOR RANGES. 
Agent for ALBION POTTERY, Antioch, Cal. 

MANUFACTURE ALL KINDS QF 

Stove and Range Linings, Backs and Chechs for Marble Mantels, 
Vases, Hanging Baskets, Tileing, Brain and Chimney Pipes, Etc, 



Nos. 3 & 5 Steuart St., Cor. Market, San Francisco. 



COFFEE AND SPICE MILLS 

625 ^ND 627 FRONT ST. 



The oldest Coffee and Spice Factory on the Pacific Coast. 
MANUFACTORY OF THE 

ORIGINAL CHARTRES COFFEE, 

First introdnced into this country in Jane, 1851, by G. Yenard. 



qenuijste mocha, coffee. 



ALL KINDS OF GREEN, ROASTED AND GROUND COFFEES. 

ALSO, SPIOES AND CALIFORNIA MUSTARD. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



liii 



1B4:Q. 



IS'ZS. 



PIONEER IRON WORKS, 

Nos. 225 and 227 BEALE STREET, 

Between Howard and Polsom, SAN FRANCISCO. 



CHARLES H. LEAVITT, 



Stool Ijixxoca. 
BANK VAULTS, 

BURGLAR, FIRE PROOF; 

AND SILVERWARE SAFES, 

PRISON CELLS, 

FIRE-PROOF 

IDOOIFLS, 

Detachable Knobs, no Key. A large assortment of Combination and Key Locks on 
hand. Latest Improved Shears, Punches, Dies, etc., for Cold Iron Works. 

Constantly on hand a large assortment of 

FIRE PROOF DOORS AND SHUTTERS. 




• WROUGHT IRON 

© 1 m K) ]i m P ^ 

BUSSEY'S PATENT 
Combination Burglar Proof 

BANK VAULT 

AND 

SAFE LOCKS, 

Containing MUUons of changes. 




CSi^DEPOT OF THE 









'5?V5 



I 



bfo 



^^^ 






ALSO OF THE 










^(f*P 



^|gi^ 



BeniclA. Tannery 

Manufacturing ax.i. kinds or ^eayy ^eather. 



418 BATTERY STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



JlV 



Pacific coast business directory. 



o. :BoisrisrE]^5r, Tr. 



-MANUFACTURER OF- 



BAND, CIRCOLiRiSPRfflGSiWIIlG MACHINES 

And Shaping Machines; Also, Patent Hay Hake, Draper Aprons, 

GRAIN CARRIERS, GRAIN L_lf=TERS, ETC., ETC- 



Attends to all kinds of Agrricultural Wood Work, and Jobbing Generally. 

No. 221 MISSION STREET, just below Beale St., San Francisco, 



PIONEER PAPER IKIIIjiIji 

TAYLORVILLE, MARIN COUNTY, CAL. 
S. P. TAYLOR & CO., - - - Proprietors. 

Also Agents Sagle Paper Mills. 
Manufactarers and Importers of all kinds of 

PRINTING, MANILA, HARDWARE AND STRAW 

PAPERS, PAPER BAGS, T"WINE, ETC. 

Paper Warehouse, No. 416 Clay Street, San Francisco. 

The Highest Price paid for Rags, Rope, Etc. 



32 FREMONT STREET, San Francisco, 

Maker of Models for Inventors, Drawing Instruments, 

Small Machines, Philosophical Instruments, Scales and Weights. 

All kinds of Brass and Iron Work. Bepairing Promptly Attended to. 



CALIFORNIA BELLOWS MANUFACTURINa CO. 




SAN FRAKCISCO. 

JAMES CAMPBELL, Snoerinten't 

Sole Manufacturers of the 
Improved Bellows, with Pat- 
ent Keversible Nozzle. 

Blacksmiths', Moulders 'and 
Coopers' Bellows, of every de- 
scription, made to order. 

The patronage of the Trade 
most respectfully solicited. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Iv 



-Vvo 3E*irot©ot tlxe C3ri*oo©i:±©ei 




Established 1855. 



Established 1855. 



North Side, San Francisco, 

m^ isii IP in ^^1 ^v ^ji> 1 



Our Manufactory of Maccaroni and Vermicelli is in every respect the best in the State of Cali- 
fornia. We hav« always on hand for trade a large quantity of the finest Maccaroni, Vermicelli, Farina, 
and Paste of all descriptions, in French and Italian style. 

We do not solicit family trade. We warrant all our boxes better weight than those of any other factory. 



No. 22 Mission Street, 

Between Spear and Steuart, SAN FRANCISCO. 

BOATS BUILT TO ORDER & CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 

ALL ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO. 
Agent for California for the sale of HOLMES' PATENTED SELF-RIGHT- 
ING SURF AND LIFE BOATS. 




THE DR. BLY ARTIFICIAL LIMBS. 

166 TEHAMA STREET, 

CORNER OF THIRD. BET. HOWARD AND FOLSOM. 

References to parties wearing these Limbs given when applied for. 
The best Artificial Limbs made. Send for descriptive circular. 



THE "ANATOMICAL LEG," 

With a universal ankle motion; the above cut is its illustration. This 
Artificial Leg approaches so much nearer an imitation of the functions 
of nature than any other, that it stands without a rival among all the 
inventions in artificial legs, old or new. (The very latest announced 
MEW iNVENTioss duly considered.) Address, 



166 Tehama Street, 



s:E=i=i.i3sra-, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



f 



Patentees, Manufacturers and Wholesale Dealers in 

240 MONTGOMERY STREET, 

ROOM 6, BET. PINE AND BUSH. 



MZXTSS CAB.£FT7ZiZ.7 E2:iiMZ2TSD, 



And accurate written reports furnished. 



Ivi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PHCENIX IRON WORKS. 

' JOHATHAH KITTREDaE. 



MANUFACTURER OF 



Wrought 
Iron 




Ittttff^ 



Prison 



Cells, 



Girders, 
AND ALL KINDS OF HOUSE SMITH WORK. 



Fire and Burglar-Proof Safes 



Comiantty on hand and made to order at the shortest notice. 



< 

PQ 



CO 

h 

> 




> 2 
• o 

53 



Nos. 18 and 20 Fremont Street, near Market, San Francisco. 

♦«* 

Welded Steel and Wrought Iron Safes. Forging and Machine Work. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ivii 




I<S^5^^^I< 



-A^ISIID 




HORIZONTAL FLUME, 

MANUFACTURERS OF Patented April Ist, 1873. 

Dii Mi WATER WIEELS, 

ALSO, ALL KINDS OP 

MILL GEARING ESPECIALLY ADAPTED TO OUR WHEELS. 



PRICES GREATLY REDUCED AND COMPETITION DEFIED. 



FOIFl. S-^TISP^^ek-OTIOnST IT? H^^S 3STO TnQTT i\ T . 



Ilavingr established ourselves in this city, we will give our personal attention to our business, and 
thereby hope to give better satisfaction than we have been able to give heretofore through agents. We 
will also do a commission business in 

MILLERS' AND MINERS' SUPPLIES. 

Our reputation as Milling Engineers is sufiBcient guarantee of or ability to give entire satisfaction 
We can furnish anything that our patrons may desire, on the shortest notice. Please remember that we 
give personal attention to our business. 

Address or call on Leflfel & Myers, 306 California St. 



SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE AND NEW PRICE LIST.-SENT FREE. 



Iviii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




c& CO. 



C^l|eiT\i^t^ ai\(i 



!|)otl:\edkrie^, 



IMPORTERS OF 



l^^^^lO^Ea^^ 



S: 




::?4''S=' 





s<^Si 



II 



:m 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Steele's Glycerine Lotion, Steele's Saponaceous Tooth 

Powder, Steele's Extra Quality Cologne 

Water, and Steele's Griudelia 

liOtion, for the Cure 

Of Poison 

Oak. 



1|^=^J. G. Steele & Co. import directly from Eastern and 
European markets. 



J. C. STSSZiS A CO. 

521 Montgomery Street, SAN FRANCISCO. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. lix 



GEO. C. SHREVE & CO. 



I]S^r=OI=l.TE3T\S OF" 



AVATCHES, 

DIAMONDS. 

110 Montgomery Street, 



Make a Specialty of the 



Gorham Manufacturing Company's 

;©rlimf Silyef Kii 6- 




Particular attention is requested to the many attractive designs now 
being produced by this celebrated Company. "With -works projected on a 
scale unparalleled for magnitude in the -world, together with the best 
talent for designing, the most skilled workmen, the best labor-saving 
machinery, and the immense amount of goods produced, they are enabled 
to offer the best made and most artistic articles at the lowest possible 
price. 

8®" The standard of Silver used is British Sterling. 



Ix 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixi 



(^ 



m^mmw B®f 1 



S. W. COR. BATTERY AND UNION STREETS. 



I3SrOOFLi^Or=lu^TE]ID. 



CAPITAL, $250,000 

And possesses a capacity equal to the Refining of Eight Thousand 
Tons Annually. Its products are 

(A) A. A B Crushed Sugar, Extra Cut Block Sugar, 

15-lb. Loaves put up for export, Fine Crushed and Powdered, 

Granulated, Extra Golden C, 

Extra Golden Syrup, Golden C. 

CUBE SUGAR, in boxes of 25, 50 and 100 pounds, and also in barrels. 

HERMAN MEESE, President. 

Office at the Refinery, S. W. corner Union and Battery Streets. 



A, B'WS'WBlilj, 

BOOK BINDER, 



-AND- 



BLANK BOOK HANUFAGTUBEB, 

No. 521 CLAY STREET, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



Ixii PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



NO. 108 BATTERY STREET, SA.N FRANCISCO. 

Sole Agent for the Pacific Coast for 

Dnpirs C™"' isiet. B^^^^* Imd^ ^i Sp"^^^''^ Po*. 

m liisBE SHEETS B'mm &mi^^^smi§ ©^ 

NEVER FAILING BRANDS OF FUSE, VIZ: 

Triple Tape, Double Tape, Single Tape; Cement No. 2, Cement No. 1; Hemp, Water-proof 

and Submarine. 



^/Ivl^firO A MM® ^«>^^ 



<3^= unrivaled new wodel =^^e5 

Spoi^inc Rifles, Carbines and Muskets, 
standard, or extra fine and extra finished. 



ing Tools for Cartridges, in sets and primers, per 1000. Cartridges, central fire, for New 
Model, and rim fire for Oli Model Winchester Arms, as well as for all other Rifles 



Reload 

Fniinl. fl'„^ ..^*. , -- 

and Pistols, bot i central and rim fire. SALES BY THE CASE 



B. ]\d:oQUIL]L.i^]N, 

IMPORTER AND MANUFACTURER OF 

WALNUT, ROSEWOOD AND GILT 

LOOKING GLA-SSES, 

ENGRJ\yiNGS, GHROMOS, L/THOGRAPHS 

And Depot for CURRIER & ITES' PICTURES, 

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL, 

NOS. 209 AND 211 LEIDESDORFF STREET, 

AND NO. 529 COMMERCIAL STREET, 
Between Commercial and Sacramento, Montgomery and Sansom, San Francisco. 



Pictures, Diplomas and Business Cards Framed on the most reasonable 
terms. REGILDING done in the best style. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixiii 



No. 1006 HAMILTON ST., PHILADELPHIA. 




SMITHS AND BOILER MAKERS. 




^x.A2ti£vah BflCi^oMxitBe. 



Ixiv 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Warehouse & Selling 
Office, 

179 River Street, 

TROY, N. Y. 

Manufactory at 

Hart's Falls, 

OR 

Schaghtiooke, 




THOMAS LAPE, 

President and Furcbasing Agent. 

E. A. HARTSHORN 

Secretary and Selling Agent, 

CLARK CHILL, 

Treasirer and Saperintendent. 

R.E.STARKS, 



Assistant Treanrer. 



Upholstery Twines, Druggists' Twines, Fullers' Twines, 

Mattress Twines, Sail Twines, Hardware Twines, 

Seine Twines, Hop Twines, Bailing Twines, 

Broom Twines, Tobacco Twines, Wrapping Twines, 

Brush Twines, "Wool Twines, Carpet Twines, etc 

Direct all Communications or Orders to 






MILLEU, BAER So PARKIN 



Established 186^. 



(Pittsburg, f?a. 



MANUFACTUKERS OF TBE 



CRESCEHT BRMI) OF TOOL STEEL 



C3::EI^'^^^ others using Steel of Extra Quality...^ 

Also, CAST, SPBIIB anil MACHfflERY STEEL 



OF A.LL SIZES. 



f 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixv 



AGHICULTURAL IMPLEMEITTS 

AND * 

MA.CH[IISrES. 



\mmi 



Quincy Hall, Boston, Mass., 53 Beekman St., New York City. 

MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS. 




SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF THE 



BOSTON .^TH 



M 



DUU 



CLIPPER I 



D 



Jj 



Knox's Patent, wltl Cast Steel, and Session k Knox's new Patent 





BoTton nfnT>.^f i^i^ "^^ ^'''"^'"^ *^^ lightness, beauty and easy draft of the Cast Steel 

Mou?dbo!rKrIl7« 5 "" T^""/ T^''''^ ^^' exceeding anything heretofore manufactured. The 
by licHll Habi^ftv Jn'h P'f '''^' y^^'.rr^^^'"^ '^''''"'^'' ^""''^''^ the toughness is retained 
obtained than Ivplhlf b'-eakage is avoided. By this process a greater degree of hardness is 
forms and the S. f'^'t-^"''''" '" PIow-Mouldboards. They are made with the most perfect 
torms and the highest polish, scouring iu any soil, and in durability surpassing all others 



Genuine Eagle Cast Flown, Gana Plomi rhiJfi^,^*^^^^ rr 
Horse PowerslThreshing Machines, HeadS, Ri^^^ZTma^^^^ 
%'<\ ^<trtHre Forks the Perry Gold Medal Mowe/^TheAmerZan Hal 
rediUr, BitrVs Self- Adjusting Steel Tooth Horse Bake, Ames'^hS^K 
and Spades, Scythes, Axes, Etc, ^^un,f:, ^mes Shovels 



Factories at Worcester and Groton Junction, Mass. Particular attention paid to execution 
of Orders for Foreign Markets and the Pacific Coast. execution 



Ixvi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



W. H. DOAME, Prea't. 



». Ki. liYON, Sec'y- 




MANUFACTURERS OF EVERY VARIETY OF 



PITEIT WOOD 



1 
J 



mm 



IICHIIR! 




[WARRANTED SUPERIOR TO ANY IN USE. 



-^3sriD 



MATCHING MACHINES, 

SCROLL AND BAND SA^WS, IRON FRAME TENONING MA- 
CHINES, IRON FRAME SASH AND MOLDING MA- 
CHINES, EDGE MOLDING AND SHAPING 
MACHINES, TRANSVERSE AND DI- 
MENSION PLANERS. 

MOETISIITG & BOmm MACHIITES 

tertical, Circular aotl EaniResariog Macliiiies, 

Vertical and Homoatal Boring Machines, 

POWER FEED EDGING SAWS, RIPPING AND CROSS-CUT- 
TING MACHINES. IMPROVED SPECIAL MACHIN- 
ERY FOR WHEEL MAKING, ETC., ETC, 
A SPECIALTY MADE OP 

SHAFTING HAIffGBRS i& PULLBYS 

CatCULABS AND PBICES SENT ON APPLICATION. 



J. A. FAY & CO., COR. JOHN AND FRONT STS., CINCINNATI, 0. 

H. P. OREGORY, AGENT, San Franoisoo, Cal. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT 




Ixviii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 







ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixix 



JOHN RUSSELL CUTLERY CO. 



FACTORIES AND OFFICE, 



TURNBRS' FALLS, raASS". 



MANUFACTUKKES OP 



BOTCHER, PAINTERnNDDRUGGlSTSlNlYES 

IN OREAT VARIETY. 

Eztra Hard Rubber Handle Table Cutlery of our own Mamifacture, 
Fine Ivoride Handle Table Cutlery, Very White and Durable* 

Sample Office, 77 Chambers St., N. Y, 



These Goods are kept In Stock by tbe Principal Cutlery, Hardware and Qneensware 

Jobbers of San Francisco. 



j^ "X" 1 o nr ,A. x« 



ADJUSTS ITSELF B NEEDLES & AWLS. 



ALL THICENESSES 

OF WOEK. 
ONE MACHINE 

—FOR— 

All Classes of Work. 




Mm MacMne SnpBlKS. 



ALL MAOHHIES waeemted 
rOE ONE YEAE. 

All Parts Furnlsbed in 
Duplicate. 



O P XPI CB. 



70 rsABx. sTBsisT^ sosToxr* 



Ixx 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Wm-M-T^ ^ Xa^^C^3S1frOimXHC, 



PROrRIETORS OF THE 




Manufacturers and Importers of Saddlery Hardware, 
OFFICE— 52 AN» 54 TERllACE, .... BUFFAliO, N. Y. 



-^3Sr ID 



'wm' 



mm 






THE UNDERSIGNED MANUFACTURE ALL KINDS OP 
PISH HOOKS POR 



Our Hooks are all made of the best Quality of Steel Wire, 

and are Superior in Quality and Lo"wer in Price than 

any Hooks Sold, of Equal Quality, made in 

the World. Also a General Assortment 

of Fishing Tackle. 






Orders Solicited and Promptly Filled. Send for Clrenlar« and Price lilsts. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. Ixxi 



MOEBIS, WHEELER & CO. 



Manufecturers aud Dealers in 



IRON, STEEL & NAILS 



^MmmmMEi,PMsm. f^. 



Charcoal and Anthracite Pig Iron, Boiler and Ship Plates, Bar Iron. 
Angle and T Iron, Rivets, Sheet Iron ; a full assortment 
of Merchant Iron of all kinds, and Out 
Nails and Spikes constant- 
ly in stock. 



PHILADELPHIA, NE^?V YORK, 

1608 Market Street, I4. Cliff Street. 



UNION STONE CO. 

Patentees and Manufacturers of 

UmOir EMERY WHEELS, EMEHT, 

Emery Cloth, Emery Oil| Whet Stones, etc. 

MACHINES TO RUN EMERY WHEEL UPON, OF ALL KINDS. 

Emery Knife Grinders, -with automatic action, for grinding long knives 
used by Planing Mills, Book Binders, Curriers, &c. Saw 
Gummers, Tool Grinders, and Diamond Tools, 
for keeping Emery Wheels in order. 

AGENTS FOR PACIFIC COAST, 



107, 109and 111 FRONT STREET, 



Ixxii PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



GEORGE A. PRINCE & CO., 

Organs and Melodeons. 

The Oldest, Largest, and Most Perfect Manufactory in the 
_ United States. 

64,000 

No^w in use. 
No other Musical Instrument ever obtained the same Popularity. 

SEND FOR PRICE LISTS. 

ADDRESS, 



EUGENE F. PHILLIPS, 



„ fWVlBEWCE, % I, 



MAUFACTURERS OF 



THE HOXSIE & REED 

Patent FlexlWe Gas-TliM Win. 



The " make-up " of this tube includes six 
separate layers of Animal Intestines, 
which must, in their natural condition, be 
air and gas-tight. These, by our process, 
are kept in this condition in our Tubes, and 
as we finish it on the outside with a fine Mo- 
hair Braid, it makes the nicest-looking, most 
durable, and universally acknowledged 

BEST TUBING 

In the market 

B9-PIea8e send for Sample Card and 
Price Iiist. 



PATENT FINISHED 

INSULATED TELEGRAPH WIRE 

PATENT ELECTRIC CORDAGE, 

RUBBER-COVERED WIRE CABLES, 
ETC., ETC. 



My Wires took the two highest prizes, Bronze 
Medals — at the Cincinnati Exposition of 1874, 
for the best OJice and the best Insulated 
Line Wire, and those wishing 

"Will do well to give me a call. 
B^^Please Send for Sample Card and Price 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxiii 



" By common consent, success is an evidence of superiority." — Ed. Everett. 

3,790,964 PACKaCES SOLD IN 1872 and 1873. 




Fpot>ll 



Tor beauty of polish, saving of labor, freeness from dust 
durability and cbeapness,truly unrivalled in any country 

CAUTION— Beware of worthloso Imitations under other names« 
put up In similar shape and color Intended to deceive. Each 
packaee of the genuine bears our Trade Mark. Take no other. 



WHOLESALE AGENTS IN SAN FRANCISCO, JOHN TAYLOR & CO., 5H WASHINGTON ST. 

NOTICE.— These goods, owing to 
their superior quality, large size (of 
•which the above cut is a fac simile,) 
have for years coraraanded an enor- 
mous sale in the Eastern States, and 
•we have recently established an agen- 
cy in Calfornia as above, aaid the Rising 
Sun Stove Polish -will be found by the 
trade and consumer to supercede oth- 
er articles largely. Try it. 




Factoky: Canton, Mass.— Established 1861. 



MOSELEY'S PATENT 

EUREKA SCROLL SAW MACHINE 



CONCEDED TO BE THE 



■S^VERY BEST SCROLL SAW MACHINE IN USE.s^Sx 

Never was exhibited in competition* with other Ma- 
chines that it did not take the 
First Premium. 

Price bozed for shipment at Factory, $151.75 




STEAM BOILERS A SPECIALTY. 



Ixxiv PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



=TP3"E!= 



TURNER &. SEYMOUR MF'G CO, 



Manufacturers, Importers and Dealers in 






HARDWARE, NOTIONS, ETC. 

m BWaMB8W,» MEW W0MM, 

MANUFACTORY AT 



lli^CELEBIiATED SHOUmm ORGAH 



F4 



-sJ* 




/^. 






1-3 



tid 



-THEY COMPRISE THE- 



EUREKA. PARAGON, ORGHESTRALS AND GRANDS 

These Organs are the most perfect and beautiful in the world, and must only be seen and 
heard to be appreciated. The price is so low that all can buy a First-Class Organ. Cata- 
logues mailed, post paid upon application to 

B. SHONINGER Organ Co., 51 to 61 Chestnut St., New Haven, Conn. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxv 




-^^^^VXH ««^E« Wo„^^ 



MANUFACTCBB ALL KINDS OF 

DriMists' Mm afll Inlia Mm KooJs 

SPECIAL AHENTION PAID TO ALL KINDS OF JOB WORK. 



mm mms> 



:B:E=tooK:ij-5risr, 



3SrE"W ^2"0^=LI^. 



I have made H. S. CROCKER & CO., 401 & 403 SANSOM ST., SAN FRANCISCO, 
my agents for the sale of the above goods. All orders addressed to them will receive 
prompt attention. 



rA^tw %^m!i. 



The undersigned offers his ser- 
vices as an Eastern Agent or 
Represer +ative for Pacific Mercan- 
tile Housco or Manufactories . He 
has had many years of experience 
as an Agent, and possesses a large 
acquaintance among the business 
communities of the New England, 
Middle and Western, and more 
Northern of the Southern States; 
also in the British Provinces of 
North America, and a limited ac- 
quaintance in Great Britain, and 
on the Continent of Europe. 



BEST OF NEW YORK CITY REFERENCES 
GIVEN. 

I<oe»Iitlea Preferred, 

NEW YORX CITY, BOSTON OR PHILADELPHU. 

Parties in want of such an agen t, can obtain full infor- 
mation of 

J. E. JOHNSON, P. 0. Boi No. 1 1 93eacon Falls, Comi. 



Harper Twelfetrees 

CORDOVA WORKS, • BOW, LONDON, 

The Largest Exporters of 

l\]\m h>] Ink 



IN THE WOKI.I>. 



-Also Manufactubebs 



14UHBE¥ BMih WmM 



FOB EXPORTATION. 



Ixxvi 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



FISHEHIES. FISHERIES. 

3,000 dozen Best Grade Cotton Cod Lines, 

30,000 pounds Best Grade Cotton Ropes. 

100,000 pounds Cotton Seine Twine, 

100,000 pounds Cotton Seine Netting. 
Any net made to order,suited to the rivers and coast of the Pacific and its islands 
10,000 lbs. approved brandsFlax Salmon Gill]SretTwine,inade to order 
5,000 lbs. Fine Gill Netting, suited from sardines to a shad. 
Dip Nets, Cork and Ceder Buoys,Leads, etc., etc. 

COTTON IS MORE DURABLE THAN HEMP, 

And cheaper, and used exclusively in the United States. 



ESTABLISHED 1854. 



EEORGANIZED 1872. 



C^DETHOIT CAB WOEKS 



MANUFACTURE 





0/kp WilfEEiS fim O^STIWigS, 

EIRAM WALKER, . . . . . • President 

GEO. E. R USSELL, . . . Secretary and Treasurer 

GEO. B. RUSSELL, Vice-President 

E. a C0CI<:LEY, Agent 




^DETROIT, MICUM 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxvii 



]Vr.A.^2^I3:EIW'£5 



Competent Judges say tbey are 

"Wortli AH Otte Pot Toptler." 

More than 500,000 of them have been used 
in the Schools of America. Business men 
have many times said of 

UNIVERSITY BOOK-KEEPING 

"We would not for $1,000 part with 
the instruction we have gained from it." 

The author has been eight years Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction in Michigan, 
and is now President of the Mayhew Busi- 
ness College, of Detroit. 

The University Book-keeping is sent 
by mail to any address on receipt of $2.50, U. 
S. Currency. Schools and the trade supplied 
at usual discount. 

IRA MAYHEW, Detroit, Mich. 



S. T^. SXJBBAIID. 



MANUFACTURER OP 



SEAL PRESSES, 

f AI SEALS, LINEN MARKERS, k. 

Dating and Endorsement Stamps for Kail- 
roads, Banks, Offices, «fec. Seals for Cor- 
porations, Lodges, Notaries, Soci- 
eties, &c. Inspectors' and 

EXPRESS CO.'S WAX SEALS, 

Linen Markers for Marking Clothing with 
Indelible Ink, in Writing, Old En- 
glish, German Text, or Ko- 
man Letters. 

STAMP RIBBONS, ALL COLORS. 

Wholesale and Ketail. 



t^All K.ind8 of Stantpa Jtepaired^'^Sn 

Orders by Mail or Express promptly executed. 



Geo. H. Steward. 



J. Kensett Vail. 



. H. STEWARD 



^ COp 



7 



Manufacturers of all kinds of 

Banklngr Hoase, 

Post Office, 

Business and 

Kallroad Ticket Dating 

HAHD STAMPS, 

SEAIi PRESSES, WAX SEAI^S, STEHT- 
ClliS, Etc., Etc. 



Cbeck Protectors and Cancellers. 

Blbbons, all Sizes, Sent 

by Slail. 

ENGRAVING AND DIB SINKERS, 

In all Its Branches. 

Send for Catalogue. The Trade Supplied. 

Ko. 29 William St., N. T. 




MAUFACTUKERS OF 




WALLINGFORD, CONN. 

SAI.ESR009I : 

676 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



Embracing all Articles of the kind for 

Table and Ornamental use known to the 

Trade, among which are fine 

TEA SETS, SALVERS, 

Ice Pitchers, Casters, Butter Coolers, 
Cake and Fruit Baskets, 

KNIVES, SPOONS, FORKS, ETC., ETC. 

All orders sent to Factory or Salesroom 
will receive prompt attention. 



Ixxviii PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



C5oi\c5of(i :^|)fir\^ Wofk^. 

J. Pi^LLMER & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CARRIAGE SPRINGS, 

Superior Temper, "Warranted. 



ESTABLISHED IN 1852. ESTABLISHED IN 1852 

TOnilAITCS, MSP-HZiiM <& CO. 

PROPRIETORS OF THE 

Green Island MalleaUe Iron "Works, 

AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

MALLEABLE IRON CASTINGS IN ALL THEIR VARIETIES. 

(Satriag^ §xmx a cf pejcialtjj* ^mtl fox a fi^atalogm. 



GET THE BEST. WEBSTER'S UNABRIDGED DICTIONARY 

10,009 Words and Meanings not in other Dictionaries. 3000 Engravings, 1810 Pages Quarto. 
F'FLTCDJEi, - S12.00. 

^^h^ Webster now is glorious. [Prea. Itaymond,VcissarCol. 

- Every scholar knows its value. • [ TT. ff. Prescott. 

/ Best defining Dictionary. [ Horace Mann. 

Standard in this office. [ A. H. Clapp, Oov't Printer 

The etymology without a rival. [ John O. Saxe.. 

(f Excels in defining scientific terms. [Pres. Hitchcock- 

Remarkable compendium of knowledge. i Pres. Clark- 

The sales of Webster's Dictionaries throughout the country in 1873 were 20 times as large as the sale 

of any other Dictionaries. 

G. & C. MERRIAM, Springfield, Mass., Publishers Webster's Unabridged. 

fiSB-iOLD BY ALL SA^J FRANCISCO BOOKSELLBRS.-^a 




THE HULL&BELDEN CO. 

fSucceeding the Bartram & Fanton Mf'g Co., R. A. Belden & Co., and F. A. Hull & Co.) 
MANUFACTURERS OF 



if Si¥itt iS/111 »4111i 

ENOINE and Hi^lSTD Li^THES, 

Iron Planers, Improved Milling and Screw Machines, 

''The Dainry" Drill Cliuct, Special Mactiinery anJ MacMne fort, 

Shafting, Pulleys and Hangers; also, Steel and Iron 
Of Every Description. OANAL STREET, DANBURY, CONN. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxix 



THE AMERICAN LINEN THREAB CO. 



-MANDFACTUBER8 OF- 



Patent Linen Thread, in Spools and in Skeins. 

Whipmaher^ and Bookbinder'H Threads, Oill Net and Salmon fn-ines, 

machine and Hand Shoe Threads, Saddlers' Thread, in all Colors, 

Eiinen and Tow Yarns, Broom, Variegated and Pink liinen Twines. 

N. B.— Orders for any of the above named Goods, together with everything else pertaining to Wet and 
Dry Spinning, will receive our prompt attention. SATISFACriUiSI GUARANTEED. 



Mechanicsville, 



Saratoga County, N. Y. 



WT©Hlff 



FORTV^RDiisra, sKLiPi^iisra, 



'$SSl#fli: 




»i 



tt# 



Solicits Consignments; also Orders for the Purchase of 
Merchandise in general. 



122 CHURCH STREET, - - NEW YORK 



Iv/Jik^lW 4\ -111 n^lF-' 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



PRINTING INKS 



W^mWM 






^im>^ 



Mwm 






No. 20 SPRING LANE, 



Ixxx 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 






Liimiif 



Rest iCofflforl to tlfiSf firing 

The Houskhold Panacea and Family Liniment is tho 
best remedy in the world for the following complaints: Cramp 
in the limbs and stomach, pain in the stomach, bowels or sidei 
rheumatism in all its forms, colic, neuralgia, colds, fresh wounds 
spinal complaints, and sprains and bruises. Don't fail to pro- 
cure it. Its equal has never been known for removing pain in 
all cases. For internal and external use. 



BROWN'S 



COMFITS 



WOEM LOZENGES. 



XJSEl 

BROWN'S 

Camphorated 

Saponaceous 




WINSLOW'S 

. FOR 

GHILDEEIT 

TEETHING. 




Undoubtedly, with Children, attributed to other causes, is occa- 
sioned by worms. Bkown's Vermifuge Comfits or Worm 
Lozenges, although effectual in destroying worms, can do no 
possible injury lo the most delicate child. This valuable combi- 
nation has been successfully used by physicians, and found to be 
absolutely sure in eradicating worms, so hurtful to children. 



SOLD By ALL DRUGGISTS. 



25 GENTS A BOX. 



To Cleanse and Whiten the Teeth, to remove Tartar from the 

Teeth, to sweeten the breath and preserve the Teeth, 

to make the gums hard and healthy, use 

Biown's Camptiofated Saponaceous Dentifrice. 

Microscopical Examinations by Dr. H. I. Bowditch, of the matter de- 
posited on the Teeth, have proved that those only who used Soap as a 
Dentifrice were free from accumulations of animal and vegetable para- 
sites upon the teeth and guma. Tho addition of Camphor strengthens 
and relieves soreness of the gums and teeth, and maintains them constan- 
tly in a healthy state. Used daily as a preventive for the Tooth-Ache, it 
is invaluable. 5*5 Cents a bottle. 

Manufactured by JOHN I. BROWN & SONS, Boston 

CORTIU BROWN, Proprietors, New Tort 



You will find MRS. WINSLOW'S SOOTHING SYRUP »" 

invaluable friend. It cures Dysentery and Diarrhoea, regulates 
the Stomach and Bowels, cures Wind Colic, softens the Gums, 
reduces Inflammation, and gives tone and energy to the whole 
system. In almost every instance, where the infant is suffering 
from pain and exhaustion, relief will be found in fifteen or twenty 
minutes after the Soothing Syrup has been administered. Do 
not fail to procure it. 

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS. 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxi 



A SPLENDID RECORD FOR HOWE'S SCALES. 



Importer and Sole Agent on the Pacific Coast for 




Slanufactiired by tlie Brandon 3Iaunrac(urlng Co., Brandon, Ver. 

Railroad Track, Ilay, Coal and Cattle Scales, Miners' Transportation, Railroad Depot, Leather Deal- 
ers', Wool Scales, Dormant Two-iron Pillars, Dormant single Pillar, Portable Scales with wheels. Portable 
Scales with Drop Levers, Rolling Mill, Grain, Pork, Wheelbarrow, Hopper Scales, Army and Farmers' 
Transportation, Post Ofiice Balances. Even Balances, the celebrated Howe's Union Scales, 210 Jb, with two 
Platforms, Grocers' Scales, etc-, all of the celebrated Howe Patent. 

-ALSO AGENT FOR— 




All Kinds of Scales Eepaired by Skillful Mechanics. 

List of First-class Premiums for HOWE'S SCALES, on the Pacific Coast. 

San Francisco mechanics' Instltnte, 1869, (Fairbanks CompetiDs,) Silver Medal. 

Oregron State Agricultural Society, 1871, • • Oold Medal. 

California*' " " 1874, (Fairbanks Competing,) Silver Medal. 

» » " 1875, • • Oold Medal. 



REMOVED TO THE NEW AND ELEGANT STORE, 

SOUTHEaST COBNEB MftBKET MO FBEMONT ST8. 

The undersigned has removed from his old place of business to the new and elegant premises situ- 
ated at the SOUTHEAST CORNER OF MARKET AND FREMONT STREETS. 

This now and elegant store has the most commanding location of any business place in San Francisco. 
The store has a depth of W14 feet and a width of.& feet. 

The store is amply lighted by windows fronting on Fremont Street, aa well as windows in the rear of 
the store, where there is a passage-way for loading and unloading goods. 

The rapid growth and constantly increasing popularity of Howe's U. S. Standard Scales making it evi- 
dent that at no distant day a change of location would become a matter of necessity, I seized the opportu- 
nity presented to secure so desirable a location and a store so well arranged for showing Howe's U.S. 
Standard Scales. 

All of our grades of Scales will be set up ready for use, and purchasers can readily determine the 
capacity and sizes of platform that may be desirable for their business wants. 

The Pacific Coast is achieving a rapid growth, and Howe's U. S. Standard Scales have and will keep 
pace with its growth, and eventually will drive entirely out of the market goods of like character, which 
have so long sustained themselves on an old reputation, for the reason that Howe's Scales embody in their 
manufacture all the late and modern improvements that have been made in scales for the last twenty 
years. 

Once more, as repeatedly dome in this Journal, I thank the public for their generous approval of my 
efforts in their behalf as well as my own, in building up a trade for so superior an article of Scales, and 
hope for a continuance of the public's good-will and patronage. I shall still further endeavor to merit 
their approval, and put to shame those interested parties with other goods of like character, but of infe- 
rior worth, who would like to get me out of the way. 



The Jjargest and most complete Scale Establish- 



V. S. 'W. PARKHURST, 



ment in the United States. 



Southeast Corner dfarket and Fremont Streets. 



Ixxxii PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Established 1782. 




k 




Manufacturers of 



Litkje&llraiipind 

OFFICES, 31st ST., 

BELOW CHESTNUT, PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 





J. H. BODENSTEIN", 

Manufacturer of all kinds of 

ICE TOOLS & ELEVATOR CHAINS 

Kepairing Promptly and Neatly done. 

All Work Warranted to give Satisfaction. 

STAATSBURGH, DUTCHESS CO., N. Y. 



MANUFACTURER OF — - — 



f 



PEARL AND SLEEVE BUTTONS, 

STUDS, &c., of every description. 

Bo. 9 ALLIN& STREET, HEAR MARKET STREET DEPOT, NEWARK, H. J. 



No. 24 COLUMBIA ST., NEW YORK, 

MAKER AND PATENTEE OF 

HyJranlic Jacts & Pnnclies, Tule Expan flers 

AND DIRECT-ACTING STEAM HAMMERS. 

Communications by letter will receive prompt attention. 

JACKS for Pressing on Car Wheels or CRANK PINS made to order. 



AiDVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxiii 



HOO^IS]^ a^ O! 



CARRIAGE BUILDERS, 

ESTABLISHED 1807. 

113 ywnm^ stpeet, mvmn, tMim% 

MIDWAY BETWEEN BELCRAVIA AND THE HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT. 

TO KCB^^ IvT^^JESTTT TE3:E QXTEEIST. 

His Majesty the Emperor of Germany, His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, K. G., His Koyal 
Highness the Duke of Ediriburgli, K. G., His losperial Highness the Crown Prince of 
Germany, His Royal Highness the Duke of Cambridge, K. G., Her Royal 
Highuess the Ducliess of Cambridge, His Serene Highness 
the Prince Tecls, etc., etc., etc. 




1851. lionflon— Prize Itfednl. 

I8SS. Paris— Reporter to Society of Arts. 

1852. Iioudon— Juror and Reporter. 
1863. Frencli Treaty Medal. 



1885. CoIogne-FlrAt-CIasH Silver Sledal. 

1885. Oporto— Oold JHcdal or Honour. 

1865, Dublin- Juror aud Reporter. 

1887. Paris— Juror and Reporter. 



1873. liondon— Reporter to Society of Arts. 

Combining Iiightness, Strength, Elegance, Comfort. 

IjAND AUS. with Patent Balance-action Heads, to enable the oocupants readily to open the Car« 

riage or close it in case of rain, and light enough to use for long distances in hilly countries. 

A Large Stock of fashionable, sound Carriages, that have been carefully used, 

ranging in prico from one-third to two-thirds the price of new. 

Exportation to the Continent of Europe, India, the Colonies, North and j 
South America, etc., etc. 

The Size of the Borses to be used should be stated tvhen ordering Carriages. 



Ixxxiv PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRBCTORT. 



ESTABLISHED 1859. 



ii^toe fc©em#m 




oe 4 



I METAL TRADES' ADVERTISER, 



B f*1 

a 

Entered at Stationers' Hall. Beffistered for Transmission £ O 

to Foreign Countries. 3 ^ 



^ * A MONTHLY PRIVATE TRADE JOURNAL *" | 

PnbllKhrd on tlic First Day of the Monlli for tb« Proprietors, nt 

44:a, C-A.lSriSr03Sr ST., X.03SriD0IT, ElTO-L-A^lSriD, 

And issued in 13 Numbers, the last partaking of the form of a Diary, and entitled "The 
Ironmonger's Diary and Test Book." 



"TIIE TKOXMOXGFIl " was esfnhlislieil In the year 1(st9, and is the oldest and only representative orsran of 
the Tron. H«nl\var»\ and Metal Trades. This Journal stands pre-eminent amongst tnide publications, and pos- 
sesses all the ndvantiiges of the Coiniuerci.il N'e«spi»i»er and a hixh-«M!»ss I Jterary Masijizine. The principal 
characttTistics of " Tlio Ironmonsrer " are sot forth in the accuracy of its Market Keports and Prices Current, the 
Intrinsic value of it.'* Home, Foreign and ColoniaJ Correspondence, the inipartitility of its gratuitous criiicisma 
upon the leading novelties of the oay. its careful selection of .VgricultnriU. I,eg!U, and Magisterial news apper- 
taining to the Metal Trades, the completeness of its lists of Patents and general !>tatistlcs. its comprehensive 
DirtH-tory of Manufactures, and multiplicit.v of chussideii Advertisements. It can. therefore, be imme<1iately 
VHTceiveii that the main objtH-t of this publication is to furnish a faithful record of all things of specitio value to 
those iutereste<1 in the manufacture, pnrchjjse, consignment, shipment, or sale of Hardware, Arms and .\mmu- 
nttion. Oils. Seeds. Implements, and Machinery. 

THE Sl'BSCRIlTION, (.Including the Ironmonger's Diary and Text Book.l 10 shillings per annum, post free, 
pavable in advance. Single Copies of the '•Ironmonger,'' 1 shilling, post free. Single Copies of the "Iron- 
monger's" Diary aud Text Book,'' 3 shillings, post free to new subscribers. 

SCAUS OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISEMENTS. 

THE IRONMONGER AND METAL 
TRADES' DIRECTORY. 



DISPLAYED ADVERTISEMENTS, 

COXSiatlSG OF 

1 page. 7x9 inches. £5 00?^ Insertion. 

»i " 3 15 

li " „ 2 15 " 

«j' " „ 2 

1-6 " 1 •:: 6 

^ " 18 " 

1-16 " 10 " 

Less 10 ^ cent, on six. or 20 ?» cent, on Uitrteen, con- 
secutive insertions respectively, If ordered in advance. 



This most important feature of "The Ironmonger" 
and liegister of the manufacturers of Great Britain, is a 
daily index of reference for all connected with the 
Wholesale and Retail Trades, and consequently a most 
valuable medium of publicity for all wishing to extend 
their business relationship with Great Britaiu and For- 
eign Countries. 

21s. per annum (payable in advance"* is the charge for 
the registration of any name and address under each 



SPECIAL RATES FOB WRAPPER AlfD PAGES heading selectetl. io per annum being the fee in cases 
PRECEDIXG A2f D FOLLOWING LITERARY where maimfiu-turers insert their trade marks, and oc- 
SIATTER, I *^upy lines, in size equivalent to an inch. 

EXTRA CHARGE FOR THE ENTIRE TRADE ISSUE. 

During the months of -Vpril ;md (October no less than lO.OOO Copies are distributed gratuitously throughout 
the world"; aniomrst all couuei-te<l with the Metal Trades, and as much expense is entailed in tr.insmitUng a large 
proportion of these numl>ere to residents in all the principal seats of foreign commerce. Advertisements appear- 
ing OX I.Yin the.<!e spei^'ial hjdf-yearly issues are chargeil double tlie ordinary rate. Alaunfacturers Circulars, 
Prospectuses, and Price Lists are distributed in tliese numbers at 

I5». per I.OOO if consisting of « pages. 

SOs. " 4 pages. 

40*. " " S pages. 

All Advertisements for insertion must be sent to the Publisher on or before the 2fith of the month, except 

Employers', Assistants', and Auctioneers' Advertisements, which can l)e received up to 10 itm. on the morning 

previous to publicatiou. 

Books for review. Correspondence for publication, and Samples in illustration of Xovel Inventions, should be 
addr«vsse<lto the Editor, who is open to accept Trade .\rticles and intelligence in any langiiage from residents in 
all quarters of the globe, luul to recompense those desiring payment for such contributions which shall be 

"^^Itemitta'iices' should" be made iwvable to E. P. H.\lse. cross»Hl M.\^rtix * Co., and transmitted to the Pub- 
lislu^r,whohiistheentirechargeofairmattersrelatingtothe.\dverUsementDt>partmentof ''iHElKOXMONBER, 
and undertakes to furnish Estimates for printing CircuUus, and engraving all kinds of Mechanical Des^ns ami 
Illustrations, 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. IXXXV 



FIRST PRIZE. FIRST PRIZE. 

TZIOMAS FZiSMZITG <& SOIT, 

WEST GROVE MILL, 

HALIFAX, YORKSHIRE, ENGLAND, 

KanaEactaren of every description of 

Woo'l, Cloth, etc., for Carding Flax, Tow, Jute, Cotton, Worsted, Sillt, Shoddy, China Grass, and 
other fibrous materiala. All kinds of 

For X>re8siog Silk; Leather Belting, single and doable. Card Clothing of every description. Also 

GENERAX MILL FURNISHING. 

Asentaln Vienna ...„ JullinsA Koncbany. 

AarentM in Italy Champny dc Alexander. 

AsenlM in KuKOla. Uermany and France F. Votta A Co. 

AtcenUi In Ireland Bidel A Co. 



PEEK, FREAN & CO., 



ItAHUFACrCBRRS 07 



FANC! BISCDITS FOR EXPORIATION, 



Xj o isT ID o isr . 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED FOR EXCELLENCE OF QUALITY : 

LONDON, 1862. DUBLIN, 1865. 

PARIS, 1867. HAVRE, 1868. 

AMSTERDAM, 1869. NAPLES, 1871. 

(Mention Extraordinaire.) • 

Medal for ProyreiM, Vienna. 1^73. 

Crold nedal Awarded by tbe Kational Academy of Acrrlcnltnre, 

9Ianura<rtureM and Commerce, Paris, 1974. 

No higher award being made in any ca.se for English Biscuits. 

UPWARDS OF ONE HUNDRED AND FIFTY VARIETIES. 

Tbe«e Ceieltrated BiMcuiiii are of tbe very Beot Oencrlplion, Warranted lo Retain tbeir 

<laality for a ConHiderable Period, and pan, with Contldence, l>e Bee- 

omuiended to Mbipper* and Kxporterat. 



Ixxxvi PACIFIC COAST BUSINE;SS DIRECTORY. 



PLATINUM, GOLD, SILVER, 
ANTIMONY, BISMUTH, QUICKSILVER. 

JOEl^^ZOl^^ATmilY & CO. 

HATTON GARDEN, LONDON, 

Platinum Manufacturers, Aesayers, Smelters, Refiners, and 

Metallurgical Chemists. 

SODIUM, POTASSIUM, MAGNESIUM, ALUMINIUM, NICKEL, COBALT. 



}ihi[\vdh6tui^Qi^^ of Sfti^l\e^ 

SINCE ANNO DOMINI 1777. 

KENT'S HAIR BRUSHES are the best that can bo manufactured, and the most durable, pene- 
trating, and elegant in design and finish. 

KENT'S TOOTH BRUSHES are manufactured in a special factory, with the greatest care 
They are all warranted sound, no loose hairs, and those improved under the patent of Dr. Maury of Wash- 
ington, U. S., are the most pleasant to use, and the most harmless to the gums and to the enamel of the 
teeth. Every druggist or dealer in brushwaro should order Kent's Brushes from the wholesale houses in 
the United States. 

STORES— II Oreat 9Iai'lboroagli St., liOndon ^¥, England. 



Mainifaelursr o! Watsii Materials I Tools of e7er; kini 

"WATCH GLASSES OP EVERY POSSIBLE VARIETY. 
A BRONZE MEDAL was awarded to 

J"- ID. 'V^XISTTDTJIHI, 

For PURE CHRONOMETER OIL, at the Paris Grand Exhibition, 1S67. 

OLDHAM, nr. MANOHESTEE, ENGLAND. 



USEFUL M ODEEH IH VEHTIOHS. 

CLARKE &, DUNHAM, 

69 MARK LANE, LONDON, ENGLAND. 

General Factors for Engineers, Mill Furnishers, Iron Merchants, Dealers in Birmingham, 
Sheffield, French and German Goods; Patentees of the Millstone Balance, etc.; Proprietors of 
Liemain's ''Needle" Lubricator Patent, etc.. Mechanical Letter Binders. 

Ik Largest Depot in Mark Lane for Millstoiies and Modern Flour and Rice Mill Macliinery." 



ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxvii 



CALIFORNIA SUGAR REFINERY 

STOCK COMPANY. 

,@^CAPITAL STOCK, - $1,500, 000. ^S». 

NUMBER OF SHARES, 3,000. S500 PER SHARE. 



ncorporated April 3, 1867. 




C. SPRECKELS, 

D. SPRECKELS, 



President and Manager. 
Secretary. 



C. SPREOKELS, GEO. H. EGGBRS, PETER SPREOKELS, 

JOHN SPREOKELS, H. HORSTMANN. 



COMMERCIAL AGENTS, 



2±0 California i!5tr*eet- 



WORKS. S. W. COR. EIGHTH &BRANI\IAN STREETS. 

This Eefinery, having recently trebled its capacity, is better prepared to supply 
the great demand for its various kinds of 



Ixxxviii 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



JOBXT H. SIMS, 

MANUFACTURER OF 

WROUGHT IRON GIRDERS, 

Aiclors aM Tie BoMs, Bnr£lar-Proof Bant Vaults ai 

JiiZZi T?^OKZS, BRZDGS "WOKII, 
Cast and Wrought Iron Cemetery, Stoop and Area Railings, 



AND ALL KINDS OF 



Willi, 



123 AND 

Between Mission and Howard, 




125 BEALE STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

All orders for the interior, Oregon and Nevada, also Montana, 
Idaho and Washington Territories, attended to with promptness 
and dispatch. Mr. Sims appreciates the past liberal patronage 
of his friends, and trusts he may continue to merit it in the 
future. For the information of strangers he would say that he 
feels confident that his experience in his particular calling is 
•surpassed by none on this coast, which his superior work, sent to 
almost every town in California, Oregon, Victoria and Sandwich 
Islands, and to be seen on some of the best buildings in San 
Francisco, fully attests. 

N. B.-Mr. E. M. BURTON, of Portland, will make contracts 
for Iron Work in my name. 



RISDON &o "TOWER 



-MANAGERS OF- 



PACIFIC BOILER, SHEET IRON & WATER PIPE WORKS 

Are fully prepared to do at Shortest Notice, and in the best Workmanlike manner, all kinds 
of Boiler and Sheet Iron Work, High and Low Pressure Boilers Built and Repaired. 

We refer to Twenty Years Experience in the above business as a guarantee that all orders 
for work will be faithfully executed. 

Office and Works, 118 and 120 FREMONT STREET, 

Bet. Mission & Howard, San Francisco. 

J. N. RISDON, formerly of Coffey & Risdon and Risdon Iron Works. 
CHAS. TOWER, formerly Foreman of Coffey & Risdon and Risdon Boiler Works. 



mi^i^i 




TTEReAICfGLlSSmilER 



G=& SAN FRANCISCO. =s: 



AD\'ERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



Ixxxix 



II ^kP 






S. W. CORNER BATTERY AND UNION STREETS. 



IKTO 0^=^1=01=1 A. TTErD. 



CAPITAL, 



$500,000 



And possesses a capacity equal to the Refining of Twelve Thou- 
sand Tons Annually. Its products are 

(A) Crushed Sugar, Extra Cut Block Sugar, 

1 5 and 3 5-lb Loaves, put up for export, Fine Crushed and Powdered, 

Granulated, Extra Fine Bar Sugar, 

Extra Golden Syrup. Extra Golden C, Golden C. 



CUBE SUGAR pnt np in 25, 50 and 100-poniii cases. Also In Barrels and Half-Bdrrels 



HERMAN MJi;p:]SE;, 

I» II E3 SI!) E! KTO?. 



Of&ce at the Refinery, S. W. Cor, Union ^Battery Sts. 







MANUFACTURER OF 



IMPROVED WINDMILLS, 



W£FM^ F^'^MB. 



PUMPS (S. HORSEPOWERS 



SAN FRANCISCO. 
SEND FOR CIRCULAR 



xc 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



EICELSIOE 

Improved 

Windmill. 

The opinion has become quite 
prevalent that Windmills are 
not to bo relied upon, either to 
withstand violent storms, or to 
perform their work in very 
light winds. Such opinion is 
doubtless true, with regard to 
many of the Mills made in Cal- 
ifornia, and especially true 
with regard to most of those 
sent here from the East. It is, 
however, an injustice towards 
the few mechanics who have 
made wind-power a study and 
a specialty for many years, to 
class the productions of their 
labor with those of the many 
who pretend to be windmill 
makers, but who have compar- 
atively little experience or 
practical knowledge of the 
business. 

We were the inventors, more 
than ti-'n years ago, of the sin- 
gle, cross-vane windmill. The 
demand for them gradually in- 
creased until they have come 
into more general use than 
any other mills. Of course, 
other parties were induced to 
make an imitation of them, and 
some to make use of its name, 
"EXCELSIOR." A man is 
desirous of purchasing a wind- 
mill, and starts in pursuit of 
the factory. Presently he sees 
a sign,'- WINDMILLS," walks 
in and inquires, " is this the 
place where they make the 

HXCRLSIOR WlNDMIM.?" The 

answer is, "Yes, sir — 0, yes, 
we make them," or words to 
that eft'ect. and the gentleman 
really thinks he is purchasing 
:in KXCELSIOR. We have 
recently caused the name to bo 
registered in the U. S. Patent 
)Hico as our Tk.\i>e Mark, and 
I'lereby caution all persons not 
to make unlawful use of the 
•amo. 

The EXCELSIOR was awarded the first or cash premium at the Cal. State Agricultural Fair in 1872— 
the only time ever exhibited there. It has taken a larger number of premiums at the Mechanics' Institute 
Fairs in San Francisco than any other windmill. 

We have of late made material improvements in their construction. They are adjustable and self- 
regulating, arc very substantially built, and with reasonable care will last for twenty-five to thirty years. 
Revolving horizontally upon anti-friction balls, enables them to catch the slightest breezes, and they will 
run in liyhier winds than any other mills, and violent storms very seldom injure them. They are always 
under perfect control, a child being able to operate them. 

The cut, engraved from a photograph, represents the style and appearance of the improved or forty- 
fan EXCELSIOR. 

They are made in twelve sizes, from twelve-foot to forty foot diameter of wheel. A larger stock and 
assortment kept on hand than can be found in the State. Every mill fully guaranteed. 

Excelsior Wind Mill Works, 211 k 213 IVIission St., San Francisco, 

ATWOOD & BODWELL, Proprietors. 




ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



XCI 



Horse-Fovrers, 

IVITII RATEXT 

DRAW-SPRINa LEVERS. 



$140.00 

TRIFZiB CSAIIS 

— AND — 

DOUBLE LEVERS, 

For Tno Horses. 




EXCELSIOR, 

$100.00 

OBfE-HORSE. 




F A R M E K S ' 

$80.00 

S I IT G Zi £I-G£iiR£l D, 

FOR OKE HORME, 




ZZOXISIB Z>0'\7^£3Z=t.S». 



Those machines are complete in every detail, and pos- 
sess every improvement and advantage that can be 
combined in Sweep Hor.'ie- Powers. They have an ad- 
vantage over any other horse-power in this market, viz: 
our application of the patent rubber draw-spring, 
which prevents any broakago of the gears by any sud- 
den start, or jumpin?, or fractiousness of the horse; and 
when used for pumping, materially lessens the jerking 
motion on the lever, caused by the change of motion of 
the piston. 

We use external gears in these machines. They 
areuniversally used on all kinds of geared machinery 
where internal gears can be dispensed with, being 
ni'.re easily lubricated and cleaned, and less liable to 
bleak the periphery of the wheels. 

'I hese Powers have dust-proof and self-oilingjournals; 
aro simple, strong, durable and cheap. Having suc- 
ceeded in making them much superior to those which 
have been imported from the East, we have virtually 
stopped their importation. 

We furnish with these powers, when desired, any 
size of belt wheels, or style, or weight of balance 
wheels, combined witti a movable crank-pin for pump- 
ing, and counter-balance when needed. 



THE STOVER 

Selfm Begulathiff 

WINDMILL, 

Is the best Eastern WindMill 

ever introduced into this 

State. 

FOR SAI4E BY 

Atwood &, Bodwell. 




& 



WIND-MILL 





These Pumps were design- ^,„ 
ed especially for Windmill'—- 
work. 

They are superior to any 
pump of Eastern make, both 
in weight, strength and in- 
side finish. 

They are constructed in 
the simplest form of a lift 
and force pump, and are not 
liable to get out of order. 



2201^'^^ Fremont 

1 $-F- 



.411 kiiKlH of ]*i|>iii);. Fitt- 
IngM. t'Ic. tiiriiiKlietl itl low- 
est raten); alMO,Wulcr Tanks 
of all »iK«ii. 




XCll PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



GILROY CIGARS, 

3IA1)E OF CALIFORNIA-GROWN TOBACCO. 

SMOKING TOBACCO, 

Unequaled for Delicacy and depth of Flavor by any Tobacco for Pipe 

Smoking or Cigarette. 

Golden Thread Smoking Tobacco, 

ALSO. A GREA.T VARIETY OP OTHER SMOKING TOBACCO, 
MANUFACTURED AND FOR SALE BY THE 

GONSOLIDATEO TOBACCO COIDPT. 



S.A.1S^ FRANCISCO. 



(0 



THE 



PACIFIC COAST 

BUSINESS DIRECTORY 



FOR 1876-78 



C9KTi.ljnsa THE 



NAME AND POST OFFICE ADDRESS OF EACH MERCHANT, 
MANUFACTURER AND PROFESSIONAL 



BESiDntQ m 



THE STATES OF CALIFORNIA, OREGON. AND NEVADA; THE TERRITORIES OF 
WASHINGTON, IDAHO. MONTANA. UTAH, ARIZONA. AND ALASKA; 
AND THE COLONY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

ALSO, A 

WITH THB FEDERAL, STATE AND MUNICIPAL OFFICERS ATTACHED THERETO, 
AND 

AN EXHIBIT OF THE RESOURCES OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



THIRD YEAR OF PUBLICATION. 



COMPILED BY 

HENRY G. LANGLEY, 

EDITOR OP THE CALIFORNIA STATE REGISTER, PACIFIC COAST ALMANAC, ETC., ETC. 



riioo 11^6 Dali&TB, QolJ Ooln. 

SAN FRANCISCO: 

HENRI G. LANGLEY, PUBLISHEB, 612 CLAY STREET, 

FRANCIS & YALENTINR, COUMERCIAL 3TEAU PRESSES, 517 CLAT STREET. 
1875. 






A Few More Sets only Remain on Wand. 

SAK FRANCISCO DIRECTORY, 

FROM 1854 to 1875. 

Eighteen Volumes Octavo, the whole Forming 

A COMPLETE AND RELIABLE HISTORY OF THE 

CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 

From its first settlement to the present time. 

:For Sa.lo, - - - I^'rlce S3S.OO. 



HENI^Y G. L ANGLE Y, Publislxer, 

61S CIj-A."5r STPIEEX , 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the Year one thousand eight hundred and seventy-fiye, 

By HENRY G. LANGLEY, 

In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington. 






ADDITIONS AND COEEECTIONS. 

Page 17— U. S. Cabinet— Zachariah Chandler, Secretary of the Interior. 

Page lO.j— Area of San Luis Obispo should be 3,200 square miles, instead of 32,000. 

Page 103— Population of 1870 should be 560,247; of 1874, 726,967. 

Page 119— Gilroy Consolidated Tobacco Company employ 725 men, instead of 125. 

Page 230 — George Hewston, Mayor, in place of James Otis, deceased. 

Page 243— Area of San Luis Obispo County 3,200 square miles, in place of 32,000. 






PREFATORY 



" The Pacijic Coast Businkss Directort ia intended to be a triennial publication, which will contain 
the name and post office address of each merchant, manufacturer, and professional engaged in business in 
the States and Territories bordering on or in the immediate vicinity of the Pacific Coast, with such infor- 
mation connected with the resources of that section of the country as will best exhibit their variety, char- 
acter, and extent; together with any other data of general interest that will add to the value of the work 
as a useful manual of reference." 

The above extract from the preface of the first volume of The Pacific Coast Business Directory sets 
forth the general plan adopted in the preparation of the material for the present work. Such additions 
and alterations in the arrangement of the work as time and experience suggested have been taken advan- 
tage of, and every efibrt made to render its pages more attractive than the previous issues, and in every 
respect thoroughly reliable. 

A brief reference to the contents of the present volume will show the extent and the important char- 
acter of the information contained therein. The first part of the work contains the organization of the 
Federal Govecnment at Washington and on the Pacific Coast, and the officers thereof— including accurate 
lists of the Post Offices and Postmasters— with a variety of useful data of a general character ; part second 
embraces the organization of the different States and Territories on the Pacific Coast, and the officers 
attached thereto, with appropriate references to the various departments of each; and a carefully prepared 
exhibit of the resources of each of the States and Territories included in the plan of the work. In this 
department, the agricultural, the mineral, the commercial, and the manufacturing interests have each 
received careful attention, andu large amount of valuable information— including lists of Quartz, Saw and 
Grist Mills, and the most important manufacturing enterprises in operation and in progress— will be 
found embraced therein. Following each State and Territory will be found a Gazetteer of the Counties, 
Cities, and Towns composing the same, with the address of each merchant, manufacturer and professional 
residing therein. Over five hundred counties, cities, and towns in this part of the work are each pro- 
faced by an accurate description of its resources and prospective advantages, the whole comprising an 
amount of information not to be found in any other publication. This department also includes one of 
the most valuable and important features of the work, a classified Business Directory, containing the 
name of each merchant, manufacturer, and professional in the States of California, Oregon, Nevada, the 
Territories of Washington, Idaho, Montana, Utah, Arizona, and Alaska, and the Colony of British Colum- 
bia, arranged under the head of the business or profession in which ho is engaged. The Gazetteer and 
Business Directory contain over fifty thousand addresses residing in twenty-five hundred and sixty-six 
different localities, nearly twice as many names as are contained in any other publication issued on the 
Pacific Coast; of this number thirty-five thousand, representing one thousand three hundred and eighty 
difierent localities, are in the State of California. An analytical table of contents, and full and complete 
indices are added, which exhibit at a glance the variety and character of the subjects referred to in this 
work, and greatly facilitate reference thereto. 

The labor and expense of collecting the material for a work of the character of the Coast Directory, 
and the amount of careful, patient, and persistent labor necessary to prepare it for the press, can be scarcely 
realized by the uninitiated. In addition to a number of special canvassing agents, who visited every 
prominent locality in the territory embraced in the plan of the work, over twelve thousand communica- 
tions and blanks of various descriptions have been forwarded to the different Federal, State, County, and 
Municipal officers, and a numerous list of special correspondents engaged in developing the resources of 
the Pacific Coast. From these different sources a larger amount of material has been secured, when its 
completeness is considered, than has been heretofore collected on the Pacific Coast. To what practical 
use it has been devoted, the pages of the work must testify; and the compiler therefore submits the result 
of his labors to the careful consideration of his patrons, and only asks that indulgence for any defects 
existing therein which is reasonable, after a due appreciation of the numerous difficulties usually attend- 
ant upon similar enterprises. 

In conclusion, the compiler would again express his obligations to his numerous correspondents, for 
their ready and willing assistance. To Messrs. Wells, Fargo & Co. he is especially indebted, for their 
prompt and courteous cooperation in placing at his disposal the aid of their numerous and gentlemanly 
representatives on the Pacific Coast. He would also express his thanks to Mr. Myron Angel, for his im- 
portant contributions on the resources of the States and Territories of the Pacific Coast, and the descrip- 
tions of the counties and cities composing the same. Also to the editors of the different newspapers, 
for the interest manifested in the success of the enterprise; to his patrons, for their substantial evidence 
of good will; and to Messrs. Francis & Valentine, for the care bestowed on the execution of the typo, 
graphical department of the work. 



CONTENTS. 



UNITED STATES. 



PAGE. 

EXECUTIVE AND CABINET 17 

MINISTERS AND DIPLOMATIC AGENTS 17 

CONSULS AND CONSULAR AGENTS 18 

ARJNIY, AND THE ORGANIZATION THEREOF 19 

Division of the Pacific 19 

Regiments attached 19 

Stations of Troops 20 

NAVY, AND THE ORGANIZATION THEREOF. 21 

Pacific Fleet 21 

Navy Yard, Mare Island 21 

POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT, PACIFIC COAST 22 

Rates of Postage 22 

Registration of Letters 22 

Postal Cards 22 

Postal Money Order System 22 

Postmasters and Offices, California' 23-27 

Postmasters and Offices, Oregon 27-29 

Postmasters and Offices, Nevada 29 

Postmasters and Offices, Washington Territory .. 30 



PAGE. 

Postmasters and Offices, Idaho Territory 31 

Postmasters and offices, Montana Territory Zl 

Postmasters and Offices, Utah Territory 32 

Postmasters" and Offices, Arizona Territory 33 

Postmasters and Offices, Alaska Territory 34 

Postmasters and Offices, British Columbia 34 

JUDICIARY— SUPREME COURT 34 

Circuits and Judges 34 and 35 

JUDICIARY-PACIFIC COAST 35 

Courts and Terms, California „ 35 

Courts and Terms, Oregon 35 

Courts and Terms, Nevada 35 and 36 

Courts and Terms, Washin!<ton Territory 36 

Courts and Terms, Idaho Territory 36 

Courts and Terms, Montana Territory 36 and 37 

Courts and Terms, Utah Territory 37 

Courts and Terms, Arizona Territory 37 

PUBLIC DEBT 38 



PACIFIC STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES AND DATE OF 
ORGANIZATION 



Area of each 

Population and Capital of each . 



C AI.IFORNI A. 



FEDERAL OFFICERS 38 

EXECUTIVE AND STATE OFFICERS 39 

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS 39 

LEGISLATURE 40 

Senate, Members 40 

Assembly, Members 40 

JUDICIARY— SUPREME COURT 41 

DISTRICT JUDGES 41 

JUDICIAL DISTRICTS 41 

C^ONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS 41 

TERMS OF DISTRICT COURTS 42 

SENATORIAL DISTRICTS 42 

ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS 43 

STATE BOARD OP EDUCATION 43 

STATE LIBRARY 43 

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 43 

REGENTS STATE UNIVERSITY 43 

STATE APPOINTEES 44 

STATE HARBOR COMMISSIONERS 44 

DEAF AND DUMB AND BLIND INSTITUTE... 44 

INSANE ASYLUM 44 

STATE PRISON 44 

MILITARY DEPARTMENT 44 

Officers and Staffs 44 and 45 

NOTARIES PUBLIC _ „ 45-48 

COMMISSIONERS OF DEEDS 48 

DEBT OF STATE 49 

GEOGRAPHY, AREA, RESOURCES, etc 49 

Geographical Features 49 

Harbors ., 49 

Mountains 51 

Rivers 52-54 

Valleys 54-56 

Area 56 

Climate 56 and 57 

Resources 58 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 58 

Wheat 59 

Barley 59 

Oats 60 

Corn 60 

Rye 60 

Buckwheat 60 

Beans 60 

Peas 60 

Peanuts 60 

Castor Bean 60 

Flax 61 

Rice 61 

Hops 61 

Silk 61 

Sugar Beet 62 

Tobacco 62 

Cotton 62 

Fruit 62 

Wine and Brandy 63 

Nuts and Forest Trees 64 

Coffee 64 

Tea 64 



Grasses 64 

Vegetables RS 

DIVERSITY OF CROPS 65 

LIVE STOCK, Etc.... —65 and 110 

Horses 65 

Mules ~ 66 

Neat Cattle „ „ 66 

Hogs 66 

Poultry 66 

Bees. 66 

Sheep 66 

Angora Goats 66 

MINERALS 67 

Gold 67 

Silver and Lead 69 

Copper 70 

Quicksilver 70 

Iron 70 

Chromium 71 

Coal 71 

Borax 71 

Sulphur 71 

Salt 71 

Petroleum 71 

Antimony T2 

Tin 72 

Plumbago 72 

Platinum 72 

Marble 72 

Limestone 72 

Granite 72 

COAST FISHERIES 72 

MANUFACrURES 73 

COMMERCE 74 

PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT Central Pacific 

Railroad 74 

AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS 75 

Acres Inclosed 75 

Acres under Cultivation..... 75 

Acres Wheat 75 

Acres Barley 75 

Acres Oats 75 

GRAPE VINES CULTIVATED 75 and 76 

WINE AND BRANDY PRODUCT 75 and 76 

RAILROADS PACIFIC COAST 70-81 

QUARTZ MILLS 82-87 

QUICKSILVER FURNACES 88 

GRISTMILLS 89-92 

SAWMILLS 92-98 

CANALS AND WATER DITCHES 98 

BANKS AND BANKING 98 

LIBRARIES 99 and 100 

YIELD PRECIOUS METALS PACIFIC COAST.... 100 

POPULATION SAN FRANCISCO 100 

NEWSPAPER AND PERIODICAL PRESS 101-103 

COUNTY FINANCES, DEBT, Etc 104 

COUNTY RE(.:EIPrS AND EXPENDITURES 104 

CITY AND TOWN FINANCES, DEBT, ETC 104 

COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS 105 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE. 

LEOAL DISTANCES 105 

POPULATION, 1870 AND 1S74 105 

VALUE REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY 105 

POPULATION CITIES AND TOWNS, 1870 105 

ELECTION RETURNS, 1868-1875 106 

METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS 107-109 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 109 



PAGE. 

FOREIGN CONSULS, SAN FRANCISCO 109 

LIVESTOCK 110 

GOLD AND SILVER PRODUCT U.S 110 

GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS REGISTER.. ..111- 

290 and 810 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY, SAN FRANCISCO.. .291-384 
BUSINESS DIRECrrORY, CALIFORNIA. 385-500 



OBEOOir. 



EXECUTIVE AND STATE OFFICERS 501 

FEDERAL OFFICERS 501 

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS 501 

JUDICIARY, SUPREME COURT 501 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEYS 502 

JUDICIAL DLSTRICTS 502 

AREA AND RESOURCES 502-504 

COI NTIES AND COUNTY SEATS 504 

POPULATION, 1870 504 

ELECTION RETURNS, 1872, 1873 504 

ACRES ASSESSED 504 



VALUE REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY HOi 

GRIST MILLS 505 and 506 

LIBRARIES 50« 

SAWMILLS 507-509 

FINANCES 509 

aUARTZ MILLS 510 

NEWSPA PERS 510 

GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS KEGISTER...511- 

552 and 811 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY 553-580 



If E VAD A. 



EXECUTIVE AND STATE OFFICERS 581 

FEDERAL OFFICERS 581 

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS 581 

JUDICIARY, SUPREME COURT 582 

SENATORIAL AND ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS 582 

AREA AND RESOURCES 582 584 

QUARTZ MILLS 584-58fi 

GRIST MILLS 586 

SAW MILLS 587 

NEWSPAPERS 587 



FINANCES 588 

COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS 583 

POPULATION, 1870 588 

ELECTION RETURNS. 1874 588 

VALUE REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY 588 

LIBRARIES 588 

GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS REGISTER... 589- 

616 and 811 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY 617-634 



TIT ASHIKOTON TEBBITOBT. 



EXECUTIVE AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS... 653 

FEDERAL OFFICERS 6.53 

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS 653 

LEGISLATIVE DISTRICTS 653 and 654 

AREA AND RESOURCES 6.54 

NEWSPAPERS 6.55 

LIBRARIES 6.56 

SAW MILLS 656 and 657 

GRIST MILLS 6.57 

COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS 658 



658 



POPULATION, 1873 

ELECTION RETURNS— 1870, 1872....> 658 

VALUE REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY.... 658 

AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS 658 

Yield of Grain— Live Stock 6.58 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 6.58 

GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS REGISTER.. .6-59- 

678 and 812 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY 679-687 



IDAHO TERRITORY. 



EXECUTIVE AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS .. 689 



FEDERAL OFFICERS 
REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS.. 

LEGISLATIVE DISTRICTS 

ARE.A. AND RESOURCES 

COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS 

POPULATION 

ELECTION RETURNS, 1874 . 



689 
689 
689 
690 
691 
69] 
691 
VALUE REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY... 691 



QUARTZ MILLS 691 

SAW MILLS 692 

NEWSPAPERS 692 

G lilST MILLS 693 

FINANCES 693 

PUBLIC SCHOOLS 693 

LIBRARIES 693 

GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS REGISTER... 695-704 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY 705-710 



9IONTANA TERRITOR-r. 



EXECUTIVE AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 711 

FEDERAL OFFICERS 711 

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS 711 

LEGISLATIVE DISTRICTS 711 

ARE.A. AND RESOURCES 712 and 713 

COUNTIES AND COUNTY SEATS 713 

POPULATION 713 

ELECTION RETURNS, 1874 713 

ACRES CULTIVATED 713 

VALUE REAL AND PERSONAL PROPERTY... 713 



LIBRARIES 713 

QUARTZ MILLS 714 

SMELTING FURNACES 714 

SAW MILLS 715 

FINANCES 715 

GRIST MILLS 716 

NEWSPAPERS 716 

GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS REGISTER... 717-727 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY 729-736 



UTAH TERRITORY. 



EXECUTIVE AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 737 

FEDERAL OFFICERS 737 

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS 737 

AREA AND RESOURCES 737 and 738 

GRIST MILLS 738 and 7.39 

SAW MILLS 740 and 741 



LIBRARIES 741 

QU.A^RTZ MILLS 742 

NEWSPAPERS 742 

GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS REGISTER... 743-762 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY 763-775 



ARIZOKA TERRITORY. 



EXECUTIVE AND TERRITORIAL OFFICERS 776 

FEDERAL OFFICES 776 

REPRESENTATION IN CONGRESS 776 

LEGISLATIVE DISTRICTS 776 

AREA AND RESOURCES 777 

LIBRARIES 777 



QUARTZ MILLS 778 

GRIST MILLS 778 

SAW MILLS 778 

NEWSPAPER.S 779 

GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS REGISTER... 780-785 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY 786-788 



AIiASKA TERRITORY. 

AREA AND RESOURCES 789 | GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS REGISTER 790 

COI.ONY OF BRITISH C O I, U 91 B I A . 

CIVIL OFFICERS 791 I LIBRARIES 793 



AREA AND RESOURCES 791 and 792 

ELECTORAL DISTRICTS 793 

NEWSPAPERS 793 



LIBRARIES 

GAZETTEER AND BUSINESS REGISTER. ..794-802 
BUSINESS DIRECTORY 803-809 



SVPPIiESIEKT AR Y K A BI E S . 



CALIFORNIA 811 

OREGON 810 



[NEVADA 816 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY 812 



GENERAL INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Agriculture, British Columbia 7i)l 
Agriculture, Calil'ornia....58 and 75 
Agriculture, Idaho Territory.. ti'JO 
Agriculture, Montana Terri- 

tory 712 

Agriculture, Nevada 582 

Agriculture, Oregon 502 

Agriculture, Utah Territory... 737 
Agriculture, Washington Ter- 
ritory 658 

Alaska Territory, Area and 

Kosources 789 

Alaska Territory, Business Di- 
rectory 790 

Alaska Territory, Post Offices.. 3-1 
Alaska Territory, Register of 

Names 790 

Angora Goats, California, 

C6 and 110 

Antimony, California 72 

Area and Resources, Alaska 

Territory 789 

Area and Resources, Arizona 

Territory 777 

Area and Resources, British 

Columbia 791 

Area and Resources, California 

49-74 
Area and Resources, Idaho 

Territory 690 

Area and Resources, Montana 

Territory 712 

Area and Resources, Nevada.. 582 
Area and Resources, Oregon... 502 
Area and Resources, Utah Ter- 
ritory 737 

Area and Resources, Washing- 
ton Territory 654 

Area I'acific States and Terri- 
tories 39 

Arizona, Department of U. S. 

Army 19 

Arizona Territory, Area and 

Resources 777 

Arizona Territory, Business 

Directory 786 

Arizona Territory, Govern- 
ment 776 

Arizona Territory, Post Offices 33 
Arizona Territory, Register of 

Names 780 

Arizona Territory, U. S.Courts 37 

Army, U. S 19 

Asphaltum, California 71 

Assembly, California 40 

Assembly Districts, California 43 
Assembly Districts, Nevada... 582 

Asses, California 110 

Banks, California 98 

Barley Crop, California. ..-59 and 75 
Barley Crop, Washington Ter- 
ritory 658 

Bean Crop, California 60 

Bees, California 66 

Borax, California 71 

Borax, Nevada 583 

Brandy Product, California 

tj3 and 75 
British Columbia, Area and 

Resources 791 

British Columbia, Business 

Directory 803 

British Columbia, Govern- 
ment, etc 791 

British Columbia, Post Offices 34 
British Columbia, Register of 

Names 794 

Buckwheat Crop, California... 60 
Business Directory, Alaska 
Territory 790 



PAGE. 

Business Directory, Arizona 

Territory 786 

Business Directory, British 

Columbia 803 

Business Directory, California 385 
Business Directory, Idaho 

Territory 705 

Business Directory, Montana 

Territory 729 

Business Directory, Nevada 617 

Business Directory, Oregon 553 

Business Directory, San Fran- 
cisco 291 

Business Directory, Utah Ter- 
ritory ; 763 

Business Directory, Washing- 
ton Territory 679 

Butter Product, California 66 

Cabinet, U. S 17 

California, Area and Resources 49 
California Business Directory 385 
California, Cities and Towns 

111 and 810 
California, Department of U. 

S. Army 19 

California Finances 49 

California Judiciary 41 

California, Officers, etc 39 

California, Post Offices 23 

California, Register of Names.. HI 

California, U. S. Courts 35 

Canals and Water Ditches, 

California 98 

Castor Bean Crop, California.. 60 

Cattle, California 6(i and 110 

Cattle, Washington Territory 658 
Central Pacific Railroad, Pas- 
sengers and Freight 74 

Champagne Manufacture, Cal- 
ifornia 63 

Cheese Product, California 66 

Chiccory Culture, California... 65 

Chromium, California 71 

Circuit Court, U. S 35 

Circuits, U. S 34 

Cities and Towns, Alaska Ter- 
ritory 790 

Cities and Towns, Arizona Ter- 
ritory 780 

Cities and Towns, British Co- 
lumbia 794 

Cities and Towns, California 

111 and 810 
Cities and Towns, Idaho Terri- 
tory 695 

Cities and Towns, Montana 

Territory 717 

Cities and Towns, Nevada 589 

Cities and Towns, Oregon 511 

and 811 
Cities and Towns, Pacific Coast 12 
Cities and Towns, Utah Ter- 
ritory 743 

Cities and Towns, Washing- 
ton Territory 659 and 812 

Climate, Alaska Territory 790 

Climate, Arizona Territory ... 777 

Climate, British Columbia 792 

Climate, California 56 

Climate, Idaho Territory 690 

Climate, Montana Territory... 713 

Climate, Nevada 583 

Climate, San Francisco 107 

Climate, Washington Territory 055 

Coal, California 71 

Coal, Oregon 504 

Coifee Plant, California 64 

Collectors of Customs, see 
Federal Officers 



PAGE. 

Colleges, Washington Terri- 
tory 658 

Columbia Department U. S. 

Army 19 

Commerce, California 74 

Commissioners of Deeds, Cali- 
fornia 48 

Congress, Members of, Califor- 
nia 39 

Congress, Members of, Nevada 581 
Congress, Members of. Oregon 501 
Congressional Districts, Cali- 

ifornia 41 

Consuls and Commercial 

Agents, U. S 18 

Consuls, Foreign, San Fran- 
cisco 109 

Copper, California 70 

Copper, Nevada 583 

Corn Crop, California (iO 

Cotton Crop, California 62 

Counties and County Seats, 

California 105 

Counties and County Seats, 

Idaho Territory 691 

Counties and County Seats, 

Montana Territory 713 

Counties and County Seats, 

Nevada 588 

Counties and County Seats, 

Oregon 504 

Counties and County Seats, 

Washington Territory 6.58 

County Finances, California ... 104 
County Officers, Arizona Ter- 
ritory 780 to 785 

County Officers, California 111 

to 290 
County Officers, Idaho Terri- 
tory 695 to 704 

County Officers, Montana Ter- 
ritory 717 to 727 

County Officers, Nevada .589 to tJ16 
County Officers, Oregon 511 to 552 
County Officers, Utah Terri- 
tory 743 to 762 

County Officers, Washington 

Territory t)5V) to 678 

Courts, see respective headings 

Dairies, California 66 

Deaf and Dumb and Blind 

Institute, California 44 

Debt, Cities and Counties, Cal- 
ifornia 104 

Debt, Idaho Territory 693 

Debt, Montana Territory 715 

Debt, State, California 49 and 104 

Debt, State, Nevada 588 

Debt, State, Oregon 509 

Debt, United States 38 

Delegate in Congress, Arizona 

Territory 776 

Delegate in Congress, Idaho 

Territory 689 

Delegate in Congress, Montana 

Territory 711 

Delegate in Congress, Utah 

Territory 737 

Delegate in Congress, Wash- 
ington Territory 658 

District Courts, California 41 

and 42 
District Courts, U. S., Pacific 

Coast 35 

Ditches, see Water Ditches 

Diversity of Crops, California 65 
Education, State Board of, 

California 43 

Election Returns, California... 106 



GENERAL INDEX. 



PAGE. 

Election Returns, Idaho Ter- 

ritory •• 691 

Election Returns, Montana 

Territory '13 

Election Returns, Nevada 588 

Election Returns, Oregon 504 

Election Returns, Washington 

Territory 658 

Electoral Districts, British Co- 
lumbia "^93 

Examiners, Board of, Nevada 581 
Executive Department, Arizo- 
na Territory 776 

Executive Department, Cali- 
fornia 39 

Executive Department, Idaho 

Territory 689 

Executive Department, Mon- ^ 

tana Territory 711 

Executive Department, Ne- 
vada 581 

Executive Department.Orogon 501 
Executive Department, U. S... 17 
Executive Department, Utah 

Territory 737 

Executive Department, Wash- 
ington Territory 653 

Federal Officers, Arizona Ter- 
ritory 776 

Federal Officers, California ... 38 
Federal Officers, Idaho Terri- 
tory 689 

Federal Officers, Montana ^ 

Territory 711 

Federal Officers, Nevada 581 

Federal Officers, Oregon 501 

Federal Officers, Utah Terri- 
tory 737 

Federal Officers, Washington 

Territory 653 

Finances, California 49 

Finances, Counties and Cities, 

California 104 

Finances, Idaho Territory 693 

Finances, Montana Territory.. 715 

Finances, Nevada 588 

Finances, Oregon 509 

Finances, United States 38 

Fisheries, California 73 

Flax Culture, California.....^.... 61 
Flour Manufacture, Arizona 

Territory 778 

Flour Manufacture, California 89 
Flour Manufacture, Idaho Ter- 
ritory 693 

Flour Manufacture, Montana 

Territory 716 

Flour Manufacture, Nevada... 58*5 

Flour Manufacture, Oregon 505 

Flour Manufacture, Utah Ter- __ 

ritory 738 

Flour Manufacture, Washing- 
ton Territory 657 

Foreign Ministers, U. S 17 

Forest Trees, California 64 

Fortifications, Pacific Coast 20 

Fruit Growing, California 62 

Gazetteer, Alaska Territory.... 790 
Gazetteer, Arizona Territory... 780 
Gazetteer, British Columbia... 794 

Gazetteer, California Ill 

Gazetteer, Idaho Territory 695 

Gazetteer, Montana Territory. 717 

Gazetteer, Nevada 589 

Gazetteer, Oregon 511 

Gazetteer, Utah Territory 743 

Gazetteer, Washington Terri- 
tory 659 

Geography, Alaska Territory.. 789 
Geography, Arizona Territory 777 
Geography, British Columbia.. 791 

Geography, California 49 

Geography, Idaho Territory... 690 
Geography, Montana Territory 712 

Geography, Nevada 582 

Geography, Oregon 502 

Geography, Utah Territory 737 



PA.GE. 

Geography, Washington Terri- 
tory 654 

Gold Product, Arizona Terri- 
tory 100 

Gold Product, British Colum- 
bia 792 and 100 

Gold Product,California..f')7 and 100 
Gold Product, Idaho Terri- 
tory 690 and 100 

Gold Product, Montana Ter- 
ritory 712 and 100 

Gold Product, Nevada...583 and 100 
Gold Product, Oregon. ..508 and 100 
Gold Product, United States... 110 
Gold Product, Utah Territory 



738 and 100 
Gold Product, Washington Ter- 
ritory 100 

Grain Crop, California 59 and 75 

Grain Crop, \Vashington Ter- 
ritory 658 

Granite, California 72 

Grape and \V'in6 Growing, Cal- 
ifornia 03 and 75 

Grasses, California 64 

Grist Mills, Arizona Territory 778 

Grist Mills, California 89 

Grist Mills, Idaho Territory... 693 
Grist Mills, Montana Territory 716 

Grist Mills, Nevada 586 

Grist Mills, Oregon 505 

Grist Mills, Utah Territory 738 

Grist Mills, Washington Ter- 
ritory 657 

Harbors, California 49 

Hay Crop, California 64 

Hay Crop, Washington Terri- 
tory 658 

Hogs, California 66 and 110 

Hogs, Washington Territory... 658 

Hop Culture, California 61 

Horses, California bo and 110 

Horses, Washington Territory 658 
Idaho Territory, Area and Re- 
sources 690 

Idado Territory, Business Di- 
rectory 705 

Idaho Territory, Government, 

etc 689 

Idaho Territory, Post Offices... 31 
Idaho Territory, Register of 

Names 695 

Idaho Territory, U. S. Courts.. 36 
Indian Agents, see Federal 

Officers 

Indian Corn Crop, California... 60 

Insane Asylum, Calitornia 44 

Insurance Companies, Califor- 
nia 109 

Internal Revenue Officers, see 
Federal Officers. 

Iridium, California 72 

Iron, California 70 

Iron, Nevada 583 

Iron, Oregon 504 

Iron, Utah Territory 738 

Judges, see respective Courts. 
Judicial Districts, California.. 41 

Judicial Districts, Oregon 502 

J udicial Districts, U. S. Pacific 

Coast 35 

Judiciary, California 41 

Judiciary, Nevada 582 

Judiciary, Oregon 501 

Judiciary, U. S 34 

Land Agents, U. S., see Fed- 
eral Officers. 
Land Offices, U. S., see Fed- 
eral Officers. 
Lands, Agricultural, Arizona 

Territory 777 

Lands, Agricultural, British 

Columbia 792 

Lands, Agricultural, Calitor- 
nia. 58 and 75 

Lands, Agricultural, Idaho 
Territory 690 



PAGE. 

Lands, Agricultural, Montana 

Territory 712 

Lands, Agricultural, Nevada.. 583 
Lands, Agricultural, Oregon... 503 
Lands, Agricultural, Utah Ter- ^ 

ritory 738 

Lands, Agricultural, Washing- 

ington Territory 655 

Lands, State, California 58 

Lead Product, California 69 

Lead Product, Nevada 583 

Legal Distances, California 105 

Legislative Assembly, British 

Columbia 793 

Legislature, Arizona Territory 776 

Legislature, California 40 

Legislature, Idaho Territory... 6.S9 
Legislature, Montana Terri- 
tory 711 

Legislature, Nevada 582 

Legislature, Washington Ter- 
ritory 653 

Libraries, Arizona Territory... 777 
Libraries, British Columbia... 793 

Libraries, California 99 

Libraries, Idaho Territory 693 

Libraries, Montana Territory. 713 

Libraries, Nevada 588 

Libraries of the World 100 

Libraries, Oregon 506 

Libraries, Utah Territory 741 

Libraries, \Vashington Terri- 
tory 656 

Library, State, California. 43 

Limestone, California 72 

Live Stock, Calitornia. ..(Jo and 110 
Live Stock, Washington Ter- 
ritory 658 

Lumber.Manufacture, Arizona 

Territory 778 

Lumber, Manufacture, Cali- 
fornia 92 

Lumber, Manufacture, Idaho 

Territory 692 

Lumber, Manufacture, Mon- 
tana Territory 715 

Lumber, Manufacture, Ne- 
vada 587 

Lumber, Manufacture, Oregon 507 
Lumber, Manufacture, Utah 

Territory 740 

Lumber, Manufacture, Wash- 
ington Territory 656 

Manufactures, California 73 

Marble, California 72 

Merchants and Professionals, 

Alaska Territory 790 

Merchants and Professionals, ^ 

Arizona Territory 786 

Merchants and Professionals, 

British Columbia 803 

Merchants and Professionals, 

California 385 

Merchants and Professionals, 

Idaho Territory 705 

Merchants and Professionals, 

Montana Territory 729 

Merchants and Professionals, 

Nevada 617 

Merchants and Professionals, 

Oregon 553 

Merchants and Professionals, 

San Francisco 291 

Merchants and Professionals, 

Utah Territory 763 

Merchants and Professionals, 

Washington Territory 679 

Meteorological Observations, 

San Francisco 107 

Military, California 44 

Military, U. S., Pacific Coast .. 19 
Military Posts, U. S., Pacific 

Coast 20 

Mills, Flour, Arizona Terri- 
tory 778 

Mills, Flour, California 89 

Mills, Flour, Idaho Territory.. 693 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PAGE. 

Mills, Flour, Montana Terri- 
tory 716 

Mills, Flour, Nevada 58(j 

Jlills, Flour, Oregon 505 

iSlills, Flour, Utah Territory.. 738 
Mills, Flour, Washington Ter- 
ritory 657 

Mills, Quartz, Arizona Terri- 
tory 778 

Mills, Quartz, California 82 

Mills, Quartz, Idaho Territory 691 
Mills, Quartz, Montana Terri- 
tory 714 

Mills, Quartz, Nevada 584 

Mills, Quartz, Oregon 510 

Mills, Quartz, Utah Territory.. 742 
Mills, tiaw, Arizona Territory. 778 

Mills, Saw, California 92 

Mills, Saw, Idaho Territory ... 692 
Mills, Saw, Montana Territory 715 

Mills, Saw, Nevada 587 

Mills, Saw, Oregon .507 

Mills, Saw, Utah Territory ... 740 
Mills, Saw, Washington Ter- 
ritory 656 

Mineral Resources, Arizona 

Territory 777 

Mineral Resources, British 

Columbia 792 

Mineral Resources, California 67 
Mineral Resources, Idaho Ter- 
ritory 690 

Mineral Resources, Montana 

Territory 712 

Mineral Resources, Nevada... 582 

Mineral Resources, Oregon 503 

Mineral Resources, Utah Ter- 
ritory 738 

Mineral Resources, Washing- 
ton Territory 655 

Ministers, Foreign, U. S 17 

Montana Territory, Area and 

Resources 712 

Montana Territory, Business 

Directory 729 

Montana Territory, Govern- 
ment, etc 711 

Montana Territory, Post Offices 31 
Montana Territory, Register 

of Names 717 

Montana Territory,U.S.Courts 36 

Mountains, California 51 

Mulberry Trees, California 61 

Mules, California 66 and 110 

Mules, Washington Territory 658 

Navy, U. S 21 

Navy, U. S., Pacific Ocean 21 

Navy Yard, U. S., Mare Island 21 
Nevada, Area and Resources.. 582 
Nevada, Business Directory ... 617 

Nevada, Government, etc 581 

Nevada, Post Offices 29 

Nevada, Register of Names ... 589 

Nevada, U. S. Courts 35 

Newspapers, Arizona Terri- 
tory 779 

Newspapers, British Columbia 793 

Newspapers, California 101 

Newspapers, Idaho Territory.. 692 
Newspapers, Montana Terri- 
tory 716 

Newspapers, Nevada 587 

Newspapers, Oregon 510 

Newspapers, Utah Territory... 742 
Newspapers, Washington Ter- 
ritory 655 

Notaries Public, Calitornia..._ 45 

Nut Trees, California 64 

Oat Crop, California 60 and 75 

Oat Crop, Washington Terri- 
tory 658 

Oregon, Area and Resources... 502 
Oregon, Business Directory ... 553 

Oregon, Government, etc 501 

Oregon, Post Offices 27 

Oregon, Register of Names ... 511 

Oregon, U. 8.\Courts 35 

Pacific Division, U. S. A 19 



PAGE. 

Pacific Fleet, U. S. N 21 

Pacific States and Territories.. 39 

Pea Crop, California 60 

Peanuts, California 60 

Pension Agents, see Federal 

Officers 

Periodicals, California 101 

Petroleum, California 71 

Pilot Commissioners and Pi- 
lots, S. F 44 

Platinum, California 72 

Plumbago, California 72 

Population, California 105 

Population, Idaho Territory... 691 
Population, Montana Terri- 
tory 713 

Population, Nevada 588 

Population, Oregon 504 

Population, Pacific States and 

Territories 39 

Population, San Francisco 100 

Population, Washington Ter- 
ritory 658 

Post Office Department, Pacific 

Coast 22 

Post Offices, Alaska Territory 34 
Post Offices, Arizona Territory 33 
Post Offices, British Columbia 34 

Post Offices, California 23 

Post Offices, Idaho Territory... 31 
Post Offices, Montana Terri- 
tory 31 

Post Offices, Nevada 29 

Post Offices, Oregon 27 

Post Offices, Utah Territory 32 

Post Offices, Washington Ter- 
ritory 30 

Postage Kates 22 

Postal Cards 22 

Postal Money Order System.... 22 

Poultry, California 66 

Precious Metals, Product Pa- 
cific States and Territories 100 
Prosecuting Attorneys, Oregon 502 

PuDlic Debt, U. S 38 

Public Schools, California 43 

Quartz Mills, Arizona Terri- 
tory 778 

Quartz Mills, California 82 

Quartz Mills, Idaho Territory 691 
Quartz Mills, Montana Terri- 
tory 714 

Quartz Mills, Nevada 584 

(juartz Mills, Oregon 510 

Quartz Mills, Utah Territory. 742 
Quicksilver Furnaces, Cali- 
fornia 88 

Quicksilver Product, Califor- 
nia 70 

Railroads, Pacific Coast 76 

Real and Personal Property, 

California 105 

Real and Personal Property, 

Idaho Territory 691 

Real and Personal Property, 

Montana Territory 713 

Real and Personal Property, 

Nevada 588 

Real and Personal Property, 

Oregon 504 

Real and Personal Property, 

Washington Territory 658 

Receipts and Expenditures, 
Counties and Cities, Cali- 
fornia 104 

Receipts and Expenditures, 

Idaho Territory 693 

Receipts and Expenditures, 

Montana Territory 715 

Receipts and Expenditures, 

Oregon 509 

Register of Names, Alaska 

Territory 790 

Register of Names, Arizona 

Territory 780 

Register of Names, British 

Columbia 794 

Register of Names, California 111 



PAGE. 

Register of Names, Idaho Ter- 
ritory 695 

Register of Names, Montana 

Territorv 717 

Register of Names, Nevada 589 

Register of Names, Oregon 511 

Register of Names, Utah Ter- 
ritory 743 

Register of Names, Washing- 
ton Territory 659 

Rice Culture, California 61 

Rivers, California 52 

Rye Crop, California 60 

Salt, California 71 

Salt, Nevada 583 

San Francisco Business Direc- 
tory 291 

Saw Mills, Arizona Territory.. 778 

Saw Mills, California 92 

Saw Mills, Idaho Territory ... 692 
Saw Mills, Montana Territory 715 

Saw Mills, Nevada 587 

Saw Mills, Oregon 507 

Saw Mills, Utah Territory 740 

Saw Mills, AVashington Terri- 
tory 656 

Senate, California 40 

Senatorial Districts. California 42 
Senatorial Districts, Nevada.. 582 

Sheep, California 66 and 110 

Sheep, Washington Territory. 658 

Silk Culture, California 61 

Silver Product, Arizona Terri- 
tory 100 

Silver Product, British Colum- 
bia 100 

Silver Product, California 

69 and 100 
Silver Product, Idaho Terri- 
tory 100 

Silver Product,Nevada583and 100 

Silver Product, Oregon 100 

Silver Product, United States.. 110 
Silver Product.Utah Territory 100 
Smelting Furnaces, Montana 

Territory 714 

Sugar Beet, California 62 

Sulphur, California 71 

Sulphur, Nevada 583 

Supplement to Business Reg- 
ister 810 

Supreme Court U. S., Arizona 

Terriory 37 

Supreme Court, California 41 

Supreme Court U. S., Idaho 

Territory 36 

Supreme Court U. S., Montana 

Territory 36 

Supreme Court, Nevada 582 

Supreme Court, Oregon 501 

Supreme Court, U. S 34 

Supreme Court U.S., Utah Ter- 
ritory 37 

Supreme Court U. S., AVash- 

ington Territory 36 

Surveyor Generals U. S., see 

Federal Officers 

Swamp Land, California 58 

Tea Plant, California 64 

Terms District Courts, Cali- 
fornia 42 

Terms Supreme Court, Califor- 
nia 41 

Terms Supreme Court. Nevada 582 
Terms Supreme Court, Oregon 501 

Terms Supreme Court, U. S 34 

Terms U. S. Courts, Pacific 

Coast 35 

Tin, California 72 

Tobacco Culture, California ... 62 
United States Army, Division 

of the Pacific 19 

United States Army, Organiza- 
tion of 19 

United States Cabinet 17 

United States Circuits 34 

United States Consuls and 
Commercial Agents 18 



INDEX TO ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



PAGE. 

United States Courts, Pacific 
Coast 35 

United States Executive De- 
partment 17 

United States Foreign Minis- 
ters 17 

United States Judiciary 3-1 

United States Navy, Organi- 
zation of. 21 

United States Navy, Pacific 
Coast 21 

United States Officers, Pacific 
Coast, see Federal Officers 

United States, Public Debt 38 

United States Supreme Court 34 



„ , „, PAGE. 

Utah Territory, Area and Re- 
sources 737 

Utah Territory, Business Di- 
rectory 763 

Utah Territory, Government, 

etc 737 

Utah Territory, Post Offices 32 

Utah Territory, Register of 

Names 743 

Utah Territory, U. S. Courts... 37 

Valleys, California 54 

Vegetable Crop, California 65 

Washington Territory, Area 

and Resources 654 

Washington Territory, Busi- 
ness Directory 679 



,„ , . PAGE* 

Washington Territory, Gov- 
ernment, etc 653 

Washington Territory, Post 

Offices 30 

Washington Territory, Regis- 
ter of Names 659 

Washington Territory, U. S. 

Courts 36 

Water Ditches, California 98 

Wheat Crop, California. ..59 and 75 
Wheat Crop, Washington Ter- 

. ritory 658 

Wine Growing, California, 

,„ , t)3 and 75 

Wool, California 66 



INDEX TO ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



PAGE. 

.s:tna Insurance Co., register of 

names, side line, pages 17-811 

Albany Brewery xl 

American Mills xllv 

Angell, Palmer & Co xxxix 

Atwoocl & Bodwell xc and xci 

Baiidmann, Nielsen & Co xxix 

Bank of California ix 

Bay Sugar Refinery ....Ixi and Ixxxix 

Beilingham Bay Coal Co xx 

Bergin & Beiin xliv 

Bernard, Charles xxix 

Black Diamond Coal Co xx 

Blake, RobbjDs & Co., register 635 

Bonney, O., Jr liv 

Booker, W. L xvi 

Bosqui, E. <fe Co., register of names, 

side line, pages 18-812 

Bragg Robert xlii 

Brittan, Holbrook& Co., register..37S 

Britton, Rey & Co., register 348 

Brovvell, .T., register 688 

Brown, William xxxix 

Bruce, Donald back cover. 

Buswell, A Ix 

California Bellows Manuf. Co liv 

California Insurance Co xxiv 

California Mills xxvii 

California Powder Works, register3.54 

California Sugar Refinery Ixxxvii 

Callagban. D. & Co xlv 

Carter & Wheeler .xxiv 

Cbapman, C. M xlv 

Church <fe Co., register 323 

Clark, Truman S xxxviii 

Cole, N. W. & Co xxxvi 

Colorado Steam Navigation Co vii 

Columbia Foundry xli 

Cook, Clarissa Mrs xllv 

Cornwall, P. B xx 

Craig, R. R. & J Iv 

Crawford, A. & Co xx 

Ciibery & Co front cover. 

Day, Thomas, register 338 and li 

Dewey <ft Co iii 

Eastman, Frank xxxiv 

Eitnor, Rudolph Ix 

Everdiug, J. & Co xxi 

Fariisworth & Clark, register of 
names, bottom line, pages.. 18-812 

Feldmaim, L. <fe Co xxxi 

Fireman's Fund Ins. Co., front cover 

Francis <fe Valentine, register, 

-,. ,. ^ . 13 and 636 

Fulton Foundry xli 

Garratt, W. T 31 

Gerke, H ."■.xxii 

German Savings and Loan Soci- 
ety xxii 

Getleson & Landis, register .339 

Giant Powder Co xxix 

Glasgow Iron Manufacturing 
and Importing Co xxiii 



PAGE). 

Goddard & Co., register 322 

Goodall, Nelson & Perkins S. S. 

Co vi 

Gray, M., register of names, top 

line, pages 17-811 

Gray, Samuel C liii 

Grosh & Rutherford xlv 

Hallidie, A. S 1 

Hamburg-Bremen Insurance Co..xv 
Heald's Business College, regis- 
ter 289 and back of volume. 

Hendy, Joshua xli 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Soci- 
ety xxi 

Hicks & Co., register 299 

Hinckley & Co xli 

Home Mutual Insurance Co xvii 

Houseworth, Thomas & Co., front 
„ cover. 

Howes, George & Co xix 

Hunt, E. O Ixxxix 

Husing, D xlii 

Johnson, J. C. & Ccxxxii and xxxiii 

Johnson, T. Rodgers 31 

Kallenberg, Theodore liv 

Kittredge, Jonathan ivi 

Kohler & Frohling front cover. 

Kuh, Leopold xlv 

Laird, D. W., register of names, 

top line, pages 18-812 

Langley, Henry G., register, 

290 and 63.5 

Leavitt, Charles H liii 

Leffel & Myers ivii 

Linforth, Kellogg & Co xviii 

Llewellyn, Reese xli 

Locke & Montague, register 375 

London and San Francisco Bank 

(Limited) x 

London Assurance Association ii 

Macdonald, D. A. & Co xxxi 

Main & Winchester, register 338 

Marcus, George & Co xxv 

Martell, John 1 

Martin, E. & Co .."."!..'...!!xxi 

Masonic Savings and Loan Society, 
■.,.«. ~ xxiii 

McAffee, Spiers & Co 29 

McCain, Flood & McClure xxvi 

McMillan & Kester 1 

McQuillan, B ixii 

Merrill, J. C. & Co .'.'.'. xxvi 

Mills, Robert Ixxxviii 

Miners' Foundry xxxix 

Moore, H. H., register 298 and 728 

Morelos, Antonio xl 

Moynihan & Aitken xlii 

Northern Assurance Co xvi 

Oregon Steamship Co v 

Pacific Cement Co., register, 736 

„ .> and 15 

Pacific Cordage Co xiil 

Pacific Iron Works, register 322 



PAGE. 

Pacific Mail S. S. Co., register 374 

Pacific Oil and Lead Works iv 

Pacific Rolling Mill iv 

Pages, Jules F, register 727 

Paltenghi, A xl 

Parkhurst. V. S. W Ixxxi 

Philadelphia Brewery xxviii 

Pioneer Carpet Beating Ma- 
chine xxxviii 

Pioneer Iron Works liii 

Pioneer Paper Mills liv 

Plate, A. J. <fe Co xxxiii 

Portland Boiler Works xlii 

Ray, W. S Hi 

Read, Ellis, register 616 

Risdon Iron and Locomotive 

Works li 

Risdon <fe Tower Ixxxviii 

Rochicioli, R. F xxxvii 

Rodgers, Meyer & Co xxvii 

Roman, A. <fe Co., register of 
names, bottom line, pages... 17-811 

Royal Mail Steam Packet Co xvi 

San Francisco Cordage Factory..xxx 

San Francisco Savings Union xx 

Saul & Co xxxiii 

Saulnier, J. & Co xxii 

Scherr, F xxv 

Schiller, Frederick C xliv 

■Selby, T. H. & Co xii 

Shreve, George C. «fe Co lix 

Sims, John R Ixxxviii 

Skinker, John Ixii 

Smith, William xliii 

Snook, G. <& W xliii 

Southwick, A. H xlviiiand xlix 

Spaulding, J. & Co xxxviii 

Speyer, Morris & Co xv and xviii 

Spreckels & Co xl 

Spring, Menzo Iv 

Steele, J. G. <& Co., register, 355, 
580, 637, 704 and advt. dept. 24 

and Iviii 

Steiger & Kerr xxxvi 

Strahle, J. & Co., register. 375 

Straut & Hamilton xxv 

Swiss American Bank xi 

Taylor, S. P. & Co "uv 

Tenthorey, J. P. & Co Iv 

Thompson Brothers xxxvii 

Truworthy, Francis M xxx 

Tustin, W. I xlviandxlvii 

XJUmann, M. & Co xxxii 

Union Insurance Co xiv 

Union Wire Mattress Co xxxviii 

Venard, G ifi 

Vice, Martin iv 

Wagner, Joseph, register .354 

Warner & Silsby xliv 

Waterhouse & Lester. xxxv 

Weed & Kingwell 25 

Wells, Fargo <fe Co viii 

Wetherbee, George M xliii 

Wieland, John xxviii 



H 



10 PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 

BUSINESS CARDS — SAN FRANCISCO. 

(See Business Directory from page 291 to 383.) 



PAGE. 

Armes <fe Dallam, 

296, 305 (2), 308, 361, 373, 378, 382 

Baker, George H 320, 3-48 

Bancroft, A. L. & Co 358, 365 

Bandmami, Nielsen & Co 352, 366 

Barker, James L 325, 332, 366 

Bendel, B. & Co 350 

Blake, Robbins & Co 362 

Boesch, Emil a39 

Bonnet. L., Mme .331 

Bryant & Taylor 370 

Burkarclt, Max 365 

Burnham, J. W. & Co 307 

Butler, Theodore A 320 

California Bed Comforter Fac- 
tory 2!)7 

California Insurance Co 337 

Callaghan, D. & Co 382 

Clark, W. H. T 372 

Cook, A. O., Mrs 322 

Cook, H. N 295, 297, 3.33 

Cosgrave & Co 337 

Crocker, H. S. <fc Co 867, 374 

Daly & Hawkins 304 

Daneri, F. & Co 340 

Davis, Murray 311 

Day, Thomas 325, 366 (2) 

Dewey & Co 362 

DoUiver <fe Bro 339 

Duff, James M 304 

Eitner, Eudolph 320 

Empire Match Factory, 35C 

Everson, Wallace « 3.37 

Farjeon, S. & Co 380 

Figer Brothers .305 

Flint, Peabody & Co 316, 3.54 

Florence Sewing Machines 371 

Fonda, W. T 371 

Frey, W. A 301, 315, .379 

Gannon, P. T 310 

Getleson <fe Landis 339 

Gilbert & Moore 325 

Giller, C. L 320 

Gillespie <fe Zan 305 

Gray, Mathias 358, 365 



PAGE. 

Adams, McNeill <fe Co., Sacra- 
mento, register 429 

Autenreith, E. H., Yreka 16 

Bank of Watson ville, Watson- 

ville, register 391 

Batchelder, B. P. .Stockton 23 

Baumeister & Wolf, Napa, re- 
gister 458 

Beaudry, P., Los Angeles 3 

Bellrude, J. S., Saucelito 19 

Billings, A. W., Watsonville 22 

Blackburn & Waters, Watson- 
ville, register 478 

Bond, W. H., Santa Kosa, re- 
gister 489 

California Military Academy, 

Oakland 12 

Chappelet & Miner, Oakland, 

register 500 

Churchill, S. W., San Jose, re- 
gister 443 

Cole, James, Stockton 23 

College of Notre Dame, Marys- 

ville 14 

College of Notre Dame, San Jose.. .18 
Davisson, D. D., Santa Kosa, 

register 487 

Dockvveiler, H., Los Angeles ,3 

Doherty, llichard, Pescadero, 

register 442 

Doherty, Richard, Purissima, 

regster 442 

Dunsmoor Brothers, Los An- 
geles 3 

Farmers and Merchants Bank, 

Los Angeles 5 

Fisher <fe Thatcher, Los Angeles 2 

Fluhr, C, Los Angeles 2 

Fresno Expositor, Fresno 16 

Frisius & Hernster, Santa Barbara..lO 
Gerkhardt, H. F., Cloverdale, 

register 438 

Gessler, F., Ukiah, register 407 



PAGE. 

Gray, Samuel C 340 

Hanly, George T. & Co 312, 377 

Hartford Fire Insurance Co 336 

Hill, Samuel 371 

Hoag, Charles P 381 

Hodge, John G. & Co 374 

Home Mutual Insurance Co 337 

Houghton, F. T. & Co., 296, 298, 305(2) 
307, 311, 321, 351, 362, 370, 381, 382 

Houseworth, Thomas & Co 363 

Hueter Bros. & Co 292, 362, 379 

Hughes, John F 367 

Huntington, F. A 319,349 

Keeler, J. M. & Co 352 

Knowlton, J.J 335 

Koehler & Ritter 372 (2) 

Kuh, Leopold 293 

Laird, D. W 338 

Liesenfeld, P 297 

Locke & Montague .337, 375 

Lowry, J. W 307 

Marsh, H. F 308 

McCurrie & Weber 358 

Meighan, John J 294 

Methodist Book Depository 299 

Mever, Charles 330 

Molineux, H 311 

Moore, H. A. Mrs 332 

Neis & Ebert 350 

J^ew England Mutual Life Insur- 
ance Co 337 

Newton Brothers & Co 377 

Norcross <fe Co... 3.54 

Norton, G. A 371 

Owens, John B 366 

Pacific Barrel and Keg Factory 316 

Pacific Lamp and Reflector Fac- 
tory 339 

Pacific Newspaper Publishing 

Co 291 

Pacific Saw Manufacturing Co.... 370 

Pages, Jules F 320 

Palmer, W. J. T. & Co 325 

Patch, George W 374 

Patterson, William 317, 354 



CALIFORNIA. 

PAGE. 

Gilbert, C. C, Chico 10 

Gilligan, M., San Rafael, register...492 

Golden Gate Academy, Oakland 11 

Gooch, J. H., Anaheim 10 

Gordon, U. M. & Co., San Rafael.. .13 

Grand Hotel, Stockton 24 

Grimes, Brice, San Buenaventura.. .8 
Harris, George <fe Son, Petaluma, 

register 494 

Hensley, George B., San Diego 21 

Hewitt, H. T., Santa Rosa, re- 
gister 487 

Hopkins & Somes, Los Angeles 4 

Houriet, L. & Co., San Jose 18 

Huntington, Hopkins & Co., 

Sacramento, register 221 

IngersoU, W. B., Oakland, re- 
gister 480 

Kalisher, W. & Co., Los Angeles 4 

Kennedy, S. T., San Jose, register. 443 

Knight, W. H., Marysville 14 

Lockwood & Bryan, Monterey, 

register ^441 

Lyford, L. Dexter, Los Angeles 2 

Marin Carriiige Manufacturing 

Co.. San Rafael, register 411 

McNamara, William, Red Bluff... ..14 

Meyer, Samuel, Los Angeles 3 

Mills Seminary, Seminary Park 12 

Morris, J. F., Santa Barbara. in 

Muller, Max, Tehama 14 

Murat, Joseph, Santa Barbara 9 

Mutual Relief Association of Pet- 
aluma 16 

Newsom, L. M., Oakland, register.478 
Oakland Bankof Savings, Oakland.ll 
Pacific Theological Seminary, 

Oakland ii 

Page <fe Gravel, Los Angeles 7 

Rolfe & Hendrick, .San Diego 3 

Roop & Cottle, Gilroy Hot 

Springs, register 439 



PAGK. 

Peck, E. H 363 

Perey, P 316 

Phillips, Taber & Co 326 

Pope & Talbot 349 

Prusso (fe Splivalo 349 

Ransome, E. L 292, 375 

Raymond, G. A 3.50, 370 

Reiss Brothers A Co 312, 331 

Remington Sewing Machines .371 

Riordan, Rosina Mrs 3,54 

Rochicioli, R. F 372 

Roos, Joseph & Co 292, 320, 365 

Rosseter & Smith 340 

Ruhl Brothers 308 

Saul <fe Co 307 

.Schmidt M. <$; Co 348, 382 

Schraubstadter «fe Co 365 

Schulz & Fischer 372 

Schumacher, A 340 

Sciaccaluga, A 321 

Showers, Jewell & Co 371 

Shreve, George C. & Co.. .317, 338, 380 

Smith. Francis & Co 366 

State Investment and Insurance 

Co 3.37 

Steiger &-Kerr 322 

Stockman, J. M 358, 363 

Strahle, Jacob & Co 297, 321 

Studley, B. W 380 

Sullivan, J. F 295 

Tay, George H. A Co 375 

Taylor, S. P. & Co 362(2) 

Thuener & Martens 372 

Trumbull, R. J 371 

Truworthy. F. M 370 f2), 374 

Tucker, J. W. & Co 317, 338, 380 

Tustin, W. 1 381 

Unsworth <fe Reilly 370 

Watson & Barnhart 295 

Watson, M. V. B 371 

Weed & Kingwell 301 

Wheeler <fe Wilson Maauf. Co 371 

White Brothers 307 

WUsou Sewing Machine 371 



PAGE. 

Rowan, A. H., Bareges, register.. .118 
Sage, Lewis A., Congress Springs, 

register 443 

San Diego Union, San Diego 21 

San Joaquin Valley Argus, Merced.22 

San Jose Institute, San Jose 19 

Santa Clara College, Santa Clara.. ..17 
Santa Cruz Sentinel, Santa Cruz, 

register 477 

Santa Rosa Bank, Santa Rosa 13 

Savidan, J., San Jose, register 492 

Sentinel PrintingCo., Santa Cruz, 

register 477 

Shepherd & Shaffer, San Diego •? 

.Smith, H. M., Los Angeles 2 

Southwick, A. H., Oakland 

xlviii and xlix 
Staser & Nelson, Tehama, regis- 
ter 397 

Stockton Leader, Stockton 24 

Stoddard, W. M., Los Angeles 4 

Swanton, C. W., Pescadero, reg- 
ister 442 

Sweetser & Alsip, Sacramento, 

register 487 

.Switzer, E. D., San Diego 21 

Tay, John I., Oakland 11 

Temple <fe Workman, Los.ingeles..6 
Tinkham <fc Butterfield, Oakland, 

register 491 

Tobin, J. F., Vallejo 14 

ToUes & Fleming, San Bernar- 
dino 20 

Toy, Bickford & Co., Edendale, 

register 429 

Twist, F. W., Santa Barbara 9 

University of the Pacific, Santa 

Clara 18 

Washington College, Washington 

Corners 12 

Wharton, Maria Mrs., Oakland, 
register 445 



INDEX TO ADVERTISING DEPARTMENT. 



11 



OREGON, NEVADA, Etc. 



PAGE. 

Anderson, John S., Seattle. 
W. T., register 681 

Andrews, W. R., Seattle, W. T., 
register 679 

Arizona Citizen, Tucson, A. T., 
register 779 

Arizona Sentinel, Yuma, A. T., 
register 785 

Bailey, M., McMinnville, Ore- 
gon, register 561 

Bishop Scott Grammar and 
Divinity School, Portland, 
Oregon, register 561 

Collins, J. L.. Dalla.s, Ore 27 

Davis, T. A. & Co., Portland, Ore...27 

Dexter, Horton <fe Co., Seattle, 
W. T., register 679 

Dickinson, O.. Salem, Oregon, 
register 577 

Dickman, £mil, Virginia City, 
Nevada 30 

Dooly, J. E. & Co., Ogdeu City, 
Utah, register 742 

Drake, B. F., Salem, Oregon 28 

Draper, J. N. <fe Son, Salem, Ore- 
gon, register 578 

Elliott, Vincent, Virginia City, 
Nevada 30 

Ellsworth & Louthan, Kelton, 
Utah, register 742 



PAOBX 

Fredericks, Joseph, Virginia City, 
Nevada, register 631 

Hacheney & Stemme, Portland, 
Oregon, register 577 

Hamilton, P. R., Reno. Nevada, 
register 620 

Hewitt, R. H., Olympia, W. T 28 

Himes, George H., Portland, 

Ore., register 576 

Idaho Statesman, Boise City, 

I. T., register 69'! 

Jaquish, J. N., Reno, Nev., re- 
gister. 625 

Jones & Patterson, Salem, Ore 28 

Lafayette Courier, Lafayette, 

0"re 27 

Lefevre, J. B. B., Virginia City, 

Nev 30 

Lucas <ft Redon, Victoria, B. C. 

register 806 

McDonald, S. P., Vancouver, 

W. T 28 

National Business College, Port- 
laud, Ore 26 

New North West, Deer Lodge 

City, M. T., register 716 

PUkington, John B., Portland, 

Ore., register 574 



PAOK- 

Portland Academy and Female 

Seminary, Portland, Ore, re- 
gister 562 

Reed, C. A., Salem, Ore., register.567 
Riggs, D. L., Salem, Ore.,register.570 
Rose & Pottinger, Victoria, B. C, 

register 809 

Saunders, Philip, Portland, Ore., 

register 569 

Silsby, S. C, Idaho City. I. T. 

register 694 

St. Helen's Hall, (Day School,) 

Portland, Ore., register 560 

Traver, George W., Portland, 

Ore., register 577 

University Washington Terri- 

tnrv, Seattle, W. T 29 

Verdi Planing Mills Co., Verdi, 

Nev., register 631 

Vincent, De H. W., Corvallls, 

Ore., register 566 

Walling, A. G., Portland, Ore., 

register 577 

Webb <fe Mullard, Virginia City, 

Nev 30 

Wiener, M. & C, Austin, Nev., 

register 588 

Wood, T. A., Portland, Ore., reg... 574 
Zan Brothers .fe Co., Portland, 

Ore., register 558 



EASTERN AND FOREIGN ADVERTISEMENTS 



PAGE. 

American Linen Thread Co.,Mechanicsvil!e, N. Y., 
Manufacturers Threads and Twines, adv. dept. 
page l.xxix 

American Needle and Fish Hook Co., New Haven, 
Conn., Fishing Tackle, etc., adv. dept. page Ixx 

American Net and Twine Co., Boston, Mass., Manu- 
facturers Fishing Lines and Nets, adv. dept. p...lxxvi 

Ames' Plow Company, Boston, Miiss., and New 
York City, Manufacturers Agricultural Imple- 
ments, adv. dept. page Ixv 

Bemis <fe Call, Springfield, Mass., Hardware and 
Tool Co., adv. dept. page Ixxxii 

Bodenstein, J. H., Staatsburg, N. Y., Manufacturer 
Ice Tools and Elevator Chains, adv. dept. p Ixxxii 

Brandon Manufacturing Co., Brandon, Vt., Manu- 
facturers Howe's U. S. Standard Scales, adv. 
dept. page Ixxxi 

Cable Flax Mills, Troy, N. Y., Manuf. Twines, 
Yarns, Shoe Threads, etc., adv. dept. page Ixiv 

Clarke & Dunham, London, England, Mill Furnish- 
ers and Iron Merchants, adv. dept. page Ixxxvi 

Curtis, Jeremiah & Sons, New York City, Patent 
Medicines, adv. dept. page Ixxx 

Detroit Car Works, Detroit, Mich., Manufacturers 
Cars, Car Wheels and Castings, adv. dept. p....lxxvi 

Dickinson, C. B., Brooklyn, N. Y., Manufacturers 
Drugirists' Sundries and India Rubber Goods, 
adv. dept. page l.txv 

Donald, W. C. & Co., Boston, Mass., Manufacturers 
Printing Inks, Varnishes, Etc., adv. dept. page Ixxix 

Dudgeon, Richard, New York City, Manufacturer 
Hydraulic Jacks, Punches, etc., adv. dept. p Ixxxii 

Fay, J. A. <fe Co., Cincinnati, O., Manufacturers 
Wood Cutting Machinery, adv. dept. page Ixvi 

Fleming Thomas & Son, Halifax, Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, Manufacturers Card Clothing and Mill Fur- 
nishing, adv. dept. page Ixxxv 

Greaves, William, Newark, N. J., Manufacturer 
Pearl and Sleeve Buttons, Studs, etc., adv. dept. 
page Ixxxii 

Hoey, Jo.seph & Co., New York City, Designers and 
Engravers on Wood, adv. dept. page Ixviii 

Hooper & Co., London, England, Manufacturers 
Carriages, adv. dept. page Ixxxili 

Hubbard, H. W., Hartford, Conn., Manuf. Hand 
Stamps, Seal Presses, etc., adv. dept. page ...Ix.xvii 

John Russell Cutlery Co., Turners' Falls, Mass., 
Manufacturers Cutlery, adv. dept. page Ixix 

Johnson, J. E., Beacon Falls, Conn., Mercantile 
Agent, adv dtpt. page Ixxv 

Johnson. Matthe.v & Co., Loudon, England, Man- 
ufacturers Platinum, Assayers and Metalurgical 
Chemists, adv. dept. page Ixxxvi 

Johnston, William J., Washington, D. C, Attorney 
at Law, and Solicitor of Claims, register page 678 

Jones, Lamson <fe Co., Windsor, Vt., Manufiicturers 
Improved Engine Lathes, Screw Milling Ma- 
chines, etc.. adv. dept. page Ixvii 

Kent, G. B. & (;o., London, England, Manufacturers 
Hair and Tooth Brushes, adv. dept. page Ixxxvi 

Luttgeti, Frederick Wm., N. Y. Cit.v, Forwarding, 
Shipping and Com'n Merchant, adv. dept. p Ixxix 



PAGE 

Mavhew Ira. Detroit, Mich., Publisher Mayhew's 
Universitv Book Keeping, adv. dept. page Ixxvii 

Merriam, G. <fc C, Springfield, Mass., Publishers 
Webster's Unabridged Dictionary, adv. dept. 
page Ixxviii 

Miller, Bai r & Parkin, Pittsburg, Pa., Manufacturers 
Steel, adv. dept. page Ixiv 

Morris. Wheeler <fe Co., Philadelphia, Pa., and New 
York (Mty, Manufacturers Iron, Steel and Nails, 
adv. dept. page. Ixxi 

Morse Bros., Ca-iton, Mass., Manufacturers Rising 
Sun Stove Polish, adv. dept. page Ixxiii 

Moselev, Jerome S., Syracuse, N. Y., Manufacturer 
Eureka scroll Saw Machine, adv. dept. page.. ..Ixxiii 

National Wax Thread Sewing Machine, Boston, 
Ma,ss.. E. E. Bean, Agent, adv. dept. page Ixix 

Nelson & Co., New York City, Manufacturers Plum- 
bago Paint, register page 12 

Owen Paper Co., Housatonic, Mass., Manufacturers 
Writing Papers, register page 653 

Palmer, J. &■ Co., Concord, N. H., Manufacturers 
Carriage Springs, adv. dept. page Ixxviii 

Peek, Frean & Co., London, England, Manufac- 
turers Fancv Biscuits, adv. dept. page Ixxxv 

Phillips, Eugene F., Providence, R. I.. Manufacturer 
Gas Tight Tubing and Insulated Telegraph 
Wire, etc., adv. dept. page Ixxii 

Pratt & Letchworth, Buffalo, N. Y. Manufacturers 
and Importers Saddlery Hardware, adv. dept. 



page.. 



.Ixx 



Prince, George A. & Co., Buffalo, N. Y., Manufac- 
turers Organs and Melodeons, adv. dept. page.. .Ixxii 

Sellers, William & Co., Philadelphia, Pa., Machinists, 
Founders and Boiler Makers, adv. dept. page Ixiii 

Shoninger Organ Co., New Haven Conn., adv. dept. 
page Ixxiv 

Slmpson,'"Haii, Miller <fe Co., Wallingford, Conn., 
and New York City. Manufacturers Sliver Plated 
Wares, adv. dept. page ..•: .....Ixxvii 

Steward, George H. & Co., New York City, Manu- 
facturers Hand Stamps, Seal Pres.ses, etc., adv. 
dept. page •••■ ..Ixxvil 

The Hull & Belden Co., Danbury, Conn., Manufac- 
turers Belden's Improved Crank Planers, En- 
gine and Hand Lathes, etc., adv. dept. page.. Ixxvih 

Thelronmonger and .Metal Trades Advertiser, Lon- 
don, England, adv. dept. page Ixx.xiv 

Torrance, Merriam <fe Co., Troy, N. Y., Green Is- 
land Malleable Iron Works, adv. dept. page...l.\xviii 

Turner & Seymour Manufacturing Co., Wolcotl- 
ville, Conn., and New York City, Upholsterers 
Goods, Hardware, Notions, etc., adv. dept. p...lxxiv 

Twelvetrees, Harper & Son, London, England, 
Glycerine Soap Powder and Laundry Ball Blue, 
adv. dept. page .....Ixxv 

Union Stone Co , Boston, Mass., Manufacturers Un- 
ion Enierv Wheels, Emery etc., adv. dept. p Ixxi 

Wetherill <fe Bro., Philadelphia. Pa., Manufac- 
turers White and Red Lead, etc., adv. dt-pt. p.lxxxil 

Windle, J. D., Oldham, near Manchester, Eiigluiid, 
Manufacturer Watch Materials and Tools, adv. 
dept. page Ixxxvi 



AN INDEX 



To THE Cities, Towns, and othkr Localities, contained in this AVork, Arranged According to Counties 



CALIFORNIA. 



Alameda County. page. 

Alameda 112 

Altaiiiont 113 

Alvarado 113 

Amador, see Dougherty's Station 114 

Berkeley 119 

Brooklyn 123 

Centre ville 127 

Clinton, see Oakland 130 

Deuota 137 

Dougherty's Station 138 

Dublin, see Dougherty's Station 13'J 

East Oakland, see Oakland 110 

Edendale 110 

Fruitvale, P. 0. address, Brooklyn 117 

Harrisburg Ijl 

llaywood 154 

Ladd's, see Nottingham Iii4 

Livermore 107 

Melrose, P. 0. address, Alameda 17i) 

Mid-.vay 181 

Mission San Jos6 182 

Mount Eden 187 

Newark I'j3 

Niles 193 

Nottingham, see Livermore 195 

Oakland lOtJ 

Ocean View, P. 0. address, Berkeley 810 

Piedmont White Sulphur Springs, P. (J. address, 

Oakland 208 

Pleasant View, P. 0. address, Sunol 211 

Pluasanton 211 

San Antonio, see Oakland 228 

Snn Leandro 242 

San Lorenzo 242 

Seminary Park, P. 0. address, Brooklyn 255 

Sunol 2<J8 

Temescal. P. 0. address, Oakland 271 

Union City, P. 0. address, Alvarado 27ii 

Vallojo Mills, see Niles 278 

Warm Springs Landing, P. 0. address, Harris- 
burg 281 

Washington Corners 281 

West Oakland, see Oakland 283 

Alpine County. 

Bear Valley, P. 0. address. Silver Mountain 119 

Markleeville 175 

Alonitor 184 

Silver Mountain 2.57 

Woodfords 285 

Amador County. 

Alabama House, P. 0. address, lone Valley 112 

Amador City 114 

Aqueduct City, P. 0. address, Pino Grove IIU 

Boston Ranch, P. 0. address, Buena Vista 122 

Buena Vista 123 

Butte City, P. 0. address, Jackson 124 

Central House, P. O. address, Drytown 127 

Clinton, P. 0. address. Pine Grove 131 



! page. 

Coyoteville, P. 0. address, Fiddletown 135 

Drytown 139 

Enterprise, P. 0. address, Drytown 141 

Fiddletown 143 

Finn's Ranch. P. 0. address, Fiddletown 144 

Forest Home 145 

lone City, P. 0. address, lone Valley 159 

lone Valley, see lone City ItiO 

Jackson 100 

Kennedy Flat, P. 0. address, Jackson 102 

Lamb's Bridge, see Forest Homo 16ti 

Lancha Plana 106 

Middle Bar, P. 0- address, Jackson 181 

Mount Spring, P. 0. address, Jackson 187 

Newton Mine, P. O. address, lone Valley 193 

Oneida, P. 0. address, Jackson 203 

Pine Grove 209 

Plymouth 211 

Pokerville, P. O. address, Drytown 211 

Q. Ranch, P. 0. address, lone Valley 213 

Shaker Ridge .-. 2-55 

Sutter Creek 209 

Volcano 280 

BuTTK County. 

Bangor 118 

Berry Creek 120 

Bidwell's Bar 120 

Biggs Station 121 

Boston Ranch, P. 0. address, Oroville 122 

Brush Creek, See Mountain House 123 

Butte Creek Crossing, P. 0. address, Inskip 124 

Cana 120 

>Cedar Ranch, P. 0. address. Oak Arbor 127 

Centerville, P.O. address, Chico 127 

Central House 127 

Chapparal House, P. 0. address, Inskip 128 

Cherokee 128 

Chico 12ft 

Clear Creek, P. 0. address, Pentz 130 

Clipper Mills 131 

Dayton, P. 0. address, Chico 130 

Durham 139 

Enterprise, P. 0. address. Berry Creek 141 

Fairview, P. 0. address, Chico 143 

Flea Valley, P. 0. address, Yankee Hill 144 

Forbestown l-U 

French Creek, P. 0. address. Brush Creek 140 

Frenchtown, P. 0. address, Yankee Hill 140 

Grainland 150 

Gri3ley 152 

Inskip 159 

Lava Beds, P. 0. address, Moore's Station 100 

Leonard's Mill, P. 0. address, Magalia 100 

Little Kimshew, P. 0. address. Lovelocks 107 

Lovelocks 173 

Magalia 174 

Martinsburg, see Gridley 170 

^lesilla, see Pentz 181 

Moore's Station 18o 

Moorotown, P, 0. address, Forbestown 180 



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The Proprietors of the GEM are NOT Officers of the 




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*13 






INDEX TO CITIES, TOWNS, AND OTHER LOCALITIES. 13 



PAGE 

Monntain Cottage, P. 0. addresa, Brush Creek... 187 

Mountain House, P. 0. address, Brush Creek 187 

Nelson 190 

Nimshew, P. 0. address, Magalia 194 

Nord 194 

Oak Arbor 195 

Oak Grove Ranch, P. 0. address. Oak Arbor 195 

Oregon Gulch, P. 0. address, Oroville 203 

Orolewa, P. 0. address, Clipper Mills 203 

Oroville 203 

Paradise, P. 0. address, Magalia 205 

Peavine, P. 0. address. Brush Creek 20(5 

Pentz 206 

Potter's Ravine, P. 0. address, Cherokee 212 

Powellton 212 

Robinson's Mill, P. 0. address, Forbestown 21tj 

Rock Creek, P. 0. address, Nord 2Iti 

Ruckers Ranch, P. 0. address. Oak Arbor. 217 

Thompson's Flat, P. 0. address, Oroville 272 

Virginia Mills, P. 0. address, Bidwell's Bar 279 

Whitewash Trees, P. 0. address, Oroville 281 

Wild Yankee, P. 0. address. Brush Creek 284 

Wyandotte, P. 0. address, Oroville 287 

Yankee Hill 287 

Calaveeas County. 

Albany Flat, P. 0. address. Angels Camp 113 

Altaville, P. 0. address. Angels Camp 113 

Angels Camp 115 

Big Trees 120 

Calaveritas, P. 0. address. Fourth Crossing 125 

Camanche 125 

Campo Seco 12(3 

Cave City, P. 0. address, Mountain Ranch 127 

Chili 130 

Chili Gulch, P. 0. address, Mokelumne Hill 130 

Copperopolis 134 

Double Springs, see Spring Valley 138 

Douglas Flat, P. 0. address. Murphy's 138 

Dry Creek, P. 0. address, San Andreas 139 

Esperanza, P. 0. address, Mokelumne Hill 141 

Flume House, P. 0. address, Mokelumne Hill ... 144 

Fourth Crossing 146 

Gwin Mine 153 

Happy Valley, P. 0. address, Mokelumne Hill.. 154 

Hawkeye, P. 0. address. Angels Camp 154 

Independence Flat, P. 0. address. Railroad Flat 159 

James Bar, P. 0. address, Gwin Mine ItiO 

Jenny Lind l(jl 

Jesus Maria, P. 0. address, Mokelumne Hill Itjl 

Kentucky House, P. 0. address, San Andreas ... H>2 

Merrimack, P. 0. address, San Andreas 181 

Milton 182 

Mokelumne Hill 184 

Mokelumne River, P. 0. address, Camanche 184 

Mosquito Gulch 187 

Mountain Ranch 187 

Murphy's 188 

North American, P. 0. address, Jenny Lind ...... 194 

'Byrne's Ferry, P. 0. address, Sonora, Tuol- 
umne Co 195 

Railroad Flat 213 

Reynolds Ferry, P. U. address, Copperopolis 215 

Rich Gulch (Lower), see Gwin Mine 215 

Rich Gulch Flat, P. 0. address, Mokelumne Hill 215 
Robinson's Ferry, P. 0. address. Angels Camp .. 216 
Salt Spring's Valley Reservoir, P. 0. address, 

Milton 228 

San Andreas 228 

Sandy Gulch, P. 0. address. West Point 246 

Shaferville, P. 0. address. Telegraph City 255 

Sheep Ranch, P. 0. address, Mountain Ranch ... 256 

Spring Valley, see Valley Springs 262 

Telegraph City 271 

Vallecito 276 

Valley Springs 278 

AVttst Point 283 

Whisky SlideV P. oraddres7,"Mokei'um^^^^ 281 

Colusa County. 

Bear Valley, P. 0. address, Colusa 119 

Bridgeport, P. 0. address, Grand Island 122 

Butte City 124 

Central 127 

Coast Range 131 

College City 132 

Colusa 132 

li 



Elk Creek ...ill 

Fresh Water i46 

Grand Island 150 

Grimes Landing 153 

Jacinto 16O 

Kanawha '. 162 

Leesville • .' igg 

Moon's Ranch .'..""..'.""! 186 

Munchville, P. 0. address. Sulphur Creek '. 188 

Newville 193 

Ohio House, P. 0. address. Spring Valley.....".".... 203 

Olimpo 203 

Princeton 212 

Spring Valley 262 

St. John 263 

Sulphur Creek, see Munchville 268 

Sycamore 270 

Venado .'.!.!!'.'.""'.'.!.".".'.".' 278 

Wilbur's Hot Sulphur Springs, P. 6. address. 
Sulphur Creek 281 

Contra Costa County. 

Alamo 112 

Antioch 115 

Bareges Sulphur Springs, P. 0. address. Walnut 

Creek ng 

Black Diamond 121 

Clayton 130 

Concord 134 

Danville 136 

Fish Ranch, P. 0. address, Lafayette 144 

Lafayette 165 

Limerick, P. 0. address, Danville 166 

Martinez 175 

New York Landing, see Black Diamond 193 

Nortonville 195 

Pacheco 204 

Pinole, P. 0. address, San Pablo 209 

Pittsburg Landing, P. 0. address, Antioch 209 

Point of Timber 211 and 810 

Rhoda Valley, P. 0. address, Martinez 215 

San Pablo 245 

San Ramon 246 

Somersville 259 

Walnut Creek 281 

Webb's Landing 283 

Del Norte County. 

Altaville, P. 0. address. Crescent City 113 

Crescent City 135 

Happy Camp " 154 

Rockland, P. 0. address. Crescent City 216 

Smith River 258 

El Dorado County. 

American Flat. P. 0. address, Kelsey 114 

Blakeley's, P. 0. address, Placerville 121 

Buckeye Flat, P. 0. address, Shingle Springs 123 

Cedar Rock, P. 0. address. Slippery Ford 127 

Clarksville 130 

Coloma 132 

Deer Creek, P. U. address, Shingle Springs 137 

Deer Valley, P. 0. address. Green Valley 137 

Diamond Springs 137 

Dick's Station, P. 0. address. Slippery Ford 137 

El Dorado 140 

Fair Play 143 

Garden Valley 147 

Georgetown 148 

Georgetown Junction, P. 0. address. Slippery 

Ford 148 

Georgia Slide, P. 0. address, Georgetown 148 

Gold Hill see Granite Hill 150 

Granite Hill 1.50 

Green Valley 152 

Greenwood 152 

Grizzly Flat 1.53 

Half-Way House, P. 0. address. Slippery Ford... 153 

Indian Diggings, P. 0. address, Mondon 159 

Jay Hawk, P. 0. address. Green Valley 161 

Kelly Creek, P. 0. address. Green Valley 162 

Kelsey 162 

Kingsville House, P. 0. address. El Dorado 163 

Lake Valley 165 

Latrobe 166 

Logtown, P. 0. address. El Dorado 169 



14 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PAGE. 

Louisville, P. 0. address, Kolsey 173 

Mondon 17'.t 

Middlotown, P. 0. address, I'laeorvillo 181 

Moore's Staiion, P. 0. address, Slippery Ford 18ti 

Mud Springs, see El Dorado 1«8 

Nashville 190 

Negro tlill, 1'. 0. address. Mormon Island, Sac- 
ramento Co 190 

Newtown 193 

Orr's Station, P. 0. address. Pilot Hill 204 

Pacific House, P. 0. address, Placerville 20,5 

Phillips Station, P. 0. address. Slippery Eord 208 

Pilot Hill 208 

Placerville 20<J 

Pleasant Valley 210 

Quart/.villo, see Nashville 213 

Kiebors Station, P. U. address, Placerville 215 

Rowland 217 

Salmon Falls 228 

Shingle Springs 23ti 

Slippery Ford 258 

Sly Park, P. O. address, Pleasant Valley 258 

Smith's Flat, P. O. address, Placerville 258 

Spanish Dry Diggings 262 

Spanish Flat, P. U. address, St. Lawronceburg... 2t)2 

Sportsman's Hall, P. 0. address, Placerville 2ii2 

St. Lawrenceburg 203 

Strawberry Valley, P. U. address. Slippery Ford 207 
Sugar Loaf Station, P. 0. address, Slippery Ford 207 

Tallac 270 

Tiger Lily, P. U. address. Diamond Springs 272 

Uniontown, P. 0. address, Coloma 270 

Volcanoville, P. 0. address, (Georgetown 280 

Yank's Station, P. 0. address, Rowland 287 

Fresno County. 

Areola, see Borden 116 

Berendo 119 

Big Dry Creek 120 

Borden 122 

Buchanan 123 

Centreville, P. 0. address, King's River 128 

Firebaugh 144 

Fort Miller, P. U. address, Timber Cove 145 

Fresno City 140 and 810 

Fresno Flats 147 

Gold Gulch, P. 0. address, Buchanan 150 

King's River, see Centreville 103 

King's Kiver Switch 810 

Kingston 103 

Millerton. P. 0. address. Fort Miller 182 

New Idria 193 

Panoche 205 

Riverdale 210 

Sycamore Creek 270 

Watson's Ferry, P. 0. address. Firebaugh 281 

Humboldt County. 

Areata H6 

Brown's Landing, P. 0. address. Table Bluff 123 

Bucksport, P. 0. address. Eureka 123 

Camp Grant 120 

Centerville, see False Cape 127 

Eel River, see Rohnerville. 140 

Eureka 142 

False Cape 143 

Ferndale 143 

Garberville 147 

Gas Jet 148 

Hooktown, P. 0. address. Table Bluff. 157 

Hydesville 158 

Laribee Creek, P. 0. address, Hydesville 100 

Mad River 174 

Mattole, see Petrolia 178 

McLeansville, see Hooktown 178 

McNelty's Landing, P. 0. address. Table Bluff... 178 

Myers Landing, P. 0. address. Table Bluff. 188 

Petrolia ; 208 

Rohnerville 210 

Salmon Creek, P. U. address. Table Bluff. 228 

Table Bluff. 270 

Upper Mattole 270 

Weitchpeck, P. 0. address, Martin's Ferry 283 

Yagerville 287 

Inyo County. 

Bier Owens Lake, P. 0. address. Independence.... 120 



PAGR. 

Big Pine 120 

Bishop's Creek 121 and 810 

Cam|) Independence, P.O. address. Independence 120 

Cartago, P. 0. address, Olancha 120 

Corro Gordo 128 and 810 

DarwinI 13o and 810 

Fish Si)rings 144 

Fort Indopendence, see Camp Independence 145 

Uaywoe Meadows, P. 0. address, Olancha 154 

Indopendence '. 158 

Lagunita 105 

Lone Pine 109 

Oasis 203 

Olancha 203 

Panamint 205 

Piper's Ranch, see Oasis 209 

Round Valley 217 

Swansea, P. 0. address, Cerro Gordo 209 

Sylvania 270 

VV right's Station, P. 0. address. Fish Springs 287 

Kkrn County. 

Allen's Camp 810 

Alpine Mill, P. 0. address, Glenville 113 

Bakerstield 117 

Oaliente 125 

Cantield, P. U. address, Bakersfield 120 

Claraville, P. 0. address, Havilah 130 

Delano 137 

El Tejon, P. O. address, Bakerstield 141 

Fortiojon, P. 0. address, Bakerstield 140 

Glenville, see Linn's Valley 150 

Green Valley 152 

Havilah 154 

Hot Spring Valley, P. 0. address, Kernville 157 

Kanawha Rancho, P. 0. address, Bakerstield 102 

Kern Island, P. O. address, Bakerstield 102 

Kernville 102 

Linn's \'alley, P. U. address, Glenville 107 

Oak Creek, P. 0. address, Tehichipa 195 

Panama 205 

Pettersburg, P. 0. address, Havilah 208 

Piute 209 

Posey Creek, P. 0. address, Bakerstield 212 

Sagoland, P. 0. address, Weldon 220 

San Emigdio, P. U. address, Bakerstield 234 

Summit Mills, P. 0. address, Kernville 208 

Tehichipa 271 

Tejon 271 

Walker's Basin, P. 0. address, Havilah 280 

Weldon 283 

Willow Springs, P. O. address, Tehichipa 284 

Klamath County. 

Bald Hills 118 

Big Bar, P. 0. address, Orleans 120 

Black Bear 121 

Brownsville, P. O. address, Petersburg. 123 

Cecilville, P. 0. address, Petersburg 127 

Centerville, see Yocumville 127 

Cottage Grove 135 

Forks of Salmon 145 

Fort Bar, P. O- address. Forks of Salmon 145 

Fort Gaston, see Hoopa Valley 145 

Gulion's Bar, P. 0. address, Forks of Salmon 1-53 

Hoopa Valley 157 

Klamath Bluffs, P. 0. address, Martin's Ferry.... 103 

Klamath Mill 103 

Lakeville, P. 0. address, Petersburg 100 

Lincolnville, P. 0. address. Forks of Salmon 167 

Martin's Ferry 170 

Oliver's Flat, see Lincolnville 203 

Orleans Bar 203 

Petersburg 208 

Rock iianch, P. 0- address, Orleans Bar 210 

Somes Bar 259 

Summerville, P. 0. address, Petersburg 208 

Trinidad 272 

Yocumville 287 

Lake County. 

Allen Springs 113 

Bartlett Springs 118 

Bradford's Station, P. 0. address, Middletown .. 122 

Glenbrook 149 

Gravelly Valley 152 

Guenoc 153 



INDEX TO CITIES, TOWNS, AND OTHER LOCALITIES. 15 



PAGE. 

Harbin's Springs, P. 0. address, Middletown 154 

Highland Springs 15tj 

Hot Sigler Springs, P. 0. address, Lower Lake... 157 

Kelsey ville, P. 0. address. Uncle Sam 162 

Lakeport. » lt>5 

Lower Lake 174 

Manhattan, see Knoxville 174 

Middlotown 181 

Morgan, P. U. address. Lower Lake 180 

Pearson's Springs 206 

Siglor Springs, see Hot Sigler Springs 257 

Soda Creek Quicksilver Mines, P. 0. address, 

Lower Lake 258 

Uncle Sain, see Kelseyville 276 

Upper Lake 276 

Witter Springs _ „ ~ 285 

Lassen County. 

Argusville 116 

Big Valley „ 121 

Coppervale — - 134 

Dayton 137 

Haydcn - 154 

Janes villa 161 

Johnsonville, P. 0. address, Susanville 161 

Junction House 161 

Lassen - 166 

Long Valley 169 

Merrillville ™ 181 

Miltord 181 and 810 

Susanville 268 

Los Angeles County. 

Anaheim 114 

Anaheim Landing, P. 0. address, Anaheim 115 

Azusa 117 

Ballona, P. 0. address, Los Angeles 118 

Capistrano, see San Juan Capistrano 126 

Compton 134 

Cottonwood Grove, P. U. address, Lyons Station 135 

Downey City, P. O. address, Los Nietos 138 

Duaito, P. 0. address. El Monte 810 

El Monte 141 

Gallatin, see Downey City 147 

La Puonta, P. 0. address. El Monte 164 

Lexington, see El Monte 166 

Lopez Station, P. O. address, San Pernando 169 

Los Angeles 169 

Los JSietos, see Downey City 173 

Lyon Station 174 

Machado 174 

Mission San Gabriel, see San Gabriel 182 

Monte, see El Monte 185 

Newport, P. O. address, Santa Ana 193 

Orange 203 

Pasadena 205 

Petroliopolis, see Lyon Station 208 

Ravenna City ,. 213 

San I'ernando 235 

San Francisco Canyon, P. 0. address, Lyon Sta- 
tion 236 

San Gabriel 236 

San Gabriel Mines, P. U. address, Azusa 236 

San J uan Capistrano, P. 0. address, Capistrano- 242 

San Pedro, P. 0. address, Wilmington 245 

Santa Ana 246 

Santa Monica 252 and 811 

Soledad, P. 0. address, Lyon Station 259 

Spadra 262 

Tustin City 275 

Westminster 283 

Wilmington 284 

Maein County. 

Angel Island 115 

Black Point 121 

Bolinas 122 

Caliiornia (Jity, P. 0. address, Saucelito 125 

Estero Americano, P. 0. address, Bloomfield, So- 
noma County 141 

Marshall 175 

Nicasio , 193 

Novate, P. address. Black Point 195 

Olema 203 

Preston, P. U. address, Tomales 212 

Ross Landing. P. 0. address, San Rafael 216 

San Quentin 245 

San Rafael 245 

Saucelito 254 



PAGE. 

Tomales 272 

Mariposa County. 

Agua Fria, P. 0. address. Mount Bullion 112 

Bear Valley 119 

Boneyard, P. 0. address, Coulterville 122 

Bower Cave, P. 0. address, Coulterville 122 

Bull Creek, P. 0- address. Coulterville 123 

Clark's Station, P. 0. address, Mariposa 130 

Colorado, P. 0. address, Mariposa 132 

Coulterville 135 

Hazel Green, P. 0. address, Coulterville 155 

Uite's Cove, P. 0. address, Mariposa 156 

Hornitos 157 

Mariposa 175 

Mormon Bar, P. 0. address, Mariposa 186 

Mount Bullion, see Princeton 187 

Princeton, P. 0. address. Mount Bullion 212 

Yosemita 287 

Mendocino County. 

Albion 

Anderson 

Boonville, P. 0. address, Anderson 

Bourns Landing, P. 0. address, Gualala 

Bridgeport Landing, P. 0. address, Miller 

Cahto 

Calpella , 

Caspar 

Centreville, P. 0. address. Potter Valley 

Christine 

Conway's Landing, P. 0. address, Punta Arenas. 

Covelo 135 and 

Cufley's Cove 

Ferguson's Cove, P. 0. address, Gualala 

Fish Rock, P. 0. address, Gualala 

Garcia River, P. O. address, Punta Arenas ....™. 

Gualala 

Hermitage . 

Kabasilla 

Little Lake, see Willitsville 

Little River 

Long Valley, P. U. address, Cahto „ 

Manchester 

Mendocino „ 

Miller, see Bridgeport Landing 

Mountain House, P. 0. address, Cloverdale 

Navarro Ridge 

Noyo 

Ocean View, P. 0. address, Mendocino 

Pine Grove, P. 0. address, Casper 

Porno 

Potter Valley, see Centreville 

Punta Arenas 

Round Valley, see Covelo 

Salmon Creek, P. 0. address, Albion 

Sanel 

Sherwood Valley 

Ukiah 

Uncle Abe's Landing, P. 0. address, Cuffey'sCove 

Whitehall 

WiUitsville , 

Yorkville 



113 
115 
122 
122 
123 
124 
125 
127 

lisa 

134 
810 
136 
143 
144 
147 
153 
156 
162 
167 
167 
169 
174 
179 
181 
187 
190 
195 
203 
209 
211 
212 
212 
217 
228 
246 
256 
275 
276 
284 

284 

287 

Merced County. 

Cottonwood, P. 0. address, Hill's Ferry 135 

Cressey, see Livingston 136 

Dover, P. 0. address. Hill's Ferry 138 

Hopeton 157 

Lewis' Ranch, P. 0. address. Union ...,„ 166 

Livingston 168 

Los Banos 173 

Merced 179 

Merced Falls „ 181 

Plainsburg 210 

San Luis Ranch 244 

Snelling 258 

Union 276 

Modoc CotWTY. 

Adinvillo „ Ill 

Camp Bidwell, see Fort Bidwell 126 

Canby 126 

Codarvillo 127 

Centerville, P. O. address. Hot Springs 127 

Dorris Bridge 138 

Eagleville ^ 140 

Fort Bidwell 145 

Goose Lake, see Willow Ranch 150 



16 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PAGE. 

Hot Springs, see Centerville 157 

Lake City ltJ5 

Surprise Valley, P. 0. address, Lake City 268 

Whitley's Ford !i84 

Willow Ranch 284 

Mono County. 

Adobe Meadows, P. 0. address, Benton 112 

Antelope, see Coleville 115 

Benton 119 

Bodie, P. 0. address, Bridgeport 122 

Bridgeport 122 and 810 

Coleville 131 

Hot Springs, P. 0. address, Benton 158 

Partzwick, see Benton 205 

Whisky Flat, P. 0. address, Benton 284 

Monterey County. 

Blanco 121 

Castroville 127 

Chualao 130 

Deep Wells Station, P. 0. address, Natividad ... 137 

Gabilan 147 

Gabilan House, P. 0. address, Watividad 147 

Gonzales 150 

Half Way House, P, 0. address, Salinas 154 

Jolon 161 

Monterey ~ 185 

Moss Landing, P. 0. address, Castroville 187 

Natividad 190 

New Republic, see Santa Rita 193 

Pajaro, P. 0. address, Watsonville, Santa Cruz 

County 205 

Paul's Island, P. 0. address, Castroville 206 

Pleito 211 

Salinas 226 

San Antonio 228 

Santa Rita 252 

Soledad 259 

Napa County. 
Branch Lunatic Asylum, P. 0. address, Napa 

City 122 

Calistoga 125 

Capell Valley 126 

Carneros, P. 0. address, Napa City 126 

Knoiville 164 

Monti<3ello 186 

Napa City 188 

Napa Soda Springs,lP. 0. address, Napa City 190 

Napa White Sulphur Springs, P. 0. address, 

Napa City 190 

Oakville _ 203 and 8)0 

Phoenix Mine 208 

Pope Valley 211 

Rutherford 217 

Sebastopoi, see i'ountville 255 

St. Helena 262 

Suscol _ 269 

White Sulphur Springs, see Napa White Sulphur 

Springs 284 

Yountville 288 

Zem Zem 290 

Nevada County. 

Allison Ranch, P. 0. address. Grass Valley 113 

Anthony House. 115 

Bear Valley, P. 0. address, Emigrant Gap, 

Placer Co 119 

' Birchyille, P. 0. address, Sweetland 121 

Boea 121 

Boston Ravine, P. 0. address, Grass Valley 122 

Bridgeport, P. 0. address, Anthony House 122 

Broneo „ 123 

Central House, P. 0. address, iSlevada City 127 

Cherokee, P. 0. address, Patterson 128 

Columbia Hill, P. 0. address, North Columbia... 132 

Donner Lake, P. 0. address, Truekee 138 

Eureka South, P^ 0. address, Graniteville 143 

Fall Creek, P. 0. address. Emigrant Gap, Placer 

Co 143 

Forest Springs, P. 0. address. Grass Valley 145 

French Corral „ 146 

Glenbrook Park, P. 0. address. Grass Valley 150 

Graniteville, see Eureka South 150 

Grass Valley 150 

Hot Springs, P. 0. address, Tahoe City 158 

Hudson House, P. 0. address, Anthony House.... 158 
Humbug, see North Blaomfield 158 



PAGE. 

Hunerfirth's, P. 0. address, Nevada City _ 158 

Indian Springs, P. 0. address, Kough and Ready 159 

Kenebec Hill, P. 0. address. North Columbia 162 

Lake City, P. 0. address. North Columbia 165 

Little Grass Valley, P. 0. address, North Colum- 
bia 167 

Little York 167 

Lowell Hill, P. 0. address, Little York 174 

Malakoff, P. 0. address. North Bloomtiold 174 

Montezuma, P. 0. address. North San Juan 185 

Mooney Flat, P. 0. address, Smartsville 186 

Moore's Flat 186 

Morrison's Station, P. 0. address, Colfax 187 

Mount Vernon House, P. 0. address, Nevada 

City 187 

Nevada City 190 

Newtown, P. 0. address. Rough and Ready 193 

North Bloomfield 194 

North Columbia, see Columbia Hill 194 

North San Juan 194 

Omega 203 

Ophir Hill, P. 0. address. Grass Valley 203 

Patterson 206 

Pet Hill, P. 0. address, Smartsville 206 

Pleasant Valley, see Anthony House 211 

Quaker Hill, P. 0. address, Nevada City 213 

Kay's Ranch, P. 0. address. North San Juan 213 

Red Dog, P. 0. address. You Bet 214 

Relief Hill, P. 0. address, North Bloomfield 215 

Rough and Ready 216 

Soda Springs 258 

Spencovillo 262 

Summit Valley, P. 0. address. Soda Springs 268 

Sweetland 269 

Toll House, P. 0. address. North Columbia 272 

Truekee 273 

Union Hill, P. 0. address, Nevada City 276 

Washington 281 

Woolsey's Flat, P. 0. address, Moore's Flat 287 

You Bet 288 

Placek County. 

Alta 113 

Applegate's Siding, P. 0. address, Colfax 116 

Auburn 116 

Bath 118 

Blue Canon 121 

Butcher's Ranch 124 

Cisco 130 

Clipper Gap 131 

Colfax 131 

Damascus, P. 0. address, Iowa City 136 

Danetown, P. 0. address, Lincoln 136 

Deadwood, P. 0. address, Michigan Bluff. 137 

Dutch Flat 139 

Emigrant Gap 141 

Forest Hill 145 

Gold Hill, P. 0. address, Lincoln 150 

Gold Run 150 

Grizzly Boar House, P. 0. address, Butcher 

Ranch 153 

Horse Shoe Bar, P. 0. address, Michigan Bluff... 157 

Iowa City, see Iowa Hill 160 

Iowa Hill, P. 0. address, Iowa City 160 

Lake Bigler, see Tahoe City 165 

Last Chance, P. 0. address, Michigan Bluff. 166 

Lincoln 167 

Long Ravine House, P. 0. address, Colfax 169 

Mclvinneysville, P. 0. address, Tahoe City 178 

Mchigan Bluff. 181 

Mineral Bar, P. 0. address, Colfax 182 

Monono Flat, P. 0. address, Iowa Hill 185 

Newcastle 193 

New England Mills, P. 0. address, Colfax 193 

Ophir 203 

Penryn 206 

Pino 209 

Rattlesnake Bar, P. 0. address, Newcastle 213 

Rocklin 216 

Roseville 216 

Sarahsvillo, P. 0. address, Bath 254 

Secret Springs, P. 0. address, Michigan Bluff..... 255 

Shady Run 2-55 

Sheridan 256 

Summit, P. 0. address. Soda Springs 268 

Tahoe City 270 

Todd's Valley 272 

Virginia, P. 0. address, Lincoln 27J 

Yankee Jim's 287 



INDBX TO CITIES, TOWNS, AND OTHEK LOCALITIES. 



Plumas County. page. 

American House, P. 0. address, La Porte 114 

Beckwith 119 

Big Meadows, see Prattville 120 

Buckeye Ranch, P. 0. address. Buck's Ranch 123 

Buck's Ranch 123 

Butte Valley, P. 0. address, Longville 124 

Cherokee, P. 0. address, Greenville 128 

Crescent Mills 136 

Diamond Springs House, P. 0. address. La Porte 137 

Dutch Hill 140 

Eureka Mills. P. 0. address, Mohawk Valley 143 

Grass Valley (Little) 152 

Greenville 152 

Jamison City, P. 0. address, Mohawk Valley lUl 

La Porte 164 

Longville 169 

Marion Flat, P. 0. address, Longville 175 

Meadow Valley 179 

Mohawk Valley 184 

Nelson Point 190 

Oak Ravine, P. 0. address, Spanish Ranch 195 

Onion Valley, P. 0. address, Gibsonville 203 

Prattville 212 

Quincy 213 

Red Clover Valley, P. 0. address, Taylorsville.... 214 

Rich Bar, P. 0. address, Spanish Ranch 215 

Saw Pit Flat, P. 0. address, Gibsonville 254 

Spanish Ranch 262 

Summit 268 

Taylorsville 270 

Twelve-mile Bar, P. 0. address, Spanish Ranch.. 275 

Winthrop Hoiise, P.O. address. La Porte 285 

Yankee Hill, P.O. address, La Porte 287 

Saceamento County. 

Ashland, P. 0. address, Folsom 116 

Brighton 123 

Cosumnes 135 

Courtland 135 

Daylor's Ranch, P. 0. address, Cosumnes „ 136 

Doby Ranch 138 

Elk Grove 141 

Emmaton •. 141 

Florin 144 

Folsom 144 

Franklin 146 

Freeport 14H 

Gait 147 

Hicksville 156 

Hill Top, P. 0. address, Michigan Bar 156 

Isellatta 160 

Live Oak, P. 0. address, Michigan Bar 167 

Michigan Bar 181 

Mormon Island 186 

Onisbo, P. 0. address, Courtland 203 

Richland 215 

Routier's Station 217 

Sacramento 217 

Sheldon, P. 0. address. Elk Grove 256 

Twelve-mile House 275 

Union House 276 

Walker 280 

Walnut Grove 281 

San Benito County. 

Cinnabar 1.30 

Emmett 141 

Erie „ 141 

Grogan, see Paicines 1.53 

Hollister 1.56 

Paicines 205 

Peach Tree 206 

Picacho 208 

San Benito 228 

San Juan Baptista 241 

Slack Caiion 257 

TresPinos 272 

San Beknabdino County. 

Bairdstown 117 and 810 

Chino 1.30 

Cucamonga 1.36 

Riverdale 216 

San Bernardino 229 

San Gorgonio, P. 0. address, San Bernardino 236 

San Salvador, P. 0. address, San Bernardino 246 

Temescal 272 



San Diego County. page. 

Agua Caliente, P. 0. address, Warner's Ranch... 112 

Ajuanga, P. 0. address, Temecula 113 

Ballena 118 

Banner 118 

Bernardo 120 

Campo 126 

Fort Yuma, P. 0. address, Yuma, A. T 146 

Julian City 161 

Montserrat 186 

Mount Fairview 187 

National City 190 

North San Diego 194 

Oak Grove 195 

Pala 205 

Poway 212 

San Diegnito 231 

San Diego 231 

San Diego North, see San Diego 233 

San Jacinto 236 

San Luis Rey 244 

San PasquaL 245 

Stonewall 267 

Temecula. Z7l 

Valley 278 

Viejas 279 

Warner's Ranch 281 

San Fbancisco County. 

Alcatraz 113 

San Francisco 235 

San Joaquin County. 

Acampo Ill 

Atlanta 116 

Banta's Station, P. 0. address, Banta 118 

Belota 119 

Bur wood 124 

Collegeville 132 

Davis' School House, P. 0. address, Lodi 136 

Elliot 141 

Ellis 141 

Farmington 143 

Fisher's Ridge, see Belota 144 

French Camp, P. 0. address, Stockton 146 

Lathrop 166 

Linden„ 167 

Live Oak, P. 0. address, Stockton 167 

Lockeford 168 

Lodi - 168 

Meinecke, P. 0. address, Morano - 179 

Mokelumne Station, see Lodi 184 

Peters 208 

Poland, P. 0. address, Lockeford 211 

Ripon 216 

San Joaquin 236 

Stockton 263 and 811 

Taisonville, F- O. address, Woodbridge 270 

Waterloo 281 

Woodbridge 285 

San Luis Obispo County. 

Arroyo Grande 116 and 810 

Avila, P. 0. address, San Luis Obispo 117 

Cambria 125 

Cayucas Landing, P. 0. address, Old Creek 127 

Cholame 130 

Josephine 161 

Moro Bay, see Morro 187 

Morro 187 

Old Creek 203 

Paso Robles 205 

San Luis Obispo 243 

San Marcos 244 

San Miguel, P. 0. address, San Marcos 245 

San Simeon 246 

Santa Margarita 252 

Suey 267 

San Mateo County. 

Belmont 119 

Byrne's Store, P. 0. address, San Mateo 124 

Gordon's Landing, P. 0. address, San Gregorio... 1-50 

Half Moon Bay 1.53 

La Honda 164 

Lobetus Station, P. 0. address, Purissima 168 

Menlo Park 179 

Milbrae, P. 0. address, San Mateo 181 

Pescadero 206 



Pacific coast business directory. 



PAGE. 

Pif?oon Point, P. 0. address, Pescadoro 208 

Purissima 213 

Redwood City 214 

San Bruno, P. 0. address. San Mateo 230 

San Felix Station, P. 0. address. San Mateo 23o 

San Grogorio. P. 0. address. Redwood City 236 

San Mateo ■"•• -244 

School House Station 2o5 and 811 

Sears ville 2.>5 

Spanishtown, see Half Moon Bay 262 

Visitacion Valley, P. 0. address, San Francisco.. 280 

Woodside 286 

Santa Barbara County. 

Ballards, P. 0. address, Santa Barbara 118 

Carpenteria 126 

Foxen's, P. 0. address, Santa Maria 146 

Golleta IW 

Guadalupe 153 

.Joanata 161 

La Gaviota, P. 0. address. Las Cruces 164 

La Graciosa 164 

La Patera, see Patera Rancho 164 

Las Cruces 166 

Lompoc 169 

Los Alisos, see Patera Rancho 169 

Montecito, P. 0. addres-s. Santa Barbara 18.5 

Nahuijui, P. 0. address. Las Cruces 188 

Patera Rancho, P. 0. address, Santa Barbara ... 205 

Quemnda. P. 0. address. Las Cruces 213 

San Marcos, see La Graciosa 244 

Santa Barbara 246 

Santa Barbara Hot Sulphur Springs, P. 0. ad- 
dress, Santa Barbara 248 

Santa Inez, P. 0. address. Las Cruces 252 

Santa Maria 252 

Smith's Landing, P. 0. address, Carpenteria 258 

Santa Clara County. 

Adobe Creek, P. 0. address, Mayfield Ill 

Alma 113 

Alviso 113 

Augusta, P. 0. address, Santa Clara 117 

BeU's Station 119 

Berryessa. P. 0, address, San Jose 120 

Burnett 124 

Cinnabar, P. 0. address, San Jose 130 

Congress Springs, see Saratoga 134 

Coyote Station, P. 0. address, Burnett 135 

Edenvalo Station, P. 0. address, San Jose 140 

Evergreen 143 

Five Mile House, P. 0. address, San Jose 144 

Gilroy 148 

Gilroy Hot Sulphur Springs 149 

La Borea 164 

Lexington 166 

Live Oak, P. 0. address, Gilroy 167 

Los Gates 173 

Madrone Station, see Sherman 174 

Mayfield 178 

Millikin's Cross Roads, P. 0. address, Santa 

Clara 182 

Milpitas 182 

Mountain View, P. U. address, Mountain View 

Station 187 

Mountain View Station 187 

New Almaden 192 

Oak Grove, P. 0. address, Mayfield 195 

San Felipe 234 

San Jose 236 and 810 

San Ysidro 246 

Santa Clara 249 

Saratoga 254 

Sargent's Station, see La Borea 254 

Sherman 2.56 

Tennant's Station 272 

Santa Cruz County. 

Aptos ; 116 

Bear Creek, P. 0. address, Boulder Creek 110 

Boulder Creek 122 

Corralitos, P. 0. address, Watsonville 134 

Davenport 136 

Felton 143 

Half Way House, P. 0. address, Watsonville 154 

Rancho Arroyo de Laguna, P. 0. address, Santa 

Cruz 213 

San Lorenzo, P. address, Boulder Creek 243 



PAGE. 

Sanford's Station, P. 0. address, Watsonville 246 

Santa Cruz 250 

Scott's Creek, P. 0. address, Seaside 255 

Seaside 255 

Seven Mile House 255 

Sequel 261 

Strawberry Valley Magnetic Springs 267 

Vine Hill 279 

Waddell Creek, P. 0. address. Seaside 280 

Watsonville 281 

Whisky Hill, P. 0. address, Watsonville 284 

Shasta County. 

Adams Ferry, P. 0. address, American Ranch... Ill 

American Ranch 114 

Anderson, P. 0. address, American Ranch 115 

Arbucklo, P. 0. address, Horsetown 116 

Bald Hills, P. 0. address, Horsetown 118 

Bass Station, see Stillwater 118 

Bell's Bridge 119 

Buckeye, P. 0. address, Shasta 123 

Burgettville 124 

Burnoy Valley 124 

Castle Rock, P. 0. address, Portugee 127 

Centerville, P. 0. address, Shasta 127 

Churntown, P. 0. address, Shasta 130 

Cl'jar Creek, see Bell's Bridge 130 

Cottonwood 135 

Dog Creek, P. 0. address, Portugee 138 

Eagle Creek, P. 0. address, Horsetown 140 

Fall River Mills 143 

Foster's Ranch, see Cottonwood 146 

French Gulch 146 

Gas Point 148 

Horsetown 157 

Igo 158 

Janesville, P. 0. address, Horsetown 161 

Lower Soda, P. 0. address, Portugee 174 

Ludwig's Bridge, see Cottonwood 174 

Middletown, P. 0. address, Shasta 181 

Millville 182 

Mountain House, P. 0. address, French Gulch... 187 

Parkville 205 

Piety Hill, P. 0. address, Horsetown 268 

Pittville 209 

Portugee 212 

Reading 214 

Roaring River 216 

Round Mountain 217 

Shasta 255 

Shingletown 256 

Slate Creek, P. 0. address, Portugee 258 

Soda Springs, P.O. address, Portugee 258 

Southern's Station, P. 0. address, Portugee 262 

Spring Creek 262 

Stillwater 263 

Sweet Briar Ranch, P. 0. address, Portugee 269 

Texas Springs, P. 0. address, Horsetown 272 

Tower House. P. 0. address, French Gulch 272 

Upper Soda, P. 0. address, Portugee 276 

Watson Gulch, P. 0. address, Horsetown 281 

Whiskytown, P. 0. address, Shasta 284 

Sierra County. 

Alleghany 113 

Brandy City, P.O. address, Camptonville, YubaCo 122 

China Flat, P. 0. address, Downieville 130 

Downieville 1.38 

Empire Flat, P. 0. address. Table Rock 141 

Eureka North. P. 0. address, Fir Cap 143 

Fir Cap, see Eureka North 144 

Forest City 145 

Gibsonville 148 

Goodyear's Bar 150 

Howland Flat, P. 0. address, Table Rock 158 

Indian Hill, P. 0. address, Camptonville, YubaCo 159 

Kanaka Ravine, P. 0. address, Downieville 162 

Loganville, P. 0. address. Sierra City 169 

Loyal ton 174 

Minnesota, P. 0. address, Alleghany 182 

Mobile Flat, P. 0. address, Downieville 182 

Mountain House, P. 0. address, Downieville 187 

New York Flat, P. 0. address, Downieville 193 

Newark, P. 0. address, Gibsonville 193 

Pike City, P. 0. address. Plum Valley 208 

Plum Valley 211 

Poker Flat, P. 0. address. Table Rock 211 

Port Wine 212 



INDEX TO CITIES, TOWNS, AND OTHER LOCALITIES. 



PAGR. 

Randolph, P. 0. address, Sierra Valley 213 

Sardine Valley, P. 0. address, Trucliee, Nevada 

County 254 

Scales Diggings 255 

Sierra City 256 

Sierra Nevada House, P. 0. address, Campton- 

ville, Yuba Co 257 

Sierra Valley, see Sierraville 257 

Sierravillo, P. 0. address. Sierra Valley 257 

Sleighville House, P. 0. address, Camptonville, 

Yuba County. 258 

South Fork, P. 0. address, Downieville 261 

St. Louis 263 

Table Rock, see Howland Flat 270 

Webber Lake, P. 0. address, Sierra Valley 283 

Siskiyou Cou.nty. 

iEtna Mills, see Etna Mills 112 

Berry Vale 120 

Buttevilie, see Edgewood 124 

Callahan's Ranch 125 

Cottonwood, P. 0. address, Henley 135 

East Fork (Scott River) P. 0. address, Callahan's 

Ranch 140 

Edge wood 140 

Etna Mills 141 and 810 

Fort Gough, P. 0. address, Sciad Valley 145 

Fort Jones 145 

FVench Flat, P. 0. address, Yreka 146 

Guzelle 148 

Hawkinsville, P. 0. address, Yreka 154 

Henley, see Cottonwood 156 

Hooperville, P. 0. address. Fort Jones 157 

Humbug, P. 0. address, Yreka 158 

Johnson's Bar, P. 0. address, Scott River 161 

Little Shasta, P. 0. address, Yreka 167 

McAdams Creek, P. 0. address, Fort Jones 178 

Mount Shasta. 187 

Miigginsville, P. 0. address, Fort Jones 188 

Oak Bar 195 

Oro Fino 203 

Rough and Ready, see Etna Mills 217 

Sawyer's Bar 255 

Sciad Valley ; 255 

Scott River, see Scott's Bar 255 

Scott's Bar, P. 0. address, Scott River 255 

Soda Springs, P. 0. address, Berryvale 258 

South Fork, P. 0. address, Callahan's Ranch 2in 

Strawberry Valley, see Berryvale 2(i7 

Yreka 288 

Solano County. 

Batavia 118 

Benicia 119 

Binghampton 121 

Bridgeport, P. 0. address, Cordelia 11^2 

Collinsville 132 

Cordelia 1.34 

Denverton 137 

Di.von 137 

Elmira 141 

Fairfield, P.O. address, Suisun City 143 and 810 

Fosters, P. 0. address, Davisville, Yolo Co 146 

Green Valley, P. 0. address, Cordelia 152 

Main Prairie 174 

Rio Vista 215 

Rockville, P. 0. address, Cordelia 216 

South Vallejo, see Vallejo 2)1 

Sui.sun City 267 

Three Mile House, P. 0. address, Vallejo 272 

Vaca Station, see Elmira 276 

Vacaville ■. 276 

Vallyo 277 

Sonoma County. 

Bloomfield 121 

Bodega Bay, P. 0. address, Smith's Ranch 122 

Bodega Corners, P. 0. address. Smith's Ranch.... 122 

Clairville, see Geyserville 130 

Cloverdale 131 and 810 

Dodgeville, see Pine Flat 138 

Donahue, P. 0. address, Lakeville i: 8 

Duncan's Mills 139 

Excelsior. 143 

Fisherman's Bay. 144 

Fisk's Mills 144 

Forestville 145 

Freestone 146 

Frontier House, P. 0. address, Petaluma 147 



page. 

Fulton 147 

Geyser Springs 148 

Geyserville, P. 0. address, Clairville 148 

Glen Ellen 149 

Guerneville 153 

Healdsburg 155 

Kellogg .* 162 

Knightsville, P. 0. address, Calistoga 164 

Lakeville 166 

Litton Springs 167 

Mark West, see Fulton 175 

Mark West Warm Mineral Springs 810 

Mercury ville 181 

Ocean View 203 

Petaluma 206 

Pine Flat 208 

Plantation House. P. 0. address, Fisk's Mill 210 

Redwood, P. 0. address, Guerneville 214 

Rudsill's Landing, P. 0. address, Petaluma 217 

Salt Point, P. 0. address, Fisk's Mills 228 

Santa Rosa 252 

Santa Rosa Sulpher Springs, P. 0. address Santa 

Rosa 254 

Sebastopol 255 

Skaags Springs, P. 0. address, Healdsburg 257 

Smith's Ranch, see Bodega Corners 258 

Sonoma 259 

Sonoma Valley, P. 0. address, Sonoma 260 

St. Louis, P. 0. address, Sonoma 263 

Stony Point 267 

Timber Cove 272 

Two Rocks 275 

Valley Ford 278 

Washoe House, P. U. address. Stony Point 281 

Willow Creek, P. 0. address, Duncan's Mills 284 

Windsor 285 

Stanislaus County. 

Bakerville, see Watorford 118 

Buena Vista, P. 0. address, Knight's Ferry 123 

Burnetts, P. 0. address, Oakdale 124 

Ceres 128 

Clyde, P. 0. address, Oakdale 131 

Crow's Landing 136 

Grayson 152 

Hill's Ferry 156 

Hurr's Ranch 157 

Knight's Ferry 163 

La Grange 164 

Modesto 182 

Oakdale 195 

Oristembra, see Crow's Landing 203 

Salida 226 

Stanislaus 263 

Turloek 275 

Twenty-six Mile House 275 

Waterford 281 

Sutter County. 

Kirksville 163 

Live Oak 167 

Meridan 181 

Nicolaus 193 

Pleasant Grove Creek 210 

Rome : 216 

South Butte 261 

West Butte 283 

Yuba City 289 

Tehama County. 

Antelope Valley, P. 0. address, Red Bluff 115 

Battle Creek : 118 

Belle Mills, P. 0. address, Red Bluff 119 

Henley ville l'"6 

Paskenta 205 

Ked Bluff. 213 

Scatterville, P. 0. address, Tehama 255 

Tehama 271 

Tuscan Springs, P. 0. address. Red Bluff. 275 

Vina 279 

Yellow Jacket, P. 0. address. Red Bluff. 287 

Trinity County. 
American House, P. 0. address. Trinity Centre.. 114 

Big Bar. 120 

Big Flat, P. 0. address. Big i^ar 120 

Burnt Ranch 124 

Cinnabar, P. 0. address. Trinity Centre' 130 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PAGE. 

Coffoo Crook, P. 0. address. Junction City 126 

Cox's Bar, soo Big Bar 135 

Door Station, P. 0. address, Trinity Centre 138 

Douglas City 138 

Hav Fork -• • 154 

Hobokon Flat, P.O. address, Burnt Ranch 156 

Indian Creek, P. 0. address. Douglas City 159 

Junction City lljl 

Lowiston 1^6 

Lowden's Ranch 173 

Minersville 182 

New River, P. 0. address. Burnt Ranch 193 

North Fork, see Trinity 194 

Oregon Gulch, P. 0. address, WeaverviUe 203 

Ruchs 217 

Taylor's Flat 270 

Trinity (North Fork) 273 

Trinity Centre 273 

Trinity River, P. 0. address. Burnt Ranch 273 

Weaverville 282 

Tulare County. 

Cross Creek 136 

Farmersville 143 

Fountain Springs 146 

Grangeville 150 

Hunsaker 158 

Jonesa 161 

Lakeside 166 

Piano 210 

Porterviile 212 

Tipton 272 

Visalia 279 

AVambat 281 

White River .._ 284 

Woodville 286 

TuoLUMNB County. 

Algerine, P.O. address, Jamestown 113 

Big Oak Flat 120 

Bronson's Station, P. 0. address, Chinese Camp. 123 

Brown's Flat, P. 0. address, Sonera 123 

Campo Seeo, P. 0. address, Jamestown 126 

Cherokee, P. 0. address, Sonera 128 

Chinese Camp 130 

Colfax Springs 131 

Columbia 132 and 810 

Confidence, P. 0. address, Sonora 134 

Garrote, P. 0. address, Groveland 148 

Garrote, (No. 2) P. 0. address. Groveland 148 

Gold Springs, P. 0. address, Columbia 1-50 

Gold Springs Cottage, P. 0. address, Jamestown. 150 

Groveland, see Garrote 153 

Harden'? Mill, P. 0. address, Groveland 154 

Italian Bar, P. 0. address, Columbia 160 

Jacksonville, P. 0. address, Chinese Camp 160 

Jamestown 161 

Knickerbocker Flat, P. 0. address, Columbia 163 

Lawrence House, P. 0. address, Jamestown 166 

Moccasin Creek, P. 0. address, Big Oak Flat 182 

Montezuma 186 

Mount Pleasant, P. 0. address, Chinese Camp 187 

Pine Log Crossing, P. 0. address, Columbia 209 

Quartz Mountain, P. 0. address, Jamestown 213 

Rattlesnake Creek, P. 0. address. Big Oak Flat. 213 

Raw Hide Ranch, P. 0. address, Jamestown 213 

Santa Maria 2.52 

Saw Mill Flat, P. 0. address, Columbia 254 

Shaw's Flat 256 

Sonora 260 

Soulbyville, P. 0. address, Sonora 261 

Springfield, P. 0. address, Columbia 262 

Strawberry Flat, P. 0. address, Sonora 267 

Sugar Pine 267 



PAGE. 

Summerville, P. 0. address, Sonora 268 

Tuttletown, P. 0. address, Columbia 275 

Wood's Crossing, P. 0. address, Jamestown 286 

Ventura County. 

Hueneme 1-58 

Nordhoff _ 194 

San Buenaventura 230 

Santa Paula 252 

Saticoy 254 

Scenega 255 

Yolo County. 

Antelope 

Brown's Corners, P. 0. address, VVoodland. 

Buckeye 

Cache Creek ~ 

Cachoville, P. 0. address, Yolo 

Capay 

Capay City, P. 0. address, Capay 

Cottonwood, see Cache Creek 

Davis ville 

Dog Town, see Capay City _ 

Grafton, see Knight's Landing _ 

Knight's Landing, P.O. address, Grafton.. 163 and 

Langville, see Capay 

Merritt's Station, P. 0. address, Woodland 

Normanville, P. 0. address. Woodland 

Oat Valley 

Plainfield, P. 0. address. Woodland 

Prairie 

Washington, P. 0. address, Sacramento 

Weyand's Corners, see Prairie „ 

Winters 

Woodland 

Yolo, see Cacheville 

Yuba County. 

Brown's Valley 

Brownsville 

BuUard's Bar 

Camptonville 

Clayton's Ranch, P. 0. address, Brownsville 

Columbus House, see Strawberry Valley 

Dobbins' Ranch, P. 0. address, Oregon House... 

Dry Creek, P. 0. address, Oregon House 

East Bear River, P. 0. address, Wheatland 

Empire Ranch, P. 0. address, Smartsville 

Foster's Bar, P. 0. address, Camptonville 

Fountain House, P. 0. address, Oregon House.... 

Frenchtown, P. 0. address, Oregon House 

Half Way House, P. 0. address, Oregon House... 

Hansonville 

Honcut 

Indian Ranch, P. 0. address, Oregon House 

Marypville 

Mount Hope, P. 0. address, Forbestown _ 

Natchez, P. 0. address, Hansonville 

North Star, P. 0. address. Strawberry Valley 

Oak Valley, P. 0. address, Camptonville 

Ohio Saw Mill, P. 0. address, Forbestown 

Oregon Hill, P. 0. address, BuUard's Bar 

Oregon House 

Paulin ville, P. 0. address, Hansonville 

Rodman Hill, see Natchez 

Sharon Valley, P. 0. address, Brownsville 

Slate Range, P. 0. address, Camptonville 

Smartsville 

Stanfield Ranch, P. 0. address, Oregon House.... 

Strawberry Valley 

Sucker Flat, P. 0. address, Smartsville 

Texas Hill, P. 0. address, Oregon House 

Timbuctoo 

Virginia Ranch, P. 0. address, Oregon House 

AVheatland 

Woodville House, P. 0. address, Clipper Mills... 



115 
123 
123 
124 
124 
126 
126 
135 
136 
138 
1.50 
810 
166 
181 
194 
208 
210 
212 
281 
283 
2*5 
28) 
287 

123 
123 
123 
126 
130 
132 
138 
139 
140 
141 
146 
146 
146 
154 
154 
157 
159 
176 
187 
190 
195 
195 
203 
203 
203 
206 
216 
2.55 
258 
258 
263 
267 
267 
272 
272 
279 
283 
287 



OREGON. 



Baker County. 

Auburn 514 

Baker City 514 

Burnt River, P. 0. address. Express Ranch 516 

Clarksville 518 

El Dorado 523 

Fort Sumter, see Sumter 525 

Humboldt Basin 527 

Jordan Valley _ 529 



Malheur. P. 0. address. El Dorado 532 

Marys ville - 533 

Mormon Basin, see Humboldt Basin 5.34 

Prichard 545 

Rye Valley 546 

Snake River, P. 0. address. Express Ranch 548 

Stone 549 

Sumter 5-50 

Wingville 552 



INDEX TO CITIES, TOWNS, AND OTHER LOCALITIES. 



Benton County. page. 

Alsea 512 

Corvallis 519 

Drift Creek 522 

Elk City. P. 0. address, Newton 523 

Kings Valley 529 

Little Elk 532 

Monroe 534 

Newport 535 

Newton, see Elk City 53o 

Philomath 537 

Starrs Point, see Monroe 549 

Summit 549 

Toledo 550 

Clackamas County. 

Beaver 515 

Butte Creek 516 

Canby 518 

Canemah, P. 0. address, Oregon City 517 

Clackamas 517 

Clear Creok 518 

Cuttingsville 520 

Damascus 522 

Eagle Creek 523 

Glad Tidings 526 

Highland 527 

Milwaukie 533 

Molallo 533 

Needy 534 

Norton 535 

Oregon City .535 

Oswego 536 

Sandy 548 

Spring Water 549 

Upper MoUala, seeMollala 551 

Zion 552 

Clatsop County. 

Astoria 513 

Clatsop Beach, see Seaside House.. .^ » 518 

Clifton 518 

Jewell 529 

Knappa 530 

Lexington, see Skipanon 531 

Olney 5*5 

Seaside House 548 

Skipanon 548 

Westport 552 

Columbia County. 

Caple's Landing, see Columbia City 517 

Clatskanie 518 

Columbia City 518 

Marshland 532 

Ranior 545 

Riverside 545 

Sauvies Island 548 

Scappose 547 

St. Helens 549 

Coos County. 

Bandon 515 

Bay City, P. 0. address, Marshfield 515 

Blue Mountain, P. 0. address, Isthmus 516 

Coaledo 518 

Coos City 518 

Coos River 519 

Coquille 519 

Dora 522 

Eastport _ 523 

Empire City 523 

Enchanted Prairie 524 

Fairview 525 

Henry ville 527 

Hermansville 527 

Iowa Slough 528 

Isthmus, see Utter City 528 

Marshfield 532 

Newport, P. 0. address. Empire City 535 

North Bend, P. 0. address. Empire City 5a5 

Ott 536 

Randolph 545 

Sitkum 548 

Sumner 550 

Utter City 551 



Cubby CotrnTY. page. 

Chetco 517 

EUensburg 523 

Port Orford 537 

Douglas County. 

Cammas Valley 516 

Canonville, P. 0. address, North Canonville 517 

Cleveland 518 

Cole's Valley 518 

Cow Creek, see Galeiville 520 

Drains 522 

Elkton 523 

French Settlement 525 

Galesville 525 

Gardiner 525 

Looking Glass 532 

Myrtle Cr_eek 534 

North Canonville, see Canonville 535 

Oakland S35 

Pass Creek, see Drains 536 

Roseburg _ 545 

Scottsburg 548 

Ten-Mile , .550 

Wilbur 552 

Yoncalla 552 

Grant County. 

Alvord 512 

Camp Harney 516 and 811 

Camp Watson 516 

Canon City „ 517 and 811 

Day ville 522 

Dixie, see Prairie City 522 

Granite Creek, P. 0. address, Parkers ville 526 

John Day City, P. 0. address, Canon City 529 

Monument 534 

Olive Creek, P. 0. address, Parkerville 535 

Parkersville 536 

Prairie City 645 

Jackson County. 

Applegate 512 

Ashland 512 

Barron 515 

Brownsborough 516 

Central Point 517 

Eagle Mills, P. 0. address, Ashland 523 

Eagle Point 523 

Evan's Creek, P. 0. address. Rock Point 525 

Grant's Pass •■ 527 

Jacksonville : 528 

Jump-off-Joe, P.O. address, Leland,JosephineCo 529 

Louse Creek, P. 0. address. Grant's Pass 532 

Phoenix 537 

Rock Point 545 

Sam's Valley 547 

Uniontown, P. 0. address, Applegate 551 

Willow Springs 552 

Josephine County. 

Althouse, P. 0. address, Kirbyville 512 

Browntown, P. 0. address, Kirbyville 516 

Dog Creek. P. 0. address. Slate Creek 522 

Galice Creek, P. 0. address. Slate Creek 525 

Grave Creek, see Leland 526 

Kirbyville 529 

Leland 531 

Murphy 534 

Slate Creek 548 

Sucker Creek, P. 0. address, Kirbyville 549 

Waldo 551 

Williamsburg, P. 0. address, Applegate, Joseph- 
ine Co 552 

Wolf Creek, P. 0. address, Leland 552 

Lake County. 

Big Springs, P. 0. address, Linkville 515 

Drew's Valley 522 

Fort Klamath 525 

Hot Springs 527 

Lakeport, see Morgansvilla 531 

Langoll's Valley 531 

Linkville 531 

Lost River 532 

Morgans ville 534 

Sprague River 549 

Tule Lake 550 

Yainax 552 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Lank County. page. 

Belknap Springs. •- : 51.5 

Bethesda Springs, P. 0. address, Belknap Springs SIo 

Butte Disappointment, P. 0. address, Dexter 510 

Camp Crook j^'J' 

Cart Wright's • " 7 

Chester ol' 

Clovordalo, see Cresswell olo 

Coast Fork, see Cottage Grove 518 

Cottage Grove 520 

Creswell 5.20 

Crow 520 

Dexter, see Butte Disappointment 522 

Eugene City 524 

Franklin 525 

Gate Creek 526 

Goshen 526 

Junction City (formerly Lancaster) 529 

Lancaster, see Junction City 531 

Long Tom 5S2 

McKinzie Bridge 533 

Mohawk SSH 

Pleasant Hill SifT 

Battlesnake .545 

Siuslaw 548 

Spencer Creek 549 

Springfield 549 

Walterville 551 

Willamette Forks. 552 



Linn County. 



Albany 

Brownsville 

Crawfordsviile . 

Fox Valley 

Grass Ridge 

Halsey „., 

Harrisburgh 

Jordan 

Lebanon 

Miller's 

Mount Pleasant. 
Muddy Station... 

Peoria 

Pine 



Scio 

Shedd 

Sodaville 

Sweet Home 550 and 

Tangent 

Waterloo 



Marion County. 



Aumsville 514 

Aurora 414 

Brooks 516 

Butteville 516 

Champoeg, see Newellsville 517 

Fairfield, P. 0. address, Silverton 525 

Gervais 526 

Hubbard 527 

Jefferson 529 

Marion 532 

Monitor ., 533 

Newellsville 535 

Salem 546 

Silverton 548 

St. Louis, P. 0. address, Silverton 549 

St. Paul 549 

Stayton 549 

Sublimity 549 

Turner 550 

Woodburn „ 552 

Multnomah County. 

Albina, P. 0. address, Portland 512 

East Portland 523 

Portland 557 

Powell's Valley ,545 

St. Johns 549 

Willamette Slough 552 

Polk County. 

Bethel 515 

Buena Vista 516 

Dallas 521 | 



Dixie, see Rickreal 

Elk Horn 

Eola. 



PAGR. 

.... 522 
.... 523 
524 



Grand Ronde .526 

Independence 528 

Lawn Arbor 531 

Lewisville 5-31 

Lincoln 531 

Monmouth 533 

Perrydale 537 

Rickreal 545 

Zena 552 

Tillamook County. 

Garibaldi „ 526 

Kilchis 529 

Nehalom 534 

Nestockton 5."5 

Tillamook 5.50 

Umatilla County. 

Cayuse 517 

Heppner 527 

Lee's Encampment, P. 0. address, Cayuse .5:^1 

Lena 531 

Meadowville 533 

Midway 533 

Milton 533 

Pendleton 536 

Pilot Rock 537 

Swift's Station, see Marshall 550 

Umatilla 5.50 

Weston 551 

Willow Forks 552 

Union County. 

Cove 520 

Island City 528 

La Grande 530 

North Powder : 535 

Orodell 536 

Sand Ridge 548 

Sparta 549 

Summerville 549 

Union 550 and 811 

Wallowa 551 

Wasco County. 

Antelope 512 

Bridge Creek 516 

Dalles City, The Dalles 521 

Hood Hiver 527 

Mitchell 533 

Mount Hood 534 

Olex 535 

Prineville 545. 

Scott's 548 

Shell Rock 548 

Spanish Hollow 549 

The Dalles, see Dalles City 550 

Tygh Valley 550 

Upper Ochoco 551 

Warm Springs 551 

Willoughby 552 

Washington County. 

Beaverton 515 

Camp Polk 516 

Cedar Mill 517 

Centreville, P. 0. address, Hillsboro 517 

Cornelius 519 

Dilley 522 

Forest Grove 525 

Gales Creek 525 

Gaston 526 

Glencoe 526 

Greenville 526 

Hillsboro 527 

Joppa 529 

Middleton 533 

Mountain Dale 534 

Peak 536 

Scholl's Ferry 547 

Tualitin 550 

West Union 551 



Yamhill County. page. 

Amity 512 

Bellevue 515 

Carlton 517 

Dayton. 522 

Fort Yamhill, P. 0. address, Sheridan 525 

Lafayette 530 

McMinnville 533 



Newburg 535 

North Yamhilll 535 

Panther Creek 536 

Sheridan 543 

St. Joseph ,. 5J9 

West Chehalin jt, 551 

Wheatland ." 552 



NEVADA. 



Churchill Countt. 
Borax City, P. 0. address, Wadsworth, Washoe 

County 691 

Dead Horse Well, P. 0. address, Wadsworth, 

Washoe County 594 

Hot Springs, P. 0. address, Wadsworth, Washoe 

County 600 

Ragtown, P. 0. address, Wadsworth, Washoe 

County 605 

Sand Springs, P. 0. address, Wadsworth.Washoe 

County 606 

Slough Station, P. 0. address, Wadsworth, 

Washoe County 607 

Soda Lake, P. 0. address, Wadsworth, Washoe 

County 607 

St. Clair's Station, P. 0. address, Wadsworth, 

Washoe County 607 

Stillwater fi08 

Westgate, P.O. address, Wadsworth, Washoe Co.. 615 
Douglas County. 

Double Springs, P. 0. address, Genoa 594 

Genoa 598 

Genoa Hot Springs, P. 0. address, Genoa 598 

Glenbrook 598 

Lake Tahoe, P. 0. address, Glenbrook 601 

Mammoth, P. 0. address, Genoa 602 

Sheridan (300 

Silver Lake Mining District, P. 0. address, 

Dayton 607 

Spooner Station, see Glenbrook 607 

Twelve Mile House, P. 0. address, Genoa 609 

Van Sickle's Ranch, P. 0. address, Genoa 609 

Walker River 614 

Elko County. 

Buel 591 

Bull Run Valley 591 

Bullion 591 

Camp Halleck .["" 591 

Carlin 501 

Coral Hill ; z::::::::;: 593 

Cornucopia 593 

Dry Creek .■.■.■.■.■.■.■.". ...'.; 594 

Elko 595 

Gold Field .........'.""*..'..'.'...'" 598 

Halleck "'"' 599 

Humboldt Wells, see Wells !!!!".'...."!!!!'..'.."!! 601 

Huntington " 601 

Island Mountain, see Gold Eield ..." 601 

Mineral Hill :""; 602 

Mountain City . {;02 

Ruby Valley '.'."!!!!'..!!.'.'."".'.!;.' 606 

South Fork, see Coral Hill 607 

Sprucemont ]_''[ 607 

Starr King City, P. 0. address, Sprucemont '!!!.'." 608 

Tecoma 608 

J^oano 608 

Tuscarora 604 

Wells :;:": m 

White Rock \[\ 615 

White Sulphur Springs .'•"'■.....'.".*.*.'..."..'.."!." 616 

Esmeealda County. 

Alida, see Lida 539 

Aurora !!!.!!!! 589 

Belleville .............."..... 590 

Columbus .'.!!!..'.!'.'..'.".'.! 593 

Elbow Ranch. P. 0. address, Aurora.!.......".".".!!] 595 

Five-mile Ranch, P. 0. address, Aurora 597 

Five Spring Toll Road, P. 0. address. Aurora 597 

Greenfield, see Mason Valley 599 

Lida 601 

Mason's Valley .!..!.....!..!!!!!!! 602 

Pine Grove !!! 603 

Silver Peak .'. !!!!...!!!!!! 607 

Sweetwater "!!.'." 608 

Teal's Marsh !.." "„'„ 608 



Wellington 615 

Eureka County. 

Beowawe 591 

Cortez, P. 0. address, Beowawe 594 

Eureka 596 

Palisade 603 

Piute " 605 

Ruby Hill 606 

Secret Canon, P. 0. address, Eureka 606 

Humboldt County. 

Camp McDermitt 591 

Dun Glen """ 594 

Golconda !.!'."'....".'. 598 

Humboldt House ."'.!...!!!!!! 601 

Lovelocks „ 602 

Mill City !!!!!.;.!!!.;:!.V.! 602 

Oreana 603 

Paradise Valley 603 

Rye Patch !!.!!! 606 

Unionville '," 609 

Winnemucca !!!.'.'.!!! 616 

liANDER County. 

Austin 589 

Battle Mountain '."!!!!!!!!! 590 

Galena !!!!!!!! 597 

Lincoln County, 

Bullionville 591 

Clover Valley '.. 593 

Dry Valley 594 

Hiko 600 

Panaca 603 

Pioche City 603 

St. Thomas 607 

Lyon County. 

Dayton 594 

Eureka Mill, P. 0. address, Dayton 597 

Fort Churchill, P. 0. address, Dayton 597 

Johntown, P. 0. address, Dayton 601 

Mound House, P. 0. address, Dayton 602 

Silver City 607 

Sutro 608 

Nye County. 

Belmont 590 

Duck water 595 

Ellsworth 595 

Hot Creek 600 

lone City 601 

Jefferson „ 601 

Junction 601 

Morey 602 

Ophir Canon, see Twin River 603 

Patterson, P.O. address, Hamilton, White Pine Co 603 

Reveille 606 

San Antonio " " 606 

Troy. 609 

1 win River 609 

Tybo 609 



Ormsby County. 

Carson City 591 

Empire City 596 

Warm Springs, P. O. address, Carson City 614 

Storey County. 

Gold Hill 598 

Virginia City 610 and 811 

Washoe County. 

Bronco 591 

Crystal Peak 594 

Franktown ; 597 

Glendale ! """! ,598 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



PAOK. 

Hot Springs, P. 0. address, Truckee, Cal 600 

Pooville <^^ 

Rono ,bOo 

Steamboat Springs *^° 

Verdi ^09 

Washoe City W4 

White Pine County. 

Cherry Creek 593 

Diamond ^" 

WASHINGTON 



Chehalis Coumty. 



Cedarville 

Chehalis Point., 
Elraa., 



Gray's Harbor, see Chehalis Point 

Hoqiiiam 

Montosano 

Oakville 

Queneault, P. 0. address, Chehalis Point 

Satsop 

Sharon 

Clallam County. 
Cape Flattery Light House, P. 0. address, Neah 

Bay 

Makah, see Neah Bay 

Neah Bay 

New Dungeness a 

Port Angeles 

Quillehutte, P. 0. address, Neah Bay 

Clarke County. 

Battle Ground 

Brush Prairie 

Lewis River _ 

Maple Grove, P. 0. address. Battle Ground 

Pioneer 

Stoughton 

Union Ridge 

Vancouver 

Washougal 

Cowlitz County. 

Castle Roek 

Freeport 663 and 

Kalama 

Martin's Bluff. 

Monticello 

Mount Coffin 

Oak Point 

Olequa 

Pekin 

Pumphrey's Landing, see Olequa 

Silver Lake 

Island County. 

Coupeville 661 and 

'Coveland 

Oak Harbor 

Utsalady 

Whidby's Island, P. 0. address, Coupeville. 

Jefferson County. 

Port Discovery. 

Port Ludlow 

Port Townsend 

King County. 

Black River 

Dwamish » 

Fall City 

Freeport, P. 0. address, Seattle - 

Renton Mines, see Black River 

Seattle 

Slaughter 

Snoqualmie 

Squak 

Swantown, P. 0. address, Seattle 

Swinomish 

White River 

Kitsap County. 

Blakeley 

Port Blakeley, see Blakeley 

Port Gamble 

Port Madison 

Seabeck 

Teekalet, see Port Gamble 



page. 

Duck Creek, P. 0. address. Cherry Creek 595 

Eberhardt 594 

Egan Canon 595 

Hamilton 599 

Mineral City 602 

Schellbourne 606 

Shermantown 607 

Silver Park 607 

Silverado, P. 0. address. Eureka, Eureka Co 607 

Treasure City 609 

TERRITORY. 

Klikitat County. 

Block House 659 

Columbus 661 

Goldendale 663 

Klikitat 664 

Rockland, P. 0. address. The Dalles, Oregon 670 

White Salmon 677 

Lewis County. 

Algernon 659 

Boisfort 659 

Centerville, P. 0. address, Skookum Chuck 660 

Chehalis 660 

Claquato 661812 

Cowlitz 661 

Gleneden 663 

Grand Prairie, see Winlock 663 

Little Falls 665 

Mossy Rock 665 

Napavine 665 

New Askiem Prairie 666 

Newaukum 666 

Silver Creek 672 

Skookum Chuck 672 

Winlock 678 

Mason County. 

Arcadia 659 

Lightville v 665 

Oakland ^ 666 

Skokomish, see Union City 672 

Union City, P. 0. address, Skokomish 675 

Pacific Coumty. 

Brookfield 659 

Bruceport 659 

Cape Disappointment, P. 0. address, Unity 659 

Cementvilie, see Knappton 660 

Fort Canby, P. 0. address, Unity 662 

Ilwaco, P. 0. address, Unity 663 

Knappton 664 

Oysterville 667 

Riverside 670 

South Bend 673 

Unity, see ilwaco 675 

Willopa, see Riverside 678 

Willopa Valley, P. 0. address, Woodward's Land- 
ing 678 

Woodward's Landing 678 

Pierce County. 

Byrd's Mills 659 

Castlenook Fishery 660 

Elhi 662 

Fort Nisqually, P. 0. address, Steilacoom 663 

Franklin 663 

Glendale, P. 0. address, Franklin 663 

Lake View 665 

New Tacoma 666 

Puyalup 670 

Steilacoom ., 673 

Tacoma 674 

San Juan County. 

Lopez Island 665 

Orcas Island 667 

San Juan 670 

Skamania County. 

Cascades 659 

Collin's Landing 661 

Snohomish County. 

Centrevilleu 660 

Lowell 665 

Mukilteo 665 

Snohomish City 672 

Tulalip 674 



INDEX TO CITIES, TOWNS, AND OTHER LOCALITIES. 



Stevens County. page. 

Colville, see Fort Colville 661 

Crab Creek 662 

Fort Colville 662 

Four Lakes 663 

Hangman's Creek 663 

Pine Grove 668 

Pinkney City, see Fort Colville 668 

Rock Creek 670 

Rosalia 670 

Spokane Bridge 673 

Spokane Falls 673 

Walker's Prairie 676 

Thueston County. 

Beaver 659 

Olympia 666 

Tenino 674 

Tumwater 674 

Yelm 678 

Wahkiakum County. 

Cathlamet 660 

Eagle Cliff 662 

Eureka, P. 0. address, Eagle Cliff 662 

Skamokawa 672 

Waterford 677 

AValla Walla Coumtt. 

Alpowa 659 

Burksville 659 

Day ten ^ 662 

Pataha .• 668 

Pataha Prairie 668 

Tukannon 674 

Waitsburg 676 

Walla Walla. 676 and 812 

Wallula 676 



Whatcom County. page. 

Cedar Creek 660 

Cedar Grove 660 

Fidalgo 662 

Guomas 663 

La Conner «. 664 

Lummi 665 and 812 

Lynden 665 

Nooksachk 666 

Point Williams, see Samish 668 

Samish 670 

Sehome „ 672 

Semiahoo 672 

Ship Harbor 672 

Skagit 672 

Steptoe 673 

Trudden 674 

Whatcom 677 

Whitman County. 

Almoti, P. 0. address, Owensburgh 659 

Colfax 661 

Ewartsville 662 

Owensburgh ^ 667 

Palouse 668 

Union Flat 675 

Walton 677 

Yakima County. 

Attanam 659 and 812 

Ellensburg „ 662 

Fort Simcoo, P. 0. address, Yakima _ 663 

Kittitass 664 

Konnewock 664 

Nanum 665 

Pleasant -. „.- 668 

Selah 672 

Wenatchie, P. 0. address, Nanum 677 

Yakima City 678 and 812 



IDAHO TERRITORY. 



Ada County. 

Boise City. 696 

Emmettsville 697 

Falk's Store 697 

Indian Valley 699 

Lower Boise , 700 

Middleton ., 700 

Payette Store 701 

Payetteville 702 

Salubria 703 

Washoe 704 

Weiser 704 

Altueas County. 

Atlanta City „ 695 

Indian Creek 699 

Pine Grove 702 

Rocky Bar 702 

Boise County. 

Boston, P. 0. address, Centerville „ 697 

Centerville 697 

Gold Hill, P. 0. address, Idaho City 698 

Granite Creek, P. 0. address, Placerville 698 

Horse Shoe Bend 698 

Idaho City 698 

Pioneer ville 702 

Placerville _ 702 

Quartzburgh 702 

Squaw Creek 704 

Idaho County. 

Elk Creek _ 697 

Florence 698 

John Day's Creek 699 

Manuel Ranch 700 

Shearer's Ferry 703 

Slate Creek 704 

Warren's Diggings, see Washington 704 

Washington 704 

White Bird, P. 0. address, Manuel Ranch 704 

Kootenai County. 
Pend' Oreille 702 

Lemhi County. 

Fort Lemhi 698 

Junction 699 



Leesburg 699 

Lemhi, see Fort Lemhi 699 

Oro Grande, P. 0. address, Salmon City 701 

Salmon City 702 

Nez Perce County. 

Clear Water 697 

Elk City 697 

Fort Lapwai, see Lapwai 697 

Lapwai 699 

Lewiston 699 

Mount Idaho 700 

Newsom Creek 700 

Paradise Valley - 701 

Pelouse Bridge 702 

Pine Creek 702 

Thome Creek 704 

Oneida County. 

Beaver Caiion 695 

Black Foot, P. 0. address. Fort Hall 695 

Bloomington 695 

Cariboo Mines, P. 0. address. Soda Springs 697 

Clifton 697 

Corbett's Station 697 

Eagle Rock 697 

Fish Haven 698 

Fort Hall 698 

Franklin 698 

Gentile Valley 698 

Georgetown 698 

Iowa Bar 699 

Keenan City 699 

Liberty -. 700 

MaladCity 700 

Market Lake 700 

Marsh Valley, P. 0. address, Malad City 700 

Montpelier 700 

Ovid 701 

Oxford 701 

Paris 701 

Pleasant Valley 702 

Red Rock, P. 0. address, Oxford 702 

Ross Fork 702 

Soda Springs 704 

St. Charles „ 704 

Weston 704 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



OwYHKE County. i-age. 

Boonville, P. 0. address. Silver City 697 

Fairview 6OT 

Silver City ^03 

South Mountain '04 

MONTANA TERRITORY 



Wagontown, P. 0. address, Silver City., 

Shoshone County. 
Piorc&City 



PAGE. 

.... 701 



702 



Braver Head County. 

Argonta 717 

Bannack City 717 

Beaver Head Valley 718 

Burnt Pine 718 

Darling 729 

Gleudale, P. 0. address, Darling 721 

Lovell's 724 

Watson 727 

Chotrau County. 

Benton City, see Fort Benton 717 

Fort Benton 721 

Deer Lodge County.' 

Boartown 717 

Bliickfoot City 718 

Butte City 718 

Cable City 717 

Deer Lodge City 720 

Divide 720 

Divide Greek, P. 0. address. Divide 720 

Emmetsburgh 721 

French Gulch 721 

German Gulch 721 

Gold Creek 722 

Greenwood 722 

Gwendale 722 

Harrisburg 722 

Helmville 723 

Highland 723 

Lincoln 724 

McClellan Gulch ^ 724 

New Chicago 725 

Phillipsburg 725 

Pike's Peak 725 

Pioneer 725 

Rod Mountain City 725 

Silver i^ow 725 

Springfield, see Lincoln 720 

Warm Springs 727 

Washington Gulch 727 

Yamhill, P. 0. address. Pioneer 727 



Yreka 



727 



Gallatin Cousty. 

Bozeman 718 

Central Park 719 

Chico 719 

Emigrant 721 

Fort Ellis 721 

Gallatin City 721 

Hamilton 722 

Hay den 722 

Willow Creek 727 

Jefferson County. 

Beaver Creek 717 

Boulder Valley 718 

Clagett 719 

Clancey 719 

Cold Spring 719 

Hot Springs, P. 0. address, Clancey 723 

Indian Creek, see St. Louis 723 

Jetferson City 723 

Prickly Pear 725 

Radursburg 725 



Saint Loui? 725 

Springville 728 

Whitehall 727 

Lewis and Clarke County. 

Canyon Creek 719 

Clarkston 719 

Fort Shaw 721 

French Bar 721 

Helena 722 

Park City, P. 0. address. Union ville 725 

Silver City. 725 

Sun Kiver 726 

Union ville 726 

Madison County. 

Adobe Town, P. 0. address, Virginia City 717 

Cicero, P. 0. address, Laurin 719 

Eau Claire, see Jefferson Island 720 

Fish Creek 721 

Gaffney 721 

Hamilton „ 722 

Harrison 722 

Havana 722 

Iron Hod 723 

Jeflfsrson Island 723 

Junction 723 

Laurin, see Cicero 723 

Lewis 723 

London City, P. 0. address, Jeflerson Island 724 

Meadow Creek 724 

Nevada City 725 

Pollinger, see Gaffney 725 

Rochester 725 

Sheridan 725 

Silver Star 726 

Sterling 726 

Summit 726 

Twin Bridges 726 

Virginia City 726 

Meagher County. 

Camp Baker 719 

Canon Ferry 719 

Canton 719 

Cave Gulch, P. 0. address, Canon Ferry 719 

Centreville 719 

Diamond City 720 

Hot Springs, P. 0. address. Camp Baker 723 

Trout Creek ."..... 726 

Missoula County. 

Agency 717 

Cedar Creek, P. 0. address. Quartz Creek 719 

Corvallis 719 

Flat Head Lake 721 

Forest City 721 

Fort Owen, see Stevensville 721 

Frenehtown 721 

Horse Plains 723 

Missoula 724 

Quartz Creek 725 

Saint Ignatius 725 

Scribner, see Flat Head Lake 725 

Skalkaho 726 

Stevens ville 726 

Superior 726 



UTAH TERRITORY. 



Beaver County. 

Adamsville 743 

Beaver 743 

Greenville 748 

Minersville 751 

Shauntia 759 

Box Elder County. 

Bear River City 743 

Brigham City > 744 

Call's Fort » 745 

Corinne ~ « 745 

Dewey ville 746 

Kelton 750 

Plymouth 755 



Portage 755 

Terrace 761 

Willard City 762 

Cache County. 

Clarkston 745 

Hyde Park 748 

Hyrum 748 

Logan 750 

Mendon 751 

Millville 751 

Newton 752 

Paradise 754 

Providence 755 

Richmond 755 



INDEX TO CITIES, TOWNS, AND OTHER LOCALITIES. 



PAGE. 

Smithfield 7«0 

Wellsville 762 

Davis County. 

Bountiful, P. 0. address. Stoker 744 

Centre ville 745 

Farinington 747 

Kaysville 750 

Stoker 7tj0 

Woods' Cross 762 

Iron County. 

Cedar City ~ 745 

Hauiilton's Jj'ort 748 

Iron City 74y 

Panguitch 753 

Paraguonaii 754 

Parowan 754 

Summit 700 

Juab County. 

Chicken Creek — 745 

J>iaiiioiid 74(j 

Euroka 747 

Levau 750 

Mona 731 

Nephi, P. 0. address, Salt Creek". 752 

Sail Ureek 75tf 

Silver City 7bO 

Kane County. 

Bellevue 744 

Duncan's Ketreat 746 

(ilendalo 747 

(iraiton 748 

Hillsdale 748 

Johnson 74d 

Kanab ; 74U 

Kanarraville 749 

Mammoth, P. U. address, Hillsdale 760 

Mount (Jarmel 75:^ 

Mountain Dell, P. O. address. Virgin City 752 

Pahreah 75a 

Kauch 753 

Kock ville 755 

fcjhonesburgh 760 

Toquorville 761 

Virgin City 761 

Windsor 76;i 

Millard County. 

Cove Creek 746 

Pillmore 747 

Holden 748 

Kanosh 730 

Mead6w 751 

Oak City 752 

fcicipio 75y 

Morgan County. 

Croyden 746 

Enterprise 746 

Milton, P. U. address, Morgan City 751 

Morgan City 752 

Peterson 754 

Porterville, P. U. address, Morgan City 755 

Kichville, P. 0. address, Alorgan City 755 

Piute County. 

Circle Valley 745 

Marysvaie 751 

KicH County. 

Lake Town 750 

Meadow ville 751 

Kandolph 755 

Woodrutt. 762 

Salt Lake Cotn»TT. 

Alta 743 

Bingham Canon 744 

Brinton 745 

Butlerville 745 

Camp Douglas, P. 0. address, Salt Lake City 745 

Draper 746 

Granite City 748 

Uerriman 748 

Mill Creek 751 

Paper Mill 754 

Salt Lake City 755 

Sandy 759 

Silver Spring „ yjjo 



PAGE. 

South Cottonwood 760 

Taylors ville 761 

Union 761 

West Jordan 762 

San Petb County. 

Ephraim ; 746 

Fairview 747 

Fayette 747 

Fountain Green 747 

Gunnison 748 

Manti 750 

Moroni , 752 

Mount Pleasant 752 

Perkinsville, P. 0. address, Wales 754 

Spring City 760 

Wales 761 

Seviee CoimTY. 

Annabolla 743 

Glen wood 747 

Inverury 749 

Joseph City, P. 0. address, Kichtield 749 

Monroe 751 

Prattville 755 

Richfield 755 

Salina 756 

Summit County. 

Coalville 745 

Echo 746 

Hennefervillo 748 

Kamas 749 

Park City 754 

Parley's Park 754 

Peoa 754 

Rockport 755 

Wanship 762 

Tooele County. 

Centre 745 

Columbia 745 

Deep Creek 746 

Gold Hill, P. 0. address. Deep Creek 747 

Grantsville 748 

Jacob City 749 

Lake Point 750 

Lewiston 750 

Uphir 753 

Kichville, P. U. address, Tooele City 755 

Saint John 758 

Stockton 760 

Tooele City 761 

Vernon 761 

Utah County. 

Alpine City 743 

American Fork ; 743 

Battle Creek, see Pleasant Grove 743 

Cedar Fort, see Cedar Valley 745 

Cedar Valley 745 

Deer Creek 746 

Fairtield 747 

Forest City 747 

Goshen 748 

Homansville 748 

Lehi City 750 

Payson 754 

Pleasant Grove 754 

Provo 755 

Salem 756 

Santaquin - 759 

Spanish Fork 760 

Spring Lake - 760 

Springville - 760 

Wasatch County. 

Charlestown 745 

Heber 748 

Midway 751 

Wallsburgh 762 

Washington County. 

Fort Hamblin 747 

Harrisburg 748 

Hebron 748 

Leeds 750 

New Harmony 752 

Pine Valley 754 

Pinto 754 

St. George 755 

Washington 762 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Wkbee County. pagk. 

Alma 743 

Eden 7415 

Harrisville 748 

Hooper 748 

Huntsville 748 

Lynno 750 



PAGE. 

North Ogden 752 

OKden City 752 

Plain City 754 

Slaterville 7t)0 

Uintah 761 



ARIZONA TERRITORY. 



Maricopa County. 

Camp McDowell, see McDowell — 780 

East Phcenix 781 

Haydon's Ferry 781 

Maryville 781 

McDowell 781 

Morgan's Ferry 782 

Phoenix 782 

Mohave County. 

Aubrey 780 

Beale Springs 780 

Camp Alexander, P. 0. address, Hardyville 780 

Camp Mohave, see Mohave City 780 

Cerbat 780 

Chloride 780 

Fort Mohave 781 

Hardy ville 781 

Mineral Park 781 

Mohave City 781 

Union Pass 784 

Pima County. 

Apache Pass 780 

Camp Bowie 780 

Camp Grant 780 

Clifton 780 

Cri ttenden 780 

Florence 781 

Gila Bend 781 

Goodwin 781 

Maricopa Wells 781 

Monument 782 

Pima Agency 782 



San Pedro 783 

San Xa vier del Bac 783 

Sanford 783 

Santa Rita, P. 0. address, Tubac 783 

Sasabi F'lat 783 

Sonorita Valley, P. 0. address, Crittenden 783 

Stafford 783 

Sulphur Springs, P. 0. address, San Pedro 783 

Xros Alamos 783 

Tubac 783 

Tucson 783 

Yavapai County. 

Agua Fria Valley 780 

Antelope Creek 780 

Apache 780 

Bradshaw 780 

Camp Verde 780 

Defiance 780 

Fort Whipple, P. 0, address, Prescott 781 

Kirk land Valley 781 

Prescott 782 

Smith's Mill 783 

Stantonville 783 

Walnut Qro\'e 784 

Wickenburg 784 

Williamson's Valley 784 

Yuma County. 

Arizona City 780 

Colorado Reserve, P. 0. address, Parker 780 

Ehrenburg 781 

La Paz 781 

Parker 782 

Yuma 784 



ALASKA TERRITORY. 



Fort Kenay, P. 0. address, Sitka 790 

Fort Tongass, P. 790 

Fort Wrangel, P. 790 

Kodiak, P. 790 

Klowak 790 



Michaelovski 790 

Sitka, P. .790 

St. George's Island 790 

St. Paul 790 



BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Ashcroft, P. 794 

Barkerville, P. 794 

Big Bend 794 

Boston Bar 794 

Bridge Creek 794 

Burrard Inlet, P. 794 

Cache Creek, P. 795 

Cameronton, P. 0. address, Barkerville 795 

Cariboo, see Barkerville, Dog Creek, Dunkeld, 
Keithley Creek, Omineca, One Hundred and 
Fifty Mile House, Quesnelle.Quesnelle Forks, 

Skeena, Soda Creek, and Van Winkle 795 

Chemainus, P. 795 

Chilliwack, P. 0.... 795 

Clinton.P.O 795 

Comiaken, P. 0. address, Cowichan 795 

Comox, V. I., P. 795 

Cowichan.P.0 795 

Dog Creek, P. 795 

Dojglas 795 

Duck&Pringles,P. 795 

Dunkeld, P. 795 

Esquimault, V. I. , P. 795 

F"orks of Quesnelle, see Quesnelle Fotks 796 

Gladstonville, P. 0. address. Van Winkle 796 

Granville, P. 796 

Grouse Creek, P. 0. address, Barkerville 796 

Hazleton 796 

Hope, P.O 796 

Horse Shoe Bay, see Chemainus 796 

Kamloops, P. 796 

Keithley Creek, P. 796 



Kootenay, P. 796 

Lac La Hache, P. 796 

Lake Town 796 

Langley, P.O 796 

Lillooet, P. 796 

Lytton, P. 796 

Maple Bay, P.O 797 

MoodyviUe. P. 797 

Nanaimo, V. L, P. 797 

New Westminster, P. 797 

Nicola Lake, P. 798 

O'Kanagan, P. 798 

O'Kanagan Mission, P. 798 

Omineca, P.O 798 

One Hundred and Fifty Mile House, P. 798 

Quamichan, P. 798 

Quesnelle, P. 798 

Quesnelle Forks, P. 798 

Richfield, P. 0. address, Barkerville 799 

Salt Spring Island, P. 799 

Skeena, P. 799 

Soda Creek, P. 799 

Somenos, P.O 789 

Sooke.P.0 799 

Spencer's Bridge, P. 799 

Sumas, P. 799 

Telegraph Creek 799 

Van Winkle, P. 799 

Victoria, P.O 799 

Wellington Mine 802 

Yale.P.0 802 



Shoninger Organs, Sole Agency at GRAY'S Music Store, 105 Kearny St., S. P. 



UNITED STATES, 



UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT. 

October 15th, 1875. 



THE EXECUTIVE. 

ULYSSES S. GRANT, of Illinois President of the United States Salary, ?50,000 ' 

HENRY WILSON, of Massachusetts Vice-President of the United States ... " 10,000 



THE CABINET. 

HAMILTON FISH, of New York Secretary of State Salary, 810,000 



BENJAMIN H. BRISTOW, of Kentucky .' Secretary of the Treasury . 

WILLIAM W. BELKNAP, of Iowa Secretary of War. 

GEORGE M. ROBESON, of New Jersey Secretary of the Navy 

VACANT.-' Secretary of the Interior.... 

EDWARD PIERREPONT, of New York Attorney-General 

MARSHALL JEWELL, of Connecticut Postmaster-General 



10,(00 
10,000 
10.000 
10.000 
10,000 
10,000 



MINISTERS TO FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 

ENVOYS EXTRAOEDINAEY AND MINISTERS PLENIPOTENTIARY. 



COUNTRY. 


CAPITAL. 


MINISTERS. 


SALARY. 


Ap- 
point 
ed. 








812,000 
12,000 
10,000 
12,000 
17,500 
17.500 
17,500 
12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
10,000 
17,500 
12,000 


18H8 
1S71 
1S7;^ 
1869 
1809 

1870 
18(11 
1873 

1872 
1878 
1874 


Bra/.il 


Piio Janeiro 




Chili 




China 


Pekin 




France .' 


Paris 


Elihu B. Washburne, 111 


Gorman Empire .... 




J. C. Bancroft Davis, Mass 


(Treat Britain 




Robert C. Schenck, Ohio 


Italy 




George P. Marsh, Vt 


Japan 


Tokei 


.John A. Bingham, Ohio 


Mexico 






Peru 




Francis Thomas, Md 


Russia 


St. Petersburg 


Vacant. (E.Schuyler, Sec. in charge.) 
Caleb Cushing, Mass 


Spain 








* October 15th, 1875, Benjamin E 


. Cowen, Assistant 


, Acting. 







A. EOMAN & CO., Publishers, Booksellers, and Stationers, 11 Montgomery St., S. P. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



18 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Ministers to Foreign Countries — Continued. 



MINISTERS RESIDENT. 



Argentine Republic 

Belgium 

Bolivia 

Central American States.. 

Pcnmark 

Ecuador 

lireece 

Hawaiian Islands 

Xetlipr lands 

Portugal 

Swollen and Norway 

!>wit/.erland 

Turkey 

Uruguay and Paraguay... 
United States of Colombia 
Venezuela 



Buenos Ayros... 

Brussels 

La Paz 

Guatemala City . 

Copenhagen 

Quito 

Athens 

Honolulu 

Hague 

Lisbon 

Stockholm 

Berne 

Constantinople .. 

Montevideo 

Bogota 

Caracas 



Thomas Osborne, 111 

J. R.Jones 111 

Robert M. Reynolds, Ky. 
fieorge Williamson, La.. 
M. J. Cramer, Ky 



J. Meredith Read. Pa.... 
Henry A. Peirce, Mass... 
Chas. T. Gorham, Mich. 

Benjamin Moron 

C. C. Andrews, Minn 

Horace Rublee, Wis 

George H. Boker, Penn. 
John C. Caldwell. Me.... 

Wm. L. Scruggs, Ga 

Thomas Russell, Mo 





Ap- 


SALARY. 


point- 




ed. 


87,500 


1872 


7,500 


IS'W 


7,500 


1872 


10,000 


187:} 


7,500 


1870 


7,500 




7,.500 


187;5 


7.500 


18tii» 


7,500 


1870 


7,500 




7,.t00 


im 


7,r,00 


18ti9 


7,500 


1870 


10,000 


1871 


7,.50O 


1878 


7,500 


1871 



c3 



MINISTERS RESIDENT AND CONSULS GENKRAL. 



Hayti.... 
Liberia. 



Port-au-Prince , 
Monrovia 



MINISTERS. 



E. D. Bassett, Pa 

J. Milton Turner, Mo. 



87,500 
4,000 



Ap- 
point- 
ed. 



18!)9 
1871 



Consuls General, Consuls, Consular Agents and Commercial Agents of the United States, at the 
Ports of the Pacific, and Adjacent Thereto, with their Residences. 

Those marked C. G. are Consuls General; C, Consuls ; V. C, Vice Consuls; Con. A., Consular Agents; 

Com. A., Commercial Agents. 



AUSTRALASIA. 

J.'W. Smith, Con. A., Adelaide Fees. 

William J. Gillam, Con. A., Albany Fees. 

Henrv Driver, C, Auckland 1,500 

D. McPherson, Jr., C, Hobart Town Fees. 

Thomas Adamson, Jr., C. G., Melbourne 4.000 

George W. Mitchell. Con. A., Newcastle Fees. 

James H. Williams, Com. A., Sydney Fees. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

David Eckstein, C, Victoria Fees. 

CHILL 

John C. Morong, Con. A., Caldera Fees. 

H. Villanueva, Con. A.. Cociuimbo Fees. 

i:iia.s D. Brnner, C, Talcahuano 1,000 

David J. Williamson, C, Valparaiso 3,000 

CHINA. 

Joseph J. Henderson, C, Amoy 3,000 

Robert M. Tindall, C, Canton 4,000 

William A. Cornabe, Con. A., Che Foo Fees. 

J. C. S. Colbv, C, Chin Kiang 3,000 

M. M. Delano, C, Foo Chow 3,500 

Richard M. Johnson, C, Han Kow 3,000 

David H. Bailey, C, Hong Kong 3,500 

Francis P. Knight, C, New Chwang Fees. 

E. C. Lord. C, Ningpo Fees. 

George F. Seward, C. G., Shanghai 4,000 

COSTA RICA. 

Arthur Morrell, C, San Jose Fees. 

Earnest Rohrmoser, Con. A., Punta Arenas .... Fees. 

EAST INDIES. 

F. W. Partridge, C, Bangkox 3,000 

Benjamin F. Farnham, C, Bombay Fees. 

A. C. Litchfield, C. G., Calcutta 5,000 

Francis Newman, C, Ceylon 

Adolph G. Studer, C, Singapore 2,500 



JAPAN. 

John H. Hawes, C, Hakodadi 2,tO0 

Thomas B. Van Buren, C. G., Kanagawa 3,000 

Willie P. Mangum, C, Nagasaki 3.000 

Nathan J. Newwitter, C, Osaka and Hiogo 3,000 

MEXICO. 

J. A. Sutter, Jr., CAcapulco 2,000 

Alexander Willard, C, Guaymas 1,000 

D. Turner, C, La Paz Fees. 

A. Morrill, C, Manzanillo Fees. 

Edward G. Kelton, V. C, Mazatlan Fees. 

M. Garfias, C, San Bias Fees. 

NICARAGUA. 
Romeo H. Freer, Com. A., San Juan Del Norte 2,000 

PACIFIC ISLANDS. 
Samuel S. Foster, C, Apia, Navigator's Islands 1,000 

James Scott, C, Honolulu 4,000 

Jonathan Russell, C, Manila Fees. 

PERU. 

Phillip Clayton, C, Callao 3,500 

S. C. Montjoy, C, Lambayoque Fees. 

RUSSIA. 

James Crowley, C, Amoor River™ 1,000 

Edmund Brandt, C, Archangel Fees. 

SALVADOR. 
Maurice Duke, C„ San Salvador. Fees. 

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA. 

James Thorington, Jr,, Com, A., Aspinwall 2,500 

James M. Eder, C, Buenaveptura 3,000 

Owen M. Long, C„ Panama ,..., 3,500 

F. D. Garcia, C, Santa Martha.. 2,-500 



rAElTSWOETH & CLAEK want good Agents in all principal places. 



Best Piano Tuners at GHAT'S, 105 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



MILITARY DIVISION OF THE PACIFIC. 



19 



MILITARY DIVISION OF THE PACIFIC* 



Includes Departments of California, the Columbia, and Arizona. 

San Francisco. 



Headquarters, No. 105 Stockton street. 



Major-General John M. Schofield Commanding. 



Captain William M. ■Wherry,") 

Captain Richard F. O'Beirne, > Aides do Camp. 

Second Liout. Frank Michler.J 

Lieut. Col. John C. Kelton Adjutant General. 

Captain AVilliam M. Wherry... Acting A. A. General. 

Lieut. Col. Koger Jones Inspector General. 

Colonel Robert Allen Chief Quartermaster. 

Lieut. Col. Asher R. Eddy Depot Quartermaster. 



Lieut. Col. William W. Burns Chief Com. of Sub. 

Lieut. Col. Robert Murray Medical Purveyor. 

Liout. Col. Julian McAllister Chief Ord. Officer. 

Major Henry Prince Chief Paymaster. 

Captain Thomas Wilson... Purch'ing and Depot Com. 
Captain William P. Martin. ..Military Store Keeper. 
First Lieut. John C. Mallery Engineer Officer. 



DEPARTMENT OF CALIFORNIA. 



Includes California (excepting southern portion) and Nevada, 

Francisco. 



Headquarters, 105 Stockton street, San 



Major-General John M. Schofield Commanding. 



.Aides do Camp. 



Captain William M. Wherry, 
Captain Richard F. O'Beirne, 
Second Liout. h'rank Michler,. 

Major Samuel Breck Adjutant General. 

Lieut. Col. Roger Jones Inspector General. 

Major Herbert P. Curtis Judge Advocate. 

Lieut. Col. A. R. Eddy Chief Quartermaster. 

Captain Thomas Wilson. ..Chief Com. of Subsistence. 

Surgeon Charles McCormick Medical Director. 

Surgeon C. C. Keeney Attending Surgeon. 



Major Samuel Woods Chief Paymaster. 

First Lieut. John C. Mallery Engineer Officer. 

Lieut. Col. Julian McAllister Chief of Ordnance. 

Major J. H. Nelson Paymaster. 

Major D. Taylor ; Paymaster. 

Major C. W. VVingard Paymaster. 

Major I. A. Brodhead Paymaster. 

Captain George B. Sanford{ ^S^'mS/i. '°' 



Captain Evan Miles, Recruiting Officer, Sacramento, Cal. 

DEPARTMENT OF THE COLUMBIA. 

Includes Oregon and Idaho, Washington and Alaska Territories. Headquarters, Portland, Oregon. 

Brigadier General 0. 0. Howaed Commanding. 



Lieut. J. AV. Sladen ~| 

Lieut. William H. Boyle >- Aides de Camp. 

Lieut. M. 0. Wilkinson J 

Major H. Clay Wood Adjutant General. 

Major R. N. Batchelder Chief Quartermaster. 

Capt. Geo. H. Weeks, Depot Q. M. Fort Vancouver. 
Captain W. H. Bell Chief Commissary. 



Surgeon E. J. Bailey Medical Director. 

Major Joseph H. Eaton Chief Paymaster. 

Major William A. Rucker Paymaster. 

Major J. P. Canby Paymaster. 

Major R. H. Towler Paymaster. 

Lieut. John A. Kress Chief of Ordnance. 



DEPARTMENT OF ARIZONA. 

Includes California, (south of a line drawn from Point Conception to the northwest corner of Arizona) and 
Arizona Territory. Headquarters, Prescott, A. T. 

Brevet Major General August V. Kautz Commanding. 



First Lieut. E. D. Thomas, \ a-^ ^ p 

First Lieut. F. A. Whitney, | ^^^^^ "® ^"""P- 

Captain James P. Martin Acting A. A. General. 

Major A. W. Evans Acting A. Inspector General. 

Major John G. Chandler Chief Quartermaster. 

Lieut. Col. John D. Wilkins Chief Com. of Sub. 



Surgeon D, L. Magruder Medical Director. 

w M Mo^r,ori;o^ (Major and Paymaster, 

W. M. Maynadier | stationed at Prescott. 

Major James R. Roche { ^7t tS. '^^''""^"^ 

Lieut. E. D. Thomas Acting Engineer Officer. 



OFFICERS STATIONED AT SAN FRANCISCO— NOT ATTACHED TO STAFFS. 



Lieut. Col. B. S. Alexander Senior Engineer. 

Lieut. Col. Charles S. Stewart Engineer Duty. 



Major George H. Mondell Engineer Duty. 

Lieut. John H. Weeden Engineer Duty. 



REGIMENTS SERVING IN THE DIVISION OF THE PACIFIC, 

FiEST Cavaley— Col. Alvan C. Gillem, Commanding. Headquarters, Benicia Barracks, Cal. 
Sixth Cavaley— Captain C. B. McClellan, Commanding. Headquarters, Camp Lowell, A. T. 
FouBTH Aetillery— Col. Horace Brooks, Commanding. Headquarters, Presidio of San Frant^isco. 
TwiiLFTH Infantry.— Lieut. Col. A. D. AVilson, Commanding. Headquarters, Angel Island, Cal. 
Twenty-Fiest Infantby.— Col. Alfred Sully, Commanding. Headquarters, Fort Vancouver, W. T. 
Eighth Infantry.— Col. August V. Kautz, Commanding. Headquarters, Prescott, A. T. 



* Note.— The Regular Armv, under present organization, comprises ten Regiments of Cavalry, five Regi- 
ments of Artillery, and twenty-five Regiments of Infantry, making an aggregate maximum strength of 32,512, 
rank and file. The Act of Congress, approved June 16, 1874, reduces the number of enlisted men in the Army to 
2.5,000. 



A. HOMAN & CO.. Medical, Theological, and Scientific Books, 11 Montg'y St., S. F. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Mercliant. 



20 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Military Divison of the Pacific — Continued. 
STATIONS OF TROOPS IN THE DIVISION OF THE PACIFIC. 



DEPARTMENT OF CALIFORNIA. 



Alcatraz Island, Cal 

Angel Island, Cal 

Benecia Barracks, Cal 

Benecia Arsenal, Cal 

Bidwell Camp, Cal 

Gaston Camp, Cal 

Ualleck Camp, Nov 

Intlependence Camp, Cal... 

McDermit Camp, Nev 

Point San Jose, Cal 

Presidio, Cal , 

f Yerba Buena Island, Cal, 
t Not garrisoned. 



COMMANDING OFFICEE. 



Major C. H. Morgan, 4th Artillery 

Col. 0. B. Wilcox, 12th Infantry 

Lt. CoK W. L. Elliott, 1st Car 

Major J. McAllister, Ordnance Dep't.. 
Capt. R. F. Bernard, 1st Cavalry 

Capt. R. C. Parker, 12th Infantry 

Capt. M. H. Stacey, 12th Infantry 

Capt. A. B. MacGotvan, 12th Infantry 

Capt. H. Wagner, 1st Cavalry 

Capt. J. Mendenhall, 4th Artillery 

Col. H. Brooks, 4th Artillery , 

First Lieut. William Everett 



Co's C and K, 4th Art., and Detach- 
ment of enlisted men from Fort 
San Jose and Presidio. 

Headquarters and Co's C, F and I, 
12th Infantry. 

Headquarters Co. D, 1st Cavalry. 

Detachment of Ordnance. 

Co's G and A, 1st Cav., and Co. G, 
12th Infantry. 

Co. E, 12ch Infantry. 

Co. H, 12th Infantry. 

Co. D, r2th Infantry. 

Co. C, 1st Cavalry. 

Co. G, 4th Artillery. 

Headquarters, and Co's A, D, M, 
and Light Bat. B, 4th Artillery. 

In Charge. 



DEPARTMENT OF THE COLUMBIA. 



Boise Fort, Idaho 

Colville Fort, W. T 

Fort Canby, W. T 

Harney Camp, Oregon 

Klamath Fort, Oregon 

Lapwai Fort, Idaho , 

Sitka, Alaska 

Stevens Fort, Oregon 

Townsend Fort, V\ . T 

Vancouver Fort, W. T 

Vancouver Arsenal, W. T, 
Vancouver Depot, W. T.... 
Walla Walla Fort, W. T.. 



COMMANDING OFFICER. 



Capt. G. M. Downey, 21st Infantry 

Capt. M. Harris, 1st Cavalry 

Capt. F. G. Smith, 4th Artillery 

Major J. Green, 1st Cavalry 

Capt. James Jackson, 1st Cavalry 

Capt. H. M. Smith, 21st Infantry 

Capt. J. Campbell, 4th Artillery 

Capt. M. P. Miller, 4th Artillery 

Capt. G. H. Burton, 21st Infantry 

Col. Alfred Sully, 21st Infantry 

First Lt. J. A. Kress, Ordnance Dept... 
Capt. George H. Weeks, Acting Quarterm'r 
Major E. Otis, 1st Cavalry 



Co. K, 21st Infantry. 

Co. M, 1st Cavalry. 

Co. H, 4th Artillery. 

Co's K, 1st Cavalry, and A, 21st Inf. 

Co. B, 1st Cavalry, and F, 21st Inf. 

Co. E, 1st Cavalry, and G, 21st Inf. 

Co's F and M, Light 4th Artillery. 

Co. E, 4th Artillery. 

Co. C, 21st Infantry. 

Headq'rs Co's D, H and I, 2l8t Inf. 

Detachment of Ordnance. 

Co's F, L and H, 1st Cavalry, and 

Co. E, 21st Infantry. 



DEPARTMENT OF ARIZONA. 



Apache Camp, Arizona.. 

Bowie Camp, " 
Grant Camp, " 

Lowell Camp, " 

McDowell Camp, " 
Alojave Camp, " 
Verde Camp, " 

Whipple Fort, " 
Whipple Depot, " 

Yuma Fort, Cal 

Yuma Depot, Arizona . 

(New San Diego, Cal.. 

( Not garrisoned. 



COMMANDING OFFICER. 



Capt. F. D. Ogilby, 8th Infantry., 



First Lt. W. M. Wallace, 6th Cavalry 
Capt. A. T. Smith, 8th Infantry 



Co's A and D, 6th Cavalry, and Co's 

E and K, Sth Infantry. 
Co. H, 0th Cavalry. 
Co's B, G and M,(5th Cavalry, and 

Co. I, Sth Infantry. 
Headquarters, and Co. L, 6th Cav., 

and Co's D and G, Sth Infantry. 

Capt. A. W. Corliss, Sth Infantry Co. K, 6th Cav., and Co. C, Sth Inf. 

Co's A and K, 12th Infantry. 

Co's E and I, 6th Cav., and Co's A 

and B, Sth Infantry. 
Co. F, 6th Cav., and Co. F, Sth Inf. 



Capt. John N. Andrews, Sth Infantry., 



Capt. E. C. Woodruff, 12th Infantry. 
Capt. George M. Brayton, Sth Infantry.. 



Capt. J. J. Van Horn, Sth Infantry. 

First Lt. B. Aldrich, Sth Inf , A. A. Q. M. 

Major H. R. Mizner, 12th Infantry 

Capt. G. M. Bradley, A. Q. M 

Ordnance Sergeant Michael Donovan, in 
charge. 



Co. H, Sth Inf., and Co. B, 12th Inf. 



* Fortifications have been erected at the following points: San Francisco Harbor; Fort Point and Alca- 
traces Island ; San Diego Harbor; Mouth of the Columbia River ; Forts Stevens and Cape Disappointment. 
Batteries have been also erected at Point San Jose, Lime Point, and Angel Island, San Francisco Harbor. 



PAENSWOETH & CLAEK, Fire Insurance Agents for Pacific Coast, San Francisco 



GEAY'S New Music Store, 105 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



UNITED STATES NAV Y — P A C 1 F I C. 



21 



UNITED STATES NAVY*— PACIFIC COAST. 

NORTH PACIFIC FLEET. 

Rear Admiral Jno. J. Almt, U. S. N Commanding. 



Vessel. 



Pen?acola, F. S 

Benicia 

Portsmouth 



Motive Power. 



Screw 
Sails '. 



Tonnage. 



2,158 

1,122 

816 



Guns. 



Commanding Officer. 



Captain Bancroft Ghorardi. 
Captain W. E. Hopkins. 
Commander Silas Casey, Jr. 



SOUTH PACIFIC FLEET. 
Rear-Admiral Napoleon Collins, D. S. N Commanding. 



Vessel. 



Richmond, F. S 

Omaha 

Onward, Store Ship 



Motive Power. 



Screw, 
Sails . 



Tonnage. 



2,000 

1,122 

701 



Guns. 



Commanding Officer. 



Captain E. R. Col horn. 
Captain P. C. Johnson. 
Lt. Commander Edwin White. 



SURVEYING SERVICE.— PACIFIC OCEAN. 



Vessel. 



Tuscarora 

Narragansett 

U. S. C. S. S. Hassler. 



Motive Power. 



Screw.. 



Tonnage. 



726 
506 



Guns 



Commanding Officer. 



Commander Geo. E. Belknap. 
Commander George Dewey. 
Lt. Commander H. C. Taylor. 



NAVAL RENDEZVOUS —SAN FRANCISCO. 
Captain Paul Shirley, U. S. N Commanding. 

NAVY PAY OFFICE.— SAN FRANCISCO. 
Pay Inspector J. S. Cunningham, U.S.N In Charge. 

NAVY YARD— MARE ISLAND. 

REAR ADMIRAL JOHN RODGERS, U. S. N Commandant. 

CAPTAIN TIIOS. S. PHELPS Executive Officer. 

CAPTAIN THOS. S. PHELPS ^Equipment Officer. 

COMMANDER W. E. FITZtlUGH Navigation Officer. 

COMMANDER W. E. FITZHUGH .Inspector of Ordnance. 

E. LAWTON Chief Engineer. 

PAY INSPECTOR CASPER SCHENCK Paymaster 6f the Yard. 

PAY INSPECTOR JAMES FULTON Inspector of Pr6vi.no ns and Clothinq. 

MEDICAL INSPECTOR J. SUDDARDS In, Charge of Naval Hospital. 

SURGEON \y, E. TAYLOR Surgeon of the Yard. 

CIYIL OFFICERS. 



Geo. W. Much Naval Constructor. 

Calvin Brown Civil Engineer. 



W. H. Davis Timher Inspector. 

W. C. Root Superintendent of Floating Docks. 



MARINE BARRACKS— MARE ISLAND. 
Captain C. D. Hebb Commanding. 



* On the 1.5th July, 1874, the Navy of the United States consisted of one hundred and seventy-five ve.s'^el.s 
with a tonnage of 171, S60. They are calculated t« carry, when in commission, about 1.200 guns. Of tlie.se fifty- 
three are Iron C'lads and Monitors, and twenty-eight are I'ugs, etc. There were in commission, July 15th, 187-1, 
(including all) sixty-three vessels, mounting fi** guns. 

Note.— The foJlowing are the different Stations as at present organized : European Station , Rear Admiral 
Augustus L. Case; A.siatic Station, Hear Admiral Alexander M. Pennock ; North Atlantic Station, Rear Admiral 
J. R. Madison Mullany ; South Atlantic Station, lOrdored to command) Rear Admiral William E. Le Roy; North 
Pacific Station, Rear Admiral John J. Almy; South Pacific .Station, Rear Admiral Napoleon Collins. In ad- 
dition to the vessels attached to these Stations, there are several others engaged on special service. 



L. EOMAN & CO., Blank Books and Counting House Stationery, 11 Mont. St., S. F. 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merchant 



22 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



United States Navy — Continued. 
VESSELS— MARE ISLAND. 



Vessel. 



Inrlependence, Roc. Ship 

Cnlitbrnia 

Nyack 

Jamestown 

Cyane 

^lonadnock 

Cainancho 

Alohican 

Monterey 



Motive Power. 



Sails . 
Screw 

Sails . 

Screw, 



Tonnage. 



l.fOl 

2, -WO 

593 

985 

(•72 

1,504 

841 

671 

52 



Guns. 



Commanding Officer. 



Captain Thomas Pattison. 
In Ordinary. 



Repairing at Vallejo 

" " Mare Island. 
Yard Tug at Mare Island. 



Iron Clad. 



POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT— PACIFIC COAST. 

I. A. AMERMAN, Superintendent Railway Mail Service, Eighth Division San Francisco. 

E. L. ALEXANDER, Special Agent San Francisco, Cal. 

JAMES B. UNDERWOOD, Special Agent Eugene City, Oregon. 

JOHN H. WICKIZER, Special Agent Salt Lake City, Utah. 



RATES OF POSTAGE ON DOMKSTIC MAIL MATTER. 

On letters, sealed packages, mail matter wholly or partly in writing, except book manuscript and cor- 
rected proofs passing between authors and publishers, and except local or drop letters, or United Sta'es 
postal cards; also all matter to which no specific rate of postage is assigned, and manuscript for publica- 
tion in newspapers, magazines, or periodicals, three cents for each half ounce or fraction thereof. 

On local or drop letters at offices where free delivery by carriers is established, two cents for each half 
ounce or fraction thereof. 

On newspapers, magazines and periodicals, exclusively in print and regularly issued at stated periods 
from a known office of publication, without addition by writing, mark or sign, and addressed to regular 
subscribers, two cents for each pound or fraction thereof, on publications issued weekly and oftener; less 
frequently, three cents for each pound or fraction thereof. 

On miscellaneous mailable matter, embracing pamphlets, occasional publications, transient news- 
papers, magazines, handbills, posters, unsealed circulars, prospectuses, books, book manuscript, proof- 
sheets, corrected proof-sheets, maps, prints, engravings, blanks, flexible patterns, articles of merchandise, 
sample cards, phonographic paper, letter envelopes, postal envelopes and wrappers, cards, plain and 
ornamental paper, photographic representations of different types, seeds, cuttings, bulbs, roots, scions, 
and all other matter which may be declared mailable by law, and all other articles not above the weight 
prescribed by law, which are not from their form or nature liable to destroy, deface or otherwise injure 
the contents of the mail bag, or the person of any one engaged in the postal service, one cent for each 
ounce or fraction thereof. 

REGISTRATION OF DOMESTIC LETTERS. 

Letters may be registered on payment of a fee of eight cents in addition to the regular letter rate of 
postage, but the Government takes no responsibility for safe carriage, or compensation in case of loss. 
Postmasters are required to register all letters properly presented for that purpose, but no letters are to be 
registered on Sunday. 

POSTAL CARDS. 

The object of the postal card is to facilitate letter correspondence, and provide for the transmission, 
through the mails, at a reduced rate of postage, of short communications, either printed or written in 
pencil or ink. They may therefore be used for orders, invitations, notices, receipts, acknowledgments, 
price lists, and other requirements of business and social life ; and the matter desired to bo conveyed may 
bo either in writing or in print, or partially in both. The postage of one cent each is paid by the stamp 
impressed on these cards, and no further payment is required. No card is a "postal card" except such as 
are issued by the Post Office Department. 

POSTAL MONET ORDER SYSTEM. 

The money order system is intended to promote public convenience, and to secure safety in the trans- 
fer, through the mail", of small sums of money. All principal Post Offices receive money and issue drafts 
for the same upon other Post Offices, subject to the following charges and regulations : 

Domestic Bates. — On orders net exceeding Sl5, 10 cents ; over S15 and not exceeding $30, 15 cents ; over 
S30 and not exceeding S^O, 20 cents ; over S40 and not exceeding $50, 25 cents. 

Sritish and Sioiss Hates.— On orders not exceeding SIO, 25 cents ; over SlO and not exceeding S20, 50 
cents ; over S20 and not exceeding 530, 75 cents ; over §30 and not exceeding $J0, 31 ; over S40 and not ex- 
ceeding S50. Si. 25. 

German Bates.— On orders not exceeding 85, 15 cents ; over S5 and not exceeding $10, 25 cents ; over 
SlO and not exceeding S20, 50 cents ; over S20 and not exceeding S30,75 cents ; over 580 and not exceeding 
$10, $1.00 ; over $40 and not exceeding $50, 81.2-5. 

A money order may be issued for any amount, fVom one cent up to fifty dollars inclusive, but fractional 
parts of a cent must not bo introduced into any money order or account. United States Treasury Notes, 
or National Bank Notes only received or paid. When a larger sum than fifty dollars is required, addi- 
tional orders to make it up must be obtained. 

An order is only payable at the office upon which it is drawn. The order should bo collected within 
one year from its date. After once'paying an order by whomesoever presented, provided the required in- 
formation has been given by the party who presented it, the Department will not hold itself liable to any 
further claim, but in case of improper payment of an order, will endeavor to recover the amoimt for the 
owner. 



PAHNSWORTH & CLAEK represent $10,000,000 of Insurance Capital 



The only Music Engraving House in San Francisco is GEAY'S. 105 Keamy St. 



POST OFTICE S C ALIFORNIA. 



23 



POST OFFICES— CALIFORNIA. 

[* United States Money Order Offices. B., British; Q., Gorman; S., Swiss.] 
Corrected by Offi,cial Reports to October 1, 1875. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Acampo San Joaquin John N. Woods. 

Aidenville Modoc Emanuel Lauor. 

Alameda Alameda. Arthur S. Barber. 

Alamo Contra Costa James Foster. 

Albion Mendocino C. E. White. 

Alcatraz San Francisco. ..Chas. E. Thomas. 

Alleghany Sierra Samuel S. Crafts. 

Allen's Springs Lake George Allen. 

Alma Santa Clara Lysander Collins. 

Alta- Placer _ EdgarM.Banvard 

Altamont Alameda. VVm. H. Wright. 

Ah'arado Alameda Daniel C. Owen. 

Alviso Santa Clara Miss M. A. Wade. 

Amador City Amador Aaron Weil. 

American Ranch. ..Shasta Elias Anderson. 

Anaheim Los Angeles Wm. M. Higgins. 

Andrews Station... Los Angeles A. G. Krazvnski. 

Angel Island San Francisco... Charles Mellon. 

Angel's Camp Calaveras William Crooks. 

Antelope Yolo A. W. Dunnigan. 

Anthony House Nevada W. Westertield. 

Antioch* Contra Costa Van W. Phillips. 

Aptos Santa Cruz Josor>h Arano. 

Areata Humboldt Charles Smith. 

Argusville Lassen John W. Nottin. 

Arroyo Grande SanLuisObispo John Corbit. 

Atlanta San Joaquin John D. Murphy. 

Auburn* Placer S. W. Willis. 

Azusa Los Angeles Oliver T. J ustice. 

Bakersfield» Kern G. B. Chester. 

Bald Hills Humboldt A. L. Orcutt. 

Ballena San Diego J. L. Mclntee. 

Ball's Ferry Shasta William W. Ball. 

Bangor Butte J. E. Allen. 

Banner San Diego C. B. Dickerman. 

Banta San Joaquin I. G. Israel, Jr. 

Bartlett Springs... Lake M. A. Long. 

Batavia Solano T. S. Bayley.- 

Bath Placer Horace Baldwin. 

Battle Creek Tehama A. H. Gray. 

Bear Valley Mariposa Edward M. Rice- 
Beck with Plumas W.C.Bringham. 

Bell's Bridge Shasta Joseph M. Cecil. 

Bell's Station Santa Clara George Hogeman. 

Belmont San Mateo Chas. F. Janke. 

Bolota San Joaquin 

Bonicia* Solano A. McDonell. 

Benton Mono Wm. u. Marshall. 

Berondo Fresno F. Asbec. 

Berkeley Alameda Frank .J. Adams. 

Bernardo San Diego Zenas Sikes. 

Berry Creek Butte David Johnson. 

Berryvale Siskiyou Justin H. Sisson. 

Bidwoll's Bar Butte I. R, Ketcham. 

Big Bar Trinity AVm. Wilshure. 

Big Dry Creek Fresno Francisco .Jensen. 

Big Oak Flat Tuolumne Wm, Urich. 

Big Pine Inyo .J. W. .McMurray. 

Big Trees Calaveras J. F. Sperry. 

Bigg's Station Butte G. K. Smith. 

Binghampton Solano Luther W. Frick. 

Bishop Creek Inyo J. P. Yaney. 

Black Bear Siskiyou Wm. A. Farish. 

Black Diamond Contra Costa P. Bargion. 

Black Point Marin J. B. Sweotser. 

lilanco Monterey Charles Jjonis. 

Bloomfield Sonoma Abnor H. Knapp. 

Blue Canyon Placer .Jno. C. Petorman. 

Boca Nevada Wallace Doan. 

Bolinas Marin James M. Davis. 

Booneville Mendocino .J. T. Rogers. 

Borden Fresno M. C. Landrum. 

Boulder Creek Santa Cruz Chas. T. Cottrell. 

Bridgeport Mono .- Amasa F. Bryant. 

Brighton Sacramento Samuel G. Foster. 

Bronco Nevada Alex. M. Wickes. 

Brooklyn Alameda Thos. F. Steere. 

Brown's Valley Yuba Fred. W. Schaaf. 

Brownsville Yuba Martin Knox. 

Brush Creek Butte Robert B. Grace. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Buchanan Fresno John Brown. 

Buckeye Yolo Robt. A. Daniels. 

Buck's Ranch Fhimas William Wagner. 

Buena Vista Amador William Cook. 

Ballard's Bar Yuba A. J. Gove. 

Burgi'ttville Shasta John E. Mooers. 

Burnett Santa Clara Orvis Stevens. 

Burney Valley Shasta Geo. L. Carman. 

Burnt Ranch Trinity M. Hennessey. 

Burwood San Joaquin Ishmael Monroe. 

Butcher Ranch ....Placer Thos. P.Martin. 

Butte City Colusa Wm. F. Miller. 

Cache Creek Yolo Abraham Haines. 

Cahto Mendocino Robert White. 

Calionte Kern A. G. Davis. 

Calistoga Napa Ezra B. Badlam. 

Callahan's Ranch. .Siskiyou R. M. Hayden. 

Calpella Mendocino Peter R. Klein. 

Camanche Calaveras N. Ziramormann. 

Cambria. San Lui< Obispo(ieorgo W. Lull. 

Camp Grant Humboldt B. G. Hurlbert. 

Campo.._. San Diego Lyman H.Gaskill. 

Campo Seco Calaveras David B. Nye. 

Camptonville'* Yuba ,.. Joshua H. Variel. 

Cana Butte B. W. Lekens. 

Canby Modoc Jas. W. Pope. 

Capay Yolo Edw. E. Perkins. 

Capell Napa J. G. Bradshaw. 

Capistrano Los Angeles Marks Mendelson 

Carpenteria. Santa Barbara.G. E. Thurmond. 

Caspar Mendocino D. W. McCallum. 

Castroville* Monterey Israel Johnson. 

Codarville Modoc John H. Bonner. 

Central Colusa W. H. Williams. 

Central House Butte J. S. Hutchins. 

Centrevillo Alameda H. C. Gregors'. 

Ceres Stanislaus Daniel Whitmore. 

Cerro Gordo Inyo F. K. Miller. 

Cherokee Butte Mrs. A. F. Jones. 

Chico"'B Butte Louis A.Hildreth. 

Chili Calaveras Mrs. E. Murphy.. 

Chinese Camp Tuolumne Chas. B. Cuttings. 

Ctiino San BernarclinoSimon Goldsmith. | 

Cholame San Lui>; ObispoDavid Russell. 

Christine Mendocino Andrew Gantly. 

Chualao* Monterey Thos. Snyder. 

Cinnabar San Benito George W. Chick. 

Cisco Placer H. A. Campbell. 

Clairville Sonoma Martin Hiber. 

Clarksville El Dorado Gilbert S. Tong. 

Clayton Contra Costa Charles Rhine. 

Clipper Gap Placer Jos. A. Iloagland. 

Clipper Mills Butte Enoch H. Pratt. 

Cloverdale Sonoma J. A. Linville. 

Coast Range Colusa Noah Si!np,<on. 

Coleville Mouo Morri* Dick. 

Colfax I'lacer N RD Traphagan 

College City Colusa E. Rathbun. 

Collegeville San Joaquin Andrew Lawson. 

Collinsvillo Solano Emory Upham. 

Coloma El Dorado Joh.i Price. 

Columbia* Tuolumne Edward Elias. 

Colusa*B Colusa Jos. H. .Jones. 

Compton Los Angi'les Chas. S Fisher. 

Concord Contra Costa Samuel Bacon. 

Coppervale Lassen C. C. G oddrich. 

Copperopolis Calaveras Calvin Honey. 

Cordelia Solano Charles Rau).«oy. 

Cosumne Sacramento John C. Tubbs. 

Cottage (Jrove Siskiyou William Elliott. 

Cottonwood Shasta Jacob Foster. 

Coultorvillo Mariposa Nelson T. Cody. 

Courtland Sacramento James V. Sims. 

S. Hornbrook. 

W. H. Woodbury. 

Crescent Mills Plumas M. 1>. Branslord. 

Cross Creek Tulare C.!H. Robinson. 

Crow's Landing .Stanislaus lohn F. Tucker. 

(.'ncamonga Sanlieirtiardino F. Louis Riche. 

Cuffey'.< Cove Mendocino John Conway. 



V^UUl lltVIIU ......... ...*i,'f&vi <hiiiv:ii i^\j 

Covelo Meijdocino . 

Crescent Citv Del Norte... 



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A. EOMAN & CO., "Wedding Invitations engraved and printed, 11 Mont. St.. S. r, 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery oor. Merchant, 



24 


PACIFIC 


COAST BUSINESS DIRECT OR Y. 


Name. 
Danvillo 


County. 
..Contra Costa. 


Postmaster. 
...Michael Cohon. 
...Abner B. Elder. 
...William Purdy. 
...Wm. H. Mardon. 
...Andrew Hare. 
..E. Chauvin. 
...S. K. Nurse. 
...E. (i. Bradbury. 
...A. F. Colburn. 
..S. JD. Russell. 
...N. B. Rine. 


Name. 

Glonbrook 

Glenvillo 

Gold Run 

(loleta 

Gonzales 

(ioodyear's Bar.. 

Grafton 

Grainland 

Grand Island 

Grangovillo 


County. 

..Lake 

...Kern 


Postmaster. 

...D. E. Mills. 
...losonh Mnvorq. 






..Placer ShubaelWardnor. 

..Santa Barbara. J. G. Foster. 

..Monterey William Searls. 

..Sierra '.Oscar F. Ackerly. 

..Yolo S. J. Fryett. 

..Butte 0. Groonobanm. 

..Colusa C. J. Diefondorff. 

..Tulare J. "S. Phillips. 

..El Dorado Wm. P. Vernon. 

..Nevada John W. Robb. 

..Nevada John S. Sykes. 

..Lake Archy McMath. 

..Stanislaus J. R. McDonald. 

..El Dorado Wm. H. Willet,«. 

..Plumas J. H. Whitlock. 

..El Dorado Robert Gay. 

Butte .Saiiiiinl .T rtnvia 


Davisvilie 

Decota 

Delano 


..Yolo 

..Alameda 

..Kern 


Diamond Springs 

Dixon-' 

Doby Ranch 

Dorris Bridge 

Dougherty's Sta' 

Douglas City 

Downievillo'-'B.... 

Drytown 

Duncan's Mills .. 

Durham 

Dutch Flat*B 

Dutch Hill 

Eagloville 

Edgowood 

El Dorado 

El Monte 

Elk Creek 


..El Dorado 

..Solano 

..Sacramento... 


n. Alameda 

..Trinity 

■Sierra 

..Amador 

..Sonoma 

..Butte 

.Placer 


...S. Wortheimer. 
...A. H. Marshall. 
..William Ryan. 
...William Jennings 
...Thos. Beacom. 
..Wm. W. Durham. 
...Daniel E. Smart. 


Granitevillo 

Grass Valley-'B.. 
Gravelly Valley.. 

Grayson 

Green Valley 

Greenville 

Greenwood 

Gridley 

Grizzly Flat 

Grovoland 

Guadaloupe 

Gualala 

Guenoc 

Guerneville 

Gwin Mine 

Half Moon Bay.. 

Hansonville 

Happy Camp 

Harrisburgh 

Havilah 

Hay Fork 

Hayden 

Haywood 

Healdsburg*B.... 

Henley 

Henley ville 

Henry 

Hermitage 

Hicksville 

Highland Spring 

Hill's Ferry 

Hollister'-- 

Honcut 

Hoopa Valley 

Hopeton 

Hornitos 

Horr's Ranch.. -- 

Horsetown 

Hot Springs 

Huonema 

Hunsaker 

Hydesville 

Igo 

Imusdale 

Independence'-'... 

Indian Gulch 

Inskip 


..Modoc 

..Siskiyou 

.El Dorado 

..Los Angeles... 
..Colusa 


...Benj.Schoeline. 
..Jos. Cavanaugh. 
..BenoitT. Church. 
...Wm. F. Turner. 
...John E. Holland. 
..J. N. Andrews. 
...J. L. Johnson. 
...G. H.P.Henderson 
...L. N. Davidson. 
..David Catfyn. 
..Jos. M. Upham. 
..G. W. Towle. 
..Jno. F. Murphy. 
..David H. Shaw. 
..Frederick Axe. 
..Frank J. Smith. 
...0. Walker. 

..J. G. Carr. 
..Benj. W. Curtis. 
..Alonzo Sweet. 
..T. J. Brundage. 
..0. D. Dyke. 
..Hub. W. McKoy. 
..Edward J. Dodge. 
..Russell B. Wight. 
».Thomas J. Julian. 
..Geo. L. Hoffman. 
..James G. Bonds. 
..J. C. Fi,sk. 
...Fred. Helmke. 
...Sarles H. Yellot. 
...Joshua H. Smith. 
..D. W. C.Gaskill. 
..Rod. S. Weston. 
...Amb. H. Cowdon. 
..Albert L. Lamb. 
...John Selling. 
..William R. Boyd. 
..Irwin Ayres. 
.. A loxander wen.s. 
...Charles A. Hart. 
..Moses Davis. 
..William Roddick. 
..PyramK.Beckley. 
...D. G. Webber. 
..Fred. S. BJume. 
...Wm. J. Beldeii. 
..M. 11. Williams. 
..Thompson Plumb. 
J. H. Durham. 


..El Dorado 


..D.T.Loofbourrow 

.T.imns 'Pnnnn)i;il 


..Santa Barbara.. John Dunbar. 

..Mendocino C. D. Robinson. 

..Lake Thos. H. Hames. 

..Sonoma John W. Bagloy. 

..Calaveras R. M. Redmond. 

..San Mateo Henry S. Pitcher. 

..Yuba James H.Hanson. 

..Del Norte .Tnmos Cnmn. 


Elliott 

Kllis 


..San Joaquin. 
.San Joaquin . 

..Solano 

..Placer 

..Sacramento... 

.San Benito 

..San Benito 

..Siskiyou 

..Humboldt. 

..Santa Clara... 
..Sonoma 

..El Dorado 

..ShaJta 

..Humboldt 

..Tulare 

..San Joaquin.. 
..Santa Cruz.... 

..Humboldt 

..Amador 

..Sierra 


Elmira 

Emigrant Gap 

Emmaton 

iMiimott 

Erie 

Etna Mills 

Euroka'BG 

Evergreen 

Excelsior 

Fair Play 


.. Alameda 

..Kern 

..Trinity 


..G. W. Peacock. 
..Elias Cohn. 
..Adam D. Bayles. 
..Albert Ament. 
..W^ra. Hayward. 
..Albert Wright. 
..John S. Eubanks. 
..C. G. Alexander. 
..M. Siltz. 
..S. W. Knowles. 
..S. D. Johnson. 
...Hiram Spartzer. 
..Jno. C Gambling. 
...Thomas Yost 
..Hiram Eldred. 
..Joshua P. Stokes. 
..H. H. Hunt 
..Andrew Alcese. 
..John W. Roberts. 
..Alexander Loiter. 
..James L. Ballard. 
..Achille Levy. 
...Samuel D. Shuey. 
..Elias 0. Smith. 

..Alonzo Englo. 
..George S. Gould. 
..John B. Rowley. 
..A. Chichizola. 
..John Stokes. 
L.. Daniel McCarty. 
..J. W. McMurry. 
..Jas. W. Chinn. 
..Josiah Pool. 

..P. N. Aronson. 
..Chas. M. Meek. 
..B. F. Butterlield. 
..Levi N. Breed. 
..Celestino Ugo. 
..Henry C. Dodge. 
..G. W. Colton. 
3 W. S.Humphries. 
..H. W'. Hawver. 
.Charles W. Day. 
..Abraham Lent 


..Alameda 

..Sonoma 

..Siskiyou 

..Tehama 

..Lassen 

..Mendocino 

..Sacramento ... 

^..Lake 

..Stanislaus 

..San Benito 

..Yuba 

..Humboldt 

..Merced 

..Mariposa 

..Stanislaus 

..Shasta 

..Modoc 

..Ventura 

..Tulare 

..Humboldt 

..Shasta 


Fall River Mills. 

F''also Cape 

Farmersville 

Farmington 

Folton 

Ferndale 

Fiddletown 

Fir Cap 

Firebaugh 

Fish Springs 

Fisherman's Bay 
Fisk'g Mill 


..Inyo 

..Sonoma 

..Sonoma/ 

..Sacramento... 
..Sacramento... 

..Butte 

..Sierra 

..Placer 

..Amador 

..Sonoma 

..Siskiyou 

..Modoc 




Forbostowa 

Forest City 

Forest Hill* 

Forest Homo 


..Inyo 

..Mariposa 

.Butte 

..Santa Barbara 

..Amador 

..Placer 

..Sacramento... 

..Colusa 

..Amador 

..Tuolumne 

..Lassen 

..Calaveras 

..Monterey 

..Tulare 

..San Luis Obisp 

..San Diego 

..Trinity 

..Lassen 


Forks of Salmon 
Fort Bidweli'' 


F^ort MjUe^r 

Fountain Springs 
Fourth Crossing 


..Fresno 

..Tulare 

..Calaveras 


lone V'alley-' 

Iowa City 

Isleton 

Jacinto 

Jackson'-B 

Jamestown 

Janesville 

Jenny Lind 

Jolon 

Jones'.. 


Freeport' 


..Sacramento... 

.Sonoma 

..San Joaquin.. 

..Nevada 

..Shasta 


Freestone 

French Camp 

French Corral. „. 

French Gulch 

Freshwater 

Fresno City 

Fresno Flats 

Fulton 

Gabilan 

Gait 

(Jarborville 

Garden Valley.... 

(las Jet. 

• ths Point 

Ha/elle 


..Fresno 

..Fresno 

..Sonoma 


..Chas. AV.Delong. 
..T. J. Allen. 
..Jos. W. Stevens. 

..Mark H. Clark. 




Junction City 

Junction House. 

Kanawha 


..Sacramento... 

..Humboldt 

..El Dorado 

..Humboldt 


..John Brewster. 
..J. C. Garber. 
.. KinaldoFilippini. 
..Thomas Stewart. 


..Sonoma 

..El Dorado 

.Kern 

..Mendocino 

..Fresno 

..Fresno 

..Sutter 

..Siskiyou 

..Stanislaus 

..Napa 


..C. T. Van Namee. 
..August Soisnop. 
..Andrew Brown. 
..F. A. Whipple. 
..H. D. Silverman. 
..L. Gilroy. 
..L. H. Wiseman. 
..John Daggett. 
..A.T. Bartlett 
..Wm.F.Schwatka. 




Kernville 

Kibesillah 

King's River 

Kingston 

Kirksville 

Klamath Mill 

Knight's Ferry... 
Knoxville 


..Siskiyou 

..El Dorado 

..vSonoma 

..Sierra 

..Santa Clara... 
sSanta Clara... 
.Sonoma 


..Mrs. H. C. Eddy. 
..Ben. F. Shepherd. 
..Mrs. G. McBride. 
..James S. Perry. 
..Henry W. Briggs. 
..George Roop. 
..Charles Justi. 


Geyser Springs.... 

(iibsonville-' 

Gilroy'-'B 

Gilroy Hot Spring 
Glen Ellen 





Before insuring call on PAEITSWOIITH 3: CLAEK, 426 California St., S. F. 



Burdett Organs— without a rival. M. &EAY, Agent. 105 Kearny St., S. F. 



POST OFFICES — CALIFORNIA. 



25 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

La Borea Santa Clara A. Johnson. 

La Fayette Contra Costa Benj. Shrove. 

LaCiraciosa Santa Barbara.. Chas. H. South. 

La Grange Stanislaus Theo. W. Ferry. 

La Honda San Mateo Wui. M. Soars. 

La Forte'-- Tlumas H. Washington 

Lagunita Inyo James Bridgor. 

Lake City Modoc Jauios M. Wood. 

Lake Valley El' Dorado K. Woodbnrn. 

Lakeport Lake Goorgo Martin. 

Lakeside ^ Tulare Theodore Wil lard 

Lakeville Sonoma Chas. A. Bod well. 

Lnneha Plana Amador J. W. D. Palmer. 

Las Cruces Santa Barbara..Alf. B. Williams. 

Lathrop San Joaquin W. A. Thompson. 

Latrobe El Dorado Andrew J.Adams. 

Leosville Colusa J. H. Clark. 

Lemore Tulare Benjamin Hamlin 

Lewiston Trinity Hiram Hayes. 

Lincoln-' Placer Wm. Ingram. 

Linden San Joaquin Wm. E. Fitield. 

Little Kiver Mendocino Isaiah Stevens. 

Little York Nevada J. K. Fuller. 

Live Oak Sutter H. L. Gregory. 

Livermore .<^rrr:rrAlameda A. J. McLeod. 

Livingston Merced Edward J. Olds. 

Loekeford San .Joaquin Dean J. Locke. 

Lodi San Joaquin B. D. Beck with. 

Lompoc Santa Barbara.. Benj. F. Tucker. 

Lone Pine ; Inyo H. A. Loomis. 

Long Valley Lassen John W. Doyle. 

Longville .'Plumas P. K. Welsh. 

LosAngeles'-'B.G. S.Los Angeles H. K. AV. Bent. 

Los Banos Merced Moses Korn. 

Los Gatos Santa Clara W. S. McMurtry. 

Los Nietos Los Angeles .'G. M. Diofl'ondorf. 

Lovelock Butte Ozias E. Jones. . 

Lowdon's Ranch....Trinity 0. E. Lowden. 

Lower Lake Lake John K. Stanley. 

Loyalton Sierra Wm. F. Collins. 

Machado Los Angeles Dionicio Sanez. 

Mad Kiver Humboldt Wm. M. Scott, 

Madelin....^ Lassen M. L. Cheney, 

Magalia Butte Simon Marks. 

'Main Prairie Solano C. H, Merithew. 

Manchester Mendocino C. W. Reinking. 

Mariposa'" Mariposa .Joseph H. Miller. 

Mark AV'est Sonoma Willis Faught. 

Markloeville* Alpine John Simpson. 

Marsl^ll Marin N. V. Ford. 

Martinez'-- Contra Costa Oliver F. James. 

Martin's Ferry Humboldt John F. Martin. 

Mary sville'BGS.... Yuba Barney Eilerman. 

Mayfield Santa Clara George Francis. 

Meadow Valley Plumas Hamilton Brown. 

Mendocino'-' Mendocino L. A. Morgan. 

Mendon El Dorado Henry Edner. 

Menlo Park San Mateo Carrie J. Fletcher. 

Merced'-'- Merced Samuel C. Bates. 

Merced Falls Merced Wm. Nelson. 

Mercuryville Sonoma W. H. Whitton. 

Meridian Sutter John F. Fouts. 

Merrill ville Lassen Osman Folsom. 

Michigan Bar Sacramento Chas. 11. West. 

Michigan Blufl' Placer Carl F. Froitag. 

Middletown Lake Eli«ha Whiting. 

Midway Alameda Phillip Fabian. 

Milford Lassen Louis M. Grill. 

Miller Mendocino Jno. S. Kimball. 

Mill ville Shasta lohn AVhcatloy. 

Mil pitas Santa Clara E. W. Darling. 

Milton Calaveras Abr'm D. Fox. 

Minors ville Trinity F. 'Bates. 

Mission San Jose.. .Alameda J. P. Chamb^rlin. 

Modesto'-' Stanislaus James F. Swain. 

Mohawk Valley Plumas Palmer Bigelow. 

Mokolumnellill-'BCalaveras Wm. Innes. 

Monitor Alpine Joseph Larson. 

Monterey'-'B Monterey Felipe Gomoz. 

Montezuma Tuolumne Albert Fox. 

Monticello Napa Morris Cohen. 

Mont-errat San Diego S. Goldbaum. 

Moon's Ranch Colusa N. Merrill. 

Moore's«i<'lat Nevada Samuel Caldwell. 

Moore's Station Butte Byron Maguire. 

Mormon Island Sacramento Thos. Stofihenson. 

Morro SanLuisObispo..W. E. Stewart. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Mosquito Gulch ....Calaveras John Lewis Hoey. 

Mount Bullion Mariposa Charles Blood. 

Jlount Eden Alameda F. Brustgrun. 

Mount Fairview....San Diego Benj. F. Jones. 

Mount Shasta Siskiyou Cornelius Haight. 

Mountain House. ..Sierra Daniel T. Colo. 

Mountain Ranch. ..Calaveras ..BartolomoDughi. 

Mountain View Santa Clara Honrj' D. Margot. 

Murphy's Calaveras Riley Senter. 

Napa City-'B.G.S. .Napa J. H. Rowland. 

Napa Junction Napa Mrs. E. E. Berg- 
man. 

Nashville El Dorado Jno. E. Ensoy. 

National City San Diego L. W. Dinmond. 

Natividad Monterey Wm. S. .Johnson. 

Navarro Ridge Mendocino Charles Wintzer. 

Nelson Butte R. F. Dockery. 

Nelson Point ."..Plumas Sylvester Myers. 

Nevada City'-'B Nevada H. H. Haskins. 

New Idria Fresno A. Berryman. 

New Almaden Santa Clara F. Fiedler. 

Newburg Park Ventura Egbert Shewbery. 

Newcastle Placer Mrs.M. L. Culver. 

Newville Colusa B. M. Seribner. 

Nicasio Marin Hiram F. Taft. 

Nieolaus Sutter Mrs. A. Arens. 

Niles Alameda Wm. Snyder. 

Nord Butte G. W. Colby. 

NordhofF Ventura L. R. Herberts. 

North Bloomfield..Nevada T. P. Crandall. 

North Columbia. ..Nevada A. L. A%)odrutJ'. 

North San Diego. ..San Diego Patrick O'Neill. 

North San Juan'-'... Nevada Anson B. Swan. 

Nortonville Contra Costa Charles Gwynn. 

Noyo Mendocino A.W.Macpherson 

Oak Bar Siskiyou ...». Daniel Caldwell. 

Oak Grove San Diego.^. A. M. Kenniston. 

Oakdale Stanislaus Robert B. Sydnor. 

Oakland'-B.G.S Alameda J. E. Benton. 

Oak ville Napa William Locker. 

Oasis Inyo Noah T. Piper. 

Oat Valley Yolo 0. E. Parker. 

Olancha Inyo William Walker. 

Old t'reek San LuisObispoGeorge Stone. 

Olema Marin W. 0. L. Crandall. 

Olirapo Colusa F. C. Graves. 

Omega Nevada Wm. Brandon. 

Ophir Placer W. Hathaway. 

Orange Los Angeles N. D. Harwood. 

Oregon House Yuba FieldingDarnielle 

Orleans Humboldt Edwin Benjamin. 

Oro Fino Siskiyou R. A. Wright. 

Ore villa'* B :.... Butte John J. Smith. 

Pacheeo'- Contra Costa Wm. Crichton. 

Paicines San Benito E. E.Kile. 

Pala San Diego William Veal. 

Panama Kern Frank P. May. 

Panamint Inyo G. A. Swasey. 

Panoche Fresno A. M. Poage. 

Pasadena Los Angeles Josiah Locke. 

Paskenta Tehama Henry M. Elkins.. 

Paso Roblos San Luis ObispoG. R. Sanderson. 

Patchin .: Santa Clara...... Josiah S. Fowler. 

Patterson Nevada Henry Morgan. 

Peach Tree San Benito Andrew J. Copley 

Penryn Placer lohn Holder. 

Pentz Butte Manoah Pence. 

Pescadero San Mateo B. G. Stryker. 

Petaluma'-'B.G.S... Sonoma Amasa Morse. 

Petersburg Siskiyou Geo. G. Brown. 

I^otrolia Humboldt Martin Sanders. 

Phoenix Mine Napa Joseph II. Cowan. 

Picacho San Benito Michael Cody. 

Pilot Hill El Dorado William Buchan. 

Pino Flat Sonoma J. G. Thompson. 

Pino Grove Amador J. T. Wheeler. 

Pino Placer James 0. Loomis. 

Pittville Shasta Samuel Gordon. 

Piute Kern F. A. Stouten- 

burgji. 

Placorvill6*B El Dorado A. J. Lowry. 

Plainfiold Yolo J. W. Waldorf. 

Plainsburg Merced A. J. W. Albeck. 

Piano Tulare Wm. Thomson. 



A. EOMAN & CO., Fine and Fancy Stationeiy, 11 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



"D. "W. Laird, San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



26 


PACIFIC 


COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY 




Name. 
Pleasant Grovo 

Creek. 
Pleasant Valley. 


County. 

..Sutter 

..El Dorado 


Postmaster. 

.Charles Bishop. 
.Albert Elkin. 
.1. W. (Joldman. 
..Allan McLean. 
.S. H. Porter. 
..S. G. Lewis. 
.Jos. P. McCabo. 
.J. W. Bransford. 
..G. P. Hill. 
.Henry Mason. 
..Elijah Plummer. 
..Robert Pitt. 
.P. T. Mc(}eo. 
..Castanos Paine. 
..R. P. PowoU. 


Name. 
Santa Margarita. 
Santa Maria 


County. 
.SanLuisObispo 
..Santa Barbara 
..Los Angeles... 

. Ventura 

.Monterey 

.Sonoma 

.Santa Clara.... 

.Ventura 

.Marin 

..Siskiyou 

..Ventura 


Postmaster. 
.William Farrell. 
.S. G. Lock wood. 
.W. H. Williams. 
.Jno. H. Pond. 
.J. M. Soto. 
.Rufus A. Temple. 
.V. M. Whipple. 
.Eugene A. DuvaL 
.J. S. Belrude. 
.Richard Doran. 
.Charles U. Decker 

.Jos. J. Hills. 
.Sigmund Simon. 
.A. Eikerenkotter. 
.David Post. 


Santa Paula 

Santa Rita 

Santa Rosa-^' 

Saratoga 


Ploito 

Plum Valloy 


..Monterey 

..Sierra 

..Amador 

..Contra Costa... 

.Mendocino 

..Napa 

.Sierra 

..Tulare 

..Shasta 

..Mendocino 


Plymouth 

Point of Timber.. 

Porno 

Pope Valley 

Port Wino 

Portorvillo 

Portugee 

Potter Valley 


Saueelito 

Sawyor.'s Bar 

Scenega 

School House 

Station. 

Scott River 

Searsville 

Seaside 

Sobastopol 

Seiad Valley. .....i 

Shady Run 

Shakeiidge 

Shasta-'B 

Shaw's Flat 

Sheridan 

Sherman 

Sherwood Valley 
Shingle Springs.. 

Shingloton. 

Siorra City 

Sierra Valley..,.. 
Silver Mountain 

Slack Canyon 

Slippery Ford 

Sniartsville 


..Siskiyou 

..San Mateo 

..Santa Cruz 


Povvellton 

Prairie 

Prattville 

Princeton 

Punta Arenas 


..Butte 

.Yolo 




..Willard Pratt. 
.David Bentley. 
.LeGrand Morse. 
..R. Dohorty. 

.T. F. Hersey. 

..Edwin Taylor. 
..Wm. H. Bahney. 
..ChaunceyC.Bush. 
..W. J. Wilcox. 
..N. Williams. 
..Charles A. Pino. 
..A. B. Crook. 
..Thos. Thompson. 
oJ. P. Groves. 
..Joseph S. Drew. 
..Lewis G. Smith. 
..Jno. P. Coates. 
.J. D. Pratt. 


..Siskiyou 

..Placer 

..Amador 

.Shasta 

..Tuolumne 

..Placer 

..Santa Clara.... 

..Mendocino 

..El Dorado 

..Shasta 

..Sierra 

..Sierra 

..Alpine 

..San Benito 

..El Dorado 

..Yuba 

..Del Norte 

..Sonoma 

..Merced 

...Nevada 

.Monterey 

..Contra Costa... 


..Chas. M. Bailey. 
.Jas. F. Talbot. 
..Claiborn Foster. 
..L. Wellendorff. 
.A. Bullerdeick. 
..Eug. C. Rogers. 
..Cesar Piatti. 
.Hiram T. Hatch. 
.Simon 0. Pierce. 
.Jno. McCarloy. 
..August C. Bush. 
..Sheldon I. Burton 
.Richard H. Ford. 
.James B. Davis. 
.J. B. McConnaha. 
.T. H. McFaddon. 
.James Brooking. 
..Jas. L. Springer. 
..W. C. Fisher. 
..William Jones. 
..A. Everett. 
.Geo. H. Scammon. 
..William A. Tripp. 
.M. E. VVooster. 
.Harlow L. Street. 
..Edward Porter. 
..J. F. Buchanan. 
..George C. Eagan. 
..William B.Davis. 
..R. Thompson. 
..Jacob Hyatt. 
..J. W. Sebastian. 
.J. S. P. Bass. 
..Chas. 0. Burton. 
..FraneisE. Farley. 
..Harvey Hayne. 
.William Youlon. 
.T. J. Northrup. 
..Jas. G. Taylor. 
..M. C. Blanck. 
•Simon Schooline. 
.Mark Ager. 
..J. C. Partridge. 
..S. Thompson. 
..Jackson Dennis. 
..Benjamin Wood. 
.Howell Davis. 

..Frank G. Patrick. 
..T. A. McFarland. 
..J. 0. Forbes, jr. 
..EphraimClement. 
..A. Pelltreau. 
..G. W. Hodgkins. 
..John M. Force. 
..Edward Green. 
..William B. Rose. 
..Edward Parks. 
..Simon Levi. 
oA. A. Lathrop. 
..William Tennant. 
..K. Miller. 
..Arch. W. Thorp. 
..AVilliam M. Rice. 
..Chas. Constable. 
..Warren Dutton. 
..J. A. Owens. 
..William Childs. 
..Hiram Hayes. 
...Fred. H. Loring. 


.Colusa 


..Mendocino 

..San Mateo 

..Plumas 

..Calaveras 

..Tehama 

..Shasta 

..San Mateo 

..Sacramento .... 

..Solano 

..San Joaquin.. 

..Fresno 

..San Bornardin 
..Shasta 


Quincy 

Railroad Flat 

Red Bluflf---- 


Redwood City'.... 

Richland 

Rio Vista 


Riverdalqji. 

Riverside. .._r..... 
Roaring River.... 


Smith's Ranch.... 

Snelling'-' 

Soda Springs 

Soledad 

Somersville 


Rohnersville 

Roseville 

Rough and Readj 
Round Mountain 

Round Valley 

Routier's Station 

Rowland 

Rutherford 

Sacramento*B.G. 

Saint Helena 

Saint John 

Saint Louis 

Salida 

Salinas'-- 

Salmon Falls 

San Andreas'" 

San Antonio 


..Humboldt 


'..Newida 

...Sh^ta 

..Inyo 

..Sacramento.... 

..El Dorado 

..Napa 

S.Sacramento... 

..Napa 

..Colusa 

..Sierra 

..Stanislaus 


.JohnF.Schroeder 
..Frank Kenyon. 
Jno. E. Jones. 
..A. D. Patterson. 
..Thos. Rowland. 
..Wm. B. Roberts. 

..W. C. Hopping. 
..D. B. Carver. 
..Chas. J. Papst. 
..Daniel Conlin. 
..J. W. McCarthy. 
J. H. McDougall. 


Sonoma 

Sonora'-'BG 

Sequel 

South Butte 

Spadra 

Spsh. DryDigging 
Spanish Ranah... 

Spenceville 

Springville 

Stillwater 

Stockton'-' BGS .... 

Stonewall 

Stony Point 

Strawberry Valle 

Sugar Pine 

Suisun City'-' 

Sulphur Creek.... 

Summit 

Sunolglen 

Susanville* 

Suscol 

Sutter Creek'-' 

Sweetland 

Sycamore 

Table Bluff 


..Sonoma 

..Tuolumne 


..Santa Cruz 

..Sutter 

..Los Angeles... 
s.El Dorado 




..Nevada 

..Ventura 

..Shasta 

..San Joaquin.. 

..San Diego 

..Sonoma 

yYuba 

..Tuolumne 

..Solano.. 

..Colusa 


..El Dorado 

..Calaveras 

..Montere.y 


..Thomas Orr, Sr. 
..Hosea G. Allen. 
..FrancisSylvoster. 
..G. W. Brown. 
oJas. C. Peacock. 
..R. C. Cunningham 
..Jno. W. Goodwin. 
..Wm. A. Ewing. 
.David D. Brady. 
..Wm. E. Harvey. 
..W. Kittridge. 

...James Coey; 
..Samuel M. Lyon. 
.Henry C. Hart. 
..F. Estudillo. 
..Levi B. Holt. 
..E.A.Clark. 
..J. W. Whitney. 
..R. C. Nabb. 
..John L. Shiman. 
O.John J. Simniler. 
..Manuel Arano. 
..E. G. Locke. 
D. George Butchart. 
..John Goodspeed. 
...Thos. J. Wright. 
..Harlow Gilbert. 
..C. P. Tinkham. 
..Fred. H. Pratt. 
..E. F. Mills. 
)o\V. S. Whittaker. 
..John H. Bruen. 
..Wm. W.Thatcher. 
..Wm.H. Spurgeon. 
L.G. P. Tobbetts. 
..Jas. M. Billings. 
..John Brazer. 


San Bernardino'-- 

San Bruno 

SanBuenavontur 
San Diegnito 


..San Bornardin 

...San Mateo 

i-'-'Ventura 

..San Diego 

..San Diego 

..Santa Clara .. 
..Los Angeles... 

>..San Francisco 
..Los Angeles... 


..Alameda 

..Lassen 

..Napa 

..Amador 

..Nevada 




San Fernando.... 
San Francisco 

•-'BGS 

San Gabriel 

San Gregorio 


.Humboldt 

...Sierra 

..Placer 

..El Dorado 

..I'rinity 

..Plumas 

...Tehama 




..San Diego...... 




Table Rock 


San Jose'-'B.G.S.. 

San Juan 

San Leandro 

San Lorenzo 

San Lui;< Obispo* 
San Luis Ranclj.. 

San Luis Rey 

San Marcos 

San Mateo 

San Pablo 


..Santa Clara.... 

..San Benito 

..Alameda 

...Alameda 

..SanLuisObisp 

...Merced 

..San Diego 

..SanLuisObisp 

..San Mateo 

...Contra Costa. 

..San Diego 

..Marin 

..Marin 

..Contra Costa.. 
..San Luis Obisi 
..Santa Clara... 




Taylor's Flat 

Taylorville 

Tehama 

Tehichipa 

Tejon 

Telegraph City... 

Temecula 

Temescal 

Tennaut 

Timber Cove 

Timbuetoo 

Tipton 

Todd's Valley 

Tomales 

Tres Pinos 

Trinidad 

Trinity 

Trinity Centre... 


...Kern 


..San Diego 

...SanBernardii 
..Santa Clara... 

..Sonoma 

..Yuba 

..Tulare 


San Pasqual 

San Quentin 

San Rafael'-' 




...Placer 

..Marin 

..San Benito ... 

..Humboldt 

...Trinity 


San Ysidro 

Sanol 

Santa Ana 

Santa Barbara*! 

Santa Clara'-' 

Santa Cruz'-'BG... 


..Los Angeles., 
i.. Santa Barbara 
..Santa Clara... 
...Santa Cruz... 




..John F. Greeley. 







PAHITSWOETH & CLAUK represent the best Eastern Insurance Companies. 



Send orders for Music to GRAY'S, 105 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



POST OFFICE S — O R E G N. 



27 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Tulare Tulare C. P. Ellis. 

Turlock Stanislaus P. C. Lander. 

Tustin City Los Angeles Colnrabus Tustin. 

Twelve Mile HouseSacramento Z. T. Coy. 

Twenty-six Mile 

House-Stanislaus Austin Smith. 

Two Rocks Sonoma J. B. Schoobeda. 

LTkiah-' Mendocino Henry D. Levy. 

Uncle Sam Lake W. B. II. Dodson. 

Union Merced Patrick Bennett. 

Union House Sacramento G. Brainard. 

Upper Lake Lake R. G. Reynolds. 

Upper Mattole Humboldt Morgan Rudolph. 

Vacaville* Solano Edward S. Smith. 

Vallocito Calaveras F.. Bacigalupi. 

Vallejo-'B .-...Solano M. J. Wright. 

Valley San Diogo John T. Adams. 

Valley Ford Sonoma J. E. Fowler. 

Valley Springs Calaveras Robert Eproson. 

Venado Colusa Phi neas Williams. 

Viejas San Diego W. S. Clendenin. 

Vina Tehama Samuel C. Dicus. 

Visalia-'BG ^^ .... Tulare John A. Keyes. 

Volcano .iB Amador Peter A. Clute. 

Walker .^..Sacramento John AV. Roberts. 

Walnut Creek^.. Contra Costa John Slitz. 

Walnut Grove. ..▼..Sacramento John W. Sharp. 

Wambat ...Tulare Jacob K. Cramer. 

Washington Nevada H. Buisman. 

Washington Plumas Mrs. R. King. 

Washington 

Cbrner^\lameda Wm. H. Mack. 

Waterford.^ .Srotanislaus Henry H. Howell. 



Name. CoQnty. Postmaster. 

Watsonvill6*B Santa Cruz Edward Martin. 

Woavorville-'B.G...Trinity Chas. Hartman. 

Webb's Landing. ..Contra Costa R. V. Snodgrass. 

AVoldon Kern Alex. Forsyth. 

West Berkeley Alameda James S. Higgins. 

West Butte Sutter J. McOpe. 

West Oakland Alameda Henry Y. Baker. 

West Point Calaveras Allen M. Harris. 

Westminster Los Angeles T. C. Hull. 

Wheatland-' Yuba John Landis. 

White River Tulare Levi Mitchell. 

Whitehall Mendocino James M. Smith. 

Whitley's Ford Modoc Henry Longcor. 

Willits Mendocino Hiram Willits. 

Willow Ranch Modoc Andrew Snider. 

Wilraington-'B Los Angeles A.Laubersheimer 

Windsor Sonoma J. J. Lindsay. 

Winters Yolo Lorenzo Moody. 

Witter's Springs. ..Lake Dexter Witter. 

Woodbridgo San Joaquin B. G. Rutledge. 

Woodford's Alpine W. P. MerrilL 

Woodland*B Yolo George D. Fisk. 

Woodside San Mateo Robert 0. Tripp. 

Woodville Tulare James A. Slover. 

Yankee Hill Bntte M. H. Wells. 

Yankee Jim's .-.Placer Timothy Donelin. 

Yo Semite Mariposa .1. M. Hutchings. 

Y^ocumville Siskiyou Jno. P. Fairchild. 

Yolo Yolo C. V. Burke. 

Yorkville Mendocino Elijah M. Hiatt. 

You Bet Nevada Benj. F. Snell. 

Yountville Napa Chas. Lambert. 

Yreka'^BG Siskiyou A. E. Raynes. 

Yuba City Sutter N. S. Hamlin. 



ZemZem . 



.Napa J. C. Owen. 



POST OFFICES— OREGON. 



Name. 
Albany' 



Coun^^ Postmaster. 

...Linn.....'..^. P. H. Raymond. 

Alsea Benton Thomas Russell. 

Alvord Grant J. G. Abbott. 

Amity Yamhill Rich. L. Simpson. 

Antelope Wasco N. W. Wallace. 

Applogate Jackson John Bolt. 

Ashland'-'- Jackson Abel D. Helman. 

Astoria-'G.. Clatsop AVm. Chance. 

Auburn Baker Thomas Smith. 

Aumsville Marion John G. Blakeley. 

Aurora Marion Frederick Giesy. 

Baker City'B Baker George H. Tracy. 

Barron Jackson James Tyler. 

Belknap Springs.. ..Lane R. S. Belknap. 

Bellovue Yamhill John Enory. 

Bethel- Polk A. S. McGraw. 

Bonanza Lake .'..John S. Shook. 

Bridge Creek Wasco Alfred Sutton. 

Brooks Marion Obed (Jreon. 

Brownsborough Jackson Robert H. Brown. 

Brownsville* Linn Peter Hume. 

lUiena Vista Polk J. W. Hobart. 

Butte Creek Clackamas Moses Fried. 

Butter Creek Umatilla John S. Vinson. 

Buttoville Marion Benj. F. Cone. 

Carlton Yamhill Flarias J. Fryer. 

Camas Valley Douglas John W. Arley. 

Camp Crook Lane G.R.lIammersley. 

Camp Harney Grant Wm. .7. Stevens. 

Camp Polk Washington S. W. Hendlan. 

Camp Watson...*.. ..Grant Metier Howe. 

Can by Clackamas Charles Knight. 

Canyon City'-'BG... Grant I), (t. Overholt. 

Cartwright's Lane William Kussull. 

Cayuse Umatilla Frank Ringuet. 

Cedar Mill Washington J. Q. A. Young. 

Central Point Jackson C. Magrudor. 

Chester Lane Tamils I!. Chester. 

Chetco Curry ^. Miller Cooley. 

Clackamas '...Clackamas Wm. Phillips. 

Clarksville Baker Henry Rust. 

Clatskanio : Columbia Enoch W.Conyor.s. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Clear Creek Clackamas Joel Dickson. 

Cleveland Douglas Franklin M. Good 

Clifton Clatsop Vincent Cook. 

Coaledo Coos James C. Kelly. 

Coles Valley Douglas Geo. Shambrook. 

Columbia City Columbia Mrs. M. J. Caples. 

Coos City Coos Henry A. Coston. 

Coquille Coos Jno. T. Moulton. 

Cornelius Washington M. F. Nessly. 

Corvallis' Benton Elias Woodward. 

Cottage Grove Lane D. C. Underwood. 

Cove Union Samuel D.Cowles. 

Cravvfordsville Linn Robert Glass. 

Croswell Lane John T. Gilfry. 

Crow Lane A. Hemenway. 

Cuttingsyille Clackamas Charles Cutting. 

Dallas* Polk John James. 

Damascus Clackamas Norman Darling. 

Dayton Yamhill John Cary. 

Dayville Grant Jas. N. Brackett. 

Dexter. Lane S. Handsacker. 

Dilley Washington Soth Markham. 

Dora Coos John H. Roach. 

Drain Douglas John ^V.Krowson. 

Drift Creek Benton Matthew Brand. 

Drew's Valley Jackson Geo. W. Penland. 

Eagle Creek Clackamas Henry Wilburn. 

Eagle Point Jackson Andrew McNeil. 

East Portland Multnomah Wm- S. Smith. 

El Dorado Baker Thomas Stevens. 

Elk Horn Polk »....Thos. R. Blair. 

Elkton Douglas A.. B. Haines. 

EUensburg Curry .' Mrs.M. E.Huntley 

Empire City Coos , Chas. AV. Tower. 

EnchantodPrairio.Coos Miss A. E. King. 

Eola Polk V— l^Guben Doty. " 

Eugene City''BG...Lano h..A. S. Pattersonr 

Express Ranch Baker. Clark W. Durkeo. 

Fairfield Marion Aug. E. Brayman. 

Forest Grove* Washington Hon. H. Saylor. 



A. EOMAN & CO., Booksellers, Importers, and Publishers,'!! Montgomery St., S. P. 



D. "W. Laird, San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



28 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Fox Valley Linn A bnorD. Gardner. 

Franklin Lane J. H. McCulloch. 

Galos Creek Washington Loster Kay. 

(Jalosvillo DoiiKlas Daniol A. Levins. 

(Janlinor Douglas 7. II. Butlor. 

(Jaribaldi Tillamook William Kalston. 

(■aston Washington 11. L. Marston. 

Gate Creek Lane Thos.M. Martin. 

(Torvais Marion Saml. L. Gaines. 

Glad Tidings Clackamas I'otcr J. Hidings. 

Gloncoo Washington .John T. Fowlor. 

(jooso Lake Lake Robert H. Diinlap 

Goshen Lane John Ilandsakor. 

(irand Hondo Hoik G. 0. Litchfield. 

(Grant's Pass Jackson Eb. Dimmick. 

Grass Hidge Linn A. P. Nye. 

Greenville I Washington J. F. Pierce. 

Halsey Linn John M. Morgan. 

Ilarrisburgh''- Linn Iliram Smith. 

Henryville Coos S. D. McCJrath. 

Ileppner Umatilla G. W. Stansbury. 

llormansville Coos Henry Shrooder. 

Difrhland Clackamas Godfried Wallace. 

Ilillsborn Washington MissM. A.Brown. 

Hood River Wasco Wm. P. Watson. 

Hubbard Marion Aaron B. Gleason. 

Humboldt Basin... Baker Paul L.Shumway. 

Independence Polk Wm. L. Hodgin. 

Iowa Slough Coos Riley W. Nosier. 

Island City Union Myndert Sterling. 

Jacksonville-' Jackson Max Mullor. 

Jefferson Marion Chas. B. Roland. 

Jewel! Clatsop Wm. H. Kirkpat- 

rick. 

Joppa Washington F. AV. Webster. 

Jordan Linn Elias Forgery. 

Jordan Valley Baker John E. Baxter. 

Junction City Lane J. W. Brasfield. 

Keppner Umatilla David A. Herran. 

Kilchis Tillamook Wm. D. Stillwell. 

Kind's Valley Benton C. B. Crosno. 

Kirby Josephine Sam'l \V. Sawyer. 

Knappa Clatsop Auren Knapp. 

La Fayette- Yamhill John W. Watts. 

La Grande- Union John Cramblit. 

LangoU's Valley... Jackson J. T. Fulkorson. 

Lebanon Linn S. H. Clanghton. 

Leland Josephine Sam'l Harknoss. 

Lena Umatilla Chas. E. Hinton. 

Lewisville Polk Abraham Wing. 

Lincoln Polk Lewis Abrams. 

Linkville .Jackson George Nourse. 

Little Elk Benton H. E. Baker. 

Long Tom Lane Henry C.Huston. 

Looking-Glass Douglas H. Lellinsky. 

Lost River Lake W. H. Horton. 

Marion Marion R. H. Rutherford. 

Marshfield" Coos Andrew Nasburg. 

Marshland Columbia Z. S. Bryant. 

Marvsville Baker Robb C. (xeorge. 

McKinzie Bridge... Lane P. C. Renfrew. 

McMinnville- Yamhill John Spencer. 

Middleton Washington F. A. Olds. 

Midway Umatilla Henry C. Myers. 

Millers Linn Henry Newman. 

Milton Umatilla Louis F. Holman. 

Milwaukie Clackamas Edmund Ross. 

Mitchell Wasco G. W. Cranston. 

Mohawk Lane Miss Jennie Scott. 

Mohilla Clackamas Andrew J. Stubbs 

Monitor Marion Jos. P. Eagon. 

Monmouth Polk AV. Waterhouse. 

Monroe Benton W. S. Humphrey. 

Monument „Grant P. S. Wilson. 

Morgans ville Lake J. P. Roberts. 

Mount Pleasant Linn E. T. Richardson. 

Mount Hood Wasco Mrs. A. Shanon. 

Mountain Dale Washington David 0. Quick. 

Murphy Josephine Ephraiiu Park. 

Myrtle Creek Douglas T. H. Gobbert. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Needy Clackamas Wm. Moroland. 

Nehalom Tillamook Samuel Corwin. 

Nostocton ; Tillamook F. M. Lamb. 

New berg Yamhill Simeon Albe. 

Newollsvillo Marion Chas. 0. Polland. 

Newport Benton Fred. H. Sawtello. 

Newton Benton F. M. Carter. 

North CanyonvilloDouglas Ben. J. Sideman. 

North Yamhill Yamhill W. J. McConnoll. 

Norton Clackamas Z. C. Norton. 

Oakland-'- Douglas Jas. A. Sterling. 

Olex Wasco Joseph II. Butlor. 

Olney Clatsop Mrs. M. A. Gray. 

Oregon City-' Clackamas John M. Bacon. 

Orodell Union W. J. Snodgrass. 

Oswego Clackamas E. W. Crychton. 

Ott Coos Chris. Lohnherr. 

Parkerville Grant Mrs. E. Newton. 

Peak Washington B. F. George. 

Pendleton Umatilla Lot Livcrniore. 

Peovia Linn Geo. \V. Davis. 

Porrydale Polk J. W. McGrew. 

Philomath Benton J. L- Shipley. 

Phuenix Jackson T. G. Roames. 

Pilot Rock Umatilla A. J. Sturtevant. 

Pine Linn E. Willoughby. 

Pleasant Hill Lane R. M. Callison. 

PortOrford I Curry A. D. Wolcott. 

Portland-'BGS Multnomah Goo. E. Cole. 

Powell's Valley... .Multnomah T. K. Williams. 

Prairie City Grant Jules Lo Bret. 

Prichard Baker R. A. Pierce. 

Prineville AVasco D. E. Thomas. 

Rainier Columbia Dean Blanchard, 

Randolph Coos A. Pershbaker. 

Rickreal ...Polk ...Zed. Rosendorf. 

River Side Columbia Jos. Banner. 

Rock Point Jackson B. Haymond. 

Roseburg-'- Douglas H. C. Stanton. 

Saint^felens Columbia B. F. Giltner. 

Saint John's Mulwiomah B. 0. Severance. 

Sain-t J oseph Yamhill Jas. H. Olds. 

Sakjm-'B Marion Thos. B. Rickey. 

Saui'* Valley Jackson Edwin Morgan. 

Sand Ridge Union Cyrus W. Enloe. 

Saridy Clackamas Richard Gerdes. 

Saime's Island Columbia H. J. Mclntire. 

Scapjioose Columbia S. T. Gosa. 

Scholl's Ferry Washington Jas. R. Bennett. 

Scio Linn B. W. Redman. 

Scott's Wasco D. G. Leonard. 

Sco^tsburg Douglas James Lyster. 

Seaside House Clatsop S. R. Stanley. 

Shedd Linn A. Wheeler. 

Sheridan Yamhill A. S. Saylor. 

Silverton Marion Jos. A. Wright. 

Sitkum Coos G. W. Bates. 

Siuslaw Lane John Simpson. 

Skipanon Clatsop David E. Pease. 

SlateCreek Josephine J. P. Knight. 

Sodaville Linn David P. Foot. 

Spanish Hollow.... Wasco Jesse Eaton. 

Sparta Union Wm. W. Ross. 

Spencer Creek Lane Joseph F. Amis. 

Sprague River Lake J. W. Gearhart. 

Springfield Lane Albert G. Hovey. 

Springwater Clackamas Geo. A. Crawford. 

Stayton Marion S. D. MeCauIey. 

Stone Baker L. P. Colburn. 

Summorville Union W. H. Parrcnt. 

Summit Benton H. N. Bowman. 

Sumter Baker F. W. Webster. 

Sweet Homo Linn Henry Eckerman. 

Tangent Linn Z. Beard. 

Ten Mile Douglas William Irwin. 

The Dalles-- Wasco Mrs.E. M. Wilson. 

Tillamook Tillamook G. W. Fearnsido. 

Toledo Benton Henry P. Butler. 

Trent Lane H. 0. Morgan. 

Tualitan AVashington Wm. Greenwood. 

Tulo Lake Lake Elkanah Whitney 

Turner Marion R. 0. Thomas. 

Tygh Valley Wasco Hezekiah Staley. 



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POST OFFICE S — N E V A D A. 



29 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Umatilla"- Umatilla James H. Koontz. 

Union Union George Wright. 

Upper Oehoco Wasco JamesH. Miller. 

Utter City Coos William Chance. 

Waldo Josephine A. B. Mollwain. 

Wallowa Union F. C. Bramlett. 

Waltervillo Lane George Millican. 

Warm Springs Wasco M. W. Walker. 

Waterloo Linn S. 0. Gager. 

AVost Chehalem Yamhill J. L. Davis, 

West Union Washington S. A. llolcomb. 

Weston Umatilla E. M. Purinton. 

Westjiort Clatsop John West. 

Wheatland Yamhill Peter Barendregt, 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Wilbur Douglas Goo. W. Grubbe. 

Willamette Forks.. Lane Jesse Simmons. 

Willamette SloughMiiltnomah Thos. .J. Howell. 

Willoiighby Wasco Mrs. L. V. Wilson. 

Willow Forks Umatilla A. C. Pettys. 

Willow Springs Jackson Julius T. Kellogg. 

Wingville Baker Z. Bryant. 

Woodburn Marion A. Mathiot. 

Yainax Jackson James Harer. 

Yoncalla Douglas C. E. Tracy. 

Zona Polk E. W. Cooper. 

Zion Clackamas W. H. H. Wade. 



POST OFFICES— NEVADA. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Aurora-' Esmeralda J. M. Meredith. 

Austin ■■B.G Lander William Gibson. 

Battle Mountain. ..Lander Albert Dawes. 

Belmont'- Nye H. P. Stimler. 

Bellville Esmeralda Alsop J. Holmes. 

Beowawe Eureka ...Oliver Benson. 

Buel Elko W. F. McMillan. 

Bullion Elko L. T. Morgan. 

Bullionville Lincoln Julius Sultan. 

Camp Halleck Elko M. C. Crosby. 

Camp McDermitt.. Humboldt F. P. Brougham. 

Carlin Elko Thos. Holmes. 

Carson City-'B Ormsby Benj. L. Winnie. 

Cherry Creek White Pine 0. H. Grey. 

Clover Valley Lincoln Lyman L. Woods. 

Columbus Esmeralda Alex. Spencer. 

Coral Hill Elko Geo. H.Sheppard. 

Cornucopia Elko C. F. Meacham. 

Dayton Lyon J. A. Bonham. 

Diamond White Pino L. L. Higbie. 

Dry Creek ELoji A. B. Miller. 

Duck water Nye.-. Isaac Irwin. 

Dun Glen Humboldt D. P. Crook. 

Eberhardt White Pine Adam Johnston. 

Elko--B Elko Thos. N. Stone. 

Ellsworth Nye P. 0. Tyler. 

Empire City Ormsby James Morris. 

Eureka* Eureka John F. Kamsey. 

Franktown Washoe Nath. Holmes. 

Galena Lander Benj. F. Wilson. 

Genoa Douglas .John H. Davis. 

Glenbrook Douglas Michael Spooner. 

Golconda Humboldt MeredithMeader. 

Gold Hill Storey S. W. Chubbuck. 

Halleck Elko J. S. Fenn. 

Hamilton^B White Pine HarveyCarpenter. 

Hiko Lincoln Chas. G. Heath. 

Hot Creek Nye L. F. Joslyn. 

Humboldt House... Humboldt L. A. Blakosley. 

Huntington Elko George W. Taft. 



lone City Nye.. 

Jefferson Nye.. 

Junction Nye.. 



.Geo. W. Veatch. 



.G. 0. Kilbourne. 
.A. E. Minium. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Lida Esmeralda Thomas Shaw. 

Lovelocks Humboldt George Lovelock. 

Mason Valley Esmeralda David Cooper. 

Mill City Humboldt Augusta B.Gould. 

Mineral City White Pino Henry Hilp. 

Mineral Hill Elko Thos. J. Isbell. 

Morey Nye M. F. Randolph. 

Mountain City Elko Thomas Paroz. 

Oreana Humboldt L. II. Carpenter. 

Palisade Lander John Marchant. 

Paradise Valley... .Humboldt J. B. Merchant. 

Pine Grove Esmeralda A. D. Kobinson. 

Piocho- Lincoln Chas. F. Meyers. 

Piute Eureka Junius M. North. 

Poeville Washoe... J. G. Law. 

Reno- Washoe S. M. Jamison. 

Reveille Nye C. W. Paino. 

Ruby Hill Eureka Chas. Schulze. 

Ruby Valley Elko Ira D. Wines. 

Rye Patch Humboldt J. H. Borland. 

Saint Thomas Lincoln) Alfred Frye. 

San Antonio Nye J. G. MitchelL 

Schellbourne White Pine William Burk. 

Sheridan Douglas Chas. Nathan. 

Silver City Lyon T. S. Davenport. 

Silver Peak Esmeralda J. H. Lyon. 

Spruce Mount Elko T. Callaghsm. 

Sutro Lyon Roberts. Raw. 

Sweetwater Esmeralda Henry Williams. 

Tecoma Elko C. W. Burton. 

Toano Elko F. F. Marx. 

Treasure City White Pine J. L. Robertson. 

Troy Nye Charles Palmer. 

Tuscarora Elko A. E. Lancaster. 

Twin River Nye John G. Prague. 

Tybo Nye Chas. Garrett. 

Unionville Humboldt Fred. X. Banks. 

Verdi Washoe Geo. W. Foulk. 

Virginia City-'BGSStorey D. 0. Adkison. 

Wabuska Lyon H. F. Swasoj'. 

Wads worth Washoe Edwin Fowler. 

Walker River Douglas John Hoye. 

AVashoe City Wa.shoe Peter V. Marker. 

Wellington Esmeralda Joe. P. Davis. 

Wells Elko R. P. HamiU. 

White Rock Elko B. B. Painter. 

Winlock Lewis C. C. Paggett. 

Winnomucca Humboldt Frank C. Robins. 



o 

c*- 

o 
I—" 

!-•• 

o 



t-t 

C/3 

d 
o 



M 









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30 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



POST OFFICES— WASHINGTON TERRITORY. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Algernon Lewis C. B. McCready. 

Alpowa Walla Walla Daniel B. Favor. 

Arcadia Mason E. A. Wilson. 

Attanam Yakima William Bland. 

Battle Ground Clarke B.W.N. Levericho 

Beaver Thurston Chas. P. Judson. 

Black Kiver King (ieo. W. Hardin. 

Blakeloy Kitsap William Ronton. 

Block House Klikitat Michael Green. 

IJoistfort Lewis John H. Miller. 

Brookfiold Pacific Joa. G. Megler. 

Brucoport Pacific William Marks. 

Brush Prairie Clarke James Rambo. 

Burksville Walla Walla Marshall B. Burk 

Cascades Skamania S. M. Hamilton. 

Castle Rock Cowlitz Wm. Huntington. 

t'athlamet Wahkiakum Alex. D. Birnio. 

Cedar Creek Whatcom John Ludlow. 

Cedar Grove Whatcom McK. T. Tawes. 

Cedarville Chehalis James Smith. 

Contreville Snohomish Robt. Freeman. 

Chehalis Lewis John T. Newland. 

Chehalis Point Chehalis Glenn Peterson. 

Claquato Lewis Geo. J. Hoguo. 

Colfax Whitman Thos. J. Smith. 

Collins Landing Skamania William Collins. 

Columbus Klikitat Amos Stark. 

Coupeville Island 0. H. Morgan. 

Coveland Island Wm. E. Carlton. 

Cowlit/. Lewis Louis L. Dubean. 

Crab Creek Stevens W. A. Busey. 

Dayton Walla Walla. ...Jesse N. Day. 

Dwamish King Henry H. Miller. 

Eagle Cliff. Wahkiakum A. M. Meyers. 

Elhi Pierce John (Jrainger. 

EUensburg Yakima John A. Shoudy. 

Elma Chehalis J. T. Young. 

Ewartsvillo Whitman Giles D. Wilber. 

Ball City King Wm. H. Taylor. 

Fidalgo Whatcom Wm. Munks. 

Fori Colville Stevens C. H.Montgomery. 

Four Lakes Stevens Ed. J. Turner. 

Frec^port Cowlitz V. N. Wallace. 

Gleneden Lewis J. W. Ingalls. 

Goldendale Klikitat Wm. Oldham. 

Guemes Whatcom H. P. O'Bryant. 

Hangman's Creek..Stevens Mrs. L. L. Wimpy 

Hoquiam Chehalis Edwd. Campbell. 

Kalama Cowlitz E. G. Ingalls. 

Kittitass Yakima J. D. Olmstead. 

Klikitat Klikitat Henry T. Loins. 

Knappton Pacific P. T. Dickenson. 

Konewock Yakima Isaac A. Flint. 

La Conner Whatcom George Gaches. 

Lake View Pierce Moses Ward. 

Lewis River Clarke John H. Simmon. 

Lightvillo Mason Erastus A. Light. 

Little Falls Lewis George Goudior. 

Lopez Island San Juan H. E.Hutchinson. 

Lowell Snohomish E. D. Smith. 

Lumni Whatcom CatharineMcDon- 

ough. 
Lynden Whatcom' H. A. Judson. 

Martin's Bluff Cowlitz Wm. H. Martin. 

Meadow Brook Lewis R. T. Crawford. 

Montesano Chehalis Chas. N. Byle,s. 

Monticello. Cowlitz C. Huntington. 

Mossy Rock Lewis Mrs. L. Winston. 

Mount Coffin Cowlitz Crumline LaDu. 

Mukilteo Snohomish Jacob D. Fowler. 

Nanum Yakima D. J. Schnebly. 

Napavine Lewis James Urquhart. 

Neah bay Clallam Henry Landes 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

New Dungeness Callam AVilliam King. 

New Tacoma Pierce Wm. H. Fife. 

Nowaukum Lewis H. C. Sherey. 

NowaukumPrairioLowis Marcell Perlier. 

Nooksachk Whatcom Wm. Hampton. 

Oak Point Cowlitz A. S. Abornethy. 

Oakland Mason Walter E. Willey. 

Oakville Chehalis James R. Harris. 

Olympia'-B.G Thurston Andrew J. Burr. 

Orcas Island San Juan Robert McCanie. 

Owensburg AVhitman A. J. Wisner. 

Oysterville Pacific John Briscoe. 

Palouse Whitnaan Jesse Davis. 

Pataha Walla Walla A. J. Favor. 

Pataha Prairie Walla Walla Ransom Long. 

Pekin Cowlitz John W. Caples. 

Pine Grove Stevens Wm. A. Sanders. 

Pioneer Clarke Wm. Field. 

Pleasant Grove Yakima S. R. Geddis. 

Port Angeles Clallam Marcel. Huntoon. 

Port Discovery .Jefferson Geo. W. Downs. 

Port Gamble Kitsap D. B. Jackson. 

Port Ludlow Jefferson Arthur Phinney. 

Port Madison Kitsap P. J. Primrose. 

Port Townsend* Jefferson James Seavoy. 

Puyallup Pierce Chas. B. Bobbins. 

Riverside Pacific Asahel K. Bush. 

Rock Creek Stevens Henry Wells. 

Rosalia Stevens J. M. Whitman. 

Samish Whatcom William Dean. 

San Juan San .Juan I. Katz. 

Satsop Chehalis John Brady. 

Seabeck Kitsap Richard Holyoke 

Soattle=''B.G King Wra. H. Gilliam. 

Sehome Whatcom Sutcliffe Baxter. 

Solah Yakima Augusta Clemen. 

Somiahmoo Whatcom J. E. Murne. 

Sharon Chehalis Seburn Wylie. 

Silver Creek Lewis John Tucker. 

Silver Lake Cowlitz Drusilla Germond 

Skagit Whatcom Ed. McAlpino. 

Skaiuokawa ....Wahkiakum Albert B. Moe. 

Skokomish Mason John McReavy. 

Skookumchuck Lewis C. Crosley, Jr. 

Slaughter King Alex. S. Hughes. 

Snohomish SnohomiSh E. C. Ferguson. 

Snoqualmio King .J W. Borst. 

South Bend Pacific John Wood. 

Spokane Bridge Stevens M. M. Cowley. 

Spokane Falls Stevens C. F. Yatone. 

Squak King James Bush. 

Steilacoom City-'-... Pierce ; Julius Dickens. 

Steptoe Whitman J. C. Richardson. 

Stoughton Clarke M. B. Jones. 

Sumner Pierce J. C. Kincard. 

Tacoma'^ Pierce August Walters. 

Tanalquot Thurston D. J. Hubbard. 

Tenino Thurston F. R. Brown. 

Trudden Whatcom Thos. E. Barrett. 

Tukannon Walla Walla .John Kirk. 

Tulalip ; Snohomish Jas. Comerford. 

Tumwater Thurston Sam. G. Ward. 

Union Flat Whitman M. H. Murton. 

Union Ridge Clarke Stephen Shobert. 

Unity Pacific John Hunter. 

Utsaiady .Island Thomas Cranney. 

Vancouver'" Clarke J. Eddings. 

Waitsburgh'^- Walla Walla Wm. N. Smith. 

Walker's Prairie...Stevons F. W. Perkins. 

Walla Walla-'B.G. Walla Walla Mrs. C. F. Smith. 

Wallula Walla Walla A. C. Short. 

Waterford Wahkiakum A. S. Hapgood. 

^Vashougal Clarke George W. Hart. 

Whatcom Whatcom James Power. 

\t hite Kivt r King C. M. Vandoron. 

White Salmon Klikitat Jas. R. Warner. 



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POST OFFICE S — I DAHO TERRITORY. 



31 



Name. County. Pcstmaster. 

Winlock Lewis Chris. Pagett. 

Woodard's Liand'g. Pacific E. A. Soule. 



Name. County. 

Yakima Yakima 

Yelm Thurston 



Postmaster. 
.Joseph Schanno. 
.M. M, Metcalf. 



POST OFFICES— IDAHO TERRITORY. 



Name. 
Atlanta 



County. Postmaster. 

.Alturas Nelson Davis. 



Beaver Canon Oneida L. A. Harknoss. 

Bloomington Oneida Wm. Hulmo. 

Boise City-B.G.S..Ada .John A. Post. 

Centreville Boise Peter J. Moore. 

Clear \yator Nez Perce J. F. Silverwood. 

Clifton Oneida II. N. Howell. 

Corbett's Station. ..Oneida Mrs. A. Corbett. 

Eagle Rock Onoida Israel Heald. 

Elk City Nez Perce John G. Ziegle. 

Emmettvillo Ada Nathan Martin. 

Fairview Owyhee Charles Umber. 

Falk's Store Ada Jas W. Patton. 

Fi.sh Haven Oneida John Stock. 

Florence Idaiio Andrew Floyd. 

Fort Hall Oneida Hugh Travers. 

Fort Lemhi Leuihi N. J. Andrews. 

Franklin Oneida L. H. Hatch. 

Gentile Valley Oneida Wm. H. King. 

Georgetown Oneida Henry A. Lewis. 

Horse Shoe Bond... Boise Henry H. Clark. 

Idaho City-'- Boise S. C. Silsby. 

Indian Valley Ada John G. Curtis. 

Iowa Bar Oneida Wm. Hartley. 

John Day's Creek. Idaho J. H. Elfers. 

Junction Lemhi A. M. Stephenson 

Keenan City Oneida Jos. W. Perkins. 

Lapwai Nez Perce David C. Kelly. 

Leesburgh Lemhi James D. Wood. 

Lewiston-'G Nez Perce .Mex. McGregor. 

Liberty Oneida Edwin N. Austin. 

Lower Boise Ada C. J. F. Peterson. 

MaladCity Oneida Emory J. Davis. 

Manuel Ranch Idaho John J. Manuel. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Market Lake Oneida John N. Adams. 

Middleton Ada M. K. Jenkins. 

Montpelior Oneida David Osborn. 

Mount Idaho Nez Perce Loyal P. Brown. 

Newsom Creek Nez Perce D. B. McConnell. 

Ovid Oneida N. C. Ediefson. 

Oxford Oneida A. P. Welchman. 

Paradise Valley. ...Nez Perce Sam'l B. Edwards. 

Paris Oneida John U. Stucki. 

Payotto Store Ada A. J. McFarland. 

Payetteville Ada George W. Hunt. 

Polouse Bridge Nez Perce James T. Atwood. 

Pen d'Oreille Kootenai Shep. Warren. 

Piorco City Shoshone John Kodgers. 

Pino Creek Nez Perce William brewer. 

Pine Grove Alturas G. D. Golden. 

Pioneersvilie Boise J. M. Cannadj'. 

Placorville oise J. H. Myer. 

Pleasant Valley.. ..Oneida Leo Mantle. 

Quartzburgh Boise Richard G. Allen. 

Rocky Bar Alturas W. P. Callahan. 

Ross Fork Onoida Stanton G. Fisher. 

Saint Charles Oneida J. Pugmire. 

Salmon City Lumhi George L. Shoup. 

Salubria Ada E. S. Jewell. 

Shearer's Ferry Idaho F. A. Shearer. 

Silver City-:B Owyhee Edw. H. Moore. 

Slate Creek Idaho D. L. Noggle. 

Soda Springs Oneida W. W. Sterrett. 

Squaw Creek Boise Wm. S. Mitchell. 

Thorn Creek Nez Perce H. W. Deacon. 

Washington Idaho A. Freidenrick. 

Washoe Ada James Hanity. 

Woiser Ada Woodson Jeffreys. 

Weston Oneida John H. Clarke. 



POST OFFICES— MONTANA TERRITORY. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Agency Missoula L. S. Tesson. 

Argenta Beaver Head....G. D. French. 

Bannack City* Beaver Head A. F. Wright. 

Beartown Deer Lodge Denis Manton. 

Beaver Creek Jefferson John W. Rogers. 

Blackfoot City Deer Lodge C. G. Birdseye. 

Boulder Valley Jefferson Hiram Cook. 

Bozeman'^ Gallatin Josiah H. Taylor. 

Burnt Pine Beaver Head D. R. Parker. 

Butte City Deer Lodge Anson Ford. 

Cable City Deer Lodge Michael Kaiser. 

Camp Baker Meagher William Gaddis. 

Canton Meagher Wm. E. Tierney. 

Canyon Creek Lewis <k Clarke. Wm. S. Negus. 

Canyon Ferry Meagher J. V. Stafford. 

Central Park Gallatin V. A. CockrelL 

Centreville Meagher James Barker. 

Cicero Madison Jean B. Laurin. 

Clagott Jefferson A. C. Quaintance. 

Clancy Jefferson G. W. Crane. 

Clarkston Lewis & Clarke. J. F. Wilson. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Cold Spring Jefferson AVm. Flaherty. 

Corvallis Missoula Maurice Block. 

Chico Gallatin John Cone. 

Darling Beaver Head Jos. A. Brown. 

Deer Lodge City*GDeer Lodge Edw. S.Stackpole. 

Diamond City Meagher Leopold Marks. 

Divide Deer Lodge C. F. Wunderlich. 

Emigrant Gallatin F. Bottler. 

Emmetsburgh Doer Lodge M. Wallswork. 

Etna Missoula A. Burker. 

Fish Creek Madison Harrison Jordan. 

Flat Head Lake Missoula V. H. Coombs. 

Forest City Missoula Tho.s. William's. 

Fort Benton Choteau John W. Power. 

Fort Shaw'- Lewis & Clarke J. H. McKnight 

French Bar Lewis & Clarke Thos Gray. 

French Gulch Deer Lodge A. M. Morrison. 

Frenchtown Missoula H. Lassere. 

Gaffney Madison Owen Gaffney. 



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San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



82 PACIFIC 


COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 


Name. 


County. 


Postmaster. 


Name. 


County. 


Po.stmaster. 


Gallatin 


..Gallatin 


...W. T. Harris. 


Radersburgh 


..Jefferson 


.Jas. R. WestoD. 




..Door Lodge... 
..Door Lodge... 


...H. B. McCleary. 


Red Bluff 


Mnrlison 




(xroenwood 


...Henry S. Clarke. 


Rod Mount'nCity..Doer Lodge... 


.H. L. Wolf. 


Gwendale 


..Deer Lodge... 


...E. P. Thomas. 


Rochester 


...Madison 


..W. H. Archer. 


Ilainilton 


..Gallatin 


...Albert Small. 


Saint Ignatius... 


..Missoula 


.James Burns. 


Harrisburgh 

Harrison 


.Door Lodge... 
..Madison 


..K. K. Richards. 
...Nelson J. Isdell. 








Sheridan 


..Madison 


.R. 1'. Batoman. 


llaydon 


..(Jallatin 


...Mrs.R.E.Ferroll. 


Silver Bow 


..Doer Lodge.... 


.Isaac Dean. 


Helena'-B.G 


..Lewis & Clarke S. IL Grouse. 


Silver City 


..Lewis & Clarke 


..Philip Green. 


Helmvillo 


..Deer Lodge... 


...'Vlvin Lincoln. 


Silver Star 


..Madison 


..John Anderson. 


llorso Plains 


..Missoula 


...James K. Clark. 


Skalkaho 


..Missoula 


.David C. Elliott. 


Jofforson City 


..Jefferson 


...N. Morriman. 


Springville 

Sterling 






..Madison 


.Chas. H. Peck. 


Jottorson Island. 


.Jefferson 


...Joseph Gans. 


Stevensville 


..Missoula 


.J. A. Lomme. 


Junction 


..Madison 


...John S. Mearns. 


Summit 


..Madison 


.H. D. Rossiter. 








Sun River 


..Lewis AClarke 


..C. A. Bull. 


Laurin 


..Madison 


...Jean B. Laurin. 


Superior 


..Missoula 


..Geo. Conford. 


Lewis 


..Madison 


...P. D. Hay ward. 








Lincoln 


..Deer Lodge.. 


...Alfred P. Rose. 


Trout Creek 




.Rich'd D. Cotter. 
.M. H. Lott. 


Twin Bridges 


..Madison 


McClellan Gulch. 


..Deer Lodge... 


...Charles Pryae. 








Meadow Crook.... 


.Madison 


...W. P.Walton. 


Unionville 


..Lewis &Clarke..Philip Constans. | 


Missoula'' 


.Missoula 


...W.S.H. Dickinson 














Virginia City-''BGSMadison 


..F. C. Deimling. 


Nevada City 


..Madison 


...Nicholas Carev. 








New Chicago 


..Deer Lodge... 


...J.A.Featherman. 


Warm Springs... 


..Deer Lodge.... 


.Elise Girard. 








Washingt'n Gulch. Deer Lodge.... 


.Patrick S. White. 


Phillipsburgh 


..Deer Lodge.. 


...Hugh Bell. 


Watson 


..Beaver Head. 


.I'hilip Lovell. 


Pikes Peak 


..Deer Lodge... 


...T. C. Brady. 


Whitehall 


..Jefferson 


.E. G. Brooks. 


Pioneer 


..Deer Lodge... 


..George Perry. 


Willow Creek 


.:Gallatin 


.Terry Burns. 


Quartz Creek 


..Missoula 


...Allen Boice. 


Yreka 


...Deer Lodge.... 


.Wm. Ferguson. 




POST OFFICES UTAH TERRITORY 




Name. 


County. 


Postmaster. 


Name. 


County. 


Postmaster. 


Adamsville 


..Beaver 


...Alex. G. Ingram. 


Forest City 


..Utah 


..Will Chislett. 


Alma 


..Weber 


...E. Ellsworth. 


Fort Hamblin 


..Washington.... 


.E. K. Westover. 


Ali'ine City 


..Utah 


...T. J. McCullough. 


Fountain Green.. 


..San Pete 


..R. R. Lewellyn. 


A.]ta. 


..Salt Lake 

..Utah 


...V. M. Street. 
...L. B. Harrington. 


Glendale 


..Kane 


.Jas. Leithead. 


American Fork.. 


Annabella 


..Sevier 












Goshen 


..Utah 


..J. B. Johnson. 


Bear Eiver City.. 


Box Elder 


...Jacob Hanson. 


Grafton.... 


...Kane 

..Salt Lake 

..Tooele 


.Sam'l Stanworth. 
.G. Silverborg. 
..Miss M.J.Jeffries. 


..Beaver 

..Washington.. 


...William P. Pole. 
...Joel H. Johnson. 


Bellevue 


Grantsville...". 


Bingham Canyon 


..Salt Lake 


...Isador Morris. 


Greenville 


...Beaver 


..Henry Blackner. 


Brigham City-'..- 
Brinton 


Box Elder 










..Salt Lake 


...David B. Brinton. 








Butlerville 


..Salt Lake 


...Philander Butler. 


Hamilton's Fort 


..Iron 


..J. W. Middleton. 








Harrisburg 


..Washington.... 


.Revils Fuller. 


Call's Fort 


..Box Elder 


...R. R. Beattie. 


Harrisville 


..Weber 


.StephenF. Wilson. 


Cedar City 


..Iron 


...John Chatterly. 


Heber 


..Wasatch 


..John Gallagher. 


Cedar Valley 


..Utah 


...J. A. Rodeback. 


Hebron 


..Washington.... 


.George H. Crosby. 




..Davis 


...Wm. Reeves. 


Herriman 


..Salt Lake 


. Wm.H. Freeman. 


Centre 


..Tooele 


...William Ajax. 


Hillsdale 


..Kane 


.Seth Johnson. 


Charleston 


...Wasatch 


....Joseph McKae. 


Holden 


..Millard 


.Benjamin Bennet. 


Chicken Creek.... 


.Juab 


...L. M. Palmer. 


Homansville 


..Utah 


..C. Sunomersdorf. 


Circle Valley. 


..Piute 


....Lewis 0. Hardy. 


Hooper 


..Weber 


..H. W. Manning. 


(JlarKSton 


..Cache 


...Simon Smith. 


Huntsville 


..Weber 


..William Halls. 


Coalville 


..Summit 


...John Boyden. 


Hvde Park 


..Cache 


.Mrs. A. G. Hydo. 


Columbia 


...Tooele 


....Arthur D. Foster. 


Hyrum 


..Cache 


.James Unsworth. 


Corinne-" 


. Box Elder 


...T. J. Black. 








Cove Creek 


..Millard 


...Thos. Mather. 


Inverary 


..Sevier 


.Wm. A. Stewart. 


Croyden 


..Morgan 


...Chas. Bunting. 


Iron City 


..Iron 


..Ebenezer Hanks. 


Deer Creek 


..Utah 


....Jas. H. Smails. 


Jacob City 


..Tooele 


..Isaac Spangler. 


Deweyville 


..Box Elder 


....John C. Dewey. 


Johnson 


..Kane 


.S. E. Johnson. 


Diamond 


..Juab 


...Wm. H. Shock. 










..Salt Lake 

t..Kane 


...Berj. Green. 
...Robert W. Reeve. 


Kamas 

Kanab 


..Summit 

..Kane 


.Geo. B. Leonard. 
..John T. Eagon. 


Duncan's Retrea 








Kanarraville 


..Kane 


.Albert B. Gnffin. 


Echo City 


..Summit 


...Elias Asper. 


Kanosh 


..Millard 


.W. W. Damron. 


Eden 


..Weber 


....J. M. Ferrin. 


Kavsville 


..Davis 


..Jas. W. Walker. 


Ephraim 


..San Pete 


....George Irwin. 


Kelton 


..Box Elder 


.Merlin C. Sabin. 


Eureka 


..Juab 


...A. H. Noon. 














Lake Point 


..Tooele 


..Peter Clinton. 


Fair View 


..San Pete 


...L. Wilson. 


Laketown 


..Rich 


.W. B. T. Gibbons. 


Fairfield 


..Utah 


...Henry Snyder. 


Leeds 


..Washington.... 


.Chas.A. Connelly. 


Farmington 

Favette 




...Walter Walker. 


Lehi City 

Levan 


..Utah 

..Juab 


..David Evans. 
.Heber Hartley. 


..San Pete 


...James Mellor. 


Fillmore City 


..Millard 


...Andrew Henry. 


Lewis 


..Tooele 


.B. F. Shaw. 



Live Agents in country towns wanted by FAENSWOETH «S; CLAEK, S. E 



GEAY'S New Music Store, 105 Eaarny Street, San Francisco. 



Kame. County. Postmaster. 

Logan ■• Cache Chas. B. Robbins. 

Lynne Weber... Lewis Taft. 

Manti ' San Pote Jacob Hern. 

Marysvale Piute Mile.? Durkee. 

Meadow Millard Edwin Stott. 

Mendon Cache John Donaldson. 

Midway Wasatch D. Van Wagoner. 

Mill Creek Salt Lake E. Fairbourn. 

Millville Cache James 0. Biglow. 

Minersville Beaver James H. Rollins. 

Mona Juab Geo. W. Johnson. 

Monroe Seyier Michael Johnson. 

Morgan'-' Morgan W. M. Parker. 

Moroni San Pete G. W. Bradley. 

Mount Carmel Kane H. B. Jolley. 

Mount Pleasant San Pete Joseph Page. 

New Harmony Washington Wm. Pace. 

Newton Cache W. F. Littlewood. 

North Ogden Weber Sidney Stevens. 

Oak City Millard Henry Ropers. 

Ogden City'B.G.... Weber Joseph Hall. 

Ophir Tooele William B. Sager. 

Pahreah Kane A. F. Smithson. 

Panguitch Iron W. D. Kartchner. 

Paper Mill Salt Lake W. C. A. Smoot. 

Paradise Cache Henry A. Shaw. 

Paragoonah Iron Silas S. Smith. 

Park City Summit W.J.Montgomery 

Parley's Park Summit W. II. Kimball. 

Parowan Iron Geo. Grimshaw. 

Payson Utah John T. Hardy. 

Peoa Summit A. Marchant. 

Peterson Morgan Isaac Bowman. 

Pine Valley Washington Wm. Snow. 

Pinto Washington R. Harrison. 

Plain City Weber Wm. W. Maguire. 

Pleasant Grove Utah Elijah Mayhew. 

Plymouth Box Elder H. D. Pessons. 

Portage ..Box Elder W. H. Anderson. 

Prattville Sevier G. W. Bean. 

Providence Cache J. F. Madison. 

Provo City Utah Mrs. M. H. Cun- 
ningham. 



Ranch Kane... 

Randolph Rich.... 

Richfield Sevier., 



..G. Williams. 
.Wm. Howard. 
.H. P. Miller. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Richmond Cache Henry Standage. 

Rockport Summit Henry Soamans. 

Rockville Kane Zemira Draper. 

Saint George'''- Washington John Pymm. 

Saint John Tooele G. AV^ Burridgo. 

Salom Utah George Killian. 

Salina Sevier Wm. McFadyen. 

Salt Creek Juab John Hague. 

SaltLakeCity'-BGSSalt Lake John M. Moore. 

Sandy Salt Lake W. H. Cullmer. 

Santaquin Utah Wm. W. Barnett. 

Scipio Millard Wm. Memmott. 

Shauntie Beaver James K. Clark. 

Shonesburg Kane John J. AUred. 

Silver City Juab S. B. Moore. 

Silver Spring Salt Lake R. A. Wilson. 

Slatersvillo Weber D. Bartholomew. 

Smithfield Cache Jaa. S. Cantwell. 

South Cottonwood. Salt Lake Edwin Warenski. 

Spanish Fork Utah Wm. R.Jones. 

Spring City San Pete George Brough. 

Spring Lake Utah Sam'l Oponshaw. 

Springville Utah W.D.Huntington. 

Stockton Tooele Louis Benites. 

Stoker „ Davis David Sessions. 

Summit Iron James Dalley. 

Taylorsville Salt Lake John Webster. 

Terrace Box Elder Samuel H. Cave. 

Tooele Tooele John Rowberry. 

Toquerville ,Kane Israel Hoyt. 



Uintah AVeber 

Union Salt Lake. 



.C. de LaBaume. 
.Ole E. Orstad. 



Vernon Tooele Jno. Sharp. 

Virgin City Kane James Jepson. 

Wales San Pete.. John Price. 

Wallsburgh Wasatch Wm. E. Nuttall. 

Wanship Summit Henry Reynolds. 

Warrensburgh Iron Wm. S. Warren. 

Washington Washington W. H. Crawford. 

AVellsville Cache W. F. Darley. 

AVest Jordan Salt Lake F. A. Cooper. 

AVillard Box Elder Jas. G. Murray. 

Winsor Kane Anson P. Winsor. 

AVoodrufi' Rich William H. Lee. 

Ay cod's Cross Davis Wm. S. Muir. 



POST OFFICES— ARIZONA TERRITORY. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Agua Fria Valley.. Yavapai Dennis J. Matt. 

Antelope Valley ....Yavapai Chas. G. Ginung. 

Apache Yavapai Chas. E. Harlow. 

Aubrey Mohave Leo Mayne. 

Beale Spring Mohave Jacob Ralph. 

Bradshaw Yavapai N. C. Sheckells. 

Camp Grant Pima AVarner Buck. 

Camp A^erde Yavapai William Head. 

Cerbat Mohave William Coy. 

Clifton Pima Cornelius Bennett 

Crittenden Pima Thomas Hughes. 

Defiance Yavapai Wm. E. M. Amy. 

East Phoenix Maricopa Ed. E. Hellings. 

Ehronberg Yuma P. M. Fisher. 



FIorence'^ Pima.. 



, Jos. Collingwood. 



Gila Bend Pima Albert Decker. 

Goodwin Pima T. Mc Williams. 

Hardyvillo Mohave AV. M. Hardy. 

Hayden's Ferry Maricopa Henry W. Clarke. 

Kirkland Valley. ..Yavapai Charles AV^.Beach. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

La Paz Yuma Benj. H. Spear. 

Maricopa Wells Pima Mrs. M. J. Moore. 

McDowell Maricopa Frank A. Shaw. 

Mineral Park Mohave Alder Randall. 

Mohave City Mohave Paul Broon. 

Monument Pima Peter Kitchen. 

Parker Yuma John H. Salt. 

Ph(jenix=> Maricopa VVm. A. Hancock. 

Pimu Agency Pima 0. li. Cook. 

Prescott'-'B.G Yavapai i'houdoro W. Otis. 

Sanford Pima Stephen Birchard. 

SasabiFlat Pima Manuel Amardo. 

Smith's xViills lavapai Fritz Brill. 

Statiord Pima J. E. Baily. 

Tres Alamos Pima Thomas Dunbar. 

Tubac Pima A. Kickman. 

Tucson'-' ii Pima Charles H. Lord. 

Walnut Grove Yavapai Miss J. Oswald. 

Vvickonburgh Yavapai H. VVickenburg. 



Yuma ,. Yuma., 



.U. S. Fitzgerald. 



JL. EOMAN & CO.. Medical, Theological, and Scientific Books, 11 MontgV St., S. P. 
3 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



34 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



POST OFFICES— ALASKA TERRITORY. 



Name. County. Postmaster. | Name. 
Fort Wrangel Wm. King Lear. I Sitka 



County. 



Postmaster. 
."Win. Phillipson. 



POST OFFICES— BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Ashcroft Yale H. P. Cornwall. 

Barkorville Cariboo John Bowron. 

Burrard Inlet New West- 
minster. ..M. Michaud. 

Cache Creek Yale James Campbell. 

Chemanius Vancouver Thomas G. Askew 

Chillewack New West- 
minster. ..R. C. Garner. 

Clinton Lilloet C. E. Pope. 

Comox Vancouver Joseph Hodello. 

Cowichan Vancouver Samuel Harris. 

Dog Creek Cariboo William Wycott. 

Duck and Pringle..Yale James Duck. 

DunkeJd Cariboo Allen Graham. 

Esquimalt Victoria John T. Howard. 

Granville New West- 
minster... M. Michaud. 

Hope Yale John G. Wirth. 

Kamloops Yale Wm. B. Wilson. 

Koithley Creek Cariboo G. A. Vieth. 

Kootenay Kootenay William Milby. 

Lac La Hache Lilloet P. Gannon. 

Langley New West- 
minster. ..W. W. Gibbs. 

Lilloet Lilloet Alfred Smith. 

Lytton Yale John Boyd. 



Name. County. Postmaster. 

Maple Bay Vancouver Wm. Beaumont. 

Moody ville New West- 
minster. ..D. S. Milligan. 

Nanaimo Vancouver James Harvey. 

New We8tminster..New West- 
minster. ..Valentine B. Tait. 

Nicola Lake Yale John Clapperton. 

O'Kanagan Yalo C. U'Keefe. 

O'Kanagan Mission Yale Eli Seguin. 

Omineca .Cariboo Francis Page. 

One Hundred and 
Fifty MileHouse..Cariboo G. W. Cook. 

Quosnelle Cariboo Abraham Barlow 

Quesnelle Forks. ...Cariboo W^. P. Barry. 

Salt Spring Island. Vancouver T. C. Barry. 

Skeena Cariboo Thomas Hankin. 

Soda Creek Cariboo Robert McLoese. 

Somonos Vancouver A. R. Rier. 

Sooke Vancouver. Michael Muir. 

Spence's Bridge. ...Yale John Murray. 

Sumas New West- 
minster...©. W. Miller. 

Van Winkle Cariboo Alex. Lindsay. 

Victoria Victoria Henry Wootton. 

Yale Yale Benj. Douglas. 



THE JUDICIARY. 

SUPEEME COUKT OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Name. 



Office. 



Date of 
Appoint- 
ment. 



Circuit. 



State Whence 
Appointed. 



Salary. 



Morrison R. AVaite 
Joseph P. Bradley 

Ward Hunt 

William Strong 

Nathan CUtiord 

Noah H. Swayne... 

David Davis 

Samuel F. Miller... 
Stephen J. Field... 



Chief Justice 

Associate Justice 



1S74 
1870 

1872 
1870 
ia58 
1S()2 
1802 
18^2 
18(33 



Fourth . 

Fifth 

Second.. 
Third.... 

First 

Si.xth .... 
Seventh 
Eighth.. 
Ninth.... 



Ohio 

New Jersey... 

New York 

Pennsylvania 

Maine 

Ohio 

Illinois 

Iowa , 

California 



$10,500 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 



Circuits.— i?'{rs<— Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and Rhode Island. iSfeeond— Vermont, 
Connecticut, Northern New York, Southern New York, and Eastern New York. T/iu-d— New .Jersey, 
Eastern Pennsylvania, Western Pennsylvania, and Delaware. i^ViwrtTi— Maryland, West Virginia, Vir- 
ginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina. i?'J/<7i— Georgia, Northern Florida, Southern Florida, North- 
ern Alabama, Southern Alabama, Mississippi,' Louisiana, Eastern Texas, and Western Texas. Sixth— 
Northern Ohio, Southern Ohio, Eastern Michigan, Western Michigan, Kentucky, Eastern Tennessee, and 
Western Tennessee. Seventh — Indiana, Northern Illinois, Southern Illinois, and Wisconsin. Eighth — 
Minnesota, Iowa, Eastern Missouri, Western Missouri, Kansas, Eastern Arkansas, Western Arkansas, 
and Nebraska. JVi/UA— California, Oregon and Nevada. 

The Court holds one general term, annually, at Washington, D. C, commencing on the first Monday 
in December. 

D. Wesley Middleton, of Washington, Clerk. John W. Wallace, of Pennsylvania, Reporter. 



PARNSWORTH & CLAEK'S Insurance Office, i25 California Street, San Prancisoi 



Eoenisch Upright Pianos, for $335, at (jEAY'S, 105 Kearny St., S. P. 



UNITED STATES COURT S P ACIFIC STATES. 



35 



CIRCUIT COURT OF THE UNITED STATES. 



Name. 



Office. 



Date of 
Appoint- 
ment. 



Circuit. 



State Whence 
Appointed. 



Salary. 



George F. Shepley... 
Lewis B. Woodruff.. 
William McKennan 

Hugh L. Bond 

W. B. Woods 

H. H. Emmons 

Thomas Drummond 

John F. Dillon 

Lorenzo Sawyer 



Judge. 



1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 
1869 



First 

Second.. 
Third.... 
Fourth . 

Fifth 

Sixth 

Seventh 
Eighth.. 
Ninth.... 



Maine 

Now York 

Pennsylvania 

Maryland 

Alabama 

Michigan 

Illinois 

Iowa 

California 



S6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6.000 
6,000 



UNITED STATES COURTS. 

*NINTH CIRCUIT— COMPOSED OF THE STATES OF CALIFORNIA, OREGON, 

AND NEVADA. 

NINTH CIRCUIT— CALIFORNIA. 



Hon. Stephen J. Field, Associate Justice U. S.'-' 
Supremo Court, a?.?igned to Ninth Circuit, 
San Francisco S6,000 

Hon. Lorenzo Sawyer, Circuit Judge, San 

Francisco 5,000 

Walter Van Dyke, District Attorney, San 

Francisco Fees. 



John M. Coghlan, Assistant District Attorney, 

San Francisco Fees. 

E. P. Marsellus, Marshal, San Franci.''C0 Foes. 

L. S. B. Sawyer, Clerk, and Commissioner, 

San Francisco Fees. 

Josei)h F. O'Beinne, Deputy Clerk, and Com- 
missioner Fees. 



Terms held at San Francisco second Monday in February, second Monday in July, and second Monday 
in December. Special Terms at the discretion of the Court. 



■■' During the absence from the State of the Presiding Judge, the Terms of the Court are held by the Circuit 
Judge and the Judge of the United States Bistrict Court. 

DISTRICT COURT— CALIFORNIA. 



Edward B. Cotter, Clerk, San Francisco Fees. 

A. D. Grimwood, Deputy Clerk, San Francisco Fees. 
E. P. Marsellus, Marshal, San Francisco Fees. 



Hon. Ogden Hoffman, Judge, San Francisco.. ..S5,000 

Walter Van Dyke, District Attorney, San 

Francisco Fees. 

John M. Coghlan, and A. P. Van Duser, As- 
sistant District Attorneys, San Francisco... Fees. 
Regular Terms hold at San Francisco, first Monday in April, second Monday in August, and first 

Monday in December. Special Terms at the discretion of the Court. 

NINTH CIRCUIT— OREGON, 



Hon. Stephen J. Field, Associate Justice U. S. 

Supreme Court, San Francisco 

Hon. Lorenzo Sawyer, Circuit Judge, San 

Francisco 35,000 



Rufus Mallory, District Attorney, Portland, 

Oregon Fees. 

Ralph \\'ilcox. Clerk and Commissioner, Port- 
land, Oregon Fees. 

D. J. Malarkey, Marshal, Portland, Oregon ... Fees. 

Regular Terms held at Portland on the first Monday in January, May and September. Special 
Terms at the discretion of the Court. 

DISTRICT COURT— OREGON. 

Hon. M. P. Deady, Judge, Portland, Oregon... S3,000 I Ralph Wilcox, Clerk and Commissioner, Port- 
Rufus JMallory, District Attorney, Portland, land, Oregon Fees 

Oregon Fees. | D. J. Malarkey, Marshal, Portland, Oregon ... Fees. 

Regular Terms held at Portland on the second Monday in April, August and November. Special 
Terms at the discretion of the Court. 

NINTH CIRCUIT— NEVADA. 



Hon. Stephen J. Field, Associate Justice U. S. 

Supreme Court, San Francisco'-' 

Hon. Lorenzo Sawyer, Circuit Judge, San 

Francisco 85,000 

— Clapp, xMarshal, Virginia City Fees. 

Regular Terms held at Carson City on the first Monday of March, August and December, 



William Woodburn, District Attorney, Virginia 

City Fees 

R. M. Daggett, Clerk and Commissioner, Vir- 
ginia City Fees. 



A. EOMAN & CO., Tine and Fancy Stationery, 11 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



36 PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



DISTRICT COURT— NEVADA. 

Hon. Edgar W. Ilillycr, Judge, Carson City 13,500 I II. M. Daggett, Clerk and Commissioner, Vir- 

Willinm Woodburn, District Attorney, Vir- ginia City Fees. 

ginia City Fees. | — Clapp, Marshal, Virginia City Fees. 

Regular Terms hold at Carson City on the second Monday in March, June and October. Special 
Terms at the discretion of the Court. 



* Salary as Judge of the Supreme Court — *l,(in(j allowed for traveling expenses. 

SUPREME COURT— WASHINGTON TERRITORY. 



Hon. Orange Jacobs, Chief Justice, Seattle S3,000 

Hon. R. S. Greene, Associate Justice, Olympia 3,000 
lion. J. K. Lewis, Associate Justice, Walla 

AValla 3,000 



S. C. Wingard, District Attorney, Olympia 

S250 and Fees. 

E. S. Kearney, Marshal, Walla Walla, 

$250 and Fees. 



Regular terms held at Olympia, second Monday in July. 

DISTRICT COURT— FIRST DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Stevens, Yakima, and AValla Walla. Sessions held second Monday in May 
and third Monday in November, at Walla Walla ; second Monday in June, at Fort Colville ; first Monday 
in October, at Yakima City. 

Hon. J. R. Lewis, Judge, Walla Walla. 

DISTRICT COURT— SECOND DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Klikitat, Clarke, Wahkiakum, Cowlitz, Pacific. Chehalis, Lewis, Thurston, 
Skamania, and JMason. Sessions held second Monday in April and first Momlay in Xovembor at Van- 
couver ; third Monday in March, and fourth Monday in November, at Olympia ; third Monday in Juno, 
at Oysterville. 

Hon. R. S. Greene, Judge, Olympia. 

DISTRICT COURT— THIRD DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Pierce, King, Kitsap, Jefferson, Clallam, Whatcom, Island, Snohomish and 
San Juan. Sessions held fourth Monday in August and first Monday in February at Seattle ; second Mon- 
day in August and second Monday in January, at Steilacoom ; fourth Monday in February and second 
Monday in September, at Port Townsend. 

Hon. Orange Jacobs, Judge, Seattle. 

SUPREME COURT— IDAHO TERRITORY. 



Hon. M. E. HoUister, Chief Justice, Silver City $3,000 
Hon. W. C. Whitson, Associate Justice, Boise 

City 3,000 

Hon. John Clark, Associate Justice, Lewiston. 3,000 



•James W, Huston, District Attorney, Boise 

City 8200 and Fees. 

R, L. Richardson, Clerk and Commissioner, 

Boise City S20U and Fees. 

Joseph Pinkham, Marshal, Idaho City FeesJ 

Regular terms held at Boise City first Monday in January. 

DISTRICT COURT— FIRST DISTRICT. 

Includes the counties of Nez Perce, Idaho, Lemhi, and Shoshone. Sessions held first Monday in April 
and October, at Lewiston ; third Monday in June, at Pierce City ; first Monday in July, at Washington, 
and first Monday in August, at Oro Grande. 

Hon. John Clark, Judge, Lewiston I A. Squire, Clerk, Lewistown Fees. 

Prosecuting Attorney, Lewiston 81,500 | P. C. Coburn, Deputy Marshal, Lewistown Fees. 

DISTRICT COURT— SECOND DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Ada, Boise, and Alturas. Sessions held first Monday in April and Novem" 
ber, at Boise City ; second Monday in May and tii-st Monday in October, at Idaho City ; first Monday in 
June and Second Monday in September, at Rocky Bar. 

Hon. W. C. Whitson, Judge, Boise City 1 Goo. L. Richards, Clerk, Idaho City Fees. 

Geo. Ainslie, Prosecuting Attorney, Idaho John Gray, Deputy Marshal, Idaho City Fees. 

City 81,500 | 

DISTRICT COURT— THIRD DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Owyhee and Oneida. Sessions held first Monday in June and Second Mon- 
day in October, at Silver City ; first Monday in August atMalad City. 

Hon. M. E. Hollister, Judge, Silver City I Benjamin Biggerstaff, Clerk, Silver City Fees. 

F. E. Ensign, Prosecuting Attorney, Silver Geo. Gilmore, Deputy Marshal, Silver City... Fees. 

City 81,500 I 



SUPREME COURT— MONTANA TERRITORY.* 



Hon. D. S. Wade, Chief Justice, Helena 83,000 

Hon. Hiram Knowles, Associate Justice, Deer 

Lodge City 3,000 

Hon. Francis G. Servis, Associate Justice, Vir- 
ginia City 83.000 



Merritt C. Page, District Attorney, Raders- 

burg 8250 and Fees. 

Isaac R. Alden, Clerk, Virginia City Fees. 

W. F. W^heeler, Marshal, Helena 8250 and Fees. 



Addiess, for fire insurance, FAMSWOSTH & CLAUK, 126 California St., S. ?. 



J 



Eemember GRAY'S Music Store is moved from Clay St, to 105 Kearny St., nr Post. 



UNITED STATES COURT S — P ACIFIC STATES. 37 



Regular Terms held at Virginia City on the first Monday in January, and second Monday in August. 
Special Terms at the discretion of the Court. 

DISTKICT COUET— FIRST DISTRICT. 

Includes the counties of Madison, Gallatin and JoflFerson, (Big Horn County being attached to Galla- 
tin for judicial purposes). Sessions hold first Monday in April and secona Monday in September, at 
Virginia City; second Monday in March and fourth Monday in October, at Bozeman; third Monday in 
February and first Monday in October, at Kadersburg. 

Hon. Francis G. Servis, Judge, Virginia City.. I T. Mufily, Clerk, Virginia City Fees. 

Robert P. Vivien, District Attorney, Boze- 
man 81,000 and Fees. | 

DISTRICT COURT— SECOND DISTRICT. 

Includes the counties of Missoula, Deer Lodge, and Beaver Head. Sessions hold fourth Monday in 
June, and second Monday in November, at Missoula; second Monday in April, first Monday in Septem- 
ber, and first Monday in December, at Deer Lodge City; first Monday in Juno, and second Monday in 
October, at Bannack City. 

Hon. Hiram Knowles, .Judge, Deer Lodge City. I 0. B. O'Bannon, Clerk, Deer Lodge City Fees. 

A. E. Mayhew, District Attorney, Doer Lodge 

City 81,000 and Fees. | 

DISTRICT COURT— THIRD DISTRICT. 

Includes the counties of Lewis and Clarke, and Meagher, (Choteau and Davrson being attached to 
the county of Lewis and Clarke, for judicial purposes). Sessions held first Monday in March, first 
Monday in June, and first Monday in November, at Helena; second Monday in May, and third Monday 
in October, at Diamond City. 

Hon. D. S. Wade, Judge, Helena I A. H. Beattie, Clerk, Helena Fees. 

Joseph K.Toole, District Attorney, Helena Sl.OOO 

and Fees. I 

SUPREME COURT— UTAH TERRITORY. 



Hon. S. B. Lowe, Chief Justice, Salt Lake 

City S3,000 

Hon. P. H. Emerson, Associate Justice 3,000 

Hon. J. S. Boroman, Associate Justice 8,000 



William Carey, District Attorney, Salt 

Lake City $250 and Fees. 

George K. Maxwell, Marshal, Salt 

Lake City $250 and Fees. 



The term of the .Justices of the Supremo Court is four years. One session of the Court must be held 
annually at the seat of the Territorial Government. 

SUPREME COURT— ARIZONA TERRITORY. 

Hon. E. F. Dunne, Chief Justice, Tucson $3,000 I James E. McCaffry, District Attorney, 

Hon. De Forrest Porter, Associate Justice, | Tucson $250 and Fees. 

Yuma 3,000 H. B. Jones, Clerk. Tucson Fees. 

Hon. C. A. Tweed, Associate Justice, Phoenix. 3,000 | ¥. H. Goodwin, Marshal, Yuma $500 and Fees. 

Regular Terms held at Tucson, second Monday in January. 

DISTRICT COURT— FIRST DISTRICT. 

Includes the County of Pima. Sessions held first Monday in March and October, at Tucson. 

Hon. E. F. Dunne, Judge Tucson | L. C. Hughes, District Attorney Tucson 

H. B. Jones, Clerk Tucson. 

DISTRICT COURT— SECOND DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Yuma and Mohave. Sessions held third Monday in March and first Monday in 
November, at Yuma; first Monday in May and first Monday in October, at Cerbat. 

Hon. Do Forrest Porter, Judge Yuma. I M. G. Blakely, District Attorney Cerbat. 

C. W. C. Rowell, District Attorney Yuma. | J. W. Dorrington, Clerk Yuma. 

DISTRICT COURT— THIRD DISTRICT. 

Includes the Counties of Maricopa and Yavapai. Sessions held third Monday in June and November, at 
Proscott; first Monday in May and September, at Phcenix, 

Hon. C. A. Tweed, Judge Phoenix. I H. H. Cartter, Jr., District Attorney Prescott. 

John A. Rush, District Attorney fhoenix. I Ed. W. Wells, Clerk. Proscott. 

C. F. Cate, Clerk Phoenix. 



"The Chief and .Vssociate Justices of the Supreme Court being the Judges of the District Courts, receive no 
other salary or compensation than tliat ailowed them as Justices of the Supreme Court, rue terms of the Dis- 
trict Courts are regulated by tlie Supreme Court, and the Supreme Court has the power to change the time of 
nolding tlie terms of the District Courts. 



A. EOMAN & CO., General Agents for Subscription Books, 11 Montgomery St., S.F. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



38 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



FEDERAL OFFICERS.* 



Namo of Inciiinbont. 



Jaiues M. Gitoholl 

Samuel J. Clarko, Jr... 
Thomas ]i. Shannon.... 

(^iles 11. (jray 

Edwin (}. VVaito 

G. W. Dont 

.1. (t. Mooro 

Frederick Lux 

11. Z. Whoolor 

William Jacobs 

VV. W. Bowers 

William Sherman 

S. D. Mills 

E. Goddard 

Joseph F. Evans 

0. H. La Grange 

Oscar D. Munson 

Alexander Martin 

J. T. Babcox 

Lucion Uawloy 

John Sedgwick 

A. L. Frost 

Alvin B. Clark 

A. F. Adams 

James T. Stratton 

Com. A. T. Snell 

George Davidson 

Henry G. Rollins 

C. H. Chamberlain 

T. B. McFarland 

Hart Follows 

Melville Cottle 

Otis Perrin 

Charles M. Patterson.. 

L. T. Crane 

Alfred James 

J. W. Haverstick 

G. A. Botsford 

M. C. Andross 

Aaron Boll 

Charles McDonald 

C. P. Roberts 

S. Cooper , 

J. R. Lockwood 

Andrew Miller 

George H. MeCallum ., 

Thomas May 

C. N. Ellinwood 

J. D. Stevenson 

1. A. Amerman , 

E. L. Alexander 

John D. Creigh 

Charles C. Bemis 

James Hillman 

R. H. Waterman 

Henry R. Reed 

S. W. Beall 

Samuel McCullough.... 



Office. 



Register in Bankrui)tcy 

Register in Bankruptcy 

Collector of Customs 

Surveyor I'orL 

Naval Officer 

Appraiser of Customs 

Appraiser of Customs 

Assistant Appraiser of Customs 

Assistant Appraiser of Customs 

Examiner of Drugs 

Collector of Customs 

-A^ssistant Treasurer 

Special Agent Treasury Department 

Special Agent Treasury Department 

Special Agent Treasury Department 

Superintendont U. S. Mint 

Assayer U. S. Mint 

Melter and Refiner U. S. Mint 

Coiner U. S. Mint 

Supervisor Internal Revenue 

Collector Internal Revenue 

Collector Internal Revenue 

Internal Revenue Agent 

Inspector Tobacco and Cigars 

Surveyor General 

Light-house inspector Twelfth District 

Assistant in Charge Coast Survey 

Register Land Office 

Receiver Land Office 

Register Land Office 

Receiver Land Office 

Register Land Office 

Receiver Land Office 

Register Land Office 

Receiver Land Office 

Register Land Office 

Receiver Land Office 

Register Land Office 

Receiver Land Office 

Register Land Office 

Receiver Land Office 

Register Land Office 

Receiver Land Office 

Register Land Office 

Receiver Land Office 

Register Land Office 

Receiver Land Office 

Supt. Marine Hospital Service Pacifle Coast... 

Shipping Commissioner 

Assistant Superintend't Railway Mail Service 

Special Agent P. 0. Department 

Centennial Commissioner 

Supervising Inspector Steamboats 

Inspector Boilers 

Inspector Hulls 

Pension Agent Army and Navy 

Observer Signal Service 

Supt. Construction U. S. Public Buildings., 



Residence. 



San Francisco 



San Diego 

San Francisco. 



Sacramento 

San Francisco 



Sacramento .... 

Stockton , 

Marysville 

Los Angeles.... 

Visalia 

Shasta 

Humboldt 

Susanville 

Independence. 
San Francisco 



Salary. 



Fees. 
Fees. 
S7,0U0 
5,1)00 
5.000 
3,1)2.5 

2, .500 

2,500 

2,000 

3,000 

0,000 

^8 per day. 

8 per day. 

8 per day. 

4,500 

3,000 

3,000 

3,000 

3,000 

4, .500 

3,500 
$5 per day. 

Fees. 
$3,000 



$.500 and Fees. 



$3,000 
Fees. 

1,(300 & $5 p.d'm 
l,lj00ife$5p.d'm 

3,000 

2,000 

2,000 

Fees. 
$1,150 
$10 per day. 



* For List of Army and Navy Officers, see pages 19 and 21. For List of Postmasters, see page 23. 

DEBT OF THE UNITED STATES, JULY 31st, 1875. 

Debt Interest Coin Bonds at 6 per cent $1,09.5,8.58,550 00 

Bonds at 5 per cent (513,(j32,7.50 00 

Interest 2(5,813,441 75 

$1,736,304,741 75 

Debt Interest Lawful Money. 

Certificates of Indebtedness at 4 per cent $ 678,000 00 

Navy Pension Fund at 3 per cent 14,000,000 00 

Interest 4(),320 00 

$14,724,320 00 

Debt on which Interest has ceased since maturity 10,678,270 26 

Interest 227,103 67 

$10,90.5,373 93 

Debt Bearing no Interest, Old Demand, Legal Tender Notes, etc $502,98^1,073 44 

Total Debt $2,264,923,.50a 12 

Cash in the Treasury, coin, etc 137,.529,670 16 

Actual Debt, August 1st, 1875 $2,127,393,838 96 



Country property insured on best terms with FAENSWOETH & CLAEK, S. P. 



f he largest stock of Sheet Music west of Chicago, at CJEAY'S, 105 Kearny St., S. F. 



MISCELLANEOUS TABLES. 



39 



PACIFIC STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



Name. 



Da 
of 
Organ'n. 



Area 
Square Miles. 



Population 

18(J0. 



Population 
1870. 



Population 
1875. * 



Capital. 



California 

Oregon 

Nevada 

Washington Territory 

Idaho Territory 

Montana Territory 

Utah Territory 

Arizona Territory 

Alaska Territory 



1850 

1859 

1864 

1853 

18li3 

1863 

1850 

18133 



154,126 

95,27^ 

120,000 

70,000 

100.000 

144,000 

83,460 

105,120 

577,300 



379,994 

52,465 

6,857 

11,594 



40,273 



500,247 
90,923 
42,491 
23,955 
14,999 
20,5'>5 
86,786 
9,658 



800,000 
1213,000 
70,000 
40,000 
35,000 
20,500 
150,000 
12,500 
12,000 



Sacramento. 

Salem. 

Carson City. 

Olympia. 

Boise City. 

Helena. 

Salt Lake City. 

Tucson. 

Sitka. 



^Estimated. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA* 

Capital, Sacramento. 
STATE OFFICERS— EXECUTIVE DEPAETMENT.* 



Name. 



Romnaldo Pacheco 

William Irvyin 

Drury Melone 

J. J. Green 

John Lord Love.... 
Ferdinand Baehr... 

Robert Gardner 

H. N. Bolander 

Grant H. Springer. 
Albert Hart 



Office. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 

Secretary of State 

Controller... 

Attorney-General 

Treasurer 

Survo.vor-General 

Supt. Public Instruction... 

State Printer 

Governor's Private Soc'ry.. 



Residence. 



Sacramento... 
San Quentin.. 
Sacramento- 



Term Expires. 



December, 1875.. 



At will . 



Salary. 



$7,000 
Per diem. 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3,000 
Fees. 

2,400 



STATE OFFICERS ELECT— 1876-79. 



Name. 



AVilliam Irwin 

J. A. Johnson 

Thomas Bock 

J. W. Mandeville 

Jo. Hamilton 

J.G. Estudillo 

William Minis 

Ezra S. Carr 



Office. 



Governor 

Lieutenant-Governor 

Secretary of State 

Controller 

Attorney-General 

Treasurer 

Surveyor-General 

Supt. Public Instruction 



Residence. 



Siskiyou County 

San Francisco County, 

Monterey County 

Tuolumne County 

Placer County 

San Diego County 

Yolo County 

Alameda County 



Term Expires. 



December, 1879. 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS. 

FoRTT-FOUETH CONGRESS. ENDING MaRCH 4TH, 1877. 



Name. 


Office. 


Residence. 


Term Expires. 








March 4th, 1879. 








March 4th, 1881. 








March 4th. 1877. 


H. F. Page 




Placorvillo 


March 4th, 1877. 


J. K. LuttroU. 


" 


Santa Kosa ; 


March 4th, 1877. 


P. D. Wigginton 




March 4th, 1877. 











*The State Election takes place on the first Wednesday of September, 1877, and every two years thereafter. 
The term of offlce for each of the State officers is four years, commencing with the first Monday in December, 
(December 2, 1875) after the election. 



A. ROMAN & CO., Blank Books and Counting House Stationery, 11 Mont. St., S. P. 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merchants 



40 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



LEGISLATURE OF CALIFORNIA.* 

Twenty-First Session will commonee December 6th, 1875. 
SENATE— roKTT Members. 
President James A. Johnson. 



District. 



1st District. 
2d District. 
3d District.. 

4th District. 
5th District. 
6th District. 
7th District. 

8th District.. 

yth District. 
10th District. 
11th District. 

12th District. 

13th District. 

At Large 

Hth District.. 

15th District. 
16th District.. 

17th District.. 
ISth District. 

19th District.. 

20th District- 
21st District. 
22d District. 
23d District- 
24th District. 

25th District.. 
26th District. 
27th District.. 

2Sth District. 
29th District.. 



Counties. 



San Diogo and San Bernardino 

Los Angeles 

San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and 

Ventura 

Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Mono, and Tulare 

Mariposa, Merced and Stanislaus 

Monterey, San Benito and Santa Cruz 

Santa Clara ™.... -j 

San Francisco and San Mateo 

San Francisco 

San Francisco - _ 

San Francisco _ 

San Francisco | 

San Francisco , | 

San Francisco „. | 

Alameda f 

Contra Costa and Marin 

San Joaquin ( 

San Joaquin and Amador. _ \ 

Calaveras and Tuolumne 

Sacramento „ i 

Solano _ „ 

Solano and Yolo 

Napa, Lake and Sonoma 

Sonoma 

Placer „.. 

Alijine and El Dorado 

Nevada 

Nevada and Sierra 

Sutter and Yuba 

Butte, Lassen and Plumas 

Del Norte, Humboldt, Klamath and 

Mendocino 

Modoc, Shasta, Siskiyou and Trinity- 
Colusa and Tehama- 



Names. 



.1. W. Sattorthwaite. 
C. W. Bush 



W. .J. Graves 

Tipton Lindsey 

John M. Montgomery , 

T.Flint 

Thomas H. Laine 

W. Z. Angney 

George H. Rogers , 

T. McCarthy 

J. Craig 

Edward Nunan 

William M. Piorson .... 

M. J. Donovan 

Frank McCoppin 

Robert Howe 

Philip A. Roach 

Washington Bartlett... 

Edward Gibbons 

James Beazell „. 

Paul Shirley 

G. S. Evans 

James T. Farley 



Rienzi Hopkins 

James A. Duffy 

Creed Haymond 

S. G. Hilborn...„ 

H. E. MeCune 

W. McPherson HUL. 

B. F. Tuttle 

N. Martin 

Thomas Fraser 

M. P. O'Connor 

H. K.Turner 

S. Spencer „...„ 

W.C. Hendricks. 



R. McGarvey.. 
W. J. Tinnin.. 
E. J. Lewis.... 



Term 
Expires 



Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1877, 

Doc. 1879. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1879. 

Doc. 1879. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1879. 

Doc. 1879. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1877. 

Doc. 1877. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dee. 1879. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1877. 

Dec. 1879. 

Dee. 1877. 

Doc. 1879. 



ASSEMBLY— Eighty Members. 



Alameda-T. F. Bagge, D. W. Gelwicks, M. W. Dixon. 

Amador — H. A. Carter, T. Dunlap. 

Butte— T. J. Jenkins, E. S. Ruggles. 

Calaveras— J. B. Reddick. 

Colusa and Tehama— T. J. Hart. 

Contra Costa— C. Woods. 

Del Norto— James E. Murphy 

El Dorado — G. J. Carpenter. 

El Dorado and Alpine- S. A. Nott. 

Fresno— J. D. Collins. 

Humboldt— J. Clark. 

Lake-R. V. S. Quigley. 

Los Angeles— John R. McConnell, F. Lamboume. 

Marin— G. W. Burbank. 

Mariposa and Merced— J. W. Wilcox. 

Mendocino — J. M. Covington. 

Mono and Inyo — M. Griswold. 

Monterey— C. S. Abbott. 

Napa — George N. Cornwall. 

Nevada— S. L. Blackwell, G. W. Giffin, T. A. Blue. 

Placer— ^\^ M. Crutehor. 

Plumas and Lassen — John W. S. Chapman. 

Sacramento — T. J. Clunie, Marion Brigga, A. D. 

Patterson. 
San Benito— G. M. Roberts. 
San Bernardino — Henry Suvorkrup. 
San Diego — James M. Pierce. 
San Francisco — J. V. Coffee, Thomas Mclnerney, J. 



W. Harding, AVilliam McMann, Samuel E. Weth- 
erill, J. C. Murphy, James G. Carson, William 
O'Connell, Joseph W. Jourden» M. McCarthy, 
AVilliam Broderick, George A. Young, K. M. 
darken, J. 0. B. Kennedy, Herman Ranken, 
Thomas Barber, D. C. Sullivan, Gus. PuUen, 
Fred. Raisch, James G. Maguire. 

San Joaquin— R. C. Sargent, Martin Lammers, John 
Patterson. 

San Luis Obispo— R. M. Preston. 

San Miitoo — J. Garrotson. 

Santa Clara— Cyrus Jones, Lawrence Archer, S. J. 
Jamison. 

Santa Cruz — H. Rice. 

Sierra— J. Klotz. 

Siskiyou and j\Iodoc— F. G. Harris. 

Solano — J. McKonna, T. M. Swan. 

Sonoma— E. C. Henshaw, W. Ferrall, J. Samuels. 

Stanislaus — J. J. Scrivener. 

Sutter— C. P. Berry. 

Trinity and Shasta— J. M. Briceland. 

Tulare and Kern— A. D. Patterson. 

Tuolumne — T. C. Birney. 

Ventura and Santa Barbara— W. A. Hayne. 

Yolo — Jason Watkins. 

Yuba— D. A. Ostrom, (A tie between E. Qoblo and 
J. C. Bradley.) 



''Meets biennially on the first Monday of December. The Senate is composed of forty, and the Assemblj^ of 
eighty members. Terms of Senators four years ; Assemblymen two years. Compensation, $10 per day during 
the session, and mileage, at the rate of twenty cents per mile. 



PAEITSWOIITH & CLAEK, Fire Insurance Agents for Pacific Coast, San Francisco. 



Steinway Pianos, the best in the world, M. GRAY, Agent. 105 Kearny St., S. P. 



MISCELLANEOUS TABLES. 



41 



JUDICIAKY— SUPREME COURT.* 



d 
w 
I> 

o 
o 






ta 

o 
o 

t« 

!-■■ 



o 

a 



■3 

1— » 
»-» 
o 






Name of Incumbent. 



William T. Wallace 
Joseph B. Crockett.. 

A. L. Rhodes 

A. C. Niles 

E. W. McKinstry ... 

Grant I. Taggart 

Allen Tillinghast 

Charles A. Tuttle 

Charles Sumner 

Carl C. Finkler 



Office. 



Chief Justice 

Associate Justice 

Associate Justice 

Associate Justice 

Associate Justice 

Clerk 

Deputy 

Reporter 

Phonographic Reporter. 
Secretary 



Residence. 



San Francisco 

Oakland 

San Jose 

San Francisco 
San Francisco 

Oakland 

San Francisco, 

Oakland , 

San Francisco, 
San Francisco, 



Term Expires. 



January, 18S0.. 

1882" 
1870.. 
1878.. 

December, 1875 

At will 

At will 

At will 

At will 



Salary. 



$6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
6,000 
4,000 
. 1,800 
4,000 
4,000 
3,000 



•■'Term of office, ten years. Terms of the Court are held at San Francisco on the second Monday in January 
and July, and at Sacramento on the second Monday in April and October. The Supreme Court has appellate 
juri.sdiciion in all cases In equity, in all cases at law involving the title or possession of real estate, or the legality 
of any tax, toll, fine, etc., or in which the matter In controversy amounts to $300 ; also in all cases arising in the 
Probate Courts ; and in all criminal cases amounting to felony, on questions of law alone. 

DISTRICT JUDGES.t 



District. 



1st 

2d.. 

3d.. 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th 

8th 

9th 

10th 

nth 

12th 

13th 

14th 

loth 

16th 

17th 

18th 

19th 

20th, 



Name of Incumbent. 



Eugene Fawcett 

Charles F. Lott 

Samuel B. McKee.... 
Robert F. Morrison . 
Samuel A. Booker... 

Lewis Ramago 

W. C. Wallace 

John P. Haynes 

A. AV. Rosborough.. 

P. W. Keyser 

A. C. Adams 

J. R. Sharpstoin 

Alexander Deering.. 

T. B. Reardon 

S. H. Dwindle 

Theron Reed 

Y. Sepulveda 

W. T. McNealy 

E. D. Wheeler 

David Bolden , 



Residence. 



Oroville 

Oakland 

San Francisco 

Stockton 

Sacramento 

Napa City 

Eureka 

Yreka 

Marysville 

Mokelumne Hill.. 

San Francisco 

Mariposa 

Nevada City 

San Francisco 

Havilah 

Los Angeles 



San Francisco., 
San Jose 



Term Expires. 



December, 



1875 

1879 
1875, 
1877, 
1879, 
1875, 
1879, 
1879. 
1879. 



Salary. 



$5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
6,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
5,000 

■ 5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
6,000 
5,000 
5,000 
6.000 
5,000 
4,000 
4,000 
6,000 
5,000 



f Term of ofiSce, six years. For names of County Judges, see Gazetteer under each county. 



JUDICIAL DISTRICTS, AND THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME. 



1st Diet.—: 

2d Dist.- 

3d Dist.- 

4th Dist.- 

5th Dist.- 

6th Dist- 

7th Dist.- 

8th Dist- 

9th Dist.- 

10th Dist.- 



San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, and 

Ventura. 
Butte, Lassen, Plumas, and Tehama. 
Alameda, and part of San Francisco. 
Part of San Francisco. 
San Joaquin, Stanislaus, and Tuolumne. 
Sacramento and Yolo. 
Lake, Marin, Mendocino, Napa, Solano, 

and Sonoma. 
Del Norte, Humboldt, and Klamath. 
Shasta, Siskiyou, Trinity, and Modoc. 
Colusa, Sierra, Sutter, and Y^uba. 



nth Dist. — Amador, Calaveras, and EI Dorado. 

r2th Dist.— Part of San Francisco, and San Mateo. 

13th Dist. — Fresno, Mariposa, Merced, and Tulare. 

14th Dist.— Nevada and Placer. 

15th Dist.— Contra Costa, and part of San Francisco. 

16th Dist. — Alpine, Inyo, Kern, and Mono. 

17th Dist. — Los Angeles. 

ISth Dist. — San Diego and San Bernardino. 

19th Dist. — Part of San Francisco. 

20th Dist. — Monterey, San Benito, Santa Cruz, and 
Santa Clara. 



CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICTS. 

First District— The City and County of San Francisco. 

Second District— Contra Costa, Alameda, San Joaquin, Calaveras, Amador, EI Dorado, Sacramento, 
Placer, Nevada, Alpine, and Tuolumne. 

Third District— Marin, Sonoma, Napa, Lake, Solano, Yolo, Sutter, Yuba, Sierra, Butte, Plumas, 
Lassen, Tehama, Colusa, Mendocino, Humboldt. Trinity, Shasta, Siskiyou, Del Norte, and Modoc. 

Fourt_h District— San Diego, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, Santa Barbara, Ventura, San Luis Obispo, 
Tulare, Monterey, San Benito, Fresno, Kern, Merced, Mariposa, Stanislaus, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, San 
Mateo, Mono, and Inyo. 



A. E0MA17 & CO., Booksellers, Importers, and Publishers, 11 Montgomery St., S. P. 



D. "W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. ■ 



42 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TERMS OF THE DISTRICT COURT. 



Counties. 



Alamoda 

Alpine , 

Amador 

Butto 

Calaveras 

Colusa, 

Contra Costa 

Del Norte 

El Dorado 

Frosno 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Korn 

Lake , 

Lassen , 

Los Angeles 

Marin 

Mariposa 

Mendocino , 

Morced 

Modoc 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napa , 

Nevada 

Placer 

Plumas 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino.. 

San Diego 

San Francisco ... 



San Joaquin , 

San Luis Obispo 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara... 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Toulumne 

Ventura ...' , 

Yolo 

Yuba 



Days of Term. 



Third Monday in February, June, and October. 

First Monday in April and October. 

Second Monday in March, Juno, September, and December. 

First Monday in March, second Monday in July, and third Monday in November. 

Second Monday in January, April, July, and October. 

Fourth Monday in April, second Monday iniAugust, and first Monday in December. 

Third Tuesday in April, July, and Novemb r. 

Second Monday in May. August, and November. 

Second Monday in F'ebruary and May, and third Monday in August and November. 

Third Monday in February, June, and October. 

Second Monday in March, .June, September, and December. 

First Monday in May and November. 

Third Monday in May and November. 

Third Monday in April, and Second Monday in November. 

Second Monday in June and September. 

First Monday in February, May, August, and November. 

First Monday in March and July, and Third Monday in November. 

Third Monday in April and August, and second Monday in December. 

Second Monday in April, third Monday in July, and first Monday in November. 

Third Monday in March, July, and November. 

Second Monday in July, and third Monday in October. 

Third Monday in April and October. 

Third Monday in March, July, and November. 

First Monday in February, June, and October. 

Second Monday in March, June, Soi)tember, and December. 

First Monday in February, May, August, and November. 

Fourth Monday in May, and first Monday in October. 

First Monday in February, April, June, August, October, and December. 

First Monday in April, August, and December. 

Second Monday in March, June, September, and December. 

Second Monday in January, April, July, and October. 

Third District — Third Monday in April, August, and December. 

Fourth District— First Monday in February, May, August, and December. 

Twelfth District— First Monday in .January, April, -July, and October. 

Fifteenth District — First Monday in March, June, September, and December. 

Nineteenth District — First Monday in April, August, and December. 
First Monday in February, May, and August, and third Monday in October. 
Second Monday in May, September, and January. 

Second Monday in February, and fourth Monday in May August and November. 
Third Monday in March, July, and November. 
First Monday in January, May, and September. 
Second Monday in February, June, and October. 
Second Monday in March, June, and November. 

First Monday in April, second Monday in July, and fourth Monday in October. 
Third Monday in January, May, and September. 
Third Monday in January, May, and September. 
Third Monday in February, June, and October. 
Second Monday in January, April, and September. 

Fourth Monday in February, third Monday in June, and second Monday in Nov. 
Fourth Monday in January, first Monday in May, and fourth Monday in October. 
Second Monday in April, August, and December. 
Third Monday in January, May, and December. 
First Monday in March and July, and third Monday in November. 
First Monday in March, July, and November. 
Third Monday in January, May, and September. 
Third Monday in January and May, and first Monday in October. 



SENATORIAL DISTRICTS, THE COUNTIES COMPOSING 

OF EACH. 
1st Dist.— San Diego and San Bernardino, elect 

one Senator. 
2d Dist. — Los Angeles, elects one Senator. 
3d Dist.— Ventura, Santa Barbara, and San Luis 

Obispo, elect one Senator. 
4th Dist.— Tulare, Inyo, Fresno, Mono, and Kern, 

elect one Senator. 
5th Dist.— Mariposa, Merced, and Stanislaus, elect 

one Senator. 
6th Dist.— Santa Cruz, Monterey, and San Benito, 

elect one Senator. 
7th Dist. — Santa Clara, elects two Senators. 
8th Dist.— San Francisco and San Mateo, elect one 

Senator. 
9th Dist. — San Francisco, elects two Senators. 
10th Dist. — San Francisco, elects two Senators. 
11th Dist. — San Francisco, elects two Senators. 
r2th Dist.— San Francisco, elects two Senators, 
loth Dist.— San Francisco, elects two Senators. 
14th Dist. — Alameda, elects two Senators, 
loth Dist— Contra Costa and Marin, elect one Senator 
lOth Dist. — San Joaquin, elects one Senator; and 



17th Dist 

18th Dist, 
19th Dist, 

20th Dist 
21st Dist 
22d Dist 
2:^d Dist 
24th Dist 

2.5th Dist 
26th Dist 

27th Dist 

2Sth Dist 

29th Dist 



THE SAME, AND REPRESENTATION 

San Joaquin and Amador, elect one 

Senator. 
. — Tuolumne and Calaveras, elect one Sen- 
ator. 
, — Sacramento, elects two Senators. 
. — Solano, elects one Senator; and Solano 

and Yolo, elect one Senator. 
. — Napa, Lake andSonoma.electoneSenator 
. — Sonoma, elects one Senator. 
. — Placer, elects one Senator. 
. — El Dorado and Alpine, elect one Senator. 
. — Nevada, elects one Senator; and Sierra 

and Nevada, one Senator. 
.—Yuba and Sutter, elect one Senator. 
.—Butte, Plumas, and Lassen, elect one 

Senator. 
.—Mendocino, Humboldt, Klamath, and 

Del Norte, elect one Senator. 
.—Siskiyou, Modoc, Trinity and Shasta, 

elect one Senator. 
. — Colusa and Tehama, elect one Senator. 



PAENSWOETH & CLAHE'S Insurance Office, 426 California Street, San Pranciscc 



Ernst Kap's, Grands, Haines Bros.' Square, and Eosenkranz Uprights, at SEAT'S. 



STATE DEPARTMENTS. 



43 



ASSEMBLY DISTRICTS, AND THE COUNTIES COMPOSING THE SAME. 



Alameda— Three Members. 

Amador — Two. 

Butte— Two. 

Calaveras — One. 

Colusa and Tehama— One. 

Contra Costa — One. 

El Dorado— One. 

El Dorado and Alpine— One. 

Fresno — One. 

Humboldt — One. 

Klamath and Del Norte— One. 

Lake — One. 

Los Angeles — Two. 

Marin— One. 

Mariposa and Merced— One. 



Mendocino— One. 

Mono and Inyo — One. 

Monterey — One. 

Napa— One. 

Nevada — Three. 

Placer— One. 

Plumas and Lassen— One. 

Sacramento — Three 

San Benito— One. 

San Bernardino — One. 

San Diego— One. 

San Francisco— Twenty. 

San Joaciuin — Three. 

San Luis Obispo— One. 

San Mateo — One. 

BOARD OF EDUCATION. 



Santa Clara— Three. 

Santa Cruz— One. 

Sierra- One. 

Siskiyou and Modoc— One. 

Solano— Two. 

Sonoma— Three. 

Stanislaus— One. 

Sutter— One. 

Trinity and Shasta— One. 

Tulare and Kern— One. 

Tuolumne- One. 

Ventura and Santa Barbara— One. 

Yolo— One. 

Yuba— Two. 



Romaaldo Pacheeo>.. ex-ofRcio, President no compensation. 

Henry N. Bolander-,;: ex-officio. Secretary no compensation. 

James Denman,.;.= Superintendent Public Schools, San Francisco no compensation. 

James G. Kennedy,! Superintendent Public Schools, Santa Clara no compensation. 

Thomas 0. Crawford,! Superintendent Public Schools, San Joaquin no compensation. 

G. R. Kelley,t Superintendent Public Schools, Sacramento no compensation. 

A. C. McMeans, Superintendent Public Schools, Sonoma no compensation. 

W. F. B. Lynch, Superintendent Public Schools, Alameda no compensation. 

Charles H. Allen, Principal State Normal School no compensation. 

'■'Will be succeefled December, 1875, by the Governor elect; Superintendent Public Instruction elect, and Su- 
perintendent Public Schools, San Francisco, elect. 

fWill be succeeded, by the Superintendent of Santa Clara, San Joaquin and Sacramento Counties elect. 

STATE LIBRAEY. 



E. B. Mott, President, Trustee no compensation. 

Joe Hamilton, Trustee no compensation. 

F. W. Hatch. Trustee no compensation. 

J. J. Green, Trustee no compensation. 



J. W. Armstrong, Trustee no compensation. 

R. 0. Cravens, Librarian S2,.'i0n 

Mrs. L. E. Morton, Deputy 1,800 

Peter F. Mohun, Deputy 1,800 



STATE BOARD OF HEALTH. 



Name. 



Office. 



Residence. 



Term Expires. 



Salary. 



Henry Gibbons, M. D.... 
Luke Robinson, M. D.... 

A. Stout, M. D 

F. D.Todd, M. D 

J. F. Montgomery, M. D. 

C. L. Lane, M. D 

T. M. Logan, M. D 



Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member 

Member and Secretary 



San Francisco 
Santa Clara .. 

Stockton 

Stockton 

Sacramento .. 
San Francisco 
Sacramento ., 



Dee. 1875 
Dec. 1875 
Dec. 1875 
Dec. 1875 
Dec. 1875 
Dec. 1875 
Dec. 1875 



No compensation 
No compensation 
No compensation 
No compensation 
No compensation 
No compensation 
No compensation 



REGENTS STATE UNIVERSITY, 



Name. 



Romualdo Pacheco, Governor 

William Irwin, Lt. Governor 

Speaker Assembly 

Superintendent Public Instruction.. 
President State Agricultural Society 
A. S. Hallidie, Pros. Mech. Institute 

John F. Swift 

J. W. Winans 

William Meek 

Horatio Stebbins 

Lawrence Archer 

J. West Martin 

Samuel B. McKee 

D. 0. xMills 

H. H. llaight 

J. Mora Aioss 

J. M. Hamilton 

John S. Hagar 

A. .J. Bowie 

F. M. Pi.xley 

John B. Felton 

W. T. Wallace 

R. E. C. Stearns 



Office. 



Ex-officio Regent President... 

" Regent 

" Regent 

" Regent 

" Regent 

" Regent 

Appointed Regent 

" Regent 

" Regent 

" Regent 

" Regent 

" Regent 

" Regent 

" Regent 

Honorary Regent 

" Regent 

" Regent 



Secretary. 



Regent 
Regent 
Regent 
Regent 



Residence. 



Sacramento 

Sacramento 

San Francisco.. 

Sacramento 

Sacramento 

San Francisco.. 
San Francisco.. 
San Francisco.. 

Oakland 

San Francisco.. 

San Jose 

Oakland 

Oakland 

San Francisco.. 

Alameda 

Tomescal 

Guenoc 

San Francisco.. 
San Francisco.. 
San Francisco.. 

Oakland 

San Francisco.. 
San Francisco.. 



Term 
Expir's 



1879 
1879 



1876 
1888 
1800 
1876 
1878 
1880 
1882 
1884 
1886 
1888 
1890 
1876 
1878 
1880 
1882 
1884 
1886 
At Will 



Salary. 



no compensa- 
[tion 



S3,000 



A. ROMAN & CO., Publishers, Booksellers, and Stationers, 11 Montgomery St., S. F. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



44 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



STATE APPOINTEES— MISCELLANEOUS. 



Names. 



R. K. Piotrowski 

A. «. Aboil 

Louis P'alkenau 

James Hunter 

James L. Hissell 

S. M. Mousor 

Joseph .Austin 

Porter Iladen 

Isaac Sivain 

Archibald Harloo 

J. \V. Foard 

Charl's Nelsonf 

Aldon Y. Trask 

AV. P. AVells 

Eugene L. Sullivan... 

William Alvord 

Louis McLane 

Daniel Biarloy 

J. D. P. Teller 

Theodore G. Cockrill 

B. B. Redding 

S. R. Throckmorton.. 

J. D. Farwell 

James Otis 

H. H. Toland 

J. M. McNulty 

J. P. Whitney 

James Simpson 



Office. 


Residence. 


Term 
Expires. 


Salary. 


Commissioner of Immigration 


San Francisco... 


1877 




Commissioner to Centennial Exhibi'n 


No comp. 


San Francisco... 


At will 


State Gauger 

Inspector Gas Meters 

Vaccine Agent 

Port Warden 


Fees. 


San Francisco... 




Fees. 








San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco... 
San Francisco- 
Sacramento 

San Francisco... 


At will 

At will 

At will 

At will 

At .will 

At will 

At will 

At will 

1878 

1878 

1878 

187t) 

1875 

1875 

1879 

1879 

1879 

1875 




Port Warden 




Port Warden 




Port Warden 




Insurance Commissioner 

Pilot Commissioner 


S3,000 
Fees. 


Pilot Commissioner 

Pilot Commissioner 


Fees. 


Park Commissioner 


No comp. 




No comp. 


Park Commissioner 




giiOU 


Marine Board 


,500 


Marine Board 


500 


Fish Commissioner 


No comp. 






Fish Commissioner 




Ex-Officio President Board of Health.. 
Member Board of Health 


San Francisco... 


No comp. 


Member Board of Health 








Member Board of Health 






No comp. 


Member Board of Health 


San Francisco... 




No comp. 



tPiLOLS Port of San Fr.^.ncisco.— W. N. Shelly, Charles Mayo, John Mahan, Frank Murphy, S. C. 
Isathan, W. H. Jolliffe, Thomas J. Knipe, Frank Boyd, William W. Neal, William E. Domett, John 
W. Ott, Freeman Trask, J. S. Dolliver, A. B. Gove, J. B. Jones, Thomas J. Reddish, Andrew J. 
Young, Eugene Freeman, Ignatius Pierce, and J. H. Rodgers. Benicia and Mare Island— C. H. 
Harrison. 

STATE HAKBOR COMMISSIONEES. 



Name. 



Samuel Soule 

T. D. Mathewson. 
D. C. McRuer 



Residence. 



San Francisco. 



Term Expires. 



Salary. 



.83,000 
. 3.000 
. 3,000 



DEAF AND DUMB AND BLIND INSTITUTE. 



J. Mora Morse, (President) Director. 

L. Hamilton Director. 

T. L. Barker Director. 

E. J. Crane Director. 



D. D. Shattuck Director. 

H. A. Palmer Director. 

Waring Wilkinson Principal. 



E. E. Thrift, (President) Director. 

Donald McLellan Director. 

0. Harvey Director. 

J. K. Doak Director. 

L. M. Cutting Director. 



INSANE ASYLUM, STOCKTON. 



P. V. Batte Treasurer and Ex-Officio Secretary. 

G. A. Shurtleff, M. D Superintendent. 

Isaac S. Titus, M. D Assistant Physician. 

Walter R. Langdon, M. D Assistant Physician. 



STATE PRISON, SAN QUENTIN 

Rqmualdo Pacheco, Governor Director. 

William Irwin, Lieut. Governor Director. 

Drury Melone, Secretary of State Director. 

William Irwin, Lieut. Governor Warden. 

James Towle Captain of the Guard. | 



Lee B. Matthews Captain of the Yard. 

C. P. Tinkham Turnkey. 

William M. Harron Commissary. 

P. W. Randle Physician. 

William H.McGrew Clerk. 



MILITARY DEPARTMENT OF THE STATE. 

In re-organizing the Military of the State under the law of 18(56, the troops mustered into the service 
as the National Guard consist of one Division, which is divided into six Brigades. 

Governor Romualdo Pacheco Commander in Chief. 

Staff of the Commander in Chief.— Brig.-G on. L. H. Foote. Adjutant Inspector, Quartermaster, and Com- 
missary-General, Chief of Ordnance, and ez-offlcio Chief of Staff; Col. Edgar Mills, Chief Engineer; 
CoL William Harney, Paymaster-General; Col. Eugene L. Sullivan, Judge Advocate-General; Col. G. 
J. Bucknall, Surgeon-General; Lieut-Cols. Claus Spreckels, Thomas K. Hook, W. W. Dodge, B. D. 
Murphy, James H. Withington, and AVilliam E. McArthur, Assistant Adjutant-General, Aida-de- 
Camp; Capt. Charles J. Collins, Aid-de-Camp to Adjutant-General. 

Maj. Gen. D. W. C. Thompson Commanding Division National Guard, CaL 



Best country insurance effected with PAENSWOETH Si CLAEK, San Francisco. 



pianos and Organs rented and sold on instalments at G-BAY'S, 105 ICearny St., S. F. 



NOTARIES PUBLIC. 



45 



staff. — Lieut. Col. C. Mason Kinne, Assistant Adjutant General; Lieut. Col. W. R. Smedburg, Division 
Inspector; Lieut. Col. Frank Soule, Jr., Engineer UtRcer; Lieut. Col. A. W. Preston, Ordnance Office; 
Lieut. Col. Charles H. Barth, Quartermaster; Lieut. Col. Samuel N. Morris, Commissary; Lieut. Col. 
C. V. D. Hubbard, Paymaster; Lieut. Col. W. C. Burnett. Judge Advocate; Lieut. Col. J. M. McNulty, 
Surgeon; Major Sheldon I. Kellogg, Jr., Aid-de-Camp; Major John F. Alexander, Aid-de-Camp. 



Phineas Banning, Brig. Gon 1st Brigade. 

James Coey, Brig. Gen 2nd Brigade. 

I.E. Ketchum, Brig. Gen 3rd Brigade. 



W. L. Campbell, Brig. Gon 4th Brigade. 

Chas. Cadwalader, Brig. Gon oth Brigade. 

John C. Schmidt, Brig. Gen Oth Brigade. 



NOTARIES PUBLIC 

In and for the various Counties, who were in office October 15th, 1875. Hold office two years, or until 
their successors are appointed. The figures after the names of the Counties represent the number 
of Notaries to which each is by law entitled. 



Date Appoint- 
ment. 
Dec. 8, 1873.. 



Dec 

Jan. 

May 

May 

May 

June 

June 

June 

July 

July 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Aug 



8, 1873 

2, 1874.. 
1, 1874.. 
5, 1874. 
5, 1874.. 
3.1874.. 
3, 1874. 

3, 1874., 
7, 1874. 
7, 1874. 
7, 1874.. 

14, 1874.. 
„ 25, 1S74., 
Aug. 25,1874. 
Sept. 28,1874. 
Jan. 7, 1875.. 
April 12, 1875.. 
June 28, 1875.. 
Sept. 20,1875., 



Dec. 1, 1873., 

Dec. 13, 1873.. 

Jan. 5, 1874., 

June 11, 1875. 



Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Jan. 
May 



11, 1873. 

1(5, 1873. 

22, 1873. 

27, 1874. 
ti, 1874. 
Marchl3, 1»75. 
:May 27, 1875. 
July 8, 1875. 



Dec. 5, 

Dec. 10, 

Doc. 10, 

Jan. 7, 

Jan. 27, 

Jan. 27, 

Jan. 27, 

Feb. 7, 

Feb. 24, 

Feb. 24, 
March21, 

June 3, 

June 3, 

July 7, 

Jan. 7, 

April 24, 

Sept. 17, 

Sept. 25, 



1873. 

1873. 
1873. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
Iis74. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 



Dec. 13. 1873. 
Jan. 7, 1874. 
Jan. 8, 1874. 
Feb. 10, lb74. 
March 3, 1874. 



ALAMEDA-20. 

Name Incumbent. Residence. 

.William Hoskins Oakland. 

.A. M. Church Livermore. 

.M. T. Dusenburg ...Oakland. 

■ W. B. Ma,?on Ea.?t Oakland. 

.John K. Palmer Pleasanton. 

.George W. Bond Centreville. 

,T. W. Millard ^Mission San Jose 

.J. H. Redstone Oakland. 

.William Bolton Oakland. 

.A. G. Oakes Haywoods. 

.T. A. Smith Alameda. 

.George E. Smith East Oakland. 

.D. C. Owen Alvarado. 

.Geo. W. Edwards Oakland. 

.L. G. Yates Centrevile. 

.W. M. Gilcrest Oakland. 

.A. B. Webster East Oakland. 

.Curtis H. Lindley.... Livermore. 

A. D. Thomson Oakland. 

.John W. Sessions.. ..Oakland. 

ALPINE— 15. 

.M. Maxwell Monitor. 

.John Simpson Markleeville. 

.A. C. Folger Silver Mountain. 

.John A. Johnson VVoodfords. 

AMADOR— 20. 

.R. Ludgate lone City. 

.L. M. Laine Volcano. 

.J. S. Hill Amador City. 

.John Keyes Sutter Creek. 

.B. F. Richtmeyer ...Jackson. 

.C. K. Johnson Sutter Creek. 

.J. N. Randolph Sutter Creek. 

.Sebastian G. Lewis..Plymouth. 

BUTTE-20. 

.A. Maurice, Jr. Oroville. 

.W. W. Stone Biggs Station. 

.L. D. Freer Oroville. 

.A. J. GifiFord Chico. 

.Bd'.vard Hoole Chico. 

.J. M. Burt Oroville. 

.Louis Glass Cherokee. 

.A. M. Barnard Nord. 

.George J. Bourne ...Chico. 

.H. T. A. Smizer Dayton. 

.J. P. Leonard Oroville. 

.John C. Gray Oroville. 

.Andrews Hallett Chico. 

.E. S. Owen Forbestown. 

.George W. Colby Colby's Landing 

.h\ C. Lusk Chico. 

.Alex. P. Wangle Chico. 

.Park Henshaw Chico. 

CALAVERAS-20. 
.William T. Lewis ...San Andreas. 

.J. M. Baker Copperopolis. 

.0. F. Tibbete Mokelumne Hill 

.C. W. Gottischalk ...San Andreas. 
.W. H. Leavitt Mokelumne Hill 



Marchl7, 1874...Tho3. L. Lindsey Angels Camp. 

June 3, 1874. ..Ira H. Reed West Point. 

Aug. 4, 1874... W.K. Boucher Mokelumne Hill 

June 11, 1875... Levi P. Felton Murphy's. 

COLUSA-15. 

Jan. 20, 1874. ..Jackson Hatch Princeton. 

Aug. 25, 1874... P. H. Scott Princeton. 

Dec. K), 1874. ..J. B. De Jarnott Colusa. 

Jan. 8, 1575... David Golden Colusa. 

May 20, 1875... James Hart Colusa. 

Oct. 2, 1875. ..John H. Leining .....Colusa. 

CONTRA COSTA-20. 

Dec. 1, 1873. ..Peter Pons Pacheco. 

Dec. 20, 1873. ..Charles B.Wood Danville. 

Feb. 3, 1874. ..S. Bacon Concord. 

Feb. 7, 1874. ..J. P. Abbott Antioch. 

March 3, 1874... John Slitz Walnut Creek. 

March 3, 1874. ..J. P. Jones Martinez. 

Marchll, 1S74...T. J. Wright San Pablo. 

May 20, 1875. ..Charles Rhine Clayton. 

EL DORADO-20. 

Oct. 28, 1873... W. E. Riebsam Latrobe. 

March26, 1874...T. B. Patton Placerville. 

April 3, 1874. ..J. L. Perkins Placerville. 

April 3, 1874...J. M. B. Weather- 
wax El Dorado. 

May 5, 1874. ..J. P. Jackson Georgetown. 

May 5, 1874. ..Samuel Kyburg Clarksville. 

June 3, 1874. ..Thomas Eraser Placerville. 

Sept. 8, 1874. ..E. G. Bradbury DiamondSpringa 

Sept. 24, 1874. ..A. J. Spencer Lake Valley. 

Sept. 24, 1874... E. L. Crawford Georgetown. 

Sept. 28, 1B74... George H. Ingham. ..Coloma. 
Dec. 3, 1874. ..George W. Farree... Greenwood. 
Dec. 3, 1874. ..Geo. G. Blanchard...Placerville. 

Dec. 23, 1874...0gden Squires Placerville. 

MarchSO, 1S75...A. A. Howard Lake Valley. 

May 7, 1875. ..S. 0. Pierce Shingle Springs. 

FRESNO-19. 

MarchlO, 1874...M. G. Church Fresno. 

April 3, 1874. ..C. A. Hoaton Fresno. 

April 10, 1874... Wm. Taymonville...Millorton. 

July 2, 1874. ..Thomas Pryce Fresno. 

Sept. 1, 1874... E. F. Greenleaf. Now Idria. 

Oct. 24. 1874...Launcelot Gilroy ...Kingston. 

Jan. 18, 1875... W. H. Creed Fresno. 

Feb. 2tj, 1875... H. S. Dixon Fresno. 

MarchlO, 1S75...H. L. Rea Fresno. 

May 20, 1875... W. T. Rumble Millerton. 

HUMBOLDT-19. 

Nov. 17, 1873...P. F. Hart Ferndale. 

Doc. 1, 1873... S. M. Buck Eureka. 

Jan. 27, 1874. ..Byron Doming Areata. 

Jan. 27, 1874... J. A. Whaloy Areata. 

Jan. 27, 1874. ..F. B. Simonds Rohnervillo. 

Jan. 27, 1874...iM. J. Conklin Petrolia. 

Marchii, 1874... J. K. Dallison Eureka. 

May 5, 1874... E. J. Dodge Ferndalo. 

May 5, 1874. ..J. C. Garber Eel Kiver. 

April 29, 1875. ..J. W.Henderson Eureka. 

Sept. 11, 1875... Robert Porter Hydesville. 

Oct. 11, 1875. ..A. W.Randall Eureka. 



s> 
i-i 

C3 
p 






O 



o 
o 
o 

o 
o 
o 

o 

> 



o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 



£3 



p 

o 

k 



A. ROMAN & CO., Wedding Invitations engraved and printed, 11 Mont. St.. S. P. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 513 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



46 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Fob. 25, 
April 22, 
Aug. 25, 
Sept. 22, 
Oct. 12, 
Nov. 2, 
March27, 
MarchliO, 
April 5, 
May 2fi, 
Juno 7, 
June 21), 



Nov. 26, 
Feb. It). 
March 3, 
Marchll, 
April ;S, 
April 25, 
Oct. 22, 
Oct. 24, 
Nov. 25, 
Feb. 2t), 
May 20, 
Sept. 25, 



1S74. 
1874. 
Ih74. 
LS74. 
1874. 
1874. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 



1873. 
1874. 
Ib74. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 



INYO-17. 

.R. A. Loomis Lono Pino. 

..D. V. McCartor Uerro Gordo. 

.Patrick Roddy Indepondonco. 

.G. H. McCalluiu ludopondence. 

.C. B. Kichardson ...Panainint. 

.11. E. Arick Panaiuint. 

.Goo. C Alexander... Bishop Creek. 
.John M. Murphy ...Panamint. 

.V. A. Gregg Independence. 

.I'aul W. Bennett Independence. 

.W. S. Grant Darwin. 

..M. J.McManus Darwin. 

KERN-15. 

.A. C. Lawrence Bakersfield. 

.Benjamin BrundageBakersfield. 

..J. L. Tilloy Kernvillo. 

,. J ulius Chester Bakerstield. 

.S. J. Lansing Bakerstield. 

..J. W. Freeman Havilah. 

.W. A. Johnson Bakerstield. 

,.T. A. Stoutenberg ...Kernvillo. 

.E. E. Calhoun Tehichipa Val'y 

..A. H. Davies Bakerstield. 

..S. A. Burnap Panama. 

..Qeo.Vonable Smith.Bakerslield. 

LAKE— 15. 

.H. A. Oliver Guenoc. 

,.D. V. Thompson Upper Lake. 

..A. P. McCarty Lakeport. 

..William Kelsey Lower Lake. 

..George T. Martin ...Lakoport. 
..John 11. Sopor Middlotown. 



Jan. 20,1874. 
Feb. 3,1874. 
July 25,1874. 
Jan. 20, 1875. 
March-2.5, 1875. 
July 8, 1875. 

LASSEN-15. 

Jan. 20, 1875...W. E. Norris Susanville. 

LOS ANGELES-21. 

.J. B. Holloway Galatin. 

.A. C. Holmes Los Angeles. 

.J. J. Warner Los Angeles. 

.S. G. Oabanis Los Angeles. 

.Jos. Huber, Jr Los Angeles. 

.A. J. King Los Angeles. 

.W. N. Ord Los Angeles. 

..C. E. Bean Los Angeles. 

.John Loop Los Angeles. 

.P. H. Downing Wilmington. 

.S. Hamilton Los Angeles. 

.H. H. Dickerman Tustin City. 

..J. W. Clark Anaheim. 

..T. F. Barber Los Angeles. 

..C. H. Grattan Los Angeles. 

..C. R. Johnson Los Angeles. 

..A. B. Moffitt San Fernando. 

.H. C. Austin Los Angeles. 

..P. C. Tonner Spadra. 

..Robert Strong Westminister. 

..George J. Clark Los Angeles. 

. J. M. Rothschild Los Angeles. 

..Wm. H. Williams. ..Santa Monica. 

..Thos F. Barbee Los Angeles. 

..James C. Kays Los Angeles. 

MARIN-IS. 

..E. B. Mahon San RafaoL 

..William VanderbiltTomales. 

..R. K. Weston San Rafael. 

..T. J. Bowers San Rafael. 

..C. A. Barney San Rafael. 

..W. IL McGrow San RafaeL 

..W. 0. L. Crandall...01ema. 

MARIPOSA-15. 
Aug. 12, 1874... Jonathan Wentzer..Coult6rviIle . 

Feb. 25, 1874. ..Morris Newman Bear Valley. 

Jan. 2(i. 1875...L. F. Jones Mariposa. 

MarchlS, 1875... William Adams Hornitos. 

MENDOCINO-15. 

Nov. 18, 1873... Joseph A. Knox Sunol. 

Dec. 18, 1873... Augustus Heesor Mendocino. 

Feb. 7, 1874...Gustavus Lindoroos. Point Arenas. 

May 8, 1874. ..T. L. Carothors Ukiah City. 

Juno 3, 1874... R. McGarvoy Ukiah City. 

June 12, 1874... Frank E. Warren.. ..Mendocino. 



Den. 


19, 1873.. 


Jan. 


20, 1874. 


May 


15, 1874. 


June 


3, 1874. 


June 


22, 1874. 


Jnlv 


7, 1874.. 


July 


7, 1874.. 


July 


7, 1874. 


Aug. 


5, 1874.. 


Aug. 


7, 1874. 


Aug. 


14, 1874. 


Aug. 


20, 1874. 


Sept. 


1, 1874. 


Sept. 


14, 1874. 


Got. 


9, 1874. 


Nov. 


6, 1874. 


Dec. 


12, 1874. 


Ann. 


28. 1875. 


MarchlS, 1875. 


Jiay 


8, lb7o. 


.May 


21), 1875. 


Aug. 


3, 1875. 


Sep. 


10, 1875. 


Sep. 


1«, 1875. 


Oct. 


5, 1875. 


Dec. 


13, 1873. 


1)00. 


13, 1873. 


Doc. 


13, 1873. 


Jan. 


5, 1874. 


Jan. 


20, 1874 


Kob. 


27, 1874. 


July 


7, 1874. 



July 1, 1874. ..Charles W. DunslowMendocino. 

July 7, 1874. ..M. J. C. Galvin Mendocino. 

July 25, 1874. ..George VV. Claxton..Kibosillah. 

Sept. 9. 1874... A. C. Squire Navarro. 

Sept. », 1874. ..C. W. Olmstead Gualala. 

Nov. 5, 1874...I. M. Ellis Round Valley. 

Jan. 5, LS75...P. C. Dozior Ukiah City. 

April 12, 1875... John K. Chambers. ..Covelo. 

Oct. (i, 1875... Martin Baechtel Littlo Lake. 

MERCED-15. 

Nov. 5, 1873. ..S. C. Bates Merced. 

Nov. 25, 1873... W. F. Clarke Los Banos. 

Dec. 8, 1873...P. D. Wiggington Merced. 

Dec. 29, 1874... W. S. Weed Merced. 

Fob. 3, 1875. ..S. W. Geis Merced. 

June 1875. ..John K. Law Merced. 

June 9, 1«75... Charles M. Blair Merced. 

July 19, 1875. ..Gilbert B. NoighborSoelling. 
Sept. 27, lb75...E. Jackman Merced. 

MODOC-15. 

.John H. Bonner Cedorvillo. 

.George 11. Knight... Adin. 

.J. C. Bowmer Lake City. 

..H- L- Spargur Camp Bidwell. 

MONO-15. 

.David Hays Bridgeport. 

,.J. S. Kirkendall Colevillo. 

..John C. Mitchell Benton. 

MONTE RE Y-20. 

1873. ..John Ruurds Monterey. 

1874... .John S. Payne Pajaro. 

1874. ..\V. P. NichoUs Salinas City. 

1874... J. A. McCandless Salinas City. 

1874. ..S. M. Swinerton Salinas City. 

1&74... Felipe Gomez Monterey. 

1874... A. M. James Monterey. 

1874...M. M. Speegle Castroville. 

1674. ..John K. Alexander.Salinas City. 

1874... W. H. Clark Salinas City. 

1874... B. S. Starr Salinas City. 

1874... N. A. Dorn Salinas City. 

1875. ..John L. Murphy Salinas City. 

1875... W. B. Wood Castroville. 

1875. ..Samuel Cassiday Salinas City. 



May 9, 1874. 

May 27, 1S74. 

May 27, 1874. 

Nov. 7,1874, 



Feb. 24,1874., 
Feb. 24,1874. 
March2(j, 1874. 



Nov. 28, 
Feb. 17, 
March 3, 
May 1, 
May 20, 
May 20, 
July 7, 
Aug. 12, 
Sept. 1, 
Nov. 30, 
Dec. 21, 
Dec. 2:), 
March 8, 
April 19, 
July 19, 



NAPA-16. 

Dec 6, 1873...AV. M. Boggs Napa City. 

Dec. 23, 1873... R. Bunnell Napa City. 

Dec. 31, 1873. ..A. C. Palmer Calistoga. 

Jan. 27, 1874. ..A. C. McDonnell Yountvillo. 

May 5, 1874. ..Louis Bruck Napa City. 

Sop. 8, 1874. ..George W. Towle Napa City. 

Nov. 2, 1874... Robert Crouch Napa Citj'. 

Nov. 5, 1874...E. E. Stacy Calistoga. 

Dec. 8, 1874... Richard Dudding.... Napa City. 

Feb. 20, 1875...J. E. Pond Napa City. 

March 9, 1875. ..J. H. Rowland Napa City. 

June 25, 1875. ..A. J. Hull Napa City. 

June 28, 1&75...P. E. Johnston Napa City. 

Aug. 3, 1875... R. H. Sterling Napa City. 

Sept. 25, 1875...N. M. Bonham St. Helena. 

NEVADA— 20. 

..0. P. Stidgor North San Juan. 

..E. W. Roberts Grass Valley. 

..James A. Stidgor North San Juan. 

..J. B. Johnson Nevada. 

..W. K. Spencer Grass Valley. 

..R. B. Patton Sweetland. 

,. J. J. L. Pell Truckoe. 

.. VVilliam George Grass Valley. 

..A. J. Ridge Grass Valley. 

..Nilos Searles Nevada. 

..J. J. Caldwell Nevada. 

..A. M. Walker Truckee. 

..V. S. Bell French CorraL 

..S. B. Davenport Nevada. 

..D. J. Crowloy Nevada. 

.. W. D. Long Nevada. 

..Charles W. xvitts Grass Valley. 

..J. M. W^alling Nevada. 



Doc. 
Jan 
Feb, 

Fob. 17, 
March 3, 
March 3, 
April 8, 
June 13, 
Aug. 5, 
Nov. 25, 
Dec. 12, 
Jan. 13, 
Feb. 9, 
Feb. 17, 
April 23, 
Aug. 28, 
Sept. 
Oct. 8, 

PLACER-20. 

Nov. 8, 1873...Henry Briggs Lincoln. 

Nov. 28, 1873. ..James Moore Ophir. 



22, 



1873. 
1S74. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874, 
1874, 
1874. 
Ib74. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875., 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 



PAIINSWOETH & CLARK, Pire Insurance Agents for Pacific Coast, San Pranciscc 



Largest stock Musical Merchandise west of Chicago, at GEAY'S, 105 Kearny, S. P. 



NOTARIES PUBLIC. 



47 



Dec. 10, 
Dec. 20, 
Feb. 3, 
Marchl7, 
Juno 8, 
July 1, 
Aug. 4, 
Kov. li», 
Dec. 10, 
Jan. 7, 
March 8, 
May 3, 
May 7, 



Doc. 13, 1873.. 
Dec. 13, 1S73.. 
Dec. 13, 1873. 
July 8, 1874. 
Mareh30, 1875. 
May 20, 1875. 



Dec. 11, 
April 2, 
April 3, 
April 8, 
J uly 7, 
July 7, 
July 25, 
Aug. 3, 
Sep. 24, 
Dec. 2ii, 
Jan. 7, 
March 9, 
Marchli, 
April 12. 
April 23, 
April 24, 



1873...P. B. Weber Gold Run. 

1873... A. H. Cowden Forest Hill. 

1874. ..J. D. Pratt Hosevillo. 

1874... James Jameson Dutch Flat. 

1874. ..A. J. Bishop Laet Chance. 

1S74...R. C. Poland Auburn. 

1874... A. D. Campbell Emigrant Gap. 

lb74...P. Stone Iowa Hill. 

1874. ..C. F. Macy Iowa Hill. 

1875... W. B. Storey Colfax. 

, 1875 ..B. Walsh Auburn. 

1875. ..J. A. Forbes, Jr Tahoo City. 

1875... Peter Singer Jjincoln. 

PLUMAS-15. 
.James H. AVhitlock. Greenville. 
.George W. Hodgkins.Taylorville. 

..Simon Scheeline Summit. 

• William N. KelloggQuincy. 

..Samuel N. Scott Dutch Hill. 

.Simeon Wheeler La Porte. 

SACRAMENTO-20. 
1873. ..Edward M. Martin..Sacramento. 

1874. ..C. S. Coffin Sacramento. 

1874. ..Samuel Cross Sacramento. 

1S74... J ames H. Ferris Gait. 

1874. ..L. S. Taylor Sacramento. 

1874...Edvvard F. Taylor. ..Sacramento. 

1S74...C. H. Wyman Sacramento. 

1874...Josiah Pool Onisbo. 

1874. ..H. K. Snow Sacramento. 

1674... J ulius NV'etzlar Sacramento. 

1875... W. R. Cantwoll Sacramento. 

1875. ..P. J. Hopper Sacramento. 

1875. ..Ed. Cadwalader Sacramento. 

1875. ..A. C. Freeman Sacramento. 

1S75...W. R. Hinkson Sacramento. 

1875... W. C. Crossette Folsom. 



June 

June 

July 

July 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Dec. 

Feb. 



3, 1874... 

3, 1874.. 

8, 1874.. 
25, 1874.. 

(J, 1874.. 

0, 1874.. 

6, 1874.. 

12, 1874.. 
25, 1874.. 

8, 1874.. 

2, 1875.. 
March2.5, 1875.. 
June 10, 1875.. 



Dec. 5, 

Dec. 13, 

Dec. 19, 

Jan. 8, 
Marchli, 

June 9, 

July 7, 

July 7, 

Oct. 22, 

i\ov. 17, 

Dec. 12, 

Jan. 20, 

Jan. 25, 

Feb. 4, 
March25, 

April 1, 
April 1, 

May 3, 

May 3, 

aept. 11, 

Sept. 17, 



1873. 
1873. 
1873. 
1874., 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874.. 
1874. 
1874. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875. 
1875, 



.R. De Zaido San Francisco. 

.S. S. Murfey San Francisco. 

.P. G. Wood San Francisco. 

.S. Hermann San Francisco. 

.F. 0. Wegener San Francisco. 

.A. C. Crane San Francisco. 

.H. C. Blake San Francisco. 

.J. W. Connor San Francisco. 

.James L. King San Francisco. 

.H. S. Tibbey San Francisco. 

.E. V. Sutter San Francisco. 

.A. S. Gould San Francisco. 

.Philip Mahler San Francisco. 

SAN JOAQUIN-20. 

.L. M. Cutting Stockton. 

• R. E. Wilhoit Stockton. 

..S. J. Hinds Stockton. 

.P. S. Wilks Stockton. 

.S. S. Burge Stockton. 

.J. H. VVubster Stockton. 

..A. G. Brown Stockton. 

.W. S. Montgomery. ..Stockton. 

.W. M.Gibson Stockton. 

.Alonzo Rhodes Stockton. 

.C. W. Dohrmann Stockton. 

..George A. Brown. ...Stockton. 

..J. F. Truett Ellis. 

.A. M. Noble Stockton. 

..J. M. Hogan Stockton. 

..James M. McCarty.. Stockton. 

..John C. Reid Stockton. 

..Philip B. Eraser Stockton. 

..H. T. Compton Stockton. 

..J. A. Loutiit Stockton. 

..John E. Budd Stockton, 



SAN BENITO-13. 

April 16, 1874...N. C. Briggs Hollistor. 

April 10, 1874. ..C. G. Lathrop Hollister. 

May 5, 1874. ..John M. Whitney. ..San Juan. 

Oct. 19, 1874... E. C. Tully Hollister. 

Nov. 19, 1874... W. S. McFheeters... Hollister. 

SAN BEBNARDINO-15. 

1873... B. B. Harris Agua Mansa. 

1873. ..L. C. Waite Riverside. 

1674... John Brown San Bernardino. 

1S74...J. W. Satterwhite...San Bernardino. 

1874...Dennis Searles { ^^jiist^^J".''^ '^• 

1874...N. C. Bledsoe San Bernardino. 

1874. ..F. L. B. Goodwin. ...San Bernardino. 

1875. ..J. J. Atkinson Bear Valley. 

1875. ..N. 0. Arrington Bairdstown. 

1875... Rodney K. Sherwin.San Bernardino. 

1875. ..Isaac H. Levy San Bernardino. 

1875. ..James P. Greeve Riverside. 

1875...Amasa Swift San Bernardino. 

1875. ..A. D. Boren San Bernardino, 

SAN DIEGO-15. 

1874... H. H. Dougherty San Diego. 

1874. ..Silvester Statler San Diego. 

1874. ..Moses A. Luce San Diego. 

1874... Charles F. Monroe.. Julian City. 

1874. ..N.H. Dodson Old San Diego. 

1874. ..G. G. Bradt San Diego. 

1874...Chas.B. Dickerman. Banner. 
1875... Edward Bannister... San Diego. 
1875. ..Geo. N. Hitchcock...San Diego. 

1875... Robert Leslie Julian City. 

1875... William R. Porter. ..San Diego. 

SAN FRANCISCO-24. 

1873... D. K. Swim San Francisco. 

1873. ..John Hamill San Francisco. 

1874. ..James Brooks San FrancLico. 

1874. ..Daniel McLaren San Francisco. 

1874. ..Charles J. Torbert...San Francisco. 

1874...E. H. Tharp San Francisco. 

1874. ..H. Lowenberg San Francisco. 

1874... Arnold Fuller San Francisco. 

1874. ..N. P. Smith San Francisco. 

, 1874...J. H. Blood San Francisco. 

, 1874. ..B. V. Joice San Francisco. 



Nov. 


4,1 


Dec. 


22. 


March 10, 


June 


18, J 


July 


7, 


July 


25,] 


Dec. 


19, 


Kob. 


20, 


Feb. 


20, 


Feb. 


30, 


April 


5. 


April 


12, 


April 


12, 


April 


23, 


Fob. 


10. 


MarchlO, 


Marc 


ilO, 


Marc 


i23, 


May 


15, 


July 


1, 


Oct. 


14, 


March 8, 


Marc 


1 8, 


May 


20, 


Juno 


10, 


Oct. 


24, 


Oct. 


25, 


Jan. 


3, 


Jan. 


0, 


Feb. 


20, 


Apri' 


18, 


Apri 


22. 


April 28, 


May 


2, 


May 


2, 


May 


2, 



Dec. 


12, 


Dec. 


31, 


Dec. 


31, 


Fob. 


7, 


Feb. 


24, 


June 


0, 


Aug. 


14, 


Keb. 


n, 


Aug. 


3, 


Sep. 


13, 



SAN LUIS OBISPO-18. 

1873... P. A. Forester Cambria. 

1873. ..M. B. Harrison San Luis Obispo. 

1873... D. F. Newsom Arroyo Grande. 

1874...R. M. Preston Old Creek. 

Is74... Ernest Graves San Luis Obispo. 

1874. .. J. B. Butchart San Marcos. 

1874... A. M. Loomis San Luis Obispo. 

1875. ..Ezra Carpenter San Marcos. 

1875. ..P. H. Dunn Paso Robles. 

1875. ..F. K. Miller San LuisUbispo 

SAiSf MATEO-15. 

Feb. 25, 1874...P. G. Stryker Pescadero. 

April 10, 1874. ..George W. Fox Redwood City. 

Nov. 19, 1874. ..J. P. Ames Spanishtown. 

June 5, 1875. ..H. A. Scofield Redwood City. 

SANTA BARBARA-18. 

Dec. 8, 1873. ..Robert Pollard Guadalupe. 

Jan. 20, 1874. ..S. R. J- Sturgeon Santa Barbara. 

May 0, 1874... B. F. Thomas Guadalupe. 

July 10, 1874. ..A. S. Copper Santa Barbara. 

July 25, 1874. ..N. W. Winton Santa Barbara. 

Aug. 4, 1874... E. M. Hoyt Santa Barbara. 

Nov. 2, 1874...C. E. Chubbuck Lompoc. 

Feb. 2, 1875. ..Jonas Wescoatt Guadulupe. 

March30, 1875. ..W. W. Broughton... Lompoc. 

May 8, 1875. ..John P. Honning Lompoc. 

July 8, 1875... W. M. Francis Santa Barbara. 

Sept. 15, 1875. ..F. N. Gutierrez Santa Barbara. 

Oct. 2, 1875... C. A. Storke Santa Barbara. 

SANTA CLARA-28. 

1874. ..C. F. Wilcox San Jose. 

1874... \V\ Henderson Mayfield. 

1874. ..S. P. Taylor Mountain View. 

1874... J. B. Hewson San Jose. 

1874. ..E. W. Aram San Jose. 

1874... James R. Lowe San Jose. 

1874. ..J. W. Johnson San Jose. 

1874...C. C. Stephens San Jose. 

1874 ..James A. Clayton. ..San Jose. 

1874. ..George W. Yoell San Jose. 

1874...J. T. Melone San Jose. 

1874... F. McCusker San Jose, 

1874. ..W. W. Hoover Gilroy. 

1875... R. B. Buckner Gilroy. 

1875... William P. Veuve. ..San Jose. 

1875. ..G. C. Jenkins Santa Clara. 

1875. ..John T. Colahan San Jose. 

1875. ..James S. Dilley Santa Clara. 



Jan. 

Jan. 

Feb. 

Feb. 

Fob. 

Apri 

April 25, 

June 22 

July 

July 

July 

July 

Dec. 

Feb. 

MarchSO 

Juno 10, 

Juno 2J, 

June 25, 



A. BOM AN & CO., Photograph Albums, Bibles, and Frayer Books, 11 Mont. St., S. F, 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



48 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



May 5, 1874.. 

May 5, 1674. 

July 7,1874., 

Jan. 28,1875. 

April 20. 187j.. 

May 8, 1875., 

J uly lU, 1875. 

Aug. 28,1875. 



Doc. 22, 1873. 
March 3, 1874. 
April 1, 1875. 



Nov. 
Jau. 
May 
iUay 
July 
Aug. 
Aug. 
May 
iiopt. 



18. 1873. 
5, 1874. 
8, 1874. 

15. 1874, 
8, 1874. 

10, 1874. 

11, 1874, 
2U, 1S75. 
11, 1875. 



Feb. 16,1874. 
April 17, 1S74. 
July 25,1874. 

17, 1674. 
7, lb75. 

18,1875. 

2tj, 1875, 



Au 
Jan. 
Jan. 
May 



Dec. 

Dec. 

Jan. 

Jan. 

April 

April 

July 

July 

Aug. 

Aug. 

Uct. 

JNov. 

Jan. 

i'eb. 

Aug. 

Sept. 

Sept. 



1, 1873. 
11, 1873. 

5, 1674. 
20, 1874. 
lU, 1674. 
22, 1874. 

7, 1874. 
10, 1874. 

19. 1874. 
25, 1874. 
31, 1674. 
21, 1674. 
20, 1875. 
2(3, 1875. 

4, 1875. 
6, 1675. 

10. 1875. 



19, 



Jan, 
Jan, 
March 3, 
May 1, 
July 
July 
July 
Sept. 
JSfov. 
Jan. 
Marchl3, 
April 19, 
April 23, 
April 27, 
Sept. 0, 
Uct. 8, 



Nov. 26, 
Nov. 26, 
i'eb. 25, 
Feb. 25, 
March 3, 
July 29. 
Dec. 3, 
Jan. 7, 
March 8, 
J une 25, 



1874. 
1674. 
1874. 
1674. 
1874. 
1674. 
1674. 
1874. 
1874, 
1675. 
1675. 
1875. 
1675. 
1875. 
1675. 
1675. 



1873. 
1873. 
1874., 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1675. 
1875. 
1675. 



SANTA CRUZ-20. 

.L. D. lioUbrook Watsonvillo. 

..Frank Cooper Santa Cruz. 

,.J. 11. Logan Santa Cruz. 

..E. L. AVilliaius Santa Cruz. 

,.A. S. Kittredgo Watsonvillo, 

..Julius Loo Watsonvillo. 

..Richard ThompsoD..Santa Cruz. 
..J. L. lialsioad Watsonvillo. 

SHASTA-15. 

..Goorgo K. Knox Shasta. 

.W. N. Guptill Millvilla. 

..James McCormick ..Reading. 

SIERRA-15. 

.John T. Bradbury...Alloghany. 

.Thomas Stoddort Dowuieville. 

..li. Darry Dovvnievillo. 

..George Wood Siorraville. 

,.John W. Oroar Downieville. 

.M. VVincholl Gibsonvillo. 

,.C. W. Uendol St. Louis. 

..0. F. Hakes Sierra Valley. 

..J. T. Mooney Sierra City. 

SISKIYOU-15. 

..E. H. Hall Etna. 

..John V. Brown Yreka. 

..A. F. McCarton Fort Jones. 

..11. B. \Varren ireka. 

,.M. Rennor Yreka. 

..i. S. Board Etna. 

..B. W. Jenkes Sawyer's Bar. 

SOLANO-20. 

..James Barry Benicia. 

..H. B. Ammons Vacaville. 

..Gustavo Luttges Maine Frairie. 

..i. E. Abbott Vallqjo. 

..C. W. Kiley Vallejo. 

..C. A. Pine Rio Vista. 

..James 11. Barrett ...Elmira. 
..Thomas Manslieid... Vacaville. 

..J . Mclvenna Suisun. 

..J. T. Hammond Suisun. 

..J. \Y. CoUen Dixon. 

.E. H. Sawyer Vallejo. 

..S. G. Hilborn Vallejo. 

,.H. B. Sholaon Dixon. 

..Henry Llackman Vallego. 

..S. F. Hyde Fremont. 

..George H. Riddell... Benicia. 

SONOMA-22. 

..W. J. Hardy Santa Rosa. 

..J. G. Thompson Fine Flat. 

..H. C. Firebaugh Healdsburg. 

..\V. H. Bond Santa Rosa. 

..G. L. Wratten Sonoma. 

..D. C. Brush Cloverdale. 

..D. D. Garden Fetaluma. 

..E. S. Lippitt Petaluma. 

,.R. H. Temple Santa Rosa. 

..L. H. .Norton Healdsburg. 

..J. Burckhalter Santa Rosa. 

..John 11. Fowler Valley Ford. 

..U. H. Hoag Bloomtield. 

..John li. Fressly Santa Rosa. 

..J. C. Wickersham...Foialuma. 
..B. B. Allen Sebastopol. 

STANISLAUS-20. 

..L. B. Walthall Modesto. 

..T. A. Caldwell Modesto. 

..S. P. Rogers Modesto. 

..C. S. S. Hill Oakdale. 

..D. H. Pierce La Grange. 

..John Warner Knight's Ferry. 

.J. F. Ward Turlock. 

..George H. Copland.. Grayson. 

..J ames Burney Modesto. 

..Charles P. Harris. ..Hill's F'erry. 



SUTTER-15. 
Nov. 20, 187S...J. H. Ray Yuba City. 



Doc. 
Jan. 
Oct. 
Feb. 
Oct. 



Doc. 6, 1873., 
Fob. 2ii, 1874., 
April 3, 1874., 
Oct. 19, 1674.. 
March30, 1875.. 
Sept. 11, 1875., 



March20, 1874, 
March20, 1874, 
Fob. 9, 1875. 



Dec. 18, 

Doc. 22, 

Jan. 12, 

Jan. 12, 

J an. 12, 

Jan. 12, 

July 1, 

July 7, 

Aug. 5, 



1873, 
1873. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874, 
1874. 
1674, 



Aug 

Oct. 5, 

Oct. 19, 

Oct. 27, 

Nov. 2, 

Nov. 19, 

Feb. 20, 
March27, 

July 19, 

July 26, 

Aug. 28, 



29, 1874. 



1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1874. 
1875. 
1875. 
1873. 
1675. 
1875. 



Nov. 

Dec. 

Dec. 

Doc. 

Jan. 

April 

May 

July 

Sept. 

Nov. 



June 
July 
July 

Nov. 



20, 1873...Richard Bayno Yuba City. 

20, 1874. ..J. L. Wilbur Yuba City. 

23, 1874... W. H. Lee Yuba City. 

20, l875...William C. Smith.. ..Meridian. 
8, 1875... J. M. Thomas Yuba City. 

TEHAMA-15. 

,.W. H. Jones Red Bluff. 

.Charles Harvoy Red Bluff. 

..S. N. Merrill Tehama. 

.Jamos T. Matlock. ..Red Bluff. 

.Jerome Banks Red Bluff. 

..Charles A. Garter. ..Red Bluff. 

TRINITY-IS. 

,.F. W. Young Weaverville. 

..Asa Taylor Junction City. 

.John G. Irwin Weaverville. 

TULARE-19. 

..J. C. Ward Visalia. 

,.S. C. Brown Visalia. 

..M. S. Babeock Kings River. 

,. J. 0. Lovejoy Tulare City. 

..C. S. O'Bannon Visalia. 

..Julius Levy Visalia. 

..James M. Johnson.. Visalia. 
M. W. Williamson. ..Porterville. 

..John M. Crowley Visalia. 

T P Pnr.1 i Mineral King 

••'^•^- ^°^^ I M.J>istrict. 

..C. W. Hackett Grangorvillo. 

..R. C. Red Porterville. 

.Levi Mitchell White River. 

.James A. Slover Tulo River. 

.D. K. Zumalt Visalia. 

.Justin Jacobs, Jr. ..Visalia. 
..Charles M. Vallee... Visalia. 

..N. O. Bradley Visalia. 

..Joseph A. Norvell... Visalia. 
..1. E. Marshall Wheatville. 

TUOLUMNE— 20. 

..E. E. White Columbia. 

..J. F. Rooney Sonora. 

..William Urich Big Oak Flat. 

..C. L. Street Sonora. 

..M. Bacon Chinese Camp. 

..A. BuUerdieck Shaws Flat. 

..E. R. Galvin Sonora. 

..A. B. Preston Jamestown. 

..J. D. Redmond Sonora. 

..Charles Tupper Sonora. 

VENTURA-15. 

..W. T. Williams S.Buenaventura 

,.M. E. Jimenez S.Buenaventura 

..H. Robinson S. Buenaventura 

..A. Gerterding Hueneme. 

..C. D. Bovestel S.Buenaventura 

..G. B. Scidmore. S. Buenaventura 

YOLO-20. 

..C. S. Frost Woodland. 

..E. R. Perkins Capay. 

..C. F. Reed Knight's Land'g 

..John S. Lambert.. ..Cal. Q. S. M. Co. 

..James O'Neal Davisville. 

..R. P. Davidson Woodland. 

..John H. Murphy Cachevillo. 

..J. C. Hulse Winters. 

YUBA— 20. 

..William Singer Marysville. 

,.M. A. Marcuse Marysville. 

..J. L. Lockwood Camptonville. 

..James E. Moody Wheatland. 

..George Merritt Marysville. 

..E. A. Belcher. Marysville. 

..J. C. Bradley Marysville. 

..M. C. Dufficy Marysville. 

..B. W. Houser Marysville. 

..John Krause Marysville. 

..L. R. Sellon Marysville. 

..N. D. Poppert Marysville. 

..Timothy S. Brew Smartsville. 

..John T. McNutt Smartsville. 



11, 1873. 

1. 1873. 
22, 1673. 
22, 1873. 
20, 1874. 

8, 1874. 
1, 1674. 

1. 1874. 
8, 1874. 
2, 1874. 



Nov. 12, 1873. 
Jan. 27, 1874. 
Jan. 20, 1875. 
Jan. 20, 1875. 
March 8, 1875. 
jMay 10, 1875. 



Nov. 14,1873. 

Jan. 7,1874. 

June 22, 1874. 

July 7, 1874. 

Oct. 2, 1874. 

Oct. 8, 1874. 

June 25, 1875. 

June 4,1875. 



Nov. 17.1873. 
Nov. 28, 1873. 
Feb. 3, 1874. 
Feb. 7, 1874. 
March 3, 1874. 
May 22, 1874. 

3, 1674. 

8, 1874. 
25, 1874. 

7, 1874. 
MarchSO, 1875. 
May 3, 1675. 
Sept. 22. 1875. 
Oct. 5, 1875. 



Pirst class fire insurance policies issued by PAMSWOETH & CLAEK, S. P. 



Send orders for Music to QUAY'S, 105 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



CALIFORNI A — C OMMISSIONERS OP DEEDS. 



48a 



COMMISSIONEKS OF DEEDS. 

[Appointed for Four Years.] 

WITH NAME, RESIDENCE, AND DATE OF EXPIRATION OF COMMISSION OF EACH. 



(Corrected at the oflSce of the Secretary of State, October 15th, 1873.) 



Name. 



Residence. Date Ap- 
pointment. 

ALABAMA. 
John C. Berry Mobile Sept. 3, 1872 

ARKANSAS. 

Frank Strong Little Rock April 6,1872 

J. C. Battenfield Russellville May 11, 1875 

ARIZONA TERRITORY. 

W. P. Miller Nov. 17, 1871 

W. H. Silverthorn Mineral Park Feb. 2, 1872 

D. Henderson Prescott April 29, 1872 

H. N. Alexander Yuma Nov. 27, 1872 

James E. McCaffry Tucson Feb. 16. 1874 

H. P. Sonntag Yavapai City July 25,1874 

J. W. Clark Tucson Aug. 3, 1874 

James P. Bull Mineral Park June 1,1875 

Jerome H. Vaughn McCrackin Hill.June 5, 1875 

COLORADO TERRITORY. 

Robert S. Morrison Denver May 4, 1871 

CONNECTICUT, 
S. Tweedy Danbury Dec. 9, 1871 

D. Y. Gordon Hartford Mar. 18, 1872 

E. Goodman Hartford Oct. 7, 1872 

J. C. Hollister Nevr Haven Jan. 17, 1873 

H. E. Taintor Hartford April 19, 1873 

H. H. Noble Bridgeport Feb. 3, 1874 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA. 

N. Callan Washington April 6. 1872 

Ivan Pike AVashington Sept. 20, 2872 

George F. Graham Washington April 1, 1875 

FLORIDA. 

J. H. Durkee Jacksonville April 29, 1872 

Manuel C. Jordan Jacksonville Oct. 2, 1875 

GEORGIA. 

J. W. Burroughs Savannah Mar. 27, 1872 

Samuel Levy Augusta June 7,1872 

A. C. Glenn Atlanta Feb. 3,1875 

ILLINOIS. 

S. W. King Chicago Mar. 1,1872 

S. S. Willard Chicago Dec, 29, 1872 

Henry Wisner Chicago Dec. 6, 1872 

P. A. Hoyne Chicago Sept. 11, 1873 

A. L. Bartlett Chicago Sept. 11,1873 

Charles Knobelsdoff... Chicago May 8, 1874 

INDIANA. 

George H. Campbell. ..Indianapolis May 20, 1872 

KENTUCKY. 
R. H. Thompson Louisville Nov. 18,1873 

LOUISIANA. 

A. Hero, Jr New Orleans Mar. 25, 1872 

A. D. Bragdon New Orleans April 6, 1872 

James Graham New Orleans July 1,1873 

J. G. Eustice New Orleans Dec. 8, 1873 

Alfred Ingraham New Orleans Mar. 25, 1875 

MAINE. 

.James O'Donnell Portland Aug. 17, 1874 

Winfield S. Choate Augusta Sept 24, 1875 

MARYLAND. 

J. H. Buchanan Baltimore Feb. 27, 1872 

W. W.Latimer Baltimore July 19,1872 

H. L. Emmons, Jr Baltimore April 29, 1873 

W. B. HiU Baltimore -July 7, 1874 

MASSACHUSETTS. 

George A. Dary Boston April 6,1872 

S. Lynde Boston June 22,1872 



Name. 



Residence. 



Date Ap- 
pointment. 

C. H. Adams Boston June 22, 1872 

A. J. Morton Boston Aug. 3, 1872 

E.J. Jones Boston Feb. 25,1873 

James B. Bell Boston Sept. 17, 1873 

Daniel Sharp Boston Jan. 17, 1874 

Samuel Jewinson Boston Feb. 18, 1874 

J. B. Braman Bo.ston July 6, 1874 

R. M. Thompson Boston July 9, 1874 

L. W. Kelloy Salem Nov. 

George T. Angell Boston Jan. 



8. 1874 

7. 1875 



9,1872 



9, 1871 

15. 1871 

17. 1872 

25. 1873 

25. 1874 
10, 1874 
25, 1874 



J.Henry Hill Worcester May 26,1875 

MICHIGAN. 
Wm. J. Waterman Detroit June 7, 1873 

MINNESOTA. 

Charles Mc. C. Reeve. ..Minneapolis Mar. 

MISSOURL 

CullenM. Lincoln St. Joseph Dec. 

Henry Clusky St. Louis Dec. 

John R. Boas St. Louis Nov. 

W. McPherson, Jr St. Louis Feb. 

James E. Lincoln. Liberty Feb. 

W. A. Clark St. Louis Aug. 

J. S. Garland St. Louis Aug. 

A. Cameron St. Louis Sept. 28, 1874 

MONTANA TERRITORY. 

Seth Bullock , Helena Feb. 5,1872 

NEW HAMPSHIRE. 

W. H. Hackett Portsmouth Feb. 17, 1875 

NEW JERSEY. 

George P. Kingsley Orange June 10,1872 

Chas. J. K. RosenburgBloomfield June 29, 1872 

NEW YORK. 

Edward Bissell N. Y. City. Sept. 21. 1871 

Samuel Adler N. Y. City Oct. 26. 1871 

Joseph B. Norris N. Y. City Nov. 5. 1871 

M. H. Regensburger.-.N. Y. City Nov. 17,1871 

Joseph T. Brown N. N City Nov. 25, 1S71 

Anthony J. Thomas ...N. Y. City Dec. 9, 1871 

Charles H. Smith N. Y. City Jan. 10, 1872 

Henry C. Banks N. Y. City Feb. 1, 1872 

Mordecai Lewis N. Y. City Feb. 22, 1872 

William H. Clarkson..N. Y. City Feb. 26, 1872 

Charles J. Bushnell....N. Y. City Mar. 12, 1872 

Moses B. Maclay N. Y. City Mar. 12, 1872 

Silvester Lay N. Y. City Mar. 27, 1872 

Joseph L. Fairchild ...Buffalo May 4, 1872 

Thomas Kilvert N. Y. City May 20, 1872 

Watson Hildreth N- Y. Cty May 20, 1872 

John Bissell N. Y. City May 23, 1872 

W. H. Butler N. Y. City July 1. 1872 

F.P.Burke N. Y. City Aug. 1,1872 

C. E. Mills N. Y. City Sept. 18, 1872 

AV. E. Osborn Brooklyn Jan. 18,1873 

0. P. C. Billings N. Y. City Feb. 17, 1873 

George W. Brown N. Y. City Feb. 25. 1873 

Horace Andrews N. Y. City May 3, 1873 

E. F. Corey, Jr N. Y. City July 1, 1873 

F. F. Fargo Buffalo Sept. 23, 1873 

H. A. Bagley N. Y. City Dec. 10, 1873 

Alex. Ostrander N. Y. City Feb. 6, 1874 

M. Cranwell Albany Feb. 24, 1874 

John A. Helleny N, Y. City Feb. 24, 1874 

L. W. Sloat N. Y. City April 10, 1874 

S. C. Doty N. Y. City April 10, 1874 

John K. Hackett N. Y. City April 10, 1874 

Thomas B. Smith N. Y. City May 1, 1874 

George J. Smith N. Y. City May 1, 1874 

F. R. Anderson N. Y. City June 18, 1874 

1. Spencer Smith N. Y. City June'22, 1874 

N. E. Monroe N. Y. City June 22, 1874 

M. J. Merchant N. Y. City June 22, 1874 



A. ^OMAIT & CO., Medical, Theological, and Scientific Books, 11 Montg'y St., S. ?. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



486 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Name. Residence. Date Ap- 

pointment. 

Georgro W. Collos "NT. Y. City July 7, 1S74 

R. B. iMnrtin N. Y. City July 25, 1874 

W. R. Darling N. Y. City July 25, 1874 

Edward Webster Rochester Sept. 8, 1874 

E. F. Wooks N. Y. City Dec. 23, 1874 

I. AV. Law ton N. Y. City Jan. 12,1875 

Chnrlps iVottleton N. Y. City Jan. 2(i, 1875 

D. Ji. lluliues N. Y. City Feb. 3, 1875 

Charles W. Anderson..N. Y. City Mar. 25, 1875 

Jacob Du Rois N. Y. City April 14, 1875 

Olo II. Holborg N. Y. City April 14, 1875 

(lOurco Chesebro N. Y. City May S, 1875 

Edward (J. ]51ack ...... N. Y. City Juno 25, 1875 

William l'\ Lett N. Y. City June 25, 1875 

A. B. Coloiiian N. Y. City Juno 25, 1875 

Lyman B. Perkins Buffalo Aug. 3, 1875 

P.' A. UoRoman N. Y. City Aug. 28,1875 

S. R. Goodale r N. Y. City Sept. 10, 1875 

Eleazor Jackson N. Y. City Sept. 13, 1875 

NEVADA. 

H. R. Broakey Pioehe Nov. 4, 

William Timson Hamilton Dec. 29, 

W. J. Moody Shelbourn Mar. 5, 

Thomas E. Hayden ...Reno Nov. 4, 

T.N. Rogers Elko Nov. 29, 

A. E. Shannon Austin Feb. 4, 

E. B. StonehiU Virginia City Feb. 25, 

R. V. Dey Virginia City May 14, 

R. L. Thomas Virginia City June 3, 

John \V. Grier Silver City July 13, 

Thomas Laspevre Eureka Sept. 10, 

James H. Smith Gold Hill Feb. 11, 

J. E. Dealy Carson City Feb. 27, 

OHIO. 

James Wade, Jr Cleveland Aug. 11, 

S. Carpenter Cincinnati May 19, 

George E. Pomeroy Toledo July 7, 

OREGON. 

Joseph Simon Portland Aug. 1, 

0. F. Boll Portland Feb. 6, 

D. L. AVatson Empire City Feb. 17, 

A. S. Gross Portland April 5, 

George H. Jones Salem June 8, 

Andrew J. Moses Portland July 8, 



1871 
1871 

1872 
1872 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 
1875 
1875 



1873 
1874 
1874 



1872 
1873 
1873 
1875 
1875 
1875 



PENNSYLVANIA. 

William F. Robb Pittsburg OeJf. 26, 1871 

H. E. Hindmarsh Philadelphia Feb. 20,1872 

C. H. Krumthaar Philadelphia Mar. 15, 1872 

Theodore D. Rand Philadelphia Jan. 7, 1873 

Henry Reed Philadelphia Mar. 31,1873 

J. B. Moffitt Philadelphia July 21, 1873 

Henry Phillips Philadelphia Dec. 8, 1873 

Samuel L.Taylor Philadelphia Feb. 14,1874 

Joseph S. Perot Philadelphia May 1, 1874 

A. H. Morgan Philadelphia May 27, 1874 



Name. Residence. Date Ap- 

pointment. 

F. IT. Janvier Philadelphia July 25, 1874 

Samuel B. lluey Philadelphia 7uly 28, 1874 

W. A. Holman Pittsburgh Sept. 24, 1874 

Charles Chauncey Philadel|)hia Oct. 5, 1874 

J. P. Diver Pliiladolphia Jan. 12, 1875 

C. W. Carrigan Philadelphia Feb. (i, 1875 

Kinley J. Toner Philadelphia. Mar. 25, 1875 

Benjamin F. Moore IMiiladelphia April 14, 1875 

Edward Shippen I'hiladelphia May 3, 1875 

EUwood Mattock Philadelphia Juno 25, 1875 

RHODE ISLAND. 

Charles Selden Providence Mar. 10, 1874 

F. Brinloy Newport July 9, 1874 

C. Rhodes Providence Aug. 29, 1874 

SOUTH CAROLINA. 

A. E. Cohen Charleston May 28, 1872 

TENNESSEE. 

James E. Hall Memphis Nov. 4, 1871 

B. F. Murphy Memphis April 10, 1873 

T. L. Marshall Nashville April 19, 1873 

TEXAS. 

D. H. Barziza Houston Mar. 4, 1872 

W. R. .lohnson Galveston Nov. 4, 1872 

B. B. Paddock Fort Worth July 11, 1873 

J. T. Estoll Houston Feb. 3, 1874 

R. D. Johnson Galveston Feb. 2, 1875 

UTAH TERRITORY. 

William Clayton Salt Lake City. ..Feb. 19, 1872 

James W. Stainburn...Salt Lake City. ..Feb. 26, 1872 

A. S. Gould Salt Lake City. ..July 11, 1873 

Julia K. Sutherland. ..Salt Lake City. ..Feb. 16, 1875 

VIRGINIA. 

John S. Kady Richmond Sept. 3, 1872 

WASHINGTON TERRITORY. 

Isaac N. Reed Walla Walla Nov. 25, 1872 

M. M. Ilarkness Whatcom Jan. 22,1873 

L. A. Banks Walla Walla. July 8, 1873 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

John Lawless Dublin Dec. 9, 1871 

AVilliam Grain London Feb. 7, 1874 

John H. Grain London Feb. 18, 1874 

A. W. Cooke London April 29, 1874 

M. H. Jacobs London Nov. 18, 1874 

FRANCE. 

C. S. Johnson Paris July 22, 1872 

John McRead, Jr Paris Feb. 10, 1874 

E. B. Morel Paris Feb. 24,1874 

MEXICO. 

F. H. McCormick Mexico Feb. 6, 1873 



DEBT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 

JUNE 30, 1875. 

Total Funded Debt $8,654,500 

Total Outstanding Warrants 187.885 

Total Debt $3,842,385 

Assets in State Treasury, Bonds held in Trust for School Fund .$1,737,500 

Bonds held in Trust for University Fund 811,500 

Cash in Treasury 1.105,879 

Total Assets $3,654,879 



Country property insured on best terms witli PAMSWOETH & CLARK, S. P. 



Shoninger Organs, Sole Agency at GRAY'S Music Store, 105 Kearny St., S. F. 



CALIFORNIA. 



ITS GEOGRAPHY, TOPOGRAPHY, AREA, CLIMATE AND RESOURCES. 



California, the Golden State of the Union, ranks as the Empire State of the Pacific Coast, and as such 
takes precedence among her sisters, as tirst noticed in this number of the Pacific Coast Business Dirkc- 
TORY. To a certain extent California is a representative of the body of States and Territories west of the 
Rocky Mountains, from the peculiarities of the seasons, the mineral resources, the grandeur of the scene- 
ry, etc., as contradistinguished from the Atlantic slope. The lofty Cordillera constitutes the backbone of 
the continent, and parallel ranges give feature to the scenery and character to the climate. The year is 
dividedinto the seasons of Wet and Dry, rather than Winter, Spring, Summer and Autumn. The mount- 
ains reach into eternal snow, and the valleys possess an equable clime, bordering on perpetual Summer. 
Extremes of fertility and barrenness are found in various sections. Forests of incomparable grandeur 
and rocky peaks; broad fertile plains and forbidding deserts are contiguous. The precious and the useful 
metals are found in every quarter, and no section, however barren in its outward appearance, can safely 
bo condemned as valueless. Beneath the verdant meadow is the glittering gold, and the rocks of the 
desert are veined with silver and lead and other valuable minerals. These facts have been made kno<vn 
through exploration and toil, and the development continues. From year to year discoveries are made 
and new resources opened, and thus, as wo proceed, are hopes encouraged. 

In laying before the readers of tho Pacific Coast Business Dirf.ctory this sketch of Csilifornia, wo 
shall attempt instruction without speculation, and a simple statement of facts without rhetorical advocacy 
of its general merits or of particular interests, leaving conclusions to be formed by others. The informa- 
tion presented is derived from every available source, and digested through many years of residence, ex- 
plorations and careful study. 

For several years after the occupation of the country by the Americans, the State was regarded as 
valuable only for its mines and for the rearing of stock; its peculiar climate forbidding the culture of tho 
soil excepting to a very limited extent. This belief was only dispelled by successive and increasing ex- 
periments. Facts alone have slowly removed the prejudice which eloquence founded on theory, enthusi- 
asm, or self-interest, could never aifect. By the dry detail of statistics and unembellished description tho 
truth is made impressive, and the real wealth of California, its advantages and disadvantages, its extent 
and its capacity are made known. 

geographical features. 

California extends from latitude .^20 32' as its southern limit to the forty-second parallel, with its 
southern extremity lying between 114o 30' and 117o G' longitude, and its northern extremity between 120o 
and 124o 15', giving it a northwest and southeast course along the coast of about seven hundred and fifty 
miles, with a breadth from one hundred and eishtv to two hundred and eighty miles, comprising an area 
ofJ.')4,llij square miles. The State is bounded north by the State of Oregon, east and northeast by the 
State of Nevada, and the southern portion east by the Territory of Arizona, south by the Mexican Terri- 
tory o^ Lower California, and west and southwest by the Pacific Ocean. Cajjital, Sacramento. Chief com- 
mercial city, San Francisco. The other principal towns are San Diego, San Bernardino, Los Angeles, 
Santa Barbara, Salinas, Monterey, Santa Cruz, San Jose, Oakland, Stockton, Vallejo, Petaluma, Napa, 
Santa Uosa, Eureka, Folsom, Grass Valley, Marysville, Colusa, Chico, lied Bluff, Yroka, and others thriv 
ing and growing into importance. The great carion of Yosemite, the Big Trees of Mariposa and Cala- 
veras, Lake Bigler, Donner Lake, Calistoga, the Geysers, the beach at Santa Cruz, and the numerous hot 
and medicinal si)rings in various parts of the State, are attractive Summer resorts, visited, by large num- 
bers of tourists from all quarters of the Union, seeking health and recreation. The distinguishing iihysi- 
cal features are the towering Sierra Nevada on the east and the Coast Range of Mountains on the west, 
enclosing the broad valley of tho Sacramento and tho San Joaquin ; the capacious bays of San Francisco, 
Monterey and San Diego, and the extensive waste of the Colorado Desert. Numerous subordinate ranges 
of mountains and lofty peaks are named, and smaller streams and valleys without number. 

In presenting the area of California, a comparison may be made vvith the section composing the 
Atlantic seaboard. Tho forty-second parallel, marking its northern limit, also marks the northern limit 
of Pennsylvania and Connecticut, and 32o 20', the latitude of San Diego, is south of the city of Charles- 
ton, in South Carolina, and the trend of the coast is about the same, but northeast instead of north- 
west. Our State, thus, would cover the principal portion of the Atlantic coast States of Pennsylvania, New 
Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North and South Carolina, and Georgia, the coast lines corres- J^ 
ponding to each other, and the Sierra Nevada occupying tho position of the Alleghany Mountains. The , J-* 
eastern coast presents numerous indentations in bays, rivers and sounds, while the western is broken only O 
in very few places. With fewer harbors, however, the latter is subject to a less number of storms, and the Q 
dreaded Cape Hattoras has no counterpart on the Pacific. Tho prevalence of fogs in Summer and an occa- ■- 
sional southeast storm at tho beginning of the rainy season are all that render navigation dangerous, and 9 
notwithstanding the rigidity of the coast, secure landings are found almost at every point Dusiness or ^5 
necessity demand. j j. 

harbors. ^ 

Tho natural harbors of California are the Bays of San Diego, Monterey, San Francisco and Humboldt, ea 
with roadsteads and landings at a score or more of places along the coast, safe at most seasons and at some § 
localities, by tho aid of the engineer could, without great expense, bo made perfect. 08 

'I'he Bay of San Diego, tho most southern, is a small but completely landlocked sheet of water, tho 

fortion available for a harbor covering an area of about twenty-five square miles, and is of easy access, 
t lies in latitude .323 40', longitude 117o 12'. A deep channel connects it with the ocean and tho 
bar at the mouth carries a depth of four to five fathoms of water, affording passage to tho largest 



A. BOMAN & CO., Publishers, Booksellers, and Stationers, 11 Montgomery St., S. F. 
4 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



50 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECT OR Y. 



ships. Tho moan rise and fall of tides is 3.7 feot: of spring tides 5 foot, and of neap tides 2.3 foot. Here 
storms are of rare occurence, and the climato is of the most equable and salubrious known. Tho towns of 
New and Old San Diogo are at the eastern extremity of tho bay. The steamers of tho Pacific Mail S. S. 
Co. call at this port, as well as do others, and it is the oxpoctod western terminus of tho Texas Pacific 
Kailway. Those arms of commerce connecting it with tho interior and with tho great cities of the world, 
give merited consoiiuenco to this, one of tho most beautiful and safest harbors of the world. 

The anchorage of San Luis Key, in latitude ood 17' and longitude 1173 29', is unprotected and littlo 
used. The same may bo said of tho anchorage of San Juan Capistrano, situated twonty-flvo miles 
northwest of tho former. 

Anaheim Landing is equally unprotected, but in fair weather is considerably used, the receiving and 
discharging of passengers and cargo being efifoctod by lighters while tho sea-going vessels are anchored a 
milo or more from shore. Here the shore runs nearly east and west and the landing is distant from San 
Podro between ton and eleven milos. Other and similar landings are made along the coast but cannot bo 
designated as harbors. 

San Pedro Bay, though it cannot bo classed with the bay of San Diego as a harbor, is the most import- 
ant port of tho lower coast. From it tho productive country of the interior is easily accessible, roads 
leading easterly to Arizona, and northerly to the rich mining regions of Inyo, and those with the prosperous 
neighboring country give it a largo and increasing commerce. Los Angeles, twenty-two miles north from 
tho anchorage, is tho distributing point, but Wilmington, three miles inside the bar, is tho receiving point. 
The construction, hero, of a breakwater, or dyke, by the United States Uovernment, running from a point 
of land called Kattlosnake Island to Boadmans Island, has greatly improved tho harbor, affording protec- 
tion from the southeast winds, and at the same time so coatining and directing tho tidal currents as to 
wash and deepen tho channel crossing tho bar. This improvement is still in progress, and further dredging 
will give tho harbor the safety and capacity that the importance of the position demands. Previously 
this was but an open roadstead with about five fathoms of water a mile from land, but it is believed a line 
harbor will bo created where piers will be built, and landings made direct. At present lighters aro used 
transferring freight through a tortuous channel to an inner bay at Wilmington. Tho tides rise and fall 
from three to five foot, with extremes of six and a half feet. 

Santa Monica is about twonty-two miles north northwest of San Pedro and fifteen miles a little south 
of west from Los Angeles, and fronts a largo open bay, or bight of the coast, lying between Point Vincent 
on the south, and Point Duma on the west, twenty-six miles apart. Here landings have been eflfectod 
for a number of years, by means of lighters and surf boats directly upon tho broad and smooth beach, but 
recently a wharf 2,700 feet in length has been constructed at which deep water vessels moor tvith safety. 
This adds greatly to the convenience of tho commerce of Los Angeles. A railroad connects tho two places, 
ana is extending as the Los Angeles and Independence llailroad to Inyo county. The Boach at Santa 
Monica is a favorite place for bathers, and the new town promises to bocome important as a summer re- 
sort as well as for its convenient harbor. 

Point Huenemo, or Conversion, is tho next landing in much use as we go up the coast. A lighthouse 
has been proposed on this point which the Coast Survey locates in latitude 34c 08' north, and long- 
itude ll'.to 09' west. Westerly extends tho Santa Barbara Channel, about one hundred miles in 
length and twenty-five in width, lying between the main land and tho chain of islands, the principal of 
which are the Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa, and San Miguel. At the western extremity of the channel, on tho 
land side, is Point Conception, one of the most prominent headlands of the coast, and protecting the 
southern section from tho cold northwest winds which sweep, in summer, so fiercely along the exposed 
parts of Northern California and Oregon. 

The chains of islands along the Southern Coast, as San Clemente, Santa Catalina, San Nicholas, 
Anacapa, Santa Barbara, Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and San Miguel are quite barren, and generally destitute 
of water, therefore offer slight inducements lor culture, and with grazing capacities extremely limited. 
The most important is Santa Catalina, off the coast of San Pedro, which has a good harbor, but about all 
good fishing is found. 

Within the Santa Barbara Channel landings are made at numerous places, the principal being at San 
Buenaventura, Santa Barbara and Kl Coxo. These are generally open roadsteads, the swells of the sea 
being broken by a heavy growth of kelp, affording a partial protection to shipping and to wharves within. 
At Santa Barbara a substantial pier has been constructed which steamers and vessels approach and 
fasten to. 

From Point Conception the coast bears northwest, high, bold and dangerous. The first landing 
reached is that of San Luis Obispo, or Avila, as it is recently named, the principal town beteg ten miles 
inland. This is not a pleasant landing, though much used in obedience to the demands of business in the 
interior. 

The Bay of San Simeon, in latitude 3-5o 39' and longitude 121o 15', is an exposed roadstead, but affords 
a good anchorage during northwest winds. From this the shore stretches direct and unbroken to latitude 3t)o 
3.3', where the small but beautiful Carmello Bay breaks tho rigid line. Tho Sierra Santa Lucia rises ab- 
ruptly from the sea, and from San Luis Obispo to Point Carmello, a distance of one hundred and ten milos, 
offers no depression for convenient passage, and is unexplored and unknown. A few miles north of 
Carmello Bay is Point Pinos, around which enters the grand and historic Bay of Monterey. This is the 
oldest of tho occupied portions of California, having been entered and taken possession of by the Spanish, 
under Viscayno, in December, li)02. Tho bay is of large area, with an opening twenty-five miles broad, 
while it extends into the land only half that distance. The portion embraced in Point Pinos, being a 
capacious bay fronting the town of Monterey, is well landlocked, and constitutes a perfectly safe harbor. 
The Salinas and tho Pajaro rivers enter the bay on the eastern side, their mouths forming good harbors 
for light-draft vessels. On the northern shore, near tho ocean main, is tho harbor of Santa Cruz — not 
always safe, but easily reached and much frequented. Thence northerly to the Golden Gate intervenes a 
rocky and dangerous coast. Several points project into the sea, and slight indentations aro made, where 
light-draft vessels at times may land, but which larger ships always shun. Half Moon Bay, eighteen 
miles south of the Golden Gate, affords a good summer anchorage. 

Under the latitude 37o 48' longitude 122o 30', the coast abruptly opens to the great Bay of San Francisco, 
one of the very best harbors of the Pacific and of the world. The entrance is by the Golden Gate, a strait 
one mile in width by six miles in length, expanding in the broad bay of eight miles in width, reaching 
southward forty miles and north twenty-five, and with Suisun adding thirty more to its extent, giving a 
shore line of over three hundred miles. This is a noble inland sea, containing a number of fine harbors, 
and possessing a commerce within itself. Upon rocky points defensive forts are erected ; and Fort, Limo 
and Black Points, and Angel, and Alcatraces Islands stand in the passage-way, formidably armed and 
ready to dispute tho entrance of a hostile fleet. The bar off the mouth of the Bay has a depth of five 
fathoms, rapidly^ deepening inside with an easy and safe passage. This bay, it is by .'^ome believed, was 
first entered by Sir Francis Drake in 1579, although general authority locates his bay and landing some 
thirty miles northwest. The entrance is otherwise reported as first seen by Forrelo, in 1543, the successor 
of tho groat Spanish Navigator, Cabrillo, but the only authentic account of tho discovery of the bay was 
by a land party from San Diego in 17(i9, under Gasper do Partola, who were seeking the Bay of Monterey, 
but who, traveling eastward of tho Coast Range, had missed the object of their search. In 1776 the Golden 



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CALIFOKNIA — GENERAL D E 8 C.R I P T I N. 51 



Gate was passed by Francisco Paulo and Benito Cambon and the Mission' Polores founded, and thence 
dates its opening and occupation. "- ' / ' 

About the great bay are numerous estuaries and tidal inlets, as well as boW landing places constituting 
harbors of every class. The most notable are Oakland, Benicia, VallejoandSaiit'elit(\ Oakland being at the 
terminus of the transcontinental railroad, and directly opposite the great city of Siln if ancisco.is most import- 
ant. This city lies upon the broad estuary of San Antonio, upon which such imprbveulents are making and 
ordered by Government as to make it one of the most convenient and best protectod'harboys in the world. 
Vallojo, although twenty-three miles distant from Golden Gate, is much used in freighting ,ahips with wheat. 
Here is the Navy Yard of Mare Island, the chief naval station on the Pacific Coast. 'The <ythor harbors 
and landings are so numerous that the whole Bay of San Francisco and its contiguous siee'te of water, 
with their throe or four hundred miles of shore line, may be regarded as one grand hai'biji'.„-'jn this 
respect, with its central location, its contributory rivers, its surrounding country rich in agriqtJiure and 
minerals, and the salubrity of its climate, render it the largest, best and most favored harbor of tlj« ^lobe. 

A few miles north of the entrance to San Francisco is Drake's Bay, more interesting from its hiJtoiJ';Ul 
associations than important as a shelter of commerce. Here the renowned navigator. Sir Francis DVika, 
landed in the summer of 1578, near three hundred years ago, and took possession of the country in tiie 
name of Elizabeth, the Virgin Queen of England. While here a monument was erected commemorative 
of the event, and engraved plate and coin deposited, but they have never been recovered. The Portuguese 
navigator, Cabrillo, under the orders of Mendoza, Viceroy of Mesico, had sailed along the coast in 1542, 
but Drake's is the first landing recorded, and the little bay, formed by the projection of Point Keyes, 
where it occurred, now bears his name. 

Tomales and Bodega Bays are parts of the same body of water, extending in^ the land immediately 
north of Point Reyes, and form one of the small class of harbors which are quite frequent along the 
northern coast. From Bodega Head the coast presents an even front to the ocean, without ma-y rocks or 
points. Numerous small streams enter the sea, and at most of them are landings which are sometimes 
called harbors. 

Fort lloss, Havens, Point Arena, Xovarro River, CuflFee's Cove, Albion River, Little River, Mendocino 
Bay, Russian Gulch, Gasper Creek and Noyo River, are the principal of these indifferent harbors. They 
are used chiefly by staunch sea-going schooners in transporting lumber and the products of the ranches to 
San Francisco. Many of these little harbors, however, are beautiful sheets of water when once inside, 
and their commerce, of the products of the country, is large and increasing. 

Under latitude 40; 2ti', longitude 124j 24' is Cape Mendocino, a prominently rocky headland, and the 
most western point of California. This was discovered by Cabrillo, in 1542, and named in honor of his 
patron, the Viceroy Mendoza, although the coast survey attribute the discovery to Ferrilo, the successor 
of Cabrillo, in 1543. 

Humboldt Bay, in latitude 40d 48', longitude 124d 12', is the most capacious inland body of water in the 
north, and furnishes an excellent harbor. The bar at the mouth has a depth of twenty-one feet at low 
tide, but the sea at times breaks dangerously upon it. The entrance to the bay is between two low sand 
spits, and is but about three hundred yards in width. This lovely body of water has a length of sixteen 
miles, and a breadth varying from one to five miles, constituting a noble, safe and beautiful harbor. 

Twenty-five miles north, Trinidad Point projects southwestwardly a short distance into the sea, and the 
small body of water contained in the curve is called Trinidad Bay. The point protects it from all but the 
south winds, and when these are not tempestuous the harbor is safe and good, it being claimed by some as 
the best harbor between San Francisco and Puget Sound. A short distance north, the great Klamath 
Kiver pours its torrents into the ocean, but furnishes no harbor. Landings are effected during calm« in 
the neighborhood, but the coast is not approachable in severe weather. 

The harbor of Crescent City, in latitude 41 d 44', longitude 124o ]I', is in part protected by Point St. 
George, and is safe unless in very severe storms from the south. At the extreme northern limit of the 
State is Pelican Bay, but a slight indentation of the coast, and without protection to make it a harbor of 
importance. 

MOUNTAINS. 

The interior presents a surface of lofty mountains, deep valleys and broad plains. The first rise in 
grand serrated lines with majestic peaks towering above the region of eternal snows, and in gently round- 
ed hills, while the valleys and plains enclosed by them are marked with the distinction of unsurpassed for- 
tility of soil, of perfect loveliness of climate, or arid and sandy deserts. 

In the vast area extending through ten degrees of latitude, and from three to four of longitude, are 
numerous ranges of mountains, appearing to tne casual observer as only two systems — the Sierra Nevada 
on the east and the Coast Range on the west; but the State Geological Survey has established the fact that 
what appears as but two is composed of many. The ridge dividing the waters of the Pacific and those 
flowing easterly into the great basin, is usually denominated the Sierra Nevada throughout its whole 
course in the State, but south of the thirty-fith parallel this becomes the Coast Range, and is generally low 
and broken. There is here apparantly but a single chain, but on the eastern side are numerous detached 
and precipitous ranges irregularly filling the region thence to the Colorado. 'This broad section consti- 
tutes one of the most desolate portions of our country. Rocky and tempest-beaten as are its hills, and burn- 
ing and sand-driven as are its valleys, it cannot be utterly condemned as valueless from its forbidding 
appearance. Minerals in great abundance have been found in different localities and thorough explora- 
tion may redeem the character of the whole. In the northern portion of this desert region are the Arma- 
gosa. Slate Range, Panamint, Telescope, Inyo and White Mountain Ranges, in all of which mines of value 
have been discovered, and some have developed enormous wealth. 

The most southern snow-capped peak is Mount San Jacinto, near 8,000 feet high, standing on the divid- 
ing line between the coast and the waters flowing to the desert of the Colorado. This peak sends off a 
range to the south, having the burning desert of the Coahuilla— the bed of an ancient lake— on the east, 
and the pleasant valley of San Jacinto on the west. Thirty miles north is Mount San Bernardino, 8,750 
feet high, the most elevated land of Southern California, giving the name to this part of the range, and 
connecting with the San Gabriel Mountains, which, running westerly, connect the chain with the wilder- 
ness of mountains running through the counties of Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo and Monterey, the dif- 
ferent coast ranges terminating on the ocean at the Golden Gate, or at Mount Diablo. At Los Angeles, 
the single high and precipitous mountain of San Gabriel, t),500 feet high, sixty miles in length and twenty- 
five in breadth, stands between the fertile plains of the coast and the sterile region of the eastern basin. 
The principal ranges south, not before named, are the Santa Anna, Temoscal and Cuyamaca. North are 
the Sierra Santa Monica, commencing at Los Angeles and running northwest thirty-six miles to the high 
headland of Point Mogu, on the Pacific. The San Fernando, San Francisco, Santa Susanna, Santa Inez, 
San Rafael, Santa Lucia, the Palo Scrito Hills, the Gabilan, Santa Cruz, Contra Costa and Mount Diablo 
Ranges constitute the principal coast mountains between Los Angeles and the Bay of San Francisco, and 
between the ocean and the southern half of the great valley of California. The most elevated peaks are 
Mount Hamilton, 4,44ii feet ; San Carlos, 4,'.i77 ; and Mount Diablo, 8,K7ii foot above the sea. Among these 
mountains and' hill ranges are a great number of valleys, some of hundreds of square miles in extent, as 
the San Fernando, Santa Clara, Santa Maria and Salhia."!, and thousands of others of various sizes, from 



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broad plains to littlo nooks in tho' mountain fastnesses, all, when irrigable, of groat fertility and perfect 
loveliness, and uttording pluusant Sites for a vast number of quiet, happy and prosperous homes. Many of 
these were selected by thooarlv missionaries for their extensive ostablishraonts, and in their days of pros- 
perity exhibited a wealth of resource since but rarely reached throughout the section. 

Apparently, the SanUabriol Range is the continuation of the fcJierra Nevada, extending the great 
chain south to the l-,suinsula of California ; but south of teo 30' that mountain falls away to 
Tohichipa Vall«y, or 'trends westerly to the Tojon Pass, and making a more intimate junction with the 
coast ranges. Fr jm the thirty-fifth parallel the Sierra rises, a grand and mighty range, extending to the 
northern limi't ol f.ho State, whore, spreading in high plateaus circling to the west and to the ocean, or con- 
tinuing through Oregon and to the north, it maintains an almost uninterrupted elevation of 0,000 to 8,000 
feet, witli serSral peaks rising to the sublime hight of 14,000 and 15,000 feet above the sea, their summits 
far abovathe limit of vegetation, and forever buried in the accumulated ice and snows of preceding ages. 
Chief .imcng those towering peaks are Mounts \Vhitney, 15,000 ; Brewer, 18 88tj ; Williamson, 14,900 ; 
Ivp.Veiiij, 14,000 ; King, 14.000 ; Tyndall, 14,88l> ; and fifty or sixty others in the southern portion of the 
I aiiSt' over 1-5,000 feet high ; with Lassen'sPeak 10.577, and Mount Shasta 14,442 feet high, in the north. 
' This grand range pursues its rigid course for (iOO miles through the State, parallel with the coast, giving 
rise to many streams, which unite and form the great rivers San Joaquin and Sacramento, that break 
through the coast mountains to the sea by the Bay of San Francisco. From the western base to the sum- 
mit is about seventy miles. With different altitudes are different climates, soils and productions. The 
lower foot-hills possess a 'thin, red soil, usually requiring enriching and irrigation to make it fertile, and 
tht-n it produces abundantly of fruits, vines and cereals. At a greater elevation the soil is more fertile, but 
the climate limits the range of plants. The distinguishing features of this noblest of mountain ranges 
are its mines of gold and its forests of pine, with its preciiiitous chasms, its grand scenery, and the mam- 
moth sc(/ttoia f/iya'iiea, the largest trees of the earth. The gold production of the western slope of this 
mountain from 1848 to 181)5 was estimated at i('JOO,000,000, and since that date the product has averaged 
about 528,000,000 annually, making an aggregate of 3^1,250,000,000 of that precious metal which stands as the 
basis of the currency of the world. Nor is the mineral wealth of the chain confined to gold alone. Copper, 
lead, silver, iron, coal, petroleum, granite, marble, lime and various other metals and substances are pro- 
duced. Still the resources of the groat Sierras are hardly known. tJold having been chiefly sought and 
its production attended with groat excitement and extravagance, other sources of vrealth were overlooked. 

Tlao Sierra Nevada, branching or curving westward, between the parallels of 40o and 41o, connects with 
the northern system of Coast ranges which enclose the Valley of the Sacramento. North of the fortieth 
parallel, these are gold-bearing, are lofty and rugged, with forests of pine, spruce and redwood, and of 
similar geological formation to the great mountain of the eastern portion of the State. Southward are a 
number of distinct ranges, so disposed as to enclose many valleys of greater or less extent, such as 
Clear Lake, Berroyesa, Napa, Ukiah, Kussian liiver, Hoopa, Sonoma, etc., all of exceeding beauty and 
fertility. 

Scott Mountain, in the northwestern part of the State, is the loftiest and most extensive range, branch- 
ing oti' from the great peak of Mount Shasta, and running southwesterly toward the ocean. The principal 
peaks of this system of mountains west of the Sacramento are Yallobally, 8,000 feet ; Mount Baldy, ii,'-i-)! ; 
Mount St. Johns, 4,500 ; Mount Ripley, 4,000 ; Mount Cobb, 3,800 ; Mount St. Helena, 4,343 ; Sulphur Peak, 
3,471 ; and Mount Tamalpais, 2,<i00 feet high, overlooking the Golden Gate. 

lieeent discoveries of quicksilver-bearing rock in this region have given it increased importance. 
Minos of undoubted wealth have been opened in various parts of Lake, Sonoma and Napa Counties, and a 
valuable vein of gold-bearing quartz is found on Mount St. Helena. Hot and medicinal springs are 
numerous, and in one of the gorges of the western slope of Sulphur Peak are the singular boiling and 
spouting fountains known as The Geysers. Those, with the romantic and beautiful scenery of the country, 
offer great attractions to health and pleasure-seeking tourists. 

This system of mountains is indefinitely called the Coast Range, and it occupies the entire north- 
western portion of the State, from the Golden Gate and Bay of San Francisco on the south, the Sacramento 
Valley on the oast, to the Pacific Ocean on the west. Near the Ocean the mountains are clothed with a 
dense forest of redwood, which is a very valuable timber and easily worked, and is produced in large 
quantities. In this section too is found the laurel, one of the most beautiful ornamental woods known to 
the cabinetmaker. 

Mount San Bernardino in the southern district and Mount Diablo in the northern are established as the 
initial points for the base and meridian lines of the United States system of land surveys. 

RIVERS. 

The rivers of California are quite numerous, and some are of great extent, although few are navigable. 
The largest is the Colorado, running near five hundred miles along the eastern border, and having a total 
length, from the source of its principal branch. Green River, in Idaho, of about two thousand miles. This 
great stream drains all the western slope of the Rocky Mountains, from the Snake River to Mexico, 
receiving in its course the Yampah, Uintah, White Kiver, Grand, San Juan, Colorado Chiquito, Gila, and 
others of less note. From California it receives no water, the arid desert through which it flows 
having no streams. The Colorado, at ordinary stages, has a breadth of about four hundred yards, and 
always a rapid current flowing over a changing bed of sand, often so shallow as to forbid navigation by 
vessels drawing throe feet of water. At its mouth, in the Gulf of California, its strong current meets the 
rising tide in a dangerous swell, rolling up the river a wall of waters, grand to the sight, but a terror to 
navigators, its season of Iflood is in the months of June and July, when the melting snows of the Kocky 
Mountains have reached the mouth, sending the water over the valley lands and flowing a largo stream 
into the desert of the Colorado. This stream bears the name of New River, but exists only when the 
Colorado is above its banks. An effort has recently been made, or rather was long ago proposed and now 
renewed, to obtain governmental aid to conduct the waters of New River over a large extent of desert for 
the purpose of irrigation, but as it leaves the parent stream within Mexican territory, a serious obstacle to 
the enterprise is interposed. A survey shows that much of the country is below the level of the Colorado, 
and that the valley of New River could, by proper engineering, be reclaimed. This stream, in periods of 
very high water, extends one hundred and fifty miles into the desert, and as the soil possesses elements of 
great fertility, upon receding, vegetation is rank and prolific. 

White River, or Agua Blanco, rises among the snows of Mount San Bernardino, draining the eastern 
slope of that towering peak and flowing southerly into the desert, is soon lost in the sands. While in its 
mountain course this is a very pretty stream of from twelve to twenty yards in breadth, and takes its name 
from the purity of its waters. The basin into which it debouches is at the eastern foot of the San Gorgonio 
Pass, and is the northern extremity of the great Coahuilla Valley, which extends to and includes the valley 
of New River — the whole evidently being below the level of the sea. 

The Mohave is one of the largest of the desert streams. Rising in Mount San Bernardino it drains 
the northern slope, and flowing northerly and northeasterly for a distance of about one hundred and fifty 
miles, sinks in the basin of Soda Lake. Several fertile valleys are along its line, but in the latter part 
of its course the desolation is supreme. 

The Amargosa is a singular river of the desert, rising in the State of Nevada, on the northeastern side 



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CALIFORNI A — G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 63 



of the Amargosa Mountains, and in a course of about two hundred miles, sometimes on the surface and 
then disappearing beneath the sands, making a circuit of the southern portion of the range, turns north- 
westerly and disappears in Death Valley, a depression reported, (though doubtful) to be near four hun- 
dred feet below the level of the sea. 

Owens River is another of the basin east of the Sierra, but from the fertile vallev through which it 
flows cannot be called a river of the desert. Rising in the Sierra Nevada, in latitude :?7o 40', it flows south 
into Owens Lake,. running?a course of about one hundred and fifty miles in length. This river and valley 
has attained increased importance in late years from the discovery and development of rich lead and silver 
mines in the vicinity. Owens Lake, which receives the water of the river and all drainage of the surround- 
ing country, is a body of water eighteen miles in length by twelve in width, and is intensely impregnated 
with salt, alkali and other substances. A small steamboat is emploved on the lake in transporting ores 
and merchandise between the mines of Cerro Gordo and the road leading to Los Angeles ; also to the town 
of Swansea, on the shore of the Lake, where reduction works are established, convenient to the forests of 
the Sierra Nevada. 

Along the southern coast are a large number of unnavigable streams, flowing to the ocean, which 
furnish water for a few mills and for irrigation. The principal of these are the San Diego, Santa Ana, 
San Gabriel, Los Angeles, Santa Clara, Santa Inez and Santa Maria. Some of these sink before reaching 
the sea during the Summer, but are rapid torrents in the rainy season. The Santa Ana is the largest of 
these, rising in Mount San Bernardino; it, with its numerous branches, drains the southern and western 
slopes of that peak. In the early part of its course this is a large and rapid stream, but dwindles in size 
as it approaches the ocean. San Bernardino, Riverside, Anaheim and other towns are on its banks. The 
general course of the stream is westerly, and its total length about one hundred and forty miles. 

The San Gabriel rises in the mountains of the same name, and flowing southwesterly a distance of 
fifty miles, enters the sea near Wilmington, into the roadstead of San Pedro. 

The Santa Clara rises in Soledad Pass, Los Angeles County, and flows westerly one hundred and 
twenty miles, entering the ocean near San Buenaventura, in Ventura County. The valley is generally 
broad and inviting, and with proper irrigation and cultivation would be productive. Upon the head- 
waters of this stream gold was discovered in IS'iO, and mining is still carried on in a simple and inditt'erent 
manner. The precious metal is found in nearly all the streams flowing from the San Bernardino and San 
Gabriel Mountains, and energetic mining is carried on in several localities. 

The Salinas is a river of considerable magnitude, rising in the southern part of San Luis Obispo 
County, its principal branch being the Rio San Juan, and has a total length of more than two hundred 
miles, emptying into the Bay of Monterey. But even this stream does not always reach the sea, as, during 
periods of drought, the thirsty sand of the valley absorbs the water. The river, in a groat part of its 
course, flows over a sandy bed half a mile to a mile and a half in width, and a hundred or more feet below 
the general plain of the valley. The tide rises for several miles from the mouth of the river, and for that 
distance is navigable, affording a good harbor. The valley of the Salinas extends in an unbroken plain 
for eighty miles up the river, and with a width of from six to fifteen miles, comprising a half million acres 
of arable land, of great fertility when watered by rains or irrigation. 

The Pajaro is a river of about fifty miles in length, receiving the San Benito from the valley of the 
same name, and flowing into the Bay of Monterey a few miles north of the mouth of the Salinas. It is 
navigable to the town of Watsonville, six miles from the bay, and is important from the commerce carried 
on and the great productions of the adjacent country. 

The San Lorenzo is a small stream running through the town of Santa Cruz, and entering the northern 
side of Monterey Bay. Flowing to the ocean from the same vicinity are the San Gregorio and Pescadero, 
from the latter of which it is proposed to conduct water for an additional supply of the City of San Fran- 
cisco. On the eastern summit of the Santa Cruz Range rise the San Francisquito, Redwood and Pillar- 
citos Creeks, the latter furnishing the principal part of the water now used in San Francisco. 

North of the Golden Gate, the mountains approach near the coast, but are much broken, and permit 
the passage of many small streams and some rivers of large size. The principal are Russian River, Wal- 
halla, Garcia, Novarra, Albion, Big River, Noyo, Matole, Eel River, Mad River, Redwood, Klamath and 
Smith's River. 

Russian River is one of the most important of the northern coast streams, from the fact of its long 
course through a succession of some of the finest valleys of the State. Rising from several bra^iches in the 
mountainous region of Mendocino County, in latitude 39o 30', it flows southerly for about seventy-five miles 
to the middle of Sonoma County, thence westerly to the ocean in latitude 38^ 30', having a total course of 
about one hundred and twenty-five miles. In its course it receives the Mark West, Santa Rosa, and Green 
River creeks, which flow through the center of Sonoma County, and water some of its most lovely valleys. 

Eel River has its source in the ii^mediate vicinity of Russian River, but runs northerly and empties 
into the ocean in latitude 40o 40', a few miles south of Humboldt Ray. This stream receives several large 
tributaries from a wild and sparsely populated region. The valleys are comparatively small, bu^ of great 
beauty and fertility, and are rapidly filling up with settlers. The river is navigable for several miles from 
its mouth, but its entrance is obstructed by a bar, preventing its becoming valuable as a harbor. Its 
length is about one hundred and fifty miles. At some seasons the river is thronged with salmon, and ex- 
tensive fishing and curing establishments are carried on near its mouth. 

Mad River enters the ocean a few miles north of Humboldt Bay. It has an average width of about one 
hundred yards, but a bar at the mouth prevents its being used as a harbor or for navegation. The 
ancient name, given it by the old navigators, Husta and Bodega, was the Rio de los Tortolas. 

The Klamath is the largest river entering the ocean south of the Columbia. It has its source in the 
lake country of eastern Oregon, and flowing through the high plateau which forms the connection— or the 
division— between the Sierra Nevada and the Cascade ranges, past Shasta and Scott's vallej's, it breaks 
through the coast mountains in deep and rugged caiions. The total length is about three hundred miles, 
and it bears a large body of water to the sea. The mouth is obstructed by a dangerous bar of shifting sand, 
but the river may be navigated for some forty or fifty miles by light-draft steamers with power to stem 
its strong current. During freshets, the Klamath rises to extraordinary heights, reaching at times over one 
hundred feet above its ordinary level. The mouth of this river is in latitude 41; 33' north and longitude 
liio O.y west. The other streams of the coast are short and rapid, aifording fine water-power for mills, and 
several have good harbors at their mouths. 

Several small streams empty into the Bay of San Francisco and its contiguous waters. Entering the 
southern extremity are the Guadalupe and Coyote, running through the large and fertile valley of Santa 
Clara, and holding between them the beautiful city of San .Jose, 'i'he northen part, or San Pablo Bay, re- 
ceives the Potaluma, Sonoma and Napa creeks, which water valleys of the same names, remarkable for 
their fertility of soil, loveliness of climate, and quiet beauty of scenery. The tide rises in these streams, 
rendering them navigable for several miles from their mouths. Those constitute convenient little harbors 
for vessels of lightdraught, and beautiful and prosperous villages are built upon their banks. 

The Sacramento and the San Joaauin, with their tributaries, constitute the great fluvial feature of the 
State, as the Sierra Nevada, which they drain, is distinctive among mountains, and as the great valley 
through which they flow is conspicuous for its exhaustloss resource of agricultural wealth. 'Ihe Sacra- 
mento, the larger of the two, has its source at the western base of Mount Shasta, and running almost di- 



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54 PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



roctly south, emptying into Ruisun Bay, thonce through tho bays of San Pablo, San Francisco and tho 
Golden Ciato to tno ocean. Tho total length is four hundred and sixty-fivo miles, and is navigable for throo 
hundred and ton miles— to Rod Bluff— at all seasons of tho year. Tho tide rises in it to Sacramento City, 
seventy miles above its mouth, and to that point it is navigable for vessels drawing seven feet of water. 
The towns of Rio Vista, Sacramento, Knights Landing, Colusa, Princeton, Tehama and RedBluflF are on 
its banks. 

Tho San Joaquin is a sister river, rising in tho southern portion of tho Sierra, and flowing north, drains 
tho southern half of tho great valley of California, joins tho Sacramento at tho point where Doth enter the 
bay. The total length is two hundred and seventy-five miles, and in time of high water, is navigable for 
one hundred and fifty miles from its mouth. Vessels drawing five foot of water ascends it to Stockton, a 
distance of one hundred and twenty-fivo miles, by water, from San Francisco. Tho water of these rivers 
was once clear and sparkling, but the washings of the gold placers have discolored it and filled tho beds 
with gravel and sediment from the mines. 

Pitt River is tho principal tributary of tho upper Sacramento, being larger than the stream bearing 
the name. One of its branches. Fall River, rises in Mount Shasta and flows eastward; other branches 
Iiiive thi>ir sources in the great northern plateau of tho Sierra, and after a course of near two hundred 
miles, join the Sacramento near the town of Shasta. This stream courses through several important mount- 
ain valleys and a region of superb forests. Those resources are receiving increased attention since tho 
subjugation of hostile Indians who disputed their development, and this long neglected section is advanc- 
ing in importance. 

McCloud River bears tho happy distinction of being one of the clearest, prettiest, and most romantic 
of the many beautiful mountain streams of the State. The lofty Mount Shasta furnishes its source, and 
tumbling with many grand cascades, and sparkling through rocky canons and leafy vales for a course of 
some eighty or ninety miles to the south, it empties into Pitt River, a few miles above its junction with tho 
Sacramento. This is a favorite fishing stream, and has been selected by the IT. S. Commissioners superin- 
tending the propagation offish, as the principal scene of their operations in this State. 

Feather River, the Rio de las Plumas of former days, is the largest tributary of the Sacramento, drain- 
ing the Sierra between the latitudes of S'Jo 10' and 40o 30', and is formed of numerous forks and branches. 
The principal of these is the North Fork, which rises on the southern slope of Lassen's Peak, and becomes 
a rai>id stream of one hundred yards in breadth as it flows through the valley of Big Meadows. Rush, 
Indian, and Spanish creeks, and East Branch, flowing through beautiful mountain valleys, and past rich 
mining camps, join the iSorth Fork from the east, and Cherry Creek and West Branch enter it from the 
west, all considerable streams. The Middle Fork rises in Beckwourth Valley, a plain apparently of the 
great plateau east of the Nevada range, and cutting through the mountains flows southwostward, joining 
the North Fork four or five miles before entering the valley. The South Fork and Nelson Creek are 
smaller streams and branches of the Middle Fork. 

The Yuba is an important stream, and drains a large area of tho Sierra. This too, has its North, South 
and Middle Forks, with many branches to each, all of which have become celebrated from the richness of 
the gold diggings in their beds, bars and neighboring hills. The Yuba enters the Feather at Marysville, 
whence the latter is navigable for light draught steamers to its junction with tho Sacramento, forty miles 
distant. Bear River is the most southern branch of Feather. In the mountains it is quite an important 
stream, but in the dry season it disappears in tho valley before reaching the main river. 

The American joins the Sacramento by tho city of the same name, and is one of the most important of 
its branches. This river will over be connected with the history of the State, as it was on its banks that 
gold was discovered in 1848, which dates an era in the commerce of the world. The nomenclature of the 
mountain branches is the same as usually adopted by the gold hunters, being designated as forks. These 
have thkjir source in many beautiful crystal lakes, high up among the eternal snows, which, by simple 
engineering, could be turned into capacious reservoirs, thus reserving the floods of winter for use in the 
fields and cities of the plains below. The Rubicon, Pilot, Hangtown and Silver Creeks are names of 
streams entering the American. 

The branches of the Sacramento entering it are the Clear, Cottonwood, Elder, Thorns, Stoney, 
Cache and Putah creeks. These all have their sources in the Coast Range and after running through 
many lovely valleys in the mountains, these considerable and ever-running streams debouch upon the 
great plain of the Sacramento, and in seasons of drought seldom reach the main river. 

The system of the San Joaquin is the counterpart of tho Sacramento with tho exception that no stream 
flows from tho Coast Range to water the western portion of the broad valley. Flowing from the Sierra 
Nevada are the Cosumno, Dry Creek, Mokelumne, Calaveras, Stanislaus, Tuolumne, Merced, Cowchilla 
and t'resno, all noted for the gold mines of tho section of their drainage. The Merced is the river of Yo- 
semite, and, as are the Tuolumne and Stanislaus navigable for a short distance from their mouths. 

The southern portion of the great valley of California embraces Tulare, Buena Vista, Kern and other 
lakes, which receive Kings, Kaweah, White and Kern rivers, all large streams, having their sources among 
the lofty peaks of the most elevated portion of the Sierra Nevada. 

East of the range and north of the streams previously mentioned, and partly within the State, are 
Walker, Carson, Truckee and Susan rivers, with their numerous branches flowing eastward to lakes in 
the great basin. These, before reaching the valley, are strong and beautiful streams, afibrding water- 
power or for irrigating the bordering land. Tho first two empty into large lakes of the same name, the 
Truckee into Pyramid Lake, all in the State of Nevada, and the Susan into Honey Lake. 



The many mountains of California naturally have their corresponding valleys, and these are, in 




„^ing .. ^. . - . 

clivities are on tho one hand, and broad plains or expanded meadows on the other. Everywhere the soil 
contains elements of great fertility, and with the aid of abundant water vegetation is prolific. Soils of 
every character are found ; drifting sands ; arenaceous loam ; reddish gravel and tho deep clayey adobe. 
All are productive under irrigation, but under tho dependence of rains, great sections pass as sterile deserts 
when tho uncertain season or the capricious elements fail to supply tho fructifying element. When, there- 
fore, the area of the valleys is considered and the amount of arable land contained in them is estimated, 
the present condition is disregarded, for that which is now apparently a barren desert may, under different 
circumstances, or at another season, become a luxuriant garden. 

There are two classes of valleys— the small park-like basins in the mountains, and the lower valleys 
near the sea or bordering on the groat rivers. The great valley of the Colorado, in which may be placed 
the larger portion of San Diego and San Bernardino counties, is an inhospitable desert, and although it may 
be possessed of minerals and a soil rich in the elements of fertility, its climate renders it valueless for 
present purposes. Within this region are several distinctive valleys, as the Mohave Valley, bordering the 
Colorado, the Coahuilla and New River Valley, the Valley of the Mohave, on the river of that name, and 



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CALIFORNI A — G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 55 



Death Valley, on the Nevada line. This section comprises a vast area, exceeding forty thousand square 
milea, and is the Sahara of America. 

Bordering the eastern base of the Sierra Nevada are numerous valleys of considerable extent, well 
adapted for agricultural and grazing purposes. Of these are Owens Valley, the Big Meadows of Walker 
River, Long, Sierra, Beckwourth, Honey Lake and Surprise Valleys. Owens Valley has a length of 
upward of one hundred miles, and is threaded by the river from which it takes its name. Beckwourth, 
Surprise and Honey Lake Valleys are of similar character to Owens, and fade away into the wastes of sage 
brush and alkali. Surprise Valley is embraced in the new county of Modoc, in the northeastern corner of 
the State, and is rapidly filling up with settlers. This entire section, embracing Modoc, Siskiyou and parts 
of Shasta, Plumas and Lassen counties, is an elevated plateau, havin" a lava bod with volcanic peaks and 
basaltic ridges dividing it into different valleys. The lofty peaks. Mount Shasta and Lassens Butte, are 
extinct volcanoes, which in all probability have formed the floods of lava now covering the vast region. 
The elavation is from 3,500 to 4,500 feet, with mountain peaks rising ten thousand feet above them. The 
climate of these mountain valleys is pleasant and healthful, the summer days being warm, but the nights are 
often frosty, while the winters are never excessively cold. The water is abundant and of the purest quali- 
ty, and as the grazing is excellent, these valleys are peculiarly adapted to dairying and stock-raising. The 
Valley of Big Meadows is one of the most romantic and beautifully situated of this plateau. This is about 
fifteen miles in length and from two to three in width, and is enclosed in volcanic peaks and ridges. The 
North Fork of Feather lUver and several branches of the same run through it, and a luxuriant growth of 
grass gives it its pleasant name. The Mountain Meadows, lying to the eastward, are a part of the same 
valley, connected by an easy pass. These are several miles in extent, and roach, with slight rise, to the 
summit of the Sierra, whence, through Summit Valley, the waters of Susan River flofll'eastward to Honey 
Lalio. 

Indian and Genesee Valleys are parts of a great basin south of Big Meadows, and without the lava 
formation. The altitude is not so great as the former, and the snows are not so heavy nor the frosts so 
severe. The area of this basin is of about twenty-five square miles, and is occupied by a thrifty and pros- 
peroui farming and mining community. 

American Valley, a few miles south of {Indian, is similar to the latter though of loss area. These are 
of the most lovely and picturesque of the great range. Environed by lofty mountain ridges, clothed from 
summit to base with stately pines, with towering, snow-clad peaks in the distance, and verdant meadows 
in the foreground, fill a picture at once lovely and grand. Throughout the Sierras smaller valleys of equal 
loveliness are found, sparkling with lakes and rivulets set like gems on the mountain side, destined to 
become the pleasant and prosperous homes of intelligent cultivation. 

The great valley of California, next to the Sierra Nevada, is the distinguishing feature of the State. 
This grand basin lies between the Sierra Nevada and the Coast Range, a level plain having a length of 
four hundred miles, and an average breadth of forty, giving an aggregate area of li),000 square miles, or 
upward of ten million acres. The greater portion is arable and very productive, producing grain, cotton, 
tobacco, root crops and fruit of every variety belonging to a semi-tropical climate. The range of products 
is almost unlimited. The wheat, which is the reliance of the coldest latitudes, grows with unsurpassed 
luxuriance and Tunequaled quality by the side of the cotton field; and the apple and the orange are gath- 
ered in contiguous orchards. Within this wide range may be found all products of farm or garden, grove 
or orchard, park or forest. As its landscape is inspiriting from its extent and loveliness so are its pros- 
pects of future wealth and high cultivation limitless. Sixteen great counties, with parts of others in the 
bordering foothills, make up its political divisions; cities stud its plains and navigable rivers, and lines of 
railroad open every portion to commerce. Conventionally the valley is divided into three parts, as the 
Sacramento Valley, San Joaquin Valley and Tulare Valley, being the sections bordering the rivers and 
lakes ot their names. The Sacramento flowing from the north enters the valley at Redding, and after re- 
ceiving many streams in its course of over two hundred miles, joins the San Joaquin in Suisun Baj' and 
breaks through the inner Coast Range on the way to the sea. The San Joaquin has a similar course 
though in the opposite direction. The southern section of the valley embraces lakes Tulare, Kern and 
Buena Vista, which in seasons of freshets unite and flow into the San Joaquin. These are usually called 
the Tulare Lakes. About them and about the lower courses of the Sacramento, San Joaquin and Feather 
rivers are large areas of " tule " or marsh lands, subject to long continued inundation during each year, 
and requiring protection by dikes and drainage before they can be tilled, but when so reclaimed are very 
productive. Lying, as the greater portion of them do, along the banks of navigable rivers and sloughs, 
they are of easy access, and with their warmth and depth of soil their value under cultivation can scarcely 
be estimated. Grain, grass and trees grow luxuriantly, and several crops can annually ho gathered from 
the same ground. These lands aggregate several thousand square miles, of which over i,TOO,000 acres have 
been listed to the State and are wholly or in part reclaimed, costing from five to twenty dollars per acre. 

Large sections of the great valley, although of fertile soil, are unproductive without irrigation, and 
for this the lofty mountain ranges afford every facility. The snows upon the mountain peaks and the 
many lakes hiding like nests at the river sources are natural reservoirs of water which may be drawn 
upon while the summer droughts desiccate the plain. A proper system of engineering will so utilize these 
that at some future day there will be no part of the great valley, or the pleasant foothills, not brought 
under cultivation. Already enterprises of this character have been entered upon, and several large 
irrigating canals have been constructed. Their success has been proven, and where used the result has 
been to increase the product several fold, and to make certain a crop where otherwise nothing could have 
been grown. As an illustration it is shown that an irrigated field in Tulare County produced seven crops 
of alfalfa, averaging two tons per acre at each cutting, or fourteen tons of hay per acre for tho season. One 
acre of irrigated alfalfa will support twenty sheej), while three acres of natural grass are required for one. 
With such results, and with the abundant water that may bo utilized, the ten million acres of the great 
valley and contiguous foothills may be transformed into a veritable garden, supplying sustenance for 
many millions of people. The Kings River and San Joaquin Valley Irrigating Canal, the Fresno Canal, 
and others, have been constructed, which irrigate large areas, with the most flattering results. 

Tho valley of tho Salinas resembles in many respects the valley of tho San Joaquin, and is tho second in 
size of the great interior valleys of tho State. The Kio San Juan, rising in tho hills dividing the valley 
from Tulare, constitutes the main branch of the Salinas. The valley of this stream is hilly, and with little 
arable land. After a flow of upward of one hundred miles northwestward, passing tho San Antonio Ilill^, 
tho river enters the real valley of the Salinas. This spreads to a width of from twelve to fifteen miles in 
its lower extension, furnishing more than half a million acres arable land. Salinas City, a bustling town, 
has recently been built in the centre of the valley, and Castroville is near tho mouth of tho river. Tho 
Southern Pacific Railroad now extends to Soledad, threading the valley for a distance of upward of forty 
miles, giving transportation facilities to the most occupied and cultivated portion of tho valley. Tho 
Salinas and Monterey Railroad, in course of construction, will connect it with a convenient seaport. This 
valley, like its counterpart, the San Joaquin, is subject to severe winds and droughts, but in years of 
plenteous rains it yields abundantly. 

Tho Pojaro, San Benito and San Lorenzo Valleys are drained to Monterey Bay, the first having an 
area of about seventy-five square miles, the second about two hundred, and the San Lorenzo about thirty, 
all exceedingly fertile, and distinguished for their loveliness of climate and variety of productions. 



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56 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Tho Santa Clara Valley is the largest and most important of the coast valleys, extending, with slight 
intorniption, from the southern lino of Santa Clara County to tho Bay of San Francisco, fifty miles in 
length and twenty niilos broad in its widest place, having nn area of about five hundred square miles. 
This valley, though without tho name, embraces the Bay of San Francisco, extondins in a broad belt of 
rich soil along the eastern shore. The beautiful city of San Jose is tho entrepot of .Santa Clara Viilloy. 

Between the Contra Costa Hills, which border tho bay of San Francisco on tho east, and tho Monto 

Diablo Range, are tho Amador, Livermore, San Ramon and Pachoco valleys, siiccooding each other from 

south to north, and comprising, with other small valleys connected with them, an area of about throo 

'^ hundred and fifty square miles, all possessing a rich, loamy soil, and distinguished for the quantity and 

2 quality of wheat grown. , , ., , , . ^ 

o , Southerly, hidden among tho hills of tho coast, or sloping oft to tho sea, are many valleys and plains 
rt of exquisite beauty and inviting fertility. Many of these localities were settled by the Monks, who oxhib- 

3 : ited aesthetic tastes of a high order in choosing sites for their Missions. Wherever tho name of Missi.'n is 
H \ applied, it is the assurance of loveliness of location and fertility of soil. Soledad, San Miguel, Carmelo, 

San Luis Obispo, Santa Inez, Santa Barbara, San Buenaventura, San Fernando, and numerous others, are 
well known and seem worthy of detailed descriptions, but to describe all would fill a volume. Some are 
o 1 of large extent, and, whore watered, are very productive. Even the hills afibrd good grazing, and if 
j abundant water were supplied, the greater portion of tho country could be cultivated. The entire region 
t*» is a sanitarium, not being surpassed in healthiness in the world. The mineral resources are important; 
_*^ i the recent discovery of quicksilver inciting the people to enterprise and exploration. Coal, petroloum, 
Cj asphaltum, sulphur and other minerals are found and wrought to some extent, but the field is only now 



O 



opening. 

South and east of Los Angeles, a broad inclined plane extends from the mountains to the sea, consti- 
tuting one of tho most important agricultural sections of the State. This includes the valleys of Los 
Angeles, San Gabriel, Santa Ana, San Bernardino, Cucomongo, San Juan Capistrano, San Luis lley, San 
Diego and others. This is the land of the orange and the olive; of soft and genial summers, and mild 
winters; where the verdure, the flowers, and the ripening fruit of the orange groves give to all cultivated 
grounds tho appearance of a paradise. Here, as in most sections of California, the skill of the engineer is 
required to render fruitful the fertile soil. Without water all is barren, but with tho magic streams grains 
and tre-s spring with vigorous life from tho ground. Here, as elsewhere, the absence of forests is marked 
as a sjrious misfortune to the country, but with irrigation, so quickly do they grow, whether of fruit, orna- 
ff-\ ] mental, or woods for building or cabinet purposes, that all the defects on this score can bo readily 
fn I supplied. 

j2 North of the Bay of San Francisco, are a large number of small and pretty valleys, the most important 

of which are Napa, Sonoma, Petaluma, Russian River, Berreyesa, Clear Lake, Anderson, Potter, Hoopa, 
Eel River, Humboldt Bay, and many others pf less note. Those of the southern portion are quite densely 
peopled and well cultivated, and constitute themost advanci^l wine-producing section of the State. These, 
although of a comparatively high latitude, possess a climate but slightly differing from that of the southern 
coast. Frosts are seldom experienced in winter, and the coast winds modify the heats of summer. Oranges 
and all the fruits of the South grow in perfection, and health prevails. 
ra I Such is a brief resum? of the agricultural sections of California. Only tho principal valleys have been 
Jj I mentioned, and but attention called to them, the limits of this sketch forbidding a dotaiUid and compre- 
fH 1 hensive description. But the valleys alone do not comprise all the arable lands of the State. Tho hills 
j^ I of the coast, when watered by the fogs of the ocean, furnish superb grazing, and large extents can be suc- 
cessfully cultivated. Also, along the western flank of the great Sierra are broad belts that can be converted 
into productive farms and vineyards. 

AREA. 



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The area of California is about 154,118 square miles, or 08,634,240 acres, as nearly as can be calculated 
without an accurate survey. Of this vast surface, nearly one-fourth, or 40,000 square miles, lies in the 
J^ : southeastern part of the State, beyond tho Sierra Nevada and the dividing chain which separates the 
*°^ coast from the valley of the Colorado, and is to a great extent valueless. Small sections along the Colora- 
A4 do, in the desert, and in the valley of the Mohave, may be cultivated ; but still it would leave one-fourth 
^ I of the area of the State as an irreclaimable waste, although seamed with metaliferous veins bearing gold, 
' silver, lead and copper. Much of that, also, that appears as drifting sand in tho valleys is composed of 
minute shells and would probably be a valuable article of export to enrich other soils. 

The valleys classed as fertile cover one-sixth of the State, having an area of 2ii,000 square miles, or 
16,640,000 acres, three-fifths being in the basin of the Sacramento and San Joaquin. The hills and mount- 
ains susceptible of cultivation will aggregate an area of 10,000 square miles, or 6,400,000 acres, making a total 
ot 36,000 square miles, or 23,040,000 acres of arable land. Tho surface covered by the Sierra Nevada is about 
38,000 square miles, of which 20,000 are covered with forests, 5.000 are destitute of vegetation, and 13,000 
may be classed as fit for cultivation or grazing. The soil covering the auriferous gravel is usually the best 
for cultivation, but the area of such deposits none can venture to estimate. Tho other mountain ranges 
of tho State contain but little land that is entirely valueless, it either being covered with forests or fit for 
grazing purposes. Throughout the southern portion of California, much of the hill land is covered with 
chaparral or barren rocks, rendering it almost valueless. Estimating this, from careful observation, at five 
per cent, of the remaining lands, it would amount to about 4,000 square miles. 

The surface of California may be classed as follows : Total area, 154,116 square miles ; arable land, 
36,000 ; desert, 44,000 ; forests, 35,000 ; lakes and rivers, 1,700 square luilos ; grazing. 37,416. These estimates 
are made from the most recent examinations and reports. The Commissioner of the General Land Oflice, 
in his report upon California, estimates that " 80,000,000 acres are suited to some kinds of profitable hus- 
bandry : of these, 40,000,000 are tit for the i)low, and the remainder present excellent facilities for stock- 
raising, fruit-growing, and all the other kinds of agriculture. This agricultural area exceeds that of Great 
Britain and Ireland, or the whole of the peninsula of Italy." 



CLIMATE. 

The climate of California has been the boast of its citizens from the time it became known, and has 
been extolled by all travelers. Comparisons with pleasant Italy and sunny France are made, and the 
climate of the State is said generally to resemble that of the countries bordering the Mediterranean. 
Much of its high praise comes from the fact that the people are mostly from the northern Atlantic States, 
and the contrast is so great between the mild temperature of California and the extremes of the East that 
it has caused extravagance in its description. Meteorologists in delineating by isothermal lines the rela- 
tive climates of the United States present Calitornia in favorable contrast with the Atlantic coast. None 
of the lines commencing north of South Carolina touch tho Golden State. The Florida lino, while follow- 
ing tho thirtieth parallel west of the Mississippi Valley, curves to the northward and strikes the Pacific near 
our northern boundary. The same line indicates the climate of all our great valleys, only the elevated 
regions and those ex|)osed to the cold ocean winds experiencing alow temperature. 

The precipitous rise of mountains from the level of tho sea to an altitude of from one to throe miles in 
height, gives a great range of temperature at all seasons of the year, perpetual winter reigning on the 
mountain-tops, while the valleys show only the alternations of spring, summer and autumn. The seasons 



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CALIFORNI A — Q ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 57 



are more nroperly divided into AVot and Dry. The natural laws governing the meteorology of the Pacific 
are such that the groat wind currents from the northwest strike upon the coast during the summer months, 
and, though filled with moisture, instead of condensing; in rain, their moisture is absorbed and lost in the 
dry and warmer air of the land. In winter, the regularity is disturbed, and southern winds, particularly 
those from the warm regions of the southeast, bring abundant rains, or snow at an altitude of from '2,t00 to 
3.000 feet. The climate is thus divided into two seasons. Wet and Dry. The wet season commences in 
November, the heaviest rains falling in the latter part of December, and continuing until April or ilay. 
During the severest winters, not more than half the days are rainy, and below the snow-line the tempera- 
ture is mild, and whon not raining, the weather is peculiarly pleasant and lovely. This is the season of 
plowing and i)lanting, giving the farmer the long period of six months to prepare and seed his ground, 
tho.igh, to insure a good crop, it is necessary that cereals be sown previous to the fall of the latest rains. 
During the winter months, whon other sections of the Union are covered with snow and the ground 
hardened by frost, the hills and valleys of California are clad in verdure, presenting a scene of loveliness that 
gives peculiar charm to the country, redeeming it from many detracting features it may possess. The month 
of February is usually exempt from excessive rains, is warm and pleasant, and is the season in the lower val- ' m 
leys for the springing of buds and flowers, which in the following month expand in boautv and fill the air I fj 
with fragrance. The last months of the rainy season close in glory. There is no dismal Winter to " linger o 
in the lap of Spring." The trees are crowned with the brightest green, and fields and gardens are bedecked | J^ 
with tints of every hue. California is then the " land of sun and flowers," and then is the most happy ; P 
season of the year. . 

The rainfall varies regularly with the locality and with different years. The lea't fall is upon the ' "- 
Colorado desert, where the average does not exceed three inches per annum, and the greatest is in the 
mountains of the northern coast, where a fall of V^ inches in a year has occurred. The towering ridse of 
the Sierra Nevada intercepts the cloud-bearing winds of winter, and, however dry the season may be in 
the valleys and along the coast, always receives vast deposits of snow, which, measured as water, varying 
with the season, is from fifty to one hundred inches in a year of rainfall, and droughts are unknown. The 
southern portion of the State receives the least, and the northern mountain region the most. The Colorado 
desert, however, is in a section of different seasons from those which prevail west of the dividing line, it 
being between the seasons of the California coast and those of Mexico, where the months of July and 
August furnish the most rain. 

At San Diogo, on the southern coast, the annual rainfall is about ten and a half inches; at San Fran- 
cisco it is twenty and a third ; at Sacramento, nineteen ; and at Nevada City, in the Sierra, at an altitude 
of 2,:K0 feet, the average fall is fifty-five inches. The least fall measured at the last locality was in the 
season of 183'V4, that being seventeen and a quarter inches, and the greatest in 18 il-2, 109 inches. At 
greater elevations the fall is almost entirely in the form of snow, which attains a depth of from eight to 
twenty-five feet. 

The Dry season is the summer and autumn of California, the season of maturity and harvest. It ex- 
tends from May to November, a period of six months, when rain seldom falls. Showers sometimes occur 
in the interior and mountains in July, and a few light rains may occur in September and October; at other 
times no fall of water need be expected. Journeys may be undertaken, and the gathered crops of the field 
be exposed without fear of interference or damage by rain. The harvest commences in May, first in the 
cutting of grass for hay, and continues with the cereals at the convenience of the farmer. The great labor 
of turning, drying and sheltering grain, required of the farmer in the East, from the frequency of summer 
rains, is never exacted in California, as the long dry season gives ample time for the harvest, and prepares 
the grain in a condition superior to any possible attainment in rainy countries. 

Three different climates may be found from the ocean to the mountain summits: that of the coast, with 
its cold winds and fogs ; the warm valleys of the interior ; and the frosty region of the high mountains. 

The temperature of the elevated region is severe in winter, though not approaching the extreme cold 
of the Atlantic coast, and frosts occur during every month of the year. Below the altitude of a thousand 
feet, frosts are rare, and oranges and other semi-tropical fruits are cultivated with great success, and with- 
out protection from the climate. It is quite singular that the temperature of the sheltered valleys or 
mountain-tops varies but little with the latitude. The peaks of San Bernardino or San Gabriel are soon 
covered with snow with the earliest storms, and at about the same elevation as along the northern Sierras. 
The orange groves, which give such beauty to the fields of Los Angeles, present as bright a foliage and as 
golden fruit in the gardens of the north ; and the palms and agaves, or century plant, which give such 
picturesque effect to the scenery of the south, flourish equally well in the northern valleys. 

On the coast, however, a great change is observable south of Point Conception. Thence the shore line 
trends to the east, and the cold northwest winds which have swept so fiercely along the land to this point 
are broken and warded off, and the climate of the south is like the protected valleys of the north. This 
refers only to that portion of the south, west of the dividing range. East of that, the heat and aridity are 
excessive, rendering the country a cheerless desert, although much of it possesses every element of fertility 
in its soil. 

San Diego is distinguished for the equability of its climate, the temperature seldom varying as much as 
twenty-five degrees during the year, the average being but little more than 60^ of Fahrenheit, and the ex- 
tremes 50. and 75^. At Fort Yuma, the average is about 70o, and the heats of summer often reaching to 
120 . But these are exceptional localities. At Los Angeles, frosts sometimes occur, and the temperature of 
summer reaches from OOa to 100^, with an average of about 60^; but its extremes are rarely experienced, 
and the locality is distinguished for the mildness and salubrity of its climate. 

The climate of San Francisco may be taken as the representative of the northern coast, although in the 
extreme north the cold winds, whose chilling dampness is felt as they strike the land, are more severe 
than in the central portion. Th9so winds give a disagreeable character to the climate of summer, but 
coming from their long circuit over the broad ocean, are uncontaminated with any malaria, and bring with 
them the vigor and health which characterize the sections exposed to their influence. There is but little 
change in the temperature of the coast during the year, the summers being colder and the winters warmer 
than in the interior. This equabilty is undoubtedly caused by the even temperature of the water of the 
ocean, which always stands at about 523 or j^io. The land temperature, as measured at sunrise and noon, 
during the past twenty years, at San Francisco, by Dr. 11. Gibbons, shows a mean of about r,ih for the year, 
the warmest month, September, being from oSo to 633, and the coldest, January, the lowest moan for the 
month being 4ii3 in lSii8, the usual mean being above 503. 

The great Valley of California and its contiguous mountain region has a climate of ardent warmth in 
summer, and few light frosts in winter, the extremes slightly exceeding those of Los Angeles, the moan 
being one or two degrees higher. Near the entrance to the basin, the sea breeze is felt, and modifies the 
heat, while in the northern and southern portions the thermomoter often shows lOOo, and seldom a sum- 
mer passes but that a heat of more than IOO3 isexporionced at Marysville; such extremes are only reached 
on one or two days of a year. But owing to the uniform dryness of the air, which promotes evaporation 
from the surface of the body, and to the uniformly cool and refreshing nights, this excessively warm 
weather is not so oppressive as it would appear. With the announcement of the " heated term " at the 
East, when the thermometer shows 00^, come reports of scores of people killed by sunstroke or dying by 
prostration from the heat, and of the loss of life by the terrible hydrophobia, but such things are unknown 



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58 PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



in tlio nuro atmosphoro of California. Noithor are tho storms of hail, rain and wind, with thoir thunder 
and ligntning acconipnniinonts, brinsinj? dostriiction to proi)erty and death to people in tho East, repeated 
on the I'ncific Coast. Sunstroke, hydroiihobiii and thunder and lightning are here almost unknown. 

Upon tho lofty summits of tho mountains and in tho elevated valleys is found another climate, where 
winters aro iiuite severe, the snow fulling and ioo forming. Tho mountain ridges are cold at night through- 
out the summer, and tho valleys pleasantly cool, thoir climate resembling that of the Atlantic Coast of the 
same latitude. 

RRSOURCRS. 

California constitutes an empire by itself. Ilor territory extends over ten degrees of latitude, and in- 
cludes valleys by the soa and mountains reaching to tho eternal snows. Over her immense area a kindly 
nature has bestowed every jihysical feature desirable by man, and a climate varying only by altitudes. 
Within this we find every resource of honor, pleasure and wealth. To call attention to all, or describe 
them, would fill a cumborsomo volume. Tho great area of tho State, much of which is but slightly ex- 
plored, ofTors mnny difficulties for a thorough examination, and naturally invites speculation. Wo expect 
our State to become groat and wealthy, with a population of teoraing millions, drawing from the soil tho 
treasures Nature has stored for their use, adapting every moans that is furnished to add to their comfort 
and convenience, and sending forth a thousand arms of commerce to ovory quarter of tho globe. Believ- 
ing in the oxhaustless native wealth of California, it is a pleasure to discuss the theme. The natural re- 
sources of a country consist in its soil, its mines, its forests and its fisheries, and tho industrial resources 
in caiiabilities for manufactures and adaiitability to commerce. Tho first form the basis of the latter as 
well as of all wealth. The savage subsists from the spontaneous growths of the soil, and as man advances 
in civili/.ation so do the productions of agriculture. Tlie farmer supplies the manufacturer, who prepares food 
and clothing. These alone support society and maintain a commerce in its earliest stages. A further ad- 
vanced state of enlightenment seeks below tho surface of the earth, and mines are developed. Those aro the 
most important of the resources of a country, and from them a nation rises to wealth and power. Tho soil 
and the mines of England have made her the richest country of the earth, and enabled her to become tho 
most extensive manufacturing and commercial nation of tho world. Let us examine into the resources of 
California, and see if she possesses the elements to support a largo population and enable her to rise to fu- 
ture greatness. 

AGRICULTURE. 

Thecultureof the soilin California was not until recently regarded as an important resource. The 
golden grains from the placers and veins of the Sierra, gave tho only incentive to industry, while the broad 
valleys, sered and sun-cracked by tho heats and droughts of summer, were dreaded as inhospitable and 
irreclaimable deserts. American farmers were accustomed to tho frequent showers and verdant fields of 
summer, and the belief was entertained that summer rains were indispensble. Gradually the prejudice 
has been overcome, and now the golden grains from the fields exceed in value those from the mines. The 
future is very bright, and production is without range or limit. Tho extent of arable soil is immense, 
and the geniality of the climate fosters all vegetable and animal life. Estimates bv enthusiasts, once 
thought extravagant, are proving within bounds as development follows experiment. The soil is generally 
deep and lasting, and if supplied with water responds to evory demand. Neither is the productive soil 
confined to the valleys and plains, for wherever the climate permits, and water is afforded, roots, fruits 
or cereals grow luxuriently. The rank tule succumbs to the whoatfield, and the repulsive chaparral gives 
way to the vineyard. Cotton and tobacco know no north nor south, and recent trials show that both are 
here grown and cured in greater perfection than elsewhere in tho United States. Tropical fruits grow in 
luxuriance side by side with the hardy apple of the north, and the camel of the African desert grazes and 
brings forth its young in the same field with the cashmere goat from the heights of flimmalaya. Within 
the range are nearly all plants and all useful animals. The fruits have grown to such perfection that the 
fame of the State has become world-wide, and so favorable is it for the rearing of stock that animals brought 
to it from other countries here add new developments and come to greater perfection. The diseases to 
which horses, cattle, sheep, dogs and other animals are subject in other countries are almost unknown on 
the Pacific Coast. 

The agricultural field we have shown to comprise an area of 36,000 square miles, or 23,040,000 acres of 
arable land, and a grazing range of 41,500 square miles, or 2i),5(j0,000 acres, or a total of 49,(J00 ,000 acres; 
and this is to be'largoly increased by the suDJection of the forests and the reclamation of tho desert. The 
grazing lands, where capable of being irrigated, are generally susceptible of cultivation, and under such 
conditions the total area should be described as arable. 

Fifty million acres of tillable and grazing land is less than the usual estimate, but the twenty-five 
million comprised in the southeastern section of the State, from the dividing ridge of the Sierra to the 
Colorado, we have classed as desert, which has been generally ranked as fitted for some purposes of cul- 
ture or pasture. Small areas may be rendered fertile, and beds of marl and salt, and veins of lead, gold, 
silver and copper are known to exist; but tho barrenness is so general that to class its many millions of 
acres as agricultural or grazing, would be but a deceptive array of figures. 

The swamp and overflowed lands have attracted increased attention in the last few years. Such lands 
as require protection from overflow to bo successfully cultivated, were granted the State by the General 
Government. The area of these is not well defined, but is estimated at from three to five thousand square 
miles. The most important sections are within tho deltas of the great rivers, and are beds of peat, formed 
by the deposit of silt and the growth of rank vegetation. Such a soil is of incomparable fertility and inex- 
haustible resource. They are reclaimed by the construction of embankments, or levees, to prevent over- 
flows, and when thus protected, two, and sometimes three crops of grain are grown annually, yielding 
often sixty bushels of wheat to the acre. A field of eleven acres, on Sherman Island, in 1874, yielded 
90 bushels per acre. Fruit and forest trees grow as well, and with the warm climate and moist soil there 
can be no limit to the range of production. The trade winds entering by the Golden Gate sweep gently 
over the delta during the summer, tempering the climate most pleasantly. When this broad soa of 
waving tule is fully reclaimed to cultivation in the products best adapted to the soil, it vyill pour forth a 
wealth unprecedented in agriculture, and furnish pleasant homos for as dense a population as crowd the 
rich lands of Holland or Belgium. Ex-Surveyor-General Bost estimates the total area of the swamp and 
overflowed land belonging to the State, at three million acres, every acre of which would produce fifty 
bushels of wheat at each cropping, or other products in proportion. 

These, as well as other arable and grazing lands of California, are generally owned in large tracts. 
Anterior to the acquisition of the country by the United States, large grants to individuals had been 
made, aggregating some six million acres, in bodies of from throe to forty square leagues in extent, cover- 
ing the most choice sections of valley and grazing lands near the coast. Subsequently, large purchases 
have been made of Government land, several persons owning over two hundred thousand acres each, and 
the Assessor's reports show one hundred and twenty-two farms exceeding twenty thousand acres each, one 
hundred and fifty-eight exceeding ten thousand acres, and generally showing that large farms is tho rule. 
Nevertheless, there are still large areas unoccupied, much being desirable land. The prices of land so vary, 
according to location, soil and character of title, that no satisfactory report can be given. In some locali- 
ties, it is obtained at the Government rate of S1.25 an acre, from some of the large Mexican grants at even 



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CALIFORNI A — G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 59 



less, and from that rate to SlOO per aero for farming land near the large towns. Of the large amount claimod 
or owned bv private individuals, there were, according to the Report of the State Surveyor-tieneral tor the 
year 1873. only 4,843,532 acres enclosed, and but 2,477,012 under cultivation. Of these 1,739,608 were cul- 
tivated in wheat, producing 2ii,089,i;i57 bushels. . , „ . l- 

The lands granted to the different railroad companies as subsidies in aid of construction comprise 
several thousand square miles, of which large quantities have been sold at prices averaging about tive 
dollars per acre. These lands are sold on a credit of five years; a payment of twenty per cent, being made 
at the time of purchase, with interest on all sums remaining unpaid. The railroad companies claim the 
policy of selling their agricultural lands at low rates, on easy terms and in limited quantities to those who 
will cultivate the soil and who will own the land they cultivate. 

From the amount and quality of land presented [as agricultural, a faint estimate can be made of the 
population the State will sustain. With reclamation of the low lands and irrigation of the dry, wo have 
shown the products exceed that of almost any known country. Add to these the manufacturing facilities 
afforded by the rapidly falling streams of the mountains or by the abundance of cheap coal found and 
developing, and to these add the wealth of minerals never known before, and then the grandest forests 
humanity ever beheld, and none can conceive the wealth that may be produced or the myriads of people 
that may be maintained. 

AVhrat.— The leading agricultural product of the State, as well as of all countries capable of the pro- 
duction, is wheat, the staff of life and the ancient basis of values. The California farmer having learned 
that the summer-cracked soil of the great valleys would product wheat in greater quantities than he had 
been accustomed to gather on the prairies of the West, and that the long droughts which he had thought 
precluded cultivation only perfected his grain and insured a safe harvest, has turned his chief attention 
to the raising of this cereal until the crop materially affects the markets of the world. In the crop year 
ending June 30th, 1873, there were prodviced 12,1)75,470 centals of wheat, from 2,0()3.420 acres, and in 1874, 
19.891,800 centals from 2,490,700 acres, a general average of about fourteen bushels per acre. The average 
was much reduced by the drought which affected the west side of the San Joaquin Valley, where large 
tracts had been sown. Many farms reported a yield of forty-five, fifty, and as high as sixty bushels per 
acre, the larger farms generally a less rate than the small ones. The counties producing over a million 
centals were: Colusa, 1,700,000; Santa Clara, l,3(i0,000; Monterey, 1,1)32.000; San Joaquin, 2,200,000; Stani- 
slaus, 3,220,000, and Merced, 2,400,000. This royal grain is grown in every section of the State, and at every 
altitude, from San Diego at the south, to Siskiyou at the north, and from the sea coast to the high plateaus 
of the Sierra Nevada. Many of the great farms cover from ton to forty thousand acres, and in the great 
valleys of the Sacramento, San Joaquin and Salinas the traveler may pass for miles and miles, almost a 
day's journey, through a continuous wheat field, unobstructed and unguarded by fence, the growing grain 
spreading to the horizon like a broad prairie in its native wildness. A single farm on the bank of the 
Sacramento River, of 45,000 acres, produced some 30,000 tons, or at the rate of twenty-five bushels per acre. 
To take this crop of a single farm to market at San Francisco would require the constant services of ten 
steamers, making a trip in ten days, each towing a barge of 300 tons, for a period cf one hundred days, and 
in sending it to England, would dispatch a ship of a thousand tons each day for a whole month. The 
amount of the whole crop of the State that can be spared to export is, placed in round numbers, at 600,- 
000 tons, leaving 200,000 tons for home consumption and seed. To illustrate the magnitude 'of this a calcula- 
tor has estimated that if it were taken on carts overland to New York, one ton to each cart, it would form 
a close column with one end entering New York before the rear had loft San Francisco. This imagi- 
nary train is surely an imposing one, and would rise to mock those who a few years since declared the great 
valleys but sun-burnt deserts, and the State unfitted for self-support. The usual market for wheat is 
Great Britain, where California, from its superior quality and dryness, always commands a ready sale. 
Therates of freight vary from S17 to S25 per ton, and the price in San Francisco from S1.60 to $2.25 per 
cent al, the first being about the rate for 1874. 

The production of this grain has greatly increased during the past five years. In 1865, the product 
was 11,579,127 bushels, and the average twenty-four bushels per acre. The prices then were from $3 to 85 
per cental, two preceding years of great drought having nearly exhausted the home supply of breadstuffs. 
Then California was not an exporter. In the subsequent years of 18B7 and 1868, the price exceeded $2.50 
per cental, which greatly encouraged the production. But the low price of Si. 50, in 1869, did not dis- 
courage the farmer, and a still greater breadth was sown in 1870. The extension of the railroads through 
the wheat-growing districts has given an impetus to the business, and a better prospect for profits in distunt 
localities. With the cost of cultivating and harvesting an acre of nineteen bushels, or 1,140 pounds, at Sl6, 
and the price one and three-fourth cents per pound, or S19.95, a profit of $3.95 per acre is left the farmer. 
The cost of production is divided as follows: Plowing, sowing and harvesting, $8..50; threshing, $1.50; sacks, 
81; hauling, freight, etc., $3.50; interest or rent, 81.50. 

The wheat for shipment abroad is freighted to San Francisco, Vallejo, or Oakland, in small vessels or 
by railroad, and at those several points is taken on board ship. From far up the Sacramento or San 
Joaquin, it is brought in barges towed by small steamers, and the cars bring it from points along the line 
of the railroads. An elevator for raising and loading grain in bulk was constructed at Vallejo, but the 
system of shipping grain in sacks is considered the best, and is therefore adhered to. 

The usual varieties cultivated are the Chilean, Sonora Club and Australian, and the distinction of 
winter and spring wheat is not known. The sowing is best made in November and December, in order to 
be benefitted bvall the rains of the winter; but good crops are often obtained when the seeding is made in 
February and March, if it should happen that rains fall in considerable quantity in April and May. Har- 
vest begins in June, and is done by reaper or header machines, drawn b^ horses, and the threshing is by 
machinery often driven by steam. The grain is received in sacks, and is stored in the field, by the rail- 
road stations, or by the river landings, where it awaits a market or transportation. Stacks and barns, in 
which to store the crop to await the toilsome process of the flail, during the long and frozen winter, aro 
unknown in the sunny clime of California. The golden grain can safely remain in the field, either in the 
straw or in the sack, improving in the dry atmosphere until the rains of October or November, during 
which the farmer has had ample time to transport it to market or the great warehouses by tide-water, 
where at any time the ships of commerce may take it on board for a distant port. This dried and hard 
wheat is preferred in all markets to any other, as it withstands without damage the long voyage through 
the tropics, where damp grain would heat and sweat. It is, moreover, strong in nutritious matter, and re- 
quires the addition of much water when prepared for use, thus giving the advantage of increased weight to 
tae consumer. 

Barlky.— This cereal ranks next to wheat in quantity of production and aggregate value. It was in 
great demand in the early days of the State for feed for horses, and for a number of years constituted the 
leading product of the farmer. Being regarded as a hardy plant, it was thought to be the only grain that 
could DO successfully raised in such a climate as California. Growing finely and producing^ a perfect 
kernel, it became a favorite article with the farmer, and nearly all the grain fields of the State wore 
devoted to it. At last, in about 1857-8, the product became so great tho markets were overstocked, and 
barley sold at from fifty cents to $1 per cental. This low rate admonished the farmer that he must vary 
his crop, and wheat, oats and other grains were essayed. Success attended tho venture, and thus barley 



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60 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



is tho honored pioneer of the cereals of California. This prrows on lands not farorable to other grains' 
and as tho seed is not so onolosod in tho head as wheat, more falls in harvesting, thiis seeding tho ground 
for tho following voar. Tho "voluntoor" crops from such sowing are often bettor than tho first, and give 
an easy profit to the farmer. Five and six volunteer crops have been known to succeed each other, but 
usually in the third year tho field is so choked with woods and cheat as to render tho crop valueless except 
for hay. The yield of barley is often as high as forty bnshf>ls per acre, but tho report of the Surveyor- 
General shows the crop for ISiiit to have averaged twenty bushels per acre. There were then 8i)2,S:?!i acres 
sown, and the product was 7,:?'iI,;Kri bushels. In tho year 1S7'1 there were 451,000 acres sown and 8,10.'),484 
bushels harvested, anil in 1874. oOO.iOO acres and 1I,!>72,400 bushels. The price of this grain during some 
years has exceeded that of wheat, so prone have farmers been to abandon one clas.s of products and con- 
centrate upon another. Lately the price has but little exceeded Si per cental, being from SI to SI. 10; but 
this will give an average profit of $5 to S7 per acre. Tho barley of California, like the wheat, is a superior 
article, and it has been successfully exported to the East and England, where it was used for making boor. 
Its groat superiority has created such a market that California barley is enabled to pay railroad trans- 
portation across the continent. This grain may bo planted later than wheat, as it grows and matures 
rapidly. The manner ofharvesting, threshingand sacking is the same as wheat, but barley finds a home 
market rather than seeking a foreign one. It is \ised throughout tho Pacific Coast as food for horsos, to 
tho almost exclusion of oats, and is also converted into malt for making beer. 

Oats.— In most countries oats constitute the principal grain food for horses, but in California barley 
has been substituted. Not, only is this cereal the delicate food for horses, but in Scotland and on the 
continent of Europe it is highly regarded for its nutritious and strongth^^ning qualities as a food for man. 
The cultivation of this valuable grain is comparatively neglected, and for several years the acreage and 
yield has fallen off. In ISW we recorded a product of 2,'i()8,75') bushels from 72,0)4 acres, being an average 
of thirtv-two bushels per acre. In 1872 we find 88,0")l) acres and 2,lii4,017 bushels, and in 1878 it had fallen 
to <il,0fi7 acres and l,li4R,!)i)4 bushels, an average of twenty-six and a half bushels per acre. Tho usual 
market price for oats ranges from ftl.4o to f 1.M5 per cental. This beautifully growing grain is a "native 
and to the manor born," the hills and plains biding covered with it in a wild state, growing most luxuriantly. 
This indigenous grass is largelv cut for hay, for which it is well adapted. To observe tho countless thou- 
sands of acres of this wild grain waving in the wind when the virgin soil of the State, was untouched by 
the plow, was one of the pleasantest sights that greeted the eye of the pioneer, and was convincing to every 
sensible observer of the capacity of the country for the production of every other species of grain. It has 
lately been demonstrated that by careful cultivation the native wild oat can be transformed into a plump 
and heavy seed, superior and more hardy than any other species of that grain. This is a grand discovery, 
and will save from extirpation this fine native plant. 

Oats are grown succossfullv in this State, and, as with other grains, exceed in weight the standard 
established in the East, weighing here usually about forty pounds per bushel. As with all other grain in 
California, it is sold and reckoned by the cental, or hundred pounds. This grain is grown throughout the 
State, and is planted and harvested as wheat and barley. 

CoRy.— Tho climate of California being warm and the soil rich, it would naturally be supposed that 
corn would be the most largely producing grain, but such is not tho fact. Referring again to tho Survovor- 
General's Report, we see that 88,025 acres were cultivated in 1878, and 1,807,8 !4 bushels produced an 
average of near thirty-five bushels per acre. In the great corn-growing States of Indiana, Kentucky and 
others of the Mississippi Valley, from forty to one hundred bushels are produced, showing that California 
is far behind those States in that grain. It is gratifying, however, to know that the grains which are 
raised are preferable for breadstufFs, equal as food for stock, and are produced with less manual labor ; 
and, besides that, the luscious grapes of our vineyards furnish to the bibulous a pleasanter beverage than 
corn whiskey. 

The fact is pow gensrallv claimed that this cereal is grown with greater certainty than formerly, and 
the product is increasing. There are several localities whore corn is grown with groat success. These are 
in the vicinity of Chico, in Russian River Valley, and at El Monte, in Los Angelas County. The worm is 
the great enemy of the corn-grower, but the localities mentioned are more exempt from its ravages than 
elsewhere. Quite large quantities are grown in the vicinity of cities, where it is sold green in the markets, 
at high prices. The usual price for shelled corn is about Sl.75 per cental. 

Rtk— The rye crop of California is among the least of the cereals, simply, it appears, because it has 
not become tho fashion to cultivate it. This grain grows to great perfection, particularly in the moun- 
tainous and colder sections of the State. Upon the eastern slopes of the Sierra the grain grows to a size re- 
sembling the plump berry of wheat, and is rich and nutritious. This is one of the best of cereals for do- 
mestic use, ranking next to wheat, and is raised whore the other will not yield a remunerative crop. If it 
is desired to find a substitute for corn for distillation, rye can well supply the place. The opportunities 
for the distiller in this connection are very great. The fine quality of the grain, the cheapness of the land 
where grown, and the certainty of a crop, are inducements to its cultivation and utilization. Tho Reports 
of the .Surveyor-General give no basis for an estimate of the average product per acre, as much of tho rye, 
as well as other grains, is cut for hay; therefore we see reported many acres of rye cultivated which return 
barely enough of grain to seed tho ground for another crop. The official report for 1878 shows a product of 
39, :ai bushels, and 2,-533 acres cultivated. The crop of 1874 is much larger. Rye usually sells at Sl.OO to 
Si. 10 percental. 

Buckwheat. — This is usually a very successful crop, although the grain is grown only for local con- 
sumption, and the market is easily overstocked. The product in 1878 is officially reported at 18,757 bush- 
els, from 518 acres, or an average of twenty-six bushels per acre. Buckwheat flour soils at S3.50 per hun- 
dred lbs. 

Beans.— The favorite food of the miner and tho toiler in the country has, since the days of the pioneer, 
been the edible whose name heads this paragraph. Frijoles and tortillas were the mainstay of 
tho country in the days of '49. Then they were imported in large quantities from Peru and Chili and 
around Cape Horn. Beans are now cultivated to supply the homo demand and for export. Upward of 200,- 
000 bushels are raised annually, the average being about twenty-seven bushels per acre, and the price 
about 81.70 per one hundred lbs. 

Peas.— This plant is cultivated successfully in every section of the State, sufficient to supply all de- 
mands, the annual product being about lOO.OOJ bushels. As peas are usually consumed when green, the 
estimate of production is difficult to make with any degree of accuracj'. 

Peanuts are produced in large quantities on the sandy river bottoms, the product being about200,000 
bushels per annum. This properly belongs to the tubers, as it grows beneath the ground. It is very pro- 
lific, producing from 1,000 to 2,000 pounds per acre. California peanuts have become popular in other 
^tates, and quite large quantities are exported. 

Castor Bran. — The castor bean, from which the castor oil of commerce is obtained, is indigenous to 
the soil of California, and therefore its cultivation was naturally suggested. In the warm valleys it grows 
luxuriantly, and its product is becoming an important item in agricultural statistics. The product in 1873 



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CALIFORNI A — G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 61 



was 233,932 pounds. The counties where this is chiefly cultivated aro Los Angeles, Sutter and Yuba. The 
successof the cultivation is variously estiujated, but the profits reported in some localities encourage the 
belief that it will become a prominent crop. Four to five cents per pound aro readily obtained lor castor 
beans. 

Flax. — The establishment of extensive Linseed Oil Works in San Francisco has stimulated the cultiva- 
tion of flax, and the breadth of land devoted to this product is rapidly increasing. In 1S73, says the official 
report, 3,y3y acres were in flax. The Surveyor-General estimates that 2,000 pounds of seed can be grown 
per acre, returning S80, seemingly much more profitable than wheat. The stalk is seldom saved for the 
fibre, as, when cultivated for seed, it is not valuaole for spinning, and it is asserted that when grown in the 
warm climate and rich soil first appropriated by the husbandman, it becomes too brittle for use. Flax 
and hemp are indigenous to California, and there can be no question but that they may be 
grown to perfection for every purpose to which they are usually applied. ' A bagging factory at Oak- 
land, in Alameda County, uses a large quantity of jute, which it imports, but would substitute flax and 
hemp were such fibre obtainable and properly prepared. Four hundred hands are employed, and ten 
thousand sacks are turned out daily. l)uring the season of 1874 the Pacific Cordage Company planted a 
field of five acres in Alameda County, in hemp, as aa experiment, which yielded about 1,000 pounds of 
fibre to the acre, of excellent quality, returning a value of about $250 per acre. The culture and manufac- 
ture of flax, hemp and jute offer grand opportunities for unlimited capital. 

Rice.— Much as the cultivation of rice has been advocated, the favorable opportunities shown forth 
and great profits assured, this valuable cereal does not yet enter into any table of California agricultural 
statistics. Some fifty million pounds are imported annually, at a cost of upward of three million dollars. 
The extended area of tule lands in various parts of the State, particularly about the delta of the Sacra- 
mento and San Joaquin rivers, are eminently suited to the culture of rice, and the inquiry is often pro- 
pounded why it has never been undertaken. Experiments have been reported as in contemplation, but 
no results are returned. These lands are now devoted to wheat and produce largely, but as that grain brings 
only from one and a half to two cents per pound, the higher price of rice, being from five to eight cents 
per pound, it appears that the cultivation of the latter would be most tempting to the enterprising farmer. 
Upland rice is grown successfully, as proven by experiment of iMr. J. II. Taylor, who, in 1874, planted 
three acres in Livermore Valley, which grew well. It is the belief of the experimenter .that upland rica 
will grow on any land that will produce good barley. 

Hops.— In the cultivation of the iiop it has been necessary to overcome a prejudice, — as it was in many 
other things,— and now that the California hop is admitted as superior to all others, unless it is the 
Bavarian, its culture is advancing. The quantity produced it is difficult to ascertain, as no reliable statis- 
tics aro collated, the official reports varying so greatly from those obtained privately or from newspapers 
as to render them totally valueless. The County Assessors return a product of about half a million 
pounds per annum, at the rate of from two hundred to eight hundred pounds per acre ; while 
unofficial sources report a product of from one to two thousand pounds per acre. Formerly the 
brewers imported the hops required in their business, but now they are exported largely, California hops 
generally loading the market in New York, and selling at from thirty to fifty cents per pound. The East- 
ern and English markets for the superior Calitornia hops is almost unlimited, and they seem capable of 
driving the product of the yards of Wisconsin and New York, the principal hop-growing sections of the 
East, Irom the market. Here the yield is greater, the product better, and the price higher. This is 
another branch of cultivation that will relieve the soil and the market of wheat, greatly to the advantage 
of the farmer. 

Silk. — For several years the experiment of silk culture has been most successfully tried. The mul- 
berry tree grows luxuriantly everywhere, and the climate, except, perhaps, immediately along the coast, 
where cold and damp in summer, or in the mountains above the altitude of three thousand feet, is most 
favorable to the health and working of the silkworm. Progress in the culture and manufacture, however, 
has not been commensurate with the importance of the matter or the seeming profits claimed for such 
enterprise. Under the stimulus of a bounty ofi'ored by the State, a number of agriculturists entered upon 
the production of mulberry trees and the rearing of silk-worms, and their success was highly marked. 
One of these reported that he fed the leaves from throe and a half acres of land covered with two-year- 
old morus muUicaulis trees, grown where they stood, from cuttings. They had been cut back, the pre- 
ceding winter and spring, close to the ground, and the tops used for cuttings, so that they did not famish 
much over one-half the foliage they would have done had they been prubed with an eye to that purpose. 
The result was 48j ounces and lo>3 pennyweights of eggs, sold at $i an ounce — jl,y4u.70; value of eggs 
retained, $1,807.50; perforated cocoons sold at j7o; or a total value of 13,020. The expense for labor, etc., 
was 5i;472, leaving a net profit of $.S,448. The feeding commenced on the 1st of Juno, and on the 25th of July 
the eggs were all made. Here is a profit of SJl.OOO per acre from the second year of planting the trees, and 
not two months' time occupied in feeding the silkworms or gathering the harvest. This, however, was at 
an exceptional period, when the demand for eggs in France was great and the price high, but it neverthe- 
less demonstrated the adaptability of the country for the culture. During the month of August of the 
same year the same gentleman, from the same trees, fed a like number of worms of the J apanese trivoltine 
variety, and produced a large quantity of cocoons. 

Another silk-grower, in Yolo County, reports that from the tenth of an acre of two-year-old trees he 
gathered 000 pounds of leaves, or at the rate of 0,000 pounds per acre. From these leaves and some he 
obtained from another source, ho fed the worms from one ounce of eggs of the French variety. It took 
1,T»J0 pounds to bring them to maturity. They produced sixty ounces of eggs and twelve pounds of cocoons, 
after being perforated by the moths. These, at S4 an ounce for eggs, and seventy-five cents per pound for 
the cocoons, (export prices) would bo worth .1f24il. At this rate, an acre would bring 3'J'JO. This was in 
18Ji), an exceptional year, the worst ever known for the business in California. The cost of cultivating 
an acre of two-year-old trees, and picking and feeding the leaves to the worms from four ounces of eggs, 
would not exceed S200, leaving a clear profit from one acre the second year of ^700. 

A Sacramento gentleman reports that he fed the worms of a little less than three ounces of eggs, 
picking his leaves from the trees on an acre of land. Some of the trees were four years old ; most of 
them, however, wore two. He produced 280 ounces of eggs and forty-eight pounds of perforated cocoons. 
The eggs were sold in the year 1830 at Su an ounce, bringing Sl,080 for eggs and $30 for cocoons, a total of 
81,71(j. Deducting expenses of feeding, $175, it leaves a clear profit from an acre of $1,541. 

The experiment of silk culture has also been made at Nevada, at an elevation of 2,800 feet in the 
mountains, with equal if not greater success ; also, in Santa Barbara, in the southern part of the State, 
near the sea ; so we may say that the capacity of California for the production of silk is unlimited. 

The principal eflorts of the silk culturists have been in the production of eggs, to supply the ravages 
of disease in Europe. That demand becoming less, and the State bounty ibeing withdrawn, interest in the 
culture declined. Two silk manufactories having been established, a market is offered for cocoons, or 
reeled silk, and as the production is the simple work of the household, it is particularly inviting to the 
small farmer. 

This branch of agriculture roquiroa but little land or capital, and labor but for a few months of the 
year, light, and which the women and children of a family can perform. In years of drought, to which 



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62 PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



tlio State is subject, and which aro so disastrous to tho groat whoat-grower and grazier, the small area 
required by tho silk culturist can bo easily irrigated, and no danger from such cause need Do apprehended. 
Tho many thousand littlu valleys in the loot-hills of the Sierra Nevada, or of our other mountain ranges, 
aro specially adapted to this purpose. Thoro a (ortilo soil is found; irrigation, if needed, is convenient; 
tho climato is most equable and free from severe yvinds; but fow acres aro required, and tho product is as 
easily transported to market as was tho gold which originally enriched tho secluded ravines.. By this 
moans the impoverished placers can bo rucnrichod, and from the exhaustion and disfigurement of tho gold 
washing, made perpetually productive with that which ornaments and improves while it produces. 

riucu lands are open to occupation as a free gift, or purchased at a trifling cost, and ten thousand 
families could make comfortable, yes, luxurious liomes upon them. The market for silk, or tho eggs, is 
unlimited, and while a judicious Government protects the cultivation by a tax upon tho luxuries tlM 
wealthy indulge in, so long will the production be highly remunerative. The worm in California is founa 
to be healthy, and the silk of the best quality known. Knowing all these facts, how groat is the induce- 
ment to immigration, and to our present population to enter upon this branch of agriculture! When wo 
contemplate that the silk industry of Franco has risen to tho valuo of S170.U00,000 annually, and that our 
climato and soil is more favorable, we can appreciate tho importance of the culturo to California. The 
failures of former years, or tho decline of the excitement, cannot bo hold against tho practicability of 
successful culturo, as that has boon fairly proven, and tho importance is everywhere acknowledged. 

Sugar i5i;i:T. — The production of tho Sicilian Boot, and tho manufacture of sugar from it, has pro- 
gressed favorably during the past four years. In 1870 tho California Beet Sugar Company commenced 
operations at Alvarado, Alameda County, where several hundred acres were planted, and a sugar mill of 
fiity tons capacity per day was erected. This mill continued work with some profit for three years, when, 
for reasons of cheaper land and cheaper fuel, tho machinery and field of operations of the company were 
removed to Soquel, in Santa Cruz County. At Alvarado the land suitable for tho sugar beet was valued at 
S200 per acre, and rental at tho rate of ?J20 per acre was paid. At Soiuol land is rented at from $4 to $5 
per acre. The annual cost of fuel at Alvarado was S30,000, and more than half that expense will be saved 
in tho better timbered region of Santa Cruz. Tha company purchases boots at 33.50 per ton, an aero pro- 
ducing about twenty tons; eight to nine per cent, being sugar. Several hundred acres have been planted 
in sugar beets at Soquel, sufficient to keep the mill running at its full capacity from the time of the ripen- 
ing of the beets, in August and September, as long as they can be preserved in good condition, generally 
until April following. The results for the year 187i are not yet ascertained, but are reported as very prom- 
ising. The proprietors of this enterprise were Messrs. BonosteolJS: Otto, who had experionco in Europe, and 
were successful in establishing boot sugar manufacture in Wisconsin, before coming to California. 

At Sacramento wore made tho first attempts in this branch of culture and manufacture, and for obtain- 
ing information upon the subject, the enterprising founders of the company dispatched a person to Europe, 
where he, for several seasons, observed the processes at the farms and sugarios. Notwithstanding these 
intelligent precautions, the establishing of the Sacramento sugary was accompanied by many reverses 
and disappointments. In 1878-4 complete success was reported. The sugary has a capacity of working 
80 tons of beets per day, and a farm is planted of 750 acres, which produces from five to twenty tons per 
acre, y eliding an excess of 10 per cent, of sugar at the factory. At the Sacramento works operations com- 
menced early in August, being a full month earlier than boots are in condition in other counties, or even 
in the cool climate of the bay and coast counties of this State. The sugary is run day and night during 
the season, thirty men, mostly Chinese, being engaged on a shift of twelve hours each. 

The favorable results from these enterprises are most encouraging. They have demonstrated that Cali- 
fornia can produce sugar for consumption and for export. The present establishments are capable of pro- 
ducing from 4,000,000 to 6,000,000 pounds annually, but as from 40,000,000 to 50,000,000 pounds are imported, 
there is room for more. 

Tobacco. — As with nearly every vegetable production in which California now claims superiority, 30 
with tobacco, the fact of their adaptation to tho soil and climate was only ascertained by trial and experi- 
ment. Many experiments in tobacco cultivation were made, and single stalks and beds were seen growing 
luxuriantly in different parts of the State as a rare plant, but its curing for the uses for which it is prized 
was deemed impracticable, but for reasons few could tell. Recently a process has been discovered and 
patented by Mr. J. D. Culp, of curing the weed, and with the aid of this it is now believed that California 
tobacco will surpass in excellence that produced in any other section of the Union, and equalling the re- 
nowned products of Cuba. This discovery has given a groat incentive to the culture, and from the small 
experimental fields of a few years since there are now farms of hundreds of acres growing tobacco, tho ag- 
gregate, in 1874, bein,' estimated at 1,400 acres, chiefly in Santa Clara County, of which about one-third was 
of the Cuban variety. The successes have been so very great that tho number of acres will be largely in- 
creased. The yield of the Cuban, or Havana tobacco is at the rate of about 1,200 pounds per acre, worth 
fifty cents per pound, or returning StiOO gross per acre. The ordinary tobacco, however, brings a less 
price, but it is claimed that even this will return a profit of 8200 per acre. The patentees of tho curing pro- 
cess exact a royalty of twenty per cent, upon tho gross crop of all those who arrange with them to 
adopt it. 

Cotton.— Several of the staples of other States are contending for the first rank in this. Experiments 
have proven that " King Cotton " can flourish well on California soil, and its cultivation is advocated as 
far more profitable than the production of wheat. The most extensive experiments have been made by 
Colonel J. M. Strong, in Merced County, where one and a half bales were grown per acre, of better quality 
than is usually grown in the Southern States, and with less labor. One bale per acre is a large return in 
the Cotton States, and there the field must be plowed and hoed four times in the season; but the cotton 
grown on the Merced required hoeing but once. In the South, it is damaged and stained by the summer 
rains, and sometimes killed by frost, neither of which are to harm it in California. The cost of production 
in the most favored locality of the South is twelve coals per pound, while in California it is but eight cents. 
Such was the report of Colonel Strong in 1870, although the newspapers in the localities where cotton is 
most cultivated give the product at about 300 pounds per acre. The principal cotton fields are inAIerced 
and Fresno counties, and it is also cultivated successfully in Colusa, Amador, Placer and other sections. 
In 1874 about 1,000 acres were planted in Fresno, and about the same in Merced, with an expected total 
product of 600,000 pounds of cotton, worth twenty cents per pound, the crop being reported as excellent, 
buch an amount will appear quite largely in the agricultural statistics, and will draw general attention 
to the subject. There aro millions of acres of California soil adapted to the growth of cotton equally as 
well as the locality in Merced or Fresno counties, where the experiments have been made with such good 
results. This branch of agriculture opens another grand resource of tho State awaiting development. The 
unrivalled water-powers afforded by the mountain torrents which pour into the valley from the high 
Sierra invite the manufacturer to apply them, and at no distant day we may expect to see near the fields 
where the cotton is produced the mills which prepare the fibre for market. 

Feuit.— The capacity of California for the production of fruit is practically unlimited. The climate ot 
lovely Los Angeles, where the grape, fig, orange, lemon, pomegranate and other tropical fruits grow to per- 
fection in great fields and orchards, is the same as in the great valley of the Sacramento and other sheltered 
localities in the northern part of the State. The orange may be taken as an extreme proof of both capacity 



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CALIFORNI A — G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 63 



of soil and of climate, it requiring the one rich and the other temperate and free from severe frosts. Its suc- 
cessful cultivation is more satisfactory proof than the most careful register of the thermometer, and is com- 
prehended by the educated as well as by the uneducated. This noble fruit of the most beautiful tree 
known grows to perfection wherever planted — in the valleys of the Coast Range, throughout the Sacra- 
mento Valley, and in the foot-hills of the Sierra Nevada. Early in the decade of '50, a gentleman at Bid- 
well's Bar, a mining town of Butto County, planted an orange seed as an experiment, f rciui it a tree grew, 
which, to the surprise of all, flourished, and within ten years after became a source ot revenue to its 
thoughtful and careful owner. This town is in the foot-hills of the Sierra Nevada, and in latitude 39o 30'. 
Farther north, in the Sacramento Valley, also in Napa and Sonoma, oranges are grown, and always in the 
open air. In the gardens of Marysvillo, Sacramento, Stockton, Folsom and other cities, is seen this highly 
ornamental tree, with its dark green foliage, from which peers in beautiful contrast the golden fruit, most 
attractive to the eye and profitable to the possessor. There is no limit to the production of this desirable 
fruit, and the great amount consumed, not only where raised, but throughout the United States, promises 
a market as extensive as our cajiacity to produce. The oranges of Los Angeles, for several seasons have 
found a ready market in San Francisco, and are so superior to those from the Pacific Islands that the latter 
only find purchasers at reduced rates. A single tree, eighty years old, in Los Angeles County, has pro- 
duced in a single year upward of 81,0iJ0 worth of oranges. The Pacific Railroad opens an unlimited mar- 
ket for this fruit, which can bo safely transported, and invites the farmer or horticulturist to engage in its 
production. It may bo said that the soil and climate in which oranges grow to such perfection as in Cali- 
fornia are capable of producing anything. The pears of California liavo also attained a wide celebrity, and 
are, with other perishable fruits, exported largely to the states of the east. By some it is asserted that 
apples and peaches, although beautiful to the eye, are devoid of the flavor of those of choice localities in 
the east, but this is contradicted by experienced pomologists who have made careful tests. With choice 
selections and careful culture all fruits in this state are as superior in quality to those of other sections of 
the Union as they are in size and appearance. There is scarcely a limit to the ranga of varieties that may 
be successfully grown, even many of the fruits of the extreme tropics, as bananas, are growing in Fresno, 
and cocoanut trees of three and four years growth flourish at San Jose and in the Golden Gate Park at San 
Francisco. The delicious strawberry is found in the markets at almost any season of the year, although in 
the Spring months the yield is most prolific. Every berry, from bush or vine, known in horticulture, here 
finds its home, and improves in its quality. To give the list, statistics of production, and description of 
varieties, would fill a volume. Grapes enter largest in the arrays of figures, and of this class the product 
of California equals, if it does not surpass, that of any other section of the globe. 

The disposal of the vast quantities of fruit produced is an important problem, and the doubt of its 
favorable solution has retarded the progress and care of culture. The transcontinental railroad affords 
the opportunity to send to the east that which is grown convenient to the lino, and a profitable business 
has arisen. Cars are prepared for the purpose, and a system for packing and care adopted, by which the 
fruit is retained in good condition. The cost of transit to New York is very great, being about 81,200 to 
New York for a single car load, consisting of from 3.50 to 400 boxes of fruit. The many carloads going 
eastward during the season indicate that the profits are encouraging. 

Another means of disposing of the fruit is in drying; and for this, processes have been invented by Messrs. 
Alden, Cassidy and others, which dessicates it in a few hours fit for packing for commerce. By means of 
an endless chain of light shelves, ascending through a column of heated air, the fruit is dried in superior 
condition, retaining virtues and a freshness that are destroyed by the time and many mishaps of the old 
customs. At the Fairs of 1874 raisins, prunes, apples, currants, potatoes, pears and many other articles 
prepared by the Alden process were exhibited, which appeared superior to anything heretofore shown, and 
demonstrated the practicability of thus preserving and rendering marketable our perishable products. 
An extensive and exceedingly profitable field is thus opened for California fruits. At present large quanti- 
ties of raisins and dried prunes are imported from Europe, which may now be supplied by home produc- 
tion, and we may also supply in great part the entire Union. Grapes or plums, selling at from one to four 
cents per pound, when converted into raisins or prunes, losing two-thirds of their weight, are raised in 
value from five to twenty fold. 

Wisis AND Brandy. — These are the product of the grape, and constitute one of the great staples of Cali- 
fornia. The limit of production, or localities best suited for the vino, can be scarcely pointed out. From 
the plains of the extreme south to the mountain-sides and valleys of the north, at an elevation of 4,000 
feet, the grape is equally at home, though changing its qualities with its change of location. The richest 
soil by the river-side, as well as the arid and gravelly hills, produce grapes of the finest quality. A vast 
area of mountain land, too dry for growing grain, is well adapted for the vine, and the wine made from 
grapes grown in such places is stronger than that grown in the moist and more fertile soil of the valleys. 
The vine was planted in California by the first Missionaries, a hundred years ago, and has borne fruit 
without the loss of a single year ever since. The Mission grape is the most cultivated, but many varieties 
of recent import are supplanting it, as being more marketable for the table, and for drying into raisins. 
The character and quality of wine appears to be as greatly influenced by the soil and climatic conditions 
of the locality as by the grape from which it is made. This has been particularly remarked in Europe ; 
so in every quarter of California many different brands are rising into celebrity made from the same 
original species of grape. Even at this early day in our history of wine-making, the list of wines is very 
formidable, and what is gratifying is that the quality, if not tho quantity, is rapidly improving. In making 
wine, as in other efforts in developing our resources, the knowledge obtained in other countries was of 
little avail, repeated losses, following experiment, leading the way to success. And still improvement 
continues, giving the assurance that at no distant day California wines will take tho precedence over 
all others. 

From several causes, among which were Federal taxation, inexperience in manufacture, and wines oj 
unaccustomed tastes, the planting of vineyards and making of wino received a check, and the statistical 
figures have remained about the same for several years past. Tho general estimate is that there are 
some 30,000,000 vines growing in California, from which about the same number of gallons of wino might 
be made, but the demand for eating and drying the grapes is greater than for wine, and only some O.OoO,- 
000 gallons are manufactured annually, tiiough by some estimated at 10,000,000 gallons. Los Angeles 
is the oldest and tho loading county in viniculture, producing over 1,')00,000 gallons, and Sonoma ranks 
second in the list, manufacturing upward of (iOO.OOO gallons. From Tehama in tho north comes the well- 
known Gorke wine, from San Mateo the Golden, and from San Bernardino in the south the favorite 
Cucamongo. From El Dorado, Placer, Amador and others of the old mining counties, come wines and 
brandies of fine quality, and as tho soil of the mountains is proving most favorable for grape-growing, as 
well as for other fruit, it is probable that in tho future tho wines of tho Sierra will rival, if not surpass, in 
quality and quantity those of the great valleys.' 

The manufacture of brandy follows wine-making, tho annual product being from 250,000 to 300,000 
gallons. In this no brands have yet attained celebrity, tho general character being crude and fiery. 
These defects, however, will probably be remedied by experience and as tho liquors acauiro age. The 
strong wines of the mountains appear most favorable for distilling, and as our wino and brandy-makers 
become experinced, California brandy may rival tho choicest descriptions of Franco. 

Champagne is made in large quantities, some few brands having achieved a reputation for quality al- 



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San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



64 PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



most equaling the most noted champagnes of Khoims. The light wines of Sonoma arc largely used in the 
manufacture of this sparkling and exhilarating beverage. Two methods of manufacture are used ; the 
natural fermentation in the bottle, and the injection of carbonic acid gas by the soda fountain; Iho 
former being the only true method of makingchampagne, the latter being an imitation that has prcyudicod 
consumers against the homo-made article. There is no doubt that some of the champagnes of California 
are equal to those of any country, and will soon supply the home demand. 

Mr. Arpad Ilaras/.thy, who is e.\tensively engaged in cultivating the vine in Sonoma County, and in 
making champagne in 8an Francisco, estimates the cost of land and establishing a vineyard in that county 
at jI-'jO per acre, which, when in full bearing, should give a net return of from 150 to $;iO. Kuch acre will 
give from .'!.')0 to 40U gallons of wine, worth from twenty-five to thirty-five cents per gallon at the vineyard; 
grapes soiling at from j'-'O to ?•% per ton, the higher i)rice being for the choice European varieties. 

At Sacramento the Johnson Distillery Coni|iany, operating under a patented process of making brandy, 
is prepared to work up the large cron of grapes grown in that vicinity. By this process it is claimed a 
better quality and greater quantity of brandy is made than by the old method of making it, now brandy 
being given the taste and appearance of age. 

Xsirs AND FoKKST Trkks.— The first steps in arboriculture in California were in the planting of the 
hardier varieties of fruit trees, extending with caution to those more delicate, until it is ascertained that 
there is, practically, no limit to the cultivation of Iruit, nut or forest trees. Of fruit trees it is ascertained 
from the reports of the Surveyor-General that there are some 4,000,000 growing. The princiiial nut trees 
are the almond and walnut, which are successfully grown in nearly every county in the State, Alameda, 
Sacramento, Santa Barbara, San Bernardino and Sonoma leading. Almonds of several varieties are 
grown, the favorite being the Longuedoc, a soft-shell, which is well adapted to many localities. This fruit, 
or nut, blossouiin.u' early in the season, is often blasted by frosts in localities subject to such visitations, as 
near the snow line in the mountains or by the dami) river bottoms of the Sacramento. The almond tree, 
resembling the early peach, flourishes in localities favorable to that plant, and comes in bearing in throe 
or four years from the seed. The walnut, of the European variety, the most prized for its nuts, is 
grown quite extensively, there being reported upward of 100,000 trees as in cultivation. This tree comes 
into bearing in about ten years and continues fruitful for a century. The chestnut, butternut, filbert and 
others are grown to a slight extent, and n;ill, undoubtedly, in course of time, become prominent amongour 
products. Those trees are rather slow growers, but long livers, and while ornamenting the landscape 
return a profit in nuts and valuable wood to the owner. 

The cultivation of forest trees, or trees for the value of their timber, alone promises to become an 
important interest with land-owners. The native forests of California, while of the grandest and most 
valuable of their class in the world, are devoid of many varieties of timber most used in the mechanic 
arts, such as in making agricultural implements, wagons, wooden ware, etc. A number of tine cabinet 
woods are indigenous to the country, as laurel, myrtle, madroiia, mountain mahogony, manzanita, etc., 
susceptible of a high polish, and have acquired a well established celebrity for their great beauty.^ The 
pines, firs and redwoods are unsurpassed in quantity and grandeur of growth, and the forests of Sierra 
isevada and the Coast Kange mountains seem suftieient to supply the world with lumber. Live 
and deciduous oaks of the various classes grow abundantly, but the wood is usually brittle and unfit for 
the uses it is generally devoted to in other countries. In the deep mountain cafions grows a very good 
quality of live oak, but its inaccessibility has prevented up to the present its appropriation to use. The 
system, recently adopted, of V flumes for floating lumber, will render the timber of the otherwise 
inaccessible localities available, and will thus open an almost inexhaustible and exceedingly valuable 
resource. . . . , l ^ 

Many of the valuable varieties of Eastern, Australian, Japanese, Asiatic and other forest trees have 
been transplanted here, and. grow with a luxuriance equaling those of their native soil. The maple, ash, 
locust, and hickory of the east, and the eucalyptus of Australia are the most valuable. Of the latter are 
twenty or more varieties, and their virtues are loudly extolled. It is the grandest tree of the Australian 
forest, and grows with great rapidity in California soil, trees of a dozen years of age towering a hundred 
and twenty-five feet in height, even the plants of four or five years' growth being stately trees. In Ala- 
meda County a forest of 195 acres has been planted with eucalyptus by U. S. Surveyor-t^eneral J. T. 
Stratton, which is growing well, the trees at four years of age being fifty feet in height and twelve inches 
in diameter at the trunk. Seven hundred trees of this size are on an acre, but halt are to be removed, 
leaving ooO per acre to continue their growth. The value of those removed, if sold for firewood, is 
estimated at the rate of $100 per acre, the cost of the plantation, including land, cultivating, interest, etc., 
being at the rate of SlX) per aero. This is a fair and noble experiment, and great hopes are entertained of 
the result. At present the value of the eucalyptus for fuel or for use in mechanics is not ascertained, but 
the problem will soon be solved. The medicinal properties of the tree are claimed as very important, 
both from the medicines extracted from it and th3 intiuenco it has in preventing miasmatic diseases in its 
neighborhood. For this purpose it has been exiinsively cultivated in India and Algeria, and is thus in- 
dorsed by the governments of those countries. A dry soil and a warm climate are most favorable to its 
growth, and if this tree proves to possess the propei ties claimed of it, it is certainly a valuable acquisition 
to our forests. 

Coffee.— An indigenous shrub, common in the foot-hills of the Sierra Nevada, much resembling the 
coifee plant, has been called "wild coiFee," but by o.hers is classed as a species of buckthorn. I'eople 
familiar with the coft'ee plantations of Central America were the first to point out the resemblance of the 
stalk, leaf and berry, and it is quite probable that such a kinship exists that the native stalk would sup- 
port the graft of the true and cultivated plant. Should this prove true, another and important resource 
is added to our native wealth. , , . „ , , ,. t 

Tea.— An attempt at the cultivation of the tea plant was undertaken, in IbvO, by a colony of Japanese, 
in El Dorado County, but from the interruption of race prejudice, bad selection of land and other causea, 
the experiment proved unprofitable, as nearly all first trials have, and the project was abandoned. The 
tea plant, however, has been grown successfully in several localities as a rare shrub, thus proving the 
adaptability of our soil and climate for its production, were it remunerative. 

Grasses.— A long article could be written descriptive of the native grasses of California. In bygone 
times this was the favorite land of the herdsman, and horses and cattle, deer, elk and antelope ranged over 
the country in countless droves, unattended and uncared for by man, feeding upon the spontaneous growth 
of the soil through all seasons of the year. A peculiarity of the grasses being the abundance of seed, 
which, ripening with the stalk, affords nutriment when all seems dry and barren. In the southern part 
of the State the burr clover and the alifilerilla or fileree constitute the chief herbage, and several varieties 
of red clover, timothy and wild oats, in the valleys and hills of the north. Alfalfa, or lucerne, is much 
prized and its cultivation is becoming general. The peculiar qualities of this grass is its strong roots, 
which strike deep for water and enable the plant to grow and retain its verdure during the long and 
dry summer. So prolific is the growth that in favored localities from two to four cuttings of hay are made 
annually, returning from two to four tons per acre each cutting. Where uncultivated land is used in 
pasturing sheep, from one to ten acres are required per head, but the same in well cared tor alfalfa will 
feed twenty head per acre. This grass requires cutting often, or grazing constantly; otherwise its rank 
growth renders it unfit for the purposes sought. 



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CALIFORNI A — G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 65 



Vegetables.— That class of the farmer's product commonly denominated as vegetables, as distinguished 

from cereals, trees, fibrous plants and fruits, are grown to perfection in California. I'otatoes flourish most ^^ 

successfully in the coast counties, where the cool and moist climate of summer is exceedingly favorable ; H 

also in the moderately elevated regions of the Sierra Nevada. In some localities the product is reported 1-3 

at 500 bushels per acre, and the quality is as good as tho production is prolific. Onions were ever a favorite ^ 

with the Spanish occuiiants of the land, and well they mii^ht bo, for the onions of California, largo and CZ 

crisj), bear slight resemblance to their tough and bitter congeners of the east. This, too, is tho land of the *^ 

vino, growing the watermelon, muskmelon, canteloupe, cucumber, pumpkin, squash and other cucurbi- |_| 

taceous plants. These grow everywhere, of unparalellcd size and excellence, watermelons attaining a ^ 

weight of fifty. pounds, and squashes two hundred and forty pounds. Cabbages have been reported as Pn 

weighing sixty pound? a single head, and beets eighty pounds. Carrots, parsnips, turnips and all roots j-j 

flourish similarly, and where the growth is great the quality is usually enhanced in like proportion. Often, J^ 
and is it the iiopular belief at the east, that rank growth is at the expense of tho quality ; but tho rule , ^ 

does not hold good on the Pacific Coast, as here the reverse obtains. The capacity of our agricultural P*" 
sections in the productions of root and garden vegetables is unlimited, and in these as in many other | ^ 

things the Golden State would take the premium of the Union. C2 

The many articles successfully cultivated it would be difficult to mention, a.s the list would be intermi- ^ 

nable. Sweet potatoes constitute a large item among the farmer's products, 5,ol3 tons being reported as tho rj 

crop of 1873, from 1,324 acres. Chiccory is cultivated to a considerable extent, chiefly in Sacramento County, o 

where an incorporated company is organized for its production. The root of this plant is prepared as a ^ 

substitute for coffee. Large quantities are imported from Germany. Millet, canary seed, poppy, pie plant, B 

mustard, tomatoes, garlic, okra, peppers — in fact all classes of plants and vegetables known to tho cuisine ; I^ 

are cultivated with success. j P^ 

California may be classed, par excellence, " the land of sun and flowers." Nowhere is the flora more j ^ 

extensive or varied, either cultivated or in the wildness of nature. The broad plains and the grassy 1 ,J*^ 
hills, when the warmth of spring follows the refreshing rains of winter, are vast beds of flowers of every ! 

hue, presenting a landscape most enchanting to the pioneers who first invaded the wilderness. Since then S> 

delioate and tasteful cultivation has greatly enriched the store. Throughout the country, in the village j. 

garden or about the farmer's cottage, where are people of Eesthetie tastes, the dwellings are embowered in K 

roses and vines, which in the spring and summer months are bedecked in the rich array of many colored J^ 

flowers. Roses grow to veritable trees, with thousands of brilliant blossoms, and fuschias flame in vari- j ^ 

egated hues to the second story windows. A single rose bush, trained over a modest cottage in Santa Rosa, 1 J^> 

had at one time four thousand full blown roses and twenty thousand buds! In such a manner can the 1 S 

homes of Californians bo ornamented, the soil and climate affording all, asking only the slight aid of Indus- I Pi 

try and taste. | "* 

The sunflower Is the posy of the peasant. Though usually grown in the gardens of the poor, or those of ^ 

simple tastes for ornamentation, it possesses a value scarcely appreciated. In California they grow to im- I |S 

mense size, some attaining a height of fifteen feet, with a flower four feet in circumference. A field of this ^ 

plant will yield about fifty bushels of seed per acre, with a heavy and wooded stalk suitable for fuel. Each 2^ 

bushel of seed will give one gallon of oil, said to be equal to that from the olive, while the residue, or oil- i c> 

cake, is exceedingly nutritious as a food for animals. Thus every part returns a value. Besides its worth ti 

for the products mentioned, it is claimed to possess the properties of the eucalyptus in being an absorbent 1 f^ 

of the miasma causing malarial fevers; and for this purpose its planting is recommended by the Superin- sa 

tendent of the Smithsonian Institute, at Washington. ^ 

DITERSITY OF CE0P3. O^ 

In California, the farm is generally more the field of business operations than the family house. It is , g* 

where the investment in land and improvements is counted and interest rated; where labor is hired and ' f^ 

driven as upon a soulless corporation, and where dividends of cent per cent, are demanded. The farms | a> 

that figure in statistics, and swell our exports; that are the themes of newspaper reports and the pride of , f^ 

our people, are, when not covered with the waving grain, bleak and dismal to the eye as they stretch j m 

away for miles, unincumbered by fences and unadorned by trees, without roads or barns, and at long I o> 

intervals only the low and comfortless farm house, merely a shelter and a rendezvous for the hands, in the ' ^^ 

midst of a vast field. These great farms are from 1,000 to 20,0»JO acres, and are usually devoted to a single . ^ 

purpose, as wheat-growing, a cattle or sheep range. The wheat-grower supplies his men with potatoes, ^ 

cabbages and bacon from a distant section; the cattle-raiser lives without milk or butter, and tho shei>herd ^ 

follows his flocks in the manner of past centuries, while the small farms and neat homesteads, where I - 

neighbors vie with each other in advancing comforts, and where the varied fields, orchards, pastures and ] 5, 

gardens, which supply nearly every want of the household, are seldom seen. No country offers better [ fi 

opiiortunities for the moderate farmer than does California, and were tho same industry and economy | pj 
displayed here as in opening farms on the bleak prairies of the West, a far higher degree of comfort and 
prosperity would be attained. Instead, great operations are the fashion, and wealth the first year, or an 
annual increase of thousands, alone satisfies. To follow in the groove of the great land owner, or despair 
for want of capital, is the failing of the small farmer. While the possessor of many miles exhausts his soil 
in wheat, the careful farmer, with his various fields, orchards and gardens, marketing his high-priced pro- 
ducts, and renewing the wealth of his ground, will add beauty and value to tho country; and eventually 
tlio system will absorb the great eatatos. 

LIVE STOCK. 

The stock-rearing capacity of California was never disputed. To this purpose were tho broad plains , 

and grass-covered hills of the coast devoted prior to the discovery of gold and the occupation of the country | "^ 

by Americans. Horned cattle were the principal species reared, and these were valuable only for their hides, ; ■^ 

horns and tallow, which constituted the stajde articles of export. Horses were reared for guarding and ^ 

managing the cattle, and these, with small flocks of sheep and goats, constituted the stock and wealth of •^^ 

the country. All were in half-wild condition, reproducing themselves without the aid of man, and from ' S 

the finest original breeds of the earth had so degenerated that its replacement was deemed necessary. For I q 

this purpose tho best of thorough-bred stock has been imported and great improvements made. I -j— 

Horses.— The original horse of tho country was the Spanish Barb, formerly one of the most famous and O 

best bloods of the world, but through several centuries of neglect it had degenerated into tho mustang. C> 

Even in its latter form it is hardy and spirited, and was excellent for tho saddle and for tho purpose for ' M 

which it was required— that of herding stock. The mustang is quickly improved by the thorough-bred, a o 

half-breed horse being handsome, strong, hardy and free, and well adapted to the saddle or carriage, mak- ra 

ing one of the best of stage horses. For draft, carriage and racing, the best of English breeds have been ^ 

imported, and the horses of California will, on an average, favorably compare with tho best in tho world, la 
The health of this noble animal in this State is usually good, tho diseases to which ho is subject in most 
countries not prevailing. All, when brought here, seem to develop themselves more fully and increase 
in size and spirit. The number of horses in California in 1873, as reported by the Surveyor-General, was 
214,4tJ3. 






A. EOMAN & CO., Publishers, Booksellers, and Stationers, 11 Montgomery St„ S. P, 
5 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



QQ PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



MuLKS.— Those animals were formerly used in groat numbers for packing goods in the mountainous 
regions, anterior to tho con.-<truction of roads, and are still, but of another variety, used largely as freight 
teams. The first wore tho Spanish mulo, imported from Mexico, Peru and Chile; and tho latter are tho 
mucii "larger animal raised of American stock, and very valuable, usually worth from $200 to $-400 per head. 
The last Report of tho Surveyor General gives tho number at 23,071. 

Nkat Cattli;.— Tho rearing of cattle was formerly the groat business of tho country, but it is not now 
go extensively prosecuted. Tho original Spanish stock, which covered tho plains with wild cattlo upon 
the advent of the Americans, has boon rapidly exhausted by tho slaughter— often wanton and wasteful— 
neglect and drought. To supply their place, many hundred thousand head have been driven from tho 
Valley of tho Mississippi to California, tho most of which have gone to tho shambles. Of late years, 
greater etforts have been made in tho roaring of such stock, and with tho vast resource of pasture at com- 
mand, hopes are entertained that tho State may supply tho homo demand in that product of which sho was 
once an exporter. The climate is most favorable for all kinds of stock, and disease is almost unknown. 
The succeeding Agricultural Fairs for several years, continually growing in importance and interest, have 
given pleasing proof of tho advance making in the improvement of the stock of neat cattle. Durhams, i 
Aldernovs, Dovons and other favorite broods, were exhibited in largo numbers and of very fine quality. 
The numijor of neat cattlo reported in the State in lS7.i, was 814,212. Notwithstanding the great area of 
our grazing lands and tho productiveness of cultivated fields, whether in grass, grain or roots, much of the 
beef of tho country is imported from Nevada and even from tho plains of New Mexico and Texas. 

Marin County leads largely in the products of the dairy, having made in 1878, 2,312,4!)3 pounds of butter, 
and 45,000 pounds of choose. Here are some of the largest and most complete dairies in the world, at one 
of which, upward of 3,000 cows are milked, though distributed in bands under tho charge of separate 
parties. Tho cows are milked twice daily, and turned out day and night to feed. Hay is provided and fed 
in stormy weather. The production of butter is at the rate of one to one and a fourth pounds per diem for 
each fiow, or about two hundred pounds per season, soiling in San Francisco at from thirty to fifty cents 
per pound. The favorite stock here is the Short-horn mixed with American, the Devons proving poor 
milkers. The grazing is a rich bunch grass, kept fresh and verdant by fogs of the ocean, but nutritious 
when dry. Tho proportion of cows to acres on tho ranches devoted to the purpose is about one to seven. 
This business, that has given great wealth to those who have pursued it in an energetic and enterprising 
manner, and while largo quantities of butter and cheese are imported, invites others to enter upon it. The 
system also prevails whore the capitalists owning the land, cattle, building and all implements neces- 
sary for the business, farms out the diiferent dairies to those who do tho work, at a rental of S30 per cow 
per annum. The other counties leading in the business are Sonoma, San Mateo, Sacramento and Plumas, 
tho aggregate manufacture being, according to statistical report of 1873: 5,321,469 pounds of butter, and 
1,343,782 pounds of cheese. 

California, although importing largely of both those products of the dairy, still exports, some butter 
successfully to the groat cities of the east, the tine quality and the early grass of our spring-like winters 
enabling our dairymen to obtain remunerative prices for their choice products. The best localities for the 
dairy *re on the coast, and in the high and pleasant valleys of the Sierra, where are thousands of square 
miles of tine grass lands, watered by pure and sparkling streams, yet unoccupied, and most favorable for 
he rearing of stock and tho manufacture of butter and cheese. 

Hogs.— Swine were a tabooed animal under the Mexican rule in California, and no story can be told 
of porcine romance of the olden time. Pork has always been a high-priced article on the Pacific Coast, 
and less attention has been paid to this than any other stock, although the profits attending its rearing 
have always been large. The number of hogs reported in 1873 by the Surveyor-General was 215,531. Pork 
is a favorite food with the Chinese population, and is consumed largely in the many forms in which it is 
prepared by all classes of people. To show the anomalous condition of husbandry in California, it is but 
necessary to point to the largo quantities of bacon, hams, lard, etc., imported at high rates, while the food 
suitable for making pork is sold at low rates for export. 

Poultry.— No more profitable branch of husbandry can be pursued in California than that of the rais- 
ing of poultry. From tho pioneer days ot '49, whon eggs were sold for two dollars each and chickens for 
an ounce, to the present, tho market has never been overstocked, and prices have always been high 
Many farmers have to thank their thrifty housewife, who, maintaining the poultry yard, by that means 
carried the family ovor the distress of dry seasons when the crops proved failures. But the great profits 
have not induced many to engage largely in the enterprise, and even now eggs are brought by rail from the 
states of the Mississippi Valley to the San Francisco market. Eggs are sold at from 25 to 50 cents per 
dozen, chickens at from 75 to irl each, turkeys at from 25 to 30 cents per pound, geese at from ?1. 50 to 83 
per pair, and ducks at about half the rates. Such prices are not paid in other parts of the world, and indi- 
cate how profitable is the poultry yard to the farmer of the Golden State. 

Bkes.— The honey bee was introduced in California subsequently to the acquisition of the country by the 
United States, and it has spread wonderfully. Apiaries are established in every section of the State, and 
"bee trees " in great numbers are found in the neighboring forests. The season of honey-making lasts from 
February to the closing of the dry season, the bees storing chiedy during the summer. A great variety of 
trees, shrubs and flowers furnish the feeding ground, and " Orange Flower honey" is an attractive and 
common brand. 

Sheep. — The growth of wool has proven one of the most profitable branches of industry pursued in 
California. The range is extensive, the stock healthy, the increase rapid, and the prices for wool and 
mutton high. Under these circumstances, it is not strange that groat fortunes have been made. The 
production of wool is rapidly increasing, the report of 18tj8 showing a clip of 0,715,049 pounds; in 18u9, 
9,402,304, and tho census of 1870 reports a clip of 11,391,743 pounds. The yield in 1873 was 30,049,497, and in 
1874 about 38,000,000, an increase of over seven million pounds to a year. The usual price of wool is in the 
neighborhood of 25 cents per pound, or an aggregate return to the State of 59,500,000. The counties most 
largely engaged in tho business are along tho coast, south of the Bay of San Francisco, though in all the 
counties sheep are raised, but generally in large bands, and not in the small flocks which so greatly aid 
the farmer in other countries. The original stock was the small Mexican sheep, but this has been so 
greatly improved that Merino now predominates. Other fine breeds have been introduced, greatly 
enhancing tho value of the stock; some Cotswold, attaining a weight of four hundred pounds, and furnish- 
ing a fleece of the very finest wool, weighing eighteen pounds. This breed thrives exceedingly well in Cali- 
fornia, even better than the common stock, and is excellent for its mutton, as well as valuable for its long, 
fine and heavy fl'eece. About 4,000,000 pounds of tho wool shorn in California is manufactured here, and 
the balance exported. The woolen goods of this State, particularly blankets, have obtained a high reputa- 
tion in the East, whence, and to the mining region of the interior, large quantities have been sont. 

Angora Goats have been reared quite extensively, though chiefly in mixad breeds, being crossed with 
the common goat, as the most inexpensive way of obtaining a flock of this fine-haired animal. They are 
very hardy, and thrive well upon the sparse herbage of the foot-hills. The wool of the Angora has not yet 
made a figure in the market, the skins tanned with the hair on being the most marketable. 



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CALIFORNI A — G ENBRAL DESCRIPTION. 67 



MINERALS. 

The preceding detail of the agricultural resources of California presents a most hopeful aspect, but, 
prolific as is the soil, extensive the area and genial the climate, the mineral resources will dispute with 
agriculture for the precedence. The mineral wealth lies buried deep beneath the soil, and while the 
surface is furnishing its stores of food and clothing, the hidden rocks are yielding their varied treasures, 
neither interfering with the other, but both rendering mutual assistance. Above and below— agriculture 
and mining— these are the twin sisters of wealth which constitute the pride and the grandeur of the Golden 
State. From north to south through our broad domain; from whore our eastern boundary pierces the 
eternal snows to where the Pacific laves the golden sand, every hill and mountain range bear precious 
mines and veins of ore. No limit can be given to their extent, nor catalogue of their different names. 
Almost every valuable substance sought by the metallurgist in the soil and the rocks of the earth are found 
in greater or less abundance. As explorations continue, new discoveries are made, and with development 
new sources of wealth are opened. 

In the extreme sense the word mineral includes every inorganic substance flowing from or taken from 
the earth, as springs or wells of water, clay for bricks, sand for mortar, etc., but in a more limited sense it 
is applied to metals and metalliferous rocks; oil, salt and medicinal springs; sulphur beds, and borax 
fields, and kindred matters. However it may be limited or extended, California, in every sense, is pre- 
eminent in minerals. But in discussing this resource of our State it would be almost impossible, if not 
unfair, to disconnect it from our neighboring State of Nevada, whoso associations are so intimate that for 
all matters of business they should be regarded as one, though generally in this article we shall refer to 
the minerals of California alone. 

The history of mining is coeval with the occupation of the State. The very earliest explorers of the 
Coast, Sir Francis Drake, Cabrillo, Viscaino, and others, gave glowing accounts of mythical mines, but, 
extravagant as were their descriptions, the realities of subsequent centuries have equaled the vivid imag- 
inings of the romancing navigators. 

The earliest gold washings known are in what are now called the San Francisquito hills, bordering 
the Santa Clara Kiver in Los Angeles County. These were discovered and worked to some extent about 
I80O, and gold from them was sent by Don Abel Stearns to the United States Mint at Philadelphia. Un 
the San Gabriel in the same county and in the same period gold was also mined. The profits attending 
these operations are not recorded, but the enterprise was not conducted with great energy, as the present 
condition of the ancient placers indicate. Silver and copper were also found in the same localities, but 
have not been mined profitably. 

Notwithstanding the early assumption of mineral wealth, and the workings of the fields of Los Ange- 
les, the mining history of the coast, to which general attention is paid, dates back only to the eventful day, 
the 19th of January, 1848, when Marshall picked up the shining particles in the saw-mill race at Coloma, 
which proved to bo gold, and which discovery has proven of so much importance to the world. Anew 
era in commerce, and civilization dates from that discovery. The world was set ablaze with excite- 
ment ; new life was given to commerce ; great enterprises were encouraged and sustained, and the pro- 
gress of centuries was consummated in a decade. Revolutions in politics and governments as well as in 
business were effected, and man in intelligence, independence and enlightenment took a gigantic stride 
forward never to recoil. The influence was electric and world wide. Nations fraternized, and the civili- 
zation and power of Christendom rapidly encircled the globe. Human rights and liberal ideas gained 
the ascendancy over oppressive institutions and debusing prejudices, and the masses opened for them- 
selves a field for the pursuit of knowledge, wealth and happiness. These grand advances were due al- 
most exclusively to the gold discoveries in California, and the new life infused thereby. The country was 
fortunately in the hands of a free government, and rapidly filled with a brave, intelligent and law-abiding 
people, whose influence never ceases to be felt, and whose example has led to the great results claimed. 

Gold.— The royal metal claims our first attention. The auriferous belt is now known to extend through 
the entire length of the State, and at both extremes is mined extensively and successfully. This belt, 
however, cannot be claimed as continuous, at least as far as demonstrated from present developrnont. The 
majestic range of mountains, the Sirra Nevada, rises through the peninsula of Lower California, and ex- 
tends northward into Oregon, and turning to the coast westward of Mount Shasta. Throughout this range, 
with the exception of slight intervals, gold is found. It is difficult to localize it or define its extent. In 
veins and placers; in slate and porphyritic seams; in deep gravel beds and under the lava of dead volca- 
noes: in river channels and bars; in the alluvium of the surface and on the deep bed-rock of the ancient 
drift, gold is found in lumps and nuggets; in flaky, brilliant scales, and in infinitesmal dust. The quartz 
mill, the drift, the hydraulic and the sluice are used to obtain the glittering metal. 

San Diogo, the most southern county, is the most recent to develop her wealth in gold. In 1889, S9me 
placer gold was found in one of the gulches of the Cuyamaca' Mountains, near the head of the San Diego 
Kiver, and about fifty miles from the bay. This led to the discovery of quartz veins, and the Julian 
mining district was organized, shortly followed by the organization of Banner District, adjoining it on 
the east. The Washington mine for a period led the van, and many other ledges were discovered 
showing rich specimens of gold, and a sharp excitement was created. The Golden Chariot, now Ghariot 
Mill, Ready Relief, Redman, Owens, Stonewall Jackson, and many other veins have been discovered, 
and worked with energy and profit. Six or seven quartz mills, with an aggregate of forty or fifty stamps, 
are employed in reducing the ore, which is usually of a high grade, from $10 to S250 per ton, although the 
veins are generally small, ranging from one foot to fifteen feet in width. The product of those mines for 
the period since their development has been largo, nearly $1,000,000 in the year 1874, and from several, 
high dividends have been paid. The Bladen mines are a new discovery about twenty five miles south of 
the peak of San Bernardino, and are opening with fine prospects. 

The success of these mines, being in a locality not until recently regarded as in the golden belt, has 
given a great impetus to progress in San Diogo County, giving employment to largo numoors of people, 
furnishing a market for produce, paying fortunes to the owners, and adding now resources to the State. 
To what extent explorations will connect these districts with the northern districts of the State, time only 
can tell. At present, a barren space intervenes, and we travel northward to the gold mines of Holcomb 
Valley, in San Bernardino County. Hero is an extensive region upon the northern and western elope of 
the great poak of San Bernardino, and rich placers as well as paying quartz lodes are found. These mines 
have been worked since 18(50, and have produced large quantities of the precious metal. Mining and 
prospecting is conducted with vigor, and discoveries of a most encouraging character were recently made. 
Holcomb Valley, Bear Valley, Gold Mountain, Lytlo Creek, and other places, are prominent mining 
localities. 

Some fifty or sixty miles northwesterly are the ancient placers of the San Gabriel and the San Fran- 
cisquito, never extensively, and now indifferently, worked. The irregularity of the mountains from the 
Sail Gabriel in Los Angeles County to Fort Tejon in Kern County sends us wandering for the chain, 
and through this distance are found but fow prominent gold mines. At Solidad, in Los Angeles County, 
near the summit of the dividing ridge, veins of gold-bearing quartz have been found and worked to some 
extent, and at Tehachipi, in the southern part of Kern, hydraulic washing has been successfully con- 
ducted for the past twelve or fburteen years. 



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68 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Northward from Walker's Pass, in latitude S'lo 30', the groat mountain rises in its sublime majesty and 
extends in one grand serrated column of five hundred miles in length, and studded with peaks the highest 
in the United States. Iloro is the groat gold field of the world. The western flank of this noble range is 
seamed with veins of gold, and its riverbeds and ancient gravel deposits are stored with the precious 
metal. In this region have boon the great mining enterprises, and from it has been taken the vast treasure 
that has flooded the world. Twonty-sovpn counties upon this belt claim gold mining chiefly or as a part of 
tlu'ir resources. Centrally, at Coloma, in El Dorado County, gold was first discovered, and through this 
central portion the bolt of placers appears widest and richest. In Mariposa, Amador, and Nevada Coun- 
ties have been do\T>loped the most extensive quartz veins, and in Placer, Nevada, and Yuba, the most 
complete system of hydraulic mining. 

In Tuolumne, Calaveras, and Amador Counties exists a large vein, or a series perhaps, which is 
claimed to bo continuous, and is called the " Mother-lode," and the very rich mines of Sutter Crook, in 
Amador, Angels, in Calaveras, and at Quartz Mountain, in Tuolumne, are upon the vein. The Princeton, 
and other mines of the Mariposa estiite.in the south, and the mines of Grass Valley, in the north, are also 
thought to be on the same, but as in thodiiforont localities are many parallel veins, and as far from the 
lino of the " Mother-lode," are gold-bearing ledges of great value, the theory of the existence of a con- 
tinuous great vein, or that the rich mines are all on one lodge, cannot be held as proven. Far in the 
northwest, in distant Siskiyou, are the groat Klamath, and Black Bear mines, on a vein of similar features 
as the "Mother-lode," indicating by the wide separation a multiplicity of veins rather than a continuous 
one. High up in the Sierra, and low down in the foot-hills, the gold-bearing veins are found, and their 
number is countless. Their width varies from a few inches to twenty feet, their course usually north a few 
degrees west, and dipping to the eastward. The deepest explorations are in the Amador mines, where a 
depth of 1,'-W) feet has been reached. At Mariposa (iOO feet has been sunk; at Grass Valley, 1,000; and 500 
feet at the Black Bear, in Siskiyou County. These explorations are comparatively slight, but are the 
most extensive in the State. The Amador mine, in Amador County, is at the surface, 900 feet above the 
level of the sea, consequently its present workings are several hundred foet below the ocean. 

Hydraulic washing constitutes a novel and interesting system of mining. The deep gravel deposits 
having fine particles of gold disseminated through the mass, require rapid removal to extract the precious 
metal with profit. For this the hydraulic has come into use. Large capital, bold enterprise and good 
judgement are required, but with these success may be assured. The gravel ridges vary in deiJth from 
fifty to five hundred feet, and if containing gold of the value of ten cents per cubic yard, andiavorable for wash- 
ing, are mined profitably. To wash them sluices from four to eight feet in width, and sometimes extending 
a mile or more in length, are placed, reaching from the lowest bed of the gravel down some adjacent canon. 
With an iron pipe from a foot to twenty inches in diameter a column of water under great pressure is led 
to the base of the gravel, against which it hurls itself like a liquid catapult and the bank melts before it 
and flows through the sluices where the golden particles settle and remain. Nozzles, distributors, riffles, 
undercurrents, quicksilver, etc., are required to complete the apparatus. Gratifying success has attended 
this class of mining in Nevada, Placer, Yuba and Butte counties, and the system is extending in grand 
proportions. Preparing for the purpose are many grand enterprises, as th j Amador Canal Co. in Amador 
County; the El Dorado Deep Gravel Co., «nd the Mount Gregory Water and Mining Co., in El Dorado 
County; the Iowa Hill Canal Co. and the Boar River Tunnel Co., in Placer County, and the North Bloom- 
fiolcl V\'ator and Mining Co., in Nevada County, and many others which promise to restore the mining coun- 
ties to their former wealth and prosperity. The great flood of gold obtained in the first few years of mining 
was from the easily worked placers, the river bars and beds, the ravines, gulches, flats and hill-sides, by 
the simplest processes and by labor unassisted by capital. With the decline in value of the shallow pla- 
cers, the grandest of enterprises, in the opening of the deep hill deposits, were undertaken and prosecuted 
with an energy having no parallel in mi^ning history. These were often undertaken in a hap-hazard man- 
ner and conducted with great sacrifices, sometimes resulting in an entire failure or loss to the projector, 
but adding greatly to the aggregate product of gold, giving enormous incomes to successful individuals and 
general wealth to the country. But the losses resulting from the guess-work system discouraged enter- 
prises of the kind, which, together with the excitements attending other mineral discoveries in the neigh- 
boring States and Territories, caused an exodus of miners from the placers of California, and the great 
decline of the mining interest. Every period of excitement has shown a decrease in the gold product, and 
although they incite to great enterprise and extend the area of the mineral territory, have caused great 
loss to the mining interests of the State. This depression can be but temporary, as the gold will not waste 
by waiting in the deep gravel-beds or the countless veins of quartz which seam the mountains. The lack 
of any outside excitement is readily shown in the increased receipts of California gold at the Mint and 
Assay Offices in San Francisco. 

The courage with which the laboring miner formerly sought the hidden treasure is in extreme con- 
trast with the timidity exhibited by the capitalists of the country. An air of distrust has constantly been 
thrown around every mining enterprise in California, until the belief prevailed that the decline in the 
receipt of bullion, and consequent decline in prosperity, was caused by the actual exhaustion of the 
mineral deposits. 

Never was there a greater error! There are hundreds of square miles of deep auriferous deposits, 
where but the surface or some small point has been touched, leaving the mass to be explored by the future 
miner. These great regions seem formed by glacio-aqueous action, the material torn from more elevated 
regions by ice, ground into sand, clay and bowlders, freeing the gold from its original matrix, and quietly 
depositing all in gently flowing currents or standing bodies of water. The crushing of the rocks and the 
enormous Ijowlders found beneath, within and above strata of clay and sand, indicate an inconceivable 
power; the deep deposits of clay, sand and gravel in level beds and horizontal strata are proof of the 
lengthy period and quiet manner of the deposition; also, that there has been no groat disturbance of the 
deposits during or since they were made, and the character of the rocks and the gold being similar to 
those found in the higher elevations of the Sierra, point out the direction of the current. The theory of 
the ancient "Blue River," running from north to south through the Sierra, whose channel was the great 
"blue lead," can have no foundation when the facts are critically examined. There are many such leads 
and channels, and of different degrees of altitude throughout the mountains. 

These are the great reservoirs of treasure that now invite development. Their mysteries are hidden 
beneath the accumulations of countless years, and in many instances are locked in the embrace of the 
basalt and debris of the ancient volcano. Such hills as were of convenient access have been explored, and 
in some cases mined away by the drift or hydraulic; but by far the greater part still remain but slightly or 
entirely untouched. To develop these and demonstrate their value is an object worthy the National or 
State Government's attention. The formation not being fully understood, the unaided efforts of the miners 
to fathom their depths have been baffled; in some instances by the quantity of water, the great depth, the 
length of tunnel required, and the misdirection of work. There are also many groat ridges branching 
off from the main chain, entirely covered with volcanic matter, concealing the auriferous drift, if there 
should be any, but which it is reasonable to suppose contain the golden channel beneath the rugged rock 
or noijle forest that crowns the hills. Such channels were found beneath the basalt of Table Mountain, 
in Tuolumne County; another in a similar mountain in Butte County; also, in other localities. 

These ridges flank the Sierra its whole length, like groat ribs from the dorsal column, and constitute 



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CALIFOKNI A — G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 69 



a resource of the precious metal which will take generations to exhaust, while adding to the wealth of 
the country. 

The river beds still constitute an important mining resource, having never been exhausted, and their 
treasures replenished by_ the waste from the washing of the mines upon their banks. Lower rates of 
wages and subsistence, with a comprehensive system, will yet enable the extraction of a vast amount of 
gold from these deposits. 

The most lasting of the mineral resources of California is generally conceded to be the quartz veins. 
From these, it cannot be doubted, came the gold which enriched the placers with a wealth never before 
known. The gold-bearing veins are found throughout the western slope of the Sierra Nevada, and in the 
mountains of the northwest coast The number it would be difficult to estimate, and new discoveries are 
continually adding to the list. Comparatively few of the many thousands known are developed, and the 
majority of those worked upon are so indiiferently managed that their great value is scarcely known. It 
has been the misfortune of the State that the most of the mining enterprises of this department have 
been undertaken by men limited in both moans and experience. In some instances they have risen with 
the occasion, and by skill and energy developed properties of extraordinary value. Small and incomplete 
mills, with rude methods of saving the gold, incurring expense and loss, have generally been established 
to aid in the development of a mine, and unless the quartz was exceedingly rich, failure was the natural 
conseijuence. A better understanding of the subject is now beginning to prevail; greater confidence is 
feU in mining interests than formerly; men of wealth and business capacity are turning their attention to 
it, and we may say that a new era in quartz mining api)ears to be opening in California. It is well to hope 
that such is the case. The resource is grand, illimitable, inexhaustible. The gold-bearing veins are in 
countless numbers, and are found from the extreme southern border of the State to the northern lino, and 
in the Sierra Nevada from its base to its summit. The gold is contained in the rock in various proportions, 
from a few dollars to several hundred per ton. The rapid mountain streams furnish abundant water- 
power, or the plentiful forests supply fuel for steam purposes, thus giving convenientaid for propelling the 
necessary machinery. Everywhere the conditions are most favorable, and it is reasonable to expect that 
great wealth will result from the full development of the quartz and hydraulic mines. 

There are no satisfactory statistics of the amount of gold produced in California since 1818, but it is 
estimated by the best authorities at $1,150,000,000, or $l,200,000,iX>0. The largest amount reported mined in 
any one year was in 1853, when upwards of SGO.000,000 were exported, and it was believed that nearly fifty 
per cent, more was mined and retained in use or carried out of the country by private means. At that 
time the great gold excitement which had stirred the world was at its culmination, the mountains were 
alive with men, the precious dust was easily obtained, the river beds and bars were yielding their riches, 
abundant rains gave the "dry diggings" the needed water, and work was conducted with great energy. 
The discovery of the silver mines of Nevada drew away men and capital, and the gold product declined to 
about 520,000,000 in 1870. Latterly the transportation of bullion having concentrated almost entirely in 
the express of Wells, Fargo & Co., a reliable source of statistical information is established. The general 
superintendent of that company reports the transportation of 318,025,722 in 1878, and 520,000,000 of Califor- 
nia bullion in 1874. Of this, in 1873, 317,280,951 was gold, and S74-l,77] in silver and base bullion. The 
impression is that a considerable amount goes by other means, swelling the aggregate for 1874 to S20,000,- 
000. The bullion product of Nevada in 1873 was 835,254,507, and the grand total for all the mining States 
and Territories west of the Mississippi in the same year was 372,258,093. 

SiLVF.R andLead.— Let us branch off from the royal metal and notice the product of the princely 
silver. The mines of California are not confined to the western slope of the Sierra, nor is gold the only 
valuable metal which miners seek. Crossing the mountain — the great treasure-bod of the world — the 
metal changes from gold to silver. Eastward, in Nevada, the silver is generally very pure or mixed with 
gold, but the most prominent silver mines of California are of argentiferous galena ores, as are many in 
Nevada. Such ores are beneficiated by smelting in stock furnaces, while finer ores are reduced by 
stamps and amalgamation. The product is a rich lead, usually called bullion, bearing from S200 to JlOO of 
silver per ton. The melted matter is run from the furnaces into molds, formin#bars of about 100 pounds 
each„in which shape it is sent to the refineries at San Francisco, in the East, or in Europe, where the silver 
and lead are separated and both enter their respective channels of commerce. 

The principal silver-lead mines of California are in Cerro Gordo District, Inyo County, the leading ., 
mines being the Union, Santa Maria, apd Belmont, on Buena Vista Mountain. Two companies, the Cerro , m 
Gordo, on the eastern shore of Owen's Lake, and the Owen's Lake Company, whose furnaces are at Swan- «<| 
sea, on the western shore, whence ores are transported by steamers from the mines. 

The product of these mines is enormous, and the working is very profitable. The veins are from 10 j j^ 
to 40 feet in width, the ore being argentiferous and cupriferous galena, and carbonate of lead, carrying • o 
from 25 to 90 ounces of silver per ton, and 30 to 50 per cent, of lead. The ores are smelted by charcoal, *^ 
which costs 30 to 32)^ cents per bushel, about 30 bushels being consumed per ton of ore. The bullion is I S> 
transported in wagons 250 miles to San Fernando, whence it is taken by railroad, via Los Angeles, to the ^ 
harbor of San Pedro. About 30,000 pounds of bullion per day is produced, the value of the annual pro- »2 
duct being about 82,000,000. ►^ 

These mines were discovered by some Mexicans in 1805, and their value appears to be increasing | ^ 
annually. The large business of these mines and the valley of Owen's River necessitate improved means 
of transportation, and for this purpose a company has organized for the construction of a narrow-gauge 
railroad from the lake to the city of Los Angeles. 

The Panamint is a newly organized silver-bearing district, about on the line between Inyo and San 
Bernardino counties, seventy miles easterly from Indian Wells, a station on tho road from_ Los Angeles 
to Cerro Gordo. No great developments have, in the latter part of 1874, been made, but it is ascertained 
that the mineral belt covers an area of two and a half by five miles in extent, and contaim* a system of 
wide and well defined veins, carrying an abundance of rich ore. This district has recently been brought 
prominently before the public, and scientific investigation proves its value. Ono largo, true fissure vein, ; m 
the Wonder, is known to exist, having several ore chimneys of from 300 to 600 feet in length, and varying ^ 
from 3 to 25 feet in width. This vein is easily traced for a mile or more in length, and gives evidence of *g 
permanency in every respect The Marvel, Venus, Hudson River, and other claims in the district, are f^ 
reported rich. From 875 to 8100 per ton is the average of free milling ore, generally of silver fahlerz, 
sometimes assaying as high as 82,0(J0 per ton. The topography of the country is very rough and barren, 
the mountains higli and precipitous, and the cafions deep; but silver exists and an active community is 
sure to follow. In Surprise Caiion, which tho Wonder ledge crosses, will probably bo built tho "city" of 1 S 
the district. Wood, water, salt and building material, and other necessities for working ores are at band, t* 
and the prospect of an important mining camp is very fair. I D^ 

In the northwestern part of Inyo County, or perhaps in the eastern part of Tulare, is the Mineral King [ t* 
district, situated high upamong the lofty peaks of tho Sierra, whore a ledge of silver-bearing quartz of g^ 
great size and supposed richness exists. Those mines, lying between Independence, in Inyo County, and . 
Visalia, in Tulare County, are of recent discovery and but slightly developed. 

Mono and Alpine Counties contain a vast number of silver-bearing veins, many of which have been 
developed to a very fair extent, proving of considerable value. Several mills and reduction works have 
been erected and much silver extracted, but through extravagance and ignorance of management brilliant 



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70 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



sucooss has not followed mining. The Dundorberg, and Pionoor, aro prominont mines in Mono County, 
and tho Exchoquor, IXL, Tnrshish, Northwestern, and Pennsylvania, are the rei)resentative mines of 
Alpine. Recently a renewed interest has been taken in the silver mines of these two counties, and largo 
returns aro hoi>od for. 

In other localities in California, silver is produced, considerable quantities being obtained trom tho 
pold of tho plaeors. New and most encouraging developments have, in the summer of 1874, boon made in 
St. Ilolona Mountain, near Calistoga, in Napa County. One or more silver-bearing veins, with a percent- 
(igo of cold, have boon found, and a ton-stamp mill has been erected for boneticiating tho ores. The Calis- 
toga V'oin has been explored to a depth of several hundred foot, and found rich. The first product of 
SlL'.dOO was received in San Francisco October 3d, 1871. This is considered of unusual importance, from tho 
circumstance that it is in a section formerly regarded as valueless in minerals, but by this development it 
is shown that no limit can be put to tho gold and silver bearing region. 

'J'in' annual product of silver obtained from California mines, and separated from the gold, is about 
S.'i,OOo,iioO. Of this $J,lH)0,000 comes with the lead bullion of Inyo, S20U,()U0 from Mono and Alpine. 

Tn San Diego and San liornardino counties are several new silver-bearing districts, which, with Pana- 
mint and Calistoga, will soon be adding large figures to the list of treasure statistics. 

Copper.— Mining for copper has not been conducted with much energy for several years past, although 
ores of this metal are found in various parts of tho State. From the extreme northwestern to the extreme 
southeastern border of California, cupriferous veins and masses of ore exist. In Del Norte, now added to 
Siskiyou County, largo masses of rod oxide and metallic copper have boon mined, and but for the inaccessi- 
bility of tho region, mining operations could be conducted with profit, as there can be no doubt of the 
extent and value of the ore. 

At Co pporopolis, in Calaveras County, are several large copper-bearing veins, which were formerly 
mined with great profit. The Union mine, for several years, gave out a profusion of wealth, and obtained 
a world-wide reputation, but a decline in the price of copper, rather than the exhaustion of tho mine, 
caused a suspension of mining. In 181)3 a copper-mining excitement prevailed, and in difi'erent sections of 
the State veins of the mineral were found and partial developments made, but as the excitement abated 
copper mining coasod. The fact of its existence, however, is established, and under more favorable cir- 
cumstances copper mining will be resumed. 

QuicKSiLVKR.— Contemporaneous with the development of the gold mines of California came the dis- 
covery of the gold-minors assistant — the quicksilver of New Almadon. This liquid metal is almost in- 
dispensable in tho mining of gold and silver, and it is a most happy condition of circumstances that all 
the metals should exist in the same country and in such quantities. Seldom has there been found in the 
world such a grand deposit of cinnabar as existed at New Almadon, which for more than twenty years 
supplied the gold mines of California and tho silver mines of Nevada with quicksilver, besides furnish- 
ing large quantities for export. During this prolific period the price of the metal was from forty to seven- 
ty-five cents per pound, at which comparatively low rate large fortunes were made in its extraction. From 
this mine has been taken during the twenty-five years of its operation, 583,200 flasks of quicksilver of 
seventy-six and a half pounds each, or 44,1)14,800 pounds. The mines of New Almadon do not furnish the 
quantity nor the quality of ore of former years. In 1850 the ore returned thirty-six per cent of quicksil- 
ver, and 23,875 flasks were produced, while at the present time the production does not exceed 15,000 
flasks annually, and the percentage is under ten. The quicksilver mines of Idria, in Austria, return about 
two per cent, and those of Almaden, in Spain, about eight per cent. 

The New Idria quicksilver mines were discovered in 185(3, by prospectors in search of silver. They 
are in the southwestern part of Fresno County, on the eastern slope of the Mount Diablo range. The 
principal veins are the Idria, San Carlos, Cerro Benito, Panoche, and Molino. The product from these 
mines is from 7,000 to 12,000 flasks per annum, the former figures covering the amount for some years past, 
though recently mining has been pushed with vigor. 

The Fiodington mine^were discovered in 1801, and from 1862 have been quite vigorously worked. They 
are situated in the southeastern part of Lake County, and the thriving town of Knoxville has grown up 
about them. For several years the product of tho Redington mines was about 5,000 flasks annually, but 
recently, under the stimulus of high prices and freedom from a contract that limited production, tho 
amount has largely increased. 

The three mining companies named have been the principal quicksilver producers previous to the 
year 1874, ami absolutely governed the market. During that year the price of the metal had rapidly ap- 
preciated and it is now a cash article at SO. 85 per pound. This advance in price, and new discoveries be- 
ing made, a quicksilver mining excitement was the consequence, and a large number of mines are now 
worked as a consequence. The Coast Range system of mountains is the principal field of the prospector, 
and from Lake County in the north, to Santa Barbara in the south, many veins of cinnabar have been 
found. The locations and companies organized are very numerous, and without our range to detail, but 
promise to bring forward Lake, Sonoma, Colusa, Solano, Napa, Santa Clara, San Benito, Fresno, Monte- 
rey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara as prominent mining counties. In several of tho counties named 
extensive and expensive furnaces have boon erected, the returns from many of which indicate the most 
favorable results. At Cambria, in San Luis Obispo County, very promising developments have been made. 

In the range of mountains along the borders of Sonoma and Lake Counties, at Pine Flat, are the 
Rattlesnake, Flagstaff, Oakland, Annie-Belohor, Sonoma, and manv others, that give high promise, and 
from some has already commenced to flow the stream of quicksilver which is so much needed in the gold 
and silver mining of the Pacific Coast. The Oakville, Washington, Valley, and other mines of Napa 
County have shipped considerable quantities of quicksilver, and will hereafter figure in the statistics of 
production. Recent reports announce rich quicksilver mines in Del Norte County. As silver and gold 
mining extends, the demand for quicksilver increases, and as those interests are rapidly extending the 
recent quicksilver discoveries seem most providential. 

Iron.— Royally endowed as is California with the noblest of metals, she is by no means deficient in 
those the most useful, chief of which is iron. Although there are no blast-furnaces nor iron mines in 
development, there is an abundance of iron ore of a high percentage, which seems capable of supplying 
the great demand of the State. A company was formed several years since to work an iron mine in Sierra 
County, where a large body of oro exists contiguous to limestone, and in the midst of a densely wooded 
region. Charcoal could be had in unlimited quantities at low rates for smelting, limestone flux was at 
hand, and all the conveniences requisite for carrying on the business appeared to be supplied, but the 
enterprise is still in abeyance. Perhaps the more active or speculative employment of capital in gold and 
silver mines, or stock transactions, prevents the tamer investments in iron mining. 

An extensive bed or stratum of magnetic iron ore, showing over i)4 per cent, fine metal, is found near 
Clipper Gap, in Placer County, on the line of the Central Pacific Railroad. A company was once organ- 
ized to work this mine, and considerable developments were made, of a most favorable character, but still 
iron mining is not yet reckoned among our industries. 

Beds of like character are found in nearly every county in the State ; one in Butte County, at 
Chapparal Hill, on the road leading from Oroville to Susanville, has been penetrated by shafts and tunnels, 
showing an unlimited quantity of ore, which yields by assay 05 percent, metal. 



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CALIFORNIA — GENERAL DESCRIPTION. 71 



Chromium, or Chromk, is faund in large quantities in various parts of the State, and is mined and 
exported with success. This is an iron ore, though used as a pigment in forming colors and paints, and in 
the coloring of glass. Chrome is a rare and valuable mineral in other sections of the world, but appears 
to be abundant in California. It is found in the foothills of the Sierra Nevada, in Yuba, Placer, Amador, 
Tuolumne, and other counties, and in the Coast Range. The principal localities where it is mined are in 
Del Norte and Sonoma Counties. NoarCthe town of Cloverdale, in the northern part of Sonoma County, 
a large bed, or vein, of this ore is found, from which some twenty tons per day are taken, the market 
for it being in England. 

Coal.— The geological features of California have been regarded as unfavorable for coal, but never- 
theless that valuable mineral, or its relative, lignite is found in many localities, and is successfully mined. 
At Monte Diablo coal has been mined for the pa^st fifteen years, and some lf30,000 tons are produced annual- 
ly. The coal is of poor quality but being furnished at less price than that imported is largely employed in 
river and bay steamers, and local manufactories where steam power is used, and the mining has been pro- 
fitable to the owners. In Butte, Placer, Amador and San Joaquin counties are deep beds ef coal, or 
lignite, and mining is conducted with energy at Lincoln, lone and Corral Hollow. These lignites have 
been used to a considerable extent in the vicinity of the mines for some years, giving satisfaction to the 
consumers. Discoveries of coal have been quite numerous of late in the Coast mountains from San Diego 
to the northern limits of the State. The Lincoln coal, of Placer County, is supplied in Sacramento at S1.7o 
per ton and makes an excellent fuel, but burns up rapidly, leaving no slate or klinker. 

Borax. — This valuable salt was formerly obtained in large quantities from Borax Lake, an arm of 
Clear Lake, in Lake County, but upon partial exhaustion of the bod, and a rise in the water of the lake 
occurring in 1868, the mine was abandoned. The borax was chiefly found in crystals in the mud at the 
bottom of the lake, where it was sought by means of coffer dams. The principal sources of supply of this 
material at present are in the extensive beds of borate of soda, and borate of lime, in Esmeralda County, 
Nevada, near the line of California. Similar beds exist in the desert region east of the Sierra Nevada, in 
this State, one in Inyo County recently prospected shows a value supposed to equal those of Nevada. The 
products of the Nevada fields are refined in San Francisco and the quantity is such as to supply the 
home demand and furnish considerable for exportation. The present price of borax is about 12 cents per 
pound, at which rate its mining and refining is regarded as profitable. 

Sulphur. — Another of the prominent and peculiar minerals of Lake County is sulphur. This is a 
very common substance, entering largely in the composition of all ores, but disassociated from other 
minerals and in a pure state is rare. Beds of it exist in Lake, Sonoma, Santa Barbara, and Ventura coun- 
ties, and it is mined to a large extent. The Lake County mines furnish about 500 tons annually. 

Salt. — The salt of California is usually made from sea water, there being several large evaporating 
fields in Alameda, and also in Los Angeles counties. Upon low lands subject to tidal overflow levees are 
constructed with gates to flood and drain the field at high and low tide. The sea water is permitted to 
enter, and is then restrained. In a few days it so evaporates that crystals of salt are formed, when the 
water is drained off before the salt is embittered or soiled by the deposition of lime or other matter in 
solution or floating in the water. In this manner many thousand tons of salt of an excellent quality are 
made annually, and salt marsh lands susceptible of such flooding are held as valuable. One establish- 
ment, the Crystal Salt AVorks of Alameda, produce about 2,500 tons per annum, bringing from SIO to $20 
per ton in the San Francisco market. The product of the different fields exceeds 80,000 tons per annum. 
The great Colorado desert was evidently once submerged, and now in the greatest depressions are thick 
beds of crystalized salt of unknown e.xtont. These would be veritable mines were they near lines of cheap 
transportation. The State of Nevada contains many such deposits, and the vast quantity of salt used in 
beneficiating of silver ores is mined within her limiffi. An extensive salt deposit covering a mile and a 
quarter square and afoot in depth, of a very pure article, is found near the Pananiint mines in Inyo County, 
and a similar one exists near Cerro Gordo in the same county. Numerous salt beds and springs are found 
in various parts of the State. 

Pktroleum.— Under the head of petroleum we will include asphaltum and brea, or the minora! tar or 
bitumen that is so abundant along the southern coast. The early navigators exploring the coast noticed 
the heavy flow of bitumen into the sea along the Santa Barbara Channel, covering the water for a great 
distance with a thin film of oil. The same phenomenon continues, and the sailors of to-day are as much 
astonished jat the glimmering irradiances of the surface of the water as were those of Vancouver, or 
Belcher, half a century or more ago. Flowing springs of this substance are common throughout the 
counties of Monterey, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura, and Los Angeles, and it is also found in 
tho Tulare Valley, also in Colusa County, and near the coast in Humboldt County. From the earliest set- 
tlement of the country by the Spaniards tho " brea " has been used for rooting houses, as tar for the axles 
of carettas, for paying the seams of boats and vessels, for burning, and for every purpose their limited arts 
found it applicable. This, when dried and hardened by exposure to the sun and weather, forms asphal- 
tum, of which beds covering hundreds of acres are seen in many localities. Tho asphaltum is mined or 
dug out and large quantities find a market at about $20 per ton in San Francisco and other cities where it 
is used in making sidewalks, covering roofs, laying pavement, cementing walls to prevent the seepage of 
water, and other purposes. The field for the uses of asphaltum is very large, as it seems so well adapted 
to so many purposes, and in congratulating California upon the abundance of her mineral resources, 
asphaltum and its cheapness comes prominently forward. This substance is quarried by gads and blasting 
like rock, the beds being sometimes 30 or 40 feet in depth, and is also found in large blocks on the sffa 
shore. In these localities it is sold at from $2 to $i per ton, and in San Francisco at from 315 to $20. 

Petroleum in flowing wells iB rarely found, but in the San Fernando hills, some thirty miles north- 
west of Los Angeles, are several springs of oil, and developments have been made by boring and tun- 
neling, by which means considerable quantities of a heavy oil is obtained. Numerous mining excitements 
have attended the explorations of the bitumen and petroleum region, and no settled system of operations 
and production has been adopted. Many refineries have been establi.shcd, and largo quantities of oil 
produced, but as yet none has been prejjarod equal to tho illuminating oils of the east, or perhaps the 
proper burners are not yet invented, as with tho greatest care the smoke is not consumed. A good hibri 
eating and burning oil is obtained, and if a perfect method of utilizing it be discovered, unlimited quanti- 
ties could be supplied. 

In 181)5 a company of eastern capitalists, of which Thomas Scott, of Pennsylvania, was at tho head, 
obtained some 250,000 acres of land in Ventura, Santa Barbara, and Los Angeles counties, and proeooded 
to bore extensively for oil. A flowing well was obtained on the Ojai ranch, in Ventura County, at a depth 
of (JOO feet, which at first run 25 barrels a day, but from neglect and partial obstructions, tho present flow- 
does not exceed eight or ten barrels. Among tho difteront works of tho vicinity are the llayward, produ- 
cing ten barrels per day, the Stanford six barrels, the Santa Paula ten barrels, and others an aggregate ol 
ten barrels. This generally, however, is allowed to run to waste, in consequence of a want of market, only 
about 200 barrels monthly being sold. This oil can bo delivered at the wharf at San Buenaventura at one 
dollar per barrel. 

Near the Matolo River, in Humboldt County, petroleum has been found, and considerable efforts were 
made, some years since, to obtain flowing wells, but with poor success. 



A. EOMAU & CO., Wedding Invitations engraved and printed, 11 Mont. St., S. P. 



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72 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Antimony.— This motnl is rarely niinod in tho United States, but California would not be true to her 
claims of procodonco in minerals if antimony were not reckoned among her products. This is found asso- 
ciated with other metals, forming antimonial ores, but, in one instance at least, near Havilah, in Kern 
County, a vein is mined for it alone. 

XiN— Tho tin mines of San Bernardino County have attracted much attention.both from tho rarity of occur- 
rence of that metal, and its intrinsic value, but the deposits have not been found to be extensive or rich, 
and no groat progress has been made in their dovolopmont. Tho ore has boon niinod and tin produced 
therefrom, and the voins have been claimed as rich, but disputes of title to tho land is given as tho reason 
tor not working the mines. Tin ore has also boon found in other parts of tho State, but no mines are yet 
opened. As we progress in developing our State, wo will undoubtedly include tin mining as one of our 
resources. 

Plumhago.— This mineral boars also tho names of blackload and graphite, its familiar uses being tho 
making and lining of crucibles, and as leads for i)oncils. It is found in various parts of the State, occur- 
ring in veins in the primary rocks in tho same manner as the quartz veins bearing gold, silver, antimony, 
or other motnls. Often the black oxide of manganese is mistaken for plumbago, and reports of rich veins 
are made. Although it is often found, it is generally in an impure state, and therefore of little value. 
A plumbago mine of considerable value has been worked in Tuolumne County, near Sonera, with encour- 
aging success. At this mine the plumbago is rained and prepared at a cost of Si per ton, and with bags 
and expenses of shipping is delivered in England at a cost of about S45 per ton, where its market value 
is $100 per ton. 

Platinum, Iridium, anp Osmium are found usually associated with gold, but are not sought or mined as 
a special industry. Deposits of platinum of several pounds weight have been found in washing gold- 
bearing gravel. It occurs mostly in the northern part of the State, the gold of that section, particularly 
that obtained along tho ocean beach, being alloyed with iridium and osmium to a slight extent. 

Marble.— As the miners delve in the rocks of the mountains in the persistent search for whatever 
treasure is hidden in their close embrace, many brilliant discoveries are made, and now and pleasing 
resources developed. Tho lofty Sierra and parallel Coast Kange, groat chains of granite and slate, are 
seamed and permeated with many strata of rich and beautiful rocks, some of the metalliferous veins we 
have heretofore noticed, and others of various character and uses. Countless is tho number already 
brought to light, and still the work of exploration continues. Of the many valuable rocks disclosed, 
marble is not the least in importance. This beautiful stone is found in every quarter of the State, and 
where its veins or quarries are most exploited the finest and purest quality is obtained. The most noted 
ciuarries are at Columbia, Tuolumne County ; Indian Diggings, El Dorado County ; and near Suisun, in 
Solano County. From these large quantities of marble for household and monumental work have been 
obtained, and many large masses fitted for statuary. In a great many other localities aro quarries where 
it is obtained both for tho lime kiln and for ornamental work. California marble is generally clouded in 
white and gray, and in Placer and Butte counties are beds of black-streaked, streaked with white, all 
susceptible of a high and lustrous polish. The Suisun marble is of various shades of brown and yellow, 
resembling malachite, but is not so plentiful as in other localities. Recent explorations at Indian Diggings 
have opened a quarry which is said to equal in beauty and texture the famous marble of Italy, and in 
such quantities as would supply tho world with the finer sort. At present, it is chiefly used in mantels 
and fire-places in dwellings, and in monuments, but as taste and refinement advance with wealth build- 
ings will be constructed of the beautiful substances, and marble palaces and marble halls will adorn the 
streets of our cities and suburban towns. 

Ltmkstonb.— This being of the same composition, is closely associated with marble, but the coarser 
qualities are simply called limestone, and for use is calcined for lime. The most choice sources of supply 
of lime used in building and plastering are in Santa Cruz County and Cave Valley, in El Dorado County. 
Limestone is abundant in every section of the State, and is cheaply obtained in unlimited quantities. 

Granite. — Stone for building or other purposes, either granite, basalt, sandstone, freestone, or cobbles 
lies on every hand, of the very best quality and profusion. At Folsom, Rocklin, Penryn and Newcastle 
are quarries of granite, whence large quantities are obtained and an unlimited supply I'emains requiring 
only the skillful quarryman to remove it from its primeval bed, and in such form and size of block as his 
ingenuity may devise. The basements of the State Capitol, the Custom House, the Mint and the Apprais- 
er's Store are of granite from these quarries. It is also coming rapidly into use in small blocks as pave- 
ment for the streets, and in various modes its employment is increasing. Basalt blocks, chiefly from Son- 
oma County, are also largely used in street paving. For this purpose, too, the cobbles washed from the 
placers are used, and of these an infinite supply is at hand merely for the picking up. The localities of 
sandstone, freestone, clay for brick, and of other building material, would constitute too tedious a catalogue 
to mention; suffice that the State is supplied with every desirable variety without limit and with quality 
unsurpassed. 

COAST fisheries. 

The great ocean bordering our coast for more than 800 miles, the bays and rivers and the many 
interiorlakes and mountain streams, furnish an inexhaustible resource in the finny tribes that swarm 
the waters, affording abundant food, luxury and manly sport. Long before the people of the United 
States occupied the country, the oil hunters of New England, as well as those of other Atlantic States, 
England, and Europe sought the northwest coast for their prey, and New Bedford, Nantucket, and many 
other cities based their wealth and drew their income from our waters. The sailors of the olden time were 
enchanted with the Pacific, its islands and main, and their witching wildness and wealth formed the 
themes of many marvelous tales. The early whaler pursued the Cetacea with great energy, and still the 
mammoth of the deep supjilies a revenue to many seekers of its oily treasures. The chemist, however, by 
manufacturing fluids for burning, and the oils obtained from vegetables and land animals, and, more par- 
ticularly, the discovery of the vast quantities of petroleum, have relieved the demand for whale or fish oil, 
and the business of the whaler is shorn of its former proportions. 

Notwithstanding tho price of whale products are now larger than when, twenty or thirty years ago, 
the business was pursued so energetically, tho profits are, comparatively, not so great, or perhaps, other 
uses of capital aro more attractive. In 18*5 the price of sperm oil was 84 cents per gallon, whale oil .?i) 
cents, and whalebone 21 cents per pound. The prices varied but little for a dozen years, though slightly 
appreciating. During and at tho close of the war the prices rose to the highest, being, in 18(i5, $2.'2o per 
gallon for sperm, $1.4 o for whale oil, and Sl-Vl per pound for bone. By the same list from the Merchants' 
Magazine, the rates in 1872 were Sl.4o for sperm oil, U5)^ cents for whale, and Sl.28^^ per pound for bone. 
The business was at its height in 1854, when were engaged in it 602 ships and barks, 28 brigs, and 38 
schooners, aggregating 208,3'J!) tons, and returning 73,t)'Jti barrels of sperm oil, 3iy,8:i7 barrels of whale oil, 
and 3,445,200 pounds of bone, having an aggregate value of 110,710,748.80. In 1872 the value of the product 
was S2,;)50,288.8i)._ 

_ The California whale fishery is chiefly conducted by shore parties, having establishments at various 
points along the coast, ag at Half Moon Bay, Pigeon Point, Monterey, Carmel Bay, San Simeon, San Luis 
Obispo, (xoleta, Portuguese Bond, San Diego, andPointAbanda, which is just across the line in Lower Cal- 



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CALIFORNI A G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 73 



ifornia. Each whaling station is organized upon tho same plan as is the crew of the whale-ship, attack- 
ing the whalo in boats, and having try-works on shore. The boats usually carry a harpoon gun and a gun 
for firing bombs, or explosive lances, into tho game. Tho whales generally taken are the humpbacks, 
California grays, and sometimes a right-whale, a finback, or sulphur-bottom. _ 

The aggregate amount of oil taken by tho several shore parties, says Captain Scammon in his excellent 
book on the "American Whale Fishery," since their first establishment to 1872, was not less than 95,000 
barrels, of the value of SI, '242,800, during a period of twenty-two years. The business is declining on 
account of the scarcity of the game and their grovving wildness, rendering them ditBcult of approach. 

The sardine, small and insignificant as it seems individually, is, from its fine quality and vast numbers, 
one of the most important of the finny tribe. Tho epicures of all sections of the world are familiar with 
the little tin box containing tho favorite minnow-like tish packed in oil, which has been prepared with 
extreme care on the shores of the Mediterranean, and it is only in this manner that the sardine is gener- 
ally known. Formerly it has boen maintained that the sardine was peculiar to tho southern coast of 
Europe, and found in no other waters, although it was long since proven that the identical species 
swarmed as countless as the sands of tho sea along tho coast of California, in fact from Puget Sound to the 
Lower Peninsula. Instances are related wheij the entrance to some bay or river would bo blackened by 
the masses of these tiny fish, and hundreds could be dipped up at a single chanco cast of a common 
bucket. 

With such a piscatorial resource, it would seem unbusiness-like to send millions of dollars annually to 
France for the delicacy we have at our hand, also having the price enhanced by heavy duties, freights, 
insurance, time, damage, etc. But, as with many another inviting field, the fact was doubted, timid capital 
declined to enter untrodden paths, adj^ocates were derided, and solicitors for aid were snubbed, and thus 
has California development dragged itself along, enriching its people and the world more through force 
of circumstances than intelligent design. 

Recently, a gentleman of enterprise, T. N. Wand, Esq., after careful study of the subject, has entered 
upon the undertaking of preparing this delicacy, so bountifully provided by nature, to tho uses of man. He 
has organized the California Sardine Co., which has established itself in San Francisco, and in August, 
1874, commenced sending its goods upon the market. The success appears confirmed, and a great enlarge- 
"mont of the establishment is promised. The preparing of sardines implies the using of large quantities of 
olive oil, and thus aids another resource. The olive tree flourishes in perfection in the warm soil and 
genial climate of California, and its cultivation will be greatly encouraged by the now enterprise of the 
California Sardine Co. At present the oil used is the product of European grovos, those of California not 
yet being able to supply the demand. Other interests will also be encouraged, as one great enterprise 
opens tho way and demands the support of many industries. 

The salmon of the Pacific Coast have obtained a world-wide reputation. It is one of the most beautiful, 
as it is one of the most valuable of American fishes, and California and tho Northwest Coast is its favorite 
home. The bays and rivers are at times alive with these graceful and silvery swimmers, and they are 
caught in seines in large numbers. Tho demand for them is very large, both at home and abroad, either 
fresh, pickled, smoked, or canned. Such a delicacy is salmon considered by the wealthy of the East that 
seventy-five cents to one dollar a pound is paid for the fresh fish carried thither by rail from California, 
though the price at home is only from six to fifteen cents. Many thousand barrels and cans are put up 
annually, the principal establishments being at Collinsville, Rio Vista, and Sacramento City, on the Sacra- 
mento liivor ; at Eureka, on Humboldt Bay ; at Eel River, and at the mouths of several smaller streams 
on the coast. At many available stations north of the S-tate, in Oregon, Washington, British Columbia, 
and Alaska, are large packing establishments. The noble fish attains a weight of from 20 to 30 pounds, 
and is in tho best condition when ascending the rivers in the spring and early summer. 

Many others of the important fishes of the table and of commerce are found in tho waters of and bor- 
dering on the State, as the cod, herring, smelt, bass, rock fish, sturgeon, tomcod, flounder, perch, turbot, 
baracouta, many varieties of trout; and of Crustacea and molusks, are the shrimp, crayfish, crab, oysters, 
clams, cockles, and mussels. The list of California fishes could be greatly extended, and a visit to the 
stands of the various markets of San Francisco will convince one of the endless^ variety. The mountain 
lakes and streams embowered in evergreen forests and gurgling through deep canons, sparkling and cold 
from tho snow-covered peaks, are the favorite home of the delicate trout. In no country is this fine sport- 
ing fish in greater abundance or of finer flavor. Both in the Coast Range streams and of the Sierra 
Nevada, but more particularly in the latter, do they abound. Lake Bigler or Tahoe is noted for its pecu- 
liar variety of salmon trout, which grows to nearly the size of the largest salmon. 

Much attention has of late years been paid to introducing new varieties, and to tho breeding or culti- 
vating of fish. The shad, which is such a favorite along tho Delaware, Hudson, Connecticut, and other 
Eastern rivers, has been successfully planted in tho waters of the Sacramento, and several propapated 
from the imported spawn have been caught. A great many other classes have been brought over the con- 
tinent, some of which had probably better been left, and in a few years we may add the eel, catfish, pike, 
bluefish, bullhead, chub, lobster, and others to our list. 

The oyster was seldom found on the California coast, but north of the Columbia River there are pro- 
lific beds of this delicious bivalve. The stingaree or gar, an unwelcome fish in our waters, destroys the 
oyster when it is unprotected, thus necessitating their cultivation in fo'^ded fields of water. At Shoalwator 
Bay, and other localities on the northern coast, vast quantities of oysters are obtained of a small variety 
called the California oyster. These are usually planted in the protected beds in San Francisco Bay, where 
they increase in numbers and size, and are drawn upon for the market. Eastern oysters are treated in the 
same manner, and as they rapidly improve when planted, it indicates that the conditions are favorable 
to their growth, were it not for the fish that prey upon them. 

MANUFACTURES. 

No State in the Union, nor any condition of society, present stronger invitations to tho manu- 
facturer than does California. The cheap coal from the mines of Monte Diablo and other localities 
on the coast, also the wood fuel from the forests of the Sierra, and the many rapidly falling moun- 
tain streams, furnish an unlimited power for machinery. The principal manufactories of tho State, whore 
machinery is used, are operated by steam ; but the great water-power of tho Sierra Nevada streams will 
some day be applied to use. Those streams are never-failing, and enter the groat valley with a rapid fall 
most easily utilized. The eastern cities of Lowell, Lawrence, Rochester, and others of large population 
and great wealth, owe their prosperity to the water-power furnished by the rivers on which they stand. 
But tho Genessee, Merrimac, Mohawk or Jamos do not afford more power than do the Feather, American. 
Tuolumne, and many others throughout the State ; and near those, if our State possesses resources equal 
to those of tfie East, we may expect equally large manufacturing towns. 

Tho diverse resources and favorable climate of tho Pacific Coast give extraordinary facilities and in- 
ducements to manufacture. Tho products of the soil are of every variety, and the mines give forth every 
mineral requiring the aid of machinery to transform into articles of use, and furnishing tho material of 
which tho machinery is made and operated. That the forests require saw-mills and the wheat fields flour 
mills, the flocks and herds woolen mills and tanneries, is patent to every observer ; but tho detail of every 
class of manufacture which wealth and necessity have brought out would be surprising to all. But there 



A. BOMAN & CO., Pine and Fancy Stationery, 11 Montgomery St., San Prancisco. 



D. "W. Laird, San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



74 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



is a broad field yot iinoccupiod. A multitude of articles are yet imported, made in distant lands of Cali- 
fornia products, which a judicious oconomy would have made hero. The making of one article requires 
and suRffosts the making of another, and so manufactures are extended. The prosonco of almost every 
minora! used jn nioehanics and chemistry suggest.'' the establishing ot metallurgical works of every de- 
scription and groat extent, consuming and utilizing the products of the mines, causing the development 
of thoso bearing substances not familiar to most people, but much used in the arts, and preparing for use 
the metals, salts, alkalies, acids, and precious stones with which California is by nature supplied beyond 
all sections of the earth. 

The climate, too, comes to the aid of manufactures. With the profuse supply of every material, a fer- 
tile soil, an infinity of minerals, inoxha\istiblo forests, and unlimited water-power, there prevails a climate 
whore frosts never cause a cessation of work, nor are storms to annoy and destroy. The floods are meas- 
ured as accurately as the tide, and the coming of the rains is noted as the sunrise. With so many and so 
groat advantages, with all rorjuisites at hand, and the enormous consumption of material by the minor, 
there opens for the manufacturing interest a prospect which promises the State the first rank in popula- 
tion, wealth and importance. 

COMMERCE. 

California stands upon the western shore of the continent, presenting an extended front to the 
Pacific Ocean, possessing many good harbors, that of San Francisco being one of the very best of the 
world. Across the ocean are the oldest civilizations, the most populous and wealthy countries of the 
globe, and eastward is the great highway which connects the sea with the interior. For the ordinary pur- 
l)oses of domestic trade the many small landings along the coast suffice, to which are added the capacious 
and safe harbors of San Diego, Monterey, San Francisco, and Humboldt Bays, and reaching far inland 
are the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers, with thoir branches, connecting the commerce of the interior 
to that of the ocean. These conveniences are of an extraordinary character, and have marked out the 
pathway of commerce which is to engirdle the earth. These features directed the route of emigration, 
and imperatively fixed the line of the transcontinental railroad. Whatever deserts were to be traversed 
or mountains to be scaled, there could be no deviation from the course; the gold mines, the great valley, 
and the harbor of San Francisco must be reached. But with enlightenment the desert faded away, and 
in its stead was a territory rich in minerals of every kind, and creating a trade of great importance. By 
further discoveries more of the recently unexplored regions have been made known, and the vast territory 
from the Sierra Nevada to the Rocky Mountains, and from Mexico to Alaska, has been made contributory 
to California. The wealth and varied resources of all this section, comprising an area of 1,800,000 square 
miles, none can estimate. It constitutes an empire as large as Europe without Russia, and with resources 
to support as large a population. Of all this California is the commercial center. 

Commercially speaking, San Francisco is California, as at this place centers all trade, and ever will, 
unjess the great natural advantages it possesses are criminally neglected by her merchants or destroyed 
by politicians. Upon San Francisco's policy and prosperity depond.s the prosperity of California and the 
contributory States and Territories, and without their development the city will remain a second-rate 
town. Millions of peof>le will yet occupy the surrounding regions, to be reached by the branching arms 
of many iron roads — the most perfect highway of inland commerce — and pour their wealth into her lap. 

The bright future of being one of the first cities of the world, ana the center of finance and exchange, is 
before her. The full development of the commerce of the Pacific, with friendly relations with the people 
of its fertile islands and the countless millions beyond, making them familiar with our products and man- 
ufactures and taught to use them, will establish a foreign trade that will accomplish the first, and com- 
mand this trade; while the surrounding country, constituting the source of supply of the precious metals, 
will fulfill the second. 

From the earliest history of commerce, nations have sought for the trade of Asia, and that people 
which possessed it became the most powerful, and those cities that commanded it the most wealthy and 
populous. For thousands of years the trade has been considered, as now, the great prize to be contended 
for, and no sacrifice too great to gain it. In value it constitutes three-fourths the commerce of the world, 
and the city which leads in transacting it leads in all things else. Nineveh, the everlasting, grew from it; 
and Palmyra, the beautiful, with her towering pillars and marble palaces, sprung from the desert as the 
caravan of laden camels passed by. For centuries was it by this route that the countries bordering the 
Mediterranean, then constituting the world of enlightenment, received the costly goods of India. Sub- 
sequently, the route by the Red Sea and Egypt was taken, and Alexandria sprung into being. An adven- 
turous age followed; the Cape of Good Hope was discovered, and the maritime nations of Western Europe 
contended for the prize, gained it, and transferred the seat of power. Portugal, Holland and England 
have enjoyed the trade, and with it power. London is now the mistress of Asiatic commerce, and has be- 
come in consequemje the largest and richest city the world ever saw. And now comes the grand contest 
to rob her of the lucrative trade. For this purpose, Russia sends her armies to the frontier of India, ex- 
tends her territory over the China herder, and seeks the passage of the Bosphorus. For this, too, the 
French have made the Canal of Suez; and for this the United States acquired California, with its Bay of 
San Francisco, and have built a railroad from ocean to ocean, one of the greatest undertakings of modern 
times. 

The railroad has opened the great channel of commerce, and minor lines, and lines of steamships 
radiate from its western terminus. The largest and best merchant vessels the world ever saw have been 
built to cross the broad Pacific, and in a journey of sixty days by rail and steamer the traveler can make 
the circuit of the globe. The mammoth steam packets cross the ocean with the regularity of a ferry, and 
China and Japan in one direction, and Australia, New Zealand, and the many islands of the South Sea 
are made familiar to us as neighboring States. The current of trade is established, with San Francisco 
as its central depot, and that its set continues depends upon enterprise and justice; enterprise in avail- 
ing ourselves of the opportunities and conditions that nature and the times have placed at our bidding, 
and justice to the inferior races who in countless millions people the lands with which we seek to deal. 
Before us is the great Pacific, with its many islands and rich countries, all with diverse products and 
wants requiring exchange, and creating a new commerce in addition to the one established through such 
long periods of time. San Francisco, in developing the resources of the country at her back, and culti- 
vating friendly relations with the people of the Pacific and its coasts, will command the situation and the 
trade which the force of England, the intrigue of Russia, nor the cunning of France, can ever take away. 

PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT, CENTRAL PAOIPIO RAILROAD, 1874. 

Passkngers.— Total for year ending December 31, 1874: East— Through, 24,802; Way, 267,573. West- 
Through. 54,943; Way, 272,899. Gain to the State, 1874, 30,141. In 1873 the gain was 20,838, and in 1872, 
12,395. The gain for 1875 is estimated at 50,000. 

Freight.— Total for year ending December 1, 1874, 2.125,229,802, of which 1,4.54,070,408 was local, and 
216,728,573 through. The total West, same period, was 153,028,028. Of this last aggregate there were for- 
warded East— Barley, 25,881,625 pounds; Butter, 438,768 pounds; Canned goods, 1,101,233 pounds; Fruits, 
349,942 pounds; Honey, 384,888 pounds; Salmon, 6,155,371 pounds; Wine, 4,392,499 pounds; Wool, 
30,627,799 pounds; Quicksilver, 432,635 pounds. 



Country property insured on best terms with PAENSWOETH & CLARK, S. F. 



Ernst Kap's, Grands, Haines Bros.' Square, and Eosenkranz Uprights, at GBAY'S. 



CALIFORNI A — G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 



75 



TABLE 

Exhibiting the Number of Acres of Land Inclosed and Under Cultivation in California during the 
year 1874, with the amount of Wheat, Barley, and Oats raised thereon. 



COUNTIES. 



Alameda 

Alpine 

Amador 

Butte 

Calaveras 

Colui?a 

Contra Costa 

Del Norte 

El Dorado 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Kern 

Klamath 

Lake 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Marin _ 

Mariposa 

Mendocino 

Merced 

Modoc 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napa 

Nevada 

Placer 

Plumas 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino .. 

San Diego 

San Francisco — 

San Joaquin , 

San Luis Obispo.... 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou , 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus , 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 

Yuba 

Totals 



Acres 
Inclosed. 



125,972 

4.500 

60,184 

311,350 
48,.5(>5 

300,000 

174,000 
11,875 
60,080 

146,000- 
70,600 
9,230 
38,283 
1,222 
41,487 
25,147 
46,000 

293,101 
28,200 
81,680 

251.516 
24 ,.500 
11.340 

263,589 

110,455 
68,000 
21.673 
48,583 

292,505 

160,000 
22.000 
17.222 



275.000 

1.50.000 

a5,160 

26,773 

513,361 

70,.5.56 

60,000 

27.600 

67,780 

221,209 

661,343 

45,600 

264,450 

1.59.000 

12,1.50 

75,.397 

155,000 

4,000 

81,593 

1.37.700 



6,292,634 



Acres 
Cultivat- 
ed. 



116,011 

2,862 

18,713 

184,.375 

11,160 

300,000 

83,800 

2, .576 

13,706 

47,000 

16 ,.540 

9,194 

15,025 

701 

10.419 

5,312 

53.000 

15,697 

8,400 

20.907 

201,495 

18,200 

720 

121,240 

44,015 

1.5,500 

45,033 

3,578 

60,610 

60,000 

10,000 

20,714 



246,2.50 
40,000 
33,115 
28,.390 

208,432 

19,971 

31,.3.50 

2,995 

30,127 

149,331 
68,265 

4.50,000 

153,652 
50,000 
9, .563 
43,782 
35,000 
18,000 

160,450 
.50,640 



3,366,716 



Wheat. 



Acres. Bushels. 



63,139 

200 

845 

148,9,35 

800 

200,000 

61,6.50 

293 

806 

30,000 

1,645 

1,668 

4,848 

54 

4,518 

1,948 

650 

2,103 

730 

4. .325 

16.5,140 

7,000 

230 

91,450 

32,985 



19,072 

781 

8,144 

40,000 
3,000 
6,.506 



190,000 

5,000 

7,240 

15,715 

175,2;^? 

7,890 

8,280 

1,700 

10,9.37 

12-5,437 

27,801 

405,000 

100,780 

40,000 

• 980 

15,412 

4,600 

1,078 

65,a35 

16,729 



2,128.615 



1,450,3.53 

4,000 

21.125 

2,780,700 

2,938 

2,000,000 

1,720,400 

8,250 

6,230 

180,5.50 

40,000 

31,666 

119,200 

605 

82,320 

30,824 

13,600 

44,163 

1,72.5 

86, .573 

865,530 

140,800 

4,600 

2,424,800 

495,900 



199,224 
10,483 

171.844 

480.000 
31,000 

103,120 



2,225,000 
100,000 
127,215 
168,229 

1,632.762 
201.1.50 
115,920 
28,-360 
174,992 

2,072,118 
526,4.50 

3,000,000 

1,209,260 

1.000,000 

14,,300 

206,856 

70.000 

19,381 

2,080,000 
260,055 



28,784,.571 



Barlky. 



Acres. Bushels. 



30,273 

360 

1,-520 

21,-325 

2,200 

10,000 

16,200 

190 

320 

15,600 

790 

1,149 

5,171 

10 

2,093 

2,.362 

12,900 

879 

3,100 

2.511 

24,602 

5,200 

190 

29,600 

3,985 



5,704 

492 

19,971 

15,000 

4,200 

9,520 



33.000 
30.000 

4,180 

8,474 
13,101 

4,420 

7,645 
700 

1,670 
10,964 

6,377 
45,000 
20,132 
14,000 
50 
23,797 
900 
14,922 
11,315 

8,1-53 



875,612 

900 

45,360 

475,936 

2:^,167 

200,000 

660.200 

8,300 

2,297 

234.000 

21.000 

25,120 

125,464 

200 

44,121 

48,ia5 

376,000 

27,688 



77,842 
310,7-52 
210.800 
3,800 
962.-500 
117,210 



70,805 

5,-594 

350,797 

200,000 

93,925 

45,560 



-506,217 



560,000 
750,000 
120,261 
286.365 
127.239 
168,800 
150,945 
15,219 
43,400 
276,461 
144,795 
900,000 
501,352 
350,000 
670 
2.52,143 
9,000 
298,440 
282,875 
182,464 



Oats. 



Acres. Bushels. 



1,489 
40 

■■""so" 



9,000 

4,.500 
684 
184 
7-50 

4,796 
697 
275 
164 
110 

1,495 
400 

9,113 
400 

1,273 
10 

4,000 
280 
.5.50 

1,095 



5,949 
1,895 
2,064 

200 
40 

300 



1,040 



11,063,-564 



8,-505 
6 

837 
2,225 

175 

.500 
2.900 

1-36 
4,908 



175 
100 



937 
150 
17 
100 
215 



32,450 
120 

1,810 

180,000 

162,2-50 

30,148 

716 

12,730 

2-53,000 

21,2-50 

9,045 

3,2-30 

4,-500 

40,8-56 

2,000 

223,258 

cut for hay 

33,-560 

200 

150,600 

7.000 

22.000 

36,135 

cut for hay 

44,1-3.5 

44,676 

6,000 

1,600 

6,000 

29,000 

352,700 

280 

13,1.36 

73,025 

4,375 

12,.50O 

72,.500 

15,000 

141,605 

2, .333 
1,000 

22,488 

1,400 

180 

8,000 

4,013 



74,729 I 2.077.804 



TABLE 

Showing the Number of Grape Vines Cultivated, and the Product of Wines and Brandies, in California 

during the Year 1874. 



County. 



Alameda 

Alpine 

Amador 

Butte 

Calaveras 

Colusa 

Contra Costa. 

Del Norte 

El Dorado 

Fresno 



No. 
Grape 
Vines. 



627,611 



1,680,300 

600,-564 

5-52,600 

245,000 

478,490 

.50 

1,420,2-55 

26,760 



Gallons 
Wine. 



100.000 



82,200 
26,930 
44,030 



90,220 
'l23,'915 



Gallons 
Brandy 



2,000 



900 
' 1,060' 



3,650 



County. 



Humboldt.... 

Inyo 

Korn 

Klamath 

Lake 

Lassen 

Los Angeles.. 

iVIarin 

Mariposa 

Mendocino...,, 



No. 
Grape 
Vines. 



4,600 
15,485 
61 ,.334 

1,984 
46,917 

3,640 

1,2.50,000 

11,663 

350,000 

31,370 



Gallons Gallons 
Wine. jBrandy 



980 



1,460.000 
2,713 
12,000 



50,000 



1,500 



A. EOMAN & CO., Booksellers, Importers, and Publishers, 11 Montgomery St., S. P. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



76 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Grape Vines — Continued. 



County. 



Merced 

Modoc 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napa 

Nevada 

Placer 

Plumas 

Sacramento 

San l^cnito 

8an Kornardino .. 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

San Joaquin , 

San Luis Obispo.. 

Snn Mateo 

Santa Barbara... 
Totals 



No. 
Grape 
Vines. 



175.082 
2,080 



15 

;,i08, 

340 

SOU, 

tiOO 
100 



.,000,000 

00,000 

140,2(i0 

213,!>84 



Gallons 
Wines. 



7,930 



•133.88') 
20,000 
59,812 



161,Wt8 
:-!,000 

125,000 
5,000 



71,000 



2.325 



Gallons 
Brandy 



1,170 



11.300 



3,.505 



2,595 

300 

4,000 



2,138 



1,000 



County. 



Santa Clara 
Santa Cruz. 

Shasta 

Sierra , 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus .. 

Sutter 

Tohatna 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne... 

Ventura 

Yolo 

Yuba 



No. 
Grapo 
Vines. 



1,213 

2112, 

4uo; 
1 

75 
690 

5,1)03 
2ii0 
(>07 
G.50 
21 
285 

1,400 
135 
550 
470 



30,19f),429 



Gallons 
Wines. 



Gallons 
Brandy 



128,.321) 

70,000 

31,400 

150 

400 

125 ,.300 

3t)5.510 

.50,500 

75,325 

50,000 

.575 

2,000 

75,000 

7,000 

13,700 

30,000 



1,800 



3,858,027 175,944 



72,4.36 

1,200 

2.50 



5,000 
2,220 
2,.500 



2,000 



1,200 
2,120 



RAILROADS OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Converging channels of commerce fix the sites of cities and govern their destiny. Rivers and bays 
and the endless sea are the channels Nature offers, and road.s, canals, and railways are provided by man. 
From the earliest daivn of civilization, the aim of gorernmonts and of statesmen have been to connect the 
country with the capital, and to facilitate intercommunication between all commercial points. The eflorts 
made, the condition and degree of perfection of thyse artificial lines of intercommunication may be taken 
as the measure of enlightenment of the different eras. When Rome was mistress of the world, her civili- 
zation was of the highest recorded in history anterior to modern times; and her grand system of highways, 
radiating from the proud capital through distant provinces and dependencies, are still the marvel of engi- 
neers, and their ruins survive the barbarism of centuries succeeding the fall of the Empire. Through 
Italy. vSpain. France. Britain, Asia Minor, Northern Africa, and wherever Roman conquest extended, or 
wherever her Briarean arms of commerce stretched her hands, there were found her massive ways, arching 
over rivers, piercing mountains and crossing deserts; forming channels of trade which brought the wealth 
of a hundred nations to the central power. Those were the work of a strong and enlightened govern- 
ment, enabling it through many centuries to maintain its supremacy, while the people were enriched 
beyond all others known in history. Roman merchants wore more powerful than princes, and to do 
pomothing for the public good was a greater honor than to be born of noble blood. The making and 
superintendence of highways were positions of honor, and were sought by people of the highest rank. 
The adage of the present day that " all roads lead to Rome," was then true in its literal sense. The trade 
of Europe, Asia, and Africa, all the then known world, was by these means centered in the great metrop' 
olis, and inland exceeded maritime commerce. 

With the fall of the Roman Empire, civilization declined. The grand system of public highways, 
which was a part of Roman greatness, decayed with her. and in the semi-barbaric days that followed, 
inland commerce almost ceased to exist. Seaports became the centers of wealth and power, and those 
localities were most successful where rivers or deep bays afforded water communication with the interior. 
At last canals were constructed as adjuncts of water courses, and were considered the grandest works of 
engineering of their day. These were, indeed, a noble step in advance, and gave impetus to the new 
civilization. 

But the crowning triumph of inventive genius was the conception of the railroad and the locomotive. 
For these, the world is indebted to George Stephenson, an English collier, who first made the experiment 
in 1814; and in 1829 his son, Robert Stephenson, brought the invention to perfection. It is this system 
that affords the present opportunity; that enables commerce to exceed all record of itself in history; that 
promotes civilization by facilitating inter-communication, and makes all people kin. Tho railroad, in its 
effectiveness, far surpasses the costly and massive highways of the ancient Romans. Two simple bars of 
iron lying upon the ground, almost concealed amid tho growing herbage, constitute the channel of a 
mighty commerce. Over mountain and plain, through watery marsh and sandy desert, the railroad bears 
its equal way, and over it, as part of itself, the apparently vitalized machine rushes along with its laden 
train with the speed of the wind and as tireless as the elements. 

The inland commerce of the Pacific States was necessarily large, and roads through mining regions 
were constructed at great expense. The transportation of goods and passengers was conducted in as good 
a manner as the case would admit of; but the travel by stage, however tine the coach or dashing the team, 
was toilsome in the extreme, and the freightage of goods in the mammoth " prairie schooners," with one 
or several " back actions " attached, slowly dragged over the dusty or muddy roads by long lines of mules 
or horses, was tedious and expensive. The construction of the main trunk lines of railroad have driven 
the great stages and teams from the field; but as adjuncts of the road they are still employed on shorter 
lines and in subordinate service. The iron road will continue to encroach upon the inferior; and so great 
is its superiority, that we may expect at no distant day that the country will be interlaced with the paral- 
lel rails as it is with the public roads of the present. 

The construction of tho Central Pacific was one of the grandest triumphs of the age, both as regards 
engineering and finance, and this success stimulated others to similar enterprises. Three other great 
lines were projected, being the Northern Pacific, from Lake Superior to Puget Sound ; the Atlantic and 
Pacific, or Thirty-fifth Parallel Route ; and the Texas-Pacific, or Thirty-second Parallel Route, the latter 
having its western terminus at San Diego. 

Some apprehension has been felt lest the builders of railroads should seek other terminal points than 
San Francisco, to the great injury of this city. The terminal points suggested are Goat Island, Oakland, 
and Alameda for the Central Pacific and its branches, and Vallejo and Saucelito for the system west of the 
Sacramento River. Every attempt to create a rival to San Francisco has heretofore failed, and every 
reason teaches that any repetition of the effort by the railroad builders will be as futile. The iron rails 
may reach no farther than Oakland, Vallejo, or Saucelito, on the bay, or it may be claimed that roads 
end at San Diego or on Puget Sound, but for all purposes of business or pleasures no transcontinental 
road can be considered as having any other terminus than San Francisco. These other localities nourished 



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CALIFORNI A G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 77 



into prosperity and wealth will, instead of being rivals, become stalwart supports of the central dome. 
The noble harbor, the navigable rivers radiating from it, the vast extent of productive country easily 
accessible, and the winds and currents of the ocean, all combine to fix the site of the metropolis, and man 
has but to follow the dictates of nature and to improve. 

Thk Narrow Gaugb Systkm.— A new style of railroad has within a few years past been favorably 
considered by the public, and promises on minor routes to become of general adoption. This is denomin- 
ated the narrow-gauge system, and trucks of various widths are used. Recent experiments in England 
have shown that a track of but ten inches in width would be operated with good etfeet; and one very im- 
portant road in Wales, having a gauge of but twenty-three inches, has been used with very good success 
for several years.^ At the military camp at Aldershot, England, the British Government has had con- 
structed a road of eighteen inches gauge, with a double track, occupying a roadway of ten feet in width. 
Upon this a speed of twenty to thirty miles an hour is made with long trains and heavy freight. These 
successes demonstrate the feasibility and groat economy of the system. Several narrow-gauge tracks 
have been laid in our Pacific-coast railroad system, and many more are in contemplation. The common 
gauge is thirty-six inches, or throe feet, with corresponding weight of locomotive and cars and strength of 
rail. Of course, not so heavy trains can be taken, nor can equal grades be overcome as with the much 
heavier engines of the broad gauge, but, ordinarily, the system is effective and economical. Roads of 
throe feet gauge are built and equipped at a cost, varying with the cost of grading, of from SS.OOO to 320,- 
001) per mile, while the cost of the ordinary broad gauge is from 830,000 to S50,000 per mile. The engines of 
the former may be made weighing from eight to fifteen tons, while those of the latter are from thirty to 
sixty tons. 

Already a number of narrow-gauge roads are in operation, and more are in contemplation. The first 
on this coast over which ran a locomotive was that of the Newiiort Coal Mining Company, of Coos Bay, 
Oregon. This is of but three miles in length, and its chief use is the transportation of coal from the miner 
of the company to the ship-landing at the bay. It was constructed several years since, but was adapted 
to steam power in 1871, whence it is classed as a narrow-gauge of the modern pattern. 

The other roads of this class now in operation are the Monterey and Salinas Valley Railroad, nineteen 
miles in length, the North Pacific Coast Railroad, from Saucelito to Tomales, fifty-two miles in length, 
the Nevada Central Railroad, from Pioche to BuUionville, twenty-two miles in length, the Utah Northern, 
from Ogden, via Logan, to Franklin, seventy-six miles, and the American Fork Railroad, from Lehi, on 




Fernando two hundred and nine miles, now completed from Los Angeles westward to Santa .\Lonica, fifteen 
miles; the Colfax and Nevada, via Grass Valley, thirty-six miles ; and in Nevada the Palisade and Eureka, 
which, when completed, will have a length of eighty miles. Several other projects are discussed, with a 
promise of work, the most extensive being the Humboldt Pacific Narrow Gauge Railroad, from the I3ig 
Bend of the Humboldt River, in Nevada, through the Klamath Lake and Rogue River Valleys, in 
Oregon to the Pacific Ocean, a distance of five hundred miles. 

Thk Prismoioal Ststkm.— From the broad six feet gauge to the gauge often inches, seems the extreme 
of reduction, but inventive genius will not rest at that. A single rail is now proposed, which, at first 
glance, seems impossible to be operated with safety. The rail is in the form of a prism, hence the name, 
upon the top of which the driving and supporting wheels run, the cars being supported in an upright 
position by wheels bearing on the sides of the prism. This form of railroad, it is maintained, can be con- 
structed at about S4,000 per mile, and operated with greater economy and safety than any other. A road 
on the prismoidal system is proposed from Santa Barbara to Bakersfield, a distance of one hundred miles, 
also as a street railroad in San Francisco. The elevated track would constitute a rigid obstacle at street 
or road crossings, which seems an insurmountable objection to its adoption, particularly in cities, unless 
greatly elevated. 

The Northern Systkm.— The railroad systems of the Pacific Coast in the future may be classified as 
the Northern, Central and Southern. The first will have its western terminus on Puget Sound, with the 



continental route, 

The Northern system comprises a line from Puget Sound, first to Kalama on the Columbia River, 
thence easterly to Duluth, the extreme western point of Lake Superior. This road has been endowed 
very liberally by Congress, its land grant being thirty-eight million four hundred thousand acres bordering 
the road, twenty miles on each side, in alternate sections in States and forty miles in the Territories. The 
eastern portion is completed from Duluth westward to the Missouri River, a distance of four hundred and 
sixty miles. This division crosses the northern portion of the State of Minnesota and the Territory of 
Dakota, commanding thi fertile region through which it runs as well as the great valley of the Saskat- 
chewan and the Rod River of the North, of our British neighbor. It will have a length of about fifteen 
hundred miles, crossing the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers and ascending the valley of the Yellowstone 
to near the " Mauvais Terres," that wonderful land recently dedicated by Congress as a grand National 
Park. The Rocky Mountains are crossed in Montana and the Columbia River in the Territory of Wash- 
ington. The route then descends that river, on its northern bank, to Kalama, and sixty-five miles from 
the sea, whence it runs to Puget Sound. This division has been completed, running through Cowlitz, 
Lewis, Thurston, and Pierce counties, threading the fertile valleys of the Cowlitz, the upper Chohalis, the 
Claquato, and by the shores of Puget Sound to the newly built city of Tacoma, a distance of one hundred 
and five miles from the Columbia at Kalama. With the exception of this division but little progress has 
been made on the Northern Pacific since the completion of the Eastern division fromI)uluth to Bismarck, 
on the Missouri River. The completion of the Puget Sound division accommodates the business of a 
section of great resources, possessing a mild and healthy climate, though of sparse population, and also 
fbrms the northern link in the great chain of railways running parallel with the Pacific Coast, connecting 
the waters of Puget Sound with the Bay of San Diego, with San F'rancisco as the central point. 

Orrgon axd Cai.ii'orxia Railroad.— The City of Portland, although untouched by the Northern Pacific 
trans-continental lino, may still bo regarded as the central point, on tho Pacific Coast, of the northern 
system. That city, from its fine harbor, rich surroundings, and linos of river navigation, is fixed as the 




of Oakland, in Douglas County, a distance of one hundred and eighty-two miles. The principal towns on 
the routo are Oregon City, Salem, Albany, and Eugene, with numerous other villages and stations. For 
upward of one hundred and forty miles the road traverses the fertile valley of the Willamette, thence over 
gently-rolling hills it enters the valley of tho upper Umpqua, the entire section being well occupied and 



OS 



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78 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



possessing rosources and attractions scarcely sur^mssed by any equal area of the globe. The projected 
route continues to the southern boundary of the btato, a distance, on the stage road, of one hundred and 
sixty miles, whore it will connect with the lino going northward, from Sacramento, making a continuous 
railway from the metropolis of Oregon to the capital of California, a total distance of six hundred and 
forty-two miles, it presont a gap exists of two hundred and ninety miles in extent, from the southern 
terminus of the Oregon and California at Oakland to the northern terminus of tho California and Oregon 
at Redding. The company is chartered by Congress, and is richly endowed by National and State subsi- 
dies, having a land grant of twelve thousand eight hundred acres per mile of road. Work was commenced 
in ISU'J, and energetically prosecuted until tho present terminus was reached in the summer of 1872. 

Orkgon Ckntral Railroao.— This was commenced at the same time as the Oregon and California, ami 
contended for tho subsidies offered by Congress to such company as would first construct a certain numlx i 
of miles of road with the intention of extending it southward to the State line, but soon abandoned tlii' 
contest. Subsequently, its property and franchises falling into the hands of tho rival company, work was re- 
SLimod for tho dovolopment of the country west of tho Willamette River. Tho Oregon Central is now com- 
pleted to Gaston, thirty-seven miles from Portland, traversing a fertile, well-timbered, and interestiiii,' 
country. Its route extends up the valley of the ^Villametto to Junction City, one hundred and eleven mili s 
from Portland, whore it will unite with tho Oregon and California Railroad. From the Town of Cornelius, 
a point on the road twenty-five miles from Portland, it is proposed to construct a railroad to Astoria, at 
thomouthof tho Columbia River, and to aid the project, liberal grants of land have been made by Congress. 

Newport and Coos Bay Railroad is a short and private line of but three miles in length, employed 
in the transportation of coal from the Newport mines to tho ship-landing on tho bay. This is a narrow 
gauge, and bears the distinction of being the first on the coast operated with a locomotive, this distinction 
dating from 1871. 

Thk Walla Walla Valley Railroad extends from Wallula, on the Columbia River, to the thriving 
Town of Walla Walla. This distance is thirty miles, through one of the loveliest and most fertile valleys 
ot Washington Territory. 

Cascades Railroad.— Tho great Columbia is navigable for sail vessels and steamers for many hundreds 
of miles of its course, although broken by rapids as at the Cascades and the Dalles. To pass these obstruc- 
tions railroads have been constructed. The first is at the Cascades, where the mighty river rushes through 
tho Cascade range of mountains. This railroad is on the no»th side of the river in Washington Territory, 
is six miles in length, and connects with two towns. Cascades and Upper Cascades. It was constructed in 
1852, and was the first railroad built west of the Rocky Mountains. 

The Dalles Railroad, in Oregon, passes the second portage of the Columbia, is fifteen miles in length, 
and connects the two towns of Dalles and Celilo. This is an important link in the navigation of the river, 
and is the medium of an extensive traffic. 

The Oregon City Railroad has a length of one and a half miles, and is chiefly used for the portage of 
merchandise past the falls of the Willamette. 

The Central Pacific Railroad eonstitutee the main trunk of the Central System. This, joined with 
the Union Pacific, is the pioneer transcontinental line. Its conception was deemed visionary, and fur 
many years the project was scouted as impracticable, but its realization is one of the grandest triumphs ia 
the history of finance and civil engineering. During tho decade succeeding the acquisition of Calilbrnia 
by the United States, the subject of a Pacific Railroad was an important element in politics, and was 
vehemently discussed in Congress, but tho jealousy of sections prevented the consummation of any plan. 
The route naturally suggested was that usually taken by the emigrants, but Southerti interests pointed to 
the lofty mountains and deep snows, and thus successfully opposed all propositions favored by the -North. 
The secession of the South left the North free to act, and soon thereafter tho desired measures were passed 
in Congress and the work entered upon. Fortunately the men who sprung forward and secured the subsi- 
dies and franchises were equal to the task, and from the date of commencement the work was pushed 
through with a skill and energy never surpassed. The work of construction began at Sacramento in 18:j >, 
and on the lyth of May, 18l>9, the last spike was driven, and connection with the Union Pacific made 
at Promontory in Utah, eight hundred and twenty-eight miles from San Francisco. By subsequent 
arrangement, Ogden was made the connecting point, giving the Central Pacific eight hundred and eighty 
miles of road, and the Union Pacific ten hundred and thirtj'-two miles to Omaha. This grand line luads 
to San Francisco as a mighty river leads to tho sea, gathering its branches from every valley trending to 
its course, and bears its flood to the metropolis. The Central Pacific crosses Utah, Nevada, and California, 
and stretches its arms out far and wide on either side. Tho branches are already many, but their number 
in the future will be vastly increased. In tho distant East are the Utah Northern, Central and Southern, 
with the lesser branches of these; in Nevada is the Virginia and Truckee, now in operation ; 
the Eureka and Palisade Narrow-tJuage, in course of construction ; and in California are 
the California and Oregon, tho California Noithern, the Sacramento Valley, the California 
Pacific, San Francisco and North Pacific, the Copperopolis, the San Joaquin Valley, and the 
Southern Pacific, with their secondary branches, which, with others in the Central System, 
give an aggregate of two thousand one hundred and sixty miles of railroad west of Ogden, of which one 
thousand seven hundred and fifty miles is controlled by a single company. The ditticulties to overcome in 
constructing and maintaining the Central Pacific road were enough to deter the boldest engineers and 
capitalists. A snow-covered mountain was to be crossed at an altitude of seven thousand and forty-two 
feet with less than one hundred miles in which to make the rise. By groat skill in engineering, and jud^;- 
ment in selecting, a route afibrding a nearly uniform grade was found, the heaviest being one hundred 
and sixteen feet per mile, and the ascent with trains is effected by doubling the locomotive power used 
on ordinary grades. Protection from the snov? is obtained by sheds, or housing the track, or covering 
it with a well-supported roof, ot which there is built an aggregate of about nineteen miles. At tho San 
Srancisco terminus a substantial pier has been constructed reaching into the bay eleven thousand feet, 
where a depth of water twenty-six and one-half feet at low tide is found, and where are slips and docks 
for ships and steamers, and large storehouses for the shelter and reception of merchandise. This, how- 
ever, is only in part the terminus. Large steamers are provided wifh railroad tracks upon their decks by 
which trains of cars are ferried without delay, and merchandise destined for San Francisco is discharged 
at the depots within the city. Here, in.Mission Bay and vicinity, tho company have, by grant and purchase, 
upward of two hundred acres of land, where upward of a million dollars have been expended in improve- 
ments, in constructing wharves, railroad tracks, warehouses, and offices. Here connection is made with 
the Southern Pacific, and freight by both roads is unladen at the same warehouse. The remaining great 
engineering feat is to perfect the connection by a bridge across the Bay of San Francisco. 

Sacramento Valley Railroak.— The Sacramento Valley is the pioneer of California railroads. This 
was constructed in 185o and 1850 from Sacramento to Folsom, a distance of twenty-two and a half miles, 
and at a cost of 81,100,000. The building of this road was regarded as an important enterprise at the time, 
and it was the first ever seen by many of the early immigrants to the State. For a number of years a 
large business was transacted over the Sacramento Valley Road; but in consequence of the decline of tho 



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CALirORNI A — G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 79 



section supplied by it, together with the construction of the Central Pacific, its trade has greatly fallen off. 
The road was extended in lt(J4, with the design of continuing it to Placerville, but to the present date the 
extension has reached only to Shingle Springs, a distance of twenty-six miles from Folsom. The combined 
roads now bear the name of Placervillo and Sacramento Valley Railroad, and are owned by the Central 
Pacific Company. 

California and Orkgon Railroad. — The branches of the Central Pacific are now oflScially designated 
as " Divisions." Thus, the line under consideration is called "Central Pacific Railroad, Oregon Division." 
The separate track of this Division leaves the main trunk at Koseville Junction, eighteen miles from 
Sacramento, and runs north through the counties of Placer, Sutter, Yuba, Butte, Tehama, and Shasta, 
having the towns of Marysvillo, Chico, Tehama, and Red Bluff on the route, and terminating for the 
present, at the town of Redding, one hundred and seventy-one miles from Sacramento. This is entirely 
in the broad valley of the Sacramento, and, with but slight intervals, the country passed over is of great 
fertility. The road is aided by a liberal grant of land from Congress, amounting to six thousand four 
hundred acres per mile of road, or the alternate sections for ten miles on each side of the track. It is 
proposed to continue this to the Oregon boundary, where it will meet the Oregon and California Railroad 
from Portland. 

Stockton and Copperopolis Railroad. — The rich mines that gave the name and built the once thriving 
town of Copperopolis, appeared to demand the aid of the iron road to transport the ores, and Congress 
was induced to grant a subsidy of five sections of land per mile of road to encourage its construction. The 
work was entered upon in 1870, and completed to Milton, a distance of thirty miles. At Peters, fifteen 
miles from Stockton, is a branch road, intending originally to extend to Visalia, as a rival to the San 
Joamuin Valley branch of the Central Pacific. This was constructed to Oak Dale, a distance of thirty- 
four miles from Stockton. These ambitious projects of opposition are now owned by the Central Pacific 
Company, and as a rival or competing roads their extension is not probable. The mining, agricultural, 
and horticultural interests of Calaveras and Tuolumne counties would be greatly advanced by the com- 
pletion of the Stockton and Copperopolis Railroad. 

San Joaquin Valley Railroad.— This division of the Central Pacific is one of its most important 
branches. It is to the southern portion of the great valley what the California and Oregon is to the 
northern. Branching from the main trunk at Lathrop, nine miles from Stockton, and ninety-seven miles 
from San Francisco, it extends up the beautiful and fertile valley of the San Joaquin to Bakersfield, a dis- 
tance of two hundred and seventeen miles, and will soon be extended to Tehiehipa, twenty miles further. 
This is through one of the most extensive wheat-growing sections of California, and both mountain and 
valley abound in resources of the most attractive character. The counties of San Joaquin, Stanislaus, 
Mercod, Mariposa, Tulare, Fresno, and Kern are crossed, and the road will be extended southerly to 
connect with the southern system of transcontinental roads. Surveys extend southward to Los Angeles, 
eastward into Inyo County and to the Colorado River, near Fort Mohave, southeastward to the Colorado 
and Fort Yuma, and westward by several routes into the Salinas Valley, to form a junction with the 
Southern Pacific, now building southward from San Francisco. 

Stockton and Ionr Railroad.— Stockton is becoming an important railroad center through the energy 
and enterprise of its citizens in developing the resources of its surrounding country. The latest of these 
enterprises is the Stockton and lone Kailroad, a narrow-gauge, of thirty-five miles in length, projected 
chiefly for the transportation of coal from the mines of lone to market. Work upon this was begun in the 
Summer of 1874, and with slight interruptions has been continued with the expectation of its early com- 
pletion. 

San Jose Division. — At Niles, twenty-nine miles from San Francis6o, a branch leads from the Central 
Pacific to San Jose, eighteen miles distant. This route, on the eastern side of the bay, being entirely level, 
makes it the favorite route for the transportation of freight, notwithstanding a ferriage of some three miles 
or more. At San Jose, connection is made with the Southern Pacific, thus making the circuit of the south- 
ern portion of San Francisco Bay. 

The Oakland Division consists of the ferry route over the Bay of San Francisco, connecting by rail 
with trains running over about eight miles of road to the cities of Oakland, Brooklyn and Alameda. Two 
branches of railroad constitute this line, one reaching to Brooklyn, the other crossing the estuary of San 
Antonio to Alameda. This division, though short, is a very important one, there being twenty-four trains, 
or forty-eight crossings of the Bay, daily, with a very large and increasing traffic. 

Southkrn Pacific Railroad. — The San Francisco and San Jose Railroad follows the Sacramento 
Valley in order of construction, and for a number of years was the only ironed way that made this city its 
objective point. Having its starting point in San Francisco, at the corner of Fifth and Townsend streets, 
it crossed the Bernai Heights at a high grade, thence through San Mateo to San Jose, a distance of titty 
miles. The construction of this road, attbrding rapid passage from the city to the country, gave the oppor- 
tunity for business men to enjoy suburban residences, and many beautiful villas were established in the 
pleasantly selected localities along tho peninsula. In 1870, this road went into the possession of the South- 
ern Pacific Railroad Company, whose name it noiv bears. Since that date its extension has been rapid, 
,and now the grand highway runs from San Francisco to Solodad, in Monterey county, a total distance of 
one hundred and forty-throe miles, with a branch from Gilroy to Tres Pinos, twenty miles in length. In 
its course it traverses the fertile valleys of Santa Clara, Pajaro, and of the Salinas River ; a vast extent of 
very productive country, and containing some of the loveliest spots in the State. The surveys for further 
extending the road, both the line up the Salinas Valley and the one by HoUister, have been numerous and 
extensive, reaching by the coast to the southern counties and to Fort Yuma, also by difiorent passes 
through the Coast Range into the San Joaquin and Tulare valleys to the same points. The road is subsi- 
dized by grants of land of ten sections per mile, and is chartered to intersect the Texas and Pacific Rail- 
way at Fort Yuma, thus connecting the Southern and Central systems. 

San Juan and Salinas, oe Thk San Juan and Watsonville, is a proposed narrow-gauge to connect 
the town of San Juan with the Southern Pacific Railroad either at Salinas City, where it will also connect 
with the road to Monterey, or at Watsonville, where it will connect with the new road to Santa Cruz. 

Santa Cruz and Watsonville Railroad, in course of construction during the year 187J, is on the 
narrow-gauge system, and with a length of thirty miles will transport the freight and passengers of the 
beautiful valley of the Pajaro to the seaport of Santa Cruz. 

Monterey and Salinas Railroad.— The first narrow-gaugo railroad of California to be completed 
now connects the ancient capital with the new and thriving city of Salinas. This has a length of nineteen 
miles, is of three feet gauge, and was constructed at a cost of S8,04;J per mile exclusive of equipment. 
The locomotives in use were made in New York, and wore placed on the road at a cost of $10,000 each. 
Passenger cars cost io.OOO each, flats $100, and box-cars $57") each, the other costs of fitting and furnishing 
aggregating a rate of about $1,500 per mile of road. At Monterey a wharf has been built at a cost of 
$11,000, extending to deep water in the bay, having a length of one thousand feet. Two capacious ware- 
houses, one at Monterey and the other at Salinas City, costing $9,000. The Salinas River is spanned by a 
bridge of three hundred feet in length, built on five piers of piles. This road was completed and com- 



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80 PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



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menced business operations in October, 1874, the work having been pushed with much energy as the first 
grading was begun in the preceding April. The route, however, was not a difficult one to build upon, as 
the low cost proves. This road is the property of enterprising citizens of Monterey County, who thus 
endeavor to revive the commercial importance of the old city of Monterey. 

Thk Nokth Paoific Coast Railroad.— The advantages of the narrow-gauge system of railroads will 
be thoroughly tested by the j)ractical working of those now in course of construction. One of the princi- 
pal of those is the North Pacific Coast, completed in November, 1874, running from Saucolito, on the Bay 
of San Francisco, via San Rafael, to tide water on Tomales Hay. a distance of fifty-two miles. This road 
it is proposed to extend northerly to the mouth of Russian River, a distance of twenty-five miles, and 
eventually to Humboldt Bay. At Saucelito ferry connection is made with San P^ancisco, distance seven 
miles. The route of this road is over a hilly country, and its construction has been quite expensive, cost- 
ing without equipment about 5tl5,0OO per mile, or with equipment 820,000 a mile. The gauge is three feet, 
and the usual narrow-gauge rail, weighing thirty-six pounds to the yard, is used. The country penetrated 
is rich in resources, being one of the most prosperous dairying sections of the State, and, as it extends, 
will enter the redwood lumber region, and give life to new interests. 

San Qukstin and San Rafakl Railroad is three and a half miles in length, oonnecting the town of 
San Rafael with San Francisco Ferry at San Quentin, 

Thk Pittsburg and thk Black Diamond Railroads are each seven miles in length, and are used in 
the transportation of coal from the mines in Mount Diablo to Suisun Bay; the first terminating at Pitts- 
burg Landing, and the other at New York of the Pacific. These are local roads for special purpose, and 
do not class with the great commercial roads of the country. 

Californiv Pacific Railroad.— This road, with its branches, formerly constituted an independent, 
secondary system, with Vallejo for its centering point, connecting with San Francisco by steamer, bat the 
transfer of tlio property to the Central Pacific Company changed it from a rival to an auxiliary line. The 
system consists of the road from Vallejo to Sacramento, a distance of sixty miles ; a branch from Napa 
Junction to Calistoga, a distance of thirty-four miles ; and another from Davisville to Marysville, a 
distance of forty-four miles. The first branch preceded in construction the main line, and was called the 
Napa Valley Railroad, running through the rich valley of that name to the pleasant village at its head, 
the most fashionable watering place of California. The Marysville branch leaves the main trunk at 
Davisville, uml proceeds via Woodland to Knight's Landing, on the Sacramento River. The original con- 
nection with Marysville was interrupted by the destruction of a portion of the road in 1873, and business 
has not yet been resumed. At Vaca Station, a branch of thirty miles in length reaches to the town of 
Winters, on Pulah Creek, in Yolo County, passing through Vacavillo and the beautiful valley of that name. 
The length of these roads now in operation is one hundred and thirty miles, exclusive of the steamboat 
connection from Vallejo to San Francisco. 

, San Francisco and North Pacific Railroad.— The beautiful valleys of Petaluma and Russian River 
now resound wiih the clamor of the rushing train bearing the products to market from the well-tilled 
plains and vine-clad hills of Sonoma, and from the dense forests and fertile vales of Mendocino. The 
San Francisco and North Pacific has been completed to Cloverdale, in Sonoma County, making its entire 
length fifty-six miles from Donahue, where it connects with steamer for San Francisco, a distance of 
thirty-four miles. It is probable that this road will be extended through Ukiah to Humboldt Bay on the 
north, and southerly through Marin County to the harbor of Saucolito. In its present course it passes the 
towns of Petaluma, Santa Rosa, Windsor and Hoaldsburg, all, together with its termini, pleasant and 
thriving places. The country traversed is one of the most interesting and prosperous sections in the 
State. 

California Northern Railroad connects the cities of Marysville, in Yuba County, and Oroville, in 
Butte County ; distance, twenty-six miles. This is one of the pioneer railroads of California, and was 
built to connect the head of navigation on Feather River with the interior, also aspiring to form a section 
of the overland line via the Beckwourth Pass in the Sierra, and also to become a portion of the California 
and Oregon Road. 

The Southkrn Systkm.— The southern transcontinental railway forms the basis of the third system 
of the Paeitic Coast roads. After many efforts, and organizations succeeding organizations, the 
Texas and Pacific Railway Company was formed, the way has been made clear, and work earnestly 
begun. Having purchased the property and franchises of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company of the 
East, it starts work with many miles of road already completed in Louisiana and Texas. The initial 
point is at Marshall, on the eastern boundary of Texas, whence it crosses the State to El Paso and iiayv 
Mexico, thence to the Gila, Fort Y'uma, and San Diego, a total distance of one thousand four hundred 
miles. The entire course is almost due west, near the thirtj'-second parallel of latitude. At Marshall, 
two Ijranch roads, one to New Orleans, three hundred miles distant, and the other to Memphis, will con- 
nect it with the eastern system of railways. The route offers no serious engineering difficulties, the lofty 
Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountains, which cross the Central route, here are greatly depressed, and snow 
interposes no obstacle. The country traversed, however, is the desert belt of the continent, though pos- 
sibly rich in minerals. By grants from the State of Texas and from Congress, the company will receive 
some thirteen million acres of land to aid in the construction, while the people of San Diego, amonsr other 
gifts, have bestowed upon it upward of nine thousand acres of valuable land within the city, and eight 
hundred acres upon the water front of the bay. The construction of this road will instill new life into the 
southern country, will develop important interests, and enable busy commerce and elegant leisure to 
enjoy the grand harbor and lovely climate of San Diego. 

San DiKGo and San Bernardino Railroad.— Several years since, when it was believed the Southern 
Pacific Railroad would be constructed via Fort Y'uma, San Gorgonio Pass, and San Bernardino to San 
Francisco, the San Diego and San Bernardino Railway Company was organized with the design of inter- 
cepting the road at the latter place. In its aid San Diego County has voted a subsidy of tlOO,000 and San 
Bernardino S5n,000. The distance between the two towns is one hundred and twelve miles, and the esti- 
mated cost and equipment of the road is 12,000,000. The route is generally favorable, and the country 
traversed exceedingly fertile. San Luis Rey, Temecula. and Riverside, are on the route, and the valley of 
San Bernardino is one of the most lovely and productive in the State, requiring only the railroad to furnish 
a market. These San Diego roads have not been prosecuted with the energy hoped for, but the recent 
development of great mineral wealth in the vicinity of the routes traversed, will be a great inducement to 
their completion. 

San Pedro and Los Angeles Railroad.— Los Angeles is becoming the center of an important system 
of railroads, taking even the prospective lead of San Diego, with all its advantages of a safe and commo- 
dious harbor, as chief of the southern system. The pioneer railroad ot the south is the busy one connect- 
ing the city of Los Angeles with the port of San Pedro, eighteen miles in length. This was constructed in 
181)4, by the city and private capital combined, but is now controlled by the Directors of the Central 
Pacific Railroad Company, as one of the important branches of their Southern Pacific Division. Recently 
great activity has been manifested by the Railroad Company in keeping pace with the rapid development 



PAHITSWOETH & CLAM, Fire Insurance Agents for Pacific Coast, San Franciscc 



Shoninger Organs, Sole Agency at SEAT'S Music Store, 105 Kearny St., S. P. 



CALIFORNI A — G ENERAL DESCRIPTION. 81 



of the southern section of California. Four railroads now radiate from the city, and other lines are in 
contemplation. 

Thk Los Angelks and San Fernando will form the southern link of the San Joaquin Valley branch of 
the Central Pacific, and now connects with stages from the latter, leaving about one hundred and forty 
miles of stage travel on the land route from San Francisco. This road has a length of twenty-one miles 
running north to the new and rising town of San Fernando. 

Thk Los Angeles and San Bernvrdino is the local name of the extreme southern branch of this 
Division of the Central Pacific. This is rapidly extending into the great Colorado desert on its way 
to Fort Yuma and beyond, and is now in operation to the new town of Colton. near San Bernardino, 
sixty-three miles from Los Angeles. The route is via the San Gorgonio Pass, the Coahuilla Valley in 
the great desert, and to Fort Yuma, on the Colorado Kiver. 

The Los Angeles and Anaheim Railroad runs southwesterly, via Los Niotos, and the fertile valley 
of the San Gabriel, and has a length of about twenty-seven miles. A portion of this, from Los Angeles to 
Los Xietos, a distance of eighteen miles, has been running since 1873, the balance was completed in 1875. 

The Los Angeles and Independenpe Railroad is a proposed narrow-gauge imperatively called for 
by the great and rapidly increasing trade of the mining region east of the Sierra, particuliirlv those of 
Inyo County. Two routes are proposed, one via Spadra and the Cajon Pass near San Bernardino, having 
a distance of two hundred and twenty-two miles; the other, via San Fernando and the Soledad I'ass, with 
a length of two hundred and nine miles. The Los Angeles and Santa Monica Railroad is designed hs a 
portion 'of the Los Angeles and Independence road, and is in course of construction in Soptomber, 
1875, with prospects of its early completion. This will have a length of fifteen miles, and will connect 
the new sea port of Santa Monica with Los Angeles, the commercial center of the south. 

NEVADA. 

Virginia and Truckke Railroad.— The enterprising capitalists of Virginia City at an early dav saw the 
necessity of cheaper transportation than teams afforded for the immense ciuantitios of ores minedj and the 
wood, timber, and merchandise consumed in the destructive oiieration of mining on the groat Com^tock 
vein, therefore, as soon as the route of the Central Pacific Railroad was decided upon, the design was con- 
ceived of connecting by rail the mining region with the water-powers afforded bv the two rivers, the Car 
son and the Truckee, also with the great trunk railroad. For this the Virginia aiid Truckeo Railroad Com 




*<J 



following to Carson, twentj'-one miles. The whole road was finished in June, 1872, and through trains run 
thenceforward. The through transportation of passengers and merchandise employ three trains daily, 
and the Carson Division from six to thirty trains, making the road one of the most remunerative in the 
world. 

Nevada Central Railroad. — This road has its initial point among the mines of Pioche, whence 
it winds over the range of hills south of the town, and descends southeasterly to the valley at Bullionville. 
It is for the transportation of ores, chiefly, that the road is constructed, although it is designed to extend 
it eastward to connect with the Utah Southern, or other railroad pushing southward, as is eontemiilated, 
from Salt Lake to Colorado, or to the Pacific Ocean at San Diego. The comiianv bears tlie name of' 
Nevada Central, though, locally, the work is designated as the Pioche and Bullionville Railroad. The 
gauge of this road is of the popular standard on this coast, being three feet in width of track, having 
ties five feet in length, laid two feet apart, and rails weighing one hundred and thirty pounds for the 
usual length. j 

The Palisade and Eureka Railroad belongs to the narrow-gauge system, and will connect the mining ! 
town of Eureka with the Central Pacific at Palisade. Some thirty miles were completed and put in oper- 
ation in 1874, and in Soptember, 1875, some sixty miles were completed and in operation. The work pro- 
gresses with the expectation of completing the whole, a distance of eighty miles, in 1875. 

UTAH. 

The railroads of Utah, in operation and projected, centering at Salt Lake City, may be regarded as 
constituting a subsidiary system, contributing to, while independent of, the Central and Union Pacrfic, 
which constitute the main trunk of the central system. First in importance of the railroads of Utah is the ' •-* 
trans-continental, formed of the Union and Central Pacific, which connect at Ogden. j f^ 

The Utah Central Railroad.— Salt Lake City was severely affected by the construction of the Pacific ^ 
Railroad, at some distance north of her, but her leading citizens, as' energetic and enterprising in this m 
crisis as in the settlement of the desert, at once remedi'^d the injury by the construction of the Utah Cen- 
tral Railroad. This road connects with the Pacific Railroad at Ogden, where the two sections of that great *^ 
thoroughfare unite, and runs south thirty-six and one-half miles to Salt Lake City, passing the villages of ^. 
Kaysville, Farmington, and Centerville. It was constructed in 18i>!», by tho people of the section and P* 
under the leaders of the Mormon Church, who still retain its management. j ^^ 

Utah Southern Railroad. — This road, commencing at Salt Lake, where it connects with the Utah 
Central, leads southerly, and is now completed to Lohi, in Utah County, a distance of HI miles, but tho 
surveys and grading extend to Prove, seventeen miles further. It is i)ro|iosed to exti»nd this road south- 
erly, through the Territory and to the Colorado River, and possibly to the Pacific Ocean, at San Diego, 
Eassing about eighty miles east of Pioche, which is three hundred and fifty-seven miles southwest of Salt 
lake. 

American Fork Railroad. — The pioneer narrow-gauge, for general business, has been built from 
Lehi, where it connects with tho Utah Southern to American Fork Canon, a distance of thirty-.*ix miles. 
This enters one of tho rich mining districts of the Wasatch Range, and is now cuiiii)loted as far as Deer 
Creek. 

Utah Northern Railway. — This is a narrow-gauge, from the Central Pacific at Brigham .lunclion, to 
extend northward through tho fertile Bear River and Cache Valleys fur tho accommodation of the trade 
for Idaho and Montana. The road extends to Franklin, on Bear River, twenty-two miles north of Lojran, 
and within a few miles of the line of Utah and Idaho, having a total length of seventy-five milus. These 
roads— The Utah Northern, Central, and Southern— constitute an important chain runningalongtho western 
base of the Wasatch range of mountains, having a total length of about one hundred and sevonty-tivo miles. 

With this we close the review of tho railroads of tho Pacific Coast. This grand stylo of liigh way is one 
of the noblest inventions of tho ago, and is rapidly coming into use wherever man journeys or goods aro 
transported. The projected roads aro almost innumerable, and we may expect to see the diy when every 
country road will be supplied with the smooth and unfailing iron rail. 



A. ROMAN & CO., Publishers, Booksellers, and Stationers, 11 Montgomery St., S. P. 
6 



D. W. Laird, San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



82 PACIFIC COAST 


BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 


QUARTZ MILLS. 

The number of quartz mills enumerated in the following table, compiled from tho County Assessor's 
returns of 1S71. to which are added a few erected during tho year 1875, is throe hundred and ninety, of 
which one hundred and ninety-two are propelled by steam, one hundred and eighty-three by water, and 
seventeen by steam and water. Tho cost of these mills range from $1,000 to SJ75,000, with from two to 
eighty stamps each. Nevada County is the loading quartz county of the State, and next in importance 
are the counties of Amador, Calaveras, El Dorado, Placer, Sierra and Tuolumne. During the present 
vear several large and expensive mills have been erected, or are in course of construction, in ditforont 
portions of tho State, among which may be mentioned that of tho Surprise Valley Mining Company's, of 
twenty stamps. !it Panamint; tho Sumner G. M. Company's, of eighty stamps, at Kernville, and the Gold 
Mountain G. M. Company's, of 40 stamps, at Bear Valley, San Bernardino County. In Inyo County, and 
the section bordering on the State of Nevada, are several smelting furnaces of large capacity, for the 
reduction of base metal ores. In the table are a number of mills designated by stars, which were erected 
for the purpose of crushing cement, but at present very fow are in operation. 

TABLE OF QUAKTZ MILLS, 
With the Location, Name, Cost, Date of Erection, Number of Stamps, Occupant's Name, etc., of each. 


Location. 

• 


NameofMiU. 


2,3 


B? 

■3 


> 

■-1 


CO 

a> ° o 
■-1 


Cost. 


Gold 

or 

Silver. 


Present Occupants. 


ALPINE COUNTY. 

Main Carson River 




1869 
ISbH 
18t)8 

isatj 

181)6 
1864 

1856 
1871 

1857 
1856 
1873 
1860 
1857 
1865 
1869 
1868 
1862 
1857 
1861 
1875 
1861 
1871 
1858 
1858 
1S6) 

1859 
1866 
1859 
1865 
1838 
1865 
1865 
1862 
1865 
1863 
1860 
1855 
1860 
1864 
1865 

1874 
1868 
1868 
1866 
1873 
1865 
1873 
186i 
1856 
1868 
1868 


10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
6 

10 
20 
8 
40 
20 
20 
16 
10 
12 
20 
10 
60 
16 
10 
10 
20 
16 
10 
40 
20 
16 
20 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
12 
20 
10 
10 
20 

"i5" 

5 
4 
8 
5 
4 

12 
4 
4 

12 


"T 
...„. 

1 
I 

""i" 
} 


water 
steam 

water 

steam 
water 

steam 

s & w 
water 
s <fe w 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 

steam 

water 

s & w 
water 

S ife w 

water 
s & w 
water 
steam 
water 

s <fe w 

steam 

water 

steam 

water 
steam 
water 
steam 

water 


$ 
35,000 
50,000 
40,000 
40,000 
36,000 
15,900 

10,000 
10,000 

6,000 
80,000 
10,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
12,000 

5,000 
100,000 
10,000 
10,000 
10,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
100,000 
10,000 
15,000 
20,000 
10,000 
12,000 

9,000 
10,000 
20,000 

8,000 

8,000 
20,000 

4,000 
15,000 
20,000 

9,000 

8,000 

5,000 
5,000 

10,000 
5,000 
5,000 

20,000 
4,000 

15,900 

30,000 


Silver 


C. B. Coleman, Manager. 
Jones, Wade & Co. 

B. Hunter, Manager. 
L. Chalmers, Manager. 

Pittsburg Company. 

W. Johns, Supt. 
J. Treglorn, Supt. 
A. Hayward. 
Keystone Con. M. Co. 
J. Treglorn, Supt. 
Plymouth M. Co. 
W. H. Hooper & Co. 
Philadelphia Co- 
Haley & Hardenburg. 
Kennedy Mining Co. 
Kearsing Brothers. 
Oneida Mining Co. 
Zeile Mining Co. 
Gold Mountain Co. 
Amador Con. Mining Co. 
L. R. Poundstone, Supt. 
Amador Con. Mining Co. 
R. C. Downs. 
Con. Amador Mining Co. 
S. D. R. Stewart, Supt. 
S. D. R. Stewart, Supt. 
Amador Mining Co. 

C. T. Wheeler. 
California Furnace Co. 
J. B. Pine, Supt. 
Woodcock & Co. 

P. A. Chute. 
Rose & Co. 
William Johns, Supt. 
McLane & Sorocco. 
Fogus & Co. 
L. R. Poundstono. 
McLane & Sorocco. 
H. Shultz. 
Lawton & Co. 

Electric Mining Co. 

Perkins & Co. 

E. W. Slater & Co. 

J. W. Riant. 

Derrick & Wells. 

E. C. Ross & Co. 

V. Poumarats & Co. 

Nisbet & Co, 

Croville G. & S. M. Co. 

Grummet & StempeL 

Reese & Perkins. 














Silver Creek 

Star 


It 11 




AMADOR COUNTY. 




Gold 




Bunker Hill 


11 11 




11 It 






Gover 




11 


Potosi 






Casco 






11 




" , 




Zeile Mining Co 


Lower Rancheria 


Tellurium 














11 11 


Con. Amador 


11 11 


Lincoln Q. M. Co 


11 11 


11 11 




11 (1 












11 




11 


Golden Gate 


11 


Italian 


11 




•1 




11 




It 


Pioneer 


t« 


tt 




BUTTE COUNTY. 










<i 








Inskip 




Porter Mining Co 






Nisbet 




Smith <fe Sparks 




It It 























TAMSWOETH & CLAES want good Agents in all principal places. 



Best Piano Tuners at GEAY'S, 105 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



CALIFORNI A Q UARTZ MILLS. 



83 



Quartz Mills — Continued. 



Location. 



CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

Altaville 

Angel's Camp 



Name of Mill. 



Blue Mountain. 
Carsons 



Cherokee Flat. 
Eldorado 



Fourth Crossing. 

Indian Creek 

Lower Calaveritas. 
Lower Rich Gulch . 
Mokelumne Hill.... 
Mokelumne River.. 
Mosquito 



Railroad Flat., 



Rag Town Gulch- 
San Andreas 



San Antonio.. 
Sandy Gulch . 
Sheep Ranch. 
Skull Flat..... 



KL DORADO COUNTY. 

Cold Spring 

Coloma 

Cosumnes 



Diamond Springs.. 
El Dorado 



Georgetown.... 

Georgia Slide.. 
Grizzly Flat... 



Lyonsdale.. 
Kelsey 



Placerville . 



Shingle Springs., 
Smith's Flat 



Soap Weed.... 
Texas Hill.... 
Voleanoville., 
White Rock.. 



FRESNO COUNTY. 

Coarse Gold Gulch. 
Fine Gold Gulch 



Altaville Q. M. Co. 

Billings 

Doe & Bro 

Leeper 

Mattson 

Heckendorn 

Finnegan & Co 

.Stevenot 

Union Quartz Co ..., 

Cherokee 

Irvine 

Rodesino 

Thorpe 

Calaveras 

McKee 

Paloma 

Lamphoar 

i'hoss 

Garland's 

Glencoe 

Seigler's. 

Clark 

Hepburn 

Lewis & Bros 

Petticoat 

Wolverine 

Ilamsdale 

ilathgeb 

Lloyd Bros 

Woods 

Harris 

b'erguson & Co 

Zacatero , 






Jolumbus 

tsabollG.&S. M. Co. 
Stillwagon & Norton 

Tulloch & Ault 

•Cook's 

?ort Yuma 

davilah 

uogtown 

.Montezuma 

V.Y. El Dorado.. 

nigar Loaf 

Union 

vVildor 

Clipper G.&S.M.Co. 

vVoodside 

Slue Rock 

<Jagle 

Mount Pleasant... 

lilue Ledge 

L^lymouth 

•it. Lawrence 



1863 

181)8 
1860 
1874 
1871 
1873 
18U() 
1864 
186,5 
1860 
186.5 
1872 
IWl 
1871 



xoldner 

Harmon 

less' 

Lioafers Hollow 

Lyon 

Manning 

"^ew York 

'acifie 

'overty Point 

Using Hope 

ihepherd'a 

Cray's 

'Hook and Ladder.... 

Iranite 

Jobb&Co ." 

•Stewart's 

''rench 

Live Oak 

Jead Broke 



Coxas Flat.. 
lubort's .... 



1868 
1874 
1864 
1873 
1864 
1872 
1869 
1869 
1870 
1869 
1872 
1872 
1873 
1870 
1869 
1860 
1872 
1873 



1866 
1864 
1866 
1866 
1866 
1864 
1868 
18,56 
1866 
1865 
1866 
1865 
1865 
1863 
1863 
1866 
1866 
1867 
1864 
1864 
1871 

1873 
1866 
1870 
1866 
1870 
1864 
1862 
1857 
1864 
1870 
1870 
1863 
186(i 
1860 
1866 
1866 
1859 
1866 
1870 



1865 
18fi8 



m 3 ® 



Cost. 



water 



steam 
water 



steam 
water 
steam 



water 

steam 
water 
w & s 
water 

steam 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 



water 



water 



steam 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 



water 

steam 
water 

steam 

water 
steam 

water 
steam 
water 
steam 



water 
steam 
water 

steam 
water 



steam 



15,000 

15,000; 

10,000 

1,.500 

800 

12,000 

10,000 

15,000 

30,000 

8,000 

6,000 

15,000 

2,000 

20,000 

4,000 

80,000 

8,000 

6,000 

12,000 

8,000 

10,000 

6,000 

6,000 

5,000 

20,000 

15,000 

1,500 

8,000 

2,000 

5,000 

5,000 

5,000 

12,000 



Gold 

or 

Silver, 



6,000 
1,,500 
4,000 
1,000 



25,000 

9,000 

60,000 

20,000 

15,000 

12,000 

2,.500 

12,000 

6,000 

1,000 

12,000 

60,000 

60,000 



G.&S, 
Gold 



60,000 

5,000 

20,000 

1,.500 

12,000 

2,500 

5,000 

10,000 

15,000 

8,000 

2,,500 

3,000 

1,.500 

500 

2,000 

4,000 

3,000 

40,000 

2,000 

500 



5,000 
7,000 



Present Occupants. 



Larco, Prince & Co. 

E. Billings. 

J. Doe & Bro. 

K. Loepor. 

J. Mattson. 

Heckendorn Mining Co. 

l^innegan & Co. 

G. K. Stevenot. 

H. McMillan. 

D. D. Deraarest, 

William Irvine. 

G. Rodesino. 

W. Thorpe & Sons. 

Calaveras G. M. Co. 

McKee. 

Gwin Mining Co. 

D. C. Lamphear. 

Lewis Brothers. 

C. J. Garland. 

Glencoe Mining Co. 

J.F. Seigler&Co. 

W. V. Clark. 

W. Hepburn. 

Lewis & Brothers. 

Petticoat Mining Co. 

Wolverine Mining Co. 

G. Tiscomia. 
Lloyd Brothers. 
V. Compere. 
A. M. Harris. 
Ferguson & Co. 
Bateman & Co. 



C. W. Brewster. 
Stillwagon & Norton. 
Copper Mine. 
J. Cooke & Co. 

— Perkins, Supt. 
Pocahontas G. M. Co. 

— Richmond, Agent. 
N. Y. El Dorado Co. 
C. McGuiro, Supt. 
W. E. Church, Supt. 

B. W. Wilder. 

R. Cushman, Supt. 
Ash, Lane & Knox. 
John Hines & Co. 
William Bigler. 

A. M. Stetson, Supt. 

— Potter, Supt. 
Bateman Macnevins, 

& Burke. 
Goldner, Webber & Co. 
Harmon G. & S. M. Co. 
W. F. .less. 

C. W. Moulthrop, Supt. 
H. L. Robinson, Supt. 
Blain, Anderson & Co. 
F. Reed. 

J. M. Douglas. 
Burdick & White. 
J. Blair. 

Shepherd & AVitten, 
Gray Brothers & Son. 
Anderson &, Redd. 
Granite, Partridge & Lucas. 
Cobb & Co. 
Stewart & HalL 
French Company. 
Ward Brothers. 
Burlingham & Jayco. 



— Rogers. 
N. Hubert. 



^ 



o 
o 

o 



o 



A. ROMAN & C0„ Medical, Theological, and Scientific Books, 11 Montg'y St., S.P. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



84 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Quartz Mills — Continued. 



Location. 



INYO COUNTY. 

Cerro Gordo 



Chrysopolis City . 
Fish Springs 



■TzJ Koarsarge District.. 



Lone Pine , 

Owens River . 
Fanamint 



Swansea. 



KERN COUNTY. 

Erskine Creek 

Green Horn 

Havilah 



Kernville. 



Keysville.. 
Long Tom . 
Sageland .. 



Walker's Basin.. 



KLAMATH COUNTY. 

Big Bend, Salmon Riv. 

Black Bear Gulch 

Eddy's Gulch 



Jackass Gulch. 



MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

Bear Creek 



Bear Valley. 
Bondurant .. 

Buckeye 



Buffalo Gulch.... 

Chimesal 

Gentry's Gulch. 

Hites Cove 

Hornitos 



Mariposa Creek.. 
Maxwell Creek... 



Merced River , 

Mount Gaines 

Mount Ophir 

Princeton 

Snow Creek 

Sweetwater 

Temperance Creek. 

Whitlocks... '. 



MONO COUNTY. 

Benton 



Bodie 

Montgomery . 
Rough Creek. 



Sunshine Valley. 



Name of Mill. 



Belshaw's Furnace... 

Beaudry's 

Oro Fine 

McMurry's 

AVestervillo's 

Kearsarge Mill 

Silver Sprout 

Wolfskin & Co .... 

Eclipse 

Jacobs Mill 

Surprise Valley... 



Owens LakeS. L. Co. 



Erskine Creek 

Alpine G. M. Co.... 

Howe 

Marsh & Kennedy. 
N. Y. & Clear Creek 

Mining Co 

Rand A Co.'s 

Caldwell 

Sumner 

Wadleigh 

Mammoth 

Long Tom 

Esperanza 

St. John M. Co.... 
Joe Walker 



Abrams& Co.'s . 

Black Bear 

Klamath 

Live Yankee 

Morning Star..., 
Evening Star 



Bobbio's , 

Chittenden's 

Bear Valley 

Hesleps 

Shimer & Co.'s 

Neal's 

Wilccx's , 

Feliciana Vein 

Robinson & Co.'s 

Coward's 

Hites 

Hornitos G. & S. 

Mining Co 

Francis 

Mariposa 

Maxwell G. & S. 

Mining Co 

Benton Mills 

Mount Gaines , 

Mount Ophir 

Princeton 

Buckingham Mount, 

Malone's 

Barrett's 

Lafayette Mining Co. 
Cunninghams , 



Comanche 

Williams 

W. J. Williams & Co, 

Empire 

Pioneer Mill 

Gregors 

Lockberg & Walker. 
Bechtel & Starks 



1868 
I8G'J 
18l)( 
18()7 
181)7 
i8t)t) 
1871 
18li'J 
1870 
187J 
X875 



ISlJy 



1866 
1866 
186.5 
1866 

1866 
186.5 
1862 
1875 
186.5 
1866 
1865 
1869 
1868 
1866 



186.5 
1872 
1864 
1861 
1873 
1870 



1865 
1861 
1855 
1866 
1863 
1869 
1870 
1865 
1861 
I860 
1874 

1860 
1856 
1861 

1864 
18.58 
1862 
18-58 
1860 
18fJ 
1863 
1860 
1866 
1863 



1872 
1874 
1871 



1869 
1867 

1874 



NAPA COUNTY. 

Silverado Calistoga 1874 10 steam 20,000 G.&S. Calistoga G.'& S. M. Co. 






water 



steam 



water 
steam 



water 



steam 



Cost. 



steam 20,000 
5,000 



water 
steam 



water 
steam 



water 

steam 
water 
steam 



water 
steam 



water 
steam 



steam 



;%,000 
1,200 
1,000 
50,000 
30,000 
14,000 
75,000 
1.5,0U0 
75,000 
25,000 
25,000 



5,000 
30,000 

5,000 
20,000 

20,000 
16,000 
5,000 
1.50,000 
15,000 
35,000 
20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
25,000 



30,000 
18,000 
17,000 
3,000 
13,000 



4,000 

10,000 

20,000 

10,000 

12,000 

4,000 

3,000 

6,000 

4,000 

25,000 

40,000 

.30,000 
40,000 
82,000 

60,000 

120,000 

13,000 

95,000 

40,000 

5,000 

8,000 

5,000 

5,000 

22,000 



40,000 
10,000 
30,000 
1.30,000 
5,000 
1,000 
2,000 
5,000 



Gold 

or 

Silver 



Silver 

G.&S. 
Gold 

G. & S. 

Silver 
U. &S. 

Silver 
G. &S 
Silver 



Gold 



Silver 



Gold 



Present Occupants. 



M. W. Belshaw & Co. 

V. Beaudry. 

Now York Company. 

J. W. McMurry. 

J_. R. AVesterville. 

Kearsarge Co. 

Silver Sprout. 

Wolfskil) & Co. 

Eclipse Mining Co. 

Jacobs A Co. 

Surprise V. Mill & Water Co 

Stewart, Jones & Co. 

Owens Lake S. L. Co. 



Andrews & Welch. 
Alpine G. M. Co. 
W. B. Douglas & Co. 
L. Wattiez. 

A. B. Pendleton & Co. 
A. A. Hand & Co. 
E. R. Burke. 
Sumner G. M. Co. 
Sumner G. & S. M. Co. 
Mammoth Mining Co. 
H. Burdett. 
Esperanza Mining Co. 
St. John Mining Co. 
Joe \Valker Mining Co. 



Abrams & Co. 
B. B. G. M. Co. 
Klamath Co. 
John Daggett. 
J. B. Jenkin & Co. 
A. Myers. 



Juan Bobbio. 
George Chittenden. 
Mariposa Company. 
Campbell & Turner. 
Shimer & Co. 

H. Neal. 
Cahon & Co. 
A. Gagliardo. 
Robinson & Co. 
Hasloe Mining Co. 

Hornitos G. & S. M Co. 
Francis Mining Co. 
Mariposa Co. 

Maxwell G. & S. M. Co. 
Mariposa Company. 
J. Spagnoli. 
Mariposa Company. 
Mariposa Company. 
G. Bernhard. 
James Malone. 
Joseph Barrett. 
Lafayette Mining Co. 
L. Cunningham. 



Albert Mack. 
A. B. Williams. 
W. J. Williams & Co. 
Empire M. & M Co. 
C. H. Aaron. 
Frank Gregor. 
William O'Hara. 
Bechtol & Stark. 



PAENSWORTH & CLAEK, Pire Insurance Agents for Pacific Coast, San Prancisco. 



GEAY'S New Music Store, 105 Kearny Street, San Prancisco. 



CALIFORNI A — Q UARTZMILLS. 85 


Quartz Mills— Continued. 


Location. 


; fName of Mill. 




72 

3 p 


s 




Cost. 


Gold 

or 
Silver. 


Present Occupants. 


NEVADA. COUNTY. 


Eureka M. &M. Co... 
Birchville M. & 


1886 

1868 
1866 
18()7 
1867 
1866 
1863 
1872 
1869 

1865 

1868 
1868 

1856 

1862 

1867 
1870 
1870 
1866 

1872 
1864 
1853 
1864 
1866 


5 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

10 

15 
10 

12 

8 
10 
10 
20 
30 

10 
30 
20 

8 

8 

8 

15 
35 

4 
8 
8 

"ib" 
4 

8 

10 
5 

8 

20 

8 

8 

5 
10 

2 
10 

4 
10 

...„. 

20 

12 

20 

8 

8 

10 

20 
It) 
10 
4 




[vater 

;team 

ivater 
steam 

water 

steam 

water 
steam 

water 
steam 
water 
steam 

water 
steam 

water 

s.&w. 
steam 
water 

steam 

steam 
water 
steam 

s.&w. 
water 

steam 

water 

" 


3,000 

15,000 
15,000 
10,000 
15,000 
10,000 
15,000 
4,000 
6,000 

7,000 

10,000 
6.000 

30,000 

22,000 
20,000 
10,000 
25,000 
125,000 

10,000 
30.000 
20,000 
8,00U 
20,000 
12,000 

25,000 
175,000 

2,000 
3,000 
8,000 
3,000 
3,000 
6,000 
5,000 
10,000 
40,000 
2,500 
12,000 

8,000 
6,000 

10,000 

20,000 

5,000 

3,000 

3,000 

15,000 

15,000 
2,000 

10,000 
2,500 

12,000 
5,000 
3,000 
5,000 

as.ooo 

65,000 
15,000 
lO.OOC 

y,ooc 

60,001 

20,00( 

lO.OOt 

7,00( 

3,00 


Gold 
<i 

Gold 

G.&S 
) Gold 


Hawley Brothers. 

W.T.Thomas, Supt. 
R. C. Black, Supt. 

C. AUenberg, Agent. 
Thomas Lloyd, Supt 
W. J. Gunn, 

J. C. Merrill & Co., Agents. 

D. Ale,xander, Supt. 

E. D. Evans, Supt. 

V. G. Bell, Supt. 

V. G. Bell, Supt 
V. G. Bell, Supt 

A. E. Davis, Supt. 

H. Sylvester, Supt. 
A. B. Brady, Supt 
J. Miller, Supt. 
Goddard & Co. 
David Watt, Supt 

M. McDonough, Agent 
William Watt, Supt. 
W. J. Crase, Supt 
J. A. Townsend, Supt 
W. Loutzenheiser, Supt 

Frank G. Beatty, Agent. 
Ed. Coleman, Supt. 

Hermann Kruso, Supt 
George Lord, Supt. 
Estate John W.Larimer. 
Dorsey & Derboc, 
Adrian & Co. 
Eureka G. M. Co. 
Idaho Q. M. Co. 
R. Fryer & Co. 
Stephen Moore, Supt 
J. S. Wynn, Agent. 
J. L. Smith, Supt 

Joseph Perrin, Supt. 

Thomas Walker, Supt 
James K. Byrne, Agent 
Carney & Co. 
Carney & Co. 
0. Maltman, Supt. 

Thomas Pattinson, Agent 

J. L. Holland, Supt 

Jacob Bachtal, Supt 

California Con. G. M. Co. 

Jones & Keith. 

S. T. Murchie, Supt 

0. Maltman. 

Providence G. & S M. Co. 

Murchie Bros. 

J ohn Berry, Supt 

John Parrott 
Bruce B. Lee, Supt. 
James Kitts. 
Edwin Tilloy, Supt 
C. P. Purring ton, Supt. 

R.C. Walrath.Supt 
C. P. Purrington, Supt. 
George C. Spocner, Supt 
George C. Spooner, Supt 


Eureka Township 


Black & Young's 

Liberty Q. M. Co 

Mutual G. M. Co 

Rising Star G.M. Co. 
StarQ. M. Co 


Big Slide M. Co 

Kansas M. Co 




tl t* 


'•'Milton Mining & 
Water Co 


4( it 


'•'Milton Mining & 
Water Co 


WEVADA COUNTY. 


^Nebraska M. Co 

Allison Ranch 




•'Alta Hill Gravel 

Mining Co 

Coe G. Minins Co 

•■'Dartmouth M. Co... 
E. Eureka G. M. Co. 

Empire G. M. Co 

Enterprise Gravel 


" ::::::::; .".■■.:: 


It i> 


•1 tt 


•• •; 


Eureka G. M. Co 

Gold Hill 


11 <• 


Greenhorn G. M. Co. 


I I ::::::::::::::: 


'■'Hope Grav. M. Co... 
Howard Hill Gold 


It 11 


Idaho Q. M. Co 


1868 


>( '• 


••'Independent Gravel 


„ „ 


Kentucky G. M. Co. 


1873 


li 11 


<( >• 


Metallurgical Works 
North Star 


18a2 
1865 
1865 

1875 
18.54 
1870 
1865 

1871 
1863 

1864 
18'ii; 
1866 
1866 
1874 

1865 
18i;7 
1865 
1873 
1874 
1875 
18IJ0 
1874 
1863 
1861 

1863 
1874 
1854 
1864 
1868 

1871. 
1874 
186.1 
186(] 


11 •> 


■1 <> 


11 It 


•1 11 


11 11 


11 11 


Oriental Mining Co... 
Orleans Gold M. Co. 
Osborn Hill Con. G. 


11 11 


11 11 


11 11 


Slate Ledge M. Co. 
Town Talk Gravel 


11 11 


11 11 


Union Hill 


Hunt's Hill 


■'Carney & Co's 








Metallurgical Works 

U. S. Grant Mill k 

Mining Co 


Nevada Township 

X 11 

North San Juan 


Cal. Con. G. M. Co.... 


Gold Tunnel 


Jones & Keith 

Lone Star Mining Co. 
Metallurgical Works 


Nevada Quart/, M. Co 

New York & Grass 

Valley Gold M. Co. 

Occidental M. Co 




Pittsburgh G. M. Co 
Providence G. & S. 


Wyoming G. M. Co 
'•'American M. Co 


'•'Cement Mills. 



__ _— — — — — 

A. EOMAIT & CO., Blank Books and Counting House Stationery, 11 Moi\.t. St., S. P. 



J'ewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Hetail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merchant 



86 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Quartz Mills — Continued. 



Location. 



NKVADA COUNTY (Cont.) 

Kough and Ready Twp 
Washington Township 



PLACER COUNTY. 

Auburn 



Name of Mill. 



Bath 

I Colfax 

I Crater HiU., 

Damascus... 



Devil's Caiion.. 
Forest Hill 



CtoU Hill... 
Gold Run.. 
Neivcastle . 
Ophir 



Secret Canon 

Shipley Ranch 

Stewart's Flat 

Whiskey Diggins. 



PLCMAS COUNTY. 

Antelope 

Argentina 



Cherokee 

Dixie 

Eureka 

Eagle Gulch 

Franklin Hill 

Genessee Valley.. 
Greenville ,. 



Indmn Valley. 

It !• 



Jamisoj) Creek'.'.'.'.',".',',',!, 



Mohawk Valley,, 

Round Valley 

Woif, Creek. 



San Francisco Cop- 
per Mining Co 

Fidelity Q. M. Co 

Locke & McCurdy 

Marietta Mining Co. 
Tecumseh Q. M. Co.. 



Eclipse 

Green 

Rough Gold Co... 

Rising Sun 

St. Patrick 

'•'Damascus C. M. 

Pioneer 

•'■'Missouri Co 

'^Baltimore 

•Big Spring Co... 

•^Hope Co 

Oro Co 

Gold Hill 

••'Indiana Hill 

Schnabcl's 

Pugh's 

Weity's , 

St. Lawrence 

Secret Spring 

Shipley , 

Stewart's Flat 



SA» BEa>rAHDrNo co. 

Bear Valley 

Holcomb Valley 

Ivenpah 

Mojave ,. _ 



SAN DIBGO COUNTY. 

Banner City 



Branson District.. 

Ouvamaca. _ 

Julian City 



SHASTA COT,-NTY. 

French Gulch 



S. F. Clear C reek.. 
Spring Cree'i 



Butterton & Co.... 

Hobert & Co 

Moore's 

Baker 

Perkin's 

Eureka 

Eagle Gulch 

Franklin Hill Co., 

Genessee 

Greenville 

Lone Star 

i^rescent 

InJiar? Valley 

Pennsylva.nia 

M3.mmoth "• 

^0 Co 

4ng & Co 



Wojyerjne,, 



Bear Valley., 

Melius 

McFarlane... 
Green Lode... 



Golden Chariot.. 

Pionoor 

Ready Relief..... 

McFhorson 

Stone Wall 

McMechan's , 

Owen's 

Parson 

Reynold's 

Wilson's 



Highland 

AVashington . 



Live Oak. 



1872 
1870 
187:i 
181)8 
18B4 



1872 
1871 
18li.5 
18(Jit 
1870 
18(J7 
18.S3 

i8ad 

18(ji) 

i8a« 

18(it) 
186 ti 
18t)8 
18tj.5 
1872 
18t)3 
186.5 
lStJ7 
18ti4 



18SJ 
18btj 



1870 
18(5.5 
1868 
18.52 
1874 

18a' 

1S()2 
18tJ2 
181)2 
18t)i) 
18ij::i 
18!j3 
1851 
1&52 

I'm 

18bi 
1874 



1875 
18(50 
1874 



D O 

•o • 



187.3 
1870 
1874 
1870 
1871 
1870 
1870 
1870 
1871 
1872 



1863 
1851 
1872 
1874 



23: 



steam 
wilier 



water 
steam 



water 
steam 



water 

steam 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 



water 
steam 



water 



S.& w, 
water 



steam 



water 



steam 
water 



Cost. 



15,000 
8,0(H) 
8,000 
10,000 
16,000 



5,000 
8,000 

12,000 
6,000 

20,000 

8,m) 

12,0<X) 
12,000 
7,000 
10,000 
15,000 
12,000 
4,000 
8,000 
20,000 
2,000 
6,000 
8,000 
10,000 
8,0<X) 
3,000 
6,000 



2,000 
1.7.50 



steam 



water 



steam 



steam 
water 
steam 



25,000 

5,000 

100,000 

2,000 

2,000 

1,.500 

6,000 

7,000 

60,000 

20,000 

20.000 

20,000 

3,000 

2,000 

20,000 

2,000 



Gold 

or 
Silver. 



Copp'r 
Gold 



Present Occupants. 



100,000 
15,.W 
30,000 
1,000 



15,000 
5.000 

15.000 
6,000 

20,000 
4,000 
5,000 
3,000 
4,000 
4,000 



10,000 
10,000 



Gold 

Silver 
Gold 



G.&S. 
Gold 



G. F. Deetkin, Supt. 



Geo. W. Kid & Co. 
T. D. Woolsey, Agent. 



Eclipse Mining Co. 
(xreen Mining Co. 
Dewey & Burt. 
Rising Sun Co. 
St. Patrick Mining Co. 
Robert Lewis & Co. 
Coleman & Co. 
A. Moore & Co. 
William Northwood. 
J. P. Castner & Co. 
George W. Reamer. 
George W. Reamer, Agent. 
Steven Quinn & Co. 
Indiana Hill C. & M. Co. 

— Schnabel. 

C. D. Pugh & Co. 
Welty & Co. 
Staples & Co. 
Grant & Co. 

— Shipley. 
J. Rogers. 
Menta Co. 



J. B. Butterton. 
Hobert & Co. 
A. P. Moore. 

G. C. Perkins. 

Edwin & Co. 
Franklin Hill Co. 
Genessee Co. 
H. C. Bidwell. 
C. H. Lawrence. 
Crescent Co. 
Indian Valley Co. 
O'Toole & Co. 
Plumas Eureka. 
Plumas Eureka. 
King ii Co. 
Plumas Co. 
Burge & Co. 



Gold Mountain G. M. Co. 
Holcomb V. G. M. Co. 
McFarland Bros. & Co. 
George K Moore. 



Whitney & Co. 
Benshley & Whitney. 
Neyhart & Schuyler. 

Frary & Farley. 
.James McMechan. 
Booth De Freese & Co. 
Parson & Cotton. 
C. M. Reynolds. 
W. Montgomery. 



Thomas Purnell, Supt. 
■I. Syme, Supt. 
Kingsbury & Co. 
John O.Welsh. 



*Ceme nt Mills. 



■PAHrfSWOETH & CLARK represent $10,000,000 of Insurance Capital 



Jhe only Music Engraving House in San Pranoisco is GRAY'S. 105 Keamy St. 



CALIFORNI A — Q UARTZ MILLS. 



87 



Quartz Mills — Continusd. 



Location. 



SIERRA COUNTY. 

Alleghanytown 



American Hill . 



Divide 

Downieville., 



Hog Canon 

Kanaka Creek 

Kanaka Ravine 

Middle Yuba River- 
Mountain House 

Pike City 

Sierra Buttes 



Sierra City . 



Wet Ravine. 
AVolf Creek... 



SISKIIOU COUNTY. 

Greenhorn 

Humbug Creek 



Name of Mill. 



0,3 



Eagle 

21 Quartz M. Co 

American Hill 

Von Humboldt 

Keystone Q. M. Co- 
Gold Bluff 

Leonards 

Red Dog 

Primrose 

Oak Flat 

Kanaka Q. M. Co 

French 

Brush Creek 

Alaska 

Colter's 

Hank's 

Hitchcock 

Independence 

Independence 

Reis 

Chipps 

Phoenix 

Union 

Independence 



Oro Fino 

Quartz Valley.. 



TRTNITY COUNTY. 

East Fork 



TULARE COUNTY. 

White River 



TUOLUMNE COUNTY. 

Blue Gulch 



Cherokee 

Confidence District. 

Deer Creek 

Five Mile Creek 



Jackass Hill 

N. F. Tuolumne River 



Poverty Hill 

Quartz Mountain. 



Raw Hide Ranch 

S. F. Tuolumne River. 
Soulsbyville 



Sullivan & Edgerton 

Eliza 

Adelaide 

Jones 

United Company. 

Johnson's 

Turk's 



1866 
18H.5 
1858 
1870 
1858 
1858 
1869 
1874 
1858 
1868 
1865 
1865 
1868 
1866 
1871 
1872 
1872 
18-58 
187.3 
18.52 
1867 
1868 
1860 
1868 



1874 
1872 
1871 
1869 
1870 
1870 



East Fork . 



Blood & Co.... 

Gafhwiler 

Philadelphia. 
Redtield 



Stanislaus River., 
Sutrar Pine 



Tuolumne River... 
Turn Back Creek.. 

Tuttletown 

Whi.skoy Hill 

Yankee Hill 



Eagle 

Shawmutt 

Sarco 

Confidence 

Deer Creek 

Hazel Dell 

Randall's 

Water's 

Big Canon 

Bonito 

Consuelo 

Grizzly 

Starr King 

Golden Rule 

Knox & Boyle 

Heslop 

App's 

Raw Hide Ranch- 
Santa Maria 

Gilsons 

Soulsby 

River Side Mill.... 

Eureka 

Excelsior 

Lombardo. 

Monitor 

Pirate 

Buchanan 

Laurel Hill 

Patterson's 

Preston's 

Shanghai 



1866 
1867 
18i7 
1866 



1863 

187 

18-58 

1869 

1865 

1864 

1674 

18-59 

18-58 

1866 

1866 

18.59 

1864 

1865 

1868 

1860 

1860 

18-)i 

1871 

185'J 

1858 

1874 

18-59 

1873 

1860 

186M 

1860 

I85!t 

18.57 

18.57 

18.57 

1862 



gz 



steam 
water 
s.&w. 
water 
steam 
water 

steam 

water 
water 

steam 

water 



Cost. 



Gold 

or 

Silver. 



12,000 

4,000 

8,-500 

12,000 

15,000 

14.100 

3,000 

3,000 

15,400 

7,000 

22,-500 

4.000 

20,000 

7,000 

45,000 

28,000 

45,000 

30,000 

30,000 

8,000 

10,000 

5,000 

8,600 

8,000 



water 
steam 
water 



1 water 



steam 



water 

steam 
water 



steam 



s.&w 
steaiu 
etiam 



water 



steam 
water 



10,000 
2,000 

2,000 
2,000 
4,-500 



600 



6,000 
7,000 
10,000 
4,000 



10,000 

10,000 

5.000 

40,000 

8,000 

4,000 

8,000 

5,000 

15,000 

10,000 

20.000 

20.000 

7,000 

15,000 

6,000 

10,000 

20,(M)0 

45,000 

8,000 

8,000 

20,000 

20,000 

20,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,000 

10,(X)0 

3,000 

15,000 

4,-500 

10,000 



Present Occupants. 



Eagle Q. M. Co. 
21 Q. M. Co. 
Young & Co. 
Von Humboldt. 
Kevstone G. Q. M. Co. 
O'Donald & Co. 
Patrick Grant. 
Hode & Johnson. 

Wilcox. 
Manson & Co. 

French Co. 
Cole & Brown. 
Alaska Q. M.Co. 
English Q. M. Co. 
English Q. M. Co. 
Sierra Butte M. Co. 
English Q. M. Co. 
English Q. M. Co. 
English Q. M. Co. 
Manson & Co. 
— Winstead. 
Union Q. M. Co. 
Latreill & Co. 



Sullivan & Edgerton. 
Eli/.a M. & M. Co. 
Warren & Moses. 
McConnell &. McMannuH. 
T. McCann. 
A. M. Johnson. 
F. Turk. 



H. Engle. 



Blood & Co. 
(Not occupied.) 
Burns, Vauxem & Co. 
F. Redfield. 



Eagle Mining Co. 

A. B. Preston, Agent. 

C. Lombardo. 

Confidence Mining Co. 

Deer Crock Mining Co. 

Wing & Co. 

Randall & Co. 

Waters & Co. 

Cobb & Sinton. 

Bonito Co. 

Consuelo Co. 

Gashwiler .& Co. 

R. Inch & Co. 

Golden Rule Mining Co. 

A. B. Preston & Co. 

Heslep A Co. 

App & Waller. 

— Hiiydock, Agent 
L. Gilson, Agent. 
Raymond k Casham. 

M. Johns. 
Murphy & Co. 

— Edwards, Agent, 
Wright & Co. 

C. Lombardo. 
Monitor G. & S. M. Co. 
C. Dorsoy. 

Tuolumne G. & S. M. Co. 
P. Easton. 
J. Corrigan. 
Preston <t App. 
Gashwiler Jk. Co. 



Hi 

> 

cl 

t> 

!^ 
o 

s> 



» 






O 
•©» 

ca 
o 

o 
o 
o 
o 



o 

13* 






m 



p* 



p* 



A. ROMAIT (S; CO., Wedding Invitations engraved and printed, 11 Mont. St., S. P. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



88 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



QUICKSILVER FURNACES. 

Soon nftor tho discovory of gold in California, deposits of cinnabar were found at Now Alamaden, Santa 
Clara County, wliiuh subsoquont di'volopuiunts proved to be of vast extent and exceeding richness. Kor 
several years this mine alone supplied tho gold mines of tho Pueitic coast with quicksilver, oosidos furnish- 
ing large qiKiiititiis Ibr export. In 1850 it yielded 2'i,87.j flasks, but at tho present time tho production does 
not oxcood l"),oou ilasUs annually. Tho Now Idria mine, in Fresno County, was discovered in IS'jii, and 
has since been successfully worked. Tho production of this mine has been from 7,UUU to I'J.OUO flasks per 
annum. Next in importance, if not their equal, is the Kedington mine, located at Knoxville, Napa 
County, from which largo quantities of quicksilver have boon taken since its discovery in 18iil. I'revious 
to I. 72, those were the only quicksilver-producing mines of any note in tho State, but since that period, 
rich deposits of cinnabar have boon discovered in several counties, from Dol Norte in the north to San 
Diego in tho south, and the production of the valuable metal has been largely increased. The counties of 
Santa Clara, Fresno, Napa, Lake, Colusa, Sonoma, Solano, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara are now 
known to contain largo deposits of cinnabar, and in all of them expensive furnaces are being erected, and 
quicksilver mining vigorously prosecuted. The following table contains a list of tho principal quicksilver 
furnaces in operation January, 1875, and tho capacity of each as far as could be ascertained at that date. 

TABLE OF QUICKSILVER FURNACES, 

With the Location, Name, Date of Erection, Capacity, Cost, and Present Occupants. 



Location. 



Name. 



When 
Erect'd 



Capaci- 
ty Tons 
per day 



Cost. 



Present Occupants. 



COLUSA. COUNTY. 

Bear Valley 

Sulphur Creek , 



Wild Goose., 

Abbott 

Buckeye 

Elgin , 



FRESNO COUNTY. 

Little Panoche 

Moody Caiion 

Silver Creek 



Little Panoche.. 
Cerro Gordo .... 
New Idria 



1874 
1874 
1874 
1874 



1874 

1873 
1858 



7,000 
10,000 
10,000 

7,000 



5,000 
10,000 
100,000 



LAKR COUNTY. 

Lower Lake 

Middletown 



Pine Mountain., 



Sulphur Banks 

Great Western 

Koarsage 

Lake County Mine 

American Q. S. Mine., 



NAPA COUNTY. 

Knoxville 

Knoxville 

Manhattan 

Napa Valley 

Pope Valley 



California ... 
Redington ... 
Manhattan . 

OakviJlo 

i-Etna 

Phoenix 

Washington 



1867 
18(i9 
1871 
1872 
1871 
1868 



140,000 
40,000 
10,000 
30,000 
30,000 
7,000 



SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 



SANTA BARBARA COUNTY 

Santa Inez Valley 



Josephine ., 
Keystone ... 
Mahoney ... 

Oceanic 

Quien Sabe. 
Kinconada ., 
Santa Cruz ., 

Los Prietos. 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

Guadaloupe 

New Almaden 



Santa Clara ... 
Now Almaden 



SOLANO COUNTY. 

Valley Township 



John Brownloy . 
St. John's 



SOVOMA COUNTY. 

Knight's Valley District, 



Mendocino Township . 



Washington Township. 



Ida Clayton 

Yellow Jacket 

Annie Belcher . 

Flagstaff 

Kattlosnake .... 

Socrates , 

Sonoma 

Cloverdale , 

Geyser 

Missouri , 

Mount Vernon . 
Oakland 



1875 



1861 
1861 



1870 
1872 



1874 

1874 

1874 
1875 
1874 
1875 
1873 
1874 
1874 
1873 
1875 
1874 



30 



30,000 



5,000 
20.000 



15,000 

15,000 

12,000 
12,000 
12,000 
20,000 
10,000 
10,000 
15,000 

1,000 
12,000 

3,000 



Wild Goose Q. M. Co. 
Abbott Q. M. Co. 
Buckeye Q. M. Co. 
Elgin Mining Co. 



Little Panoche Q. M. Co. 
Cerro Gordo Q. _M. Co. 
New Idria Mining Co. 



California Borax Co. 
Great Western Q. M. Co. 
Kearsage Q. M. Co. 
Lake County Mining Co. 
Wright Bros. 



California Q, M. Co. 
Kedington Q. M. Co. 
Knox ii Osborne. 
Oakville Q. M. Co. 
^tna Q. M. Co. 
Phoenix Q. M. Co. 
Washington Q. M. Co. 



Josephine Q. M. Co. 
Cross & Co. 
James F. Mahoney. 
Oceanic Q. M. Co. 
D. C. Norcross /fe Co. 
C. W. Dana & Co. 
Sunderland Q. M. Co. 

Los Prietos Mining Co. 



Santa Clara M'g As. of Baltimore 
Quicksilver Mining Co. 



Brownley & Co. 
Neat & Wilson. 

f Knight's Valley Land and 

I Contract Co. 

I Knight's Valley Land and 

( Contract Co. 

Carr & Co. 

Bell & Co. 

Parrott & Co. 

Bell & Co. 

W. W. Dodge & Co. 

Booth & Co. 

Flood & O'Brien. 

Stuart & Elder. 

Bell & Co. 

Bank of California. 



Before insuring call on FAENSWOETH & CLAEK, 125 California St., S. F, 



Burdett Organs— without a rival. M. GEAY, Agent. 105 Kearny St., S. F. 



CALIFORNIA — GRIST MILLS. 



89 



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o 



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C3 






GRIST MILLS. 

The number of mills enumerated in the following table, compiled from the County Assessor's returns 
of 1874, is one hundred and sixty-one, of which eighty-three are iiropollod by water, seventy-three by steam, 
and five by steam and water. These mills wore erected at a cost of from S2,000 to SlOO.UOO.having from one 
to eight run of stone, with a capacity of from ton to eight hundred barrels per day. The largest mill in 
the State is located at South Vallojo, Solano County. San Francisco County, with eight mills, including 
three which are engaged almost exclusively in grinding feed, is the largest flour producing county in the 
State. Next in importance are the counties of Alameda, Sacramento, San Joaauin, Santa Clara, Solano, 
and Sonoma. 

TABLE OF GRIST MILLS, 

With the Location, Name, Run of Stone, the Capacity per Day, Power Used, Cost or Valuation, and the 

Occupant's Name of each. 



Location. 



ALAMEDA COITNTY. 

East Oakland 

Haywood 

Livermore 

Mission San Jose 

Niles 

Oakland 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

lone City 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

Butte Creek 

Chieo 

Durham Station 

Oroville 

Rock Creek 

COLUSA COUNTY. 

Colusa 

Grand Island 

Princeton 

CONTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

Antioch 

Lafayette 

Pacheco 

DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

Smith River Valley 

EL DORADO COUNTY. 

Placerville 

FRESNO COUNTY. 

Centreville 

HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

Ferndale 

Mattole 

Rohnerville 

INYO COUNTY. 

Bishop Creek 

Independence 

KERN COUNTY. 

Bakersfield 

Linn's Valley 

Walker Basin 

KLAMATH COUNTY. 

Hoopa Valley 

South Fork of Trinity.... 

LAKE COtJNTY. 

Kelsey Creek 

Lakoport 

Lower Lake 

LASSEN COUNTY. 

Johnstonville 

Milford 



Name of Mill. 



Clinton 

Haywood .. 
Livermore 

Mission 

Alameda ... 
Oakland 



Golden Star, 
lone City 



Butte 

Chico 

Durham 

Ophir 

Keefer..... 



Colusa 

Grand Island , 
Princeton 



Union 

Lafayette 
Pacheco .. 



Del Norte... 
Creighton's 
Centreville 



Pacific 

Langdon's.... 
Rohnerville. 



Bishop Creek . 
BeU's 



Kern River .... 
Smithwick's .., 

Walker Basin 



Hoopa Valley 
Campbell's 



Kelsey 

Lakeport., 
Eclipse.... 



Lassen 

Honey Lake 



No. 
Run 
Stone 



Capaci- 
ty per 
day. 



250 
50 



60 



125 



100 
100 

75 
100 

75 



125 
100 
100 



40 
80 
130 

50 



100 
40 

100 ■! 



40 



Power 



steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
water 
steam 



steam 
water 



water 
water 
water 
steam 
water 



steam 
steam 
steam 



steam 
steam 
steam 



water 
water 
water 



water 
water 
steam 



water 
water 



water 
water 
water & 
steam 



water 
water 



water 
steam 
steam 



water 
water 



Cost. 



25,(;00 
15,000 
20,(100 
11,000 
100,000 
30,000 



20,000 
20,000 



10.000 
40,000 
20,000 
40,000 
15,000 



10,000 
8,000 
10,000 



10,000 
5,000 
12,000 



5,000 

5,000 

20,000 



2,.500 
2,500 
3,000 



5,000 
5,000 



8,000 
4,000 

10,000 



3,000 
4,000 
4,000 



Present Occupants. 



Weston & Welsh. 
S. Wotten. 
C. .J. Stevens. 
Adam Laumeister. 
.•Vlameda Flour Mill Co. 
Babcock & Gould. 



F. C. Hall & Co. 
J. Cummings. 



Morse & Morse. 
J. Bid well. 
Goss & Co. 
Brooks & Goldstein. 
J. L. Keefer. 



J. D. Gage. 
J.K. Giles. 
0. F. Cook. 



Wro. Girvin. 
Warren Brown. 
W. J. Ireland. 



J. G. Anthony. 
James Creighton. 
E. Jacob & Co. 



J. Russ. 

M. K. Lan^don. 

Martin & Kellogg. 



J. Russell. 
A. Bell. 



W. Muehe & Co. 
N. Smithwick. 

W. Rankin. 



U. S. Government. 
T. G. Campbell. 



P. Burtnott. 
H. Boggs. 
Jno. Mather. 



7,000 IS. R. Hall & Bro. 
5,000 J. M. Steinberger. 






m 



P 






C3 

p 

o 



A. ROMAN & CO., Pine and Fancy Stationery, 11 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



90 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Grist Mills— Continued. 



Location. 



LOS ANOKLKS COUNTT. 

Azusa Dalton'L -- 

Los Niotos Los Nietos . 

La Puente Workman's 



Nanioof MiU. 



MKNDOCINO COUNTY. 

Ancl(M-.«on Valley 

Coyoto ViiUoy 

Littlo Lako 



Round Valley 

Ukiah 

Ukiah 



MRRCED COUNTT. 

Morcod 

Mercod Falls 

Merced River 



MODOC COUNTY. 

Adin Big Valley 

Cedarvillo 

Lake City 



MONO COUNTY. 

Coleville 



MONTEKKY COUNTY. 

Salinas City 



NAPA COUNTY. 

Chiles Valley 

Napa City 

Napa Valley 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 

Greenville 

Indian Valley 



SACRAMENTO COUNTY. 

Sacramento 



Michigan Bar 



SAN BENITO COUNTY. 

Hollister 

San Eenito River 



SAN BERNARDINO COUNTT. 

San Bernardino 

San Salvador 

Spring Creek 

Warm Creek 



Gpchwind's. 
Cleveland's., 
Duncan's ..., 

James' 

(Jray's 

Moore's 

Ukiah 



Pioneer 

Nelson & Son's. 

Murray's 

Eden 



Adin 

Cedarville 
Lake City .. 



Antelope 

Salinas City 



Chiles 

Vernon 

St. Helena 

Star of the Pacific 



C. H. Laurena's 
Taylor's 



Capital 

Lombard 

Phoenix 

ioneer 

Sacramento ... 
Michigan Bar 



San Benito. 



SAN DIEGO COUNTT. 

Aqua Caliente 

San Diego 



SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY. 

San Francisco 



SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY. 

Linden 

Poland's 

Stockton 



Woodbridge 



Southern Pacific 
San Bernardino 

Spring Creek 

San Bernard 



Julian City 
San Diego .. 



Capitol 

Commercial 

Golden Age 

Golden Gate 

National 

* Pioneer and Alta 

•■■■■Wheelan's 

'•■Yolo 



Linden 

Lone Star ... 

City 

Humphrey's 

Lane's 

Woodbridge 



No. 
Run 
Stone 



Capaci- 
ty per 
day. 


Power. 


Cost. 


15 

20 
20 


water 
water 
water 


7,000 
7,000 
12,000 


20 
30 


steam 
water 
steam 
water 
water 
water 
steam 


2,ono 

2,000 
4,000 
2,000 
1.500 
2,000 
8,000 


20 
15 
20 
40 


120 
120 
120 
120 


steam 
water 
water 
water 


2,000 
6,000 
6,000 
10,000 


25 
40 
40 


water 
steam 
water 


4,500 
7,000 
10,000 


60 


water 


5,000 


100 

15 
125 

«{ 

50 




15,000 

5,000 
30,000 

10,000 

15,000 


water 
steam 
steam 
& water 
water 




water 
water 


6,000 ■ 
30,000 


30 


50 
350 
100 
500 
200 

40 


steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 


1,000 
80,000 
25,000 
100,000 
40,000 
450 

30,000 




water 


12 

10 

8 

12 


water 
water 
water 
water 


12,000 
4,000 
4,000 
8,000 


50 
100 


steam 
steam 


7,000 
25,000 


200 
200 
400 
500 
300 
150 
150 
100 


steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 


20,000 
10,000 
25,000 
50,000 
.50,000 
10,000 
2,000 
15,000 


200 
50 

500 
25 

240 
60 


steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 


30,000 
10,000 
40,000 
4,000 
20,000 
10,000 



Present Occupants. 



Henry Dalton. 
D. C. Wilson. 
W. Workman. 



L. E. White & Co. 
W. J. Cleveland. 
F. L. Duncan. 
C. P. Traber. 
U. S. Government. 
Jno. Hillman. 
S. Wurtenburg. 



Isaacs & Richardson. 
Nelson & Son. 
J. C. Blackburn. 
W. Lee Hamlin. 



Harris & Mitchell. 
Rusill & Co. 
Geo. Wynet. 



Estate of B. G. Hartshorn. 

Wm. Brunewell. 

J. B. Chiles. 
Cooper & Andrew. 

J. Mecklenburg. 

F. W. Ellis. 



C. H. Laurena. 
J. W. Thompson. 



Withington & Bagley. 
A. Redington & Son. 
Reel & Childs. 
Smith & Williams. 
C. McCreary & Co. 
James Jordan. 



J. M. Browne. 
G. H. Goff. 



B. F. Matthews. 
Jno. W. North. 
Mrs. Meek. 
Davis & Conn. 



Frary & Schultz. 
J. Lankershim. 



Doming, Palmer & Co. 
Grosh A Rutherford. 
F. D. Conro & Son. 
Horace Davis & Co. 
Marten stein & Doming. 
Bisen Bros. 
Dohrman & Co. 
J. Rosoberry & Co. 



Wasley, Patterson & Co. 

S. L. Magee. 

Sperry & Co. 

D. G. Humphrey. 

R. B. Lane 

Green & Wristow. 



'■ Eeed Mills. 



PAENSWOHTH & CLARK represent the best Eastern Insurance Companies 



Send orders for Music to G-EAY'S, 105 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



CALIFORNI A — G RIST MILLS. 



91 



Grist Mills — Continued. 



Location. 



SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. 

Arroyo Grande 

Cambria , 

Chorro , 

La Cuesta 



SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

Redwood City 

Spanishtown 



SANTA BARBARA COUNTY. 

Santa Barbara 



SANTA CLARA COUNTY. 

Alyiso 

Gilroy 

Los Gatos 

San Jose 



Santa Clara 
Saratoga 



SANTA CRUZ COUNTY, 

Corralitos 

Santa Cruz 



Corralitos 

Fleck's 

Mayor's 

Hatues' 

Wilson's 

Watsonville Watsonville 



Soquel. 



Name of Mill. 



Branch's 

Leffingwell & Sons 

Chorro 

Sumner's 



Redwood City 
Ames 



Santa Barbara . 



Alviso , 

Santa Clara Valley., 

Los Gatos 

Moody's 

Orange 

Vineyard , 

Santa Clara 

Saratoga 



SHASTA COUNTY. 

Cottonwood 

Fall River 

Millville 



SIRRRA COUNTY. 

Randolph 



SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

Scott Valley 



Shasta Valley.. 



SOLANO COUNTY. 

Benicia 

Suisun City 

South Vallejo 



SONOMA COUNTY. 

Bodega Township 

Cloverdale 

Mendocino Township . 

Petaluma " 



Santa Rosa 



Sonoma 
Vallejo 



Farmer's 

Cook & Winter'i 
North Star 



Etna 

Farmer's 

Lafayette 

Rough and Ready.. 

Union 

Butteville 

Shasta River 



Benicia., 
Suisun .. 
Starr's ., 



Smith's 

Sulphur Creek 
Healdsburg ... 

Mill Creek 

Central 

Oriental 

Empire 

Mark West , 

Santa Rosa 

Chauvet's 

Mathews' 



STANISLAUS COUNTY. 

Knight's Ferry 

Paradise City 



Stanislaus 
Paradise ... 



TEHAMA COUNTY. 

Antelope Creek 'Antelope . 

Battle Creek Union 

Cottonwood Cottonwood , 

Sesma North Star .. 

TRINITY COUNTY. ' 

Hay Fork 'Hay Fork .. 

Weaver's Creek Davidson's.. 



No. 
Run 

Stone 



Capaci- 
ty per 
day. 



300 



17.5 
100 
300 
100 
360 
50 



50 
32 
50 
.50 
200 
50 



100 

"ioo" 



400 
300 
800 



100 
100 
120 

60 
130 

50 
1.50 

40 
100 

30 

40 



120 
120 



125 

50 

.50 

200 



Power. 



water 
steam 
water 
water 



steam 
water 



steam 



steam 



water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 



water 
water 
water 
water 
steam 
steam 



water 
water 



water 



water 
steam 
water 
water <t 
steam 
water 
water 
water 



steam 
steam 
steam 



steam 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
water 
water 



water 
steam 



water 
water 
water 
water 



water 
water 



Cost. 



10,000 
8,000 

15,000 
8,000 



8,000 
6,000 



10,000 



75,000 



75,000 
20,000 
75.000 
15,000 
75,000 
7,000 



18,000 
8,000 
8,000 
10,000 
12,000 
6,000 



10,000 



12,000 

7,000 

8,000 
15,000 
5,000 

10,000 

8,000 
5,000 
6,000 



70,000 
35,000 
90,000 



6,000 

7,000 
10,000 

8,000 
16,000 

8.000 
22,000 

4,000 
10,000 

2,U00 

3,000 



.32,000 
75,000 



25,000 

12,000 

1,000 

50,000 



4,000 
2,600 



Present Occupants. 



Branch Bros. 
Leffingwell & Sons. 
Pollard & James. 
S. Sumner. 



Rankin & Baird. 
J. P. Ames. 

Rynerson & Tilley. 

Bray Bros. 
Cuthbert Burrell. 
Rodgers & Co. 
Moody & Bro. 
Doleval & Paulding. 
Pfisler & Co. 
Chas. Clayton. 
W. S. HoUenback. 



Ford & Sanborn. 
John Fleck. 
J. F. I. Bennett. 
Hames & Daubinbis. 
0. P. Wilson & Co. 
Chas. L. Thomas. 



E. Nichols. 
Cook & Winters. 
Wilkinson & Ross, 



Lipscom & Co. 



George Smith. 
E. Reichman. 
E. Bean. 

George Smith. 

Wm. H. Morgan. 
Jacob Myers. 
Charles Schlicht. 



Ballard & Hall. 
Hibbard & Co. 
Starr, Campbell & Co. 



Thomas Smith. 

Carruthers & Co. 
Saules & Sons. 
McCune Bros. 
Wash. Neil. 

J. W. Mandeville & Co. 
.Jno. Mather. 
Bowman Bros. 
G. Chauvet. 
Overton & Sons. 



D. W. Tullock. 
T. M. Rankin. 



J. S. Cone. 
W. S. Carver. 



Ellis & Co. 



A. D. Bayless. 
R. A. Davidson. 



«3 



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i, EOMAIT & CO., Booksellers, Importers, and Publishers, 11 Montgomery St., S. P.. 



D. "W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



92 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Grist Mills — Continued. 



Location. 



TULARK COUNTY. 

Linn's Valloy 

People's Ditch 

Portorsville 

Tulare 

Visalia 

TUOLUMNK COUNTY. 

Norman Crook 

Sonora 

AV^ood's Creek 

VKNTURA COUNTY. 

San Buonavontura .... 
Santa Paula 

TOT.O COUNTY. 

Cachovillo 

Knight's Landing .... 
Woodland 

YUBA COUNTY. 

Boar Kiver 

Marj'sville 

Wheatland 



Name of Mill. 



Sraitbwick 

Illinois 

Tule Kiver 

Tulare 

Tulare Valley .... 

Columbia 

Sonora 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Santa Paula 

Cacheville 

Knight's Landing 
Woodland 

Union Mills 

Buckeye 

Marysville 

Wheatland 



No. 
Run 
Stone 



Capaci- 
ty per 
day. 



1 
2 
2 
2 



60 
100 
80 



100 
400 
250 
250 



Power. 


Cost. 


water 


4,000 


water 


5,000 


water 


5,000 


steam 


15,000 


steam 
& water 


25,000 


water 


7,000 


water 


15,000 


water 


12,000 


steam 


4,000 


water 


10,000 










steam 




water 


15,000 


steam 


40.000 


steam 


20,000 


steam 


35,000 



Present Occupants. 



Noah Smithwick. 
N. P. Dillon. 
Johnson & Keenoy. 
Simpson & 11am. 

R. E. Hyde. 



S. K. Hanson. 
Hampton & Smith. 
James Bell. 



P. Perkins. 
Blanchard & Bradley. 



E. H. Eastham. 
Rhodes & Arnold. 
Rhodes & Arnold. 



Stoddard & Bro. 
A. D. Starr & Co. 
Traynor & Ellis. 
Torson, Clark & Co. 



SAW MILLS. 

The number of mills enumerated in the following table, compiled from the County Assessor's returns 
of 1874, is three hundred and eighty-eight, of which two hundred and twenty-four are propelled by steam, 
ono hundred and sixty by water, and four by steam and water. The cost of these mills vary from $1,000 
to S80,00l), with from one to five saws, and a capacity of from ono thousand to eighty thousand feet of lum- 
ber per day. All of those in San Francisco County and a few in other counties are planing mills, being 
engaged almost exclusively in the manufacture of dressed lumber and other building material. In several 
counties, particularly Butte, El Dorado, Humboldt, Mendocino, Nevada, Placer, San Mateo, and Santa 
Cruz, the manufacture of lumber is a very important branch of industry, large and expensive mills having 
been erected, which give employment to a large number of men. 

TABLE OF SAW MILLS, 

With the Location, Name of Mill, Number of Saws, Capacity, Power Used, Cost or Valuation, and Occu- 
pant's Name of each. 



Location. 



ALPINE COUNTY. 

Blue Lake 

Carey's Mills 

Fredericksburg 

Markloeville 

Mid. Carson River.. 

Silver King 

" " Valley.... 
Silver Mountain 

AMADOR COUNTY. 

Antelope 

Antelope Creek 

Volcano 

BUTTE COUNTY. 

Chico Ridge 

Clipper Mills 



Name of Mill. 



Grant , 

Carey's Mills , 

Cast Iron 

Grant 

Buena Vista ,.., 

Buena Vista 

Smith's 

Minnesota 

Davidson's 

Dennis & Gilman 

Exchequer 

Robinson 

Butterfield 

Fithean & Co's... 

Mace's 

Leslie's 

Arcade 

Belmont 

Cascade 

Dashaway 

Excelsior 

Victor , 

Yelper , 

Clipper 



No. 
Saws. 


Capac'y 






teet 
perday. 


Power. 


Cost. 


1 


4,000 


steam 


8 
4,000 


1 


3,000 


water 


3,000 


2 


10,000 


water 


8,000 


1 


5,000 


steam 


4,000 


2 


10,000 


water 


5,000 


3 


20,000 


water 


7,000 


2 


5,000 


water 


4,000 


1 


4,000 


water 


10,000 


2 


12,000 


water 


12,000 


2 


15,000 


stoam 


20,000 


2 


12,000 


water 


7,000 


1 


3,000 


water 


3,000 


1 


8,000 


steam 


5,000 


2 


14,000 


steam 


8,500 


1 


7,600 


steam 


3,000 


1 


5,000 


steam 


2,500 


2 


25,000 


steam 


8,000 


2 


20,000 


steam 


6,000 


2 


25,000 


steam 


8,000 


2 


10,000 


stoam 


4,000 


2 


15,000 


steam 


0,000 


2 


25,000 


stoam 


7,01)0 


2 


12,000 


steam 


5.000 


2 


20,000 


steam 


8,000 



Present Occupants. 



Curts & Griffiths. 
W. B. Lake. 
AV. Smith. 
Curts k Griffiths. 
Johnson & Barber. 
Toby & Mason. 
Smith & Co. 
AV. H. H. Graham 
D. Davidson. 
S. B. Gilman. 
Exchequer Co. 
J. S. S. Robinson. 



F. M. Whitmore. 
Fithean, Brandon& Miller. 
F. Mace. 
Leslie & Son. 



McCormick & Bro. 
Butte Flume & Lumb. Co. 
Butte Flume & Lumb. Co. 
E. Finley. 
W. K. Springer. 
W. K. Springer. 
William Bonham. 
Union Lumber Co. 



PAEITSWOETH & CLAEK'S Insurance Office, 426 California Street, San Francisco 






Kranich & Bach Pianos at GEAY'S, 105 Kearny St., S. F. 



CALIFORNI A — S AW MILLS. 



93 



o 

«:♦• 

S> 

o 
I— • 

o 



a 
t> 

o 

o 
o 



W 



p* 



Saw Mills — Continued. 



Location. 



Name of Mill. 



No. 
Saws. 



Capac'y 

feet 
per day. 



Power, 



Cost. 



Present Occupants. 



BUTTE COUNTY (Cont.) 

CoDCOw Valley 

Dogtown Kidge 



Flea "Valley 

Mooretovvn 

Mountain House.. 



CALAVERAS COUNTY. 

Big Trees 

El Dorado , 

Love's Creek 

Railroad Flat 



COLUSA COUNTY. 

Stoney Creek 



COXTRA COSTA COUNTY. 

Pacheco 



DEL NORTE COUNTY. 

Bunker Hill 

Crescent City 



Happy Camp- 
Indian Creek., 

Lake Earl 

Smith River... 



EL DORADO COUNTY. 

Consumnes 



Diamond Spring . 



Elkhorn 

Georgetown. 



Kelsey 

Mount Gregory. 
Placerviile 



Pleasant Valley.. 
Spanish Flat 



FRESNO COUNTY. 

Fre.=no Flats , 

Fresno River , 

Mill Creek 

Pine Ridge 



San Joaquin N. F., 
" N. F.. 



HUMBOLDT COUNTY. 

Areata 

Eureka 



Mullen's 

Buckeye 

Casey's 

Fairfield, 

Green's 

McKay's 

Nimshew 

Puckett's 

Saterlee's .... 

Star 

Flea Valley. 

Roger's 

Turner's 



Kimball & Cutting.., 

Eureka 

Love & McGaffey's., 

Clark's 

McCarty's 



Foutz's... 
Pacheco., 



Independence., 

Coast 

Elk River 

Doolittlo's 

•Junction 

Lagoon 

Lake's 



Farnham's 

Putnam's 

Tyler's 

Cold Springs 

Diamond 

Hooper k Co's 

North Weber 

ily Park 

Stone Breaker 

Elkhorn 

Canon Creek 

Grasser Place 

Rock Canon 

Bear Creek 

Mt. Gregory 

Ashland 

Pacific 

Sportsman's Hall. 

Baltic 

Demith's., 



Green & Sharpton. 

California 

NVagey's 

Clipper 

Humphrey's 

Phoenix 

Herron's 

McCullough's 



Ferndale . 



Dolly Varden.. 

Bay 

Eureka 

Fay's 

Ilowitt & Co's.. 

Island 

Jones & Co's.... 

Occidental 

Vance's 

Pacific 



3,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
20,000 

i5,uyo 

8,000 
8,000 
15,000 
25,000 
10,000 
10.000 



10,000 
10,000 
7,000 
20,000 
10,000 

5,000 



water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 



steam 
steam 
water 
water 
steam 



10,000 
5,000 

35,000 
1,000 

10,0(X) 

25.000 
4,000 



6,000 
1,000 
3,000 
12,000 
12,000 



3,000 
9,000 
12,000 
14,000 
2,000 
8,000 
5,000 
0,000 
12,000 
10,000 
12,000 
14,000 
12,000 



10,000 
18,000 
12,000 
10,000 
13,000 
6,000 
1,000 
7,000 



12,000 
30,000 
3.5,000 
25,000 
15,000 
20.000 
25,000 
30,000 
30,000 
6,000 



water 
steam 
steam 
water 
water 
steam 
water 



steam 
water 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
water 
water 
water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 



steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 



steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 



2,000 
5,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3,000 
5,000 
4,000 
3,000 
3,500 
4,.500 
6,000 
4,000 
5,000 



8,000 
6,000 
6,000 
10,000 
9,000 



4,000 



10,000 
5,000 

40,000 
5,000 

10,000 

2.5,000 
4,000 



4,000 
1,.500 
8,000 
4,000 
7,000 
4,000 
2,000 
2,000 
10,000 
10,000 
2,000 
6,000 
7.000 
6,000 
8,000 
7.000 
6,000 
11,000 
15,000 
5.000 



10,000 
7,000 
6,000 
6.000 
4.H00 
1.000 
7,000 



10,000 
3.5,000 
40,000 
10,000 

6,000 
20,000 
2-5.000 
40,000 
30.000 

2.500 



J. Mullen & Co. 
John Hupp. 
B. Casey & Co. 
William Hasty. 
Cohn ifeTaber. 
Chico Lumber Co. 

Dufour & Co. 
S. Marks. 
A. B. Saterlee. 
Doon k. Morris. 
Flea Valley Mill Co. 
Geo. B. Rogers k Co. 
Turner k Farnham. 



Kimball & Cutting. 

J.Burt. 

Love k McGaffey. 

W. V. Clark. 

D. McCarty, 



— Foutz. 



H. N. Dalton. 



Northern Hydraulic Co. 

T. Van Pelt. 

Hobbs, Pomeroy k Co. 

H appy Camp Co. 

Happy Camp Ditch Co. 

C. C. Mill Co. 

J. L. Lake. 



— Farnham. 

W. H. Putnam. 

R. S. Tyler. 

M. G. Griffith. 

M. G. Griffith. 

H. 0. Hooper & Co. 

Ch. Sibeck. 

Cutler k Card. 

Griffith k Bryant. 

J. & J. Blair. 

Pease & Co. 

Pease k Co. 

Robert Noble. 

Heirs W.H.Hollingsworth 

Pease k Co. 

Jones k Blanchard. 

Jones k Blanchard. 

J. k J. Blair. 

Louis Lepetit. 

H. Demiths. 



Green & Sharpton. 
Cal. Lumber Co. 
P. Wagey k Son. 
Glass iV Donahue. 
Humphrey J: Mock. 
A. C. Jack k Co. 
J. M. Herron. 
George Green. 



Minor & Falk. 
Dolbeerife Carson. 
B. R. Jones k Co. 
Fay Bros. 
Howitt k Co. 
Russ, Pickard k Co. 
D. K. Jones k Co. 
Evans k Co. 
John Vance. 
Joseph Russ. 



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A. EOMAN & CO., Photograph Albums, Bibles, and Prayer Books, 11 Mont. St., S. F, 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



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94 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Sa"W Mills — Continued. 



Location. 



HUMBOLPT COUNTY (Cent.) 

Hydesvillo 

Matidlo 

liohiiiTvillo 

Salmon Cruok 

Trinidad 



INTO COUNTY. 

Big Pine 

Bishop Creek 

Blaok Rock 

Cottonwood Creek.. 



KERN COUNTY. 

Greenhorn Mountain. 



Livormore , 

Piute Mountain. 

San Euiigdio 

Tehichipa 



KLAMATH COUNTY. 

Hoopa Valley 

Orleans 



Salmon Kiver, Main.... 

E. h\... 

S. F.... 

Sawyer's Bar 

South Fork of Trinity. 
Willow Creek 



LAKE COUNTY. 

Cobb's Valley 



Mount Hanah 

N. of Clear Lake.. 
Pine Mountain...., 



Pope " 
Upper Lake.. 



LASSRN COUNTY. 

Big Valley 



JanesTille. 



Milford 

Susan Kiver.. 



LOS ANGELES COUNTY . 

Los Angeles 



MARIN COUNTY. 

White Ranch 



MARIPOSA COUNTY. 

Coulterville 

Snow Creek 

Sweet Water 



MENDOCINO COUNTY. 



Albion River., 
Anderson Valley., 

Brush Creek 

Cahto 

Casper Creek 

Elk Creek 

Garcia River , 

(jualala River , 

Little Lake 

Little River 

Mendocino 

Navarro River 

Noyo River 

Point Arena 

Redwood Valley .. 



Name of Mill. 



Wright & Langdon's .. 

Mattolo 

Rohnorvillo 

Babcock's 

•Smith <t Dougherty's., 
Hooper's 



Bell's 

Bishop Creek. 
Black Rock.... 
Stevens' 



Harmon's 

R. H. Evans 

Livermoro's 

Barton Bro's 

San Emigdio 

Brite's 

Humiston & Co'i 



Hoopa Valley 

Graham's 

J. A. Pearch's 

Nordheimer Creek. 

Crawford's 

Ritner's 

Sawyer's Bar 

Campbell's 

Dart's Mill 



Pacific 

Standiford' 

Moore's 

Bateman ... 
American.. 

Rico 

Loconome.. 
Dennison... 



Murdock's 

Willow Creok. 

Adams 

Byer'.' 

Kairchild 

Stockton 



Perry & Woodworth's. 
Griffith, Lynch & Co's, 



Shaver's. 



Hoborn's . 
Clark's .... 
Malone's . 



Albion 

Gschwind's 

Sander's 

Simpson's 

Casper 

Elk Creek 

Garcia 

Gaulala 

Blossor's 

Little River .... 

Mendocino 

Navarro 

Noyo 

Ross & Francis. 
Reed's 



No. 
Saws. 



Capac'y 

feet 
porday. 



4.000 
(i.OOO 

a'),ooo 

20,000 
25,000 



1 7,000 

1 8,000 

1 0,000 

1 8,000 



5,000 
(3,000 
6,000 
3,000 
5,000 
4,000 
10,000 



1,000 
1,000 
1,.500 
1,000 
1,000 
5,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1.000 



6,000 
1,000 
3,000 
3,000 
2,r>00 
3,000 
3,000 
3,000 



4,000 
6,000 
4,000 
10,000 
3,000 
2,000 



15,000 
20,000 



10,000 



8,000 
9,000 
3,000 



25,000 
10,000 
30,000 



22,000 
16,000 
25,000 
20.000 
2,000 
18,000 
80,000 
25,000 
30,000 
1,000 
2,000 



Power. 



water 
water 
stonm 
steam 
steam 
steam 



water 
water 
water 
water 



steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 



water 
water 
water 
water 
water 
water 
water 
water 
water 



steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 



water 
steam 
water 
steam 
water 
water 



steam 
steam 



steam 



steam 
steam 
steam 



steam 
steam 
steam 



steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
water 



Cost. 



3,000 

3.000 

5,000 

10,000 

20,000 

25,000 



9,000 
10,000 

8,000 
10,000 



9,000 
8,000 

10,000 
5,000 
6.000 
5,000 

10,000 



Present Occupants. 



6.000 
1,200 
2,300 
4,000 
1,000 
1,800 
1,000 
2,.500 



5,000 

8,000 
6,000 
8,000 
5,000 
4,000 



10,000 
14,000 



7,000 



Wright & Langdon. 
Hubert & Dudley. 
Martin & Kellogg. 
Orvilie Simmons. 
Smith & Dougherty. 
Hooper & Co. 



Stewart & Co. 
T. D. Lewis. 
J as. W. Smith. 
Stevens & Co. 



M. E. Harmon. 

R. H. Evans. 

H. P. Livermore. 

H. Barton & Bros. 

John Funk. 

J. M. Brite. 

L. F. Humiston &Co. 



U. S. Government. 
J. W. Graham. 
J. A. Pearch. 
A. Bahr. 
W. P. Bennett. 
J. P. Ritnor. 
J. T. Barrows. 
T. G. Campbell. 
J. Ziegler. 



Mat. Harbin. 
Wm. Gordon. 
L. Carson & Co. 
L. A. Young. 
Americano. S. Co. 
H. W. Rice. 
B. Knawer. 
A. J. Stroup & Co. 



Murdoek & Quinn. 
Lonkey & Lapoint. 
J. W. Cornelison. 
Byers & Co. 
T. H. Fairchild. 
H. C. Stockton. 



Perry, Woodworth & Co 
Griffith, Lynch & Co. 



Isaac Shaver. 



9,000 — Hobom. 
8,000 D. Clark. 
4,000 J. H. Malone. 



30,000 
5,000 
10,000 



oO.OOO 
15,000 
80,000 
30,000 
2,000 
20,000 
80,000 
30,000 
3.5,000 
6,000 
2,000 



McPherson & Wetherbeo. 

A. Sanders. 
J. H. Simpson. 
J. G. Jackson. 
T, Murray. 
Nickerson & Co. 
Heywood & Harmon. 
Blossor Bros. 
Cromby & Perkins. 
Mendocino Mill Co. 
Tiohenor & Bixbee. 
McPherson & Wetherbee. 
Ross & Francis. 
Eraser & Brown. 



Dwellings and grain warehouses insured on best terms by FAENSWOETH & CLAEB 



Guild, Church «S; Co.'s Pianos (Oregon Gold Medal, 73 and 74), at GEAY'S, S. P, 



CALIFORNI A — S AW MILLS. 



95 



Sa"W Mills — Continued. 



Location. 



MPNDociNo rouyTY (Cont) 

Reed's Redwoods 

Round Valloy 

Sherwood ^'alley 



MKKCED COUNTY. 

Merced 



MODOC COUNTY. 

Big Valley 

Camp Bidwell 

Cedar villa 

Goose Lake Valley... 
Hot Spring Valley .. 

Lake City 



MONO COUNTY. 

Adobe Meadows .... 
Antelope Valley .... 

Buckeye Canon 

Hot Spring Canon . 



NEVADA COUNTY. 

Bloomfield Township 



Name of Mill. 



No. 
Saws. 



Reeves'.. 
Gray's .. 
Hatch's 



Pioneer.. 



McDevitt's 

Brown ii Jopp's.. 

Russell's 

Snider's 

Cannon Creek ... 

Porter's 

Metzgar's 



McGee's .... 
Antelope .... 

Eagle 

Patterson's . 



Eureka 



Grnniteville 

Grass Valley 

Grass Valley Township... 



Little York 
Meadow Lake 



Nevada 



Truekee 

Washington Township . 



Bloomfield 

Little Grass Valley.... 

Star , 

Fridgeon & Go's , 

Milton 

Snow Tent 

Eureka 

Shaw's 

Fuller's , 

Grass Valley 

Mohawk Lumber Co 

V'oss (2 mills) 

Alder Creek 

Boca Mill and Ice Co... 
Bragg &. Folsom's . 
Nevada and California 
fruckee Lumber Co. 

Chapman's 

Cooper's 

Flume Lumber Co ... 

Marsh's (2 mills) 

Scotch Flat 

Ellen's 

Fall Creek 



PL\CER COUNTY. 

Aha (near) 



Coldstream 

Dutch Flat (near). 
Emigrant Gap 



" " (near).. 
Martis Valley 



Tamarack 



PLUMAS COUNTY. 

American Valley 



Big Meadows 

Butte Valley 

Dutch Hill 

Eureka Mountain.. 

Greenville 

Humbug Valley ... 
Indian Valley 



La Porte 

Meadow Valloy 
Mohawk Valley.. 
Onion Vall«y 



Capac'y 

feet 
per day. 



Alabama 

Kearsage 

Rock Creek 

Stanford 

Water Mill 

Avery's 

Putnam's (2 mills) 

Culbertpon's 

McFarland's 

Richardson Bros .. 

SchafiFor's 

Mountain 



Gansner's 

Hartwell's 

Lawrence's 

McBeth's 

Lawrence & Young . 

Eureka 

Hough & Co 

VVallick'8 



Lawrence's. 
Taylor's .... 

Young's 

La Porte .... 

.Jack's 

Woodward . 
Overton's.... 



8,000 
l..iOO 
8,000 



3,000 
10,000 
1,200 
12,000 
4,000 
8,000 
2,000 



6,000 
4,000 
5,000 
6,000 



10,000 

10,000 

25,000 

10,OU0 

5,000 

20,000 

20,000 

3,000 

3.000 

30,000 



2-5,000 
40,000 
40,000 
40,000 
35,li00 
70,000 
10,000 
10,000 
2-5,000 
25,000 
20,000 
30,000 
10,000 



14,000 
20,000 
.W,000 
35,000 

5,000 
15,000 
20,000 

8,000 
15,000 
40,000 
40,000 
15,000 



5,000 
2,-500 
4,000 
1,500 



Power. 



steam 
water 
water 



steam 



water 
water 
steam 
water 
water 
water 
water 



steam 
water 
water 
steam 



steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
water 
steam 
water 



2,000 
3,000 
5,000 
3,000 
4,000 
14,000 
4,000 
1,.500 
5,000 



steam 
steam 
s. <fc w. 
steam 
water 
water 
s. & w. 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 



steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 



water 
water 
water 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 
water 
water 
water 
water 
water 
steam 
water 
water 
steam 



Cost. 



4,000 
1,.500 
10,000 



4,000 



2,400 

4,S(X) 
6,000 
5,000 
3,000 

i,m) 

4,000 



3,.500 
3.000 
3,000 
4,000 



4,000 
8,000 
10,000 
8,000 
3,000 
15,000 
10,UOO 
6,000 
3,000 
6,000 



15,000 

yo.ouo 

30,000 

2-5,000 

20.000 

40,000 

6,000 

6,000 

40,000 

15,000 

15,000 

15,000 

5,000 



20,000 
20,000 
15,000 
15,000 

5,000 
20,000 
20,000 

8,000 
12,0(X) 
2-5,000 
25,000 
10,000 



3,000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,000 
3,000 



Present Occupants. 



4,000 
1,500 
3,rm 
3,000 
3,000 
8.500 



2,000 
1,200 
5,000 



T. Reeves. 

U. S. Government. 

U. T. Hatch. 



Isaacs it Richardson. 



W. S. McDevitt. 
Brown & Jopps. 
Russell & Co. 
A. Snider. 
Frank Cooley. 
Porter Bros. 
Jno. Metzgar. 



Hightower & Sanguinette. 
N.W. Hatch. 
Towle <k HunewelL 
K. S. Patterson. 



James Cregan. 

J. C. Broderick. 

Eureka Lake and Yuba 

Pridgeon & Co. [Canal Co. 

V. G. iiell, Supt. 

L. B. Churchill. 

Eureka Lake and Yuba 

John Shaw. [Canal Co. 

P. J. Fuller. 

Joseph Perrin. 

R. McMurray, Supt 

Louis Voss. 

Jas. Machomich, Agt. 

L. E. Doane, Supt. 

Bragg ik Folsom. 

0. Lonkey. 

Edward J. Brickell, Supt. 

C. K. Chapman. 

George Cooper. 

Harvey Cooper, Supt. 

M. L. & D. Marsh. 

Smith & Mills. 

E. Ellen. 

James Culbertson. 



Towle Bros. 
Al. Towle. 
Towle Bros. 
Jno. Knoeland. 

Avery & Sons. 
Putnam & Co. 
Jas. Culbertson. 
— McFarland. 
Richardson Bros. 
Geo. Schafi'er. 
Goo. Goissendorfer. 



F. Gansner. 
J. F. HartwelL 
H. C. Lawrence. 
John McBeth. 
Lawrence & Young. 
Eureka Co- 
Hough & Co. 
E. Wallick. 
M. S. Ascheim. 
Estate of W. H. Blood. 
J. T. Taylor. 
H. Holthouse. 
Union Lumber Co. 
Richard Jacks. 
Isaac Hurley. 
Jno. Porter. 



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San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory^D^W^Laird^jl^^ cor. Merchan t. 



96 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Saw Mills— Continued, 



Location. 



sackamknto county. 
Sacramento 



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SAN BERNARDINO COUNTY. 

Grass Valley 



Hunsacker 

Little Bear Valley ... 

" " (near).. 



Name of Mill. 



No. 
Saws. 



Capital 

iiotchkiss' 
Mechanics' 



Clipper 

Grass Valley . 

MetcalPs 

Lapruix 

Bear Valley . 



Capac'y 

feet 
perday. 



10 4,000 
9 5,500 
4 5,000 



SAN PIEGO COUNTY. 

AguaCaliente Shaw's 1 

Cayamaca Dupre*' 1 

San Diego Hanlon's... 6 

" " Herrander's Z 

" " San Diego 4 



10,000 
12,000 
8,000 
10,000 
12,000 



10,000 
13,000 



Power. 



Cost. 



SAN FRANCISCO COUNTY.' 

San Francisco 



S\N LUIS OBISPO COUNTY. _ 

Cambria Cambria 

Leffingwell & bons , 

San Luis Obispo Santa Rosa 

Santa Kosa 



Beale Street., 
California ... 
Enterprise ... 

Excelsior 

Mechanics' . 
South Park 
South Point.. 
Thomas' 



SAN MATEO COUNTY. 

Garzos Creek 

Haskin's Mill 

Pescadero 



Garzos.. 



Pescadero Creek. 



Purissima... 

San Gregorio 

Summit 

Taylor's Mill.. ........ 

Temploton's Gulch. 
Tornitas Creek 



Burch &Co 

Carter's 

Carter's 

Spaulding & Go's..., 

Tufley's 

Voris' 

Voris' 

WaddelPs 

Haywood's 

Pages 

Hatch & Borden's.. 

Templeton's 

S. P. Pherris 



S\NTA CLARA COUNTY. 

Gilroy 91''"®^,- 

Uvas Creek nv.„o^.= 



Hanson & Ackerson's. 
Froment ■ 



8,000 

riO,ooo 

70,000 
3,000 
40.000 
10,000 
24,000 
15,000 



5,000 

10,000 

4,000 

2,500 



15,000 
10,000 



3,000 
20,000 



Chase's . 



SANTA CRUZ COUNTY. 

Aptos Creek 

Brancefort Creek 

Fall Creek 



P4 



Felton 

Pete's Creek 

San Lorenzo River. 



Santa Cruz.. 
Soquel 



Watsonville . 



Nichols 

Warner's 

Ashley's 

Otto's 

Otto's 

Treat's 

Pioneer 

Ellsworth's 

Hicks' 

Silver's 

Davis & Cowells'.. 

Glassell's 

Bates' 

Soquel 

Savage 

Clipper 

Corralitos 

Eureka 



2,000 
3,000 
20,000 
30,000 
10,000 
15,000 
15,000 
15,000 
30,000 
10,0U0 
8,000 
30,000 



steam 
steam 
steam 



steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 



water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 



steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 



steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 



steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 



Present Occupants. 



5,000 
10,000 
5,000 



5,000 
7,000 
3,000 
4,000 
7,000 



2,000 
3.500 
4,000 
2,500 
0,000 



5,000 
1,50,000 
75,000 
15,000 
20,000 
25,fl00 
40,000 
24,000 



3,000 
5,000 
1,800 
1,000 



3,000 



5,000 



3,000 
5,000 



25,000 
3,000 
10,000 



15,000 
15,000 



10,000 

2,000 

2,0J0 

3,000 

20,000 

2o,U00 

15,000 

5,000 

8,000 

8,000 

15,000 

8,000 

5,000 

20,000 

3,000 

25,000 

20,000 

20,000 



3,000 



Theiss & Co. 
Hotchkiss & Co. 
Hobby & Taft. 



Vanslyke & Somers. 
Tyler Bros. 
John Metcalf. 
Wm. Lapraix. 
Wm. Caley <fc Co. 



Shaw ATjams. 
Jose E. Duprez. 
John Hanlon. 
John Herrander. 
W. W. Terry & Co. 

Daniel D. Holland. 
California Mill Co. 
D. A. McDonald & Co. 
William A. Meeker. 
Wells, Russell & Co. 
F. Korbel & Brothers. 
A. M. Jewell & Co. 
C. W. Thomas. 



Joseph Johnson. 
Leffingwell & Sons. 
William Gillespie. 
W. Leffingwell. 



Hanson & Co. 
— Haskins. 
Burch & Co. 
Johnson & Co. 
Johnson & Co. 
Spaulding & Co. 
•John Tufley. 
I. N. Voris. 
N. Voris. 
W^. W. Waddell & Co. 
B. Haywood. 
A. Peers. 
Hatch & Borden. 
H. Templeton. 
S. P. Pherris. 
— Taylor. 

Hanson & Ackerson. 
Froment & Co. 



steam 
steam 



water 

water 

water 

water 

water 

steam 

steam 

water 

water 

water 

steam 

steam 

steam 

steam 

water 

steam 

steam 

steam 



5,000 
5,000 



3,000 
5,000 
2,000 
5,000 



30,000 

10,000 

5,000 

5.000 

8,000 

10.0(» 

10,000 

6,000 

20,000 

5,000 

10,000 

8,000 

8,000 



Hodge & Whitehurst. 
S. H. Chase. 



B. C. Nichols & Bro. 
D. Lear. 
Otis Ashley. 
George Otto. 
George Otto. 
George Treat. 
Page & Peers. 
J. W. Ellsworth. 
Hicks Bros. 
S. Merrill. 
Davis & Cowell. 

Gardner & Co. 
Soquel Lumber Co. 

Ford & Sanborn. 
Ryder, Orton & Co. 
Ford & Sanborn. 



' Planing mills only 



* Planing mills only. 

Live Agents in country towns wanted by PAENSWOETH & CLAKK, 5. E 



#Burdett Organs- 


without a rival. 


M. 


GHAT, Agent. 105 Kearny St., S. F. 




CALIFORNIA- 


-SAWMILLS. 97 




Saw Mills- 


Continued. 




Location. 


Name of Mill. 


No. 
Saws. 


Capac'y 

feet 
per day 


Power. 


Cost. 


Present Occupants. 






2 

2 
1 

2 
2 

3 
3 
2 
1 
3 
3 
5 
1 
3 
2 


20,000 
■10,000 
10,000 
25,000 
20,000 

3,000 
0,000 
1,500 
1,500 
1,200 


steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 

water 
water 
water 
water 
water 


8,000 
7.000 
3,000 
5,000 
10,000 

6,000 
12,000 
2.000 
6,000 
2,000 


Ford & Sanborn. 
Ford & Sanborn. 
John Hunt. 
Ford & Sanborn. 
Hatch & Co. 

M. B. Vilas. 
KlotzA Co. 
Sidney Charles. 
Charles Camden. 
John P. Webb. 
L. Dana. 
Cook & Winter. 
H. H. Baker. 
George Myers. 
Griffin & Co. 
John i""leming. 

Marks & Co. 
D. L. Whitney. 
John Dixon. 
Benjamin Pauley. 
G. Meredith. 
G. Meredith. 
Marks & Co. 
Meikle Bros. 
Stewart & Co. 
D. L. Whitney. 

D. F. Cole. 
Xelson & Co. 
S. B. Parker. 
A. J. McGuire. 
Chandler & Co. 
O'Leary & Roberts. 

— I'letcher. 
Cobb &i Co. 
Hamlin & Herrican. 

— Wooden. 

R. P. Hirst. 
William H. Smith. 
M. B. Pitman. 
Fostus Payne. 
Wright Bros. 
J. S. Cleland. 

E. Bean. 

J. B. Leduc. 
J. M. Dobkins. 
Stone & Ross. 
Lamb & Co, 

Frank Gifford. 
Henry Ludolff. 
Meeker Bros. 
J. K. Smith. 
C. Fuller. 
Norton & Co. 
Alexander Duncan. 
Hoald & Gurne. 

F. Korbel £i Bros. 
Mead & Hassey. 
.Murphy Bros. 
William Miller. 
F. Helmko. 
Bihlcr &. Dingley. 
Piatt Mill Co. 

Empire Lumber Co. 
Empire Lumber Co. 
Empire Lumber Co. 
Blue Ridge Co. 

— McCormick. 
Vllen&Co. 
Allen iCo. 

iillman & Patten. 
Blue Ridge Lumber Co. 
Blue Ridge Lumber Co. 




Shingle Mill- 

Planing Mill"!!!'.'.'.".'"."." 


t* 




SHASTA COUNTY. 

Battle Creek 


Vilas' 




Klotz' 








Camden's 

Webb's 




Fall River 
























Oak Run „ 




3,000 
3,000 
2,500 

4,000 
5,000 

10,000 
3,000 
4,000 
4,000 
3.000 
3,000 
2,000 
5,000 
4,000 
3,000 
5,000 
2,000 
6,000 
6,000 

12,000 
5,000 

14,000 
3,000 

3,000 
l,.5O0 
2,500 
2,500 
2,000 
2,500 
2.000 
2,000 
2,500 
2,000 
2,500 


water 
water 
water 

steam 
water 
water 
water 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
water 
water 
water 

steam 
water 
water 
water 
water 
water 
water 
water 
water 
water 
steam 

steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 
steam 

steam 
steam 
steam 
water 
steam 
steam 
8. & w. 
water 
steam 
steam 


4,000 
7,000 
2,500 

8,000 
3,000 
8,(100 
4,000 
8,000 
8,0U0 
5,0(J0 
6,000 
4,000 
6,000 
4,000 
5,000 
3,000 
3,000 
8,000 
4,000 

10,000 
3,000 

10,000 
4,000 

3,000 
3.000 
3.000 
4,000 
3,000 
5,000 
2,500 
4,000 
5,000 
3,000 
4,000 

5,000 




Whisky t«wn 

SIKRRA COUNTY. 


Fleming's _ 












East Fork 


Eureka 


Oooks & Meredith's... 
Goodrich ~ 






Gibson ville 








Howard Ranch 






Pike City 




Randolph ., 




Rock Creek 




















i> <• 




4< t< 




SISKIYOU COUNTY. 

Butt' ville 


Summit _ 


Cottonwood Creek 


Cottonwood 


Etna 












Little Shasta River 


Cleland 






Scott River 

Shasta Vallev 


Jackson's 


Maxwell 


Strawberry Valley „.. 

Yreka __ 


Stone <t Ross 


Lamb it Co's.. 


SONOMA COUNTY. 

Anally Township 


Gifford's 




LudollTs 




41 !• 






10,000 










b.OOO 








Ocean _ 


Duncan's 


25,000 
20,000 
20,000 
15,000 
20,000 
18,000 
15,000 
25,000 
25,000 

25,000 
2.5,000 
10,000 

2.000 
30,0!10 
25,000 
40,000 

2,.5O0 
25,000 
10,000 


25,000 


Heald's 








'• 






•• 






Salt Point 


Miller's 


Salt Point Township 

Stewart's Point 




"iiV.ooo" 

25,000 






Piatt's 


TEHAMA COtmTY. 


Belle 








1. 






Battle Creek 


















H •> 












Digger Creek 


Blue Kidge No. 1 


10,000 
7,000 




2 





A. BOMAN & CO.. Medical, Theological, and Scientific Ecoks, 11 Montg> St., S. F. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



98 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Sa^W Mills — Concluded. 



Location. 



Bigger Croek. 
Pine Creek 



TRIMITT COUNTY. 

Bi^Bar 

Canon Creek 

" E. F 

East Weaver Creek- 
Hay Fork 



Hyampom 

Lowistown 

Swift Creek 

Trinity River. 



Weaver Creek. 
Weavervillo.... 



TULARE COUNTY. 

Foot of Sierras , 



Old Tule River Pinery. 
Tule River 



TUOLUMNK COUNTY. 

Brown'.s Ranch 

Garrote (No. 2) 

S. F. Stanislaus Kiver.. 
Sugar Pine - 



VENTURA COUNTY. 

Gilroy 

Lexington 



San Buonaventura(near 



YUBA. COUNTY. 

Deadwood Croek 

Now York Township. 

Oak Valley 

Oregon Hill 

Sharon Valley 



Name of Mill. 



Blue Ridge No. 3. 
Koefor's , 



Siraond's 

(ruthrie's 

Depinotto's.... 
Ware & Co's.. 



Bayloss' 

Ewing's 

Allen's 

lloadley's 

Morrison's 

Bartlott & Evan's.. 

McGillivray's 

Sturdivant'a 

Davidson's 



Campbell's , 

Hyde's 

Wagey's 

Wilson's 

Dillon's 

Thomas & Dunlap. 



Bradford & Way's.. 

Kocca's 

Center 

Hale & Hale 



Rieketts & Co'?.. 

Coval's 

McMillen's 

Bernard's 



Deadwood 

Challenge 

Oak Valley 

Cottage 

Sharon Valley. 



No. 
Si^ws. 


Capac'y 






feet 


Power. 


Cost. 




per day 






2 


10,000 


steam 


6,000 


3 


2.).000 


steam 
water 




2,500 




1,500 


water 


2,500 




1,500 


water 


2,500 




2,500 


water 


5,000 




2,500 


water 


5,0(H) 




2,000 


water 


4,000 




1,.500 


water 


2,.5i0 




1,500 


water 


2,000 




1,500 


water 


4,000 




2.000 


water 


4,000 




2,000 


water 


4,000 




2,000 


water 


4,000 




2,000 


water 


5,000 




2,000 


water 


4,000 




8,000 


steam 


8,500 




8,000 


water 


5,000 




28,000 


steam 


20,000 




25,000 


steam 


18,000 




K,000 


steam 


0,000 




10,000 


steam 


8,000 




18,000 


steam 


15,000 


H 


20,000 


steam 


6,000 


1 


1,.500 


water 


1,000 


2 


5,000 


stoam 


3,.500 


2 


15,000 


steam 


4,000 


3 


30,000 


stoam 


50,000 


1 


2,.500 


water 


2,.500 


2 


10.000 


water 


10.000 


1 




water 


2,000 


1 


14,000 


s. & w. 


6,000 


1 


15,000 


steam 


8,000 


1 


4,000 


water 


4,000 


1 


15,000 


stoam 


8,000 


1 


0,000 


water 


4,000 



Present Occupants. 



Blue Ridge Lumber Co. 
J. L. Keefer. 



Simonds & Co. 
William Guthrie. 
.Joseph Dopinette. 
William Ware & Co. 
William Ware & Co. 
A. D. Bayless. 
Joseph Ewing. 
H. C. Allen. 
Taylor & Dack. 
E. Fador. 
— Evans. 

Joseph McGillivray. 
Sturdivant & Whitmore. 
R. N. Davidson & Co. 
Jumper & Co. 



H. Campbell. 
R. E. Hyde. 
Philip Wagey. 
D. E. Wilson. 
N. P. Dillon. 
Thomas & Dunlap. 



Bradford & Way. 
Golden Rock Water Co. 
J. B. Carter & Co. 
George W. Hale. 



Rieketts & Co. 
Coval Bros. 
McFarland & Co. 
Irvine Bernard. 



Union Lumber Co. 
Cfnion Lumber Co. 
James Gray. 
Union Lumber Co. 
L. T. Crane & Bro. 



CANALS AND WATEE DITCHES. 

In February, 1807, there were relsorted as having been constructed in this State to that date, fivo 
thousand three hundred and twenty-eight miles of artificial water courses for mining purposes, at an 
expense of over tifteon million dollars. The Surveyor-General reports, for 1874, sis hundred and eighty- 
two ditches constructed for mining purposes, with an aggregate length of five thousand six hundred and 
twenty-eight miles, and a supply of two hundred and eighty-one thousand eight hundred and forty inches 
por day. There are also six hundred and thirty ditches used for irrigating one hundred and forty 
thousand acres of land. In addition to the ditches enumerated above, there are numerous enterprises 
organized to supply water for municipal purposes. Thirty-six interior cities and towns are thus supplied, 
and the capital employed amounts to many millions of dollars. The Spring Valley Water Works Com- 
pany, of San Francisco, is an extensive and costly undertaking, with a capital of i^lO. 000,000. The county 
of El Dorado has nine hundred, Nevada seven hundred and thirty. Placer four hundred and ninety-two, 
and Trinity four hundred and forty miles of mining ditches. The county of Los Angeles has nearly four 
hundred miles of ditches, and extensive works for the supply of water for irrigating purposes have boon 
completed in Kern, Merced, San Joaquin, San Bernardino, Siskiyou, Tulare, Yolo, and several other 
agricultural counties of the State. 

BANKS AND BANKING, 

The number of banking institutions transacting business at San Francisco is thirty-seven; Commer- 
cial banks, fourteen; private bankers, eight; savings banks, fifteen. In the interior of the State there 
are one hundred and three. Commercial, fifty-four; private bankers, thirty; savings banks, nineteen. 
There are eleven National Gold Banks in the State, with an aggregate capital of about five million dollars, 
of which two are located at San Francisco, with a capital and line of deposits of about five and one-half 
million dollars. Tho total paid-up working capital of the commercial banks of San Francisco is about 
twenty-five million dollars. Aggregate capital and deposits, January 1, 1875: Commercial banks, $.54,053,337. 
Savings banks, $55,021,177. Total, $10y,!i74,514. Three of tho commercial banks of San Francisco, Bank 
of California, Merchants Exchange Bank, and the Bank of Nevada, each have a paid-up capital of five 
million dollars. The London and San Francisco and the Anglo-Californian Bank, each have a capital of 
three million dollars. 



PAENSWOETH & CLAEK'S Insurance Office, ^25 California Street, San Francisc 



Eoenisch Upright Pianos, for $335, at CtRAY'S, 105 Kearny St., S. P. 



CALIFORNI A — L IBRARIES. 



99 



LIBRARIES OF CALIFORNIA. 

The table of the Libraries of the State, belonging to the public, or to Associations, is a gratifying 
exhibit of the literary taste of the citizens. The list does not include the many small libraries attached to 
Public and Sunday Schools, nor the large private libraries of individuals, by including which the figures 
would be greatly enlarged— the number aggregating over two hundred thousand volumes, exhibiting a 
constant increase, and challenging comparison with any of the older States of the Union. These Libra- 
ries are found in all sections of California, from the great cities to the secluded mining towns of the Sierra 
Nevada, indicating a reading and consequently intelligent population, far in advance of now countries in 
general. The many ditferent Associations maintaining libraries is very noticeable, among which the 
Odd Fellows show most prominently, the library of that Society in San Francisco being one of the largest 
and begt selected in the State. 

LIBRARIES— PUBLIC AND SOCIETY. 

With the Name, Location, Date of Organization, etc., of each. 



l-l 

a 

o 

td 



County. 



Alameda 

Butte '.'.'."'." 

Colusa 

El Dorado 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Klamath 

Los Angeles 

Marin 

Mendocino 

Monterey 

Napa ... 

Nevada 

Placer 

Plumas 

Sacramento 

San Diego 

San Francisco. 

San Joaquin.... 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara 
Santa Clara 



Location. 



Alvarado 

Berkeley 

Oakland 

Oroville 

Colusa 

Placerville 

Eureka 

Independence... 
Sawyer's Bar... 

Los Angeles 

San Quentin 

San Rafael 

Ukiah City 

Monterey 

Napa City 

Grass Valley 

Nevada City , 

Auburn 

Spanish Kanch. 
Meadow Valley 
Sacramento 

San Diego 

San F'rancisco... 

" •< 

*i i( 

*< »« 

Stockton 

Redwood City... 

Santa Barbara. 
San Jose , 



Name. 



Odd Fellows 

State University 

Oakland 

Odd Fellows '."". 

Ladies' Library 

Odd Fellows 

Confidence Engine Co 

Neptune 

Eureka Association 

Independence Union 

Odd Fellows 

Library Association 

State Prison 

Mechanics' institute 

Odd Fellows 

Library Association 

Napa City Library 

Odd Fellows 

Literary Association 

Law Library 

Odd Fellows 

Odd Fellows , 

Library Association , 

Library Association 

Library Association , 

Odd Fellows 

State Agricultural Society , 

State Library 

Fioneer Association 

Free Keading Koom 

L'nai B'rith 

Bohemian Club 

California Academy of Sciences. 

California Pioneers 

Chamber of Commerce 

Clerks' Kelief Society 

Druids 

Irish Literary and Social Club.. 

Law Library 

Mechanic's Institute 

Mercantile Library Association, 

Military Library 

Odd Fellows 

Sodality of the V. B. M 

St. Andrews Society 

St. Ignatius 

St. Joseph's Society 

St. Mary's Association 

Supt. Public Schools 

San Francisco Verein 

San Francisco Turn Verein 

Territorial Pioneers 

Young Men's Christian Asso'n.. 

California Pioneers 

Insane Asylum 

Odd Follows 

Society Natural History 

Young Men's Christian Asso'n... 

Franklin Association 

Odd Fellows 

Young Men's 

Odd Fellows 

Academy Notre Dame 

Library Association 



Date of 
Organiza- 
tion 



1870 
18ti8 
1867 
18(10 
1870 



1858 
18G0 
1874 
]8il0 
1873 
181)9 
1871 
1874 
1849 
1871 
18tjfi 
18t)9 
189f) 
18.i7 
1856 
18."j7 
18.58 
18-57 
1872 



18.50 
1854 
1871 
18(i8 
1872 
18-53 
1850 



1864 



1870 
1865 
18.55 
185.3 
1873 
1854 
1861 
1863 
1866 
1874 
1867 
18.50 
1853 
1852 
1874 
1853 
1868 
1855 
18.55 
1856 
1868 
1866 
1869 
1869 
1874 
1851 
1872 



No. Vol 



l,-500 
12,000 
3,.500 
2,.500 
1,000 
500 

"i',56o 

300 

■ 400 

350 

1,400 



230 
1,000 
1,000 

500 
2,500 

800 
4,.500 

400 

500 

400 
5,.539 
3,360 
2,.500 
35,114 
1,200 

300 
3,000 

500 
2,000 
2,.500 

500 

2,200 

1,500 

2,000 

13,000 

28,000 

40,000 

900 
26,000 
1.200 
1,000 
2,.500 
1,000 
2,.500 
l,-500 
5,600 

8u0 

250 
4,000 
2,800 
2,-500 
3,000 
1,.500 

""400 
500 
350 
],.500 
2,000 
3,900 



A. EOMAN & CO., Fine and Fancy Stationery, 11 Montgomery St., San FranciscOi 



D. W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



100 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Libraries — Continued. 



County. 


Location. 


Namo. 


Date of 
Organiza- 
tion. 


No. Vols. 




Santa Clara 


Santa Clara Collogo 


18.-31 

1872 

1872 

1858 
18(>8 
18.)li 
18.-)G 
18-34 
181)8 
18U(J 

1850 
18li9 

18.5.5 
1802 
1874 
18.38 
18(i0 


14,800 






1,!)00 








100 








800 


ti 11 








Sha<<ta 






1,000 






Odd b'ollovvs 


200 




Benicia 


Benicia Collogo 


1,.500 






St. Catherino's Academy „ 

Youn2 Ladies' Seminary 


800 


11 


«' 


800 


.1 






800 






Odd Follows 

Ulatiis 


1,700 






Suttor. 


Yuba City 




(500 




Rod Blu£f . 


Odd Follows 


400 






Snoll Historical Library Ass'n.... 


950 


Yolo 




500 






Ladios' Public Library 


300 




Marys ville 


City Library 


3.000 






Odd Fellows 


2,000 



Prixcipal Public Libraetks of the World. — Europe: National Library, Paris— 2,000,000 volumes, 
150,000 manuscripts; British Museum, London— 1,100,000 volumes, 811,000 manuscripts; Imperial, St. 
Petersburg— 1,100,000 volumes, 35,000 manuscripts; Royal, Munich— 900,000 volumes, 22,000 manuscripts; 
Koyal, Berlin— 700,000 volumes, 15,000 manuscriiits; Imperial, Vienna— liOO.OOO volumes, 20,000 manu- 
scripts; Koyal, Copenhagen — .550,000 volumes, 25,000 manuscripts; Royal, Dresden— 500,000 volumes, 3,000 
manuscripts; Royal, Stuttgart— 150,000 volumes, 3,.500 manuscripts; Bodleian, Oxford— 310,000 volumes, 
30,000 manuscripts; City, Strasburg— 300,000 volumes, 15,01)0 manuscripts; Public Library, Naples— 200,000 
volumes, 3,000 manuscripts; Vatican, Rome— 105,000 volumes, 25,.500 manuscripts. United States — The 
census for 1870 returns the number of libraries 104,815, with an aggregate of volumes of 45,528,938. Prom- 
inent Libraries— Congressional Library, Washington— 30L),UJO volumes; Public Library, Boston — 280,000 
volumes; University, Cambridge— 205,000; Astor, New York— 1.50,000- Mercantile, New York— 155,000; 
Public Library, Philadelphia— 108,000; Athaeneum, Boston— 100,000; Mercantile, Philadelphia— 100,000. 



AMOUNT OF PRECIOUS METALS 

Produced in the States and Territories West of the Missouri River, 1874. 



States and Territories. 



Gold Dust and 

Bullion 

by Express. 



(jold Dust and 
Bullion by 

other 
Conveyances. 



Silver Bullion 

by 

Express. 



Ores and Base 

Bullion 

by Freight. 



TotaL 



California 

Nevada 

Oregon 

Washington 

Idaho 

Montana 

Utah 

Arizona 

Colorado 

Mexico 

British Columbia.. 



,015, 
345, 
5.55, 
141, 

,207, 

,.581, 
83, 
23, 

,.590, 
84, 

,487, 



568 
394 
504 
390 
007 
302 
721 
333 
,700 
,055 
,473 



1,691,.556 

34, .539 

55,356 

14,139 

120,765 

2.38,130 

8,372 

2,3.33 



$967,8.57 

30,954,002 

150 



$1,715,5.50 
4,117,098 



551,572 



148,747 



740,565 

400 

1,745,705 

714,223 
337 



600,000 
5,072,020 



8.55,000 



$20,300,531 

35,452,233 

609,070 

155,535 

1,880,004 

3,439,498 

5,914,278 

26,066 

4,191,405 

798,878 

1, 636,-557 



Totals $24,114,833 



$2,243,943 



3.5,681,411 



$12,360,828 



874,401,055 



POPULATION OF SAN FRANCISCO, MARCH 1, 1875. 

The following estimate of the population of this city has been prepared from careful investigation 
made during the progress of the canvass for the San Francisco Directory for 1875, and other reliable data; 
and in directing attention thereto, it is believed that the aggregate therein presented is a fair approxima- 
tion to the actual number: 

White Males over twenty-one 77,206 

White Females over eighteen (estimated) 44,000 

White Males under twenty-one (estimated) 43,572 

White Females under eighteen (estimated) 37,804 

White Males, names refused, and foreigners not taken in the canvass (estimated) 1,750 

Chinese, Male and Female 19,000 

Colored, Male and Female. 1,800 



Total permanent population 225,132 

To which should be added a large element of the population known as "floating," estimated at... 5,000 



Total population, March 1, 1875 230,132 

The estimate of the males over twenty-one in the above table is based upon the aggregate of names 
contained in the San Francisco Directory for 1875, and the number of females over eighteen (44,000) is esti- 
mated upon the returns of the Federal census of 1870. 

The aggregate of the present year (230,132), as compared with that of last year (200,700), exhibits a gain 
of 29,432, or about fifteen per cent., a much greater per centage of increase than has taken place for a sim- 
ilar period since 1850. 



PAHITSWOIITH & CLAEK represent the best Eastern Insurance Companies. 



3uild, Church & Co.'s Pianos (Oregon Gold Medal, '73 and 74), at QUAY'S, S. 7, 



CALIFOKNI A — N E W S P A P E R S. 



101 



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> 
o 

o 
o 

m 



M 



(21 



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CO 

o 
o 
o 
o 
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o 



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PIJ 



NEWSPAPER AND PERIODICAL 'PRESS. 

There are published in the State of California two hundred and forty-one differo.it newspapers and 
periodicals. Twenty-one are published in foreign languages, vi/,. : two in French, ten in German, four in 
Spanish, one in Italian, two in Scandinavian, one in Russian, and two in Chinese. , ^ ■ > 

LIST OF NEWSPAPERS AND PERIODICALS ' .;* 

Published in California, with the Place and Time of Publication, Name of Publisher, ofc ,' e*.c. 



County. 



Alameda . 



Alpine .. 
Amador. 



Butte . 



Calaveras 



Colusa. 

Contra Costa , 

El Dorado 

Fresno 

Humboldt.... 



Inyo.., 
Kern 



Lake ... 
Lassen 



Los Angeles.. 



Marin 



Mariposa.... 
Mendocino . 



Merced. 



Modoc 

Monterey . 



Napa 



Nevada 



Town. 



Alameda ... 
Berkeley .... 
Livorniore 
Oakland .... 



San Leandro 

AVa.sh'n Corners.. 
Silver Mountain. 
Jackson 



Sutter Creek , 
Chico 



Oroville 

Mokeiumne Hill 
San Andreas 



Colusa 



Antioch .... 
Martinez .... 
Placerville. 



Fresno. 
Eureka . 



Independence 

Panauiint 

Bakersfield 



Lakeport., 
Susanville 



Anaheim 

Downey City . 
Los Angeles... 



Santa Monica. 
Wilmington .. 
San Rafael 



Mariposa ... 
Mendocino 
Ukiah City. 

Merced 



Dorris Bridge 
Castrovillo.... 

Monterey 

Salinas City... 



Napa City-.- 



St. Helena .... 
Grass Valley. 



Nevada 

North San Juan. 



Name. 



Encinal 

Berkeleyan 

Enterprise 

Alameda County Gazette.... 

Journal 

News 

Real Estate Circular 

Semi-Tropical Pre.^s 

Signs of the Times 

Transcript 

Tribune 

Record 

Independent 

Chronicle 

Dispatch 

Ledgin- 

Foothills Ensign 

Butte Record 

Chico Enterprise 

Mercury 

Calaveras Chronicle 

Calaveras Citizen 

Foothill Democrat 

Independent 

Sun 

Ledger 

Gazette , 

El Dorado Co. Republican. 

Mountain Democrat 

Expositor 

Review 

Humboldt Times 

Standard , 

West Coast Signal 

Inyo Independent 

News 

Kern Co. Courier 

Southern Californian 

Lake Bee 

Lake Democrat 

Lassen Advocate 

Lassen Journal 

Gazette 

Courier 

E.xpross , 

Herald 

La Cronioa , 

Mirror 

Semi-Tropical Farmer 

Star 

Sud Californische Post 

Outlook 

Enterprise 

Herald 

Marin Co. Journal , 

Gazette , 

West Coast Star 

Democratic Dispatch , 

Mendocino Democrat 

Express 

Sfan Joaquin Valley Argus. 

Modoc Independent 

Argus 

Ht.rald 

Monterey Democrat 

Salinas City Index 

Town Talk 

Free Press 

Register 

Reporter 

Star 

Foothill Tidings 

Union 

Transcript 

Times 



AVhen Issued 



Weekly 

Semi-Mon'ly 
Weekly 



Daily 

Monthly. 
Weekly . 

Daily ...! 

Weekly'.'. 



D. and W, 

Weekly ... 



Tri-Weekly.. 
Weekly 



D. and W, 



Semi-Weeklv 
Weekly 



D. and W. 
Weekly.... 



Daily 

Weekly 

D. and W.. 
W^eekly .... 



Daily. 



Weekly 



Publishers. 



P. K. Krauth. 
Berkeleyan Club. 
(ienrge 15. Shearer. 
Bi.^hop & Powers. 
Journal Co. 
Oakland News Co. 

F. S. Page. 
George W. Barter. 
Seven I h Day Ad. Pub. Co. 
Bishop & Powers. 
Benjamin A. Dewes. 

S. S. Saul. 

W. W. Theobalds & Co. 
R. M. & A. C. Folger. 
W. M. Penry. 
Briggs & Eiigon. 
AVebb Lagrave. 
George H. Grosette. 
Edward Hoole. 
Gray & De Mott. 
C. B. Higby. 
W. 0. Swonson. 
W. F. Leavitt. 
Wharton & f utman. 
Addington & Green. 
J. P. Abbott. 
Bunker & Porter. 

B. F. Davis. 
W. A. Selkirk. 
J. W. Ferguson. 

C. A. Heaton. 
J. E. Wyraan. 
I'.ichard V. Chadd. 
David E. Gordon. 
Challant & Childs. 
T. S. Harris. 

Julius Chester. 
J. B. Baccus, Jr. 
A. A. R. Utting. 
Partridge & Slater. 

G. M. Pierce. 
Melrose & Athearn. 

A. Waite. 
P^xpross Company. 

Los Angeles Printing Co. 

E. F. Teodoli. 

Varnell, Caystile &. Brown* 
T. Glancey. 

B. G. Truman. 

C. Jacoby. 

L. T. Fisher. 
L. T. Fisher. 
John Wood. 
S. F. Barstow. 
A. Reynolds. 
M. J. C. Galvin. 
Mrs. Bi-lle Lynch. 
A. Montgomery. 

F. H. Farrar. 
R. J. Steele. 

D. C. Slater. 
J. Merritt. 
Walton & Curtis. 
Leigh & Upton. 
M. Byerly. 

S. J. Uensley. 
0. P. II odd y. 
(i. M. Francis. 
(Jeorge W. Gift. 
De Witt C. Lawrence. 
S. G. Lewi?. 
C. H. Mitchell. 
Brown A Watson. 
A. J. Patrick & Co. 



A. ROMAN & CO., General Agents for Subscription Books, 11 Montgomery St., S. F, 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



102 



PACIFrCT 'COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Ns"wspapers and Periodicals — Continued. 



NovBda 

IMacer , 



Plnnia* 

Sacrouii'Dto . 



o 



San Benito 

San Bernardino. 



c3 






O 
O 



C/3 
O 

(^ 

PI 
pa 



San Diego 

San Francisco-. 



Town. 



Name. 



Tfuckeo Republican Semi-\Veekl.v!rroston A Edsvards 



Auburn - il'lai-er .Argus 

" - I IMacer Herald 

Quincy 

tol^oui 

Sacramento 



When Issued 



Publishers. 



Pl'.imas National 

Telegraph 

Bee 

California Teacher 

Enterprise 

Herald iDailv.:. 

Journal _ ITri-Woekly. 



Weekly lArgus I'ublishine Co. 

- J. A. Filcher i: Co. 

" - William E. Ward. 

" - Airs. John F. Howe. 

Daily 'j. MeClatchy & Co. 

Monthly- jConimittee. 

Weekly IPavis \- Crites. 

Herald Publishing Co. 
K. F. Wermeyer A Co. 



Hollister .Advanc 

, " Enterprise 

?an Bernara.no-I Advertiser 

Argus 



Record-Lnion 'Daily iSacraniento Publishing Co. 

Rescue Weekly G. B. Katzonstoin. 

Sac. Valley Agriculturist ...| " _ i W. H. Crowell A Co. 

Semi-Weekly Union iSemi-Weekly.Sscramento Publishing Co. 

Weekly ,F. W. Blake. 

Ijohn Mctionigle. 

D. and W Perris & Isaac. 

W. H. Gould. 



San Diego . 

San Francisco-. 



• jGuardian 

.Times 

-lUnion 

. I World 

J A bend Post 

■ i. Alaska Herald.... 

• Alta Calitoruia .. 

■ -Animal's Friend . 



-.••'Banker and Depositor 

.... Calitbrnia China Mail- 

•■-■ California Christ'n Advocate 

....'California Chronik 

... !California Demokrat 

.-••ICalifornia Farmer 

....'California Granger 

•--jCalifornia Horticulturist 

.... California Journal 

-...ICalifornia Mail Bag 

....jCalifornia Skandinav .... 
....California Staats Zeitung 

....China News 

....Coast Review 

••••Commercial Freight Circular 

.... Commen-iiil Herald , 

....Commercial News- i Daily 

jCourier do San Francisco ...'l*. and W 



Bi-Monthly. 
D. and W.„.. 
Monthly- 



.Arthur Kearney. 
Isaac A; Rodemyre. 
Douglas Gunn. 
Julian \' Conklin. 
S. F. Abend Post Co. 
.A. A. Stickney. 
Frederick MacCrellish Jk Co 
S^ F. Society Prevention of 
I Cruelty to Animals. 

" - iBanker.vDepositorPub.Co. 

Monthly- | Frederick Marriott. 

Weekly iCommittoe. 

- IF. Hess J: Co. 

Daily IF. Hess & Co. 

Weekly.- iWarron & Co. 

" - [George \V. Uenning. 

Monthly John IL Carmanv J: Co. 

Weekly Wentzol, Hnefner i Co. 

Monthly- I Frederick Marriott. 

Semi-Mont'ly'Hugo Nisbeth. 

Weekly- F. Hess A Co^ 

iBogardus A Gordon. 

Monthly- jJohn G. Edwards^ 

*' jJobn U. Carmany i Co. 

Weekly _ I John H. Carmany i Co. 

— Bates, Woods Jc Co. 
...'E. Derbec. 



iDanske .Amerikaner I Weekly.- Ilversen .t Freese. 

.jEl Tecoloto i Daily J. M. Pimentel & Co. 

.jElevator IWeekb- Philip A. Bell. 

.:Evangelist | " _ C. Moutgomerv. 

.Evening Bulletin ID., W., & O.-'S. F. Bulletin Co. 

-Evening Post iD. and W Evening Post Pub. Co. 

. E.taminer D. and W jWilliam S. Moss & Co. 

.'Figaro |l»aily iJoLn P. Bogardus. 

.Golden Dawn Monthly- 'Dora Darmoore. 

.|Golden Era U\ eekly.- Thoiuas J. Foard. 

iGuide iTri-Weekly.- Vandall i Voigt. 



jHeald's College Journal 

Hebrew - 

I Hebrew Observer 
I Humorist 



Monthly- 'Heald's Business College. 

Weekly.- Philo Jacoby. 

" _ 'William Saalburg. 

" - Max Burckhardt. 

Illustrated Press jMonthly S. F. Journal of Com. Co. 

Irish News Semi-Monfly Jeffrey Nunan. 

Weekly iGeorgo Thi^tleton. 

Semi- Weekly I Frederieo Epson. 

Weekly |G. B. Cevasco. 

Bi- Weekly ...JFelippe Fierro. 

Weekly— Georges Francfort 

Monthly- IF. Schuenemann Pott. 

D. and W-... Ledger PublishingCo. 

.Monthly- 'S. D. Simonds. 

Weekly— Dewey A Co. 

" - Lyons & Barry. 

Daily - San Francisco Call Co. 

Monthly- Sherman i Hyde. 

Weeklj- New Age Publishing Co. 

" - Rev. Sylvester Woodbridge 

" _ Chock Wong & J. Hoffmann. 

Monthlv- John H. Carmany & Ck). 

Weekly- : C A. Klose. 

Peter Anderson. 
Evangel Publishing Co. 



I Jolly Giant 

La Sociedad 

iLa Voce del Popolo 

iLa Voi del Nuevo Mundo ... 

|Le Petit Journal 

Leaves forFreeReligious Life 

Ledger ••• 

I Living Way- 

'.Mining and Scientific Press.. 

I Monitor _ 

.Morning Call 

j Musical Review 

New Age 

Occident 

lOriental 

Overland Monthly 

Pacific 

Pacific Appeal 

I Pacific Baptist and Evangel. 

, [Pacific Coast Wine i Liquor 

Herald 

Pacific Churchman 



Monthly- 



John H. Carmany k Co. 
Cubery A Co. 



rAmTSWOBTH & CLAEK'S Insurance Office, 426 California Street, San Francisco. 



Shoninger Organs, Sole Agency at GRAY'S Music Stcre, 105 Kearny St., S. P. 



CALIFORNI A — N EWSPAPERS. 



103 



Ne-wspapers and Periodicals— Continued. 



^ 



a 

o 
o 



M 

e 









o 

o 
P 
P 



!-■• 

CD 



o 

o 
?> 






P* 



CJounty. 



San Francisco-... 



San Joaquin . 



San Luis Obispo. 
San Mateo 



Santa Barbara.. 



Santa Clara 



Santa Cruz . 



Shasta — 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solano 



Sonoma . 



Stanislaus 



Sutter.... 
Tehama . 



Trinity . 
Tulare . 



Tuolumne 



Ventura 
Yolo 



Yuba. 



Stockton 



Town. 



San Francisco.. 



San Luis Obispo. 
Redwood City .., 

San Mateo , 

Guadalupe , 

Lompoc , 

Santa Barbara.. 



Gilroy .... 
San Jose . 



Santa Clara. 
Santa Cruz.. 



WafBonville 

Shasta 

Doivnieville 
Yreka 



Dixon . 
Suisun . 
Vallejo 



Healdsburg 
I'etaluma .. 



Santa Rosa.. 



Modesto 



Yuba City 
Red Bluff 



Tehama 

Weaverville 
Visalia 



Sonora . 



San Buenavont'a 
Woodland .... 



Marysville . 
Wheatland' 



Name. 



Pacific Coast Pulpit 

Pacific (lirocer 

Pacific Law Reporter 

Pacific Medical and Surgical 

.Journal 

Pacific Methodist 

Pacific Rural Press 

Pac. States Industrial Guide. 

Pacific Youth 

People's Voice 

Real Estate Circular 

Resources of California. 

San Franci?co Chronicle 

S. F. Journal of Commerce.. 
SanFranciscoMarkotReview 
San Franci-^co News Letter.. 

San Francisco Star 

Si)irit of the Times 

Statistician 

Stock E.Ychange 

Stock Report 

Temperance Champion 

Temperance Roll Call 

Visitor 

Voice of Israel 

Watchmaker's Guide 

Western Lancet 

Wino Dealer's Gazette 

Herald 

Independent 

ader 

Tribune 

Times 

Gazette 

Telegraph 

Record 

Index 

News 

Press 

Republican 

Advocate 

Leader 

Advertiser 

Argus 

California Agriculturist 

Mercury 

Patriot 

Echo 

Owl 

Local Item 

Sentinel 

Pajaronian 

Courier 

Mountain Messenger 

Journal 

Union 

Tribune , 

Republican 

Chronicle 

Solano Times 

Rus.sian River Flag 

Argus 

.Standard 

Santa Rosa Times 

Santa Rosa Democrat 

Sonoma Democrat 

Herald 

Stanislaus News 

Sutter Banner 

People's Cause 

Sentinel 

Tocsin 

Trinity Journal 

Delta 

Tulare Times 

Tuolumne Independent 

Union Democrat 

Ventura Signal 

College Monthly 

Yolo Democrat 

Yolo Mail 

Appeal 

Herald 

Free Press 



When Issued 



Semi-Mont'ly 

Monthly 

D. and W 

{ Monthly.. | 

Weekly 



Monthly.. 



Weekly 

Monthly... 

D. and w'.' 
Weekly.... 



Monthly 

D. and W 

Monthly. 



Weekly.- 
Monthly.. 



D. and W.. 
Weekly .... 



D. and W 

Daily '.'.'. 

Weekly 



Daily 

Weekly 

Monthly 

D.and W 



Weekly .. 
Monthly.. 
Weekly... 



D. and W. 
Weekly .... 



Monthly- 
Weekly... 

Daily 

Weekly... 



Monthly.. 
Weekly... 



D. and W.. 

Daily 

Weekly 



Publishers. 



Cubery & Co. 

Hollaway i Co. 

John P. Bogardus. 

Drs. Henry Gibbons and 

Henry Gibbons, Jr. 
W. B. I'arsons. 
Dewey & Co. 
Dewey & Co. 
John F. Davis. 
I. S. Nathan. 
Thomas Magee. 
J. P. H. Wentworth & Co. 
Charles De Y'oung & Co. 
S. F. Jour, of Com. Pub.Co 
John H. Carmany & Co. 
Frederick Marriott. 
Geo. T. Hanley & Co. 
Chase & Boruck. 
Louis P. McCarty. 
W. P. Harrison & Co. 
Stock Report Publish'g Co. 
Champion l^ublishing Co. 
A. A. Bynon. 
Carlos White. 
I. S. Nathan. 
F. B. Burnham & Co. 
Western Lancet Pub. Co. 
Wine Dealer's Gaz. Pub.Co 
H. S. Spaulding i Co. 
N. M. Orr. [don. 

Mrs. Laura de Force Gor- 
Kembaugh & Thornton. 
Duncan McPherson. 
P. H. McGowan. 
J. R. Porterfield. 
VV. W. Broughton. 
Russell it Co. 
A. Pettygrove. 
J. A. Johnson. 

A. S. Winchester. 
H. C. Burkhart. 
J. C. Martin. 

B. H. Cottle. 
W. A. January. 

S. H. Herring & Co. 
J. J. Owen. 
F. B. Murdock. 

C. W. Upton. 
Students S. 0. College. 
U. Coffin. 

Sentinel Printing Co. 

C. 0. Cummings. 

W. L. Carter. 

V'aughn A: Downer. 

Robert Nixon. 

John W. Bird. 

R. D. Hopkins &. Co. 

0. B. Powers. 

F. A. Leach & Co. 

Gibson & Roe. 

Leslie A. Jordan. 

Weston, Scudder & Co. 

.Mutual RelieiousAssociat'n 

(ieorgo H. Marr. 

T. L. Thompson. 

T. L. Thompson. 

H. E. Luther & Co. 

J. D. Spepcer. 

(irover <k Apperson. 

L. D. Clark. 

A. Townsend. 

W. L. Jernegan. 

Lovejoy & Craig. 

Delta Publishing Co. 

Mattrick <fe Bretz. 

J. C. & W. A. Duchow. 

Chas. H. Randall. 

Shepherd ii Sheridan. 

Faculty Hesperian College. 

William Saunders. 

Wagstaff k Sharp. 

Lockwood A Dawson. 

Parry Brothers. 

Walsh & Larrabee. 



A. EOMAN & CO., Blank Books and Counting House Stationery, 11 Mont. St., S. F. 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merchantc 



104 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



FINANCES OF THE SEVERAL COUNTIES OF CALIFORNIA. 



Counties. 



Alamoda 

Alpine 

Amador 

Butto 

Calaveras 

Colusa 

Contra Costa ... 

Dol Norto 

El Dorado 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Kern 

Klamath 

Lake 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Marin 

Mariposa 

Mendocino 

Merced 

Modoc 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napa 

Nevada 

Placer 

Plumas 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

SauBernardino 

San Diego 

San Francisco.. 
San Joaquin ... 
SanLuisObispo 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara. 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 

Yuba 

Totals 



Date of 
Return. 



Aug. 1S74 
Oct. 187-J 
Jan. 1875 
July 1871 
Sept. 1871 
Oct. 1871 
Juno 1871 
Oct. 1874 
Oct. 1871 
Oct. 1874 
Jan. 1875 
Sept. 1874 
Jan. 1875 
Aug. J 874 
Aug. 1874 
Sept. 1874 
Oct. 1874 
Sept. 1874 
Aug. 1874 
Aug. 1874 
Jan. 1875 
Jan. 1875 
Aug. 1874 
Aug. 1874 
Aug. 1874 
Aug. 1874 
Sept. 1874 
Aug. 1874 
Aug. 1874 
Oct. 1874 
Aug. 1874 
Oct, 1874 
Mar. 1875 
Oct. 1874 
Oct. 1874 
Oct. 1874 
Aug. 1874 
Aug. 1874 
Nov. 1874 
Oct. 1874 
Oct. 1874 
Nov. 1874 
Aug. 1874 
Aug. 1874 

1874 
an. 1875 
ug. 1874 
une 1874 
ug. 1874 

1874 

1874 
•pt. 1874 

1874 



Aug. 

J 

A 

J 

A „ 

Aug. 

Aug. 

S( 

A 



Funded 
Debt. 



$70,000 



212,404 

ll!t,;!25 

47,000 



15,000 



3(),300 



2,54(3 

41,000 

10,218 

6()0,8;i8 

140,000 



110,21)3 
75,000 
14,186 



228,000 



10,000 
35,000 
715,200 



7,252 

55,000 

3,725,000 

258,400 

55.000 

100,000 

62,000 

370,000 

05,000 



20,000 
55,000 
183,000 
376,000 
46,000 
25,000 
28,689 



30,000 



214,000 



18,230,231 



Rate of 
Interest. 



7 per ct. 



10 per ct. 
8 per ct. 
10 per ct. 



10 per ct. 



10 per ct. 



10 per ct. 
8 and 12 

10 per ct. 
7 and 10 
7 and 8 



8, y and 10 



10 per ct. 



8 per ct. 
10 per ct. 
6 and 8 



7 per ct. 
7 and 10 

6 and 7 
7, 8 and 10 
10 per ct. 
10 per ct. 

7 per ct. 

7 and 8 

8 and 10 



10 per ct. 

10 per ct. 

10 per ct. 
7 and 8 
9 per ct. 

10 per ct. 

10 per ct. 



10 per ct. 



8 per ct. 



Floating 
Debt. 



880,450 

41,473 

82,718 

28,622 

94,228 

10,133 

44,(188 

7,886 

200,523 

2,050 

9,261 

60,000 

51,770 

15,205 

16,698 

4,250 

7,000 

27,655 

68,290 

28,822 

19,252 

2,086 

3,849 

58,200 

103,982 

58,164 

6,712 

36,186 

507 

12,671 



89,.500 



32,803 



105,842 

23,000 

73,780 

2,747 

5,000 

182,.508 

1,919 

5,000 

50,002 

19,.546 

67,122 

53,813 

58,682 



98,000 



$2,0.55,805 



Assets. 



50,003 

2,000 
30,000 
59,140 

4,950 
17,905 
23,211 

5,300 
10,841 

8,400 



5,434 



4,400 

5,093 

14,824 

122,974 

27,705 

651 

17,680 



3,7.36 
25,000 
21,802 

9,422 
14,172 

3,300 
67,7.52 

3,9.58 
13,988 
15,907 
251,200 
81,261 
27,100 
48,301 
60,000 
21,508 
21,000 
12,640 

9,308 
20,000 
44,048 
51,533 
10,907 



15,659 
3,056 
2,244 
2,011 
7,043 
54,900 
20,968 



$1,. 3.54,241 



Actual 
Debt. 



J100,447 

39,473 

52,718 

181 ,880 

208,603 

39,228 

21,777 

2,581) 

189,682 

8,6.50 

9,261 

90,866 

54,770 

13,351 

52,605 

5,644 

544,864 

139,0.50 

67,6.39 

121,405 

94,2.52 

16,272 

113 

33,200 

310,180 

48,742 

2,.540 

67,886 

048,045 

8,713 



128,.593 
3,473,800 

177,139 

27,900 

84,.502 

2,000 

460,334 
67,000 
61,140 
13,439 
40,600 

321,460 

326,386 
40,093 
75,002 
32,576 
64,066 
51, .569 
56,671 
22,9.57 
43,100 

103,032 



$8,938,701 



Receipts. 



$409,847 
11,119 



165,072 



129,181 

144 ,.512 

10,.500 

67,978 



89,.500 
40,000 



19,280 
15,819 
17,184 
210,000 
139,081 
39,794 
89,915 



7,9,50 
120,000 
135,762 
170,911 
91,695 
49,046 
3.52.368 



.36,755 

76,000 

3,7I2,.551 

194,656 

111,171 

119,619 

59,204 

278,493 

70,500 

42,915 

70,434 



210,.546 
179,968 
106,1.33 
119,060 
7,234 
30,404 
69,395 
31,888 
73,009 
181,768 
151,993 



S8,460,210 



Disburse- 
ments. 



$406,297 
11,680 



144,937 



117,033 

112,221 

9,000 

64,.528 



81,282 
35,000 



16,740 
16,698 
15,405 
160,000 
142,.57S 
39,5.52 
106,336 



7,6.50 
1.50,000 
113,959 
138,8.50 
102,723 
37,788 
312,429 



22,666 

69,.500 
3.430,808 
165,346 
110.456 
146,6.54 

60,986 
260,073 

50,000 



34,248 



216,908 
177,266 
95,225 
71.000 
19,405 
24,507 
73,5.57 
27,816 
65,966 
88,464 
131,025 



$7,685,462 



FINANCES OF CITIES AND TOWNS. 



62 
235 
225 
135 
265 

95 
115 
185 
165 

83 
152 
2.35 
176 

"153 
160 
1.54 

81 
220 
135 
120 
135 
160 
101 
132 
115 

85 
235 

80 

75 
160 
200 
145 

75 
100 
175 
103 

75 
100 

85 
190 
115 
165 

93 
100 
130 
135 
205 
137 
185 
100 

95 
181 



Cities. 



Beneeia 

Eureka 

Los Angeles 

Marysville 

Napa City 

Sacramento 

Santa Clara 

San Diego 

San Jose 

San Luis Obispo. 

San Rafael 

Stockton 

Vallejo 

Nevada City , 



Totals.. 



Date of 
Return. 



Aug... 
Oct... 
Dec. 
Nov . 
Aug.. 
Jan... 
Aug.. 
Oct... 
Oct . 
Oct.... 
Aug.. 
Aug.. 
Aug.. 
Sept.. 



.1874 
.1874 
..1874 
..1874 
..1874 
.1875 
.1874 
..1874 
..1874 
.1874 
.1874 
.1874 
. 1874 
..1874 



Funded 
Debt. 



$21,455 



190,000 
100,000 



1,800.000 



6,319 

10,000 

270,000 

57,433 



Rate of 
Interest. 



5 per ct. 
10 per ct. 
7 and 10 
10 per ct. 



6 per ct. 



7 per ct. 

8 and 10 
7 and 15 



,455,207 1126,411 



Floating 
Debt. 



$405 
7,.500 
30,750 



87,000 



550 
"206" 



Assets. 



$3,118 



5,000 

3,347 

213,678 

1,900 

6,000 

28,151 

224 

9,127 

a3,.500 

2,336 

2.000 



$308,381 



Actual 
Debt. 



$18,742 

7,500 

220,750 

95,000 



1,586,.322 



81,000 



6,095 

1,423 

236,200 

55,303 



Receipts. 



$3,300 
15,556 



52,000 

12,120 

439.638 

6,700 

13,000 
151,8.38 

12,226 



$2,308,635 



156,803 
28,797 
5,000 



$896,978 



Disburse- 
ments. 



81,950 
14,226 



50,000 

8,223 

425,612 

4,800 

9,000 

141,745 

11,982 



122,494 

33,013 

5,000 



$828,045 



PAENSWOETH & CLARK, Fire Insurance Agents for Pacific Coast, San Prancisco. 



GRAY'S New Music Store, 105 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



CALIFORNI A — C OUNTY SEAT 



105 



TABLE 

Exhibiting the County Seats of the different Counties, Legal Distances, Population of 1870 and 1874, etc. 



Counties. 



Alameda 

Alpine 

Amador 

Butte 

Calaveras 

Colusa 

Contra Costa 

Del Norte 

El Dorado 

Fresno. 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Kern 

Klamath 

Lake 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Marin 

Mariposa 

Mendocino 

Merced 

Modoc 

Mono 

Monterey 

Napa 

Nevada 

Placer 

Plumas 

Sacramento 

San Benito 

San Bernardino- 
San Diogo , 

San Francisco.... 

San Joaquin 

San Luis Obispo.. 

San Mateo ... 

Santa Barbara... 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 

Yuba 



County Seat. 



Oakland 

Silver Mountain.. 

Jackson 

Oroville 

San Andreas 

Colusa 

Martinez 

Crescent City 

Plaeerville 

Fresno 

Eureka 

Independence 

Bakersfield 

Orleans Bar 

Lakeport 

Susanville 

Los Angeles 

San Rafael 

Mariposa 

Ukiah 

Merced 

Dorris Bridge 

Bridgeport 

Salinas City 

Napa City 

Nevada City 

Auburn 

Quincy 

Sacramento 

Hollister 

San Bernardino.. 

San Diego 

San Francisco 

Stockton 

San Luis Obispo. 

Redwood City 

Santa Barbara... 

San Jose 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Downieville 

Yreka 

Fairfield 

Santa Rosa 

Modesto 

Yuba City 

Red Bluff. 

Weaverville 

Visalia 

Sonera 

San Buenav'tura 

Woodland 

Marys ville 



T3 Vx^ 






135 
140 
55 
75 
60 
75 
90 
465 
50 



390 



450 
120 
200 
550 
1.35 
145 



260 



60 
65 
35 
145 
Capital 



600 
750 
117 
51 
335 
140 
435 
150 
245 
185 

no 

3.50 
90 
130 
77 
50 
145 
255 
250 
115 
465 
36 
50 



Total >«W»7 



1853 
1804 
1854 
18.50 
1850 
1850 
1850 
1857 
18.50 
1858 
18.53 
1866 
1866 
1851 
1861 
1864 
1850 
■ 850 
18.50 
1850 
1855 
1874 
1861 
18.50 
1850 
1851 
1851 
1854 
1850 
1874 
1854 
1850 
1856 
1850 
1850 
1856 
1850 
1850 
18.50 
1850 
1852 
18.52 
18.50 
1850 
18.54 
1850 
1856 
1851 
18.52 
1850 
1872 
18.50 
1850 



Area. 



850 

700 
1,4.58 

936 
2,376 

7.56 
1,440 
1,872 
8,7.50 
2,800 
5,832 
8,000 
2,000 

972 
4,932 
6,000 

570 
1,440 
3,816 
1,975 
7,280 
4,176 
3,000 

828 

1,026 

1,386 

2,736 

1,026 

1,000 

23,472 

15,156 

42 

1,350 

32,000 

432 
3,.540 
1,332 

432 
4,500 

830 
3,040 

800 
1,400 
1,3.50 

.576 
2,800 
1,800 
5,600 
1,944 
1,380 
1.150 

600 



Population. 



1870. 



24,237 

685 

9,582 

11,403 
8,895 
6,1H5 
8,461 
2,022 

10,309 
6,336 
6,140 
1,9.56 
2,925 
1,686 
2,969 
1,327 

15,309 
6,903 
4,572 
7,545 
2,807 



430 
9,876 
7,163 
19,134 
11,3.57 
4,489 
26,830 



3,!)88 

4,951 

149,473 

21,0.50 
4,772 
6.635 
7,784 

26,246 
8,743 
4,173 
5,619 
6,848 

16,871 

19,819 
6,499 
5,030 
3,.587 
8,213 
4,533 
8,150 



9,899 
10,851 



Estimated 
1874. 



Amount of 

Real and Personal 

Property, 1874. 



36,.500 

1,000 

10,.500 

1.5'000 

8,.500 

15,000 

10,300 

3,000 

10,000 

10,.500 

12,420 

3,200 

6,000 

2,500 



2,200 
21,500 



4,000 

9,500 

6,000 

2,400 

600 

8,700 

13,9.50 

19,500 

18,325 

5,000 

36,000 

5,000 

7,400 

10,000 

200,000 

25,000 

8,000 

11,215 

11,000 

30,000 

9,300 

1,730 

5,100 

8,000 

19,000 

22,.500 

8,000 

7,127 

5,000 

3,400 

9,500 

7,000 

3,600 

12,000 

11,000 



560,247 



$35,070,867 
848,466 
2,.5.54,5.55 
9,062,619 
1,6.56,331 
9,1.39.850 
7,665,955 
697,565 
2,494,622 
7,.557,426 
4,407,043 
1,471,215 
3.603,316 
592,526 
1,919,110 
1,165,274 

12,080,.S66 
7,408,438 
1,365,251 
5,424,012 
6,897,903 
1.003,745 
545,892 
9,.5.50,615 
8,028,824 
8,684,078 
6,781,966 
1,414,121 

23,708,990 

4,.557,507 

1,669,591 

3,069,383 

267,872,646 

20,426,121 
4,640,876 
8,636,527 
6,010,309 

3l,705,.566 
7,250,650 
1,875,846 
2,295,317 
2.986,332 

10,407,904 

16,800,825 
7,426,766 
4,6.54,208 
3.878,625 
1,003,(569 
4,296,231 
1,447,675 
2,911,065 
7,309,179 
5.326,180 



$611.2.56,939 



TABLE OF POPULATION 
Of the Principal Cities and Towns of California, according to the Federal Census of 1870. 



Alameda 

Anaheim 

Benicia 

Chico 

Columbia 

Colu.sa 

Gilroy 

Grass Valley.. 

Havilah 

Independence 

Jackson 

Knights Fer'y 
Lakeport 



County. 



Alameda 

Los Angeles 

.Solano 

Butte 

Tuolumne 

Colusa 

Santa Clara.. 

Nevada 

Kern 

Inyo 

Amador , 

Stanislaus 

Lake 



Pop'n 



1,5,57 

56.5 

1,660 

3,718 

2,200 

1,051 

1,7.58 

7,066 

439 

400 

2,411 

850 

297 



Los Angeles... 

Marysville 

Monterey 

Oakland 

Petaluma 

Plaeerville 

Quincy 

Red Bluff 

Sacramento... 
San Bern'dino 
San Diego. 
San Francisco 
San Jose.... 



County. 



Los Angeles... 

Yuba 

Monterey 

Alameda 

Sonoma 

El Dorado 

Plumas 

Tehama 

Sacramento.... 
San Bern'dino 

San Diego 

San Francisco 
Santa Clara.... 



Pop'n 



5,614 

4,375 

1.112 

11,104 

2,868 

1,562 

610 

920 

16,298 

3,060 

2,300 

150,351 

9,091 



.San Rafael 

Santa Clara.... 

.Santa Cruz 

Santa Rosa 

Sonora 

Stockton 

Susanville 

Tehama 

Ukiah 

Vallojo 

Visalia 

Yuba City 



County. 



Marin 

Santa Clara... 
Santa Cruz.... 

Sonoma 

Tuolumne 

San Joaquin.. 

Lassen 

Tehama 

Mendocino..., 

Solano 

Tulare 

Sutter 



Pop'n 



831 

3,470 

2,3.50 

2,901 

2,498 

10,033 

640 

163 

965 

6,392 

913 

999 



A. I10MA17 & CO., Booksellers, Importers, and Publishers, 11 Montgomery St.. S. F^ 



D. "W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 





106 PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




OFFICIAL KETURNS-CALIFOKNIA. 

Election for Prksident and Vice-Presidknt of the United States, 1868 and 1872, Governor 1871 and 1875. 


•I-i 
o 


COUNTIES. 


President, 1868. 


PR ESIDENT, 1872. 


Governor, 1871. 


Governor, 187.5. 


o 


Grant 


Seymour. 


Grant. 


Greeley. 


Booth. 


Haight. 


Irwin. 


Phelps. 


BidwelL 




1,861 

54 

1.10!) 

1,279 

1,143 

359 

1,092 

162 

1,676 

72 

768 

113 

208 

248 
210 
748 
529 
4(i7 
621 
98 


1,262 
67 

1,224 

1,245 

1,050 
699 
738 
173 

1,683 
381 
507 
100 
422 
187 
454 
122 

1,236 
4:i3 
663 

1,002 
272 


2,564 

89 
994 

1,203 
908 
490 
958 
169 

1,:309 
111 
993 
206 
174 
83 
202 
181 

1,310 
600 
399 
662 
263 


1,228 
38 
766 
816 
751 
469 
461 
139 

1,093 

2;w 

403 
176 
285 
122 
355 
91 
1,229 
219 
364 
725 
380 


2,489 
136 

1.132 

1,458 

1,062 
497 

1,066 
188 

1,532 
130 

1,094 
266 
171 
151 
269 
2.53 

1,421 
687 
541 
694 
152 


1,571 
91 

1,063 

1,.504 

1,163 
915 
702 
212 

1,55;^ 
597 
650 
311 
362 
250 
525 
185 

2,077 
5.50 
675 

1,114 
438 


2,483 
80 

1,150 

1,375 
903 

1,275 
699 
236 

1.238 
651 
714 
359 
694 


1,9.56 

51 
638 
318 
522 

68 
765 

48 
740 

49 
951 
179 
138 


895 
87 
393 
1,146 
402 
548 
396 
136 
556 
197 
272 
248 
376 












Butto 


l>» 




.— 1 


Colusa 




Contra Costa 

Del Xorto 


El Dorado 




Fresno 


clj 


Humboldt 


- 


Invo 


a> 


Kern 


o 


Klamath'^ . 


i-i 


Lake 


663 

199 

2,898 
471 
484 

1,071 
5&5 
336 
80 
886 
989 

1,664 
881 
5;}0 

2,361 

643 

729 

7.55 

14,199 

1,440 
7.56 
623 
798 

2,634 
834 
614 
470 
886 

1.480 

2,106 
788 
555 
599 
400 
846 
931 
414 

1,169 
865 


82 

134 

667 

310 

58 

204 

172 

7 

37 

736 

629 

1,067 

1.065 
2.30 

1,483 
285 
204 
593 

5,179 

1,805 
199 
828 
409 

1,695 
645 
288 
348 
490 

1,391 
736 
382 
184 
404 
334 
285 
501 
120 
136 
577 


211 

200 
1,.543 
2H8 
412 
481 
397 
284 
133 
441 
248 
990 
606 
425 
1.649 
199 
427 
2.52 
6,080 
449 
596 
141 
541 
733 
578 
296 
519 
154 
532 
737 
137 
490 
136 
75 
434 
322 
413 
889 
652 


ro 


Lassen 


ft^ 


Los Angeles 

Marin 


o 

»7i 


^lariposa 


^londocino 


la 


Merced 


o 


iModoct 


■tJ 


^lono 


148 

580 

752 

3,014 

1,988 

711 

3,193 


89 

663 

684 

2,4.55 

1,233 

554 

2,216 


88 
1,155 

897 
2,036 
1,417 

512 
3,393 


50 
976 
552 

1,437 
838 
280 

1,469 


117 
1,129 

979 
2,462 
1,698 

645 
3.734 


84 
1,202 

831 
2,227 
1,3:^0 

601 
2,647 


<u 


Monterey 


k4 


Napa 




Nevada 


O 


Plaeer 


Plumas 




Saernmento 

San Bonitot 


o 

1 


San Bernardino.. 
San Diego 


263 

129 

12,184 

2,101 

372 

627 

428 

2,307 

1,153 

638 

1,328 

835 

1,540 

1,799 

350 

581 

a50 

505 

338 

994 


378 

2;?5 

13,582 

1.867 

345 

417 

301 

2,330 

737 

556 

794 

918 

1,443 

2,402 

642 

561 

398 

391 

679 

1,115 


319 

513 

11,784 

1,783 

461 

648 

692 

2,219 

1,029 

539 

926 

709 

2,413 

1,703 

464 

496 

400 

.345 

395 

810 


190 

3(50 

11,185 

1,312 » 
321 
303 
480 

1,670 
470 
282 
374 
663 

1,257 

1,601 
666 
276 
235 
307 
498 
726 


413 

631 

13,977 

2,006 

563 

925 

762 

2,772 

1,213 

638 

1,173 

872 

2,701 

1,881 

527 

630 

542 

429 

437 

898 


525 

6.54 

11,018 

1,802 

586 

6.50 

720 

2,444 

777 

645 

633 

1,101 

1,.361 

2,512 

817 

664 

605 

422 

696 

1,086 


San Francisco ... 

San Joaquin 

San Luis Obispo. 
^an Mateo 


Santa Barbara ... 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 


M 


Shasta. 


Sierra 


•y 


Siskivou 


« 


Solano 




Sonoma 


n 


Stanislaus 




Sutter 


o 

O 


Tehama 


Trinitv 


Tulare 


«« 


Tuolumne 




Venturat 


S 


Yolo 


995 
1,331 


1.061 
1.112 


842 
1,163 


711 

852 


1,064 
1,380 


1,126 
1,237 


Yuba 


Totals 


54,.t8S 


54,1)78 


54,020 


40,718 


62,587 


57,511 


61 ,.509 


81.322 


29,7.52 




t Recently Organized. 


t of Legisl 


ature, approved Mai 


xh 28, 1874. 


1 

e 


First Distric 

Second Distr 
Placer, Sacramen 

Third Distric 
Modoc, Napa, P 
Yuba-LuttreU, 1 

Fourth Distr 
San Benito, San ] 
Cruz, Stanislaus, 


vc 

—County 

c^— Count 
to, San Jo 

<— Counti 
umas, Sh 
8,468; Dei 

let — Count 
iernardinc 
Tulare anc 


►TE FOI 

of San Frs 

ies of Alar 
aquin and 

3s of Butte 
asta, Sier 
lio, 14,284 

ies of Fre 
), San Diei 
I Ventura- 


IMEME 

mcisco— P 

neda, Alpi 
Tuolumne 

, Colusa, 
ra, Siskiy 
Reed. 6,(] 

!no, Inyo, 
;o, San Lu 
— Wiggintc 


ERS 01 

per, 12,417 

ne, Amad 
-Page, 13 

Del Norte, 
ou, Solanc 
70. 

Kern. Lo 
is Obispo, 
n, 15,649 ; 


^ CONG 

; Rankin 

or, Calave 
,624 ; Lar 

Humbolc 
), Sonoma 

s Angeles, 
San Mate( 
Houghton 


RESS, 1 

6,791 ; Sw 

ras, Contra 
kin, 12,154 

It, Lake. ] 
, Sutter, 

Mariposa 
), Santa Bt 
, ll,0i10 ; 1 


B75. 

ift, 6,103. 

Costa, El 
; Tuttle, £ 

jassen, M 
Cehama, ^ 

, Merced, 
rbara. Sa 
Thompson, 


Dorado. 

),589. 

arin. Me 
trinity, " 

VIono, ]V 
ata Clar 
5,343. 


Nevada, 

ndocino, 
iToio and 

onterey, 
a, Santa 



Dwellings and grain warehouses insured on best terms by FAENSWORTH & CLAI 



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METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATION S. 107 



Meteorological ObserTatlons made at San Francisco, from November, 1850, to June, 1875. 

BY HKNRY OIBBONS, M.D. 

In the following tables the reader -will find, in a condensed form, the results of twenty -four 
years' diligent observation of the climate of San Francisco, with more particular reference to rain. 

Rain has fallen in every month of the year. In July it has rained only in one year ; August 
has furnished rain in four years ; June in seven years ; September in twelve years ; October in 
sixteen years. No account is made of a mere sprinkle, nor of the deposit of summer mist. The 
greatest quantity of mist which ever falls in twenty-four hours is about three hundredths of an 
inch. But this quantity is very rare. Near the ocean the mist is waich more copious. 

The driest season was 1850-51, which gave only seven inches. Next to that was 1863-64, 
with eight and one half inches. The winter of 1867-68 gave the most rain — forty inches. The 
average is between twenty -one and twenty-two inches. 

The earliest setting in of the rainy season was October 8 ; the latest, January 12. An early 
beginning and an aljundant supply are apt to go together, but there is no rule in this respect-— 
the latest begimiings have been followed by an average supply. 

The average date of the beginning of the rainy season is November 28 ; of the termination, 
April 10. March is as certain to bring rain in liberal amount as any other month. In one year 
out of every three there is no rain of importance after March. The last showers of the season 
come, with remarkable uniformity, about the third week of May. 

The middle of January is the average dividing point of the rainy season. The mean quan- 
tity before January 1 is about equal to the mean quantity after January 31. 

December gives the greatest average quantity ; January is not far behind ; February, March, 
and November come next, and are nearly alike; then April, May, and October, in the order 
named. 

The greatest amount of rain in any one month was in January, 1862, when there fell the 
enormous quantity of eighteen inches. 

It is worthy of note that in the driest seasons there has been an abundant supply for agri- 
cultural purjjoses, had it been distributed evenly. Three inches in December, with one inch 
in each of the four following months, would answer all purposes. 

The rain table of San Francisco may be made the basis for estimating the fall in other parts 
of the State. The mountains of the north have from two to tliree times as much, and the 
southern section of the State about half as much, or even less in some localities. The valley of 
the Sacramento has nearly the same quantity as San Francisco ; that of the San Joaquin one 
fourth or one third less, the quantity diminishing southward. 

By reference to the tables showing the extremes of heat and cold, it appears that the coldest 
weather was in January, 1854, when the mercury fell to 25°. At that time the mud in the 
streets was frozen solid, and the shallow ponces were covered with ice strong enough for boys to 
skate on. But such weather is extremely rare, though since that time the ground has been 
frozen several times so as not to thaw fully in the shade for a day or two. The coldest noonday 
embraced in the record was 37°. Often the entire winter passes by without bringing the ther- 
mometer so low as the freezing point. In 1853 it fell at no time below 40°. 

The extreme of heat was on the tenth and eleventh of September, 1852, when the thermom- 
eter reached 97° and 98° on the two days, respectively. This, however, was entirely excep- 
tional, and might not occur again in half a century ; the air was dry as a sirocco, and caused 
the woodwork of houses to crackle and the plaster to break on the wooden walls. 

With the exception just noted, the hottest day on record was 93° on the sixth day of July, 
1867. In October, 1864, and in September, 1865, it reached 91°, and in July, 1855, it reached 
90°. Thus it appears there were only six days in twenty-four years when the thei-mometer rose 
as high as 90°. 

The table of mean temperature shows that our summer does not come till the summer months 
have passed by. September is the warmest month in the year, and October next ; then comes 
August ; July, the hottest month elsewhere, is the fourth here, or links with June ; next come 
April and May ; then March and November ; then February, and, finally, January and Decem- 
ber, which are the only winter months, if indeed we have any weather that deserves the name 
of winter. 

Tvidce the ground has been covered with snow. On the twenty-ninth of December, 1856, it 
snowed very fast for several hours, and two or three inches gathered, but it melted before night. 
On the twelfth of January, 1868, it snowed fast before day, so that two inches collected. But 
it disappeared before sunrise, so that few persons enjoyed the rare spectacle. 

The extraordinary evenness of the climate depends on the adjacent ocean, the water of which, 
flowing in a current from the north, is always at a temperature of about 52°, summer and 
winter. The sea breeze of summer, which chills the air at noonday, leaves no place for hot 
nights. There is not, on an average, one night in the year when it is warm enough to sit out 
of doors at midnight with comfort. 



A. EOMAN & CO., Publishers, Booksellers, and Stationers, 11 Montgomery St,, S. P. 



D. "W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchants 



108 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF RAIN IN EACH MONTH SINCE 1850; AND THE TOTAL AMOUNT IN EACH RAINY SEASON. 
NOTE— EACH COLUMN REPRESENTS ONE RAINY SEASON. 



Month 


1851 


1852 


1853 


1854 


1855 


1856 


1857 


1858 


1859 


1860 


1861 


1862 


1863 


1864 


1865 


1866 


1867 


1868 


1869 


1870 


1871 


1872 


1873 


1874 




.1 
1.0 

.2 
2.2 
7.1 


5.3 
11.9 


1.4 

2.1 


'2.1 
.4 
.4 


5.4 


.5 
2.9 
4.0 


"'.°i 
3.0 
4.2 


.1 

'Z.'i 

.5 
4.8 








.1 

"!i 

2.7 


'.2 

'i'.h 

1.7 


.2 
.1 

.1 
7.6 
6.9 






















Sept 

October . 

Nov 

Decemb'r 


'b'.'i 
1.5 


.1 

.9 

.2 

4.8 


'z.k 

6.1 


.2 

.1 

3.1 

.6 


'2:7 
13.1 


.1 

.6 

3.1 

12.1 


'".2 
1.2 
4.3 


.2 
2.34 
1.24 
4.50 


.06 

";49 
3.04 


.04 

.13 

2.27 

13.40 


.04 

.06 

2.90 

7.80 


■■;56 

1.25 
9.59 


.06 
2.75 
5.41 

.30 




1852 

.6 
.1 
6.4 
.2 
.3 


1853 

4.1 
1.2 
4.8 
5.1 
.3 


1854 

4.3 
8.4 
3.2 
3.3 
.1 
.1 


1855 

4.5 
4.6 
4.3 
5.6 
2.2 


185C 

8.4 

.5 

1.6 

3.2 

.9 


1857 

2.1 
8.6 
1.6 

.1 


1858 

11 
1.3 
3.9 
1.1 

■\ 


1859 

1.0 
5.2 
2.5 
.3 
2.0 


1860 

1.1 
1.4 
3.1 

1.7 
2.6 


1861 

1.2 

2.8 

3.4 

.3 

.7 

.2 


1862 

18.1 

6,1 

1.7 

1.1 

.9 

.2 


1863 

3.3 
3.3 
2.4 
2.9 
.4 


1864 

1.3 

'i!4 
.9 
.5 


1865 

3.9 
.8 
.6 
.7 
.4 


1866 

11.0 
1.5 
2.6 

.1 
1.8 

.2 


1867 

"el 

6.2 

2.2 

1.1 

.1 


1868 

9.6 
6.2 
6.4 
2.2 

'".2 


1869 

H 
4.0 
3.2 
2.2 
.1 


1870 


1871 


1872 


1873 


1874 


1875 


January 

F,b 

March... 
April.... 
M.uj 


3.76 
4.53 
1.84 
1.49 
.36 


2.34 
3.55 
1.24 
2.05 
.31 


6.50 
7.90 
1.53 
1.22 


2.27 

3.40 

.74 

.37 


5.33 

2.49 

3.56 

.89 

.40 


7.13 
.34 

1.30 
.10 
.27 

1 27 














.3 






































































Totals. 


18.2 


33.5j23.0 


24.1 


21.2 20.0 


19.0 


19.8 


17.114.6 


38.0 


15.2 


8.5 


21.3 


21.2 


32.0 


40.5 


21.6 


20.08 


13.08 


33.10 


17.58 


24.07 


18.93 




18 


50— 


Nov. 


1.3 


De 


s., 1. 


1. 


1851- 


-Jar 


1., 0. 


J; Feb., 0.4; 


March, 1.9 ; April 


1.1 


May, 7. 


Total 


7.1. 







T-A-BXiE II. 

DATE OP THE FIRST AND LAST RAINS, AND OF THE BEGINNING AND ENDING OF EACH RAINY SEASON; ALSO, THE 
AMOUNT OF RAIN WHICH FELL BEFORE THE END OF THE YEAR, AND THE AMOUNT AFTER THE END OF 
THE YEAR, IN EACH SEASON, SINCE 1850. 



1850-51.. 
1851-52. . 
1852-53. . 
1853-54. . 
1854-55. . 
1855-56.. 
1856-57.. 
1857-58.. 
1858-59.. 
1859-60. . 
1860-61.. 
1861-62. . 
1862-63. . 
1863-64. . 



First 
Rain. 



Last 
Rain. 



Rainy Season. 



Begins. Ends. 



Nov. lOMay 
Sept. 6 May 
Oct. 28 May 
Sept. 15 April 
Oct. 4 May 
Nov. 10 May 
Sept. 10 Mar. 
Oct. 6;May 
Oct. 21 1 May 
Nov. 9 1 May 
Oct. 4 May 
Nov. 1 May 
Nov. 5 May 
Sept. 19,May 



20Dec. 
17iDec. 
12:Nov. 

28,Jan. 
20'Dec. 
25iNov. 
31 Nov. 

21 Nov. 
22 1 Dec. 

22 Nov. 
22 Dec. 
12 Nov. 
19 Dec. 
17 1 Nov. 



5!May 1 

19:March 31 

9April 29 

12 April 28 

SliApril 17 

10 April 14 
15, March 31 
24!April 7 

4!April 10 

9April " 

6 April 5 

lOApril 14 

IS April 26 

11 April 4 



Bef e 


After 


Jan. 


Dec. 


2.4 


4.7 


10.5 


7.7 


18.0 


15.5 


3.6 


19.4 


2.9 


21.2 


6.6 


14.6 


7.5 


12.5 


8.1 


10.9 


8.8 


11.0 


6.9 


10.2 


6.0 


8.6 


9.9 


28.1 


2.9 


12.3 


4.4 


4.1 



1864-65. . 
1865-66.. 
1866-67.. 
1867-68. . 
1SS8-69.. 
1869-70.. 
1870-71.. 
1871-72.. 
1872-73.. 
1873-74. . 
1874-75. . 
1875-76.. 

Mean. 



First 
Rain. 



Nov. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Sei)t. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Nov. 
Oct. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Sept. 



Last 
Rain. 



15 May 
24 June 
3 May 
14 June 



May 
May 
May 
May 
April 
June 



Rainy Season. 



Begins. Ends, 



Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Nov. 
Dec. 
Oct. 



23 March 4 
13 March 31 
16AprU 12 
WApril 13 
17iMarch 29 
7!April 11 
2'April 17 
leJAprU 18 
281 Feb. 28 
31 May 7 



Nov. 28April 10 8.0 13.3 



Bef'e 
Jan. 



14.9 
4.0 
15.8 
15.9 
5.7 
8.1 
3.5 
15.8 
10.8 
11.4 
8.5 



After 
Dec. 



6.4 
17.2 
16.4 
24.6 
15.9 
12.0 

9.3 
17.2 

6.8 
12.3 



T-A_:bi.e III. 

MAXIMUM QUANTITY OP RAIN IN EACH MONTH, MINIMUM QUANTITY IN EACH MONTH, AND AVERAGE QUANTITY 

IN EACH MONTH, SINCE 1850. 





Jan. 


Feb. 


Mar. 


April. 


May. 


June. 


July. 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Dec. 




18.1 
0.6 
4.8 


8.6 
0.0 
3.3 


6.4 
0.6 
3.0 


5.6 
0.0 
1.7 


2.0 

0.0 

.50 


0.2 
0.0 
0.4 


0.3 
0.0 
0.1 


0.2 
0.0 
0.1 


1.0 

0.0 

.05 


3.4 

0.0 

.37 


7.6 
0.1 
2.4 


13.4 




0.4 




5.0 







T-A-IBIiDS I"V. 

MEAN TEMPERATURE OF EACH MONTH SINCE 1850, DEDUCED FROM TWO DAILY OBSERVATIONS, ONE AT SUNRISE, 

THE OTHER AT NOON; ALSO, THE MEAN TEMPERATURE OF EACH YEAR. 



Month. 


1851 


1852 


1853 


1854!l855 


1856 


1857 1858 


1859 


1860 1861 


1862 


1863 


1864 


1865 


1866 


18671868 


18691870 


1871 


1872 


1873 


1874 


1875 


January.. 


49,3 


50 8 


.52 


48 2 


51 


48,8 


51.246.3 


46,5 


47.8 47.5 


47.6 


.57.7 


52,5 


49,4 


49.0 


51.2145.9 


5I.2I52.5 


51.5 


53.3 


55.5 


47.1 




February. 


51.1 


53 1 


54 1 


.53 6 


56,8 


.53,7 


51.4 53.1 


48. 8 


.50,5 


51.1 


46.7 


,50.9 


55.9 


.51.0 


.53,4 


52.0151.9 


51.2153.5 


51.0 


55.0 


50.0 


49.1 




March 


.53,8 


5'^ 9 


55 9 


.54 1 


59 4 


55 9 


55.952.0 


49 


.53,(1 


,53,7 


,50.2 


.57.8 


.55.6 


.53.3 


.54.3 


50.553.5 


57.451.5 


,53.2 


55.6 


bb.l 


49.8 




April 


.57,7 


55 4 


.58 3 


59.8 


57 7 


55 9 


58.855.7 


,53,6 


.53,0 


,57,1 


.51.3 


,55.7 


.57.9 


.55.5 


.58.4 


57.5 55.3 


,56.5 


.54.8 


54.2 


54.5 


54.8 


55.7 




May 


.57.0 


.55,1 


60 7 


56.8 57.7 


.56 2 


57.5:57.6 


,57,2 


.54,0 


,57.5 


.55.5 


,57.6 


,58.9 


62.0 


,5K,0 


58.3t58.0 


,58.5 


.58.4 


55.3 


57.6 


55.1 


58.0 




June 


.58,8 


60,4 


61 9 


58.5|59.9 


,59,1 


60.958.7 


61.5 


.57.9 


57.6 


61.2 


.58.2 


.58.3 


61.2 


62.0 


60.2158.0 


60.0 


58.4 


56.5 


60.0 


56.2 


59.0 




July 


.57.9 


61,4 


60,3 


61.3]61.2 


59 4 


59.2 60.7 


.59.3 


61.3 


,58.5 


61.7 


59.7 


.57.6 


61.1 


.59.6 


63.2 59.6 


60.2 


62.4 


58.0 


59.7 


57.5 


57.9 




Aiigust.... 


63 2 


61,2 


60 


60.3:62.5 


.59 6 


59.l'61.9 


61,1 


62,5 


.58.9 


62.0 


61.1 


60.6 


60. 


.59.(1 


60.4 


59.8 


59.6 


64.3 


59.5 


59.8 


60.0 


59. b 




September 


61,6 


63,1 


62 7 


60,5 


62 4 


61,5 


60.8 62.4 


61,4 


62.9 


60.3 


61.3 


63.6 


60. H 


63.3 


62.1 


61.3 


,59.3 


60.0 


61.5 


61.4 


60.0 


58.7 


61.3 




October.... 


61. tl 


,58,7 


62,7 


60,7 


61,6 


.57,6 


6O.6I57.8 


,59,7 


.56.8 


56.(1 


63.3 


62.2 


.59.6 


.58.7 


62.(1 


58.2 


60. a 


60.5 


58.0 


61.2 


62.2 


58.6 


60.0 




November 


56 :' 


.53 5 


.57 (' 


,58 (1 


52 fl 


53 3 


54.5 54. C 


.53 5 


.52,8 


,54.2 


.56.2 


,57.3 


.56. C 


.57.6 


,56.6 


.56.7 


,57.2 


.56.4 


bb.4 


.56.6 


58.0 


56.4 


56.4 




December. 


51.3 


50.8 


52.1 


53.8 


47.8 


47.0 


59.5 44.8 


46.3 


49.2 


51.7 


49.5 


53.7 


51.0 


47.2 


54.7 


55.3 


53.2 


50.7 


51.0 


54.7 


51.3 


49.0 


49.6 




Mean. . . 


56.6 


56.5 


58.1 


57.1 


57.6 


55.7 


57.0j55.4 


54.8 


55.1 


55.4 


55.5 


57.5 


57.0J56.7 


57.4 


57.1 


56.1 


56.9 


56.8 


54.6 


55.4 


55.7 


54.5 





PAMSWOETH & CLAEK want good Agents in all principal places. 



The only Music Engraving House in San Francisco is G-EAY'S. 105 Keamy St. 



METEOROLOGICAL OBSERVATIONS. 



109 



T-A-ibIjIe: -v. 

EXTEEMES OP HEAT IN EACH MONTH SINCE 1850; AXSO, IN EACH YEAR. 



Month. 1851 1852 1853 1854 1855 1856;1857,1858 1859 1860 1861 1862 1863 1864 1865 1866 1867 18681869 1870 1871 1872 18731874 1875 



January.. 
February. 

March 

A2>ril 

May 

June 

July 

Auc/mt.... 
September 
October.... 
November 
December. 



61 61 



Year... 84 98 



83 87 87 91 91 



87 88 91 78 



T-A-IBLE ■VI. 

extremes of cold in each month since 1850; ALSO, IN EACH TEAR. 



Month. 


1851 


1852 


1853 


1854 


1855 


1856 


1857 


1858 


1859 


1860'l861 

1 


1862 


1863 


1864'l885'l866'l867 


1868 


1869 


1870'l871 


1872 


1873 


1874^1875 


January.. 


30 


35 


41 


25 


33 


33 


32 


30 


30 


31 


29 


29 


40 


38 


35 


38 


37 


32 


35 


36 


34 


41 


45 


30 




February. 


33 


40 


42 


38 


41 


40 


31 


30 


34 


32 


38 


34 


38 


43 


38 


42 


37 


31 


36 


38 


38 


40 


36 


38 




March 


34 


36 


41 


;« 


44 


41 


41 


36 


35 


37 


37 


3/ 


44 


44 


36 


42 


38 


38 


44 


38 


39 


46 


43 


33 




April 


42 


37 


46 


45 


40 


40 


44 


38 


34 


39 


40 


36 


43 


40 


40 


45 


42 


42 


43 


39 


41 


40 


41 


45 




May 


45 


41 


47 


43 


44 


43 


43 


40 


39 


39 


43 


38 


44 


47 


46 


43 


47 


44 


47 


45 


43 


47 


45 


50 




June 


49 


49 


50 


47 


49 


46 


50 


44 


4b 


45 


49 


49 


50 


48 


49 


49 


48 


45 


48 


47 


46 


51 


49 


49 




July 


47 


49 


51 


46 


51 


48 


50 


48 


48 


46 


49 


49 


50 


48 


50 


49 


52 


46 


52 


53 


49 


51 


50 


50 




AurjUSt.... 


50 


49 


51 


50 


,53 


49 


50 


49 


48 


50 


47 


49 


51 


48 


50 


50 


51 


49 


48 


56 


52 


52 


53 


52 




September 


50 


45 


50 


46 


50 


51 


50 


44 


43 


47 


47 


42 


53 


48 


47 


50 


50 


49 


48 


54 


49 


48 


52 


48 




October... 


4V 


46 


49 


46 


51 


41 


45 


36 


38 


40 


40 


50 


42 


47 


47 


49 


41 


45 


45 


42 


45 


44 


45 


51 




November 


41 


40 


44 


4V 


42 


40 


31 


34 


36 


39 


35 


44 


43 


42 


44 


44 


44 


45 


36 


40 


38 


40 


46 


44 




December. 


35 


36 


40 


38 


29 


35 


34 


27 


32 


32 


3b 


38 


40 


38 


27 


42 


39 


41 


28 


32 


38 


31 


32 


34 




Year... 


30 


35 


40 


25 


29 


33 


31 


27 


30 


31 


29 


29 


38 


38 


27 


38 


37 


31 


28 


32 


34 


31 


32 


30 





INSURANCE COMPANIES. 

Fire Insurance. — The number of companies doing a Fire or Fire and Marine Insurance business in 
this State, October 1, 1875, was eighty-four. Of the.se seven were California companies, fifty-one were com- 
panies of other States of the Union, fifteen of Great Britain, four of (Germany, four of China, two of Switzer- 
land, and one of France. 

LiFK Insurancb.— At the last session of the Legislature the Insurance laws of the State of California 
were amended by the enactment of certain provisions, the better to secure the interests of policy-holders. 
Section 419 of the new Civil Code provides that any Insurance Company, whether of this or any other 
State, in order to become legally authorized to transact business in California, must have a paid-up capital 
equal to 1200,000, at least, and that this capital must always be maintained intact. This, with sundry 
other provisions, all of which had simply the effect to place all foreign companies upon precisely the same 
footing as our own home companies, resulted in the withdrawal of their agencies from this State on the 
part of all the outside companies then doing business within it, except four, which are the only ones now 
authorized by law to issue policies of Life Insurance in California. These are the National Life Insurance 
Company of the United States of America, Chicago, Illinois; New England Mutual Life insurance Com- 
pany, Boston, Massachusetts; Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Company, Milwaukee, \Visconsin; 
Union Mutual Life Insurance Company, Maine. These, with the Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
of Sacramento, the only home company now doing Life insurance business in the State, constitute the only 
five Life Insurance companies which can now legally issue now policies. Besides these, seven companies 
of those formerly having agencies here, the .^tna, of Hartford, Connecticut; The Germania and the Man- 
hattan, of Now York; The Life Assurance of America, of St. Louis, Missouri; the New Jersey Mutual, of 
Newark, New Jersey; the Piedmont and Arlington, of Richmond, Virginia; and the Widow and Orphans' 
Fund, of Nashville, Tennessee, are now legally authorized to collect renewal premiums only. 

The aggregate business. Fire and Marine, for the year 1S74, is as follows: Insurance written, $258,544,- 
350; premiums received, $4,448,033.02; losses paid, $l,0;)8,40ij.4ti; ratio of losses to premiums, 24.7. Of this 
amount the California companies transacted the following: Insurance written, |y8,5b2,27t».58; premiums 
received, 31,771,548.81); losses paid, $541,217.33; ratio of losses to premiums, 30.55. The diminished ratio of 
losses paid to the amount of insurance written, and the amount of premiums received, shows a marked 
improvement in the business of property insurance in this State during the year lb74, as compared with 
that of the two preceding years. 

FOREIGN CONSULS RESIDING AT SAN FRANCISCO. 



Argentine Republic, Charles Baum. 
Atistro-Hungarian Empire, GL A. E. Muecke. 
Belgium, Emil Grisar. 
■■Belgium, S. Mohange. 
Bolivia, F. Herrera. 
'■■Chili, F. Casanueva, Jr. 
Costa Rica, F. Herrera. 
*Costa Rica, T. Lemmen Meyer. 
Denmark, Nicholas Sonnichsen. 
Ecuador, F. Herrera, acting. 
'•■France, Jules Belcour, acting. 
*German Empire, Adolph RosenthaL 
*'Great Britain, W. Lane Booker. 
Greece, Emilo V. Sutter. 
Guatemala, Leslie C. Hanks. 
Hawaiian Islands, H. W. Severance. 
* Consuls General. 



Honduras, W. V. Wells. 

Italy, Count I)iego Barrillis. 

Japan, Saburo Takaki. 

Mexico, Manuel Azpiroz. 

Netherlands, J. I>e Fremery. 

^'Nicaragua, F. Herrera. 

Peru, Frederico de la Fuenta y Subirat 

Portugal, Francis Berton. 

Russia, Vladimir Weltzky. 

San Salvador (vacant). 

Spain, C. Martin. 

Sweden and Norway, August Berggren. 

Switzerland, F. Berton; Antoine Borel, vice. 

Turkey, George W. Gibbs. 

United States of Colombia, Ricardo Morales. 



L. EOMAN & CO., Wedding Invitations engraved and printed, 11 Mont. St.. S. P. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



110 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



TABLE 

Giving tho number of Horses, Cattle, Sheep, Hogs, etc., in the State, compiled from the reports of the 

County Assessors, 1874. 



Counties. 



Alameda 

Alpine 

Amador 

I),ltt0 

Calaveras 

(Jolusa 

Contra Costa 

Del Norto 

El Dorado 

Fresno 

Humboldt 

Inyo 

Korn 

Klamath 

Lake 

Lassen 

Los Angeles 

Marin , 

Mariposa 

Mendocino 

Mercod 

Modoc , 

Mono 

iMouterey 

Napa 

Nevada 

Placor , 

Plumas , 

Sacramento 

San Lenito 

San Bernardino... 

rian iJiego , 

dan Francisco 

San Joaquin 

San Luis Obispo.. 

San Mateo 

Santa Barbara.... 

Santa Clara 

Santa Cruz 

Shasta 

Sierra 

Siskiyou 

Solano 

Sonoma 

Stanislaus 

Sutter 

Tehama 

Trinity 

Tulare 

Tuolumne 

Ventura 

Yolo 

Yuba 

Totals 



6,973 
28.3 
2,51() 
5,413 
2,21)(j 
6,W1 
5,19G 
534 
2.029 
5.439 
4,01)3 
4,01)4 
4,Glt) 
34l> 
1,932 
2,145 
7,U17 
1,.505 
l,t)(J7 
4,SU9 
3,942 



1,419 
8,554 
4.842 
1,9G2 
2,543 
1,372 
(i,732 
3,209 
3,372 
4,427 
6,0u0 

10,20() 
3,822 
3,4i)9 
2,101 

11,058 
3,017 
2,l).54 
790 
7,449 
5,407 
8,()(i4 
O.tiSli 
3,868 
4,244 
tl4() 
9,8(57 
1,858 
3,()t)3 
5,731 
3,3!)5 



218,010 



398 
15 
225 
732 
171 
l,3li!) 
581 
114 
124 
503 

m> 

080 
419 
478 
218 
133 
900 
101 
21)5 
505 
852 



187 
178 
533 
120 
270 
118 
322 
211 
319 
598 
10 
898 
3.">4 
304 
315 
490 
148 
l'.i7 
105 
472 
892 
720 

1,423 
545 
122 
259 
412 
1.57 
158 

1,012 
325 



5,794 
230 
2,354 
4,070 
3,753 
2,0:)1 
4,01!) 
1.085 
3,008 
1,57.» 
4,808 
1,121 
1,030 
342 
1,338 
1,151 
4,377 
19,102 
1,858 
4,.521 
2,533 



2,042 
5,778 
2,589 
2,411 
2,325 
2,107 
9,120 
3,340 
1,014 
5,108 
4,020 
5,004 
8,342 
6,587 
2,708 

12,262 
3,782 
1,440 
1,000 
2,047 
4,173 

17,271 
1,075 
2,987 
2,72(5 
414 
3,125 
2,409 
1,370 
3,207 
3,553 



22,003 827 I 1!)8,700 



1,904 

203 

1,319 

3,320 

2,447 

057 

4,.520 

093 

1,024 

1,204 

7,425 

1,294 

345 

775 

602 

4,421 

1,950 

3,282 

1,450 

2,.591 

2,154 



1,089 
3,0.50 
2,045 
1,298 
1,271 
2,139 
5,058 
2,532 

402 

2,233 

21 

4,273 

9,009 

991 
3,340 
5,102 
1,300 
1,940 



5,310 
1,348 
5,(i90 
1,359 
2,209 



233 
4,557 



735 
1,8.57 
1,082 



118,305 



303 



675 

235 

448 
42 



3,587 
2,472 

129 
2,905 

207 



550 
430 
509 
703 
1,425 



918 
1,648 
220 
83 
218 
137 
310 
374 
150 
480 



101 
3,052 
108 
502 
408 
47 
415 



2,113 
351 

1,032 
118 
59 



77 
2,101 



175 
39 
110 



30,3^8 



17 

54 

117 

204 

150 



2 

72 

221 

190 

441 

191 

152 

73 

65 

95 

166 

132 

77 

317 

6 



132 



32 
200 
375 
211 
297 
2 
121 
153 



10 
40 

173 
41 
40 

4.53 

1.50 
80 

104 
4 

137 
16 
99 



5,951 



op 



10,941 

840 

6,940 

16,318 

9,295 

9,149 

17,429 

2,984 

8,122 

44,073 

30,413 

12,032 

40,074 

3,974 

5,084 

10,824 

16,356 

29,037 

8,210 

18,712 

14,878 



11,042 

29,424 

10,015 

0,840 

5,722 

7,725 

22,879 

14,841 

9,282 

18,703 

4,041 

21,895 

37,808 

11,554 

17,034 

31,356 

8,070 

9,951 

3,040 

23,909 

14 ,.595 

30,808 

9,802 

9,316 

8,004 

3,913 

26,032 

6,669 

6,131 

9,806 

9,821 



770,793 



36,532 

1,075 

15,170 

67,8.55 

39,654 

185,309 

13,1.55 

842 

13,1.52 

403,024 

73,448 

3,334 

225,703 

617 

20,897 

17,322 

473,963 

l,3(i5 

51,048 

93,6.56 

25,993 



1,976 

123,010 

23,922 

2,122 

39,998 

3,702 

100,301 

71,949 

59,310 

80,617 

590 

99,232 

179,081 

455 

244,781 

43,811 

1,648 

47,395 

1,049 

20,.550 

51,7.59 

62^49 

135,188 

30,525 

94,660 

14,286 

298,300 

10,010 

148,748 

53,720 

27,209 



4,114,149 



!2l 
» o 

• m a- 

•-I a 
so o 



121 



2,536 
1.50 

7,906 
100 

1,122 



6,713 

6,437 

50 

173 

801 

40 



22 
1,975 
65 
3,98:3 
203 
242 



716 
2,000 

120 
1,290 
5,503 

484 
1.347 

737 

384 
1,203 



482 
1,176 



173 
1,567 

638 
1,141 



145 

165 

423 

779 

16 



595 

1,270 

2,705 

75 

719 
1,044 



59,676 



2,734 
119 

3,010 
12,978 

3,004 
14..529 

5,081 
844 

1,8-58 
13,928 

7,506 

1,435 

3,439 
794 

4,085 
596 

5,900 

6,011 

3,3.35 
11,041 

4,962 



174 
4,620 
6,428 
1,075 
3,780 
488 
7,030 
3,102 
1,344 
1,240 
3,704 
8,217 
5,111 
2,080 
1,208 

.7,840 
1,500 
6,891 
600 
2,170 
8,137 

12,205 
5,9.59 
9,495 
5,033 
564 

12,280 

588 

5,723 

12,829 
3,446 



2.53,122 



GOLD AND SILVEK PKODUCT OF THE UNITED STATES. 

Dr. Linderman, Director of the United States Mint, in his report for 1874, estimates the increase of 
coin and bullion in the United States for the past two vears at $o8,45(),364. The estimated total on Juno 
30th, 1874, was $160,846,228. In 1872 the total was §128.389,804, of which the banks held $10,000,000 
at the East, and tho Pacific coast $20,000,000. The estimated production in the United States since 
June 30th, 1872, is $140,000,000. During the fiscal year ending June 30th, 1874, there wore in gold $68,801,- 
595; in silver $15,122,151, operated upon by the mint and its branches. The coinage for that year was: 
In gold, $50,442,690; in silver, $5,983,001. The average coinage for the ten next preceding years was: gold, 
$22,780,289; silver, $1,275,623. 

The total of gold produced in California from 1847 to and including 1873, is estimated in round num- 
bers at $'(85,800,000. Tho production of gold in all the other States and Territories from 1860 to 1874 is 
estimated at $2.54,9.50,000. Total, $1,240,750,000. To this must be added $189,000,000 in silver, produced 
from 1849 to 1874; making a grand total of precious metals added to the circulation of the world by this 
country in a quarter of a century of 81,429,7.50,000. 



PAmTSWOETH & CLAUK, Fire Insurance Agents for Pacific Coast, San Francisii 



Largest stock Musical Merchandise west of Chicago, at CRAY'S, 105 Kearny, S. P. 



GAZETTEER 



BUSINESS REGISTER 

OF THE 

STATES AND TERRITORIES 

or THE 

PACIFIC COAST. 



8®* In this department will be found, alphabetically arranged under the several States and 
Territories, the names of the different counties, cities and towns on the Pacific Coast, and the local 
officers governing the same, with the address of each Merchant, Manufacturer and Professional residing 
therein. When the PostofEce address differs from the name of the locality, it is given immediately after 
the name and preceding the locality to which it refers. 

For information connected with the Government, Resources, Statistics, etc., of the different States and 
Territories of the Pacific Coast, see the pages immediately preceding each. 

For Supplementary Names, see page 810. 



agt Agent 

attj' Attorney at Law 

Bap Baptist 

bdg Biiililing 

bet. Between 

blk Block 

Cong Congregationalist 

cor Corner 

e East 

Episc Episcopalian 

gen mdse General Merchandise 



Heb Hebrew 

imp Importer 

J P Justice of the Peace 

Luth Lutheran 

mdse Merchandise 

manuf. Manufacturer 

mcht Merchant 

Meth Methodist 

n North 

N P Notary Public 

nr Near 



op Opposite 

P Post Office 

Presb Presbyterian 

proptr Proprietor 

Q M Quartz Mill 

R C lioman Catholic 

Rev Revf-rend 

s South 

S M Saw Mill 

Unit Unitarian 

w West 



CALIFORNIA. 



Acampo, San Joaquin Co, P O 13 miles east 

of Stockton 
Denhara Vf 8, wagon maker 
Kirkland William, general merchandise 
Sagu (ieorgo, blacksmith 
Welsh Daniel, liquor saloon 
Woods John N, postmaster 

Adams Ferry, Shasta Co, P O address, 

American Planch, 24 miles s e of Shasta 
Adams W J, hotel proprietor and general merchant 
Darrh S. lumber 

Adinville, Modoc Co, P O 42 miles s w of 

Dorris Bridge, is in the southern portion of Big Val- 
ley, SO miles, by road, north ofSusanville, and 140 
northeastof Redding, on the California and Oregon ' 
' Railroad. The town was named in honor of Mr. 
Adiii McOowell, Its flrst settler, and was a strong 
candidate for the county seat, but being only one 
mile from the county line of Lassen, the selection 
of Dorris Bridge was made. 



Arentz E, liquor saloon 

Auble M, livery stable 

Bautz T A, attorney at law 

Benham <fe Ingram, blacksmiths 

Blaske A, druggist 

Buchor &. Briscoe, general merchandise 

Frank A J, blacksmith 

Urubbs E P, general merchandise 

Hall H P, physician 

Harris L W, livery stable 

Lauer E & Co, general merchandise 

Lauer Emanuel, postmaster 

Mann 11, li(iuor saloon 

McMath C, hotel 

Traugh L G, attorney at law 

Willow Creek Lumbering Co, lumber dealers 

Adobe Creek, Santa Clara Co, P 
dross, Maytield, Itj miles n w of San Jose 
Finger August, nursery 
Monahan Charles, liquor saloon 



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A. ROMAN & CO., Photograph Albums, Bibles, and Prayer Books, 11 Mont. St., S. P, 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant 



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112 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY, 



Adobe Meadows, Mono Co, P O address, 

ISenton, 4 ) miles s e of Bridgeport 
Shaw Friuik, hotel 
iEtna Mills, Siskiyou Co. (See Etna Mills) 

Agua Caliente, San Diego Co, P O address, 
Warner's Ranch, (iO miles n o of San Diego, a 
small agricultural setlloinont, and a place of 
resort at the hot sjjrings for invalids 

Wilson ilonry, general merchandise 

Agua Frio, Mariposa Co, P O address, 

Aluunt Bullion, 5 miles w of Mariposa 
Sanguinetti A, general merchandise 

"Ajuanga, San Diego Co, P address, 

Toniocula, 85 mil is n o of San Diego 
Bergman Jacob, stock raiser 
Konnistun M A, stock raiser 
Thoman Charles, stock raiser 

Alabama House, Amador Co, P O ad- 
dress, ione Valley, 'M miles n w of Jackson 
Stacy Varnum, hotel 

Alameda, Alameda Co, P O 2 miles s of 

Oakland, with wbicli It is connected by railroad 
by which trains make hourly trips with the ferry to 
San Francisco, 9 miles distant. This pretty name 
of a prettj^ locality signiUes a walk embowered in 
trees, and is understood to embrace the peninsula 
lying between the estuary of San Antonio on the 
north and San Leandro Bay on the Bouth, two arms 
of the Bay of San Francisco. This penmsulais about 
four miles in length by one and a half in breadth, is 
a level plain X)f tertile soil which is covered by a na- 
tive growth of live oaks whose perennial verdure 
lends lasting beauty to the lovely landscape. The 
plot was originally laid out in the three villages of 
Woodstock, Encinal and Alameda, but the latter 
name includes all. The broad streets and park-like 
groves render the peninsula very attractive as a 
place of residence and pleasure resort; the many 
line mansions and cottages, and the numerous picnic 
parties in their season, give evidence of the fact. 
The present population numbers about 'l,oOO, and is 
well supplied with churches, the Methodist, Presby- 
terian, iilpiscopal and Catholic having tine edifices; 
and schools of every grade are maintained. The 
Alameda Mnclnal, a weekly journal of high repute, 
is pubUshed by Mr. F. K. Krauth, which, in Sept., 
1874, passed its fifth anniversary. 

ALAMEDA ENCINAL, F K Krauth, proprietor, 

Park 
Bancroft A J, butcher, Park 
Bannister Alfred, civil engineer. Park 
BAKBEK AKTHUK S, postmaster and general mer- 
chandise. Park 
Barlow Henry S, proprietor Loyal Oak Hotel, Park 
Baroteau Auguste, groceries, liquors and restaurant, 

Encinal 
Bishop J Jc S, groceries. Park 
Boehmer Fritz, general merchandise, Park 
Bremer Herman, tSchuetzen Park, Mastic Station 
Cobb George D, attorney at law. Park 
Convado George, liquor saloon 
Cook Alexander & Co, blacksmiths and wagonmak- 

ers. Park 
Coy Frank, real estate, St. Paul 
Derby E M & Co, lumber, Alameda Point 
Durein John, boots and shoes. Park 
Kichler K, physician, cor Oak and Kailroad Ave 
Ellory Epes, real estate, cor St Paul and Jefferson 

Ave 
■^jfcFaskings Louis, hotel. Railroad Ave 

Flynn W' G, real estate agent and liquor saloon, cor 

Euclid and Kailroad Ave 
Foster C H, architect rear Public School 
Gamba A, " Gamba's Retreat," Encinal Station 
Gibbons W^illiam, attorney at law. Central Ave 
Gibbons William P, physician. Central Ave 
Glas, Frank, liquor saloon. Park 
Hally & Curvey, blacksmiths. Park 
Head R G, contractor and builder, Santa Clara Av 
Hess A, homeopathic physician. Park 
Holtz William, groceries and liquors, Santa Clara* 

Ave 
Horst William, liquor saloon. Mastic Station 
Jaquith W K, builder, liuena*Vista Av 
Jenks k Mead, real estate agents. Park 
Josee William H, upholstering and furniture, Park 



Kay I N, proprietor Yosomito Hotel, Park 

Karstadt Frederick, liquor saloon, Park 

Koono E B, druggist, I'ark 

KRAUTH F K, proprietor Alameda Encinal, Park 

Lemkio Charles 11, barber, Park 

Lewis George L, livery stable. Park 

Liese Conrad, butcher. Park 

McKoo J W, real estate and lumber. Park 

Mills Thomas, tinsmith, and plumber. Railroad Ave 

Moeller August, nurseryman. Mastic Station 

Moulton G >1, coal, Park 

Murray George E, house and sign painter, Pftrk 

Nobmann John, licjuor saloon and restaurant. Park 

Pago Nathaniel, real estate. Railroad Ave 

Palmer <k Smith, real estate agents. Park 

Parr Thomas li, harness and saddlery. Park 

Perkins William, builder and contractor, cor Park 

and Lincoln Ave 
Probst L, bakery. Park 
Rabio R, confectionery and fruits, Park 
Richter Max, bakery. Park 
Riothard, Victor, brewery. Third Ave 
Severin, Theodore, liquor saloon, Park 
Smith J S, tailor. Park 
Smith Thomas A, notary public, Park 
Straub Denis, contractor Encinal Station 
Taber R L Rev, clergyman (Presb) 
Trenor Eustace, physician, cor Lincoln Ave and 

Everett 
Whitney & Co's Express, cor Park and Railroad 

Ave 

Alaraeda County. Organized in 1853. 

Bounded north by Contra Costa, east by Contra 
Costa and San Joaquin, south by Santa Clara and 
west by the Bay of San Francisco. Area, 8(J0 square 
miles. Assessed valuation of property for 1874, 
?;j5,000,000. County Seat, Oakland. Principal towns: 
Alameda, Alvarado, Berkeley, Centerville, Decota, 
Dublin, Haywood, Livermore, Mission San Jose, 
Pleasanton, and San Leandro. Oakland, Brooklyn, 
Clinton and San Antonio, the three latter formerly 
organized as Kast Oakland, now constitute one city, 
with a population of nearly 20,000. Conimuuication 
with San Francisco is conveniently maintained by 
steam and sailing vessels from the many landings 
and small harbors along the Bay. Ferriesare estab- 
lished at Berkeley and Oakland, at the latter place 
Piissenger and freight boats making from thirty to 
forty trips per day. The Central Pacific Railroad 
passes over the greatest length of the county and 
connects with San Jose bj' a branch from Niles Sta- 
tion. Total length of railroads, 116 miles. 

The resources of Alameda are chiefly agricultu- 
ral, it ranking as one of the first counties in the 
State for its cereal productions. Fruit is raised in 
large quantities, of an excellentquality and in great 
variety. Coal is found in the Monte Diablo range 
at various places, and at Corral Hollow it is mined 
to a limited extent. Numerous manufactures, 
smelting and refining works have been established 
at places along the Bay rendered available for the 
purposes by the many fine landings. 

The topographical features of the county are hills 
and valleys, all generally fertile. Two ranges of 
hills, the Contra Costa and Monte Diablo, with their 
subjacent valleys, run from north to south. The 
rich Amador and Livermore valleys lie between 
these two ranges, and the San Joaquin valley con- 
stitutes the eastern portion. A plain about four 
miles in width, exceedingly fertile and picturesque, 
on which is located the prosperous city of Oakland, 
extends from the Bay to the Contra Costa hills. 

Offlcers: Stephen G. Nye, County Judge; John 
V. B. Goodrich, Clerk ; Albert A. Moore, District 
Attorney ; Henry N. Morse, Sheritt'; B. S. Marston, 
Recorder; Peter K. Borein, Auditor; Robert S. 
Farrelly, Treasurer ; Calvin J. Stevens, Tax Collec- 
tor ; J. E. Whitcher (Oakland Township), A. B. 
Webster (Brooklyn), S. I. Marston (Washington), 
Minor Smith (Alamedal, L. C. Moorhouse (Eden), 
Hiram Bailey (Murray), Assessors; Luis Castro, 
Surveyor ; Solon H. Mather, Coroner and Public 
Administrator; W. F. B. Lynch, Superintendent 
Public Schools. 

,Alamo, Contra Costa Co, P O 14 miles 

s e of Martinez 
Foster James, postmaster and attorney at law 
Hamburg L, harness and saddlery 
.Henry J B, hotel 
Khron Henry, agent Whitney & Co's express and 

shoe maker 
Seely Daniel, blacksmith 
Sohn Peter, general merchandise 
Tubbs W W Rev, clergyman (Presb) 



Before insuring call on PAENSWOETH & CLAEK, 426 California St., S. P. 



A. HOMAN & CO., General Agents for Subscription Books, 11 ILIontgomery St., S. F. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



113 



Albany Flat, Calaveras Co, P O address, 

Angels Camp, 15 miles s of San Andreas 
Lee Andrew, general merchandise 

Albion, Mendocino Co, P O 48 miles w of 

Ukiah 
T>Handloy William, hotel and dealer railroad ties, 

posts, etc 
Macpherson & Wetherbee, lumber manufacturers 
White C E, postmaster 
White L E & Co, general merchandise, hotel and 

agents Wells, Fargo & Co 

Alcatraz, San Francisco Co, P O 2 miles 

n e of San Francisco 
Thomas Charles E, postmaster 

Algerine, Tuolumne Co, P address, 

Jamestown, 7 miles s of Sonora 
Nau E, butcher 
Rocco John, general merchandise 

Alleghany, Sierra Co, P O 9 miles s of 

Downioville 
Bradbury & Powell, butchers ^ 

Brainard Charles, livery stable and stage office 
Crafts S S, postmaster 
Crafts & Co, general merchandise and agents Wells 

Fargo & Co 
Deyo William A, liquor saloon 
Lefevre Josiah, physician 
Miller Ernst, saloon and restaurant 
Thompson David, hotel 
AVest & Clute, liquor saloon 

Allen Springs, Lake Co, P 29 miles n e 

of Lakeport 
Allen Bros, hotel and market* 
Allon George, postmaster 
Allen Vail, general merchandise 
Douglas J ohn, carpenter 
Johnson Al, livery and feed stable 
Mitchell J E, blacksmith 

Allison Rancli, Nevada Co, P O address, 

(irass Valley, 7 miles s of JMevada City 
Ahern James, liquor saloon and boarding 
Hennessy I'atrick, general merchandise 
Sullivan Thomas, liquor saloon 

Alma, Santa Clara Co, P 15 miles s w of 

San Jose 
Chase S H, lumber 

Collins Lysandor, postmaster and hotel 
Collumlet feter, distillery 
Millard Jjewis, contractor 
Meiseenhoimer M, surveyor 
Sanderson &, Co, lumber manufacturers ■ 

Alpine County. Organized in 1864. 
Bounded northeabt by tlie Wiate of Nevada, ease by 
Mono, south by Tuolumne, and west by Cala- 
veras, Amador and El Dorado. Area, 850 square 
miles. Assessed valuation of propert.v for 1S74, ^850,-. 
OtXJ. County seat, Silver Mountain. Principal towns: 
Monitor and MarkleeviUe. -Kesources, lumber and 
minerals. Its topography, as i is name implies, is 
of Alpme character, being mountainous and bro- 
ken. It lies on the summit and eastern slope of the 
Sierra Nevada, and contains the sources of two( 
branches of the Carson river, which How northeast- 
wardly through deep caQons into the State of Neva- 
da. Their rapid fall as they descend from the lofty, 
snow-capped peaks ofthe mountains, atlbrds abund- 
ant water power for the manufacture of lumber 
or for the reduction of ore. Alpine enjo.vs a con- 
siderable trade iu lumber and flrewoodi which it 
furnishes to Nevada, and its mines of gold, silver 
and copper are worked with some success. Agri- 
culture is carried on iu the small valleys to a limited 
extent. 

Officers: Silas W. Griffith, County Judge ; Leon 
M. Huel, Clerk, Recorder and Auditor ; Thomas J 
[Orgon, District Attorney ; John B. Scott, SherilT 
and Tax Collector; Thomas \V. Legget, Treasurer; 
Charles B. Gregory, Assessor ; James Champion, 
Surveyor ; 1). N. McBeth, Coroner and Public Ad- 
ministrator ; A. C. Pratt, Superiuteadent Public 
Schools. 

Alpine Mill, Kern Co, P O address, Glen- 

ville 
Collar Eugene, general merchandise 



Au- 



Alta, Placer Co, P O 33 miles * ^ 

burn ^ 

Banvard B M, postmaster and hotel 
Banvard L II, agt C P R R and A & P Telegraph Co 
Betts J, agent Wells, Fargo & Co 
Damsguard John, lumljor manufacturer 
Mattel Jo.'eph, liquor saloon 
Taylor & Pickens, general merchandise 
Tillotson L B ife Co, lumber manufacturers 
Towle Brothers, lumber manufacturers 
Towlo Gould & Co, lumber manufacturers 
Wright J E, livery stable, liquor saloon and market 

Altamont, Alameda Co, P O 39 miles e of 

Oakland 
DolanP, hotel ' 

Wright William H, postmaster, agent Wells, Fargo 

& Co, and general merchandise 

Altaville, Calaveras Co, P O address, An- 
gels Camp, 12 miles s of San Andreas 
Beker John, brewery 
DEMEREST D D, foundry 
Nuninger H, liquor saloon 
PRINCE B R, hotel and general mdso 

Altaville, Del Norte Co, P address, Cres- 
cent City, 1(5 miles n e of Crescent City 
Tack Nicholas, hotel 

Alvarado, Alameda Co, PO 18 miles s e of 
• Oakland and 26 miles s e of San Francisco, is in Wasli- 
iugton Township. This is one of the oldest towns 
of Alameda, and was the first county seat. Ala- 
meda creek flows through the place, affording 
navigation to light draught vessels, by which easy 
communication is maintained with San Francisco. 
The town boasts the leading stove foundry in the 
State, and until recently a Beet Sugar factory flour- 
ished, but this, to secure cheaper land and fuel, was 
removed to Sequel, Santa Cruz Co. Another, how- 
ever, is soon expected to take its place. The sur- 
rounding land is low and of great fertility, assuring 
large business and an abundant prosperity to the 
people. The landing, or port of Alvarado, is at 
Union Citv, half a mile from the principal town, and 
possesses "four or five large warehouses and engages 
quite a fleet of small vessels. 

Alguite Rodney, harness and saddlery 

Bidtenger William, shoe maker 

Brvan VV J, superintendent Alvarado Foundry 

BUTTEAU S A, physician 

DYER E H, surveyor 

Helwig P, butcher 

Heyer August, liquor saloon 

Huff Edward, liquor saloon 

Ingalls B F, builder 

Latin W H, liquor saloon 

Lee Antonio, barber 
•Listen William M, general merchandise 

Lowell A J, tinsmith 

May August, butcher 

McKeown James, blacksmith and wagon maker 
iOwen Daniel C, postmaster, agent Wells, Fargo & 
Co, notary public and insurance agent 

'Ralph John H, general merchandise 

Smithurst John, liquor saloon 

Stokes James J, general merchandise 

■Sumner H C, livery stable 

TAY GEORGE H & CO, proprs Alvarado Foundry 

•TULLER P, proprietor Brooklyn Hotel • 

Williams B F, attorney at law 

Alviso, Santa Clara Co, P O 9 miles n of 
San Jose,and 35 miles by steamer s e of San Francisco, 
at the head of San Francisco Bay, and is the land- 
ing, or embaroadero, of San .lose. This is an im- 
portant depot for the trade of Santa Clara county, 
having five brick warehouses for the storage of 
grain, and six of wood for hay, all of large capacity, 
one of the warehouses connected with Bray's flour- 
ing mill having capacity for the storage of 5,000 
_ tons of wheat. Two steamers make daily trips to 
• San Francisco, touching at the Green Point Dairy 
Ranch. Numerous small sailing craft also ply in 
the trade. A narrow gauge railroad to San Jose 
Is proposed, which would greatly facilitate busiiu'ss. 
A large flouring and paper mill constitute the 
manufactures. The place is surrounded by a large 
extent of nuirsh land, subject to overflow at the 
highest tides, and a company has been formed 
which is engaged in the reclamation of a large are;i 
lying between Alviso and the lauds of the old Mis- 
sion of San Jose. 



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IFEANCIS & VALENTINE, Printers, 517 Clav and 510-516 Commercial St.. S. T. 

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D. "W. Laird, San Prancisco Jewelry Mamifactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



114 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Franlln?' 



our manufncturor 
oot and shoo maker 



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Andora 

Ayros 1^ ..^_. 

Bray Franll^ropriotor Alviso Flour Mills 

Oaitor John S & Co, grain warohouso 

Erkson William, Granger's grain warehouse 

(Jallaghor Andrew, warehouse 

Hum U II, hay warehouse 

Hays & Carter, proprs Alviso & San Jose stage line 

Howard k Emerson, blacksmiths 

IIUTCIIINSON K, lumber and warehouse 

Johnson S \V, butcher 

Karr John, superintendent Alviso warehouse 

King E J, paper mill 

I'ogue Thomas, hotel 

San Francisco and Alviso Transportation Co 

Tilden I) K, general merchandise 

'■Vincent Louisa Madame, hotel 

Wade H, warohouso 

Wade H G, grain warehouse 

AVade M A Miss, postmistress 

Whitcomb 0, blacksmith 

Wright William, liquor saloon 

Araador, Alameda Co. (See Dougherty Sta- 
tion) 

Amador City, Amador Co, P O 6 miles n 
w of Jackson 

Allen (ireorgo, lumber 

'Chichizola A, general merchandise 

Crib bins 1', hotel 

FLEEHART C, agent Wells, Fargo & Co 

HAKRINGTON J W, proprietor Amador Hotel i 

Harris S, cigars tobacco and fruit 

Ueisch P, barber 

HEWITT C, superintendent Keystone Consoli- 
dated Mining Co 

Jordan J T, wagon maker 

Kerr Thomas, livery stable -^ 

KIRKLAND W W & Co, general merchandise 

Kling George W, liquor saloon 

Mooney M, liquor saloon 

Peyton William, liquor saloon 

Sowdon Joseph, shoe maker 

TIMMERMAN JOSEPH, blacksmith and wheel- 
wright 

Weil Aaron, postmaster, agent W U Telegraph Co 
and general merchandise 

Werner & Sutherland, butchers 

Amador County. Organized in 1854. 
Bounded north by Kl Dorado, east by Alpine, south- 
east and south by Calaveras, and west by San Joa- 
quin and Sacramento. Area. 700 square miles. As- 
sessed valuation of property for 187-4, $2,554,5.55. Coun- 
ty seat, Jacli.son. Principal towns: Dry town, Fiddle- 
town, lone, Sutter Creek, and Volcano. The re- 
sources are mineral, with capacity for agriculture 
and grazing to a considerable extent. Fruit, in great 
variety, is successfully grown, and in the manufac- 
ture of wine and brandy Amador promises to take 
high rank. Its gold mines, particularly in quartz, 
are among the richest in the world, and their suc- 
ce.ssful prosecution is very encouraging to that in- 
terest. The great Mother Lode passes through the 
county, upon which are some of the richest mines iiT 
the State. Abed of coal, or lignite, is found near 
lone, which supplies a fair quality of fuel, much 
used at the mines and mills in the vicinity, and to 
which a railroad from Stockton is building. Copper 
and other minerals are found, and successfully 
mined. The Amador Canal, a grand mining enter- 
prise, was completed in 1874, earring 5,000 inches of 
water, giving cheap motive power to machinery and 
new life to placer mining. The county is long adTh)- 
narrow, extending from the summit to the base of 
the Sierra Nevada on its western slope. The south 
branch of the Cosumnes runs along its northern 
border, and the Mokelumne on its southern. Sutter 
and Drj' creeks, two small streams, are in the lower 
portion. Lines of stages to Sacramento and Stock- 
ton pass through it, connecting with the Central 
Pacific Railroad at Gait. 

Officers: Thomas M. Pawling, County Judge; James 
B. .Stevens, Clerk, Kecorderand Auditor; Thomas J^ 
Phelps, District Attorney; Peter Fagan, Sheriff and 
Tax Collector; John A. Butterfleld, Treasurer; John 
VV. Surface, Assessor; William L. HcKim, Surveyor; 
Daniel Myers, Coroner and Public Administrator; 
Samuel G. Briggs, Superintendent Public Schools. 

American Flat, El Dorado Co, P O ad- 
dress, Kelsey, 7 miles n of Placorville 
Lawyer J J, groceries and varieties 



American House, Plumas Co, P address, 

La Porte, :!•> miles s of Quincy 
Cunningham Patrick, hotel 

American House, Trinity Co, P O address, 

Trinity Centre, 50 miles n o of Weaverville 
Dodge W S, hotel 

Araerican Ranch, Shasta Co, P 0. (See 

Anderson) 
Anderson Elias, Postmaster 

Anaheim, Los Angeles Co, 26J miles s e of 

J,os Angeles, 12 miles n of Anaheim Landing, and 
22 miles n e of Wilmington. The town is located In 
the valley of the Santa Ana river, was established 
in 18)7 by an association of Germans, who there un- 
dertook the cultivation of the vine on the co-operat- 
ive principle. A large plat of ground was laid out 
in fields of twenty acres, and allotted to each share- 
holder. A canal from the Santa Ana river fur- 
nished water for irrigation, and the colony prcspered 
beyond expectation. The town thus established has 
grown to be a largeandimportantplace,.sendingthe 
products of its vineyards to all parts of the United 
"" States, and will, before the end of 1875, be connected 
by railroad with Los Angeles and the sea. The 
town of Downey has been laid out, 13 miles north- 
erly, and to this point the Anaheim branch of the 
Southern Pacific Railroad was completed in October 
1874, with the expectation of reaching Anaheim in 
January following. But the section will never be 
entirely dependent on railroad transportation, as 
the .sea is near, and at the port, Balsa Chica, a wharf 
2,000 feet in length, costing iJSO.OOO, is in course of 
construction by the farmers »nd business men of the 
countj', which will afford independence and relief to 
tlie great andgrowing business. One newspaper, the 
Gazette, is published weekly. 

ANAHEIM GAZETTE, R Melrose, proprietor 

Backs F & J, furniture and wall paper 

Bennerscheidt J, stoves and tinware 

BLANKEN HERMAN, apothecary 

Bush Charles H, harness and saddlery 

Calisher M & Co, general merchandise 

Clarke Henry, attorney at law 

CLARKE J VV, real estate agent, notary public and 

justice of the peace 
Clarke & Austin, books, stationery and insurance 

agents 
Cohen B, butcher 

Crowther W, blacksmith and wagon maker 
DASSONVILLB V, physician 
DAVIS P & BRO, general merchandise and grain 
Eldridge Flora Mrs, milliner and dressmaker 
Fischer John, real estate 
Flint, iji.xby & Co, stage proprietors 
Gabino Real, liquor saloon 
Gad/, & Lewis, livery stable 
"Gardiner J S, physician 
Goldstein S, brewery 
GOOCH J H, wagon and sign painter 
GOODMAN & RiMPAN, general merchandise 
Hamilton Samuel, attorney at law 
Hardin W N, physician 

"EIMANN & GEORGE, general merchandise 
Hibile Charles, saloon and bakery 
Higby C C & Co, proprietors Planters' Hotel ' 
HiGGINS, WILLIAM M, druggist and postmaster 
Hill A, blacksmith and wagon maker 
Jones AI 8, physician 
Kirby L W, liquor saloon 
Kuelp F Vf Mrs, private school 
LANGENBERGER A, general merchandise and agt 

Wells, Fargo & Co » 
List Michael, butcher 
Luedke R, watches and jewelery 
Massemann C, liauor saloon 
MELROSE R, proprietor Anaheim Gazette 
Mendelson M A, merchant tailor 
Mitchell N H, livery stable and proptr Wilmington 

& Anaheim stage line 
Nebelung Max, proprietor Anaheim Hotel 
Olen W R, real estate agent 
Payne D, wagon and sign painter 
Pellegrin P, watchmaker and jeweler 
Phillips C J, dentist 
Polhemus Henry D, real estate agent and telegraph 

operator 
RICHARDS P, liquor saloon 
ROQUES & GAGNEUR, liquor saloon and restaurant 



f-H 



Best Piano Tuners at GRAY'S, 105 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



PEAUCIS & VALENTINE, Printers, Designers, and Engravers, 517 Clay St., S. P. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



Waetonberg Louis, proprietor Anaheim and Los 

Angeles stage line 
Wiseman W C. attorney at law 
Yocum J H, physician 



Anaheim Landing, Los Angeles Co, P 

address, Anaheim, 37 miles s e of Los Angele3 
Anaheim Lighter Co, forwarding 
Classen M, restaurant and liquor saloon 
Halborstadt & Co, lumber 

Anderson, Mendocino Co, P 0. (See Boon- 

ville) 
Rogers J Taylor, postmaster 

Anderson, Shasta Co, P address, Ameri- 
can Ranch, 18 miles s e of Shasta 

Anderson Elias, agent Wells, I'argo & Co and rail- 
road agent 

Bedford & Wright, general merchandise 

Egleston W J, agent J B Haggin 

Ludwig William, machinist 

Palmer & Wagner, fishermen 

Parhann I) & Son, blacksmiths 

Roberts Frank, teacher ^ 

Salsbury \Villiam, carpenter 

Sinder L P, liquor saloon 

Snow John, hotel 

Angel Island, Marin Co, P O in the Bay 

of San Francisco, 12 miles s e of San Rafael and i 
miles n of San Francisco 
Mellon Charles, postmaster 

Angel's Camp, Cdlaveras Co, P 012 miles 

8 e of San Andreas 
Anderson James, liquor saloon 
Bruner Frederick, butcher 
Cooley John, boot and shoe maker 
Cosgrove M Mrs, hotel 
Crooks William, postmaster and books, stationery 

and tobacco 1 

Feray John, livery stable 
Fletcher J T, lumber 
Garlick Joseph, liquor saloon andtakery 
Hockman Richard, varieties 
Johnson J RaivsonRev, clergyman (Cong) 
Kelly W A, physician 

Lindsay T L, notary public and justice of the peace 
Love A & Co, lumber 
MATSON JAMES, blacksmith 
Peirano John, dry goods and provisions 
Peirano Joseph, general merchandise 
Robinson L R, barber 
SCRIBNER JOHN C, agent 'Wells, Fargo & Co. 

general merchandise and drugs 
Speilner John, boot and shoe maker 
Stickles E <te G, general merchandise 
Tait William, tinsmith and justice of the peace 
Tryon G C, proprietor Angel's Hotel 
Waterman E K, blacksmith and wagon maker 

Antelope, Yolo Co, P O 20 miles n w of 

Woodland 
Argyle J A, carpenter 
Brown Z G, drugs and varieties 
Buckly Robert, brick maker 
Dunnigan &. Yarick, hotel and blacksmiths 
Uunnigan A W, postmaster 
Earle William, general merchandise 
Gray George W, carpenter 
Gray J B, liquor saloon 
Gray Joseph, carpenter 
Kior H M Physician 
Lily James, carpenter 
Lyon George, blacksmith 
Mitchell Thomas, blacksmith 
Ross D L, liquor saloon 
Yarick G W, harness and saddlery 

Antelope City, Mono Co. (See Coleville) 

Antelope Valley, Tehama Co, P O ad- 
dress, Ked Bluff, 4 miles e of Red;Bluff 
Blossom R H, wine grower 
Clark S D, general merchandise 
Loupee & Sanford, blacksmiths and wagon makers * 
Wilson James, wagon maker 



Anthony House, Nevada ۥ 

w of Nevada 
Westerfield William, postmaster an 



115 

7&da C^^^^^ miles 
istor an(^^Hreral mdse 



Antioch, Contra Costa Co, P O 25 miles e of 

Martinez. The town is pleasantly situated near the 
head of Suisiin Bay, and is the depot for shipment 
of produce of a large and fertile agricultural sec- 
tion. The event of 1374 was the loading of a large 
ship %vith wheat direct for L,iverpool, thus proving 
the capacity of the harbor, and giving hopes of the 
future. The construction of the King.s river and 
San Joaquin Canal, for navigation and irrigation, is 
expected, with its terminus at Antioch, which would 
make this an important port. The town enjoys con- 
siderable trade with the neighboring farmers, and 
al.so with the coal miners of Monte Diablo. The 
Antioch Distillery has been in operation some years, 
and a successful pottery is established, which manu- 
factures large quantities of earthenware. One 
newspaper, the Ledger, is published weekly. 

ANTIOCH LEDGER, J P Abbott, proprietor. Main 
^^Bayliss Edward, liquor saloon. Main 
Beasley E T Kev, clergyman (Cong) 
Behan, Timothy, liquor saloon, Wyatt 
Brewer ii Coates, general merchandise, '<5or Front 

and Galloway 
Brown George W. carriage painter and trimmer, 

Main 
Burk Geo, barber. Main 
Callihan P Rev, clergyman (R O 
CAKMAN GEORGE C, groceries, Front 
Chase & Robins, livery and teed stable. Main 
CRUIKSHANK & STKICKLEK, real estate and 

insurance agents. Main 
DAHNKEN FliEDEKlCK, liquor saloon. Wkarf 
Dillon & Tall, restaurant. Front 
Dolan M, livery stable. Main 
Ewing James, blacksmith and wagon maker 
Fischer Ferdinand, bakery. Main 
Forman W R ife Co, butchers, Front 
Galloway Joseph & Co, lumber, cor Wyatt a.Bd Gal- 
loway 
Gillespie G A, groceries, Main 
Girvin William, flour manufacturer 
Giusti Charles boot and shoe maker, Main 
/^GRIFFIN PATRICK, proprietor American Ex- 
change Hotel, cor Main and Wyatt'' 
Hard R B, stoves, tin, and hardware. Main 
Homburg Martin, general merchandise and ship 

chandlery, cor Alain and Front 
Howard J R, physician. Front 
Jacobs M H, merchant tailor, Front 
.Joslin S B, harness and saddlery, cor Wyatt and 

Boober 
JostC, proprietor Antioch Distillery 
Kahn Maurice, general merchandise. Front 
Kinkead William & Son, restaurant. Front 
Lobree Isaac, general merchandise, cor Main and 

Front 
Macartney D, fruits, vegetables, etc, AVyatt 
4'^IAHAN D P, proprietor Antioch Hotel and justice of 

the peace 
McDermott P, blacksmith and wagon maker. Main 
Moore & Luppa, butchers 
MORRISSEY M A, liquor and billiard saloon coil 

Wyatt and Galloway 
Nellis S, bakery 

Nelson Alice Mrs, restauraBt, Main 
Nooks & Co, butchers 
Oden H D, physician. Front 
Oden W T, druggist, cor Main and Front 
Orso & Bros, boot and shoe makers. Main 
Parkinson M C, physician. Main 
Peers Charles, liquor saloon. Main 
Peterson Bros, blacksmiths 

PHILLIPS VAN W, postmaster, agt Wells, Fargo 
■> & Co, and books and stationery, cor Main and 

Front 
Reich J C. boot and shoe maker. Main 
Remlree William, barber, Main 
Sayers Samuel, attorney at law 
Sutton Thomas A, liquor saloon. Main 
Tappeinor John, boot and shoe maker. Wyatt 
Thyarks George, general merchandise, cor Main and 

Front 
Walcott Oliver, attorney at law 
Wild C, tailor. Main 
Wilkening Frederick, liquor and billiard saloon, cor 

Main and AVyatt 



A. EOMAN & CO., Importing Booksellers and Stationers, 11 Montgomery St., S. F. 



GEAY'S New Musio Store, 105 Kearny Street, San Pranclsco. 



IIG 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 




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AVilliail^^^K, liquor saloon, Main 

Woll & ^^^■bnorul morchandiso, cor Galloway 
andV 

Applegate's Siding, Placer Co, P O ad- 
dress, CoU'ax, 10 uiiloa n o of Auburn 

Applogato Uoorgo W, I'ruit and wino grower 

Holmes II T & Co, linio manufacturers 

Aptos, Santa Cruz Co, POT miles e of 

SaiitH Cruz. This place, which has an extensive 
beach and wharf, has lately assumed importance. 
Here, during the past sutnmer.Claus Spreckles, Esq. . 
of San Francisco, hivs erected a splendid hotel and 
laid out walks and drives with the view of making 
It a popular resort for invalids and those seeking 
pleasure in lioth surf and glade. 

ARANO JOSEl'H, postmaster and gen mdso 

GASQUE HENRY, manager Aptos Hotel 

Nichols B C, lumber manufacturer 

Rico 1) M, hotel proprietor 

Walsh P K, proprietor Live Oak Hotel 

Aqueduct City, Amador Co, P O address 

Pino Grove, 10 miles e of Jackson 
Ludekins Louis, general merchandise 

Arbuckle, Shasta Co, P O address. Horse- 
town, 35 miles w of Shasta 
Parks George & John, general merchandise 

Areata, Humboldt Co, P O 8 miles n of 
Eureka by water and 14 by land, is pleasantly situa- 
ted at the northern extremity of Humboldt Bay, 
with surroundings most romantic and lovelj', and 
abounding in wealth. The soil is very fertile, and 
the neighboring forests are grand in the extreme. 
The California laurel.ione of the most beautiful of 
cabinet wood-^, grows quite plentifully, and from the 
immense forests of redwood a vast quantity of lum- 
ber is made. Two small steamers make semi-daily 
trips to Eureka, and sea-going vessels sail direct to 
outside ports. Some marsli land is in the neighbor- 
hood, which, when reclaimed, is found very pro- 
ductive. The principal exports are potatoes, dairy 
products, wool, tanbark, laurel and redwood lum- 
ber. 

Bauman John, blacksmith 

Bowen G C, drugs and medicines 

Brizard Alex, general merchandise 

Bull J C, butcher 

Burns Robert, tinsmith 

Cowan E, blacksmith 

Craig J U, liquor saloon 

Crogban & Murphy, livery stable 

Culberg J, general merchandise 

DEMING BYRON, agent Wells, Fargo & Co, notaf^ 



public and justice of the peace 

Dening B, wagon maker 

Hevelin Thomas, tanner 

Falk & Miner, lumber and flour manufacturers 

Fickle W Y, physician 

Force L, physician 

Greenewald J, general merchandise 

Harpst, Spring & Co, general merchandise ^" 

Hawkins E. cabinet maker 

Kirkby W H, livery stable ^ 

„ , McLi^od D, blacksmith 
**a#MerriU S AV, hotel 

Odenheimer William, shoe maker 

Preston A M, tanner 

Reed J L, architect 

Richards C C, liquor saloon 

Kichart F, hotel 

Shorleg Louis, tobacco and fruits 

Simpson D L, liquor saloon 

Smith Charles, postmaster and general merchandise 

Smith Joshua, boot and shoe maker 

Stanley G R, Rev, clergyman, (Meth) 
i^ Todd J S, clergyman, (Presb) 
^ Watkins & Gilbraith, blacksmiths 

Yocum G W B, blacksmith 



Areola, Fresno Co. (See Borden.) 

Argusvill«, Lassen Co, 71 miles n w of 

Susanville 
Carmichael & Farrington, lumber dealers 
Chandler C, hotel 
Chandler & Roney, stage agents 
Curry J D, general merchandise 
Nolten John W, postmaster 
Ricketts R A, stock dealer 



Arroya Grande, San Luis Obispo Co, P O 

IS miles s e of San Luis Obispo, Is In a pleasant val- 
Ic.v, and promises to become a place of considerable 
importance. Nearthe town are the White Sulphur 
Springs, where accommodations hiive recently been 
constructed tor parties resorting hithej' for health or 
Jileasure. The water iif the sprint's lias a tempera- 
ture of 115 degrees, and contains sulphur, iron, mag- 
nesia, etc., giving it rare inediciiial qualities. Wild 
game, romantic scenery, and a pleasant climate are 
among the attractions to this healthful resort. The 
nearest landing to Arroyo Cirande is the l'eople'8 
Landing, near Point Sal, 9 miles distant. 

Branch Bros, flour manufacturers 

Corbit John, postmaster and blacksmith 

Hammer.fchlag M, general merchandise 

Lyon J M, blacksmith 

Newson 1) h\ notary public, conveyancer and real 
estate agent 

Bobbins George W, hotel propr and gen mdse 

Ryan W H, liquor saloon 

Ashland, Sacramento Co, P address, Fol- 

som, 25 miles n e of Sacramento City 
Latham & Lawton, general merchandise 

Atlanta, San Joaquin Co, P 15 miles s of 

Stockton 
Averill Bros, blacksmiths and wheelwrights 
Davenport E G Mrs, hotel 
Murphy J D, postmaster and general merchandise 

Auburn, Placer County, P O and County 
seat, ;i5 miles n e of Sacramento. The Central Pa- 
cific Kailroad passes near the village, and stages 
connect it with the surrounding towns. Kich placer 
mines were discovered here in 1849, and from 
that date the place grew to be one of the chief 
mining centers of the State. It is well built of 
brick and stone, and the public buildings, churches, 
schools and neat private residences enabowered in 
the shade of luxuriant fruit trees, constitute an 
adornment of which any town would be proud. 
The construction of the railroad turned travel and 
trade in other directions, which were formerly con- 
tributary to its prosperity, and less business is trans- 
acted than formerly. Several rich cjuartz mines 
exist in the vicinity, but horticulture is destined to 
be the most important interest. Fruits of all kinds, 
of which grapes are the principal, are grown ex- 
tensively and vvith great success, and many thous- 
ands gallons of wine and brand.vof a superior quality 
are aimually manufactured. The Herald and Argus 
newspapers are published weekly, the former 
Democratic and the latter Republican, and rival 
each other in giving information of their section. 

Adrian A Mrs, restaurant, Plaza 

Albrecht & Stephens, proptrs American Hotel, Plaza 

Andrews Jc HoUenbock, agents Wells, Fargo & Co, 
bankers and jewelers, Main 

ARGUS PUBLISHING Co, proptrs Placer Weekly 
Argus, Washington 

Bethel Samuel, U S deputy mineral surveyor 

Betton Simon, liquor saloon, Plaza 

Borland James, proprietor West's Hotel, C P R R 
depot 

BuUard Austin D, proprietor Empire Hotel, Wash- 
ington, near Plaza 

Burns Hugh, liquor saloon, cor Main and Commercial 

Cain Thomas, liquor saloon, Main 

Campbell J E, attorney at law. Commercial 

Couroy Michael, agent Cave Valley Lime Co, nr 
C P R R depot 

Crisman George, liquor saloon and lodgings, Court 

Crutcher William B, proprietor Auburn Water 
Works, High 

Cubberly IJaniol C, wagon maker, AVashington 

Curley & Mahon, liquor saloon, C P R R depot 

D'Orplee Louis H, dentist. Commercial 

Dallman Louis, varieties. Main 

Daniels Samuel, brick manufacturer 

Deuel S A, physician. Commercial 

Dodge Edward E Rev, clergyman, (Meth) 

Du Bois A S. physician. Commercial 

Dwyer & Gubbay, general merchandise. Plaza 

Eddy & Hofi'man, butchers. Plaza 

Edler Frederick A, gunsmith. Plaza 

FILCHER J A, proprietor Placer Herald, Wash- 
ington 

Finley C W, surveyor, Court House 

Fougeron Augustus, stoves and tinware, Commercial 

GORDON ROBERT, general merchandise, cor Main 
and Commercial 



Largest stock Musical Merchandise west of Chicago, at G-EAY'S, 105 Hearnj, S. P. i 



PRANCIS & VALENTINE. Commercial Printing House, 517 Clay Street, S. P. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



117 



GWYNN BENJAMIN F, constable, office with R C 

Poland, Court 
Hale & Craig, attorneys at law. Commercial 
Hamilton, Norton & Bullock, attorney's at law, Com- 
mercial 
Hellwig Charles J, harness and saddlery. Main 
Holdreg Delos D, house and sign painter, Washing- 
ton 
Holle Edward F, bakery and liquor saloon. Plaza 
Houser Louis, dry goods, clothing, boots and shoes, 

Plaza 
Hunt & Hadley, blacksmiths and wagon makers, nr 

C P R R depot 
KBEHNER GEORGE A, liquor and billiard saloon, 
Washinarton nr Plaza 
jLiniger John, liquor saloon. Main 
"pLipsett Alexander, proprietor Orleans Hotel, cor 
Court and Main 
Lubeck David W, dry goods, clothing, boots and 

shoes, Commercial 
Lyon Walter B, insurance agent, Commercial 
Macombe George B, stoves and tinware. Main 
Maun Valentine V, furniture, bedding and under- 
taker. Commercial 
Maun William D, agent A & P Telegraph Co, C P R 

R depot 
Martin & Richardson, house and sign painters. Plaza 
McClellen Mrs, dress and cloak maker, Washington 
Mc Creedy George W, liquor saloon. Main 
McGuire William B, liquor saloon, Plaza 
McLaughlin Joseph, livery stable, Washington 
Myres Benjamin F, attorney at law. Court 
PLACER HERALD, J A Filcher, proprietor, Wash- 
ington 
PLACER WEEKLY ARGUS, Argus Publishing Co, 

proprietors, Washington 
Poland Robert C, notary public and justice of the 

peace. Court 
Predom Moses, blacksmith, Washington 
Rackeliff Alden, architect, builder and contractor, 

East 
Rapier Richard G, hair dressing saloon and baths, 

Plaza ^ 

Reamer George W, proprietor Bear River ditch 
Shay Eliza Mrs. liquor saloon and restaurant. Main 
Siefert & Dodsworth, butchers. Plaza 
Smith John J, proprietor Auburn Hotel and hay and 

grain dealer, nr C P R R depot 
Spear David W, attorney at law, Sacramento 
Stephens Thomas E, general merchandise, Washing- 
ton 



products of fisheries along the coast. The town was 
laid out in the summer of 1874, and bids fair to pros- 
per. Narrow gauge lines of railroad are proposed 
with prospects of building, one to San Luis Obispo, 
and another to Guadaloupe, and the valley of the 
Santa Maria, connecting at the county line with one 
proposed from Santa Barbara. 

Benrimo M A, hotel 

Schwartz & Harford, lumber dealers 

Azusa, Los Angeles Co, P 20 miles e of 

Los Angeles 
Booth N B, nurseryman 
Caley Thomas E, teacher 
Ca-sey John W Rev, clergyman (Baptist) 
Dalton Henry, fruit grower and distiller 
Goldsmith Adolph, general merchandise 
Gordon J T, attorney at law 
Justice Jesse, blacksmith 
Justice Oliver T. postmaster 
Potter J C, butcher 

Bairdtown, San Bernardino Co, P O 
McGee W T, postmaster 

Bakersfield, Kern Co, P and County- 
seat, one mile from the San Joaquin Valley branch 
of the Southern Pacific Kailroad, and by that line 
29S miles s e of San Francisco, and 140 miles n of Los 
Angeles. Stages leave daily for San Fernando, on 
the Los Angeles line, and for Lone Pine, Inyo Co. 
The town is pleasantly situated on the banks of 
Kern river, one of the largest streams issuing from 
the Sierra Nevada, and is surrounded by an exceed- 
ingly fertile section of country. The railroad, though 
not built directly to the town, has given a great im- 
petus to business, and the population of thj neigh- 
borhood is increasing rapidly. The gold mining re- 
gion of the neighboring mountains, and the silver 
mines of Inyo give considerable trade to the place. 
The rapidly flowing stream of Kern river affords 
abundant water power, by which means manufac- 
turing may be added as one of its resources. The 
Courier and Southern Californian are published 
weekly. 

ACKLIN J K, proprietor Southern Californian 
Adams W S, livery and feed stable 
Baker & Muobe, restaurant and bakery 
Balser <& Schlachter, brewery ' 

Bratton A C, physician 
Brower Celsus, agent J H Rodington 
Brundage B, attorney at law 
Campbell & McCumber, liquor saloon 



Stevens Solon M, agent W U Telegraph Co, cor Main^^^^'::: ^,l^lf! bj^!'T^^^J^ """^ ^'° "^^^^ 

and Commercial 
Stone Henry, blacksmith, Washington 
Walsh Edward, merchant tailor, Main 
Walsh James, boot and shoe maker. Main 
AVells & Stevens, druggists and apothecaries, cor 

Main and Commercial 
Werraann Abraham, hair dressing saloon and baths, 

Main 
White John M, blacksmith, Washington 
Willis Samuel W, postmaster, books and stationery, 

Commercial 

Iment George, agent C P R R, commission and 

forwarding, C P R R depot ^ 

Worsley John, boot and shoe maker 






Augusta, Santa Clara Co, P O address, Santa 
Clara, 0^^ miles w of San Jose 

Sanborn K C, liquor saloon 

Watkins & Scott, manufacturers agricultural imple- 
ments and steam engines 

« 

Avila, San Luis Obispo Co, P O address, San 
Luis Obispo, 9 miles s s w of San Luis Obispo, is a 
newly surveyed town at the People's Laniling, San 
Luis Obispo Bay, and receives its name from the 
Messrs. Avila, the owners of the land surrounding 
the harbor. This harbor, although generally avail- 
able, is not regarded as safe in stormy weather, par- 
ticularly during southeast winds, but it Is claimed 
that it may be easily rendered a harbor of refuge by 
the construction of a sea wall, for which Congress 
has been petitioned. The harbor, or roadstead, is a 
broad open bay formed by the projection on the west 
and northwest of Point San Luis, but on the south is 
unprotected. ItisinXjat. 3.5^ 10' 37" north, and Long. 
120^ 43' 31" west. A wharf 7S0 feet in length gives ac- 
comodation to shipping, with twenty feet of water 
at low tide. The principal exports are wool, hides, 
wine, dairy products, asphaltum, whale oil and the 



Chester Julius, notary public 

Clarke & Co, blacksmiths 

Colby P T, attorney at law and county judge 

Collins & Denver, blacksmiths and wagon makers 

Collins & Saenger, butchers 

Condict H F, hotel 

COONS ALONZO, stationery and agent W U Tel- 
egraph Co 

Cross Anson, livery and feed stable 

Davies A H, attorney at law 

Dimmock H C,^physician and dentist 

Donnell R R, liquor saloon 

Dumble E H, tinsmith and well borer 

Escalet E, hotel 

Fillebrown T R, civil engineer 

Freeman J W, attorney at law 

Galtes Pablo, general merchandise 

Garrett Matthow, carpenter 

Hanson A G Rev, clergyman (Meth) 

Hasey J J, well borer 

Hasey M M Mrs, millinery and fancy goods 

•Hirschfeld &, Jacoby, general merchandise 

Hewlett John, contractor and builder 

UUDNUT RICHARD, proprietor Kern County 
Courier 

Hunt & Co, blacksmiths and tinsmiths 

Jackson A R, civil engineer 

Jewett Bros, wool growers 

Johnson William A, real estate 

KERN COUNTY COURIER, Richard Hudnut, pro- 
prietor 

Kern Valley Bank, S Jewett, presidetit 

LANSING SAMUEL J, agent Wells, Fargo & Co, 
notary public and cashier Kern Valley Bank 

Lawrence A C, attorney at law 

Lennox Andrew, wool grower 

Lowe & Scribner, watches and jewelry 

Mattson 0. harness and saddlery 



A. EOMAN & CO., Medical, Theological, and Scientific Books, 11 Montg'y St., S. P. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



118 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



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Maul C A, boots and shoes 
McClanahan P I), physician 
McKarland William, carpenter 
Mix A A, phvfician nnil druggist 
iMorgan J D, blacksmith and wagon maker 
Muolio William, proprietor Kern River Flour Mill 
Murphy J J, general merchandise 
"Noiderauor .lacob, furniture 
•Olds II F, hotel 
I'avy & Willow, livery stable 
Payne & .Johnson, real estate 
Plunkett Robert, contractor and builder 
Pope W II, hair dressing saloon and baths 
Price B U, stage agent 
Reinstein Philip, harness and saddlery 
Riley J R. physician and druggist 
Rogers L S, physician 
Rothrock & Iloughton, photographers 
Smith (t V, attorney at law 
Smith J E, blacksmith and wagon maker 
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIAN, J K Acklin, propri- 
etor 
Templeton & Hooker, wool growers 
Toussaint Antoine, stoves and tinware 
Tungate John B, liquor saloon 
Weil Jacob &Co, general merchandise 
Withington Robert W, liquor saloon 

Bakerville, Stanislaus Co. (See "Waterford) 

Bald Hills, Klamath Co, P 35 miles s w 

of Orleans Bar 
Hanrahan Brothers, stock raisers 
Hopkins John J, stock raiser 
Lyons J, stock raiser 
Orcutt A S, postmaster 

Bald Hills, Shasta Co, P O address, Horse- 
town, 25 miles w of Shasta 
Drew James, blacksmith 
Gary H, general merchandise 

Ballards, Santa Barbara Co, P address, 

Santa Barbara, 43 miles n w of Santa Barbara 
Russdell F M, hotel 

Ballend, San Diego Co, P 43 miles n e 

of San Diego 
Mclntoe John L, postmaster 
Tighe William J, hotel (Julian Road) 

Ballona, Los Angeles Co, P O address, 

Los Angeles, 8 miles w of Los Angeles 
Greenbaum E, general merchandise 

Bangor, Butte Co, P O 14 miles s e of Oro- 

ville 
Allen John E, postmaster, physician, and general 

merchandise 
Brown John, blacksmith 
Hart & Allen, blacksmiths and wagon makers 
Kitchen A, liquor saloon 
Norman L, teacher 
Osgood Gardner, blacksmith 
Payne Joseph, hotel 

Banner, San Diego Co, P O 50 miles n e of 
San Diego, is a new and flourishing mining town in 
San Felipe cafion,5 miles eastof Julian. The mines 
■were discovered and the district organized in 1871, 
and a busy town of 500 or 600 inhabitants has been 
built up. The Chariot, Ready Kelief, Empire, 
Hubbard, Poorman, Cable, Kentuck, Redman, 
and others are among the principal mines, some 
of which have yielded considerable gold and are 
classed as dividend-paying mines. The gold pro- 
duct of this and Julian, which are statisllcallv 
classed together, In 1874 was about $300,000, while 
such progress is makiug that the yield for 1875 is 
cnntidently estimated at $1,000,000. In the town are 
two stores, two hotels, three boarding houses, a res- 
taurant, four saloons, a echoolhouse, postoffice, etc., 
having the usual appearance and business houses of 
a prosperous mining town. The section is quite ele- 
vated, the climate pleasant and healthy in a re- 
markable degree, and the soil fertile, producing 
grain, vegetables, and fruits of all varieties. 

Austerhous Charles, liquor saloon 

Campbell Henry, liquor saloon 

DICKERMAN C B, books and stationery, and post- 
master 

Duffy James, liquor saloon 



Dwarkowsky <Sc Hawyor, general merchandise 
Frary A Shultz, general merchandise 
King George V, hotel 
Kohn L F Mrs, hotel 
Murphy Francis, liquor saloon 
Osbourno R W, boot and shoo maker 
Reed Frank, restaurant 
Shaw C A, livery stable and blacksmith 
Sloan Joseph, liquor saloon 

Wilson Henry, general merchandise (Warner's 
Ranch Road) 

Banta's Station, San Joaquin Co, P O 

address, Banta, 16 miles s w of Stockton, on the 
Central Pacific Railroad, occupies an important 
position as a central trading and grain-shipping 
point for a large area of tlie San Joaquin Valley 
west of the river. From this point a branch of the 
Pacific Railroad has been surveyed via Antioch and 
the shore line of San Pablo and San Francisco Bays, 
which is intended to command the business of the 
towns on the route as well as to avoid the crossing 
of the Monte Diablo range, as is now required, at an 
elevation of over seven huudred feet. 

Bell G W, carpenter 

Davis F J, stock dealer 

Fowler & Williams, hotel 

Godchaux & Wolf, general merchandise 

Hamilton H M Rev, clergyman 

Henderson & Halstead, butchers 

Horing C, harness and saddlery 

Hutchings E, liquor saloon 

Israel I G, postmaster 

Israel W 0, stage proprietor and livery stable 

Kahn & Hoffman, general merchandise 

Lackie J P, grain buyer and warehouse 

Lamb & Bro, stock dealers 

Nichols J E, agent Wells, Fargo & Co, and C P R R 

Porter Bros, liquor saloon 

Upson Charles, watch maker and jeweler 

Wilson H 0, restaurant and saloon 

Young Z, blacksmith and wagon maker 

Bareges Sulpher Springs, Ygnacio 

Valley, Contra Costa Co, P address. Walnut 
Creek, 10 miles s e of Martinez and 18 miles north 
of Oakland. The water of these springs has 
proved very efficacious for the cure of rheimat- 
ism, all skin diseases, billious complaints, poison- 
ing from lead or mercury,and uterine and ovarian 
diseases 
.JiOWAN A H, physician and proprietor springs 

Bartlett Springs, Lake Co, P 25 miles 

n e of Lakeport 
Bartlett & Son, liquor saloon 
Brame J S, groceries 
Henderson J W, agent Wells, Fargo & Co 
Long M A, postmaster 

Long & Brown, hotel, livery stable and market 
Tucker, Long & Brown, general merchandise 

Bass Station, Shasta Co. (See Stillwater,) 

Batavia, Solano Co, P O 14 miles n e4|f 

0^ Fairfield 

Bayley Thos S, postmaster and agt Wells, Fargo & Co 

BAYLEY & COULTER, grain and warehouse 

Byrne Patrick, hotel 

Hainos George, wagon maker 

Hughes Charles, liquor saloon and restaurant 

Lavolle Michael, liquor saloon 

Macken Lewis, blacksmith 

AIUNSON D L, general merchandise, grain and wool 

Bath, Placer Co, P O 24 miles e of Auburn 
Baldwin Horace, postmaster 

Greeley, general merchandise 

Greenwood William, hotel 

Simmons Peter, general merchandise and saloon 

White John, shoe maker 

Battle Creek, Tehama Co, P O 18 miles n 

of Red Bluff 
Carver W S, flour manufacturer 
Gray Augustus H, postmaster 
Gray A W & Co, general merchandise 
Love E Mrs, hotel 
Lowry Myron, blacksmith 
Winsell J F, plysician and_druggist 



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Bear Creek, Santa Cruz Co, P O address, 

Boulder Creek, 12 miles n of Santa Cruz 
Wood R E, manufacturer brooms and matches 

Bear Valley, Alpine Co, P address. 

Silver Mountain 
Blood II S, hotel 

Bear Valley, Colusa Co, P O address, 

Colusa, 30 miles w of Colusa 
Ingram G C, hoteland supt Abbott Quicksilver Mino 

Bear Valley, Mariposa Co, P O 12 miles 

n w of Mariposa 
Castagnotto John, general merchandise 
Darling Eben Orvis, general merchandise 
Hammatt & Newman, butchers and livery stable 
Newman Maurice, attorney at law 
Newman Maurice H, agent Wells, Fargo & Co 
Peart Henry, liquor saloon 
Pendola Nicolas, general merchandise 
Rico Edward M, postmaster and hotel 
Trabucco Louis, general merchandise 
Wilcox J W, blacksmith and foundry 

Bear Valley, Nevada Co, P address, 
Emigrant Gap, Placer Co, 23 miles n e of Nevada 
City 

Tompkins E 0, hotel 

Beckwith, Plumas Co, P 40 miles e of 

Quincy 
Aron Jacob, liquor saloon 
Bringham W C, postmaster and hotel 
Cross Urias, blacksmith 
Scheeline Simon, general merchandise 
Sharp John, wagon maker 

Belle Mills, Tehama Co, P O address. Red 
Bluff, 32 miles east of Ked Bluff, in the midst of the 
grand forests of the Sierra and the seat of a large 
lumber trade. The Empire Lumber Co. is the prin- 
cipal manufacturer, and sends its products to the 
valley by means of a flume .30 miles in lengtli. The 
place having a very romantic and healthy location 
is much visited by pleasure parties and excursion- 
ists during the summer. 

Empire Lumber Co, lumber manufacturers 

Ka'iffman C F & Co, general merchandise 

Hughes A, liquor saloon 

Bell's Bridge, Shasta Co, P O 12 miles s e 
of Shasta '^^ 

Bell J J, hotel, blacksmith, wagon maker and gen- 
eral merchandise 

Cecil Joseph M, postmaster and general merchandise 

McLaughlin T, stock dealer 

Mullin T, stock doaler 

Bell's station, Santa Clara Co, P 50 

miles s of San Jose 
Hogeman George, postmaster 

pnt, San Mateo Co, P O 4 miles w of 
pod City 

ozos, hay warehouse 
Charles A, agt S P R R and Wells, Fargo 

Bruner Frederick, livery stable 

Hull William W, brick maker 

Janko Chailos A, proprietor Belmont Park grounds 

Janke Charles F, postmaster 

J^ANKE & CARSTENS, general merchandise 

Kelly Henderson & Gilchrist, liquor saloon 

Oliver J M, blacksmith 

Waltermiro & Brennan, liquor saloon 

Waltermiro M W Mrs, hotel 

Belota, San Joaquin Co, P 18 miles — of 

Stockton 
Parker Alfred, general merchandise 

Benicia, Solano Co, P O 22 miles s w of 

Fairfield, is located on the northern side of the 
Strait-s of Carqulnoz, 25 miles northeast of San 
Francisco, on the line of watercommunication with 
the interior of the State, and has a tine harbor along 
its front where the largest .sea-going vessels can lie 
within a few yards of ilie shore. Benicia was for- 
merly the Capital of California, and a city of much 
Importance. It is now the government depot of 



B^mpi 



arms ana supplies lor ine military staciot 
Pacific Coast, and contains extensive I 
storehouses, magazines, and shops for tl 
facture and repair of army material. The i 
turing Interests are represented by aCem 
Flouring Mills, Tanneries, Glove Factories: 
industries of minor importance. Seven 
tional institutions of a high order are ma 
among which are the St. Augustine's Lite 
Military College, St. Mary's of the Pacific, 
YoungLadies' .School, St. Catherine's Cor 
Young Ladies, and the Benicia Female .S 
the oldest in the.State,all holding a high ran 
joying popu7ar patronage. Connected wit 
these institutions are libraries accessibl 
students. 

Barrey J J, liquors 

Barry James, groceries and liquors 

Barry John, wine manufacturer 

Blake William, .stoves and tinware 

BLDME JOSEPH, U S Army 

Breck J Lloyd Rev, principal St Mary's set 

Brown & McKaw, tannery 

Carney John, li,iiuor saloon 

Clyne James, blacksmith and wagon maker 

Currier M Mri, varieties and fancy goods 

Dalton Samuel„rostaurant 

Durner Vi, merchant tailor 

Ewing .lames', general merchandise 

Feige Robert, dry goods 

Fischer Joseph, butcher 

Folsom Myrick, proprietor Willard's Hotel 

Foreman W H, dry goods, boots and shoes, 

Haggerty Jeremiah, butcher 

Hastings, Tarbox <fe Danforth, proprietors 
Warehouse 

Heonan M, liquor saloon 

Henry James, Martinez and Benicia Ferry 

Houghton C B, lumber 

Jacobs J J, boot and shoe maker 

Jones J W, drugs, groceries, etc 

Kelley J Mrs, liquor saloon 

Kingstrey Thomas, liquor saloon 

Kuhland William, boot and shoe maker 

MALLOW .J^MES, liquor saloon 

McBain & MclJougal, tannery 

McDonell Archibald, postmaster 

Miznor Landing B, attorney at law 

Moore C J, agent Wcflls, Fargo & Co, insari 
telegraph ageny 

Moore &, Cumming^tannery 

Oppermann , tiiilor and liquor saloon 

Perrin , blacksmith 

Pope Charles li, principal Young Ladies Se: 

Quigg Charles, liqi;ors 

Reed J, liquor saloon 

Reynolds Ann Mrs, hotel 

Ruegor <fe Co, brow ry 

Stevens G W, gentral merchandise 

Stevens John, liqi or saloon 

Sweeney M M, stoves, pamps, tinware, etc 

Benton, Mono Co, P O 70 miles s e of 

port 
Abjjott A W, liquor saloon and livery stabl 
Alverson B B, liquor saloon 
Claussen — Mrs, hotel 
Creaser John A, general merchandise 
Cross G W, liquor saloon 
Everett Charles Rev, clergyman 
(jriswold M. physician 
Kelty E C, hotel 
Laird C P Mrs, hotel 

Mack A, general merchandise and blacksm 
Marshall William B, postmaster 
Miner E R, agent Wells, Fargo & Co, and g< 

Berendo, Fresno Co, P 10 mil 

Fresno City 
Asbeck Fr, postmaster and agent Wells, Fa 
Grace P & Co, hotel and general morchandi 

Berkeley, Alameda Co, P O 5 mil 

Oakland, seat of the State University of C 
'• Westward the course of Empire takes i 
said the Bishop of Cloyne a century and a 
and here, in the extreme West, oii the mc 
seat for the queen of the empire, is fonndi 
versity on the grandest basis of modern 
which has been given the nainc of the i 
philosopher and poet. The course has bi 
ward until the Pacific is reached, and here 
accumulate new force. Facing the Golden 



A. ROMAN & CO., Booksellers, Importers, and Publishers, 11 Montgomer; 



Jewelry Manufactory, Wholesale and Retail, D. W. Laird, cor. Mont, and Merchant. 



120 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



looking out ftt its sirinored portals upon the broad 
oceun is the site of the Acadeinic halls of Herkeloy. 
The locality Is at the base of the Contra Costa hills, 
and about three miles from the Bay of San Frau- 
risoo, haviii),' such an elevation as to command a 
view of water and plain, of many white-winded 
ships and smoky steamers; of proud cities and 

Eleasant villas; of fields and orchards and distant 
ills, softened in the hazy atmosphere of an almost 
perpetual summer, constituting a panorama of 
extreme loveliness. One hundred and sixtj' acres 
of ground is devoted to the University, upon which 
are erected the Colleges of ARriculture and of Let- 
ters, and other buildiuKS, and the surroundings are 
laid out in tasteful design and planted with trees of 
many species. An abundant supply of water is 
obtained from the neighboring hills, furnishing 
fountains and Irrigating the soil. The design of 
the University comprehends a series of Colleges, 
practical, scientific and classical, giving every 
branch of education and preparing for every pro- 
fession. Supported by the State and by endow- 
ment from the United States Government and 
bequests of individuals, tuition is free and capacity 
unlimited. While j'et in its infancy it is prosperous 
and growing, and bids fair to equal any of the great 
Institutions of the world. The village of Berkeley 
adjoins the University ground, where students 
obtain lioard and residence, and many handsome 
dwellings are in the neighborhood. The village 
and University are reached bystreet railroad cars 
and pleiisant carriage roads from Oakland, and by 
direct ferry line from San Fraucisco to Berkeley 
lauding. 
Bowen ^V'illiam J, postmaster 

Bernardo, San Diego Co, P O 30 miles n of 

San Diego 
Sikos Zenas, postmaster 

Berry Creek, Butte Co, P O 18 miles n e 

or Orovillo 
Jobuson Russell, lumber manufacturer and hotel 

Berryessa, Santa Clara Co, P O address, 

San Jose, 3 miles n e of San Jose 
Ivory & Anderson, blacksmiths and wagon makers 
Wandall Jacob, butcher 

Berry vale, Siskiyou Co, P O 30 miles s e of 

Yreka 
Ream"*, tub and pail manufacturer 
Sisson Justine H, postmaster aqd hotel 
Stone & Ross, lumber manufacturers 

Bidwell's Bar, Butte Co, P O 9 miles n e 

of Oroville, is one of the oldest mining camps in 
the State, and was formerly the county seat, is 
on the line of travel to Quincy and other localities 
in Plumas county. Its situation is quite romantic, 
being on the southern bank of the Middle Fork of 
Feather river, and is surrounded by high hills. The 
place is distinguished by the possession of a large 
and fruitful orange tree, grown from a seed planted 
on the spot in 1853 more in playfulness than in ex- 
pectation of its growing; but to the surprise of all a 
tree was the result, which demonstrated the adapt- 
ability of this northern and elevated section of the 
country to the growth of oranges, and also became a 
source of important revenue to the fortunate ex- 
perimenter. 

Bendle John S, general merchandise 

Ketchum Isaac R, postmaster 

Big Bar, Klamath Co, P 6 address, Orleans, 

8 miles w of Orleans Bar 
Sutherland D, trader 

Big Bar, Trinity Co, P O 26 miles w of 

Weavorville 
Tinsley A J, general merchandise 
Willshire William, postmaster 

Big Dry Creek, Fresno Co, P O 

Awald H, blacksmith 

Jensen Francisco, postmaster and gen merchandise 

Big Plat, Trinity Co, P O address, Big Bar, 

22 miles w of Weaverville 
Norman William S, blacksmith 

Big MeadO'WS, Plumas Co. (See Prattville) 

Big Oak Plat, Tuolumne Co, P 14 miles 

s e of Sonora 
Barnes T R, liquor saloon 



Cavagnero .John, general merchandise 
(lamblo John, teacher 
Harper C L, carpenter 
Marcono Luigi, general morcbnndiso 
McCarthy James W, blacksmith 
Mookin A (4, carpenter and undertaker 
I'riost W C, hotel 
Ropotta (} \i, shoemaker 

Urich William, postmaster, agent Wells, Fargo & 
Co, notary public, news and insurance agent 

Big Owens Liake, Inyo Co, P O address, 

Indopondonco, 18 miles s of Indepondonce 
Passmore Thomas, hotel 

Big Pine, Inyo Co, P O 27 miles n of Inde- 
pendence 
Blaisdell S W, teacher 
Brown J S, general merchandise 
Ergle C, blacksmith 
McMurry Jonathan W, postmaster 
Naylor t>, general merchandise 
Stewart & McDonald, lumber manufacturers 

Big Trees, Calaveras Co, P O 33 miles n e 
of San Andreas, reached by stage from the Central 
racitic Railroad at Gait, or from Milton, the termi- 
nus of the Stockton and Copperopolis Railroad. 
Among the many wonders sought by the tourist in 
California none exceed in grandeur, or remarkable 
age of vegetable life, the grove of liiammoth trees 
of Calaveras county, and none are of easier access. 
A few hours ride by stage over a country where 
every mile affords interest and pleasure, and one 
is in the midst of these, the grandest productions of 
the earth. There, in the terse Saxon parlance, are 
the "Big Trees." Tliey are indescribable by com- 
parison or statement of dimensions, and can only 
be appreciated by observation and reflection. 
There are many other great trees among the noble 
forests of the Sierra, particularly in the region of 
Yo.semite, but the grove of Calaveras is distinctive 
from its aggregation of the giants, and its accessi- 
bility. This grove, bi' route of railroad and stage, 
is it2 miles from Sacramento, in latitude 38° north 
and longitude 120° 10' west, and at an elevation of 
4,370 feet above ihe sea. Within an area of 50 acres 
are 103 large trees, 20 of which exceed 25 feet in 
diameter at the base, and as a consequence exceed 
75 feet in circumference ! This noble grove, surpas- 
sing in grandeur all known arboreal productions of 
the earth, has been placed by Congress under the 
protection of the State of California to be forever 
preserved as objects of interest and curiosity, and 

the region as one of public resort. The Big Trees 

*■* were discovered in June, 1850, and previous to being 
placed under the protection of the State one was 
felled. To accomplish this, long, pump-boring 
augers were used and the constant toil of five men 
for 25 days ; but when thus completely severed two 
and a half day's labor with various mechanical 
appliances were required to throw it from its broad 
base, and thus this monarch of the forest, which 
had crowned in glorious majesty the hights of the 
Sierra through all the ages of Christianity, before 
Solomon builded his temple, and even centuries 
before David had raised the kingdom of Judea to 
its zenith, was laid prostrate on the earth. Troy 
fiourished and decayed while this tree was 
and it was a giant of 500 years' growth v 
thage was founded. Its annular line.' 
3000 years of life ere the vandal hand la: 
This grand tree was 302 feet in hight and' 
circumference at the ground. Upon the upper part 
of the prostrate trunk a house and double bowling 
alley have been constructed, and on the stump a 
dancing hall. Four setts of quadrilles, or thirty- 
two pensons can engage in dancing upon it at the 
same time, with room for musicians and spectators. 
From this an idea, by comparison, can be obtained 
of its grand dimensions. The largest of the trees 
now standing is the " Mother of the Forest," whose 
hight is 321 feet and circumference at the base 90 
feet. This tree has been denuded of its bark, which 
wasstripped for exhibition at the Bast, leaving it to 
perish. Near by lies what once was the largest of 
the group, called the " Fatherof the Forest," which, 
when standing, is estimated to have reached a 
hight of 435 feet and had a circumference of 110 
feet at the base. Another prostrate is the " Burnt 
Tree," which is hollow and mto which a person can 
ride on horseback for a distance of 60 feet. "Her- 
cules," another of these giants, is !)5 feet in circum- 
ference and 320 feet high. The " Hermit," so-called 
from being at some distance from the others of the 
grove, is liO feet in circumference and 318 feet high. 
Among others of great interest and bearing names 
are "The Old Maid," "Old Bachelor," "Three 



•th. Troy 

'Mm 



Pirst Premium to Guild, Cliurcli & Co.'s Pianos, at QUAY'S, 105 Kearny St., S. P. 



PEAITCIS & VALENTINE, Printers, 517 Clay and 510-516 Commercial St., S. P. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



121 



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Graces," "Two Guardsmen," "Siamese Twins," 
" Mother and Son," " Pioneer's Cabin," and " Uncie 
Tom's Cabin." A well Icept hotel gives accommo- 
dation to visitors, and various means of recreation 
are provided, thus inviting the tourist to one of the 
most remarkable localities of California. 

Deeble S, hotel (Reservoir House) 

Dunbar Freeman, lumber manufacturer 

Dunbar W, lumber manufacturer 

McOowan W S, telegraph operator 

Sperry J F, postmaster 

Sperry, Keefor & Co, proprietors Mammoth Grove 
Hotel, livery stable, and general merchandise 

Big Valley, Lassen Co, P O 80 miles n w 

of Susanville. 
Brownell H G, stock dealer 
Drake William B, blacksmith and hotel 
Eadland R, stock dealer 
Mires C H, teacher 
Murdock k Quinn, general merchandise and lumber 

manufacturers 
Woolsey E H, postmaster 
Worland C, stock raiser 

Biggs Station, Butte Co, P 12 miles w 

ofOrovillo 
Brush & Hurbert, livery stable 
Butfington & Smith, general merchandise 
Bunnell k, Co, warehouse and grain shippers 
Cecil D A, agent Wells, Fargo k Co 
Chapman P F, physipian 
Flemming Thomas, lumber dealer and insurance 

agent ,' 

Franl^lin Julius, barber 
GREIN PHILIP, proprietor Planters' Hotel 
Uicox & Klock, liquor saloon 
Kemper F C, harness and saddlery 
MACKEY T C, physician 

Marshall & Parker, blacksmiths and wagon makers 
McKillican k Detzlor, blacksmiths and wagon makers 
Myers John W, carpenter 
Parker S W, restaurant 
Rankin k Bishop, liquor saloon 
Rosenberg M, general merchandise 
Schu John A, shoemaker 
Smith G K, postmaster 
Smith Isaac P, hotel and feed stable 
STONE W W, Notary Public and grain dealer 
,STONE W W &C0, general merchandise 

Binghampton, Solano Co, P O 16 mile^ 

n e of Fairdeld 
Frick Luther \V, postmaster 
Smith W H, blacksmith 

Birchville, Nevada Co,P O address, Sweet- 
land, 10 miles n of Nevada City 

Newell George B, general merchandise and justice 
of the peace 

Rowo , teacher 

Thomas Cornelius, liquor saloon 

Bishop's Creek, Inyo Co, P O 45 miles 

n w of Independence 
Clark Andrew, clergyman (Baptist) 
■Clark John, hotel 
Ford R W, blacksmith 
Lewis T D, lumber manufacturer 
Lilaland A Mrs, teacher 
Middleton S A, physician 
Mills John, blacksmith 
Pinchower S, general merchandise 
Rowan Bros, lumber manufacturers 
Russell k Bro, flour manufacturers 
Sneden Seth G, attorney at law, agent Wells, Fargo 

k Co, and general merchandise 
SpencorA, general merchandise 
Wainwright C, teacher 
Yaney J P, postmaster 

Black Bear, Klamath Co, P 40 miles e 

of ' irleans Bar, is rapidl v advancing with the great 
prosperity of the mines in the vicinity. The Black 
Bear and the Klamath are the principal mines, em- 
ploying a large number of men and producing from 
$50,000 to $7.5,000 monthly. These mines with their 
bu.sy mills give life to the place, secluded as it is 
among the lofty mountains of the Coast Range. 
Parish William A, postmaster and superintendent 
Black Bear Quartz Mining Co 



Black Diamond, or New York Landing, 
Contra Costa Co. P. 0. 16 miles e of Martinez. The 
shipping point of the Black Diamond Coal Mine, to 
which a railroad is in operation from the mines at 
Nortonville, some six miles long. It derives the 
name of New York Landing from the name of the 
first sea going vessel that loaded there. 

Allen Edgar, telegraph operator and agent Whitney 
& Co's Express 

BARGION PETER, postmaster, agent Wells, Fargo 
& Co, and superintendent landing 

Morgan, Duncan & Davis, general merchandise 

Murphy E K, hotel 

Nichols Joseph, hotel 



Black Point, Marin Co, P O. 
Swoetser J B, postmaster 



(See Novate) 



Blakeley's, El Dorado Co, P O address, 

Placerville, 5 miles e of Placerville 
Blakeley James, hotel 

Blanco, Monterey Co, P O 4J miles w of 

Monterey 
Faneuf E R, blacksmith 

Louis Charles, postmaster and general merchandise 
McClurk Josephine, teacher 
McFadden Charles, dairyman 

Bloomfleld, Sonoma Co, P O 18 miles s w 

of Santa Rosa 
AchufiF J N, physician 
Appleton J, clergyman (Meth) 
Cannon L L, Bloomfield stage and livery stable 
Carrasco Clemente, liquor saloon 
Clark Johnston B, carpenter 
Colby PS Miss, teacher 
Crawford C, clergyman (Presb) 
Grose John M, carpenter 
Derby George, carpenter 
Haltor William, horticulturist 
Harlow James, teacher 
Hickman B F, harness and saddlery 
Hoag H, attorney at law, notary public and ins agt 
Kauffmann F, painter 
KaufFmann F A. wagon maker 
Kauffmann L. boot and shoe maker 
Kline J. blacksmith 

Knapp Abner H, postmaster and general merchandise 
Knapp C H, photographer 
Knapp George, painter 
► KufHe Isaac, proprietor Washington Hotel 
Lefobvre M, proprietor Big Valley House 
Magour L C, carpenter 
Melmer George, barber 
Mills W J, tanner 
Oliver k Mooney, blacksmiths 
Palmer C H, tinsmith 
Palmer James, undertaker 
Percival W C, flour manufacturer 
Pettit k Cannon, liquor saloon 
Powers T P, teacher 

Stewart & Hall, gen mdse and agts Wells, Fargo & Co 
Stillwell Valentino, butcher 
Tittamore C, wagon maker 
Weaver John, watch maker 

Blue Oanon, Placer Co, P O 42 miles n e of 

Auburn 
Mosher A B, hotel, groceries and liquors 
Myrick R L, agent C P R R and A & P Telegraph Co, 

and general merchandise 
Peterman John C, postmaster, agent Wells, Fargo <fe 

Co, general merchandise and hotel 
Towlo Bros, lumber manufacturers 

Boca, Nevada Co, P 89 miles e of Nevada 
City 

Bacon B F, agent C P R R and A & P Telegraph Co 

Boca Mill and Ice Co, L E Doan, superintendent, 
lumber manufacturers and ice dealers 

Bragg & Folsom, lumber manufacturers (Camp 18) 

Doan L E, agent Wells, Fargo & Co, and superintend- 
ent Boca Mill and Ico Co 

Doan Wallace, postmaster 

Gray Joseph, lumber manufacturer 

Nevada Ico Co, J S Thompson, superintendent 

^dfoell John A, liquor saloon 

Pacific Shingle Co, shingle manufacturers 

Schafor , hotel 



»*• 



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San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant,! 



122 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



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Bodega Bay, Sonoma Co, P O address, 
Smith's Ranch, 22 luilos s w of Santa Rosa 

Borrv S B, livory stable 

Bihlor & Dinxloy, general merchandise and lumber 
manufacturora 

Bootcher J, liquor saloon 

Bvrne James, liquor saloon 

Elson William, liquor saloon 

Bodega Corners, Sonoma Co, P O ad- 
dross. Smith's Ranch, 20 miles w of Santa Rosa 

Paspros Ovrus, livery stable 

Doriin AVilliam, dairyman 

(Jiioilinan & Co, general merchandise 

ITaokett J J, physician 

Kowalsky E H, general merchandise 

McCanghev James, general merchandise and agent 
Wells, Fargo & Co ' 

McCulloeh R, clergyman (Presb) 

McLaughlin R, boot and shoe maker 

Murray 'ihomas, butcher 

Piggott A K, physician 

Robinson William, blacksmith and wagon maker 

Sanisol Hiram, gunsmith 

Springer James L, postmaster and justice of the 
peace 

Stewart W H, boot and shoe maker 

Stump James, billiard saloon 

Stump J C, hotel 

Bodie, Mono Co, P address, Bridgeport, 

1() miles e of Bridgeport 
Lock berg Louis, blacksmith 

Bolinas, Marin Co, P 30 miles s w of San 

Rafael 
Andrew N 0, machinist 
Barge Georcre, hotel 
Betten William, merchant 
Bronios Pablo, physician 
Davis James M, postmaster 
Drum James T Rev, clergyman 
Finey Mathew, cooper 
Gibson H, merchant 
Gillespie A, blacksmith 
Gordon Lewis, wagnri maker 
Johnson Thomas, ship carpenter 
Lewis L, house carpenter 
Michaelis A, blacksmith 

Boneyard, Mariposa Co, P address, Coul- 

terville, 30 miles n w of Mariposa 
Myers Henry, general merchandise 

Boonville, Mendocino Co, P O address, An- 
derson, 25 miles s w of Ukiah 

Bradway A S, blacksmith 

Brown J T, phvsician 

Derick T F. artist 

Raskins J M, teacher 

Kavanaugh N, general merchandise 

Kinff M 0, attorney at law 

MoAbee G N, liquor saloon 

McAbee J W, hotel 

McSimsey C P, stock dealer 

Rogers & Carter, general merchandise and agents 
Wells, Fargo & Co 

Tavlnr Archie Rev, clergyman 

Wightman Henry, carpenter 

Borden, "Fresno Co, P O 

Borden R, agent C P R R 

Ebell & Co, liquor saloon and livery stable 

Edwards & Carter, billiard saloon and restaurant 

Hall B, justice of the peace and agent 

Harris D C, butcher 

Hope, Edwards & Co, blacksmiths and wagon 

makers 
.Tones J R. general merchandise 
Landrum M Cpostmaster and agt Wells, Fargo & Co 
Mace R P, hotel 
Mann A & Co, blacksmiths 
Morton & Anderson, liquor saloon 
Simon, Jacobs & Co, general merchandise 

Boston Ranch, Amador Co, P address^ 

Buena Vista, 14 miles w of Jackson 
Waters Hugh H, hotel 



Boston Ranch, Butte Co, P O address, 

Oroville, II miles o of Orovilla 
Hurl Smith H, hotel 

Boston Ravine, Nevada Co, P O address, 

Grass Valley, 5 miles s w of Nevada City 
Barrette A E, liquor saloon 
Behrisch Charles, liquor saloon 
Bendorf Charles, boot maker 
Campbell A: Stoddard, general merchandise 
Fielding Thomas, liquor saloon 
Ford Martin, groceries and liquors 
Morateur Andre, groceries and liquors 
Nevin John, blacksmith and wagon maker 
Prout Thomas, butcher 

Boulder Creek, Santa Cruz Co, P O 15 

miles n of Santa Cruz 
Cottrell Charles T, postmaster 
Crediford Stephen, hotel 
Crediford W S, teacher 
Hite R C, carpenter 
Sanseman A R, general merchandise 

Bourn's Landing, Mendocino County, P O 

address, Gualala 
Bourn Morton, liquor saloon and shipping merchant 
Carter Peter Y, blacksmith 

Bower Cave, Mariposa Co, P O address, 

Coulterville, 37 rniles n of Mariposa 
Pickart Louis, hotel 

Bradford's Station, Lalce Co, P O ad- 
dress, Middletown, 40 miles s e of Lakeport 
Bradford E C, hotel 

Branch Lunatic Asylum, Napa Co, 
P address, Napa City, 1% miles s e of Napa 
City 

Jacobson C, hotel 

MOLLOY E H Mrs, varieties 

Brandy City, Sierra Co, P O address, 
Camptonville, Yuba Co, 12 miles w of Downie- 
ville 

Andrus B, hotel 

Bavouset George, general merchandise 

Bridgeport, Colusa Co, P O address, Grand 

Island, (3 miles s e of Colusa 
Cook F, proprietor Grand Island Mills 
Davis Howell, general merchandise 
Gordon William, telegraph operator 
Helton William M, hotel and liquor saloon 
Jeffries & Parr, blacksmiths and wagon makers 
Mills William, liquor saloon 

Bridgeport, Mono Co, P O and county 

seat is in the "Big Meadows" of Walker's Eiver. on 
the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada, near the 
State line, and is usually reached via the Pacific 
Railroad and Aurora, a long and circuitous route. 
It is also reached by wagon road from Stockton via 
the Sonora Pass, but the route is not practicable at 
all seasons. 

Allen A H, hotel 

Bryant Amasa F, general merchandise and post- 
master 

Hays David, general merchandise 

Hughes P G, blacksmith 

Hunnewell & Towle, lumber manufaeturerg 

Murphy J C, attorney-at-law 

Nye Peter, contractor and builder 

Patterson R S, lumber manufacturer 

Stanton William H, liquor saloon 

Whitman George N, attorney at law 

Bridgeport, Nevada Co, P O address, 

Anthony House, 12 miles w of Nevada City 
Cole Charles, hotel 

Bridgeport, Solano Co, P O address, Cor- 
delia, 5V^ miles w of Fairfield 
BIHLER HENRY, butcher and liquor saloon 
Breck Samuel, general merchandise 
Bridgeport Grist Mill, W W Mason, proprietor 
BUHRMEISTER H G, general merchandise 
EBER LORENZ, blacksmith 
MASON W W, blacksmith and wagon maker 



Best Piano Tuners at &EA7'S.. 105 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



JlAlTCIS & VALENTINE, Printers, Designers, and Engravers, 517 Clay St., S. P. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



123 



J Neil William D, blacksmith 
TPITTMAN C J Mrs, hotel 

Turner J E, boot and shoe maker 

WILSON CURTIS, agent Wells, Fargo & Co.and J P 

Bridgeport Landing, Mendocino Co, P 

address. Miller, HO miles w of Ukiah 

Dixon James, lumber manufacturer 

Hall A W, sneculator 

KIMBALL & ZUVER, general merchandise, con- 
tractors, railroad ties, etc 

Lemoine Edward, blacksmith 

Mitchell John M, wagon maker 

Wright Leroy, live stock dealer 

Brighton, Sacramento Co, P O 5 miles e of 

Sacramento 
ClippinKer J A. telegraph operator 
Foster Samuel G, postmaster 
Gilbert A B. butcher 
Jackmnn S H, teacher 

Lowell Marcus AV, distiller and justice of the peace 
Orm & Perkins, liquor saloon 

Patterson A D. justice of the peace and liqtuor saloon 
Potter J, liquor saloon 
Pressor Robert R, wagon maker 
Pugh Samuel H, blacksmith 
Teed Charles, general merchandise 

Bronco, Nevada Co, P O. 93 miles e of 
Nevada Citv 

WICKES ALEXANDER M, postmaster and gen- 
eral merchandise 

Bronson's Station, Tuolumne Co, P 

address, Chinese Camp, 15 miles s of Sonora 
Bronson H N, hotel 

Brooklyn, (East Oakland) Alameda Co, 

PO, wasan incorporated town from May, 1870, to 
September, 1872. when, by a vote of the citizens, it 
was united with Oakland. It occupies an exceedingly 
picturesque position on the north side of the San 
Antonio estuary, and is not second to Oakland 
proper as a desirable place of residence. Its pro- 
gress in population is equally rapid, and when the 
expected improvements of the harbor are com- 
pleted it must become a place of commercial im- 
portance as well as a great manufacturing centre. 
Already many manufactories are Inactive operation 
within its borders or in the township of Brooklyn, of 
which it forms a part. Many miles of streethave 
been graded and macadamised within the past 
twelve months, while more are either in progress 
or contemplation. A fine school-house, costing some 
?16,00u, has been erected within the past year. (.For 
names business meu see Oakland.) 
Steere Thomas F, postmaster 

Brown's Corners, Yolo Co, P address, 

Woodland, 13^ miles w of Woodland 
Brown George, liquor saloon and race track 
Ellis George, liquor saloon, training stable and 
race track 

Brown's Flat, Tuolumne Co, P address, 

Sonora, 2 miles n of Sonora 
Brink Isaac, blacksmith 
Honessoy E Mrs, general merchandise 
Slattery E Mrs, groceries and liquors 

Brown's Landing, Humboldt Co, P O ad- 

drosp. Table Bluff, 15 miles s of Eureka 
Brown Charles, liquor saloon 

Brown's Valley, Yuba Co, P O 12 miles 

n e of Marysville 

Canady Silas, stage proprietor 

Carey James, shoo maker 

Hague L L. physician 

Hitchcock S B, liquor saloon 

Ives Ralph 0, hotel 

Roberston J F, blacksmith 

Schaaf Frederick W, postmaster and general mer- 
chandise 

Schmidt J B, hotel 

Sersanous Michael, liquor saloon and boarding 

Brownsville, Klamath Co, P O address, 

Petersburg 
George W H, general merchandise 



Brownsville, Yuba Co, P O 26 miles n of 

Marysville 
Albert David, horticulturist 
Albert James W, painter 
Diol Leonard, blacksmith 
Hawley Truman, wagon maker and carpenter 
Howell William, hotel 
Knox Martin, postmaster and hotel 
Rupp C, lumber manufacturer 

Brush Creek, Butte Co, P 0. (See Mount- 
ain House) 
Douglass John N, postmaster 

Buchanan, Fresno Co, P O 22 miles n of 

Fresno City 
Brown P R, physician 

Brown John, gen mdse, hotel and postmaster 
Smith Louis, drugs and general merchandise 
Woolcock Philip, blacksmith 

Buckeye, Shasta Co, P O address, Shasta, 8 

miles e of Shasta 
Battam Thomas, blacksmith 
Burll George, general merchandise 

Buckeye, Yolo Co, P O 13 miles s w of 

Woodland 
Akers T B, liquor saloon 

Ely Benjamin, postmaster and general merchandise 
Ely John, liquor saloon 
Harling & Lowry, general merchandise 
Hayes Edward S, blacksmith 
Krause Fritz, harness and saddlery 
McCIure James, blacksmith 
McGrath & Co, carpenters 
Rice A R, liquor saloon 

Buckeye Plat, El Dorado Co, P address, 

Shingle Springs, 10 miles w of Placerville 
Duggan J, blacksmith 

Buckeye Ranch, Plumas Co, P O address. 

Buck's Ranch, 30 miles s w of Quincy 
Sherman Charles, hotel 

Buck's Ranch, Plumas Co, P 16 miles 

s w of Quincy 
Wagner William, postmaster and gen mdse 

Bucksport, Humboldt Co, P address. 

Eureka, .3 miles s of Eureka 
Shannahon John, general merchandise 

Buena Vista, Amador Co, P O 12 miles w 

of Jackson 
Cook William, postmaster and general merchandise 
Crail W, wagon maker and painter 
Dillion Marion, general agency 
Fitz Simmons John, general merchandise 
Fitz Simmons Miller, blacksmith 
Ford H T, jeweler and watchmaker 
Ford H W. teacher 
Ritehoy William C, hotel 
Thompson Alexander, attorney at law and searcher 

of records 
Tubbs L, livery stable 

Buena Vista, Stanislaus Co, P O address. 

Knight's Ferry, 30 miles n e of Modesto 
Bach W F, wool dealer 
Brown P. wine and fruit 
Dingley Samuel, hotel 
Foster P B. harness and saddlery 
Parker D, blacksmith 
Pentland Bros, wine and fruit 
Randall & Stewart, general merchandise 
Ross John, liquor saloon 
Winters G, painter 

Bull Creek, Mariposa Co, P address, 

Coultervillo, 43 miles n of Mariposa 
Black A G, general merchandise and hotel 

Bullard's Bar, Yuba Co, P 30 miles n e 

of Marysville 
Baxter John, general merchandise and blacksmith 
Gove Austin J, postmaster 
Mix George J, hotel 



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ROMAN & CO., General Agents for Subscription Books, 11 Montgomery St., S.P. 



r. "W. Laird, San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



124 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Burgettville, Shasta Co, P O 90 miles n e of 

Sbasta 
Eilor David, general merchandise 
Mooers John E, postmaster and general merchandise 
Sylvester Joshua, hotel 

Burnett, Santa Clara Co, P 12 miles s of 

San Jose 
Allen John II, blacksmith 
CEKIBELLIS, postmaster, general merchandise and 

hotel 

Burnett's, Stanislaus Co, P O address, Oak- 
dale 
Adio C, liquor saloon 
Burnett — , blacksmith 

Burney Valley, Shasta Co, P O 75 miles 

n e of Shasta 
Burns Katie, teacher 
^Vhite Asa, postmaster and hotel 

Burnt Ranch, Trinity Co, P O 40 miles -w 

of Weaverville 
Caraway }V, trader (Areata Road) 
Gray David B, general merchandise 
McVVharter A L, trader 
Reach J T, blacksmith 
Thomas R S, postmaster and attorney at law 

Bur-wood, San Joaquin Co, P 25 miles 

s e of Stockton 
Monroe Ismael, postmaster 
Wilkerson John, physician 

Butcher Ranch, Placer Co, 10 miles n e 

of Auburn 
Johns William, blacksmith 
Martin Thomas P, postmaster, general merchandise, 

and hotel 
Oman Peter, blacksmith 

Butte City, Amador Co, P O address, 

Jackson, 3 miles s of Jackson 
Toak A, general merchandise 

Butte City, Colusa Co, P O 18 miles n of 

Colusa 
Dollings W W, teacher 
Herd G S, candies and fruit 
Miller Marshall, liquor saloon 
ililler William F, postmaster 
Rantze David & Son, blacksmiths 
Ryan James & Co, general merchandise 
Waite R D, liquor saloon 
Welborn T M, hotel 

Butte rOounty. Organized in 1850. — 
Bounded on the northwest by Tehama, northeast 
by Plumas, southeast by Yuba, south bv Sutter and 
west by Colusa. Area, 1,458 square mile's. Assessed 
valuation of property for 1874, $9,062,619. Countvseat, 
Oroville. Principal towns : Bangor, Bidwell's Bar, 
Bigg's Station, Cherokee, Chico, Forbestown.Inskip, 
Magalia, Thompson's Flat, Wyandotte, Nord, Grid- 
iey's Station and Lovelock. 

The county is composed of both mountain and 
Valley land, in nearly equal proportions ; the mines 
and forests of the Sierra, and the agricultural lands 
of the plain, constitute its resources. The soil of the 
valley is very fertile, producing an average of 2 i'4 
bushels of wheat per acre. Fruit i< grown in great 
perfection, oranges ripening at Bidwell's Bar, which 
is in latitude 39 deg. .51 min., and at an elevation of 
about l.iXK) feet above the ocean. This may be taken 
as a mea-sure of the horticultural capacity of thesec- 
tion, and of the climate of the Sacramento Vallev, 
and the foothills of the Sierra Nevada. Coal,,or"a 
light lignite, is found in Table Mountain, near 
Oroville. 

Butte was one of the earliest mining counties, but 
that interest was allowed to decline, until recently 
capital and intelligence are paying it increased at- 
tention, a.s in other counties, with the prospect of 
returning it to its former importance. At Cherokee 
is operated one of the best appointed hydraulib- 
mines in the State, where by skillful engineering a 
stream of water is supplied which crosses the West 
Branch of Feather river in an inverted siphon of 
iron, having a depression of 830 feet below the out- 
let, and 980 feet below the inlet. These mines pro- 
duce about half a million dollars of gold annually, 
one bar made from a single clean up in 1873 being 



worth $72,000, the largest ever made in any mining 
country. 

The principal streams are Feather River and its 
branches In the eastern portion, the Rio Scco, liutte. 
Little Butte, Chico and Kock Creeks (lowing into the 
plain toward Sacramento, and the Sacramento 
along its western border. The interior streams 
afford fine facilities for manufacturing, milling and 
irrigating purposes, and the beautiful Sacramento 
bears on its bo.som the rich freight which the fertile 
farms and prolific hills supply. 

The Northern California Itailroad, on the eastern 
side of Feather River, connects Oroville and Marys- 
ville, having 13'». miles of track in this county, and 
the California and Oregon Railroad runs diagonally 
forty :niles across It. Some singularly rugged 
mountain peaks, or buttes, rising from the niidstof 
the Sacramento Valley, give the countv its name. 

Officers: William S .Safford, County Judge: Thos. 
Callow, Clerk ; Patrick Ogilby Hundley, Uistriet 
Attorne.v ; Samuel L. Daniels. Sheriff and Tax Col- 
lector; William Armstrong, Recorder and Auditor; 
William .Schneider, Treasurer; .loseph C. Werts- 
baugher. Assessor; James McGann, Surveyor; 
Louis W. Hoops, Public Administrator ; Hiram T. 
Batchelder, Superintendent Public Schools. 

Butte Creek Crossing, Butte Co, P O ad- 
dress, Inskip 
Richardson H S, hotel 

Butte Valley, Plumas Co, P address 

Longville, 27 miles n w of Quincy 
Bailey Thornton, blacksmith 
McBeth John, general merchandise 

Butteville, Siskiyou Co. (See Edgewood) 

Byrne's Store, San Mateo Co, P O address, 

San Mateo, <J miles w of San Mateo 
Byrnes James, liquor saloon 

Cache Creek, Yolo Co, P O 12 miles w of 

Woodland 
Andre Louis, carpenter and justice of the peace 
Bonham B B, physician 
Costick Abraham, shoemaker 
Davis Charles H A Co, butchers • 

Gill Henry, blacksmith 

Haines Abraham, postmaster and gen merchandise 
Heinrichs Frederick, butcher 
Hilliker & Loranger, hotel 
Hoffman Augustus, gen merchandise 
Hudson Mark, liquor saloon 
Johnson J, wagon maker 
Jones J K, well borer 
Keller Joseph, shoe maker 
Tandy G, harness and saddlery 
Whitney Joseph, blacksmith and wagon maker 
Wolfe Simon, liquor saloon 

Cacheville, Yolo Co, P O address, Yolo, 5 

miles n w of Woodland 
Alpaugh Thomas, flour manufacturer 
Bradshaw R M, shoe maker 

Cummings Bros, livery stable and stage proprietors 
Dechoune J M, wheelright 
DUTTON 0, tinsmith 
GRIFFITH A, general merchandise and agent Wells, 

Fargo & Co 
Hadley &. Wagoner, harness and saddlery 
HALL k PENDERGAST, general merchandise. 

grain and wool 
Hatch Jabez, proprietor Cacheville Mills 
Hines & Co, butchers 
Hinman J M Rev, clergyman (Meth) 
Hutton J A, attorney at law and county judge 
Hyman & Sussman, general merchandise 
Kier H M, physician 
Mering S N. attorney at law 
Pettit Asa, blacksmith and wheelwright 
Powers J W, liquor saloon 
Praster A J, blacksmith and wheelwright 
Reynolds W F, wheelwright 
Rose Augustus, liquor saloon 
Smith William H, barber 
SPENCER WILLIAM F, proprietor Cacheville 

Hotel 
Zimmerman G W, physician 

Cahto, Mendocino Co, P O 45 miles n w of 

Ukiah 
Benton James B, harness and saddlery 



Largest stock Musical Merchandise west of Chicago, at QUAY'S, 105 Zeamy, S.! 



FEANCIS & VALENTINE. Commercial Printing House, 517 Clay Street, S. P. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



125 



Feazel H P, painter 

Layton F B, blacksmith 

Purdy II, wagon maker 

Simpson & White, general merchandise and agents 

Wells, Fargo & Co 
Ward J ]), liquor saloon 
White Robert, postmaster and hotel 

Calaveras County. Organized in 1850 



Ayres Charles A, agent AVells, Fargo & Co, and 
^_ railroad agent 
p3adlam E B Jc Co, real estate agents 

Badlam Ezra B, postmaster and agt W U Tel Co 
I Baldwin N, blacksmith 

Chesebro J A, proprietor Magnolia Hotel 

Cook J, liquor saloon 

Demmick & Clemmings, blacksmiths 

Donnellan B C, wagon maker 



Hounded on the northwest by Amador, east an(i«»Dorgeloh L & Co, proprietors Calistoga Houso 



southeast by Alpine and Tuolumne, and on the 
southeast by Stanislaus and west by San Joaquin. ^ 
Area, y36 square miles. Assessed valuation oftf>rop- y' 
erty for 1S74, $l,65C,:i31. County seat. San AiPreas. y 
Principal towns, Angels, Cam po Seco, Chinese.Camp,"''-'- ' 
Copperonolis, Milton, Mokelumne Hill, JIurphy's, 
Vallecito, and West Point. The largest streams are 



the Mokelumne on the northern border, the Calav 'Francis J H, general merchandise 



veras in the interior, and the Stanislaus on the 



southern border. Its resources are mineral antfl' j-j-eidburg M, general merchandise 



agricultural, aided by the grand forests of the moun 
tains. The "'Big Trees of Calaveras" have obtained 
a world-wide renown. On a high ridge in the eastern 
portion of the county is a grove of 103 trees, several 
exceeding thirty feet in diameter, of proportional 
height, and stand as the most majestic monuments 
of the vegetable kingdom the earth ha.s produced. 
The copper mines of Copperopolis were formerly 
worked with great profit, the Union mine being 
considered one of the richest of that metal known. 
The decline in the prices of copper, together with 
the high rates of working expenses, is the cause of 
the decline in that interest. Gold mining is carried 
on with increasing energy, the many rich quartz 
lodes and the deep channels of ancient glacial drift 
giving unlimited fields for the most extensive ope- 
rations. The vast deposits of auriferous gravel are 
melting away before the hydraulic, proving remu- 
nerative to the miner and encouraging to every in- 
terest. The agricultural and horticultural resources 



Drussoll D, butcher 
Enos .Joseph, barber 

vans C,^proprietor petrified forest 

eige R S, proptr Iron Mountain Warm Springs 
Fisher W F, livery stable 
Foss & Connelly, proprietors Geyser stage line 



FREE PRESS, P Hoddy, proprieter 



Getloson H & Co, general merchandise 

Gordon William Rev, clergyman (Me.th) 

Grauss Joseph, baker 

Haeckl Louis, liquor saloon 

Hartinan & McGuire, liquor saloon 

Uirschman J, shoe maker 

HUDDY P, proprietor Free Press 

Irons W 0, shoemaker 

Lutie A, stage proprietor 

Maddow J H M, wine manufacturer 

Miller A, harness and saddlery 

Mitchell H II, dentist 

Mitchell James Rev, clergyman (Presb) 

Nichoson, F P, druggist 

Noel J T, carpenter 

Palmer A C, lumber and justice of the peace 

Reid S J, physician 



are also great, the county atfording grazing for art Schonewald George, proprietor Springs Hotel 
large number of sheep and goats, and many flourish- Seawell J W & Co, butchers 
ing vineyards and orchards of every variety of fruit Stratton W E, liquor saloon 



are found. Stagecommunication is had from various 
points with Stockton and Sacramento. The Stock- 
ton and Copperopolis Kailroad, originally Intended 
for the transportation of copper ore, was only com- 
pleted as far as Milton, in the western portion of the 
county, to which point it continues in successful 
operation. 

Officers: William B. Norman, County Judge; Jubal 
A. Foster, Clerk, Recorder and Auditor; William T. 
Lewis, District Attorney; Benjamin K. Thorn, She rifl' 
and 'I'ai Collector; John Gallagher, Treasurer; Wil- 
liam J. R. Robertson, Assessor; A. E. Wheat, Sur- 
veyor; H. G. Allen, Coroner and Pubhc Adminis- 
trator; J. B. Garvey, SuperintendentPublic Schools. 

Cala Veritas, Calaveras Co, P O address, 

Fourth Crossing 
Casta Lewis, general merchandise 

Caliente, Kern Co, P O 
Coley Henry C, postmaster 

California City, Marin Co, P O address, 

Saucelito, 10 miles s o of San Hafael 
Beckennan & Co, brickmakers 
Monckin John, liquor saloon 

Calistoga, Napa Co, P O 28 miles n w of 

Napa City. This Is one of the most fashionable 
resorts on the Pacific Coast, celebrated alike for the 
valuable medicinal properties of its mineral springs' 
and the comfort and elegance of its surroundings. 
It is beautifully located at the head of Napa Valley, 
64 miles from San Francisco, and is the northern ter- 
minus of the Napa Valley Railroad. By this line 
Calistogais made the centerof trade and travel of an 
important section of country. Until 1874 the region 
was chiefly attractive as a resort for tourists in 
search of health and pleasure, the many medicinal 
springs of Napa, Lake and Sonoma counties, with 
the grand, romantic and strange scenery inviting 
visitors from all parts of the world. But recent dis- 
coveries of gold, silver, and quicksilver mines 
throughout the same romantic region have added 
greatly to the importance of the place as a business 
center. The Callstoga mine, on Mount St. Helena, 
a few miles from the town, has surprised the coun- 
try with its wealth as well as with its occurrence in a 
range of mountalnsgenerally condemned as barren 
of the precious metals. Other gold and silver-bear- 
ing veins have since been discovered, and Calistoga, 



from being known only as a place of fashionable p ,.,":„_ ri,' i,"?^ 
resort, or from Its vineyards and wine cellars, wilT 'y"*'J^'''o,'^„^ ' noiei 
rank as a center of great mining Industries, and IJarko i' L, tcacno 



advance in proportionate Importance, 
paper, the Free Press, is published. 



Thompson A C, marble works 
Williams & Metzler, proprietor Harbin Springs stage 
line 

Callahan's Ranch, Siskiyou Co, P 42 

miles s of Yreka 
Denny & French, general merchandise and agents 

Wells, Fargo & Co 
Farrington Stephen, blacksmith 
Hayden Richard M, postmaster 
Hayden Bros, hotel and butchers 
Masterson Ann Mrs, hotel 

Calpella, Mendocino Co, P O 6 miles n of 

Ukiah 
Klein Peter R, postmaster 
Merriman A, hotel 
Quinliven Dennis, blacksmith 

Camanche, Calaveras Co, P O 18 miles w 
of San Andreas 

Cavagnaro D, general merchandise 

Charroux A, blacksmith 

Dios Francisco D, liquor saloon 

Doherty M, general merchandise 

DoonerJohn, teacher 

Duffy M, hotel 

Lawson L, shoemaker 

Tipko N, liquor saloon 

Zimmerman Nicholas, general merchandise, post- 
master, and agent Weils, Fargo & Co 

Cambria, San Luis Obispo Co, P O 34 miles 

n w of San Luis Obispo, near El Morro Landing 
on the coast, occupies a pleasant localitj- in the Coast 
Range, fronting the ocean. Its resources have been 
the rich pasturage of its surroundings, but recent 
dl-scoveries of quicksilver in the neighboring moun- 
tains have given it increased importance. The 
Oceanic Quicksilver Mine is represented as having 
abundant ore in a stratum of conglomerate, 60 feet 
in thickness, giving assays of from 5 to 28 per cent, 
of metal. 

Baker J C, lumber dealer 

Campbell J D, livery stable 

Colo G M, harness and saddlery 

Conway E M, agent WoUs, Fargo & Co 

Cramer S L, tinsmith 



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Frankol L, general merchandise 



L EOMAN & CO., Medical, Theological, and Scientific Books, 11 Montg'y St., S. F. 



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San Francisco Jewelry Manuf actory. D. W. Laird. 613 Montgomery cor. Merchan t, 



126 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



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Grant, Lull. & Co, gonoral merchandise 

Hiicknoy John, blacksmith 

Johnson JoroMiiah, liiiuor saloon 

Johnson Joseph, lumber manufacturer 

Judson SV A. painter 

Kaet/.ol riiilip. wagon maker 

LolHnK'ivi-tl A- Sons, flour and lumber manufacturers 

LinKoO W. hotel 

Lull (loorgo W . postmaster 

Mathors C'arolan. civil engineer 

Mondorscheid Brothers, druggists 

Puluier OS, carpenter 

Pico Benigno. liquor saloon 

Proctor AKader, blacksmiths 

Kaiiuigo >t Conway, general merchandise 

Rothschild Is, Co, general merchandise 

Hussoll C J, attorney at law 

Sherman Thadeus, carpenter 

Sweet Thomas, wagon maker 

Utlov Merrit, butcher 

Walker tJ A, physician 

Milliains Henry, carpenter 

■\Villiams J P, teacher 

Williams Silas, cheese manufacturer 



Camp Bidwell, Modoc Co. (See Fort Bid- 
well) 
Camp Grant, Humboldt Co, P O 60 miles 

s of Eureka 
Carroll William, general merchandise 
Ilansell A, justice of the peace and nurseryman 
Hurlbert B G, postmaster and hotel 
Way William, blacksmith 

Camp Independence, Inyo Co, P O ad- 
dross, Independence, 2 miles n of Independence 
Bell A N, flour manufacturer 
Cohn J, general merchandise 

Campo, San Diego Co, P O 60 miles e of 

San Diego 
Bratton A IS' , teacher 
Cline C, liquor saloon and hotel 
Gaskill Brothers, blacksmiths and wagon makers 
Uaskill Lyman H, postmaster 
Gass Augustus M, general mdse 
Moore A M, teacher 

Carapo Seco, Calaveras Co, P O 12 miles 

n w of San Andreas 
Bauman Adam, livery stable 
Creighton James, butcher 
Curry John, carpenter 
Dorset Louis, blacksmith 
Hawes Benjamin F, business agent 
•Metz John, hotel 

Nye David B, gen mdse, postmaster and hotel 
Peck F C, boot maker 
Thompson William, wine manufacturer 
Vieusseux (Jaspard, general merchandise and agent 

Wells, Fargo & Co 
WooUey William, liquor saloon 

Campo Seco, Tuolumne Co, P O addresss, 

Jamestown, 4 miles s of Sonora 
Eberhardt William, groceries and provisions 

Camptonville, Yuba Co, P O 45 miles n e 

of Marysville. A mining town on Oregon Creek, a 
branch of the Middle Yuba Kiver, on the stage 
road leading from the Pacific Kailroad at Collai 
tbrougii Kevada and North San Juan to Downie- 
ville. It is also connected by stage with Marysville. 
Extensive gravel ranges are in the vicinity, upon 
one of which the town is built, and these have been 
largely mined by the hydraulic process, but a want 
of sufficient water retards operations. The locality 
is healthy, the site pleasant, and mineral resources 
unlimited but without abundant water and other 
appliances which only well directed capital can 
command, no mining town can prosper. 

Biber C W, physician , ,Tr „ -n 

Brown J P & Co, bankers and agts Wells, Fargo <fe Co 

Brown & Graves, livery stable 

Budden James, physician and apothecary 

De Cray Augustus, cigars and tobacco 

Erwin Joseph, blacksmith 

Gassner J M, tanner 

Gerwienor C, boot maker 

Graham J R, boot maker 



(tray Charles, liquor saloon 

Hanson John, liquor saloon 

Jones Joseph, hotel 

Lock wood J Jj, attorney at law 

Mansur C F, drugs, newspapers and stationery 
4a^lcliellan J G, tinsmith 

McMurray V C, liquor saloon 

Meek John R, groceries, provisions and hardware 

Miller A ti, butcher 
«(-0'Hara Charles, livery stable 

Titus F H, teacher 

Yariol, Joseph H, postmaster and carpenter 

Cana, Butte Co, P 36 miles n wof Oroville 
Babcock W H, blacksmith 
Dillon J A, blacksmith and wagon maker 
Hail F W, hotel 

Hubbell Jackson, postmaster, agent CPRR, and 
•' general merchandise 
Levens B W, general merchandise 
Bowles Daniel, liquor saloon 

Canby, Modoc Co, P O 26 miles w of Dorris 

Bridge 
Pope James W, postmaster 

Canfleld, Kern Co, P O address, Bakers- 
field, 12 miles s w of Bakorsfiold 
Oulton John, general merchandise 
Veeder C H, notary public 

Canon Creek, Trinity Co, P O address, 

J unction City, 16 miles n w of Weaverville 
Flowers & Smith, lumber manufacturers and ditch 

proprietors 
Gilzean James, hotel 
Jones T D, liquor saloon 
Lang Max, general merchandise 

Capay, Yolo Co, P 16 miles W of Wood- 
land, situated on the banks of Cache Creek, at the 
mouth of Capay Valley, and iu the neighborhood of 
a good agricultural section. 

Appleby A, hotel 

Barrett & Strobach, liquor saloon 

Carroll John H & Co, Orleans Hill, Vinicultural 
Association 

Freeman F S & Co, general merchandise 

Gordon D G, blacksmith and wagon maker 

Lang John A, liquor saloon 

Levy W A: Bro, general merchandise 

Lewis T J, harness and saddlery 

Perkins Edward E, postmaster 

Wells A J, blacksmith and wagon maker 

Capay City, Yolo Co,P O address, Capay, 

20 miles w of Woodland 
Clark C C, liquor saloon 

Nurse M A, surveyor and general merchandise 
Vogoli Peter, hotel 
Wood Joel, blacksmith 



Capell Valley, Napa Co, P O 15 miles n 

of Napa City 
Bradshaw John G, postmaster 

Capistrano, Los Angeles Co, P O. (See San 

Juan Capistrano) 
Mendelson Marks, postmaster 

Carneros, Napa Co, P O address, Napa 

City, 5 miles w of Napa City 
Weston — , hotel 

Carpinteria, Santa Barbara Co, P 12 

miles e of Santa Barbara 
Anderson William, groceries 
Beach J, wagon maker 
Bradford William, blacksmith 
Mclntyre & Perry, carpenters and builders 
Norris Benjamin, wagon maker 
Pettinger Thomas, house carpenter 
Smith Benjamin, blacksmith 
Thurmond G E, postmaster and general merchandise 

Cartago, Inyo Co, P O address, Olancha, 

50 miles s of Independence 
Belshaw & Titsworth, proprietors freight steamer 

Bessie Brady 
Cerro Gordo Freighting Co, freighting 
Villagas A, hotel 



Send orders for Music to GRAY'S. 105 Kearny Street. San Pranoisce. 






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Doylo John, liquor saloon 

Gordon Alexander, butcher 

Gregor James, blacksmith 

Heldt George, liiiuor saloon and livery stable 

Johnson J G, gon mdso and lumber manufacturer 

Kelly Frank, boot maker 

King John, liquor saloon 

McCallum D \V^, postmaster and mill superintendent 

Koss J S Kev, clergyman (Baptist) 

Oastle Rock, Shasta Co P address, Por- 

tugueo, 1)8 miles n of Shasta 
Hanlon K, hotel 

Oastroville, Monterey Co, P 10 miles n 

of Salinas. This Is a thriving town, situated at the 
fool of the great Salinas valley, and near the en- 
trance of the .Salinas river to the Bay of Monterey. 
It is three miles east of Moss Landing, the usual 
name of -the port— the entrepot of an extensive and 
fertile section— enjdj-ing a large trade with San 
Francisco by means of light draft steam and sailing 
ve-ssels, as well as the S Jb* II K, which passes through 
it. One newspaper, the CastrovUle Argus, is pub- 
lished weel^y. 

Asher 11 k. Co, general merchandise 

Black ifc Brown, proprietors Ocean Flour Mill 

Brown W U, barber 

BUKLAND JOHN, general merchandise 

Buzzell M A Mrs, milliner and dress maker 

Caldwell E F, restaurant and liquor saloon 

Castro J B, real estate 

Castro Ygnacio, general merchandise, agent W U 
Telegraph Co, and insurance agent 

CASTKOViLLF AKGUrf, J Merritt, proprietor 

Corey William, hotel 

Curran Hugh Kev, clergyman (R C) 

Fall Michael, liquor saloon 

Farley W T, liquor saloon 

Farmer H W, tailor 

Gibson W H, agent Wells Fargo & Co 

Gilleary Kev, clergyman (K C) 

HEN KY WALTEK, liquor saloon 

Jennings , physician 

Johnson Israel, postmaster 

Keating L \i & Co, general merchandise 

Kirkup E, physician 

LAUCK A: MEYEK, brewery 

Longley Abner H, stoves, tin and hardware 

Look in, Leonard, general merchandise and market 

Malloy John A, druggist 

MEAL) HENKY Jj, general merchandise 

MEKKITT J, proprietor Castroville Argus 

MILLER k Co, general merchandise 

Pombur J M & Co, flivery stable 

POMBEK K, liquof saloon 

POST'W B, butctier 

Reirdon John, harness and saddlery 

Rogers W A, infllrance agent 

ROI'll HIKAM, agent Pajaro Brewery 

Speegle M M, justice of the peace and notary public 

SPEEGLE Jj JOHNSON, liquor saloon 

Sprague & Wood, general merchandise 

Btorer John, butcher 

AVatson J E, fruit and varieties 

Whitcher C K, blacksmith 

Wright A, painter 

Cave City, Calaveras Co, P O address, 

xMountain Ranch, 12 miles e of San Andreas 
Nichols George, general merchandise 

Cayuca's Landing, San Luis Obispo Co, 
P address, Old Creels, 19 miles n w of San Luis 
Obispo. 

Cass J ames, general merchandise and lumber dealer 

Cecilville, Klamath Co, P O address, Pet- 
ersburg, 27 miles s e of Orleans Bar 
Lightman George II, general merchandise 

Cedar Ranch, Butte Co, P O address, Oak 

Arbor, Itj miles n o of OrovilJe 
Hakes Harry, hotel 

Cedar Rock, El Dorado Co, P addresg, 

Slippery Ford 
Smith J, bee raiser 



Cannon &. Benton, liquor saloon 

Cre.«sler k Bonner, general merchandise 

Ewing L Rev, clergyman 

Giroux & Co, blacksmiths 

Gooch k Co, lumber manufacturers 

Hirenyniann Jesse, livery stable 

Lee Charles W, stoves and tinware 

Long A K, hotel 

Madison Nelson, wagon maker 

Monchamp Julius, hotel 

Patterson W H, physician 

Russell John M, flour manufacturer 

Centerville, Butte Co, P O address, ( 

>jZ miles n of Oroville 
Baker Friend, liquor saloon 
Brotherton J K, general merchandise 
Nicholl John, mountain express 

Centerville, Humboldt Co. (See 
Cape) 

Centerville, Klamath Co. (SeeTocun 

Centerville, Mendocino Co, P O ad 

Potter Valley, 18 miles n eof Ukiah 
Armstrong William, carpenter and cabinet mi 
Boyes William R, hotel 
Garner A, shoe maker 
Carner J M, poultry dealer 
Foster J L, blacksmith and wagon maker 
Hopper G 15, blacksmith 
McUaniel 1>, teacher 
McDaniel W D, attorney at law 
McGoe P T, general merchandise 

Centerville, Modoc Co, P O address 

Springs, 15 miles w of Lorris Bridge 
Ballard James L, general merchandise 
Black Martin, liquor saloon 
Kennedy A H, teacher 
Stewart Milo, teacher 

Centerville, Shasta Co, P O address, 

ta, miles s of Shasta 
De Pray Paul, general merchandise 

Centerville. (See Centreville) 

Central, Colusa Co, P 10 miles s 

Colusa 
Williams W H, postmaster 

Central House, Amador Co, P O ad 

Drytown, 11 miles n of Jackson 
Grambert k Wells, hotfel 

Central House, Butte Co, P 12 r 

of Oroville 
Frost S L Kev, clergyman 
Hutchins John S, postmaster 
Hutchins Kate Miss, teacher 
Mattoon E, physician 
Westwood JJavid, blacksmith 

Central House, Nevada Co, P O ac 
JN'evada City, 10 miles n e of Nevada City 
Robinson J . hotel 

Centreville, Alameda Co, P O 21 

s e of Oakland. Centreville is the centrt 
extensive agricultural district. In itsvicinity 
Bay shore, are several salt works. A fe\ 
west are the lands of the Ureen Point Daii 
pany. Fruit is largely grown in the viclidty 
trevUle, and during the pa.st year a fruit pre 
factory, on the Alden process, was estabUi 
the town. 

Alexander W Rev, clergyman (Presby) 

Allen C H, physician 

Babb C 0, liquor saloon 

Barry J Mrs, dressmaker 

Beck I) H, harness and saddlery 

Blancow William, wool grower 
J^OND k RANDALL, agents Wells, Fargo & 
general merchandise 

Brier W W Rev, clergyman (Presby) 



\. EOMAN & CO., Importing Booksellers and Stationers, 11 Montgomery 



San Prancisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. "W. Laird, 613 Montgomery cor. Merchant, 



128 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



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BUTTEAU S A. physician A 

Controville Fruit Preserving Co, Geo W Bond, sWpt 

Clougli B 1) T, nurseryman 

Coleuian J W, liijuor saloon and livery stable 

Faulkner D A, blacksmith and machinist 

Green Point Dairy Co 

Gregory U 0, general merchandise and postmaster 

llrtgan J S, tinsmith 

Hilton F 11, shoo maker 

Jarvis A: Co, storage and forwarding 

LEWIS J B MKS, proi>riotress United States Hotel 

I'endergast M, shoo maker 

Plummer J A Jt Co, proprietors Crystal Salt Works 

Sal/, it Co, general merchandise and agents AV U 

Telegraph Co 
Shinn James, nurseryman 
Silva Manuel, barber 
AValton William, blacksmith 
Yates L G, dentist, notary public and justice of the 

peace 

Fresno Co, P O address, 



Centreville, 

Kings River 
Anderson A G, liquor saloon 
Ayors John, wagon maker 
Cudv J, barber 

ti-f C'^l^l^f ell P Mrs, hotel 

2^ Cuckrill S K, physician 

- Frankenau S A Jc Son, general merchandise 
Friedman F\ liquor saloon 
Graves W L, physician 
Groover J T, physician 
Guion A Dilly, carpenters 
Hutchinson ii Shafford, livery stable 
Hutchinson & Ward, blacksmiths 
Jacob K Jc Co, general merchandise 
Silverman U i), agent Wells, Fargo & Co 
Thomas A B, dentist 

AVills A: Hull, restaurant and liquor saloon 
Winckleman & Noonan, butchers 



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Ceres, Stanislaus Co, P 4^ miles s e of 

Modesto 
Annear J G, blacksmith 
Urouse H W, surveyor 
Chapen A Mrs, teacher 
liawkens Samuel, carpenter 
Lee Cyrus, physician and general merchandise 
Tully George, manufacturer 
Whitmore Daniel, postmaster 

Cerro Gordo, Inyo Co, P 40 miles s e of 

Independence, on Buena Vista mountain, one of the 
Inyo [range wUicli borders Owens lake and valley on 
the east.ls a prosperous mining town. The section of 
country in which it is located is desolate and barren, 
but numerous veins of argentiferous galena redeem 
the desert, and make it the chosen home of man. 
The mines were discovered in 1SG5 by some ile-vi- 
caus, who demonstrated in a simple manner that 
the ores could be smelted with protit. The Union, 
and the .Santa Maria are the principal mines, the 
former furnishing the ore that is smelted in the fur- 
naces of Cerro Gordo, the latter sending its ore to 
the furnaces at Swansea, on the shore of Owens 
lake. These several furnaces produce lead bullion 
in large quantities, from twenty to forty thousand 
pounds daily, which is trau.sported by steamer 
across the lake, then by wagons to San Fernando, 
about -00 miles, where it is taken on cars via Los 
Angeles to San Pedro, for shipment to San Francis- 
co for separating and refining. The Los Angeles 
and Independence Kaiiroad, now proposed, called 
for by the large business of Cerro Gordo, will greatly 
facihtate the business of this rich mineral region. 

Alexander J, attorney at law 

Barrows William, general merchandise 

Beardsley John, fruit 

Beaudry V, smelting works 

Belshaw M W ,t Co, smelting works 

Cohen C <)c M, general merchandise 

Craig James J: Co, water works 

Crapo William, mineralogist 
I Freedman A L, proprietor American Hotel 

Gould U W, dentist 

Grant J 0, physician 

Hoff V & Co, general merchandise 

Hughes & Williams, liquor saloon 

Johnson K C, liquor saloon 



Lozano A Monton, blacksmiths 
Magrath M, blacksmith 
Miller F K, postmaster 
Montgomery A, coal dealer 
Requad A, restaurant 
Komo R, restaurant 
Travis Lola, liquor saloon 

Chaparal House, Butte Co, P O address, 

Inskip, 52 miles n of Oroville 
Noel Peter, hotel 

Cherokee, Butte Co, P O 12 miles n of 

Orovillo 
Bolter F, dentist 
Boyer D, liquor saloon 
Burt J, blacksmith 
Delf H, liquor saloon 
Goodday L, general merchandise 
Huen F, wagon maker 
Jones A F J>Irs, postmistress 
Lively Joseph, wagon maker 
Morrison H P, liquor saloon* 
Parry George, hotel 
Powell David, physician 

Rapp A, blacksmith ,^ 

Wolf & Bro, general merchandise • 

Cherokee, Nevada Co, PO address, Patter- 
son, 17)4 miles n of Nevada City 
Bray Michael, boot and shoe maker 
Bristow & Blasingame, butchers 
Fitter John, hotel 
Fitzpatrick M, general merchandise 
O'Connor &€o, butchers 
Sneath James, blacksmith 
TURNEY CATHERINE MRS, hotel 
Vaughn J C, blacksmith 

Cherokee, Plumas Co, P O address, Green- 
ville, 22 miles n of Quincy 
Bellas George, hotel 

Cherokee, Tuolumne Co, P O address, 

Sonora, H miles e of Sonora 
Marshall Robert, lumber dealer 
Perrano G, general merchandise 
Smith Sidney & Bro, lumber dealers 

Chico, Butte Co, P 25 miles n w of Oro- 
ville, is a flourishing town of 5,(XX) inhabitiints, and 
is an important station on the line of the California 
and Oregon railroad, 9.5V miles from Sacramento. 
This pleasant village is located on the southeast 
bank of Chico creek, where it debouches upon the 
plain, six miles from the Sacramento river. The 
broad and fertile valley of the Sacramento em- 
braces it, and to the eastward rises the heavily 
timbered region of the Sierra Nevada, giving it sur- 
roundings of the most favorable character, while 
the rapid stream gives power fiof manufacturing 
purposes. With these firm foimdations of pros- 
perity the growth of the place has been rapid, and 
it counts as its evidence of advancement five 
churches, one acadamy, two private schools, and 
a public school house, costing ?'25,0(X). The lumber 
trade of Chico isa prominentfeature of its business, 
being facilitated by the construction of a flume, 
from the saw mills in the Sierra, 35 miles in length, 
to within 3 miles of the town, by which 60,000 feet 
of lumber per day is floated down at a nominal 
cost. Two important roads crossing the mountains 
have their initial points at this place, and over them 
are carried the mails and express for Plumas 
and Lassen counties. Two newspapers, the yorth- 
crn Enttrpi-ise and the Suite Becord, are published 
weekly. 

Ackerman & Thompson, butchers, Second 

Allen Brothers, blacksmiths. Main 

Allen Isaac, president Butte Flume and Ltimber 
Co, Main 

Arents Hiram, agent Union Fire Insurance Co 

Baker B B, shoe maker. Main 

Baker J H C, billard saloon. Main 

Ball Charles, watches and jewelry. Main 

BANK OF BUTTE COUNTY, Charles Faulkner, 
Cashier, Second 

Bank of Chico, A II Crew, cashier, Broadway 

Barnham ii. Aldersley, lumber, First 

Bedford Harry, house and sign painter, Broadway 



Lasky Jc Moffat, general merchandise 
Leida A, express 



Kersting <& Kichards, liquor saloon and restanranto* Bell J N, physician and proprietor private hospital, 



Junction 
BIDWELL JOHN, flour mill 



Pirst Premium to Guild, Clmrcli & Co.'s Pianos, at GEAY'S, 105 Kearny St., S. f. 



Send orders for Music to GRAY'S, 105 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



129 



Blood A F, soda water manufacturer and ice dealer, 
Broadway 

Bliiinberg Alfred, tnilor, Main 

BOURNE (iEOliGE J, insurance agent and notary 
public, Second 

Brockentield F, varieties, Broadnray 

Broslauer B & Co, general merchandise, Main 

Breslauer Manuel, clothing and furnishing goods. 
Main 

Brouse A H, blacksmith, wagon maker and carriage 
painter. Junction 

Brown J C, harness maker. Broadway 

BULLARD A, grain and sacks. Second 

Burk J, liquor saloon, Second 

Burlingame & King, dentists. Second 

Butte Flume and Lumber Co, Isaac Allen, presi- 
dent, office Main 

BUTTE RECORD, George H Crosette, editor and 
proprietor, Broadway 

Buttorfield George, byilder and carpenter, Broadway 

Campbell James, bUiksmith, Junction Broadway 

Camper & Tinker, blacksmiths and wagon makers, 
Junction Broadway 

Gary S A, liquor salOon, Main 

Central Hotel, Clark k Trimble, proprietors, Broad- 
way 

Chapman & McKay, lumber manufacturers. Main 

Cheney W Fitch, physician, Main 

CHICO HOTEL. Ira A Wethorbee, proprietor m 

Circle D S, agent Wheeler ife Wilson's Sewing Ma- 
chine Co, Broadway 

Clark A G Mrs, dress maker, Broadway 

Clark & Trimble, proprietors Central Hotel, Broad- 
way 

CLARKE J A, attorney at law. Second 

Coombs William; restaurant. Main 

Cotaneh L J MrSj ladies hair dresser 

Croissant Charles, brewery, Broadway 

CROSETTE GEORGE H, proprietor Butte Record, 
Broadway 

Crum F A, dentfet, Main 

Daly J T, attoriiy at law, Broadway 

Davidson George, liquor saloon. Main 

Davis G W, physician. Second 

Davis & Waltorst machinery, engines and boilers 

DAWSON J ALVAN, physician, Broadway 

DE HAVEN W.N, editor Northern Enterprise, cor 
Main and Second 

Dewar D, insurance agent. Main-' 

Dorn G W, gen lAdse. cor Main and Second 

Downer John A, manager W U Telegraph Co 

Drake Julius, carpenter, Broad.way 

Eitel Frank, drugfe^and varieties. Junction 

Fargo & Frost, blacksmiths, Broadway 

FAULKNER CHARLES, cashier Bank of Butte Co, 
and agent ^\'^ells, Fargo &. Co, Second 

Finnegan Stephen, boots and shoes. Main 

Fuller Luther, liquor^loon. Main 

GARDNER N B, p"jrietor Junction Hotel and 
feed stable. Junction Broadway and Main 

GiEFord & Lusk, attorneys at law. Second 

GILBERT C C, groceries and provisions, Main^ 
street Junction 

Goff W C, saddler. Main 

Goodday Max, clothing and furnishing goods. Main 

Graves George W, druggist and chemist, paints and 
oils, cor Second and Main 

Greene C E, homeopathic physician. Main 

Greer A P & Co, liquor saloon. Main 

Gruber J C Mrs, milliner and dress maker, Maio-^ 

Hall N, confectionery and canned fruits. Main 

Hallet Andrews, notary public and ins agt. Second 

Hallettife Loy, furniture, sashes, doors, Dlinds, bed- 
ding and picture frames. Main 

Heath W D, insurance agent 

Henderson Beverly, barber. Main 

Henderson George T, eclectic physician 

Henderson Park, eclectic physician 

Henderson Williiuu, eclectic physician 

HIBBARD & SOMMER, watches and jewelry. 
Second 

Hildroth L A, postmaster 

Hill & Cramer, liquor saloon, Main 

Hobart C V, agent Travelers' Life and Accident 
Insurance Co, Second 

Holmes & Jackson, resturant. Main 

UOOLE EDWARD.propriotorNorthern Enterprise, 
cor Main and Second 

Hyde William, photographer, Main 

Isenberg Sarah Mrs, dress maker, Broadway 



Jackson Frank M, watches and jewelry, cor Second 
and Main 

Jackson Peter & Co, hair dressing saloon and baths. 
Main 

Jackson & Dailey, hair dressing saloon and baths 

Jacobs Woolf, dry goods, clothing, boots and shoes. 
Main 

Johnson Dwight, wagon maker, Main 

Johnson Newman, groceries and crockery, Broad- 
way 

Jones, Reilly & Co, hardware and agricultural im- 
plements, cor Front and Broadway 

Jones & Fowler, planing mill and moldings. Main 
►JUNCTION HOTEL, N B Gardner, proprietor. 
Junction Broadway and Main 

Kelsay .lames Rev, clergyman, (Methodist South) 

Kempfifc Miller, butchers, Broadway 

Kern Frederick, manufacturing jeweler 

King Mary, liquor saloon, Broadway 

Knapp Evan, contractor, builder and brick yard, 
Third 

Kunz Christopher, baker 

Lackey Nathaniel, barber. Main 

Lee J H. marble engraver. Main 

Leitzinger M, saddlery and carriage trimmings, 
Main 

Lightner Frederick, liquor saloon 

Longdon J B, liquor saloon, Broadway 

Lucas A J, furniture. Main 

Marcuse M <fe Co, tobacco and cigars. Second 

Mason C C, eclectic physician. Second 

McCormick J N & Brother, lumber manufacturers. 
Main 

McGregor & Tetreau, carriage makers, Broadway 

Miller C A, agent Empire Lumber Co 

Morse & Alorse, proprietors Butte Mill and dealers 
grain. Junction 

Newman J F, hardware, stoves and tinware 

Nichols & Wilson, liquor saloon. Main 

Noonan D, agent vEtna Insurance Co of Hartford, 
Main 

NOONAN JERRY C. druggist. Main 

NORTHERN ENTERPRISE, Edward Hoole, pro- 
prietor, cor Main and Second 

Nourse George F, grain shipper 

Parker M W, confectionery and cigars. Main 

Parsons N F & Co, carpenters, Broadway 

Patten & Pearson, liquor saloon. Second 

Peal James, boot and shoe-maker, Broadway 

Pearson J M Mrs, milliner and dress maker, Main 

Peters P & Co, boots and shoes. Main 

Priddy W B Rev. clergyman (Meth) 

Purinton S Miss, dress maker. Main 

Reavis D M, butcher. Main 

Reister L A, harness and saddlery. Main 

Robertson D, blacksmith, Broadway 

Rose E, wholesale and retail wines and liquors. 
Second 

Sanderson, Harris & Co, dry goods, clothing, boots 
and shoes, wines and liquors, cor Front and Main 

Schwein M, liquor saloon and hotel. Main 

Scott J W, produce commission, Second 

Seitz Richard, liquor saloon 

Shearer <fc Evans, livery stable, Broadway 

Sherwood&Turner.carriage makers and blacksmiths, 
Broadway 

Springer \Y K, manufacturer lumber, shingles, doors, 
blinds and dealer hay and grain. Junction 

Sprouts il, physican. Main 

STEWARD JOSEPH J, proprietor Union House, 
Main 

Stewart W H, barber. Main 

Stilson C L & Co, hardware, cutlery and stoves, 
Second 

UNION HOUSE, Joseph J Steward, proptr, Main 

Waddams C. gunsmith. Main 

Waddams William, gunsmith. Main 

Walker Cleland, drugs, books and stationery. Second 

Walker S Mrs, dress maker, Broadway 

Walker S & Co, builders, millwrights, and carpen- 
ters. Main ' 

Wall J S & Co, groceries and provisions. Main 

Walsh Thomas & Co, harness and carriage trim- 
mings. Second 

Warren E A, confectionery and cigars 

Warren Robert E, organs and music. Second 

Waterland William, tailor, Main 

AVatts N, physician 

AVayland J F, physician. Main 

Wedekind & Burkett, liquor saloon. Second 



A. ROMAN & CO., General Agents for Subscription Books, 11 Montgomery St., S.F. 



San Francisco Jewelry Manufactory, D. W. Laird,' 513 Montgomery cor. Merchant. 



130 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



WEED & WEED, livery stable. Main 
WETHEllBEE IK A A, proprietor Chico Hotel 
Williams & Carpenter, wood, Hazel 
WillianiR & Doak. fruits and vegetables, Main 
WitberellS A Mrs, dressmaker, Broadway 
Witherspoon J 11, Chiuo and Big Meadows express. 

Main 
Wood Jesse Rev, clergyman, (Independent) 
Woods AFordham, clothing and tarnishing goods. 

Main 
Woodman J M Rev, clergyman, (Congr) 
Zwislor E II, physician, Main 
Zwisler & Broyles, dry goods, shoes and carpets 

Main * 

Chili, Calaveras Co, P O 5 miles n w of 

San AnJiuas 
Murphy E Mrs, general merchandise and postmis- 
tress 

Chili Gulch, Calaveras Co, P O address, 

xMokelumne llill,(j miles n of San Andreas 
Lantanier A, liquor saloon 

China Flat, Sierra Co, P O address, 

Iiownieville, 5 miles e of Downieville 
Junot Frederick, general merchandise 

Chinese Camp, Tuolumne Co, P 

11 miles s of Soiiora, is a small town on the west 
bank of Wood's (Jreek, connected by s.age 
with Sonora and Jacksonville. Formerly it was a 
busy mining town, but tbat interest, in this locality, 
is now mostly abandoned to the Chinese, while the 
white population have turned their attention to fruit- 
growing, farming, and stock-raising. Being on 
several routes of travel, it shows some business life. 
Stages from Milton and Oakdale, the termini of the 
Stockton and Copperopolis, and Stockton and Visa- 
lia Kailroads, 27 miles distant, pass Chinese Camp 
en route to the Big Trees of Calaveras, and to Yosem- 
ite Valley. These, with the mines of the surround- 
ing country, gives the place considerable trade. 

BACUN MAK'i'i.N, banker and general merchan- 
dise 

Cutting Charles B, harness and saddlery, postmaster 
and telegraph operator 

Egling L, blacksmith and wheelwright 

Gross A, liquor saloon 

Hanna (ieorge, livery stable 

KempsoD John, boot and shoe maker 

LAMJfSUN il M, physician and druggist 

Mann J C, liquor saloon 

Mamio P, harness and saddlery 

Mayer Leonard, butcher 

McAdams T, general merchandise 

Morris A, dry goods and clothing 

maimer E T, barber 

Pratt ri J, attorney at law 

riULiNSKY C W H, proprietor Gairett House, and 
agent Wells, Fargo & Co 

Weyer F, liquor saloon 

Wheeiock S C, liquor and billiard saloon 

Chino, San Bernardino Co, P O 25 miles 

e of San Bernardino 
Goldsmith Simon, postmaster 
Grant — , physician 

Kaliman & Goldsmith, general merchandise 
Yount David, blacksmith 

Cholame, San Luis Obispo Co, P O 50 

milus n e of San Luis Obispo 
Acunio A, general merchandise 
Butchart & Russell, general merchandise 
liussell David, postmaster 

Christine, Mendocino Co, P 32 miles 

w of Ukiah 
Estlick Alexander, blacksmith 
Gantly Andrew, postmaster, gen mdse and brewery 
Gschwind John, flour and lumber manufacturer 
Nolan J ames, hotel and livery stable (North Fork 

Navarro KiverJ 

Chualao, Monterey Co, P O 10 miles e of 

Salinas 
Droege & Co, general merchandise 
Hubbard William, blacksmith and liquor saloon 
Killogg, G P, dairyman 
Kinkade William, hotel 



Laird Charles, dairyman 

Mclnto.fh William, painter 

O'Donald Martin, liquor saloon 

O'Hern D. hotel 

Peterson M, carpenter 

Kay John, boot and shoe maker 

Smith & Mosier, blacksmiths and wagon makers 

Sn.vder Thomas, postmaster, agent Wells, F^argo Sc 

Co, gon mdse and market 
Tuttle S E. restaurant 

Churntovrn, Shasta Co, P address Shasta, 

10 milos of Shasta 
Bergo Henry, general merchandise 
Hyatt Isaac, saloon and blacksmith 

Cinnabar, San Benito Co, P O 
Chick George W, postmaster 

Cinnabar, Santa Clara Co, P O address, 

San Jose, d miles 3 w of San Jose 
Downer H H, hotel 
Wall John, blacksmith • 
Wetzel Hermann, hotel 

Cinnabar, Trinity Co, P O address, Trinity 

Centre, 50 miles n e of Weaverville 
Foley D H, liquor saloon , 

Cisco, Placer Co, P O 56 miles n e of Au- 
burn, on the Central Pacific Railroad. Located near 
the summit of the Sierra Nevada, at an elevation 
of 5,911 feet. During the period required for cutting 
the railroad tunnel through the dividing ridge of 
the mountain, Cisco was the railroad terminus, 
aaa was then a place of active business, being also 
the depot of supplies for the mining district of 
Meadow Lake. At present it is an eating station 
on the railroad, and its businessiis confined to the 
mining localities in the vicinity of Meadow Lake. 

Campbell R A, postmaster, general merchandise and 

agent Wells, Fargo <fe Co 
Hamilton J H, agent C P R R 
McHugh John, hotel 

Clairville, Sonoma Co, P O. (See Geyser- 

ville) 
Critchtield George W, postmaster 

Clara ville, Kern Co, P O address, Havilah 

Weir William, liquor saloon 

Clark's Station, Mariposa Co, P O ad- 
dress, Mariposa, 25 miles e of Mariposa 
Clark Galen, hotel 

Clarksville, El Dorado Co, P O 16 miles 

w of Placerville 
Cram S K, liquor saloon • 
Karowell & Co, general merchandise 
McCarty D, lime manufacturer 
Swallin Frapk, lime manufacturer 
Tong Gilbert S, postmaster and carpenter 
Tong M Mrs, hotel 

Clasrfcon, Contra Costa Co, P O 13 miles s e of 

Martinez 
Bauer &. Kapp, brewery 
Bentley Robert, liquor saloon 
.Chapman &, Killer, butchers 
Curry James, livery stable 
Ingram Henry, general merchandise 

Merritt Rev, clergyman, (Cong) 

Rhine Charles, postmaster and general mercbaijldise 
Rhine Jacob, hotel 
Wall George, hotel 
Williamson John, liquor saloon 

Clayton's Ranch, Yuba Co, P O address, 

Brownsville, ob miles n of Marysville 
Shattuck T F, general merchandise 

Clear Creek, Butte Co, P O address, Pentz, 

12 miles n of Uroville 
Clark E D, hotel 

Clear Creek Station, Shasta Co. (See 

Bell's Bridge) 
Clinton, Alameda Co. (See Oakland) 



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STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



131 



Clinton, Amador Co, P O address, Pine 

Grove, 5 miles s of Jackson 
SpagDoli i> B, attorney at law and notary public 
Spagnoli D B & Bro, general merchandise 

Clipper Qap, Placer Co, POT miles n e of 

Auburn 
Hoagland Joseph A, portmaster and gen mdse 
Holmes H T & Co, lime manufacturers 
Honn George W, hotel 
Judkins Samuel, liquor saloon 
McEnerney Mrs, hotel 

Clipper Mills, Butte Co, P 32 miles e of 

Oroville 
Bean & Bro, stock raisers 
Binet E, manufacturer saddle trees 
Bliss W Y, teacher 
Cornell P M, hotel 
Kelley J B, hotel 
Leach A M, lumber 
Pratt, Alley & Co, general merchandise 
PRATT ENOCH H, ?»wtmaster and agent Wells, 

Fargo & Co 

Cloverdale, Sonoma Co, P 32 miles n of 

8anta Kosa, at the terminus of the San Francisco 
and North Pacific Railroad, is a flourishing village 
situated in the valley of Russian river, and sur- 
rounded by a fine agricultural and grazing region. 
From it stage routes radiate into Mendocino and 
Lake counties, and to the celebrated Geysers, a few 
miles to tlie east, which wonderful springs consti- 
tute one of the attractions to tourists, and a fashion- 
able resort during summer. To these resources are 
added the many discoveries of richquicksilverveius 
In the mountains lying between Russian river and 
Clear Lake valleys, which are most accessible via 
Cloverdale, and which will give it much trade. The 
locality is claimed as one of the most delightful for 
residences in the State. 

Abraham C, general merchandise 
f ^Asher & Bro, general merchandise 
•f-Beam & Woodworth, furniture 

Boggs J 0, physician 

Byron & Minihan, proprietors Cloverdale Hotel _^ 

Crigler, W E & Son, groceries 

Davis B J, butcher 

Davis &. Walton, livery stable 

Dixon John, liquor and billiard saloon 
""+GEHKHAKDT H FEED, proprietor United States 
Hotel 



Carpenter W H, blaoksmith 

Simpson Noah, postmaster and stock raiser 

Coleville, Mono Co, P O 30 miles n w of 

Bridgeport 
Dick Morris, postmaster and blacksmith 
Goodenow Lloyd, physician 
Hartshorn B G Airs, general merchandise 
Hatch N W, lumber manufacturer 
Jriikendale J S, notary public 
Turner & Olds, liquor saloon 
Watkins R G, attorney at law 

Colfax,Placer Co, P 17 miles n e of Auburn, 
is the most important station on the Central Pacific 
Railroad, being the depot for Grass Valley, Nevada, 
and other northern towns, also for Iowa Hill and 
other localities south and east. The town is 
pleasantly situated on a ridge between the Ameri- 
can and Bear Rivers. Its mild climate and fertile 
soil afford opportunities for the Horal ornamenta- 
tion of residences and the cultivation of almost 
every variety of fruit. The route of the Colfax and 
Nevada Narrow Gauge Railroad has been surveyed, 
with prospects of its early construction. Illinois- 
town, half a mile distant, was formerly the trading 
point on this ridge, but the construction of the rail- 
road, with the depot at the present site of Colfax, 
caused the transfer of the principal business of that 
village to the latter. 

Allen & Co, bacon and ham packers 

APPLEGATE GEORGE W 

Baylies D W, watchmaker and jeweler 

Benjamin William, harness and saddlery 

Boynton George, house and sign painter and paper 



Grant George, blacksmith and wagon maker 
Gray Riley, blacksmith 
Qropp Charles, brewery 
Haupt J ulius, stoves and tinware 
Kerns & Shrewsbury, livery stable 
Kerr R A, boot maker 
Kilbourn Ward, druggist 
Kline M, general morTOandise 
Levy D, tailor 

Lewis Byron Rev, clergyman (Christian) 
'Linville B & Son, general merchandise 
Linville, Jasper A, postmaster and stage agent 
Livernash J H, cabinet maker 
McHarv^y C F, harness and saddlery 
Mitchell Charles E, general merchandise 
Moore Joel W, fruits 

Morgan D B, justice of the peace and insurance agt 
Muntz Jacob, boot maker 
Schwartz M, varieties 
Shaw & Hoadley, general merchandise and agents. 

Wells, Fargo & Co -"^ 

Shore James M, liquor and billiard saloon 
Simpson A C, barber 
Spurr Daniel, attorney at law 
Sulphur Creek flour mills 
Tann James, harness and saddlery 
-Vanarnam and Kennedy, proptrs Geyser Springs 

and Cloverdale stage line 
W|lJis& McCray Mrs, millinery and fancy goods 
Wise Elbert, general merchandise 
Woods William M, liquor and billiard saloon 
Young N A, agt S F & N P R R and tel operator 

Clyde, Stanislaus Co, P address, Oakd^ 
Herald & Harrison, warehouse 

Coast Range, Colusa Co, P O 50 miles 

8 w of Colusa 
Brownell J W, sheep raiser 



Bross Peter, physician 
Cleaveland J J Rev, (Meth) 
Culver J A, blacksmith and wagon maker 
Curley & Mahon, restaurant and liquor saloon 
Davenport John A, liquor saloon 
DeBlanchemarie Louis, liquor saloon 
Fawcett George Hi barber 
Fuller P J, lumber manufacturer 
Groves George, proprietor Temperance Hotel 
HarrLson James, agent Bear River Ditch Co 
-^ HAYFORD, HIMES & CO, general merchandise 

and agent Cal Powder Works 
Hayford James B, forwarding and insurance agent 
Hayford William B, insurance agent 
Himes W A, secretary and treasurer Rising Sun 

Gold M'g Co, and insurance agent 
Hodgdon J P, agent C P R R 

KECK JACOB, general merchandise & liquor saloon 
Kennedy Austin, hair dressing saloon and baths 
-JilLMBR H C, proprietor Junction House 
Kuenzley Jacob, agent W U Telegraph Co, and justice 

of the peace 
Leeds L D, liquor and billiard saloon 
Lobner Leopold, dry goods, clothing, furnishing 

goods, boots, hats, etc 
Lord Thomas J, livery and feed stable 
McCarty John, boot and shoe maker 
McCullough Geo B, carpenter, builder, and lumber 

dealer 
Millan William G, bakery and liquor saloon 
Mischler John, butcher 
Murphy Bernard, liquor and billiard saloon 
Nickell George W, hay, grain, produce, and groceries 
Papin Louis, restaurant 
PLANK ASA H, proprietor Exchange Hotel 
Read Sam, forwarding merchant 
Rich William C, attorney at law 
Shaw Clark J, stage agent and proprietor 
Smith James, gunsmith 
Storey William B, agent Wells, Fargo & Co, notary 

public, and insurance agent 
Toop C P, carpenter and builder 
Traphagen N R D, postmaster, druggist, and book- 
seller 
Voss Louis, lumber 
Wales Henry, agent A & P Telegraph Co, and fancy 

poultry . 
Webster Elijah, liquor and billiard saloon 
Young John, proprietor Central Hotel 



Colfax Springs, Tuolumne Co, P O ad- 
dross, Garrote, 40 miles s of Sonora 
Elwell Charles H, hotel 



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132 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



College City, Colusa Co, P O 18 miles sof 

Colusa 
Bashore Bros, livery and food stable 
Cain J II, insurance agont 
Cai%>ontor W J Uov, clergyman and president Pierce 

Christian College 
Davis Siuion, physician and druggist 
Diot'endorfl", 1' J A U E, general merchandise 
]»uinold J II, insurance agont 
llaiulin & Ilewott, blacksmiths 
Johns James W, butcher 
Kirtby L W, hotel 
Liminoux Paul, shoo maker 
McAtoe F X, harness and saddlery 
Patterson James M, butcher 
Kathburn E, postmaster and plasterer 
Scott James, wagon maker 
AValker 11 P, carpenter and contractor 
West John, carpenter and contractor 
M'orsley Bros, blacksmiths 

Collegeville, San Joaquiu Co, P O 8 miles 

s e of Stockton 
Chalmers L K, physician 
Cravvford S P, physician 

Lawson Andrew, postmaster and gen mdse ^ 

McCabo A, carpenter and builder 
JMelntosh James, insurance agent 
Snow William 11, contractor 

^Voodard , teacher 

Yeager C Rev, clergyman 

Collinsville, Solano Co, P O 20 miles s e of 

Fairtield 
Bird John, grain and hay dealer 
HOOPER THOMAS P, agent C P R R steamer|. 

hotel and liquor saloon ^ 

HOSKING WILLIAM, general merchandise and 

agent Wells, Fargo & Co 
Kahn Paul, general merchandise 
Krause E E, blacksmith 
Upham Emory J, postmaster, real estate and stock 

dealok 
Walton E W, blacksmith 
Warren F P, wagon maker 

Coloraa, El Dorado Co, P O 10 miles n wof 
Placerville. It is distinguished in the history of Cali- 
fornia as the place where gold was first discovered, 
bj- Marshall, in 1848, inaugurating a new era in the 
business of the world. This vviis for a number of 
years an exceedingly prosperous mining locality, 
but subsequently, as the rich placers became ex- 
hausted, every available spot of ground was planted 
with trees and vines. The fruit and wines produced 
have obtained a world-wide celebrity, and the in-; 
habitants enjoy a very comfortable prosperity. Co- 
loma is pleasantly situated on the south side of the 
American River, on the stage-road from Auburn, on 
the railroad to Placerville. It is also reached from 
Sacramento via the Sacramento Valley Kailroad 
and stage from Shingle Springs. Coloma is a quiet 
rural village, showing little of the life and bustle of 
early days, but it is regarded as a favorite place of 
residence to those located there. 

AllhoflF Martin, agent W U Telegraph Co 
Barnes J L it Bro, wine manufacturers 
Borland Alexander, boot and shoo maker 
Burgess K, blacksmith 

Chalmers Robert, insurance agent and wine manu- 
facturer and distiller 
Childs F S, druggist 
Claussen Peter, boot and shoe maker 
Hooper William, fruit cultivator 
Ingham (ieorgoH, notary public and attorney at law 
Mahler & Crocker, wholesale fruits 
McBride Bernard, liquor saloon 
Meyers Henry, hotel 

Othick ^V D, wine manufacturer and distiller 
Price John, postmaster and general merchandise 
Smith E M, wine manufacturer 
Tenscher John, cooper 
Weller Ellas, gen mdse and agent Wells, Fargo «fe Co 

Colorado, Mariposa Co, P O address, Mari- 
posa, 7 miles n of Mariposa > 
Duborg William, general merchandise 
Garibaldi G, general merchandise 

Columbia, Tuolumne Co, P O 4 miles n n w 
of Sonora, is reached by daily stage from Milton, 



about 20 milesdistant.the terminus of the Copperop- 
olis railroad. In the early day.s nf mitiitig this was 
one of the richest gold regions of the .State, and a 
well-built and flourishing city soon grew up. The 
town has been thrice destroyed by fire, the last 
time in IsfiO, and since that dLsaster it has not main- 
tained its former Importance. Gold washing is still 
carried on to some extent in the place, and in the 
neighboring camps. Uold-beaiing veins of quartz 
are known to exist In the neighborhood, but are 
neglected by capital. About two mile.sfrom Colum- 
bia i.s an e.xtensive and valuable marble quarry, 
which invites the construction of a railroad for its 
development. The soli in the vicinity is adapted to 
agriculture, and where farming and garden prop- 
erty is secured from invasion by the miners, great 
success has attended its cultivation. All kinds of 
fruit, including oranges and other semi-tropical 
varieties, grow luxuriantly and of the finest quality. 

Bornheim llonry, liquor saloon 

Brady M, general merchandise 

Brunet L, dry goods 

Butler Horace, restaurant 

Callaghan Daniel, boot and shoe maker 

Cunniff Thomas, liquor sala*n 

Eblor William, harnessgj^^addlery 

Elias Edward, postmasTer, telegraph agt, and books, 
stationery and cigars 

Fallon Owen, proprietor Fallon's Hotel 

Jobannesman A, liquor and billiard saloon 

Kelly M, livery stable 

Kluber Honry, Jiquors 

Knapp Sewell, general merchandise 

Koch Charles, barber 

Levy J, dry goods 

Levy S & H, dry goods and clothing 

Mack John Rev, clergyman (Presb) 

Martin P li, watchmaker 

Morgan George, proprietor City Hotel 

Rehm M J, liquorsaloon 

Ryan William C, groceries 

Schoettgon F T, batcher 

SCHOOLER &. RICHARDS, blacksmiths 

SEVENING HENRY, agent Wells, Fargo & Co, 
and gold dust buyer 

Siebert Antono, baker 

iSiebert William, liquor saloon and billiards 

Springfield Brewery Depot 

Stoltze F, liquorsaloon and restaurant 

Tibbotts J P, physician 

White E E, notary public and justice of the peace 

Wilson James, boots and shoes 

WING GiDEO.N, tinsmith and deputy collector U S 
internal revenue 

Zwickert F, boot and shoe maker 

Columbia Hill, Nevada Co, P O address, 

"■ North Columbia, 11 miles n e of Nevad(j|City 

Ayers Levi, postmaster, and justice of the pntM 

Patten James, blacksmith a, 

PINGREE J 0. hotel 

Woodruif A L, general merchandise 

Woods Jeremiah, hotel 

Columbus House, Tuba Co. (See Straw- 
berry Valley) 

Colusa, Colusa Co, P O and county seat. 

The town occupies a most lovely site on the west 
bank of the Sacramento River, in the midst of a 
grove of large oak trees, having a most cheerful and 
pleasing eftect. Here ihe river is broad, and the 
navigation is without difficulty, aSording ready and 
cheap transportation. The exceedingly fertile soil, 
stretching in a wide expanse in all directions, assures 
a long continuance of the substantial prosperity that 
has created this thriving village. The town plot 
was surveyed in August, 1850, and the name of Colusa 
given it, something similiar, signifiying ".scratch," 
in the gutteral language of the Indians, being the 
name of the tribe occupying the locality. Until 1S,>3. 
this was regarded as the head of navigation on the 
Sacramento, but venturesome speculators and mer- 
chants had explored the river, and Red Blutf be- 
came established as the distributing point for the 
mining region of Shasta, Trinity and Siskiyou coun- 
ties. As a way place Colusa declined, but since the 
development of the agricultural wealth of the valley 
she has advanced with rapid strides and upon a firna 
basis. Her trade is with the farmers and graziers of 
the valley, and with the quicksilver mines of the 
Coast Range. A passenger boat makes daily trips 
to Knight's Landing, connecting with the California 
Pacific Railroad for Sacramento and San Prancisco, 
and stages leave daily for Marysville, Bartlett's 



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S-TATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



133 



Springs, Wilbur's Springs, Chico, Knight's Landing. 
Princeton, Newville, etc., there being ten lines of 
stages running from the town. Two newspapers, 
the Sun and Independent, are published weekly. 

ADDINGTOX ^ GREEN, proprietors Colusa Sun. 

Allen S H, liquor .saloon 

Allen Stephen, builder and contractor 

Bacigalupi G B, ice (Jream saloon 

Baker Samuel, feed and livery stable 

Belton W H, physician 

Billups William M. agent Dresbach & Co 

Blanck Martin C, wholesale liquors 

Bobst T .S, jeweler and watch maker 

Bodefield John, cigars 

Bodefield .Joseph, clothing 

Bridget'ord E A, butcher 

Brooks George G, cigars, tobacco and varieties 

Brower J, wagon maker 

Brown Justin, liquor saloon 

Buckelew A S, jeweler and watch maker 

Bundy X Porter, eclectic physicians 

Burnett Robert, stage agent 

Byers J H Rev, clorgytnan (Presb) 

Carpaneto Louis, restaurant 

Gary Lewis, stoves and hardware 

Caulkins Silas, ice dealer 

Cayot A, wagon maker 

Cheney .John, livefy stable 

Clayburgh M, drj'-soods and clothing 

Colusa Academy, Mrs L G Thompson, principal 

Colusa County BJfck 

Colusa House, S P French, proprietor 

COLUSA IXDEPENDEN'T. Daly A Glenn, propts 

Colusa Seminary, Mrs H Miller, principal 

COLUSA SUN, Addington A Green, propts 

Colusa Water Works, H H Thomas, superintendent 

Cook G A, stage agent 

Cook k Graham, stationery and fancy goods 

Corey T & Co, proprietors National Hotel 

Crandall Giles G, broker 

Gulp John, livery stable 

Culp & Reynolds, livery stable 

DALY & GLENN, proprietors Colusa Independent 

Danner J B, contractor and builder 

De Jarnatt J B, notary public and conveyancer 

De Jarnatt W H, general merchandise 

Dean W D & Co, lumber dealers 

Deuel John C, attorney at law 

Dewey L H, watch maker 

Doyle J M, surveyor 
^Estill W K, general merchandise 

Farmers Bank 

Farmers' Storage & Commission Co, Waller Calmes, 
president • 

Farris M B & Co, undertakers 

Farris Robert, contractor and builder 

Frank A, merchant tailor 
wFrench S P, proprietor Colusa House 

Furth J, general merchandise 

Gage J D, flour manufacturer 

Gibson & Co, restaurant 

Gifford C P, carpenter 

Gill J W & Co, contractor and builder 

Gilmour A Bond, boots and shoes 

Goad J W, attorney at law 

Goad, W F, attorney at law 

Gosliner & Co, dry goods 

Goulding D, tailor 

Goulding &, Brigham, proprietors Munchville and 
Wilbur stage line 

Groenham John, bakery and confectionery 

Grover Bros, hardware and agricultural implements 

Guffin A J, phy.sician 

Hagar George, real estate 

Hamilton L E, harness and saddlery 

Hart A L, attorney at law 

Hart Jackson, broker 

Hart James, attorney at law 

Hart T .J, attorney at law 

Howard B, physician 

Jackson S H, liqvfor saloon 

Jones E W & Co,, warehouse and storage 

Jones Joseph H, 'postmaster and produce broker 

Kioser Louis, harness and saddlery 

Kirk S T, attorney at law 

Kirkpatrick B F, wagon maker 

Kirschbaum Emily Mrs, liquor saloon 

Klcn Henry, butcher 

Koon .John, liquor saloon 

Lewis J B, sewing machines 



Loper, Jose D, barber 

Luhrmin Frank, blacksmith 

Lumsden Nicholaus, physician 

Mann F T, bakery 

Mason OB, conveyancer and attorney at law 

Matzinger & Co, brewery 

McClure -• — , stage agent 

McDonald.M Miss, millinery 

Mciirath J" Mrs, millinery 

McGrath & Co, stoves and hardware 

McGuire John, tailor 

Mendenhall W T, sewing machines 

Miller Catherine Mrs, brewery 

Miller H Mrs, principal Colusa Seminary 

Miller William A Co, proprietors Bartlett Springs 

and Colusa stage lino 
Mitchell H, sfoves and hardware 
Mitchell k Co, liquor saloon 
Mitchell k Jamison, groceries 
Mitchum H B, collector 
Murdock S R, agent Farmer's warehouse 
National Hotel, T Corey k Co, proprietors 
Newton Charles A. accountant and collector 
Nicholson G ^K, liquors 
O'Brien D, shffo maker 
Peters John. Ijquor saloon 
Probst Benjamin, shoe maker 
Putman F M, groceries, crockery, etc 
Reno k Scott, barbers 
Riley Williatn, blacksmith 
Roberts J L*liquor saloon 
Robinson L, physician 
Roche William, blacksmith 
Safladay ATJurtis, fruit and confectionery 
Seube B k Co, wholesale liquors 
Shusard George, city express 
Smith F Z, deijtist 
Smith Tartan, auctioneer 
Smith k Schillinger, proprietors Colusa and Chico 

stage line 
Spaulding & Cook, blacksmiths and wagon makers 
Spittler George J. druggist 
St Maurice D E, painter 

Stanton J B, superintendent C L & M Telegraph Co 
.Swank C, black?.mith and wagon maker 
Talbot A, dentist 
Tardiff k Collins, barbers 
iThompson L G Mrs, principal Colusa Academy 
Tindall M L, attorney at law 
Totten Mark, carpenter 
Vallean G W, photographer 
Ware G W, general merchandise 
Washburn A L, news agent 
AVASHBURN P L. druggist and agent Wells, Fargo 

k Co, and Telegraph Co's 
Weaver Jacob, blacksmith 
Wescott Benjamin, carpenter 
Westcott k Dunlap, liquor saloon 
Wilkins J F, commission merchant 
Williams J W, painter 
Williamson J, painter 
Wilsdorf Frederick, painter 
AVood A, wholesale liquors 
Worley H Mrs, dress maker 

Colusa County. Organized 1850. Bounded 

north by Tehama, east by Butte and Sutter, south bv 
Yolo and west by Lake and Mendocino. Area. 2,376 
square mile.s. A.s.sessed valuation of property for 
1^7-1, ?9.]:j»,8.50. County seat, Colusa. Principal 
towns. College City, Jacinto. JIunchville, Newville 
and Princeton. "The principal resource of the 
county is agricultural, this ranking ne.xt to Stani- 
slaus In the production of wheat, and next to Sono- 
ma in agricultural wealth. The county is also dis- 
tinguished foritstinestock of improved breeds of all 
domestic animals, grazing and cattle-raising having 
been the first of its developecl enterprises. The 
hills of the Coast Range, which swell the western 
border of the county, have long been known to con- 
tain silver, quicksilver, copper, sulphur, petroleum 
and salt, and recent developments have shown the 
quicksilver deposits to be of great value. As ex- 
plorations continue, and the natural resources are 
made known, it indicates that every portion of the 
county possesses wealth of an agricultural or min- 
eral chanicter of a high order. Munchville, near 
Wilbur Springs, is in the centre of the quicksilver 
region and is thirty-five miles south of west frrjm 
the town of Colusa. The State is distinguished for 
its large farms, and this county presents a repre- 
sentative of this class. In the northern part of the 
county is the farm of Dr. Hugh Glenn, of -57,000 



ti 
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Pk« 



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134 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



aores, having a frontiige on the Sacramento River 
of seventeen miles, and extendlnp: live miles into the 
plain. Tills was mostlv cultivated in wheat in the 
vear 1S7-), and about 1,600.000 bushels was the pro- 
duct. The county is nearly a parallelogram, ex- 
tending sixty miles in a direct line north and south, 
and the .southern part from Rutte Creole, and the 
northern from the Sacramento river, to the summit 
of the C'oiust KaiiK(> on the west, giving a breadth of 
near fifty miles, tlius embracing a broad and fertile 
aection (if the great valley. The river affords cheap 
transportation through the whole length of the 
county, being navigable at all 8ea.sons of the .vear 
for steamers towing barges of eight hundred tons to 
the town of Colusa, and of four hundred tons to 
points above. This fine and open channel forbids a 
mi nopoly of transportation, and has obviated the 
neces.sity of a railroad for freight, although the in- 
cr asing passenger travel indicates the necessity of 
this improved s.vstem of highways. A large nuni- 
ber of small streams have their sources in the Coast 
Range and tiow eastward, and either sink in the 
valley or gather in the sloughs that connect with 
the Sacramento in the .southern part of the count.v. 
Stony Creek, the principal of the Coast Range 
streams, rises about twenty miles north of the 
southern boundary and flows north to the northern 
boundary, thence southeast to the Sacramento. 
These would afford means for extensive irrigation 
were they controlled by proper engineering. The 
Colu.sa, Lake and Mendocino Telegraph Compau.v, 
having their headquarters at Colusa, extend their 
wires through the counties named, being a great 
convenience to the business public and a source of 
profit to the pro.iectors. At Colusa it connects with 
the Western Union Telegraph and with the world. 
Officers: F. L. Hatch, County Jndge; S. M. Bishop, 
Clerk, Recorder and Auditor; A. h. Hart, District 
Attorney; James L. Howard, Sheriff and Tax Col- 
lector; Moses Stinchfield, Treasurer; W. N. Herd, 
Asse.ssor; M. P. Ferguson, Survej'or; S. H. Allen, 
Coroner and Public Administrator; J. E. Putnam, 
Superintendent Public Schools. 

Corapton, Los Angeles Co, P O 12 miles s 

of Los Angeles 
Bland A Rev, clergyman 
Finley J Mrs, teacher 
Fisher Charles S, postmaster 
<Trand S &, Co, general merchandise 
Proctor A A, blacksmith 
Tarr C W Rev, clergyman 
Warren R B, teacher 
Wright C B, hotel 

Concord, Contra Costa Co, P O 6 miles s e 

of Martinez 
Bacon Samuel, postmaster, notary public and justice 

of the peace 
Bacon & Co, general merchandise 
Bonte &Bauman, bJacksmiths and wagon makers 
Bevert W L, liquor saloon 
Blechor Chris, shoe maker 
Downing Theodore, livery stable 
Gebringer A. manager Leal Bluff Warehouse Co 
Goodale & Newstadtor, general merchandise 
Hamolin L A, physician 
Hcrmandoz Joaquin, groceries 
Klein Philip, hotel 
Loring Henry, hotel 
Moreno L F, harness and saddlery 
Parker Samuel, candies 
Perez Francis, liquor saloon 
REIF CHARLES, liquor saloon 
Riiios P, barber 
Venegas M, groceries and liquors 

Confidence, Tuolumne Co, P O address, 

Sonora, 12 miles e of Sonora 
Barron William H, general merchandise 
Baxter D F, hotel 

Davely Theodore, general merchandise 
Duvelling L T, general merchandise 
Miller James L, hotel 
Richards John, engineer 
Thomas James, blacksmith 



Congress Springs, Santa Clara Co. 

Saratoga) 



(See 



Contra Costra County. Organized 1850. 

Bounded north by the Straits of Carqninez, Suisun 
B ly and the San Joaquin River, east by San Joa- 
quin County, south by Alameda, west by Alameda 
and the Bay of San Francisco, and northwest by 



San Pablo Bay. Area, 756 square miles. Assessed 
valuation ol pnoperty for )S74, J7,665,95o. County 
seat, Martinez. Principal towns, Antioch, Clay- 
ton, Concord, Nortonville, Pacheco, Somerville 
and San Pablo. Resources, agricultural and min- 
eral, both of high character. Contra Costa is most 
favorably situated for trade and the exportatlou of 
its products. The peak of Monte Diablo, the 
most prominent object observed In approach- 
ing the harbor of San Francisco, rises from the cen- 
ter of the county, and is richly stored with valua- 
ble minerals, coal being the principal, but copper 
and quickisilver are also found. Coal Is mined ex- 
ten.sively, atid from the northern spurs of Monte 
Diablo comes the chief .supply of fuel for the bay 
and river steamers, and the manufactories of the 
State. The monthly product is about 20,000 tons. 
The principal mines are the Black Diamond at Nor- 
tonvJUe, and the Pittsburg, Union and Central at 
Somersvllle, only one mile distant, other mines in 
other localities are now opening. The plain.s, val- 
leys and hillsides are exceedingly fertile, and agri- 
culture and grazing are conducted with great suc- 
cess. Contra Costa has navigable water on three 
of its sides, rendering communication with other 
parts of the State most convenient, and cheap 
transportation for all of its products. Two rail- 
roads, aggregating fourteen miles of track, are con- 
structed for carrying the coals of Monte Diablo to 
the navigable waters of Suisun Bay. Two lines of 
proposed railroad will run through Contra Costa 
County. One of the.se, having its starting point be- 
tween Bantas and Ellis stations, on the C. P. R. R., 
and its terminus at Oakland, is nartl.v grraded, and 
will encircle the county on threiPof its sides. The 
other is a narrow-gauge road, which the farmers of 
Contra Costa and Alameda Counties propose to 
build from Livermore to Martinez, following a level 
grade a distance of about S.'J miles. In 1874 an excel- 
lent road was built to the summit of Monte Diablo, 
which has now become a favorite resort for visitors, 
anxious to witness the grand panoramic view pre- 
sented. 

Officers: Thomas A. Brown, County Judge; 
Lewis C. Wittenmeyer, Clerk ; Hiram Mills, Dis- 
trict Attorney; Mark B. Ivor.v, Sheriff and Tax Col- 
lector ; George J. Bennett, Recorder and Auditor ; 
John R. L. Smith, Treasurer ; James Foster, As- 
sessor ; Russell Eddy, Surveyor ; Edwin W. Hiller, 
Coroner and Public Administrator; Alfred Thurber, 
Superintendent Public Schools. 

Con-way's Landing, Mendocino Co, P O 
T^> address, Punta Arenas, 70 miles s w of Ukiah 
Hargraves Zip, liquor saloon 
McDonald John, liquor saloon 
McMillan Angus, general merchandise 

Oopperopolis, Calaveras Co, P O 18 miles 

south of San Andreas. Here were tormerly some 
very rich copper mines, which for a few years 
poured forth their wealth in great profusion. At 
that time Copperopolis exhibited great prosperity, 
but declined as the interest in copper mining went 
down. The Stockton and Copperopolis Railroad 
was projected in the hope that by faciUtating trans- 
portation copper mining would be revived, but the 
railroad was only built to Milton, 30 miles from 
Stockton, and statu quo describes the situation. 

Baker J M. notary public 

Braids Charles, blacksmith 

Cravvtbrd George 0, liquor saloon 

Fontania A, groceries, wines and liquors 

Ford John L, liquor saloon 

Hodges G Z, hotel 

Honey Calvin, postmaster and patent medicines 

Honey Milton, agent W U Telegraph Co 

Kelly Peter, livery stable 

Marsan P C, butcher 

Marsters E G, gunsmith 

Mead G A, lumber dealer 

Turner William, wagon maker 

Zaiss G B, brewery 

Coppervale, Lassen Co, P 15 miles w of 

Snsanville 
Goodrich Carlton C, postmaster, hotel, and land agt 
Williams M & W, hotel 

Cordelia, Solano Co, P 0. (See Bridgeport) 
Ramsey Charles, postmaster 

Corrallitos, Santa Cruz Co, P O address, 

Watsonville, 15 miles e of Santa Cruz 
Ford & Sanborn, manufacturers flour and lumber 
Porter G K & B F, tanners 



rHANCIS Sn VALENTINE. Commercial Printing House, 517 Clay Street, S. F. 



The largest stock of Sheet Music west of Chicago, at QUAY'S, 105 Kearny St., S. F. 



STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



135 



Oosumes, Sacramento Co, P 0. (See Bay- 
lor's Rancb) 
Tubbs J ohn C, postmaster 

Cottage Grove, Klamath Co, P O 

Elliott William, postmaster 

Cottonwood, Merced Co, P O address 

Hill's Ferry, Stanislaus Co 
Badt & Lowenburg, general merchandise 

Cottonwood, Shasta Co, P 20 miles a e 

of Shasta 
Dreiling Joseph, carpenter 
Foster Jacob, postmaster and hotel 
Forster John H, agent California & Oregon Railroad 
Gilbert L Miss, teacher 
Gray T, blacksmith 
Jones Mrs, dressmaker 
Mertz Valentine, liquor saloon 
Nichols E, flour manufacturer 
Patterson J N Rev, clergyman 
Price William F, general merchandise 
Richardson P S Miss, teacher 
Rowley L H, blacksmith 
Smith J 0, physician 

Cottonwood, Siskiyou Co, P O address 

Henley, 22 miles n of Yreka 
Brady John, hot^l 
Brown J V, liquor saloon 
Eubanks J S, blacksmith 
Eubanks Miss, manager W U Telegraph Co 
Mickalwaitt William, liquor saloon 
Smith & Miller, general merchandise 

Cottonwood, Yolo Co. (See Cache Creek) 
Cottonwood Grove, Los Angeles Co, P 



address Lyons Station, 40 miles n w of Loa«»Burtsehell F, prop City Hotel, and gen mdso 



Angeles 
Moore Charles, hotel and feed stable 

Coulterville, Mariposa Co, P O 25 miles 

n \v of Mariposa 
Austin H G, physician 
Bruschi Francisco, general merchandise 
Canova G, general merchandise 
Cassaccio Andrew, liquor saloon 
Capurro Francisco, boot maker 
CODY NELSON T, druggist, postmaster and agent 

Wells, Fargo & Co 
Debolt John, restaurant 
Hobron G W, lumber manufacturer 
Jones Ralph, watchmaker and jeweler, 
Longhurst Peter, liquor saloon 
Mentzer John, livery stable 
Pendola G, general merchandise 
Rihn J C, butcher 
Shimer James, blacksmith 
Sinning Adolph, cabinetmaker 
Smith J AV, liquor saloon 
Tiscornia Antonio, general merchandise 
Wagner Daniel, proprietor City Hotel and Wagner 

House 

Courtland, Sacramento Co, P O, 19 miles 
n e of Sacramento 

Bump Nathan, blacksmith 

Kahn Paul, general merchandise, tule covers manu- 
factory, and agent Wells, Fargo & Co 

Morse Stephen, blacksmith 

Sims James V, Postmaster 

Covelo, Mendocino Co, P 60 miles n of 

Ukiah 
Aldrich E W, physician 
Batoman J D, physician 

Bransford W L, drugs, stationery, and varieties 
Burchard J L Rev, clergyman ^^ 

Coshard 0, harness and saddlery ^ 

Cunningham J P, hotel 
Day & Scott, livery stable 
Dunlap L, painter 
EborleCH, butcher 
Ellis J & Co, general merchandise, and agents Wells, 

Fargo & Co 
Fairbanks II J, general merchandise 
Hastings Thomas, liquor saloon 



Hornbrook Sanders, postmaster 
Montague & Henry, liquor saloon 
Murphy A J, barber 
Potts G H, physician 
Prezing G J, shoemaker 
Scott E W, livery stable 
Williams S G, blacksmith 

Coyote Station, Santa Clara Co, P ad- 
dress, Burnett, 15 miles of San Jose 
Perry Jane Mrs, proprietress Fifteen Mile House 

Coyoteville, Amador Co, P O address, 

Fiddletown, 25 miles n e of Jackson 
Taylor James, general merchandise 

Cox's Bar, Trinity Co. (See Big Bar) 
Crescent City, Del Norte Co, P 0, an in- 

corporaterl citv and Coimty seat, is pleasantly situa- 
ted on a slight indentation of the ocean coast, facing 
the south, and protected from the northwest winds 
bv Point St. George. The harbor being open to the 
south, is unsafe for vessels in the winter storms. A 
good substantial wharf has been built out from 
Battery Point, at which vessels discharge at almost 
all times of the year, but during heavy southeast- 
ers the waves break over it. Conamunication is 
maintained with San Francisco by steamers and 
sailing vessels, and a large business is carried on 
with the interior, although rendered difficalt by tlie 
mountainous character of the country. Cresent 
Citv is in Latitude 41° 44' 32" north and Longitude 
124° 11' 22" west, and 'So'i miles n n w from San 
Francisco. The surrounding country is cultivated 
to a considerable extent, and flour and saw mills 
are among the manufacturing institutions main- 
tained. Oue^ newspaper, the Courier, is published 
weekly. 

Adams B, physician 

Ahrens J, cabinet maker and upholsterer 

Barth George Jr, billiard saloon 



Church E B Rev, clergyman (Episcopal) 

Corrin F, boat builder 

Crandall Samuel, builder and plasterer 

Crawford William, wood dealer 

Crescent City Boat Co, boating _ 

CRESCENT CITY COURIER, Mason & Tack, 

proprietors 
Crescent City Mill Co, lumber manufacturers 
Crescent City Wharf & Lightering Co, lightering 
Crusins F, pork packer and butcher 
Darby & Donovan, billiard saloon 
Eldredge J E, photographer 
Eudert & McLaughlin, billiard saloon 
Fisherman A, boots and shoes 
Frantz J F, blacksmith 

Gilsworth Joseph, stone mason and contractor 
Gihvorth S A, laundry 
Hamilton W A, attorney at law 
Harper .James, liquor saloon 
HOBBS, POMEROY & CO, lumber manufacturers, 

gen mdse, forwarding and commission 
Hodgkins & Church, hardware, stoTos and saddlery 
Howell A J, sho imaker 
Hughes James, druggist 
Jones S Rev, clv;rgyman (Meth) 
Keller H, boot and shoe maker 
Kiefer Charles, house and sign painter 
Knox F, physician 
Liddle James, liquor saloon 
Lipowitz Max, teacher 
Magruder E N, carftenter and joiner 
Malonoy T, livery and sale stable 
MARHOFFEK JACOB, County Assessor 
Marhoffer Joseph, brewery and soda factory 
Mason Edgar, dentist 
Mason William B, attorney at law 
MASON A TACK, proprietors Crescent City Courier 
McCreesh k Co, butchers 
McLaren James, carpenter and builder 
McLellan & Co, livery and sale stable 
McNamara N, proprietor American Hotel, and 

wholesale liquor dealer 
Meyers & Tryon, beef and pork packers 
Miller John, blacksmith 
Murphy J E. attorney at law 
Patterson C E, carpenter and builder 
PfeifFer C H, dry goods and clothing 
Richardson George, carpenter and builder 
Richert .John, liquor saloon 



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136 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



^ 
N 



Sartwoll D S, wntch maker and jewolor 

Siivillo William, attorney at law 

yolig & ChAplin, dry goods and clothing 

Shipnmn 1) E, liquor and billiard saloon 

Smith J, liquor sialoon 

Southworth E D, liquor saloon 

Stone A West, liquor saloon 

Straub Edward, hairdressinK saloon and baths 

Straub (} A, cabinet maker 

Tuck &. Eldridge, cabinet makers 

Theilacker J F, bakery 

\"orlander E, tanne>rv 

WALL J (i, agent Wells, Fargo & Co 

Walrath F Kev, clergyman (Roman Catholic) 

^\'at5on William, wagon maker 

Wengi?r i Esswoin, groceries and crockery 

Woodbury W H, postmaster, books and toys 

Woodbury W H Mrs, milliner and dressmaker 

Yates Edward, proprietor Del Norte Hotel 

Ziraerel F, tailor 

Orescent Mills, Plumas Co, P O 16 miles 

n of Qiiincy 
Haugh R H, liquor saloon 
Bransfoid M B, postmaster 
Carter J S, physician 
Carter J: Lioyle, hotel and general merchandise 

Cressey, Merced Co. (See Livingston) 

Crimea House, Tuolumne Co, P O ad- 
dress Chinese Camp, 15 miles s of Sonora 
Stockel J B Mrs, hotel ^ 

Cross Creek, Tulare Co, P O 15 miles s w 
ofVisalia ^ 

Jacobs, Simon & Co, general merchandise 
Robinson Charles H, postmaster 

Cro"w's Landing, Stanislaus Co, P O 15 

miles s w of Modesto 
Armstrong J L, general merchandise 
Boggs (roorge \\', commission and warehouse 
Byers John Q, carpenter 
Ciow J B, stock dealer 
Crow J P, commission and grain warehouse 
(Tcorge A: Webber, blacksmiths 
Tucker John F, postmaster 

Cucanaong-a, San Bernardino Co, 22 miles 

w of San Bernardino 
Cueamonga Vineyard Co, wine and brandy manufs 
• larcia T S, wool grower 
Medau Bertrand, bakery 
liiche F Louis, postmaster and general merchandise 

Cuffey's Cove, Mendocino Co, P O 55 

miles w of Ukiah 
Conway John, postmaster 
Lynch .t Kinney, liquor saloon 
McDonald A, blacksmith 
Mc^Manus S Mrs, hotel 
Welle i Conway, general merchandise 

Damascus, Placer Co, P O address, Iowa 

City, 3(i miles n e of Auburn 
Cannon F E, butcher 
Denly II K, general merchandise 
Hall John, hotel and general merchandise 

Daneto-WTl. Placer Co, P O address, Lincoln, 

15 miles w of Auburn 
Nader Henry, groceries 

Danville, Contra Costa Co, P O 16 miles 
s e of Martinez 

Cameron W W, supt Monte Diablo'stage road 

Cohen Michael, postmaster 

Cohen A Cahen, gen mdse and express agents 

Conway John, general merchandise 

Rawley <k McPheeters, blacksmiths and wheel- 
wrights 

Darwin, Inyo Co, P O 

Elder Abner B, postmaster 

Davenport, Santa Cruz Co, P O 13 miles 

n w ot Santa Cruz 
Hatch & Brangan, lumber manufacturers 



LORENZEN LORENZ, ship builder 

Purdy William, postmaster and general merchandise 

Roque A, hotel 

Sprague A Co, blacksmiths 

Wuurr Henry, lumber manufacturer 

Davis School House, San Joaquin Co, 

P address, Lodi, 7 miles n of Stockton 
Chase C H, general merchandise 

Davisville, Yolo Co, P O 9^ miles s w of 
Woodland. This is a village springing up since the 
construction of the California Pacific Railroad, 
which passes through the place. It is situated in 
the midst of a rich agricultural section, on the north 
bank of Putah Creek, and i.s the center of consider- 
able trade. Fruit of e.xcellent quality and in great 
variety is grown in the vicinity, and several thou- 
sand boxes of rasins were made in 1S7-}, which sold 
at $J.75 per box of 2:! pounds each. Here the 
railroad forks, as it comes from the south, one 
branch going east H miles to Sacramento, and the 
other northerly to Woodland and Knight's JL^anding, 
24 miles 

Allen Rev. clergyman (Methodist) 

Brown Edmund _L, liquor saloon and bowling alley 
Brown Elijah ^\', hardware, stoves, agricultural im- 
plements and insurance agent 
Collins Thomas B, blacksmith and wagon maker 
Cooley i Rowe. provirietors Davisville Mills 
Crandall C B. liquor saloon 

Crawford Frederick G, liquor and billiard saloon 
Dresbach, Bane A Co, general merchandise 
Dresbach A Co, grain dealers and warehouse 
Faber William, brewery 

Fairburn Alexander Rev, clergyman (Presbyterian) 
GafiFard Jonathan W, hotel, billiard and liquor 

saloon 
Gardner Matthew, physician 
Grangers' Warehouse, W H Marden, manager 
'•Green Thomas, boot and shoe maker 
(Tumpper John, liquor saloon and boot maker 
Haight Emmor J, druggist and insurance agent 
Hayden William S, livery and feed stable 
Hite A E, well borer 
Uoag Benjamin H, fruit and produce 
Hotfman George, harness and saddlery 
Horning Jacob, agent Wells, Fargo A Co 
Horwood Charles A Co, blacksmiths and wagon 

makers 
Kinsman Julius A, liquor saloon 
Levy Henry, hair dressing saloon and baths 
Marden William H, postmaster, hotel and market 
ilcKennifl' Jerry, boot and shoe maker 
Molvin J C A Co, general merchandise 
Melvin John C, liquor saloon 
-Melvin Joseph, grain warehouse 
Morgan John L, carpenter and builder 
U"Noal James, justice of the peace and notary public 
OLUFS B, agent Cal P R R and W U Telegraph Co 
Farmeter Joel E, painter and paper hanger 
I'earce Thomas B, dentist 
Piper Daniel R. liquor saloon 
Royce Roland W, livery and feed stable 
Saunders I J, inventor 
Schultz Frederick, liquor saloon 
Siebold Andrew, bakery and liquor saloon 
.Steel Isaac C. lumber agent 
Terrill A Williams, general merchandise 
Tufts George, fancy goods 
W'eber George, liquor and billiard saloon 
\\ einberger Marcus, general merchandise 
Welch E E Mrs, milliner and dressmaker 
Wilson Barney, harness and saddlery 

Daylor's Ranch, Sacramento Co, P O ad- 
dress. Consumes, "3) miles s eof Sacramento 
Balis George W, hotel 
Cotton J S, hotel and groceries 
Esterbrook James Mrs, blacksmith 
grazer — , hotel 
Tubbs A Howell, groceries and liquors 

Dajrton, Butte Co, P O address, Chico, 23 

miles n w of Oroville 
Bowman S, general merchandise 
Carton Peter, liquor saloon 
Greenbaum 0. general merchandise 
Yokum H F, hotel 



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STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



137 



Dayton, Lassen Co, 20 miles e of Susanville 
Jones S, hotel 
Sifford A, teacher 

Dead"WOOd, Placer Co, P O address, Michi- 
gan Bluff, 37 miles n e of Auburn 
Ferguson D, hotel 
Morton Mrs, hotel 

Decota, Alameda Co, P O, a station on the C 

PRR 
Decota Bros, grain warehouse 
Hare Andrew, postmaster 

Deep "Well Station, Monterey Co, P O 

address, Natividad, IS miles n e of Monterey 
Foster Allen, general merchandise and hotel 

Deer Greek, El Dorado Co, P O address. 

Shingle Springs, 15 miles s w of Placerville 
Holdridge L, hotel 

Deer Valley, El Dorado Co, P address. 

Green Valley. 12 miles n w of Placerville 
Reese John, teacher 
Smith E II, general merchandise 

Del Norte County. Organized 1857. 
Boiindeii nortb by Oregon, east by Siskiyou, south 
by Klamath and west by the Panific Ocean. Area, 
1,440 square miles. Assessed valuation of property 
forl874, $697,5fio. County seat, Crescent City. Priii- 
cipal towns. Crescent City and Happy Camp. This 
Is the extreme north-eastern count.v of the State, 
hence it.s name. The resources of Del Norte are 
abundant, though slightly developed, chiefly owing 
to the mountainous and inaccessible character of 
the country. The forests are on a grand scale, and 
a large lumbering business is carried on. Farming 
is not an extensive resource, but .several thousand 
acres are under cultivation, and a grist mill ofsev- 
enty-tive barrels capacity a day is maintained at 
Crescent Cit.v. The mineral wealth is great, though 
the production is not large. Gold is mined on the 
Klamath and its branches, and in the sands of the 
ocean beach. Rich veins of copper exists in the 
mountains ea.st of Crescent City, and imme-se de- 
deposits of iron ore of a high percentage are found^ 
A company of San Francisco capitalists has been 
formed for working these ores, for which the abun- 
dant forests afford convenient fuel. Chromic iron 
ore, or chrome, highly valued as a pigment, and 
used as a coloring matter in various ways, appears 
In inexhaustible quantities in the viclnit.v of .Smith 
Biver valley, and is mined for shipmerit East and 
to Europe. During the year 1874 over 1,200 tons of 
this ore were shipped East from the mines of Del 
Norte. The fisheries of the coast and streams 
entering the ocean constitute an important resource, 
the salmon being chiefly sought, and of this noble 
fish some two thousand barrels are taken annuallyT 
At CrescentCitj', on the coast, is an open roadstead,^ 
where steamers and sailing vessels land passeugeasl ' 
and freight in favorable weather. 

Officers: W. A. Hamilton, County Judge; P. H. 
Peveler, Clerk, Kecorder and Auditor : William 
Sample, District Attorney ; R. S. McLellan, Sher- 
iff and Tax Collector; John Chaplin, Treasurer; 
Jacob Jlarhoffer, Assessor: D. S. Sartwell, Sur- 
veyor ; JJb Magruder, Coroner ; J. E. Eldridge, 
Public Administrator ; Max Lipowitz, Superintend- 
ent Public Schools. 

Delano, Kern Co, P O 35 miles n of Bakers- 

fidd 
Amy Victor, liquor saloon 
Chauvin E, postmaster, general merchandise and 

agent Wells, Fargo & Co 
Rice J W, hotel and general merchandise 
York Fred, agent S P R R 

Denverton, Solano Co, P O 9 miles s e of 

Fairfield 
Crawford J N Rev, clergyman 
Daniels Addio F Miss, teacher 
Levigno H, carpenter 
Mein Robert, storage and forwarding 
Nurse Stephen K, postmaster and gen mdse 
Sullivan & Ent, blacksmiths 
SMITH WILLIAM 

Diamond Spring House, Plumas Co, P O 

address. La Porte. 4U miles a of Quincy 
Union Lumber Co, lumber manufacturers 



Diamond Springs, El Dorado Co, P 3 

miles s of I'lacerville. 
Bradbury Erastus G, postmaster and agent Wells, 

Fargo & Co 
Dean Isaac, blacksmith 
Griffith' & Bryant, lumber manufacturers 
Harris Thomas, provisions and hardware 
Hogan P B, lumber manufacturer 
Hooper H 0, door and sash manufacturer 
Ilsohn Frodk. hotel 
Koch B, hotel 

Schneider John .Jr, liquor saloon 
Siosbuttel Alexander, hotel 

Dick's Station, El Dorado Co, P O ad- 
dress, Slippery Ford, 46 miles n e of Placerville 

Yarnold Richard, hotel 

Dixon, Solano Co, P O 20 miles n e of Fair- 
field, and 20 miles s w of Sacramento, on the line of 
the California Pacific Railroad, and in the midst of 
a rich and exten.sive agricultural district. This town 
has grown into existence during the past five years 
* and is rapidly increasing in population and wealth, 
being now the second town of business importance 
in the county. The erection of a high school is in 
contemplation. The Tribune Is published weekly. 
Population aHbutSOO. 

Audo William, liquor saloon 

Bank of Dixon, H B Sheldon, cashier 

Barnes T B, collector 

Bean J R, proprietor Bean's Hall 

Blitch J S Rev, clergyman 

■Blum, Sons & Co, general merchandise and grain 

Brock A, barber 

Brown Samuel, liquor saloon 

Cadman George, blacksmith and machinist 

Carpenter M, blacksmith and wagon maker 

Colburn A F, postmaster, druggist, news dealer and 
watch maker 

Cole & Co, groceries, fruits, etc 

Cole G A Mrs, milliner and dress maker 

Cotton J W, real estate and insurance agent 

Craig & Moshier, photographers 

Dashiell W A, real estate 

Dempster W H, shoe maker 

DIXUN TRIBUNE, Linthicum & Hopkin proptrs 

EPPINGER & CO, general merchandise 

Ferguson & Co, general merchandise 

Ferguson W R, butcher 

FREDERICKSON JOHN, lumber and insurance 
_ agent 

Goimann F, shoe maker 

Goetz F Mrs, brewery 

Goffert H, harness and saddlery 

Hamilton J T, shoo maker 

Hays L C, attorney at law 

Hill W W, grain warehouse 

■HINMAN \V S, proprietor Kings Hotel and lirery 
stable 

Hohlmann V J, roprietor Empire Hotel 

Huff D B, lumLar 

llutton Edwar , barber 

Ilgner \V Mrs, dress maker 

Johnson J & Bro, blacksmiths and wagon makers 

Kairsch John, harness and saddlery 

Kirby A, druggist 

Kline & Co, stoves, tin and hardware 

Koehler Henry, baker 

Leake Edward E, agt Wells, Fargo & Co and W U 
Tel Co 

LINTHICUM & HOPKINS, proprietors Dixon 
Tribune 

Little &. McCoy, butchers 

Martin & Hardy, liquor saloon 

Morris & Hall, liquor saloon 

Parola F H, shoe maker 

Peterson Anna Mrs, bakery and oyster saloon 

I'owell A, lumber 

Pratt A H, physician 

Riddle R, flour manufacturer 

Schrimor C, stoves, tin and hardware 

Smith H, liquor saloon, tailor and gents' furnishing 
goods 

STEVENS S C, justice of the peace 

Straub William, liquor saloon 

Stuart & Hamilton, painters 

IJpham F F, dentist 

Van Zant J K & Co, varieties 

Weiho Edward, liquor saloon 

White M, Mrs, liquor saloon and restaurant 



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138 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Dobbins' Ranch. Yuba Co, P O address, 

OrcRon House, 27 miles n e of Marysville 
Merriatn Joseph, hotel 
Slin^sby i Gettins, general merchandise 

Doby Ranch, Sacramento P O, 20 miles s 

of Siicramonto 
Carroll Z. bhioksiuith 
Rujsoll Samuel I), postmaster 

Dodgreville, Sk^noma Co. (See Pine Flat) 

Dog Creek. Shasta Co, P O address, Portu- 

eoo. ■" inilo* n of Shasta 
Smith ^\■illianl T. general merchandise and hotel 
Smithson S, hotel 

Dog To"wn, Yolo Co. (See Capay City) 

Donahue, Sonoma Co, P address, Lake- 

villo, \H miles s e of Santa Rosa 
Susenboth -Tohn C, hotel 
Rochfort Thomas, general merchandise 

Donner Lake, Nevada Co, P O addres?, 

Truokee. -^5 miles n e of Xpvada; The lacustrine 
s«N^n(>rv of the Sierra Xevada h;is become widely 
celebrated for it< beauty, but in no section is it 
shown in more charmins loveliness, associated with 
wild crrandeur. than at Donner Ijike. Pure and 
snarklincr. this mirror-lilce l>ody of water rests in 
its quiet vale, frinsed with eversrreen forests, while 
in the west rises, in grim m.-yVsty. the mouotain 
ridse of ruirsrtHl rocks alons which is hewi? the 
narrow shelf that tv>ars the ereat Pacific Railroad 
and its sweeping trains like a battle of life against 
the elements— a triumph of Art over Xature. The 
Lake is three and a half miles in len.cth. bv one in 
breaith. of great depth and pnrity of water, and 
occupies a M,«in of the e;istorn «lope of the Sierra, 
having the high monn'ains on three sides, the east- 
ern opening of the valley of the Tniokee Hiver one 
br.iMoh of which here taking its source. Tourists in 
sean'^ of the refreshing and picturesone. visit it via 
the Summit, or from the town of Tnirkee, two 
miles distant, or view the scene from p.-issing trains. 
Turing the summer it is a ple.a.sant place of resort, 
stages and carriages being avail.able to vi.«;itor8. ac- 
commodation by gtHHl hotels, the fishing and boat- 
ing are always excellent, and the pure air. the fresh 
cold w.ster. and the graml scenery give health to 
the body, and pleasure to every sense. The name 
perpetually recalls a nainful feminiso-^nce of the 
trials and hardships of the pioneers of Cjvliforni.i. 
Xear the sonihern end of the lake are some high 
stumns of trees, old and decaying, indicating the 
site of the '•■ponner C.ibins." where, in I'M*;, a partv 
of immigrants from Illinois, of which the Ponner 
family were prominent meml)ers. caught in the 
early snows of th.1t year, made their encampment 
and were compelled to pa-ss the winter. Terrible 
suffering ensued, many dying from starvation and 
others relieved themselves bv cannib.allsm. and 
suspicions are entertained that in the deep despair 
of the frigid imprisonment murder was <y)minitted 
that the pangs of hunger might be relieve<1 from 
the bodv of the victim. The surviving immigrants 
were relieved in Febniarv. ij^T. bv the exertions of 
the settlers at Sutter's Fort, and their tale of suffer- 
ing and despair sent a thrill of horror over the 
countr.v, and to this day attaches a melancholy in- 
terest to the scene that l)ears the name. 

Door Station, Trinity Co, P O address, 

Trinitv Centre 
■WTiittmore H M. hotel 

Dorris Bridge, Modoc Co. P O and County 

seat 'iXi miles n e of Sacramento, is a newlv settleid 
Kv^a'.ity at the junction of the North aiid South 
Forks of Pitt River, in what is locallv called Hot 
Spring Vallo.v. The town is of but recent location, 
and is in a wild and elevated region, but is sur- 
n^-.- i-Hl by broad meadows of excellent gra.sses, 
ar*' r.!;!ig abundant pasturage. The scenerv is ro- 
ir.i- ::,'. the water pure and cold, and the climate is 
siilv-.ot to no extremes of heat and cold, although 
fros's oct'ur in Summer and snows of two feet in 
depth come in Winter. 

Barber W C. liquor saloon 

Coombs Williani. liquor saloon 

rOKRTS JAMES J attorney at law 

Harmon Jt Billman, blacksmiths 

Harris tT F. attorney at law- 
Hill H (t, ph.vsieian 

Lauer E Jc Co, general merchandise 



Mann Henry, liquor saloon 
Mark A Weller. livery stable 
McKay George, carpenter 
Pendleton and O'Hale, carpenters 
Rine X B, postmaster 
Skinner William, attorney at law 
Smith J L P, carpenter 

Double Springs, Calaveras Co. (See Val- 
ley Springs* 

Dougherty's Station, Alameda County, 

P 14 miles s e of Oakland 
Bowen .Tohn, wheelwright 
Donnelly James, butcher 
Dougherty J W, stock raiser 
Green John, general merchandise and hotel 
Luten Peter, hotel 

Wortheimer Siegfried, postmaster and gen mdse 
Wills T D, blacksmith 

Douglas City, Trinity Co, P O 7 miles s of 
Weaverville 

Carr T S, teacher 

Earl A R, notary public 

Gream W T. blacksmith 

Hennessy D. liauor saloon 

Leonard H W, hotel 
1 Lobdell 0, gunsmith 

Marshall .Amos II, postmaster 
, Marshall i Mason, general merchandise 
! Wallace .t Mabie, butchers 
"Weaver W T, blacksmith 

Douglas Flat, Calaveras Co, P O address, 

I Murphys, IS miles s of San Andreas 
j Gagliardo Antonio, general merchandise 
I Perasso G, general merchandise 
Perry S A, general merchandise 

Dover, Merced Co, PO address. Hills Ferry, 
I Stanislaus Co, ."W miles s w of Snelling 
^ Shaw Hiram, blacksmith 

Do"wney City, Los Angeles Co, P O ad- 
dress. Los Xietos, 12 miles s e of Los Angeles 

Adams Samuel A Rev, clergyman 

Adams S G Rev, clergyman 

Barnett G, blacksmith 

Baruch ,fc Loeb, general merchandise 

Benbrook Charles, liquor saloon 

Brown J C, boot maker 

Brownstono Samuel, attorney at law 

Clayton P Rev, clergyman 

Cooper jc Co, blacksmiths and wagon makers 

Crowell C T, general merchandise 

Frankel Bros, general merchandise 

Gilletta C Rev, clergyman 
%raham J B, hotel 

Griffith i Lynch, lumber 

Guirado B, general merchandise 

Holloway J B, attorney at law ' 

Jenkins W W, attorney at law 

Jones S, painter 

Leach J W Rev. clergyman 

Mitrovitch J, fruits 

Moores William Rev, clergyman 

Pollard L C, liquor saloon 
. Rice M, hotel 
i Settle M G Rev, clergyman 
I Shortridge Charles, harness and saddlery 

Smith A Fulton, druggists and agents Wells, Fargo 
A Co 

Stacdifer R, livery stable 

Stroud R. blacksmith 

Stuart Henry, blacksmith 

Wolfe George W, attorney at law and justice of the 
I peace 

Downieville, Sierra Co, P O and county 

seat. 110 miles from Sacramento, is situated on the 
north fork of the Yulia river. This town, one of the 
oldest in the northern part of the State, still enjoys, 
a goodly portion of its former prosperity. Many 
millionsof dollars of the golden dust havebeen ex- 
tracted from the piaoersin the vicinit.v: and at the 
present Ume several valuable quart.z leads are 
worked, which yield remunerative returns to their 
owners. It is reached by stage from the Pacific 
Railroad at Colfax, also by stage over a well im- 



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STATE OF CALIFORNIA. 



139 



*f III 



F roved wagon road from Marysville and by stage 
rom the railroad at Truckee. The ^fourUat» Met- 
senger, a paper of many years standing, is published 
weekly. 

Aiken Cvrus D, physician and druggist 

Barry Edward, attorney at law 

Bartlett Lewis, attornev at law 

Bollo (t. groceries and liquors 

Bosch Ferdinand, brewery 

Brown & Ward, hardware .^ 

Byington L, butcher 

Callis Albert, barber 

Chase O C, pbvsician 

Chappius A, liquor saloon 

Cochran .James, liquor saloon 

Cohn A k Co, dry goods and clothing 

Coloney TT C, harness and saddlery 

Cowden V> H, attorney at law 

Cunningham John, fruit and confectionery 

Davidson S R, attorney at law 

Eli^s k Brother, dry goods and clothing 

Eschbacher F A, hotel 

fJale .Tohn. attorney at law 

Gardiner Thomas, dentist 

Oaribaldi k Co, groceries and liquors 

Orant Patrick, dry goods 

Ouirzbergor k To, bjUchers 

Hartling Valentine. Coot and shoe maker 

Havnes P L. Rev. clergyman (Meth) 

Howard A Mead, livery stable 

Jft k Zimmerman, blacksmiths 

Jackson Piehard Y. forwarding and packing 

Johnson John, barber 

Jiimp Alembi, physician 
jiiser E, liquor saloon 

^/elly Peter, liq'ior saloon 

Kruse Ernest, billiard saloon 

Lacore Bros, carpenters 

LatreiMe B. clothing 

Luther W T k Co, forwarding and packing 

Lvnch C iVf Bev, clergyman (R C^ 

Manson.AVilliam .t Co, iron and brass foundry 

McDonald 0, hotel 

McGuire A J. carpenter and builder 

Meany N IT. liquor and billiard saloon 

Meriiiis k Co, groceries 

MOUNTAIN MESSENGER, Vaughn <k Downer. 
proprietors 

Nessler k Rlohm. brewery 

Noland k Co. blacksmiths 

OREAR JOHN W, agent Wells, Fargo k Co, station- 
ery and sporting materials 

Purdy H H, jewelry 

Quick John R, boot maker 

Ryan William, postmaster 

Scamman ITonry, banker and assayer 

Stodd"rt William, groceries 

VATGIIN & DOWNER, proprietors Mountain 
Messenger 

Ware Larry, tailor 

Weil John, groceries and liquors 

Weir & Thatcher, livery stable 

Wiggins James S, liquor saloon 

Dry Creek, Calaveras Co, P address, San 

Andreas 
Oneto Lorenzo, general merchandise 

Dry Creek, Tuba Co, P O address, Oregon 

House. 2"> miles n e of Marysville 
Kingdon H, hotel 
Shoenholzer George, general merchandise 

DrytO'wn, Amador Co, P 11 miles n w 

of Jackson 
Clark W 0, livery stable 
Clemens James, liquor saloon 
Croglow H, wagon maker 
Finn Stephen, wine manufacturer 
Gifford .Samuel, shoe maker 
Grimes George, dry goods and clothing 
•Reich 1', barber 
- -H EN DKK.SON F B, proprietor Exchange Hotel — 
JENNINGS WILLIAM, postmaster, grocer, agent 

Wells, FargoA Co, and manager W U Telegraph 

Co 
Leincke Charles, manufacturer wine and vinegar 
Miller D R, blacksmith 



Normon W A, physician 

Silvy Thomas, butcher 

WILLIAMS J C, general merchandise 

Dublin, Alameda Co. (See Dougherty's 
Station) 

Duncan's Mill, Sonoma Co, P O 25 miles 

8 e of Santa Rosa 
Beacom Thomas, postmaster, agent Wells, Fargo & 

Co, and hotel 
Duncan A k Co, lumber manufacturers and general 

merchandise 
Knowles Joseph, flour manufacturer 
Markham Andrew, liquor saloon 

Durham, Butte Co, P O 18 miles n w of 

Orikiiio 
Baker .T»)lacksmith 

Cambell James, railroad agent and liquor saloon 
Durham William W, postmaster 
Gass & Co, warehouse and flour manufacturers 
Pratt C, warehouse 

Dutch Flat, Placer Co, P 32 miles n e 
of Auburn, and 67 from Sacramento, on the south 
side of Bear river, is noted for its gold mines. The 
village lies contiguous to the Central Pacific Rail- 
road, thereby enjoying facilities of ready communi- 
cation with the metropolis. Here and in the vicin- 
ity are numerous high ridges and points of aurifer- 
ous drift, having an accumulation of gravel of from 
two to seven hundred feet in depth, and mining in 
this by hydraulic washing and underground exca- 
vation constitutes the resources of the place. Min- 
ing has been carried on here .since the early days of 
the gold discovery, and improvements in the hy- 
draulic process have kept pace with the advance of 
the country. A great outlay of capital is required 
to properly open and operate the.se mines, and 
neoes-sariiv the land is owned In large tract*, or 
claims, controlled by wealthy companies, who 
usuall.v own the ditches, or canals, that bring water 
from distant .sources, and several million dollars are 
produced annuallv. From the deep excavations 
made in the mines' of Dutch Flat, a good opportu- 
nitv is offered to observe the character of the for- 
mation, and to deduce therefrom a theory of the 
causes of the gold-bearing gravel deposits of the 
.Sierra :S^evada. The town is at an elev.ition of 
3.42.5 feet above the sea, being about halfway up the 
mountain side, and in the region of snow in the 
winter. The climate, however, is very pleasant 
and healthy, and tender fruits, gardens, etc., are 
cultivated. 

Arnold L B, attorney at law 

Berg August, watchmaker and jeweler 

Boek Herman, liquor and billiard saloon 

Boke John H, books, stationery, fancy goods, and 
insurance agent 

Brown C J, attorney at law 

Coffin I T, Dutch Flat Water Works 

Cohen G & Bros, dry and fancy goods, clothing, 
boots, hats, etc 

Colgrove Levi R, livery stable 

Davis Abraham, liquor saloon 

Disque Henry, agent C P R R and groceries and hard- 
ware 

Eckert Peter, wagon maker 

FalIer.John R, liquor saloon 

GARDNER M S, capitalist 

Granger George H, liquor saloon 

Halsey George M, blacksmith and wagon maker 

Hillhouse William H, hardware, stoves and tinware 

Hoos Frank C, liquor saloon 

Hoos John F, boot and shoe maker 

Hudepohl H Rudolph, dry goods, clothing, boots, 
hats, etc 

Jameson .James, justice of peace and notary public 

Jameson k Brinkman, hair dressing saloon and 
baths 

Johnson Austin, harness and saddlery 

Kopp Charles M, butcher 

Lepper Oliver, boot and shoe maker 

Ludlum Thomas B, manager Ceder Creek Gold 
Mines and Water Co (limited) 

Maker George S, general merchandise 

Marcovich J B, proprietor Dutch Flat Hotel 

Martin Noble, physician 

McClure E L. banker, agent Wells. Fargo k Co, W 
U Telegraph Co, and insurance agent 

Mcintosh James, liquor saloon 

Meyers John, liquor saloon 



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140 



PACIFIC COAST BUSINESS DIRECTORY. 



Micholl & Rnblin, proprietors Placer Brewery 

Nichols T J, insurnnco ngont 

NICIHtLT,^! WA P, bankers and gold dust buyers 

PKKKY ALBERT E, gun and locksmith 

Pinnoo (J I) llev.clorKyman (Moth) 

QUIKK JAMES, photographer 

Kunck.'l Justus H, bakery and groceries 

Rupprioht John, general merchandise 

Pimiiions Robert, fruit, candy, vegetables, etc 

Smart Daniel E, postmaster and varieties 

St Clair L P, butcher 

Stover L K, druggist and apothecary 

Swon'pon M Mrs, proprietress I'lacor Hotel 

Swensson Samuel E. liquor and billiard saloon 

TOWLE BROTHERS, lumber manufacturers 

Towlo, Gould A- Co, lumber manufacturers 

Uren Clement, Deputy U S Surveyor 

Voiffht & Lakamp, clothing, furnishing good|rboots, 

hats, etc W 

West Henry K, livery stable 
Wilson M W, physician and dentist 

Dutch Hill, Plumas Co, P O 26 miles n w 

of Quincy 
Dutch Hill Mining Co, general merchandise 
Scott Samuel N, postmaster 

Eagle Creek, Shasta Co, P address, 

Horsotown, 18 miles s w of Shasta 
Baker A M, general merchandise 
Frank J M, wine manufacturer 
Jones E R, general merchandise 
Murray J, general merchandise 

Eagleville, Modoo Co, P O 43 miles s e of 
Dorris Bridge 

Clark WiUard S, hotel 

McCarty Eli, blacksmith 

Parker W P, carpenter 

Scheeline Benjamin, postmaster and general mer- 
chandise 

East Bear River, Yuba Co, P O address, 

Wheatland, 16 miles s e of Marysville 
Connelly May E, teacher 
Farrell J J, hotel 
Larrabee T S, teacher 
Stoddard Joel & Bro, flour manufacturers 

East Fork, (Scott Elver) Siskiyou Co, P O 

address, Callahan's Ranch, 45 miles s of Yreka 
Haislop J B, general merchandise 

East Oakland, Alameda Co. (See Oakland) 

Eden Vale Station, Santa Clara Co, P O 

address, San Jose, 7 miles s of San Jose 
Robinson John, hotel 

Edendale, Alameda Co, P O 6 miles s e 

of Oakland 
FIELD W J, grocery and llciuor saloon 
Kohler R J, reduction and refining works (Damon's 

Landing) 
Merritt J B, superintendent fuse factory and justice 

of the peace 
Metcalf Enos, postmaster 
TOY. BICKFORD & CO. proptrs safety fuse factory 

Edgewood, Siskiyou Co, P O 24 miles s e 

of Yreka 
Bowen G W, blacksmith 
Caldwell Jackson, blacksmith 
Cavanaugh Joseph, postmaster, hotel, and general 

merchandise 
Hirst R P, lumber manufacturer 
Maxwell & Sons, lumber manufacturers 
Meyers Jacob, flour manufacturer 

Eel River, Humboldt Co. (See Kohnerville) 

El Dorado, El Dorado Co, P O 6 miles s w 
of Placerville, is reached by the Sacramento Valley 
and Placerville Railroad, which terminates at Shin- 
gle Springs, thence six miles by stage. This was 
formerly a very prosperous mining town, but has 
accompanied the general decline with the placers. 
Several valuable quartz mines, horticulture, and 
agriculture, constitute its resources 

Brenton William, liquor saloon 

Church Bonoit T, postmaster 



Davis L M, horticulturist 

Drew M, harness and saddlery 

Harvev R K, hotel 

HIRSCH&COBLENTZ, general merchandise and 

agents Wells Fargo & Co 
Norton D E, horticulturist 
Parsons 11, butcher 
Parsons S, barber 
Proctor D M, physician 
Russell T, groceries and provisions 
Shafer Jacob, shoemaker 
Thoisen John, brewery 

Wethorwa.K J M B, wine and brandy manufacturer 
Yeadon Joshua, blacksmith and wagon maker 
Yeadon William, liquor saloon 

El Dorado County. Organized 1850. 

Bounded north by Placer, ea.st by the State of 
Nevada and .•Mpine County, south by Amador, and 
west by Sacramento and Placer. Area, 1,K72 square 
miles. Assessed valuation of propertj' for 1874, 
$2,494,622. County seat, Placerville. Principal 
towns, Coloma, Diamond Springs, EI Dorado, 
Georgetown, Greenwood, Grizzly Flat, and Shingle 
Springs. The topographical features are moun- 
tainous, the county occupying a .section of the 
western slope of the Sierra Nevada from the sum- 
mit to the foot hills, embracing rugged peaks, in 
whose glens rest the perpefllal snows or winter, 
bordered by the broad forest belt, where gigantic 
pines and cedars, as monuments of time, clothe in 
dark evergreen the mountain side down to the 
region where wide spreading oaks, over gently 
rolling hills give an orchard-like appearance to a 
lasting summer scene. Lofty mountains and lovely 
lakes, deep caflons and swift flowing rivers, pleas- 
ant valleys and sombre forests diver.sify th^^ 
scenery. Lake Bigler, one of the most beautifi|H^| 
sheets of water in the world, at an elevation of 6,00^^ ■ 
feet, like a sparkling jewel set irj an emerald of 
fore.st, crowns the mountain top, and innumerable 
lesser lakes are like gems on the border. These 
smaller lakes give source to the many branches of 
the American River, which, with the Cosumnes, 
constitute the fluvial system of the county. At 
Coloma, in January, 1843, gold was discovered and 
from here the news spread over the globe and 
brought the rush that revolutionized California and 
the world. El Dorado, then leading in population 
and in the production of gold, obtained the 
sobriquet of " The Empire County," and still she 
may retain the position as the representative 
county of the mining region. While she has been 
distinguished and regarded only for her jnineral 
wealth, her resources are extensive and varied. 
Vast ridges of auriferous drift are deposited 
throughout the mountains, and veins of gold-bear- 
ing quartz seam the slope. The forests are unsur- 
passed in any country, and a soil, which under irri- 
gation is fitted for any tillage, covers marbles, and 
granites, and beds of iron-stone, valuable in building 
and other uses. But with all her native wealth, her 
advance in population and prosper! tj* is slow. The 
early rush of miners sought only the surfiice 
placers, from which they rapidly exhausted the 
gold and fled. The Washoe travel for a period 
gave the appearance of life, while it drained the 
population. Then horticulture seemed the only 
reliance, and fruit of every variety was grown in 
great abundance and unsurpassed in quality. At 
last a new era promises. Great enterprises are 
going forward to develop the chief resources, and 
which will place the county on a firm foundation 
for perpetual prosperity. The towering mountains 
preserve in snow-covered peaks and rock-bound 
lakes the fall of winter storms, and here by simple 
engineering water could be gathered from them to 
,carry on all operations below in agriculture, mining 
and "manufacture. The most noted enterprises for 
the.se purposes are the El Dorado Deep Gravel Co., 
the Mount Gregory Water and Mining Co., and the 
California Water Co., which are constructing large 
canals and opening extensive hydraulic mines. 
The first is constructing a canal of twelve feet in 
width on top by four in depth to carry water from 
the South Fork of the American River to the 
mines in the vicinity of Placerville. The Mount 
Gregory Company comprises a lumber, water and 
mining enterprise, and brings water from Pilot 
Creek and the Rubicon, (the latter one of the princi- 
pal forks of the American), to the mines of Mount 
Gregory and Volcanovllle, and the California Water 
-. , Co. from the headwaters of Pilot Creek supplies 
the mines of the Georgetown divide. From the 
sparkling waters of the Rubicon it is expected to 
supply the cities of Sacramento, Vallejo, Oakland 
and San Francisco, by means of about IBO mile-; of 
iron pipe, giving them the best water supply of any 
of the large cities in the world. Communication is 



rUANCIS & VALENTINE, Printers, Designers, and Engravers, 517 Clay St., S. 3 



QUAY'S New Music Store, 105 Kearny Street, San Francisco. 



STATE OP CALIFORNIA. 



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maintained by many lines of stages, and the I'lacer- 
ville and Sacramento Valley Kailroad enters the 
county from the west, reaching as far as Shingle 
Springs, having twenty-one miles of track in the 
countv. Formerly, here was the great thorough- 
fare of immigration and tra%'el across the Sierra 
Nevada, and several tine turnpikes were con- 
structed ; but the completion of the I'acitic Railroad 
turned travel away. Its great resource, mining, is 
now reviving, and with its other resources devel- 
oped, promises to restore her former prosperity. 
Officers: Charles F. Irwin, County Judge ; Whit- 
man U. Jlill, Clerk, Recorder and Auditor ; Gideon 
J. Carpenter, District Attorney; William II. Brown, 
Sherilf and Treasurer ; Thomas A. Gait, Tax Col- 
lector and Asses.sor ; William Jabine, Surveyor ; 
Frederick Collins, Coroner and» Public Adminis- 
trator; John P. ilunson, Superintendent Public 
Schools. 

El Monte, Los Angeles Co, P O 12 miles e 

of Los Angeles 
Broadded J W, blacksmith 
Cecil J 2s, liijuor saloon 
Elias A, harness and saddlery 
i'ort Anton,^ hotel 
German J T, wagon maker 
Hannon C, physician 
Hayes T, wagon maker 
Hopper John, liquor saloon 
Horn Jc Turner, general merchandise and agents 

Wells, Fargo <fc Co • 

McLain Thomas, general merchandiso 
Metzer Louis, general merchandise 
Quinn M F, livery stable 
Schmidth Henry, blacksmith 
Snider L», general merchandise 
iturner \\ illiam F, postmaster 
Tyler M F, hotel 
Woodward \V, blacksmith 

El Tejon, Kem Co, P O address, Bakers- 
field, .">U miles s e of £akersfield 
Beale K F, wool grower 
Woodward U W, woul grower 

Elk Creek, Colusa Co, P O 40 miles n w of 

Colusa 
Houston J W, hotel and teacher 
Hull C T, teacher 

McUetrick Thomas, postmaster and liquor saloon 
Whipple H V Kev, clergyman 
Williams John, trader 
Wolters H, general merchandise 

Elk Grove, Sacramento Co, P O 16 miles s e 

ot tiacramonto 

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