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THE OHLY WEEKLY MUSICAL JOUR.NAL IH THE GEEAT WEST 



VOL. XL. No. ly^^^^y^jlg, l(i8004 SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. APRIL 2. 1921. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



TETRAZZINI SINGS TO 6000 ENTHUSIASTS LEVITZKI REVEALS NEW PIANISTIC ART 



Famous Queen of Song Appears Before Her Favorite Audience Who 

Gave Her a Stupendous Ovation — Singer in Excellent Voice — 

Francesco Longo, Pianist, Max Gegna, Cellist, and 

J. Henry Bove, Flutist, Share in the Honor 

of the Brilliant Occasion 



Young Russian Genius Opens New Vistas in Pianistry and By Reason 

of an Astounding Facile Technic, Unusually Big and Warm Tone 

and an Intensely Dramatic Style of Expression Thrills Every 

Fibre in the Soul of a Genuine M usic Lover 



By ALFRED METZGER 



By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 



All one had to do was to gaze upon 
the visage of Madame Luisa Tetrazzini 
to note that she wa.s radiantly happy. 
And why shouldn't she be? First of all 
she was once again "Home," in her be- 
loved San Francisco. Secondly, she was 
singing to those who love her dearly, to 
our musical public who have taken her 
to our very hearts and claim her as our 
own. The adoration of thfs now world 
celebrated prima donna has not dimmed 
in the slightest degree by those who first 
recognized her genius and a.ssisted in 
paving the way to her glorious triumphs. 
The reception given her by the six or 
close on to seven tliousand people who 
crowded the Civic Auditorium on March 
27th was in every respect a duplication 
of the greetings tendered her some six- 



demonstrates that Madame Tetrazzini has 
always known how to sing correctly as 
well as to conserve her voice. Therefore, 
the great artist! 

It is quite obvious that Madame Tet- 
razzini is still mistress of her coloratura 
pow.ers.. The many ornamentations, daz- 
zling sky rocket and vocal gymnastic 
effects of every description are evident 
and she sings them with a spontaniety 
and an effervescence which is electrify- 
ing. Her roulades, cadenzas, trills and 
runs are of the real coloratura timbre, 
always containing that much desired 
"ping" to the tones and they are true to 
pitch. Tetrazzini today is unrivalled 
when it comes to taking her extreme 
high tones very softly, swelling and still 
more crescendoing and then finally di- 



True greatness can only be discovered 
in that artist who possesses those indi- 
vidual gifts that cause him to deliver a 
message different from the message of 
any other artist. Unless a new arrival 
upon the stellar firmament of the musical 
world is thus able to tell us something 
new he has no right to be counted among 
the elect. Those who heard Mischa Le- 
vitzki at Scottish Rite Auditorium last 
Sunday afternoon must have been im- 
pressed with tlie fact that they were lis- 
ening to a virtuoso who beyond doubt 
had something new to say. He immedi- 
ately revealed that force of authority and 
individuality of style that proclaims the 
genius, and even his youth occasionally 
disappeared beneath the mature intellect- 
uality of his musical expressions. 

Mr. Levitzki combines the ability to 
obtain a big, resonant, forceful tone with 



terly rendition in every sense of the word. 

The versatility of the artist was dem- 
onstrated in his remarkable grasp of the 
Chopin group. Like an actor who Is ca- 
pable to change his characters in such a 
manner as to absolutely sink his person- 
ality into whatever role he may assume, 
so Levitzki succeeded in investing each 
composer's work with its special atmos- 
phere and spirit. And thus the contrast 
he obtained between the dramatic, stir- 
ring and impressive Beethoven Sonata 
and the graceful, limpid and delicate 
Chopin works was an achievement of the 
greatest magnitude. It must be heard to 
be appreciated at its highest artistic 
worth. 

The final group of the program, consist- 
ing of Troika en trainneaux (Tschaikow- 
sky). La Jongleuse (Moszkowsky), Etude 
de Concert (Liszt) and Blue Danube 




teen years ago in the old Tivoli Opera 
House days. She can come to us none too 
often for she will ever remain our "little" 
Tetrazzini. 

As I heard Madame Tetrazzini at this 
concert I found her vocally superb. In 
the last couple of years she has devel- 
oped tremendously. The natural beauty 
of her voice and god-given gifts which 
she used to rely principally upon for her 
successes has now been coupled with an 
artistic growth which is most astonish- 
ing. She has added to her talents a 
power tor dramatic expression which 
heretofore were not manifested and 
which are such that one hardly expects 
to hear from a coloratura soprano. What 
is most delightful about this acquisition 
is the fact that while Madame Tetrazzini 
has developed the lower and medium 
registers of her voice to such a point 
that no one can any longer say that they 
are of a baby-like quality, she has not 
Impaired her vocal organ in the least. On 
the contrary, her voice is more beautiful 
for Its equalization. Her middle tones are 
as rich, as mellow and warm as her high 
tones remain as ravishingly pearly, clear 
and brilliant as of yore. 'This once more 



minishing them to the finest pianissimo. 
What is more Tetrazzini does not merely 
touch these high C's and D's and ofttimes 
an E, but she positively sustains them. 
Who else is there today who can accom- 
plish such a vocal feat? 

One of the most exacting pieces of 
singing that this artist did during the 
afternoon was the Ah, non credea, from 
Somnambula, which included mostly 
everything demanded of a real artist, 
starting with pages of recitative and end- 
less passages of legato singing as well 
as the florid aria. It was here that she 
evidenced her perfect dynamic control, 
her perfection of breathing and tone col- 
oring of an opalescent character. 

It was most assuredly another Tetraz- 
zini triumph and one whicii will not be 
forgotten either by the artist herself or 
the audience. A coloratura singer such as 
Madame Tetrazzini Is heard but once In 
a lifetime. It Is unnecessary to say that 
Madame Tetrazzini was most lavish with 
her extra numbers for that has always 
been a part of her success, her gracious- 
ness, appreciation and ber ability to 
make her audience her friends. 

(Continued on I'agf 9, Column 1) 



the judgment of shading his phrases in a 
manner to also obtain the finest pianis- 
simo. No matter how much power ha 
may infuse inio his interpretations, he 
never pounds nor mars the quality or 
timbre of his touch. The speed in which 
he takes certain dlBlcult technical pas- 
sages is almost unbelievable. Certain oc- 
tave runs with both hands are played 
with such rapidity that the piano assumes 
the character of an organ tone, and this 
effect came specially to the fore during 
the rendition of the Bach-Tausig organ 
toccata and fugue, which was given a 
most brilliant, intelligent interpretation. 
The Gluck-Brahms Gavotte revealed 
the more delicate side of the pianist's 
varied accomplishments and emphasized 
specially his fine sense of rhythm and his 
exquisite accentuation. In the Beethoven 
Appassionata Mr. Levitzki showed him- 
self a master of classic art and here his 
youth was overshadowed by the power 
of his mind. Wo can not remember ever 
having heard this sonata played with 
such intense musicianship, such earnest 
sincerity, such deliberate abandonment 
Into the spirit ot the work than Levitzki 
revealed on this occasion. It was a mas- 



rt bBMMO n-liONe Hplendli] voice 

11 be licnrd ot the Columbia Theatre on 
>rnooii, April 10th. 

Waltz (Schulz-Evler), gave Levitzki fur- 
ther opportunity to display his astound- 
ing versatility and deep musicianship. If 
you liave not already heard this real giant 
of the piano, don't miss him at his second 
and final concert at Scottish Rite Audi- 
torium tomorrow (Sunday) afternoon. 
You will find him a pianist whom you 
simply can not afford to miss and who 
even though still in the early part of his 
career has attained a finish and intellect- 
uality of conception that puts him right 
In the front line of the great masters of 
the present day. Levitzki Interprets the 
classics as well as all other works en- 
tirely different from what you have heard 
before. He gives the old masters a mod- 
ern style of expression, but he does not 
thereby offend your sensibilities, but 
opens your eyes to something new and 
surprisingly pleasing that hitherto you 
had no idea of. Levitzki is the first 
pianist whom we have heard who by In- 
terpreting the classics in an altogether 
original and novel manner made us forget 
some ot the traditional Ideas to which we 
had become accustomed. To miss hearing 
Levitzki Is to forego one of the greatest 
enjoyments of a concert season. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



DO YOU KNOW THE DUO-ART? 



A Typical Duo- Art Program 



Time: Any time 
Place: Your own home 



Etude ('■The 
Uhapsodio 
Etude (R 



Polonals 



Played by FERRUCCIO DUSONI 



Shepherd's Hey (English Mor 



Vou are cordially Invited to organize a group of friends to hear the above wonderful program on tl 
Duo-Art reproducing piano. We shall be delighted to arrange this or some other program at any tin 
in our Duo-Art concert room. 



We carry everything in Music — Steimvay and other Pianos. Pianola and Duo-Art 
Pianos, Aeolian Pipe Organs, Robert Morton Cathedral Organs, Victrolas and 
Victor Records, Player Rolls, Conn Band Instruments, String and Orchestral In- 
struments, Sheet Music and Music Books. 



Sherinan,|Hay& Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, San Francisco 
Fourteenth and Clay Streets, Oakland 




loscf Hofmann today makes reproducing 
rolls EXCLUSIVELY for the Duo-Art piano. 
Read his statement: 

"These rolls correctly produce my phrasing, 
accent, pedaling and, what is more, they are 
endoived with my personality. 
"One thing is certain: in the production of 
my ozvn playing, the Duo-Art is so far su- 
perior to any other instrument of its kind, 
there can be no real basis for comparison." 




The JEANNE JOMELLI 

VOCAL STUDIOS 

HOTEL RICHELIEU 



VIOLIN DEPARTMENT 

Under the direction of 

SIGNOR ANTONIO de GRASSI 

Formerly of Londun 

Signer de Grassi was a pupil oC 

Ysaye, Joachim and Sevcik 



Piano, Organ and Theory Department 

Under 

GEORGE EDWARDS 

Post-Grndiiote of tUe Cliicaero .Muiticnl College 

The Theory Course covers the fundamentals o 
lusic. including Sight Reading, Composition, Har 
lony, etc. 

PUPILS NOW BEING ENROLLED 



Pupils are also now l 
nd SpnniHh Classes. 

TEL. FRANKLIN 2381 



rolled for the Frencli 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGORY, Director 

LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of Slnplne. Complete Course of Opemtle Traln- 
loc. 2730 Pierre S). Tel. Fillmore 4S!13. 

MME. CARRINGTON LB^VYS 

Prima DoDua WItli StrakOKCh, Mapleson, Etc. 

EMLYN LEWYS 

Orsaolat Fifth Chorch of Cbriat Scientist. Formerly 

Principal of Virgil Plaao School, London, Engrland. 

Res. Stadlo; 2041 Lyon Street. Phone Fillmore 552 

MRS. S. P. MARRACCI, Vocal Teacher 

Italian method; 14 year> of Btage experience; former prima 
donna nltli Caruso and Tetrasxlni; coachea pnpila 
VocqIIt and In Dramatic Deportment. 
Stadlo, 464 Columbna Avenue. Phone Garfield 2276 

NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

SAN JOSEI, CAL. 

Confers Deereea A'vrnrda Certificates 

For Particulars apply to Sister Superior 

MME. LEONORE GORDON FOY 

Dramatic Sopmno 
Studio: Claremont Hotel 



MISSION PLAYS™5?ir;j.S""* 

By JOHN STEVEN HcGROARTY 

Tenth Year 

At Old San Gabriel Mission 

Now Open With 

FREDERICK WARDE 

The Famous Shakesperean Actor and 

Cast of Over 100 Players 

Ticket OSicea: 

LOS ANGELES: Ground Floor Pacific Electric 
Building, Sixth and Main streets. Tel. 13123 — 13026. 
Box Office, Alhambra 198. 

Performances Every Afternoon — Except Mondays — 
At 2:15. Evenings, Wednesday and Saturday, at 8:15 
Prices, Sl.OO. «1.S0, «2.00, $3.00 — AU Seata Reserrcd 
E. K. Hoak, General Manager, Van Nuys Building, 
Los Angeles, California, 

Take Pacific Electric Car 



-Opera and Voice 

Telephone : Berkeler 0300 



Arrillaga Musical College 

Fernando Miclielena, President; 
A. L. Artlf^ucH. Vicc-Preft.; V. de Arrillnea, Director 
Unexcelled facilitien for the study of music in all 
ItM branches. Laree Pipe Organ. Recital Hall. 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
Suu Francisco, Cal. Phone West 4737 



Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 
Music Courses Thoroueh and Progrresslve 
Public School Unslc, Accredited Diploma 



IRENE HOWLAND NICOLL 

Specially qualified In diagnosis, tone placing and restora- 
tion of the voice. Stndloa: Tel. Berk. 5053 J; 8S8 Contra 
Costa Ave Berk. — S. F.* Sat. Aft., 606 Kobler & Chase Bldf. 

LEN BARNES 

BARITONE — ^VOCAt INSTRUCTION 

Studio, Heine BalldlnE. 408 Stockton Street 

Res., 1G32 Union St. San Francisco. Phone Franklin 1325 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST ACCOMPANIST 

In.trnctlon In Piano and Pipe Orsan. Voeal Coaehlas. 

OrEaul.t and Choir Director St. Loke'a Bpiaeopal Gkureh. 

Stndio: 308 Locnat St. Tel. FlUinore 1*T* 



WALLACE A. SABIN 



Manning School of Music 



JOHN C. 

3242 Wa.hlne'on 

Snu 

Por further inromint 

MChooi. or phone i-^lllm 


MANNING, 

FrnnclMCo, 
on address 
ore :i05. 


Director 
Presidio Avenue 

the secretary of the 


a 


I,I«t Your Wiin(« with the 

MUSICAL ARTIST TEACHERS AGENCY 

New York San Diego 

Now Is the time to place your applications for next 
ason. Many positions open both East and "West. Ad- 
ess Mrs. Bertha Slocum. 1834 First St., Western repre- 
ntative. San Diego, Calif. 



SIGMUND BEEL 



semble playloE- Studio 1373 Post St. Phone Prospect 757 

THE PASMORE SYSTEM OF VOCAL TECHNIQUE 

H. n. PoHmore — Studios: Suite 506 Kobler & Chase BIdir.. 
S. F.: 25S0 College Ave., Berkeley. Residence 201 Alva- 
rodo Road. Berkeley. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT, Pianist 

2015 Broderlck St., near Clay Telephone Fillmore 314 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 

PIANIST — ACCOMPANIST — T&ACHBR 
Studio I 827 Shrader St. Phone Park IMS 



Phone Pranhlln 2603) Sat^ First Christian Sdttm 
Chnrcb. Phone Franklin 1307; Res. studio, S143 Lewlataa 
Ave., Berkeley. Phoue Piedmont 2428. 



Miss Myra Lumbard Palache 

PIANIST AND ACCOMPANIST 

Available for Concerts. Season 192O-102I. 

20 Brookslde (off Claremont ATCnue)* Berkeley 

Phone Berkeley 4091 

SENORITA TEODELINDA TERAN 

Cello Piano tanebt by Hattbay Touch Method of the 

Royal Academy of London. For appointment* PhOfLe* fr«B 
7 to 9 P. Mm Prospect 6544 — Gaflney Buildlnv. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



^rifir €0^2teimI1Bc^Mu 



HE ONLY wgEKLV MU5ICAL JOUI^>JAL IH T 



ALFRED METZGER 
B. W. JELICA 



Editor and Publisher 
Advertising Manager 



Executive Offloe 

Suite BOI. Kohler A Chaae BnlldlnK. 26 O'Farrell Street 

Telephone Kearny MS4 



Oakiand-Berkeley-Alnmeda Office 

2.101 Bancroft Way, Berkeley. Telephone Berkeley 4230J 

L. Mackay-Cantell In Cbarse 



L.oa Ansrelea Office 

705 Philharmonic Auditorium. Tel. Pico 24M 

Bruno David IlsKher In CharEe 



Vol. XL 



Satnrday, April 2, 1921 



Ne. 1 



TWENTIETH YEAR 



STRAIGHT-FROM-THE-SHOULDER TALK 



The Pacific Coast Musical Review does not 
like to call attention to the tardiness of a few 
of its advertisers, both in this city and away 
from here. And when doing so it does not wish 
to reflect upon the integrity of those who are 
somewhat reluctant in their remittances. We 
know from personal experience that it is not 
always convenient to meet one's obligations, spe- 
cially when others upon whom one depends are 
remiss in their duties. But it is not fair to ex- 
pect the majority of our advcrtiser,s and sub- 
scribers to be as prompt as they are, when the 
minority continues to hold back. And while ordi- 
narily we do not resort to public notice, finally 
when all other attempts have been exhausted, it 
is necessary to use unusual means to secure the 
desired effects. 



This paper has never coimtenanced rude or an- 
noying methods with those slow in their remit- 
tances. We have tried to be as courteous as pos- 
sible. But it is impossible for any business en- 
terprise to meet its own obligations, when those 
indebted to it refuse to assist it by regular pay- 
ments. Our terms for advertising are made spe- 
cially low. Rates in Eastern music journals are 
from five to six times as high as ours. And with 
our low advertising rates we have graded them 
to such an extent that a teacher or artist can use 
the advertising columns for as little as fifty cents 
a week. But how can we afford to make such low 
rates when a certain proportion of the adver- 
tisers — even though they arc in the small minor- 
ity — does not make payments promptly. For it 
may easily be seen that in such an event the 
enormous expenses to be defrayed by this paper 
must be borne by the two-thirds advertisers who 
pay promptly. 



Under the present conditions this is ])racti- 
cally impossible. We simply can not continue to 
publish a si.xtecn-page paper if one-third of our 
advertisers do not remit promptly. It becomes 
absolutely necessary to reduce the size of the 
paper to twelve pages, unless it is the idea of the 
musical public that we suspend publication alto- 
gether. The publishers bear the heavy expenses 
of the paper as much as possible by reducing 
their own remuneration. But we can not do this 
eternally. The time must come sooner or later 
when the only manner in which printing bills 
and salaries can l)c paid is by economy. 



As long as we publish the present amount of 
advertising we can not reduce the size of the 
paper, for in such event the subscribers would 
be dei>rived of reading matter to which they are 
entitled. But we can eventually reduce the size 



of the paper by suspending all those advertise- 
ments which remain unpaid more than two 
months. We shall not embarass delinquent ad- 
vertisers by giving at this time a fixed date when 
such suspension will go into eft'ect, but it will 
become necessary within a short time to adoi)t 
this rule of suspension in order to reduce the 
size of the paper beginning prior to the end of 
the season. 



All delinquent March bills will contain a 
memorandum announcing the date when the sus- 
pension will begin, unless remittance is made 
prior to such date. The same holds good for sub- 
scribers who are delinquent in their payments. 
Subscriptions must be paid in advance, and all 
those subscriptions remaining unpaid by a cer- 
tain date will be discontinued. During these days 
of high prices of printing it is necessary to e.x- 
ercise as much economy as possible. The publi- 
cation of delinquent advertisements and contin- 
uation of e.xpired subscriptions represent just 
that much waste. And the Musical Review, nor 
any other business enterprise, is financially so 
well established that it can afford waste. 



This reminds us of another waste. The custom 
of using advance notices when such notices are 
not justified by adequate advertisements is also 
a waste, for it costs money to set up composi- 
tion. Now, we trust that no individual artist or 
manager will take these remarks as intended for 
himself or herself. We are speaking here in a 
general sense. For instance, when anyone pub- 
lishes an advertisement occupying three inches 
and then asks us to publish a column or two of 
free notices together with pictures, he or she is 
using more space than they are entitled to, and 
are compelling us to publish a paper larger than 
is justified by the advertising patronage. In the 
end this means suspension, if it is permitted to 
continue too long. If it depended upon us alone 
we would give everyone who deserved it free 
reading notices. But it requires money to print 
and publish a paper. Unless advertising patron- 
age is more than enough to pay for the bills, the 
publication of a music journal becomes impossi- 
ble. Therefore, it will become necessary to re- 
duce all advance notices to a space commensur- 
ate with the advertising space taken. Particulars 
regarding these rules will be jjublished before 
the end of the season. 



There is another matter. The Pacific Coast 
Musical Review gives special rates when 
amounts are being paid in advance. Now some 
artists have accepted this proposition of advance 
rates, but occasionally do not remit the amounts 
until the advertisement has been published for 
.'ieveral weeks. They evidently do not realize that 
this is not quite straightforward. -Advance pay- 
ment means actually paying in advance. The mo- 
ment an advertisement has appeared the i)ayment 
is not in advance any more, and the advertiser 
is not entitled to the advance jiayment rate. After 
this, whenever an advertiser, who accepts an 
advance rate contract, does not pay in advance 
he will be charged regular rates as long as the 
advertisement appeared prior to payment. 



The Pacific Coast Musical Review publishes 
reviews of concerts, items of personal interest 
and other news items for the benefit of its sub- 
scribers. In order to obtain space for such news 
no one is obliged to advertise. In the case of ex- 
traordinary successes we are even willing to oc- 
casionally publish a half tone, AFTl'^R the event 
recording such success. But it is obviously unf.iir 
and unjust on the part of members of the pro- 
fession to expect us to publish pictures, articles 
and items concerning matters of no special in- 
terest to our readers and purely and simply rep- 
resenting an advertisement, unless such member 
helps us in one way or another to publish this 
paper. A subscriber is not entitled to free reading 
notices and pictures, because our subscription 
jirice in itself does not represent a profitable in- 
come. Besides the subscribers get fifty-two issues 
a year for three dollars, or each copy for a little 
less than six cents. If the paper is not worth that 
much, it is not worth subscribing for. 



.■\ftcr nineteen years of hard work, innumera- 
ble sacrifices and considerable financial reverses, 
we have built up this weekly paper to a size 
more representative of Pacific Coast activities 
I'laii it used to be. It should be even larger and 
more representative than this. The Pacific Coast 
should support a weekly music journal of at 
least twenty-four pages. This can be done with a 
little more advertising and subscription patron- 
age than we have now. But it must be PAID 
patronage. When one-third is always owing it 
is impossible to meet our own obligations. And 
so it is better to have a few less advertisers and 
subscribers who pay promptly than to have so 
many of whom a proportion do not pay. For it is 
obviously impossible to pay printing bills with 
the accounts on our books. 



In printing these matters we do not conform 
to the opinions of some of our friends who think 
that it is unbusinesslike to call attention to delin- 
quencies of patrons. But it would be equally un- 
businesslike to permit delinquent accounts to 
accumulate until they wreck the business. It is 
better to save the situation when it is time, 
than to wait until it is too late. Therefore this 
paper is reluctantly compelled to announce that, 
unless the one-third of our delinquent advertis- 
ers and subscribers who are either unable or 
unwilling to make remittances more promptly, 
change their methods, we shall be compelled to 
suspend all those advertisements and subscrip- 
tions not paid up to within at least two months at 
the time mentioned upon the notices forwarded 
cm April 1st from this office. 



KATHLEEN PARLOW A GREAT VIOLINIST 

Attains Rare Artistic Heights at Only Local Recital — 

Last Artist on Jessica Colbert's Successful 

Series of Concerts 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 
A concert course of the very highest musical value 
has been presented to the concert devotees of Saa 
Francisco during this past season by one of our resi- 
dent managers, Mrs. Jessica Colbert. After listening 
to each of the artists which she placed in this series, 
I felt that there was very little to anticipate which 
could be more delightful artistically. We heard Alice 
Gentle and Laurence Leonard. Serge Prokofiell, Julia 
Claussen, Arthur Midd:eton, Paul Althouse. Leopold 
Godowsky and Max Rosen, and last but not least, Kath- 
leen Parlow. This is a coterie of artists that one can 
easily be proud to have given to the public and the 
public in their turn should feel grateful tor the privi- 
lege of having heard them. 

It was at the Scottish Rite Auditorium, on the eve- 
ning of March 28th, that Kathleen Parlow made an 
impression upon an audience that will not easily be 
forgotten. Miss Parlow comes upon the stage with a 
directness of manner and goes about her business with 
a purpose and straightforwardness which is only one 
of her many agreeable assets. The lack of eccentrici- 
ties is apparent in her admirable performance as well 
as in her most refined personality. Miss Parlow started 
her program with tire Vitali Chaconne in which she 
was able to reveal her polished style, her broad and 
even tone. Her bowing is firm, energetic and virile 
and her violin sings with a brilliancy and weaves ex- 
quisitely colored phrases. But above all, even her tech- 
nical perfection, she possesses a humaness and elo- 
quence which is most compelling. Kathleen Parlow is 
not the .sensational type of violinist because she is 
both the mistress of herself and her instrument. She 
does not allow herself to be carried away by what haa 
often been misnamed temrerament. She has this qual- 
ity in abundance and displayed it in her playing of the 
Achron Hebrew Melody in which she produced the most 
plaintive tone and wailing effects, truly traditional of 
this most interesting composition. Her Mozart contained 
that grace, spritellness and charm, reminding me of a 
rare piece of valuable old fllet lace, so delicately fine, 
was it. In all her numbers Miss Parlow proved that 
she has just claim of being one of the greatest violin- 
ists of the time. 

Fred Melsom Gee furnLshed unusually line accom- 
paniments and never failed in giving the necessary 
llrm yet pliant support. 



The Chamber Society of San Francisco, consisting of 
l.cuis Persinger, director and first violin; Louis Ford, 
second violin; Xallian Firestone, viola; Horace Brltt, 
'cello, and Elias Hecht. flute, are now filling a series 
of engagements in California under the management 
of Mrs. .lesslca Colbert. We shall publish further par- 
ticulars regarding this tour in the next issue of this 
paper. 



Among the secular choral publications of G. Schirmer 
I am happy to welcome Denza's three songs, for duet or 
two part chorus. In Shadowland being of especial 
beauty. Eduardo Marzo has a cycle of four songs, 
named after the seasons, which, as a whole, would make 
an excellent group. He writes well and fluently for 
the voice. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSirAL REVIEW 



NEW YORK ENJOYING MANY FINE CONCERTS 

New York Symphony, Philharmonic, National Orches- 
tras Draw Big Audiences — Boston Symphony and 
Toscaninl Score — Lashanska and Oscar 
Seagle Give Concerts 

By ROSALIE HOUSMAN 
New York, March 20, 1921.— Sunday, March 13th, held 
its usual quota of interesting events. At Aeolian Hall, 
Damrosch and tlie New York Symphony held sway, with 
Ignatz Friedman as soloist (superb in every capacity), 
at Carnegie Hall Stransky had Schwarz, the Russian 
baritone, who scored a success in recital and is engaged 
by Mary Garden for the coming season, and at the new 
Town Hall, which is a delightful place to hear music, 
Dohnanyi was the concert giver. What a wonderful 
artist he is! In his work, whether in either of the two 
Beethoven Sonates (the op. 31, No. 3, or in the Moon- 
light) or in the Schumann Carneval, there was the same 
earnest fidelity to the composer's interest, combined 
with a beautiful and musical tone, which is rare and 
satisfying. His quiet and impersonal manner, with its 
hints of deep reserve, hardly lead one to expect the 
thrills that his playing produces. In things like his 
own Passacaglia, or the Bear Dance, and other novel- 
ties of Bela Bartok, the abandon and force of his inter- 
pretations startle one. I was glad to see the name of 
a fellow countryman on the program, as so far we have 
had precious little of Bartok's, and I can only hope 
we will have more. 

Mengelberg's season with the National Symphony is 
drawing to a close, and there are only a few concerts 
till he sails, on the 26th of this month. On this occa- 
sion Rachmaninoff appeared as composer-pianist; his 
third concerto the music. A crovpded and appreciative 
house attested the popularity of both artists. But there 
was an important novelty on tlie program, played in 
New York for the first time, the suite of Richard 
Strauss, which he compiled from the incidental music 
to Moliere's L,e Bourgois Gentilhomme. It was orig- 
inally written in 1912, and rearranged, as it now is, last 
year. It is in nine parts, and I read that it was delight- 
ful music, and for small orchestra (thirty-six instru- 
ments). I regret to have missed it, but I was at the 
MacDowell Club, where Benno Moiseiwitch and his 
charming wife, Daisy Kennedy, with several assisting 
artists, gave a program of novelties. It was all chamber 
music, and a quintet of Nandor Zsolt, and Macedonian 
sketches of John Heath (of whom I recently wrote 
in reviewing some English things) for violin and piano, 
stand out to me as the leading features of a wonderful 
evening. 

Monday had its share of ensemble music, in the Els- 
chuco Trio, at Aeolian Hall, presenting Schubert's in 
K fiat, op. 100, and the A minor of Tschaikowsky. This 
was the last of their three subscriptiun concerts, which 
are becoming more popular and appreciated each sea- 
son. At the Town Hall there was also of the best. 
'I'here Schmuller, the Russian violinist, who came over 
to us with Mengelberg, shared honors with Ossip Ga- 
brilowitsch, who came from Detroit to play with him. 
They were well suited to each other, and the tonal 
biend was a perfect thing. The Brahms, op. 108, a 
rarely lovely work, served to show this unity of con- 
ception to its best advantage. The Beethoven, op. 10 
and 12, were also superbly played. 

Pavlowa has been crowding the Manhattan Opera 
House these past ten days, with her ever fresh and 
spontaneous art. She has programmed several new Mex- 
ican dances, and staged and costumed them gorgeous- 
ly. This shows her in an entirely new phase of her 
art. In her company is a young •Californian, Herbert 
Stowitts, whom she has trained and who has that in- 
tangible quality in all his work, imagmation, and we 
can quickly perceive and sense it. The rest of the week 
was a repetition of her usual repertoire, and' was 
crowded at each performance. 

Hulda Lashanska gave one of her rare recitals on 
Tuesday evening, filling Carnegie Hall from roof to 
cellar, and the charity who benefited financially got 
no more from it in coin than an enthusiastic audience 
did in pleasure, for her rarely beautiful singing. She is 
one of the few recitalists who really SING. Her's is a 
lovely voice, well trained, and responsive to her musi- 
cal sense, and is even and pure throughout its large 
register. Beginning with a Handel aria, through a group 
o: German songs, given in the original, she sang some 
ot Grieg in French, and in English, Russian as well as 
American works, it was her singing of Over the Steppe 
of GretchaninolT which touched deepest, but it hardly 
seems fair to pick. La Forge, who played delightful ac- 
companiments, was the hero of the last group, when 
two of his works were given and re-demanded. There 
have been so few real singers this winter among the 
many female voices, but any season which presents to 
us Hempel, Birget Engell and Mme. Lashanska, is, for 
all of us, still a proof that song is still a beautiful and 
worthy art. I had commenced to doubt it. 

The same evening at the Town Hall, Oscar Seagle, 
who also appears seldom in New York, gave a delight- 
ful recital, principally of French songs, and I under- 
stand it was an artistic treat. The special joys of the 
evening were Franck's Nocturne and a group of old 
French. Mr. Seagle was de Reszke's assistant in Paris 
for several years, and it was with him that his inflexi- 
ble baritone voice was given its training. 

Wednesday the Scola Cantorum with D'Alvarez as 
soloist gave another of the Spanish programs in which 
Mr. Schlndler revels. There were folk songs for solo 



voice us well as many In choral settings, and for good 
measure, though the program was already too long, 
three numbers of the wonderful Palestrina mass, Popae 
Marcelli, were added. They alone were worth Ihe whole 
program and were admirably sung. Mme. D'Alvarez has 
never been in better voice, and it is music of this 
sort which show her to greatest advantage. 

Thursday. March 17th, brought the afternoon series 
of Damrosch's Historical cycle to an end. The program 
was devoted to Wagner, and Mme. Easton was the so- 
loist. It began with the Meistersinger prelude, then 
came the Flying Dutchman, which is only too rarely 
given, and the Ballade from the same opera, which 
Mme. Easton sang with great beauty of tone, remark- 
Hble diction and dramatic feeling. Her sense of the long 
phrase is remarkable, and is always musically lovely. 
The Ring was well represented, with the Walhalla 
music, the Feuerzauber, and from the Gotterdammer- 
ung, we heard the Funeral music, and the final scene, 
in which Mme. Easton again thrilled us. Apart from 
her artistic work, I know of no woman now singing 
who has such a command of singable English, and to 
say that every word of the Brunnhilde music came out 
clear above the orchestra is no exaggeration. The same 
program was repeated Friday evening, the 18th, at 
Carnegie Hall, and so this interesting series closed. 

Thursday evening the last concert of the Boston 
Symphony took place at Carnegie Hall, when Mr. Mon- 
teux gave the Second Brahms as his main offering. As 
in all his programs there was one novelty, as it is his 
principle to produce as many worthy new things each 
season as is possible. And as he always puts the best 
on his New York programs, we should be very grate- 
ful. This time we heard Ravel's Valses Nobles et Sen- 
timentals, which were originally written for piano, and 
truth to tell, I prefer them in their original dress. The 
scoring is frequently delightful, though often the acid 
effects Ravel indulges in are not always happy. It is 
noi. very important, but on the whole, refreshing music, 
which was extremely well played and was enjoyed. 
There was also the Euryanthe overture of Weber, and 
Berlioz' Romeo Alone, from the Symphony of Romeo and 
Juliet. In this music Berlioz was particularly happy in 
getting his musical idea and his means of expression 
in perfect accord, and this was truly beautiful music, 
and the brilliant finale appropriate to close a delightful 
season. Monteux has given us unhackneyed programs, 
and has developed his band most beautifully, with a 
plastic freedom of phrase and always good pitch. He 
told me, personally, that he expects to bring back many 
interesting novelties, as he goes to France early in May. 

Friday afternoon saw Toscanini's farewell at Car- 
negie Hall (March ISth) as the orchestra leaves soon 
for him. Quite fitting in every way, the selections of an 
Italian program and most of the works repetitions of 
things played earlier, and prove to us conclusively that 
the symphonic side of art is by no means neglected 
in modern Italy. It is well worth remembering names 
like Pizzetti, Cassela, Resphegi, Malipiero and de Sa- 
bata, and we, as well as the composers, owe Toscanini 
and his men a debt of gratitude for making us more 
familiar with their work. 

Saturday's most interesting event was the first pub- 
lic performance of Harold Morris' senate, published re- 
cently by John Church. Oliver Denton, one of America's 
foremost pianists, played it beautifully, and it was easy 
to see the enthusiasm that it evoked. The scherzo, a de- 
licious bit, was especially well liked, and in response 
to the applause at the end of the senate, Mr. Denton 
came out again and repeated it. It certainly is gratify- 
ing to the young composer, who bowed his acknowl- 
edgments from a box, to have as big and important a 
work as this so instantly received, and it ought to be 
an encouragement to other American composers as 
well. Surely the real thing has made itself felt, and is 
with us to stay. Mr. Denton played a well chosen pro- 
gram, with two Brahms rhapsodies and a Chopin group, 
and is a fine musician and a player of power, imagina- 
tion and charm. 



When Chas. Coopt-r recently played at the Globe 
Concert, of which I wrote, he received many favorable 
comments on his Hplendid work tliere. None was better 
expressed than the note in Die Globe, which runs a 
splendid music page under tlie successful guidance of 
Chas. Isaacson. The heading cf the column Is, in Itself, 
expressive of the contents. They call It Grace Notes. 
To quote: When Chas. Cooper plays piano, his own 
joy in his music Is written so clearly upon his manner 
and liis countenance that It is translated equally to 
all who hear him and feel the exaltation of his as- 
tounding personality. He positively makes the notes 
dance and sing, and roar, and — anything that any 
speaker can do his notes can do. 

Mr. Isaacson has voiced the audience's reaction very 
well indeed. It gave Mr. Cooper its whole-hearted and 
sincere applause and appreciated, I am sure, his sim- 
ple and natural manner. Paul Reimers, a lieder-singer 
of rare qualities, shared honors with Mr. Cooper, and 
it was on this occasion that Mary Garden, the guest 
cf honor, responded to the popular appeal and, playing 
her own accompaniments, sang three songs. 



Pianistically the treat of the week was the recital of 
Guiomar Novaes, of whom one cannot say enough in 
praise. This young Brazilian who studied in Paris with 
Isidore Philip, brings all the charm and spontaniety of 
youth to her interpretations, and also the majority of 
a well-balanced and beautiful musical sense. Each sea- 
son when she returns to play for us, seems but to in- 
tensify her art — technic seems secondary, and never 
obtrudes itself on the listener's consciousness. Her fin- 
ger work is crystal clear and limpid, and the power at 
her command is at times overwhelming. For poetic in- 
terpretation, for delicacy and nuance (poor abused word, 
which I am trying to use in its original sense), and for 
grandeur of line, where needed, give me Novaes. She 
is one of the very few who can satisfy you from all 
angles. This time (March 5) she did the Franck Pre- 
lude, Fugue and Variations, the Bach D minor Preludes 
and Fugue, Scarlatti's Pastorale and Caprice (and how!) 
as well as many of lesser interest. Arlequin, a prelude 
by Stierlin Vallon, was delightful and deserved its re- 
peat. Did I mention her wonderful playing of the Chopin 
Barcarolle, on which so few sail to success? It empha- 
sized all her love of musical color, and that indescrib- 
able Rubato, which one must hear for oneself. The en- 
tire program was a joy, and she was gracious with many 
encores. 

On Sunday afternoon, January 30th, Sergei Klibansky, 
the well known vocal teacher, held an informal recep- 
tion in honor of Miss Nellie Cornish, who is so well 
known in the West. Mr. Klibansky was an instructor 
there last summer, and his success was so definite that 
he has been re-engaged for this coming summer term. 
A large crowd thronged the big studios on West 59th 
street and several of Mr. Klibansky's artist pupils, 
among them Betsy Lane-Shepherd, and Lotta Madden, 
sang, to the great pleasure of the assemblage. Among 
those who called from four to six were Mr. and Mrs. 
Paolo GallJco, Louis Kommenich, Nelson Illingsworth, 
Theodore Spiering, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Cooper, Mabel 
Wood-Hill and Harvey Hindermeyer. 

Rachmaninoff played an aU-Russian program Satur- 
day afternoon, February 26th, at Carnegie Hall, which 
included his own Senate, one of Scriabine's and a rep- 
resentative list of her composers. He was enthusiastic- 
ally received, and played beautifully. It is always a 
great treat to hear him. 

The oeneftt performance of the Chicago Opera Asso- 
ciation, headed by Galli-Curci in Rigoletto, netted a 
very large sum to the Italian hospital, for whom it was 
given. Andre Chenier announced at the Metropolitan 
for the Saturday matinee was put off, as Gigli was un- 
able to appear. Tosca was substituted, and Scotti was 
wonderful, as always, as Scarpia. 

At the Manhattan performance of Manon, just as the 

orchestra began the prelude to tlie third act, a wave of 

applause, started by Miss Garden, swept the house as 

Pershing was seen to enter a box. The entire house 

(Continued on Page 5, Column 1) 



ETHEL GERTRUDE CANNON 




ARTIST-STUDENTS' PIANO COURSE 



HIGH LIGHTS IN MRS. CANNON'S 
PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUCTION 

IV. 

IF FROM THE BEGINNING TECHNICAL STUDY HAS BEEN 
THE RESULT OF THE EXPRESSION OF THE MUSICAL 
IDEA, THEN THE PHYSICAL SELF WILL RESPOND, AND 
SIMPLICITY OF MOVEMENT AND VITALITY OF PURPOSE 
WILL COMBINE TO PRODUCE PLASTICITY OF OUTLINE. 

{To be Continued Next Week.) 



FURTHER ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING STUDIO AND 
OPENING DATE WILL APPEAR LATER. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Distinguished Artists Residing in California Who are Available for Concerts During the Season 1920-1921 

Editorial Note: — The Pacitic Coast Musical Review is in a position to guarantee the artistic efllclency of the artists represented on this page. They have establlBhed a 
reputation for themselves, partly national, partly international, through regular concert tours or by appearances in operatic organizations of recognized fame. The purpose 
of setting forth the availability of these reputed artists is to convince the California musical public that distinguished artists of equal merit to any reside In this State. 
We Intend to prove that a resident artist confers honor upon the community in which he resides. 



Announcing the Personnel of 

"Le Trio Louise" 

Kajetan Attl — Bohemian Harpist 

Otto King — Norwegian Cellist 

M. Anthony Linden — American Flutist 

riiree DlalliiKulpilivd .\rll>its In n Vnlqnc Chnmbei 

lliinlc Buaenible Prfxenling llniiKiini rroernini 

liupoaslblc to Hear Uuder Any Other Auapleei 

For Dotes nnil Terms Atldresa 

M. Anthony Linden, 457 Phelan Bldg., 
! San Francisco 

j Care of S. F. Symphony Orchestra 



OLGA 
STEEB 

"The Genius of 
the Piano" 

Management 

CATHERINE A. 
BAMMAN 

63 West 39th, N. Y. 

Local Representative: 
C. E. HUBACH, 126 S. Rampart Blvd., Los Angeles 




Warren D. and Esther H. 

ALLEN 

Joint Recitals 



Organist 

Pianist 

Lecturer 




PHYLLIDA 
ASHLEY 

PIANIST 

NOW BOOKING 

SEASON 1921-1922 

HAENSEL & JONES 

Management 

Aeolian Hall 

New York City 

Personal Address: 

Wildwood Gardens, Piedmont, Calif. 



NEW YORK LETTER 

(Continued from Page 4. Column 3) 
rose and cheered, and Polacco changed to the Star 
Spangled Banner, in honor of the General. It was a 
very thrilling moment. 

Sylvester Rawling, one of New York's best known 
critics, died this week. He had been associated with 
Huneker on the World, and was his life-long friend. 
The music world paid him honor at his funeral, and 
Orvllle Harrold sang. 

The Metropolitan had many repetitions this past 
week and will give Andre Chenier on the 26th as a 
novelty. It has been heard over here before, but not 
recently. Muzio and Glgli wil head the cast. Bori re- 
appeared as Flora in L'Amore del Tre Re, and again 
thrilled her hearers. She has one of the loveliest 
voices I have ever heard, and as an actress Is second 
to none. It is the unanimous verdict that her voice is 
lovelier than ever. 

Ruffo was the piece de resistance at the Friday 
Morning Btltmore Concert, sharing the honors with 
VIdas and Leta May, soprano. It was the last of this 
season's series, and was a brilliant affair. 

A favorite of the Orpheum circuit has deserted her 
old friends, and in going on Broadway with a clever 
comedy, is winning new laurels, in a new field. The 
play is Dear Me, and Miss La Rue's husband. Hale 
Hamilton, Is part author, as Luther Reed, claims the 
other share. John Golden, who has Lightnin' and other 
successful comedies to his credit, is the producer, and 




M. ANTHONY 

LINDEN 

ForcnioNt Ainrrleno 
Flute VlrtaoHO 

Principal Solo Flute S. F. 
Symphony Orchestra. 
Formerly Principal Solo 



phony Orchestra. 
ertm. Solo. Ensemble, ObllKato 
Llmitea Number of PuplU 
leu Adilresx. 457 Phelan Bldg:. 
, S>inphony Orehestrn 




Povl 
Bjornslgold 

Tiie Eminent Danisli 
Dramatic Tenor 



till be 



ie fnr coneertM, oi>ern nod oratorio 
linniUK early In April 

Management Hugo Boucek, 116 39th St., N. Y. 
Personal Address: 355 Octavia St., San Francisco 



ASOhJ^RECSTAUST 
Of=GEHUiN£ MERIT 



A*^» HIGH WORTH -t- 




m3 Glenn Ave 

5erkel<?yCal. 




MARION 



VECKI 

BARITONE 
AVAILABLE FOR 

Concert - Opera - Oratorio 



the theatre is the Republic, on Forty-second street. It is 
an attractive place, and the play is well mounted. The 
cast is exceptionally well balanced, and it is hard to 
pick any for special mention, as they all play up to 
each other in splendid fashion. I understand it has a 
record of a year's success before coming to New York, 
where, I think, the record will be duplicated. It looks 
that way now, as New York is quick to realize when 
it has a good, clean comedy on the boards. Miss La 
Rue surprised all who knew her work, before, with 
her delicate whimsicalities, and comedy touches. Of 
course, she sang several songs, one expects her to al- 
ways. There Is no one, either on the concert stage, or 
anywhere else, who can put over a song like Miss La 
Rue. Her diction Is perfect, and her voice expressive 
of any emotion she wishes to convey. I only hope 
that the narrower sphere of the concert stage will hear 
her in a program suited to its needs. In Dear Me, 
Miss La Rue, and Mr. Hamilton play opposltes, and 
Robert Fischer, as the musician, is an excellent third 
in this merry comedy. I can heartily recommend it to 
any San Franciscan, who, on coming to New York, 
wishes a pleasant and happy evening entertainment. 
It has many a good laugh, and is well done. 



The Bohemians of New York gave a reception in 
honor of Rudolph Ganz, the famous piano virtuoso, at 
which an interesting program was rendered by Mr. 
Ganz himself and also by an orchestra under the direc- 
tion of Frederic Jacobi. Mr. JacobI directed one of his 
own compositions entitled Morning and Evening at Blue 
Hill, and which Is still in manuscript. It Is scored for 
strings, oboe, clarinet, percussion and piano, and was 
originally written for a concert by Fritz Krelsler's 
pupils at Rlue Hill last summer. 



FRANK MOSS 



PIANIST 
Ensemble 



Accompanist 



JESSICA COLBERT 



BalldlDK, Sbd Franelaeo 



Constance Alexandre 

MEZZO SOPRANO 

A California artist wlio is recognized in 

Eastern music centers where she has 

received the commendation of press 

and public 

Addreiisi Pnciflc Count MuMlcal Review 
801 Kohler & Chaae BldE-. San Pranclaeo, Calif. 



Lawrence jtrauss 

TENOR 

Management Jessica Colbert 

Studio; 
807 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

(Mondays and Thursdays) 



Residence Studio: 2904 Garber St., Berkeley 




BRUCE 

CAMERON 

Tenor 

Voice Culture 

Concert, Church Recital 



Soloist Third Church of Christ Scientist 

3538 Twenty-Third Street, San Francisco 

Tel. Mission 1297 

Management Leah Hopkins, 408 Stockton St. 




Mrs. 

Cecil 
Mollis 
Stone 

CONCERT- 
ACCOMPAXIST 
ANn CO.\rH 



Kearny &464 




Selby C. Oppenheimer lias engaged the Columbia 
Theatre for the Sunday afternoons of May Ist and 8th 
to house the great attraction he has chosen to close his 
current musical season. Adolph Bolm, the greatest of all 
Russian male dancers, at the head of his unique Ballet 
Intime, will appear In programs that have been referred 
to as the most beautiful bits of stage pictures ever pre- 
sented on the American stage. In conjunction with 
(ieorge Harrere and the Little Symphony. The combina- 
tion of Doim and Barrere makes for a remarkably ar- 
tistic imit and the success of these two world-famous 
artists in combination has been nothing short of phe- 
nomenal. 



The Pacific Coast Musical Review contains many In- 
teresting articles written by its representatlres through- 
out the country who are recognised authorities In the 
musical world. Subscriptions }3.00 per year. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MATZENAUER'S ASSISTING ARTISTS 

Frank La Forge, Pianist and Accompanist, and Charles 
Carver, Basso, Create Excellent Impression Every- 
where and Prove Truly Great Attractions 

Music lovers of San Francisco wilt be pleased to 
know tliat tlie Matzenauer concerts will provp to be 
specially interestnig and artistic. First of all there is 
the Diva, whose truly extraordinary voice and vocal 
art represent one of tiie tinest artistic expressions in 
the music world today, then there is Frank La Forge, 
the greatest among all accompanists and a pianist of 
excellent style and authority. In addition to these there 
is Charles Carver, a basso of exceptional merit, wliose 
success is prmcipally due to the training he received 
under Frank La Forge and whose natural adaptability 
and beautiful resonant voice never fails to create a 
lasting impression among the large audiences that as- 
semble at the Matzenauer concerts. 

The Pacific Coast Musical Review is always delighted 
when an artist brings Frank La Forge as his or her 
accompanist. For his presence is pleasant in more ways 
than one. In the first place his accompaniments are in- 
comparable because of their finesse, accuracy, artistic 
excellence and uniformity with the soloist's individ- 
uality. Then Mr. La Forge's own compositions, while 
always enjoyable, never seem quite so effective as when 
the composer himself presides at the piano. Finally it 
is usual tliat when La Forge acts as accompanist he 
also contributes one or two piano solos, and thus repre- 
sents a feature of the program which forms a most 
important part of the event. 

We shall be most eager to hear Charles Carver. 
Rarely indeed have we seen such enthusiastic press 
reviews in the New York ^papers than have been ac- 
corded Mr. Carver after his various appearances tliere. 
On March 8th that excellent artist appeared at tlie 
Town Hall in New York and the followmg are a few 
of the representative reviews that appeared in the New 
York press after the event took place: 

New York Evening Sun: Charles Carver, basso. He 
is a basso cantante distinctly, and a good one. 

N. Y. Herald: His phrasing and feeling were good, 
and his diction was admirable. 

N. Y. Times: . . . can sing a love song with youth's 
air of lover-like sincerity. 

N. Y. World: A voice of clear and sympathetic qual- 
ity. His youth by no means beclouds an instinct for 
phrasing and evidence of real feeling. 

N. Y. Mail: The young basso who recently took New 
York by surprise at his debut, . . . has a well-balanced, 
well-controlled voice with equal beauty in the high 
and low registers. He sings with dignity and sincerity. 
His teacher, Frank La Forge, accompanied him yester- 
day, and the utter absence of notes helped create an 
impression of complete spontaniety. 

N. Y. Telegraph: Charles Carver, one of the most 
promising young bassos on the musical horizon, gave a 
recital of songs in the Town Hall last evening, where 
he was accompanied by the composer-pianist, Frank La 
Forge. Mr. Carver is the fortunate possessor of a bass 
voice of real musical quality, even to its lowest vibra- 
tion, and his powers of interpretation are on a par with 
his vocal endowment. Still very young, being now In 
his twenty-fourth year, he has reached a position that 
many of his older contemporaries might envy. Mr. Car- 
ver is one of Mr. La Forge's particular finds. 

Charles Carver, basso, was called upon at the last 
moment to substitute for Mme. Florence Easton at the 
Hippodrome Sunday night, March 13, 1921. He sang a 
group of three numbers with his teacher, Frank La 
Forge, at the piano, and was warmly received. 



SPKECH IN SONG 



MARJORIE RAMBEAU AT THE CURRAN 

Beginning tomorrow night, lor two weeks only, A. H. 
Woods will present America's greatest dramatic actress, 
Marjorie Rambeau, in Channing Pollock's stirring dra- 
matic sensation, The Sign on the Door, at the Curran 
Theatre. This play of Channing Pollock's is a red- 
blouded American melodrama of American lite with its 
gaieties and tragedies. Miss Rambeau and Mr. Pol- 
lock's spirited play form an irresistible combination — 
both player and play appear to have been made for 
each other, although it is hardly possible that Mr. Pol- 
lock had any artist in mind when he designed and wrote 
the play. At any rate, this union of player and play has 
provided the theatre-goers with the most satisfying 
dramatic treat for many seasons. Mr. Woods has sur- 
rounded Miss Rambeau with an exceptional cast of 
Broadway players, including Lee Baker, Harry Min- 
turn, Harold Salter, Hugh Dillman and Beatrice Allen. 
The original Broadway production will be seen here. 



FRANCES ALDA CONCERT 

Mme. Prances Alda, now at the height of her vocal 
career, and with a program that cannot help but ap- 
peal to all lovers of good song, will be presented by 
Frank W. Healy at Scottish Rite Auditorium on Sun- 
day afternoon, April 3rd, at 2:30 o'clock. With Theo- 
dore Flint at the piano, here is the program for the 
concert: Prelude (Debussy), Mr. Flint; (a) When Two 
that Love Are Parted (Secchi), (b) Nymphs and Shep- 
herds (Purcell), (c) O Sleep, Why Dost Thou Leave 
me? (Handel), (d) The Lass with the Delicate Air (Dr. 
Arne), Mme. Alda; (a) Jag letver (Swedish) (Merikan- 
to), (b) J'ai pleure en Reve (Hue), (c) A des Oiseaux 
(Hue), (d) Quand ]e Dors (Liszt), (e) Davnol moy 
drug (Rachmaninoff), Mme. Alda; (a) Romance (Sibel- 
ius), (b) Marche Militaire (Granados), Mr. Flint; Aria, 
Un bel di (from Madame Butterfly) (by request)' (Puc- 
cini), Mme. Alda; (a) Charity (written for and dedi- 
cated to Mme. Alda) (Hageman), (b) Minnetonka (by 
request) (Lieurance), (c) The Singer (written for and 
dedicated to Mme. Alda) (Maxwell), (d) I Will Walk 
With My Love (Old Irish Folk Song), (e) There Is No 
Death (O'Hara), Mme. Alda. 



By JOHN WHITCOMB NASH 

What one sings is of less consequence than how 
well it is done. A singer with splendid vocal endow- 
ment and the literature of the world at his convenience 
may still be deplorably deficient in artistry; on the 
other hand we may note a goodly percentage of suc- 
cessful singers who are such because of their attain- 
ment along cultural lines, which forces upon us the 
fact that successful singing is a matter of choice, 
and this is particularly true of that branch of vocal 
culture known as "diction." 

Good diction may be described as that style of speech 
delivery which is phonetically correct, free and dis- 
tinct in transition, and appropriate in tone. Such ele- 
gance is vital to the success of the singer but must 
never border upon the affected or unnatural. Now, to 
acquire a good diction in English is far more difficult 
than in any of the other three great music languages 
because the vowel usage is so much more complex, but 
the time-honored fiction that English is unsuited to the 
refinements of song should be discredited at once, 
and every effort made to encourage the adoption of 
correct phonetics throughout the length and breadth 
of the United States. 

All authorities agree that a perfect legato is the 
mark of an artfst, and analysis shows that the legato 
includes, and is impossible without, a smooth transi- 
tion of both vowel and pitch; moreover the consonants 



"PALE MOON" 



An Indian Love Song 



Frederick Knight Logan 

Lyric by 

Jesse G.M. Click 

SnuB by 
Madame Rosa Raisa 

IVIadame Beryl Brown 

IVIadame Cyrena Van Gordon 

Madame Stella Jelica 
Mr. Arthur MIddleton 

Mr. George Meader 
and hundreds of other International Stars 

VOCALISTS AND TEACHERS 

Ask for it of your Music Dealer: if he cannot and 
will not supply you write direct to the Publisher 

Forster 
Music Publisher 

INC. 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS 



must be touched in such a way that the even flow of 
the phrase is not interfered with; in other words, to 
insure the symmetry of the phrase its elements must 
be equalized. To accomplish this an exhaustive study 
of the phonetics of correct English is necessary, and 
in pursuing it we find the germ of perfect vocalization. 
To the native-born American this is not difficult, pro- 
vided he has a competent guide or teacher who can 
show the difference between dialect and legitimate use; 
to the foreign-born singer, however, each vowel is sev- 
eral times a stumbling block because it represents a 
variety of different sounds; forthwith he labels the 
whole language impossible, and it through choice, or 
necessity, he begins to teach singing, it is in his own 
language, with many distortions of the truth about what 
he considers an unsingable language. Something must 
be done by American singers and teachers; for unless 
the singers exemplify the refinements of our mother 
tongue, dialects, slang, and strange vernaculars will 
very soon strip it of its real beauties. Since the advent 
of the moving picture theatres, and the consequent ab- 
sence of the spoken drama, we are deprived of a very 
efficient school of beautiful speech, which is much to 
be deplored. Refined English is becoming more and 
more rare, and is as noticeable in singing as in every- 
day speech. As a matter of fact the breath support and 
impulse which makes speech pleasing and elegant will 
do the same thing for song; the principal differences 
being those of pitch and length. The sustained use of 
the vowels in the song phrase emphasizes the errors, 
as well as the excellences of one's diction; moreover 
certain distortions would be overlooked in speech which 
assume prominence in song. 

The most insistent of the undesirable qualities of 
voice coloring are, first, a gutteral use of the broad 
vowels, and second, a nasal twang that goes with the 
narrower ones in some sections of the country; nota- 
bly in the rural districts of New England. Free speech 
has, apparently, been interpreted as meaning the right 
to distort our language to the point of dismember- 



ment, and dialects, which were originally the result of 
carelessness and negligence, have become the estab- 
lished idiom. It would seem that the logical class of 
people to elevate our speech ideals are the singers, and 
while it would be Impossible to give even a brief ex- 
planation of tlie processes Involved In an article of this 
length, it Is hoped that someone may be inspired to 
renewed efforts on behalf of a very deserving cause. 
To Improve one's singing or speaking is to "sound- 
center" the tone in such a way that it acquires correct 
shape, the desired "color" and the maximum amount of 
resonance. This can be accomplished only through the 
ear and the mind; never by any conscious control of 
the membraneous surfaces of the oral cavity. One of the 
first requirements in such a study is that the guide or 
model be accurate and reliable, for the sound concept 
is the essence of what the voice will deliver. 



MUSICALES BY ELIZABETH SIMPSON'S PUPILS 



Two charming class muslcales were given by plipils 
of Elizabeth Simpson at her attractive Berkeley studio 
on Saturday afternoons, January 29th. and March 5th, 
a large number of pupils playing with great success on 
each occasion. Although the largest share of Miss Simp- 
son's work is with advanced and professional pianists 
she still retains great interest in children's work as 
well; and one of the most interesting features of her 
class recitals is the playing of a group of talented 
children, one of whom usually gives an original com- 
position. The January program included, among other 
numbers, Moszkowski's charming Valse Brilliante, 
played in brilliant style by Miss Helen Eugenia Mer- 
chant, one of Miss Simpson's most promising and tal- 
ented young pupils; Chopin's Etude in C sharp minor, 
Juba Dance by Nathaniel Dett, and Caprice Espagnole 
by Moszkowski, splendidly played by Mrs. Ernest Will- 
iams of San Francisco; and an Arabesque by Debussy, 
Pan by Godard, and Liszt's tenth Rhapsody, which 
were given a brilliant and finished rendition by Mrs. 
Ethel Long Martin, a charming pianist of Oakland, 
who has received her entire training with Miss Simp- 
son. 

The program of March 5tli was equally successful, the 
numbers being as follows: Carneval Mignonne 
.(Schutt), Butterfly Etude (Chopin), Miss Helen Mer- 
chant; Romance (Sibelius), Miss (31adys Sibley; Ecos- 
saien (Beethoven), Miss Dorothy Hopkins; Romance, 
Gromentanz (MacDowell), Miss Marion Lowrie; C!on- 
solation (Liszt), Gordon Hall; Waltz (Chopin), Miss 
Eleanor Chamberlain; Menuetto (Mozart), Danse Negre 
(Cyril Scott), Miss Helen MacGregor; Sarabande 
(Bach), Rondo a Capriccio (Beethoven), Scherzo B 
minor (Chopin), Alborada del Grazioso (Ravel), Miss 
Simpson. 



OPPORTUNITY FOR TALENTED SINGERS ■ 

In order to give talented singers who wish to study 
opera the opportunity to test their ability under far 
Torable conditions the San Francisco Community Serv- 
ice Recreation League announces the organization of a 
Community Opera School. 

The work of the school will be divided into sections, 
each section studying a different opera. Those who 
enter the school may select the opera they desire to 
study and will be assigned to the section they choose, 
provided their talent and ability justify the choice. 

Prominent professional singers and opera coaches 
have volunteered their services in coaching the various 
operas. All students of the school will be required to 
be members of the chorus. 

At the regular weekly rehearsals of the chorus the 
various opera sections will have the opportunity of pre- 
senting scenes from the opera they are studying before 
the entire school. Later, acts or scenes from those 
operas will be given semi-public performances at 
Neighborhood Centers, Army and Navy Posts, Hospi- 
tals and other institutions, similar to the work of the 
Community Service Recreation League through its dra- 
matic and entertainment department. 

In the preliminary organization of the school and 
direction of the chorus, the temporary services of Mr. 
Alexander Stewart, well known choral director, who 
is now engaged on the National Staff o£ Community 
Service as representative of Community work in Cali- 
fornia, have been secured. 

No instruction fee will be charged in the school. To 
cover some incidental expenses a registration fee of 
$1.00 covering a period of three months' work will be 
required from each student. 

The students will be expected to furnish their own 
scores of the operas which they desire to study, Appli- 
cations for membership will be received at the office 
of the Community Service Recreation League, 317 
Flood Building, Phone Douglas 4293, or at the regular 
weekly ensemble rehearsal, Thursday evenings at 8 
o'clock. The first rehearsal of the chorus will be held 
at the Social Service Building of the Emporium, en- 
trance on Jessie street, next Thursday evening, April 7th. 

Although the main object of the school is to famil- 
iarize the students with opera routine, as soon as the 
work justifies the effort a public performance of one 
or more of the operas with full chorus and professional 
orchestra, will be given. 



Johanna Kristoffy 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
Thorouffh Vocal and Dramatic TralaInK 
lan IVaihlnarton St. Phone Pranklln 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 





Frieda Hempel 

Prima Donna Soprano of the Metropolitan and Chicago 
Opera Gjmpanies. She sings, with the latter company, 
in Los Angeles April 4 to 9, and in San Francisco April 
II to 23. California music lovers should journey far to 
hear Hempel and her distinguished co-artists in this feast 
of grand opera. 



This is a reproduction of an actual photograph of Hempel 
singing in direct comparison with Mr. Edison's Re-Creation of 
her voice. The instrument is an official Laboratory Model in 
a William and Mary cabinet. 



The oAcid Test of 
Direct Comparison 



FRIEDA HEMPEL, prima donna soprano of the Chicago Opera 
Company in its present Pacific Coast tour, famous Edison recording 
artiste, has been called by noted critics "the most richly endowed 
soprano in America." 

She has made this searching test of Mr. Edison's Re-Creations of her 
superb voice before blindfolded musical experts — and they could not 
tell vk'hen Hempel stopped and the new Edison took up her song alone. 

Thousands of similar Tone Test comparisons have been made, by 
other Edison recording artists — both vocal and instrumental — before 
over five millions of critical auditors. 

The result is infallibly an unqualified triumph for the New Edison — • 
an unassailable proof that the New Edison literally Re-Creates music. 



Lovers of the finer things in music 
■want no phonograph that falls 
short of meeting such a merciless 
test as this. That is luhy cultured 
music lovers demand 

27^^ NEW EDISON 

^' The Phonograph With a Soul" 



A Glimpse of the Qracc- 
ful and Exctusi-ve 
XVIII th Century, an 
Authentic Period Model 




Your nearest Edison dealer will relish an opportunity to 
prove to you the truth of these statements and show you 
other striking proofs. Get in touch with him and investigate. 




^^^^^^^^ 



■■fe^J^er- 




San Francisco 



Los Angel 



Portland 

Distributors of Edison Phonographs and Re-Creations for the 
Pacific Coast States 



EDtsoMte-atunoNS 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



STABAT MATER ATTRACTS LARGE AUDIENCE 

Myrna Sharlow Sings Exquisitely at Eleventh Annual 

Performance of Rossini Composition Given 

Under Direction of Paul Steindorff 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

There is nothing that one can imagine more pictur- 
esque, utmospherlc and altogether ideal than a perfect 
day at the Greek Theatre, Uerkeley. On Good Friday 
afternoon, March 25th, I'aul Steindorff conducted the 
eleventh annual presentation of Rossini's beautiful 
Stabat Mater. Climatically it was a perfect day but 1 
am sorry to say not so artistically. One or two obsta- 
cles stood in the way of this performance, preventing 
it from attaining this looked-tor perfection. However, 
there did prevail a few very artistic incidents when real 
artistic heights were reached. One would think that 
after eleven successive presentations of this work that 
it would be given as nearly perfect as is possible to 
accomplish. The difficulties were principally with the 
lack of orchestral rehearsing and Mr. Stelndorff's ideas 
In tempi. It was Miss Myrna Sharlow, a young singer 
with a bright future, who rose to the occasion, sur- 
mounted the difficulties victoriously and saved the day. 
If it hadn't been for her and also the excellent work 
of Henry L. Perry, one of the finest oratorio singers 
on the Coast, there would have been several disastrous 
moments in the quartet portions of the performance. 
Thanks to these two artists, tor that is what they 
proved, the quartet in the Sancta Mater would liave 
wandered any distance from the pitch. The substan- 
tial and strong voice of Henry Perry came forward as 
a splendid support and Miss Sharlow's voice rang out 
distinctly and clearly, keeping as best they could the 
unity and harmony. Miss Sharlow is a little artist who 
ha.s already gained recognition in several of the fore- 
most opera houses in the United States. She is a singer 
who will, too, find her place upon the concert stage, 
for she lias the presence, personality and musical quali- 
fications. Her's is a lovely soprano voice, one which is 
both dramatic and at the same time answers well the 
lyrical demands put upon it. It is fresh, vibrant, rich 
and warm, and what is most delightful to behold is the 
fact that it is possessed by an artist who understands 
how to manipulate it. I have heard the Inflammatus 
given frequently, both in the Stabat Mater and also 
in concerts of a religious character, but never any more 
beautifully than the interpretation that Miss Sharlow 
gave it She had the dramatic instinct for it and what 
is more, she sang it without forcing and reached her 
three high C's with the most conceivable ease and most 
accurately in pitcli. This no doubt was due to the fact 
that she did not try to outsing the entire chorus and 
thus strain her voice. They were brilliant, clear and full 
tones. Her vocalization is excellent and her diction, 
even out of doors, was most distinct and concise. 

Maude King Clark Upham sang the contralto role and 
proved thoroughly at home in the oratorio style of 
singing. She sang the parts with due consideration 
for the text and sang her music with dignity and re- 
pose. Her expression and understanding of this most 
difficult of all styles of singing was a revelation. One's 
own effects must be accomplished solely through their 
ability to create atmosphere and to dissect every dra- 
matic possibility, and this Mrs. ITpham did most ad- 
mirably. Mr. Perry sang his allotted part, displaying 
his fine resonant voice to great advantage and gave 
thorough satisfaction in every respect. The impression 
that I received from the work of John B. Sietert, tenor, 
upon this occasion was not very favorable. He may 
have been hampered by nervousness so I trust to hear 
him again under better circumstances. The chorus un- 
der Mr. Steindorif's training and direction was excellent 
and they did some splendid ensemble work. The Stabat 
Mater was followed by a performance of Henry Had- 
ley's Ode entitled The New Earth, which was given 
a noteworthy presentation. 



COMMUNITY MUSIC 



The national headquarters of Community Service, 
Inc., New York, has assigned Alexander Stewart, special 
representative for community music in California, to 
the staff of the San Francisco Community Service Rec- 
reation League for a temporary period. Mr. Stewart 
will assist Chester Rosekrans, executive secretary, and 
the local committee of the league in its community 
music work. 

The organization of a community opera school along 
the lines of similar institutions successfully promoted 
I.. Community Service in several of the large Eastern 
'■:ies; and a school of Community Music, are among 
ihe plans under consideration. It is also proposed to 
hold a Music Week in San Francisco similar to that 
given in New York City last year. 

Mr. Stewart has just returned from Los Angeles 
where he conducted a successful Community Music 
School under the auspices of the University of South- 
ern California from which thirty leaders of Community 
Music were graduated, and also organized plans for 
Music Week which is to be held in Los Angeles the 
first week in June. 

Before the war Mr. Stewart was prominently identi- 
fied with musical work in the bay cities, giving up his 
professional work to enter the field of the War Camp 
Community Service. 



EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

Edwin H. Lemare's organ recital program for Sun- 
day evening at 8 o'clock at Ihe Exposition Auditorium 
is as follows: Fugue on a Trumpet Fanfare (Lemmens) ; 
Siberian Waltz (Cyril Scott); Second Romance in D 
flat (Lemare) ; Allegro Moderate, from Unfinished Sym- 
phony in B minor (Schubert) ; Improvisation on Brief 
Theme; Wotan's Farewell and Fire Charm, from The 
Walkure (Wagner). 




ALICE 
GENTLE 

MEZZO 
SOPRANO 



(Mllano). nicfroiioUtnu Opera IlDUHe (New 
i; Ui-iu-fiilc Oiicru Compnny (Havana) 
CvcIiimIvo Mnuogementi 

HAENSEL & JONES 

Acollnn Hall, New York 
Paclflc ConHt Maiin|i;eiiieuti 

JESSICA COLBERT 

Henmt UiilKllue, Sou Frauciaco 




Mary 
Jordan 



will feature the charming 
song 



''I Passed by Your 
Window'' 

By MAY H. BRAKE 

at all the Southern and Pacific Coast engaee- 

ments of her forthcoming tour. 

This song has been enthusiastically received by 

vocalists in all parts of the country. 

It may be heard on the Q. R. S. Word Roll No. 

1162, or on the Aeolian Record No. B 24011, sung 

by Colin O'More. 

Order the song through your local dealer. 

ENOCH & SONS 

50 East 34tb Street 
NEW YORK 

nd CHAM- 



EMERSON 
PIANOS 

Satisfying in Tone 
Dependable in Quality 
Reasonable in Price 

Sherman,p[ay&Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, San Francisco 

Fonrteentb and Clay StreetBt Oakland 
Sacramento Fresno Vallejo Stockton San Joae 
Spokane 



Portland Seattle 



Tacoma 



FRANK CARROLL GIFFEN 

TBACHESR OF SUVGING 



Mrs. King- Clark Upham 

VOCAL STUDIOS 



Heine Building 
408 Stockton St. 



Telephone 
Kearny 6y6 



CHICAGO GRAND 
OPERA COMPANY 

MARY GARDEN, General Director 
SAN FRANCISCO SEASON 

Munnecincnt — SICI,UV C. OI'I'KMflSIMKIl 

CIVIC AUDITORIUM 

Two Weeks Beginning 
Monday Night, April 11, 1921 

Seats Now^ on Sale 



at Sherman, Clay & Co., San 

Mail orders must Include 

check for full value tickets plui 



ey 



of 10%. Send self-addressed 

envelope. 

"THE GREATEST ARTISTS 

IN THE GREATEST OPERAS" 

OrcheHtrn of 70 — Ballet — ClioruM of 75 

Monday, April llth 

OTELLO — Rosa Ralsa, Charles Marshall, Rimini. 

Tncaday, Anril 12tll 
CARMEN — Mary Garden, Muratore. Baklanoff, 

Weaiiedday, Aiiril 13th 
TRAVIATA — Frieda Hempel, Bond, Rimini. 

TliurHdny, Aiirll 14tli 
AMORE DEI TRE RE — Garden, Edward Johnson, 
Baklanoff, Lazzari. 

Friday, April IBth 
TROVATORE— Raisa, Van Gordan, Lament, Rimini. 

Saturday IHatlnee, April ISth 
MARTHA — Hempel, Bonci, Lazzari. 

Saturday Night. April 10th 
FAUST — Garden, Muratore, Dutranne. 

Monday, April ISth 
RIGOLETTO — Hempel. Bonci, Jos. Schwara. 

Tuendny, April 10th 
CAVALLERIA — Raisa, Lamont, Defrere. 
PAGLIACCI — Muratore, Rimini, Maxwell. 

WedncHday, April 20th 
THAIS — Garden. Martin, Dufranne. 

Thursday, April 21st 
LOHENGRIN (in English)— Raisa, Van Gordan, 
Johnson, Baklanoff. 

Friday. April 22nd 
ELISIR D' AMORE— Hempel, Bonci, Rimini. 

Saturday Matinee, April 23rd 
MONNA VANNA — Garden. Muratore, Baklanoff. 

Saturday Msht, April SSrd 
TOSCA — Raisa, Johnson, Rimini. 

Prices $7.50, $5, $3 $2, War Tax 10% Extra 



Gaetano Merola 



MANHATTAN GRAND OPERA CO. 

and 

SAN CARLO GRAND OPERA CO. 

ANNOUNCES 

That he will spend ten weeks in San Francisco 
commencing 

JUNE 1st, 1921 

and will take a- limited number of pupils in voice, 
operatic coaching and tradition 



SELBY C. OPPEXHEIMER ATTRACTIONS 

LEVITZKI 

The FlanlHtlc Sensation 
Vear 
POSITIVE FAREWELL %\ 

Columbia "Tomorrow ^^ 

(Sunday Aft., April 3, at 2:30) 

Entirely new program includes 
Beethoven "Waldstein" sonata 
Bach. Chopin, Gluck, Liszt, Le 



One Recital Only — Mme. Margaret 

MATZENAUER 

CONTRALTO 



COLUMBIA THEATRE 
Sunday Aft., April 10th 

Tickets now on sale at SHER- 
MAN, CLAY & CO 
MAIL ORDERS to SELBY C. 

OPPENHEIMER 
Prices $2.50, J2, (l.BO, ?! (tax 





PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



DAY DKBAMSl A NOVELTY in 


the Form of a Munlcnl RondlnK 


Words by Natalie W. Price 


Music by Phyllis Fergus 


For Speaking Voice and Piano wi 


h Two Violins ami Singing Voice 


Price, 


»1.2S 


Owing to the perfect blending of the In! 


trumenls with the Singing and Speaking 


Voice and the rare quality ol the poem. 


his Reading with Music is a most Effec- 


tlye Number Tor Club Progra 


•ns and ALL, Entertainments. 


Published by CLAYTON F. 


SUMMY CO.. Chicago, and 


for sale by HENRY' GROBB. 


135 Kcnrny St.. Son Frnnrlaoo 


Piano Teachersl Send us your names, r 


eceive free Summy's Study-Service Sheet 



©Ifc 




i'^-:,iw^i|gss«asjpii 




Grand Prix. Paria 

Grand Prixm, St. Louh 

HE richness, evenness, depth and 
charm cf Baldwin tone cannot be 
duplicated. Only with the Bald- 
win Piano can it be produced be- 
only the Baldwin has the 
propertiea capable of it3 develop- 



^he^alDroinf iano (forapany 

310 Sutter St. San Francisco, Cal. 




=»l® 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMERCIAL 

52« Cnllfomla Street. Snn Frandseo, CnL 

Member of the Federal Reserve Syatem 

Member of the Aeaoelated Savlnsa Bank* of San Pranclaeo 

MISSION BRANCH, Mlaalon and 21at SIreeta 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH. Clement and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Halcht and Belvedere SIreeta 

DECEMBER Slat. 1920 

Assets $611,878,147.01 

Deposits . . 66.338,147.01 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,540,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 343,536.85 

OFFICERS — JOHN A. BUCK, President; GEO. TOURNT. Vice-President and 
Manager; A. H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-President and Cashier; E. T. KRUSE, Vice- 
President; A. H. MULLER. Secretary; WM. D. NEWHOUSE. Assistant Secietary; 
WILLIAM HERRMANN. GEO. SCHAMMEL. G. A. BELCHER. R. A. LAUENSTEIN. 
Assistant Cashiers; C. W. HETER. Manager Mission Branch; W. C. HBYER. 
Manager Park-Presidio District Branch; O. P. PAULSBN. Manager Halght Street 
Branch; GOODFELLOW, EELLS, MOORE A ORRICK, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— JOHN A. BUCK, GEO. TOURNY. E. T. KRUSE. 
A H B. SCHMIDT, I. N. WALTER. HUGH GOODFELLOW, A. HAAS, E. N. 
VAN BERGEN, ROBERT DOLLAR. E. A. CHKISTENSON. L. S. SHERMAN. 



TETRAZZINI CONCERT 

(Continued from Page 1. Column 2) 
Madame Tetrazzini was most fortunate 
in securing the very valuable assistance 
of Francesco Longo, pianist, Max Gegna, 
cellist, and J. Henri Bove, flutist, as lier 
co-artists and artists in their particular 
line of work they proved to be in the 
real sense of the word. Only one pon- 
cert has been announced for Madame 
Tetrazzini but it is to be hoped that W. 
H. Leahy and Frank W. Healy, under 
whose excellent management she ap- 
peared here, will be able to arrange an- 
other concert for San Francisco's favor- 
ite, sometime in the very near future. 
Tetrazzini will sing in Oakland on 
Wednesday evening, April 6th. 



MATZENAUER IN OAKLAND 

Miss Z. W. Potter, Oakland concert 
manager, is preparing for the final con- 
cert of the Artists Concerts Series to taKe 
place in the Oakland Auditorium Opera 
House on Friday evening, April 8th. Mme. 
Margaret Matzenauer, prima donna, con 
ceded to possess the greatest voice of the 

M. ANTHONY LINDEN 

FAMOUS FLUTE VIRTUOSO 



MacArfhur Thealre, Oakland 

Dr. Maxim De Grosz 

Musical Director 
1108 Fulton St. Ph, Fillmore 2869 



ADCLE ULMAN 



Metropolitan Opera House today, will 
sing with Frank La Forge, renowned com- 
poser-pianist, assisting upon a superb pro- 
gram. It is true that the world has never 
heard a voice like Matzenauer's; with a 
range and compass unique in the musical 
world, she not only sings a dramatic 
soprano role with clearness, sweetness 
and beauty, but descends to the contralto 
register with an opulent, golden voice of 
much depth and alluring seductiveness. 

The entire series in Oakland has been 
especially well-attended during the sea- 
son just closing and it may be necessary 
to enlarge the seating space for this at- 
tractive concert by placing extra seats In 
the orchestra pit and upon the stage. Miss 
Potter is planning to manage a more ex- 
tensive course next season for Oakland, 
announcements concerning which will 
appear early in April this year. Tickets 
and information tor the Matzenauer con- 
cert may be obtained now at the box office 
with Sherman, Clay & Co., Oakland. The 
usual prices obtain. 



Pupil of Mme. Glacor 


no MInko 


accept a limited nur 


nber of 


voice culture. Studio, 




Ave. Tel. Pac. 33. 





SIEFERT SOLOIST AT CALIFORNIA 

John B. Siefert, tenor, formerly of 
Pittsburg, Pa., will sing the aria from La 
Boheme, Che Gelida Manlna (Thy Tiny 
Hands Are Frozen), at the California 
Theatre tomorrow morning. Mr. Siefert, 
who is now a resident of Oakland, comes 
to the California with a high reputation. 
He was soloist with the Russian Sym- 
phony orchestra of Pittsburg for three 
appearances, and with the Pittsburg Fes- 
tival orchestra for seven appearances. His 
work has received uniformly glowing 
praise from the critics. Sietert's unusu- 
ally higlipitched voice has wonderful 
tonal qualities, and his control of it is 
Intelligent. 

Leslie Harvey, organist at the Califor- 
nia, will offer Bolero, by Moszkowski. The 
following will be tlie numbers by Herman 
Heller and the California Theatre orches- 
tra: Niebelungen niar<-h (Wagner); Mar- 
guerite waltz from Faust (Gounod); Suite 
('a.^toral (Chabrier); William Tell over- 
lure (Rossini). 



Another 

Metropolitan Star 

Endorses SOLOELLE 




Jomelli 



Formerly leading soprano of the Metro- 
politan Opera Company, Covent Garden, 
London and Royal Opera Company of 
Paris and Brussels — an internationally 
recognized vocal instructor 

W rites of the 



SOLOELLE 

The Tone-Coloring Solo Player-Piano 



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a skilled accompanist at home." ^—-/^ // 



The Soloelle enables you to put into music your own individu- 
ality — your own soul. 

The music produced by the Soloelle is far superior to any music 
produced by any other player piano — it is without parallel — it 
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Hear and play ihe Soloelle before you buy ANY Player 
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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Week's Music Events in Los Angeles 

By BRUNO DAVID USSHER 



Los Angeles, Miircli 2S, 1921— From an authoritative 
source 1 have learned that Ihe Minneapolis Symphony 
Orchestra. Emit Oberhoffer, conductor, has been dis- 
banded. The cause tor this extraordinary and regret- 
table step is said to be a disagreement between the 
orchestra management and the Musician's Union. 

Little has happened during the week before Easter 
here. Easter celebrations however are more markedly 
musical than ever before. Fully 30,000 people were 
attracted by the Easter Sunrise Service in the Holly- 
wood Community Park, which more than ever became 
a memorable event through the generous co-operation 
of the Philharmonic Orchestra and Madame Elizabeth 
Rothwell, whose soprano sounded magnificent in the solo. 

The musical selections of the orchestra opened with 
the Entrance of the Gods into Walhalla, from Wagner's 
Rninegold, and included also selections from Parsifal. 
Mastersingers of Nuremberg and The Finlandia tone 
poem by Sibelius. Mr. W. A. Clark's generosity in pre- 
senting this great orchestra for the second time at 
Easter to the people of Los Angeles marks his gift to 
the West to an added degree as a civic institution. 

From level to level, from base of hill to pinnacle, the 
tone flowed upward reaching to the farthest outposts 
of the canyon as clearly as it carried to the nearest 
radius of listeners. The music worshiper on the high- 
est side of the bowl rim could hear every word of the 
Morning Hymn of Heuschel sung by Mme. Elizabeth 
Rothwell, whose warm-hearted expression made the 
noblesse of her vocal art most impressive. Her solo 
made a deep and visible impression on the vast audi- 
ence. The community felt itself comfortably identified 
with the program in the community singing of Holy, 
Holy, Holy, and All Hail the Power of Jesus' Name, 
led by Hugo Kirchhofer. director of the Hollywood 
Community Chorus. The Easter address was given by 
Dr. James Hamilton Lash and scriptural readings by 
Dr. W. F. Richardson. Prayer was said by Dr. Samuel 
J. Skevington. 

Easter breakfast was served at Hotel Hollywood 
through the courtesy of Miss Myra Hershey. Mrs. J. J. 
Carter, the beloved community worker of Hollywood, 
presided in her usual faultless capacity as hostess. 

Incidentally, much of the success of this second 
musical Easter celebration must be credited to the 
enthusiastic efforts of Mrs. Carter, president of the 
Hollywood Community Chorus, and its director, Mr. 
Kirchhofer, as it was the Hollywood Community Chorus 
who again sponsored the memorable event. 

A letter from L. E. Bebymer, now in the Clara Bar- 
ton Hospital recuperating from a nervous breakdown, 
was read by Mrs. Carter. It was the impresario's vision 
of the Philharmonic Easter service of 1941 in Holly- 
wood. Impresario Behymer's message is so unique and 
so characteristic that is it recorded herewith, specially 
as it was of strong appeal when read at the gathering 
in the Hotel Hollywood. It is entitled: 
"A Fantasy 

"As I rested in my bed in a cloistered room at the 
Clara Barton Hospital on Easter morn a shade ap- 
proached saying, 'I am Manitou, the Spirit of the Moun- 
tains, the Curator of the people; listen to my prophetic 
words: 

" ' 'Tis Easter morn, 1941, and from the sheltering 
arms of the foothills of the Sierra Madres, adown the 
valleys and across the plains to the glistening sands 
and the ripples of the sun-kissed Pacific, rest a million 
souls of all creeds and nations, politics and aims: a 
mighty city with its myriads of people expectant of a 
glorious, worshipful day; a city of arts and crafts, re- 
nowned for its music, its literature, its paintings, its 
sculpture, its homes and its mighty currents of com- 
mercial life. 

" 'Of all the gems in its diadem Hollywood is the 
brightest, for it is within the precincts of Hollywood 
that Architecture and his twin brothers. Color and 
Form, have made attractive the homes and their sur- 
roundings; and at the far gateway of this section, as 
the sun glints upon the brow of a hill far above a 
mirrored lake and beautiful waterfall, trumpets sound 
forth the Parsifal motif and from the crowns of other 
hills ten thousand choral voices chant responses of the 
Easter service, while down below in the valley under 
■he sheltering wings of the great stage one hundred and 
iifty instrumentalists start the Easter service, and 
opposite this wondrous bowl in serried rows one above 
the other to the hilltops, one hundred thousand wor- 
shipful people hear and enjoy the sublime harmonies. 

" 'It is the Philharmonic Orchestra, the soul of Los 
Angeles, and the first number under the baton of a 
splendid leader is a symphony of praise entitled Easter 
on Olive's Mount, composed by Walter Henry Roth- 
well, master musician and conductor — an Inspiration 
which came to him when he led this band of musicians 
at the first Hollywood Easter service. The people of 
Ho'lywood have builded well; Pasadena, Los Angeles 
and Hollywood recognized the splendid work of W. A. 
Clark, Jr., far-seeing lover of music and art, the founder 
of this perfect organizntion and its master-mind in its 
early days, a worthy philanthropist and an idealist, and 
have perpetuated it to this day to the utmost perfec- 
tion. The great Outdoors has given of its beauty and its 
noble natural grandeur until a pilgrimage across the 
world is well repaid while one worships at this glor- 
ious shrine.' 

"O Manitou; may thy vision come to pass." 

In spite of the fact that the Philharmonic Orchestra 
took the part of "Chantecler" on Easter morn at o;35 



(some people call it night), it played with wonted bril- 
liancy its scheduled Sunday Popular concert. 

The mere fact alone that Jules Lepske, violin solo- 
ist at yesterday's Popular Concert by the Philharmonic 
Orchestra, played the first movement from the difli- 
cult Tschaikowsky concerto with much finesse of tech- 
nic and appealing musicianship may be a source of 
gratification to the management and the musical com- 
munity of Los Angeles. The significant point, liowever, 
is that we possess a musical organization in this or- 
chestra where artists of the calibre as Mr. Lepske 
play at the third stand of the first violins. The appear- 
ance of Mr. Lepske proves that the rank and file of our 
Philharmonic players is on such standard from which 
soloists can be drawn readily. 

This statement in no wise reflects on Mr. Lepske's 
standing as an artist, which was fully proved by his ex- 
cellent playing being of high order. His tone is clear, 
firm and yet of sweet mellowness. In spite of the im- 
mense difficulties Tschaikowsky has written into the 
violin part, Mr. Lepske always showed clean-cut lech- 
nic. In response to prolonged applause he played Bach's 
Air on the G String, which too revealed fine sense of 
phrasing. 

A novelty o£ interest and charm were the Four 
Dances by H. J. Stewart, the noted San Diego Exposi- 
tion organist and composer. These dances were taken 
from his music to the 1916 Bohemian Grove play Gold, 
given that year in San Francisco. Mr. Rothwell chose 
the Dance of the Wood Spirits, Dance of the Gnomes, 
Dance of the Satyrs and the Finale Ensemble. Mr. 
Stewart's music is of refreshing gracefulness and sim- 
plicity. His melodies are light and well in keeping with 
the subject. The second and third dances were spe- 
cially characteristic. The composer was present and 
warmly greeted with prolonged applause when led to 
the platform hy Mr. W. A. Clark, Jr. 

Grieg's Homage March to Sigurd Jorsalfar with its 
stately mood and festive character was a fitting open- 
ing for an Easter program. The orchestra played it with 
spontaneous warmth. In the two Liadow numbers, Kiki- 
mora and Baba-Jaga, characteristic musical pictorializa- 
tions through the performance were eminent. These 
two compositions are based on weird fairy tales. Lia- 
dow's conception reminds one almost of the fan- 
tastic exquisitely colored illustrations by Walther Rack- 
ham, the English painter. Exquisite tonal color shad- 
ings, too, were produced by Mr. Rothwell, who gets 
notable response from his players. Most enjoyable too 
was the style set in the Two Norwegian Dances by 
Grieg. The second had to be encored to a large meas- 
ure thanks to Mr. Henri de Busscher's captivating oboe 
playing. Brilliant was the finale of the concert which 
closed with the Rossini's William Tell Overture, in 
which pression on the part of the string sections was 
notable. 

Impresario L. E. Behymer is still confined to the con- 
valescent room. His Easter fantasy indicates that he is 
living up to his slogan of "keeping going all the time." 

Henry Svedrofsky, the well-known assistant concert- 
master of the Philharmonic Orchestra, played with 
such distinguished success before the Ebell Club that 
he was immediately re-engaged. Besides playing the 
Slavonic Dances (Dvorak), Romance (Wieniawski). Ca- 
price Viennoise (Kreisler), Havanoise (Saint-Saens), 
Mr. Svedrofsky was forced by urgent applause to give 
several encores. 

The Noack Quartet gave two highly successful re- 
citals at Ventura and Santa Monica. 

Madame Anna Ruzena Sprotte, the much-admired con- 
tralto, has been exceedingly busy also during the last 
few weeks. She was the soloist at two concerts given 
by the Orpheus Club, sang with equal success at the 
Pasadena High School in a special recital, and ap- 
peared at a musicale tor the San Pedro Naval Station. 
She was also chosen as soloist for the Twilight Musi- 
cale in benefit of the starving children of Europe. Now 
this remarkable artist will present the Choral Section 
of the Friday Morning Club in concert, adding another 
activity to her notable career. 

The success of her pupils serves to remind one 
of the saying that "by their fruits ye shall know them." 
Her pupils have been coming to the fore in a growing 
measure. Miss Lillian Backstrand was soloist with the 
Grauman Symphony Orchestra. Miss Isabel Smith was 
asked to appear in recital before the Wa Wan Club. 
Mrs. Mj'rtle Pryibil Colby is adding another engage- 
ment to her honor list with a request from the Friday 
Morning Club to sing for them. Miss Gertrude Nord has 
been engaged by the California Opera Company. Miss 
Gladys Hill and Miss Adelaide Walton will appear in 
recital in April, while four other pupils are to sing in 
the Pilgrimage Play Chorus. Indeed a notable record for 
a teacher. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Spenser-Kelly, two singers whose 
baritone and soprano voices are unusually finely blend- 
ed, will sing on the 31st at the Clark Memorial Home 
Musicale. They also will be soloists at the Ambassador 
Sunday Series, and have just filled a return engage- 
ment before the Y. M. C. A., whose members were so 
delighted with the two artists that they have given a 
banquet in their honor. By the way, it's usually the way 
of return engagements with the Spenser-Kellys. 



SYLVAIN NOACK 

Ciinrvrlniniilcr l*lilllinrinonlc OrvheMtra of hom Aoselea 
120 South Oxford Avenue 

limited number of puplln for violin playing and 



CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

Violin Musical Theory. Faculty Member College of 

Music 

306 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles — Wed. and Sat. 

JAY PLOW^E-Solo Flutist 

Philharmonic Orchestra — Trio Intlme 

Studio: 334 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles 

Res. Phone: 579064 

ANN THOMFSON-Pianiste 

PIANISTE TO RUTH ST. DENIS 

Recilnla — Concert a — Inxtrnctlon 

801 MnJ. Thenire Oldg., Res. Pbone Wllnh. 751 

DAVOL SANDERS 



JOHN SMALLMAN 

Darltone Concert Ensoe^raentit — Conductor Loa Aagrele* 
Orntorlo Society 

For information see E. M. Barger, Secretary, 330 Blanch- 
ard Hall. Los Angeles, Calif. 



HENRI de BUSSCHER 

Belgian Tenor 




Teacher of 
OBOE if SINGING 



Studio: 1500 S. Figaeroa 

Tel. 23195 
Res. Phone 'Vermont 1625 



GRAUMAN'S 

MILLION DOLLAR THEATRE 
Broadway at Third 
LOS ANGELES 



SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



MISHA GUTERSON, CONDUCTOR 



Sunday Morning Concerts 

Every Sunday, Starting at 11 A. M. 

Soloists From Operatic and Concert Stage 

ALL SEATS RESERVED 
— at — 

50 Cents 

and War Tax 



Which includes the privilege of remaining for the 
regular Grauman Photoplay program. It is advisa- 
ble that seats be secured several days in advance 
in order to secure choice locations and avoid wait- 
ing in line on Sunday. 



EGAN SCHOOL of MUSIC and DRAMA 

Egan Little Theatre, Bld^.. Los Aneeles, California 

MUSIC DRAMA DANCING 

la all their branches 
Faculty of Teachers 
VOICE VIOLIX 

Roland Paul Madame Petschnikoff 

Bertha Vaughan Oscar Selling 

PIANO DRAMA 

Homer Grunn Frank Egan 

Mildred Marsh Marshall Stedman 

Winifred Hooke Anton Dvorak 

Lester Gauweiler Eleanor McKee Dvorak 

DANCING 
Mile. Prager Anna Dowdell 

Assistant teachers in all departments. Write for 
catalog. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



11 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

University of Southern California 

Distinguished Faculty — Strong Courses 



THEODORE GORDOHN'S ,',",%'„'r:l 

EMMeiitlalM mid Extracts for the Vlollu nnd Ensemble. 
TenclirrN and OrcheNtrn ClitMs by AppolDtment. Itlember 
rbllbamionlo Orc-heiitrn. Studio: SOS Majestic Theatre. 
IMione llTttS. 



J. SPENSER-KELLY, Baritone 



PATRICK G'NEIL, Tenor 

CONCERTS VOICE PRODUCTION RECITALS 

Studloa: tIOl-02 Maje»tlc Theatre Bids., Los Angreles 

Phoue: 11765 



Brahm van den Berg 



Rosa St. Ember 

Voice SpeclnllHt — Reel tain — Concerts 

Illustrated Lectures or. Voice Culture 
1029 Arlington Ave. Phone 111S4 

ILYA BRONSON 

Solo Cellliit Pliiliinrmoiilc Orchenlra. Member Trio Intime 
and l,OM An^eleN Trio. IiiMtrucllon, Chamber 

Mu>lc, Recitals 
Studio: coin La Mlrnda. Phone Holly 3044 



ALFRED KASTNER, Harpist 

Solo Harpist Philharmonic Orchestra, Member Trio Intime 

Recital — Instruction — Concerts 

Studio: 240 S. Gramercy Place. 660481 

Alexaniler Saslavsky— Violinist 

Director Sjmluvsky Chamber Music Socicly 

Concerts in Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego 
Studio: 4T2 lllanchard Hull, Phoue UIOHi 

JAMISON VOCAL QUARTET 

ConeertH — Reel lalM— Club ProeraniH — ^InrRarel MeNMer, 

Hnsel U. AnderNon, Edna C. VoorheeM, Daisy V. Prldeaux, 

Abble Norton JamlHoti. Direelor-AccompnulHtc. 2024 S. 

Hno\er. 2.ttlSr. 

The Heartt- Dreyfus Studios 



ZOELLNER QUARTET 

Mnnneeincnt H. 4V: A. Culbcrtsoii, Aeolian Hall. New York 

SerlouM StudentN Accepted 

PerNonal AddreNM: 12r.O WlndKor Blvd., Loh Aueclen 

FLORENCE MIDDAUGH-- Contralto 

< oiicrriK— Onilorlo — Recilala 
Tuesday and Kridii; MurninKx, :!14 Music Arts BldR,. 
Los AnKcles. Sluillii IMiunc in<)N2. Residence \Vllsh. .'S70O 

LORNA USSHER— VioHniste 

CONCERTS— TUITION— RECITALS 

705 Auditorium, Pico 2454 



GREGORY KRESHOVER 



HELEN KLOKKE 

DRAMATIC INTKRPRETATION 

CONCERTS— RECITALS— CLUB PROGRAMS 
HnnaKemclll; France t^olilHnler, .SKI >InJ, Theatre, 1,VIH0 

An event of unusual interest will be tlie recital by 
Helen KloUke, popular dramatic interpreter of Los 
Angeles, who will give a concert recital at the Ebell 
Club Auditorium, FViday eveninK, April 29tli, at 8:30 
o'clock. This recital is in response to the many demands 
of her admirers who are most entliusiastic over her 
recent success in her interpretation of Monna Vanna. 
which she gave at the Little Theatre last month. 

Miss Klokke has had the opportunity of studying 
both American and European metliods, but has received 
most of her dramatic training in Los Angeles. Her orig- 
inal Interpretations of the poems and plays which she 
gives have brought her the favorable notice of all lov- 
ers of dramatic art. 



It is her purpose to combine music with some of the 
selections which she will present, and is very fortunate 
in having IMonimia Laux Botsford, well known pianist 
and composer, at the piano. Mrs. Botsford has com- 
posed the musical settings for several of the poems 
which Miss Klokke will interpret, and with this at- 
mosphere of complete sympathy, it is assured that the 
recital will be an event to be long remembered. 

The Bohemians of Los Angeles, an unusually inter- 
esting club of musicians, artists and professionals, will 
hold its first high jinks on April 6th at the Athletic 
t'lub. Alexander Saslavsky, the brilliant violinist, is 
president of this club, which stands for "due recogni- 
tion of resident artists." Further details about this bril- 
liant event and the notable efforts of the club will be 
shortly forthcoming. 

A new and very telling incident has been introduced 
into the last act of The Mission Piay, now in its tenth 
season at the Old Mission Playhouse at San Gabriel. As 
the mourners carry the body of the starved Padre into 
the ruined courtyard of Mission San Juan Capistrano, 
tliey now sing the Indian Death Song. John Steven Mc- 
Groarty, author of The Mission Play, heard the mourn- 
ful strain chanted by a very old Indian woman at 
Pauma. He recognized it as one of the almost forgotten 
Indian melodies and had Senor Salvadore Nune of The 
Mission Play quartet transcribe the music from the old 
woman's wierd chanting, thus preserving one of the 
nalive folksongs, and later introtiucing it into the third 
act of The Mission Play. The old Indian woman said 
it had been the Death Song of her people when they 
were Indians of the Mission Las Flores, below the ranch 
of Santa Margarita, where she was born more than 
ninety years ago. 



Manager Grauman presented the Stanford Glee Club 
in a return engagement, and to judge from the recep- 
tion the singers received he scored another point as a 
producer. 

Credit too much be given to Orchestra Manager 
Michael — eisoff, the first cellist of the orchestra, who 
is doing much to assure the success of novel musical 
features o( these concerts. 



MOTION PICTURE MUSIC 



One of the finest concerts given by the Grauman 
Symphony Concert was that on Easter Sunday morn- 
ing. As usual hundreds of people were turned away and 
many remained literally begging for the favor to be 
given a chance to purchase returned tickets. This came 
to my personal observation when I turned my second 
"press" ticket over to the box office. There was a reg- 
ular scramble for it. This may be a most gratifying 
tribute to Managing Director Sid Grauman and Con- 
ductor Misha Guterson. 

Mr. Guterson selected a program of great attractive- 
ness. In keeping with the spirit of the Easter holiday 
solemn and joyful trumpet calls introduced the pro- 
gram proper. The trumpeters (Messrs. Zingals and 
Tieck) were attired in biblical costume. The choice of 
the Tannhauser Overture as opening number was equal- 
ly fitting. It created the atmosphere for an Easter con- 
cert and Conductor Guterson knew how to sustain it, 
for his second number was a Parsifal selection com- 
bining the impressive bell effects with the devout 
march of the knights. Wolff Ferrari's music from the 
Jewels of the Madonna also had a fervour that pre- 
served the style of the program chosen. 

This was achieved with equal success when twenty 
violinists chanted Bruch's lovely musical prayer, Ave 
Maria, accompanied by two harps. Cordial applause 
marked also this number, which had been made still 
more characteristic through the players wearing white 
cassocks over black robes. The joy of Easter then 
was emphasized with fine effect by conductor and or- 
chestra in the Weber's Jubel Overture. 



LOTTA MADDEN THRILLS THREE THOUSAND 

Distinguished American Soprano Receives One of the 
Greatest Ovations Ever Bestowed at the Cali- 
fornia Theatre by a Record Audience 

By ALFRED METZGER 

Anyone who missed hearing Lotta Madden at the 
California Theatre last Sunday morning surely lost an 
excellent opportunity to hear an American singer who 
compared most favorably with any of the concert artists 
now before the public. Miss Madden simply thrilled 
three thousand listeners who had the good fortune to 
hear her, and our readers know us well enough to un- 
derstand that we do not easily enthuse at concerts. 
This excellent artist possesses a dramatic soprano 
voice of fine timbre and resonance. She sings with her 
whole soul and, above all, in tune, and ennunciates 
clearly. The aria from La Porza del Destino entitled 
Pace, Pace, was interpreted with a fervor and spirit 
rarely heard at a musical event, and Miss Madden, at 
the conclusion of the same, was the recipient of the 
ovation above referred to. 

In addition to this principal aria to which the Cali- 
fornia Theatre Orchestra, under the direction of Her- 
man Heller, played an excellent accompaniment. Miss 
Madden sang an Easter song entitled Hossanah and 
as a third number the distinguished vocal artist sang 
Back to Virginny. It is a pity that an artist of such 
unquestionable distinction as Miss Madden could not 
be heard in San Francisco in a concert either by her- 
self or under the auspices of one of our music clubs. 
We consider it nothing short of an artistic disgrace 
that a singer of such unquestionable merit should 
pass through San Francisco unheard at a regular con- 
cert attended by our regular concert goers. By this 
we do not mean to reflect upon the merit of the 
California Theatre concerts, but we mean to say that 
an artist of such reputation and such truly remark- 
able gifts can not possibly display her real worth 
as soloist with an orchestra in three program num- 
bers. Slie should be heard in an entire concert pro- 
gram and we wager to predict that once given the 
opportunity hundreds of music lovers would gladly 
rejoice in Miss Madden's art. Let us hope that this 
distinguished artist will soon visit this city during 
a regular concert tour. Artists like Miss Madden 
should be backed by organizations like the Federa- 
tion of Music Clubs, in order to give them the worthy 
opportunity to establish a reputation in the remotest 
corners of the country. 

Miss Madden is no stranger in the concert field of 
the United States. She has sung at the Metropolitan 
Opera House with great success. She has been en- 
gaged as soloist with the leading symphony orches- 
tras of the country. She is an oratorio singer of in- 
ternational reputation. In short, she belongs among 
the leading vocal artists of the day. And such a dis- 
tinguished member of the profession comes to San 
Francisco and is not given a chance to appear in a 
concert of her own! We are truly ashamed of the 
indifference shown in certain musical quarters. If it 
is expected that everyone should boost San Francisco, 
this is not a way to encourage some to do so. 







CLEVER CARICATURE BY SWAYNE PUPIL 



The picture shown below is a clever pen and Ink 
sketch which was drawn by a pupil of Wager Swayne 
and sent anonymously to him as a valentine. It is a 
humorous portrayal of the feelings of a pupil who 
brings an insufficiently prepared lesson to Swayne, 
whose gentle (?) methods of dealing with such cul- 
prits are well known by all habitues of his studio. To 
the serious student Swayne's patience, resourcefulness 



and tact are unfailing, in spite of the tremendous liyna- 
mic force which exacts from each pupil the best work 
of which he is capable; but woe to the unlucky dis- 
ciple who shows Inattention, carelessness or slipshod 
preparation, for a truly hair-raising experience awaits 
him, such as is feebly portrayed by this sketch. The 
ferocious face In the background is, of course, Swayne's 
own, while the trembling wretch at the piano Is being 
reminded of some act of criminal forgetfulness in a 
manner which forcibly suggests to his mind the har- 
rowing details of the rest of the picture. 



12 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MATZENAUER 

"The World's Greatest Contralto" 
Concert Management ARTHUR JUDSON, Philadelphia 



SONG RECITAL 

BY 

MME. ALDA 

Famous Metropolitan Opera House Soprano 
TOMORROW, APRIL 3d 

■l::t(> O'CLOCK 

SCOTTISH RITE AUDITORIUM 

Theodore Flint at the Piano 

NEXT TUESDAY, APRIL 5 

DUCI DE KEREKJARTO 

Violin-Virtuoso 
<De8lf1cr d'Aiitnlfl'y, Accompauiat) 

Will Give His Final Kecltal at 

SCOTTISH RITE AUDITORIUM 

Manngeinciit Frank AV. Henly 

Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Co. 



Now Ready: Two New Books for Rhythmic 
Development in Children 

RHYTHMIC SONGS 

For Kindergarten nnd Primary Grades 
2. 

Rhythmic Stunts and Rhythmic Games 

WorilH nnd Music 

ABDIB GERRISH-JONES 

Adaptions and Descriptions 

OOVE B. AVILSON-DORRETT 

These games were compiled to meet the demand 
for a new type of rhythmic material, the result of 
the needs of the children in the Demonstration 
Play School, University of California. Mrs. Dor- 
rett has had many interesting experiences in test- 
ing rhythmic games in this school and those 
offered in the collection were tried out during the 
summer session of 1920. 

PRICE $1.00 AND POSTAGE 

WESLEY WEBSTER, Publisher 

San Francisco 



ELSIE COOK (Mrs. Elsie Hughes) 

ENGLISH PIANIST 

Medalist Tobias Matthay Pianoforte School, 
London, Eng. 

SUMMER COURSE FOR 
TEACHERS 

In San Francisco, June 27th to August 6th 

Including Teaching Principles and Interpretation 



Maurice Lawrence 



ORCHE}STRA CONDtlCTOR 

1050 Wasblngton St. San Francisco 

Phone Garfield 060 



GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 
MME. MINKOWSKI 

Lat* of Itvrr Tork. Berlin and Drcadcn. Vocal lekool, 
Saito SOT. Kokler * Okau BuIMIac 

LEVIT2KI ENTERTAINED AFTER HIS CONCERT 

Following his farewell appearance in New York for 
two seasons, Mischa Levitzki was the guest of honor 
at a supper party given hy Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Urclis 
at the Esplanade Restaurant on the evening of March 
7th. Practically every pianist of note in New York had 
heen present at the concert and later went to the sup- 
per. Among the invited guests were Mme. Frieda Hem- 
pel, W. B. Kahn, Mme. Marguerite d'Alvarez, Miss Ethel 
Leginska, Miss Guiomar Novaes, Mr, and Mrs. Erno 
Dohnanyi, Mme. Eva Gauthier, Miss Paula Pardee, Miss 



Elizabeth Strauss, Mrs. Williston Hough, Mr. and Mrs. 
Frederick Steinway, Miss Urohs, Dr. Sigmund and Mme. 
Fannie Bloomfleld-Zeisler, Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Vietor, 
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Epstein, Mr. and Mrs. R. R. 
Wells, Mrs. Ernest Hutcheson, Daniel Mayer, Henry 
Junge, John Powell, John Palmer, Juan Reyes, Emil 
Fuchs and Conrad V. Bos. Following the supper John 
Palmer entertained the company with very amusing 
imitations of various well-known artists, and there 
were comic stunts at the piano by Mr. Levitzki, Mr. 
Bos, Mr. Dohnanyi and Mr. Reyes. All joined in wishing 
Mr. Levitzki godspeed on his forthcoming tour of the 
Pacific Coast, Hawaii, Australia and Europe. 



SCHUMANN-HEINK RECEIVES FINE TRIBUTE 

After her recent appearance in New Orleans, among 
the many tributes to her voice and art she received 
from every source, Madame Schumann-Heink values 
most highly the following one that appeared on the 
editorial page of the leading paper of that city: 

"If ever any one of God's creatures deserves a dis- 
tinguished service medal from the whole world, it is 
that fine old grenadier of music and motherhood, Ma- 
dame Ernestine Schumann-Heink, who enriched New 
Orleans' music loving world with her tremendous organ 
notes Saturday night. Age cannot stifle nor sorrow 
pale the glory of her voice, nor the human note of her 
wholesome personality. May it he but 'au revoir,' ma- 
dame, and every good spirit attend your bravely trod- 
den paths. 

"And it is but 'au revoir'," Madame said on depart- 
ing, to the distinguished group of persons who came to 
the station to see her off the day after her concert. 
"I will always return to sing in New Orleans and give 
you of my best." 



THE JENNY LIND TRIO'S BERKELEY SUCCESS 

The Jenny Lind Trio, which consists of Harriet Ben- 
nett, Louise Brehany and Maybelle Baalmann, and as- 
sisted by Daniel Popovitch, pianist, appeared in a 
joint recital at the Hotel Claremont on the evening 
of February 23rd. The Jenny Lind Trio was organ- 
ized for the purpose of reviving the old-fashioned songs 
and folk music. The concert was well attended and 
heartily appreciated by the enthusiastic audience. The 
following program was rendered and will be repeated 
in San Francisco in the near future: Ballade in A 
flat (Chopin), Daniel Popovich; (a) Echo Duet — Per 
valli, per boschi, (b) When Twilight Weaves, Jenny 
Lind Trio; Aria — Semiramide (Rossini), Harriet Ben- 
nett; Fairy Tale (Sergei Mihaelof) (dedicated to Miss 
Harriet Bennett), Prelude (Sergei Mihaelof) (dedicated 
to Mr. Daniel Popovich), Ballade (Sergei Mihaelof), 
Daniel Popovich; English Ballads — (a) Open Thy 
Heart, (b) Marguerite, (c) The Merry, Merry Lark, 
(d) Spring, Louise Brehany; Duettinos of 1840 — (a) 
How Sweet When the Shadow is Passing, (b) Hark, 
'Tis Fairy Music!, Jenny Lind Trio; (a) Pierrot, (b) 
The Kerry Dance, (c) An Old-Fashioned Girl, Harriet 
Bennett; Ballotta (II Guarany) (Gomes), Louise Bre- 
hany; (a) Melodie (Gabrilowitsch), (b) Dance of the 
Gnomes (Liszt), Daniel Popovich; From Flower to 
Flower, Jenny Lind Trio. 







ARTUR 








ARGIEWICZ 

VIOLINIST 

Assistant Concert Master, S. 
F. Symphony — ^Director Vio- 
lin Dept. Ada Clement Music 
School — Seven years on Fac- 
ulty N. Y. Institute of Musi- 






cal Art — Dir. Frank Dam 
rosch. 






Spiritual and distinguished. — Mason in Ex- 
aminer. 

Argiewiez was in admirable form. — Brown 
in Chronicle. 

We do not hesitate to pronounce him a 
virtuoso of the first rank. — Alfred Metzgep 
in P. C. Musical Review. 






Address Applications to the Secretary 

CLEMENT MUSIC SCHOOL 
3435 Sacramento St. Tel. Fillmore 898 





CHAMBER MUSIC IN BERKELEY 

Second Concert of Series of Two Brilliant Events 
Scores Artistic Triumph In College City 

By L. MACKAY-CANTELL 

The second of the two events at Wheeler Hall this 
week, that of the San Francisco Chamber Music Con- 
cert of Wednesday evening, was conspicuous for two 
opposing reasons — the masterly musicianship of this 
group of players and the exquisite program rendered, 
as against a lack of response in the numbers attend- 
ing, which is incredible in view of the popularity of 
tliese artists, all virtuosi of the highest order. If, as 
one critic on the Bay has said, "chamber music is over 
tlieir heads," on what can a true musical culture be 
based? It was originally, to be sure, a royally aris- 
tocratic privilege to hear such music. 

The program Wednesday evening included the Beet- 
hoven Quartet in F major, op. 59, No. 1, for strings; 
Bach's Sonata in G major, tor flute, violin and cello; 
Lento (Dvorak), Scherzo (Ippolitov-svanoft), First 
Movement from Quartet, op. 5 (Le Guillard), Berceuse 
(D'Osten-Sacken), Orlentale (Glazounow). The playing 
of this society — Mr. Louis Persinger, first violin, Mr. 
Louis Ford, second violin, Mr. Nathan Firestone, viola, 
Mr. Horace Britt, violoncello, and Mr. Elias Hecht, 
flute — was consistently artistic and admirable, their 
ensemble perfection, their interpretations uniformly ex- 
quisite, forceful, dignified, dreamy or dramatic, as re- 
quired by the work. 



THE BEEL-McMANUS SONATA RECITALS 

Two especially noteworthy musical affairs have taken 
place this week under the Greek Theatre department, 
Sam Hume, manager, of the University of California, 
in Wheeler Hall: the first of the series of three Beet- 
hoven Sonata Concerts, a performance by Sigmund Beel, 
violinist, and George McManus, pianist, of the entire 
set of violin and piano sonatas of Beethoven. With the 
tide of public appreciation strongly set toward the 
modem freer forms and swifter transitions this is a 
courageous program, but one which should be the 
more eagerly patronized as a rare opportunity for com- 
parisons between old and new masters of form. One 
might have wondered last Tuesday night where wiere 
the serious music students of the Bast Bay who should 
have been there, and others to whom an opportunity 
for hearing such musical works Is not of moving-picture 
frequency. 

The three sonatas given were interpreted with style 
and were throughout extremely satisfying, well con- 
trasted and delightful, beginning with the Sonata in 
G major, op. 96; the Sonata in A major, op. 12, No. 2, 
and Sonata in C minor, op. 30, No. 2. The second pro- 
gram is equally well chosen, as follows: Sonata in A 
minor, op. 23, Sonata in A major, op. 30, No. 1, Sonata 
in F major, op. 24, Sonata in D major, op. 12, No. 1. 
This concert will be given Tuesday evening, March 
29th, at Wheeler Hall. 

The third concert will close with the famous Kruet- 
zer Sonata, being given on the third successive Tues- 
day evening. This series is well worth coming from 
the other bay cities to attend. 



SCHUMANN-HEINK GIVES TO CHILDREN 

After the great reception accorded her recently in 
Birmingham, Alabama, the great mother-heart of Mme. 
Schumann-Heink was again evidenced when she, in con- 
junction with Manager R. S. Douglas of the Jefferson 
Theatre, donated $1000 from the receipts of her con- 
cert to the local fund for the starving children of 
Europe. Chairman Adams expressed on behalf of the 
campaign committee a deep sense of gratitude and ap- 
preciation to Mme. Schumann-Heink and Manager Doug- 
las for the very generous donation. 

According to the Age-Herald: "The reception given 
Mme. Schumann-Heink was both a testimonial to a 
warm-hearted woman, whom to see is to love, and an 
incomparable singer, an intensely human personality, 
radiating kindliness and good humor, as much pleased 
with the success of her fellow artists and as desirous 
of having them receive their meed of applause as she 
was gratified by the enthusiasm evoked by every num- 
ber she sang." 



ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

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THE LOOK (Lyric Soprano) 2 Keys 

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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



I 




ty IlluilrauJ Stwi 



Jrifia i^putppl 



"There Is not a singer upon the operatic or the concert stage in America to compare with Miss Hempel in present glories of 
voice. There is none who excels her In skill of lyric song. She is Indeed fast becoming the unique figure in her generation." 

—Henry T. Parker, "The Boston Transcript," February 12, 1921. 



fianagrmrnt of 3ftieha l^sm\isl 



1B4 iialitBan Awpttur, NfJU ^ork 



UNIVERSAL INTEREST IN OPERA SEASON 

Unprecedented Demand for Tickets on the Part of 

Musical and Social Circles Keep 

Oppenhelmer Office Busy 

Musical and social circles of San Francisco are show- 
ing more interest in Uie coming of the Chicago Grand 
Opera Company to San Francisco than has been shown 
in any musical event in the recent history of the city, 
The offices of Selby C. Oppenhelmer, under whose man- 
agement the season ot two weeks beginning April 11th 
will be given at the Civic Auditorium, literally were 
flooded with mail orders that showed interest, not only 
in the city but all through Northern Calitornia and as 
tar away as Reno and Portland. 

One (act that stands out clearly in the public's ap- 
preciation of the Chicago Company's wonderful organ- 
ization is the recognition of Rosa Raisa as a star o 
the first magnitude. The operas in which Raisa will 
appear are strong in public favor. The season was de- 
signed to open with Otello in order that San Francis- 
cans might hear this wonderful dramatic soprano, to- 
gether with Charles Marshall, as their first taste of the 
musical treats to be offered during the two weeiis. 
Eastern critics have declared Raisa supreme as Des- 
demona while Marshall's remarkable triumph as Otello 
already is musical history. With one performance of 
Otello Marshall, unheralded and almost unknown, 
sprang into fame. So popular was this performance that 
it was given four times during the six weeks m New 
York this being the most frequent presentation of any 
one opera given in that city by the Chicago Company. 
Otello will be Marshall's only appearance here, but 
Raisa will be heard in Trovatore, Cavalleria, Lohengrin 
and Tosca. 

One ot Mary Garden's best performances is Amore 
del Tre Re, which, though not so well known here as 
her Carmen and Thais, has nevertheless won a place 
in popular favor, if the advance sale may be taken as a 
criterion. In this opera she has the support o£ Edward 
Johnson, Georges Baklanoff and Lazzari. 

Traviata and Elisir d' Amore, in which Hempel and 
Bonci will be heard together, are likewise strong in 
popular esteem. 

Two notable changes have been made in the casts, 
as originally announced. One of these changes marks 
the acquisition of the famous baritone, Joseph 
Schwarz. by the Chicago Company. Schwarz will sing 
here in the title role of Rigoletto, replacing Rimmi, 
who will be heard in several other operas, including 
Otello on the opening night. The other change gives 
to Faust on Saturday night, April 16th, the added at- 
traction of Georges Baklanoff as Mephistopheles, a role 
in which he is probably without a peer. Cotreuil orig- 
inally was scheduled to sing Mephistopheles but local 
opera-goers urged upon Mary Garden, through Man- 
ager Selby C. Oppenhelmer, that she cast Baklanoff in 
this part and thereby present Faust with a cast that 
Wi^uld be difficult to equal since Garden appears as 
Marguerite. Muratore as Faust and Hector Dutranne 
as Valentine. 
Following are the complete repertoire and casts: 
Monday, April 11th — Otello, with Rosa Raisa, Charles 
Marshall and Rimini. 

Tuesday, April 12th — Carmen, with Mary Garden, 
Muratore and Baklanoff. 

Wednesday, April 13th — Traviata, with Frieda Hem- 
pel, Bonci and Rimini. 

Thursday, April 14th — Amore dei Tre Re, with Gar- 
den, Edward Johnson, Baklonaff and Lazzari. 

Friday, April 15th— Trovatore, with Raisa, Van Gor- 
don, Lament and Rimini. 

Saturday matinee. April 16th — Martha, with Hempel, 
Bonci and Lazzari. 

Saturday night. April 16th— Faust, with Garden, Mu- 
ratore and Baklanoff. 

Monday. April 18th— Rigoletto, with Hempel, Bonci 
and Schwarz. 

Tuesday, April 19th — Cavalleria, with Raisa, Lament, 
Defrere; Pagliacci, with Muratore, Rimini and Maxwell. 
Wednesday, April 20th — Thais, with Garden, Martin 
and Dufranne. 

Thursday, April 21st — Lohengrin (in English), with 
Raisa, Van Gordon, Johnson and Baklanoff. 

Friday, April 22nd— Elisir d'Amore, with Hempel, 
Bonci and Rimini. 

Saturday matinee. April 23rd — Monna Vanna, with 
Garden, Muratore and Baklanoff. 

Saturday night, April 23rd — Tosca, with Raisa, John- 
son and Rimini. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

MATZENAUER'S GREAT CONCERT PROGRAM 

Eminent Diva, Assisted by Frank La Forge and Charles 

Carver, Will Present One of the Finest Musical 

Feasts Heard Here This Season 

Assisted by Charles Carver, the eminent basso, and 
the ever-popular Frank La Forge, Madame Margaret 
Matzenauer, one of the greatest concert and opera stars 
the world has ever known, will give one recital in the 
Columbia Theatre on next Sunday afternoon, April 10th, 
under Selby C. Oppenheimer's management. It is need- 
less to dwell on the exalted position that Matzenauer 
holds in the world ot music. Her name is a household 
word wherever the best and greatest artists are known. 
At the Metropolitan Opera House she has for years been 
the leading contralto and has assumed most of the more 
important dramatic soprano parts. Her vocal equipment 
is unusual and her art and technique perfect. 

It will be a great treat to hear Matzenauer within the 
confines of the Columbia Theatre, which is an ideal con- 
cert hall (or vocal programs, and every phase o( her 
delicate and beautKul art will be brought forward to its 
fullest advantage at this Columbia recital, which will 
positively be the only one she will give in San Fran- 
cisco this season. 

The complete program to be rendered by the artists 
on this occasion is as follows: O del mio dolce ardor 
IGluck). Spring Night (Schumann), Sapphic Ode 
(Brahms). Erlking (Schubert), Mme. Matzenauer; Aria 
from The Magic Flute (Qui sdegno) (Mozart). Mr. Car- 
ver; Supplication (dedicated to Mme. Matzenauer) (F. 
La Forge), Nocturne (dedicated to Mme. Matzenauer) 
(F. La Forgel. Mandoline (Debussy), Aria (rom Samson 
and Delilah, Mon coeur s'ouvre a ta voix (Saint-Saens). 
Mme. Matzenauer; O Sleep, why dost thou leave me'' 
(Handel), Gia il sole dal Gauge (Scarlatti), Mexican 
Folksong, Love Has Eyes (Bishop), Mr. Carver; Wan- 
derer's Nightsong (Rubinstein). Barcarolle (Tales ot 
Hoffman) (0((enbach). Mme. Matzenauer, Mr. Carver; 
Romance (F. A. Forge), Etude de Concert (MacDowell). 
Mr. La Forge; Aria (rom Le Prophete (Ah! mon fils) 
(Meyerbeer), Mme, Matzenauer. 

Tickets for the Matzenauer concert can be secured at 
Sherman, Clay & Company. Matzenauer and her assist- 
ing artists will appear in Palo Alto on next Tuesday 
night, in Berkeley next Thursday night and in Oakland 
next Friday night. 



Miss Ida Hjerleld-Shelley, the well-known pianist aud 
teacher of Sacramento, presented one of her young ar- 
tist pupils in a recital which took place at her studio 
on March 22nd. Little Gladys Buell. the talented young- 
ster, is but ten years old and is said to have a most 
extraordinary memory for she played the most intricate 
numbers along with the more simpler ones entirely 
without music. Miss Shelley has given the child spe- 
cial attention and laid the Inundation for a very bright 
future if she continues along the ratli .Mis.s Shelley has 
laid out for her. The little girl was ably assisted at 
the concert by Ingeborg Sjostrom and Mrs. Frederick 
N. Evans, vocalist. Tlie program was as follows: Two- 
Part Invention No. 1 (Bach). Little Fantasie (Bach). 
Rondo in D major (Mjzart), Duo. -Mazurka (2 pianos) 
IWachs). Ingeborg and Gladys; Fiir Elise (Beethoven), 
iVatchman's Song (Grieg), Humoreske (Grieg). Duo. 
Nocturne (2 pianos) (Jungmann). Ingeborg and Gladys; 
Recollections of a Theatre (Schumann). Sea Breezes 
(Frontini), Songs — Mother Dear (Manna Zucca). An 
Open Secret (Woodman). Sleep My Darling (Manna 
Zucca). Little Shepherd (Debussy). Song of the Brook 
(Warren). 



MISS ADELE ULMAN'S PUPIL RECITAL 

The piano pupils of Miss Adele Ulman gave a recital 
and studio at 178 Commonwealth Avenue on Saturday, 
February 26th. The affair was a most enjoyable one and 
the following program was excellently rendered: 

Marche Mllltalre (Schubert), Margaret Andrews and 
Leslie Baer; Dance Lightly (Gaynor), Down by the 
Frog Pond (Swi(t), Alberta Jannopoulos; The Church 
Dell (Martin) The First Robin (Rogers), Bemlce 
Schmltt; The Clock (Maxim), Old Time Dance (Rogers), 
Melvin Parker; The Pipe (Maxim), The Cuckoo in My 
Clock (Maxim), Frances Simpson; The Rooster (Max- 
im), Lied (Bach), Caroline Wolcott; Soldiers' March 
(Schumann), Courtly Dance (Rogers), Norman West- 
lake; Funeral March (or the Pet Bird (Tschalkowsky), 
The Wild Rider (Schumann). Frances Baer; Ave Maria 
(Burgmuller). Etude In G Minor (Heller), Laura Ham- 
mer; The Little Rogue (Ho(mann), Menuet (Martin), 
Evelyn Joseph; Amaryllis (Krentzlin). Echoes of the 
Ball (Gillet). Leslie Baer; Allegro (Haydn), First Loss 
(Schumann), Hunting Song (Schumann), Margaret An- 
drews. 



LEVITZKI TOMORROW 



San Francisco has seldom been stirred to such depths 
by a pianist as marked the reception given Mischa Le- 
vitzki at his debut here last week. Rarely has an audi- 
ence left a concert hall as enthusiastically singing the 
praises of a singer or player as (ell to the lot o( young 
Levitzki and for good reason. Levitzki is all that Man- 
ager Selby C. Oppenhelmer claimed him to be. He is a 
pianist of extraordinary equipment, combining every 
feature o( his art with a youthful enthusiasm and a far- 
reaching personality. Various musical critics o£ San 
Francisco have likened him to a young Hofmann; he has 
been termed a "young seer of the piano." It has been 
said that he has attained "technical perfection." and 
(rom every standpoint Levitzki has been praised beyond 
all precedent. 

The young genius will appear at the Columbia Theatre 
tomorrow atternoon in an extra recital which will be 
the last he will give in San Francisco this season, and 
the Columbia Theatre will be crowded with music lovers 
who are enthused over his art. Levitzki will play a pro- 
gram entirely different from the one he gave last Sun- 
day but equally representative in its proportions. It 
will' include the great Waldstein Sonata of Beethoven, a 
work in which Levitzki is said to reach unusual heights; 
the Organ Fantasy and Fugue o( Bach; a specially se- 
lected Chopin group, which will include the big Waltz 
in A flat op 34, Ballade in A flat. Nocturne in C minor, 
etudes in C major and F major; the Sgambati arrange- 
ment of Gluck's Melody. Liszt's concert study in D flat, 
and the technically marvelous Sixth Rhapsody, besides 
two manuscript works of his own. Invocation and Faith, 
and Valse Sentimentale. 

The remaining tickets tor the Levitzki concert can 
be secured at Sherman, Clay & Company today and at 
the Columbia Theatre tomorrow. 



SIGNOR DE GRASSI AT JOMELLI STUDIOS 

Since the return o( Signer Antonio de Grassi (rem 
New York, the announcement has been made that he 
will be at the head o( the violin department o( the 
Jeanne Jomelli Studios at the Hotel Richelieu on Van 
Ness avenue, and will commence teaching there im- 
mediately. ,_. , , » J 

Signer de Grassi has become most highly esteemed 
here as an artist and a teacher through his public ap- 
pearances and also through his teaching at the head of 
the violin department o( Mills College. His enviable 
reputation, owever. is (ar (rom being confined to the 
United States, (or to quote (rom the London Morning 
Post, Signer de Grassi is "one of the great violinists of 
the day." He has acquired his art through his studies 
under the world-famous teachers. Joachim in Berlin. 
Sevcik in Prague and Ysaye in Brussels. 

In Prague. Signer de Grassi was the principal teach- 
ing assistant to Sevcik and was also the concert master 
ot the Bohemian Philharmonic. In England he is also 
recognized as an artist of highest rank having lived 
five years in London and concertized extensively. Sig- 
ner de Grassi turned out a remarkable number of artist- 
pupils who has achieved great success in both Europe 
and America. During the spring and summer Signer de 
Grassi will fill a number of concert engagements lo- 
cally and in various cities of the Coast. 



KEREKJARTO'S FINAL CONCERT 

Kerekjarto, (he phenomenal young Hungarian vio- 
linist, whose two appearances in San Francisco have 
set the musical world agog. will, assisted by d'Antalffy 
at the piano, give his final San Francisco recital at 
Scottish Rite Auditorium on Tuesday evening, April 
5th. Mr. Kerekjarto has prepared the following pro- 
gram: Larghetto (Handel); Chaconne (for violin alone) 
(Bach); Symphony Espagnole (Lalo) ; (a) Nocturne. 
E flat major (Chopin-Sarasate), (b) Minuet (Kerek- 
jarto), (c) The Bee (Schubert), (d) Hejre Kati (Hun- 
garian Csardas No. 4 (Hubay). 



SHAKESPEARE WORK AT GREEK THEATRE 

Two years ago the eminent singing teacher Wil- 
liam Shakespeare, while in San Francisco, composed 
a very beautiful communion service in E flat which 
he dedicated to "his dear friend H. B. Pasmore of 
San Francisco." It was first sung by the choir of St. 
Stephens Church. Mr. Pasmore being at the organ. 
On Christmas, 1918, it was sung again at St. Stephens 
Church with the composer at the organ. Mr. Pasmore 
again gave it at St. Stephens Church on Easter of 
this year and it will be repeated at the Greek The- 
atre this coming Sunday at four o'clock with a choir 
augmented to about fifty voices, under the direction 
of Mr. Pasmore, with Suzanne Pasmore-Brooks at 
the piano. The program for this occasion reads as fol- 
lows: Kyrie, (the Ten Commandments); Credo, (Shakes- 
peare); Interlude, (Shakespeare); Baritone Solo — It Is 
Enough (Mendelssohn), Herbert McCormick; Soprano 
solo — Abide With Me (Russell). Terese Zanetin; Bari- 
tone solo — Pilgrim's Song (Tschalkowsky), Rev. Geo. 
H. B. Wright; Tenor solo — Then, Then Shall the 
Righteous Shine Forth (Mendelssolm), G. W. Rasmus- 
sen; Sursam corda and Sanctus. Benedictus, Agnus Dei, 
Gloria in Excelsis (Shakespeare), soli by Therese Zane- 
tin, Edna Walker, Vera Matthews, J. C. Lacey, and 
Herbert McCormick. 



MOLLIERE COMEDY AT GAITE FRANCAISE 

During the third month of the season at the Gaite 
Francaise Director Andre Ferrier will present Le 
Medecin Malgre Lui, a comedy in three acts by 
Molliere. This excellent work has been translated into 
practically all languages and is considered by authori- 
ties to be the best play written by the famous French 
author. It will theretore represent one ot the important 
epochs o( the present season at the little French the- 
atre where the play will receive a caretui and artistic 
production. The performance will undoubtedly meet 
with great success. The first presentation took place 
yesterday (Friday), April 1st, too late for review in 
these columns. However, it will be repeated several 
times during this month on Friday evenings. During the 
engagement of the Chicago Opera Co.. the Gaite Fran- 
caise will be closed, but Andre Ferrier will arrange 
an intimate reception in honor of his friends of that 
great organization who include such artists as Mura- 
tore, Baklanoff, Dufranne and others. La Gaite Francaise 
is a beautiful and artistically constructed little theatre 
which gives many neople a splendid opportunity to be- 
come famiiar with" the French language. Tickets are 
on sale at Sherman. Clay & Co. and at the Gaite 
Francaise, 1470 Washington street, or you may tele- 
phone Franklin 3322. 

STANFORD UNIVERSITY ORGAN RECITALS 

Warren D. Allen, University organist, will give the 
following two programs at the Memorial Church of 
Stanford University during the week beginning April 
:>d: Sunday— Sonata No. 6 in D minor (Mendels- 
sohn). Andante Cantabile (rom the Fourth Symphony 
(Wider). Piece Heroique (Cesar Franck). On Tuesday, 
April 5th, the program just named will be repeated. 
On Thursdav. April 7lh, the following program will 
be presented: Solemn Prelude (T. Tertius Noble), 
L'organo primitive (Yon), Alegretto from the Fifth 
Symphony (Beethoven), Toccato (Augustine Barie). 

Miss Ann Thompson, the brilliant young pianist of 
Los Angeles, is appearing at the excellent dance 
programs now being given by Ruth St. Denis and Ted 
Shawn at the Players' Theatre every Friday atternoon. 
.Vliss Thompson is making an excellent impression by 
reason o( her unquesticnably artistic pertormances. and 
she is' now preparing programs together with Earl 
Meeker. o( Los Angeles, to be presented on a concert 
tour through Calitornia next season. 



Cecil Fanning 

Baritone 

H. B. TURriN, AcM>n>*anls> 

A44rcui L. B. Bchrmer, Aadltorlam DIdc.. 
Lov ABBclea. CaU or Hra. Jeaalra Colbert, 
401 Hearat Bids.. San Franrlaro. <->!. 

KAJETAN ATTL 

HARP VIRTVOSO 
Sololit Siin FrnnclHco Symphony Ort-hem- 
tr«. Available for Coacerts. Reeltala and 
laatractlon. 

Stndlot ICKM Kohler A Chaae Dalldlnc 
Ren. Fboor Bay View (lin 

Jean Criticos 

Scleotlflc Emliialon of Voire 

Rea. SIndloi 321 HiEblnnd Ave., riedmont 

Tel. Piedmont 7SJ 

Id Kohlor .£ Chnae DIdE. 

Stndio 706 — Mon.. \Vod. and FrI. 

PAUL STEINDORfr 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languages 

5302 Broadway .... Oakland 



P.'VCIFIC CO.'VST MUSICAL REVIEW 

Mrs. William Steinbach ALEXANDER GROMOFF 



HENRIK GJERDRUM 


PIANO 


1804 Larkin SI. 


Pbone Frnnkllu 821S 



Unfurnished Studio for Rent 



Inquire 408 Stockton St., Room 803 

or TelephiMie Berkeley 43S4 

MISS EMILIE LANCEL 

MEZZO SOPRANO 

Concert and Opera 

433 IStta Ave. Phone Bay VIety 1461 

ZHAY CLARK 

SOLO HARPIST 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE ORCHESTRA 
SOFIA NEWLAND NEITSTADT 

VOICE CULTl'RE 

OlclloD — Repertoire — Couching 

Studio: sa Hamilton Place, Ooklund. Snn 

Francisco, WeUnCMdny and Saturday. 8U0 

Kohler & Chai.e Unlldlng. 

MISS ETHEL PALMER 

RrprcKcnlntlve 

ADA CLEMENT PIANO SCHOOL 

/tealdence Studio, 204 A Street, Snn Rntnel 

Telephone Sau Rofuel 842-J 

MRS. ZAY HECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

2001 California St., San Francisco. Tel. 
Fillmore 2539. Institute of Music. K. & 
C. Bldg.. Tel. Kearny 5454. 



Re^ulatlns and Repairing and Playe 

Piano Work. 

For further information apply 

Weatern School of Piano Tuning 

Cor. JLaguna and Hayes Sts. Ph. Mkt. 1753. 
Call or write tor booklet. 

SUZANNE PASMORE-BROOKS 

PIAMST 
SfndloHi 5<Mt Kohler <!t^ ClinNC nidK.; 1717 
Vallejo St., S. F.; 2004 Gnrber S(., Berkeley. 

PERCY A. R. DOW 

TEACHER OP VOICE 
Kadioai 802 Kohler A Chaae Bids., S. F. 
MXZ Oeean View Dr, Oakland (Residence) 

DOUILLET CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

irai JnckaoB St. San Francisco. CaL 



DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 

Stadia, SOS-004 KOHLER * CHASE BLDG. 

Phone Kearny MS4 



MRS. CHARLES POULTER 
■4PKAVIO St. Aadrevra Charch 

Valee Cnllore. Piano. 588 2Tlh St., Onk- 
laad. TeL 10T9. Kahler Jt Chase Bids. 
Wa«aaadara Tal. K.^mT MS4. 



LARGE. ATTRACTIVELY PHRMSIIED 

Studio For Rent 

ContolnInK Concert Grand IMnno 

Free Telephone Accraslhle 

1048 Union St. Tel. Prospect 4400 

Mrs. Alvlna Hener Wlllson 



VOICE CULTURE 

Studio: 

1)02 KOHLER A CHASE BLDG. 

Snn Francisco Phone: Kearny IMM 

MISS CHRISTINE HOWELLS 

FLUTIST 
Avallnble for Cooeerla an Snlolnt or for 
ObUvato Work. Ken.. 
Count 7. Tel. Delveder 



DouKlu 



edere, Marin 



ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 

PIAMST .tM> TKACHER 
ReMldence nnd Studio, 1I12K Hllleicnsa Are.. 
Onkliiud. TeL rieUniont 5005. 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRA I>TO 
Voice Culture. Suite "C" Kohler A Cbai 
lluildluc. Tclephoue Kearor &454. 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

ORGANIST ST. MARY'S CATHEDRAL 

Piano Department. Hamlin School 
Organ and Piano. Arrlllaea Musical College 

ANIL DEER STUDIO 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

PIANO 
Stadlot 1003 Kohler & Chase Bids. 



JOSEPH B. CAREY 

t'onipoMcr u::d -VrrniiBcr of .>luslc 
Residence Studio: 3TS tioldcn (inte Avi 
rnnklln TIIS4. l-aulnges Theatre Uld( 
:i:i l-riinclsco. <;:irllrld 45,'.. 

MISS FRANCES MARTIN 



MRS. EDWARD E. BRUNER 

SOPRANO: Available for Engagements 
Stodloi 8!S0 4Srd Ave. Phone: Pnc. .■i2,"IO 

VICTOR LICHTENSTEIN 



Studio 701 Hcli:c llIdK. Stockton fir. ^ 
nes; Suiter :ij.-.l; lvc..|rn) 071) 

LOUISE BREHANY 

Voice Culture 



Diiilu 

OOO Kohler A: Chase 

.'i4.'.4. Res. Pho 



Bide. Pho 



ETHEL A. JOHNSON 

SOPR.VNO 

ilember University Extension FaouU\ 
Studio: 506 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 
Res.: 51 Buena Vista Terrace 
Tel.: P ark 1291 

Miss Lena Frazee 



Leonora Thompson 

I'upil of Mile. Theodore, Paris. Alexis 

Kosloff. Pavley and Oukrainsky. 
Class or private instruction in character, 

interpretive and ballet dancing 
lOr, Post St. Kearny 2203 



Joseph George Jacobson Leonard A. Baxter 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Comlque. Paris 

Studio: 3107 Washington Street 

Phone Fillmore 1K47 



SIR HENRY HEYMAN 



134 Spruce Street. Phone Fillmore llSl 



RUDY SEIGER 

General Musical Director 

lard Hotels Palace and Fa 

In San Francisco 



Geo. Stewart McManus, Pianist 

KOHLER & CHASE BLDG. 

Phone. Kearny S4S4. Res., 2140 Hyde St. 

Phone Prospect IMSO 

FREDERICK MAURER 



Teacher of PI 

CoacbluK. Si uuiu i A,^v Lie ■« 

Berkeley. Pbone Berkeley &30 



■ cuvuirr ui ■ iiiuv iiiid HurmoDy, Bnaemble 
CoacblDK. Studio: 1726 Le Koy Aveaue 



Ada Clement Music School 

343S Sacramento St. Phoue Fillmore 808 

MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of Singing. 32 Lorettn Ave.. Pied- 
mont. Tel. Piedmont 304. Mon.. Kohler A 
Chase Bldg.. S. F. Telephone Kearny G4&4. 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 SCOTT ST_ Bet. Clay & Washington 
Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 
Mrs. Noah Brandt, Pluuo 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprnuo Soloist, Temple Emnnu El. Con- 
<'ert nnd Church Work. Vocal Instruc- 
tion. 2S3I> Clay St.. Phoue West 4SU0. 



JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 

BARITONE 

1100 Bush Sired, San Francisco 
Residence Phone Franklin «M8 

Marion Ramon Wilson 

CONTRALTO 
Opera nnd Concert. European Credentials 
1801 California St. Tel. Prospect 3830. 

Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHF.R OF SlVtJINO 
Ease of Prnducdoo and I'urlly of Tone 
378 Sutter St. (Tues., Wed. and Thara.) 



ic Studio 

41 Grove St.. Near Larkin— Civic Center 

Professional Instruction in 

Acting, Stage Techulque, Fencing, 

Mnkc-iip, Voice nnd Expression 

Special Class for Children In Dancing 
Saturday Afternoons and by Appointment 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



SIGISMONDO MARTINEZ 
551 Hyde Street Phone Franklin 821J 

ELIZABETH SIMPSON 
2518'/^ Etna St.. Berkeley. Tel. Berk. UIO 

MISS EDITH CAUBU 
37« .Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 

MRS. JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

ETHEL DENNY 

904 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 5454 

MISS MARION FRAZER 

3406 Clay St. Tel. Prosp. 3208 

J. B. ATWOOD 
2111 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal. 

MABEL MARBLE 

901 Koliler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 5454 

WALTER FRANK WENZEL 

1916 Golden Gate Ave. Fillmore 4733 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 
301 Spruce Street Paciflc 1«70 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 
Studio 973 Market Phone Sutter 733» 

MACKENZIE GORDON 
S832 Jackson Street Phone West 467 

ESTHER MUNDELL 
376 Suiter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

MME. M. TROMBONi 
Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny 5464 

JOHN A. PATTON 
900 Kcihler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6464 

VIRGINIA PIERCE ROVERE 
2139 Pierce St., San Francisco 



OTTO RAUHUT 
367 Arguello Blvd. Phone Pacific 366i 



ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Cbase Bldg. Tel. Keamj S4t4 



G. JOLLAIN 
376 Suiter Street Phon» K«^Tiy M l? 

ORLEY SEE 
1004 Kobler A Cbue Bldi. Tol Douc. KTi 

StU.O PIA.MSTS A.\D ACCOMPA.MSTS 

HAZEL M. NICHOLS 
570 Merrlmac St.. Oak. Lakeside 6435 



CL.MIINF.T 



FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF EXPERTS IN 

MANUFACTURING AND REPAIRING OF 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 

HWD AND ORCHESTRA 

BOLANDER INSTRUMENT CO. 

.^4 Kearny Street Douglas 3340 

H. C. HANSON MUSIC HOUSE 

140 O'Farrell St. Sutter 4457 

REED .\-\D -MOUTHPIECE MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 

789 Mission St. Suiter 6355 

PHONOGRAPH REPAIRING 

PHONOGRAPH SERVICE STATION 

539 Valencia St. Park 2222 



F. A. LUTZ 

Geary St. D usla« 2127 

MAX W. SCHMIDT 
216 Pantages Bldg.. Oakland 



RELIABLE PIANO TUNERS AND 
REPAIRERS 

OEITEMEIER PIANO CO. 

853 Valencia Street Mission 477 

MR. H. J. MORGAN 
69 Haight St. Mission 3660 



ALCAZAR 

With "The Gilded Cage" well on its 
way, having played to several packed 
houses the fore part of the week, and 
with a big advance sale for the balance, 
the entire .\kazar aggregation are more 
than satisfied that Lionel B. Samuel, the 
new manager, is onto his job when It 
comes to picking plays that San Fran- 
ciscans appreciate. And now comes the 
announcement that "Clarence," the great- 
est of all comedies, will he next week's 
attraction cnnunencing Sunday. "Clar- 
ence" is a Booth Tarkington product and 
was one of Broadway's greatest successes. 
There never has been a play Just like It 
before and to prove just how well little 
or New York liked it, Alfred Lund, the 
original "Clarence," rose to stardom 
after the first Broadway performance. 

Carence. a discharged soldier, of course, 
is the central figure who conies to the 
olllce of Mr. Wheeler, "a specialist in 
dollars," to get a job. I'nwltlinKly he 
hear.s all the family scandal as told by 
two refractory adolescents, a daughter 
and a son. Because Clarence can drive a 
team of army mules without swearing, 
Wheeler employs him at his home as a 
sort of secretary. Clarence, by llxing the 
heating apparatus. Uining the piano, re- 
pairing leaking ripes, playing the saxo- 
lilione and turning tlie very young daugh- 
ter's attention fn.m a grass widower, 
much older than herself, eventually wins 
I he affection of all. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 











9 


WAGER SWAYNE 

PIANIST AND ARTIST TEACHER 

of PARIS ond NEW YORK 

Now in San Francisco 

2404 Broadway Telephone Fillmore 1905 

Pupils Prepared for Public Playing 








JOHN WHITCOMB NASH 

Vocal Studios 
Suite SOO, Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Evening classes in Harmony. Especially adapt- 
ed to the needs of the singer. Visitors' cards are 
issued upon request. 

A really remarkable little booklet entitled, "The 
Plain Truth About Voice," is free. We will 
gladly mail it. 



CalifbrrvJa 



Third Grand Concert 

SEASON 1921-22 

Sunday, April 3, 1921, U A. M. 

John B. Siefert 

Tenor 

offering 
"Che Gelida Manina" Leoncavallo 

California Theatre Orchestra 
HERMAN HELLER, Conductor 




GEORGE EDWARDS 

Teacher of 
Piano, Organ and Composition 

Studio 501 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 
Residence 1453 Willard St. 

Phone Park 2135 



Madam Mackay-Cantell 



[Madam Mackay-Cantell Is a cousin of Percy 

Rector Stephens, by whom she Is endorsed] 

Kohler & Chase Bldg:. Phone Kearny 6454 

RcMldencc Studio: 2301 Baiieroft Way, Berkeley 

Phone Berk. 4230 J 



Heine Piano Co. 


"TAe House of Grands" 




Poelflc Coast Repreaenfatlves 
of the World's Renoirned 

HAZELTON 

Bstnbliiihed 1848 

DECKER & SON 

Establiahed 18S3 


Heine 
Building 
Musical 
Studios 

for 
Artists 

to 

Let 

Inquire 

Heine 

Piano Co. 




FRANCIS BACON 

EntaMlahed I78S 

nnd XG other makes 

Home of the famons WBLTE 










Stockton Street at Sutter. Heine Building 



S CHUMANN-HEINK 

Assi^ed by KATHERINE HOFFMANN at the Piano 

Season 1920-21 — Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 



iitisxni&fjcimlm 



mna 



Most costly and most beauti- 
ful piano in the world 




The choice of discriminat " 
musicians and connoisse 
everywhere 



More than any other piano in the world, the Mason & Hamlin is a striking 
tangible testimonial to the superior taste, appreciation and musical judgment 
of those who purchase it. Both grands and uprights are now being shown at 
our stores. We invite critical inspection and test. 



Two Entrances 

135-153 Kearny and 217-225 Sutter Sts. 

Victor Talking Macbines 




"■^ilgj^BAUeD® 



-MASON AND HAflUN PIANOS- 




Oakland— 1209 Wadiington Street 

San Jose— 199 Soutli First 

Sheet Mnsic 



^A (ha^ Wx^kd %tWaf 



J THE OHLY WEEKLY MU51CAL JOURNAL IHTHE GR,EAT WEST 



VOL. XL. No. 2 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. APRIL 9. 1921. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



CHICAGO OPERA ASSOCIATIO N TO T EST CITY'S MUSICAL STATUS 

Degree of Musical Taste Prevalent in Community Depended Upon Large Percentage of Attendance at All Performances — Neglect of Productions 

Excellently Cast in Favor of Sensational Stellar Performances Sure Sign of Lack of Musical Judgment — Two Weeks of Ideally 

Presented Operatic Works Represents an Invaluable Education in Vocal and Operatic Art 



Anyone who tells you anything but favorable things 
about the visit of the Chicago Opera Association is 
either musically ignorant or does so from unworthy 
personal motives. Speaking from a distinctly musical 
Pvint of "iew we claim that the two weeks' visit of the 
Chicago Opera Association, under the able and bril- 
liant direction of Mary Garden, is of inestimable edu- 
cational value to anyone associated with musical art. 
To actually realize the musical and artistic importance 
of this engagement it is necessary to state that the 
Chicago Opera Association represents the very best in 
operatic prv^ductions in tlie world. There simply is noth- 
ing better. If there is we do not know of it, nor is 
there any record of it. It is even doubtful in our minds 
whether there is an organization equally as complete 
and thorough as the Cliicago Opera Association, for its 
array of principal artists contains more vocalists of 
internaticnal fame than any other operatic organiza- 
tion in the world as far as the writer is personally 
aware of. 




FBIED.V HEMPEL 
The cclebratc4l Frlnin Donnn Colornliirti nbo will nppenr 
an Vloletta In Trnvlnlii with the Chleneo (>|>ern Ahmo- 
clntlou at the Civic .\uilltorltini next WedneMdny eve- 
ning:. 

We have had an opportunity to assure a large 
number of music lovers of mistaken conceptions re- 
garding the personnel and repertoire as well as price 
of admission of the Chicago Opera Association, not to 
say anything regarding tlie doubt expressed concern- 
ing the acoustic properties of the Civic Auditorium. 
We believe our readers will find it useful if we repeat 
in this treatise the various subjects discussed in these 
private conversations. It will possibly induce many to 
buy their teats, when they had made up their minds 
not to ga, and they will afterwards be grateful to us 
for being instrumental in changing their minds. 

The most frequently heard complaint is that of un- 
satisfactory acoustic properties of the auditorium. We 
will admit that the Civic Auditorium is not the most 
Ideal place to give grand opera, but a great deal has 
been done to improve the conditions against which 
there seem to be complaints, and we believe the most 
objectionable features have been eliminated. In the first 
place the stage will occupy one-third of the auditorium, 
thus bringing it well within reach of the auditors and 
cutting off a great deal of surerfluous space. Further- 
more, there will be no seats under the balcnnies and 
that entire space will be cut oft by draperifs. The or- 
chestra seats will be raised In spots, and the apparent 
deadness of sound supposed to result from the draperies 



By ALFRED METZGER 

will be obviated by the funnel-like effect of the stage, 
which will result in the sound being thrust out toward 
the hearers. The seating capacity of the auditorium 
will be reduced to 6200 from 10,000, thus cutting the 
space into half and thereby increasing the volume of 
sound proportionately. We are safe to predict that no 
one will have any reason to complain of tlie acoustic 
qualities after these improvements have been made. 

The other complaint that has come most frequently 
to our attention is that of price. Music students and 
teachers telling us that $7.60 and 55.00 is more than 
they can afford. Others saying that these prices are 
more than they are willing to pay for productions like 
Traviata, Trovatore, Rigoletto, etc We shall proceed 
to prove how unfounded these c^Jmplaints really are. 
Each production extends through practically three 
hours, and in some instances even longer. A vocal or 
"coaching" lesson extends through half an hour or an 
hour. No one thinks it unreasonable to pay from $3.00 
to $5.00 for a lesson lasting either half an hour or an 
hour. Yet to listen to an operatic production by the 
greatest artists in the world, equipped and produced 
according to the most ideal conditions is considered 
'tco much money." No lesson, no matter under what 
able and authoritative auspices, can possibly secure so 
much information and knowledge than the practical ex- 
perience of listening to tliese operatic works under such 
ideal conditi..ins and lasting from six to eight times 
as long as a lesson. We have known of instances when 
students were perfectly willing to pay $100 for an 
ordinary course of instruction extending over a fixed 
number of lessons without thinking it too much money. 
And yet liere is a CLurse of fourteen lessons of almost 
invaluable artistic importance which can be had at $60 
and at the highest at $105. Surely the contention that 
prices are too high is ridiculous. 

But it is not necessary to pay the highest prices. 
There are $3.00 and $2.00 seats. These are not by any 
means exhausted, for there are so many of them, the 
seating capacity of the auditorium being so big. If San 
Francisco wishes to lay claim to being indeed a musical 
cimmunity NOT ONE OF THESE LOW-PRICED 
SEATS SHOULD BE UNSOLD AFTER THE ENGAGE- 
MENT OF THE CHICAGO OPERA ASSOCIATION 
OPENS NEXT MONDAY. If these seats are not sold 
out for ALL performances, then San Francisco is NOT 
a musical community no matter what anyone else may 
say to the contrary. Even though the highest priced 
seats were sold out for all performances and if the 
low-priced seats were not sold, still this city could 
not be regarded musical. It is now up to the students 
and teachers of San Francisco to show that it is a 
musical community. They will be responsible if the 
engagement of the Chicago Opera Association should 
prove that we are not a musical city. 

We now come to the contention that operas like 
Carmen, Traviata, Rigoletto, Cavalleria Rusticana, Pag- 
liacci, Trovatore, etc., are not worth hearing at the 
prices charged by the Chicago Opera Association. Of 
course, anyone who is really musical immediately per- 
ceives the stupidity of such a contention. We admit that 
we have witnessed productions of these operas that 
were not worth any high price. We have also wit- 
nessed productions of these operas that we would not 
have paid ten cents to hear. But such productions can 
not be compared with those given by the Chicago Opera 
Association. In the first place the principal artists be- 
long to the very greatest exponents of operatic art In 
the world. There is not a weak link In the casts. Then 
you have a large, picked orchestra of the best musi- 
cians under the direction of great conductors. There 
la a well trained chorus with uniformly fine voices. 
There Is a first-class ballet. The scenery is pictorially 
and hl.'torically correct, and pleasing. The stage man- 
agement Is exemplary. If you have not heard the operas 
mentioned by a company such as the Chicago Opera 
Association, or one of equal merit, you simply have no 
Idea how beautiful these operas are. Your musical edu- 
cation is absolutely incomplete, if you have not heard 
every opera performed in the way the Chicago Opera 
Association performs them. To say that you have 
heard these operas done as well by companies of more 
modest dimensions simply proves your ignorance of 
music as an art and your provincialism In matters of 
operatic expression. There is no music student, be he 
vocal or instrumental, who can possibly afford to miss 
attending this opera season no matter what sacrifices 
he has to make. To do so Is simply neglecting hia edu- 
cation unmercifully. It la not necessary to buy the 
highest priced seals. The writer used to wait tor hours 
at the gaFiery entrance of European opera houses to 
get in the front row. He used his lunch-money to buy 



the tickets. And there were hundreds like him In a 
city of 60,000 inhabitants. That is what you call a musi- 
cal city. How many such music lovers are there in San 
Francisco, a city of 600,000 inhabitants, or ten times 
as large? 

It is not necessary at this late day to comment at 
length upon the personnel of the company. It contains 
the very best artistic material before the musical world 
today. There may be an occasional artist of great merit 
who in certain roles may surpass one or two of the 
artists in the casts of the Chicago Opera Association. 
But speaking in a broad sense the company as such 
consists invariably of artists of the highest rank and 
in certain instances the artists are not equalled by 
any other in tlie world. Take, for instance. Mary Gar- 
den. There is no exponent of the modern school of 
French opera that can possibly be compared with this 
great vocalist. As an actress she has no superior and 
hardly an equal. There has been much prejudice ex- 
pressed regarding Mary Garden's voice. It is not by 




.VLESSANDKO llO\< I 
iiniouN Lyric Teuur nho nlll Mini 
In Trnvlntn, with the ChtrnEO <> 
the C'lvie Auilltorlum next Wedn 



any means lacking in color and warmth. It Is a voice 
of much flexibility and resonance. It Is used moat in- 
telligently, and anyone who tells you that Mary Gar- 
den is not as great a singer as she Is an actress simply 
imitates parrot-like a prejudice that at one time has 
crept into tlie columns of a paper and that has been 
greatly exaggerated. We have heard Mary Garden sing 
In a manner that was thoroughly conformant to the 
highest principles of the art. 

Frieda Hempel represents to us the highest Ideal of 
coloratura singing in the world today. We know of no 
coloraturc singer who compares with Frieda Hempel 
and who Is singing at the present day In grand opera, 
and we make this statement unreservedly, having the 
popular successes of another young colorature singer 
still in mind. Frieda Hempel does not only possess a 
voice of rare beauty and command respect as an artist 
of the first calibre, but possesses a iiersnnallty of un- 
usual charm and magneli?m. To nii-^s Frieda Hempel in 
some of the coloratura roles for which she is announced 
Is simply to neglect an orporiunity to hear these roles 
sung In a manner as no one else can sing them at the 
present day. So be sure and g i to hear Traviata, Rigo- 
letto, Martha, L'EIlsir d'Amore, etc. 

(Continued on ragu 4, Column 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




S T E I N W A Y 

Used and Approved by the Created PianMs 

TEACHERS of music on the Pacific Coast, in striking majority, use and approve the Steinway 
piano. The greatest artists on the concert stage use and approve it. The home of dignity, refine- 
ment and distinction unerringly chooses it. 

Liszt, greatest of all pianists, pronounced the Steinway greatest of all pianos. Wag- 
ner, Rubinstein, Gounod and their briUliant contemporaries were equally quick to recog- 
nize and acclaim its pre-eminence. 

Each year since those great beginnings, the Steinway has strengthened and increased 
its prestige with those who made and those who love great music. 

One of the reasons lor this is that the Steinway has always been made under the 
personal direction and the personal ownership of the Steinway family. 

All the materials which go into a Steinway are available to the whole world — but 
the genius which transmutes them into Steinway Tone begins and ends with Steinway. 

To make a piano is one thing — to make a; piano for the immortals is another. 

Paderewski, Hofmann, Rachmaninoff — the Steinway is their chosen instrument just 
as it was Liszt's. 

Is there any wonder that the mere presence of a Steinway in a home is a token of 
musical authority and distinction? 

We carry everything in Music — Steinway and other Pianos, Pianola and Duo-Art 
Pianos, Aeolian Pipe Organs, Robert Morton Cathedral Organs, Victrolas and 
Victor Records, Player Rolls, Conn Band Instruments, String and Orchestral In- 
struments, Sheet Music and Music Books. 




Sherman, May & Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Streets, Oakland 

Sacramento — Stockton — Fresno — Val lejo — San Jose 

Portland — Seattle — Tacoma — Spokane 




The JEANNE JOMELLI 

VOCAL STUDIOS 

HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van Ness Ave., at Geary St., 
San Francisco 

Announces the addition of a 

VIOLIN DEPARTMENT 

Under the direction of 

SIGNOR ANTONIO de GRASSl 

Formerly o£ London 

Signer de Grass! was a pupil of 

Ysaye, Joachim and Sevcik 

and principal teaching assistant to 
Sevcik In Prague 1807-lflOS 

Also a 

PianOr Organ and Theory Department 

Under 

GEORGE EDWARDS 

Post-Grndunte of the Chicago MuhIcoI College 

The Theory Course covers the fundamentals of 
music, including Sight Reading, Composition, Har- 
mony, etc. 

PUPILS NOW BEING ENROLLED 

Pupils are also now being enrolled for the Freneli 
and SpaoiHh Classes. 

TEL. FRANKLIN 2381 



Arrillaga Musical College 

Fernando Michelena. Preinldenti 
A. L. ArtlgueH, VIce-PreB.i V. de Arrlllusa, Director 
Unexcelled facilities for tbe study of nmnlc In all 
Its branches. Laree Pipe Organ. Recital Hall. 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
San Francisco, Cal, Phone West 4737 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING, Director 



8243 Wnahlnsto 



Street, near Presidio Avenoe 
I Franclftco, Cal. 
Ion address the seeretary of the 



List Vonr Wants with the 

MUSICAL ARTIST TEACHERS AGENCY 

New \oik San Diego 



Many posi 
dress Mrs. Bertha £ 
sentative, San Diego, Calif, 



lace your applications 

open both East and West. Ad- 

1834 First St., Western repre- 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGHRY. Director 

LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of SlnsioK' Complete Course of Operatic Traln- 
l«K. 27ae Plerr-g- ^t. Tel. Fillmore 4.tS3. 

MMB. CARRXNGTON L.EWY8 

Prima Donna With Strakosch, Hapleson, Etc. 

BML.YN LEWYS 

Organist Fifth Church of Christ Scientist. Former!? 
Principal of Vlrfdl Piano School. London, England, 
Res. Studio: 2041 Lyon Street. Phone Fillmore 552 

MRS. S. P. MARRACCi, Vocal Teacher 



NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Confer. Deeree. Award. Certificate. 

For Partlealar. apply to Sister Snperior 

MME. LEONORE GORDON FOY 

Dramatic Soprano — Opera and Voice 
Studio: Claremont Hotel Telephone: Berkeley 9300 

Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 

Music Courses Thorough and Prorresslve 
Public School Mnsle, Aeeredlted Diploma 

SIGMUND BEEL 

Coaeert Master of L. A. Symphony Orchestra dnrlnff last 
four years, frill accept puplln In adT-anced violin and en- 
semble playinc- Studio 1373 Post St. Phone Prospect 757 

THE PASMORE SYSTEM OF VOCAL TECHNIQUE 



radn Rond. Berkeley. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 
MRS. OSCAR MANSFBLOT. Pianist 

201.^ Uroderlck St., near Clay Telephone Fillmore 314 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 

PIANIST— ACCOMPANIST— TEACHBR 
■tndloi 827 Shrader St. Phon* Park IMS 



MISSION PL AY S?J; ?i;r,S'" " 

By JOHN STEVEN McGROARTY 

Tenth Year 

At Old San Gabriel Mission 

Now Open With 

FREDERICK WARDE 

The Famons Shakesperean Acrtor and 

Cast of Over 100 Players 

Ticket Offices: 

LOS ANGELES: Ground Floor Pacific Electric 
Building, Sixth and Main streets. Tel. 13123—13026. 
Box Office, Alhambra 198. 

Performances Every Afternoon — Except Mondays — 
At 2:15. Evening's, Wednesday and Saturday, at 8:15 
PriccH, $1.00, $1.S0» $2.00, $3.00 — AU Seats Reserred 
E. K. Hoak, General Manager, Van Nuys Building, 
Los Angeles, California. 

Take Pacific Electric Car 



IRENE HOWLAND NICOLL 



placing and restora- 



Speclally qualified in diaf^noKls, 

tion of tbe ^oice. Stadios: Tel. Berk. KO-IS J; 868 Contra 

Costa Ave., Berk. — S. F., Sat. Aft^ 606 Kohler & ChaB<> Pldff. 



LEN BARNES 



BARITONE — VOCAL INSTRT7CTION 

Studio, Heine Building. 408 Stockton Street 

Res., 1632 Union St. San Francisco. Phone Franklin 1325 



UDA WALDROP 



PIANIST ACCOMPANIST 

Instruction in Piano and Pipe Orcan. Vocal Caaehla*. 
Organist and Choir Director St. Luke's Episcopal Chureh. 
Studio: 308 Locust St. Tel. Fillmore 1«7t 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

Orsranlst Temple Bmanu El, First Church of Christ Sci- 
entist, Director Lorlnc Club. S. F.. Wed^ 1017 Califorala 
St., Phone Franklin 2003) ^at.. First Christian Seieaea 
Church. Phone Franklin 1307; Res. studio. 3143 Lewistaa 
Ave., Berkeley. Phooe Piedmont 24X8. 



Miss Myra Lumbard Palache 

PIANIST AND ACCOMPANIST 

Available (or Concerts, Season 1920-1 021 



SENORITA TEODELINDA TERAN 

Cello — Piano taught by Hatthay Touch Method of the 
Royal Academy of Loadoa. Far appalataseats Phaai^ fraa 
7 to P. M., Prospect 9544 — OmMmtj Bnndtngr. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



[irTHE"5NI.Y WffiKLY MUSICAL JOURNAL IN THE CKEAT VIST TB 
PubliMhed Everr Snturdny by the 
MtSICAl. REVIEW COMPANY 

ALFRED METZGER PreRldenI 

TIIOS. E. ATKINSON Vlce-Prenldenl 

MARCUS L. SAMUELS Secretary and Treaauper 

Suite KOI Kohler <& Chniie BIdK., 2« OTarrell St., Son 
FranclMCO, Cal. Tel. Kearny 54M 

ALFRED METZGER - Editor and Publisher 
CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE - Asst. Editor 
B. W. JELICA - Advertising Manager 

Nen York Office, 139 Weat 86th Street 
MIhm Roaalle Honaman In Charee 

Oakland-Berkeiey-Alameda Office 

2301 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, Telephone Berkeley 4230J 

L. Mackay-Cantell In Charge 

Seattle Office, 1521 Fifteenth Ave., Seattle, Waahlnsfon 
Mra. Abble Gerrlah-Jonea In Chnrge 

Loa Anselea Office 

70S Philharmonic Auditorium. Tel. Pico 2454 

Bruno David llaaher in Charice 

San DIeeo, Cat., Office, 1834 FIrat Street 
Mrs. Bertha Slocum In Charge 



a concert in the Civic Auditorium. And in recent 
conversations with Mr. Lemare, we have discov- 
ered that there is nothing in his contract to pre- 
vent such concerts. On the contrary there is a 
clause in his contract actually encouraging the 
introduction of such organists. But the recent 
ordinance really prevents the city from obtain- 
ing the services of the best available artists, for 
it puts the salary upon the lowest possible basis, 
and prevents it from being increased should the 
occasion arise. 



Vol. XL 



Satnrday, April 9, 1921 



No. 2 



Entered aa aecond-claaa mall 



■ at S. P. Poatoffice, 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 
Annually In Advance Includlnr PoafaKei 



TWENTIETH YEAR 



THE MUNICIPAL ORGAN RECITALS 



The Pacific Coast Musical Review has always 
been consistently opposed to the mixing of poli- 
tics and music. For this reason it has placed itself 
on record against a municipal opera house. For 
the same reason it has originally fought against 
the scheme of a municipal organist controlled by 
a music committee of the Board of Supervisors. 
That its attitude in this respect has been correct 
may easily be perceived from the conditions now 
existing in the Civic Auditorium and centering 
around the municipal organist. Before we pro- 
ceed any further in this matter we wish to state 
emphatically that it is our fixed opinion that Ed- 
win H. Lcinare has been treated simply shame- 
fully during the last few months. And in making 
this statement we are not considering at present 
Mr. Lemare's standing as an organist, nor his 
efficiency nor his influence as an artist in the 
community. VV'e are here concerned exclusively 
with the principle of fair and square dealing. 



In the first place the Pacific Coast Musical 
Review was not in sympathy with the ordinance 
recently placed upon the ballot limiting the salary 
of the city organist to less than $100 a concert, 
provided it is a weekly event, and less per con- 
cert when recitals are more frequent. In the first 
place we do not believe in having the voters at 
large determine the salaries of city officials, and 
in the second place it is a bad precedent to fix 
salaries by ordinance, for it is difficult to alter 
them no matter how urgent may be an increase 
or decrease at one time or another. There is an- 
other question involved in this salary proposition. 
It put San Francisco on record as being in favor 
of employing the cheapest organist and not the 
best organist. It puts upon its statute books the 
fact that it is a question of money and not of 
efficiency that is associated with the position of 
the official organist. It seems to us the Mayor and 
the Board of Supervisors should be able to de- 
termine the salary of a city organist, provided 
they are competent to do so. The ordinance placed 
upon the statute books would seem to indicate 
that there is a distrust among certain politicians 
as to whether our city government is competent 
to decide upon the salary of a city organist. 



Musical people will agree with us when we say 
that San Francisco either wants a competent art- 
ist at its city organ, or none at all. We are, and 
always have been, in favor of giving every ef- 
ficient artist, whether he resides in the bay region 
or comes here as a visitor, an opportunity to give 



Let us suppose that San Francisco had an op- 
portunity to engage an artist of Mr. Bonnet's 
standing in the musical world. And let us fur- 
ther suppose that Mr. Bonnet could pack the 
auditorium at the admission rate of ten cents 
every Sunday. It would be possible to earn for 
the city one thousand dollars a week, or $52,000 
a year. Now the present ordinance makes such 
an engagement absolutely impossible. The whole 
trouble with our organ recitals has not been due 
to artistic efficiency, for no matter what differ- 
ences of opinion regarding Mr. Lemare may exist 
among musicians, the fact remains that he occu- 
pies a prominent position among the distin- 
guished organists in the world. The public know 
him therefore only as an artist of international 
reputation. But you can not inte^-est the public 
unless you employ proper means. The California 
Theatre attracts three thousand peopU each Sun- 
day morning to its concerts at five times the ad- 
mission prices charged at the municipal organ 
recitals. The symphony concerts attrac'- 60,000 
people a season at from ten to twenty times the 
price of admission charged at the municipal 
events. Grand opera seasons attract from forty 
to fifty thousand during one and three weeks' 
engagements at prices ranging from ten to sev- 
enty-five times the prices charged at the weekly 
organ recitals. Surely there must be a way to 
attract a few thousand people a week to concerts 
in the Civic Auditorium at ten cents admission. 



But it evidently is impossible to do so when 
politics are mixed with music. It requires ade- 
quate publicity, variety of programs, occasional 
introduction of special features and above all 
consistent efficiency. If any one is under the im- 
pression that popular music, or jazz, or cheap 
vaudeville programs will effect any change, they 
are surely mistaken. We believe that Sunday is 
a very unfavorable day for these events, for peo- 
ple do not like to stay indoors on such a day 
except during inclement weather. A week day 
would be better. Then there should be always 
special features. The American public likes a 
change. We are sure that Mr. Lemare would be 
able to make many suggestions and take a far 
greater interest in these concerts if he were sure 
of the co-operation of the music committee, in- 
stead of its bitter opposition. We can not blame 
him for becoming discouraged. Indeed, we would 
have no respect for any man who could remain 
calm under the partisan and personal antagonism 
that has shamefully characterized the manage- 
ment of the organ recitals in recent months. 



ought to stand up in meeting and say so. On the 
other hand if an artistic improvement is intended, 
if efficient artists residing in California arc to be 
engaged to add to the drawing power of these 
events, we would like to know about it. There is 
no one better able to tell us about this than 
Chairman Emmett Ilayden who has been taking 
such a lively interest in the municipal organ re- 
citals of late. The Pacific Coast Musical Review 
has no interest in the matter except in so far as 
the general public is concerned. Municipal organ 
recitals are successes in other communities where 
organists receive from six to ten thousand dollars 
a year. Why can't they be made a success in 
San Francisco? We believe it would be wisest to 
take these events out of politics and have them 
supervised by competent private inanagers. 

MATZENAUER IN GREAT VOCAL FORM 

Assisted by Frank La Forge and Charles Carver, Great 

Artist Thrills Record Audience at Stanford 

University Assembly Hall 

By ALFRED METZGER 

If you have not already bought your tickets for the 
Matzenauer concert be sure and do so as soon as you 
read these lines, for you will have reason to thank us 
for suggesting this to you. Although we have barely 
time, before going to press, to spread this information 
before it is too late, we feel we would be remiss in our 
duty to the musical public if we did not resort to these 
means of calling attention to the concert to take place 
tomorrow (Sunday). Mme. Matzenauer is in great voice. 
The beauty, volume, limpidity and warmth of this won- 
derful vocal organ is at its heighth. The intensity of ex- 
pression, the authoritative interpretation and the grip- 
ping dramatic climaxes are among the greatest enjoy- 
ments of her art. Her program Is an unusually dignified 
one containing some of the classics, some modern works 
and some excellent La Forge songs. We shall leave more 
detailed criticism until next issue. 

Frank La Forge both as accompanist and pianist has 
an opportunity to arouse the admiration of his friends. 
The more frequently we hear him the more fixed be- 
comes our often expressed opinion that he is the fore- 
most accompanist of the time. You are going to have a 
surprise in Charles Carver. He is a basso of extraordi- 
nary powers. His voice is big. resonant and appealing. 
His vocal expression is judicious and consistently intel- 
ligent. The manipulation of his voice is extraordinarily 
facile. In other words he is an artist who will impress 
you thoroughly. There is always a certain timidity prev- 
alent to give unrestrained praise to one young in years 
and experience. We do not belong to that class. We 
know that you will enjoy hearing Mr. Carver and be- 
come as enthusiastic as we are. 



It is evident, as far as we can ascertain, that 
the opponents of Mr. Lemare, by reason of their 
persistent methods, have finally succeeded in 
driving him away. We understand that he will 
cease his activities on July 1st. This must be 
known to those in charge of the organ recitals. 
But so far we have not been told what is going 
to take the place of these recitals. If they are to 
1)e discontinued and the organ is permitted to 
rot where it stands, then we ought to know. If 
there are better plans that will show an artistic 
improvement, we should be told. If the city audi- 
torium is to be turned over to outside parties, we 
also should know. But surely it is not fair to 
deprive the public of a certain musical feature 
without at the same time telling what is to take 
its place. May be the organ position is to be 
utilized to serve political ends and get votes. 
For it will be seen that while the salary of the 
organist has been curtailed there is no provision 
made for preventing expenditure of money for 
assisting artists. Is it possible that it is the sense 
of those who fathered the ordinance to divide the 
$7500 among more than one person? Is it pos.sibic 
that all kinds of amateurs who control votes may 
be engaged to serve political ends? If so someone 



Rosa Raisa in speaking about Miss Mary Garden says 
that, "Miss Garden has such power to direct and con- 
trol that it she so desired she would have the ability 
to become the President of the United States." 



ST.VTEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP. MA J.ACEMENT, 

CIRCl'I.-\TION, ETC.. REQUIRED BV THE ACT 

OF CONGRESS OF AUGUST 24, 1012 

Of Pacific Coast Musical Review, published weekly at 
San Francisco. California, for April 1. 1921. 
State of California, 
County of San Francisco. 

Before me. a Notary Public in and for the State and 
county aforesaid, personally appeared Alfred Metzger, 
who, having been duly sworn according to law. deposes 
and says that he Is the Editor of the I'aclflc Coast Musi- 
cal Review and that the following Is. to the best of his 
knowledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership, 
management (and If a daily paper, the circulation), etc., 
of the aforesaid publication tor the date shown In the 
above caption, required by the Act of August 24. 1918. 
embodied In section 443. Postal I,aws and Regulations, 
printed on the reverse of this form, to-wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, edi- 
tor, managing editor, and business managers are: 

Names of — Post office address — 

Publisher, The Musical Review Company 

26 O'Farrell St.. San Francisco 

Editor. Alfred Metzger 26 O'Farrell St.. San Francisco 

Managing Editor. None. 
Business Manager. None. 

2. That the owners are: (Give names and addresses of 
Individual owners, or. If a corporation, give name and 
the names and addresses of stockholders owning 1 per 
cent or more of the total amount of stock.) 

The Musical Review Company. 

Alfred Metzger 26 O'Farrell St.. San Francisco 

.•!. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other 
security holders owning or holding I per cent or more of 
total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the 
names of the owners, stockholders, and security holders. 
If any. contain not only the list of stockholders and 
security holders as they appear upon the books of the 
company, but also. In cases where the stockholders or 
security holders appear upon the books of the company 
as trustees or In any other fiduciary relation, the name 
of the person or corporation for whom such trustee Is 
acting, is given; also that the said two paragraphs con- 
tain statements embracing affiant's full knowledge and 
belief as to the circumstances and conditions under which 
stockholders and security holders who do not appear 
upon the books of the company as trustees, hold stock 
and securities In a capacity other than that of hona ndc 
owner; and this afflant has no reason to believe that any 
other person, association, or corporation has any interest 
direct or Indirect In the said stock, bonds or other securi- 
ties then as so stated by him. „_„„„„ 
AI-FRED METZOER. 
(Signature of editor, publisher, business manager, or 

Sworn to and subscribed before me this Ist day of 
April. 1921. „ . „„,,_,_ 

(Seal) M. A. BRUSIE, 

Notary Public In and for the county of San Francisco, 

State of California. 

(My commission expires September 24. 1922.) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



CHICAGO OPERA ASSOCIATION 

(CoiUlnuoil from Page 1) 
The Chicago Opera Association has the distinction 
of having among Its artists the two greatest lyric ten- 
ors In the world today. Allessandro none! Is among lyric 
tenors what Caruso Is among dramatic tenors. Bond 
is one of the few survivors of the genuine school of 
bel canto, that is actually beautiful singing. His voice 
Is smooth and flexible. His coloring Is delicious. His 
artistic expression is authoritative and impressive. 
His histrionic art is delightful. In short, his association 
with Frieda Hempel in operas such as have been men- 
tioned above can not be valued too highly. It is im- 
possible to hear these roles presented in a better 
style or form. 

The other great lyric tenor is Lucien Muratore, 
than whom there is no finer exponent in the modern 
French roles. His interpretation of Don Jose in Carmen 
is said to be unique for its dramatic and musical expres- 
sion. He sings opposite Mary Garden and the artistic 
ability of these two artists is enhanced by their per- 
sonal attractiveness. 

There are some American vocal artists of national 
and international fame in the company. Among these 
are Charles Marshall, a dramatic tenor of unusual abil- 
ity and voice: Edward Johnson, also a tenor of great 
distinction; Charles Lament, another tenor of brilliant 
achievements. Joseph Schwarz, a Russian baritone of 
particular merit, has been announced as an extra addi- 
tion to the cast. Among other artists already known 
here are Baklanoff, Dufranne and Ricardo Martin. 

Another stellar attraction of unusual magnitude is 
R- sa Raisa, a dramatic soprano of splendid voice and 
histrionic power, who with Rimini, a baritone of well 
known art stic capability, will sing some of the more 
dramatic operas. 

Last but not least we wish to call attention to our 
old friend Giorgio Pclacco, than whom there is no 
greater operatic conductor before the musical world 
today. Indeed there are few conductors like Polacco 
anywhere nor have there ever been. To hear Polacco 
guide the destinies of his large and excellent orches- 
tra through the mazes of the orchestral scores will in 
itself be an artistic treat well worthy the prices asked 
for tickets. 

Regarding the advisability of seeing special operas 
we WLUld say, see as many as you can, but if you can 
only go to a few, select several of contrasting charac- 
ter. Do not go just to those which are dramatic and 
modern, but select one of the lighter works like Tra- 
viata, Rigoletto or L'Elisir d'Amore. You will not re- 
gret following our advice. You may think you have 
heard these operas, but unless you have heard them 
by a company of the Chicago Association's proportions, 
you really have not heard them at all. You may believe 
what we say. Then again, do not just select operas in 
which Mary Garden sings. Of course, everyone wants 
to hear Mary Garden, but even she, as general director 
of the Chicago Opera Association, likes to see the other 
productions also well attended. If you can not afford 
to hear all operas select one Mary Garden performance, 
one Frieda Hempel and one Rosa Raisa. These will in- 
clude also Muratore, Bonci and some of the other ar- 
tists. This is about all we can say at this time. And 
now enjoy this season. Do not let anyone spoil your 
joy of living by "knocking" and fault finding. Just go 
and enjoy yourselves and let the croakers stay at home. 



MATZENAUER TOMORROW 

Margaret Matzenauer, the famous contralto of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company, and one of the foremost 
contralto recitalists of the day, will give her only San 
Francisco recital scheduled for this season at the Co- 
lumbia Theatre tomorrow afternoon. Matzenauer, "the 
glorious queen of song," will have as assisting artists 
the remarkable young American basso, Charles Car- 
ver, and the ever popular Frank La Forge, pianist- 
composer. 

In referring to the art and voice of Matzenauer it 
would seem that critics and writers the country over 
are forced to take refuge in superlatives of a seldom- 
used character. She has risen so rapidly to the very 
top of her profession that today she is generally re- 
garded as not only the world's greatest contralto but 
one of the greatest recital singers and operatic prima 
donnas of all times. San Franciscans well remember her 
last appearance here when she created no less than 
a furore at her recitals and the hundreds who will 
crowd into the Columbia Theatre tomorrow are keenly 
anticipating the musical treat of the season in hearing 
the brilliant artist within the confines of an ideally 
built concert theatre. 

The complete program to be given by the three par- 
ticipants in tcmorrow's event is as follows: O del mio 
dolce ardor (Gluck), Spring Night (Schumann), Sap- 
phic Ode (Brahms), Erlking (Schubert), Mme. Matze- 
nauer; Aria from The Magic Flute (Qui sdegno) (Mo- 
zart), Mr. Carver; Supplication (dedicated to Mme. 
Matzenauer) (F. La Forge), Nocturne (dedicated to 
Aria from Samson and Delilah (Saint-Saens) (Mon 
Mme. Matzenauer (F. La Forge), Mandoline (Debussy), 
coeur s'ouvre a ta voix), Mme. Matzenauer; O Sleep, 
why dost you leave me? (Handel), Gai 11 sole dal Gauge 
(Scarlatti), Mexican Folksong, Love Has Eyes (Bishop), 
Mr. Carver: Wanderer's Nightsong (Rubinstein), Bar- 
carolle (Tales of Hoffman) (Offenbach), Mme. Matze- 
nauer, Mr. Carver: Romance (F. LaForge). Etude de 
Concert (MacDowell), Mr. La F ree: Aria from Le 
Prophete (Ah! mon fils) (Mpyerb-er). Mme. Matze- 
nauer. Tickets can be secured at Sherman, Clay & Co. 
today and at the Columbia Theatre tomorrow. 



NEW YORK SEASON BEGINNING TO WANE 

Operatic and Orchestra Season Are Closing — Mengel- 

berg the Outstanding Sensation — Kre sler and 

D;.hnanyi In Farewell Concert 

By ROSALIE HOUSMAN 
New York, March 27.— As Spring is approaching fast 
the music season here is reaching Its end. There still 
will be many concerts between now and the first of 
May, but the bigger events, like the various orchestras, 
are concluding their series. Of the local orchestras, the 
first to conclude, was the New York Symphony Orches- 
tra, which, at Aeolian on Sunday, March 20th, gave the 
last of its subscription concerts. At this event, the 
announcement of the Flagler prize was made, and was 
won by Louis Gruenberg of New York, for a symphonic 
work called the Hill of Dreams. The work will be 
given for the first time at the opening concert of the 
next season. 

Mr. Stransky held three request programs for his 
final week, and one was devoted to Wagner. As always 
there was a packed house at these concerts, and the 
seasc n was in every way a great success, with Wagner 
and Tschaikowsky as musical heroes. I believe that the 
orchestra now goes on its coast to coast tour. 

But it is to Wilhelm Mengelberg that the season's 
hcnors go. I don't think any other conductor here has 
ever had such ovations at the end of his concerts as 
Mengelberg has had each time he conducted. Nor do I 
believe that there ever has been a conductor here, or 
elsewhere, who was more worthy of public or artistic 
approval. When he came, in January, he found an or- 
chestra of average abilities, who had played under va- 
rious conductors, and had had some of the rjutine 
training necessary. He demanded extra rehearsal time, 
and got it, and by dint of hard work, by the time he 
left, and he was here but ten weeks, he had developed 
a band of men whose response to his every wish was 
so plastic that it seemed a very marvel. Mengelberg 
has a great personality and he lives and expresses 
every note of the score, which he conducts without 
notes. I have seen him in rehearsal, and his technical 
knowledge of his material is prodigious. The subtlety 
of his rhythmic sense, his vitality in interpretation, his 
untiring energy, are but a few of the things we listen- 
ers observed of this musical soul. One can't describe 
him, but hearing him frequently is the biggest lesson 
an amateur and professinal musician can desire. He 
was the shining light of the entire season, and it is to 
be regretted that he did not always have the over- 
crowded houses his genius deserved. People gradually 
awoke to what they had been missing, and his final 
three concerts were crowded and showed him all possi- 
ble honor and acclaim. He sailed Saturday for Holland, 
and will return early next year as one of the con- 
ductors of the new amalgamated Philharmonic. 



The opera season, too, is nearly over, and the usual 
repetitions are drawing crowded houses. Good Friday 
saw the revival of the "English" Parsifal, with Easton, 
Harrold and Wliitehill, and Bodansky at the baton. 
I heard it last season and a more reverent and won- 
derful performance I never knew. Friends told me it 
was even more beautiful this time, as they have been 
doing it frequently, and it goes better for that reason. 
Easton is one of my happiest recollections as Kundry. 

Tuesday evening, the 22nd, at the concert of the 
Beethoven Association, the participants were the Letz 
quartet, George Hamlin, tenor, in songs of Schubert 
and Schumann, in the original, and last though never 
least, was Hofmann, who joined the quartet in the F 
minor Brahms quintet. It was ensemble playing par 
excellence, and one could observe how Hofmann took 
and kept the lead of the music throughout, and how 
delightfully the others followed his guidance. He never 
le. his personality obtrude, and he even had the piano 
placed to one side, so as not to claim too great atten- 
tion. The place was crowded, and exceptionally enthu- 
siastic. Mr. Hamlin is one of the finest lieder singers I 
know, now before the public, and thrills and charms 
with art, phrasing and voice. 



Arturo Bonuccl, au Italian 'celllat, made his Ameri- 
can debut this past week, and charmed a large audi- 
ence with his beautiful tone and exquisite style. It Ib 
a pleasure lo welcome him here, and 1 hope he will be 
heard frequently with orchestra and In concert. Good 
'cellists are so rare and we have missed Cassals 
greatly. 

Saturday afternoon saw the final concerts of Erno 
Djhnanyi and tritz Kreisler, both men of supreme 
ability on their respective instruments. I heard the 
former, who gave me, personally, the piano thrill of 
this past season. According to the Times every Inch 
except the chandeliers at Larnegie Hall was taken to 
hear Kreisler, who did the Brahms G majur and some 
solo Bach, and afterwards pleased his countless ad- 
mirers with the smaller tidbits of his repertoire. Of 
Djhnanyi I cannot say enough. He is a mature artist, 
with a keen spiritual vision. His tone is always warm, 
beautiful and expressive, and technically his resources 
seem unlimited. As a composer I have found him less 
interesting than as interpreter, as the music of his 
own, that he has played for us, is of a much lighter 
caliber. Perhaps there are many other things of a 
more profound import than he has shown us. On this 
occasion we were treated to a very dramatic reading 
of Beethoven's Appassionata Sonata as well as Op. 110, 
which is more lyric than the epic op. 57. Both were 
painted on large canvas, but the inner line was never 
forgotten. A highly imaginative reading of the Etudes 
Syo-phoniques followed, and then shorter pieces of his 
own. Judging pianistically, I think his Marche Humor 
esque, op. 17, No. 1, and the Capriccio, op. 24, No. 3, 
would be great fun to play. A final encore of Trau- 
merei was lovely beyond words, and though I think he 
Flayed more I left, having heard in that one page of 
music a message of spiritual beauty which I will not 
easily forget. 



PERCY RECTOR STEPHENS TO RETURN 

Teacher of Paul Althouse to Conduct Second and Last 
Teaching Course in California 

Percy Rector Stephens of New York City will ar- 
rive in San Francisco in June to conduct a summer 
course of seven weeks. His studio in the Kohler & 
Chase Building will open June 27th and close August 
13th. Perhaps one of the most successful of Mr. Steph- 
ens' singers is Paul Althouse, who was recently heard 
here. Mr. Althouse is not only an artist of the concert 
stage, but is one of the leading tenors of the Metro- 
politan Opera Company. Critics are unanimous in the 
praise of his vocal talents and artistry as a singer. 
Mr. Althouse's tour was one of exceptional interest, 
his route having followed the boundaries of the United 
States from New York to Canada. Mr. Althouse is 
under the constant training of Mr. Stephens, and has 
been for the last ten years, proving again that single- 
minded in effort is of profit. Mr. Stephens is planning 
to conduct a mixed choir of from eighty to one hun- 
dred voices. Preliminary conducting and arrangements 
are in the hands of Mr. Laurence Strauss of Berkeley. 



SWAYNE PUPILS IN SUCCESSFUL RECITAL 

A brilliant class musicale was held at Wager Swayne's 
San Francisco studio on Saturday, March 26th, a large 
number of pupils presenting a splendid program in a 
tTioroughly artistic and musicianly manner. The follow- 
ing numbers were beautifully rendered: Scenes from 
Childhood (Schumann), Improvisation (MacDowell), 
Eigaudon (MacDowell), Mrs. George Uhl; Variations 
(Paderewski), Miss Enid Newton; Two Etudes (Cho- 
pin), Miss Lillian Frater; Rossignol (Liszt), Miss El- 
len Swayne; Waltzes (Granados), Staccato Etude 
(Rubinstein), Miss Elwin Calberg; Intermezzo (Les- 
chetizky), Valse Triste (Sibelius), Ballade (Chopin), 
Miss Josephine La C. Neilson; Novelette (Schumann), 
Intermezzo Orientale (Rogers), Polonaise (MacDow- 
ell), Miss Audrey Beer; Fantasie (Mozart), Miss Es- 
ther Hjelte; Polonaise (Chcpin), Miss Clare Lenfesty; 
Berceuse (Chopin), Campanula (Liszt), Caprice Espag- 
nol (Moszkowski), Miss Ethel Denny. 



ETHEL GERTRUDE CANNON 




ARTIST-STUDENTS' PIANO COURSE 



HIGH LIGHTS IN MRS. CANNON'S 
PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUCTION 



A TALENT FOR MANUAL DEXTERITY ALONE DOES NOT 
LEND ITSELF TO THE EXPRESSION OF REAL ART FORMS, 
AND IS AS UNSATISFACTORY AS SHAKESPEARE MOUTHED 
BY THE UNINITIATED. 

(To be Continued Next Week.) 



FURTHER ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING STUDIO AND 
OPENING DATE WILL APPEAR LATER. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Distinguished Artists Residing in California Who are Available for Concerts During the Season 1920-1921 

Editorial Note; — The Pacilic Coast Musical Review is in a position to guarantee tlie artistic etiiciency uf the ariists represented un this page. They have established a 
reputation for themselves, partly national, partly international, through regular concert tours or by appearances in operatic organizations of recognized fame. The purpose 
of setting forth the availability of these reputed artists is to convince the California musical public that distinguished artists of equal merit to any reside In this State. 
We Intend to prove that a resident artist confers honor upon the community in which he resides. 



I Announcing the Personnel of 

I "Le Trio Louise" 

! Kajetan Attl — Bohemian Harpist 

iOtto King — Norwegian CelHst 
M. Anthony Linden — American Flutist 
Three DiNtlDKUlnhed ArtiKtn In n Unique Chnmber 
MiiHic KnMeiuble PreNeutlng VnuHiinl ProKramn 
■ mpoaalble to Hear Muiler .\ny Other Annplcea 
For DatcN and TermM .\ddreaii 

M. Anthony Linden, 457 Phelan Bldg., 
I San Francisco 

j Care of S. F. Symphony Orchestra 



OLGA 
STEEB 

"The Genius of 
the Piano" 

Management 

CATHERINE A. 
BAMMAN 

53 West 39th, N. Y. 

Local Representative: 
C. E. HUBACH, 126 S. Rampart Blvd., Los Angeles 




Warren D. and Esther H. 

Organist A W V T^^¥ Contralto 

— ALLEN 

Joint Recitals 

AildreNNt 
Office of the OricanUt, Stanford UnlrerBlty, Calif. 

^iiniuiiiiiiiiiiuii!iiiiiiiii:iiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiimiiii:iiiiiitiiiiitiiiiii:iiiiii 




PHYLLIDA 
ASHLEY 

PIANIST 

NOW BOOKING 

SEASON 1921-1922 

HAENSEL & JONES 

Management 

Aeolian Hall 

New York City 

Personal Address: 

Wildwood Gardens, Piedmont, Calif. 



JACK HILLMAN 

BARITONE 

Just Returned From New York 
Exponent of Vocal Methods of 

CLARA NOVELLO DAVIES 

Teacher of LOUIS GRAVEURE 



PHILHARIVIONIC CONCERTS 

The two great orchestral concert events scheduled for 
the Philharmonic Orchestra of New York will draw 
thousands of music lovers to the Exposition Auditorium 
In San Francisco on Sunday afternoon, April 24th, and 
to the Greek Theatre in Berkeley on Saturday night, 
April 23rd. 

The Philharmonic is the oldest organization of its 
kind in America and the third oldest in the world. It 
was originally organized in 1842, made up to 58 musi- 
cians — 90 is the number carried on their present tour. 
The greatest crowd ever faced by the Philharmonic 
players included 12,684 at Madlsou Square Garden in 
New York. 

At both the San Francisco and Berkeley concerts 
■peclal programs will be given. The numbers will be 
directed by Stransky excepting that Hadley will con- 




M. ANTHONY 

LINDEN 



Flute Vlrtao«c» 

Principal Solo Flute S. F. 
Hvm phony Orchestra. 
Formerly Principal Solo 
Flute Minneapolis Sym- 
phony Orchestia. 
I lit hi V lu. i uiic-i'rin. Solo. Bimemblp. Obllsntu 
AVIII Afcfiit n Limited Number of Puplla 
TeriMN nnd OntcM AddreM<4. 4^7 Pbelan OMk. 
Care S. F. Sj-tnphony Orcheatra 




Povl 
Bjornskjold 

The Eminent Danish 
Dramatic Tenor 



Management Hugo Boucek, 116 39' h St., N. Y. 
Personal Address; 355 Octavia St., San Francisco 



ASONQRECITALIST 
oi^CEHUINE MERIT 



A«oH!GHWDErrH 




1U5 Glenn Aw. 

berkffl^yCal. 



1 MARION 

HVECKI 

I BARITONE 



AVAILABLE FOR 



Concert - Opera - Oratorio 



Suiter 1100 



duct his own works. The San Francisco program will 
be as tollcws: Symphony No. 5 in C minor (Beethoven); 
Prelude, Choral and Fugue (Bach); Symphonico poem 
Salome (Hadley); Tone Poem The Swan of Tuonela 
(Sibelius); Prelude to the Mastersingers (Wagner). 

The list of Berkeley works includes: Symphony No. 
4 (Tschaikowsky) ; Tone Poem Death and Transflgura- 
ti:)n (Strauss); The Culprit Fay (Hadley); Tannhauser 
Overture (Wagner). Programs of such rare and fas- 
cinating character are seldom oflfercd music lovers and 
without doubt the concerts by the Philharmonic Or- 
chestra will be triumphant affairs. The Philharmonic 
comes to California under the management of Selby 
C. Oppenheimer. 



Lincoln S. Batchelder was the soloist at the concert 
and card party given at the Masanic Temple under the 
auspices of Presidio Lodge on Wednesday evening, 
March :!Oth. He played a group of Chopin Valses and 
the Arabpsoue en forme d'elude of Leschetijsky, and 
concert etude of Rubinstein and Nocturne In D flat of 
Chopin. His numbers wore greatly appreciated by all 
those present. Mr. Balchelder also played the accom- 
paniments of Miss Jeanne Webster, who sang several 
ballads in a very pleasing manner. Both young artists 
created a very favorable impression. 

Miss Sullna Ratto, a talented young pupil of Lincoln 
S. Batchelder, appeared as soloist at the annual break- 
fast of the Vlttorla Colona Club, given at the Palace 
Hotel Saturday afternoon, April 2nd. Miss Ratto played 
the Romance c f Sibelius, Andante Finale of Leschetiz- 
sky and encore numbers In a very finished and artistic 
manner. Miss Ratto has recently appeared with great 
success before the To Kalon Club and California Club, 
reHecllng great credit upon herself and teacher. 



FRANK MOSS 

PIANIST 
Solo Ensemble Accompanist 



Manaeementt 

JESSICA COLBERT 

010 llearNt Bulldlne. Sno FronclHeo 



Constance Alexandre 

MEZZO SOPRANO 

A California artist who is recognized in 

Eastern music centers where she has 

received the commendation of press 

and public 



.\ddreSM: Paclfle Coant Mi 
801 Kohler & Chane Dtde., San 



I Review 

DCiaro, Calif. 



Lawrence jtrauss 

TENOR 

Management Jessica Colbert 

Studio: 
807 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

(Mondays and Thursdays) 



Residence Studio: 2904 Garber St., Berkeley 




BRUCE 

CAMERON 

Tenor 

Voice Culture 

Concert, Church Recital 



Soloist Third Church of Christ Scientist 

3538 Twenty-Third Street, San Francisco 

Tel. Mission 1297 

IVIanagement Leah Hopkins, 408 Stockton St. 




Mrs. 
Cecil 
Mollis 
Stone 

CONCKRT. 
ACCOMPAMST 
AND CO.\Cil 

PHONES: 

Bayvlow 107.1 

Kearny li^-ii 

Rraldrnre SIndloi 

lN.tl Ilnlboa St. 




SCHUMANN-HEINK IN KANSAS CITY 

That wonder woman among the vocalists, Ern- 
estine Schumann-Heink, who appears In Chicago for 
the first time in two years at the M"dlnah Temple on 
April 6th. sang in Kansas City on March 16th in Con- 
vention Hall before an audience of over live thousand 
people, and smashed all local records from a box office 
and capac'ty standpoint. According to a telegram re- 
ceived from the well known Western managers, Horner 
& Witte: •Madame Schumann-Heink sang last night to 
.in audlenc" of more than five thousand d >llars. Her 
voice is more beautiful than ever, her art more colossal. 
Madame sang her way Into tho heart of Kansas City 
people as never before " And SchvimannHeInk has en- 
Joyed some notable triumphs In this city. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MARJORIE RAMBEAU AT HER BEST AT CURRAN 

"The Sign on the Door" Enacted By An Excellent Com- 
pany Gives Distinguished Emotional Actress One 
of Her Greatest Opportunities 

By ALFRED iVIETZGER 

Those who mingled among tlie audience that left the 
Curran Theatre last Sunday evening after the conclu- 
sion of the opening performance of The Sign on the 
Door In which Marjorie Rambeau Interprets the leading 
role, heard but one expression of opinion, namely: "It 
Is the finest production I have seen in a long time." 
As a rule you overhear many conflicting opinions when 
mingling with the crowd leaving a theatre; but this was 
not the case in this instance. Such uniformity of opinion 
on the part of the public is the best evidence for the 
excellence of a production. 

Personally the writer thorouglily enjoyed every mo- 
ment of the play. It you are fond of quick action; it you 
revel in thrilling climaxes; if you enjoy an occasional 
surprise; if you admire the mingling of pathos and hu- 
mor, in short if you admire a genuinely human play The 
Sign on the Door will suit you from the ground up. It 
combines those elements that appeal to one who seeks 
relaxation rather than mental strain in his amusement 
hours. In a sense it is a detective story, and again it is 
a human interest story of the most attractive sort. It 
gives he various actors opportunities to reveal their 
naturalness and their unforced portrayal of living types. 
Marjorie Rambeau is at her best. This means that 
she rivets your interest from beginning to end. Her 
laughter is contagious. Her tears seem real. She lives 
the part. In addition to the unusually impressive bit of 
histrionic art which she essays IVIiss Rambeau presents 
a most charming personality, electric with youthful vi- 
tality and endearing "with an inexplicable personal 
charm. We have never witnessed the gradual architec- 
tural structure of an emotional climacteric period de- 
veloped with finer artistry nor with stronger power than 
was done by Miss Rambeau in the final act of The Sign 
on the Door. You simply cannot afford to miss attending 
this performance. 

Everyone of the performers essay their respective 
roles with intelligence, skill and conviction. Each one 
represents a living type. Hugh Dillman, Beatrice Allen, 
Petra Weston, Lee Baker, Edward Power, Robert Vivian, 
Joseph Slaytor, Roy Walling and George Roberts each 
is worthy of equal praise. There is a uniformity of ac- 
tion and a life-like unfolding of the story that cannot 
help but arouse admiration. Mr. Power's inspiring real- 
ism with which he invests the scene of his cross-exami- 
nation by the district attorney is a refined piece of act- 
ing that cannot be forgotten when once witnessed. 

The play is so well presented and so interesting that 
although it does not end until after eleven the time 
seems Incredibly short. 



FRANCES ALDA HAILED WITH ENTHUSIASM 

Noted Dramatic Soprano Electrifies Large Audience at 

Scottish Rite Auditorium With the Intensity of 

Her Art and Beauty of Her Voice 

By ALFRED METZGER 

That Frances Alda is an vocal artist of the foremost 
artistic type cannot be questioned by anyone who at- 
tended her concert at Scottish Rite Hall last Sunday 
afternoon. The fact that Alda is a singer who is able 
to make her artistic power felt was evidenced by the 
large audience that attended. Her ability to interest 
and thrill her listeners was established by the enthusi- 
asm that prevailed throughout the course of the pro- 
gram. Mme. Alda's strength lies in her fine, vigorous 
and ringing voice in the first place and her exceptional 
temperament and intelligent grasp of the compositions 
she interprets. The applause that results from her ren- 
dition of a composition is spontaneous and prolonged. 
It frequently requires the repetition of a work and oc- 
casionally there would be cause for Mme. Alda to give 
a second encore. 

That under such conditions an Alda concert is of the 
utmost artistic importance cannot be denied, and the 
•writer is glad to know that this artist is thoroughly ap- 
preciated here. Her program, while it contained some 
numbers of splendid appeal and representative charac- 
ter, was not in the strictest sense of the word a concert 
program of the most dignified dimensions. It predomi- 
nated just a bit too much in modernity and lacked some- 
what in the beauty of classic atmosphere. Nevertheless 
Mme. Alda was able to reveal her fine intensity of emo- 
tion and her flexible vocal powers. Theodore Flint proved 
an accompanist and pianist of superior accomplish- 
ments and judgment. 

The complete program was as follows: Prelude (De- 
bussy), Mr. Flint; (a) When Two that Love Are Parted 
(Secchi), (b) Nymphs and Shepherds (Purcell) (c) O 
Sleep, Why Dost Thou Leave Me? (Handel), (d) The 
Lass With the Delicate Air (Dr. Arne), Mme. Alda- (a) 
Jag letver (Swedish) (Marikanto), (b) J'ai pleure en 
?fJJ ?"^l; '9 >'^^'^'=^ Oiseaux (Hue), (d) Quand Je 
mZI 'a^",^ '; ''i °^™'" ™°5' <^™g (Rachmaninoff), 
^^t',rlt''-J''\ ?,°'°™'''= (Sibelius), (b) Marche Mili- 
R^ uiflf fp*'"^ •'^"■/u^'"''' ^"^ U° "«! di from Madame 
Butterfly (Puccmi) (by request), Mme. Alda; (a) Char- 
^LI'^Jk^,^- ""■ =""* dedicated to Mme. Alda) (Hage- 
?,n^i;'?' Mmnetonka (by request) (Lieurance) (c) The 
Singer (written for and dedicated to Mme Aldk) (Max 

ffi 'fe'l'Triil"^^" ^"^^'^ LoveTdld IHsh'FoTk 
song), (e) Ther e is no D eath (O'Hara), Mme. Alda. 

RALPH LANE MAKES WORTHY DEBUT 

Ralph Lane, a gifted young violinist, pupil of Hother 
Wismer. made his public debut at a violin recita in 
Sorosis Club Hall on Thursday evening, March 31st A 
^vi'ifht* ^"^ demonstrative audience"^ crowded evert 
available space and a number had to stand up t was S Renaud) 




Prima Donna Soprano, 

every way a triumph for pupil and teacher alike. The 
program contained some very ambitious works, among 
them Max Bruch's Violin Concerto op. 26 in G minor and 
two duets by Spohr and Wienawski. The young violin- 
ist exhibited many notable artistic traits. In the first 
place he possesses an unusually large and warm tone. 
He plays with vigor and emotional intensity, and his 
technic is already exceedingly well developed. 

His audience evidently enjoyed every number on the 
program, applauding with apparent relish and demanding 
encores not as a matter of mere courtesy, as is usually 
the case, but because everyone wanted to hear more. 
This in itself was evidence of the capability of the young 
artist. Ralph Lane and Hother Wismer played the two 
duets above referred to in a manner that enhanced the 
enjoyment of the event, and when Mr. Wismer, during 
the course of the evening, expressed his appreciation, 
and the pride which he and his pupil felt in the evident 
success they were achieving, he had everyone of the 
auditors with him. 

There is no question in anyone's mind but that young 
Lane is headed for a brilliant career. He possesses the 
necessary artistic and technical qualifications and is 
under the best of training. The complete program was 
as follows: Violin Soli (a) Call of the Plains (Rubin 
Goldmark), (b) Snake Dance (Cecil Burleigh), (c) Chan- 
son-Meditation (Cottenet); Violin Concerto Op. 26 in G 
Minor (Max Bruch), Ralph Lane; Violin Duets— An- 
dante in E flat Op. 39 (Spohr), Andante in E flat Op. 18 
(Wieniawski), Hother Wismer and Ralph Lane; Violin 
Soli— Ave Maria (Schubert- Wilhelmj), Spanish Dance 
(Granados-Kreisler), On Wings of Song (Mendelssohn- 
Achron), Nocturne (Chopin-Auer). 

STANFORD UNIVERSITY ORGAN RECITALS 

The recitalist at the Stanford Memorial Church on 
Sunday afternoon, April 10th, will be Eugene Field Mus- 
ser, organist at the College of the Pacific, San Jose. Mr 
Allen, who is the organist will be in Fresno opening a 
new organ in the Christian Science Church. Mr Mus- 
ser's program for the tour o'clock recital will be an- 
nounced later in the week. Mr. Allen will play on Tues- 
day and Thursday as follows: 

,„T"®^i^^' ■^P''" 12th— Sonata in the Style of Handel 
(Wm Wolstenholme) ; Evening Song (Schumann); Can- 
zonetta (DAmbrosio); Barcarolle (Arensky) ; Final— 
, ,?J'' i''°°' "'^ ^"^ S""e (Boellmann). Thursday, April 
Uth— Toccata in D minor (Bach); Andante from the 5th 
Symphony (Beethoven); Adagletto from the Suite 
Larlesienne (Bizot). arranged by Herbert A. Fricker: 
B«nl °,is^° "'■'"^ ^^ '=^°°''' '^^"^ Choeur (Albert 



ISth of April 

JACK HILLMAN ENDORSED BY EASTERN 
TEACHERS 

One of our young California artists has just returned 
from an extensive visit in New York. Jack Hillman, 
whose lovely voice and delightful artistry has given all 
who have heard him an unusual amount of pleasure, has 
been in the Eastern musical metropolis for the past 
eight months, where he has been studying with Clara 
Novello Davies, teacher of Louis Graveure. Mr. Hillman 
also did some excellent work with Walter Golde, the 
eminent pianist and coach, who has accompanied sev- 
eral of the world's greatest artists. The following let- 
ters show the esteem in which Mr. Hillman was held 
by his teachers: 

"My Dear Mr. Hillman: — I have great pleasure in 
stating that I consider you a most competent teacher 
of my method; not only are you a capable exponent 
but you have an exceptional gift for imparting which is 
rare. Those who will be able to place themselves under 
your guidance will be fortunate indeed. 
Yours very sincerely, 

CLARA NOVELLO DAVIES." 

Mr. Golde wrote the following letter to Mr. Hillman: 

"My Dear Mr. Hillman: — I would like to take this 
opportunity to express my appreciation of your work 
with me this season. You have a real singer's instinct; 
you have a mind extremely receptive to new ideas and 
you easily absorb them. Such Innate qualifications, to- 
together with the quality of your voice, serve as a fine 
foundation for rapid progress toward the goal of per- 
fection which all serious-minded artists like you crave. 
I sincerely hope that the principles of style which we 
evolved together will prove in good stead to you both 
in your concert work and in your teaching. With best 
wishes for your success, 

I am, yours very sincerely, 

WALTER GOLDE." 

Mr. Hillman will be found every Tuesday and Friday 
in his new handsomely appointed studio in the Heine 
Building, 408 Stockton street, Suite 803. 



Johanna Kristoffy 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




Louis Graveure, on California Links. San Francisco 



Graveure 

Pacific Coast Tour 

will open 

December 15th 



and include 



California, Oregon 
and Washington 



For Dates and Terms 

W. H. C. BURNETT 

626 Ford Building Detroit, Mich. 




PERCY RECTOR STEPHENS 

Second and Last San Francisco Season 

Seven Weeks — June 27 to August 10 

1921 



I 



This summer will be the last opportunity of study with Mr. 
Stephens on the Pacific Coast, as he will conduct master classes 
in the Chicago Musical College during the summers of 1922, 
1923 and 1924. Application can be made for Pacific Coast 
enrollment with B. J. Parker, 47 West 72nd Street, New 
York. After June 1st, Kohlcr & Chase Bldg., San Francisco. 

By special arrangement of William Frederick Gaskins, Di- 
rector of Music, Oregon Agricultural College, Mr. Stephens 
will conduct classes in Portland, Oregon, for four weeks, 
August IS to September 10. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



TWO GREAT ARTISTS HONORED BY SIR HENRY 

Red Room of Bohemian Club the Scene of Most Enjoya- 
ble Luncheon — Table Decorations Emblematic of 
Eastertide and Most Original 

The entertainment of distingulslied visiting artists 
by Sir Henry Heyman, our dean of violinists, Is a tra- 
dition in San Francisco. Tiiis pleasurable duty has 
been assumed by him for so many years that it would 
be difficult 10 estimate its part in building up the city's 
musical reputation. In earlier times, when great artists 
looked with distaste, or dread, on the long and tedious 
Journey across dusty desert to the Coast, the glowing 
accounts of the hospitality and warmth of the dwellers 
by the Golden Gale induced them to return and to 
persuade others to malie the trip. This hospitality and 
warmth was more than the applause o£ packed halls. 
It was direct and personal. The absent artist recalled 
the banquet table laden with gOud cheer and sur- 
rounded by good fellows endi^wed with precious gifts of 
mind and heart. And among these sympathetic and gen- 
ial souls, he recalled at the table's head the charming 
personal.ty and kindly figure of Sir Henry, ever after- 
ward a friend to hold. 

At such a table, Sir Henry as usual playing the gen- 
erous host, Emilio de Gogjrza and Mischa Levitzki were 
guests of honor on March 26th, the Saturday preceding 
Easter. It was an elaborate luncheon in the famous red 
room of the Bohemian Club. Being a loyal Bohemian 
since early manhood, Sir Henry always entertains at 
the club, of which he is an honorary life member. 

The setting of the table suggested Spring, Easter 
and Bohemia. Gorgeous branches of cherry and plum 
trees, clustered with red and white blossoms, repre- 
senting Spring, were spread on the spacious oval table. 
A iaige white owl, in the center, symbolized Bohemia, 
and about the owl lay a large assortment of colored 
eggs surrounded by tiny yellow chicks, little white 
bunnies and baby owls, anticipating the Easter morrow. 
One of the little chicks was perched on the owl's 
shoulder. The table decorations Impressed as exceed- 
ingly beautiful and distinctively original. Further in 
keeping with Easter were the Easter place cards at the 
plates. 

Emilio de Gogorza, as a friend of many years' stand- 
ing, sat at Sir Henry's right, and at the left Mischa 
Levitzki — the greatest concert baritone and the young 
genius of the piano. "It is. as some of you know," be- 
gan Sir Henry after the guests were seated, "my cus- 
tom always to greet my guests with a few words just 
before the feast begins. I do this because my distin- 
guished friend, Saint-Saens, once told me that speech- 
making interferes with one's digestion. I know it inter- 
feres with mine, and I do not wish it to interfere with 
yours. Therefore do not be alarmed, for I shall be brief. 
I desire to give you all a hearty welcome, and to my 
two distinguished guests of honor I beg to extend the 
very heartiest welcome of which I am capable. I am 
proud and happy to enjoy the good fortune of having 
myself surrounded with such a representative gather- 
ing as my guests, to pay tribute to two men so eminent 
in their respective branches of musical art. Emilio de 
Gogorza has delighted us in San Francisco by his mar- 
vellous vocal artistry many times. We all love him for 
his great gifts, his beautiful voice, his sound musician- 
ship, his vocal mastery, He is indeed a master singer, 
one who by his wonderful natural gifts and art com- 
pels unstinted admiration; a man of great culture and 
reflnement and as a gentleman of the highest type, I 
respect and honor him. Facile princeps' he is the most 
distinguished baritone on the concert stage today." 

Placing his hand on Levitzki's shoulder in a fatherly 
sort Lf way, the genial host continued; "Mr. Levitzki, 
as you all know, is considered not only the very great- 
est of the younger pianists but already ranks among 
the real heroes of the pianistic world, and as the older 
ones pass on, he will surely some day be proclaimed 
the master of masters of the pianoforte. Personally — 
as you can see for yourselves— he is a most charming 
and refined young gentleman, and his personality re- 
flects much Joy and sunshine. Nothing gives me greater 
pleasure than to have so many of my good friends gath- 
ered about me. I am especially happy today that we are 
assembled in this beautiful, red room so reminiscent 
of great artists and happy hours." 

In conclusion Sir Henry requested all to rise and Join 
with him in drinking to the continued good health, hap- 
piness and general welfare of his two distinguished 
guests of honor — Emilio de Gcgorza and Mischa Levitzki. 

Later on Sir Henry arose to propose a toast to a 
"most distinguished artist and beautiful woman" — 
.Madame de Gogorza, formerly Madame Emma Eames. 
Mr. de Gogorza was requested to convey greetings of 
remembrance and admiration to her. 

Anthony Linden, solo flutist of the Symphony Or- 
chestra, who has quite recently been elected a member 
of the Bohemian Club, made his artistic debut in the 
club on this occasion, and by his playing of two very 
elaborate flute solos created a veritable sensation, prov- 
ing himself to be a virtuoso of the very first rank. 
Kajetan Attl offered two brilliant harp solos, which 
gained for him new laurels and confirmed the opinion 
of all that he is the greatest harp virtuoso in the United 
States — or, as one of the guests expressed himself, "the 
harp virtuoso de luxe." The vocalists who contributed 
to this unique luncheon were Harry Robertson, whose 
sweet tenor voice always charms, the popular basso, 
Austin W. Sperry, and Bohemia's favorite tenor, the 
gifted Charles F. Bulotti, while that master accompan- 
ist, Uda Waldrop, presided at the piano. 

Edward F. O'Day paid a beautiful tribute to the visi- 
tors by describing the emotions of one who, untrained 
in music, rested under the spell of its interpreters. His 
short speech, eloquent and witty, was greatly enjoyed. 

By way of broad humor, Joseph S. Thompson gave a 
discourse with pedagogical gravity supported by "au- 



thorities," on the "pBycho-analysla of the faulty dis- 
placement of the epiglottis in singing," and "the de- 
vitalization of the weight touch in piano playing," the 
first aimed at Mr. do Gogorza, the second at Mr. 
Levitzki. 

Beautiful and exceedingly impressive remarks were 
made by former Bohemian president Frank P. Deering, 
tlie club's most distinguished orator. As a finale that 
really great tenor, Mackenzie Gordon, Bohemia's Ca- 
ruso, in glorious voice, assisted by Austin Sperry and 
Charles Bulotti, gave an imitation of Italian street 
singers in Neapolitan songs, done in true Italian spirit 
with humorous exaggeration of Italian peculiarities, yet 
marvellous and thrilling singing. 

The guests who enjoyed the hospitality of Sir Henry 
were; Emilio de Gogorza, Mischa Levitzki, Frank P. 
Deering, George F. Richardson, Haig Patigian, presi- 
dent of the Bohemian Club; Edward F. O'Day, John B. 
Farish, John C. Manning, Austin W. Sperry, Alfred 
Metzger, F. A. Denicke, Robert S. Moore, Dr. Tiieodore 
Rethers, Herbert Thompson, Mackenzie Gordon, Kaje- 
tan Attl, Charles Bulotti, Joseph S. Thompson, Fred L. 
Button, Uda Waldrop, Anthony Linden, Horace H. Mil- 
ler, L. F. Schneider, Domenico Brescia and Harry Rob- 
ertson. 

Just a day previous to the luncheon Sir Henry, de- 
scribed as a genius for frieidship, entertained Pader- 
ewski during the four hours that this great artist- 
statesman spent in San Francisco on his way to his 
ranch at Paso Robles, to which Sir Henry has been in- 
vited. Sir Henry also entertained his old friend, Josef 
H.,fmann, during his recent visit liere. 



Harold Bauer, world-famous pianist, will give a series 
of ten classes for the study of the piano which will take 
place during the five weeks commencing May 11th. 
These classes will be given at the Institute of Musical 
Art, New York City. 

Mrs. Alfred W. Hilback, soprano, Mrs. Alexander Gut- 
man, pianist, assisted by Owen A. Troy, violinist, and 
Verne W. Thomp,son, pianist, rendered a most interest- 
ing musical program at tlie Pacific Union College 
Chapel at St. Helena, Napa County, on Saturday eve- 
ning, March 26th. A large audience gathered to hear 
these delightful artists whose splendid work was ap- 
preciated by the musical people of that entire territory. 

Madame Rose Relda Cailleau gave her usual monthly 
pupil recitel at her studio, 3107 Washington street, on 
Saturday afterncon, April 2nd. Fifteen young vocal 
scholars rendered a very lovely program and were 
heard by their relatives and friends who were bidden 
to the unusually interesting affair. The following sing- 
ers participated; Miss Marcelle Lehmann, Miss Eliza- 
beth Magee, Miss Madeline O'Brien, Mrs. Jack Golden, 
Miss Blanche Kollman, Miss Margaret Mack, Miss 
Myrell Rosenthal, Martin O'Brien, Miss Miriam Healy, 
Miss Ruby Hale, Miss Helen Mauser, Mrs. Carolyn 
Graham, Miss Margaret O'Brien, Miss Corinne Keefer 
and Mrs. Benjamin Williams. 

The Pacific Musical Society are offering two unusual 
programs for their April concerts. The first recital will 
take place on Thursday evening, April 14th, in the 
Ballroom of the Fairmont Hotel, and will be rendered 
by Esther Deininger, pianist; Pauline Dreusike, so- 
prano, with Mrs. William Ritter at the piano; John B. 
Siefert, tenor, accompanied by Mrs. Lola Gwin Smale. 
The Mozart D minor concerto will be interpreted by 
Mrs. David Hirschler, pianist. Miss Jo'Sephine Holub, 
Mrs. Charles de Young Elkus, Mrs. John W. Winkler, 
Mrs. W. C. EldenmuUer, Jr., violinists. Miss Edna Cad- 
walader, violist. Miss Margaret Avery, cellist, Mrs. J. 
H. Boedler, contrabass, and Henri E. Salz at the har- 
monium. The concert for the following meeting, which 
is scheduled to take place at the Fairmont Hotel on 
April 2Sth, will be interpreted by Margaret Jarman 
Cheeseman, mezzo-soprano, with Mrs. Frederick Crowe 
at the piano. Brooks Parker, flutist, Caesar Addimando, 
oboist, Chester Hazlett, clarinetist, with Mrs. Peter J. 
Morch at the piano. Saturday afterncon, April 9th, in 
the Redroom of the Fairmont Hotel, the members of 
the Junior Auxiliary will render a program, to which 
all members are cordially invited. 



RAILROAD SHOPMiEN AS MUSICIANS 

By Alexander Stewart 

An outgrowth of wartime music in the industrials that 
is still being carried on with conSipicuous success is the 
musical activity among the employes in the shops of 
the Southern Pacific Railway at Sacramento, Cal. These 
shops have a uniformed band of thirty-eight players and 
a glee club of forty-flve. Both organizations are under 
one director, J. E. Weida, foreman of Local Machine 
Shop No. 1, who serves as musical director without pay. 

The band members all own their own instruments. 
The uniforms were secured through the proceeds of a 
ball and other entertainments organized by a committee 
chosen from among the workmen. The band has a musi- 
cal library that represents an outlay of $2000. It contains 
the cream of standard compositions suitable for band, 
as well as some of the lighter music. 

The glee club received its real start during the war 
period. The formation of it was entirelly voluntary, 
through the gathering together of a number of the men 
at the noon-hour to rehearse the war songs which were 
to be sung at shop meetings in the interest of the Lib- 
erty Loan sale. As the numbers increased, the singers 
offered their services to those in charge of the drives 
in the city. Later they were duly organized under the 
name of the S. P. Glee Club. The uniforms for the club 
were purchased at an expense of about $1300 through 
a number of minstrel performances given by the club. 



Funds tor the respective organlzallonH aro now provided 
through an annual ball arranged by the band and a 
minstrel show by the glee club. The glee club also makes 
a moderate charge for providing entertainment at lodge 
banquets and other private occasions. For civic bene- 
flls, however, both organizations have always contrib- 
uted their services. 

tiuring one of the war drives the band played twenty- 
seven different engagements, while the glee club sang 
almost an equal number. A special train was run out 
of Sacramento on two occasions carrying the band and 
glee club and a corps of speakers in the interest of the 
Liberty Loan. Although the territory through which 
these trains passed was said lo have subscribed its full 
quota, over a half-million dollars in subscrlpti .ns was 
taken on the trip. On such occasions the members of 
both band and glee club were allowed their regular pay 
Just as if they had been employed at their occupations 
in the shops. The railroad company provided the spe- 
cial trains on such occasions, but has made no expen- 
ditures cf noney or donations toward the maintenance 
of either organization. 

The glee club has acquired a varied repertoire, and 
it sings all of its music from memory. Instant approval 
was won by the glee club's Christmas carol singing, 
and it has now been made an annual custom. The plan 
was as follows: On Christmas morning at five o'clock 
the group of singers, in automobiles furnished by va- 
rious club members, made the rounds of the hospitals, 
the city and county Jails, houses of city ofRcials, rail- 
road officials and to the homes of shop employes who 
had been ill. Once this custom had been inaugurated, 
the club began to receive inquiries long before the suc- 
ceeding Christmas. These came from hospitals, orphan- 
ages and other institutions, the directors of which de- 
sired to have coffee and food ready for the carolers on 
their early morning rounds. 

The two organizations recently functioned with credit 
at the reception to General Pershing and his staff at 
the state armory in Sacramento, where they alternated 
in furnishing musica". numbers. Last Novembeer the glee 
club gave a concert In the open air Greek Theatre at 
Berkeley. 

Last December the band and glee club, backed by 
the Sacramento Union, launched a drive for funds to 
assist the Salvation Army in its work in the city. For 
six nights either the band or the glee club or both made 
the rounds of hotels, motion picture houses or anywhere 
else where people were congregated. In the six days a 
total of $3200 was received, while more contributions 
came later by mail. Sometime afterward a coffee house 
was opened by the Salvation Army with the aid of this 
fund. The new coffee house ministers to the needs of 
many unfortunates and temporary relief is also given 
to families through this fund. The two organizations 
have also expressed their willingness to assist in the 
broad community music development in Sacramento 
under the auspices of Community Service, including the 
Music Week plan in May. 



LEVITZKI YOUNG GENIUS OF THE KEYBOARD 

Magic Playing of Young Russian Virtuoso Again De- 
lights an Appreciative Audience at His 
Second Local Appearance 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

After the sensational success which Mischa Levitzki 
enjoyed at his first crowded concert here I felt assured 
that he would also appear before a capacity audience 
at his second recital which took place at the Columbia 
Theatre, Sunday afternoon, March 3rd. Perhaps it was 
the Spring weather which took so many people out of 
town, which prevented every seat from being filled. 
It seems to me that there are many beautiful Spring 
days coming in which to revel in the country, while 
a pianist and a musician such as Mischa Levitzki 
comes but only too seldom. Somehow I did not note 
the same familiar faces in tlie audience which one 
becomes accustomed to seeing at different recitals dur- 
ing the season. Is the interest of our resident pianists 
and other musicians beginning to diminish that they 
can afford to let such an artist as Mr. Levitzlti pass 
through San Francisco without liearing him? And 
where are the young students who did not thinlt him 
worth while hearing? If the pupils themselves haven't 
the inclination to attend every concert given by a great 
artist, it is up to their instructors to arouse their inter- 
est and enthusiasm to want to hear these masters. 
Surely, these students would have come away from the 
Levitzki recital very much the wiser for having heard 
him. He has much to give and he gave it in a masterly 
manner. 

Nothing could have been more beautiful than the 
Waldstein Sonata of Beethoven as played by Mr. Le- 
vitzki. It was true in its sentimental interpretation, 
accurate in its most difficult technicalities, which gave 
him full sway to exploit his fine sense of rhythms and 
his brilliant tone. Mr. Levitzki chose an exquisite set 
of Chopin numbers for his second group and played 
them in such a manner that will not easily be wiped 
out of one's mind. These he interpreted with a great 
amount of charm and poetry but avoided being over 
sentimental, which is a grievous fault of many young 
pianists when trying to express the works of Chopin. 
One cannot imagine a more intellectual musician or 
a more polished stylist than is Mr. Levitzki or one 
who is better qualified temperamentally as well as ar- 
tistically to interpret the master works of this com- 
poser. The other numbers on the program included 
works of Liszt and two numbers from Levitzki's own 
pen, which won hearty appreciation and which proved 
intensely interesting. Mr. Levitzki appeared In San 
Francisco under the management of Selby C. Oppen- 
heimer. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



FOLKS NBKD A LOT OF LOVINGi by K. A. Glen 

MV LUV IS LIKl!: A RED, KKD ROSE!: by C. Uloom 

Two Xcw Soneii fop Medium Voirr 

ongs that have that human appeal that finds an Instan 



the hu 



I'ubllshed by Clayt 



F. Su 



Co., 




The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO RANK) COMMHRCIAL 

SZe CnllCornla Street. San Franclaco, Cat. 

Member of the Federal Renerie Syntem 

Member of the Aaaoclated Sa%'inK« Baoka of San PrancUco 

MISSION RRANCH, Miaalon and 21at Streeta 

PARK-PIIKSIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH. Clement and 7tta Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH. HalKht and Belvedere Streela 

DECEMBER Slat, 1920 

Assets _ 96ft,ft7N,147.01 

Deposits 0(l.:t.1N,l 47.01 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1.mM>,noo.OO 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,540.000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 343.330,85 

OFFICERS — JOHN A. BUCK. President; GEO. TOURNT. Vice-President and 
Manager; A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-President and Cashier; E. T, KRUSE. Vloe- 
President; A. II. MULLER, Secretary; WM. D. NEWHOUSE, A-ssistant Secretary; 
■WILLIAM HERRMANN, GEO. SCHAMMEL, G. A. BELCHER. R. A. LAUENSTEIN, 
Assistant Cashiers; C. W. HETER, Manager Mission Branch; W. C. HEYER, 
Manager Park-Presldio District Branrh; O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Haight Street 
Branch; GOODPELLOW. EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorneys. 

BOARD <>F DIRECTORS — JOHN A. BUCK, GEO. TOURNY, E. T. KRUSE. 
A. H. R. SCHMIDT, I. N. WALTER. HUGH GOODFELLOW, A. HAAS, E. N. 
VAN BERGEN, ROBERT DOLLAR. E. A. CHRISTENSON, L. S. SHERMAN. 



MARION H. BROWER AT CALIFORNIA 

Once again the California Theatre has 
selected a resident artist as the .soloist 
with Herman Heller and the California 
orchestra. This time Marion Hovey 
Brower will be the soloist, and she will 
make her arpearance tomorrow morning 
at the Fourth Grand Sunday morning 
concert of the present season. Miss 
Brower will sing Visi D'Arte, from Puc- 
cini's La Tosca. 

Miss Brower is a dramatic soprano 
and, on the few occasions she has been 
heard locally, has made a very favorable 
impression. She has unusual range of 
voice, is sympathetic in her style and 
possesses a very pleasing charm of per- 
son. She recently appeared at the Greek 
Theatre in Berkeley and at the Fairmont 
Hotel. 

Herman Heller and the California or- 
chestra will be herird in four numbers, 
as follows : Sounds of Peace (March) by 
Von Blon, Blue Danube (Waltz) by 
Strauss, IVladame Butterfly (Selection) 
by Puccini and The Flying Dutchman 



M. ANTHONY LINDEN 

PASIOUS FLVTE VIRTUOSO 

Now Conducting His Artist Ensemble In a 
Series of Entre Acte Concerts at the 



Dr. Maxim De Grosz 

Musical Director 
1108 Fulton St. Ph. Fillmore 2869 



ADCLE UCMAN 

Pupil of Mme r.iacomo Mini<owFky will 
a-ccpt a limited number of pupils for 



(Overture) by Wagner. Leslie V. Harvey, 
California's organist, will render Wag- 
ner's Traume as an organ solo. 



BETHLEHEM CHOIR IN NEW YORK 

Bethlehem, Pa., April 2. — Three hun- 
dred members of the Bach Choir of Beth- 
lehem left on a special train this morn- 
ing for New York City to take part in 
the program this afternoon of the Ora- 
torio Society of New York in the Manhat- 
tan Opera House. The Bach Choir, 
which has been termed "tlie best choir 
in the United States," will sing four 
Bach chorales and two choruses of the 
B Minor Mass, under Dr. J. Fred WoUe, 
conductor. The expenses of tlie trip are 
borne by Charles M. Schwab, who was 
recently elected President of the Choir. 
The Choir will give the sixteenth Bach 
Festival at Lehigh University on May 
27th and 28th. 



ALCAZAR 



Belasco & Mayer of the Alcazar Thea- 
tre make the announcement that begin- 
ning this dale Nancy Fair will be starred 
in all future productions. A new contract 
has been ."iigned between the Alcazar anfl 
this popular leading lady to this effect. 
"Three Faces East" from the pen of An- 
thrny Paul Kelly, the well known author, 
will be the attraction for next week, com- 
mencing with the Sunday matinee. It was 
produced last season with great success 
by Cohan & Harris. The piece is full of 
trnse and exciting moments dealing with 
the inner workings (if tlie English and 
German Secret Service Bureau. Mi.-s Fair 
will play the part of Htlene of the Ger- 
man Intell'gence office, (he Violet Hem- 
ing part of the original production, "Clar- 
ence." this week's attraction. Is adding 
laurels to the Alcazir's long Iht of suc- 
cesses, besides giving Dudl-y Ayres the 
rorular leading n'an, an opportunltv of 
which he takrs full advantage There 
will be the regular Thursday and Satur- 
day matinees. 



Another 

Metropolitan Star 

Endorses SOLOELLE 




Jomelli 



Formerly leading soprano of the Metro- 
politan Opera Company, Covent Garden, 
London and Royal Opera Company of 
Paris and Brussels — an internationally 
recognized vocal instructor 

Writes of the 



SOLOELLE 

The Tone-Coloring Solo Player-Piano 



The Soloelle — a most magnificent and artistic instrument 
—a player piano that really permits those ■who have a love 
of music in the heart to produce music that is honestly 
artistic and colorful—a player piano that gives the singer 
a skilled accompanist at heme." ^^-^ •/ 



The Soloelle enables you to put into music your own individu- 
ality — your own soul. 

The music produced by the Soloelle is far superior to any music 
produced by any other player piano— it is without parallel— it 
is the only player piano pronounced a super-instrument by 
great singers and musicians. 

Hear and play the Soloelle be/ore you buy ANY Player 
Piano. 

Price, $740 to $1650 
Convenient terms Other instruments in exchange 




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San Francisco San Francisco Oakland 

321 Sixth Street 121 N. 1st Street 

Richmond San Jose 



Exclusive Knabe Dealers 



Licensed Soloelle Dealers 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Week's Music Events in Los Angeles 

By BRUNO DAVID USSHER 



Los Angeles, April 4tli, 1921— It may well be doubted 
as to whether Maestro Rothwell and the Philharmonic 
orchestra ever gave greater enjoyment to their audi- 
ence than last Friday. Also it would seem that there 
never was such a wide-awalte, enthusiastic gathering 
at any previous afternoon concert by the orchestra, 
and that "in spite" of Beethoven. Perhaps we have 
never heard Beethoven's Seventh Symphony as it was 
rendered yesterday. Certainly, Mr. Rothwell surpassed 
himself as a Beethoven exponent. His interpretation 
was compelling, specially during the second and fourth 
movements. It was an intensely human Beethoven, un- 
flavored with conductorial antics, true in style and 
phrasing. Indeed, IMr. Rothwell's interpretation was 
great through the utter absence of any element alien 
to the work. He is one of those conductors who let the 
work dominate the interpretation and not vice versa. 
This is an ideal attitude. Dynamically the performance 
was given with great reverence tor the character of the 
work. Mr. Rothwell at no time permitted himself to 
indulge in undue fortissimo effects, though Beethoven's 
fondness of strong contrasts in this work might easily 
have led to them. The work of the orchestra had color, 
but it suggested more the effect of exquisite tonal 
threading and weaving than painting, beautifully clear 
also during the fughetta and the last movement. 

The symphony was presented like a piece of marvel- 
ous old-fashioned lace, its silken threads still strong, 
still telling a tale of buoyant, grand joys and solemn 
moments of love and resignation. This lace-work effect 
was the result of remarkable ensemble relation among 
the various instrumental sections, of whom the wood- 
wind group excelled during the symphony. The violas 
and cellos, too, stood out sympathetically in the March 
movement. 

Margaret Matzenauer, contralto of extraordinary 
vocal means, was a superb soloist. Of range, her voice is 
clear and colorful in the headtones, as it has organ-like 
richness in the lower register. Endearing in the lovely 
Schumann and Brahms songs, she was dramatically 
eloquent in Schubert's "Erlking" and inspiring, over- 
awing in Isolde's Love Death from Wagner's Tristan 
and Isolde. Mme. Matzenauer cast a spell over her listen- 
ers through the beauty of her notes and the irresistible 
charm of her expression. 

The magic of her art was glorious in the Lovedeath. 
It conveyed a spiritual element which also lifted con- 
ductor and orchestra to great power of declamation. 
Los Angeles indeed was fortunate to hear this Wagneri- 
an excerpt in the operatic version and with a singer of 
such renowned Wagnerian training. Unfortunately some 
of the translations used in the vocal numbers were dis- 
tracting in sense and so cumbersome that they impaired 
phrasing and clarity of her diction. 

Les Preludes by Liszt was the closing number of the 
concert. The violins, celli and brass sounded well, while 
Mr. Rothwell imbued the performance with a forceful- 
ness and grandeur that made it memorable. 

The Philharmonic Orchestra is getting its travel- 
ling kit ready. The organization will go on a tour the 
latter part of this month and will be absent until the 
early part of June. Thirty-four cities in ten states are 
to be visited. The tour will extend east as far as Denver 
and north into Canada to Vancouver. A more complete 
outline of the first Annual Spring-toiir — for this is the 
beginning of regular annual tours which are to extend 
from year to year, will be found in this column shortly. 
Next year the orchestra, it is planned, will travel at 
least as far as Chicago with New Orleans as the south- 
most point. This week the Philharmonic Orchestra 
plays in San Diego, Pullerton, Ventura and Pasadena. 

On Sunday the regular Popular Program will be play- 
ed here. No doubt, it will prove popular with the 
Tschaikowsky Symphony Pathetique, March Slave and 
the Roccoco Variations on the same program. Ilya Bron- 
son, the excellent solo-cellist of the orchestra will play 
the Variations. He has met with distinguished success 
in this solo-part before, so that much may be expected 
from him. 

Following a "tradition" the last double concert of the 
Friday and Saturday series, on the 15th and 16th, will 
not include a soloist Three of the four numbers how- 
ever are new on the programs of the orchestra, while 
one, the Mahler, has never been given here before. The 
program reads: Overture Magic Piute (Mozart); Suite 
No. 2 Indian, Op. 4S (MacDowell) ; Adagietto from the 
Fifth Symphony (Mahler) ; Caprice Espagnole (Rimsky- 
Korsakow). The orchestra season will close with a 
Request Program on the 23d, the date of the 12th Pop- 
ular Sunday Concert. 

A century and a half of piano music was cleverly em- 
bodied in Olga Steeb's second piano program at the 
Ebell clubhouse. It revealed her as conversant with 
Mozart as with music of modern Spain. There is noth- 
ing of the "make believe" kind about Miss Steeb's play- 
ing. Obviously she makes it a duty for herself to 
establish the bona fide nature of her musicianship at the 
beginning of every program by playing one or two 
works of strictly classic style. Seemingly she enjoys 
doing so. Her Mendelssohn playing in the E minor Pre- 
lude and Fugue was lovely and decisive. Miss Steeb's 
Mozart style is most happy. It offers gracefulness of 
phrasing with a tempered briskness. There is a beauti- 
ful, pronounced legato. Her Mozart reading has color 
and temperament. Technically it spells musical ele- 
gance. In the Mendelssohn D minor Scherzo lightness of 
touch and mirth of phrasing called up the vivacious 



spirit of Puck from Midsummer Night's Dream. Then 
followed two groups of shorter works by Chopin, Men- 
delssohn, Brahms, MacFayden, Albeniz and Debussy 
which were rendered with a facility akin only to a 
born pianist. The Blue Danube paraphrase formed a 
brilliant request finale. 

Alfred Cortot, French pianist, played duets with him- 
self and later sat at one piano and watched another do 
a recording of the work of his remarkably facile fingers 
Friday night at Philharmonic auditorium at his joint 
concert with the Duo-Art reproducing piano sponsored 
by the George Birkel Music Company. Mr. Cortot is 
one of the greatest pianists heard on the coast and his 
own work, so technically stupendous, warm and color- 
ful and superb in interpretation, was augmented in high 
degree by the uncanny reproductions made by the 
Duo-Art. 

The reproductions were not mere mechanical sound- 
ings of hands playing thrills and crescendos, but were 
true pictures of mood and paintings of style. As to 
certain mannerisms of fingering, these, too, were re- 
corded with exact finesse. In tlie Polonaise (Chopin) the 
Duo-Art played a reproduction of Mr. Cortot's playing 
while he accompanied with the orchestral part at sec- 
ond piano. Exactness of tempo, phrasing, tone quality 
and technical form were observed, and the same was 
true where Mr. Cortot alternated with his own playing 
the recorded playing of the Liszt Rhapsodie Hongroies. 

It was a masterly performance of the Etude em Forme 
de Valse (Saint-Saens) which Mr. Cortot played in 
person, followed by an absolutely true reproduction of 
the composition at the Duo-Art, with the pianist sitting 
with folded arms and swaying to the music created 
by his own rhythmic fiying finger work visible on the 
recording instrument. The program ended with Varia- 
tions on a Theme by Beethoven (Saint-Saens) for two 
pianos. 

Much of the success of the Grand Ball held by the 
local theatrical colony at the Ambassador has been 
ascribed to the manner in which the manifold threads 
were pulled that released the musical cues. This was 
done by Henry Svedorfsky, the assistant concertmaster 
of the Philharmonic Orchestra, who had full charge 
of the musical arrangements. 

A concert of great charm was given yesterday after- 
noon at the Auditorium by a number of leading artists 
who contributed their services most geneously, so that 
the receipts of the event could be turned over for edu- 
cational purposes to the Walt Whitman School. Among 
these were Dr. Ray Hastings, who gave several organ 
soli of highly pleasing character. The Trio Intime, Jay 
Plowe, flute, Ilya Bronson, cello, and Alfred Kastner, 
harp, captured their audience with the "first shot." 
They were complete victors after their third number. 
Mrs. Norman Hassler, who rendered her own accom- 
paniments, possesses a well schooled soprano of much 
charm. She had to quiet the applause with an encore. 
Alfred Kastner's exquisite harp technic roused the 
audience to great enthusiasm. The singing of the Jami- 
son Vocal Quartet, from a musical, vocal and personal 
viewpoint a genuinely sympathetic ensemble, appealed 
warmly. They too had to sing "just once more," Mrs. 
Jamison's own Mammy" Lullaby which took well. Mrs. 
Abbie Norton Jamison accompanied in that musical 
fashion which is winning and quite her own. A group 
of terpsichorean poses by the Manya Radina Dancers 
closed the program enjoyably. The general concert ar- 
rangements were in the hands of amateur-managers, 
which accounted for delays in the program and slight 
disturbances. If the artistic success was great in spite of 
this fact, with special emphasis it must he credited to 
the quality of the performers. 

Kathleen Parlow, violinist, who was the soloist Thurs- 
day night for the Ambassador concert series, bids fair 
to be a successor to Maud Powell. Not that she plays 
like the late Miss Pawell. She does not. She plays like 
Kathleen Parlow and her style is distinctly individu- 
alistic as well as her interpretations. Miss Parlow's 
work carries a broad underlying technique. Her bowing 
is superb in its assurance and clean cut application. 
She draws an enormous tone from her instrument and it 
is warm and surcharged with feeling. She is the most 
interesting violinist who has visited the city this season. 

Her work in Hymn to the Sun (Rimsky-Korsakow) 
was broad and sweeping and the Paderrewski Minuet 
was charming in execution. The Mozart Rondo showed 
formidable technique, the Chopin Nocturne was accept- 
able though the least interesting of her endeavors and 
the sarasate "Gypsies" was an exhibition of splendid 
virtuosity. Miss Lillian Backstrand, coloratura soprano, 
was a most interesting assisting artist. Miss Backstrand 
has a remarkably lovely upper voice, which is beauti- 
fully produced and shows a ciear and remarkable 
range. Her middle voice is not so pleasing, but the 
quality is there for further cultivation if the singer 
wishes. 

Her singing of the aria from La Perle du Bresil was 
beautifully done in the latter half, as soon as the singer 
recovered from nervousness. The Swedish song, Kollbri 
Visa (Hallstrom), the Norwegian number, Echo Song 
(Thrane) were things of beauty and showed her fine 
range. Miss Backstrand has much to be proud of and 
it is a pleasure to hear her work. 



SYLVAIN NOACK 

Conecrtmnater l*hllliurniuiilc Orvhealra vt Ltou Aageltm 
VM tioutb Oxford Atenue 

Limited number of pupils tor violin playing and 



CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

violin Musical Theory. Faculty Member College of 

Music 

306 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles — Wed. and Sat. 

JAY PLOWE— Solo Flutist 

Philharmonic Orchestra — ^Trio Intime 

Studio: 334 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles 

Res. Phone: 579064 

ANN THOMPSON-Piamsie 

PIANISTE TO RUTH ST. DENIS 

RecltalN — CoiicertH — InMtructlon 

801 MnJ. Thciitrc Bide., R<M>. Phone Wll»h. 751 

DAVOL SANDERS 



JOHN SMALLMAN 

Baritone Concert Cnengementit — Conductor Lob Anip^Iea 
Oratorio Society 

For information see E. M. Barger, Secretary, 330 Blanch- 
ard Hall, Los Angeles, Calif. 



HENRI de 


BUSSCHER 




HpS^^H 


Belgian Tenor 




^^Hjn p^^j^^l 


Snlo Oboe, Philharmonic 
OrchcHtra, Los AnEele« 

Teacher of 
OBOE ^ SINGING 

Coaclilng: (or 
Concert and Opera 

Stndio: 1500 S. Figneroa 
Tel. 23195 









GRAUMAN'S 

MILLION DOLLAR THEATRE 
Broadway at Third 
LOS ANGELES 

GREATER 

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

MISHA GUTERSON, CONDUCTOR 

Sunday Morning Concerts 

Every Sunday, Starting at 11 A. M. 

Soloists From Operatic and Concert Stage 

ALL SEATS RESERVED 

50 Cents 

and War Tax 

Which Includes the privilege of remaining for the 
regular Grauman Photoplay program. It is advisa- 
ble that seats be secured several days in advance 
In order to secure choice locations and avoid wait- 
ing in line on Sunday. 



EGAN SCHOOL of MUSIC and DRAMA 

Egan Little Theatre. Bldg:., Los Aneeles, California 

MUSIC DRAMA DANCING 

In all Ibelr branches 
Faculty of Teachers 
VOICE VIOLIN 

Roland Paul Madame Petschnlkoff 

Bertha Vaughan Oscar Selling 

PIANO DRAMA 

Homer Grunn Frank Egan 

Mildred Marsh Marshall Stedman 

Winifred Hooke Anton Dvorak 

Lester Gauweller Eleanor McKee Dvorak 

DANCING 
Mile. Prager Anna Dowdell 

Assistant teachers In all departments. Write for 
catalog. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

University of Sotithern California 

Distinguished Faculty — Strong Courses 

Senil for cnlaloK 



THEODORE GORDOHN'S iilli^o'r^J 

KaMeutlali* and Bxtrocts (or the Violin and Ennemble. 
Tearhera and OrcheKtra CIiimm by Apiiolntmcnt. Member 
rhllharmonlc Orcheatrn. Studlu: T>02 Majeadc Theatre. 



J. SPENSER-KELLY, Baritone 



PATRICK O'NEIL, Tenor 



Pbonei 117«5 



Brahm van den Ber^ 

Conoerl Pliinliit, no« kaaklnE for 11)21-22 
MonnKenient; France Golijwnter, 810 MaJ. Theatre, 15480 

Rosa St. Ember 

Voice Specialist — Recitala — Concert. 

Illustrated Lectures or. Voice Culture 
1029 Arlington Ave. Phone 111S4 

ILYA BRONSON 

Solo CellUt rhllharmonlc Orche.tra. Member Trio Intlme 
and Lo. AnBele. Trio. InNtractlon, Chamber 

Mnalc, Recital. 
Slodloi sets La MIrada. Phone Holl)' 3044 

ALFRED KASTNER, Harpist 

Solo Harpist Philharmonic Orchestra. Member Trio Intlme 

Recital — Instruction — Concerts 

Studio: 240 S. Gramercy Place. 660481 

Alexander Saslavsky— Violinist 

Director SnHlaYHky Chamber MumIc Society 



JAMISON VOCAL QUARTET 

Conrcrta— RocltolH— Club rroernniM — Margaret Meaaer, 



The Heartt- Dreyfus Studios 



ZOELLNER QUARTET 

.UannRemeot H. & \. Culbert.on. .teollnn Hall, New York 

SerlouB Studcnia Accented 

Peraonal Addre.a: 1250 Wlndxor Bird., Lo. AOKelea 

FLORENCE MIDDAUGH— Contralto 



AnKelCK. Studio 



100K2. Re.ldence \VII.h. 6700 



LORNA USSHER—Violiniste 



GREGORY KRESHOVER 



HELEN KLOKKE 

DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION 

CONCERTS— RECITALS— CLUB PROGRAMS 
aicement: France Goldnater, NIO MaJ. Theatre, IIMSO 

HENRY SVEDROFSKY 

IMIILIIARMONIC 



3012 South Westc 



Tuition In 
VIOLIN AND KNSE.Mni.E PLAYING 

Available for Concerts and Re 



Pho 



West 500S 



The Egan school operatic department, under the di- 
rection of Roland Paul, will present Tavallerla Rustl- 
cana Sunday afternoon. April 17. at the Egan Little 
Theatre. This Is the Initial production of a series of 
operatic performances which win be staged throughout 
the year. 



FIRST WESTERN TOURj, 

Philharmonic Orchestra 

of Los Angeles, California 

Founded by Management of 

W. A. Clark, Jr. L. E. Behymer 

Walter Henry Rothwell 

CONDUCTOR^ 

75 World-Famous Musicians Eight Distinguished Soloists 

Giving Forty Concerts in Thirty-five Cities 

Tour Starts Monday April 25th, 
ending Saturday May 28th. 





ITINERARY 




ilakrrKileld, Calif. 


Portland, Ore. 


Yakima, Wa.h. 


Uonlder, Colo. 


Kre>na, Calif. 


Taeoma, Wa.h. 


MiNHoula, Mont. 


Colorado SprlngH, Colo. 




Seattle, YVOHh. 


Deer Lodfce, Mout. 




Chlco. Calif. 


Victoria, D. C. 


Ilutte, Mont. 


Salt Lake City, Utah 




lIcllluBhnm, Waah. 


Helena, Mont. 


OKden, Utah 


KuKCue, Ore. 


Seattle, Waxh. 


nilllUBK, Mont. 


Reno, Ncv. 


Salem. Ore. 


Spokane, Wnah. 


Cheyenne, Wjo. 


San Jo«e, Calif. 


Corvallla, Ore. 


.Vberdeen, W aah. 


Ft. Colllna, Colo. 


Monrovia, Calif. 




Olynipla, Wa.h. 


Greeley, Colo. 





Offices: 521 Philharmonic Auditorium Building, Los Angeles, Calif. 



John Smallman will present in a song recital on Tues- 
day evening, April 5, at Ebell clubhouse, Miss Elsie 
Younggren, mezzo soprano, who has successfully held 
the position of soloist at the Mission Inn, at Riverside. 
Calif., tor the past four .vears, and at present soloist at 
the inn. 

Mme. Anna Ruzena Sprotte entertained the choral 
section of the Friday Morning Club with a musical at 
her home, in Seventh avenue, recently and was pre- 
sented with a hand.some baton of ivory and ebony in 
recognition of her work as conductor of the section. 
The program was given by Jack Hillman, baritone, of 
San Francisco; Myrtle Pryibil-Colby, soprano; Gertrude 
Ross, pianist, and Mme. Sprotte. 

The members of the Zoellner Quartet are again in 
Los Angeles returning the past week from a triumphant 
tour of the East and Middle West. The Zoellners have 
made a great many trans-continental tours and have 
1100 concerts as trophies of these tournees. It is not 
surprising then to know the Zoellners were acclaimed 
with enthusiasm bordering on ovation. Their success 
was so marked that reappearances were demanded and 
contracts closed for next year in Wichita, Kans., St. 
Joseph, Mo., Topeka, Kans.. Dubuque, la., Richmond, 
Ind., Detroit, Peoria, 111., which are a few of the return 
dates. They report the advance of musical understand- 
ing throughout the country as remarkable. All their con- 
certs were made on schedule time with no delays what- 
soever, though one incident was almost a near tragedy. 
Joseph Zoellner, Jr., fell in Topeka. Kansas, and for a 
few days had to use a crutch. The Zoellners will give 
a program here on April 2.')th at the Ebell Club Audi- 
torium which will be their last concert In Los Angeles 
this Season. 

Madame Estelle Heartt-Dreyfus gave a most charm- 
ing as well as interesting presentation of songs at the 
private musical held by Mrs. Albert Miller Stephens. 
The well-known contralto, accompanied by Grace An- 
drews, sang Russian, Italian, American and Spanish 
songs. Most of the latter had never been heard here 
before. Mme. Dreyfus brought them from Spain on her 
recent arrival. The singer was much acclaimed and had 
to respond with numerous encores. 

Tlie Spanish songs and dances performed at the Mis- 
sion Play in San Gabriel contain several historic Items 
of interest to musicians. 

Patrick O'Neil. Irish tenor, will sing Monday evening 
at a benefit at Knights of Columbus auditorium. Mr. 
O'Neil will be featured in Irish songs and will also sing 
two arias. 

Louise Gude, soprano, has announced a song recital 
to be given at Trinity Auditorium on May 4, in re- 
sponse to Insistenl demands from her many friends and 
admirers who feel that she has delayed her local ap- 
pearance too long. Miss Gude returned to the city of 
her birth after three years' study with Herbert Wlther- 
spoon in New York and four years study In Europe. She 



also studied opera repertoire with William Wade Hin- 
shaw, head of the American Opera company of the 
Park Theatre in New York. After a tour of the East 
and South she for a time gave up her concert work, 
but now has decided to return to the concert stage. 
She will no doubt return to New York in the tall where 
she plans to give several concerts. 

Brahm van den Bergh, the eminent pianist, gave two 
very successful concerts in La Jolla and Coronada. He 
is preparing for his third local solo recital here which 
will prove distinctly interesting, as he plans to play a 
very successful concerts in La Jolla and Coronado. He 
number of modern works, which he brought with him 
from Europe last fall. One of the larger program pieces 
will be the beautiful sonata by Leopold Godowsky, I. e., 
the one in three movements. 

Mrs. Bessie Bartlett Frankel, the well-known Presi- 
dent of the California Federation of Music Clubs, enter- 
tained Dr. Hollis Dann, the widely recognized musical 
educator for Cornell University, at her home with mem- 
bers of the Southern California Public School Music 
Teachers Association as special guests. 

Florence Middaugh, contralto, recently from New 
York, was soloist at the Sunday night concert at Hotel 
Ambassador last Sunday. Miss Middaugh has appeared 
on several programs recently and her work Is becoming 
well known. 

Raymond Harmon, tenor, was one of the programists 
at the recent dinner of the Southern California Woman's 
Press Club at Ebell clubhouse. He sang three songs by 
Charles Ferry, well-known pianist-composer, with Mr. 
Ferry at the piano. 



MOTION PICTURE MUSIC 



A "request" program which met the full demands 
of his public was given yesterday by Conductor Mlsha 
Gutcr.'ion at the Grauman Theatre. As usual there was 
a capacity audience present which greatly enjoyed the 
concert as the warm applause indicated. 

The overture Merry Wives of Windsor was played 
with romantic charm and Jocularity. Seldom has the 
Kamenoi Ostrow by Rubinstein been heard with deeper 
pathos at any of the theatre houses here. In this number 
the colli developed warm tone of sincere appeal. The 
merrier element of music was happily conveyed in the 
Strauss Waltz Vienna Life. The daintiness of Herbert's 
Badinage was equally pleasing. Premier Amour by An- 
dre Bcnolst sounded well, specially In the strings. The 
finale was sparkling in Offenbach's overture Orpheus In 
the Underworld which gave Concertniaster Jaime Over- 
ton occasion for a pleasing violin solo. Miss Madeline 
Lux. the soprano soloist, won the cordial thanks of the 
public with an aria from Massenet's Herodiade and In 
Adore and Be Still by Gounod to which Conductor Outer- 
son added attractiveness with his violin obllgalo. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



CHICAGO OPERA COMPANY'S GREATEST TOUR 

Trftvellng as live distinct companies tor transportation 
convenience, the Chicago Opora Association started 
from Now York on Sunday (March G) on a transcon- 
tinental tour of the greatest dimensions ever under- 
taken in America, following a record season of six 
weeks at tlie Manhattan Opera House in New York City. 

The 250 artists and members of the ballet, chorus, 
orchestra and staff left on two special trains, preceded 
by a special baggage train, over the Baltimore & Ohio, 
for the first stop of their two months' trek. Then they 
will visit Pittsburgh, Cleveland, Cincinnati, Tu'.sa, Dallas, 
Houston, San Antonio, El Paso, Los Angeles, San Fran- 
cisco and Denver, completing the circuit on their arrival 
In Chicago on May 2nd. 

Preparations for this tour were begun last summer, 
■when the management, foreseeing the tremendous task 
ahead, engaged Mr. B. K. Bixby, tor twenty-flve years 
with the Pennsylvania Railroad and recognized as one 
ot the foremost transportation experts in the country, 
to plan and carry out the innumerable and intricate de- 
tails of this record movement. 

His methods already have been put to the test twice, 
first in the two weeks' tour that preceded the Chicago 
engagerLent of ten weeks and then in the ordinarily 
heart-breaking job of moving the big organization (prob- 
ably the biggest ot its kind in the world) between the 
closing performance in Chicago on a Saturday night 
and the opening in New York on the following Monday. 
In both of these operations, every car was hauled ex- 
actly according to schedule and not an article was lost. 
This in itself was no mean teat, considering the num- 
ber of people and the $3,000,000 worth ot property in- 
volved. 

The company has been in New York tor six weeks, 
and in that time the final details have been worked out 
by Mr. Bixby under the direction of Miss Mary Garden, 
general director ot the association, and Mr. George 
M. Spangler, business manager. It was found that to 
prevent confusion, to facilitate loading and unloading 
and to add to the comfort of all concerned, it would 
be wise to make a unique arrangement; in other words, 
to divide the large company and its enormous equip- 
ment into units. To this end the following companies 
were formed and incorporated: 

Chicago Opera Association, George M. Spangler, man- 
ager. 

Othello Opera Co., C. A. Shaw, manager. 

Lohengrin Opera Ck)., E. K. Bixby, manager. 

Traviata Opera Co., H. W. Beatty, manager. 

Monna 'Vanna Opera Co., James O'Donnell, manager. 

While traveling together, these units wi 1 be under 
separate command, as it were, moving on a time card 
such as the operating department ot a railroad itself 
uses. The arrangements contemplate exact schedules 
after the manner ot a great shipment ot merchandise, 
except that in this case famous singers and musicians 
and costly operatic treasures are to be carried around 
the country over half a dozen railroads. 

An instance ot the emergencies that may arise came 
up here in New York during the heavy storm ot last 
week. Scenery for tie Baltimore performances was be- 
ing loaded into the biggest baggage cars the railroads 
have — 74 footers — on the Jersey side of the North River. 
Because ot the condition of traffic, it was found that 
the scenery could not be taken across the river and that 
if the cars were not brought immediately to the New 
York side, it would be impossible to open in Baltimore 
on Monday. The problem was to find a barge big enough 
to ferry the cars. Finally, the B. & O. people traced the 
largest barge on the river. The cars just went aboard, 
and that was all. On the New York side great difficulty 
was encountered in running the extra long cars on to 
the switches and then in switching the cars in the 26th 
street yards. This was accomplished only after several 
breakdowns and hours of hard labor, hut it was done. 
As each opera in the repertoire received its final per- 
formance at the Manhattan, the scenery, costumes and 
special equipment were hurried to the yards and there 
loaded, the special train awaiting its final assembling 
until the curtain descended on Carmen on Saturday 
night. Then the last ot the stage equipment, baggage, 
music, musical instruments, etc., were rushed to the 
loaders and sent to Baltimore tor the speedy dressing 
of the stage ot the Lyric Theatre in that city. 

On Sunday morning, the principals, led by Miss Gar- 
den, boarded special all-steel trains and followed, re- 
maining in Baltimore for three performances. Then 
began the real road experiences, with jumps scheduled 
).-r the middle of the night, as soon as possible after 
the curtain. At 2 a. m. on the morning of March 10th 
the five units boarded the B. & O. specials tor Pitts- 
burgh, appearing there twice. Then the New York Cen- 
tral took the organization to Cleveland. The Big Four 
took oveer the specials at Cincinnati, carrying the com- 
pany to St. Louis. stop here, made only to transfer 
to the Frisco lines, which took the Chicago Opera to 
Tulsa, Ok"a., and to Dallas, Texas. 

At Dallas, the longer jumps begin over the Southern 
Pacific, arrangements tor which already have been com- 
pleted by Mr. Bixby and P. L. Pickering, assistant gen- 
eral agent tor the railroad. Between March 23rd and 
March 2Gth, four performances will be given in Dallas, 
with an open date on Good Friday to give the artists 
and companies an opportunity to rest. March 27th will 
be spent en route to Houston, where two performances 
are scheduled. San Antonio and El Paso are next on 
the list for two operas each, atter which the Chicago 
Opera will arrive In Los Angeles for a stay of one week. 

The two following weeks will be spent in San Fran- 
cisco, where fourteen performances will be given, and 
then comes a two-day jump to Denver via Ogden on 
the Union Pacific. After a week in Denver the same 
road win carry the companies to Omaha, where the spe- 
cial trains will be switched over to the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee & St. Paul for the home run to Chicago. 



Every detail so far as possible has been worked out 
for the entire trip, down to sidings and station track- 
age. Every seat, berth and stateroom lias been as- 
signed and every member of the companies will know 
In advance his or her exact place In the various cars. 
For the entire trip seven compartment, two drawing- 
room cars and twelve section sleepers and continuous 
dining car service have been provided. 

Apart from operation details, the management has 
made every possible provision for the comfort of the 
artists in the hope that they will complete an exacting 
season with their return to Chicago on May 2nd without 
exhaustion. 



Those Interested In the work have long realized that 
while much native ability ot a high order exists in thin 
country, the chance for its full development In the 
Lnited States is practically neg.lglblo. Few agencies 
for adequate training tiie pupil in orchestral conduct- 
ing or In the higher branches of ensemble work exist 
here. In consequence America Is dependent on foreign- 
ers for most ot the important conductorships and for 
the direction of many of her greater musical activities. 
The A. O. S. hopes to aid in ameliorating this condition 
by affording a new means of developing native talent. 



AMERICAN ORCHESTRAL SOCIETY FOUNDED 

Under Sponsorship of Mrs. E. H. Harriman Educational 

Ensemble Body Is Organized to Train Efficient 

Orchestral Musicians and Conductors 

New York, March 14. — Sponsored by Mrs. E. H. Har- 
riman, the American Orchestral Society has been 
formed for the purpose ot developing musical talent in 
America through the establishment in New York of a 
central training orchestra and the formation of neigh- 
borhood musical groups working in conjunction with it, 
The project is purely educational and is not designed to 
enter the concert field or to compete with existing sym- 
phony orchestras or with the work now being done by 
institutes of music. On the contrary, the hope is ex- 
pressed by its founders that it will maintain a supply 
ot American trained musicians by providing them with 
a high type of ensemble training in orchestral work 
and an opportunity to study conducting, hitherto ob- 
tained only in foreign countries. 

Articles ot incorporation of the society have been 
approved by the Supreme Court. The directors are Mrs. 




Music Week next 



E. H. Harriman, Arden, N. Y. ; Mrs. Henry P. Loomis, 
Tuxedo Park, N. Y.; Mrs. J. Gilmore Drayton, New 
York; Mrs. Charles Cary Rumsey, Westbury, N. Y.; 
Henry White, New York; Charles A. Peabody, Cold 
Springs Harbor, N. Y.; Franklin W. Robinson, New York; 
Robert S. Lovett, Locust Valley, N. Y. ; George Adams 
Ellis, New York; Rawlins L. Cottenet, New York; Mrs. 
William Kinnlcutt Draper, New York; Walter V. James, 
New York; Carl W. Hamilton, New York; Ethan Allen, 
New York, and Cornelius N. Bliss, Jr., Westbury, N. Y. 

The program of the society provides for the found- 
ing of a central orchestra ot fifty or sixty first rate 
musicians under the leadership of Dirk Foch, the forma- 
tion of neighborhood groups of amateur musicians, and 
co-operation with local musical organizations already in 
existence. The promising members ot these groups will 
be given opportunity to play in the central orchestra, 
to study conducting under its leader, and to receive the 
training which such practical work and association will 
afford. Counsel and instruction will be given free to the 
members ot the local musical bodies. It is planned to 
have the central orchestra visit the local groups and 
hold popular concerts in their localities as well as its 
home quarters. 

This general scheme ot musical development was un- 
dertaken only atter a city-wide survey made by Miss 
Jean E. Moehle, secretary of the society, had revealed a 
demand for a wider opportunity for serious musical 
training. Twenty-three orchestral groups, six choral 
societies, two concert bands in various sections ot the 
city, asked to be admitted. In addition 600 musicians 
have been brought in touch with the plan. 

Up to February 15th the society had already organ- 
ized ten local musical groups with a membership of 
600. Rehearsals are now under way and the work of 
ing. The active co-operation of this training orchestra 
training applicants for the central orchestra Is progress- 
wlth the already functioning local groups will follow at 
once. 



OLGA STEEB CONTINUES ARTISTIC TRIUMPHS 

With the Noack String Quartet as Associate Artists 

Brilliant Young California Pianist Delights Large 

Musical Audience In Pasadena 

On Monday afternoon, February 14th, Olga Steeb and 
the Noack String Quartet won new laurels for them- 
selves In a charming program given at the Hotel Mary- 
land, Pasadena, in its beautiful Palm Room, under the 
management of Hubach and Riggle. From one of the 
daily papers we take the following: 

"St. Valentine's day was distinguished by a rare 
musical treat and social event at Hotel Maryland, the 
occasion being the second musical tea of the series be- 
ing given by Hubach and Riggle, the atfair taking place 
In the beautifully decorated Palm Room at 3 o'clock. 
Olga Steeb, California's famous pianist, and the Noack 
String Quartet furnished the musical numbers, giving 
an artistic performance of the highest order. 

"Distinctly artistic and technical is Olga Steeb, who 
opened the program with a group of three numbers. 
Pastorale Varlee (Mozart), Gavotte (Gluck-Brahms), 
and RIggaudon (Raff), playing as an encore Moment 
Musicale (Schubert). Her second group Included the 
Scherzo (Charles T. Griffes), Arabesque No. 1 (De- 
bussy) and Polonaise E major (Liszt), and as an en- 
core Chopin's Nocturne. Technic for pianists, as for 
violinists, has progressed to such a degree of perfec- 
tion that it is no longer necessary to comment upon 
mere muscular and digital proficiency. Miss Steeb pos- 
sesses these in abundance, but it is through her free, 
and frequent original, interpretations that she makes 
her greatest appeals. She is one ot the greatest pian- 
ists of the younger generation. She has spiritual and 
mental poise In her work, and yet an abundance ot 
emotional fire and warmth to color her playing. She 
also has the high rhythmic sense, a touch masterly, yet 
refined, and a true and faullless delivery ot tone which 
makes her playing big and clean. 

"The membership ot the Noack String Quartet con- 
sists of Sylvain Noack, first violin and founder ot the 
quartet, who is well known as concert master and so- 
loist with the Phi harmonic Orchestra; Henry Sve- 
drofsky, assistant concert master of the same orches- 
tra, plays second violin; Emile Ferir, viola, can be de- 
scribed as one of the foremost viola players ot the 
world, and W. V. Ferner. cello. Is also an important 
member ot the quartet. The quartet played the four 
movements ot the Dvorak quartet, F major. Opus 96, 
and sounded a new musical triumph for Pasadena. 
Every one ot the four musicians Is distinguished by true 
artistry, surrendering his musical personality for the 
benefit ot the whole, hence fine ensemble work was ac- 
comiplished at all times. Tonally, as well as from an 
Interpretative standpoint, the quartet Is well blended. 
There was fine unity ot style throughout the quartet 
from Dvorak, and it is almost needless to say tl^at 
technically the performance of the work, in its fo>jr 
movements, was flawless." ^'' 

On February 22nd Miss Steeb gave an all-Amerlcao 
program at Riverside, Cal. She played compositions 
by MacDowell, Fannie Dillon, Carl A. Preyer. A. Mac- 
Fadyen. Roy Lament Smith and others. On February 
27th she will play a recital for the Valley Hunt Club ot 
Pasadena. On March 8th she will appear in a concert 
with the Noack Quartet in Los Angeles. On March 
17th and April 1st she will give her own recitals In 
Los Angeles. She is simply overwhelmed with appli- 
cations for lessons and is teaching a very large class 
ot unusually talented pupils, giving up every moment 
to those who desire to study with her which she can 
possibly spare from her concert work. 



Mme. Jeanne Jomelli gave a dinner in honor of Emillo 
de Gogorza at the Richelieu Hotel last Friday evening. 
The guests, who were all friends of Mr. de Gogorza's, 
were Signer and Mme. Antonio de GrassI, Mr. and Mrs. 
Selby Oppenhelmer, Mr. and Mrs. Horace Britt, Mr. 
and Mrs. Ord Bohannan, Mme. Lydia Sturdevant, Mrs. 
Elsie Kasper, Mrs. Grace Campbell, George Stewart 
McManus, Elmer M. Woodbury, W. Orrin Backus and 
George Peltier of Sacramento. The wife of Mr. de 
Gogorza, Mme. Emma Eames, of grand opera renown, 
was associated with Mme. Jomelli in the Metropolitan 
Opera Company. Mme. Eames and Mme. Jomelli also 
studied In Paris under the same teacher, the celebrated 
Mme. Marches!. 

Orley See, the brilliant young violinist, whose merits 
are recognized by the musicians of the bay regions, 
appeared In a recital in Oroville on Friday evening, 
April 1st. Mr. See was accrmpanled at the piano by 
Mrs. Orley See, who Is widely known as a most tal- 
ented pianist and accompanist. Mr. See had the assist- 
ance of Miss Lotte Harris, a member ot Mills College 
and a resident of Oroville, whose lovely soprano voice 
was heard to good advantage in two groups of songs 
and one group with violin obligates. This is Mr. See's 
fifth visit to Oroville during the period of tour sea- 
sons, which proves how well his excellent art is ap- 
preciated there and how highly he is held In the esteem 
of the musical citizens of that city. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 





ALICE 


\ M^ ^^1 


1 GENTLE 


^H ^'"^B^^^l 


W MEZZO 


^^^-^^^p 


^ SOPRANO 


1,11 Sinln llllliiiiiil. Ilrlr 
Tark)l Briiccole Oii« 


>|iolltnii Opera llonne (New 
m Company lliilvnuu) 
lliiuiiucniciit: 


HAENSEL & JONES 


Aeolllin ila 


11. New York 


Pminr C<>u« 


MuunKemeuli 


JESSICA 

Hciir.t llullilli 


COLBERT 

K, Sou Frauclaco 



Lotta Madden 

Soprano 

"She reminded many hearers of Florence 
Hinkle in respect of vocal quality and style." 
— New York Times. 

"Her voice is suggestive of Matzenauer's 
molten tones at times." — Walter Anthony, 
SeatUe P.-I. 

Pacific Coast Tour 
March and April 



XortltweMteru ItrpreMeutatlvc 

KATffCRINC RICC 

Sherman uud Clay BIdi;., Taconia, M'anb. 
South«veH«ern Reprenentatlvet 

ALICE SECHELS 

OS Po»< SI., Son Krnuclaco, Cnl. 
Monnecment: 

MUSIC LEAGUE 
of AMERICA 

I «e»t :Ulh SI.. New York City 



EMERSON 
PIANOS 

Satisfying in Tone 
Dependable in Quality 
Reasonable in Price 

Sherman.Hay & 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, San Francisco 

Poortccnth aod Clajr Sfreeta, Oaklaad 

Karramenio Preano VaUeJo Slockfon Saa J»a» 

Portl»tid 'beadle Taeoaoa lyakaaa 



FRANK CARROLL GIFFEN 

TE«CHEn OF <<INOING 



Mrs. King-Clark Upham 

VOCAL STUDIOS 



Heine BuiUtnf* 
408 Stockton St. 



Telephone 
Kearny 6y6 



MATZENAUER 

"The World's Greatest Contralto" 
Concert Management ARTHUR JUDSON, Philadelphia 



CHICAGO GRAND 
OPERA COMPANY 

MAKY GVHDEN. GciiernI Dlreclur 

SAN FRANCISCO CIVIC AUDITORIUM 

Two Weeks Beginning 

Monday Night, April 11, 1921 

MnnnKrmeiit, SEI,BY C. OPPENIIEIMER 

SEATS NOW ON SALE 



April 
April 
April 
April 



11— Otello 
12— Carmen 
13 — Traviata 
14 — Amore E 



CIny & Co.. Son FronclHco 
f 70 — Dnllcl — CboruK of 75 
REPERTOIRE 

April 18 — Rlgoletto 



April 20— Thais 
April 21 — Lohengrin 
April 22— Elisiar d'An 
April 23 — Monna Vanr 



April 16 — Martha 

(matinee) {matinee) 

April 16— Faust (night) April 23 — Tosca (night) 



ELSIE COOK (M" E'«e ""gt") 

ENGLISH PIANIST 

Medalist Tobias Matthay Pianoforte School, 
London, Eng. 

SUMMER COURSE FOR 
TEACHERS 

In San Francisco, June 27th to August 6th 
Including Teaching Principles and lalerpretation 
nl Addreaa: 340 VnlvcrsHy Ave., Palo Alto, 
California 



GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 
MME. MINKOWSKI 



ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

Published By 

THE BOSTON MUSIC CO. 

THE JOHN CHURCH CO. 

G. SCHIRMER 

Frequently Seen on Programs of 

GRAVEURE, MACBETH, EASTON, JORDAN, 

WERRENRATH 

And Many Other Distinguished American Singers 

TAPS (Baritone or Contralto) 2 Keys 

THE LOOK (Lyric Soprano) 2 Keys 

TARA BINDU (Mezzo) 

RIM OF THE MOON (Tenor) 2 Keys 

TIDALS (Baritone or Contralto) 

For Sale at All Leading Music Houses 



Ready: Two New Books for Rhythmic 
Development In Children 



RHYTHMIC SONGS 

For Klndrricarteii anil Primary Grudra 
2. 

Rhythmic Stunts and Rhythmic Games 

Wnrda and Muxlr 

AnniE GEIIRISII-JONES 

Adnpthina and DeMerlptlona 

OLIVE R. WII.SON-DORIIETT 

These games were compiled to mnet the demand 
for a new type of rhythmic material, the result of 
the needs of the children in the Dem jnstration 
Play School. Universlly of California. Mrs. Dor- 
rott has had many interesting experiences in test- 
ing rhythmic games in this school and those 
offered In the collection were tried out during the 
sun.mer sessi n of 1920. 

PRICE (1.00 AND POSTAGE 

WESLEY WEBSTER, Publisher 
San Francisco 



THE NEW YORK 

PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Josef Strantky 

Conductor 

HENRY HADLEY, Associate Conductor 

TWO FESTIVAL COCERTS 

Exposition Audiloriiim, San Franciaco 

Sunday Afternoon. APRIL 24. 1921 

BACH Prelude, Choral and Fugue 

BEETHOVEN Symp. No. 5 C Minor 

HADLEY Salome 

SIBELIUS Swan of Tuonela 

WAGNER Prelude "Mastersingers" 

GREEK THEATRE. V.C., BERKELEY 
Saturday night, APRIL 23 

TSCHAIKOWSKY Symphony No. 4 

STRAUSS Death and Transfiguration 

HADLEY Culpret Fay 

WAGNER Tannhauser 

Tickets $2.50, $2.00, $1.50, $1.00 (Ta.x Ex- 
tra). On sale at Sherman, Clay & Co., San 
Francisco and Oakland, Tupper & Reed, 
Varsity Candy Shop and Co-op. Store in 
Berkeley. 

Management — Selby C. Oppenheimcr 



Gaetano Merola 

Conductor 

MANHATTAN GRAND OPERA CO. 

and 

SAN CARLO GRAND OPERA CO. 

ANNOUNCES 

That he will spend ten weeks in San Francisco 

commencing 

JUNE 1st, 1921 



and 



U take a limited number of pupils In voice, 
operatic coaching and tradition 

AddreMK all CommunlcntlonH to Pnclflc Coaat 



Maurice Lawrence 

ORCHESTRA CONDUCTOR 

lOSO AVashlnston St. San Frsnclaco 

Phone Garfleld 009 



$400 



CO.NCERT GR.VND PIANO 

IIEAlITIPri, C.\RVED ROSEn OOD CASB 

A FIRST CI^\SS INSTRUMENT 

tDDRESS HO.\ S-IO. P.ICIFIC COAST MISICAI, REVIEW 





ARTUR 


n 




B 


ARGIEWICZ 

VIOLINIST 

Assistant Concert Master, S. 
F. Symphony— Director Vio- 
lin Dept. Ada Clement Music 
School — Seven years on Fac- 
ulty N. Y. Institute of Mual- 






cal Art — Dlr. Frank Dam 
rosch. 






Spiritual and distinguished. — Mason In Ex- 
aminer. 

Arglewicz was In admirable form. — Brown 
In Chronicle. 

We do not hesitate to pronounce him ■ 
virtuoso of the first ranl<.— Alfred MeUg«r 
In P. C. Musical Review. 


Add ess Applications to the Secretary 

CLEMENT MUSIC SCHOOL 

3435 Sacramento St. Tel. Flllmora 8»8 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SIGNIFICANT MUSIC | 



BY ROSALIA HOUSMAN 
The Viola Suite of Ernest Bloch 

When Mrs. Coolidge announced the winner ot the 
1919 Berkshire Festival Prize, to be Ernest Bloch, she 
focused the musical public's attention on the name ot 
one ot the world's great musicians. Up to this time, Mr. 
Bloch's name and work were known to comparatively 
few, though these were the ones who really counted In 
the realm of art. The Friends of Music had played some 
ot his orchestral music, as had other organizations, yet 
because his musical expression was so new and Indi- 
vidual, his voice had not carried tar. Mrs. CooUdges 
prize did a double service, in conferring public honor 
on a big musical work, and in making Mr. Bloch and his 
writings known to a larger audience. 

This prize winning work has been recently published 
by G. Schirmer, who are Bloch's publishers. It is ded- 
icated to Mrs. F. S. Coolidge, and is issued for piano, as 
well as in orchestral score. It is ot the former edition 
that I am speaking, as it is the one I have on my re- 
viewer's desk. It appears to be in the four movements 
of the conventional Suite, but I use the word appears 
advisedly. The resemblance is really only on the sur- 
face. Within the apparent limitations of this form, Mr. 
Bloch felt free to express himself, and has poured into 
it, an emotional content unsurpassed in any modern 
composition. 

Tht movement begins Lento— after several bars the 
viola enters In its lowest register, marked Mlsterioso, 
and the effect is unearthly, and holds the listeners' at- 
tention at once. Succeeded by a Molto Lento, and again 
by the tempo of the beginning, this first section really 
serves as an extended introduction to the main part of 
the movement itself, an Allegro ot dramatic intensity. 
With an epic breadth, and passionate utterance, 
rythms freely follow each other, as in blank verse, 
growing more intense as the movement proceeds. This 
splendid surge is as inevitable as the sea itselt — the on- 
ward tides rush relentlessly on. There is soemthing of 
the old Hebrew here, as in all of Mr. Bloch's music, it 
is unconsciously felt. It is the hopeless, pessimism of 
his setting of the 137th Psalm, that speaks to me here, 
for I have heard this music several times, and that is 
how I re-acted to it. 

The second movement is marked Allegro Ironico, and 
in this tempo indication, one has a key to the music it- 
selt. The technical difficulties for soloist and pianist 
are extreme — here the remarkable freedom ot the 
rhythmic line is so elastic, that it presents unheard-of 
difficulties to the interpreters. It is glowing with bar- 
baric color— hot reds and brilliant yellows clash, blend, 
and again stimulate you with their dissonance. The 
short Grave section which interrupts, only intensifies 
the restlessness of the movement, as its contrast is only 
one of tempo, and not one of real inner change. There 
are hints of it later — but it is the Allegro which brings 
this movement to a triumphant conclusion. 

The third part. Lento, is the real slow movement ot 
the Seulte. The piano can scarcely give it its true color, 
though this music seems more native to the instrument 
than the others. In spiritual content, this is a noc- 
turne but it is a night under tropical skies, in soft 
scented airs. Here everything is hushed and at peace, 
and the restlessness ot the other music is for a time 
silenced. Subtly the lights and shadows are evoked, 
and shift, carrying one along on magic wings. Or- 
chestrally, this is beautiful beyond mere words, and 
full of new effects ot penetrating beauty, and soul stir- 
ring thrills. When played by Louis Bailly with Mr. Bo- 
dansky's orchestra it brought the most spontaneous ap- 
plause ot the evening. 

The final movement, a Molto Vivo, is frankly based 
on material of the Far East. The theme is pentatonic, 
wild and barbaric, less subtly dissonant than the rest, 
and exults in its rhythmic torcefulness. It is a brilliant 
and fitting close to this master work, and is true to it 
in spirit and logical development. 

This is just a r6sum§ of the music itself, but there 
is far more significance to it than merely this. Its big 
freedom, its untrammeled expression, held within these 
apparent limits, show the superb indifference of Mr. 
Bloch to the petty considerations ot mere outline and 
formal melodic line. As in Rodin's work, power, 
=5trength, and even ugliness is exalted as being true to 
life, so in this Suite Ernest Bloch has not compromised 
with his ideals, and has given us fine, strong music, 
which will not be easy for everyone to assimilate. But 
it is GREAT stuff, none-the-less, and I am hoping that 
Nathan Firestone will have the courage to learn it, and 
present it to the San Francisco public. 

Of Special Interest to Choral Societies 

I have a large collection of secular two and three part 
choruses for women's voices, from the various publish- 
ers. The largest number are issued by the firm ot John 
Church, Cincinnati, and will please every taste. Some 
are a capella, though the majority are not. Let me 
enumerate a few composers and their most representa- 
tive work. The following are for three part chorus: 
MacFadyen's Cradle Song, Carl Hahn's Song ot the 
Chimes, W. H. Neidlinger's Wind in the Tree Top, (here 
humming and melodic counterpoint are effectively used 
to offset the melody), Spross' Harp ot Winds, Walter 
Kramer's successful song arranged for chorus with alto 
or baritone solo, and in two parts let me suggest Sum- 
ner Salter's Revel ot the Fairies. Werthner has adapted 
a number of famous songs for choral use, and handled 
his task well. In this form, one can find Mignon's song 
ot Thomas, Cujus Animam ot Rossini, and Feldelnsam- 
keit of Brahms. Good English texts are provided. 



To consult the Ditson list, we find some masterly ar- 
rangements ot Victor Harris, the able leader ot the St. 
Cecelia Society. First to hand comes a splendid hand- 
ling ot the Hymn to the Sun, from Rlmsky-Korsakow's 
fairy opera, Coq D'Or. The lovely coloratura bits are 
given to the soprano soloist, the rest is choral. Padre 
Martini's old melody, Plaisir d'amuur, is another, but 
It Is in Schumann's Return (four part) tliat he is most 
skilful. This is written in strict canon between the 
first soprano and first alto, and the whole should sound 
well. 

To speak ot the music Issued for male chorus is a 
pleasant task. Schirmer's have quite a number of good 
things, like Wm. Lester's three or four part chorus. 
The Three Fishers will be well worth the learning. 
All ot these are a capella. Wilson Bishop's setting ot 
the Longfellow poem Daybreak is a worthy contribu- 
tion to men's choral societies, and it, like Kenneth 
Murchison's Capt. Kidd, will probably be much used. 

The John Church firm has devoted its energies to 
male chorus, and sends in some very good music. Mary 
Turner Salter's, There Was a Little Girl, will probably 
always get an encore, as its text is clever, and fittingly 
handled from the musical side. Her Death of Love is 
fine music, quite tree in the handling ot the voices. 
There's the Storm Song ot Gantvoort, and Sweet, Sweet 
Lady of Spross, both effective. But the finest thing I 
came across on their list is Neidlinger's De Massa of 
de Sheepfol', with a deeply moving melodic line. His 
other things, Behold the Fig Tree and Lord of All Being 
are sacred music, but they have not that rare touch 
ot inspiration ot the other. There is really little sacred 
music issued. Neidlinger also contributes Bethlehem 
for chorus and baritone solo, and Jesus, Lover of My 
Soul, which has solos for soprano and alto. These will 
answer the organist's needs for the average service. 
Spross's Cry Aloud, being written to a text of Isaiah, 
will find a wider scope, and could be used in all 
churches, which Oley Speak's Let Not Your Heart Be 
Troubled, could not. This is a Schirmer publication, 
as is Buzzi-Peccia's Justice ot God, listed under gen- 
eral anthems. These will no doubt find a welcome in 
the choir loft. 

Harold Flammer issues John Prindle Scott's Ride 
On, an anthem with tenor or soprano solo, suitable for 
Palm Sunday, as well as for general use. It is im- 
pressive, and will be splendid at the end of a service. 

The Ditsons have several choral works ot larger di- 
mensions, issued in booklet form. A Musical Surprise 
displays a keen sense ot humor, and ought to appeal 
to the teacher hunting for something new to teach in 
the higher grammar grades. The sketch is by Clara 
Richey, and the music by L. Fairchild. It requires four 
soloists, soprano, alto, tenor and bass, which would en- 
list the services ot boys as well as girls. Investigate 
it. I would hate to spoil the surprise. Pan's Flute, by 
the well known composer, Carl Busch, is a big work, 
worthy to be heard everywhere. It requires a baritone 
soloist, as well as a women's chorus, and the handling 
of Mrs. Browning's poem is well and flexibly done. 
Time ot performance is given at thirty minutes. I 
specially liked the flute solo, which runs through the 
work, and is heard unaccompanied. Lady Anne, another 
ot Cecil Forsyth's Choral Ballads, is subtitled a polite 
tale. An alto has the solo bits. Mr. Forsyth is respon- 
sible for the amusing text, and the work, which takes 
about fifteen minutes to perform, is dedicated to the 
St. Cecelia Society of New York. 



Miss Marjorie Chapin, teaching accompanist to Mme. 
Jomelli, is taking a much needed vacation from her 
strenuous duties. Miss Chapin will make a trip to 
Honolulu. Her place at the Jomelli Studio is being filled 
by Mrs. Ord Bohannan, an accomplished pianist and 
also a composer ot considerable note, having over 200 
published compositions. Mrs. Bohannan is the wife ot 
the able musical director ot the First Congregational 
Church of this city. 



ADDITIONAL LOS ANGELES ITEMS 

One of the recent bulletins issued by the Temple 
Baptist Church carried a picture of the church organist. 
Dr. Ray Hastings, on the front page. Beneath was 
penned a fine tribute of this "brilliant, genial organist," 
to quote the article, which was written in view ot the 
fact that Dr. Hastings had presided nine years at this 
organ bench. To judge from the ovation he will remain 
in that capacity many more years to come. 

Edith Lillian Clark, pianist, presented several pupils 
in recital in a musical recently. The program included 
compositions ot Bach, Schumann, Richard Hageman, 
Gounod, Rogers, Grieg, Grainger, MacDowell and Liszt, 

Irene Mason, a very gifted young pianist, one of the 
advanced pupils of Charles Draa, the editor of the Music 
Club Federation Bulletin, showed fine training and good 
talent in a well varied program of classic and modern 
works. This is the second recital Miss Mason has given 
with much success. 

Two piano recitals were given recently by the Davis 
Musical College. Monday afternoon program consisted 
ot piano solos by Marion Prances Woldridge, Francis 
Allen, Dorothy Donnel, Lewis Hughes. Ethlyn Burrows, 
Carmelita Ruiz, Blenda Kiethley, Audrey Kiethley and 
George Wright. On Wednesday the program was by 
Margret Whitcomb, Elizabeth Morin, Irene Marsh, Rich- 
ard Coombs, Mary Eckenroth, Arthur Dunn, Henrietta 
Donnadien and Mildred Ward at the piano with Miss 
Sadie Keefer in vocal solos. 



LOS ANGELES ENJOYS CHICAGO SINGERS 

Opening Performance of Otello Thrills Crowded House 

Includ ng Social and Musical Elements— A 

Great Organization in Every Way 

By BRUNO DAVID USSHER 

Verdi's Otello was a brilliant prelude to the moat 
brilliant operatic season witnessed here in many years, 
that of the Chicago Grand Opera Company, who made 
their debut last night at the Philharmonic Auditorium. 
A host of vocal aristocracy found the City of the Angels 
ready to surrender, generous in paying them homage, 
as last night's premiere proved. Mary Garden, the illus- 
trious Primadonna-Dlrector-General, received a pro- 
longed ovation when she appeared in her box during 
the second act. A storm of enthusiasm swept the festive 
audience who seemed to realize the significance of a 
great artist and remarkable woman holding the su- 
preme reins of one of the most accomplished opera com- 
panies ever formed in any country. 

Everything points to a complete success of the local 
season, which is being marshalled here by Impresario 
L. E. Behymer, through his executive. Miss Rena Mac- 
donald, who even more than on similar occasions proves 
to be the solo-mind behind the solo-voices in arranging 
business and press affairs, while Mr. Behymer is still 
confined to the sick-room. The performance of Otello 
under Pietro Cimini's baton, Charles Marshall as Otello, 
Rosa Ralsa as Desdemona, Giacomo Rimini as Jago. 
Carmen Pascova as Emilia, Lodovico Olivieri as Casslo, 
in the principal parts was eminently successful. 

The presentation was a vocal revelation to Los An- 
geles, not only because the work had never been heard 
here before, but on account of the exquisite quality in 
which it was produced. Neither settings, nor the chorus, 
or the orchestra, have been surpassed and scarcely 
equalled by any other company. As to the soloists it 
may safely be said that Mr. Marshall's Otello vocally 
and histrionically is epochal. Rosa Ralsa, a golden- 
voiced prima donna, is lovely and captivating as Des- 
demona. Rimini as Jago is fascinating. His voice is 
beautiful and fiows easily in rich tones. He is a fine 
actor. Mile. Pascova as Emilia sings with great finesse, 
adding characteristic touches to the Shakespearean 
drama. Olivieri as Cassio, too, fits well into this remark- 
able ensemble, which finds wonderful support in Jose 
Mojica as Roderlgo, Virgilio Lazzari as the Venetian 
Ambassador, Sallustio Civai as Otello's predecessor, 
and B. Landesman as a herald. 

The chorus is unusually large, as is the orchestra, 
sings well and with a freedom of expression vocally and 
histrionically which is most enjoyable. As already indi- 
cated, Maestro Cimini shared greatly in the success of 
the performance, which with elaborate characteristic 
costuming and artistic lighting will stand out singularly 
in local operatic history. 



LARGE AUDIENCE HEARS SHAKESPEARE MUSIC 

A large audience braved a heavy windstorm to hear 
the Shapespeare Communion Service in E flat sung by 
the augmented choir of St. Stephen's Church in the 
Greek Theatre of the University of California last Sun- 
day afternoun, and was well repaid for its temerity, for 
the chorus, which was really an aggregation of Pasmore 
pupils to the number of fifty, sang with a beauty of 
tone rarely heard and with an intonation that was as 
perfect as possible. The service itself is of oratorio 
proportions. It has a beautiful harmonic scheme and 
concise and definite form with a counterpoint that 
brings out all the brilliancy ot the voices. The Agnus 
Dei is of pathetic beauty, the credo rises to majestic 
and dramatic expression. Its appeal is so great that the 
hearer, it a skeptic, feels with the Roman who said 
"almost thou persuadest me to become a Christian." 
The soloists presented the numbers of the interlude 
with convincing power. Therese Zanetin's voice reached 
the hearts of the vast audience and created the hush 
that comes only when a notable thing is being enacted. 



Antoine De Vally, the well known tenor and vocal 
pedagogue, announces that he has removed his studio 
from Market Street to 1913 Baker Street, where he 
will continue to give his occasional studio and operatic 
recitals which have made such an excellent impression 
among our musical public. 

RUDOLPH GANZ TO CONDUCT SYMPHONY 

St. Louis, March 26.^ — Rudolph Ganz, the pianist, has 
been selected conductor of the St. Louis Symphony Or- 
chestra for a term of three years, it was announced 
today. Mr. Ganz succeeds Max Zach, who died recently. 

Rudolph Ganz, while remaining a citizen ot Switzer- 
land, has for twenty years spent much of his time in 
the United States, appearing here with the leading or- 
chestras and musical societies. He was born February 
24, 1877, at Zurich, and studied in the local conserva- 
tory, as well as later at Lausanne and Strasbourg and 
with Busoni in Berlin. He played in public at 12 years 
old in his native town and has conducted music festi- 
vals there. His St. Louis engagement will not be Mr. 
Ganz' first residence in the West, since at the outset ot 
his career he was a teacher from 1901 to 1905 In Chi- 
cago. He married in New York in 1900 an American 
singer, Mary Forrest. Mr. Ganz has composed several 
works for orchestra, including a symphony and a piano- 
forte concerto or "concert piece," as well as many piano 
a nd violin solos, male choruses and over 150 songs. 

Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Ortcmn, HanuouT. OrranUt and Miuleal 
Director of Flr»t PrMbytertan Church. Alameda. Hove 
Stndlot HIT PABIT STREET. ALAIHBDA. Telephone Ala- 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Cecil Fanning 

Baritone 

H. B. TURPIN, AceoinvasUt 
4ddrca«t L. B. Befarmer, Aadttorlum Ride 
Lorn Aaselaa. Cml„ or Mrs. JeHalra Colbert. 
«>f Hearat BIdK„ Han Franoliiro. rnl. 

KAJETAN ATTL 

H \np \'inTro«o 

SoIolBf Snn Franclnco Symphony Orohcn- 
tr«. A\allable ror Coiiv«rl«, KecUnls «ad 
iDatrnrfloa. 

Stadtot 104M Kohler A Cliaae BalldlDC 
Rr>. Fhouf Bay View «1ti 

Jean Criticos 

Sclenfiflc EmlNHlon of Voloe 

R». Stiidloi 321 HlfchUnd Ave.. Piedmont 

Tel. Piedmont TSJ 

In Kohler Jt Chane BldK. 

Studio TOO — Mon.. Weil, and Frl. 

PAUL STEINDORFP 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languages 

5302 Broadway .... Oakland 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

PIANO 

1KD4 Larkin St. 
Phone Franklin S2IS 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 

PIANIST 
Studloi ir>37 Kuelld Avenue, Berkeley. 
Phone Berkeley 6006. 

MISS EMILIE LANCEL 

MEZZO SOPRANO 

Concert and Opera 

«S3 18th Ave. Phone Bay View 1481 

ZHAY CLARK 

SOLO HARPIST 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE ORCHESTRA 
SOFIA NEWLAND NEUSTADT 



studio: sa Hamilton Place. Oakland. San 
FranclMco, Wednesday and Saturday, 80« 
Kohler « C haKc Building. 

MISS ETHEL PALMER 

KriirCKeutallve 

ADA CLEMENT PIANO SCHOOL 

Aenldeuee Studio. 204 A Street. San Rafael 

Telephone San Rafael 842-J 

MBS. ZAY HECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

2001 California St.. San Francisco. Tel. 
Fillmore 2539. Institute of Music. K. & 
C. Bld g.. Tel. Kearny 5454. 

STUDY PIANO TUNING 

complete course in Piano Tuning. Action 
Regulating and Repairing and Player- 
Piano Work. 
Fpr further information apply 
Weatern School of Piano Tuning: 
Cor. Laguna and Hayes Sts. Ph. Ml<t. 1763. 
Call or write for booklet. 



SUZANNE PASMORE-BROOKS 

PIANIST 
Stndioal CHHI Kohler .)L Chane BldE.! 1717 
Vailejo St., S. F.; 2904 Garber St., Berkeley. 

PERCY A. R. DOW 



USZ Oeeaa VIen Dr., Oakland IRealdenee) 

DOUILLET CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

Ifn Jaekaan St. Saa Franetaea, CaL 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 

Stadia, SOS-SIM KOHLER A CHASE BLDG. 

Phoae Kearny IMH 

MRS. CHARLES POULTER 

St. Aadrewa Cksrck 



Vale* Cultare. Plaao. 5KN 271b Sl_ 
toad. TeL S07S. K»hler < Chau Bids. 
Wadaaadara TaL K^mr S4S4. 



Mrs. William Steinbach 

VOICE CULTURE 

Studio: 

S02 KOHLER A CHASE BLDO. 

Kan Pranri.eo Phone: Kearny MM 

MISS CHRISTINE HOWELLS 

FLUTIST 
Available for Conrerta aa SnloUt or for 
Obllcalo Work. Rea., Belvedere, Harin 
ronnry Tel. Reltedrre 1IW 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRA I-TO 

Voice Culture. Suite "C" Kohler A Chaae 
IlalldlDK. Telephone Kearny M64. 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

ORGANIST ST. MARY'S CATHEDRAL 

Plane Department, Hamlin School 
Orean and Piano, ArrlllnKn Mualcal College 

ANIL DEER STUDIO 



JOSEPH B. CAREY 

Cuni|,o»er and AriauKer of Maale 

llrnldence Sludloi 378 Golden Gate Ave., 

■ -rnukllu 7I>S4. Paulaicea Theatre BIdsr., 

Snn FnincUco. GarSeld 4r,B. 

MISS FRANCES MARTIN 

CONCERT PIANIST AND TEACHER 
Ken. Studio: IKIl Georgia St.. Vallejo, Cal. 

MRS. EDWARD E. BRUNER 

SOPRANO: Available for Ensagementa 
Stndlai SS» 4Srd Ave. Phone: Pae. B330 

VICTOR CICHTENSTEIN 

VIOLINIST— CO.\D|!CTOR—l. EC TI'KKR 
PupUa Accepted In Violin and E::>cmble 



StudI: 



IMit 



701 He 



llldk- 



oekto 
Xzr^t lvc:ir 






LOUISE BREHANY 

Voice Culture 

Diploma Royal Academy. Rome, Italy. 

000 Kohler ,& Chaae Bldg. Phone Kearny 



M.Vt. Re 



Pho 



Franklin 408* 



ETHEL A. JOHNSON 

SOPR.ANO 

Member University E.xtension Faculty 
Studio: 50G Kohler & Chase Bldg. 



Miss Lena Frazee 



Evelyn Wyich Ware ":«<>«?" .I!!.»".,P«" 



ate Instruction in cha 
interpretive and ballet dancing 
les Poat St. Kearny 2205 



Joseph George Jacobson Leonard A. Baxter 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Comlqne. Parla 

Stndloi 3107 Waahlncton Street 

Phone Fillmore 1847 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 

SOLO VIOLINIST MUSICAL DIRECTOR 
Teacher Violin. Viola. Enaemble Plarlng 
434 Spraea Street. Phone Fillmore 1181 

RUDY SEIGER 

General Mnitlcal Director 

D. M. Llnard Hotels Palace and Fairmont 

In San Fraaelaco 

Geo. Stewart McManus, Pianist 

KOHLER & chase: BLDG. 

Phone, Kenriiy 54r,4. Res.. l.TOS Fifth Ave. 



FREDERICK MAURER 

Teacher of Piano and Harmony, Enaemble, 
C4»achlng. Stndio: 1726 Le Roy Avenue 
Berkeley. Phoae Berkeley 53S. 

Ada Clement Music School 

343S Sacramento St. Phone Fillmore 8B8 

MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 



Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 SCOTT ST., Bet. CHay & Waablngtoa 
Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 
Hra. Noah Brandt, Piano 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Sololat, Temple Emano EI. Con- 
cert and Church Work. Vocal Inatruc- 
lloa. 2.',30 Clay St, phone Weat 4N»0. 

JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 

BARITONE 

llOfl Buah Street. San Franclweo 
Raaldanee Phone Franklin SO«g 

Marion Ramon Wilson 



1801 California St. Tel. Proapeet SSSS. 



Marie Huges Macquarrie ^ary Coonan McCrea 



Solo Harpist and Accompanist 

Harpist Trio Moderne 

1115 Taylor St. Tel. Franklin 8425 

ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 



Oaklan*. TcL Ptcdmsat BOSS. 



STS Sutter St. (Tnea.. Wed. and Thara.) 

ALEXANDER GROMOFF 

Art — Science Vocal Culture 

003 Kohler A Chase Bids. 

Honrjt 5 to p. m. Phone DodsUm S483 



Dramatic Studio 

41 Grove St., Near Larkin— Civic Center 

ProfcRttlonnl Instruction in 

ActlnKt Stnse Technique, Fencing:, 

Mnke-up. Voice and Exprennlon 

Special Class for Children In Dancing 
Saturday Afternoons and by Appointment 



Ruth Degnan 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



SIGISMONDO MARTINEZ 
661 Hyde Street Phone Franklin 8211 

ELIZABETH SIMPSON 
2518^4 Etna St., Berkeley. Tel. Berk. 1116 

MISS EDITH CAUBU 

376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 

MRS. JANET ROWAN HALE 

901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

ETHEL DENNY 
904 Kohler & Bhase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 5454 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
3406 Clay St. Tel. Prosp. 3208 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal. 

MABEL MARBLE 

901 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 5454 

WALTER FRANK WENZEL 
1916 Golden Gate Ave. Fillmore 4733 



MRS. RICHARD REES 
673 Scott Street Tel. Park 6176 

MRS. OLIVE REED CUSHMAN 
433 El woud Ave.. Oakland. Tel. Oak. 6184 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

301 Spruce Street Pacific 1670 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

1913 Baker St. Phone West 1347 

MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 467 

ESTHER MUNDELL 
376 Suiter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

MME. M. TROMBONI 
Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny 6464 

JOHN A. PATTON 
900 Kohler a Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6464 

VIRGINIA PIERCE ROVERE 
2139 Pierce St., San Francisco 



ANDRE FERRIER 

1470 Washington St. Tel. Franklin 3322 



OTTO RAUHUT 
357 Arguello Blvd. Phone Pacific 36«l 



HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4174 



ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Keamy 6464 



Q. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter Street Phons Ksainy MIT 

ORLEY SEE 
1004 Kohler * Chase Bldc Tel Dou«. l«Tt 

SOLO PIANISTS AND ACCOMPA.NISTS 

HAZEL M. NICHOLS 
570 Merrimac St., Oak. Lakeside 6435 



BROOKS PARKER 

Palace Hotel, San Francisco 

tI..\HI NET 

H. B. RANDALL 

1770 Grove St. West 8054 



FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF EXPERTS IN 

MANUFACTURING AND REPAIRING OF 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



BAND AND ORCHESTRA 



BOLANDER INSTRUMENT CO. 
54 Kearny Street Douglas 3340 

H. C. HANSON MUSIC HOUSE 
140 O'Farrell St. Sutter 4457 

REED~AND MOUTHPIECE MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 

789 Mission St. Sutter 6355 



PHONOGRAPH REPAIRING 



PHONOGRAPH SERVICE STATION 

539 Valencia St. Park 2222 



F. A. LUTZ 
45 Geary St. Douglas 2127 



MAX W. SCHMIDT 

216 Pantages Bldg., Oakland 



RELIABLE PIANO TUNERS AND 
REPAIRERS 



DEITEMEIER PIANO CO. 
863 Valencia Street Mission 477 



MR. H. J. MORGAN 
69 Haigbt St. * Mission 3660 



COSTl'MKRS 



Marie Hughes MacQuarrie, the very 
Rifted and charming young harpist, ap- 
peared as soloist with the Cecelia Choral 
Society of Stockton on Wednesday, 
March 30th. of which Percy A. R. Dow 
is the director. The lovely artist was 
heartily applauded by a very apprecia- 
tive audience and was forced to add sev- 
eral encores to her already extensive pro- 
gram. The trio Moderne. of which Marie 
Hughes Macquarrie Is a member, the 
other two artists being Christine How- 
ills, flutist, and Grace Becker, cellist, 
appeared in Sacramento for the McNeil 
Club the following day, March 31st. The 
artists rendered ensemble numbers as 
well as solo groups. In Orland. on March 
:i9th, the trio appeared under the aus- 
pices of the University of California, and 
on April 12th the Trio Moderne will give 
a recital at Wheeler Hall, Berkeley, for 
the English Club of the University of 
California. Everywhere these talented 
young musicians appear they receive 
high commendation upon the excellencs 
of their work. It is both novel and In- 
teresting. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 







WAGER SWAYNE 

PIANIST AND ARTIST TEACHER 

of PARIS and NEW YORK 

Now in San Francisco 

2404 Broadway Telephone Fillmore 1905 




s 










JOHN WHITCOMB NASH 

Vocal Studios 
Suite 500, Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Evening classes in Harmony. Especially adapt- 
ed to the needs of the singer. Visitors' cards are 
issued upon request. 

A really remarkable little booklet entitled, "The 
Plain Truth About Voice," is free. We will 
gladly mail it. 



CaliTorrua 



Fourth Grand Concert 

SEASON 1921-22 

Sunday, April 10, 1921, 11 A. M. 

Marion Hovey Brower 

Soprano 

otEerIng 
Visi D'Arte, from La Tosca Puccini 

California Theatre Orchestra 
I HERMAN HELLER, Conductor 



GEORGE EDWARDS 

Teacher of 
Piano, Organ and Composition 



Studio 501 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 
Residence 1453 Willard St. 

Phone Park 2135 



Madam Mackay-CanteU 



TEACHER OF SINGING 
Cnrefiil Voice Building: Repertoire 

" I of Percy 
endorsed] 



Mackay-Cantell is ; 



[Mada 

Rector Stephens, by whon 
Kohler & ClinHc Bldg. Phone Kearny R454 

Residence Studio: 2301 Bancroft Way, Berkeley 



Berk. 4230 J 



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"TAe House of Grands" 




Pacific Coaiit RepreBentatlves 
of the World'H Renowned 

HAZELTON 

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and 15 other makes 
Home of the famoun WIDLTE: 


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SCHUMANN-HEINK 

Assi^ed by KATHERINE HOFFMANN at the Piano 

Season 1920-21 — Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 




The Official Piano of The Opera 





CYRENA VAN GORDON 



What is more natural than that the greatest operatic organization of the v^orld 
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voice their admiration and enthusiasm for the Mason & Hamlin. Among them are 



ROSA RAISA 
CYRENA VAN GORDON 
ALESSANDRO BONCI 
VIRGILIO LAZZARI 



LUCIEN MURATORE 
PIETRO CIMINI 
GENO MARINUZZI 
CARLO CALEFFI 



GEORGES BAKLANOFF 
EDWARD JOHNSON 
GIACOMO RIMINI 
FOREST LAMONT 



At our stores from Portland, Oregon, to San Diego, Mason & Hamlin Pianos 
in all styles, Grands and Uprights are shown. We invite a critical test and hear- 
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J THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOUR.NAL IK THE GREAT WEST 



VOL. XL. No. 3 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. APRIL 16. 1921. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



THOUSANDS ENJOY OPER ATIC FEAS TS BY CHICAGO FORCES 

Over Four Thousand Attend Opening Performance of Otello With Rosa Raisa and Charles Marshall— Carmen With Mary Garden and Lucien Muratore 

Given Before Capacity House (6000), Even Standing Room Being Sold Out— Traviata Revealed Frieda Hempel and Allessandro Bonci at 

Their Best— Polacco Given Enthusiastic Welcome Home — Complete Productions Including Principals, Orchestra, Chorus, and 

Stage Equipment Greatest Seen Here in Fifteen Years 



By ALFRED METZGER 



Th6 musical life of any community 
would be without zest and energy were 
It not for symphony concerts and grand 
operatic seasons, for while the concerts of 
soloists appeal essentially to the music 
lovers who are familiar with the art, the 
symphony concerts and opera seasons 
appeal to a much wider circle. Of course, 
there is an occasional soloist who will 
attract the masses, but he or she is very 
rare and does not influence the musical 
life of a community to any great extent. 
But beyond and above the regular sym- 
phony and opera seasons of a commun- 
ity so far removed from the musical cen- 
ters of the country as San Francisco is, 
an engagement such as that of the Chi- 
cago Opera Association exercises the 
greatest influence upon the public at 
large, for it combines in itself elements 
other than the mere musical feast. There 
is the society element which has an op- 
portunity to utilize music as a means to 
vary its ordinary program of private 
functions. There is the element of pub- 
licity which gives music a prominence in 
the public press usually restricted to sen- 
sational events. There is the element of 
universal popular appeal which convinces 
students and their friends that music 
after all is a vocation well worth under- 
taking. Last but not least there is the 
educational element which enables the 
people to witness the best of a certain 
musical enterprise in the world and thus 
becoming enabled to set a standard by 
which to judge other events of a high 
class musical character. These elements 
combined should do a great deal toward 
the realization of the Grand Opera House 
which is to be part of the War Memorial 
and which no doubt will soon be started 
toward its culmination. 

There are various ways in which to 
enjoy a grand opera season such as is 
bemg given by the Chicago Opera Asso- 
ciation. There are some people who are 
satisfied to listen to one or two great 
artists, admiring their fine voices and 
artistic styles. There are others who like 
to witness fine spectacular effects, such 
as scenery, costumes and lighting. There 
are again others who admire the general 
aspect of the event, including the fine 
dresses, large crowds and festive atmos- 
phere. And there are finally those who 
regard operatic production from the 
standpoint of the ensemble effects, in- 
cluding competent leading artists, effi- 
cient secondary artists, fine chorus, large 
orchestra, capable conductors, and exem- 
plary stage management. To these latter 
belong the really musical people, among 
whom we count ourselves. With us it is 
not a question as to whether Mr. Smith 
or Mr. Jones was in the best of voice, 
whether Mme. Brown was a better ac- 
tress than singer, or vice versa, whether 
the house was large enough or the at- 
tendance satisfactory, or the acoustics 
perfect. We want to know whether the 
opera received a gratifying presentation, 
and whether EVERY portion of the pro- 
duction was given in as excellent a man- 
ner as it was possible to do. 

And this condition was thoroughly met 
by the Chicago Opera Association at its 
opening performance of Otello last Mon- 
day evening at the Civic Auditorium, 
when for the first time since 1906 grand 
opera was given in a manner comparable 
to the scenes of those days at tlie Grand 
Opera House. For the first time since 
then San Francisco was able to furnish 
a stage sufficiently spacious and ade- 
quale to house the immense settings and 
obtain the effective perspectives which 
can only be attained in the largest opera 
houses In the world. It is well worth the 
sacrifice of minor defects In an audi- 
torium of the kind to which the Civic 
Auditorium belongs In order to obtain 
the wonderful stage effects witnessed 



during the production of Otello. And so 
before particularizing the artistic details 
of the production we wish to compliment 
Mary Garden, Jacques Coini and their 
associates upon the flawless stage man- 
agement and the beautiful picturesque 
and historically accurate appearance of 
scenery and costumes. 

We also wish to call attention to the 
well-trained and thoroughly proficient 
chorus who did not only sing well and 
absolutely in pitch, but who, unlike most 
choruses, deported itself naturally and 
moved about the stage in a manner con- 
formant to the logical action of the story. 
It is also in place to call attention to the 



If you wish to judge the quality of an 
orchestra listen to its brass and reed 
section. It these sections are adeuately 
in tune and play with expression and 
uniformity of color, you may be sure that 
you listen to a splendid orchestra. And 
this was the case. Owing to the immens- 
ity of the auditorium there may be just 
a little increase in the string section but 
otherwise the result was simply beyond 
criticism. Pietro Cimini proved himself 
an excellent conductor, bringing out the 
various beautiful phrases of the opera 
and occasionally securing splendid climac- 
teric periods that gave you a thrill even 
in that big place where tone is frequently 




CH.\ni,EB MARSHALL 

The DUtinffulMhcd Amerlcnn Tenor Who 
.\rtli4tl<' Triumph at the OpenlnB I'ei 
of the Chlciieo Opern AMxOfintlor 
the Hole ot Otello 



excellent impersonation of the minor 
roles which were presented by Carmen 
Pascova as Emilia, Lodovico Olivlero as 
Casslo, Jose Mojica as Roderico, Sallustio 
Civai as Montano, and B. Landesman as 
a herald. The adequate impersonation of 
minor roles in the way of pleasing voices, 
convincing dramatic action and dignified 
deportment adds greatly to the excel- 
lence of any operatic production and 
thanks are due the direction of the Chi- 
cago Opera Association for the care 
taken in attaining these pleasing results. 
Before we speak of the leading artists 
we wish to put in a word In behalf of 
the orchestra. We understand there are 
from seventy to seventy-five musicians, 
and from what we heard Monday night 
they belong to the best to be obtained. 



restricted in volume. This proved that 
the conductor was sure of his work, that 
he is an expert in his art and that he 
understands how to co-ordinate all the 
various elements that combine to create 
a complete operatic production. 

Verdi's Otello is one of the most difll- 
cult operas composed either on account 
of Its orchestral score or vocal passages. 
The orchestra Is called upon to play 
some exceedingly tricky passages. This Is 
specially true ot the horns and trumpets. 
There are some piano and pianissimo ef- 
fects that were attained with entrancing 
musicianship. Then again there were 
some staccato periods in pianissimo 
which created a most ethereal effect. 
In many respects the orchestral work 
could be termed "symphonic." 



And now we come to the principal 
vocal artists. In reviewing their work it 
must be kept in mind that the vocal score 
of Otello is exceedingly dilficult. When 
Verdi changed his scheme of operatic 
composition from the old school of col- 
oratura opera to the newer school for 
which Richard Wagner had blazed the 
trail he evidently did not write any more 
for vocal artists of limited means. Be- 
ginning with Aida he asked of dramatic 
tenors and souranos a range in height 
and depth that only a few truly great 
singers are able to attain according to 
his ideals. We find the dramatic tenor in 
Aida singing a high C right in the start. 
And so it is with Otello. The soprano, 
tenor and baritone are called upon to 
sing in high regions in a manner that is 
a sure test of their extraordinary vocal 
powers. If under such conditions voices 
do not always attain the timbre and rich- 
ness ot quality which they possess in the 
particular range to which they are ordi- 
narily adapted, it is not a question of 
lack of efficiency, but of a natural con- 
dition which such high notes absolutely 
can not help but create. The higher you 
play upon a violin string the more you 
will reduce resonance and breadth of 
tone. It would be unnatural if it were 
otlierwise. 

And so we find Rosa Raisa, for In- 
stance, the greatest dramatic soprano we 
iiave heard in years, called upon to sing 
a vocal score that is in spots beyond the 
ordinary confines of such a voice, and it 
is done with a surety and with an artistic 
finesse and accuracy that is astounding 
to say the least. We find in Rosa Raisa a 
phenomenon regarding vocal powers and 
executive force. One time she is able to 
thrill you with the vigor of her attack, 
the stridency of her dramatic energy, 
the bigness of her vocal organ, and again 
she is able to bring tears of sympathy 
to your eyes with the softness of her 
tones, the elegance of her mezza voce, 
the swiftly changing colors ot her intel- 
lectual phrasing. We can not imagine a 
finer, more musicianly. more artistic and 
more effective rendition than the Ave 
Maria in the last act as Interpreted by 
Mme. Raisa. It was a masterly presen- 
tation of one of the most beautiful con- 
ceptions in operatic literature. The artist 
is worthy of the homage ot every genuine 
music lover. 

We received a surprise in the art of 
Charles Mar.nhall, who gave us an ex- 
emplary Otello. We have already become 
used to gratifying vocal organs among 
our American artists. We have even lis- 
tened to some excellent concert singers 
who were expressive in their message. 
But somehow we have always felt that 
there was lacking that natural tempera- 
ment and warmth of color in the Ameri- 
can artist which the foreigner so fre- 
quently exhibited. But Marshall does not 
need to be ashamed to stand beside any 
operatic artist in the company. He, too, 
has almost unsurmountable difficulties 
to overcome In the vocal score. Both as 
to height and depth he is called upon 
to use his uttermost resources. And he 
did 80 with a success and an understand- 
ing that justifies genuine commendation. 
His voice is big, pliable and resonant. It 
is used with such intelligence that its 
pitch remains true in the most trying 
episodes. His enunciation Is clear and 
specially his Italian docs not possess that 
foreign accent which we hear so frequent- 
ly among American singers. We arc spe- 
cially able to determine this when he 
sings with Rimini, wliose Italian Is ele- 
gant and correct. As an actor we do not 
know Marshall's superior on the operatic 
stage. In the last act he obtained the 
dramatic climax without undue exag- 
geration and without melodramatic ef- 
(Contlnucd on Pane 8. Column 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



You Are Invited to Hear the Duo- Art Piano 



Another Typical Duo- Art Program 



Time: Any time 
Place : Your own home 



Minuet, Op. 14, No. 1 Padeiewski 

Played by IGNACE PADEBEWSKI 

Scherzo In B-fiat minor Chopin 

Played by JOSEF HOFMANN 

Kamennol-Ostrow Rubinstein 

Played by HAROLD DAUER 

Prelude In C-sharp minor Rachmaninoff 

Played by OSSIP GADRILOAVITSCH 

Llebestraum No. 3 Liszt 

Played by RUDOLPH GANZ 

Litany Schubert-Cortot 

Played by ALFRED CORTOT 



You are cordially invited to organise a group of friends to hear the above zvonder- 
ful program on the Duo-Art reproducing piano. We shall be delighted to arrange 
this or some other program at any time in our Duo-Art concert room. 




We carry everything in Music — Steinzvay and other Pianos, Pianola and Duo-Art Pianos, Aeolian 
Pipe Organs, Robert Morton Cathedral Organs, Victrolas and Victor Records, Player Rolls, Conn 
Band Instruments, String and Orchestral Instruments, Sheet Music and Music Books. 



Kearny and Sutter Streets 
San Francisco 



IGNACE PADEREWSKI 



What a program ! The instrument that plays 
it is the instrument of which Padcrewski 
himself has exclaimed : 

"/ shall be proud indeed to have my playing 
reproduced ivith such manifest fidelity." 
Paderewski makes reproducing rolls today 
EXCLUSIVELY for the Duo-Art piano. 




Sherman,play& Go. 



Fourteenth and Clay Streets 
Oakland 



Sacramento — Stockton — Fresno — Vallejo — San Jose — Portland — Seattle — Tacoma — Spokane 




The JEANNE JOMELLI 

VOCAL STUDIOS 

HOTEL RICHELIEU 

ary St., 
:o 

Vnnounces the addition of a 

VIOLIN DEPARTMENT 

Under the direction of 

SIGNOR ANTONIO de GRASSI 

Formerly ol' Loudon 

Signer de Grassi was a pupil of 

Ysaye, Joachim and Sevcik 

and principal teaching assistant to 
Sevcik In Prasue 1907-lOOS 

Also a 

Piano, Organ and Theory Department 

Under 

GEORGE EDWARDS 

Post-Grndunte of the Chicago Musical College 

The Theory Course covers the fundamentals 



including Sight Reading, Composition, Har- 
mony, etc. 

PUPILS NOW BE3ING ENROLLED 
Pupils are also now being enrolled for the French 
and Spanish Classes. 

TEL. FRANKLIN 2381 



Arrillaga Musical College 

Fernando Mtchelenn. President; 
A. L. Artlguen, Vlce-PrcB.; V. de Arrillaga, Director 
Unexcelled facllitlefi for the Htudr of mnslc in all 
ItM brancheM, Large Pipe Organ. Recital Hall. 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
San FranclHCO, Cal, Phone West 4737 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
or MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGORY, Director 

LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



2730 Plvrrp 



Tel. Fllln 



4553. 



MISSION PLAY e™3?iSS"°" 

By JOHN STEVEN McGROARTY 

Tenth Year 

At Old San Chtbrlel Mission 

Now Open With 

FREDERICK WARDE 

The Famous Shakeapereon Actor and 

Cast of Over 100 Players 

Ticket Offices! 

LOS ANGELES; Ground Floor Pacific Electric 
Building, Sixth and Main streets. Tel. 13123 — 13026. 
Box Office, Alhambra 198. 

Performances Every Afternoon — Except Mondays — 
At 2:15. Evenings, Wednesday and Saturday, at 8:15 
Prices, $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, $3.00 — ^All Seats Reserred 
E. K. Hoak, General Manager, Van Nuys Building, 
Los Angeles, California, 

Take Pacific Electric Car 



MME. CARRINGTON L.EWYS 

Prima Donna TVlth Strakosch, Mapleaon, Etc. 

BMLYN LE^VYS 

Organist Fifth Church of Christ Scientist. Formerlr 
Principal of Vlr^ll Piano School, London, England. 
Res. Studio: 2041 Lyon Street. Phone Fillmore 552 

MRS. S. P. MARRACCI, Vocal Teacher 

Italian' method; 14 years of sta^e experience; former prima 
donna with Cara.<so and TetrasElni; coaches pupils 
Vocally and In Dramatic Deportment. 
Studio, 464 Columbus Avenue. Phone Garfield 2276 

NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Confers Degrees Avrards Certtfleates Res., 1632 Union St. San Francisco. Phone Franklin 1325 

For Particulars apply to Sister Superior " 



IRENE HOWLAND NICOLL 

specially qualiOed in diagnosis, tone placing and restora- 
tion of the voice. Studios: Tel. Berk. 5053 J; SOS Contra 
Costa Ave., Berk. — S. F., Sat. Aft., 606 Kohler & Chase Pldg. 

LEN BARNES 



MME. LEONORE GORD6N FOY 

Dramatic Soprano — Opera and Voice 
Studio: Cloremont Hotel Telephone: Herkeley 9300 

Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 

Music Courses Thorough and Progressive 
Public School Music, Accredited Diploma 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING, Director 

S242 Washington Street, near Presidio Avenue 

San Francisco, Col. 

For further Information address the secretary of the 

school, or phone Fillmore 305. 

List Your Wants with the 

MUSICAL ARTIST TEACHERS AGENCY 

New York San Diego 

Now Is the time to place your applications for next 
season. Many positions open both East and West. Ad- 
dress Mrs. Bertha Slocum, 1834 First St., Western repre- 
sentative, San Diego, Calif. 



SIGMUND BEEL 



■emble playing. Studio 1373 Post St. Phone Prospect 75T 

THE PASMORE SYSTEM OF VOCAL TECHNIQUE 

H. n. Pasmore — Studios: Suite 506 Kobler & Chase Bldg« 
S. F.: 2530 College Ave.. Berkeley. Residence 291 Alva- 
rado Rond, Berkeley. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparine Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT, PlaniX 

2015 Uroderlck St.. ne ar CloT Telephone Fiilmoie .114 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 

PIANIST — ACCOMPANIST — ^TEACHER 
Studtot 827 Shrnder St. Phone Park ICM 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST ACCOMPANIST 

Instruction in Piano and Pipe Organ. Vocal Coaehlay* 

Organist and Choir Director St, Luke's Episcopal Chnreh, 

Studio: 30S Locust St. Tel. Fillmore 1070 

WALLACE A. SABIN 

Organist Temple Emann El. First Church of Christ Sel- 
eutlst. Director Lorlng Club. S. F., Wed., 1617 California 
St., Phone Franklin 2603; Sat., First Christian Sdea 



Miss Myra Lumbard Palache 

PIANIST AND ACCOMPANIST 

Available for Concerts, Season 1920-1921 

20 Brookslde (off Claremont Avenue), Berkeley 

Phone Berkeley 4091 

SENORITA TEODELINDA TEltAN 

Cello— Piano taught by Matthay Touch Method of the 
Royal Academy of London. For appointments PhAne* froat 
7 to 9 P. M.» Prospect 6544 — Galfney Building. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



l^riFir 

m THlTONO' WEEKLY MUSICAL JOURtNAL If^ THE GREAT WEST Hi 
PubllMhed Kvery Snturdny by the 
MUSICAL REVIEW COMPANY 

ALFRED METZGER Preaidcot 

THOS. K. ATKIXSOIV VlccPrealdent 

MARCI'S L. SAMUELS Secrctury and Treannrer 

Suite 801 Kohier A Cbaiic Bldgr., 26 O-Pnrrell St., SsD 
Franrlnca, Cm. Tel. Kearny S4M 

ALFRED METZGER - Editor 

CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE - Asst. Editor 
B. W. JELICA - Advertising Manager 

New York Omee. 130 Urat SOth Street 
MIsa Roaalle Houaman In Cbnrse 

Oakland-Berkeley-AIameda OOlce 

3.101 DancroCt Way, Berkeley, Telepbone Berkeley 4230J 

L. Mackny-Cantell In Cbarse 

Seattle Office, 1521 Flfteeutb Ave., Seattle, Waahlncton 
Hra. Abble Gerrlab-Jonea Ijl Cburse 

Loa Anselea Once 

705 Philharmonic Auditorium. Tel. Pico 24S4 

Bruun David llaaber In Cbarse 

San DIcEo, Cal., Ofllce, 1834 Flrat Street 
Mra. Bertha Slocum In Charge 



Vol. XL 


Saturday, April 16, 1921 




No. 3 


The PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW la 
■heet-maale departmeDta of nil leadlas ■■ 


for aa 

aunic ■ 


le at the 
torea. 


entered 


aa ■econd-claiia mall matter at S. 


P. Poi 


■tonce. 


A 


SUBSCRIPTIONS 
.DHunllr In Advance InclodlDK Postayet 


»s.oo 


Porclsn 














TWENTIETH YEAR 



THE GRAND OPERA SEASON 



There is one thing which the visit of the Chi- 
cago Opera .A^ssociation has demonstrated more 
than anything else, namely, that San Francisco 
needs an opera house very badly. When it is 
shown that three, four and six thousand people 
can be attracted to an operatic production at one 
time, and that an advance sale of over a hundred 
thousand dollars for a two weeks' season, can 
be obtained then it is almost criminal to with- 
hold from such an opera-loving community a 
temple of music suited to its artistic taste. Why 
delay the building of the War Memorial any 
longer? Surely there can not be anything; wrong 
with it. We have been told that two million dol- 
lars have been subscribed. If this is so why hesi- 
tate any longer? If it is true that under present 
londitions another half million dollars is required 
to meet expenses for material and labor, raise the 
balance. Have our wealthy people who stand at 
the head of the movement, not sufficient confi- 
dence in the success of their own enterprise to be 
afraid to raise these additional $500,000? We 
hope not. Why all this procrastination with the 
artistic problems of the community? We have 
the same story in our Musical Association's af- 
fairs. How some of our multi-millionaires hate 
to part with a few dollars! Possibly they are not 
as rich as we think they are. 



Another thing which this season has shown 
us is that the opera-going people have musical 
sense in this city. They applaud the right artists 
at the right time. Unlike other seasons of less 
pretensions they do not insist upon encores that 
would mar the continuity of the action. While 
occasionally they reward a vocalist at the con- 
clusion of an aria, they do not prolong the ap- 
plause unnecessarily, but stop when they see the 
conductor raise the baton to signal the progress 
of the performance. San Francisco o])era audi- 
ences have not always been so careful in observ- 
ing musical proprieties. It is also a pleasure to 
note the large percentage of people filling the 
cheaper seats, even at times when the auditorium 
is not sold out. It shows a real love for art, for 
people who arc willing to undergo the inconveni- 
ences of standing in line and then climbing to 
the topmost rows in the balcony must love music 
very dearly. The Chicago Opera Company, in 
presenting grand opera as it should be presented, 
with all adherence to stage settings, costumes, 
adequate casting, and uniform musical excellence 
before thousands of music-loving people, educate 
these people to a higher conception of opera as 



an art, and it will require more painstaking ope- 
ratic productions if managers wish to satisiy our 
people in tuture. 'i he times of barnstorming com- 
panies are past for good and all. 

Companies of artistic pretensions who are will- 
ing to give operas at moderate prices, must now 
conform to a higher ideal of artistic and mechani- 
cal equipment. Slip-shod stage management, in- 
competent minor artists, small and incomplete 
orchestras and the other weak features of travel- 
ing organizations with which we were willing 
to be satisfied in the past will not be tolerated 
any more. If an operatic manager expects to make 
money in San Francisco henceforth, he will have 
to give productions somewhat comparable to 
those we are just witnessing. Even though he 
may have to raise his prices somewhat, he will 
find if he does not improve he will meet with 
financial defeat in this city. 



Someone may say that although the Metro- 
politan and Chicago Opera Companies were here 
before still the city supported its Lombardis, etc. 
But it must not be forgotten that at those times 
the seating capacity of the grand opera house or 
the Tivoli were only a little over two thousand. 
Now five and six thousand people go at a time. 
We should not be surprised if the total attendance 
of separate individuals would come higher than 
forty thousand, possibly nearer fifty thousand. 
This is almost ten per cent of the population. 
Formerly but very few low-priced seats could 
be sold. Now there are several thousand low- 
priced seats at every performance. Hence a greater 
proportion of our population hears these operas, 
and thus is enabled to create a standard by which 
to judge others. Even our Italian fellow citizens, 
who always will attend Italian opera seasons, 
may be seen at the Verdi performances, and they, 
too, will receive an increased estimate of scenery, 
costumes, orchestra and chorus than they had, 
unless they witnessed these productions in their 
native land. So it will be seen that San Fran- 
cisco is being educated to enjoy the best ; and 
none but the best, or at least as near the best 
as possible, will be tolerated henceforth. 



Although temporarily an engagement of this 
kind requires a great deal of money (we should 
not be surprised if this season will cost San 
Francisco opera goers more than $200,000) but 
it will be worth more than this. Indeed, the actual 
value to the city in advertisement, education and 
stimulant can not be estimated. It will interest 
thousands of people in music who hitherto were 
lukewarm in their regard. It will add enthusiasm 
to the student's life. It will encourage the teacher 
to know that so many people are willing to spend 
high prices to hear opera. In fact it simply puts 
an impetus behind our musical activities, adds 
zest to our life, raises the standard of the jirofes- 
sion, creates respect for music among the people 
at large, and last but not least exercises a refin- 
ing influence upon the mind of the community. 



REAL TRIUMPH FOR HEMPEL AND BONCI 

Ideal Presentation of Traviata Arouses Greatest Enthus- 
iasm So Far at Chicago Opera Association Season — 
Bravos and Cheers Reward Artists 

By ALFRED METZGER 

Society turned out in full force on Monday evening 
to give the opening of the grand opera season its offi- 
cial approval. The aensation-Ioving people turned out 
on Tuesday to hail Mary Garden and Muratore to the 
tune of more than 6000 people and $25,000 in money. 
But Wednesday night was tlie real music lovers' and 
muaiciana' night. You can well leave it to your students 
and genuine music loving people to select most efllcient 
and delightful artists as their favorites and most appeal- 
ing operas as their favorite entertainment. Although the 
unprecedented attendance on the previous evening 
naturally caused a reaction, still those present would 
more than have filled an ordinary theatre auditorium, 
and the triumph achieved by Frieda llempel and Ales- 
sandro Bond will beyond a doubt add hundreds to their 
admirers. We shall look confidently to gratifying In- 
crease of attendance at future performances In which 
these artists appear. 

We said in last weeit'a Issue that the musical taste 
of San Francisco will be judged by the occupancy of 
the lesser priced seats, for It Is there where the genuine 
music enthusiasts may be found. We were more than 
gratified to find that these parts of the house were well 
occupied. We were sllU further pleased to note the ex- 
traordinary enthusiasm that prevailed throughout (he 
evening. There were actually more curtain calls than 
on any of the two previous nights and even after the 
performance was at an end there were not less than 
FIVE more curtain calls, a thing that so far had not 



been noticed at this grand opera season. This goes to 
show that the three or more thousand people in attend- 
ance belonged to the musically elect. They knew they 
were witnessing an excellent performance and they were 
not afraid to let go. For the first time since the season 
opened real cheers and bravos could be heard. Surely 
Frieda Hempel and Allessandro Bonci have reason to 
feel proud of their triumph. 

It really was an unforgettable performance. The stage 
settings were simply magnificent. The setting for the 
first act was luxurious In the extreme. We have never 
seen its equal even at the greatest opera houses. It can 
only be employed upon a stage of the size of the Audi- 
torium. The brilliant candelabra with hundreds of tiny 
lights representing candles made a splendid impression. 
Then the ballet was Introduced In the third act and was 
as usual gracefully and effectively interpreted. It was 
good to witness a complete production of Traviata. and 
it sounded excellently even though we have become al- 
most too familiar with the opera. 

Of course Traviata. like most of Verdi's earlier operas, 
centers around the coloratura soprano, Frieda Hempel 
as Violetta was at her best. We never had the pleasure 
to admire Frieda Hempel in oiiera, and although we ex- 
pected a great deal our expectations were surpassed. 
Her voice is clear, ringing, true and carries to the far- 
thermost corners of the Auditorium. But above and be- 
yond the beautiful vocal organ, which Is one of the finest 
we have ever heard, there is the intelligence behind the 
voice. It was simply thrilling to hear the florid passages 
negotiated with a color and shading that accentuated 
their beauty and grace. Miss Hempel left nothing un- 
done to emphasize the musical value of these phrases. 
She succeeded in vividly shading runs, trills, and stac- 
cato passages. Her attacks were clean and certain. 
Her emotional phrasing was realistic and natural. Her 
acting was unsurpassable. In short, regarding the com- 
bination of vocal art and dramatic force, the Violetta of 
Frieda Hempel is the greatest impersonation of the role 
we have seen and heard, and among the Violettas it has 
been our pleasure to hear were several of the world's 
greatest coloratura sopranos. If any music lover misses 
hearing Frieda Hempel after this wonderful demonstra- 
tion, he or she will never be able to make up for the 
loss. In addition to the excellent artistic achievements 
Miss Hempel's appearances suited the role. She looked 
charming and in the last act did not make the scene 
ridiculous by reason of too much avoirdupois. Her 
gowns were rich and tasteful and her deportment simply 
ideal. To say any more would spoil what we have said 
already, for it would become too extravagant. 

If you have not heard Allessandro Bonci in the role 
of Alfredo you have not heard this role sung as well 
as it can be. As a rule we hear tenors who sing the role 
too heavily. Bonci with his excellent lyric tenor voice 
shades the phrases to a nicety and secures every particle 
of the bel canto effects which Verdi intended to infuse 
into the musical periods. It is impossible to imagine 
anything more beautiful than the ensemble singing of 
Hempel and Bonci. The writer who really is fonder of 
the manner in wliich a vocal artist expresses himself 
than of the means by which he obtains such results, ex- 
perienced the happiest moments of his life wJien two 
such fine voices as those of Hempel and Bonci united 
in revealing the artists' souls and minds in the beauti- 
ful vocal phrases penned by Verdi, No wonder people 
cheered and continued calling out the artists at the end 
of each act, and even at the conclusion of the opera. 
We are more than ever convinced that Bond belongs 
among the greatest lyric tenors of the day. 

It was the first time in our experience as an opera 
goer when we found the last act of Traviata not tire- 
some. It was done with such exquisite art. The phrasing 
of the music was so sympathetic and intelligent that 
one forgot the rather light nature of the composition 
when compared with the tragic incidents. Both Hempel 
and Bonci enacted these scenes with the most effective 
pathos, the former esiiecially obtaining the sympathy 
of the audience which was at times moved to tears. 
Although we are writing this early Thursday morning, 
our enthusiasm has not cooled, and we are not easily 
enthused. Hempel and Bonci will appear this (Saturday) 
afternoon in Lucia, Monday night In Riggoletto, when 
a new Russian baritone will make his appearance also, 
and Friday night in Elisir d'Amore, You will make no 
mistake to pick out these nights to go to the opera. 
Don't think because you have heard these operas that 
you will not enjoy them. If you have not heard them 
by a company of the magnitude of the Chicago Opera 
Association, you simply have not heard them at all. 
When you do hear them, you will understand better 
what we mean. 

Chorus and the orchestra again did themselves and 
the company justice. What a relief It is to listen to a 
chorus that can sing in tune, whose voices are not 
marred by age. whose ensemble Is uniform and above 
all whose costumes are In accordance with the period 
In which the action takes place, Jacques Colnl and Mary 
Garden are entitled to the gratitude of our opera goers 
for giving them stage pictures In conformance with the 
traditions of grand opera. There is another thing both 
Hemi>el and Bonci demonstrated, namely, that it is not 
necessary to shout In order to be heard. By using their 
voices naturally and easily they could be heard every- 
where In the Auditorium. We trust the other artists will 
benefit by this demonstration. 

Another artistic Improvement was the raising of the 
platform upon which the orchestra is placed. The sound 
became larger and it was possible for singers as well 

as audience to hear the musicians. (!i: nu> Rimini as 

the father of Alfredo had another opportunity to delight 
everyone with his big, resonant voice and his artistic 
execution. All the other roles, although minor In nature, 
were entrusted to most capable singers such as Phillne 
Falco, Joso Mcjlca. Desire Defrore. Sallustio CIval, Con- 
slantlne Nlcolay, Anna Corcntl. Uiuseppa Minerva and 
Harry Cantor. 



4 PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

MATZENAUER CONCERT ONE OF SEASON'S ARTISTIC EVENTS 

Distinguished Diva Sings the Best Selected Concert Program Heard Here this Season From a Vocal 

Artist and Interprets It in a Masterly Fashion— Frank La Forge Sustains His Exalted 

Position Among Accompanists, Composers and Pianists — Charles Carver 

Adds Greatly to Enjoyment of Event 

By ALFRED METZGER 

Among the new onea not heard before were: Suppli- 
cation and Nocturne, both dedicated to Mme. Matzen- 
auer, and Sanctuary, which was sung by Mr. Carver 
In Berkeley, before the Berkeley Musical Association. 
Mr. La Forge played a piano composition of his own 
entitled Romance, in the San Francisco concert. The 
beauty of all La Forge compositions is to be sought 
in their distinct Individuality of style, the adherence 
to melodic principles, their emphasis of decisive emo- 
tional sentiments, and the singable character of the 
vocal compositions. Mr. La Forge not only knows how 
to accompany but how to write for the voice, and 
herein he shows his knowledge of the voice In all its 
aspects, wherefore his association with a vocal artist 
proves such a splendid feature of a concert program. 
The three new La Forge songs consist of a more som- 
bre color, while The Message, which Mme. Matzenauer 
sang as an encore, represents a brighter type and al- 
ways arouses the enthusiasm of an audience. In his 
solos Mr, La Forge pleased his audience so greatly 
that he was compelled to play two encores. 

Charles Carver, basso, a young vocal artist and pupil 
of Frank La Forge, was heard here tor the first time 
on this occasion. Being rather tall, slightly built and 
youthful in appearance, an audience may easily fall 
into the error of regarding him as awkward and unused 
to the platform, but In reality this is not so. "Uneasi- 
ness may be the result of the appearance, and not 
actually the cause of inexperience. We consider Mr. 
Carver perfectly at home upon the stage. His voice 
is one of the most beautiful bass voices it has been 
our pleasure to hear. Its youthfulness is still apparent, 
but maturity can not be obtained through tuition or 
adaptability. It can only be obtained in due course 
of time. Mr. Carver's voice is splendidly placed. He 
uses it with fine artistic judgment. This was specially 
evident during the rendition of the Mexican folk song 
wherein he succeeded in obtaining certain lyric quali- 
ties and certain graceful turns which are rarely heard 
in a voice of the ordinary unwieldiness of a basso pro- 
fundo. In the Mozart aria Mr. Carver showed fine dra- 
matic sense, and the deep as well as high notes did 
not exhibit any unpleasant signs of forcing. It is this 
judicious use of the covered tones in both Mme. Mat- 
zenauer and Mr. Carver which we personally always 
admire in a singer. Of course, if it were overdone it 
would not be artistic, but it it is done judiciously it is 
most delightful. 

Mr. Carver exhibited a certain element of refinement 
and assurance that appealed to us greatly. No one 
will, of course, contend that Mr. Carver is already as 
finished an artist as he will be five or ten years hence. 
No artist is ever finished, unless he is "done for." And 
so we do not hesitate for a moment to contend that an 
enviable and brilliant career awaits Mr. Carver, and 
both he and Mr. La Forge have already reason to feel 
much gratified with the results obtained so tar. He 
proved one of the bright spots of the program. 

The program presented last Sunday was as follows: 
O del mio dolce ardor (Gluck), Spring Night (Schu- 
mann), Sapphic Ode (Brahms), Erlking (Schubert), 
Mme. Matzenauer; Aria from The Magic Flute (Qui 
sdegno) (Mozart), Mr. Carver; Supplication (dedicated 
to Mme. Matzenauer) (F. La Forge), Nocturne (dedi- 
cated to Mme. Matzenauer (F. La Forge), Mandoline 
(Debussy), Aria from Samson and Delilah (Saint-Saens) 
(Mon coeur s'ouvre a ta voix), Mme. Matzenauer; O 
Sleep why dost you leave me? (Handel), Gai il sole 
dal Gauge (Scarlatti), Mexican folksong. Love Has 
Eyes (Bishop), Mr. Carver; Wanderer's Nightsong (Ru- 
binstein), Barcarolle (Tales of Hoffman) (Offenbach), 
Etude de Concert (MacDowell), (Mr. La Forge); Ana 
from Le Prophete (Ah! mon flls) (Meyerbeer), Mme. 
Mme. Matzenauer, Mr. Carver; Romance (F. La Forge), 
Matzenauer. 



Notwithstanding the impending opening of the Chi- 
cago Opera Association season the concert scheduled 
at the Columbia Theatre last Sunday afternoon and 
presenting Margaret Matzenauer was attended by one 
of the largest audiences of the season. This did not 
only prove that the distinguished vocal artist is a spe- 
cial favorite in this community, but it also reflected 
creditably upon the musical laste of the people who 
could not be prevented from listening to such a pro- 
gram even though their interest may have been di- 
vided. Those who were sufficiently musical to attend 
the Matzenauer concert had reason to feel gratified, for 
the program was the best selected concert offering 
heard here this season and the event itself was one 
of the most enjoyable we have attended. 

We heard some beautiful German classics in English. 
Tile writer is thoroughly in sympathy with the mass of 
the American public when they wish to understand 
what is being sung at a concert or opera. We remem- 
ber well how bored we were when we had to listen to 
songs or operas in foreign languages before we under- 
stood what it was all about. We can understand why 
an artist, or student, or music lover familiar with for- 
eign languages, and accustomed to hear songs and 
operas in foreign tongues, hesitates to listen to them in 
another language. But the auditor, the average man or 
woman who PAYS to go to concerts is entitled to un- 
derstand the WHOLE song or opera and not only halt 
of it. And we know that those people, who never heard 
a song in a foreign tongue, or who never understood 
the words, get more enjoyment of a concert when they 
are able to grasp the meaning of that which is being 
interpreted. 

Of course, the translation or adaption from a foreign 
tongue into English must be artistic, tasteful and musi- 
cal. Otherwise it would be better to sing it in a for- 
eign language. Now, the translation of the Erlking 
which Mme. Matzenauer used is a decidedly bad trans- 
lation in every way. It is uncouth, unmusical, at times 
even almost unsingable. We are certain that a much 
better translation could be obtained. On the other hand 
the translation of Spring Night by Schumann was ex- 
ce'.lently done. The same was true of the two Bride 
Songs of Schumann, which Mme. Matzenauer sang in 
Berkeley and which had to be repeated. 

Mme. Matzenauer belongs to that type of operatic 
artists whom we enjoy hearing in concert. She handles 
her voice most judiciously and carefully and pays spe- 
cial attention to the phrasing and coloring of her pe- 
riods. The arias from Samson et Delilah and the Prophet 
were done in impressive bravura style and brought 
out all the e-xcellent artistic faculties of the artist. She 
understood how to gain her climaxes by gradual in- 
crease of power, and at no time did she force her voice 
to gain thrilling effects. She succeeded in accentuating 
certain musical episodes without marring the smooth- 
ness and flexibility of her fine vocal organ. 

The true greatness of a vocal artist may always be 
sought in the effect he or she derives from so-called 
simple songs. Among the encores sung by Mme. Mat- 
zenauer were such poetic lyrics as an Indian love song 
by Lieurance and In the Time of Roses by Reichardt. 
Here the Diva attained simply indescribaljly beautiful 
results. The elegance of her phrasing, the judicious col- 
oring of the most musical sentiments, the floating, 
ethereal timbre of her voice combined to make these 
simple works stand forth as unforgettable moments 
of a delightful program. 

The writer chronicles here, of course, merely his 
personal impressions. And we do not hesitate to say 
that the Matzenauer concert was one of the most en- 
joyable experiences we had this season. According to 
our way of thinking, Matzenauer is one of the few truly 
great operatic artists whom we admire in concert 
singing. Indeed, among the operatic vocal artists we 
, have heard this season in concert Matzenauer stands 
out prominently as the most versatile and most intellec- 
tual. If others did not derive the same impression from 
this concert as we did then their artistic taste and 
ours is at variance. 

After hearing Frank La Forge for the third time 
within a week (we heard the Matzenauer concert in 
Palo Alto, Berkeley and San Francisco), we still ad- 
here to our already repeatedly published opinion that 
he appears to us to be the foremost accompanist be- 
fore the musical public. Why are we so fixed in our 
opinion? Simply because La Forge responds to our 
preconceived idea of what an accompanist should be, 
namely, a background and dependable associate of the 
soloist. Mr. La Forge does not merely play the notes 
correctly; he does not merely phrase with judgment 
and color; he does not alone accentuate rhythm and 
sentiments. He does more. He absolutely fuses himself 
into the character of the soloist and plays in exactly 
the same spirit and atmosphere suggested by the solo- 
ist. His own personality, artistically speaking, sub- 
merges itself into that of the artist and thus soloist and 
accompanist become one in their musical relation. We 
do not know of another accompanist who succeeds in 
attaining the same effect in quite such unassuming and 
natural manner. 

Mr. La Forge is so well known as a composer that 
the public would be disappointed if a soloist with 
whom he appears did not include some of his works 
on the program. Both Matzenauer and her associate 
artist, Charles Carver, included some La Forge songs. 



WHO'S WHO AT THE OPERA 

By Constance Alexandre 

The question of whether San Francisco Is or le not 
ready to support an opera house and naturally an 
opera company of Its own is a topic which has ofttlmes 
been discussed by both our resident amslcians and our 
patrons of art. Since the opening performance of the 
Chicago Opera Company, which, I do not hesitate for 
a minute to say, is the greatest operatic organization 
In this country today and I doubt whether Its equal 
can be found anywhere In the world, San Francisco has 
once again demonstrated that Its musical populace Is 
actually opera hungry and that we are willing to make 
any sacrifice no matter how great or what the cost 
may be for a feast of music such as this company Is 
delighting us with. It also proves to us that, that much 
talked of opera house should soon become a reality, 
both for the betterment of our community as well as 
the progression of art in this city. However, It re- 
mains to be seen whether San Francisco can afford to 
support such an enterprise like a Chicago Opera Asso- 
ciation or even a Metropolitan. Not that I compare San 
Francisco to either New York or Chicago, for first of 
all we have neither the population nor the wealth 
here like there Is existing in the two cities just men- 
tioned. But what we have here Is a public which can 
back an organization with all their whole-hearted en- 
thusiasm, their gratitude and appreciation of the many 
great gifts these artists have to offer us. There is a 
spontaneity here which I find does not prevail in the 
East, due to the fact that there they are blase and 
bored with opera resulting from the overdose of it 
thrust upon them these many, many years. Now it has 
become merely a habit tor the subscribers to occupy 
their logos and boxes, not that they "love the opera 
less," but because it has become a portion of the win- 
ter's routine. Here it is a stimulant to us who get such 
a treat but once every seven years, when a few wealthy 
patrons are willing to give their support to the Chicago 
Opera Company which enables thousands to both 
enjoy a season of opera as well as to benefit from the 
enlightenment derived therefrom by those In search 
of musical education. Let us hope that Mary Garden, 
whom I trust will hold her exalted position as general- 
directress of the Chicago Opera Association for many 
years, will bring her song birds to San Francisco when 
our new Music Temple is once safe on its foundation, 
not for just two weeks but say for two months. 

During the first couple of nights of the opera I no- 
ticed among the audience many of our well-known musi- 
cal people as well as those of our elite. In Manager 
and Mrs. Selby C. Oppenhelmer's box on Monday eve- 
ning were Mr. and Mrs. Giorgio Polacco, the later be- 
ing professionally known as Edith Mason, Mr. and Mrs. 
William B. Kahn, Mrs. Kahn being more familiarly rec- 
ognized as Frieda Hempel, whose chic appearance and 
charming, sweet personality was the cause of much 
admiration; Emilio de Gogorza, the famous Spanish 
baritone, and Mrs. Helen WInslow. In M. H. De Young's 
box was Miss Maude Fay. I noticed Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
W. Healy enjoying the performance in company with 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Lang. Our Symphony conductor, 
Alfred Hertz, and Mrs. Hertz were among the most 
enthusiastic auditors, as were Monsieur and Madame 
Armand Cailleau. I saw Joseph D. Redding strolling 
about during the intermission and also Mackenzie Gor- 
don. Mr. and Mrs. John D. McKee, president of the 
Musical Association of San Francisco, was there, as was 
E. S. Heller, one of the board of directors of the same 
association. Miss Alice Seckels and Myrtle Donnelly 
seemed to approve of the performance if the satis- 
fied expression on their faces was any proof. Others of 
note that I saw were Madame Francesca Coini, a for- 
mer San Francisco singer and now the wife of Jacques 
Coini, stage director of the company; Mr. and Mrs. 
Eugene Eikus, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Steindorff, Mr. and 
Mrs. Uda Waldrop, Julius Waybur, president of the 
Berkeley Musical Association; Walter Anthony, who 
was specially engaged by the Bulletin to come here 
from Los Angeles and whose musical criticisms are both 
authentic as well as interesting; Dr. Emil Jellneck, Mr. 
and Mrs. B. W. Jelica, Mrs. M. E. Blanchard, Mrs. Ed- 
win N. Short, Mrs. John E. Birmingham, Mrs. Stanley 
Morsehead, Miss Augusta Hayden, Mrs. Maude King 
Clarke Upham, and Mrs. Ward Dwight. 



ETHEL GERTRUDE CANNON 




ARTIST-STUDENTS' PIANO COURSE 



HIGH LIGHTS IN MRS. CANNON'S 
PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUCTION 

VI. 

TECHNIC IS REAL ONLY WHEN ALLIED WITH INTER- 
PRETATIVE TRUTH— THE IMAGINATION DEVELOPED 
THROUGH THE STUDY OF KINDRED ARTS— AND LIFE 
ITSELF (BOTH HUMAN AND DIVINE) SHOULD BE THE 
TORCH BEARER. 

(To be Continued Next Week.) 



FURTHER ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING STUDIO AND 
OPENING DATE WILL APPEAR LATER. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Disting uished Artists Residing in California Who are Available for Concerts During the Season 1920-1921 

Editorial Note:— Tbe Pacilic Coast Musical Review is In a position lo guarantee the artistic efflciency of ihe artists represented on this page. They have esublished a 
reputation for themselves, partly national, partly International, through regular concert tours or by appearances in operatic organizations of recognized fame. The purpoae 
of setting forth the availability of these reputed artists Is to convince the California musical public that distinguished artists of equal merit to any reside In this State. 
We Intend to prove that a resident artist confers honor upon the community in which he resides. 



Announcing the Personnel of \ 

"Le Trio Louise" | 

Kajetan Attl — Bohemian Harpist j 

Otto King — Norwegian CeUist | 

M. Anthony Linden — American Flutist | 

Tbree DlMtlnKulfibed ArtlMta In a Unique Chamber i 

MuHlc Ensemble Prenentlns XTnuaunl ProKramn | 

ImpoaHlble to Hear Under Any Other Aaaplces i 

For Dates and Terms .\ddress I 

M. Anthony Linden, 457 Phelan Bldg., I 

San Francisco I 

Care of S. F. Symphony Orchestra i 



OLGA 
STEEB 

"The Genius of 
the Piano" 

Management 

CATHERINE A. 
BAMMAN 

53 West 39th, N. Y. 

Local Representative: 
C. E. HUBACH, 126 S. Rampart Blvd., Los Angeles 




Warren D. and Esther H. 

ALLEN 

Joint Recitals 



Organist 

Pianist 

Lecturer 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiDimiiJiiiirimiiiiiiiiiiiiiitmiiiiiiitiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiimii 



JACK HILLMAN 

BARITONE 

Just Returned From New York 
Exponent of Vocal Methods of 

CLARA NOVELLO DAVIES 
Teacher of LOUIS GRAVEURE 



//■S 


X PHYLLIDA 
\ ASHLEY 

L \ PIANIST 


'(ll 


1 \ NOW BOOKING 
f j SEASON 1921-1922 

/ HAENSEL i. JONES 

/ Management 
/ Aeolian Hall 

New York City 
onal Address: 
irdens. Piedmont, Calif. 


ex. 

Per 
Wlldwood G 



KOSHLAND CONCERT BRILLIANT SUCCESS 

Magnificent Residence of Prominent Social Leaders and 

Music Patrons Crowded When Distinguished 

Artists Give Delightful Program 

The beautiful residence of Mr. and Mrs. Marcus S. 
Koshland, 3800 Washington street, presented a brilliant 
appearance on the evening of Thursday, April 7th, when 
It was crowded with leading member.s of San Fran- 
cisco's social and musical set. The object of this gath- 
ering was a benefit concert instituted by Mrs. Koahland 
for the benefit of the American Kindergartens in 
France. It was in every sense a distinct and striking 
success, for notwithstanding the single admission tick- 
ets being five dollars each an unusually large demand 
existed for them and consequently a handsome sum 
was realized for the good cause. 




M. ANTHONY 

LINDEN 



For 



Flu 



Vlrtn 



Principal Solo Flute S. F. 
Symphony Orchestra. 
Formerly Principal Solo 
Flute Minneapolis Sym- 
phony Orchestia. 
Solo, Ensemble. ObIls:nto 
Llmlled Number of Pupils 
les Addres.N, 457 Phelnn Uldg. 
F. Sj-mphony Orchestra 




Povl 
Bjornskjold 

The Eminent Danish 
Dramatic Tenor 



Management Hugo Boucel<, 116 39th St., N. Y. 
Personal Address: 355 Octavia St., San Francisco 



ASWQRECITALIST 
OPGENUINE MERIT 



ANOHIGH'WDRTH^ 




COL-**"" 1115 Glenn Ave. 

5erkel<?yCal. 




MARION 



VECKI 

BARITONE 
AVAILABLE FOR 

Concert - Opera - Oratorio 



In addition to the splendid musical program prepared 
for this occasion those attending indulged in dancing, 
for which pastime the spacious and beautifully ap- 
pointed ballroom furnished an irresistible inducement. 
Bridge players were involuntarily lured to the artistic- 
ally decorated library and drawing rooms. In the lofty 
hall where Mrs. Koshland had Installed a beautiful pipe 
organ, a well selected musical program was presented. 
Violet Silver, violinist, accompanied on the piano by 
Mrs. Beatrice Becker-Levi, contributed a number of ex- 
cellent solos. 

Uda Waldrop delighted the assemblage with several 
organ selections. Herman Heller interpreted an excel- 
lent violin solo accompanied by Mrs. Koshland on the 
organ. Eniil Barth also added to the enjoyment of the 
evening by InlprpretIng several organ numbers. Miss 
Myrtle Donnelly added to the excellence of the pro- 
gram by singing a Gluck aria and the Romeo and Juliet 
waltz song. Miss Constance Alexandre won hearty com- 
mendation for her artistic interpretation of a group of 
modern French songs. Both Miss Donnelly and Miss 
Alexandre were accompanied on the |>iano by that ex- 
cellent and refined pianist, Gyula Ormay. Everyone in 
attendance pronounced the event as having been one 
of the most distinctive and select ever given In this 
city. A. M. 



Madame Rose Relda Callleau, San Francisco's charm- 
ing coloratura soprano, appeared before the members 
and their friends of the Century Club on Wednesday 
afternoon. April 6th. The occasion was lo present to the 
members of this organization the songs and a little 
playlet bv the late Elizabeth Mills Crothers. These 
songs, which are yet In their original manuscript, are 
Indeed exquisite for their poetical and tender sentl- 



Solo 



FRANK MOSS 

PIANIST 
Ensemble Accompanist 



Rtudloi lloon 



ManaKcmcDtt 

JESSICA COLBERT 

Hcamt Bolldlnv, Sun PrancUco 



Constance Alexandre 

ME2ZO SOPRANO 

A California artist who is recognized in 

Eastern music centers where she has 

received the commendation of press 

and public 

Address: PnclOc Coast Musleai Review 
801 Kohler & Chase Bids., San Francisco, Calif. 



H 



Lawrence jjtrauss 

TENOR 

Management Jessica Colbert 

Studio: 
807 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

(Mondays and Thursdays) 



Residence Studio : 2904 Garber St., Berkeley 



BRUCE 

CAMERON 

Tenor 

Voice Culture 

Concert, Church Recital 



Soloist Third Church of Christ Scientist 

3538 Twenty-Third Street, San Francisco 

Tel. Mission 1297 

Management Leah Hopl<ins, 408 Stocl<ton St. 




Mrs. 

Cecil 
Mollis 
Stone 

CONCKHT- 
ACCOMPAMST 

.\ivn covrii 

PHONES: 

Bayvlcw 1075 

Kearny 5151 

nesldenee Stndloi 

1N,11 Bnlhoa S). 

San Frandseo 




ments. The late composer wrote the verses as well as 
the music of her songs and in so doing was able to 
give to both text and music eriual consideration. Ma- 
dame Cnilleau certainly did full Justice to these lovely 
numbers. They are the type of songs which revealed 
the many delightful qualities of this singer's voice to 
greatest advantage. She brought out clearly Ihe many 
sweet and melodious passages throughout the scores 
and Invested them with a warmth and a woaUh of 
emotion which seemed to touch the hearts of her audi- 
tors. Her reading of the poems were so distinct that 
one was able to appreciate the beauty of the text as 
well as enjoy the intelligence of her musical interpreU- 
lions. It is to be hoped that these songs will bo pub- 
lished that they may be heard and sung by many of 
our leading vocalists. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



THE OPERA 



(Coiitlnuod fr 

feet. It was superbly done. We take off 
our hat to Charles Marshall. He is an 
artist par excellence. 

We also were pleasantly surprised with 
Giacomo Rimini, whose Jago, from a vocal 
.standpoint, was graceful and artistic. In- 
deed his tine, smooth baritone, which was 
tested by the difficult score, proved far 
more robust and clear than we had a 
right to expect from the reports that 
reached us. Indeed we enjoyed his per- 
formance exceedingly. His acting, some- 
how was overshadowed by the quality of 
his singing. At times he seemed to sub- 
merge himself into the role, but at other 
times he appeared to be the concert 
singer rather than the operatic actor, and 
we missed that thrill which this role of 
Otello used to give us when presented 
by one of San Francisco's idols — Gau- 
denzio Salassa. And by saying this it is 
by no means our intention to enter into 
comparisons. However, Rimini proved 
himself a Jago of superior achievements 
and unusual vocal powers. He added 
greatly to the enjoyment of the produc- 
tion. 

Although Virgillo Lazzari enacted a 
comparatively minor role, namely, that of 
Lodovico, his voice and art stood out so 
boldly that we do not hesitate to enu- 
merate him among the principal artists. 
His rich, sonorous, vibrant bass voice 
rang out truly and firmly and he sang 
with an emphasis and dramatic convic- 
tion that could not help but strike a re- 
sponsive chord in the heart of every gen- 
uine admirer of vocal art. It was a splen- 
did contribution to the general ensemble 
and it was an uplifting of a compara- 
tively small part into one of the impor- 
tant phases of the performance. We 
await impatiently future appearances of 
Mr. Lazzari. 

We wish to compliment Selby C. Op- 
penheimer and his associates for the ar- 
tistic manner in whicli the Civic Audi- 
torium was arranged. The acoustic char- 
■ acter was improved considerably, the 
•stage was ideal, the publicity campaign 
all that could be desired, and the event 
attained that dignity and superiority 
which a truly worthy enterprise should 
always exhibit. 



PngB I, Column 3) 

of anyone else. Wehave witnessed the per- 
formances of all the worth-while Carmens 
appearing in this country during the last 
twenty-five years and we certainly place 
Miss Garden's among the very best. As 
to whether one prefers one impersonation 
to another depends of course upon per- 
sonal taste, training and temperament. 
Miss Garden believes in creating a rather 
genteel Carmen. She adopts the French 
view and adds her personal touch to It. 
We have never been one of those music 
lovers who regard beauty of voice above 
anything else in vocal art. On the con- 
trary natural beauty of voice should be 
subordinated to artistic expression and 
technical finish backed by realistic phras- 
ing. That artist who possesses a voice of 
less beauty, but secures eventual results 



MARY GARDEN A UNIQUE CARMEN 

;Voice Subordinated to Histrionic Art — 

Muratore a Great Don Jose — Polacco 

at His Best at Conductor's Desk 

By ALFRED METZGER 

As we already remarked in another 
part of this opera review, we do not look 
upon opera from the standpoint of in- 
dividual effort only. We prefer to regard 
opera from the standpoint of the per- 
spective, including the entire work as a 
whole in which each individual contrib- 
utes his or her share toward the success 
of the performance. One weak link fre- 
quently mars the beauty of an operatic 
performance when looked upon from this 
angle. The productions of the Chicago 
Opera Association represent the very best 
in grand operatic art. and anyone not 
satisfied with these examples of musical 
enterprise simply will never be satisfied 
in his life. 

And it is from the standpoint of ensem- 
ble work that we must regard the magni- 
ficent performance of Carmen given by 
the Chicago Opera Association at the 
Civic Auditorium last Tuesday evening. 
The production was as magnificent before 
the footlights as it was upon the stage, 
for over six thousand people assembled 
to express their appreciation for exem- 
plary operatic productions. The enthus- 
iasm grew as the evening progressed and 
eventually hearty ovations were showered 
upon Mary Garden, Lucien Muratore, 
Giorgio Polacco, Georges Baklanoff and 
the rest of the company. It was truly a 
gala occasion and everyone was made 
happy. Miss Garden, after the conclusion 
of the second act, was presented with an 
array of floral tributes that was incom- 
parable for richness of color and magni- 
tude of volume. 

When a writer is called upon to pen a 
review of a Carmen performance he 
naturally confines himself first to an im- 
pression of the title role. Mary Garden 
would not be worth writing about it she 
had not conceived an idea of Carmen sep- 
arate and distinct from the impersonation 



of her eyes than unnecessary and violent 
convulsions of her body. The dally papers 
already referred to her conception of 
reading fortune from cards by imitating 
the sang frold of a poker player, looking 
at the cards In true poker fashion while 
"holding them against the vest," and also 
to tlie episode in the first act where she 
pulls out some hair from one of the cig- 
arette girls and gloats over the tew 
strands before throwing them away with 
an Indescribable gesture. 

Much more could be said about Mary 
Garden's Carmen, but this will suffice for 
the present purpose. Next to Mary Gar- 
den in individual effort was the Don Jose 
of Lucien Muratore. Indeed it was far be- 
yond the finest impersonation of this 
role, both vocally and histrionically, we 
have ever witnessed. The distinguished 
French vocal artist was in excellent voice 
and negotiated the various sentiments of 
the role with an intelligence and an ad- 
herence to the emotional colorings that 
was truly enchanting. Mr. Muratore se- 
cured every particle of shading and mean- 
ing from the musical phrases. We never 
heard the fiower song in the second act 
presented with finer poetic instinct or 




MAUY GARDEN 

I'he FnnioUM Diva-lmpresaria AVho HaH Conqaered Son Francisco "With the 

Fervor of Her Art and the Supremacy of the Chicago 

Opera Association 



Of highly artistic value, appeals more to 
our taste than the singer who, born with 
a beautiful voice, is unable to get the 
best from it. Miss Garden belongs to 
those consummate artists who accom- 
plish the almost impossible with material 
not overmuch promising. She possesses a 
natural voice of much resonance and 
warmth, lacking somewhat in flexibility 
and pliancy, and she does things with it 
(as for instance raising the chest tone 
"up to her chin") that no other singer we 
know of could do without disastrous re- 
sults. But it is not a question of how you 
do a thing, as it is a question of getting 
results, and herein Mary Garden belongs 
among the initiated. She gets artistic re- 
sults beyond all expectations. 

She employs her voice to create fixed 
sentiments. In Carmen it is her declama- 
tory style that reveals the innermost emo- 
tions of the character. She lends to Car- 
men a certain element of dignity in con- 
trast to other Carmens that reveal an 
element of abandonment and crudeness. 
The withering effect of her scorn, for in- 
stance, was more in evidence by reason 
of the inflection of her voice and glance 



greater human appeal. It was sung with 
every artistic fibre in the artist's body. 
The change from the love-sick swain into 
the mature man and eventually into the 
revengeful and jealous lover was in- 
describable in its realistic force. In ap- 
pearance as well as in his fine vocal in- 
stincts and beauty of voice Muratore gave 
us an unforgettaljle Don Jose. 

Baklanoff in his six-feet-two height, 
towering above anyone else on the stage, 
sang the Toreador song with fine, ring- 
ing voice of robust quality, and pleased 
the huge audience so much that he could 
easily have sung an encore had the ethics 
of the artistic direction permitted him to 
do so. And by the way. this rule against 
encores is simply excellent. Thus the ac- 
tion of the story is not interrupted and 
the fine effect of a first rendition is not 
marred. Desire Defrere as Morales, Ed- 
ouard Cotreuil as Zuniga. Philine Falco 
as Frisuita, Carmen Pascova as Mercedes. 
Constantino Nicolay as Dancairo, Eu- 
genie Corenti as Lilla Pastia. contributed 
greatly to the fine ensemble. The quintet 
in the second act could not have been 
done any better. It was the best and 



most accurate and artistic Interpretation 
of this exceptionally difllcult number wo 
have ever heard. 

We wish to say a few words In praise 
of Margery Maxwell as MIcaela. Her 
voice rang true and pliant as well as sil- 
very. She sang with much taste and her 
becoming modesty, naturalness and sweet- 
ness of deportment contrasted effectively 
with the rude surroundings of a smug- 
glers' camp. 

Again the stage settings were impres- 
sively tasteful and effective in color de- 
sign. The lighting effects were striking, 
especially In the moonlight scene of the 
third act. The chorus work was extraor- 
dinarily fine. The cigarette girls' chorus 
in the first act was good enough to be 
repeated, because of the beautiful shading 
and musicianly ensemble work. The bal- 
let under the leadership of Mile. Ledova 
was pleasing to the eye and graceful in 
execution. Specially noticeable were the 
youthful appearance of the girls and also 
their unquestionably handsome looks. 

The most pleasant duty of the critic's 
task we have left to the end. We refer to 
the conductor, Giorgio Polacco. If there 
was any doubt in any one's mind regard- 
ing the greatness of the conductor it must 
have been dispelled Tuesday evening. 
Hardly ever glancing on the score, with 
eyes and ears everywhere, with a mag- 
netism and certainty of execution that 
included every part of the production, 
with the vocal phrases to be read upon his 
lips, Giorgio Polacco dominated the per- 
formance from beginning to end. The 
tempi were correct and inspiring, the 
rhythm was delightful, the phrasing of 
everyone from orchestra member to the 
most modest chorus member was in con- 
formance to the entire artistic produc- 
tion. We have never seen this perform- 
ance surpassed in precision and uniform- 
ity of musical shading. No wonder that 
Polacco was called for after the second 
act and upon not appearing being received 
with unusual warmth upon his entry just 
prior to the beginning of the third. Be- 
tween the third and fourth acts, when 
appearing upon the stage, Mr. Polacco re- 
ceived an ovation in conjunction with 
Mary Garden, Lucien Muratore and Bak- 
lanoff. 

While the acoustic properties of the au- 
ditorium are somewhat improved from 
the standpoint of the audience, it seems 
that upon the stage and in the orchestra 
pit they are still far from satisfactory. 
We are told that the singers cannot hear 
the orchestra, and that the conductor 
even can hardly get an idea of the orches- 
tral ensemble. That under such conditions 
Jt is difficult to sing goes without ques- 
tion, and that the artists are able to do 
as well as they succeed in doing is worthy 
of the highest praise and surprising in 
the extreme. 



MARY NASH AT THE CURRAN 

Unusual interest attaches to the ap- 
pearance of Mary Nash in Thy Name is 
Woman, the new play by Carl Schoner 
and Benjamin F. Glazer. which William 
A. Brady is sending to the Curran Thea- 
tre, opening tomorrow night, direct from 
its season-long run at the Playhouse, 
New York, in that Miss Nash has only 
played in London and New York. 

This gripping drama of intense situa- 
tions and thrilling climaxes gives Miss 
Nash a wonderful opportunity to display 
her marvelous gifts, for she reaches mo^ 
ments that show her great versatility, 
which make her one of the foremost 
players of the English speaking stage. 

Her supporting company is especially 
strong, including that admirable actor, 
Jose Ruben, as well as Rod La Roque 
and John F. Morrisey. Marjorie Ram- 
beau's very successful engagement at the 
Curran Theatre in The Sign on the Door 
will come to a close with the perform: 
ance this evening. 



The Institute of Music of San Francisco, 

of which Arthur Conradi is the director, 
gave a faculty recital recently before a 
very enthusiastic and appreciative gath- 
ering. Those contributing to the success 
of the affair were Arthur Conradi. violin- 
ist, Harry E. Van Dyke, pianist, and Mrs. 
Mabel Sherwood-Willis, accompanist. The 
interesting numbers rendered were as 
follows: Senate,' op. 19 (Emil Sjogren); 
Etude A minor, Polonaise (McDowell) ; 
Arabesque, No. 2, Jardins sous la Pluie 
(Debussy) ; Chaconne (unaccompanied) 
(J. S. Bach) ; Magic Fire (Wagner- 
Brassin), Etude Mignon (Harry E. Van 
Dyke), Tarantella (Moszkowski); Ber- 
ceuse (Faure), Nocturne, op. 28, No. 2 
(Chopin-Conradi), Polonaise, A major (H. 
Wieniawski). 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



empel is! ^ere 





Aa SnittH liiiti) in tljr JJ^iHlorical (Criitrniiial (Sanrrrt 

ON TOUR WITH THE CHICAGO OPERA COMPANY IN HER WORLD-FAMOUS ROLES 

Hiolptta in ICa (Eraniata IGaJig l^arrift tit iHairta Slitria tit iCitria hi ffiantrnprittonr 
Aiiita iit IG'iEltBir i'Amorf O^ilJia in iRtgnlrtla 



MANAGEMENT OF FRIEDA HEMPEL 



164 MADISON AVENUE, NEW YORK 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Week's Music Events in Los Angeles 

By BRUNO DAVID USSHER 



Los Angeles, April 11, 1921. — The all-Tschalkowsky 
program ol' the Philharmonic Orchestra yesterday after- 
noon came as a timely reminder that there can be 
found as much and more dramatic value in symphonic 
music than iu certain operas. The weak point of many 
operatic attempts is that they disclose only theatrical 
pose or at best pathos which cannot become really 
dramatic even through the most magnificent settings. 

The universal drama of the struggle between the 
Inner and the outer man, between the higher and the 
lower in man was forcibly and yet with due subtleness 
presented by Conductor Rothwell in Tschaikowsky's 
Symphony Pathetique. Here real drama, tragedy of the 
soul, could be witnessed. "Bcce homo," "Behold the 
Man," was the deeply delving thought Mr. Rothwell'a 
interpretation conveyed in the tragic first and fourth 
movements as well as the lighter allegro middle move- 
ments which are distinctly overshadowed by the ada- 
gios. 

It was a beautifully matured performance, technically 
and as regards expression. The individual emphasis 
given to the themes by the various instrumental sec- 
tions of the orchestra was impressive on its own merit 
and in view of the unity which made phrasing and 
dynamic effects most likable. The organic functioning 
of this great tonal body was remarkably demonstrated 
and productive of singularly beautiful effects. Mr. Roth- 
well was happy in obtaining well measured tonal blend- 
ing and distinct color values even in the tremendous 
dynamic climaxes. These are results of fine conduc- 
torlal "touch," to borrow a pianistic term, as well as 
of sensitive responsiveness on the part of his musicians. 

It lies in the titanic nature of this symphony that 
the first and last movement made the most profound 
impression, but also the middle movements found high- 
ly admirable readings. There prevailed a certain free- 
dom of phrasing which increased the spontaneous ap- 
peal of this music. The third movement sounded like a 
feast of the spirits of rhythm. The fluency and precis- 
ion with which the more polyphonic episodes were ren- 
dered was noteworthy. 

Ilya Bronson, the soloist in the rococo variations for 
'cello and orchestra, played excellently. His bowing, 
equally elegant and firm, drew a tone of great volume 
and warmth, indicative of fine musicianship. The phras- 
ing was pleasantly animated by the graceful rococo 
spirit the composer meant to convey. The delicate fili- 
gree work of the solo part was presented with a 
finesse only an artist of finished technic possesses. 
Mr. Branson responded with an encore to the pro- 
longed applause. 

The program closed with a spirited reading of the 
March Slave, in which the Tartar element of Tschai- 
kowsky's music became rather obvious. 

Mr. Rothwell's Tschaikowsky presentations are ex- 
ceptionally fine and always welcome. Tschaikowsky can 
teach American composers a valuable lesson, as he is a 
pastmaster in combining the national with the cosmopoli- 
tan idiom in music. Therefore an all-Tschaikowsky pro- 
gram has an additional value for us. But it would seem 
that it would even more benefit the American composer 
of today to have his own works performed, specially by 
an organization as led by Maestro Rothwell. There is 
a great opportunity awaiting "our" Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, more pregnant than the programs of the past 
two seasons would reveal. 

Friday and Saturday the Philharmonic Orchestra will 
play MacDowell's Suite No. 2, Indian, opus 48, two 
Nocturnes, Clouds and Festivals, by Debussy, the Ada- 
gietto from the fifth symphony by Mahler, and Ca- 
priccio Espagnol by Rlmsky-Korsakow. The Popular 
Concert, closing the season, Sunday the 17th, will be 
a request program. 

It was the Philharmonic Orchestra of Los Angeles 
which placed the city permanently on the musical map. 
Now this great organization is taking the field to fully 
establish the musical independence of the West from 
the East A five weeks' tour will take the orchestra to 
35 cities in 10 Western states. East the trip extends 
to Denver and north into Canada as tar as Vancouver 
and Victoria. 

With the Minneapolis Orchestra disbanded, one of 
the most regular orchestral visitors in the West is 
eliminated, so that the spring tour of the Los Angeles 
organization fills a great need and strengthens the spe- 
cifically western music lite considerably. 

The traveling organization of the Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, headed by W. A. Clark, Jr., founder of the 
orchestra; Conductor Walter Henry Rothwell and, it 
his health will allow. Manager L. E. Behymer; Mrs. 
Carolyne Smith, secretary-treasurer of the orchestra; 
Assistant Manager William Edson Strobridge and Pub- 
licity Director Harry Bell. The party will number more 
than 80 persons. Seventy-five are members of the or- 
chestra and soloists. Chief among the latter are Mme. 
Elizabeth Rothwell, dramatic soprano, and Richard 
Buhlig, the gifted soloist. These figures show that most 
traveling orchestras carry a smaller number ot players 
on their tours. 

By Special Train 

A special train will convey the orchestra, adminis- 
trative staff and W. A. Clark, Jr., who has his own pri- 
vate car. 

The Journey begins April 21st and includes Bakers- 
field, Fresno, Sacramento, Chico; in Oregon, Medford, 
Eugene, Salem, Corvallis, Portland; in Washington, 
Seattle, Yakima, Spokane, Aberdeen, Tacoma; in Brit- 



ish Columbia, Vancouver and Victoria; in Montana, 
Missoula, Deer Lodge, Butte, Helena, Billings; In Colo- 
rado, Fort Collins, Greeley, Boulder, Colorado Springs, 
Denver. The return is made via Cheyenne, Wyo., Salt 
Lake City, Ogden, Reno, San Jose and Santa Barbara. 
Next "Vear the "East" 

This will be the first ot a regular series of spring 
tours. An eight weelcs' excursion is already planned for 
next spring, which will reach south to New Orleans 
and include in the East at least Chicago, if not also the 
Atlantic seaboard. 

Also in the near West tlie field tor "our" orchestra is 
widening. Beginning next fall regular orchestra seasons 
in at least six Southern California cities will take place. 
San Diego wants ten, Santa Barbara ten, Pasadena, 
Santa Ana, Pomona and Ontario each four concerts. The 
local season in Los Angeles will be extended to include 
May. 

The interest with which the guest concerts ot the 
orchestra in the various cities is anticipated is great 
and sincere. Thus the gift of W. A. Clark, Jr., not only 
spreads the fame of Los Angeles, but it knits closer 
together the communities ot the West while elevating 
their cultural life. 

Impresario L. E. Behymer had to undergo a serious 
operation for removal of a kidney last Thursday morn- 
ing, but is already markedly improved. "Bee" kept 
going until the last hour dictating a raft of letters as 
late as Wednesday afternoon. The medicos are com- 
pletely satisfied with the course of the operation and 
the rapid recovery ot their patient. Mr. Behymer is in 
such fine form already that he will return to his home 
within three weeks, which, however, would not permit 
him to accompany the orchestra on its tour. 

David J. Grauman, familiarly known as "D. J." in the 
theatrical world of which he was a pioneer on this 
Coast; father of Sid Grauman and halt owner ot Grau- 
man's Theatrical Enterprises, died of heart failure 
Tuesday afternoon at his Hollywood home, St. Francis 
Court, Cherokee and Hollywood boulevard. 

He complained of a cold at the theatre Sunday and, 
while confined in his bed Monday, the seriousness of 
his condition was not understood. Yesterday noon he 
phoned F. W. Hundley, auditor ot the company, re- 
garding business. Shortly after 3 o'clock the houes- 
keeper found him in sinking condition. Doctors were 
summoned, but he had passed away before their ar- 
rival. 

Sid Grauman was located at Lasky's studio and im- 
mediately ordered both theatres closed until Thursday. 

It is claimed that "D. J." and Sid Grauman opened the 
first 10-cent vaudeville theatre in America, about eight- 
een years ago, then known as the Unique Theatre, on 
Market street, San Francisco, where twelve to sixteen 
performances were given daily, consisting ot vaudeville 
acts and motion pictures. Success attended the venture 
and similar theatres were opened in San Jose, Stock- 
ton, Sacramento, Fresno and Oakland. 

They built the Lyceum in San Francisco and lost 
both theatres in the big fire. Undaunted they produced 
a mammoth tent, seating 2800 people, known as the 
National, and without missing a performance, built a 
corrugated iron building on the outside ot this tent. 
Three years later a $300,000 theatre was built on Mar- 
ket street between Fifth and Sixth. They then built 
the Imperial and Mission Theatres in the Mission dis- 
trict. 

Locally the company owns and operates Grauman's 
Million Dollar Theatre and Grauman's Rialto. 

Mr. Grauman is survived by a widow and his son. 

Mr. Grauman was born in Louisville, Ky., March 30, 
1853. 

The heads ot the city administration, many well 
known film producers, exhibitors and actors paid the 
moving picture magnate the last tribute. The Grau- 
man Orchestra, under Conductor Guterson, provided 
fitting music during the last ceremonies. 

Enter: The Municipal Band ot Los Angeles! 

In a concert free-tor-all Wednesday evening, April 
20th, at the Auditorium on Fifth and Olive. 

Thanks to the energetic efforts of the L. A. Wood- 
wind Club, J. Cronshaw, president, Los Angeles will 
soon possess the rich civic and musical asset ot a fine 
band of 60 pieces. The concert of the Municipal- Band 
of Los Angeles, as the organization will be called, is 
under active preparation. Rehearsals have been held 
for two weeks under George Multord, the well known 
leader of the Catalina band, who will conduct the 
"debut" concert. Vocal and instrumental solo nmn- 
bers are included in the attractive program, which will 
be the prelude to an indefinite series of free perform- 
ances by the new musical organization. 

A feature of the musical schedule proposed by the 
Municipal Band will be wide variance of hour and loca- 
tion concerts, so that the entire population of the city 
will be able to enjoy the concerts without having to 
leave their neighborhood. 

"Called for the best of them; 

Loving the rest ot them; 

Bold with the courage of red-blooded men; 

Fill'd with good-fellowship; 

Smiling from heart to lip; 

Proud ot the gifts ot Bohemian men." 
— such was the bearing of "The Bohemians of Los 
Angeles," who on Wednesday night celebrated the tor- 



SYLVAIN NOACK 

r-oiicertninafcr Phllliurmuiilti OrclieMlm of I>u« AD|c«lca 
I'M Mouth Uzford Avenue 

Limited numbur or pupils (or violin playing and 



CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

Violin Musical Theory, Faculty Member College of 

Music 

306 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles — Wed. and Sat. 

JAY PLOWE-Solo Flutist 

Philharmonic Orchestra — Trio Intlme 

Studio: 334 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles 

Res. Phone: 679064 

ANN THOMPSON-Piamste 

PIANISTE TO RUTH ST. DEXIS 

RecitniN — ConcertM — InKtructlon 

In Care AIdhIcqI Courier, Nevr York 

Manng^enient Hnrry H. Hall 

DA VOL SANDERS 

VIOLIN SOLOIST and COMPOSBR 

Head Violin Dept.» College of MuhIc, IT. S. C. — Member 

PhllharmoDlc Orchestra 

3201 S. Pl^ueroa St., Loh Aneeles Phone Main 2100 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

Baritone Concert E^ngrasrementii — Conductor Loa Anvelea 
Orntorlo Society 

For Information see E. M. Barger, Secretary, 330 Blanoh- 



ard 


Hall, Los Angeles, Calif. 


HENRI de 


BUSSCHER 




HI^^^H 


Belgian Tenor 




^^Hjm pi^^j^^l 


Solo Oboe, Fhllharmonlc 
OrcbcHtro, Los AngeleB 

Teacher of 
OBOE tsf SINGING 

Coaching for 
Concert and Opera 

Stndio: 1500 S. Figoeroa 
Tel. 23195 









GRAUMAN'S 

MILLION DOLLAR THEATRE 
Broadway at Third 
LOS ANGELES 

GREATER 

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

MISHA GUTERSON, CONDUCTOR 

Sunday Morning Concerts 

Every Sunday^ Starting at 11 A. M. 
Soloists From Operatic and Concert Stage 

ALL SEATS RESERVED 

—at— 

50 Cents 

and War Tax 



Which Includes the privilege of remaining for the 
regular Grauman Photoplay program. It is advisa- 
ble that seats be secured several days in advance 
in order to secure choice locations and avoid wait- 
ing in line on Sunday. 



EGAN SCHOOL of MUSIC and DRAMA 

Keon Little Theatre. Bide., Loa Aneelea, California 

MUSIC DRAMA DANCING 

in all their branches 
Faculty of Teachers 



VIOLIN 

Madame Petschnikofl 
Oscar Selling 



VOICE 

Roland Paul 
Bertha Vaugha 

PIANO UK-ABIA 

Homer Grunn Frank Egan 

Mildred Marsh Marshall Stedman 

Winifred Hooke Anton Dvorak 

Lester Gauweiler Eleanor McKee Dvorak 

DANCING 

Mile. Prager Anna Dowdell 

Assistant teachers in all departments. Write for 

catalog. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

UniversKy of Southern California 

Distinguished Faculty — Strong Courses 

Scnil for catolos 



THEODORE GORDOHN'S X*!'h'„'r:l 

BsKcnIliilii and Kilracia for the Violin and Ensemble 
Tearbera and OrcbeNtra Clnna b>- Appointment. Membei 
PbllbarnionIc Urrbeatra. Studio: 502 Majealle Tbeatre 
Pbone 117(12. 



J. SPENSER-KELLY, Baritone 



Puplla accepted In every branch of the vocal art. 
Studio. 344 MuNlc-ArtN Bids. Plioiic 10082 

PATRICK O'NEIL, Tenor 

CONCERTS VOICE PRODUCTION RECITALS 

Stndloai 601-02 Majeatlc Tbeatre Bide, Loa Anselea 



Brahm van den Ber^ 

Concert Plnnlot, noiv booking for 1021-22 
Ifanaeemeiiti Franee Goldivater. 810 MaJ. Theatre. 15480 

Rosa St. Ember 

Volee Speelnll.t — Recital. — Concert. 

Illustrated Lectures op. Voice Culture 
1029 Arlington Ave. Phone U1S4 

ILYA BRONSON 

Solo Cellist rbllbarmonic Orchestra. Member Trio Intime 
and Lo> AnKcien Trio. lostroctlon, Chamber 

Music, Recitals 
Studloi S615 La MIrada. Phone Holly 3044 

ALFRED KASTNER, Harpist 

Solo Harpist Philharmonic Orchestra, Member Trio Intime 

Recital— Instruction — Concerts 

Studio: 210 S, Gramercy Place. 660481 

Alexander Saslavsky— Violinist 

Director SiiHlavHky Chamber >lusle Society 

Cisco, San Diego 
Pbone 10082 

JAMISON VOCAL QUARTET 

Concerts — RerilnlN — Club ProernniH — MarKorcl Messcr, 
Hascl B. Anderson. Bdna C. Voorhees. DalMy V. Prideaux. 
Abble Norton Jamlnou, Director-AccomitanlNtc, 2024 S. 



The Heartt- Dreyfus Studios 



ZOELLNER QUARTET 

.MaoaKemenc H. * A. Cnlherl.on, Aeolian Hall. New Vork 

ScrlouH studentH Accepted 

PerKonal Addre»: l2.-iO VVlndaor Blvd.. Lo. Angelea 

FLORENCE MIDDAUGH — Contralto 

Confer tM—Orntorlo — Itcoltals 
Tuesday and Frldiij ^fornlnuN, .tM Music Arts Bldfc., 
I.os AnKclcs. Sliidle. i'lione 100M2. Reshlence Wllsh. B700 

LORNA USSHER— Violiniste 

CONCERTS— TUITION— RECITALS 
705 Auditorium, Pico 2454 



GREGORY KRESHOVER 



HELEN KLOKKE 

DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION 

CONCERTS— RECITALS— CLUB PROGRAMS 
tinnaicrnieni: France (ioldivnier. 810 MnJ. Theatre. 15480 

HENRY SV EDROFSKY 

ASIST.4NT CONCERTMASTER PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

Tuition In 
VIOLI.V AND ENSEMBLE PLAYING 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 
3012 South Western Ave. Phone West E006 



CALIFORNIA THEATER 

Main .Nenr .Mnib, Loh Annde. 
Moat ArtUllc Theater-Home of the 

California Concert Orchestra 

Carll D. Elinor. Director 



FIRST WESTERN TOURj 

Philharmonic Orchestra 

of Los Angeles, California 

Fountded by Management of 

W. A. Clark, Jr. L. E. Behymer 

Walter Henry Rothwell 

CONDUCTOR^ 

75 World-Famous Musicians Eight Distinguished Soloists 

Giving Forty Concerts in Thirty-five Cities 

Tour starts Monday April 25th, 
ending Saturday May 28th. 





ITINERARY 




Bnkerafleld. Calif. 


Portland, Ore. 


Yakima, Wa.b. 


Boulder, Colo. 


FrCNno. Calif. 


Tacomn. Woah. 


MlNNOuIa. Mont. 




Sacramento, Cnllf. 


Seattle, Waah. 


Deer Lodge. Mont 




Chlco, CallL 


Victoria, U. C. 


Itutte, Mont. 


Suit Lake City, Utah 


Medford. Ore. 


nclllnEbnm, Wash. 


Helena, Mont. 




EuKeae. Ore. 


Seattle, VVnah. 


HIlllUKa, Mont. 


Reno, Nev. 


Salem. Ore. 


Spokane. Waab. 


Cheyenne. Wyo. 


San Jo.e, Calif. 


Corvallln, Ore. 


Aberdeen, Wanh. 


Ft. Collin.. Colo. 


Monrovia, Calif. 




Olympla, VVa.h. 


Greeley, Colo. 





Offices: 521 Philharmonic Auditorium Building, Los Angeles, Calif. 



mation of tlieir club at the Blue Room of the Athletic 
Club with sparkling mirth, fine music, good tales and 
clever tricks. Altogether the Bohemians of Los Angeles 
lived up to tlie motto so cleverly worded by their vice- 
president, Charles de la Plate, who also had written a 
Jolly tune to the verses. It resounded not only once but 
five times after President Alexander Saslavsky had 
turned over the gavel to Winter Hall, who with the gift 
of gab of a bi-illiant actor unloosed a multitude of 
"high Jinks." 

It was only three months ago that a few musicians 
resolved to form a club after the fashion of the Bo- 
hemian Clubs in New York and San Francisco. Sons 
of all the sister arts Joined as well as professional men 
of diverse callings, to cultivate goodfellowship and to 
encourage the best in music, art and literature. Now 
the club counts close to one hundred members and 
proved with its first program that art, serious and gay, 
has double charm when enjoyed in good company. 

An "official" and accordingly a joyful rendition of the 
"Song of tlie Bohemians" with solo voices, chorus and 
a "symphony" orchestra opened the program proper. 
The "soloists" were Patrick O'Neil, Anthony Cadson, 
Charles de la Plate, George Walker and Z. Earl Meeker. 
The "solemn" performance was conducted by Alex- 
ander Saslavsky, who wielded a branch of holly instead 
of a baton most effectively. 

The Saslavsky Trio, consisting of Alexander the 
Great in person. Addling; Robert Alter, the congenial 
barrister-'cellist, and Mrs. Kate Hall, the gifted Austral- 
ian pianist. Their music was so well liked that they had 
to play also the second movement of the D-minor 
Arensky trio. 

George Walker, the former basso of the Berlin Royal 
Opera, delighlcd Ills hearers with a ballad by Purcell 
and Loewe. He brought down the house with an irre- 
sistible parody of Sullivan's Lost Chord, epitomising 
the woes of the man who finally gets the "call" and 
then after all finds himself cut off. Mr. Vernon Spencer, 
the well-known pianist, added to the fun of the musical 
persiflage with emphatic accompaniment. 

Mrs. Katie Hall at the Piano and Alexander Saslavsky 
once more demonstrated their distinguished art with 
two movements from the Brahms Sonata In D and found 
warm admirers. 

The "altitude record" of the "high JInka". however, 
was reached in the Kinder Symphony by Haydn. Alex- 
ander Saslavsky again assembled an impressive orches- 
tral and vocal ensemble. Misses Modesta Mortenson and 
Lala Fagge, Mrs. Wes.sels, Mrs. Hermerick, Edwin 
Clark, Robert Alter. John Terry formed the string, brass 
and percussion sections. The woodwind section was 
manned wiht soloists exclusively, Vernon Spencer. Pat- 
rick O'Neil. Winter Hall, Dr. Eugene Davis and Charles 
de la Plate displaying "wondrous" beauty of tone and 
phrasing in the nightingale, quail and cuckoo calls. An- 
lb ny Carlson tinkled tlie triangle with bewliching 
effect. Haydn Jones became a virtuoso of the tambou- 
rine, while it took George Walker, a basso profoundo. to 
coax wails out of a hlghtenored rattle. It Is Impossible 
lo estimate whether the blending of tone, the phrasing, 
or the dynamic and rhythmic effects could be surpassed. 
Suffice to say. that Maestro Saslavsky and his artists 



were rendered an ovation that would make any other 
orchestra turn green with envy. 

Winter Hall then entertained charmingly with humor- 
ous stories, followed by Don Turley, a wizard of the 
sleight-o'-hand craft. 

The Trio Impromptu, J. Spenser-Kelly, Clifford Biehl 
and Charles de la Plate revealed their musical versatili- 
ty by singing three terzets: Winter Song, Babe of Ken- 
tucky and Copper Moon with fine effect. The nature of 
the clever arrangement was that every one of the three 
artists selected one number without the knowledge of 
his companions so that they had to sing It prima vista. 
Miss Doris van Loan was a versatile accompanist. 

With a gracious toast to the lady-guests by Winter 
Hall and the Song of the Bohemians ended this moat 
charming and successful party. 

The officers of The Bohemians of Los Angeles are 
L. Alexander Saslavsky, president; Charles Henri de la 
Plate, vice-president; Dr. Eugene Davis, secretary; Jod 
A. Anderson, treasurer: Board of Governors — Thomas 
Taylor Drill, Anthony Carlson. Edwin H. Clark. Histori- 
ographer, Vernon Spencer. 

In response to several requests from singers who wish 
a copy of the words to the satiric version of Sullivan's 
Lost Chord as sung by George Walker at the High Jinks 
of "The Bohemians of Los .\ngeles ", I am appending the 
lines of the The Lost Call. 

Seated one day In the office. 

Distracted and 111 at ease. 

I wildly Jiggled the phone hook. 

And Central Bald; 'Number, Please." 



That she ansv 

It killed me with sheer amazement. 
It thrilled me with Herce delight. 
For when she repeated the number. 
She ACTUALLY got It rlshl. 

I glued the phone to my eardrum. 
And my heart bent high and fast. 
As I said to myself "Kureka", 
I shall get the call at last. 

I waited, and wnllcd. and waited. 
Once more I seized the hook 
Between my thumb and my flnger. 
And shook, and shook, and shook. 

But I listened and listened vainly. 
The nun had waned and set. 
And the atnrs were out. but Central 
Had made no answer yet. 

It may be she'll 



that 



V and then. 
In Heaven, 
voice again 



Hecht la still In town, we are Informed, but could not 
be located This Is not the flrsl time that our clubs kept 
.■iecrel the appearance of eminent artists. May Mukle 
played before the Friday Morning cnub last fall under 
similar circumstances. This does not seem fair to the 
artists who may well expect the clubs to announce thslr 
recitals in keeping with the importance of their sololsta. 
An Invitation Is herewith extended to visiting artists 
to communicate directly with this office. 



LOS ANGELES NEWS | 



MlBS hemi Fnizoe, mezzo-soprano from San Francisco, 
will be tho soloist at the Ellis Club Concert tomorrow 
night. J. B. PouUn will conduct with Mrs. M. Hennlon 
Robinson at the piano. 

The L. A. Oratorio Society under John Smallman will 
present the Hymn of Praise by Mendelssohn and St. 
Cecelia mass by Gounod on Thursday. The soloists are 
Mavcella Craft, the wellknown prima donna soprano, 
Clifford Biehl, tenor, and Charles de la Plate basso. 
Dr Ray Hastings, organist, and members of the Phil- 

'harmonic .Orchestra will also participate in the per- 

.formance. 

Miss Elsie Younggren, soloist of the Riverside Mis- 
sion Inn, and artist pupil of John Smallman, gave a 
successful recital at the Ebell clubhouse last Tuesday 
evening. Miss Younggren sings with fine musical under- 
standing, so that tlie charm of sweet and clear notes 
is distinctly appealing. She possesses ease of technic 
and shows good training. Her diction is distinct and her 
.interpretation pleasing. 

Dr Davis presented Miss Creta VirDen pianist, in a 
program consisting of Liszfs Etude in D Flat, Chopms 
Fantasie in F Minor, and the Schubert-Tausig March 
Militaire. Her playing received most complimentary at- 
tention from members of both the Matinee Musical Club 
and the Wa-Wan Club, before which she appeared. 

Charles B. Pemberton, successful composer, is writing 
a trio for flute, 'cello and harp, which will be presented 
next season by the Trio Intime. 

Oscar Selling, eminent violinist and much sought 
teacher, has re-opened his studio as member of the 
Egan School faculty. 

' Miss Mildred Marsh, pianist, who recently returned 
from New York City, where she spent several months 
concertizing, has reopened her studio at the Little 
Theatre Studio Building. While east. Miss Marsh had 
several of her own compositions published, which are 
proving exceptionally popular. 

■ Winifred Hooke announces a piano recital of modern 
works on Tuesday morning, April 19, at 11 m the Little 
theatre. Assisted by Axel Simonsen, ■cellist, she will 
play the sonata for piano and 'cello by Ornstein, and the 
Sonata Opus 57 No. 5, by Scriabine, none of which have 
been heard here before. A group of smaller pieces by 
Blanchet and Scriabine and modern English composers 
-will complete the program. Miss Hooke is considered 
an unusually fine exponent ot modern music. Both 
Miss Marsh and Miss Hooke are also members of the 
Egan School staff. 

Ilya Bronson, the solo-'cellist of the Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, announces a sonata recital together with Mrs. 
May Macdonald Hope, pianist of the Los Angeles Tiio 
to take place after the return of the orchestra £rom its 
spring tour. The Los Angeles Trio will give its last 
concert of the season on the 18th. The program consists 
of the Henry Schonefeld Sonata opus 53 tor violin and 
piano, the Arensky Trio in D minor, the Brahms B 
major Trio opus 98. 

An AU-American program by the Saslavsky Trio on 
the 15th is being anticipated with much interest. 

On the 18th the Woman's Orchestra under Henry 
Schoenfeld will give its second concert. A pretentious 
program, including the Italian Symphony by Mendels- 
sohn, Weber's Preziosa Overture. 

The Hollywood Community Orchestra will be heard 
in a program of its own on Saturday, the 23d. Jay Plowe, 
the well-known flutist who is the conductor, has been re- 
hearsing- with the forty player s for several months. 

Florence Middaugh, contralto, is to appear as soloist 
on several programs the coming week. March 27, she 
gave a series ot selected songs at the Sunday evening 
concert at the Ambassador, Miss May Orcutt at the 
piano Friday Miss Middaugh and Bessie Chapin will 
be joint soloists at a concert in Ventura and on the 
2th inst., will give a program at the Ebell Club. 

Manager Behymer will present Jan Kubelik, the fa- 
mous violinist, on the 19th and 23rd. The Philharmonic 
Orchestra of New York will give two concerts, on the 
21st and 22d. The well-known Bolm Ballet with the 
Little Symphony under Barrere, the great flutist, is due 
here May 3d, 5th and 7th. 

The San Francisco Chamber Music Society appeared 
in recital before one of our leading Clubs. As no advice 
regarding this enjoyable event was received; neither 
from the artists nor from the club, tbis office Is not in 
a position to include a review of the concert. Mr. Elias 

Estelle Heartt-Dreyfus has announced the date of 
her annual concert as the evening ot the twenty-sixth, 
at the Gamut Club Tlieatre. The assisting artists are to 
be Mme. Ariadna Roumanova, composer-pianiste, and 
Miss Grace Andrews, accompanist. 
' The program groupings will be request songs, Spanish 
and Russian. . 

She will also give a purpose program, entirely of 
Spanish songs, before the Riverside Polytechnic High 
School on the twenty-ninth, and a program of tradition- 
al themes before the Jefferson High School of Los An- 
geles, May 20.- 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

Richard Buhlig, who has been conducting master 
claaaes locally during the last five weeks, will play two 
programs tor his pupils and their guests on the 14th 
and 2l3t Insts. The flrat program offers Variations on a 
motif ot Bach, three piano pieces of Beethoven, and a 
sonata. 

The second program has scheduled an entire Beetho- 
ven program, the Sonata E Major, A Major and C Minor. 
These two concerts are attracting widespread attention 
among the professionals and serious music students. 

Brahm van den Berg, the pianist, received a letter 
this week from E. R. Blanchet, the Swiss composer, 
whose compositions he has used extensively on his pro- 
grams this season. Mr. Blanchet has just finished a con- 
cert etude, dedicated to Mr. van den Berg which he 
declared is one ot the best things which he has written. 

For his coming concert Mr. van den Berg has found a 
Blanchet composition of character. It is an episode from 
the Turkish suite, and is called Au Jardin du Vieux Serail 
(In the Garden ot the Old Seraglio). The composer 
seems to have the garden of the Sultan in Adrianople 
in mind, for the composition has the crarming oriental 
atmosphere unmistakably depicted. 

Every selection on the coming program suggests a dif- 
ferent country, tor instance, the Sonata by Godowsky 
is Polish, the Blanchet number, Turkish; the Albeniz 
number, Spanish; the composition by Balakirew, Rus- 
sian, and the Liszt numbers, Hungarian. 

Helen Klokke, whose coming concert at Ebell Club 
Auditorium on Friday evening, April 29, promises to be 
one of the most artistic Dramatic recitals this season, 
has decided to give the last act of Monna Vanna as one 
ot her numbers. 

Miss Klokke gave a Dramatic Reading ot the whole 
play ot Monna Vanna at the Little Theatre just pre- 
ceding the opening of the play ot the same name, 
which was directed by Hedwiga Reicher, and her sym- 
pathetic portrayal of the different characters stamped 
her as an artist of rare intellectual understanding. 

In order to give the different numbers on her program 
the proper atmosphere. Miss Klokke has choosen gowns 
and stage settings in novel coloring design. 

Beside the selection from Monna Vanna, she will give 
scenes from Shakespearean and Modern Plays and a 
group of poems set to music by Monimia Laux Botsford, 
tor which the composer will play the accompaniment. 



effectively used by Carll Densmore Elinor in his score 
to The Mistress of Shenstone at the California Theatre. 
The Overture to The Beautiful Galatea by Suppe is 
another well-played selection on the program of this 
week. 



LOS ANGELES MOTION PICTURE 
MUSIC 



AT GRAUMAN'S 

Grouped around a magnificent setting of floral pieces 
contributed by friends of the late David Grauman, were 
thirty-five singers an dthe orchestra, who opened the 
Concert at the Grauman Theatre a few days ago with 
Handel's Largo as an impressive tribute to the memory 
of the well-known theatreman. Standing the huge audi- 
ence joined the performers in silent thought for the 
man who had become a pioneer in the realm ot the 
theatre. 

Then, quite in keeping with the imperturbed attitude 
the late "D. G." showed at all times and exigencies, the 
musical program took its charming course. Conductor 
Guterson's All-Waltz program proved one of the most 
pleasing events of the season. In reality it was an inter- 
national dance program, as it included the Waltz of 
America, Wedding of the Winds by John T. Hall, that 
of Russia and Poland with compositions by Tschaikow- 
sky (Waltz of the Flowers), and Chopin. France was 
represented with Music by Durand, Spain by La Zar- 
zuela of Pietro Lacome and Vienna with The Blue Dan- 
ube, an arrangement which pleased greatly through 
selection and rendition. 

Ettore Campana, the baritone soloist, sang Largo al 
Factotum from Rossini's Barber of Sevelle with spon- 
taneous effect, combining brilliancy of technic and 
humor, so that he was warmly applauded. 

Following on the steps of his spontaneous success, 
Mr Grauman announces that Signer Campana has been 
engaged for next Sunday, April 17, when he will sing 
in duet with Miss Norina Coleman, one of his pupils 
tor whom much praise has been given. In addition. Miss 
Coleman will render a solo number. The regular pro- 
gram will consist of a Symphony Concert, including 
Unfinished Symphony, Schubert; Midsummer Night's 
Dream, Mendelssohn; and Tannhauser March by R. 
Wagner. 



MOVING PICTURE MUSIC AT THE CALIFORNIA 

Notable among the musical features of Los Angeles 
cultural life are the daily concerts by the California 
Theatre Concert Orchestra, under the direction of Carli 
D. Elinor. This splendid symphonic body numbers some 
fifty seasoned, experienced musicians, many of whom 
have devoted their careers mostly to grand opera and 
symphony orchestras. Mr. Elinor's orchestral settings 
to the feature pictures at the California reveal, each 
week, the maestro's remarkable knowledge of musical 
literature, both popular and classic, and a visit to this 
rich palace ot the cinema art has a double significance, 
because not only is the California a house ot discrim- 
inating patronage because of its super-productions ot 
the screen, but the programs, as set to these photo-plays 
are so cleverly synchronized as to prove highly educa- 
tional as well as entertaining. 

The California Theatre is under the management o£ 
Fred A. Miller, who, with Mr. Roy Miller, also control 
the Miller Theatre, a half block south. At the latter 
house a new $30,000 Robert Morton symphonic organ is 
being installed, with a view to making the musical fea- 
tures at this theatre take rank with the best in Los 
Angeles motion picture houses. Mr. Charles R. Baker, 
for many years manager ot the San Carlo Grand 
Opera Company, is acting manager of Miller's Theatre. 

Music from Tschaikowsky Fifth Symphony is being 



NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

No musical event in recent years, save perhaps the 
present engagement of the Chicago Grand Opera Com- 
pany, has awakened keener interest among music lovers 
in San Francisco and nearby cities than the coming of 
the nationally famous Philharmonic Orchestra of New 
York. This great orchestral body holds a unique posi- 
tion in the history of musical America. It is the pioneer 
ensemble organization of the country and is held more 
in the nature of a great American inslitution vieing in 
importance with the big opera companies themselves 
than as a musical attraction. The present is the 79th 
season of the New York Philharmonic and records show 
that it is the third oldest symphony orchestra in the 
entire world and the oldest in the United States. It was 
founded in a modest way eight decades ago and year by 
year has grown until its position today ranks it among 
the greatest symphony forces the country possesses. 

The two engagements which Manager Selby C. Oppen- 
heimer has arranged in this vicinity tor the Philharmonic 
are m^de possible only through his giving a substantial 
guarantee to the directors of the orchestra and the fa- 
mous players under the baton of their leader. Josef 
Stransky, and his associate director, Henry Hadley. 
They will play in the Exposition Auditorium on Sunday 
afternoon, April 24th, and in the Greek Theatre on the 
campus of the University of Berkeley on next Saturday 
night, April 23rd. The present arrangement ot the Audi- 
torium will be retained for the orchestral concert. 

The program to be played in Berkeley includes 
Tschaikowsky's Symphony No. 4, Strauss' tone poem 
Death and Transfiguration, Wagner's Tannhauser Over- 
ture, and Hadley's The Culprit Fay. The San Francisco 
program is composed of Beethoven's Fifth (C minor) 
Symphony, Bach's Prelude, Choral and Fugue, Sibelius' 
tone poem The Swan of Tuonela, Wagner's Prelude to 
The Mastersingers and Hadley's symphonic poem Sa- 
lome. Hadley will conduct his own compositions. Tickets 
for these events are now obtainable at Sherman, Clay 

& Co. , . 

BOLM'S BALLET WITH UNIQUE MUSIC 

Perhaps nothing from a theatrical or musical stand- 
point is nearly so fascinating to the average seeker of 
the better form ot entertainment than the interpretation 
of classic music through the medium of the dance. Some 
of the innermost emotions of the great composers are 
best expressed in the dance and the most potent factor 
in developing this medium of musical understanding has 
been the choreographic schools of Russia. 

From this source comes Adolph Bolm, leader of his 
cult and one of the greatest male dancers. San Fran- 
ciscans will remember Bolm as the outstanding feature 
of the Imperial Russian Ballet during the engagement 
at the Valencia Theatre several years ago. 

Bolm has remained in America to assume the direc- 
tion of dancing with the Metropolitan Opera Company 
and during bis regime in the big New York Opera House 
he has extended his fame from virtuoso to director and 
his remarkable production of Rimsky-Korsakott's "Coq 
d'or" has been the mos discussed ballet production the 
Metropolitan has ever undertaken. 

Bolm is now at the head of his own organization of 
Russian dancers which he has termed the "Russian Bal- 
let Intime" and which is now presenting what has been 
termed some beautiful series ot stage pictures. Asso- 
ciated with Bolm in his enterprise is Georges Barrere, 
one of the most noted flutists, conducting the Little 
Symphony, an organization of 14 chosen players pecu- 
liarly adapted to the work their leaders have in hand. ' 

Most unusual and varied programs will be given by 
this delightful combination in the Greek Theatre at 
Berkeley on Saturday night, April 3pth, and at the Col- 
umbia Theatre in San Francisco on the Sunday after- 
noons of May 1st and 8th. The Barrere players will 
offer such seldom heard works as Gretry's Cephale et 
Procris, Hadley's Flowers, Gluck's Orpheus, Pierne's 
For My Little Friends, Gluck's Iphigenie en Aulide, and 
works by Carpenter, Godard, Saint-Saens, Perilhou, etc. 

The dance selections on the various programs are 
made up of interpretations of works by 'Tschaikowsky, 
Schubert, Adolph Adams, Seeling, (31uckhoff, Liszt, 
Glazounoff, Chopin, Mendelssohn, Faure, Prokofleff, De- 
bussy, etc. 

Special curtains and original lighting effects most ar- 
tistically designed are cleverly employed in the inter- 
pretation of these dances, and Manager Oppenheimer 
firmly believes that this attraction will prove to be the 
crowning delight of his extraordinarily heavy musical 
year. ^ 

Kajetatr AttI and Harriett Bennett appeared at the 
High School Auditorium, in Santa Cruz, Calif., on April 
7th. under the auspices of the Saturday Afternoon Club. 
Both the famous harpist and the young soprano were 
enthusiastically received by an audience who were not 
satisfied with the generous number of selections ren- 
dered but insisted upon encore after encore. Their suc- 
cess there was instantaneous and they will no doubt 
meet with a warm and hearty welcome by the musical 
people of Santa Cruz whenever they may have the good 
fortune to appear there. 



Johanna Kristoffy 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 

ThorouKk Vocnl and Dramatic Tralnlns: 

ISae iraaUnetoa St. Phone Pranklln 1721 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



FOLKS NEED A LOT OF LOVINGt br K. A. GIrn 

MY LUV IS like: a red, red ROSE: bT C. DIoom 

Two .Xnv SonciK for Medium Volo« 

nga thut have that human appeal that finds an Instan 



Published by Clayton F 

Henry Grobe, 135 K 



y Co., Chicago, 



m*:. 




The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 



MISSION BRANCH, Hlulon and 21st Streela 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and Tth At«. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, HalKbt and BelTcdere Streeta 

DECEMBER 31gt. 1920 

Assets Ve»,R78,14T.0t 

Deposits 6e,83K,l47.ai 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 



OFFICERS— JOHN A, BUCK, President; GEO. TOURNT. Vice-President and 
Manager; A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-President and Cashier; E. T. KRUSE, Vice- 
President; A. H. MULLER. Secretary; WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary; 
WILLIAM HERRMANN. GEO. SCHAMMEL. G. A. BELCHER. R. A. LAUENSTEIN. 
Assistant Cashiers; C. W. HETER, Manager Mission Branch; W. C. HBYER, 
Manager Park-Presidio District Branch: O. F. PAULSEN. Manager Halght Street 
Branch; GOODFELLOW. EELLS, MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— JOHN A. BUCK, GEO. TOURNY, E. T. KRUSE. 
A. H. R. SCHMIDT. I. N. WALTER, HUGH GOODFELLOW, A. HAAS. B. N. 
VAN BERGEN, ROBERT DOLLAR, E. A. CHRISTENSON, L. S. SHERMAN. 



ALCAZAR 

"Up-to-date plays regardless of royal- 
ties" is the motto being lived up to by 
Belasco & Mayer of the Alcazar Theatre. 
Heretofore it has been the custom of all 
stock managers to put on I he so-called 
"good old shows" and keep down the ex- 
pense. At the Alcazar, under the manage- 
ment of Lionel B. Samuel, a new prece- 
dent has been established. Pay for the 
rlgbt type of plays and the results will 
speak for themselves. Following this 
statement comes the announcement that 
Wedding Bells will be next week's at- 
traction at the Alcazar, It recently played 
at the Curran Theatre in this city to 
$3,00 prices. Today Wedding Bells is the 
sensation of the age in London, England. 

The piece deals with a young man 
who recently secured a divorce from his 
flrst wife owing to the fact that he sin- 
cerely believed that she didn't love him. 
When the play opens he is about to 
marry for the second time, when his con- 
science tells him he must tell some one 
of the former marriage. In order to re- 
lieve his mind he tells his former trou- 



bles to his pal, who is to act as his best 
man at the second wedding, and so the 
play goes on. 

Three Paces East, Anthony Paul Kel- 
ly's dramatic hit, is the current attrac- 
tion played to capacity business. There 
will be the usual Thursday and Saturday 
matinees. 



M. ANTHONY LINDEN 


FAMOUS FLUTE VIRTUOSO 


Now Conducting His Artist Ensemble In a 


Series of Entre Acte Concerts at the 


MaeArlhnr Theatre, Oakland 



Dr. Maxim De Grosz 

Musical Director 
1108 Falton St. Ph. Fillmore 2869 



ADCLE ULMAN 

Pupil of Mme. Giacomo Minkowsky 
accept a limited nurnher of pupils 



The Music calendar for Mills College 
promises to be of especial interest to 
music lovers during the remaining weeks 
of the semester, Friday afternoon, April 
15th, two students who have majored in 
music — Miss Eleanor Klink and Miss 
Gladys Washburn — will give a piano and 
'cello recital in Alumnae Hall on the 
Mills campus. Among the numbers which 
they will play will be compositions from 
Bach, Simon, MacDowell and Rover. 

Sunday afternoon, April 17th, the 
vested choir of the college will give the 
Half Hour of Music at llie Greek Theatre, 
Berkeley. This choir of forty voices will 
sing a processional and recessional, and 
will also sing eight other numbers. The 
choir will be assisted by Miss Anita 
Hough, Miss Lotta Harris, Miss Marian 
Towt and Miss Mona Wood, vocalists. 

Wednesday evening, April 27th, the an- 
nual piano and vocal concert will be held 
at the Fairmont Hotel. San Francisco. 

Sunday, May 1st, the regular organ re- 
cital of Wm. W, Carruth will be given in 
Lisser Hall on the campus. 

Monday, May znd, there will be a stu- 
dent organ recital, also held In Lisser 
Hall. 

Wednesday, May 4th. will be a piano 
recital by Miss Bernice Starratt and Miss 
Isabel Becker, and the following evening, 
Thursday. May 5th. the original composi- 
tion concert, under the direction of Wm. 
J, McCoy will be given at Hotel Oakland, 

Subscribe for the Pacific Coast Musical 
Review. $3.00 per year In advance. 



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NEW YORK ENJOYS ORATORIO FESTIVAL 



Walter Damrosch and New York Symphony With Dis- 
tinguished Soloists and Fine Chorus Present Chil- 
dren's Crusade, St. Matthew's Passion 
and Dream of Gerontius 

By ROSALIE HOUSMAN 

New York, April 3, 1021— The musical season is slow- 
ly coming to an end. and now the most important or- 
chestral concerts are over. The National Orchestra has 
several more concerts to give, and Bodansky is again 
at the helm. The most important music given this past 
•week has been the oratorio festival at the Manhattan 
Opera House, where Walter Damrosch has led the New 
York Symphony Orchestra with chorus and distin- 
guished soloists, in great music. The first performance 
was the Children's Crusade, of Gabriel Pierne, in which 
Miss Garrison and Miss Ottilie Schillig, Mario Chamlee 
and Royal Dadmun had the leading solos. The chorus, 
a massed group of some 800, with many school chil- 
dren besides, were seated on a huge scaffolding which 
filled the vast stage. The music was sung in English, 
and the chorus showed careful rehearsals, m having a 
good attack and clean diction. The music has charm 
and appeal, but is not strikingly original. It was much 
appreciated and the soloists received their well deserved 
share in the applause. The second performance wa,s 
Wednesday evening, the 30th, and the St. Matthews 
Passion of Bach was the ottering. This great and glor- 
ious music was sung with deep reverence for its sacred 
character, and no applause was permitted until the end 
of the first and second sections. The soloists were 
Marie Sundelius, Marguerite D'Alvarez, George Meader, 
William Simmons and Reinald Werrenrath, in his accus- 
tomed part of Jesus. Finer singing or understanding of 
this difficult music I have never heard, with a deep- 
seated seriousness and religious appreciation which 
makes it live long in one's memory. To Meader, who 
had the most diflicult part of all to sing (the Narrator), 
should go stellar honors; his work shows him a 
rare artist and musician. The music lies cruelly high 
for tenor, and in spite of this every word he sang car- 
ried through the place, and was easily understood. Ihe 
other soloists lent distinction to their parts, and the 
chorals were wonderfully well sung. Mme. D'Alvarez 
quite surpassed herself in her share of the work. 

The Dream of Gerontius of Elgar was the next work 
presented, with Chamlee, Frieda Klink and Fred Pat- 
ton as soloists, and this high water mark of English 
choral music was well sung and enjoyed. It is English 
to -the core, efltective, and at times very beautiful, but 
at others extremely dull. A Bach-Wagner program en- 
listing Mme. Easton and Clarence Whitehill, as well as 
the Bach singers from Bethlehem, and also the Verdi 
Requiem, were offerings of the week. In the later, 
Chamlee and Peralta are leading soloists, and it is ex- 
tremely gratifying to find two Califomlans on the list, 
and to know that they acquitted themselves so splen- 
didly. Next week Miss Anglin will co-operate with Mr. 
Damrosch, and two performances of the Iphegenia with 
Mr Damrosch's music will be given. I do not think they 
will be as effective indoors as they were at the Greek 
Theatre, but I am sure they will he most interestingly 
done. 

There were several most interesting events in the 
concert field. The one which stands out as unique was 
the Jlarp Convention's first assembling at Carnegie 
Hall the 29th, when sixty well known harpists assem- 
bled' to play the Handel Largo. It was so impressive 
that they were obliged to repeat it. Miss Maud Morgan, 
veteran artist, led, and later played several solos. John 
Freund of Musical America read a well expressed ad- 
dress and a lengthy program followed, with Viola Bates, 
soprano, as assisting soloist. Mr. Carlos Salzedo brought 
an individual note to the evening in his playing of tlie 
Widor Chorale with Variations, accompanied by his 
own recording of the piano part on the Duo-Art. The 
unity achieved was in every sense remarkable and bal- 
anced, and proved Mr. Salzedo a Duo-Artist in more 
senses than one. The climax of the evening was the Bach 
Suite, in which Salzedo and six of his pupils played. 
It was the same ensemble which recently returned from 
a successful tour. The concert made one conscious of 
the harp's tremendous possibilities, of color and expres- 
sion. X hope it will awaken in the American composer 
a desire to write for the instrument, and enrich its lit- 
erature. There were other convention meetings which I, 
as a member, was requested to attend but unfortu- 
nately could not. 

Nina Koshetz, a Russian soprano recently arrived, 
gave her first concert at the new Town Hall on Easter 
Sunday afternoon, and aroused tremendous enthusiasm 
as she did when soloist with the Scola Cantorum a 
while back. She gave us many novelties in her native 
tongue, none of which was lovelier than an unpublished 
song of Scriabin's, dedicated to her, for her sole use. 
Hers is a name to be remembered, as an artist who 
gives one a real thrill. 

At Mme. Helen Tas' violin recital, the 28th, the 
chief pleasure of a well selected program was the 
Brahms D minor senate, in which she was assisted by 
Bos, and among her shorter numbers Frederick Jacobi's 
Prelude was so well liked that the audience immediate- 
ly demanded a repetition. I understand that Gardner 
played it recently in San Francisco. 

Harold Morris, the young composer-pianist, of whose 
senate I recently wrote, was the concert giver at Aeol- 
ian Hall the afternoon of the 8th, and on this occasion 
presented three sonates. This, in itself, is a rare record 
for any composer, and that they were unusual and 
splendid musically, makes the record that much more 
BO. Morris plays his own music with authority, and is 
musicianly in all he undertakes. John Church has pub- 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

lislicd the one In B minor, and the other two (one tor 
violin and piano. In which he had the assistance of Al- 
bert Stoessel), and one for piano solo, were much en- 
Joyed, and will, I hope, soon reach publication. It is to 
men of Mr. Morris' fine idealism and sterling musician- 
ship that we must look for the development of Ameri- 
can music, and what he has already done proves him 
a standard bearer of wliom we are Justly proud. 

Pianistically, the week had less than usual of Inter- 
est, except the Lhevinne concert, which filled Carnegie 
Hall on the afternoon of April 2nd. He was in wonderful 
form, and his limpid, exquisite tone roused his audience 
to great excitement. His program was made up of many 
unfamiliar things— Beethoven's E fiat variations and 
fugue, several etudes, a Caprice and Prelude of Rubin- 
stein, and a Chopin group. The Rubinstein things were 
of pianistic interest, but expressed little, though Mr. 
Lhevinne played them delightfully. I had not heard him 
for several years, and found the well remembered lyric 
quality and subtle color sense I have always so ad- 
mired, but the rugged, more masculine side I did not 
find, to my personal disappointment. His rare technical 
facilities are a Joy, but I really missed a more personal 
message than he gave us. 

DELIGHTFUL CONCERTS IN HUMBOLDT COUNTY 

The Music Department of the University of California 
Extension Division has arranged two delightful con- 
certs in Humboldt County at the end of the week, one 
at Scotia on Friday evening, April 15th, and the other 
at Areata on Saturday evening. 

The artists who will appear are Marie Hughes Mac- 
quarrie, harpist; Albert E. Rosenthal, 'cellist, and John 



Patton; (a) Pantaele (DonUottl-Zabell, (b) Medley 
(Original), (c) Spanish Dance (TedeschI), Mrs. Mac- 
quarrie; (a) Ave Maria (Schubert), (b) Moment Musi- 
cale (Schubert), (c) Spinning Song (Popper), Mr. Ros- 
enthal; English Group— (a) Clown's Song (Twelfth 
Night) (Schumann), (b) Sigh no More, Ladles (Stev- 
enson), (c) Ford o' Kabul River (Kipllng-Cobb), (d) 
Fuzzy Wuzzy (Kipllng-Whitlng), Mr. Patton. 




SIGNOR ANTONIO DE GRASSI 

The Noted Violin Vlrtnoso Who Will Appear As Solo- 
ist at the California Theatre Tomorrow 



PERCY RECTOR STEPHENS TO CONDUCT HERE 

Conductor of Schumann Club of New York to Conduct 
Chorus of Mixed Voices in San Francisco 



Closing its eighth season, the Schumann Club of New 
York, Percy Rector Stephens, conductor, will perform 
for the first time the prize work of Samuel Richard 
Gaines, A Fantasy on a Russian Folk Song. The Schu- 
mann Club as clubs of like character throughout the 
United States, have felt the dearth of a worthy litera- 
ture To encourage the writing of part songs and can- 
tatas tor women's voices the Schumann Club offered 
prizes to composers of all countries, receiving manu- 
scripts from more than twenty-one different foreign 
countries. The Schumann Club, as a women's chorus, 
is unique, in that it holds a place in the world's music 
center as a convincingly artistic body. Of special in- 
terest to Californians is the announcement of the com- 
ing of the conductor of the Schumann Club to San 
Francisco for a second but last season. Mr. Stephens 
has been engaged to conduct a chorus of mixed voices 
to he selected from singers of the Pacific Coast 



(Sunday) Mornlns 

A. Patton, baritone, all popular musicians of the bay 
cities who have appeared in many recitals throughout 
the state. Mrs. Macquarrie is already known in Hum- 
boldt County as an exceptional musician, for she ap- 
peared at Eureka as harpist with the Trio Moderne re- 
cently and was highly recommended for her mastery of 
the harp and admired for her gracious personality as an 
artist. She has been harpist with the California Thea- 
tre Symphony Orchestra in San Francisco, under Her- 
man Heller. 

Albert E. Rosenthal is one of the leading 'cellists of 
the Pacific Coast. He received his training in Europe 
and has appeared in recitals both there and in America. 
John A. Patton is popular as a baritone in San Fran- 
cisco and the bay cities. The following citicism recently 
appeared in a San Francisco paper: 

"The surprise of the evening came with the appear- 
ance of John A. Patton, who is the possessor of a rich 
baritone voice of unusual quality and beauty. His 
knowledge of voice placing is perfectly demonstrated 
by this gifted singer from whom much may be expected 
in the future." 

The program to be presented has been prepared to 
bring together some of the most charming numbers 
written for harp and 'cello or arranged for the baritone 
voice. The program which will be presented at these 
concerts is as follows; (a) To a Water Lily (MacDow- 
ell), (b) Gavotte (from Sonata in E flat) (Valentim), 
(c) Neapolitan Serenade (Sgambati), Mr. Rosenthal; 
(a) Le Carillon du Vere (Old French), (b) An Clair de 
la Lune (Lully), (c) Le Cor (Ballade) (Plegier), Mr. 



CORTOT CHARMS A CAPACITY AUDIENCE 

Standing Room Only Sign Exhibited at Scottish Rite 

Auditorium When Famous Pianist Plays 

With Assistance of Duo-Art 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

The sort of an audience which every artist enjoys 
playing to greeted Alfred Cortot, the famous French 
pianist, at his only San Francisco appearance this 
season. Thanks to the kindness and generosity of Sher- 
man Clay & Co., who issued invitations to their many 
friends which included nearly the entire musical popu- 
lace of the community, the Scottish Rite Auditorium 
was packed to its doors on the evening of April 6th. 
I am wondering whether this great master, Alfred Cor- 
tot would have drawn such a multitudinous attend- 
ance had the tickets been sold at the regular box office. 
There were a great many there on this occasion who 
are not habitual concert goers, especially if the affair . 
happens to he of a high musical standard such as a 
piano recital. However, upon the receipt of an mvita- 
tion many people find themselves suddenly becoming 
music lovers, therefore this tremendous audience. In- 
deed, these people should feel a debt of gratitude to 
their hosts tor the privilege which was bestowed upon 
them and the great pleasure derived therefrom. 

As Mr. Cortot played at this recent concert he exhib- 
ited pianism at the pinnacle of its possibilities^ It is 
quite easy to see that Mr. Cortot is a man who has 
deepest reverence tor his art. Can one apply the term 
beautiful to personality? If so, Mr. Cortot possesses a 
personality which is imbued with many desrees of 
beauty for his spirituality is evident in his strong yet 
mobile countenance. His modesty and simplicity are m 
themselves charming to behold, while underneath it 
one can not help but feel the strength, the culture and 
refinement of this man's nature. Alfred Cortot was born 
to he a great artist. If one is observing enough they 
could detect this by regarding closely his slender and 
tapering fingers. If he hadn't selected the P>ano as the 
medium for expressing his poetic soul, surely those ex- 
quisite hands and fingers would have revealed art in 
another phase. Perhaps by molding his expressions and 
ideas in marble or conveying them on canvas. 

Cortot's playing is marked for his impeccable taste 
and for his great ability to breathe spirituality and 
an unearthly atmosphere into his interpretations. Pe* 
Die tell me that Vladimir de Pachman was perhaps one 
of the greatest exponents of the works of Chopm Never 
having heard this musician I can not either aflirm or 
dispute this attribute, but I do ^ow that as Alfred 
Cortot played Chopin I can not conceive of it being 
played with more subtlety ot phrasing, a more polished 
style and with a more delicate touch or depth of PO^hc 
exnression. That ever interesting number of the late 
aaude Achille Debussy, entitled La Cathe^-le en6lo«^ 
tie was superbly performed by Mr. Cortot. He createa 
a m'od ^hich p^vailed long after the last tone faded 
and his color effects were of tints of the softest greys, 
bhies and wisterias. One could almost feel the mys- 
Hcisms °n the air. All these uplifting qualities were ex- 
hiWted throughout Mr. Cortot's entire program. He is 
certainly a poet of the piano with genius m his fingers 
'°\n%Tio^^eT:m be both a rare privilege as 
wen Ts Pleasure for the coming generation to sit m 
Thei i^usc'r^ms and listen to Alfred Cortot Play on 
the Duo-Art Reproducing Piano in very much the same 
way as we hear the glorious voices o many «f our 
operatic celebrities on the talking machine today This 

B^ ^ x^i::ss ^^tSi^n ^^^ J 

musicians long after they have finished their earthly 
course! 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



jf^ 


ALICE 


i^pm 


1 GENTLE 


V ^ '^ .^^H 


'' MEZZO 


V^^^^^ 


SOPRANO 


l.a Sialn IMIIaiiol, Mrlrop 

Vfirk) J Draocale Opera 

ICxt'liiNltc 91 


ulltan Opera HouMe (New 
Compan} (Havana) 


HAENSEL 


& JONES 


Arollnn Hull 


Xe«- York 


Faclllc ConKt 


InuBBemeut: 


JESSICA COLBERT 

Hearal BiilKllas, San FraaclKco 



CHICAGO OPERA 
COMPANY 

MARY GARDEN. General Director 

CIVIC AUDITORIUM 

Management, Selby C. Oppenheimcr 

LAST WEEK 

STAR SINGBRS — Hary Garden. Frieda lleinpei. 

RoHn RalMa, \ an C^tirUon. ^luratore, llonel. Jnhn- 

■on, Uaklanoir. KInllnl. CONUICTOKS l-olaeeo. 

Clnilnl. Smallcna 
OrcbeHtra of 7U — llallet — Chorus of 75 
REPERTOIRE 
Monday. Rieolettn; TueHday. Cavallerla and Taic- 
lla.-el: Wednenday. ThaU: Thnrxday. i,olienerIn; 
Saturday luatlnee, Monna Vanna; Saturday nluht. 
Tosra. 

SEATS ON SALE 

at Sherman. Clay A Co.. San FraneUeo 
MANY GOOD SEATS STILL AVAILABLE 



ELSIE COOK (M" E'sie Hughes) 

ENGLISH PIANIST 

Medalist Tobias Matthay Piatioforte School, 

London, Eng. 

SUMMER COURSE FOR 
TEACHERS 

In San Francisco, June 27th to August 6th 
Including Teaching Principles and Interpretation 

Peraonal Addreaai 340 miver.lty Ave., Palo Alto, 
California 



EMERSON 
PIANOS 

Satisfying in Tone 
Dependable in Quality 
Reasonable in Price 

Sherman.play & Co. 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clmj Rlrcefa, Onklnnd 

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FRANK CARROLL GIFFEN 

TKACHKR OK SINGING 

no.l Che.tnut Street, near Hyde 

Appolntmentn by Phone — Proapeet 3320 



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THE NEW YORK 

PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 



JOSEF STRANSKY, Conductor 



HENRY HADLEY, Associate Conductor 



The Pioneer Orchestral Organization— "The history of the Philharmonic Orchestra is the his- 
tory of music in America."— James Gibbons Huneker. 



Two Festival Concerts 

EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM. SAN FRANCISCO 

SUNDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 24 

BACH (prelude, choral and fugue) ; BEETHOVEN (Symphony No 5) • 
HADLEY (Salome); SIBELUS (Swan of Tuonela) ; WAGNER (Mas' 
tersingers). ^ 

GREEK THEATRE, U. C, BERKELEY 
(SATURDAY NIGHT, APRIL 23 

TSCHAIKOWSKY (Symphony No. 4); STRAUSS (Death and Trans, 
figuration); HADLEY (Culprit Fay); WAGNER (Tannhauser). 



Tickets now on sale at Sherman, Clay 4 Co., In San Francisco and Oakland, and at Tupper & Reed 

Varsity Candy Shop and Associated Students Store in Berkeley. • "Pper & need. 

MANAGEMENT SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER 



ZECH ORCHESTRA GIVES AMBITIOUS PROGRAM 

Fine Ensemble Organization Now in Its Sixteenth Year 
Attracts Large Audience and Receives Spon- 
taneous and Genuine Ovation 

The Zech Orchestra, of which William Zech is the 
able and energetic director, gave the second concert 
of its sixteenth season at cialitornia Hall on Tuesday 
evening. April 5th. There was a very large and demon- 
strative audience that practically fllled every corner in 
the large auditorium and that rewarded conductor and 
orchestra with repeated ovations that spoke in no un- 
certain terms of the splendid impression made by the 
concert giving bodies. San Francisco has every reason 
to feel proud of an organization such as the Zech Or- 
chestra, and the young musicians who have become 
members of it have reason to feel gratified with the 
results attained under Mr. Zech's able and skillful 
leadership. 

This orchestra has been in existence during a period 
of sixteen years, and during this time it has never 
ceased to give its regular concert seasons. For this 
reason it has become an institution and Mr, Zech is 
not only entitled to the gratitude of those who have 
directly benefited from his artistic efforts, but to that 
of the community to whom he has presented a number 
of able professional orchestral musicians who have since 
become identified with prominent orchestras from the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra down the line. 

The Zech Orchestra consists essentially of pupils of 
Mr, Zech, However, any young and ambitious musicians 
eager to gain experience in ensemble playing is wel- 
come to enter as a member, provided he or she pos- 
sesses the necessary ability and musical knowledge. The 
rehearsals of the Zech Orchestra are veritable lessons 
in ensemble playing and those fortunate enough to par- 
ticipate in them have no idea how much value they 
receive in return for the nominal fee asked of them 
as monthly dues. The concert recently given is an ex- 
cellent example of the progress made by the Zech 
Orchestra under their distinguished leader. 

The moment the orchestra begins its programs it 
becomes evident that the heart and soul of every 
member is in the work. The conductor dominates the 
body of young musicians who play with precision and 
taste. Even the woodwind and brass sections are above 
the ordinary, and the soloists, most of whom are Mr. 
Zech's pupils, possess poise, ability and musicianship. 
This was the case on this most recent occasion when 
Miss Olive Hyde contributed the solo number. Miss 
Hyde proved to be an artist of many praiseworthy at- 
tributes. She possesses a splendid technic. plays with 
understanding and intelligence, gives the impression of 
having thoroughly grasped the composition before inter- 
preting and deports herself In a modest yet dignified 
and professional manner. 

Every number on the program was worthy of com- 
mendation, but wc hardly are able to spare the space 
to devote to It detailed mention. However, a glance at 
the selections quoted below will convince any musician 
of the Importance of the event and the skill and musi- 
cianship of the orchestra as well as the enterprise and 
ambitions of it.s conductor. The recent concert was one 
of the most enjoyable of the season and the complete 
prngrani was as follows: 



Maurice Lawrence 

ORCHF.STHA CONOl/CTOR 

)050 Waahlncton St. San Pranelaco 

Phone GarHeld DaO 



GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 
MME. MINKOWSKI 

Lata af Ifew York, Berlia aai Draa<«a. Txal leka*!, 
■■■fa aOT. Kaklar A Okaaa BalKlac 



Gaetano Merola 

Conductor 

MANHATTAN GRAND OPERA CO 

and 

SAN CARLO GRAND OPERA CO 

ANNOUNCES 

That he will spend ten weeks In San Francisco 

commencing 

JUNE 1st, 1921 

and will take a limited number ot pupils In voice, 
operatic coaching and tradition 

Addreaa all Coniinunlcatlona to PaelUe Coaat 
->lu>lcal Review 



ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

Published By 

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Frequently Seen on Programs of 

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WERRENRATH 

And Many Other Distinguished American Singers 

TAPS (Baritone or Contralto) 2 Keys 

THE LOOK (Lyric Soprano) 2 Keys 

TARA BINDU (Mezzo) 

RIM OF THE MOON (Tenor) 2 Keys 

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I-"'C COAST Ml SICA I. REVIEW 



AI>I>RF.SS IlOX 2JII. P 







ARTUR 


n 






ARGIEWICZ 

VIOLINIST 

Assistant Concert Master, S. 
P. Symphony— Director Vio- 
lin Dept. Ada Clement Music 
School— Seven years on Fac- 
ulty N, Y. Institute of Musi 






cal Art— Dir. Frank Dam 
rosch. 




Spiritual and distinguished.— Mason In Ex- 
aminer. 

Arglewici wai In admirable form. — Brown 
In Chronicle. 

We do not hesitate to pronounce him a 
vlrtuoio of the flrit rank. — Alfred Motzgar 
In P. C. Musical Review. 






Address Applications to the Seerstary 

CLEMENT MUSIC SCHOOL 

343S Sacramento St. Tel. Fillmore 8M 





SIGNIFICANT MUSIC 



BY ROSALIA HOUSMAN 
What the Dltson's Are Publishing 

Much of the boat and most representative o£ Amer- 
ica's music is pulilished by this enterprising Boston 
lirm— and tliey are equally partial to songs, as they are 
to their up-to-date O. D, series o! good teaching music 
tor piano. That graded course Is an honor to the firm 
which issues it. , , 

Let me speak of songs first, and as I have a veiy 
large collection I will only be able to discuss the songs 
which are the most significant. There is a fine list ap- 
propriate for Easter service— Easter Morn (Bible Song) 
of Wm. Armes (tor low or medium voice), is the most 
beautiful; of their anthems, Easter Chimes, Chas. P. 
Scott (mixed voices), At the Sepulchre (mixed voices, 
with bass solo) of G. B. Nevin, and Stanley Avery s 
Lift ttP Your Voices Now (also mixed choir), are the 
ones I can unhesitatingly recommend. 

Getting back to secular music, I find several excep- 
tionally lovely songs. The Song of the Shepherd Boy 
from Stillman Kelly's Pilgrim Progress, is now issued 
separately (for high voice), and it ought to find its place 
on every program where worthy American songs are 
used. After all, what matter who wrote it, if it is only 
that rare thing, good music? ,,,. x v, u t.„„„ 

Then there's a barcarolle, Starry Night, John H. Dens- 
more which is fine teaching material (issued tor both 
high 'and medium voice), a ballad, by that clever and 

;ifh"iusruie"';^ght meCy ^ to? thifsoH^o? s"ngf In ^^ M^^^rT^U^^T^ not in a position to say, but 
r,^n«inf ne^™ dIalecT LiT Rosebud Joe, with melodic it is good music and, after all, that should be our 
reTa^ by E c! Hamilton, Pearl Curran's Flirtation standard. La Fontaine des Gazelles and L'Heure Tra^- 
and Sonny Boy, now both issued tor med: 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

will nnd frequent place on programs of dlBcrlmlnallng 
artists. At the Edge of the Sea Is singable, and has a 
llowing acconipanlinont to sustain its melody. Dry bo 
that Tear is a liner thing, 1 think, and will appeal most- 
ly to the tenor voice. I am told that he was a pupil of 
our own Wallace Sabin. Another reason to endear his 
music to us Westerners. 

Sidney Homer bears a name well known to all of us, 
and in Issuing these Cheerful Songs of his, to Poems of 
American Humor, Schirmer's added a new leaf to Amer- 
ican music. Most of our composers write seriously, so 
it is with positive reliet that we turn to amusing things 
like these. They are in Mr. Homer's characteristic 
vein, and demand a sense of liumor in the interpreter, 
as well as perfect diction, or else over half of their 
charm would be lost. I rather think men will find them 
more usable than women. There are six in the set, and 
I recommend that they all be investigated, as it is 
rather difflcult to decide which is the funniest or the 
cleverest. 

Dirk Foch, a Hollander, now living over here, has 
set four Maeterlinck poems and an English translation 
is provided for the songs. Mr. Foch proves himself to 
be an experienced composer, with a leaning to a very 
modern idiom, and is most successful in writing for 
the voice. 'Whether he has been so with the poems is 
a decision I leave to the interpreter, who is better able 



votte (Lully), Song Without Words (Salnt-Saena), 
Hunting Song, Barcarolle (Heller), Ghosts (Schytte), 
Marlon Clement. 

The concert which took place on April 16th was under 
the direction of Lillian Hodghead and was the followinK: 
A Spring Idylle (Virginia Myaell), Entrance to the For- 
est (Schumann), Ruth Cook; The Little Forest Bird 
(Schytte), Elizabeth Larsh; The Woodpecker (Louise 
Wright), Katharine Eddy; Dropping Waler (Hannah 
Smith), Evelyn Hodghead; To a Waterlily (MacDowell), 
Stella Stevens; The Swan (Palmgren), Preston Ames; 
Butterfly (Grieg), Elizabeth Sherwood; May (Schu- 
mann), The Song of the Lark (Tschaikowsky), Adrienne 
Hedger; The Swallow (Daquin), Devona Doxie; Down 
in the Forest (MacDowell), Margaret Larsli; The Call 
of the Birds (Rameau), The Prophet Bird (Schumann), 
Margaret O'Leary; The Little Shepherd (Debussy), 
Kathryn Kent; From an Indian Lodge (MacDowell), 
Ernst Ophuls; Idylle (Kjerulf), Patrice Nauman; To the 
Sea (MacDowell), Morton Gibbons; At the Seashore 
(Arensky), Louise Zeh; The Eagle (MacDowell), Kath- 
ryn Kent; Clear Moonlight (Debussy), Ruth Cook, 



Rosalie Housman is continuing to meet with great 
success in the East where she is most active as a com- 
poser, teacher and lecturer. On Monday, March 7th, 

^^.„ -- - Miss Housman gave a lecture at the Evander Childs 

^„ judge. Personally, La Vierge Chantant seems the jjigh School and the topic of her discourse was Early 
finest in this set. It demands a flexible sense of rhythm pjano Music. On March 14th, Miss Housman spoke 
and lies high. on Chopin, Liszt and Brahms and on the second of 

Frank St. Leger, one of the assistant conductors of May, she will speak on American Music. Miss Housman, 
the Chicago Opera Association, sends two beautiful who is qualified to an unusual degree to speak — •>-".■' 



French songs, on Arabian poems. Whether the music 



these 
arious subjects, is no doubt meeting with great suc- 
cess as she makes her talks interesting as well as of 
educational value. 



standa: 

quille are the songs and I 



I heartily recommend them. 



Mrs. Alma Schmidt Kennedy, the well known piano 

instructress, is succeeding in presenting several very 

no young artists before the public. Recently two 

musicians gave a recital creating a most favorable im- 

U0.1JU »«-=- — - , rression and reflecting due and just credit upon their 

peal and My Heart Is a Lute, of Eleanor Marum, lor te?.ch.eT for the excellence of their instruction received 
high voice. Sopranos will fall for it surely, and so will under her splendid guidance. At Mrs. Alma Schmidt 
their audiences. 



Service's Heart of Gold. What a ripping fine ballad it 
is for a man to sing to a lady. The poem is simple and 
direct and the music is in every way fitting. 

To come to the O. D. series— I find first to hand, a 
volume of 70 good old dances for piano, arranged by 
James O'Malley and Finlay Atwood. Most of them are 

"andlhere Ve^^omf go^r oJd EngUsh Tef incS. pre^sTnt^^gn^ Anton'ioDe GrlssrnoTed iTalian violin- Senate dp^; 31, No. 2 (d minor) (Beethoven) Largo. 
The book should appeal to teachers for a two-fold pur- fjt ^jth Herman Heller and the California theatre Allegro) Miss Jones; (a Gavotte (Gluck-Brahms), (b) 
Iif..«„.o";„^^i»Lhin.r material with a definite l^^ZWl Th« soloist's program number will be Bruch's Etude, b fiat minor _ (Mendelssohn), (c) Berceuse 



Kennedy's studio, 1537 Euclid Ave., Berkeley, on April 
3rd, Miss Claire Jones and Charles Allen Lewis gave 
a most enjoyable program of piano classics which were 
as follows: (a) Prelude — b fiat minor (Bach), (Well 
The California theatre, next Sunday morning will Tempered Clavichord, Vol. I), (b) Arietta (Leo), (c) 



SIGNOR DE GRASS! AT CALIFORNIA 



pose; first, as good teaching material with a definite orchestra. The soloist's program number 

rhythmic appeal and also that it is excellent material to q Minor Concerto. . ^ ,.. 

give a pupil to read at sight. Children will like these signer De Grassi has made his home in California 

dances and in enjoying them, probably will overcome f^^ ^ number of years and has established an enviable 

many rhythmic difiiculties which have always been reputation here, but prior to his coming to California 

troublesome. . . .^ he concertized extensively in Europe where he studied 

Book three and tour (of the fourth year) of the ^^^g,. such masters as Professor Joachim of Berlin, 

School Credit course are also available, and there are professor Sevcik of Prague and Eugene Ysaye of Brus- 

interesting as well as instructive selections included. I ggjg jjis concerts in London brought him perhaps nis 



find the technical exercises ot good and practical use, 
the illustrations and biographical notes of great ui- 
lerest With these notes are also simple harmonic ex- 
planations of chords; so that the student grows In both 
technical as well as the musical side by side. It is to 
be hoped that these lessons are well understood by 
t..ose teaching them, or else much ot their practical 
.alue will he lost. 
Ditsons are also issuing Graded Piano pieces by Amer 



greatest success, where he was acclaimed an artist of 
the highest attainments. 

Since the upheaval of the European war, he has made 
his home in California, devoting himself to teaching as 
well as concertizing and composing. He has turned out 
a remarkable number of young artists who have ap- 
peared successfully on the concert stage and also won 
the recognition ot learned audiences both for them- 
selves and their master. 



composers, a splendid plan. I received tlie second Director Herman Heller of the ^alitornia orcuesu* (Erahms), (c) Ballade B minor (Brahms), (d) Gavotte 

(B) second half, as well as the third year (A) first has chosen the £°'1°'«'™S, numbers :Kobespieretover- (ciuck-Brahms), Scherzo C sharp minor (Chopin). 



niror-tnr Herman Heller of the California orchestra 
;,?a°^BTreSharrsTeirrthe\lTd7ear(ATfl7st hafctse^n^thrroVwing .numbers; Robe^^^^^^^^^^ 
haS These are franily teaching pieces, and the names jure) by Litolff, Schubert's Unfinished Symphony and 
of most ot these less important American composers ciifl'e's Coronation March. At the console ot the Dig 
are not known to me. However, the music is good, Wurlitzer, Leslie V. Harvey,^ California organist, will 
though not touched by high inspiration. Most proba- 
bly those who teach or study these books will not no- 
tice the lack, and as these are well edited, one will 
use them for practical value. Before closing, let me 
call the teacher's attention to a little book called Musi- 
cal Dictation, by Samuel W. Cole. This book has - 



(Chopin), (d) Prelude, No. 16 (Chopin), (e) Etude, Op. 
25, No. 5 (Chopin), (f) Valse, E flat major (Chopin), 
Miss Jones; Suite (for Two Pianos) (Arensky), Ro- 
mance, Valse, Mr. Lewis and Miss Jones. 

Miss Jones also gave an entire recital of her own at 
her teacher's studio, playing a most difflcult program, 
but overcoming the many intricacies in a most agreeable 
manner. The selections on this occasion were: (a) Pas- 
torale (Angelus) (Corelli-Godowsky), (b) Senate E 
minor (Scarlatti-Tausig), (c) Preludio e Puga D major 
(Bach), (WellTempered Clavichord, Vol. I), (d) Prel- 
udio d minor (Bach), (Well Tempered Clavichord, Vol. 
I), (e) Preludio e flat minor (Bach), (Well Tempered 
Clavichord. Vol. I), (f) Preludio ("Toccata" B flat major 
(Bach), (Well Tempered Clavichord, Vol. I); Sonate 
Op. 31, No. 3, E fiat major (Beethoven), Allegro-Al- 
legretto; (a) Ballade D minor (Brahms), (After the 
Scotch Ballad "Edward"), (b) Ballade D major 



offer Military Polonaise by Chopin. 

KUBELIK TO PLAY 



The Berkeley Ensemble gave the following program 

on March 19th before a very select audience who found 

Mr. Frediani most interesting in his groups of French 

and Russian songs. These he gave with rare taste and 

excellent diction while the work ot both Mr. Lane and 

I, * „„„ ;„ csoT, Trr!,nri<!po on Mr. Hagman was both appreciated and applauded by 

Jan Kubelik will appear but ™«/ /"i °f° ;™°^;f ™ ° t their auditors. The program was the following: O ces- 

cai uiciauou. oj o<.mu=> v.. — .. -...- ..-- ----- his present tour and 1° accommodate all wnowiiiwa ^^^^ ^. pi^g^j.„ji durante). M'ha preso alia sua raena 

special educational advantage and will find a long to hear him Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer has engagea (p^aajge), in Summer Fields (Brahms), Farewell 
needed want. It aims to train the pupil's ear and rhyth- j^g Exposition Auditorium where this event wiiii.a«.e (pranz), Mr. Frediani; Impromptu (Schubert), Mr. Hag- 
mic sense and through doing so, make him actually re- pj^^g ^^ Thursday night, April 28th. KubeuK «'" "^ ^^j^. ggau Soir (Debussy), Bprgere Legere (Wecker- 
spond understandingly to these two important factors heard not only as a virtuoso but as a composer, lorine ^.^^ jeunes fillettes (Weckerlin), L'Adi^u du Mitin 
of all music. There is so little training in schools in program that he will render will include his own uon- (pgggard), II neige (Bemberg), Mr. Frediani; Romance 
this direction, and even less in the private lesson, ^grto in C major, which made a very dehnite ana oe- (gij^gjiug,. jjr. Hagman; Songs My Mother Taught Me 
where the time limit precludes it. I hope that progres- ^j^gij impression in New York and other cities, uiner (Dvorak), Homeland Mine (Gretchanlnoff), Over the 
sive Western teachers will avail themselves ot such a ^orks will include the Beethoven's Romance in G major, gjgppg (Gretchaninoff) , Blue Are Her Eyes (Watts), 



splendid method. Bach's Preludium tor violin only, the Introduction and 

, Rondo Cappriccio of Saint-Saens, Sarasate s Spanish 

Songs From Schirmer's Lists Dance No. 7 and a Paganini number. Pierre Aug'eras 

I have a large collection ot good songs to hand, re- will act in the dual capacity °« P'^no soloist paymg 

cently from the press of this well known firm, and Chopin's Ballade m F^major and as accompanist to M 

it is the significant ones of which I wi ■- '- '" ""*•- ■"-'■-'='- 't'=-i.„»„ t„_ *i„= o.to„i- a. 



Mr. Frediani; Violin Selections, Mr. Lane. 



speak. The Kubelik. Tickets for this event are now on sale at bner- 
name' of Schirmer on a piece of music is, in itself, a man, Clay & Company. 



guaranty of its sterling quality, but even ot this list 
of better things it is quite possible to pick the best. 
This is what this little article will try to do. 

The high water mark has been touched, I feel, by 
the series ot six songs, called Euphonies, by Sigisinund 
Stojowski, who is so well known as a teacher of piano, 
and who has written many delightful things tor his 
own instrument. These are the first songs I have seen 
from his pen, and they bear out the promise of his 



The Arriiiiaga Musical College was the scene where 
Miss Lillian Langfelder gave her excellent piano recital 
on March 2nd. The young artist was ably asslFted on 
the program by Olive Richardes, soprano, who rendered 
two very charming songs in a highly intellectual man- 
ner. Miss Langfelder chose one ot the most classic 
programs to interpret and made a most favorable im- 
pression with the brilliancy of her technic and the 
The young scholars of the Ada Clement Music School delightful clarity of her tone. Her readings were both 
are continuing to give their monthly concerts at the artistic and imbued with emotional color. The program 
school 3435 Sacramento St. At each of these affairs the contained the following selections: Concerto G minor 
students appear before quite a large assembly which is (Mendelspohn), Miss Lilian Langfelder; (a) I,a 'Wally 
most beneficial for them in several respects. It first (Catalani), (b) Sunbeams (Landon Roland). Miss Olive 
of all gives them confidence in their own ability, accus- Richardes; Preludes — No. 1 C major. No. 10 C sharp. No. 



ADA CLEMENT MUSIC SCHOOL ACTIVITIES 



other work. They bear the dedication to his famous toms them to appear before one another, and it also is 17 x fiat major. No. 16 B flat minor (Chopin), Miss Lil- 



country-woman, Mme. Marcella Sembrich, who would 
be their ideal interpreter. Their melodic line is quite 
simple and direct, and though freer rhythmically than 
many songs (probably due to their being originally 
composed in Polish), they offer no difiiculties to the ex- 
perienced artist, who will delight in their charm of line 
and mood. To specify, let me call your attention spe- 
cially to Wert Thou the Lake, and Farewell. 

It is sad to think that Tom Dobson, that young and 
delightful singer, was taken in the flu epidemic, and 



a means to show the progress being accomplished by 
each individual from time to time. Very praiseworthy 
work is being attained at this school, which once again 
demonstrates that it has a very high standard and its 
instructors are both competent as well as sincere and 
earnest. Recently Bailey Millard gave a reading of chil- 
dren's poems which was greatly appreciated. The pro- 
gram of March 5th was rendered by Newell and Marion 
Clement and was as follows: Duet, America, Old Peas- 
ant Dance (Rontgen), Merry Parmer, Wild Rider (Scha- 



that his small, but ever spontaneous voice, is forever mann). Arioso (Handel), Courtly Dance, Hop Scotch 
still. He left several charming songs, which are among (Rogers), Tarantelle (Lynes), Newell Clement; Duet, 
Schirmer's recent offerings, and I am certain that they (Dalcroze),- Prelude (Bach), Two Preludes (Chopin), Ga- 



lian Langfelder; (a) The Bird ot the Wilderness (Hors- 
man), (b) "Voi lo Sapete" — Cavalleria Rusticana (Mas- 
cagni). Miss Olive Richards; Chanson Negre — "Le Ban- 
anier" (Gottschalk), Caprice Espagnole (Moszkowski), 
Miss Lillian Langfelder. 

Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Orfcan, Harmony. OrKBnlat and Hnnlcal 
DIreetor of Flmt Prenbyfertan Ohorcta. Alameda. Home 
Stndlot HIT PARU STREET, AI^AMEflA. Telephone AU- 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Cecil Fanning 

Baritone 

H. B. TURPiaf, Aceompanlal 

Addrcaai L. E. Buhrnttr, Aodltorluiii Bide, 
Loa ABKclaa, CaU or Mra. Jeaaica Colbert, 
Ml Hear>t Bide. San Franrlaro. Cal. 

KAJETAN ATTL 



trm. Available tor Coucertv, Recitals and 
InatmclloD. 

Stvdioi lOM Kohler A Ckaae Bnlldloc 
Rew. Phoac Bay View 619 

Jean Criticos 

Scientific EmUaloB of Voice 

nea. Stndloi 331 HIshlaDd Ave., Piedmont 

Tel. Piedmont 78J 

In Kohler £ Chaae BIdK. 

Studio 7(KI — Mon.. AVeil. and FrI. 

PAUL STEINDORPr 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Language* 

6302 Broadway .... Oakland 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

PIANO 

lSa4 l.nrkin St. 
Phone Frnukllo SglS 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 



MISS EMILIE LANCEL 

MEZZO SOPRANO 

Concert and Opera 

433 18th Atc. Phone Bar View 1461 

ZHAY CLARK 

SOLO HARPIST 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE ORCHESTRA 
SOFIA NEWLAND NEDSTADT 



Kohler & Chn 

MISS ETHEL PALMER 

l(r|>r<->cn<iitlve 

ADA CLEMENT PIANO SCHOOL 

Aealdence Sfudio, 204 A Street. San Rafael 

Telephone San Rafael 842-J 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

2001 California St., San Francisco. Tel. 
Fillmore 2539. Institute of Music, K. & 
C. Bids-.. Tel. Kearny 5454. 



Regulatlns and Repairing and Playe 

Piano Work. 

'='or further information apply 

'Weatem School of Piano Tonlns: 

Cor. LsBuna and Hayes Sts. Ph. Mkt. 1753. 



Call 



rite for book! 



SUZANNE PASMORE-BROOKS 

PIANIST 

SIndlOMi not! Kohler & Choac Blde.t 1717 
Vallcjo St., S. F.; 20O4 Garber St., Berkeler. 

PERCY A. R. DOW 



: Ocean View Or„ Oakland IRealdence) 

DOUILLET CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

ITBl JackaoB St. Saa Fv«Belse«, CaL 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 

Stndla, WS-WM KOHLER Jt CHASE BLDO. 

Phone Kearnj K4S4 



MRS. CHARLES POULTEK 
■•rmAHO St. Aadrewa Chareh 

Valee Cullnre. Piano. BSD 37tk St„ Oak- 
Ub«. TeL 1»7>. Kakler Jt Chaaa Bids. 
Wa4>aadaTa T*L K^-imr MM. 



Mrs. William Steinbach 

VOICE CULTURE 

Studio: 

802 KOHLER A CHASE BLDO. 

San PrancUco Phonei Kearar 54M 

MISS CHRISTINE HOWELLS 

FLUTIST 

Available fnr Coocerta aa SoIoUt or for 
Obllcato Work. Rca., Belvedere. Marin 
CoDDtr. Tel. Belvedere 11W 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRALTO 
Voice Culture. Suite "C" Kohler A Ckaae 
Bnlldlns. Telephone Kenrny S4S4. 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

ORGANIST ST. MARY'S CATHBDRAL 

Piano Departmentp Hnmlla School 
Orson and Piano, Arrlllaitia Maalcol ColleK« 

ANIL DEER STUDIO 



JOSEPH B. CAREY 

Compoaer and ArrnuKer of Mualc 

Rraldcuce Sludloi 37S Golden Gate Ave., 

Frniiklln 7I)HI. l>nu(nttra Theatre BIdff.. 

Snn Fnincl.co. Gnrllrld 4n,'i. 

MISS FRANCES MARTIN 

CONCERT PIANIST AND TEACHER 
Re>. Studio: UOl GeorKla St,. Vallejo, Cal. 

MRS. EDWARD E. BRUNER 

SOPRANOl ATallable for Encasementa 
Studl.i 8M 4Srd Ave. Phone! Pae. SaSO 

VICTOR LICHTENSTEIN 

VIOLINIST — CONDI C TOR — l.l-:< Tl IIKIt 
I'uplla Accepted In Violin mid lOuMcniblc 

PInyluK 

Studio 701 Heine Hide. Stockton ur. Sutter 

PhoiiCM; duller 32.-.li Krnriiy II7I1 

LOUISE BREHANY 

Voice Culture 

Diploma Royal .\cadcmy. Route, Italy. 
Bide. Phone KenrDy 
uei Franklin 4086 

ETHEL A. JOH?iSON 

SOPRANO 

Member University Extension Faculty 
Studio: 506 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 
Res.: 51 Buena Vista Terrace 
Tel.: Park 129 1 

Miss Lena Frazee 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 'L®®"?''^ ThompSOn 



Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 



Phone Fillmore 1847 



SIR HENRY HEYMAN 

SOLO VIOLINIST MUSICAL DIRECTOR 
Teacher VloUa, Viola, Enaemble PlayUc 
434 Spmee Street. Phone Fillmore 1181 



RUDY SEIGER 

Qeneral Hnalcal Director 

D. H. Llaard Hotel* Palace and Fairmont 

In San FraacUca 



Geo. Stewart McManus, Pianist 



FREDERICK MAURER 

Teacher of Piano and Harmony. Ensemble, 
Coaching. Stodio t 1 726 Le Ror Avenae, 
Derkeiey. Phone Berkeley 539. 



Ada Clement Music School 

3435 Sacramento St. Phone Fillmore 898 

MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 



Brandt's Conservatory of Music 



Noah Brandt. Piano 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Sololat, Temple Kmnnn Kl. Con- 
cert and Church 'Work. Vocal Inatmc- 
tlon. 3639 Clay St., Phone West 4890. 



JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 

BARITONE 

lioa Bnah Street, San Franrlaco 

RMld.nee Phone Franklia IHM8 



Marion Ramon Wilson 



1801 CalltornU St. Tel. Proapeet MM. 



Marie Huges Macquarrie ^ary Coonan McCrea 



Solo Harpist anil Accompanist 

Harpist Trio Moderne 

1115 Taylor St. Tel. Franklin 8425 

ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 



Oakland. TeL Pledm«n< BOSS. 



TEACHER OP SINOINO 

Ease off Production and Purity off Tone 

S7« Sutter St. tTuea.. n'ed. and Thara.) 

ALEXANDER GROMOFF 

Art — Science Vocal Culture 

003 Kohler A Chaae BldK. 

Hour. 5 to p. m. Phone Douslaaa {^432 



ruction in cho 
nil ballet dancing 

Kearnr 2205 



Leonard A. Baxter 

Dramatic Stndlo 

41 Grove St.. Near I.arkin — Civic Cent 

ProffcMHlonal InHtructlou In 

Actlne, Stnse Technique, Fencing. 

Make-up. Voice nnd Expreaaion 



Ruth Degnan 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



SIGISMONDO MARTINEZ 
661 Hyde Street Phone Franklin 8211 

ELIZABETH SIMPSON 
2518^ Etna St., Berkeley. Tel. Berk. 1118 

MISS EDITH CAUBU 
37« Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 

MRS. JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

ETHEL DENNY 
904 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 5454 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
3406 Clay St. Tel, Prosp. 3208 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal. 

MABEL MARBLE 

901 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 5454 

WALTER FRANK WENZEL 
1916 Golden Gate Ave. Fillmore 4733 



MRS. OLIVE REED CUSHMAN 
433 Elwood Ave.. Oakland. Tel. Oak. 6164 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 
301 Spruce Street PaclBc 1670 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

1913 Uaker St. Phone West 1347 

MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 467 

ESTHER MUNDELL 
376 Suiter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

MME. M. TROMBONl 
Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny 6464 

JOHN A. PATTON 
900 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6464 

VIRGINIA PIERCE ROVERE 
2139 Pierce St., San Francisco 



ANDRE FERRIER 

1470 Washington St, Tel. Franklin 3322 



MARGARET JARMAN CHEESEMAN 

701 Post St. Tel. Franklin e«20 



OTTO RAUHUT 
3B7 Arguello Blvd. Phone Paclflc 3661 



ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6414 



MME. DE GRAS8I 

'..'.S Russell St., Berk. Tel. Berk, 1724 



G, JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter Street Phone Kaaray M17 



ORLEY SEE 
1004 Kohler A Chase Bide. Tel Douc. KTI 



JLO PIANISTS AND ACCOMPANISTS 



HAZEL M. NICHOLS 

570 Merrimac St., Oak. Lakeside 6435 



BROOKS PARKER 
Palace Hotel, San Francisco 

Cl.ARlNKT 

H. B, RANDALL 

1770 Grove St. West 8064 



FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF EXPERTS IN 

MANUFACTURING AND REPAIRING OF 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



BAND AND ORCHESTRA 



BOLANDER INSTRUMENT CO. 

54 Kearny Street Douglas 3340 

H. C. HANSON MUSIC HOUSE 
140 O'Farrell St. Sutter 4467 

M l 

REED AND MOUTHPIECE MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 

789 Mission St. Sutter 6356 

PHONOGRAPH REPAIRING 

PHONOGRAPH SERVICE STATION 
539 Valencia St. Park 2222 



F. A. LUTZ 

45 Geary St. Douglas 2127 



MAX W. SCHMIDT 

216 Pantages Bldg., Oakland 



RELIABLE PIANO TUNERS AND 
REPAIRERS 



DEITEMEIER PIANO CO. 
853 Valencia Street Mission 477 

MR. H. J. MORGAN 
69 Haight St. Mission 3660 



J. C. LAW LOR 



l''lllmorc SUON 



COSTI'MERS 



GOLDSTEIN & CO. 

SS3 Market St. San Francisco 

STUDIO TO SUB-LET 



nrlil Ii:i7. Michl, 

Oiga Block Barrett, pianist, and Emil 
Rossel, violinisi, gave a very lovely pro- 
gram on Monday, April 4th, at the Chan- 
ning Auxiliary, which was rendered at the 
|-lrst Unitarian Church. They were both 
greeted by a very large audience who 
tended them a very enthusiastic welcome. 
After each group hearty applause demon- 
si rated the great success which they had 
scored. Mr. Rosset rendered the Romance 
(Svendscn), Mazurka (Wienlawskl), Sou- 
venir (Drdla). Olga Block Barrett pUyed 
Etude op. 25, No. 1 (Chopin), Humoreske 
(Schutt). Frelschulz Etudes (Heller). 



Subscribe for the Pacific Coast Musical 
Review, $3.00 per year In advance. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




WAGER SWAYNE 

PIANIST AND ARTIST TEACHER 
of PARIS and NEW YORK 

Now in San Francisco 

2404 Broadway Telephone Fillmore 1905 

Pupili Prepared for Public Playing 




CalifbrTua 



Fifth Grand Concert 

SEASON 1921-22 

Sunday, April 17, 1921, 11 A. M. 

SIGNOR 

ANTONIO DE GRASSI 

Noted Italian Violinist 

offering 

G Minor Concerto Bruch 

California Theatre Orchestra 
HERMAN HELLER, Conductor 

I iiiTt iHMUdM 




GEORGE EDWARDS 

Teacher of 
Piano, Organ and Composition 

Studio 501 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 
Residence 1453 Willard St. 

Phone Park 2135 



JOHN WHITCOMB NASH 

Vocal Studios 
Suite 500, Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Evening classes in Harmony. Especially adapt- 
ed to the needs of the singer. Visitors' cards are 
issued upon request. 

A really remarkable little booklet entitled, "The 
Plain Truth About Voice," is free. We will 
gladly mail it. 



Madam Mackay-Cantell 

TBACHBR OF SINGING 
Careful Voice Building: Repertoire 

[Madam Mackay-Cantell is a cousin of Percy 

Rector Stephens, by whom she is endorsed] 

Kobler & Chase Bld^. Phone Kearny 5454 

ReDldence Studio: 2301 Bancroft Way, Berkeley 

Phone Berk. 4230 J 



Now Ready: Two New Books for Rhythmic 
Development in Children 



RHYTHMIC SONGS 

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2. 

Rhythmic Stunts and Rhythmic Games 

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Adnptloni* and DeHcrlptionM 
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These games were compiled to meet the demand 
tor a new type of rhythmic material, the result of 
the needs of the children in the Demonstration 
Play School, University of California. Mrs. Dor- 
rett has had many interesting experiences in test- 
ing rhythmic games in this school and those 
offered in the collection were tried out during the 
summer session of 1920. 

PRICE $1.00 AND POSTAGE 

WESLEY WEBSTER, Publisher 
San Francisco 



SCHUMANN-HEINK 

Assi^ed by KATHERINE HOFFMANN at the Piano 

Season 1920-21 — Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 




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CYRENA VAN GORDON 



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ROSA RAISA 
CYRENA VAN GORDON 
ALESSANDRO BONCI 
VIRGILIO LAZZARI 



LUCIEN MURATORE 
PIETRO CIMINI 
GENO MARINUZZI 
CARLO CALEFFI 



GEORGES BAKLANOFF 
EDWARD JOHNSON 
GIACOMO RIMINI 
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At our stores from Portland, Oregon, to San Diego, Mason & Hamlin Pianos 
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IJ THE ONLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JQUR.NAL IK THE GEEAT WEST § JJ 



VOL. XL. No. 4 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, APRIL 23. 1921. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



TWO WEEKS' OPERA SEASON BREAKS WORLD RECORD FOR ATTENDANCE 



More than Two Hundred Thousand Dollars Received for Fourteen Performances — Thais and Monna Vanna Pack Auditorium with Nearly 8000 People 
and with Nearly $30,000 in the Box Office — Carmen, Cavalleria and Pagliacci, Lohengrin, Rigoletto, and Tosca Reap Over $25,000 
More than 50,000 Different People Attend Performances of Chicago Opera Association — Two and Three Dol- 
lar Seats Sold Out at Most Performances, Proving San Francisco a Really Musical Community 



MARY GARDEN AN INCOMPARABLE FIORA 

Realistic Performance of Famous Singing Actress as 

Montemezzi's Heroine Arouses Audience to 

High Pitch of Enthusiasm 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

A score lacking dust and cobwebs, which is the usual 
sign of old age. was magnificently presented by the 
artists of the Chicago Opera Company at the Civic 
Auditorium on Thursday evening, April 14th. L'Amore 
dei tre Re, from the pen of Italo Montemezzi, perhaps 
Italy's greatest writer of the modern music drama. 
served to reveal the art of Mary Garden at the zenith 
of its powers. For many years Mary Garden has been 
the source of a controversy of nearly every well known 
critic as well as many well versed in music throughout 
this country. She has puzzled them to such a degree 
that they did not know exactly what stand to take re- 
garding her operatic performances. Mary Garden was 
one of the very first artists to introduce into America 
the works of the modern French school. She was in 



quite apparent that voice is not the principal requisite. 
If the singer is blessed with a voice of rare beauty 
so much the better, but seldom does one find the com- 
bination of vocal perfection with great histrionic abil- 
ity. Miss Garden has not what the Italians would term 
bel-canto in her singing, but what she has is a keen 
sense for dramatic characterization. Her voice is just 
the type of organ one can imagine belonging to a woman 
who is of the temperamental and emotional nature of 
Miss Garden. It serves her purpose and answers every 
demand she puts upon it. Mary Garden is not seeking 
to produce pure and pearl-like tones but she is express- 
ing something far more significant — that of music and 
deep human expression through the medium of her 
voice. Expression and declamation is first and fore- 
most with this artist who is the mistress in the art of 
nuance. The only other artist that I can recall at this 
moment who can produce the tonal colorings, emotional 
and poetical appeal through a voice of not an over- 
abundance of natural beauty, is Yvette Guilbert. 

As Flora, of the Benelli libretto. Miss Garden painted 
a picture of a woman thoroughly human being con- 



was the art of a very great actress. As alert with vi- 
tality as was Miss Garden as Flora. Just so reposeful 
and full of poise will she be when we hear her as 
Monna Vanna. I do not hesitate to proclaim Mary Garden 
as the brainiest singing actress of the day. 

Edward Johnson, a young American tenor, essayed 
the role of Avito and succeeded in making his concep- 
tion of ihe character both ardent and yet tender. His 
voice is '^f excellent quality which he uses with great 
discrimii tion and be possesses a manly bearing which 
adds to t • romantic figure he is endeavoring to portray, 
zzari made a splendid Archibald, making the 
man a character full of strength and singing 
with a dramatic force which enabled him to 
.■i rich, resonant voice to the fullest. His acl- 
oth convincing and thoroughly in keeping with 
the role. The Manfredo of George liaklanoft was most 
interesting for the many personal touches he added in 
his conception of the character. He scored a great suc- 
cess for the excellency of his singing which was on a 
par with his acting. 

Last but by no means the least was the wonderful con- 



Virgilii 
crafty o' 
his mus: 
display 1. 
ing ' 





KlllKI) A III-:MI*KI, 



The Imminent Prima Don 



of the World** 



Unit Furthrr Entabllithrd llrr 



(ilOlUilU l*OI.\(-<-1» 
I Whiini the I'arlflr (oaiit ^Iuh 
mmaiiilltiK FlKiirv I'rriilillnK i 
L'tor'M DfMk at (he I*rrHenf Ti 



reality giving the musical public something new, some- 
thing far beyond their capability of grasping, and when 
one is not receptive and has not the capacity for under- 
standing new works or new methods the result is criti- 
cism and lack of proper appreciation. Richard Wagner, 
who wrote over the heads of his public and was striv- 
ing for new effects, was criticised in the same manner 
as Miss Garden, who us Thais and Melisande as well 
as several other characters of these modernists was 
also condemned. She was of a new era while her public 
was yet living in the past although ready to be re- 
born. However, It did not take this artist long before 
she had converted her American public to her new Ideas 
and modern schooling until she now occupies one of 
the most exalted positions in the musical world. 
Whether one admires Miss Garden's voice or her vocal 
technic is but a matter of personal taste, nevertheless, 
no one, musical or otherwise, can help but bow down 
to and respect the great mentality and the unique per- 
sonality, which i.H hers. 
For the interpretations of the modern music it is 



sumed with the fires of a passionate love. Yet, at the 
same time, she never sacrificed this side of the char- 
acter to the obstruction of the finer and more delicate 
touches. Her duet in the first act with Avito. and also 
in the second, was full of touching appeal, poetic ten- 
derness and charm. No matter ho'w much intensity Miss 
Garden may infuse into her more fervent scenes, like 
a stroke of lightning, she can become as spiritual and 
as mystical as one can possibly imagine. This is one of 
Miss Garden's greatest assets, this instantaneous 
changing from mood to mood with equal consideration 
of every dramatic value. No one can imagine a more 
beautiful picture than Mlas Garden, as she stood on top 
of the high balcony waving her scarf. She seemed lo 
Just naturally fall into poses and gestures, each more 
graceful than the last. Every curve of her lithe and 
beautiful form seemed to express the emotion she was 
vibrant with. Her death scene was both realistic and a 
bit harrowing. The clutching of her fingers while being 
choked by the old blind king and later the loose flop- 
ping of her arms, showing her to be In utter relaxation, 



ducting of Giorgio Polacco who produced many scintil- 
lating and colorful effects. He caused his men to reveal 
the seductive subleties prevalent in the score and con- 
ducted with an acuteness of discernment which can be 
issued only from the mind of a genius. He leads with 
precision and adds a great amount of energy and vigor, 
thus causing the beautiful music of the Montemezzi 
score to reach a most brilliant climax and weave end- 
less emotional glows. 



ROSA RAISA REJUVENATES OLD VERDI OPERA 

Gifted Dramatic Soprano the Recipient of Unbounded 

Applause in Recognition of Her Gorgeous 

Voice and Brilliant Singing 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 
If Verdi's old opera. II Trovatore, were given as the 
Chicago Opera Company presents it. there would be ab- 
solutely no excuse for musical people complaining of 
their being tired of and bored with the works of the 
(Continued on Page 4, Column 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




S T E I N W A Y 

Used and Approved by the Created Piani^s 

■^EACHERS of music on the Pacific Coast, in striking majority, use and approve the Steinway 
piano. The greatest artists on the concert stage use and approve it. The home of dignity, refine- 
ment and distinction unerringly chooses it. 

Liszt, greatest of all pianists, pronounced tlie Steinway greatest of all pianos. Wag- 
ner, Rubinstein, Gounod and their brillliant contemporaries were equally quick to recog- 
nize and acclaim its pre-eminence. 

Each year since those great beginnings, the Steinway has strengthened and increased 
its prestige with those who made and those who love great music. 

One ot the reasons tor this is that the Steinway has always been made under the 
personal direction and the personal ownership of the Steinway family. 

All the materials which go into a Steinway are available to the whole world — but 
the genius which transmutes them into Steinway Tone begins and ends with Steinway. 

To make a piano is one thing — to make a piano for the immortals is another. 

Paderewski, Hofmann, Rachmaninoff — the Steinway is their chosen instrument just 
as it was Liszt's. 

Is there any wonder that the mere presence of a Steinway in a home is a token of 
musical authority and distinction? 

We carry everything in Music — Steinn'ay and other Pianos, Pianola and Duo-Art 
Pianos, Aeolian Pipe Organs, Robert Morton Cathedral Organs, Victrolas and 
Victor Records, Player Rolls, Conn Band Instruments, String and Orchestral In- 
struments, Sheet Music and Music Books. 

Sherman, Lfiay& Go. 

Kearny eind Sutter Streets, San Francisco. 

Fourteenth and Clay Streets, Oakland 

Sacramento — Stockton — Fresno — Vallejo — San Jose 

Portland — Seattle — Tacoma — Spokane 




The JEANNE JOMELLI 

VOCAL STUDIOS 

HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van Ness Ave., at Geary St., 
San Francisco 

Announces the addition of a 

VIOLIN DEPARTMENT 

Under the direction of 

SIGNOR ANTONIO de GRASS! 

Formerly of Loudon 

Signer de Grassi was a pupil of 

Ysaye, Joachim and SevcikI 



Piano, Organ and Tlieory Department 

Under 

GEORGE EDWARDS 

PoHt- Graduate of the Chicago Musical College 



PUPILS TfOW BEING ENROLLED 

Pupils are also now being enrolled for the French 
and SpnuiHU Classes. 

TEL. FRANKLIN 2381 



Arrillaga Musical College 

Feruaudo Mlcbeleno, President; 
A. L. ArtiguCH, VIcc-Prea.; V. de ArrlllnEaf Director 
Unexcelled facilitlcm for the study of music In all 
Its branches, Lorge Pipe Organ. Recital Hall. 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
San Francisco, Cal. Phone West 4737 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
or MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGORY, Director 

LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

CONTRALTO 
Taaeher of Slnsins. Complete Conrae of Operatic Traia- 
l»g. arwt Pleree g«. Tel. FUlmore 4BB3. 

MME. CARRINGTON L.B'WYS 

FrltDS Donna Wltli Strakosch, Hapleaon, Bte. 

EMCYN LEWYS 

Oreanlat Fifth Charch of Chrlat SdentUt. Formerly 

Principal of Vlrgrll Piano School, London, Eneland. 

Re,. Studio: 2041 Lyon Street. Phone Fillmore 652 



By JOHN STEVEN McGROARTY 

Tenth Year 

At Old San Gabriel Mission 

Now Open With 

FREDERICK WARDE 

The Famous Shakesperean Actor and 

Cast of Over 100 Players 

Ticket Offices: 

LOS ANGELES : Ground Floor Pacific Electric 
Building, Sixth and Main streets. Tel. 13123 — 13026. 
Box Office, Alhambra 198. 

Performances Every Afternoon — Except Mondays — 
At 2:15. Evenings, Wednesday and Saturday, at 8:15 
Prices, 91.00, 91^.50, 92>00. 93.00 — All Seats Reserred 
E. K. Hoak, General Manager, Van Nuys Building, 
Los Angeles, California. 

Take Pacific Electric Car 



MRS. S. P. MARRACCI, Vocal Teacher IRENE HOWLAND NICOLL 



Vocally and in Dramatic Deportihent. 



Studio, 464 Colnmbns Avenue. 



Phone Garfleld 2278 



Costa Ave., Berk, — S. F.» Sat. Aft., 006 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING. Director 

3243 Washington Street, near Presidio Avenue 

San Francisco, Cal. 

For further information address the secretary of the 

school, or phone Fillmore 395. 

List Your Wants with the 

MUSICAL ARTIST TBACHERS AGENCY 

New York San Diego 

Now Is the time to place your applications for next 
season. Many positions open both East and West. Ad- 
dress Mrs. Bertha Slocum, 1834 First St.. Western repre- 
sentative. San Diego, Calif. 



NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Confers Degrees Awards CertlUcates 

For Particulani apply to Sister Superior 

MME. LEONORE GORDON FOY 

Dramatic Soprano — Opera and Voice 
Studio: Claremont Hotel Telephone; Berkeley »300 

Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 
Music Courses Thorouffh and Progressive 
Public School Music, Accredited Diploma 

SIGMUND BEEL 

Concert Master of L. A. Symphony Orchestra dnrlnc last 
four yeara, 'will accept pupils in advanced violin and en- 
semble playlnc. Studio 1373 Post St. Phone Prospect 767 

THE PAiSMORE SYSTEM OF VOCAL TECHNIQUE 



rado Road. Berkeley. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparinc Teacher for 
MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT. Pianist 

201& Uroderick St., near Clay Telephone Fillmore 314 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 

PIANIST — ACCOMPANIST— TEACHER 
Stndioi SX7 Shrader St. Phone Park I«M 



LEN BARNES 



UDA WALDROP 

PLANIST ACCOMPANIST 

Instruction In Piano and Pipe Orcan, Vocal Coachlns* 

Or^aulst and Choir Director St. Luke's Episcopal Chnreh. 

Studio: 308 Lacnst St. Tel, Fillmore 1070 



WALLACE A. SABIN 



St., Phone Franklin 2«03t Sat., First ChrUtlan Scfen 

Church. Phone Franklin 1807) Res. studio, 3X42 Lewtatan 
Ave Berkeley. Phone Piedmont 2428. 



Miss Myra Lumbard Palache 

PIANIST AND ACCOMPANIST 

Available for Concerts, Season 1920-1021 

20 Brookslde {ott Claremont Avenue), Berkeley 

Phone Berkeley 4001 

SENORITA TEODELINDA TERAN 

Cello— Piano taugrht by Matthay Touch Method of the 
Royal Academy of London. For appointments Ph^e, fram 
7 to P. H.. Prospect eS44 — Gaffney BuUdSnff. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Tl THE ONLYlVl^EKLY MUSICAL JOURNAL IK THE GP£AT W£5T I I] 
PubllNhea Every Saturday by the 
MUSICAL REVIEW COHPANV 

AI.FRED METZGER Prealdrnt 

THOS. E. ATKINSON Vlce-Prealdrnt 

MARCrS L. SAMUELS Secretory and Treanurer 

Suite NOl Kohler it Chaae Bids.. 26 O'Parrell St., Snn 
Pranclnco, Cal. Tel. Kearny MM 

ALFRED METZGER - Editor 

CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE - Asst. Editor 
B. W. JELICA - Advertising Manager 

New York Office, 139 Weat Seth Street 
Mlaa Roaalte Houaman In Cbarse 

Oakland-Berfceley-Alamedn Office 

2301 Banerort Way, Berkeley, Telephone Berkeley 4230J 

L. Mackay-Cantell In Charge 

Seattle Office, 1S21 Fifteenth Aye., Seattle, WaahluKton 
Hra. Abble Gerrlah-Jonea In Charice 

Loa Anselea Office 

70S Philharmonic Andltorlum. Tel. Pico Z4M 

Bruno David Uaaher In Cbarce 

San DIeco, CaL, Office, 1834 PIrat Street 
Mra. Bertha Slocum la Charge 



Vol. XL 



Saturday, April 23, 1921 



Ne. 4 



■ at S. F. Poatoffice. 



TWENTIETH YEAR 



MISSION PRESERVATION FUND 

Believing that the Old Spanish Missions in Cali- 
fornia are of tlie utmost value to the State from a 
commercial and historical, to say nothing of a spir- 
itual point of view, knowing that they are a price- 
less treasure, impossible to duplicate, and realizing 
that unless IMMEDIATE action is taken they will 
crumble and totter into irreparable decay, John 
Steven McGroarty, author of the Mission Play, with 
the co-operation of the Mission Players, and the 
able assistance and support of E. K. Hoak. has or- 
ganized the Mission Preservation Fund. It is a plan 
so simple and direct, so absolutely devoid of the 
evils of red tape and the complexities of differing 
interests, that it carries the conviction of success 
at once. 



With the artistic, consistent and perpetual preser- 
vation of the California Missions as its object, it 
asks the co-operation of every Californian, either by 
birth or adoption, to become a member of the Mis- 
sion Preservation Fund. The annual dues are one 
dollar — less than two cents a week. Is there a man, 
woman or child in California who can't afford to 
give that much for the preservation of the most sig- 
nificant historical monument in the country? 



Virginia has made Mt. Vernon, the home of 
Washington, one of the most beautiful and inter- 
esting places in .America ; Massachusetts has im- 
mortalized Plymouth Rock; Pennsylvania has care- 
fully guarded and preserved Independence Hall — 
what will California do for her Missions? It is an 
individual que.stion. From a commercial angle, the 
drawing power of the Missions is of interest to 
everyone. Thousands of tourists come to California 
lo visit them, and shudder at their pitiful condi- 
tion, and wonder at the a])athy of the people who 
should preserve them. 



So, you are asked to help. Those interested in or- 
ganizing the Fund, did so out of sheer love for the 
Missions. No salaries will be paid to executives, 
there are no over-head or under-hand expenses to 
be met, merely incidentals of stationery and post- 
age, as the officer and clerical staff of the Mission 
Play will be utilized to han<lle the business of the 
Mission Preservation Fund. When John Steven Mc- 
Groarty, he of the loyal California heart, wrote the 
Mission Play, it was with the idea of awakening 
people's minds and hearts to the value and beauty 
and importance of the Missions, and with the hope 
of their ultimate preservation. 



In the New Mission Playhouse there will be a 
suite of offices for the Mission Preservation Fund. 
The two interests are linked in purpose, and the 
first hundred dollars of the Fund were subscribed 
by the Mission Players. It is the aim of the organ- 
ization to have one hundred thou.sand Californians 
as members within the next sixty days. As the Mis- 
sion Preservation Fund grows, representative men 
in the various localities of the State will be asked 
to take charge of their districts, but the actual ex- 
penditure of the money will be under the direction 
of a capable committee, and all building and restora- 
tion plans will be supervised by Arthur I3enton, the 
national authority on Mission architecture, whose 
(ilenwood Mission Inn and New Mission Play- 
house at San Gabriel are two of the most distinct- 
ive examples of Spanish Mission buildings in the 
coimtry. 

John Steven McGroarty is Director General and 
E. K. Hoak P)Usiness Manager of the Fund. Mem- 
berships will be received at the California offices of 
tlie Pacific Coast Musical Review in San Franci.sco, 
I. OS .'Xngeles and San Diego, which in turn will be 
forwarded to the main office of the Mission Pre- 
servation Fund, and certificates of membership 
mailed direct to subscribers. 



A TRIBUTE TO A GREAT MASTER 



Now that the Chicago Opera .Association's San 
Francisco sea.son has been concluded in a manner 
justifying this community to feel proud of the 
showing it made, we feel inclined to bestow a well 
merited tribute upon one of the most commanding 
figures of the engagement, namely, Giorgio Pol- 
acco. The writer did not have to wait until Polacco 
conquered for himself the leading position he oc- 
cupies today in the world of music to realize his 
unquestionable genius. When he first appeared in 
the Tivoli Opera House sixteen years ago he had 
our deepest respect and admiration. We felt at 
that time that he was a master of his craft, a born 
conductor, a musician from tip to toe and a genius 
who dominated any body of artists over whom he 
may be called upon to wield his baton. Mary Gar- 
den, although we were already certain of her in- 
tellectual power, rose even higher in our estiina- 
tion when she chose Giorgio Polacco as the prin- 
cipal conductor of the Chicago Opera .As-sociation. 



Since his appearances in the Tivoli Opera 
House Mr. Polacco followed Toscanini at the 
Metropolitan Opera House, New York. Campa- 
nini at Covcnt Garden, London, was the first for- 
eigner to conduct French opera in Paris at the 
request of composers and distinguished directors, 
and in other ways attracted the calcium of public 
attention upon his artistic life. He stands before 
us today as the latest addition to the world's 
greatest operatic conductors, and among those 
active at present, and whose ability and reputa- 
tion we know, we regard Giorgio Polacco as the 
greatest of them all. We do not like to make this 
broad statement without giving our reason. 



We watched Mr. Polacco conduct the perform- 
ance of Cavalleria Rusticana from the first row 
of the orchestra pit, and we became convinced 
that our estimate of his genius is not exaggerated. 
He never once looked upon the score. He had his 
eyes and cars everywhere. He knew every note 
of the score. At times he would give some musi- 
cians in the orchestra the signal to fall in, while 
singing along with principals and chorus, giving 
cues, telling the people on the stage to move for- 
ward or to leave and paying attention to every 
shade and nuance on the score by remarks and 
certain expressive gestures of hi.s hand or baton. 
We found exceptional educational value in watch- 
ing Mr. Polacco's mode of conducting. Nothing 
escaped him. And when Muratore, after the first 
act of Pagliacci, took him by the hand and led 
him before the curtain he bestowed a homage well 
merited. 



L'.VnKjre dei Tre Re. Here symphonic knowledge 
is necessary to secure the artistic effects the score 
demands. Giorgio Polacco made a veritable sym 
l)hony of this score. We had heard this opera be- 
fore, but we never realized the beauties it con- 
tains until we heard Polacco conduct it last week. 
W'c sincerely trust that before long (iiorgio Pol- 
acco will have the opportunity to conduct sym- 
phony concerts in this country. We predict he 
will make a sensational success, as he already 
has done in the operatic field. 



Mr. Polacco is not only a conductor, he is an 
artist as well. Unless a performance can be pro- 
duced according to the highest artistic principles 
Mr. Polacco will not conduct it. He has in him 
that material and that musical knowledge which 
makes him as fine a symphony conductor as an 
operatic director. Take for instance the opera 



Prior to his accepting the engagement as prin- 
cipal conductor of the Chicago (Jpera Association 
Polacco had signed a contract with the Colon 
Theatre of Buenos Ayres to act as artistic and 
orchestra director this year. And although he no 
doubt would jjrefcr to rest after these two weeks 
of strenuous effort with the Chicago Opera Asso- 
ciation he will leave, almost immediately after the 
company closes its tour in Denver, for South 
.America. It is an unusual honor and distinction 
to be called to the Colon Theatre in Buenos 
Ayres. No admission" tickets are sold. The entire 
season is given through subscription. Only the 
greatest artists are engaged. It is the most unique 
and in many ways the greatest opera season in 
the world. Polacco is exactly the man for such a 
great distinction. And so we rejoice in the recog- 
nition of Giorgio Polacco as one of the world's 
great masters of the baton. As we expected his 
fame has become international. He has been re- 
warded with the triumph of artistic achievement 
and recognition. And what is the most wonderfu' 
thing of it all he remains the same courteous, 
modest, likable fellow it has ever been our pleas 
ure to call friend. 

ALFRED METZGER. 



THE PASSING OF OSCAR WEIL 



With the death of Oscar Weil on Thursday. 
..April 14th, San Francisco's musical colony lost 
one of its most important and in a way mos 
unique members. Only a day or two before hi; 
sudden death, which was the result of acute in- 
digestion, he attended to his lessons and his regu 
lar work as hale and hearty as anyone, although 
already enjoying the ripe age of eighty-two years. 
We saw him last at the Levitzky concert whis- 
pering, as was his wont, his opinions regarding 
the merits of the artist or the composition as the 
case might be. Mr. Weil was a genuine musician 
of the old school. He was conservative to the 
last degree and could not be reconciled to the new 
school which is trying to make arithmetical prob- 
lems of an emotional art. 



Oscar Weil passed most of his life in San Fran- 
cisco. We found some of his able critical reviews 
in old numbers of the Argonaut as early as in the 
'seventies. He wrote constructive from a technical 
jjoint of view, but was unmerciful in his strictures 
upon those whose ability he questioned. He was 
a very able writer, but very caustic in his style, 
frequently employing biting sarcasm. He was as 
uncompromising in his critical attitude toward 
that which was inefficient, as he was in his atti- 
tude toward ultra modernism for which he could 
find no excuse. His knowledge of music was un- 
cannily accurate, and his memory something to 
be marveled at. As a theoretical musician he had 
no superior anywhere. He made staunch and de- 
voted friends and bitter enemies. The former, be- 
cause of the respect they entertained for his 
knowledge and his loyalty to them, the latter be- 
cause of his habit of telling the truth without fear 
or favor. 



< )scar Weil was a pedagogue of the old school 
believing in thoroughness and educating young 
musicians according to the rules of absolute effi- 
ciency without arousing false hopes or making 
his lessons merely commercial propositions. When 
you studied with Weil you were sure to know 
your business. He was a composer who wrote lit- 
tle, but that which he wrote was excellent in 
every way, both as to inspiration and technical 
construction. He represented San Francisco's 
most picturesque and characteristic musical fig- 
ure. He will be missed by hundreds. His place 
can never be filled. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSirAL REVIEW 



TIIK OPERA 



(Continufd I'l'om Pago I. Column 3) 
oUUm- musters. It la not because we have heard these 
operas hummed to us ever since our childhood days that 
we llnd these strains monotonous and tiresome, for what 
was music to our oars then should still remain melodious 
to us now. The melodies of these operas have not 
changed, but unfortunately it is the standard of the 
artists that has deteriorated. These beautiful arias with 
their many long sustained and coloratura passages which 
call for the real hen canto style of singing and beauty 
of vocal technique can reveal their true loveliness only 
when interpreted by great artists. Why many of us have 
become bored with these tunes is because we have heard 
them so often distorted in such a manner by inferior 
singers that Giusseppi himself, were he alive, never 
would have recognized what he had written. On the 
other hand, when 11 Trovatore is conducted by a master 
such, as Mr. Cimini proves to be and Leonore sung as 
only Rosa Raisa can sing her, then, new life is trans- 
mitted into what we thought to be a hackneyed score. 

A better vehicle to disclose the artistry of Rosa Raisa 
cannot be imagined. Vocally and temperamentally it 
suits her as if the composer had just such a singer in 
mind when he received his inspiration. Madame Raisa 
has endless vocal resources, there seeming to be no 
limit to the compass of her voice or the volume of her 
tones. And what is so exquisite in all the young woman 
achieves lies in the fact that she never puts quantity 
before quality. Her singing is always accomplished with 
the greatest facility, her coloratura work and her trills 
are on a par with her dramatic delineation while the 
tonal beauty and brilliancy is a rare musical feast for the 
ear. The quality of Madame Raisa's voice is of such rav- 
ishing beauty that words almost fail to express its rarity. 
One cannot conceive of a more exquisite upper register 
with her opulent, clear and ringing tones. The middle 
portions of her voice are as mellow, as luscious and 
velvety as a mezzo-soprano, and the real wonder of it 
all is that the voice is equalized in quality and beauty 
throughout. Her pianissimo and mezzo voce in the ex- 
treme heights are thrown forth without stint, never 
losing in texture or deviating from tune. And what, too, 
is so delightful to behold in the voice of this singer is 
the freshness and the evidence of youth. As good as she 
sounds to the ear, just as appealing is she to the eye. 
It is a revelation to behold a young artist blessed with 
a grace of form and of such a junoesque figure. Rosa 
Raisa has the most gorgeous dramatic soprano of this 
decade and with the warmth of her temperament and 
her limitless power of expression there is little wonder 
that she thrilled her audience and created the furore 
that she did. Bravo, Rosa Raisa! 

Cyrena Van Gordon, who sang the part of the Gypsy. 
Azucena, made her first appearance with the company 
in this role. It is an ideal part for either a mezzo-soprano 
or a contralto to give of her talents without restraint. 
There is equal opportunity for the artist who is gifted 
both histrionically as well as vocally to cause Azucena 
to be one of the bright spots of the performance, but 
one of these qualities minus the other leaves the old 
Gypsy as a rather weak and insignificant character. As 
Miss Van Gordon interpreted the role, she seemed to 
miss its dramatic possibilities. Perhaps after continued 
appearances in the part she may succeed in imbuing 
the necessary fire, dramatic force, terror and emotional 
color the .part demands. Her voice is of splendid range 
and power, but somewhat lacking in resonance in the 
middle position, and she has a tendency to sing below 
pitch, thus marring the artistic qualities in her vocaliza- 
tion. 

Forest Lamont proved a satisfying Manrico histrioni- 
cally, but vocally left much to be desired. He sings with 
dramatic conviction, so much so that he evidently does 
not realize how much he is forcing his tones, for if he 
did, perhaps he would guard against this fault. The re- 
sult of less shouting, w^ould consist of freer tones, which 
are less nasal, and reveal to advantage the better qual- 
ities of his voice. Giacomo Rimini, who sang the Count 
di Luna, was not in his usual excellent vocal condition, 
which is no doubt due from the strenuous work put 
upon him during the week. The chorus and orchestra 
again were of that high musical standard already .set 
up for us by this fine organization, while the staging 
was of its accustomed pictorial beauty. 



MATINEE AUDIENCE GIVES HEMPEL OVATION 

Charming Coloratura Soprano Thrills Vast Audience By 

the Pure Beauty of Her Lyricism When She 

Appears As Lucia 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

An audience of great size and one which was alert 
with enthusiasm greeted Madame Frieda Hempel and 
her associate artists at the first matinee performance 
given by the Chicago Opera Company, on Saturday after- 
noon, April 16th. That Madame Hempel enjoyed a dis- 
tinct triumph in the title role of Donizetti's lovely opera 
Lucia di Lammermoor can be appreciated only by those 
present who witnessed the overwhelming reception 
which was hers after her exquisite singing of the mad 
scene. The applause which reached her w^as thunderous 
and the writer has lost track of the number of curtain 
calls the prima donna was forced to accept alone. Frieda 
Hempel has certainly created a sensation in San Fran- 
cisco and gained a host of friendly admirers who will 
not hesitate to pay her art its due homage at each of 
her appearances. Personally, having heard Madame 
Hempel many times at the Metropolitan Opera House, 
New York, I sincerely regret that we are not to hear 
her sing several of her other roles in which I doubt 
whether she has an equal. As a Mozart singer she can 
not be surpassed, while in the Rosenkavalier of Richard 
Strauss, Madame Hempel's singing and acting is in a 



c1h88 ul] llH own. So we opera goorH hi San FninclHou 
realize that there Is stlU a great deal In store for uh to 
hoar and let us hope that Madame Hempel will soon 
be given the opportunity to satisfy our hopes. 

As Lucia, Madame Hempel once again proved that 
she is one of the very few remaining exponents of the 
pure and real art of vocalization. What is so interesting 
in Madame Hempel's art is that she is just as much at 
home in the lyric style of singing as she is with works 
calling for a display of fireworks. Her luscious and vel- 
vety tones which contain a heart warming appeal, 
seemed well suited to express the Donizetti music, and 
her appearance was as piquant and lovely to the eyes 
as her impeccable taste in phrasing and her concise 
enunciation delighted the ears. Not only did Madame 
Hempel sing the fioratura passages throughout the mad 
scene with grace of execution and dazzling brilliancy, 
but she enacted the role with an effectiveness which 
once again revealed her dramatic gifts. Such a depth of 
feeling that she displayed during her entire performance 
certainly warranted the great ovation that was hers. 

Alessandro Bonci again was heard opposite Madame 
Hempel and was in splendid vocal condition, showing 
that he is a master of these light tenor roles. It does 
not matter whether Mr. Bonci is always in the best of 
form, for his art is such that it overshadows a voice of 
the most exquisite beauty. His musicianly taste is un- 
surpassable, his skill in phrasing and ability to color 
his tones with every shade of emotion is what places 
him on the high artistic plane wherein he lives. As Ed- 
gardo he sang with his usual clear, vibrant voice and 
acted with fervor and spirit. Giacomo Rimini made a 
very satisfactory Lord Ashton both vocally and histrioni- 
cally, and Mr. Cimini conducted with firmness and en- 
ergy, exhibiting the delicate beauty of the score. 



GARDEN AND MURATORE SING TO 7000 

Largest Audience Ever Known to Witness An Indoor 

Performance of Opera Greeted Mary Garden 

and Lucien Muratore in Faust 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

Anyone not afflicted with poor eye sight may have 
seen that it was a Garden-Muratore night at the Opera 
on the evening of April 16th. At least seven thousand 
people pushed their way into the massive Auditorium, 
while several hundreds who could neither secure seats 
or standing room reluctantly took their regretted de- 
parture. This record-breaking audience will most as- 
suredly go down Into operatic history showing that in 
San Francisco there are more operatic enthusiasts than 
in any other city in the world. It may, too, arouse the 
citizens in our community to such a degree that they 
will finally see the necessity of an opera house. Then 
we not only will be able to accommodate all those de- 
sirous of hearing opera performances, but 'the artists 
will appear under more favorable conditions, giving us 
the productions that can only be appreciated in a real 
operatic atmosphere. Then I know that we will hear 
Mary Garden as Melisande, a role in which the term 
"divine" is the only expression befitting her interpreta- 
tion. Perhaps, too, by that time we shall hear many of 
the Wagnerian masterpieces which can only be given 
on a stage of great dimensions and with latest technical 
equipments. This however, is not a review of Faust, but 
brought in merely to show what we can have and must 
have, and it's up to us to make it possible, for the edu- 
cational value of the rising generation and for the artis- 
tic betterment of the city. 

The Marguerite which Miss Garden gave us the other 
evening was a characterization vastly different from 
that given the role by any other artist and which re- 
vealed to me another phase of her endless gifts as an 
artist. No matter if her interpretations are not always 
accurate traditionally, she plays them according to her 
own conception of the role, and her ideas are never 
lacking individuality, interest and personal charm, 
backed by super-intelligence. And I believe that one of 
the many assets which have made Miss Garden the real 
great artist that she is lies in her ability of being abso- 
lutely original histrionically and not being afraid to play 
her parts according to her own ideas, even though they 
may differ from the conventional. So as Marguerite 
there were many very interesting incidents created by 
Miss Garden, and one could not help but admire the 



novel touches Khe. Buccecdod in revealing. Her Jewel 
Song waa excellently given, Bhowlng that MIbb Garden 
when she chooses can lose herHolf in HonK aa well an 
in dramatic action. Her voice waH clear and of a lovely 
timbre well modulated In tone and rich In contraHtlng 
colors. She sang It with splendid technical brilliancy 
and invested it with touches of Joy, vanity and pleaH- 
urable excitement over the posHesslon of gifts which 
this young unsophisticated maiden never hoped to at- 
tain. She dressed the character with simplicity and 
looked as only Miss Garden can, a charming and appeal- 
ing picture. 

The Faust of Lucien Muratore again marked hlra as 
the most ideal singing actor of the age. It is not merely 
that Mr. Muratore possesses a voice of rare BweetnesH, 
a freshness and a vibrant ring which thrills his hearers, 
but he knows how to play on one's heart-strings through 
the sympathetic delivery of his lyrics and emotional 
expressiveness. And besides being a singer of great 
poise, taste and musical insight he is always in the 
picture dramatically. One feels the strength of his per- 
sonality and the sincerity expressed in his action. In 
every respect Mr. Muratore looks the romantic role, 
for he wears his exquisite costumes with dash and style. 
His rendition of the Salute demeure was sung with 
vocal skill once more revealing the caressing and tender 
qualities of his voice. I know that a superior artist than 
Mr. Muratore does not exist, for one cannot fancy a more 
ardent and ideal wooer, a more polished and finished 
actor. 

Mr. Baklanoff sang the role of Mephisto with great 
tonal volume and acted it in a truly remarkable manner. 
The serenade was a bit sombre in color but he neverthe- 
less brought into light a certain sarcasm and fiendishneas 
which the role calls for. There was poise and dignity 
throughout his entire performance and once again Mr. 
Baklanoff showed his ability to sink his own identity 
under the cloak of his acquired character. Hector Du- 
franne, an old favorite in San Francisco, being recalled 
for his excellent interpretations of the father in Louise 
and Athanael in Thais, sang the part of Valentine, and 
while his voice has not retained its former lusciousness 
and splendid timbre he nevertheless sings with the au- 
thority acquired by the years of experience of a very 
fine artist. 

Too much praise can not be given to Conductor Pol- 
acco, who enunciated the Gounod score with delicacy, 
accuracy and imagination. He always maintained perfect 
control over the orchestra, chorus and soloists, thus a 
perfect ensemble and unity being achieved. When Mr. 
Polacco is at the helm of the orchestra the music takes 
on added lustre. The performance was given a beautiful 
mounting which is usual with all the Chicago Oper^ 
Company's presentations. ■ 



JOSEPH SCHWARZ CREATES A SENSATION 1 

Shouts of Bravo and Huge Demonstration of Approval 

Greet Russian Baritone at Initial Appearance. 

Hempel an Exquisite Giida 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

Once again Mary Garden demonstrated her keen judg- 
ment when she recognized the real "Find'* for her Chi- 
cago Opera Company in Joseph Schwarz, the Russian 
baritone. The Civic Auditorium on the evening of April 
18th did not tremble as the result of an earthquake such 
as many buildings did fifteen years earlier on the same 
date prior to this eventful operatic performance. The 
great building did shake, though, from the unbounded 
and thunderous applause of an audience who reached a 
high pitch of frenzy over the truly marvelous interpre- 
tation Schwarz gave his Rigoletto- Miss Garden is on.-> 
of those operatic artists who is not wraped up in her 
own successes alone, and now as general director of this 
wonderful company she is displaying her broad-minded- 
ness and excellent taste in giving not only of her best 
but the best she can secure artistically, as well. Mary 
Garden knows how opera should be given, how each role 
should be portrayed, and she will leave no stone un- 
turned to secure the right artist to fill the right place. 
And with her alert mind and far-sightedness she imme- 
diately knew that Joseph Schwarz would be of tremen- 
dous value to her organization; hence his being sent for 
from New York to appear in the one production of Rigo- 
letto in San Francisco. His immediate triumph was 
(Continued on Page 5, Column 1) 



ETHEL GERTRUDE CANNON 




ARTIST-STUDENTS' PIANO COURSE 



HIGH LIGHTS IN MRS. CANNON'S 
PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUCTION 



VI 

Imagination should be guided by r 
relation of tiie signs and symbols, 
gression of musical ideas which, if 
in what is called interpretation. 



elative value and comparative 
, to form a succession or pro- 
moulded plastically, will result 



FURTHER ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING STUDIO AND 
OPENING DATE WILL APPEAR LATER. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Distinguished Artists Residing in California Who are Availabie for Concerts During the Season 1920-1921 

Editorial Note: — The Pacific Coast Musical Review Is in a position to guarantee tlie artistic efficiency of the artists represented on tills page. They have established a 
reputation for themselves, partly national, partly international, through regular concert tours or by appearances in operatic organizations of recognized fame. The purpose 
of setting forth the availability of these reputed artists Is to convince the California musical public that distingulsbed artists of equal merit to any reside In this State. 
We intend to prove that a resident artist confers honor upon the community in which he resides. 



L 



Announcing the Personnel of 

"Le Trio Louise" 

Kajetan Attl — Bohemian Harpist 

Otto King — Norwegian Cellist 

M. Anthony Linden — American Flutist 

rhree nifitlDBulnhed .^rtlMfs In a Tnlque Chamber 

IIiiMic KnNcmblp I'reNeDtlng rnunnnl Profcramn 

ImpuNHlble to llenr Under .\ny Other AunplecM 

For Dntea and Termi* Addreiin 

M. Anthony Linden, 457 Phelan Bldg., 

San Francisco 

Care of S. F. Symphony Orchestra 



OLGA 
STEEB 

"The Genius of 
the Piano" 

Management 

CATHERINE A. 
BAMMAN 

53 West 39th, N. Y. 

Local Representative: 
C. E. HUBACH, 126 S. Rampart Blvd., Los Angeles 




imiiiiiiiiiiimitiiiiiimiiiiiltiiMiiniiiiiimitiiiiiiiiiilmiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiilinilllttl 



Warren D. and Esther H. 



Organist 

Pianist 

Lecturer 



ALLEN 

Joint Recitals 



nford Vnlversltr, Calif. 




PHYLLIDA 
ASHLEY 

PIANIST 

NOW BOOKING 
SEASON 1921-1922 

HAENSEL & JONES 

Management 

Aeolian Hall 

New York City 

I llepreBentatlve: 

•r. 30i;B Richmond Blvd.. 
ikland. Cal. 



JACK HILLMAN 

BARITONE 

Just Returned From New York 
Kxponent of Vocal Methods of 

CLARA NOVELLO DAVIES 
Teacher of LOUIS GRAVEURE 



Ren, 



rewarded by a conlract with the fair Impressarlo which 
makes him a member of the company. 

Joseph Schwarz Is more than the possessor of a Une 
voice, for he Is also a stupiindous actor. The manner In 
which he planned his impersonation was really masterly. 
He did not immediately reveal to his audience his many 
gifts, but little hy little, one by one, he unfolded his 
dramatic talents and added powers to his vocalization 
until his big opportunity in the third act arrived, and it 
was here that he attained a climax of great heights. 
Schwarz is an artist who has mastered the technique 
of the stage In every detail. These new touches and the 
finesse he brings into the role causes this character, 
which often becomes absurd when in the hands of a 
less capable actor, to become realistic and intensely 
human. In his scenes with Oilda he emphasized the 
pathos and tenderness prevailing in the character by 
the caressing qualities of his robust voice and the 
nobility of his actions. Mr. Schwarz's voice is an excel- 




M. ANTHONY 

LINDEN 



Flute Vlrfu 



S. F. 



Principal Solo Flut 
Symphony Orchestra. 
Formerly Principal Solo 
Flute Minneapolia Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 
. Soto. EnKemble, ObliKOtu 
Ited Number of Pupils 

457 Phelan BI(1k. 



Accept n I. 
nnd Tint 
re S. F. Sj-mphony Orcheiitra 




Povl 
Bjornsigold 

Tlie Eminent Danish 
Dramatic Tenor 



Management Hugo Boucel<, 116 39th St., N. Y. 
Personal Address: 355 Octavia St,, San Francisco 



AS(WORECITAL!ST 
OPCENUINE MERIT 




1115 Olenn Ave. 

berkelGyCal. 




MARION 



VECKI 

BARITONE 

AVAILABLE FOR 

Concert - Opera - Oratorio 



lent organ with a fine ringing resonance in its extremi- 
ties. It is of tremendous power and volume, but handled 
with the discretion of the truly experienced singer. His 
mezzo-voce and pianissimo retain a fine carrying quality 
and his effects are absolutely legitimate, never attained 
through cheap or trlclty methods. It will be interesting 
for all who witnessed his first operatic sensation In 
America to follow his career, for such an artist is bound 
to cause a furore everywhere. 

Lovelier singing than what Frieda llempel did as Hilda 
could not be accomplished by any other coloratura so- 
prano. Her voice has a limpidity and warmth that fe" 
voices of this type contain. But it is not this velvety 
smoothness and clarity of lone which is her chief attri- 
bute, for her main attraction, for me at least, is hor 
exquisite musicianly taste and the Intelligence she ap- 
plies to her vocalization. I have never heard more beau- 
tifully shaded runs, as clean or even coloratura passages 
or accentuated and skillful phrasing as in her t'aro 
Nome aria. Her tones are all on the same line with one 
another while each flows like an endless stream into one 
another, causing her to reveal a perfect legato which 
few other singers can claim. Added to these vocal feats, 
Madame Hempel is an artist who not only sings with 
her voice but she manifests powers of heart that imme- 
diately make an appeal to her hearers nnd win for 
her a warm place in their affections. After all is said 
and done, it Is the human qualities, that of the heart and 
soul, that we look for In a singer, and Frieda Hempel has 
these quallflcallons plus a dainty and rnarmlng appear- 
ance. remlndlni; me always of a pretty Dresden doll. 

Even though Mr. KoncI, who sang the role of the Duke, 
was suffering from hoarseness, one could not help but 
detect now and again the real quality of his voice and 
his mastery of the art of bel-canto (olasl a lost art to 
most of the singers of the decade) is always in evidence. 
To listen to the production of his tones, his Impeccable 



FRANK MOSS 



PIANIST 
Ensemble 



Accompanist 



ManaKementi 

JESSICA COLBERT 

(110 Heamt BnlldlnK, San PrancI 



Constance Alexandre 

MEZZO SOPRANO 

A California arti.<;t who is recognized in 

Eastern music centers where she has 

received the commendation of press 

and public 

AddreHH: Pacific Coant Musical Review 
ROl Kohler & Chase lllde.. San Franclaeo, Calif. 



Lawrence jtrauss 

TENOR 

Management Jessica Colbert 

Studio: 
807 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

(Mondays and Thursdays) 



Residence Studio: 2904 Garber St., Berkeley 




BRUCE 

CAMERON 

Tenor 

Voice Culture 

Concert, Church Recital 



Soloist Third Church of Christ Scientist 

3538 Twenty-Third Street, San Francisco 

Tel. IVIission 1297 

Management Leah Hopkins, 408 Stockton St 




Cecil 
Mollis 
Stone 




taste in molding his phrases, his dear enunciation, Is a 
lesson to any sturioni of the art of singing. And It Is well 
to remember thai when the lolce of such a great artist 
as Mr. Bond once begins to deteriorate his art never- 
theless remains, which only shows us that more Is re- 
quired than a natural gift to become a real exponent of 
singing. Intelligent and artistic usage of a voice of nr 
great beauty will carry one much turther than the pos- 
session of a voice of rare texture hut minus the applica- 
tion of brain for Its hackgroiiiul. Mr. Hone I will always 
remain the wonderful master I hat he is because he has 
both these essentials, voice and mental powers. 

The smaller roles were all capably sung, nnd the 
orchestra under the baton of Mr. rimlnl played Verdi's 
old opera with enthusiasm and much tonal beauty. Mr. 
Cimlnl came In for his share of the applause of the 
evening along with the artists. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



CAVALLERIA AND PAGLIACCI PERFORMANCE 



HORACE BRITT TO LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO 



UNIVERSITY OF FINE ARTS HONORS ARTISTS 



Muratore Proves an Exceptional Canto While Rosa 

Ralsa Shines in Cavallerla — Great Honor 

Conferred Upon Mary Garden 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

I do not believe that I am allowing personal enthu- 
siasm to overshadow my better judgment when I state 
that the finest performance of Cavallerla and Pagliacci 
that I have ever had the good fortune to witness was 
given by the Chicago Opera forces on Tuesday evening. 
It has been my privilege to hear some of the world's 
finest artists in these operas; namely, Destinn as San- 
tuzza and Caruso as the Canio in Pagliacci, and I feel 
quite confident after hearing Madame Raisa and Mon- 
sieur Muratore that^hey need not fear for their artistic 
laurels. They both wear their crowns of success most 
becomingly. It is not a case of who is the best Canio 
or the greatest Santuzza for, it stands to reason that 
while both Caruso and Muratore are equally great ten- 
ors their interpretations must vary due to their own 
individualities and their personal conceptions of the 
role. So I will not go as far as to say that Muratore is 
greater than Caruso or that Madame Raisa better than 
Madame Emmy Destinn, but I will say that I admired 
Mr. Muratore's enactment of the role of Canio and his 
rendition of the Vesti la Guiba far better than that of 
the Metropolitan tenor, and his singing of it is mighty 
beautiful. As for the performance of Madame Raisa's 
Santuzza it gave me absolute pleasure and satisfaction, 
both vocally and dramatically. With each performance 
in which this artist appears her voice seems to attain 
more brilliant heights. She never overdoes the part in 
her anxiety to act, and the opulence and luscious mel- 
lowness of her magnificent voice meets every demand 
she puts upon it for emotional expression. Rosa Raisa 
has certainly mastered the art of vocal technic as well 
the finesse o£ style. She meets the big orchestral cli- 
maxes with a facility and tonal volume that startles 
her audience and on this occasion she aroused her hear- 
ers to such a pitch of excitement after her big scene 
with Alfio, that if it had not been for Maestro Polacco, 
who started his orchestra for the finale, I fear that the 
audience would still be there shouting and applauding. 
It was a real Raisa triumph. 

Riccardo Martin sang Turridu and very successfully, 
too. He sang with splendid vocal control and put a his- 
trionic brutality into the role which made it stand forth 
most effectively. Desire Defrere was unquestionably the 
best Alfio I have ever witnessed for the music lay well 
within his splendid vibrant voice and he acted his role 
with conviction and dignity. 

The very finest bit of singing and acting that Mr. 
Rimini has thus far given us was in his performance of 
Tonio. He demonstrated his versatility as both singer 
and actor by bringing into his allotted part many orig- 
inal touches and bits of comedy that won for him bursts 
of laughter from the audience. Margery Maxwell sang 
Nedda and once again displayed the sweetness of her 
voice and the simplicity and charm of her actions. But, 
it was Lucien Muratore who received the tempestuous 
ovation and no matter how wild the audience went the 
great demonstration was justified. His golden tones 
poured forth with a freshness and power that was a 
joy to the ear. In every sense of the word Monsieur 
Muratore is the perfect actor, master of every situa- 
tion and in each pose and gesture is an underlying 
significance which expresses phases of the character 
that the music alone does not reveal. His singing of 
the famous Vesti la Giuba was given with not only ex- 
quisite tone but excellent phrasing, impeccable musical 
taste and perfect diction. There was pathos and tragedy 
in his reading of this aria, a subdued and deeply rooted 
grief rather than the explosive emotion that many in- 
ferior artists resort to in order to convey sentiment of 
any sort. His interpretation was both gripping and 
thrilling and one for other singers to try if they can 
to mimic. I know that another artist such as Monsieur 
Muratore does not exist, at least not to my knowl- 
edge, and I hope that we shall hear him out here for 
many seasons to come. He is one tenor in a lifetime and 
one can hear him none too often to revel in the won- 
ders of his artistry. 

Mr. Polacco did much more than merely conduct the 
orchestra for he practically dominated the entire per- 
formance. One always knows when this master wields 
the baton for both principals and chorus seem inspired 
and the whole ensemble takes on new vigor and, scin- 
tillating colorful effects. 

The culmination of the evening's excitement came 
when Stage Director Jacques Coini appeared before the 
footlights and made an announcement which was re- 
ceived with the greatest joy on the part of the audi- 
ence and artists. The telegram wliich he read stated 
that the French Government had conferred a very great 
honor upon their general director and co-artist, Mary 
Garden, by making her a Chevalier of the French Le- 
gion of Honor. This distinguished title is but seldom 
bestowed and only to those of real rare attainments. 
No doubt the French Government have recognized the 
genius of the woman who has done many a service in 
the behalf of France. She was one of the very first 
who introduced and spread French art throughout the 
United States. Paris audiences adore Miss Garden, she 
has been with them so long that they claim her as 
their own. Nevertheless, if they claim her on account 
of her successes there, then she must be adopted by 
every nation, for her popularity is universal. Mary 
Garden is recognized for her artistry all the world 
over and beloved for her own magnificent personality 
by all who come into contact with her. May this be 
just one of the honors that this wonderful artist and 
splendid woman will enjoy. In response to the cheers 
of joy, Miss Garden stepped upon the stage and bowed 
her thanks and acknowledged the ovation which she 
received. 



OiBtinguished Solo 'Cellist of San Francisco Symphony 

Orchestra Receives Distinguished Appolntnnent 

and Will Locate Permanently in New York 

The Pacific Coast Musical Review regrets more than it 
can express the necessity of announcing to the musical 
public of this city the unpleasant news that Horace Britt, 
solo 'cellist of Ihe San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, 
will leave San Francisco permanently to locate in New 
York. He has received the distinction of being selected 
as a member of the famous Letz (Quartet, which organ- 
ization has made such a splendid impression upon New 
York critics and public that its future is assured. The 
organization is backed by one of America's foremost 
financiers and business men. During the past season the 
Letz Quartet appeared in about ninety concerts. 

The first concert next season will take place at the 
celebrated Pittsfield, Mass.. Chamber Music Festival in 
September. The internationally noted Rosset Quartet 
of Vienna will appear at the same event. The lively in- 
terest manifested by public and wealthy music patrons 
in chamber music is a decidedly healthy sign of Amer- 
ica's rapid musical progress. The success of the London 
String Quartet last season justifies the return of that 
splendid organization next season. 

While we naturally do not begrudge Mr. Britt his well- 
merited good fortune and this recognition of his unques- 
tionable artistic superiority as one of the world's lead- 
ing 'cellists and this recognition as being included in th-^' 
country's foremost musical activities, still we feel his 
departure a severe musical loss to San Francisco which 
will be difficult to replace. Mr. Britt. during his sojourn 
in this city, has contributed greatly to the enjoyment 
of our public and has added his share to the musical 
growth and expansion of musical taste in the community. 

Personally Mr. Britt has made hosts of friends by rea- 
son of his personal charm and unfailing courtesy and 
modesty, and we are only one of thousands who wish 
him Godspeed and all kinds of good fortune in his new 
commanding position, and shall watch with unvarying 
interest his progress in the world of music. Undaubtedly 
he will attain his highest ambitions and aspirations and 
San Francisco will have reason to feel proud to have 
had him as a member of her musical colony for six years. 



GAN2 TO CONDUCT ST. LOUIS ORCHESTRA 

We take great pleasure in printing from the New 
York Times the following interesting announcement: 

St. Louis, March 26. — Rudolph Ganz, the pianist, has 
been selected conductor of the St. Louis Symphony 
Orchestra for a term of three years, it was announced 
today. Dr. Ganz succeeds Max Zach, who died recently. 

Rudolph Ganz, while remaining a citizen of Switzer- 
land, has for twenty years spent much of his time in the 
United States, appearing here with the leading orches- 
tras and musical societies. 

He was born February 24, 1877, at Zurich, and studied 
in the local conservatory, as well as later at Lausanne 
and Strassburg and with Busoni in Berlin. He played in 
public at 12 years old in his native town and has con- 
ducted music festivals there. 

His St. Louis engagement will not be Mr. Ganz's first 
residence in the West, since at the outset of his career 
he was a teacher from 1901 to 1905 in Chicago. He mar- 
ried in New York in 1900 an American singer, Mary 
Forrest. 

Mr. Ganz has composed several works for orchestra, 
including a symphony and a pianoforte concerto, or 
"concert piece," as well as many piano and violin solos, 
male choruses and over 150 songs. 



SUCCESS OF LEADING CALIFORNIA ARTISTS 

Marie Hughes Macquarrie, the well known and suc- 
cessful young harp virtuosa, appeared in conjunction 
with Albert Rosenthal, 'cellist, and John A. Patton, bari- 
tone, in Eureka. Scotia and Arcadia, California, during 
the week of April 11th, with brilliant success. The pro- 
gram included a movement from the Valentini Sonata 
for 'cello, which Mr. Rosenthal played exquisitely, and 
a group of English and French songs sung by Mr. Pat- 
ton with excellent voice and in splendid taste. Mrs. 
Macquarrie was heartily received both as accompanist 
and soloist and has reason to feel much gratified with 
her success. 

Mrs. Macquarrie also appeared recently as soloist 
with the Cecilia Choral Society of Stockton on Wednes- 
day. March 30th, of which Percy A. R. Dow is the di- 
rector. The lovely artist was heartily applauded by a 
very appreciative audience and was forced to add 
several encores to her already extensive program. The 
Trio Moderne, of which Marie Hughes Macquarrie is a 
member, the other two artists being Christine Howells, 
flutist, and Grace Becker, 'cellist, appeared in Sacra- 
mento for the McNeil Club the following day, March 
31st. The artists rendered ensemble numbers as well as 
solo groups. In Orland, on March 29th, the trio appeared 
under the auspices of the University of California, and 
on April 12th the Trio Moderne gave a recital at 
\\aaeeler Hall, Berkeley, for the English Club of the Uni- 
versity of California. Everywhere these talented young 
musicians appear they receive high commendation upon 
the excellence of their work. It is both novel and inter- 
esting. 



The University of Fine Arts held a reception and tea 
In honor of several of the visiting artiste of the Chicago 
Opera Company. The delightful affair took place in the 
Colonial Ball Room of the Hotel St. Francis on Monday 
afternoon, April 18th. The huge room was filled to ItH 
capacity by the members of the organization and those 
guests who made every effort to secure an invitation. 
The honored guests included Miss Mary Garden, who 
appeared most becomingly attired in a gown and cloak 
of the very latest mode, and a close-fitting hat that al- 
lowed a few strands of her Titian hair to be seen from 
beneath the flesh-colored plumes. But it was not merely 
because she was so smartly gowned that every eye was 
directed toward her, but more so as a result of her bright 
and smiling countenance, which made each individual 
feel that she was a long-lost friend returning to renew 
old acquaintances. 

Miss Garden has that friendly and aiTable manner 
that compels one to approach her and know that one 
will be gladly welcomed. Her wonderful and magnetic 
personality is felt as keenly when meeting her as Miss 
Garden as when hearing her as Louise, Melisande, Thais 
or any of her other innumerable roles. Miss Garden was 
introduced to the guests by Joseph D. Redding, who 
made a very clever little speech and also a plea for 
the new opera house, which we hope will soon be real- 
ized. Miss Garden then spoke, thanking the people of 
San Francisco for the wonderful reception she and her 
company had received and for their appreciation and 
support of their endeavors. She, too, made an appeal for 
a befitting home for opera, putting it in such a way that 
one felt its necessity and her earnestneess in our future 
musical welfare. 

Giorgio Polacco was the next guest of honor to speak. 
and he emphasized his love for San Francisco and bis 
hopes of some day settling here permanently. This great 
admiration that he has had for this city has been of a 
duration of over seventeen years, for, as he expressed 
himself, that "It was here my early artistic successes 
were first enjoyed and encouraged." Mr. Polacco con- 
ducted many operatic performances at the old Tivoli 
Opera House long before his Metropolitan triumphs. 
Madame Polacco, better known to the musical world as 
Edith Mason, enjoyed an equally warm reception. 
Madame Cavallieri, one of the most beautiful creatures 
that one's eyes can gaze upon, was present, most fetch- 
ingly gowned in black, and shared the honors which 
were being bestowed upon her famous husband. Lucien 
Muratore. When the tenor was called upon for a few 
remarks, he modestly excused himself, saying that he 
spoke but little English. 

T^Tiile tea was being served, a musical program was 
rendered and it was good to see how heartily the artists 
enjoyed the work of their confreres. Madame Rose 
Relda Cailleau sang two numbers, as did Madame Stella 
Jelica, while the concert master of the Chicago Opera 
Orchestra played a violin selection and a short poem 
dedicated to Miss Garden was read. When tea was over 
many had the pelasure of chatting with the honored 
guests, who seemed to have thoroughly entered into 
the spirit of the affair, thus ending a most charming 
afternoon. C. A. 



PHYLLIDA ASHLEY TO GIVE CONCERT SERIES 

PhylUda Ashley, the brilliant young pianist, will give 
a series of concerts in Suite A and B of the Palace 
Hotel of this city at 3:30 o'clock on Tuesday afternoons 
of the following days: April 26th, May 10th and May 
24th. Miss Ashley has arranged three delightful pro- 
grams. She will play with depth of interpretation, bril- 
liancy and charm the rarest compositions of the oldest 
masters and carry her audiences through to the loveliest 
of the modern compositions. The three programs ar- 
ranged for this occasion will be as follows: First Con- 
cert — Toccata and Fugue, D minor (Bach-Tausig), Ga- 
votte (Gluck-Brahms), Pastorale (Scarlatti), Le Coucou 
(Daquin); Sonata, Op. 53 (Waldstein) (Beethoven), 
Moment Musical, F minor (Schubert), Romance, Etudes 
Symphoniques (Schumann), Second Concert — Chopin — 
Fantasy, Op. 49, Etudes — C minor, G sharp minor, C 
sharp minor, G flat; Nocturnes — E major, F major, D 
flat major. Ballade — G minor. Waltz — A flat, Op. 42, Ber- 
ceuse, Ballade — A flat. Third Concert — Prelude, Chorale 
and Fugue (Cesar Franck), Pagodes, Jardin Sous La 
Pluie, La Soiree Dans Grenade (Debussy), In Autumn 
(MacDowell), At Sunset (Mason), Theme and Varia- 
tions (Schelling), Vers I'Azur, Vers la Tombe (Stojow- 
ski). Nocturne (Paderewski), Rhapsody No. 10 (Liszt). 



Muriel Randolph Grant 

SOPRANO — TEACHKR OF VOICE 

Voice Plncing n Specialty 

Stoillo: Kohler .£ Chnae BldB. 



Franklin .1!t»3 



KcariiT 34i>4 



BETHLEHEM BACH FESTIVAL 

Dr. J. Fred Wolle. conductor of the Bach Choir, has 
announced the following soloists for the 1921 Bach Fes- 
tival to be held Friday and Saturday. May 27th and 
28th, at Lehigh University: Friday at 4 p. m. and 8 
p. m., soprano, Mildred Faas of Philadelphia; alto. 
Merle Alcock of New York; tenor, Nicholas Douty of 
Philadelphia; bass, Charles Trowbridge Tittmann of 
"Washington, D. C. Saturday at 1:30 p. m. and 4 p. m., 
soprano, Florence Hinkle of New York; alto, Mabel 
Beddoe; tenor, Mr. Douty; bass, Mr. Tittmann. 

The accompaniment for the singing of the Bach Choir 
of 300 voices and soloists will be furnished by members 
of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

The program for this, the sixteenth Bach Festival, is 
as follows: Friday at 4 p. m., cantata. The Sages of 
Sheba, Suite in D, No. 3. Overture: Air; Gavotte: 
Bourree: Gigue. The Ascension Oratorio. Friday at 8 
p. m.. Motet: Come Jesu, Come, Suite in C. Overture; 
Courante; Gavotte: Forlane (Danza Venezianna) Men- 
uetto; Bourree: Passepied. Cantata: Praise Thou, Jer- 
usalem, the Lord. Saturday at 1:30 p. m.. Mass in B 
minor, Kyrie and Gloria; 4 p. m.. Mass in B minor, 
Credo to end. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



k Lil HF. 0\ HIS FAVORITE HORSE 



Season 1921-1922 

Opening Concert in the Auditorium, Civic Center, San Francisco, Cal., 

Sunday, January 8, 1922. On this tour Mr. Graveure will visit the principal 

cities of California, Oregon and Washington 

LOCAL MANAGEMENT 

FRANK W. HEALY, 906 Kohler & Chase Bldg., San Francisco 



Louis 

GRAVEURE 

The Greatest Concert 
Artist of the age will 
spend June to Septem- 
ber in Europe, returning 
to America in the early 
fall to begin a coast to 
coast tour. 



For Dates and Terms 

W. H. C. Burnett, 626 Ford Building 
Detroit, Michigan 



TINA LERNER IN SPAIN 

Friends in San Francisco are in receipt of cards and 
letters from Tina Lerner on her tour of Spain whicli 
was most interesting. Mme. Lerner writes that she and 
her husband are enjoying good health and that she has 
met with the most enjoyable receptions wherever in 
Spain she has given a recital. 

Mrs. Ruth Muzzy Conniston, the well known and 
gifted young pianist and accompanist, left recently for 
the East, to be gone several months. Mrs. Conniston 
contemplates taking an advanced course in organ, to 
perfect herself in that line. Musical circles will greatly 
miss her, for she enjoys unusual popularity among her 
many friends. 

Muriel Randolph Grant, concert and oratorio singer, 
formerly of New York and Cincinnati, has been so favor- 
ably impressed with San Francisco that she has decided 
to locate here permanently. She is sharing the studio of 
Jessie L. Wentworth in the Kohler & Chase Building. 
Mme. Wentworth will act as her accompanist. Mme. 
Grant has received her teacher's certificate and diploma 
of graduation under Mme. Tekla Virginia of Cincinnati, 
and has coached with Lander Radonovitz of Chicago, 
Bernardo .lensen of New York, and Grace G. Gardner 
of New York and Cincinnati. Mme. Grant has been most 
successful in voice placing and tone development, and 
specializes in coaching for oratorio and concert reper- 
toire. During the war .she gave up her concert work in 
this country, devoting her talents to the mission of 
bringing cheer and encouragement to the American boys 
in the trenches of France. 

Suzanne Pasmorc Brooks gave a recital for nine of 
her pupils in her studio at the Kohler & Chase Building, 
on Saturday afternoon, .-^pril ninth. A tenth pupil, Huth 
Cutler of Berkeley, was unable to be present. The per- 
formers were: laabelle Henderson, Charline Miller, 
Blume Alzenburg, Dora Walker (sister of Eva Walker, 
who has for six years been Mrs. Pasmore Brooks' pupil, 
and who is herself a very successful pianist, accompan- 
ist, ensemble player and teacher), Thomas Cameron. 
Sadie Trager, Audrey Siiean, Paul Wilson, of Berkeley, 
the latter also playing a duet with his sister, Kathleen, 
who is a pupil of Mrs. Pasmore Brook's pupil, Lucy Law- 
rence, of Berkeley, Billy Sergeant, son of Mrs. Genevieve 
Rlxford Sargeant, the well known artist, was also to 
have appeared, but his brother Winthrop played that 
afternoon at Mr. Minetti s violin recital, and another 
brother. Emmet, played the 'cello at the Pacific Musical 
Society children's concert at the Fairmont Hotel, so 
Billle, the youngest, had to forego playing in order to 
hear his brothers perform. 



WOMEN'S CHORAL CLUB AT CALIFORNIA 

The Calit'ornia Club Choral, a San Francisco organiza- 
tion of about si.tty local women, will sing Sunday morn- 
ing at the California theatre, with Herman Heller and 
the California theatre orchestra. 

The choral body has been in existence about twelve 
years and has at various times been under the direction 
of such men as Paul Steindorft and Alexander Stewart. 
The present director. Homer Henley, has guided the 
vocal destinies of the club for the past three years. Tlie 
members of the choral body are all members of the 
California Club, as well, and number in their ranks 
some of the best and most accomplished artists in 
the city. 

They will sing the dramatic tone poem. The Death of 
.Joan of Arc, by Henri Bemberg. for orchestra and chorus 
of women's voices and soprano solo. It is a work of 
great dramatic power and intensity — and depicts the 
execution of the immortal Jeanne d'Arc on a canvas 
whose sweep allows a great massing of tone, color and 
modern orchestral effects. The several divisions of the 
work comprise The Procession to the Stake, the chorus 
For whom are making sucli preparations of Death, the 
Arioso. O Christ, thy Crucifix, the pastoral Chorale, 
Who Steeled Thy Heart. Joan of Arc. Simple Peasant, 
and the tremendous Finale, 'Twas God Willed It So. 

Hildred Hansen Hostetter, a noted Eastern lyric 
soprano, will sing the solo part. She has just made her 
home in this city. The artist has appeared with success 
both in opera and oratorio with many of the leading 
artists, and comes to California with the highest creden- 
tials. Site has a voice of rare natural loveliness, and to 
this has added a technical perfection which makes licr 
work at once commanding and thoroughly enjoyable. 

Director Heller of the orchestra has selected the fol- 
lowing numbers: La Princesse Jaune (Overture), by 
Saint-Saens, The Hussars (Waltz) by Ziehrer, Za Za 
(Selection) by Leoncavallo, and Herod (Overture) by 
Henry Hadley. 

As an organ solo, Leslie V. Harvey, California's organ- 
ist, will offer Largo by Handel. 



(MacDowell), Miss Audrey Beer; Valse (Cliopin). Rha))- 
sody (Liszt), Miss Ethel Denny; Waltz (Chopin), Miss 
Hazel Land; Ballade (Chopin), Miss Ellen Swayne; Ca- 
thedrale Englantie (Debussy), Miss Ruth Davis; Impro- 
visation (MacDowell), Rigaudon (MacDowell), Mrs. 
George Uhl; Impromptu (Arensky), Miss Esther HJelle. 



Subscribe for the Pacific Coast Musical Review, the 
only weekly music journal on the Pacific Coast. $3.00 a 
year in advance. It gives you the news .vou arc most 
Interested in. 



WAGER SWAVNE'S PUPIL RECITAL 

An unusually brilliant class musical was given by 
Swayne pupils at his Broadway studio on Saturday. April 
ninth, a large number of pupils participating with marked 
success. The following numbers were most artistically 
rendered: Sarabande (Bach), Jardin sous la Plule (De- 
bussy), Rondo (Beethoven), Scherzo (Chopin). Miss 
Elizabeth Simpson; Toccata and Fugue (Hach-Tau8sigl. 
Mr. Elwin Calberg; Polonaise (Chopin), Miss Josephine 
LaCoste Nellson; Eight Lyric Pieces (Grieg), Air Varie 
(Paderewski), .Miss Enid Newton; Senate (Schubert). 
Etude (Chopin). Rhapsody (Liszt), .Miss .Marion Frazer; 
Etude (Rubinstein), Miss Lillian Fraler; Cracovlenne 
Fantastique (Paderewski), Orientale (Rogers), Polonaise 



PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA CONCERTS 

Music lovers in the San Francisco Bay section will 
be regaled by two extraordinary concerts by the famous 
Philliarraonic Orchestra of New York at the Greek 
Theatre in Berkeley tonight and in the Auditorium in 
San Francisco tomorrow afternoon. This celebrated or- 
chestral body of 100 musicians will play two especially 
beautiful programs on this occasion under the direction 
of Josef Stransky and Henry Hadley. 

Of all American orchestras the Philharmonic holds 
the most unique position. It is the oldest body of en- 
semble players existent in America today and it is 
claimed that tlie Philharmonic is the third oldest or- 
chestra of continuous existence in the world. Founded 
SO years ago it has grown year by year until today the 
100 players of the organization form a body that is an 
incomparable unit and whose playing of the great clas- 
sics is unexcelled by any kindred "string band." 

The present tour of the Philhamonic has been one 
succession of triumphs after the other, the players 
making their first trans-continental trip and appearing 
in cities that are giving them overflowing and enthus- 
iastic crowds. Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer, who is 
bringing the Philharmonic Orchestra to this section. Is 
assured of great throngs at both of their Berkeley and 
San Francisco concerts. 

Tonight's program is ideally selected to bring out the 
maximum effect in the wonderful Greek Theatre. The 
4th Symphony of Tschaikowsky with its blare of brasses 
and melodic beauty will be faultlessly played, then will 
come Strauss' tone poem Death and Transflguratlon, 
Henry Hadley's The Culprit Fay, and Wagners Tann- 
hauser Overture. 

In the Auditorium here tomorrow afternoon the or- 
chestra will play on the opera stage, assuring acoustical 
perfection to the throngs who will attend. Stransky has 
selected a most fascinating program for this occasion 
as well and will play the classical Beethoven Fifth Sym- 
phony, which by many is considered the master work 
of symphonic compositions; the Arbcrt arrangement of 
the Bach Prelude, Choral and Fvigue, Henry Hadley's 
symphonic poem Salome, the beautiful tone poem of 
Sibelius The Swan of Tuonela. and the smashing pre- 
lude to the Mastersingers of Wagner will make up the 
San Francisco list. All of the works will be conducted 
by Stransky with the exception of Hadley's own compo- 
sitions over which he will wield the baton. 

These will positively be the only two concerts to be 
given by the Philharmonic players In this section. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Brilliant Closing Concert of Los Angeles Symphony Season 



W. A. Clark, Jr., President-Founder, and Walter Henry Rothwell, Conductor, Cheered and Applauded 

at Final Pair of Concerts — Silver Loving Cup Presented to Mr. Clark by the Orchestra 

Members — Los Angeles Oratorio Society, John Smallman, Director, Gives 

Fine Concert with Marcella Craft as Soloist 



Hovward Potter, formerly accompanying such aitlHtK iih 
Marcella Sembrlch, Jan Kubellk, Nellie Melba, Fritz 
Krelsler, and Amellta Galll-Curcl, on theli- tours an per- 
sonal representative, is here with Mary Oardon In a like 
capacity. Mr. Potter la singularly fitted for such dlplc 
niaLIc posts and he is busy Introducing a portion of the 
people eager to meet the Diva.' It would bo Impossible 
for her to meet all who wish to shake her band. Mr. Pot- 
ter Is affiliated with the Wagner Concert Direction In 
New York. 



BY BRUNO DAVID USSHER 



Los Angeles, April 16, 1921. — The presentation of a 
silver loving cup by the Philharmonic Orchestra to W. A. 
Clark, Jr., the President-Founder of the orchestra, and 
demonstrative applause and bravo calls from the public 
marked the closing concerts Saturday night and Sunday 
afternoon. Conductor Walter Henry Rothwell and his 
players were given a temporary farewell greeting of 
great cordiality by the large audiences. Particularly 
yesterday afternoon the audience remained in their seats 
for a long while recalling and cheering the maestro di 
capella time and again. 

"The artistic success of the Philharmonic Orchestra 
will be greater next year," declared W. A. Clark, Jr. yes- 
terday afternoon as a small throng of admirers gath- 
ered in front of Conductor Rothwell's room behind the 
stage. "The orchestra is only two seasons old. It is still 
a young organization. But there is no doubt we shall 
do better yet next season." 

Conductor Rothwell was all smiles: "The people have 
been lovely. They have been most encouraging during 
the past two seasons, but the farewell greeting they have 
given us now makes me fee! proud and glad to think 
that we shall come back soon." 

Enthusiastic applause endorsed the brief dedication 
speech of Assistant Manager W. E. Strobrldge on Satur- 
day evening when he presented the silver loving cup to 
Mr. Clark on behalf of the members and the staff of the 
orchestra. Spontaneous expressions of admiration also 
greeted Conductor Rothwell yesterday afternoon during 
the magnificently played request program. 

That a program selected by the audience should close 
the season seemed significant, as it emphasized the 
strong link already existing between the public, Conduc- 
tor Rothwell and his fellow-artists. The quality of its 
rendition came as a compelling answer to the great 
promise given by them at the beginning of the season. 
If the public had had its way it would have heard not 
only a request but an all-encore program. 

Yesterday's program opened with the Wedding March 
from Midsummernigbt's Dream, followed by Liszt's Les 
Preludes. The March already had aroused the enthusiasm 
of the audience, but it was after the Liszt number that 
a veritable storm of applause broke loose. As stated 
before in this column Mr. Rothwell's performance of 
this work is noteworthy in every respect. L'Apprentl 
Sorcier by Dukas was given with the usual brilliancy. 
The Strauss waltz, Voices of Spring, and the Peer Gynt 
Suite (Grieg) proved most popular. The Mastersinger 
Prelude closed the season and in masterly fashion. It 
was a fitting choice for a finale, this music which in the 
Wagner music drama is an apotheosis of the poet- 
musician Hans Sachs, whose prophetic words urge his 
people to honor their great masters. 

The last pair of concerts of the season were played 
on Friday and Saturday without a soloist participating. 
Mr. Rothwell's choice of program nevertheless drew 
large audiences, who listened keenly to the interesting 
programs. If the selections of these last programs may 
be taken as' indications for the coming season, we shall 
hear fascinating programs. 

The two novelties were MacDowell's Second Indian 
Suite and the Adagietto from the Fifth Symphony by 
Mahler. The Suite was played brilliantly. It is a difficult 
work which sounded specially well on Saturday night. 
The Legend and the Dirge were given readings of char- 
acteristic atmosphere. One wonders whether MacDowell 
was not inspired to write the Dirge by Wagner's Death- 
March from Siegfried. The suite was well liked. The 
Mahler composition was also given an encouraging 
welcome, so that Mr. Rothwell may feel justified in 
breaking another lance for this great tone poet with 
whom he had come in close touch as disciple and asso- 
ciate conductor. The melodious movement is of strong 
emotional appeal which is tempered with pensiveness. 
It is a work of deep feeling, clear in form, and leaves 
a lasting impression. In the middle part one is reminded 
of Wagner's style in the second act of Tristan and 
Isolde. Mahler, however, has a message of his own, for 
the thematic material is concise and determined though 
of distinguished loveliness and tending to be elegic. 
The movement is scored for strings and harps. It was 
given a more personal, convincing reading than the 
other program numbers. Instrumentally it pointed to 
the fine qualities of tone and phrasing in the string 
sections. 

Debussy's two nocturnes, Clouds and Festivals, were 
rendered with fine regard for color values. Specially the 
mysterious second number which includes that visionary 
tone picture of a procession on high was given beauti- 
fully. Both are compositions which demand delicate 
phrasing and shading, and they found it on Saturday 
to full success. 

RImsky-Korsakoft Caprice Bspanol delighted the pub- 
lic as usual. Mr. Rothwell plays it with an abandon 
which makes one forget the amount of technic it re- 
quires. There is a tendency of disregarding tone color 
in favor of temperament in this number. However, it is 
being done with a purpose. The soli of Mr. Noack, vio- 
lin, and Mr. Bronson, 'cello, were fine incidental num- 
bers. The orchestra as a whole received cordial farewell 
salutations after this parting number, while a beautiful 
laurel wreath was presented to the maestro. 

Manager Behymer is "picking up" rapidly. He would 
not be "Bee" if he did not keep close tab of current 
events and those to come. Already he has announced the 



return engagement of the Scotti Opera Company early 
in fall. There will be a re-arrangement of the Philhar- 
monic Courses next season. No matinee concerts will be 
given, only evening recitals. But this does not indicate 
a diminution of events. Quite the contrary. 

The Los Angeles Oratorio Society was severely tried, 
but stood the test with fine success, when two days be- 
fore the concert a change in the musical directorship 
had to be made owing to the Indisposition of Conductor 
John Smallman. The performance of Gounod's Missa 
Solenelle and Mendelssohn's Hymn of Praise was, there- 
fore, given under the baton of Henry Schoenfeld, who 
rose fully to the situation. 

Both works contain complicated choral passages which, 
however, were sung with precision and spontaneousness 
in spite of the change In leadership. That this was pos- 
sible speaks well for the quality of the preliminary re- 
hearsal work conducted by John Smallman and for 
Henry Schoenfeld's strong musicianship as conductor 
of the concert. It was only natural that some of the 
musical detail work and interpretive nuances were lost, 
which, under normal conditions, make the concerts of 
this organization so enjoyable. Special credit must be 
given to the chorus members for their splendid musical 
discipline in the various fugues. 

Marcella Craft, the soprano soloist, vocally gave of 
her best in the Gloria and the Benedictus in Gounod 
work, singing with an ease of technic and beauty of 
tone which roused her audience to warm applause. Her 
control of breath in the Benedictus was remarkable. 
She seemed to lend more expression to her solo in Men- 
delssohn's cantata, which generally was sung with 
greater freedom of phrasing and feeling by all partici- 
pants who in this number had overcome the strain of 
singing under such difficult conditions. Miss Craft's per- 
fection of technic appeared supreme In Oh, Night that 
Covers Me, a French aria by Adrien Earth, which is 
technically most taxing, although her singing here 
lacked in emotion and clarity of diction. 

Charles de la Plate, basso; Clifford Biehl, tenor, and 
Clemence Gifford, mezzo-soprano, proved that pleasing 
soloists can be found "at home." Mr. de la Plate pos- 
sesses beautiful material which, however, needs further 
development so as to make it more fiexible and color- 
ful. Clifford Biehl was sincerely appealing in the Watch- 
man solo during the Hymn of Praise, but his singing 
suffers from a vibrato and his voice lacks in volume. 
Miss Gifford showed pleasing manner of presentation. 
Her tones are warm though they are not smooth enough. 

Dr. Ray Hastings, the organist, had good opportuni- 
ties to reveal his art of registration. He gave effective 
support to the singers. His prelude to the Sanctus beau- 
tifully reflected tlie spirit of this episode. Last, but not 
least, the excellent work of Miss Lorna Gregg, the ac- 
companiste, must be noted, who rendered specially valu- 
able support during this performance, where her work 
formed a most helpful link between the conductor pro 
tern and the chorus. 

Homer Grunn, eminently successful composer and 
pianist, has just returned from New York, where he 
made six piano records for the Ampico. For years Mr. 
Grunn belonged to the leading members of our pianistic 
guild here. His work with the Brahms Quintet is well 
remembered and be will be heard again before long on 
the concert platform. 

The records he made were all compositions of his 
own and are among his most successful creations. He 
"recorded" the Song of the Mesa, Indian Love Song. 
Flute God At Sun Rise, HopI Dance and the charming 
concert valse entitled In Spring Time. Mr. Grunn has 
spent for several years his summer vacations at Indian 
reservations in New Mexico and the musical "loot" he 
has brought home has matured into characteristic compo- 
sitions of musical value and charm. Mr. Grunn uses fine 
musical discrimination in utilizing the Indian themes. 
He has just had word that the ballet Xocbltle danced 
by a Ted Shawn ensemble and to which he has written 
significant music, is still on the road and will be touring 
for some time yet. 

■While In New York Mr. Grunn found a cordial welcome 
from composers. The Musicians Publishing Company 
has accepted the Marche Heroique for piano and or- 
chestra and two songs called Fan Song and To Florinel. 
Mr. Grunn has written a group of Stellar songs, the 
first of which, "Venus, will appear at Schirmer's. 

A fine tribute has been paid to Homer Grunn in re- 
gard to his compositions epitomizing the native music 
of the Indian setting in New Mexico. George Wharton 
James, author of the Important volume captioned New 
Mexico, Land of Delight Makers, has devoted three 
pages to Mr. Grunn's compositions incorporating Indian 
themes. No other composer has been given so much 
attention In this authoritative volume. Writing of Homer 
Grunn's Zuni Impressions, the Desert Song, the Love 
Song and others, Mr. James comments how these compo- 
sitions convey the "feeling of the deep spirit" that lives 
in Indian art, that they "describe the spirit of the coun- 
try and the people." Listening to Mr. Grunn's music 
based on the Indian motifs, he adds that "one feels the 
wide spaces of the desert country, the outlook on high 
mesas, the primitive conditions." It seems good news 
to add that Mr. Grunn's pen is busy. 



Virginia Pierce Rovere, the accomplished vocalist, 
sang most charmingly at the reception given by Mrs. 
Ellse Bachrach to Mr. and Mrs. Giorgio Polacco at her 
attractive Green street residence. Signor De Grassl also 
contributed to the musical program by rendering a few 
violin selections which were enjoyed by the guests and 
honored visitors as well. 

SYLVIAN NOACK 

ConcertmoBter Pfallhannonlc Orchestra of Lo« Angrcles 
120 South Oxford Avenue 

Limited number of pupils for violin playing and 
chamber music. 



CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

Violin, Musical Theory. Faculty Member College of 

Music 

306 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles — Wed. and Sat. 

JAY PLOWE— Solo Flutist 

Philharmonic Orchestra — Trio Intlme 

Studio: 334 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles 

Res. Phone: 579064 

ANN THOMPSON-Pianisie 

PIANJSTE TO RUTH ST. DBMS 

Recitals— Concerts — Instruction 

In Care Musical Courier, New York 

Management Harry H. Hall 

DA VOL SANDERS 



JOHN SMALLMAN 

Baritone Concert EngrneementB — Conductor Los AdkcIm 
Orntorio Society 

For information see E. M. Earger, Secretary, 330 Blanch- 
ard Hall, Los Angeles, Calif. 





HENRI de 


BUSSCHER 




^HH^^H 


Belgian Tenor 




^H^|«9^H 


Solo Oboe. Philharmonic 
Orchestra, JLos Anseles 

Teacher of 
OBOE ^SINGING 

CoachlDfT for 
Concert and Opera 

Stndio: 1500 S. Figneroa 
Tel. 23195 









GRAUMAN'S 

MILLION DOLLAR THEATRE 
Broadway at Third 
LOS ANGELES 



SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



MISHA GUTERSON, CONDUCTOR 



Sunday Morning Concerts 

Every Sunday, Starting at 11 A. M. 



Soloists From Operatic and Concert Stage 
ALL SEATS RESERVED 

50 Cents 

and War Tax 

Which Includes the privilege of remaining for the 
regular Grauman Photoplay program, it is advisa- 
ble that seats be secured several days In advance 
In order to secure choice locations and avoid waltr 
ing in line on Sunday. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

University of Southern California 

Distinguished Faculty — Strong Courses 

Send for cntalntc 



J. SPENSER-KELLY, Baritone 



PATRICK O'NEIL, Tenor 



Brahnt van den Berg 



ILYA BRONSON 

Solo Cellist Phllhsriiionlc Orcheslra. Member Trio lD<line 
and 1.0B AoeeieM Trio. Instruction, Chamber 

Mnalc, Recltala 
Sludloi SeiS La Mlrada. Phone Holt)' 3044 



ALFRED KASTNER, Harpist 

olo Harpist Philharmonic Orchestra. Member Trio Intln 

Recital— Instruction— Concerts 

Studio: 240 S. Gramercy Place. 560481 

Alexander Saslavsky—Violinist 

DIrFctor ^nwlavsky Chamber Music Society 



JAMISON VOCAL QUARTET 

<:ancerta — RecllnlH — Club PrograniK — Mnrgnret Mesoer, 

llniiel B. AnderNon. Kdiin C. VoorheeM. Dtiiny V. Prideaux. 

Ahhic Norliin JamlMnii. nireclor-.XccomimiilMte, 2024 S. 

Hoover. '^iifAr, 

The Heartt- Dreyfus Studios 



ZOELLNER QUARTET 

MnunKemenl II. * A. CulherOon. teollnn Hall. NciT York 

Serious SluileiUN Aeeepted 
Personal A.l<lro«»: i:;."" \\ IniKur Blvd.. I.os AnKelea 

FLORENCE MIDDAUGH — Contralto 



fIf-M. Slufllo Phone 100)^2. 



hience \Vllflb. K700 



LORNA USSHER— Violiniste 

CONCERTS— TUITION— RECITALS 
705 Auditorium, Pico 2454 

GREGORY KRESHOVER 

ASSISTANT MUSICAL DIRECTOR 

MISSIO.V TIIEATHK, I.OS ANGELES 

HELEN KLOKKE 

DRAMATIC IINTKRPRETATIOIV 

CONCERTS— RECITALS— CLUB PROGRAMS 
lliinnicrni : Frnnre C;ul<l» iiirr, NIO MnJ. Thenire, 1S4H0 

HENRY SVEDROFSKY 

ASIST.VNT CO.XCERT.MASTEIl PIIILHAnMOMC 
OnCHESTR.V 

Tuition In 
VIOLIN ANI> ENSEMIILE PLAYING 

Available for Concerts and necitals 
3012 South Western Ave. Phono West 5006 



CALIFORNIA THEATER 

.Mnin Venr Mnlh, I.os AnKrIrs 
Host Arflslle Thrnler-llnnie of (he 

California Concert Orchestra 

Cnrll I>. Kllnnr, Director 

Finest Motion Plclnre llrchrstrn In the West 

DAILl St MI'IIOMC; < O.M KIITS 



OSCAR SEILING 



violin t'lassrs. i:t24 S. FlKuerron. Phones ||I>;I71 A 211170. 



HOMER GRUNN 



Xludlo: 1.1S4 South FlKuerroa. Phone S4IS0 



FIRST WESTERN TOURj, 

Philharmonic Orchestra 

of Los Angeles, California 

Founded by Management of 

W. A. Clark, Jr. L. E. Behymer 

Walter Henry Rothwell 

CONDUCTORj 

75 World-Famous Musicians Eight Distinguished Soloists 

Giving Forty Concerts in Thirty-five Cities 

Tour starts Monday April 25th, 
ending Saturday May 28th. 





ITINERARY 






Uakersfleld. Calif. 


Portland, Ore. 


Yakima, Wash. 


Boulder, Colo. 




Fresno, Calif. 


Taeoma. Wash. 


Missoula, Mont. 






Sacramento, Cnllf. 


Seattle, AVash. 


Deer Lodge, Mont 






Chiro, Calif. 


Victoria, D. C. 


liutte, Mont. 


Salt Lnke <;lly. 




.Medford, Ore. 


nellluKham, Wash. 


Helena, Mont. 






Eueene, Ore. 


Seattle, Wash. 


IIIIIIUKS, Mont. 






Salem, Ore. 


Spokane, AA'nsh. 


Cheyenne, W j o. 






Corvallls, Ore. 


Aberdeen, Wash, 
Olympla, W'osh. 


Ft. Collins, Colo. 
Greeley, Colo. 


Monrovia, Calif. 





Offices: 521 Philharmonic Auditorium Building, Los Angeles, Calif. 




and chorus in California. Since that time the company 
has been placed on a sound working basis, it is stated, 
with the result that it can proceed as one of the civic 
features. 

The roster of principals includes Irene Pavloska. Basil 
Ruysdael. Marie Morgan, Edwin Stevens, Roy Atwell, 
Philip Ryder, John Westervelt, Fred Holmes, Suzanne 
Keith, Sybil Stone. Alderine Crafke and others' with 
whom negotiations are now going on. The chorus sec- 
tion will number sixty voices, denoting an even greater 
nqmerical strength than was apparent in lolanthe. Hans 
Linne will direct the performances, with an orchestra 
of grand opera proportions. Miss Marjorie Maughlin 
will have charge of the ballet section. 

.\niong the operas in contemplation are: Firefly. Fra 
Diavolo, Gondoliers, La Hoheme, Mikado, Fortune Teller, 
Babette, Robin Hood, Carmen, Pirates of Penzance, 
Martha, Boccaccio, Ruddygore, Runaway Girl, Geisha. 
Florodora, Dorothy, Pagliacci and Cavalleria Rustlcana. 

Since the first performances by the California Opera 
Company, Business Manager Charles R. Baker has re- 
ceived many requests for bookings of the organization 
from important outside cities, and it is planned to visit 
these upon a well-arranged tour at the close of the 
Mason Opera House engagement. 

The interest in "our own" opera company is sincere 
to the tune of thousands of dollars which have been 
guaranteed by a very representative list of Los Angeles 
men and women of affairs. 



MOTION PICTURE MUSIC 



IIOMEIl liltlNN 



I'he DIstlnKulshrd Li 



Trip 



nposer-l'lnnlst Who 
New York 



The Pacific West will have an opera company of its 
own. Based on the splendid artistic success of the 
lolanthe production, the continuance of the California 
Opera Company's career Is now definitely assured. 

The organization will occupy the Mason for a period 
of two weeks beginning May 2.i. The first attraction will 
be Rudolf Frlml's The Firefly, for which rights have 
lately been secured by Manager \V. G. Stewart. Adequate 
backing for the organization, which made such a favor- 
able impression recently In lolanthe at the Auditorium, 
has now been obtained, and a Coast tour Is In prospect 
following the local engagement. 

The scores of The Firefly, in 
originally achieved a stellar succ 
the East. The company Is already rehearsing. In the re- 
cent engagement at the Auditorium Mr. Stewart went 
far to prove that not only could Los Angeles become 
the home of Its own operatic organization, but that 
there was an abundance of talent, both for solo roles 



At Graumans — The all-symphonic program offered 
yesterday morning by Conductor Misha Guterson was 
one of tlie most enjoyable performances given at the 
C.rauman Theatre. Including Mozart, Schubert, Rossini, 
Mendelssohn and Wagner it had variety and drew warm 
applause. The Unfinished Symphony by Schubert found 
a pleasing reading during which its abundance of melo- 
dious beauty was well contrasled. The romantic charm 
of the Fingals Cave Overture by Mendelssohn was char- 
acteristically revived in the haunting movement of the 
wave motif. The Tannhauser March was a brilliant 
finale. It was gratifying to hear a program of such 
quality which was none too serious, as the size of the 
audience proved. 

The vocal soloist. Miss .\orlna Coleman, soprano, sang 
Vn Bel Di from Madame Butterfly and the duet La CI 
Dareni La Mano from Mozart's Don Giovanni together 
with Signer Ettore Campana, baritone. Both numbers 
were well received. 

At Millers — The Pathe picture, Behold the Man. whose 
showing next week at Miller's Theatre will be featureil 
by a magnificent musical program comprising carefully 
chosen selections rendered at each presentation. Among 
the artists engaged for this super-production arc Anne 
Ebert, solo violinist, Ruth Mitchell, soprano, and John 
Westervelt, tenor. At next Sundays premiere of Behold 
the Man the new $30,000 Robert Morton symphonic 
organ will be played by Prof. C. L, Rlemcr, for the first 
time. In connection with the .Miller Theatre Orchestra, 
of which he is also director. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SPLENDID CONCERTS IN TRANS-BAY CITIES 

Matienauer Concert Great Success— Good Friday Con- 
cert a Success — Lada Greatly Admired— Berkeley 
Musical Association Concludes Season 

By L. MACKAY-CANTELL 

The llnal concerl ol' the Artials Concerts Series, uiuler 
the able management of Miss Z. W. Potter, took plttce 
at the OaUland Aiuiitorlum Theatre, Friday evening, April 
8th, when Madame Margaret Matzenauer, contralto, as- 
sisted by Charles Carver, baritone, and Prank La- Foiyt', 
presented the following splendid program to a thrilled 
and enthusiastic audience: (a) Lungi dal caro bene 
(Secchi), (bl The Kiss (Beethoven), (c) Give Me Thy 
Heart (Bach), (d) Warning (Mozart), Mme. Matzenauer; 
(a) Come, Beloved (Handel), (b) Love Is a Bauble (Old 
English) Mr. Carver; (a) May Night (Brahms), (b) 
The Butterfly (Franz), (c) Mother, O Sing Me to Best 
(Franz), (d) When Your Dear Hands (Frank La Forge), 
Mme. Matzenauer; (a) In Summer Fields (Brahms), (b) 
Des Pas des Sabots (Laparra), (c) A Heart Mislaid 
(Fi-ank La Forge), (Dedicated to Mr. Carver), (d) Per- 
jura (Sung in Spanish) (Lerdo de Tejada), Mr. Carver; 
(a) Wanderer's Nightsong (Rubinstein), (b) O, That we 
Two Were Maying (Nevin), Mme. Matzenauer, Mr. Car- 
ver- (a) Dream of Love (Liszt), (b) Valse de Concert 
(Frank La Forge), Mr. La Forge; Aria Armour Viens 
Aider from Samson and Delila (Saint-Saens), Mme. Mat- 
zenauer. 

Madame Matzenauer was gorgeously attractive in 
voice and costume alike; her singing was faultless, and 
her assisting master artists, Mr. Carver and Mr. La 
Forge, gave theii- supporting numbers with equal success. 
From the printed list of artists available for Miss Pol- 
ter's next season's concerts, the flattering success she 
has achieved this year will be more than equaled by 
the artistic and box office evidence of her next season, 
subscriptions for which are already well in advance. 

The monthly program of the Alameda County Music 
Teachers' Association was given at Ebell Hall, Oakland, 
Monday evening. March 28th; Miss Schebatowitch, pian- 
ist. Albert Rosenthal, 'cellist, and Mrs. Hill, voice, with 
Mrs. Suzanne Pasmore Brooks and Mrs. Alwyn . (com- 
poser) as accompanists, presenting each number with 
the finished artistry which has come to be expected 
from these exceptional musicians. Mrs. Alwyn's group 
of six songs were particularly applauded, giving a new 
occasion for self-congratulation by those present upon 
the participation of this talented lady in the activities 
of this important association. Miss Schehatowitch's vir- 
tuosity is a matter for a more general appreciation, as 
performance is generally better understood than the 
thing performed. The mid-monthly meeting of the asso- 
ciation took place at the delightful home of Mrs. Jacob 
Del Valle, one of the Association Council, and herself a 
musician of the first rank. 

Greek Theatre Activities 

The eleventh annual Good Friday concert under the 
direction of Paul SteindorfE consisted in a presentation 
of the Stabat Mater (Rossini) and The New Earth 
(Henry Hadley) by the San Francisco Choral Society, 
the Wednesday Morning Choral of Oakland, the Berke- 
ley Oratorio Society and an orchestra of sixty pieces. 
The weather was at its best and the tremendous seating 
capacity of the Greek Theatre was taxed by the numbers 
gathered to hear and appreciate the work of Mr. Stein- 
dorff and his ensemble. The work of the chorus was ex- 
cellent, although a greater number of tenori would have 
given a better balance. 01 the soli by Myrna Sharlow, 
soprano, Maude King Clark Upham, mezzo-soprano, John 
B. Siefert, tenor. George W. Finer, tenor, Henry L. Perry, 
bass, Mr. Perry's recitative Eia, Mater, fons amoris 
was the most distinguished, although these singers were 
all well applauded for their handling of these well-known 
arias. 

Lada, the Dancer 

Lada, who danced at the Greek Theatre, Saturday 
evening, April 2nd, was received most enthusiastically 
and merited an even greater demonstration. Her art is 
not spectacular, but is reserved and cleverly interpreta- 
tive; her figure is very slender but graceful, — she gives 
an impression of complete control, her slow movements 
(always the most difficult) being delightfully suave, sure 
and unhurried. Her supporting artists were the Pawling 
Trio, piano, violin and 'cello, and a soloist, Miss Maurine 
Dyer. Of Lada's dances; Blue Danube Waltz (Strauss), 
Waltzes (opus 39, Nos. 2, 10 and 15, of Brahms), Hun- 
garian Dance (Brahms), Waltz and Mazurka (Chopin), 
Indian Dance and Lassie o' Mine, — the audience .unmis- 
takably enjoyed the beauty of her second interpretation 
with floating balloon most gracefully handled, her Indian 
war dance, very typical and richly costumed, and her 
last encore, which was a humorously delicious frolic to 
the music of Jingle Bells. This last was something so 
ail-American, refined and yet quaint and captivating as 
to lead to the hope that American popular music or even 
negro spirituals or Indian rhythms are not the sum 
total of what may be interpreted as typically American. 

The public is now anticipating the coming of the New 
York Philharmonic Symphony Orchestra, to be directed 
by Joseph Stransky and Henry Hadley; the Grand Opera 
to be given by the Steindorft forces; and the Bolm 
ballet and Barrere Ensemble, to appear at the Greek 
Theatre, under the management of Mr. Sam Hume. 
The De Gogorza Concert 

It is a pleasure, after being left cold by Amato, cross 
by Anna Case, curious by Mary Jordan, and contemptu- 
ous by Samuel Gardner, to be able to invoke all the 
joyous adjectives of delight to express the art of Emilio 
De Gogorza! His is singing. The inspiring beauty of 
vocal art in all its perfection. He lacks nothing, and • 
fails nowhere. His .program was fine throughout wltli 
fitting encores. He did not descend to the cheap music 
hall ballad for his closing numbers to propitiate a pop- 
ular demand, thereby proving the idea fallacious. The 
Berkeley Musical Association is to be congratulated on 
this program especially. It included six folk songs from 




JAN KVBBLIK, 

Great noheniiiin Vlullnist, Who Will Give One Snn Frnnclseo 
Bxliosltlon .\ndttoriiiin on Tfaursdnr Kvenin^, April ! 



MILL VALLEY MUSICAL CLUB 

Tlie April program of the Mill Valley 
Musical Club was Indeed delightful. 
Madame Montague Yates, a most valued 
member of the club, talked on Gounod's 
works. The Poet, and a reading of the 
third act of Chanticler, The Singers. Thla 
remarkable woman is beloved by all who 
know her, and it is a great grief to Mill 
Valley to lose her for a season, as she 
Intends to make a trip to British Colum- 
bia. There is grandeur yet Blmpllclty 
about her delivery that hold all and her 
spiritual message was even understood 
by the little children present. Miss Ethel 
A. Johnson, President, finished each 
recitation by request of Mme. Yates with 
an appropriate song, bringing surprise In 
the person of Albert E. Rosenthal to play 
the obligato to the Sing, Smile and Slum- 
ber. 

Mrs. Ruth Waterman Anderson was 
also a favorite and won the audience 
directly with her Indian songs, her warm 
and sympathetic voice, being especially 
suited to these. She is a songstress of un- 
derstanding. Miss Aileen Murphy is a 
great favorite with the slub, her last ap- 
pearance winning her special mention and 
place among all our artists. She is indeed 
a most gifted pianist that should be 
heard more frequently. Her rendition of 
Le Vent by Alkan was repeated by spe- 
cial request. Her masterly style in En 
Route, by Godard, will not soon be for- 
gotten. As an accompanist she also 
proved herself competent. Mrs. Mary 
Gardner also distinguished herself in ac- 
companying Miss Johnson and Mr. Rosen- 
thal. 

James Hamilton Howe, the energetic 
oratorio conductor, who will be remem- 
bered by San Franciscans as having 
given the city some splendid oratorio 
performances prior to 1906, recently gave 
a performance of The Messiah. It was the 
first concert of the Choral Symphony 
Society, of which Mr. Howe is the con- 
ductor, and took place in the First Meth- 
odist Episcopal Church, Bremerton, 
! Wash., on Easter Sunday afternoon, 
March 27th. 



the Basque, three Russian numbers by Gretchaninoff, 
Moussorgsky and Rachmaninoff. Canto del Presidierio 
(Alvarez), Noche Serena (Mexican folk song). El Pane 
(Folk dance of Murcia), of which the Noce Sereno was 
marvelously lovely, followed by two French songs of 
Massenet and Bizet, two English songs of Cyril Scott 
and The jfipes of Pan by Elgar. Mr. De Gogorza's encores 
included La Paloma and Huhn's Captain of My Soul. 

The Matzenauer Concert 

This, with the exception of the New York Chamber 
Music Society concert, was a departure from the single 
artist programs ol this series, and was greatly enjoyed 
by a capacity audience. Madame Matzenauer's gorgeous 
voice and personality are too well known to need par- 
ticularizing comment. She was in splendid voice, and to 
those who enjoy hearing songs in English she gave par- 
ticular pleasure, while those who have been accustomed 
to her German numbers in German could hardly com- 
plain ol this wartime expediency which Madame Matzen- 
auer evidently intends to permanently adopt. Her assist- 
ing master artists, Charles Carver, baritone, and Frank 
La Forge, contributed to the delight of a well-satisfled 
audience. Mr. Carver is a young man who promises to 
be a tremendously popular addition to the number of 
internationally known male voices of America. 

The entire program included: (a) Dry ye not (Ludwlg 
van Beethoven), (b) It thou be near (Johann Sebastian 
Bach), (c) Slumber Song (Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart), 
(d) Lusinghe piu care (Georg Friedrich Handel), 
Madame Matzenauer; Possenti Numi (The Magic Flute) 
(Mozart), Mr. Carver; (a) Ever lighter grows my Slum- 
ber (Johannes Brahms), (b) Two Songs of a Bride (Rob- 
ert Alexander Schiimann), (e) Before the Crucifix 
(Prank La Forge), (d) Clavellitos (Valverde), Madame 
Matzenauer; (a) Sanctuary (Prank La Forge), (b) 
Maidens are like the Wind (Karl Loewe), (c) Nina 
Pancha (Valverde), Mr. Carver; (a) O that we two were 
Maying (Ethelbert Nevin), (b) Barcarolle (Tales of 
Hoffman) (Jacques Offenbach), Madame Matzenauer, Mr. 
Carver; (a) Nocturne (Francois Frederic Chopin, (b) 
Dance (Beethoven), Mr. La Forge; Arioso, La Mort de 
Jeanne d'Arc (Henri Bemberg), Madame Matzenauer. 

The eleventh season of the Berkeley Musical Associa- 
tion Concerts ended with this concert at the Harmon 
Gymnasium, Thursday evening, April 7th. 



MR. AND MRS. POLACCO HONORED 



The very attractive apartment of Mrs. Elise Bachrach 
was the scene of a most delightful reception given in 
honor of Maestro Giorgio Polacco and his very charm- 
ing wife, Madame Edith Mason Polacco. Many friends of 
the illustrious conductor who knew him well in former 
days, when he was at the Tivoli Opera House, greeted 
him on this occasion, and it was easily perceived that 
he was very happy renewing the old friendships. Among 
those who called during the afternoon to welcome Mr. 
and Mrs. Polacco were: Mr. and Mrs. Mackenzie Gordon, 
Mrs. Theresa Bhrman Bauer, Madame Patrizi, Mrs. Ed- 
win N. Short, Miss Maude Fay, Miss Constance Alex- 
andre, Miss Augusta Hayden, Frederick Mauer, Jr., and 
many other well known musicians and members of our 
social set. 



KUBELIK NEXT WEEK 



In point ol the esteem in which an artist is held by the 
great American public no one who has ever appeared in 
this country holds a more remarkable place than Jan 
Kubelik. famous Bohemian violinist, who is now making 
his first tour of this country in ten years. When Kube- 
lik first flashed across the musical horizon of the United 
States he was acclaimed by high and low as one of the 
greatest of his cult. A number of tours made at that 
time brought thousands upon thousands to worship at 
the Kubelik shrine. 

When the war broke out Kubelik found himself on 
his estate near Prague in Bohemia and unable to return 
to America, necessitating the cancellation of the tour 
that was arranged lor him in 1915. Only last year was 
he able to find a way to return, and the most remark- 
able circumstances of this return has been that he has 
continued to wield his magic bold over the people and 
to bring forth greater enthusiasm than any of his con- 
freres. On his reappearance in New York at the Hippo- 
drome last November SOOO people cheered for 30 min- 
utes and at once re-established Kubelik's exalted posi- 
tion. Critics agreed that he had lost none of his techni- 
cal cunning and that as an artist he was still the pre- 
eminent figure. 

In other Eastern cities the same story was told. 
Thousands gathered to hear him and thousands went 
forth to once more sing his praise. Ten concerts were 
given in Havana last month and eacli time hundreds 
were turned away unable to gain admission. Kubelik 
is now in Los Angeles and Manager Selby C. Oppen- 
heimer, who is bringing him here next Thursday night 
lor a single concert at the Exposition Auditorium, has 
been advised by his Los Angeles office that Kubelik is 
now playing more wonderlully than ever, and the big 
Philharmonic Auditorium there witnessed rare scenes 
of enthusiasm during and after his recital. 

In San Francisco, where Kubelik will positively play 
but once, he will be heard not only as virtuoso but as 
composer, for his first program number will be his own 
Concerto in C major, a work that has brought unanimous 
praise to its composer. He will also render the Beetho- 
ven Romance in G major, Bach's Preludium for violin' 
alone, Saint-Saens' Introduction and Rondo Cappriccio, 
Sarasate's Spanish Dance No. 7, and La Streghe by Pag- 
anini, all works which will completely display the Kube- 
lik masterly technique. Pierre Augieras will appear at 
the piano as well as rendering the Chopin Ballade in F 
major No. 2 as solo offering. Kubelik tickets are now 
selling at Sherman, Clay & Company. 



Johanna Kristoffy 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 

Thorough Vocal i 
ISSO rvashlnvtoa St. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



FOLKS NEED A LOT OF LOVINGi by K. A. Glcn 

MY LI;V IS LIKE A RED, RED ROSK: bj C. Blooni 

Two New SouKH for Medium Voice 

e are songs that have that human appeal that llnds an Instant re 
the human heart. 
Published by Clayton F. Summy Co.. ChlcKgo, and tor sale by 
Ileno' Grobe, 135 Kearny St.. Snn Francisco 




The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 



MISSION BRANCH, Mlulon and 21at SIreeta 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and Ttfc A» 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Haiclit and Belvedere Streeta 



..«e»,878,147.0I 



DECEMBER 31s(. 1920 

Assets „ „ .^ ^ _, 

Deposits !!'.L!!!!!!!!!!!!!!~!!!.~!!'!7e8!s3sii47!6i 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,540,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 343,530.85 

OFFICERS — JOHN A. BUCK. President; GEO. TOURNT, Vice-President and 
Manager: A_ H. R. SCHMIDT, Vice-President and Cashier; E. T. KRUSE. Vice- 
President; A. H. MULLER, Secretary; WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary; 
WIU-IAM HERRMANN. GEO. SCHAMMEL. G. A. BELCHER. R. A. LAUENSTEIN, 
Asaiatant Cashiers; C. W. HETER. Manager Mission Branch; W. C. HBYER, 
Manager Park-Presidlo District Branch; O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Haight Street 
Branch; GOODPBLLOW. EELLS. MOORE Ik ORRICK, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— JOHN A. BUCK. GEO. TOURNT, E. T. KRUSE 
A. H. R. SCHMIDT, I. N. WALTER, HUGH GOODPELLOW, A. HAAS. E. N. 
VAN BERGEN. ROBERT DOLLAR. E. A. CHRISTENSON. L. S. SHERMAN. 



SIGMUND ANKER'S CONCERT 

Sigmund Anker, tlie well-known violin- 
ist and teacher, will give his annual pu- 
pils' recital at Scottish Rite Hall tomor- 
row (Sunday) evening, April 24-th. Mr. 
Anker is featuring a most deserving 
young prodigy in Sarah Kreindler. who is 
only eight years of age. Mr. Anker con- 
siders the youthful violinist an extraor- 
dinarily talented child. She has only 
studied two years and a half and she will 
play at this concert De Beriot's Ninth 
Concerto. Redfern Mason, after hearing 
the young musician at the Pacific Mu- 
sical Society's Junior concert, said of her 
that she played with such aplomb and 
Justness of accent that he was delighted. 

Another gifted little artist who will 
appear at this concert is Iris Loraine 
Currie, a child colorature soprano, who 
thrilled 10,000 people at Civic Auditorium 
last year at a Masonic Concert. She will 
contribute Massenet's Elegle, with Sarah 
Kreindler playing the violin obligato. She 
possesses a singularly sweet and well 
schooled voice. The other principal num- 
ber on this program will he interpreted 
by Sigmund Anker's Sirins Orchestra. 

M. ANTHONY LINDEN 

PAMOtrs FLUTE VIRTUOSO 

Vlow Conducting His Artist Ensemble In a 
Series of Entre Acte Concerts at the 

MacArlhnr T healre. Oakland 

Dr. Maxim De Grosz 

Musical Director 
1108 Fnlton St. Ph. Fillmore 2869 



ADCLE ULMAN 

Pupil of Mme. Giacomo Minkowsky 
accept a limited number of pupils 



composed of pupils between six and four- 
teen years of age. Other soloists will be: 
Prances Wiener, Jeanette Davis, Clara 
Bercovitz, .-Mice Aston, Donna Anderson 
and Esther Heller. 



ALCAZAR 



The Acquittal, a gripping mystery play 
of tense interest, will be the attraction at 
tlie Alcazar Theatre for the week begin- 
ning Sunday afternoon, April 24th. Wliile 
the plot is unfolded after the approved 
manner of the detective story, the work 
cf running down tlie criminal is in the 
hands of a newspaper reporter of unusual 
talents, and the manner in which he out- 
wits his brother scribes and solves tlie 
strange features of the case is delight- 
fully entertaining. A wealthy man has 
been killed under peculiar circumstances. 
The police have come to the conclusion 
that the case is one of accidental death, 
but the reporter, who had been the re- 
cipient of the dead man's bounty for 
many years, is convinced that murder 
has been done. He sets himself the task 
of solving the mystery, and in addition 
to accomplisliing his purpose he manages 
to put over a "scoop" for liis paper. 

Rita Weiman. the author, succeeds well 
in keeping her audience in suspense as 
to the final outcome, the identity of the 
murderer remaining concealed until the 
end. 

Nancy Fair, the .\lcazar's charming 
leading woman, will be found happily 
cast as the wife of the business manager 
of the dead man, the latter being one of 
lliose suspected of the killing. Dudley 
Ayres will be seen as the young reporter 
from the West; Joe Conway and Thomas 
Chatterton will put on the black mons- 
taclie of the villain. Florence Printy. tlie 
new ingenue, welcomed to the O'Fari'ell 
street playhouse last week, will have an 
important role. Others in the cast will be 
Emily Pinter. Henry Shumer. Charles 
Yule, Ben Erway. Walter Belasco, Fred- 
erick Green, E. C. Raffetto. Waller Emer 
son and Howard Miller. 



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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



FREDERICK JACOBI'S NEW YORK SUCCESS 



BodanskI to Present His Symphonic Poem Next Week- 
Mrs. JacobI Scores Genuine Triumph as Pianist — 
Vincent d'lndy to Visit New York 



By ROSALIE HOUSMAN 

New York, April 10. 

High spots on the New York calendar ot the past 
week have been tew, but there was an unusual concert 
of our well-liked American violinist, Albert Spalding, 
which filled Carnegie Hall Sunday the 3rd. His program 
was not unusual, but his supreme artistry is, and he 
thrilled his auditors. The same afternoon at Aeolian 
Hall saw the final concert ot the season ot the Society 
of the Friends of Music, an organization which stands 
for the very finest in music. This time they chose to 
give an all-Bach program, for which we should be eter- 
nally grateful. The Metropolitan Opera House Orchestra, 
under the inspiring baton ot Bodansky, gave us first the 
F major concerto, with its exquisite violin obligate, fol- 
lowed by the little-known tenor cantata O Hapless Man, 
sung by George Meader. His light tenor voice is suited 
to Bach's music, and he has a style and understanding 
of its impersonal beauties which is a rare delight. His 
diction is perfect, not one word in all the florid music 
was lost. The Cantata, God's Time Is Best, was the con- 
cluding work, an impressive, soul-stirring choral work 
with several solos, sung by Marion Telva, contralto, and 
Wm. Gustafson, bass, of the opera, and the tenor part 
was again in the hands of Mr. Meader. One would have 
to go a long ways to hear flner singing than was on this 
program, as the chorus, trained, I am told, by Stephen 
Townsend of Boston, was excellent in attack, phrasing 
and pitch, and Bodansky handled his men with a rever- 
ence ot the beauties of this music which enriched its 
many charms. 

The Philadelphia orchestra had its final program, an 
all-Tchaikowsky one, on Tuesday evening, the 5th. The 
ever-popular Pathetique, the Nut-Cracker suite, and the 
1812 overture were the featured music. Stokowski cer- 
tainly gets all the meat out of the symphony, and espe- 
cially the two middle movements. Strange, how audi- 
ences love this music. The suite was exquisite, and 
daintily done, worth going miles to hear, with its piquant 
orchestration, and the 1812 brought the evening to a 
stirring close. Mr. Stokowski was the recipient ot an 
enormous wreath, and he and the orchestra were obliged 
to bow their acknowledgments many times. 

I did not see the performance of Miss Anglin in Eu- 
ripides' Iphigenia, as I had already seen it at the Greek 
Theatre, and I felt it would lose in a building. The gen- 
eral reports were that it was an impressive spectacle, 
fairly well done, and that all honors were Miss Anglin's 
for her superb acting and wonderful voice. I understand 
the choruses were not as skillfully handled as out West, 
and the critics did not write enthusiastically of the 
Damrosch score. Merle Alcock again sang the contralto 
solos, and received unanimous praise. 

Miss Leonora Sparkes of the Metropolitan gave her 
own recital, and it -was in every way delightful. Her 
voice has freshness, timbre and charm, and her hearers 
were wildly enthusiastic over her, which was deserved. 

At last I have had an opportunity to hear and judge 
the performance of Tristan, which Sembach and Easton 
sang this past week at the Metropolitan Opera House. 
Scenically it was gorgeous, and quite in keeping with 
the best traditions. The orchestra was led by Bodansky, 
who was remarkable, and the orchestra never for a min- 
ute was too loud and out of the picture. And the solo- 
ists — one cannot say too much in their praise for beau- 
tiful singing and for their understandable English, 
though frequently one's sense of humor was touched by 
the curious translations of familiar phrases. Easton was 
in every way regal, graceful, and vocallly beyond crit- 
icism. Though Sembach occasionally betrayed his Ger- 
man origin, he sang a very understandable English, 
which many native singers could envy. He was a hand- 
some Tristan, and in the second act the long duet with 
Isolde seemed short, with the lovely singing that was 
heard. Jeanne Gordon as Brangane, Whitehill as Kur- 
venal and Gustafson as the King completed a well- 
balanced cast, and all were excellent vocally, as well. 
It was in every way a memorable performance: And 
every seat taken, though it began early and was over 
at midnight. 

Julia Gulp, who was to sing this afternoon (April 10th) 
is indisposed, and will give her recital later in the month. 

I know that all Californians will be interested to hear 
ot the successes of Frederick Jacobi and his talented 
wife. She is an unusual pianist, and Friday of this past 
week, gave a senate recital with Joseph Fuchs, violinist, 
at the Damrosch Institute. The novelty was Dohnanyi's 
C sharp minor senate, which is musically the most indi- 
vidual composition I have heard of his. It was well 
played. Mrs. Jacobi has not only all the necessary equip- 
ment of a concert pianist, but has a something more, if 
one can confine one's impression of vision and insight 
to words. I have heard lew at Aeolian Hall at any time 
who are more sensitive artists than she, and her quiet, 
modest manner is also an unusual asset. Mr. Jacobi has 
been seeing bis songs on programs quite often recently, 
and at present Mr. Bodansky is rehearsing his Sym- 
phonic poem, the Eve of St. Agnes, after Keats, for per- 
formance on April 29th and May 3rd. I have seen the 
score and have heard it at the piano, and I can assure 
you that it is in keeping with the spirit of the poem, and 
well written for orchestra. It is less complicated than 
his other music, and is more closely knit, and is very 
expressive. I am keenly awaiting an opportunity of hear- 
ing it in its native dress. 



Vincent d'lndy, (he French composer and founder ot 
tile I'nrls Schola Cantorum, will visit this country next 
season on the Invitation of Waller Unmroscli, when he 
will appear as guest composer-conductor ot the New York 
Symphony Orchestra In the third pair ot concerts in the 
regular Carnegie Hall series, December Ist and 2nd, 
which will be Mr. d'Indy's only appearance in New York. 

The engagement ot Mr. d'lndy to appear in New York 
was arranged when Walter Damrosch and his orchestra 
gave concerts in Paris last May under the auspices of 
the Ministry of Fine Arts. On this occasion d'lndy served 
with Saint-Saens on tjie municipal committee appointed 
to welcome the Americans; and the French composer's 
visit to our shores at this time should further the fine 
musical entent existing between France and America. 

The programs selected tor performance in Carnegie 
Hall by Mr. d'lndy will include his own compositions. 
During the past season Mr. Damrosch and his sym- 
i-liony men produced for the first time here the new 
Symphonic Interlude, La Queste de Dieu from d'Indy's 
opera. The Legend of St. Christopher, which made a 
deep impression when it was given its premier in Paris 
last June. Besides other works for the orchestra d'lndy 
has composed three symphonies, the third of which was 
first played here by Mr. Damrosch in 1919. 



ALICE FRISCA A GREAT SUCCESS IN LONDON 

After a successful season in Paris, Alice Frisca, who 
is remembered here as Miss Alice Mayer, a pupil ot 
Pierre Douillet, was engaged by Daniel Mayer Co., man- 
agers in London, for a series of concerts in England, 
where she is already booked tor many concerts and has 
been re-engaged by Sir Henry Wood to play at two 
Promenade Concerts in London next August. Her debut 




HILDRED HANSEX HOSTETTER 
oIolKt of the Californiii Club Choral Who Will A|ipe 



in London took place in Queen's Hall with the assist- 
ance of the symphony orchestra under the direction of 
Sir Henry Wood. Her selections were Grieg's Concerto 
in A minor and Liszt's Concerto in E flat. There were 
2500 people present, of which 200 were obliged to sit 
upon the stage behind the orchestra. Owing to the nat- 
ural coldness ot the English public, their enthusiasm 
was considered remarkable, as Miss Frisca was recalled 
not less than 14 times and was obliged to play four 
encores. 

For lack ot space we reprint only part ot the criticisms 
from the London press: 

The Sunday Times, London, March 27, 1921. — Her 
great asset at present is her youthful vitality. — Ernest 
Newman. 

Westminster Gazette, London, March 22, 1921. — ^What 
one can in any case assert with confidence is £liat she 
plays very neatly and cleanly and with plenty of intel- 
ligence and temperament to boot. Her brilliant execu- 
tion and tasteful interpretations made it a pleasure to 
listen to her performances, and her success was un- 
mistakable. 

Daily Chronicle, London, March 22, 1921. — Miss Frisca 
elected to be heard in familiar music. Her playing of 
both these works (Grieg and Liszt Concertos) was re- 
markably fresh and spontaneous. Her technique is un- 
usually fine, her tone rich, and her style shows her to 
be possessed of genuine temperament. 

Daily Mail, London, March 22, 1921. — Her playing was 
nimble and vivacious. She is quite a young girl and 
won sympathy of the audience, which demanded four 
encore pieces. 

The Daily News, London, March 22, 1921. — Miss Frisca 
has an extremely pleasing touch and plays with con- 
spicuous neatness and admirable taste. She played 
Liszt Concerto with great spirit, and there was so much 
applause that she had to add some extra pieces. Her 
greatest effect was made in one ot Liszt's Hungarian 
Rhapsodies. — A. K. 



The Pall Mall and (iluho, London, March 22, 1921.— 
The Grieg Concerto revealed her aB a brilliant player. 
She has a good tone with a curious personal mannerism 
ot softening It sometimes at a point where most pianists 
would be relying upon full-toned bravura. She subse- 
quently played with equal brilliance Liszt's Concerto In 
E flat.— E. E. 

The Morning Post, London, March 22, 1921.— There Is 
every reason why siie siiould come so long a distance 
to demonstrate her present attainments, for they are 
considerable. Her choice was given to Grieg and Liszt 
Concertos, works that have the common factor of being 
of well-defined character. That character is well suited 
to Miss Frisca's methods, with I he address she can 
command, and with the poetic insight she showed her- 
self to possess by her reading ot the Adagio of the Grieg. 

The Referee, London, March 27, 1921.— She played 
with a brilliancy and assurance remarkable in one so 
young, and her readings had the confidence and exuber- 
ance of youth. It would be interesting to hear her with- 
out an orchestra. — Lancelot. 

The Saturday Review, London, March 26, 1921. — Her 
style, generally, may be summed up in the word "bril- 
liant." She shows to greatest advantage in the display 
ot technique and feats ot virtuosity. She has a bright, 
elastic touch, and phrases with commendable clearness 
and decision. 



PRACTICE AND ITS PURPOSE 



By JOHN WHITCOMB NASH 

All teachers are conscientious in prescribing the work, 
but unless the practice is supervised it sometimes hap- 
pens that the ideals which should be brought into the 
simple but essential processes of vocalization are never 
even thought of. Just how far-reaching such a condition 
may be is seldom appreciated, but unless there are ideals 
applied to the technical exercises there will be some- 
thing missing when it comes to singing for an audience. 

Doing one thing at a time, knowing it is done well, 
and its relation to other things equally well done — and 
understood — is a splendid formula for the preparation 
of a singer. Practice material there is a plenty, but the 
way in which it is sometimes used defeats its own ob- 
ject. A well balanced plan of daily work is vitally neces- 
sary to well belanced results. There are several ele- 
mentary conditions to be mastered; to attempt them all 
at once as one does in singing a song is to fail in their 
application. No one who has not segregated these ele- 
ments and studied them and their relations and propor- 
tions, can be sure of a just delivery in song. Let us take 
as an instance the matter of attack, which comprises but 
simple, easily understood principles. Each student has 
his (or her) own personal difficulties in mastering the 
real thing because of misunderstanding the required 
effect. He may use the glottic attack, he may scoop up 
on to the pitch, he may feel around in a dozen different 
ways, but the fact is there is just one correct way. A 
smeary attack is as bad as writing a letter and then 
smearing the wet ink. The song and the letter are both 
spoiled. Those students who possess glorious voices but 
are outdistanced by their fellows not so well endowed, 
may generally find the reason in the quality of their 
daily practice, and whil^ the superlatively endowed 
might have attained heights unapproachable to the 
others, we must admit that there is something great 
about achie-.Jlng the best that is in us. 

It is said that the Meistersinger's guilds agreed upon 
the rules and prohibitions that governed their contests. 
These rules when assembled were called Tabulators, and 
contained (if my memory serves me) thirty-four articles, 
each of which was a definite "do" or "don't," It should 
not be a difficult matter to reconstruct such a set of 
guiding principles, and it might be a good thing to en- 
courage the compilation of such a document. The more 
prominent teachers and authorities of San Francisco 
might spend their time to less purpose than in such a 
diversion, including only such points as every one of 
them would agree upon. 

The real value of a musical education is in being able 
to appreciate and express the great things one is made 
of and in touch with. Unless one has a ready technique 
and can use it there is not much satisfaction in just 
singing. The very pursuit of ideals in technical exercises 
is the price one pays for vocal excellence, and the in- 
dividual shapes his or her success in this way. 



DE GRASSI THRILLS RECORD AUDIENCE 

Signor Antonio de Grassi, the distinguished violin vir- 
tuoso, played to a packed house last Sunday morning at 
the California Theatre. A great deal is expected of a 
pupil of the great Ysaye and Sevcik and the fullest ex- 
pectations were realized in Signor de Grassi's masterful 
interpretation of Max Bruch's Violin Concerto in G 
minor. That Antonio de Grassi is to be reckoned among 
the foremost violinists of the day is not to be questioned 
after hearing his performance Sunday. His pure and 
limpid tone is combined with a technic well nigh fault- 
less and his interpretations are given in an authoritative 
and delightful style. The difficulties of the intricate con- 
certo were simplified and almost concealed by Signor de 
Grassi's exquisite technic. 

Signor de Grassi followed the Bruch Concerto with an 
entrancing interpretation of a Berceuse of his own com- 
position, which gave great delight to the audience. In 
this number he was accompanied by tbat admirable 
musician, Frederick Maurer. The concert as a whole 
was one of the big events in the history of the Califor- 
nia Theatre which is to be commended for its presenta- 
tion of such a distinguished soloist as Signor de Grassi, 
the only regret being perhaps that he was allotted so 
little time on the program. Signor de Grassi will take 
up his teaching at the Jomelli Studios, Hotel Richelieu, 
the latter part of this month. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




ALICE 
GENTLE 

MEZZO 
SOPRANO 



>VuIllBii Opera Ho 
Vork); llriii'cnie Oiiera Company (Hi 
Ext'luxlte MnuaBemcnt: 

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Pacific CoaMt ManaKcmeDtt 

JESSICA COLBERT 

llcamt llullilluK, San Pranolaco 



BETHLEHEM 

BACH FESTIVAL 

".( Xatioiial Institution" 
Dr. J. Fred WoUe, Conductor 



Friday, May 27—4 P. M. and 8 P. M. 

Cantatas, Oratorio, Motet 

Saturday, May 28—1 :30 P. M. and 4 P. M. 

Mass in B Minor 



BACH CHOIR. 300 VOICES 

Members Philadelphia Orchestra 

Soloists — Organ 

Moravian Trombone Choir 



For tickets and information, address Bach 
Choir. Huff Music Store. Bethlehem. Pa. 

Lehigh University 



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EXTRAORDINARY ATTRACTION— MOST BEAUTIFUL ENSEMBLE 



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Lotta Madden 

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"She reminded many hearers of Florence 
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Pacific Coast Tour 
March and April 



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ENGLISH PIANIST 

Medalist Tobias Matthay Pianoforte School, 
London, Eng. 

SUMMER COURSE FOR 
TEACHERS 

In San Francisco, June 27th to August 6th 

Including Teaching Principles and Interpretation 

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Gaetaiio Merola 

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and 

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ANNOUNCES 

That he will spend ten weelss in San Francisco 

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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SIGNIFICANT MUSIC 



BY ROSALIA HOUSMAN 
The Songs of Bryceson Treharne 

The Boston Music Co. sent me quite a collection of 
the songs of this talented musician to review, and I find 
them big enough to devote a special space to them in 
my ravievv column. Mr. Treharne has been a prolific 
writer, and has a goodly number of art songs to his 
credit, which are gradually winning their place on re- 
cital programs of merit. Many artists use them, and 
Graveure specially, tor whom Mr. Treharne acted as 
accompanist for a time. Of them all, I have a personal 
prejudice in favor of Uphill, to a splendid poem of 
Christina Rossetti. It is musically expressive, and has 
a noble line which rises steadily and strongly as the 
song proceeds. It does not shun the modern harmonies, 
but the means of expression is always subservient. It 
is one of the best art songs I know. A song of dramatic 
interest which is best tor male voice is The Terrible 
Robber Men, with its rhythmic chant as accompaniment. 

Some will enjoy the Fair Circassian and others. Re- 
nunciation, but let me call your attention to A Widow 
Bird, which is an exquisite setting of the Shelley poem. 
Here again, we are given the mood at the very first bar. 
and it is held throughout. It is utterly sad and lone- 
some music, and will be a novelty tor the high and lyric 
soprano. There are several settings of Shakespeare's 
poems, and of the series I think that Sigh No More is 
his best. It might have been written several centuries 
ago, which proves Mr. Treharne to be a skilful adapter 
of any idiom, as well as a master craftsman. 

So, in closing, let me only say this: that I am sure 
Mr. Treharne is one of the best song composers who is 
in America today, and that any song of his is worth 
the serious attention of all musicians. 

Significant Music from the Boston Music Co. 

This time I have reecived several volumes of songs 
and piano music from this wide-awake firm standing so 
strongly for the better side of music. Their editor, Carl 
Engel, is a splendid musician and composer himself (I 
shall have occasion to discuss his violin suite soon), and 
has unerring and good taste. 

To speak of the piano music first. In the B. M. Co. 
edition, A Bagful of Goodies, by Chas. Herter. comes 
first to hand. These are ten easy pieces of the first and 
second grades with attractive titles and cheerful melo- 
dies. So the technical diflaculties which are often diffi- 
cult for both teacher as well as pupil to overcome are 
met here in attractive fashion and so enjoyed. A set of 
four piano pieces by Wm. C. Heilman are of more than 
medium difficulty and are a group of moods. They are 
reminiscent of the Schumann Fantasie pieces and have 
real beauty and charm. An Old Garden is but three pages 
long, but one can say a lot in this space, and with 
poetic feeling. I think a good name for the group would 
be poems in tone, and an imaginative student will play 
them well. 

Serenata, a suite of Helen Hopekirk's, deserves a 
paragraph to itself. Here is new wine in old bottles, 
to refer to an antiquated phrase. It is in five parts, with 
a Maestoso at the beginning (not easy by any means), 
followed by a quaint Minuet. One is conscious of old 
laces and the shadows of candle light. Pianists will per- 
haps find this a favorite section. Next comes the restful 
and dignified Sarabande, a courtly and dignified dance. 
Within the limits of a single page the whole charm of 
other days is evoked, and the dignity found in Bach 
is also present here. The Arioso is freer, and the finale, 
a Rigaudon, is delightful and spontaneous. This music 
as a whole bears a dedication to the dean of our Ameri- 
can composers, Arthur Foote, who is a warm friend of 
Miss Hopekirk's. In honoring him she has also honored 
us, as we are all glad to find the name of this well loved 
composer here. 

The beginner is not neglected in the lists. Here are 
two special books devoted to his interests. Katherine 
Davis's First Studies in Rhythm' are of the greatest use 
to the child mind. He is given his medicine with at- 
tractive poems, which should linger easily in his mem- 
ory. And tlirough these verses he gains a sense of ac- 
cent, measure and note value, which is so difficult to 
teach. And there's the Good Night Garden of Song which 
will be the best of fun for the mother to play and sing 
with the wee musician. The composer, Emma B. David, 
is also responsible for the verses, which are child- 
like and amusing. They lie well within the limited range 
of the child's voice, and the accompaniments are easy 
to play. So I judge that this little collection will meet 
many happy friends on its travels and will gladden many 
childish hearts. 

If you want to sing for your little one and want to 
know a group of lovely songs which will appeal greatly, 
let me recommend the Never Lonely Child, the music 
of which was written by Carl Engel, of whom I spoke 
before. The poeins of Virginia W. Mackall show a deep 
understanding of a youngster's viewpoint, and musically 
Mr. Engel has followed and framed them with delight- 
ful melodies. It is also interesting to note that the ex- 
pression marks are in English, a good step in the right 
direction. These songs are thought of in musically mod- 
ern idiom, but then, Mr. Engel writes for modern chil- 
dren, whose ears are becoming daily accustomed to the 
things which sound new and strange to us, but which 
are natural to the untrained mind. Melody and a keen 
sense of humor are not lacking either, and it will be 
interesting to see which one would appeal first. I guar- 
antee that the singr-r who learns them will have as 
much pleasure in the task as her auditors, big and small 
will, in hearing them done. 

Songs of My Spanish Soil, which are settings of tour 
poems by the composer Julio Osma, are utterly lovely. 
It is a pleasure to come in contact with the real thing 
as these seem to be. They have all the rhythmic variety, 
the languor of the south, and a delicious melody line. 



BALLET AND SYMPHONY 

Manager Selby C. Opponheimer will present a most 
unusual and tascinating attraction at the Columbia 
Theatre as the concluding number of his most success- 
ful concert and music season in the combination of 
Adolph Bolm and his Russian Ballet and the Little Sym- 
phony under the direction of George Barrere. 

Adolph Bolm is recognized as the foremost male ex- 
ponent of the Russian dance in the world today. He first 
came to this country as co-star with Nijinskl with the 
DiaghilefT Ballet Russe and San Franciscans will remem- 
ber his superb performances during the engagement of 
this extraordinary organization at the Valencia Theatre 
a number of years ago. On this occasion the critics 
agreed and the public acquiesced that Bolm was the real 
star of the company and his artistic interpretation 
brought forth the greatest volumes of praise accorded 
any member of the organization. 

Bolm remained in America to assume the directorship 
of dance of the Metropolitan Opera Company and his 
artistic production of the ballets with that company, 
particularly the production of Rimsky-Korsakoff's Coq 
d'Or, has made his name a household word. Bolm will 
be assisted on his coming visit by an organization 
headed by the Misses Ruth Page, Margit Leeraas, Anata 
Grassi, Messrs. Caird Leslie, Senia Gluckoff and others. 

The music tor his entertainment will be supplied by 
the Little Symphony Orchestra of fourteen selected in- 
struments under the direction of its founder and con- 
ductor, the famous flutist, George Barrere. The first part 
of the program tor Sunday afternoon will be devoted to 
orchestral selections by the Barrere players and will 
include Gretry's Cephale et Procris, Henry Hadley's 
suite Flowers, and Pierne's suite For My Little Friends. 
Barrere will also be heard in flute soli by Gluck and 
Wider. 




MARV N-\SH, 

TJie DlKtinKuiNhed American E^mo- 
tionnl Actress Tioyv Appenrinij; at the 



Curran Theatre 



"Thy Na 



The second part introduces the Ballet, and the ar- 
rangement of numbers will be as follows: Humoresque 
(Tschaikowsky), Margit Leeraas and Senia Gluckoff; 
Deception (Schubert), Ruth Page, Amata Grassi, Caird 
Leslie; A Venetian Youth (Adam), Adolph Bolm; The 
White Peacock (Chas. T. Griffes), Margit Leeraas; Fan- 
taisie Chinois (Seeling), Ruth Page, Caird Leslie, Serge 
Orlotf, Senia Gluckoff; Bal Masque (Liszt), Ruth Page, 
Caird Leslie; Group of Spanish Dances (a) Panaderos 
(Glazounoff), Margit Leeraas, (b) Spanish Dance (Al- 
beniz), Adolph Bolm, (c) Spanish Rhythm (Laparra), 
Margit Leeraas, Adolph Bolm; Valse (Chopin), Ruth 
Page; Saltarello (Mendelssohn), Amata Grassi, Senia 
Gluckoff; Pavanne (Faure), Margit Leeraas, Caird Les- 
lie; Assyrian Dance (Lazare Saminsky), Adolph Bolm. 

A special program -will be announced for the second 
Sunday afternoon. The Bolm Ballet with its Little Sym- 
phony will give a special program in the Greek Theatre 
in Berkeley on ne.xt Saturday night, April 30th, when 
these most artistic dance settings will be enjoyed at 
their very best. For this occasion the orchestral num- 
bers will include Iphegenie en Aulide by Gluck, John 
Alden Carpenter's Little Indian and Little Dancer, and 
Perilhou's Suite Francaise, and flute soli by George 
Barrere. 

The dance numbers will include the following: Decep- 
tion (Schubert), Ruth Page, Amata Grassi, Caird L<eslie; 
A Venetian Youth (Adam), Adolph Bolm; Irish Dance 
(Stanford), Margit Leeraas, Caird Leslie; Les Precieux 
Ridicules (Serge Prokofieff), Ruth Page, Adolph Bolm; 
Saltarello (Mendelssohn), Amata Grassi, Senia Gluck- 
off; Mexican Episode (Esperon), Ruth Page, Margit 
Leeraas, Adolph Bolm: The White Peacock (Charles 
T. Griffes), Margit Leeraas; Bal Masque (Liszt), Ruth 
Page, Caird Leslie, Senia Gluckoff; Suggestion Diabol- 
ique (Serge Prokofieff), Adolph Bolm; Torch Dance (De- 
bussy), Ruth Page, Margit Leeraas, Amata Grassi; Ar- 
menian Dance (Howard Brockway), Adolph Bolm. 

Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer guarantees that these 
performances will be the most unique and beautiful in 
their line ever presented in this city and in Berkeley, 
and assures his patrons that no company of dancers or 
musicians have ever presented a more delicately beau- 
tiful series of numbers than have been arranged by Bolm 
and Barrere. 



KOHLER & CHASE'S NEW MANAGER 

L. A. Flelflchmann, the new retail manager of Kohler 
& Chase, has already made many friends Hince hlH 
arrival In this city more than a month ago. Ho has 
endeared hlmHelt to a large number of the profeHHional 
people by his courtesy and Interest and In gradually 
becoming a factor in music trade circles. Mr. FlelHch- 
mann, prior to his San Francisco selection, was retail 




general manager tor the famous Wurlitzer Co. of Cin- 
cinnati, and during the war served as officer in the 
army. He was also formerly with the Wm. Knabe Co. 
in Baltimore and Washington, where he proved most 
successful. His position with Kohler & Chase is that 
of retail general manager and owing to his keen In- 
terest in music as an art and consequently in the pro- 
fession he is eager to meet all prominent people asso- 
ciated with music in this city. Owing to his person- 
ality this should not be difficult for him. We wish Mr. 
Fleischmann all possible success in his new position. 



ALAMEDA COUNTY TEACHERS 

The Alameda County Music Teachers' Association is 
making ambitious plans tor the forthcoming State 
convention which will take place some time in July. 
However, these activities do not restrict the regular 
efforts of the association, the monthly meetings and 
programs continuing to attract general interest. One 
of the finest programs of the season w'ill be given at 
Ebell Hall, Oakland, Harrison street near Fourteenth, 
next Monday evening, April 25th, The musicians par- 
ticipating in this event include; Edward Pease, bari- 
tone, president ot the California Music Teachers' Asso- 
ciation; Zoe Geery Pease, accompanist, of Sacramento; 
Helene AUmendinger, contralto; Elizabeth Simpson, 
pianist; Bess Pangburn, harpist, and Josephine Crew 
Aylwin, accompanist. The complete program to be pre- 
sented on this occasion will be as follows: Piano Soli — ■ 
(a) Sarabande (Bach), (b) Gigue (Loeilly), (c) Le 
Bavolet Flottan (Couperin), (d) Rondo a Capriccio 
(Beethoven), Miss Simpson; Contralto Solo — ^Ah! Ren- 
dimi (Mitrane 16S9) (Francesco Rossi), Miss Allmen- 
dinger (Mrs. Aylwin at the piano); Baritone Soli — (a) 
La Procession (Cesar Franck), (b) L'Heure Exquise 
(Reynaldo Hahn), (c) Love is a Bubble (Francis AUti- 
sen), Mr. Pease (Mrs. Pease at the piano); Harp Soli — 
(a) Prelude (op. 52) (Hasselmans), (b) Phantasy (op. 
4) (Schnecker), (c) Mazurka (op. 12) (Schnecker), 
Miss Pangburn; Contralto Soli — (a) Ah! Love but a 
Day (Mrs. H. H. A. Beach), (b) Gae to Sleep (Wm. 
Arms Fisher), (c) Rachem (Mana-Zuca), Miss AU- 
mendinger; Piano Soli — (a) La flUe aux Cheveux de Lin 
(The Maid with the Flaxen Hair) (Debussy), (b) Jar- 
din sous la Pluie (Garden under Rain) (Debussy), (c) 
Scherzo (B minor) (Chopin), Miss Simpson; Baritone 
Soli — (a) The Quest (Elinor Smith), (b) Thy Beaming 
Eyes (MacDowell), (c) I Want to be Ready (Cecil Bur- 
leigh), Mr. Pease. 



Mrs, A. L. Miller of Marysville was recently elected 
President of the Northern District ot the California Fed- 
eration ot Women's Clubs, and a more deserving honor 
has never been bestowed by that splendid organization. 
Mrs. Miller has a most enviable record in the musical 
annals of this part of the State. For six years she acted 
as chairman ot the Marysville Arts Club under three 
presidents. She served for tour years as chairman of 
music for the Northern District ot the California eFd- 
eration ot Women's Clubs under two administrations. 
She was State chairman of music for the California 
Federation of Women's Clubs tor two years, making six 
years' service in State and District boards. She has 
given 134 lectures and recitals all over the State during 
her term ot office. She has given forty-six concerts for 
the Marysville Art Club with home and outside talent, 
raising $1000 last season for a concert series of cele- 
brated artists. Mrs. Miller is known and appreciated 
throughout California for her scholarly lectures and 
artistic piano interpretations. She has been asked to 
take part in thirteen State and District Conventions of 
the California Federation of Women's Clubs. Her lec- 
tures and the high standard she maintains in music has 
resulted in better work from clubs under her leadership. 
Mrs. Miller has toured Europe in concerts, meeting 
with merited recognition from musicians, at home and 
abroad. No other member of the Northern District ot 
the California Federation of Women's Clubs has as good 
a record as Mrs. Miller. 

Miss Elizabeth Westgate I 

Teacher of Piano, Orsmni Harmonr* Orranlat and Hoalcal 
Director of First Preabrtertaii Church. Alameda. Home 
Stndloi 1117 PARU STREET, ALAHBDA. Telephone Ala- 
meda 165. ThnrMdaTB, Merrijnan School. 07* Oakland Ave., 
Oakdaad. Telephone Piedmont 3T70. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Cecil Fanning 

Baritnne 

H. B, TURPIN, Aee«inpaiilat 
4ddrea«i L. B. Behrtner, Andltorlam Bldr- 
Loa Aaselea, CaU or Hra. Jeaaica Colbert, 
401 Hearat Bide. Saa Pranclaco, Cal. 

KAJETAN ATTL 

HARP VIRTUOSO 
Sulolfft Snn FrancUoo Symphony Orchen- 
trm. Available for Concerts, Re«ltala and 
Inatmctlon. 

Stadloi KKM Kohler A Chaae Bnlldlnc 
Ren. Phone Bay View 610 

Jean Criticos 

Scientific EmUalon of Voice 

Rea. Stndlot 321 Hlcblsnd Ave.. Piedmont 

Tel. Piedmont 78J 

In Kotiler & Chose Bide. 

Studio 706 — Mon., AVed. and Frl. 

PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languages 

5302 Broadway .... Oakland 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

PIANO 

ISa-l Larkin St. 
Fhooe Froukltn 831S 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 



MISS EMILIE LANCEL 

MEZZO SOPRANO 

Concert and Opera 

433 18th Ave. Phone Bay View 1461 

ZHAY CLARK 

SOLO HARPIST 
CALIFORNIA THEATRE ORCHESTRA 

SOFIA NEWLAND NEUSTADT 

VOICE CULTURE 

DIcllon — Repertoire — Coachlnsr 

SludlO! S3 Hamilton Place. Oakland. Snn 

FranelMCo, Wednesday and Saturday, 800 

Kobler & ChaHe Uulldlne. 

MI^S ETHEL PALMER 

ReprcNcntatlve 

ADA CLEMENT PIANO SCHOOL 

ilealdence Studio, 204 A Street. San Rafael 

Telephone Son Rafael 842-J 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

2001 California St., San Francisco. Tel. 
Plllmore 2539. Institute of Music, K. & 
C. Bldg,. Tel. Kearny 6454. 



Regulating: and Repairing and Player- 
Piano Work. 
Por further information apply 
Weatern School of Piano Tnnlncr 



SUZANNE PASMORE-BROOKS 

PIANIST 
Stadloa: 500 Kohler Vt Cfaaae Bldg.; 1717 
Vallejo St., S. F.i 21)04 Garber St., Berkeley. 

PERCY A. R. DOW 

TEACHER OP VOICE 
■tadioai goa Kohler Jt Chaae Bids., 9. F. 
MB Oeean View Dr, Oakland (Realdeneel 

DOUILLET CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

IfSl JaekaoB St. Saa Fr«aelac*» CmL 



DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST COMPOSITION 

Stadlo, (•S-S04 KOHLER A CHASE BLOC. 
Phone Kearny S4S4 



MRS. CHARLES POULTER 



St. Andrcwa Ofesreh 
Vale* Caltnre. Plaao. S88 37tk St„ Oak- 
Uad. Tel. M7t. Kakler A Chaaa Bids. 
WaJ a aadaya TaL K^ray MS4. 



Mrs. William Steinbach 

VOICE CULTURE 

Studio: 

1102 KOHLER Jk CHASE BLDO. 

San Franetaco Phoaet Koaray B454 

MISS CHRISTINE HOWELLS 

FLUTIST 

Available for Concerts as Soloist or for 
ObUsalo Work. Res., Belvedere, Harln 
Connty. Tel. Be lvedere IIW 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 
Studlot 1920 Scott St. Phone Fillmore 1&61 

MME. ISABELLE MARKS 



Bnlldlnc Telephone Kearny M54. 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

ORGANIST ST. MARY'S CATHEDRAL 

Piano Department, Hamlin School 
Or^an and Piano, Arrlllaica Musical Collese 

ANIL DEER STUDIO 



JOSEPH B. CAREY 

* imiponer and Arrauser of Mnalc 
Ilealdence Studlot 378 Golden Gate Ave- 
Franklln 78M. Panlanea Theatre Bldg., 
>an Krnnclaeo, Garlleld 4SS. 

MISS FRANCES MARTIN 

CONCERT PIANIST AND TEACHER 
He.. Sludlo; IWI Geo rgia St.. Vallrjo, Cal. 

MRS. EDWARD E. BRUNER 

SOPRANOi ATallahle tor Encaiemenl. 
Stndlai 85* 43rd Aye . Phone: Pae. SISO 

VICTOR LICHTENSTEIN 

VIOLINIST— CONDUCTOR— I, KCTUUKR 
Puplla ,\ccepted In Violin nud Kuaenibie 

PinylDK 
Sludlo 701 Heine IIIdE. Slocklui 
I'liiiiicw; Sutler ail.M; Keiin 



tier 



LOUISE BREHANY 

Voice Culture 

Diploma Royal Academy, Rome. Italv 
"°" S^'^'n* '^'""' "'*«• •■'■"■" Kf«rny 



S454. Re 



Phone: Franklin 4080 



ETHEL A. JOHNSON 

SOPRANO 

leinber University Extension Faculty 
Studio: SOS Kohler & Chase Bldg. 



Miss Lena Frazee 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware Lconora ThompSOn 



Alexis 



Stndloi lOOS Kohler A Chaae Bids. 
Phooe Kearny S4S4 



I'upil or Mile. Theodor 

Pavley and Oukr 

ate instruction in character. 

tive and ballet dancing 

Kearny 2205 



Joseph George Jacobson Leonard A. Baxt 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Cotnlque. Paris 

Stodiot 3107 WaahloKton Street 

Phona FUlmore 1S47 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 



434 Spruce Street. Phone Plllmore IISI 



RUDY SEIGER 

Oenervl Musical Director 
D. H. Llnnrd Hotels Palace and Fair 
In San Francisco 



Geo. Stewart McManus, Pianist 



FREDERICK MAURER 

Teacher of Piano and Harmony, Ensemble, 
Coachlnv Studlot 1729 Le Roy Avenue, 
Berkeley. Phone Berkeley S30. 

Ada Clement Music School 

343S Sacramento St. Phone Fillmore S98 

MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 



Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 SCOTT ST„ Bet. Clay & Wa.hlustoa 
Mr. Noah Brandt, VIollo 
Hra. Noah Brandt, Piano 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Soloist, Temple Emanu El, Con- 
cert and Church 'Work. Vocal Instruc- 
tion. 2S30 Clay St., Phone W>st 4890. 

JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 

BARITONE 

1 100 Bn.b Street. San FrancI.eo 

Raaldaaee Phone Praoklla DOCS 

Marion Ramon Wilson 

CONTRALTO 
Opera and Concert. Buropeaa CredeatlAI. 
1801 CalKornU St. Tel. Proapeet ISW. 



er 

Dramatic Studio 

41 Grove St., Near Larkin— Civic Centei 

Profeaalounl In.tructlon in 

Acting, Staire Technique, Fencing, 

Make.np, Voice and Kxprenalon 

Special Class for Children in Dancine 
Saturday Afternoons and by Appointmcnl 

Ruth Degnan 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



SIGISMONDO MARTINEZ 
661 Hyde Street Phone Franklin 8211 

ELIZABETH SIMPSON 

2518H Etna St., Berkeley. Tel. Berli. Hl« 

MISS EDITH CAUBU 
37t Sutter Street P hone Douglas 269 

MRS. JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone Weet 1307 

ETHEL DENNY 
904 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 5454 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
3406 Clay St. Tel. Prosp. 3208 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal. 

MABEL MARBLE 
901 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 5454 

WALTER FRANK WENZEL 

1916 Golden Gate Ave. Fillmore 4733 



MRS. RICHARD REES 
673 Scott Street Tel. Park 6176 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 
301 Spruce Street Paclflc 1(7* 



Marie Hughes Macquarrie ^ary Coonan McCrea 



Solo Harpist and Accompanist 

Harpist Trio Moderne 

1115 Taylor St. Tel. Franklin 8425 

ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 

PIANIST AND TEACHER 



TEACHER OF SINGING 

Raae of Prodactloa and Purity of Tana 

ST« Suiter St. (Tuea.. We*. aD< Thua.) 

ALEXANDER GROMOFF 

Art — Science Vocal Culture 

903 Kohler A Chaae Bide. 

Hour. S to p. m. Phone Douslaaa &4S2 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone Weit 417 

ESTHER MUNDELL 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 

MME. M. TROMBONI 
Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel.. Kearny 6464 

JOHN A. PATTON 
900 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6464 

VIRGINIA PIERCE ROVERE 
2139 Pierce St., San Francisco 



ANDRE FERRIER 

U70 Washington SI. Tel. Franklin 3322 



MARGARET JARMAN CHEESEMAN 
701 Post St. Tel. Franklin 6620 



OTTO RAUHUT 

367 Arguello Blvd. Phone Paclflc 36(1 

HOTHER WI8MER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4(74 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kobler & Chase Bldr Tel. Kaarny (414 

MME. DE GRAS8I 
2335 Russell St., Berk. T«l. Berk, 1724 

G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter Street Phone KMrny MIT 

ORLEY SEE 
1004 Kohler * Chase Bide T«l Oouc. 1(71 

SOLO PIANISTS AN D ACCOMPANISTS 

HAZEL M. NICHOLS 
570 Merrimac St., Oak. Lakeside 6436 



BROOKS PARKER 

Palace Hotel, San Francisco 



CLAHI.NET 



H. B. RANDALL 
1770 Grove St. West 8064 



FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF EXPERTS IN 

MANUFACTURING AND REPAIRING OF 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



BAND AND ORCHESTRA 



BOLANDER INSTRUMENT CO. 
54 Kearny Street Douglas 334 

H. C. HANSON MUSIC HOUSE 
140 O'Farrell St. Sutter 4467 

REED AND MOUTHPIECE MAKER 



LOUIS J. PAQUET 

789 Mission St. Sutter 6366 



PHONOGRAPH REPAIRING 



PHONOGRAPH SERVICE STATION 
539 Valencia St. Park 2222 



F. A. LUTZ 
45 Geary St. Douglas 2127 



MAX W. SCHMIDT 

216 Pantages Bldg., Oakland 



RELIABLE PIANO TUNERS AND 
REPAIRERS 



DEITEMEIER PIANO CO. 
853 Valencia Street Mission 477 



MR. H. J. MORGAN 
69 Halght St. Mission 3660 



COSTUMERS 



STUDIO TO SUB-LET 

llourM 1);;iU a. ni. to r,::iQ p. ni. only 
I iKhl. hrnl. Ilnhy (irand IMano. (all <iar- 
Hfld (I.f7. Mizht. Henrny .lOlll. Doirnlown 



STANFORD RECITALS 



The programs to be given by Warren 
n. .Mien, organist of Stanford University, 
at Stanford Memorial Church during the 
week beginning Sunday. April 24th. will 
be as follows: Prelude from the Sym- 
phonic, op. 18 (Edward S. Barnes); Bene- 
diilus (Max Reger) ; Canzonetta (D'Am- 
Itrosio): Fantasia — Sonata in A flat. op. 
2iith — Sunday program repeated. Thurs- 
day. April 28th— Fe.stal Procession (Qor- 
65 (Josef Rheinberger). Tuesday, April 
don U. Nevin); Idyl (R. S. Stoughton) ; 
From In FViiryland. a Suite for Organ 
Meditation a St. Clotilde (Plilllp James); 
Prelude to The Deluge (SalntSaens). 
(transcribed by .Alex. Guilinant, Postlude 
in C (Carl Paige Wood). 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




WAGER SWAYNE 

PIANIST AND ARTIST TEACHER 
of PARIS and NEW YORK 

Now in San Francisco 

2404 Broadway Telephone Fillmore 1905 

Pupilt Prepared for Public Playing 




JOHN WHITCOMB NASH 

Vocal Studios 
Suite 500, Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Evening classes in Harmony. ICsjjecially adapt- 
ed to the needs of the singer. Visitors' cards are 
issued upon request. 

A really remarkable little booklet entitled, The 
Plain Truth About Voice." is free. We will 
gladly mail it. 



California 



Sixth Grand Concert 

SEASON 1921-22 

Sunday. April 24, 1921, 11 A. M. 

CALIFORNIA CLUB 
CHORAL 

Composed of 60 Women's Voices 

offering 

"The Death of Joan of Arc" 

California Theatre Orchestra 
HERMAN HELLER, Conductor 




iiTI I llMlli^ 



GEORGE EDWARDS 

Teacher of 
Piano, Organ and Composition 



Studio 501 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 
Residence 1453 Willard St. 

Phone Park 2135 



Madam Mackay-Gantell 

TEACHER OF SINGING 
Careful Voice BaildlDG; Repertoire 

[Madam Mackay-Cantell is a cousin of Percy 
Rector Stephens, by wliom slie is endorsed] 



Phone Berk. 4230 J 



Now Ready: Two New Books for Rhythn 
Development in Children 



RHYTHMIC SONGS 

For Kindergarten and Primary Grade** 
2. 

Rhythmic Stunts and Rhythmic Games 

AVordB and Munlc 

ABBIE GERUISH-JONES 

AdantlouH and DeHorlptlonH 

OLIVE B. WILSON-DOHBETT 

These games were compiled to meet the demand 
tor a new type of rhythmic material, the result of 
the needs of the children in the Demonstration 
Play School, University of California. Mrs. Dor- 
rett has had many interesting experiences in test- 
ing rhythmic games in this school and those 
offered in the collection were tried out during the 
summer session of 1920. 

PRICE »1.00 AND POSTAGE 

WESLEY WEBSTER, Publisher 
San Francisco 



SCHUMANN-HEINK 

Assi^ed by KATHERINE HOFFMANN at the Piano 

Season 1920-21— Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 




The Official Piano of The Opera 





ALESSANDRO BONCI 



LUCIEN MtlR.tTOBE 



What is more natural than that the greatest operatic organization of the w^orld 
should choose as its official piano the most beautiful and costly instrument ever 
created — individually and enthusiastically the artists of this great galaxy of stars 
voice their admiration and enthusiasm for the Mason & Hamlin. Among them are 



ROSA RAISA 
CYRENA VAN GORDON 
ALESSANDRO BONCI 
VIRGILIO LAZZARI 



LUCIEN MURATORE 
PIETRO CIMINI 
GENO MARINUZZI 
CARLO CALEFFI 



GEORGES BAKLANOFF 
EDWARD JOHNSON 
GIACOMO RIMINI 
FOREST LAMONT 



At our stores from Pordand, Oregon, to San Diego, Mason & Hamlin Pianos 
in all styles, Grands and Uprights are show^n. We invite a critical test and hear- 
ing of them. 

Two Entrances cr^l^ 3r^^>«t Oakland — 1209 Washington Street 



135-153 Kearny and 117-125 Sutter Sti. 
Victor Talking Macbines 




^^ile>^BAUeD@pi 



-MASON AND HAMUN PIANOS- 



San Jose— 199 Sooth First 
Sheet Music 



brffir (hi^ INfaral %tWta 



IJ THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOUI^NAL IH THE GREAT WEST 



VOL. XL. No. 5 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, APRIL 30. 1921. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



CHICAGO OPERA ASSOCIATION CLOSES NEW YORK ORCHESTRA DISAPPOINTING 



Mona Vanna and La Tosca Attract Record Audiences to Civic Auditorium 

on Saturday Afternoon and Evening — Mary Garden and Muratore 

Receive Ovation at Matinee Performance — Rosa Raisa is 

Cheered at Evening Performance — Polacco Adds to 

His Laurels With Wonderful Artistic Direction 

By ALFRED METZGER 



The liistoric grand opera season of two 
weeks concluded by Ihe Chicago Opera 
Association in San Francisco last Satur- 
day afternoon and evening will go down 
as the greatest event of this kind ever 
given anywhere. San Francisco once 
more has reason to feel proud of the 
showing it made, and we are recording 
in detail the essenti.il features of this 
season on the editorial page of this issue. 
This space we shall devote exclusively to 
a review of the two closing perform- 
ances. From the financial standpoint the 
production of Mona Vanna on Saturday 
afternoon was the greatest of the four- 
teen, although La Tosca on the evening 
of the same day also attracted one of the 
largest audiences of the season. In many 
respects Mona Vaana was the finest ar- 
tistic presentation of the engagement. 
owing to the uniformly excellent work of 
the members ot the cast. There was not 
one weak spot. 

One of the greatest features of this 
engagement of the Chicago Opera Asso- 
ciation was the scenic investure and the 
stage management. Mona Vanna was no 
exception to the rule. The perspective of 
the scenes, the beautiful color effects, the 
magnificent lighting and the tasteful and 
rich costumes combined to feast the eye 
as the music feasted the ear. It is in 
operas like Mona Vanna wherein the av- 
erage American opera-goer misses the 
English language, tor during the long 
semi-recitatives given to one or two per- 
sons, wherein one individual occupies the 
center of llie stage for several minutes 
at a time, and where the orchestra ac- 
tually furnishes the music almost exclu- 
sively, it becomes monotonous to concen- 
trate your attention upon sentiments 
which you do not grasp. No matter how 
beautiful the language may be, no matter 
how classic its graceful swing and un- 
dulation, it becomes meaningless when 
you miss the content of the lines. 

Fortunately Mary Garden as Mona 
Vanna and Lucien Muratore as Princi- 
valli succeeded in militating this monot- 
ony by reason of their vivid histrionic 
art — for after all histrionic art predomi- 
nates and overshadows the vocal score. 
Muratore, by reason ot his splendid vocal 
organ, wliich he uses with fine artistic 
discretion, and wliich he succeeds in pre- 
senting In the most scintillating phrases. 
aroused his hearers to the highest pitch 
of enthusiasm, eliciting cheers upon 
cheers after the second act. Mary Garden 
was here at her best. Her graceful 
strides, her characteristic poses of arms 
and shoulders, her splendid, refreshing 
personality, her eloquent facial expres- 
sion and classic profile combined to 
stamp upon the role her individuality to 
such an extent that, like her Thais, the 
part becomes identified with her person 
and It will be dlHicult, if not impossible. 
for anyone else to satisfy us in this role 
of Mona Vanna. After the conclusion of 
the second act we counted at least fif- 
teen curtain calls for Mary Garden and 
Lucien Muratore. 

Georges Baklanoff in the role of Guido 
iproved to be at his best. Indeed vocally 
a.-; well as dramatically he gave the best 
I'lrtormance of any during the engage- 
ment as far as his personal elTorts are 
' oncerned. His voice rang out true and 
vibrant and his bearing was dignified 
and impressive. He interpreted his lines 
with conviction and verisimilitude. Edo- 
uard Cortreull as Marco also added to 
the artistic part of the production, both 
vocally and histrionically, while Jose 
Mojica as Vedio added to his long array 
of excellent performances of minor roles 
by reason of his flexible, true voice and 
easy deportment. 

One of the outstanding features of the 
production was Giorgio Polacco, who 
once more had an opportunity to display 



his genius as a grand operatic conductor. 
He brought out the symi)honic character 
of the production with unerring precision 
and fidelity, and he revealed himself 
once more as a master of phrasing and 
orcliestral precision. Tlie cantabiie pas- 
sages seemed to emanate from his baton 
with enticing beauty, and he succeeded in 
showing the music at its most magnifi- 
cent aspect. Surely Polacco has amply 
proved himself a master of his craft and 
as far as the writer is concerned he re- 
gards him as one of the foremost wield- 
ers of the baton in the world today. Not 



Although Personnel of Organization Uniformly Excellent This Material is 

Not Utilized By Conductors According to Highest Artistic Principles — 

Tone Quality, Precision of Attacks, Intonation and Technical Skill 

Predominate— Lack of Adequate Phrasing, Singing Quality 

and Tone Coloring — Hadley Composition Excellent 

By ALFRED METZGER 



The widely heralded visit of the Ne 
York Philharmonic Orchestra, under the 
direction of Josef Stransky and Henry 
Hadley, took place at the Civic Auditor- 
ium on Sunday afternoon. April 24th, be- 
fore an audience of about two thousand 
people. It w;is a larger audience than 
could have been expected after the clos- 
ing of the Chicago Opera Association and 
a smaller one than would have attended 
if the New York Philharmonic Orchestra 
management would not have been too 
proud to advertise a little on the Pacific 
Coast, prior to the visit ot that organ- 




less efiicient was the work of Jacques 
Coini, to whom was entru.ttid the stage 
direction. We never wilnesseii any more 
appealing stage pictures than we saw 
during this engagement. Before the visit 
of the Chicago Opera A.ssociatlon we 
said that this season represented the best 
in operatic productions in the world. 
There is nothing better. And if any one 
found any fault with tliese presentations 
then they found fault with the best that 
is offered in the field of opera in the 
world. 

But even among the best in the world 
there Is found a diversity of excellence, 
and little weaknesses will creep in de- 
spite everything. And so the concluding 

(Continued on Page 11, Column 2) 



ization. Xo matter what any one may say 
to the contrary you can not get large 
numbers of people attending an event, 
specially when another musical ru-cnsb n 
is concentrating attention for the time 
being, unless you resort to more than or- 
dinary publicity. II .vou Just are satisfied 
with the usual amount of publicity, you 
will get the usual attendance. As long as 
New York managers and organizailiins 
hide themselves behind their self-sufll- 
cicncy and consider the West as some- 
thing provincial and not to bo regarded 
except from a "local" standpoint, so long 
will they have to be sallslled with com- 
monplace attendance and commonplace 
audiences, and nothing In tlie world will 
ever change this undlsputable fact. The 



Pacific Coast Musical Review will in fu- 
ture assume exactly the same altitude 
toward Eastern attractions and managers 
which they assume toward the far West. 
If they ignore us, we shall ignore them, 
except in so far as a just and fair review 
of the event is concerned. Such a review 
we owe our readers. There Is no use be- 
ing generous to people to whom gnerosity 
is an unknown quantity. 

Having recorded our mental slate in 
this matter we can not afford to be as 
severe with the artistic performance of 
the Philharmonic Orchestra of New York 
as the occasion would Justify for fear of 
being regarded as prejudiced. Hence we 
shall first point out the best features of 
tlie concert. The New Y'ork Philharmonic 
Orchestra consists of as splendid an ar- 
ray of artist-musicians as it has been our 
pleasure to witness. The string section 
18 uniformly excellent. The brass section 
— specially Ihe horns and trombones — 
is unsurpassed anywhere. It is simply 
magnificent. It is one of the finest brass 
sections we have ever heard. The wood 
wind section is splendid. Intonation, flex- 
ibility of tone, warmth of color and pre- 
cision of attacks are among the leading 
features of the orchestra. It is a delight 
to listen to such an orchestra and we 
enjoyed every moment Just admiring the 
splendid material of which this orches- 
tra consists. 

That such a representative and ideal 
body of musicians should be directed by 
conductors so indifferent to the possi- 
bilities of a great orchestra of this kind 
seems to us an unsuluble puzzle. Surely 
New York is capable of securing greater 
conductors for such an orchestra man Jo- 
sef Stransky or Henry Hadley. Even the 
audience assembled at the Auditorium last 
Sunday afternoon sensed this. For neither 
of the conductors succeeded in getting 
a regular San Francisco ovation. In the 
Beethuven symphony there was lacking 
tliai singing quality whicli should charac- 
terize the 'cello and violin sections when 
negotiating those magnificent phrases of 
the andante movement. The tempi were 
lacking in spirit and energy. The Meis- 
lersinger Prelude lacked in precision of 
attacks and rhythms — did not attain real 
climaxes, failed to impress with Its vi- 
tality and accentuation and, In short, 
sounded somewhat anaemic. 

By all means the best numbers on the 
program consisted of the Hacli Chorale 
and Fugue and Hadley's symphonic poem 
Salome. We have never denied Mr. Had- 
ley's claim to distinction as a musician 
and composer. His Salome reveals 
strength of material, intellectuality of 
ideas, ingenuity of teclinical construc- 
tion and strength ot architectural beauty. 
It is one of tile best works we heard 
emanate from the mind of any living 
composer. It adds strength to the claim 
I hat the American composer is entitled 
to a place in the sun. We lake off our 
hat to Henry Hadley as a composer, 
while we can not show deference to him 
as a conductor. 

The reading of Sibelius' Swan of Tu- 
eiiela proved In no uncertain terms what 
we mean by lack of interpretative pow- 
ers on the part of the orchestra. Here 
was a chance to show beautiful phrasing 
and coloring. Instead all we got was ac- 
curacy of pitch and uniformity of bow- 
ing. We heard pianlsslml, fortisslml and 
plan!, but no shading of phrases, no 
graceful accentuation, no delicate tints. 
Such effects can only be obtained by a 
conductor who is a genius. We do not 
like to resort to provincialism by refer- 
ring to the San Frnncisco Symphony Or- 
chestra's Interpretations, and so we shall 
close with the remark that the artistic 
exhibition of the New Y'ork Philharmonic 
(Continued on Page U, Column 2) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



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The JEANNE JOMELLI 

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Van Ness Ave., at Geary St., 
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Announces the addition of a 

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PUPILS NOW BEING ENROLLED 
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Fernando Mlchelenat President} 
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Par forthcr Information address the secretary of the 

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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



^rifir €di\sl Blusiral 3JeW# 

Hi THE ONL^' Wl£EK i:i M ...--..-._ .-:...--:. ''.L - [!\ TH E CP.UXT U&ST llj 
PubllHliet] Kvcry Saturday by the 
MUSICAL REVIEW COMPANY 

ALFRED METZGER PrMldent 

THOS. E. ATKISSON Vlce-Prcmdent 

MARCUS L. SAMUELS Secretary and Treasurer 

Suite SOI Kohler A Clinne BI<I|e.. 26 O'Farrell St., Snn 
Kranclnto. Cnl. Tel. Kearny .'V154 

ALFRED METZGER - Editor 

CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE - Asst. Editor 
B. W. JELICA - Advertising Manager 

New York Office, I3B n>at 80th Street 
Miss Rosalie Housman In Chnr^re 

Oakland-Berkeley-.^lanieda Office 

ll.lOt Bancroft Way, Berkeley, Telephone Berkeley 42MJ 

L. Mnckny-Cantell In Charse 

Seattle Office, 1S21 Fifteenth Ave., Seattle, AVashlnston 
Mrs. Abble Gerrlsh-Jones In Chnrge 

Los Anceles Office 

705 Philharmonic Auditorium. Tel. Pico 2454 

Bruno David Ussher In Chnrice 

San Dleso, Cal.. Office, IS34 First Street 
Mrs. Bertha Slocum In Charge 



Vol. XL 



Satnrday, April 30, 1921 



Ne. 5 



Bntcred as second-class mall matter at S. F. Postoffiee. 



TWENTIETH YEAR 



THE MUSIC CLUB CONVENTION 



Upon another page of this issue will be found 
an official announcement from Los Angeles con- 
cerning the third annual convention of the Cali- 
fornia Federation of Music Clubs, which will take 
place beginning Sunday, May 1st, and ending 
Wednesday, May 4th. Our'readers will also find 
enumerated in that article the various programs 
and we feel that much credit is due those who 
have compiled these events. The arrangement of 
such a convention requires a great niany details 
and usually the largest share of the work falls 
upon a few shoulders. Those least willing to help 
along a good cause stand aside and criticise or 
find fault, but do not show their sincerity and 
interest by joining in the general co-operation of 
forces. 



The Pacific Coast Musical Review is occasion- 
ally receiving critical comments upon the pro- 
ceedings of such organizations as music clubs and 
music teachers' associations. We feel that the 
only way in which to cause improvements and 
expansion of policy is to join the array of work- 
ers and help the cause by personal efforts and 
advice. One of the weakest arguments in musi- 
cal co-operation is the complaint that people un- 
worthy of membership are admitted in musical 
organizations, or that the policy is not artistic 
enough nor dignified or serious enough for the 
purpose at hand. If all musical progress depended 
upon those people who merely discover weak- 
nesses, but are unwilling to assist in strengthen- 
ing them, there would be no progress made at all. 
The only way in which to attain effective results 
by means of co-operation such as this Federation 
of Musical Cluljs affords is to add your own mind 
and intelligence to the co-operative mind and in- 
telligence of all the others associated in this 
worthy cause. 



The Pacific Coast Musical Review believes in 
deeds not words. It believes in action, not fault- 
finding. It believes in co-operation, not working 
at cross purposes on the part of single individ- 
uals. The California Federation of Music Clubs 
is concentrating and centralizing the efforts of 
large numbers of people toward the common 
good. The eventual benefit can not be attained 
in one, or two, or three years. (Gradual evolution 
and practical experience will eventually prove the 
excellent advantage to be derived from such an 
organization. No one will maintain that the Fed- 
eration is at ])resent in that complete and influ- 



ential position in which il will find it-self a num- 
ber of years hence. But, under the presidency of 
.Mrs. Bessie Bartlctt Frankel, it is now upon the 
right road. Every music cUib in California ought 
to belong to it. Kvery member of such club ought 
to contribute her share toward musical progress. 
Ideal musical conditions can only be attained by 
thi- put. ling of all musical interests. The larger 
the number of people who co-operate the greater 
the benefit to the largest number. Of course there 
are members in the organization who should not 
be entrusted with certain duties which are at 
present in their care, but as long as no one else 
is suggested to take such place, and as long as 
no efforts are being made to improve these weak 
spots, so long no one has any reason to complain 
or criticise. The only way in which to get better 
representation in certain places is to suggest 
and recommend people specially suited for them, 
not to refuse to attend the convention or to help 
the cause, because one may not agree with con- 
ditions. 



The editor of this paper so frequently discusses 
these matters with members of musical clubs that 
we trust those with whom we have conversed 
upon these subjects will not take these remarks 
to themselves. Wc do not refer here to any spe- 
cial conversation we may have had on this sub- 
ject with members of musical clubs. We are 
speaking altogether in a general way. Indeed, we 
have said the same things repeatedly in connec- 
tion with various other matters. Our great policy 
in the establishment of greater musical associa- 
tion and co-operation has always been to urge 
musical people to get together, work together, 
act together, advise together and associate with 
one another for everyone's good. Wc have seen so 
many worthy enterprises die an untimely death, 
because those most fitted to further the interests 
of such cause stood by the wayside sneering and 
finding fault, instead of getting in and taking a 
hand in the shaping of the policy. The musicians" 
union would be in far better ethical condition, 
if the best elements would take a personal inter- 
est in the welfare of the union. The Federation of 
Musical Clubs is now in right hands. To oppose 
it is to injure your own interests. To uphold it. 
is to contribute toward the musical growth of 
the community. In this spirit we wish the third 
annual convention of the California Federation 
of Music Clubs in Los Angeles the best of luck, 
and may its difficult problems be solved to the 
best interests of all concerned, and may every 
music club in California become a worthy and 
valuable link in the strong chain of musical 
emancipation. 

THE OPERA SEASON 



It has always been the custom of the Tacific 
Coast Musical Review to give adequate credit 
whenever something really worth while is being 
accomplished in the interest of music. The recent 
engagement of the Chicago Opera Association 
proved an event of such far-reaching and bene- 
ficial influence upon our musical life that we feel 
justified in calling attention to the most impor- 
tant features associated with this two weeks of 
unprecedented grand operatic events. We look 
pains to ascertain the exact conditions associated 
with this engagement and are thus in a position 
to point out the outstanding features that reflect 
creditably upon San Francisco and the local man- 
agement, Selby C. Oppcnheimer. 

The total receipts of the engagement, includ- 
ing war tax, represented the gratifying amount 
of $250,000. The total receipts less the war tax 
consisted of about $225,000. It is interesting to 
note that during the first week the receipts were 
about $90,000, while during the second week the 
receipts were $160,000. Prior to this recent en- 
gagement the greatest amount ever taken in dur- 
ing a one week's operatic season took i)lace in 
Atlanta, Ga., when the Metropolitan Opera Co., 
including Caruso, took in receipts amounting to 
$140,000 in one week. Thus San Francisco ex- 
celled the world's record in one week's operatic 
engagement by $20,000. The amount mentioned 
in connection with the Atlanta season represents 
the puljlished figures, the actual figures may not 
come up to the amount, while the San Francisco 



figures are based upon the war tax paid to the 
government. 

In round figures 80,000 people attended the 
opera season. Computed upon the advance sale 
which was about $100,000, 40,000 to 45,000 dif- 
ferent people attended the season. About 35,000 
tickets were sold to people coming here from 
country districts, leaving to San Francisco and 
vicinity an attendance of about 50,000. This also 
appears to us to be quite a record. For among 
these 50.000 ticket buyers about 30,000 or 35,000 
represented different people. As a stimulus for 
musical education Manager Selby C. Oppcn- 
heimer arranged a special rate for University 
students, enabling 2500 of these to attend the 
opera at one dollar, giving the choice of any scat 
in the house, .\nother most creditable action was 
the thoughtfulness in permitting inmates of or- 
phan a.sylutns and similar charitable institutions 
to attend some of the performances as guests of 
the management. This the writer discovered in- 
directly without the management calling his at- 
tention to it. 



The season was noteworthy on account of the- 
fact that among the fourteen performances given 
only one was repeated, and even in this instance 
the company was ready to give another perform- 
ance, artists and scenic equipment being among 
the company's repertoire. The performance here 
referred to was Rigoletto, and at the first pres- 
entation there were $15,000 in the house and 
the second time $25,000. In point of attendance 
the second Rigoletto performance was larger by 
four tickets than the Mona \'anna performance, 
the latter, however, exceeded the Rigoletto per- 
formance in financial returns, as quite a number 
of student tickets above referred to were used 
at the Rigoletto performance. Every scene used 
in the Chicago productions during the company's 
regular season could be used on the Civic .Audi- 
torium stage specially constructed for this occa- 
sion. Many scenes could not be used except in 
Chicago, New York and San Francisco. All other 
stages upon which the company appeared on this 
tour were unable to hold the huge scenic sets. 

In conclusion wc wish to congratulate Manager 
Selby C. Oppcnheimer upon the invariable cour- 
tesy, patience and efficiency of those in charge 
of the box office. It is, of course, inevitable that 
occasional errors occur during a period of such 
strain and activity entailed by two weeks of such 
constant demand of attention on the part of the 
public. The lines at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s fre- 
quently extended around Kearny to Sutter 
street and did not diminish from early morning 
until late afternoon. It required constant atten- 
tion and concentration to serve these thousands of 
people. Then Manager Oppcnheimer earned for 
himself the commendation and gratitude of the 
press. He appreciated the service rendered him 
by the newspaper people and did not hesitate to 
reciprocate whenever possible. The excellent pub- 
licity service prior and during the engagement 
was also worthy of the heartiest commendation. 
To really enumerate all those entitled to recogni- 
tion would require quite a neat list of names, and 
fearing that in quoting such names wc might 
inadvertently omit one we will refer to box office 
attendants, ushers and publicity agents collect- 
ively and bestow upon Selby C. (Jppenheinier 
the credit of knowing how to choose his assistants 
and how to recognize and reward faithful serv- 
ices upon those who helped him to swing this 
huge enterprise. 

♦ . 

IVIiss Dorothy Blaney, a very gifted young pianist, 
will bo lu'ard In n recital to be given in tha Italian 
Room of llie Hotel St. Francis on tlic evening of May 
2nil. Invitations tor this affair are being Issued by :lie 
Alumnae of the School of Music. IJominican College. 
San Italael, while the patrons are the followin';: Mr. 
and Mrs. J. K. Arnisby, Mr. and Mrs. George Brooke, 
Sigmund Heel, Dr. and Mrs. T. E. Ilailly. Mr and Mrs. 
Leon Douglass. Mr. and Mrs. Milton Esberg. Mr. and 
.Mrs. J. R. Hanlfy, Dr. and Mrs. C. D. McOelligan. Mr. 
and Mrs. O. B. Martin, Miss Margaret Mee, Miss Mary 
I.. Phelan. and Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Smith. Miss Dlancy 
has chosen the following list of will known piano 
worlds to Interpret: Bach — Prelude and Pugue. E flat 
minor. Gavotte and Musette. D minor; Beelhoven-Busoni 
— Ecnssalses: Chopin — Nocturne. F minor; Etudes, op. 
2,';, No. 2: op. 2i", No. 3; op. 10, No. 3; op. 25, No. 12; 
Oluck-Hrahma— Gavotte; D'Albert— Suite; Debussy— La 
Fille aux cheveaux de Iln; Dohnanyi— Rhapsody, 



PACIFIC COAST MUSirAL REVIEW 



THE SENSATION OF SINGING TO INVISIBLE THOUSANDS 

Frieda Hempel, Distinguished Soprano of Chicago Opera Company and Stellar Recording Artiste 

of Edison Laboratories, Says the Recording Horn and the Cold Eye of the "Movie" 

Camera Are Cousins — Tells of Famous Blindfold Comparison Test 

— Interesting Sidelights on Great Inventor 



By ADDISO 

Piieda Hempel is a dual artiste, as San Francisco 
opera-goers have liad atnple opportunity to learn. 

In the first place, she is the consummate mistress 
of her vocal art; the possessor of a voice that may 
verily be likened to one ot the diamonds in that in- 
comparable necklace she lias worn with some of her 
costumes — notably in the ballroom scene in La Traviata. 
Like those diamonds, Hempel's voice scintillates and 
sparkles in its brilliant coloratura qualities. Like them, 
it flashes rich flames of passion and color in its deeper 
register. Like them, it is many-faceted and never the 
same — yet always the same. 

Secondly, Hempel is equally the consummate actress. 
Her mastery of the art histrionic has won San Fran- 
cisco to her feet even as has her voice. The exacting 
role of Violetta in La Traviata, wherein she made her 
brilliant San Francisco debut last week, is a difficult 
test of both arts. La Traviata is a "one-woman opera." 
Hempel was that woman. Vocally and dramatically it 
is an ordeal for the woman, too. Yet Hempel's voice 
was as fresh and true in the tragic death scene as 
when she greeted her guests in the first act. 




parlsonn oi her own superb .soprnno voiee with Mr. EUi- 



The thousands who have heard her sing, at the Audi- 
torium, have shaken the great structure with thunderous 
applause. Curtain call after curtain call has brought 
Hempel and her distinguished fellow artists out to smile 
their thanks. 

And there's Just the point: 

For one auditor who has listened to Hempel under 
such thrilling and glamourous conditions, blistering 
palms with encores and curtain calls, thousands who 
have reveled in her voice have been beyond visual 
range of those magnetic charms that make her Violetta, 
her Lucia, her Gilda, the dramatic achievements they 
are. And these thousands hear nothing but the voice 
itself, as Edison has caught and transfixed it tor all 
posterity — has "recreated" it, to use the word that an 
original New York music critic coined and gave to 
Mr. Edison. 

What are the sensations of the artiste who, having 
swept the great "horseshoe" of the Metropolitan and 
its brilliant thousands into submission, having brought 
yet more thousands of San Francisco opera devotees 
literally to their feet with enthusiasm in our great 
auditorium, having ihrilled packed humanity in the 
Philharmonic Auditorium at Los Angeles, must needs 
send that peerless voice into the cold mouth of the re- 
cording studio horn — the very antipodes of a brilliant 
opera'house packed with admiring music lovers? 

I asked Miss Hempel "how it felt." She studied the 
bare fraction of a second and was ready with her 
simile : 

"It Is Just the same sort of thing," she replied, "that 
confronts the emotional actress who, having enacted a 



N N. CLARK 

llirilling scene from a powerful play before a theatre 
audience completely en rapport with her, goes through 
the same scene before the cold, unresponsive eye of the 
motion-picture camera. Having acted for the 'movies' 
myself, I know tliat the sensations are exactly the same. 

"In tlie one case, the sensitive film is ready, the scene 
is set, and the word 'Action' starts the mechanism. The 
actress is part of tliat mechanism. In the other case — 
in Mr. Edison's recording studios — we are, in a way, at 
an even greater disadvantage, in that there is not even 
a stage setting to provide the semblance of theatrical 
glamour when that receptive wax disc starts turning." 

"And yet," I asked, "do not you and the motion pic- 
ture actress have to enlist your imaginations to help 
you 'put it across'? In other words, do you not have to 
get yourselves into the same mental attitude, for the 
moment, as though you were actually before an au- 
dience?" 

"Assuredly yes!" declared Miss Hempel. "If we did 
not — well, what the world sees on the screen and hears 
from the grilles of thousands of phonographs would be 
so cold, so lifeless, so soulless, that one seeing and 
one hearing would spell 'finis.' 

"Imagination, though, is as necessary an ingredient 
in the make-up of a recording artist as the voice itself. 
She must imagine her audience, imagine the footlights, 
imagine the glamour — even the applause. Just so must 
the motion picture actress visualize a responsive throng 
before her. Only thus can she and I reach the hearts 
of those who see and hear us — see and hear our art 
dissociated from ourselves, as it were. 

"I might really say," the singer added with a smile, 
"that the unresponsive horn in the recording studio and 
the cold, expressionless eye of the motion picture cam- 
era are cousins." 

Miss Hempel says that it was her hearing the voices 
of other great artists "re-created" by Edison — including 
that of Alessandro Bond, who, singing roles so intimately 
associated with her own during the San Francisco sea- 
son, has given us such a splendid Alfredo in Traviata, 
such an Edgar in Lucia di Lammermoor, such a Duke 
in Rigoletto, such a Nemorino with that beautiful ro- 
manza Una Furtiva Lagrima in L'Elisir d'Amore — that 
imbued her with the desire to have her own voice thus 
"re-created" and immortalized. 

"I never realized so deeply what this means," she 
said, "as I did when I was chosen to impersonate Jenny 
Lind, in the New York Jenny Lind memorial Jubilee last 
October — with Mr. Arthur Middleton, another of Mr. 
Edison's artists, as my own baritone. "Think of it! Jenny 
Lind gone from us forever — yet hardly a handful of 
people are alive today who heard her great voice! And 
Mr. Edison did not invent the phonograph, even in its 
first crude form, until she had left us. 

"How splendid it would be if we could listen today 
to a 're-creation' of Jenny Lind's voice! As it is, the 
best we can have is a substitute — but I shall always 
remember the great honor and the thrill that it brought 
me to be chosen as the singer of today most like Lind. 
The three songs I sang that night have been recorded 
by Mr. Edison, and I have learned, only since reaching 
San Francisco, that they will shortly be available here. 
They were Casta Diva from Bellini's Norma, Mozart's 
aria Non Mi Dir from Don Giovanni, and the Norwe- 
gian herdsman's song Kom KJyra, or The Echo, with 
which Jenny Lind really made her greatest appeal. 

"I always wanted to really hear my own voice. Every 
singer does. After making my first recording for Mr. 
Edison I knew that I was literally listening to my own 
voice — liearing it Just as others hear it when I sing at 
the Metropolitan, or here in your beautiful, responsive 
San Francisco. But I wanted to know Just how faith- 
fully the inventor had caught the shadings of it; the 
tinges and nuances that make the individuality in any 
voice. I wanted to know if a blind man could tell the 



■ 


^ 

5 


' 



MR. GDISON IX HIS LIBnARV 
'I'he great Inventor can read the rerorded Mound 
waveH on the Nurfacc of one of hiN dlKCS an 
easily an you read the type on thlM pase — 
can diMtlngulHh flute from violin, noprano 
from contralto, etc. 

difference lietweeii tlie voice from my throat and the 
voice from the throat of the phonograph; so I had five 
of my good friends — musical experts all — blindfold 
themselves and listen. 

"I sang them lo non sono piu I'Annetta from Ricci's 
Crispino e la Comare — the phonograph playing beside 
me. After a few phrases I stopped singing. I watched 
the expressions of those five blindfolded men. They did 
not alter. I sang again — stopped again. Then I had to 
laugh, and of course the trial was over. I was satisfied, 
after that, that Mr. Edison's adoption of that word 
're-creation' was justified." 

Miss Hempel is a profound admirer of the inventor 
of the phonograph, and knows his hobbies and his pe- 
culiarities intimately. 

"Though Mr. Edison is very deaf indeed," she said, 
"that very fact enables him to sift out, as it were, the 
defects and impurities of a voice submitted to him for 
trial, and base his judgment of its recording qualities 
upon those essentials that make or break a voice. 

"It is almost uncanny to see Mr. Edison pick up a 
record and, by scrutiny of those tiny little ripples in 
its surface, tell you just what sort of voice is there 
recorded, or whether it is a violin or a flute or an 
oboe. And he can tell you, too, by listening to the 
record of a voice, if the artist who made it was tired 
when she sang, or fresh, rested and vigorous. But it is 
just his ability to do these things that Jias enabled 
him to bring his great musical instrument, the phono- 
graph, to such perfection that such things as my 'blind- 
fold test' are possible." 



BENJ. MOORE ACCOMPANIST FOR TITTA RUFFO 

The many friends of Mr, Benjamin S. Moore, organist 
of Trinity Church, will be pleased to hear of his splen- 
did success in New York, where he is spending the sea- 
son. Mr. Moore is a member of the Bohemian and Family 
Clubs, and prominent as an organist and coach. 

During the past month he has appeared in concerts in 
Washigton, D. C, as accompanist for Titta Ruffo, the 
great baritone, and Kochanski, the Polish violinist, 
whose appearance in New York this season has been one 
of the sensations of the year. During the winter he has 
appeared with various other artists, among whom are 
Kathleen Parlow and Lucy Gates. The managers in New 
York have been most generous in their recognition of 
Mr. Moore's ability and he has been urged by them to 
return next season. 

Mr. Moore is working with the Lhevinnes and is tak- 
ing every advantage of the opportunities offered in the 
musical center. 



ETHEL GERTRUDE CANNON 




ARTIST-STUDENTS' PIANO COURSE 



HIGH LIGHTS IN MRS. CANNON'S 
PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUCTION 

VII. 

Certainly lack of, or angularity of musical thought, produces 
like impressions upon the listener, consequently the study of 
the musical text, from a simple melody to the classics In large 
form, or from an elementary finger exercise to the rounding out 
of all the points of technic in Its most difficult forms and rhyth- 
mic phases should, when produced, be a living manifestation of 
correct musical thought processes. 



FURTHER ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING STUDIO AND 
OPENING DATE WILL APPEAR LATER. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Distinguished Artists Residing in California Who are Available for Concerts Du ring the Season 1920-1921 

"Z::ttXr^2tJ.^Tl'iTn^l^^^^^ »' ■■"' "-"-'^ -^presented „ n tU,s page. They ..ave es.abM.bed . 

of setting forth the availability of these ^puted artisjris to convTncI thf rihfnrn^^^ I, n ''PX^f^^^^' m operatic organisations of recognised fame. The purpo.. 

We intend to prove that a resident artist confers honor upon tTe community In XrherLC^^^^ distinguished artists of equal merit to any reside In thl. 8t.t.. 



Announcing the Personnel of 

"Le Trio Louise" 

Kajetan Attl — Bohemian Harpist 

Otto King — Norwegian Cellist 

M. Anthony Linden — American Flutist 



Thn-c DiatlD 



Unlqu 



Ciiambe 
nuHnnl ProKroni 
r Other Aimplce 
Addremi 



nipoimlble to Hear ITnder 
Par Datei and Te 

M. Anthony Linden, 457 Phelan Bldg., 

San Francisco 

Care of S. F. Symphony Orchestra 



OLGA 
STEEB 

"The Genius of 
the Piano" 

Management 

CATHERINE A. 
BAMMAN 

53 West 39th, N. Y. 
Local Representative: 
C. E. HUBACH, 126 S. Rampart Blvd., Los Angeles 




"I'"' <w niii 111(1 rill ititii mill iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



Organist 

Pianist 

Lecturer 



Warren D. and Esther H. 

ALLEN 

Joint Recitals 



Address: 
Office of the Organist, Stanford University, Calif. 




M. )(. Mich. 



PHYLLIDA 
ASHLEY 

PIANIST 

NOW BOOKING 
SEASON 1921-1922 

HAENSEL & JONES 

Management 

Aeolian Hall 

New York City 

nal Rei»reMentatlvet 

•ner. 3066 RIclimond Blvd.. 
Oalilanci. Cal. 



JACK HILLMAN 

BARITONE 

Just Returned From New York 
Exponent of Vocal Methods of 

CLARA NOVELLO DAVIES 

Teacher of LOUIS GRAVEURE 



MME. JOMELLI INCREASES OPERATIC CLASS 

That the recent engagement of the Chicago Grand 
Opera Co. has created a stimulus in the musical circles 
of San Francisco Is indicated hy the increased activi- 
ties in the vocal studios. 

For one, Mme. Jeanne Jomelli, the celebrated grand 
opera star, has found it necessary to have an addi- 
tional accompanist particularly to assist her in the 
training of her pupils for operatic roles. Mme. Jomelli 
is numbered as one of the five greatest operatic so- 
pranos and has a repertoire of between forty and fifty 
grand operas. In 1906 Mme. Jomelli arrived first In 
America from Paris and made her debut as one of the 
leading prima donnas of the Metropolitan Grand Opera 
Company in the opera of Tannhauscr, Alfred Hertz 
conducting. Sembrlch, Nordica and Eames were at that 
time still with the Metropolitan, the four contemporary 
artists making a constellation of sopranos that has 
never been equaled. 




M. ANTHOKY 

LINDEN 



ITIncipal Solo Flute S. F. 
Symphony Orchestra. 
I'-ormerly Principal Solo 



t'uiivi-rlM, Solo. GUNemble, ObllKOtu 
em n l.lnilled Number of Pnplla 
ud Dalen Addrean. 1S7 Pbelan Bldg. 
Cnre S. F. Snniibony Orctaealra 




Povl 
Bjornskjold 

The Eminent Danish 
Dramatic Tenor 



Management Hugo Boucek, 116 39th St., N. Y. 
Personal Address: 355 Octavia St., San Francisco 



OPGEHUiHS MERIT 




1 MARION 

^VECKI 

BARITONE 



AVAILABLE FOR 



Concert - Opera - Oratorio 



rhroMleIc nidif-. 



Mme. Jomelli ranks not only as one of the world's 
foremost singers but she is also recognized interna- 
tionally as a teacher of highest attainments and San 
Francisco can well be proud to have her as a resident. 
Owing to her strenuous teaching activities, Mme. Jo- 
melli is not accepting any concert engagements at the 
present time. During the coming summer she will con- 
tinue her teaching at the Hotel Richelieu, giving a 
special suninier course in operatic repertoire. 



SOLOISTS FOR BACH FESTIVAL 

Bethlehem. Pa.. April 20.— Dr. J. Fred Wolle, con- 
ductor of the Bach Choir, has announced the following 
soloists for the 1921 Bach Festival, to be held Friday 
and Saturday. May 27th and 28lh. at Lehigh University: 
Friday at 4 p. m. and S j). m. — Soprano. Mildred Faas of 
Philadelphia; alto, Merle Alcock of New York; tenor, 
Nicholas Douty of Philadelphia; bass, Charles Trow- 
bridge Tittmanu of Washington, D. C. Saturday at 
1:30 p. m. and 4 p. m.— Soprano, Florence HInkle of 
New York: alto, Mabel Beddce; tenor, Mr. Douty; bass, 
.Mr. Tittmann. 

The accompaniment for the singing of the Bach 
Choir of 300 voices and soloists will be furnished by 
members of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 

The program for this, the sixteenth Bach Festival, is 
as follow.s: Friday at 4 p. m.. cantata. The Sages of 
Sheba, Suite in D, No. 3. Overture, air. Gavotte; Bour- 
ree. GIgue. The Ascension Oratorio. Friday at 8 p. m.. 
Motel, Come Jesu. Come. Suite in C; Overture; Cour- 
ante; Gavotte; Forlane (Danza Venezlana) Menuetto; 
Bourree; Passepled. C'antata, Praise Thou. Jerusalem, 
the Lord. Saturday at 1:30 p. m. Mass in B minor. 
Kyrle and Gloria; 4 p. m., Ma.s8 In B minor, Credo lo 
end. 



FRANK MOSS 

PIANIST 
Ensemble Accompanist 

ludlo: nooniii 1 and 2, No. 408 StoektOD St. 
(Heine Bide) 

Alanasementi 

JESSICA COLBERT 

UIO Hearst BulldluBr, San Francisco 



Constance Alexandre 

MEZZO SOPRANO 

A California artist who is recognized in 

Eastern music centers where she has 

received the commendation of press 

and public 

.Addrean: PaelUe Cosat Mualcal Review 
SOI Kohler * Cbaae Bldg., San Pranelaco, Calif. 



Lawrence Strauss 

TENOR 

Management Jessica Colbert 

Studio: 
807 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

(Mondays and Thursdays) 



Residence Studio: 2904 Garber St., Berkeley 




BRUCE 

CAMERON 

Tenor 

Voice Culture 

Concert, Church Recital 



Soloist Third Church of Christ Scientist 

3538 Twenty-Third Street, San Francisco 

Tel. Mission 1297 

/lanagement Leah Hopkins, 408 Stockton SI 




Mrs. 

Cecil 
Mollis 
Stone 

rONCKRT. 
ACCOMP.t.MST 
ANn COACH 

PHONKS: 

Bayvipw 107r. 

Kearny 51E.4 

Realdeore Sludloi 

IN.1I Balboa SI. 

San Prnnrlaro 




The 1921 Bach Festival will take place on Friday and 
Saturday. May 27lh and May 28th, In the Packer Me- 
morial Church. Lehigh University. Bethlehem. Pa. The 
choir, which will be under the conductorship of Dr. J. 
Fred Wolle. consists of 275 voices, several soloists, or- 
chestra, organ and Moravian Trombone Choir. The pro- 
gram for Friday. May 27th. will be the Cantata, The 
Sages of Sheba. Suite In D. No. 3 Overture. Air Gavotte, 
Bourree, C.lgue. These will be given at the 4 o'clock 
rrogram while at 8 o'clock of the same day the 
.Motet: Come, Jesus, Come, Suite In C, Overture, Cour- 
ante. Gavotte, Forlane (Danza Vcne/.lana), Menuetto, 
Bourree, Passepled, will be sung. The Saturday program 
will Include the Mass In B minor which will be given 
In two bearings. The first part will be sung at the 1:30 
session, while the last half will start about the middle 
of the afternoon. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MARY GARDEN CHARMS IN MASSENET OPERA 

Thais, Taken From the Book of Anatole Franco, Mag- 
nificently Staged and Sung by Garden, Lures 
Greatest Audience of Season 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

One can hardly bhime Selby C. OppenUeimer for the 
bright and happy smile which his face is wreathed in 
these days. Who is there who wouldn't he joyous as well 
as proud over a genuine success? No matter in what 
direction success comes it is always a personal satis- 
faction, especially so, when it comes through one's 
own hard and persistent work. Mr. Oppenheimer cer- 
tainly deserves to be congratulated for the efficiency 
of his management of the Chicago Opera Company in 
San Francisco. To bring an organization of this sort 
to this city not only warrants a tremendous amount 
of financial backing but the keenest personal atten- 
tion. That Mr. Oppenheimer gave every ounce of his 
energy, ambition and careful thought to the most 
minute detail can be appreciated only by those who 
attended these performances during the past two 
weeks and witnessed the record-breaking attendance. 
The success of this engagement will most assuredly 
go down in operatic annals. I congratulate Mr. Oppen- 
heimer upon the triumph he is now enjoying and hope 
that this will be but the beginning of many mox*e. 

Thais without Mary Garden just could not exist. It 
is an opera which has never been very popular but 
owes its box office value to the drawing power of this 
star who lias become so closely identified witli the 
title role. Musicians will flud a great deal of merit in 
the opera, for even though the music is a trifle sac- 
charine it is excellently scored and contains a certain 
amount of atmospheric charm. But, for the average 
opera-goer who seeks merely the enjoyment derived 
therefrom it does not appeal to or arouse in tbem any 
special enthusiasm. This is due to Massenet's not 
building up and reaching any definite climax or its 
lack of outstanding arias. The real gem of the music 
is created in its orchestration and the singing, more 
declamatory in style, is somewhat within a frame- 
work, going on in endless strains which after awhile 
become a trifle monotonous. Therefore to make a real 
triumph in this work, it necessitates an artist who is 
both singer and actress, plus personality. There are 
many artists who can portray the first two acts, that 
of Thais the courtesan prior to her conversion, but 
very few who can reveal the spirituality, the poetical 
appeal, unearthly aloofness and tenderness such, as 
Miss Garden succeeds in accomplishing in the latter half 
of the opera. And it is in just these episodes that I 
believe Mary Garden attains the perfection of her art 
for she seems inspired when creating characters of 
these idealistic types. 

It is worth the admission itself to see Miss Garden's 
first entrance as she rushes upon the stage, throwing 
buge bunches of red roses. Throughout this and the 
following scene she brings into play every bit of 
womanly charm and every alluring quality which this 
beautiful specimen of femininity has at her command. 
But where Miss Garden proves her rare taste is re- 
vealed in her ability to do away with vulgarity and not 
resorting to the coarseness which coulu so easily take 
place. There is nothing quite so delightful as her scene 
with Athanael on the oasis, both from the picturesque 
and interpretative viewpoint. Her plastic poses are ex- 
quisite to behold. The resignation of all that is world- 
ly, the gain of the spiritual over the material and her 
parting with her benefactor were marvelously imparted 
and imbued with a suggestion of pathos that pulled on 
one's heart strings. Miss Garden's singing is never bet- 
ter than in music of this sort for Thais is written within 
the very best portions of her voice and lends itself 
amply to her emotional powers of expression. I shall 
never forget the quality of voice in which she utters 
these last lines of her role at the end of the final 
scene, "Je vols le ciel, je vols Dieu." In this phrase 
Miss Garden conveys the impression of a soul already 
on its celestial journey for she uses a tonal coloring of 
the most translucent hues which seem to veil the voice 
so as to produce these cloudy effects. 

Since Miss Garden first made her American debut 
at the Manliattan Opera House in Thais on November 
25, 1907, fourteen years have elapsed. For those who 
still maintain that she has no voice but is more of 
an actress and a great personality, just let me say 
that she manages to hold her public in the hollow of 
her hand without the slightest effort. There were 
8000 people who heard her on this occasion as Thais! 
Was it just to look at lier and to indulge in her mag- 
netism and charms? To prove that Miss Garden en- 
joys greater popularity and wider recognition for her 
-irtistry remains in the fact that she can attract such 
a vast audience, especially if their claim is justified. 
Who else is there who can take her place or her roles? 
None other to my knowledge, and why? Because Mary 
Garden does more with the vocal equipment which is 
hers than those who possess voices of far greater 
beauty. Because Miss Garden has the imagination, mu- 
sical intelligence, dramatic powers and personal mag- 
netism to interest her audiences and hold them. That 
is why for fourteen years Mary Garden has held tliis 
unique position in the operatic field of America which 
is hers. 

The Athanael was Hector Dufranne. whom we have 
seen in the character many times. He is the same con- 
scientious and sincere artist that he ever was and it 
is this quality of absolute sincerity which stands forth 
in his conception of the monk. It is a part which is 
very apt to be overdrawn but Mr. Dufranne shows his 
mastery by refraining from being bizarre and ultra. He 
expresses himself admirably through his excellent vo- 
calization even though his voice is not quite as sonor- 
ous or as smooth in texture as of yore. Mr. Dufranne 
can always be counted upon to give a polished and 
well-conceived interpretation to his different charac- 



terizations for he adheres lo tradition besldeH using his 
own Individuality. 

Mr. Polacco conducted with his accustomed vigor 
and energy, putting new life into the music through his 
own personal magnetism. The lovely Meditation Rc- 
ligleuse was well played, receiving the usual amount 
of applause which this melody invariably brings forth. 
It was a superb performance of Thais which I doubt 
will ever be surpassed. 



WAGNERIAN OPERA HEARTILY ACCLAIMED 

Revival of Lohengrin in English Meets With Approval 

By Great Audience Who Welcome Its 

Return After Long Silence 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

Many years have passed since San Francisco has 
had the opportunity of hearing a Wagnerian master- 
piece in its entirety. It is only within the last year 
that the Metropolitan Opera managers decided to take 
several of the German scores from off their shelves 
and reopen them, mucli to the satisfaction of everyone 
interested in music as an art and as an education. 
As a result of the temporary abolishment of Wagnerian 
operas many new worlts have been placed in the reper- 
toires of both the Metropolitan and Chicago companies 
which have since proven not to be worthy of their ■ 
presentation. These novelties, it is true, have been 
heard several times during the season and then quickly 
dropped, which once more emphasized that it is very 
difficult, if possible at all, to supplant the works of the 
older masters. Now that the old repertoire has been 
resurrected we shall again hear Tristan und Isolde, and 
Der Ring des Nibelungen. If such artists as the Mozart 
operas require can be secured, perhaps these old gems 
may once more find their rightful place. Then those of 
this younger generation who are musically inclined may 
revel in their classicism. I believe that the reason for 
our not hearing these Mozartean works is due more 
to the lack of qualified singers than to their German 
origin, as the Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni and 
The Magic Flute have been frequently performed in 
this country in Italian. 

Speaking of the language in which the operas are 
being sung brings me to the point which is uppermost 
in a great many people's minds. Many are in favor of 
hearing the foreign works in English and many do not 
believe in translations. Those, who are not in favor 
of translation, maintain that it requires just as great 
a genius to re-write them as it did for the originator. 
Secondly, the artists singing claim that our language 
is very harsh and too difficult to sing in. This last 
complaint is more on the part of the Amei'ican singers. 
And right here I wish to say that it is our own Ameri- 
cans whom we can understand the least. Is it because 
they imagine by being born Americans or English that 
they need not lay special stress upon the enunciation 
of their mother tongue? I have noticed that it is the 
foreigner, although they retain their native accents, who 
pronounce our language most distinctly and most care- 
fully. It is for this very reason of having to be careful 
that they succeed in being understood. They secure 
a coach, a man or woman who is well versed in English 
and speaks it purely and perfectly, to study with. In 
this manner they succeed in perfecting, themselves 
as best they can. On the other hand, our Americans do 
not work as hard with their diction, thinking tone 
quality is the only essential for a singer to be perfect 
in, and the result is a mouthing and chewing of their 
words. When it can be understood it is anything but 
a pure English. It seems easier for them to learn 
French, German and Italian because tliat does not 
come natural to them and they have to work to ac- 
quire a concise foreign enunciation. 

At this performance of Lohengrin, which was sung 
in English, I had no difficulty at all in hearing and 
understanding every syllable said by Edward Johnson, 
who sang Lohengrin. 

They tell me he is equally at home in Italian, which 
shows that he has made a special study of diction, 
and I assure you his singing shows it. It does not in- 
terfere with his tonal quality but on the other hand it 
only lends additional character to it and helps his 
singing to penetrate a great deal further, for Mr. John- 
son's voice is not what I consider voluminous. His aria 
in the final act, entitled, In Distant Lands, was given 
with the exact emotional interpretation and with musi- 
cal discernment. He looked the character of the Knight 
of the Holy Grail in every respect and acted the heroic 
figure with nobility. Desire Defrere sang a rather small 
role, that of the Herald, but I mention him specially 
on account of his splendid English enunciation, which 
caused his part to stand forth with added importance. 
Mr. Defrere, by the way, is French. Edouard Cotreuil 
sang the role of the King, Henry I, with distinction 
and dignity, even though his voice is not quite heavy 
enough for the role. It necessitates a basso with 
greater depth and resonance than that of the voice of 
Mr. Cotreuil. However, his performance, from a musical 
and an interpretative standpoint, was thoroughly satis- 
factory. 

Cyrena Van Gordon sang Ortrud and looked regal in 
her long, flowing gowns. I do not quite agree with her 
facial makeup, for Ortrud is a deceitful woman, a con- 
spirator, one who harbors evil thoughts. Miss Van Gor- 
don looked much too beautiful to the eye. A woman 
who is of the type of Ortrud would assume a fiendish 



expresHlon und a flerceneHH which MIhr Van Gordon did 
not convey. Whilo her voice waB agreeable Bho could 
have sung la cither Lutln or Chinese, bo hadly wan her 
EuKllBh pronounced. Unless we can underHtand our 
own tongue, I would personally rather hear opera In 
another language, for then I do not expect to be able 
to follow the libretto accurately. Miss Van Gordon, by 
the way, Is American. She had better take more pains 
with her English enunciation. 

Mr. BaklanolT gave a splendid delineation of Fred- 
erick of Telramund, and if one did not catch all that 
he uttered there is a plausible reason, for he is Rus- 
sian and has not been in this country but a few years. 
There Is no excuse though for Americans. Rosa Raisa 
was indeed ravishing as Elsa. She made Elsa an ap- 
pealing, sympathetic figure who personified modesty 
and innocence. Her singing throughout, especially In 
the second act, when she sing.s her aria to Ihe breezes, 
contained many of the ethereal characterizations and 
ofttimes she conveyed to the audience the idea of her 
being somewhat in a trance. She was easily under- 
stood and if she was not quite at her accustomed ease 
it may be that she was taking special care of her enun- 
ciation and was not quite mistress of her vocal re- 
sources. 

It was indeed wonderful again to hear this fine and 
richly orchestrated score and for revealing the many 
beautiful episodes prevalent therein I owe a debt of 
gratitude to Mr. Cimini. He had a great deal of con- 
sideration for his soloists by keeping his orchestra well 
modulated, thus allowing them to sing and not shout. 
Wagnerian music can be sung at all times by artists 
who know how to conserve their voices. If one tries 
to scream over the orchestra this music will naturally 
prove disastrous to their voices, but if they take the 
vocal portions of these operas as an accompaniment to 
the orchestra rather than the other way around, they 
will succeed in singing as well and as long as many of 
the world's famous Wagnerian interpreters, Johanna 
Gadski, Olive Fremstadt, Lilli Lehmann, Jean de Retake 
and his brother Edouard, Lillian Nordica, Emma 
Eames and many others. It was a decided treat to hear 
this opera and it was one which enticed many of our 
musicians to attend. They did not hesitate to show their 
approval by enthusiastic and prolonged applause. 



BOLM BALLET AND LITTLE SYMPHONY 



A rare combination of musical beauty is scheduled for 
presentation in the Greek Theatre tonight and at the 
Columbia Theatre tomorrow (Sunday) afternoon, under 
the management of Selby C. Oppenheimer. As the con- 
cluding event in his most wonderful year in catering 
to the artistic taste of his clientele, Oppenheimer has 
selected Adolph Bolm, the famous male Russian 
dancer, and George Barrere, recognized as the world's 
greatest flutist, to present unusual programs of dance 
and music. 

Bolm. who will be remembered as the star of the 
Diaghileff Ballet and who is famous as the producer of 
Coq d'Or, Petroushka and Birthday of the Infanta with 
the Metropolitan and Chicago Opera companies, will be 
surrounded by a group of a half dozen graceful and 
beautiful maidens joining with him in the interpreta- 
tion of some of the loveliest music ever played here. 

The orchestral setting under Barrere's personal di- 
rection includes a little symphony of 14 chosen musi- 
cians, wonderfully adapted to the interpretation of the 
delicate music of olden days. The programs are divided 
into two parts in the first of which the Little Symphony 
is heard in seldom given orchestral numbers, including 
works by Gretry, Gluck, Wider, Pieme, Perilhou, of the 
older school, and Henry Hadley and John Alden Car- 
penter representing the moderns. 

The dance programs consist of a dozen selections, 
each presented by Bolm and his assistants, and it is 
claimed that every number is a work of rare beauty 
and a joyful experience never to be forgotten. Oppen- 
heimer has received hundreds of criticisms from other 
cities bestowing profound praise upon this combina- 
tion and feels sure that he is providing San Franciscans 
with an unusually rare treat in bringing Bolm and Bar- 
rere to this city. 

In addition to the concerts tonight and Sunday a fare- 
well special program will be given at the Columbia 
Theatre on next Sunday afternoon, May Sth. 



Muriel Randolph Grant 

SOPRANO— TEACHKR OF VOICE 

Voice Plnclns a Siiecialty 

Studio; Kohler & Chase Bids. 

RCM. Phone Franknn anna KcurnT .'>454 



ALEXANDER SASLAVSKY AT CALIFORNIA 

The California Theatre tomorrow morning will pre- 
sent Alexander Saslavsky, Russian violinist, as the sO' 
loist at its Seventh Grand Sunday Morning Concert of 
the present season, offering Vieuxtemps' D minor con- 
certo. Saslavsky began to study the violin at the age 
of nine, entering the Imperial Conservatory in Russia. 
After graduating with honors, he went to "Vienna, en- 
tered the Imperial Conservatory of Music and finished 
his studies with the great master, Jacob Grun. 

He came to America in 1894, and after a successful 
concert tour in the United States and Canada, he set- 
tled in New York, joining the New York Symphony 
Orchestra — Walter Damrosch, conductor — shortly be- 
coming its concert master and assistant conductor. He 
was also one of the organizers of the Russian Sym- 
phony Orchestra, serving as concert master for four 
years. Mr. Saslavsky has devoted much of his time to 
chamber music, being the organizer of the Mendelssohn 
Trio, New York Trio, the Saslavsky String Quartet and 
the Saslavsky Chamber Music Society. 

The following numbers have been chosen by Director 
Heller for the orchestra; Entry of the Boyards, by Hal- 
vorsen, including Serenade by Moszkowski and Love's 
Dream After the Ball by Czibulka; Irish Rhapsody by 
Herbert and Rienzi (overture) by Wagner. Sibelius* 
Valse Triste is offered by Harvey as an organ solo. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



CHARLES 

MARSHALL 

WORLD'S GREATEST HEROIC TENOR 

CHICAGO OPERA ASSOCIATION 

"Big is his voice-Big as Tamagno's and of mucli better quality. His top notes were thrill- 
ing; they had a quality and ring like Caruso's" New York Evening Post 
"The biggest sensation of the present Chicago Opera Season was the instantaneous and 
complete success of Charles Marshall." Chicago Herald and Examiner 
"Marshall's 'Otello' debut great triumph." Chicago Daily News 
"Chas. Marshall scores hit in operatic debut." Chicago Evening American 
"Charles Marshall makes impressive debut in 'Otello'." Chicago Daily Tribune 
"Marshall wins honors." Puts wealth of resources into role of Distracted Moor. 

San Francisco Chronicle 
"Marshall charms in Verdi song." San Francisco Examiner 

"Charles Marshall, Giant American Tenor, triumphs as 'Otello'." San Francisco Daily News 
"Marshall as 'Otello', wins great audience." Los Angeles Examiner 

"'Otellos' like Charles Marshall are not made, they are born." Los Angeles Times 




CHARLES MARSHALL 

ChieaAo Opera Abb'ii. (he Senealion ol the Seaeon 

Chicago Evening Journal — 

By the end of the first act Marshall was a por- 
sonaee. He is a bie artist, physically, vocally and 
temperamentally. If you care to see a striking, a 
really magnificent stage picture, go to "Otello" and 
watch for Marshall's entrance in the last act. 

New York Evening Post — 

Ralsa and Tltta Ruffo. and a tenor unknown here 
yesterday morning hut famous today, Charles Mar- 
shall, who in one evening planted himself firmly 
on a level with our leading opera singers. 

Seeing and hearing him as "Otello" last night, no- 
body wondered that he made a sensation in Chi- 
cago. He did the same thing here. Countless and 
thunderous were the curtain calls for him. 

Charles Marshall Is, in stature and voice, a born 
"Otello." Big Is his voice — big as Tamagno's and of 
much better riuality. Some of hia top notes were 
thrilling; they had a quality and a ring like Ca- 
ruso's. Verdi would have liked his "Otello." 

New York Morning Telegraph — 

He possesses a live, robust voice which he di- 
rects with great agility and a fine dramatic sense. 
Marshall had control of his audience and his _ac- 
ceptanc 



vith his physlqu 
! and soft when 
and shadow 



nd yet his tones were 
caslon demanded. The 
1 work came well Into 
1 dropped the applause 



ell 

flexible 

lights and shadows of hi 

play and when the curtal 

of the huge audience wa 

were the curtain calls that 

shall was pronounced 

came in for his share of the applause Ir 

with his beautiful singing of the "Credo. 



Los Angeles Times- 



like Charle 



nor with the 
rythlng that 



San Francisco Chronicle — 

Marshall Wins 
sings only this one role 
season, fully justified his 

most exacting parts ever written for a tenor, 
obust and virile singer of Caruso-like physiqu 






onquer 
ingly 



the difllcult 
xhaustible vi 



vith 



San Francisco Examiner — 



The 



appear- 



sensational incident of Marshall's 
nee as "Otello" in Chicago and New York and his 
rlumph there had been heard of, but it hit San 
Francisco again with all the effect of a sudden 
Of Marshall's histrionic ability there can 



gr 



litio 



He 



ellent 



ntin 



Los Angeles Examiner — 

"Marshall's Triumph." — The i 
ence from the first note and hi! 
climaxes, both vocal and dram 
volume of tone and his intensi 
meet the highest expectations 



Chicago Evening American — 



nd carrying puM 



New York Times- 
He is well fitted by 
ful and heroic- figur. 



A'on his audi- 
'Ith Its rising 
Ltic, his resounding 



range, rhysl- 



intellig 
bearing, gest 
Ing follows 
representativi 



aturo for the part, a pi 
overtopping the talle 
stage. His acting de 



I and tt 
exam] 
of the 

hail i.nssessi 



St stentorian 



say Tan 

of gr. 




Chicago Daily News — 

There wen 
He is a big 



tain 



alls afte 



which ha 
and it hii 
with dramatic illusi 



first act. 

ith a phenomenal vocal endur- 

.iso nas a robust, virllo tenor voice, 

an-ylng power, if not great resonance, 

ISO a high range. He played the part 



Chicago Herald and Examiner — 

The biggest sensation of the present Chicagi 
opera season was the Instantaneous and complete 
success of Charles Marshall. American tenor, wht 

ide his American debut last night in Verdl'a 



To 



"Otello 



for oiie performance only. Ho turnt _ , 

tation of "Otello" last night into a personal tri- 
umph and electrified the audience with the power 
and beauty of his voice and the gripping Intensity 
of his acting in the role of the fiercely Jealous 

Chicago Tribune — 

.\ <lejnonstratlnn of appreciation that contained 
the elements of a riot greeted Charles Marshall. 
iiiympian of stature and possessing a voice of In- 
credible power, he was a magnificent compelling 
figure. Dramatic Intensity lies heavy In his voice. 
In quality It tends toward a baritone. The richest, 
warmest notes lie In the lower and middle regis- 
ters. It lends Itself to vehement declamation or 



exception of one or two high tone 

the comfortable feeling (hat he holds a wealth o 

volume In reserv.-. His Intonation Is entirely ac 



Exclusive Management: HARRISON & HARSHBARGER 

1717 Kimball Bldg., Chicago 




AVID USSHER 

Zelia Vaiasade, Soprano. 
Gilbert Smltli. Tenor. 

Address, Some Music Needs, W. L, Hubbard. 
{Well known lecturer, musical critic, and interpreter of 
operalogues.) 



Flanders Requie 



..Frank La Forgro 



MONDAY EVENING, 8tl5 O'CLOCK 

Ball Room, Hotel Alexandria 
Reception to Officers and Delegates. 
Songs — 

The Lights of Home Linn Seller 

Love's on the Highroad James Roge 



Supplicatio 



Mi! 



-Frank La Forge 



8 PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

Third Annual Convention of California Federation of Music Clubs 

Great Interest Shown by the Sixty Federated Clubs in Great Event Which Will Open in Los Angeles 
This Sunday, May 1st— Five Hundred Members and Visiting Delegates and Two Thou- 
sand Persons Are Expected to Attend — Complete Official Programs of 
the Four-Day Convention Are Interesting 

By BRUNO D 

Los Angeles. April 2B. 1921. — The third Annual Con- 
vention of the Federation of California Music Clubs to 
be held next week, from IMay 1st to May 4th, in our 
city, promises to be one of tlie greatest events in the 
musical lite not only of Los Angeles or the Southwest, 
but of the entire Slate, The local clubs under the di- 
rection of State President Mrs. Cecil Pi-ankel, and Mrs. 
Gertrude Ross, program chairman, together with nu- 
merous committee members guided by Mrs. Grace Wid- 
ney Mabee, have made extensive and unique prepara- 
tions for a program which reflects well not only upon 
the Californian but the American musical life in gen- 
eral. The interest shown by the sixty federated clubs in 
the event can be measured by the fact that over 500 
delegates and visiting members are expected. Altogether 
a total attendance of about 2000 persons is anticipated. 

The program does merit such attention. It not only 
covers a very wide field, but contains features never 
offered before. It offers performing musicians, compos- 
ers and those interested in the theoretical and edu- 
cational side of music great opportunities to receive and 
give. The program of church music will have a wonder- 
ful message. It should make for musical and denomi- 
national tolerance. In fact every day brings numerous 
significant program items. Perhaps two more program 
features may be mentioned specially, the two plays 
during the Tuesday evening program introducing the 
spoken drama, and the music-dramatic presentation of 
Coleridge Taylor's Hiawatha's Wedding Feast, on 
Wednesday night. The cast in the latter also is a nota- 
ble one, Gaston Glass (Hiawatha), and Will Desmond 
(Lagoo), are well known actors. Harold Proctor will 
sing the tenor part. The part of the Chief will be 
played by an Indian Chief, who holds this office in 
actuality. 

All the programs are open to the public free of 
charge. Only for the presentation of Hiawatha's Wed- 
ding Feast tickets will be sold, the purpose being to 
raise means for the educational fund, so that the per- 
formance has no commercial tendency but is given for Music In the Grammar Grades, Miss Kathryn E. Stone, 
a benefit. Supervisor. 

The complete official program, as given in the fol- Work illustrated by classes from the grades, 
lowing, shows that much, very much in fact, may be Elementary Schools Orchestra, Miss Jennie Jones: 
expected to happen in the realm of music at Los (a) March, American Union Mackle-Beyer 

(b) Overture, Gibralter Al Hayes 

(c) Idyl, La Fontaine Chas. B. Lysberg 

(d) Our Boys and Girls of California Emll Ascher 

Written for and dedicated to the boys and girls of the 

Elementary School Orchestra. 



NORMA GOULD AND DANCfiES 
Demonstration of Eurythmics Applied to Dancing. 
Helen Tappe at the Piano. 



The Dancers 
Bertha 'Warden 
Sadie Hindman 
Martha Gill 
Grace 'Williams 
Josephine Spates 



Ruth 'Wilton 
Evelyn Crist 
Hazel Purl 
Matilda Mayer 
Thyrza Showalter 
Elizabeth Schreiber Margaret Case 

Marion 'Wallace 
Songs — 
Only Thine. G. Vargus, Oakland. 
Lett (words by David Runyan) Clarence Gustlln, Santa 

Ana. 
O Golden Sun, Grace Adele Preeby. 

Leon Rice, Tenor. 
Composers at the piano. 
TUESDAY MORNING, MAY 3, O'CLOCK 
Normal Hill Center Auditorium, 
Fifth and Hone Sts. 
Kducntlonal Department 
Ml-. Charles 'Wakefield Cadman, Director. 
Miss Frankel and Mrs. Emma Bartlett, Chairmen Pub- 
lic School Music, presiding. 



Inglewood Union Higli School Orchesti 



Fifth and Olive Sts. 

RECITAL 

Illustrating the 

HISTORY OP CHURCH MUSIC. 

Educational Department. Church Music Division 

Mrs. Grace 'Widney Mabee, State Chairman. 

Temple Unptist Choir 

Emory Poster Baritone and Director 

Dr. Ray Hastings Organist 

Constance Balfour ..Soprano 

Nell Lockwood Contralto 

Clifford Biehl Tenor 

Fred C. McPherson Baritone 

AsHlsted by ll'iiiii Il'rilh Uunrtct 

Myrtle Phybil Colby Soprano 

Mme. Anna Euzena Sprotte Contralto and Director 

George Willeys Tenor 

Harold Ostrom Baritone and Cantor 

Be-ssie Fuhrer Erb Violin 

Robert Alter 'Cello 

Esther Rhoades Harp 



Selections from an opera given in the Public Schools: 

MARRIAGE OP NANNETTE 
Libretto by Agnes E. Peterson. 
Music by Louis W. Curtis. 

Lincoln High School Glee Club, Louis "W. Curtis, Di- 
rector. 

TUESDAY' AFTERNOON, MAY' 3, Is-TO O'CLOCK 

Normal Hill Center Auditorium, 

Fifth and Hope Sts. 

Mrs. Frankei and Mrs. Bruner, Presiding. 

Glendale High School Glee Club, Mrs. Dora Gibson, 



Early Christian — Shepherd of Tende 
Jewish Temple Service — Kadusha. 
Syrian Polk Song (violin)— Ancient Lullaby. 
Gregorian Chant. 

Transition— Come Let Us Reason Palestrina 

Polk Song — Joseph, Tender Joseph Mine 14th Century 



(Contralto) 
Reformation — Behold I Stand at the Do 
Eigbteenth Century— 



Bach 

. .....Mozart 

Nineteenth Century — Stabat Mater Rossini 

The New Formalism — Light Celestial Tschaikowsky 



Twentieth Century Contrast — Hear, O Heavens, 



..H. J. Stewart 



The Gospel Hymn 

(a) Golden Crown. 

(b) Just as I am. 

Modern: Democracy and Service, I Made of My Heart 

a Temple (tenor) O'Hara 

Social Service Makes Us Strong Nagler 

Joy and Dove — Easter Morn (by special request) i. 

Gertrude Ross 

ripilome- wliiLe f^ilies of Our Lord Dickinson 

MOMJVY 5IORNING. MAY' 2, 0:30 O'CLOCK 
Ball Room, Hotel Alexandria 
Mrs. Frankel and Mrs. Jones, Presiding. 
Assembly songing — America the Beautiful. 
Llewellyn B. Cain. Festival Director, C. P. M. C. 
Greeting from State President. 
Address by Sylvester Weaver, President Chamber of 

Response for Delegates, Mrs. E. E. Bruner, 2nd "Vice- 
Report of Local Boards, Mrs. Grace Widney Mabee, 

Committee Reports 

rrograni. Gertrude Ross, Chairman. 

Credential, Julius V. Seyler. Treasurer. 

Greetings, Hdward Pease, President State Music Teacb- 



MOND,\Y Al.'TERNOON. 1:30 O'CLOCK 

Ball Room, Hotel Alexandria 
Urs. Frankel and Mrs. Ritchie, Presiding 



Southern California Public School M. T. A. 
3. 

Polytechnic High School Boys Glee Club, Mrs. Gertrude 
B, Parsons, Director: 

(a) The Bells of Sbandon Nevin 

<b) Lassie O' Mine Walt 

(c) Our Mary Arr. 

4. 
Illustrated Talk, Teaching of the Voice in the Public 
Schools. Arnold Wagner, Public School Music Depart- 
ment, University of Southern California. 
5. 
Choral Club of Los Angeles High Scbffol accompanied 
by L. A. H. S. Orchestra, Miss Verna E. Blythe. Director: 

(a) A Song of Liberty Mrs. H. H. A. Beach 

(b) The Landing of the Pilgrims Coerne 

TUESDAY' EVENING. M.YY 3, «!30 O'CLOCK 

Banquet. Bbell Club, 

Roland Paul, Toastraaster. 

Followed by two one-act plays, given by the Dramatic 



BROKEN IDOLS, bv Harl Mclnroy. 



Frederick Bond 

Horton, R. A. 
Victor Rottman 



Lady Horton. his mother 

Cerise, La Mignon's maid Margery Riley 

dressing room. Theatre Royal, 



Scene — La Mii 



■hinese Mother Goose Melodies Bainbridge Cris 

■Mrs. Lillian Birmingham, San Francisco Musical Club 
Charles Perry at the Piano. 



Helen 

Grigeri, Stepanovitch Smirnov Charles Meredith 

rvant of Madame Popova Antrim Short 

\ room in the house of Madame Popova. 

THE WHITE CHRYSANTHEMUM 
(A Japanese Fantasy) 
by Josephine Crew Aylwin of Berkeley. 



SYLVAIN NOACK 



rhllburmonlc OrvUi 
I'M South Oxford A 

ibor of pupllu for 



wf Lou AdbvIc 



CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

VIOLIN— MUSICAL THEORY 

Faculty Member College of Music 

306 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles— Wed. and Sat. 

JAY PLOWE-Solo Flutist 

Philharmonic Orchestra — Trio Intlme 

Studio: 334 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles 

Res. Phone: 579064 

ANN THOMPSON-Pmmsie 

PIANISTE TO RUTH ST. DENIS 

RccltnlH — CoDcertM — IiiHtruvtion 

In Cnre MuMlcal Courier, New York 

Management Harry H. Hall 

DAVOL SANDERS 



e Mnin 2190 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

Darltoue Concert Engogementn — Conductor Los Anselea 
Oratorio Society 

For information see E. M. Barger. Secretary, 330 Blanch- 
ard Hall, Los Angeles, Calif. 



HENRI de 


BUSSCHER 






Belgian Tenor 




^^H jm f^Hj^^H 


Snlo Oboe, Plillliarmonlc 
OrchcHtrn, Lom Angeles 

Teacher of 
OBOE fcf SINGING 

Coachinf!: for 
Concert and Opera 

Studio: 1500 S. Figneroa 
Tel. 23195 


. 







GRAUMAN'S 

MILLION DOLLAR THEATRE 
Broadway at Third 
LOS ANGELES 



SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

MISHA GUTERSON, CONDUCTOR 

Sunday Morning Concerts 

Every Sunday, Starting at 11 A. M. 

Soloists From Operatic and Concert Stage 

ALL SEATS RESERVED 
—at— 

50 Cents 

and War Tax 

Which includes the privilege of remaining for the 
regular Grauman Photoplay program. It is advisa- 
ble that seats be secured several days in advance 
in order to secure choice locations and avoid wait- 
ing in line on Sunday. 



Marian Nickolson, Violinist. 



Maestro William Tyroler 

OF THE 

Metropolitan Opera House, New York 

begs to announce that he will establish a 

Master School for Grand Opera and Concert 

in connection with a 

Chorus School for Grand Opera and 

Oratorio 

in Los Angeles 

Address applications to 

127 North Boylston St., Los Angeles 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

University of Southern California 

Distinguished Faculty — Strong Courses 

Nenil for catnloK 



J. SPENSER-KELLY, Baritone 

THE ABSOLUTELY CORRECT METHOD OF VOICE 

PRODUCTION 

roplt« accepted In every branch of the vocnl art. 

Studio. »44 Muslc-Artn BIdK. Phone lOU.SZ 

PATRICK O'NEIL, Tenor 

CONCERTS VOICE PRODUCTION RECITALS 



Brahm van den Berg 



ILYA BRONSON 



ALFRED KASTNER, Harpist 

Solo Harpist Philharmonic Orchestra. Member Trio Inti 
Recital— Instruction— Concerts 
Studio: 240 S. Gramercy Place. 660481 

Alexander Saslavsky— Violinist 

JLIIrector SiiMlavKk:r Chamber MunIc Society 



JAMISON VOCAL QUARTET 

Coiirerta — Reeltoln— Club ProKrnni« — narKuret Me»»c 
lln^el B. AnderKon. Ednn C. Voorheen, Dolny V. Pridrnu 
Abhie Norton Jomlaou. Director-Accomiinninte, 2«Ji 



The Heartt- Dreyfus Studios 



ZOELLNER QUARTET 

MannKenient H. •& A. CDlberlnon. Aeolian Hall, Ne<T Vork 

Seriouf* StudentK .Accepted 

Pemonnl Addreax: ISSO Windsor Blvd., Loa Angelea 

FLORENCE MIDDAUGH— Contralto 

Concerts— Oratorio — Reollala 
Tueaday and Friday Mornlnea, 314 Mualc Arta Bids., 
Loa Anselea. Studio Phone 10OS2. Realdence Wllah. STOO 

GREGORY KRESHOVER 



HELEN KLOKKE 

DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION 

CONCERTS— RECITALS— CLUB PROGRAMS 
Maoagenient: France Goldtvater. 810 MaJ. Theatre. 1S480 

HENRY SVEDROFSKY 



Tuition In 
VIOLI.N AND ENSEMBLE PLAYING 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 
3012 South Western Ave. Phone West 500C 



CALIFORNIA THEATER 

Main Near Ninth, Loa Anselea 
Moat .Vrliatic Theater-Home of the 

California Concert Orchestra 

Cnrll D. Elinor, Director 

Fineat Motion Picture Oroheatru In the AVeat 

DAILY SY.MPHONIC CONCKRTS 



OSCAR SEILING 

CONCERT VIOLINIST AND INSTRUCTOR 
elurnrd From Ilia Kaalrrn Tour and Una Rrann 

Ilia \ iolin Ciaaara. 
urtio: 132^1 S. l''iKnrrroa. Phonea (iOM7l « 241170 



HOMER GRUNN 

COMPOSER— PIANIST 

ivnilnl>le for Concerta and ReelfnIi 
lo: i:i24 South Figucrron. Phone : 

GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 
MME. MINKOWSKI 



Read the Pacific Coast Musical Review, tlie only mu- 
ical paper in the west — $.*? per year. 



FIRST WESTERN TOURj 

Philh arm onic Orch es tra 



Founded by 
W. A. Clark, Jr. 



of Los Angeles, California 



Management of 
L. E. Behymer 



Walter Henry Rothwell 

CONDUCTORj 

75 World-Famous Musicians Eight Distinguished Soloists 

Giving Forty Concerts in Thirty-five Cities 

Tour starts Monday April 25th, 
ending Saturday May 28th. 





ITINERARY 




nnkerafleld, Calif. 


Portland, Ore. 


Yakima, Waah. 


Boulder, Colo. 


Freano, Calif. 


Tacomu, Waah. 


>liaaouia, Mont. 


Colorado SprinKa, Colo. 


Sacramento, Calif, 


Seattle, Waah. 


Deer LodKe, Mout, 


Denver. Coio. 




Victoria, B, C, 


Hutte, Mout. 


Salt Lake city, 1 lah 


Medford, Ore. 


neilinKham, Waah, 


Helena, Mont. 


tiKden, Utah 




Seattle, Waah, 


BllliuEa, Mout. 


Reno, Nev. 




Spokane, Waah. 




San Joae. Calif. 






Ft. Colilna, Colo. 


Monrovia, Calif. 




Olympla, Waah. 


Greeley, Colo. 





Offices: 521 Philharmonic Auditorium Building, Los Angeles, Calif. 



ROLAND PAUL 

VOICE CULTURE— COACHING IN REPERTOIRE 

OPERA CLASSES INCLUDING COMPLETE 

PRF.SF.NTATIONS 

Studio 1324 S. FiKuerron. Phone 21S«r> 



PERSONS IN THE PLAY 
ling Dew), a Japanese girl 



Elle 



Pressley basis, 



Otsyu (M_ „ , , . 

Malku. her sister Marion Fisher 

Chiyo. their nurse Lillian Birmingham 

Noda San. a gardener Luther Marchant 

Scene — a garden in Japan. 

Time — The present. 



ALEXANDER SASLAVSKY SCORES SUCCESS 

Distinguished Violinist Big Factor in Los Angeles 

Events — Los Angeles Trio Ends Its Season — 

Lena Frazee Makes Many Friends 

By BRUNO OAVIO USSHER 

Roland Paul's opera class has given a most pleasing 

performance of C'avalleria Rusticana on a professional 

complete stage settings. As the engraver 

was unable to complete the cut of the layout in time for 

this issue, we will include both in our next letter. 



by The Zoellm 

Fannis Cha 

Sostenuto. Byon to the Dawn. 
Impressions^ Op. 19 



..Emerson Whiteht 
Pastoral. 
Elegy. 

CAIN 
A dramatic scene. Words and mus 
Lawrence Tibbits, baritone. 
Composer at the piano. 
Sketch for quartet. Lucile Crews, 



Cleveland, Ohio 



by Rupert Hughes. 



Redlands. 

e'Humming Bird. Sarah C. Bragdon. Pasadena, 
nrlse Song. Charles Skilton. University of Kansas. 

WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON 
to Ride, 1:30. Start from Gamut Club. 1044 So. Hope, 
e delegates and all members of Federated Music 
B are Invited to lea by Mrs. Dean Mason. 340 La- 
.te place, at 4 o'clock. 

WEDNESDAY EVENING 
Trinity Auditorium 
netit Educational Fund. Tickets 11.00. at Birkels. 
jman's Symphony Orchestra. Henry Schoenefeld, Con- 



(a) Oh. Bird 

(b) Ah. Love but a 

(c) Call of the Tral 
td) Spring Singing 



rlcan composers; 



Ruzena Sprotte, Contralti 



Cadman 

...Beach 

...Foster 

icFadyen 



vords written by H. W. I^ngtellow. the 

music composed by S. Coleridge Taylor. Staged by W. O. 
Stewart, organliier of the California. Oper 



Accompanied by Woma 



Hiawatha .. 
Minnehaha . 
Pau-Puk-Kc 

Lagoo 

Nokomls 

Chlblabos .. 

Osseo 

Chief 



Mr 



..Gaaton Glass 
Melba Mclslng 
Arnold Tamon 
Will Desmond 
Charles H. Toll 



..Ha 



old Pi 



Edgo 

By Himself 

of the Tribe Clarence Gusllln 

Men and women of the Tribe 

The soclaf side of the convention will be rich In 
charming events of entertaining nature. Prominent 
leaders of society and well-known clubs have already 
made arrangements to open their homes and to fill up 
their gasoline tanks in honor of the guests. 



One of the most, if not the most, delightful concerts 
of the season by the organization did the affair prove to 
be, with the excellent interpretations of .Mexander Sas- 
lavsky, the violinist, as a prime inspiration. The pi'o- 
gram was well selected, embracing the Charles Wakefield 
Cadman Trio in D iMaJor, the Sonata in D Major by 
Harold Webster, both of whom are residents of this 
city: the Quartete in D Minor by Chadwick and the 
first movement from a Scottish sonata by Helen Living- 
stone. Besides, a group of selected songs was effectively 
given by Mariska Aldrich, whose operatic experience lent 
dramatic attraction to these numbers. Her voice has 
bigness and power, wiiich she uses with very convincing 
musicianship. 

Cadman's Trio is not unfamiliar here, but its brilliant 
and characteristic beauties were well brought out by the 
ensemble. The Webster sonata is distinguished by 
much originality and romantic feeling — a very pleasing 
work. Miss Livingstone's employment of Gaelic color 
in the sonata excerpt was very interesting, while the 
quartet in D minor by Chadwick revealed that composer's 
lyrical vigor and his adept skill in the handling of 
themes. Robert Alter, 'cellist: Helen Lewyn, pianist: 
Modesta Mortensen, violinist: Morliana Fowler, pianist, 
and Hazel Lukagel. viola player, capably assisted Mr. 
Saslavsky In his attractive production of these worthy 
American compositions. 

Alexander Saslavsky himself will be heard at the Sun- 
day Morning Concert of the San Francisco California 
Theater May 1st, where he will play the Vieuxtemps D 
Minor Concerto No. 4. His San Francisco appearance 
will be one of numerous engagements which will take 
him to Fresno, Seattle, Spokane, Coeur d'Alene, Wallace, 
Pullman and other communities of the N'orthwest. As 
last year, Mr. Saslavsky will again give a series of 
summer concerts in Denver, where his chamber music 
series are among the best attended events in the realm 
of music. In the Fall Concertmaster Saslavsky will re- 
sume Ills concerts here and at San Diego, Including the 
neighborhood cities. 

Just prior to his departure his advanced pupils will be 
heard in recital. The program Includes a Vivaldi con- 
certo for four violins. Symphony Espagnol by Lalo, Con- 
cert Militaire by Lipinsky, Vieuxtemps D Minor Con- 
certo, Phantasy Lombardle by the same composer. Con- 
cert Romantitjue by Godard. a list which reflects credit- 
ably on the work done in the Saslavsky studio. Among 
Mr. Saslavsky's students Is .Master Leon Burfort, who 
in spite of his mere nine years plays a dc Berlot concerto 
well and gives fine promise for the future. 
(Continued on Page 10, Col. 11 



10 



LOS ANGKLES NEWS 



(Continued trom imge 9, column 3) 
Mlas Lena Fnizee was the highly successful soloist at 
the last Ebell Cluh Concert, when her well-trained con- 
trulto voice won her immediate applause of great spon- 
taneity in the aria Joan d'Arc by Bemberg. Her singing 
of old English songs and modern compositions, too, was ^ 

delightful as to technique and expression. There was q^^^H'"^^^^ li,"Tschaikowsky, and a group of three 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

Reinald Worranrath, baritone; Vasa Pridoha, violinist; 
Sophie Braslau, contralto; Louis Graveure, baritone; 
either Percy Grainger or Yolando Mero, pianists, clos- 
ing with the always welcome Eugene Ysaye. 

The Zoellner Quartet will close its Los Angeles con- 
cert series next Monday evening at the Bhell Clubhouse. 
As a quartet playing the highest type of music, re- 
flecting exquisite polish and perfect balance, the Zoell- 
ners have enjoyed recognition and innumerable honors 
from coast to coast. 

The program will include: Quartet in B Flat, Mozart; 



great charm in her interpretation of *\°'^:'^^'''™5° numbers "inorud'ing Minuet "of Boccherini, Humming Bird 
melodies. In tact, she had to give encores after every l^'Hf^^- B°agdon (a first performance), and the Adagio, 

^'The concert brought warm applause also to Conductor opus 64, No. 5, by Haydn_^ 

Poulin and Mrs. M. Hennion Robinson, the clever accom- 
paniste. Of particular interest was The Song of the 
Camp by the well-known San Diego organist and com- 
poser H J Stewart, which is musically appealing and 
grateful for male choir. The composer paints the vary- 
ing moods of the poem cleverly and achieves touching 
contrasts The chorus sang it with distinct success. 

Rolling Down to Rio and the Tinker Song from Robin 
Hood were especially pelasing program numbers, slinw- 
ing the chorus as well drilled rhythmically. Othe- 
graveu's Handorgan Man sounds much easier than it is, 
for its counter rhythms and changing cues keep the 
various sections on the alert. It, too, had to be repeated. 
Other effective program numbers were Gloria, by Pec- 
cia- On the Water, bv Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, and 
Plainsman's Song, by Bliss. The Rhapsodie by Brahms 
sounded somewhat monotonous. 

Specially noteworthy was The Cherubic Hymn, taken 
by Gretchmaninof from the Russian Liturgy of St. John 
Chrysostemus on account of the ecclesiastic treatment of 
the voices. In this number and in Oh Earth, Thou Art 



Mme Ir«ne Pavlovska, brilliant prima donna soprano, 
has been re-engaged by the Chicago Opera Company 
Association during Mary Garden's and Conductor Po- 
lacco's sojourn here. This will mean a most valualMe 
addition to the Chicago Opera forces. Mme. Pavlovska 
is now on a concert tour through the Northwest. The 
gifted singer, who is a most charming actress, spent four 
seasons already in the fold of the great association, but 
preferred to enter the concert field last fall, which proved 
a great success. Mme. Pavlovska is equally as fine on 
the concert platform as on the operatic stage, as we 
had occasion to acknowledge in these columns. The 
contract offered her by Garden and Polacco assures the 
singer important roles and an attractive salary. At the 
end of her present tour Mme. Pavlovska will visit her 
family in Canada and then go East, where she will con- 
certize until she joins her former operatic comrades at 
Chicago. Mme. Pavlovska is of Polish descent, Canadian 
born and American by marriage to George Carew, the 
gifted actor, who played the part Princivalli in Monn; 



Martin Loeftler, Wallace Goodrich and Frederick Stock. 

"The prizes are open only to American-horn citlzenB, 
or to those born In Europe of American parents. The 
pieces offered must never have been performed in puh- 
•B ui posoiaua SHa.ippB puB oranu lus.i s.josoduioa aqi 
illlAV 'onoui JO amBU poumsHi! UB jopun u\ iusb eq tHnoi 
Xaiix -uoniiaaraOD snoiAaJd Jiwe %v poaajjo .laAan pue 'D|i 
sealed envelope sent at the same time. Each orchestral 
score must be accompanied by an arrangement for the 
pianofortes in tour hands. 

"The pieces are to be sent to Mrs. Elizabeth C. Allen, 
Secretary for the Paderewski Fund, at the New Eng- 
land Conservatory of Music, Gainsborough Street and 
Huntington Avenue, Boston, between September 15 and 
September 30, and not earlier or later. The judges re- 
serve the right to make no award if the compositions 
sent in do not seem of sufflcienl merit to deserve prizes. 

"The decision of a majority of the judges is to be 
binding on all parties concerned. The trustees assume 
no responsibility tor the loss of manuscripts while in 
transit." 



Wondrously Fair the boy choristers from St. Paul Ca- Vanna with such success a few weeks ago m a Hedwig 
thedral participated. Choirmaster Ernest Douglas con- Reicher stage production. 

ducting. The hoys have had good schooling, though their ■ 

tone production and diction is uneven. William Tyroler, who is well remembered as the ac- 
. companist and coach of eminent singers, is on his way 

The Los Angeles Trio made many converts at their jq lq^ Angeles, where he will open a studio and teach 
last concert in the Ebell Club House. They would ^g^^^ ^s well as repertoire and chorus study. Mr. Ty- 
brlng many more into the fold of chamber music but tor ^^igj ^^g jjere last with Amato, the famous baritone, 
the end of the season. However, these three musicians, j^ whose great concert successes he shared fully. The 
May Macdonald Hope, pianist; Leon Goldwasser, violin- well-known vocal coach has until recently been con- 
ist, and Ilya Bronson. 'cello, will find a large congregation nected with the Metropolitan Opera in New York as 
aw^aiting them at the outset of their musical revival coach, and is now planning to devote his unique experi- 
campaign next fall. There can be little doubt of it. ^^^^ jq ^^g upbuilding of an American school of singers. 

A spiritual message of lovelier musical language has , 

seldom been preached here than during the performance 
of the Brahms B major Trio, opus S. The Trio offered 
finely blended ensemble work. The playing had great 
strength and was well balanced in shading. The smiling 
melancholy of the Arensky D minor Trio also was con- 
veyed with winning delicacy of nuancing and beauty of 
phrasing. Both works were given with a technical elo- 
quence that was sustained with depth of interpretation. 

The violin and piano Sonata, opus 53, by Henry 



MOTION PICTURE MUSIC 



Music descriptive of visions and dreams was fasci- 
natingly programmed yesterday morning at the Grau- 
man Theater, where a capacity audience found much de- 
lisl't ill following Conductor Guterson's baton into the 
SchoeneVeid" made a "strong impress'lon. Spontaneously realm of a phantastic world. The fairy wonders of 
melodical it is of handsome musical architecture. The Mendelssohn's Midsummer Night's Dream music were 
thematic 'development is natural and interesting. The charmingly portrayed. The melodious Vision by Tschai- 
movements are well contrasted and contain nothing alien kowsky, and Imaginary Ballet by Coleridge Taylor also 
to their humor. It is a sympathetic work, free from emo- were played with good expression. 



tional pretense and artificialities of harmony, and it 
won through the genuineness of its language. While not 
too difficult, it is grateful lor both players. 

Leon Goldwasser was never heard to better advantage. 
His mellow tone had warmth and a singing quality. 
Ilya Bronson again was in fine form, especially in the 
"elegia adagio" of the Arensky work. May Macdonald 
Hope did excellent work in all three program numbers. 
She is an exceptionally gifted chamber music player. 
He fine adaptability to style of tone and phrasing 
marked her playing as delightful. The Los Angeles Trio 
possesses in her a trusty musical pilote. 

On business and vacation President George J. Dowling 
ot the Cable Company of Chicago Is visiting in Los An- 
geles and staying at the Los Angeles Athletic Club until 
Tuesday. The Cable Company manufactures the Con- 
over, Kingsbury and Wellington pianos and also the solo- 
Eupiona players. 

Mr. Dowling is giving much ot his time while here 
to Manager E. P. Tucker ot the Wiley B. Allen Company, 
sole Pacific Coast distributor of the Cable Company's 
products. He reports an increasing demand for pianos 
and musical instruments in general, both in the United 
States and foreign countries. 

The advent of the Bohm Russian Ballet and the Bar- 
rere Little Symphony in a unique combination ot the 
dance and instrumental music. May 3d, 5th and 7th, at 
Philharmonic Auditorium, is ot special interest because 
ot the fact that Bohm first brought the Russian ballet 
out of Russia to this country, and he is already a favorite 
locally from his excellent performances during the Dagh- 
lieffi ballet engagement, in which he was star solo artist 
and ballet master. 

Ann Thompson, talented pianlste, who has been soloist 
and accompanist for the Denishawn concert dancers in 
their recent tour, will return to Los Angeles May 3d 
for three weeks. She expects to give a joint recital 
with Earl Meeker, baritone, before the Pasadena Shake- 
peare Club May 10th. Miss Thompson was received with 
enthusiasm in all the Northern cities and duplicated her 
splendid success here. 

The Philharmonic artist course for next season will 
otter twelve famous recital artists on a series ot Tuesday 
evenings, with the natinee series of previous years tem- 
porarily discontinued. 

Among the artists scheduled are: Arthur Rubinstein, 
gifted pianist; Mabel Garrison, coloratura soprano; 
either Alessandro Bonci or Emmy Destinn; Renaro Za- 
nella, baritone, and Grace Wagner, soprano, in joint re- 
cital; Helen Stanley, soprano; Pavlowa and her company 
or a joint recital by Alma Gluck and Bfrem Zimbalist; 



The phantastic nature of the program found its most 
realistic climax in the Dance of Death by Saint-Saens, 
which gave Concertmaster Jaime Overtone occasion tor 
a fine solo. In the Raindrop Waltz by Strauss a pleasing 
anti-climax was offered, the program closing success- 
fully with Ponciello's Dance of the Hours. 

Mme. Anna Ruzena Sprotte. the distinguished con- 
tralto soloist, received cordial applause when singing 
"My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice," by Saiut-Saens, and 
Dreams, by Wagner. Mme. Sprotte combines great art- 
istry of expression and technique with much beauty of 
tone. Her singing of the two numbers revealed ex- 
cellent sense o£ style and made a profound impression. 
Incidentally, this was the third engagement ot this artist 
at the Grauman concerts within this season. 



At Miller's and California — What good scoring 
was eloquently demonstrated by Carli Densmore in his 
musical setting to the religious film. Behold the Man, 
now showing at Miller's Theater. It is a pictorialization 
ot the Christ life, and, though not lacking in diversity, 
breathes always an atmosphere of great serenity. This 
expression has been well sustained in the score, which 
at the same time is built up with choicest stones Irom 
the famous musical quarries, hence not lacking in va- 
riety of expression. Wagner is represented with Par- 
silal, Lohengrin and Rienzi. We find Tschaikowsky, 
Handel, Rubinstein, Chopin, Wallace, Mendelssohn and 
Beethoven. The vocal soli (Handel, Bach-Gounod and 
Faure), too, were chosen with fine effect. Director 
Kiemer is well at home at the new organ. The soloists. 
Miss Ruth Mitchell and John Westervelt, enter fully into 
the spirit ot their presentation, so that a very har- 
monious effect has been achieved. At the California Mr. 
Elinor delights his hearers with a most characteristic 
score to Kazan, the Alaskan picture. He gives a fine 



reading of 
responding. 



Carmen Overture, the orchestra finely 



PADEREWSKI PRIZES 



Boston, April, 1921.— The New England Conservatory 
of Music Bulletin for April makes the following an- 
nouncement which is ot interest to American composers: 

"Mr. William P. Blake, surviving trustee of the I. J. 
Paderewski Fund for American Composers, offers two 
prizes tor the current year: one of one thousand ($1000) 
dollars for a Symphony and one of five hundred ($500) 
dollars tor a piece ot Chamber Music, either for strings 
alone or for pianoforte or other solo instrument or in- 
struments with strings. 

"The judges who have agreed to serve are Charles 



M'MANUS-BEEL RECITALS IN BERKELEY 

Three Beethoven Violin and Piano Recitals Elicit En- 
thusiastic Endorsement in College City— 
Both Artists Highly Praised 

George S. McManus and Sigmund Beel, who have 
been giving sonata recitals in Berkeley during the 
winter months, have enjoyed unusual success and were 
enthusiastically praised by the critics on that side of 
the bay. The following paragraph is quoted trom the 
Berkeley Times of March 23rd: "Last evening marked 
the commencement of the second performance ot the 
complete set of piano and violin sonatas of L. van Beet- 
hoven, played by Sigmund Beel, violinist, and George 
Stewart McManus, pianist. From the standpoint ot mu- 
sical excellence the recital was all that could he de- 
sired and was worthy of the large Aeolian Hall audi- 
ence; in other words, a beautifully balanced rendition 
of Beethoven, sane and free from the slightest taint of 
emotionalism which often beclouds true worth. From 
the Allegro Moderate ot the G major sonata to the 
finale Allegro ot the C minor sonata, the artists showed 
ease and mastery." 

After the second recital the same paper stated the 
following: "The second concert g^ven last night in 
Wheeler Hall by Sigmund Beel, violinist, and George 
Stewart McManus, pianist, lully sustained the excel- 
lent and interesting work already done by these two 
artists. In fact they have never displayed greater spon- 
taneity nor closer ensemble work. The program showed 
a steady ascending freedom ot thought and expression 
until the third number Sonata in F major, the height of 
clarity ot utterance and impersonal beauty was reached. 
Especially was the adagio movement of that sonata ren- 
dered exquisitely. The tenderness, grace and lucidity 
were ot Beethoven, Beel and McManus were present 
appreciating the master with us. . . . Too much 
can not be said in praise of the ensemble work of these 
musicians. The mellowness of Mr. Beel's playing forms 
a fine complement to the accurate impersonal sense of 
music expressed by George McManus It is a pity that 
more music lovers are not having the pleasure o£ hear- 
ing these events. The name, Beethoven sonatas, need 
not frighten away those who do not consider themselves 
technically cultivated in music. One finds in going that 
there is sustained and stimulating interest in the un- 
weaving melodies, the combination of sounds, the lovely 
movements. The weary person is rested by such an un- 
toldment. The musical person is delighted by it. It was 
a pleasure last night to note the audience was larger 
than that of last week." 

The Berkeley Times of April 6th stated the follow- 
ing: "The third Beethoven concert given by Sigmund 
Beel and George Stewart McManus last night at 
Wheeler Hall closed the series ot three concerts for this 
season. It was a fitting climax to the trio. Mr. Beel 
and Mr. McManus, it not so spontaneous as they were 
last Tuesday night when they played quite out ot 
themselves, were in usual fine form and their numbers 
moved with admirable ease, flexibility and spirit. The 
brilliance and finish ot the piano work was specially 
notable in the allegro con spirito movement of the first 
sonata. In the second movement of the same sonata the 
crescendos were beautifully worked up and that move- 
ment melted graciously into the rondo of a charming 
playfulness. In that respect Beethoven's versatility has 
been a great surprise to those not closely familiar with 
the master. That he should express so many moods, 
gay as well as more serious, enlarges one's concept ot 
the scope of his work. In the second sonata the haunt- 
ing melody and rhythm ot the minuetto movements 
were particularly appreciated by the audience. Coming 
as it did, in its delicate grace after the allegro in 
which violin responds to piano with Bach-like faithful- 
ness, it formed a delightful and complete contrast to 
what had preceded it. Of course the gem of the evening 
was the performance of the famous sonata in A major. 
On a larger, grander scope than the other sonatas, re- 
quiring more maturity of interpretation and more sus- 
tained ability than the other two, it was truly a thing 
ot beauty and a joy forever. All the ripeness of Mr. 
Beel's work and the impersonal beauty ot Mr. Mc- 
Manus' playing evidenced themselves in the final ef- 
fort. It was magnificent." 



Johanna Kristoffy 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
Thoroash Vocal and Dramatic Training 



IS«* WashlnKto 



Franklin 1721 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO DANK) COMMERCIAL 
526 California Street, Sao FraoclBCo, Cal. 

Member of the Federal Refterve SyHtem 
Member of the Aaaoclated Savlnsa Baaka of Saa Franclaco 

MISSION BRANCH. Mlaaloo aod 31at Streeta 

PARK-PRBSIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clcmeot and 7th At«. 

HAIGHT STRBBT BRANCH, Halsht and Belvedere Streeta 

DECEMBER Slat, 1920 

Asseta „ »«»,878,147.01 

Deposits ee.a38,l47.0l 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,540,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 343,530.85 

OFFICERS — JOHN A. BUCK, Preatdent; GEO. TOURNY, Vice-President and 
Manager: A. H. R. SCHMIDT. Vice-President and Cashier; B. T. KRUSE, Vloe- 
President; A. H. MULLER, Secretary; WM. D. NEWHOUSE, Assistant Secretary; 
WILT.IAM HERRMANN. GEO. SCHAMMEL, G. A. BELCHER. U. A. LAUENSTETN, 
Assistant Cashiers; C. W. BEYER, Manager MiBSion Branch; W. C. HEYER. 
Manager Park-Presidio District Branch; O. F. PAULSEN, Manager Halght Street 
Branch; GOODFELLOW. EELLS. MOORE & ORRICK. General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRKCTORS— JOHN A. BUCK. GEO. TOURNY, E. T. KRUSE, 
A. H. R. SCHMIDT, I. N. WALTER. HUGH GOODFELLOW, A. HAAS. E. N. 
VAN BERGEN, ROBERT DOLLAR. E. A. CHRISTENSON. L. S. SHERMAN. 



ALCAZAR 

Less than four months after Nancy 
Fair appeared as the star in The Girl in 
the Limousine on the road, she is to 
again take the leading part in that pro- 
duction, which has been secured by Be- 
lasco & Mayer f^r presentation at the 
Alcazar Theater beginning next Sunday 
matinee. This is the first time in the 
theatrical annals in this city where a 
star and a complete production have been 
presented at popular prices so soon after 
the road tour. Nancy Fair achieved a 
distinct triumph in The Girl in the Lim- 
ousine, and the critics were loud in their 
encomiums after her appearance at the 
Curran last December. Her support at 
the Alcazar will, if anything, be superior 
to that sent out in the traveling com- 
pany from New York. 

The Acquittal is being well received at 
the Alcazar this week, where crowded 
houses are the rule. 



that Jolson has been the star of the 
Winter Garden, he has never before had 
such an ample budget of corking new 
songs, and in the singing of comic songs 
Al Jolson leaves all others far behind. 
In Sinbad he impersonates Inbad, the 
porter, which gives him ample opportu- 
nity for the display of all his extraordi- 
nary powers. With such an entertain- 
ment, backed by a large company, there 
is little doubt that the Curran Theatre 
will be filled to overflowing at every per- 
formance. 

Mary Nash, the gifted emotional ac- 
tress, will conclude her engagement to- 
night in the Spanish melodrama, Thy 
Name is Woman. 



CURRAN THEATRE 

Beginning Monday night at the Curran 
Theatre, AI Jolson, the world's greatest 
entertainer, will be the attraction in the 
Winter Garden's mammoth musical ex- 
travaganza, Sinbad. 

In Sinbad. there are fourteen glitter- 
ing, gorgeous scenes, through which the 
inimitable Jolson frisks and frolics, ca- 
pers and carols, producing gales upon 
gales of laughter. During the nine years 

M. ANTHONY LINDEN 

FAMOUS FLUTE VIRTUOSO 



MacArlbur Thcutre, Oakland 

Dr. Maxim De Grosz 

Musical Director 
1108 Fulton St. Ph. Fillmore 2869 



THE OPERA 

(Continued from Page 1, Col. 2) 
performance of La Tosca was not one 
of the strongest productions of the sea- 
son. Neither Rosa Raisa. nor Rimini, nor 
the orchestra, were at their best. The 
tempi were somewliat slow and the in- 
terpretation lacking in rhythm, accent 
and color. Edward Johnson was the best 
artist in the cast on (his occasion and 
did some excellent work. In justice to 
Rosa Raisa, however, it must be said that 
she was called before the curtain time 
and time again and cheered to the echo 
by her vast audience. But the season was 
sucii a splendid one, everyone was so 
happy and there was such uniform satis- 
faction that we do not wish to mar our 
critical review with any severit.v. Let us 
conclude the season with a hearty word 
of endorsement and thanks to Mary Gar- 
den and her associates. 



ADCLE ULMAN 




Pupil of Mme. Glacomo Minkowsky 


will 


accept a limited number of pupils 


for 


voice culture. Studio, 118 Commonwe 


alth 


Ave. Tel. Pac. 33. 





N, Y. PHILHARMONIC 

(Continued from Page 1, Col. 4.) 



A certain observing lady in the audi- 
ence called our attention to the careless 
attire of the musicians in the orchestra. 
She thought it would have been far more 
respectful toward San Francisco to dress 
somewhat more uniformly and fashion- 
ably, instead of coming attired In sack 
suits of varying colors. However, we 
have since been told that the orchestra 
was in too great a hurry to get out of 
the city to bring along extra suit cases 
containing proper apparel. 



The Principal Con- 
ductor of The 
Chicago Opera 
Association Indor- 
ses The Soloelle 




World Famous Conductor 
Successor to Mancinelli, as principal 
conductor in Rome, Italy; successor 
to Campanini, as principal conductor 
Royal Opera, Covent Garden, London, 
England; successor to Toscanini, as 
principal conductor Metropolitan 
Opera Company, and at present prin- 
cipal conductor of Tlie Chicago 
Opera Association, writes of the 

Soloelle 

The Tone- Coloring Solo Player Piano 

"I was a skeptic. The Soloelle surprised me beyond words 
to express and convinced me that at last a mechanism has 
been perfected which mirrors the musical moods of its 
operator. The wonder of the Soloelle lies in separate con- 
trols for melody and accompaniment, permitting treatment 
of the tone-coloring of melody and accompaniment individ- 
ually. This is entirely new and places the Soloelle firmly 
upon the artistic plane" 




The marvelous Soloelle enables you to play all the music you love 
best just as you love best to play it. It gives to you, yourself, the 
mastery of tone — the mastery of interpretation, even if ycu have no 
knowledge of the keyboard. 

It is a pleasure to show and explain to you the wonders of the 
Soloelle in our studios. 

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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



YOUNG VIOLIN MAKER A GENIUS OF HIS ART 

Alfred Lanlnl of San Jose Attracting Universal Atten- 
tion Because of His Fine Craftsmanship 

By EDWARD F. O'DAY 

Has Calitornia a native-born genius wlio is worthy to 
be added to the roll ot tame which is blazoned with 
the names of Stradavari and the Amati? 

Perhaps a strange question to ask, and yet there is 
living and worlting at San Jose a young violin-maker 
whose instruments have won the praises of the cog- 
noscenti. 

It is tiie purpose of this article to make lovers ot 
music acquainted with the name and work of Alfred 
Lanini, a young builder of fiddles. 

Artist-craftsmen are essentially modest; they shrink 
instinctively from wiiat is called "exploitation." They 
are content with their work, and care nothing for pub- 
lic applause. Perhaps they tell themselves that public 
applause for any kind of highly specialized accomplislv 
ment must be undiscriminating and therefore meaning- 
less. 

But the applause of music lovers for a violin-maker 
who excels in his craft is intelligent applause, and it is 
to win that sort of applause for Alfred Lanini of San 
Jose — provided he be found worthy of it — that he is to a 
certain extent "exploited" (liorrible word, is it not?) in 
this issue of our paper. M^e want, besides, to deserve a 
part of the honor of discovering him. 

-\lfred Lanini lives and works in the Garden City of 
the Santa Clara Valley. A young man, he has already 
accomplished a great deal. He has a wife and an infant 
son. And he has made twenty-seven violins, five 'cellos 
and three violas. A very respectable achievement for a 
man who is just turned thirty! 



youngest of their three children. Ho gave the average 
amount of attention to his studies at the Gonzalez pub- 
lic school, and all his spare time ho gave to mechanical 
work. 

"As long as 1 can remember," he told the present 
writer, "the violin has been my delight. It must have 
been the tlrst instrument I ever heard. Living in tlie 
country I had few opportunities for hearing any instru- 
ment, and doubtless my first hearing of violin music 
made a profound impression. And still, 1 cannot recall 
that first experience, much as I have tried to do so. 

"I wonder if on the occasion wiiich 1 strive in vain 
to recall, something was said in my hearing about the 
mystery that lies hidden in the tone and the construc- 
tion of the violin? Certainly that mystery has been an 
abiding wonder with me from the first dawn of con- 
scious thought. 

"When I was ten years old I tried my best to pene- 
trate that secret. I fashioned my first violin from cigar 
boxes." 

The Laninis retired from dairy farming and went to 
live in San Jose. There Alfred attended High School, 
and studied the violin at the Conservatory of IMusic. 
There too he made his first violin worthy of the name. 

"This first violin," he says, "I made under the in- 
struction of Dr. W. B. Hill of San Jose, an accom- 
plished amateur of the instrument and a good crafts- 
man. 

"When I thought I had learned ail I could from Dr. 
Hill, I tried to study under other violin-makers in this 
country. But I had no success. I found none that would 
accept me as a pupil. The invariable claim was violin- 
making could not be taught — that it was a gift. Some 
asked impossible sums for what they called their 
'secrets.' 

"One day I had the good fortune to examine a Pres- 




The Native-Born Young Violin 



Parts of tho Musical World 



AVorkshop in San Jose to All 



To make twenty-seven violins argues enthusiasm for 
the craft, and also a steady application to the work 
bench. To make twenty-seven good violins means that 
one has added to the music values of the world. If 
among those twenty-seven there are some exceptionally 
fine violins, then the maker deserves to be acclaimed. 

And experts of this city declare that Alfred Lanini 
has made some violins that are indeed exceptionally 
fine. 

All of Alfred Lanini's years since childhood have 
been enthralled by the spell of violin-making. It is the 
life-work to which he has devoted himself. It is more 
than an avocation with Alfred Lanini, It is a passion. 

Somewhere in the misty past the magic of the violin 
must have been glamoured upon an ancestor of this 
young man. His parents are not accomplished in instru- 
mental music. Giovanni Lanini, his father, and Carmela 
Badasci Lanini, liis mother, were born at Frasco, in the 
Canton of Ticino, Switzerland. Neither had a musical 
education, but from girlhood Carmela Badasci had a 
fine voice and sang in the church choir of EYasco. So 
far as is known there was never a violin-maker in the 
family, and Alfred Lanini's early preoccupation with 
this craft must be set down as a mystery of heredity. 
For violin-making was a very early preoccupation with 
Alfred Lanini. 

At the age of twenty (this was in 1876) Alfred's father 
Giovanni came from his native canton to Gonzalez in 
the Salinas Valley of California, and engaged in dairy 
farming. Ten years later Carmela Badasci followed him, 
and they were married on her arrival in IVIonterey 
County. Alfred, who was born in January, 1891, was the 



senda, and I was so struck by its beauty that I felt cer- 
tain that violin-making could not be in Italy the lost 
art that so many said it was. I decided to try in Italy 
for that additional instruction which I needed. 

"I arrived in Milan in 1912. There I heard about the 
great Antoniazzi. But what I heard was not reassuring. 
All who discussed Antoniazzi told me that he would 
not take a pupil. They added that although an artist 
in the first rank of violin-making, he was exceedingly 
hard to get along with and had very few friends. 

"Nevertheless I called upon him. Much to my sur- 
prise he insisted on seeing me make a violin. So I 
made one in his shop, under his eyes. The workman- 
ship must have been satisfactory, for he invited me to 
be his pupil. 

"The Antoniazzi method was unique, but it was a 
sound method, and there was tradition behind him. He 
had learned under his father and under Cerutti. And 
Cerutti was the pupil of Storioni. 

"Antoniazzi died before I had finished my course. But 
not before I had learned his method and style. He left 
all his tools and models to me. 

"I was his last pupil — the third he had accepted dur- 
ing a lifetime of fiddle-making. 

"Then I studied violin repairing under Farotti of 
Milan, a very good workman. In his shop I worked on 
some very fine instruments." 

Alfred Lanini returned to San Jose in 1914 and 
opened his present shop, a most interesting place to 
visit, as may be imagined. He finds San Jose, an excel- 
lent place in which to work. 

"The climate is proper for the work," he says, "and 



the surroundings are quiet, which is a great help In 
violin-making." 

And now for a tew hints about the technique of the 
craft. Hero are Lanini's words: 

"The best wood is native Italian tor backs, and Swiss 
pine for the tops. I use Italian wood when I <,an gel It, 
but mostly Tyrolean which is of very high grade. I have 
made very good violins of American wood, but It is 
hard to find suitable pieces, as there is no one that 
selects it in this country. 1 have never seen wood In 
California that would make a good violin. 

"I use the Guarnierius model a great deal, as I ad- 
mire its boldness. When 1 want something different I 
follow Camilli — sometimes Stradivari or Guadagnini. 

"I always make my own varnish, using a recipe given 
me by Antoniazzi, who claimed that it was Storionl's 
own. Certainly it is a very superior varnish, and with 
age it acquires a rich gloss. 

"It takes me two to tliree months to finish an instru- 
ment, depending on the weather. I average about twelve 
a year. 'That and repair work keep me busy." 

Busy indeed — and it may be added, happy. And who 
would not be happy, conscious that he was adding, as 
Alfred Lanini adds, to the audible beauty of mankind? 



MARSDEN ARGALL SINGS AT MILLS COLLEGE 

Gifted Young California Baritone Delights Large Au- 
dience at Lisser Hall of Famous College and 
Wins Brilliant Success 

By ELIZABETH WESTGATE 

About a year and a half ago I had genuine pleasure 
in writing for the Pacific Coast Musical Review a re- 
port of a recital given by a singer then not quite twenty 
years old. This young man, Marsden Argall, sang at 
that time an exigeanL program disclosing a beautiful 
basso cantante organ, musical intelligence of a high 
order and a stage presence instantly winning by man- 
liness, modesty and sincerity. And I advised readers to 
remember that name. Mr. Argall has spent the last 
year in New York, interrupting his college course for 
the time. He had lessons with Herbert Witherspoon, Ida 
Valeria, Tanara, former coach for the Metropolitan and 
Manhattan Opera Companies, and, others of equal re- 
nown. And last Tuesday evening at Lisser Hall, under 
the auspices of the Mills College Music Department. 
Mr. Argall sang the following program: Caro mjo Ben 
(Giuseppe Giordani), When the Roses Bloom (Reich- 
ardt), Plaisir D'Amour '(Giovanni Martini), Drink to 
Me Only with Thine Eyes (Unknown), Prologue. Pag- 
liacci (Leoncavallo), Chinese Mother Goose Rhymes 
(Bainbridge Crist), Ave Maria (Bach-Gounod), with 
'cello and violin obligate and piano and organ accom- 
paniment; Eili-Eili (arranged by William Armes Fish- 
er), Negro Spiritual, My Way's Cloudy (H. T. Bur- 
leigh), She is from the Land (Frank Lambert), Plead- 
ing (Edward Blgar), Calm as the Night-(Carl Bohm), 
Nina (Venetian Dialect) (Tanara). At Dawning (Cad- 
man), There Is No Death (O'Hara). It should be stated 
at the outset that the interpretations of all these varied 
songs was the singer's own. Possessing as a gift of 
heaven, a voice perfectly "placed" he has worked with 
his teachers on tone work exclusively. For that reason 
the artistic maturity of the conceptions revealed an 
unusual endorsement. 

The exquisite legato of the Caro mio Ben, the classic 
purity of the Reichardt song, the veiled disclosures ot 
Plaisir D'Amour, tlie aristocratic reticence of the Drink 
to Me Only, the exposition of all these attributes be- 
tokened not only innate taste but a promise scarcely 
measurable. The always acclaimed Prologue was given 
with a splendid abandon to the various moods depicted 
by the composer and with a richness of vocal material, 
a truly clever manipulation (if the word can be ac- 
cepted in this connection) of the voice. For encore to 
this a delightful song by Lohr called The Ringers, was 
sung with unction and a full and restrained apprecia- 
tion of its intrinsic humor. 

The Crist songs, miniatures charmingly done, were 
given with color and spirit and a most upsetting candor! 
Their wit is delicate, but it reaches. The young stu- 
dents of the college who assisted in the obligati and 
accompaniment of the Ave Maria played well, and with 
sympathy, and assisted in making this an interesting 
portion of the program. I am not sure that it suited Mr. 
Argall's temperament so well as most of the other 
numbers did, but it nevertheless was well done. The 
magnificent Hebrew song seemed entirely accordant 
with the singer's mood and made a deep impression. 
To the characteristic negro spiritual he brought a Just 
appreciation. The wistfulness of the Lambert song,new 
to most of us, the intense mood of pleading, the breath 
and fervor, of the favorite Bohm song, all these were 
given from the heart, surely. 

After this group, Mr. Argall was obliged to sing 
twice, first complimenting his accompanist, Frederic 
Maurer, by giving his agreeable composition, I Would 
My Song Were Like a Star, and then Le Bonte's rol- 
licking Irish Names. With unabated enthusiasm even 
after so exacting a list, the singer set forth the final 
three offermgs. There Is No Death was given with im- 
plicit conviction and ardor. 

Again I adjure music lovers to remember a name! 
Mr. Argall has resumed his course at Stanford but is 
anticipating further musical study next year. At twenty- 
one years of age to have accomplished so much is a 
feat not often duplicated. 



Mrs. Samuel Savannah gave a very dehghtful musi- 
cal at her home, 452 Pacheco street. Forest Hill, on the 
afternoon of April 23rd. Many guests were bidden to 
the affair and the program rendered was heartily appre- 
ciated by those present. Three very well known artists 
participated, namely: Mrs. Romayne Hunkins, Miss 
Lena Frazee and Mrs. Samuel Savannah, and the num- 
bers were excellently delivered, causing the guests to 
shower the artists with bursts of applause. 




ALICE 
GENTLE 

MEZZO 
SOPRANO 



HAENSEL & JONES 



JESSICA COLBERT 

lluililliiK, Snu FrnnclBco 



loxTmoum.v \Rv attu\ctio.\ 

MOST HK\1IIP||, |.;\smi|||.|.; 



RUSSIAN BALLET 



IlentleU by Ailolph 



LITTLE SYMPHONY 

I'uiirlrrn S<le,i,.,l IMnyiTs I nd,.r Dlrt-.-iion of 

GEORGE BARRERE 

HorlilV i;real.s< I li,l|»( 



fiRKF.K THi:\TKE 
liirkilc)- I. c. 

THIS SATURDAY NIGHT 



NEXT TWO SUNDAY AFTERNOONS 
MAY 1st and 8th 



TIckelii NOW ON SALE at Sheriiinn. Cloy & Co 
In San Frani-iseo and Oakland, and at Tupper 
Hrrd-K. VarKitT Candy Shot) and Co-«n sJoi-V 
Urrkeley. ... ^u on. :,iore 

l-RICES: fj^',0. »2.oo. »1..10. »l.00 (Tai Eilrn) 
ManaKrnirnI: SEI.llY C. OI'PENHEIMER 



EMERSON 
PIANOS 

Satisfying in Tone 
Dependable in Quality 
Reasonable in Price 

Sherman. Hay & Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clnjr Street*, Oakland 

Sacramento Freano Vallejo Stockton San Joae 

Portland Seattle Tacoaa Isokaao 



FRANK CARROLL GIFFEN 

TE*CHER OF SINOING 

»ll.% Cheatnut Street, near Hyde 

Appointment* by Phone — Proapect 3320 



Mrs. King- Clark Upham 

VOCAL STUDIOS 



Heine Buildinf; 
408 Slotilon Sr. 



TrUphime 
Ktartiy 6y6 



Maurice Lawrence 

ORCHESTRA CONDUCTOR 

lOBO WaahlnctoD St. San Francl.co 

Phone GarHeld D«9 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIKVV 



\d 




A Special 

Summer Course for Singers 

Is announced by 

John Whitcomb Nash 

The work will be given at one of the most charming and exclusive sum- 
mer resorts in Northern California 

The course should appeal especially to professional singers, teach- 
ers, coaches and accompanists. It comprises three two-week terms 
commencing Monday, July 4th. 

Lessons and Lectures will be massed, thus giving ample opportuni- 
ty to enjoy the out-of-doors. 

Full Particulars will be mailed upon request 

JOHN WHITCOMB NASH 

Vocal Studios: Kohler & Chase Bldg,, San Francisco 



AMERICAN PIANIST AT ORPHEUM 

Daisy Nellis, American pianist ot distinction, who 
safely may be compared with the very best of the day, 
is to play at the Orpheum next week. Her engagement 
opens on Sunday. 

This young woman possesses great talent, but among 
other qualities she has a youthful enthusiasm and a 
charming personality which greatly endears her to 
her auditors. 

Born at Kansas City, the daughter of an eminent 
surgeon, she began study ot the piano at the age of 
five and continued to work constantly since, always 
holding her art above the pleasures which would turn 
her attention in another direction had she heeded. 

Miss Nellis represents one of the American musi- 
cians who came to the front so rapidly that contem- 
porary American artists have as much prestige as those 
ot the old world. Her first musical training was ob- 
tained at home but she finished under the guidance ot 
Rudolph Ganz. 



Gaetano Merola 

Conductor 

MANHATTAN GRAND OPERA CO 

and 

SAN CARLO GRAND OPERA CO 

ANNOUNCES 

That he will spend ten weeks in San Francisco 

commencing 

JUNE Isl, 1921 

and will take a limited number ot pupils In voice, 
operatic coaching and tradition 

Inforniatlnn a« l„ tern.,, and time may he had now 

at .SIndIo, No. .17 CnflTncy llldB., 37(1 Sutler St. 

1'elephunc Kearny .-JW 



The San Francisco Musical Club gave a lovely concert 
consisting of the works by modern composers on the 
morning ot April 7th. Their next program will be on 
April 21st at Native Sons Hall and those participating 
will be Mrs. Umberto Rovere, Mrs. Anthony J. Silva, 
Mrs. Josephine Crew Aylwin, Mrs. Martha Drake Parker. 
Mrs. Arthur Hill, Mrs. Grace .Jones, Miss Helene All- 
mendinger. Miss Dorothy Dukes, Miss Audrey Beer, and 
iMrs. Thomas Inman. The Annual Jinks is scheduled to 
lake place on the evening ot April 28th at 8:30 p. m. 

Alice Davies Endriss presented a number of her stu- 
dents in a recital which took place at the Y. W. C. A. 
Auditorium, Oakland, on March 26th. The concert proved 
to be one of the most enjoyable of its type, for each of 
the many participating young violinists showed splendid 
training and unusual talent. The lengthy program was 
as follows: Scenes that are Brightest (Papinl Op. 79), 
Fred Dorward: Landler (Bohm), Gerald Billman; Twi- 
light Meditation (Devaux Op. 23), Norman Marvin; Song 
of the Troubadour (Charles Morley Op. 89), Russell Mor- 
ris; Miserere, from II Trovatore (Verdi), Ruby Nash; 
Valse Caprice (Arthur Seybold), Robert Swanson; Ga- 
votte (Gossecc). Amy Bourdieu; 5th Nocturne (J. Ley- 
bach, Op. 52). Winston Young; (a) Enlracte, from Car- 
men, (b) Orientate (Cui), Grace Waldman; Scene de 
Ballet (De Beriot). Raymond Ambrose; (a) Nocturne B 
flat major (Chopin), (b) Moment Musical (Schubert 
Kreisler), Lucile Cody; (a) To a Wild Rose (MacDow- 
ell), (b) Spanish Dance (Rehteld), Albert White; Rev- 
erie (Vieuxtenips), Schon Rosmarl (Kreisler), Raymond 



ELSIE COOK (M" E'«e Hughes) 

ENGLISH PIANIST 

Medalist Tobias Matthay Pianoforte School, 

London, Eng. 

SUMMER COURSE FOR 
TEACHERS 

In San Francisco, June 27th to August 6th 
ncludlng Teaching Principles and Interpretation 

. ... _ eralty Aye.. Palo Alto, 



Peraonal Addreaai 340 I 

California 



MISS AUDREY BEER 

I'lWIST AXD TE.4< HER 
Studio, 2U,1 Mctlnre St.. Oakland. Tue.day. and Wedaea- 



dayN In San 



l>r. o. w. Jonaa 



$400 



.. tOMKRT <iltAM> IMAXO 

nEAtTIKlI, CARVKD ROSKWIIOII CASE 

A FIRST CI.ASS I.\STm>lE\T 

"'""^="8 BO.X 240. PACIKIC COAST Ml Sl\-W. REVIEW 



Harriet Pasmore, fourth daughter of Henry Bicktord 
Pasmore, writing from Paris, reports enthusiastically 
about her singing and studying there. Her efforts in the 
latter direction are focused on French diction and reper- 
toire while as a singer she is being warmly welcomed 
in the French salons as well as among the Americans. 
Miss Pasmore notes that German songs are being sung 
in Paris a great deal. Recently Miss Pasmore sang af 
the home ot Mme. I>uvergey, meeting there Louis Au- 
bert, one of the leading t'rench composers much In the 
public eye. Mr. Aubert was very enthusiastic over Miss 
Pasmore's singing, saying that her voice was Just the 
one to succeed, not only for itself but because of its 
scarce variety, and offering to use his influence when 
Miss Pasmore felt that she needed it to get on in opera, 
which by the way Is reported to be very difficult with- 
out heavy financial backing, and a very strenuous life 
when achieved. Mr. Aubert gave Miss Pasmore a private 
interview, going over many delightful songs with her and 
offering to give her pointers whenever she wishi-d. Miss 
Pasmore finds that her ability lo play her own accom- 
paniments however difficult excites a great deal of 
amazement as does also her singing unaccompanied 
which she does Informally in studios where no piano Is 
available. So one leanis that the muslclanly singer Is 
rare even In Paris. 




ARGIEWICZ 

VIOLINIST 

Assistant Concert Master, S. 
F. Symphony— Director Vio- 
lin Dept. Ada Clement Music 
School— Seven years on Fac- 
ulty N. V. Institute of Musi- 
cal Art— Dir. Frank Dam. 
rosch. 



Spiritual and dittlnguithed.— Maun in Ex- 
aminer. 

Arglewicz wai in admirable form.— Brown 
In Chronicle. 

We do not hesitate to pronounce him a 
virtuoso of the flret rank.— Alfred MeUger 
in P. C. Muaical Review. 



Addreta Application* to the SaoraUry 

CLEMENT MUSIC SCHOOL 

3436 Sacramento St. Tel. Flllmora Ml 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SIGNIFICANT MUSIC 



I] 



BY ROSALIA H0U8MAN 
Leo Sowerby 

It is Willi positive deligiit tliat I talte pen in Imnd to 
write about tile music ot this young American composer. 
His work bears the spark of real genius, going through, 
at present perhaps, its hour of exuberant vitality, but 
when he has found his true expression (and sometimes 
I am sure he has), he will be the most significant note 
in our newer American music. The characteristic note 
he has already sounded is aggressive strength and abun- 
dant vitality, and he says it with a positiveness which 
makes one pause and listen. His published list is not 
extensive, hut very high in average. 

Mr. Sowerby comes from Grand Rapids, certainly not 
the place one expects to find genius. But America is a 
land of contradictions, as Sowerhy proves further by 
going to Chicago, studying there with that sterling or- 
ganist, Eric Delamater, and becoming identified with 
the music of the Windy City. He hecame not only a 
skilled organist, but is also an accomplished pianist, as 
he recentlv played his own concerto with the St. Louis 
orchestra 'This is the work heard here with Damrosch; 
the piano part was in the capable hands ot Robert 
Schmitz It was also Damrosch to whom we owe thanks 
for a hearing of the beautiful overture Come Autumn 
Time. 

I have received a representative collection of Mr. 
Sowerby's works, many of which are still unpublished, 
and with the exception of a chorale prelude for organ, 
issued by H. G. Gay & Co., all I have seen comes from 
the Boston Music Co. Mr. Engel has told me personally 
that he firmly believes in Leo Sowerby's genius as an 
expression of the present day American life, and so we 
have the overture, the violin and .piano senate, several 
anthems, and piano music. More will, I believe, he pub- 
lished soon. , ,. , 

The Chorale-Prelude is based on a melodic fragment 
from Palestina, and is for the concert or organist's 
repertoire. It calls for a 3 manual organ, and registra- 
tions are included. As the composer is a skilled or- 
ganist, it is- only natural that he will want his indica- 
tions carried out. From the musical side it is colorful, 
rich in the weaving ot the many voices, and takes ad- 
vantage ot the many possibilities of the instrument. I 
find it strong and well molded in design and splendid 
music throughout. Though very young (Mr. Sowerby is 
now but 26), he has a complete mastery of material and 
knows what he wishes to say. And that is personal and 
worth saying. Mr. Sowerby is hlunt, direct, hut not 
always simple in expressing himself. But that again is 
a keynote of our period. 

The Violin Suite challenges attention next. Here are 
four movements of the convention forms, a Gavot, Rig- 
adoon. Saraband, and Jig. Even in his spelling of these 
old dances Mr. Sowerby shows his freedom. It seems at 
first glance quite simple and unpretentious; look closer 
and you will find an untrammeled harmonic line, which 
has some of that acid sweetness characteristic of 
Maurice Ravel. I suspect a strong affection tor this 
French composer and his work in Mr. Sowerby. Perhaps 
because I have it too. But some of the progressions and 
general outlines in this significant music show the same 
subtleties and niceties ot style. The violinists' share 
abounds in modern devices and demands freedom and 
excellent bowing. I find the Rigadoon absolutely delight- 
ful. It is perhaps a little boisterous, hut in its very 
freshness lies its greatest charm. 

The Sarabande, with its fourths and other newer de- 
vices, has a broad flowing melody, showing us that though 
we may expect the most modern discords, we also have 
lovely sustained line as well. Mr. Sowerby's modernism 
is radical, but conscious, as it appears to be based on 
knowledge. The Jig will bear this out, with its bold 
progressions and strong rhythms. 

To turn to another side ot his work I want to call 
your attention to the three Anthems. The Lord Reign- 
eth, tor mixed chorus and organ, is suitable, in the 
Biblical text employed, for synagogue as well as church 
use, and is a brilliant choral setting. As a finale number 
tor chorus it is superb, and he has built a stirring climax. 
There is inspiration in every line. The Risen Lord, too, 
is strong, fine music, but I prefer the third, I Will Lift 
Up Mine Eyes, with its alto solo. This is the simplest 
and the most beautiful, showing a deeply devotional 
spirit. In every way, to quote the "Musician," the com- 
poser has given us all something out ot the ordinary. 

The two piano pieces. In My Canoe , and The Irish 
Washerwoman, are less significant, but interesting nOne 
'he less. So far, the best ot his tor piano which I know 
., the concerto, and I wrote ot that recently in discussing 
its New York priemiere. 

So let me finish my tew words by speaking ot the 
overture Comes Autumn Time. This had the record of 
eight orchestral hearings in this one season alone. And 
it is deserving ot it! It is scored tor a full modern or- 
chestra, including the usual number of horns, trom- 
bones, and strings, as well as four kettledrums, tuned 
on t, a, d, and e — cymbals, chromatic hells (which have 
a real melody assigned them), the tubula bells, harp, 
and celesta. This seems an exceedingly colorful aggre- 
gation, and Mr. Sowerby understands its many facets 
and plays upon it freely. Nowheres is there music purely 
for its own sake, though this music is full ot the joy ot 
youth and at times threatens to go out ot bounds. Mr, 
Sowerhy, however, is always the complete master of his 
medium, and uses the^e many instruments effectively. 
The title owes its origin to a poem of Bliss Carman, in- 
scribed on the score. There is a praiseworthy economy 
of material here, which is not the case with the piano 
concerto. This is pictorial music, brilliant in hue and 
always a blaze ot color. Its form is simple and direct, 
its appeal also, and I predict tor it as well as for its 
composer, a future ot equal brilliance and splendor. 



WEEK OF PIANO RECITALS IN NEW YORK 

Samoroff, Cottlow and Novaes Attract Enthusiastic 

Audiences — Sophie Braslau and Galll-Curci Sing 

Before Crowded Houses — Schumann 

Club Gives Excellent Concert 

By ROSALIE HOUSMAN 

New York, April 16, 1921. 
The National Symphony Orchestra is still holding 
its own at Carnegie Hall, and at its last concert fea- 
tured Dohnanyi as soloist in the Emperor Concerto of 
Beethoven, and also programmed Smetana's overture 
to the Bartered Bride, and Tschaikowsky's Fourth Sym- 
phony. What a relief it is to hear this so seldom played 
and interesting music. To me it is worth a dozen 
Pathetiques, and it was most beautifully played. And 
an enthusiastic audience acclaimed it noisily, proving 
their keen interest in it. I hope we will hear it more 
frequently on next season's programs. But the eve- 
ning's important event was the Dohnanyi playing of the 
Beethoven Emperor Concerto. Here was an interpreta- 
tion in a heroic mold, worthy of the divine inspiration, 
and Dohnanyi gives one the impression of reserve 
power and poetry that I remember D'Albert for. He is 
the most inspiring artist we have had this season. 

Sophie Braslau filled Carnegie Hall the same after- 
noon with her annual recital. She has grown enor- 
mously, not only in her vocal equipment, but in imagin- 
ation and the delicate subtleties of her interpretations. 
Her voice is one ot the most remarkable of any ot the 
present contraltos, with its power of infinite expression 
and color. Interesting in classic repertoire and in the 
more modern songs, yet it is in the Russian art songs 
that her personality is most felt, and there is no one 
doing the Moussorgsky songs, with her penetrating in- 
sight and passionate love ot color. She well deserved the 
long and sincere applause of all her admirers. 

Galli-Curcl at the Hippodrome had about six thou- 
sand people to hear her that same evening, and at the 
Metropolitan the opera concert, in which fourteen stars 
appeared, drew a full house. 

Monday night, the 11th ot April, was eventful be- 
cause ot the second concert ot the Schumann Club at 
which the prize-winning cantata was sung. It was a 
tantasie on a Russian Folksong, by Samuel R. Gaines, 
and in its performance, lasting about twenty minutes, 
two violins and piano, as well as chorus, were em- 
ployed. Taking it all in all, it was too long, and had too 
many repetitions, hut it is a well written work, and 
shows skill in the handling ot voices. Of far greater 
interest was the setting of Pan, by David S. Smith ot 
Yale, with a beautiful solo tor oboe, and an expressive 
hit for solo soprano. The program was devoted to 
American music, and the New York Chamber Music 
Society contributed, to every one's delight, by playing 
the tour delightful pieces of Deems Taylor, Through 
the Looking Glass. They show skill, imagination and a 
spontaneous sense ot fun which is really refreshing. 
The singing ot the club was on a par with its usual 
excellence, with accurate attack, an appreciation ot the 
pitch and perfectly understandable English. Percy Rec- 
tor Stephens is to be congratulated in having such a 
responsive choir, but they are more to be felicitated in 
having a man ot Mr. Stephens' musicianship and ability 
tor their conductor. The unity of ideals between them 
is unusual and praiseworthy. 

Samaroff has finished her series of eight recitals, 
having played all the Beethoven piano senates, and 
played them beatifuUy. It was one of the most inter- 
esting events ot a full season, and was well attended. 

Planistically the end of the week proved more inter- 
esting, with Augusta Cottlow's annual recital on Friday 
afternoon, April 15th, at Aeolian Hall. Her program 
was delightfully unconventional and unhackneyed, a 
relief to audiences and reviewers alike. She gave the 
MacDowell Eroica Sonata as the principal offering, and 
her playing ot this glorious sonata was in every way 
worthy ot the composition. The sincere and noble lines 
of the work were expressively played, and the tender- 
ness ot the second theme of the first movement stirred 
one deeply. MacDowell is America's pride, it is ours, that 
we have in Miss Cottlow an American who plays him 
so beautifully for us. There were also two of Chas. 
Grittes' compositions on her program — The Vale ot 
Dreams, and Night Winds, both mood music, and played 
with poetic insight. Frederick Ayers, of Colorado 
Springs, was represented by a clever piece called the 
Voice ot the City, which has spirit and rhythmic inter- 
est. There were three choral preludes of Bach ar- 
ranged by Busoni (whose pupil Miss Cottlow was), 
and a group of Chopin, including the Berceuse and the 
Barcarolle. And throughout its taxing length Miss Cott- 
low was always musically interesting, imaginative, and 
with a sense of power unusual in pianists, men and 
women. It was one of the most pleasurable ot a full 
season's concerts. 

Miss Guiomar Novaes gave her final concert at Aeol- 
ian Hall on Saturday afternoon, April 16th, with the 
liall crowded to capacity. And what a beautiful pro- 
gram it was! There was the Chopin B minor sonata, 
which, as far as I am personally concerned, no one 
plays as wonderfully, several short things ot Albeniz, 
and the Carneval for good measure. There were many 
other things, and certainly the afternoon's tour-de-torce 
was an arrangement of the Scherzo ot Mendelssohn's 
Midsummer Night's Dream. Much as one deplores these 
transferred things, yet we must admit that to hear Miss 
Novaes subtly recall the orchestra with her delicate 
touch is worth it, and it brought her the most spon- 



laneouH applause of the day. 1 havH written before of 
her magnetism, her dynamic sense of rhythms and 
rubato, and each time I hear her I am more enthralled 
by these qualities in her playing, which make her 
unique among the many we hear. I was conscious of an 
orchestral wealth ot color in this recital, and was In- 
terested to read Aldrlch's comment to trie same effect. 

Boris Godonouw was restored to the repertoire of 
the Metropolitan Opera House for one performance 
Saturday evening, with Didur in the title role and sev- 
eral changes in the long cast. It was exceptionally well 
sung, and as I have heard it countless times, I teel I 
can judge. Diaz as Dmitri, Jeanne Gordon as Mariana, 
were a few ot the newcomers, and acquitted themselves 
splendidly. 

Walter Damrosch, conductor ot the New York Sym- 
phony Orchestra, has accepted an invitation from Lord 
Howard deWalden, president of the British Music So- 
ciety, to conduct the London Symphony Orchestra for 
one of the concerts of the Congress ot the British 
Music Society, to be given June 16th, when Mr. Dam- 
rosch will present American compositions. Mr. and Mrs. 
Damrosch with their two daughters, the Misses Polly 
and Anita Damrosch, will sail on the French liner, 
S. S. Lorraine, April 30th. 



DELIGHTFUL OAKLAND CONCERT 

The Joint Recital to he given on Thursday evening, 
May 5th, at Ebell Hall, in Oakland, by Eva Garcia, pian- 
iste, and Grace LePage, lyric soprano, has already 
aroused considerable interest in the musical world of 
this Bay region, the music lovers one and all looking 
forward to this affair with the keenest ot pleasure. 

The following program will be rendered: Toccato and 
Fugue (Bach-Tausig), Eva Garcia; Polonaise, Mignon 
(Thomas), Grace LePage; Spring's Singing (MacFay- 
den). The Bitterness ot Love (Dunn), Grace LePage; 
Concon (Daquin), Nocturne F Sharp (Chopin), Foun- 
tain (Douillet), Miss Garcia; Si, Michiamano MImi, from 
La Boheme (Puccini), Gracia, in Spanish, (Granados), 
Grace LePage; Scherzo, B flat minor (Chopin), Eva 
Garcia; A Fairy's Love Song (Spross), Homing (Del 
Riego), Rain (Curran), Grace LePage. 



JOINT RECITAL 

by 

Eva Garcia 



PIANISTE 

and 



Grace LePage 

LYRIC SOPRANO 

EBELL HALL 

Harrison Street Near 14th Street 
Oakland 

Thursday Evening, May 5 

Tickets $1.00 (including War Tax) 



DAISY NELLIS 

America's Pianist of Distinction 

Begins a week's engagement this Sunday 
afternoon in a repertoire of good music. 

Also a Regular Orpheum Show 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 



OBklaad. Telephone Pte<meat 9rT0. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Cecil Fanning 

Baritone 

H. B. TURPIN, AccomranUt 

AddrcBsi L. K. Behrmer, Auditorium BIdK.. 
I'Oa Aaselea, Cat., or Hra. J«aalca Colbert, 
401 Hearat BIdv.. San Fraorlafo, Cal. 

KAJETAN ATTL 

HARP VIRTUOSO 
SolulHt Snii Fraiioldco Symphony Orehei*- 
Im. Available tor Cooccrta, Kecliala nud 



Jean Criticos 

SclentlOc Kmlaalon of Voice 

nea. Stiidlot 321 HlehUnd Ave., Piedmont 

Tel. Piedmont 78J 

In Kohler & Chaae Bids. 

Studio 706— Mon.. Weil, ond Fri. 

PAUL STEINDORPF 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languages 

5302 Broadway .... Oakland 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

PIANO 

1S04 Larkln St. 

Phone Frnuklln 821S 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 

PIANIST 
Stndio! 1537 EuFlId .Vvenue. Berkele}'. 
Phone Berkeley 0006. 

MISS EMILIE LANCEL 

MEZZO SOPRANO 

Concert and Opera 

i33 18th Ave. Phone Bay Vtevr 1461 

ZHAY CLARK 

SOLO HARPIST 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE ORCHESTRA 



Mrs. William Steinbach 

VOICE CULTURR 

Studio: 

002 KOHLBR A CHASE RLDG. 

San Franclac o Phone; Kearny 54M 

MISS CHRISTINE HOWELLS 

Fl.l'TiST 
AvBllnble for Concerts aN Sololnt or for 
ObllfEato Work. Rea., Belvedere. Marin 
ronnty. Tel. Belvedere IIW 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRALTO 
Volee Culture. Suite "C" Kohler Jk Chase 
llaildlnc. Telephone Kearor K4K4. 

ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

ORGANIST ST. MARVS CATHEDRAL 

PInno Department, Hamlin School 
OrKan nud PInno, Arrltlaien Mualcnl Colleee 

ANIL DEER STUDIO 



JOSCPH B. CAREY 

roni|M>ner and Arrnnieer of Mualr 
IIOHidenco Studloi 37H (ioldru (inte A«r., 
I'rnuklln TOM. PnntnKeH Theatre IIMk.. 
Siin KmnrUeo. GarMeld -ir^t. 

MISS FRANCES MARTIN 

<'<)\ri-:ilT PIANIST AND TKACHER 
ll.-«. Studio: »01 GeorKia St.. Vnllejo, Cal. 

MRS. EDWARD E. BRUNER 

SOPRANOi ATallnble (or Encasement. 
Stndloi 8M 43rd Are. Phonei Pac. S330 

VICTOR LICHTCNSTEIN 

VIOI.IMS T— tONUI < TOR— LlOt Tl HKK 
l'u|ill» Accepted In Vlullii uuil lOii.emhI.. 

IMnMuic 

Studio 701 Heine UldK. Stucklon nr. Sutler 

I'hono! Suiter :12.VI; Keurny U7II 

LOUISE BREHANY 

Voice Culture 

DIplouin Rojnl Aeudeni], Rome. Italy. 
000 Kohler * Chn.e BIdK. Phone Kenrnx 



:MS4. Ke 



Pho 



e: Franklin 408* 



ETHEL A. JOHNSON 

SOPRANO 

llember University Extension Facull 
btudio: 50b Kohler & Chase Bldg. 



Miss Lena Frazee 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware LcOHOra ThompSOn 



ANDRE FERRIER 
H7» Washlneton Si. Tf|. Franklin 3322 



MARGARET JARMAN CHEESEMAN 
701 Post St. Tel. Franklin 6620 



OTTO RAUHUT 
li.l? Arguello Blvd. Phone Pacific 3611 

HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Paclfle 4(74 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Keamy 14(4 

MME. OE QRA88I 
23.-{5 Russell St.. Berk. Tel. Bprk, 1724 

G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter Street Phone Kearny MIT 

ORLEY SEE 
1004 Kohler A Chue Bldr TU. Done KTt 

SOLO PIANISTS AND ACCO.If PANISTS 

HAZEL M. NICHOLS 
570 Merrimac St.. Oak. Lakeside 643B 



BROOKS PARKER 
Palace Hotel, San Francisco 



Phone Kearny R454 



Pupil of Mile. Theodor 

Kosloff. Pavley and Oukrainsky. 
s or private instruction in charai 
interpretive and ballet dancing 



CL.\RIXET 



H. B. RANDALL 
1770 Grove St, West 80S4 



SOFIA NEWLAND NEUSTADT 

VOICE CULTURE 
Diction — Repertoire — Conchlnt; 
o: 53 Hamilton Place, ~ ■ " 
Fiaeo, ^Vednesday nud 
Kohler A ChoHe Building. 

MISS ETHEL PALMER 

ADA CLEMENT PIANO SCHOOL 

<te>ldence Studio, 204 \ Street, San Rafael 

Telephone San Rafael 842-J 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

2001 California St., San Francisco. Tel. 
Fillmore 2539. Institute of Music, K. & 
C. Bldg.. Tel. Kearny 5454. 



Regulating and Repairing and Playe 



School of Piano Tuning 



SUZANNE PASMORE-BROOKS 

PIANIST 
StDdlo.i 54m Kohler & Chaae Bide.; 1717 
Vallejo St., S. F.[ 2004 Garker Sl„ Berkeley. 

PERCY A. R. DOW 



Oceaa view Dr„ Oakland (Re.lden 

DOUILLET CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

ITn Jaekja«B it. Saa Fr«Del«e«, CmL 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST COMPOSITION 

atndlo, ««S-S4M KOHLER * CHASE BLDG. 
Phone Kearny M&4 



MRS. CHARLES POULTER 

MIfWLAno St. Andrewa Okorch 

Valee Citltnre. Plana. 588 27th 9I„ Oak- 
land. Tel. ie7>. Kakler A Chaaa Bldc_ 
WadMadara T*L K_.r>y MS4. 



Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 



Pkona FUlmore 1847 



SIR HENRY HEYMAN 



43-1 Spmce Street. Phone Fillmore llSl 



RUDY SEIGER 

General Mu.leal Director 
D. U. Lln,ird Hotel. Palace and Fair 
In San FrancUca 



Geo. Stewart McManus, Pianist 



FREDERICK MAURER 

Cher of Piano and Harmony, 
chine. Studloi 1720 Le Ro 
erkeley. Phone Berkeley 539. 

Ada Clement Music School 

3435 Sacramento St. Phone Fillmore 898 

MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 



Brandt's Conservatory of Music 



Mr.. Noah Brandt, Plan 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Suprnuo SoloiNt, Temple Emnnu Bl. Con- 
vert nud Cbnreh Work. Voval Inatrut- 
tlon. S:i30 Clay St., Phone West 4800. 



Kearny 2265 



Leonard A. Baxter 

Dramatic Studio 

41 Grove St.. Near Larkin— Civic Center 

ProfeHHionnl lu.tructlon In 

Actlngrt Sfnare Technique, Fenclns:. 

Mnke-np, Voice and Expre.alon 

Special Class for Children in Dancing 
Saturday Afternoons and by Appointment 

Ruth Degnan 



FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF EXPERTS IN 

MANUFACTURING AND REPAIRING OF 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



BAND AND ORCHESTRA 



242S Pine St. 



TE.\CHER OF 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



SIGISMONDO MARTINEZ 
661 Hyde Street Phone Franklin 821J 

ELIZABETH SIMPSON 
2518H Etna St.. Berkeley. Tel. Berk. 1110 

MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 

MRS. JANET ROWAN HALE 

901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

ETHEL DENNY 

904 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 5454 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
3406 Clay St. Tel. Prosp. 3208 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way, Berkeley, Cal. 

MABEL MARBLE 
901 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 5454 

WALTER FRANK WENZEL 
1916 Golden Gate Ave. Fillmore 473:1 



MRS. OLIVE REED CUSHMAN 
433 Elwood Ave., Oakland. Tel. Oak. 6164 



BOLANDER INSTRUMENT CO. 

54 Kearny Street Douglas 3340 

H. C. HANSON MUSIC HOUSE 
140 O'Farrell St. Sutter 4467 

REED AND MOUTHPIECE MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 

789 Mission St. Sutter 63BB 



PHONOGRAPH REPAIRING 



PHONOGRAPH SERVICE STATION 
539 Valencia St. Park 2222 



F. A. LUTZ 
45 Geary St. Douglas 2127 



MAX W. SCHMIDT 
216 Pantages Bldg, Oakland 



RELIABLE PIANO TUNERS AND 
REPAIRERS 



DEITEMEIER PIANO CO. 

S.SJ Valencia Street Mission 477 



MR. H. J. MORGAN 
69 Halght St. Mission 3660 



COSTUMEHS 

GOLDSTEIN & CO. 

SS3 Market St. San Francisco 

STUDIO TO SUB-LET 



JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 

BARITONE 

11011 lluah Street. San Frnncl.co 
Realdence Phone Franklin 50«8 



Marion Ramon Wilson 

CONTRALTO 
Opera and Concert. European CredentlAI. 
1801 CallfornU It. Tel. Proapeet XSIO. 



Marie Hughes Macquarrie ^ary Coonan McCrea 



Solo Harpist and Accompanist 

Harpist Trio Moderne 

1115 Taylor St. Tel. Franklin 8425 

ROSGOE WARREN LUCY 

PIANIST AND TEACHER 



TEACHER OF SINGING 

Ea.e of Production and Purity of Tanc 

S7« Sutler SI. ITnea.. Wed. and Tknra.) 

ALEXANDER GROMOFF 

Art— Science Vocal Culture 

1103 Kohler A t.'haae BIdir. 

Hour, r, to II p. m. Phone DooRlaaa 5432 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

.■iOl Spruce Street Pacific 1670 



ESTHER MUNDELL 

376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 



MME. M. TROMBONI 
Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny B4S4 



JOHN A. PATTON 
900 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6464 



VIRGINIA PIERCE ROVERE 
2139 Pierce St., San FYanclsco 



EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

Edwin H. Lemare's weekly organ re- 
citals. Interrupted by Ihe opera season, 
will be resumed on Sunday evening at 8 
o'clock at the Exposition Auditorium, 
when his program will be as follows: 
Prelude to Lohengrin (Wagnerl: Morning 
Serenade (l.emarel: Gavotte Modem 
(Lemarel: Canzonna de la Sera (D'Et- 
ryl; Allegro Moderato. from unfinished 
Symphony In B Minor (Schubert); Im. 
provisatlon on brief theme; Acatlemic 
Festival Overture (Brahms). 



Tessle — "Agnes always finds something 
lo harp on." 

Hessle — "Yes; I only hope she'll be as 
fortunate In the next «,,i|rl "— N v. U. 
Alumnus. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




WAGER SWAYNE 

PIANIST AND ARTIST TEACHER 
of PARIS «nd NEW YORK 

Now in San Francisco 

2404 Broadway Telephone Fillmore 1905 

Pupilj Prtpared for Public Playing 



FOLKS NEED A LOT OP LOVINOi br K. A. Cltn 

MY mV IS LIKE A BED, RED ROSEi br C. Blooit 

Two New SotiKM for Medium Voice 

i are songs that have that human appeal that finds an Insla 
the human heart. 
Published by Clayton F. Summy Co., Chicago, and for sal 
Heary Grobe, 13:^ Keliniy ^t'> Han FranclNCo 



An Aspiring Young Artist either iB ambitious or indifferent. If he Is ambltlius he 
■wants to become famous and he can not become famous without publicity— he can 
not obtain publicity without advertising. 



Cal i r onvi a 



Seventh Grand Concert 

SEASON 1921-22 

Sunday, May 1, 1921, 11 A. M. 

ALEXANDER SASLAVSKY 

Russian Violinist 

offering 

Vieuxtemps' D minor concerto 

California Theatre Orchestra 
HERMAN HELLER, Conductor 

I iiiTI I rriiKi^ 




ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

Published By 

THE BOSTON IVIUSIC CO. 

THE JOHN CHURCH CO. 

G. SCHIRIVIER 

Frequently Seen on Programs of 

GRAVEURE, IVIACBETH, EASTON, JORDAN, 

WERRENRATH 

And Many Other Distinguished American Singers 

TAPS (Baritone or Contralto) 2 Keys 

THE LOOK (Lyric Soprano) 2 Keys 

TARA BINDU (Mezzo) 

RIM OF THE MOON (Tenor) 2 Keys 

TIDALS (Baritone or Contralto) 

For Sale at All Leading Music Houses 



Now Ready: Two New Books for Rhythmic 
Development in Children 

RHYTHMIC SONGS 

For Kindergarten and Primary Gradeit 
2. 

Rhythmic Stunts and Rhythmic Games 

^Vo^dH and MohIc 

abbie: gerrish-jones 

AdnptloDH and DeMcrlptionM 
OUVE B. W'lLSON-DORRETT 

These games were compiled to meet the demand 
for a new type of rhythmic material, the result of 
the needs of the children in the Demonstration 
Play School, University of California. Mrs. Dor- 
rett has had many interesting experiences in test- 
ing rhythmic games in this school and those 
offered in the collection were tried out during the 
summer session of 1920. 

PRICB «1.00 AND POSTAGE 

WESLEY WEBSTER, Publisher 
San Francisco 



S CHUMANN-HEINK 

Assi^ed by KATHERINE HOFFMANN at the Piano 

Season 1920-21 — Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New^ York 



I 




The Official Piano of The Opera 





ALESSA5JDR0 BOBICI 



LUCIEN MIIRATORE 



What is more natural than that the greatest operatic organization of the world 
should choose as its official piano the most beautiful and costly instrument ever 
created — individually and enthusiastically the artists of this great galaxy of stars 
voice their admiration and enthusiasm for the Mason & Hamlin. Among them are 



ROSA RAISA 
CYRENA VAN GORDON 
ALESSANDRO BONCI 
VIRGILIO LAZZARI 



LUCIEN MURATORE 
PIETRO CIMINI 
GENO MARINUZZI 
CARLO CALEFFI 



GEORGES BAKLANOFF 
EDWARD JOHNSON 
GIACOMO RIMINI 
FOREST LAMONT 



At our stores from Portland, Oregon, to San Diego, Mason & Hamlin Pianos 
in all styles, Grands and Uprights are shown. We invite a critical test and hear- 
ing of them. 



Tw^o Entrances 
135-153 Kearny and 117-125 Sutter Sts. 
Victor Talking Machines 




"-^ilgy^B Allen® 



-MASON AND HAMUN HANOS- 




Oakland— 1209 Washington Street 

San Jose— 199 South First 

Sheet Music 



J THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOUR.NAL INI THE GREAT WEST III 



VOL. XL. No. 6 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, MAY 7. 1921. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



BOLM-BARRERE COMBINATION DELIGHTS THIRD CLUB CONVENTION IN LOS ANGELES 



Barrere and His Little Symphony Prove Unique and Entertaining Feature 

— Bolm Ballet Exhibits Graceful and Varied Intepretations of 

Terpsichorean Art — Large Audience Enjoys Novel 

Combination of Music and Dancing 



Mrs. Bessie Bartlett Frankel, State President, and Mrs. Belle Ritchie, 

Vice-President, Officially Open Session With Interesting Addresses 

at Alexandria Hotel — Concert of Church Music at Baptist 

Temple Church Crowded to the Doors 



By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

An attraction which caused this sea- 
son's rich musical festivities to reach a 
most appropriate climax was the Adolph 
Bolra Russian Ballet and the Little Sym- 
phony of which George Barrere is the 
director. Selby C. Oppenheimer present- 
ed this unusual offering to this city's lov- 
ers of art at the Columbia Theatre on 
Sunday afternoon. May 1st. This is not 
the first time that San Francisco music 
patrons have had the privilege of hear- 
ing George Barrere, for it was only a 
season or two past that lie, as a mem- 
ber of the Trio de Lutece, appeared here. 
If he succeeded in charming these music 
lovers then he more than repeated this 
accomplishment on this occasion. By this 
time everyone who is familiar with the 
name of George Barrere must surely real- 
ize that anything he is associated with 
artistically must be of the very highest 
standard in music. 

This miniature orchestra, consisting of 
fourteen musicians, is characteristic for 
the absolute polish and the finesse it at- 
tains throughout its programs. Never at- 
tempting numbers but those which are 
absolutely suited to an orchestra of this 
size Mr. Barrere and hi.s Little Sym- 
phony played for us several exquisite 
compositions, consisting of one of the 
older Fi-ench masters, Gretry. a more 
modern composition by Gabrielle Pierne, 
and a delightful suite by the American 
composer and conductor, Henry Hadley. 

This small body of players is abso- 
lutely qualified in every degree to reveal 
the delicacy and the beauty so prevalent 
in worlts of the early composers who 
wrote many more chamber music compo- 
sitions than do our writers of today. The 
modernists are composing more for the 
augmented orchestras. So it was really 
a revelation to hear the lovely interpre- 
tation that Mr. Barrere and his men gave 
to the Gretry's Cephale et Procis. Gretry 
may be termed the French Mozart and 
there prevails in his music the same 
grace, spirit and pure melodious strains 
which stamped his works as being 
classic gems. Barrere attains a beauty of 
phrasing and tonal coloring which can 
scarcely be surpassed while the musical 
balance has never been approached by 
any other orchestra of this type. The 
Hadley composition is light but refresh- 
ing and melodious, absolutely representa- 
tive of the subject the composer had in 
mind. 

It would be mere folly to try to de- 
scribe In words the gorgeous playing of 
George Barrere. Tliis master of one of 
the most intricate instruments, the flute, 
can be appreciated only by those who 
heard him. They alone reveled in the 
perfection of his art. This artist has a 
tone of the most exquisite quality, vi- 
brant, fresh and full. His art of coloring 
and shading is most alluring for its 
warmth, mellowness and appeal. The ex- 
treme high tones tliat he produces with 
the instrument are not unlike the tones 
of the singer Tetrazzini in tlieir crystal- 
line clarity and purity. The audience was 
spellbound during his solo work and then 
applauded Mr. Barrere vociferously. 

Now that our ears were satisfied our 
eyes had to be recompensed. Tliey, too, 
were rewarded with a feast of choreo- 
graphic presentations. The dances ar- 
ranged by Adolph Bolm and liia liussian 
Ballet revealed in every detail of technic, 
stage settings, magnificence of costuming 
and lighting effects the master liand of 
a genius. Their repertoire is both novel 
and original while the interpreters consist 
of artists who have completely mastered 
the terpsichorean art. Adolph Holm is ever 
entrancing to the admirers of pantomime 
and the artistic dance, lie is more the 
athletic type of dancer than the poetical. 
There is a virility as well as masculinity 
in his plastic poses and his gestures. 



His Spanish dances seemed to catch 
the fancy of the audience to such a de- 
gree that a repetition would have been 
more than welcome: however. Mr. Bolm 
reached a higher point in his artistry 
when he danced the Assyrian Dance, the 
music of which was written by Samin- 
sky. This gave him the opportunity to 
develop many attractive pictures in har- 
monious positions and steps. There is 
slight wonder that Mr. Bolm enjoys the 
reputation of being one of the world's 
foremost male dancers, for when it comes 
to his conveying spirit, histrionic ability 
and authentic style I doubt whether he 
has a superior. 

One of the most charming bits of danc- 



By BRUNO DAVID USSHER 
Los Angeles, May 2. 1921.— The third 
State Convention of the California Fed- 
eration of Music Clubs opened very aus- 
piciously Sunday evening with a concert 
of church music at the Baptist Temple 
Church. Two thousand seven hundred 
people filled the vast auditorium to the 
last seat and listened with rapt atten- 
tion to the sacred strains which were 
selected from the days of the early 
Church Fathers up to modern anthems. 
The illustrious program was a wonderful 
gift of the federated music clubs to the 
public of Los Angeles, who duly appreci- 
ated it. Altogether the program was a 
most fitting preludium to the convention 
of an orsiinization as this, whose objects 




Ing was by Ruth Page, who was most 
effective in a waltz, the music of which 
came from the pen of Cliopin. She was 
most spiritual to behold and the light- 
ness and daintiness of the dance were 
beautifully personified through the grace 
of her steps. Enthusiasm reigned and 
applause poured forth during the after- 
noon in torrents. It was easily seen that 
the efforts of the Little Symphony and 
the Russian Ballet had been the source 
of endless pleasure and entertainment to 
all present. I am quite sure that many 
who were present will again avail them- 
selves of another artistic feast by at- 
tending the next and last concert of thia 
remarkable organization on Sunday, May 
8th. 



include the highest musical ideals for 
the State, the Nation and the world in 
general. 

Suffice it to say in this advance report 
that the proceedings of the first day took 
a most satisfactory and harmonious 
course. The Monday morning session was 
devoted mainly to business matters. In- 
cluding a rousing welcome from the State 
President, Mrs. Bessie Frankel, an ]m- 
])ressive reply from Mrs. Bello Ritchie of 
Fresno, vice-president at large, who spoke 
on behalf of the delegates, summing up 
beautifully tlio ideals of the federation, 
and of Mrs. Grace ^^■idney Mabee, who 
as State Chairman of the Convention 
gave an excellent report. Mrs. Gertrude 
Ross, who surpassed herself In arranging 



a valuable and interesting program (see 
last issue of April 30th), very graciously 
handed the printed program to the presi- 
dent, Mrs. Bessie Frankel, instead of a 
report, adding in the tersely humorous 
strain so typical of her. that "this is the 
report, 'subject to change.' " Among the 
other reports were those by the treas- 
urer, Mr. Julius Seyler, and of Mrs. Mat- 
tison B. .Tones, first vice-president and 
chairman of tlie extension work, who 
communicated that the federation had 
nearly doubled in size. Twenty-nine clubs 
had been added during the last year, 
bringing the total to 61 clubs. 

Of special Interest during the after- 
noon session were two motions presented 
by Mrs. Mattison B. Jones, which were 
both unanimously adopted. One calls loi 
the incorporation of the State Federation 
under the laws of California. The other 
covers the acceptance of the amendments 
to the By-Laws as set forth in the Federa- 
tion Bulletin for April, so ably edited by 
Charles Draa. Today's sessions were held 
in the Alexandria Hotel, where also to- 
night's reception will be given. 



Behymer Improving 

Manager L. E. Behymer Is progressing 
excellently on the road of convalescence 
and will leave the hospital in about two 
weeks. I expect to have a chat with him 
this week. 

Philharmonic Orchestra on Tour 

Glowing reports are received here about 
the great successes of the Philharmonic 
Orchestra while on the road. The orches- 
tra will play in Seattle on ihe 9th, the 
10th at Spokane, the 11th at .Missoula, 
Wash., the 12th at Deer Lodge, the 13th 
at Butte, the 14th at Helena, the 15th at 
Billings, Mont., the 17th at Fort Collins, 
the 18th at Greeley, the 20th at Colorado 
Springs, the 21st at Denver, Colo., the 
23rd at Salt Lake City, the 24th at Ogden. 
I'tah, the 25th at Reno. Nev., and the 26th 
at Fresno. It will reach Los Angeles the 
following day. While on tour Harry Bell. 
the publicity director of the orchestra, 
who also booked and arranged the entire 
tour, is acting as manager of the organ- 
ization. 

Richard Buhlig's Piano Clan 

Upon his return from the tour with the 
Philharmonic Orchestra of Los Angeles 
Richard Buhllg will conduct a class in 
The Art of Piano Playing in all its aspects 
of interpretation, style and technic. at 
912 West 20th street, Los Angeles, Cal., 
during six weeks beginning Friday, June 
3rd. 

The course will comprise 12 sessions, 
on each Tuesday and Friday afternoon, 
from 2 until 6 o'clock, from June 3rd un- 
til July 12th. Active participants will be 
limited to eight players, each player to 
play once a week for an hour of individ- 
ual instruction, besides being present at 
all other lessons, as all instruction will 
be in class, \on-playing listeners will also 
be admitted to the class, their number 
being limited to twenty-five. The choice 
of works to be played will rest with' the 
players, but announcement will be made 
each time of the works to be played at 
Ihe next session. 



SAN ANSELMO CONCERT 

A remarkable program of Russian and 
Spanish music will be given In Saint An- 
selm's Auditorium on Sunday afternoon. 
June 12, at 3 o'clock. The following artists 
will participate: Mrs. John Rnsseter, 
mezzo soprano; Myrtle Claire Donnelly, 
lyric soprano: Reverend Eduar Boyle, 
lyric tenor; Marie Hughes Macquarrle, 
harp: Esther Ilowells. Ilute: Louise 
Becker, 'cello; Uda Waldrop. piano. A 
short lecture will also be given by a 
scholar, the name to be announced later. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




S T E I N W A Y 

Used and Approved by the Created Piani^s 

TEACHERS of music on the Pacific Coast, in striking majority, use and approve the Steinway 
piano. The greatest artists on the concert stage use and approve it. The home of dignity, refine- 
ment and distinction unerringly chooses it. 

Liszt, greatest of all pianists, pronounced the Steinway greatest ot all pianos. Wag- 
ner, Rubinstein, Gounod and their brillliant contemporaries were equally quick to recog- 
nize and acclaim its pre-eminence. 

Each year since those great beginnings, the Steinway has strengthened and increased 
its prestige with those who made and those who love great music. 

One of the reasons for this is that the Steinway has always been made under the 
personal direction and the personal ownership of the Steinway family. 

All the materials which go into a Steinway are available to the whole world — but 
the genius which transmutes them into Steinway Tone begins and ends with Steinway. 

To make a piano is one thing — to make a piano for the immortals is another. 

Paderewski, Hofmann, Rachmaninoff — the Steinway is their chosen instrument Just 
as it was Liszt's. 

Is there any wonder that the mere presence ot a Steinway in a home is a token of 
musical authority and distinction? 

We carry everything in Music — Steimvay and other Pianos, Pianola and Duo-Art 
Pianos, Aeolian Pipe Organs, Robert Morton Cathedral Organs, Victrolas and 
Victor Records, Player Rolls, Conn Band Instruments, String and Orchestral In- 
struments, Sheet Music and Music Books. 

Sherman, play & Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Streets, Oakland 

Sacramento — Stockton — Fresno — Vallejo — San Jose 

Portland — Seattle — Tacoma — Spokane 




The JEANNE JOMELLI 

VOCAL STUDIOS 

HOTEL RICHELIEU 

Van Ness Ave., at Geary St., 
San Francisco 

Announces the addition of a 

VIOLIN DEPARTMENT 

Under the direction of 

SIGNOR ANTONIO de GRASSl 

Formerly ot London 

Signer de Grassi was a pupil ot 

Ysaye, Joachim and Sevcik] 

and principal teaching assistant to 
Sevcik In PrnBue lOOT-lOOS 

Also a 

Piano, Organ and Tlieory Department 

Under 

GEORGE EDWARDS 

Post-Gradaate of the Chicago MnBlcal College 

The Theory Cou 



PUPILS NOW BBING ENROLLED 

Pupils are also now being enrolled for the French 
nd SpanlHh Classes. 

TEL. FRANKLIN 2381 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
OP MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGORY. Director 

LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

CONTRALTO 
Te«eker •( SIbkIdc* Complete Course of Opomttc Tralm- 
iBg. a73« Pleree St. Tel. Fillmore 4553. 

MME. CA.RRINGTON LE^WyS 

Prima Donna Witli StrakoKcb, Hapleaon, Etc. 

EMLYN LiEWYS 

OreonUt Fifth Charch of Chrlat Scientist. Formerly 

Principal of Vlrgrll Piano School, London, Bneland. 

Res. Stndio: 2041 JLTon Street. Phone FUlmore 552 



FRANK CARROLL GIFFEN 

TEACHER OF SINGING 



Mrs. King- Clark Upham 

VOCAL STUDIOS 



Heine Building 
408 Stockton St. 



Telephone 
Kearny 676 



'^ll::^^':^:^!^!^^:^ IRENE ROWLAND NICOLL 



Specially qnallfied In diagnosis, tone placing and restora- 
tion of the voice. Stadlo»: Tel. Berk. 5653 J; 868 Contra 
Coata Ave., Berk. — S. F., Sat. Aft.* 606 Kohler & Chase Bids. 



Arrillaga Musical College 

Fernando Michelena, President; 
A. L. Artlgues. Vlce-Pres.} V, de Arrillaga, Director 
' Unexcelled facllltieH for tbe stndy of music In all 
Its branches. Large Pipe Organ. Recital Hall, 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
San Francisco, Cal. Phone West 4737 



Mannuig School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING. Director 



3242 ^Vashlngton Street, near Presidio Avenue 
San Francisco, Cal. 
For further information address the 
■ehool, or phone Fillmore 385. 



secretary ot the 



L,iHt Your WnntM with tbe 

MUSICAL ARTIST TEACHERS AGENCY 

New York San Diego 

Now Is the time to place your applications for next 
eaaon. Many positions opvn both East and West. Ad- 
Mrs. Bertha Slocum. 1834 First St., Western repre- 



Dtatlve, San Diego, Calif, 



NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

SAN JOSE, CAL. 

Confers Degrees Awards Certtflcatea 

For ParticnlaM apply to Sister Superior 

MME. LEONORE GORDON FOY 

Dramatic Soprano — Operm and Voice 
Studioi Claremont Hotel Telephone: Berkeley 0300 

Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 
Music Courses Thorough and Progressive 
Pnblle School Mnsie, Accredited Diploma 

SIGMUND BEEL 

Concert Master of L. A. Symphony Orchestra during last 
four years, ivUl accept pupils in advanced violin and en- 
semble playing. Studio 1373 Post St. Phone Prospe<rt 757 

THE PASMORE SYSTEM OF VOCAL TECHNIQUE 



rado Road, Berkeley. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 
MRS. OSCAR MANSFELDT, PUnlst 

2015 llroderick St., near Clay Telephone Fillmore 814 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 

PIANIST — ACCOMPANIST — TBACHBR 
(tndloi 827 Shrader St. Phone Park IMS 



LEN BARNES 



UDA WALDROP 



PIANIST ACCOMPANIST 

iDstractloD in Piano and Pipe Or^aa. Vocal Coaehla^. 

Orsrani.t and Choir Director St. Lahe'a Epiacopal Charch. 

Studio: 308 Loeoit St. Tel. Fillmore 1»7« 



WALLACE A. SABIN 



Organist Temple Emano El. First Church of Christ Sci- 
entist, Director Loring Club. S. F., 'Wed., 1617 California 
St., Phone Franklin 2603} SaC, First Christian Sdene* 
Church, Phone Franklln_1307} Res. 
Ave., Berkeley. " ~ 



Miss Myra Lumbard Palache 

PIANIST AND ACCOMPANIST 

Available for Concerts, Seaaon 1020-1821 



SENORITA TEODELINDA TERAN 

Cello — Piano taught by Hatthay Touch Method of the 
Royal Academy of London. For appointments Ph«KCy froai 
7 to 8 P. M., Prospect 0644 — Gaifney Building. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



111 THE ONL'.' W h:i> '_ :' .\ . 11 i£ QU tAT WEST Hi 

Pulill!.litMl 10\t-r> >iiliir.liiv l>y (lie 

Mi'sicAL hi;vil:\\' coSiivvnv 

ALFRED MBTZGKR Prealllcnt 

THOS. K. ATKIXSON VIcr-PreBiilenI 

MARCIS L. SAMUELS Secretary and Treaaurer 

Suite 801 Ivohler 4K Chase IIIiIk.. 26 O'Farrell St.. Sau 
Frnneliico. Cgl. Tel. Keariij- M54 

ALFRED METZGER - Editor 

CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE - Asst. Editor 
B. W. JELICA . - Advertising Manager 

New York Offlee, 13a We«t 80th Street 
Mliia RoMalle Honaman In CbnrKe 



closo (Salnt-Saens), Jan Kubellk; Ballade P major No. 
2 « hopin), Pierre Augieras; (a) Spanish Dance, No. 7 
(Sarasate), (b) La Streghe (I'aganinl), Jan Kubellk. 



Onkland-BerkeleT-Alameda Offlee 
3301 Bancroft ^Vny, Derkeley, Telephone Berkeley 4230J 
L. Maekar-Cantell In Charge ' 



Seattle Omce, I52I Plfteentb Ave., Seattle. W'aahlnicio 
Mra. Abble Gerrlah-Jonea In ChurKC 

Loa AuEelea Office 

705 Philharmonic Auditorium. Tel. Pico 24S4 

Itruuo David llMaher lu ChnrKe 



Vol. XL 



Saturday, May 7, 1921 



No. 6 



The PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW la for aale at the 
aheet-mualc departmeuta of all leading mualc atorea. 



: S. P. Poatoffice. 



SVBSCRIPTIOIVS 
Annually In Advance IncIndluK Poataarei 
United Statea 



Forclsn Conntrlea 



TWENTIETH YEAR 



JAN KUBELIK AS COMPOSER AND SOLOIST 

Famous Virtuoso Presents Own Concerto and Inter- 
prets Program of a Conventional Character — Did 
Not Seem to Be in His Best Form 

By ALFRED METZGER 

While the audience that attended the Kubellk con- 
cert at Civic Auditorium on Thursday evening, April 
2Sth, would have crowded an ordinary theatre, the in- 
terest on the part of the musical public was not as 
great as it used to be. The truth of the matter is that 
Kubelik's artistic reputation was never sufficiently pro- 
nounced to justify anyone to place him in line with the 
really great ones of the world of music. His first suc- 
cesses were due principally to the wonderful advertis- 
ing faculties of his first manager, Hugo Goerlitz, and, 
secondly, to a brilliant technic and small but clean and 
"velvety" tone. 

Kubelik never appealed- by reason of temperament 
or emotionalism. His previous tour also fell considera- 
bly below his first sensational successes. The fact is 
that technic alone is not sufficient nowadays to attract 
the great mass of mu.sic lovers. Leopold Auer turns out 
pupils almost every day who accomplish some astound- 
ing technical feats. We have heard some students right 
here in San Francisco who astonished us by reason of 
their technic. There is a possibility of conquering, even 
though hampered with a small tone, for quality goes 
a long way to overshadow quantity — witness, for in- 
stance, Heifetz's success. 

But Kubellk has not only failed to progress and ex- 
pand since he was here last, he actually has retro- 
graded, for almost throughout the rendition of his pro- 
gram last week he played off pitch, something of which 
we never thought him guilty. At times even his instru- 
ment — which, by the way, is one of the most beautiful 
violins we have ever heard — was decidedly out of tune. 
Such a persistent deviation from pitch is surely inex- 
cusable in an artist, and it is a mystery to us that a 
virtuoso of Kubelik's reputation should offend to such 
a great degree in this direction. 

The program began with a concerto composed by the 
artist himself. It is a work that can not be considered 
in any way original in thought or concept. It is written 
along conventional lines, very remini.scent throughout, 
and does not leave any marked impression on your 
mind. It is dry and monotonous, lacking In the essen- 
tials of creative art; namely, the power to fascinate 
and thrill. Technically, wherein Kubelik used to over- 
shadow his contemporaries, the artist made a very 
poor showing. His double stops were muddy, his spiccato 
and scales did not reveal that clarity of expression nor 
precision of accents and notes which one expects from 
a great artist. In short, Kubelik either was very sick 
on that evening or he has deteriorated to an extent 
the lack of which we have never observed in an artist 
before. The execrable acoustic properties of the Audi- 
torium may also be responsible for the lack of true 
Intonation. 

Pierre Augieras, the accompanist, occasionally re- 
vealed some refined artistic shading and graceful tech- 
nic, but occasionally he would obtain a tone of decidedly 
metallic stridency, at times drowning the soloist. Nev- 
ertheless Mr. Augieras seemed to be the more con- 
scientious artist of the two. The complete program was 
as follows: Concerto C major (Kubelik), .Ian Kubellk; 
(a) Romance G major (Beethoven), (bl Preludium (for 
violin alone) (Bach), (c) Introduction et Rondo Caprlc- 



DOROTHY BLANEY'S PIANISTIC TRIUMPH 

Highly Accomplished Young Artist Enthuses Large Au- 
dience at St. Francis Hotel With Her Electri- 
fying Emotionalism and Technic 

The Italian Room of the St. Francis Hotel was crowd- 
1 d on IVIonday evening. May 2nd, when Miss Dorothy 
Blaney, pianist, gave a piano recital, under the auspices 
of the .\lumnae of the School of Music of Dominican 
College, San Rafael, of which institution Miss Blaney 
was a pupil and graduate before departing for the East 
to study with Jo-sef Lhevinne. The writer was fortunate 
enough to hear Miss Blaney while she was still at the 
Dominican College, under the efficient care of the sis- 
ters, and we can notice her growth and intellectual 
expansion. Technically there was not much to improve, 
for she had been exceedingly well trained even at that 
time. 

Miss Blaney is beyond a doubt a very accomplished 
and gifted young pianist. She played the Bach prelude 
and fugue, gavotte and musette, with the academic con- 
scientiousness necessary to attain effective interpreta- 
tion. She played the Beethoven-Busoni Ecossaises with 
brilliant technical expression as well as musicianly sin- 
cerity. She invested the Chopin group with a carefully 
thought out and effectively shaded sympathy and ca- 
ressing affection which could not but earn her the 
hearty endorsement of her hearers. And, by the way, 
her Chopin interpretations revealed that masculinity 
and firmness which we admire so much in Lhevinne's 
own conception of this master of pianistic literature. 

During the rendition of the Gluck-Brahms' Gavotte, 
possibly the least difficult of all the heavy works pre- 
sented. Miss Blaney seemed to show a slight sign of 
indecision, but we only mention this accident here to 
emphasize the extent of her assurance which caused 
her to overcome the obstacle with an ease that left most 
of her hearers ignorant of the slight confusion. It was 
surely one of the cleverest expositions of musical or 
artistic sangfroid we have yet witnessed. The D'Albert 
Suite, Debussy's La fille au cheveux de lin, and last 
but not least, the Dohnanyi Rhapsodic, closed an ex- 
cellent program presented in a manner most dignified 
and efficient, and prophetic of an enviable and brilliant 
career. We sincerely congratulate Miss Blaney upon 
her unquestionable artistic triumph. 

ALFRED METZGER 



FLOWERS AND MUSIC 



By SID GRAUMAN 

Had God created this world a place of black and 
white, how much of its beauty would have been lost. 
For the loveliness of the flowers lies not alone in the 
delicate material of their leaves, but more, far more, 
in their varied colorings. The pulsive, wonderful beauty 
of the rose would be lost were it merely a black mass. 
The tinted tenderness of the pansy would be gone for- 
ever were we to hide its colors beneath a coat of 
black or white. Truly, it is the coloring that God has 
given to each of His wondrous of nature that makes 
them seem to live and breathe. 

A synonym — and yet, not a synonym: Music, say we. 
is to the moving picture flashed upon the screen but 
another likeness of the color and the flower. For what 
can so enhance the beauty and the theme and the 
heart of a photoplay as harmony, rightly played and 
rightly placed. 

How many times have we attended the little show 
where a lone pianist sat at the keys, missing a phrase 
now and again, or even worse, striking the wrong 
notes continually, possibly making far more noise with 
her chewing gum than the piano would ever be able to 
give forth. With a comedy — slapstick, if you please — 
this kind of music may be desirable. But with real pic- 
tures, never. 

To Mischa Guterson, conductor of the Grauman Sym- 
phony Orchestra, goes the honor of arranging the musi- 
cal scores for the orchestra at each of tlie Grauman 
theatres. When, during a heart-rending scene, your 
mind is carried further along by an intensely dramatic 
composition; or, when, during the breakneck race of 
tlie hero to save the life of his loved one, the music 
thrills with its speed and seems to aid him on his 
way; or, \vhen he finds her and holds her tight and 
breathless in his arras, a soothing harmony fills the 
air — these are the moments when we should appreciate 
more and more the coloring that the music lends to the 
photoplays. 



MUSIC CLUBS BACK AMERICAN COMPOSERS 

The following resolution was unanimously adopted at 
the Presidents' Conference of the California Federation 
of Music Clubs, thirty-nine presidents being present: 

Whereas, We consider that the time has come when 
concerted action should be taken in recognition of the 
American composer and his compositions; and. 

Whereas. The California Federation of Music Clubs 
is organized to promote and develop American Musical 
Art; therefore be It 

Resolved, That we, assembled at the Presidents' Con- 
ference of the California Federation of Music Clubs, 
request the Federation to urge all musical organizations 
in the State (namely. Symphony Orchestras, Chamber 
Music Societies, f horal Clubs, Club Program Commit- 
tees and Recitalists) to present on each and every pro- 
gram at least one American Composition of a recog- 
nized standard of excellence; and be it further 



Resolved, That a letter be sent to each Club Presi- 
dent advising them of this action and request them to 
use their Influence with the musical organizations In 
their territory that this may be effectively carried out 
Signed. 
WA-WA.\ CUB OP LOS ANGELES 
GRACE WID.NEY .MABEE, Pres. 
Lnanimously adopted at tlie Presidents' Conference 
held at the Mens City Club, March lot, 1921, In Los 
Angeles. 



MRS. E. E. YOUNG SOLOIST AT CALIFORNIA 

Mrs. Edward E. Ifoung. San Francisco pianist, will 
play tomorrow morning at the California Theatre with 
Herman Heller's orchestra. 

Mrs. Young received her training in San Francisco 
and has appeared as solo pianist and accompanist for 
Mme. Bernice Pasquall, Metropolitan opera star. In con- 
cert in the interior, and as her accompanist In recitals 
In this city. She has also accompanied Elsa Ruegeer 
distinguished 'cellist. ' 

.Mrs. Young has played also for the Saturday Club 
in Sacramento and three times for the Saturday After- 
noon Club of Stockton, in addition to many other ao- 
pearances. 

Her number at the California Theatre will be Men- 
delssohn's Concerto G minor. 

Director Herman Heller has chosen the following se- 
lections for the orchestra: Tannhauser (March) by 
Wagner. Symphony Pathetique No. 6 by Tschalkowsky 
and The Bamboula (Rhapsodic Dance) by Taylor 

As an organ solo Leslie V. Harvey will offer Medita- 
tion from Thai.s by Massenet. 



BY WAY OF EXPLANATION 

Owing to the crowded condition of our advertising 
columns this week, and to the lack of time to add any 
pages at the last moment, the Pacific Coast Musical 
Review is obliged to hold over a number of Important . 
reviews and news articles until the next issue. Among 
these are: the concerts of the Pacific Musical Society, 
Recital of Mills College students. Recital by Ellse Tri- 
cou. Manning School students, California Tour of Cham- 
ber Music Society, Concert Tour of Louis Persinger, and 
a few other equally interesting events. 

DAISY NELLIS PLEASES ORPHEUMITES 

Daisy Nellis, a clever young American pianist, who 
has an enviable concert reputation to her credit, appears 
at the Orpheum this week and has made quite an Im- 
pression with her audience. She plays such excellent 
compositions as the MacDowell Sonata, an Irish Coun- 
try Dance, Liszt's Campanella. and a pot-pourri con- 
taining the better known compositions, in a manner 
that justifies the enthusiastic applause that greets her 
at the conclusion of her act. Miss Nellis has a brilliant 
technic. an excellent taste for shading, and adds to this 
a charming personality. 



AL JOLSON PACKS THE CURRAN THEATRE 

The question of theatre prices and attendance has 
simply come down to the fact that people are willing 
to pay any price for that which they want, and are un- 
willing to pay anything for that which they do not want. 
Proof of this assertion may be obtained by attending 
the Curran Theatre this week where Al Jolson is pack- 
ing the houses with Sinbad. This clever comedian pos- 
sesses the knack to make people laugh without effort 
and his remarkable voice is heard in songs that appeal 
to the masses. Al Jolson is today * the most popular 
comedian on the musical comedy stage. 

In addition to Mr. Jolson's own genius the produc- 
tion presents many other delightful features. The cos- 
tumes are magnificent, reminding one of the recent pro- 
duction of Chu-Chin-Chow. while there are numerous 
acts of a pleasing variety and excellence. Sinbad Is a 
"production" and must be regarded from the ensemble 
standpoint. Individual efforts merely represent a part 
of the complete performance and as such are respon- 
sible for its excellence. The music is catchy and rhyth- 
mically effervescent, while scenery and other accessor- 
ies are of the most artistic and colorful. There Is no 
doubt in our mind but that during the two weeks of Its 
engagement Sinbad will crowd the Curran 'Theatre at 
every performance. 



Jack Edward Hlllman, the well known California bari- 
tone, will sing al a benefit concert to be given by Mr. 
and Mrs. Mollenhauer. violinist and pianist respect- 
ively, at Sorosls Club Hall on Wednesday evening. May 
11th. Mr. Hlllman will sing the following songs: Chan- 
son Triste (Duparc), Lied Maritime (Vincent d'Indy). 
Momento iTirlndellil, Love Me. or Not (SecchI), Lor- 
raine, Lorraine, Lorce (Spross), At the Last (Stone), 
The Muleteer (Di Nogero). 

Iris Currle, the fourteen-year-old prima donna, scored 
a brilliant triumph on Sunday, April 26th. at Scottish 
Rite Auditorium. Words are Inadequate to describe the 
artistic faculties of this youthful prodigy. She simply 
overwhelmed the audience In her remarkable Interpre- 
tation of Charniant Oiseau from the Pearl of Brazil. 
Her success was so spontaneous that she was offered 
a lucrative engagement at one of the leading theatres, 
which, however, her teacher, Mme. S. P. Marraccl. ad- 
vised her to refuse owing to her lender years. Like a 
bird, singing seems to come to this young singer na- 
turally. There Is velvet In her voice, her technic Is 
fluent, and she has so many qualities of natural talent 
that one may easily predict a brilliant future for her. 
In addition to her artistic faculties Iris Is a modest 
child with pleasing and graceful manners. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSirAL REVIEW 



JULIA GULP THRILLS NEW YORK MUSICIANS 

Great Concert Singer Impresses With German Classics 

In Original Language — Kreisler, Bauer and 

Gulp on One Program— Music Week 

By ROSALIE HOUSMAN 

New York. April 25. — New York has again celebrated 
a National Music Week, in which many artists contrib- 
uted, and which is another proof of the awakening 
music spirit in our midst. Judging from the full sched- 
ule of concerts from best to worst, we have had an 
unusually full season, and this week was the crowning 
event, in which the city and public shared. There were 
innumerable free concerts in public places, and firms 
like the Aeolian company contributed with excellent 
noon recitals, in which the world's best shared, and 
which were also free. It was also the final week of the 
Metropolitan opera season, with the usual repetitions, 
and a gala bill of acts from several operas in honor of 
the visiting prince of Monaco. The final performance 
was Lohengrin, with the same splendid cast, starring 
Florence Easton. So far, Mr. Gatti-Gassaza has made no 
formal announcements, but it is generally known that 
la Geraldine has been re-engaged at a substantial in- 
crease, that Ruffo as well as Galli-Curci are signed up, 
and so is Selma Kurz, who certainly will be a sensa- 
tion. A revival of the Ring in the original is also 
hinted at. 



Sunday last (April 17th) saw Carnegie Hall packed 
to hear the last big piano recital of the season, when 
Ossip Gabrilowitsch treated us to a wonderful all- 
Chopin program. The afternoon previous Miss Novaes 
gave us the B minor Sonata, so it was in keeping to 
hear its mate, the B flat from Gabrilowitsch. There 
were ten of the preludes, the lovely E major Etude, op. 
10, a nocturne, and other well loved things. As always, 
there was pure beauty for its own sake, simplicity and 
nuance in his interpretations, and an introspective note 
which heightened and intensified everything he did. Be- 
ing an orchestral conductor has not altered his piano 
playing, but perhaps he is such a remarkable conductor, 
because he is so sensitive a pianist, who can tell? I 
only know that he is one of the very few artists in the 
most restricted sense of the word, who has person- 
ality, style, and all the great things, and of whose in- 
finite power to charm I never tire. 



Tuesday evening, April 19th, was the last of the series 
of the Beethoven Association concerts, with a full-to- 
overflowing program. Bauer and Gabrilowitsch in the D 
major Mozart Sonate, for two pianos; Kreisler, who 
played the Chaconne, then Mme. Julia Gulp in a group 
of Brahms, which she was obliged to increase, and as 
a final joy, Bauer and Kreisler added the Kreutzer 
Sonate. Three weeks before every seat had been sold, 
as the announcements read Kreisler and Rachmaninoff, 
though the latter was unable to appear, owing to acute 
neuritis. To criticize such a concert as this were an 
impertinence, but I wish simply to comment on Mme. 
Gulp, who sang on this occasion for the first time in 
five seasons. She sang in the original German, and 
how the lovely Bralmis melodies thrilled one again. It 
was as if one had not heard them since she was away, 
and they were even more wonderful than before. To 
me, her voice has a more rich and mellow quality than 
before, and her psychic power of interpretation still 
thrills and fascinates as always. Bos again presided 
at the piano, and shared lier ovation. There was a most 
distinguished and musically representative audience 
present, and among them Dr. and Mrs. Hertz, to whom 
1 spoke. 

Announcement has been made that Henry Hadley and 
Victor Herbert are to share the Stadium concert season 
of eight weeks this summer, as conductors, and it is 
to be hoped that they will give as artistic and worthy 
programs as we had last season when Mr. Rothwell had 
the baton. I rather imagine they will.be of more popu- 
lar character, and it is a great deal in favor of the 
governing board that Americans are chosen. 

Ellen Beach Yaw and her husband, Franklin Cannon, 
gave a joint recital Thursday {April 21st) at the Town 
Hall, and were enthusiastically received by a full house. 
Miss Yaw still startles one with her phenomenal high 
tones, which she uses occasionally, and they were al- 
ways on the pitch. She sings well, and commands a 
delightful style. Mr. Cannon showed himself a sterling 
artist, and in the varied program presented pleased as 
well as his wife. 

Saturday afternoon, the 23rd, Dohnanyi was the 
guest conductor and soloist of the National Symphony, 
and will be again on Tuesday evening next, when I 
expect to hear the program and report on it. I can only 
quote from the Times in the meanwhile, and tell you 
that it was a remarkable concert, in which Brahms' 
Variations on a Haydn theme were played, and also the 
G major Mozart concerto, and a Suite of Dohnanyi's 
own. 

In the evening Gulp gave her only New York recital, 
sold out in advance, and it was one of old favorites, and 
in them all she made one's heart and soul rejoice. But 
it is her German songs that exert still the profoundest 
impression, and there was a cheering ovation. 

Sir Henry Heyman had the honor of entertaining 
Joseph Stransky at dinner at the Bohemian Club on 
Sunday evening, April 24th, after the New York Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra concert, of which Mr. Stransky 
was the distinguished conductor. Sir Henry had planned 
an elaborate luncheon for Mr. Stransky, which could 
not be given owing to the limited visit of the noted 
master of the baton. 



S. F. IMUSICAL CLUB GIVES ENTERTAINMENT 

The San Francisco Musical Club, of which Mrs. Ed- 
ward Everett Bruner is the president, gave its an- 
nual Jinks on Thursday evening, April 28th, at Native 
Sons Hall. This club Is one which boasts of many of 
our well known musicians for its active members. For 
that reason it is always doubly intere-sting to attend 
these yearly entertainments and see how these serious- 
minded artists act when Ihey shed their professional 
cloaks of dignity and become "just regular fellows." 
If I am not mistaken I believe that they enjoy these 
few hours of frivolity equally as much as those in the 
audience. The participants enter into the spirit of the 
occasion with a spontaneity and enthusiasm which nat- 
urally conveys a happy mood to every one present. And 
merriment surely did reign throughout the evening. 

The program opened with a sketch in Pantomime, 
entitled the Immortal Lovers, which was adapted from 
the Chinese by Flora Bruner and set to music by Mary 
Carr Moore, who occupied the conductor's desk during 
its rendition. The setting given this playlet was Orien- 
tal and most attractive to the eye. Mrs. Bruner in her 
few explanatory notes on the program gave us a splen- 
did idea of the text which enabled one to appreciate its 
significance. The music is prevalent with strains of the 
East and is rich with Oriental atmosphere. The story 
was interpreted by Roberta Stone, who took the part 
of the Girl, while the Boy was played by Ellen Pressley. 
Luther Marchant was the God of Wrath, and several 




MRS. E. K. YOUXG 
The Prominent Cnliforniu Pianist AVho W ill Be Solo- 
ist at the Cnlifornia Theatre at Tomorro^v's 
Sunday Mornlng^ Concert 

members of the club appeared as Maidens of the Tem- 
ple. The artists were thoroughly familiar with their 
allotted roles, thus permitting the Immortal Lovers to 
run with smoothness and finesse. 

From China we were ushered into the Salon of the 
Seeress, where June C. Nahl's sketch called The Sum- 
mons was rendered. The supplicants succeeded in sum- 
moning many dead ones back to life, and according to 
the amount of humor and comedy they succeeded in 
creating they certainly seemed glad to be alive once 
again. The old timers who were resurrected were Bach, 
personified by Katherine Herzog; Beethoven, Olga Bar- 
rett; Chopin, Maybel West; Patti, Hazel Mackay, who 
was justly recalled for a repetition of her exquisite 
rendition of The Last Rose of Summer; Shakespeare, 



Florence Rltter; Rembrandt was the author, June Nahl; 
while the modern entertainers were Anna Short as the 
Jazz Queen, and she certainly did put some jazz and 
zipp Into that dance of hers and plenty of pep Into 
her song. I have always felt that the Orpheum has lost 
a great attraction In Anna Short and Hhe has mlRsed 
her vocation in life. She with her Prince Jazz, Howell 
Janes, would certainly be an excellent comblnatton on 
any vaudeville stage, for their team work Is splendid. 
Altogether it was a clever and most amusing play, one 
which seemed to capture the fancy of the audience. 

From the Salon of the Seeress we went back again 
to China. How one does travel in the short space of a 
few hours, and how much one does see and hear! While 
we were in China this time, Paul Bliss wrote an operetta 
called The Feast of the Little Lanterns. Again Oriental 
colorings and atmosphere prevailed. A beautiful stage 
setting with richly embroidered Chinese screens and 
tapestries pleased the eyes from a pictorial standpoint, 
while catchy and tuneful melodies greeted the ears. 
The members of Princess Chan's household appeared In 
exquisite Chinese costumes while the Princess herself, 
better known to her American friends as Flora Bruner, 
wore one of the handsomest Chinese Mandarine cloaks 
and an ornamental hair dress. Not only was Mrs. Bruner 
most attractive to gaze at but she pleased tremendously 
with her musical accomplishments. I did not know that 
such lovely voices existed in China and that the Chinese 
were so artistically gifted. Whether Princess Chan was 
taught by a Chinese vocal teacher or an American one 
I cannot tell, but I do know that her sweet and sym- 
pathetic soprano voice is well employed by its possessor. 
The Princess expressed herself admirably and suc- 
ceeded in producing some charming effects. 

Grace Molony as the Princess' Governess is a come- 
dienne to the tips of her fingers and with her facial ex- 
pressions and grotesque gestures and humorous singing 
she was the incentive for bursts of hearty laughter. After 
her first song she encored at least four or five times. 
Talent such as hers certainly should be developed for it 
is the means of giving endless pleasure and enjoyment 
in just such affairs. Everyone concerned in the success 
of this operetta deserves praise, for the chorus was well 
drilled and the orchestra and principals could not have 
been better. I thank the San Francisco Musical Club 
for the very pleasant and happy evening they afforded 
me. C. H. A. 



ALICE GENTLE MARRIES IN SANTA CRUZ 

Alice Gentle, the well-known and beautiful mezzo- 
soprano whose fame and popularity reaches widely 
over the entire Pacific Coast as well as throughout the 
East, recently became the bride of Jacob Robinson 
Proebstel of Portland, Oregon, The marriage took place 
at the home of the bride's cousin. Mrs. Elder, in Santa 
Cruz, on Thursday, April 28th, with just a few relatives 
of the bride and groom being present. Mr. and Mrs. 
Proebstel expect to motor to Los Angeles, where they 
will spend their honeymoon, and from there the bride 
will go to Ravinia Park, 111., where she will appear in 
grand opera for the third consecutive season. Mr. Proeb- 
stel is widely known throughout the country as one of 
the most capable of the younger managers. Among the 
many attractive artists which he will have to look after 
in the future will be the most important one of all (that 
is to him), Alice Gentle. Miss Gentle, as she will con- 
tinue to be known in the operatic and concert field, will 
have some very interesting plans to disclose at the be- 
ginning of the new season which will please her many 
friends and admirers, who wish her continued success 
in her chosen career. The staff of the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review wishes Mr. and Mrs. Proebstel a very 
happy and prosperous wedded life. 



Marie Hughes Macquarrie, whose exquisite harp-play- 
ing is attracting the attention of all our well-known 
music lovers, will charm the patrons of the Tivoli Thea- 
tre during the week of May 8th, when she with William 
Flashman, the noted flutist, will play the first move- 
ment of the Mozart concerto, with the accompaniment 
of full orchestra. No doubt this charming young artist 
will be the means of attracting many a large audience 
to this theatre. 



ETHEL GERTRUDE CANNON 




ARTIST-STUDENTS' PIANO COURSE 



HIGH LIGHTS IN MRS. CANNON'S 
PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUCTION 

VIM. 

The actor forms his conception of his role, and then endeavors 
to project that conception out to his audience through the in- 
flections of his voice, his facial and bodily movements assisting. 
With the other arts previously mentioned the same thought holds 
good — the something to express precedes the technic of express- 
ion. But, how often is the musical student led through a wilder- 
ness of technical exercises — and later masses of etudes — with no 
thought other than mechanical precision, and many times even 
lacking progression towards any given point but the measure. 



FURTHER ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING STUDIO AND 
OPENING DATE WILL APPEAR LATER. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Distinguished Artists Residing in California Who are Available for Concerts During the Season 1920-1921 

^''J,'?''H'„'^f°*°\Tjj!* u"/'"" "^n"'' Musical Review is in a position to guarantee the artistic efficiency of the artiata represented on this page. They have esUbU.hed a 
reputa ion for themselves, partly national, partly international, through regular concert tours or by appearances In operatic organizations of recognized fame. The purpos* 
of setting forth the availability of these reputed artists is to convince the California musical public that distinguished artists of edual merit to any reside In this State. 
We Intend to prove that a resident artist coi\ters honor upon the community in which he resides. ■• .» o o^oio. 



Announcing the Personnel of | 

"Le Trio Louise" j 

Kajetan Attl — Bohemian Harpist | 

Otto King — Norwegian Cellist i 

M. Anthony Linden — American Flutist | 

rhree UlatlDKulahed .trllnO In n Unique Chnmber | 

llimlc Enacmblr PreaenllnB ttnununl ProKrnnm I 

ImpuiiHible to Hear Under Any Other Auspleeii i 

For Dales nnd Ternm Addrefm i 

M. Anthony Linden, 457 Phelan Bldg., j 

San Francisco | 

Care of S. F. Symphony Orchestra | 



OLGA 
STEEB 

"The Genius of 
the Piano" 

Management 

CATHERINE A. 
BAMMAN 

53 West 39th, N. Y. 
Local Representative: 
C. E. HUBACH, 126 S. Rampart Blvd., Los Angeles 




iiiiiiiiiiiiiiliilliiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiliiiiiiKniiiiiiiiutfiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiitii'': 



Warren D. and Esther H. 

A W W W^^Y Contralto 

ALLEN 

Joint Recitals 



Organist 

Pianist 

Lecturer 




PHYLLIDA 
ASHLEY 

PIANIST 

NOW BOOKING 
SEASON 1921-1922 

HAENSEL & JONES 

Management 

Aeolian Hall 

New York City 



M. H. .Mich 



Cal. 



nd Blvd.. 



^^^ 


JACK HILLMAN 


^^^m 


BARITONE 


^ 


\ Just Returned From 
1 New York 
1 Exponent of Vocal 
1 Methods of 

CLARA NOVELLO 
DAVIES 


studio: 803 Heine Bldg. 
Res. HOC Bush St. 


Teacher of 
LOUIS GRAVEURE 

Phone Garfield 2495 
rhtuie Franklin 5068 



MADAME LEONORE GORDON FOY ON TOUR 

The many friends and admirers of Madame Leonore 
Gordon Foy will be pleased to read about the success 
with which she Is meeting during her present concert 
tour of the South. Madame Foy is now in Texas, already 
having appeared in Houston. Dallas. Fort Worth and 
Palestine. On her way into Texas. Madame Foy sang in 
many of the California interior cities, where she formed 
manv mew admirers. 

During .Madame Foy's visit in Palestine, the Daily 
Herald published the following paragraph: "A very 
artistic entertainment was given Wednesday evening at 
the High School Auditorium, when the American Legion 
presented in concert Madame Leonore Gordon Foy. dra- 
matic soprano. The program consisted of a miscellane- 
ous group of songs, with the Musette Waltz from La 
Boheme and Vissi d'arte from La Tosca. Madame Foy 
being In costume for each of these numbers, together 




M. ANTHONY 

LINDEN 



Pi Incipal Solo Flute S. F. 
Hymphony Orchestra. 
I'..imerly Principal Solo 
I'"liite Minneapolis Sym- 
phony Orchestra. 
Solo, Knaemble, ObllKntu 
ed Number of Puplla 
Addreaa, 4^7 Pheinn Dlds. 




Povl 
BjornskjoM 

The Eminent Danish 
Dramatic Tenor 



Management Hugo Boucek, 116 39th St., N. Y. 
Personal Address: 355 Octavia St., San Francisco 



ASON<3SEaT4LtST 
OPGEHUiNE MERIT 



^»H!CiM WORTH ^ 




1115 Glenn Aw. 

5erkffl(?yCai. 




MARION 



VECKI 



BARITONE 

AVAILABLE FOR 

Concert - Opera - Oratorio 



Chronlele Dlde., San Fi 



Salter lll>9 



With an oral synopsis of each opera by Mrs. Anna W. 
Hunt, and the G Minor Ballade, piano solo by the ac- 
companist. Miss Winnie Wetenkamp. Madame Foy de- 
lighted the audience with the small group, the high- 
water mark of which was reached in the Love of Poland, 
arranged by Saslavsky for her. and in which she gave 
poetic interpretation to that great national spirit in love 
of country which is characteristic of the Polisli peojile. 
Madame Foy has fine stage presence, and in the opera 
arias she showed her artistic ability in dramatic inter- 
pretation as well as the large range and power of her 
voice, and she responded to a number of encores from 
a highly appreciative audience. She brought down the 
house wlien she graciously brought forward her accom- 
panist to receive part of the honors of the evening's 
success." V 

The Palestine Daily Visitor wrote the following 
tribute: "Madame Foy. dramatic singer, delighted a 
large audience at the High School Auditorium Wednes- 
day night in a classical repertoire. She has a wonder- 
fully beautiful voice of strength and sweetness, and 
everyone who heard her was enthusiastic in their praise 
and many pronounced her recital as the best ever given 
here. Her costumes were superb and suited the graceful 
figure that adorned them. Madame Foy la an exceptional 
attraction." 



MINETTI PUPILS IN SECOND RECITAL 

Pupils of Glulio MInettI, the well-known violinist and 
pedagogue, gave the second recital of the season at 
their teacher's studio. 3325 riay street, on Saturday. 
April 9th. The following program was interpreted 
in a manner that revealed excellent training nnd flne 
Iiroflciency: A Winter's Day (Laighton). Douglas Her; 
La Cinquantaine (Gabriel-Marie). Jean Feldheym; Ca- 



FRANK MOSS 

PIANIST 
Solo Ensemble Accompanist 



Manasenientt 

JESSICA COLBERT 

610 H«arMt BalltlluK. Snn FronclKco 



Constance Alexandre 

MEZZO SOPRANO 

A California artist who is recognized in 

Eastern music centers where she has 

received the commendation of press 

and public 



Addreant Pnclflc Coaal 
801 Kohler A Chnae Dldg.. 



nevle<r 
riaeo, Calif. 



Lawrence j^rauss 

TENOR 

Management Jessica Colbert 

Studio: 
807 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

(Mondays and Thursdays) 



Residence Studio : 2904 Garber St., Berkeley 




BRUCE 

CAMERON 

Tenor 

Voice Culture 

Concert, Church Recital 



Soloist Third Church of Christ Scientist 

3538 Twenty-Third Street, San Francisco 

Tel. Mission 1297 

Management Leah Hopkins, 408 Stockton St. 




Cecil 
Mollis 
Stone 

rOXCKRT- 
ACCOMPAMST 
AND COACH 




thedral (Chimes (Devaux). Edward Hrawn; Concertino 
(Ortmans). Miss June Cumlnns; Concertino in A minor 
(Accolay). Miss Madaleine GoUlsnilth; 2nd Concerto In 
1) (Ortmans). Emmet Rlxford; Souvenir (Drdia). Miss 
Gladys Walbel; Andante and Allegro (Allen). .Miss Jose- 
phine FInnell: Roroanza (Svendsen), Miss Eunice Jur 
gens; Andante, from 7tli Concerto (De Berlot). Win 
throp Sargeant; Allegro, from 7th Concerto (De Berlot). 
Ben Robin. The students were ably assisted at the piano 
by Mrs. C. W. O'Brien. 



The Pacific Coast Musical Review is the only paper 
that covers the entire musical held. Subscriptions $3.00 
per year in advance. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 






L S. SHERMAN'S 50TH BUSINESS ANNIVERSARY 



SIGNIFICANT MUSIC 



the May "Harmony") 



An event of supreme importance in tlie liistory of tlie 
House of Sl\erman, Clay & Company in San Francisco 
occurred seventeen montlis ago. To Mr. L. S. Stierman 
tlie affair was one of deep, lieart-felt pleasure. 

The celebration observed by Mr. Sherman was this: 
the golden jubilee of his own career as merchant, ob- 
served by the election of the son of his late co-worker 
as President of the House. 

For it was on September 10, 1S70, that Mr. Sherman, 
then a young man of twenty-three (he is now a young 
man of seventy-four) bought out his employer, A. A. 
Rosenberg, and went into the music business with his 
own name above the door. 

Seven years later Mr. Shennan became associated 
with the late Major Clay, and they worked together as 
a splendid team for many years. But as the year 1920 
approached, Mr. Sherman began to turn over in his 
mind a suitable method of celebrating his own halt- 
century as a music merchant. 

Mr. Sherman, at that time, had been president of 
Shennan, Clay & Co. since its first incorporation. Many 




L. S. SHERMAN 

Chairman of Board of Directors of Sherman. Clay & Co., 
who celehrated hlH golden business Jubilee, b7 the elec- 
tion of Philip T. Clay to the presidency of the famous 
music firm. 

times he had urged Major Clay to take the title, but 
Major Clay had insisted on Mr. Sherman remaining at 
the head of the House he had helped to found, and 
Major Clay, as every member of the organization knows, 
passed away in 1905. 

One day a plan occurred to Mr. Sherman. It struck 
him, as he humorously .put it to Mr. R. T. Clay, that "a 
good way might exist to make one of the younger men 
President without waiting for himself to die." Why 
should not a new ofBce be created, that of the chairman- 
ship of the Board of Directors? This was in line with 
modern corporation organization, as is well known by 
the example of Judge Gary of the United States Steel 
Corporation and many other heads of businesses not 
so vast. 

The president of a business house is a good deal like 
a field marshal of an army. Back in the nation's capital 
sits the commander-in-chief, the advisory staff, and the 
other counsellors and students of battle strategy. But 
to the field marshal falls the task of actually supervising 
the campaign in the field. This is a work for a young 
IT in, ripe in experience but at the very top of his powers 
for energy and aggressiveness. And Mr. Sherman de- 
teimined to make this position open for Mr. Philip T. 
Clay, son of the original Clay in the House of Sherman, 
Clay & Co. 

This was accomplished at the annual meeting in Janu- 
ary, 1920. Mr. Sherman, equipped by his long experience 
and his proved ability to be the chief counsellor, the 
Chairman of the Board, saw the son of his old and well- 
loved associate become Sherman, Clay & Co.'s president. 

Everybody congratulated the firm, at that time, on 
the choice of a field executive in Mr. P. T. Clay. But 
nobody realized that, back in his own heart, Mr. Sher- 
man was holding a quiet little celebration that gave him 
the most satisfaction of all, because nobody realized it 
except himself. 

He was making way for the second generation. He 
was doing something tor somebody else. That was the 
way Mr. Sherman celebrated his golden jubilee as a 
music merchant. And why has he revealed it now? 

"I have let the cat out of the bag because the example 
may help other young men to attain the positions we 
old fellows have been holding," he said recently. "There 
are other music houses In the country, as well as busi- 
ness firms of other kinds, where the second generation 



should have its chance. Sons of the founders, or old 
and valued employes who have made good, should rise 
to the high places. Maybe my example will suggest to 
the other presidents the plan of taking over the chair- 
manships of their Boards." 

Mr. Sherman derives much satisfaction from the suc- 
cessful working out of his plan to have Mr. Clay succeed 
him to the Presidency of the House as a method of 
recognizing its fiftieth anniversary in the commercial 
world, and from the fact that the same celebration will 
continue as long as Mr. Clay occupies that chair. 



PHYLLIDA ASHLEY DELIGHTS GATHERING 

Excellent Pianist Creates Most Favorable Innpresslon 

at First Concert of Series Which She Is 

Giving at Palace Hotel 

By CONSTANCE ALEXANDRE 

At the Palace Hotel on the afternoon of April 26th, 
a large audience gathered to hear Phyllida Ashley, who 
gave her first public recital since her return to Cali- 
fornia. Miss Ashley is a young Californian who has 
spent some time in the Eastern musical metropolis 
where she devoted herself to series study and later 
made frequent appearances in concert. Miss Ashley 
made quite a name for herself in New York where 
she earned the high approval of both public and the 
press. On this occasion she hadn't the slightest difli- 
culty in living up to the reputation which preceded her 
here, while the splendid commendations passed upon 
her work are well founded and justified. 

The program which Miss Ashley chose was rather 
a conventional one but new interest was added to it 
by the brilliancy and charm with which it was played. 
Where Miss Ashley found the most congenial environ- 
ment was in the Beethoven Sonata Op. 53 (Waldstein). 
Her authentic Beethoven style, intellectual musical in- 
sight of her composition, devoid of all unnecessary flare 
and flourish but imbued with the most innate senti- 
ments, were keenly appreciated. Her playing is distin- 
guished by her phenomenal technical resources, bril- 
liant tone and beautiful touch and the individuality 
which characterizes her many interpretations. In the 
Pastorale of Scarlatti, Miss Ashley showed herself to 
be a player of grace and poetic feeling. This young 
pianist, besides being unusually musical and technically 
equipped, gives one the impression that she has delved 
into the music of the older composers and succeeded in 
dissecting their ideas and messages. These she conveys 
most satisfactorily to her audiences. Miss Ashley has 
every gift of the truly rare pianist and it is with the 
greatest pleasure that one hears her. 



CLOSE OF OPPENHEIMER SEASON 

The close of the music season will be marked by the 
final performance here of the Adolph Bolm Russian Bal- 
let and George Barrere's Little Symphony in a specially 
selected program at the Columbia Theatre tomorrow 
afternoon. No attraction of the year has so completely 
fascinated local music lovers and the unanimous opinion 
seems to be that the Barrere-Bolm combination is pre- 
senting the most interesting programs of dance and 
music given in San Francisco this season. 

Holm's organization ecinsists of a half dozen of the 
most talented choreographic stars of the Imperial Rus- 
sian Ballet School, and the 14 symphonic players con- 
stituting Barrere's "Little Orchestra" are all artists of 
the highest character. The beautiful costuming, extraor- 
dinary lighting, and altogether fascinating "tout ensem- 
ble" of the event will serve to crowd the Columbia Thea- 
tre tomorrow afternoon. 

The complete specially arranged program, rich in 
gems of music and dance, and including a number of 
last week's favorite productions as well as many new 
works, is as follows: Part I. Little Symphony — Les Fetes 
de I'Amour (G. Ph. Rameau), Two Aubades (Ed. Lalo). 
Poem (Charles T. Griffes), Georges Barrere; East and 
West (Charles S. Skilton). 

Part II. Ballet Intime — Deception (Schubertl. Butli 
Page, Amata Grassi. Caird Leslie; Mazurka (Chopin), 
Adolph Bolm; Serenade (Georges Hue), Little Sym- 
phony; Irish Dance (Grainger). Mareit Leeras. Caird 
Leslie; Les Precieux Ridicules (Prokofieff). Ruth Page. 
Adolph Bolm: Panaderos (Glazounoff), Margit Leeras; 
Fantaisie Chinoise (Seelig), Ruth Page, Caird Leslie, 
Serge Orloft, Senia Gluckoff; Torch Dance (Debussy), 
Ruth Page, Margit Leeras, Amata Grassi; Suggestion 
Diabolique (Prokofieff), Adolph Bolm; Menuet (Lully), 
Little Symphony; The Bee (Schubert), Ruth Page; 
Pav^nne (Paure), Margit Leeras. Caird Leslie; Assyrian 
Dance (Lazare Saminsky), Adolph Bolm. Tickets can be 
secured at Sherman, Clay & C^ompany this afternoon 
and at the theatre after ten o'clock tomorrow morning. 



Not So Tuneful 

Toinette — "I hear there was lots of music at Nellie's 
house last night." 

Tony — "Yes! Charlie proposed and gave her a brass 
band." — Rutgers. 



Muriel Randolph Grant 

SOPHAIVO — TEACHER OP VOICE 

Voice Placing a Specialty 

Studio: Koltler & Chase Bldgr. 



Frnnklln Snns 



Kearny t)4S4 



BY ROSALIA HOUSMAN 

Songs of Harry T, Burleigh and the Music of A. Walter 

Kramer 

These two names which I am coupling are really well 
contrasted and each has given us and American Music 
a splendid contrlhution. It is not out of respect to hie 
age (as Mr. Burleigh is the older or the two men), 
that I mention him first, but Just an agreeable accident. 
Mr. Burleigh has always been known as the first musi- 
cian to bring the Negro Spirituals to our concert plat- 
form and no one is more qualified to do it than he. He 
has had training under Dvorak and other well known 
musicians, and as he is of the negro race it is fitting 
that he should be the authentic spokesman of the race. 
But to show his wider versatility, Mr. Burleigh sent 
me a number of other songs to discuss, not in any way 
based on negro melody. In all of them there is a 
melodic charm and fine feeling for the text, particularly 
in the Wood of Finvara, to a poem of Arthur Symons. 

Here is a big, broadly thought-out art song, which is 
sincerely beautiful. It is dedicated to Mary Jordan, as 
are other things of his. I know she has introduced many 
of his songs (Deep River is also dedicated to her), and 
that they are fellow soloists at Temple Emanuel here. 
BVagments and Down by the Sea are also emotional 
songs, and very grateful to the singer. Burleigh him- 
self being a singer, naturally considers the artist. And 
the proof of it is, that they are constantly being sung. 
McCormack has used several — Little Mother of Mine, 
and Under a Blazing Star, and is always scoring a suc- 
cess with them. Were I a Star is frankly a love song 
with a direct appeal, simple to do. In Summer is a 
better, bigger thing, and is another art work, as we 
are proud to have from Mr. Burleigh. 

\A^alter Kramer sent me a representative list of his 
work, including piano music, an Eclogue for violin, and 
numerous songs. These have been on countless pro- 
grams in the East, but I believe are less known West, 
and it is to introduce these two men that this short 
article is written. 

Let me mention the piano music first. Mr. Kramer's 
idiom is modern, yet not aggressively so. He has felt 
the trend of the times, and taken to himself only the 
best of it, and in giving it back to the world, has shown 
that his personal note, after all, is clear and distinctive. 
He understands the modern keyboard, and through 
this knowledge has made some of his loveliest effects. 
One is conscious of it in the three Preludes, op. 33, 
as well as in the Intermezzo, and the Fragment, op. 4, 
Nos. 1 and 2. The latter has been appearing on all of 
Grainger's recent programs and was a success at the 
New York recital. I would class this piano music as 
mood paintings, as there is sucli a strong feeling of 
color throughout. Harmonically, Mr. Kramer is very 
plastic, and that is one of the reasons why his music 
sounds so spontaneous, almost as if improvised. I do 
not mean to Imply that it is formless, rather that it 
has an indefinable quality of freshness. 

I feel this less in the Valse Triste, but often in the 
songs. The two violin selections I have are the Eclogue 
and Chant Negre, which later appears as .a piano solo 
also. Its chief cliarm is its naivete, and it is subtly 
harmonized. The Eclogue, which has appeared on Kreis- 
ler's programs, is a miniature tone-poem, beginning 
soulfully on the G string, and mounting in intensity as 
it takes in all the instrument. Nowhere is Mr. Kramer's 
warm, melodic gift more in evidence. 

But it is the songs that are best known, and of them 
it is hot easy to pick a favorite. There is the Last 
Hour, which has been widely sung; Allah, and Tears, 
all of which show that spontaneity so characteristic of 
all Mr. Kramer's music. Tears is not easy to sing, 
hut I find it one of the very best, even more lovely 
than The Faltering Dusk set to a poem of Louis XJnter- 
meyer's. Both in the poem and the music, a great deal 
is expressed by the simplest means — it is an adequate 
setting. The two Teasdale poems, Swans, and Joy, are 
again different, yet alike. Joy carries you on in its 
pulsing beat, strong and alive. This poem has had 
many musical gowns made for it, none fit it better than 
this. Of Swans I want to say that I like it best of them 
all, as it is a musical and very free expression, such 
as one rarely finds within bar limits. It is diflScuIt to 
sing, and should be done by a high and lyric voice. 
There is a rich sense of color here — chords interweave 
and melt away, and the result is lovely. When one has 
become acquainted with these, I feel sure that you 
will also want to know other works, and you surely 
will find some to please every taste. 

We can be very proud of both these Americans, whose 
work is so different, yet so American. These two names 
are frequently on the same programs, so they can 
stand together here. Get acquainted with their music, 
and remember the names, they are well worth it. 



Sir Henry Heyman, one of the most beloved and old- 
est members of San Francisco's musical circle, has just 
been remembered by another very famous violinist and 
teacher, Leopold Auer. The remembrance came in the 
nature of a very wonderful book written by Mr. Auer, 
and in which he lias placed a beautiful inscription to 
Sir Henry. The reason why Sir Henry is delighted with 
this token is not only because the book is of real 
musical significance, but also for the reason that it 
comes to him from a very dear friend of long duration. 
These two men have known each other for years and 
have enjoyed many an hour together, in which they 
have conversed upon the subject which is dearest to 
them both — the violin and its interpreters. While Sir 
Henry was East last year he was the guest of Leopold 
Auer upon several occasions, and there in his home met 
many of the most famous violinists of this decade. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




Graveure 

Pacific Coast Tour 

will open 

December 15th 

and include 

California, Oregon 
and Washington 



Loiilii Graveure, on California MukH, Son FrnuclBco 



For Dates and Terms 

W. H. C. BURNETT 

626 Ford Building Detroit, Mich. 



THE SUMMER SESSION 

OF 

THE CORNISH SCHOOL 

Drama ■ Music ■ Dance 
GUEST TEACHERS 

MAURICE BROWNE and ELLEN VAN VOLKENBURG, Directors of THE SCHOOL OF THE THEA- 
TRE. June to October. MORONI OLSEN and a corps of eight other teachers. Classes in Play Acting, Play 
Staging, Play Writing and Puppet Production. 

ADOLPH BOLM of the Bolin Ballet Intime. Classes for Amateur and Professional Dancers. Normal Classes 
for Teachers. July 11 to August 6. 

E. ROBERT SCHMITZ, Famous French Pianist. Classes for Artists and Teachers. August 5 to Septem- 
ber 15. 

SERGEI KLIBANSKY, the Vocal Instructor of New York City. July 18 to August 27. 

CALVIN BRAINERD CADY, Music-Education Normal for Private and Public School Teachers. July 13 
to August 27. 

BOYD WELLS, Eminent American Pianist. July and August. 

FREE SCHOLARSHIPS are offered in all departments. 

Address: 

THE CORNISH SCHOOL 

900 East Pine Street, Seattle 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Week's Music Events in Los Angeles 

ByBRUNODAVlDUSSHER 



Los Angeles, May 2.— Estelle Heartt-Dreyfus, the 
much-admired contralto, celebrated her return from a 
tour around the world with a program of great artistic 
refinement. Few recitals have been given here in which 
vocal attainment, interpretation and selections were of 
such high standard and so closely balanced. Few artists 
indeed are able to build distinguished and distinctive 
programs as this artist does. Few can Imbue their selec- 
tions and renditions with so much personality without 
creating a disagreeable impression of premeditation. 
While all of Mrs. Dreyfus' work is letter-true, it Is spir- 
ited and spiritualized, spontaneous to a degree which 
shuts off any danger of the "letter killing the spirit." 
There was much applause, many encores and floral 
tributes were exchanged. 

Mme. Dreyfus was vocally at her best. She masters 
the production of tone with a leisureliness which makes 
one forget technical difficulties. This singer is truly an 
adept in varying her methods with the character of her 
songs, whether they be American, Norwegian, Spanish 
or Russian. This is being done, it seems almost uncon- 
sciously, which proves how fully she enters into the 
spirit of the various compositions. Her contralto is col- 
orful and even in all registers, has breadth and flexibil- 
ity. The notes are always well placed, round and clear. 
Her diction is perfect and the pitch not only true but 
captivating in its absolute purity, specially during the 
rise and fall of the melody in some of the Spanish songs 
which, being of folklore character, are supported only 
by a minimum of harmonization and piano accompani- 
ment at times. One is almost grateful that the human 
language does contain consonants, for Mme. Dreyfus 
gains phonetic values from them which prove that all 
languages are musical. It merely depends on how they 
are sung. 

The first groups of songs consisted of Nocturne (Chad- 
wick), Where My Caravan Has Rested (Lohr), Songs My 
Mother Taught Me (Dvorak), Flower Bain (Schneider), 
My Swan (Grieg), The Mirror (Ferrari), I Passed by 
Your Window (Brahe). They had been selected by re- 
quest and served as a preludium to an interesting vocal 
chapter of Spanish numbers, all of them new to this 
city, and gathered by the singer during her recent visit 
to Spain. 

These songs were given in Spanish and in the mood 
and spirit of their native country. The chanting in the 
Watchman's song by Pedrell, with its religious note, 
was given admirably. There was an almost mystic under- 
current in the lullaby, called Mother. In these, as in The 
Wayfarer, all three by the same composer, one had to 
admire the beautiful phrasing and tonal coloring with 
which the singer enriched the simplicity of the folklore 
themes. The Wayfarer is specially interesting, as the 
melody is based on mere syllables, not on words, which 
enhanced the charm of the singing voice. Lavanders' 
love song. The Driver, gave Mme. Dreyfus opportunity 
to produce high notes of color and limpidness, equal to 
those of the middle and lower register. In fact, her voice 
seems to have gained in the treble. Again in the Sere- 
nade, sung in two different versions by Hague and 
Nicholson, the Chula by the latter, Calleja's Farewell to 
the charming girls of Granada and Laparra's greeting 
to Sevilla, Mme. Dreyfus displayed a wealth of local 
coloring, authoritative interpretation and rhythmic elas- 
ticity which made her singing delightfully appealing. 
Always, while striving tor realism, fine discretion is used 
as to effects. She applies a specific portamento in the 
Spanish songs which in nowise infringes on the strict 
accuracy of her notes, yet which adds a touch of emo- 
tion that well fits these melodies. 

Characteristic as the Spanish group were the Rus- 
sian songs by Rachmaninoff (The Soldier's Bride), 
Gretchaninoff (Over the Steppe), Korsakoff (Song of In- 
dia) and Moussorgsky's Hopak. It was as if Mme. Drey- 
' fus employed a different method of nuancing the heauties 
of these yearning strains. The Hopak was enlivened 
with fine elan. 

Of the three manuscript songs by Mme. Ariadne Rou- 
manova, the words taken from the Sanskrit, the one en- 
titled You and I is musically most valuable. Her other 
songs. Sleep, The Weeping Plant and Gypsy song, con- 
tain much atmospheric value. Mme. Dreyfus' interpre- 
tation of The Weeping Plant was impressive. As a com- 
poser of piano pieces Mme. Roumanova is also typically 
Russian, but is less eloquent than as a writer of songs. 
Her piano works reveal little melodic strength. Undoubt- 
edly Mme. Roumanova is greatly gifted, though she 
»■- ems influenced by such composers as Liadow. She is 
a.oo a good accompaniste. 

All of the songs, with the exception of the Russian 
group, were accompanied by Miss Grace Andrews, who 
performed a feat of memory by rendering her part by 
heart. 

Announcement that the California Opera Company is 
to have a two weeks' engagement at the Mason Opera 
House beginning Monday, May 23, has immediately at- 
tracted the attention of music-lovers. Mr. Wm. G. Stew- 
art, managing director, since the recent brilliant per- 
formances of lolanlhe, has kept his capable forces well 
intact, and is now even adding to their numerical, as 
well as their artistic strength for the forthcoming pro- 
ductions at the Broadway house. 

It was Mr. Stewart's original intention to produce 
Firefly during the first week of the Mason engagement, 
and Fra Diavolo during the second half, but owing to 
a very general demand for another of the Gilbert and 
Sullivan works he has selected Mikado as the second 
offering of the new organization. This opera Mr. Stew- 
art produced at the Academy of Music in Brooklyn two 
years ago, the production being acclaimed the most per- 



fectly staged and finely sung performance of its kind 
ever heard there. It will be presented upon a plane of 
equal beauty and artistic excellence at the Mason. 

Roy Atwell, the eminent singing comedian, who sang 
the role of Jenkins in the original cast assembled to 
produce Rudolf Friml's The Firefly, has been secured 
by Mr. Wm. G. Stewart for the production of that de- 
lightful operetta at the Mason Opera House, the week of 
May 23rd. Mr. Atwell is one of the finest character sing- 
ing artists of the day, and toured the large cities in the 
Friml opera with Emma Trentini. It is probable Mr. 
Atwell will also appear in the opera Mikado to be pro- 
duced at the Mason by the California Opera Company 
during the second week of the forthcoming engagement. 
Atwell is a favorite with Paciflc Coast audiences and 
has many admirers also in San Francisco. 

It is probable the California Opera Company, states 
Business Manager Charles R. Baker, will be heard in 
several of the larger cities of the State following the 
Los Angeles engagement. 

Brahm Van Den Berg, the eminent pianist, will ap- 
pear in recital, Wednesday evening. May 11, at Trinity 
Auditorium. He has prepared a program of modern com- 
positions which will include the Senate by Leopold Go- 
dowsky, which is a most interesting work. It is de- 
scribed by the composer as being "autobiographical in 
character, but possesses a symbolism applicable to all." 

The Senate is divided into five movements, the First 
being the tragedy of life as it seems to youth, the Sec- 
ond is tender and lyrical, the Third is the hurly-burly 
of life, its restless activity and hectic gaiety and finally 
its tragic assertiveness, the Fourth is lite in its more 
atlahle moments. The final movement is the Retrospect 
in which all of life is reviewed and in conclusion is the 
"Apotheosis of life and of death, in which the uncer- 
tainty of the one and the inexorable certainty of the 
other find their balance in Nirvana." The complete pro- 
gram reads as follows: Senate (Leopold Godowsky), 
Au Jardin du Vieux Serail (B. R. Blanchet), El Puerto 
(I. Albeniz), Islamey (M. Balakirew), Etude No. 3 (Pag- 
anini-Liszt), Nocturne No. 3 (F. Liszt), Rhapsodie No. 
6 (F. Liszt). 

Students of violin welcome the return of Oscar Sell- 
ing, the well known artist and instructor. Mr. Selling 
expects to present a number of his pupils in recital be- 
fore long. His ensemble class is growing fast. 

A 'cello and piano sonata evening by Ilya Bronson 
and May McDonald Hope is announced for June 9th. 



MOTION PICTURE MUSIC 



At Grauman's — Not only have the Sunday Morning 
Concerts at Grauman's maintained a fine standard as to 
playing and interpretation under the baton of Misha 
Guterson, but they have also featured definite program- 
matic ideas as described in the various reviews of the 
last month or two. 

Yesterday Conductor Guterson took the subject of 
"Flowers" for his musical essay and achieved most 
pleasing orchestral descriptions. His method of holding 
a certain thought during the concert, varying it of course 
in due measure, make the concerts instructive and de- 
cidedly attractive to the public as the crowded houses 
and applause indicate each time. 

The program opened with Goldmark's overture-fan- 
tasy In the Garden, which with its beautiful garlands 
of melodies and rich bouquets of colorful harmonies 
found apt reproduction by the orchestra. No doubt Gold- 
mark will be played many years hence though he is not 
so well known in this country as he merits. 

Then followed a musical flower show of "exhibits" by 
Bendix, Nevin, Lehar, Macbeth and MacDowell, charm- 
ingly displayed, with a daintiness a flower music de- 
mands. It was a program of numerous lovely miniature 
effects. 

Even the soli by Miss Constance Balfour, the Flower 
Song from Gounod's Faust and Violets by Ellen Wright 
were in keeping with the program. Miss Balfour pos- 
sesses fine technic. Her notes are well produced, clear 
and reveal appealing expression. 

The score to the picture What Every Woman Knows 
is a clever medley of Scotch and English airs inter- 
spersed with descriptive episodes of dramatic value and 
has much local color. 

At the California — Jack London's new photo-drama, 
The Little Fool, current offering at the California Thea- 
tre, has been cleverly set to music by Carli D. Elinor, of 
the California Concert Orchestra. It amounts to another 
of those refreshing scores he so often selects. 

Mr. Elinor has chosen several of the brightest num- 
bers from BYiml's You're In Love, the late comic opera 
triumph in New York. Alone With You is a very popular 
song, and Mr. Elinor found it meritorious enough to 
use it as the theme for Paula and Evan, the two leading 
characters in the play. The maestro produces a very 
amusing effect where the girls in the story play "leap- 
frog" and indulge in other antics. He has enhanced these 
bagatelles by using Everybody Shimmies Now, and has 
introduced Lake's Lone Song as the theme for Richard, 
another prominent character in the play. 

Mr. Elinor cleverly interprets the Stag Hunt scene in 

Merry England with musical accompaniment, opening 

with a quiet passage suggesting early morning, when 

the mists hang low over the mountain crags. The horns 

(Continued on Page 9, Column 2) 



SYLVAIN NOACK 

CoiiuertmnMter PhUhnrmonlc Orcfaeiiira of I,oM AdvcIcb 
120 Saulb Ozford Avenue 

Limited number ot pupils for violin pliylnB and 

CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

VIOLIN— MUSICAL THEORY 

Faculty Member College of Music 

306 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles— Wed. and 8«t. 

JAY PLC WE— Solo Flutist 

Philharmonic Orchestra — Trio Intlme 

Studio: 334 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles 

Res. Phone: 579064 

ANN THOMPSON~PM«/.f/^ 

PIANISTE TO RUTH ST. DBMS 

RecUals — Concert h — Instruction 

In Cnre MubIcqI Courier, New York 

Manngement Hnrry H. Hall 

DA VOL SANDERS 



Main 2180 



JOHN SMALLMAN 

Baritone Concert Bn^aeementR — Conductor Los Anseles 
Oratorio Society 

For information see E. M. Barger, Secretary, 330 Blanch- 
ard Hall, Los Angeles. Calif. 



HENRI de 


BUSSCHER 






Belgian Tenor 




^^B js» fs;>I^^H 


Solo Oboe, Plillbarmonic 
OrchcHtrn, Lou Angrelea 

Teacher oj 
OBOE i^ SINGING 

Coaching for 
Concert and Opera 

Stndio: 1500 S. Figaeroa 

Tel. 23195 
Res. Phone Vermont 1625 









GRAUMAN'S 

MILLION DOLLAR THEATRE 
Broadway at Third 
LOS ANGELES 



SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

MISHA GUTERSON, CONDUCTOR 

Sunday Morning Concerts 

Every Sunday, Starting at 11 A. M. 

Soloists From Operatic and Concert Stage 

ALL SEATS RESERVED 
— at— 

50 Cents 

and War Tax 

Which Includes the privilege of remaining for the 
regular Grauman Photoplay program. It is advisa- 
ble that seats be secured several days in advance 
in order to secure choice locations and avoid wait- 
ing in line on Sunday. 



Maestro William Tyroler 

OF THE 

Metropolitan Opera House, New York 

begs to announce that he will establish a 

Master School for Grand Opera and Concert 

in connection with a 

Chorus School for Grand Opera and 

Oratorio 

in Los Angeles 

Address applications to 

127 North Boylston St., Los Angeles 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium Bidg., Los Angeles 



COLLEGE OF Ml SIC 

Universily of Southern California 

SrMMEK SKSSION 

June ::Tlh li> AukiikI cllli 

>lnMler <'Iiihncm oimiliirtfd by 

(>l,<i V STKI'.II. Xuird rilinliil 

:i::ai south KiKIU-rrun Strt'cl — South .14rt 

Send tor CatnluK 



J. SPENSER-KELLY, Baritone 

THE ABSOLUTELY CORRECT METHOD OP VOICE 

PRODUCTIOIV 

PupllN nccepted in every bronch of the Toeal art. 

Studio. :<44 >lu>l<--Arti< Illd£. Phone lOONS 

PATRICK O'NEIL, Tenor 

CONCERTS VOICE PRODUCTION RECITALS 

Stodloat 001-02 Mtijeattc Theatre Bids.. Loa Ansrelea 

Phooei 1170G 

Brahm van den Ber^ 

Concert Plnniitt, now hookini? for 1021-22 
llnnnKemenl: Krnnee Goldnater. SIO MnJ. Theatre. 1.VINO 

ILYA BRONSON 

Solo CcllUt Philharmonic Orchestra. Member Trio Intlrae 
«Dd Loa Aneeleri Trio. Inntrnctloa, Chamber 

Mufllc. Recitals 
Stndlot S«15 Lb MIrada. Phone Holly S4VM 

ALFRED KASTNER, Harpist 

Solo Harpist Philharmonic Orchestra. Member Trio Intlme 

Recital — Instruction — Concerts 

Studio: 240 S. Gramercy Place, 560481 

Alexander Saslavsky— Violinist 

Director Sn«lnv»ky Chamber MuhIc Society 

Concerts In Los Angeles. San Francisco. San Diego 
Slodio: 422 ninnchnrd Hull. Phone 100S2 

JAMISON VOCAL QUARTET 

ConcertH — Recltaln — Club ProjrrnmK— Maricaret >1eBi»er. 
Hn«el II. Andemon. Edna C. Voorbecw. Dalny V. Prldcnux. 
Abble Norton JamlMoii. Dirct-tor- AcconiimnlNte. 2H24 S. 

The Heartt - Dreyfus Studios 



ZOELLNER QUARTET 

Manneement II. & A. CiilhertHon, Aeolian Hall. View York 



PerKOnnl Addr 



i::.'0 \\ IndK 



vd., Loa Angelea 



FLORENCE MIDDAUGH- Contralto 

ConrertH — Orn(orlo — Recitals 
Taeaday and Frldfiy MornlnKM, .'tl-l Moalc Arts Bldg:.. 
I.OM AnsrelcN. Studio Phone 100H2. Realdenee Wllsh. R70O 

GREGORY KRESHOVER 



HELEN KLOKKE 

DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION 

CONCERTS— RECITALS— CLUB PROGRAMS 
tiunnccement: France Goldwnter. HIO MnJ. Theatre. 154S0 

HENRY SVEDROFSKY 



VIOLIN .1ND ENSEMBLE PL.WING 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 
3012 South Western Ave. Phone West 5006 



CALIFORNIA THEATER 

Main Near Mnlh, LoK .tneelcn 
Mont Artlxtic Thcater-IIonie of the 

California Concert Orchestra 

Carll D. Elinor, Director 

FIneat Motion Picture OrchcKlra In the Weat 

I>A1L\ SVMI'HtiMC CONfl'iKTS 



OSCAR SEILING 

CONCERT VIOLI.MST AND INSTRUCTOR 
>ur and Una He 



Haa Returned From Hix Km. 

Ilia \loil 

Studio: ].'t24 S. FiRuerro 



no:i71 * 241)70 



udio 



HOMER GRUNN 

COMPOSER PIANIST 

rrla and Recitnia 



2'tlHO 



EARL MEEKER, Baritone 

4'oncertH — Herltnlit — lnp>lrucllnn 

SeoHon Ur^l.2.i >oiv llooklnK 

Studlot ^r,Wt So. Kl^ucron Phone mf>5 

Read the Pacific Coast Musical Review, the only mu 
steal paper in the west — %?, per year. 



FIRST WESTERN TOURj 

Philh arm onic Orch es tra 

of Los Angeles, California 

Founded by Management of 

W. A. Clark, Jr. L. E. Behymer 

Walter Henry Rothwell 

CONDUCTOR^ 

75 World-Famous Musicians Eight Distinguished Soloists 

Giving Forty Concerts in Thirty-five Cities 

Tour Starts Monday April 25th, 
ending Saturday May 28th. 



ITINERARY 



Bakerafleld, Calif. 
Freano. Calif. 
Sacramento. Calif. 
Chico, Calif. 



Aberdeen. Waah. 
Oiympln. Waah. 



ma. Waah. 


Boulder. Colo. 




»uln. Mont. 


Colorado Sprlnic 


a. Col 


Lodge. Mont. 


Denver. Colo. 




e, Mont. 


Salt Lake City, 


Utah 


nn. Mont. 


OKden. Utah 




iiEa, Mont. 


Reno. Nev. 




enne. Wyo. 


San Joae, Calif. 




ollina. Colo. 


Monrovia. Calif. 




Icy, Colo. 







Offices: 521 Philharmonic Auditorium Building, Los Angeles, Calif. 



ROLAND PAUL 

VtUCE CULTURE — COACHING IN REPERTOIRE 

OPERA CLASSES INCLUDING COMPLETE 

PRESENTATIONS 

Studio i:i24 S. PiKuerroa. Phone 21S05 



Now Is The Time 

To Arrange 

Your Bookings for Next Season 

Concert Tours and Recitals 

BOOKED BY 

HUBACH & RIGGLE 

Managers of Distinguished Artists 

1922 So. Hobart Blvd. Phone 72521 

Los Angeles 

Concert Tours Throughout 
The West 

Send Us Your Programs and Circulars 

NOW 



PIANO RECITAL 

BRAHM VAN DEN BERG 

EIMINENT DUTCH PIANIST 

Trinity Auditorium, Los Angelei 

PROGRAM 

Sonate Leopold Godowsky 

Au Jardin du Vieux Serail E. R. Blanchet 

El Puerto A. Albeniz 

Islamey M. Balakirew 

Etude No. 3 Paganini-Liszt 

Nocturne No. 3 F. Liszt 

Rhapsodie F. Liszt 

Management 

FRANCE GOLDWATER 



are then lieanl. The Jolly riders come up singing and 
hurry on to entrap their prey before It ventures from 
its lair. The chase follows and the dogs bark as they 
madly follow the horses and huntsmen. 



Earl Meeker, successful baritone. i.s preparing for an 
extensive concert tour during next season together with 
Ann Thompson, the gifted pianlstc. Reccnily Mr. Meeker 
won mucli applause during his recitals at the San Fer- 
nando High School and at the Harvard School. On May 
10th he will be hearii jofore the Shakespeare Club of 
Pasadena. T:,e Matinee Mu» al Club requested a pro- 



gram for June, as did the Santa Monica High School. In- 
cidentally. Mr. Meeker is one of our vocalists here who 
did their bit during the war. One of his pupils, Gilbert 
Smith, tenor, won first honors during the Young Artists' 
Contest and will appear during the Convention. 

Florence Middaugh, whose beautiful contralto and flne 
art of singing has made her well known in spite of the 
shortness of her sojourn, sang again with the Chapin 
Trio during the Ambassador Hotel series last Tuesday. 
Miss MIddaugh's selections and performance were well 
liked. 

In the Edison re-creations for tills month are listed the 
records made by the Zoellner quartet of MacDowell's 
To a Wild Rose and the adagio cantablle from one of 
Haydn's quartets. The Zoellners make their bow to Edi- 
son owners with these selections, which arc sure to be 
a splendid addition to any "record" library. 
(Continued on Page 12, Column 1) 



10 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MYRTLE CLAIRE DONNELLY CONCERT 

The spaoioua home of Miss Mary Loiiiwe Phehin, on 
WuBhington street, was the setting for the lovely pro- 
gram given by Miss Myrtle Claire Donnelly, soprano, 
in aid of the festival and carnival to be given for the 
beuellt of St. Ignatius Church. The beautiful rooms and 
patio were gorgeously decorated for the occasion, re- 
calling how music and springtime have been associated 
since (he beginning of the tonal art. Miss Donnelly has 
one of those rare voices which Once heard Is not to be 
forgotten. The youug artist is not only gifted with a 
beautiful voice, but is a favorite in society. She was 
received with genuine enthusiasm, and showered witli 
congratulations for her artistic rendition of her varied 
and well chosen numbers. 

Miss Donnelly was assisted by Noel Sullivan, basso, 
and Gyula Ormay, one of the foremost of our resident 
pianists. The program was as follows: (a) Tre Giorni 
(Nina) (Pergolesi), (b) Papillons (Chausson), (c) Min- 
uet (Mannon) (Puccini), Myrtle Claire Donnelly; (a) 
Berceuse de I'oubli (Rabey), (b) Donde te Hallas (Mex- 
ican Folk Song), (c) Supplication (Frank La Forge), 
(d) Cargoes (Dobson), Mr. Sullivan; (a) Wounded Birch 
(Gretchaninoff), (b) Berceuse (Gretchaninoff), (c) The 
Lass with the Delicate Air (Dr. Arne), Myrtle Claire 
Donnelly; Duet (Don Giovanni) (Gounod), Miss Don- 
nelly and Mr. Sullivan; Aria Romeo et Juliette (Gou- 
nod), Myrtle Claire Donnelly. 



PROGRAM OF TRANSCRIPTIONS AT MILLS 

The last of the series of Sunday evening organ re- 
citals given at Mills College this year by Wm. W. 
Carruth, organist, was offered Sunday evening, May 1st, 
at 7 o'clock, in Lisser Hall on the college campus. The 
program was unusual in that it was composed entirely 
of transcriptions. The use of transcriptions or arrange- 
ments on organ recital programs has been a subject of 
considerable controversy among organists and musi- 
cians. One side contending that for the most part tran- 
scriptions are ineffective and inartistic, and that so 
many beautiful compositions have heen written for the 
organ that the organist does not need to resort to 
adaptations of vocal and instrumental music; and that 
furthermore, by their use, he is discouraging compos- 
ers from writing for the organ. The other side assert 
that many compositions are more effective when ar- 
ranged for the organ than in their original form, and 
that the public would much rather hear them than 
many of the "dry" compositions of Bach, Handel, Rhein- 
herger, etc. The pro-transcriptionists claim that the or- 
gan is like a large orchestra, with an infinite variety of 
tonal effects, and capable of rendering ■ all kinds of 

Mr. Carruth was assisted by two students of the 
music department. Miss Lotta Harris, soprano, of Oro- 
ville, and Miss Anita Hough of Fruitvale, mezzo-soprano. 
The program follows: Piano transcriptions — Prelude in 
C sharp minor (Rachmaninoff-Lemare), Gavotte (Tours), 
Berceuse (Dreyschock-Homare), Song Without Words 
(Mendelssohn); vocal duet (Quis est Homo, from Ros- 
sini's Stabat Mater). Orchestral transcriptions — Adagiet- 
ta. Minuet, from L'Arlesienne (Bizet), Pastorale Mys- 
tique (Massenet) ; vocal duet, Recordare from Verdi's 
Requiem; Operatic transcriptions — Hymn to the Sun 
from Le Coq d'Or (Rimsky-Korsakoff ) , Flower duet, 
finale to Act III, from Mme. Butterfly (Puccini), Grand 
March from Aida (Verdi). 



a noteworthy performance. Richard Hunter sang a 
Spring Serenade and an aria from Rlgolelto. Here Is a 
voice of great promise for it is sweet, rich and pure, 
will) a groat amount of flexibility. For a voice of this 
type he has dramatic force and he made a distinct hit 
with his splendid singing. Corinne Koefer employs her 
fine mezzo voice with unusual discretion and sang her 
songs with style and emotional warmth. Lovelier singing 
cannot be imagined than what Margaret Mack did. Her 
voice is clear and true and of a delightful timbre, 
which is remarkably even and flowing. She captured her 
audience by the way she sang the Madame Butterfly 
aria for it contained a depth of understanding and 
sympathy. 

Mrs. B. Williams has an exquisite coloratura voice 
which carries exceedingly well to the farthest end of the 
hall. She displayed splendid vocal technic and her many 
coloratura phrases were richly colored and shaded. She 
sings accurately in tune and enunciates distinctly. Mrs. 
Williams has every qualification to become a very splen- 
did artist and it will be most interesting to watch her 
artistic growth. Mrs. J. Golden sang the Cry of Rachel 
and the Seguidille from Carmen, which served to re- 
veal both the fine quality of her voice and her dramatic 
temperament. Her voice is velvety and vibrant and it 
contains some excellent high notes which she produces 
with as much ease as the luscious tones of her con- 
tralto register. 

Others on the program whose singing gave great 
pleasure were: Miss Margaret O'Brien, Miss Myrell 
Rosenthal, Miss Marcelle Lehm'ann, Miss Helen Mau- 
ser, Miss Elizabeth Magee, and Mrs. Carolyn Graham. 
Mrs. J. Baalman again delighted with the excellence of 
her accompaniments, playing in a manner which be- 
spoke unusual sympathetic understanding for the 
singer and displayed sound and tasteful musicianship. 

C. H. 



CAILLEAU PUPILS SING AT PALACE HOTEL 

An audience the size of which would have pleased 
many a full-fledged artist was the one that heard the 
pupils of Madame Rose Relda Cailleau at the Palace 
Hotel on April 28th. The huge ballroom was filled to its 
capacity by the many friends of the young vocalists, 
who considered the affair of sufficient importance to 
attend. Even thougli the concert was in the nature of 
a pupils' recital it was such that warranted tlie spon- 
taneous and enthusiastic applause that was demon- 
strated. Pupils' recitals are more or less alike in one 
respect, and this concert did not prove the exception. 
The young singer who does exceptionally fine work in 
the studio is frequently so overcome with, nervousness 
that her best efforts are handicapped as a result of 
this sudden attack of stage fright. On the other hand 
the one who sometimes causes her teacher a bit of un- 
easiness proves a general surprise. 

They seem to receive a certain stimulant wbich helps 
them through, their ordeal and they come out flying a 
banner of success. At this concert several of the thir- 
teen students who rendered the program of splendid 
selections earned for themselves fresh laurels, thus re- 
fiecting due and just credit to the excellence of the 
training imparted to them by Madame Cailleau. Owing 
to the length of the program and the great number of 
participants I regret that I can mention in detail but 
a few of those whose work stood forth as being spe- 
cially praiseworthy. I trust that this will be understood 
by the few whose efforts will have to be omitted in 
this review and that they will not think that the rea- 
son is lack of appreciation due their singing. 

Miss Madeline O'Brien's voice never showed to better 
advantage than while singing the Romeo and Juliet 
Waltz of Gounod's. Everyone who has ever laid eyes on 
the music must realize its tremendous difficulties, but 
they did not seem to hamper Miss O'Brien in the least. 
Her voice quality was of a lovely texture and specially 
delightful were her pianissimo tones. She executed her 
phrases with skill and invested a great amount of ex- 
pression. Miss Blanche KoUman is always charming to 
listen to. One reason for this is due to her personal 
poise and bearing and the assurance of her delivery. 
Miss KoUman makes up her mind what she wants to do 
and she goes ahead and does it like a real musician and 
artist. Her voice is gaining constantly and her inter- 
pretations are backed with intellect and taste. She gave 



BAKERSFIELD ENJOYS FINE RECITAL 

Mrs. Dwight L. Clarke Gives Excellent Song and Piano 

Recital for Harmonia Departnnent of 

Woman's Club of BakersfieJd 

Mrs. Dwight L. Clark, formerly known to San 
Franciscans as Edna Willcox, gave a delightful song 
and piano recital before the Harmonia Department of 
the Woman's Club of Bakersfield at Castle Hall of that 
city on Monday evening, April 4th. The following review, 
which appeared in the Bakersfield paper, is evidence of 
the success scored by Mrs. Clarke: 

Typifying the spirit of spring in a costume of em- 
broidered green tulle, Mrs. Dwight L. Clarke seemed 
more spirit than flesh in her recital last night at Castle 
Hall. There was not an available seat in the hall, and 
the crowd which came early and sat in tense silence 
throughout the evening testified to the ability of th.e 
musician and the high regard in which she is beld by 
the people of Bakersfield. 

It is greatly to Mrs. Clarke's credit that she does 
not hold herself aloof from the community, denying 
herself and her talents to the people who are so eager 
for something really good in music. Once each year 
Mrs. Clarke gives a program of music for the Harmonia 
Department of the Woman's Club and the public. -It 
is done without any thought of compensation — simply 
as her contribution to the musical department of the 
club. 

Too often the artist and the woman are two distinct 
personalities, but not so with Mrs. Clarke. She always 
is her own charming self. She is conscious of her audi- 
ence and quick to recognize the interest and response. 
Mrs. Clarke's unusual ability as a pianiste came as a 
surprise to many who had knowii of her only as a 
singer. Her work at the piano is brilliant. There is an 
assurance — a ready understanding — that comes with 
training, experience and character. The greater number 
of the songs were sung in English, much to the delight 
of the audience. The voice, now high, now low, now soft, 
now loud, was always clear as the notes of the lark. 

In the song, Lo, hear the gentle lark, the singer 
showed a remarkable control and variety of tone. Bon 
Jour ma Belle, was delightful. The thought in the little 
comedy was brought forward and the music was only 
the medium of expression. The French and Italian 
music found their places in offerings from Massenet, 
Gounod and Puccini. Miss Isabel Forker contributed not 
a little to the completeness of the evening, being more 
than satisfactory as an accompanist. Great quantities 
of flowers were received by the two musicians from 
the Harmonia Department and friends. 



THE MOUNTAIN PLAY 

More than usual interest is- manifested in the annual 
Mountain Play, to be given in the wonderful amphi- 
theatre on the slopes of Mt. Tamalpais on Sunday after- 
noon, May 22nd, at 2 o'clock. This will make the ninth 
offering of the Moimtain Play Association, an organ- 
ization unique of its kind and now world-famous, and 
this year Tamelpa, a legendary play of Indian char- 
acter by Dan W, Totheroh, will be presented for the 
first time. 

The natural settings of the outdoor stage have never 
been touched and this anxious care to preserve the 



Musical Clubs— Attention! 

Shigers - histrumeritalists - Lecturers 
Supplied for All Programs 

LEAH HOPKINS 

Concert and Lecture Management 
408 Stockton St., San Jranchco , Tel. Kiarny 344.2 



work of nature unspoiled, though Ideal In character, 
makes the selection of plays an exceedlnglj' dlfflcult 
matter. No iirtKlclal lighting or effects can be Intro- 
duced and the drama lias an almost Impossible task In 
measuring up to the magnlllcent stage setting which 
nature has provided, 

Tamelpa will be the first original play to be enacted 
on the mountain, and has been especially written for 
the wonderful stage by one who has often acted there 
and knows it well. Special Indian music has been pre- 
pared for the play by George B. Edwards, the well- 
known composer, the cast will be made ui> of the best 
players of the association, and Garnet Holme, as usual, 
will have charge of the production. The chorus and 
dances will be given by members of the Alpine Club, 
genuine mountaineers who always aid the Mountain 
Play Association. 

Mrs. D, E. F. Easton will again manage the produc- 
tion. The officers of the IVIountain Play Association in- 
clude R. F. O'Rourke, president; John B. Catlin, first 
vice-president; Hon. William Kent, second vice-presi- 
dent; Leroy G. Harvey, treasurer, and Mrs. D. E. F. 
Easton, secretary-manager. The board of directors Is 
composed of Miss JjUlu J. Blumber, Miss Mabel 
O'Rourke, W. L. Courtwright, .T. W. Dolliver, Will Fal- 
ley, Harvey L. Hansen, Homer T. Miller, John J. Mazza, 
R. L. Radke, Edward Rainey, Henry Regan, C. F. Run- 
yon, Ralston L. White and Al, Pinther. 



RICHARD STRAUSS TO VISIT AMERICA 



lent which will be of intense interest 
to music lovers throughout the country has just been 
issued by the International Concert Direction, Inc., Mil- 
ton Diamond, director. 

Richard Strauss, the famous and universally known 
composer, conductor and pianist, will come to America 
under the auspices of this management, for a three 
months' tour beginning in October. His last appearance 
here was in 1904, when practically all his symphonic 
works were produced under his own baton by the 
Wetzler Symphony Orchestra at a "Strauss Festival" 
in Carnegie Hall. Since then he has appeared in almost 
every great city of Europe. 

Here, it is announced that Mr. Strauss will conduct a 
series of orchestral concerts, three to be given at the 
Metropolitan Opera House, and a series of "Strauss 
Evenings," assisted by some noted singer, interpreting 
Strauss' compositions, with the compoesr himself at 
the piano. There is a rumor of certain operatic per- 
formances as guest conductor of his own compositions, 
but of this the management remains silent. 

Tlie achievements of Richard Strauss are familiar to 
almost everyone, musician and layman alike; He has 
conducted some of the greatest orchestras in Europe, 
and is a prolific and probably the most gifted composer 
alive today. He has written, besides numerous sym- 
phonies, operas and selections for nearly every instru- 
ment, a varied list of chorals, anthems and practically 
every combination for voice and instrument. Among his 
best known and most beautiful songs are Staendchen, 
Traum durch die Dammerung and Sehnsucht. Of his 
operas, Der Rosenkavalier — produced at the Metropoli- 
tan several years ago with great success — and Elektra 
are well known, and our own Mary Garden has made 
Salome a by-word. 

Strauss' Legend of Joseph, a pantomime ballet first 
produced in Paris by the Russian Ballet in 1914, has 
recently been one of the big features of Berlin's Fash- 
ion Week. ^ 

Evelyn Phelan, a very brililant young piano pupil of 
George Stewart McManus. played for Alfred Cortot re- 
cently in Stockton and received hearty commendation 
from the famous French pianist. Miss Phelan and Mr. 
Cortot played a suite for two pianos after which Cortot 
expressed great delight over the young lady's perform- 
ance and pronounced for her a very promising career. 
Mr. Cortot spoke most enthusiastically about Miss Phe- 
lan's talents to many other well-known musicians. Mr. 
McManus has every reason to feel very proud over the 
success of his pupil. 

Miss Ida Hjerleid-Shelley, well known in Sacramento 
as one of the foremost piano intructresses, is most for- 
tunate in presenting before the musical public of that 
city very talented young pupils. Their successes reflect 
great credit upon the teacher who is responsible for 
the excellency of their work and under whose splendid 
guidance their achievements are being attained. Edna 
May Will,, the twelve-year-old child of Mr. and Mrs. 
S. E. Will, gave a piano recital recently at the studio 
of her teacher and was ably assisted by two of her ■ 
fellow students, and rendered a very difficult as well 
as classical program, The concert proved to be most 
successful and was enthusiastically appreciated by the 
large gathering who attended. 



Henrik Gjerdrum appeared in a joint recital with So- 
phie Hammer, lyric soprano, on April 8th at Hotel Clare- 
mont, Berkeley, under the auspices of the Scandinavian 
Club of the University of California. Mr. Gjerdrum was 
most enthusiastically received. He played several com- 
positions of the northern composers, including numbers 
by Grieg and Olsen. Several engagements as accompan- 
ist have kept Mr. Gjerdrum busy. In that capacity he ap- 
peared recently with the Pacific Musical Society and 
on April 9th with the Scandinavian Singers at theii 
annual concert. 



Johanna Kristoffy 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



THESE MEN ARE EDITORS 

of the Progressive Series of Piano Lessons 
LEOPOLD GODOWSKY, Editor-in-Chief 



JOSEF HOFMANN 
EMIL SAUER 

W. S. B. MATHEWS 



CO-EDITORS 

EDGAR STILLMAN KELLEY 
EMERSON WHITHORNE 

ARTHUR EDWARD JOHNSTONE 



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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



LOS ANGELES NEWS 



(Continued from imge It, column 3) 
A "full dress" operatic performance of Cavalleria RuB- 
ticnna was given last Sunday by Roland Paul's Opera 
Class at the Egan Little Theatre. It was an operatic 
event of distinct artistic merits regarding solo and choral 
work. The presentation was given witli professional 
endeavors and stood far beyond the usual amateurish 
display of artist's pupils. Roland Paul has assembled 
promising talent among the soloists and the chorus 
wliich showed excellent vocal training and dramatic un- 
derstanding. Naomi Hoffman was the prima donna of 
the enjoyable performance. Miss Hoffman is a highly 
gifted soprano who .some day will be found among the 
headliners. Her voice shows great range, beauty and 
clarity of tone and warmth of expression. Histrionically 
too she did noteworthy work, Clarence Norton as Alfio 
showed fine vocal means of much strength. His is a 
baritone of beautiful timbre which he uses well. The 
Turrldu of Pat Hyland was specially pleasing during the 
Farewell song in which the young singer produced some 
top-notch notes that will single him out among the 
tenors of future days. Vivian Saunders Jones was a 
charming Lola and Minnie Marshall a characteristic 
Lucia. 

The work of the chorus was excellent and compared 
favorably with that of professional operatic units heard 
here. The quality of diction and tone production among 
singers and chorus members was remarkaljly good and 



Duke— Jack Qraf, Jack Hallman, Pat Hyland; Mad- 
delena — Gertrude Baker, Pay Reynolds, Minnie Mar- 
shall, Ruth Cole. Mabel Roberts, Belie V. Catlln; Gilda— 
Helen Carlyle, Velda Cannon, Naomi Hoffman, Georgia 
Stark, Dorothy Whitehead. Vivian Saunders Jones; Rig- 
oletto — Winslow Fitch, Albert McMillan, Clarence Nor- 
ton, Cashel Robinson, Joseph J. Joimson. 

The sextette from Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor 
was rendered by: 

Edgar — Jack Hallman, Pat Hyland; Henry — Albert 
McMillan, Clarence Norton; Lucia — Helen Carlyle, Velda 
Cannon, Naomi Hoffman. Georgia Stark, Vivian Saun- 
ders Jones, Dorothy Whitehead, Mabel Shaw; Bide-the- 
Bent — Winslow Pitch, Cashel Robinson, Josef J. John- 
son; Alice — Gertrude Baker, Fay Reynolds, Minnie Mar- 
shall, Belle V. Catlin, Ruth Cole, Mabel Roberts; Ar- 
thur — Jack Graf. 

Roland Paul, who wielded the baton during the per- 
formances, was most heartily applauded and sincerely 
commended upon the splendid training his pupils re- 
vealed. Alma Stetzler, his associate director, who as- 
sisted most ably, shared the success with him. Credit 
for the smoothness of the presentations must be given 
also to the pianists Thurza Strong and Rubert Holben 
who played the orchestra parts on two instruments. 
Anna Dowdall, ballet mistress, was successful in her 
choreographic directions. Oscar Selling added to the 
atmosphere of the presentation with his beautiful violin 
solo in the Inteniiezzo. Mr. Selling had to encore the 
number in response to the insistent applause. 

It is of interest to note that Mr. Paul's opera class 
i.s conducted on the "merit" plan. Whoe\'er rehearses the 



ComposltionB for voice, by Charles T, Ferry, the local 
composer-accompanist, appear more and more fre- 
quently on programs of successful singers. 




Gifted and excellently Rchooled principals of the n 
PauFH Opera Cla.ss at the Little Theatre. Upper 

(Santuzza). Pat Hylnnd (Turrldu); Lower row <left to rl^ht); Vlvla 

rticipants and directed the successful jierformanee), Minn 



Paul (ivho coached all the ; 



n h> Rolai 
. \iioiiil Hoi 
Loin). Roliir 
shall (Lucia 



Showed a pleasing evenness which may be explained by 
the fact that every member of the cast has studied ex- 
clusively with Mr. Roland Paul. This fact alone would 
lend to the production a unique nature. 

After the Cavalleria performance the members of the 
cast appeared again and sang the great quartet from 
Rigoletto and the Sextet from Lucia in that same nota- 
ble fashion which marked their previous work. Al- 
though none of the members of the cast appeared on 
the stage before they showed much ease of action. 

The list of casts in addition to the soloists mentioned 
read for the opera: 

Flower Girls— Gertrude Baker, Margaret Carlyle, 
Gladys Slater, Georgia Stark. 

Carters — Jack Graf, Jack Hallman, Arnold Gregg, Al- 
bert McMillan, Cashel Robinson. Winslow Fitch. 

Villagers — Velda Cannon, Helen Carlyle, Belle V. Cat- 
lin, Mary Cavanaugh, Beth Chittenden, Ruth Cole, Sar- 
ette Manter, Anita Newman, Elizabeth Perkins, Gerald- 
ine Fitzmaurice, Fay Reynolds, Gypsy Millette, Mabel 
Roberts, Rebecca Stern, Mabel Shaw, Dorothy White- 
head, Sammy Cohn, Owen Hale, William DaShielle, J T 
Williams. 

The Intermezzo was played by Mr. Oscar Selling. 

Second Piano: Hubert Holben. 

The quartette from Verdi's Rigoletto was sung by: 



part best receives the "assignment." Naturally there is 
much eagerness among the students. Mr. Paul is plan- 
ning presentation of Mikado, Martha, Merry Wives of 
Windsor and Aida with the final purpose o£ building up 
a professional company. In his opinion there is ample 
vocal material available locally to form an opera com- 
pany. This is shown by the fact that he already has 
formed two casts each for Martha and Mikado. While 
so far the presentations have been given by his own 
pupils he is willing to open his operatic classes to stu- 
dents of other teachers. 

At the Davis Musical College last Friday night stu- 
dents of the violin and saxaphone classes were heard 
in a most successful recital, under the direction of Mrs. 
Theodocia Wessels, head of the violin department. Stu- 
dents heard were Misses Mary Dinning, Margaret Rol- 
lins, Helen Nash, Messrs. Levis Wright, Lawrence 
Wright, George Head and Nevin Dietrich. At the close 
Mrs. Wessels in response to the numerous requests, 
played a solo, most ably accompanied by Dr. Eugene 
Davis. 

Ruth Hutchinson, the soprano prize-winner at the last 
National contest held by the Federated Music Clubs, 
sang with distinct success before the Ebell Club, the 
Shkkespeare Club here, and the Teachers Association of 
Colton, 



News from Santa Ana, Calif. 

The Ellis Club of Los Angeles will be heard In Santa 
Ana early in May tor the benefit of The American Le- 
gion, who have Just completed a drive for the Disabled 
Veterans of the World War, raising fifteen hundred dol- 
lars whicli was sent to the Los Angeles fund for the 
new home which is being provided for their disabled 
men, and the funds raised l)y the Ellis ('lub concert 
which is being donated by them, are to go for Orange 
County disabled men. Santa Ana is certainly doing her 
share, and with a larger percentage per capita than Los 
Angeles. 

The Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra closed the 
course of concerts of eight events which have been put 
on in the new High School Auditorium by the Santa Ana 
Musical Association of which Clarence Gustlin is presi- 
dent. 

Every seat in the auditorium was sold and a most en- 
thusiastic audience greeted Rothwell and his men. 

It certainly speaks for the musical taste and fine or- 
ganization of these smaller outlying towns when Santa 
Ana and Ontario will attempt to bring the orchestra 
to their people, and also it is noteworthy that only an 
endowed orchestra could afford to come at a price within 
the reach of these small communities. 

Orange County is to have a chorus which will be com-, 
posed of singers from every town within its confines. 
It has been organized within the last fortnight and has 
an enrollment of seventy-five voices to start with. It 
is called the Orange County Choral Union and under the 
direction of Ellis Rhodes plans to do serious choral 
works worthy of the concerted effort of the whole 
county. Mr. Rhodes is very active teaching voice at his 
Santa Ana studio. 



SWAYNE PUPILS IN BRILLIANT PROGRAM 



The most brilliant class musicale of the present sea- 
son was held at Wager Swayne's Broadway studio on 
Saturday, April 23rd. Swayne's class numbers many ex- 
ceptionally fine professional pianists who are filling 
important concert engagements in the near future; and 
this program was largely made up of selections from 
the prospective programs of these brilliant artist pupils, 
which were played with splendid technical and artistic 
finish. The numbers were as follows: Reflets dans I'eau 
(Debussy), Polonaise (Chopin), Miss Josephine La 
(Ijoste Neilson; Ballade (Chopin). Miss Ellen Swayne; 
Valse (Chopin), Mrs. George Uhl; Prelude (Debussy). 
Gigue (Loeilly). Bavolet Flottant (Couperin), Jardin 
sous la Pluie (Debussy), Miss Elizabeth Simpson; 
Waltses Poeticos (Granados), Etude (Chopin), En Au- 
tomne (Moszkowski), Impatience (Moszkowski). Noc- 
turne (Paderewski), Etude (Rubinstein), Elwin Cal- 
berg; Cllair de Lune (Debussy), Capriccio (Scarlatti), 
Prelude (Rachmaninoff), Miss Marion Frazer; Etude 
(Chopin), Etude (Rubinstein). Miss Lillian Frater; Ma- 
zurka (Chopin), Prelude (Chopin), Miss Audrey Beer; 
Polonaise (Chopin), Miss Clare Lenfesty; Canzonetta 
(Schutt), Miss Esther Hjelte; Bagatelle (Beethoven), 
Nocturne (Chopin). King's Hunting Jig (Dr. John Bull), 
Miss Enid Newton; Ballade (Chopin), Nocturne (Cho- 
pin), Rhapsody (Liszt), Marche Grotesque (Sinding). 
Campanella (Liszt). Miss Ethel Denny. 



S. F. MUSICAL CLUB HONORS NATIVE COMPOSERS 

A splendid program which proved of exceptional in- 
terest to all San Francisco's music devotees was given 
May 5th at 10:15 a. m. at Native Sons Hall by the San 
Francisco Musical Club, of which Mrs. Edward Bruner 
is president The program included works of composers 
of California. The club was represented by three of its 
composer-members — Mrs. Aylwin, whose piano numbers 
were played by Miss Marion de Guerre; Miss Frances 
Murphy, whose lovely songs. The Twilight Pool, There 
Cried a Bird, and In the Shade of the Trees, were sung 
by Mrs. Herbert M. Lee, with the composer at the 
piano; and by Mrs. Cecil Hollis Stone. Mrs. Stone's 
very beautiful songs. Remembrance, My Lady's Songs, 
and At the Last, were sung by Jack Edward Hillman. 
It was a great pleasure to hear Mr. Hillman's splendid 
baritone voice again, after his absence in New York, 
where he met with much success in the musical world. 
Mrs. Stone accompanied him. 

Mrs. Josephine Crew Aylwin has called her piano 
cycle In Summerland. The number called Hammock 
Musings was inspired .by a poem by Bayard Taylor; 
The Campfire by a poem by John Milton, and a Moon- 
light Trail had its inspiration in a poem by George 
Darling. Domenico Brescia has written two numbers 
called Ritornelli and Tempo di Minuetto for violin and 
piano, which his son Peter Brescia played with his 
daughter. Miss Emma Brescia, at the piano. Miss Mil- 
dred Jones played two piano numbers by George Ed- 
wards. One is called Florence and the other Lulu, 
from Portraits, op. 13. 

A double quartette composed of Messrs. Seifert, Wil- 
terdink, Murdock, Calame, Williams, Molitor, Ward and 
Neilsen of the Loring Club, under the direction of Wal- 
lace Sabin. sang a group of songs composed by Mr. 
Sabin and one by Miss Dorothy Fyfe. Mr. Sabin's songs 
are A Spring Madrigal, the words of which were writ- 
ten by Homer Henley, She Walks in Beauty and The 
Long Road. Mrs. Horatio StoU was at the piano. Mrs. 
Marguerite Raas Waldrop sang a group of songs by 
Uda Waldrop with Mr. Waldrop at the piano. The titles 
are Spray. A Fairy Lullaby. A May Night, The Dream 
Ship, Life Eternal and Indian Lament. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 





ALICE 




\ GENTLE 


yt »- T^ft^^^H 


' MEZZO 


\^^^^^^ 


SOPRANO 


l,n Sc-nlii (lllliiiiol. Metron 

York); llriiwiile Oiicrm 

ICxrIiislvi! M 


.llinu Oi.era Hon.e (New 
C»mi>un> tllnvaua) 


HAENSEL 


& JONES 


Aeollnn Hall 


New York 


rorllU- Cuimt 


InunKementi 


JESSICA COLBERT 

Mcnmt UullilluK, Sau FroncUco 



Gaetano Merola 

Conductor 

MANHATTAN GRAND OPERA CO. 

and 

SAN CARLO GRAND OPERA CO. 

ANNOUNCES 

That he will spend ten weeks in San Francisco 

commencing 

JUNE 1st, 1921 

and will take a limited number of pupils in voice, 
operatic coaching and tradition 



ELSIE COOK (M" E'"e Hughes) 

ENGLISH PIANIST 

Medalist Tobias Matthay Pianoforte School, 
London, Eng. 

SUMMER COURSE FOR 
TEACHERS 

In San Francisco, June 27th to August 6th 
Including Teaching Principles and Interpretation 

PerMonal Addre»: 340 Unlveritlty Ave., Palo Alto* 
California 



EMERSON 
PIANOS 

Satisfying in Tone 
Dependable in Quality 
Reasonable in Price 

Sherman,Hay& Go. 

Kearny and Sutter Streets, San Francisco 

Foarteeath aod Clar 9trc«tB, Oakland 
Saerameato Fre.no Vallejo Stocktoa San Joa« 
■poknaa 



Porllud 








MISS AUDREY BEER 




I'lWIST V.\l) TKACHIOR 


Stndio 


31).% MrCliirc St.. Ilnklnnii. Tiir><lny>i nnd WednM- 


dii 


YH In Sun FrnnclM.-o — StudU». Ilr. O. W. Jonn. 



GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 
MME. MINKOWSKI 

Lata «t new York. Berlin an< Drendoa. Toeal Sekool, 
SaKo SOT. Kokloe « Okaao BalldlBa 

Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of PInoo. Orcaa. Harmonr- Orvanlat aad Moaleal 
Director of Flr«t Vrt-mttrttrimn Church. Alameda. Hamc 
lltvdloi 1117 PARU STREET, AI-AMKDA. Telephooe Ala- 
■ieda IRA. Thoradar*. Merrlman School, &7« Oakland At*.. 
Oaklaad. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



$400 



COIMCERT GRAND PIANO 

BEAIiTIFlIl, CARVED ROSEWOOD CASE 

A FIRST CLASS INSTRUMENT 

ADDRESS BOX 240. PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




A Special 

Summer Course for Singers 



Is announce 



dby 



JoKn Whitcomb NasK 

The work will be given at one of the most charming and exclusive sum- 
mer resorts in Northern California 

The course should appeal especially to professional singers, teach- 
ers, coaches and accompanists. It comprises three two-week terms 
commencing Monday, July 4th. 

Lessons and Lectures will be massed, thus giving ample opportuni- 
ty to enjoy the out-of-doors. 

Full Particulars will be mailed upon request 

JOHN WHITCOMB NASH 

Vocal Studios: Kohler & Chase Bldg., San Francisco 



ALICE SECKELS' 1922-23 MATINEE PLANS 

It will be a welcome bit of news to those who had the 
pleasure of attending the Matinee Musicales which Alice 
Seckels gave last season at the Hotel St. Francis, to 
read that she is contemplating giving another such 
series for the ensuing year. There was nothing given 
last season from both the social and artistic aspect that 
proved more popular and gained wider recognition. 
With each recital given by one of Miss Seckels' well- 
known artists the attendance seemed to grow, while the 
friendly and informal atmosphere which was felt at the 
very first concert of the series prevailed tliroughout the 
season. The subscribers to the course heard five recitals 
during 1920-1921. but next year, owing to the great suc- 
cess of this novelty and also to the growth of the sub- 
scription list. Miss Seckels intends giving six Matinee 
Musicales. Every day there are inquiries about these 
affairs, and no doubt if this interest continues to be 
manifested throughout the summer, by the time the new 
musical season starts the limit for subscriptions will 
be reached. 

The first Matinee Musicale will take place some time 
in the early part of November, the artist giving the 
opening program being Arthur Hackett. the American 
tenor. Mr. Hackett will be recalled by those who heard 
him upon his last appearance here as assisting artist to 
Geraldine Farrar. as an artist of great distinction. His 
success then was emphatic, and it is expected that lie 
will duplicate his triumph when he is heard again. 
Mabel Garrison, one of the leading coloratura sopranos 
of the Metropolitan Opera Company, and one who has 
received her education and made her reputation in 
America, being American through and through, will be 
the next celebrated star to appear on this course. Miss 
Garrison is a charming artist, with a personality that is 
winsome and piquant. 

Helen Stanley, too, will be remembered by local music 
lovers, for she won their hearts at her last concert in 
this city, which was about two seasons ago. Miss Stan- 
ley is as well qualified as an operatic singer as she is 
as an interpreter of the lieder. One can anticipate an 
unusually interesting program from this delightful artist. 
Someone who is new to San Francisco, but an artist 
whose reputation has preceded him. is Vasa Prihoda. the 
violinist. He is a Czech by bijth. but his fame has car- 
ried liim into Italy, where he was a sensation, and last 
year he took New York by storm. This will be Mr. 
Prihoda's first trip west of the Rocky Mountains. 

Miss Seckels could not please her subscribers more 
than when she decided to place one of San Francisco's 
favorites in this series. Percy Grainger, pianist and 
composer, needs no introduction here, for no pianist en- 
joys greater popularity than does this eminent musi- 
cian. Sophie Braslau. contralto of the Metropolitan 
Opera company and well known throughout the country 
where she has earned a most enviable reputation for 
herself as one of the most enjoyable concert singers, 
will return to San Francisco after an absence of two 
seasons. The rich, luscious tones of Miss Braslau's voice 
warmed the hearts of all who heard her. while the in- 
tensity of her utterances displayed her temperamental 
and emotional nature. 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY'S MAY PLANS 

As this season's last attraction, the Pacific Musical 
Society offers a most unusual program which will take 
place on May 12th in the ballroom of the Hotel Fair- 
mont. The partlcipalinK artists are three of the finest 
musicians residing in California, so that a rare musical 
treat is being anticipated by all the members of the 
society. The vocalist of the evening will be Povl 
BjornskjoUl. the noted Ilanlsh dramatic tenor, who al- 
ready enjoys great popularity and artistic recognition 
In this community, where he has appeared on several 
occasions. The society Is quite elated in securing the 
services of Mr. BJornskJold as one of their final attrac- 
tions. 

The tenor will be assisted at the piano by another 
very well known musician. Prank Moss, whose solo 
work and art of accompanying entitle him to rank 



Lotta Madden 

Soprano 

"She reminded many hearers of Florence 
Hinkle in respect of vocal quality and style." 
— New York Times. 

"Her voice is suggestive of Matzenauer's 
molten tones at times." — Walter Anthony, 
Seattle P.-I. 



Pacific Coast Tour 
March and April 



NorthwcNtcrn RepreHentntlve 

KATHCRINC RICE 

nnau nud <'lny BhlK,. Tnooma, WaNh. 
SonlhweXt-rn RriirciientnllvFt 

ALICE SECKELS 

08 Pout St.. San Frnucl.co, Cal. 
Mnnmcrmpnl: 

MUSIC LEAGUE 
of AMERICA 

1 Willi 34111 St.. Nciv Vork City 



Myrtle Claire Donnelly 



7» : 



tk .\v 



Mnir. Srinkrlrh — and Parln 
Coniirrvntoiro 

limited numlirr of pnpila 
nllahle dnir addrraa 

Pkone Parillr llOilN 



among the very best in that particular line. .Miss Phyl- 
lida Ashley, a California artist who has al.io been ac- 
claimed in Eastern cities where she appeared frequently 
in concert, will be the instrumentalist of the recital and 
will enthuse her hearers with the excellence of her 
planistry. 

On Tuesday evening. May 31«t. in Scottish Rite Audi- 
torium, the society promises its members a novel enter- 
tainment in the nature of a Jinks. They will present an 
Up-To-The-Mlnute version of The Song Birds, written 
by Victor Herbert. 



John Whitcomb Na«h has secured accommodations for 
his summer class at one of the most attractive outing 
spots in Northern California. There Is a great deal of 
valuable time lost to students owing to the summer 
vacation, and yet, who can compute the value of a few 
weeks among the mountains and lakes at this aeason? 
It was this thought, emanating from certain of Mr. 
Nash's pupils in the first instance, that Induced him 
to see what arrangements could be made which would 
give vacation privileges and at the same time offer 
opportunities for study. A schedule has been arranged 
so that all work will be completed by noon each day 
with the exception of an ensemble class one. or possibly 
two. evenings each week. While the accommodations 
are limited there are still vacancies, and a brief num- 
ber will be admitted to the course. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 



SAVINGS (THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) COMMHHCIAL 

526 Calllomla Street, San Praiicl«eo, CaL 

Member of the Federal RederT© Syiitem 

Member of the AMOClated Savlnsa Banka o« San Franelaco 

MISSION BRANCH, Mlaalon and 21at Streeta 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH, Clement and Tth Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, Halght and Belvedere Streeta 



DECEMBER Slst, 1020 



Capital Actually Paid Up ...... 

Reserve and Contingent Fund 
Employees' Pension Fund 



1,000,000.00 
2,540,000.00 
343,B3S.8S 



OFFiSers-JOHN a, buck: Pre'siaentT'GEo: TOURNT Vice-President and 
M.n»?»r- A_ H R SCHMIDT. Vice-President and Cashier; E. T. KRUSE, Vloe- 
Manager. Ji- n. ij^, °^'i,'S^ ■ , ^v WM D NBWHOUSE, Ass slant Secretary; 
wflLlAM HslkM^NN GeS? SotImML G. a! BELCHER. K A LAUENSTEIN, 
yiViiltt SShle^- C W HETER. Manager Mission Branch; W. C. HBYER, 
A ?,= Sr pSrk Pres'idli DlstHct Branch; O. P. PAULSEN, Manager Halght Street 
B?rnch- GOODFBLLOWr EBLLS, MOORE & ORRICK, General Attorneys. 

boIbd OF DIRECTORS-JOHN A. BUCK, GEO. TOUBNT BT KRUSE, 
BO*BD OF u»i».v -^j^rEJl, HUGH GOODFBLLOW, A. HAAS E. N. 

VANBERGENrROBBRT DOLLAR. E. A. CHBISTENSON, L. S. SHERMAN. ■ 



ALCAZAR 

A delightfully mysterious drama based 
upon spiritualism and containing tlie 
flavor of a detective story is The Hole in 
the Wall, by Fred Jackson, which will be 
staged at the Alcazar beginning with next 
Sunday's matinee. It will afford San Fran- 
ciscans an opportunity of seeing Nancy 
Fair in a new role and one which gives 
her an opportunity of showing that she 
can fascinate as successfully in a serious 
part as she does as a comedienne. 

The story deals with a girl falsely im- 
prisoned in Sing Sing for a crime which 
she did not commit. She is released and 
determines to wreak vengeance on the 
society that has forced her to spend a 
long time in durance vile. She becomes 
involved with crooks and takes the place 
ot one of their leaders who has been 
killed. Using spiritualism first to trap the 
unwary, she finally discovers that she 
has become a real spiritualist. Then 
comes a detective-reporter on the scene. 
She gives him a reading, and there is a 
wonderful surprise ending. 

Dudley Ayres will have the principal 
male role, and every member of the Al- 
cazar company is needed with several 
extra pe^rle. This week Nancy Fair is 
appearing as the star in her original part 
in The Girl in the Limousine, which is 
proving one of the Alcazar's most suc- 
cessful attractions. It is certainly the 
funniest farce of the season. Alcazar 
patrons are looking forward to the pres- 
entation of Turn to the Right, beginning 
May 15 th. 

M. ANTHONY LINDEN 

FAMOUS FLUTE VIRTUOSO 

Now Conducting His Artist Ensemble In a 

Series of Entre Acte Concerts at the 

MacArtbar Theatre. Oakland 

Dr. Maxim De Grosz 

Musical Director 
1108 Fulton St. Ph. Fillmore 2869 



ADCLE ULMAN 

Pupil of Mme. Glacomo Minkowsky will 
accept a limited number ot pupils for 
voice Bulture. Studio, ITS Commonwealth 
Ave. Tel. Pae. S3. 



MAX ROSEN TO TOUR EUROPE 

In spite of the financial allurement of 
the concert field in this country. Max 
Rosen has decided to spend the next two 
seasons concertlzing in Europe. He will 
sail May 24th on the Aquitania, accom- 
panied by his father, who has constantly 
watched over the young violinist and 
shared his hopes and successes. This is 
their first return to Europe since Max's 
triumphant home-coming four and a half 
years ago. 

Mr. Rosen has had an eminently suc- 
cessful season. Besides appearances with 
the Los Angeles Philharmonic and Na- 
tional Symphony Orchestras, and numer- 
ous solo recitals, he has toured jointly 
with Leopold Godowsky. His first appear- 
ance abroad will be in recital in London, 
and he will tour England, Holland, 
France, Italy and other countries. Among 
the orchestral concerts already arranged 
are several at the Augusteo in Rome, un- 
der the direction of Molinari. Before sail- 
ing, Mr. Rosen will make a series of new 
records for the Brunswick Phonograph 
Company. 

EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

Edwin H. Lemare, municipal organist, 
will give his 185th organ recital at 8 
o'clock on Sunday evening at the Exposi- 
tion Auditorium, his program being as 
follows: Prelude and Fugue, Great A 
minor (Bach); Allegretto Grazioso (Rob- 
ert Fuchs) ; Clair de Lune (Lemare) 
Folk Song (Lemare) ; Ride of the Valky- 
ries, from Die Walkure (Wagner), Im 
provisation on brief theme; Concern 
Overture in C minor (Hollins). 



MISS RICHARDES' SUCCESS 

Miss Olive Richardes, the young and 
beautiful lyric soprano, has been ac- 
cepted by Mr. Fortune Gallo to make 
her debut with the San Carlo Opera Co. 
next season. Mr. Gallo became enthu- 
siastic over her pure lyric soprano voice, 
declaring the voice itself wonderful for 
one so young (18 years). Miss Richardes 
has been studying under the late Prof. 
Michelena and is now coaching under the 
celebrated opera star. Mm. S. P. Mar- 
racci. She Is also an organist of merit. 
On Wednesday night, March 2nd, Miss 
Richardes was heard in a recital at the 
Arrillaga Musical College with great suc- 



The Principal Con- 
ductor of The 
Chicago Opera 
Association Indor- 
ses The Soloelle 




World Famous Conductor 
Successor to Mancinelii, as principal 
conductor in Rome, Italy; successor 
to Campanini, as principal conductor 
Royal Opera, Covent Garden, London, 
England; successor to Toscanini, as 
principal conductor Metropolitan 
Opera Company, and at present prin- 
cipal conductor of The Chicago 
Opera Association, writes of the 

Soloelle 

The Tone- Coloring Solo Player Piano 

"I was a skeptic. The Soloelle surprised me beyond words 
to express and convinced me that at last a mechanism has 
been perfected which mirrors the musical moods of its 
operator. The wonder of the Soloelle lies in separate con- 
trols for melody and accompaniment, permitting treatment 
of the tone-coloring of melody and accompaniment individ- 
ually. This is entirely new and places the Soloelle firmly 
upon the artistic plane" 




The marvelous Soloelle enables you to play all the music you love 
best just as you love best to play it. It gives to you, yourself, the 
mastery of tone — the mastery of interpretation, even if ycu have no 
knowledge of the keyboard. 

It is a pleasure to show and explain to you the wonders of the 
Soloelle in our studios. 

Hear and play the Soloelle before you buy ANY Player Piano. 
Price, $750 to $1750 

Terms to suit Other Instruments in Exchange 




26 O'Farrell Street 2460 Mission Street ®^ „ 1^ Street 

San Francisco San Francisco Oakland 

321 Sixth Street 121 N. 1st Street 

Richmond San Jose 

Exclusive Knabe Dealers Licensed Soloelle Dealers 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

Master Coach 

Announces a SUMMER COURSE in Grand Opera in all Lan- 
guages — and Oratorio, commencing Monday, May 16, 1921, at his 
San Francisco Studio, 701 Heine Building, Stockton St., near Sut- 
ter. Communications regarding enrollment in this Course, address 
at above Studio, or to 5302 Broadway, Oakland. 



Mary Coonan McCrea 

TBACHKK UF SlKGl.NO 
Kaar of I'rodnctlon aDd Purltr of Taac 
376 Sutler St. (Ta»„ Wed. and Tkara.) 

ALEXANDER GROMOFF 



JOSEPH B. CAKEY 

rciMiiioiiiT iind ArrniiKer uC Mil 
Kruidrnrr Studio: :!7N Gulden liu 



Cecil Fanning 

Baritone 

H. B. TVRPIN, Aeeomvaalat 

Addreaai L. K. Bebrmer, Anditorlom Bide.. 
Loa Ancelea, CaU or Hra. Jeaalea Colbert, 
Ml Heamt Bide San Franelaco, Cal. 

KAJETAN ATTL 

HARP VIRTl'OSO 
SoloUt Snn FrnnolHco Symphony Orrhen- 
tra. Avnllnble tor Concerts, Recltala and 
Inatrurtlon. 
Studio: I0O4 Kohler Jt Chnae Bnlldlnx 
Rea. Phone Bay VIen 619 

Jean Criticos 

Scientific BtuUalon of Voice 

Rea. Studio I 321 Highland Ave. Piedmont 

Tel. Piedmont 7SJ 

In Kohler & Chaiie BIdfc. 

Studio TOG — Mon.. AVed. and FrI. 



Mrs. William Steinbach MISS FRANCES MARTIN 



HENRIK GJERDRUM 


PIANO 


1R64 l.arkin St. 


Phone Frnuklln 8S1.S 



VOICK CULTURB 

Studio: 

902 KOHLER A CHASE BLDG. 

^wo Franptaco Phoiiri Kearny K4M 

MISS CHRISTINE HOWELLS 

FLVTIST 
Available for Cnncerta an SoloUt or for 
Oblleato Work. Ren^ Belvedere. Marin 
County. Tel. Belvedere 11 W 



MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

ORGANIST ST. M.ARY'S CATHEDRAL 

Plono Department, Hamlin School 
OrEou and Piano, Arrlllnea Musical Collece 



CONCERT PI.INIST AND TEACHER 
Re«. Studio: 1101 GcorKin St.. Vallejo, Cal. 

MRS. EDWARD E. BRUNER 



VICTOR LICHTCNSTEIN 

VIOLINIST — CONDl'CTOR — LIOCTl'llEH 
I'uliIlM Accepted In Viollu and Euacnible 

PInyluK 

Studio 701 Heine IlldK. Stockton ur. Suiter 

Pbonen; SnKrr ■.tir,4; Ki:irny «7« 

LOUISE BREHANY 

Voice Culture 

Diplnnm Royal Acodemv. Konir, Itiilv. 

000 Kohler * Chnae BIdK. Phone Kearny 

04M. Rea. Phone; Franklin losa 

ETHElTArjOHNSON 

SOPR.\NO 

Member University Extension Faculty 
Studio: 50G Kohler & Chase Bldg. 
Res.: 51 Buena Vista Tejiace 
Tel.: Park 129 1 

Miss Lena Frazee 



ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 

PIANIST 
Studio: 1537 Euclid Avenue, Berkeley. 
Phone Berkeley 6006. 



ANIL DEER STUDIO LeoHora Thompson 



MISS EMILIE LANCEL Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



MEZZO SOPRANO 

Concert and Opera 

433 18th Ave. Phone Bay Vlenr 1461 

ZHAY CLARK 

SOLO HARPIST 

CALIFORNIA THEATRE ORCHESTRA 
SOFIA NEWLAND NEUSTADT 

VOICE CULTURE 

Diction — Repertoire — Conchlne: 

Studio; 63 HomlltoD Place. Oakland. Son 

Franelaco, VVednCNday and Saturday, 806 

Kohler ^e Chaae B uilding. 

MISS ETHEL PALMER 

ReiireHcntative 

ADA CLEiVlENT PIANO SCHOOL 

ilealdeoce Studio, 204 A Street. San Rufael 

Telephone San Rafael 842-J 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HAR.MONY 

2001 California St.. San Francisco. Tel. 
Fillmore 2639. Institute of Music, K. & 
C. Bldg.. Tel. Kearny 5464. 



Regulating and Repairing and Playe 

Piano Work. 

S"or further information apply 

VVentern School of Piano Tuning 

Cor. Laguna and Hayes Sts. Ph. Mkt. 1763. 
Call or write for booklet. 

SUZANNE PASMORE-BROOKS 

PIANIST 

Sturiloa; 506 Kohler * Chase BIdK.I 1717 
Vallejo St., S. F.i 20O4 Garber St., Berkeley. 

PERCY A. R. DOW 

TEACHER OF VOICE 
Sludloai 802 Kohler A Chaae Bldg., S. F. 
MXS Oceaa View Dr, Oakland (Realdencel 

DOUILLET CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

ITai JackaoB St. Sbb FrvaeUco, CkL 



DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 

Studio, SaS-604 KOHLEIR « CHASE BLDG. 

Phone Kearny 541>4 



MRS. CHARLES POULTER 



Joseph George Jacobson 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Comlque, Parla 

Studio: 3107 Vfaahtngtoo Street 

Pkon. Fillmore 1847 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 

SOLO VIOLINIST MUSICAL DIRECTOR 
Teacher Violin, Viola. Enacmble Plarlns 
434 Spraoe Street. Phone Fillmore 1131 

RUDY SEIGER 

General MaMlcal Director 

O. H. Lloitrd Hotels Palace and Fairmont 

In San Franelaco 

Geo. Stewart McManus, Pianist 



FREDERICK MAURER 

Teacher of Piano and Harmony, Enaemble 
Coaching. Studio: 1726 Le Roy Avenue 
Berkeley. Phone Berkeley S30. 

Ada Clement Music School 

3435 Sacramento St. Phone Fillmore SOU 

MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 



Brandt's Conservatory of Music 



Nuah Brandt, Piano 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Kololnt. Temple Kmnnu l<:i. Cou 
cert and Chnrch Work. Vocal Inntruc 
tlon. SA39 Clar St^ Phone Weat 4NU( 



Pupil of Mile. Theodore, Paris. Alexis 

Kosloff. Pavley and Oiikrainsky. 
'^' ---.-.. .. character, 

. nive ana baiiet dar " 
1(15 PoMt St. 

Leonard A. Baxter 

Drnnintic Studio 

n Grove St.. Near Larkin— Civic Center 

ProfpN-Hlounl InHtructioo In 

Actlne, Stage Technique. Fencing. 

Make-up, Voice and GxpreHnlon 

Special Class for Children In Dancing 
Saturday Afternoons and by Appointment 



Ruth Degnan 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



SIGISMONOO MARTINEZ 
561 Hyde Street Phone Franklin 8211 

ELIZABETH SIMPSON 

251 8H Etna St.. Berkeley. Tel. Berk. HIO 

MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 

MRS. JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

ETHEL DENNY 

904 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 5454 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
3406 Clay St. Tel. Prosp. 3208 

J. B. ATWOOD 
2111 Channing Way. Berkeley, Cal. 

MABEL MARBLE 
901 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K'rny 54,^4 

WALTER FRANK WENZEL 
1916 Golden Gate .\ve. Fillmore 4733 



St. Audrewa Ckmrek 
Valec Culture. Piano. 588 27th St., Oak* 
land. TeL >»7>. Kakler Jt Chaae Bldg. 
WoAaaadaya T*L iC^ray S4S4. 



ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 



Oaklaud. TeL Piedmont GOSB. 



JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 


1100 Buah 
Realdene 


BARITONE 

SIreel, Snn Frnnclnco 
e Phone Pranklla MMM 


Marion 


Ramon Wilson 




CONTRALTO 




ON TOUR 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 
301 Spruce Street Pacific 1679 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

1913 Haker St. Phone West 1347 

MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone Weit 4B7 

ESTHER MUNDELL 
376 Sutter St. Tel. Kearny 2637 



MME. M. TROMBONI 
Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny 54(4 

VIRGINIA PIERCE ROVERE 

2139 Pierce St.. San Francisco 

ANDRE FERRIER 

1470 Washington SI. Tel. Franklin 3322 



OTTO RAUHUT 
3.S7 Arguello Blvd. Phone Pacific 3661 



ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny tUi 



MME. OE GRASS! 
2335 Russell St.. Berk. Ti'l. Berk. 1724 



G. JOLLAIN 
376 Sutter Street Phone KeunT UIT 



ORLEY SEE 
1004 Kohler ft Chaae Bldg. Tat Dooc. ItTI 



PIAMSTS A.\D ACCOMPANISTS 



HAZEL M. NICHOLS 

570 Merrimac St., Oak. Lakeside 6436 



BROOKS PARKER 

Palace Hotel, San Francisco 

CLAR I N ET 

H. B. RANDALL 

1770 Grove St. West 8054 



FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF EXPERTS IN 

MANUFACTURING AND REPAIRING OF 

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 



BAVDAND ORCHESTR.* 



BOLANDER INSTRUMENT CO. 

54 Kearny Street Douglas 3340 

H. C. HANSON MUSIC HOUSE 
140 O'Farrell St. Sutter 4467 

REGD A.VD MOL'THPIECE MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 

789 Mission St. Sutter 6355 



PHONOGRAPH REPAIRINO 



PHONOGRAPH SERVICE STATION 

539 Valencia St. Park 2222 



F. A. LUTZ 

4,i Geary St. Douglas 2127 



MAX W. SCHMIDT 
216 Pantages Bldg., Oakland 



RELIABLE PIANO TUNERS AND 
REPAIRERS 



DEITEMEIER PIANO CO. 
863 Valencia Street Mission 477 



MR. H. J. MORGAN 
Haight St. Mission 3660 



CO.STIIMERS 



STUDIO TO SUB-LET 



eld Ua7. Mght. Ke 

No Such Luck 

Young woman (entering music store) — 
"Have you 'Kissed Me in the Moon- 
light'?" 

Clerk — "I don't think so; I'm new here. 
Maybe it was the other man." — Ft. Wil- 
liams Times-Journal (Canada). 

"Why do you allow your daughter to 
hang the piano so hard?" 

"I'm hoping she'll either sprain her 
wrist or bust the instrument." — Boston 
Transcript. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




WAGER SWAYNE 

PIANIST AND ARTIST TEACHER 
of PARIS and NEW YORK 

Now in San Francisco 

2404 Broadway Telephone Fillmore 1905 

Pupil! Prcparld for Public Playing 



FOLKS NEinD A LOT OF LOVINOi by K. A, lilrii 

MV LUV IS like: a UmD, RBD ROSISj kjr C. Illaom 

Ttvo New SonKM fur Mcdluin Voice 

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THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOURNAL IK THE GREAT WEST §JEJ 



VOL. XL. No. 7 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. MAY 14. 1921. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



LOS ANGELES ENJOYS MANY PROGRAMS DURING CLUB CONVENTION 

Excellent Addresses By Officers — Delightful Banquet at Alexandria Hotel — Communication From L. E. Behymer Read at Banquet — Prominent Artists 
Delight Thousands of Music Lovers — San Francisco Selected as Next Convention City — Everyone Has Fine Time and Commit- 
tees Receive Hearty Recognition For Fine Work Accomplished 



Los Angeles, May 9 — The third State Convention of 
the California FedCTation of Music Clubs was a most 
impressive and convincing demonstration of the active. 
creative interest taken by the women of the Golden 
State in matters of music. It proved that our California 
women, like their grandmothers, have in them the pio- 
neer spirit, the spirit which plants, cultivates and pro- 
duces. The musical profession of the State and also of 
the country may well feel deeply indebted to the high 
purpose which enlivens this wonderful organization. 

As reported in the last issue, the program of the 
opening night, Sunday. May 1. gave a musical-historic 
survey of Church music incorporated in the regular ser- 
vice of the Temple Baptist Church. The program (see 
reprint of complete Convention program in issue of 
April 23rd) was greatly enjoyed by a vast audience of 
about 2700 people. 

It may be already stated here that most sessions of 
the Convention were enjoyed by large audiences, in 
several instances numbering 2000 listeners, so that the 
message of the California Federation of Music Clubs 
reached vast multitudes. The program opened with 
brief cordial remarks by Rev. W. Brougher. the pre- 
siding pastor of the church, who was followed by Mrs. 
Bessie Frankel, the State president. Mrs. Grace Widney 
Mabee, chairman for the Committee on Church Music, 



By BRUNO DAVID USSHER 

that "tliere is no town too small to have Its own musi- 
cal club." The wonderful results of the extension work 
done under the indefatigable first vice-president. Mrs. 
Mattison B. Jones, was illustrated in a very minute re- 
port which culminated in the most gratifying announce- 
ment that the number of federated clubs in the past 
twelve months has been more than doubled. Twenty- 
nine new organizations actually joined the Federation, 
bringing the total to sixty-one clubs, which figure how- 
ever will grow within a few days as fourteen applica- 
tions are pending. The amount of work carried through 
by Mrs. Mattison B. Jones can be measured by the fact 
that 1015 pieces of mail have been forwarded by her in 
efforts to further the growth of the Federation. 

The address of Mrs. Bessie Bartlett Frankel, presi- 
dent of the State Federation, was received with much 
appreciation. Mrs. Frankel welcomed the delegates arid 
members cordially, giving the following resume of the 
year's work: 

"This Convention marks another milestone on our 
journey of progress. It ends a year devoted to serious 
endeavor and steadfastness of purpose. We find a few 
of our cherished desires realized, while others are in 
the formative stage, although we can visualize in the 
very near future their fulfillment. But most gratifying 
of all. is the fact, that in our Arch of Service to Amer- 



the California State Federation at the National Board 
Meeting held at Akron, Ohio, the National President's 
home, in November. Called five consecutive Committee 
meetings: addressed the Public School Music Super- 
visors Annual Meeting In April at Sacramento: attended 
the Preliminary Contest of the Young Professional Mu- 
sicians in Los Angeles and that State Contest held at 
Berkeley; written the usual number of letters, prepared 
six articles for our official bulletin. Assisted the Chair- 
man of the Convention Program in every way possible. 
"It has been a privilege to serve you and I have made 
every effort to represent you to the best of my ability, 
striving always t(i keep before me a vision of our high 
ideals and the thought so beautifully expressed by 
Shakespeare: 'To thine own self be true. And It must 
follow, as the night the day. thou canst not then be 
false to any man.' In conclusion may I leave you with 
this thought, which you have heard me say so many 
times — and yet a thought so true, it should be the fiaming 
torch in all our work. We get out of anything only that 
which we bring to it. Let us attend the sessions this 
week, with a receptive and an open mind, never with 
a sense of criticism but rather, as one great family — 
each bringing to the fireside the spirit of love, inspira- 
tion and harmony. May we take each hour as it arrives 
and as it departs, erase its failures from our memories 




DKI.EUATES TO Tllllin CONVKNTION C AI.II'OH M A FKOKR 


\TIO>- OF MISIC < l,t IIS l\ I.OS AXtJKI.ES. MAV FiHST TO FOI UTII 


Front row — SUth pemon left to right — <hnrle» Dran, nirertor of Publlelty; Mr 














nIc drnionNtrntlonN were elven. Two of the nioMt MUcreMMful HrNNlonN of 


preaenoe of larpe aadlenceM formed by the seneral pabllc. 





Mrs. Mattison B. Jones, first vice-president, and Mrs. 
Gertrude Ross, tlie ingenious architect of the entire 
Convention program. 

Although the program was of great diversity in style 
it was very impressively carried through by the follow- 
ing artists: Constance Balfour, soprano: Nell Lock- 
wood, contralto; Clifford Biehl, tenor; Fred C. McPher- 
son, baritone; Oscar Selling, violin; Robert Alter, 'cello; 
Bessie Fuhrer Erb. violin; Esther Rhoades, harp, and 
B'nai Brith Quartette — Myrtle Prybil Colby, soprano; 
George Willeys, tenor; Mme. Anna Ruzena Sprotte, con- 
tralto and director: Harold Ostrom, baritone and cantor. 

Much credit must be given to Dr. Ray Hastings, whose 
organ accompaniments came in good stead in many of 
the selections. The splendid co-operation of the Baptist 
Church Choir under its Director, Emory Foster, also 
deserves special mention. It is of special interest to note 
that an Alleluia by Mozart seemingly made the strong- 
est Impression on the audience who insisted on its 
repetition. It was given by Miss Constance Balfour, so- 
prano, accompanied by Bessie Fuhrer Erb, violin. Rob- 
ert Alter, 'cello, and Esther Rhoades, harp. The Syrian 
Lullaby for violin and organ gave Oscar Selling good 



lean Music, we have cemented the Keystone of Loyalty 
and Unwavering Allegiance, so that in time to come 
the very unselflsliness of its fundamental principles will 
stand as a protection against every destructive influence. 

"The first half of this second term as your President 
has drawn to a close; it has been a year rich with op- 
portunity for service: a year which was begun with en- 
thu.siasm and a keen appreciation of the problems and 
privileges pertaining to such an office. We have grown 
from a tender sapling to a staunch tree, deep rooted, 
whose massive branches, heavily leaved, extend their 
shelter and protection to our young and ambitious 
musicians. 

"1 attribute any success we may have enjoyed to the 
loyal co-operation of my Board of Managers, Chairmen 
and County Directors, who have always given so cheer- 
fully of their time and have devoted themselves un- 
stintingly to our work. But our efforts would have been 
fruitless had it not been for the sincere interest of our 
Club Presidents and through them, the other members 
of our united family. 

"Our first regular State Board meeting of the year 
vas held in the Los Angeles City Club Rooms, the first 



opportunity to produce beautiful phrasing and bowing Wednesday in September. I have attended the regular Music Need 



combined with singing tone. Fine work also 

by the B'nai Brith Quartette under Madame Anna Ku- 

zena Sprotte, the noted contralto. 

The success of the Monday morning program also has 
been announced in the last issue. Mrs. Belle Ritchie, 
vice-president at large, who had come from Fresno to 
sound a fine progressive note, found warm acclamation 
when she closed her splendid remarks with the words 



Ihly sessions following. Presided over four supple- 
mentary Board meetings In San Francisco with the 
members residing in the northern part of the State. 
Addressed the State Convention of the Music Teachers' 
Association at San Diego in .Inly. Called and presided 
over our President's Conference held in San Diego In 
October. Two In Los Angeles in October and March, 
two in San Francisco in October and April. Represented 



onvrntlon Im 

and register its success." 

Monday afternoon was devoted both to business mat* 
ters and art. The amendments as published in the bul- 
letin for April were accepted and the proposal to incor- 
porate the Federation under the laws of the State ap- 
proved. The Philomela Chorus of the University of Red- 
lands, consisting of about thirty well trained girls' 
voices, proved a fine musical organization. C. H. Marsh 
achieved brilliant results with his young singers, 
especially in Debussy's Mandoline, which is extremely 
difficult regarding intonation. The young ladies sing 
musically and with good coloring of tone. 

Of the prize winners in the Young Artist's Contest 
only two were heard. Miss Viola Cossack, piano pupil 
of Olga Steeb, and Gilbert Smith, tenor, artist pupil of 
Earl Meeker. Miss Cossack possesses considerable 
technlc and fine understanding. Her Interpretations were 
poetic, revealing a strong musical personality. Mr. Gil- 
bert Is a very sympathetic singer, who uses his voice 
artistically. His tenor Is of lyric quality, even and ample 
of range, productive of clear, appealing notes. No doubt, 
both victors will make good headway. 

W. L. Hubbard, the noted music critic, spoke on "Some 
in which he warned against the tendency 
prevailing towards over-emphasis of the technical de- 
velopment In the training of young artists. He pointed 
out that the great need of the country as a musical 
nation is to develop poetic imagination on the part of 
the performer and greater receptlveness on the part of 
audiences. The program, which Included community 
singing led by Llewellyn B. Cain of Fresno, the Festival 
(Continued on Page 6. Col. 1) 



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The JEANNE JOMELLI 

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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



III THE ONLY WgC t . :i ■ -. ! H EoefAT wBTTII 

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Vol. XL 



Satnrday, May 14, 1921 



No. 7 



The PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW la for aale at the 

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TWENTIETH YEAR 



CHAMBER MUSIC SOCIETY ADMIRED IN SOUTH 

Owing to lack of courtesy extended by a Los Angeles 
musical club to the representative of this paper it was 
Impossible to review the concert given by the Chamber 
Music Society of San Francisco in that city. However, 
we are pleased to record the fact that the organization 
met with well deserved enthusiasm and recognition. 
The members were not only the recipients of public 
commendation and applause, but they were also hon- 
ored socially. Among these courtesies bestowed upon 
them none was more appreciated than a reception bv 
the Noack String Quartet, at the home of Sylvain 
Noack, concert master of the Los Angeles Symphony 
Orchestra, and director and first violin of the Noack 
String Quartet. 

Naturally there was an enjoyable program interpreted. 
The Saint-Saens String Quartet was played by Mr. 
Noack and his associates and after this artistic per- 
formance had been duly acknowledged by the San 
Francisco musicians, the Los Angeles artists asked the 
Chamber Music Society to favor them with an expres- 
sion of their artistry. However, none of the players 
had his instruments with him, but upon being asked 
to play upon the instruments of the Noack Quartet 
.Messrs. Persinger. Ford. Firestone and Britt imme- 
diately responded, and notwithstanding the fact that 
their own instruments were of different style, make 
and tone, and being utterly unfamiliar with the instru- 
ments upon which they played, they succeeded in in- 
terpreting the Mozart E fiat major quartet to such an 
extent and with such fine musicianship that they elicited 
the hearty and enthusiastic admiration of the members 
of the Noack Quartet, who thought it impossible tor any 
quartet to achieve such a feat. 



LOUIS PERSINGER WINS PRAISE IN NORTH 

Louis Persinger appeared as soloist at the last con- 
cert of the Portland Symphony Orchestra which took 
place at the Heilig Theatre on Wednesday evening. 
April 20th. under the direction of Carl Denton. The ar- 
tistic merit of Louis Persinger was duly recognized and 
acknowledged. We find the following expressions upon 
his playing: 

Portland Oregonlan — There was a good deal of curi- 
osity expressed about the concert appearance of Mr. 
Persinger, who is concert master and assistant con- 
ductor of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, and 
by his brilliant violin playing in liruch's concerto in G 
minor, op. 26. he fulfilled all the enthusiastic things 
said In advance about his artistry. A violin student of 
the great Eugene Ysaye and a graduate of one of the 
most famous musical conservatories of Europe, Mr. Per- 
slnger's violin art i.s remarkable for his splendid, shin- 
ing tone, well grounded technic, gift of rhythm and fine. 
Instant Intonation. He played a concerto of tremendous 
difficulty, but did so quietly and easily. He accentuated 
and brought into being all the different voices that 
Bruch created to speak his imi>ressive message, and 
made them all vocal. Ills interpretations al.so were 
noted for polish and finish. The concerto takes about 
24 minutes to play, and all this time Mr. Persinger 
played so ably that he held the rapt attention of his 
audience. He is easily one of the best native-born vio- 
linists of this country. When he finished the concerto 
the audience gave him a hearty recall and his reply 
was Prelude in G minor (Bach), a selection that took 
some courage to play. Mr. Persinger could have played 



several other extras, but contented himself with bowing 
his acknowledgments. 

Portland Journal— In the hands of Louis Persinger 
the cherry stained Guarnerius that he plays becomes a 
soulful, living violin that breathes music noble, virile 
and immensely fascinating. Per.slnger is an American 
violinist, one of the greatest living, and Wednesday 
night he appeared at the Heilig Theatre as soloist with 
the Portland Symphony Orchestra, which gave its last 
concert of the season. He Is concert master and assist- 
ant conductor of the San Francisco Symphony Orches- 
tra, for conductor .\lfred Hertz knows what a violinist 
should be and insists on having the best. A pupil of 
the great Vsaye and also a graduate of the Leipsic Con- 
servatory, Persinger's tone has the silken beauty of the 
famous Belgian master combined with a power that can 
be traced to the influence of the German school. Bruch's 
concerto in G minor was the work chosen by Persinger 
for this occasion and it was played with such depth, 
brilliancy and exquisite nuances that, notwithstanding 
its great length, it seemed too short, indeed. The or- 
chestra, conducted by Carl Denton, gave excellent sup- 
port. The audience insisted on more from the soloist 
and he played the difficult Bach Prelude in G minor. 
-Applause followed with such vigor that it was hard to 
see how Persinger could refuse, but he held his ground 
firmly and if more is wanted it will have to be at another 
concert appearance. Surely he will be warmly welcomed 
here in the future. 

Portland Evening Telegram — Louis Persinger. violin- 
ist, appeared as guest artist, and gave a masterly ren- 
dition of the Max Bruch concerto in G minor. His tone 
is brilliant, and his playing has the finish of the French 
school. His interpretation of the concerto was interest- 
ing and rather original in certain passages.' He was 
recalled many times, and finally played the Bach Pre- 
lude in G minor. 

It will be interesting to music lovers of San Fran- 
cisco to hear that they almost lost their concert master 
to Chicago, for, just after signing up with the San Fran- 




J vcii kdw.vhd hu.i.man 

The i.ui-c.-«»tul yoUHK CalUornia llnrllone who nlll alng 
at the Cnlirornln Theatre Toniorrow (Sunday) Morning 

Cisco Symphony Orchestra for another year. Mr. Per- 
singer received an offer to become concert master for 
the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, which offer he was at 
that time unable to accept. Mr. Persinger will spend 
the summer at one of the Beach resorts in Southern 
California, but before locating there for the summer 
he will go to Colorado Springs and Denver where he 
is booked for some concerts during this month. On 
Thursday, April 2l8t, Mr, Persinger scored a brilliant 
triumph in a joint concert with Lawrence Strauss at 
Astoria. Ore. 

Of course Mr. Persinger will continue his splendid 
activity as director and first violin of the Chamber 
Music Society of San Francisco next season. 



LA GAITE FRANCAISE (FRENCH THEATRE) 

Andre Ferrier. the active director of the French Thea- 
tre, repeated the great success of Grlngolre. the beauti- 
ful comedy by Theodore de BanviUe. played by Mme. 
Jeanne Gustin-Ferrler. Edith Solomon and Andre Ferrlcr 
in the leading part of Grlngolre. in which he is excellent. 
Alme Du Barley. Chevalier Fallon. Louis Arnoux, H. 
Puttaert. Ed. Baron. J. Butners. Misses Henry and Bar- 
teaux. yesterday (Friday, May 13th). There was also La 
Grammaire. a comic play by E. Labiche. played by Emil- 
ienne Pairrieres, Andre Ferrier, Gus. Lecbton, Puttaert, 
Ed. Baron. 

A special performance will be given by A. Ferrier In 
honor of Chas. Gassion. a veteran, who came back from 
France last Sunday. Chas. Gassion was an active mem- 
ber of the French Theatre before the war. During his 
service he was wounded and gassed three times and 



the French Government decorated him with the Croix 
de Guerre and MedalUe Mllitalre. This performance will 
take place Wednesday. May 18th. 

Emillenne Pairrieres will leave San Francisco for 
Paris: she will study dramatic art for a few weeks 
with a great actor from the Comedle Francalse. a friend 
of Andre Ferrier. and she will reappear on the stage of 
La Gaite Francalse next season. 



Gladys M. Knowlton, an unusually successful and ar- 
tistically proficient organist, who is becoming widely 
known in the Northwest, and whose home Is Portland, 
Oregon, had the honor to be selected as the artist to 
open a new organ at the Vining Theatre in Ashland, 
Oregon. The Portland. Oregon, Telegram had this to 
say of the event: "Gladys M. Knowlton. the organist. In 
a series of short musical sketches, showed the range 
and use of the various stops of the organ one after 
another. After this feature of the program Mrs. Knowl- 
ton gave her concert, commencing with the Poet and 
Peasant overture, and following with several other fine 
selections, among which were some of the oldest melo- 
dies. The artist is completely at home at the organ, 
understands the technique and mechanism thoroughly 
and plays with a wonderful amount of feeling. Follow- 
ing her concert the photoplay To Please One Woman 
was thrown upon the screen, and for the first time the 
movie attendants realized what effect the music, coming 
from such a gifted musician as Mrs. Knowlton, could 
mean in connection with the picture." 

The Philharmonic Trio, consisting of Orley See, vio- 
linist. W. Villalpando, 'cellist, and Wm. Caruth, pianist, 
appeared at Stanford University in Palo Alto on Tues- 
day evening. May 10th. before an unusually large audi- 
ence. The numbers that this excellent aggregation of 
players rendered were the Mendelssohn Trio. op. 49 and 
the Smetana Trio, Op. 15. Mr. See played a group of 
solo numbers and was the recipient of hearty and well 
deserved applause. 

John A. Patton, the well-known singer, will leave San 
Francisco shortly to teach at the States Teachers Col- 
lege in Greely, Colorado, for the summer session of ten 
weeks. After this has terminated Mr. Patton will go 
East and later abroad tor a period of at least two years, 
during which time he will devote himself to further 
serious study. During the last three months Mr. Patton 
enjoyed coaching opera with Mr. Alberti. one of Los 
.'\ngeles' most noted teachers in that line. Meanwhile, 
prior to his departure. Mr. Patton will be found in his 
studios in the Kohler & Chase Building, where he has 
the distinction of being assistant instructor to Fred- 
erick E. Blickfeldt. 



The San Francisco Music Teachers' Association met 
on Monday evening. April 25th. at 1721 Jackson Street, 
a large number of members being In attendance. Frank 
Carroll Giften. president, was in the chair and sounded 
the B. B. slogan for the Music Teachers' Association 
as well as for Northern California. Plans for the im- 
pending annual State convention which will take place 
in Oakland during July were outlined and discussed. 
.^t the close of the business meeting the following de- 
lightful program was presented: Sonata C minor for 
violin and piano (Grieg). Mrs. Olga Block-Barrett and 
Arthur Conradi: Songs — Come My Beloved (Han- 
del). Moonlight (Schumann), Norwegian Echo Song 
(Thrane). Miss Ethel Johnson, soprano. Miss Eva Wal- 
ker, accompanist. Dainty refreshments concluded the 
evening's social function. 

Cecil Cowles, the brilliant and charming young Cali- 
fornia pianist, recently concluded a very successful con- 
cert tour of seven weeks through the Middle West. 
I'pon her return she appeared at a private musicale in 
New York at the residence of Mrs. Alfred Beadlestone, 
270 Park Avenue. She also gave a most successful con- 
cert in Washington. D. C. The Composers' Music Cor- 
poration have accepted four of Miss Cowles' composi- 
tions, including Two Sketches — Persian and Chinese — 
and two Preludes. This exceptionally gifted and suc- 
cessful young creative and executive artist is also 
writing some very pretty songs which she expects to 
publish. Rudolph Ganz is one of the distinguished com- 
posers whose works are being published by the Com- 
posers' Music Corporation. 

Mills College Students, members of the theory 
classes, gave an excellent concert of compositions, at 
Hotel Oakland on Thursday evening. May 5th. A large 
audience was In attendance and everyone thoroughly 
enthused over the work done on this occasion. A de- 
tailed review of the event will appear In the next Issue 
of this paper. 

Kajetan Atll, the distinguished Bohemian harpist, ap- 
peared at the recent Music Festival In Fresno and 
scored a brilliant triumph. The Fresno Republican of 
April SOth had this to say of him: "With home talent 
of SOO voices, a splendid orchestra, two able directors, 
a Spanish tenor, and best of all. the famous Bohemian 
harpist, Kajetan Attl, the California Raisin Festival 
presented in the Civic Auditorium, yesterday after- 
noon, one of the largest local musical performances 
ever witnessed In Fresno, surpassed only by the eve- 
ning performance under the same auspices. Kajetan 
Attl of the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra bas ap- 
peared in Fresno before on one occasion as soloist of 
the Fresno Male Chorus, and while with a few remote 
exceptions the harp Is generally an instrument of 
greatest appeal to music lovers, the manner In which 
this particular artist handled it added much. In a few 
words, bis playing of well selected numbers was su- 
perb, and his phrasing excellent beyond mention." 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Gossip About Musical People 



Albert Elkus, the well-known composer-pionlBt and 
one of the most intelligent and thorough musicians re- 
aiding in the tar West, left for London about a month 
ago and will return some time in September. We trust 
that Mr. ElUus will be able to tell our readers something 
about musical conditions abroad, either during his stay 
there or immediately after his return. 

The Minettl Orchestra will give the second concert 
of its season at Scottish Rite Auditorium on Friday 
evening, June 3rd. The first concert was given at Golden 
Gate Commandery Hall, but inasmuch as the attend- 
ance was so large that many people were unable to 
gain admittance, Mr. Minetti ha? been obliged to secure 
a larger hall. An excellent program has been prepared 
for this occasion, and there is no doubt that those in- 
terested in these concerts will enjoy a pleasant evening. 

IVIiss Marion Frazer, the excellent young pianist and 
teacher, pupil ol: Wager Swayne, has moved her studio 
to 289S Jackson street, where she is instructing a splen- 
did class o£ young students who thoroughly enjoy the 
lessons they receive from this capable artist. 

L. E. Behymer, the distinguished impresario, who has 
been confined to the hospital tor some time where he 
has undergone a serious operation, has been convales- 
cing during the last few weeks and his thousands of 
friends are glad to hear that he is entirely out of dan- 
ger. He is the recipient of numerous messages con- 
gratulating him upon his recovery and these hearty 
wishes come from some of the world's greatest expo- 
nents of the art. The Pacific Coast Musical Review, 
which has a specially soft spot in Its heart for the lik- 
able and indefatigable "Bee," cannot express itself too 
■warmly regarding the fact that he has been spared to 
the community, thus continuing his wonderful construc- 
tive work in behalf of musical progress and expansion 
in the far West. 

Fitzhugh Haensel, of the firm of Haensel & Jones of 
New York, which belongs among the leading managerial 
bureaus in the country, was in San Francisco recently, 
and was one of the callers at the Musical Review office. 
Mr. Haensel left with Schumann-Heink tor the Orient, 
where he had booked an extensive concert tour tor the 
eminent diva. Both Schumann-Heink and Mr. Haensel 
will be back in the United States early in the fall to 
begin the transcontinental tour ot the great contralto, 
who will appear in San Francisco in January. 

Artur Argiewicz, the well-known violinist and teacher, 
gave bis first pupils' recital since being associated with 
the Ada Clement Music School yesterday (Friday) eve- 
ning, May 13th. Participating in the program was Gae- 
tane Britt, violinist, daughter ot Mr. and Mrs. Horace 
Britt, who was assisted by Miss Ada Clement, pianist; 
Horace Britt, 'cellist; Artur Argiewicz, violinist, and 
Miss Kathryn Wolff, accompanist. The program con- 
sisted of: Double Concerto In D minor for two violins 
(Bach), Gaetane Britt and Artur Argiewicz; Introduc- 
tion and Rondo Capriccioso (Saint-Saens), Gaetane 
Britt, Miss Kathryn Wolff at the piano; Trio in G tor 
violin, 'cello and piano (Mozart), Gaetane Britt, Horace 
Britt and Artur Argiewicz. 

The San Francisco Art Association, conducting the 
Palace ot Fine Arts, J. Nilsen Laurvik, director, gave a 
Memorial Concert in honor ot Mme. Emilia Tojetti, un- 
der the auspices of the Women's Auxiliary of the Palace 
ot Fine Arts, on Friday afternoon, April 22nd, In the 
Rotunda of that magnificent edifice. On this occasion a 
painting by Arthur Matthews, one ot the most eminent 
living American artists, was presented to the Museum 
by the Women's Auxiliary. The readers ot the Pacific 
Coast Musical Review are so familiar with Mme. To- 
jetti's notable activities in behalf ot music during her 
successful and useful life in San Francisco that further 
comment upon her work is not necessary at this time. 
The program was given under the direction of Miss 
Ada Clement, Redtern Mason and Albert Elkus. The 
program presented on this occasion was as follows: 
Orchestra — Oberon Overture (Weber) ; Orchestra — (a) 
Chanson Triste, (b) Romance (Tschaikowsky) ; Violin 
solo — (a) Prelude in E major, (b) Gavotte (Bach), 
Lojas Fenster. Violet Fenster Blagg at the piano; Or- 
Ck estra — (a) Pastoral, (b) Minuet (Bizet) ; Orchestra — 
l>'nce of the Hours (Ponchielli) ; Orchestra — Wedding 
Day (Grieg); Orchestra — Reverie (Debussy); Violin 
solo — (a) Old Refrain (Kreisler), (b) Minuet (Pade- 
rewski-Kriesler) , (c) Obertass (Wieniawski), Lojas 
Fenster, Violet Fenster Blagg at the piano; Orchestra — 
Dreams (Wagner) ; presentation by Mrs. Joseph Fife, 
president, Women's Auxiliary, ot a painting by Arthur 
Mathews to the Museum, as a permanent memorial to 
Mme. Tojetti; response on behalf of the San Francisco 
Art Association, Arthur Brown, Jr., president; accept- 
ance on behalf ot the Museum, J. Nilsen Laurvik, di- 
rector; Orchestra — Merry Wives of Windsor (Nicolai). 

Alexander Saslavsky, the distinguished violin vir- 
tuoso, who scored such an artistic success at the Cali- 
fornia Theatre two weeks ago, when he was soloist at 
one of the Sunday morning concerts, also distinguished 
himself at the Raisin Festival in Fresno, where the Sas- 
lavsky Trio was one of the principal attractions and 
scored a decisive triumph. After his California Theatre 
concert Mr. Saslavsky left tor Portland and Seattle, 
where he has been engaged to give a series ot con- 
certs which extend throughout the Northwestern terri- 
tory. 



Albert King, the well-known pianist, together with 
his mother, loft tor Paris on Sunday, May I at, by way 
of Canada and New York. He expects to arrive In Paris 
about the middle of June, and he will continue his stud- 
ies with Ferruccio Busonl. While In New York he will 
play for Rachmaninoff and has been Invited to meet 
several distinguished artists, among whom may be In- 
cluded Anna Fitzlu. He will remain abroad tor an in- 
definite period and this summer will travel through 
Belgium, Germany and Switzerland. Mr. King has prom- 
ised the Musical Review to keep its readers informed 
of musical conditions abroad. 

H. B. Pasmore, the well-known vocal pedagogue, gave 
an informal reception in honor of Mary Boyd Wagner 
at his studio, 506 Kohler & Chase Building, on Thurs- 
day evening, May 12th, previous to that young vocal 
artist's departure on an extended concert tour through 
the northern States which will terminate in New York. 
Mrs. Wagner has a high soprano of beautiful timbre 
and a flexibility that is very rare. Her scale is impecca- 
ble even in the most rapid passages. Mrs. Wagner has 
had the advantage ot studying with several noted teach- 
ers and tor the past year has taken a course in technic 
and interpretation with Mr. Pasmore, attaining most 
remarkable results. 

Mrs. Alma Schmidt-Kennedy, the excellent pianist 
and pedagogue, gave two splendid musicales at her 
artistic studio at 1537 Euclid avenue, Berkeley, on the 
first two Sundays in May. On the evening of May 1st 
Miss Katherine Simon, Miss Doris Osborne and Miss 
Helen Margaret Reborn appeared in the following pro- 
gram: (a). Fantasie Impromptu (Chopin), (b) Scherzo 
E minor (Mendelssohn), (c) Norwegian Bridal Proces- 
sion (Grieg), Miss Osborne; (a) Sonata B flat minor 
(Chopin), (b) Scherzo from F minor Sonata (Brahms), 
(c) Prelude G minor (Rachmaninoff), Miss Reborn; 
(a) Soltegietto (Ph. Em. Bach), (b) Preludes Nos. 14 
and 18 (Chopin), (c) Etude de Concert (MacDowell). 
Miss Simon. The program was intelligently and artis- 
tically interpreted by these three well-prepared stu- 
dents. 

On Sunday evening. May 8th, Miss Carrie Jones, pian- 
ist, and Horace Britt, 'cellist, gave the following de- 
lightful program: Sonata, op. 32, C minor (Saint-Saens), 
Miss Jones and Mr. Britt; Sonata, op. 31, No. 3. E flat 
major (Beethoven), Miss Jones; Sonata, op. 40, A minor 
(Boellmann), Miss Jones and Mr. Britt. This event 
proved to be one of the most enjoyable concerts of the 
season and both Miss Jones and Mr. Britt excelled in 
splendid ensemble playing and fine shading. Mrs. Ken- 
nedy is deserving ot great credit for arranging these 
events which give those who appreciate music most an 
excellent opportunity to enjoy an occasional event of 
the highest phase. 

Miss Zella Vaissade, soprano, and Miss Marion Nichol- 
son, ot Berkeley and Oakland, respectively, won State 
honors in the contest conducted biennially by the Na- 
tional Federation of Music Clubs. The winners will next 
meet the contestants from the district ot Western States 
and the winners in the district contests will attend the 
national contest which will be held in the East in June. 
Miss Vaissade will not be obliged to enter the Western 
division contest, as there are no vocalists contesting 
from other States represented in the district. Miss Vais- 
sade Is a pupil ot Lawrence Strauss, and is soloist at 
the First Congregational Church in Berkeley. The con- 
test between the residents of Northern and Southern 
California was held at the Berkeley Piano Club last 
month. 

Mrs. J. E. Birmingham, one of Calitoruia's leading 
vocal artists and teachers, has been elected as presi- 
dent of the San Francisco Musical Club tor the ensuing 
term. Mrs. Birmingham has been prominently asso- 
ciated with club work tor a number of years and has 
done some invaluable work in the way of education 
and specially ot presentation of original and new oper- 
atic works. She is full of energy and enthusiasm and 
ought to make a fine executive oflicer. 

Edwin H. Lemare, the distinguished organ virtuoso 
and municipal organist of San Francisco, announces a 
farewell series of organ recitals to be given at the 



Exposition Auditorium beginning In July. TheHC events 
are being given itt the special and urgent roiuent of a 
large number of admirers of Mr. Lemare's who resent 
the treatment he received on tiie part of polltlciana, 
and who wish to demonstrate that his efforts are thor- 
oughly appreciated In this community. Mr. Lemare has 
prepared a series of Qiatchless programs for this occa- 
sion and particulars will be announced In this parer 
beginning with next week. 

Christian C. Holtum, basso, who left some time ago 
for the East to continue his studies, is succeeding rap- 
idly in gaining experience and adding to his talent. He 
is studying voice with David Bispham and is also study- 
ing piano and Italian. He is singing with the New York 
Oratorio Society, and has been attending numerous 
concerts and operatic performances during the season 
in New York. 

Miss Hazel M. Nichols, the brilliant young pianist, 
has been very busy ot late. She won the piano con- 
test recently given by the National Federation of Music 
Clubs. She played with enthusiastic response at the 
Fairmont Hotel for the To Kalon Club on March 1st as 
soloist and accompanist on a program with Jack Moul- 
throp, violinist. She has accepted an offer as accom- 
panist for a mixed quartet consisting of Carl Anderson, 
director and tenor; Lowell Redfield, baritone; Mrs. 
Brewer, soprano, and Mrs. Anderson, contralto. Miss 
Nichols also played as accompanist for Mme. Stella 
Jellca on a program of the Scandivanlan Singers at 
Scottish Rite Auditorium on April 9th and as piano 
soloist and accompanist with Mme. Jellca in San Jose 
on April 2nd. She appeared as piano soloist and ac- 
companist with the California Mixed Quartet, Carl An- 
derson, director, at the Masonic Temple in Oakland, 
on April 16th. She also acted as accompanist for the 
same quartet at Hotel Oakland for the Lion's Club 
Luncheon on April 20th, and on Easter Sunday she 
played accompaniments tor Edna Horan, violinist, at 
Ebell Hall in Oakland. 



Miss Birdice Blye, one of the foremost women pian- 
ists of America, appeared as soloist at Notre Dame Col- 
lege, San Jose, on Tuesday, April 19th, and scored a 
brilliant success. Among other complimentary com- 
ments the Mercury-Herald of April 20th says of Miss 
Blye: "As a virtuoso she is admired for her faultless 
technic and the strength and vigor ot her conception. 
There is a beauty and grace in her playing, and a deli- 
cacy and tenderness in expression." The program in- 
cluded works by Bach, Beethoven, Chopin, Rubinstein, 
Liszt and Paderewski. Miss Blye has been a visitor in 
San Francisco during the last week or two and may 
possibly arrange for a concert tour in California for 
either the next or following season. She is one of the 
Eastern artists who should receive opportunities to 
appear here. 

Miss Elizabeth Levy of Salem, Ore., recently returned 
to her home after a sojourn in Europe, and the Oregon 
Sunday Journal of Portland, Ore., had this to say of 
her at the time of her return: "Miss Elizabeth Levy, 
violinist and teacher, has just returned to her home in 
Salem after an extended trip abroad. It was her good 
fortune to have had the privilege of becoming a pupil 
of the renowned Caesar "Thomson, first teacher of the 
Royal Conservatory of Music, Brussels. Courses in the 
most modern normal methods, advanced technical stud- 
ies and artistic interpretation were pursued by Miss 
Levy and the progress she made was most highly com- 
mended and praised by her distinguished teacher. Be- 
sides these splendid courses ot advanced study, every 
opportunity to hear concerts, operas and oratories was 
taken advantage of. Perhaps the greatest ot these was 



Johanna Kristoffy 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 



ETHEL GERTRUDE CANNON 




ARTIST-STUDENTS' PIANO COURSE 



A spec 


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instruct 




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to acquire 


Indi- 


vidua! 


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of 


express 


on and 


originality 


of s 


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in additi 


on to 


techni 


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proficier 


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Anyor 


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to 


beco 


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w^ill fi 


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FOR FURTHER PARTICULARS ADDRESS IN CARE OF PACIFIC COAST MUSI- 
CAL REVIEW, SUITE 801 KOHLER & CHASE BLDG., SAN FRANCISCO 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Distinguished Artists Residing in California Who are Available for Concerts During the Season 1920-1921 

Editorial Note; — The Pacitic Coast Musical Review Is in a position to guarantee the artistic eltlciency of the artists represented on this page. They havu established • 
reputation for themselves, partly national, partly International, through regular concert tours or by appearances Id operatic organizations of recognized fame. The purpose 
of setting forth the availability of these reputed artists Is to convince the California musical public that distinguished artists of equal merit to any reside in this State. 
We intend to prove that a resident artist confers honor upon the community in which he resides. 



Announcing the Personnel of 

"Le Trio Louise" 

Kajetan Attl — Bohemian Harpist 

Otto King — Norwegian Cellist 

M. Anthony Linden — American Flutist 



>b<fd .\rtlfi 



I'nlque Chambe 
iinunl PruKrnni 
Other Aunlilct* 



For DatcH and Terms .Addrens 

M. Anthony Linden, 457 Phelan Bldg., 

San Francisco 

Care of S. F. Symphony Orchestra 




Povl 
Bjornskjold 

The Eminent Danish 
Dramatic Tenor 



beKluiiiuE enrly In .Vpril 

Management Hugo Boucek, 116 39th St., N. Y. 
Personal Address: 355 Octavia St., San Francisco 




MARION 



VECKI 

BARITONE 

AVAILABLE FOR 

Concert - Opera - Oratorio 



Sa«er 1190 



to have heard ^\'illiam Mengelberg conduct his own 
orchestra in Amsterdam at the Concert Gebow and 
also when he conducted the National Symphony orches- 
tra in New York. The concert master of the Amster- 
dam orche.stra is a cousin of Miss Levy. On the return 
trip, several weeks were spent In New York City while 
the opera and concert season was at Its best. Miss Levy 
heard the great artists in opera. Miss Levy was greatly 
honored by playing in the foreign cities. Brussels and 
The Hague, and at the Seamen's Charities concert 
given In the first-class lounge on the Imperator. Mu- 
sicians of International repute contributed numbers 
and the collection brought $3.'j00. The place of honor 
on this program was given to Miss Levy. In New 
York City Miss Levy rendered solos in Carnegie Hall 
preceding the first of a series of addresses given by 
Dr. Stephen S. Wise, and she was requested to appear 
at the second address of the series. This she did with 
repeated success." 

Mme. Virginia Pierce Revere, the well-known so- 
prano soloist, appeared with much success before the 
San Francisco Musical Club on Thursday morning. April 
21st. and sang with fine artistic effect the Casta diva 
aria from Bellini's opera Norma. 



Warren D. Allen gave the following organ recitals 
at Stanford Memorial Church of the Stanford Univer- 
sity during the week beginning Sunday, May 8th: 
Sunday. May 1st — Chant de printemps (Joseph Bon- 
net), Echoes of Spring (tran.scribed by Edward Shlppen 
Barnes) (Rudolf Friml). May Night (Selim Paimgren). 
Spring Song (Mendelssohn). Faith In Spring .trans- 
scribed for organ by \V. D. Allen) (Schubert). Rhap- 
sody in D major (Rossetter G. Cole). Tuesday, May 3rd, 
above program repeated. Thursday. May .^tth, at 4:15 
p. m. — Bell Synipl.ony (arranged for organ by Wm. C. 
Carl) (Henry Pursell), (Arietta (Coleridge-Taylor), Mir- 
age, The Old Mission (from Scenes from the Mexican 
Desert); Folk Song (E. H. Lemare), Choral Prelude, 
Rejoice, ye Pure In Heart (Leo Sowerby). 



Mrs, David J, Galraud and her pupils gave one of 
the most enjoyable entertainments of the San Jose 
■Woman'.s Club at the residence of Mrs. J. W. Nixon 
In San Jose on Tuesday afternoon. April 2Gth. The San 
Jose Mercury-Herald of May 1st had this to say of 
the event: "One of the most enjoyable entertainments 
of the club year was given by Mrs. Uavid J. Cairaud 
and her pupils, assisted by some of the club ladies. 




M. ANTHONY 

LINDEN 



Principal Solo Flute S. F. 
Syni|)liony Orchestra. 
l''ormcrly Principal Solo 
FUite Minneapolis Sym- 
I)hony Orchestra. 
Solo. KnHemble, Obllsntu 
Will .\ree|>t n Limited Number or PuplU 
Tcrmn nnd Dntcs Addreaii. 4S7 PheUn Bldg. 
Cnre S. F. Sj-mphouy Orcheatra 



ASON<jg£CSmL§ST 
OPGEKUiHE MERIT 




m5 Glenn Aw. 

5erkffl<?yCai. 



BRUCE 

CAMERON 

Tenor 

Voice Culture 

Concert, Church Recital 



B 



Soloist Third Church of Christ Scientist 

3538 Twenty-Third Street, San Francisco 

Tel. Mission 1297 

Management Leah Hopkins, 408 Stockton S' 



last Tuesday afternoon. The lovely home of Mrs. J. W. 
Nixon was a very artistic setting for this meeting, 
and the decorations of beautiful spring roses, the ex- 
quisite costumes and the splendid music and appropri- 
ate readings were all in perfect blending. Mrs. J. G. Jury 
presided at the business meeting; Mrs. G. B, May 
was chairman of the program and also assisted the 
hostess in entertaining. Mrs. G. A. Penniman and Mrs. 
Jury assisted in serving the refreshments. Following 
is the program: Talk on Three Books for Musical Ref- 
erence. Mrs. David J. Gairaud; Vocal solos — (a) The 
Lilac Tree (Gartian). (b) The Hand of You (Bond), 
(c) Roses of Memory (Hamblen). Miss Grace Pearl; 
Echoes from the Opera, Mrs. Maud Jury; Piano solos — 
(a) Lento (Cyril Scott), (b) Scotch Poem (MacDowell), 
Miss Bertie Schleuter; Poem, The Nightingale and the 
Organ. Mrs. George May; Vocal solos — Song of the Vio- 
lin (Carrie Norton Jamison). The First Blue Bird (Car- 
rie Norton Jamison). Miss Leonore Martin; Reading, 
How a Thanksgiving Dinner Was Given to Bach. Mrs. 
Walter Johnson; Vocal solos — Smilin' Through (Fenn), 
Spring's a Loveable Ladye (Elliott). Miss Adele Lewis; 
Sayings from Henderson's What Is Good Music, Mrs. 
David J. Gairaud. 



Phylllda Ashley, the brilliant and unusually accom- 
plished young California piano virtuosa. Is meeting with 
pronounced artistic success at her aeries of piano re- 
citals at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco and Hotel 
Oakland, Oakland. We reviewed in last issue her first 
San Francisco triumph and this success was repeated 
in Oakland on May 3rd. Kedfern Mason in his review of 
her San Francisco concert said that Miss- Ashley "has 
realism of authentic fire, and the last movement of 
the Waldstein Sonate was played In a way only possi- 
ble to a genuine artist." A more extensive review of the 
second San Francisco concert will appear In this paper 
next week. The second Oakland concert will take place 
next Tuesday, May 17th. while the third San Francisco 
concert will be given at the Palace Hotel on Tuesday 
afternoon. May 24th. Those fond of the best piano lit- 
erature rendered In excellent fashion aliould not fall 
to attend these concerts. 

Grace Le Page, lyric soprano, and Eva Garcia, plan- 
iste, gave a Joint vocal and piano recital at Ebell Hall, 
Oakland, on Thursday evening. May 5th, which was at- 
tended by a representative and appreciative audience 
and wlilch proved a decidedly excellent event. The 
editor of the Pacific Coast Musical Review was present 
and will review this program In next week's issue. 




OLGA 
STEEB 

"The Genius of 
the Piano" 



CATHERINE A. 
BAMMAN 

53 West 39th, N. Y. 
Local Representative; 
C. E. HUBACH, 126 S. Rampart Blvd., Los Angeles 




PHYLLIDA 
ASHLEY 

PIANIST 

NOW BOOKING 
SEASON 1921-1922 

HAENSEL & JONES 

Management 

Aeolian Hall 

New York City 

KepreMentotiv 



Mrs. 

Cecil 
Mollis 
Stone 

CONCERT- 
ACCOMP.\imST 
AND COACH 



Renldenee Studio: 
1X31 Balbon St. 
Sao Frnaclaeo 





JACK HILLMAN 



BARITONE 

Just Returned From 

New York 

Exponent of Vocal 

Methods of 

CLARA NOVELLO 

DAVIES 

Teacher of 

LOUIS GRAVEURE 

I'hoiie Giirnelil 2495 

Phone Franklin 5068 



Ruth St. OenIs and Ted Shawn, assisted by Ann 
Thompson, the brilliant and genial young pianist and 
accompanist of Los Angeles, appeared in a series of 
splendid events in San Francisco and vicinity during 
the last month. We shall publish a detailed account of 
these events in the next Issue of this paper. The Chi- 
cago Grand Opera season and the Convention of the 
IVluslc Club Federation has monopolized so much space 
in this paper Ihaf many important affairs had to be 
left out. As long as the profession does not support 
this paper sutticiently to publish editions large enough 
to take care of every event as it occurs, we must take 
recourse to postponement of publication, until the sup- 
port is sufliclent. We trust to be able to publish a 
large enough paper next season. 

Mother Wismer, the successful and much admired 
violinl.st, will give a violin recital at Sorosis Club Hall 
on .Monday evening. May 16th. The program which has 
been chosen for this occasion Is a splendid one and Is 
sure to attract a large attendance, as la always the 
case at Mr. Wismer's concerts. Frank Moss, the ex- 
cellent pianist, will appear as soloist as well as ac- 
companist. The two artists will play the wonderful 
Strauss Sonata, op. 18, for violin and piano. Mr. Wismer 
will perform the Spohr O minor concerto, only too 
rarely heard here, but full of beauty and extremely 
dinicult. Frank Moss will play compositions by Debussy 
and Dohnanyl and a group of classic and modern violin 
soli will round out a fine program. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Week's Music Events in Los Angeles 

ByBRUNODAVIDUSSHER 



(Continueci from Page 1, Col. 3) 
THE MUSIC CLUB CONVENTION 

Chorus Director of the Federation, closed ivlth clever 
demonstrations given by members of th« Glendale 
Junior Clubs, who gave several vocal numbers with good 
effect. 

The beautiful singing of Mrs. Belle T. Ritchie, accom- 
panied by Mrs. M. Hennion Robinson, opened the eve- 
ning program, also given at the Alexandria Hotel. Again 
a large audience was present. A display of programs is- 
sued by music clubs, handsomely arranged, attracted 
much attention. The main part of the program was given 
over to Miss Norma Gould whose dancers earned much 
warm applause with fine demonstrations ot eurythmic 
exercises. Frank Geiger, in conclusion, rendered Clar- 
ence Gustlin's song, Lett, with telling effect, adding 
Grace Adele Freebey's song, O Golden Sun, a composi- 
tion which is gaining steadily in popularity with singers 
and hearers. More than an hour after the last solo the 
large audience remained chatting and renewing old ac- 
quaintances. 

Tuesday morning and afternoon served to demon- 
strate th» excellent standard ot music in the schools of 
this city. Of special interest were three addresses, one 
by Miss Ida Bach, in charge of music instruction at 
Manual Arts High School, who spoke on Opera in the 
Public Schools. An excellent paper was delivered by 
Earl Z. Meeker, who dealt with the important subject 
of the Relation between the Private Music Teacher and 
the Public School Music Teacher. Important too w^re 
the remarks by Arnold Wagner, an authority on public 
school music instruction and member of the College ot 
Music Faculty, who gave his views on The Teaching of 
Voice in the Public Schools. The two sessions were 
highly enjoyable as well as instructive and earned much 
credit for Mrs. Emma M. Bartlett, the Federation Chair- 
man of the Committee on Public School Music. 

The program brought demonstrations by the Ingle- 
wood Union High School Orchestra under A. F. Monroe; 
by pupils of the grammar grades under Miss Katherine 
Stone, the most able supervisor ot music in the public 
schools; a combined orchestra of 165 young musicians 
ot the elementary schools under Miss Jennie Jones, who 
supervises the orchestra work in all elementary schools; 
by the opera class of Manual Arts High School under 
Miss Ida Bach; by the Lincoln High School Girls Glee 
Club under Louis W. Curtis. In the afternoon the Glen- 
dale High School Glee Club was heard under Mrs. Dora 
Gibson, followed by the same organization of the Poly- 
technic High School under Mrs. Gertrude B. Parsons. 
The closing number was rendered by the Los Angeles 
High School Chorus accompanied by the orchestra of 
this flue school, conducted by Miss Verna B. Blythe. 
It may safely be said that much ot the choral work done 
by the young singers would make some of our adult 
choruses blush and it reflects nobly on the high ideals 
cherished and practised by the musical staff of our pub- 
lic schools. Little as a rule is known ot their hard labor 
of love. It was therefore a fine thought to pay them due 
homage by allotting a full day's session to their notably 
successful efforts. 

Tuesday evening saw the Convention assembled in 
the Ebell Club House banqueting. Roland Paul was a 
charming toast-master and amusingly aided by litOe im- 
promptu songs written and sung by Mrs. Grace Widney 
Mabee who was a graceful musical jester. Mr. Paul's 
witty remarks elicited sprightly remarks from Mrs. Lil- 
lian Birmingham of San Francisco, Josephine Crew Ayl- 
win of Oakland, Gertrude Gilbert, San Diego, Belle T. 
Ritchie, Fresno, Annette Cartledge, Redlands, Edna 
Johnson, San Francisco, Mr. and Mrs. Rupert Hughes, 
Mrs. Charles H. Toll, Los Angeles, Mr. Charles Mere- 
dith, W. G. Stewart, Director-General of the California 
Opera Company, Mrs. Rugsell J. Waters and Lewellyn 
B. Cain of Fresno. 

A message to the Convention guests, penned upon 
request by Impresario L. B. Behymer, was read by 
Charles A. Draa and shows that though handicapped 
by illness "Bee" was in spirit with the assemblage. Mr. 
Behymer's greetings finely reflected the spirit ot the 
Convention and struck a sympathetic note which un- 
doubtedly will long resound. The message ot the famous 
I'.ipresario in greeting the Federation members, says: 
' ?vly Dear President, Guests and Members of the 
Federation: 

"It is indeed an honor to be requested to say a tew 
words to this splendid organization this evening, but 
I would much prefer to speak to you personally rather 
than through the murky atmosphere of gas and ether, 
the operating room or the hospital shadows ot the past 
six weeks. When I have anything to say I prefer to look 
one in the eye and try, through correct modulation ot 
tone, with the assistance of your kind, courteous, recep- 
tive ears, to convey a message that will reach home, so 
why burden your banquet board with a hospital message? 

"I understand that it is in the capacity of President 
of the Gamut Club that I am honored in being permitted 
to extend this greeting to you this evening. It matters 
not in what capacity, however, I am allowed to say these 
words. Each of you has personally earned the innate 
right to be here to honor this board and to be honored 
by those surrounding it. You are here In recognition ot 
the splendid work you are performing in your own im- 
mediate neighborhood; the radiation of your personal 
musical authority, together with your optimism and 
through the work being done by the clubs you represent 
in your respective communities — because this Is a fact — 
unless you do this work no one else will; unless you 
make the sacrifice no one else will be lound who will. 



"I might be permitted to say that it is not the Gamut 
Club and its representative, neither our worthy Federa- 
tion President or any individual that makes possible 
this welcome which our local members so heartily give 
you tonight. It is the united work in the past and pres- 
ent of the representative clubs in this section, whether 
members ot the Federation or not, who have assisted 
in the musical work and enables the splendid represen- 
tation of local musicians to not only greet you but to 
honor you this evening; among them the Dominant 
Club, the Wa-Wan, the St. Cecelia, The Musicians' Club, 
the MacDowell. the Matinee Musical, The Wednesday 
Morning, the Gamut, the Music Teachers' Association, 
the musical sections of the Ebell and Friday Morning 
Clubs, the work ot that splendid body of students and 
women, the Woman's Orchestra of Los Angeles, of 
W. A. Clark, Jr.'s excellent body ot players, the Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra of Los Angeles, the splendid show- 
ing each season of the Lyric, the Ellis and Orpheus 
Clubs, the Los Angeles Oratorio Society, and the musi- 
cal sections ot the Hollywood, Glendale, Pasadena, and 
all the neighboring musical clubs that have united for 
years in making the city ot Los Angeles and vicinity of 
additional intrinsic musical value, and they all lay their 
tributes at your feet in recognition of the work that 
you and your clubs are doing to further the unrivaled 
cause which you so capably represent. 

"There was a time in the last six weeks in the dark- 
ness when I said to myself, 'What's the use? Your work 
is done; you have performed your bit; there are plenty 
ot others to take it up. Thirty-five years of constant en- 
deavor from Denver West, in connection with these 
splendid people here and throughout the Coast have 
just brought to the horizon ot the West the dim dawn 
ot the rising ot the musical sun. It is time to rest. Why 
fight?' 

"And then through the pain and darkness ot uncer- 
tainty would come the voices ot most capable surgeons, 
wonderfully attentive nurses, a long retinue of friends 
with kind words and tokens bringing back a bulldog 
determination and a call irresistible, 'You have thirty 
years more of work to accomplish — the time is alto- 
gether too short for the purpose; there is much to do, 
so strap up the pack and mush along.' The fighting 
spirit returned to win again and as from now on that 
dawn increases and the musical support grows stronger, 
whether it is the club work and the team work down in 
the oasis of the Arizona desert, or up in the mountains 
of Globe or Bisbee, or in the softer spots ot Riverside 
or Redlands, or up that wonderful avenue of the Kern 
through the San Joaquin where the magnificent work 
of Belle Ritchie is being done, or down where toll the 
Mission bells where Gertrude Gilbert and her people 
press steadily forward; or whether in Sacramento, Visa- 
lia, San Francisco, Oakland, San Jose or Stockton, or 
up in Chico and the northern environments, or over 
to Reno where social distinction makes the work hard, 
the splendid work ot you and your club and the people 
back of you and with you will bring into full force the 
musical glow that in time to come, when the noonday 
of music in this State is reached, will go down as the 
musical history ot the great Southwest and you have 
been the pioneers. 

"So return to your homes, your clubs and your work 
with new vigor; but when you return, go with that 
spirit that demands that your citizens in your respec- 
tive places of residence give the same recognition ot 
your value and your authority ot twenty years of con- 
stant study and service that carries the right to place 
in your local halls ot fame the names of their leading 
physicians, bankers, merchants, manufacturers, fruit 
growers, business and commercial men and women, and 
say, 'We have a right to demand an equal position with 
you because when the requiem of the dead is sung, when 
the bridal veil is arranged and the songs ot the service 
are given, when the quickness and brilliancy and beauty 
of the music ot the Fiestas are requested, or the hymns 
are sung tor charity, you come to us and request our 
service tree — the only service that you request free — 
and we gladly give it, but we feel we are entitled to our 
niche not only in the community, in the Forum, in the 
school and the home, but an equal showing among our 
citizens to be called useful, and it is tor these attri- 
butes which you possess that we greet you this eve- 
ning." 

After the banquet, Harl Melnroy's exquisite little play, 
Broken Idols, was presented by the Drama League, fol- 
lowed by the Russian play, A Bear, from the pen of 
Tschkhov, the great writer. Music came into its own 
with the singing of the characteristic Chinese Mother 
Goose Rhymes by Bainbridge Crist, Mrs. Birmingham 
winning enthusiastic applause, excellently assisted by 
Charles T. Ferry at the piano. 

Wednesday was American Composers' Day. Charles 
C. Draa, director of publicity, explained the activities of 
his department, which has rendered most creditable ser- 
vice. Within the last seven months, 34-,600 bulletins have 
been sent out to the members reaching at least 75,000 
readers. The bulletin is self-supporting and pays for 
itself through the sale of advertising space. Only a 
limited number of advertisements are sold and only on 
invitation. Mr. Draa paid fine tribute to Miss Jennie 
Winston, the State chairman for publicity, and to Mrs. 
Alfred Bartlett, who as legislative chairman at Sacra- 
mento has rendered valuable service. Mr. Draa, whose 
voluntary work as editor of the bulletin has proven a 
great asset to the progress ot the Federation, was given 
an ovation. 

Vernon Spencer and Rupert Hughes then discussed 
(Continued on Page 7, Col. 3) 



SYLVAIN NOACK 

CuiivertTnimler I'lillhurmonio OrehcBtrn of Kua AdscIcv 
120 Soufh Oxford Avenue 

Limited number of pupllu for violin playlns and 



CHARLES E. PEMBERTON 

VIOLIN— MUSICAL THEORY 

Faculty Member College of Music 

306 Blanchard Hall, Los Angeles— Wed. and Sat. 

JAY PLOWE— Solo Flutist 

Philharmonic Orchestra — Trio Intlme 

Studio: 334 Blanchard Hall, Los Angelei 

Res. Phone: 579064 

ANN THOMFSON-Piamste 

PIANISTE TO RUTH ST, DENIS 

RecltiilH — Concertft — Innt ruction 

In Care MuhIcoI Courier, New York 

Mnnneement Harry H. Hall 

DAVOL SANDERS 

ad COMPOSER 
of AluNlc, V. S. C. — Member 
Plilliiaimoiiic OrcheMtra 
3201 S. Fleueroa St., Lob Auareles Phoae Main 2190 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

Baritone Concert En)i;agemenfK — Conductor Los Ansele* 
Oriitorlo Society 

For information see E. M. Barger, Secretary, 330 Blanch- 
ard Hall, Los Angeles, Calif. 





HENRI de 


BUSSCHER 






Belgian Tenor 




^^H j<» ;*M|^^| 


Solo Oboe, Plillliarmonic 
Orciieiitra, Loh Aneelea 

OBOE y SINGING 

Coachine for 
Concert and Opera 

Stndio: 1500 S. Figneroa 
Tel. 23195 









GRAUMAN'S 

MILLION DOLLAR THEATRE 
Broadway at Third 
LOS ANGELES 



SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

MISHA GUTERSON, CONDUCTOR 

Sunday Morning Concerts 

Every Sunday, Starting at 11 A. M. 

Soloists From Operatic and Concert Stage 

ALL SEATS RESERVED 
—at— 

50 Cents 

and War Tax 



Which Includes the privilege of remaining for the 
regular Grauman Photoplay program. It is advisa- 
ble that seats be secured several days In advance 
in order to secure choice locations and avoid wait> 
ing in line on Sunday. 



I 



Maestro William Tyroler 

OF THE 

Metropolitan Opera House, New York 

begs to announce that he will establish a 

Master School for Grand Opera and Concert 

in connection with a 

Chorus School for Grand Opera and 

Oratorio 

in Los Angeles 

Address applications to 

127 North Boylston St., Los Angeles 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



L. E. Beh)mier 

MANAGER OP DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



COLLEGE OF MUSIC 


University of Southern California 


SUMMER 


SESSION 


June :!7th to 


VUKUNt Ittli 


Manter CloNiie^ 


eondlieteU by 


Ol.GA STEEU, 


Noted I'lnnlNl 


3201 Sonth PlKUcrro 


n SIreet— South 3-123 


Send for 


Cntalof; 



J. SPENSER-KELLY, Baritone 

THE ABSOI.UTKLY CORRECT METHOD OF VOICE 

PRODUCTION 

PupllM accepted In every branch of the vocal art. 

Studio. a4-l Munlc-Arl. BldK. Phon e I0OS2 

PATRICK O'NEIL, Tenor 

CONCERTS VOICE PRODUCTION RECITALS 

Stndloai 601-02 lUaJeatlc Theatre Bide Loa Anselea 

Phonei lires 

Brahm van den Ber^ 



ILYA BRONSON 

Solo CelllMt PhllhannoDic Orchestra. Member Trio Intlmc 
•Dd Lob ADvele* Trio. Inatractloo, Chamber 

MuBic, ReeltaU 
Stndloi M15 La MIrada. Phone Hollr S044 

ALFRED KASTNER, Harpist 

Solo Harpist Philharmonic Orchestra, Member Trio Intlme 

Recital — Instruction — Concerts 

Studio: 240 S. Gramercy Place. 66048] 

Alexander Saslavsky—Violinist 

Director Sanlavsky Chamber Muolc Society 



JAMISON VOCAL QUARTET 

Concert* — RecitalH — Club ProKrnmM — Morsruret Meimei 
Hnsel B. Anderson, Bdna C. VoorheeM, Dnlfiy V. Prldeaux. 
Abble Norton JamlaoiL, Dlrector-Accomi*unlM(e, 2024 S. ' 
Hnnver. 23ft3R 



The Heartt- Dreyfus Studios 

421 Sooth Alvnrado Street — MornlDKM. Voice and Modern 
Lancuasrea. RvNldence, Dr>'HOn ApartmentN. Phone noOOl. 

ZOELLNER QUARTET 

Manasement H. & A. Culbertaon, Aeolian Hall, New York 

Serloua StudentN Accepted 

Personal .Addrenai 12BO Wlndnor Blvd., Loa Angelea 

FLORENCE MIDDAUGH -- Contralto 

Cuncertii — Oratorio — Recltala 
TneMda>- and Friday MurnluKH, 314 MumIc Arta Bldfc., 
LoM Anffelea. Studio Phone I0OS2. Realdence AVllah. S700 

GREGORY KRESHOVER 



HELEN KLOKKE 

DRAMATIC INTERPRETATION 

CONCERTS— RECITALS— CLUB PROGRAMS 
laacement: France Goldwnter. 810 MnJ. Theatre, 1M80 

HENRY SVEDROFSKY 



Tuition In 
VIOLIN AND ENSEMBLE PLAYING 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 
3012 South Western Ave. Phone West 6006 



CALIFORNIA THEATER 

.Main Near Ninth, Lopi Angelea 
Moat Artlallc Theater-Home of the 

California Concert Orchestra 

Carll D, Elinor, Director 

Flneat Motion Picture Orcheatra In the Weat 

UAILV SV.MPHONIC CONflORTS 



OSCAR SEILING 

CONCERT VIOIJMST AND INSTRUCTOR 
and Una Re 



Raa Returned Prom Ilia Eaaler 

Ml> Molin C 

Studloi 1.12.1 S. KlKUrrroa. 1 



00371 & 2^1070 



HOMER GRUNN 

COMPOSER — PIANIST 

?rla and necllali 



EARL MEEKER, Baritone 



stndloi inOO So. PiKu 



Read the Pacific Coast Musical Review, the only mu- 
elcal paper in the wesi — $3 per year. 



FIRST WESTERN TOURj 

Philh arm onic Orch es tra 



Founded by 
W. A. Clark, Jr, 



of Los Angeles, California 



Management of 
L. E. Behymer 



Walter Henry Rothwell 

CONDUCTOR^, 

75 World-Famous Musicians Eight Distinguished Soloists 

Giving Forty Concerts in Thirty-hve Cities 

Tour starts Monday April 25th, 
ending Saturday May 28th. 





ITINERARY 




Bakeralleld, Calif. 


Portland, Ore. 


Vaklnia, Waah. 


Boulder. Colo. 


Freano, Calif. 


Tncomn, Wnah. 


MI»ouln, Mont. 


Colorado Sprln8:a, Colo. 


Sacramento, Calif. 


Seattle, Waxb. 


Deer LodKC, Moat 


Denver. Colo. 


Chico, Calif. 


Victoria, B. C. 


llutte, Mont. 


Suit Lake City, Utah 


Medford, Ore. 


Ilclllnehnm, Wash. 


Helena, Mont. 


OKden, Utah 


BUKene, Ore. 


Seattle. Wa«h. 


Bllllnea, Mont. 


Reno, Nev, 


Salem, Ore. 


Spokane, Waah. 


Cheyenne, Wyo. 


San Jane, Calif. 


Corvallla, Ore. 


Aberdeen, Waah. 


Ft. Colllna, Colo. 


Monrovia, Calif. 




OljTOpla, Waah. 


Greeley, Colo. 





Offices: 521 Philharmonic Auditorium Building, Los Angeles, Calif. 



Mme. Anna Ruzena Sprotte 

Contralto 

EMINENT SUCCESS 

as 

SOLOIST 

State Convention 
California Federation of Music Clubs 



Will Teach 

Summer Term June 27th - August 6th 



NOW BOOKING 



Season 1921-22 

For Terms and Dates Apply 
Manager Selby Oppenheimer 
68 Post Street. San Francisco 



ROLAND PAUL 

VOICE CULTURE— COACHING IN REPERTOIRE 

OPERA CLASSES INCLUDING COMPLETE 

PRESENTATIONS 

Studio 1324 ». PlBuerroa. Phone 3IS0,-) 



(Continued from Page 6, Col. 2) 
the problems confronting the American composers after 
which an interesting program was rendered by the 
well-lcnown Zoellner Quartet. The selections Included 
the first movement from a quartet. Hymn to the Dawn, 
l)y Fannie Charles Dillon, Los Angeles; two movements 
from the quartet entitled Greek Imprensioas by Emer- 
son Whithorne of Cleveland, Ohio; one movement from 
a quartet by Luclle Crews, Redlands. and two descrlp- 

(Continued on Page 8, Col. 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



LOS ANGELES NEWS 



(Continued from Page 7. Col. 31 
live pieces for string quartet, Tlie Humming Bird, by 
Sarali C. Rragdon, Pasadena, and Sunrise Song by 
Clmrles Sldlton i:rom the University of Kansas. Law- 
rence Tibbetts sang a composition. Cain, by Rupert 
Hughes, and was. as the members of the quartet, riclily 
honoi-ed by the appreciative audience. 

Two announcements from the chair brought warm 
applause. Inasmuch as their offlcial wording is of im- 
portance they are quoted in full. One is from the office 
of the Philharmonic Orchestra of Los Angeles: 

"The Philharmonic Orchestra of Los Angeles, W. A. 
Clark, Jr.. founder, Walter Henry Rothwell, conductor, 
will donate to the Federation the three hundred dollars 
($300.00) which is to be given in 1922 as a prize for 
the best Chamber Music, the manuscripts to be sub- 
mitted not earlier than December 1, 1921, and not later 
than January 1, 1922." 

The other recorded: 

"Mr. L. E. Behymer of Los Angeles wiU donate to 
the Federation the seventy-five dollars ($75.00) which is 
to be given as a prize for a State song, twenty-five dol- 
lars ($25.00) to be paid for the best words submitted 
for the song, and fifty dollars ($50.00) for the best 
musical setting of these words, the poem to be in the 
hands of the committee not earlier than August 1st, and 
not later than September 1, 1921." 

In closing the session Mrs. Bessie B^ankel, State 
President, handed a beautiful silver loving cup to Clar- 
ence Gustlin. as representing Orange County, the district 
which won this enviable trophy by bringing the greatest 
number of music clubs into the fold of the Federation 
during the past seven months. 

Wednesday afternoon was spent motoring and sipping 
tea at the lovely residesce of Mrs. Dean Mason, presi- 
dent of the Los Angeles Symphony Orchestra Associa- 
tion, who welcomed the guests most charmingly. The 
closing evening of the Convention was celebrated with 
a benefit performance of Hiawatha's Wedding, effective- 
ly staged at Trinity Auditorium by W. G. Stewart, Hans 
Lin^e producing the best results possible as conductor. 
Harold Procter gave a matured rendition of the great 
tenor solo. The augmented Woman's Symphony Or- 
chestra and a selected chorus completing the musical 
cast. The performance was impressive and well planned, 
demonstrating again Mr. Stewart's remarkable qualities 
as an operatic producer. Preceding the operatic-panto- 
mimic performance were vocal and orchestral selec- 
tions by various composers. 

Madame Anna Ruzena Sprotte, one of the most sym- 
pathetic singers we possess, captivated her audience 
with the apparent ease of her fine vocal technic. sing- 
ing a new song by Homer Grunn, called Florinel, Fay 
Foster's Call of the Trail and The Dawn on the Desert 
by Gertrude Ross. Mme. Sprotte's colorful, warm notes 
were enhanced with a depth of feeling that brought 
spontaneous response from the audience. She was given 
a greeting by her hearers which expressed eloquently 
the joy she afforded them. Mrs. Ross too was heartily 
applauded. The Woman's Orchestra, rendering the Pre- 
lude and Ballet from the Forest Play by Howard Han- 
sen, the gifted composer from San Jose, gained new 
laurels. Two numbers by Henry Schoenefeld, Air for 
the G string and Caprice Espagnol, also were well re- 
ceived, the composer conducting. 

Unofficial announcements indicate that next year's 
State Convention will be held in San Francisco, pre- 
sumably about the same time as the one so success- 
fully carried through in Los Angeles. 



had to respond to an encore, using a very clever Imi- 
tation of an old-fashioned music box, carrying one back 
to childhood, and leaving a smile of appreciation with 
her auditors. 

Madame Neustadt, In her charming manner, Intro- 
duced the participants, and invited the audience to re- 
main at the close to greet Mr. and Mrs. Pease. In her 
remarks she brought out the fact that a goodly number 
have joined the Association, and expressed a desire to 
assist, so we feel both enthusiasm and assurance in re- 
gard to the Convention: though each must do his full 
share toward its happy consummation. A. F. S. 



footsteps, whether thoy led towardH muHfc, poetry or 
the kindred arts. It was alwayw in quest of Bomo new 
expreHslon of the beauty in lift; or nature. To think 
beautifully was his dally preachment, and to be true 
to your ideals his dally service. It Is an artistic creed 
that we should always follow, always remembering him 
who taught it to us. Remembering this, wo remember 
him. and in "carrying on" his Ideals of aint^orlty, truth 
and beauty, we are but keeping his spirit alive within us. 



APRIL CONCERT, ALAMEDA COUNTY M. T. A. 

The series of monthly concerts being sponsored by 
the Alameda County Music Teachers' Association, and 
given in Ebell Hall, Oakland, are meeting with much 
favorable comment and artistic success. These con- 
certs are preliminary to the State Convention to be 
held in the Bay district in July, and are a means of 
arousing Interest and increasing membership in this 
most worthy organization. It will be only through the 
heartiest co-operation of the Bay musicians that we 
will be able to hold the most successful Convention 
possible, and if each branch of the Northern district 
can boast the same cordial spirit the Alameda branch 
now enjoys, the coming Convention will be loudly ac- 
claimed. A most cordial invitation is being extended 
to all interested in the project to lend a hand and to 
feel that on each member rests the responsibility. 

The April concert had as honor guest Edward Pease, 
baritone, and State President of the Association; while 
Helene AUmendinger, contralto; Elizabeth Simpson, 
pianist; and Bess Pangburn, harpist, were the other 
contributors. Zue Geery Pease and Josephine Crew 
Aylwin were exceptional accompanists. Mr. Pease, 
coming to us from an extended illness, was not able 
to sing all his programmed numbers, but very effectively 
interpreted a short group, of which MacDowell's Thy 
Beaming Eyes won much merited applause. Mrs. Pease 
giving most excellent support at the piano. 

Madame AUmendinger gave us very great pleasure 
in the Rossi Ah! Rendimi and Mana-Zuca Rachem; 
possessor of a beautiful voice and most gracious stage 
presence, Madame AUmendinger may be expected to 
meet with favor. Mrs. Aylwin proved, as always, a most 
capable and interesting accompanist. 

Miss Simpson, so well known about the Bay, hardly 
needs comment from the writer, but suffice it to say, 
her usual success was enjoyed. The group of old clas- 
sics, with Bach, Couperin and Beethoven represented, 
were perhaps, the most successful. Miss Pangburn gave 
delight with a group of harp numbers, including an 
Attl arrangement of Schuecker's Mazurka, Op. 12, and 



HEARS DOHNANYl PLAY AND CONDUCT 

Frederick Jacobi's Poem, Eve of St. Agnes, Enthusiasti- 
cally Received at Its First Performance — 
Alfred Hertz Applauds Heartily 

By ROSALIE HOUSMAN 

New York, May 1, 1921. — There were but three import- 
ant and interesting events at this stage of the season, 
the concert of the National Symphony where Dohnanyi 
conducted, played the Mozart concerto, and appeared 
also as composer with a suite. Op. 19. This was the 
second performance of the same program. I promised 
in my last to speak of this concert, which I did not 
hear before. In all three capacities he shone brilliantly. 
As a conductor he is virile, reticent of gesture, com- 
pletely expressive of the composer's innermost thought, 
and also very experienced. He conducted the G major 
Mozart from the piano, and played it with a purity and 
perfection of tone I do not remember to have heard 
equaled. As an interpreter of the classic in music he is 
unexcelled, with the simplicity of manner and viewpoint 
only the very few and great can attain. As a composer 
I found the suite richly scored, melodious, without being 
banal, logical in form, and well written. I do not, how- 
ever, rank him as high as a composer as I do as soloist, 
though he is a great and interesting creative musician. 
The audience went wild over him, according him an OTa- 
tion as they have been giving Mengelberg, and after 
the Mozart specially. The orchestra was reduced to the 
size of the older times and sounded well. I wish com- 
posers could again write so expressively with small 
means as Mozart did. It is far more beautiful, though 
very different from the tangle of tone we frequently 
hear. 

Friday afternoon, the 29th, saw the first performance 
of Frederick Jacobi's Poem, the Eve of St. Agnes, 
which was the center of the final concert of the Na- 
tional's season. Michel Piastre was the assisting soloist, 
playing the Mendelssohn violin concerto. He is one of 
the few new Auer pupils who deserve the tremendous 
ovation they receive, as he has style, accurate pitch, 
and a keen sense of a beautiful interpretation. The rest 
of the program was the Lohengrin Prelude and the 
Tannhauser Overture. Mr. Jacobi's music was wonder- 
fully played, and SOUNDED well. The scoring is color- 
ful, expressive of the moods and beauties of the Keats 
poem, and throbs with warmth and vitality. In form, it 
is closely knit, direct, and a consistent whole. In it, I 
feel Mr. Jacob! has grown tremendously, and has given 
his love of color and his poetic, lyric imagination free 
rein. I can sum it up in no better words than to quote 
Keats himself, and say that "a thing of beauty is a joy 
forever." I sincerely hope San Franciscans will hear it 
next winter. Judging by Mr. Hertz' enthusiasm at the 
rehearsal and performance, I suspect it will be heard. 
The audience was more than enthusiastic, and recalled 
the composer to the stage frequently to express its 
approval. 

Friday evening, at a concert at Carnegie Hall, given 
for the Boys Federation, a charity organization, three of 
our biggest artists participated. We had the rare pleas- 
ure of hearing Ganz and Spalding give us Frank's violin 
and piano sonate, each also in solo groups, and last 
but never least, Graveure in two groups of songs. Among 
the interesting things we heard, several for the first 
time, were songs and piano music by Richard Ham- 
mond, whose music I ran across in reviewing. It is 
well written imaginative music, with something to say. 
Remember the name. There were some fine songs of 
Treharne and a Scherzo of Leginska's which has had a 
lot of mixed criticisms. I found it intense, strong music, 
pagan in quality, wildly free and utterly devoid of the 
classic line which is, after all, but a time respected 
convention. Some of the naked force which is in Orn- 
stein is also here, and I admit liking the discordant 
music, as it was expressive, sincere, and well made. 
The audience liked Spalding's Etchings which he 
played well, and accorded Ganz an ovation for several 
of his shorter compositions. Honors were about even 
between all three artists, who gave liberally of their 

best. ^ 

IN MEMORIAM 

In the passing of Oscar Weil a great musician has 
gone from us. It leaves a void in our city's musical 
community that can never be filled. Time only will 
soften the loss of many of us, who were his pupils and 
friends. To say what knowing him has been to me, a 
pupil, is to speak of the holiest in art, for to have 
worked with Mr. Weil is to have known true beauty. 
His ideals were always of the highest, and it was an 
inspiration to work out the problems of music with 
him. His sincerity and artistic honesty, often caustically 
expressed, were stimulating beyond words, and it 
kindled in the student a worship of the best, which is 
his legacy to us. I know that his memory will always 
be fresh to me, for he has lit the torch at the altar of 
highest beauty where all who serve Art may come. 

Oscar Weil was always young in spirit, adventuring, 
so I used often to think, in fields which had never seen 
the foot of man before. One gladly followed his guiding 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERT 

Margaret Jarman-Cheeseman, Mezzo Soprano, Brooks 

Parker, Flutist, Caesar Addimando, Oboelst, and 

Chester Hazlitt, Clarinetist, Give Fine Program 

By ALFRED METZGER 

Although the recent concert of the Pacific Musical 
Society took place on Thursday evening. April 28th. 
when Kubelik appeared at the Civic Auditorium and 
the San Francisco Musical Club gave a splendid Jinks 
at Native Sons Hall, quite a large audience witnessed 
the performance of the artists who interpreted a very 
interesting and musicianly program. The vocal soloist 
of the occasion was Mrs. Margaret Jarman-Cheeseman, 
mezzo soprano, who made her initial appearance before 
the Pacific Musical Society on this occasion. Mrs. Cheese- 
man sang the following vocal compositions: Aria Stella 
Vagabonda from Adrienne Lecouvreur (Cilea), Aria 
Printemps qui commence from Samson et Dalila (Saint- 
Saens), Mistica (Tirindelli), Night and the Crutains 
Drawn (Serrata), J'ai pleure en reve (Georges Hue), 
L'ultiraa canzone (Paolo Tosti), and Israfel (Edgar Still- 
man Kelly). 

It was indeed enjoyable to listen to Mrs. Cheeseman, 
for she proved herself to be an artist who sings with 
depth of expression and intelligence of phrasing. Now- 
a-days there is altogether too much concentration upon 
tonal beauty alone, without adequate attention being 
paid to exact enunciation and adequate emphasis of 
the meaning of a song. Mrs. Cheeseman, while pos- 
sessing a big, resonant voice, nevertheless does not 
sacrifice diction and expression to tonal smoothness. 
In her operatic arias as well as her songs she succeeded 
in attaining dramatic emphasis, at the same time toning 
down to lyric elegance when the necessity required it. 
We find in Mrs. Cheeseman a most gratifying addition 
to our vocal forces, and it is to be hoped that she re- 
ceives the opportunities to display her art on many 
occasions during the next season. 

Brooks Parker, flute, Caesar Addimando, oboe, and 
Chester Hazlitt, clarinet, with Gyula Ormay at the piano, 
played the following ensemble numbers: Suite for oboe 
and clarinet (Gabriel-Marie); Duos for flute and oboe — 
Pastorale par un beau jour (L. FUliaux-Tiger), Serenade 
sous bois (Hedwige Chretien); Trio for flute, oboe and 
clarinet, without accompaniment, Aubade (Paul de 
Wailly), Quartet for flute, oboe, clarinet and piano — 
Caprice — on Danish and Russian airs (Saint-Saens). 
All of these works were either entirely new or almost 
new to our musical public. Notwithstanding the fact that 
these musicians can hardly spare sufficient time to re- 
hearse frequently they played well together and inter- 
preted the difficult classics in a manner to exhibit thor- 
ough musicianship. 

Every one of these artists gave evidence of serious- 
ness and inherent artistry and they deserve the utmost 
encouragement. Tonal beauty, accuracy of intonation, 
spontaneity of attacks and ensemble work and intelli- 
gent expression are among the leading features of their 
work. We are glad that some of our best musicians are 
paying attention to this ensemble music and are given 
opportunities to display their merit. The Pacific Musical 
Society is entitled to credit for its judgment in select- 
ing such numbers for its fine programs. 



MRS. UDA WALDROP'S CONCERT ACTIVITIES 

There is scarcely a young singer who enjoys wider 
popularity and whose art evokes greater admiration 
in San Francisco than does Margaret Raas Waldrop. 
Mrs. Waldrop appears very frequently in joint recital 
with her well-known husband, Uda Waldrop, who is 
appreciated equally for his many lovely song composi- 
tions and other works, as he is as an accompanist of the 
first rank. Recently Mr. and Mrs. Waldrop appeared for 
the Maya Aztec and Applied Arts Society in Palo Alto 
where they rendered a group of Indian music, including 
numbers of Mr. Waldrop and Charles Wakefield Cad- 
man. An enthusiastic audience appreciated these very 
effective selections. 

At the last meeting of the San Francisco Musical 
Club, the program of which was devoted to the works 
of California composers, Mrs. Waldrop again acquitted 
herself most brilliantly and reflected credit upon the 
excellent songs written for her by her husband. Mrs. 
Waldrop's voice exhibits many lovely qualities that 
cause her to be the charming artist that she is. She 
conveys many moods and various color modulations. 
Among her most impressive assets is her refinement 
of musical style and taste as an interpreter. The songs 
that she sang were all well suited to her voice, and one 
of the most delightful was the Fairy Lullaby which 
served to reveal her exquisite pianissimo tones. A May 
Night is a song characteristic for its bright and happy 
nature, while the Spray is a rather descriptive number 
which reaches a big and dramatic climax. Another de- 
lightful song that showed Mr. Waldrop to be inspired 
to an unusual degree when he created it is the Dream 
Ship, which I can well imagine would be enjoyed and 
appreciated by a very young child. Atmosphere and 
color reigns throughout the Life Eternal which is an 
Indian Lament most in keeping with the text. All of the 
songs are very melodious as well as singable and I feel 
very confident that Mrs. Waldrop will not be the only 
artist who will make excellent use of these numbers in 
their repertoires. C. H. A. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ALICE 
GENTLE 




HAENSEL & JONES 

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ANNOUNCES 

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commencing 

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and will take a limited number of pupils in voice, 
operatic coaching and tradition 



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ENGLISH PIANIST 

Medalist Tobias IVIatthay Pianoforte School, 



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MILLS COLLEGE STUDENTS' CONCERT 

Students of Mills CoUeRe gave their annual concert 
at the Kairmont Hotel on Wednesday evening, April 
22nd. in the presence of a large audience that occupied 
practically every seat in the spacious ballroom. The 
students presented were pupils of: Edward F. Schneider, 
piano, Frederick M. Biggerstaff, piano, Henrietta Blan- 
chard, voice, Elizabeth Mackall, voice, and William 
F. Laraia, violin. The accompanists were: Frances Kel- 
logg. Anita Hough, and Doris Olson. As usual this 
event exhibited the imtiuestlonable thoroughness of 
training and excellence of material associated with 
the music deparimenl of Mills College. The hearty 
recognition of the musical status of the event on the 
part of the audience proved further evidence for the 
artistic character of the occasion. 

The opening number consisted of two unusually well 
rendered ensemble numbers, namely. La Colomba (Tus- 
cani Folk Song), and Si mes vers avaient des ailes 
(Hahn) by Lotta Harris. Marian Towt. Mona Wood, 
Anna Louise Elliott, Anita Hough and Bernice Tutt. 
Marian Handy played Partita. No. 2 (Bach), and D 
major Prelude (Rachmaninoff) with fine touch, clean 
technic. tasteful phrasing and faultless memory. Dor- 
othy Hall sang Do Not Go My Love (Hageman) and 
At the Well (Hageman) with a clear soprano voice and 
distinct enunciation. Pearl Blake interpreted two 
Tschaikowsky numbers — Troika and Scherzo Humeris- 
tique most conscientiously and effectively, showing both 
artistic instinct and adaptability. Lotta Harris revealed 
a big soprano voice containing warmth of timbre and 
impressive volume. Her mezza voce and diction were 
specially notable. Mona Wood employed a flexible tone 
and emotional coloring by interpreting two violin num- 
bers — Romance (Wieniawsky) and Orientale (Cui). 

Bernice Tott's fine contralto voice was heard to splen- 
did advantage in II mio bel foco by Marcelli (1686-1739) 
and Voce di donna from Gioconda (Ponchielli). Her 
pronunciation was distinct and her expression decidedly 
painstaking and judicious. Meredith Eichelberger ac- 
quitted herself most creditably in the interpretation of 
two piano compositions — May Night (Palmgren), and 
Caprice Espagnol (Moszkowsky). exhibiting grace and 
exceptional technical skill. Her staccato work and 
chromatic scales were negotiated with fluency and mu- 
sicianly judgment and her rhythm and accents were de- 
cidedly enjoyable. Marian Payne sang Serenade hy 
Strauss and My Lover He Comes On the Skee (Clough- 
Leighter) with a clear, bell-like soprano voice, investing 
these songs with warmth of reading and clarity of 
phrasing. Anita Hough showed more than ordinary mu- 
sicianship in her interpretation of L'Heure Exquise (Pol- 
dowski) and Du Christ avec ardeur from La Mort de 
Jeanne d'Arc (Bemberg). She also proved the possessor 
of a mezzo voice of rich timbre and fine pliancy. 

Frances Kellogg played Chopin's Ballade in G minor 
in a manner that proved her poetic instinct as well as 
her fine training. Her touch was limpid and elegant, 
her technic easy and fluent, and her conception intelli- 
gent. The six vocalists who sang the introductory num- 
l)er also concluded the program with The Hills of Dream 
(Forsyth), and Morning (Speaks). Thus one of the very 
best students' recitals we have heard during the season 
came to a happy conclusion. A. M. 



ELISE TRICOU'S PIANO RECITAL 

One of the most interesting and efficient student re- 
citals given in some time was the one by Elise Tricou. 
pupil of John C. Manning, which took place at Sorosis 
Club Hall on Friday evening. April 29th. Miss Tricou 
is only in her thirteenth year and her excellent exhibi- 
tion of pianistic art is exclusively due to the training 
she received from Mr. Manning during the last four 
years. The program, as may be seen by examining it 
later on in this article, consisted of works difficult of 
solution by artists much more advanced in years than 
young Miss Tricou. but the latter's mentality fully jus- 
tified Mr. Manning in presenting his young artist-stu- 
dent in this recital as was to be gathered from the em- 
phatic and decisive attitude of appreciation on the part 
of the audience evident throughout the rendition of the 
program. 

The Pacific Coast Musical Review is specially inter- 
ested in the praiseworthy efforts of young students who 
are beginning to enter a career, and even though Elise 
Tricou is still in the early stages of her education she 
gives such excellent evidences of natural artistic in- 
stinct and thorough training that her work should be 
heartily encouraged and her numerous qualifications 
duly emphasized. She plays unusually well for one so 
young in years and experience, her skill and ability 
manifesting themselves in effective concentration of 
mind, thorough understanding of that which she is play- 
ing and a poise most unusual oven in older students. 

The audience practically filled every available seat in 
the hall and proved by ils insistent, frequent and spon- 
taneous outbursts of applause that the finished work by 
this conscientious, sincere and unaffected girl went 
straight to the heart of those most competent to judge. 
Both Mr. Manning and Elise Tricou are worthy of the 
highest praise and commendation. The complete pro- 
gram rendered on this occasion was as follows: Inven- 
tions— E major and A minor (Bach). Caprlccio (Scar- 
latti — Tauslg); Sonate op. 2, No. 1 (Beethoven); But- 
terfly. Lonely Voyager. Birdling. To Spring (Grieg); 
Etude — G major (MoszkowskiJ ; The Two Larks (Les- 
chetizky). 

*j CONCERT 

j MRS. JOHN CHARLES ROHLTS 

I LYRIC SOPRANO 

1 (;»l.l llnllroom. Fiilrmont Hotel 



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Musical Cltibs—Attentmi! 

Siiij^ers - Instrumenlalists - Lecturers 
Supplied far All Programs 

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