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LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 




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IJJE THE QHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOUR.NAL INI THE GREAT WESfT l 



VOL. XLIV. No. 1 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. APRIL 7. 1923. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



CLUB CONVENTION MEETS IN SANTA ANA RESIDENT ARTISTS SCORE MANY SUCCESSES 



Delegates From Eighty Music Clubs in California Hold Interesting Sessions Ensemble Organizations and Soloists Impress Large Audiences With The 
— Excellent Programs Prepared for This Occasion — Large Delegation ^ Excellence of Their Artistry — People's Symphony Orchestra Gives 

From San Francisco and Other Northern California Centers — f^"" ^94,,|iiTschaikowsky Program — Christine Paauw Scores Success — 
Encouragement of Resident Artists is Principal Topic cyA '^'2>iC ^^" Francisco Trio and Florestan Trio Give Programs 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



When this issue of the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review will be in the hands of 
our subscribers the fifth annual conven- 
tion of the California Federation of 
Music Clubs wi'.l have passed into history 
at Santa Ana. As usual the publiciLv 
department of the Federation neglected 
this paper shamefully. Had it not been 
for the fact that our good friend Mr. 
Gustlin, vice-president of the Federation, 
supplied us with some preliminary news. 
we would have been entirely without in- 
formation and would have had to make 
up our own stories. Why is it that this 
paper can work from year to year in the 
interests of leading musical organizations 
and put at their service its columns and 
influence and for some reason or other it 
cannot secure the litt'.e courtesy of atten- 
tion at the time of the convention. We 
asked certain secretaries of the clubs to 
occasionally furnish us with news and for 
the life of us we can not even get an 
occasional item without actually hunting 
for it all over the State. If our columns 
are not worth anything to the Federation 
the sooner we know it the better and we 
will offer them to someone more appre- 
ciative. 

In order to send every music club in 
the Federation a copy of this paper we 
wanted to get a revised list. We were 
told we couid not get the list, but if we 
handed over literature or copies of the 
paper to the president these copies or 
literature would be forwarded. Now, it 
would not have been necessary to ask for 
such list, because with a little effort we 
could secure a list of tae clubs, which 
does not happen to be a secret. We only 
wanted to save a little time. But, no. 
We are alright as long as we wish to 
contribute our services and time to the 
cause, but we are all wrong when we 
want a little favor. Well, now that this 
is off our chest we can continue to boost 
the cause of the California Federation of 
Music Clubs. 

The editor of the Pacific Coast Musical 
Review will be able to attend the closing 
days of the convention, and he is rather 
proud to represent the Musicians' Club 
of San Francisco whose President, Vin- 
cent de Arrillaga, has appointed him as 
the first delegate of the Musicians' Club 
ever attending a State convention of 
music ciubs. Indeed, thanks to Mrs. 
Birmingham's excellent missionary work, 
the Musicians' Club of San Francisco has 
become one of the few members of the 
Federation among the Northern California 
clubs. We are glad to bring the music 
clubs a message from the Musicians' Club 
of San Francisco. 

Of course what all artists in California 
will be awaiting with interest will be the 
action that the clubs will take in regard 
to the recognition — the REAL recognition 
— of resident artists. The time has come 
when the clubs owe it to themselves, their 
members and the artists residing in this 
State to take a definite stand in thig 
matter. This paper is willing to furnish 
a list of representative artists whose 
ability skill and reputation is beyond 
criticism. If the clubs should maintain, 
through their representatives, that the 
rank and file of the members are unwil- 
ling to listen to resident artists, we should 
favor a vote among the MEMBERSHIP 
regarding their attitude, and we feel if 
the matter is properly presented the 
great majority of the members will be in 
favor of encouraging resident artists. 



But even if such opinion should be un- 
favorable to the artists, which we do not 
think it will be. then it becomes necessary 
to ORGANIZE ALL THOSE MUSIC LOV- 
ERS WHO ARE IN FAVOR OF RESI- 
DENT ARTISTS. This paper will not 
rest until recognition for the resident 
artists is secured. But we feel confident 
that the California Federation of Music 
Clubs is inclined to favor greater encour- 
agement of the resident artists than they 
have hitherto revealed. 

The next issue of the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review will be devoted prin- 
cipally to the proceedings at the fifth 
convention of the California Federation 



The last few weeks have been so active 
musically that a number of important 
events by resident artists have not been 
reviewed in this paper. The reason for 
delaying publication . of these affairs is 
due to the fact that rather than deal with 
them in a perfunctory and brief manner 
we preferred to delay the report and so 
our readers will find a record of important 
musical events of a local nature, but 
nevertheless of an artistic character, 
which have taken place in San Francisco 
recently. 

Eighth People's Symphony Concert. — 
The eighth concert of the People's Sym- 
phony Orchestra took place at Scottish 




THK I'l.ON/.AI.IOt aitKTKT 

' in San FranrlHCo ThiH SeoHon Take 
II >e\t Sunday Afternoon (April !.'»» 
aeenient of Selby C. Onpenhelnier 



of Music Clubs, and we feel certain that 
our readers will be greatly interested for 
it will contain material which is of value 
to everyone sincerely devoted to the in- 
terests of music in this state. The pro- 
gram is exceedingly well compiled and 
the artists chosen include some of the 
most competent in the State as well as in 
the world, as the Flonzaley Quartet is one 
of the attractions as is also the Philhar- 
monic Orchestra of Los Angeles and the 
Noack Quartet. 



The Musical Blue Book of California, 
which will be published by the Musical 
Review Publishing Co. early in October, 
will represent a complete resume of 
musical activities in California. Its spe- 
cial intention is to get the resident artists 
in close contact with managers and music 
clubs. If you really wish to become ac- 
quainted with those elements who are 
able to secure for you remunerative en- 
gagements and artistic recognition we can 
not imagine a better opportunity to ob- 
tain adequate recognition than through 
the medium of this publication. To 
neglect being represented in this book is 
to intentionally lose one of the best 
chances to become known among the very 
people who can do you the most good. 



Rite Auditorium on Thursday evening, 
March 22nd, before a large and apprecia- 
tive audience. The program consisted 
e.xclusively of Tschaikowsky numbers as 
follows: Symphony Pathetique, Serenade 
Melancholique, Marche Slav. The follow- 
ing review which appeared in the San 
Francisco Call over the signature of 
Charles Woodman shows the impression 
received by one of the hearers: 

Neither Alexander Saslavsky, the con- 
ductor; the Symphony Association nor 
anyone else need apologize any more for 
the People's Symphony Orchestra — not 
after the "all-Tschakiowsky" program it 
gave at Scottish Rite auditorium Thurs- 
day evening. As far as those in the audi- 
ence were concerned, and it included a 
fairly representative number of San Fran- 
cisco's prominent music lovers, Saslavsky 
himself, as director and soloist, and the 
fifty-six musicians under his baton were 
given overwhelming demonstrations of 
popular approval and praise. 

Robert C. NeweH, president of the asso- 
ciation, gave an illuminating address on 
the French horn with which A. Heineman 
played measures illustrative of the way 
it functions and its melodious tones. Ac- 
cording to custom. Newell also spoke on 
the character of the great Russian com- 
poser and the themes of his "Pathetique" 



symphony, which were played by the 
orchestra prior to the performance of the 
entire work. 

With his solo number, the "Serenade 
Melancholique," for which Guilio Min- 
netti conducted the orchestra with ad- 
mirable skill, Saslavsky fully justified 
Newell's introductory remarks, in which 
he referred to the conductor as a "dis- 
tinguished Russian musician who honored 
San Francisco by his presence and work." 
though he has been one of the famous 
artists of this country for many years. 
Incidentally, Newell told how, when a boy 
in Russia, Saslavsky played the serenade 
for and was commended by Tschaikow- 
sky. He created a furore when he played 
it last night in tones so smooth, broad and 
deep as to give one the impression that 
he was inspired by the spirit of the mas- 
ter. 

I never heard the symphony played bet- 
ter — seldom as well. Every movement 
was loudly applauded and the last two so 
vociferously that the entire ensemble had 
to rise twice in acknowledgment. Newell 
recalled the tact that Saslavsky was con- 
cert master with Damrosch when he gave 
the first performance of the work in this 
country, shortly after the composer's 
death. The "Marche Slave" was equally 
well done. In fact, it was thrilling. The 
only thing the audience seemed disap- 
pointed about was that Saslavsky could 
not be induced to play an encore. C. W. 

The ninth educational concert by the 
orchestra is set for April 12. 

Christine Paauw's Concert — Christine 
Paauw, colorature soprano, gave a con- 
cert under the management of Selhy C. 
Oppenheimer at the Colonial Ball room 
of the St. Francis Hotel on Monday eve- 
ning, March 12th in the presence of a 
good sized audience that seemed to enjoy 
every moment of the program, if one 
may judge by the measure of applause 
accorded this artist. Mme. Paauw is a 
native of Holland and has to her credit 
an enviable European reputation prior to 
her visit to America. Her San Francisco 
concert was due to the fact that she re- 
sided here temporarily and her program 
showed that she is an experienced artist 
whose laurels were won justly. Mme. 
Paauw's voice is a colorature soprano of 
considerable range and flexibility with a 
certain hardness in the high tones which 
so many vocal artists from Germany, 
Russia. Holland, Sweden and Norway 
seem to reveal. This character of the 
voice is no doubt due to the language of 
these countries which is in the main 
gutteral and which unquestionably exer- 
cises a certain influence on the tone pro- 
duction. 

As may be seen from the appended pro- 
gram Mme. Paauw has a very extensive 
repertoire at her disposal and she sings 
it with taste and judgment. Unfortun- 
ately we could only hear the first part of 
the concert, but we certainly were con- 
vinced of the fact that the artist sings 
with enthusiasm, abandon and conviction. 
Her enunciation was not always what we 
have a right to expect from experienced 
artists, but those who came to hear evi- 
dently were pleased with her efforts. 
Lincoln S. Batchelder both as accompan- 
ist and soloist added to his reputation he 
already has established tor himself here 
and was entitled to the recognition ac- 
corded him by his hearers. The complete 
program was as follows: (a) Voi che 
(Continued on Page 11, Col. 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The DUO-ART in the 
STEINWAY 



The Duo-Art reproducing feature 
may be had only in Steinway, 
Weber, Steck, Wheelock, Stroud 
and Aeolian pianofortes. 

The great fact that the Duo- 
Art can be had in the Stein-way is 
itself an eloquent tribute to the 
T)uo-Art. 




Sherman,Pay&Go. 



Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Sts., Oakland 

Sacramento - Stockton - Fresno - San Jose 

Portland - Seattle - Tacoma - Spokane 








GEORGIA KOBER 

AMEHICAIV PIANIST 
Studio: Sa.'i.Mn Sutter St. 
I. Kearny 5903. WednesdaTS and Tliursdars 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 

Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



Arrillaga 


Musical College 




V. de A 


rrlllaea, Director 




A. I.. Artleuea, Pr 


ss.; Louia Alegrrla. VIce-Pre 


a. 


llnexrelled faclIItU 


m for tile ntudy of music In 


all 


llM branchea. Lar^e 


Pipe Orgao. Recital Hull 




2:115 m 


CKSON STREET 




San Franelaeo, Cal. 


Phone West 4737 1 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING. Director 
3^2 >VaslilnE<on Street Telephone Killnioi 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 

ADV.4NCED PUPILS .ACCEPTED 
Pupil of Mnie. V. SlepnnolT (Oeriln), M. Slevetfing, 



and E. Boher 
Kohler & Tfan 
Kearny 5154. 



Schn 

e Dldc, n'rd. & Sot. Mo 
Rea. phone Piedmont 7U< 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of i'lnmi. Orcnn, Harmony. Orennlal and Mnaical 
Director of FIr.t Preahylerinn ( horcb. Alameda. Home 
Studio: 111T PAIUi STREET. Al.AMEDV. Telephone Ala- 
meda IS.*?. Thuradnya. Mcrrlmnn School. 507 Eldorado Ave., 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 277<k. 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
or MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGORY. Director 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERJCKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



Teacher of Sinking. Coniple 



Ine. 27:10 Pier 



• t. Tel. FUlmore 4:>r>3. 



of Operatic Train- 



MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

ITALIAN VOCAL TEACHER 

a and Tetrazzi 
ipils vocally ar 
English, Fien< 

studio — IU4 Colunibua Ave., Phone Garfield ^'2 






—Endorsed by Bono 
n Uramaiic Deporti 
?nd Spanish spoken. 



MR. and MRS. GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 



Dominican College School of Music 

S.VN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 

>luNic Couraea Thorough and ProereaalTe 

Public School Mnalc. Accredited Diploma 

THE PASMORE SYSTEM OF VOCAL TECHNIQUE 

H. B. Pnamorc — Stndii 
S. F.! 25:10 t'oilcee A 
rado Road, Berkeley. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 



JACK HILLMAN Baritone 



MADAM MACKAY-CANTELL 



Dli 



CO^"rERT COACH — VOCAI. TRCHXItirE 
^ER-OICTION 

nbylerinn Choral Society. 



W« 



RESIDENT ARTISTS who are available for concert 
3urs during the season 1923-1924 will please register 
fith the Pacific Coast Musical Review so that we are 
ble to recommend them to music clubs, music schools 
nd managers. Only artists of reputation and experience 
re eligible for registration. 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

Orsanlat Temple Emanu El, Flrat Church of Chriat Sci- 
entist, Director LorInK Club. S. F.. Wed., 1817 California 
St., Phone Franiclin 2«03: Sat.. Firat Chriatlan Science 
Church, Phone Franlclin 1307; Rea. atndio, 3142 Lenlaton 
Ave., Berlceley. Phone Piedmont 242S. 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 

PI.4NIST — ACCOMPANIST 
nber ITnlveraity Extenaion Faculty 

t Phone Pacific 



sth 



883. 



NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

San Jose. Cal. 
Confera De^reea, Awnrda Cert Iflcatea, Complete Coliese 
Conaervntory and Academic Couraea In Piano, Violin. 
Harp, 'Cello. Voice. Harmony, Counterpoint, Canon and 
Fugue and Scieace of Mnaic. For partlculara Apply to 
Slater Superior. 



For Rent From May 15 to Sept. 15 
$100 A Month 

IlcHldrnce Studio— Four Rooms— Two Grand IMaaoa 

Rcferencea Required — For Particninra Addreaa 

EDITH BE.VJAMIX 

:t404 CIny Street Telephone Fillmore 8S4T 



JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 

ThorouBb Vocal and Dramatic Training 

740 IMne St. Phone Douslaa <!«24 



E. HAROLD DANA 



1 Studio 

IIX{ GREKX STRRET 

Voice Plopement. llreath Control 

Proper Production 

■hone ProNpcct SltO for A|i|>ointmen 



KARL RACKLE 

PIANIST — INSTRUCTOR 



JOSEPHIINE WILSON-JONES 

Dramatic Si>prano — Pupil of i.amperti, Oarcln. Vocal 
Studio, .'■4.-> Sutler Street, San Frnnciaco. Realdcnce, 4857 
Parii Douievard. Onltland. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ITtHE'ONLY weekly MU5iCAL JOURJIAL IM THE GI^£AT W£5T 1 1] 

MDSICAI, REVIBW COMPANT 

AI.FRF.D MBTZGER Pr«aldcn< 

C. C. EMERSON Vice Prealdent 

MAKCHS L. SAMUELS Secrclary and Treanorer 

Suite SOI Kohler & Chaae BldS'. 26 O'Farrell St., San 
Franclaco, Cal. Tel. Kenrny 5454 

ALFRED METZGER ^^ Editor 

C. C. EMERSON - Business Manager 

Make all cbecka. drafta, money ordera or other forma of 

remittance payable to 

PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

Oaklaod-Berkeley-Alameda OHIce 1117 Paru St., Alameda 

Tel. Alameda 155 
Ml«a EHznheth Wcatgate In Charge 

Nen 1 ork OHIce, 54 Weat 87th Street. Phone Schuyler 157U 
Mlaa Hoanlle Hon anian In Charge 

Sent lie Olflce, I5U1 Fifteenth Ave., Seattle, Waahlnglon 
Mra. Abhie Gerrlah-Jonea In Charge 

Loa Angelea OHIce 

Suite 447, Douglaa BIdg., 257 So. Spring St, Tel. S20-302 

Sherman Danby In Charge 

San Diego, Cat., Office, 1S34 FIrat Street . 
Mra. Ilertha Slocnm In Charge 

Vol. XLIV SATURDAY, APRIL 7, 1923 No. 1 

i ur r,\CIFlC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW la for aale at tha 
Mheet-muNlc departmenta of all leading muale atorea. 

Entered na aecond-clasa niaU matter at S. F. Poatofflce. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 
Annually In Advance Including Poataget 

United Statea _ fS.OO 

Foreign Conntrlea _ 4.00 

TWENTY-SECOND YEAR 

DON'T ALWAYS THINK OF YOURSELF 



There is a certain element in the musical jiro- 
fession which thinks it can not get along in life 
unless it always looks out for itself and does not 
care what becomes of anyone else. It is this ele- 
ment that does not only make it difficult to pub- 
lish a music journal for the benefit of the profes- 
sion and the musical public, but that also stands 
in the way of any progressive measures which a 
certain enterprising and far-sighted element of 
the community is anxious to inaugurate. This 
clement includes those who refuse to advise their 
pupils to attend concerts, because they might 
learn something that lessens their estimation for 
their teacher. It includes people who refuse to 
encourage choral societies, because they are 
afraid that the director might want to give sing- 
ing lessons and thus entice a pupil away from 
them. It includes teachers and artists who refuse 
to encourage an enterprise intended to secure for 
a community operatic seasons, because they are 
afraid that whoever is in charge might take away 
money from people that should be spent in music 
lessons. It also includes managers who oppose 
any public-spirited enterprise, because they them- 
selves have nothing to do with it. 



The Pacific Coast Musical Review specially has 
to contend with an element which is entirely 
enamored with its own individual affairs and 
which does not care a tinker's imprecation 
whether the rest of the profession is getting 
along. There isn't a teacher, student or music 
lover who does not realize the necessity of a 
music journal. It is just as necessary for the 
musical profession to have an organ of publicity 
which defends it against unjust legislation and 
against attacks from the outside as any other pro- 
fession. In a way a music journal is just as im- 
portant for the musical people as a daily paper is 
for the public in general. And yet there are a 
number of teachers and professional musicians 
who think that a music journal ought to be pub- 
lished for their own private benefit and only sec- 
ondly for the musical public at large. Now, every 
one knows that the Pacific Coast Musical Review 
has struggled for twenty-one years to fight for 
the profession. And yet when our solicitors ask 
for support in the way of advertisements we hear 
arguments like these: "The Musical Review is 
pro-German," or "The Musical Review publishes 
pictures of people who are not worthy and writes 
captions under them that are not deserved," or 
"The Musical Review forgot to publish some- 
thing about my last concert." 



support a music journal that is published for the 
benefit of the MAJORITY, and not for the spe- 
cial benefit of the few. This paper has endeavored 
to be of service to the ENTIRE MUSICAL 
PROFESSION AND PUBLIC. We would like 
to do much more for the individual teacher and 
artist, but they don't let us, because they do not 
support this paper sufficiently to justify us' to 
publish a larger paper so that we can devote more 
space to the efforts of individuals. The great ma- 
jority comes FIRST. The individual comes sec- 
ond. As long as we have scarcity of space, we 
must devote this to the interests of the majority. 
If the individual teachers or artists wish to secure 
lienefit from these columns, they must support 
the paper in a manner to enable it to print enough 
pages to include these efforts. 



A music journal should not be judged by the 
successes it achieves for a few teachers or artists, 
but by the conditions it creates for the majority 
of the musical profession and musical public, 
Twelve years ago this paper saved the profession 
what would have amounted by this time to mil- 
lions of dollars in state taxes not to say anything 
about inconvenience and injustice, when it suc- 
cessfully and single-handed fought the State li- 
cense bill for music teachers. Four years after- 
wards this same bill was introduced again, but 
the California Music Teachers Association made 
it unnecessary for this paper to again take up the 
cudgel in the defense of the profession. Two or 
three years ago this paper suggested to the music 
teachers that they need not pay any city license, 
if they proved to the Board of Supervisors that 
the license was unjust and that they possessed 
sufficient political influence to back up their con- 
tention with votes. Upon this suggestion Frank 
Carroll Giffen, Mrs. Lillian Birmingham and 
other members of the Music Teachers Associa- 
tion of San Francisco succeeded in having the 
municipal teachers' tax removed. Tliousands of 
dollars were saved to the profession. 



This paper has consistently fought for the verv 
best Symphony concerts which this city can sup- 
port. It fought for four years, contrary to the ad- 
vice of some of its best friends, against the con- 
certs given under the direction of Henry Hadley 
and succeeded in securing an improvement in the 
engagement of Alfred Hertz. It has since per- 
sistently fought for the continuance of Mr. Hert? 
as conductor of our symphony orchestra, and now 
thousands of music lovers enjoy the concerts, the 
teachers are more prosperous and the city enjovs 
a great musical reputation. We have consistently 
and persistently espoused the cause of the Cham- 
ber Music Society of San Francisco from its very 
inception, when daily papers and many music 
lovers refused to tell the truth about its efficiency 
and the good it did for the community. Now the 
Chamber Music Society, thanks to the enthusi- 
asm of Elias M. Hecht, has made San Francisco 
famous in the East and is now about to enter 
upon a trip to Honolulu. 



We have persistently and consistently fought 
the battle of the American artist, composer and 
teacher. We have fought for the resident artist 
until we have made enemies of visiting artists 
and managers. Even this week the editcr of the 
Pacific Coast Musical Review is attending the an- 
nual convention of the California Federation of 
Music Clubs for no other purpose than to fight 
for the recognition of resident artists of ability. 
We have tried to be as generous as possible to 
the resident teacher and students. And what are 
the thanks we get? Arguments why this paper 
should NOT be supported instead of arguments 
why EVERYONE OUGHT TO HELP US 
MAKE THIS PAPER SO BIG THAT IT CAN 
WIN EVERY BATTLE IT FIGHTS FOR 
THE PROFESSION IN AS SHORT A TIME 
AS POS.SIBLE. We are accused of being pro- 
German, when we are nothing but pro-music. 
Because we are indignant at the injustice done 
Mine. Johanna Gadski by prevaricators and mean 
and spiteful persons who accuse that artist of in- 
discretions of which she is absolutely innocent, 
we are called pro-German. 



songs and opera in English? Is this pro-German, 
too? Is our fight for the retention of Alfred Hertz 
whom thousands of music lovers admire and love 
pro-German. "What on earth has got into some 
people anyhow? And then we are told we should 
not caption pictures with favorable inscriptions, be- 
cause such artists do not deserve it. Who says they 
don't deserve it? If we refused to give recognition 
to every artist and teacher in California whom an- 
other artist or teacher does not consider worthy, we 
would have mighty little to say about anybody. 
Fortunately the majority of the profession is not so 
small nor narrow to demand of us to publish only 
the pictures and names of teachers and artists they 
themselves approve. Not everybody is wrong. Some- 
body must be right occasionally. 



.-Xml then we come to those artists and teachers 
who are indignant at us, because we happened to 
forget to publish something about their concerts or 
have delayed in publishing it. Some of those possi- 
bly belong among the number whom others accuse 
us of noticing when we should ignore them. Some- 
liow they never seem to remember the notices and 
reviews we DID NOT FORGET TO PUBLISH. 
Why is it necessary to always remember the un- 
favorable things ; why not occasionally remember 
something that we have done and which was appre- 
ciated? We have hereabouts teachers, artists and 
managers who support this paper to a very modest 
extent, possibly an extent commensurate with their 
income, but we are ready always to extend cour- 
tesies far beyond the justification ofathe support we 
receive. We do not make conditions of restricting 
complimentary notices to the amount of inches paid 
for by the artist, teacher or manager. But they seem 
to hold US responsible for EVERY POUND OF 
FLESH. If we received the support, we could be 
more generous, because we could publish a larger 
paper. But to refuse us advertising support, because 
we don't publish more about local artists ' and 
teachers, while at the same time preventing us from 
publishing a sufficiently large paper to print all the 
news, is certainly a very peculiar way of looking at 
things. 



Then we ha\e people living in interior cities who 
claim that our editorial articles are restricted too 
much to San Francisco and Los Angeles? What do 
you think of this? The problems of San Francisco 
and Los Angeles are the problems of every city in 
California. Our fight for resident artists, our en- 
deavors to prevent politicians from taxing music 
teachers to death, our encouragement of young stu- 
dents and prospective artists, our fight for American 
artists and composers, our persistent efforts to en- 
courage the establishment of music festivals and 
choral societies apply to EVERY COMMUNITY 
IN THIS STATE. We would pay more attention 
to interior cities if they accomplished more in the 
way of big musical endeavors. Let our interior cities 
engage California artists of standing at a remunera- 
tion commensurate with their ability. Let interior 
communities engage the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra or the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orches- 
tra. Let interior communities engage the Chamber 
Music Society of San Francisco or similar organiza- 
tions from Los Angeles and see whether we would 
not devote editorial space to them. But as long as 
they do not do anything worthy of editorial comment 
why should we worry. 



What do you think of members of the profes- What about our fight for American artists, 

sion who argue like this when they are asked to American teachers, resident artists, and singing 



Either the musical profession and public wants a 
nnisic journal or does not want it. If it wants it we 
should receive the whole-hearted support in the 
shape of advertising and subscription patronage. If 
no wants us to publish a music journal the best way 
to stop us is to refuse us that patronage which we 
think we are entitled to. It is not a question of 
PRIV.ATE recognition of what each individual can 
get out of the paper, but of what is the best for the 
commimity at large. And anyone who considers his 
private affairs more important than the affairs of 
the profession or the musical public is not the kind 
of a musician worthy of the support of a music 
journal. If he feels that we can not get his support 
unless we pay special attention to himself at the ex- 
pense of someone else just as worthy or worthier 
WE DON'T WANT HIS SUPPORT. Neither do 
we want the support of those people who become 
angry because we ask them to pay for the debts 
they incurred with this paper. We have far more 
use for the artist or teacher who does not advertise 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



or subscribe for lliis paper, because he can't afford 
it, than we have for those who advertise and don't 
pay. Well, this is about all for this week, and we 
think it should last for a while. 



CONCERT AT THE MUSICIANS' CLUB 

The San Francisco Musicians' Club presented a pro- 
gram of compositions by John Laurence Seymour, last 
Tuesday evening at their club rooms at 533 Sutter Street. 
Mr. Seymour is a young Californian from Los Angeles, 
who has studied at the University of California and 
abroad. He has recently returned from Italy and the 
concert Tuesday evening was the first presentation of 
his work since his return. Mr. Seymour made a few 
remarks about his work. He regards opera as his 
principal field, but recently he has taken up chamber 
music. 

The first part of the program was comprised of three 
Elegiac Tone Poems for viola and piano, expressive of 
the "beauty of lite we experience in its sadder mom- 
ents." These pieces were played by Julius Hang and 
Raymond White. Part two was comprised of three 
songs sung by Mrs. Flora Howell Bruner with Vincent 
Arrillaga at the piano. 

Part three was an Arthurian Suite for clarinet, bass 
clarinet, viola and piano, consisting of nine pieces 
depicting scenes from Tennyson's "Idylls of the King." 
It was played by Messrs. Randall, Shamis, Seymour 
(the composer, who is also a violinist) and White. The 
music is of the modern school. There is much simul- 
taneous use of different keys. It is more scholarly than 
inspired, more logical than truthful. For example, in 
the "Love of Guinevere," Mr. Seymour told us that he 
used two keys simultaneously to express duplicity of 
character. It is logical to suppose that two keys might 
express duplicity but the result was only cacophony 
which might mean anything or nothing and which 
proved that the logic is not true. 

KARL RACKLE. 



IVIme. Rose Relda Cailleau presented fifteen of her 
pupils at the last studio recital before the public con- 
cert which is to take place at the Palace Hotel on April 
25th. This event took place on Saturday afternoon, 
March 31, and the program was as follows: (a) Tommy 
Lad (Margetson), (bl Duna (McGill). Martin O'Brien; 
(a) Will o' the Wisp (Spross), (b) Anhelo (Anna 
Case), Miss Margaret O'Brien; (a) Just a' Wearin' 
(Bond), (b) Open Secret (Woodman), Miss Doreen 
Tittle; (a) Madrigal (Chaminade), (b) You Dear and I 
(Clarke), Mrs. D. Cohen; (a) Dreamin' Time (Strick- 
land), (b) Pettis Roses (Cesek), Miss Eleanor Spreckels; 
(a) Aria from Sonnambula (Bellini), (b) The Wren 
(Benedict), Miss Gertrude Sheusen; (a) Noon and Night 
(Hawley), (b) Love's in My Heart (Woodman), Mrs. 
A. B. Price; (a» Lilac Tree (Gartlan), (b) Row, Row 
(Strickland), Miss Elizabeth Terry; (a) Elegie (Mas- 
sanetl, (b) Conseils a Nina (Wekerlin). Miss Geraldine 
Watt; (a) Star (Rogers), (b) In My Garden (Liddle). 
Miss Alice Wilson; (a) Si mes vers (Hahn), (b) Aria 
from Herodiade (Massenet), Mrs. L. Woolams; (a) Gray 
Dove (Saar), (b) A Birthday (Woodman), Miss Marie 
CuUen; (a) Automne (Massenet), (b) Today (Huerter), 
Miss Elizabeth Magee; (a) Traeume (Wagner), (b) 
Strida la vampa (Verdi), Miss Caroline Breuner; (a) 
Dawn (Curran), (b) Robin's Song (White), Miss Beulah 
Masterson. At the piano Miss Hazel Nichols. 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Readers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Address communications to 
the Question Editor, Pacific Coast Musical Review, 
Room 801. Kohler & Chase Building, San Francisco. 

1. What does Fg in an orchestral score mean? — L. T. 
It means the bassoon. It is an abbreviation of the 

word Fagott, which is the German name of the bassoon. 

2. When was Gounod's "Redemption" written? — A. V. 
It was first performed August 30th, 1883, at the Birm- 
ingham (England) Festival of that date. 

3. Is Debussy's "Iberia" an opera? — E. G. O. 

No. It is the second number of an orchestral suite of 
three pieces called "Images." 

4. Was Georg Schumann related to Robert Schumann? 
— N. A. J. 

No. 

5. What were Paderewski's encores at his San Fran- 
cisco recital? — B. A. 

Impromptu in A flat (Schubert) ; Hark, Hark the Lark 
(Schubert-Liszt-; Spinning Song (Mendelssohn); Second 
Rhapsody (Liszt); Minuet (Paderewski) ; Etude (Liszt); 
C sharp minor Waltz (Chopin). Information for answer 
No. S was given by Arthur Agard. 

Note: I have a communication from an anonymous 
correspondent who differs from me on one of my 
answers in the issue of March 17th. First. I must ask 
all correspondents to be good enough to give me the 
courtesy of their confidence and enclose their names and 
addresses. The reason is obvious. No names will ever 
be published and no conlidence betrayed. Anonymous 
communications are invariably thrown out. 

This correspondent informs me that the "Jewels of 
the Madonna " was first produced in Munich instead of 
Berlin, as I answered. However, I have substantiated 
my statement by half a dozen authorities, including 
Krehbiel, Kobbe. Mason, and McSpadden, and they all 
agree that the "Jewels" was first produced in Berlin. 
So my answer was correct after all. I am quite liable 
to make mistakes, however, and will always consider 
it a favor to be corrected by my readers. 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

By Elita Huggins 

1605 The Alameda, San Jose, Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 



Gounod's Oratorio The Redemption was given by the 
conservatory of music of the College of the Pacific on 
the afternoon of Easter Sunday. Charles M. Dennis 
was the skillful director, with Miles A. Dreskell the 
efficient concertmaster. The quintet of soloists com- 
prised Juanita Tennyson, soprano: Ardis Carter, con- 
tralto; Chester Herold, tenor; and Frank Towner and 
Ronald Hunt, Baritones. The colleges chorus and the 
A Capella choir assisted by the college orchestra and 
the five soloists brought the number of participants 
close to one hundred and fifty. 

The outstanding feature of the prologue was the 
splendid singing of The Earth Is My Possession by the 
beautifully drilled A Capella choir. The famous chorus 
Unfold, Ye Portals Everlasting, was well given, as was 
also the grand final chorus. The Word Is Flesh Become.- 
Mrs. Tennyson was at her best in From Thy Love as a 
Father, her obligate notes ringing bell-like above the 
well sung chorus. Mrs. Tennyson and Miss Carter did 
beautiful work in Lovely Appear. 

The work of the men soloists lay chiefly in recitatives, 
which were given with smooth sureness. Chester Her- 
old's lyric tenor, Frank Towner's mellow baritone, and 
the sympathetic voice of Ronald Hunt were all especially 
suited to the demands of the oratorio. Walline Knoles 
and Kenneth MacKenzie sang in pleasing style the 
parts of the two thieves. Miss Eleanor Short and Allan 
Bacon gave good assistance as accompanists. 

The musical services at the Scottish Rite Temple on 
Maundy Thursday and Easter Sunday were most im- 
pressive. LeRoy V. Brandt, organist and choirmaster 
for the Bodies, arranged the programs in keeping with 
the spirit of the services. For Maundy Thursday he 
gave as an organ solo the Prelude to Widor's Symphony 
in C minor and Verdi's Ave Maria, transcribed for the 
organ by Harry Rowe Shelley. The Scottish Rite choir 
sang At Eventide May There Be Light, by Stebbins. 

The music was more joyous in character on Easter 
Sunday. A new departure was effected, in that instead 
of an organ prelude, a vocal one was given by the 
choir — the immortal Easter hymn. Jesus Christ Is Risen 
Today, to the setting by Lyra Dividica. Christ Arose, 
by Lowry, was also sung, and Granier"s Hosanna was 
given as a solo by Edwin J. Furgeson. The conclusion 
of the musical setting to the service was a variation on 
the Dresden Amen, played by Mr. Brant. 

William Edward Johnson directed an excellent pro- 
gram for the Easter services at the Christian Church. 
I Know That My Redeemer Liveth from The Messiah 
was well given by Miss Daisy Ostenberg. A ladies' 
quartet composed of the Misses Ida Taylor, Betty Steele, 
Daisy Ostenberg and Alice Brunk sang He Is Risen by 
Gabriel, followed by the duet Hosanna by Granier, 
delightfully sung by Miss Taylor and Arthur Johnson. 
Miss Brunk and Miss Steele sang the effective duet 
Magdalene by Warren. Mr. Johnson sang Buzzi Peccla's 
Gloria with great feeling. The choir in its numbers 
probably reached its best in the closing anthem. They 
Have Taken Away The Lord by Stainer. Mrs. Richard 
M. Bartie, who presided at the organ, did most efficient 
work. 

The sixth and last of the undergraduate recitals at 
the conservatory of music of the College of the Pacific 
will be given Tuesday night in the college auditorium. 
A group of talented students comprising Pearl Hummel, 
pianist; Helen Barber, contralto: Bernice Bogert, vio- 
linist; Marian Temple, pianist; Grace Conner, reader; 
Rose Van Valin, cellist, and Walline Knoles, baritone, 
will present the following interesting program: Piano — 

(a) Nocturne in E flat (Chopin), (b) Song of the East, 
(Cyril Scott), (c) To the Sea (MacDowelU, Miss Pearl 
Hummel; Songs — (a) Salutation to the Dawn (Steven- 
son), (bl Cradle Song (Kreisler), (c) Dusk in June 
(Foster), Miss Barber with Miss Bernice Rose at the 
piano: Songs — (a) Old French Song (Tschaikowsky), 

(b) Romance (Gliere), (c) A Negro Croon (Hartman), 
Miss Bogart with Miss Marian Temple at the piano; 
Piano — (a) Lotus Land (Scott), (b) The Eagle (Mac- 
Dowell), (c) Consolation, E major (Liszt), Miss Temple; 
Reading, Tragedy of Nan (Cutting from the third act) 
(Masefield), Miss Conner; Sonata for Cello. Adagio 
sostenuto — Allegro (Beethoven), Miss Van Valin, Miss 
Rose at the piano; Songs — (a) Hear Me, Ye Winds and 
Waves (Handel), (b) Where'er You Walk (Handel), (c) 
Left (Gustlin), (d) Mary (Richardson), Mr. Knoles with 
Miss Olive Bryson at the piano. 

Miss Georgia Kober, pianist, will play tor the members 
and guests of the Santa Clara County Branch of the 
League of American Pen Women at the Women's Club- 
house on the Stanford Campus on Saturday afternoon, 
April 7th. Miss Kober is the head of the Sherwood 
School of Music ot Chicago and is passing a year in 
Palo Alto. She appeared for a number of years with 
such organizations as the Thomas orchestra as the 
soloist and with Charles Dalmores, Mischa Elman and 
other internationally famous artists. 

Music will be one of the main features at the dedica- 
tion of the new Campbell Grammar School. Edward 
Towner, director of the band department at The Insti- 



Kohler & Chase 

iCnabf paiwa 
2Cnabp Amptrn 



SAN JOSE HEADQUARTERS 
185 So. First Street 



ALFRED LANINI 

Expert Maker of Violins, Violas and Cellos 

With European Experience 

Artistic Repairing Rare Old Violins For Sale 

591 E. ST. JAMES STREET 

San Jose, Calrfornia 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

LeRoy V. Brant, Director 

OniTN CtiiirNi'M in All llrnnches of MuhIv at 
All Stii|!r«K o( -Vdv 



CALIFORNIA 



MUSICIANS' HEADQUARTERS 

FERGUSON MUSIC HOUSE 

MUSICAL MERCHANDISE OF EVERY 

DESCRIPriON 

250 So. First Street Phone 299-r 

San Jose, California 



ALLAN BACON 



C'onrert Orcanlst 



The College of the Holy Names 

Lake Merritt, Oakland 
Complete Conservatorr Coorae — Piano. Harp, VIoIIb. 
'Cello. Voice. Connterpolnt. Harmony, HIatory 

tute of Music, who has cnarge of the Campbell Grammar 
School band, will give several numbers with the band, 
among them being the Star Spangled Banner. Blossoms 
Bright March (Southwell), Festival Ovei'ture (Southwell) 
and Les Cloches de St. Malo (Rimmer). This last 
number will be given with a chimes solo and band 
accompaniment. 



Miss Olive Burgess, a vocal pupil of Henry Bickford 
Pasmore, head of the singing department at The Insti- 
tute, will sing The Swallow (del' Acqua). Miss Burgess 
formerly taught in Campbell and there won her way to 
the hearts of the patrons of the school by her sweet and 
well trained voice. 



JOSEPH BONNET IN ORGAN RECITAL 

The musical public is greatly interested in the single 
recital ot Joseph Bonnet, the renowned French organ 
virtuoso, to take place at the Exposition Auditorium, 
next Wednesday evening, April 11. This distinguished 
organist created a profound impression when he first 
played on the great municipal organ in this city in the 
latter part of 1919, and since that time he has continued 
to meet with unqualified success wherever he has 
appeared. 

I3onnet stands among the greatest organists of the 
age and he was recently decorated by the French 
government with the Cross of the Legion of Honor. He 
has prei)ared a most interesting program for his only 
San Francisco appearance and he will open the evening 
with the Sonata in D Minor No. 1, by Guilmant. His Bach 
number will be the Prelude and Fugue in D Major, and 
he will play Cesar Franck's "Piece Heroique" and the 
Finale to the First Symphony of Louis Vierne. Com- 
positions of his own will be the "Matin Provencal" and 
his Berceuse, and another group will include composi- 
tions by Du Mage, de Grigay, William Byrd, Palestrina 
and Buxtehude. 

San Francisco's favorite tenor. Charles F. Bulotti, 
will be the vocalist ot the evening and he will be 
accompanied by Uda Waldrop. There is a large demand 
for seats at Sherman. Clay and Company's, and the 
recital will be under the direction of the Auditorium 
Committee of the Board of Supervisors, J. Emmet Hay- 
den, chairman. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



RAISA AND RIMINI COMING SOON 

Those who attended the pertormances of The Jewels 
of the Madonna and The Girl of the Golden West given 
here last season by the Chicago Opera Company un- 
hesitatingly proclaim Rosa Raisa as one of the foremost 
dramatic sopranos. This prima donna will soon visit 
California, for the first time appearing as a recital artist 
in the tar West and under the management of Selby 
C. Oppenheimer. She will sing two programs in con- 
junction with the baritone, Rimini at the Curran Theatre 
on Sunday afternoons, April 22nd and 29th, which will 
be the only appearances of these artists in northern 
California this season. 

Upon the concert platform Mme. Raisa is equally at 
home as she is in opera so that it would be difficult to 
state whether she excels as a singing actress or as an 
interpreter of songs. Through the opulence of her 
glorious tones as well as through the dramatic intensity 
of her portrayals, Madame Raisa's emotional tempera- 
ment enables her to penetrate into the soul of the songs 
of France, Germany, Russia and England giving each 
thefr traditional and authentic interpretation. 

The appearance of Madame Raisa by herself would 
be a sufficient attraction but with her talented husband, 
Giocomo Rimini, the illustrious baritone, who will also 
be recalled by local audiences with genuine pleasure, it 
is quite sate to predict that these impending recitals 
will be among the outstanding musical feasts of this 
very brilliant season. 

Both artists will be heard in operatic excerpts, duets 
from several of the operas in which they have been 
acclaimed the world over and in groups of songs in 
Russian, English and other languages. The complete 
program for the first Sunday will be as follows: Bolero 
from Vespri Siciliano (Verdi), Mme. Raisa; Drinking 
Song from Hamlet (Thomas), Mr. Rimini; Group of 
Russian Songs — (a) Autumn (Arensky), (b) O Cease 
Thy Singing (Rachmaninoff), (c) Be It Bright Day 
(Tschaikowsky). Mme. Raisa; Duet — Squillo Soavi 
(Denza), Mme. Raisa and Mr. Rimini: Group of English 
Songs — (a) Ashes of Roses (Woodman), (b) Happiness 
(Hageman), (c) At the Well (Hageman), Mme. Raisa; 
(a) Aria from Fedora (Giordano), (b) Warrior Song 
(Brull), Mr. Rimini; Aria from Ernani (Verdi), Mme. 
Raisa; Duet from Don Pasquale (Donizetti), Mme. Raisa 
and Mr. Rimini. 



ALCAZAR THEATRE 



A tremendous triumph has been scored by Allan Pol- 
lock, the celebrated international star, in his enter- 
taining play, "A Bill of Divorcement," and a second 
week of this notable attraction begins at the Alcazar 
with the matinee April 8th. 

Enthusiastic applause has greeted Pollock at every 
performance, and as many as fifteen curtain calls have 
been demanded by the audience during the past week. 

"A Bill of Divorcement" contains a good measure of 
comedy, although it is a play of distinctly dramatic 
tinge. It deals with a proposed law that permits divorce 
in the case of insanity, and mirrors in true fashion the 
return in 1935 of a husband, long confined in an asylum 
for supposed lunacy, and the complications that arise 
when he finds that his wife has divorced him and about 
to be married to another. 

Pollock has established himself as a sterling actor by 
his clever rendering of the important role of the hus- 
band in this vehicle, and individual tiiumphs have been 
scored by every member of his supporting company. 

Mary Duncan, Cliff Thompson and Marie Dunkle are 
new faces, and Nana Bryant has a splendid opportunity 
in the leading feminine characterization. Others in the 
cast are Ketta Sunderland, Emmett Vogan, Leigh Wil- 
lard and Norman Feusier. 



SCANDINAVIAN SINGERS CONCERT 

The eleventh annual concert of the United Scandina- 
vian Singers of San Francisco will take place this Satur- 
day evening at Scottish Rite Auditorium, Van Ness 
Avenue and Sutter street, when a very interesting pro- 
gram will be presented, under the direction of Axel 
Pihlstrom. The many men of this big chorus have 
excellent voices that have been splendidly schooled and 
they will be heard in songs of Hallstrom, Dudley Buck, 
Paulus, Hartman, Gounod and other standard composers. 
Edna Fischer Hall, contralto, will be the soloist of the 
evening, and other numbers will be contributed by the 
Arion Trio, composed of Joyce Hol'.oway Barthelson, 
piano: Josephine Holub, violin, and Margaret Avery, 
violoncello. Dancing will conclude the evening. 



Mme. Rose Relda Cailleau presented a number of 
her students at her regular monthly pupils' recital in her 
studio in the following excellent program on Saturday 
afternoon, February 24: (a) My Laddie (Thayer), (b) 
Pirate Dreams (Huerter), Miss Myrtle McLaughlin; (a) 
Sylvia (Speaks), (b) Sonny Boy (Curran), Mrs. Alan 
Van Fleet; (a) Marcheta (Scherzingerl. (b) Velia from 
Merry Widow (Lehar), Miss Naomi Connelly: (a) Love 
(Huerter). (b) Star (Rogers), Mrs. Price; (a) Duna 
(McGill), (b) Thou Art So Like a Flower (Chadwick), 
Miss Katharine Smith; (a) In a Blue Moon (Fisher), 
(b) Homing (Del Riego), Miss Elizabeth Magee; (a) 
I Passed by Your Window (Brahe). (b) You Dear and I 
(Clarke), Miss Alice Wilson: (a) Dreamin' Time, (b) 
Jasmine Bud (Strickland), Miss Geraldine Watt;' (a) 
Tes yeux (Rabey), (b) Curley Headed Babby (Clutsam), 
Miss Sue Thorne; (a) Venitian Song (Tosti), (b) A 
Poor Finish (Waller), Miss Marie Cullen; (a) Musette 
Aria from La Boheme (Puccini): (b) Lite and Death 
(Taylor). Miss Caroline Breuner; (a) Visi d'Arte from 
Tosca (Puccini), (b) Filles de Cadix (Delibes), Miss 
Beulah Masterson; (a) Trees (Rasbach), (b) Aria from 
Sapho (Gounod), Miss Corinne Keefer. At the piano 
Miss Relda Marie Cailleau and Mme Rose Relda Cailleau. 



Music Composers, Attention! 

WE OFFER THE FOLLOWING PRIZES: 

$150.00 for the most attractive unpublished 
anthem submitted. 

$100.00 for the second most attractive un- 
published anthem submitted. 

$75.00 for the third most attractive unpub- 
lished anthem submitted. 
All anthems submitted must be in our 

hands not later than July 1, 1923. 

Send for our special announcement folder 

outlining all conditions and rules of the 

competition. 

Lorenz's 5th Anthem Competition 

We publish about two hundred anthems a year. By 
our method of distribution, each anthem is sung by 
not less than 20,000, in some cases, by as many as 
35,000 singers within about two months of publication. 
The demand for so many new anthems every year 
constitutes a large opportunity for anthem writers, 
and this anthem contest is our earnest invitation to 
them to embrace it. 

LORENZ PUBLISHING CO. 

216 W. 5th St., Dayton, O. 70 E. 45th St., New York 
218 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 



EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, APRIL 11 

at 8:20 o'clock 

The City of Sjin Prnnrlxia Presents 

Joseph 

BONNET 

The Great French Organ Virtuoso 

One Recital Onh 

Charles F. Bulotti 

SAN FRANCISCO'S FAVORITE TENOR 

As.slstlnK .\rtlsl 
I n.V «.VI,nROP AT THK PIANO 

Reserved Seats 50c, 75c and 81.00 

On sale at Sherman, Clay & Company's 

Direction Auditorium Committee 

Board of Supervisors 



Walter 

PIANIST- 


Frank Wenzel 

-ACCOMPANIST— COACH 




«•> 


Studio: 601 Kohler & Chase BIdg. 
Res: 1916 Golden Gate Ave. Fillmore 4733 



San Francisco, Jan. 26-28 
Alfred Hertz 



ANIL DEER 

COLORATURA SOPRANO AND 
VOICE SPECIALIST 

Announces 
that owing to changes in Studio schedule 
necessitated by her concert engagements 
she will remain in San Francisco during 

JUNE— JULY— AUGUST 

STUDENTS' WAITING LIST 

NOW OPEN 

Address: 79 Central Ave., San Francisco 



Selby C. Oppenheimer Attractions 



'^' The Flonzaley Quartet 

SCOTTISH RITE HALL 
NEXT SUNDAY AFTERNOON 
"Quartet G Major, Arnold Bax, Quartet E Minor, 
op. 59, No. 2, Beethoven, Two Sketches op. 15, 
Goossens." 

Tickets— $2, $1.50, $1. (Tax extra). 
Now on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s. 



RAISA 



RIMINI 



Two Joint Recitals by the World's 

Greatest Dramatic Soprano and the 

Famous Baritone 

CURRAN THEATRE 

SUNDAY AFTERNOONS, APRIL 22-29 

Tickets— $3, $2.50, $2, $1.50, $1 (Tax extra 

Tickets now on sale at 

Sherman, Clay & Co,'s, San Francisco 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 

Teacher of Singing 

Are j<iu snlisHeil ivilli your teaeherf 

<'aii he iilaee >m»u before the imhile; 

-\re you sntisfled with your iiroirreNsf 

Is he n FiKldist. or Charletnn; 

Are you sure your teacher knows hoivf 
'j'vW*'" "'""'" '""''"K "BREATH f "TONGUE?" 

If In douht. eonsult Mr. BoRart, who studied In 
burope with the teachers of Sembrick. Scalchi, 
llisiiham. etc. 

Pupils iirepareil for Opera. Oratorio. Church and 

:)7« SITTER STREET — DouRlas »2.W 

221S I.AKIC STREET — Bayvlew -ISTl 

Evenlnj^M hy appointment 

Rend llr. Hoearfs article In this paper of March 

24. in2:l, about "Chnrletans" 



The Eve of St. Agnes 



FREDERICK JACOBI 



New York, March 6 
Dirk Foch 



HAZEL JOHNSON 

COLORATURA SOPRANO 

PUPIL OF DOMENICO BRESCIA AND FERNANDO MICHELENA 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND SOLFEGGIO 



studio:— Kohler & Chase BIdg.,— Kearny 6454 



Residence Studio:— 2720 Filbert St.,— West 8152 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



I 



The Most Significant Fact of All 

{Begardins THE AM PICO] 
T would be the natural thing for a concert pianist to 
record his playing for the reproducing device used 
in the piano he uses in concert — not only because of his 
preference for the piano itself, but because he is usually 
bound to the manufacturer by close ties of friendship. 
To either break or strain those ties takes courage — the 
courage of strong conviction. It is significant to note 
the large number of master pianists who have broken 
all precedents in the world of music by recording their 
art for the Ampico in preference to the reproducing 
device used in the piano they use in concert. The fol- 
lowing is a partial list of them : 

SERGEI RACHMANINOFF 
MISCHA LEVITZKI OLGA SAMAROFF 

ERNEST VON DOHNANYI 
GEORGE McMANUS RICHARD STRAUSS 

FANNY BLOOMFIELD ZEISLER 
YOLANDA MERO GERALDINE FARRAR 



* Rachmaninoff 

"I have never before recorded for any reproducing instrument. 
Now I have played my works for tlie Ampico because of its absohite 
faithfulness, and its capacity to preserve beautiful tone painting. 
It goes far beyond any reproducing piano in these particulars, which 
a pianist must demand in considering a perpetuation of his art." 

Sergei Rachmaninoff. 

* Levitzki 

"For a number of years I have been keenly interested in the possi- 
bilities of the Reproducing Piano. I believe I have heard them all, 
not once, but many times, but until I heard the Ampico, I never 
found one that I thought adequately duplicated the artist's playing. 

"It is for this reason that I have decided to record my playing 
for the Ampico e.xclusively." 

Mischa Levitzki. 




"Positively Uncanny" 

Says A Ifred Hertz, director of the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 
"I surely was delighted witli tlie excellent performance. The 
mysterious way of starting the instrument was positively uncanny. 
I enjoyed enormously tlie whole recital, as I always do when 
Godowsky plays. I am usually against encores of the same selec- 
tion, but I thoroughly enjoyed each repetition of Godowsky 's playing 
as given last night by the Knabe Ampico." 




At Carmel-by-the-Sea 

At this charming spot on the California Coast is to 
be found what is probably the most notable colony of 
artists, writers and musicians in the world. No com- 
munity could possibly be found, more exacting in its 
standards, more critical in its judgment. The interest 
of this group centers in their club, where within the 
past month they have installed a KN.MJE. With all 
the world to choose from, they have chosen this com- 
panion of great masters to be the center of their own 
activities. .\^ a A t!i Ji*' 

Henceforth this House shall 
be known by this sign, 

• KOHLER- er • CHASE • 



San Francisco 



KNABE 




AMPICO 



Oakland 



Resident Artists Give Fine Concerts 



Sonata Recital at 8. F. Conservatory. — 

The second of a series ot three Sonata 
recitals was given at the San Francisco 
Conservatory, 3435 Sacramento Street, on 
IMoncIay evening, March 26th by Ada 
Clement, pianist, and Artur Argiewicz, 
violinist, assisted by Rena Lazelle, so- 
prano. The program consisted of the 
Sonata by Bloch; Songs — To Music 
(Schubert), The Trout (Schubert), Devo- 
tion (Schumann), Snow Flowers (Schu- 
mann), A Thought Like Music (Brahms) 
and The Smith (Brahms); Sonata No. 10 
in F major (Mozart). Owing to the fact 
that we had to attend the concert of the 
San Francisco Trio at the St. Francis 
Hotel on the same evening we missed 
the opening number, namely, the Bloch 
Sonata. A friend who hoard this work 
assured us that owing to its ultra modern 
character we might not have liked it any- 
way, so he thought we should be glad we 
missed it. Nevertheless we should have 
been interested to hear it from such two 
able artists as Miss Clement and Mr. 
Argiewicz. 

This was the first opportunity we had 
to hear Miss Lazelle, and we certainly 
were most favorably impressed both with 
the quality and timbre ot her voice and 
the intelligent use she makes ot it. Miss 
Lazelle possesses a voice of fine flexibil- 
ity and clearness. She uses it with ex- 
actitude as to intonation, tone placement 
and emotional coloring. Her songs were 
principally of the classic order and all of 
them were Interpreted with scholarly 
adherence to their significance and with 
decided emphasis of their beauties. Miss 
Lazelle is beyond question an artist of 
high rank and a vocalist ot vast technical 
and artistic resources. She is a most 
valuable addition to San Francisco's musi- 
cal colony. 

The program concluded with the Sonata 
No. 10 in F major by Mozart, excellently 
interpreted by Artur Argiewicz and Ada 
Clement. It is a delight to listen to such 
music when interpreted as these two art- 
ists do. for they are so sincere in their 
musicianship, so facile in their technical 
execution, and so musicianly in their 
phrasing that they are able to obtain from 
a Mozart work every particle of artistic 
balance. It was certainly a very able 
performance. 

San Francisco Trio Concert. — The San 
Francisco Trio gave the third and final 
concert of the season at the Italian Room 
of the St. Francis Hotel before a crowded 
house. The organization consists of Elsie 
Cook Hughes, pianist, William E. Laraia, 
violinist, and Willem Dehe, cellist. Eva 
Koenig-Friedhofer mezzo-soprano was the 
assisting artist. The opening number of 
the program consisted of Trio in C major, 
with mezzo-soprano solo entitled Prelude 
to Keat's Endymion by George Edwards. 
Mr. Edwards is one of the most resource- 
ful and ingenious of our young composers 
and has adapted the idiom of the ultra 
modern school. Judging from the stand- 
point of technical proficiency the mem- 
bers ot the trio certainly acquitted them- 
selves nobly of their tasks, for the diffi- 
culties encountered in this work, specially 
in so far as they concern tone color 
effects, contrast in shading, carefully 
drawn intonation and precision in attacks 
necessitated by frequent changes of keys 
and other intricacies, usually associated 
with the modern school of composition, 
are many and tedious ones. 

As a theoretician Mr. Edwards has no 
superiors that we know ot but we must 
confess to an inability to thoroughly 
grasp the significance and purpose of this 
ultra modern school that deals with in- 
tangible problems of sentiment. And 
because we do not consider our personal 
opinion as final we feel in justice bound 
to retrain from going into details when 
we do not understand the objects which 
these composers are trying to reveal. 
May be some day we will be less dense, 
but in the meantime we are certainly 
most bewildered. The audience evidently 
enjoyed Mr. Edwards' work for the ap- 
plause was spontaneous and heart-felt. 
He was called out again and again and 
finally was induced, together with Mme. 
P>iedhofer to sing as encore quite a 
pleasing and well conceived song, also by 
Mr. Edwards, which had considerable 
heart appeal and was melodic without 
being superficial. Mme. Friedhofer sang 
with fine quality of voice and with intelli- 
gent phrasing and appealing sympathy. 

The trio played furthermore Bee- 
thoven's Trio in B flat major op. 97 which 



we were unable to hear on account ot 
attending another event. William Laraia, 
with Mrs. Hughes at the piano, played 
the Mozart Concerto. E flat major, in a 
manner that justly brought him the cor- 
dial appreciation of his audience. Mr. 
Laraia draws a smooth tone of more 
quality than quantity and studies his 
scores carefully. The Trio is a worthy 
institution well deserving of hearty en- 
couragement. 

Marion Ramon Wilson Concert. — Mar- 
ion Ramon Wilson, mezzo-contralto, gave 
her first concert ot the season 1923 at 
Century Hall on Tuesday evening, March 
20th on the same evening when Moisei- 
witsch held forth at Scottish Rite Audi- 
torium. Her audience, while not exces- 
sively large was thoroughly in accord 
with the singer's message if one has a 
right to judge by applause. Miss Wilson 
exhibits originality ot delivery and in- 
terpretation, a voice of great vigor and 
resonance and she possesses a repertoire 
ot unusual extent and variety. She is 
evidently imbued with the spirit of her 
work for she thrusts herself body and 
soul into her interpretations. The follow- 
ing program was heartily applauded. In 
Questa Tomba (Beethoven), Voce di Don- 
na — from the Opera La Gioconda (Pon- 
chielli), Connais tu le pays? — Romance 
from the Opera Mignon (Thomas). II est 
doux, il est bon — Air de Salome from 
Herodiade (Massenet), Adieu, forets — 
the Opera Jeanne d'Arc (Tchaikovsky); 
(a) All mein Gedanken, mein Herz und 
mein Sinn (Richard Strauss) (b) Fus- 
sreise (Hugo Wolf), (c) Traume (Richard 
Wagner) ; (a) Les Papillons (Ernst 
Chausson), (b) Nell (Gabriel Faure) ; (a) 
Melisande In the Wood (Alma Goetz), (b) 
O For A Breath O' The Moorlands (Wil- 
liam Arms Fisher), (c) "Would God I 
Were the Tender Apple-Blossom" (Old 
Irish); (a) The Parting (Frederick 
Maurer), (b) "I'd Roam the World Over 
With You" (Old Irish), (c) Work! (Ger- 
trude Ross). 



The San Francisco Music Teachers' 
Association held its regular monthly 
meeting on Monday evening. March 26th 
at 22 Presidio Terrace. The honor guest 
was Pir-o-Murshid Inayat Khan, the 
noted Sufi mystic, philospher and musi- 
cian. Inasmuch as his grandfather is 
known as the Beethoven of India, the 
address of Inayat Khan proved to be 
most Interesting. A deligjitful program 
was arranged, which was rendered 
by Mrs. Lorraine Sands Mullin, soprano. 
Miss Sarah Kreindler, violinist, and Mrs. 
E. E. Young, pianist. 

Elizabeth Simpson's pupils were heard 
in the fourth class recital of the present 
season on Saturday afternoon, February 
24th at Miss Simpson's beautiful Berke- 
ley studio, a program of unusual excel- 
lence being very artistically rendered. 
A group of talented children opened the 
program, some of them being presented 
by teachers in Miss Simpson's normal 
class, and the remainder of the program 
was as follows: Romance and Valse for 
two pianos (Arensky), Miss Helen Mer- 
chant, Miss Margaret Pish: Berceuse 
(Palmgren), Dragon Fly (Palmgren), 
Predication aux Oiseaux (Liszt). Mrs. 
Ethel Long Martin; Bourree (Bach-Saint- 
Saens), Miss Margaret Lyman; Danse 
Negre (Cyril Scott), Miss Valentine Mc- 
Gillicuddy: Berceuse (Grieg). Miss Max- 
ine Blakemore: Variations, A major 
(Paderewski), Miss Margaret Fish; Noc- 
turne (Schumann), Miss Eleanor Cham- 
berlain; To a Waterlily (MacDowell), 
Miss Myrtle de Vaux; Scenes from Child- 
hood, No. 4 (Schumann), Miss Jacqueline 
Otto; Ballade, Op. 47 (Chopin), Miss 
Helen Merchant; Capriccio Brillante 
(Mendelssohn). Miss Margaret Fish. Or- 
chestral accompaniment on second piano 
by Miss Simpson. 



Pearl Hossack Whitcomb, mezzo con- 
tralto, whose artistic work is attracting 
mucli attention this season, shared the 
honors of the evening with Prio-Murshid- 
Imyad Kahn, the mystic of India, at the 
last meeting of the San Francisco Music 
Teachers' Association held at the home 
ot Mrs. E. E. Young in Presidio Terrace. 
Mme. Whitcomb sang a group of Mrs. 
Mackaye Cantell's songs and a charming 
French group. Mrs. Whitcomb also 
scored a decided artistic success at the 
Palace of Fine Arts on Sunday, March 
18th. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




SUMMER 
MASTER SCHOOL 

Beginning June 4, 1923 
FOR 

ARTISTS TEACHERS 
STUDENTS 




FRANK LA FORGE, ComposerPiaiiisi 



THE LA FORGE-BERUMEN STUDIOS 



Frank La Forge: 
Ernesto Berumen: 
Arthur Kraft: 



Composer-Pianist : Coaching, Programme Building Classes 
in Accompanying and Piano [Leschetizky], 

Concert Pianist : Piano, Specializing in Interpretation and 
Technique. 

Concert Tenor : Voice Culture and Oratorio, Tenor Soloist 
St. Bartholomew's Church, N. Y. 



Ernest Bloch 



The Eminent Composer, Director of the Cleveland Institute 
of Music, Will Conduct Five Weeks' Master Courses in Peda- 
gogy, Form, Counterpoint, Harmony and Fugue, Beginning 
June Twenty-fifth. 




Recitals at Aeolian Hall (in connection with the Duo-Art 
Piano), which have been extremely successful in giving many 
young artists public appearances, will continue through the 
summer. 

Artist Singers, Pianists and Accompanists available for 
concert. 

For information address: 



Secretary, HARRIET KOSANKE 

14 W. 68th St., N. Y. 

Telephone: Columbus 8993 




ARTHUR KRAFT, Tciior 



Photo by Ivan Block 
ERNEST BLOCH 
Distinguished Composer. Director of 
llie Cleveland Institute of Music 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

SHERMAN DANBY, REPRESENTATIVE AND CORRESPONDENT 

Assisted by Miss Lloyd Dana and Miss Mildred Alexander, Los Angeles; Miss Penelope Newkirk; Hollywood; Mrs. Helen Wood, Pasadena. 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: SUITE 447 DOUGLAS BUILDING, 257 SO. SPRING STREET, TELEPHONE 820-302 

Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



LOS ANGELES CALENDAR 

MO\n.\V. APRIL nth 

(feorftln Kobfr. roeilnl Ebell Club, I,. A. 

TI'KSUAV, APRIL. 10«h 

Cecil ^InrKULTlte SImunilH, recltnl Ebell Club. I.. A. 

WKUVESDAY, APHII. 11th 

W. J. lloonler. fonoert Gamut Club, I.. A. 

TIllHSDAV. APRIL 12th 

I OK ViiBelcM Trio, •■oncert Ebell Club. L. A. 

(I.ubovlskl. viollnlKt. Moy .MeDonald Hope, planlnt. 
Ilyu llroUHOn. 'eelllHtl. 

Apparently mus:c must have its seasons like kite- 
flying which suggests that grown-ups are much like 
children. On March 30th. the Los Angeles Chamber 
Music Society played to us for the last time this season, 
the remaining concert on April 19th— please note this is 
on a Thursday evening— being in the hands of very dis- 
tinguished visitors, the London String Quartet. Let us 
hope that all music lovers will talk Chamber Music 
throughout the summer and insure good support for the 
local organization next fall. 

The program was: The String Quartet, D. Major. 
No. 2 (Borodine); Madam Noy (Arthur Bliss), Soprano 
— Monnie Hayes Hasting and Flute, Clarinet, Bassoon. 
Harp, Viola, Double Bass; Octet, opus 166 (Franz 
Schubert-. The Octet includes Sylvain Noak, first vio- 
lin; Henry Svedrofsky, second violin; Emil Ferir, viola 
and Ilya Bronson, violoncello; Max Fuhrmann, bassoon; 
Pierre Perrier, clarinet; Karl Chlupsa, French horn and 
Ernst Huber, double bass. With Borodine we enter a 
new musical realm. The tonal quality is something like 
Smetana. but the music is original and beautifully re- 
fined. In the quartet each voice is given its full value. 
It is difficult to detect the outside world in this music 
except a certain romantic quality in the Notturno. This 
is as romantic as Dohnanyi. but Borodine's passion is 
more spiritualized. Nothing in this exquisite movement 
was finer than the duet tor 1st and 2nd violins, and 
nothing throughout the whole work was more impressive 
than the playing of Svedrosky, a wonderfully subtle 
artist. 

Monnie Hayes Hastings singing of old Madam Noy. a 
"witchery poem" set to music by Arthur Bliss, a young 
English composer, caused her audience to demand an 
encore, whereon she sang it again to our great delight. 
The melody runs all over the scale in a most delightfully 
improbable manner, and so thoroughly did singer and 
musicians (who were led by Maquarre) enter into the 
fantastic and humorous spirit of the work that we should 
like to hear them do more next season. Miss Hastings 
has a lovely voice, the gift of interpretation and a 
captivating presence. Franz Schubert's Octet wound 
up the program. This is an unusual form, and the 
French horn naturally dominates the music and sets its 
character. The Scherzo is one of the most sprightly 
rustic movements I have heard. The last movement is 
full of charming sentiment we associate with Schumann, 
LLOYD DANA. 



SOHMER 

Gupid 




THE first successful small grand was a SOHMER. 
Iniilt 39 years ago. It was the realization of the 
long-hoped-for Orarui uf small dimcTisions possessing 
the musical and artistic qualities inhccnt in the Grand 
of larger size. 

The Cupid Grand of today is the logical result of that 
pioneer effort and the developitiert which followed. 

Tlierr are more S,,limrr Pmnns m uie in Greater 
AVw Ynrk Hum uny other iirtisth .tlilke. 



Confilttf Fumishcn of Successful Homes 

BROADWAY, BETWEEN SEVENTH AND EICHTK 

Exclusive SOHMER llepresenlatiiies 



Fitzgerald's for the Advancement of Music 

Levitzki 

This great musician, one of the masters of the piano of the 
present day, may be heard outside of the Concert Stage, only 



Ampico 



For he records for this instrument Exclusively, 
end that you hear him on the 

KNABE 



^FlTZGERMJ)fBa MUSIC CO j 

HILL STREET VP'^AT 7S.7-72.Q 

Los Angeles 




Edward Johnson appears at the Philharmonic Audi- 
torium April 3rd. in an unhackneyed program, which 
includes Old English airs, Scotch ballads, peasant songs, 
and an aria from Andrea Chenier (Giordana). The popu- 
lar tenor was heard here last year, singing with Mary 
Garden in the Chicago Grand Opera Company's produc- 
tion. The Love of Three Kings, and the title role of 
Tannhauser. At present he is a member of the Metro- 
politan in New York, 

Guiamar Novaes. Brazilian pianiste, will close the 
Philharmonic Matinee Course witli her recital of Satur- 
day afternoon, the 7th inst L. E. Behymer has attempt- 
ed for tour years to bring this brilliant artist to the 
Coast, and now Los Angeles residents will have an 
opportunity to judge the value of her title — a second 
Carreno. 

The College of Music, U. S. C. faculty presented under 
Dean Skeele. a musical program at their meeting of 
March 28th. Appearing on the program were: Dean 
Skeele. organist; Adelaide Trowbridge, pianist; Davol 
Sanders, violinist; Horatio Cogswell, baritone; Ruth 
Marie Smith, pianist; Lillian Backstrand, soprano; 
Dorothea Stuthman, pianist. 

Hubert Graff has been engaged by Constantin Baka- 
leinikoff as solo harpist for the Kinema Orchestra. Graff 
presented in March, an unusual program of forty non- 
professional harpists, at the Gamut Theatre. 

The London String Quartet will appear at the Los 
Angeles Chamber Music Society's last concert of the 
season, April 19th, Thursday evening. Composed of 
James Levy (at the present time unable to travel be- 
cause of ill health; Arthur Beckwith taking his place 
temporarily). Thomas W. Petre, H. Waldo Warner, and 
C. Warwick-Evans, the quartet was organized in 1908 
and made its first appearance in London in 1910. In that 
city during ten years, 150 concerts were given, War- 
ner's compositions are a feature of the chamber music 
society. 

Harry Girard, baritone, gave a pupils' recital in the 
Egan Theatre, March 30th. Leona Hunter, mezzo-so- 
prano, and Helena Hall, contralto, made up the program. 
Girard is assisted in his teaching by Agnes Cain Brown 
and will present another student program during the 
last of this month. 

Genevra Johnstone Bishop gave a lecture-recital on 
the Passion Play of Oberammergau for the last March 
meeting of the Tuesday Afternoon Club of Glendale. 
Assisting her with the songs were Ernest Morrison. 
Edna Maxmiller and Gladys White. 

Dr. Frank Nagel offered an opera reading of Madame 
Butterfly at the Masonic Temple on the 2nd inst. As- 
sisting artists were Marguerite Vogel in the title role, 
Lillian Snelling Farquhar as Suzuki, Raymond Harmon 
as Pinkerton, and Amos Dorsey Cain as Sharpless. 

Dean Gray, baritone who for two years toured with 
the Ruth St. Denis Coiupany, sang for the Wednesday 
Afternoon Club of Alhambra, April 4th. 

Th» Philharmonic Orchestra gives its thirteenth sym- 
phony concert in the Auditorium. April 6th and 7th. W. 
H. Rothwell, conductor has chosen the Beethoven Fifth 
for the symphony. Euphorion. an entirely new number 
by Paolo Gallico. composer and piano teacher of New 
York, will be a feature of the program. Gallico was the 
recent winner of the JIOOO prize of the American Federa- 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium Bldg., Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

COMPOSER-PI AN ISTE 

Just Issued tor the Piano 

"SPANISH SERENADE" and "RIDE OF THE COWBOY" 

ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CULTURE — CO.*CHING IN REPERTOIRE 

OPERA CLASSES INCLUDING COMPLETE 

PRESENTATIONS 

Stndio 1324 S. FlKneroa. Phone Z1805 

CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

Available (or Concerts and Recltala 

Limited Number of Advanced Puplln Accepted 

VIollnlHt Los Aneeles Trio 

Stndioi aa4 Manic Arts Stndio Bldg. Phone I00S2 

ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

Tneadart Wednesday, Friday Afternoons 
£arnn School. Phones 21805 or 271330 
1324 South Flgaeroa» Los AnKelea 

SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCERT M.4STER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTR.4 

i'oncertH and Recitals 

MannEenicnt Mrs. Caroline C. Smith, 424 Auditorium HIdE. 

Los Angeles Chamber Music Society 

EI.EVE.N'TH CONCERT 
FRIDAY HVE.MNG. MARCH .10 

GAMUT THEATRE 
Monnie Hayes Hastings, Soprano 



at East Box OfTioe, Audit 

Information at No. ». Gamut Club 

Phone S22-.S0U 




LOS ANGELES 

CALIFORNIA 

THEATRE 



GREATER CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
ELINOR, Conducting 
50 MUSICIANS 

Program for n erk of April sth 
Soloist — (JeorKin SInrk — < oloralurn Soprano 

(a( — I.ES i>RELUDES I.ls».t 

III) — CARMENA YVIIson 

THE \VHE.\ Benrdii-t 

Miss Stark 
(,.> — Tl RKEY IN THE .STR.IW — Concert Trnns- 

srrlptlon (ininn 

In Coniiin<.|ioii Willi ::nil Week of 
TlH- (^oliHvvii i'rotliirflon 

"sni i.s mil s \i,i:" 

RUPERT Illi;ili:s' <ir,.nt Sliirj of Motion 

l-it'lure Life 

With Richard DIx, Mar llusch. Frank Mnj-o, Eleanor 

lloardman. Lcn- Cody, Harbara La Marr and 

thirty-llvc prominent players of fliindom 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



[■hlltanrmonlc Orchestra 
Member Trio Intlrae. I.ot* AneeleM Trio, Philharmonic 
Quartet. InHtruetlon. Chamber MuhIc Recitals 
saiS La Mlrada — Phone Mollr 3044 



JAMISON VOCAL QUARTET S7„°f 



cert* RecKalH 



Jean Coln'elL Hnmel B. Andcrtion, E:dna C. Voorheea. Daisy 
V. Prldeanx, Ahhie Norton JnmiHon. Director-Accompan- 
iHte. 2024 S. Hoover. Phone: Went 7707. 

The Heartt-Dreyfus Studios 

VOICB AND MODEKIV LANGIIAOB8 

Gamat Club mat:.. 1044 South Hope Street. Personal 

Representative, Grace Cnrroll-L:illot. l>hones 822-809 and 

85437. 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

LOS A\GELES 

1250 AVIndsor Boulevard 031S FloIIrfvood Boulevard 

Complete Faculty of Artist Teachers 

JOHN SMALLMAN-- BARITONE 



EARL MEEKER-Baritone 

Concerts — Recitals — Instruction 

Featuring: All-American Programs 

Studio: ISOO So. PiEueroa St. Phone 23195 

Anna Ruzena Sprotte 

CONTRALTO School of A ocai Art 

Studio: Tnhoe llulldlne IMacdonrIi Club Rooms) 

For information lies. Phone 741G4 

MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



GRACE WOOD JESS ""^zzo soprano 

DRAMATIC INTERPRETER OF FOLK SONGS 
IN COSTUME RECITALS 

Management: L. K Behymer. Log Anerelea 

ANN THOMPSON-P/anis/e 

PIANIST or PERSONALITY 



CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN 

Americana Popular Compoaer on tour with TSIAM.NA 
Eaat and South: Oct. and Nov. — Pac. Coa»t: Jan. and Feb. 
East asalni Feb. and April — California: April and May 

CHARLES BOWES 



COMPOSER 

Head Violin Dept., College of Music, V. S. C. — Member 

Philharmonic Orchestra 

X^t S. Flgneros St^. Low Angeles Phone Mstn gllW 

FRANCE GOLDWATER 

Mnnaser of ArtUtN — Proerams for Clubs 

Musical — Dramatic — Lecturers 

304-.10S Majestic Theatre nidc Telephone 151S0 



WILLIAM E. HULLINGER 



NEVniE-MARPLE MUSIC CO. 

(at Piatt's Music Store) 

620-22 South Broadway, Los Angeles 
Distributors for the 

WORLD'S LARGEST 
PUBLISHERS 
Catalogues on Request 



tion of Music Cluba, submitting his oratorio, The Apoca- 
lypse. Bertha and Henry Svedrofsky will be the solo- 
ists, playing Bach's Concerto for two violins and orches- 
tra. Tl>e same composition was played by them at one 
of the Hollywood Bowl concerts directed by Hertz last 
summer. 

Evelyn Paddock Smith gave a piano recital in con- 
junction with the Arts and Crafts Day of the Santa 
Monica Bay Woman's Club. She is a pianiste of merit, 
has won favorable praise in the Northern cities, and 
now selects Santa Monica for her home. 

The Gamut Club will celebrate a birthday anniversary 
on April 4th, with a musical program arranged by 
Charles C. Draa. The club is nineteen years old, and the 
only organization in the city of a social-musical nature. 
L. E. Behymer has acted as president for the past seven 
terms. Among the most prominent artists secured for 
the program are May McDonald Hope, pianiste. Amos 
Dorsey Cain, baritone: Basil Ruysdael. basso; Doris 
June Struble, musical reader; Maurine Dyer, soprano; 
Mrs. M. Hennion Robinson, accompaniste; and members 
of the Orpheus Quartet. 

Winifred Hooke has arranged a piano recital tor the 
5th inst., in the Ebell auditorium. Being an exponent of 
the moderns, she will include on her program several 
new works of Debussey, Scriabine, Cowell, as well as 
the classics from Liszt, Bach and Chopin. Winifred 
Hooke it was who introduced for the first time here 
Cesar Franck's Variations Symphoniques, playing it 
with the Philharmonic Orchestra. 

The Flonzaley Quartet will play only one concert here, 
that being on April 7th in the Bovard auditorium, U. S. C. 
This will make the last of a series of music events 
which the Women's University Club has offered this 
season, and lovers of chamber music will find the pro- 
gram most inviting. Following are the selections 
announced: F minor quartet (Beethoven), Andante 
Cantabile (Tschaikowsky), Londonberry Air, and Puck 
by Josef Speaight. 

Josef Rosenfeld's Ambassador Sextet played its regu- 
lar Sunday night concert in the hotel lobby just before 
the Stanford Glee Club gave its Easter concert at the 
Ambassador. 

Estelle Heartt-Dreyfus gave a song recital on Easter 
morning at the South Pasadena home of Mrs. J. F. Toi-- 
rance. .Accompanying her on the piano was Grace 
.Andrews, and on the organ, Adolph Tandler. 

Calmon Luboviski and May McDonald Hope will 
appear in a joint recital in Yuma Arizona on April 10th. 
Luboviski gave a concert April 3rd at Glendale High 
School with the Ampico. and on the 4th at the Holly- 
wood Women's Club, and on the 6th he presented a 
program at the High School in Monrovia, 

The Orpheus Four, a ma'.e quartet under the direction 
of Samuel Glasse, will form part of the program for the 
Hoosier recital, to be given in the Gamut auditorium on 
April 11th. Since its recent return from tour, this will 
be the first time the quartet has appeared in an entire 
program. 

The Zoellner Quartet returned March 28th from its 
twelfth concert tour of the East, having played forty-six 
concerts in the nine weeks' absence from this city. 
During the tour, the quartet introduced for the first 
time to American audiences, a Fantasie for string quar- 
tet by Frances Ralston, and Serenade Tendre, by Jongen. 
Throughout the summer, the members will devote their 
interest to the school founded by them, The Zoellner 
Conservatory of Music. 

Otto Herschler, Dean W. F. Skeele, Dr. R. B. Mixdell 

gave an organ recital in the Bovard Auditorium. U. S. C. 
Monday evening under the auspices of the local chapter 
of the American Guild — of Organists. On the 12th of 
April, Sibley G. Pease, secretary of the guild, has 
arranged for four different organ recitals for school 
children. At the First Presbyterian Church, with Mr. 
Sibley G. Pease as organist First Presbyterian Church 
Hollywood. With Mr. Wm. Kilgrove as organist. Boyle 
Heights, M. E. Church. Mrs. Elizabeth Lee Van Armen, 
organist, and at the Ashbury M. E. Church, with E. B. 
Gowan as organist. Members of the Southern California 
Branch of the American Guild of Organists will convene 
here during the last week of June, the local chapter 
acting as host. For this convention Sibley Pease of 



Philharmonic Orchestra 

OF LOS ANGELES 

FOUNDED BY W. A. CLARK, JR. CAROLINE E. SMITH, MANAGER 

WALTER HENRY ROTHWELL, CONDUCTOR 

THIRTEENTH SYMPHONY CONCERT 

FRIDAY AFTERNOON AND SATURDAY EVENING, APRIL 6-7 

Soloists— MME. and HENRY SVEDROFSKY— Violinists 



PROGRAM 



liCETIKHEN 

IlAdl 

P tOL V (. tl.I ICU 

\\ \(.M It 



FIFTH SYMPHONY 

CO\CKRTO FOR TWO VIOLI.VS AND ORCHESTRA 

SYMPHONIC POEM "EUPHORIUM" 

ENTRANCE OF THE GODS I.NTO Y'ALHALL.V 



STEINWAY 

QiwalnstrumefHioplhe ImniortxiLs 

mMsm 



When you buy a Stcintvuy you know that you 
will never have to buy another piano. Vou liiion 
thnt It will retain its unrivaled tone iierfecliou for 
n llfetiiue, that If Puderewski himself came to your 
house you would have an instrument worthy <if 



cb. 



Steinway Uprights from $925 

Steinway Grands from $1450 

Extended Time Payments 



BIRREL 



448 COMPANY 

Droadw^ 'vfte Steinway House 



1027 North Bonnie Brae Street, is attempting to supply 
organists from the entire state of California with the 
necessary information. 

Maud Reeves Bernard, organizer and director of the 
Euterpean Quartet, presented a recent concert at the 
Raymond Hotel in Pasadena. She also was principal 
soloist for the Easter services at the United Presby- 
terian Church, singing on the same program as J. H. 
Johnson, tenor; G. M. Vail, basso: and Reta Nelson, alto. 

Myra Bell Vickers presented her pupils in a costume 
recital before the Highland Park Woman's Club. March 
30th. Those participating were: Gertrude Kochring, 
Nelle Mitchell, Mildred Masser, Velva Swartz, Thelma 
Swartz, Gladys Hommat, Otto Ploetz and Paul Vickers. 



Mme. Newrcombe 

PRINDELL 

Desirable Dignified 

Engagements Publicity 

Personal Representative of Distinguished Artists 

MAJESTIC THEATRE 

LOS ANGELES 

Phone 642-93 Phone 642-93 



A. KOODLACH 

VIOLIN M.VKER AM> REPAIRER 

( onnoisseur— Appriii.ser 
n Majestic Theatre Hldg.. Los Aimclis Phone 070-! 

ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 



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MARGARET HEDGER MAULE 

EXPERIENCED INSTRUCTOR IN NORMAL 

COURSE IN MUSIC 

PIANO ORGAN 



TeL Fair Oaks IH41 



De Lara Grand Opera Company 

MANUEL SANCHEZ DE LARA, Conductor 
PreHen«« "II Trovalore" on TucKdny Eveiilnj;^. \|»ril 
'Mtti, at Gniiiat Thenter, Loh AniK^eleN, anil on ThurN- 
dny Kvenhif^. April 2«tli. at I'aMaflcna Hiph School 



ELEANOR JESSICA TIPTON 

VOICE CULTURE 
Protege and Pupil Madame Nordica 

MAC BURNEY Chicago— Two Years 

FRANKLIN HUNT Kansas City— Five Years 

STUDIO 214, MUSIC ARTS BLDG., Phone 



10 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Etecta Felt Ferry, mezzo-soprano, is to leave for a 
concert tour which will extend to Chicago. She is a 
pupil of Bertha Vaughn. 

May Robeson will give a program of Russian music 
for the Hollywood Woman's Club, at its meeting of 
April 4th. This pianiste is quite active at present, 
coaching under May MacDonald Hope, maintaining a 
studio at Monrovia and filling engagements as accom- 
paniste. She is planning for May. a program which will 
be in the nature of a survey of piano literature. 

William Tyroler, pianist-coach, and Alice Lohr, 
soprano, will appear in joint recital April 24th, in the 
Ebell Auditorium. 

Cecile Marguerite Simonds, the six-year old violiniste, 
will give a recital in the same auditorium on the 10th 
inst. 

Raymond Harmon, a tenor who has appeared Jointly 
this season, will present a recital of his own in the 
Ebell on April 18th. 

Alfred Bonnet, French organist, is to play in the 
Bovard Auditorium, U. S. C, on the 17th inst. 

Helen Hammond, Mary Christine Albln, Marjorie 
Vorhes, will give vocal, piano, and violin selections for 
the Junior auxiliary of the Wa-Wan Club, on the 7th 
inst. 

The West Ebell Club was furnished with a musical 
program April 3rd. Those taking part were Fern 
Haynes and Mrs. Howard Schumann, pianlstes; Mmes. 
George Cooper, Elridge Myers, and Leonard Casey, with 
vocal selections. 

Amo Dorsey Cain and Mrs. Amo Dorsey Cain pre- 
sented a pupils' recital in the Stillwell Hotel on the 
evening of April 1st. 

Alfred Mirovitch, whose similar plans of last summer 
were interrupted by a tour of the Orient, will conduct 
a Master Class in Los Angeles, beginning .lune 10th 
and e.xtending over a period of six weeks. His present 
concert tour will end May 23rd, with an appearance at 
the Hollywood Woman's Club. 



ROSE FLORENCE— Mezzo Soprano 



studio:— 545 Sutter Street 



CONCERT— VOICE PLACING— COACH ING 



nenl —L. E. Behymer, 70S /ludilo 



Telephone Kearny 3598 
Building, Los Angeles 



The Raisa-Rimini joint recital will be given in the 
Philharmonic Auditorium April 24th. Rosa Raisa, the 
Russian prima donna, has w-on pronounced success both 
in America and abroad; Giocomo Rimini, baritone has 
appeared with her in the same opera companies abroad. 
Both artists are members of the Chicago Grand Opera 
Company, and possess extensive repertoires. 

Olga Steeb, pianiste. will be soloist for the Woman's 
Symphony Orchestra when the second concert of the 
season will be given in the Philharmonic Auditorium 
April 18th. She will play the fourth piano concerto in 
G major of Beethoven — the first time this composition 
has been interpreted with an orchestra in Los Angeies. 
Olga Steeb has just returned from a successful tour of 
the East and North. 

Brahm van den Berg, pianist, was featured soloist of 
the Ambassador Sextet concert Sunday night, March 
25th. He appeared through the courtesy of the Fitz- 
gerald Music Company, featuring a composition, Cap- 
riccio on the Ampico. 

An entire MacDowell music program was given in the 
MacDowell club rooms on March 26th. Dr. Alexis 
Kali and Lillian Ruthoff played the first movement from 
the Second Concerto, as arranged for two pianos. Ethelyn 
Harrison Forshner. pianiste, furnished the musical set- 
tings for a group of MacDowell's poems, and Virginia 
Delia Rovere, soprano accompanied by Marjorie Chapin, 
gave a number of shorter songs. 

Winifred Hooke, pianiste, and exponent of modern 
music, will appear in recital at the Ebell Club on April 
5th, and will include on her program a composition by 
the CaiitorniaD, Henry Cowell. The concert is in the 
nature of a farewell, as the pianiste departs for Europe 
shortly. 

Mrs. Carl Johnson, contralto, appeared before the Wa 
Wan Club, February 21st. On the same program, which 
was given in costume, was Barbara Kierulft, harpist. 

Guimar Novaes gives a piano recital Saturday after- 
noon, April 7th. in the Philharmonic Auditorium. She 
is a Brazilian in her early twenties and has won phe- 
nomenal success since she was first heard here in 1916. 
She appears locally under the management of L. E. 
Behymer. 

Gertrude Ross has had her songs included on the pro- 
grams of a number of noted artists this season. Louis 
Graveure, in a New York recital of February 22nd, 
presented Serenade with success and will include it in 
next season's repertoire. Florence Easton, Florence Mac- 
beth, Estelle Heartt-Dreyfus, and Theo Karle also are 
presenting compositions from the pen of this Los 
Angelf_-s composer, 

Violet O'Connell gave a violin recital in Hollywood 
March 17th. She is a resident of Alhambra, studying 
under Maud Irvine, who accompanied on the night of 
her recital. 

Doris June Struble gave a piano recital in Bakersfield 
on March 26th. This appearance marked the beginnng 
of a month's tour, to extend as far as Chicago 



Margaret Goetz and Grace Freebey, in addition to their 
operalogue presentations, have arranged a series of 
artist-pupil recitals for the months of April and May. In- 
cluded tor appearance are Mrs. W. L. Porterfield, con- 
tralto, who also gave a recital in Santa Ana on the 2.ith 
of March. Evelyn Mansfield, soprano, Isabel Narre and 
Lynne Merril, pianistes. 

Jules Lepske, vioIinist,will appear in recital next season 
under the management of France Goldwater. He is now 
one of the first violinists of the Philharmonic Orchestra 
and has filled occasional solo engagements during his 
three years' residence in this city. 

Viola Ellis, contralto, gave a recital in the Maryland 
Hotel of Pasadena on the afternoon of March 26th. 

California Theatre. — Liszt's Symphonic Poem, "Les 
Preludes,'' is the feature of the concert arranged by 
Carii Elinor at the California Theatre for Easter 
week. This is the first rendition in Los Angeles other 
than by the Philharmonic Orchestra, and is character- 
istic of Mr. Elinor's constant effort to broaden the scope 
of his programmes and aid in the popular understanding 
and appreciation of good music well played. An addi- 
tional treat on the programme is the appearance of the 
young coloratura soprano. Miss Georgia Stark, singing 
H. Lane Wilson's "Carmena," a song sparkling with 
Andalusian color, written in characteristic Spanish 
waltz style and rhythm, offering an exceptional oppor- 
tunity for displaying vocal technic. Her second number, 
"The Wren,' by Benedict, a clever musical invention 
that affords the singer a chance for some charming 
effects, is in well selected contrast to "Carmena." 

The programme closes with "Syncopated Impres- 
sions," arranged by Mr. Elinor, a delightful mosaic of 
syncopated harmony from the current popular tunes 
Mr. Elinor's arrangement reveals intricate characteris- 
tics and new and subtle orchestral effects. The musical 
setting for the super picture, "Souls For Sale," ar- 
ranged by Mr. Elinor, is extremely well done and rounds 
out a most enjoyable programme tor the music lover 



KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



Secretary ond .Manaser of 
K. Altl, Room 1004 Kohler 
& Chaae nidg., San Franciaco 



Western Representative of Lyon & Healy Harps 

Trlelihone DouKlan 1878 




Siellojelica 

COLORATURA SOPRANOl 



800 KOHLER CHASE DLDC 
SAt^ FRANCISCO 






PRIZE FOR MUSICAL COMPOSITIONS 

Mr. W. A. Clark, Jr., President of the Philharmonic 
Orchestra of Los Angeles announces a musical contest 
open to composers of the State of California and offers 
a prize of $1000.00 for the best symphony or symphonic 
poem for orchestra, and a prize of $500.00 tor the best 
chamber music composition (trio, quartet, quintet, etci. 
Rules of the Contest 

1. Contestants must be American citizens and resi- 
dents of the State of California. 

2. The works submitted must be original composi- 
tions and must not have been published or performed 



4. Each manuscript should bear plainly marked on its 
titie page a motto but NOT THE NAME OF THE COM- 
POSER. A sealed envelope containing the name of the 
composer and bearing on the outside the same motto 
as is placed on the title page should accompany each 
manuscript. 

5. The judges will be Walter Henry Rothwell, Henry 
Schoenefeld, Charles Wakefield Cadman, Homer Grunn 
and Dr. Humphrey J. Stewart. A majority decision will 
rule. Should no manuscript be of sufficient merit to 
justify the awarding of the prize, the judges will have 
the privilege of re-opening the contest within one year. 

6. It is understood that the prize-winning manuscripts 
will be the property of the Philharmonic Orchestra of 
Los Angeles which will have the right of first perform- 
ance: however, the composer will have the privilege of 
copyrighting the work and collecting royalties from 
sources other than the Philharmonic Orchestra of Los 
Angeles. 

7. The Philharmonic Orchestra of Los Angeles will 
not be obligated to a performance of the prize-winning 
orchestral composition, but should a performance be 
decided on the composer will be required to supply the 
necessary orchestral parts. 

8. Manuscripts must be submitted not later than 
September 1, 1!»23, to Caroline E. Smith. Manager of the 
Phiharmonic Orchestra, 424 Auditorium Build ng Los 
■Angeles, Calif. 



Miss Umer first received recognition when she composed 
and orchestrated the music for the 1916 Parthenia at the 
University of California. Since that time she has 
studied composition and harmony in the Ecoie Normale 
de Musique. Paris, having been awarded the George 
Ladd Prix de Paris scholarship at the University of 
California in 1919. 

Mr. Laraia has distinguished himself as violinist with 
the San Francisco Trio, concert master of the Peoples' 
Symphony Orchestra, head of the violin department at 
Mills College. He is a native of San Francisco, a gradu- 
ate of the Conservatory of Bologna, Italy, later having 
studied with the great master Cesar Thomson in Brus- 
sels. While in Europe he won much distinction as 
soloist and he will be welcomed in this capacity by his 
San Francisco admirers. 



FLONZALEY QUARTET ON APRIL 15 

When the Flonzaley Quartet give their only San 
Francisco concert at Scottish Rite Hall, next Sunday 
afternoon, April 15, under the management of Selby C. 
Oppenheimer, local music lovers will have the oppor- 
tunity of hearing one of the greatest chamber music 
organizations appearing before the public today. The 
programs that this ensemble presents are at all times 
on a plane with their high artistic ideals and performed 
in a manner which has evoked enthusiasm and apprecia- 
tion from the press and public alike. 

At their coming San Fiancisco concert the Flonzaley 
Quartet will render a program of classics in which the 
artistic perfection for which they are justly famous 
will have full scope. The numbers to be played will be 
as follows: Quartet in G major by Arnold Bax the 
English composer whose work has created so much 
discussion in the past few years; Beethoven's majestic 
Quartet in E minor. Op. 59 and two sketches from the 
opus 15 quartet of Eugene Goossens which the author 
has subtitled "By the Tarn" and "Jack o' Lantern." 

Tickets for the Flonzaley Quartet are on saie at 
Sherman, Clay & Company. 



CHALIAPIN COMING 



RESIDENT ARTISTS IN JOINT RECITAL 

Miss Catherine Urner, soprano, and William F. Laraia. 
violinist, will be heard in joint recital on Monday eve- 
ning, April 23rd at the Fairmont Hotel. The artists 
will have the able assistance of Else Cook Hughes at 
the piano. The proceeds of the recital will go toward 
the endowment fund of Mills College, and the Music 
Club of the college together with a group of prominent 
patrons are sponsoring the event. The concert is under 
the management of Alice Seckels. 

Miss Urner is Director of the Vocal Department of 
M.lls College. In addition to her work as soloist she is 
widely known for her compositions, which include songs 
piano sketches, organ fugues and string sextettes, trios! 
and a symphonic poem of the California -Missions for 
full orchestra. This latter work is now under consid- 
eration for presentation in Paris by Golschmann, one 
of the younger conductors of the modern French school. 



The mere announcement that the famous Russian 
baritone, Feodor Chaliapin would return to San Fran- 
cisco to fullfil his engagement lost through illness last 
month and that he would appear at the Exposition Audi- 
torium on Sunday afternoon, May 20th, and Monday 
evening. May 28th has already brought to Manager Selby 
C. Oppenheimer's oflice hundreds of inquiries regarding 
seat reservations and the best method of securing good 
places to hear the most famous of present day singers. 

Chaliapin, following his fateful California trip returned 
immediately to Chicago, where with recovered voice he 
created renewed sensations as the featured star of the 
special engagement of the Russian Grand Opera Com- 
pany in that city. He is now closing his season's work 
with the Metropolitan Company of New York and within 
memory no singing artist has ever received such com- 
plete and unanimous praise from all critics and public 
as has tliis marvellous Russian. 

Mail orders for the Chaliapin concerts should be sent 
to Manager Oppenheimer in care of Sherman, Clay & 
Co.. now. They should include the full amount of the 
value of the tickets plus the government tax and for 
the convenience of a prompt return of the tickets self- 
addressed envelope. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



(Co 



RESIDENT ARTISTS 

itlnued from rage 1. Col. i) 



sapete — Canzone from Le Nozze di Fi- 
garo (Mozart), (b) Amarilli, mia bella 
(Caccini), Madam Paauw; (a) Komm. 
wir wandeln i Peter Cornelius), (b) Jlond- 
nacht (Sehuman), (c) Vergebliclies Stand- 
clien (Brahms), (d) Maria's Wiegenlied 
(Max Reger), Madam Paauw; Ou va la 
jeune Indoue from Lakme (Deiibes). 
Madam Paauw; (a) Aufschwung (Schu- 
mann), (b) Warum? (Schumann), (c) 
Rhapsodie G Minor (Brahms). Mr. Bat- 
chelder; Recit et air de Lia from L'en- 
fant prodigue (Claude Debussy). Madam 
Paauw; (a) Le soir (A. Thomas), (bl 
Vilanelle (Dell' Acqua). (c) Crepuscule 
(Massenetl. Madam Paauw; (a) The Rose 
and the Nightingale (Rimsky-Korsakow). 
(b) Deep in Love (Rachmaninoff), (c) 
Last Dance (Harriet Ware). Madam 
Paauw; Ombre legere from Le pardon 
de Ploermel (Meyerbeer), Madam Paauw. 



Eva Garcia's Piano Recital — Eva Gar- 
cia, the delightful and exceptionally 
gifted pianist gave a most successful 
piano recital at the Hotel Oakland Ball- 
room on Tuesday evening. March 13th. 
under the management of Zanette W. Pot- 
ter. H. Arthur Garcia, violinist, was her 
assisting artist. The appearance of Miss 
Garcia always creates a very favorable 
impression upon us. for she demonstrates 
in no small degree our contention that 
very worthy artists are residing right 
among us. On this occasion she again 
reflected credit upon the profession. Her 
program was extensive and varied and 
she brought to her work every ounce of 
seriousness, care and sincerity of which 
she is capable. Technically she brought 
out the most difBcult passages with ease 
and exactitude, while from an emotional 
sense she emphasized the sentiments of 
every composition in a manner most con- 
ducive to artistic interpretation. 

Specially worthy was her grasp and 
execution of the Bach-Taussig Toccata 
and Fugue which she played with mascu- 
line force and yet with that fine quality 
of tone that infused musicianly phrasing 
into the interpretation. Miss Garcia 
never pounds and she colors her runs and 
octave passages in a manner to give them 
unusual grace. No wonder her large 
audience bestowed upon her that measure 
of approval which only a sincere artist 
is entitled to receive. H. Arthur Garcia, 
although we were unable to remain until 
his appearance, reports credit him with 
adding to the art'stic value of the con- 
cert. 

The complete program was as follows: 
Toccata and Fugue (Bach-Taussig). Miss 
Garcia; Seguidilla (Castilian Dance) 
(Albeniz). Romance (La Forge). Study C 
minor (Revolutionary) (Chopin), Waltz 
C sharp minor (Chopin), Scherzo B fiat 
minor (Chopin). Miss Garcia: Hejre Kati 
(Hubay). Ave Maria ( Schubert- Wilhelmj). 
H. Arthur Garcia: Arabesque No. 1 (De- 
bussy), Arabesque No. 2 (Debussy). The 
White Peacock (Griffes), The Fountain 
(Douillet), Rhapsody G minor(Brahms), 
Miss Garcia. 

Miss Garcia is a pupil of Pierre Douil- 
let's, whose composition she played and 
whose influence upon her artistic training 
she readily concedes. 



Florestan Trio Concert — The Florestan 
Trio appeared at Scottish Rite Auditorium 
on Monday evening, March 19th. The 
event was one of the Music Lovers' Con- 
certs, featuring American Artists only, 
which are being given under the direc- 
tion and management of Ida G. Scott, The 
Florestan Trio consists of Lajos Fenster, 
violin, Dorothy Pasmore, violonce'.lo, and 
Frank Moss, piano. This combination of 
artists represents some of the very best 
artistic material that can be had in this 
State or any other. Tlie program in- 
cluded: Trio op. 8 (Brahms), Sonata tor 
violin and piano (Cesar Franck), Lajos 
Fenster and Frank Moss; Trio op. 1 
(Korngold). 

Although the audience was not as large 
as the occasion warranted the enthusiasm 
that prevailed amply compensated the 
artists tor their excellent work. The in- 
terpretations of these representative 
classics of both the old and new school 
showed that the musicians comprising 
this trio are fully alive to the possibilities 
of the compositions they had chosen for 
performance. Their reading was intelli- 
gent and uniform as to interpretative 



conception and their technical grasp of 
the various diflSculties was thoroughly 
in conformance with established stand- 
ards. 

In the Sonata both Mr. Fenster and Mr. 
Moss acquitted themselves most credita- 
bly and invested their interpretation with 
that intensity of emotional emphasis and 
that precision of phrasing which this 
work demands. The concert was in every 
respect a worthy musical event and one 
of the enjoyable occasions of the season. 



Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert an(J Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 
Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languages 

'1302 Broadway .... Oakland 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE S.W FRAXCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banks ot San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haiglit and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UJloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (43<4) 

per cent per annum was declared for the six months 

ending December 31st, 1922. 

INTEREST WILL HEREAFTER BE COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 
INSTEAD OF SEMI-ANNUALLY AS HERETOFORE. 



ADELE ULMAN 

TE.%CHER OF VOICE AND PI.VXO 



Pacific 33 



Laura Wertheimber 

Preparatory Teneher for 

.>lr!i. Xoilh llraudt 

2211 Scott St. Telephone Fillmore lr.22 



Mrs. William Steinbach EDWIN HUTCHINGS 



VOICE CULTLRE 

Stadio: 

go: KOHLER & CHASE BLDG. 

Swn FmnelMoo Phone; Kewrpy ■t4■^^ 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

BARITO.XE — VOICE CUI/rHRE 

Authorized to Toaeh Mine. Schnen- 

Renc'N Method 

1314 LeavetiTTorth St. Phone Pro.spect l)2.-»3 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 

PIANIST 
Studio: 1537 Euelld Avenue, Berkeley. 
Phone Berkeley tllHH). 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 



PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

90.'; Kohler & Chniie Bill. Tel. Suiter 7:<H7 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COtlPOSITION 
Studio, 603-604 KOHLER & CH.^SE BLOG. 
Phone Keorny .••■4.V4 

MRS. CHA.RLE5 POULTER 

SOPRANO St. Andreira Church 

Voice Culture, Piano. S88 27th St., Oak- 
land. Tel. 2079. Kohler & Chaae Bldg., 
WedneitdaTfi Tel. Kearnj !>454. 

ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 



Oakland. Tel. Pledn 



Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGING 
■itudio .36 Gafrner Building. :<76 Sutter St. 
Tel. DouKlas 42»3. Rc«. Tel. Kearny 2.140 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 

AnnoDneeM the opening of her new Reni- 
denee Studio, Clark AptH., Apt. 2<t — l.'ts 
Hrde St.. San FrnneUeo. Phone ProMpeet 
SOai. Fridays. !»U2 Kohler & Chawe Bid?. 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRALTO 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

GRADU.\TE OF SCHOLA C.VNTORUM, 

PARIS 

ORGANIST ST. MAHV'g OATHEDRAb 



ESTHER MUNDELL 

SOPRANO AND TEA( IIKII 

Pupil of 

lie RcHxke and Percy Rector Stephens 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



Joseph George Jacobson 



PIANO 
St. Phone FUlniore 348 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 



SIGMUND BEEL 

Manter Classes for Violin 

Studio Iluildlne, 1373 Post Street 

Tel. Prospect 7.->7 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 



OF MUSIC 



Music School) 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRj\LTO 
Teacher of SlnKlnc. 32 Loretta Ave, Pied- 
mont. Tel. Piedmont 304. Mod., Kohler <& 
Chnse Rldg.. S. F. Telephone Kcsrny .VtiM. 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 SCOTT ST„ Bet. Clay & Waahlngton 

Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 
Mrs. Nonh Brandt. Piano 



MARION RAMON WILSON *»;-,■ 

DRAM.ATIC CONTRALTO tlon. 

Opera Succeases In Europe: Concert Sue- 

cesses In -America. Address 1^01 California 
St., San Frnnelwco. Telephone Prospect 3620 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

no Soloist. Temple Emanu El. Con- 
ind Church AVork. Vocal instrnc- 
2.-..ln Cinr St.. Phone West 4Sn0. 



MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 

ARTISTIC PIANO INSTRUCTIOIV 

Studio: 1U09 Kohler A ChaHe Bldg. 

Telephone Kearny 5454 

Rea. Tel. Bayview 4104 

EVA GARCIA 

CONCERT PI.\NIST. ACCOMPANIST 

»Nn TEACHER 

Studio: 41116 Piedmont Ave. Tel. Pled. 2750. 

Residence: 4iri2 Hoive St., Oakland 
Tel. Pied. .■MII2 

ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 



RUTH DEGNAN 

PUPIL OF GIACOMO AND MME. 

MINKOW.SKI 

TEACHKIR OF VOICE 

242.S Pine S*. Tel. West 7012 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 .Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 

2321 Jackson St. Phone Fillmore 3256 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 



OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

MISS MARION FRA2ER 
2027 California St. Tel. Fillmore 3827 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Ghanning Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Park 1974 

MARJORIE E. YOUNG 

1363 Grove St. Tel. West 4571 

MRS. H. I. KRICK 

479 Forest St., Oakland. Tel. Pied. 3554 

MARGARET WHITE COXON 

149 Rose Av., Oakland Piedmont 1608-W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue — Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 

1841 Fulton St Tel. Pacific 4219 

DOROTHY PASMORE 
1715 Vallejo St. Phone West 1195 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 467 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

301 Spruce Street Pacific 1679 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

22U1 Scott St. Phone West 1347 

ANDRE F^ERRTEr 
1470 Washington St. Tel. Franklin 3321 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

1005 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K. 5454 

MARGARET BRUNTSCH 

70 Piedmont St. Phone Park 3469 

MME. M. TROMBONI 

601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 



OTTO RAUHUT 

357 Arguello Blvd. Phone Pacific 3561 

HOTHER WISMER 
3T01 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4974 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454 

EMIL HAHL 
Res.: 2756 Baker St. Tel.: Fill. 229' 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 

434 Spruce St. Tel. Fillmore 1131 

REED A.ND MOUTHPIECE M.\KER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 

789 Mission St. Sutter «JH 

If you want to become known to the 

musical public of California, advertise in 

the Pacific Coast Musical Review. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

on the Programs of Distinguished American Artists 

Published by 

G SCHIRMER, JOHN CHURCH CO., THE BOSTON MUSIC COIVIPANY, 

THE COIVIPOSERS' MUSIC CORPORATION 

Songs for All Voices, New Publications of the Composers' Music Corporation 

THE CRY OF THE ORIENT TOMORROW 

THE FOREST OF DREAMS 

A CYCLE OF SIX— SONGS OF THE LITTLE DAYS 

For Sale at the Leading Music Houses 



THE LITTLE HANON, By Robt. J. Ki„g 

A new work patterned after tfaoMe contained in the famoUH "Hanon Vi 
PlanUt." It Nbould serve the «ame purpOHe for the coinparntlve beglnne 
the larger one had bo MueeeifHfaliy aeeompllHhed for the more advanced. 

Cheerfully sent for inspection to anyone. 
HENRY GROBE, 135-153 Kearny Street. 

Representative for the Clayton F. Sttmmy Publications. 



MAUD G. McFAUL 

ACCOMPANIST 

1128 Chestnut Street 

Telephone Prospect 4032 



JOHN WHITCOMB NASH 

VOCAL CULTURE 



Discovery Concerts! 

Every Sunday morning at 12:30 
P. M. these Discovery Concerts 
are given at the Granada and 
California Theatres. 



/*J™"J»*Si Patrons are invited to 
S^QtllCnilT remain for the picture 



Qonstance Alexandre 

Mezzo Soprano 

Pupils Accepted 

Inquiries made at 

801 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Phone Kearny 6454 



Frank Moss 

PIANIST 

Residence Studio — Hotel Normandie 
Telephone Franklin 5400 

Available for Recitals 

Management Ida G. Scott 

Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny 5454 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 

Endorsed hy Wae:er Swayne 

Special Normal Course for Teachers, based on Swayn 

Principles 

Studios 807 Kohler « Chase Bids. 

2S1814 Etna St., Berkeley. Phone Berkeley 131t) 



Leslie V. Harvey 

Organist 
Coliseum Theatre 



SCHUMANN HEINK 

STEINWAY PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

Season 1922-23 — Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 



The 
PIANOFORTE 



There is a subtle satisfaction in knowing 
that one's possessions, whatever their nature, 
are of superlative excellence. 

A Gobelin tapestry or a da Vinci painting is 
a constant source of pleasure and bears testi- 
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lover the same is true in the possession of a 
Mason & Hamlin Piano. 

Those who are musically sensitive, whose 
appreciation of tonal quality renders them 
competent to judge, pronounce the Mason & 
Hamlin Piano the leading instrument of its 
kind. 

Dame Melba, richly endowed with musical 
discrimination, says in this connection: "It 
seems to me that the preference on the part of 
an individual for the Mason & Hamlin Piano 
is indicative of a superior musical nature." 

Only an actual hearing can give a realization 
of its beauty of tone. 




WE INVITE A HEARING 



two entrances 

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victor talking machines 




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LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



]^rffir €0Mt 




JJ THE QHLY WEEKLY IV1U51CAL JOURNAL IMTHE GREAT WEST 1J| 



VOL. XLIV. No. 2 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1923. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



MUSIC CLUB CONVENTION ENDORSES RESIDENT ARTISTS 



Persistent Campaign for Recognition of Resident Artists Ends With Passing of Resolution to Recommend to Music Clubs and 

Managers to Include in Courses at Least Two Resident Artists During a Season — Fifth Annual Convention Held 

at Santa Ana a Brilliant Success — Fine Programs Rendered — Those in Charge of Convention Entitled 

to the Highest Praise for Efficient Preparation — Mrs. Lillian Birmingham Presided With Dignity 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



The fifth annual convention of the California Federa- 
tion of Music Clubs, which took place at Santa Ana on 
April 4, 5, 6 and 7 has gone into history and to the 
credit of those in charge of the convention be it said 
that it was in some respects the most successful and 
most far reaching of all the gatherings which the music 
club clans held so far. It is with a great deal of 
rejoicing and gratification that the editor of the Pacific 
Coast Musical Review listened to the resolution recom- 
mending to the eighty odd clubs of California, and to 
the managers belonging to the Federation, to include in 
the itinerary of concerts during a season at least two 
resident artists of California. This resolution in itself 
will prove invaluable in the attitude of the musical 
public toward resident artists, for the combined mem- 
bership of the music clubs represents alone over ten 
thousand music loving people and the influence of these 
ten thousand upon their relatives and friends practically 
reaches every one interested, in music. It is a great 
victory for the resident artists and the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review can not conceal its pride in the part it 
took to secure this recognition from the California 
Federation of Music Clubs. 



music clubs of the Federation w.ll be fearless and thus 
establish a real standard for the recognition of resident 
artists which will prove of invaluable benefit to music 
in California. It may even lead to an adoption of this 
principle everywhere in this country and automatically 
eliminate imposition and charlatanism in the profession. 
The Wednesday Evening Reception 
An informal reception to delegates and guests was 
held at St. Ann's Inn, Santa Ana, on Wednesday eve- 
ning, April 4th. Nearly one hundred delegates were in 
attendance, which, of course, were augmented by many 
friends and guests. The membership of the federation 
really justifies the attendance of 300 delegates, but 
evidently the distance being so far from many cities 
and the delegates paying their own expenses had some- 
thing to do with the attendance being only one third of 
the actual delegation. At 8.30 o'clock there was a per- 
formance of Arthur Sullivan's Cantata the Golden 
Legend which was presented by courtesy of the Orange 
County Choral Union at the Temple Theatre and which 
was interpreted in an exceptionally artistic and efficient 
manner by Mrs. H. M. Sammis. soprano; Miss Edith 
Cornell, contralto; Mrs. A. L. Knlpe, contralto; Earl 



America! America! 

God mend thine every flaw. 
Confirm thy soul in self-control. 
Thy liberty in law! 

Oh, Beautiful for patriot dream 

That sees beyond the years, 
Thine alabaster cities gleam 

Undimmed by human tears. 
America! America! 

God shed His grace on thee. 
And crown thy good with brotherhood 

From sea to shining sea. 

After the conclusion of the anthem the Rev. F. T. 
Porter delivered a very impressive invocation. Clar- 
ence Gustlin. chairman of the local convention board, 
extended the greetings in that graceful, well enunciated 
and happily worded style that made him the outstanding 
popular figure of the convention. Mayor J. G. Mitchell 
of Santa Ana delivered the address of welcome extend- 
ing to the assembled delegates the freedom of the city, 
but admonishing them not to exceed the speed limit in 



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FIFTH ANNUAL CONVE.VTION CALIFORXIA FEDERATION OF Ml'SIC CI.rDS 
h in Santa An 



lion of tlir < 



«rMil>i<-<i in From ot Fimt Coneresational (ha 
nlifnrnin Frderntion of Munii' ClubK Toole Place in Ss 
'Kolutlonn PaxHeil Ih One Berommendlne Muxli- (lulu 



BeHidiOK in California in itinerary 



Although the principal fight has been won. the cam- 
paign is not yet entirely finished. For unless the artists 
included for uresentation before the music clubs of 
California are indeed worthy of recognition, that is to 
say are comparable in efficiency, reputation, experience 
and musicianship to other artists recommended to the 
music cUibs for engagement, this fight will have to be 
fought all over again, for the music clubs will justly 
maintain, in case the artists selected fall short of artistic 
expectations, that if these are examples of resident art- 
ists it is unjust and unfair to expect the clubs to recog- 
nize and remunerate tliem on a basis established for 
visiting artists. All personal ambitions and convictions 
regarding an artist's accomplishments must give place 
to serious consideration of his or her artistic skill as 
compared with visiting artists. Mere self-confidence in 
one's ability should not be regarded as proof o( positive 
efficiency. The best way in which to decide upon the 
eligibility of resident artists to be placed side by side 
with visiting artists ot distinction, is the evidence of 
past successes and experience. And by this we do not 
mean successes as represented by the adulation and flat- 
tery of friends, but by undisputable endorsement of press 
and public in communities of unquestionable musical 
standing and preferably away from home, not necessarily 
away from the home State, but assuredly away from the 
home city. And these successes should be based upon 
appearances for which admission has been charged. In 
other words only resident artists of similar experience 
and a like measure of success as visiting artists are 
justified to regard themselves, or to expect to be 
regarded by others, on an equality with visiting artists. 
We trust tliat our resident artists, their friends and the 



Meeker, baritone; Ray Miles, tenor; Mrs. Ruth Parkin- 
son, accompanist, and Harry Warne, organist. A chorus 
of fifty voices aroused the audience to genuine enthusi- 
asm because of its tone quality, precision of attacks and 
intelligent phrasing. The hosts of the reception were 
the Santa Ana Musical Association, the Orange County 
Choral Union and the Orange County Music Teachers' 
Association. 

Proceedings of Thursday, April 5th 
Mrs. Lillian Birmingham called the Convention to 
order at the Temple Theatre at 9; 30 o'clock, after which 
the assembly sang America The Beautiful, words by 
Katherine Lee Bates and music by Samuel A. Ward. 
Mrs. Abbie Jamison of Los Angeles directed the singing 
and Clarence Gustlin ot Santa Ana, was at the piano. 
This composition has been selected as the official song 
ot the National Federation ot Music Clubs and all mem- 
bers ot the Federation are asked to memorize the words, 
which are as follows; 

Oh beautiful for spacious skies 

For amber waves of grain. 
For purple mountain majesties 

Above the fruited plain! 
America! America! 

God shed His grace on thee. 
And crown thy good with brotlierhood 

From sea to shining sea! 

Oh, beautiful for pilgrim feet 
Whose stern. Impassioned stress, 

A thoroughfare for freedom beat 
Across the wilderness! 



their transactions, for there was a terrible judge In 
Orange County, whose name made automohillsts tremble 
and whose jail sentences for speeding are famous 
throughout the land. Mayor Mitchell need have had no 
fear, for at this as well as preceding conventions of all 
characters no speedometers are necessary, for as a rule 
the schedule runs all the way from half an hour to an 
hour behind. Mrs. Lir.Ian Birmingham of San Francisco, 
president of the California Federation of Music Clubs, 
ably responded in the name of the assembled delegates, 
creating an excellent Impression and saying as usual, 
the right thing, at the right time, in the right place. In 
the absence of Mrs. Carroll Nicholson (this time we 
made sure we were right before speaking ot Mrs. Nichol- 
son's absence, for last time at the Music Teachers' 
Association Convention we said she was absent, when 
she was there). Miss Ethel Congdon proceeded with the 
report on credentials showing that seventy-one delegates 
were in attendance. Mrs. Nicholson was to have pre- 
sented the report on program, she being the chairman 
of the program committee. 

In the absence of John C. Manning of San Francisco, 
director of the extension department. Miss Eva Francis 
Pike of Los Angeles, the assistant director, presided, 
with that efficiency and sincerity which has made her 
such an influential factor at these conventions. Mrs. 
Cecil Frankel, chairman ot the National Federation ot 
Music Clubs, extended the greetings of the National 
Federation with that helpful, optimistic and whole 
hearted attitude which has p'.aced her in a position ot 
national importance and which makes her such a 
dependable pillar of strength in the Federation. The 
(Continued on Pagrc- 7. Col. 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



STEINWAY 

The Instrument of the Immortals 



When you buy a 
STEINWAY, you 

know that you will 
never have to buy 
another piano. 




ShermanMay&Go. 



Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Sts., Oakland 

Sacramento - Stockton - Fresno - San Jose 

Portland - Seattle - Tacoma - Spokane 




GEORGIA KOBER 

AMERICAN PIANIST 

Stadia: SOn-M.'i Sutter St. 

Tel. Kearnr 5903, WedneMdaTS and Tbnrsdajs 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 

Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
or MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGORY, Director 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

OrEBnUt Tempte Bmana EU Flrat Chnrch of ChrUt Scl- 
entUt. Director Lorlng Club. S. P„ Wed. 1617 CalKornU 
St., Phone Franklin S603i Sat.. Flrat ChriatUn Science 
Cknreh, Phone Franklin 1307 1 Res. atodio, 3142 LenlatOB 
Ave., Berkeler. Phone Piedmont 2428. 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 



aclBc 8W2S 

The College of the Holy Names 

Lake Merrilt, Oakland 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

Contralto 
Teacher of Singlne. Complete Course of Operatic Train 
ins* 2780 Pierce St. Tel. FUlmore 4553. 

MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

ITALI.^N VOCAL TEACHER 



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For Rent From May 15 to Sept. 15 
$100 A Month 

ReHldenrv Sliidin— Four Kooiiix— Ttv» Grand IMnnox 

Referencen Required — For Piirtieulnrn AddreDX 

KDITH IIK\JA>H\ 

3404 (lay Street Telei.hone Fillmore 8.S47 



Arrillaga Musical College 

V. de ArrUlaea, Director 
*A. L. ArtlfiTuea, Prea.; Loula Aleeria, VIce-Prea. 
Unexcelled faellltlea for the atady of maalc In all 
Ita branches. Laree Pipe Orean. Recital Hall. 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
Saa Fraaclaco, Cal. Phone Weat 4737 



Phone Garfield 227U 



Manning School of Music 



JOIIIV C. MANNING, Director 



3242 Waahlnsli 



Telephone Fllln 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 

ADVANCED PUPILS ACCEPTED 
Pupil of Mme. V. Stepanoir (Berlin), M. SleveklnE, 
and E. Robert Srhmltx (New York). Studio: lOOS 
Kehler & Cbaae Bide., Wed. A Sat. Morninss. Tel. 
KearnT S4EV4. Rea. phone Piedmont 700. 



MR. and MRS. GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 



Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAP'AEL, CALIFORNIA 

Music Conraefl Tboroueh and Prof^rreaslTC 

Public School MuhIc. Accredited Diploma 

THE PASMORE SYSTEM OF VOCAL TECHNIQUE 

H. D. Pasmore — Studloa: Suite 506 Kohler & Cbaae Bldg., 
S. P.: 2.'>.t0 ColIcEe Ave., Berkeier. Reaidence 201 AWa- 
rado Road, Berkeley. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSfi"ELDT, Pianiat 

207 Cherry St.. Bet. Washington S: Clay. Tel. Pac. ll.iOO 

JACK HILLMAN Baritone 



antelln HOBS. 

MADAM MACKAY-CANTELL 

CONCERT COACn—VOCAL TECHNiaUE 
SUPKR-DICTTON 
Director Calvary Presbyterian Choral Society. 



JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
Thoroueh Vocal and Dramatic Training 
Pine St. Phone Douelns 0824 



E. HAROLD DANA 

Soloist. First Church of Christ 
ancisco. California, .Announces 
.studio at 

1133 GRF.EN STREET 
I'oice Placement, Breath Contri 

Proper Production 
one Prospect 800 for Appointm 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 



Furthc 



We 



lOOO. 



Teacher of Pla 



ny. OrEanUt I 



ad Hnalcal 



Director of First Presbyterian C hurch . Alameda. Ho 
fltadio: 1117 PARir STREET. ALA9TKDA. Telephone Ala- 
■teda ISB. Thursdays, Merrlman School. S07 Eldorado Aye, 
Oakland. Telephone Piedmont 2770u 



RESIDENT ARTISTS who are available for concert 
tours during the season 1923-1924 will please register 
with the Pacific Coast Musical Review so that we are 
able to recommend them to music clubs, music schools 
and managers. Only artists of reputation and experience 
are eligible for registration. 



KARL RACKLE 

PIANIST — INSTRUCTOR 

ice Studio 1330 Pine St Tel. Prospect 02IB 

'ward Tuesdays. Address 300 Smalley Ave, 



JOSEPHINE WILSON-JONES 

raniatic Soprano— Pupil of Lamperti, Garcia. Vocal 
tudlo. .'',4.' Sutter Street. San Francisco. Residence, 4057 
ark Boulevard, Oakland. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Ijrifir ffi0a^2toiml3kW# 



HE ONLY WEEKLY MU51CAL JOUR 



4 THE GREAT WEST I 



MrSICAL REVIEW COMPANT 
ALFRED METZGER 



count of their "localization," It does not mean 
that the California Federation of Music Clubs 
recommends to its member clubs the engagement 
of artists with no reputation, no experience and 
no artistic standing in the world of music. 



C. C. EMERSON Vice PreBldent 

MARCUS L. SAMUELS Secretary and Treanarer 

Suite 801 Kohler & Chaite Bide.. 28 O'Farrell St., San 
Francisco. Cal. Tel. Kearny M.'>4 



ALFRED METZGER 
C. C. EMERSON 



Editor 
Business Manager 



otber (orma of 

PACIFIC CO.^ST MUSICAL REVIEW 

Oakland-Berkeley-Alameda Olflce 1117 Paru St., Alameda 

Tel. Alameda I5S 

Miss Elizabeth WeslKDte In Charge 



Los AnKeles OHIce 

Snile 447. Douglas Bide- 2.'.7 So. Spring St. Tel. 820-302 

Sherman Danby In Charge 



Vol. XLIV SATURDAY, APRIL 14, 1923 



Entered as second-class mall matter at S. F. Postofflce. 

srnscRiPTioivs 

Annually In Advance Includlne PoBtaset 

United States _ »,1.0« 

Foreign Countries 4.0O 



TWENTY-SECOND YEAR 



San Francisco, California, for October 1, 1922. 
State of California. 
County of San Francisco. 

Before me. a Notary Public in and for the State and 
county aforesaid, personally appeared Alfred Metzger. 
who. having been duly sworn, according to law. deposes 
and says that he is the Editor of the Pacific Coast Musi- 
cal Review and that the following is, to the best of his 
knowledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership, 
management (and if a daily paper, the circulation), etc.. 
of the aforesaid publication for the date shown in the 
above caption, required by the Act of August 24. 1918, 
embodied in section 443. Postal Laws and Regulations, 
printed on the reverse of this form, to-wit: 



edi 



..26 O'Farrell St., San F; 
Editor, Alfred Metzger ....26 O'Farrell St., San Francisco 
Managing Editor. None. 

Business Manager 

C. C. Emerson, 26 O'Farrell St.. San Francisco 

2. That the owners are: (Give names and addresses of 
individual owners, or, if a corporation, give name and 
the names and addresses of stockholders owning 1 per 
cent or more of the total amount of stock.) 

The Musical Review Company : 

26 O'Farrell St., San Francisco 

Alfred Metzger 26 O'Farrell St.. San Francisco 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees, and other 
security holders owning or holding 1 percent or more 
of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities 
are: None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the 
names of the owners, stockholders, and security holders, 
if any, contain not only the list of stockholders and 
security holders owning or holding 1 per cent or more 
company, but also, in cases where the stockholders or 
security holders appear upon the books of the company 
as trustees or in any other fiduciary relation, tlte name 
of the perscm or corporation for whom such trustee is 
acting, is given; also that the said two paragraphs con- 
tain statements embracing afllar 
belief as to the circumstances and 
stockholders and security holde 

upon the books of the company as trustees, hold stock 
and securities in a capacity other than tliat of bona fide 
owner; and this affiant has no reason to believe that any 
other person, association, or corporation has any interest 



ties tha 



ck, bonds 
stated by him. 

ALFRED METZGER. 
of editor, publisher, business manager. 



ubscrlbed befor 



first day of 



MUSIC CLUBS AND RESIDENT ARTISTS 



Both the California Federation of Music Clubs 
and the distinguished artists residing in Cali- 
fornia are to be congratulated upon the passage 
of the resolution which recommends to the clubs 
of the Federation, as well as to the managers 
supplying the clubs with artists, that the season's 
intinerary should include at least two artists of 
distinction residing in California. This resolution 
means that the California Federation of Music 
Clubs places the artists of reputation residing in 
California exactly upon the same basis as distin- 
guished artists residing elsewhere, but visit Cali- 
fornia occasionally. It is a final elimination of any 
discrimination that existed among the music 
clubs against artists residing in this State on ac- 



These artists, who are only beginning to be- 
come known, or who are endeavoring to establish 
a reputation for themselves, are not entitled to be 
placed side by side with distinguished artists 
visiting this State. They must first make a name 
for themselves. The artists not as yet having 
established a reputation for themselves have been 
taken care of by the music clubs for a number 
of years. Indeed most of the artists engaged by 
music clubs for concert purposes belong in this 
class. Some of them are not entitled to anj' re- 
muneration, for the fact that they receive their 
opportunities to appear in public and discover 
whether they are fitted for a concert career is 
worth considerably money in itself. It is equiva- 
lent to the money which any business enterprise 
usually is compelled to invest and sometimes 
lose in an endeavor to discover wdiether the publ'C 
will support it. The music clubs furnish to the 
embryo artist an opportunity free of charge for 
which a business house usually is compelled to 
spend thousands of dollars. 



But this resolution, passed at the fifth annual 
convention of the California Federation of Music 
Clubs, refers only and solely to artists who either 
have come to California from elsewhere and who 
have established for themselves a reputation for 
artistic proficiency, after gaining many artistic 
triumphs in various parts of the world ; or from 
artists born in this State, but having conquered 
for themselves an artistic career either on this 
Coast or abroad. In other words it is intended to 
make residence in this State something of advan- 
tage instead of making it a penalty. It is one of 
the most far reaching decisions ever made by the 
California Federation of Music Clubs, which 
should be duly appreciated by every artist of dis- 
tinction residing in California. The Pacific Coast 
Musical Review naturally feels much gratified 
over the part it had in winning this victory for 
the resident artist, and it will continue this cam- 
paign by following up the success of this deci- 
sion. While the resolution recommends every 
club and manage affiliated with the Federation only 
two artists a season it does not limit this decision 
to this number. .A club may engage more resi- 
dent artists than two if it so desires and if its 
members are in sympathy with this encourage- 
ment of resident artists ; but the resolution cer- 
tainly expects every club in the Federation to en- 
gage at least two artists of distinction, residing 
in California, during a season. 



The Pacific Coast Musical Review will now 
endeavor to influence those clubs in the Federa- 
tion that do not engage any artists at all to take 
sufficient interest in the distinguished artists re- 
siding in California to raise sufficient funds to 
engage at least two or three of such artists during 
the course of a music season. In this way they 
will not only assist the resident artists, but they 
will increase their membership who will take 
more interest in the programs. It is all very well 
for a music club t(5 give young aspiring artists a 
chance to appear in public, but it is far more im- 
portant to give artists, who have established a 
reputation at home and abroad, a chance to make 
a living. A music club which does not consider 
this -problem seriously and act in accordance with 
fairness and justice is not practicing what the 
National Federation preaches and does not do its 
share toward SUPPORTING and ENCOURAG- 
ING American artists and composers. 

SAN FRANCISCO OPERA ASSOCIATION 



In conformance with the prediction of the Pa- 
cific Coast Musical Review there resulted from 
the introduction of three separate operatic proj- 
ects the organization of the most feasible of these 
three projects, namely, that of the San Francisco 
Opera Association with Gaetano Merola as con- 
ductor. Details of the object of this organization 
have been published in the daily papers and will 
be set forth in greater detail in next week's issue 
of this paper. In the meantime we wish to call 



attention to the announcement of Mr. Merola re- 
garding the establishment of a permanent opera 
chorus. This chorus is not only to be used for 
operatic purposes, but also to give occasional per- 
formances of choral works and assist in the i)res- 
entation of great musical feasts such as the Ninth 
Symphony by Beethoven, Before his departure 
for Europe Alfred Hertz asked Mr. Merola to 
organize such a chorus and make it a permanent 
institution. 



Now. we trust that the vocal teachers and 
students will co-operate with Mr. Merola in this 
great work. Let us, for the time lieing, forget 
personal envy, petty jealousies and unworthy 
suspicions and see whether there are sufficient 
BI(i teachers in San Francisco to place the good 
of the community above their own selfish pur- 
poses. Mr. Merola wishes to organize this chorus 
not for the purpose of securing singing pupils, 
nor to take pupils away from other teachers, but 
for the purpose of giving San Francisco the foun- 
dation for a big chorus which will be ready for 
an}' artistic emergency. Such chorus will be of 
inestimable value to the teachers, for it aflfords 
their jjupils opportunity for practical experience, 
and it will prove of even greater value to the 
students, for it secures for them a repertoire and 
experience which they can not possibly attain ex- 
cept through such masters as Mr. Merola. 



There is altogether too much conceit rampant 
among young students — conceit that gives them 
an idea that they can enter an operatic career as 
leading or secondary artists without first having 
thoroughly finished a period of apprenticeship by 
means of which they have attained practical ex- 
perience sufticient to appear on a level with other 
professional artists. A good voice, several years' 
study and an attractive personality are not 
enough to secure recognition as an operatic artist. 
There must also be PRACTICAL EXPERI- 
ENCE. And this experience can never be gained 
except through such opportunities as Mr. Merola 
offers. Everything worth while having requires 
hard work to attain. Anything easy to attain is 
not worth having. And so if you really wish to 
make an operatic career your eventual aim — if 
yon really wish to become sooner or later an 
operatic artist — Mr. Merola offers you a chance 
which all the money in the world can not buy 
for you, and he offers it to you right at your door. 
If vou don't accept it you will regret it all vour 
life. 



MEROLA STARTS OPERA CHORUS 

Those who wish to join the gran(i opera chorus 
which is to form one of the features of the eight prod- 
uctions to be given under the auspices of the San 
Francisco Opera Association next September may now 
apply to Gaetano Merola for a hearing. The chorus is 
now being organized and Mr. Merola will listen to 
voices on Tuesday and Friday afternoons between two 
and tour o'clock at Room 705 Kohler & Chase Building. 
Inasmuch as the minor roles for the operas to be pre- 
sented will be chosen from those who apply for the 
chorus those of our young vocalists who are eager to 
obtain experience in grand opera repertoire and per- 
formance will find this opportunity specially valuable. 
As already announced in the daily papers eight per- 
formances will be given during the period of two weeks 
and the leading roles have been entrusted to some of 
the principal artists of the Metropolitan Opera House, 
New York. Rarely has there been offered a more valu- 
able chance to secure practical experience in grand 
operatic singing and deportment. 



CHAMBER MUSIC AT DOMINICAN COLLEGE 

Perhaps the greatest achievement of recent musical 
activities will be the concert to be given by the inter- 
nationall.v-known London String Quartet at the Domini- 
can College on Saturday evening, April 14th at 8:15, 
under the management of Jessica Colbert. This quartet 
is considered unrivalled in chamber music and has met 
with unanimous success throughout its tour of the 
United States and Canada. 

"Almost one felt the floor last evening at the close 
of each number of the London String (Juartet, so gently 
had one been borne into ethereal regions and if the four 
artists and their instruments had disappeared fi'om the 
stage one would not have been greatly surprised upon 
first "coming back," so completely did they melt into 
their melodies as they played. 

"It was last season that the quartet toured the United 
States, for the first time, by the way, with Beethoven 
programs given in observation of the 150th anniversary 
of the birth of the great composer. Whether surging 
into the richness of a full orchestra, or receding softly 
into a vanishing whisper, there was a delicate precision 
and a grace of movement that held the audience en- 
tranced." — Stockton Daily Evening Record. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



NEW YORK CONTINUES TO HEAR GOOD MUSIC 

German Grand Opera Company Creating a Sensation — 

Van Hoonslraaten Elected Associate Conductor 

of New Philharmonic Orchestra 

BY ROSALIE HOUSMAN 

[Editorial Note — The following letter was delayed in 
transmission owing to an accident. The aeroplane which 
carried this letter was burned and some of the mail bags, 
including the one containing this letter were saved. 
After being rescued it was forwarded by the post office 
authorities by mail. The events recited in the letter took 
place early in February. — A. M.] 

The most discussed event of the week is the election 
of Van Hoogstraaten, a Hollander, and the husband of 
the well-known pianist. Elly Ney, to the leadership of 
the Philharmonic, the oldest symphonic organization in 
America, and for the first halt of the season, sharing 
equally with Mengelberg. the responsibility of the 
season s work. His work, of which New York has heard 
a bit, during the summer at the Stadium series, and at 
several Rvents during the past season, has been most 
favorably commented on by press and public. His con- 
ducting shows a warm musical feeling, attention to de- 
sign and detail, and a simplicty of manner. He knows his 
orchestra, gets fine results, often quite vital and com- 
pelling, and it is to be hoped that he will be given the 
opportunity to develop into a dependable, and splendid 
conductor. New York needs new blood — in Hoogstraaten 
I think they have found the right man. 

The German comrany at the Manhattan is having a 
successful season, and is also giving New York a taste 
of the Ring, a feast which has been missing from our 
musical programs for a number of seasons. It has been 
crowded to the doors, and though the scenic investure is 
less adequate, and the orchestra a scratch one 
picked up here, the performances show the real 
mood of the music, and have the right spirit. Much 
of the credit is due to Leo Bloch, the composer-con- 
ductor, and his assistant Moericke. The principals are 
excellent vocally, and even the words are clearly dis- 
tinguishable above the heavy orchestra. It would not 
be surprising it a number of the artists were to remain 
here. 

One of the most unusual programs has Just been given 
by Ethel Leginska who is visiting her native shores 
after a temporary residence in England. Her playing is 
as beautiful as ever. There is exquisite clarity, warm 
resonance, charm and poetry in her classic group, par- 
ticularly in her Chopin. In the moderns, and she went 
far on that much traveled road, the imaginative quality 
was most in evidence. It included three of her own 
things, as well as some delightful Goosens and Berners. 
The Valses Sentimentales of Ravel were piquantly 
played with subtle colorings. Of her own, the Scherzo 
has been heard befor.e and improves much on better 
acquaintance. There was an amusing dance of the Little 
Clown, and a less intriguing Slumber Song. The best 
of her own was an Etching, called at Night, which was 
genuinely musical. The Goosens were not so new, 
though interestingly done. Two baritones held forth on 
Washington's birthday — Werrenrath in a popular pro- 
gram at Carnegie Hall, and at Aeolian, Louis Graveure 
gave an eclectic one. Both halls were well filled with 
holiday crowds — each artist satisfied his public. Both 
did of their best, which says much — were liberal of en- 
cores and sang favorites. There were many novelties on 
the Graveure program, which appealed to to me very 
much. He has courage to present Schoenberg, Jarnach, 
Grauer, Ravel and others as first performances in a way 
which would have delighted the composers, could they 
have been present. His diction in all languages is 
supreme. Werrenrath's Kipling group strikes a sym- 
pathetic chord in the listener's ear, and as he makes 
every word distinguishable, it was a double delight. It 
was a successful occasion. 

I regret I could not attend the Casella concert, as I 
know I missed a treat. His playing, which I have enjoyed 
a number of times before, is clear, delightful and very 
sincere. And he has introduced many modern works to 
the New York public which might never have had a 
chance before. This time it was Castelnuove-Tedesco, 
and the Strawinsky Piano Rag music, the former. I hear 
being of the greater musical value. I expect to hear him 
again soon, and can then be more explicit. 

Guy Maier, without his twin, Pattison, bravely gave a 
solo recital on Tuesday evening, February 20th. at 
Aeolian Hall and won his spurs as a soloist. His indi- 
viduality, so cleverly blended in the two piano work, 
standi out strongly, rhythmically, and independently, 
and it is to be hoped he will do the solo work again. 
The program was quite conservative. 

The all-Chopin program of Mme. Novaes included the 
funeral march sonate, the Fantasie Op. 49, and a mis- 
cellaneous group and the crowded house who heard her 
were deeply impressed with the charm, poetry and 
Imagination of her playing. It sought out the many 
inner beauties of the composer, and made them an in- 
gredient of the interpretations. Her vision of the phrase 
Is large. Her sense of rhythm and color beautiful and 
her musical feeling clairvoyant. 

Of a Kreisler recital what can one say without bor- 
rowing adjectives and falling short of the supply. His 
concerts are sold out a month in advance at least. There 
is always something for each individual — the classics, 
and the smaller works of great charm. To the audience 
it did not matter what he played; that he did, was 
ample reward, and they kept him at it till the lights 
went out. 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

By Elita Muggins 

1605 The Alameda, San Jose, Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 



SAN JOSE, April 2, 1923. — An organization working 
solely for the good of the community has been formed 
during the past week and will be known as the San 
Jose Musical Association. Dr. Charles M. Richards, 
whose musical reputation is more than local, has been 
selected head of the association. Plans made for the 
season of 1923-24 will bring six artists to San Jose, the 
schedule including the following attractions: 

Madam Matzenauer of the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany; Harold Bauer, pianist; Efrem Zimbalist, violin- 
ist; Reinold Werrenrath, baritone; The San Francisco 
Symphony Orchestra, or the Philharmonic Orchestra of 
Los Angeles, and the San Francisco Chamber Music 
Society. 

As the association is contracting with the preceding 
artists with no thought of profit for itself, all money re- 
maining above the actual cost of securing the per- 
formers will be used to improve future courses or in 
presenting an additional number without expense to the 
subscribers. 

San Jose is the only city of its size, and of many much 
smaller, which has not already formed its own musical 
association and presented its own artists. In establish- 
ing such an association here, we are simply giving this 
city its rightful place in musical circles of the country. 

The personnel of the association board of governors is 
as follows: Charles M. Richards, president; D. M. Bur- 
nett, vice-president; Chester Herold, secretary-treasurer. 
The other members of the board are: Dr. W. W. Kemp, 
president of the State Teachers' College; Charles M. 
Dennis, dean of music at the College of the Pacific; Mrs. 
Howard Tennyson and Mrs. Daisie L. Brinker. 

Miss Georgie Kober, pianist, gave a delightful hour 
Saturday afternoon, April 7, tor the Santa Clara County 
Branch of American League of Pen Women and their 
guests In the Faculty Women's club house on the Stan- 
ford Campus. Miss Kober has a marvellous tone and 
plays with a style of most subtle and delicate refine- 
ment, combined with almost masculine virility and 
breadth. She accompanied her numbers with word pic- 
tures that made the program extra enjoyable. 

Her program was divided in two parts, a Debussy and 
a Russian group. The Debussy numbers were Sarabande, 
Claire de Lune, Cathedral Engulfed and Prelude. Then 
followed Minuet-Waltz (Palmgren); At the Convent 
(Borodier); Prelude B mjnor (Rachmannow) which was 
announced had never been played before in public; 
Concert Etude G Flat (Moszkowski). As an encore, 
Tschaikowsky's Meditation was played. 

Miss Kober, who is spending a year or more in Palo 
Alto, is the head of the Sherwood School of Music of 
Chicago. She left for Los Angelus Sunday to appear in 
recital at the Ebell Club, Monday the 9th, and in Pasa- 
dena later in the week. 

Music lovers are looking forward to a concert sched- 
uled for early in May in Palo Alto when, assisted by 
Mrs. Helen Engle Atkinson, violiniste, sister-in-law of 
James Swinnerton, the Casar Pranck sonata for violin 
and piano will be featured. 

Juanita Tennyson, coloratura soprano, and Maxine 
Cox, pianist, of San Jose, assisted by the Steinway Duo- 
Art, presented a program in Hollister in the High School 
auditorium Friday evening, April 6, which was enjoyed 
by a large and enthusiastic audience. Most of the pro- 
gram was made up of the list of the music memory con- 
test held in Hollister that week. The following is the 
program in full: Prelude in C sharp minor and Melody 
in F (Josef Hofmann) ; Duo-Art Soloist; Song of Thanks- 
giving (Alliston); Like a Rosebud (La Forge) Juanita 
Tennyson; Duo-Art accompanist; In the Cave of the 
Wind (Lth) Maxine Cox; Sylvia (Oley Speaks); From 
the Land of the Sky Blue Water (Cadman); By the 
Water of the Minnetonka (Lieurance) Juanita Tennyson, 
Duo-Art accompanist; Swan (Saint-Saens) Duo-Art Solo- 
ist; Come Sweet Morning (arranged by A. L.) ; Slumber 
Song (Greichaninow) Juanita Tennyson, accompanied 
by Maxine Cox. 

The Monday Musical Club of Santa Cruz, at its April 
meeting, had the second of two programs on Mozart and 
Haydn. Mrs. Marie L. Cain was piano soloist, and gave 
the Mozart sonata No. 18 (C minor). With Mrs. E. C. 
Rittenhouse, violin, and Francis Hamlin, viola, she gave 
a Mozart Trio in E flat. There were two groups of 
songs. Mrs. C. R. Basom sang With Verdure Clad, and 
two other numbers. Miss Abra Batcheldor gave Haydn's 
Spirit Song. There was a paper on Mozart by Miss Au- 
gusta Cole. The two next programs, closing a very suc- 
cessful year, will be Beethoven ones. 

The sixth and last of the series of Undergraduate 
Recitals given at the College of the Pacific was per- 
formed by Pearl Hummel, pianist. Helen Barber, con- 
tralto; Bernice Bogert, violinist; Marian Temple, pian- 
ist; Grace Conner, reader; Rose Van Valin, violincellist, 
and Walline Knoles, baritone, before a very large and 
enthusiastic audience Tuesday, April 3. An exceptionally 
varied and worthwhile program was done by the young 
performers, all of whom showed much native talent, ex- 
oellent training and fine stage presence. During the 
series of Undergraduate recitals, thirty-four membei-s 
of the lower classes of the conservatory were heard. 
This is the largest number of undergraduates to appear 
in public performance in the history of the school. 



Kohler & Chase 

IKttabe patwB 
SCnahf Ampirn 



SAN JOSE HEADQUARTERS 
185 So. First Street 



ALFRED LANINI 

Expert Maker of Violins, Violas and Cellos 

With European Experience 

Artistic Repairing Rare Old Violins For Sale 

591 E. ST. JAMES STREET 

San Jose, California 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 


LeRoy V. Brant, Director 


OITrrn Cournex in All Branvhex of Mualc at 


All Stngea of AdvancFment 


SA.\ JOSE lALIFORNIA 



ALLAN BACON 

Heud of Piano nnd Orf?an DepnrtmentH, 

Calleee of Paciflr, San Ja»e 

t'oncert OrganlKt Pianoforte Lecture RfcHnlH 

NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

San Jose* Cal. 
Confers DeKreeii, Airards CertlflcateM, Complete Collese 
Conaervatorr and Academic Cour«eii In Piano. Violin* 
Harp, 'Cello. Voice, Harmony. Connterpolnt. Caaon and 
Fueoe and Science of Maalc. For particulars Apply to 
SUter Snperlor. 

An artistic recital of four of the pianoforte pupils of 
Mrs. Daisie L. Brinker was held in her studio Tuesday 
evening, April 2, the parents and friends of the per- 
formers being the guests. The following interesting 
program was well given: Indian Love Song and Indian 
Dance (Homer Grunn), Phoebe Plate; Two Venetian 
Scenes, Love Song and Gondolieri (Nevin) Alice Bald- 
win; Romance in F (Rubinstein), Eastern Dance (Cyril 
Scott), Patty Edwards; Romance in Gb (La Forge), 
Butterfly (Grieg), Katherine Wastell. 

Calvary Episcopal Church of Santa Cruz makes a 
great deal of its Good Friday music. For twenty or more 
years there lias always been a cantata on that evening, 
one of the settings of the Passion. This year Dubois' 
Seven Last Words of Christ was chosen, and was ren- 
dered exceedingly well. The soloists were: Sopranos, 
Mrs. T. P. Williams and Mrs. A. Falk; Tenors, Lowell 
Rountree, E. W. Wells; Baritones, William Grover, Ger- 
ald Bartlett. There were twenty-five singers. Mrs. Hope 
H. Swintord, A. A. G. O., who presided at the organ and 
was also director, did most efficient work . The Easter 
music at the church was the Choral Communion Service 
of Calkin in G, the creed from Eyre in Bb. 

One of the most pleasing musical events of the season 
in Los Gatos was in the parish house of St. Luke's Epis- 
copal church Wednesday evening, April 4th, under the 
direction of Mrs. E. H. Norton. The program was: Piano 
solo, Mrs. Ham of Saratoga; Reading The Organ Builder, 
Mrs. George Place; Baritone solo, (a) Gypsy Trail, (b) 
Bells of the Sea, Dr. J. A. Collins; Soprano solo, (a) 
Forgotten, (b) In the Heart of a Rose, Mrs. F. G. Conn; 
Ladies' quartet, Clochette, Mrs. Harold Stanfield, Mrs. 
Ralph D. Robertson, Miss Maude Anderson, Miss Caro- 
line Bailey; Solo, (al Sacrament, (b) Litlle Mother of 
Mine, Mr. William Pengilly, with Dr. Charles M. Rich- 
ards at the piano; Ladies' Chorus. Venetian Suite 
(Nevin), (a) In a Gondola; (b) Morning in St. Mark's 
Square, (c) Love Song, (d) Farewell, Mrs. J. A. Case, 
Mrs. Von Rosen, Mrs. E. H. Norton. Mrs. G. S. McMur- 
try, Mrs. Harold Stanfield, Mrs. Ralph D. Robertson, 
Miss Maude Anderson, Miss Caroline Bailey, Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Blakey at the piano; Vocal solo (a) In an Old- 
Fashioned Town, (bl Born of a Pain Undying, (c) The 
Swallows. Mrs. .loseph Hewit, with reading of descrip- 
tive poem before each song by Mrs. George Place; Duet, 
Madame Will You Walk? Elizabeth Hunter and Arthur 
Van Druten; Solo, (a) Vale, (b) Long Ago in Alcala, 
William Pingilly, with Dr. Richards at the piano. 



Catherine Urner and William F. Laraia will give a 
Joint recital on Monday evening, April 23rd, at the Fair- 
mont Hotel. These artists will have the able assistance 
of Elsie Cook Hughes at the piano. The concert is spon- 
sored by a distinguished list of patrons and by the Mills 
College Musical Club, the proceeds to be used towards 
the endowment fund of Mills College. Alice Seckels is 
managing the event. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MUSIC IN THE TRANSBAY CITIES 



BY ELIZABETH WESTGATE 



1117 PARU 



One of the i 
by sending her prop; 
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Miss AVeMteate recelv 
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Miss AVestgate 



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clock p. m. If any Important eventM 



Edward Johnson's concert at the Oakland Auditorium 
Theatre, on March 30, under Miss Potter's manage- 
ment, was one of the most successful which this intrepid 
yet wise manager has given. Other musical duties pre- 
vented my hearing the program, which was as follows: 
Se nel ben (1645-1681) IStradella), Phillis Has Such 
Charming Graces (Old English). Aria from "Andrea 
Chenier" (Giordano), Silvestrik. Melodie Populaire De 
Basse Bretagne (Ducoudray). Se la vedessi, Emilian 
Peasant Song (Grimandi) I tuoi capelli, Italian Trench 
Song (Gui). Leezie Lindsay. Ballad from Scotch 
Minstrelsy (Kreisler). Le Songe. Schurkowsky (Rubin- 
stein), L'ane blanc. Klingsor (Hue). E'en Little Things. 
Tomaseo (Wolf). Angeleca. Di Giacomo IPizzetti), I 
Hold Her Hands. Tagore (Russell). Dame Nature. Kook 
(Leoni), Twilight, Teasdale (Glen), Love's Philosophy, 
Shelley (Quilter). Accompanist. Ellmer Zoller. 

This remarkable season is now drawing to a close. 
and Miss Potter may well congratulate herself. Not 
only has her acumen in "sizing up" her Oakland clientele 
been almost uncanny, but her ability to secure the 
artists to satisfy that clientele is worthy of all praise. 
The season closes with a recital by the brilliant Brazilian 
pianist. Guiomar Novaes. on the 20th of April — a fitting 
climax to a season of happy memories. 

For next season, Miss Potter will manage a series of 
concerts by the San Francisco Chamber Music Society, 
and her list for the Artists' Concert series contains 
the best attractions. Persons wishing to subscribe to 
this series would do well to engage season seats now. 
These are expected: Queena Mario, soprano. October; 
Lite Schipa. tenor. November; Elena Gerhardt. Decem- 
ber; the Duncan Dancers. January; Emilio de Gogarza. 
February; Harold Bauer and Pablo Casals. March; 
Jeanne Gordon, contralto. April. Miss Potter will also 
manage Sousa and his band, Pavlowa, Chaliapin, the 
sensational baritone, Mme. Schumann-Heink and Galli 
Curci. 

The concert of the Oakland Orpheus, Edwin Dunbar. 
Crandall. director, at the Oakland Auditorium Opera 
House, attracted the usual huge audience on Tuesday 
evening. April 3. This was the second concert of the 
twenty-ninth season, and eighty-one men — the full mem- 
bership — were on the stage. The choruses were given 
with that notable unanimity which has always char- 
acterized the work under Mr. Crandall's experienced, 
tasteful and vigorous direction; and whether dramatic 
effect was sought, or brilliant, or intense or tender, it 
was accomplished forthwith. Constant rehearsals 
throughout the year have this result. I think I have 
never heard more lovely pianissimo than these four 
score men achieved more than once last Tuesday even- 
ing. This seems to me a test of control, even more than 
when full voice, without stridency is being used. In 
this also, as well as the nuances between, the Orpheus 
excels. 

Miss Mabel Riegelman was the soloist, and exquisite 
was her singing from beginning to end. Miss Riegel- 
man is so perfectly the artist that each song means 
a new embodiment, so to speak. In the Hansel and 
Gretel aria she was truly a child, while Un bel di found 
her a woman, and a Japanese woman with Japanese 
traditions at that. It may sound absurd, but I felt that 
not even little Tamaki Miura gave quite the subtlety 
of Interpretation of her race as did our own Californlan 
singer on this occasion. Miss Riegelman sang many 
songs, and almost numberless encores, for the audience 
was unwilling to permit her to retire from the platform. 

Mrs. Bessie Beatty Roland played entirely delightful 
accompaniments for the chorus, and entered perfectly 
into the moods of the soloist. 

Owing to the fact that certain community. University 
and public school events are to occur the second week 
in May in Berkeley, it has been found that "Music 
Week" plans must be changed. Berkeley will, therefore, 
hold the latter festival from April 22 to 28! inclusive. 
Alameda County Music Week is arranged for the second 
week in May. but this is a busy world, fellow citizen, and 
there are no unoccupied hours, not to consider days. 
and then weeks. However, there wlil be various, musical 
events given In Berkeley during the week of May 6-13. 

In Oakland and Alameda many plans are being made, 
and the details will soon be ready for public perusal. 
The committees have been far from idle. The word idle- 
ness will be obsolete anyway before long. Already it is 
obsolescent, and leisure goes along with it. Yet big 
"extra" things get done somehow, and by the busiest 
persons, usually. 

The Berkeley 'Violin Club gave a recital at the Berke- 
ley Piano Club rooms Saturday afternoon, March 24. 
The members were assisted by Miss Lo!a Fitzpatrick, 
soprano, and the following piano accompanists: Alice 
McCurdy, Mrs. Margaret Kolf and Claire McClure. The 
violinists who played were Helen Chakurian. Dorothy 
Dunyon, and Carol Donnan. A charming program of 
classic and modern compositions was given, including a 
■Valse Serenade by Antonio de Grassi, which Miss 
Cbakurian played. 



Edward Johnson, tenor, gave the third concert of the 
season, before the Berkeley Musical Association at 
Harmon Gymnasium on the evening of March 20. A 
crowded auditorium and an enthusiastic reception was 
the compliment paid this singer. I was not present, being 
busy elsewhere, but I have heard unstinted praise, not 
only for Mr. Johnson's voice but for his masterly in- 
terpretations. 

The fourth concert in this series was given on March 
29, when Mr. Alfred Cortot. the distinguished French 
pianist, had a great success with a similar audience. 
His interpretation of the great B fiat Minor Sonata of 
Chopin was intensely interesting, with the French 
temperament and schooling behind it. One found many 
points differing from the conceptions of all the other 
famous pianists who play this work. 

Even the well-worn Carnaval, which, one feels, can 
scarcely have anything new to reveal, has some in- 
triguing differences— a French filagree overlay on Ger- 
man metal. Of course the Debussy set. the Children's 
Corner, was most amusingly given, delighting every- 
body. 

The brilliant Etude en Forme de 'Valse (Saint-Saens) 
was engagingly given, with splendid rhythmic swing 
whenever such passages were possible in the make-up 
of the composition. Another Saint-Saens composition 
(for the left hand alone), a short work by Albenlz, and 
Liszt's Second Rhapsody, concluded the program. 

Mme. Caro Roma is to sing some of her own songs 
for the Music History section of the Adelphlan Club 
on Friday. April 27. Mrs. F. J. Collar, soprano, Mrs. 
Franklin Crane, contralto, and the Adelphlan Quartet will 
be heard in several of Mme Roma's successful works. 
Mme. Roma's church song. I am Thy God. is simple and 
devotional, and will be liked by choir singers. 

Yesterday (Sunday) at the Palace of Fine Arts, San 
Francisco, another notable program was given, with 
young artists presenting their various accomplishments. 
Miss Eva Garcia, the successful pianist of Oakland, 
Mr. Arthur Garcia, violinist, also of Oakland. Miss Leigh 
O'Sullivan. soprano, and Miss Marie Dillon, harpist, 
presented this program: (a) A Star (Rogers), (b) Thank 
God for a Garden, (del Riego). (c) Irish Traditional 
Group, arr. by Miss Dillon. Miss O'Sullivan. harp obli- 
gato; (a) Seguidilla (Albenlz). (b) Nocturne (F sharp) 
(Chopin), (c) Romance (La Forge), (d) Rhapsodie No. 
12 (Liszt). Miss Garcia; harp solo; (a) Hejre Kati 
(Hubay), (b) Ave Maria (Schubert-Wilhelmj), Mr. 
Garcia: I Heard a Cry (Fisher) (b) Bally-Nure (County 
Antrim), (c) I Know Where I'm Goin', (County Antrim), 
(d) Bitterness of Love (Dunn), Carol Jarboe at piano; 
Sing, Sing, Bird on the Wing (Nutting), Ensemble. 

The executants were all well received by the large 
audience. Miss Garcia repeated in part the success 
which she achieved at her concert at the Auditorium 
Theatre in Oakland, already noted in this paper. The 
surety, clarity and variety of her touch, as well as her 
intelligent and very musical interpretations commend 
her. Miss O'Sullivan. making a specialty, or at any rate 
a feature, of Irish songs, gives these with unction. 
Miss Dillon and Mr. Garcia played admirably. These 
Sunday concerts attract discriminating audiences, who 
go afterwards to view the pictures. 

Those who are interested in American folk music and 
who believe that the songs of the American negroes 
are as much our heritage as are the melodies of the 
American Indians would enjoy hearing the California 
Jubilee Quartet, four educated negroes, in their negro 
spirituals. Nathaniel Dett and H. C. Burleigh, both of 
their race, have written beautiful new songs, typifying 
race characteristics, Somebody's Knocking at the Door, 
by Dett, and the touchingly beautiful Deep River by Bur- 
leigh being famous examples. There are, of course, many 
others which come to mind, and they repay study. 

Edna Horan, a very skillful and talented young 
violinist, pupil of Slgmund Beel, has appeared in vari- 
ous important musical functions of late with distinct 
artistic success. One of the most recent events was a 
recital at the studio of her teacher in the Studio Build- 
ing on Post street in the presence of students and 
members of the Violin Club in Berkeley. On this oc- 
casion she scored an unusually fine success and made 
an excellent impression, because of her fine, big, smooth 
tone, her fluent technic and above all her musicianly 
interpretations. She played: F sharp minor Concerto 
(Vieuxtemps). Chaconn e CVltali), Perpetuum Mobile 
(Novacek). Sicilienne et Rigaudon ( Francoeur- Kreis- 
ler), My Heart Ever Faithful (Kreisler). 



ANIL DEER 

COLORATURA SOPRANO AND 
VOICE SPECIALIST 

Announces 

that owing to changes in Studio schedule 

necessitated by her concert engagements 

she will remain in San Francisco during 

JUNE— JULY— AUGUST 

STUDENTS' WAITING LIST 

NOW OPEN 

Address: 79 Central Ave., San Francisco 



JOINT RECITALS 

ROSA 

R AIS A 

World's Foremost Dramatic Soprano 

Giacomo Rimini 

Baritone 
CURRAN THEATER 

Sunday Afternoons, April 22-29 

TICKETS NOW ON SALE 

»3.00, »2.50, $S.OO, »lJ-,o, »1.00 (tax 10% extral 

at Sherman, clay .& Co.'h. §an Pranclseo 

coming: 
the great "chaliapin" 

Mnnnirement .Selby C Oppenhelnier 



Music Composers, Attention! 

WE OFFER THE FOLLOWING PRIZES: 

$150.00 for the most attractive unpubhshed 
anthem submitted. 

$100.00 for the second most attractive un- 
published anthem submitted. 

$75.00 for the third most attractive unpub- 
lished anthem submitted. 
All anthems submitted must be in our 

hands not later than July 1, 1923. 

Send for our special announcement folder 

outlining all conditions and rules of the 

competition. 

Lorenz's 5th Anthem Competition 



about two hundred anthems 
thod of distribution, each anther 
s than 20,000, in some cases, by 
singers within about two months of publi 
mand for so many new anthems every yea 
tes a large opportunity for anthem writers 
,s anthem contest is our earnest invitation v 



year. By 
sung by 



ion. 



LORENZ PUBLISHING CO. 

216 W. 5th St., Dayton, O. 70 E. 45th St., New 
218 S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 



Ben Moore 

PIANIST— COACH— ORGANIST 

Organist and Director Trinity Episcopal 

Church — Beth Israel Synagogue 

2636 Union St. Tel. Fillmore 1624 

Appointment Only 



HAZEL JOHNSON 



COLORATURA SOPRANO 

PUPIL OF DOMENICO BRESCIA AND FERNANDO MICHELENA 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND SOLFEGGIO 

studio: — Kohler A Chase BIdg., — Kearny 6454 Residence Studio: — 2720 Filbert St., — West 8152 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The Most Significant Fact of All 

{llegardmg THE AM PI CO] 

IT would be the natural thing for a concert pianist to 
record his playing for the reproducing device used 
in the piano he uses in concert — not only because of his 
preference for the piano itself, but because he is usually 
bound to the manufacturer by close ties of friendship. 
To either break or strain those ties takes courage — the 
courage of strong conviction. It is significant to note 
the large number of master pianists who have broken 
all precedents in the world of music by recording their 
art for the Ampico in preference to the reproducing 
device used in the piano they use in concert. The fol- 
lowing is a partial list of them : 

SERGEI RACHMANINOFF 
MISCHA LEVITZKI OLGA SAMAROFF 

ERNEST VON DOHNANYI 
GEORGE McMANUS RICHARD STRAUSS 

FANNY BLOOMFIELD ZEISLER 
YOLANDA MERO GERALDINE FARRAR 

' Rachmaninoff 

"I have never before recorded for any reproducing instrument. 
Now I have played my works for the Ampico because of its absokite 
faithfulness, and its capacity to preserve beautiful tone painting. 
It goes far beyond any reproducing piano in these particulars, which 
a pianist must demand in considering a perpetuation of his art." 

Sergei Rachmaninoff. 

* Levitzki 

"For a number of years I have been keenly interested in the possi- 
bilities of the Reproducing Piano. I believe I have heard them all, 
not once, but many times, but until I heard the Ampico. I never 
found one that I thought adequately duplicated the artist's playing. 

"It is for this reason that I have decided to record my playing 
for the Ampico e.xclusively." 

Mischa Lcvit:ki. 




"Positively Uncanny" 

Says A If red Hertz, director of the 
Sa?i Francisco Symphony Orchestra 

■ "I surely was delighted with the excellent performance. The 
mysterious way of starting the instrument was positively uncanny. 
I enjoyed enormously the whole recital, as I always do when 
Godowsky plays. I am usually against encores of the same selec- 
tion, but I thoroughly enjoyed each repetition of Godowsky 's playing 
as given last night by the Knabe Ampico." 




At Carmel-by-the-Sea 

At this charming spot on the California Coast is to 
be found what is probably the most notable colony of 
artists, writers and musicians in the world. No com- 
munity could possibly be found, more exacting in its 
standards, more critical in its judgment. The interest 
of this group centers in their club, where within the 
past month they have installed a KNABE. With all 
the world to choose from, they have chosen this com- 
paiiion of great masters to be the center of their own 
activities. 

Henceforth this House shall 
be known by this sign, 

Kohler & Chase 



San Francisco 
Sacramento 



KNABE AMPICO 



Oakland 
San Jose 



NEW YORK'S WANING SEASON 

Final Concerts in the Different Series — 

Friends of Music Give Schubert 

Mass — Items of Symphony and 

Recital Programs 

By ROSALIE HOUSMAN 
NEW YORK, April 7. 1923.— The Schu- 
bert Mass in E flat, which was the fin.al 
production ot the Friends of Music of 
this season proved to be a choral work of 
no great importance and though there 
were several soloists, the music they had 
to sing, was purely of choral significance. 
Mr. Bodansky led the orchestra and the 
chorus which, trained by Stephen Town- 
send, sang with a beautiful tone, a clear, 
clean attack and much expression. The 
soloists, all from the opera, were Mme. 
Sundelius. Miss Telva, Messrs. Meader, 
Bloch and Schlegel. 

The Symphony Society's last concert, 
on Sunday afternoon, at Aeolian Hall, 
marked the conclusion of its forty-fifth 
year, and introduced another American 
novelty, in E. B, Hill's second Stevenson 
Suite which proved to be charming and 
was well liked. Mr. Damrosch was tre- 
mendously applauded, and was obliged 
to bow to the applause frequently. The 
rest of the program, the Mozart in C, 
which has been on the Carnegie series, 
the Ravel Daphnis and Chloe and several 
songs with orchestral accompaniment, 
sung by John Barclay, proved delightful, 
and a fitting farewell to a pleasant season. 

I understand that Chaliapin filled the 
Metropolitan at his last recital, where 
about 4000 applauded to the echo. The 
comments of the press were that be was 
in glorious voice, and thrilled his auditors. 

The German opera keeps it promises. 
The two performances which were an- 
nounced for the week were Martha with 
Claire Dux as guest, and The Merry 
Wives with Ivogun. Both performances 
took place as scheduled, drew big houses, 
and were excellently cast and sung. Their 
season has been very successful, and is 
now on a safe financial basis, so there 
will be a tour next season, with the newly 
organized State orchestra, and it is also 
announced, that Stransky. who has been 
the Philharmonic conductor for a number 
of years, will lead a few of the perform- 
ances on the tour. 

This is also Mengelberg's last week 
with the Philharmonic, and except for the 
two announced performances of the Bee- 
thoven Ninth, it is the end of the season 
for that organization, too. There have 
been no new works on the programs, and 
both Lamond and Llhevinne were soloists. 
The orchestra has been playing superbly, 
and all possible praise is due Mengelberg 
for the present perfection of the orches- 
tral tonal beauties. He plays upon them, 
as upon a giant instrument and his fine 
musicianship and sterling sincerity are 
bound to impress themselves upon the 
pliable ensemble. Finer shadings, or 
more flexible rhythmic qualities, are not 
to be imagined. 

The Metropolitan Opera season is draw- 
ing to a close, no new performances are 
announced, and the revival of L'Africaine 
is a success. No announcements for next 
season have been made, as yet. 

One cannot say enough in praise of the 
stunning performance ot Peer Gynt, 
which is now at the Schubert Theatre, 
and is a Theatre Guild Production. Those 
three words in themselves tell a story, 
and set a standard which is in itself, an 
achievement. The title part is played by 
Joseph Schildkraut, who was the lead 
also, in Liliom. which the Guild produced 
a year ago. He brings to the part, the 
finest shades of great acting, grace of 
body, and of speech, an inner light, which 
vitalizes the character, and illumines 
every line. It is the sort ot thing which 
baffles a criticism and brings forth only 
praise and commendation. The rest of 
the cast is on the same high level with 
special mention for the Solvejg of Miss 
Selena Royle, the Asa of Miss Louise 
Closser Hale (seldom has a death scene 
been so affecting as hers) and the Troll 
King of Mr. Chas. Halton. The scenic 
investure is the work of the new Russian 
director, Theodore Komisajarsky. who 
has handled the details with keen imagi- 
nation, and with a subtle power of sug- 
gestion, which brings out all the beauties 
ot the text and helps the growth ot the 
play within the spectator. Scenes like 
the Norwegian wedding, and the Mad 
House were remarkable. The costumes 
were Lee Simonson's and matched the 



technical director's plans in every way. 
The Grieg music was, of course, used and 
the Solvejg's song, sung off stage, en- 
hanced the situation, dramatically. The 
whole was a privilege to see and a lasting 
memory of a great play greatly done. 

Sunday. April 15, at 4 p. m., Warren D. 
Allen. University Organist, assisted by 
Holton White, violinist, will give the fol- 
lowing program; Chorale-Prelude, Der 
Tag. der ist so freudenreich (Bach); 
Minuet and Romanze (From the Fourth 
Symphony) (Louis Vierne); Violin solos. 
Andante Cantabile (Tschaikowsky), Fan- 
taisie dialoguee (Boellmann). Tuesday. 
April 17, at 4:15 — The organ numbers 
from Sunday's program will be repeated. 
Thursday, April 19, at 4:16 — Sonata, No. 
3 in E minor, op. 50 (Guilmant; Chant 
indoue (Rimsky-Korsakow), Capriccio in 
F (Handel-Karg-Elert), Berceuse (Joseph 
Bonnet), Fanfare (Lemmens). 

Mills College Endowment Concert — 
Thursday, April 19th; Lisser Hall, 8:15. 
Mills College Trio — Mary Elizabeth Jump, 
violin; Karolina Jump, 'cello; Frances 
Elizabeth Kellogg, piano. Program — Trio 
Opus 49 (Mendelssohn), Allegro agitato. 
Allegro appassionato. Mills Trio; Violin 
Concerto in E minor (Mendelssohn), Al- 
legro molto appassionato, Mary Elizabeth 
Jump: Piano Concerto in A minor 
(Grieg), Allegro moderato. Adagio, 
Frances Elizabeth Kellogg; Orchestra 
part on organ by Mr. Wm. W. Carruth. 

Miss Christine Howells, the delightful 
young flutist, returned from New York 
recently after nine months' absence. She 
studied with Barrere and played on vari- 
ous occasions, but concentrated her en- 
ergy on thorough expansion of her musi- 
cal horizon which the prevailing musical 
atmosphere assisted her in accomplish- 
ing. Miss Howells will again devote her- 
self to teaching and concert work and 
will no doubt play a prominent role in 
the season's musical activities. 

Miss Ives, the energetic and successful 
young manager, who has organized music 
courses in San Jose and other interior 
cities, and who has been appointed man- 
ager for the Chamber Music Society of 
San Francisco, was one of the busy at- 
tendants at the convention ot the Cali- 
fornia Federation of Music Clubs in 
Santa Ana last week. She has booked the 
Chamber Music Society with L. E. Behy- 
mer and also a number of the clubs, and 
her trip has made her many friends be- 
cause ot her genial disposition and enthu- 
siastic musical attitude. 

Miss Mildred Mattice. soprano, pupil of 

Mackenize Gordon, sang for Stanislas 
Bem and his orchestra at the Hotel Whit- 
comb last Sunday night and created an 
excellent impression with her pleasing 
voice and sincere musical phrasing. Her 
selections included: Aria from Die Toden- 
stadt (Korngold), Tes yeux (Rabey), Si 
mes vers (Hahn), O mio babino caro 
(Puccini), Down in the Forest (Ronald), 
Morning (Ole Speaks). 

Helen Hughes, a most attractive and 
gifted young dramatic soprano soloist, 
who is studying with Mackenzie Gordon, 
is gradually forging ahead among the 
truly prominent vocal artists residing in 
California. She has a beautiful ringing 
voice, a charming personality and the 
peculiar knack of appealing to the hearts 
of her hearers. She has been specially 
successful before the public in recent 
months. 



STUDENTS CHAMBER CONCERTS 

The fourth and last of this year's series 
of Students Chamber Concerts, which are 
being given under the direction of John 
C. Manning at Scottish Rite Auditorium, 
will take place next Friday evening, 
April 20. The attraction will be the 
Berkeley String Quartet, consisting ot 
Antonio de Grassi, first violin; Robert 
Rourke, second violin; E. Towler, viola 
and Willem Dehe. cello. This is one of 
the finest ensemble organizations in the 
State and the announcement of its ap- 
pearance ought to prove a great incentive 
for music lovers to attend this event. The 
program will be: Quartet for strings G 
major Op. 64 (Haydn) ; Andante Cantabile 
(Tschaikowsky), Canzonetta (Mendels- 
sohn). The soloist on this occasion will 
be Miss Helen Colburn Heath, the excep- 
tionally artistic and widely known soprano 
soloist. She will sing compositions by 
Haydn, Gretchaninow. Homer, Watts and 
Vidal. Surely a more attractive program 
can hardly be given. We shall review the 
preceding event of these concerts wherein 
Mr. Manning participated in our next 
issue. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MUSIC CLUB CONVENTION 

(Continued from Page 1, Col. 3.) 

county directors, or tliose who were present, presented 
tlieir reports showing a most encouraging growth in the 
influence and size of the federation. Mrs. Samuel Clif- 
ford Payson. director of San Diego County, led the dis- 
cussion of this report in her effervescent, brilliant and 
convincing style. Then followed the roll call of the 
clubs showing many absent. We were indeed greatly 
surprised to find so few clubs represented from the 
vicinity of the convention city, specially from Los An- 
geles. It is evidently necessary to cultivate a more 
tolerant spirit among members of the California Federa- 
tion of Music Clubs so that personal prejudices or con- 
victions are not permitted to overshadow the principle 
that club loyalty, club enthusiasm and club patriotism 
must come first and personal grievances, mostly imagin- 
ary, must be relegated into the back ground. The very 
life of this wonderful organization depends upon co- 
operation and submission to the rule of the majority. 

Mrs. Abbie Norton Jamison, one of the most illustri- 
ous pioneers and leaders in the musical club movement 
of California, delivered an address on "What Does the 
Federation Give You?" "What do You Give the Federa- 
tion?" It was an eloquent plea for the fundamental 
principles upon which the federation rests. For unless 
you go into this federation movement with the avowed 
intention of service — of giving something of yourself 
toward the happiness and contentment of your fellow- 
men, instead of joining to get only personal advantages, 
you are not a loyal member of the California Federation 
of Music Clubs. This was practically the gist of Mrs. 
Jamison's inspiring message, and it is to be hoped the 
delegates present will spread this gospel wherever they 
go. Mrs. Birmingham spoke on the problems of the 
Extension Fund. There are two phases of discussing 
financial problems by officers of a club convention. One 
is what they actually say, and the other what they 
really think. It is safe to assert Mrs. Birmingham, being 
a lady, did not say all she thought. 

The afternoon session convened at 1:30 o'c'ock with 
Mrs. Birmingham and Mr. Gustlin presiding. Miss Alice 
Eggers. chairman of the Junior Clubs, and a member of 
the Alameda County Music Teachers' Association, pre- 
sented a very interesting report of the Junior Clubs 
which we would be delighted to publish in its entirety 
if space permitted us. Ella W. Duflield, associate chair- 
man of the Junior Clubs, of Los Angeles, presented a 
report of junior and juvenile clubs which also added to 
the very valuable information given and to the realiza- 
tion of the excellent work the federation is doing. Mrs. 
M. M. Gardner of Mill Valley. California, delivered an 
exceedingly interesting and valuable address on the 
Junior Clubs extension, laying her subject most ably 
before the convention. Howard Mann of Eagle Rock, 
California, pupil of Miss H. L. Johnston sang Indian 
Love Song by Homer Grunn, the distinguished Los An- 
geles composer. The interpretation of this song brought 
out its artistic character in a most effective manner. J. 
V. Breitwieser, A. M. Ph. D., from the department of 
education of the University of California delivered one 
of the finest addresses of the Convention on The Social 
and Psychological Value of Music. His convincing and 
Illuminating ideas made a deep and lasting impression 
upon the delegates. 

One of the most interesting and most encouraging 
sessions of the convention was that of the American 
Music Department. L. E. Behymer, director, of Los 
Angeles, presided. In the absence of Miss Olive Hyde, 
of the San Francisco Musical Club, chairman of the 
Contest Committee, Mrs. Edith Wing Hughes, assistant 
chairman of the Lyric Club of Los Angeles, presented 
the report of the contest committee which announced 
the winners of the State Contests recently held in San 
Francisco and Los Angeles. According to this report 
the winners in San Francisco were: Piano — .\ileen 
Fealy, pupil of Mrs, Oscar Mansfeldt and Miss Marion 
Frazer; Voice — Corrinne Keefer, contralto, pupil of Mme. 
Rose Relda Cailleau. 

The winners in Los Angeles were: Voice — Ruth 
Williams, Long Beach, pupil of William Conrad Mills, 
dramatic soprano: Paul Russell. Claremont. pupil of 
Ralph H. Lyman, Pomona College, tenor; Violin — iEmma 
Hardy, Balboa, pupil of Lalla Fagge, Los Angeles. An 
excellent program was presented by several of these 
contest winners. Ruth Williams of Long Beach sang 
Aria from Jeanne d'Arc by Tschaikowsky in a manner 
that earned her enthusiastic applause for her voice and 
interpretation. Corrinne Keefer of San Francisco sang 
Romanza from La Gioconda (Ponchiellil, Cry of Rachel 
(Salter), Song of the Open (Frank La Forge). Her 
rich, well cultivated and intelligently used contralto 
voice delighted her listeners. Emma Hardy of Balboa, 
violinist, played the first movement of the second Vieux- 
temps concerto with fine technic and discriminating 
phrasing. Aileen Fealy, pianist of San Francisco, was 
the sensation of the program. She played Alvorada 
del graciosa (Ravel), Reflection in the Water (Debussy), 
and Rhapsodic No. 6 (Liszt). She received a tremend- 
ous ovation for her brilliant technic, her musicianly 
reading and her virtuoso-like assurance. 

At the evening session the annual American Program 
was presented at the Temple Theatre. The feature of 
this program consisted of three numbers from the Arthu- 
rean Suite op. 14 by John Laurence Seymour, tone poems 
after Tennyson's The Idylls of the King, for a clarinet, 
bass clarinet, viola and piano. This work, which is 
written in the most radical ultra modern style, was 
interpreted with great skill and facility by: J. C. 
Vox. clarinetist, Charles Jenner, bass clarinet, Mrs. 
Marcel Reitman Frank, piano and Walter H. Potter, 
piano. Miss Dorothy Pasmore. as is always the case, 
received a most cordial welcome, and thoroughly de- 
lighted her hearers with a most musicianly rendition of 
a Concertino tor cello by Attilio Ariosti, most ably 



arranged by Albert Elkus. She also iilayed with fine 
sentiment Legende Chinois by H. B. Pasmore. Frank 
Moss, played the accompaniments with well merited 
success and with unquestionably artistic efl'ect. 

Miss Bernice Brand of San Diego sang a group of 
charming songs by Alice Barnett entitled: Mood, Con- 
stancy, Days That Come and Go and Drums of the Sea. 
She possesses a fine, flexible voice and sings with depth 
of emotional expression. Frank Moss created exeep- 
tional enthusiasm with his musicianly skill in the rendi- 
tion of the Charles T. Griffes Sonata, but we heard from 
all sides that the composition itself is not grateful to 
present. We would have preferred to have Mr. Moss 
play some of the standard piano works which could have 
given the Federation delegates a higher idea of his 
mastery of the emotional phases of pianistic art, al- 
though the technical and academic intellectuality of his 
work was finely illustrated in the Grilles Sonata. Ellen 
Page Pressley of San Francisco delighted her hearers 
with the following group of songs entitled Vignettes of 
Italy by Wintter Watts: Addio, Naples. Night Song of 
Amalfi. Ruins of Paestum, From a Roman Hill, Villa 
Serbelloni, Bellaggio, Stresa. Miss Pressley, endowed 
with a clear and true soprano voice and a most charming 
personality, won her hearers instantly and was enthusi- 
astically hailed. Clarence Gustlin of Santa Ana pla.ved 
the accompaniments most effectively. Sol Cohen played 
three of his own violin compositions entitled Mirage, 




JII.SS lOHINNE KEEFER 

SuloiNi First PreNliyterinn Church, Oakland, Puiifl of 
.Mnir. Ra»<- Relda Cailleau, and Winner of 
San Praneiseo ConleNi of California Fed- 
eration of .Uunic Clul>.« for Voice 

Hob Goblins and Concert Waltz, earning the well justi- 
fied pludits of his listeners. Anna Priscilla Risher's 
song group— (a) The Storm, (b) Sail White Dreams, (c) 
Little Fishing Boat and (d) Slumber Sea was very 
excellently interpreted by the Madrigal Octet of Los 
Angeles, consisting of Edith Wing Hughes, first soprano. 
Pearl Berry Boyd, first soprano, Thelma Benson, second 
soprano, Mary Teitsworth, second soprano, Ethel Gerber 
Loucks, first alto, Reba Rice, first alto. Letitia Williams, 
second alto, Cornelia Glover, second alto. The compo- 
sitions are exceedingly ingenious and well constructed 
and contain both melody and sentiment. The ladies 
comprising the Madrigal Octet are well trained and 
skillful vocal artists whose voices blend excellently and 
who phrase, with taste and judgment. Dr. H. J. Stew- 
art's Legends of Yosemite were presented with adequate 
scenic investure and in costume by Mrs. Lillian Birming- 
ham and Jack Edward Hillman. Both artists bringing 
out the picturesqueness and the romantic spirit of the 
work with telling effect. Mrs. Birmingham was at her 
best and Mr. Hillman charmed the audience with his 
voice and declamatory vocal skill. 

Proceedings of Friday, April 6th. 
The session began at 9:30 o'clock at the Temp'.e 
Theatre with Mrs. Birmingham presiding. After the 
reading of the minutes there was an open forum in- 
cluding a discussion on the question concerning the 
engagement of resident artists. This discussion was lead 
by Lucille Crews .Marsh and participated in by a number 
of prominent delegates. It resulted in the drawing up 
of the resolution in favor of resident artists mentioned 
in the beginning of this report. Miss Adelaide Trow- 
bridge, of Los Angeles, member of the State Board of 
Directors of the Music Teachers' Association of Califor- 



nia, delivered a most interesting address on The Rela- 
tionship between the Federation and the Music Teacher 
As part of the time allotted to the Educational Depart- 
ment Mrs. Abbie Norton Jamison, chairman of the 
course of study, introduced her report convincing every- 
body of the remarkable progress made during the year 
in this valuable department of the federation. At noon 
there was luncheon at Saint Ann's Inn which was 
attended by all visitors interested in public school music. 
The speakers on this occasion were: Miss Estelle 
Carpenter of San Francisco, Adelaide Trowbridge Dora 
Gibson, Margaret Wickes and others. The Senior High 
School Glee Clubs, of the Santa Ana High School, Miss 
Margaret Wickes, director, made an excellent impression 
with their precise, well intoned and skillfully phrased 
rendition of The Fairy Pipers (Brewer) and June 
Rhapsodie (Daniels). 

The afternoon was exclusively devoted to an entire 
program of school music. Mrs. Emma Bartlett, chairman 
ol public school music, presided. The chairman intro- 
duced the report on public school music which gave an 
astoundingly successful account of the work accom- 
plished by the federation in this department The 
Kinder Band of South Pasadena— Miss Phoebe Ray 
Wadsworth, supervisor of Music Elementary Schools 
South Pasadena and Petite Etna Monroe, conductors' 
rendered three selections most effectively. Frances 
Wright, associate professor of public school music of 
the University of California. Southern Branch gave an 
exceedingly instructive and enlightening address on 
Public School Music and its Relation to the Private 
School Music Teacher. The Junior High School Glee 
Club of Santa Ana, under the direction of Miss Edith 
Cornell, rendered a group of delightful selections two 
of which were arranged for trio by Abbie Norton Jami- 
son, and five of which were composed by Mary Green 
Payson of San Diego, in a manner that revealed splen- 
did training on the part of the director and exceptional 
adaptability on the part of the students. 

The sensation of the afternoon was the orchestra of 
the San Diego High School under the direction of Nino 
Marcelli. These young musicians played Poet and 
Peasant Overture (Suppe), Adoration (Felix Borowsky) 
and Hungarian Dances 5 and 6 (Brahms) in a manner 
so precise in rhythm, attacks and tempi and so intelli- 
gent in phrasing that it was simply unbelievable except 
you heard it with your own ears. Mr. Marcelli is 
entitled to the highest praise for the work he has done 
with these students. They p'ay tastefully, correctly and 
uniformly. It is by far the best school orchestra we 
have ever heard. San Diego is indeed lucky to have 
such an instructor as Nino Marcelli in its midst. 

The Bella Musical Junior Club of the Inglewood High 
School played Polonaise by Mentor Crosse with Emil 
Baffa and Neva Abshier at the first piano and Leora 
Ridley and Harold Crow at the second piano. This 
number was also directed by Nino Marcelli and justly 
aroused the prolonged enthusiasm of the audience. The 
San Diego High School has reason to feel exceedingly 
proud of the lasting impression for uniform excellence 
which their representatives left with the delegates of 
the convention. 

The afternoon session closed with a program of Music 
in the Church. Mrs, Grace Widney Mabee. chairman, 
presided. Mrs. Mabee is also chairman of the same 
department in the National Federation of Music Clubs. 
This much informed and very intelligent exponent of 
this phase of music delivered an address on the Ideals 
for Church music of the Federation and laid stress upon 
the unsatisfactory condition in the churches wherein 
music is being shamefully neglected. Mrs. .Mabee 
showed convincingly how necessary it is to have the 
best of music in the churches, and she mentioned cer- 
tain churches that are doing excellent work upon the 
basis of the ideals of the federation. C. Albert Tufts 
played three organ solos: Prelude and Fugue (Krebs), 
Fantasietta avec variations (Dubois) and Toccata (Dig- 
gle) and revealed an extraordinary skill in securing the 
greatest artistic results from a limited instrument. His 
ability to express himself artistically is certainly most 
exceptional. Mrs. F. W. Slabaugh sang Easter Morn, 
(Gertrude Ross) and The Lord is My Light (Clarence 
Gustlin) in excellent voice and with fine effect regarding 
the inner meaning of the two works, both by eflicient 
composers. 

Mrs. Holmes Bishop, soprano, Mrs. F. W. Slabaugh, 
contralto. Raymond Miles, tenor, and Maurice Phillips, 
basso, comprising the quartet of the First Congrega- 
tional Church of Santa Ana, sang several compositions 
with fine vocal material, delightful blending of voices 
and excellent interpretation. The program was con- 
cluded by Leslie Brigham. baritone, singing several 
oratorio arias with a voice of splendid resonance and 
with fervor and clarity of diction. 
The Banquet 
L. E. Behymer acted as Toastmaster at the banquet. 
He certainly knew how to make everybody feel happy 
and among the delegates making brief aadresses, limited 
to five minutes or less, were: Clarence Gustlin, who 
called on several members entrusted with the arrange- 
ments of the convention: special credit being due to 
The Santa Ana Musical Association, The Orange County 
Choral Union, and the convention Board — T. H. Warne, 
treasurer, Mrs. Ella Campau, Mrs. Nat N'eff, Mrs. W. B. 
Snow. Miss Charlotte Dresser, Miss Edith Cornell, Miss 
Leila Ritner. Miss Marjorie Warner, A. H. T. Taylor, 
Jessie Albright, Charles Wollaston, J. A. Miller and C. 
W. Householder. Mrs. Charles F. Smith, chairman of 
the hospitality committee, received special praise for her 
indefatigable work in behalf of the delegates as did also 
Mrs. Theo. Winbigler, chairman of the decoration com- 
mittee whose tasteful floral decorations at the banquet 
and the delightful fruit baskets in the rooms of the 
delegates were thoroughly appreciated. Among those 
who spoke at the banquet in addition to L. E. Behymer 
(Continued on Page 10, Col. 1.) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

SHERMAN DANBY, REPRESENTATIVE AND CORRESPONDENT 

Assisted by Miss Lloyd Dana and Miss Mildred Alexander, Los Angeles; Miss Penelope Newkirk; Hollywood; Mrs. Helen Wood, Pasadena. 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: SUITE 447 DOUGLAS BUILDING, 257 SO. SPRING STREET, TELEPHONE 820-302 

Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



LOS ANGELES, April 10.— I spent an evening last 
week with Hugo Kireklioffer whose name perhaps is 
more tamiliar than any other connected with music in 
Los Angeles and particularly Hollywood. His efforts 
with the community chorus there and in other places in 
Southern California has given him a publicity value 
but seldom attained with the general public. Plus 
that he is endowed with a personality that rings true 
and a hearty laugh that begets confidence. We discussed 
the general music conditions for fifteen years back — 
reminisced on the times when he first landed on the 
coast and took his first musical position with the Holly- 
wood High Scliool at a mighty small salary. The 
results he has attained have been those that come with 
hard work and loyalty to the public. I wish some of 
the many musicians now in Southern California could 
have been present to hear the discussion the net result 
of which was that we are both agreed that the pro- 
fessional musician, is indeed, sadly abused in Southern 
California in 1923. 

We discussed some fine musicians known to each of 
us by name and by facts who are just barely eking out 
an existence and some of whom have been very very 
close to the cushion and scores ot whom are in debt and 
never will get out. They owe the butcher the baker 
and the advertising man. They arrive here full of 
hope and thrilled with the boom talks ot Southern 
California— sunshine and happiness. Pupils are waiting 
on every corner and profitable engagements are being 
turned down every day. Where do these false ideas 
spring from? Personally I think that the hope is father 
to the thought and the prospect of sunshine and fiowers 
outweighs good judgment. 

Kirckotfer told me of writing an old friend in Cleve- 
land just a tew days previous. The old friend is thrilled 
with the idea of coming South and expects much. 
Other friends in other lines of endeavor were successful. 
Why not he. Why should there not be a demand for 
an accomplished musican and teacher. What Kirck- 
otfer wrote was to the effect that it he earned bread 
and butter in Cleveland, to stay there because it was 
extremely doubtful it he would make dry bread here. 
That was not lack of loyalty to Los Angeles — but the 
plain unvarnished truth without the glitter and the 
emotional appeal. 

Every now and then the head lines talk about Los 
Angeles being the center of art and music! Absurd. 
Los Angeles is the center ot Hickville. Our art and 
music attainments are ninety per cent bluff. Only a 
very small percentage of our population is cultured. 
Very few parents are paying more than a dollar a lesson 
for the musical education of the offspring. Some few 
thousands are — and some few teachers are doing well — 
but compare that percentage with the supposed to be 
million population! 

The truth is there are more musicians and music 
teachers who have spent years of study in Europe and 
in our big Eastern cities — musicians whose educations 
costs thousands of dollars — that are struggling out a 
mere pittance here — than in any other spot in the 
world today. 

What is tlie answer? The answer is that as long as 
■ sixty per cent of the growth here is from Iowa, Kansas, 
and middle west farmers — it is wrong to import artists 
and instructors qualified to make their living from the 
sons and daughters of cultured people. The musical 
clubs of California have a very serious situation to face 
in which they can be of great help. Stop insulting 
artists by telling them they can receive a lot ot free 
publicity or offering them a fee less than they would 
receive in a main street cabaret. We have a glut of 
artists — hut a scarcity of appreciative managers in clubs 
or elsewhere. We have the musicians and they have 
stiff upper lips but ninety per cent of them are flat broke. 

Los Angeles the center of music and art. Maybe. 
One brilliant young thing told me the other day that 
Paderewski was a famous IVIilwaukee brewer! And 
there are others. 



The little bird prognosticator referred to last week 
was right and the rain came and dampened most of the 
Easter IVIusic services. The Hollywood Bowl serv- 
ice with the assistance ot about titty of the children and 
some ot the choir was beautiful in its simplicity and 
sincerity. The crowd numbered over three thousand 
Instead of the forty thousand who would undoubtedly 
have been present it the rain had only held off for a few 
hours. It was too damp for the musicians and their 
instruments although many were present. Hugo Kirck- 
hoffer led the singing to the accompaniment of an 
organ. A larger (rowd was present at Mt. Rubidoux 
near Riverside inasmuch as many left for the scene 
the night before and so braved the early morning 
showers. The Virginia Hotel Long Beach service under 
the direction of Madame Prindell was well attended 
and notwithstanding the adverse conditions was most 
successful. 



Fitzgerald's for the Advancement of Alusic 

Levitzki 

This great musician, one of the masters of the piano of the 
present day, may be heard outside of the Concert Stage, only 
on the 

Ampico 

For he records for this instrument Exclusively. 
We recommend that you hear him on the 

KNABE 

iFTfZGERALD ^M MUSIC CO J 

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At the California Theatre — The same musical program 
was held for the second week in conjunction with the 
Rupert Hughes picture, "Souls for Sale," which is prov- 
ing a big attraction at the popular playhouse. Next week 
Managing Director Fred Miller will present an all 
McDowell program in tribute of the MacDoweli Club of 
Allied Arts. Claire Forbes Crane, concert pianist, will 
be the guest artist and will play MacDowell's Second 
Concerto with the California Theater Concert Orchestra, 
Carli D. Elinor, conducting. 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium Bldg., Los Angeles 



DE LARA GRAND OPERA COMPANY 

Rehearsals are progressing rapidly for the production 
of II Trovatore which is to be presented on April 24th 
in the Gamut Theatre, by the De Lara Grand Opera 
Company, under the direction of Manuel Sanchez De 
Lara, conductor. 

The leading soprano role ot Leonora will be sung by 
Dorothy Grosse, a popular dramatic soprano of South 
Pasadena. Miguel Laris, tenor, will sing the role ot 
Manrico; Harry Ershoff. Russian baritone, will sing the 
role of Count di Luna; Billie Carson, contralto, will sing 
the role of Azucena; Forest Bell, basso, will sing the 
role of Ferrando; May Montana, lyric soprano, will take 
the part of Inez, Leonora's companion; Douglas Cole 
will take the part of Ruiz, second tenor, and Elleck 
Caminker will sing the part ot an old gypsy — second 
baritone. 

II Trovatore was given last year with great success 
by this company in Los Angeles and Long Beach, and is 
being produced again now by special request. Besides 
the performance at the Gamut Theatre on April 24th it 
will be repeated in the Pasadena High School Audi- 
torium on April 26th. 



13TH CONCERT BY PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Beethoven's Fifth Symphony Thrills Large Audience — 

Bertha Fiedler-Svedrofsky and Henry Svedrofsky 

Delight With Bach Double Concerto 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

We never pay a visit to Los Angeles, during the course 
ot the regular concert season, without attending one of 
the symphony concerts. This time we were fortunate 
enough to witness a concert of one of the thirteenth 
pair which had as its orchestral feature the incompar- 
able Fifth Symphony by Beethoven. We were pleased to 
find a very large house assembled and the enthusiasm 
was spontaneous and universal. As we have had oc- 
casion to mention several times the Philharmonic 
Orchestra of Los Angeles is one of the very finest or- 
ganizations of its kind in the country, which means in 
the world, and the beauty of tone, exactitude of phrasing, 
conciseness of intonation and uniformity of attacks rep- 
resent one of the most delightful experiences to witness. 
On this occasion the Fifth Symphony by Beethoven gave 
the artist-musicians an exceptionally fine opportunity to 
display their skill and musicianship. 

Walter Henry Rothwell conducted with sincerity, 
energy and a love for his work. If the attitude of the 
audience may be taken as a criterion for Mr. Rothwell's 
ability to sound the depths of a composition then he 
certainly succeeded in obtaining the desired results. 
The applause was hearty and convincing and several 
jecalls were justified until finally the entire orchestra 
had to respond to the force of the ovation. Words are 
feeble to describe the grandeur and beauty of this 
symphony. Neverth.eless unless a conductor unden- 
stands his duty and the orchestra is able to respond to 
the suggestions of the conductor, even the Fifth Sym- 
phony of Beethoven may lose much of its artistic effect. 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

COM POSER-PI AN ISTE 

Just Issued for the Piano 

"SPANISH SERENADE" and "HIDE OF THE COWBOY" 

ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CULTURE— COACHING IN REPERTOIRE 

OPERA CLASSES INCLUDING COMPLETE! 

PRESENTATIONS 

Studio 1324 S. Flarneroa. Phone XISOS 

CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 
Available for Con€ 
Limited Number of Adv 

Violinist Los Angeles Trio 
Studloi S.14 Mnsle Arts Studio Bldg. Phone 1<K)S2 

ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

Tuesdar< WedneMday, Friday Afternoons 
Egran School. Fhonea 21805 or 271330 
1324 South Plsneroa, Loa AnKelea 

SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCERT MASTER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Concerts and Recitals 

Management Mrs. Caroline C. Smith, 424 Auditorium Bldg. 

Los Angeles Chamber Music Society 

ELEVE,\'TH CONCERT 
FRIDAY EVENING, .MARCH .30 

G.4MIIT THEATRE 

Monnle Hayes Hastings, Soprano 

Philharmonic auartet 

Flute, Clarinet, Bassoon, French Horn. Harp. Double Basa 

Seats at East llov OfTlee. Auditorium 

Information at No. 0, Gamut Club 

Phone 822-S01> 




LOS ANGELES 

CALIFORNIA 

THEATRE 



GREATER CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
ELINOR, Conducting 
50 MUSICIANS 

PROGRAM FOR WEEK OF APRIL IS 
Claire Forbes Crane. Guest Artist 
Music of Kdnnrd MacDovrell 
In) March from Indian Suite. 
Ih) To a Wild Rose. 
(c) .Second Concerto (Last Movement) 

Claire Forbes Crane, Pianist 



Hon 



vllh the Goldnr' 
"VAMTV FAIR" 



Thacker>'*s fan 



titory brought 
en h}' Hugo llnllln 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Member Trio Intlme, Los AnKeleH Trio, Philharmonic 
Quartet. Instructton, Chamber Music RecltnU 

CS015 La Mlra da — Phone Holly 3044 

ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

Teacher of Plana, Harmon}', Voice Coach. Dnrlne March 
and April. Merritt Jonen Hotel, Santa Monica. Tel. Santa 
Monica e»-145. No. 34$ Music Arta Bids.. Loa Anecleii. 
Tel. 821-181. 

The Heartt-Dreyf us Studios 

VOICE) AND MODEIRN I.ANOUAOBS 

Gamat Club Bld^., 1044 Sooth Hope Street. Personal 

Repreaentatlve, Grace Carroll-Billot. Phones 822-800 and 

85437. 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

LOS ANGELES 

1250 Windsor Boalevard 6318 HollTTrood Boulevard 

Complete Faculty of Artist Teachers 

JOHN SMALLMAN-- BARITONE 



EARL MEEKER-Baritone 

Concert* — Recitals — Instrnctton 



Anna Ruzena Sprotte 

CONTRALTO School of Vocal Art 



MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



GRACE WOOD JESS »"==»'» soprano 

DRAMATIC INTERPRETER OF POLK SONGS 
IN COSTUME RECITALS 

Management: L. E. Behymer. Los Angeles 

ANN THOMPSON-P,an«/e 



CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN 

America's Popular Composer on tour Trith TSIANINA 
East and South; Oct. and Nov. — Pac. Coast: Jan. and Feb. 
East asalni Feb. and April — California: April and Mar 

CHARLES BOWES 



DA VOL SANDERS ^^'^^mpo^er "'^ 



HZflt ^' Flgneroa 



nic Orchestra 



aiBp 



A. KOODLACH 

violin maker and REP.IIRER 

Connoisseur — Appraiser 

K03 Majestic Theatre BIdB.. Los Angeles Phone IITO-02 



Mme. Newcombe 

PRINDELL 



Desirable 
Engagements 



Dignified 
Publicity 



Personal Representative of Distinguished Artists 

MAJESTIC THEATRE 
LOS ANGELES 



Phone 642-93 



Phone 642-93 



LAST CONCERT OF SEASON 
FOURTEENTH SYMPHONY CONCERT 

Philharmonic 
Orchestra 

of Los Angeles 

Founded by CAROLINE E. SMITH 

W. A. CLARK, JR. Manager 

WALTER HENRY ROTHWELL 

Conductor 

Friday Afternoon at 3 O'clock, April 20 

Saturday Evening at 8;30 O'clock, April 21 

PROGRAM 

Brahms Syniphonr No. 1, In C Minor 

DebUMsy Prelude L'.lpres-mldl D'un Faune 

Strauss Tone Poem, "Death and Transnguratlon" 




Clarence Gustlin 

PIANIST-COMPOSER 

Assistant Instructors : 
MISS ELIZABETH PARLOW MISS AUDREY ISBELL 

First Vice-President California Federation of Music Clubs 

President and Founder of Santa Ana Musical Association 

California Engagements After March 1, 1924 

In Europe for Season 1923-24 

Studio: 816 No. Main St., Santa Ana, Calif. Phone 1327-J 



On this occasion the graceful, flowing melodies and the 
ever-recurring climaxes of magnificent regal dimensions 
succeeding in touching the very soul of the listeners. The 
ovation was indeed well justified. 

There was a new work by an Italian-American en- 
titled Symphonic Episode "Euphorion." The composer's 
name is Paolo Gallico and he is a former pupil of Mr. 
Rothwell's. There can not be any doubt regarding the 
fact that Mr. Gallico is a master of his craft. He under- 
stands the technical requirements of composition to the 
very minutest detail. His scoring is not only ingenious 
and individualistic, but it is wonderfully skillful in its 
discriminating distribution among the various groups of 
instruments. There are certain chords and phrases, 
usually found among the followers of the ultra-modern 
school, possibly tor the simple reason that wherever 
tone color effect is the principal issue the originality of 
ideas is greatly restricted. There are certain progres- 
sions and chord effects in this modern school which 
every composer seems to employ, and which he is 
justified to employ. 

In naming this work an episode Mr. Gallico chose 
well. It is all there is to it.. Therefore the technical 
aspect of the composition overshadows its emotional 
phase, wherefore the writer does not appreciate its 
musical value. It is purely and simply a mathematical 
example of cleverely put together musical idioms, but 
does not contain either inspiration nor big musical 
thoughts. It is an episode, as already stated, and further- 
more a purely technical episode. It contains the usual 
dischords dissonances, cacophonies, muted effects and 
peculiarly shaded tone color nuances which mean noth- 
ing from an emotional sense. At times the work is 
ridiculously difficult and glaringly discordant. It almost 
seems as if the composer endeavored to write down 
a difficult passage just to find out whether the musicians 
in the orchestra are able to play it. So while Mr. Gallico 
is most assuredly a skillful and ingenious arranger of 
notes and a judge of scoring he has no soulful appre- 
ciation of real sentiments and stirring emotions. There- 
fore those naturally cold at heart will enjoy this work 
while those eager to be moved will find much lacking 
in it 

We certainly were delighted with the performance 
of Bach's Double Concerto for two violins and orchestra 
in D minor so excellently interpreted by Bertha Fiedler- 
Svedrofsky and Henry Svedrofsky. Both artists are 
thoroughly competent to cope with the technical and 
emotional difficulties which this work calls for. It is. 
of course, essentially a technical work, and to add to it 
a depth of musicianly sympathy requires the utmost 
artistry of expression. That both these violinists suc- 
ceeded in emphasizing both the technical and emotional 
aspects of the work proved that they are musicians far 
above the ordinary. In short they are both artists who 
understand the intricacies of their instruments and 
know how to secure the best effects with the least 
effort. The hearty applause accorded ruem by the 
audience was ample evidence for the success they 
achieved. 

The concluding number of the program consisted of 
the Entrance of the Gods into Valhalla from The Rhine- 
goid by Wagner. This is one of the most majestic and 
inspiring works composed by that giant of the music 
drama. The Philmarmonic Orchestra responded splen- 
didly to the demands of this occasion, and while it is 
possible to obtain more thrilling climaxes in this work, 
provided they are built up slowly and gradually per- 
mitted to accelerate in tempo, instead of being started 
somewhat too impetuously, still the effect was unmis- 
takable and the precision of the performance was de- 
cidedly enjoyable. It was an excellent concert and the 
delegates of the California Federation of Music Clubs 
Convention, who were assembled on this occasion, were 
among the most enthusiastic and most demonstrative 
members of the audience. Mr. Rothwell may well feel 
gratified with the result of this concert. 



UNIFORMS AND CRINOLINES AT RIVOLI 

By Alfred Metzger 
Evidently Ferris Hartman and Paul Steindorff are 
giving the musical public the kind of production it wants 
for the Rivoli Opera House is again exhibitng large 
audiences after a brief interval of slackening in attend- 
ance. When Johnny Comes Marclng Home is one of 
the disti!J.ctive Tivoli successes with plenty of catchy 
and spirited songs alternated with witty sayings and 
plenty of comedy and hence the public is pleased to 
bestow upon this production its favor. The performance 
is well mounted, the chorus sings with virility and in 
excellent vocal condition and orchestra as well as minor 



rolls are in splendid hands. Paul Steindorff conducts 
with his old-time dash and knowledge of the score and 
Ferris Hartman is taking care of the stage with well- 
known adherence to detail and ensemble effects. 

Robert Carlson in the role of General William Allen 
portrays the best character in his career and permits 
his voice to ring out with sonority and accuracy. Paul 
Hartman interprets the role of Felix Graham with his 
usual well thought-out dramatic skill. John Van sings 
and acts the role of Colonel John Graham in a manner 
to accentuate its most delightful phases. E. John Vale in 
the role of Major Geoffrey Martin reveals a splendid 
tenor voice that has been well trained and is being 
used by an intelligent artist. Although this role should 
be sung b.v a baritone Mr. Vale's robust tenor does not 
mar its artistic advantages. 

George Kunkel in the role of Uncle Tom does some 
exceedingly clever character work. Muggins Davies 
is attractive, acts convincingly and effectively and 
dances enchantingly as Cordelia Allen. Bessie Tannehill 
as Mrs. Constance Pemberton adds to the ensemble of 
the production by reason of her intelligent acting and 
her discriminating vocal effort. Lillian Glaser looks 
charmingly, sings delightfully and deports herself real- 
istically in the role of Kate Pemberton. Other roles that 
are well sustained are impersonated by Walter Barnow, 
Alfred Coutts. Josephine Welch, Etta Moran and Elfrieda 
Steindorff. 

Ferris Hartman has one of his very finest character 
impersonations in Jonathan Phoenix. It is evident that 
he has made deep study of this character. He em- 
phasizes its pathetic as well as humorous side and is 
natural on both. He never fails to gain a laugh when 
the occasion demands and he also succeeds in accentu- 
ating the emotional side of the role. Notwithstanding 
the fact that the character is that of a spy, and an 
individual not exactly worthy of respect, Mr. Hartman's 
impersonation robs the part of any offensive quality it 
may nossess. As usual the distinguished comedian earns 
the lion's share of the applause. 

When Johnny Conies Marching Home will remain on 
the boards for another week when it will be followed 
by that exceedingly entertaining musical comedy Mme. 
Sherry. 



MABEL RIEGELMAN TRIUMPHS IN OAKLAND 

Mabel Riegelman, the distingished prima donna 
soprano, was soloist at the second concert of the 
twenty-sixth season of the Oakland Orpheus Club which 
took place at the Auditorium Opera House, Oakland, on 
Tuesday evening, April 3, before a capacity audience. 
Miss Riegelman sang two groups of songs, namely: I — 
(a) Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt (Schubert), (b) Gretel 
(Pfitznerl. (c) Vous dansez. Marquise (Lemaire), (d) 
Vn bel di from Mme. Butterfiy (Puccini). II— (a) The 
Dove (Folk Song of Tuscany) (Kurt Schindler), (b) The 
Little Bells of Sevilla (Homer Samuels), (c) The Little 
Brown Owl (Wilfrid Sanderson), (d) Arietta from 
Romeo and Juliet (Gounod). 

Miss Riegelman was in excellent voice. She sang 
with that spirit and vitality which forms such a splendid 
part of her artistic work, and she aroused her audience 
to the highest pitch of enthusiasm. She received nu- 
merous recalls and as encores to the first group she 
sang: Rain (Curran) and The Cuckoo Clock (Schafcr). 
After the second group she sang: Minor and Major 
(Spross), Absent (Metcalf) and upon special request she 
again sang The Cuckoo Clock. She obtained delightful 
effects from this latter song which brought out her 
individuality of style in a most emphatic degree. Alto- 
gether it was a genuine triumph which only the finest 
artists enjoy. 



MARGARET HEDGER MAULE 

EXPERIENCED INSTRUCTOR I.V NORMAL 

COURSE IN MUSIC 

PI.\NO ORGAN 

VOICE CULTURE 

139 S. Los Robles, Pasadena, California 

Tel. Fair Oaks l.'(41 



De Lara Grand Opera Company 

MANUEL SANCHEZ DE LARA, Conductor 
Presents "11 Trovatore" on Tuesday EvenLne, April 
2-lth, at (inmut Theater, Los .\neelrs, and on Thurs- 
day EvenioK, .\pril 2(i1h, at Pasadena High School 
-Vudltorinm. 



10 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



MUSIC CLUB CONVENTION 

(Continued from Page 7, Col. 3.) 

and Clarence Gustlin were: Mrs. Lillian Birmingham, 
Mrs. Cecil Frankel, Ray C. B. Brown, Carrie Jacobs Bond. 
Mrs. Caroline E. Smith, Miss Antoinette Ruth Sabel, 
Frank H. Colby, Nino Marcelli, .Alfred Metzger and 
others whose names we are not able to remember at 
this time. After the banquet the delegates visited the 
concert of the Flonzaley Quartet as guests of the Santa 
Ana Musical Association where they had a chance to 
admire the exquisite artistry of these four musicians 
in a program of classic compositions. Inasmuch as we 
shall again refer to the work of these artists at their 
San Francisco concert it is not necessary to go into 
details at this time. 

Proceedings of Saturday, April 7. 

The final day of the convention began with the ses- 
sion at the Temple Theatre at 9:30 a. m. with Mrs. 
Lillian Birmingham presiding. A number of resolutions 
were read including one recommending the music clubs 
and managers to include two artists residing in Cali- 
fornia in the next season's itinerary. Another resolu- 
tion extended thanks to the press and others who as- 
sisted in making the convention such a success. Then 
there were resolutions dealing with certain laws regard- 
ing the educational department of the state in so far as 
music is concerned. All resolutions were approved with- 
out a dissenting vote later during the session. 

George Edwards, chairman of the publicity depart- 
ment, being absent Mrs. .Josephine Wilson, assistant 
director of the department, of San Francisco, read the 
report which dealt with the publicity and the Bulletin 
of the Federation. Mr. Edwards very facetiously re- 
ferred to the financial condition of the Bulletin and 
added that in case the Bulletin would ever make any 
money he would prefer to resign from the position as 
editor as it would be a sure sign of its artistic deterior- 
ation. 

Ray C. B. Brown, music editor of the San Francisco 
Chronicle, spoke intelligently and convincingly on the 
problem of Criticism and Publicity saying that the press 
agent in exaggerating the merits of artists and in claim- 
ing everyone to be the greatest in the world is gradually 
arousing a feeling of skepticism in the minds of the 
public which eventually is bound to prove injurious to 
artists as well as to music in general. He sponsors more 
moderation in the tone of advance notices and publicity 
campaigns and more adherence to the actual facts, 
instead of employment of extravagant adjectives un- 
justifiable by the actual circumstances, and a more 
dignified attitude of the manager toward the artist. 

One of the most enjoyable phases of the convention 
was the singing of the choruses from the Cantata Rose 
Maiden by Cowen by the Broadway Department Store 
Chorus of Los Angeles, consisting of eighty-two mem- 
bers. Miss Antoinette Ruth Sabel, director of the chorus, 
is entitled to lavish praise for the excellent results she 
has attained in training inexperienced vocalists to sing 
accurately and artistically in four parts. It is remark- 
able what this energetic and truly efficient musician is 
able to accomplish. Her address on Industrial Music 
was inspiring and convincing and she certainly is doing 
a wonderful work in the musical development of the 
State. 

During the afternoon the delegates enjoyed an auto- 
mobile ride to Laguna Beach where the visitors were 
the guests of the Laguna Beach Art Association for 
tea and a visit to the art gallery. During the evening 
the delegates were the guests of the Los Angeles Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra at their regular Saturday evening 
concert which wiil be reviewed elsewhere in this issue. 



CHALIAPIN RETURNING IN MAY 

Since the unfortunate cancellation of his tour in Cali- 
fornia a short while ago, Feodor Challapin, the famous 
Russian basso, entirely recovered from the effects of 
his attack of Laryngitis has been making musical his- 
tory in both Chicago and New York. To his credit he 
has placed ten operatic performances in Chicago's great 
Auditorium theatre, each one of which have found the 
available space in the huge opera house much too limit- 
ed to hold the throngs that struggled to hear him. In 
addition to these operatic performances, Chaliapin was 
heard in eight recital appearances, and the same story 
of enormous crowds, and hundreds turned away each 
time was the result. In New York. Chaliapin is now 
closing the Metropolitan Opera Company's present sea- 
son in a more vivid blaze of glory than has ever attended 
the final operas by this institution before. Carnegie 
Hall and the vast Hippodrome have been far too small 
to hold the crowds that have assembled for his recitals. 
No such enthusiasm for a singer has ever before been 
displayed by the American public, and audiences and 
critics alike agree unanimously that Chaliapin is the 
greatest vocalist of the day, if not of all time. 

Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer. who returned to his 
patrons over $10,000 when Chaliapin disappointed in 
February, has induced the famous Russian to make a 
special trip across the continent next May to appear in 
tills city, and because of the artist's desire to keep 
faith, Chaliapin has consented to sing here at the Expo- 
sition Auditorium on Simday afternoon. May 20th. and 
again on Monday night. May 28th. These two recitals 
will be great musical events here, and Oppenheimer is 
being besieged witli advance mail orders for the events. 



ROSA RAISA AND GIACOMO RIMINI 

The waning music season will bring to San Francisco 
as one of its closing yet most important attractions no 
less famous operatic stars than Rosa Raisa-Qiacomo 
Rimini, who will be heard in two joint recitals at the 
Curran theatre on tlie next two Sunday afternons of 
April 22nd and 29th. Both of these great singers are 



ROSE FLORENCE— Mezzo Soprano 

CONCERT— VOICE P LACING— COACHING 
Studio:— 545 Sutter Street 

Management — L. E. Behymer, 705 Audi 



Telephone Kearny 3598 

Building, Los Angeles 



popular in San Francisco, where they are of course 
known best from their operatic triumphs as leading 
members of the Chicago Grand Opera Company. As a 
recitalist Raisa is considered one of the best of the 
opera stars. She made her debut at the Teatro Reggie 
in Verdi's first opera, "Oberto" and immediate success 
destined her to become, one of the leading singers. Raisa 
is an accomplished linguist, speaking fluently French, 
Italian, Russian. Polish, Spanish, English and German 
and her song programs are given in various tongues. 

Rimini is an Italian, a native of Verona and was 
chosen by Toscanini for the title role in Verdi's Falstaff, 
when he conducted that opera in Milan some years ago. 
Critics have declared Rimini one of the most versatile 
of all present day concert and opera baritones, for, 
equipped with unusual musical intelligence, he is adept 
in nearly every important baritone role, and a concert 
singer of unusual style and brilliance. 

The two Raisa-Rimini recitals in San Francisco, will 
he the only appearance of these stars in Northern Cali- 
fornia this season, and will be given under the manage- 
ment of Selby C. Oppenheimer. Programs replete with 
arias, songs and duets, have been arranged. The first 
program, that of Sunday afternoon, April 22nd, ( includes 
the duets Squille Soavi by Denza, and the famous duo 
number from Donizetti's Don Pasquale. Mme. Raisa's 
numbers include the Bolero from Verdi's Vespri 
Siciliani: the aria from Verdi's Ernani, a group of Rus- 
sian songs by Arensky, Tschaikowsky, Rachmaninoff, 
etc.. English works by Woodman, Richard Hageman, 
and others, while Rimini will render the Drinking Song 
from Hamlet. Brull's Warrior Song, the aria from Gior- 
dano's Fedora, and other selections. For the last con- 
cert an entirely different program will be arranged. 

Raisa-Rimini tickets are now on sale at Sherman, 
Clay & Co. 



THE FLONZALEY QUARTET 

The only concert to be given in San Francisco this 
season by the Flonzaley Quartet will bring a full house 
to Scottish Rite Hall tomorrow (Sunday) afternoon. 
This world-famous chamber music organization belongs 
among the foremost ensemble combinations. This year 
marks the eighteenth consecutive season of the quartet 
as a unit and from it's inception, Adolfo Betti, first 
violinist, Alfred Pochon, second violinist, and Iwan 
d'Archambeau, cellist have devoted their lives and tal- 
ents to its development. Louis Bail'y. the violist, has 
been a member of the Flonzaley Quartet for the past 
five years. 

Tomorrow's program is one of special interest. The 
first number to be played will be the quartet in G major 
by Arnold Bax. Bax is one of the members of the mod- 
ern English school of composition of which Frank 
Birdge is considered the leader. Bax, Percy Grainger 
and Cyril Scott are of the same group. Bax was born in 
London in 1883 and studied at the Royal Academy of 
Music. He is a composer of Symphonic Poems, has 
written two important works for chorus and orchestra, 
a ballet, several song cycles, chamber music, piano 
sketches and songs. The quartet to be played tomorrow 
is considered one of his most impressive works and the 
profound students who comprise the Flonzaley Quartet 
have expressed themselves as considering it one of the 
finest of modern compositions. 

The majestic Beethoven Quartet in E minor. Op. 59, 
No. 2 will also be given tomorro\v. This is one of the 
most important of the Beethoven "Chamber Music Fam- 
ily," and is accepted as the standard of the great genius 
of Bonn. The final offering tomorrow will be two 
sketches for string quartet from the Op. 15 of Eugene 
Goossens, the eminent British conductor-composer, 
whose skilled baton is now being wielded over the Lon- 
don Symphony Orchestra. 

Tomorrow's concert will begin at 2:45 and will posi- 
tively be the only concert by the Flonzaley Quartet this 
season and is given under the management of Selby C. 
Oppenheimer. 



CONVENTIONALITIES 

A Few Interesting Paragraphs of a Personal Nature 
Gathered at the Fifth Annual Convention of the 
California Federation of Music Clubs. 



Clarence Gustlin — Vice President of the California 
Federation of Music Clubs and President of the Santa 
Ana Musical Association surely did not observe the 
eight hour day during the course of the convention. If 
ever there was a busy individual it was Mr. Gustlin. 
And the most remarkable thing of all was that he never 
lost any of his good nature, his kindliness, his will to 
help everybody, his generosity and his almost unbe- 
lievable patience. If there is any such thing as a 
genius among those who are hosts then Mr. Gustlin is 
such a genius. He surely deserves the European trip 
which he is about to make and we wish him all sorts 
of luck, a pleasant journey and a real rest. 

Mrs. Lillian Birmingham was a very faithful and loyal 
as well as industrious presiding officer. She was always 
on time, saw that the program went along with precision 
and despatch and left no important matters unfinished. 
She took a special interest in the discussion referring 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

For Concert Gnf^asementM 
nnd iDMtructlon Apply to 
Secretary and ManUKer of 
K. Altl, Room 1004 Kohler 
& CboMC nidSo San FranclMco 

Representative of Lyon & Healy Harps 

Telephone Douglaa 1678 



Siellajelica 

COLORATURA SOPRANO] 



80O KOHLER CHASE BLDC 
SAN FRANCISCO 






to the recognition of resident artists, and these artists 
have to thank her for most of the energy responsible 
for the passage of the resolution putting the California 
artists on the musical map. 

Mrs. Josephine Wilson in her introductory remarks 
prior to reading the official report of George Edwards 
the chairman of publicity, paid such enthusiastic compli- 
ments to the newspaper profession that both our good 
friend Ray C. B. Brown and ourselves could not help 
blushing. The best thing of Mrs. Wilson's admiration 
for newspaper people is the fact that she is sincere for 
she married a newspaper man. 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Readers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address. 
Anonymous communications cannot be answered. No 
names will be published. Address. Question Editor, 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kohler & Chase Building, 
San Francisco. 

1. Who wrote the "Light of Asia?"— H. W. 
Dudley Buck. 

2. What is a bariolage?— E. S. 

Bariolage is a French word which means variegation, 
medley of colors, motley. It is therefore applied to a 
musical medley. Another use of the word in music is 
to signify a passage for the violin, etc., in which the 
open strings are more especially used. 

3. Should a young child's practice be supervised or is 
it better to leave him to practice alone? — H. P. H. 

Mark Hambourg says that no child should be left to 
practice by himself. I think that is good advice though 
for the majority of parents it is impractical. I suppose 
most children are left to do their practicing by them- 
selves because they have no one to supervise them. 
The ideal condition is for the child to have a parent or 
guardian who is musically educated and capable of 
directing the practice, and many shining lights in music 
were fostered under such a condition. Mark Hambourg 
himself is a case in point, and no doubt his own experi- 
ence is responsible for his unqualified assertion. But 
the majority of children studying music do not have 
such advantage. If the child sees the teacher frequently, 
say three or four time a week, certainly not less than 
twice, he may be trusted to do his practicing alone. 
However, if it is possible for him to have some one with 
him, I think it is better than to leave him to himself. 

4. Please mention a good book of Octave Studies tor 
the Piano, interesting and of medium grade. — R. G. 

Carl Preyer: Twenty Progressive Octave Studies, 
Op. 30. 

5. Will you kindly tell me how one can become a 
member of the Musicians Club? Also where do they 
meet and how often? What are the dues? — M. L. 

Send for application to the President, Vincent 
Arrillaga, 2315 Jackson Street. The club rooms are at 
533 Sutter Street; they have a luncheon every Wednes- 
day and a dinner once a month. The dues are $3.00 a 
quarter. Only men are eligible to membership though 
concerts and dinners are given to which ladies are 
invited. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ALCAZAR THEATRE 

Public demand is responsible for the 
announcement by Thomas Wilkes that 
Allan Pollock will continue for a third 
and positively last week in his tremen- 
dously powerful play, "A Bill of Divorce- 
ment," beginning with the matinee Sun- 
day, April 15th. 

This world discussed production is 
being presented in San Francisco in a 
manner which has won the enthusiastic 
approval of all the critics. It is being 
staged here in such a manner as to make 
it certain that it is in every way the 
equal of the New York presentation. 

Pollock plays his original characteriza- 
tion of Hilary Fairfield. It is a strong 
role, difficult and requiring the utmost 
acting effort. It is faultlessly portrayed 
by the star, and similarly the supporting 
characterizations are assumed in fine 
fashion. 

Nana Bryant is clever emotionally and 
so rises to the prominent role of Margaret 
Fairfield with unusual naturalness. Mary 
Duncan, new to the Alcazar, assumes 
the part of Sydney in a delightful way 
and her reception has been second to that 
only of Pollock himself. Every member 
of the company lias been carefully 
chosen and the scenic features are per- 
fect in their realism. 

The Alcazar has been enjoying good 
patronage with the Pollock production 
and it will be gratifying to the public to 
know that it has been extended for a 
third week. 



MUSICAL EVENTS MILLS COLLEGE 

The calendar of Mills College is filled 
with music dates for April and May, three 
of them being given in connection with 
the Alameda County Music Week cele- 
bration. 

For Thursday evening, April 12, Miss 
Catherine Urner and her class in Vocal 
Music have sent out cards announcing 
a Vocal Recital and Reception at 8:15 in 
Alumnae Hall. 

The following Thursday, April 19, the 
Mills College Trio will give a concert in 
Lisser Hall. The members of the trio 
are Miss Frances Kellogg, a senior major- 
ing in music, who is at the piano, and the 
Misses Karolina and Mary Jump, who 
play the cello and the violin. The pro- 
ceeds of this concert will be added to the 
Million Dollar Endowment Fund for 
Teachers' Salaries. 

Monday, April 23, Miss Catherine 
Urner, vocalist, and Mr. William Laraia, 
violinist, both members of the Music 
faculty at Mills College, will give a public 
concert in the ballroom of the Fairmont 
Hotel. 

The three events scheduled for Music 
Week include a concert of original com- 
positions. May 4, ballroom of Hotel Oak- 
land, an evening of interpretations of 
classical composers, Lisser Hall, Mills 
College Campus, Saturday, May 5, and an 
organ concert, Sunday evening. May 6. 
by William W. Carruth. 

The program for May 4 will be given 
by students in the Theory of Music, and 
that on May 5 by the students in prac- 
tical music. 

Luther B. Marchant is chairman of the 
Mills music department which includes 
the following teachers: 

Edward F. Schneider. Frederick M. 
Biggerstaff. William J. McCoy. William 
W. Carruth, Arthur Weiss. William F. 
Laraia. Catherine Urner. Alice C. Bum- 
baugh. Connell Keefer. Lauretta V. 
Sweesy, Elizabeth Richardson. 

Vocal Recital, by Pupils of Catherine 
Urner, Alumnae Hall, Mills College. 
Thursday, April 12th, 8: 15 p. m. Chorus, 
The Gateway of Ispahan (Arthur Pootel. 
The Class; (a) Plaisir d'Amour (Martin- 
elli). (b) But Lately in Dance (Arenskyl. 

(c) Pilgrim's Song (Tschaikowsky). Mil- 
dred Butler; (a) Her Rose (Whitney 
Coombesl. (b) Songs My Mother Taught 
Me (Dvorak). Marion Handy; (c> Chan- 
son de Florian (Godard). Lenore Glen; 

(d) Snow (Signid Lie), Ethel Dawson: 
(a) Stars With Little Golden Sandels 
(Franz), Elizabeth Smith; (b) Se tu 
M'Ami (Pergolese), Edythe Guiberson; 
(c) 'Neath the Moon (Von Fielitz), (dl 
Un Pajarito — Spanish Song of California 
(arranged by Gertrude Ross), Vilas Derr; 

(a) Elegie (Massenet), Jean Worthing- 
ton; (b) Farewell (Franz), Helen Wall; 
(c) Duna (Josephine McGill). Mary Chad- 
dock; (d) The Banjo Song (Sidney 
Homer), (e) All Through the Night (Old 
Welsh), Rose Dorn; (a) Memory (Canz). 

(b) Ljttle David Play On Your Harp 



(Grant-Schaffer), lone Hallock; (c) Thou 
Art So Like a Flower (Chadwick), 
Corinne Costin; (d) Chanson Triste 
(Duparc), Ruth Chapman; (e) Der Ring 
(Schumann). Helen Weimar; (a) My 
Lovely Celia (Old English), (b) Gial Sole 
dal Gauge (Scarlatti), Nathalie Wollin; 
(c) O del mio dolce ardor (Gluck), (d) 
The Shepherd Lehl (Rimsky-Korsakoff 1, 
(e) Aria — Habenera (From Carmen) 
(Bizet), Omo Grimwood; Chorus — The 
Hamadryads (McCoy), The Class. 

Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 



PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languages 

5302 Broadway .... Oakland 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE S.\N FRANCI.SCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve Syatem and Associated Savings 

Banks ot San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

CapitalActually PaidUp 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 2Ist Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGIIT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West>ortal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (4J4) 

per cent per annum was declared for the six months 

ending December 31st, 1922. 

INTEREST WILL HEREAFTER BE COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 
INSTEAD OF SEMI-ANNUALLY AS HERETOFORE. 



ADELE ULMA.N 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND PIANO 

Studio 178 Cominonwealth Ave. 
Telephone Pacific 33 

Laura Wertheimber 



Mm 
211 Scolt St. 



ory Teacher for 



Mrs. William Steinbach EDWIN HUTCHINGS 



VOICE CULTURE 

Stndio: 

902 KOHLER « CHASE BLDG. 

^iin Fmnelweo Phonet Kear ny 54JM 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

BARITONE — VOICE CULTURE 

Authorized to Teach Mnie. Sehoen- 

Renc'n Method 

1314 Leavenworth St. Pho ne ProNpeot 0253 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 



Phone Berkeley 6006, 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
Kohler & Cliase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 

PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

B05 Kohler & Chase Bid. Tel. Sutter 73S7 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 
Studio, 603-604 KOHLER & CHASE BLDG. 
Phone Kearny ■%4.'M 

MRS. CHARLES POULTER. 

SOPRANO St. Andrewa Chnreh 

Voice Cnltnre. Piano. 588 27th St., Oak- 
land. Tel. 2079. Kohler & Chase Bids.. 
Wednesdays Tel. Kearnj M54. 

ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 

PIANIST AND TEACHER 

Realdence and Stadlo, 612H HUleKasa Ave.. 
Oakland. Tel. Piedmont 500S. 



MARION RAMON WILSON t^^r 

DRAMATIC CONTRALTO ll«n. 

Opera Sncceanen In Europe: Concert Snc- 
reaaea In America. AddreMM isoi Califnrnln 
St.. San Frnnclwco. Telephone Prowpect 3620 



Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Stadlo 36 GafTner Ralldlag. 37(t Sntfer S(. 
Tel. Donelaa 4233. Rea. Tel. Kearnr 2340 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRALTO 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

GRADUATE OF SCHOLA CANTORUM, 

PARIS 

OReANIRT ST. MARY'S CATHBDBAb 



ESTHER MUNDELL 

SOPRANO AND TEACHKR 

Pupil o( 

lie Reszke and Percy Rector Stephena 

Studio — 54."> Suiter Street 

Res. Stndio — 664 Second .Avenue 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



Joseph George Jacobson 

PIANO 
2833 Saeramento St. Phone Fillmore 848 

ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Comlque. Paris 

Studloi 3107 WashinKtoB Street 

Phone Fillmore 1847 

SIGMUND BEEL 

Master Classes tor Violin 

Stndio Bulldlngr. 1373 Post Street 

Tel. Prospect 757 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 



OF MUSIC 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 



CONTRALTO 
Tearher of Slnelne. 32 Lorelta J 
moot. Tel. Piedmont 364. Mon., 
rhnse Ride.. S. F. Telephnne Ke 



Brandt's Conservatory of Music 



2211 SCOTT ST„ Ret. Clay A WashluKtoa 

Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 
Mrs. Noah Brandt. Piano 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH 



no Soloist. Temple Emann El. Con- 

and Church Work. Vocal Inntmc- 

25311 Clay St« Phone West 48H0. 



MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 



Rea. Tel. BayvlcTT 4104 

EVA GARCIA 

CONCERT PIANIST. ACCOMPANIST 

AND TEACHER 

Studio: 41116 Piedmont Ave. Tel. Pied. 2750. 

ReHldenoe: 4153 Howe St.. Oakland 
Tel. Pled. 3402 

ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 

Violinist and Teacher 

Head of Violin Department Ada Clement 

Music School 

34.35 Sacramento St., San Francisco 

RUTH DEGNAN 

PUPIL OF GIACOMO AND MME. 

MINKOWSKI 

TEACHBIR OF VOICE 

S42S Pine SI- Tel. ^Vest 7012 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 
2321 Jackson St. Phone Fillmore 3256 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 



OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone Welt 1307 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
2027 California St. Tel. Fillmore 3827 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Park 1974 

MARJORIE E. YOUNG 
1363 Grove St. Tel. West 4571 

MRS. H. I. KRICK 

479 Forest St., Oakland. Tel. Pled. 3554 

MARGARET WHITE COXON 
149 Rose Av., Oakland Piedmont 1608-W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue — Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 
1841 Fulton St. Tel. Pacific 421t 

DOROTHY PASMORE 
1715 Vallejo St. Phone West 1i95 



MACKENZIE CORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 467 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

301 Spruce Street Pacific 167* 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2:01 Scott St. Phone Weat 134T 

ANDRTTEH^m? 
1470 Washington St. Tel. Franklin 3321 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

1005 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K. 5464 

MARGARET BRUNTSCH 
70 Piedmont St. Phone Park 3469 

MME. M. TROMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 



OTTO RAUHUT 

357 Arguello Blvd. Phone Pacific 3561 

HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4974 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6454 

EMIL HAHL 
Res.: 2756 Baker St. Tel.: Fill. 2291 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 

434 Spruce St. Tel. Fillmore 1131 

REED AND MOUTHPIECE MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 
789 Mission St. Suttar (SH 

If you want to become known to the 
musical public of California, advertise in 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

on the Programs of Distinguished American Artists 

Published by 

G SCHIRMER, JOHN CHURCH CO., THE BOSTON MUSIC COMPANY, 

THE COMPOSERS' MUSIC CORPORATION 

Songs for All Voices, New Publications of the Composers' Music Corporation 

THE CRY OF THE ORIENT TOMORROW 

THE FOREST OF DREAMS 

A CYCLE OF SIX— SONGS OF THE LITTLE DAYS 

For Sale at the Leading Music Houses 



THE LITTLE HANON, By Roht. J. K,„g 

A new work pnttrmed afler «ho»« contalnrd In the (amoua "1 
Pianist." It nhould nerve the «nme pnrpoae tor the eomparnllv 
the larger one haa HO «ncc«s»loIly accomplished for the more ad' 

Cheerfully sent for inspection to anyone. 
HENRY GROBE, 135-153 Kearny Street. 

Reprcseyxtativc for the Clayton F. Siaiimy Publications 



nnon Vlrtuoao 
brelnner that 



MAUD G. McFAUL 

ACCOMPANIST 

1128 Chestnut Street 

Telephone Prospect 4032 



JOHN WHITCOMB NASH 

VOCAl, CULTURE 
Artist pupils available for all occasions 
500 Kohler & Chase BldK. Kearny 4891 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 

Teacher of Singing 

Are you «n<i»«fle«l with your teaeher? 

<"«n he place you before the puhlief 

Are you NatiHtled with your pruKress? 

iH he a FaUdiK*. or Charlelanf 

Are Ton sure your teaeher knows how. 

I» he alwayH talking "BREATH?" "TONGLEf 
'■JAWf 

If in douht. eonHUlt Mr. Bopart, wKo studied in 
Europe with the teachert* of Semlirlek, Scalchi, 
Uixpham, etc. 

PnpilH prepared for Opera. Oratorio. Church and 

37« SITTER STREET — Douglas »258 

1:21s I..AKE STREET — Bayvlew 4871 

EvenlngM by appointment 

Mr. BogarfN article in thin paper of March 

24. IIIUS, about "Charletau»" 



Con 



Qonstance <iAlexandre 

Mezzo Soprano 

Pupils Accepted 

Inquiries made at 

801 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Phone Kearny 5454 



Resident Artists who wish to secure engagements 
through managers and music clubs next season should 
announce their plans NOW as bookings are made im- 
mediately before the end of this season and during the 
summer months. 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 

Endorsed by Wager Swayne 

Special Normal Course for Teachers, based on Swayn 

Principles 

Stndio« SOT Kohler A Chase Bldg. 

2518H Etna St.. Berkeley. Phone Berkeley 1310 



Frank Moss 

PIANIST 

Residence Studio — Hotel Normandie 
Telephone Franklin 5400 

Available for Recitals 

Management Ida G. Scott 

Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny 5454 



Leslie V. Harvey 

Organist 
Coliseum Theatre 



SCHUMANN HEINK 

STEINWAY PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

Season 1922-23— Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 



The 
PIANOFORTE 



There is a subtle satisfaction in knowing 
that one's possessions, whatever their nature, 
are of superlative excellence. 

A Gobelin tapestry or a da Vinci painting is 
a constant source of pleasure and bears testi- 
mony to the taste of its owner. To the music 
lover the same is true in the possession of a 
Mason & Hamlin Piano. 

Those who are musically sensitive, whose 
appreciation of tonal quality renders them 
competent to judge, pronounce the Mason & 
Hamlin Piano the leading instrument of its 
kind. 

Dame Melba, richly endowed with musical 
discrimination, says in this connection: "It 
seems to me that the preference on the part of 
an individual for the Mason & Hamlin Piano 
is indicative of a superior musical nature." 

Only an actual hearing can give a realization 
of its beauty of tone. 




two entrances 

135-153 Kearny & 217-225 Sutter Sts. 

victor talking machines 




WE INVITE A HEARING 



^WilgyBAlleD®! 



MASON & HAMUN PIANOS - 




Oakland — 1209 Washington Street 

San Jose — 199 South First 

sheet music 



PUBLIC LIBRAf' 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW SEE PAGES S AND 9 



&(fir €ff^t 




Ji THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOUR,NAL INI THE GREAT WEST jj 



VOL. XLIV. No. 3 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. APRIL 21, 1923 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



BRILLIANT GRAND OPERA SEASON ASSURED 



Enthusiastic Meeting at St. Francis Hotel Results in Pledges by Promi- 
nent Music Patrons to Guarantee Expenses of San Francisco 
Operatic Season by Means of Disposing of Twenty-Five Four 
Dollar Tickets to Seven Hundred Opera Enthusiasts In 
the Bay Region — Resident Artists to Appear 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



If the enthusiasm and co-operative spirit 
that prevailed at the luncheon given at 
the St. Francis Hotel Italian Ballroom on 
Wednesday noon. April 4th is any criter- 
ion by which to judge the success of the 
grand opera season to be given by the 
San Francisco Grand Opera Association 
at the Civic Auditorium next September, 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review does 
not hesitate for a moment to predict that 
the season will be one of the most artistic 
and financially most successful ever pre- 
sented in this city. The writer was in- 
deed most gratified to note among nearly 
two hundred people in attendance promi- 
nent social patrons of music as well as 
many of the leaders from the rank and 
file. This is positive evidence that the 
musical public is united in its purpose to 
make this season a brilliant success from 
every possible angle. 

We thoroughly enjoyed the address of 
Milton Esberg whose confidence in the 
outcome of the enterprise was well justi- 
fied by the plans that were presented 
later on. Mr. Esberg is one of the most 
substantial, most reliable and most sin- 
cere patrons of music that San Francisco 
has reason to feel proud to count among 
its residents, and his confident talk help- 
ed not a little to concentrate the energy 
and enthusiasm of those assembled. An- 
other dynamic force in this splendid un- 
dertaking is Timothy Healy. a prominent 
attorney who is sacrificing some of his 
valuable time to make this operatic 
organization a lasting success. Mr. 
Healy's address breathed the spirit of 
enthusiasm and assurance and proved 
beyond a doubt that he is the right man 
in the right place. His enthusiasm proved 
contageous and the hearty applause that 
punctuated the conclusion of his speech 
was ample evidence for the confidence 
his hearers repose in him. 

Of course, the address of the event was 
that of Gaetano Merola. We know of no 
artist or musician in general who posses- 
ses the business instinct, the conciseness 
of expression, the courage of his convic- 
tion and the absolute unselfishness and 
pride in his art that Merola possesses. 
His explanations ot the enterprise were 
so lucid, his faith in the musical loyalty 
ot San Francisco so profound, his belief 
in the feasibility of the financial success 
of the institution so plain that everyone 
felt in sympathy with his enthusiasm and 
pledged himself to support him to the 
utmost extent of his or her capacity. Mr. 
Merola, the artistic spirit of the enter- 
prise, explained the purpose of thii< opera 
season in terms of which the following 
is a brief resumme: 

"Although I have directed opera in the 
most important music centers in Italy, 
France, England and America, I have 
never been in any place where there are 
so many naturally beautiful voices as 
there are in San Francisco. I may safely 
say that ninety-five per cent of an operatic 
organization could be found right here in 
California. For this reason the organiza- 
tion of a San Francisco Opera Company is 
only a logical recognition of the excep- 
tional talent to be obtained here. Among 
those who place business ability above 
artistic proficiency I am called a dreamer. 
I plead guilty to the charge. The opera 
season I gave at Stanford University last 
year was the realization of one of my 
dreams. I was told that I was an excel- 



lent conductor and artist, but not a busi- 
ness man, because the income was some- 
what below the expenses. If I had been 
less of a dreamer and artist and the in- 
come had been greater than the expense 
I would have been hailed as a great busi- 
ness man. 

"This time a number of good friends 
and music enthusiasts have taken the 
responsibility of the business portion of 
the enterprise from my shoulders. I shall 
be enabled to fulfill^he realization of my 



ists to accept engagements with the San 
Francisco Grand Opera Association; 
Beniamini Gigli, leading tenor ot the 
Metropolitan Opera Co., New York, who 
will appear for the first time in the Pa- 
cific West on this occasion; Giovanni 
-Martinelli, leading tenor of the Metro- 
politan Opera Co.. New York, who created 
a sensation at Stanford University last 
season and who will have an opportunity 
to further distinguish himself. 

"Armando Tokatyan, a young tenor 
from South .America, one of the members 
of the Metropolitan Opera Co. of New 
York, who will appear tor the first time 
on the Pacific Coast; Giordano Paltrinieri, 
another tenor from the Metropolitan 
Opera House, who was heard here to 
great advantage with the Scotti Opera 
Company; Giuseppe de Lucca, one of the 
most distinguished baritones ever creat- 
ing a lasting impression at the Metropoli- 
tan Opera House, whose Rigoletto is 
specially admirable; Gandolfi. a baritone 
highly recommended by one in whose 
judgment 1 repose the utmost confidence, 
who has recently created a sensation at 




.\SHI.EV I'KTTIS 

: Califtirnla Planlnt Who Huh I 

:ind Other EaMtfrn MuHfc Cent 

PraiMed by PreMH and Public 



dreams and artistic principles and leave 
the business details in the hands of 
others. It is. after all, the best way, for 
it enables me to concentrate my energy 
upon the artistic side of the enterprise 
which will prove to San Francisco opera 
lovers that this city can give as fine opera 
as any city in the world, including New 
York, Paris, London or Berlin. To prove 
my contention I need only say that I have 
secured the consent of the following art- 



the Royal Opera in Madrid, who will come 
specially to San Francisco from Europe 
to join this organization; Adamo Didur, 
one of the finest basses in opera and a 
member ot the Metropolitan Opera Co; 
Louis D'Angelo, basso, who was heard 
heard here with much pleasure as a 
member of the Scotti Opera Company. 

"Among the prima donne we shall have 
above all Queena Mario, a disciple of 
Marcella Serabrich, who is not a stranger 



to San Francisco, having sung here both 
with the San Carlo Opera Co. and Scotti, 
but having recently scored such successes 
at the Metropolitan Opera House that she 
may easily be mentioned among the great- 
est artists of the day in opera; Bianca 
Sar ya, the excellent dramatic soprano 
who made such an excellent impression 
at Stanford University last year and who 
is singing this year at Ravinia Park and 
who will be among the Metropolitan 
forces next sea.son. (Mr. Merola an- 
nounced the tact of Saroya's addition to 
the Metropolitan forces as being a secret 
at that time, but now the news is evi- 
dently pretty well known!. San Fran- 
cisco people will be specially gratified to 
hear that Doria Fernanda, who recently 
signed a contract with the Chicago Opera 
Association, will be a member of this 
company. In addition to these I am 
negotiating with another artist of reputa- 
tion whose name I shall not announce un- 
til I receive confirmation ot her ability to 
accept the offer. 

"The repertoire will include the follow- 
ing operas: Boito's Mefistofele with Gigli 
and Didur; (there is no record ot this 
opera ever being presented in San Fran- 
cisco before in its entirety); .\ndrea 
Chenier by Giordano; Trilogy — II Tabarro, 
Suor Angelica and Gian Schicchi by Puc- 
cini. This will be the first time Puccini's 
three one-act operas will be heard in San 
Francisco. Additional operas will be 
selected from a repertoire including 
Manon Lescaut, Mme. Butterfly, La Bo- 
heme, Rigoletto, Aida and Pagliacci. 

"We have evolved plans by means of 
which we shall be able to remodel the 
Civic Auditorium in a manner to reduce 
acoustic faults to a minimum and improve 
the seats by means of raising them like 
they are in a regular theatre. Our prices 
will be within the reach of all. There will 
be seats for one dollar and up to tour 
dollars, no higher. The four "dollar seats 
will be practically disposed of to those 
who pledge themselves to buy $100 worth 
of tickets. The arrangement will be such 
that anyone will be able to see and hear 
from every part of the house. The boxes 
will be placed along each side of the 
auditorium. We shall engage the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra and a 
chorus of 150 voices from this city. The 
minor roles will also be sung by resident 
aitists. We shall prove that there is 
ample talent in and about San Francisco 
that only awaits an opportunity to obtain 
adequate training and experience to 
prove itself capable to vie with artists ot 
distinction." 

Mr. Merola will be assisted by Wilfred 
Pelletier, assistant conductor from the 
Metropolitan Opera House; Arturo Cas- 
glia, chorus master; Natale Corossio, bal- 
let master, and .Armando Agnini, stage 
manager. The latter will come here from 
New York five weeks before the opening 
of the season to prepare the productions 
and train the singers in the minor roles. 
The headquarters of the San Francisco 
Opera Association are located at 457 
Phelan Building and among those identi- 
fied with the original organization plans 
are: Mrs. Marcus Koshland, Mrs. M. C. 
Sloss, Mrs. M. C. Porter. Mr. and Mrs. 
Timothy Healy. Mrs. Ernest Simpson, 
Alfred Hertz, Lawrence W. Harris, 
Charles K. Field. Gaetano Merola. Milton 
H. Esberg, A. W. Widenham, Selby C. 
Oppenheimer and others. 

Special appointed committees are now 
at work disposing of the seat allotments 
amounting to $100 worth of $4 seats per 
person among 700 people. $20,000 had 
already been pledged before the above 
named luncheon and by the time this 
paper will reach our readers it is safe to 
say that nearly one half of the required 
amount will have been pledged. The 
enthusiasm of those attending this lunch- 
eon was genuine and contageous, and we 
do not doubt for one moment that it will 
quickly spread throughout the entire 
community. 



h 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 







L V$trinii<nj 


v.;:; 


^^^ Z'. ' 



^n <iApp re cia tio n 

By Mrs. Noah Brandt 



(2^ 



^Tltu/U. <d'JilvnU*«. 



Z/^;^ 







/. 












^[^ 



Mrs. Noah Brandt at Her Steinway 



ShermanMay & Co. 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
Fourteenth and Clay Streets, Oakland 
Sacramento • Stockton • Fresno • Sanjose 



GEORGIA KOBER 

AMERICAN PIANIST 

Studio: 30.'.-S4n Sutter St. 
Tel. Kearny S093. WedneHdays and Thursdays 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 

. Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
or MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
4D0LF GREGORY, Director 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

OrsanUt Temple Emana E:1, Flrat Church of Christ Sci- 
entist. Director Lorlns Clob. S. F^ Wed^ 1617 California 
St„ Phone Franklin 2603 1 Sat^ Flrat Chrlatlan Science 
Church, Phone Franklin 1307) Res. studio, 3142 Levrlston 
Ave.. Berkeley. Phone Piedmont 2428. 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 



ne Pacing 8825 

The College of the Holy Names 



Complete Conse 



Lake Rlerrltt, Oakland 

torr Course — Piano. Harp, Violin, 
onnterpninl. HarmnnT, Hlatory 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 



uf sinking. Co 



MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

ITALI.AN VOCAL TEACHER 



For Rent From 


May 15 


to Sept. 


15 




$100 A Month 






Ilexidenre .S 


iidio— Kou 


Rooms— Ti> 


o Grand Pianos 1 1 


Reterenoe 


Re«iulred 


—For Partic 


ulars .\ddress II 




EDITH 


BENJAMIN 






:<4<M Clay St 


reet 


Teleiihon 


e Fillmore 


eS47 



iibus Ave., Pbo 



Arrillaga Musical College 

V. de ArrUlaea, Director 
A. L. Artlpoes. Pres.t Louis Alesrrla, VIce-Pres. 
Uneicelled tacllltles (or the study of music In all 
Its branches. Large Pipe Organ. Recital Hall. 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
Sao Francisco, Cal. Phone West 4737 



Mamning School of Music 



JOHN C. MANNING, Director 



3242 Washington 



Telephona Fllln 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 



and E. Robert Schmltx (New York». Studio: 1(105 
Kohler & Chase llldK.. Wed. & Sat. Mornings. Tel. 
Kearny 5454. Res. phone Piedmont 700. 



MR. and MRS. GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 



Dominican College School of Music 

S\.N R \ ex KL, CALIFORNIA 

>IuhIc CourMes Thorough and Progressive 

Ptihilc *ichni»l Music Accredited Diploma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite SOO Kohler & Chase Bids- 
S. P.: 2r..t0 College Ave.. Berkeley. Residence 291 Alva- 
rado Road. Berkeley. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

epnrtnK Teacher for 



JACK HILLMAN Baritone 



Residence llOfl BaHh St.. Frai>klln MWH. 

MADAM MACRAY-CANTELL 

CONCERT COACH — VOCAL TECHNIQUE 
Sl'PER-DICTION 
Director Calvary Presbyterian Choral Society. 



JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 

Thorough Vocal and Dramatic Training 

740 Pine St. Phone Donglns 0024 



E. HAROLD DANA 



ing of a Studli 



t GREEN STREET 
ncemcnt. Breath Con 
roper Production 
«pcct 800 for Appoln 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano. Organ, Harmony. OrgnnUt and Musical 
Director of First Presbyterian C hurch . Alameda. Home 
Studio: 1II7 PARU STREET. ALAMEDA. Telephone Ala- 
" I School, 507 Eldorado Ave.* 



Furthe 



We 



inoo. 



RESIDENT ARTISTS who are available for concert 
tours during the season 1923-1924 will please register 
with the Pacific Coast IVIusical Review so that we are 
able to recommend them to music clubs, music schools 
and managers. Only artists of reputation and experience 
are eligible for registration. 



KARL RACKLE 

PIANIST— INSTRUCTOR 



JOSEPHINE WILSON-JONES 

Dramatic Soprano — Pupil o1 
Studio. M.% Sutter Street. San 
Park BonlCTard, Oakland. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



THE ONL'-' WEEKLY MUSICAL JOLIRrJAL it 



he great west iij 
husicaij review company 

*I,FRKD METZGER Prealdenl 

C. C. EMERSON' _ Vice President 

MAHC(» I.. SAMl'EI.S Secretnrr and Tre«iiarer 

Snile KOI Kohler & Chaae RIdK'. 20 O'Farrell St.. San 
Praneiaro. Cal. Tel. Kearnr S4.V1 



ALFRED METZGER 
C. C. EMERSON 



Editor 
Business Manager 



other forma of 

PACIFIC COAST MllSICAL REVIEW 

Oakland-Berkeler-AIameda Olflce 1117 Parn St., Alameda 

Tel. Alameda 15S 

Mlas Clliabelh Weatgate In Charge 



I.oa Angelea Office 

Salte 447, Donelaa Bids., 2^7 So. Sprlne St. Tel. S20-302 

Sherman Danby In Charge 



Vol. XLIV SATURDAY, APRIL 21, 1923 No. 3 



individual side of our policy. That is to say we 
have not always been able to extend to the 
profession, which so generously stood by us, that 
service to which it was entitled. This was due 
to the fact that the paper was not sufficiently large 
to give us the necessary space for all our plans. 
San Francisco and the bay cities are perfectly 
able to support a paper thoroughly capable to 
attend to matters of general concern as well as 
adequately give individual service IF THE EN- 
TIRE MUSICAL PROFESSION AND PUB- 
LIC WOULD CO-OPERATE WITH US. 



Entered aa aecond-cla 



S. F. Poatolllce, 



SUBSCRIPTIONS 

4nnaallr In Advance Inelading PoataBst 

United Statea _ •».«>• 



Porelcn Conntrlea 



TWENTY-SECOND YEAR 



LET US CO-OPERATE 



The Pacific Coast Musical Review is now in its 
twenty-second year of continuous existence. It 
has been founded and conducted upon a basis of 
accomplishing the greatest amount of good for 
musical progress on the Pacific Coast. The writer 
when assuming the editorship of this publication 
had no idea of establishing what is known as a 
money-making enterprise. To say that he was 
right in his assumption will be easily understood 
by anyone familiar with the musical conditions in 
the Bay Cities. But he did accomplish something 
for the good of the musical profession and public 
during the twenty-two years of editing and publish- 
ing this journal. We have persistently hammered 
away at these principal policies which we have 
set ourselves to successfully defend : Keeping the 
musical profession out of the clutches of grasping 
politicians who always seek ways and means to 
secure jobs by taxing somebody or something; 
Seeing to it that California has a chance to en- 
courage first class symphony orchestras under 
adequate leadership; Assisting in the establish- 
ment of an adequate State Music Teachers' Asso- 
ciation ; Assisting in the maintenance of a proper 
California Federation of Music Clubs ; Fighting 
the difficult and up-hill battle shoulder to shoulder 
with the resident artist ; Getting recognition for 
California composers and teachers; Finding 
means and ways to erect an adequate concert hall 
and musicians' building; Finding ways and 
means to reduce the evil of charlatanism in the 
profession ; Giving support to movements tending 
to secure for San Francisco an Opera House and 
Opera Company worthy of its musical standing; 
Giving correct reports of the remarkable musical 
achievements of California and its principal cities. 



The writer used to report musical events for 
daily papers in San Francisco. He left one of 
these to establish this journal, because one of the 
managers would not permit him to edit a music 
page. It was then contended by the business 
managers of daily papers that there was no money 
in the musical profession, hence there was no use 
publishing a music page. Today our daily papers 
have not only regular music pages, but some of 
them are so greedy that they endeavor to urge 
our advertisers to leave us and use their columns 
instead, after we had given twenty-two years of 
our life to convince the daily papers that there is 
not only money but influence in catering to the 
iriusical profession. It is but natural that in 
endeavoring to fulfill our duty toward the musical 
public and the musical profession, in trying to 
solve the numerous problems that confronted us 
in California we have occasionally neglected the 



We feel that we have done all there is humanly 
possible to accomplish in the twenty-two years 
wherein we have been active in musical journal- 
ism. W'hether we receive credit for it or not we 
feel confident that we have victoriously finished 
some of the fights we have fought in behalf of 
the musical profession and public. We know that 
we have never regarded the financial support in 
any other light but to give the people the best 
that is in us and utilize the money to publish as 
good a journal as could be done under the cir- 
cumstances. We feel that we have done our 
duty and that our work is finished as far as the 
publication of a journal of this limited size is 
concerned. There is nothing that could keep us 
any longer in San Francisco or vicinity, unless 
we are enabled to continue in our efforts in behalf 
of music and musicians in the bay region upon a 
larger scale than has hitherto been permitted us 
to do. 



We have permission to take our readers into our 
confidence to this e.xtent that we have been 
offered a very lucrative position elsewhere in this 
State and an opportunity to dispose of our inter- 
est in this paper. The offer is so flattering that 
we hesitated to refuse its acceptance oflf-hand. 
We asked permission to think the matter over 
for a period of three or four months, and if at 
that time we still should feel inclined to accept 
we would do so. Inasmuch as it is not necessary 
to enter upon our new duties until October 1st 
of this year such time limit for either acceptance 
or rejection of the offer was allowed us. We 
thoroughly believe that the bay region and the 
rest of California can support a weekly music 
journal containing from twenty to twenty-four 
pages. But if the musical profession and public 
feels that it does not wish to support such a 
journal, we feel our work in this vicinity is fin- 
ished and the appeal made to us to assist in 
building up certain other sections of the Coast 
should not go by unheeded on our part. Before 
we make a definite decision therefore we wish to 
discover whether we are needed in this vicinity 
any longer. 



The fight in the interests of the resident artist 
is not finished by any means. Only the prelim- 
inary skirmishes have been won. There is still 
another fight we intend to begin, namely, for 
recognition of our ABLE CALIFORNIA 
TEACHERS. We think it is absolutely silly to 
go East or to Europe before a pupil is thoroughly 
ready for such a trip. Furthermore most of the 
so-called master classes by teachers who reside 
here transiently are of no value to most of the 
pupils who take advantage of such classes, for 
it is impossible to learn anything in so brief a 
time. We have here a great fight before us. The 
opera venture which is now being launched with 
Gaetano Merola at the head requires considerable 
co-operation and enthusiastic support before it 
has come to a successful conclusion. The prob- 
lem of efficient musical instruction is still one 
that needs continuous watching and stimulating. 
Indeed, there are many problems to be solved in 
California which a music journal of adequate size 
and influence can assist in launching and attain- 
ing. Among these belongs the establishment of 
a concert hall and musicians' building. 



Now, we have this proposition to make. The 
Pacific Coast Musical Review feels that it is 
wanted by the great majority of unselfish and 
broad minded members of the profession and also 
the musical public. It is true there are people 
who don't like us and who would be happy to see 
us leave. But upon investigation we find that all 
our "enemies" are such because of personal griev- 



ances that have nothing whatever to do with our 
attitude toward public matters. Either we have 
said something they didn't like, or we have 
offended a friend, or we have forgotten to make 
mention of one of their concerts, or we have done 
something they personally didn't like. We have 
not discovered ONE INSTANCE so far when 
such unfriendly attitude was ascribed to any 
opposition to some of the big problems wc have 
been discussing in these columns. 



There has been, however, a just grievance on 
the part of some of our best friends and sup- 
porters. We have not been able of late to extend 
to our patrons that service which they are en- 
titled to. To give such service regularly we need 
a bigger paper. This journal should contain 
weekly an entire page of special articles on im- 
portant musical subjects. The editorial page 
should always contain a page of discussions. We 
should have one page of European, one page of 
Eastern and one page of brief Pacific Coast news 
items. We should have a page of Studio News 
every week. We should have a page of interest- 
ing items concerning resident artists and their 
work. And last but not least we should publish 
at least one article a week from the pen of a 
distinguished artist. 



Now, all of this is possible with a paper of from 
twenty to twenty-four pages. And we can pub- 
lish such a weekly paper, if we can add THREE 
THOUSAND more subscribers to our subscrip- 
tion list and TWO HUNDRED more advertisers 
to our advertising pages. Since there are in this 
vicinity 3000 teachers, 30,000 pupils, 50,000 people 
attending symphony, chamber music, and other 
concerts and opera performances and hundreds 
of public school music teachers we feel that the 
percentage of additional support we need is so 
small that it is not impossible to secure it, pro- 
vided the profession and public is sufficiently 
interested to have a REAL music journal. In 
subsequent issues we shall outline a campaign 
to begin with our first issue in May and continue 
for three or four months. If we find that our 
services are wanted we shall stay here, although 
financially we could not hope to equal the income 
that is promised us elsewhere. If we find that 
we are not wanted any longer, there is no use 
devoting the rest of our life to a hopeless cause. 
ALFRED METZGER. 



Miss Lesta Andrews has been winning laurels in 
musicales and concerts across the bay with her lovely 
contralto voice and artistic portrayal ot lyric and dra- 
matic songs and arias. Miss Sadie Carey is here from 
Honolulu studying singing with H. B. Pasmore. She 
made a very successful appearance at the Greek Theatre 
last season. Mr. Kany is a U. C. student. He has studied 
in Vienna and is continuing with Mr. Pasmore with en- 
thusiasm for the "system." 



LOS ANGELES NEWS 

The Ebell Club gave a musical program on March 19th 
on which were presented Laura Reed Yaggy, violiniste; 
Alice Forsythe Mosher. soprano; Mrs. Guy Bush, pian- 
Iste. Illustrating the study of Russian music, Thursday 
afternoon, the 22nd inst.. Flora Myers Engell will give 
songs by Rachmaninoff and Bleichman. Mrs. W. A. 
Mabee will sing compositions of Rimsky-Korsakoff and 
Gretchaninoff. Dr. Alexis Kail will lecture with authority 
on this subject, since before his two years' residence 
here he was founder and head of the People's Conserva- 
toire of Petrograd. 

Margaret Rose Sheet, pianiste, provided the music 
for the Hermosa Beach Woman's Club at a meeting ot 
March 12th. 

Hans S. Linne has sent word to his fellow members 
of the Gamut Club that his opera, Venus in Silk, will 
receive its first presentation in Berlin, March 28th. 
Linne was a former musical conductor in this city, but 
went abroad for wider recognition. 

Constance Balfour, Harold Proctor, Edward Smythe, 
Mile. Clara Enid Deeds were soloists at the musicale 
given by the British Overseas Club on March 20th. 
Caroline M. Hermann directed her orchestra in a group 
of old English airs. 

Mischa Levitzky met with such success in his piano 
solo at the recent Symphony concert that he decided to 
return for a recital program. He was presented March 
31st in the Philharmonic Auditorium, and played selec- 
tions from Brahms, Liszt, Beethoven, Schumann, Chopin 
and Rubinstein. 

Dudley Bernays, baritone, accompanied by Edwin 
Tinney, sang tor the Wednesday Morning Cub at its 
last meeting. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



THE FLONZALEY QUARTET 

Last Sunday afternoon Scottish Rite Hall was the 
scene of a memorable musical event. The Flonzaley 
Quartet gave its only San Francisco recital this season. 
The name Flonzaley stands tor the premier string quar- 
tet; its inception and age give it such place. It is one 
of the wonders of contemporary musical affairs. A 
moment's consideration of the origin and career of the 
organization makes one realize the wonder of it. \ou 
would say it Is impossible to find four men in the world 
who are willing to submerge their personalities and for- 
get their personal interests as absolutely as is required 
of them to devote their whole time and energy to 
quartet playing. Vet this seemingly impossible thing 
is a reality in the Flonzaleys. These four men, Messrs. 
Betti Pochon, Bailly, and d'Archambeau. do nothing 
but play together. They do not play in any other organ- 
izations nor do they play as soloists. They are a 
quadernlty— a four-in-one. And .they have been at it 
for eighteen years! To be exact, it must be said that 
the original violist was replaced five years ago by 
Mr Bailly When you consider the complexity of hu- 
man nature, the demands modern lite makes upon us 
as Individuals, and the inscrutable action and reaction 
ol the thing called temperament, with which musicians 
of all people are supposed to be abundantly endowed, 
you must acknowledge this eighteen year old organiza- 
tion to be one of the wonders of the world. 

The performance of the Flonzaleys completely fulfills 
what is expected of such a unique organization. They 
play as one man. The quality of tone is absolutely 
homogeneous, the balance is perfect, and the theme or 
melody, whether given upon this or another of the tour 
instruments, always floats out with the exact force 
needed to give it proper expression. The precision is 
perfect; the nuancing and flexibility of rhythm are done 
with absolute agreement. 

The afternoon's program was very interesting, it 
began with the quartet of Arnold Bax. This work con- 
sisting of but three movements instead of the usual 
four, is ol the modern English School. Its San Francisco 
hearers found it good for it was applauded loudly and 
long and the players were recalled half a dozen times 
on it It is called Quartet in G major, and can justly 
claim that tonality; for. in spite of intricate tonal ex- 
cursions, it gives the impression of that key. Many 
modern works give no impression of tonality whatever. 
The outstanding feature of this composition is rhythm. 
The first and last movements are particularly imbued 
with exhilarating swing and accent. The middle move- 
ment, a Lento, is broadly melodious and quaint in its 

The second number on the program was the second 
Rasoumowsky Quartet of Beethoven. This work of the 
master's so-called second period, shows him m his 
full maturity. It impresses with its power and mastery. 
The reading which the Flonzaleys gave it left nothing 
to be desired. It was a great performance of a great 
work The audience recalled the performers over and 
over again until they responded with a Scherzo by 
Mendelssohn as an encore— a delicious and piquant 
performance. 

The last number on the program was another sample 
of contemporary English music— two sketches by Eu- 
gene Goosens. These sketches are music pictures. The 
first one, entitled "By the Tarn," is just what the name 
signifies. You are standing by a pool; you look into its 
depths and see the sedge and reeds that surround it. 
The picture is presented by means of tones instead of 
with pencil or brush. A curious droning accompaniment 
made out of a third is heard first in the 'cello and later 
In the first violin. There is a suave and Debussy-like 
melody. The second sketch, entitled "Jack o' Lantern," 
might be called a moving picture. Again we are looking 
upon a pool or a marsh. "Vaporous night approaches. 
The glitter and flitter of ignis fatuus dances over the 
scene. The music painter has the advantage over the 
brush painter in that he can give actual movement to 
his dancing fire. 

The recital was so well received that the players 
were recalled again and again, and added three more 
encores after the completion of the program. 

KARL RACKLE. 



NEW YORK HAILS JACOB! AS COMPOSER 

Of keen interest to the readers of the 'West, is, I am 
sure, the news of the success of Frederick Jacobi's 
symphonic poem, the Eve of St. Agnes. It had been 
heard here a short while ago, under Artur Bodansky, at 
two Carnegie Hall concerts, and was directed this time 
by Dirk Foch, who has been the leader of the City Sym- 
phony, which has Just given its first successful season 
of orchestral concerts. It had been scheduled for an 
earlier performance, but the fact of its performance in 
San Francisco, prevented, and the score fortunately 
arrived before the end of the season. It was very well 
received by a large audience, and is one of the few 
newer works to get a deserved rehearing. Critical com- 
ment was most interesting, and among some of the 
things which the various commentators wrote were the 
following. The Times "A five minutes ovation followed 
the playing of Frederick Jacobi's St. Agnes, demanding 
the composer to acknowledge the applause. "In the 
Tribune one read: "It proved interesting then (refer- 
ring to the previous performances) and so proved again, 
and it was faithful to its subject." The Evening Tele- 
gram thought it had more "charm and is built on a saner 
foundation than much of the music of younger Ameri- 
cans." Deems Taylor, in the World, commented, especial- 
ly on the clarity of the music, and on its faithfulness to 
the poem. The dilTerent divisions were easily discernible, 
and it is "well built, excellently scored, reaching a cli- 
max, though rather Straussian in its sonority, is none 
the less effective." ROSALIE HOUSMAN. 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

By Elita Huggins 

1605 The Alameda, San Jose, Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 



SAN JOSE, April 17, 1923. 
The London String Quartet gave a recital Friday eve- 
ning. April 13th, at the State Teachers' College, under 
the management of Jessica Colbert in the 1922-1923 
concert course. This is the quartet's second visit to 
San Jose, they having played here in December of 1921. 
A large and appreciative audience greeted them. The 
quartet is made up of James Levey, first violin, who is 
temporarily being replaced by Arthur Beckwith from 
London during his illness; Thomas W. Petre, second 
violin; H. Waldo-Warner, viola; C. Warwick-Evans, 
'cello. Following is the program presented: Beethov- 
en's Quartet in A major, op. 18. No. 5; Fairy Suite, The 
Pixey Ring Op. 23 (H. Waldo-Warner, the viola player); 
Three recall numbers were given, arrangements by 
Frank Bridge of two old English songs, Sally in Our 
Alley, Cherry Ripe, and for the finale a movement from 
the Peter Pan suite, by H. Walford Davies. A most 
enjoyable evening. 

Mischa Levitzki, the eminent young pianist, was the 
gue.st of Grover T. Bacon, resident manager of Kohler 
& Chase, on Saturday. He edlighted a small audience 
with an impromptu program, playing a group which in- 
cluded a Chopin Ballade, Op. 47. Valse Humoresque, 
Op. 12 (Stojowski), and several of his own compositions 
After he had finished playing these nembers, he hart 
them immediately re-enacted on the Ampico. from rolls 
he had previously made, giving him an opportunity to 
eritize his own work. Mr. Levitzki. together with 
Messrs. George Q. Chase and Leon M. Lang, of San 
Francisco, were luncheon guests of Mr. Bacon, after 
which the trio departed for Del Monte where Levitzki 
plans remaining for a short time. He expressed great 
admiration for California and tor the Santa Clara 'Valley. 
"If my work permitted it," he said, "I should make my 
home in California." 

The San Jose Music Study Club met at the home of 
Mrs. Stanley Hiller on the morning of Wednesday, April 
11th. After a business session a very interesting and 
well rendered program was presented by Mrs. Stanley 
Hiller, pianiste, and Mrs. J. Elmer Morrish, soprano. 
The program was opened with a group of compositions 
written for the harps-'chord: Gavotte from the G major 
suite, Le Tambourine (Jean Philippe Rameau) and 
Scarlatti's A Major Sonata. Mrs. Morrish then gave a 
group of three songs consisting of Be Ye In Love With 
April-tide (Ward-Stephens), Day Is Gone, (Margaret 
Lang), Spring Song (Arthur Hyde), after which Mrs. 
Hiller played Schumann's Papillion. 

Owing to the serious illness of Thomas Vincent 
Cator. composer of the score of The Beggar of Bagdad, 
which was to have been given its premier here on the 
2.ith and 26th of this month, the production of the 
opera at this time has had to be postponed, according to 
Perry Newberry, author of the libretto. Mr. Newberry 
has been coaching the cast of local people for several 
weeks, and said that while the dramatic rehearsals have 
been progressing satisfactorily, the music has been at 
a standstill, due to Mr. Cator's illness, and as there is 
no prospect of his being able to direct rehearsals of the 
singers in the immediate future, it will be impossible 
for the cast to continue work. It is hoped that San Jose 
may yet have the honor of having the premier of this 
delielitful opera before it is taken to New York for its 
professional showing by Newberry and Cator. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Shearer, late of Buffalo, N. Y., on 
the evening of Monday, April 9th, gave, at the Santa 
Cruz Congregational Church, an organ and soprano 
recital of more than usual interest. Mr. Shearer, who is 
a Scotchman, is an Associate of the Royal College of 
Organists, and a pupil of Widor. He has occupied excel- 
lent positions in Montreal and in the United States hut 
has decided to give his time to recital work. He has 
a clear, detached style, quite refreshing and different 
from the usual type of organ playing. He gave a pro- 
gram varying from Bach to Debussy. Mrs. Shearer has 
much intelligence and an excellent repertoire. Her 
voice is a pleasing one and both artists bring attractive 
personalities in their work. 

The Lyceum Club of Santa Cruz, which has recently 
finished its winter course of concerts, is negotiating with 
the most prominent impresarios of San Francisco for 
attractions for the season, 1923-24. The club is deter- 
mined to get the best for the music lovers of the town. 
Jessie Christian, coloratura soprano, and Thurlow 
Lieurance, composer of Indian music, were both on the 
recent course. 

The American Guild of Organists is to present LeRoy 
V. Brant, organist, assisted by Mrs. LeRoy V. Brant, 
mezzo-soprano, and Miss Alice Hitchcock, accompanist, 
in recital at the First Methodist Church in San Jose, 
on Monday evening. April 23rd. The recital is to be 
given for the benefit of the convention fund of the 
Guild, it being the desire of the San Jose members to 
send a delegate to the convention of organists to be 
held in southern California late in July. Among the 
numbers to be heard in the program of the evening will 
be the great G minor fugue of Bach; the Suite Gothique 
by Boellman: the Prelude to the C minor Symphony by 
Widor. together with lighter numbers. Mrs. Brant will 



Kohler & Chase 

2CitabP pauoa 
SCnabp Amptrn 



SAN JOSE HEADQUARTERS 
185 So. First Street 



ALFRED LANINI 

Expert Maker of Violins, Violas and Cellos 

With European Experience 

Artistic Repairing Rare Old Violins For Sale 

591 E. ST. JAMES STREET 

San Jose, California 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

LeRoy V. Brant, Director 

on'erM CotirMeN in .VII llrnnchCN nf MuhIc at 
All Sf.-iKe..< of -Vdv 



SA.N JOSE 



CAMKORMA 



ALLAN BACON 



Btfllnlj 



NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 
San Jose. Cal. 
Coafers Deereea. Ayiordi. CertlBontex. Conipleic Collcse 
Caaaervatory and Academic CourHCH In rinno. Violin, 
Harp, 'Cello. Voice, Harmony, Counlerpolnt. Canon and 
Pacae and Science of Munic. For parllculnrn Apply 1o 



•lute 



render Brahm's Sapphic Ode, numbers of Grieg, Ger.Tian 
and other notable composers. The artists of the eve- 
ning are all from The Institute of Music of San Jose, 
where Mrs. Brant is voice teacher. Miss Hitchcock the 
accompanist, and Mr. Brant, teacher of piano, organ and 
is also director. Mr. Brant is organist for the Trinity 
Episcopalian Church, the Scottish Rite Temple, the 
Friendship Mason Lodge, all of San Jose, and is regent 
of the San Jose sub-chapter of the organists guild, and 
has been connected in many ways with the musical 
growth of the city. 

Miss Marie Mace, teacher of music in the sixth, sev- 
enth and eighth grades at the Campbell grammar school, 
recently directed a music festival in that school. Miss 
Mace is a student of public school music at The Institute 
of Music. 

The Santa Clara County Music Teachers' Association 

he'.d its regular monthly meeting on Tuesday evening, 
April 10th. at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s new home on 
South First Street. The Music Teacher's convention to 
be held here in July was the all-absorbing topic of the 
meeting, after which a most interesting violin program 
was given by Nicoli De Lorenzo and Benjamin F. King, 
playing Bach's Double Concerto for two violins, with 
Mrs. Benjamin King at the piano. Mr. De Lorenzo fol- 
lowed this with a Bach number without piano accom- 
paniment: a fugue of the First Sonata for violin alone. 

Miss Lucille Fox, soprano, sang a group of songs at 
the meeting of the American Association of University 
Women, Saturday afternoon, April 14th at the home of 
Mrs. Wilmer J. Gross. Following is the program pre- 
sented: I Know Where I'm Goin' (.\ntrim). Wind and 
Lyre (Rogers). The Dairy Maids (La Forge), Silver 
(Victor Harris), by the Fountains (Ware). The Naughty 
Little Clock (De Koven). Miss Bernice Rose was the 
accompaniste. 

The Nevin Club met at the studio of Miss Iva Brown, 
Monday evening, April 9th. The program was in- 
tended for a strictly Nevin one, but several requests 
were played until tour extra numbers were added. A 
brief biography of Nevin was given, after which the 
following program was well interpreted: (a) Narcissus, 

(b) Rosary, Alma Reed: Barchetta, Anita Seeman; 
From suite, A Day In Venice, (a) Dawn, (b) Gondoliers, 

(c) Love Song, (d) Good-Night, Hazel Goldeen; Not- 
turnio. Miss Brown: la) Danse Negro (Scott), (b) 
Juba Dance (Dett), (c) Valse C Minor (Chopin), Valse 
G (Chopin). 

A delegation of members of the DeMolay band played 
in San Francisco, Saturday night at ceremonial of the 
order. They were directed by Edward Towner, head of 
the band department of The Institute of Music. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SCHMITZ-GAUTHIER RECITAL 

Two distinguished French artists. E. Robert Schmitz, 
brilliant young pianist, and Mme. Eva Gauthier, gittetd 
French Canadian mezzo-soprano, will give a joint recital 
at the Columbia Theatre Sunday atteinoon, April 29, at 
2:30. tor the benefit of the American Field Service 
Fellowships for French Universities. It is a singularly 
appropriate thing that the Franco-American Musical 
Society, with which both Mr. Schmitz and Mme. Gauthier 
are affiliated, should be one of the first organizations to 
sponsor the cause of the American Field Service Fellow- 
ships for French Universities, for one of tSe aims of this 
society is the establishment of a better musical relation- 
ship between France and America, expressed through 
the American Music Library which it maintains in Paris 
at 15 Boulevard des Italiens, where foreign conductors 
may obtain American scores, which had hitherto been 
unavailable, or too expensive to permit purchase in 
quantity. 

Schmitz is known to music lovers of San Francisco 
by reason of his appearance here two years ago with 
the symphony orchestra, when the brilliance of his 
performance took musical circles by storm and resulted 
in his returning to the city a few weeks later to give 
two more recitals. During the war, Schmitz served as 
a captain of infantry, and received the French war 
cross lor gallantry in action. Mme. Gauthier, who is 
known to San Franciscans by reputation only, is making 
her first apearance here. Her beautiful mezzo voice 
has been heard in many other parts of the world, how- 
ever, and everywhere she has been acclaimed. 

The program to be given in San Francisco by Mme. 
Gauthier and Mr. Schmitz promises to be an unusually 
interesting one. It is as fol'ows: 




EVA GAIITHIER 

The Gifted Freneh-Canailliin Mezxo-Soprano. Who 
AVllI Mnke Her First Appearance in Thi» City 
at the Columbia Theatre, Sunday Afternoon. 
April 2»th, In a Joint Recital With E. Robert 
Hehmitz, the DiMtlnguiNhed French rianlMt 

Carnival (Schumann), E. Robert Schmitz: Folk Songs: 

(a) The Three Ravens (English), (John Ireland), (bl 
Reynardine (Irish), (Herbert Hughes), (c) Ye Banks 
and Braes (Scotch), (Alexandre Georges), (d) The Night- 
ingale (American), (Howard Brockwayl, Aria — Una 
Voce Poco Fa (Rossini), (Barber of Seville), Eva Gau- 
thier; Nocturne, C minor (Chopin), Etude No. 5, Op. 10 
(Chopin), St. Francis de Paule Walking on the Waves 
(Liszt), E. Robert Schmitz; American: (a) So-fei Gath- 
ering Flowers (Charles T. Griffes), (Wang-Chang-Ling), 

(b) Wings of Night (Wintter Watts), (Sara Teasdale), 

(c) Leila (Bainbridge Crist), (From the Burmese by 
Powys Mather), Eva Gauthier; Chimes of Saint Patrick's 
(Emerson Whithorne), Times Square (Emerson Whi- 
thorne), Jeux d'eau (Ravel), Toccata (Saint-Saens), E. 
Robert Schmitz; French: (a) L'isle Heureuse (E. Cha- 
brier). (b) Green (Verlaine), (C. Debussy), (c) Chanson 
triste (H. Duparc), (d) Je te Veux (Valse Chantee). 
(Erik Satie-Shield), Eva Gauthier. 

The late Edward H. Krehbiel, of the New York Tri- 
bune, dean of American musical critics, devoted to Mme. 
Gauthier an entire chapter of his book, "Eighth Notes," 
which he completed shortly before his death. 

By H. T. Parker, musical critic of the Boston Tran- 
script, Mme. Gauthier is hailed as "the high priestess 
Of modern song. ' Though her understanding of mod- 



ernism in music is unequalled, she is gifted with a 
limitless aesthetic outlook which enables her to inter- 
pret successfully the music of various periods and 
schools. 

Mme. Gauthier's rich voice is so tuned and colorful 
as to express the most exquisite emotional demands 
made upon it. from the lyrics of Beethoven, through the 
fertile field of modern French, Italian and Russian vocal 
music, to the mysterious and alluring folk-music of the 
Orient and the Malay Straits, of which she has made a 
special study at first hand, and is regarded as the fore- 
most exponent thereof. 

Mme. Gauthier was born in Canada, the daughter of 
an astronomer of note. She received her musical train- 
ing in that country, and in France and England. She 
has travelled throughout Europe as well as through the 
Orient and other parts of the world. 

Tickets tor this recital are on sale at popular prices 
at Sherman, Clay & Company's store, and at the Colum- 
bia Theatre. The artists will appear also in a recital 
at Wheeler Hall. University of California, Berkeley on 
Saturday night, April 28. These two recitals mark the 
completion of a tour of the country, the proceeds series 
being devoted entirely to the endowment fund of the 
American Field Service Fellowships for French Universi- 
ties, and to the maintenance of the Franco-.^meiican 
Musical Society's Library of American Music in Paris. 



LA FORGE-BERUMEN CONCERTS 

Two public concerts were recently included in the 
activities of the La Forge-Berumen Studios. The sixth 
concert in the series of Noonday Musicales given at the 
Aeolian Hall, took place last Friday, April 6th at 12 
o'clock. Erin Ballard, the talented young pianist, gave 
a group of solos including Harmonious Blacksmith by 
Handel and Novelette by Schumann and was received 
with much enthusiasm. Miss Ora Hyde sang an Aria 
from La Forza del Destino by 'Verdi. Miss Hyde's voice 
is a soprano of lovely quality and she sings with good 
style. 

Another very talented young pianist. Elinor Warren, 
from Los Angeles, delighted the audience with Prae- 
ludieum by Mac Dowell, Meditation by Tschaikowsky 
and On the Mountain by Grieg. Irene NicoU, from 
San Francisco, who has a contralto voice of unusual 
depth and range sang Colombine by Polwdoski, Un 
doux lien Delbruck and Le Soir and Le Captif by Gret- 
chaninow. Florence Barbour again demonstrated her 
worth as accompanist. Helen Schafmeister gave a fine 
account of herself by displaying splendid sense of 
rhythm and lovely touch in Schumann-Liszt "Dedica- 
tion." She also appeared with the Duo Art Piano play- 
ing "Dance Negre Op. 58. No. 5" by Cyril Scott. 

Arthur Kraft and Lawrence Tibbett closed the pro- 
gramme with "Solenne in quest' ora" from "La Forza 
del Destino" with Florence Barbour at the piano. Their 
voices blend beautifully in this duet and they won much 
applause. 

The annual Mail concert given by Mr. Frank La Forge 
took place last Sunday evening. April 8th at the DeWitt 
Clinton High School. The piano numbers were the 
contributions of Erin Ballard and Elinor Warren. 
Arthur Kraft, tenor, with Kathryn Kerin at the piano, 
gave Scarlatti's Gia il sole dal Gange, O Sleep why dost 
thou leave me? by Handel and Pastorale by Veracini. 
He also sang in his usual finished style Mr. La Forge's 
Like the Rosebud and To a Messenger and Le Reve 
iManon) of Massenet and II Ne-lge by Bemberg. Esther 
Malmrose delighted the audience with an interesting 
group which included O quand je dors. Comment disai- 
ent-ils? and Die Lorelli of Liszt. Miss Malmrose pos- 
sesses a beautiful soprano voice and gives fine inter- 
pretations. 

Lawrence Tibbett, from Los Angeles, baritone, created 
quite a sensation with his beautiful voice, excellent 
interrretation and clear diction. He sang Retreat and 
Before the Crucifix by La Forge and Le Soir and Le 
Captif of Gretchaninow, assisted admirably by Kathryn 
Kerin at the piano. He closed the progianime with a 
dramatic rendition of Eri Tu from Un Ballo in Maschera 
of Verdi. Verna Rabey, coloratura, delighted the audi- 
ence with Come unto these yellow Sands of La Forge 
and Voci di primavera of Strauss. 



The first of a series of Senior Recitals in the College 
of the Pacific attracted a large crowd in the auditorium 
on the evening of Tuesday, April 10th. Bonnylee Stew- 
art, pianist, and Agnes Ward, mezzo-soprano, presented a 
short, varied and interesting program in a very com- 
mendable fashion. Miss Stewart exhibited a very fluent 
technique, a remarkable memory, and a fine musical 
equipment. Miss Ward has a mellow voice of wide range, 
excellent intonation and smooth production. The follow- 
ing is the program: Adieu Forets (Jeanne d'Arc), 
(Tschaikowsky), Miss Ward; (a) Chromatic Fantasy 
and Fugue (Bach), (b) Prelude (from Prelude, Aria and 
Finale), (Cesar Frank), Miss Stewart: (a) None But the 
Lonely Heart (Tschaikowsky), (b) In the Shadow of 
the Bamboo Fence (Fay Foster), (c) Spring's a Love- 
able Lady (Elliot), (d) With the Angels (Sibella), (e) 
Love is the Wind (McFadyen), Miss Ward; (a) Etude, 
Op. 10, No. 10 (Chopin), (b) Etude, Op. 25. No. 11 
(Chopin), (c) The Marionette Show (GoDssens), Miss 
Stewart. 



ANIL DEER 

COLORATURA SOPRANO AND 
VOICE SPECIALIST 

Announces 

that owing to changes in Studio schedule 

necessitated by her concert engagements 

she will remain in San Francisco during 

JUNE— JULY— AUGUST 

STUDENTS' WAITING LIST 

NOW OPEN 

Address: 79 Central Ave., San Francisco 



EDOUARD DERU 

VIOLINIST TO THEIR MAJESTIES, 

THE KING AND QUEEN 

OF BELGIUM 

Principal Assistant to Eugene Ysaye, for 

Many Years Professor of Violin at 

the Liege Conservatory of Music 

Will Be in San Francisco This Summer and 

Will Accept Pupils in Violin and 

Chamber Music Beginning 

August 15th 

For particulars regarding terms and qualifica. 
ions, as well as enlisting, address Beatrice 
Anthony, 1000 Union Street, San Francisco. Tel 
Franklin 142. Oakland Tel. Lakeside 4133. 



Music Composers, Attention! 

W^E OFFER THE FOLLOWING PRIZES: 

$150.00 for the most attractive unpublished 
anthem submitted. 

$100.00 for the second most attractive un- 
published anthem submitted. 

$75.00 for the third most attractive unpub- 
lished anthem submitted. 
All anthems submitted must be in our 

liaiids not later than July 1, 1923. 

Send for our special announcement folder 

outlining all conditions and rules of the 

competition. 

Lorenz's 5th Anthem Competition 

We publish about two hundred anthems a year. By 
our method of distribution, each anthem is sune by 
not less than 20,000, in some cases, by as many as 
35,000 singers within about two months of publication. 
The demand for so many new anthems every year 
constitutes a large opportunity for anthem writers, 
and this anthem contest is our earnest invitation to 



LORENZ PUBLISHING CO. 



216 W. 5th St.. Dayton. O. 70 E. 45th St., New York 
21« S. Wabash Ave., Chicago 



The Metropolitan put on the last revival of the season 
when they added L'Africaine to their lists. They gave 
it a sumptuous production, and a superb cast. Gigli. 
Ponselle. Rothier. Jidur and Queena Mario made up 
the principal characters and Bodansky conducted. The 
staging was sumptuous, there was a ballet in the fourth 
act and all other details were on the same scale Of 
the music itself there is little to say, except that it is 
old-fashioned overlong and has a few favorite melodies 
which seemed to please the large audience. It gave the 
leading singers ample opportunity to be vocally effective, 
and they made the most of their tasks. But why such 
antiques when Meistersinger and such are clamoring 
for a hearing? It is to be hoped that Gatti will take a 
hint from the visiting German companies who are pack- 
ing the theatres with just that which undoubtedly the 
public want. 



HAZEL JOHNSON 

COLORATURA SOPRANO 

PUPIL OF DOMENICO BRESCIA AND FERNANDO MICHELENA 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND SOLFEGGIO 



studio: — Kohler & Chase BIdg., — Kearny 5454 



Residence Studio: —2720 Filbert St., — West 816z 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



I 



The Most Significant Fact of All 

[Kegardtng THE AM PICO] 
T would be the natural thing for a concert pianist to 
record his playing for the reproducing device used 
in the piano he uses in concert — not only because of his 
preference for the piano itself, but because he is usually 
bound to the manufacturer by close ties of friendship. 
To either break or strain those ties takes courage — the 
courage of strong conviction. It is significant to note 
the large number of master pianists who have broken 
all precedents in the world of music by recording their 
art for the Ampico in preference to the reproducing 
device used in the piano they use in concert. The fol- 
lowing is a partial list of them : 

SERGEI RACHMANINOFF 
MISCHA LEVITZKI OLGA SAMAROFF 

ERNEST VON DOHNANYI 
GEORGE McMANUS RICHARD STRAUSS 

FANNY BLOOMFIELD ZEISLER 
YOLANDA MERO GERALDINE FARRAR 

* Rachmaninoff 

"I have never before recorded for any reproducing instrument. 
Now I have played my works for the Ampico because of its absoUite 
faithfulness, and its capacity to preserve beautiful tone painting. 
It goes far beyond any reproducing piano in these particulars, which 
a pianist must demand in considering a perpetuation of his art." 

Sergei Rachmaninoff. 

*Levitzki 

"For a number of years I have been keenly interested in the possi- 
bilities of the Reproducing Piano. I believe I have heard them all, 
not once, but many times, but until I heard the Ampico, I never 
found one that I thought adequately duplicated the artist's playing. 

"It is for this reason that I have decided to record my playing 
for the Ampico exclusively." 

Mischa Levitzki. 




"Positively Uncanny" 

Says A Ijred Hertz, director of the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra 

"I surely was delighted with the excellent performance. The 
mysterious way of starting the instrument was positively uncanny. 
I enjoyed enormously the whole recital, as I always do when 
Godowsky plays. I am usually against encores of the same selec- 
tion, but I tiioroughly enjoyed each repetition of Godowsky's playing 
as given last night by the Knabe Ampico." 




At Carmel-by-the-Sea 

At this charming spot on the California Coast is to 
be found what is probably the most notable colony of 
artists, writers and musicians in the world. No com- 
munity could possibly be found, more exacting in its 
standards, more critical in its judgment. The interest 
of this group centers in their club, where within the 
past month they have installed a KNABE. With all 
the world to choose from, they have chosen this com- 
panion of great masters to be the center of their own 
activities. 

Henceforth this House shall 
be known by this sign, 

Kohler & Chase 



San Francisco 
Sacramento 



KNABE AMPICO 



Oakland 
San Jose 



CHALIAPIN COMING IN MAY 

Although the first concert to be given 
in San Francisco by Feodor Chaliapin, 
the great Russian Basso, is still a month 
off. Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer, under 
whose direction the great singer will ap- 
pear here at the Exposition Auditorium 
on Sunday afternoon. May 20th and Mon- 
day night. May 28th, announces that the 
advance mail order reservations indicate 
that both of Chaliapin's appearances will 
bring to the great hall record breaking 
crowds. The successes which this bril- 
liant Russian has achieved in the past 
year in the United States has established 
an entirely new mark in the matter of 
the public's appreciation of a master 
singer. Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer 
will continue to receive mail orders for 
the Chaliapin concerts and announces 
that the regular ticket sale will com- 
mence at the box office of Sherman, Clay 
& Co., on Monday morning, April 30th. 



STANFORD UNIVERSITY MUSIC 
Spring Quarter, 1923 — Sunday, April 8. 
at 4 P. M. — Warren D. Allen, University 
Organist assisted by Sara Bibby Brown, 
soprano rendered the following pro- 
gram: Offertory for Easter Day (Ba- 
tiste), The Bells of St. Anne de Beaupre 



Miss Deer adds zest and spirit to her 
performance by giving her hearers an 
opportunity to grasp the inner meaning 
of any song she may render. Fine enun- 
ciation in English as well as other langu- 
ages and a certain knack of emphasizing 
the right sentiment in a right way, never 
exaggerating, never employing grotesque 
extravagances, and yet utilizing a certain 
energy of action and dramatic gesture 
which assists greatly in lending charm 
to her interpretations. 

Miss Deer furthermore does not select 
trash for her programs. She employs 
the classic school as well as some modem 
works. She appeals to the serious music 
lovers as well as to those enjoying a 
lighter literature. But everything she 
does, whether it be heavy or light, she 
devotes to it that care and precision of 
interpretation which lends the song the 
invaluable support of individualism. We 
know of no artists appearing before music 
clubs who are more serious, who take 
greater delight in their work, who possess 
greater natural qualifications and who 
are better fitted to give pleasure than 
Miss Deer, and we trust that she may be 
successful in securing that public recogni- 
tion which her unquestionab'e artistry 
and pleasing personality so richly deserve. 
A. M. 




ANIL DOBR 

The DellKhtful Callfornlii Soprano Soloint Who Scored Well 
Merited Trlumphx Before Mnalc Cluba of the North- 
neat ThiH SeaNon and Whone ProKroinn Are Well 
Compiled and ArtlHtically Interpreted 



(Alexander Russell) ; Aria from "The 
Messiah" (Handel); Dawn, Night, (Cyril 
Jenkins): Christus resurrexit (Oreste 
Ravanello). Tuesday, April 10, at 4:15 
P. M. — The organ numbers from Sun- 
day's program will be repeated. Thurs- 
day, April 12, at 4:15 P. M. — Hosanna! 
(Chorus magnus) (Th. Dubois); In 
Friendship's Garden (Rollo F. Maitland); 
Quasi lento (from the Sonata for violon- 
cello and piano) (G. Guy Ropartz) ; With- 
in a Chinese Garden (R. S. Stoughton); 
Salutation (Harrison C. MacDougall). 



ANIL DEER'S VOCAL ART 

Fine Judgment In Program Selection and 

Interpretation — Refinement of Style 

and Temperament 

The other day we had the opportunity 
to hear for the first time the excellent 
vocal accomplishments of Anil Deer, a 
California cantatrice who is not as well 
known as her artistic merit justifies. Miss 
Deer belongs to those staunch disciples of 
the art who devote themselves to their 
work with every ounce of energy and 
enthusiasm at their disposal. The pos- 
sessor of a beautiful voice, well placed 
and used with the utmost discrimination 



GJERDRUM'S PUPILS RECITALS 

Two recitals of unusual interest have 
been given by pupils of Henrik GJerdrum 
this month. On March 9th, eight of the 
youngest piano pupils gave a program at 
the studio of Mr. GJerdrum, 2321 Jackson 
street and on March 16th, ten pupils in 
the intermediate grade gave a recital at 
the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Ramac- 
ciotti, 2310 Steiner street. Mrs. Lillian 
Hoffmyer Heyer. mezzo-soprano, assisted 
with several songs and her beautiful sing- 
ing was greatly appreciated by the large 
number of friends gathered. The pro- 
gram given by the pupils was on the lat- 
ter occasion as follows: Rondo (from 
Sonata C major), (Mozart), Adela Gant- 
ner) : Elfin Dance (Keats), Helen Gra- 
ham; Brisie d' ete (Sanderson), Bessie ■ 
O'Shaughnessy; Impromptu Valse (Bach- 
mann). John and Vallejo Gantner; Etude 
in G minor (Heller). Dorothy Dunnigen; 
Pizzicati (Sylvia), (Delibes), Constance 
Ramacciotti; Dance a la Gavotte (Johan- 
ning), Lucinda Hanify and Maud Weiden- 
muller; Mazurka (Borowski), John Gant- 
ner; Am Strande (Posca), Maud Wleden: 
muUer; Scarf Dance (Chaminade), Her- . 
man Goldberg. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



RAISA NOT TO SING SUNDAY 

Manager Selby C. Oppenheimer has just received ad- 
vices from Madame Rosa Raisa. the soprano of the 
Chicago Opera Company who was scheduled to give 
recitals at the Curran Theater the next two Sunday 
afternoons, that a sudden necessary switch in the ar- 
rangements of her tour would make it an absolute im- 
possibility for her to reach San Francisco in time to 
appear next Sunday. Raisa wires that she hppes to ar- 
range her Eastern engagements in such a way that she 
may be able to fulfill her San Francisco engagement of 
April 29th, but even that is more or less uncertain at the 
present time, Raisa would have faced a big crowd at the 
Curran Theater, Sunday, but as Oppenheimer says there 
is nothing to do but accept the dictum of the prima- 
donna and consider the first concert at least cancelled. 
Those holding tickets for this event may redeem them 
at Sherman, Clay & Co. any day during the week or at 
the Curran Theatre on Sunday afternoon. 



THE LONDON STRING QUARTET CONCERT 

It was gratifying to note a large audience attending 
the concert of the London String Quartet, which took 
place at the Plaza Theater on Tuesday evening, April 
17th. If there is any means by which to discover the 
real musical status of a community it is by the at- 
tendance at chamber music concerts. And yet the 
excellent character of this organization and the splen- 
did reputation it enjoys should have attracted a crowded 
house and would have done so if the publicity pre- 
ceding the concert would have been in accordance with 
the merit of the event. 

The London String Quartet consists of the following 
artists; James Levey, first violin; Thomas W. Petre, 
second violin; H. Waldo Warner, viola, and C. Warwick- 
Evans, cello. Arthur Beckwith from London is tempo- 
rarily replacing Mr. Levey during his illness. The pro- 
gram presented on this occasion was as follows: Quar- 
tet in A major. Op. 18 No. 5 (Beethoven); Quartet in 
A No. 8 (Biscay! (J. B. McEwing), dedicated to the 
London String Quartet; Quartet in F, Op. 96 (Negro) 
(Dvorak). 

While it is Impossible to definitely decide which artist 
or musical organization is the best in the world there 
is no difficulty in deciding whether or not there can be 
a better one. We do not hesitate to say that it is im- 
possible to interpret chamber music more effectively 
more tastefully and conscientiously than is done by the 
London String Quartet. Particularly admirable is the 
tone quality of the organization and the "oneness" of 
Its phrasing and expression of sentiments. There is a 
certain authority in interpretation of the classics as 
well as the ultra modern style. While we found the 
McEwen work somewhat erratic in its purpose, the in- 
terpretation given It by the musicians was sufficiently 
Interesting to give prestige to the work. 

We were specially delighted with the interpretation of 
Beethoven which proved a very scholarly and at the 
same time a very individualistic and authoritative style 
of interpretation. The enthusiasm which the audience 
exhibited was indeed well justified. 



KOHLER & CHASE HOLD ANNUAL MEETING 

The annual meeting of the firm of Kohler & Chase, 
which took place at Knabe Hall of the Kohler & Chase 
building on Wednesday evening, April 4th, was a most 
pretentious affair. Department heads and employes 
numbering more than a hundred people were assembled 
and actually commemorated the anniversary of Leon 
M. Lang's connection with the firm. Among those 
present were George Q. Chase and Mrs. Quincey A. 
Chase and Mr. McCormick, vice-president of the First 
National Bank. A number of interesting addresses were 
made in which the executive ability and skill of Mr. 
Lang as manager and organizer were extolled. Mr. 
Chase paid a specially fine compliment to Mr. Lang's 
efficiency. 

Mr. Bacon, manager of the San Jose store of Kohler 
&^ Chase, was the chairman of the meeting and intro- 
duced the various speakers with that knowledge of their 
standing which only can be had. through thorough ac- 
.quaintance with them. Lang, in his address, emphasized 
the various qualifications that make up fine salesmanship 
and he placed loyalty to the firm and satisfying the 
customers above all else. The various department heads. 
Including Mr. Davis, Mr. Harlan, Mr. Bray, Mr. Chamber- 
lain, Mr. Blake and others whose names we can not 
recall contributed to the Interest of the occasion by 
speaking on subjects associated with the business of the 
firm. One keynote could be observed throughout the 
meeting, namely, that the house of Kohler & Chase has 
never enjoyed greater prosperity than it does right 
now, and everyone seems to be eager to contribute even 
more the next year. 



MADAME SHERRY AT THE RIVOLi OPERA HOUSE 

Beginning next Monday evening the Hartman-Stein- 
dorff Co. will present the ever delightful comedy Mme. 
Sherry. Those who are already familiar with the fun 
and music of this sensation of former days need no 
further recommendation in order to attend these pro- 
ductions. Those not familiar with the entertainment 
may well take the word of us who know it that they 
will make no mistake to set aside a date tor attending 
the Rivoli. Ferris Hartman will have a role specially 

*uited^ to his splendid sense of humor, while in Myrtle 
Dingwall the company will have a prima donna whose 

• charm and fine voice will make many new converts to 
the Hivoli cause. All the members of the company will 
have fine chances to be at their best. 



JOINT RECITAL 

E. Robert Schmitz 

Eminent French Pianist 

Eva Gauthier 

French-Canadian Mezzo-Soprano 

(First Time in San Francisco! 

COLUMBIA THEATER 

SUNDAY AFTERNOON, APRIL 29, AT 2:30 
TICKETS— $2.00, $1.50, $1,00, SOc. 

.\o «nr Tnx 

On Sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s, San Francisco, 
and at Columbia Theater 
Proceeds of this recital will be devoted to endowment fund of American Field 
Service Fellowships for French Universities, and to the Franco-American Musical 
Society's Library of American Music in Paris. 

Mr, SrhnilK and Mine. Gauthier will elve a recital at Wheeler Hall. 
Berkeley, Saturday Kvenlnfc. -\l»ril an 



RESIDENT COMPOSERS' PROGRAM AT FAIRMONT 

The Pacific Musical Society will give a program con- 
sisting of works of resident composers at the Fairmont 
Hotel on Thursday evening, April 26th, and judging from 
the selection much care has been taken to choosee from 
among the best. Among the names represented are Uda 
Waldrop, Albert Elkus, Domenico Bresc;a, Dorothy 
Crawford, Antonio De Grassi. and Mary Carr Moore. It 
is also interesting to note that some of the composers 
will preside at the piano, namely, Dorothy Crawford, 
Albert Elkus and Uda Waldrop. The solists will include 
Antonio de Grassi, violinist, Anna Young, soprano, 
Jascha Schwarzmann, cello, and Marguerite Raas- 
Waldrop. Mrs. Moore's composition consists of a trio 
for women's voices to be sung by Mrs. A. W. Hilbach, Mrs. 
Ward Dwight, and Mrs. H. M. Olsen. Mrs. H. F. Stoll 
will be at the piano. Signer De Grassi's work will be in- 
terpreted by the Berkeley String Quartet. The com- 
plete program will be as follows: 

Trio for Women's Voices (Mary Carr Moore) Mrs. 
Alfred W. Hilbach, Mrs. Ward Dwight, Mrs. H. M. 
Olsen, Mrs. H. F. Stoll at the piano; violin compositions 
(Domenico Brescia). .Antonio de Grassi; The L^nknown, 
Girl Climbing Ladder, A Melody of Old Design, Query, 
Oh, to be in England (Dorothy Crawford!, .4nna Young. 
Dorothy Crawford at the piano; Concertino (Paraphrase 
of Sonata No. 3. (Ariosti) (Albert Elkus), Jascha 
Schwarzmann, Albert Elkus at the piano; Spray, The 
Dream Ship. When You Go. A Fairy Lullaby. Spring 
Night (Uda Waldrop), Marguerite Raas-Waldrop. Uda 
Waldrop at the piano; Menuetto all Antica. Prologue of 
Nature (Antonio de Grassi) from Spirit of Sempervireus, 
Berkeley String Quartet — Antonio de Grassi, Robert 
Rourke, Edward "Towler. Willem Dehe, assisted by 
Mertianna Toweler at the piano. 



BELGIAN VIOLINIST TO COME HERE 

Fdouard Deru, the famous Belgian violinist, will be 
in San Francisco and will accept pupils beginning August 
15th. He is violinist to the King and Queen of Belgium, 
and professor at the celebrated Liege Conservatory of 
Music. Until the last few years Mr. Deru was associ- 
ated with Eugene Ysaye in Brussells as his principal 
assistant and concert master and associate conductor 
of his orchestra. The two Belgian violinists have often 
been heard in concerted works in Paris. Brussels, Lon- 
don and New York. Naturally San Francisco would be 
most fortunate to be able to keep such a distinguished 
artist and great teacher as one of her musical colony. 
All information and arrangeemnts for lessons may be 
obtained from Miss Beatrice Anthony, 1000 Union street, 
or telephone Franklin 142. Oakland students may ad- 
dress her at 744 Lakeshore avenue or telephone Lake- 
side 4133. 



JOSEPH BONNET'S ORGAN RECITAL 

Joseph Bonnet, the eminent French organist, gave an 
excellent recital at the Exposition Auditorium on Wed 
nesday evening, April 11th, under the auspices of tlie 
Mayor and Board of Supervisors, and under the di- 
rection of the Auditorium Committee — J. Emmet Hay- 
den, chairman; Charles Powers and Edwin G. Bath. 
Although several thousand people were in attendance 
the excellence of the concert justified a crowded house. 
Mr. Bonnet is, according to our ideals, one of the 
greatest organists of the time. His manipulation of the 
stops, his skill in pedalling, his splendid dramatic power, 
his fine knack of attaining thrilling climaxes and his 
judicious use of the swell pedal are among the fore- 
most features of his virtuosity. We enjoyed every 
number and so did the large audience. 

Charles F. BuUotti, tenor, was the soloist and he surely 
reflected honor upon our resident artists by his beautiful 
voice of even quality and smooth timbre and his in- 
telligent interpretation, together with his appealing mode 
of vocal declamation. He was justly entitled to the 
ovation he received. Uda Waldrop played the accom- 
paniments in his best mood He thoroughly supported 
the soloist with every ounce of artistry and musicianly 
judgment. ALFRED METZGER. 



The Dominican School of Music of San Rafael has 
been doing wonderful good for music in Marin County. 
Its concert and lecture course for the season of 1922- 
1923 proved a great incentive for the art both among 
the students and the public. During this month Mischa 



Levitzky, the London String Quartet and the Arntzenius 
Sisters, the latter in folk songs and dances, have de- 
lighted large audiences in the beautiful new auditorium 
of the Dominican College. This evening Jean MacMlllan, 
dramatic reader will be heard. For May the following 
announcements are made: Wednesday afternoon at 4 
o'clock. May 2, lecture; May 5, Saturday evening, Frank 
Thompson, Dickens program; May 12th, Saturday even- 
inf, Kajetan Attl, harpist; May 19, Saturday evening, 
Theodore Maynard, lecture on Francis Thompson. 

Herman Heller, the well-known orchestral conductor, 
founder of the Sunday morning concerts at the California 
Theatre and one of the most energetic exploiters of the 
best of music for the public, has been engaged by Sid 
Grauman for the Metropolitan Theatre in Los Angeles. 
He will have an orchestra of sixty-five men. Mr. Heller 
attracted crowded houses on Sunday mornings to the 
California for four years and we feel certain that he will 
duplicate his triumph in Los Angeles. He was the first 
musician to engage soloists of international reputation 
at photoplay theatres. He has always stood for the best 
music being none too good for the masses an<; one of his 
reasons for leaving San Francisco is due to the fact that 
the photoplay houses are committed to jazz. We don't 
blame him. The Metropolitan Theatre has a seating 
capacity of 4000, being the largest motion picture house 
west of New York. 



Miss Lillian Gtaser, for ten months prima donna 
soprano of the Hartman-Stelndortf Co., four of which 
were spent in Oakland and six in San Francisco, has 
decided to return East. She has been asked by De 
Wolff Hopper to again join his forces in a revival of the 
Gilbert and Sullivan operas and it is more than likely 
that she will accept this offer. During the time of her 
engagement with the Hartman-Steindorff Company Mlsg 
Glaser enjoyed much popularity because of her excellent 
voice and charming appearance. She has sung in from 
twenty to thirty operas and thus has acquired a splendid 
repertoire. During the Oakland engagement the operas 
were changed every week while in San Francisco the 
changes were every two weeks. After a vacation iu 
Southern California Miss Glaser will go East by which 
time she will have come to a decision whether to join 
the De Wolff Hopper forces or appear under other 
auspices. 

The San Francisco Music Teachers' Association will 
hold their regular monthly meeting on Tuesday evening, 
April 24th, at the Twentieth Cetnury Club House, 271^ 
Derby street, Berkeley, when they will he the guests of 
the Alameda County Music Teachers' Association. A 
splendid program will be presented by Mrs. E. E. Bniner, 
soprano, Frank Carroll Giffen, tenor, and John C. Man- 
ning, pianist. 

Miss Margaret Bruntsch, the distinguished contralto 
soloist, who has made such an excellent impression since 
her return from Europe, will give a program for the 
Adelphian Club of Alameda on Tuesday evening, April 
24th. She has selected a very representative array of 
vocal compositions and she will be assisted on this oc- 
casion by Alexander Saslvasky, violinist. 

Joseph George Jacobson's intermediate classes of 
pupils gave a recital at their teacher's studio, 2833 Sac- 
ramento street, on Friday, March 30th. Those who ap- 
peared on this occasion were: Antoinette Ratbman, 
Vera Aldestein. Ivonne Brand, Enid Tanslow, Iris Rosen- 
baum, Melba Golumb and Sadie Rabinovich. Myrtl^ 
Harriet Jacobs, a talented eleven-year-old pupil of Mr. 
Jacobson, played on Sunday, April 1, at the Granada 
Theatre and surprised her audience with her clever 
interpretation and technic. She was heartily applauded 
and responded with an encore. 

Bernard Joseph Katz, a very gifted and precocious 
piano student of Louis Felix Raynaud, gave an excellent; 
program at the Greek Theatre of the ITnlversity of Cali- 
fornia on Sunday afternoon. March 18, which occasion 
was one of the regular Half Hours of Music. The young 
pianist played compositions by Mendelssohn, Bach, 
Mayo, Chopin, Amani, Leschetltzky and Rachmaninoff 
and enthused the large audience in attendance with the 
fervor of his interpretations and the fluency of his 
technic. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

SHERMAN DANBY, REPRESENTATIVE AND CORRESPONDENT 

Assisted by Miss Lioyd Dana and Miss Mildred Aiexander, Los Angeies; Miss Penelope Newkirl<; Hollywood; Mrs. Helen Wood, Pasadena. 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: SUITE 447 DOUGLAS BUILDING, 257 SO. SPRING STREET, TELEPHONE 820-302 

Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL CALENDAR 



MONDAV, APRII- 2:!ril 

Quartette Klx-H 

TUESDAY. AI'HII. a4;l 

Rnlxn-Klnilni reeilnl IMillliiirnioiii.- 

Haxel EInell. recital ru»iiil.iiii 

John Smullmiin. Charles Wak.-ll.Id 



Koelln 



Ha 



I lull. 



Mil 



Oranice County Syiuiiln 



Ea^l ■*leeke 



The Los Angeles Trio at their fifth concert gave us 
some of the finest ensemble playing of the season. A 
trio must needs be fine especially one which includes 
pian . but the magnificent artistry of May MacDonild 
Hoie, pianiste and founder of the org uiization. makes 
of the piano the soul of this trio 'nstead of a metallic 
n urderer of the more gent'e stringed instruments. The 
program wcs: Trio No 1 G Major (Haydn); Sonata for 
Piano and ViolDncello, Op. 19 G Minor (Rachmaninoff); 
Trio C Minor Op. 108 (Brnhii s). 

This is gay and delightful Haydn. Music has not yet 
concerned itself with effect, rather was it as simple an 
expresficn of love and gratitude as the worship of local 
deities an ong the rural simpliutles of early Greece. 
The quality of Luboviski's playing, of classical tradition, 
invaiiably resrecting the sc-re, yet endawing it with 
the passion i f a true musician, comes at each hearing as 
a fresh surprise. 

What a feeling of age. of weariness, one experiences 
in this Rachmaninoff Sonata! It was a good program 
arrangement that ed us directly from Haydn, the age 
of innocence, in whom loveliness bubbles up unconsci- 
ously as tr m s me clear, exhuberant flowing spring, at 
cnce into the troubled beauty of Rachmaninoff s dream. 




Fitzgerald's for the Advancement of Music 

NELL LOCKWOOD 

Nell Lockwood, Contralto, who has been delighting Los Angeles 
audiences with her recitals during the winter, will appear in 
concert at the Mary Louise Tea Room for the Professional 
Woman's Club on April 23. In this concert— ai in all of her 
recitals and in her home — she will use the sweet toned 

KNABE 





HILL STREET '^^^ AT 7S^7-T29 

Los Angeles 



An K.xeuiplary EuNenible OrKanixaliun Which iM 

Delif^htine \mh AngrelCH MunIc L.overH With ItH 

Splendid FrogrraiuH — The PerHonnel iH .May 

MneDonald Hope. I'lano, Calnion Lu- 

bovlMky. Violin, and llya BronMon, 

Cello 

What a life, llya Bronson's cello made live in our ears — 
a despairing dream — a life which has no contact with 
nature on the surface, a subterranean river flowing 
through caverns of unearthly beauty, lighted fitful'y with 
phosphorescent flame. All is a sad illusion yet it 
breathes the passion of a strong nature. To a man with 
this in his soul, outward life could have little signifi- 
cance. Musically, the beauty of the sonata is largey 
contained in the piano chords and their unusual resolu- 
tions. The melody is a string on which the chords are 
hung like darkly gleaming jewels. 

In the Brahms trio the powers of each artist were 
called upon.. Brahms brings out a string quality that 
delights the ear of your true lover of Chamber Music. 
It was here. Undoubtedly, we cannot give too much 
credit to these three musicians. They manage to come 
before their audience so thoroughly prepared that they 
can lose themselves in the compositions, and the choice 
of program is invariably very high. LLOYD DANA. 

G. H. O'Brien, of New York city, is supervising a series 
of four Spring Morning Musicales which are to be given 
at the Ambassador Hotel Thursdays, beginning April 
19th, at 11 A. M. The first program will be given by 
Viola Ellis, contralto, and Robert Raymond Lippitt, 
pianist. Charles Wakefield Cadman, composer-pianist, 
and John Smallman, baritone, will appear April 26th. 
On May 3rd, Hallett Gilberte, composer-pianist, and 
Alice Forsythe Mosher, lyric soprano, will give a recital; 



and Mischa Violin, violinist and Helena Lewyn, pianist, 
conclude the series. May 5th. 

The Zoellner Quartet gives its fifth concert of its 
chamber n usic series in the Ebell -Auditorium the 23rd 
inst. A delightful program is planned, including the 
Hayden Quartet, Opus 76, No. 1: Aus Meinem Leben 
by Smetana; and a Serenade by Binding, Opus 56 — tor 
two violins and piano. 

Alice Forsythe Mosher, lyric soprano, sang for the 
Hollywood Community Sing last Tuesday night, the 
17th inst. One of the features of her program was the 
song by Sol Cohen, Trees of Gethsemane, when the 
composer accompanied with his own violin ohligato. 

The Philharmonic String Quartet played before a large 
audience of club members on April 13th, at the Morosco 
Theatre. It was not a long program, but one of merit, 
the two numbers being excellent interpretations of 
Beethoven and Dvorak. Those compromising the quar- 
tet were Sylvain Noack, Henry Svedrofsky, llya Bronson, 
and Bmile Ferir. 

The American Music Optomlsts meet April 26th, at 
the home of Mrs. Frank Colby, for the annual election 
of oflicers. The musical program will feature, in accord- 
ance with the aims of the society, American composers, 
those represented being George Edwards, Charles Wake- 
field Cadman, Fannie Dillon, and Gertrude Ross. Ray- 
mond Harmon, tenor, Edith Lillian Clark, pianist, and 
Sylvia Harding, violiniste, wi 1 appear en the program. 

The De Lara Opera Company will produce II Trovatore 
in the Gamut Theatre of this city on April 24th. and in 
the Pasadena high school auditorium on the 26th inst. 
The cast for the production is announced as: Dorothy 
Grosse. soprano, as Leonora: Miguel Laris, tenor, as 
Manrico; Harry Ershoff, baritone, as Count de Luna; 
Bille Carson, contralto, as Azucena; Forest Bell, basso, 
takes the part of Ferrando; May Montana, lyric soprano, 
has the role of Inez; Douglas Cole plays Ruiz, the second 
tenor; EUeck Caminker, as second baritone, will sing 
the old gypsy's role. 

Joseph Carl Briel has left tills city, to remain away 
for about two months. He goes to New York to work 
on the music score for the next Griffith photoplay pro- 
duction. The White Rose. And the same week that we 
lose one famous composer, another returns from a sec- 
ond transcontinental tour — Charles Wakefield Cadman, 
who at present is engaged on the orchestration for his 
opera. The Witch of Salem. 

Dorothy Jardon, the Chicago Grand Opera star, who 
sang, from Carmen at Loew's State Theatre for two 
weeks, remained another week at the same theatre. On 
her last program she sang two short songs, one being 
Victor Schertzinger's Adolay. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Spencer-Kelly gave a program for the 
Whittier Woman's Club the 18th inst., with Mrs. Samuel 
Bristol accompanying at the piano. Two songs from 
Joseph Carl Briel. written to the lyrics of Lucile Spencer 
Kelly and Robert Louis Stevenson, were features of the 
program. 

Paul Breckenridge is launching a new venture, namely 
the organization of a new light opera company, which 
will be known as the Colonial Opera Company. Breck- 
enridge has only recently returned from the Orient, 
where he sang baritone rol^s with several companies, 
including the Savage and Aborn. The material for bal- 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium Bldg., Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

COM POSER-PI ANISTE 

JuHt laHued for the Piano 

KI>\NI8H SERENADE" and "RIDE OF THE COWBOY" 

ALMA STETZLER 

voice Cri-TliRE — roXCHING IN RKPERTOIRHJ 

OPRRA CLASSES INCLUDING COMPLETE 

PRESEiVT \TIOIVS 

Studio 1324 S. PlKorroB. Phone X180S 

CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

Available for Coneertii and Rccltala 

Limited IVumber of Advanced Paplla Accepted 

VIoltnlHt LON Anfcelen Trio 

■JtHrtio; 334 Moal*' Artw Stadio RIdg. Phone fOWg 

ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

TueMday. Wrdneiidny, Friday Afternoona 
Egan School. Phones 21N05 or 2713S0 
1324 South Pleueroa, Loa Angreles 

SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCERT MASTER PllILHAniHONIC ORCHESTRA 

Coneertx and Reeltoin 

llnnaeement MrM. Caroline C. Smith, 424 Auditorinni RldK. 

Los Angeles Chamber Music Society 

ELEVENTH CONCERT 
FRIDAY EVENING. .MARCH 30 



, Harp, Double Bana 



Flate, 


Clarinet. B 




OOB 


F 


reneh Hot 




Seatn at 


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II -It 


Box Oniee. 








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No. », «a 








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LOS ANGELES 

CALIFORNIA 

THEATRE 



GREATER CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
ELINOR. Conducting 
50 MUSICIANS 

PROGRAM Wi':i;lv OF AI'Rli. 22 
In) SECOND POLONAISE IN E MAJOR - Li«»:t 
(if! MINl'ET .----- Beethoven 
(e) HOW MANY DO VOII REC.VLL - 12th o» Serien 
Arrnneed hy Mr. Elinor 
In eonjunetion with H. A. Snon-'d 
"HUNTING BIC; GAME IN AFRICA" 
With Gun and Camera 
A thrilling ton-reel motion pic 
man's two years' battle with th 
beasts of the African jungle. 






•PUBLIC LIBff^' 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



nembrr Tr 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

Teacher of I'inno. Iliirinony. ^'oice fooeli. During March 
and April. Merriri Jones Hotel. Snnln llonieo. Tel. Santa 
Monica 1i:t-14r>. \o. :MS MuNie Arts llldg.. [.oh .VngeieM. 
Tci. .sai-1N1. 

The Heartt-Dreyfus Studios 

V<>iCF. 4ND MtlDBKN LANGHAOBS 

Gamot Cloh Bide., 1044 Soutli Hope Street. Peraonal 

Repreaentntlve, Grace Carroll-li:iliot. Piionc* 822-800 and 

BM37. 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

LOS ANGELES 

12S0 AVIndKor Boulevnril U'MS Hollywood Doulevnril 

Complete Fncully of Artist Teaehers 



let, orchestra, principals, and cliorus of the productions, 
will be gathered from resident artists, it is stated, 

Grace Carrol Elliot will present an evening of music 
at the Gamut Theatre the 23rd inst. Under her concert 
direction will appear Adelaide Gosnell, pianiste; Purcell 
Mayer, violinist; and Erwin Yaekel, accompanist. 

The Woman's Symphony Orchestra gives it second 
and final concert of the season in the Philharmonic the 
evening of the ISth inst., when Olga Steeb plays as 
piano soloist. This organization, dating from 1894. was 
first directed by Harley Hamilton, and gave as its 
premiere concert a complete Hayden symphony. Since 
that time, the programs have included, always at least, 
one movement from a symphony, never once swaying to 
hint of modern music. For the past nine years Henry 
Schoenefeld has been director of the orchestra, and Mrs. 
Foy Neher is now filling her third term as president. 



JOHN SMALLMAN--BARITONE 



EARL MEEKER-Baritone 

Concerts — Recital* — Inntroction 
Featarlng .AU-Amerlean Program 
Studio: IROO So. Pleueroa St. 

Anna Ruzena Sprotte 

CONTR.\I.TO School of Vocal Art 



MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



Rosa Raisa and Giocomo Rimini close the PhiUiar- 
raonic artists series, with their concert on the evening 
of April 24th. Both have been heard here before, in 
the casts of Othello, and Jewels of the Madonna, but 
this is their first joint recital, locally. Raisa withstood 
privation and hardships in Italy before her voice came 
to the attention of Madame Marchesi, and later Madame 
Canipanini (sister of Tetrazzini). From that time on, 
Iiowever, her success has been pronounced, her debut 
, in Aida with the Chicago Opera Company, and her 

Phone 2S185 appearances in Italy, Covent Garden, La Scala, South 
America, and Mexico City. Rimini already had achieved 
operatic success abroad when he joined the Chicago 
Opera Company with Canipanini then as director. The 
program for the recital here includes Russian and Eng- 
lish songs, the famous Drinking Song from Hamlet, aria 
from Fedora, aria from Ernani and two duets. 

Sylvain Noack, assistant conductor of the Philhar- 
monic Orchestra, directs a group from the same body, 
with the orchestration of the Fifth Beethoven Symphony. 



GRACE WOOD JESS "ezzo soprano 

DHAM.4TIC IN'TERPRRTFR OF FOLK SONGS 
IN COSTUME RECITALS 

Managf-mrnt: L. K Behymir Los Angflfa 

ANN THOMPSON-Pianu/e 

PI.\NIST OF PERSONALITY 

124 IW. RerenHo WII. 885 

Amnico Rolln 

CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN 

Americana Popular ConipoNcr on tonr with T.SI.\NINA 

Eaat and South: Oct. and Nov Pnc. Cnant: Jan. and Feb. 

East afcaln: Feb. and April — California: April and .liny 



CHARLES BOWES 



DAVOL SANDERS ' ■?!,',?,.r,'s'!.;?,'"^ 

Head Violin Drpt., CnlleKe of Munic, II. S. C. — Memh 
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MARGARET HEDGER MAULE 

EXPERIE.NCED INSTRUCTOR IN NORMAL 

COURSE IN MUSIC 

PIANO ORGAN 



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The Philharmonic Orchestra popular concert of Sun- 
day afternoon, the 15th inst.. was the last of the season. 
It left us with a host of melodies, a tendency toward 
philosophical introspection (the program was a Tschai- 
kowsky- Wagner), and a feeling of pity tor the many 
who were absent. It was a program essentially tor 
popular taste, but the student who eagerly follows 
musical scores was caught unawares and drifted into 
enjoyment of the afternoon mood. With the exception 
of the third movement of the Pathetique Symphony — 
the march-scherzo — which won loud applause for its 
dynamic orchestration, the program was idyllic. There 
was the Introduction to Act III and the Prelude and 
Love Death from Tristan and Isolde, with its poignant 
undercurrent of tragic love. O- W. Hoffman, as on a 
previous occasion, scored with his English horn solo. 
The Meistersingers was a fit farewell, a little more 
technical, yet upholding the general tone of the program. 
It is a brilliant work by which to remember this year's 
"pop" concerts. 

The last Symphony Concert is to be played Friday 
afternoon and Saturday evening, April 20-21, with the 
Debussy Apres Midi d'un Faune for the first time on 
these programs. The Symphony No. 1 in C Minor, Opus 
88 of Brahms, and the Strauss tone poem. Death and 
Transfiguration, comprise the remainder of the program. 

Indications are that the coming performance of 
Verdi's "IL TROVATORE" scheduled for Tuesday. April 
24th at the Gamut Theatre, and for Thursday, April 26th 
at the Pasadena High School Auditorium, will be 
great successes. In both performances the leading 
soprano role of Leonora will be sung by Dorothy Grosse, 
dramatic soprano of Pasadena. Others who will take 
principal roles in Los Angeles are Billie Corson, con- 
tralto, who will sing part of Azucena; Miguel Laris. 
tenor, who will sing the role of Manrico; Harry Ershoff, 
baritone, who will sing role of Count di Luna; and 
Forest Ball, basso, who will sing part of Ferrando. In 
Pasadena, the cast of characters will be the same, with 
the exceptions of the Mezzo-soprano, who will be Vivian 
Clarke, in the role of Azucena, and Carlo Guidero, tenor, 
in the role of Manrico. Manuel Sanchez de Lara who is 
director in chief of the company, will be conductor of 
both performances of II Trovatore. 

Miss Winifred Hooke is now planning for a trip to 
Europe this summer. However she will only be there 
for a short visit, as she intends to be back in Los 
Angeles, September 1st. 



PASADENA NEWS 



De Lara Grand Opera Company 

MANUEL SANCHEZ DE LARA, Conductor 
ProMentM "II Trovatore" on Tuesday Evening. .April 
-4th, at Gamut Theater, Lof* AngeleK. and on Thurs- 
day Evenlne, April a«th, at Pasadena High School 



Unless you are known to everyone who engages artists 
or who attends concerts you can not possibly secure 
engagements, '/our mere say-so does not constitute 
proof of your experience and success. Therefore make 
your name valuable by advertising. 



Alice Coleman Batchelder, pianist, and the Selling 
String Quartet were heard in a chamber music program 
at the Vista Del Arroyo, Thursday afternoon. April 12th. 
The personnel of the quartet was made up of Oscar 
Selling, first violinist, Morris Stoloff, second violinist, 
Allard de Ridder, viola, and Franz Lusschen. 'cellist. 
With the Quartet, it is Mrs. Batchelder's intention to 
give a series of concerts next season, and the one of 
this month was to be somewhat in the nature of an 
introduction to the proposed series. 

The Pasadena Community Orchestra, under the baton 
of Will Rounds, conductor, gave an excellent concert at 
the high school, April 12th. Vibian Strong Hart, colora- 
ture soprano, was the soloist, with Lois Wall as her 
accompanist. Mme. Hart's solos included. Ah. fors e 
lui, from La Traviata, The Spirit Flower (Campbell- 
Tipton). Villanelle (Del Acqua). Spring and You (Dr. 
Frank Nagel), and Come unto These Yellow Sands (La 
Forge). Kamenoi Ostrow (Rubinstein), and The Dance 
of the Hours from La Oioconda (Ponclelli), were given 



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Harold Porter Smyth, pianist. Junia Wolff, soprano. 
Dr. Roscoe G. Dickinson, 'cellist, Reginald Bland, vio- 
linist and Judith Bland, accompanist, presented the pro- 
gram for The Music Memory Contest at the Thomas- 
Jefferson School. April 13th. 



LAMANDA PARK NEWS 

Martin E. Robinson, director, arranged the musical 
festival for The Hartzell Memorial Church, April 20th 
and 21st. The sacred opera. Queen Esther, was given 
by a chorus of seventy-five voices, supported by an 
orchestra. The choir was assisted by some of the 
leading soloists of the other churches. After the pre- 
sentation of Queen Esther, a beautiful operette. The 
Months and Seasons was given by the Sunday School, 
under the direction of Mr. Robinson. 



The California Theatre Orchestra, under Carli Elinor's 
able direction, is presenting this week an all MacDowell 
program that is extremely well selected to show to best 
advantage the orginality in melody and resourcefulness 
in command of modern harmony that are the character- 
istics of this foremost American composer. Mr. Miller 
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PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



the sale of some six thousand tickets to aid in the 
establishment of a MacDowell Colony in Southern Cali- 
fornia, similar to that at Peterboro and this gracious 
act makes the program of even greater interest to the 
public. 

The program opens with the Village Festival from the 
Indian Suite. Based on the melodies of the American 
Indians, barbaric in rhythm and played with rough vigor 
it fittingly depicts their festivities. To a Wild Rose 
from Woodland Sketches is a simple and plaintive 
melody, the natural beauty of which has been enhanced 
by the transcription for strings arranged by Mr. Elinor. 

Claire Forbes Crane, Guest Pianiste. has se'.ected the 
Largo in D minor from the second piano concerto to 
display the melodic brilliancy and modern harmonic 
invention of this great American composer and plays 
the number impressively and with brilliant effect. Con- 
gratulations. Mr. Elinor, on the beauties of this All- 
American program! 

MANY IMPORTANT CONCERTS IN NEW YORK 

Production of Mona Lisa Among Novelties of Early 

March — German Opera Co. Arouses Great Interest 

— Mr. and Mrs. Josef Lhevinne in Joint 

Recital — Walter Damrosch Resumes 

Baton 

BY ROSALIE HOUSMAN 
NEW YORK, March 5. — The outstanding novelty 
of the week of February 25, was the first American 
production of the Mona Lisa. As its title tells us, it has 
to do with the story of the famous picture, which, though 
of course, but an imagined one. is very dramatic and 
effective. The only incongruity is, to me, the placing 
ot the story between a prologue and epilogue which are 
modern, and which jar. The story, gruesome as it is. is 
capable of standing alone. The new artists were Barbara 
Kemp and Michael Bohnon, both from Berlin, and who 
have been Identified abroad with the opera. Mme. 
Kemp is Mona Lisa, her make up, is amazingly like the 
picture — her smile uncanny. Much of the success of the 
performance was due her and her remarkable acting. 
Musically, the opera was disappointing The vocal line 
was a declamation, which frequently shrieked instead 
of singing. There was a noisy orchestra on whom most 
ot the burden fell, and Bedansky did much with it, to 
make it as expressive as possible, and though the mount- 
ings were sumptuous in the style of Titian's old paint- 
ings, and the rest of the cast (among whom one must 
mention Meader and Peralta for their small parts well 
done) was effective, even Taucher, the hero, still one felt 
that as an opera it was weakest in its musical dress. 
However, one performance is not a Judgment though 
one does feel that Schillings, though a modern man, is 
unimportant in the line following the two Richards. 

At the Manhattan I had the opportunity of hearing a 
stirring performance of the Meisteringers, a boon, in 
these days of too much music which was conducted 
by Leo Blech in masterly fashion, and when one realizes 
that he had but a scratch orchestra, one is greatly im- 
pressed. The names of the artists were practically un- 
known, but after having been heard they will become 
famous. Of that there is no doubt, and it is whispered 
that the Met may annex a few. In the role ot Sachs 
was a man of gorgeous voice, Frederich Schoor, well 
known at home. It has a wonderfully sympathetic 
quality, richness, and in the Wahn aria was beautifully 
expressive. The acting was noble, simple on a par with 
the singing. In Robert Hutt they had a fine Walter, in 
Desider Zador, a clever Beckmesser, and the David of 
Paul Schwarz was ideal. As guest, Miss Claire Dux sang 
the Eva with Just the right spirit. Three weeks more at 
the Lexington are announced with other well-known 
operas. 

Josef Lhevinne and his wife gave a Joint recital at 
Carnegie Hall, on Friday night the IGth, where they 
joined forces in a suite of dances of the modern French- 
man Vuillemin, as well as in a Mozart senate, while 
Mr. Lhevinne played Beethoven and Chopin groups 
beautifully. 



To chronicle the concerts of interest and importance 
is to first mention the return of Walter Damrosch, and 
that his soloist was Rachmaninoff, playing his second 
concerto. A program of such importance brought a 
crowded house and an ovation to both men. The pianist- 
composer was in his best form, his touch warm and 
resonant, and the concerto is a grateful one to play and 
hear. The novelty was Beata Regna, of Tomassini, one 
of the Italian Symphonists, inspired, the notes tell us, 
by the Fra Angelico Angels, and so was becomingly 
dressed in the Gregorian manner, fitting to the subject. 
It was effectively scored, and was well worth hearing. 

On Sunday night, February 25, at the DeWitt Clinton 
High School, where the Evening Mail holds weekly con- 
certs, with artists of International reputation, they had 
two soloists, whose names are of special interest to the 
West. Mme. Gadski was the vocalist, Mr. Pettis the 
pianist, and the two artists had a very large and most 
enthusiastic audience. It is the policy of the paper to 
encourage music, by giving of the best, and in so doing 
to create an audience for Carnegie and other halls. By 
eight the hall is packed, many are turned away and the 
doors are closed. Mme. Gadski had a program ot stand- 
ard songs, as the audiences are being treated to the 
best of music, and was in fine voice, awakening tre- 
mendous enthusiasm. In Mr. Pettis she had a good 
foil. He was in particularly poetic mood, and fine in his 
mixed group, as later with an all-Amerlcan one, kept the 
audience's interest alive and expectant. In the latter, 
he played his own Mirror, My Pagan Prelude, and de 
Grassi's Rhapsodic Prelude. They took with the mixed, 



ROSE FLORENCE— Mezzo Soprano 

CONCERT— VOICE PLACING— COACHING 

Studio: — 545 Sutter Street Telephone Kearny 35M 

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but intensely musical audience. Both artists asked me 
to extend personal greetings to their many friends. 

The Philadelphia orchestra introduced a new Ameri- 
can work, Ernest Schelling's Victory Ball, music written 
with imagination, and a splendid appreciation of the 
modern orchestra. He bases it on a poem of rCoyes, and 
gave the tympani section of the orchestra a virtuoso 
chance. It is significant music and will, I hope, be heard 
again. The soloist was Moisewitsch, playing a new 
(to America) concerto, by Tcherepnin. I cannot say 
that it expresses much of musical interest, though it 
gives the soloist unlimited opportunity of showing off, and 
the surprising thing is, its lack of national color. The 
pianist was greatly applauded, and deserved it. 

There have been no novelties on the Mengelberg pro- 
grams, but there is always great enthusiasm for him 
and for what he does^ The Heldenleben had place of 
honor on the programs. 

Nyiroghazi returned from his western trip, and gave a 
brilliant recital at Aeolian Hall on Tuesday evening, the 
27th of February. His playing Is especially noticeable for 
its ease and fluency, while the depths are still un- 
touched. But he is very young, and has already much 
power and command of tonal color. I think he has a 
great future, and is well worth watching. 

The Friends of Music repeated the Lied der Erde of 
Mahler on their series at Town Hall. Mme. Cahier 
again singing the contralto role, and Urlus the tenor one. 
It caused quite as much comment as before, and may be 
winning friends. I find it mediocre, as I did last year, 
frequently a beautiful bit, but in the midst of a desert of 
commonplaces, long drawn out. It was splendidly given, 
and Bodansky handled his orchestra in masterly fashion. 

At the third concert of the London String Quartet 
they presented as a first performance a charming suite 
of Walford Davies. a Welshman, called Peter Pan. which 
had imagination, charm, and a thorough understanding 
of the strings. It was liked immediately. In the quintet 
of Schubert which demands two celli, Felix Salmon 
assisted and though this is a particularly long work It 
was so beautifully given as to make one enjoy it all. The 
quartet had a big house, and deserved in full measure 
the enthusiasm their playing evoked. 

All New York is mourning the death of the well known 
dean of critics. Krehbiel. which occurred during the 
past week. He has always been known for his broad- 
mindedness, his vast knowledge of the fundamentals of 
music and for his just appreciation of the things that 
count. He will be very much missed. 

At the concert of the Beethoven Association on Mon- 
day evening. March 12th, the Letz quartet, with the 
assistance of Artur Schnabel and his wife. Therese 
Schnabel. gave a classic program and won the approval 
of a crowded house. The Letz men first gave a virile 
reading of the heavenly F major, op 59, of Beethoven, 
certainly one of the most beautiful pages in quartet 
literature, and it was done with precision, tonal con- 
trasts and much appreciation of its beauties. The work 
of Horace Britt, who is their cellist, stood out strongly 
and firmly, as a strong support. Later with the pianist, 
they played the F minor quintet of Brahms with a good 
blending of individual parts. Mme. Schnabel. contralto, 
sang a number of Schubert songs, with distinction in 
phrasing and diction and made much of what is not 
naturally a beautiful voice. But for the understanding 
she brought to it. she was appreciated and applauded. 

Chaliapin has again come and gone, doing Mephisto- 
phele and Boris again, amid the thunderous applause of 
the biggest audiences of the Metropolitan's season. No 
singer, except possibly Jeritza has evoked such enthusi- 
asm as he has this season and he is the greatest singing 
artist at the opera now. The revival of L'Africaine, 
which is promised for next week, has Gigli as the prin- 
cipal singer, with Ponselle as opposite and an otherwise 
distinguished cast. 

Over at the Lexington, the German Opera Company is 
packing the place with its splendidly done Wagnerian 
performances, which are supplying a lack that New York 
has felt for many seasons. There will be revivals of 
Freischutz, Fidelio. and Hansel and Gretel. before the 
company goes on a short tour. Their season, begun 
under the worst financial difficulties, has resulted in 
success of all kinds, and is now, on a substantial basis, 
having been underwritten by a number of business 
people. 

The Scola Cantorum, under Schindler, gave another 
concert, in which many old Spanish songs, edited by 
the director, were sung, as well as some lovely Pale- 
strlna and music of his period. Mr. Schindler gets 
beautiful tonal values from his chorus, distinction of 
interpretation, and delicacy of inflections. It deserved 
the large audience, which greeted the work warmly. 

There is going to be another orchestra next year in 
this already over-crowded city which is being organized 
by some of the men of the former National Symphony 
and a few of the present Philharmonic desks. It has 



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filed incorporation papers, has, on dit, good social back- 
ing, and announces eight dates for Carnegie, as well as 
the most important fact — the conductorship of Josef 
Stransky, who, unquestionably, has a very large personal 
following. There has been much dissatisfaction over his 
resignation and it is thought likely that he will attract 
many to hear him. No name has as yet been definitely 
decided upon. 

Among the recitals of the week none was more en- 
joyable than that of the German baritone of the Metro- 
poUtan — Paul Bender, who gave a fine program on 
Tuesday evening, the 20th. His singing has the finest 
distinction, for the phrase, the musical values and above 
all, for the composer's intention. He gave a number of 
Loewe ballads as encores and remarkably sung, too, as 
well as a thoroughly representative program of classic 
songs, to which he added a number of America's best. 
For that he deserves our special thanks. 

Although Rachmaninoff was ill he played to a packed 
house on Saturday afternoon, March 24th, and gave a 
most Interesting program, lengthened by innumerable 
encores. His playing seemed warmer, more plastic than 
it was on other occasions, and, as always, thrilled his 
listeners. Particularly lovely was his playing of the 
Beethoven Appassionata. 



It Is absolutely impossible to become thorouohly 
musical without keeping Informed about what Is going 
on in music. Therefore, a subscription to the Pacific 
Coast Musical Review represents part of your musical 
education. 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Readers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address. 
Anonymous communications cannot be answered. No 
names will be published. Address, Question Editor, 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kohler & Chase Building, 
San Francisco. 

1. How many string quartets did Beethoven write? 
—A. A. 

Sixteen. 

2. What is the oldest conservatory in the United 
States?— M. F. 

Conservatory ot the Peabody Institute, Baltimore, 
founded In 1867. 

3. What Is meant by the Small Orchestra?— J. C. S. 
A symphony orchestra with trombones and tubas (and 

perhaps clarinets and drums) omitted, and with only 
two horns and two trumpets. 

4. Is Hans Richter still living? — D. H. 

No; he died six years ago, at Bayreuth, December 6th, 
1916. 

5. What is the chord of the Extreme Sixth? — L. B. 
The chord of the Augmented Sixth. 

Note: — A communication from E. C. D. supplements 
the answer to question No. 5 of the issue of April 7th, 
in regard to Paderewski's encores. The second encore 
was "My Joys." (Chopin-Llszt), and after the Chopin 
Waltz, Cracovienne Fantastique (Paderewskl), vas 
added. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ALCAZAR THEATRE 

The delicately artistic acting o£ Allan 
Pollock, the Alcazar's distinguished visit- 
ing star, will be found particularly well 
suited to his second vehicle, "A Pinch 
Hitter," which will be staged for the first 
time in the West, beginning with Sunday 
Matinee, April 22nd. By way of contrast 
to his first offering. "A Pinch Hitter is a 
comedy of the most amusing sort, said to 
be written in bright and breezy fashion, 
and filled with almost continuous laugh- 
ter. It was originally produced at the 
Henry Miller Theatre. New York, with 
Pollock in the star role, and proved one 
of the gayest comedies of the season. 

The mirth making possibilities of "A 
Pinch Hitter" may best be realized when 
it is known that Pollock, in the role of 
Dennis Lestrange, accepts a commission 
to become a co-respondent in a divorce 
case in order that he may accommodate a 
lady. The play is replete with amusing 
situations and there are good parts for 
the members of the supporting company. 
Nana Bryant will be found attractively 
cast and Mary Duncan and Cliff Thomp- 
son, who came with the star will have 
important roles. In the cast also will be 
Ancyn McNulty in a character part. Mak- 
ing his first appearance at the Alcazar in 
more than two years, will be Thomas 
Chatterton, one of the most popular actors 
ever to appear at the O'Farrell Street 
Playhouse. 

This week Pollock's initial offering. "A 
Bill of Divorcement" continues to crowd 
the Alcazar. It is a powerful play, and 
all of the critics have agreed that it is 
being presented in faultless fashion, furn- 
ishing an artistic triumph for the Alcazar. 



MADAME VOUGHT PICKS WINNERS 

During a series of ten recitals which 
Madame Stella Raymond-Vought is giving 
at the Fitzgerald Memorial Church in an 
endeavor to pay for the recently newly 
installed organ, she has been accredited 
with presenting two artists, who imme- 
diately afterwards have been awarded 
highest honors in contests which they 
have entered, namely, E. Harold Dana, 
baritone, who won highest honors from 
Titta Ruffo and Miss Corinne Keefer, 
contralto, recently awarded a scholarship 
at tile annual convention of music teach- 
ers in Santa Ana. Both of these artists 
were Californians. Madame Vought will 
present another program at the above 
Church on Monday evening. April 30th, 
when a high class program of piano, 
cello, vocal and whistMng numbers will be 
rendered. A new artist who will probably 
be in great demand shortly is Robert 
Romani. Australian bass-baritone, who 
will sing several operatic gems, in a mas- 
terly fashion. The program in its entirety 
appears as follows: 

Star Spangled Banner — Entire Audi- 
ence, Marie Rambo at the organ; Con- 
certo, G minor (Mende'ssohn), Edna Lin- 
kowski (artist pupil of George Kruger). 
George Kruger at second piano; Soprano 
Solos: (a) Care Selve (Handel), (b) 
The Winds in the South (Scott), (c) Twi- 
light (Glenn), Lucile White (artist pupil 
of Mme. Vought). E. P. Illingworth at the 
piano; Bass Solos. (a) Hear Me Ye 
Winds — "Scipio" (Handel), (b) When the 
Swallows Homeward Fly (White), (c) 
Toreador Song— "Carmen" (Bizet), Rob- 
ert Romaine. E. P. Illingworth at the 
piano; Contralto Solos: (a) Aria — Ah, 
Mein Sohn — The Prophet (Meyerbeer), 
(b) Butterflies (Seller), (c) Spring (Hil- 
dach), EUe Rademann M'Uer, Maybel 
Sherburne West at the Piano: Cello 
Solos: (a) Serenade (Popper), (b) Ber- 
ceuse (Simon), (c) Tarantelle (Popper). 
Dorothy Dukes Dimm. Martha Dukes 
Parker at the piano; Whistling Solos: 
(al Merrily I Roam (Waltz Song). (Sch- 
leiffarth), (b) By the Waters of Min- 
netonka (Lieurance), (c) At Dawning 
(Cadman)7 Mme. Scheila Wuerkert, Pro- 
fessor Theodor Irwin at the piano; Bari- 
tone Solos: (a) The 'Call of Life (Ayl- 
ward), (b) Your Eyes (Tours), (c) Dio 
Possente (Faust), (Gounod), Robert D. 
MacLure, Maybel Sherburne West at the 
piano; Concerto (Chopin), Maybel Sher- 
burne West; Marie Rambo (pupil of May- 
bel Sherburne West) at second piano. 



NOVAES TO PLAY MONDAY 

San Francisco will have its first oppor- 
tunity of hearing Guiomar Noaves. the 
greatly discussed Brazilian pianist in the 
Ballroom of the St. Francis Hotel on 
Monday afternoon. April 23rd. This fam- 
ous artist, who when thirteen years old 
was sent by the Brazilian government 
to Paris to compete tor entry in the 



Conservatory has been before the public 
as a virtuoso but a scant ten years yet 
in this time she has established a well 
merited reputation which ranks her 
among the greatest pianists of the day. 
As her program reveals Madame Novaes 
prefers the classics and tlie composers of 
the romantic period and plays very little 
of the modern school of music with the 
exception of Debussy and some of the 
French composers. Monday afternoon's 
event will be the final concert in the 
Alice Seckels' Matinee Musical Series and 
will start at three o'clock. 

Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel, Bayview/ 5278 

PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languages 

i302 Broadway .... Oakland 

Mrs. William Steinbach EDWIN HUTCHINGS 

VOICE CULTLRE 

Stndio: 

»02 KOHLER & CHASE BLDG. 

'"" Fmnnlm-o Phone; Kearny M»4 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

B.\RITONE — VOICE CULTURE 

AuthorlKed to Teaeb Mme. Schnen. 

Rene'o Slelhod 

1314 Leavenworth St. Phone Prospeet 9253 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SA'VTNCS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 
, Banks ot San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. ond 7lh Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haii-ht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UJloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (4J^) 

per cent per annum was declared for the six months 

ending December 31st, 1922. 

INTEREST WILL HEREAFTER BE COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 
INSTEAD OF SEMI-ANNUALLY AS HERETOFORE. 



ADELE ULMA.N 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND PIANO 

Studio 178 Commonwealth Ave. 
Telephone Paciflc 33 

Laura Wertheimber 



2211 Seott St. 



atory Teacher for 
. Noah Ilrandt 
Telephone Pllln 



Phone Berkeley 6006. 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO asd HARMONY 

Institute ot Music of San Francisco, 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 

PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

IIO.I Kohler £ Chaae Bid. TeL Suiter 7387 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 
Studio, 603-804 KOHLER & CH.^SE BLDG. 
Phon- Kearny M.%4 

MRS. CHARLES POULTER 

SOPRANO St. Andrena Church 

Voice Culture, Piano. 588 27th St., Oak- 
land. Tel. 2078. Kohler A Chaae BIdK.. 
Wedneadays Tel. Kearny 5454. 

ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 

PIANIST AND TBACHBR 
Realdence and Slodlo, 6128 HllleKass Are.. 
Oakland. Tel. Piedmont 509S. 

MARION RAMON WILSON 

DRAMATIC CONTRALTO 
Opera Sueeeanei* In Euriipe; Concert Snc- 
reNNen in .\nierlon. \<ldreNM ISOl Cnliftirnin 
St.. San Frnnclnco Telephone Prp.pect :i620 

Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGING 
Studio 36 UnlTney Bulldlugr, 376 Sutter St. 
Tel. Donelas 42:«. Rea. Tel. Kearny 2349 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 



Kearny 5454. 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRALTO 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

GRADUATE OF SCHOLA CANTORUM, 

PARIS 

OROAMI8T ST. MARY'S OATHlSDilAl. 

Piano Dcpartaeat, Haurilu Seh»«l 
Oegun uuH Piano. ArHllwara Mnalcwl gollearw 

ESTHER MUNDELL 

SOPRANO AND TEACHER 

Pupil of 

De Reaxke and Percy Rector Stephens 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

PUNO 

Stndloi lOOS Kohler Jk Ckaae Bids. 

Phone Kearny 5454 

Joseph George Jacobson 

PIANO 
2833 Sacramento St. Phone FUlmore 348 

ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Courlqne, Paris 

Studios 3107 WaahtngtUn Street 

Phone Plllmore 1847 

SIGMUND BEEL 

Maater Claaaea for Violin 
Studio Building, 1373 Poat Street 
Tel. Pros pect 757 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

(Ada Clement MunIc School) 
343K HacrHmenio ■*■!. Photi*' Klllm»re H»M 

MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of SlngluK. 32 Lorelta Ave., Pied- 
mont. TeL Piedmont 304. Mon., Kohler A 
Chase Bldgr.. s. F. Telephone Keami- .M.M. 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 SCOTT ST, Bet. Clay A WashlnictoD 

Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 
Mrs. Noah Brandt. Piano 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Soloist, Temple Emanu El. Con- 
cert and Church Work. Vocal Instruc- 
tion. 2.'.3» Clay St., Phone West 4800. 

MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 

ARTISTIC PIANO INSTRUCTION 

Studio: lOOB Kohler Ji: Chase Bide. 

Telephone Kearny .'.454 

Rea. Tel. Bayrlew 4104 

EVA GARCIA 

CONCERT PIANIST. ACCOMP.VNIST 

AND TEACHER 

Studio: 4lftC Piedmont Ave. Tel. Pled. 2750. 

Residence: 41.'.2 Howe St.. Oakland 
Tel. Pled. 3402 

ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 



RUTH DEGNAN 

PUPIL OF GIACOMO AND MME. 
MINKOWSKI 
TEACHUIR OF VOICE 
2428 Pine St. Tel. West 7 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douelas 269 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 
2321 Jackson St. Phone Fillmore 3256 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell SL Phone Kearny 2930 



OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
2027 Caiifornis St. Tel. Fillmore 3827 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Park 1974 

MARJORIE E. YOUNG 
1363 Grove St. Tel. West 4571 

MARGARET WHITE COXON 

149 Rose Av., Oakland Piedmont 1608-W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue— Park 341 



DOROTHY PASMORE 
1715 Vallejo St. Phone West 1(95 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 457 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

301 Spruce Street Paciflc 167« 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott St. Phone West 134J 

andreTeWRTEE ' 

1470 Washington St. Tel. Franklin 3321 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

1005 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K. .S454 

MARGARET BRUNTSCH 
70 Piedmont St. Phone Park 3469 

MME. M. TROMBONI 

601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 



OTTO RAUHUT 

357 Arguello Blvd. Phone Pacific 366j 

BOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4974 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6464 

EMIL HAHL 
Res.: 2756 Baker St. Tel.: Fill. 229' 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 

434 Spruce St. Tel. Fillmore 1131 

REED AND MOUTHPIECE MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 
789 Mission St. Sutter (IH 

If you want to become known to the 
musical public of California, advertise in 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

on the Programs of Distinguished American Artists 

Published by 

G SCHIRIVIER JOHN CHURCH CO., THE BOSTON MUSIC COMPANY, 

THE COMPOSERS' MUSIC CORPORATION 

Songs for All Voces, New Publications of the Composers' Music Corporation 

THE CRY OF THE ORIENT TOMORROW 

THE FOREST OF DREAMS 

A CYCLE OF SIX— SONGS OF THE LITTLE DAYS 

For Sale at the Leading Music Houses 



THE LITTLE HANON, By Robt. J. King 

A new work potterned after «ho»e contained In the famoua "Hnnon VlrtnMO 
PianUt." H ahould Her^e the aame pnrpone for the comparatlTe brglBner that 
the larger one han no »ucc«ri»fallT aecompli»hed for the more advanced. 

ClieerfuUv sent for inspection to anyone. 
henry' GROBE, 135-153 Kearny Street. 

Representative for the Clayton F. Summy Publications. 



MAUD G. McFAUL 

ACCOMPAIVIST 

1128 Cheatnut Street 

Telephone Proapect 4032 



JOHN WHITCOMB NASH 

VOCAL CULTURE 
Irttat pupila 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 

Teacher of Singing 



■ n he 



u natlHlted nilh you 
place you hcfore th 

n natlxflcd nilh you 
rnddlKt. or Chnrleti 
your tcnche 



In he nlway» talking "UREATHf" '•TOXGUEf 
'JAWf" 

If in doubt, connult Mr. BoKurt, »vho studied in 
Europe with the teachers of Semb.-ick, Scalchi. 
Ulxpham, etc. 

PuiiilN prepared for Oiiera. Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. 

:17I1 SUTTER STREET— DouBlos 9256 

2218 LAKE STREET — Bayview 4871 

EvcnlntfH hy aiiiiolntnient 

Read >lr. Roprart's nrtirlc in thi« paper of March 

24, Hi2:l, about "Charletaus" 



Qon Stance 'Alexandre 

Mezzo Soprano 

Pupils Accepted 

Inquiries made at 

801 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Phone Kearny 5454 



Resident Artists who wish to secure engagements 
through managers and music clubs ne.xt season should 
announce their plans NOW as bookings are made im- 
mediately before the end of this season and during the 
summer months. 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 

Endorsed by Wager Swayne 

lecial Normal Course for Teachers, based on Swayn 

Principles 

Studios 807 Kohler A Chase Bldg. 

2^181^ Etna St.. Berkeley. Phone BerlEeley 1310 



Frank Moss 

PIANIST 

Residence Studio — Hotel Normandie 
Telephone Franklin 5400 

Available for Recitals 

Management Ida G. Scott 

Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny 5454 



Leslie V. Harvey 

Organist 
Coliseum Theatre 



SCHUMANN HEINK 

STEINWAY PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

Season 1922-23 — Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 



The 




There is a subtle satisfaction in knowing 
that one's possessions, whatever their nature, 
are of superlative excellence. 

A Gobelin tapestry or a da Vinci painting is 
a constant source of pleasure and bears testi- 
mony to the taste of its owner. To the music 
lover the same is true in the possession of a 
Mason & Hamlin Piano. 

Those who are musically sensitive, whose 
appreciation of tonal quality renders them 
competent to judge, pronounce the Mason & 
Hamlin Piano the leading instrument of its 
kind. 

Dame Melba, richly endowed with musical 
discrimination, says in this connection: "It 
seems to me that the preference on the part of 
an individual for the Mason & Hamlin Piano 
is indicative of a superior musical nature." 

Only an actual hearing can give a realization 
of its beauty of tone. 





1 








r 

^!^ -? 



WE INVITE A HEARING 



two entrances 

135-153 Kearny & 217-225 Sutter Sts. 

victor talking machines 




^/'WUg>'B Allen® ra 



MASON & HAMLIN PIANOS - 



Oakland — 1209 Washington Street 
San Jose — 199 South First 

SHEET music 



FUBLIC LIBRARY 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



^A (Etr^ 




tJJl THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JQUR.NAL INITHE GREAT WEST §| 



VOL. XLIV. No. 4 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY, APRIL 28. 1923. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO CLUBS GIVE FINE CONCERTS 



City's Music Clubs and Similar Organizations Enjoy Splendid Season- 
Many Programs of Unquestionable Artistic Value Given During 
First Months of the New Year — Excellent Resident Artists 
Heartily Applauded By Large Audiences — Ensemble 
Organizations Also Enjoy Enthusiastic Receptions 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



Owing to lack of space we were com- 
pelled to delay publication of reports of 
the proceedings of the Pacific Musical 
Society and the San Francisco Musical 
Club during the months of February and 
March. However, since the efforts of 
these organizations are of the utmost 
importance to the musical life of the 
community we feel that their programs 
should not be ignored. And to do justice 
to those who are in charge of the con- 
certs we shall now include in this review 
some of the events beginning with Febru- 
ary 15th. while we shall report the con- 
certs taking place after April 7th in the 
next issue of this paper. 

COSTUME RECITAL — The partic- 
ipants in the program of the San Fran- 
cisco Musical Club on February 15th add- 
ed very much to the interest of the occa- 
sion by appearing in costumes, thereby 
paying their respects to St. Valentine. 
The work of Mrs. Robert Goodale, 
diseuse, was especially enjoyed as it was 
quite a change from the regulation pro- 
grams of instrumental and vocal music. 
She was very charming in her Chinese 
costume for the Chinese Mother Goose 
rhymes, as she was also in the quaint 
Japanese numbers. She was assisted by 
Miss Gertrude Smith, Mrs. Arthur Hack- 
ctt. Mrs. John P. Coghlan, Mrs. Byron 
McDonald, with Mrs. William Poyner, 
violinist, and artistically accompanied by 
Mabel Sherbourne West at the piano. 

The four Dreamers' Tales played by 
Marian de Guerre Steward were exquisite 
bits of coloring for the piano and were 
executed most beautifully. Mrs. Ellen 
Page Pressley, whose singing is always 
enjoyed, showed great dramatic possi- 
bilities in her interpretation of the Vign- 
ettes of Italy by Wintter Watts. Her 
voice is one of beauty and showed to 
great advantage in this interesting col- 
lection of songs. She was accompanied 
by Miss Ethel Alexander. 

M. G. McF. 

ANNIVERSARY CONCERT — Friday 

evening, February 23rd being the thir- 
teenth anniversary concert of the Pacific 
Musical Society, those taking part in the 
program made their numbers more in- 
teresting by appearing in costumes of the 
period for which the compositions were 
intended. The first and final numbers of 
the program played by Miss Josephine 
Holub. violinist. Miss Margaret Avery, 
cellist, and Mrs. H. C. Barthelson, pianist, 
were more than worthy of the enthusi- 
astic applause received. Each member of 
the trio proved herself an artist of abil- 
ity. Mrs. Philip V. Hein, ably accom- 
panied by Mrs. David Hirschler, sang II 
Baccio by Arditi and Ye Merrie Birds by 
Gombert very artistically. The Gavotte 
by Gluck-Brahms and Caprice Gluck- 
Saint-Saens were played by Miss Isabel 
Arndt and thoroughly enjoyed by the 
audience. Miss Arndt displayed pianistic 
ability in her artistic interpretations of 
these compositions. 

Mrs. Katherine Ostrander, accompanied 
by Mrs. Anna Morse, sang Masse's Drink- 
ing Song in a pleasing fashion. Two De- 
bussy numbers, arranged for four hands, 
were effectively rendered by Mrs. Charles 
Cross and Mrs. David Hirschler. Miss 
Edna Koran, accompanied by Miss Hazel 
Nichols, proved herself to be a violinist 
of exceptional merit in her playing of 



three beautiful compositions for the 
violin. The Dance of the Blessed Spirits. 
a flute solo, was daintily played by Miss 
Melva Farwell. The singing of .Abraham 
Levin, artistically accompanied by Mrs. 
Abraham Levin was well received and 
very much enjoyed. He sang with great 
style and feeling and displayed a voice 
of beauty and resonance. 

M. G. McF. 

PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY— One of 

the most interesting and most musicianly 



programs given by the Pacific Musical 
Society during the present season took 
place at the Fairmont Hotel on Friday 
evening, March 9th. The opening num- 
ber consisted of a composition entitled 
Sur la Mer by Vincent d'Indy and inter- 
preted by Miss Etta Morsehead. This 
artist succeeded in extracting from this 
composition every particle of sentiment 
and proved herself both from a technical 
and emotional point of view thoroughly 
proficient in the exposition of adequate 
pianistry. The features of the program 
were the choral numbers interpreted by 
a chorus of able ladies under the direc- 
tion of Albert Elkus. They sang as their 
first group Four Slavic Folk Songs (Jos- 
eph Zuk), Shepherd and Shepherdess, In 
Death United, The Miraculous Well, and 
Had They But Known. They also closed 
the program with a rendition of Debus- 
sy's ultra modern conceit entitled The 
Blessed Damosel. During the first num- 
ber Mrs. Isabel Arndt was the assisting 
artist while Mrs. Roy Folger presided at 
the piano. The group of four songs was 
interpreted with fine musical instinct, 
delicate and intelligent phrasing and pre- 




cision of attacks as well as correctness 
of intonation and uniformity of reading. 
Miss Arndt proved a most delightful as- 
sistant. While Mrs. Folger played the 
accompaniments ably. 

The concluding number. The Blessed 
Damosel by Debussy is exceedingly diffi- 
cult both from the standpoint of vocal 
requirements and variety of expression. 
It is therefore with much pleasure that 
we can testify to the excellent work done 
by the Pacific Musical Society Choral 
under the direction of Albert Elkus. The 
unusual and difficult modulation and 
changes of keys were gratifyingly ex- 
ecuted by these capable singers. Anna 
Young, who sang the part of the Damosel, 
was in excellent voice and revealed her 
extraordinary taste and artistic instinct 
by phrasing and tonal work of excep- 
tional worth. Mrs. M. E. Blanchard as 
the narrator also contributed in no' small 
degree to the truly artistic character of 
this performance. Allan Bier presided at 
the piano with that dignity and pro- 
ficiency which only a pianist of the ut- 
most qualifications is able to display. 

The personnel of the Pacific Musical 
Club Choral is as follows: Miss Muriel 
Barneson, Miss Eleanore King, Mrs. 
Charles P. Butte, Miss Marcella Kneer, 
Mrs. Selah Chamberlain, Mrs. L. Lazarus, 
Mrs. F. Frank Cheatham, Miss Constance 
Littlejohn, Miss M. Fitzgerald, Miss 
Lillian Littlejohn, Mrs. Arthur Good- 
fellow, Miss Alan Lowry, Miss Lucy 
Hanchett, Mrs. Stanley Morsehead, Miss 
L. W. Harris, Miss C. Rogers, Mrs. Leon 
B. Jones. Mrs. John Rosseter, Mrs. J. R. 
Kentzel, Mrs. H. H. Scott. 

Rebecca Holmes Haight, cellist, and 
Ethel Palmer, pianist, interpreted Sonata 
for cello and piano by Saint-Saens in a 
manner that revealed the musicianship 
of both these artists. Miss Haight im- 
pressed her audience with the smooth- 
ness of her tone, the virility of her ex- 
ecution and the thoroughness of her 
technic. There is a certain individuality 
of style about Miss Haight's interpreta- 
tion that reveals unusual application of 
poetic sentiment, while Miss Palmer ap- 
peared to sense the various musical 
moods of Miss Haight in a manner to 
assist in creating that excellent ensem- 
ble which the two artists presented. 

Anna Young, soprano, was the soloist 
and sang the following group of songs: 
Soldier's Bride (Rachmaninoff), Nuit 
d'etoile (Debussy), Gavotte from Manon 
(Massenet), and The Captive Lark 
(Ronald). This exceptionally gifted and 
intelligent artist employed her delightful 
voice in a manner to obtain the finest 
artistic effect from every one of the com- 
positions she had selected for interpreta- 
tion. The enthusiastic approval of her 
audience was indeed well merited. Isa- 
belle Arndt played the piano accompani- 
ment very tastefully and discriminat- 
ingly. A. M, 



THE BEAI'TIFi:i, XEW HECITAl. H.\I,I. OF THE DOMIXIC.4N COLLEGE 

FamouN Edaoatlonal liiHtitutlon of San Rafael MalntainM One of the Most Bea 

tifnl and .VcnuatlrallT Perfect Recital Hnlln In the State — Under the 

AiiHplceN of the Colieee an Excellent Concert Coorite '\Vaa 

Given at ThU Hall During the Seaaon 1822-1023 



Thursday Evening, March 22 the Pacific 
Musical Society gave another of its ex- 
cellent concerts at the Fairmont Hotel. 
The initial number on the program was 
interpreted by Miss Eva Deutsch and 
Miss Adele Davis who played two com- 
positions for two pianos, namely. Suite 
No. 2 tor two pianos (Rachmaninoff) and 
Rhapsodie for two pianos (Schmidt). 
Comprehensive interpretation of two- 
piano compositions represents an art by 
itself which is not given that attention 
which it should receive. The two pianists 
who thus undertook to espouse the cause 
of two-piano music are entitled to the 
gratitude of all serious music lovers. They 
acquitted themselves most creditably of 
a very difficult task and both as to 
technic, exactness of ensemble, fluency of 
phrasing and matching of artistic ideas 
these pianists surely gave an excellent 
account of themselves. 

Josephine Wilson-Jones, one of the 

vocal artists recently locating in San 

Francisco, sang two groups of songs 

(Continued on page 11, column 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 




^n <iApp re cia tio n 

By Mrs. Noah Brandt 



^[^ 






<^-?//c?^^f 



^^^ft*^ oJiltnt-ilH, 



O m^^i^MuC -pwn^ Hew "Coi. T-Un. it ,e*un^ -^ 



^^^ti*J^/k<^ -i^itJL 



Qh£^ ^tp' ^U-ff^^- 






^1^7 



Mrs. Noah Brandt al Her Steinway 



iiiiiW 

ShermanSiay 6* G). 

Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 
Fourteenth and Clay Streets, Oakland 

Sacramento • Stockcon ■ Fresno • San Jose 



GEORGIA KOBER 

AMERICAN PIANIST 

Studio: 30:i-r>4r> Sntter St. 
Tel. Kenrny 5903, Wednesdays and Thursdays 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 

Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGORY, Director 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

Orsanlat Temple Emana Kl, First Chnreb of Chrbit Sd- 
entUt. Director Loria^ Clab. S. F^ Wed^ 1«17 California 
St» Phone Franklin 2A03t 9at^ First ChrUtlnn Scleuea 
Charch, Pkone Franklin I307t Res. stnaio, 3142 Lewlatoa 
Ave^ Berkeley. Phone Piedmont 2428. 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 

PIANIST — ACCOMPANIST 
Member University Extension Faculty 
""" ' " le Phone Paclflc 8825 



Studio: «70 Sth 



The College of the Holy Names 

Lake Merritt, Oakland 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

Contralto 
Teacher of Slngrlne. Complete Coarse of Operatic TralB- 
Ins. 2730 Pierce St. Tel. FUlmore 4553. 

MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

ITALIAN VOCAL TEACHER 



Arrillaga Musical College 

V. de Arrillaga. Director 
A. L. ArtlKues, Pres.: Louis Alesrla, VIee-Pres. 
ITnexrelled facilities for the study of music In all 
Its branches. Large Pipe Organ. Recital HaU, 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
San Francisco, Cal. Phone West 4737 



Formei 

— Endo 

in Dramatic J3eportmer 

snd Spanish spoken. 

!>tudlo— 104 Columbus 



The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. If you help us to add 3000 subscribers to 
our list we will help you to increase your income. 



English, French 



Memning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING, Director 
3242 Wnshlneton Street Telephone FlUmoi 



DOUGLAS SOULE-Pianist 



and E. Robert Schmlls <New York). Studio: IMS 
Kohler & Chase Bide., Wed. & Sat. Mornings. Tel. 
Kearny &4S4. Res. phone Piedmont 700. 



MR. and MRS. GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 



Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 

Music Courses Thorough and Progressive 

Public School Music. Accredited Diploma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite SOe Kohler & Chase BIdg., 
S. F.i 2.V10 College Ave., Berkeley. Residence 291 Alva- 
rado Road, Berkeley. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSWELDT, Pianist 

207 Cherry St., Bet. Washington & Clay. Tel. Pac. I»30<l 

JACK HILLMAN Baritone 

BREATH — VOICE — LIFE 

eoo Kohler & Chase BIdg.. Kenrny MS4 

Residence llOfl Bowh St.. Frsivklln MWS. 

MADAM MACKAY-CANTELL 

CONCERT COACH — VOCAL TECHNiaUE 



JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 
Thorough Vocal and Dramatic Training 
740 Pine St. Phone Douglas ' 



E. HAROLD DANA 



fns of a Studio 

1133 GREKN STREET 

Voice Placement, Breath Control 

Proper Production 

Phone ProHpect SflA for Appointment 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Organ. Harmony. Organist and Musical 
Director of First Presbyterian Church, Alameda. Home 
9«B«lo: 1117 PARIT STRBRT. ALAHKDA. Telephone Ala- 
meda 155. Thnrsdays. Merrlmaa School. S&7 Eldorado Ave. 
#aklaBd. Telephone Ple4moBt 27701 



Further 



ntlon, AVeat inOO. 



RESIDENT ARTISTS who are available for concert 
tours during the season 1923-1924 will please register 
with the Pacific Coast Musical Review so that we are 
able to recommend them to music clubs, music schools 
and managers. Only artists of reputation and experience 
are eligible for registration. 



KARI, RACKLE 

PIANIST — INSTRUCTOR 



JOSEPHINE WILSON-JONES 

Dramatic Soprano^PupU of liampcrtl, Garcia. Vocal 
Studio, 54.% Sutter Street, San FranclNCO. ReHldence, 4057 
Park Boulevard. Oakland. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



III T HETONL^- WEEKLV musical journal IH the GI^EAT W£5T IIJ 

MUSICAI, REVIEW COMPANY 

A LFRED M ETZGER President 

C. C. ElUERSON Vice President 

MAKCUS L. SAMUELS Secretary and Treaiiarer 

Suite 801 Kohler <& Chaae Bids., 2« O'Farrell St., San 
Pranelneo, Cnl. Tel. Kearny 6454 

ALFRED METZGER - Editor 

C. C. EMERSON - Business Manager 

Make nil checks, drafts, money orders or other forms of 

remittance payable to 

PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 

Oakland-Berkeley-AIamcda Olfice HIT Parn St., Alameda 

Tel. Alameda 155 
Miss ElUabelh Weslgate In Charge 

Ne>v lork Uttlce, .54 West S7tb Street. Phone Schuyler 1579 
Miss Rosalie Housman In Choree 

Seallle Ulllce. 1521 Fifteenth Ave., Seattle, Washington 
Mrs. Abble Gerrlsh-Jones in Charge 

Los Aneeles OHIce 

Suite 447, Donelas Bids.. 2.">7 So. Spring St. Tel. 820-302 

Sherman Danby in Charge 

San Diego, Cal., Omce, 1834 First Street 
Mrs. Bertha Slocnm In Charge 

Vol. XLIV SATURDAY, APRIL 28, 1923 No. 4 



Entered as second-class maU matter at S. F. Postofllce. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 
Annually In Advance Including Postaget 

llnlted States _ t.1.«n 

Foreign Countries 4.00 



TWENTY-SECOND YEAR 



UNDESIRABLE EFFECTS OF JAZZMANIA 



While there have been occasional discussions 
concerning the status of so-called "jazz music" 
we do not believe that the public interest in San 
Francisco had been thoroughly aroused as to the 
pros and cons (specially the cons) of this ques- 
tion until the Pacific Coast Musical Review pub- 
lished its scathing editorial a few weeks ago. In- 
deed the effect was so surprisingly sudden that 
the management of a motion picture theatre with- 
drew its advertisement from this paper because 
of its interest in this form of music. Further- 
more we find that our good friend Redfern Mason 
of the San Francisco Examiner is getting com- 
munications from anti-jazzists and so far has 
already devoted two or three double-column 
leaders on his Sunday page to the subject. The 
Musical Courier of New York in its issue of April 
14th is publishing an editorial in black type 
tepidly defending jazz playing. 



Therefore if the management of a theatre is 
endeavoring to advertise in journals of wide cir- 
culation and influence, it seems to us that the 
havoc wrought by this Musical Review editorial 
at home and abroad ought to convince even the 
most skeptical that the Pacific Coast Musical 
Review is read. And if a theatre refuses to ad- 
vertise in journals of wide appeal, then it does 
not act in the best interests of its house when it 
ceases advertising in a paper that appeals to a 
large circle of readers simply because the man- 
agement becomes irritated on account of an arti- 
cle that does not please it. When such photoplay 
theatre discovers that something is not quite 
right with its attendance such prejudicial and in- 
tolerant attitude toward publications or individ- 
uals may have something to do with the falling 
off of the business. In business and politics per- 
sonal prejudices must give way to working soltly 
for the best interests of the cause. If this appar- 
ent principle is not followed disaster or failure 
must eventually be the result of such a fallacious 
policy. 



We find both Redfern Mason and one of the 
editorial writers in the Musical Courier defending 
jazz to a limited extent. But it is evident they 
are referring to a phase of this mania which is by 
no means that characteristic which we find ob- 
jectionable. If the modern conception of jazz 
playing, such as is practiced at most motion 
picture theatres in San Francisco (for we have 
found this objectionable distortion only at lead- 
ing photoplay theatres in this city, not at such 
leading theatres elsewhere and specially not in 
Los Angeles) were merely a question of syncopa- 



tion there would be no cause for resentment. 
But the question of syncopation, melodic line and 
rhythm is not why we are waging this campaign 
against it. There is syncopation in the finest 
classics. Dvorak's New World symphony con- 
tains elegant passages of so called "rag-time" 
which is only one of the innumerable titles for 
syncopation. We regard melodic outline and 
rhythm as absolutely indispensable to music if it 
is intended to be a truly popular entertainment. 
But jazz, as it is practiced today, is not by any 
means a matter of syncopation or melodic out- 
line. It is a deliberate distortion of music as an 
art, an ugly caricature of beautiful emotional 
expression, a deliberate attempt to ruin and spoil 
some of the finest compositions written in musi- 
cal literature and an insult to the intelligence of 
anyone — whether professional or layman — who 
enjoys music in its pure and unadulterated form. 



It is evident from the articles we have read 
that neither Mr. Mason nor the gentleman who 
wrote the editorial in the Musical Courier (whom 
we suspect to be our friend Patterson) really re- 
ferred to the phase of jazz playing which we con- 
demn. It will be remembered that we never ob- 
jected to the so-called rag-time which for a while 
formed the craze in this country. But when 
"composers" of popular music began to deliber- 
ately steal standard compositions, both of an 
operatic and concert nature, we certainly thought 
it about time to enter an objection. And as we 
predicted at that time this deliberate robbery and 
desecration of good music sounded the death 
knell of rag-time until today it is impossible to 
make money on the sale of such songs or instru- 
mental pieces. Naturally the demise of rag-time 
left a vacancy for something else and jazz be- 
came rag-time's successor. But while rag-time 
was adapted essentially to songs, jazz is really 
only applicable to dancing. We are now speaking 
of jazz in the popular sense, not what theorists 
or its apologists want it to be. It was inspired 
as an accompaniment to dancing and dancing of 
the worst kind. If music really arouses senti- 
ments equivalent to the meaning it expresses then 
jazz certainly arouses the lowest form of dancing, 
and that in itself ought to be sufficient evidence 
for its inherent uselessness. 



Furthermore in rag-time syncopation is the un- 
derlying fascination. It never appealed to vul- 
garity or coarseness. It won out through merit, 
until composers less original and less skillful 
than others resorted to plagiarism and deliberate 
robbery of other people's works, when it became 
decadent. As long as jazz was used for the ac- 
companiment to dancing, even the vicious and 
immoral kind, it did no harm in a general way. 
As long as it was intended to appeal to the taste 
of intoxicated people prior to prohibition, it re- 
tained its place in the artistic gutter. But when 
it is taken from its proper sphere, because pro- 
hibition has destroyed intoxication in public 
places, and consequently the desire to dance to 
immoral tunes, and is placed upon programs 
which should be legitimately musical, those who 
endeavor to mix legitimacy with illegitimacy are 
offending public taste. And because certain peo- 
ple have a preference for immoral dancing, im- 
moral pictures, immoral literature and immoral 
music is by no means any reason why such im- 
morality and illegitimacy should be flaunted be- 
fore the eyes of the majority of the public which 
does not like jazz music. 



Let us see what jazz really means to the people 
at large. It is a monotonously tedious repetition 
of certain slides, runs, staccato notes, key 
changes, additional chords, discords, cacaphonies 
and trickeries of various kinds including mute 
effects, assisted by the most outlandish noises 
that an ingenious percussion "artist" is able to 
invent. That is what it really means to the peo- 
ple. We have listened carefully to jazz music 
for a number of years and we can honestly say 
that, with a few exceptions (like Paul Ash at the 
Granada theatre) the interpretation of every so- 
called jazz composition sounds exactly alike and 
if we were not told the title of it we actually 
would think that in most cases it was the same old 
composition. Such titles as "Aggravatin' Papa," 



and the various hues of "Blues," are not by any 
means in the minority. We still have to hear of 
a really sensible title to a song or instrumental 
piece regarded as jazz in its popular aspect. Now 
the title and the words in this so-called jazz 
surely indicate the character of the music. If we 
are wrong we arc ready to admit it, whenever we 
are convinced. 



Some of the titles we have read and heard are 
shamelessly indecent and intentionally so. How 
can you write decent music to indecent words, we 
mean, of course, vulgarly indecent? Then watch 
the actions of the musicians while they play such 
jazz. Of all the domfools in the world a musician 
who plays jazz with his shoulders, head, body 
and hair is surely the last word in jackazzity. 
Does this add dignity to musical performance? 
It is almost unbelievable what people will do for 
money. The musicians who degrade their art to 
this extent remind us of a line from the Weber 
and Field burlesques. One of the comedians asks 
another: "What would you do for a thousand 
dollars?" And he answers: "I am ashamed to tell 
you." 



We have repeatedly referred to Mr. Ash as one 
of the exceptions among those who interpret jazz, 
because he and his orchestra invest their inter- 
pretations with a certain element of artistry; but 
when Mr. Ash says he is elevating jazz by play- 
ing The Rustle of Spring or Mendelssohn's 
Spring Song in jazz arrangement we come to the 
parting of our ways. Good music has nothing in 
common with jazz. The latter may be made 
more palatable, but it can never be artistic. An- 
other characteristic of jazz is the arrangement. 
But such arrangement if it is to be musical must 
be done by a very clever musician. Unfortunately 
only a small minority of arrangers are clever 
enough to obtain satisfactory results. Others ab- 
solutely obscure the melodic line and theme of a 
composition and when the "band" plays out of 
tune besides, and vies with the various individual 
members of noisy extravagances, we have noth- 
ing but a disgraceful exhibition of indecent music. 
We know of no instance when the interpretation 
of jazz music coincided with the score as origin- 
ally written by the composer. If it did so coincide 
jazz would already be a dead issue. 



Numerous musicians have told us, and we have 
also been informed through the telephone and by 
mail, that Jack Partington of the Granada theatre 
is the power behind jazz in the photoplay the- 
atres of this community, that if he wished it jazz 
would be impossible at theatres in this city. If 
this is true it is surprising that such a brilliant 
man who understands so well the art of show- 
manship, to whose ingenuity the musical acts at 
the Granada owe their picturesque and attractive 
setting, whose family is so distinctly musical — 
one of his sisters being a noted vocal artist at the 
Metropolitan Opera House, and another having 
the distinction of enjoying a well-merited repu- 
tation as critic — should be so erroneously com- 
mitted to a defective musical policy. Is it not a 
fact that Herman Heller used to crowd the Cali- 
fornia theatre at eleven o'clock in the morning 
with an e-xcellent program well performed? Even 
at times when the audiences were not so large 
the attendance was bigger — much bigger — than 
it is now at eleven o'clock with a small orchestra 
and so-called Discovery Concerts of which events 
we shall speak in another issue. Is it not possible 
that a big orchestra under adequate leadership, 
playing the best of music, would attract more 
people than bad music played by a small orches- 
tra and even good music interpreted by an in- 
adequately sized orchestra. 



In Los Angeles they have large orchestras 
under able leadership and the attendance is much 
bigger than it would be under less auspicious 
musical circumstances. If the jazz orchestra is so 
popular why does it not attract large audiences at 
eleven o'clock in the morning? If the majority of 
the public wishes jazz why is it that the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra can crowd the 
Exposition Auditorium with ten thousand people, 
and a jazz orchestra, at the same prices of ad- 
mission, would not draw enough to pay the mu- 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



sicians? Can Mr. Partington explain this to us? 
Now, there is excellent music played by an ex- 
cellent orchestra under the direction of an able 
conductor — Mr. Lipschultz — at the Loew War- 
field. Many people tell us about the fact that the 
Warficld has the best music and that they prefer 
to attend the Warfield for this reason. Now the 
Warfield could cut out their jazz orchestra with- 
out losing one patron and saving considerable 
money. 



friends will stick to this plan they will sooner or 
later abolish jazz entirely from the motion picture 
theatres. 



It is generally conceded by musicians who 
know that the money expended on a good jazz 
orchestra could employ a first class orchestra of 
forty or fifty men who could play the best music 
under able direction. Does Mr. Partington, and 
other photoplay theatre managers, mean to tell 
us that the jazz orchestra and jazz music at- 
tracts enough people on its own accord to justify 
the huge expenditure of such money? We do not 
believe it. If the California, Granada and War- 
field theatres — to mention the biggest ones — 
would dispense entirely with jazz and resort to 
the straight orchestra of forty or fifty men which 
would interpret good music — not necessarily 
classic or so-called high-brow music — but good 
music pleasing to the people, like overtures, 
waltzes, marches and occasionally suites and se- 
lections from light and grand operas — together 
with a soloist selected from our leading resident 
artists in a short program, they would attract ex- 
actly the same number of people. But the music 
must be played' under a conductor who is suffi- 
ciently proficient to get snap, dash and rhythm as 
well as melody from his orchestra. 



Such a brief program, without vaudeville and 
jazz, but IN CONNECTION WITH A FINE 
PICTURE (not a bad picture) will crowd any 
motion picture theatre in San Francisco. The 
management would save thousands of dollars 
now practically squandered on the swill of the 
art, and would earn the gratitude of all intelli- 
gent people whether they are rich or poor, pro- 
fessional or laymen, students or artists, society 
people or just workmen. In the depths of our 
hearts all of us enjoy the best of its kind whether 
it is music or a moving picture, with the excep- 
tion of those of us who have cultivated depraved 
tastes. Why is it necessary to force upon us that 
which we don't like, simply because we have 
learned to enjoy the photoplay theatre as a 
means of entertainment? Because Mr. Parting- 
ton honestly believes that the public really likes 
jazz music is no evidence that he is right. If jazz 
music could stand on its own feet, like good 
music always can, and earn its way without as- 
sistance from moving pictures, then there would 
be sense in Mr. Partington's contention. But as 
long as a jazz orchestra can not attract an audi- 
ence at eleven o'clock on a Sunday morning, like 
Mr. Heller and his fifty men were able to do, all 
arguments in favor of jazz as a popular attrac- 
tion prove futile. 



Los Angeles has taken away from San Francisco 
Herman Heller, Ulderico Marcelli, Gino Severi, 
Leo Strachan and Maurice Lawrence, and Seattle 
has. taken Oliver Wallace. Were it not for the War- 
field there would not be in San Francisco today one 
good-sized orchestra under capable leadership to 
present really fine music. Gyula Ormay, who is one 
of our foremost musicians, is giving excellent se- 
lections which are praised everywhere, at the Im- 
perial theatre, but his orchestra should be bigger. 
Of course, this paper has not the means to cause a 
change, but it is just possible that Mr. Partington 
and his colleagues will sooner or later find out that 
we are right. We trust it will not then be too late 
for them. In the meantime we can not help those 
members of the profession, music clubs, teachers' 
associations, students and the concert-going public, 
who express to us their indignation by phone and 
letters. There is one remedy which they can apply 
if they wish, and which the writer personally will 
be glad to assist them in, namely, TO STAY 
AWAY FROM THE THEATRES WHOSE 
MUSIC THEY DON'T LIKE AND ATTEND 
THOSE THEATRES WHERE THEY ENJOY 
THEMSELVES WITHOUT BEING AN- 
NOYED. Of course, if a photoplay is specially 
fine, one can stand the annoyance of jazz, or go 
either before or after the musical program. If our 



A NEW DEPARTMENT 

We herewith announce the opening of a new 
department in The Pacific Coast Musical Re- 
view, a department in which matters of general 
musical interest will be treated. This department 
will be under the personal care of LeRoy V. 
Brant, Director of the Institute of Music of San 
Jose. Mr. Brant is well qualified to take up this 
work. He holds the degrees of Bachelor of Music 
and Associate of The American Guild of Organ- 
ists. He is certificated by the State of California. 
He has for several years past conducted a de- 
partment similar to the one wliich he will here 
open in the San Jose Mercury-Herald. We offer 
our readers through the medium of Mr. Brant 
the benefit of many years of experience in the 
lines of teaching, choir work and general musical 
activity. 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 



By Elita Muggins 

1605 The Alameda, San Jose, Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 



SAN JOSE, April 24.— Mrs. Charles P. Braslan. presi- 
dent ot the San Jose Music Study Club, was responsible 
for the delightful musical programs heard at the con- 
vention o£ the San Francisco District Federations of 
Women's Clubs held here a fortnight ago. The choruses 
which played an important part, were under the direc- 
tion of Mrs. Antoinette Lohf, with Mrs. George A. Penni- 
man accompanist. 

An informal reception Wednesday evening, April 11. 
at the Hotel Vendome, opened the convention, the music 
for the evening being the following vocal duets by Mrs. 
Miles Dreskell and Mrs. Stanlely Hiller: Sweetly, 
Sweetly Sang the Bird (Rubinstein); The Wanderer's 
Night Song (Rubinstein); The Passage Birds' Farewell 
(Hildach). with Mrs. Howard Huggins at the piano. 

Thursday morning Mrs. Elizabeth Aten Pugh gave an 
organ voluntary, Gounod's Triumphal March (from 
Queen ot Sheba). In the afternoon the federation chorus 
sang Love's Old Sweet Song (Molloy) ; Sweet and Low 
(Barnby) ; O Dear, What Can the Matter Be (Old English 
Folk Song). At the close of the business session Mrs. 
Reuben Walgren gave the following interesting group of 
Indian songs: Zuni Indian Music (Troyer); Blanket 
Song, Sunrise Call, Cliff Dwellers' Hunting Song, and 
Lullaby (Lieurance); Miss Ruth Burlingame at the 
piano. At the reception in the evening Mrs. Wallace 
Deming, soprano, delighted the audience with her rendi- 
tion of Carew's The Piper of Love, and Will o' The Wisp 
(Spross). Mrs. Avenal Ross at the piano. 

Friday afternoon the Music Study Quartette, composed 
ot Miss Lulu E. Pieper, Miss Nella Rogers. Mrs. Sanford 
L. Bacon, Mrs. Mary Webster Mitchell, with Mrs. Daisie 
L. Brinker at the piano, were heard in four numbers; 
Processional (Cesar Franck) ; Love's Spring Song 
(Massenet); Invocation (Rogers); Indian Matin Song 
(Cadman). 

Friday evenining the A Capella Choir of the College 
of the Pacific, with Charles M. Dennis, director, gave a 
choice program: O Gladsome Light (from the Russian 
Liturgy) (A. Gretchaninow) ; Come. Dorothy, Come 
(Swabian Folk Song); Cargoes (Lutkin). Juanita Tenny- 
son closed the program with two lovely vocal numbers: 
To the Sun (Pearl Curran), Wings of Night (Wintter 
Watts), Mrs: Stanley Hiller at the piano. 

The successful convention came to a close with a 
drive to Palo Alto where the delegates were entertained 
at luncheon, after which Warren D. Allen, organist ot 
the Memorial Church, Stanford University, presented 
the following program: Chant de Printemps (Joseph 
Bonnet) ; Echoes ot Spring (Transcribed by Edward 
Shippen Barnes) (Rudolph Friml) ; May Night (Selim 
Palmgren) ; Spring Song (Mendelssohn) ; Faith in 
Spring (Transcribed for organ by W. D. Allen) 
(Schubert); Rhapsody in D major (Rosseter G. Cole). 

The final concert in the 1922-1923 Colbert concert 
course was given Thur.sday evening in the Morris Elmer 
Dailey assembly hall of the State Teachers' College. 
Madame Wilson-Jones, soprano: Kajetan Attl, harpist; 
and Anthony Linden, flutist, all ot San Francisco, gave 
an unusual program to a large and appreciative 
audience. 

Madame Wilson-Jones quite captivated the audience 
with her numbers. Songs by Dvorak, Chaminade, 
Liddle, Holzel, Lynes. Batien, Clarke and Massenet, the 
last two with flute obligato, were beautifully interpreted. 
My Prayer (Holmes) was given for recall. 

Mr. Attl, a great favorite with San Jose audiences, 
besides being accompanist for all the vocal and flute 
numbers gave five short selectons by Donizetti, 'Tedeschl, 
Renie, Hasselmans-Schnecker, and Zabel, giving for 
recall another Tedeschi number. Dance of the 
Marionettes. 

Mr. Linden, in addition to playing two obligatos. gave 
Huber's Larghetto, and two cadenzas from Mozart's 
concerto tor flute and violin, arranged by Reinecke. For 
recall he gave a little talk on the flute, and played un- 
accompanied The Little Shepherd from Debussy's suite, 
The Children's Corner. 



Kohler & Chase 

2Cnabp Amptro 



SAN JOSE HEADQUARTERS 
185 So. First Street 



ALFRED LANINI 

Expert Maker of Violins, Violas and Cellos 

With European Experience 

Artistic Repairing Rare Old Violins For Sale 

591 E. ST. JAMES STREET 

San Jose, California 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 


LeRoy V. Brant, Director 


OffcrM CourMt^ft in All Brani'bfM nt MumIc at 


All SliigcH of .Idvaiic-enient 


SAN JOSE CALIPORMA 



ALLAN BACON 

Head of Piano and Or^an DepnrtmentM. 

Collree of faclHo. San Joxe 

Concert Oreanist Pianoforte Lecture RecltnU 

NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 
San Jose. Cal. 
CenferH Decrees, AnardN CertlflcateN. Complete Collegre 
CoBMervatory and Academic CourMCH In Piano, Violin. 
Harp. 'Cello. Voice. Harmony, Counterpoint. Canon and 
Fu^ue and Science of MuhIc. For particulars Apply to 
SiJlter Superior. 



The program in full was: (a) A Sketch (Renie), (b) 
Entre-act from Lucia (Donizetti), (c) Valse (Hassel- 
mans-Schnecker), (d) Fountain (Zabel). (e) Spanish 
Patrol (Tedeschi) Mr. Attl: (a) Songs My Mother 
Taught Me (Dvorak), (b) In My Garden (Schumann), 
(c) The Silver Ring (Chaminade), (d) The Swiss Girl's 
Lament (Holzel), Madame Wilson-Jones: (a) Larghetto 
(Huber), (b) Two Cadenzas (Reinecke), Mr. Linden: 
Bartered Bride Fantasia (Smetana), Mr. Attl: (a) June 
Roses (Lynes), (b) Love's Enchantment (Batien), (c) 
A Dedication (Clarke), Elegie (Massenet), Madame 
Wilson-Jones. 



Mrs. Flora Cooper von SchuckCnan and Mrs. Hope 
Swinford of Santa Cruz recently entertained their music 
club and friends with an evening of music; the occasion 
being a two-piano recital. The first part of the program 
was the Schumann A. Minor Concerto, Mrs. Swinford 
playing the solo part. For the second halt Mrs. Cooper 
von Schuckman led with the first piano in Grieg's Peer 
Gynt Suite. Tschaikowsky's Song Without Words, and 
Danse Macabre (Saint-Saens). 



The recital given Friday evening by the local chapter 
ot Mu Phi Epsilon at the First Methodist Church was a 
decided artistic success, the large audience enjoying 
the highly meritorious program. Mu Phi Epsilon is a 
national honorary musical sorority, celebrating its tenth 
birthday next November, with over forty chapters work- 
ing to realize and maintain the ideals of the organization. 
Membership requirements are unsually strict, and only 
musicians of unquestioned talent and proven abilty may 
become members ot this society. Although every chap- 
ter's" home is in some educational institution of high 
musical rank, membership in a chapter is not limited 
to students of the school, and many musicians of pro- 
fessional standing are proud to affiliate. Such artists as 
Schumann-Heink, May Peterson, Kathleen Parlow, 
Carrie Jacobs Bond. Rosa Raisa and Emmy Destinn 
have been duly initiated as honorary members of the 
national organization. 

An organ selection by Flora Vest, groups of vocal 
numbers by Lucile Fox, Marie Brown and by a trio 
composed of Ethel Rand. Jean Madsen and Agnes Ward; 
piano solos by Dorothy Knoles, two beautiful violin 
numbers by Marjory M. Fisher, with organ accompani- 
ment played by Myrtle Shafer, and an exceedingly bril- 
liant masterful and splendid rendition of Mendelssohn's 
Capriccio Brilliant by Miriam Burton and Myrtle Shafer 
playing piano and organ, constituted the program, one 
deserving of the highest praise, and which was en- 
thusiastically received. 

A highly successful recital was given at the First 
Methodist Church Monday night when Leroy V. Brant, 
A. A. G. 0., assisted by Mrs. Leroy V. Brant, mezzo 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



oprano. appeared under the auspices of the American 
luild ot Organists. The program of the evening was 
rilliantly rendered and dramatically interpreted. Mrs. 
[rant's melodious and well-trained voice formed a fitting 
ehicle for the rendition of her numbers. Particularly 
^ell given was the difficult Sapphic Ode of Brahms, and 
lie tenderly conceived In The Boat by Grieg. Mrs. Brant 
vidently has the insight which enables her to interpret 
he great masters in their more abstract moments. 

As an organist, Mr. Brant belongs to the conservative 
chool. Not for him was the fluctuating registration 
t some of the modern players, but a severely conceived, 
imply rendered interpretation of the organ numbers 
fhich was at the same time pleasing and a relief from 
he more restless stop arrangements. Judging from the 
■pplause which his playing called forth, his conception 
if the interpretation of his numbers pleased immensely. 
ie prefaced the playing of the Bach, Widor and Boell- 
nan numbers with a few explanatory remarks, which 
nabled the untrained lover of music to better under- 
tand these involved compositions. 

Miss Alice Hitchcock played Mrs. Brant's accompani- 
nents in a most pleasing manner. The three artists 
vere from The Institute of Music of San Jose. Fol- 
owing is their program: (a) The Great G Minor Fugue 
Bach), (b) Marche Nuptiale (Harris), Leroy V. Brant: 
;a) Daffodils a-Blowing (German), (b) In the Boat 
[Grieg). 

Members of the Mu Phi Epsilon sorority gave their 
ji-monthly halt-hour of music at the Young Women's 
[Christian Association Monday afternoon at 4:.'!0 o'clock. 
Sthel Rand, Agnes Ward, Jean Madsen, Dorothy Bresse 
ind Cornelia Buttles rendered the following program: 
Ifocal trio (a) Down in Derry, (b) Love Me If I Live 
(Foote), (c) Irish Love Song (Lange), Ethel Rand, 
fVgnes Ward. Jean Madsen: Violin Soli (al Indian 
Lament (Kreisler) (b) Brindisi Valse (Alard), Agnes 
Ward; Piano Soli (a) Russian Dance (Cyril Scott), (b) 
American Polonaise (Carpenter), Dorothy Bresse; Vocal 
rrio (a) I'm Wearin' Awa', Jean (Foote), (b) The 
Morning Wind, (c) Die Mammy Coon. Accompanists, 
Cornelia Buttles and Dorothy Bresse. The growing popu- 
larity ot these half-hours of music has induced the as- 
sociation to throw open its doors that outsiders may 
llso enjoy these programs. 

Alice Metcalt, formerly of San Jose, who has been 
connected with the Jessica Colbert Agency for the past 
two years, has been appointed Associate Manager ot the 
agency. Her many friends in this vicinity will be pleased 
to learn of her advancement in her chosen work. 

The second Senior Recital attracted a large audience 
to the College ot Pacific Auditorium Tuesday evening, 
April 17. Ethel Rand, soprano, and Dorothy Bresse, 
pianist, presented a well-built program in a thoroughly 
capable and interesting manner. Miss Rand made her 
particular appeal through the use of a beautiful pianis- 
simo in her upper register, clear enunciation, splendid 
phrasing, and revealed an unusually thorough musician- 
ship. Miss Bresse's performance ot the Grieg Ballade 
in G minor was an extremely well finished piece of 
work. In accuracy, contrast of tone color, pedal effects 
and interpretation. Miss Bresse eclipsed any senior per- 
formance of recent years. Both young women possess 
the gift ot stage presence and gave pleasure to their 
hearers. 

The Elk's Concert Orchestra, under the leadership of 
Dr. Charles Richards, will give their third annual concert 
Wednesday evening. May 2, in the Morris Elmer Dailey 
assembly hall ot the State Teachers' College. Miles 
Dreskell, violinist, will be the soloist. The following 
Interesting progi-am will be given; Overture Prince 
Methuselah (Strauss); Largo from Symphony No. 5 in 
E Minor, New World Symphony (Dvorak); (a) Dagger 
Dance, (b) Indian Invocation (from Natoma) (Victor 
Herbert): Introduction et Rondo Capriccioso (Saint- 
Saens), Mr. Dreskell with Orchestra: Girl ot the Golden 
West Potpourri (Puccini): Ballet of the Flowers (1) 
Red Rose, (2) Marguerites, (3) Jasmine, (4) Heather, 
(5) Violets, (6) Lily of the Valley, (7) Daffodils, (8) 
Gardenia. (9) Mignonette, (10) Bachelor Buttons, (11) 
Hollyhocks, (12) Poppies (Henry Hadley). 

The London String Quartet gave a recital in the 
Stanford Assembly Hall on the evening of Thursday, 
April 12, before a very large audience. This was the 
last concert of the current (the eleventh) season ot the 
Peninsula Musical Association. Miss Alice W. Kimball 
is the secretary of this organization. 



ALCAZAR THEATRE 

Louis Bennison, the eminent American star, who has 
just returned from a year's tour ot the Antipodes, comes 
to the Alcazar tor a season beginning with the matinee 
Sunday, April 29th, in the season's greatest comedy hit, 
"Lawful Larceny."' 

Bennison needs no introduction to San Francisco. He 
is one ot the most popular players ever to appear in 
this city, and his rise to stardom has endeared him to 
his many friends in the bay region. He will have the 
dominating role in "Lawful Larceny," which was written 
by Samuel Shipman and produced with pronounced 
success at the Republic Theatre, New York. The play 
is distinctly a fun maker and Bennison is always at his 
best as a comedian. Filled with sparkling lines and 
situations with unexpected twists, the piece is novel 
and unique in the extreme. 

Supporting the star will be an augmented company 
headed by Nana Bryant, who will have the leading 
feminine characterization. In the cast will be found 
Mary Duncan, Netta Sunderland, Thomas Chatterton, 
Cliff Thompson. Norman Feusier, and Ancyn McNulty. 
Allan Pollock closes his most successful season at the 
Alcazar with the performance Saturday night. April 
28th. His second play, "A Pinch Hitter," is proving a 
real laugh getter at the O'Farrell street playhouse. 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES AT CONSERVATORY 

Three concerts were given on Monday evening by 
pupils ot the San Francisco Conservatory (Ada Clement 
Music School). At the school Miss Rena Lazelle, head 
ot the vocal department, presented twenty-two pupils in 
a voice recital. At the B'nai B'rith lodge a program was 
given by Marcus Gordon, pianist; Selma Margolis, 
violinist; Emilio Gavilan, baritone soloist; Walter Levin, 
accompanist, and the school orchestra. At the Hillside 
Club in Berkeley a program was given, under the 
auspices of the University ot California by Herbert 
Jaffe, pianist; Melva Farwell, flutist; Ruth Meredith, 
pianist; Jack Moulthrop, violinist, and Andrew Robert- 
son, bass soloist. 

On Monday evening, April 30th, members of the 
Adillian Club ot the Conservatory will give a concert at 
Masonic Hall, 1748 Haight street, tor the benefit ot All 
Saints' Episcopal Church. 



MADAME SHERRY A HIT AT THE RIVOLI 

Snappy Musical Comedy Attracts Large Audiences 
That are Not Niggardly With Their Applause- 
Much Laughter and Catchy Melodies 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

If you like to listen to catchy tunes and bright comedy 
we can not think of a more advantageous evening to 
spend than to attend the performance of Madame Sherry 
now delighting large audiences at the Rivoli Opera 
House. Considered from the standpoint of all around 
excellence it is perhaps the best production so far given 
by the Hartman-Steindorff Comic Opera Co. There is 
a certain co-operation between the various members ot 
the company which seemed to have been lacking here- 
tofore, and we say this without intending to reflect upon 
any individual member that might have been participat- 
ing at previous productions. Ot course the writer was 
specially pleased to welcome back Myrtle Dingwall, as 
youthful as ever and with a voice of velvety flexibility 
and an effervescent, breezy style that fits in snugly with 
the character of Yvonne Sherry the sophisticated con- 
vent graduate. 

Miss Dingwall belongs to that school ot light opera 
prima donne that possess the instinct of combining 
artistry with personality and that thrust their magnet- 
ism beyond the footlights and take a hold of the heart- 
strings of their audiences. Another newcomer is Violet 
May, a very charming blonde, good to look upon and 
also good to listen to. She has a very good voice which 
she uses to fine advantage, (and it she could divest 
herself ot certain slurring or portamento effects would 
add to the enjoyment ot those listeners who appreciate 
flawless singing) and deports herself with an ease that 
makes her fit in snugly with the rest ot the company, 
Dixie Blair continues to be a valuable acquisition to the 
organization. She emphasizes the tunny episodes of her 
role as Catherine, has a very delightful Irish brogue, 
and never becomes coarse even during tho tipsy scene. 
Her voice is pleasing and her dramatic deportment very 
natural and unforced. 

John Van in the role ot Edward continues to please 
the audiences with his voice and Myrtle Dingwall sees 
to it this time that he works tor his living. By this we 
mean that he adds some much needed spirit to his 
histrionic efforts. He even begins to dance with a cer- 
tain element of abandonment that was not noticeable 
before. Paul Hartman has an opportunity to do some 
very clever acting in the line of dialect comedy and cer- 
tainly takes fine advantage of such opportunity. George 
Kunklel is equally unctuous in the role ot Leonard 
Gomez. Muggins Davies is charged with effervescence 
and pep in her splendidly interpreted role ot Pepita, 
and she, together with Paul Hartman, have a very ef- 
fective dance which gets them an enthusiastic encore. 

Ot course, Ferris Hartman in the role ot Theophilus 
Sherry adds to his reputation as an exemplary light 
opera comedian. He emphasizes his lines in a manner 
to extract every particle ot humor from them whenever 
necessary and he recites the well known philosophical 
verses We Are Only Poor Weak Mortals After All with 
effective emphasis. Hartman does everything he under- 
takes well and in this case he adds another triumph to 
his array of artistic conquests. Robert Carlson and 
Eltrieda Steindorff add vocal solos to the performance. 
Chorus and orchestra under Paul Steindortt's experi- 
enced guidance complete the ensemble, while costumes 
and scenery add pleasure for the eye. You will not re- 
gret it you follow our suggestion and attend the per- 
formance of Madame Sherry at the Rivoli. 



Unless you are known to everyone who engages artists 
OP who attends concerts you can not possibly secure 
engagements. Your mere say-so does not constitute 
proof of your experience and success. Therefore make 
your name valuable by advertising. 



ANIL DEER 

COLORATURA SOPRANO AND 
VOICE SPECIALIST 

Announces 
that owing to changes in Studio schedule 
necessitated by her concert engagements 
she will remain in San Francisco during 

JUNE— JULY— AUGUST 

STUDENTS' WAITING LIST 

NOW OPEN 

Address: 79 Central Ave,, San Francisco 



EDOUARD DERU 

VIOLINIST TO THEIR IMAJESTIES, 

THE KING AND QUEEN 

OF BELGIUM 

Principal Assistant to Eugene Ysaye, for 

Many Years Professor of Violin at 

the Liege Conservatory of Music 

Will Be in San Francisco This Summer and 

Will Accept Pupils in Violin and 

Chamber Music Beginning 

August 15th 

For particulars regarding terms and qualifica- 
ions, as well as enlisting, address Beatrice 
Anthony, 1000 Union Street, San Francisco. Tel. 
Franklin 142. Oakland Tel. Lakeside 4133. 



SELBY C. OPPE.VHEIMKR PRESENTS 

Chaliapin 

THE WORI.D'.S (iHF'^.VTEST SIXGEK 
TWO E.\TR.\ORDI\ARV RECITALS 

EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 
Sunday Afternoon, May 20 
Monday Evening, May 28 



Ben Moore 

PIANIST— COACH— ORGANIST 

Organist and Director Trinity Episcopal 
Church — Beth Israel Synagogue 

2636 Union St. Tel. Fillmore 1624 

Appointment Only 



For Rent From May 15 to Sept. 15 
$100 A Month 



3404 Clay Street 



' Grand Piano 
ttculnrH AddreHH 
EDITH BENJAMIN 



HAZEL JOHNSON 



COLORATURA SOPRANO 

PUPIL OF DOMENICO BRESCIA AND FERNANDO MICHELENA 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND SOLFEGGIO 

j:— Kohler & Chase BIdg.,— Kearny 5454 Residence Studio: -2720 Filbert St„— Wesi 815z 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Mischa Levitzki arid the Ampico 

Mischa Levitzki Writes 

A Letter To San 

Francisco 



April II, 192 J. 
To San Francisco: "It has been a privilege to play for you 
this season. Your reception at all three of my appearances 
is a delightful memory, and I am looking forward to my 
return appearance here, which I hope will be in the near 
future. In the meantime, however, I feel that, thanks to the 
Ampico, I play to a great many of you, all but in person. 
The influence of this wonderful instrument in the home is 
inestimable. I have heard and compared all of the repro- 
ducing pianos, and to me the supremacy of the Ampico is 
unquestionable. The selection of the right reproducing 
piano should not be entered into lightly. It is too important. 
It is just as important for you as for the artist, and should 
only be made after careful comparison." 

Mischa Levitzki 



COMPARE 

►TpHE suggestion of Levitzki that you compare all reproducing 
A instruments comes with unusual authority from a great artist 
who followed exactly that same course himself. In the end he was 
forced by strong conviction to turn his back on the reproducing 
device installed in his favorite concert piano — a most courageous step. 
He, with Rachmaninoff and several other great masters who fol- 
lowed the same course, have paid the highest tribute to the Ampico, 
and furnish testimony too eloquent to be ignored. 

The Ampico is placed at your disposal, just as it was for Levitzk 
and Rachmaninoff — for any comparison you may choose to make 
Then follow your own judgment as did Levitzki, Rachmaninoff 
Godovvsky, Moiseiwitsch, Dohnanyi, Schnabel. Rubinstein, Samaroff 
Leginska, Bloomfield-Zeisler, Ornstein, Mirovitch, Nyiregyhazi, 
Maier, Pattison, La Forge, Farrar, Kreisler and scores of their 
fellow artists. 



Kohler & Chase 



KNABE AMPICO 



San Francisco 
Sacramento 



Oakland 
San Jose 



URNER-LARAIA CONCERT 

Misg Catherine Urner, soprano, and 
William F. Laraia, violinist, gave a Joint 
vocal and violin recital at the Fairmont 
Hotel on Monday evening, April 23rd, 
under the direction of Alice Seckels. An 
appreciative audience listened to a rep- 
resentative program of vocal and instru- 
mental compositions. Miss Urner is bead 
of the vocal department of Mills College 
and the proceeds of the concerts were 
utilized to swell the endowment fund. 
Owing to the tact that the San Francisco 
Musical Club held its annual banquet on 
the same evening many music lovers 
unable to be present would have been 
able to attend and thus add to the en- 
thusiastic audience. 

Miss Urner was heartily applauded for 
her vocal selections and expressed her- 
self with individuality of style and an 
enunciation that earned her many com- 
pliments. She sang with that eonfldence 
and poise which only an experienced 
vocalist is able to cultivate. Mr. Laraia 
added to the artistic excellence of the 
concert by playing a few violin compo- 
sitions well known to concert-goers 
which he interpreted with that fluency 
for which he has become known. Mrs. 
Elsie Cook Hughes played the accom- 
paniments for both Miss Urner and Mr. 
Laraia with that depth of musicianship 
and delightful coloring which forms such 
a splendid background for a soloist to 
depend upon. 



The MInetti Orchestra, under the 
astute direction ol Giulio Minetti, will 
give one of its delightful concerts at 
Scottish Rite Hall on Thursday evening. 
May 17th. Mnie. Rose Florence, the dis- 
tinguished soprano soloist, will be as- 
sisting artist as will also Tarnia Akoun- 
ina, violinist. A specially interesting 
program has been prepared by Mr. Mi- 
netti and it will be found that another 
exemplary concert has been added to the 
series of artistic successes of the Minetti 
Orchestra. 



Mrs. A. F. Bridge presented her pupils 
in a well rendered program at her studio, 
1920 Scott street, on Sunday afternoon, 
April 8th, The following pupils were 
heard: Misses Virginia Ratto, Esther 
Folli, Ruth Heany, Ruth Hannan, Ora 
Lambert, Ramona Leonard, Helen Leith- 
old, Erma Keithley, Edith Parks, Bernice 
Glasson, Jessie Clyde, Phoebe Sieroty, 
Mrs. John Baker and Mrs. S. Leon. 
Everyone of these thoroughly trained 
students reflected much credit upon her 
teacher, and several of them exhibited 
voices of unusual beauty and timbre 
which made such an excellent impression 
upon their audience that hearty and pro- 
longed applause rewarded the young 
artists for their successful interpreta- 
tions. 



Gertrude Ross, the widely known com- 
poser-pianist of Los Angeles, gave a re- 
ception in honor of Jack Hillman during 
the latter's visit to Los Angeles at the 
time of the annual convention of the 
California Federation of Music Clubs on 
Sunday afternoon, April 8th. About fifty 
prominent Los Angeles musicians were 
in attendance who were glad to meet 
Mr. Hillman and listened with pleasure 
to his interpretations of eight songs of 
which three were by Miss Ross, namely. 
My Madonna, The Open Road and Dawn 
in the Desert. That same evening Mr. 
Hillman broadcasted from the Los An- 
geles Times Radio Station singing Pro- 
logue from Pagliacci, Trees by Rasbach, 
The Open Road by Ross and Just a 
Wearyin' For You by Carrie Jacobs Bond, 
the last two songs with the composer at 
the piano. On Monday evening, April 9th 
Carrie Jacobs Bond gave a dinner in 
honor of Mr. Hillman. His trip south 
brought Mr. Hillman several requests to 
appear before some of the music clubs 
next season. The Los Angeles Times in 
commenting upon Mr. Hillman's singing 
said: "Carrie Jacobs Bond and Gertrude 
Ross, distinguished composers, whose 
songs are sung around the globe, honored 
KHJ, The Times studio, with a visit last 
night. Jack Hillman, noted baritone, of 
San Francisco, sang Just a Wearyin' For 
You, by Mrs. Bond, with the composer 
playing the accompaniment. Inspiring 
and beautiful was the voice of the singer 
and the tender notes touched by Mrs. 
Bond at the piano. Equally beautiful and 
direct from the heart were the songs of 
Gertrude Ross, sung by Mr. Hillman to 
the composer's accompaniment. The 



composer also favored with a piano solo, 
The Ride of the Cowboy, one of her se- 
lections which has a thrill to the theme 
and a wholesome, sincere sentiment.'' 

Stanislas Bern, the excellent cellist and 
director, is meeting with brilliant suc- 
cess at the Hotel Whitcomb where his 
Sunday concerts evoke specially enthu- 
siastic comment. Last Sunday Miss 
Yvonne Landsberger was the soloist and 
contributed a number of excellent vocal 
solos which brought her enthusiastic ap- 
plause because of her naturally fine voice 
and intensity of emotional coloring. 
Blanche Hamilton Fox will be the soloist 
tomorrow evening when the program 
will be as follows: March, Emperor (C. 
Friedemann) ; Overture, Fingal's Cave 
(P. Mendelssohn); Waltz, Vienna Life (J. 
Strauss) ; Vocal Solo, My Heart at Thy 
Sweet Voice (Saint-Saens) ; Blanche 
Hamilton Fox. Selection, Sari (Kalman); 
Three Dances, Nell Gwyn (E. German); 
Vocal solos — The Fragrance of the Rose 
(Clough-Leighter), The Crimson Petal 
(Auilter), Aprile (Tosti), Blanche Hamil- 
ton Fox; Melody (Brig. Gen. Charles G. 
Dawes), La Gioconda (A. Ponchielli), 
Largo from New World Symphony (A. 
Dvorak), Vocal solo, Cavalleria Rusticana 
(Mascagni), Blanche Hamilton Fox; 
Grand Opera Selection shrd cmf cmf 
Grand opera selection, Migon (Thomas). 

The San Francisco IVIusical Club elect- 
ed its new officers for the ensuing year 
recently with the following gratifying 
result: Mrs. Horatio F. Stoll, president; 
Mrs. James Pressley, first vice-president; 
Mrs. Charles Camm, second vice-presi- 
dent; Mrs. A. T. Fletcher, treasurer; 
Mrs. William B. Bosley, business secre- 
tary; Mrs. Daniel C. Deasy, recording 
secretary; Mrs. Gleen Woods, corres- 
ponding secretary; Mrs. Parker Steward, 
librarian. 



MUSIC IN NEW YORK 

By Rosalie Housman 

New York, March 28, 1923. 
Unfortunately, I could not hear the 
first American performance of Lazare 
Saminsky's Symphony of the Summits, as 
I was away on a short lecture trip. But on 
my return, I found, upon inquiries that 
it had sounded very well, was concise, 
strongly constructed, and most effective 
music. The composer, who conducted it 
himself, Mengelberg giving place on this 
occasion, was warmly greeted by the 
large audience, and there were many 
favorable comments in the press. Mr. Sanx- 
insky is one of the well-known Russians 
who have found a home here as well 
a public and publishers. 

I came back in time to hear Fernanda' 
Pratt's recital at Aeolian Hall the after^ 
noon of March 20th. There was a large 
audience, much enthusiasm and beautiful 
flowers, all a deserved tribute to one ot 
the loveliest voices heard in many a day 
Known in the Bast by the picturesque 
name of Doria Fernanda, she is yet truly 
western, with the golden tints of warmth 
and light in her radiant personality a 
is in her voice. She sings with a musical' 
feeling, a clear understanding of the 
texts, and with charm. The Spanish 
songs, to which she seems so tempera- 
mentally suited, were specially welcome 
in the hackneyed season's offerings, and 
in The Marsh-Hymn ot Ashley Pettis, she 
scored one of the hits ot the afternoon. 
There is no doubt of her artistic success, 
whether it is on the concert stage or the 
opera, as she seems to be at home at 
either. She had again put California on 
the musical map. 



It was good to hear the Freischutz 
agam after many years. Its melodies 
seem as fresh as the day they were 
written, though there are occasional mo- 
ments when things seem to be a bit stiff. 
But it is so joyous, so imbued with the 
folk-spirit and, above all, so richly scored, 
that it is worth a dozen Mona Lisa's and 
others of that type. It was adequately 
cast Hutt as Max and Miss Sinemeyer as 
Agathe doing the leads. Moricke con- 
ducted, which says much. 

The Haensel and Gretel which was also 
on their repertoire during the week 
brought a sold-out house and children 
everywhere who certainly showed inter- 
est and appreciation, frequently and audi- 
bly. The opera requires no extraordinary 
cast, but does need good staging and in 
every way they gave a good performance 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Articles of General Musical Interest 

These artloles are prepared for The Paeifio Coast 
isleal Review by I.eRoj- V. Brant, dlreetor of The 
stltute of Miisle of San Jose. Mr. Brant tvill be 
eased to treat here subjects of general musical 
tereNt. Anyone desirinK: an article on any liar- 
•uiar sul>ieet may communicate with Mr. Brant, 
re Tbe Institute of Music, South Second street 



A BIRD'S MUSICAL INSTINCT 

The question of the musical instinct of animals is one 
upon which musicians do not agree very well. We all 
know that most dogs howl at the sound of a violin, and 
that cats do not favor the piano to any extent. Beyond 
that we are not prepared to go. 

I should like to relate to you an incident which I my- 
self have witnessed which would indicate that a bird 
has a sense of pitch, of rhythm, and a memory which 
can be cultivated. 

Mrs. Nye Farley, residing in Santa Clara, has a canary 
•which she has taught to whistle. Mrs. Farley, be it 
known, is a trained musician, numbering among her 
other accomplishments the ability to whistle.. By 
whistling the selection, "Listen to the Mocking Bird," 
over and over to her canary she taught the bird to per- 
fectly duplicate the melody, up to a certain point. The 
performance would go as follows, substituting the melody 
for the words that I here give: 

"Listen to the mocking bird, listen to the mocking 
bird! The mocking bird is singing o'er her grave. Lis- 
ten to the mocking bird, listen to the mocking bird! 
Tweet, tweet, tweet, trilllllU" and so on. The bird would 
get so tar, and then burst off into his own more familiar 
style of song. 

The peculiar part of the whole matter is that the bird 
would go so far, when I first heard him. Later on, about 
a year or so, I again heard him, and he had memorized 
another half dozen bars of the music! Would not this 
indicate to anyone that the bird has a musical memory, 
and that that memory may be cultivated? It is a well- 
known fact that the German Rollers are taught to sing 
small phrases, but please bear in mind that this bird 
has actually memorized all but a few notes of the song 
I have mentioned, and that his intonation is good and 
his rhythm perfect. 

This is an isolated instance of musical memory in a 
bird. As such we cannot justly draw any definite con- 
clusions. But the incident might set us to thinking and 
observing, might it not? 



CHALIAPIN AS A PROGRAM MAKER 

Feodor Chaliapin, the great Russian basso, who will 
positively appear in San Francisco at the Exposition 
Auditorium on Sunday afternoon. May 20th. and on 
Monday night. May 28th, in two extraordinary recitals 
is strongly opposed to including operatic arias on his 
recital programs, as he considers it unintelligent for a 
singer to draw upon his operatic repertoire for a con- 
cert, when the literature of song is so rich and varied. 
Chaliapin. following a Russian custom, and one he has 
adhered to since his advent on the concert platform 
never announces his programs in advance, but sings 
from the numberless gems of his vast list, as the spirit 
moves him, and according to what he considers is most 
desired by his auditors. To hear the artist render such 
gems as The Volga Boatman. When the King Goes Forth 
to War, The Song of the Flea, The Two Grenadiers, etc., 
one can understand why Chaliapin confines himself in 
recital strictly to selections of this kind, for, as he says, 
"There may be in opera a tew rare pages that are suffi- 
ciently lyrical in character to survive being transfered 
from opera to concert, but why should one use even 
these when the world's wealth of pure song is so im- 
mense that no singer in a lifetime can explore more 
than a portion of it." 

The Chaliapin concerts will be great events here. 
Thousands will gather to hear the distinguished Rus- 
sian, whose appearances everywhere have met with 
wildest enthusiasm, and been accorded superlative 
praise. The recitals will be given under the manage- 
ment of Selby C. Oppenheimer. The ticket sale will start 
at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s store in San Francisco on 
Monday morning. 



ELLIS CLUB CONCERT IN LOS ANGELES 

The Ellis Club is giving its most pretentious program 
at the Philharmonic .\uditorium on Wednesday evening, 
April 25. Felicien David's symphonic ode, "The Desert," 
will be the outstanding offering on the program. This 
composition is in three parts, and included in its 
rendition are a recitation and a lovely tenor solo. Hobart 
Bosworth will speak the lines, while Ralph Laughlin 
will carry the tenor solo part. The Philharmonic 
Orchestra has been especially engaged to play the ac- 
companiment for "The Desert,' with Sylvain Noack as 
concert master. It has been our intention to review the 
work of this organization at some length. It is always 
a pleasure to attend their concerts — if not for the music 
—for the humor of it all. Some of the members have 
been getting out the stiff front and the high choker for 
many many years. The old boys take their efforts just 
as seriously as they did thirty years ago! To see George 
Steckel and the rest of the bassos, after the piece de 
resistance, is to know that he seen his dooty and he 
done it. Woof! Too late for a serious review this week 
— but look tor a story on the old, the good old boys, 
next week. 



MUSICAL INFLUENCE OF DOMINICAN COLLEGE 

New Recital Hall of the School of Music Is the Scene 

of an Excellent Concert Series Which Is Greatly 

Enjoyed by Students and Music Lovers 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

The Pacific Coast Musical Review intended on variofis 
occasions to compliment the authorities at the Domini- 
can College in San Rafael for the splendid achievements 
attained by the Dominican College School of Music. The 
writer spent a most pleasant afternoon at this school 
some time ago and took a'.ong with him fine recollec- 
tions of the systematic and efficient educational plan 
that is being followed at this institution. Indeed, we 
took such deep interest in the form of tuition employed 
there, and explained to us by one of the sisters in charge 
of music, that we asked for a set of the books and other 
study material in order to give our readers a more in- 
telligent idea of the effectiveness of the curriculum. On 
account of the fact that a thorough study of these 
books require more time than we have had at our com- 
mand recently, we shall have to ask the indulgence of 
our readers until such time when our examination is 
completed. 

At the time of our visit we also saw the new recital 
hall. It is a very tastefully constructed and acoustically 
perfect auditorium. It is a pity we have nothing like 
it in San Francisco. Its seats exceed a thousand, and 
while at the time of our visit no organ had been in- 
stalled, provision tor such an instrument was made. We 
also heard one of the young students sing. Her name is 
Miss Marcella Knierr and she possesses a beautiful 
dramatic soprano voice which has been trained in a 
manner to enhance its fine timbre and to sound free 
and clear. This young lady also sings with excellent 
judgment and phrases her periods in a manner to ac- 
centuate their meaning. It was a decidedly intelligent 
performance and justifies interest in the singer's future. 

Miss Irene Chisen. pianist and accompanist, played 
tor Miss Knier and revealed a complete control of the 
technical and emotional phases of pianistic art. She 
proved a splendid aid to the soloist and in her own 
work showed careful study and comprehension of the 
compositions entrusted to her care for adequate exposi- 
t'-on. Miss Knier sank Vol che sapete and 11 est doux 
11 est bon. In extending these complimentary remarks 
we speak of course of the work of students, and wish 
to emphasize the fact that there can not be any doubt 
regarding the thoroughness of their training and the 
musicianly style of their expressions. 

We also admired the beautiful homes that serve as 
residences tor the students and the artistically arranged 
grounds and school buildings. There is no doubt but 
that the Dominican College is an educational institution 
of the highest rank. For the first time in its history 
Dominican College introduced a complete concert and 
lecture course, the beautiful recital hall giving an ex- 
cellent opportunity for these ambitious plans. Mischa 
Levitzky is one of the more recent attractions enjoyed 
at San Rafael. The entire season proved an enjoyment 
and education to the students as well as to the music 
lovers of Marin County and the Sister to whose far- 
sighted judgment the success of this enterprise must 
be ascribed has indeed every reason to feel satisfied 
with the response which everyone readily gave to the 
appeals of the Dominican College for recognition and 
appreciation of its endeavors. 



S. F. MUSICAL CLUB'S ANNUAL BANQUET 

Two Hundred Members of Famous Organization 

Assemble at Palace Hotel and Listen to Many 

Addresses and an Unusually Interesting 

Program 

By ALFRED METZGER 

The San Francisco Musical Club gave its annual 
banquet at the Palace Hotel on Monday evening. April 
23rd, and judging by the attendance and the enthusiasm 
that prevailed throughout the evening there is prevalent 
a spirit of co-operation and comradeship which is indeed 
conducive to the growth and perpetuation of this or- 
ganization. Mrs. Lillian Birmingham, President of the 
California Federation of Music Clubs, and also Presi- 
dent of the San Francisco Musical Club, acted as Toast 
Misti-ess and as is always the case conducted the pro- 
ceedings with an originality of procedure and a pre- 
cision of programmatic arrangement that added zest 
and snap to the evening's events. 

Ordinarily the custom of introducing the speakers in 
rhyme is a tedious and occasionally a silly affair, but 
the way Mrs. Birmingham applied her poetic muse was 
not only entertaining, but revealed unusual skill in ar- 
rangement of rhymes as well as in the emphasis of 
the characteristics of the speaker who was being intro- 
duced. As is customary at annual banquets Mrs. Birm- 
ingham first called on the various ladies who assisted 
her during her administration in the conduct of the 
affairs ot the club. And these included: Mrs. Thomas 
Inman. Mrs. Mabel Coghlan, Mrs. Charles Curry, Mrs. 
Wilson and Miss Augusta Gillespie. Mrs. Coghlan made 
an exceptionally brilliant address, elegantly worded 
and containing beautiful sentiments that will long linger 
in the memory of those who heard the speaker. 

In courtesy to the President-elect, Mrs. Horatio F. 
Stoll was called upon to address the assemblage and 
received a most enthusiastic welcome. Mrs. Frederick 
Crowe, President of the Pacific Musical Society, Mrs. 
Alvina Heuer Wilson, President of the San Francisco 
Music Teachers' Association, and Vincent de Arrillaga, 
President of the Musicians' Club, delivered brief ad- 
dresses. Redfern Mason, music editor of the San 
Francisco Examiner, Ray C. B. Brown, music editor 
of the San Francisco Chronicle, Miss Cora Winchell, 
music editor of the San Francisco Journal and Alfred 



Metzger, editor of the Pacific Coast Musical Review, also 
contributed their share to the oratorical efforts ot the 
evening. 

After the conclusion of the addresses a music pro- 
gram was presented. The same was opened by Frederick 
MacMurray, who gave two selections tor the viola, ar- 
ranged by himself. Mrs. Ellen Page Pressley. sang an 
aria from Manon by Massenet with that graciousness of 
style and clearness of voice which has made her so many 
friends. Elsa Behlow Trautner, the possessor ot a very 
flexible and clear colorature soprano, sang the Titania 
aria from Mignon by Thomas with most effective poise 
and phrasing. Miss Modesta Mortensen interpreted two 
violin solos with technical skill and musical judgment 
and received hearty recognition tor her artistry. Miss 
Eileen Fealy gave a brilliant interpretation of Liszt's 
Sixth Rhasodie adding much to her gradually increasing 
reputation. Mrs. Marguerite Raas Waldrop sang in a 
very tasteful and refined manner a song byUda Waldrop 
entitled Every Time I Look at You, with the composer 
presiding at tbe piano, adding zest to the performance. 
It was one ot the most charming features of the pro- 
gram. Emil Breitenteld and Victor Lichtenstein con- 
cluded the program with their exceedingly humorous 
description ot moving pictures with music but with- 
out pictures. It certainly created a sensation and proved 
the hit of the evening. 

Mrs. Lillian Birmingham has the satisfaction to know 
that another unforgettable evening has been added to 
the San Francisco Musical Club's great array of success- 
ful entertainments. 



SEASON'S FINAL MATINEE MUSICALE 

Large Audience Admires Excellent Pianistic Art of 

Guiomar Novaes in the Colonial Ballroom of the 

St. Francis Hotel This Week 

Although the writer was unable to attend the concert 
of Guiomar Novaes at the Colonial Ballroom of the St. 
Francis Hotel last Monday afternoon he is able to in- 
telligently review the concert inasmuch as he Heard this 
distinguished pianist in Los Angeles a short time ago. 
The brilliant and well justified success that rewarded 
Mme. Novaes for her splendid artistic accomplishments 
in the South also crowned her efforts in this city. An 
unusually large audience attended this last one of Alice 
Seckels' Matinee Musicales and showed by its en- 
thusiasm, as reported to us by friends, that the charm- 
ing and attractive personality of the artist as well as her 
numerous musical advantages combined to make her a 
favorite from the very start. 

There is represented in this pianist the essence of 
distinguished virtuosity. She combined a number of 
musical characteristics each one of which entitles her 
to a place among the elect. Her technic is singularly 
clean cut and precise. Her touch is limpid, yet firm and 
capable ot powerful results. Her phrasing is one of 
the most delightful features of her playing. She colors 
her octave passages and her chromatic scales and runs 
in a manner to caress the ear. Such works as 
Schumann's Carnival are specially well adapted to re- 
veal her artistry at its zenith. She is an intellectual 
artist and at tbe same time tempers this intellectuality 
with virile emotionalism. She never sobs on the piano, 
but expresses herself in a manner easily comprehended 
by those to whom musical expression is a response to 
their own inner feeling. 

We particularly enjoyed her Chopin interpretation 
which lacked the saccherine effeminacy which so many 
pianists think they must apply to Chopin, and yet she 
never permitted herself to degenerate into melodramatic 
force or undue vitality. It would be difficult to imagine 
a more effective reading of the Scherzo than Novaes 
gives it. There is prevalent throughout her recital that 
inexplicable atmosphere of thoroughness and proficiency 
which always surrounds the true artist and the disciple 
chosen by the muses to deliver a real message. 



EMINENT PIANIST DELIGHTS NOTRE DAME 

Mme. Marie von Unschuld, Distinguished Viennese 
Piano Virtuosa, Assisted by Her Daughter Made- 
leine Interpret An Excellent Program 

Mme. Marie von Unschuld, the eminent Viennese 
pianist. Court Pianist to her Majesty the late Queen 
Elizabeth ot Roumania, and her daughter and pupil, 
Madeleine, a gifted juvenile pianist, gave the following 
program at Notre Dame College ot Music in San Jose 
on Monday afternoon, March 19th: Scherzo B flat minor 
(Chopin), Prelude, The Tolling Bell (Chopin-Unschuld), 
Turkish March (Beethoven-Rubinstein), Mme. Marie 
von Unschuld: Sonata A flat major, op. 26. Andante con 
Variazioni (Beethoven), Rhapsodie N'o. 10 (Liszt), 
Madeleine: Echo Study (Paganini-Unsculd). Scenes 
from Childhood (Schumann), La Campanella (Paganini- 
Liszt), Mme. Marie von .Unschuld; Valse lente 
(Brahms), Concerto G minor. Scherzo (Saint-Saens), 
Madeleine; The Wanderer (Schubert-Liszt), Rhapsodie 
No. 11 (Liszt), specially arranged and edited by Mme. 
von LTnschuld). Mme. Marie von Unschuld. 

Mme. von Unschuld is giving these concerts tor the 
benefit of -Austrian people who are suffering from post 
war conditions, and we are creditably informed that she 
is an artist of high distinction. The beneficiaries ot 
tliese concerts are principally children who have lost 
their fathers in the war. Both technically and musically 
the artist made a deep impression upon faculty and stu- 
dents, and her little daughter proved herself endowed 
with unusual talent. She obtains a very big tone, con- 
sidering her being only fourteen years ot age, and her 
interpretation is intelligent beyond her years. Mme. 
von Unschuld is a resident of Washington, D. C. where 
her husband is a member ot the Austrian Embassy. She 
is not only a distinguished artist but a refined and 
highly cultured woman. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

SHERMAN DANBY, REPRESENTATIVE AND CORRESPONDENT 

Assisted by Miss Lloyd Dana and IVIiss Mildred Alexander, Los Angeles; Miss Penelope Newkirk; Hollywood; Mrs. Helen Wood, Pasadena. 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: SUITE 447 DOUGLAS BUILDING, 257 SO. SPRING STREET, TELEPHONE 820-302 

Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



LONDON STRING QUARTET 

The twelfth and last concert of the Los Angeles 
Chamber-Music Society's series was given over to the 
London String Quartet, composed of Arthur Beckwith, 
first violin: Thomas W. Petre, second viilin; H Waldi 
Warner, viola: and C. Warwick-Evans, violoncello. The 
program was: String Quartet in C. Opus 59, No. :i 
(Beethoven); String Quartet. Opus 23, H. Waldo War- 
ner; String Quartet in F, Opus 96 (Negro), Anton 
Dvorak. 

The Beethoven is one of his very iDveliest works. We 
quickly became aware of a different tonality than is 
usually heard. Their playing is not broader than that of 
Flonzalev Quartet, not always as rich, but this is more 
than made up for by their masculine tone. I cannot 
find the word to fit the qual'ty. but I mean SDmething 
the farthest removed from that hrneyed sweetness 
which is the temptation of mus-cans who play together 
a great deal. The Andante is stilking'y original even 
in this age of originality and the kst nioven ent is per- 
haps the- most brilliant fugue ever wr'tten for strings. 

H Waldo Warner's Fairy Suite, "The Pixie Ring is 
not distinguished for its musical content except in the 
last movement, but is delightfully e:fln and humorous. 
It is a treat to be allowed to laugh at humorous mu3:c 
and to hear it played humorously. How few conductors 
recognize humor when it is written into a score In this 
case it was obvious, and the composer-violist was 
heartily applauded and smiled not unlike one of his own 

"'Dvorak's Negro Quartet is all that his New World 
Symphony just tails to be for my ears. It is beautiful 
writing throughout and was played with such remark- 
able understanding that those who were fortunate 
enough to hear it will have a standard of quartet 
quality to last them through a lifetime. The Lento-that 
lovely lament of an enslaved people— is among the finest 
things in modern music and oh how these four men 

"'T^he two developments upon Cherry Ripe and Sally 
in Our Alley by Frank Bridges, who was violist in this 
quartet before Mr. Warner, are so well known on the 
Victor Records that they were demanded and played 
as encores. I am still humming Sally in Our Alley and 
striving vainly to recapture the ravishing web of har- 
mony in the second part. In its way it is as lovely as 
Haydn's Emperor Quartet. 

I came away from this concert in that state of exalted 
excitement which only exceptional music can induce. 
Splendid as our own quartet is. it is just as well this 
concert came at the season's end. 

Now-All together for the next season.^^^ ^^^^ 



PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

The final concert of the Philharmonic Series was a'so 
one of the season's best. The symphony chosen to linger 
in our memories as the last one heard was Brahms- 
Symphony No. 1 in C Minor. Ophus 68, tollowedhy 
Debussy— Prelude a I'apres-midi d'un faune (The Atter- 
noon of a Faun) after the Eclogue of Stephane Mallarme. 
and Strauss— Tone Poem. "Death and Transfiguration. 

The Brahms Symphony furnished material for a mas- 
terly interpretation, one of the finest I have heard Mr. 
Rothwell give. In the first movement is very little 
Brahms, the composer of beautiful love-breathing songs. 
There seems here nothing but music. He wrote evidently 
thinking mostly of the possibilities of the instruments, 
and the movement is one of the wonders of symphonic 
writing. The Andante is Brahms of the songs in beauti- 
ful sustained melodies. The third. Allegretto, is gentle 
and graceful, while the fourth is an emotional and musi- 
cal triumph. At the conclusion ot the symphony, Mr. 
Rothwell received an ovation, and upon repeated calls 
Mr. W. A. Clark, founder and guarantor of our wonder- 
ful orchestra came out upon the stage amid storms of 
applause. 

Debussy's Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, unlike 
much of the music by this great modern, is a stricf.y 
thematic piece of writing, built upon a constantly re- 
curring theme which is taken up by flute, clarinet and 
oboe in so haunting a manner that it can never be 
forgotten. This number was delicately played, and 
greatly appreciated. 

Strauss's great tone poem — Death and Transfiguration 
— was a fitting number with which to close a concert 
series. Mr. Rothwell's magnificent brass section is heard 
to advantage in the triumphant transfiguration theme — 
one of the loftiest themes that ever came into the heart 
of a composer. 

The audience demonstrated its approval of the 
season's work in no uncertain manner, and thus ended 
our orchestra season for another summer. It is to be 
hoped the Hollywood Bowl concerts will be resumed 
this summer to tide us through the period of musical 
starvation. LLOYD DANA. 

That there will not be a dearth of the finest musical 
attractions for Los Angeles next season is assured by 
another concert series of world-famed artists announced 




Fitzgerald's for the Advancement of Music 

Sylvain Noack 

Sylvain Noack is considered by many critics one of the finest 
violinists in the United States. He is concert master of the Los 
Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra — owns, uses and heartily 

KNABE 

"T/ie Perfect Product of American Art" 

Mr. Noack is accepting pupils at his studio, 120 S. Oxford, 
Los Angeles. 




by George Leslie Smith, manager of Philharmonic 
Auditorium and H. M. MacFaflden, manager of the 
Elwyn Concert Bureau. These managers have com- 
pleted plans to bring to the Auditorium next season 
nine big concert attractions by direct affiliations with 
the Wolfsohn Musical Bureau of New York, the oldest 
and largest agency in America. 

This list of internationally known stars include Mme. 
Margaret Matzenauer, prima donna contra'to of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company; Clarence Whitehill, bari- 
tone of the Metropolitan who has sung most of the lead- 
ing roles this season in the Wagnerian operas; Jascha 
Hiefetz, considered by. many as the world's greatest 
violinist; Maria Ivogun, the latest European sensation 
in opera and concert, one ot the world's leading colora- 
tura sopranos, who has recently taken Irew York by 
storm in her recital work and as guest artist with the 
German Opera Company; Mario Chamlee, our own Los 
Angeles tenor who has reached the very principal ot 
success as leading tenor of the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany: the famous quartet of 'Victor artists, known 
wherever 'Victor records are heard, these noted singers 
include Olive Kline. Elsie Baker, Royal Daanum and 
Lambert Murphy, all popular favorites. 

The comic opera production (vast pocket edition) ot 
Mozart's "Impresario" with Percy Heinnes, in the lead- 
ing role supported by an all-star cast. Moritz Rosenthal, 
distinguished Polish pianist, who returns after seventeen 
years ot European triumphs: Max Rosen, young Rus- 
sian violinist who almost caused a riot by his marvelous 
playing here two years ago with the Philharmonic 
Orchestra, and last but not least on the list or celebri- 
ties, Reina'.d Werranrath. American baritone too well 
known to require introducing to local music lovers. 

This formidable array of talent will he heard on 
Monday evenings during the music season starting with 
a combination of talent on Monday night, October 22, 
that will make even the most blase patron sit up and 
take notice for it will include Mme. Matzenauer, Mme. 
Elizabeth Rothwell and Clarence Whitehill, supported 
by the entire Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Walter 
Henry Rothwell, in a program ot excerpts of Wagnerian 
operas. 

The local management of these concerts believe that 
the student and masses should have an opportunity 
to hear the best music at prices within their means and 
announce that by their direct co-operation with the New 
York Bureau they have been able to arrange this splen- 
did series at very low prices tor season tickets. 

Hallette Gilberte, composer-pianiste who is wintering 
in Pasadena, has a number of his songs included in the 
repertoire of Viola Ellis. The latter is a resident ot 
Los Angeles, and was recently pronounced by Mme. 
D'Alvarez to possess one of the great contralto voices 
of the world. 

Eleanor Hornby Woodward, dramatic soprano, has 
returned from the East, where she filled successful con- 
cert engagements. A cancellation of her engagement 
as church soloist in New York was made necessary by 
her departure for California, i'.lness ot her daughter 
being the cause. 

Gloria Mayne presented an all-Indian song recital at 
the Cahuenga Parent-Teacher Association, March 21st. 
She win repeat the program for the Highland Park 
Ebell, and the Lancaster Woman's Clubs during April. 

The Music Teacher's Association met in the Tajo 
Building, March 19th, and Jennie Winston, Bertha 
Vaughn, J. P. Poulin, Lillian Backstrand led the vocal 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

70S Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

COMPOSER-PIANISTE 

JuMt iMsued for the Piano 

"SPANISH serenade:" and "RIDE: OF THE) COWBOY" 

ALMA STETZLER 

VOICK culture: — coaching in REIPEIRTOIRB 

OPEIRA CLASSES INCLUDING COMPLETE 

PRESENTATIONS 

Stndlo 1324 S. FUrneroB. Phonii 11805 

CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 

Limited dumber of Advanced Puplla Accepted 

VloUnUt L08 Aneelen Trio 

^Indlo! 334 MohIc Art« Stndlo Bldg. Phone 100W2 

ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

Tueiiday, Wednesday. Friday .Afternoonji 
EKnn Sehool. Phonea 21N0S or 271SS0 
1.124 SoDth Fleueron, Loa Angelea 

SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCERT MASTER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
Concertii and Recltala 
Urn. Caroline C. Smith, 424 Andltorlnm BIdE. 



Los Angeles Chamber Music Society 

ELEVE.NTH CONCERT 
FRIDAY EVENING. MARCH 30 

GAMUT THEATRE 

Monnie Hayes HaittinKN, Soprano 

Philharmonic dunrtet 

Flufe. Clarinet, BaaMoou, French Horn, Harp, Double Daaa 

Seats at Eant Rox OfTiee, Auditorium 

Information at No. 0. Gamut Club 

Phone S22-800 




LOS ANGELES 

CALIFORNIA 

THEATRE 



GREATER CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
ELINOR, Conducting 
50 MUSICIANS 

PROGRAM FOR WEEK OE' APRIL 2» 
<n) E-ACIvELTA.\« ----- Meyerbeer 

ih) LIERESE^REUD ----- Krelslet 

(e) SYNCOPATED IMPRESSIONS - . . 

------ Arranged by Mr. Eilnoi 

In eonjunclion with the Goldnyn release, 
"HACKBO-NE" 



iirday Ev 



mth .\irred 






I 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ILYA BRONSON p^„^„ 

Member Trio Intlme. I^on Aneele» Trio, Philharmonic 
anartet. InHtractton, Chnmher Munlc RecltaU 

BOIR La BUraila — Phone Holly 3044 

ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

Teacher of Piano, Harmony, Voice Coach. Unrfne March 
and April, Merrllt Jones Hotel, Santa Monica. Tel. Sanin 
Monica 0a-I4.'>. !to. 348 Music Arts Bidg., Los Angeles. 
Tel. S21-lSil. 

The Heartt-Dreyfus Studios 

VOICE AND MODEUIV LANGUAGES 

Gamnt Club nidp^.. 1044 South Hope Street. Personal 

Representative. Grace Carroll-I^lliot. Phones 822-809 and 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

LOS ANGELES 

12S0 Windsor Boulevard 031S llollyn'ood Boulevard 

Complete Faculty of Artist Teachers 

JOHN SMALLMAN-- BARITONE 



EARL MEEKER-Baritone 

Concert* — Recital* — instruction 

Featuring AU-Amerlcan Programa 

Stadia; 1600 So, msueroa St. Piione 2S19S 

Anna Ruzena Sprotte 

CONTRALTO School of Vocal Art 
Studio: Tahoe Building IMacdonell Club Rooms) 



MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



GRACE WOOD JESS '»'^^-^o soprano 

DRAMATIC INTERPRETER OF FOLK SONGS 
IN COSTUME RECITALS 

Management: L. E. Kehymfr, Los AnpelPS 

ANN THOMPSON-P,an,s/e 

Pl.VNIST OF I'ERSONALiTY 



CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN 

America's Popular Composer on tour n-lth TSIANiNA 
East and South: Oct. and Nov. — Pac. Coast: Jan. and Feb, 
East again: Feb. and April — California: April and May 



CHARLES BOWES 



DAVOL SANDERS ^'?i,',?pS?l:S"'^ 

Head Violin Dept., College of Monlc. U. S. C. — Member 
Phllhamioole Orchestra 

A. KOODLACH 



60» Majestic Theatre BIdg., Los Ane 



Phone n7n.»2 



MARGARET HEDGER MAULE 

EXPERIE.NCED INSTRUCTOR IN NORMAL 

COURSE IN MUSIC 

PI.4NO ORGAN 

VOICE CULTURE 

130 S. Los Robles, Pasadena, California 



Tel, 



Oaks IS41 



De Lara Grand Opera Company 

MANUEL SANCHEZ DE LARA, Conductor 

esents "II Trovatore'' on Tuesday Evening, A| 
th, at Gamnt Theater. Los Angeles, and on Thu 
y Evening, April 2Uth, at Pasndeaa High Sch 



Round Table discussion. Cordellia Smissaert. pianiste, 
and G. Raymond Meniiennick, violinist, were soloists ot 
the musical program. 

Maud Elizabeth Ricliards sang two ot her own com- 
positions at a reception given recently in the Hollywood 
home of Dr. and Mrs. Guido Castles. Evelyn Lane 
honored the principal guest. Prince Ramchandra of 
Bombay, by singing The Song of India. 

Frieda Peycke, with a group of pianologues, and tlie 
Orpheus Four in vocal selections, entertained the 
Kiwanis Club on March 15th. 

Anna Ruzena Sprotte was given a reception by the 
Los Angeles Music Culture Club, Sunday night, the 15th 
inst., in the Kanst Art Gallery. Those appearing on 
the accompanying musical program were Gilda IVIar- 
chetti, dramatic soprano; Mme. Marguerita d'Aleria, 
pianiste; and Dr. Bruce Gordon Kingsley, opera lecturer. 

Daisy Jean, Belgian 'cellist, has given a series of six- 
teen Southern California engagements under the direc- 
tion of Frank L. Grannis (in charge of the Southern 
California Music Company Artists' Bui-eau). She ap- 
peared on the Grauman Discovery program of March 
11th, meeting with unusual success. 

Homer Simmons, pianist, has been engaged by Havrah 
Hubbard for a tour of the East. Hubbard is a lecturer 
and music critic and has presented successfully a series 
of operalogues. 

The Los Angeles Conservatory of Music gave a pupils' 
recital at the Highland Park Branch, March 16th. Those 
participating were: Inez Marston. voice; Evelyn Pick- 
rell and Florence Taylor Black, violin; Faith Hitchcock, 
Elizabeth Allen. Mary de Lano, Irene Gates, piano. Two 
more recitals will be given by the school this month. 
On March 27th, Florence Hayes and Lora Call will be 
presented, and on the 29th inst., Elizabeth Allen and 
Inez Sitton will give a program. 

Doris Struble gave a pianologue at the last meeting 
ot the Wa Wan Club's Junior Auxiliary, March 28th. 
Lora May Lamport, soprano, and Eunice Landrum, 
pianiste, were on the same program. 

Walter Fisher Skeel, A. M. Perry, Arnold Wagner 
Vincent Jones, were among those of the U. S. C. College 
of Music faculty who were installed as members of the 
local chapter of National Music honor society, during 
ceremonies held at the university in March. 

The Los Angeles Trio gave its fifth concert of the 
season in the Ebell Auditorium, April 12th, its members 
displaying even smoother ensemble playing than at their 
last appearance. The audience was large, and thor- 
oughly appreciative. 

M,ay McDonald Hope, Calmon Luboviski, Ilya Bronson 
— their music was a glimpse of pure beauty. Three 
numbers to the program, each played with consummate 
skill and understanding: Trio No. 1 G Major. Hayden; 
Sonata for Piano and Violoncello, Op. 19 G Minor, Rach- 
maninoff; Trio C Minor Op. 108, Brahms. The Scher- 
zando movement of the Rachmaninoff Sonata was de- 
cidedly the success of the evening. The violoncello and 
piano composition abounded in odd rhythms and mellow 
tones and a loud ovation followed it. 

The finesse ot the trio is the foundation of understand- 
ing underlying all its work. Such closely knitted en- 
semble playing has the semblance of one voice urging, 
of one voice typifying the beauty of sound. Both the 
trio numbers brought out this fact, the Finale of Hayden 
and the presto movement ot the Brahms. In the first. 
May McDonald Hope did some particularly commendable 
piano phrasing. But to point out the merits of each 
artist is impossible. Another such an event is dated 
for May 3rd, of which the program is: Trio B flat Major 
No. 7 (Beethoven), for violin and violoncello; Paasaeag- 
lia, Handel-Halvorsen; Trio, A Minor, Op. 50, Tschai- 
kowsky. 

James Campbell, Jr., pianist, and Norma Hewlett, so- 
prano, appeared in a joint recital in Santa Barbara last 
week. 

Margaret Monteville Juny presented her music class 



Mme. Newcombe 

PRINDELL 

Desirable Engagements Dignified Publicity 

Personal Representative of Distinguished Artists 

MAJESTIC THEATRE 
LOS ANGELES 



Phone 642-93 



Phone 642-93 



in a recital last Thursday evening, April 26, in the Music 
Hall of the Music-Arts Building. 

Mrs. Lily Link Brannon gave a Studio Recital for five 
of her pupils last Saturday afternoon April 21, at her 
studio in the Walker Theatre Building. 



Hazel Elwell, soprano, was one of the featured so- 
loists on tile anniversary program given last week by 
the Pasadena Shakespeare Club. 



Ann Thompson, pianist, presented a program at the 
Downey's Women's Club Friday, April 13. 

Charles Wakefield Cadman has returned to Los 
Angeles and will remain until the opening of his concert 
season next October. Mr. Cadman has just completed 
an interesting and successful tour of the Middle West 
and Pennsylvania, and is enthusiastic over the welcome 
accorded him and Princess Tsianina by audiences and 
critics. While in Chicago he had the pleasure ot seeing 
his opera "Shanewis" presented by the opera in Our 
Language Foundation. 

Ponselle's Program — There should be a thrill for 
music lovers, musical amateurs and music students in 
the program which Rosa Ponselle will give as her first 
Los Angeles concert on May 7. Eastern critics have 
exhausted all the adjectives in recording the brilliance 
of this flaming personality, who became a famous prima 
donna in one night as co-star with Caruso at the Metro- 
politan Opera House four years ago. William Tyroler 
will assist her here. Ponselle's program will be: Aria, 
"Pace, Pace Mio Dio" (Verdi) (From "La Forza del 
Destino"), "Odorava I'April" (Parelli), "Danza Fanciulla" 
(P. Durante), "Maria Wiegenlied" (Max Rieger), "Chan- 
son Norvegienne'' (Felix Fourdrain), Aria "Suicidio! in 
questi fieri momenti" (from "La Gioconda") (Ponchielli), 
"My Lovely Celie." (Giles Higgins), "Eros" Grieg; 
"Homage to Spring" (Alexander MacFadyen). 

Loew's State Concert Orchestra under the direction 
of Riemer will offer for the overture selections from 
"The Prince of Pilsen," one of the most popular of 
operettas. "The Serenade," by Titl, will be rendered as 
a duet by F. Mitz. playing the French horn and J. Dotzel 
the flute. 

Zoellner Recital — A program of contrasts was offered 
as the fifth concert by the Zoellner quartet at the Ebell 
club house. The program opened with the Haydn quar- 
tet. Op. 64 No. 5, followed by a Serenade Op. 56 by 
Sinding. Smetana's quartet named by him "From My 
Life" concluded the program. An extended review will 
appear in next week's issue. 

Raisa-Rimini Concert Off. — Owing to an unfortunate 
series of circumstances the Eastern management felt 
called upon to cancel the Raisa-Rimini Pacific Coast 
tour. Los Angeles patrons who hold tickets for Tuesday 
evening. April 24, will please bring same to the Audi- 
torium, west box oflSee, where adjustment will be made. 

John Smallman will prescent eight of his artist pupils 
in four recitals which are to be held at the Ebell Club 
Auditorium at intervals of three weeks beginning Friday 
evening May 11, when he will introduce Louis Yackel, 
tenor, with Eleanor Brayan, contralto. Lorna Gregg will 
be at the piano and violin solos will be given by Morris 
Stolotf. For the second recital Friday evening. May 25, 
he will introduce George Gramlich, tenur, with Mary 
Alice Whipple, soprano. For the third event on Friday 
evening, June 8, he will present Marion Bean Badenoch, 
soprano, with Robert Maile, baritone, and for the fourth 
recital on Friday evening, June 22, he will offer Erma 
De Mott, soprano, and Mildred Messer, contralto. 

Dr. and Mrs. Alfred Guido Castles gave a reception 
on .\pril 23 at their Hollywood residence. Castle Sans 
Souci, in honor ot Dr. Robert Wallace Douglas, American 
baritone. Dr. Douglas has been baritone soloist with 
the Metropolitan Opera Company for seven years. 
Among his musical achievements was his portrayal of 
Valentine while supporting Caruso in "Faust." 

Olga Steeb, guest soloist of the Woman's Symphony 
Orchestra, received an enthusiastic welcome at the 
concert given by that organization at the Philharm'onic 
Auditorium. Miss Steeb gave a beautiful interpretation 
of the Beethoven Concerto in G major, and received 
admirable support from the orchestra under the baton 
of Henry Schoenefeld. As an encore the soloist played 
Mendelssohn's Wings of Song. 

The Califoinia Theatre concert arranged by Carli 
Elinor tor this week is extremely well balanced and 
of broad musical appeal. The feature number, Liszt's 
Polonaise in E. Major, a typical and beautiful work, is 
having its first orchestral rendition in Los Angeles. 
This was originally written by Liszt as a piano solo 
and it is one of the most brilliant and colorful of his 
works. The semi-martial chivalry ot this form of com- 
position is reproduced extremely well and the entire 
plan and melodic conception are thoroughly character- 
istic. Mr. Elinor has chosen for his second number 
Beethoven's Minuett with solo violin and duet passages 
as relief — a work more frequently heard as a violin 
solo. The transcription tor strings which he has ar- 
ranged is charmingly done and its dainty beauty is quite 
in contrast to the brilliant Polonaise. The concert closed 
with another ot the "How Many Do You Recall" series 
which Mr. Elinor has made so popoular and this medley 
of harmonies of by-gone days is cleverly done, both in 
scoring and interpretation. 



10 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



AMERICAN GUILD GIVES NEW YORK CONCERT 

German Opera Enjoys Continued Popularity— Interna- 
tional Guild Gives First Performances of Several 
Important Works and Starts Commotion 

BY ROSALIE HOUSMAN 

New York, March 10. 11)23. 
The third public concert of the International Guild 
(they have also been holding private lectures tor 
their subscribers) was held at the Klaw Theatre, on the 
evening of March 4th, and the house was crowded, with 
serious musicians, who came anxious to hear the novel- 
ties scheduled, as well as the well known soloists, who 
assisted. Of these, the best known was Leo Ornstein, 
who played a Nocturne and a Sonata, neither one of the 
sort to make one squirm or profane the night. Melodic 
or conventional they were not— neither were they as 
revolutionary as some of his earlier music. Rather 
would I say they were evolutionary, as they had a far 
firmer basis and logic, and a more subtle understanding 
than the Wildmansdance, and others from his pen. They 
are strong stuff with something in them which is in our 
Age of Steel as Ornstein is, as far as I can judge, a child 
of his time. Pianistically, he was interesting, though 
why he should decide to play a Haydn theme and 
variation for an encore is too much for me. The Bela 
Bartok second quartet which opened the concert was 
tremendously interesting, imaginative, virile ad uncom- 
promisingly modern. It is masterly writing, logically 
made, at times polytonic, never ugly for mere ugliness, 
and holds the listener's attention throughout. Bartok 
is representative of young Hungary, politically and musi- 
cally emancipated. But though Lucy Gates sang the 
most important numbers, they were followed by the 
Senate for harp and piano, composed by Carlos Salzedo, 
in which he played the piano and his pupil Marie Miller 
the harp. In this music the composer had availed him- 
self of many of the new sounds which he has discovered 
in his instrument and has blended them remarkably with 
tlie piano, getting delight and new tonal conbinations 
to charm our ears. Musically, too, his message is im- 
portant. But all the racket was started by the Hyper- 
prism of the founder of the Guild, Varese, who enlisted 
the services of several horns, trombones, a clarinet, a 
flute, trumpets and about fourteen varieties of percus- 
sion which were played by the faculty and scholars of 
the Dalcroze Eurythmic school. The composer con- 
ducted. In all fairness to Mr. Varese's very evident 
sincerity I must state that the wild laughter and hysteria 
which started almost as soon as the music, was un- 
avoidable. Certainly the first sounds were wildly 
strange and the audience quite visibly expressed them- 
selves. So I found it very difficult to listen fairly, as 
the noise around was great, but though some of the 
results seemed foolish on first hearing, the evident 
endeavor of the composer to throw off all known formuli 
and express himself in a new territory were so sincere 
that, for this reason alone, the performance was justi- 
fiable. Whether it will be done again (it was repeated 
that same night) is an entirely different story; there 
may be something genuine in the attempt. 

It is very likely that the coming tour tor the benefit 
of the Field Service has been discussed in the West. 
E. Robert Schmitz and Mme. Eva Gauthier are planning 
going there in the near future. The idea was started 
most auspiciously in New York at Carnegie Hall, on 
March Bth, when the same artists, as well as Casella, 
Rothier, tlie French-American quartet and Carlos Sal- 
zedo shared a splendid program. The purpose of the 
tour is to collect funds to endow Fellowships in both 
French and American universities, in honor of the 127 
young Americans who gave their lives to the Cause, 
before we joined. In looking over the list. I was proud 
to note that there were several Californians, which fact 
should stimulate our interest. At this particular concert 
one heard the two Sketches of our own Grittes. splen- 
didly done; Schmitz and Casella in the latter's Puppa- 
zetti for two pianos, the exquisite Introduction and 
allegro for harp, winds and strings, which should be 
heard more often, Mme. Gauthier in representative 
American songs and other equally interesting music. 
The purpose is worthy of social as well as musical 
support. 

The performance of Frederick Jacobi's Eve of St. 
Agnes was delayed a week owing to the delay in getting 
the syore and parts from San Francisco, where it was 
recently heard. It had been already heard under 
Bodansky and was given here by the City Symphony 
Orchestra under Dirk Foch. It made a splendid im- 
pression on a large audience who made the composer 
acknowledge it from his lege on second hearing. (X 
heard it at its first performances), my impressions of 
its fine orchestral values were confirmed and its musical 
beauties improved on renewed acquaintance. There is 
a tender quality in the love music which bespeaks 
deeply felt joy, and the directness, the sincerity, and the 
sympathy were expressed in the performance. Press 
comments were very cognizant of the importance of 
the music. 

The American Guild's last public recital at Town Hall, 
March 7th (there is to be a semi-public one at the 
Library in April) brought a good sized house to hear as 
representative a program as has been heard this winter. 
Opening with Powell's violin senate, which he and 
Stoessel played with understanding, went the gamut of 
modernism and ended with the sonata for two pianos of 
Ornstein in which Mme. Leginska and the composer 
participated. The Powell work has a future, though 
it looks back musically, as well as ahead, and I hope it 
will be heard again. Mme. Gauthier did two groups of 
songs of Sreinert's and Vaugns, neither of great impor- 
tance, though the former's Laquer Prints seemed tar 



ROSE FLORENCE— Mezzo Soprano 

CONCERT— VOICE PLACING— COACHING 

Studio:— 545 Sutter Street Telephone Kearny 3598 

Management — L. E. Behymer, 70S Auditorium Building, Los Angeles 



more interesting. Samuel Gardner, composer-violinist, 
whose music I have reviewed, played quite a number of 
his own things, to the great delight of the audience, 
and he encored the Canebrake. Of the two-piano senate 
of Ornstein, on first hearing, I can truthfully say it is 
far too long, especially the first movement, but though 
the others are very discordant, and even violent, they 
show a power and force which cannot be denied. It 
was splendidly played by the composer and Leginska — 
the guild deserves credit for having included it, in spite 
of the lack of interest of those present. 

Other operatic notes of importance was the appear- 
ance of Mme. Kemp as Kundry, and the debut of the 
Russian artiste, Ina Bourskaya as Carmen, which suited 
her most remarkably vocally and temperamentally. Her 
voice is rich, dark, and emotionally expressive, her act- 
ing strong. 

The musical comedy field has been growing a fine 
crop, and with Miss Peggy Wood, in the Clinging Vine at 
the Knickerbocker, Henry Savage has a sure fire hit 
and a play of lusty growth. The operetta has a real plot 
— one might be tempted to say it is a play with music, 
the balance is so good, and certainly Zelda Sears, who 
provided it, has good situations and clever lines. The 
music by Harold Levey, is tuneful, fairly original and 
adequate. The supporting cast are worthy of their de- 
lightful star, and specially worthy of comment were 
Louise Galloway, Reginald Pasch, and Charles Derick- 
son. The staging was rather attractive and, on the 
whole, one must say that in the Clinging Vine Broadway 
has the best musical comedy seen in many a long 
day. 

The Schuberts, over at the Ambassador, are starring 
Tessa Kosta in Caroline, one of those sweet perform- 
ances which are just the thing for the flapper and the 
tired business man. The tunes are catchy, attractive 
and well sung — the piece is delightfully staged. It is one 
of those Southern tales with delightful old negro ser- 
vants (capably played by Mattie Koon and Ben Linn), 
a colonel (Harrison Brockbank) and all the rest of the 
family. The hero (a most romantic person) was well 
sung and played by Harold Murray and Helen Ship- 
man, as the daughter, added plenty of pep. Miss Kosta 
was a picture and sang with much charm. 



H.ADLEY'S THIRD SYMPHONY PLEASES NEW YORK 

New York Philharmonic and Philadelphia Orchestra 

Gives Excellent Concerts — Beethoven Association 

Presents Classic Program 

BY ROSALIE HOUSMAN 

New York, March 17th, 1923. 
As I am leaving on a short lecture tour, which takes 
me into Pennsylvania, I cannot make this report other 
than brief, but I can point out a few highly interesting 
concerts which have happened during the past week 
(March 12-17). Perhaps the news that will be of most 
interest would be the performance (and a very splendid 
one) of Henry Hadley's third symphony which was a 
feature of the Sunday concert at Carnegie (March 12th) 
and which was conducted by Willem Mengelherg. The 
composer was recalled to the stage several times to 
acknowledge the applause. The orchestra played beauti- 
fully, with a rich, glowing tone and elasticity. And the 
Philadelphia men, on Tuesday, the 13th, bringing the 
Schubert in C, as well as Till Eulenspiegel, and two 
Oriental Impressions of the Bostonian Henry Eicheim, 
drew a packed house and great applause. Sometimes 
Stokowski is capricious, as he was with the rhythms of 
the Schubert, but in spite of that, he infuses so much 
vitality into the orchestra, that the performance fairly 
glows with color. He made the Till quite amusing, quite 
a contrast to the reading which was given it on Thurs- 
day evening, March 15th. by Monteux and his excellent 
Bostonians. That organization has the loveliest wood- 
wind choir I have ever heard and he brings out of it a 
depth of tonal values which is firm yet flexible. His 
"Till" was sarcastic, biting, thoroughly French in spirit 
and entirely in legendary tone. The audience "ate it up" 
and the audiences of the Boston symphony are particu- 
larly reserved and distingue. There was also the Chaus- 
son symphony in B flat. Loeffler's Tintagiles (which he 
heard from a box) and which was so well received that 
the composer acknowledged the applause from there. 

Onegin was Damrosch's soloist of the week, winning 
all who heard her, with her personal charm, and magni- 
ficent voice. It is one of the greatest I ever heard. 
Mengelherg, true to his love of Mahler, performed the 
seventh Symphony and those present were either bored 
to tears by its length (an hour and a halt) or thoroughly 
enjoyed it. This is a muted question. To many Mahler 
is empty and dull, futile and poor in ideals, but there 
are many who proclaim him great and it is but fair to 
give the public the deciding voice. 

At the opera, the season's routine goes on, as always, 
with packed houses to tell of the continued popularity 
of Verdi, Puccini and others. At the Lexington, where 
German opera holds sway, there are also packed houses, 
and good performances of Wagnerian classics. It has 
been announced that the company goes on tour next 
season, and will have Josef Stransky as guest conductor. 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



Secretary and Manager of 
K. Altl, Room 1004 Kohler 
<K Chaae nidg., San FranelHCO 

Western Representative of Lyon & Healy Harps 

Telephone DoUBlaa 1678 




Stellajelica 

COLORATURA SOPRANO] 



80O KOHLER CHASE DLDC 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CO ^^^ 



At the final concert of the Carnegie series Mr. Dam- 
rosch gave an old "novelty" in the shape of the triple 
piano concerto of Bach which was done by Schnabel, 
Maier and Pattison. It has rarely been heard in the 
concert halls and that is surprising, as it is one of the 
loveliest of the ensemble numbers Bach wrote, with a 
deep and human note, which is very appealing. It was 
superbly played. 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Readers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address. 
Anonymous communications cannot be answered. No 
names will be published. Address, Question Editor, 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kohler & Chase Building, 
San Francisco. 

1. Tell me who Goosens is? W. A. 

Eugene Goosens is the "bright particular star of mod- 
ern English music," "England's leader of anti-bochism 
in music." He is of Belgian descent and was born in 
1893, the son of the former conductor of the Carl Rosa 
Opera Company. He studied at Bruges, Liverpool, and 
the Royal Academy of Music in London; was violinist 
in Sir Henry Wood's Queen's Hall Orchestra, assistant 
conductor of opera at Covent Garden under Beecham, 
and conductor of the Manchester Symphony Orchestra. 
His works include "Kaleidoscope." "Four Conceits," 
"Nature Poems," "Hommage a Debussy," "The Curse,"' 
"The Eternal Rhythm," and two sketches for string 
quartet, "By the Tarn" and ".lack o' Lantern,'' per- 
formed here this season by the Flonzalef Quartet. 

2. Is the Gong of Chinese origin? D. S. 

Yes. The Chinese until recently were the only people 
who knew the secret of tempering bronze for the manu- 
facture of gongs. A French chemist discovered that 
bronze becomes malleable by being heated and then 
plunged into cold water, and gongs are thus treated 
after casting and are then hammered. The gong is said 
to have been introduced into Europe from the East at 
the time of the French Revolution, when it was used as 
a funeral bell. 

3. What is the Line of Continuation? A. H. J. 

A term used in the working of figured basses. When 
a chord is followed by one or more of its other positions, 
a line, called the Line of Continuation, is drawn under 
them, signifying the continuation of the same harmony, 
instead of figuring each position of the chord. 

4. What is a Csardas? L. L. P. 

The Csardas, or Czardas, is the national Hungarian 
dance. It consists of two movements, a "Lassu" or slow 
movement and a "Friss" or quick movement. These 
two movements alternate as the dancers wish, a sign 
being given to the musicians when the change is desired. 

5. Who is the head of the Music Division of the Li- 
brary of Congress? T. C. 

Carl Engel of Boston, appointed in 1921. 

Note — I have a question from a person signing him- 
self A Singer. May I ask this person to be good enouf;li| 
to read the heading of this column and note the rule hi 
regard to anonymous communications. If he will exteiut 
me the courtesy of his confidence I shall endeavor Ml, 
answer his question.— QUESTION EDITOR. •( 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



(Continued from page 1, column 4) 
which included: Dove Song from Mar- 
riage of Figaro (Mozart), Er der Herr- 
lichste (Scliumann), Du blst wie eine 
Blume (Liszt). Solvejg's Song (Grieg). 
Harli! Harli! The Lark (Schuljert); .J'ai 
pleure en reve (Hue), Si mes vers 
(Hahn), and Down Here (Brahe), Mrs. 
Jones delighted her audience with her 
smoothness of voice and her exceedingly 
discriminating and tasteful mode of in- 
terpretation and her authoritative phras- 
ing gained by evident experience. Mrs. 
Jones is unquestionably a serious artist 
who grasps the significance of serious 
compositions and who interpets the same 
according to artistic principles. Judging 
from the hearty expressions of approval 
Mrs. Jones made an excellent impression. 

H. B. Randall, clarinetist, and Mrs. Lud- 
wig Rosenstein, pianist, interpreted a 
duo concertant for clarinet and piano by 
Weber in a truly musicianly and crafts- 
manlilce manner. Both proved themselves 
to be musicans of unusual artistic calibre. 
Mr. Randall has .a remarkably smooth 
tone and excellent expression, while Mrs. 
Rosenstein is a pianist of thoroughly de- 
veloped artistic instinct and delightful 
technical equipment. 

Frank Wenzel accompanied Mrs. Jose- 
phine Wilson-Jones according to the rules 
of musicianly requirements. 



Thursday Evening, April 12, the Pacific 
Musical Society gave another one of its 
enjoyable programs, every number elicit- 
ing hearty applause from the audience. 
Owing to the fact that numerous other 
events prevented our being present on 
this occasion we delight in printing the 
program in full. However, we wish to 
say that Mrs. Margaret Jarman Cheese- 
man, the possessor of an excellent so- 
prano voice, and an artist of experience 
and intelligence, was specially success- 
ful in arousing genuine enthusiasm. The 
complete program was as follows: A 
Parthenay (Chanson Tourangeaine ), 
I'Etoile du Matin (Chanson Alsacienne), 
Chanson Mexicaine (Mexico), Tambourin 
(du XVIII siecle) (Old French), Sere- 
nade Basque (France), Phileas Goulet. 
Mrs. Arthur Duclos at the piano: Air 
Varie and Minuet (1681-1764) (Mattheson- 
Bauer), Rondo a Capriccio (Beethoven), 
Intermezzo (Brahms), Scherzo (Brahms), 
Lois Adler; Where Dancing Was Loudest 
(Tschaikowsky), Nightingales Sing No 
More in the Grove (Gretchaninoff), Dan- 
son la Gigue (Poldowski), Aria, Oh, Stella 
Vagabonda (from Adrianna Lecouvreur) 
(Cilea), Margaret Jarman Cheeseman. 
Louise Gilbert Lofgren at the Piano; 
Marionettes (MacDowell), Gold Fish 
(Debussy), Rhapsodie, C Maior (Doh- 
nanyi). Lois Adler; Ay, Ay, Ay — Song of 
Argentina (Friere), Chanson Bachique 
from "Hamlet" (Thomas), Fate (Mary 
Carr Moore), Salaam (Agnes LangI, In- 
victus (Bruno Huhn), Phileas Goulet. 



LOS ANGELES TRIO CONCERT 

The last concert of the series will be 
given by the Los .Angeles Trio — May Mc- 
Donald Hope, pianist and founder; Cal- 
mon Luboviski. violin, and Ilya Bronson, 
violoncello — at the Ebell Club House, Los 
Angeles, on Thursday evening. May 3, at 
eight-thirty o'clock, when a program of 
unusual interest and beauty will be 
given. It will include: 

Trio in B flat No. 7 by Beethoven. 

Passacaglia by Handel-Halvorsen (For 
violin and violoncello alone). 

Trio A minor Op. 50 by Tschaikowsky 
(To the memory of a great artist). The 
first and greatest Classic Trio ever 
written, and the last and the greatest 
Romantic Trio ever written, while the 
DDvelty Duo the Passacaglia by Handel 
arranged by Halvorsen, an exquisite bit, 
is se'.dom heard. 

The Trio has given five concerts this 
season in a most creditable manner. 
They have established an organization 
presenting only the best in chamber 
music and have succeeded in attracting 
large and interested audiences. 

Though founded seven years ago by 
May McDonald Hope, the organization 
has not become so we'l known until this 
season and every concert giv«n has seen 
a growth in attendance. The programs 
have been arranged so as to give the 
greatest variety possible and though the 
finest of the classical masters have pre- 
dominated, many novelties have been in- 
troduced, including the Vincent D'Indy 
Trio, the Sonate by Dohnanyi, The 
Goosens Trio with Jay Plowe, Flutist, 
and the entire Sonate by Rochmaninoff 
presented here for the first time. 



Edith Benjamin, the unusually intelli- 
gent and experienced soprano soloist, has 
been meeting with well-merited success 
in the bay region throughout the course 
of the season. She gave a most enjoyable 
program at the Co-related Arts Recital 
Hall in the Fine Arts Palace recently to 
which have been added a number of 
events at public and private musical 
functions of importance. Miss Benjamin 
is accompanied by Miss Marian Prevost, 
an unusually gifted pianist and accom- 
panist. She certainly deserves her suc- 
cesses and the enthusiasm she arouses 
is ample indication of her artistry. 

Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 
3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languages 

5302 Broadway .... Oakland 

Mrs. William Steinbach EDWIN HUTCHINGS 

VOICE CULTURE 

Stodlo; 

002 KOHLER & CHASE BLDG. 

«i»n FmnHfioo Phonfi Kfrny MtM 

KURT VON GRDDZINSKI 

B.tRITOIVE — VOICE CULTURE 

Authorized to Teach Mme. Sohoen- 

Rene'a Method 

1314 Leavenworth St. Phone Prospect 0253 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE S.\N FR.^NCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 
' Banlis ol San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921 ,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7ih Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haight and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and UMoa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (4/^) 

per cent per annum was declared for the six months 

ending December 31st, 1922. 

INTEREST WILL HEREAFTER BE COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 
INSTEAD OF SEMI-ANNUALLY AS HERETOFORE. 



ADELE ULMAN 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND PIANO 

Studio 178 Commonwealth Ave. 
Telephone Paciflc 3:i 

Laura Wertheimber 

Preparatory Teacher for 

Mrs. Noah Brandt 

311 Scott St. Telephone Fillmore 15: 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

PIANO 
I IMS Kvfeicr * Chjii 
Phone ItearnT 54M 

Joseph George Jacobson 



2833 Sacran 



PIANO 
nto St. Phone FUImore S48 



Phone Berkeley 6006. 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 

PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET. VOICE 

B05 Kohler & Chaae Bid. Tel. Salter 7387 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 
Stndio, a03-«04 KOHLER & CHASE BLDG. 
Phone Kearny M.'H 

MRS. CHARLES POULTEB. 

SOPRANO St. Andrena Chnrch 

Voice Cnltnre. PUno. 588 27th St., Oak- 
land. Tel. 207S. Kohler & Chase Bids.. 
Wedneadaya Tel. Kearny 5454. 

ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 



Oakland. Tel. Piedmont 5095. 



MAR;0N RAMON WILSON 

DRAMATIC CONTRALTO 

Opera SucceaafM In Europe; Concert Snc- 
ceaaea In America. AildreHH IMO] California 
St.. San FrancUco. Telephone Proapert 3«20 

Mary Coonan McCrea 

TBACHER OF SINGING 

Studio 3« Gaflner Balldln^. 370 Sutter St. 
Tel. Douglau 4233. Rea. Tel. Kearnr 2349 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 



vearn7 5454. 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRALTO 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

GRADUATE OF SCHOLA CANTORUM, 

PARIS 

OReANIST ST. MARY'S CATHBDRAIr 

PlaBo DcpartlBeat. Ha^Aa Seha*I 
ftrgaa aad Plana. Arrtllaaa Mnaleal Cnllega 

ESTHER MUNDELL 

SOPRANO AND TEACHER 

Pupil of 

De Reazke and Percy Rector Stephena 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 



Phone Fillmore 1847 

SIGMUND BEEL 

Haater Claaaea tor Violin 

Studio Dnlldlne, 1373 Post Street 

Tel. Proapect 757 

SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of SloKlusr. 32 Loretta Ave., Pied- 
mont. Tel. Piedmont 304. Men., Kohler A 
Chaae Bldg.. S. F. Telephone Kearny 5454. 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 SCOTT ST. Bet. Clay A nrashlnKton 

Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 
Mm. Noah Brandt, Plana 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Sololat, Temple Bmana Bl. Con- 
cert and Church Work. Vocal Inatmc- 
tlon. 2539 Clay St., Phone Went 4890. 

MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 

ARTISTIC PIANO INSTRUCTION 
Stadio: 1000 Kohler & Chane Bids. 
Telephone Kearny 54.54 



Re 



. Tel. Bayview 4104 



EVA GARCIA 

CONCERT PIANIST. ACCOMPANIST 

ANn TEACHER 

Studio: 4106 Piedmont Ave. Tel. Pled. 2750. 

ReMldence: 4152 Howe St.. Oakland 
Tel. Pled. 3402 

ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 

Vlollnlnt and Teacher 

Head of Violin Department Ada Clement 

Music SchcKil 

3435 Sacramento St.. San FrancUco 

RUTH DEGNAN 

PUPIL OF GIACOMO AND MME. 

MINKOWSKI 

TEACHI5R OF VOICE 

242S Pine St. Tel. Weat 7012 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
37S Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 
2321 Jackson St. Phone Fillmore 3256 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Keamy 2930 



OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
2027 California St. Tel. Fillmore 3827 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way Berkeley, CaL 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Park 1974 

MARJORIE E. YOUNG 
1363 Grove St. Tel. West 4571 

MARGARET WHITE COXON 
149 Rose Av., Oakland Piedmont 1608-W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue — Park 341 



DOROTHY PASMORE 
1715 Vallejo St. Phone West 1»95 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 457 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

301 Spruce Street Paciflc 1676 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott St. Phone West 1347 

ANDRFTE^inCT 

1470 Washington St. Tel. Franklin 332] 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 
1005 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K. 5454 

MARGARET BRUNTSCH 
70 Piedmont St. Phone Park 3469 

MME. M. TROMBONI 

601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 



OTTO RAUHUT 

357 Arguello Blvd. Phone Pacific 3661 

HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4974 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Keamy 6464 

EMIL HAHL 

Res.; 2756 Baker St. Tel.: Fill. 229i 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 
434 Spruce St. Tel. Fillmore 1131 

REED AND MOUTHPIECE MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 
789 Mission St. Sutter UK 

If you want to become known to the 
musical public of California, advertise in 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

on the Programs of Distinguished American Artists 

Published by 

G. SCHIRMER, JOHN CHURCH CO., THE BOSTON MUSIC COMPANY, 

THE COMPOSERS' MUSIC CORPORATION 

Songs for All Voices, New Publications of the Composers' Music Corporation 

THE CRY OF THE ORIENT TOMORROW 

THE FOREST OF DREAMS 

A CYCLE OF SIX— SONGS OF THE LITTLE DAYS 

For Sale at the Leading Music Houses 



From The Very Beginning, By Phyllis Lucy Keyes 

fiiiid.-imcntui iiiiinIc itrinolpleH in a definite nnd lucid way, eomntenelni; 
«t-)?rude pEeoeN l)ut proicreHHini!: rol>idly in their exiioNltl»n of technieal 
rexalon i>r<>iiicni« nnd tlie creation of good ta«te. 
I»Kifli:. (lOo. 

HENRY GROBE, 135-153 Kearny Street. 

Representative for the Clayton F. Summy Publications. 



MAUD G. McFAUL 

ACCOMPANIST 

1128 Cbeatnnt Street 

Telephone Prospect 4032 



If a Music Journal is worth while to 
extend courtesies it should be worth 
while to subscribe for. 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 

Teacher of Singing 



Are you satlftfleU 
Can he pi 
Are you 



vi<h yon 
tefore th 
Tith yuu 



iNHfd 
Is he n FaddiHt. oi 
Are yon sore your teat-her knows ^ovft „.,„,.. 
Is he always talklni? "BREATH?" "TONGUE?" 



*'JAW ?■ 

If In donbt. 
Europe Tcith 



t Mr. Bofcart, nho studied In 
nehers of Sembrick, Scalchl, 
Bisphani, etc. 

Pupils prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 

37« Sl'TTER STREET — Doujcrlas 0256 

2218 LAKE STREET — Bayvlew 4871 

Eventni^N by appointment 

Read Mr. Boeart'H article in this paper of March 

24. maa. about "Charlctous" 



Qonstance <tAlexandre 

Mezzo Soprano 

Pupils Accepted 

Inquiries made at 

801 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Phone Kearny 5454 



Resident Artists who wish to secure engagements 
through managers and music clubs next season should 
announce their plans NOW as bookings are made im- 
mediately betore the end of this season and during the 
summer months. 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 

Endorsed by Wager Swayne 

Special Normal Course for Teachers, based on Swayne 

Principles 

Studios 807 Kohler & Chase Bids. 

2518% Etna St.. Berkeley. Phone Berkeley X31« 



Frank Moss 

PIANIST 

Residence Studio — Hotel Normandie 
Telephone Franklin 5400 

Available for Recitals 

Management Ida G. Scott 

Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny 5454 



Leslie V. Harvey 

Organist 
Coliseum Theatre 



SCHUMANN HEINK 

STEINWAY PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

Season 1922-23— Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 



The 
PIANOFORTE 



There is a subtle satisfaction in knowing 
that one's possessions, whatever their nature, 
are of superlative excellence. 

A Gobelin tapestry or a da Vinci painting is 
a constant source of pleasure and bears testi- 
mony to the taste of its owner. To the music 
lover the same is true in the possession of a 
Mason & Hamlin Piano. 

Those who are musically sensitive, whose 
appreciation of tonal quality renders them 
competent to judge, pronounce the Mason & 
Hamlin Piano the leading instrument of its 
kind. 

Dame Melba, richly endowed with musical 
discrimination, says in this connection: "It 
seems to me that the preference on the part of 
an individual for the Mason & Hamlin Piano 
is indicative of a superior musical nature." 

Only an actual hearing can give a realization 
of its beauty of tone. 




two entrances 
135-153 Kearny & 217-225 Sutter Sts. 

VICTOR talking MACHINES 




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sheet music 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



^^fir(Su^ 




U THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JQUR.NAL IK THE GREAT WESTT ] 



VOL. XLIV. No. 6 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. MAY 12. 1923. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



EMINENT ARTISTS PRESENT IDEAL PROGRAM 

E. Robert Schmitz, Piano Virtuoso, and Mme. Eva 

Gauthier, Mezzo Soprano, Enchant Music Lovers 

With Their Matchless Art 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

It would, indeed, be difficult, if not impossible, to 
suggest two artists who are able to interpret a pro- 
gram of compositions more carefully or judiciously se- 
lected, and interpreted with finer mastery of the funda- 
mental principles of interpretative art than E. Robert 
Schmitz, pianist, and Mme. Eva Gauthier, mezzo soprano, 
succeded in rendering at the Columbia Theatre on Sun- 
day afternoon, April 29th. To miss witnessing such a 
genuinely artistic performance means to sustain a loss 
that can never be replaced in one's artistic experience. 
Every moment of the two hours during which these 
artists retained the wrapt attention of their hearers was 
charged With joyous manifestation of the acme of refined 
artistry and thorough comprehension of the various 
technical requirements necessary to adequately sustain 
the highest artistic ideals. 

E. Robert Schmitz, from the very first time we had the 
pleasure to hear him, impressed us with his sincerity of 
style, his thorough grasp of the elemental beauties of 
tone color effects and his comprehensive treatment of 
the newest school of composition. Mr. Schmitz launches 




PAII. STEIXDOHFP 

The DlNtlnKUlMhed Conductor of the Rivoli Opera 

HoDHe Ooniiian}' Who t'ontrlbiitea Hueh to the 

SuccesK of That Kxeellent OreaiiUatlon 

himself into his artistic mission with such whole-souled 
determination to coax the finest sentiments from the 
works he has chosen that positively submerges his per- 
sonality into the atmosphere which the composer in- 
tends to convey. It is for this reason that his audiences 
follow him with such concentrated attention and with 
such delight in the effects he obtains. 

Mr. Schmitz opened the program with an interpreta- 
tion of Schumannls Carnaval that accentuated the 
artist's innermost poetic and romantic instinct and that 
lend an exceptional charm to the beautiful phrases of 
this immortal work. Mr. Schmitz belongs to that rare 
coterie of virtuosi who are equally proficient in the ex- 
position of the old as well as new form of musical 
literature. This was further evidenced by Mr. Schmitz' 
exceptonally suave and refined reading of the Chopin C 
minor Nocturne and Etude No. 5 from Op. 10. We can 
not imagine a more scintillating bit of cameo-like color 
changes than the exquisite rendition of these Chopin 
works under the fairy finger-tips of this splendid 
virtuoso. 

The famous Liszt rapturous description of St. Francis 
Walking on the Waters gave this artist further oppor- 
tunity to cause us to marvel at his brilliant and im- 
peccable technic while some of the newer works by 



^^'hithorne, Ravel and Debussy permitted us a glimpse 
into the impressionistic precinct of the ultra modern 
creative mind. If anyone is able to acclimatize the 
writer to the vagaries of modern pianistic literature E. 
Robert Schmitz would be the artist whom we would 
choose to bestow upon us the blessings of such conver- 
sion. 

Occasionally, during the course of our activities as 
chronicler of musical events, we receive a shock of 
pleasant surprise. This time it was Mme. Eva Gauthier 
who administered the thrill. The possessor of a light, 
clear and singularly sympathetic lyric mezzo soprano 
whose pliable timbre and quality are manipulated by 
the artist in a manner to fit every possible mood Mme. 
Gauthier leads us into a very niche of contrasting 
emotions and holds us spellbound with the versatility of 
her expressions. The simplest and apparently most 
elementary phrases are given new meaning and appar- 
ently Intricate and complicated phrases are robbed of 
their complexity by means of the ease of her vocal ex- 
pression. The modern school that apparently lacks in 
melodic invention the artist beautifies by means of 
faultless diction and the utilization of a declamatory 
style that accentuates the emotional significance of the 
work. In every respect Mme. Gauthier is an ideal con- 
cert artist and a dignified vocalist of whom the musical 
world has only a few and whose contributions to artistic 
endeavor are invaluable and therefore doubly enjoyable. 
Surely those who attended this concert deserve to be 
heartily congratulated upon the wisdom that inspired 
them to follow their inclinations. 



NEW LIGHT OPERA GIVEN FIRST READING 

Original Composition by Thomas V. Cator, Composer, 

and Louis B. Jacobs and Perry Newberry, 

Librettists, Delights Critics, in Alameda 

I A private reading of a new light opera in three acts, 
not yet named, but otherwise almost fully completed, 
was given at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Hill in Alameda 
on Sunday afternoon. May 6th. The opera had its 
inception when Perry Newberry conceived the notion of 
combining the Cinderella and the .Alladin stories; and 
so perfectly do they blend that the wonder is (as we 
always say of brilliant ideas) that it was not thought of 
long ago. It was Mr. Newberry, I believe, who wrote the 
lyrics for most of the songs, or for many of them at 
any rate. The dialogue, sparkling with clean wit. and 
perfectly delightful absurdities, is the work of Louis B. 
Jacobs and Perry Newberry, and it is accomplished with 
enormous cleverness. Of the music by Thomas V. Cator 
I shall have pleasure in speaking later in this discur- 
sive article. 

THERE IS A PLOT! The story coheres. The char- 
acters fit the story instead of the story being cut to fit 
the characters, and this, too, is unusual in a work of 
this kind. Mr. Newberry's device of the "inset"— a 
shallow stage on the main stage— at the beginning of 
each act, is used as a sort of symbolic presentation of 
what is to follow, and should be an engaging feature. 
The inset at the beginning of the opera prepares the way 
tor the first act; so that when the curtain rises on the 
first scene, the "atmosphere" is already suggested. 

The characters — and I am purposely "mixing them up" 
so that it may be seen how well they blend — include 
.Alladin, Cinderella, Dinky Didus, the Caliph of Bagdad 
and his ugly daughter, the .Akound of Swat, .\ddima, 
the mother of Alladin, the mother and step sisters of 
Cinderella, dozens of others; and they actually fulfill 
their destinies in the story, as I have hinted. The 
scene is laid in Bagdad, and the curtain rises — after the 
inset — on a colorful street with bazaars and with 
"mosques and minarets" in the distance. A beauty 
shop, which is the scene— or at least the cause — of 
several complications in the course of the work, ap- 
pears on the left. Is that not a happy beginning? 

It is pleasant to record that Mabel Riegelman is being 
negotiated with for the part of Cinderella, a role well 
calculated to display her charm and her grace and her 
brilliant dramatic ability. Stanley Engense has been 
selected for the tenor part of .\lladin, who loves 
Cinderella, although he thinks his heart is set on 
"another." This matter is one of those which is cleared 
up without any blow to the sensibilities, and helps the 
coherence of what I have been constrained to call the 
plot. Dinky Didus arrives on the first scene as the 
hind legs of a camel, and in that somewhat restricted 
position proclaims himself star comedian. When re- 
leased he has the freedom of the stage. What a first-class 
comedian will make of this role, through the three acts, 
with Mr. Jacobs' situations and dialogue, one can only 
imagine, and hardly that. His adventures are past belief 
funny, and one sees him emerge from them all with un- 
diminished vigor. 

The husband-hunting stepmother of Cinderella is a 
good part full of possibilities in the right hands. In 
point of fact all the singers have worthwhile roles, even 



the minor ones. The dialogue is a laughable mixture of 
oriental imagery and clean.cut American slang — an irre- 
sistible combination. 

Now I come to the portion of which I like best to 
speak — the music. Thomas V. Cator is too well known 
to Musical Review readers, and to the Pacific Coast 
in general, to need further introduction. At the piano 
on the afternoon of the reading Mr. Cator played the 
entire opera, suggesting the orchestration by a word 
here and there; and this gave a very good exposition 
of what the opus is. The music never loses the melodic 
line, except in one or two dances where certain rhythms 
and other effects are desired and planned for. It thus 
remains true to the conventions (and necessities) of 
light opera. But the melodies and the harmonies are 
overlaid w-ith oriental colors, brilliant and shifting, and 
done with great art; so that the music constantly sug- 
gests the East, without in any way disturbing the 
listener's enjoyment of what he expects of such work as 
this. 

The prelude and the overture are tinted thus, and, 
except for one or two numbers, these hues are every- 
where apparent. The exceptions noted are written in an 
idiom entirely American, and afford, I suppose, a neces- 
sary contrast. There are lovely, suave, graceful songs 
for Cinderella, which Miss Riegelman's fine intelligence 




LIZETTA KALOV.\. 



The A\ idely KnotTn Rn.s 

Heeentlr Returned Fr 

Southern Callfornfa a 

operative Art MUNi< 



Ian Violin VlrtuoHa, Who 

m n SuceeKNfui Tour In 

id Who HeadH The Co- 

StudioM In Berkeley 



will enhance; and, tor Alladln, solos of gleaming beauty 
and full of interest. There is a duo for Cinderella and 
Alladin, which is a gem of pure ray. There are at least 
two waltz songs which will be treasured. A contralto 
solo in the last act is full of warmth and sweetness. 
The choruses are written with skill, though one had to 
add one's imagination to what the piano was able to 
give of these. I cannot enumerate all the music numbers, 
of course. The one called Fragrance is original, delicious 
and refreshing. It will always be redemanded, I feel 
sure. Throughout the reading Mr. Engense sang the 
Alladin solos, and his ringing, robust tenor proved well 
suited to them. 

The opera is to be put into rehearsal at once, and 
will be given a presentation during a ten weeks' season 
of comic opera at the Auditorium Opera House in Oak- 
land. An exceptionally fine company is being engaged 
which will interpret a series of the latest and most suc- 
cessful light operas. 

I am waiting for a composer and librettist to write' 
a light opera with Puritan America as the setting. To 
offset the sober garb and behavior of the Puritans — and 
(Continued on page 10, column 2) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



STEINWAY 

The Instrument of the Immortals 



When you buy a 
STEINWAY, you 
know that you will 
never have to buy 
another piano. 



Sherinan,pay& Go. 



Kearny and Sutter Sts.. San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Sts., Oakland 

Sacramento - Stockton - Fresno • San Jose 

Portland - Seattle - Tacoma - Spokane 




GEORGIA KOBER 

AMERICAN PIANIST 

Studio: 3ar>-S4n Sutter St. 
L Kearny 5903, Wednesdays and Thursdays 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 

Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 343S Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



Arrillaga Musical College 

V. de ArrUlaea, Director 
A. L. Artl^nes, Trea.; Louis Alesrla, Vlce-Pres. 
Unexcelled facilities for the study of music In all 
Its brancbes. Laree Pipe OrBan. Recital Hall. 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
Saa Praaclsco, Gal. Pbone West 4T37 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING, Director 
3X42 WasblnElon Street Tclepbone Fillmore 395 



DOUGLAS SOULE-Pianist 

ADVANCED PUPILS ACCEPTED 
Pupil of_M me. V. StepanolT (Berlin), M. Sleveklns, 



nd E. Rober 
Kohicr & Cha 
Kearny 5454. 



Sch 
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Res. phone Pled 



ork). Studio: 1005 
& Sat. Mornlnss. TeL 
7«e. 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano. Organ. Harmony. Orsanlat and Maaleal 
Director of Flrat Prenbyterlan Chttrob, Alameda. Home 
Stndio: 1117 PARV STREET. ALAlflKDA. Telephone Ala- 
"chool. 507 BIdorado Atc^ 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGORY, Director 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ACCOMPANIST 

Otfictnl orfj;anist Ksposltion Auditorium, orf?anl.si 
and chuir director St. LukeN E:i>iMeoi>al Cliurch 
orpanlNt CoTieref:;ation Ileth I»«rnel. Plniio nnd 



Studio, 1915 Sacramento Street 
Telephone West 3753 



Lll.l-iAN iilKMlNGHAM 

Contralto 
ofSinslne. Complete Course of Operatic Train- 
Tel. FUlmore 4553, 

MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

ITALIAN VOCAL TEACHER 



— Endorsed by Bonci. 
in Dramatic Deportme 
and Spanish spolten. 
studio — 1414 Columbus 



ith Caruso and Tetrazzii 
caches pupils vocally an 
— Italian, English, Frenc 



MR. and MRS. GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 



Dominican College School of Music 

SASi RAFAEL, CALIFORMA 

Music Courses Tfaoroush and Prof^resslvc 

Puhllo <i<'hool Mnslr. Accredited Diploma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite 5<H) Kohler & Chase BldE., 
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MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Prepnrlnsr Teacher for 

MRS. OSCAR MANSn'ELDT. Pianist 

207 Cherry St.. Bel. \Vashlnc:ton A- CIny Tel. Pac. »30<1 

MADAM MACKAY-CANTFLL 

CONCERT COACH — VOCAL TECHMQUE 
StTpER-DICTIOX 
Director Calrnry Presbyterian Choral Society. 

Further Intormadon. West inOO. 

RESIDENT ARTISTS who are available for concert 
tours during the season 1923-1924 will please register 
with the Pacific Coast Musical Review so that we are 
able to recommend them to music clubs, music schools 
and managers. Only artists of reputation and experience 
are eligible for registration. 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

OrganUt Temple Emanu El. First Church of Christ Sci- 
entist. Director Lorlng Club. S. F., ned„ 1617 California 
St„ Phone Franklin 2«03; Sat., First Christian Science 
Church, Phone Franklin 13071 Res. stndio, 3142 Lewlstoa 
Aye_ Berkeley. Phone Piedmont 242S. 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 



The College of the Holy Names 

Lake Herrltt, Oakland 

Complete Conservatory Course — Piano. Harp, Violin, 

Tello. Voice. Connterpolnt. Harmony. History 



The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. If you help us to add 3000 subscribers to 
our list we will help you to increase your income. 



JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 

Thorough Vocal and Dramatic Tralnlns 

740 Pine St. Phone Douglas 0024 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



KARL RACKLE 

PIANIST — INSTRUCTOR 



MADAME WILSON-JONES 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



111 T HE ONL'>' WEEKL'i' MU5ICAL JOURNAL IH THE GREAT W£5T 1 11 

MUSICAL, REVIEW COMPANT 

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C. C. EMERSON Vice President 

MARCUS L. SAMUELS Secretary and Treasurer 

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VOL. XLIV SATURDAY, MAY 12, 1923 No. 6 

Tlie PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL, REVIEW Is for sale at the 
sheet-music departments of all leading nAisIc stores. 

Entered as second-class maU matter at S. F. Postofllce. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 
Annually In Advance Includlnip Poataset 

United States »3.00 

Foreign Coantrles 4.0O 

TWENTY-SECOND YEAR 

THE NEWSPAPERS' MUSIC PAGES 



A\'hen the Pacific Coast Musical Review began 
it.«i aggressive fight in behalf of the musical pro- 
fession of California twenty-two years ago not 
one daily paper in San Francisco thought it worth 
while to publish a weekly music page. It is true 
the San Francisco Examiner used to have a 
limited department for music set aside in its Sun- 
day magazine section under the supervision of 
H. H. Bosworth. uncle of Hobart Bosworth, the 
famous moving picture star. Mr. Bosworth was 
an e.xcellent critic and the writer became one of 
his staunchest friends. Prior to this, other papers 
published an occasional music department. For a 
number of years Dr. H. J. Stewart wrote a music 
column for the Evening Post. But all these con- 
cessions to musical interest were spasmodic and 
neither enthusiastic nor really of much value to 
music or the musical profession. 



The writer was musical editor for the San 
Francisco Morning Call begining in 1900, later 
wrote for the Bulletin and still later for the Eve- 
ning Post when Thomas Garret was editor, and 
we occupied that position at the time of the 
earthcpiake. Although we repeatedly urged edi- 
tors and business managers of the papers with 
which we were connected to establish a music 
page in order to encourage musical progress, our 
pleas were consistently refused and the excuse 
advanced that a music page would be of no finan- 
cial value to a daily paper. It was due to this 
inability to convert the daily newspapers to the 
cause of music that we decided the time to be 
ripe to establish an "official" organ for the musical 
profession and musical public. THERE WAS 
A.T THAT TIME NO OTHER MUSIC JOUR- 
NAL PUBLISHED WEST OF CHICAGO, nor 
did the daily ])apers pay serious attention to the 
efforts of resident artists, teachers or students. At 
that time San Francisco had no permanent sym- 
phony orchestra, no chamber music societ\' that 
attracted sufficient patronage to sustain it finan- 
cially in a manner to assure its permanency, no 
Statewide music teachers' association, no State 
federation of music clubs, nor any of the numer- 
3US aids to musical progress and the encourage- 
ment of musical taste which are now blessing the 
musical life of California. THE PACIFIC 
COAST MUSICAL REVIEW BEGAN TO 
FIGHT FOR THE ATTAINMENT OF ALL 
THESE OBJECTS IN ITS FIR.ST NUMBER. 
Phis statement can be verified by looking up the 
Sles of the paper and read our declaration of 
policy. 



these twenty-two years THE PACIFIC COAST 
MUSICAL REVIEW has had its share in this 
development, and we do not think we uttter a 
falseliood when we say our share has been great, 
l>ecause we happened to start the movement. No 
paper, be it ever so great, can win a fight single 
handed. If it says so it simply states something 
that is not true; indeed, something that is phy- 
sically impossible. Fights for the good of music or 
anything else can only be won through CO- 
OPERATION. But unless either a journal or an 
individual STARTS a fight for improvement 
there is no chance for co-operation, for while 
many have an IDEA to do something, such idea 
is of no value UNTIL DEEDS FOLLOW 
WORDS. And many a time it requires consider- 
able courage to start an innovation, for no matter 
what you want to do in behalf of music, some one 
will always put an obstacle in your way by be- 
littling your efforts, by saying that you demand 
the impossible and by natural envy which in- 
spires certain people to regard a movement un- 
worthy, UNLESS THEY THEMSELVES 
LAUNCH IT. For this reason an individual 
often hesitates to take the lead, when a music 
journal, possessing the advantage of addressing 
thousands of people, can go ahead fearlessly and 
inspire others with the courage of their convic- 
tions. In other words a music journal can infuse 
confidence where formerly there existed doubt. 



But the winning of battles in behalf of the 
musical profession and public necessitates more 
than just writing about it in the paper. It re- 
quires a great deal of time and personal political 
action to arouse the enthusiasm of the profession 
and to change ingrained prejudices. And natural- 
ly such personal efforts take away time that 
should be devoted to the business management 
and constructive policy of the paper itself. It is 
for this reason — the impossibility for us to fight 
personally for the profession and at the same time 
concentrate our undivided energy upon the man- 
agement of this paper — that the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review has not grown quicker and more 
substantially. In other words in our enthusiastic 
fight for the good of music we have neglected our 
personal fortunes. This is not a complaint. 
Neither is it intended as braggadocio or conceit. 
We merely wish to state these cold facts as an 
introduction to what we are about to write. 



The daily newspapers a few years ago at last 
began to publish music pages. But not because 
they wanted to help the profession. Oh, no. Only 
because they found interest in music so vastly 
improved that it became necessary to satisfy their 
readers. For those interested in music who sub- 
scribe for daily papers— CIRCULATION BE- 
ING THE FOUNDATION UPON WHICH 
THE DAILY NEWSPAPER BUSINESS IS 
BUILT — had a right to their news, just the 
same as those interested in sporting events had 
a right to theirs. The Pacific Coast Musical Re- 
view, having been partly instrumental in creating 
a musical interest, naturally claims also to be 
partly responsible for the fact that daily papers 
find it expedient to publish music pages to gratify 
those subscribers interested in the musical news. 



Some of the daily papers have also discovered 
that there is money in the musical profession, for 
they are now soliciting advertisements from 
music teachers, music schools and artists. Since 
it is the purpose of this paper to assist a teacher 
and artist in earning as large a livelihood as his 
talents and efficiency justifies, and since publicity 
represents the means by which such income 
may be obtained, we feel that any teacher or 
artist or music school ought to take advantage 
of this opportunity to establish a name by means 
of publicity in the daily press. Of course, we refer 
only to those whose means allow them to add this 
expense to their appropriations. We do not like 
the idea that some of our advertisers whom we 
have convinced to patronize this paper, and who 
have been using the columns of this paper, should 
permit themselves to be coaxed into stopping 
their advertisement with us and giving their sup- 
port to a daily paper instead. 



as a so-called prospect list, and tries in every way 
possible to secure this patronage. If it can be 
done by advising the advertiser to stay with this 
paper the solicitor does not object to this condi- 
tion. But if he can only secure such advertiser 
by advising him to stop with us and use the 
columns of the daily paper such solicitor will en- 
deavor to convince the advertiser of the futility 
of using the columns of this paper and the great 
advantage to be derived from advertising in a 
daily paper. The advertiser being human will 
occasionally stop his advertising with us and give 
his support to the daily papers, believing he is 
now on the way to become rich. 



The advertiser is conscientious and does not 
believe he is doing himself or this paper an in- 
justice. The solicitor is sincere, for it is his duty 
to get all the business he can. But we like to 
state a few facts which the musical profession 
ought to know and which possibly never occur 
to it. The Pacific Coast Musical Review, being a 
purely musical journal, must depend SOLELY 
upon musical people and the music trade for its 
existence. It does not, like a daily paper, obtain 
its support from all sources of advertising income. 
Were it not for the support of the musical people 
a music journal could not exist. A daily paper 
can e.xist with or without the support of musical 
people. Furthermore, if an artist or teacher ad- 
vertises in a daily paper for the purpose of obtain- 
ing courtesies, he is in duty bound to advertise 
IN ALL DAILY PAPERS. If he does not, then 
the daily papers he does not advertise in will con- 
sider it a slight, and naturally will in some way or 
other convince him that he made a mistake to 
advertise in a rival paper and not in theirs. And 
since the teacher and artist has not the income or 
means to advertise in ALL daily papers he will 
come out of his investment on the debit side of the 
ledger, for he is bound to lose the friendship of 
that daily paper in which he does not advertise. 



If he can advertise in ALL daily papers then it 
will be to his advantage to spend any amount of 
money to maintain this valuable publicity. Now, 
regarding returns. While the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review does not claim the circulation a 
daily paper does, we certainly maintain that we 
reach EVERY MUSIC LOVER WHO READS 
THE MUSIC PAGE IN A DAILY PAPER. We 
reach prospective pupils who HAVE THE 
MONEY TO PAY LIVING PRICES FOR 
LESSONS. We reach the managers and music 
clubs who engage artists. The music page of a 
daily paper is seen only in the vicinty of San 
Francisco in so far as it relates to the musical 
news. In the country editions the music pages 
and reviews are usually omitted. The Pacific 
Coast Musical Review is read in every city of 
size in California, and even in certain communi- 
ties in Oregon and Washington. We positively 
guarantee that if an advertiser does not get any 
direct results from ,his advertisement in this 
paper, he will not get any such results from his 
advertisement on the music page of a daily paper. 
For in addition to the advertiseinent in this paper 
the editor quite frequently recommends artists 
for engagements and teachers to those seeking in- 
struction. While we can not guarante that those 
to whom we recommend such artists and teachers 
will seek the services of all those we recommend 
we KNOW THAT THEY ALWAYS SELECT 
ONE OF THOSE WE RECOMMEND. 



If the musical life in California has grown 
better and if musical taste has advanced during 



Every advertising solicitor of a daily paper uses 
the columns of the Pacific Coast Musical Review 



In return for the patronage received by the 
Pacific Coast Musical Review we constantly 
launch and foster movements intended to increase 
the earning power of teachers and artists. In this 
way we indirectly assist musicians. We do not 
publish scandals about artists or teachers which 
injure the professsion indirectly. We do not de- 
stroy the good name and reputation of artists and 
teachers simply because it would make good news 
copy. This paper stands one hundred per' cent 
on the side of the artists and teachers. We can 
not please everybody. The. reader himself or 
herself can not please everybody. People become 
offended because they imagine they have been 
neglected, or because they disagree with us. 
Nevertheless we continue to work sincerely and 
persistently in the interests of the profession. We 
work day and night, Sundays and holidays to 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



further the interests of the profession. In so 
doing we may occasionally neglect to further the 
interests of a single advertiser. But we are only 
human and we are not omnipotent. 



So we naturally would like to keep all our ad- 
vertisers in our columns with the assurance that 
we will do the best we can for the profession and 
also for themselves individually, if they help us 
to pay attention to them. If through some reason 
or other they decide to discontinue their adver- 
tisement with us, whether because times are bad 
or their funds are low, they will always enjoy the 
courtesies of our columns. But if after this they 
intentionally withdraw their support from this 
paper which needs it, and transfer it to a daily 
newspaper which does not need it at all, we cer- 
tainly get peeved and such members of the pro- 
fession need not expect the personal assistance 
of this writer nor the support of this paper in any 
artistic endeavor they may undertake. They must 
depend upon the support of that paper to which 
they have transferred their affections. If there 
were another music journal in San Francisco and 
vicinity that would need the support of such 
artists and teachers, we would have no resent- 
ment if they would withdraw their support from 
us and transfer it -to our colleague. But certainly 
a few dollars a month makes no difference to a 
daily newspaper while it adds to the meager sup- 
port which a music journal receives from the pro- 
fession. 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Readers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address. 
Anonymous communications cannot be answered. No 
names will be published. Address, Question Editor. 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kohler & Cbase Building, 
San Francisco. 

1. What is meant by the Harmonic Minor Seventh? — 
N. H. 

The Harmonic Minor Seventh is the seventh harmonic, 
or partial tone, generated by a given fundamental. In 
the case of a vibrating string, it is the tone produced by 
one-seventh of the length of the string, and is a minor 
seventh above the t"ne produced by the whole length ot 
the string. It is slightly flat, being a little less than the 
true minor seventh. 

2. ^ive me the name ot a book of anecdotes about 
music— T. C. S. 

F. J. Crowest: Musicians' Wit, Humor, and Anecdote. 

3. I have seen Caruso called a tenor "di mezzo 
carittere." What is the meaning of that? — A. W. 

The words mean literally tenor "of half character." It 
is a conventirnal phrase which the Italians apply to a 
fu'l and powerful dramatic tenor with a voice quality 
almost like that ot a baritone; it means practically the 
same as a robust tenor. 

4. Is the Festival Theater at Bayreuth running at 
present, and is Cosima Wagner still living? — H. R. 

The Festival Theater is not running now; the present 
economic condition ot Germany makes it practically 
Impossible. Cosima Wagner is still living; the rumor ot 
her death in 1919 was untrue. Only a few weeks ago the 
Musical Courier printed an editorial about her and the 
Wagner fami'y from information received directly from 
persons in touch with them. 

5. What is a villanella?— M. A. G. 

A rustic Italian part-song without accompaniment. 
Originally it was a country dance accompanied with 
singing, but the singing gradualy rose in importance 
until the dancing was displaced altogether and the 
villanella became a separate form. 

NOTE — The Music Department of the San Francisco 
Public Library has supplied additional information on 
the third question ot last issue in regard to the pro- 
duction of American Opera in Europe. "Poia" by Arthur 
Nevin was produced in Berlin in 1910; "Dame I^ibellule" 
(a ballet) by Blair Fairchild, was produced in Paris in 
1921. 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

Edited By Elita Muggins 

1605 The Alameda, San Jose, Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 



Osborne Putnam Stearns, one of the ablest directors 
of motion picture orchestras in this country, and an 
arranger of exceptional accomplishments, who con- 
ducted an orchestra of forty men at the State Theatre 
in Boston, and an orchestra ot fifty at the Academy of 
Music in New York, is at present in San Francisco. If 
any ot our photoplay theatres have any ambition or 
enterprise at all they will take advantage of Mr. Steam's 
presence and endeavor to keep him in this city. 

Mme. Lizetta Kalova and Alexander Kosloff returned 
recently from Los Angeles, having received a most de- 
lightful impression about the musical activities in the 
South. Mme. Kalova and Mr. Kosloff filled several suc- 
cessful engagements in Los Angeles, San Diego and 
Santa Barbara and were asked to return for additional 
engagements next fall, showing the excellent impression 
made. Mme. Kalova will be soloist with the Philhar- 
monic Orchestra of Los Angeles under the direction of 
Walter Henry Rothwell early in October, and will visit 
a number of Southern California cities under the man- 
agement of France Goldwater. 



SAN JOSE, May 8, 1923. — The thirteenth annual con- 
vention of the Music Teachers' Association of California 
will be held in San Jose, July 4, 5, 6 and 7, six hundred 
teachers planning to convene here tor a four-day pro- 
gram. Mr. Z. Earl Meeker, state president, came from 
Los Angeles last week for a conference with the ofli- 
cers of San Jose chapter and the convention committee. 
He reports great interest all over the state in the com- 
ing event. 

Activities will start on the night of July 4 with a 
banquet. A trip through Stanford University to attend 
an organ recital by Warren D. Allen is planned tor one 
of the days. Announcements will soon be made as to 
programs and visiting artists, which will be of interest 
to all musicians. Sessions will be open to the public 
for a nominal fee. The local chapter is alive to the 
responsibility and privilege ot entertaining some six 
hundred or more music teachers and hopes to have the 
interest and support of all local music lovers. 

The convention committee consists ot Homer DeWitt 
Pugh, chairman. Miss Marjory Fisher, Mrs. Howard 
Tennyson, Mrs. Daisie Brinker, Allan Bacon and Charles 
M. Dennis. 

The Elks' Concert Orchestra gave its third annual 
Spring concert Wednesday evening, May 2, in the 
Morris Elmer Dailey assembly hall of the State 
Teachers' College. Dr. Charles M. Richards is the con- 
ductor of this splendid organization, with A. V. Schu- 
bert, concertmaster. 

Miles A. Dresskell, head of the violin department of 
the conservatory of the College ot the Pacific, was the 
soloist of the evening, playing Saint-Saens' Introduction 
et Rondo Capriccioso with great artistry. For recall, 
Mr. Dresskell responded with Massenet's Meditation 
from the opera Thais. The orchestral accompaniments 
to these solos were particularly well played. 

The opening overture was that ot Prince Methuselah, 
an operetta by Johann Strauss, brilliantly played. The 
program, well arranged, was brought to a close with a 
novelty in the shape of the unique Ballet of the Flowers 
by Henry Hadley. A dozen different flowers are por- 
trayed by characteristic music, a colorful display of 
floral photographs in a music portfolio. 

The programs contained well expressed notes which 
helped greatly in the enjoyment ot the music. The fol- 
lowing numbers were given: Overture Prince Methuse- 
lah (SItrauss) ; Largo from Symphony No. 5 in E minor. 
New World Symphony (Dvorak); (a) Dagger Dance, 
(b) Indian Invocation (from Natoma) (Victor Herbert) ; 
Introduction et Rondo Capriccioso (Saint-Saens), Mr. 
Dresskell with Orchestra; Girl ot the Golden West 
Potpourri (Puccini); Ballet of the Flowers (1) Red 
Rose, (2) Marguerites, (3) Jasmine, (4) Heather, (5) 
Violets, (6) Lily ot the Valley, (7) Daffodils, (8) Gar- 
denia, (9) Mignonette, (10) Bachelor Buttons, (11) 
Hollyhocks, (12) Poppies, (Henry Hadley). 

Edward F. Schneider, San Jose's noted composer- 
teacher, will present four of his pianoforte pupils from 
San Francisco and Oakland, at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s 
new recital hall, on the evening of Friday, May lUh. 
The musical will be invitational, and those who heard 
the fine work of Mr. Schneider's pupils at the recital 
given at the Vendome two years ago will be especially 
anxious to attend. Three of the young women present- 
ing the program Friday evening are college students. 
The selections will be by Brahms, Chopin, Rubinstein 
and Paderewski. Miss Omo Grimwood of Mills College 
will give a group of vocal numbers. 

Mr. Schneider is at present composing the music for 
the ceremony ot the Cremation of Care, to be given this 
year in the Bohemian Club grove. What will be re- 
membered with great pleasure was the presentation of 
his symphonic poem Sargasso, played last fall by the 
San Francisco Symphony orchestra at the opening of 
the Colbert concert series. Sargasso has been played 
five times during the musical season just closing, a 
record for the work of any composer. 

The Half-Hours of Music given at the Y. W. C. A. 
twice a month by members of the Mu Phi Epsilon 
Sorority, are becoming more popular each time. The 
program given Friday afternoon. May 4th, by Miss 
Genevieve Burcham, soprano, and Miss Bernice Rose, 
pianist, was as follows: (a) Prelude, (b) Nocturne, (c) 
Etude (Chopin), Bernice Rose; (a) The Island, (Rach- 
maninow), (b) Lilacs (Rachmaninow), (c) Slumber 
Song (Gutchaninow), Genevieve Burcham; (a) Lento 
(Cyril Scott), (b) Ballade (Brahms) Bernice Rose; (a) 
Stars with Golden Sandals (Robert Franz), (b) Out of 
My Soul's Great Sadness (Franz), (c) Spring's Loveable 
Ladye (W. Keith Elliott) Genevieve Burcham. 

Mrs. Lester Cowger, soprano, artist pupil ot Wni. 
Edward Johnson, will give a song recital Friday evening. 
May 15th, at the Christian church. Fifth street, San 
Jose. Mrs. Cowger, who is the soloist of the First 
Church of Christ Scientist ot Palo Alto, will be assisted 
by Wm. Riley Smith, organist, who will play a group 
of organ solos, Mrs. Percy Pogson of Melbourne, Aus- 
tralia, will be the accompanist for the evening. 

This is the sixth in a series of recitals given by Mr. 
Johnson from the studio. The program presented at 
this time will be as follows: (a) My Sweet Repose 



Kohler & Chase 

iCnabf panna 
SCuabf Amptro 



SAN JOSE HEADQUARTERS 
185 So. First Street 



ALFRED LANINI 

Expert Maker of Violins, Violas and Cellos 

With European Experience 

Artistic Repairing Rare Old Violins For Sale 

591 E. ST. JAMES STREET 

San Jose, California 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

LeRoy V. Brant, Director 

OIVerM CoumeH in All BrancheN ot MumIc at 

All .StOBCX of Advancciiicnt 
SAN JOSE CAMFORNIA 



WM. EDWARD JOHNSON 



Kiihlcr & Chn.s 



IIARITOMi; 
Ih IHh St., San Josi-, Phono 4^.10. 
Iluildine, Wcdnfjoluy. I»:il Cnslro 
14111. Oakland, Wfdnenday. 



Hannah Fletcher Coykendall 

SOPRANO 

Announces the Oiiening of Voice Studio 

Open for Engn^enientN 

Pupii ot Gaetano Mcrola 

145 Hunchett Avenue. San Jose, CalU. 

Phone ;132,5-W 



VIOLET SILVER 



VIOLINIST 



Pupil of Leopold Ane 



MRS. CHARLES McKENZIE 



th Sixteenth Sir 



ALLAN BACON 

Head of Piano and Orsan Departments, 

tollece of Paeilic. San Jose 

Concert Organist Pianoforte Lecture Recital. 

NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

San Jose, Cal. 
Confers DeKrees, Awards Certifleates. Complete CoileKe 
Conservatory and Academic Courses in Piano. Violin. 
Harp. 'Cello. Voice, HarmnnT, Counterpoint, Canon and 
Fuene and Science of Music. For particulars Apply to 
Slater Superior. 

(Schubert), (b) Who Is Sylvia (Schubert) (e) Spring 
Faith (Ries), (d) Brilliant Butterfly (Carapra), Mrs. 
Cowger; Waltz Song (from Romeo et Juliette) 
(Gounod), Mrs. Cowger: (a) Fugue on Saint Anns 
Hymn (X S. Bach), (b) The Grandmother, (Gordon B. 
Nevin), (c) March Heroique (C. Saint-Saens), Wm. 
Riley Smith; (a) The Wounded Birch (Gretehaninow), 
(b) Cradle Song (Gretehaninow), (c) Thou Billowy 
Harvest Field (Rachmaninow), Mrs. Cowger; (a) Tally 
Ho! (Franco Leoni), (b) Daddy's Sweetheart (Liza 
Lehmann) (c) The House that Jack Built (Sidney 
Homer), (d) Smile Thro' Your Tears (Bernard Ham- 
ble), Mrs. Cowger. 

Allan Bacon, A. A. G. O., organist of the College of the 
Pacific, and Warren D. Allen, A. A. G. O.. organist of 
Stanford University, will be heard in recital at the first 
Pacific Coast Organists' convention to be held in Los 
Angeles June 26, 27 and 28, under the auspices of the 
California Chapters of the American Guild of Organists. 
Mr. Bacon is also named on the convention committee. 
Recitals, talks from prominent organists and discus- 
sions of various phases of the profession will make this 
conference one of utmost interest and profit to those 
interested in the work. 



jl 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANIL DEER 



''SoulfuV 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 

Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 



SAN JOSE LETTER 

(Continued from page 4, column 3) 
The Richards Club, tlie popular men's singing society 
it San Jose, gave its third annual Spring concert Mon- 
lay evening. May 7th. in the Morris Elmer Dailey as- 
lembly hall o£ the State Teachers' college. Dr. Charles 
H. Richards, the accomplished conductor, directed with 
ikill at the pianoforte. The Arion Trio, composed o£ 
rosephine Holub, violin. Margaret Avery, violoncello, 
ind .Joyce Holloway Barthelson, pianoforte, all of Oak- 
and. were the guest artists. The following interesting 
program was given: Margarita (Chadwick) ; (a) Im- 
nortal Music (Bobyn), (b) Elysium (Speaks), (c) Peggy 
(Cox): Trio in C minor — Allegro Appassionato (Men- 
Jelssohn), Arion Trio; (a) The Long Day Closes (Sulli- 
iran), (b) In Picardie (Osgood), (c) On the Sea (Dudley 
Buck): (a) Spanish Dance (Rehteld), (b) Songs My 
Mother Taught Me (Dvorak), (c) Czardas (Monti). Vio- 
lin Solos, Miss Holub; (a) The Mill (Jensen) (b) In 
Vocal Combat (Dudley Buck) ; (a) Londonderry Airs 
(Kreisler-Grainger) (b) Rondo (Haydn) Arion Trio; (a) 
Song of Brother Hilario (Cox) (bl Winter Song (Bul- 
lard) ; Negro Songs and Spirituals (a) Rain Song (Cook), 

(b) I'm Gwine to Sing in de Heavenly Choir (Milligan), 

(c) Exhortation (A Negro sermon) (Cook). 

Orley See, violinist, assisted Warren D. Allen, Uni- 
versity organist, at the regular recital in the Memorial 
Church, Stanford University. Sunday afternoon. May 6. 
Mr. See played an Andante from a Bach Concerto, ar- 
rangements of Bizet's Adagietto, and Debussy's En 
Bateau. Mr. Allen's selections included Preludio Fes- 
tive by Bosei. and two pieces by Sigfrid Kerg-Elert. en- 
titled Cansona, and Pax Vobiscum. At the recitals Tues- 
day and Thursday afternoons, Mr. Allen will feature 
numbers selected from the works of Mozart. 

Mrs. Flora Cooper von Schuckman of Santa Cruz and 
Oakland, gave a musical at her Santa Cruz home, the 
afternoon of Thursday, May 3rd, the occasion being a 
two-piano recital, Mrs. Cooper von Schuckman first 
piano, Mrs. Howard M. Huggins of San Jose, second 
piano, assisted by Mrs. Juanita Tennyson, coloratura 
soprano, also of San Jose. The following program was 
given: Peer CSynt Suite No. 1, (a) Morning Wood, (b) 
Ase's Death, (c) Anitra's Dance, (d) In the Hall of the 
Mountain King, (Grieg), Mrs. Cooper von Schuckman 
and Mrs. Huggins; (a) Yesterday and Today (Spross), 

(b) Spring Tide (Green). Mrs. Tennyson; (a) Nocturne 
Op. 9 No. 2 (Chopin), (b) Buona Notte (Nevin). (c) 
Arabesque (2nd) (Debussy), Mrs. Cooper von Schuck- 
man and Mrs. Huggins; (a) Ma L'il Batteau, (b) 
Dreamin' Time, (c) L'il Jasmine Bud (Strickland), 
Mrs. Tennyson; Suite Op. 1.5. (a) Romance, (b) Valse. 

(c) Polonaise, (Arensky), Mrs. Cooper von Schuckman 
and Mrs. Huggins. Mrs. Tennyson's recall numbers 
were The False Prophet (Scott) and Berceuse (Gret- 
chaninow). Mrs. Huggins was the accompanist. 

Wm. Edward Johnson, baritone, was heard in a group 
of songs in Oakland, Monday, May 7th, at the Sorop- 
timists' luncheon at Hotel Oakland. Mr. Johnson was 
accompanied by Mrs. Gertrude Rost, the club's oflicial 
accompanist. 

Leda Gregory Jackson, soprano, and Batti Bernardi. 
tenor, of Australia, gave a joint recital Friday evening. 
May 4th, at the First Methodist Church, with Maxine 
Cox. accompanist. Following is the program: (a) Song 
of the Thrush (Risher), (b) Clavelitas (Valverde). (c) 
La Partida (Alvarez), Leda Gregory Jackson; Che gelida 
Manina (from La Boheme) (Puccini), Batti Bernardi; 
(a) Ah fors'e lul (from La Traviata)) (Verdi), Mrs. 
Jackson; (a) Possession (Bulkeley), (b) Take a Pair 
of Sparkling Eyes (Sullivan), (c) Midst the Petals 
(Woodford-Finden). Mr. Bernardi; (a) Together (C. 
Urmy-D B. Moody), (b) Day and Night (Williams), 
(c) Birth of Morn (Leoni), (dl Fragrance (Cator-New- 
berry). Mrs. Jackson; Ah, Moon of My Delight (Liza 
Lehman), (b) O Could I Call the Years Back (Stewart- 
North). Mr. Bernardi; Parigi, o cara (from La Traviata), 
Mrs. Jackson and Mr. Baruardi. 

Delightful local color was given to the program by 
Mrs. Jackson's charming rendition of Together, com- 
posed by our esteemed musician, singer and song- 
author. David B. Moody, who has woven tuneful melo- 
dies around a number of lovely lyrics. In this instance 
he has set to music the beautiful words from the pen 
of our beloved Clarence Urray. also' composer and poet. 
Another local color selection was a dainty solo from 
the opera The Beggar of Bagdad, composed by Perry 
Newberry and Thomas Vincent Cator of Carmel, for- 
merly of San Jose. Miss Cox played the pianoforte ac- 



companiments with skill and helpfulness, adding much 
to the evening's enjoyment. 

Preparations for the annual music festival at the Col- 
lege of the Pacific are well under way. Haydn's Crea- 
tion by the College Chorus and Orchestra, assisted by 
Marian Brown, soprano, Hugh Williams, tenor, and 
Wm. Edwards Johnson, baritone, will be the first at- 
traction May 27th. Jessie Christian, coloratura soprano, 
of the Chicago Opera Company will give the last num- 
ber of the artist series May 29th, and June 1st an eve- 
ning of American music will be given by members of 
the faculty. 

The Municipal Band Concerts at Alum Rock Park be- 
gan Sunday, May 6th, under the leadership of Will H. 
Lake. The band will play from 2 to 5 p. m. on Sundays 
and holidays during the summer months. The first pro- 
gram o£ the season was as follows: March. The Arcade 
Girl (Pryor); Patriotic Patrol, Spirit of America (Zam- 
ernik) ; Selection, Mile. Mischief (Ziehrer) ; Solo for 
trombone, performed by E. C. Breith; Overture William 
Tell (Rossini); (a) Fox Trot. Peggy Dear (Freed); (b) 
Novelette, In the Springtime (Goldman); Songs from 
Blossom Time (Romberg); Duet for flute and horn 
(Tit!). Messrs. Harner and Estrada; Intermezzo. Pas 
Des Fleurs (Delibes) ; Finale, Gateway City (King). 

The Richards Club of San Jose, assisted by Juanita 
Tennyson, soprano. Maxine Cox, pianiste. will give a 
concert in Los Gatos. Friday evening. May 11th, at 
8:30. in the Strand Theatre. 

Ida Walker Parsons, mezzo-soprano, artist pupil of 
Wm. Edward Johnson, assisted by May Miller Walker, 
pianiste, gave a successful program recently over the 
radio from the Claremont Hotel station, Oakland. The 
following numbers were given: (a) Forbidden Music 
(Gastaldon). (b) Rose in the Bud (Foster) Ida Walker 
Parsons; Second Mazurka (Benj. Goddard) May Miller 
Walker; (a) An Open Secret (Woodman), (b) All for 
You (Brown). Ida Walker Parsons: (a) Valse de Ballet 
(Ed. Poldini). (b) Petite Serenade (Meyer Helmund), 
(c) Second Waltz Brillante (Benj. Godard), May Miller 
Walker; (a) My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice (from Sam- 
son et Dalila), (b) A Spirit Flower (Campbell-Tipton), 
(c) Gray Days (Johnson), (d) A May Morning (Denza), 
Ida Walker Parsons. 



Blanche Ashley gave studio recitals by some of her 
pupils at her studio. 706 Kohler & Chase BIdg.. on 
Saturday afternoon. May 5th. The students were ably 
assisted by Tozina von der End. violoncellist. As a de- 
lightful surprise to everyone Phyllida AslUey was pre- 
vailed upon to play after the conclusion of the program 
and distinguished herself by interpreting the Tenth 
Hungarian Rhapsodic by Liszt and Fireflies by Phillipe. 
She received a genuine ovation for her truly splendid 
pianistic art. The pupils acquitted themselves most 
creditably by playing the following extensive program 
in a manner revealing diligent study and careful train- 
ing: (a) Grieg — March of the Dwarfs, (b) Grieg — 
Anitra's Dance, (c) Chopin — Prelude C minor. Robert 
Kinney; (a) Serge Prokofietf — Vision Fugitive, (b) 
Handel (Sarabande). (c) Brounox — Chinese Suite, Joan 
Goodwin; Grieg — To Spring, Raymond Lillie; (a) 
Chopin — Etude, op. 25, No. 2. (b) Moszkowski — Jong- 
leuse. Elsie Kaufman; (a) Bach — Invention No. 13. (b) 
Chopin— Polonaise Militarie, Cyril Willets; (a) Chopin 
— Prelude No. 1, (b) Bach — Minuet, (c) Debussy — Coin 
des Enfants, Yolanda Marl; (a) N. Stcherbatcheff — 
Mazurka, (b) Paderewski — Au Soir, Frank Schafer; 

(a) C. Ph. Em. Bach — Solflgetto. (b» Paderewski — Kra- 
kowiak. Harriett Lohsee; (a) Schumann — The Poet 
Speaks, (b) Group of Songs — Kathryn Smith; Berlioz- 
Adler (Piano Trio) — Rakoczy March. Cecelia Hearther 
— Joan Goodwin. Robert Kinney; (a) Beethoven — Min- 
uet in E flat, (b) Chopin — Prelude, (c) Paderewski — 
Nocturne, Eva Wolpert; (a) Florent Schmitt — Zigan- 
iana, (b) Mendelssohn — Caprice, Esther Gowick; (a) 
Heller— Warrior's Song, (b) Heller — Rivulet, (c) Bee- 
thoven — Minuet. Fordyce Osborn; (a) Chopin — Waltz. 

(b) Rubinstein — Melodie, Helen Houlihan; Chopin — 
Preludes, Cecelia Hearther; Chopin — Selected, Dorothy 
Johnson; (a) Grieg— Spring, (b) Paderewski— Craco- 
vienne, Dorothy Le Dieu; Phyllida Ashley, Awakening. 
Kathryn Smith, 'Cello Obligate — Tozina Van der Ende, 
the Composer at the piano. MSS. first time: Mendels- 
sohn — Concerto. G minor. Elsie Kaufman, orchestra part 
at second piano, Blanche Ashley. 

Among the numbers of this program will be found a 
composition by Phyllida Ashley, entitled Awakening. 
This number received its first public presentation on 
this occasion and created an excellent impression, se- 
curing for the composer a hearty and prolonged ovation. 



HAZEL JOHNSON 

COLORATURA SOPRANO 

PUPIL OF DOMENICO BRESCIA AND FERNANDO MICHELENA 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND SOLFEGGIO 



Studio: — Kohler & Chase BIdg..— Kearny 5454 



Residence Studio: —2720 Filbert St.,— We»i 815z 



EDOUARD DERU 

VIOLINIST TO THEIR MAJESTIES, 

THE KING AND QUEEN 

OF BELGIUM 

Principal Assistant to Eugene Ysaye, for 

Many Years Professor of Violin at 

the Liege Conservatory of Music 

Will Be in San Francisco This Summer and 

Will Accept Pupils in Violin and 

Chamber Music Beginning 

August 15 th 

For particulars regarding terms and qualifica- 
ions, as well as enlisting, address Beatrice 
Anthony, 1000 Union Street, San Francisco. Tel. 
Franklin 142. Oakland Tel. Lakeside 4133. 



CHALIAPIN 



The World's Greatest Singer 

Two Extraordinary Recitals 
EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

Sunday Afternoon, May 20 
Monday Evening, May 28 

Tickets Now on Sale 

At Sherman. Clay & Co.'s. San Francisco 

MAIL ORDERS payable to Selby C. 

Oppenheimer, care above 

Lower Floor: 15 rows, $2.50; next 10 rows, 
$2.00; balance. $1.50, $1.00; upper floor: 5 r*vs, 
$2.00; balance, $1.00. (Tax 10% added). Manage- 
ment Selby C. Oppenheimer. 



DALCROZE EURYTHMICS 

SIX WEEKS' SUMMER COURSE 
IN BERKELEY 

By 

ELSIE HEWETT McCOY 

CLASSES FOR ADULTS AND CLASSES 
FOR CHILDREN 



Ben Moore 

PIANIST— COACH— ORGANIST 

Organist and Director Trinity Episcopal 
Church — Beth Israel Synagogue 

2636 Union St. Tel. Fillmore 1624 

Appointinent Only 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 

SOPRANO 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 

AddresN: 471 ItTth Avenue 

Tel. Pao. «M2 



Unless you are known to everyone who engages artists 
OP who attends concerts you can not possibly secure 
engagements. Your mere say-so does not constitute 
proof of your experience and success. Therefore maks 
your name valuable by advertising. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Mischa Levitzki and the Ampico 

Mischa Levitzki Writes 

A Letter To San 

Francisco 



April J I, ig23. 
To San Francisco: "It has been a privilege to play for you 
this season. Your reception at all three of my appearances 
is a delightful memory, and I am looking forward to my 
return appearance here, which I hope will be in the near 
future. In the meantime, however, I feel that, thanks to the 
Ampico, I play to a great many of you, all but in person. 
The influence of this wonderful instrument in the home is 
inestimable. I have heard and compared all of the repro- 
ducing pianos, and to me the supremacy of the Ampico is 
unquestionable. The selection of the right reproducing 
piano should not be entered into lightly. It is too important. 
It is just as important for you as for the artist, and should 
only be made after careful comparison." 

Mischa Levitzki 



COMPARE 

THE suggestion of Levitzki that you compare all reproducing 
instruments comes with unusual authority from a great artist 
who followed exactly that same course himself. In the end he was 
forced by strong conviction to turn his back on the reproducing 
device installed in his favorite concert piano — a most courageous step. 
He, with Rachmaninoff and several other great masters who fol- 
lowed the same course, have paid the highest tribute to the Ampico, 
and furnish testimony too eloquent to be ignored. 



The Ampico is placed at your disposal, just as it was for Levitzki 
and Rachmaninoff — for any comparison you may choose to make. 
Then follow your own judgment as did Levitzki, Rachmaninoff, 
Godowsky, Moiseiwitsch, Dohnanyi, Schnabel, Rubinstein, Samaroff, 
Leginska, Bloomfield-Zeisler, Ornstein, Mirovitch, Nyiregyhazi, 
Maier, Pattison, La Forge, Farrar, Kreisler and scores of their 
fellow artists. 



Kohler & Chase 



KNABE AMPICO 



San Francisco 
Sacramento 



Oakland 
San Jose 



FLOSSIE SOULE GRIGSBY, PIANIST 

Flossie Soule Grigsby, an accomplished 
pianist, will give a piano recital for the 
Examiner Radio Station this evening. 
She received her musical training under 
the noted pianist and pedagogue, George 
Kruger, at the King Conservatory of 
Music, San Jose, from which institute 
she graduated with honor and then took 
up special studies under Kruger in San 
Francisco. Flossie Soule Grigsby pos- 
sesses a musical touch, fluency and a 
splendid technic and interprets the ideas 
of the composer in a charming individual 
way all her own. No doubt the many 
Radio fans will be interested in hearing 
this young lady in their homes over the 
radio. The progam will be as follows; 
Rondo Capriccioso, Op. 14 (Mendels- 
sohn) ; Marche of the D\#arfs, Op. 54, No. 
3 (Grieg) ; I Love Thee, Op. 41, No. 3 



certo No. 2 for Violin, D minor (Bruch), 
(First time in San Francisco), First Move- 
ment. Adagio, ma non troppo, Mrs. Edna 
Mae Stratton Nies, Violiniste, Miss Arline 
Elizabeth Lynch at the piano; Serenade 
(Under the Balcony) for String Orchestra 
with Cello Obligato (Wuerst), Mr. Harry 
B. Tobey, Cellist: Two Slavonic Dances 
(Dvorak); Prelude — The Masterslngers 
(Wagner). 

Yvonne Landsberger, the well known 
and successful young soprano soloist, 
sang at the Palace Hotel Palm Court last 
Sunday evening, April 29th. Her num- 
bers were Chanson Provencale (Del 
'Acqua) and Dawn (Curran). As usually 
she sang with temperament and spirit 
and received a most cordial recall. 

Williana Gwln, prominent pupil of 
Esther Mundell, well known local vocal 




le nrini.iiit Orcheslr 

Movinis Pic«ure Ppl 

of Seventy Me 



HIilRinAIV HELLER 

Leader, Who Han Made HIkIi Clasx »lii< 

eeH of the Greut AVeNt and Who Dlreet) 

at The Metropolitan Theatre in Lo: 






(Grieg) ; Valse E-major, Op. 34, No. 1 
(Moszkowski) ; Sous Bois, Op. 6 (Staub); 
Etude G-flat major. Op. 10, No. 5 (Black 
key Etudel, (Chopin); The Rosary 
(Nevin); Valse Caprice, Op. 7 (Newland). 



The Zech Orchestra of which William 
F. Zech is the able conductor, will give its 
first concert of the season, 1923, at Cali- 
fornia Hall on Tuesday evening. May 
15th. The soloist will be Miss^Edna Mae 
Stratton Nies and Miss Arline Elizabeth 
Lynch will be tlie accompanist. An 
exceptionally fine and interesting program 
has been prepared for this occasion and 
the following numbers will testify to the 
excellence of the event; Overture, Eg- 
mont (Beethoven); Symphony B niinor 
(unfinished) (Schubert), (a) Allegro 
moderato, (b) Andante con moto; Con- 



teacher, has been giving some successful 
concerts in Paris. The following is from 
the Paris Herald; 

"William Gwin, prominent American 
tenor, sang at the American Woman 
Club recently before a large audience and 
was enthusiastically received. He proved 
himself to be a serious and refined artist. 
His readings are the result of keen ap- 
preciation of tile poetic content of his 
songs and his work bears tile stamp of 
distinctive charm. Mr. Gwin is now on 
a tour of the northern countries of Eu- 
rope illustrating lectures on French 
music dating back to Richard-the-Lion- 
Hearted and up to the revolution of 1793. 
This concert tour is under the patronage 
of the French Government and its object 
is for the establishing of a closer artistic 
entente between France and neighboring 
nations." 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Articles of General Musical Interest 



Thexe articles are prepared for The Pacific Con 
Musical Review hy l>eRoy V. Brant, dlreolor of t: 
Institute of MuNic of San Jonc. Mr. Brant will 
pleased to treat here HubJectN of general niuNic 
interest. Anyone desirlnp: an article on any pa 
tlcular Kubjcet may conimnnlcate with Mr. Brai 
care The Institute of Music. South Second stre 
at San Salvador, San Jose. 



AN ANALYTICAL DISCUSSION OF MODERN 
MUSICAL TENDENCIES 

I realize that the title of this article in itself sets the 
stamp of boldness on me, as a writer. Yet I desire to 
state that I do not feel that I am bold in attempting to 
discuss the matter of the musical tendencies of the day. 
I do not mean to convey to the mind of the reader any 
thought that I arft authoritative in what I say. I realize 
that there is all the room in the world for differences 
of opinion on the matter of modernism in music. That 
which I shall say is, in a way, a questing after truth. 
It is not said in a dogmatic spirit, but rather as sug- 
gestive of certain trends of thought, it is said more to 
make the reader think for himself about the matter than 
to state anything as a certified fact. 

It will be well, in the beginning, to see what elem£nts 
enter into music. There is the physiological, first of all, 
for hearing is a thing of the body, and as such must be 
considered as occupying first place in our discussion. 
Then, there is the question as to what our music is 
based on, and in what way the tendencies of the day 
differ from the more established order of things. And. 
last of all, we must carefully consider just what artistic 
worth these tendencies appear to have. 

Anything having to do with music must be considered 
in relation to the physiological structure of the ear. It 
is in the ear that we determine what is unpleasant, or 
dissonant, and what is pleasant, or consonant. The 
mind has something to do with this, also, in that we may 
become educated to certain things, but in the last 
analysis this education is largely a matter of becoming 
able to follow certain musical threads, and the matter 
of dissonance is determined by the ear itself. 

Sound enters the ear through a little duct in the head, 
impignes on the eardrum, is transmitted by a series of 
little bones to a fluid in which swim a series of nerve 
endings, and the excitation of these nerve endings re- 
sults in what we know as hearing. These nerve end- 
ings are known as Corti's fibres. We do not know in 
exactly what manner these fibres make us aware of 
sound, but I will give you the hypothesis held by Corti, 
Helmholtz, and other physiologists and physicists of 
note. There are several hundred of the fibres, of differ- 
ent lengths and thicknesses. It is believed that a sound 
of a certain pitch will excite a certain fiber which is 
itself attuned to that pitch. Two sounds would excite 
two fibres, and so on. Now, it is believed, if the fibres 
vibrate in a steady rhythm a pleasing result is experi- 
enced, while if the fibres vibrate at an uneven rhythm 
the hearer becomes conscious of an unpleasant sensa- 
tion, which we call dissonance. Such a sound would be 
the barking of a dog, the roar of a lion, or other like 
sound. An example of the first would be the tone of a 
violin, in its simples form a single tone. 
(Continued next week) 

PONSELLE AT PINNACLE OF HER ART 

Rosa Ponselle, a leading dramatic soprano of the 
Metropolitan Opera House, and William Tyroler. assist- 
ant conductor of that institution, will be heard in con- 
certs at the Curran Theatre, Sunday, May 13 at 2:30 
and the Civic Auditorium, Wednesday, May 23 at 8:30. 
The Curran prices are $1.00 to $2.50 and those at the 
Auditorium 50c and $1.00 with some of the best seats 
at $2.00. 

Ponselle and Tyroler appeared before a capacity and 
delighted house at the Philharmonic Auditorium, Los 
Angeles, last Monday night. Carl Bronson of the Times 
went into ecstacies in praising the voice and the beauty 
of Ponselle. Before coming to Los Angeles, and not- 
withstanding that the Metropolitan has many great 
sopranos, including Galli-Curci, Alda, Bori, Jeritza, 
Easton and others, Ponselle's popularity is such that the 
management presented her in three of the seven operas 
just given in Atlanta, Georgia. 

Ponselle's concert notices are always excellent. Here 
is one selected at random from the hundreds of those 
received by Manager Frank W. Healy: Rosa Ponselle, 
dramatic soprano, at her initial appearance Friday 
evening, was given an ovation that few artists have been 
accorded by an Oklahoma City audience. Ponselle has 
reached the very pinnacle of her art. With a freshness 
and beauty of tone unsurpassed, she completely cap- 
tivated her audience from the first note of the aria from 
Forza Del Destino, by Verdi to the last sweet tones of 
Swanee River. 

Ponselle's voice is flawless. Her notes from low A to 
high C were full, clear, delicately colored, and resonant. 
Throughout the whole extent of her register, was that 
same warmth of tone, absolute accuracy of pitch, and 
that beautiful quality from the lowest note to its top- 
most height. Her enunciation is perfect, and her art 
exquisitely delicate, individual and radiant. She has the 
perfection of a finished artist, together with a charming 
personality. 

One of the outstanding numbers of the entire program 
came after the first group when she was given such 
enthusiastic applause that she graciously responded 
with Tosti's Good-bye to Summer. No more perfect 
interpretation of this number could have been given, 
and the audience was thrilled. At the conclusion of the 
group, which closed the scheduled program, the audi- 
ence remained seated, demanding enthusiastically just 
one more. 



MUSICAL REVIEWS SUBSCRIPTION CAMPAIGN 

It affords us great pleasure to announce that the plan 
associated with our big drive for subscriptions during 
May, June and July has met with practically universal 
approval. The prizes aggregating THREE THOUSAND 
DOLLARS to be distributed among the students or 
teachers that obtain for us three thousand subscribers 
during three months evidently have aroused the am- 
bition and enterprise of many young aspirants for musi- 
cal honors. What we regard as the most desirable 
musical prize ever offered in any contest consists of a 
scholarship course of twenty lessons (instrumental or 
vocal) from a leading pedagogue in return for one 
hundred subscribers and additional lessons for more 
than one hundred subscribers. In addition to paying for 
such course the Pacific Coast Musical Review, upon be- 
ing informed by the teacher that a student having taken 
advantage of such course is specialy talented, will start 
him or her on a career by publicity and by giving op- 
portunities to continue lessons, and when ready to secure 
opportunities for public appearances. 

Other prizes will be talking machines of $100, $75, $50 
or less in accordance to the number of subscribers a 
student will be able to secure for us. There will also 
be vacation trips to various parts of California. Then 
the prizes will include violins or other musical instru- 
ments, the value of which will be in accordance with 
the number of subscriptions secured. Most desirable 
prizes will consist of season tickets to the grand opera 
season of the San Francisco Opera Association for 1923 
and also season tickets for the concert series of 1923- 
1924, Selby C. Oppenheimer having declared himself 
ready to co-operate with us in this subscription 
campaign. 

What will no doubt prove to be a most useful and 
worth while prize will be the starting of a savings 
account in the Anglo California Trust Company repre- 
senting a third of the amount secured for subscriptions. 
In this way anyone who secures one hundred subscribers 
will be started with a $100 savings account, anyone who 
secures fifty subscribers will be started with $50 and 
so on. The special advantage of this subscription cam- 
paign is that NO ONE WILL HAVE ANY WORK WITH- 
OUT SECURING A PRIZE. If a student can only secure 
five subscribers he or she will receive a prize worth 
five dollars. 

If a student or teacher has any friends interested 
in music it should not be difficult to induce them to 
subscribe for the Pacific Coast Musical Review. To 
thoroughly understand and appreciate good music it is 
necessary to know what is going on in music, and also 
to read intelligent reviews on concerts and operatic 
performances. Parents who spend money on children 
for a musical education want to see them progress and 
become known as early as possible. This paper always 
pays special attention to pupils' recitals. Many a Cali- 
fornia artist now known nationally or internationally 
received his or her first encouragement through the 
columns of the Pacific Coast Musical Review. 

It is to the direct interest of managers, teachers, 
students and music lovers to see this paper obtain as 
large a circulation as possible. No daily newspaper is 
wilting to devote the space and attention to music, 
especially activities of resident artists, teachers and com- 
posers which the Pacific Coast Musical Review is will- 
ing to do. During twenty-two years of successive pub- 
lication this paper has proven that it is entitled to the 
confidence of the musical profession and music lovers. 
While it has not pleased everybody, it surely seems to 
have pleased the majority. We have never ignored an 
artist because he did not advertise. We have never 
knowingly injured anyone. Evidence for the worthiness 
of this paper is contained in its twenty-two years of 
continued activity. 

We shall try to make the paper more interesting by 
publishing new departments. In this way we shall 
write shorter articles, but more of them, and in order to 
make the paper of use to everybody, or to as many 
artists, teachers and students as possible, we wish that 
all would co-operate with us to send us news in as short 
paragraphs as the occasion demands. We can not tell 
what you are doing unless you let us know about it. If 
you wish to keep thoroughly well informed about musical 
activities at home and abroad you simply have to read 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review, for it has the space 
and the writers to tell you all about what is happening 
or what is about to happen in music. 

Students and teachers participating in this campaign 
will find that compared to daily papers few people out- 
side the profession, students and parents of students are 
already subscribing for this paper, hence they wilt not 
be told too often "I already subscribe for this paper." 
They will be glad to know about it and read it. The 
subscription price is only $3 a year, or a little over five 
cents a week. No one who has enough money to pay for 
lessons or attend concerts or opera will find five cents a 
week too extravagant a price to pay for his or her 
musical news. It is furthermore to the interest of resi_ 
dent artists, or students who expect to become artists 
some day to help this paper to be thoroughly circulated 
and widely read in California, for its liberality in ex- 
tending courtesies to prospective and experienced artists 
is well known. The more people read this paper the bet- 
ter known will be the artists mentioned in its columns 
and the more engagements will they eventually secure. 
By assisting the Pacific Coast Musical Review you will, 
therefore, also assist yourself. 

We are having printed matter prepared to distribute 
among teachers and students and of course wish to 
secure a large a list of those interested in music as we 
can obtain. " Further announcements will also appear 
in this paper In the meantime we would like to list the 
names of teachers and students who are interested in 
helping us to obtain three thousand more subscribers 
during May, June and July. 



For those who are especially ambitious, and who think 
they can secure more than five hundred subscribers for 
us (this includes music schools and music dubs) will be 
able to win either a grand or upright piano or a player 
piano. In fact there is nothing worth while in the way 
of prizes that a student or teacher is unable to earn. It 
all depends upon his or her popularity among friends 
or energy to secure subscriptions. 

ALFRED METZGER. 



THE FIREFLY CROWDS RlVOLl OPERA HOUSE 

Bright Prim I Opera Presents Myrtle Dingwall, Ferris 

Hartman, George Kunkel, Robert Carlson, and 

Other Members at Their Very Best 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

The Rivoli Opera House has been attracting the larg- 
est houses of the season during the course of the pres- 
entation of the Firefly which had its first production 
last Monday evening. The energetic campaign that has 
been waged hy Mayor .Tames Rolph Jr., J. Emmett 
Hayden and a Citizens Committee in behalf of the re- 
tention of the Hartman-Steindorff Comic Opera Co. in 
the interests of good music has proved most successful 
and evidently the combined interest of music lovers 
and theatre goers is aroused as one may easily note 
from the large attendance that is rewarding the excel- 
lent work of the cast. It is not difficult to secure the 
hearty support of the reople of San Fi-anc'sco. pr ivided 
they are given what they like. As long as productions 
are of fine material, ate presented in competent crafts- 
manlike manner and appeal musically and "humorously" 
to the people large houses will be the result. But if 
productions are given with inadequate support and in 
a manner not appealing to the public the people will 
not patronize them. San Francisco theatre goers are 
not sentimental, sympathetic nor even forgiving. They 
want the best presented in the finest way at the lowest 
possible prices. There are times when our theatre 
goers are even willing to pay high prices for excellent 
productions. But they have no pity for anyone that 
presents theatrical performances either by incompetent 
or partially incompetent casts. Nothing in the world 
will make the public forgive a manager who is weak 
enough to Include inefficient talent in his company. And 
any manager who thinks otherwise will sooner or later 
experience the resentment of the public. 

In making the above remarks we are not referring 
to any particular company, nor is it our intention to 
criticize anyone. We are merely stating the facts as 
we see them. San Francisco is a wonderful "show-town" 
for first cfass productions presented in first class style. 
It is a terrible "show-town" for productions of ques- 
tionable quality presented in careless fashion, even at 
small prices. Evidently The Firefly, as presented by 
the Hartman-Steindorff Co., has caught the fancy of our 
theatre lovers. .Judging from the attendance, the en- 
thusiastic applause, the demand for encores and the 
rippling laughter the audiences are thoroughly enjoy ng 
themselves. And that is the keystone to an organiza- 
tion's success. People go to the theatre to be enter- 
tained and anyone that can entertain them will reap the 
reward of their patronage. 

One of the most grateful, and at the same time one 
of the most difficult, light opera roles ever written is 
that of Nina in the Firefly. The prima donna role de- 
mands a vocal artist of high class with soubrette effer- 
vescence. Myrtle Dingwall is such a prima donna. Her 
voice has an excellent chance to reveal itself in its most 
flexible quality and the young vocal artist does not hesi- 
tate to put her very soul into her phrases. Every one 
of the splendid arias allotted to this part is sung with 
authority, taste, vivacity and musicianship. Miss Ding- 
wall justly deserves the enthusiasm she arouses. We 
were glad to note that in the last act she chose for her 
interpolated numbers songs thoroughly within her ca- 
pacity, and she sang the Cavalleria Rusticana Aria and 
Will o' Wisp with every ounce of sentiment and dis- 
crimination. It was a splendid performance. 

Ferris Hartman in the role of Jenkins, the effeminate 
private secretary, brought out every point of humor and 
a few that other comedians are not able to accentuate. 
His topical song about Some Little Bug Will Get You 
is one of the best things Hartman has ever done. It 
naturally gets many encores and the distinguished 
comedian is always ready to furnish something new. If 
you think you can sit through the rendition of this song 
without laughing heartily it is necessary that you go 
and hear it. If you don't laugh at this song, there is 
something radically wrong with your disposition, and 
nothing will ever cure you. 

George Kunkel in the role of Herr Franz has a part 
that is specially suited to his style of histrionic art. 
He interprets it throughout with dignity and never ex- 
aggerates the iines unduly, which is not as easy with 
dialect parts as many may imagine. Robert Carlson in 
the role of John Thurston has one of the most effective 
roles he so far interpreted. His fine voice has a chance 
to assert itself. John Van as Jack Travers is improving 
constantly. His voice is getting freer and he acts with 
more freedom and naturalness. 

Violet May as Geraldine does some very pleasing 
singing and looks charming. Muggins Davies is as 
vivacious and electrifying as ever in the role of the 
French maid. Paul Hartman as Pietro adds to the en- 
joyment of the production, while Dixie Blair in the 
dignified part of Mrs. Oglesby shows how versatile an 
actress she is. Elfrieda Steindorff, Lillian Leonard and 
Walter Barnow complete the excellent cast. Scenery 
and costumes are as usual very colorful and picturesque. 
Paul Steindorff and his orchestra complete the musical 
excellence of the performance. Everyone ought to hear 
and see The Firefly at the Rivoli Opera House. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

SHERMAN DANBY, REPRESENTATIVE AND CORRESPONDENT 

Assisted by Miss Lloyd Dana and Miss Mildred Alexander, Los Angeles; Miss Penelope Newkirk; Hollywood; Mrs. Helen Wood, Pasadena. 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: SUITE 447 DOUGLAS BUILDING, 257 SO. SPRING STREET, TELEPHONE 820-302 

Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



MISUAI- t AI.ICXDAa roR « KF,K OF HAV IITII 

»IOND.\y, M.AY 14 

Kocllner Qunrtft, C'uneert Gbell .\uditorliiiii. I„ A. 

Ilayiiiuiiil HariiHin. Ilecitnl Ontai io Club. S. I'HNUilcna 

C'Iriiicnt'c Giiriinl. on I'roBraiii UoiiiinaiK dull, 1.. A. 

Tl lOSllAV. MAY 15 

Groreia KoIut, Rrrilnl EUclI C lul>. I.. A. 

Ornan Ciuilil ll.'.l!nl Aneele.-! Temiile. I.. A. 

WKI»\KS1>AV, MAY 1« 

Frieda I'l-j.-ke. llrvltal I.. A. foontry «lub 

MaiKaret FIkMop .llonnon. Recital W a Wan Club. I,. A. 

THIRSDAY, MAY 17 
MiKha Ve Olln auil Helena Lewyn (Mornlni; Program) 

AmliaKMadur Hotel. 1.. A. 

Call hronKon Sineern. Concert (iantnt Club, I.. A. 

I.OH AuBeIca Conncrvatoty, Recital Kramer Studios, I.. A. 

FRID.\^'. M.V%' IK 
Drahni Y'nn Den Bctb and Flora Myer I^^nBcl. j4Mnt 

Recital Convent ol' ImmncrLi c H t. 1.. A. 

University of Southern California tilee Clab, Concert 

T.ini.y AuUlto.ium. I,. A. 

SATCRDAi, !M VI 11> 
Dinhm Van Den Berg ami Raymond Harmon. Joint 

Recital Pomona roll"K" J"! ■ ■"•""I / al. 

Frieda Pcycke, Recital Maty I.ouise Tea B u. I.. A. 

Lillian Martin, ProBiam fo- MaKun« 

Philharmonic Ai:diloriiim. 1.. A. 

Los Ange'es. May 7, 1923. 
Los Angeles Oratorio Society.— Samson and Delilah, 
given by the Los Angeles Oratorio Society at the Phil- 
harmonic Auditorium on May 1st, was a heroic attempt 
on the part of both conductor and chorus to overcome 
difficulties, some of which were inherent in the work 
chosen, others due to the failure of those members of 
the Philharmonic Orchestra who were engaged to play 
the orchestral score to master the music in the one 
rehearsal which their agreement allowed, them. 

We felt we were present at a tragedy. Nothing in 
Mr. Smallman's demeanor betrayed the handicaps under 
which he labored. The chorus did its best under the 
circumstances, but into a large body of people working 
at a disadvantage inevitably creeps in a feeling of fail- 
ure. The audience was loyal to the society, and no 
musical organization in Los Angeles deserves better of 
its audience. The truth is the society deserved a better 
vehicle than this rather incongruous opera stripped of its 
stage color, and certainly deserves better support from 
local instrumentalists. John Smallman is an excellent 
director, but he has never received adequate orchestral 
support. . . , . ^ „ 

Madame Sprotte was the one convmcing soloist. Her 
warm personality, her musical sensitiveness, her oper- 
atic training, all came to her aid, her singing of the 
song which brought about Samson's downfall was warm 
and cooing. She well understands the accents which 
shake the lover's soul. Samson— has there ever been 
a satisfactory Samson— alas, sung he ever so well- 
is always a little ridiculous. Arthur Hackett, though he 
sings smoothly, is scarcely the man to impersonate a 
giant. Ettore Campana was far more convincing, sing- 
ing the part of High Priest in a fine masculine manner, 
despite a noticeable vocal defect. Henri de La Platte, 
who was not enjoying the best of health strove man- 
fully, but his singing seemed to lack point and rhythm. 
The star of the performance was unquestionably Lorna 
Gregg, accompanist, who on a day's notice, attacked 
the piano score with that grand oratorio style of hers 
and supplemented by Ray Hastings, organist, who was 
called upon to do much playing at sight, added greatly 
to the heroic acting which characterized their musical 
tragedy. Undoubtedly the audience as a whole was 
scarcely aware of the misfortunes which accompanied 
the performance, so excellently were the weak places 
covered. 

There is so much wonderful choral music which we 
never hear — Bach, Mozart, Beethoven, Cesar Franck — 
supplementing the glorious and fitting works of Handel 
and Haydn, that the society would do well to stick to 
its true sphere and avoid those works which require 
acting and costume, and if necesary those requiring 
orchestra. Anent the failure of the orchestra to play its 
part, 1 quote the following from the excellent article by 
Bruno David Ussher in the last issue of Los Angeles 
Saturday Night. Mr. Ussher said in part: 

Altogether, the problem ot orchestral accompaniment 
at choral concerts is a serious problem, financially and 
artistically, for our choruses. As a rule, members of the 
Philharmonic Orchestra form the instrumental ensemble, 
and this was also planned for "Samson and Delilah." 
For economical reasons the choral clubs cannot afford 
to engage the orchestra members tor more than one 
rehearsal. At the one preceding this concert difiiculties 
encountered ordinarily by the shortness ot rehearsal 
time, more or less, unfamiliarity of players with the 
music and with the conductor, were greater than usual, 
as a number of the members ot the Philharmonic Or- 
chestra were prevented by other engagements to attend 
and had sent substitutes, several of them, apparently, 
substitutes in the fullest sense ot the world. Moreover, a 
tew players failed to attend the rehearsal and had in. 
tended to play at the concert without rehearsal. The re- 
sult was distressing and Mr. Smallman took a justified 
stand. 

As remarked, here is involved an artistic problem 
which needs solution for the sake ot choral growth in 
this city. For its solution the co-operation ot the in 




Fitzgerald's for the Advancemetit of Music 

Lott — Knabe Artist 

Clifford Lo'tt is one ot the best known baritones and teach- 
ers on the Pacific Coast. His appearances in Concert are 
accorded high praise by all the critics and his success as a 
teacher is no'thing short ot remarkable. In his studio, as 
well as tor all his concerts, Mr, Lott requires the famous 
art piano, the 

KNABE 




HILL STREET ^^^ AT 72.7~72.Q 

Los Angeles 



strumentalists is necessary. With all due respect to the 
members ot the Philharmonic Orchestra at large, it 
must be stated that in view ot their general efficiency 
one must doubt whether they — all ot them and always — 
have given ot their best goodwill and interest during 
rehearsals and concerts of this nature. Surface evidence 
makes one doubt it. To recall a recent instance, the 
performance of David's "The Desert," mentioned in a 
review of the Ellis concert. There occurred astonish- 
ingy ragged orchestra playing and bad intonation. 

So far as "Samson and Delilah" is concerned one must 
grant that it is difficult music to play. But what is to be 
done? The Los Angeles Oratorio Society can not afford 
to pay the high rates 'demanded for a second rehearsal. 
The players themselves are obviously handicapped by 
this one-rehearsal, make-shitt system. The Los Angeles 
Oratorio Society or any other choral club is not giving 
these concerts for commercial purposes, but tor the 
sake of artistic endeavor, tor the sake of making this a 
more musical city, in short, for the love of music. They 
cannot be expected to risk a deficit by the expense of a 
second rehearsah 

What could be done? Members of the Philharmonic 
Orchestra consider themselves artists? Could they not 
tor the sake ot artistic perfection play two rehearsals 
for the same high tee they receive tor one? Must they 
commercialize their art at the expense ot perfection? 
This is a small sacrifice and would morally and ma- 
terially in due time benefit them. It would be a sacrifice 
not often demanded and which would involve small 
financial loss. Undoubtedly, the choral society, in case 
ot a surplus might be glad to pay to the orchestra a 
bonus as large as possible for that second rehearsal, 
perhaps, pay all in full it box office receipts permitted. 
What are the orchestra players of Los Angeles going to 
do about it? It should be with them as much a matter ot 
honor as ot sacrifice tor art's sake, not merely labor at 
so much an hour. What will be their answer? If it is a 
question ot "so much an hour,'' then they must change 
their attitude and give value in full as they are paid, 

Georgia Kober, noted Chicago pianist and teacher, will 
present an interesting program at the Ebell Club Tues- 
day evening. May 15th. The program will include se- 
lections from Bach, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Scriabine, 
Rachmaninoff, MacDowell and Debussy, the Beethoven 
Sonata, Opus 27, and compositions by Tschaikowsky, 
Arensky, Richard Strauss, Palmgren and Moszkowski. 

Miss Ann J. Eachus presented four ot her advanced 
pupils. Miss Margaretha Lohmann, Miss Josephine 
Heintz, Miss Helene Morgan and Miss Berenice Morri- 
son, in a piano recital on Friday evening. May 4th, at 
the Gamut Club. The program was composed of music 
rarely heard here. The program follows: Prelude and 
Fugue, E Minor (Mendelssohn), Margaretha Lohmann; 
Intermezzo, Op. 116, No. 6 (Brahms), "The Fountain of 
the Aqua Paola" (Charles Griftes), Josephine Heintz; 
Etude (Chopin), Helene Morgan; Paganini Etude 
(Liszt); "Scherzo" (Chopin); "Ballade," Op. 10, No. 1 
(Brahms), Margaretha Lohmanu; "Rigaudon" (Mc- 
Dowelll), "Spinning Song" (Mendelssohn), "The Juggler" 
(Moszkowski), Etude, Op. 15, No. 9 (Bortkiewiez), Etude, 
Op. 15, No. 8 (Bortkiewiez), Etude, Op. 15, No. 7 
(Bortkiewiez), Berenice Morrison. 

Elsie Mannion, violinist, Ruthellen Miller, soprano 
and Ivy Mae Travis, acompanist, have just returned from 
an extended trip into the Palo Verdes and Imperial 
Valley, where they presented two straight concert pro- 
grams and four costume programs, specializing in the 
- old fashioned and Spanish costumes — and numbers in 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

COMPOSER-PI AN ISTE 

Just Isaued for the Piano 

"SPANISH SERENADE" and "RIDE OF THE COWBOY' 

ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CULTURE — COACHING IN REPERTOIRE 

OPERA CLASSES INCLUDING COMPLETE 

PRESENTATIONS 

StDdlo 1324 S. Flsaeroa, Phone X1S05 

CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

Ayallable tor Concerts and Reeltala 

Limited Number of Advanced Puplla Accepted 

VIolInlMt LON .^mcelCH Trio 

"tndlo! 3.14 Monlc Art. Studio BIdg. Phone 100S2 

ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 



TaeMday. ^ 
Bean So: 
13^ So 



'ednesday. Friday Afternooni 
lonl. Phoneii SIMOR or 271330 
ith F^l^ueron, Los Angrelea 



SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCERT MASTER PIIII.HARMOMC ORCHESTRA 

Concerts and Recitals 

Manaeement Mrs. Caroline C. Smith, 424 Auditorium Ride. 



ILYA BRONSON 



.t»lR La Mirada 



Solo 'Cclilat 

s Trio, Philharmo 
r Music Recitals 
Holly .'!<)44 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

Teacher of Piano, HarniouT, Voice Coach. DurinB March 
and Aiirll, Mcrrilt Jones Hotel, Santa Monica. Tel. SanI 
Monica tt:i-I4.'>. No. 34S Music Arts Bide., Los Angeie 




LOS ANGELES 

CALIFORNIA 

THEATRE 



GREATER CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
ELINOR, Conducting 
50 MUSICIANS 

PROGRAM FOR WEEK OF MAY 13 

(a) LA nOHEME — Selection ..._ Pacclnf 

(b) HUNG.imAN DANCE No. 5 Brahm« 

(c) NOVEMBER ROSE Snydci 

In conjunction with the distinctive 

Goldwyn release 

"THE LAST MOMENT" 

A. J. Parker Read, Jr„ production, fentDrinR 

Doris Ken>on, Henry Hull, Louis Wolheim anil 

Louis Calhearn. From a story by Jack Uoyle. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



keeping with their costumes. The trio were very much 
appreciated and will accept return engagements in the 
fall. 

Julia Robinson, soprano, of great dramatic power, 
sang an aria from Massenet's Herodiade and also a 
duet with Henry La Bonte, tenor, at Grauman's Dis- 
covery Concert on Sunday morning. May 6th. Eliza- 
beth Copeland, pianist, played several selections, one 
being Moszowski's Caprice Espagnole. 



Alfred Kastner, harpist of the Philharmonic Orchestra, 
played several selections at a program given by the 
Breon and Darrow School of Ballet on Friday evening. 
May 4th, at the Masonic Temple, 6840 Hollywood 
Boulevard. 

The Los Angeles Conservatory of Music gave a May 
festival program at the Highland Park branch Tuesday, 
presenting thirty piano pupils, all under ten years of 
age, assisted by Betty Jane Cox, reader. Last evening 
Blendia Hardesty and Irene Mathais offered piano recital 
in the Kramer Studio and on Friday evening. Lettie 
English and Dorothy Smith, pianists, will be heard in 
the same studio. E. B. Va'entine of the violin depart- 
ment completed the violin contest last night. 



Brahm van den Berg, pianist will play three groups of 
compositions at the tea musicale to be given by the 
HoUj'WOOd Auxiliary of the Children's Hospital at the 
Writer's Club, 6700 Sunset Boulevard on Tuesday, May 
8th. at 3 p. m. The members of the committees in charge 
are: Miss Josephine Haldemann, Bernice Voight, Helen 
Voight, Beatrice Chambers, Clara Louise Walker, Vilma 
Mclnnes and Grace Stroud and Mesdames Frederick W. 
Tenney, Morris Mumper and Gordon Pollock. The 
hostesses will be Mrs. Albert Crutcher, who will speak 
on the work of the Children's Hospital; Dr. Margaret 
Roberts, Mesdames John P. Mead, Grantland Seaton 
Long, Gurdon Wattles, Harry Haldeman, Alexander 
Barrett, Chester T. Hoag, William J. Todd, Miss Mary 
P. Moll and William De Mille and Miss Lila Swift. 



Mme. Newcombe 

PRINDELL 



Desirable 
Engagements 



Dignified 
Publicity 

of Distinguished Artists 



MAJESTIC THEATRE 
LOS ANGELES 



Phone 642-93 



Phone 642-93 



The Heartt-Dreyfus Studios 

VOICE *ND IIIODEK.'d LANGUAGES 

Gilinii< Club Bide., 1044 South Hope Street. Personal 

Representative, Grace Carroll-Elliot. Phones S22-809 and 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

LOS ANGELES 

1250 'Windsor Boulevard 031S Hollywood Boulevard 

Complete Faculty of Artist Teachers 

JOHN SMALLMAN--BARITONE 



Anna Ruzena Sprotte 

CONTRALTO School of Vocal Art 



MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



GRACE WOOD JESS "^zzo soprano 

DRAMATIC INTERPRETER OF FOLK SONGS 
IN COSTIIME RECITALS 

Management: L. E Bf^hymer. Los AngelPB 

ANN THOMPSON~Pianf3/e 

PIANIST OP PERSONALITY 

124 W. Rerendo WiL 885 

Amnlco Rolls 

CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN 

America's Popular Composer on tour with TSI.ANINA 

Bast and South; Oct. aud Nov Pac. Coast: Jan, and Feb. 

East again: Feb. and April — California: April and May 

CHARLES BOWES 



DA VOL SANDERS ^'?;i'„''pS?!jS"'' 

Head Violin Dept., College of Music, U. S. C. — Member 

Phllhartnonic Orchestra 

Xytl «. Flgneros ««.. to- < ngel-. fi.„„. «.«, Tion 

A. KOODLACH 



503 Majestic Theatre Bide., Los Ancelea Phone 670-91 



The Burbank Choral Club (Charles Leroy Munro, 
conductor and Myrtle Radcliffe Hart, accompanist) 
will present an interesting program at the Thomas A. 
Edison School edifice, on Mothers' Day, May 13. 1923, 
at 3:30 p. m. The program is as follows: Hail Smiling 
Morn (Spoflorth-Leslie), Burbank Choral Club; violin 
solos, Josef Rosenfeld: Sunset Trail (Cadman), Burbanlc 
Choral Club; Double Quartette — An Old-Fashioned Dear 
(Cecil Osik Ellis); Nightfall in Granada (Bueno), Bur- 
bank Choral Club; Vocal Solo — Mother O' Mine (T. 
Tours), Charles Leroy Munro; A Hundred Years from 
Now (Carrie Jacobs Bond), Burbank Choral Club; Home, 
Sweet Home (Payne), Burbank Choral Club. 

Miss Evalyn Sutphen who will be graduated from 
the College of Music, University of Southern California, 
in June, will give her senior piano recital next Tuesday 
evening in the Old Chapel of the University when she 
will be assisted by Miss Isabel Smith, soprano, and M'ss 
Elizabeth Mottern, accompanist. This is the first of a 
series of senior recitals which are to be made social 
events of the commencement season. On Friday eve- 
ning. May 11th, Miss Mabel Culver, organist, will give 
the second of the series, in the First Congregational 
Church, when she will be assisted by Mrs. Annie Mot- 
tram Craig, dramatic soprano and a member of the 
faculty. 

The last program of a series of four delightful Spring 
Morning Musicales will be given at the Ambassador 
Hotel, under the direction of Mr. G. H. O'Brien of New 
York City, on Thursday morning, May 10th. Mischa Ve 
Olin, the Russian Viol'nist. and Helena Lewyn, pianist, 
artists appearing on the program are making their first 
public appearance in Los Angeles. The London Times 
has this to say in praise of Miss Lewyn: "She has 
played in nearly all the great symphony orchestras 
both here and in England and Germany. While in 
England she had the great honor of being summoned 
to play before royalty. The forceful interpretation of 
the masters, combined with charming personality assure 
Miss Lewyn of great success." 



Russian gems, tragic, dramatic and some with their 
quota of humor, "Lieder" of Strauss. Schumann. Schu- 
bert, works by French masters and a song or two in 
English, but all interpreted as only Chaliapin interprets 
his every selection. 

The Chaliapin ticket sale is now in progress at Sher- 
man, Clay & Co.'s store in San Francisco. 



California Theatre — The program for the concert at 
the California Theatre this week is one of the most at- 
tractive Carli Elinor has offered this season. The con- 
cert opens with Rossini's famous Overture to William 
Tell, a brilliant work offering a fine opportunity for an 
interpretation in rapport with its historic background. 
Mr. Elinor's scholarly interpretation accents the sym- 
phonic construction of this old favorite and displays to 
great advantage the native beauty and brilliance of the 
composition with its contrasting moods of calm and 
storm. 

Mr. Elinor has chosen tor the second selection an 
arrangement for strings, wood winds and organ of the 
"Intermezzo Sinfonico" from Mascagni's best known 
work, Cavelleria Rusticana. and its spiritual quality and 
beauty is greatly enhanced by the contrast afforded with 
the overture preceding it. 

These two selections chosen from the list of com- 
positions used in the Public School Music Memory Test 
terminating the latter part of this month are of par- 
ticular interest to the youngsters on that account. The 
closing offering, a special arrangement by Mr. Elinor 
aptly titled "Classic Jazz," is a clever orchestration of 
present day syncopated rhythm, in which several of the 
reigning favorites are ingeniously woven into an allur- 
ing whole. 

« 

CHALIAPIN'S ADMIRABLE DICTION 

Here is an appreciation of Chaliapin that should be of 
special interest to the vocalist: "One of the most strik- 
ing features of his technique is the remarkable fidelity 
of word utterance which removes all sense of artificial- 
ity, so frequently associated with operatic singing. His 
diction floats on a beautiful cantilena, particularly in 
his mezzo-voce singing, which is one of the most telling 
features of his performance. There is never any striving 
after vocal effects, and his voice is always subservient to 
the words. This style of singing is surely that which 
Wagner so continually demanded for his interpreters: 
but it is the antithesis of that staccato 'Bayreuth bark' 
which a tew years ago so woefully misrepresented the 
master's ideal of fine lyric diction. The atmosphere and 
tone-color which Chaliapin imparts to his singing are of 
such remarkable quality that one feels his interpretation 
of Schubert's 'Doppelganger' must of necessity be a 
thing of genius, unapproachable hy other contemporary 
singers. The range of his voice is extensive, for though 
of considerable weight in the lower parts, his upper 
register is remarkable in its conformity to his demands. 
The upper E natural with which he finishes that great 
song 'When the King Went Forth to War,' is uttered 
with a delicate pianissimo that would do credit to any 
lyric tenor or soprano. Yet his technique is of that high 
order that never obtrudes itself upon the hearer. It is 
always his servant, never his master. His readings are 
all his own, and it is his absence of all conventionality 
that makes his singing of the 'Calumnia,' aria from 
'II Barbiere,' a thing of delight, so full of humor is its 
interpretation, and so satisfying to the demands of the 
most exacting 'belcantist.' The reason is not far to 
seek, for his method is based upon a thoroughly sound 
breath control, which produces such splendid cantabile 
results. Every student should listen to this great 
singer and profit by his art." 

As announced Chaliapin will appear in San Francisco, 
under Selby C. Oppenheimer's management, in two re- 
citals at the Exposition Auditorium on Sunday after- 
noon. May 20th, and Monday night. May 28th. and to 
say that these recitals will be different from any yet 
heard in this city is but putting it mi'.dly. The great 
Russian sings from a repertoire of over 300 songs, most 
of which are used publicly exclusively by him. Native 



MME. CAILLEAU'S PUPILS' RECITAL 

Mme. Rose Relda Cailleau gave her pupils' recital at 
the Palace Hotel ballroom on Wednesday evening. April 
25th. As usual a large audience that crowded the 
spacious auditorium assembled and testified by means 
of frequent enthusiastic expressions of approval its 
pleasure over the participants' artistic efforts. .'Vt least 
seven hundred music lovers were thus enabled to 
express their delight in the work of these young aspir- 
ants for musical honors. The opening number of the 
program consisted of an ensemble number entitled 
Snowflakes by Cowen which was sung by a number of 
the students who further on in the program were 
allotted solo numbers. The voices blended excellently 
and the interpretation was uniform and intelligently 
thought out. 

Miss Kathrin Smith, lyric soprano, a young vocalist 
possessing a fresh and youthful voice, sang Pale Moon 
(Logan) and When Love Is Kind (Old English) very 
pleasingly and effectively. Miss Doreen Tittle, a soprano 
of delightful quality, sang Love Sends a Little Gift of 
Roses (Oversall-Openshaw) and Until (Sanderson) with 
a very discriminating style of phrasing. Miss Alice 
Wilson, lyric soprano, revealed a clear, ringing tone, a 
voice of much carrying power and expression that gives 
much promise for future distinction. She sang In My 
Garden (Liddle) and Star (Rogers); Miss Mary Cul- 
len. lyric soprano, interpreted A Birthday (Woodman) 
and Gray Dove (Saar) with appealing interpretation 
and with a voice of exceptional sympathy. 

Miss Gertude Shenson. colorature soprano, made an 
excellent impression by singing Aria from Sonnambula 
(Bellini) and The Wren (Benedict) with an unusually 
flexible voice possessing much warmth in the middle 
position and fine resonance in the low tones. Her over- 
tones in the high register were easy and clear and she 
received a spontaneous ovation. Miss Sue Thorne, lyric 
soprano, revealed much progress since her appearance 
last year. Her high tones are ringing and she is sing- 
ing with individuality of expression, showing also de- 
velopment in her vocal powers by rendering the follow- 
ing compositions: O'si les fleurs (Massenet) and A 
Heart That's Free (Robyn). Miss Geraldine Watt, lyric 
soprano, showed many advantages including a fine stage 
presence, intelligent delivery, discriminating interpreta- 
tion and specially delightful pianissimo singing. She 
sang Elegie (cello obligate) (Massenet) and Jasmine 
Bud (Strickland). Miss Zociena Van der Ende played an 
excellent cello obligato drawing a pliant, big tone. 

Miss Margaret O'Brien, lyric soprano, interpreted 
Will 0' the Wisp (Spross) and A Poor Finish (Waller). 
She exhibited a clear and even voice well modulated 
and containing charming overtones. Miss Eleanor 
Stadegger. soprano, by rendering The Year's at the 
Spring (Beach) and Se saran (Arditi) impressed her 
hearers with the intelligence of her style and the pre- 
cise rendition of the colorature passages. Martin 
O'Brien, tenor, exhibited a smooth and velvety quality 
of voice, concise diction and a musical understanding 
in phrasing. His selections were Duna (McGilU and 
Tommy Lad (Margetson). Miss Elizabeth Magee, mezzo 
soprano, interpeted Voi le sapete from Cavalleria Rusti- 
cana (Mascagni) and A Madrigal (Victor Harris) with a 
voice of impressive dramatic character and very whole- 
some warmth of interpretation. Her voice is even in all 
positions and her declamations most artistic. 

Miss Caroline Breuner, mezzo soprano, possesses a 
soulful and flexible voice qualified to attain fine tone 
color effects and her phrasing is accentuated by ju- 
dicious expression. She sang Quando men vo from La 
Boheme (Puccini) and Life and Death (Taylor). Miss 
Beulah Masterson. lyric soprano, proved herself a very 
intelligent singer, revealing a voice of rich quality and 
timbre. She sang the colorature passages very fluently 
and invested her selections with an abundant amount 
of temperament and style. The overtones in her high 
notes were specially pleasing. She rendered Vissi d'arte 
from La Tosca (Puccini) and Les filles de Cadiz (Deli- 
bes). Miss Corinne Keefer had the honor to close the 
program. She possesses a contralto voice of unsual 
quality and has the poise and bearing of a real artist. 
She interpreted the Erlking with exceptionally fine 
phrasing and delightful diction. Her voice is rich, im- 
pressively sonorous and its sympathetic quality may be 
easiest described by the expression "there is a tear in 
it." Miss Hazel Nichols played the accompaniments in 
a manner to emphasize the best qualities exhibited by 
the singers. 

.♦ 

Alma Schmidt-Kennedy, the able and well-known 
piano pedagogue, gave another of her delightful student 
musicales at her studio. 1537 Euclid avenue. Berkeley, 
on Sunday afternoon, .\pril 22nd. The participants were: 
Miss Alice Reinhart. Miss Elizabeth Ruben. Miss Helen 
Marion Matthew, Miss Charlotte Hanni, Miss Margaret 
Moloney and Miss June Beckman. Everyone of these 
well prepared pianists acquitted herself most worthily 
in the following program: (a) Two Part Invention (No. 
13) (Bach), (b) Birdling (Grieg), Miss June Beckman; 
Fantasie (D minor) (Mozart), Miss Margaret Moloney; 
(a) Entrance (From Forest Scenes (Schumann), (b) 
Punchinello (Schuett), Miss Helen Marion Matthew; 

(a) Canzonetta (Schuett), (b) Nocturne (Grieg), Miss 
Elizabeth Ruben; (a) Menuet (E flat major) (Mozart). 

(b) Rustle of Spring (Sinding), Miss Charlotte Hanni; 
(a) Murmuring Zephyrs (Jensen-Niemann), (b) Anitra's 
Dance (Grieg), (c) Menuet (Bizet), Miss Alice Reinhart. 



10 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



DALCROZE EURYTHMIC COURSE IN BERKELEY 

The coming of Elsie Hewitt McCoy to Berkeley this 
summer, where she will conduct classes in Dalcroze 
Eurythmics, is looked forward to by many as a rare 
opportunity. Mrs. McCoy, who has for the last eight 
years been teaching eurythmics in the northwest, with 
studios at Seattle and Tacoma, was graduated from the 
school in Helleran. but returned last year for a period 
of study under Emil Jaques-Dalcroze in Geneva where 
the school is now situated. Two of Mrs. McCoy's pupils 
from Seattle are now studying in the main school in 
Switzerland. 

Even now there are many who ask "What are Dal- 
croze Eurythmics?" It is a question not easy to an- 
swer exhaustively in a few words. Evolved in the first 
instance by M. Dalcroze. when a professor in the Con- 
servatoire, as a means of putting life into his harmony 
lessons, the idea has so grown, that it is now expressed 
in a regular system, "tor developing the musical under- 
standing, by sight and hearing, first by rhythms and 
then by simple musical phrases, which the pupil will 
presently interpret with his whole body." So it is that 
when the uninitiated is introduced to a class in train- 
ing, she may be forgiven if she thinks she has stumbled 
by mistake into a dancing school, rather than into a 
school of music, but a dancing school where each move- 
ment of the body and limbs is so beautifully regulated, 
and all so perfectly co-ordinated tlie one with the other 
that at first sight it only suggests the perfection of sim- 
plicity in motion and repose. For all that it is in the 
first instance a school of music though the education 
is not confined to the training of the musical sense. 
In a comprehensive article published in the Educational 
Supplement of the February 3rd London Times it says 
in closing that the greatest feature of Eurythmic teach- 
ing is that it teaches the pupils to forget themselves, to 
sink into self consciousness {inseparable from dancing 
taught as such) in the interpretation of the music. The 
absence of "posing" beautifies and ennobles all that they 
do, but M. Dalcroze does not want bis disciples to show 
off, only to bear forward the banner of music and prove 
it is the most powerful instrument of education. 

J. J. Finley. professor of education at the Manchester 
University, England, speaks of the accomplishment of 
Dalcroze as an extraordinary and unparalleled achieve- 
ment, that he has invented a technique by which the 
human body can take its place side by side with the 
piano and violin as a master instrument, and goes on 
to say that since the days of the Greeks, he is the first 
musician to have realized what a wonderful addition 
we make to our orchestra when we add our very selves, 
bodying forth direct from our innermost feeling the 
rhythms which the composer so imperfectly symbolizes 
in the score. 



MINETTI ORCHESTRA TO CLOSE SEASON 

The Minetti Orchestra, an excellent ensemble or- 
ganization ably directed by Giulio Minetti, will give the 
final concert of its present season at Scottish Rite Au- 
ditorium next Thursday evening. May 17th. The soloist 
for this occasion will be Mme. Rose Florence, mezzo 
soprano, one of the most refined and discriminating 
vocal soloist residing in California who has earned well 
merited artistic laurels in Europe as well as in the East 
and in this State. Another soloist will be Tanya Akunin, 
a fifteen-year-old violinist. Benjamin S. Moore, whose 
accompaniments are among the very finest heard in this 
city during the course of a season will be the accom- 
panist. The following excellent program will be inter- 
preted: Overture to The Merry Wives of Windsor 
(Nicolai): Aria from damson and Delilah (Saint-Saens), 
Rose Florence: Symphony in G minor (Mozart); Con- 
certo in G minor for violin (Bruch), Tanya Akunin. 
soloist; Intermezzo from Carmen (Bizet); Vocal solos — 
Phidyle (Duparc), Over the Steppe (Grechaninoff), 'T 
is Spring (Wolf), Rose Florence; Prelude to the Deluge 
(Saint-Saens), Eunice .lurgens, soloist; Waltz — Tales 
from the Vienna Woods (Strauss). ■ 



Herman Heller, the energetic and brilliant orchestral 
director, who inaugurated the large moving picture 
theatre orchestra in the moving picture theatres of the 
Pacific West is conducting a seventy-piece orchestra at 
the Metropolitan Theatre, Los Angeles, and is meeting 
with the same success which crowned his efforts in this 
city. Under his direction Sunday morning concerts are 
given which attract large crowds, and Mr. Heller once 
more demonstrates that the public enjoys the best of 
music presented in the best possible manner, and that 
those who imagine that jazz music is any attraction are 
certainly on the wrong road. May Mr. Heller's success 
continue and become contageous. 

Uda Waldrop, the splendid organist, pianist and com- 
poser, gave an excellent program for the Grand Opening 
Organ Recital and Sacred Concert at St. Boniface 
Church on Sunday, April 29th. He was assisted by 
Charles Bulotti, who was in excellent voice. The pro- 
gram was one of the very finest ever given in a church 
in this city and both organist and vocalist added to 
their large host of friends and admirers by rendering 
the following program: Prelude (Improvisation), Uda 
Waldrop; O Come Let Us Worship — tenor solo, Charles 
Bulotti, chorus, St. Boniface's and St. Anthony's choirs, 
at the organ, R. F. Tilton; Cantabile (Tschaikowsky), 
Uda Waldrop; Ave Marie (Gounod), Charles Bulotti, 
at the organ, Uda Waldrop; Marche Funebre (Guil- 
mant), Uda Waldrop: Chant Seraphique (Guilmant), 
Uda Waldrop; Ave Verum (Mozart), St. Boniface's and 
St. Anthonys choirs, at the organ, R. F. Tilton: Tantum 
Ergo (Hamma), St. Boniface's and St. Anthony's choirs; 
Alleluja Chorus (Handel), St. Boniface's and St.Anthony's 
choirs, at the organ, Uda Waldrop) ; Postlude— Torch- 
Light Procession (Guilmant), Uda Waldrop. 



ROSE FLORENCE— Mezzo Soprano 

CONCERT— VOICE PLACING— COACHING 

Studio:- 545 Sutter Street Telephone Kearny 3598 

Management —L. E. Behymer, 705 Auditorium Building, Los Angelei 



NEW LIGHT OPERA 



(Com 



page 1, 



ulun 



4) 



though their garb was sober it must have been charm- 
ing, and quiet behavior did not of necessity bespeak a 
dull mind— why not the arrival at Plymouth of a ship 
owned by glorious pirates, bearing great chests of bril- 
liant garments and barbaric jewelry, stolen from a more 
gorgeous country? In comic opera anything may happen. 
And for fun — could anything be funnier than some of 
our Puritan ancestors and their ideas? E. W. 



Mrs. Wilson-Jones, the well known dramatic soprano, 
gave a concert in Berkeley during music week on Wed- 
nesday afternoon, April 25th, of which the Berkeley 
Gazette had the following to say: 

A most delightful contribution to the events of Music 
Week took place at the Cora Williams Institute, Wed- 
nesday afternoon, in the contest given by Mrs. Wilson- 
Jones, dramatic soprano. Receiving with Miss Williams 
was Mrs. Gilbert Moyle, of the program committee. Mrs. 
Wilson-Jones possesses a voice of remarkable purity and 
range, a technic which must be an inspiration to all 
singers, in addition to a most striking individual per- 
sonality which reaches the heart. The program of Wed- 
nesday ranged from the Jewel song from Faust — taught 
her by Gounod himself — down to her own composition. 
My Prayer, which fell upon the listeners like a bene- 
diction. The intervening numbers of varied demands 
upon vocal skill and emotion embraced Grieg's Solvejg's 
Song— taught her by Grieg — Harriet Ware's Hindoo 
Slumber Song, Oley Speaks; Star Eyes and others num- 
bering sixteen in all. A new song "Going Home" set to 
Dvorak's New World Symphony, with words of a Negro 
spiritual by an Oakland resident. Arms Fisher, met 
with great favor. 

The ease and perfect control throughout the changing 
types of compositions proved the singer to be an artist 
of true tone-production as well as of dramatic power. 
The selection of Mrs. E. H. Duncan as accompanist 
added to the joy of the performance. Mrs. Wilson-Jones 
has been heard in San Francisco, in a series of recitals 
with Attl, harpist with the San Francisco Symphony, 
this concert marking her initial appearance in Berkeley, 
which she has recently adopted as her permanent resi- 
dence as well as the center of her musical activities. 

Lizetta Kalova, the well known Russian violin virtuosa 
and Toan Kalmykoff, the famous Russian artist, held 
open house at the Co-operative Arts Studio in Berkeley 
on Sunday, April 8th. There was a most brilliant gath- 
ering of over one hundred artists from both sides of the 
Bay. The proceedings were inaugurated by a Benedic- 
tion delivered by Rev. W. Sakhovich, a Russian priest, 
and choir, followed by an excellent program including 
piano solos by Elsie Cook Hughes, soprano solos by 
Dorothy R. Talbot, piano selections by Alexander Kos- 
loft and also musical contributions by A. Ergin. Among 
the guests were in addition to the artists already men- 
tioned; Mme. Marianna Tcherkaskaya, the noted star of 
the Petrograd Imperial Opera, whose fame ranks with 
that of Feodor Chaliapin and the famous dramatic 
reader Hedwig Reicher. The resident artistic colony 
was represented by Lydia Stutevant, Mrs. G. Moyle, 
Mme. Betty Drews, Willem Dehe, Mr. and Mrs. Adams 
Armer. Mr. and Mrs. Angor, Mr. and Mrs. Aronovici, 
Mme. Cannon, Mr. and Mrs. Pratt and many others. 
Mme. Kalova and Mr. Kalmikoff are offering their studio 
to artists of all branches of art and those who were 
unable to attend on this occasion are invited to meet- 
ings every Sunday afternoon at five o'clock. 

San Francisco Lodge No. 21, Independent Order of 
B'nai BTith. gave an excellent musical program, ar- 
ranged by Cantor B. Liederman of Temple Israel, re- 
cently. The soloists included: William W. Carruth, or- 
ganist, Mrs. A. J. Hill, soprano. Cantor R. R. Rinder, 
baritone, Blanche Hamilton Fox, contralto, Rebecca 
Holmes Haight, cellist, and Cantor B. Liederman, tenor. 
It would be difficult to hear a finer array of artists in 
one program, and those in charge of this program are to 
be congratulated for giving such an excellent musical 
treat to the members of that Lodge. The complete pro- 
gram was as follows: Funeral March (Chopin), William 
W. Carruth, organist; Soprano solo— He That Dwelleth 
in the Secret Place of the Most High (MacDermid), 
Mrs. A. J. Hill; Baritone solo— The Lord Is My Shepherd 
Dvorak), Cantor R. R. Rinder; Contralto solo— Abide 
With Me (Liddle), Blanche H. Fox; Cello solo— Arioso 
(Bach), Rebecca Holmes Haight; Tenor solo— How 
Long Wilt Thou Forget Me (Pflueger), Cantor B, Lieder- 
man; Postlude — Marche Religieuse (Guilmant). 

Augusta Hayden, the well known and successful so- 
prano soloist, will be assisting artist at the Hotel Whit- 
comb Sunday evening concert, which events are being 
given every week by the Whitcomb Hotel Orchestra 
under the direction of Stanislas Bem. Miss Hayden will 
be soloist at tomorrow's event for which an exception- 
ally fine program has been prepared as will be seen 
from the following excellent array of compositions: 
March— Pomp and Circumstance (Edward Elgar), Waltz 
—Wiener Burger (Ziehrer), Selection— Madam Sherry 
(Karl Hoschva), Vocal solo (a) What's in the Air Today 
(Eden), (b) Homing (Del Riego), (c) Daffodils a Flow- 
ing (German), Augusta Hayden; Overture, Tannhauser 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



Representative of Lyon & Healy Harps 

Telephone Douelliii 1078 



Siellojelica 

COLORATURA SOPRANO] 



800 KOHLER CHASE DLDC 
SAN FRANCISCO 



CO ^^^ 



(R. Wagner"), Peer Gynt Suite (E. Grieg); Vocal solo — 
(a) Spring Night (Schumann), (b) Cradle Song (Mac- 
Fadyen), Augusta Hayden; Caprice on Spanish Themes 
(N. Rimsky-Korsakoff) ; Berceuse (Godard) ; Vocal solo 
— Lungi del caro bene (Sechi), Ouvre tes yeux bleux 
(Massenet), Chanson de I' Adieu (Tosti), Augusta 
Hayden: Grand Opera Selection, Faust (Gounod). 

Miss Hayden's accompanist will be Leo Shorr, a very 
capable pianist and accompanist, who has recently re- 
turned from a five months' trip to the Orient. 

Paul Revere Lodge, No. 462, F. & A. M., gave an ex- 
cellent program at Masonic Temple on Friday evening, 
May 4th. The program was in charge of H. M. Simons 
and all present complimented Mr. Simons on the ex- 
cellence of the artists and the delightful character of 
the program which was as follows: Selection — Paul Re- 
vere Orchestra; Bobby Bumps, a cartoon comedy; in the 
Garden of My Heart, Dunna (E John Vale); Bruce 
Wilderness Tales, a scenic film; I Cried Over You — Now 
Its Your Turn to Cry Over Me, Carolina iu the Morning, 
Mrs. M. O. Kingston; Uneasy Feet, a comedy featuring 
Lloyd Hamilton; Your Eyes Have Told Me So, Until, E. 
John Vale; Whaling in the Artie, presentation and lec- 
ture by Arnold Liebes; Selection — Paul Revere Orches- 
tra. Films through courtesy of Herbert Rothchild En- 
tertainment and H. Liebes and Company. 

Georgia Kober, the distinguished American pianist, 
assisted by Helen Engel Atkinson, American violinist, 
will give a piano recital at the Palo Alto Woman's Club 
House on Friday evening. May ISth, under the manage- 
ment of Louise E. Taber of San Francisco. Miss Kober 
is at present filling a number of engagements in South- 
ern California where she is meeting with brilliant suc- 
cess. A splendid program has been prepared for this 
occasion and those who decide to attend Miss Kober's 
Palo Alto concert will surely experience much enjoy- 
ment. The program will be as follows: A Group of Pre- 
ludes — Bach, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Rachmaninow, Mac- 
Dowell, Debussy; Sonata (piano and violin) Cesar 
Pranck); Chopin — Etude, Ballade. Nocturne, Scherzo: 
William H. Sherwood— Exhilaration, Henry Cowell— 
Chiaroscuro, (Dedicated to Miss Kober), Walter Kell.-r 
— Canon (Imitation), (Dedicated to Miss Kober); 
Tschaikowski — Meditation, Palmgren — Menuette-Waltz, 
Schubert-Ganz- (From Rosamonde) Ballet Music; Doh- 
nanyi — Etude Orientale, Moszkowski— Concert Etude. 



U. S, CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION 

The United States Civil Service Commission an- 
nounces the following open competitive examination: 
Music Teacher 

The receipt of applications will close on June 19. The 
examination is to fill vacancies in the Indian Service. 
\at an entrance salary of $760 a year, plus the increas»- 
of $20 a month granted by Congress, and vacancies in 
positions requiring similar qualifications. Furnish. .1 
quarters, heat, and light are allowed appointees trcr 
of cost. At each boarding school there is a commiin 
mess, and meals are furnished at cost. 

Applicants must have graduated from a four ye.-irs' 
high-school course. In addition they must have had :it 
least three years' experience as music teacher, and e\ 
perience in vocal training of mixed choruses, quartets, 
and other musical organizations, and in giving instru- 
mental lessons, particularly on the piano. The compl.'- 
tion of each year of study in piano and vocal music in 
a recognized conservatory of music will be accepted in 
lieu of one year of the required experience. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



EAST BAY OPERA ASSOCIATION 

Sponsored by a group of society leaders 
'and influential citizens. Oakland is to 
have a summer season of light opera, ac 
cording to plans announced yesterday 
through the East Bay Opera Association. 

The program as announced calls tor the 
services of Gaetano Merola. the famous 
conductor and impresario who staged 
a season of grand opera at Stanford 
Stadium last year and who will supervise 
the musical end of the productions. Other 
names mentioned in connection with the 
project are Mabel Hiegelman, the famous 
grand opera prima donna: Jefferson De 
Angelis. comedian; James Liddy. an Oak- 
land boy, last seen in the Henry W. 
Savage production of "The Merry 
Widow"; Georgia Knowlton, Paula Ayers, 
a nationally known contrato, and Harry 
Pheil. a tenor, recently featured by the 
Dunbar Opera Company. 

Among the local people appearing as 
sponsors for the proiect are: Mrs. 
Wallace M. Alexander. Miss Annie Flor- 
ence Brown, Miss Matilda Brown, Mrs. 
Josephine M. Pernald. Mr. George Friend, 
Dr. Herbert J. Samuels, Joseph J. Ros- 
borough, Mrs. Oscar Fitzalau Long, Mrs. 
Ergo A. Majors. Mrs. Newton Koser. Mrs. 
Frank Colton Havens, Mrs. Robert Lewis 
Hill. Mrs. W. H. Langdon, Mrs. Thomas 
G. Hutt, Mrs. Frederick Kahn, Miss Eliza- 
beth Westgate, Mrs. Herman Kruse, Mrs. 
A. S. Lavenson, Miss Louise A. Maguire, 
Mrs. Thomas Mitchell Potter, L. Cameron 
Eraser and Mrs. Oscar Sutro. 

Organization ot the association has 
reached the point, according to announce 
ment made yesterday, where Louis B 
Jacobs, who launched the Hartman 
Steindorff season at the Auditorium las' 
year, has been engaged as managing di 
rector and George Lask, the well-known 
producer, secured to produce the operas. 

Victor Herbert, the famous composer, 
has written the officials of the association 
expressing his commendation ot the 
project. It is the plan ot Jacobs to open 
the engaement at the Audtorium Theatre 
tor a ten-week period starting July 9th. 
Among the wel-known operas to be pro- 
duced are: Naughty Marietta. Sari. The 
Blue Paradise, Katinka, The Pink Lady, 
and Sweethearts. 

A feature of the engagement will be the 
premiere of a new comic opera written 
by Perry Newberry, the novelist, and 
Thomas Vincent CatoT, called The Beggar 
ot Bagdad. Offices of the association have 
been established at the Hotel Oakland. 



ALCAZAR THEATRE 

A mammoth production of "The Mas- 
querader," with Louis Bennison, San 
Francisco's own star, in the principal 
role, will be the attraction at the Alcazar 
beginning with the matinee Sunday, May 
13th. Guy Bates Post made famous the 
dual characterization in this spectacular 
drama and great preparations have been 
made for its presentation here. Benni- 
son will be seen in two distinct parts 
calling for rapid transition and requiring 
all ot his 'well known talent and artistry 
in their portrayal. He is called upon to 
be a proud, domineering although phy- 
sically weak member of Parliament one 
moment, and then, with a lightning 
change, becomes a strong, forceful 
straightforward young Westerner. 

The Masquerader is one of the most 
powerful plays written in recent years 
and has been a sensation wherever it has 
been staged. It is the work of John 
Hunter Booth and is based upon the novel 
by Katherine Cecil Thurston. Our own 
Richard Walton TuUy presented it to 
Broadway. The play is in a prologue and 
three acts and requires a total of nine 
scenes. From the prologue, showing a 
London fog, to the last curtain, it is said 
to furnish the spectator with one thrill 
after another. The suspense is sustained 
throughout, and the dramatic moments 
are lightened now and again by comedy 
touches. 

Supporting Bennison in this great scenic 
production will be Nana Bryant, who 
will have the leading feminine role, and 
a greatly augmented company headed by 
Thomas Chatterton. 



by Grieg, accompanied on the second 
piano by Myrtle Gable. 

Helen Hughes and Emily Sees, two 
young violinists will assist Mr. Kruger 
with the rendition ot the double violin 
concerto by Bach and the former will also 
play the Ballade and Polonaise by Vieux- 
temps. The talented pianiste, Edna 
Linkowski, will render some solos by 
Mendelssohn and Moszkowski, while 
Joseph Salvato will interpret the C-minor 
Concerto by Beethoven and Norman 
Smith will end the program with the 
Rhapsodie d'Auvergne by Saint-Saens. 

Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 
Concert and Church Singing in all 
languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 

Piano and Harmony 
3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 
In All Languages 

5302 Broadway .... Oakland 

Mrs. William Steinbach EDWIN HUTCHINGS 

VOICE ci;l,tvrb 

StDdIo: 
802 KOHLER A CHASE BLDG. 

Phon..! KrnrnT MiM 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banlfs ot San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Frzoicisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $30,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7lh Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Riiiiht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (43<i) 

per cent per annum was declared for the six months 

ending December 31st, 1922. 

INTEREST WILL HEREAFTER BE COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 
INSTEAD OF SEMI-ANNUALLY AS HERETOFORE. 



ADCLE ULMAN 

TEACHER OP VOICE AND IM.4NC 

Studio 178 Commonwealth Ave. 
Telephone Pacific 3.1 

Laura Wertheimber 

Preparatory Teacher for 
Ml 
211 Scott St. 



KURT VON GRUDZINSKI Evelyn Sresoyich Ware 



CONCERT AT THE SEQUOIA CLUB 

A concert of unusual interest will be 
given by George Kruger, the eminent 
San Francisco pianist at the Sequoia 
Club Hall, 1725 Washington street, on 
Thursday evening. May 17th. A program, 
consisting of compositions, seldom heard 
in public, has been arranged. Mr. Kruger 
himself will play the A-minor Concerto 



BARITO>E — VOICE CULtTURE 

Authorized to Teach itline. Schoen- 

Rene'H .Melhoil 

1314 LeBTenTCortb St. Phone Pronpect 0253 

ALMA SCHMIDT- KENNEDY 



Phone Berkeley eoO«. 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
Kohler & Cliase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 



PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

005 Kohler & Chaae Bid. Tel. Sutter 7387 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 

Stndlo, e03-eo4 KOHLER & CHASE BLDG. 

Phone Kearnz^ ri4.V« 

MRS. CHARLES POULTER. 

SOPRANO St. Andrena Charch 

Voice Cnltnre, PUno. 588 27th St., Oak- 
land. Tel. 2079. Kohler & Chaae Bids.. 
Wednesdaya TeL Kearny !MS4. 

ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 



Oakland. Tel. Pledn 



MARION RAMON WILSON 

DRAMATIC CONTRALTO 
Opera Socce«i*e« In Europe: Concert Soc- 
ceaaea In .America. Addrexn ISUl California 
St.. San Frnnclwco. Telephone Prowpecl .'tftSO 

Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGING 



MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 

Announcea the openInK of her new Resi- 
dence Studio, Clark .\pt«.. Apt. 26 — 138 
Hyde St., San Frnnclaco. Phone Prospect 
B03I. Fridays. »02 Kohler ic Chase Bldg. 
Kearny ."MM. 

MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRALTO 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

GRADUATE OF SCHOLA CANTORUM, 

PARIS 

OROANIST ST. MARY'S CATHBDRAIr 

Piano Department. Haviitn Seh««I 
t>Tga« and Piano. ^rrtHaaw Mnslcsl rollege 

ESTHER MUNDELL 

SOPRANO AND TEACHER 

Pupil of 

De ResT.ke and Percy Rector Stephena 

Studio. 703 Heine Bide -lOS Stockton St. 

Be«. Studio — 004 Second Avenue 



Joseph George Jacobson 

PIANO 

2833 Sacramento St. Phone Fillmore 348 

ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 



SIGMUND BEEL 



studio Building;, 



SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 



OF MUSIC 



Music School) 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of Slnslne. 32 Lorelta Ace., Pied- 
mont. TeL Piedmont 304. Man., Kohler « 
ri.»«e Bl«lc.. «i F Telephone KcarnT ^4^4. 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Soloist. Temple Emana El. Con- 
cert and Chorch Work. Vocal Inntrac- 
tlon. 2B3n riBT «t- Phone Went 4«»0. 

MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 

ARTISTIC PIAXO INSTRUCTION 

Stndlo: IV09 Kohler & Chase Bld^. 

Telephone Kearny S454 

Rew. Tel. Bnyvlew 4104 

EVA GARCIA 

CONCERT PI.ANIST. ACCOMPANIST 

AND TE.\CHER 

Studio: 41(10 Piedmont Ave. TeL Pled. 2750. 

Residence: 4152 Howe St., Oakland 
Tel. Pled. .1402 

ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 

Violinist and Teacher, Head of Violin Dept., 

S. F. Cons, of Music. 3435 Sacramento 

St., and 121 21st .Vve.. Tel Pac. 1284 

RUTH DEGNAN 

PUPIL OP GIACOMO AND MME. 

MINKOWSKI 

TEACHUR OF VOICE 

2428 Pine St Tel. West 7011 



TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
37« Sutter Street Phone Douglas 2«9 

HENRIK GJERDRUM 
2321 Jackson St. Phone Fillmore 3256 

JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St Phone Kearny 2930 



OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
2027 California St. Tel. Fillmore 3827 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way Berl<eley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Park 1974 

MARJORIE E. YOUNG 

1463 Fulton Street. Fillmore 2657 

MARGARET WHITE COXON 

149 Rose Av., Oakland Piedmont 1608.W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue— Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 
1841 Fulton St. Tel. Pacific 4219 

DOROTHY PASMORE 
1715 Vallejo St. Phone West 1199 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 467 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 

301 Spruce Street Pacific 1678 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott St. Phone West 1347 

ANDRE FERRIER 
1470 Washington St. Tel. Franklin 3321 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 
1005 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K. 5454 

MARGARET BRUNTSCH 

70 Pi edmont St. Phone Park 3469 

MME. M. TROMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 

JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 

601 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 



OTTO RAUHUT 
357 Arguello BlTd. Phone Pacific 3561 

HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4974 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6464 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 

434 Spruce St. Tel. Fillmore 1131 

REED AND MOUTHPIECE MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 
789 Mission St. Sutter <>U 

If you want to become known to the 
musical public of California, advertise in 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

on the Programs of Distinguished American Artists 

Published by 

G. SCHIRMER, JOHN CHURCH CO., THE BOSTON MUSIC COMPANY, 

THE COMPOSERS' MUSIC CORPORATION 

Songs for All Voices, New Publications of the Composers' Music Corporation 

THE CRY OF THE ORIENT TOMORROW 

THE FOREST OF DREAMS 

A CYCLE OF SIX— SONGS OF THE LITTLE DAYS 

For Sale at the Leading Music Houses 



From The Very Beginning, By Phyllis Lucy Keys 

'reNentH fiinilamf ntul iiiuKir priiit-llileN In n definite nnd lurid war, c>onint«nelnK 
vlth Urxt-icrnde plereM liul iiroKreMHlnK rapidly in thi-ir expoaitlon uf lechnlenl 
ind expreHHion prolileiiiM and the ereation of Kood taste. 
PUICE, «0c. 

HENRY GROBE, 135-153 Kearny Street. 

Representative for the Clayton F. Stimmy Publications. 



MAUD G. McFAUL 

ACCOMPANIST 

112S Chealnnt Street 

Telephone PrOHpect 4032 



If a Music Journal is worth while to 
extend courtesies it should be worth 
while to subscribe for. 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 

Teacher of Singing 



Are y 
Is hv 



iHfleil with yoor tencber? 
s you befitre the publlef 
iHaed nith your progretiiM? 
n Fa«ldif*(. or Churletnnf 



l/^hJ**aIway» tnlklni? "DREATHf" "TOXCrEf" 
'JAWf" 

If In doubt, consult Mr. RoKnrt, who Htndied In 
Europe with the teneheri* of Sembrlck, Sealchi. 
BlHpham. etc. 

PnpllH prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 

370 SVTTER STREET — Douglas 9250 

2218 liAlvE STREET — Bayvlew 4871 

EvenluKM by appointment 

Read Mr, Boeart'N article In thin paper of March 

24, 1»2.^, about "Charletaus" 



Qon Stance Alexandre 

Mezzo Soprano 

Pupils Accepted 

Inquiries made at 

801 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Phone Kearny 5464 



Resident Artists who wish to secure engagements 
through managers and music clubs next season should 
announce their plans NOW as bookings are made im- 
mediately before the end ot this season and during the 
summer months. 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 

Endorsed by TVagrer Swayne 

Special Normal Course for Teachers, based on Swayn 

Principles 

StDdlos 807 Kohler & Chase Bids. 

2518H Btna St.. Berkeley. Phone Berkeley ISIO 



PONSELLE 

Soprano Sensation 

nullum Tjroler AsxiKtlnB 

CURRAN, SUNDAY, MAY 13 

yi.no to «3.50 



CIVIC AUDITORIUM, MAY 23 

50e to 92.00 

Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Company 
Management Frank W. Healy 



Leslie V. Harvey 

Organist 
Coliseum Theatre 



SCHUMANN HEINK 

STEINWAY PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

Season 1922-23 — Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 



The 



PIANOFORTE 



There is a subtle satisfaction in knowing 
that one's possessions, whatever their nature, 
are of superlative excellence. 

A Gobelin tapestry or a da Vinci painting is 
a constant source of pleasure and bears testi- 
mony to the taste of its owner. To the music 
lover the same is true in the possession of a 
Mason & Hamlin Piano. 

Those who are musically sensitive, whose 
appreciation of tonal quality renders them 
competent to judge, pronounce the Mason & 
Hamlin Piano the leading instrument of its 
kind. 

Dame Melba, richly endowed with musical 
discrimination, says in this connection: "It 
seems to me that the preference on the part of 
an individual for the Mason & Hamlin Piano 
is indicative of a superior musical nature." 

Only an actual hearing can give a realization 
of its beauty of tone. 




two entrances 

135-153 Kearny & 217-225 Sutter Sts. 

victor talking machines 




WE INVITE A HEARING 



MASON a HAMLIN PIANOS 




Oakland — 1209 Washington Street 

San Jose — 199 South First 

sheet music 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



^A fc^t Wx^kd 1«W# 



THE OKLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOURNAL IHTHE GREAT WEST j j 



VOL. XLIV. No. 7 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. MAY 19. 1923. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



PONSELLE ELECTRIFIES LARGE AUDIENCE 



Prima Donna Dramatic Soprano of the Metropolitan Opera House Sustains 

Reputation of American Artists by Interpreting Representative 

Program of Operatic Arias and Songs in a Manner to Display 

Gratifying Versatility and Exemplary Vocal Intelligence 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



Although Rosa Ponselle, who appeared 
at the Curran Theatre last Sunday after- 
noon for the first time in concert in San 
Francisco, is known under an Italian 
name and reveals a style of beauty that 
bears witness to the apparent justifica- 
tion of her Latin nationality, still her 
command of the English language and 
the absolute lack of any dialect in her 
English pronunciation leads us to sus- 
pect that Miss Ponselle is a native 



not advertise her better so that she would 
have become known BEFORE she made 
her personal appearance. For if the music 
lovers of California had known the actual 
artistic accomplishments of this exception- 
ally fine artist sufficiently ahead of her 
visit, the Curran Theatre would have been 
packed, and the audience at the Civic 
Auditorium concert which will take place 
on Wednesday evening. May 23rd, would 
not have had to wait until Miss Ponselle 




Gertrude: ross 

The DiNtin»niiNhed ralifnrnia ConipoNer. \Vho HaN FlnUhed a 
CompoNltlon. "The ViHion ot Sir Laanfal,'* Dedicated to the 
t^hell Club, l,«H AneeleH. and to lie PreHented 
\>3ct Monday iSee Pnnre 0, Column 1> 



American. And if we are correct in our 
assumption America has no reason to 
feel ashamed of this daughter of the 
muses. If all American artists possessed 
the same temperament, the same quality 
of voice and the same intelligence of vocal 
art the cause of the American artist in con- 
cert and opera would have been won long 
ago. In addition to her humorous artistic 
qualifications Miss Ponselle possesses 
that rare quality of enthusing her audi- 
ence to the verge of cheering and waving 
of handerchiefs. 

There can be no question in the mind 
of anyone present at the concert last 
Sunday but that Rosa Ponselle has made 
a deep and extraordinary impression 
upon her audience and that as far as 
San Francisco is concerned her fame has" 
spread West of the Rocky Mountains. It 
is a pity that her New York managers did 



had introduced herself personally to San 
Francisco concert-goera. 

But since New York managers and most 
of the artists can not be swayed from their 
convictions that Eastern music journals 
are sufficiently read on the Pacific Coast to 
make artists known out here before they 
visit the Pacific West these artists will 
have to undergo disappointments before 
their art is generally appreciated. We do 
not mean to say that Rosa Ponselle had 
a small audience. On the contrary, con- 
sidering the lack of judgment displayed 
by her New York managers in arranging 
for her Pacific Coast publicity, there was 
a larger audience in attendance than is 
usually the case among artists who visit 
us for the first time. But an artist like 
Miss Ponselle should sing even at her 
first appearance before a sold-out house, 
and in a city like San Francisco where 



we have thousands of students and sym- 
phony and opera attendants this would 
not be a difficult object to attain. But 
the public always hesitates to attend the 
concert of an artist who is not sufficiently 
known to them, even though the ex- 
traordinary space our resident managers 
obtain in the daily papers for their at- 
tractions give them an idea of their dis- 
tinction. 

Rosa Ponselle wins her audience be- 
fore she opens her mouth to sing. Her 
personality is regal in beauty and grac- 
ious in poise. She at once puts herself 
at ease with her listeners whose hearts 
go out to her. She is generous almost to 
a fault with her encores and her willing- 
ness to gratify the insatiable greed of a 
portion of her hearers. The charm and 
spell of her personality is not marred by 
her artistic performance. Although we 
would specify her voice as being a mezzo 
soprano rather than a dramatic soprano 
(its quality being of a more limpid and 



tear remains to be seen. In any event 
her vigorous, healthy and discriminating 
support and breathing form one of the 
finest phases of her vocal equipment. If 
you want to hear a big, ringing, flexible 
and youthful vocal organ ring in your 
ears with accurate intonation and ex- 
quisite shading as to emotional values 
you certainly will become one of the 
worshippers at Rosa Ponselle's shrine. 
This artist is one of the few whose voice 
is big enough to be heard to advantage 
in the Civic Auditorium. 

Miss Ponselle included two operatic 
arias on her program. The first of these 
consisted of Pace, Pace mlo Dio from 
Verdi's La Forza del Destino and the 
other was Suicidio in questi fieri momenti 
from Ponchielli's Gioconda. In these two 
compositions Miss Ponselle displayed her 
fine dramatic instinct as well as her su- 
perior vocal powers. It was evident that 
her great reputation is based upon her 
operatic career. Most of the songs inter- 




FEODOR GHALIAPI>^ 

The Much DlHcuMMed RuKKlan SIneer. WhoH 
Here for the FIrMt T 



lighter character than a dramatic 
soprano usually exhibits) it is a voice of 
Bcintillating beauty, of enchanting flexi- 
bility and of unusual range. Her high 
notes are taken with extraordinary ease, 
but at no time do they remind you of the 
strident and vigorous tones of a dramatic 
soprano. They are ringing with silver 
tone and are exact as to intonation and 
emanate free from the throat. 

Throughout her rendition of her varied 
and representative program Miss Pon- 
selle rarely made use of the covered 
tone. Her high tones were never covered 
as far as we could ascertain. At present 
this fact does not injure her tone produc- 
tion nor does it in any way create un- 
favorable vocal results. Whether the 
diva will be able to continue this wide 
open mode of tonal emission without 
showing early signs of tonal wear and 



preted by the artist belonged to the 
lighter form of vocal literature and she 
displayed the versatility of her artistry 
by alternating humor with pathos and 
throwing in an occasional romantic senti- 
ment. Including her encores Ponselle 
gave a wide range of contrasting and di- 
versified compositions revealing a variety 
of emotional range expressing practically 
every human sentiment a composition is 
capable of. Therefore we are ready to 
regard Miss Ponselle as belonging among 
the concert artists who are entitled to 
the respect and esteem of the musical 
public. 

William Tyroler, pianist, predominated 
as accompanist. While he seemed to 
fathom the spirit of the soloist's con- 
ception of a song he made the impression 
of being more academician than senti- 
(Continued on page 11, column 1) 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The DUO-ART in the 
STEINWAY 



The Duo-Art reproducing feature 
may be had only in Steinway, 
Weber, Steele, Wheelock, Stroud 
and Aeolian pianofortes. 

The great fact that the Duo- 
Art can be had in the Steinicjay is 
itself an eloquent tribute to the 
"Duo-Art. 







ShermanMay&Go. 



Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Sts., Oakland 

Sacramento - Siockton - Fresno - San Jose 

Portland - Seattle - Tacoma - Spokane 




GEORGIA KOBER 

ABIERICAN PIANIST 

Studio: 30r.-54n Sutter St. 
Tel. Kearny 5003, Wednesdays and Thursdays 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



Arrillaga Musical College 

V. de ArrUlaga. Director 
A. L. ArtlBues. Pres.: Louis Alcerla, Vlee-Pres. 
Unexeelled facilities for the study of music in all 
its branches. Large Pipe OrEao. Recital Bail. 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
San Francisco. Cel. Phone AVeat 4737 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING. Director 
3242 Washington Street Telephone Flllnioi 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 



and E. Rober 
Kohler & Cba 
Kearny 5454. 



Schmitz (New Vork>. 
e Bide., Wed. & Sat. Mo 
Res. phone Piedmont 7UI 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano. Orean. Harmony. Orennlnt and Mnnlcal 
Director of First Prenbyf erlnn Church. Alameda. Home 
Stndio: 1117 PARU STREET. AI^AnEDA. Telephone Ala- 
■i«da 155. Tbaradaya, Merrlman School. 597 Eldorado Avc^ 
Oakhind. Telephone Piedmont 2770. 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
OP MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGORY, Director 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ACCOMPANIST 



St Exiiosil 



ion Auditorium, orj^nniNt 
l.ulse's E:plscapai Church, 
lleth Israel. Pinno and 
i coach. Available for 



Studio, 1915 Sacramento Street 
Telephone West 3753 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

Contralto 
of Singlne. Complete Course of Operatic Traln- 
I IMcrce St. Tel. FUlmore 4553. 

MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

ITALLiN VOCAL TEACHER 



!nd Spa 



rima Don 


na with Ca 


ruso and Te 


d by Bon 


!i. Coaches 


pupils voca 


lie Depor 




an, English, 


sh spoker 







ColunibuM Av 



MR. and MRS. GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 



Dominican College School of Music 

SAN BAFAKI^, CALIFORNIA 

^Inslc Courses Thorouirfa and Proffressive 

Public School Music, Accredited Diploma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite 5U« Kohler A Chase Bldg., 
S. F.i 2.',30 Colleee Are., Berkeley. Residence 201 Alva- 
rado Road, Ilerkeley. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 



St.. Re 



\Vl 



A Clay. Tel. Pnc. ft.'iOfl 



MADAM MACKAY-CANTKLL 

CONCERT COACH — VOCAI> TECHNIQUE 
SI'PEn-DlCTIO\ 
Director Cnlvnry PrcNbyterlan Choral Society. 

Fnrther Information. Went IftOO. 

RESIDENT ARTISTS who are available for concert 
tours during the season 1923-1924 will please register 
with the Pacific Coast Musical Review so that we are 
able to recommend them to music clubs, music schools 
and managers. Only artists of reputation and experience 
are eligible for registration. 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

Emann E\, First Church of Christ Scl- 
.oriuK Club. S. F., n'ed„ ]«17 California 
St.. Phone Franklin 2«03: Sat., First Christian Science 
Church, Phone Franklin 1.307; Res. studio. 3142 Lenlston 
Aye., Berkeley. Phone Piedmont 242K. 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 



studio: firo 



Pacific SS25 



The College of the Holy Names 

Lake Merritt. Oakland 



The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. If you help us to add 3000 subscribers to 
our list we will help you to increase your income. 



JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 

Thorough Vocal and Drnmatic Training 

740 Pine St. Phone Douglas 8024 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON iS. CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



KARL RACKLE 

PIANIST — INSTRUCTOR 



MADAME WILSON-JONES 



<;nrrln. Marchesi 
Studio. 2025 Durant Ave.. 
Phone Berk. 408a-%V 



I 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



^rifir (£0asilllD^aIik^M0 



III THE ONLY WEEK 



ilCAL JOURJ'JAL IH THE GREAT WEST l lj 



MUSICAL RBTIEW COMPANT 

4 l,PRRD METZGER _ PrMldenI 

C. C. EMERSON Vice PrMldent 

MABCIS L. SAMUELS Secretary and Treannrer 

Suite HOI Kohler & Chaae nldR., 26 O'Farreil St., San 
Franclnco, C'al. Tel. Kearny M.M 



ALFRED METZGER 
C. C. EMERSON 



Editor 
Business Manager 



P.ICIFIC COAST MUSIC.VL REVIEW 

Oakland-Berkeley-Alameda Office 1117 Parn St., Alameda 

Tel. Alameda ISS 

Misa Elixnlieth » eatKate In Charge 



i.ita Ansrelea Oftlce 

Dlte 447, DoDKlaa nide.. 2r,- So. Sprlns St. Tel. 820-30S 

Sherman Danby In Charge 



VOL. XLIV SATURDAY, MAY 19, 1923 



Entered an aecond-claas mall matter at S. F. Poatofflce. 

SUBSCRIPTIONS 
Annoally In Advance InclDdlnir Poatarei 

Tnlled Statea _ - •8.»0 

Fnrelirn Conntrlea „ „ 4M9 



TWENTY-SECOND YEAR 



OUR ATTITUDE TOWARD LOS ANGELES 



In this week's Los .-Kngeles letter, the Pacific 
Coast Musical Review representative refers to a 
remark of a Los ,\ngelcs publication comment- 
ing on a previous letter of his wherein he spoke 
in critical terms of certain musical conditions in 
Southern California. This remark published in 
another paper spoke of such criticism as a "knock 
from San Francisco." The Pacific Coast Musical 
Review has always been fair to every city it 
reaches on the Pacific Coast. When Los Angeles 
needed improvement in its symphony orchestra 
we did not hesitate to call attention to this fact. 
When San Francisco required suggestions con- 
cerning musical progress we never hesitated to 
apply the stimulant of criticism. When Seattle 
muddled up its symphony situation we tried to 
suggest co-operation and improvement. In no 
sense did we ever publish anything regarding 
musical conditions in other cities except in an 
endeavor of friendly suggestions for necessary 
improvement. 



No music journal (not even that published in 
Los .Angeles) has written so frequently and so 
heartily in recognition of the best work done in 
Southern California than the Pacific Coast Musi- 
cal Review. The proof of the fact that our policy 
has been appreciated is shown by constant 
growth of circulation and advertising patronage. 
Above all we have never published any deroga- 
tory remarks addressed to our colleagues of the 
musical press, nor have we knowingly permitted 
Dur representatives to use slighting references to 
other music journals. We are heartily in sym- 
pathy with every music journal published on the 
Pacific Coast and advise artists at every oppor- 
tunity to use their advertising columns. If artists 
3r teachers do not wish to advertise in other 
iournals, surely we can not be expected to force 
them to do so. But we always have been and 
ilways expect to be on the friendliest personal 
terms with our colleagues Frank H. Colby and 
David Scheetz Craig for whom we entertain the 
lighest esteem. 



When a few years ago Mr. Pryibil of the Pa- 
:ific Coast Musician came to .San Francisco to 
secure additional patronage, both from the adver- 
:ising standpoint and the subscription angle, wc 
lot only refused to put obstacles in his way, but 
lelped him in every possible manner to secure 
:he support he was after. If such support could 
lot be continuously maintained by the Pacific 
^oast Musician, it was not our fault, for at no 
:ime did we suggest to any artist or teacher to 
stop his or her patronage in the Los .Angeles 
Japer and give it to us. That is not the way we 



do business: and when afterward we met Mr. 
Pryibil he used to tell us that in his opinion we 
were a poor business man. Well, we rather are 
a little less proficient in business than assume 
the dog-in-the-manger attitude toward our con- 
temporaries. If we can not work out our salva- 
tion on a fair, square and straightforward basis', 
the sooner wc get out of this business the better 
we like it. 



The establishment of a Los Angeles office of 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review was the result 
of a steady demand in the South to reach the 
Northern musical field in a way that would bring 
the two musical sections of California into closer 
touch. Before our estal)lishing such branch in 
Los Angeles the prominent Los .Angeles musi- 
cians and their activities were not known in San 
Francisco, and vice versa. There has been es- 
tablished by this time a closer bond, the result 
of which was seen in the union of the various 
music teachers' associations of California into 
one State organization, and the addition of many 
music clubs from Northern California into the 
California Federation. Thanks to the efforts of 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review in encouraging 
this constant fusing of mutually interested ele- 
ments more cordial relations have been estab- 
lished between the various musical elements of 
the South and the North of California. 



During the regime of Bruno David Ussher, and 
now under the regime of Sherman Danby, we 
vested full authority in those who edit the various 
departments. Whenever they find it expedient to 
comment either favorably or unfavorably on cer- 
tain musical conditions we publish such remarks 
exactly as they are forwarded to us. ^\'e desire 
to stimulate our writers to do their best, and they 
can only then do their best when they are unham- 
pered by unnecessary restrictions. Therefore, 
when Mr. Danby, who is a resident of Los .An- 
geles, finds it expedient to criticise certain ele- 
ments for an attitude which he thinks injurious to 
the welfare of his community, we permit him to 
use his discretion. No doubt, the publication that 
referred to a "knock from San Francisco" must 
have known that the article was written in Los 
Angeles, by a resident of Los .Angeles and pub- 
lished in our Los .Angeles department. It could 
therefore under no circumstances have been a 
"knock from San Francisco." The writer there- 
fore deliberately falsified, and did so intentionally, 
with malice and with a desire to stir up resent- 
ment against this paper. Of course, since our 
patrons know our motives and our principles no 
harm can be done. Nevertheless such writers 
that deliberately employ falsehoods to further 
their own ends are dishonest at heart and are a 
detriment to the community wherein they reside. 
If they refuse to employ fair play toward non- 
residents, they are just as likely to be unfair 
toward their own fellow citizens. If you find 
anyone treating other people unfairly behind 
their back, this same person will treat vou also 
unfairly behind your back. There is no exception 
to this rule. 



But aside from the dishonest and unfair atti- 
tude of writers who knowingly employ falsehood 
to gratify their spite, this constant stirring up of 
strife and ill feeling between the two metropoli- 
tan centers of California is one of the most de- 
plorable habits that one can adopt. Both Los 
Angeles and San Francisco have so many advan- 
tages, and in so many respects are worthy of the 
admiration of the country and the world that 
these cheap, petty, provincial and undignified ef- 
forts to belittle one another's achievements prove 
unworth)' of both communities. While vou may 
find a narrow-minded individual now and then 
that re.sorts to undignified means, the great ma- 
jority of the public instigated by the leaders of 
the communities is not given to petty jealousv. 
Both Los .Angeles and San Francisco belong to 
California. To dedicate their glorious achieve- 
ments to the welfare of the State ought to be 
their main desire. We find Los Angeles splen- 
didly progressive in many musical matters. In 
certain respects its efforts in this direction sur- 
pass those of San Francisco. On the other hand 
San Francisco may pride itself in the accomplish- 



ments of certain musical measures which arc 
.somewhat in advance of similar measures em- 
ployed in Los Angeles. And so we find both com- 
munities rapidly forging ahead under the banner 
of musical progress, and nothing will be impossi- 
ble for these communities as long as they co-oper- 
ate in the constant growth and expansion of their 
artistic prosperity. California as a State must 
naturally benefit by the success of these two great 
cities. Co-operation is the only road to success. 
Bickering and nagging gets you nowhere. 



PROMPT INTEREST IN SUBSCRIPTION CAMPAIGN 

Gradually our plan to add three thousand more sub- 
scriptions to the Pacific Coast Musical Review list is 
assuming completion which will permit us to bring it in 
concrete form before the musical public. Already a 
number of leading teachers have volunteered their de- 
sire to act on the Advisory Board. When the list is 
completed we shall publish it. More than fifty students 
have registered their desire to participate in the cam- 
paign during which $3000 worth of valuable prizes will 
be distributed. Thanks to the hearty co-operation of 
Kohler & Chase we shall be enabled to offer a KNABE 
GRAND PIANO as the first prize to anyone who is able 
to secure the largest number of subscribers. But every- 
one who will participate in this contest will receive a 
valuable prize for his or her efforts. THERE WILL BE 
NO LOSERS. 

Considerable printed matter has to be prepared for 
such a huge contest which will be made known to FIVE 
THOUSAND students and teachers. Then, too, it is our 
intention to confer with all the music houses who ad- 
vertise in this paper regarding the kind of prizes it is 
wise to add to those already decided upon. Among 
those prizes are: Scholarship of twenty instrumental 
or vocal lessons from a leading pedogogue or music 
school; Talking Machines; Vacation Trips; Savings ac- 
count at the Anglo California Trust Co.: Season tickets 
to the Grand Opera Season of the San Francisco Opera 
Association for 1923; Season tickets for Selby C. Oppen. 
heimer's array of artists; Season tickets for the San 
Francisco Symphony Orchestra Concerts; Season 
tickets for the season of chamber music concerts by 
the Chamber Music Society of San Francisco; Violins 
and other musical instruments; Advertising in the Pa- 
cific Coast Musical Review. 

There will be other prizes to be announced later. 
Every teacher or student seriously interested in music 
should participate in this campaign, for it is to his or 
her personal interest that the circulation of a music 
journal includes as many readers as possible. During 
the twenty-two years of its publication the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review has fought many battles for the good of 
music. It has always helped those who are genuinely 
in favor of better musical conditions. It will continue 
to fight for the best interests of music. We may occa- 
sionally offend selfish individuals whose interest is cen- 
tered in their own personality, or who resent forgetful- 
ness on our part to mention their efforts as frequently 
and as prominently as they think we should. But anyone 
to whom music means something bigger than a means 
to make money, will unquestionably feel that this paper 
earns their support 

The more people read a music journal the more are 
able to listen intelligently to concerts, to know what is 
going on musically in their communities, to become ac- 
quainted with the success of their fellow citizens and 
the young people round about them, to appreciate the 
big thingg accomplished by managers and artists, to 
follow the activities of music clubs and to watch grad- 
ually the growth and expansion of musical taste and 
efforts on the Pacific Coast. This paper is not restricted 
in its scope to purely local matters. It embraces prac- 
tically the entire musical world. While we pay more 
attention to the Pacific Coast territory than the outside 
world, we do not ignore Eastern and European happen- 
ings. 

Presently we shall introduce to our readers a new 
policy in the form of new departments. These depart- 
ments will include the realm of the studio, the music 
club, music news at home and abroad, interesting educa- 
tional articles by promient musicians, a bit of humop 
and anectodes, and other departments of special interest 
to the professional as well as the layman. We feel that 
such a paper is entitled to the hearty support of every- 
one and we shall continue to try to please the majority 
of our readers as we have done in the past. So, if you 
are interested in this subscription campaign, and wish 
further particulars call or phone to this office and leave 
your name, address and telephone number, in case you 
can not get in direct touch with the writer, who will 
then communicate with you. These articles are merely 
preliminary announcements: the complete plan will be 
published and circulated as soon as it is thoroughly 
prepared. Owing to the delay occasioned by the selec- 
tion of suitable prizes and negotiations among music 
houses it will become necessary to extend the period of 
this campaign throughout the months of June, July and 
August. We can not prolong it any longer, however, 
inasmuch as it will then be too close to the concert 
season, when everyone will be very busy. 

Now then, it is our intention to add THREE THOU- 
SAND subscribers to our list during June, July and 
August and thus help to make the musical season of 
1923-24 the GREATEST MUSIC SEASON IN CALIFOR- 
NIA'S HISTORY. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SHERMAN, CLAY & CO.'S EXTRAORDINARY RISE 

Unprecedented Growth of Business During Last Five 

Years Justifies a Capitalization of More 

Than Seven Million Dollars 

Music circles of both a professional and trade char- 
acter read with great interest an announcement on the 
financial pages of the daily papers last week that Cyrus 
Peirce & Co. ot San Francisco were offering for sale an 
issue of $3,000,000 of Sherman, Clay & Co. 7% cumula- 
tive prior preferred stock. Inasmuch as the musical 
public is greatly interested in the leading music houses 
of the Pacific West we thought our readers would like 
to read the particulars regarding the causes that lead to 
this announcement and so called on P. T. Clay, Presi- 
dent of Sherman. Clay & Co. to obtain the most es- 
sential information regarding this extraordinary growth 
of financial backing of Sherman, Clay & Co. 

Before going any further it may be interesting to our 
readers to know that this is the first time The Crocker 
National Bank of San Francisco participated in the sale 
ot any stock, and also the first time that Cyrus Peirce 
and Co. offered tor sale the stock of a regular business 
concern. It is therefore reasonable to suppose that the 
business thus selected as the first one to secure such 
endorsement must possess singularly unusual character- 
istics of financial security. After fifty-three years of 
consecutive growth of financial prosperity, and after 
these years ot concentrating all stock issues among the 
immediate families ot the owners of the business, Sher- 
man, Clay & Co. offers for sale $3,000,000 worth of stock 
for which it guarantees SEVEN per cent interest per 
year. 

In 1908 Sherman, Clay & Co.'s gross sales were 
$1,965,481.66. During the year 1922 these gross sales 
amounted to $7,695,097.81. This means that during the 
last fourteen years the gross sales of the business have 
increased approximately SIX MILLION DOLLARS, or 
nearly a half million dollars a year. The biggest growth 
of the business began in 1919 when the gross sales in- 
creased to such an extent that, notwithstanding the pro- 
portionate Increase of the earnings, it has not been 
possible to provide the required new capital out of 
earnings. For this reason the present mode ot financing 
became necessary. To show how rapidly the business 
has grown during the last five years may be gathered 
from these figures: From 1908 to 1918 (inclusive) the 
gross sales increased from $1,965,481.66 to $4,758,315.08. 
But from 1918 to 1922 (inclusive) the gross sales in- 
creased from $4,758,315.08 'to $7,695,097.81. In other 
words during the first TEN years the sales increased 
about three millions, but during the last FIVE years 
the gross sales increased also about three millions, or 
twice as quickly. It is therefore natural that this new 
financial plan has become necessary. 

Sherman, Clay & Co. do a wholesale and retail musi- 
cal merchandise business. It is one of 'the largest busi- 
ness enterprises ot its kind in the United States. Its 
retail stores are located in San Francisco, Oakland, 
Sacramento, Stockton, Fresno, San Jose, Vallejo, Port- 
land, Seattle, Tacoma, Spokane, Bakersfleld, Santa Rosa, 
Watsonville and Reno. Its mall order business is large, 
ex'tending over the entire Pacific Coast and Western 
States and to Alaska, Hawaii and the Orient. In addition 
to its retail activities in the musical merchandise field, 
the Company does a large volume ot wholesale business. 
Sherman, Clay & Co. is one ot the most important sheet 
music publishers in the United States. This business 
has grown since 1915 to proportions which involve the 
publishing ot millions of copies, thereby advertising San 
Francisco throughout the world among millions of 
people. 

In no year, except during the conflagration year ot 
1906, has the firm sustained an operating loss. In 1906 
the only operating loss in the history of 'the business 
was caused by the city-wide disaster and the defaulting 
of certain insurance companies. By July 31st, 1907. all 
losses incurred in 1906 had been wiped out and the busi- 
ness showed a profit besides. The tangible assets ot the 
company at the conclusion of this financing will be 
$7,629,509.49. In 1919, in order 'to provide themselves 
with a future permanent home in San Francisco, Sher- 
man, Clay & Co. purchased the property at the North- 
east corner of Post and Stockton streets. This property 
is today worth conservatively in excess ot $775,000. It 
has a frontage of SO fee't on Post street, 122 feet on 
Stockton street, and 100 feet in the rear. Other San 
Francisco real estate owned by the company has a value 
ot approximately $50,000. At the conclusion of this 
financing this property will be clear of all encumbrance, 
and according to the terms of 'the Prior Preferred Stock, 
cannot be encumbered in the future without the con- 
sent ot the holders of 75% ot the outstanding Prior 
Preferred Stock. 

The present management ot Sherman, Clay & Co. has 
remained unchanged for many years with the exception 
'that in 1920 L. S. Sherman, who had been president of 
the company since 1892, became chairman of the Board, 
Major C. C. Clay, Vice-President from 1892 to his death 
in 1905, was succeeded in the Vice-Presidency by his 
son, P. T. Clay. In 1920. when L. S. Sherman became 
chairman of the Board. P. T. Clay became, and now is, 
President ot the Company, and F. R. Sherman, the son 
of L. S. Sherman, became and now is. Vice-President 
of the Company. F. W. Stephenson, since 1905. has been 
Secretary. Andrew G. McCarthy is Treasurer. 

For the past nine years the earnings of the business 
before interes't and federal taxes have averaged over 
$490,000 per annum, and during the past five years the 
earnings before interest and federal taxes have aver- 
aged $640,000 per annum. The dividends on this issue 
of stock amount to $210,000 per annum. Net quick assets 
shall be maintained in an amount equal to $125 per 
share of this prior preferred stock outstanding. 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

Edited By Elita Muggins 

1605 The Alameda. San Jose, Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 

l><'l>lirliiiriil >lilii:iKrr. Sue DnviN Mnytiliril. X27 



.Sun 



rlon St. Phone Sa 



. Jose 4713-J. 



San Jose. May 16. 1923. 

Edv/ard Faber Schneider, San Jose's noted ccmposer- 
teacher, presented four ot his pianoforte pupils Friday 
evening. May 11, at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s recital hall. 
Miss Omo Grimwood of Mills College sang a charming 
group ot three numbers. Miss Grimwood is a pupil of 
Catherine Urner. Several San Jose pianoforte teachers 
are being coached by Mr. Schneider. The recital Friday 
evening showed teaching ot the superior sort. Three 
of the young women presenting this splendid program 
are attending college, and one knows that when a student 
is carrying a full college course, not a great deal of time 
is left for piano study. All the more credit goes to them 
for their work showed great artistry. All ot the players 
brought out a beautiful singing tone, their fine phra,Bing 
being wonderfully well accomplished. They exhibited 
perfect poise, freedom of all evidence of nervousness 
being noticeable. 

Miss Grimwood's vocal numbers were greatly enjoyed. 
For recall she gave a delightful interpretation of 
Matinata by Elizabeth Mills-Crothers. The program in 
full: Theme — Variations. Qp. 14 (Paderewski) Miss 
Marian Handy (Mills College); (a) Barcarolle (Rubin- 
stein), (b) Staccato Etude (Rubinstein), Miss Dorothy 
Thomas (Mills College); (a) O Del Mio Dolce Ardor 
(Gluck), (b) The Shepherd Lehl (Rlmsky Korsakoff), 
(c) Habanera (Carmen) (Bizet), Miss Omo Grimwood 
(Mills College); (a) Ballade Op. 118. (b) Intermezzo 
Op. 118, (c) Capriccio Op. 116 (J. Brahms), Miss Isabel 
Becker (Mills College); (a) Nocturne Op. 15, No. 2. (bl 
Scherzo, Op. 20, No. 1 (Chopin), Miss Anita Hough (Oak- 
land). 

Violet Silver, the talented young violinist, has returned 
tD San Jose after several years in New York spent in 
study, and is planning to divide her time between San 
Francisco and here, already establishing c'asses in both 
cities. Miss Silver has had several very flattering offers 
to appear in repertoire in vaudeville which she has re- 
fused, preferring her classes and concert work. She has 
been quite active s'nce her return having played at 
several musicales in San Francisco, also appearing in 
radio programs. 

Miss Silver was just a child a little over f,-)ur years 
ago when she left for study in New York, where she was 
awarded a scholarship. Two years were spent at the 
Frank Damrosch Institute of Music, to lowed by two 
years with Leopold Auer. Th's last was made possible 
by a number of prominent San Francisco women who 
were interested in her owing to her unusual talent. It 
was her good fortune while in New York to play for 
Kreisler, who predicted an enviable future for her. San 
Joseans are indeed glad this gifted girl is returning to 
her childhood home. 

A very interesting recital was that given at College 
of the Pacific Tuesday evening. May 8th. Two young 
men, Russell Bcdey, pianist, and De Marcus Brown, 
reader, both of the class of 1923, furnished the fifth 
senior recital of the series. The largest crowd of the 
season greeted the young men and by their applause 
attested to the pleasure given by both performers. Mr. 
Bodley is a very virile pianist, showing his ability 
through a wide range ot numbers and pleasing par- 
ticularly through his interpretation of a group of modern 
numbers of which the Juba Dance by Dett was the most 
appealing and the Klavierstuck by Schonberg the most 
unusual. 

Mr. Brown's work is well known to San Jose audi- 
ences as his interpretation ot different parts in the 
Pacific Players Little Theatre productions has won him 
a wide circle of admirers. He gave great pleasure in a 
group of short numbers, three of which were by Ralph 
Westerman, a senior in the college. In his portrayal ot 
different characters in The Giants' Stair. Mr. Brown 
proved beyond a doubt his ability to depict emotion and 
delineate character. 

The recital program for last Sunday, May 13th, at the 
Memorial Church, Stanford University, took the form 
ot a sacred concert in which Warren D. Allen, the 
University organist, had the co-operation of the Elks' 
Concert Orchestra of San Jose under the direction ot 
Dr. Charles M. Richards. The program included orches- 
tral numbers and several compositions with organ and 
orchestra combined, the most important being the 
Symphony in D minor by Guilmant. The prcgram in full 
was as follows; Prelude in C sharp minor (Rachmani- 
now); The Swan (Saint-SaensI ; Symphonic in D minor. 
Op. 42, for organ and orchestra — Largo e maestosa 
Allegro, Pastorale (Guilmant); After Sundown (Frimll; 
Vesper Hymn (Bortnianskyi. Tuesday afternoon. May 
15, at 4:15. the following interesting program will be 
presented; Sonata. No. 1, in C minor (Mende'ssohnI ; 
Aria in D, originally from an orchestral suite, this 
number has been popularized in the transcription tor 
violin known as the Air on the G string (Bach ) ; Clair de 
lune (Karg-Elert) ; Variations de concert (with pedal 
cadenza by Bonnet). On Thursday afternoon. May 17th, 
Mr. Allen will be heard in the following program: ('hant 
de Printemps (Joseph Bonnet); Echoes of Spring 
(transcribed by Edward Shippen Barnes (Rudolf Friml); 
May Night (Selim Palragren); Spring Song (Mendels- 
sohn; Faith in Spring (transcribed for organ by W. D. 
Allen (Schubert) Rhapsody in D major (Rossetter G. 
Cole). 



Kohler & Chase 

2Cnabp panos 
SCnabp Ampirn 



SAN JOSE HEADQUARTERS 
185 So. First Street 



ALFRED LANINI 


Expert 


Maker of Violins, Violas and Cellos 




With European Experience 


Artistic 


Repairing Rare Old Violins For Sale 




591 E. ST. JAMES STREET 




San Jose, California 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

LeRoy V. Brant, Director 
OII'erN CourMCM in All nrnncheM nf 3IunIc at 

All Stn^eH of Ailvancc-menl 
SAX JOSE CAI.IFOKMA 



WM. EDWARD JOHNSON 



n ARITONK 
Slndlaa: »0 Sonth 14th St., San Jo 



14th. Unklnnil, Mondar 



Hannah Fletcher Coykendall 

SOPRANO 

Availnblr for CunprrtK and Rrcilnlx 

Puiifl of Gaetano >lerola 

145 Hanchett Avenue. San Jnae, CalU. 

Phone ;1525-W 



MRS. CHARLES McKENZIE 



ALLAN BACON 

Head of Piano and Organ I)e|iartn>enl«, 

ColU-ge of I'aeitie, San Jottc 

Concert OrRaniNt Pianoforte Lecture Recitals 

NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 
San Jose. Cal. 
Conferif Deereex, Awards Certincaten. Complele Colleice 
Con»ervBtory and Academic Cournei. In I'lano. I lolln. 
Harp, 'Cello. Voice, Harmony, Counterpoint, Canon and 
Faeue and Science of MuMlc. For pnrticularM Apply to 
Sinter Superior. 

The Monday Musical Club ot Santa Cruz had a large 
attendance for its May meeting, held on the eveniiiK ot 
the 7th. The subject ot study was Beethoven, wlms? 
music will also furnish the program for the June ni.-i-t- 
ing the last ot the season. The program presented in- 
cluded the sonata for piano and violin. No. 3, in E Hat. 
played by Mrs. Harold Bellus and Francis HamMn; the 
Romance in F, by Mr. Hamlin; the piano sonata. Op. 
Sla, Les Adieux, L'Absence et Le Retour, by oiio 
Kunitz; song, Knowest Thou the Land, by Mrs t', K. 
DDwling; Gavotte, piano duo. Mr. Kunitz and Mrs. liciiie 
Swinford; paper by Mrs. A. van Kaathoven, nail by 
Mrs. Raymond Coats. The annual meeting for Ilie 
election of officers will be he'ld during the week. 



The San Jose Music Study Club held an open meeting 
on Wednesday morning. May 9th, in Sherman, Clay & 
Co.'s recital hall. This c'.ub has been meeting in the 
studio of Miss Marjory Fisher during the past year or 
more, but since Sherman, Clay & Co. have moved into 
their spacious new quarters six weeks ago this or- 
ganization has met and will continue to hold its meet- 
ings in their new recital hall. The program on th'B 
cccasion was three groups of two piano duos by Mrs. 
Charles McKenzie, first piano, Mrs. Howard M. lliiL-sins. 
second piano, and a group of five vocal numbers by Mrs. 
Miles A. Dresskell, soprano. The two piano nunibi is in- 
cluded the four movements of Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite 
No. 1, Nocturne Op. 9, No. 2 (Chopin), Minuet (I'ad- 
erewski). Arabesque No. 2 (Debussy), closing tlie pro- 
gram with the Arensky Suite Op. 15. Mrs. Drcssliel. 
whose name on a program always gives pleasure. w:is 
heard in Bird ot the Wilderness (Horsman). I.itil.- 
Birdies (Buzzi-Peccia). Charity (Hageman). Tli. i uii 
nin' Little Thing (Hageman), Song of the Open i La 



I 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANIL DEER 



''SoulfuV* 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 

Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 



SANJOSE ARTICLE 



page 4. 



Forge). Mrs. Dresskell was obliged to repeat the La 
Forge number. Mrs. McKenzie played the accompani- 
ments with skill and helpfulness, adding much to the 
program. 

The Richards Club, assisted by Juanita Tennyson, 
soprano, and Maxine Cox, pianist, gave an enjoyable 
concert at the Strand Theatre, Los Gatos, Friday eve- 
ning, May 11th. Hearty and insistent applause evidenced 
the keen appreciation of the large audience. Dr. Charles 
M. Richards is the leader of this splendid organization. 
Following is the well arranged program presented: Mar- 
garita (Chadwick): (al Immortal Music (Rohynl, ,(b) 
Elyseum (Speaks), (c) Medley From the South (Pike); 
soprano solo (a) Caro mio Ben (Giordani 1744-1798 (bl 
Chanson Non'egienne (Foudrain). Mrs. Tennyson: Songs 
of the Sea (a) Three Fishers (Leater) (b) Sea Fever 
(Andrews), (c) On the Sea (Buck); Piantorte solo, Cave 
of the Winds (Loth), Miss Cox; (a) Song of Brother 
Hilario (Cox), (b) Good Bye (Tosti). (c) In Vocal 
Combat (Buck); soprano solo — (a) To the Sun (Pearl 
Curranl. (b) Slumber Seng (Gretchaninow), Mrs. Tenny- 
son; Group of Negro Sangs and Spirituals, (a) Rain 
Song (Cook), Having a night oft. his old woman being 
gone, Mr. Simmons invites some of his cronies in for the 
evening. The chief topic of ccnversatiDn is the weather 
and certain infallible signs of rain, characteristic of the 
negro superstition: (b) Exhortation — a Negro Sermon 
(Cook), (c) I'm Gwine to Sing in the Heavenly Choir 
(Milgan), (d) Swing Along (Cook). 

Mrs. Leroy V. Brant in Songs— The Knights Templar 
on Wednesday evening last were greatly delighted with 
a group of songs sung by Mrs. LeRoy V. Brant, singing 
teacher at The Institute of Music. Mrs. Brant's clear 
voice, her admirable teehnic, and above all her artistic 
interpretation delighted her audience. On Thursdjy 
evening she prepared for the Order of the Amaranth 
of which she is also an officer. The occasion was a flower 
ball, with a mus''cal program before the dancing. She 
sang My Laddie, by Thayer; Caddy's Plaiddy, by Millard, 
and Daffadills A-BIowing by Germain. Miss Alice Hitch- 
cock, an artist pupil of LeRoy V. Brant, played her ac- 
companiments and rendered with a great deal of fire 
Chopin's Military Polonaise. Her piano playing was 
greatly appreciated for its depth and briliance, and 
her accompaniments marked her as talented in this 
difficult art. 

The recital of the violin students at The Institute of 
Music Wednesday night was one marked with c'eanness 
of teehnic and excellent expression. Nine numbers, pre- 
sented by students at all stages of advancement, were 
heard. The work, done under Josef Halamicek. head of 
the violin department, showed the care which marks 
the work as insisted on at the Institute. Careful bowing, 
a good selection of material, and apt expression, com- 
bined to make the recital a success. These who par- 
ticipated in the musicale were: Owen Clarke Jones, 
Gladys Partington, Arthur Mayo, June Keller, Merton 
Carlyon. Helen Sowders, Henry Triana, and Conley 
Plummer. 

Warren D. Allen, University Organist of Memorial 
Church, Stanford University, assisted by Esther Houk 
Allen, contralto, will be heard in an unusually interest- 
ing program Sunday afternoon. May 20, at 4:00 p. m. 
when the following numbers will be given: Prelude 
and Fugue in A minor (J. S. Bach) ; Aria from Israel in 
Egypt (Handel); Canon in B minor (Schumann); Eve- 
ning Hymn The Day is Ended (with violin obligato 
played by Elizabeth Peirce) (J. C. Bartlett); Sunset 
Shadows (George W. Andrews) ; Pilgrim's Chorus 
(from Tannhauser) (Wagner). On Tuesday afternoon. 
May 22 at 4 : 15 Mr. Allen will play Minuet from the 
Symphony in G minor (Mozart); Morning Song (Sam- 
uel J. Riegel); Adorn Thyself, Fond Soul (Bach); Suite 
in D major. Prelude — Andante — Finale (Edward Ship- 
pen Barnes). Thursday, May 24th at 4:15 the follow- 
ing numbers will be given by Mr. Allen: The Pilgrim's 
Progress (Part 5) (Ernest Austin); In Springtime 
(Ralph Kinder); Chanson, from the Seven Sketches for 
Organ (Edward Shippen Barnes) ; Stately Procession 
(Eric Delamarter). 

Wm. Edward Johnson, director of music at the Chris- 
tian Church. San Jose, arranged an impressive program 
for Mothers' Day services. The numbers given were 
an organ prelude At Evening (Kinder) ; Soprano solo. 
My Mother, Betty Steele; Ladies Quartette, The Half 
Has Never Been Told; Offertory Anthem, Rock of Ages 
(William Reed) by the choir; Duet, Rock Me to Sleep 



Mother (Leslie) Miss Taylor and Miss Ostenberg; Bari- 
tone solo, Mother, My Dear (Treham) Wm. Edward 
Johnson. Mrs. R. M. Bartle presided at the organ. 

The Lyceum Club of Santa Cruz hopes to have a very 
interesting program of concerts for the next winter 
season. A letter is to be sent out asking for subscrip- 
tions for tlie course, which will have, if the response 
makes it possible, the following attractions: Arthur 
Middleton, the Metropolitan baritone; the San Francisco 
Chamber Music Society; the Pasmore Trio, and the 
mixed quartette of which Carl Anderson is the head. 

The rapidly increasing number of subscriptions which 
are coming in to the box office of Jessica Colbert at 
Sherman, Clay & Co., for the 1923-24 series of the Col- 
bert Concert Course are interesting from two angles. 
First, because of the fact that they show the existence 
of a wide circle of music lovers in and around San 
Jose and secondly because that circle is expressing its 
approval of the selection of artists for the coming sea- 
son — as they realize it is by no means an easy task to 
choose the great from the near-great. Her representa- 
tive here expresses the belief that within the next tew 
weeks the majority of the seats in the Morris Daley 
Assembly Hall will be reserved by those who wish to 
make sure of their choice. 

The San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, under the 
direction of Alfred Hertz, will open the season the latter 
part of October or early November. Following will be 
a joint recital by Paul Althouse, one of the leading 
tenors of the Metropolitan Opera Company, and Arthur 
Middleton, one of America's greatest baritones, in De- 
cember. Marie Sundelius, prima donna soprano of the 
Metropolitan Opera Company will give the third concert 
in January, and Renee Chemet, one of the greatest 
woman violinists in the world wi'l conclude the series 
in February. This will be Jessica Colbert's fourth season 
here and has already become an accepted part of the 
social life of the city. 

S. J. Mustol, formerly of this city, is meeting with 
unusual success, in his w-ork as supervisor of music in 
the Santa Ana public schools and also for his personal 
work as a musician. Professor Mustol is well known 
throughout this county where he w'orked along musical 
lines for some ten years, and was director of music at 
the University of Santa Clara and in the Santa Clara 
schools. Special honor was paid him recently by the 
Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra when the leader 
of that musical organization surrendered his baton to 
Professor Mustol during the playing of one of his own 
compositions. 

The Fourth of the series of senior recitals now being 
given at the Conservatory of the College of the Pacific 
brought out two exceptionally talented performers in 
Agnes Ward, violinist, and Jean Madsen. pianist. A 
program of high standard and splendid interest pleased 
a large audience Tuesday evening. May 1st. Miss Madsen 
is a pianist of the brilliant type with accurate technique 
and musical interpretation. Miss Ward's tone, bowing 
and intonation are excellent and she made a splendid 
impression with Hubay's Hejre Katj. Miss Madsen's 
best number was the Saint-Saens' Valse Etude. 



RECITAL AT HOLY NAMES COLLEGE 

An excellent students' recital was given at the Holy 
Names College Auditorium in Oakland by a number of 
splendidly trained students on Tuesday evening. May 
Sth, in the presence of a large and demonstrative audi- 
ence. The opening number of the program consisted of 
Clair de lune (Debussy) and Rigoudon (MacDowell) in- 
terpreted by Mary Murphy in a manner that revealed 
commendable taste in phrasing and technical execution 
that has undergone adequate and intelligent training. 
Lalitte Costigan played a harp solo by C. Schuetze 
entitled In the Garden which showed her to be endowed 
with a grasp of emotional coloring and a knack of se- 
curing a fine tone from her instrument which no doubt 
is the result of adequate instruction. 

Norine Mahone played two piano compositions. One 
of them belonging to the modern school by H. Balfour 
Gardiner entitled De Profundis and another by Concone 
name Witches' Dance. Both compositions were ex- 
cellently and discriminatingly interpreted both as to 
teehnic and phrasing. An ensemble number by Nevin 
entitled An Soir was interpreted with gratifying intona- 
tion and unanimity of bowing and expression by Violins 
— Irene Kilgore, Helen Slattery, Helene Pogue, Angelica 
Alfaro and Margaret Breier; Harp — Lalitte Ccstigan; 
Piano — Mary McCarran. 



HAZEL JOHNSON 

COLORATURA SOPRANO 
PUPIL OF DOMENICO BRESCIA AND FERNANDO MICHELENA 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND SOLFEGGIO 



studio:— Kohler & Chase BIdg..— Kearny 5454 



Residence Studio: —2720 Filbert St.,— West 815z 



Lalitte Costigan, who had made such a deep impres- 
sion with her harp playing, added to her success with 
the skillful interpretation of two piano compositions — 
Prelude op. 28 No. 21 (Chopin) and La Castagnette (H. 
Ketten). She exhibited a very pleasing touch, a fluent 
teehnic and a discriminating mode of interpretation. 
Dolores Gaxiola also distinguished herself wtih two 
piano interpretations — Nocturne op. 15 No. 1 (Chopin) 
and Egyptian Dance (Rudolf Friml). She showed the 
possession of assurance and diligent study. Her phras- 
ing was artistic, tasteful and showed the contrast be- 
tween the character of the two works. After the con- 
clusion of the successful interpretation of these piano 
compositions Miss Gaxiola revealed talent as a vocalist, 
exhibiting a pliant, sympathetic soprano voice used to 
fine advantage in Hildach's Spring. 

The H'gh School Glee consisting of a number of 
young vocal students, sang Cadman's I Hear a Thrush 
at Eve with unusually clever interpretation and with 
excellent intonation. Colette Traverse proved herself to 
be a pianist of decided accomplishments, showing easy 
adaptation to technical facility and a commendable 
sense of interpretative faculties. She played Guitarre 
(Moszkowsky) and Prelude (The Anvil) (Chopin). A 
Vocal Quartet consisting of Dolores Gaxiola, Bernice 
Kisich, Lalitte Costigan and Colette Traverse sang 
Mother by E. R. Ball with an effective realization of the 
sentiment of the composition. 

Bernice Kisich concluded the program with a bril- 
liantly rendered interpretation of Nocturne op. 15 No. 2 
(Chopin) and Tarantelle in G sharp minor {J. L. 
Nicode). She proved herself very receptive to the ex- 
pression of artistic ideas. Angelica Alfara played the 
accompaniments very intelligently and appropriately. 
One thing impressed itself on the mind of those who at- 
tended this concert, namely, that the students had been 
trained to attain confidence in their efforts. There was 
no nervousness, no lack of resolution, no self conscious- 
ness. Every student was sure of her work and played 
with ^ confidence and natural assurance that added 
much to the success of the event. The faculty of the 
Holy Names School of Music is entitled to well merited 
felicitations upon the success achieved by the students 
on this occasion. 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Readers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address. 
Anonymous communications cannot be answered. No 
names will be published. Address, Question Editor, 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kohler & Chase Building, 
San Francisco. 

1. Are harmonics on the harp notated in the same 
way as harmonics on the violin? — J. U. D. 

Yes. The harmonic mark, a small circle (o) placed 
above the note, is used to indicate harmonics in the 
music of all instruments on which harmonics are pro- 
duced. 

2. Wliat instrument is meant by the "bull fiddle?" — 
A. H. T. 

The double bass; the bass of the strings of an orches- 
tra. 

3. Who wrote the song "Over the Hills at Break of 
Day?"— P. N. 

Adam Geibel. 

4. What opera did Sullivan leave unfinished? — E. D. 
"The Emerald Isle," completed after Sullivan's death 

by Edward German. 

5. Can you explain why the tone of the ohoe is so 
much more peneti-ating than that of the clarinet? — D. 
W. G. 

Difference in tone quality directly depends upon the 
presence or absence or relative strength of upper partial 
tones, i. e., tones produced by halves, thirds, fourths, 
fifths, etc.. of the. vibrating medium and blended with 
the fundamental tone; and the presence or absence or 
relative strength of these upper partial tones depend 
upon the structure of the instrument and the manner in 
which vibrations are produced. The oboe is conical in 
shape and is played by means of a double reed; a num- 
ber of the jigber upper partial tones are thus made 
relatively very prominent, and this gives the oboe tone 
its penetrating power. In the case of the clarinet, the tube 
is cylindrical and the reed is single; as a result the 
even-numbered partials are not produced at all; so that 
the clarinet tone contains only the odd partials — the 
third, fifth, seventh, etc. 

AUGUSTA HAY DEN 

SOPRANO 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 

AddrcNH: 471 37th Avenue 

Tel- Pnc. l.na 

Unless you are known to everyone who engages artists 
or who attends concerts you can not possibly secure 
engagements. Your mere say-so does not constitute 
proof of your experience and success. Therefore make 
your name valuable by advertising. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Mischa Levitzki and the Ampico 

Mischa Levitzki Writes 

A Letter To San 

Francisco 



April II, igzj. 
To Snn Francisco: "It has been a privilege to play for you 
this season. Your reception at all three of my appearances 
is a delightful memory, and I am looking forward to my 
return appearance here, which I hope will be in the near 
future. In the meantime, however, I feel that, thanks to the 
Ampico, I play to a great many of you, all but in person. 
The influence of this wonderful instrument in the home is 
inestimable. I have heard and compared all of the repro- 
ducing pianos, and to me the supremacy of the Ampico is 
unquestionable. The selection of the right reproducing 
piano should not be entered into lightly. It is too important. 
It is just as important for you as for the artist, and should 
only be made after careful comparison." 

Mischa Levitzki 



COMPARE 

THE suggestion of Levitzki that you compare all reproducing 
instruments comes with unusual authority from a great artist 
who followed exactly that same course himself. In the cm] he was 
forced by strong conviction to turn his back on the reproducing 
device installed in his favorite concert piano— a most courageous step. 
He, with Rachmaninoff and several other great masters who fol- 
lowed the same course, have paid the highest tribute to the Ampico, 
and furnish testimony too eloquent to be ignored. 

The Ampico is placed at your disposal, just as it was for Levitzki 
and Rachmaninoff — for any comparison you may choose to make. 
Then follow your own judgment as did Levitzki, Rachmaninoff, 
Godowsky, Moiseiwitsch, Dohnanyi, Schnabel. Rubinstein, Samaroff, 
Leginska, Bloomfield-Zeisler, Ornstein, Mirovitch, Nyiregyhazi, 
Maier, Pattison, La Forge, Farrar, Kreisler and scores of their 
fellow artists. 



Kohler & Chase 



KNABE AMPICO 



San Francisco 
Sacramento 



Oakland 
San Jose 



HOTEL WHITCOMB SUNDAY 
CONCERT 



On Sunday evening. May 13th Hotel 
Whitcomb gave one of Us delightful con- 
certs with an augmented orchestra under 
the direction of Stanislas Bern. The pro- 
gram contained a number of excellent 
orchestral composition including such 
works as Elgar's March Pomp and Cir- 
cumstance, Ziehrer's Waltz Wiener Buer- 
ger, Wagner's Tannhouser Overture. 
Grieg's Peer Gynt Suite, Rimsky-Korsak- 
offs Caprice on Spanish Themes and a 
selection from Gounod's Faust. Mrs. 
Bern revealed that splendid violinistic 
virtuosity which she has maintained in 
artistic circles tor a number of years and 
her vitality affected the orchestra in a 
manner to endow it with spontaneous 
vitality and fire. A large audience thor- 
oughly enjoyed this excellent perform- 
ance and Mr. and Mrs. Bem are entitled 
to the gratitude of the Whitcomb Hotel 
management for the enthusiasm and effi- 
ciency which they put into their work. 

Augusta Hayden, soprano, was the solo- 
ist on this occasion. She sang three 
groups of songs, including: (a) What's 
in the Air Today (Eden); (b) Homing 
(Del Riego), (c) Daffodils a Flowing 
(German); (a) Spring Night (Schuman), 
(b) Cradle Song (MacFadyen); (a) 
Sungi del caro bene (Godard), (b) Guvre 
tes yeux bleux (Massenet), (c) Chanson 
de I'Adieu (Tosti). Miss Hayden created 
just enthusiasm with her fine voice qual- 
ity and her sincerity of expression. She 
sang with much taste and was recalled 
time and time again. In addition to her 
artistic triumph she proved to possess 
splendid poise and dignity of bearing. 



Orchestral accompaniment on second 
piano, Miss Simpson. 



H. B. Pasmore's talented pupil Gladys- 
Mary Campbell sang very successfully 
at a concert given in Nevada City on 
Saturday evening, May 12th, by Miss 
Dora Dooley, pianist, in honor of her 
sister, Mrs. Edward Kinne, violinist and 
singer of San'la Rosa who is visiting in 
Nevada City. The esthetic dancing of 
Miss Mary Oliver contributed to making 
the concert one of the most artistic af- 
fairs ever given in the Northern city. 
On the following day Miss Campbell sang 
to the violin obligato of Mrs. Kinne, 'the 
Bach-Gounod Ave Marie in the Catholic 
Church. After the service the congrega- 
tion gathered about the portals of the 
church in order to express to Miss Camp- 
bell their apprecia'tion of her beautiful 
voice and singing. 



Ray C. B. Brown, music editor of the 
San Francisco Chronicle, has been elected 
a member of the honorary and advisory 
board of the Franco-American Musical 
Society. His name was proposed for 
membership by E. Robert Schmitz, dur- 
ing the French pianist's recent visit here, 
and formal notification of unanimous 
election by the board of directors was 
received from New York last Sunday. 
Brown is the flrs't, and. thus far. the only 
American music critic to be thus hon- 
ored. 



Harold Pracht, associated with the 
Wiley B. Allen Co., and one of San Fran- 
cisco's best known baritones, surprised 
his many friends early in April by the 
announcement of his marriage to Miss 
Hortense Haas. The wedding was strictly 
a private one being attended by only 
'the nearest relatives and friends. No 
doubt our readers gladly join the Pacific 
Coast Musical Review in wishing the 
couple a very happy and prosperous jour- 
ney through life. 



Lolita McFarland, lyric soprano, one 
of Mme. Johanna Kristoffy's artist pupils, 
is meeting with remarkable success 
wherever she appears. In addition to 
having a beautiful voice which she uses 
with great ease and intelligence, she also 
possesses a charming personality, and a 
delightful stage presence. Miss McFar- 
land recently appeared as soloist before 
the San Francisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, the San Francisco Commercial 
Club, The Lions' Club of Berkeley, The 
Downtown Merchants' Association, and 
the Varsity College Night Entertainment 
of Berkeley. Miss Jane Sargent Sands 
proved herself on each of the above oc- 
casions a very capable and indispensible 
accompanist. 

Irving Krick, the well known and very 
talented young pianist, has been very 
busy of late. On April 22nd he played 
with much success at 'the T & D Theatre 
in Berkeley. Then he appeared on a pro- 
gram given by Alameda County 'talent in 
Martinez on May 5th, during Alameda 
County Music Week. These young artists 
were sent to Martinez to entertain Con- 
tra Costa County music lovers. On Mon- 
day and Tuesday evenings the young 
pianist played at one of the leading mov- 
ing picture theatres in Oakland. On 
Tuesday afternoon. May 8th, he played 
under the auspices of the music depart- 
ment of the 20th Century Club in Berke- 
ley on 'the same program with Mrs. Mary 
Carr Moore, Orley See and Mrs. E. E. 
Bruner On Thursday, May 10th, he 
played for the Newark Country Club in 
Newark. On Friday, May Uth, he ap- 
peared on a radio program tor the Mer- 
cantile Trust Co. of San Francisco. Irving 
and Jeanne Krick played at the Masonic 
Tem^ple in Oakland on Tuesday evening. 
May 15th during an entertainment and 
banquet given by the Knights Templar. 



Mrs. Nellie Strong Stevenson closed 
her course of Illustrated Talks on Modern 
Music this week at the Forum Club par 
lors with an analysis of ultra modern 
composers. During the season Mrs 
Stevenson has played some seventy-five 
or more piano illustrations, the greater 
number of the solo pieces from memory 
and the orchestral works in piano ar- 
rangements for four hands with the as- 
sistance of Mrs. Cecil von Seiberlich 
Bowley. The members of the class had 
no difficulty in understanding Mrs. Stev- 
enson's explanations. They have been 
enthusiastic in their appreciation and in- 
tend to continue this interesting form of 
study for general music lovers next sea- 



Mrs. Ethel Long Martin, pupil of Eliza- 
beth Simpson, gave a delightful concert 
on Monday evening. May 7th, at Miss 
Simpson's Berkeley studio as a feature 
of the Alameda County Music Week cele- 
bration. A large audience was present, 
and the following program was most en- 
thusiastically received: Gavotte (Gluck- 
Brahms) ; Romanze Sherzino, from Fas- 
chingsschwank (Schumann); Etude, A 
flat (Chopin), Etude, G flat (Chopin), 
Ethel Long Martin; Birthday Song 
(Woodman), Song of Joy (Cadman), Mrs. 
Asa Henion, Mrs. Laura Baker Fake, ac- 
companist; Berceuse, Dragon Fly (Palm- 
gren). Coming of Spring, Etude Mignonne 
(Schuett), Prelude G minor (Rachmanin- 
off), Mrs. Martin; The Winds in the 
South (Scott), The Rain (Curran), Mrs. 
Henion; The Bird-Sermon (Liszt), Fan- 
tasie Hongroise (Liszt), Mrs. Martin; 



' Jeanne Krick, pianis't and pupil of Mrs. 
H. I. Krick, played for the Priscilla Club 
of Berkeley on Wednesday afternoon, 
I May 9th, and also played on Friday eve- 
;ning. May 11th, on a radio program for 
the Mercantile Trust Co. of San Fran- 
cisco with her brother Irving Krick. 
Helen Goodfellow, another pupil of Mrs. 
Krick's, played on Wednesday, May 9th, 
for the Priscilla Club and will play on 
May 29th for the Oakland Tribune. La 
Vona Pritchard, also a Krick pupil, will 
play on the same occasion. Lloyd 
Kramer, son of Mrs. P. J. Kramer, newly 
elected Oakland school director, anolh..r 
pupil of Mrs. Krick, played on the Bov 
Scouts program in Oakland on Frirhiv 
May 11th. 



Joseph George Jacobson introdm ■ -1 
three of his pupils in the following iii.i 
gram at the Hotel Oakland in Oakland 
on May 8th: (a) Prelude (Bach), (l,i 
Sonate (Beethoven), (c) Erotik (Jacob- 
son), (dl Prelude (Chopin), (e) hov 
Dream (Lisztl, (f) Prelude C sharp min.ir 
(Rachmaninoff), Gladys Ivanelle Wilson- 

(a) Prelude (Bach), (b) Nocturne' 
(Chopin), (c) Song Without Words (Mpii- 
delssohn), (d) Butterfly (Lavallee), Myr- 
tle Harriet Jacobs; (a) Prelude (Bach). 

(b) The Caravan (Jacobson), (c) Valse 
Chromatique (Godard), (d) Marceau in 
A flat (Wollenhaupt), (e) Rhapsodic No 
6 (Liszt), Sam Rodetsky. 



If you want to become known to the 
musical public of California, advertise in 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 





Olrtistic Supremacy 

oAgain Tiecogmzed 

By 

Feodore Chaliapin 

THE WORLD'S GREATEST SINGER, WHO WILL BE 

HEARD IN TWO EXTRAORDINARY RECITALS 

IN SAN FRANCISCO 

SUNDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 20th 
MONDAY EVENING, MAY 28th 

(Management Selby C. Oppenhcimer) 

ONE RECITAL EACH IN 
PORTLAND, OREGON, WED. EVENING, MAY 23rd 
SEATTLE, WASH., FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 25th 

(Management Steers & Conian, Portland) 

Chaliapin uses the Baldwin Piano on his 
entire American tour. 

310 gutter Street, ^an ^ranrisco 




PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

SHERMAN DANBY, REPRESENTATIVE AND CORRESPONDENT 

Assisted by Miss Lloyd Dana and Miss Mildred Alexander, Los Angeles; Miss Penelope Newkirk; Hollywood; Mrs. Helen Wood, Pasadena. 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: SUITE 447 DOUGLAS BUILDING, 257 SO. SPRING STREET, TELEPHONE 820-302 

Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



MISUAI. fAI^ENDAR FOR AA EElv MAY 20 
MOIVDAV, MAV St 

Oi-rtniilc H01.H. proeniiii Ebell Club, L. A. 

Musiv Ti-aeherH' AMKOelativn. Charles E, 

IVnilierton illreeli* McDowell Club, L. A. 

MaiBOret »luu«oii nnd Lawrence Tlbbett on 

Gertrude Ro»« proBrnm Ebell Club, L. A. 

IjOM Anirelet* Trio Concert - ~ 1^- A. 

TUESD.AY, MAY 23 
Calnion LubovlNki and Raymond Harmon In 

Joint recital Women*s Club, Riverside, Cal. 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23 
Alice ForMyllic Mo«her sln(;s Gertrude Ross 

comiioxitlons _ EbeU Club, L. A. 

ERID.AY, MAY 25 

Frieda Pcyckc, in rccitnL M. E. Church, Pasadena 

D«ma Glircy, in recital Zoellner Conservatory, L. A. 

lOditii Lillian Clarice and Carolyn Handley, 

studio recital Studio, L. A. 

LOS ANGELES, May 15.— A few weeks ago I wrote 
an article endeavoring to call attention to the fact that 
Los Angeles is overgrown with a middle, class popula- 
tion not yet in sympathy with music at least to the 
extent of paying proper rates for musical education or 
patronizing any of the arts as becomes a city of this 
size. This article caused considerable comment and 
plenty of folks enjoying normal reason have been kind 
enough to express appreciation and a willingness to 
assist this publication in such constructive measures as 
may help the teacher and the resident artist. 

There is no use talking. Los Angeles is in an artificial 
state. Eventually she is going to take her place in music 
with other cities of like size but that time is not yet. 
The same conditions that apply to our ridiculous method 
of city government, our provincialism, our street cars, 
apply to music. We are young and enjoying a remark- 
ahle boom but that does not mean that our population 
has settled down to a valuation of the more serious side 
of mental and character development. A certain publi- 
cation has referred to my previous article as a "knock" 
from San Francisco. Silly. Just as absurd to continue 
to jolly the public and shout the hurrahs when cold 
facts prove us still in the infant class. 

If I were an attorney and had to brief a statement of 
facts to support the contention that — more music 
teachers are barely existing in Los Angeles and more 
resident artists of acknowledged standing receive less 
for their services in Los Angeles than in any other city 
in America half its size — I could produce tacts that 
would make the judge and jury sit up and take real 
notice. That is the trouble. The boomer shouts the 
hurrah and the boomited joins in the chorus. The for- 
mer intentionally closes his eyes to the truth and the 
latter has not had time to wake up. 

Let us therefore be fair. We have a large number of 
cultured and refined people in Southern California and 
a big sprinkling of men and women who have really 
accomplished something in the arts, a fair percentage 
of successful and well-to-do professional and business 
men but also a large percentage of the middle class and 
lower middle class, particularly from the Middle West, 




SOHME.R 




l.L cause of their rare beauty, 
tfohmer Period Grands are 
objects of art that outwardly 
reflect the exquisite musical 
qualities which have won 
world tame for Sohmer. 



Complete FumjsheR of Sui 



Los Angeles 
SOHMER Representatives 




Fitzgerald's for the Advancement of Music 

John Smallman 

John Smallman, conductor of the Los Angeles Oratorio Society 
and one of the foremost Concert Baritones and teachers of the 
Pacific Coast, recently directed the Oratorio Society in a re- 
markably successful presentation of "Samson and Delilah." Mr. 
Smallman is an enthusiastic admirer — and uses in his studio and 
in all his Concerts the 

KNABE 

lie ivill aciepi sliidenls during the summer in 
his Los Angeles Studio 

|FFrZGERALD|B| MU5IC CO J 

HILL STREET XP'^AT 7S.7-7ZQ 
Los Angeles 



that have never heard of the Philharmonic Orchestra 
or have ever spent more than a dollar for a music 
lesson for the young one — if the boy or girl does receive 
any introduction to music. The sale of phonographs last 
year in Los Angeles was better than in any other city 
in America. There is hope in that because from canned 
beans we often develop more advanced tastes. Piano 
sales showed a big increase. The deficit of the Phil- 
harmonic this year, it is said, will not be as large as in 
former years. The Hollywood Bowl and Hertz has been 
a big stimulus. Still the fact remains that there are 
more music teachers on the ragged edge in Los Angeles 
than in any other large city and when Hugo Kirckhoffer 
wrote to his friend fn Cleveland advising him that if 
he was making bread and butter there — to stay there — 
because there are too many teachers here fighting for 
the butter — or the cream — the genial Hugo was hitting 
the nail right on the head. 

It is some jump from Los Angeles to Chicago but I 
would like to call attention to the silver anniversary of 
Harrison Wild, for twenty-five years director of the 
Apollo Club of Chicago. I happen to know a little of the 
harmony that exists there between musicians and of 
the helping hand that Wild has often extended and in 
turn received. I refer to this to illustrate the utter 
provincialism — the dollar in my mitt — attitude of those 
members of the Philharmonic who considered an extra 
rehearsal for the Oratorio Society and the sending of 
substitutes purely a matter ot "business." Little sym- 
pathy has been aroused for these musicians since John 
Smallman refused what undoubtedly would have been 
their unsatisfactory services. It is true these musicians 
were within their legal rights as the society does not 
own a big exchecquer and could ill afford to pay the 
additional tee demanded for an extra rehearsal. It does 
seem though as if those who owe so much to music 
could have paid off a mite ot their indebtedness with 
a kindly act and a helping hand. 

Now let's hike back to Chicago and Harrison Wild. 
There are many thousands on the Pacific Coast who 
know him well. The celebration ot the silver anniver- 
sary in the form of a banquet was attended by over two 
hundred prominent musicians and was held May 7th at 
the Auditorium Hotel. I extract from a tribute paid by 
Miss Lina McCauley: "Theodore Thomas, Frederick 
Stock and Harrison Wild are the three men who have 
done most to make Chicago the great musical center it 
now is." Congratulatory telegrams and letters were 
read from all sections of the country, including several 
from California with our own Los Angeles leading. The 
keynote of the entire evening was expressed in the 
harmony of the various interests represented. Too often 
musicians are apt to become self-centered and critical 
ot others. There is a lesson in this anniversary gather- 
ing that could be used to advantage right here. For 
the benefit of many ex-Chicagoans now in the Southland 
I append some of the details. Appearing on a short 
program were Elsa Harthan Arendt, Stella Roberts and 
Theodore Harrison. Albert C. Cotsworth discussed Mr. 
Wild as an organist and choirmaster, Herman Devries 
as a critic and Lina McCauley evolved the musical de- 
velopment of Chicago in the past quarter of a century. 
In response Harrison Wild emphasized the co-operation 
he had received not only within his own organization 
but from musicians generally. 

Sylvain Noack conducted twenty-five principal mem- 
bers ot the Philharmonic Orchestra tor Violet Romer in 
Pasadena and the Philharmonic quartette ot which he 
is founder gave an interesting concert for the Friday 
Morning club within the past few weeks. On Wednes- 
day, May 16th, the quartette appeared in Prescott, 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

70S Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

COMPOSER-PI AN ISTE 
00 South Alvarndo i'honc r>IO 

S'lnnLKh-Ciilifornia Folic SonKs 
J. l--ischcr. \cw ^ oi it. l'iiiili.,.hcrs 

ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CIILTIIRE — COACHING IN REPERTOIRE 

OPERA CLASSES INCLUDING COMPLETE 

PRESENTATIONS 

Studio 1324 S. Pleucroa. Phone 21805 

CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

Available for Concerts and Recitals 

Limited Number of .Advanced I'uiills Accepted 

Violinist Los Aneeles Trio 



ndlni »34 Music 



Phone 100H2 



ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

Tuesday. Wednesday. Friday Afternoona 
E^gan School. Phones 218U5 or 271330 
1324 South Figueroa, Lob Aneeles 

SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCERT MASTER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Concerts and Recitiils 

lannicement Mrs. Cnroiine C. Smith, 424 Auditorium Hide 



ILYA BRONSON 

mber Trio Intime, Los 



Solo 'CcliUt 
rmonic Orchestra 
s Trio. Philharmo 
r Music Recitals 

Holir :<044 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

^acher of Piano. Harmony, Voice Coach. DurinK March 
nicii. Tei. Santa 
;.. Los Anecles. 




LOS ANGELES 

CALIFORNIA 

THEATRE 



GREATER CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
ELINOR, Conducting 
50 MUSICIANS 



cl4 of Mnj- 30th 

« Ki;iv" 

\ — s.-ltction I.udc 

Mi v. — Clark Cornet 
William Hainiltc 



(c) SYNCOPATED IMl'ltl 



l>NS.. 



Elin 



rniieed by Mr 
letion with Ernest Shipman's firoductloii 
of Rallih Connor's famous 



■•VOl'NG SHERLOCIvS-' 



I 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Ariz., on the 21st Mr. Noack appears in Hollywood and 
on June 1st in Long Beach. 

Sylvain Noack has encouraging news from his tal- 
ented pupil Carolyn De Fevre who is studying with Carl 
Flesch in Berlin. This news also confirms the tour of 
Carl Flesch in America during the coming season. Be- 
fore coming to this country Noack was assistant to 
Carl Flesch and also a member o£ his quartette. 

Zoellner Conservatory students were heard in two 
widely separated cities. On Monday evening. May 7th. 
Florence Duvall gave a violin recital at Pomona Col- 
lege, Claremont, before a large and enthusiastic audi- 
ence. On Tuesday, May Sth, Olive Englund, piano, and 
Florence Foster, violin, gave a recital in Los Angeles at 
the Sentous Junior High School eliciting warm praise 
for their splendid work. The three young artists showed 
they had received a very thorough training. Having 
worked under the Zoellners (Amandus Zoellner. Joseph 
Zoellner, St., and Joseph Zoellner, Jr.) the past three 
years enables them to give every evidence of the splen- 
did instruction they have received from their inter- 
nationally known teachers. 

Ann Thompson, pianist. Earl IVIeeker, baritone, and 
Catherine Jackson, harpist, furnished a delightful pro- 
gram for the Pomona Ebell Club last Friday, May llth. 
Mme. Newcombe Prindell presented the artists. The 
program was as follows: Caro Mio Ben (Giordani), Chi 
la Zin Zorella (Paisiello), Credo, Othello (Verdi), Mr. 
Meeker; Deux Chansons (Dubez). Ballade (Hassel- 
mansl. Miss Jackson; Wolf Dance (Cadman), The Flute 
God (Grunnl, Puck (Phillippe), Valse Brilliante (Mana 
Zucca), Miss Thompson; La Harpe (Eolienne) (Gode- 
froid). Premiere Arabesque (Debussy), Bonrie (Bach), 
Miss Jackson; Long Ago (MacDowell), My Menagerie 
(Fay Foster). The Shepherdess (Kurt Schindle), The 
Last Song (James Rogers), Mr. Meeker. 

Gertrude Ross, the beloved California composer and 
pianiste, whose compositions have won national renown, 
has just finished her new composition The Vision of Sir 
Launfal, poem by Lowell, and has dedicated this lofty 



Mme. Newcombe 

PRINDELL 



Desirable 
Engagements 



Dignified 
Publicity 



Personal Representative of Distinguished Artists 

MAJESTIC THEATRE 

LOS ANGELES 

Phone 642-93 Phone 642-93 



The Heartt-Dreyfus Studios 

VOICK AXD MODEKN L.tNGlTAOES 

Gnmut Club nide., 1(M4 Sauth Hupe Street. Pergonal 

Repreaentntive, Grnce Carroll-Elliot. Phonra 822-KOU and 

8r>«37. 

ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

I.OS ANGELES 

12S0 WIndaor Doolevard 03IK Hollytvaod Boulevard 

Complete Faculty of Artist Teachers 

JOHN SMALLMAN-- BARITONE 

Concert EnRBeements — Conductor L. A. Oratorio Society 

Mrs. H. O. Josfph, Sec'y.. 1500 .S. Flgueroa. Phone 23196 

Anna Ruzena Sprotte 

CONTRALTO School of Vocal Art 



MAY MACDONALD HOPE 



GRACE WOOD JESS »"='^'" soprano 

DR.AMATIC IN'TERPHETER OF FOLK SONGS 
l.N COSTUME RECITALS 

Manaeem'-nt: L. R Hehymer. Los Angel»li 

ANN THOMPSON-P/am.5te 

PIANIST OF PERSONALITY 

124 W. nerendn WH. 885 

Ampico Rolls 

CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN 

America's Popular Composer on tonr with TSI.IM.NA 
East and South: Oct. and .Nov. — I*ac. Coast: Jan. and Feb. 
East aealni Feb. and April — California: .April and May 

CHARLES BOWES 



DAVOL SANDERS * '?^mi.o?er "'' 

Head Violin Drpt., College of Manic, V. S. C. — Member 

i'hilharinuulo Orchentra 

»aftl <. F«gw»rftW ««.. I.w ^ng»l«-» Phono Mwlw VS^ 

A. KOODLACH 



S03 Majestic Theatre Uldic., Los Anselea Phone 670-92 



work in loving tribute to the Ebell Club. Mrs, Ross 
will present this tor the first time at the Ebell Club on 
Monday afternoon. May 21st. The artists who will assist 
her are. her young daughter Corinne, who will make her 
debut as a reader; Margaret Fischer Monson, mezzo- 
soprano, and Lawrence Tibbett, baritone who will re- 
turn from Xew York on the 19th inst. In addition to 
this composition, each of the assisting artists will alsp 
present a group of solos. The entire program of Mrs. 
Ross' compositions with Mrs. Ross at the piano is as 
follows: Part 1 — A Golden Thought, The Goblins, A 
Roundup Lullaby, Work, Lawrence Tibbett; Two West- 
ern Sketches, Spanish Serenade, Ride of the Cowboy, 
Gertrude Ross; Delight of the Out-of-Doors, Sunset in 
the Desert, Two Spanish-California Folk Songs, Car- 
mela, Old Maid's Song, Margaret Fisher Monson. Part 
2 — The Vision of Sir Launfal, Sir Launfal and the Leper 
sung by Lawrence Tibbett; descriptive songs by Mar- 
garet Fischer Monson and the narrative read by Corinne 
Ross. 

Mrs. Ross is a splendid type of American woman- 
hood and is an an excellent example of what clean con- 
structive thinking can accomplish. With a daughter 
grown, Mrs. Ross is yet only on the threshold of the 
big things she hopes to do. Gertrude Ross is as free 
from the temperamental outbursts, popularly ascribed 
to musicians, and gushings about "Art" as the galloping 
cowboys whom she sings about. Artistic living as ap- 
plied to her daily lite is what concerns Mrs. Ross, and 
her surroundings, her tolerance, her capacity for work 
is a reflection of this breadth of vision, this keen desire 
for others to see the light as she see it. 

Mrs. Ross has been a professional accompanist tor 
years and has accompanied such famous artists as Mme. 
Schumann-Heink, Clarence Whitehill, Elsa Ruegger, 
Mme. Anna Ruzena Sprotte and many others. During 
the season of the Philharmonic Orchestra Concerts in 
Los Angeles, Mrs. Ross conducted analytic classes of 
the programs and they are regarded as unusually in- 
teresting and educational. As if all this is not enough 
for one woman to do and excel, Mrs. Ross is also a 
lecturer who knows her subject well and at the Ebell 
Club on Thursday, the 24th of May she will talk on 
The Aims and Ideals of American Composers. Appear- 
ing with her on this program will be Mrs. Randolph 
Hill, Sol Cohen, the violinist; Alice Forsyth Mosher, 
the lyric soprano; George Campbell, cellist; Marguerite 
Ritter, pianiste, and Hallett Gilberte, the eminent com- 
poser. 

The Los Angeles Chamber Music Society announces 
twelve concerts tor next season, the first to take place 
on Friday evening, October 26 and on alternate Fridays 
with the Philharmonic orchestra concerts as in the past. 
The programs in the main will be presented by the local 
artists who form the ensemble. They are the Philhar- 
monic quartet, Sylvain Noack, first violin; Henry Sved- 
rosky, second violin; Emile Ferir, viola, and Uya 
Bronson, violoncello. In L'Ensemble Moderne are Emile 
Ferir, viola; Henri De Buescher, oboe, and Blanche 
Rogers-Lott. piano; and in L'Ensemble Classique, 
Henry Svedrosky, violin, Emil Ferir, viola; Fritz Gail- 
lard, violoncello, and Blanche Rogers-Lott, piano. Other 
musicians appearing will be Alfred Kastner, harp; An- 
dre Marquarre, flute; Pierre Perrier, clarinet; Ernest 
Huber, double bass and others. The Society will again 
present the London String Quartet, on its way to Hono- 
lulu and Australia, and the Chamber Music Society of 
San Francisco will close the series in April. 

Miss Florence Middaugh, contralto, was soloist on two 
interesting programs during the last week. On Tuesday 
evening at the Garden Court Apartments a recital pro- 
gram was given and on Thursday evening at Fresno, she 
was the soloist at a concert given by the Fresno Male 
Chorus. Miss Middaugh will again be the soloist for the 
Los Angeles Oratorio Society when it presents the Ode 
to Music at the Hollywood Bowl on the 27th inst. 

Miss Frieda Peycke presents her gifted pupil, Miss 
Gretchen Stutzel, in a program of musical readings at 
the Kramer studios Tuesday night. May 22. 

Music Week Festival — On May 19th the executives of 
State and City will officially proclaim and inaugurate 
Music Week in Los Angeles. This Festival will hold 
forth to the 26th and will open with a pageant over 
three miles long of band floats, childrens' choruses, 
mounted guards and heralds— a spectacle of beauty, 
light and splendor. More than 2300 professional instru- 
mentalists have offered their services to make Music 
Week the greatest in the history of the State. Thirty 
concerts every noon and night are scheduled at Persh- 
ing Square and other parks in Los Angeles. Among 
those groups who will take part in this share of Music 
Week entertainment are Grauman's Orchestras from the 
Metropolitan. Rialto and Hollywood Egyptian Theatres. 
Loews State Orchestra, the California Theatre Orches- 
tra of 50 pieces, the Elks Band, the Police and Fire- 
men's Band, the Los Angeles High School Band, the 
Salvation .\rmy and Shrine Bands. 

At the Hollywood Bowl at 3 o'clock Sunday afternoon, 
May 20th, the Hollywood Community Chorus, in charge 
of Mrs. J. J. Carter, will present a community sing in- 
cludi'ng 50,000 voices, the greatest ever held at the Bowl. 
On the program tor that afternoon there will appear 
the Los Angeles Industrial Chorus, under Miss Ruth A. 
Sable, 500 N'egro voices blended in Southern melodies. 
Such nationally known artists as Charles Wakefield 
Cadman and i\Irs. Carrie Jacobs Bond will participate. 
The Los Angeles Rotary Club will carry the spirit of 
music into the Orphan Asylums, hospitals. Home for 
the Aged. Soloists, glee clubs, band and choral societies 
will visit every institution of this kind in the city. 



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A thousand concerts are planned for Music Week and 
these concerts will be offered to the lovers of music 
without a charge of any sort being made. One of the 
officials in explaining the purpose of Music Week said: 
"The War showed the world the value of music. In 
camp, on the front line and back home America said 
it with a song. Poor in national airs, a nation ricB in 
sentiment spontaneously seized the melodies of the 
people and incorporated them into its work, to make 
play of it. Two years ago Los Angeles felt the inspira- 
tion and capitalized it into a week of song. It was then 
an experiment, but the favorable reaction of an entire 
populace showed that music was an integral part of life. 

The beautiful home of Mrs. Frederick K. Stearns, at 
722 Cresent drive will be the scene of a splendid benefit 
concert. May 22, when Madame Estelle Heartt Dreyfus, 
well known contralto, will give a musical program from 
11 to 12 o'clock. The proceeds of the concert will go 
toward the building of the Beverly Hills Women's Club. 

Leopold Godowsky, famous pianist, is returning next 
week from the Orient, following a concert tour around 
the world on which he has been absent many months. 

Sylvain Noack conducted twenty-five members of the 
Philharmonic Orchestra tor Violet Romer, artistic 
dancer of Pasadena, on April 20th. 

The Philharmonic Quartet of which Mr. Sylvain 
Noack is founder and first violinist, will give interesting 
concerts June 1st in Long Beach, and May 21st in Holly- 
wood. The Philharmonic Quartet gave a concert in 
Prescott, Arizona, May 16th. 

Helena Lewyn, pianiste. and Mischa Velin, violinist, 
gave a joint recital recently at the Ambassador Theatre, 
closing the series of Spring Morning Musicales given 
under the direction of Mr. G. H. O'Brien of New York 
City. 

The Carl Bronson Singers will hold forth at the 
Gamut Theatre, presenting an unusually interesting 
program under the direction of Miss Marion Bronson, 
who will herself sing some of the scenes from Madame 
Butterfly, with Ruth Bronson as Suzuki. Carl Bronson 
will give a short talk on atmosphering art with the 
forces. Others appearing on the program are Lucy 
Merz, who with Ruth Bronson will dance some of their 
interpretative classics; Harold Salisbury, the baritone, 
will sing a group of songs; Miss Lucile Stanley will 
perform a violin group. Miss Laura DuVal will sing the 
Charpentier aria from Louise, Miss Frances R. Young, 
contralto, will sing some Hindu songs; Mr. Harrison 
Hopkins will sing a tenor aria, and Miss Nell Stegner 
will preside at the piano. 

Sibley G. Pease, secretary of the Organist's Guild, 
has announced that a convention under the auspices of 
the Guild will be held in Los Angeles the last week in 
June, to which all organists of the State of California 
are invited. 

Calmon Luboviski, violinist, will give a recital the 
evening of May 2Sth at the Ebell Club auditorium. He 
will be assisted by May McDonald Hope, pianiste. Mr. 
Luboviski will present two of his artist pupils on the 
same program, Lois Putlitz. aged 12, and Harry Zagon, 
aged 15. With them, Mr. Luboviski will play the Vivaldi 
Concerto tor three violins and piano. 



10 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



California Theatre — One o£ the finest theatre concerts 
heard in Los Angeles is presented by Carli Elinor this 
week at the California theatre. Opening the program is 
a colorful selection from Puccini's masterful opera La 
Boheme. Puccini's music is modern without being ultra- 
modern, and as played by Elinor, tlie score contains 
melodies of the most appealing kind. The second selec- 
tion is number 5 of the suite of Hungarian dances by 
Brahms. This dance is particularly well adapted to an 




orchestra of the type of Elinor's and the conductor has 
given the selection all that can be asked for. November 
Rose, the closing number on the concert program is 
one of the new type of fox trots that are becoming a 
rage with the lovers of the modern dance. The melody, 
animated and easily remembered, is harmonized so as 
to accentuate the melodic pattern but its chief reason 
for popularity is the varied and seductive rhythms. 



YOUR PROGRAM 



By Anil Deep 
The compiling of your concert program is a difBcuIt, 
though pleasurable, task, involving thought and re- 
search that it may be artistic, educational and of gen- 
eral interest. A few of the main factors follow. The 
first consideration is to select songs which suit you — 
your voice, temperament and, as far as possible, per- 
sonality. Grade your ability and never sing any number 
which taxes all you possess: or you will never be able 
to impart that finished and satisfying lustre so neces- 
sary to your audience's full enjoyment. Sing no song 
because others do, sing it only if you like it so well you 
would rather be singing that, at the time, than any 
other song written; in this way only can you find its 
life and soul, for a fine song contains and should ex- 
press both. 

Beware of transposed versions; with few exceptions 
a song, particularly a well written one, is suitable only 
for the type of voice tor which it was originally in- 
tended. This is especially true of our old classics. Their 
writers understood voice and wrote accordingly. The 
program should include songs by our noted American 
composers, some of our local composers being among 
the best of them. 

A few light numbers always include, they add piquan- 
cy and vim to any program, besides which they are 
like small diamonds set in your platinum ring (be sure 
they are diamonds and not paste) and throwing into 
full relief your stone of many carats. This stone i. e. 
your large or heavy number, should never be selected 
haphazard, nor should it be a number you have only 
been personally acquainted with for a few months. You 
should have known and worked on it from three to 
five years at least if you expect to extract its true es- 
sence. So, you sing it, not as a number learned but 
as one you individually conceived and extemporaneously 
present. This should be true in a relative manner of 
each and every song you sing. 

Classics, yes, not alone the old reliables, but if your 
choice of songs be well selected, they should all be, in 
their way, classics, if not of this generation, a tew 
later. In compiling, use contrast, life itself is made of 
such; the darkness of night makes the sunlight seem 
doubly bright. 

Once your numbers are selected, sing, sing, sing them 
over hundreds of times, not always with an instrument 
accompanying you. Sing your whole program away 
from it, this way you can be sure of commanding its 
control and not vice versa. Then, if the real love be in 
your heart, you will enjoy a happiness beyond all 
earthly ones; the happiness of feeling you are giving out 
that which has been showered on you. 



ROSE FLORENCE— Mezzo Soprano 



CONCERT— VOICE PLACING— COACHING 



Studio:— 545 Sutter Street 



Management —L. E. Behymer, 70S Auditorium Building, Los Angele. 



Telephone Kearny 3598 



CHALIAPIN SINGS DIVERSIFIED PROGRAM 

Impressed with the unusual interest shown in Rus- 
sian songs, and assured by Manager Selby C. Oppen- 
heimer, who conferred with him in Los Angeles last 
week, that he will be greeted in San Francisco by audi- 



ences of nearly ten thousand people at each of his 
recitals in the Exposition Auditorium, tomorrow after- 
noon and again on Monday night. May 28th, Feodor 
Chaliapin, the superb Russian singing artist, has con- 
sented to deviate in a measure from his usual program 
policy of following inspiration in the choice of his songs. 
When Oppenheimer explained to Chaliapin that there 
had been so many requests from singers and students 
to know just what songs and arias might be given to- 
morrow, so that they might familiarize themselves with 
the Russian musical texts, the famous Russian consent- 
ed to mark in his "Word Book'' some forty songs and 
arias, from which he will choose the twenty-five or odd 
songs that he will use tomorrow, thus restricting his 
program from selections from a full two hundred com- 
positions to a limit of the choicest morsels in his reper- 
toire. In choosing these forty Chaliapin says it still 
leaves him the opportunity to follow his mood, or as he 
puts it himself, "The dictation of his heart." 

His list contains three of Moussorgsky's greatest 
songs, including the Dance of Death and Midnight 
Burial of a Friend. Among the others that are marked 
are Tschaikowsky's Night and the Nightingale, Racham- 
ninoff's aria from the quaint gypsy opera Aleko, love 
melodies by Glazounow, Dargomijinski, Kennemann, 
Rubinstein, Korganoft, Lisbin, etc. Then there will be 
the famous Volga Boatman's Song, Glinka's Midnight 
Review and Schumann's Two Grenadiers. When the 
King Goes Forth to War and The Song of the Flea, the 
two remarkable Russian compositions which Chaliapin 
has given on all of his programs in this country, will 
of course be included in the fare that he will serve to 
San Franciscans. Works by Beethoven, Schubert and 
Grieg, as well as Mozart's lovely Register aria from Don 
Juan are also promised gems. 

Max Rabinowitsch, the celebrated Russian pianist, 
will serve in the double capacity of accompanist and 
assisting artist at the Chaliapin recitals. Rabinowitsch 
is said to be a pianist of unusual gifts, and to capably 
uphold the standards and traditions of the Chaliapin 
entertainments. His programmed contributions for to- 
morrow include Goldstein's paraphrase on a Strauss 
Waltz, a Chopin Valse and an etude by Scriabin. 
Chaliapin will appear three times on the program, which 
is oftener than is his habit of appearing on recital pro- 
grams anywhere, for each group in which he sings con- 
sists sometimes of as many as a dozen selections. To- 
morrow's program promises a memorable day for those 
who attend, and it is promised that for his recital on 
May 28th, Chaliapin will render a program almost en- 
tirely different from tomorrow's event, yet including 
those of his numbers which register immediate popu- 
larity. 

Tomorrow's tickets are obtainable at Sherman, Clay 
& Co.'s store today. In the morning four ticket win- 
dows will be opened at the Auditorium at ten o'clock, 
and at one-thirty eight doors will be opened so as to 
handle the throngs expeditiously and to avoid crowding. 



Articles of General Musical Interest 



^ Pocillc 



These arli. 
Muxlrnl Revieiv by LeRoy V. Brant, director of The 
Institute of Music of San Jose. Mr. llrant Ti-IU be 
pleased to treat here subjects of general musical 
Interest. Anyone desiring an article on any par- 
i'^rJi "■'';''''■.'.. "!"'■ ^"""""nicnte with Mr. Brant, 
care The Institute of Music, South Second street 
at .San Salvador, San Jose. 



AN ANALYTICAL DISCUSSION OF MODERN 
MUSICAL TENDENCIES 

(Continued from last week) 

The line between dissonance and consonance is not 
at all sharply drawn. When we sound a single note we 
have as nearly a perfect consonance as it is possible 
to get. When we sound the note with its octave we still 
have a good consonance. When we sound the fifth, the 
third, the sixth, we still have consonance, though 
not so perfect. When we sound the minor seventh we 
enter the realm of dissonance, though this same minor 
seventh used in combination with certain other tones 
produces a beautiful effect. When we use the ninth we 
have still more dissonance, though that is still one of 
the most beautiful of chords, when properly used. And 
so we might multiply instances, and point out no more 
than that which has already been suggested, that dis- 
sonance is largely relative. 

Yet, it would appear, there must be some point at 
which the benefits of dissonance are overbalanced by its 
bad features. And here is where the whole argument 
of the racdernist begins. More of that later. 

We next proceed to the matter of the outstanding 
features of our present system of music. I think it would 
be safe to say that any thoughtful musician would say 
that tonality is the greatest single feature of our present 
system; that is, the system of Bach, Beethoven, and 
Brahms. By tonality, I mean the setting of some par- 
ticular note as the keynote about which a composition 
is evolved. 

It appears to me that it is unnecessary to argue as 
to the benefits we have derived from our system of 
tonality. The beautiful effects, the shades of contrast, 
the suggestions of strength, which we have been able 



/^ KAJETAN ATTL 


/JT ^B\ SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 


^jp SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 


l^Hp^^W/ ^or Concert Elnsaeements 

^ y Secretary and Manager of 

\ y K. A (II, Room 1004 Kohler 

& Chase BIdE,, San Francisco 


Western Representative of Lyon & Healy Harps 


Telephone Douelas 1678 



SieHajelica 

COLORATURA SOPRANO 1 



800 KOHLER CHASE DLDG 
SAN FIXANCISCO 



IL 



€: 






to derive by the use of this system speak tor them- 
selves. Still, the world moves on, and modernists tell 
us that we must throw overboard much of that which 
we have cherished in music, among other things our 
system of tonality. And what do we answer? 

It appears to me that we are facing a period in com. 
position when the field of tonality is to be greatly en- 
larged. Almost every great composer, acknowledged as 
such, has gone further along these lines than his prede- 
cessors. Beethoven surely went boldly ahead of the mark 
set by Mozart, and Brahms went even further than Bee- 
thoven. I may say in passing, however, that the question 
as to whether Beethoven produced more beautiful music 
than that of Mozart is one which is open to debate. How- 
ever that may be. it is almost sure that there are effects 
to be had, and beauties to be experienced, by the en- 
larging of the fields of tonality, and that our modern 
composers, and those yet unborn, will search out these 
fields, and use that material which they find. Some of 
our modernists tell us, however, that we must entirely 
do away with the idea of tonality. They say that we 
should use a twelve-toned scale, and consider nothing as 
a keycenter. It appears to me that in this the advocate 
of the system defeats his own end. He desires greater 
freedom, and he desires new effects. If he has no 
keycenter he is not taking on himself a new garment, 
but using that which was discarded by the mighty Bach 
several hundred years ago. In the days of long ago 
there was no such thing as tonality, and although the 
lack of tonality as it then existed and the same thing as 
it would now be suggested differ in some respects in the 
main essentials the two system would be alike. 

On tlie other hand the employment of tonality, but in 
a much freer manner, will give to future composers a 
device for novelty, and also doubtless real artistic 
beauty, such as they will find will produce the effects 
they so much desire. I do not state this as a settled 
fact, but merely as my opinion reached after a good 
deal of thought. 



THE LORING CLUB 

The fourth and concluding concert of the forty-sixth 
season of The Loring Club is announced for the evening 
of Tuesday, May 22, at the Scottish Rite Auditorium. 

The program contains a number of important compo- 
sitions for men's voices, among these being Arthur 
Foote's Bedouin Song and The Farewell of Hiawatha 
(in which the solo will be sung by James E. Ziegler). 
The Song of the Sou-wester and The Little Admiral by 
Charles Villiers Stantard, the soloists in those two 
being P. H. Ward and George Krull and Rheinberger's 
Saint John's Eve. 

Among the compositions new 'to The Loring Club 
programs to be sung on this occasion are Edwin Schultz' 
Forest Harps, the tenor soloist in which will be G. A. 
Rogers, and Barnby's Sweet and Low as arranged for 
chorus of men's voices by John Hyatt Brewer. 

Another feature will be Mair's Suorai's Song, an mv.tr- 
com^panied chorus sometimes in eight parts; while I). li, 
Moody's setting of Clarence Urmy's lyric Dusk is ni 
special interest in that this is a setting of lines of a 
California poet by a member of The Loring Club; and 
by request Henry Hadley's The Musical Trust will be 
included in the program. Mr. Ziegler will sing a group 
of songs by Wallace A. Sabin and Frederick Mauer, 
accompanied by the composers. 

The accompaniments will be Benjamin Moore, piano, 
and eight strings with William F. Laraia as principal 
violin, the concert being directed by Mr. Sabin. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ROSA PONSELLE'S TRIUMPH 

iC.ntinued from page 1. column 4) 

mentalist in his piano work. His Wag- 
nerian transcription lacked positiveness 
and torce. Teclinically. too, he did not 
always overcome obstacles with ease and 
craftsmanship. But as accompanist he 
proved quite a dependable pillar for the 
soloist to lean upon. The second Ponselle 
concert will take place at the Civic Audi- 
torium on Wednesday evening. May 23rd 
when the following program will be pre- 
sented: Aria from William Tell (Ros- 
sini), Rosa Ponselle; (a) Nel Cor Piu 
non mi sento (G. Paisiello), (b) Chi Vuol 
la Zingarella (1741-1S16) (G. Paisiello), 
(c) Stille Thranen (Schumann), (d) 
Celle je le prefere (Fourdrain), Rosa 
Ponselle; Wotan's Farewell and Magic 
Fire Music from Die Walkure (Wagner- 
Tyroler), William Tyroler; Aria, Ernani 
Involami from Ernani (Verdi), Rosa 
Ponselle; (a) Spinning Song from The 
Flying Dutchman (Wagner), (b) Dedica- 
tion (Schumann-Liszt), William Tyroler; 
(a) At the Ball (Tschaikowsky), (b) A 
Memory (Rudolph Ganz), (c) The Piper 
of Love (Molly Carew), Rosa Ponselle. 



ALCAZAR THEATRE 

"Johnny Get Your Gun," a rollicking 
comedy of thrills and satire, which had 
Its premier at the Alcazar, will again be 
the attraction at that theatre beginning 
next Sunday matinee. May 20th. The play 
was written especially for Louis Benni- 
son, who is now filling a starring engage- 
ment at the O'Farrell street playhouse. 
It is the work of Edmund Lawrence 
Burke, and after a noteworthy success 
here, it was presented in New York, en- 
joying a long run. 

Bennison won fame and success with 
this vehicle throughout the country and 
in it he will be found at his best. He will 
be seen as Johnny Wiggins, a big-hearted 
cow-puncher who turns stunt rider for a 
movie outfit. His delineation of this part 
gained for him the commendation of the 
dramatic critics of the nation and started 
him on the road to stardom. 

Fun of the bright breezy sort, mingled 
with distinctly novel and original situa- 
tions and rapid fire developments com- 
bine to make "Johnny Get Your Gun" an 
unusual entertaining offering. Indeed, 
there are said to be laughs in nearly 
every line. 

Nana Bryant will have a delightful 
role as the leading feminine characteriza- 
tion, and an augmented cast is required. 

This week Bennison is giving a clever 
interpretation of the dual role in "The 
Masquerade!-," which is enjaylng good 
business. The final performance will be 
given Saturday night. 



THE ONLY GIRL AT THE RIVOLI 

An Unusually Entertaining Farce to Be 

Feature at Hartman-Steindorff 

Comic Opera Co. 

The exceptionally successful musical 
farce. The Only Girl, will be the next 
Rivoli production. This is the third of 
a series of the lighter productions which 
Ferris Hartman and Paul Steindorff are 
to stage during the spring and summer 
season. The Only Girl is unique among 
light operas by reason of the fat't that it 
combines a consistent and humorous plot 
with an exceptionally brilliant score. The 
piece may be described as a musical rom- 
ance. The plot concerns a woman-hating 
author and a man-hating female com- 
poser. Through circumstances they are 
drawn together and eventually disillu- 
sionize each other. The big comedy 
scenes in the piece, however, take place 
in the disillusionment which follows the 
marriage of three idealistic bachelors. 
The scene in which they describe the 
merits of their fiancees and the follow- 
ing scene in which they relate their ad- 
ventures after marriage are among the 
funniest ever written tor the American 
stage. 

The enormously popular song. When 
You're Away, is one of the musical num- 
bers in The Only Girl. Another song 
which has attained wide popularity is the 
topical number called When You Got a 
Ball and Chain Around Your Ankle. The 
Only Girl is the sort of a show that is 
guaranteed to provide a laugh a minute. 
It is ideally adapted for theatre parties. 



It your organization has not yet taken 
advantage of the generous profit-sharing 
terms offered by the Rivoli, it will pay 
you to get in touch with Mr. Grandjean, 
the Treasurer, at the earliest possible 
moment. Attention of the Rivoli patrons 
is also called by the management to the 
fact tha't the regular Sunday matinee has 
been eliminated and a special bargain 
matinee substituted for Wednesday, at 
which all seats are placed on sale at 25 
and 50 cents. 



Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 

Concert and Church Singing in all 

languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 
Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languages 

5302 Broadway .... Oakland 

Mrs. William Steinbach 

VOICE CULTURE 

Studio: 

902 KOHLER A CH.l$E: BLDG. 

^RII PrnnolN<*o Phone: Kenrny K4!M 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE S.\N FKAXCISCO BANK) 

SAVINCS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and .\ssociated .Savings 

Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees* Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission and 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7lh Ave. 

HAICHT STREET BRANCH Haiglit and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter \^7A} 

per cent per annum was declared for the six months 

ending December 31st, 1922. 

INTEREST WILL HEREAFTER BE COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 
INSTEAD OF SEMI-ANNUALLY AS HERETOFORE. 



ADCLE ULMA.N 



Laura Werthelmber 

Preparatory Teacher fop 

Mrs. Noah nrandt 

21t Seott St. Telephone Fillmore 152 

EDWIN HUTCHINGS 



KURT VON GRUDZINSKI Evelyn Sresovich Ware 



B.VRITOXE — VOICE CLLTUKE 

Aothorixed to Teach Mnie. Schoen- 

Rene'n Method 

1314 Leavenworth St. Phone Prospect 9253 



Phnne Kear 



ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY Joseph George Jacobson 



Phone Berkeley 600«. 



PIANO 

St. Phone Fillmore 348 



MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
Koliler & Cliase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 



PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

BOS Kobler & Chnie Bid. Tel, Salter 7387 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 

Studio, e03-«04 KOHI.ER & CHASE BLDG. 

Phone Kearny^ &454 

MRS. CHARLES POULTER. 

SOPRANO St. Andrews Chareb 

Voice Cnltnre. Piano. S88 27th St., Oak- 
land. Tel. 2079. Kohler & Chase Bids., 
Wednesdays Tel. Kearny 54rV4. 

ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 



Oakland. Tel. Pledn 



MARION RAMON WILSON 

DR.tMATIC CONTRALTO 

cesses In America. Address I.SOI California 
St.. San Francisco. Telephone Prospect :{ti20 

Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGING 



MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 

Annoances the opening of her new Resi- 
dence Stndio, Clark Apt*.. .\pt. 28 — 138 
Hyde St., San Francisco. Phone Prospect 
0O31. Fridays. »02 Kohler iS: Chase Bids. 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRALTO 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

GRADUATE OF SCHOL.t CANTORUM, 

PARIS 

ORGAMIST ST. MARY'S CATHBDBAIr 

Piano Depnrtaient. Haailln Scho«l 
Or»»n and Piano. Arrlllaga Mnslcal Collfga 

ESTHER MUNDELL 

SOPRANO .\ND TE.ACHER 

Pupil of 

De Reszke and Percy Hector Stephens 

Studio. 703 Heine Blde» 408 Stockton St. 

Res. Sttidio — 004 Second Avenue 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 



Phone Filln 

SIGMUND BEEL 

Master Classes for Violin 

Studio BulldinE, 1373 Post Street 

Tel. Prospect 7.'»7 

MARY ALVERTA MORSE 



SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

(Ada Clement .Mu»ic School) 
34.^r» Saerameino wt. Phone h'lllniore SftW 

MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of SInKlnE. 32 Lorclta Ave., Pied- 
mont. Tel. Piedmont 304. Mon., Kohler .£ 
Chase Bldg„ S. F. Telephone Kearny .%4M. 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 



HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano SololMt, Temple Gmana El. Con- 
cert and Church \Vork. Vocal Instrnc- 
tlon. 3.1311 Clay St., Phone Weat 4800. 

MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 



EVA GARCIA 

CONCERT PIANIST. ACC(>MP.\NIST 

AND TEACHER 

Studio: 4100 Piedmont Ave. Tel. Pied. 2750. 

Residence: 4I.',3 Howe St, Oakland 
Tel. Pled. 3492 

ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 

Violinist and Teacher. Head of Aiolin Dcpt., 



RUTH DEGNAN 

PUPIL OF GIACOMO AND MME. 

MINKOWSKI 

TE.\CHI5R OK VOICE 

S42S Pine St- Tel. West 7012 

TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 



HENRIK GJERDRUM 

2321 Jackson St. Phone Fillmore 3256 



JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
2027 California St. Tel. Fillmore 3827 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Park 1974 

MARJORIE E. YOUNG 

1463 Fulton Street. Fillmore 2657 

MARGARET WHITE COXON 

149 Rose Av., Oakland Piedmont 1608-W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue— Park 341 



DOROTHY PASMORE 
1715 Vallejo St. Phone West 1S95 



MACKENZIE GORDON 

2832 Jackson Street Phone West 457 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott St. Phone West 1347 

ANDRE PtFirtieFt 

1470 Washington St. Tel. Franklin 3321 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 
1005 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K. 5454 

MARGARET BRUNTSCH 

70 Piedmont St. Phone Park ."469 

MME. M. TROMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 

JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 
601 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 



OTTO RAUHUT 
357 Arguello Blvd. Phone Pacific 3561 



HOTHER WISMER 

3701 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4974 



ARTHUR CONRADI 

906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6454 



SIR HENRY HEYWAN 

434 Spruce St. Tel. Fillmore 1131 

REED .\.ND MOUTHPIECE MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 

789 Mission St, Sutter 6356 

If you want to become known to the 
musical public of California, advertise in 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

on the Programs of Distinguished Amepican Artists 

Published by 

G. SCHIRMER, JOHN CHURCH CO., THE BOSTON MUSIC COMPANY, 

THE COMPOSERS' MUSIC CORPORATION 

Songs for All Voices, New Publications of the Composers' Music Corporation 

THE CRY OF THE ORIENT TOMORROW 

THE FOREST OF DREAMS 

A CYCLE OF SIX— SONGS OF THE LITTLE DAYS 

For Sale at the Leading Music Houses 



espotiltlon of technical 



From The Very Beginning, By Phyllis Lucy Keyes 

'reNentf* fiinilanicntui muNic prfnciplCN In a definite and lueld way, commenelne 
vlth flrnl-Krade pleeen bul i>roKre»»lnB rapidly I 
ind exprcMHlon prolileniN and ihe creation of eood taMte. 
PKICk;. OOc. 

HENRY GROBE, 135-1S3 Kearny Street. 

Representath'C for the Clayton F. Suinmy Publicolions. 



MAUD G. McFAUL 

ACCtlltlPANIST 

1128 Cheatnot Street 

Telephone Proapect 4932 



If a Music Journal is worth while to 
extend courtesies it should be worth 
while to subscribe for. 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 

Teacher of Singing 

Are you Nntiftfled with your teacher? 
Can he place you before the public? 
Are you MatUfled with your progreuft? 






'JAWf" 

If in doubt, consult Mr. Boga 
Europe 'fvith the tenchem of 
BlHpham, etc. 

Pupils prepared for Opera, Oratorio. Church and 
Concert. 



24. 1»2», about "Chnrlela 



Qonstance <iAlexandre 

Mezzo Soprano 

Pupils Accepted 

Inquiries made at 

801 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Phone Kearny 6464 



Resident Artists who wish to secure engagements 
through managers and music clubs next season should 
announce their plans NOW as bookings are made im- 
mediately before the end of this season and during the 
summer months. 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 

Endorsed by WasTC Swayne 

Special Normal Course for Teachers, based on Swayne 

Principles 

Studios 807 Kohler A Ckase Bldv- 

2518H Etna St.. Berkeley. Phone Berkeley 181<» 



PONSELLE 

Sensationally Successful Singer 

AT BARGAIN PRICES 

SOc to $1.00 
Front Rows, Main Floor, $2.00 

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23, AT 8:30 P. M. 
EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

Tickets at Sherman, Clay & Company 
Management Frank W. Healy 



Leslie V. Harvey 

Organist 
Coliseum Theatre 



SCHUMANN HEINK 

STEINWAY PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

Season 1922-23 — Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 



The 
PIANOFORTE 



There is a subtle satisfaction in knowing 
that one's possessions, whatever their nature, 
are of superlative excellence. 

A Gobelin tapestry or a da Vinci painting is 
a constant source of pleasure and bears testi- 
mony to the taste of its owner. To the music 
lover the same is true in the possession of a 
Mason & Hamlin Piano. 

Those who are musically sensitive, whose 
appreciation of tonal quality renders them 
competent to judge, pronounce the Mason & 
Hamlin Piano the leading instrument of its 
kind. 

Dame Melba, richly endowed with musical 
discrimination, says in this connection: "It 
seems to me that the preference on the part of 
an individual for the Mason & Hamhn Piano 
is indicative of a superior musical nature." 

Only an actual hearing can give a realization 
of its beauty of tone. 




two entrances 

135-153 Kearny & 217-225 Sutter Sts. 

victor talking machines 




WE INVITE A HEARING 



^gy'BAUeD® 



MASON & HAMLIN PIANOS - 




Oakland — 1209 Washington Street 

San Jose — 199 South First 

sheet music 



'^'""'ic. nan, ^ 



LOS ANGELES MUSIUL REVIEW SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 




rtr ^u^t 




IJJ THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOUR,NAL INLTHE GREAT WE5T §1 



VOL. XLIV. No. 8 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, MAY 26, 1923. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



CHALIAPIN'S VOICE AND ART MAKE SENSATIONAL IMPRESSION 



Six Thousand Cheering Music Lovers Pay Homage to Distinguished Russian Basso — Artist Mingles Beauty of Voice With 
Emphatic Emotional Declamation and Very Plastic Facial Expression — Does Not Indulge in Needless Exaggera- 
tions — Tone Production, Breathing, Diction and Intonation Represent Highest Ideals of Vocal Art — Is 
Master in Attaining Thrilling Climaxes — Predominates in Exploitation of Russian Folk Songs 
and Operatic Arias — Reveals Striking Contrasts in Alternating Pathos and Humor 

BY ALFRED METZGER 



About six thousand mu.sic lovers assembled at the 
Exposition Auditorium last Sunday afternoon to welcome 
Feodor Chaliapin, announced prior to his visit as Russia's 
greatest singer. Since we have not heard every great 
singer hailing from Russia and since there are many 
great Russian artists of all varieties of musical en- 
deavor we do not know whether Chaliapin is Russia's 
greatest singer, furthermore we do know it is impossible 
to regard any artist as the greatest in the world. But 
we do know that Chaliapin is certainly a master of his 
craft and an artist of rare accomplishments, even of 
genius, after hearing him last Sunday. Right in the 
beginning we must say that we received a pleasant sur- 
prise when Chaliapin began to sing. Judging from other 
so-called acting Russian singers more especially after 
hearing Vladimir Rosing, we expected that Chaliapin 
would employ the same exaggeration, the same top- 
heavy dramatic frenzy, the same disregard for vocal 
beauty that some of these ultra modem vocalists have 
displayed. It was with a deep sense of relief that we 
found Chaliapin following strictly within the legitimate 
lines of artistic vocal expression. 

In the first place he has a magnificent, rolling, res- 
onant and flexible bass voice of a somewhat heavier 
timbre than that of a basso cantante and a somewhat 
lighter quality than that of a basso profundo. However, 
the vastness of the auditorium may have affected the 
volume and compass of the voice so that in a smaller 
space it may assume the characteristics of a profundo 
voice. But above all notwithstanding the ponderous 
character of the voice it was handled with a lightness of 
"touch" as it were and an eveness in passing from the 
low to the middle and from the middle to the high 
tones which only the greatest artists reveal in their 
performances. 

There are so many excellent Qualities in Mr. Chalia- 
pin's vocal expressions and there are so many students 
that should be able to appreciate these qualities that 
we are greatly tempted to enumerate them in the order 
of their introduction to our senses. First of all we noted 
a magnificent mezzo voce and judiciously covered high 
tones. It is easy enough to sing loud, but to sing soft 
and retain the color and sonority and character of voice 
— that is the acme of singing. The high tones of even 
the greatest bassos are not always pure and clear, but 
those of Chaliapin are the essence of vocal beauty, 
flexibility and pliancy. His head tones are examples of 
tonal purity and the resonance of his middle and low 
tones is indeed a feast to behold. At no time does 
Chaliapin's voice lose its robust character as a genuine 
basso, and nevertheless it is applied with equal effect 
to dramatic and lyric situations. 

The variety of his expression is a marvel to behold. 
There is nothing in the gamut of emotions that does 
not receive realistic interpretation at the hands of this 
great singer. Humor and pathos, tears and laughter, 
sorrow and satyre all receive their attention in a man- 
ner that is never lost by his audience which hangs 
eagerly on every tone that escapes his throat. And 
while Chaliapin occasionally emphasizes specially ac- 
centuated sentiments with vivid facial expression and 
occasional dramatic gestures, he never exaggerates 
these elocutionary accents unduly, nor in a manner to 
mar the artistic finesse of his delivery. Whatever ges- 
ture or mimicry is employed by Chaliapin is merly an 
attempt to put on a little heavier color when the occa- 
sion demands. And this slight difference between exag- 
geration and natural verisimilitude of emotional ex- 
pression represents the highest form of declamatory 
art. The difference between artistic "vulgarity" or 
"coarseness" and refinement is so small that most mod- 
ern singers fail to remain on the straight line. 

Another most admirable trait in Chaliapin's vocal art 
is his truly extraordinary breath control. His sustained 
tones are marvels of evenness and exactitude of pitch. 
In the Volga Boat Song he begins one of these sustained 
tones, holds it in one breath and before ending attains 
a truly thrilling crescendo — all in one breath. He did 
this several times during the afternoon and every time 
with a perfection of execution that was truly admirable. 



Another decidedly remarkable trait of Chaliapin's vocal 
art is bis diction. At the time the Russian Opera Com- 
pany was here we received the impression that the 
Russian language was unpleasantly gutteral and nasal. 
No such impression could have been received from 
Chaliapin's enunciation. It was musical, and reminded 
one somewhat of the Italian. And by the way when 
singing in Italian Chaliapin strangely enough became 
occasionally just a bit nasal in his enunciation, while in 
Russian this quality never asserted itself. 

Of course his Russian folk songs and operatic arias 
proved to be the most authoritative and moat impressive 
phase of his performance. Without undue exaggeration 
he obtains the depth of emotionalism that other so-called 
modern Russian artists only obtain with the most an- 
noying exertion of muscular power. His attainment of 
humorous effects is the acme of refinement, as for 




pho 



■ianlHt Who 
Ovnlion After Playing the 
■iient of the TNehaikowMky 
I H llh the People's Sym- 



ehe» 



Re 



instance in his matchless interpretation of the Song of 
the Flea which might so easily become coarse but 
which under Chaliapin's skillful treatment attains a 
most unique phase of refined humor. His manner of 
laughing in itself is a work of art. 

In addition to his thoroughly artistic expression and 
exemplary mode of singing Chaliapin was the personifi- 
cation of graciousness and gentility. A disarming smile 
wreathed his countenance every time he entered the 
stage and notwithstanding the apparent greed and 
rapacity of his audience that seemed never to get 
enough Chaliapin never for a moment lost his equanim- 
ity and good nature. He is singer, actor, gentleman and 
showman combined. No wonder the auditorium rang 
with the cheers of the audience and huge crowds sur- 
rounded the stage after the conclusion of the program 
overwhelming the great basso with ovations and demon- 
strative exhibition of admiration. 

Max Rabinowitsch played the accompaniments. He 
proved to be an artist of rare attainments during his 
task of accompanying Chaliapin. He accentuated every 
nuance of emotion. He followed the spirit of the com- 
position. He fathomed the depths of the artist's varying 



moods. In short his pianistic assistance was more in the 
form of an ensemble performance than a detached in- 
strumental interpretation besides the soloist's vocal 
effort. As soloist, however, Mr. Rabinowitsch did not 
quite attain the heights that distinguished his accom- 
paniments. The Strauss waltz lacked definite accents 
and suave phrasing. In addition it was somewhat too 
fast. Technically the artist is certainly most facile. 
He employs the explosive touch the hammer-like 
application of the finger tips on the keys, instead of 
the newer school of pressure-touch which really pro- 
duces a more soft and velvety tone quality. Technically 
nothing is too difficult nor too swift for him. He plays 
quick chromatic runs and octaves with a velocity and 
accuracy truly astounding. It is only in his deliberate- 
ness of phrasing and adequate accentuation in solo 
numbers wherein we can not always agree with him. 

Mr. Chaliapin selected his songs from a repertoire of 
seventy-six. Following are the numbers he interpreted: 
Song — A Toast to the Sun and to Love (Glazounow), 
Aleko (Rachmaninoff), The Two Grenadiers (Schu- 
mann), The Midnight Review (Glinka), The Govern- 
ernmont Clerk (Dargomizhsky), Oh Could I But Express 
in Song (Malashkin), My Dwelling Place (Aufenthalt) 
(Schubert), Aria, Pretty Lady from Don Giovanni 
(Mozart), In Questa Toniba (Beethoven), Russian Con- 
vict Song (Folk Song arranged by Karatigin), She 
Laughed (Lishin), When the King Went Forth to War 
(Koeneman), Volga Boat Song (Russian Folk Song 
adapted by Kennemann), Mephisto's Song of the Flea 
(Moussorgsky), and a Russian Folk Song which is not 
in the book. Altogether he sang fifteen songs and two 
or three encores after the conclusion of the program. 

We should like to add that we have never heard In 
Questa Tomba sung more impressively. It was a won- 
derful demonstration of legato singing, The Two Grena- 
diers and She Laughed (Sie lachte) were heard here 
by Dr. Wullner, but Chaliapin gave them an entirely dif- 
ferent interpretation and yet just as impressive and 
gripping, attaining truly thrilling climaxes. The Govern- 
ment clerk was indeed an example of humorous inter- 
pretation. You simply could not help laughing. If you 
Iiave not heard Chaliapin sing that bouffo aria from 
Don Giovanni you really have no conception what 
.Mozart singing means when done by a great basso. It 
was the acme of limpidity and grace. It was irresisti- 
ble. Schubert's Afenthalt seemed to us a bit too heavy 
and also a bit too fast. Somehow the purely lyric char- 
acter of the song and its dainty poetry was not quite 
attained by the artist. In the Russian Boat Song, The 
Volga, Chaliapin attained quite an effect in crescendo 
and diminuendo describing the approach, the passing 
and departure of the boatman. It was splendidly done. 



MARION FRAZER'S ARTISTIC SUCCESS 

Miss Marion Frazer. the exceptionally gifted young 
pianist, who has forged ahead so rapidly in this part 
of the State, "joth as artist and teacher, was the soloist 
with the People's Symphony Orchestra under the direc- 
tion of Alexander Saslavsky recently and scored a de- 
cided triumph. She played the first movement of the 
Tschaikowsky concerto and aroused her audience to 
well justified demonstrations of enthusiasm. Her tech- 
nical as well as emotional faculties thoroughly fitted 
her to give this brilliant composition an adequately 
artistic interpretation. The enthusiasm she aroused was 
real as could easily be ascertained from the spontaneous 
and prolonged applause. Anna Cora Winchell had this 
to say of Miss Frazer's interpretation in her review of 
the concert published on April 27th in the San Francisco 
Journal: "Miss Marion Frazer, still a very young girl, 
if one may judge by her unsophisticated manner, played 
the Tschaikowsky B fiat minor concerto. Its technical 
exactions are tremendous and the young, supple fingers 
demonstrated a remarkable combination of strength and 
flexibility. Passages which challenge experience were 
given with clarity and double octaves were taken with 
a rapidity almost unbelievable and with great evenness.'' 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



STEINWAY 

The Instrument of the Immortals 



When you buy a 
STEINWAY, you 

know that you will 
never have to buy 
another piano. 




ShermanMay& Go. 



Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Sts., Oakland 

Sacramento - Stockton - Fresno - San Jose 

Portland - Seattle - Tacoma - Spokane 




GEORGIA KOBER 

ame:rican pianist 

studio: 30r>-Mr. Sutter St. 
Tel. KearnT 5903, IVeanesdays and Thursdaya 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



Arrillaga Musical College 

V. de Arrillasa, Director 
A. I.. Arttsues, Pres.t LouU Aleerln, Vtce-Prea. 
Unexeelled facilities for the Mtudr of music in ail 
its brnnelics. Large Pipe Orgran. Recital Hail. 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
San Francisco, Cal. Plione n'est 4737 



Msinning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING, Director 
3242 Washlnston Street Telephone Fiilmor 



DOUGLAS SOULE.-Pianist 



and E. Robert Schmltx ( Nen York). Studio: IU05 
Kohler & Chase Bide., Wed. & Sat. MornlnKS. Tel. 
Kearnr S4&4. Res. phone Piedmont 7««. 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacb«r of Plnno. Orsan, Harmony. OreanLit and Mnvlcal 
Director of Flmt Prenbyterlan Chnrch. Alameda. Home 
Stvdio: HIT PART STRRETT. ALAMEDA. Telephone Ala- 



«da 155. ThnrBdaya. Merrln 



Oakhuid. Telephone Piedmont 2T7a. 



chool, 5(»7 Eldorado Ave., 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGORY, Direotor 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ACCOMPANIST 



OllU'lal organist I':xnosltIon 
and choir director St. Lulcc 
orgianist ConiC^reeatlon Beth 



Auflltorlum, OTstmlHt 

's Episcopal Church, 

Israel. Plnno and 

>ach. Available for 



Studio, 1915 Sacramento Street 
Telephone West 3753 



LILLIAN BIRMINGHAM 

Contralto 
Teacher of Singing. Complete Course of Operatic Traln- 
Ing. 2730 Pierce St. Tel. FUlmore 4553. 

MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

ITALIAN VOCAL TEACHER 



—Endorsed by Bon 
in Dramatic Depor 
3nd Spanish spoke 
studio— 4U4 Coloni 



th Caruso and Tetrazzlnl 
•aches pupils vocally and 
—Italian, English, French 

ve„ Phone Garfield 227U 



MR. and MRS. GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 



Dominican College School of Music 

SAN R.VFAEI,, CALIFORNIA 

Music Courses Thoroueh and Prosrressive 

Puhllc School Music. Accredited Diploma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 



MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 



MADAM MACKAY-CAISTELL 

COXCERT COACH — VOCAI, TECHNIQUE 
SIIPER-DICTIOV 
Director Calvary Presbyterian Chornt Society. 



Furthe 



Inforn 



AVe 



1000. 



RESIDENT ARTISTS who are available for concert 
tours during the season 1923-1924 will please register 
with the Pacific Coast Musical Review so that we are 
able to recommend them to music clubs, music schools 
and managers. Only artists of reputation and experience 
are eligible for registration. 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

OrpanUt Temple Emanu Bi, First Church of Christ Scl- 
entUt, Director Loring Club. S. F., U'ed„ 1617 California! 
St.. Phone Franlflla 2«(Ktt Sat.. First Christian Science 
Church. Phone Franklin 1307 1 Res. studio* 3142 Lewlstoa i 
A^e.. Berkeley. Phone Piedmont 242N. 

LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 



The College of the Holy Names 

Lake Merrltt, Oakland 

Complete Conservnlory Course — Piano. Harp, Violin, 

Tello. Voloe. ronnterpolnt. Harmony. Hlwtory 



The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student If you help us to add 3000 subscribers to 
our list we will help you to increase your income. 



JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 

Thorough Vocal and Dramatic Training: 

740 Pine St. Phone DouElas 0024 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON &. CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



KARL RACKLE 

PIANIST— INSTRUCTOR 



MADAME WILSON-JONES 



Phone Berk. 4e80-W 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



III THEOML'.- WEEKL-i MUjICAL JOUENAL IK THE C.KEAT W£5TT I] 

MIISICAI, RBVIBW COMPANT 

»I,KRKH «F,T7.GER Prenldrnt 

C. C. EMERSO.\ „ Vice President 

tlillC'lS I.. !»AMUKI.S Secretnry and Trennurer 

Suite SOI Koliler tV Chnne nidi;.. S«t O'Fnrrell St.. San 
I'rniK'lx'o. C nl. Tel. KenrnT .VIM 



added to our list will be much larger tlian we ex- 
pect. No one will be a loser. Everyone working 
in this campaign is bound to win a prize. 



ALFRED METZGER 
C. C. EMERSON 



Editor 
Business Manager 



PACIFIC COAST »Ui.SIC.\L REVIEW 

Uuklaud-Uerkelej-Alumeda Ulllee 1117 Pnru St., 
Tel. Alameda 15S 
Miss Elizalieth » estKale In Charee 



I.ON tnereles IMHee 

Snile 447, DonRlns BIdE., 2.'7 So. Spring St. Tel. 820-302 

Sherman Danl>7 In Charge 



VOL. XLIV SATURDAY, MAY 26, 1923 



Fn(i-irt a. 



fer at S. F. Postoffle 



SinsCRIPTlONS 
%nnnall7 In \dvnnee Ineladlnf: Poatairei 

I'nIfrd states _ _ tX.tm 

r-„..»lirn Cnnnfles AMt 



TWENTY-SECOND YEAR 



FRESNO STEPS INTO LINE 



As will be seen by reading the letter on page 
;en of this issue the San Joaquin Valley tnusical 
rerritory has been added to the field included by 
:he Pacific Coast Musical Review. While the 
jrincipal city in this territory is Fresno, the 
rorrespondcnt, Lilian Turney Hays, will include 
:en cities in her district. Like Mrs. Huggins, our 
San Jose correspondent, includes a number of 
:ities in the Santa Clara X'alley and as far South 
IS Santa Cruz. The territory of which Fresno 
s the center is specially fertile in musical en- 
leavors and really must be included among the 
Host musical centers in California. For a long 
;ime the Pacific Coast Musical Review wanted 
■epresentation in that vicinity in order to show 
;hc otlier communities in California what Fresno 
ind vicinity accomplishes in music. We know 
:hat our readers will be surprised at the spirit 
ind enterprise which is so characteristic of the 
San Joaquin \''alley. and we feel that in Mrs. 
Hays we have the right representative. 

OUR SUBSCRIPTION CAMPAIGN 



Our plans and preparations for our big sub- 
scription campaign to be conducted during June, 
ruly and .\ugust are now completed. The prizes 
set aside for students and teachers who will par- 
ticipate in this campaign to the extent of adding 
:hree thousand subscribers to our list in Northern 
California are surely worth working for. If any- 
Jne has any ambition at all he or she should be 
5ager to secure the first prize of a $1575 Knabe 
jrand piano, while other prizes include, plaver 
iianos. upright pianos, talking machines, violins 
ind other instruments. Not one of the least im- 
aortant prizes is a scholarship of from $100 to as 
ligh as $500 for either vocal or instrumental 
nstruction by a leading pedagogue or music 
school. In the case of advanced pupils taking ad- 
ifantage of this scholarship we shall accept the 
ivord of their teacher combined with our own 
judgment regarding their talent, and if sufiicient- 
!y talented we will help them to start a career. 
rhe prizes will also include season tickets for 
:he grand opera season of the San Francisco 
Opera Association for 192.^, under the direction 
jf Gaetano Merola, next September, and also for 
;hc symphony concerts, chamber music concerts 
ind the series of concerts under the direction of 
^elby C. Oppenheimer. In next week's issue we 
'hall publish a whole page announcement giving 
:he details of the subscription campaign and we 
:rust that every student will be sufficiently awake 
:o take advantage of the opportunities offered in 
this campaign. If only fifty students and fiftv 
teachers participate, the number of subscribers 



Articles of General Musical Interest 

These articles are prepared for The Paelflc Coast 
nluslenl Review Ijy I.eRoy V. Rrant, director of The 
Instltnte of Jlnslc of San Jose. Mr. Brant will he 
pleased to treat here suhjects of general musical 
interest. Anyone desiring an article on any par- 
ticalar subject may communicate with Mr. Brant, 
care The Institute of Bluslc, South Second street 
at San Salvador. San Jose. 



(Conclusion) 

The matter of tonality is one which as but little to 
do with the physiological side of the question. TonaUty 
has to do with musical education. Not so the matter 
of dissrnance. Dissonance is a state which we cannot 
alter. It e.\ists because there are laws of nature which 
make it exist, and these laws we cannot change. One 
can easily see that a person brought up with a different 
conception of tonality to that which we have would 
think our system of music strange or crude. But no 
matter where one received one's musical education one 
could not escape the fact that a tonal relationship of 
say 13 to 12 is unpleasant. 

It. therefore, appears to me that we cannot go as far 
in the use of free dissonance as some of our modernists 
would have us think. We to'erate dissonance only inso- 
far as it receives a compensation from a melodic line. 
If we can hold a clear conception of two or more 
melodies moving together in our minds we can excuse a 
harsh dissonance which may be temporarily caused by 
those melodies. But if the thread of the me'lodies be so 
intricate that we cannot follow them we have no longer 
an excuse for the use of the dissonance, and we should 
not use it. 

We have theorists of the present day who build up a 
system of tonality on strange and unusual, and d'ssonant 
chords. Any physicist will te'l us that our system of 
music is founded on Nature's chord, the major triad. 
We cannot improve on Nature's rivers, or Nature's 
mountains. Can we better Nature's music? 

However that may be, we have long believed that 
dissonance was to be used as a relief from consonance. 
It is a tact that in many of our modern compositions 
consonance is used as a relief from dissonance. I be- 
lieve this to be wrong. One reason for my belief is based 
on the physiological aspect of the matter; that is, the 
demands on the nerve centers is too great. Anyone who 
has ridden from San Francisco to San Jose on the train 
just as the sun was setting, when the train was going 
by the picket fence that lines the right of way in some 
places, will remember the unpleasant effect of the flick- 
ering of the light. If we may translate this circumstance 
Into the language of hearing, we will have much the 
same thing happening to our ears when we have too 
much dissonance as befell our eyes when we experienced 
the flickering produced by the picket fence. Suppose 
the right-of-way had been lined by beautiful trees, planted 
closely together. The same thing would have happened 
to our eyes. Yet, a tree here and there, to break the 
monotony of the landscape, is truly beautiful. 

Is it hard to draw our conclusion? 

I must acknowledge that I cannot see the beauty of 
some of the compositions of the day. Those of the most 
decided tendencies towards dissonance I cannot under- 
stand; that is. as to beauty. But I have tried to over- 
come this prejudice, and present to my readers certain 
facts of which they may not have thought which will 
suggest to them lines of thought which will cause them 
to think through this matter for themselves. Out of all 
this striving for new things some good is bound to come. 
In every bushel of chaff there are certain grains of 
wheat. It is certain that time alone will fan the flour 
for us, and leave there that wheat which is of true 
kernel, sound and fertile. 



MINETTI ORCHESTRA CONCERT 

By Alfred Metzgep 

The Minetti Orchestra gave its third concert of the 
season at Scottish Rite Auditorium on Thursday eve- 
ning. May 17th in the presence of a very large and 
unusually enthusiastic audience. The more we watch 
Giulio Minetti conduct an orchestra, the more do we 
become convinced that he is a bom conductor who 
knows exactly how to obtain the maximum of artistic 
effects from a body of capable musicians. No one real- 
izes what it means to train from sixty to seventy youth- 
ful players in a manner to secure the genuinely artistic 
results that characterized this latest performance of 
the Minetti Orchestra. Surely Mr. Minetti was entitled 
to the ovations and floral tributes that were so liberally 
bestowed upon him. 

The introductory number of the program consisted of 
Nicolay's Merry Wives of Windsor Overture which was 
interpreted with a precision of attacks and sprightliness 
of rhythm that many a professional could not attain. 
One of the most difBcult composers to interpret is Moz- 
art, and yet both as to delicacy of phrasing, precision 
of intonation and tastefulness of coloring these young 
musicians attained astounding results. The Deluge by 
Saint-Saens, with violin obligato by Eunice Jurgens, 
who played with fine tone and impressive emotional 
emphasis, also aroused just appreciation. The conclud- 
ing number was Strauss' Tales From the Vienna Woods 
Waltz which was given an exceptionally effective 
reading. 

The vocal soloist was Rose Florence, the exceptionally 
artistic and well equipped soprano soloist. Mme. Flor- 
ence sang as her first number an Aria from Samson and 



Delilah and later a group of songs including; Phldyle 
(Duparc), Over the Steppe (GretchaninoffI, and 'Tis 
Spring (Hugo Wolff). She certainly left a most excel- 
lent impression with her hearers. She is a vocal artist 
of exceptional refinement of style, has a voice of fine 
timbre and flexibility, sings with thorough knowledge 
of the qualifications that combine to create genuine 
artistry, and gives evidence of having prepared her 
songs with every ounce of judgment and effective em- 
phasis of the most charming phrases. It was the per- 
formance of a full fledged artist who gives prestige to 
any program on which she may appear. 

The surprise of the evening was little Tania Akoun- 
ine, a youthful Russian violinist, pupil of Nathan Landa- 
berger, who took the house by storm with her excellent 
rendition of Bruch's violin concerto in G minor. The 
youthful violinist draws a fine, smooth tone, has a. 
truly remarkable control of technical requirements and 
plays with a judgment in phrasing that is rare even in 
more experienced artists. The young artist possesses 
exceptional temperament and reveals all the qualifica- 
tions that justify predictions of a brilliant future. She 
was accorded a tremendous ovation and was supported 
by the orchestra in a manner that would have done 
credit to an organization of professional musicians. 



MUSIC CLUB CONTESTANTS SENT EAST 

The winners in the California State Contest of Young 
Artists recently conducted by the California Federation 
of Music Clubs are being sent East partly by the clubs 
themselves and partly through private efforts. The 
winner of the State Contest for piano was Aileen Fealy 
whose expenses for her trip to Ashville, N. C, where 
she will participate in the National Contest of the Na- 
tional Federation of Music Clubs, is being defrayed by 
the following clubs and organizations: The Musical As- 
sociation of San Francisco, the Musicians' Club of San 
Francisco, the San Francisco Musical Club, the Pacific 
Musical Society, the California Club Choral, the Chan- 
ning Auxiliary, the Forum Club, the Corona Club, the 
Spinners Club, the Berkeley Piano Club, the Etude 
Club of Berkeley, the Twentieth Century Club Choral, 
the Wednesday Morning Choral of Oakland the Senza 
Ritmo Club of Oakland, the Mill Valley Musical Club 
and the Merced Music Club. 

This is unquestionably the first time that so many 
of the representative musical and other organizations 
of Northern California have joined their efforts for the 
advancement of the young California musician (in other 
words the resident artist) and it is already apparent 
that the definite stand taken by the California Federa- 
tion of Music Clubs in behalf of resident artists is bear- 
ing fruit. The State Contest, of which Miss Fealy was 
the first prize winner for piano, was preliminary to the 
National contest to be held in Ashville on June 9th, 
under the auspices of the .National Federation of Musi- 
cal Clubs. These contests are held every two years tor 
the avowed purpose of aiding American bom and Ameri- 
can trained musicians. 

Miss Fealy, a San Franciscan, although but eighteen 
years old, won not only the State piano contest, but 
also first prize in the San Francisco hearing over the 
contestants of all departments. She has studied with 
her aunt, Mrs. P. F. Weeks, who was her first teacher, 
and with Mrs. Oscar Mansfeldt, Marion Frazer and has 
coached with Wager Swayne. She is a member of the 
San Francisco Musical Club and the Pacific Musical 
Society. 

Corinne Keefer, contralto, who won the Northern 
Califomia contest tor women's voices, is having her 
expenses defrayed through the efforts of her teacher, 
Mme. Rose Relda Cailleau who in the short period of 
ten days sold $300 worth of tickets for a concert given 
by Miss Keefer and Mme. Cailleau at the Fairmont 
Hotel last Wednesday evening which was crowded to 
the doors and which will be reviewed in the next issue 
of this paper. At the same time we shall be pleased 
to publish the names of the patrons and patronesses. 

Southern California is raising money to send Ruth 
Williams, winner of the Southern California contest for 
women's voices, and Paul Russell, State winner for 
men's voices, to Ashville to participate in the National 
contest. It is evident that the public spirit of California 
has positively asserted itself in the important problem 
of fostering and encouraging musical talent developed 
and trained and flourishing in its midst. 



INTERESTING LECTURE ON HEBREW MUSIC 

Victor Lichtenstein, the well known and exceptionally 
well informed musician and lecturer, gave the last of 
a series of exceedingly valuable discourses at the head- 
quarters of the Musicians' Club of San Francisco on 
Sutter street, Friday evening. May 18th. A very large 
audience was in attendance which showed by its close 
attention and well applied applause that it thoroughly 
understood and valued the lecture on The Jew in Music 
which Mr. Lichtenstein so ably exploited. The special 
feature of the lecture was reference to the works of 
Ernest Bloch, the eminent composer of the new school 
whose arrangements and new ideas of Hebrew music 
form such an important part of latter-day musical litera- 
ture. Mr. Lichtenstein proved himself thoroughly com- 
petent and well equipped to do his flne subject the ut- 
most justice, and his remarks showed evidences of au- 
thority and conscientious study. 

The musical illustrations were rendered by Cantor 
Reuben Hinder of Temple Emanu El and by Mrs. Lich- 
tenstein. The former, by reason of his expert knowl- 
edge of ritual service, imbued his interpretations with 
the fervor and sincerity of him who understands his 
art from beginning to end. Mrs. Lichtenstein displayed 
a remarkably flne volc« used with excellent Judgment 
and an interpretation that denoted intellectual applica- 
tion and judgment of artistic values. ' 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



CHALIAPIN FAREWELL MONDAY NIGHT 

The last chance to hear Feodor Chaliapin, the Russian 
vocal giant, in America this season occurs at the Expo- 
sition Auditorium next Monday night, and some twelve 
thousand music lovers from San Francisco and all 
Northern California will take advantage of the oppor- 
tunity of hearing the most famous of present day artists. 
Chaliapin himself, enamored of California, and of San 
Francisco in particular, has told his manager, Selby 
C. Oppenheimer that he finds it possible to sing at his 
very best in this city, and that the notable concert of 
last week will be more than repeated is assured. He 
has promised many songs, arias and compositions on 
Monday night that he did not sing last week, and will 
also include many of those delightful favorites which 
evoked such storms of enthusiasm last Sunday. That 
the Auditorium will be crowded should be self-evident. 

That Chaliapin is an extraordinary vocal artist is 
verified by the unanimously enthusiastic opinion ex- 
pressed after his recital last week. Never in the history 
of concert-giving in the west has an artist received 
more universal acclaim. It has been said before that 
the city became excited over the appearances of singers 
and instrumentalists: but in this case, such excitement 
seems just a bit more apparent. From the moment 
Chaliapin appears upon the stage, until the conclusion 
of his final song, he holds his audience completely in 
the palm of his hands, and inspires thrill after thrill by 
his remarkable interpretations. A critical analysis of 
his superb work by the writers of the San Francisco 
press reveal a concensus of opinion that has rarely been 
bestowed upon a singer here, and proves at once the 
exalted position of the artist in the world today. 

Max Rabinowitsch, the renewed pianist from Russia, 
who established a definite success last Sunday, will 
again serve as assisting artist and accompanist for 
Chaliapin, his program contributions including the 
Eugen Onegin paraphrase, Balakirew's The Lark and a 
work by Borodine. As before Chaliapin will announce 
his songs by number from the platform, the audience 
referring to books of words and English translation of 
all songs which will be distributed free to them. 

The ticket sale continues at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s 
in San Francisco today and all day Monday until five- 
thirty, after that tour windows at the Auditorium will 
be opened to take care of the last minute throngs. 



GRAVEURE CLASSES FILLING 

San Francisco's special adaptability as a convention 
city was definitely fixed when the Democrats left here 
loud in their praises of the hospitality accorded them. 
of the climate encountered, by them and by the special 
fitness of the city in many ways to house big gather- 
ings. Now comes another phase of the unique position 
San Francisco holds among the country's cities, and 
this time it is as the ideal place to hold the most im- 
portant music classes ever undertaken in the United 
States. From all corners of the country will come the 
foremost singers, teachers, artists and students, to spend 
a part of their summer around the bay studying with 
the peerless baritone, Louis Graveure, who has chosen 
this city, above all others to conduct a series of Master 
■Vocal Classes. In choosing San Francisco Graveure 
measured well the distance from the center of popula- 
tion, and determined that even considering the long 
distance many of his pupils would have to travel, the 
advantage of study in the west would more than coni- 
'Pensate tor the time lost in making the journey. The 
Graveure classes will not alone be one of the greatest 
advertising benefits ever accorded San Francisco, but 
will give rare opportunity to California students to 
study with the famous master, right at home. Graveure, 
whose classes will be under the management of Selby 
C. Oppenheimer will start his activities on Monday, 
July 16th. and remain here for five weeks. Master 
pupils as well as Auditors will be accepted, the details 
of arrangement being available by application to Oppen- 
heimer at his office in the Foxcroft Building, 68 Post 
Street. 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Readers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address. 
Anonymous communications cannot be answered. No 
names will be published. Address, Question Editor, 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kohler & Chase Building, 
San Francisco. 

1. Has Stransky resigned as conductor of the New 
York Philharmonic Orchestra, and if so, has his suc- 
cessor been chosen? — L. N. 

Stransky has resigned as conductor of the New York 
Philharmonic Orchestra in order to take charge of the 
newly-organized State Symphony Orchestra. Two men 
have been chosen to succeed him, both Dutchmen — 
■Willem van Hoogstraten, to conduct the first half-sea- 
son, and Mengelberg. who was a guest conductor last 
year, to conduct the second half-season. 

2. How much money is spent in the United States on 
musical education? — C. F. 

Last year $6,546,750.00 was spent. Prof. Farnsworth 
of Columbia University is the authority for these 
figures. 

3. Who wrote the new opera "Mona Lisa"?— P. B. 
Max Schillings. 

4. What was the date and place of Maud Powell's 
death?— H. S. 

January 8, 1920, Uniontown, Pa. 

5. What does Hailing mean? — T. E. O. 

The Hailing is the most characteristic dance of the 
Norwegians. It is of the character of a country dance 
For a description of it, see Grove's dictionary ■ 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

Edited By Elita Muggins 

1605 The Alameda, San Jose, Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 15S1 

Uc'linrtinent MiiniiKi-r, Sue Dnvin Mnj-nnnl, X27 Ka 
Snn Carlox St. Phone San Jose 47I3-J. 



SAN JOSE, May 22, 1923 
The First California De Molay band, under the capa- 
ble leadership of Edward Towner, gave a brilliant con- 
cert in the Morris Dailey auditorium of the State 
Teachers' College on the evening of May 10. The pro- 
gram was a pleasant intermingling of classical num- 
bers, with several light fantastic musical novelties as 
well as a collection of old southern melodies. George 
Eardley, one of the cast in My Word, Matilda!, the 
senior play of the State Teachers' College, gave a vocal 
number, as did also Miss Elizabeth Cameron and her 
French Maid Chorus, also a part of My Word, Matilda. 
Ed Moore sang A Perfect Day with an accompaniment 
by the band, followed by two violin solos by Conley 
Plummer. D. T. Hakin played two original composi- 
tions for the pianaforte. A Russian Dance and An Old 
Love Song, which were well received. 

The selections played by the band, ranging in variety 
from William Tell to such homely and time-honored 
numbers as Dixey and Old Black Joe, were well inter- 
preted, showing that they are one of the finest musical 
organizations of its character in the State. These boys 
have played in many places, the most notable, perhaps, 
being at the Shrine convention last year in San Fran- 
cisco, where they received a wonderful ovation. 

Edward Towner, the band's leader and director, or- 
ganized the band in January of 1922. Mr. Towner at- 
tended a meeting of the San Jose chapter of the Order 
of De Molay and suggested starting a band. Twenty- 
five boys showed up. Five of them had played instru- 
ments before, but only two of them had played in bands. 
At this first meeting, five were trying to play snare 
drum, two attempted to solve the mysteries of the bass 
drum, and about six saxaphone players. The rest of 
the sections had one or two boys in them. At the next 
practice the sections were better balanced, new boys 
had come in joining the weak sections and several of 
the drummers and saxaphonists had changed instru- 
ments. New members kept coming in until the band's 
membership reached fifty. They improved steadily due 
to hard practice and the untiring work of Edward 
Towner. They are contemplating a concert tour of the 
LTnited States this summer. 

Mischa Ve Clin, the famous Russian violinist, who 
has deserted the concert stage for a brief tour on the 
Orpheuni circuit, is .delighting audiences at the Ameri- 
can Theatre for tour days this week. W. J.Beatty, who is 
very active in promoting better music for motion picture 
houses, never misses an opportunity in bringing artists 
to his theatre. Learning that Mr. Olin had this week 
free, he at once took advantage of the opportunity. Mr. 
Olin is heard in Schubert's Serenade and Kreisler's 
Tambourin Chinois, accompanied by the Knabe-Ampico. 
His third number is Zigeunerweisen (Gypsy Airs) by 
Sarasate, accompanied by Beatty's American Symphony 
Orchestra. For recall Mr. Olin is playing his own ar- 
rangement of My Old Kentucky Home, unaccompanied, 
a most charming number. 

Born in Russia, Mr. Olin was educated in Germany, 
graduating from the Berlin Conservatory at the age of 
fourteen, at which time he appeared with the Philhar- 
monic Orchestra in Berlin, with Otto Nikish, director. 
After a few months spent in England he returned to 
the Royal Academy of Music to compete in the 
Mendelssohn Concourse, and succeeded in winning 
first prize. Mr. Olin. who is now a citizen of the United 
States and saw service in the World War, has shortly 
returned from fresh triumphs in South America where 
he has been toui-ing for the past two years. Shortly be- 
fore his engagement on the vaudeville circuit he was 
heard in two recitals in Carnegie Hall, New York, also 
playing in Philadelphia, Boston and Chicago. 

Wm. Edward Johnson, baritone, sang a group of songs 
appropriate for Mother's Day for the Soroptimists at 
their weekly luncheon Monday, May 14th, at Hotel 
Oakland. Mrs. Gertrude Ross was the accompanist. 

Esther Houk Allen, contralto, and Samuel Savannah, 
violinist, assisted by Warren D. Allen, pianist, gave a 
very fine program at Castilleja School, Palo Alto. Sun- 
day, May 6th, when the following numbers were given: 
(a) On Wings of Song (Mendelssohn-Achron), (b) Slav- 
onic Dance, No. 2 in E minor (I>vorak), Mr. Savannah: 
(a) Faith in Spring (Schubert), (b) Nur Wer die 
Schnsucht Kennt (Tschaikowsky), (c) My Love Is Like 
the Lilac Tree (Brahms I, Mrs. Allen: Suite in D minor, 
op. 44 Allegro risoluto. Canconetta con variazine. Rondo 
a la rusee (Edouard Schuett). Mr. Savannah: (a) The 
Sea (Grant Schaefer), (b) Fairy Went a-Marketing 
(Arthur Goodhart), (c) My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice 
(Samson et Delilah) (Saint-Saens), Mrs. Allen. 

Marian Ives, who has been associated in San Jose for 
the past several years with different musical courses 
for concert managers, is here making preparations for 
promotion of the newly organized San Jose Musical 
Association headed by Dr. Charles M. Richards. This 
association is inaugurated for the purpose of bringing 
internationally famed artists to our community. 

A very unusual recital was that given at the College 
of the Pacific Tuesday, May 15, when the A Cappella 
Choir of the college, under the direction of Charles M. 
Dennis, gave the sixth annual concert. The program. 



Kohler & Chase 

IKnabp panoa 
SCnabp Ampirn 



SAN JOSE HEADQUARTERS 
185 So. First Street 



ALFRED LANINI 

Expert Maker of Violins, Violas and Cellos 

With European Experience 

Artistic Repairing Rare Old Violins For Sale 

591 E. ST. JAMES STREET 

San Jose, California 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

LeRoy V. Brant, Director 
Ofl'erM Coumen In All BrnncheH of Manic at 
All StsiKea of Adv 



SAX JOSE 



CAMFORMA 



WM. EDWARD JOHNSON 

IIARITOE 

itudloH: »9 South 14th St., San Jone, Phone 4:i.S0 
1:1.11 Cantro St. at 14th. Oakland, Mondaj'a 



Hannah Fletcher Coykendall 

SOPRANO 

Available for ConeertH and Recltnltf 

Pupil of Gaetano Merola 

StndIo^l45 Hanohett Avenue, San Jo.te, Calll 

Phone 3525-\V 



MRS. CHARLES McKENZIE 

ACCOMPANISTE 
TE.VCHER OF PIANO 

hone S. J. l.-igH nO South Slatteenlh Strei 

ALLAN BACON 



Concert Or^nnlMt 



Pinnofor 



RecltnU 



NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 
San Jose, Cal. 
Confers DeKrcea, AwnrdH Certlflcntea. Complete Colleff*' 
Conaervatorr and Academic CoumeH In Piano, Vlolla«> 
Harp, 'Cello. Voice. Hormonr. Counterpoint, Canon an4y 
Fame and Science of Munlc. For partlculam Apply fa 
Slater Superior. 

VIOLET SILVER 

VIOLIXIST 
I'uiill of L,eo|iaId -\uer Studio at Vendoine 

Concert and Private EnRaeenientH 

both educational and entertaining, was given a splendlA 
performance. j 

The A Cappella Choir is, perhaps, the only organizll^ 
tion of its kind on the Pacific Coast. The piano is nob 
used even in rehearsals and the result is a form of pure 
choral work that is ravishing in its effect. In tone 
quality, balance of parts, delicacy of shading and nuance,! 
the Choir aims at the highest possible standards and the 
charm of the selections performed add further to the 
enjoyment of its program. 

The program Tuesday evening opened with foj 
Palestrina sacred numbers, in which the Choir did 
finest work. Four Russian choral numbers were 
the performance of which further established the repu-" 
tation the Choir has achieved tor adequate performance 
of this singularly impressive type of music. Four charm 
ing folk-songs followed which were thoroughly enjoyed 
by the audience. Dett's O Holy Lord, a Negro spiritual 
and Come, Dorothy, Come, a Swabian Folk Song, mak 
ing strongest appeal. These numbers, full of remolf 
modulations, demanding much in expressiveness, provec 
thoroughly the musicianship of the Choir. 

Agnes Ward, violinist of the class of 1923, gave an ex 
cellent performance of two brilliant numbers, ably ac 
companled by Jules F. Moullet. 



I 
el 



Warren D. Allen, University Organist, Memorla 
Church. Stanford University, will be heard In an inter 
esting program Sunday afternoon. May 27, at 4 o'clock 
Mr. Aliens numbers will include The Pilgrim's Prog 
ress (Part 5) Pilgrim's Journey to the Palace Beautifu 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



PUBLIC LIBRA R>^ 



ANIL DEER 



''Soulful" 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 

Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 



;Ernest Austin); In Springtime (Ralph Kinder); 
Vdorn Tliyselt Witli Giadness, O My Soul (Bach); 
3horale in A minor (Cesar Pranck). Tuesday, May 29, 
it 4:15 Mr. Allen will play: Choral-Improvisation on 
Clearer, My God, to Thee (Sigfrig Karg-Elert); Russian 
Boatman's Song on the River Volga (arranged for organ 
)y Clarence Eddy): Canon in B minor (Schumann): 
>adle Song (Franz Schubert 1797-1828); Fantaisie 
Symphonique (Nossetter G. Cole). Thursday, May 31, 
It 4:15: Funeral March on the Death of a Hero (from 
he Sonata, op. 26 Beethoven) ; Song of Sorrow (Gordan 
}. Nevin); Epic Ode (Ralph H. Bellairo) Dreams 
Traume) (Richard Wagner); Stately Procession (Eric 
)elamarter. 

The program on Sunday, June .3, will be presented by 
he A Cappella Choir o£ the College of the Pacific, iji- 
ected by Charles M. Dennis. 

The second annual concert of the San Jose high school 
irchestras and band was given Friday evening. May 18, 
n the high school auditorium. With the exception of 
wo vocal solos by Ed Ferguson, the entire program 
fas given by high school students under the leadership 
if George T. Matthews, musical director. In the first 
lumbers when the band and the first and second or- 
hestras were combined, there were seventy-flve youth- 
ul musicians on the stage. Their instrumentation in- 
ludes all the symphony instruments, with flute, oboe, 
assoon, French horns, clarinets, trumpets, trombones, 
ympani, drums and all the strings. There were thirty- 
ix violins in all, beside violas, cellos, three string 
asses. The band has also full instrumentation. The 
rogram was given by the first and second orchestras, 
he band, the military brass band, several selections 
eing played by the symphony orchestra alone, also 
umbers by the boys' glee club. Great credit is due 
Ir. Matthews for the range of selections and their 
xcellent rendition. The program was the following: 
a) March The Cup Winner (Toeaben), (b) Selection 
"annhauser (Wagner). First and Second H. S. Orches- 
ras; Duet Serenade (Titl) Marie Straight, Flute. Emil 
lodenschatz, French horn, G. T. Matthews at the piano; 
Iverture, Merry Wives of Windsor, (N'icolai) First 
Irchestra: Tenor Solos (a) Kashmiri Song (Woodford- 
'inden) (b) I Love a Little Cottage (O'Hara) Ed. Fer- 
uson, Mrs. Muriel Berry at the piano; Characteristic 
Pance Moon Madrigal (Willeby) First Orchestra; Over- 
iire. The Bridal Rose (Lavallee); Patrol, Knights of 
lid (Kiefer) High School Band: Songs— (a) Break, 
Ireak, Break, (Fearis). (b) My Mammy's Voice (Loomis) 
ligh School Boys' Glee Club, Miss Cleo Parmalee, dl- 
ector; (a) Fantasia, Maritana (Wallace), (b) March The 
lew Colonial (R. B. Hall), (c) Star Spangled Banner, 
[igh School Band. Mr. Ferguson sang Mary (Richard- 
on) for recall. The Glee Club responded with an extra 
umber, an amusing parody. Just a Song at Midnight, 
■ith cleverly rendered Meows. 

The recital featuring the blind piano student, Manuel 
.Ivernaz, given at The Institute of Music last Thursday 
vening proved to be one of the most interesting held at 
lis school for many weeks. A large crowd assembled 
t the Institute parlors, and interest was at a high pitch 
iroughout. 

Preceding young Manuel's playing three other pri- 
lary students performed. They were Donald Kapp 
enevieve Kelly and Jack Rappaport. After they had 
nished Le Roy V. Brant, the director of the Institute 
nd the teacher of Alvernaz, explained the Braille nota- 
on, and later passed around samples of the books and 
ther sheets. Questions were freely asked, and an- 
wered, concerning the Braille and also concerning the 
lind boy's work. After the recital many of those pres- 
nt came forward and talked with the twelve-year-old 
Id. It was announced that it was exactly one year 
ince he had taken his first music lesson from Mr. Brant, 
aving at that time no previous knowledge of either 
lusic or Braille. The boy plans to become a concert 
ianist, and judging from the style of his playing he 
■111 be able to do so. Following is his program: Water 
ily (Ducelle), Donald Kapp: Folk Song (Martin), Jack 
appaport; Pastorale (Burgrauller), Genevieve Kelly 
xplanation of the Braille Notation— In the Balloon 
schytte). The Swing (Stamaty), The Orchestra (Con- 
Me), The Soldier's March (Concone), Fantasy (Moz- 
rt). Invention (Bach), Manuel Alvernaz; Exhibition of 
le Braille Material; By the Spring (Gurlitt), Northern 
trains (Gurlitt). Grandfather's Birthday (Gurlitt) 
lumber Song (Gurlitt), Sunshiny Morning (Gurlitt)' 
.untmg Song (Gurlitt), Manuel Alvernaz. 

Chester Herold, tenor, was one of the featured soloists 
t a Sunday morning radio church service broadcasted 
■om a San Francisco station. May 20. His numbers in- 
luded Be Merciful Unto Me, O God (W. Berwald) 



House of Jacob (Benedict), How Beautiful Upon the 
Mountains (Harker). Miss Gladys Salisbury played the 
organ accompaniments. 

Grover T. Bacon, resident manager of Kohler & 
Chase, gave a recital Monday afternoon. May 21, to the 
piano pupils of Miss Alma Williams of the State 
Teachers' College, playing several groups of numbers 
on the Knabe-Ampico that these young students were 
studying. This is the third time Miss Williams has 
taken her classes to hear Ampico programs, it having 
proven so very instructive. 

Mrs. Miles A. Dresskell, Miss Reynolds and Ed. Fer- 
guson gave a program of vocal numbers for the Neigh- 
bors of Woodcraft last week at Elks' hall during their 
convention. 

The Holy City, by Alfred Gaul, was given two per- 
formances at Trinity Church Sunday. May 20 and Mon- 
day. May 21. A large choir was assembled under the 
direction of LeRoy V. Brant, director of the Institute of 
Music of San Jose, who is organist and choirmaster at 
Trinity Church. The soloists tor the occasion were 
Miss Lulu Pieper, soprano; Mrs. Santord Bacon, con- 
tralto; Roy Thompson, tenor, and Frank Towner, bari- 
tone. Mrs. LeRoy V. Brant, singing teacher at the In- 
stitute, assisted her husband in the directing of the 
choir. 

The production was highly artistic in finish, and 
unusual in some respects. The tremendous chorus for 
a double choir which is usually omitted was performed 
with fine effect. Particularly good were the three fugue 
choruses, of which the one just mentioned is perhaps 
the best. List, the Cherubic Host, for female quartette 
and chorus and baritone obligate was also excellently 
done. All the choruses were up to a high standard of 
merit, and showed a large amount of careful work and 
training on the part of the director. 

Mrs. Lester Cowger, soprano, artist pupil of William 
Edward Johnson, assisted by William Riley Smith, 
organist, and Mrs. Percy Pogson, accompanist, gave a 
recital at the Christian church on the evening of Tues- 
day. May 15. The selections given by Mrs. Cowger were 
admirably suited to her nch and sympathetic voice and 
were well diversified and colorful. Mrs. Pogson's ac- 
ccmpanying was very fine. Mrs. Pogson, who has made 
her home in Melbourne, Australia, for the past thirteen 
years, will be remembered as Miss Ida Sedgwick, who 
was very active in local musical circles. William Riley 
Smith of the College of the Pacific and organist of First 
Church of Christ Scientist, San Jose, gave three beauti- 
ful organ numbers played with splendid technique and 
expression. For a recall number to her last group, Mrs. 
Cowger delighted the audience with Way Down Upon 
the Swanee River. The program as presented, (a) My 
Sweet Repose (Schubert), (b) Who is Sylvia (Schubert), 
(c) Spring Faith (Ries). (d) Brilliant Butterfly 
(Campra), Mrs. Cowger; Waltz Song (from Romeo et 
Juliette) (Gounod), Mrs. Cowger: (a) Fugue on Saint 
Anne's Hymn (J. S. Bach), (b) The Grandmother (Gor- 
don B. Nevin), (c) March Heroique (C. Saint-Saens), 
Wm. Riley Smith; (a) The Wounded Birch (Gretchani- 
now), (b) Cradle Song (Gretchaninow), (c) Thou Bil- 
lowy Harvest Field (Rachmaninow), Mrs. Cowger: (a) 
Tally Ho! (Franco Leoni) (b) Daddy's Sweetheart (Liza 
Lehmann), (c) The House that Jack Built (Sidney 
Homer), (d) Smile Through Your Tears (Bernard 
Hamble), Mrs. Cowger. 

An Hour of IVIusic, given by a group of Castilleja 
pupils, Palo Alto, April 22, was a very enjoyable affair, 
those appearing on the well arranged program show- 
ing excellent instruction. The program as presented 
was: March (Schumann), Nancy Schoenwald; Boat 
song (Heller), Margaret Kirkup; Wood Nymph's Harp 
(Rea), Ruth Woolsey; Bay Breezes (Concone), Winne- 
fred Hickey; The Book (Karganoff) Lois Wild; (a) 
Minuet (Beethoven), (b) Hide and Seek (Schytte) 
Samuel Smith; (a) May, Dear May (Schumann), (b) 
Gypsy Boy (Schytte). Harold Smith; (a) Minuet 
(Bach), (b) Scherzottino (Goodrich). Elizabeth Eiiin; 
Goblins (Wright). Ruth Woolsey: Ghost Story (Gurlitt). 
Dorothy Houston: (a) Jack in the Pulpit (Wright), (b) 
Sleep Song (Wright), Betty Olsen; The Night Wind 
(Dutton), Edith Tough; Child Falling Asleep (Schu- 
mann), Nini Jago; Birdling (Grieg). Anna Taylor; The 
Pipers (Gounod), Marjorie Morrison; (a) Serenade 
(Olsen), (b) Tarantelle (Heller). Constance Morse; 
(a) Spring Mood (Haydn), (b) From the Long Ago 
(Dutton). Elizabeth Nourse. 

The Trinity Boys' Choir was augmented by the admis- 
sion of thirteen choristers on Whitsunday, bringing 
the number of boys in this organization now up to 28. 



HAZEL JOHNSON 



COLORATURA SOPRANO 

PUPIL OF DOMENICO BRESCIA AND FERNANDO MICHELENA 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND SOLFEGGIO 

studio:— Kohler A Cha«e BIdg..— Kearny 6454 Residence Studio; -2720 Filbert St,— We»t Site 



EDOUARD DERU 

VIOLINIST TO THE KING AND 

QUEEN OF BELGIUM 

Professor of Violin at the Liege 

Conservatory of Music 

Will Accept Pupils in Violin and 

Chamber Music Beginning 

August 15th 

For particulars regarding terms and qualiflca- 
tons, as well as enlisting, address Beatrice' 
Anthony, 1000 Union Street, San Francisco. Tel, 
Franklin 142. Oakland Tel. Lakeside 413 



WILL C. HAYS 

Violinist 



-OTPfn^ 



Pupil of Kilian, Munich, and of 

Ondricek, Vienna 

Studio: 1753 Van Ness Ave., Fresno 

Telephone 7499 



John Ribbe 

Solo Pianist 



Studio No. 1 
683 Sutter Street San Francisco 



Frank Moss 

PIANIST 

Residence Studio — Hotel Normandie 
Telephone Franklin 5400 

Available for Recitals 

Management Ida G. Scott 

Kohler & Chase Bldg., Tel. Kearny 5454 



Ben Moore 

PIANIST— COACH— ORGANIST 

Organist and Director Trinity Episcopal 

Church — Beth Israel Synagogue 

2636 Union St. Tel. Fillmore 1624 

Appointment Only 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 

SOPRANO 

Available for Concertx and Recitals 

AddreHK; 471 UTlh .\venQe 

Tel. Pge. tt.ta 

Trinity Church is one of the few churches in the State 
which has a boys' choir, and although the director does 
not endeavor to do without female voices, the boys' 
department is a novel but artistic addition to the re- 
sources of the choir. The boys have been trained under 
Le Roy V. Brant, director of The Institute of Music of 
San Jose, organist and choirmaster at Trinity Church. 
The new choristers sang the celebrated hymn Rejoice. 
Ye Pure in Heart, as an offertory number the day of 
their admittance. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Mischa Levitzki and the Ampico 

Mischa Levitzki Writes 

A Letter To San 

Francisco 



April II, 1923- 
To San Francisco: "It has been a privilege to play for you 
this season. Your reception at all three of my appearances 
is a delightful memory, and I am looking forward to my 
return appearance here, which I hope will be in the near 
future. In the meantime, however, I feel that, thanks to the 
Ampico, I play to a great many of you, all but in person. 
The influence of this wonderful instrument in the home is 
inestimable. I have heard and compared all of the repro- 
ducing pianos, and to me the supremacy of the Ampico is 
unquestionable. The selection of the right reproducing 
piano should not be entered into lightly. It is too important. 
It is just as important for you as for the artist, and should 
only be made after careful comparison." 

Mischa Levitzki 



COMPARE 

THE suggestion of Levitzki that you compare all reproducing 
instruments comes with unusual authority from a great artist 
who followed e.xactly that same course himself. In the end he was 
forced by strong conviction to' turn his back on the reproducing 
device installed in his favorite concert piano — a most courageous step. 
He, with RachmaninofE and several other great masters who fol- 
lowed the same course, have paid the highest tribute to the Ampico, 
and furnish testimony too eloquent to be ignored. 



The Ampico is placed at your disposal, just as it was for Levitzk 
and Rachmaninoff — for any comparison you may choose to make. 
Then follow your own judgment as did Levitzki, Rachmaninoff 
Godowsky, Moiseiwitsch, Dohnanyi, Schnabel, Rubinstein, Samaroff 
Leginska, Bloomfield-Zelsler, Ornstein, Mirovitch, Nyiregyhazi 
Maier, Pattison, La Forge, Farrar, Kreisler and scores of their 
fellow artists. 



Kohler & Chase 



KNABE AMPICO 



San Francisco 
Sacramento 



Oakland 
San Jose 



Are you planning to spend the Summer Vacation in Los Angeles? 
If so, you uill be glad to know that 

TWO MASTER CLASSES 

in VOICE and PIANO 
will be conducted by two well known teacbers 




f eatman (§viffitf) 

**Recognized authority on Voice Produc- 
tion and the Art of Singing — Teacher 
of Teachers throughout Europe 
and America." 

July 2nd to August 11th 



mtxth iWirobitcl) 

Pianist — Composer — Teacher 

(Graduate Petrograd Conservatory of 

Music — only concert pianist of the 

Essipoff School in America.) 

June 11th to July 21st 

— — For Detailed I 




L. E. BEHYMER, Manager RENA MacDONALD, Associate 

705 Auditorium Bide.. Los Angeles, Calif. 



THE ONLY GIRL AT THE RIVOLI 

By Alfred Metzger 

In selecting the musical comedy The 
Only Girl for presentation the Hartman 
Steindorff Comic Opera Co. made no mis- 
take, for this exceptionally funny and 
melodious entei'tainment is charged with 
interest and situations that are c'everly 
created and exceptionally well presented. 
It is one of those up-to-date musical plays 
that comhine novel situations with music 
of a light but classy order and contains 
a series of surprises and interesting situ- 
ations. Ferris Hartman is taking care of 
a juvenile part and doing it in a manner 
to delight those who rejoice in the com- 
bination of humor and sympathetic love 
scenes. In Mr. Hartman tliere is graph- 
ically demonstrated the age-old adage — 
once an artist always an artist — and the 
histironic ability of Ferris Hartman sim- 
ply can not be surpassed. 

John Van as Corksy combines an ever 
increasingly pleasing tenor voice with 
also constantly improving histrionic ahil- 
ity. He is thoroughly at ease in the part. 
Paul Hartman as "Fresh" adds to the 
breezy atmosphere of the performance. 
Robert Carlson as "Bunkie" has ample 
opportunity to reveal his fine, ringing 
voice and his conscientious submergence 
into the role. George Kunkel as the 
valet has a minor ro'e wliich he essays 
with all the seriousness at his command. 
One of the bright spots of the perform- 
ance is Myrtle Dingwall whose excep- 
tionally beautiful voice is heard on vari- 
ous occasions and whose convincing his- 
trionic art is one of the delights of the 
performance. Miss Dingwall has con- 
quered for herself a lasting place in the 
affections of the public. 

Rene Lowrie as "Birdie" looks charm- 
ing and acts convincingly. Dixie Blair 
as Margaret is one of the high lights of 
the performance, obtaining every ounce 
of effect from the comic situations and 
acting with a thoroughness testifying to 
her natural adaptability. Violet Maye as 
Jane adds to the general pulchritude of 
the cast and sings with pleasing voice. 
Muggins Davies in the role of "Patsy" is 



as irresistible as usual enacting her part 
with convincing naturalness and bubbling 
good humor. Elfrieda Steindorff sings a 
number of arias with increasing taste 
and Lillian Leonard as Ruby adds charm 
to the ensemble. Chorus and orchestra 
as usual complete the musical balance. 



The San Francisco Music Teachers' 
Association will hold its regular monthly 
meeting on Tuesday evening. May 29th, 
at 3107 Washington street. The program 
will be interesting as it will be im- 
promptu, members being asked to come 
prepared to contribute to the evening's 
entertainment. 

Erwin V. Holton, tenor, will be soloist 
for the McNeil Club of Sacramento, of 
which Percy A. R. Dow is the director, 
next Tuesday evening, May 29th. He will 
sing two groups of songs and one solo 
number with the chorus. No doubt he 
will meet with his usual artistic sue 
cess. 

Atha Hillback, soprano, will be soloist 
at the Hotel Whitcomb Sunday evening 
concert, tomorrow. She will sing three 
groups of songs including: Shepherd!.' 
Thy Demeanour Vary (Brown), Th«j' 
Lass With the Delicate Air (Arne). 
Three Songs From Eiland (Fielitz), 11 ' 
Baccio (Arditi). Eugenia Mem will play 
a violin solo, Sicilienne el Rigaudon 
(Francoeur-Kreisler). The orchestra is 
under the direction of Stanislas Bem. J 



ATTENTION MUSIC STUDENTS!—- 
There are a number of students with ex- 
ceptional talent who have no opportunity 
to obtain the necessary training to utilize 
such talents. Participation in the Pacific 
Coast Musical Review's monster subscrip- 
tion contest will not only enable such 
students /to secure the necessary funds 
for their lessons, but wll give them a 
chance to start a career. This paper will 
furnish the teacher and the publicity to 
obtain engagements. For particulars ad- 
dress Subscription Contest Editor, Pa- 
cific Coast Musical Review, 801 Kohler 
& Chase Building, San Francisco. 



m 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



"J Model for Singers of If'orthy Ambitions." — W. J. Henderson, New York "Sun." 




The Distinguished Baritone, and Model Recitalist 

LOUIS 

GRATEURE 

VOCAL MASTER CLASSES 

FOR ARTISTS— TEACHERS— STUDENTS 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
for a period of five weeks, beginning 

July 16th, 1923 

IT IS ADVISABLE TO MAKE EARLY APPLICATION FOR MEMBERSHIP IN THESE CLASSES AND 

FOR PRIVATE INSTRUCTION, FULL INFORMATION, RATES, CONDITIONS, TERMS AND 

ARRANGEMENTS APPLY DIRECT TO 

SELBY C. OPPENHEIMER, Manager, Foxcroft Building, 68 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



A conductor of rank 



One of the elect! 



,nn. B. Z. o. StC. m'Mnt 



VLADIMIR SHAYITCH 

conducting the Berlin Philharmonic, BerHn Symphony, 
Dresden Philharmonic and Leipzig Symphony Orchestra 
is enthusiastically acclaimed by public and by press. 



prfMMion that are 
nerliner TaiseMa 



t, Febr. 



Shuvitch IH one ot the 

Pathetique he made the 
notiun and |ion'«r of ex- 
nith. 



tjf Tschaiko 



24th, 1923. 

audience Vladimir Shavitch 
ed the rhilharmonic Orchestra in Beethoven- 
he all-Russian program included the Scheche- 
sky-Korsakoff and the Fourth Symphony 



, the la 



sky; both 

being i 



nbued 



also belongs Vladimir Shavitch, who. how- 
is to me to be one of the Foremost among 
with an artist's soul, entirely given to the 
OH InMitlrntion of the moment, he combines a 
which betrays exact German classical 
Therefore the Overture "Romeo and 
DUgh given with deeply felt emotion still 
clarity and sharp definite 



in the 



titly 



nduetor of Rnnk. 



Allg. MuKik Mf^.. Uerllu. March 9th. 1923. 

Vladimir Shavitch at the head of the Berlin Syii 
phony Orchestra gave us a performance of the Tscha 
ktjwsky B minor Symphony that was well forth hea 
ing. It was a pleasure to watch with what natura 
ness and simplicity the young conductor iinpoMed h 
will upon the oreheMtra. And what he imposed w; 
right: elaHtle and full of life the rhythm, the tern 
authoritively correct, and strikingly obvious his sens 



Febr.. 11th. 1923. 
jughout with understanding 
and elan. He also has grace and stage presence, and 
in him we encountered a personality worth meeting. 

SiKnnle. Berlin. March 7th, 1923. 

Emotionally felt to the last degree, iuHplred through 
a MtronK nnturnl musical Inntlnct conducted by spar- 
ing, but significant gestures, the Overture "Romeo 



: able 



pr 



to the full. 



DRESDEN 
Drewd. NeneHttt Nnchr., Febr. 14th, 1923. 

Vladimir Shavitch, in a concert with the Philhar- 
monic Orchestra, conducted a purely Russian program 
of which Tschaiko wsky Fourth Symphony and the 
Schecherezade by Rimsky-Korsakoff were the promi- 
nent parts. Both these works presented by 



vhat 



nded 






"sophisticated" 

i and genuine than ever 

luHpired interpretation. 



The soloi-st, Frau Melanie Ki 
rchestrated songs by Rachr 
vith her usual effectiveness. 



DieMdener Nachrlchten. Febr. 12th. 1923. 

At the concert of the Philharmonic Orchestra Vladi- 
mir Shavitch conducted a program that was remark- 
able for its conciseness: Tschaikowsky. Rachmani- 



noff. Balakireff. Rimsky-Korsakoft. Th 
Symphony rose to the full splendo " . 

The strongly impressive motive of Fate appeared lik 
■ of bronzi 



ty. 
ke 
its rhythmical accuracy, that 
characterizes the whole first part. A spirited inspira- 
tion pervaded the whole, powerful clImaxeN were 
reached on a large scale prepared by the ingenuous 
hand of the conductor. In the Andantino Shavitch al- 
lowed the different groups of instruments to revel in 
the most i^lorioux HhadeM of eolorlni; and the melodi- 
ous fineness of this movement dawned upon us in 
delightfully Moft beauty. 



The 



rded 



th 



shar 



uUu 



ell- 



SnehH. VolkMztR.. Dresd.. Febr. 10th, 1923. 

The conductor, a thorough musician of deep 
tional power, who NtandN above hlM taHk, scor 



I.BIPZIO 

IVeneste Xachr.. March 8 th. 1923. 

unusually gifted conductor was in 

in the person of Vladimir Shavitch who 



Leipzig Symph 



y Orchestra 
r of the baton 
and of the s( 



a.rkable technic 



Xeue Leipxieer Zeltun?. March Sth. 1923. 



Tschaiko 
Orchestra 



sky prograi 



lum-Saal 




n by the 


Leipzig Symph 


nir Shavit 


h. Shavitch has 


bility. ma 


■iters his scores 


Kagrt^eHti 


ve power over 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

SHERMAN DANBY, REPRESENTATIVE AND CORRESPONDENT 

Assisted by Miss Lloyd Dana and Miss Mildred Alexander, Los Angeles; Miss Penelope Newklrk; Hollywood; Mrs. Helen Wood, Pasadena. 

LOS ANGELES OFFICE: SUITE 447 DOUGLAS BUILDING, 257 SO. SPRING STREET, TELEPHONE 820-302 

Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each week. 



I.OS AXGELES MUSICAL CALENDAR 
Moiidar. May 28 
Cnlmon Luliovlskl — aaaiitted by May McDonald 

Hopv Recital Ebell Auditorium 

LoM AngclcH Con«ervatory Recital Kramer Studios 

Tuesday. May 29 
Fanny AVarren, Musical aud Comedy 

Readlnea - Gamut Club 

I.ON AnKelcN ConMervntory, Recital (Mrs. Thomas, 

planlste .- Kramer Studios 

Wednesday. May 30 
Aneeleno Minstrels, John Smallman directing Gamut Club 
Constance Ualfour. Memorial Services — 

2:30 |>. m Forest Lawn 

Thursday, May 31 
Anf^eleno Minstrels. John Sniaiiman directing.. ..Gamut Club 
Call Bronson's pupil. Lucy Mers Allen In 

Recital Symphony Hall 

Los .Vnecles Conservatory Recital Highland Park 

Sunday. June 3 
Rosa Ponselle — Benefit Concert for Bowl — 

;t p. Ill Hollywood Bofvl 

Los Ange'es, May 21, 1923. 

OfBcially adopting the slogan — 'Music for all and all 
tor Music" — Music Week was ushered in Los Angeles 
on Saturday night with a dazzling pageant of flower 
he-decked floats, marching choristers, hands and the 
combined efforts of 10,000 or more musicians and others 
connected indirectly with music to make of Music Week 
something permanent in its cultural effect. The civic 
spirit was reflected in this parade, and during the week 
a thousand concerts were given in every available 
auditorium in the city. Great credit must be given the 
artists who so generously donated their services tor the 
encouragement of the better understanding of music. 

Practically all the music clubs and allied organizations 
of Los Angeles and surrounding communities were rep- 
resented in this mammoth pageant staged on Broad- 
way, and mention must be made of the Hollywood com- 
munity chorus float which won the cash prize of $200. 
Other prize winners were the Los Angeles Times and 
the Western Union. Winning cups were the American 
Legion Band, the Los .'\ngeles Police Band, Jinnistan 
Grotto Industrial Band, the Junior Band and the City 
Play Ground Department. Of the business floats the 
cup winners were the Fitzgerald Music Company, Music 
Trades Association, Barnes Music Company. Of the 
industrial floats the employes of the three offices of the 
Southern California Edison Company of Pasadena, Lan- 
caster and Los Ange'.es won cups. Of the marching or- 
ganizations, the camp flre girls won the cups and of the 
civic organizations the Anaheim and Alhambra Cham- 
bers of Commerce won the deserved honors. All of 
which goes to show that the spirit of music is working 
a leaven for the entire civic structure. 

One of the most important events in its ultimate good 
for Los Angeles week was the banquet given at the 
Hollywood Woman's Club, by the Hollywood Chamber 
of Commerce to which probably about 300 "picked" 
people were invited. Its purpose was to further guar- 
antee the success of the summer Bowl concerts, and 
Mrs. J. J. Carter, that remarkab'.e dynamic personality 
was the guiding spirit who with her co-workers made 
the Hollywood Bowl the success it was last season. 

Among the speakers who were heart, soul and purse 
for the success of the Bowl were Dr. Wilson Martin, 
who likened these people who were so vitally interested 
in this great civic movement to Argonauts. Ben Pear- 
son, the executive chairman of Music Week spoke on 
the effect of music which, in cementing the nations 
together, would develop a national conscience. Alex- 
ander Stewart was another speaker who had something 
to say and said it weU. Other prominent business men 
who spoke were J. T. Fitzgerald at whose appearance 
the banqueters burst into song, singing "For He is a 
Jolly Good Fellow." The University of Southern Cali- 
fornia was represented by J. Baldwin Woods on the 
faculty, who assured Mrs. Carter the co-operation of 
the entire school force. L. E. Behymer, the impresario, 
addressed the gathering and gave us a picture of his 
boyhood and Los Angeles thirty years ago and told us 
of dreams come true. 

Among the women who spoke were Mrs. Mead, presi' 
dent of the Ebell Club, Carrie Jacobs Bond, the com- 
poser, and Mrs. Chauncey Clark whom we as a com- 
munity are great'y indebted to, for her generous spirit 
in selling the large tract of land which is now the 
Hollywood Bowl for a sum of about one-flfth of its 
realty valuation. The guest of honor was the noted 
conductor, Emil Oberhoffer. who has been made the 
musical conductor for the summer concert season. He 
spoke a tew words in appreciation. His fine personality, 
coupled with the tact that he made the Minneapolis 
Symphony natlonal'y famous, will assure music success 
to the Bowl. With Mrs. Carter, Mr. Blanchard, and her 
co-workers, to work for the flnancial success, there is 
not a doubt in any one's mind but that the Bowl will be 
a permanent thing in Hollywood. 

A program of unusual interest given during Music 
Week was that sponsored by the American Optomists 
and the MacDowell Club of allied arts. The artists ap- 
pearing on this program were Henri de Busscher and 
Emile Ferir, noted Symphony Orchestra men, and 
Blanche Rogers-Lott, pianiste. who has worked un- 
ceasingly in behalf of music and who together with May 



Fitzgerald's for the Advancement of Music 

Godowsky — The Master 



Leopold 


Godo 


wsky, 


ne of 


th 


f, 


eat 


!St p 


an 


SIS 


of 


today, h 


just retu 


rned 


from a 


most 




ces 


ful 


tour 


of 


th 


t 


rient. T 


history c 


f the 


achieve 


ment 


of 


thi 


s m 


aster 


of 


th 


P 


anoforte 


one closely connected 


with 


the 


great 


mstr 




nt 


he 


has chos 


to aid h 


s interpretati 


ons, the 

















KNABE 



|riTZGERAII)^ MMUMCCa y 

HILL STREET X?'^AT 7&7-7Z9 
Los Angeles 




MacDonald Hope, have been responsible for the un- 
usually fine Chamber Music programs given in Los 
Angeles. 

Grace Wood Jess, singer of folk songs appeared on 
this program, also Raymond McPheeters, accompanist, 
Jay Plowe, flutist and Charles Wakefield Cadman, the 
composer, and Emilie Cole, the soprano; follows the 
interesting program: Ensemble Moderne — Suite by 
Arthur Foote — Allemande, Rigaudon; Jay Plowe and 
May MacDonald Hope — Poeme for flute and piano by 
Charles T. Griffes; Ensemble Moderne — The Bagpipe, 
tone poem by Charles Martin Loeffler; Grace Wood 
Jess — American Folk ' Songs — Of the Kentucky Moun- 
tains — Six Kings's Daughters, The Nightingale. An 0".d 
Maid's Song, arranged by Howard Brockway; Of the 
Plantation — Swing Low, Sweet Chariot, arranged by 
Harry Burleigh; Run, Mary, Run. arranged by David 
Guion; Charles Wakefield Cadman and Emily Cole: 
Three Songs, Composer at the Piano — I Saw Thee First 
When the Cherries Bloomed (From "Sayonara" Cycle). 
How Like a Troubadour (First Los Angeles perform- 
ance). Calling to Thee, Piano Excerpts from the Com- 
poser's Omar Khayyam Suite, The Caravan; Prayer 
from opera. The Witch of Salem, (first Los Angeles 
performance). Sheila's Song from opera. The Witch of 
Salem, (first Los Angeles performance). 

Others who ccntributed during Music Week was Ilya 
Bronson, the cellist, whose generous spirit carried -him 
far, and he offered not only his services, but to under- 
write the sum of $100 to insure towards the success of 
the Bowl; The Symphony Club, of which Mr. Bronson is 
a member, presented an interesting program on the 
evening of the 21st, and some of the numbers given 
were the Oheron overture (Weber) Hungarian march 
(Berlioz), first movement of the eighth Beethoven 
Symphony and the Phedre overture (Massenet). 

As the grand finale of Music Week the grand open 
air free concert will be given at Exposition Park with 
Hugo Kirchoffer directing the Orpheus Quartet; Henry 
Schoenfield conducting the Woman's Symphony and all 
the schools in Los Angeles will present programs. 

Harry Ben Gronsky, ten year-old violin'st, appeared 
in a recital given under the auspices of the boy's 
teacher, Gregor Cherniavsky and L. E. Behymer, the 
impresario, at the Auditorium on Friday evening. He 
played numbers from Schubert, Ries, Auer, Wieniawsky 
and Kreisler's Viennese popular song. 

Lawrence M. Tibbett, young Los Angeles baritone re- 
turned last Saturday from his first winter in New York. 
Like all Calitornians, the West is in his blood, and he 
was glad of an opportunity to spend the summer on the 
Pacific Coast. He will be musical director for the 
Pacific Palisades Chautauqua Course at Santa Monica. 
Before leaving New York Mr. Tibbett, who coached one 
season with Frank La Forge, signed a contract with the 
Metropolitan Opera House, where he will sing secondary 
baritone roles next season. His entire vocal training 
was gained in Los Angeles under the late Joseph Dupuy 
and Basil Ruysdael. 

However I have no intention of descanting on the un- 
doubted excellence of local voice production methods, 
or the fame of Frank La Forge as a musical coach, be- 
cause Lawrence Tibbett himself seems to me to have 
always carried within him the seeds of a brilliant 
musical career. There are many singers who are not 
musicians. There are a tew singers who are musicians 
first of all, to whom life comes as a sequence of musical 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

705 Auditoriuin BIdg., Los Angele* 



GERTRUDE ROSS 



COMPOSER-PIANISTE 



1000 South Alv 



Phone 51003 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CULTURE — COACHING IN REPERTOIRE 

OPERA CLASSES INCLUDING COMPLETE 

PRESENTATIONS 

Studio 1324 S. Flsueroa. Phono tlSOS 

CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

Available for Concerts and ReeltaU 

Limited Number of Advanced Pupils Accepted 

Violinist Los Angeles Trio 

««odloi .1.t4 Music Arts Studio BIdg. Phone 10OS2 

ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

Taeada7. Wedneadar. Friday Afternoona 
EKan School. Phonea 21805 or 271330 
1324 South Flsaeroa, Loa Ansrelea 

SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCERT MASTER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Concerts and Recltalu 

Manasenient Mra. Caroline C. Smith, 424 Auditorium Bldie. 



Member Trio Intime, Loa An«relea Trio, Philharmonic 

Q,a>rtet. Instruction, Chamber Mualc Recltala 

K615 La Mlrada — Phone H0II7 3044 

ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

Teacher of Plnno, Harmonr. Voice Coach. During March 
and April, Itlerrltt Jones Hotel, Santa Monica. Tel. Santa 
Monica 03-14S. No. 348 Music Arts Bids.. I'OS Aneeles. 
Tel. S21-1S1. 




LOS ANGELES 

CALIFORNIA 

THEATRE 



GREATER CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
ELINOR, Conductine 
50 MUSICIANS 

PROGRAM FOR WEEK OF MAY 27 

(a) The Prince of PUscn — Selection Luders 

(b) Poet and Peasant — Overture von Suppe 

Marlmbaphone Solo — Charles E. Calkins 

(c) Syncopated Impressions 

Arrnnsred by Mr. Elinor 

In conjunction nllh 

HAROLD LLOYD 

The prince of skylarkers. In his latest 

hurricane of humor 

"SAFETY LAST" 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 






sounds, whose own lives give tliem the key to phrasing 
and inflections which others must learn mechanically 
from teachers. Great singing is only possible to born 
musicians who are fortunate enough to possess fine 
vocal instruments. Without voices of great power such 
musicans can often attain first rank. The Metropolitan 
Opera House has such a man in Scotti, whose musical 
and dramatic sense — intelligence in the best sense of 
the word — enables him to outshine many a vccal giant. 
It is my belief that Lawrence Tibbett will become one 
of the great singer-musicians of our day. though, of 
course, this may not happen over night. 

He talked very little to me of music, but a great deal 
of some ancient Chinese paintings he saw at the Metro- 
politan Museum, works which caught and presented the 
immense power of nature and he spoke enthusiastically 
of the Moscow Art Theatre productions because he found 
that the actors imagined fiercely, intensely, the char- 
acters they created, that they were encouraged to do 
this, allowing technique to grow naturally out of their 
Impassioned imagination. Briefly, this young singer is 
far more concerned with life than with music — with 
Life, the basis of music and of all the arts. Perhaps it 
is this attitude which makes of his singing something 
alive. Lawrence Tibbett couples great dramatic ability 
with his musicianship, a dual talent which will stand 
him in good stead at the "Met," and he possesses that 
which has brought many a less gifted singer through 
with flying colors — intelligence. That is the first and 
last quality you feel in the man. 

Mr. Tibbett's first appearance in Los Angeles since 
his return from New York was at the Ebell Club on 
Monday afternoon, where he sang the parts of Sir 
Launfal and the Leper in the first production of Ger- 
trude Ross, the famous composer's new composition 
The Vision of Sir Launfal, a musical setting of Lowell's 
well-known poem. A reception was tendered Mr. Tib- 
bett on Friday evening at the home of his sister, Mrs. 
Cyrus Grant, by Mrs. Cyrus Grant and Mrs. Lawrence 
M. Tibbett, which was attended by a representative 
gathering. LLOYD DANA. 

Charles Wakefield Cadman, ass'sted by Margaret 
Messer Morris, soprano, will appear in Bakersfield on 
Monday. May 28, when they will present two recitals. 
Mr. Cadman has finished same new compositicns and 
will present some of them for the first time on these 
programs. This is the third season that Mr. Cadman 
and Margaret Messer Morris have appeared upon pro- 
grams together as he finds her work most satisfactory 
and her interpretations of his songs charmingly original. 

Leon Goldwasser presented his pupil, Laura Filer 
Griding, in a violin recital at the Ebell Club, Tuesday 



Mme. Newcombe 

PRINDELL 

Desirable Dignified 

Engagements Publicity 

Personal Representative of Distinguished Artists 

MAJESTIC THEATRE 

LOS ANGELES 

Phone 642-93 Phone 642-93 



ZOELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

LOS ANGBLCS 

1250 WIndMor BoQlevard 6318 Hollywood Bonlevard 

Complete Faculty of Artist Teacher* 

JOHN SMALLMAN 



SHIRI.RV T.VGO.VRT, Seorelorj- 

Anna Ruzena Sprotte 

CONTRALTO School of Vocal Art 
Stndloi Tahoe Bulldlne IMocdonell CInb Rooms) 
For Inrormntion Res. Phone T-1184 

MAY MACDONALD HOPE 

CONCERT PIANISTE — LOS ANGBLBS TRIO 
Stndloi Sa3 Mn»lc Ar«« S»ndlo nidg. Phonci 1 00W2 

ANN THOMPSON-P/an<5/e 

PIANIST OF PERSONALITY 

1Z4 W. Rcr^nrto ,V|L 885 

Amnico Rolls 



CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN 

America's Poonlar Composer on tonr with TSIANINA 
Kast and Sonth: Oct. and Nov. — Pnc. Coast: Jan. and Feb, 
East asalni Feb, and April — Callfornlai April and May 

CHARLES BOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 

446 S. Grand View. Phone 554646. Lo» AnBeles 

DA VOL SANDERS "^'^^'m^pS^^S"^ 

Head Violin Dept., CoIleKc of Music, V. S. C. — Meaiber 
.„ Philharmonic Orchestra 
awil <. Fiirneroa «t,. l.o« <a»ele. Phone Msta aino 

A. KOODLACH 

VIOLIN MAKER AND REPAIRER 

Connoisseur — Appraiser 

B03 Majestic Theatre BIdK,. LOS Anccles Phone 670.91 



evening. May 22, The assisting artists were Mabel Cap- 
pell, soprano, and Mary Louise LeGrand, accompanist. 

The Music Culture Club presented Mme. Marguerite 
d'Aleria, the Hungarian pianiste in a program of classics 
and modern masterpieces, at the Kanst Art Gallery last 
Thursday evening. May 24. Mae Borsham Albers. 
soprano, assisted and Dr. Bruce Gordon Kingsley gave 
an interesting analysis on Schumann's "Carnival." ' 

Miss Frieda Peycke gave a group of musically illus- 
trated readings at the Philharmonic Auditorium on 
Saturday night on the program furnished by members 
of the Lyric Club. She gave four numbers and re- 
sponded to two encores. The most popular were 
"Ballads of Mary Ann" and "Us Twins." 

Calmon Luboviski, gifted violinist will give a recital 
the evening of May 28 at the Ebe'.I Club. He will be 
assisted by May MacDonald Hope, pianiste and founder 
of the Los Angeles Trio. These two artists will play the 
Buscni Sonata in E minor and Mr. Luboviski will play 
the Bach Sonata in G minor for violin alone. On this 
occasion he will present two of his artist pupils on the 
same program, Lois Putlitz, age 12, and Harry Zagon, 
age 15. 




has made quite a local reputation for herself and Mme. 
Stetzler is planning to take her to New York to study 
with the famous diva, Marcella Sembrich. 

John Smallman will direct the Oratorio Society in 
Hadleys Ode to Music at the Holywood Bowl on Sun- 
day, May 27. at 3 o'clock. Mme. Anna Ruzena Sprotte, 
contralto; Melba French Barr, soprano: Clifford Lott, 
baritone and Arthur Hackett, tenor, will be the soloists. 

Mjabelle Everett presented her pupils in theT annual 
recital given at the Ambassador Hotel on Sunday, May 
20. The program was as fo'lows: 

Mah Lindy Lou (Strickland), The Shoogy-Shoo (May- 
hew), Ensemble; In Italy (Del Riego), Slave Song 
(Boyd), Miss Gladys Wetherby; II mio bel foco (Mar- 
cello), Miss Freda Faris; The Lord is My Shepherd 
(Liddle), Miss Lula Lanterman; The Enchanted Glade 
(Barker), Miss Lanterman and Mr. Worth; Mattinata 
(Leoncavallo), Songs of Araby (Johns), Od Plaid 
Shaw! (Old Irish), Mr. Worth; Nuit d'etoiles (Debussyl 
11 Neige (Bemberg), Miss Margaret De Mers; Amarilli 
(Caccini) ; Chi vuol la zingarella (Paissiellu) ; Seguldila 
(Bizet), Miss Maude Shenberg; Cry of Rachael (Salter), 
Miss Leontine Redon; Still wie d'e nacht (Bohm), Es 
blinkt der than (Rubinstein), Hindoo Slumber Song 
(Ware), Miss Mariam Aaron; Voi che sapete (Mozart), 
My Heart's a Butterfly (Bochan). Miss Margaret Crist; 
Bird of the Wilderness (Horsman), Cargoes (Dobson), 
Morning Hymn (Henschel), Miss Faris; Don't Come In, 
Sir, P'.ease (Scott), Danza (Chadwick), Miss De Mers; 
Ouvre tes yeux bleus (Massenet), Mandoline (Debussyl. 
Carnival (Fourdrain), Miss Redon; The Last Song 
(Rogers), Miss Shenberg. 

Miss Leontine Redon, Miss Maude Shenberg and Miss 
Margaret de Mers of the Miabelle Everett Studios are 
giving the song program before the French section of 
the Ebell Club on the morning of May 25, and Miss 
Freda Farris of the same studios gives the program in 
the evening of the same day with Mabelle Havens, 
elocutionist at the Hotel Stillwell. 



LAWRENCE M. TIBBETT 



Gall Mils Dimmit, soprano, has returned from a six 
weeks' eastern tour, and while in Washington, D. C, 
sang for the D. A. R. Continental Congress. 

Ruth Stevens Frost, of the Southwest College of 
Music, will appear in a program given at the South- 
western Museum on Sunday, May 27. at 3 o'clock. She 
will play the sextette from Lucia, arranged by Letche- 
titzke and a Nocturne in G flat by Leyer-Helmund. 

Gladys G, Hill, dramatic soprano, and talented pupil 
of Mme. Anna Ruzena Sprotte, has recently been en- 
gaged as soloist at the First Christian Church on 
Eleventh and Hope streets. 

Sibley Pease, noted organist and secretary of the 
Southern California Chapter of the American Guild of 
Organists, announces that a convention will be held 
under the auspices of the Los Angeles chapter on June 
25, 26, 27, and 2S, to which all organist in California 
are invited. The Los Angeles chapter is anxious to 
know how many will avail themselves of this exce'.lent 
opportunity to meet and hear other organ'sts in Cali- 
fornia. It is believed that many will plan their vacat'ons 
so as to attend the convention. The Los Angeles com- 
mittee wishes to emphasize the fact that every organist 
in the state and from the entire country as well are 
cordially invited to attend. In order that all the cdu- 
vention details may be mailed, a prospectus is being 
prepared which can be secured by writing direct to Mr. 
Pease, 1027 North Bonnie Brae, Lcs Angeles. 

Miss Pearle Witherbee, prima donna soprano, gave an 
interesting concert-recital at Symphony Hall last Friday 
evening. Miss Witherbee was assisted by Miss Lucille 
Stanley, violinist, and Miss Anita Paller. p'aniste. 
Among the outstanding numbers on the program which 
won special applause were Springs Awakening (Dudley 
Buck), Day is Done (Balfe) and Le Pecheurs du Perles 
(Bizet). 

Will Garroway, pianist of great dramatic ability is 
one of a group of talented art'sts who will appear at the 
Discovery Concerts featured at Grauman's. He will be 
heard in Moskowski's Waltz in E major, and The Wind. 

Mme. Alma Stetzler will present her gifted pupil 
Georgia Stark, coloratura soprano,_ in a song recital to 
be given at tiie Ebe:i Club House, Tuesday evening, 
June 12. Miss Stark, who is only seventeen years old. 



GEORGE KRUGER AT THE SEQUOIA CLUB 

One of the mcst interesting and successful concerts 
of this season was given under the direction of George 
Kruger at the Sequoia Club Hall on Thursday, May 17. 
The people must have anticpated a treat because the 
attendance was such that every available space was 
occupied in the hall. Those who participated in the pro- 
gram were George Kruger with his four artist students, 
Edna Linkowski, Myrtle Gab'e, Norman Smith and 
Joseph Salvato, ass'sted by two young viclinists, Helen 
Hughes and Emily Lees, artist students of Guiseppe 
Jollain, the distinguished violin teacher of this city. 

The program began with the first movement of the 
C minor Concerto by Beethoven, which was played with 
fluent technic and Intelligent understanding by Joseph 
Salvato. Then followed the A minor Grieg Crncerto in- 
terpreted by George Kruger and accompanied by Myrtle 
Gab'e on the second piano. Long bursts of applause 
after each movement and even in the midst of the 
composition showed how powerfully Mr. Kruger Im- 
pressed the hearts of the listeners with his playing. 

After this Helen Hughes and Em'ly Lees rendered the 
double concerto by Bach in a soulful, finished way, ably 
accompanied by Mabel Sherburne West. Helen Hughes 
showed her wonderful bowing and temperament in her 
solo — the Ballade and Polonaise by "Vieuxtemps. Edna 
Linkowski made a decided hit with a Scherzo by 
Mendelssohn and the E major Valse by Moszkowskl. 
She has a splendid technic and a charming way of ex- 
press'ng herself on the piano. The program was closed 
by Norman Smith, the little wizard of the piano. He 
had chosen the Rhapsodie d'Auvergne by Saint-Saens 
and so strong was the applause that he was called to 
the platform again and again, until he responded with 
La Fileuse by Raff as an encore. 



THE ZECH ORCHESTRA CONCERT 

The Zech Orchestra of which William F. Zech Is the 
energetic and capable director, gave the first concert 
of the season 1923 at California Hall, Polk and Turk 
streets, on Tuesday evening. May 15th, before a crowded 
house. An unusually ambitious and high class program 
had been prepared and the young musicians constituting 
the orchestra proved to be thoroughly well trained and 
selected with an Idea of combining enthusiastic and well 
equipped young instrumentalists into one body. The 
program contained such difficult and splendid works as 
Beethoven's Egmont Overture, Schubert's Unfinished 
Symphony, Dvorak's Two Slavonic Dances and Wagner's 
Mastersinger Overture. It was a program that 'would 
easily be apt to tax the resources of a professional 
orchestra and when we say that Mr. Zech obtained ex- 
cellent results from this body of young musicians who 
played with ease of technical execution and truly re- 
markable judgment as to phrasing and attacks as well 
as Intonation, we surely bestow a mete of praise which 
is not only well deserved, but rarely justifiable In case 
of non-professional organizations. 

Mrs. Edna Mae Stratlon Nies. vloliniste, played the 
first number of Bruch's D minor violin concerto (No. 2) 
with exceptional skill. Overcoming almost unsurmount- 
able technical dlfflculties with surprising ease and se- 
curing emotional effects of an exceptional order. She 
well merited the ovation accorded her. Miss Arline 
Elizabeth Lynch played the piano part with fine judg- 
ment and ensemble effect. Harry B. Tobey, cellist, dis- 
tinguished himself by playing Wuerst's Serenade with 
excellent tone, expression and musicianship. It was a 
concert of which the orchestra and Mr. Zech may in- 
deed be proud. 



10 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



San Joaquin Valley Musical Review 

Edited by LILIAN TURNEY HAYS 

1753 Van Ness Avenue, Fresno, Calif. 

Telephone Fresno 7499 



Fresno, May 21, 1923. 

The third annual public school music festival will be 
held at the Fresno Auditorium on May 25th and 26th 
under the direction of Miss Inez Coffin. 1700 children 
of the city schools taking part. The program, which 
will be given in a later issue includes several composi- 
tions by Earl Towner, supervisor of music in the 
Fresno public schools and conductor of the Fresno Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Mr. Towner will conduct the orches- 
tra of fifty pieces which will be made up of members 
selected from the various student orchestras of the city 
schools. Pasquale Santa Emma will conduct the band, 
also composed of students. The Fresno Boy Choir will 
sing under the directorship of Miss Coffin. 

It is a hopeful thing for the future of music in this 
community that we have such a splendid music depart- 
ment in our public schools. Each year's Festival shows 
a marked development in the children's work and each 
year more enthusiasm is apparent on the part of the 
general public toward the Festival. Such participation 
of children in civic functions of this kind should be en- 
couraged. 

The United Scandinavian Singers gave a most inter- 
esting concert at the White Theatre in Fresno on the 
evening of May 17th. Most of the numbers were sung 
"a cappela"— without accompaniment— by the chorus ot 
sixty men under the direction of Axel Pihlstrom. Unity 
of effort and true musical appreciation were apparent 
throughout the concert. On the Sea by Dudley Buck was 
sung without accompaniment and the singers surely 
deserve especial commendation for this number. It 
reflects the soul of Scandinavian music, the love of 
the rugged shores, the stiff sea breeze and the long dark 
nights and short bright days. Konrad Anderson, bari- 
tone, has a big mellow voice and showed real artistry 
in his solos. Mrs. Romayne Hunkins of Fresno accom- 
panied the singers and Mrs. Christine M. Hart, also of 
Fresno, gave two groups of songs. 

Mendelssohn's oratorio, Elijah, was sung by the San 
Joaquin Valley Oratorio Society and associated artists 
under the direction ot Llewellyn B. Cain in Fresno April 
28th. It was a memorable 'performance. The solo parts 
were taken by Mrs. Esther L. Ryer. soprano; Mrs. R. 
G. Retallick, soprano; Miss Zaruhi Elmassian, soprano; 
Miss Minnie MacDonnald of Selma, contralto; Robert 
Blume, tenor; L. B. Cain, baritone, and Ralph R. Wise 
of Visalia, baritone. Quoting Miss Isabel Morse in the 
Fresno Bee: "The oratorio was opened with a command- 
ing, masterful solo by Llewellyn B. Cain. It was sung 
with authority, power and admirable tone quality. He 
has a: beautiful voice of unusual carrying ability and 
the solos sung by him were notably well done. If one 
were to choose among them probably the aria. It Is 
Enough, would be the first in approval. 

"The value of the organ as a harmonic background 
was apparent in the organ playing of Gladys Ogborn. 
Her enjoyment ot the composition was evident in her 
well marked rhythms. She was ably assisted by Mrs. 
Romayne Hunkins at the piano. 

"The manner in which the chorus began its numbers 
was excellent. The method of attack was evidence of the 
worth of its training. The crescendos and diminuendos 
were made with such ease that the listener felt the 
real musical feeling back of the singing . . . 

Mrs Esther Ryer, soprano, sang a pleasing duet with 
Miss Marie MacDonnald. and the aria, Hear Ye Israel, 
at the end of the oratorio with commendable sweetness 
ot tone. . . . Robert A. Blume had three important 
arias. Mrs. R, G. Retallick did some very beautiful sing- 
ing in the part of the widow. Her work was distinguished 
for its dramatic strength coupled with a high class timbre 
shown in the solo with Llewellyn B. Cain which was 
one ot the loveliest bits of the oratorio. In Ralph G. 
Wise, the community has a singer who promises much. 
His singing was characterized by a rich velvety quality 
of tone and his voice is well used. He had the largest 
number of solos and bore the test with honor. Miss 
Elmasian sang the part of youth creditably. 

"A double chorus from Orosi did some effective sing- 
ing in Lift Thine Eyes. 

"Truly Fresno should be grateful to the federation 
for a presentation which is musically educative and 
equally as enjoyable to the singers themselves as to 
the listeners." 

Last Year the San Joaquin Valley Oratorio Society 
sang The Messiah in Fresno. Kingsburg, Orosi, Reedley 
and Exeter. There are 700 voices in the chorus made 
up of smaller choral units from the various valley towns. 
Mr. Cain is make a great contribution to the musical 
life of the San Joaquin Valley and his efforts should 
meet not only with appreciation but with co-operation 
from the music lovers of the community. Thi'ee years 
ago Mr. Cain directed the Music Festival given in 
connection with the Raisin Day activities in Fresno 
and since that time he has been training choruses at the 
various valley towns. 

Next year's work of the Society is being outlined by 
Mr. Cain, and the representatives of the Church Feder- 
ation under whose auspices it will be given. The pro- 
grams will include Elijah, The Messiah. Stabat Mater, 
and a miscellaneous program to close the season. 

The Fresno Male Chorus, which is directed by Mr. 
A. G. Wahlberg, has just closed its tenth season. The 
annual election took place on May 14th and the follow- 



ROSE FLORENCE— Mezzo Soprano 

CONCERT— VOICE P LACING— COACHING 
Studio: — 545 Sutter Street 

Managemeni —L. E. Be/iymer, 70S Audita 



Telephone Kearny 3598 

uilding, Los Angeles 



ing officers were elected: A. S. Perkins, president; 
Curtis W. Beall. vice-president; C. A. Shirreft, secre- 
tary; Bryant Ashton, treasurer; L. W. Everson, chair- 
man ot the music committee: Dr. R. P. Cockrill, chair- 
man of the voice committee; Dr. Hal D. Draper, pub- 
licity director. These officers constitute a board ot 
directors. Reports from various committees and offi- 
cers showed the organization to be in good financial 
condition to begin the next season. The Male Chorus 
has given several concerts in various valley towns this 
season and five concerts at the White Theatre in Fresno. 
Mrs. Romayne S. Hunkins is the accompanist. 

The Boys' and Girls' Glee Clubs ot the Kingsburg 
High School gave Will C. Macfarland's operetta Little 
Almond Eyes May 18th and 19th under the direction ot 
Llewellyn B. Cain at the Kingsburg High School Audi- 
torium. There are sixty voices in the chorus and a solo 
cast ot twelve. Mr. Cain has been training the two glee 
clubs during the past school year and credit is due him 
tor the fact that the Girls' Glee Club took the Raisin 
Day prize at Fresno tor the best singing from floats. 

Earl Towner, conductor of the Fresno Symphony 
Orchestra, will be one of the guest conductors at the 
Hollywood Bowl concerts this summer. Mr. Towner 
will conduct among other numbers two ot his own com- 
positions. 

Mrs. Harry Coffee will leave for New York City May 
26th. While there she will coach with Mr. Frank 
LaForge. Mrs. Coffee is one of the leading pianists ot 
the San Joaquin Valley. Her playing has wonderful 
tone, a dazzling brilliancy and she brings equal intelli- 
gence and musical beauty to each composition she plays. 
Mrs. Coffee has given her art to this community with- 
out remuneration and is heartily appreciated by music 
lovers ot Fresno and vicinity. She was before her 
marriage. Miss Anna Newman of San Francisco and is 
well known in musical circles about the Bay. 

Miss Mary Orr will leave Fresno early in June to go 
to Boston where she will spend next year in study. 
Miss Orr has been organist at the First Presbyterian 
Church during the last year and has had charge ot 
the orchestra and harmony classes at the Fresno High 
School. She directed' the production of the operetta 
The Fire Prince given by the High School students last 
month and has appeared at various times during the 
year on programs. Her piano work shows a splendid 
technique and real artistry. She will return to Fresno 
in the fall of 1924. 

Miss Martha Sprengle presented two of her pupils at 
her studio in a recital given May 18th, when Frances 
Hansen and Dorothea Blume, 12-year-old pianists, gave a 
program including numbers from Heller, Haydn, Nevin, 
Bach. Grieg and others. Miss Sprengle is to be con- 
gratulated on the program ot these children. 

The choir ot St. John's Cathedral gave a concert May 
20th under the directorship of Miss Catherine Balthis. 
The choir was assisted by Will Hays, violinist; Edward 
Leonard, cellist, and Fred Brooks, clarineist; Miss Leah 
Thomas at the organ. The program follows: (a) Spring 
Song (Mendelssohn), organ and orchestra; (b) Bene- 
dictus (Rosewig), E flat, Alice Connoly and Ray Hanley; 
(c) Regina Coeli, Louise Adams, soloist; (d) Open the 
Gates (Knapp), Mrs. John A. New; (e) Agnus Dei 
(Bizet), Miss Marguerite Balthis; (t) Veni Creator 
(.Millard), Louise Adams, Ray Hanley, A. De La Tour; 
(g) Ave Maria (Millard), Miss Catherine Balthis; (h) 
(31orla (Mozart). 

Miss Lori M. Fuller will present her piano pupils in 
recital at the Parlor Lecture Club on May 24th. Invi- 
tations have been issued. The program will be; Le 
Secret (Gautier), Hazel Patterson, first player; Mar- 
jorie Guyett, second player: Jessie Patterson, third 
player; Cuckoo Song (Mae .\ileen Erb), Claire Saddle- 
myer; The Wild Horseman (Schumann), Clayton Boyer; 
The Water Wheel (Frank Lynes), Lester Reed; In 
Slumherland (Spaulding),' Hazel Patterson; The Hunt- 
er's Horn (Schmoll), Jessie Patterson; Sonatina, Op. 
36, No. 1 (Clementi), Andrew Mattel, first piano; Arthur 
Wahlberg, second piano; The Return of the Gondolier 
(Schmoll). Marjorie Guyett; Minuet (Bach), Arpeggio 
Waltz (Caroline Crawford) Eloise Kittrell; Etude No. 
11, Op. 100 (Burgmiller), Andrew Mattel; Minuet 
(Bach), Scherzo (Haydn), Arthur Wahlberg; Light Cav- 
alry (■Schmoll). John Fairweather; Forest Scenes (Carl 
Bohm), Fern McDevitt, first piano; Eleanor Mattel, sec- 
ond piano; Minuet (Bach), Frolics (Von Wilm), Ralph 
Agnew; Gavotte (Bach). Fantasie (Bach). Fern Mc- 
Devitt; Elfin Dance (Jensen), Hide and Seek (Dennee), 
Eleanor Mattel; The Flowing Tide (John Desmond 
Courtney), Clarence Phillips; In Hanging Gardens 
(Davies), Ruth Turner; Qui Vive (Ganz), Ruth Turner, 
primo; Marjorie Herrold. secondo: Song of Fancy, from 
Lyric Suite, Op. 538 (Bohm), Venetian Barcarolle, from 
Lyric Suite, Op. 538 (Bohm), Marjorie Reed; Butterfly 
(MerkeO. Maurice Adams; Barchetta (Nevin), Marjorie 
Herrold; Sonata in C. Allegro (Mozart-Grieg), Maurice 
Adams, first piand; Clarence Phillips, secoTid piaho, 

Mrs. Laura Jones Rawlinson ot New York lectured 




KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

For Coneert EnBapementu 
nnd InHtruellon '^pply »« 
ftntretarf and ,>laniiEer of 
K. /ttti, Ilnnm KI04 Kohler 
A <'hnNe nidK;., 8oD PrnnclMco 

Representative of Lyon & Healy Harps 

Trlejihune Douel'a IB78 




Siellofelica 

COLORATURA SOPRANO] 



DLDC 

SCO ^^^ 



to a representative group ot Fresno piano teachers at 
Hotel Fresno on the morning ot May ISth. About twenty- 
five teachers were present. Mrs. Rawlinson is a normal 
teacher ot the Dunning System of music study for be- 
ginners. She lectured for several months at Teachers' 
College ot Columbia University at the request ot Dean 
Charles Farnsworth and since leaving Columbia she has 
been making a tour of the United States lecturing to 
private teachers of piano and to normal students. Last 
year she spent in Europe with Mrs. Carrie Louise Dun- 
ning, the originator of this system ot "rhyme, game and 
song'' in music. Mrs. Dunning is a pupil of Leschetizky. 
The Dunning System is being used by Mrs. L. B. Cain 
of this city. It is based on one of the most simple rules 
ot child psychology — "interest without conscious effort" 
— and is purported by its exponents to eliminate the 
drudgery of the first two years of music study and im- 
plant the fundamentals ot intelligent musicianship 
rather than to develop mere players of instruments. 
The system has the endorsement of Leschetizky, Car- 
rena, Gadsky and various other musical authorities. 
Mrs. Rawlinson is an interesting speaker and her lec- 
ture was received with considerable enthusiasm by the 
teachers who heard her. 

Mrs. Emma Mescow Fitch, contralto, gave a delight- 
ful song recital at the home of Mrs. Frank Joel Cray- 
croft in Fresno May 19th. Her program follows: (1) 
Aria — My Heart at Thy Sweet Voice — Samson et De- 
lilah; (2) The Last Hour (Kramer), Trees (Rasback), 
Charity (Hageman) ; (3) What's in the Air Today 
(Eden), By the Waters of Minnetonka (Lieurance), Who 
Knows (Stickle), The Fields of Ballyclare (Maley); (4) 
Crying of the Waters (Campbell Tipton), Years at the 
Spring (Beach). Twilight (Glens), Vale (Russell); (5) 
Across the Hills (Rummel), The Lazy Song (Lawson), 
I Heard a Cry (Fisher), The Icicle (P.assett). 

Mrs. Fitch has a big dramatic voice of powerful 
sweetness and she has the musical soul and intensity of 
feeling necessary to real interpretation. Her voice is ot 
unvarying sweetness and uniformity of register Mrs. 
Fitch was a former pupil ot Percy Rector Stevens ot 
New York City and last year she studied with Madame 
Gadski and Yeatman Griffith in New York. Beside her 
concert work and private teaching Mrs. Fitch directs 
the Baptist choir ot Fresno and is contralto soloist at 
that church. 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY CONCERT 

The final regular concert of the season of the Pacific 
Musical Society took place at the Fairmont Hotel on 
Thursday evening. May 10th. Miss Esther Deininger 
was the pianist of the occasion and she distinguished 
herself with a performance that denoted careful and., 
serious study ot her work, exhibited a brilliant and 
fluent technic, a delightful touch and intelligent phras- 
ing. It was a performance of e.vceptional merit. Pearl 
Hossack Whitcomb sang her songs with well developed 
artistry, a voice ot fine timbre and quality and an 
assurance that proved her an experienced artist and 
one who knows how to apply her artistic advantages 
with decided judgment and taste. Irene Mil'ier played 
the accompaniments judiciously. Rudy Seiger was atij 
his best when playing the Grieg Sonata with J. Chandler | 
Smith at the piano. It was indeed excellent work, Jj 
showing a depth of musicianship which can only he> 
attained by a combination of technical skill and natural 
talent. It was a thoroughly enjoyable performance and. 
won well merited and enthusiastic applause. | 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SEQUOIA TRIO TO MAKE DEBUT 

The first appearance of the Sequoia 
Prio which will take place in the Italian 
Joom of the St. Ftancis Hotel on June 
1st, at 8:15 p. m., marks the birth of a 
lew ensemble organization in San Fran- 
lisco. Arthur Conraili. violinist; Pierre 
Douillet, pianist, and Arthur Weiss, 'eel- 
ist, are all well established musicians, 
ind these comprise the personnel of the 
lew trio. 

The program for the first concert will 
nclude the Brahms Trio in C minor and 
he Rubinstein Trio in G minor. Op. 15. 
3onradi will appear as soloist playing 
he Bach Chaconne tor violin alone. The 
Sequoia Trio will be heard in a series 
)t three recitals, to be held in the Italian 
loom at the St. Francis Hotel, during the 
;oming season, 1923-1924. 

The following works will be performed: 
Seethoven — Trio, B. flat, Schumann — 
rrio, F major, Brahms — Trio, C minor, 
SaintSaens — Trio, F major, Rubinstein 
-Trio, G minor, Arensky — Trio, D minor. 
U these concerts the members of the 
rrio will also appear as individual solo- 
sts. 

It may, perhaps, be interesting to 
ouch on the careers of the artists who 
lave formed this new ensemble. Arthur 
^onradi began his musical studies under 
he instruction of his mother when he 
vas four years of age. At ten he won 
I competitive violin scholarship offered 
ly the Peabody Conservatory of Balti- 
ttore, and at sixteen he was again award- 
id this prize. After three concert tours 
if this country he went to Europe for 
urther study — first in Germany and later 
n Russia. Subsequently he returned to 
Jerlin where he was identified with the 
Qusical profession. Somewhat before the 
lutbreak of the World War he returned 
o the United States and located imme- 
liately in San Francisco. 

There are few pianists living now who 
lave had the advantages of such pure tra- 
litions as Pierre Douillet received during 
lis student period. He was a personal 
riend for many years of Carl Mikuli, the 
Ilustrious pupil of Chopin. And with him 
le also made a careful study o£ the great 
omposer's works. Afterwards he went 
Nickolas Rubinstein and still later to 
l^dmund Neupert in Moscow. Douillet 
ras born in Russia of French parentage. 
Ifter concertizing in Russia, Poland, 
loumania, Austria and Germany he re- 
leived a call to the New York College 
if Music under Theodore Thomas. He is 
egarded as one of the leading pianists 
if the Pacific Coast. 

Arthur Weiss, Ph. D., has been identi- 
led on the Pacific Coast tor the past 
wenty-five years as solo 'cellist and 
eacher. He studied under the celebrated 
)avid Popper of Budapest, later on com- 
ng to New York where he played under 
Vnton Seidel and Walter Damrosch. In 
lis Doctor's Thesis published in the Uni- 
'ersity of California Series he has made 
valuable contributions to aesthetics in its 
■elation to music. 



Madame Dorothy Raegen Talbot, noted 
loncert artist, gave a concert at the 
juther Burbank Jubilee Friday after- 
loon. May 18th, at Santa Rosa. While in 
Santa Rosa, Madam Talbot was the guest 
)f Mr. and Mrs. Luther Burbank. 



CHARLES RUGGLES AT ALCAZAR 

Charles Ruggles, youthful and talented 
ictor of Juvenile roles, who has made a 
n'eat success in recent years on the 
itage and screen, will begin a starring 
leason at the Alcazar next Sunday mat- 
nee. May 27th, in Oh Boy! a delicious 
nusical comedy treat. It is a long time 
lince Ruggles has been seen in San 
Francisco, although he was a reigning 
favorite at the Alcazar before he made 
I name for himself on Broadway. 

In order to introduce Ruggles under 
:he most favorable auspices, Thomas 
SVilkes has selected Oh Boy! a joyous 
nusical comedy. It was described by the 
Vew York critics as particularly enter- 
;aining, with a full measure of zest and 
pep, and with many snappy melodies. 
Ruggles, who has a good singing voice, 
ivill have the principal role, giving him 
I full play for his fun making proclivi- 
;ies. Supporting the star will be a com- 
pany carefully selected and headed by 
N"ana Bryant, who has had considerable 
experience as a prima donna. In the cast 
win be Netta Sunderland, Mary Duncan, 
rhomas Chatterton. Cliff Thompson and 
Norman Feusier. There will be a snappy 



chorus of singing and dancing beauties, 
especially drilled by Dickson Morgan, 
and the production will be under the 
supervision of Hugh Knox. 

This week Louis Bennison is saying 
farewell to his original and most popular 
success, Johnny Get Your Gun, which is 
a riot of fun from the beginning to end. 



Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 

Concert and Church Singing in all 

languages. 

MRS. J. GREVEN 
Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

PAUL STEINDORFF 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 
' In All Languages 
5302 Broadway .... Oakland 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE S.\N FR.^NCISCO BANK) 

SAVINCS COMMF.RCIAI, 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Freincisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921 ,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mbsion and 2Ist Streets 

PARK-PRESIDIO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7lh Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Haicht and Belvedere Streets 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (434) 

per cent per annum was declared for the six months 

ending December 31st, 1922. 

INTEREST WILL HEREAFTER BE COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 
INSTEAD OF SEMI-ANNUALLY AS HERETOFORE. 



A.DCLE ULMA.N 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND PI-\!«0 

Studio ITS Commonwealth Ave. 
Telephone Pacific 33 



Mrs. William Steinbach Laura Wertheimber 



VOICE CULTURE 

Studio: 

902 KOHLER & CHASE BLDG. 

Sun Fmnoiwcn Phone; K^nmy M.'M 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

BARITONE — VOICE CULTURE 

Authorized to Tench SInie. Schoen- 

Rene'n Method 

1314 Leavenworth St. Phone Prospect 0253 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 



Phone Berkeley 6006. 

MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 

PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

0O5 Kohler & Choae Bid. TeL Sutter 7387 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VOICE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 

Studio, 603-6O4 KOHLER <£ CHASE BLDG. 

Phone Kenrnr K4S4 

MRS. CHARLES POULTER. 

SOPRANO St. Andrews Chureh 

Volee Culture, Pinno. .ViS 27th St., Oak- 
land. Tel. 207». Kohler & Chase Bids.. 
Wednesdays Tel. Kearny S4S4. 

ROSCOE WARREN LUCY 



Oakland. Tel. Pledn 



MARION RAMON WILSON 

DRAMATIC CONTR.ALTO 



Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OP SINGING 
Studio 36 GalTney BulldlnK. 376 Sutter St. 
Tel, Douelas 4233. Res. Tel. Kearny 2349 

MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 

Announces the opening of her new Resi- 
dence Studio. Clark Apts., Apt. 26 — 1.38 
Hyde St., San Frnnclseo. Phone Prospect 



MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRALTO 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

GRADUATE OP SCHOLA CANTORUM, 

PARIS 

OROAMIRT (IT. MARY'§ OATHBDRAIi' 

Piano Department, Haailla School 
Oraraw anii Piano. ArrillRgn Mwlcal Colleao 

ESTHER MUNDELL 

SOPRANO AND TEACHER 



LEILA B. GRAVES 

LVBIC SOPRANO— VOICIC CI LTCRE 

Pupil of Rose Relda Calllean 

Studio: 1.10 Central Ave. Tel. Park 1024 



Preparatory Teacher for 

Mrs. Noah Brandt 

2311 Scott St. Telephone Fillmore 1522 

EDWIN HUTCHINGS 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

PIANO 

Stndloi lOoa Kohler * Chase Bids. 

Phone Kearny S4M 

Joseph George Jacobson 



2833 Sacramen 



PIANO 
St. Phone Fillmore 348 



ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 

Opera Comlqoe, Paris 

Stndlo: 3107 WnHhlnston Street 

Phone Fillmore 1847 

SIGMUND BEEL 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 



SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 



OF MUSIC 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

CONTRALTO 
Teacher of SInelnB. 32 Lorclta Ave, Pied- 
mont. TeL Piedmont 304. Hon., Kohler A 
ChnJie Bldg.. S. F. Telephone Kearny MM. 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 SCOTT ST„ Bet. day A n^ashinKton 

Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 
Mrs. Noah Brandt. Plann 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 

Soprano Soloist. Temple Emanu El. Con- 
cert and Church AVork. Vocal Instruc- 
tion. 2.''i3f) Clay St^ Phone West 4890. 

MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 

ARTISTIC PIANO INSTRUCTION 

Stadlo: 1001) Kohler S: Chane Bids. 

Telephone Kearny MM 

Res. Tel. Bayview 4104 

EVA GARCIA 

CONCERT PIANIST, ACCO.MP.4NIST 

AND TEACHER 

Studio: 41(16 Piedmont Ave. Tel. Pled. 2750. 

Residence: 4ir.2 Hon-e St., Oakland 
Tel. Pled. .•i4n2 

ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 

violinist and Teacher. Head of Violin Dept., 

S. F. Cons, of Music. 3433 Sacramento 

St.. and 121 2lBt Ave.. Tel Pac. 1284 

RUTH DEGNAN 

PUPIL OF GIACOMO AND MME. 

MINKOWSKI 

TEACHER OF VOICE 

2428 Pine St. Tel. "West 7012 

TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 



HENRIK GJERDRUM 
2321 Jackson St. Phone Fillmore 3256 



JANET ROWAN HALE 
901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
2027 California St. Tel. Fillmore 3827 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury SL Phone Pari* 1974 

MARJORIE E. YOUNG 

1463 Fulton Street. Fillmore 2657 

MARGARET WHITE COXON 

149 Rose Av.. Oakland Piedmont 1608-W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue — Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 
1841 Fulton St Tel. Pacific 4219 

DOROTHY PASMORE 
1715 Vallejo St. Phone Wett 1«9S 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 457 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott St. Phone West 1347 

ANORk PErinieri 

1470 Washington St. Tel. Franklin 332J 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 
1005 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K. 5464 

MARGARET BRUNTSCH 

70 Piedmont St. Phone Park 3469 

MME. M. TROMBONI 
601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 

JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 

GOl Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 



OTTO RAUHUT 
357 Arguello Blyd. Phone Pacific 3661 

HOTHER WI8MER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4974 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6454 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 

434 Spruce St. Tel. Fillmore 1131 

REED AND MOUTHPIECE MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 
789 Mission St. Sutter «S6C 

If you want to become known to the 
musical public of California, advertise in 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

on the Programs of Distinguished American Artists 

Published by 

G SCHIRIVIER, JOHN CHURCH CO., THE BOSTON MUSIC COIVIPANY, 

THE COMPOSERS' MUSIC CORPORATION 

Songs for All Voices, New Publications of the Composers' Music Corporation 

THE CRY OF THE ORIENT TOMORROW 

THE FOREST OF DREAMS 

A CYCLE OF SIX— SONGS OF THE LITTLE DAYS 

For Sale at the Leading Music Houses 



From The Very Beginning, By Phyllis Lucy Keys 

fnndiimentnl niuNic prIiirlpleN In n deftnlte and Incld wo7, commencing 
it-Kradc pleceN but proKrCNHiiif!; rniiidly In Ihclr cxpoftltlon of technical 
-CHNlon problcniM and the creotlon of good tnNtc. 
I'llIlK, ««c. 

HENRY GROBE, 135-153 Kearny Street. 

Representative for the Clayton F. Snmmy Publications. 



MAUD G. McFAUL 

ACCOMPANIST 

1128 Chentnut Street 

Telephone Proapect 4932 



If a Music Journal is worth while to 
extend courtesies it should be worth 
while to subscribe for. 



MR. ANDREW BOGART 

Teacher of Singing 

Are yoa iio<l«fleiI wllh your teacher? 
Can he pinoe you before the pnbllcf 
Are you satUlled with your progresa? 
Is be n FatldlHt. or Chnrletanf 
Are you aure your teacher knows how? 
Is he always talking "BREATH?" "TONGUE?" 
•■JAW?" 

If In doubt, conault Mr. Bogart, who studied In 
Europe with the teachers of Sembrlck. SealchI, 
Blspham, etc. 

Pupils prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 
Concert. 

S7fl SV'TTER STREET — Douglas 9250 

2218 I,iAKE STREET — Bayvlew 48T1 

Kvenlnes by appointment 

Read Mr. Bogart's article In this paper of March 

24, 1»2:{, about "Charletaus" 



Qonstance <iAlexandre 

Mezzo Soprano 

Pupils Accepted 

Inquiries made at 

801 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Phone Kearny 6464 



Resident Artists who wish to secure engagements 
through managers and music clubs next season should 
announce their plans NOW as bookings are made Im- 
mediately before the end of this season and during the 
summer months. 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 

Endorsed by IVaKer Swaync 

Special Normal Course for Teachers, baaed on Swayi 

Principles 

Studios 807 Kohler A Chase Bids. 

2518H Etna St^ Berkeley. Phone Berkeley 131« 



CHALIAPIN 

The World's Greatest Singer 

POSITIVELY LAST 
APPKARAMK 

EXPOSITION AUDITORIUM 

MONDAY NIGHT 



Leslie V. Harvey 

Organist 
Coliseum Theatre 



SCHUMANN HEINK 

STEINWAY PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

Season 1922-23 — Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 



The 
PIANOFORTE 



There is a subtle satisfaction in knowing 
that one's possessions, whatever their nature, 
are of superlative excellence. 

A Gobelin tapestry or a da Vinci painting is 
a constant source of pleasure and bears testi- 
mony to the taste of its owner. To the music 
lover the same is true in the possession of a 
Mason & Hamlin Piano. 

Those who are musically sensitive, whose 
appreciation of tonal quality renders them 
competent to judge, pronounce the Mason & 
Hamlin Piano the leading instrument of its 
kind. 

Dame Melba, richly endowed with musical 
discrimination, says in this connection: "It 
seems to me that the preference on the part of 
an individual for the Mason & Hamlin Piano 
is indicative of a superior musical nature." 

Only an actual hearing can give a realization 
of its beauty of tone. 




two entrances 

135-153 Kearny & 217-225 Sutter Sts. 

victor talking machines 




WE INVITE A HEARING 



WUgKBAUen® 



MASON & HAMLIN PIANOS - 




Oakland — 1209 Washington Street 

San Jose — 199 South First 

sheet music 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



^sed&t (hs^t Iteifal WMs 



iJi THE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOURNAL IHTHE GREAT WEST 



^OL. XLIV. No. 9 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY. JUNE 2. 1923. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



CHALIAPIN AGAIN ATTRACTS THOUSANDS 

Unsurpassed Declamatory Singing Thrills Another Huge 

Multitude in the Civic Auditorium and Cheers 

Again Escape Admirers 

BY ALFRED METZGER 

It was evident that the artistic victory won by Feodor 
l^haliapin during his first San Francisco concert at the 
Uivic Auditorium on Sunday afternoon. May 20th, spread 
luickly throughout the city for at his second concert 
)n Monday evening. May 2^th at the same jjlace another 
six thousand people assembled to do homage to the 
great declamatory artist. We say declamatory advisedly 
for a second hearing positively convinced us that Cha- 
.iapin's art is greatest in his "singing speech" as it 
yere. One of the mysteries that has confronted us dur- 
ng our long career as reviewer of musical events is the 
fact that we positively were so "hypnotized" by Chalia- 
Jin's remarkable personality and unique art that it 
lever occurred to us that he rarely ever sang the melody 
)r theme of the songs he interpreted. He depends ex- 
clusively upon his rare declamatory style of singing. 

If we had not attended this second concert we might 
lever have been ab'e to classify Chaliapin- correctly. 
While listening to Schumann's Grenadiers for the second 
;ime the light began to dawn tor us. The great artist 
lontinued to sing several verses of this magnificent 
jomposition without paying the slightest attention to 
the melodic line of the song. He merely recited the 




orvii.le: harroi.d 

A livndine Tenor of the Metropnlftan Opera Co., 

\Vho StnrtH Two Weeks' KnpraKeinent nt 

I.oew-8 Warfleld Thenire, Jane 2 

lines in dramatic form and clothed them in the robe of 
his magnificent vocal organ. That is to say he merely 
sustained his tones sufBciently to speak the phrases in 
1 certain chant-like manner, but never actually singing 
the lines to the notes of Schumann's fertile creative 
mind. The same was true of songs by Rubinstein, Schu- 
bert, Tschaikowsky, Mozart and Glazounov. all of which 
we know to be exceptionally melodious, but which under 
Chaliapin's treatment lost their variety of melodic out- 
ine and became actually monotonous from a purely 
:heniatic standpoint. 

By this we do not mean to say that Chaliapin could 
lot sing the melody of these songs if he wished to. He 
las simply adopted an entirely new style suited to the 
■adical ideas of the day. The fact that he can thrill and 
sntrance six thousand people to the verge of enthusi- 
istic hysteria proves beyond a doubt that he is an artist 
)f the highest rank. Indeed on numerous occasions dur- 
tg the course of the evening his masterly handling of 
lis voice was only too apparent. For instance he made 
'reiuent use of the high, covered head tones in a mau- 
ler that, although frequently employed, never became 
;iresome or monotonous. It was done with such artistic 
ilegance that one glad'.y listened to it. Then his breath 
control was a marvel of sustaining quality and self- 
control. His legato singing, whenever he gave It a 
jtiancf, like in Malashkin's Oh. Could I But Express in 
Bong was truly enchanting to listen to. 



The marvel to us was specially the tact that content- 
ing liimself solely with the "singing speech," and mostly 
ignoring the melodic themes of a song, he still retained 
the enthusiasm and interest of his hearers. That is a 
feat which no other artist so far has been able to suc- 
cessfully accomplish (for Dr. WuUner does sing the 
melodic theme of a song). We know of no other artist 
whom we would willingly forgive this distortion of the 
thematic phrase, and this in itself is an admission how 
great an artist of individuality of style Chaliapin really 
is. On this second occasion he sang the following se- 
lections: Night (Tschaikowsky), The Old Corporal 
(Dargomizhsky), The Two Grandiers (Schumann); 
Encores— Ballad (Rubinstein), The Government Clerk 
(Dargomizhsky) and In My Dreams I Bitterly Wept 
(Schumann): Death Walks About Me (Sahknovsky). 
Aria from Don Giovanni (Mozart). We Parted Haughtily 
I Dargomizhsky), Russian Convict Son (Russian Folk 
Song arranged by Karatigin): Encores — Oh, Could I But 
Express, A Little King of Tartary's Harem Song (Rus- 
sian Folk Song) and Persian Song (Rubinstein) ; Sadko 
(Rimsky-Korsakov). When the King Went Forth to War 
(Koeneman). Volga Boat Song (Kennemaun), Mephisto's 
Song of the Flea (Moussorgsky). And then followed one 
or two more encores whose titles were lost in the throng 
that crowded around the stage. 

In the Schumann song In My Dreams I Bitterly Wept 
Chaliapin's style of ignoring the melody of the song was 
specially apparent. The ending of the song Death Walks 
About Me was singularly artistic. Chaliapin employing 
mezzo voce throughout until the final tenderly breathed 
high tone. The Persian Song also ended in a high tone 
splendidly sustained in pianissimo. In We Parted 
Haughtily Chaliapin was at his heighth as a singer. 
The composition itself is beautifully lyric and gives the 
artist ample opportunity to employ his pure and accur- 
ate high head tones. 

Max Rabinowitsch again proved a great puzzle, for 
whi'e his accompaniments were sublimely adequate to 
Chaliapin's fine expression, his solo work, specially his 
Paraphrase on airs from 'Tschaikowsky's opera Eugen 
Onegin and the Strauss waltz, was entirely lacking in 
proper accentuation, rhythm and adequate tempo. His 
interpretation of Borodin's In the Monastery and Glinka 
Balakire's The Lark seemed quite an improvement on 
the other solos. And thus the Selby C. Oppenheimer 
season closed amidst great enthusiasm and much eclat. 



BETTER MUSIC PRESENTED BY THE MOVIES 

Poorly Played Jazz of An Inferior Calibre Gradually 

Being Eliminated — Andre Satero Justly 

Pleases at California Theatre 



Whenever the Pacific Coast Musical Review aggres- 
sively attacks a musical policy which it regards un- 
worthy of the intelligence of our music lovers, and al- 
though of the magnificent theatres that grace our 
streets, it is not afraid to make itself heard. And when- 
ever this paper registers what it considers a just com- 
plaint it does not do so with any spirit of malice, nor 
with any intention whatever of intimidation or intoler- 
ance. When we are in this mood we merely intend to 
serve as a safety valve tor the public's indignation 
which is expressed to us frequently by word of mouth 
or through written messages. Quite frequently, as in 
this latter case of bad jazz playing, we find that the 
managers — at least the intelligent portion of the man- 
agers — already has felt the pulse of the public and had 
begun steps to improve the musical conditions in their 
theatres. 

A trip to the various leading motion picture theatres 
last week convinced us that the efforts of the managers 
were indeed bringing fine results. Let us begin with the 
California Theatre. There is a new conductor — Andrew 
Satero. He unquestionably understands his business. He 
has virility, fire and a sense of rhythm and succeeds in 
getting the best out of his orchestra. While the ap- 
plause he receives is gratifying and enthusiastic, as is 
always the case when good music is well played, he 
would obtain even greater applause if a few additional 
instruments in his orchestra would enable him to secure 
stronger climaxes. Then there are Waring's Pennsyl- 
vanians. Of course, being a chronicler of serious musi- 
cal events, we shall never be reconciled to the useful- 
ness of jazz playing in its accepted style. But, after 
all. we cannot be envious of the enjoyment of others 
who seem to take special pleasure in the manner in 
which these Pennsylvanians "put over" their kind of 
jazz playing. 

They are a number of enthusiastic young musicians, 
who apparently lake pride in their work and who cer- 
tainly accomplish the things they are aiming at. They 
have an accurate sense of emphasizing the melody of a 
composition and above all they play spontaneously to- 
gether, are essentially emotional and able to "sing" on 
their instruments. While their conductor and drummer 
indulge in useless muscular displays of their anatomy 



they seem to be in sympathy with the respective com- 
positions they emulate, and so the public enthusiastic- 
a'ly applauds these youthful dispensers of musical en- 
tertainment until in time they become used to their, 
at present novel entertainment, when the management 
no doubt will replace them, with something else. 

When it comes to the legitimacy of serious music ex- 
cellently performed we must give Gyula Ormay at the 
Imperial Theatre the palm. He does not compromise 
with mediocrity, and still he has trained his audiences 
to a point where they willingly accord him their admira- 
tion. We have heard any number of people, whom we 
never thought of as being specially musical, simply 
"rave" over Orniay's pianistic art. And no wonder! 
If you want to hear piano interpretation such as you 
never have heard in a motion picture theatre before, 
you simply must watch Ormay at the Imperial. His 
silver tone and brilliant, clean technic and above all his 
intelligent, artistic interpretation, not only in the pro- 
gram proper, but in the musical settings to the feature 
picture, represent the highest form of musical art. Be- 
sides Mr. Ormay has surrounded himself with an or- 
chestra of splendidly chosen musicians who play like 
artists and not like laborers to whom their music means 
so much per week. 

And then there is our old friend Paul Ash, whom we 
regard as a virtuoso conductor in the lighter form of 
musical composition. What may sound cheap under the 
direction of an ordinary theatre conductor sounds under 
the leadership of Paul Ash like another composition. 




lUAXINE CO]VRAD 

A Very Talented V 

a Coneert nt tli 

St. KranrlN Ho< 



nK ViolinlKt Who >VIII 
Colonial Ballroom of 
.\e%t Thnr»day Evenin 



If jazz actually must be played in motion picture thea- 
tres we would rather hear Paul Ash interpret it than 
anyone else, for his splendid array of artists succeed in 
following his moods to their finest details. We have 
never yet sat through a musical program at the Granada 
Theatre when we did not thoroughly enjoy every num- 
ber. And not one of the least enjoyable features is the 
manner in which the various musical acts are staged, 
both lighting and scenic effects containing what is known 
as real atmosphere for which Mr. Partington is entitled 
to the gratitude of the public. 

Next we shall speak of the music at the Loew- 
Warfield where Orville Harold holds forth and. where 
Lipschultz conducts an excellent orchestra. 



The Summer Months are the important months in the 
year tor the artist and teacher. It you permit this 
precious time to go by without taking advantage of it. 
then you surely will sustain a loss during the season. 
It is in the summer when you have time to prepare for 
the season, announce your plans, prepare your repertoire 
and show that you are alive. When the season starts it 
will be too late. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



The DUO-ART in the 
STEINWAY 



The Duo-Art reproducing feature 
may be had only in Steinway, 
Weber, Steck, Wheelock, Stroud 
and Aeolian pianofortes. 

The great fact that the Duo- 
Art can be had in the Steinisvay is 
itself an eloquent tribute to the 
T>uo-Art. 



Sherittanlway& Go. 



Kearny and Sutter Sts., San Francisco 

Fourteenth and Clay Sts., Oakland 

Sacramento - Siockton - Fresno - San Jose 

Portland - Seattle - Tacotna - Spokane 



h I i:^* * 



!■- 4. It ' ml ■ 




GEORGIA KOBER 

AMERICAN PIANIST 

Studio: 30r,-S4n Sutter St. 
1. Ivearny 5983, Wednesdays niid TluirNfln: 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 
Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



OAKLAND CONSERVATORY 
OF MUSIC 

1329 Madison St., Cor. 14th, Oakland, Calif. 
ADOLF GREGORY, Director 



WALLACE A. SABIN 



Oreanint Temple Bnianu El. Flmt Chureh of Chrlat Sd- 
entlat. Director I.orluK flub. S. F., Wed.. 1B17 Cnllfornla 
St.. Pbone Franklin 2«0:i: Sat.. Flrat Christian Science 
Church. Phone Franklin 1307! Res. atudlo, 3142 Lenlstoa 
ledniont 242S. 



Berkeley. Pho 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ACCOMPANIST 



Olliclat organist 
and choLr dir 
oreanlst Coni! 



oiial Church, 

Piano and 

.vailable lor 



Studio, 1915 Sacramento Street 
Telephone West 3753 



LXLLLAN BIRMINGHAM 

„ Contralto 

■ eacher of Singlne. Complete Course of Ooeratle TpmIm 

Ing. :!73U Pierce St. Tel. PUlmore 45537 """"'" "*'■ 



LINCOLN S. BATCHELDER 

PIANIST — ACCOMPANIST 

Slember I'niversify Extension Faculty 

iludio; «70 .sth Aviriuc Phone l'aclHe SS2; 

The College of the Holy Names 



The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. If you help us to add 3000 subscribers to 
our list we will help you to increase your income. 



Arrillaga Musical College 

V. de ArrUlaea, Director 
A. I.. Artlsnes, Prea.i Louis Ale^rla, VIce-Pres. 
rnexcelled facllltlea for the study of music In all 
ts branches. Large Pipe Orsan. Recital Hall. 



MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

ITALIAN VOCAL TEACHER 



MR. and MRS. GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 

JUST RETURNED FROM EUROPE 
ludlo: 405 Kohlcr & Chase Bids.. Tel. Kearny 54,14 



Manning School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING. Director 
8142 Washington Street Telephone Fillmore 3DS 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 

ADVANCED PUPILS ACCEPTED 
Pupil of Mme. V. stepanoll I Berlin), M. SlevekloB, 



Kearny 54t>4. Res. pho 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano, Orcan, Harmony. Orcaalst and Musical 
Director of First Presbyterian Church. Alameda. Home 
Studio: 1117 PARU STREET. ALAMEDA. Telephone Ala- 

Bscda 1%5. Thursdays, Merrlman s~»* — ' "*» "^-^ 

•■kkud. Telephone Piedmont 



Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL. CALIFORNIA 

Music Course, Thorough and ProBresslve 

Public School Mnslc. Accredited Diploma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite 506 Kohler & Chase Bldg., 
r;do'R'o'l:d° SeVkfrey^"'" ""■^"''^- »""»'»« »»! AWa- 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Preparing Teacher for 

*"**• OSCAR MANSFI-ELDT. Pianist 

-07 Cherry St.. Be t. Washington Ji Clay Tel. Par, n.iotl 

MADAM MACKAY-CANTELL 

CONCERT COACH—VOCAL TECHNIQUE 
_. SUPER-DICTION 
Director Calvary Presbyterian Choral Society. 
Farther Information. West 1000. 

RESIDENT ARTISTS who are available for concert 
tours during the season 1923-1924 will please register 
with the Pacific Coast Musical Review so that we are 
able to recommend them to music clubs, music schools 
and managers. Only artists of reputation and experience 
are eligible for registration. 



JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 

Thorough Vocal and Dramatic Training 

740 Pine St. Phone Douglas 0024 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON & CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



KARL RACKLE 

PIANIST — INSTRUCTOR 

Residence Studio ia»0 Pine St Tel. Prospect 9219 

DIO ART ROLLS 



MADAME WILSON-JONES 



Phone Berk. 408S-W 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



fir THTCTliTTiZEef LVTiU5lc5 r~JOUEHAL IN THE QgEAT WEST l U 

MUSICAIi REVIEW COMPANT 

AI.FRKD METJiGER Pre«ldeil< 

C. C. EMERSON Vice President 

)ll\ltClS 1.. SAMUELS Secretary and Tre««urer 

Snile Mil Kohk-r .V I'hnne Hide.. 2<S O'Fnrrell SI.. Snn 
l-rnn.lmo. Iiil. Tel. Kenrny .l-IM 



ALFRED METZGER 
C. C. EMERSON 



Editor 
Business Manager 



Msike nil checkH. drnflx, money orders or other forms of 

reiiiiltnnce payable to 

PACIFIC COAST MUSICAl. REVIEW 

Oakland-Berkeley-Alnmeda Olllcc 1117 Paru St., Alameda 

Tcl. Alameda l.'iS 

Miss Eli'/nhetb Wrslcule In Charse 



l.os Angeles Office 

Ulll Soiilliern California Music Co. Iluildln 

Eighth and Broadway 

(. C. Emerson in Charee 



Kt4 First St 



VOL. XLIV SATURDAY, JUNE 2, 1923 



nd-elass mail 



S. F. Postoinc 



SI'nsCRIPTIONS 
Annually In Advance InelndlnK PostHKet 

I'nlted Slates fcl.OO 

PorelcM Conntrles 4.00 



TWENTY-SECOND YEAR 




MUSIC 

Why It Is Needed 

BY J. T. FITZGERALD 



Hundreds of thousands will experience an uplift in 
thought as a result of Music Week, and industry and 
society will receive an impulse. The desire to experience 
harmony is a constant human tendency. A more har- 
monious environment is expected in some degree to 
obtain from almcst every act of our lives whether it be 
through work. play. rest, study, or religious devotion. 
Harmony is the ultimate aim of nations at war. and the 
criminal hopes to bring about more harmonious condi- 
tions for himself through plunder. 

Absolute harmony, however, is a spiritua' quality, and 
while it is beycnd the reach of any material human being 
we strive to experience what we think most nearly 
approaches that harmony. What we call music is a high, 
if not the highest, human concept of absolute harmony 
and that is why our music is a real human need. It is 
the good that music awakens within our own conscious- 
ness that we love more than we do the mus'c itself, but 
since music leads to better thoughts we encourage it: we 
study it. and cling to it because we need it. 

When turned toward a sunset the effect of light of 
different wave lengths on the retina produces a property 
of phenomena which we call color. That is harmony too, 



Three little monkeys, perched on the grand piano: 
"Why your look of fright Oshi?" said little Tunbo, who 
kept his ears covered so as to hear no evil. "Dame 
Rumor called and told the old story that those in the 
musical profession, whether performer or pedagogue, 
are inclined to speak or infer evil of their contempor- 
aries," said little Mikura, who could see no evil. "Fool- 
ish little Oshi. look not so perturbed, did you not hear 
what was said in answer?" "You must always allow 
for percentage." 

The profession is composed of a certain percentage 
of humanity with its allowance of good and bad. Pupils 
undoubtedly have unpleasant experiences, but so have 
teachers, and to condemn all because of a few is mani- 
festly unjust; where the pupil linds an incompetent 
teacher, the latter in turn finds the unsatisfactory pupil. 
Yet it all figures out to percentage and the percentage 
of either fine teaching or successful performer is small 
indeed. 

Think in all the world how really few attain the 
artistic heights, the fault — why, percentage of course. 
Teachers all have pupils who disappoint, for one reason 
or other; wha never climb to the altitudes deemed 
possible, who fail; the causes many, i. e.. one through 
ill health, another through financial inability, another 
marries and so it goes; but should one be discouraged 
because of these results? No! for it is all percentage 
again. The same holds true in relation to the pupil's 
attitude towards an unsatisfactory preceptor. 

Charlatans, yes; but the music profession is in no 
way an isolated exception in this; the field of medicine, 
dentistry, the business world, all have their irresponsi- 
ble characters, it is your percentage of "chaff among the 
wheat' and as a law of contrast, most valuable. All 
are more appreciative of the true when once they have 
suffered from the false. Xo teacher intentionally mis- 
leads a pupil, nor does any performer by malice afore- 
thought give a poor rendition; it is limitation which is 
responsible: the average critic of either is not mali- 
ciously unkind, there is the psychological desire to help 
progress. 

When one has a new idea or discovery they are most 
eager to pass it on, seemingly impelled by ego, but 
that is an erroneous idea, in the background is the 
true wish to share, impelled by the Divine. The man- 
ner of so sharing differs as do individuals and oft- 
times ways selected are not calculated to bring the 
desired result; this only embraces the frailties of 
humanity, in no way being an index of the whole. 

"Nay, nay, little Oshi," continued Mikura. "you need 
not be alarmed, the percentage of good feeling, kindly 
actions and broadiuindedness among the muchly tra- 
duced members of said profession, far overbalances 
any of the reverse; if you are numbered among them 
you will find your loudest applause, the warmest hand 
clasp and most encouraging advice "back stage." In- 
deed yes." agreed Tunbo. "travelers all upon a long 
but interesting journey; the able-bodied and the frail, 
with outstretched hands, eager to aid any who stumble 
and while ^their steps may be slow and faltering, yet 
they wend onward and upward." 




J. T. FITZGERALD 



AnKeles Who 
Music Is (ire 



of the Musical Coin 
? Support of the Ue 
itly Appreciated 



this, people from all parts of the globe will continue to 
come to us knowing that "where the people sing they 
may safely dwell tor there is no song in the wicked." 

The Hantord Musical Club gave the final concert of 
the season at the Hanford High School Auditorium. 
April 24th, presenting Julia Jack, mezzo soprano, Henri- 
etta Burns, violinist, and Genevieve Cunningham, dancer, 
assisted by the .\nipico re-enacting piano by courtesy of 
Hockett, Bristol and Cowan of Fresno. The program fol- 
lows; (1) Song — .My Heart at Thy Sweet 'Voice (From 
Samson and Delilah) (Saint-Saensl, Mrs. Julia Jack; 
(2) Violins— (a) Air for G String (Bach), (b) Songs My 
Mother Taught Me (Dvorak), (c) Orientale (Cui), Miss 
Burns; (3) Piano — *Prelude, C. Sharp Minor (Rachmanin- 
off), Played by the Composer; (4) Songs with "Violin 
Obligato — (a) Dream in the Twilight (Strauss), (bl 
Devotion (Strauss), Mrs. Jack and Miss Burns; (5) 
Interpretive Dancing — (a) Minuet in G (Beethoven), (b) 
Waltz, Op. 70, No. 1 (Chopin), Miss Cunningham; (6) 
Piano — *Liebestraum (Liszt), Played by Leo Ornstcin; 
(7) Songs — (a) De 01' Arks a Moverin' (Guion), (h) 
Inter Nos (MacFadyen), (3) From the Land of the Sky 
Blue Water (Cadman), Mrs. Jack. 

• Re-enacting the artist's actual performance through 
the Ampico in the Chickering. 



and we find by analysis that it awakens good thoughts 
in the human mind similar to those produced by audibile 
musical harmony, and that is why we love and need to 
look at sunsets. Of course there are shades and degrees 
of music appreciation. Some want a great deal of jazz 
music, mut they need far less than they want of it. 
Thought steps, as well as toot steps, must be carefully 
guarded when taking it. I frankly confess to my own 
fascination for some of it. 

The auditory nerve is not affected by spiritual har- 
mony, but through prayer or right desire understanding 
may apprehend it. At this point God's spiritual man 
lives and is experiencing — knowing — God's presence. 
Like the babe who cries longingly for the moon but be- 
comes appeased and helped by the possession of a 
colored rubber balloon, so do we more mature humans 
through our inherent sense that absolute harmony pre- 
vails and is desirable, become rested, encouraged and 
helped through the relative concord which we designate 
music. 

It is intended that the laws of our country operate 
from and are founded upon what we know of the eternal 
laws governing real spiritual existence. When we assem- 
ble in groups and participate in the concordant functions 
of Music Week we are declaring ourselves in favor of all 
law which operates for more expansive human kindness, 
checkmates selfishness expressed through animal pro- 
pensities, and which guarantees continued true progress 
and protection tor individuals and the community. 

The songs which are written and sung here today are 
the inspiration of the songs which will be written and 
sung here tomorrow, and in no small measure because of 



HARTMAN-STEINDORFF CO. TO HAVE VACATION 

Ferris Hartman, Paul Steindorff and their excellent 
company of singers at the Rivoli Opera House will take 
a brief vacation, following the final performance of 
■Victor Herbert's The Only Girl, this Sunday night. This 
announcement was made Wednesday night, but it does 
not mean that San Francisco will lose the splendid or- 
ganization that has proven such a delight to lovers of 
good music and admirers of the class of entertainment 
that made the old Tivoli famous all over the world. 

"We have been working very hard here since the 
second of October last, when we opened with The Wiz- 
ard of the Nile." said Paul Steindorff. "Thirty-five 
weeks, without missing a single performance, is a re- 
markable record, and since our opening we have given 
three hundred and twenty consecutive performances, 
including extra matinees. Seventeen comic operas and 
musical plays have been presented, each of them for 
two weeks, except The Toymaker, which ran for three 
weeks during the holidays. Needless to say. the pro- 
duction and presentation of these operas have involved 
a great amount of energy and work and we are thor- 
oughly tired and ready for a rest. 

"San Francisco, always loyal, has welcomed the re- 
vival of the old works and later musical plays which 
Ferris Hartman and I have presented, with capable 
principles, a good chorus and satisfactory orchestra — 
and at popular prices. In a very short time we hope 
to start our Summer season and under more favorable 
conditions than ever." 



QUESTION COLUMN 

Edited By Karl Rackle 



Readers are invited to send in any question relating 
to music and musicians. Give name and address. 
Anonymous communications cannot be answered. No 
names will be published. Address. Question Editor. 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, Kohler & Chase Building, 
San Francisco. 

1. Why does our musical system begin with the third 
letter of the alphabet instead of the first? — D. D. 

This question might be asked in another way: 'Why 
is our natural scale called C instead of A? Because 
this nomenclature is the result of accidental develop- 
ment and not rational design. It can only be explained 
by reference to the history of the sca'e and that is 
practically equivalent to the history of music. Our 
scale is the outgrowth of the musical system of the 
ancient Greeks; they used fifteen tones covering a 
range of two octaves and gave a different and dis- 
tinguishing name to each of them. The Romans bor- 
rowed the Greek system but applied the first fifteen 
letters of their alphabet to the fifteen tones instead of 
using the Greek names. Then Pope Gregory the Great, 
in the Sixth century, simplified the nomenclature by 
abolishing the last eight letters and using only the 
first seven, inasmuch as the last eight tones were 
repetitions of the first seven in another octave. This 
is the derivation of the names A. B, C. D. E. F. and 
G. of our tones. In the development of the modern 
system of chord structure and tonality It was found 
that the succession of tones from the note C best lent 
itself to the purpose. Thus the scale of C became the 
basis of our musical system. 

2. Of what material is the mouthpiece of the oboe 
made? — H. K. 

Of a tall grass or reed, the Arundo Donax. The 
material in its rough state is commonly called "cane," 
though it differs a great deal from real cane. 

3. Who has succeeded Krehbiel as music critic of 
the New York Tribune? — B. O. K. 

Lawrence Oilman. 

4. Tell me something about Dargomyzki? — L. R. 

A Russian composer (1S13-69), friend of Glinka and 
greatly influenced by him. It is from the works of 
these two men that the nationalist movement in Ru.s- 
sian music sprang. Dargomyzski's opera. "The Stone 
Guest," which is a treatment of the Don Juan legend, 
has been called the gospel of the New Russian School; 
and it was by this opera and his songs that Dargomyz- 
ski became the inaugurator of the movement which the 
so-called "Five" have promoted and continued. 

5. Please give me the name of a book of piano technic 
which is authoritative on double thirds. — C. B. 

Mozkowski: School of Double Notes. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



PACIFIC MUSICAL SOCIETY CLOSES SEASON 

The Pacific Musical Society closed a bril'iant season 
with two excellent events during May. The first of these 
closing events consisted of a concert program which was 
rendered on Thursday evening, May 10th and the second 
was the annual jinks which, in addition to a preliminary 
Drognim, presented Mary Carr Moore's The Flaming 
Arrow on Thursday. May 24th. Both events took place 
■IS usual at the Fairmont Hotel, the first in the Ball- 
room and the second on the Terrace. This is the ap- 
I ropriate time to comment on the retirement of Mrs. 
Frederick Crowe who was the president during the sea- 
son 19''2-23 and who, thanks to an energy and artistic 
taste that is worthy of the highest commendation, ac- 
quitted hersslf most creditably and honorably of her 
responsible task, and to whom the Pacific Musical So- 
ciety owes a debt of gratitude. 

Before the beginning of the program on May 10th took 
place the elect'on of the new officers, all of whom were 
elected by acclamation and included: President. Mrs. 
William H. Banks: First Vice-President, Mrs, Frederick 
G Canney Second Vice-President, Miss Roxana Weihe: 
Treasurer, Mrs. Phillip V. Hein; Corresponding Secre- 
tary. Miss Ruth Hammerslag; Recording Secretary, 
Miss Eva Deutsch; Directors— Miss Isabel Arndt, 
Miss Lu'u J. Blumberg. Miss Esther Deininger, Mrs. J. 
F Gurley, Mrs. Leon Lazarus and Mrs. Albert George 
Lang Surely a more representative and more worthy 
array of offiiers can hardly be selected. Both the 
officers and the club are ent tied to hearty congratula- 
ti:ins for this excellent chDice. 

Inasmuch as we ara to review two events in this arti- 
cle we shall restrict i urselves to comments on the in- 
d vidual work of the art sts giving their first program 
and omit al, reference to the compositions rendered. 
Suffice it to say that they belonged tD the most repre- 
sentative written fcr the instruments or voice (or which 
they bad been cliosen. Miss Esther Deininger was the 
pianist of the tccasion and she sustained her reputation 
by her intelligent and tasteful phrasing as well as her 
thoroughly executed techiiic. Pearl Hossack Whitcomb. 
mezzo contralto, sang her sDngs with a ringing, clear 
voice and such sincere regard for the conventionalities 
of adequate vocal interpretations that her expositions 
well merited the hearty recepti..n accorded them. Irene 
Miner accompanied the vocal artist with much taste 
and skill. Rudy Seiger, violinist, with J. Chandler Smith 
at the piano, was at his best when interpreting a Grieg 
Sonata. His fine, clean tone and his natural emotional 
faculties brought out the varying beauties of the work 
with telling effect and the support of Mr. Smith proved 
an ensemble effort of the most commendable dimensions. 
The program preceding the presentation of The Flam- 
ing Arrow on May 24th began with a monologue by Mrs. 
O'Reil y, impersonated very ably by Mrs. William Ritter. 
who indulged in one of her whimsical moods wherein 
she pointed out the more or less prominent character- 
istics of well known people in the musical colony. As 
usual, Mrs. Ritter paid her compliments to the critics, 
and she is perfectly sate for she rarely gives a concert 
nor does she indulge in musical performances. It is only 
fair to say that the various critics referred to acknowl- 
edge the accuracy of Mrs. Ritter's deductions and plead 
guilty to the various crimes, which fortunately did not 
include bootlegging, laid at their doors. Anyhow. Mrs. 
Ritter, as usual, entertained her audience to a degree 
where genuine laughter was the order of the day — or 
night. 

The Misses Wyatt presented Doris Corcoran, Ruth 
Armstrong, Esther Wacholder, Jeaness Miller and Helen 
Hutchinson in an Indian Ballet during which these 
young ladies gracefuly executed a series of descriptive 
dance episodes.. They were justly applauded with fer- 
vor. Then came the feature of the evening, namely, a 
one-act Indian Intermezzo by Mary Carr Moore, with 
libretto by Sarah Pratt Carr. It was an artistically 
conceived and well interpreted musical sketch fluently 
presented under the direction of the composer. As the 
title implies the music was of an Indian character, did 
not make any pretensions as to elaborateness, but be- 
cause of its melodious atmosphere and its simplicity of 
form made an excellent impression upon the audience. 
Mrs. Moore (or Mrs. Duclos) as she is known in private 
life) has ample reason to feel gratified with the success 
achieved by her work. She proved herself an experi- 
enced musician, who knows what she wants and who 
possesses the energy, tenacity and inspiration to finish 
what she started with every element of success. 

Marion Vecki as Oko-mo-bo, chief of a powerful West- 
ern Tribe, sang and acted the role allotted to him with 
his usual ease and naturalness. Both as to expression 
and dramatic virility he secured the desired effects. 
-Mrs. J. E. Laidaw in tlie role of Lo-lu-na. the chiefs 
daughter, revealed a fine mezzo soprano voice, of splen- 
did flexibility and accuracy as to pitch and she sang her 
phrases with care and taste. She also proved to be the 
possessor of a very charming personality. Harrison 
Cole's ilelghtful tenor voice was heard to splendid ad- 
vantage in the part of Ka-mi-ah, a young chief of the 
Ho-pi tribe. He. too, fitted snugly in the ensemble and 
employed his fine, pliant tenor voice to excellent advan- 
tage, phrasing his lines with intelligence and judgment 
and enunciating clearly and distinctly which, by the 
way, seeemd an advantage throughout the cast. 

The operatic sketch proved to be steeped in romantic- 
ism and characteristic of the Indian legend. It was well 
staged and costumed and the orchestra proved excep- 
tionally adequate for Mrs. Moore's purposes. It con- 
sisted of: Misses Edna Horan. Ruth Levy, Edna Cad- 
walader. Melva l-'arwell, Jozienna Van der Ende, Irene 
Millier, Mrs, Hany Heisfelt, L. M. Kaye, A. Weiss and 
!•;. Kennedy. Aliri- the conclusion of the program and 
1 crfonnance the guests and members indulged in danc- 
ing and refreshnii-nis. Thus the season was worthily 
closed by the Pacific .Musical Society. 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

Edited By Elita Muggins 
1605 The Alameda, San Jose, Calif. 
Telephone San Jose 1581 
ni-liartment M.-iniiKer. Sue ll.-ivii. Sloynnr.I. Ii::; 



rlto 



San Jo 



SAK JOSE, May 29. 1923. 

The flrst program in a group of three comprising a 
Spring Festival of Music was given at the College of the 
Pacific auditorium Sunday afternoon. May 27. The col- 
lege chorus and orchestra of one hundred and twenty- 
five assisted by Marion Brower, soprano, Chester 
Herold, tenor, and Wm. Edward Johnson, baritone, gave 
an excellent performance of Haydn's Creation. An audi- 
ence of over twelve hundred was in attendance and the 
general verdict seemed to be that the high water mark 
in oratorio performances at the College of the Pacific 
had been achieved. 

Mrs. Brower is the possessor of an unusually appeal- 
ing voice, pure and fresh in quality. She sings with per- 
fect ease and great flexibility and in her performance 
of With Verdure Clad proved conclusively the posses- 
sion of unusual talent. Mr. Herold's virile tenor was 
heard to excellent advantage and Mr. Johnson gave 
authoritative and adequate rendition of the splendid 
solos allotted to him. 

The chorus gave evidence of excellent training; the 
tone quality being youthful and fresh, the attention to 
shading remarkable for such young singers, and the 
sensitiveness to the conductor's baton being very de- 
cided. The orchestra of fifteen gave fine support and 
added much brilliance to the performance. Allan Bacon 
at the organ, accompanied all the solos and by his un- 
derstanding of the instrument and fine technique intro- 
duced many effects which added to the enjoyment of 
the work of the soloists. Miss Eleanor Short at the 
piano also assisted greatly in the rendition of the work. 

Too much praise cannot be given Charles M. Dennis, 
who directed the performance with apparent under- 
standing of the musical possibilities of the work and 
excellent command of his force. 

Miss Ann Gardner, head of the music department of 
Castilleja School. Palo Alto, has been granted a year's 
leave of absence, her place to be filled by Dr. Latham 
True, beginning his work this summer. Dr. True was or- 
ganist at Stanford University last year during Warren 
D. Allen's absence. He came here from Portland, Maine, 
where for fourteen years he had been a leader in the 
musical profession of that city. Previous to residence in 
Portland, Dr. True had been a graduate of the Toronto 
College of Music: a graduate of the New York Con- 
servatory, a professor at the University of Toronto, a 
fellow of the American Guild of Organists, a student for 
three winters in Leipzig under Krause (pupil of Liszt I, 
a student of theory under Prout of London, an associate 
in the Royal College of Organists in London, and asso- 
ciate editor of The American Organist. The school is 
to be congratulated on securing the services of a musi- 
cian and teacher of Dr. True's standing. 

Madame Irene Pavloska, mezzo soprano, will appear 
in Carmel-by-the-Sea on Monday evening, June 4, in re- 
cital at the Forest Theatre. 

The Municipal band, Will H. Lake, director, rendered 
the following program at Alum Rock Sunday afternoon, 
May 27, before a large audience: March, Gladiators 
Farewell (Blankenberg) : Patrol, Blue and Gray (Dal- 
bey) ; Waltz, Golden Sunset (Hall); Selection, Norma 
(Bellini); Overture. Hungarian Comedy (Kela Bela) ; 
Medley, Songs of the Old Folks (Lake); (a) Valse, 
Through the Night (Logan); (b) Fox Trot, Oh! Haro'd 
(Roberts); Intermezzo, Spanish Beauties (Stickney); 
Operatic Medley, Echoes of Grand Opera (Tobani) ; 
Finale, -Comrades Return (Chambers). 

The San Jose Music Study Club had a very interesting 
meeting on Wednesday morning, May 23rd, when Miss 
Marjory Marckres Fisher, violinist, and Mrs. Stanley 
Hiller. pianist, played Albert Stoessel's Sonata in G 
for violin and piano. Mr. Stoessel. besides being a com- 
poser of many and varied things, is at present con- 
ductor of the New York Oratorio Society. This sonata, 
which has received much comment and is full of a great 
deal of worth, is new and has not been often heard. 
The club's annual election of officers was held .previous 
to the program, Mrs. Charles P. Braslan being re-elected 
president. Mrs. Stanley Hiller was elected vice-presi- 
dent. Mrs. John Hunt Shepherd, secretary, and Mrs. 
Roy Hayward. treasurer. 

Mrs. Adriana van Kaathoven presented a group of 
soloists in the spacious lobby of the Casa del Rey. Santa 
Cruz, Saturday afternoon, May 25th, the delightful affair 
given for the benefit of the clubhouse fund of the Satur- 
day Afternoon Club. The program was announced and 
arranged by Mrs. Katherine Gray Herzog of San Fran- 
cisco, who played several excellently interpreted piano 
numbers. The first group was of the olden type,— 
Daquin, Couperin and the Boccherini Menuet. the last 
named danced by Miss Dorothy Manners Dreyfus of 
San Francisco, as was the Golliwogs Cakewalk (De- 
bussy), in Mrs. Herzog's group. Mhss Dreyfus is an 
interpretive dancer of much ability. Mrs. Herzog pre- 
sented an eleven-year-old pupil. Johanna Jongeneel of 
Berkeley, who gave Grieg and MacDowell groups with 
mature understanding. Miss Elizabeth Jongeneel. mezzo 
soprano, gave a varied group, and three von Fielitz 
songs from the famous cycle. A large and appreciative 
audience enjoyed this fine program. 



Kohler & Chase 

2Cnabp paitns 
2CuabP Ampira 



SAN JOSE HEADQUARTERS 
185 So. First Street 



ALFRED LANINI 

Expert Maker of Violins, Violas and Cellos 

With European Experience 

Artistic Repairing Rare Old Violins For Sale 

591 E. ST. JAMES STREET 

San Jose, California 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 

LeRoy V. Brant, Director 

onerx L'oiirxrs in All Dranchen ot Muxic at 
All St:iee>i ot Adv 



CAI.IFORM.* 



WM 


EDWARD JOHNSON 




IimiTO\K 


Sludlon: 

i:f:ti 


»» South 14<h St., Snn .lone. Phone 43X0. 
Lnnlro St. at 14th. Oakland, MondaTx 



Hannah Fletcher Coykendall 


SOPRANO 




Avallahle for Conrprtx and Reril 


nla 


Pupil of Gnelano Mcrola 




Studio^l4.'> Hanrhett Av«nue, San Jo 


«e. Calif. 


Phone Xr,-jr,-W 





MRS. CHARLES McKENZIE 



ALLAN BACON 



Con cert Organiwt 

NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 
San Jose, Cal. 
Confem De^reeM, Awnrdn CertlfiniteN. Coiii|ilete Collpse 
ConNervatory and Acntlenile CourNeM In I'lanu. Violin, 
Harp, 'Cello. Voice. Harmony, Counlerpoint. < anon and 
FaKrne and Science of .tlUHlc. For partleularH Apply to 
Slater Snperlor. 

VIOLET SILVER 



The program for the afternoon recital at the Memorial 
Church, Stanford University, tomorrow, June 3rd, at 4 
o'clock will be given by the A Cappella choir from the 
College of the Pacific. San Jose, under the direction of 
acting dean. Charles M. Dennis, assisted by Mr. Allan 
Bacon, head of the organ department in that instituton. 
This famous choir consists of twenty-five well-trained 
voices, pr^senting a program of choral masterpieces 
from Palestrina to the present day. Their work is of a 
very high order, and has elicited commendation from 
all of the critics who have heard them. Mr. Bacon is 
now in his second year of service at the College of the 
Pacific, having come to this school from Parson's Col- 
lege in Iowa, where he made an excellent reputation for 
himself as a recitalist. Sunday's program in full will be 
as follows: Concert Overture in B minor (.lames H. 
Rogers) ; Gloria Patri (Palestrina) ; Adoramus Te 
( Palestrina ) ; Tu es Petrus ( Palestrina ) ; Tenebrae 
Factae Sunt (Palestrina) Scherzo, from Second Sym- 
phony (Louis lierne); Cheral (Joseph Jongen); Only Be- 
gotten Son (Schvedoff); How Blest Are They (T.schai- 
kowsky): O Gladsome Light (Gretchaninow) ; Rhapsody 
in E flat (Herbert Howellsl; How They So Softly Rest 
(Willan): I Holy Lord (Dett): Now Sinks the Sun 
(Parker); Choral Blessing (Lutkin). 

For the week beginning Tuesday. June r.th, at 4:15, 
Mr. Warren D. Allt^n announces tht' following programs: 
Tuesday. June .5, at 4:15, Beethoven Program — .-\dagio 
from the Moonlight Sonata, Op. 27, No. 2; Andante 
Oantabili from the Fifth Symphony: Minuet in G major; 
Hallelujah Chorus, from The Mount of Olives. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



SAN FRANCK 
yUBUC UBP: 



ANIL DEER 



''Soulfur' 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 

Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 



On Tuesday evening Mr. Allen will present Miss Mar- 
jorie McDonald, of the Stanford Graduating Class, in a 
program of piano numbers at the Community House in 
Palo Alto assisted by the Schubert Club, the women's 
Glee Club of the University. 

On ^^■ednesday afternoon at 4-: 1.5, Mr. .\llen will pre- 
sent another artist-pupil. Miss Myrtle Klahn. A. B. 1922, 
in an organ recital at the Memorial Church. Miss 
Klahn's program will be as follows: Fantasia in G minor 
(BachI; In dulci jubilo (Bach); Sonata in E minor (Jas. 
H. Rogers); Romance san paroles (Joseph Bonnet); 
Ancient Phoenician Procession (R. S. Stoughton). 

Mr. Allen's regular program on Thursday. June 7 at 
4:1.') will consist of numbers selected from the works 
of Johann Sebastian Bach, as follows: Prelude and 
Fugue in A minor; Prelude in E liat minor, from the 
Well-Tempered Clavichord, Book 1; My Heart Ever 
Faithful, from the Pentecost Cantata; Arioso in A major 
arranged by Edward Shippen Barnes; Toccata in F 
major. 

Hannah Fletcher Coykendall, soprano, gave a musical 
program Thursday evening. May 24th, for the American 
Institute of Banking, San Jose branch, with Mrs. Howard 
Huggins at the piano. 

The sixth senior recital at the College of the Pacific 
Tuesday evening. May 22. brought Flora Vest, pianist, 
and Marie Brown, soprano, to the public's attention. An 
extremely interesting program w-as performed in ex- 
cellent style. Both young ladies are well equipped 
musically, technically, and in poise, and proved by their 
adequate performance their native talent and excellent 
training. 

The Elk's Concert Orchestra (San Jose Lodge No. 
522). under the leadership of Dr. Char'.es M. Richards, 
assisted by William Pengilly, tenor, and Miles A. Dress- 
kell, violinist, gave a program in San Francisco Satur- 
day evening, May 26, which was broadcasted by radio. 
Three local audiences listened to the concert. A large 
number of members of the local lodge and their invited 
guests gathered at the B. P. O. E. c:ub rooms, while 
the Commercial club, where a special program was 
being given, featured the concert, and the Coffee club 
entertained a large number. 

Notice of the concert had been sent to Elk lodges in 
many parts of the country and many of these held gath- 
erings to enable their members to hear the local lodge 
orchestra. It is estimated that at least several thousand 
Elks heard the concert in addition to the hundreds of 
private parties who tuned in their sets to hear the pro- 
gram. The numbers of the program came through the 
air with unusual c^arness and beauty of tone. Because 
of the wide range of the San Francisco sending station, 
it was estimated that the two-hour program given by 
Dr. Richard's musicians was heard as far away as 3000 
miles. The following numbers were heard: Overture. 
Prince Methuselah (Strauss); After Sundown (Friml); 
In My Canoe (Sowerby) ; Serenata Espagnole (Bizet); 
(a) Dagger Dance, (b) Indian Invocation (from Natoma) 
(Victor Herbert) ; Violin solo — Introduction et Rondo 
Capriccioso (Saint-SaensI Miles A. Dresskell, with or- 
chestral accompaniment; Ballet of the Flowers (Henry 
Hadley); The Love in Idleness, with basoon obligato 
(Macbeth), J. Darrell: Indian Lament (Dvorak); Tenor 
solo — Sing. SinT;, Bird on the Wing (Nutting) William 
Pengilly with orchestra; Violin solo — Meditation, (from 
the oi3era Thais (Massenet) Mr. Dresskell; Danse Orien- 
tale (Lubamirsky) ; Selections from the Girl of the 
Golden West (Puccini). 

The Monday Musical Club of Santa Cruz held its an- 
nual election of officers last week, the policy of the last 
year being endorsed by the club in its election of the 
same president. Mr. Frank Walden. Mrs. Milo Cain was 
elected vice-president. Ralph Thompson, treasurer. Mrs. 
Hope Swinford. program chairman. The secretary. H. 
W. H. Penniman. became membership chairman. Mrs. 
Raymond Coats being the new secretary. The club is 
seriously considering the purchasing of a grand piano of 



An enjoyable musical event of the past week was the 
recital of the preparatory piano students at The Institute 



of Music, held on Monday evening last. Eleven of the 
i:upils of Josephine Luoise Sinclair appeared at that 
time, playing a program from memorl that reflected 
credit on the talent of the performers and the work 
done at the Institute in their training. Those who ap- 
peared were Evelyn Raley. Esa Rosenthal. Lucretia 
Martin. Norman Warren. Vivian Malato. Drexell Kavan- 
augh. Vera Erbentraut. Gertrude Kent, Melvin MacDon- 
aid, Myra Rosenthal, Helen Buswell. 

The preparatory department at The Institute of Music 
has found favor in the eyes of music lovers because of 
the care with which students are compelled to work. 
The courses embrace not only piano, but the stringed 
instruments, band instruments and voice. 

Mrs. Reuben Walgren, mezzo contralto, artist pupil 
of Miss Lulu E. Pieper. and Miss Lucy Latham Valpey, 
organ'st and accompanist, were heard in recital Tues- 
day evening. May 22nd at the Christian Church. San 
Jose. A particularly intense and expressive interpreta- 
tion was given by Mrs. Walgren of My Heart Is Weary 
(Nadescha). (H. Goring Thomas). In the second group. 
Since You Went Away (Rosamond Johnson), Evening 
(Mana Zucca) and In Rose Time (Frank Grey) were 
beautifully and sympathetically sung. El Arriero (My 
Love Is a Muleteer) by Di Nogero, Mrs. Walgren sang 
in Spanish with a dash and vivacity which brought forth 
much applause. Perhaps the most enjoyed group was 
the one consisting of Hageman's Animal Crackers, 
I Dunno (Wellsl; Little Miss Central Park West (Fos- 
ter), and Riverside Drive versus .\venue A (Foster), her 
interpretations being very pleasing. Mrs. Walgren's re- 
call numbers were Pine Tree (Woodman), Didn't It 
Rain (Burleigh) and Eliza Lehman's arrangement of 
Annie Laurie. 

iMiss Valpey displayed much talent in her organ se- 
lections. Her renditions were characterized by dignity 
and capability, together with able expressiveness of a 
mood. Her last group was devoutly interpreted. Miss 
Valpey is an excellent accompanist, and assisted greatly 
with her work at the p'ano. The program in full: (a) 
My Heart Ever Faithful (Bach), (bl Forest Voices 
(Jensen), (c) My Heart Is Weary (Nadeschda) (H. Gor- 
ing Thomas), Mrs. Walgren; (a) Evening (Mana Zucca), 
(b( Since You Went Away (Rosamond Johnson), (c) 
In Rose Time (Frank Grey I, id) El Arriero (My Love 
Is a Muleteer) (Di Nogero), Mrs. Walgren; (a) Morning 
Mood (Griegl, lb) The Death of Ase (Grieg), (c) In the 
Land of the Sky Blue Water (Cadman), Miss Valpey; 
(a) Animal Crackers (Hageman). lb) I Dunno (Wells), 
(c) Little Miss Central Park West (Fay Foster), (d) 
Riverside Drive versus Avenue A (Fay Foster), Mrs. 
Walgren; (a) O Thou That Tellest Good Tidings (Mes- 
siah) (Handel), (bl Before the Crucifix (La Forge), Miss 
Valpey. 

Mrs. Sanford Bacon, the very well known contralto, 
pupil of Fredrik Blickfelt of San Francisco, has taken 
up her residence in San Francisco, much to the regret 
of musicians in this community, far and wide. Mrs. 
Bacon is the possessor of a beautiful rich contralto 
voice which will be sadly missed. For many years she 
was soloist at St. Josephs' church, and has been soloist 
at Trinity Episcopal for the past ten months. She was 
also a very active member of the San Jose Music Study 
Club. 

The music department of Castilleja School. Palo 
Alto, presented Miss Dorothy Butterfleld. pianist. Mr. 
Boulton White, violinist, and Mrs. W. B. Thorp, accom- 
panist, in a recital of merit on Wednesday evening. May 
2.3rd. in The Orchard House. Miss Butterfleld proved a 
splendid concert pianist, her playing being marked by 
grace of execution, poetic feeling and imagination. She 
was at her best in Schumann's Vogal als Prophet and 
Debussy's Arabesque. No. 1. The following interesting 
program was given: La Precieuse (Couperin) ; Ritter 
vom Steckenpferd (Schumann); Vogel als Prophet 
(Schumann); Prelude. Op. 2S. No. 1 (Chopin); Etude 
Op. 25. No. 3 (Chopin); Miss Butterfleld; Guitarre (Mos- 
kowski). Contredanses iBeethoven-Elman) Mr. White. 
Mrs. Thorp at the piano; Arabesque No. 1 (Debussy) ; 
Waltz in A major (Moskowski); Liebestraum (Liszt). 
Miss Butterfleld: Grieg Sonata for violin and piano. 
Op. 8 (First Movement). Mr. White and Miss Butter- 
fleld. 



RIBBE 



SOLO PIANIST 

STUDIO 683 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HAZEL JOHNSON 

COLORATURA SOPRANO 

PUPIL OF DOMENICO BRESCIA AND FERNANDO MICHELENA 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND SOLFEGGIO 



studio: — Kohler & Chase BIdg.. — Kearny 6454 



Residence Studio: .^2720 Filbert St.,— Wesi 816z 



EDOUARD DERU 

VIOLINIST TO THE KING AND 

QUEEN OF BELGIUM 

Professor of 'Violin at the Liege 

Conservatory of Music 

Will Accept Pupils in Violin and 

Chamber Music Beginning 



For partJi 



August 15th 



jiars 



Jirg terms and oualifica- 
t ons, as well as enlisting, address Beatrice 
Anthony. 1000 Union Street. San Francisco. Tel. 
Franklin 142. Oakland Tel. Lakeside 4133. 



WILL C. HAYS 

Violinist 



-t^Kfirs- 



Pupil of Kilian, Munich, and of 

Ondricek, Vienna 

Studio: 17S3 Van Ness Ave., Fresno 

Telephone 7499 



SIGMUND ANKER 

MAXINe" CONRAD 

In a 

VIOLIN RECITAL 

Colonial Ball Room. St. Francis Hole'. Thursday 

Evening. June Seventh, at S:15 O'Clork 

Benjamin S. Moore at the Piano 

Assisting Artist 

Miss Helen Schneider, Pianiste 

Cards of .-Vdmission $1.00 on sale at Kohler & 

Chase and St. Francis Hotel 



LOEWS WARFIELD 

Theatre 

Market at Taylor 

TWO WEEKS 

Commencing Saturday, June 2 

Engagement E.xtranrclinarv ! 

.America's Leading Tenfir 

ORVILLE 
HARROLD 

Caruso's successor witli the Mctro- 

])olitan Opera Co., IN Pr.RSl )X 

OX THE SCRI':i':X 

David Belasco's Drama 

"The Girl of the Golden West" 

LIPSCHULTZ AND MUSIC MASTERS 



Two Weeks, Commencing Sat., June 2 

Singing Saturday and Sunday at 2:20. 4:3."i ai 

9:35. Three Times Daily Thereafter 



AUGUSTA HAY DEN 

SOPRANO 

.Available for < oncertx and Ucclliiix 

AddreKx: -171 :!7tli Avi-nue 

Tel. Pae. «:!a 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



Mischa Levitzki and the Ampico 

Mischa Levitzki Writes 

A Letter To San 

Francisco 



April II, 1923. 
To San Francisco: "It has been a privilege to play for you 
this season. Your reception at all three of my appearances 
is a delightful memory, and I am looking forward to my 
return appearance here, which I hope will be in the near 
future. In the meantime, however, I feel that, thanks to the 
Ampico, I play to a great many of you, all but in person. 
The influence of this wonderful instrument in the home is 
inestimable. I have heard and compared all of the repro- 
ducing pianos, and to me the supremacy of the Ampico is 
unquestionable. The selection of the right reproducing 
piano should not be entered into lightly. It is too important. 
It is just as important for you as for the artist, and should 
only be made after careful comparison." 

Mischa Levitzki 



COMPARE 

THE suggestion of Levitzki that you compare all reproducing 
instruments comes with unusual authority from a great artist 
who followed exactly that same course himself. In the end he was 
forced by strong conviction to turn his back on the reproducing 
device installed in his favorite concert piano — a most courageous step. 
He, with Rachmaninoff and several other great masters who fol- 
lowed the same course, have paid the highest tribute to the Ampico, 
and furnish testimony too eloquent to be ignored. 



The Ampico is placed at your disposal, just as it was for Levitzk 
and Rachmaninoff — for any comparison you may choose to make. 
Then follow your own judgment as did Levitzki, Rachmaninoff, 
Godowsky, Moiseiwitsch, Dohnanyi, Schnabel, Rubinstein, Samaroff, 
Leginska, Bloomfield-Zeisler, Ornstein, Mirovitch, Nyiregyhazi 
Maier, Pattison, La Forge, Farrar, Kreisler and scores of their 
fellow artists. 



Kohler & Chase 



KNABE AMPICO 



San Francisco 
Sacramento 



Oakland 
San Jose 



Maxine Conrad, u very talented younK 
viriliiiist, iiiipil (if Siginund Anker, will 
give a violin rroital at the Colonial Ball 
room of the St. Francis Hotel on Thurs- 
day evening, ,lune 7th. Miss Helen 
Schneider, pianiste, will be the assisting 
artist and Benjamin S. Moore will be 
the accompanist. The following pro- 
gram will be presented: Sonata in F 
minor (Johann Sebastian Bach), Maxine 
Conrad, Benjamin S. Moore at the piano: 
Piano solo — (a) French Suite: Alle- 
n-ande, Gigue, Gavotte (Bach), (hi 
Fruehlingsnacht (Schumann-Liszt), Miss 
Helen Schneider; (a) Chanson Arabe 
(Rimsky-Korsakoff-Kreisler), (b) Ballet 
Music (Rosamunde) (Schubert-Kreisler), 
(c) Air For the G String (Bach-Wil- 
helmji, Maxine Conrad, Benjamin S. 
Moore at the piano; Ballade et Polonaise 
de Concert (H. Vieuxtemps) ; Maxine 
Conrad. Benjamin S. Moore at the piano; 
Piano solo — (a) Gondoliera (Liszt), (b) 
Valse de Concert (Strauss-Schuett). Miss 
Helen Schneider; Zigeunerweisen (Sara- 
satel, Maxine Conrad, Benjamin S. 
Moore at the piano. 

Mrs. Cecil Hollis Stone, the exception- 
ally accomplished pianist, accompanist 
and ensemble player recently returned 
from New York where she spent some 
time after returning from several months 
stay in London and Paris. Soon after 
her return to San Francisco she became 
the happy mother of a fine baby boy of 
whom slie is very proud. While in Paris 
Mrs. Stone met Arnold Bax. the eminent 
composer and Walter Dararosch who 
showed her the beautiful Fontainebleau 
Conservatory of Music. Mrs. Stone 
"will spend Iter summer at Lake Tahoe 
and upon her return will resume her 
musical activities. She no doubt will be 
welcomed back with open arms inas- 
much as artists of her calibre are not 
too plentiful. 

Frank F. Terramorse, Jr., tenor, will 
be soloist at the Hotel Whitcomb, Sun- 
day evening concert tomorrow. The pro- 
gram prepared for tliis occasion by Stan- 
islas Bern, musical director, will be as 
follows: .March, Radetzky (Franz Le- 
har) ; Overture, Poet and Peasant (F. 
Supre) ; Waltz. Puszta Maiden (Chas. J. 
Roberts); Vocal Solo, Girl of the Golden 
West (G. Puccini), Frank Terramorse; 
Selection, The Only Girl (Victor Her- 
bert): Ballet Music La Source (Suite 111 
(Leo Delibes) ; vocal solos — (a) Obstina- 
tion (H. de Fontenailles), (b) Jai pleure 
en Reve (George Hue), (c) I know of 
two Bright Eyes (G. Clutsam), (d) Bowl 
of Roses (R. C. Clarke), Frank Terra- 
morse; Old Folks at Home and In 
Foreign Lands (Chas. J. Roberts); Ber- 
ceuse (A. Jarnfeld); Cloister Scene (A. 
Rubinstein) ; Vocal solo. Aria from 
Tosca (G. Puccini), Frank Terramorse: 
Grand Opera Selection, Pagliacci (Leon- 
cavallo), Stanislas Bem Musical Director. 

St. Vincent's Academy of Vallejo gave 
the following excellent program at the 
school of music auditorium on Monday 
evening. May 7th; Concerto G minor 
(Mendelssohn), Alta Le Due, Helene 
Phillips at second piano; Valse Op 71 
(Chopin), Prelude (Chopin), Caprice 
Bspagnol (Moskowski), Adrienne 
O'Boyle; To a Wild Rose (MacDowell), 
To a Water Lily (MacDowell), Le Papil- 
lon (Lavalee), Valse Caprice (Newland), 
Genevieve Mendonse; Memories (Kus- 
sner). To Spring (Grieg), Fred Brand- 
man; The Eagle (MacDowell). Chant 
Poetique (Friml), Polonaise Op 40 (Cho- 
pin), Helene Phillips: Dance Macabre 
(Saint-SaensI, Genevieve Mendonse, Co- 
rinna Stockford at second piano; A La 
bien Amiee (Schutt), Venezia e Papoli 
(Liszt), Hexentanz (MacDowell), Helene 
Genereux; Soaring (Schumann), Fan- 
tasie — Impromptu (Chopin), Arabesque 
G minor (Chaminade), Valse Op. 34 No. 
1 (Moskowzki), Alta Le Due; Valse Op. 
15 (Arensky), Alta Le Due. Helene 
Genereux at second piano. 



(Chopin). Ruth .luli.-n Will; (a) Solfeg- 
gietto (P. E. Baih). ())) Siberzo (B flat 
minor) (Choiiin). Kalherine Simon; (a) 
Humoieske (G n)inor) (Grieg), (b) RhaP' 
sody (G minor) (Brahms), Eugenta 
Schutt; Novellette (Op. 21, No. 2) (Schtt 
manni, Marion Swayne: (a) Nocturne 
(Op. 32. No. 1) (Chopin), (b) Caprlccle 
(Op. 76, No. 2) (Brahms), Margaret Cain} 
Valse (Op. 34, No. 1) (Moszkowzkl), 
Helen Rehoi-n. 



Alma Schmidt-Kennedy, the well known 
pianist and teacher, gave another of her 
artistic musicales at her studio, l.T:i7 
Euclid Avenue, Berkeley, on Sunday eve- 
ning. May 13th, when the following pro- 
gram was splendidly interpreted; (a) 
Nachtstuck (F major) (Scliumann), (b) 
Eeoissaises (Beethoven-Busoni), Felton 
Kaufmann; (a) Ase's Death (From Peer 
Gynt Suite) (Grieg), (bl Valse (Op. 30, 
No. 1) (Brahms). Richard Gump; (a) 
Tarantelle (Mendelssohn), (b) Preludes 
(C minor and B flat minor) (Chopin), 
James Teel; (a) Nocturne (Op. 27. No. 
1) (Chopin), (b) Concert Etude (Mac- 
Dowell), Roscius Whipple: (a) Le Cou- 
cou (Daquin), (b) Etude (Op. 10, No. 5) 



L. A. 



NEW CONCERT SERIES 

That the new Auditorium Series 
concerts arranged for the Philharmonic 
Auditorium next season. by George Leslie 
Smith, contains several very attractive 
novelties as well as recital artists 
superlative quality is shown in the aB- 
nouncement that the first of the nine 
great events to be offered will include 
Mme. Margaret Matzenauer, Mme. Eliza 
beth Rothwell, Clarence Whitehill, lead 
ing baritone of the Metropolitan and th< 
entire Philharmonic Orchestra wltft 
Walter Henry Rothwell conducting, in 
superb presentation of Wagnerian music 
drama excerpts. This splendid comblna 
tion of artists supported by the orchestri 
should prove a whirlwind opening num 
her for the course, on Monday night 
Oct. 22. 

A month later on Nov, 26, will be an 
other novelty. The Impresario, Willian 
Wade Hinshaw's production of Mozart'f 
opera comique, presented with an all^ 
star cast headed by Percy Hemus, the 
American baritone. The third novelty 
coming one month later, Dec. 10, will he 
the famous ouartet of Victor artists, 
Olive Kline, Elsie Baker, Lambert Mur- 
phy and Royal Dadmun, all natinn;illy 
known artists offering a program of solos, 
duos, trios and quartets of operatic arias 
and classic numbers. 

After the first three numbers of tlie 
series the remaining six numbers will l"' 
made up of some of the world's must 
celebrated soloists. The fourth event on 
Jan. 7, being Jascha Heifetz. violinist. 
the fifth event, Moritz Rosenthal, I'cjlish 
pianist, the sixth. Max Rosen, Russian 
violinist, the seventh, Maria Ivogiin, 1 I'l 
claimed the greatest coloratura soin:inn 
of the day. The eighth, our own Mario 
Chamlee, leading tenor of the Metropoli- 
tan, and the ninth and last event, Reinald 
Werrenrath, America's most popular 
baritone. 

The primary object of Manager Smith 
in selecting this big list of artists Irimi 
the Wolfsohn Musical Bui- ii ff " 
York, was to purchase all 
direct at a price that wouM 
to offer a course within th- 
every music lover and student oi ilns 
community. 

His offering of the series of nine cvi nts 
at season prices of from four to Iwrlve 
dollars proves that he has started alius 
the right lines in his efforts to givi- the 
public a real music bargain. 



X,r- 



ALCAZAR THEATRE 

Owen Davis' latest comedy, Tl 
vous Wreck, which is to be present- -I 
Broadway this fall will be the s. 
vehicle for Charles Ruggles in his 
ring engagement at the Alcazar, ami 
be presented for the first time in 
W'est, beginning next Sunday's maiii 
June 3. Ruggle's work In this most an 
ing farce comedy will be watched m 
interest, as he will star in the New ^ 
production. 

The Nervous Wreck is said by II 
who have read the script to be by I 
odds the funniest piece ever writt- 11 
Davis, and to contain a vein of huiinn 
resistible to the appeals of the ri.^il- 
The leading role, that of a youiiL' 
dividual with an addiction to pills 
ills, is made to order for Ruggles, 
will give him a cliancc to again d'-ii 
strate his ability as a comedian. 

The Nervous Wreck is founded on I 
Raeth's story. The Wreck, and Dav- 
masterful fashion has constructed a 
with the most unique situations 
ceivable with one complication tolli 
another with dizzy suddeness. 

Thomas Wilkes has suirounded Rui 
gles with a carefully selected ci 
players, headed by Nana Bryant 
will have the leading feminine role am 
Russell Medcraft especially engaged fi 
an important characterization. T 
who will appear are Mary Dui 
Thomas Chatterton. John Fee, Not 
Feusier, Ancyn McNulty, Arthur Bel 
George Johnson and Anthony Bak-i 

Oh, Boy! the gay musical fare- 
Charles Ruggles in the principal vi- 
pleasing large audiences this wei-l. 
final performance will be given S-it 
night. 



l-la 



I 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO HELP US ADD 

THREE THOUSAND SUBSCRIBERS 

TO THE PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW LIST DURING 

JUNE, JULY and AUGUST 



HOW WOULD YOU LIKE to have delivered 
;o your home absolutely FREE a 

KNABE GRAND PIANO 
WORTH $1,575? 

You simply cannot devote your summer 
nonths to a more profitable cause than trying to 
vin this capital prize by securing the largest 
lumber of annual subscribers for the PACIFIC 
;OAST MUSICAL REVIEW during the 
nonths of June, July and August. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE! We can only de- 
iver the Knabe Grand Piano when the largest 
lumber of subscribers is NOT LESS THAN 
>IX HUNDRED. Should the largest number be 
ess, any of the other prizes can be selected, ac- 
ording to the following conditions: 

In case you should not succeed in winning the 
apital prize, but are successful in securing not 
ess than five hundred annual subscribers, you 
irill be able to obtain, without expense to your- 
elf, AN UPRIGHT PIANO WORTH NOT 
.ESS THAN $500, or a PLAYER PIANO 
VORTH NOT LESS THAN $500, or a 
VIOLIN, made specially by Alfred Lanini, the 
loted violin maker of San Jose, WORTH NOT 
.ESS THAN $500, or FREE TUITION AT 
INY MUSIC SCHOOL OR WITH ANY REP- 
RESENTATIVE TEACHER, REPRESENT- 
ED IN THE ADVERTISING COLUMNS OF 
'HE PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW, 
AMOUNTING TO NOT LESS THAN $500. 
)r we will start for you a SAVINGS ACCOUNT 
VITH THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST 
;OMPANY OF $500, OR MORE, according to 
he number of subscribers you secure. The 
mount of such savings account to represent 
)NE THIRD of the total amount of subscrip- 
ions, at the rate of THREE DOLLARS a year. 



Should you be able to secure for us not less 
han 300 SUBSCRIBERS, we shall give you a 
ree scholarship at any music school or with any 
irivate teacher represented in the advertising 
olumns of the Pacific Coast Musical Review, 
mounting to not less than $300.00. 

Or we will start for you a savings account with 
'HE ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST CO. of 
300, OR MORE, according to the number of 
ubscribers you secure between 300 and 500. 

Or you may have your choice from the foUow- 
ig prizes: 

A Violin specially made by Alfred Lanini, 
he famous violin maker of San Jose, of a value 
ot less than $300.00. 

An Art. Design Talking Machine of a value not 
:ss than $300.00. 

Or any Musical Instrument at a retail value 
f not less than $300.00. 

[The value of the above named prizes will in- 
rease in proportion to the number of subscrib- 
rs above 300.] 



Should you succeed in securing for us not less 
ban 

100 SUBSCRIBERS 
re will give you a Free Scholarship in any Music 
chool or with any private teacher represented in 
lie advertising columns of The Pacific Coast 
Jusical Review at a value of not less than $100. 

Or more, according to the additional number of 
ubscribers you may secure between 100 and 300. 

Or we will start for you a Savings Account 
mh THE ANGLO-CALIFORNIA TRUST 
)0. of $100.00. 

OR MORE, according to the number of sub- 
cribers you secure between 100 and 300. 

Or you may have your choice from the foUow- 
ig prizes: 

Standard Talking Machine of a retail value of 
ot less than $100.00. 

Violin of retail value of not less than $100.00. 



Or any other Musical Instrument of a retail 
value of not less than $100.00. 

[NOTE — The value of the above named prizes 
will increase in proportion to the number of addi- 
tional subscribers you will obtain between 100 
and 300.] 

OTHER PRIZES: 

Four tickets for the best seats of each of twelve 
different attractions of the Selby C. Oppenheimer 
Concert Course for 1923-1924. 

Three of the highest priced seats for the entire 
season of eight grand opera productions to be 
given by the San Francisco Grand Opera Asso- 
ciation for 1923 at the Civic Auditorium, under 
the direction of Gaetano Merola, next September. 

Eight highest priced season tickets for the 
Friday Afternoon Symphony Concerts given by 
the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra, under 
the auspices of the Musical Association of San 
Francisco and under the direction of Alfred 
Hertz. 



IMPORTANT NOTICE! 
Anyone securing subscriptions from people 
who wish to pay for more than one year will be 
credited with an additional subscription for each 
additional year. 



Should you secure for us not less than FIFTY 
ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS you may have 
your choice from the following prizes: 

Any Musical Instrument of the value of $50.00. 
Two of the highest priced seats for twelve differ- 
ent attractions of Selby C. Oppenheimer's Con- 
cert Course of 1923-1924. Two season tickets 
($3.00 each) for the season of Grand Opera to 
be given by the San Francisco Opera Association 
at the Civic Auditorium, under the direction of 
Gaetano Merola, next September. 

Two of the highest priced season tickets for 
the Friday Afternoon Symphony Concerts of the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra Concert 
given under the auspices of the Musical Associa- 
tion of San Francisco and under the direction of 
Alfred Hertz. 

Two of the highest priced seats for the Sunday 
regular and popular symphony concerts of the 
San Francisco Symphony Orchestra (24 concerts 
or 48 tickets) at the Curran Theatre. 

Talking Machine Records amounting to $50.00, 
OR MORE, according to the additional number 
of subscribers you may secure between 50 and 
100. 

IMPORTANT! 

If you wish to make a first payment on any 
grand or upright piano or player piano or on any 
other musical instrument such as harps, violins 
or band instruments, we will give you ONE- 
THIRD of the total amount of subscriptions you 
secure for us. 



Should you secure FROM 5 TO 50 SUB- 
SCRIPTIONS, you will have choice from the 
following prizes : 

Musical instruments of the value of from $5.00 
to $50.00, according to the number of subscrip- 
tions you secure. 

Or talking machine records, player rolls, sheet 
music, books on music, violin or other strings, 
mandolins, guitars, ukuleles, metronomes, tickets 
for symphony concerts, chamber music concerts, 
artists' concerts for any artist you wish to hear, 
opera performances, 

FOR ARTISTS, TEACHERS OR 
MUSIC SCHOOLS. 

Artists, teachers or music schools may apply 
the amount earned by them on advertisments in 
The Pacific Coast Musical Review at the rate of 
$2.00 an inch on three column pages. 
VACATION TRIPS 

If a student or teacher will secure a sufficient 
amoimt of subscribers during June, July and 
August, they may apply the amount due them 
on vacation trips in any part of California. 



HOW TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS 
SUBSCRIPTION CONTEST 

Register your name and address with the Con- 
test Editor of The Pacific Coast Musical Review. 
Secure from this paper subscription orders. 

Turn in your subscriptions as soon as received 
so that subscribers will receive their paper imme- 
diately. 

Do not let subscriptions accumulate until you 
secure the entire number you work for. ONLY 
BONA FIDE MUSIC STUDENTS, MUSIC 
TEACHERS, MUSIC SCHOOLS AND MUSIC 
CLUBS ELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE IN 
THIS CONTEST. 



Prospective subscribers should not pay money 
or currency to anyone who does not show cre- 
dentials as being a participant in the subscrip- 
tion contest and demand receipt on duplicte sub- 
scription order to be signed by contestant. 

Have checks or money orders made payable to 
PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW, and 
not to any individual. 

OF VITAL IMPORTANCE TO THE 
MUSICAL PROFESSION 
It is to the personal interest of every concert 
artist, manager, teacher, student and music 
house to help us to secure as large a circulation 
as possible among the music loving public for it 
means additional interest in musical activities and 
consequently additional income. 

OF VITAL IMPORTANCE TO OUR 
ADVERTISERS 
All prizes distributed in this subscription con- 
test will be purchased only from advertising 
patrons of this publication, except in the case of 
scholarships, when students may select their own 
teacher or music school, or in the case of vaca- 
tion trips, which may be selected according to 
the choice of the prize winner. 



Address all communications to 
SUBSCRIPTION CONTEST EDITOR 
Pacific Coast Musical Review, 801 Kohler & 
Chase Building, 26 O'Farrell Street, San Fran- 
cisco, California. 

Special features contained in Pacific Coast 
Musical Review, beginning with the issue of 
June 16, 1923: 

1 — Editorial articles on important California 
musical problems. 

2 — Weekly installments of California's musical 
history from 1849-1923 (inclusive) by Alfred 
Metzger (75 years of music in California). 

3 — Short musical items about activities in 
Europe. 

4 — Short i.nusical items about activities in the 
East. 

5 — Short musical items about activities on the 
Pacific Coast. 

6 — News from the music studios (including 
pupils' recitals). 

7 — News from the music composers' clubs. 

8 — News about resident artists, choral and or- 
chestral organizations in California. 

9 — Criticism of all musical events in the prin- 
cipal music centers of California. 

10 — Special educational artist by distinguished 
artists and leading resident pedagogues. 

1 1 — Humorous items and anecdotes. 

12 — Reviews of new music and recommenda- 
tions of new compositions. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



WEEKLY LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW 

C. C. EMERSON, BUSINESS MANAGER PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW, TEMPORARILY IN CHARGE 
LOS ANGELES OFFICE: 610 SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA MUSIC CO. BLDG., EIGHTH AND BROADWAY 

Notice to Contributors and Advertisers: All copy should be in the Los Angeles office not later than Monday noon of each v»eel<. 



EDITORIAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

In evidence of the deep personal interest which we 
are taking in the musical people of Southern Cali- 
fornia, and also as a recognition of the activities of 
distinguished California artists residing in Southern 
California we have appointed our own business man- 
ager. C. C. Emerson, to temporarily conduct the new 
Los Angeles office, which will be located in Room 
610, Southern California Music Co. Building, Eighth 
and Broadway. Mr, Emerson, who will be in Los 
Angeles when this paper is in the hands of our sub- 
scribers, has been authorized to select his assistants 
who will attend to the news, review and business de- 
partment. The editor expects to occasionaly write 
this department himself. It is with regret that we 
are compelled to make this new change so soon after 
the one preceding, but we feel that we can serve the 
musical intersts of Southern California better by a 
more direct personal contact with its distinguished 
musicians and important activities, 

ALFRED METZGER, 
Editor Pacific Coast Musical Review. 



Los~Angeles, May 2S. 1923, 

Abbie Norton Jamison, the well known piano teacher 
and voice coach, will be one of the members of the 
musical colony in the new studio building built by the 
Southern California Music Company, which is to be 
opened June first. On that same date, she will reopen 
her home studio, in her new residence at 1147 West 
21st Street, after a three months' stay at the Merritt- 
Jones Hotel in Ocean Park, Mrs, Jamison is preparing 
for a busy summer season, for in addition to a large 
enrollment in the private classes of herself and her 
.assistants, Miriam West-Hyatt and Elsie L, Carlson, 
she wi'l be one of the teachers in the Summer Session 
of the University of Southern California, 

The Jamison Quartette are giving much time to re- 
hearsals and plans for next season's work. Their re- 
cent engagements include programs at the Lyric Club 
Lawn Fete, held recently at the home of Mrs, M, L. 
Whittier. in Beverly, and an afternoon musicale given 
May third, by the First Presbyterian Church Society of 
Santa Monica, in the parlors of the Merritt-Jones Hotel. 
By invitation of Mrs, Bond they will sing a group of 
Bond songs at the Carrie Jacobsans-Bond radio program 
June 1st. 

The Southwest Museum secured Lorena Scott, so- 
prano, who toured with the Gallo-English Opera Com- 
pany for their program, and on Saturday morning, May 
26, she gave a group of songs tor the children. The 
music of the day was of an Italian character and coin- 
cided with the stories of the morning. On Sunday 
morning the museum had for its soloist the noted 
pianiste Clara Ingham, who gave a group of selected 
numbers, 

Charles Draa arranged a very artistic program in 
which the artist teacher and their pupil in the Music 
Arts Building took part. This was on Saturday and 
was followed by a reception, and like all other events 
on Music Week, was free to the public. Those taking 
part were; William Hullinger, flutist; Edith Lillian 
Clark pianiste; the Woodward whistling Quartette; 
Hubert Graft, harpist; May MacDonald Hope, pianist; 
Constance Balfour, soprano; Florence Middaugh, con- 
tra'to; Jay Plowe, flutist; J. B, Poulin, tenor; William 
Pilcher, tenor; Maude Fenolon, soprano; Raymond 
Harmon, tenor; William E, Ooley. tenor and Raymond 
McPheeters, pianist, Carl Bronson was chosen as the 
chairman. 

Sylvain Noack, concert master of the Philharmonic 
Orchestra, and Flora Myers Engel, soprano, gave a con- 
cert at the Hollywood Congregational Church on the 
evening of May 23rd that attracted a great deal of 
favorab'.e comment in musical circles. 

Georgia Stark, coloratura soprano, is to appear in 
song recital at the Ebell Club on the evening of June 
12th, She will be assisted by Homer Simmons, pianist, 
who is another artist who is New York bound. 

Miss Ruth Annette Sable, director of Industrial Music 
for the Los Angeles Commerce, on Friday evening, 
directed a program arranged by members of the 
Womens' overseas organizations for the benefit of the 
boys of the American Legion, Other offerings were 
contributed by Alberta and Lorene Davis, known as 
the "Sammie Sisters." Mrs, L. J. Selby, Diana Evers 
and Mrs. Ida Donnell. 

Mrs. Hennion Robinson, composer and pianiste, and 
Miss Ingrid Arneson soprano were heard in a group of 
delightful songs at the Press Club on Tuesday. 

Gertrude Cleophas, will give an interesting musical 
progriini on Kriday, June 1st, at 3 p, m, in the rooms 
of the MacDowrll Club in the Tajo Building, She will 
be assisted by Mrs, Graham F. Putnam and these two 
artists will offer an entire program of compositions by 
Edward MacDowell, 







Fitzgerald's for the Advancement of Music 

Olga Steeb 

This distinguished pianiste, who will appear as soloiste 
with the U, S, C, Glee Club in Los Angeles on June 1st, is 
one of the outstanding figures in the musical world today. 
The recent announcement that the Steeb Piano School 
would open early in the fall has been met with enthusiastic 
appreciation. The official piano will be the 

KNABE 






ii?ITZGERAli)pS CO.I 

HILL STREET XJ5^ AT 7S7-T29 
Los Angeles 







Mme. Anna Ruzena Sprotte, the well known contralto, 
will conduct a summer class in Los Angeles this season, 
according to announcement from her studio in the Tajo 
Building. 

William Pilcher, tenor, sang at the annual dinner of 
the First Presbyterian Church South Pasadena, and 
other appearances during Music Week were before the 
South Pasadena Chamber of Commerce, the San Pedro 
Community Chorus and at the Maryland Hotel in 
Pasadena. 

Luna Wellman Quarton's pupil. Miss Florence Austin, 
was one of the successful contestants in the Orange 
County Music contest which took place last week, win- 
ning the second place in the piano contest. The num- 
bers played by Miss Austin were Beethoven's Moon- 
light Sonata, first movement, and the Witches Dance 
by MacDowell, 

The Los Angeles Opera Club, held its first meeting 
at the Castle San Souci in Hollywood on Tuesday 
evening. The purpose of this club is a more intimate 
appreciation of grand opera, A large group of musicians 
and music lovers began the study, and among those 
present were; Mme, Alia Nazimova, Dr, Robert Doug- 
las, Senor Tonelli, Dr, Alymer Harding, Gertrude Cleo- 
phas, Albert Tessier, Frances Kendig and Mildred 
Stone. 

Mime. Johanna Sherley, pupil of Godowsky, is visiting 
in Los Angeles, and together with her talented little 
daughter, Constance Jeannette, who is regarded as a 
piano prodigy, are creating considerable attention in 
the musical world in Los Ange'.es at the present time, 

Charles Wakefield Cadman, will spend the summer 
at his home in Hollywood, completing the Hopi Indian 
Ballet tor Ted Shawn which will be produced next 
season and used on his tour by the Denishawn dancers, 
Shanewis, Cadman's opera, will be produced at the 
Hol'ywood Bowl the latter part of September, and Mr, 
Cadman's plans are to remain here during the summer 
for the rehearsals, 

Harold Hurlburt, tenor and musical lecturer of New 
York is visiting in Los Angeles, prior to his northwest- 
ern tour to begin about the first of July, He represents 
the New York vocal profession in the New, York Rotary 
Club, 

Olga Steeb, the well known American pianiste, will 
assist in the last program given by the University of 
Southern California Glee Club at Trinity Auditorium 
on Friday evening, June 1st, The club opened its win- 
ter season the first of February, making the initial 
appearance in the opera house of San Bernardino, after 
which followed a series of successful week-end trips 
and concerts in San Diego, Long Beach, Monrovia, 
Redondo, Santa Ana, Pasadena and the Bovard, Trinity 
and Ph'lharmonic auditoriums of Los Angeles, Harry 
C, Hardin, traveling manager for the Glee Club, has 
Just returned from an extensive eastern trip which has 
resulted in attractive bookings ofthe club in Ogden, 
Salt Lake City, Denver, Omaha, St. Louis, Chicago and 
other prominent cities, 

Herman Heller, conductor of Grauman's Metropolitan 
Symphony Orchestra conducted a 1.50 piece orchestra 
composed of solo artists from the four Graunian The- 
atres through an hour's superb program on Saturday 
morning at 11; 30 in Pershing Square, This was a part 
of Sid Grauman's share in the Music Week festivities 



L. E. Behymer 

MANAGER OF DISTINGUISHED ARTISTS 

Executive Offices: 

70S Auditorium BIdg., Los Angeles 



GERTRUDE ROSS 

COM POSER-PI AN I STE 



ALMA STETZLER 

VOICE CULTURE — COACHING IN REPERTOIKE 

OPERA CLASSES INCLUDING COMPLETE 

PRESENTATIONS 

StDdlo 1324 S. FlKurroa. l'hon» SISO.I 

CALMON LUBOVISKI 

CONCERT VIOLINIST 

Available tor Conrrrln and Kecllala 

Limited Number of Advontred I'u|>IIn .Accepted 

Violinist Lou Anceles Trio 

gtodio! :t34 Mgwlc Art» Studio nidg. Phone 100K1' 

ROLAND PAUL— VOICE 

TDeaday, Wednesday, Friday AfttTnoon* 
Kean School. Phones 21N0r> or :£71330 
1324 South Figueroa. L,oa An«:elea 

SYLVAIN NOACK 

CONCERT MASTER PHILHARMONIC OUClllOSi II » 

Concerts and Kecitnls 

Manaicemcnt Mm. Caroline C. Smith, 424 Auditorium III, 



ILYA BRONSON ,.^ 



nic Orchestra 
■ c, Los Aneclcs Trio, Philhnrni 
icllon. Chnnilier Music Kecltals 
Mlroda — Phone Holly :!044 



ABBIE NORTON JAMISON 

Down-town Studio removed to SOU S. Ilrondwny. Room, 

«02. Residence Studio. 1147 West 21st SI Televhone. 

West 7707. PIANO. H-VRMONV. A'OICE COACH. DI. 
HECTOR, J.AMISON ftUARTETTE. .ASSISTANT TEACH-' 
ERS: MIRIAM « EST-HVATT, GLENDALE; ELSIE L. 
CARLSON, HOLLYWOOD. ' 




LOS ANGELES 

CALIFORNIA 

THEATRE 



GREATER CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
ELINOR, Conducting 
50 MUSICIANS 

PROGRAM FOR W EElv OF .M VV 27 

<a» The Prince of Pilsen — Selection I.uders 

(bl Poet and Peasant — Overture von Supiie 

Marlnibaphonc Solo— Chnrlen E. Cnlklns 

(c) Syncopated Impressions 

XrrauKed by Mr. Elinor 

In v.,njiiiw'IF.„i with 

H Vltol.n I.I.O\D 

The prince of skyliirkcrs, in his lateal 

hurrlc.'inc of humor 

"S.AFETV LAST" 



I 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ei'pcl tliroush his various musical organizations and 
orded a wonderful treat to tlie thousands who crowd- 
the square. The chief number of Mr. Heller's pro- 
im the famous Overture 1S12 by Tschaikowsky. This 
a magnificent work opening with the strains of the 
, Russian Hymn, God Preserve Thy People, and also 
reduces the national Hymn interming'ed with the 
.rseillaise. Under Herman Heller's magic baton, and 
;h an orcliestra of this proportion, a rare treat was 
jorded music lovers which will not soon be forgotten. 

Henri La Bonte, tenor, Charlotte Gale, Agnes Cain- 
Dwn and Harry Girard appeared on the program and 
jred an operatic aria from Rigoletto at the Sunday 
rning Discovery Concert at Graumans on May 27. 
ded interest was due to the fact that Annie Timmner 
yed Casella's beautiful composition, Chanson Neopoli- 
; as a ce'.lo solo. 

'he last free concert scheduled for Music Week took 
ce at Exposition Park on Saturday night. Four 
lenibles made their only appearance of the week, 
ese were the Woman's Symphony Orchestra. Ameri- 
3 Bird Whistling Chorus, directed by Margaret Wood- 
rd, the Los Angeles Scottish Pipe Band and the 
ittish Dancers. Frank Geiger, basso, the Orpheus 
artet d'rected by Hugo Kirchoffer, and Mr. and Mrs. 
leph Regnier completed the very excellent program. 

'he Zoellner Conservatory of Music gave one of the 
St interest'ng and varied programs of the season at 
Faculty Recital at the Conservatory on the evening 
the 21st inst. The program was as fo'lows: White 
uds (Ralston), Orientale (Ralston), Caprice (Ral- 
D), Frances Marion Ralston: Intermezzo from Shane- 
(Charles W. Cadman), Scherzo, Op. 15, No. 12 
■tfcur Bienbarl. Allegretto Grazioso, Op. 13 (Iwanow), 
diner Quartet; Songs — Zueignung (Strauss), Vissi 
rte (Puccini), Dona Ghrey; Sonato, Op. 13, for 
I'll and Piano (Grieg), Antoinette Zoellner, Joseph 
illner. Jr.; Address on Public School Music — Anne 
Pherson; Songs — Le Tasse (Godard). Come to the 
odland (Ferry), Dona Gherey; Fantasie for String 
irtet (Ralston). Andante Cantabile, Op. 11 (Tschai- 
fsky), Zoellner Quartet. 

'he Los Angeles Oratorio Society presented the great- 
American oratorio, the Ode to Music by Henry 
lley, at the Hollywood Bowl on Sunday afternoon 
the final event of Music Week. The performance 
I given under the direction of John Smallman as a 
efit for the Summer Bowl Concerts. Appearing as 
ture so'o-sts was Arthur Hackett, nationally famous 
or, who made the trip from the East to appear in 
I program. The assisting artists were Florence Mid- 



Mme. Newcombe 

PRINDELL 

Desirable Dignified 

Engagements Publicity 

Personal Representative of Distinguished Artists 

MAJESTIC THEATRE 

LOS ANGELES 

Phone 642-93 Phone 642-93 



lELLNER CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

i.os Ai«GE:i,ii:s 

• Wlnil«or Ilnulevnrd (lai.s HolIyiTood Boulevard 

Coniplclc J'-nculty of Artist Teachern 

JOHN SMALLMAN 

KfK Krinoviil of Slii 

rihl llliKii- lliiililiiiK, St 

SHIKI.Kl TA(.-G,%KT, 

Anna Ruzena Sprotte 

COIVTRAI.TO Scbool of Voonl An 
Stndio: Tohoe Uuildlne Olacdowell Club Rootna) 
lor Informa llon Ue«. IMioiic 74184 

MAY MACDONALD HOPE 

CON< KUT l-l,\MSTE— I.OS ANGRI.EIS TRIO 
lllo! :ir< Mn.lr <r<» Sliidio nidg. Phom-; 1fl0«2 

ANN THOMPSON-P/anis/e 

PIAMST Ol-' I'KIISO^AI.ITV 

Wll. 885 



iinico HolN 



CHARLES WAKEFIELD CADMAN 

rl€-n'» l-onulnr Coinnoscr on Jour with TSIANINA 
nnd South: llet, mid \o\- — Pnc. ConBt. Jnn, and Feb 
OBiiln: I'-eli. and April— Oalifornia: April and May 



CHARLES BOWES 

TEACHER OF VOICE 

446 S. Grand Vifw. I'fionp SS4F,4.>i. Los AneelcB 

DA VOL SANDERS * 'V!,',?,.^?!,;"'*'' 

"d violin llfpt., ('„lleK<- of Mui.ic, V. S. C— Meaiber 
PlilMinrmonle Oroheatrn 
F'.^. iA,.„w «>« . I o, ^ne-^]*., Phon^ M»tn 21JW1 

A. KOODLACH 

vioi.ix ii\Ki.:ii A\n niDPAiRKit 

.tlajrxlio Theatre Hide.. Lou Anselea Phone 070-02 



daugh, contralto, Melba Fi'ench Barr, soprano and. 
Clifford Lott, baritone. Julius Bierlich was concert 
master in this very excellent presentation, the singers 
showed fine training and great credit is due Mr. Small- 
man who has built up the Oratorio Society to its pres- 
ent state of ability. The Ode, with the words by Henry 
Van Dyke is a poem dedicated to music and it describes 
the various moods of music and with the orchestral 
accompaniment it brought out the poets beautiful style, 
in its entirety. 



PASADENA NEWS 



The Woman's Choral Club of Pasadena gave its sec- 
ond concert of the year, s'xteenth season, in the Palm 
Terrace of the Hotel Maryland. Tuesday evening. May 
22nd, before a very appreciative audience. Much 
credit is due Mrs. C. C. Blauvelt who organized and 
who has been musical director of the club during its 
existence. Under her splendid leadership, the voices 
of approximately sixty members blended perfectly and 
followed the spirit of the selections which were we'l 
chrsen and excellently presented by the club. The 
Cub was ably assisted by Miss Lois Wall, splendid 
accompanist. Miss Catherine Jackson, well known harp- 
ist formerly of Chicago, and Miss Esther M. South, 
mezzo-contralto, who gave several lovely solos; Mrs. 
Wendell G. Robinson, whose exquisite soprano voice was 
heard above the chorus in one brill'ant number; Miss 
Carrie B. Neale, soprano, who sang very effectively the 
solo part in another, and Miss Lulu E. Finney who 
accompanied M'ss Wall in the closing number. 

Miss Marion Ralston, well known Pasadena composer, 
gave a program during Music Week at the Zoe'.lner 
Conservatory of Music in Los Angeles. 

Will Rounds, conductor of the Pasadena Community 
Orchestra, presented the last program of the season on 
Saturday evening. May 5th, at the High School Audi- 
torium with Esther Tobler, violinist as soloist. Miss 
Tobler gave a very finished peformance of Bach's Violin 
Concerto in G. Minor w'th the orchestra. Miss Tobler, 
who is a graduate of the Detroit Conservatory is con- 
tinu'ng her studies with Mr. Rounds, whose work as an 
instructor in violin playing is showing marked results. 

Music Week was observed in the Community Play- 
house by the presentation of a musical extravaganza 
called The Follies of Pasadena, the musical score of 
which was written by Dr. Raymond Mixell, a well known 
Pasadenan. The music which was sparkling and viva- 
cious received much praise and was played by a volun- 
teer orchestra of members of the Pasadena Community 
Orchestra under the leadership of Will Rounds, the 
well known conductor. 

The Monday Evening Musical Club of South Pasa- 
dena gave a very interesting concert before an audience 
of five hundred in the open air theatre of the Oneonta 
Academy, Sunday afternoon, May 20th. Norine Clark- 
son Merritt. well known concert violinist, had charge 
of and participated in the program. Space forbids 
mentioning each number but the applause proved that 
the large audience was highly appreciative. Mrs. 
Merritt is a violinist with tone, feeling and a musician- 
ship combined with grace, beauty of bowing and a 
charming personality. 

Arthur Farwell, well known composer and conductor 
with the assistance of the Community Orchestra, 
directed a chorus of 300 at Brookside Park on Sunday 
afternoon. May 20th. HELEN WOOD. 

Rosa Ponselle, the Metropolitan prima donna soprano, 
who dazzled a large audience here a few weeks ago. 
wi'l be heard at the Hollywood Bowl Sunday afternoon, 
June 3. Proceeds of the concert to be donated to the 
Bowl improvement fund, thanks to the Fitzgerald Con- 
cert direction. Arrangements are being made to accom- 
modate 15,000 hearers, when the radiant voice of the 
star will fill the Bowl. 

California Theatre,— For the concert at the California 
theatre this week, Carli Elinor is offering one of the 
most diversified programs heard in Los Angeles for 
some time. All the faculty which Gustave Luders pos- 
sessed for mingling melody, harmony and rhythm is 
remarkably expressed by Elinor in selections from the 
composer's famous comic opera, "The Prince of Pilsen," 
which is the opening selection. The second number 
is a novelty and all the ovations heard by Charles Cal- 
kins, marimbaphonist of the orchestra, are well earned. 
Mr. Calkins plays as a solo Clark's "Carnival of Venice" 
and as an encore he does Drdla's famous "Souvenir." 
Played first as a classic he swings into what are known 
as "blues' and reveals "Souvenir" as one of the best 
fox trots heard for a long time. Although the jazz 
rendition of "Souvenir" is welcomed, the third number 
on the program is called "Syncopated Impressions," 
and is Elinor's arrangement of the popular dance hits 
"Stumbling," "Some Little Bird," "A Young Man's 
Fancy and "Ain't We Got Fun." 



ORVILLE HARROLD AT LOEW-WARFIELD 

Already foremost for its musical programs, Loew's 
Warfield Theatre, sets a new mark for a motion picture 
theatre with the presentation for an engagement com- 
mencing Saturday, June 2 of Orville Harrold, leading 
American tenor of the Metropolitan Opera Company. 
Harrold has just closed his season in New York where 
he has sung more than a score of different roles for 
the Metropolitan during the past three vears. He 



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director general of the Metropolitan Company, and 
sings in California through his consent, only at Loew's 
Warfleld and at Loew's State in Los Angeles. It is the 
tenor's first appearance in a motion picture theatre. 

San Francisco music lovers will remember Harrold 
for his visit three years ago during the Scotti Opera 
season at the Exposition Auditorium. It is interesting 
also to note that it was Harrold who created the role 
of Nemion in "Cleopatra's Night," an opera by Henry 
Hadley, former director of the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra. Accompanying Horrold is Emil .1. Polak, 
former conductor for Mary Garden, Titta Ruffo, and 
other opera stars, who is guest conductor of the War- 
field orchestra for the operatic numbers. Lipschultz. 
however, directs his "Music Masters" as usual for the 
balance of the program. 

Harrold sings Canio's Lament from Leoncavallo's 
opera, "I Pagliacci" and "For I'm Falling In Love With 
Someone," a song revived from the days of his tour 
in Victor Herbert's The Naughty Marietta." By a 
coincidence of engagements. David Belasco's drama, 
"The Girl of the Golden West." which inspired Puc- 
cini's opera of the same name, is the screen attraction 
for the week. Selections from the opera will provide 
the overture for Lipschultz and the Music Masters, 



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10 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



San Joaquin Valley Musical Review 

Edited by LILIAN TURNEY HAYS 

1753 Van Ness Avenue, Fresno, Calif. 

Telephone Fresno 7499 



The Fresno Symphony Orchestra has passed through 
its seventh successful season (1922-231, under the direc- 
tion of Earl Townei-, playing to a total audience of 
10,000 people. This has heen a particularly successful 
year from a financial point of view, and— more impor- 
tant—it has been a year of musical achievement for the 
organization. The musical standard of iMr. Towner 
has always been high but he has been enormously 
handicapped because of limited instrumentation until 
this year, the fifty members of the orchestra have given 
their services without remuneration of any kind in 
order to help Fresno to have good music. For six 
years they gave of their talent and time and this year 
they were paid such a small sum that in many cases 
it did not cover transportation to and from rehearsals, 
as many of the players came from other towns to work 
with the Fresno Symphony Orchestra. The degree of 
success which any such organization attains is depend- 
ent in a large measure upon the community support it 
receives. This support has not been lacking in Fresno 
and from present indications we may expect an even 
richer season next year. The organization lacks several 
instruments which will be supplied if the funds are 
sufficient. 

During the last season the orchestra was assisted by 
the following outside artists: Charles Bulotti, lyric 
tenor, of San Francisco; Charles Wakefield Cadman, 
composer-pianist; Miss Harriet Bennett, soprano, of 
San Francisco. It was also assisted at one concert by 
The Fresno Symphony Chorus, a group of 44 voices. 
At another concert the soloist was Pasquall Santa 
Emma, local trumpeter and at the last concert Will 
Hays, violinist and concert master of the orchestra, 
played. 

Miss Bennett is a former Fresno girl and is always 
received here with enthusiasm. She is "our own" and 
we have great pride in her phenomenal rise in the 
musical world. Mr. Cadman played several of his own 
compositions on the piano and conducted the orchestral 
rendition of his Intermezzo from Shanewis. Mr. Santa 
Emma played Schubert's Serenade and Liberati's Pyra- 
mids. He is a trumpeter of first rank. He has the real 
Italian musical appreciation and his tone is as clear 
as a bell. Mr. Hays played Vieuxtempts' Ballade et 
Polonaise at the last concert (Quoting The Fresno Heel ; 

•■ In it he displayed sympathy and understanding 

of violin possibilities as well as a well developed techni- 
cal facility. Hays is a violinist of virtuoistic ability 
and is too seldom heard in solo work." Among the 
numbers given by the orchestra during the year were: 
Algerian Suite, Saint-Saens; Tschaikowsky's March 
Slav; Symphony in C minor (Number 51, Beethoven; 
Jensen's Wedding -Music; Overture Phedre. Massenet; 
at one concert the orchestra was assisted by Mr. Rich- 
ard Sarafian, flute and Mr. E. H. Leonard, 'cello, in 
Titl's Serenade. There were six concerts. 

Fresno is everlastingly grateful to the young man who 
had foresight and idealism enough to found this orches- 
tra and conduct it without personal gain during these 
first years. No one has ever done a better piece of 
musical pioneering than Mr. Earl Towner. 

The operatta, "The Belle of Barcelona,' composed 
and directed by Charles R. Chaney. music director of 
the Sanger High School was given by the students of 
the school, April 12th and 13th with a cast of 70 in the 
chorus and 15 soloists. The orchestra of 18 pieces 
under the directorship of Mrs. Chaney, pianist, was 
also made up of students. In his score Mr. Chaney 
has caught the musical spirit of historic old Spain, the 
land of sunshine and song, tambourines and castanets, 
dashing senoritas and thrilling romances. Mr. Chaney 
has a number of songs, piano and orchestral selections 
in manuscript and it is to be hoped we will hear more 
of his work. He is leader of the second violins in the 
Fresno Symphony Orchestra. 

The Seventh Annual May Music Festival of the 
Fresno Public Schools was given May 25th and 26th at 
the Fresno Civic Auditorium under the direction of 
Earl Towner and Inez Colfin. . The choruses from the 
elementary schools were directed by Miss Coffin and 
those from the secondary schools by Earl Towner. 
Accompaniments for the choruses were played by an 
orchestra selected from the Fresno High, Fresno 
Technical, Washington and Longfellow Schools. The 
band, also selected from the various schools was con- 
ducted by Pasquale Santa Emma. The following pro- 
grams were given Friday, May 25, 1923— Miss Coflin, 
director: Opening March — El Capitan (Sousa); Salute 
to the Flag, led by Captain .1. E. Burns, Commander of 
Atlanta Post 92, G. A. R; The Star Spangled Banner 
(Key-Smith); I Am Music (The Spirit of Music), Lola 
May Bernhauer; Ciriliiribin (Pestalozzal, Chorus: (a) 
Washington Post, March (Souza), (b) Gems From the 
Opera (Berry), (c) La Donna E Mobile (Verdi), Bands 
from the Fresno High and Fresno Technical Schools, 
P. Santa Emma, director; (a) Lullaby (Brahms), (b( 
From the Land of the Sky-Blue Water (Cadman), Fresno 
Boy Choir; Remarks— William .John Cooper, Superin- 
tendent of Siliools; (a) The Nipht Has a Thousand 
Eyes (Earl Towner), (b) Little Rose (Earl Townerl, 
Chorus; (ai Triumphal March, from Aida (Verdi), (b) 
God of the Nations (Verdi), High School Boys Glee 
Club, Mary Carson Orr, Director; Serenade (Schubert), 
.lohn Muir, Emerson and Kirk Choruses; 1 Love You, 
California (FrankinsteinI, Chorus; Accompanists — Mrs. 
Ora Summers, Earl Towner. Saturday. May 26, 1923— 
Mr. Towner, Director; Opening March — Sempre Fidelis 
(Sousa) ; Star Spangled Banner, Chorus, Orchestra and 



ROSE FLORENCE— Mezzo Soprano 

CONCERT— VOICE P LACING— COACHING 

Studio:-545 Sutter Street Telephone Kearny 3598 

Management —L. E. Behymer, 70S Auditorium Building, Los Angeles 



.-Audience; (a) .America's Message (.Johnstone), (bl I've 
Been Thinking, Chorus; (al Lullaby (Brahmsl, (bl 
From the. Land of the Sky-Blue Water (Cadman I 
Fresno Boy Choir, Miss Coflin, Director; (a) Festival 
Overture (Ascherl, (b) American Patrol (Meacham), 
(cl Gems From the Operas (Berry). Bands from the 
Fresno High and Fresno Technical Schools, P. Santa 
Emma, Director; (a) Star Daisies (Busch), (b) Swing 
Song (Edmunds). Fourth Grade Class, Hawthorne 
School, Lucile Mand, Director; (a) When I Go Home 
(Towner), (b) To the Spring (Gounod), (c) My Heart 
at Thy Dear Voice (Saint-Saens I, Girls' Choruses; On 
the Road to Mandalay (Speaks), Baritones and Basses; 
Unfold, Ye Portals (Gounod), Chorus. 

(Quoting Miss Isabel Morse in the Fresno Bee of 
May 26th I; The first program of the Fresno Public 
School music pupils passed off happily and was a joy 
to hundreds of young songsters, as well as to several 
thousand listeners who crowded the civic auditorium 
last night. Earl Towner, Miss Inez Coffin, Miss Mary 
Carson Orr, P. Santa Emma, L. B. Cain, Miss Henrietta 
Burns. Miss Catherine Balthis, Will Hays, Mrs William 
Foster Eilliot and many other assistants in the music 
department of the public schools have labored for 
months to perfect these festival programs and the result 
of their effort as displayed last night was admirable. 

The little people piped up in their childish trebles 
and well outlined harmonies with an evident enthu- 
siasm and love for song that was a delight to the eye as 
well as the ear. The boy choir distinguished itself in the 
difficult harmonic embroidery of the Brahm's Lullaby 
and the Land of the Sky Blue Water was clear as a 
mountain lake. The bands from the Technical and 
Fresno High Schools, under the baton of Pasquale Santa 
Emma showed the excellence of their training by then- 
precision and adherence to pitch. 

Two songs from the pen of Earl Towner were es- 
pecially well received. They are songs of sentiment 
with a rhythmical swing which the children love. Mary 
Carson Orr directed the high school boys' glee club in 
two masculine songs from Verdi. The boys attacked 
them valiantly. I Love You, California, closed the pro- 
gram amid waving handkerchiefs and a very general 
feeling among the grown-ups that the music life of the 
future Fresno is in good hands. Such a start as these 
bovs and girls are getting in the right understanding 
of "a great art and -element of life will grow into ap- 
preciation of the better sort. 

One notable impression these young singers left was 
the ease with which their songs were produced. There 
was no forcing of tones, no strained effort to make a 
big noise The melody had full sway in their minds and 
voices. Too much can not be said in commendation of 
this method of teaching children to sing. It will pre- 
serve their vocal abilities for the days when power and 
beauty of voice are expected of them. 

(To be continued next week) 



MISS CORINNE KEEPER'S CONCERT 

Miss Corinne Keefer, contralto, pupil of Mme. Rose 
Relda Cailleau. and prize winner of the Northexn Cali- 
fornia contest of the California Federation of Music 
Clubs for voice, gave a concert in the Red Room of the 
Fairmont Hotel on Wednesday evening. May 2ord, 
wherein she was ably and most artistically assisted by 
her teacher. This concert was given under the direction 
of Mme. Cailleau to enable Miss Keefer to defray her 
expenses for the trip to AsheviUe, N. C, where she -will 
compete in the National Contest of the National Feder- 
ation of Music Clubs. The patronesses who were respon- 
sible for making this event a financial success included: 
Mrs George Cameron, Mrs. Jesse Lilienthal, Mrs. Leon 
Sloss Mrs. J. W. Reid, Mrs. Mortimer Fleshhacker. Mrs. 
Rudolph Spreckles, Mrs. Sidney Ehrmann. ' Mrs. E. 
He'ler Mme. Armand Cailleau, Mrs. Will Crocker, Mrs. 
Leon Guggenheimer and Mrs. W. Magee. 

The program opened with a duet from Dehbes Lakme 
sung by Miss Keefer and Mme. Cailleau in a manner 
that revealed its innermost musical characteristics. It 
was an exceptionally successful delineation of the diffi- 
cult phrases of which this work is composed and showed 
both teacher and student thoroughly well equipped to 
render delightful compositions in a spirit of fine ensem- 
ble Mme Cailleau was the assisting artist, as already 
stated and as usual enthused her hearers with the ex- 
cellence of her vocal art. She was in specially fine voice 
and sang an Aria from Sonnambula (Bellini), When I 
Was Seventeen ( Kramer) and Les fiUes de Cadix (by 
request) (Delibes) with that limpidity of expression and 
flexibility of vocal quality which has become such a 
genuinely delightful feature in this artist's concert pro- 
grams. 

Miss Keefer acquitted herself most creditably proving 
that the prize was worthily bestowed. Her flexible, 
rich and resonant voice showed to splendid advantage 
in a number of well selected compositions. She proved 
herself capable both as Interpretor of predominating 
sentiments and also in the use of her vocal organ. She 
was enthusiastically applauded and everyone wishes her 
success in her ambitious endeavor to carry home a 
prize from the National Contest. The complete program 
rendered on this occasion was as follows: Duet— Lakme 
(Delibes), Miss Corinne Keefer and Mme. Cailleau; (a) 
Aria— Samson and Delilah (Printeinps qui commence) 
(Saint-Saens), (bl Aria— Sappho (O ma lyre immortellel 
(Gounod), Miss Corinne Keefer; (al Aria — Sonnambula 
(Bellini I (b) When I Was Seventeen (Kramer), (c) 



KAJETAN ATTL 

SOLO HARPIST, SAN FRANCISCO 
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

For Concert KnKnKementi* 
nnd Inpitractton Apply 1o 
Secretary and MnniiKer of 
K, AdI, Room 10(14 Kohler 
& Chnae HldB,. San l''rnncl»eo 



Western Representative of Lyon & Healy Harps 

Telephone Douelan 1<I7'* 




Siellajelica 

COLORATURA SOPRANO I 



800 KOHLER CHASE DLDC 
SAN FRANCISCO 




Les fllles de Cadix (by request) (Delibes), Mme. 
Relda Cailleau; (a) Aus meinen grossen Scliiu 
(Franz), (bl Erlkonig (Schubert), Miss Keefer 
Psyche (Paladihle), (b) Slav Song (Chaminadii 
Keefer; (al Trees (Rasbach), (b) The Danza i 
wick), (c) Dawn of the Desert (Ross), (d) Soni; ^ 
Open (La Forge), Miss Keefer. 

The Misses Hazel Nichols and Relda Marie C:i 
played the accompaniments with taste and ad'' 
pianistic expression. A. 



DE VALLY'S ANNUAL PUPILS' RECITAL 

The fourth annual pupils' recital of the De Val 
Opera Institute took place in the Italian ballroom of tl 
St. Francis Hotel on Friday evening. May 18. Evei 
seat was occupied by interested music lovers wl 
showed their appreciation and pleasure by rewardil 
the performers with the enthusiasm of their applaue 
Inasmuch as the writer had to attend two other even 
on this same evening, it is physically impossible fi 
him to give a detailed review of every number on t! 
program. Judging from the young singers and pianlg 
we heard, however, we feel thoroughly convinced th 
each one of them is well deserving of individual me 
tion and some day we trust that we shall have I 
opportunity to do justice to their efforts. 

It is. however, perfectly in place to compliment M 
De Valley for the splendid work he is doing in an ed 
cational way. He is not only training his students in 
manner to enable them to reveal thei; voices and 
ents at their best, but also to make them feel at ea 
and to carry themselves in a manner worthy of ( 
perienced artists. This is true of every participant 
this program. There is not apparent that atmospher*'! 
of amateurship which is an ordinary characteristic of 
a pupils' recital. Sally Osbom played the acconip.inl- 
ments very efficiently and with adherence to the si • . i;d 
and predominating features of the various youn^ [• r 
formers. 

The complete program was as follows: En ■ t'-- 
Class — Romeo et Juliette. Prologue— Verone 1 1 
deux families rivales (Charles Gounod); Floren^ > 
man— Sonatina for piano (Clementil; H. Edgar i; 
Baryton— Semele, Air: Where'er You Walk, 
Handel); Beulah Jean Pollok, Soprano — Le Mai 
Figaro, Air de Cherubin, second Acl, Mon coeui 
(W. A. Mozart); Edward G. McKenna, Tenor— Ih - i ■ 
en Tauride, Recitatif et Air de Pylade (C. '- •■"<• 
Gluckl; Elsie Ingham, Contralto — MIgnon, Roiii.n 1 
Mignon, first Act, Connais-tu le Pays? (A. Tli i. 

Muriel Chadwick— (al Theme for piano (Schul.. ■ 
Elfin Dance (Grieg); Kathleen Hall. Soprann- 
et Juliette, Chanson de Stephano, third Act. 
hier, je cherche en vain mon niaitre (Ch. Gnu, i) 
Henrv E. Reed, Tenor — Semele, Air: O Sleep! U li. 1 '"^l 
Thou Leave Me? (G. F. Handel); Beulah .loan I'.M.ik - 
(a) Who Knows, Text from the Persian oi 'imin 
Khayyam (William Stickles), (b) Down in tli. 
(Laniion Ronald); Julia Andruss — Sonata for in 
van Beethoven); Elsie Ingham— (a) The Opal. '■ 
Pearl (Adam Carse) ; Edward G. McKenna— (a) ..luiln-i, 
o' Mine (Frank E Tours), (b) Thou Art So Like, 
Flower (G. W. Chadwick) ; Kathleen Hall— (a) Flirtattf 
(Pearl (!. Curran), (b) Gossiping (John Wilson Dodgg 
Enscnilile Class— In a Persian C.iirden, Alas! ~ 
Bliring should vanish with tlii' rose (Liza Lehmani 
Misses Hall. Pollok, Ingham, Hildebrant, Messi 
Kenna, Mainwaring Reed, Kincaid, Richard, 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



.ORING CLUB CLOSES 46TH SEASON 



Jnder the Direction of Wallace A. Sabin 

Excellent Male Chorus Presents Final 

Program Before Crowded House 

By ALFRED METZGER 
The Loring Club of San Francisco, one 
il the foremost and ablest male choruses 
n the Pacific Coast, gave its fourth and 
inal concert of the forty-sixth season at 
Icottish Rite Auditorium on Tuesday 
vening. May 22. before an audience 
hat occupied every seat in the hall, many 
eing perfectly contented to stand. For 
number of years Wallace A. Sabin has 
irected this organization in a manner 
) increase its artistic possibilities until 
aday it has arrived at a period of its 
seful activity when fifteen hundred peo- 
le crowd the hall and give vent to their 
nthusiasm by prolonged and spontane- 
us demonstrations of genuine approval. 
Mr. Sabin is specially competent in 
lie selection and preparations of pro- 
rams that combine artistic character 
'ith that vein of melodic and rhythmic 
ualities which appeal so greatly to the 
verage musical audience. This final con- 
ert of the season was no exception to 
)e rule. The program consisted of the 
)llowing delightful numbers: Bedouin 
ong. for chorus of men's voices with ac- 
ompaniment of strings and piano; 
uomi's Song (Franz Mair) for chorus 
nd men's voices; The Song of the 
ou'wester (Charles Villiers Stanford). 
ir solo bass and chorus of men's voices 
ith accompaniment of strings and 
iano. Soloist P. H. 'Ward; Sweet and 
ow I.I. Barnby). for chorus and men's 
3ices; St. John's Eve (Josef Rhein- 
ergeri. for chorus of men's voices with 
icompaniment of strings and piano; 
liree Songs — Sea Fever ("Wallace A. 
abin) with accompaniment of strings 
ad pi;uio. conducted by the composer; 1 
ra\iU\ My Song Were Like a Star 
Frederick Jiaurer). Two Dreams Dwell 
1 Her ICyes (Frederick Maurer). accom- 
inied by the composer. James E. Zieg- 
ir; Dusk (D. B. Moodyt for chorus of 
len's voices; Forest Harps (Edwin 
Bhultz). for chorus of men's voices and 
)lo tf-nor with accompaniment of strings 
ad piano; soloist. G. A. Rogers; The 
Ittle Admiral (Charles Villiers Stan- 
trdl. for baritone solo and chorus of 
en's voices with accompaniment of 
rings and piano; soloist, George Krull; 
he Musical Trust (Henry Hadleyl for 
lorus of men's voices (by request! ; The 
Brewell of Hiawatha (Arthur Footei, 
antata of men's voices and baritone 
ilo, witti accompaniment of strings and 
;ano; soloist, James E. Ziegler. 
Both as to program and interpretation 
lis was one of the very best events 
.yen by the Loring Club. Of special in- 
irest was Mr. Sabin's Sea Fever and the 
vo songs by Frederick Maurer — I 
rould .\ly Song Were Like a Star and 
wo Dreams Dwell in Her Eyes. The 
iree compositions revealed fine melodic 
erit as well as very effective words. Mr. 
2igler sang them with intelligence, fine 
Idgment as to their values and an ex- 
jllent baritone voice used with discrimi- 
Ition and technical intelligence. An- 
:her splendidly interpreted work was 
rthur Foote's The Farewell of Hiawatha, 
erein also Mr. Ziegler displayed his 
•tistic Qualifications as a soloist, while 
le Loring Club responded nobly to the 
aton of the conductor, showing fine 
lending of voices and precision of at- 
.cks The choruses by Charles Villiers 
tanford were also gems of choral inter- 
■etations. P. H. Ward sang the solo in 
he Song of the Sou'wester with force 
id effectiveness, while George Krull 
ive an excellent account of himself as 
)loist in The Little Admiral. 
Benjamin S. Moore played the accom- 
miments with that artistic taste and 
rmness of execution which forms such 
splendid feature of his excellent work, 
competent string orchestra assisted 
le club and included: William F. 
iraia. Hans Koenig, Riccardo Ruiz, 
rat violins; R. Laraia and L. Armauts. 
iconrt violins; Emil Hahl. viola; Willem 
ehe, violoncello and A. Annarumi. bass, 
oth the Loring Club and Wallace A. 
Ibin have reason to feel gratified with 
le brilliant close of their splendid 
sason. 



Music Students surely can not employ 
18 summer or vacation time more pleas- 
itly than to earn for themselves a 
:hoIarship for the new season or a valu- 
)'e musical instrument. Anyone inter- 
ited in music will be glad to subscribe 



to a paper that gives him his or her 
news for the new season. Consequently 
register in our subscription campaign. 

Joseph Greven 

Voice Culture ; — Opera, Oratorio, 

Concert and Church Singing in all 

languages. 

MRS, J. GREVEN 
Piano and Harmony 

3741 Sacramento St. Tel. Bayview 5278 

PAUL STEINDORFr 

MASTER COACH 

ORATORIO— CONCERT— OPERA 

In All Languages 

5302 Broadway .... Oakland 

Mrs. William Steinbach 

VOICE CUI.TDRE 

Stadia: 

902 KOHLER & CHASB BLDG. 

«wn Frnnolwfo Phone; Kpnrny •VI.'M 

KURT VON GRUDZINSKI 

baritone: — VOICE CLILTURE 

Authorized to Teach Mine. Schnen. 

Rene'M Method 

1314 Leavenworth St. Phone Prospect ft253 

ALMA SCHMIDT-KENNEDY 

PI.\NIST 
Studio: ir.37 Eiidid Avenue, Berkeley, 
Phone Berkeley 600«. 



MRS. ZAY RECTOR BEVITT 

PIANO and HARMONY 

Institute of Music of San Francisco, 
Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 5454. 

PIERRE DOUILLET, PIANO 
NITALIA DOUILLET, VOICE 

00,'> Kohler & Ch:ise Bid, Tel. Sutter T3N7 

DOMENICO BRESCIA 

VtllCE SPECIALIST — COMPOSITION 

Studio, <f0:i-t{04 K<»HLEK & CHASE ULDG. 

Phone Kearny r>4r>4 

Madame Cherles Poulter— Soprano 



ROSGOE WARREN LUCY 



Oakland, Tel. Piedmont S09S. 



MARION RAMON WILSON 

DR.*M.\TIO CONTRALTO 



Mary Coonan McCrea 

TEACHER OF SINGING 



MRS. A. F. BRIDGE 



ELSIE COOK HUGHES 

AnDonnceM the opening of her new ReHl- 
dence Studio. CInrk AptH., Apt. 21) — VAH 
Hyde St.. San Franoisco. Phone Prospect 
B031. Fridays. 902 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 
Kenrny M.VI. 

MME. ISABELLE MARKS 

CONTRALTO 



ACHILLE L. ARTIGUES 

GRADUATE OF SCHOLA CANTORUM. 

PARIS 

OROAMI8T 8T, MARY'S OATIIBDRAI^ 

Piano Department, HaartlB Selioal 
Onran and Piano, Anillai^a Mnalcal Collefca 

ESTHER MUNDELL 

SOPRANO AND TEACHER 

Pupil of 

ne Renxke and Perey Rector Stephens 

Studio. 703 Heine Rldg., 408 Stockton St. 

Res. Stndin — 004 Second AvenwP 

LEILA B. GRAVES 

I.VBIC .SOPRANO— VOICE CI I.Tl RE 

Availahle for Conrertx and ReoltnN 

Studio: l.tO Central Ave. Tel. Park Ui'2-i 

MISS WELCOME LEVY 



The San Francisco Savings and Loan Society 

(THE SAN FRANCISCO BANK) 

SAVINGS COMMERCIAL 

Member Federal Reserve System and Associated Savinflii 

Banks ot San Francisco 

526 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 
DECEMBER 30th, 1922 

Assets $80,671,392.53 

Deposits 76,921,392.53 

Capital Actually Paid Up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 2,750,000.00 

Employees' Pension Fund 400,613.61 

MISSION BRANCH Mission .nd 21st Streets 

PARK-PRESIDlO DISTRICT BRANCH Clement St. and 7th Ave. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH Halght and Belvedere Slre<:ts 

WEST PORTAL BRANCH West Portal Ave. and Ulloa St. 

A Dividend to Depositors of Four and One-quarter (43<^) 

per cent per annum was declared for the six months 

ending December 31st, 1922. 

INTEREST WILL HEREAFTER BE COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY 
INSTEAD OF SEMI-ANNUALLY AS HERETOFORE. 



A.DELE ULMAN 

TEACHER OF VOICE AXD PIANO 

Studio 17S Commonwealth Ave. 
Telephone Pacific 3^ 

Laura Wertlieimber 

Preparatory Teacher for 

Mrw. Noah Itrnndt 

11 Scott St. Telephone Fillmore 15! 

EDWIN HUTCHINGS 



Evelyn Sresovich Ware 

PI\!VO 

Stndloi 1003 Kohler S Chaae Bldg. 

Phone Kearnj- .'.4.'H 

Joseph George Jacobson 

PI.\NO 
2S33 Sacramento St. Phone Fillmore 848 

ROSE RELDA CAILLEAU 



Opera Con 

Studio: 3107 » 

Phone Fill 



Ique, Parln 

liloeton Street 
i.ire IS47 



SIGMUND BEEL 



studio Uuildinit. 



MARY ALVERTA MORSE 



SAN FRANCISCO CONSERVATORY 



OF MUSIC 



MuNic School) 



MRS. CARROLL NICHOLSON 

C01VTR,*I,TO 
Teacher oC SlndnK. 32 I.oretta Ave, Pied- 
mont. Tel. Piedmont 304. Mon., Kohler 6i 
Chnwe nidg.. «i. F. Telephone KearnT .'MM. 

Brandt's Conservatory of Music 

2211 SCOTT ST„ Bet. Clay A WaahluKton 

Mr. Noah Brandt, Violin 
Mrn. Noah Brandt. Piano 

HELEN COLBURN HEATH 



tlon. 2r,X« Clay St_ Phone We«t 4S00. 

MR. & MRS. GEO. KRUGER 

ARTISTIC PIANO INSTRUCTION 

Studio: 1009 Kohler & Cbane Bldg. 

Telephone Kearny 5454 

Rea. TeL Bayvletr 4104 

EVA GARCIA 

CONCERT PIANIST. ACCOMPANIST 

AND TE.ACHER 

Studio: 4in« Piedmont Ave. Tel. Pled. 2750. 

Residence: 4152 Howe St., Oakland 
Tel. Pled. 3402 

ARTUR ARGIEWICZ 

violinist and Teacher. Head of Violin Dept., 

S. P. Conn, ot Music. 3435 Sacramento 

St., and 121 2lMt Ave., Tel Pac. 12S 4 

RUTH DEGNAN 

PUPIL OF GIACOMO AND MME. 

MINKOWSKI 

TEACHI5R OP VOICE 

242S Pine St. Tel. Weat TOIJ 

TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



MISS EDITH CAUBU 
376 Sutter Street Phone Douglas 269 



HENRIK GJERORUM 
2321 Jackson St. Phone Fillmore 3256 



JANET ROWAN HALE 

901 Powell St. Phone Kearny 2930 

OLGA BLOCK BARRETT 
2626 Lyon Street Phone West 1307 

MISS MARION FRAZER 
2027 California St. Tel. Fillmore 3827 

J. B. ATWOOD 

2111 Channing Way Berkeley, Cal. 

MISS LORRAINE EWING 
833 Ashbury St. Phone Park 1974 

MARJORIE E. YOUNG 

1483 Fulton Street. Fillmore 2657 

MARGARET WHITE COXON 

119 Rose Av., Oakland Piedmont 160S-W 

RUTH VIOLA DAVIS 
515 Buena Vista Avenue— Park 341 

LOUIS FELIX RAYNAUD 
1841 Fulton St. Tel. Pacific 4219 

DOROTHY PASMORE 
1715 Vallejo St. Phone West 1»95 



MACKENZIE GORDON 
2832 Jackson Street Phone West 457 

ANTOINE DE VALLY 

2201 Scott St. Phone West 1347 

ANDRT ?TR"RrER 
1470 Washington St. Tel. Franklin 3321 

PEARL HOSSACK WHITCOMB 

1005 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. K. 5454 

MARGARET BRUNTSCH 

70 Piedmont St. Phone Park 3469 

MME. M. TROMBONI 

601-2 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 

JACK EDWARD HILLMAN 

601 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Kearny 5454 



JULIUS HAUG 
798 Post St. Tel. Pros. 9269 

HOTHER WISMER 
3701 Clay Street Phone Pacific 4974 

ARTHUR CONRADI 
906 Kohler & Chase Bldg. Tel. Kearny 6464 

SIR HENRY HEYMAN 

434 Spruce St. Tel. Fillmore 1131 

REED AND HOUTHPIBCB MAKER 

LOUIS J. PAQUET 
789 Mission St. Sattar <SH 

If you want to become known to the 
musical public of California, advertise in 
the Pacific Coast Musical Review. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ROSALIE HOUSMAN SONGS 

on the Programs of Distinguished American Artists 

Published by 

G. SCHIRMER, JOHN CHURCH CO., THE BOSTON MUSIC COMPANY, 

THE COMPOSERS' MUSIC CORPORATION 

Songs for All Voices, New Publications of the Composers' Music Corporation 

THE CRY OF THE ORIENT TOMORROW 

THE FOREST OF DREAMS 

A CYCLE OF SIX— SONGS OF THE LITTLE DAYS 

For Sale at the Leading Music Houses 



From The Very Beginning, By Phyllis Lucy Keyes 

fiindnmental muHic prinrlpIeK In a deflnite and Infid way, con 
>(-Krade pU-fvn hat vrnKTenttiiie: rapidly In Iheir expoMltlon of 
•(fHNlun itrobleniH and the creation of good tnHte. 
PUICK. «0c. 

HENRY GROBE, 135-153 Kearny Street. 

Representative for the Clayton F. Summy Publications. 



MAUD G. McFAUL 

ACCOMPANIST 

1128 Chcatnnt Street 

Telephone Proapect 4932 



If a Music Journal 
extend courtesies it 
while to subscribe for 



is worth while to 
should be worth 



REMOVAL NOTICE 

MR. ANDREW BOGART 

Teacher of Singing 



KatlNtled ivith yoat 

iM lie a FuddiHt, or Charletanf 

Arc you aiire your teacher known hoTT? 

la he alwnya tnlklns "BREATH?" "TOXGUE!" 
'•JAW f" 

If in doubt, conNUlt Afr. Bofcnrt, who atadled 
Europe with 1 



iibrieh, Scnlchl, 



Illaphi 



HfillM prepared for Opera, Oratorio, Church and 



£on Stance <iAlexandre 

Mezzo Soprano 

Pupils Accepted 

Inquiries made at 

801 Kohler & Chase Bldg. 

Phone Kearny 5454 



$3,000 

IN PRIZES 

MUSICAL REVIEW 

SUBSCRIPTION CONTEST 

See Page 7 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON, Piano 



Resident Artists who wish to secure engagements 
through managers and music cluhs next season should 
announce their plans NOW as bookings are made im- 
mediately before the end of this season and during the 
summer months. 



Leslie V. Harvey 

Organist 
Coliseum Theatre 



SCHUMANN HEINK 

STEINWAY PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

Season 1922-23 — Exclusive Management Haensel & Jones, Aeolian Hall, New York 



The 
PIANOFORTE 



There is a subtle satisfaction in knowing 
that one's possessions, whatever their nature, 
are of superlative excellence. 



A Gobelin tapestry or a da Vinci painting is 
a constant source of pleasure and bears testi- 
mony to the taste of its owner. To the music 
lover the same is true in the possession of a 
Mason & Hamlin Piano. 

Those who are musically sensitive, whose 
appreciation of tonal quality renders them 
competent to judge, pronounce the Mason & 
Hamlin Piano the leading instrument of its 
kind. 

Dame Melba, richly endowed with musical 
discrimination, says in this connection: "It 
seems to me that the preference on the part of 
an individual for the Mason & Hamlin Piano 
is indicative of a superior musical nature." 

Only an actual hearing can give a realization 
of its beauty of tone. 




two entrances 

135-153 Kearny & 217-225 Sutter Sts. 

victor talking machines 




WE INVITE A HEARING 



'Wilgy^B Allen @ 



MASON & HAMLIN PIANOS - 




Oakland — 1209 Washington Street 

San Jose — 199 South First 

sheet music 



1 



'>^ UBRARy 



LOS ANGELES MUSICAL REVIEW SEE PAGES 8 AND 9 



l^fir (Eff^ 




IJJiTHE OHLY WEEKLY MU5ICAL JOURNAL INI THE GREAT WEST IJ 



VOL. XLIV. No. 10 



SAN FRANCISCO. SATURDAY. JUNE 9, 1923. 



PRICE 10 CENTS 



GODOWSKY CHATS ABOUT MUSIC IN ORIENT TRANSBAY CITIES ENJOY SUMMER CONCERTS 



Eminent Piano Virtuoso Spent One Day in San Francisco on His Way Oakland Chamber of Commerce Concert a Feature of Music Week — Mrs. 



to New York From the Far East and Told the Editor of the Pacific 

Coast Musical Review Many Interesting Things About 

Musical Conditions in the Oriental Countries 



BY ALFRED METZGER 



Wilson- Jones Gives Fine Concert — Olive Reed Cushman Students 

Are Heard in Fine Program — Berkeley Violin Club Gave an 

Enjoyable Recital — Other Interesting Events Also Please 

BY ELIZABETH WESTGATE 



Leopold Godowsky, the eminent piano 
virtuoso, who toured the Orient I his 
season and who will not return to the 
Pacific Coast in concert until the sea- 
son 1924-1925 stopped over in San Fran- 
cisco on his return trip to New York for 
one day week before last. We were 
fortunate enough to arrange a chat with 
the distinguished musican and he told us 
many things which will be of interest to 
our readers. The Oriental countries 
visited by Mr. Godowsky this season in- 
cluded China. Japan and .lava. During 
his trip he experienced all kinds of cli- 
mates and temperatures from the very 
lowest in Manchuria to the very highest 
In Java. He also had many unforgettable 
experiences not one of the least being 
the loss of his Knabe concert grand piano 
forwarded to him by Kohler & Chase in 
San Francisco and which after several 
weeks of hiding in Manchuria turned up 
in the end much to the relief of the 
great musician. 

"While I did not expect much response 
from the Oriental people," said Mr. 
Godowsky. "I was unusually surprised to 
find that I was so greatly mistaken. 
While in China the native population did 
not seem to take great interest in piano 
recitals the population of Japan and 
Java were exceptionally appreciative. In 
China my concerts were almost exclu- 
sively attended by Caucasian races, prin- 
cipally American and English people. In 
Japan and Java, however, the concerts 
were crowded with natives who evidently 
enjoyed the programs, for the scheduled 
concerts had to be increased in number 
and in the larger cities the original num- 
ber had to be doubled. In Tokyo, for in- 
stance, the original number of five con- 
certs which were given in five succes- 
sive days were crowded and another five 
concerts had to he given later also in 
five successive days. 

"I was surprised to find the Japanese 
people so intelligently musical, appreci- 
ating specially the more serious classics. 
Invariably the best music was mostly ap- 
preciated. But the surprise of my trip 
was the receptivity of the Javanese peo- 
ple. They have a music of their own 
which is singularly beautiful. Their in- 
struments are essentially percussion, but 
of a character that reveals the most ex- 
traordinary shades and tone qualities. 
They have large orchestras or bands of 
these instruments. There are two Sultans 
each of whom supports one of these 
bands, each of which has several hun- 
dred musicians. The effect of this music 
is indescribable. Some years ago one of 
these bands was in Paris and the effect 
of this music was so sensational and so 
impressive that it is not too much to say 
that the modern French music was in- 
fluenced by it and rauch of its beauty is 
owing to these Javanese strains. 

"There is a tremendous future for 
artists in the Oriental coutries. but I 
would advise those who visit the Orient 
to act exactly as they would in their 
own country. The people know what is 
proper etiquette and they want the 
artists to observe the same conven- 
tionality when appearing before Oriental 
audiences as they do before their own 
race. If, for instance, an artist, owing 
to the heat in .lava, should regard him- 
self justified to don summer attire, in- 
stead of adhering to the regulation eve- 
ning dress, he will be regarded with dis- 
favor. The Oriental people are very 
sensitive on this subject, and although 



the artist resorting to comfort may have 
no idea of slighting the people, his dis- 
regard of the conventionalities will create 
a very unfavorable impression. 

"The manager in charge of my con- 
certs (whose name the writer has for- 
gotten much to his regret — Ed.) under- 
stood his business thoroughly. Every- 
one of the concerts booked in advance 
was given and everywhere the attend- 
ance was all that could be desired. 1 



Oakland, June 5. 1923. 

Music Week on this side made no 
great demands upon the attention of the 
public. There were a few events of a 
wider interest, and many churches and 
studios gave attractive programs in 
honor of the "Week." But 'tis a busy 
world, mates, and few persons can find 
much "extra" time for special occasions. 

One of the most delightful of the larger 
aftliiis w.is till' ' nncert given at the 




I.KOPOI.D C;i>DO\\ SK V 



was treated royally in every way. met 
many prominent people who showed the 
result of culture and refinement and 
really enjoyed myself in the main 
thoroughly. Barring excessive heat in 
Java my trip was a very pleasant one 
and I am looking forward to another visit 
to the Orient, after my conclusion of the 
next American tour, with great pleasure. 
I certainly am very anxious to return. 

"I am now going to New York to make 
arrangements for Brunswick records and 
Ampico rolls, after which I may either 
return to California for a while, or go to 
Europe, according to the plans made by 
my managers in New York. I would like 
to spend the summer in this State which 
(Continued on Page II, Column II 



>iieh China, Julian unci Jiivii 

Auditorium under the auspices of the 
Oakland Chamber of Commerce on Satur- 
day evening. May 12. This year being 
the one hundredth anniversary of the 
first public presentation of Home. Sweet 
Home, the printed programs were repro- 
ductions of those in vogue in 1823 as far 
as the printing processes of 1923 are 
able to copy the older style. Very suc- 
cessfully was this accomplished, wood 
engravings of that period and quaint type 
being utilized. 

The program was well arranged, and. 
in every particular, a delight. Here it 
is: Introductory Remarks — Harrison 
Robinson, president. Oakland Chamber 
of Commerce; The Chafer and the 
Flower (Veit), Heaven, Heaven (Negro 



Spiritual I. (Burleigh). Oakland Orpheus, 
Edwin Dunbar Crandall, director, Bessie 
Beatty Roland, accompanist; Trio, C 
minor Allegro (Mendelssohn), Arion 
Trio; This is the Moon of Roses (Victor 
Harris), Orpheus; My Heart at Thy 
Sweet Voice (Saint-Saens), Eva Grun- 
inger Atkinson, Benjamin Moore, accom- 
panist; Soldiers Chorus (Faust), 
(Gounod), Orpheus: .Address, Dr. Aurelia 
Henry Reinhardt. Mills College; London- 
derry Air (Grainger-Kreisler), Rondeau 
(Hayden). Arion Trio; The Wager (E. 
D. Crandall). Lullaby (E. D. Crandall), 
Orpheus Charity (Hageman). Rain (Cur- 
ran), The Blind Plowman (Clarke). Mrs. 
Atkinson; Farewell (Ephraim Cubter. 
Jr.), Orpheus. 

At the Town and Gown club rooms in 
Berkeley, on Tuesday evening. May 22. 
-Mrs. Wilson-Jones, soprano, formerly of 
London, England, presented a charming 
program before an audience which filled 
the attractive hall. Her accompanist was 
Mrs. Edwin H. Duncan, who has the 
honor of R. A. M. after her name, and 
whose work was no small asset to the 
success of the evening. This was Mrs. 
Wilson-Jones' program: (a) My Heart 
Ever Faithful (Bach), (b) Angels Ever 
Bright and Fair (Handel), ic) My Mother 
Bids Me Bind .My Hair (Haydn); (a) 
Jewel Song (Faust). (Gounod), (bl Who 
is Sylvia? (Schubert), (c) Passing By 
(Purcell), (d) (Solvejg's Song (Grieg); 

(a) Si mes vers avaient des ailes (Hahn), 

(b) Last Night (Kjerulf), (c) The Rosary 
(E. Nevin); (a) Der rote Sarafan 
(Titoff), (b) Caller Herrin (Nath. Gow). 
(cl Believe Me (Old Irish), (d) Cherry 
Ripe (Horn), (el Battle Hymn of the 
Republic (W. Steffe); (a) An Old 
Romance (Guy d'Hardelot), (bl Star 
Eyes (Oley Speaks 1, (c) Down Here 
(Mary Brahe), (d) My Prayer (Josephine 
Wilson-Jones). 

Mrs. Wilson-Jones had Edward Grieg 
as piano-master for some time and also 
had the advantage of singing Solvejg's 
Song under his instruction, receiving 
from him a treasured compliment. For 
Gounod she sang the Jewel Song for 
Hahn the Si mes vers, and for Ethlebert 
.N'evin. The Rosary. 

Besides a youthful fresh and lovely 
voice. Mrs. Wilson-Jones possesses a gift 
for interpretation which shed new light — 
beams and not merely flashes of light — 
on songs which have become entirely 
familiar to all those who go to concerts. 
For example the last word had not been 
said as to Who is Sylvia? until Mrs. 
Wilson-Jones revealed it, although we 
have heard it from the lips of every 
great singer. Passing-By, the sweet old 
Purcell song, took on a meaning not here- 
tofore expressed, or not heretofore in my 
hearing, at any rate. 

There is not space to select for com- 
ment others of the list. They were all 
sung with exceeding charm, perfect 
enunciation, clear and luscious tone qual- 
ity, admirable in every way. 

There was one regret; one would have 
liked to hear a group, at least, of songs 
written during the twenty-three years of 
this magnificently achieving twentieth 
century. One wonders whether or not 
Mrs. Wilson-Jones is simpatica with the 
marvellous work of the great modern 
composers. ' 

(Continued on Toge 111 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



STEINWAY 

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When you buy a 
STEINWAY, you 
know that you will 
never have to buy 
another piano. 




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Sacramento - Stockton - Fresno - San Jose 

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IF YOU HAVE TALENT YOU WILL BE INTERESTED IN 

OBTAINING A FREE SCHOLARSHIP. 

See Page 7 of this Issue 



RENA LAZELLE 

SOPRANO 

Recitals, Opera, Oratorio, Concert 
Head of Vocal Department, S. F. Conserva- 
tory of Music. Member of Faculty Exten- 
sion Department, University of California. 
Address: 3435 Sacramento St. 
Phone Fillmore 898 
Teaching studio is open to visitors 
at all times. 



Arrillaga Musical College 

V. de ArrUlnea, Director 
A, L, Artl^Dea. PreH.; I.oDls Alei^rla. VIce-Pres. 
Unexcelled facilities for the atndy of mnalc In all 
Da brancbea. Large Pipe Organ. Recital Hall. 

2315 JACKSON STREET 
San Pranclaco, Cal. Pbone nreat 4737 



Mzjining School of Music 

JOHN C. MANNING, Director 
S242 Wnshlnslon Street Telephone Fillmore 395 



DOUGLAS SOULE-.Pianist 



will he I 
tenchltiit 
Monte Vl» 



ADVANCED PUPILS ACCEPTED 
' nbKcnt In Europe for Mnmmi 



Miss Elizabeth Westgate 

Teacher of Piano. Orican. Harmony. OreanlMt and Mnalcal 
Director of First PrrwbrterlBn Chareb. Alanteda. Home 
Stvdio: 1117 PARV STREET. ALARIEDA. Telephone Ala- 
Heda 155. Tbnradara. Merrlmnn Sehool, :t07 Bldorad* Ave.. 
Oakkuid. Telephone Pledmoat 2T70. 



UDA WALDROP 

PIANIST AND ACCOMPANIST 

oniclal oreanlxt Eipo 

and choir director St 

or^anlMt Congrceatlon Beth iNrael. 

orKan inMlruction — Vocal coach. Available 

concertn and organ recitaU. 

Studio, 1915 Sacramento Street 
Telephone West 3753 



l^ll^l^iAN iilKMlNGHAM 

Contralto 
of Singing. Complete Coarse of Operatic Train 
t. Tel. FUlmore 4553. 

MME. S. P. MARRACCI 

ITALIAN VOCAL TEACHER 
r Prima Donna with Caruso and Tetrazzinl 
Jrsed by Bonci. Coaches pupils vocally and 
" " -Italian, English, French 



nd Spa 



sh spoke 



studio— <«4 Columbua ATe„ Pbo 



MR. and MRS. GIACOMO MINKOWSKI 



Dominican College School of Music 

SAN RAFAEL, CALIFORNIA 
Mnalc Conraea Thorough and Progrcaalve 
Public School Muntc. Accredited Diploma 

PASMORE VOCAL STUDIOS 

Suite 506 Kohle 
S. F.) 2.%30 Colleiere Ave., Bi 
rado Road. Berkeley. 

MISS DOROTHEA MANSFELDT 

Prepnrlnp Teacher for 
MRS. OSCAR MANSTT-ELDT, Plnntnt 
207 Cherry St.. Bet. Wawhington & Clay TpI. Pne. i\ 

MADAM MACKAY-CANTELL 

CONCERT COACH — VOCAL TECHNiaUE 
SlIPEn-DICTION 
Director Calvary Presbyterian Choral Society. 



Forthc 



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RESIDENT ARTISTS who are available for concert 
tours during the season 1923-1924 will please register 
with the Pacific Coast Musical Review so that we are 
able to recommend them to music clubs, music schools 
and managers. Only artists of reputation and experience 
are eligible for registration. 



WALLACE A. SABIN 

OrEanUt Temple Emann El, Plrat Church of Chrlat Scl- 
entlat. Director Lorlnff Club. S. F., Wed.. 1617 Callfornlat 
St., Phone F^rankltn 2«03i Sat.. Plrat ChrlatlAn Sclenc«i 
Church. Phone Franklin 1307 1 Rea. atndlo. 3142 LewlatOBi 
Ave.. Berkeley. Phone Piedmont 242S. 

UNCOLN S. BATCHELDER 

PIANIST — ACCOMPANIST 

Member llnlveralty Eztenalon Faculty 

Studio! «70 Mb Avenue Phone Pacific ssi:.'. 

The College of the Holy Names , 



Tello. Voice. Co 



The larger the circulation of a Music Journal 
the better for the members of the profession and 
student. If you help us to add 3000 subscribers to 
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JOHANNA KRISTOFFY 

PRIMA DONNA SOPRANO 

Thorough Vocal and Dramatic TralniniE; 

740 Pine St, Phone DouElna 0024 



MUSIC PRINTING? 

SCHOLZ, ERICKSON 4 CO., Inc. 

521 Howard Street Phone Douglas 4273 

San Francisco 



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/OL. XLIV SATURDAY, JUNE 9, 1923 No. 10 

I'lie I'ACll-'iC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW Is for sale at the 
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Entered na second-class maU matter at S. F. Postofflce. 

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TWENTY-SECOND YEAR 

LOS ANGELES ONCE MORE 



Our editcirial in a recent issue of Pacific Coast 
Wusical Review entitled "Our Attitude Toward 
Los Angeles seems to have been misunderstood 
)y our good friend Frank H. CoHjy, editor of the 
Pacific Coast Musician, for whom we entertain 
:he highest regard. Mr. Colby is under the im- 
pression, and no doubt the editorial in question 
night have given him cause, that inasmuch as we 
■epeatedly referred to the Pacific Coast Musician, 
ve suspected that paper of having published the 
irticle of which our Los .Angeles correspondent, 
laid : "A certain publication has referred to my 
)revious article as a 'knock' from San Francisco." 
kVe hasten, in all fairness, to assure our readers 
;hat under no circumstances did we have the Paci- 
ic Coast Musician in mind when we criticised the 
ittitude of that publication which was referred to. 
indeed we knew it could not have been the paper 
)f which Mr. Colby is editor. We only mentioned 
:he Pacific Coast Musician, and our eagerness to 
issist in its success, to provethat the Pacific Coast 
Vlusical Review and its editor are in no wise an- 
;agonistic toward Los Angeles. We are trying 
;o work for the best interests of the Pacific Coast, 
md if in dfiing so we occasionally should be coni- 
jelled to criticise, this is in no sense intended as 
1 "knock," but as a suggestion to act in a digni- 
ied manner and work toward the best interests 
lot only of one's own community but of the en- 
:ire Pacific Coast. 



Thanks to the courtesy of a friend we are in 
■eceipt of the article to which we referred. It 
s the outgrowth of a wrong thinking mind, 
[t is the result of the warped mental attitude of 
3ne steeped in provincialism and naturally unfair 
jf disposition. To show in what peculiar grooves 
:ertain human minds run we will quote this arti- 
:le forwarded to us: 

Our history tells us of the rise and fall of ancient 
^ome — the ups and downs of the barbarians, Tartars 
ind Turks. Recent explorations in the Valley of Kings 
!orroborate the historical mightiness of the Pharaos; 
)ut history leaves it to our speculation, the tempera- 
nent, expression of bitterness, and the pettiness of the 
ndividual citizen of these fallen powers, during the 
>rogress of their disintegration. The metal of human 
Jeings in this world has always been pretty much the 
lame, varied only as tempered by the degree of civiliza- 
:ion of their times: so what one encounters today is 
Jrobably about what one would have encountered three 
ihousand years ago. If we are to judge the pettiness of 
:he ancient Roman by the roar of the Pacific Coast 
Musical Revue in the issue of April 1.5th, those naughty 
Barbarians most surely were called a choice lot of 
lames when they punctured the powers of Rome. 

There was a time when San Francisco was the musi- 
;al center, as well as every other center, of the Pacific 



Coast; but that was during the old Tivoli days when 
San Francisco was Monarch of the Pacific Coast, with 
the right of dictation undisputed — when she boasted a 
population of a quarter of a million, while Los Angeles 
was a mere lamb, with some forty or so thousand. Those 
were the days before the lamb got the bear by the tail. 
Since then. Mr. Editor, there has been a change. Los 
Angeles has grown to just less than a million, while, 
San Francisco's population is not far above the half 
million mark. We have more world-renowned artists 
and more high class artist teachers than any other city 
West of Chicago. Our musical organizations are the best 
and we spend more money on music and musical enter- 
tainment than any other city in the West — and what is 
more we get our money's worth — and what is still more, 
your calling us names will not remove the Music Center 
of the Pacific Coast from Los Angeles to San Francisco. 
We are real people, not "Hicks" — used to fighting for 
what we get, but broad-minded and fair. San Francisco 
business men and capitalists are investing in our busi- 
ness corners, stores and enterprises. True, they are 
paying many times what these corners could have been 
purchased for a few years ago: but they must consider 
them safe investments, for they are spending real money 
to acquire them. 

Now, instead of refuting the published conten- 
tion that there are "Hicks" living in Los Angeles, 
the writer actually PROVES it. And, by the way, 
we heartily protest against the contention that 
Los Angeles is the only city on the Pacific Coast 
that harbors its quota of "Hicks." Indeed, there 
are a few living in San Francisco, too. But they 
don't happen to get a chance to rush into print. 
The accuracy of the above article may be judged 
by the fact that the name of the Pacific Coast 
Musical Review is spelled wrong and the con- 
tribution from Los .Angeles was NOT published 
in the issue of April 15th and that the editor did 
not write it. Our good friend who mailed us the 
clipping says that the paper that printed the 
above remarks received considerable commenda- 
tion because it "went after you." .MI we have to 
say. is that ])eople who commend you for going 
after other people arc usually not the ones that 
support you when you need them. 



It happens to be one of those kinks in human 
nature that someone always likes to read some- 
thing against the fellow he doesn't like, and if 
any one takes joy in reading an article which 
"roasts" somebody he usually is in that frame of 
mind wherein he rejoices in seeing someone 
"roasted," and no one takes ])leasure in seeing 
anyone dealt with unkindly unless he has al- 
ready a fixed prejudice against him. So if the 
above article is favorably commented upon it is 
done by jjeople who never cared a rap for us anv- 
how. The important thing, and at the same time 
the only reason why we spend any time referring 
to this matter at all, is that we have fought during 
twenty-two years against this sort of knocking 
between two great cities. And it is now too late 
in the season, after we have succeeded in helping 
to attain a better understanding, to permit this 
antiquated form of backbiting to again show its 
head. We trust, indeed we know, that there are 
more than enough intelligent people residing in 
Los Angeles to resent this sort of thing. 



The contention of the writer notwithstanding, 
there is at present NO MUSICAL CENTER ON 
THE PACIFIC COA.ST. Neither San Francisco, 
nor Los .Angeles, can be called a musical center 
in the sense in which it is used in that article. 
To be a musical center a community must have 
a permanent opera house presenting permanent 
opera. It must have a concert field that INTRO- 
DUCES NEW ARTISTS TO THE MUSICAL 
WORLD, serving as a distributing center, creat- 
ing a reputation that secures recognition in the 
world of music BECAUSE OF THE CHARAC- 
TER OF THE CITY WHEREIN THE FIRST 
APPEARANCE HAS BEEN MADE. It must 
support easily at least more than one symphony 
orchestra. It must support more than one cham- 
ber music society liberally. IT MUST CON- 
TAIN EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS 
KNOWN THROUGHOUT THE WORLD, 
whose faculties include many artist teachers of 
international reputation. IT MUST BE DIGNI- 
FIED. IT MUST SUPPORT ONE OR TWO 
BIG WEEKLY MUSIC JOURNALS. Above 
all a real metropolis and music center does not 
BRAG or BLUSTER. Now, in order not to be 
misunderstood we emphatically state that we are 
making these explanations in a general way, and 
are in no sense referring to Los Angeles or San 
Francisco specifically. This applies to any com- 



munity that wants to lay claim to be a music 
center of any large territory. These qualifications 
are absolutely necessary, and without them no 
city can claim to be a musical center, or social 
or political center. 

Population, high prices for real estate, large 
numbers of teachers or students or artists also 
is of no avail unless the character of such popula- 
tion and the fairness of such prices and the effi- 
ciency of such artists and teachers puts the stamp 
of dignity and metropolitan character upon such 
conmiunity. We always admired the enterprise, 
enthusiasm, co-operation, ambition and pride ex- 
hiljited by the people of Los Angeles. It has cost 
this paper more than it earned to maintain the 
Los Angeles department. It is not a question of 
commercial advantage that prompts us to recog- 
nize the musical efficiency of Los Angeles in this 
twelve-page paper by devoting two pages to it — 
or one-sixth of its entire space. It is because we 
want our people here and throughout the Pacific 
Coast to know what is going on in Los Angeles, 
and we believe that people living in Los An- 
geles, and who are not cramped by immature 
thoughts, want to have San Francisco people 
know what splendid things they are doing for 
music. And we are equally sure that San Fran- 
cisco musicians want the Los Angeles musicians 
and music lovers to know what they are doing up 
in this part of the State. If the time should ever 
come that Los Angeles musical people don't care 
anything about what happens in other parts of 
the Pacific Coast, or if San Francisco people 
should become so narrow minded, then we pity 
anyone who wants to make a living in the musi- 
cal profession of the Pacific Coast. 



Calling names won't accomplish anything. 
.Someone made a definite statement which he sup- 
ported with what he regarded as the facts. To 
refute these facts is to send to this paper evidence 
that they were wrong and we would readily 
give the same space to the refutation that we give 
to the accusation. The fact that we reprint what 
is said above — and we only wished we could 
print something more to the point and more 
worthy — shows our fairness. Everything the 
writer says about Los Angeles is true. Every- 
thing he or she or it says about San Francisco 
is prejudicial. It is not necessary for us to defend 
San Francisco. Its actions speak louder than 
words. A city that is completely destroyed dur- 
ing three or four days and is practically rebuilt 
in five years, greater and bigger than ever, needs 
no champion. Neither does Los Angeles need 
any champion. People who can erect a great 
metropolitan community on what was originally 
nothing but desert land and also establishes some 
of the richest and most fertile orchards and farm 
lands around such metropolis needs no defenders. 
What could two such communities not accom- 
plish when working together? And what good is 
there gained by constantly wasting valuable time 
in recriminations? You can not build up any- 
thing wortli while by trying to tear down some- 
thing else that is worth while. You can only 
build up by persistent, tenacious, whole-hearted 
co-operation toward the end that your commun- 
ity wants to be counted among the worth-while 
centers in the world. If there are San Francisco 
business men who invest money in Los Angeles 
— and we are sure there are such — we take our 
hat ofl:' to them ; indeed we admire them. And it 
is equally certain that there are business men in 
Los Angeles who invest money in San Francisco. 
W'hy can not musical people imitate the example 
of the wide-awake business man? 



Dorothy Pasmore, cellist, and her sister. Mrs. Suzanne 
Pasmore Brooks, pianist, were engaged to give a pro- 
gram by the managers of "The Sylvan." in Mill Valley, 
on Thursday afternoon. May 31. As the name suggests 
The Sylvan is a delightful open-air Pavillion in the 
shadow of Mount Tamalpais. with a stage built on a 
thickly wooded hillside which has been leased by Miss 
.J. C. Mather and Miss Rachel Higgins for the summer, 
and which is the scene of daily entertainments of a 
varied nature. Miss Pasmore and Mrs. Pasmore Brooks 
presented a representative program of cello and piano 
soli beginning with Bach and Schumann and ending 
with Tschaikowsky and Debussy. Audience and per- 
formers were delighted with the natural beauty of the 
location and, contrary to tlieir expectation, found the 
acoustics quite favorable and were pleasantly Intrigued 
by the unusual effects obtained from the blending of 
the various sounds of nature with the music. 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



CLAIRE FORBES CRANE AT ORPHEUM 

One of the most artistic and musically dignified acts 
we have ever seen at the Orpheum is the one entitled 
Synchronized Moments, now being introduced by Claire 
Forbes Crane at the Orpheum. It consists of two essen- 
tial parts, namely, a motion picture of the artist and her 
hands interpreting Liszt's Love Dream and the pianist's 
version of a Liszt Hungarian Rhapsodic and Gounod's 
Faust Waltz. The first part of the act represents an 
exact reproduction of the interpreter sitting at the piano 
while she is playing behind the screen in complete syn- 
chronization with the picture. It is not only a novel, 
but exceedingly interesting musical performance. The 
playing matches the picture with uncanny accuracy. 
IVIrs. Crane is an artist of the highest rank. Her technic 
is exact to the minutest detail, her phrasing is endowed 
with unusual taste and expert artistry. Her poise is 
dignified and graceful. In short she is a pianist who 
lifts the atmosphere of the vaudeville house up to her 
level of artistic refinement. It is gratifying to note the 
enthusiasm with which her performance is received. 
Not one of the least delightful features of the act is the 
exceptionally artistic color scheme and lighting effect 
of the setting, designed by Douglas Crane, which lends 
a pleasant and harmonizing atmosphere to the entire 
act. ALFRED METZGER. 



ORVILLE HARROLD AT LOEWS WARFIELD 

By far the foremost of the distinguished artists pre- 
sented this season at the Loew Warfield Theatre is 
Orville Harrold of the Metropolitan Opera House who is 
singing an aria from Pagliacci and an American ballad 
this week. Indeed it is the only one of the prominent 
artists who so far have justified the enthusiasm of the 
advance announcements. Mr. Harrold is in excellent 
voice and sings with a genuineness of artistic abandon- 
ment that is worthy of the highest commendation. Al- 
though he is not appearing at a world famous opera 
house his performance is endowed with the same sin- 
cerity of purpose, the same contribution of artistic 
judgment and the same care to the attainment of artis- 
tic details which he bestows upon his work at the 
Metropolitan. He does not sing down to his audiences. 
He lifts his audience up to his level. Some day the 
American artist will discover that it is more grateful to 
sing in English before audiences of laymen. We feel 
sure even though Mr. Harrold's work is exceedingly 
musicanly and charged with sentiment it would have a 
still greater effect if the people could understand what 
he sings. So many artists do not realize how peculiar 
foreign languages sound in the ears of those who do 
not understand them. It really detracts from the 
artistic dignity, instead of adding to it. But Mr. Har- 
rold succeeds in making his singing so dignified that, 
unlike in other instances, his audiences do not giggle 
when listening to singing in a foreign tongue. 

Mr. LipschuUz plays an excellent selection from 
Puccini's Girl of the Golden West, a very difficult com- 
position from a purely technical standpoint, and con- 
ducted with precision and verve. It is in harmony with 
the beautiful picture of the same name presented this 
week. The violinist-conductor is also playing a solo 
which justly rouses his audience to an enthusiasm 
that would Justify a repetition. From a musical stand- 
point the m.anagement of the Loew Warfield Theatre 
has every reason to feel very proud of this week's 
achievement. Mr. Harrold will sing a U next week. 



DEBUT OF SEQUOIA TRIO 

The Sequoia Trio, consisting of Pierre Douillet, 
pianist. Arthur Conradi, violinist, and Arthur Weiss, 
cellist, made its debut in the Italian Room of the St. 
Francis Hotel on Friday evening, June 1, in the 
presence of an audience that completely crowded the 
handsome hall. The program consisted of Trio C minor 
Op. 101 (Brahms). Chaconne (for violin alone) (Bach) 
and Trio G minor Op. l.'i (Rubinstein). The three musi- 
cians constituting this trio belong to the most prominent, 
most efficient and best known members of San Fran- 
cisco's professional musical colony. Individually they 
are musicians who possess and deserve the respect of 
the community. 

Inasmuch as they have joined to present ensemble 
works only a short time before this first concert, it is 
naturally difficult to express a definite opinion as to the 
eventual growth and mission of the Sequoia Trio. It 
may, however, be stated here that, notwithstanding the 
difficulties involved in preparing and interpreting a 
program of the magnitude above mentioned the mem- 
bers of the trio impressed us with their sincerity, their 
genuine love for music, their evident desire to overcome 
great obstacles and their unquestionable fitness to in- 
terpret the classics. It was a worthy start and the 
audience did not hesitate to put its stamp of approval 
on this delightful enterprise. 

Arthur Conradi was never in better mood than when 
he interpreted the Bach Chaconne. Emotionally as well 
as technically he put his heart and soul into his work 
impressing his audience with his sincerity as well as 
his musicianship. The interpretation of this work is a 
severe test on any artist's resources and the manner 
in which Mr. Conradi faced and met this test added to 
his followers in the community. 

ALFRED METZGER. 

George Q. Chase and Leon Lang. President and Vice- 
President of Kohler & Chase, left for the Bast last 
week to attend the National Convention of Piano Mer- 
chants in Chicago and also to look after business in- 
terests. Upon their return they will announce some 
plans of special interest to the profession which neces- 
sitates consultation with manufacturers of nation-wide 
influence. Both Mr. Chase and Mr. Lang will be back 
in San Francisco early in .July. 



SAN JOSE MUSICAL REVIEW 

Edited By Elita Huggins 

1605 The Alameda, San Jose, Calif. 

Telephone San Jose 1581 

Dcimrtnient tlnniif^er. Sue DnviN Miiynnnl, a::' lOi 






rhon 



Snn Jo 



: 4713-J. 



San Jose, June 5. 
Clarence Urmy, poet, musician, teacher and critic, 
was called by death Saturday noon. June 2, after suffer- 
ing a stroke a week before. Quiet, modest to an ex- 
treme, he was internationally known for his poetic 
works, having had poems published in practically every 
well known magazine in the United States, in addition 
to the publication of several volumes of poems. His 
was the poet-touch. As he himself said: 
What is the i)oet-touch? Ah me, that every bard might 

gain it. 
And having once attained the prize, forever might 

retain it: 
To touch no thing that's vile, unless to teach the world 

to scorn it. 
To touch no thing that's beautiful, save only to adorn it. 
To patrons of the drama and music lovers of Santa 
Clara valley he was known for his criticisms appearing 
in the San Jose Mercury-Herald for which publication 
he had written for about fifteen years. He was organist 
at Trinity' Episcopal church in this city for nearly 
thirty years. For a number of years he taught piano 
at the College of the Pacific, four years ago joining the 
teaching staff of the San Jose State Teachers' College. 
In paying tribute to Clarence Urmy. the San Jose 
Mercury-Herald published a poem. The Poet and His 
Lute, which was the last completed work from his pen, 
a poem written shortly before Smiling Death stood at 
his own portal to sever strings, seal lips and still his 
hands. 

The Poet's lute, placed in his hands at birth, 
Is tuned to overtones unknown to earth. 
Tones that take wing from deftly fingered frets 
As perfume steals from bed of violets. 

The poet draws from wire spun in a star 
The music of a mighty avatar. 
Like song of humming birds throb, tiny throats! 
Too high for human ear. supernal notes. 

He wakes with magic touch his instrument 
To heavenly harmonies, rapt, eloquent — 
Dream-haunted strings that bear from far-off spheres 
Strange chords too glad for smiles, too sad for tears. 

He echoes airs that seraph tongues rehearse. 
And strives to blend them with his blissful verse — 
Elysian lyrics born of Flame and Dew, 
The faultless, ever-older, ever new. 

Thus round the poet's lute fond fancies throng 
Awaiting dulcet trysting-time with song. 
Till smiling Death at his worn portal stands 
To sever strings, seal lips, and still his hands. 

Notre Dame College, San Jose's historic institution for 
women, is closing its doors the middle of this month, 
moving to Belmont, its future home, to our great regret. 
On Saturday, June 2. the San Jose unit of alumnae gave 
an afternoon of cards and music. Tables were scattered 
over the lawns in the shade of the stately trees for 
the many who played mah jongg. bridge and whist, 
while others wandered about the lovely grounds renew- 
ing acquaintances, all paying' respect to the place which 
has been Notre Dame's home in San Jose for seventy- 
two years. A delightful program was given, under the 
direction of Miss Maxine Cox, who arranged the follow- 
ing interesting numbers: Piano solo. Arabesque (De- 
bussy), Maxine Cox; harp solo. Barcarolle (Hasselman), 
Julia Herrate; vocal solo, Star (Rogers), Adele Schill- 
ing, vocal solos (a) Three Questions (Johnson), (b) 
To "Vou (Speaks), Violet Bulmore; Trio (a) Salut 
D'Amour (Loth), (b) The Rosary (Nevin), Maxine Cox, 
piano, Leanore Milendez, violin, Isabelle Milendez, 
'cello. Interpretative solo dance of Mendelssohn's 
Spring Song, Margarita Harrison, piano accompaniment, 
Maxine Cox. 

The A Cappella Choir of the College of the Pacific, 
C. M. Dennis, director supplied the music at both 
services in the Stanford Chapel Sunday. June 3. At the 
morning service the choir sang O Lord Most Holy by 
Bruckner; Adoramus Te. by Palestrina; and Lutkin's 
Choral Blessing. At the vesper service the choir was 
assisted by Allan Bacon, organist, when the following 
program was given: Concert Overture in B Minor 
(James H. Rogers), Mr. Bacon; (a) Gloria Patri (Pales- 
trina). (b) Adoramus Te (Palestrina), (c) Tu Bs Petrus 
(Palestrina) (d) Tenebrae Factae Sunt (Palestrina), A 
Cappella Choir; (a) Scherzo, from Second Symphony 
(Louis Vierne). (h) Rhapsody in B Flat (Herbert 
Howells), Mr. Bacon; (al Only Begotten Son (Schve- 
doff). (b) How Blest Are They (Tschaikowsky). (c) 
O Gladsome Light (Gretchaninow), A Cappella Choir; 
(a) Choral (Jongen), (b) Toccata (Gigout), Mr. Bacon; 
(a) How They So Softly Rest (Willan), (b) O Holy Lord 
(Dett), (c) Now Sinks the Sun (Parker), (d) Choral 
Blessings (Lutkin), A Cappella Choir. 

Miss Emily Peelor presented four of her pupils in a 
pianoforte recital Friday evening. May 25, at her studio. 
Miss Peelor played a Chopin Nocturne at the conclusion 
of the program, adding greatly to the pleasure of the 
evening. Following is the program as given: Rondo in 
D Major (Mozart), Miss Frances Bryant; Recitation — 
Relaxation and weight playing (progressive series les- 
son), Miss Leon Ogier; (al The French Child (Behr), 



Kohler & Chase 

2Cnabf panna 
SCnabP Amptro 



SAN JOSE HEADQUARTERS 
185 So. First Street 



ALFRED LANINI 

Expert Maker of Violins, Violas and Cellos 

With European Experience 

Artistic Repairing Rare Old Violins For Sale 

591 E. ST. JAMES STREET 

San Jose, California 



THE INSTITUTE OF MUSIC 



LeRoy V. Brant, 

ouraca in All llrai 
All Slaecx of Adv 



C.VI.IFORMA 



WM. EDWARD JOHNSON 

BARITOME 

Stodloa: 00 Sonth 14th St., San Jonc, rhone 42S0. 

1331 Caatro St, at 14tli. Oakland, Mondars 



Hannah Fletcher Coykendall 

SOPKANO 

Available for Concertn and Kcrltala 

Pnpil of Gaetano Mcrola 

Studio — 145 Hauchett Avenue, San Joae, Calif 

Phone 3525-W 



MRS. CHARLES McKENZIE 



Phone S. J. IS'iH 



ALLAN BACON 

Head of Plnno and OrKnn Depnrtmendi, 

College of Paeiflc. San Jomc 

Concert Organist IManoforte l,ec*ure Recital^ 

NOTRE DAME COLLEGE OF MUSIC 

San Jose. Cal. 
Confera Degrees. Awards CertlflcatcH. Comiilete Colle 
Con«erva*or7 and Academic CourmeN In Tlano, Vlolli^ 
Harp, 'Cello. Voice, Harmony, Counterpoint, Cano 
"Fugue and Science of MuhIc. For particulars Apply tf 
Slater Superior. 

VIOLET SILVER 



Pupil of lyenpold Auc 



VIOLINIST 



Vendomc Hotel 



(b) Dream Waltz (Gurlitt), (el The Morning Glory 
Vine (Gest), Miss Ruth Cochran; (a) On the Alma 
(Educational adaptation), (b) The Little Wanderer 
(Gurlitt), Miss Leone Ogier; Remarks — How to Practice 
and How to Overcome Faulty Technique. Miss Peelor; 
(a) Mignon's Song (Thomas), (b) Tarantella. Op. 85 
No. 2 (Heller). Miss Elgie Ogier; Peer Gynt. Op. 46 (a) 
Morning Mood, (b) Ase's Death, (o) Dance of Anitra, 
(d) In the Hall of the Mountain King (Grieg). Miss 
Frances Bryant: Nocturne, Op. 9, No. 2 (Chopin), Miss 
Peelor. 

An Evening of American Music by members of the 
College of the Pacific faculty was given Friday evening, 
June 1, before an audience of about 600. Works by rep- 
resentative Americans whose published works have 
achieved national recognition were given splendid per 
formance by Allan Bacon, organist; Miriam Burton, 
pianist; Nella Rogers, contralto, with .lules Moullet at 
the piano, and the Conservatory String Quartet, with 
Bozena Kalas at the piano. The quintet gave an excel 
lent performance of the beautiful intermezzo fron: 
Arthur Foote's Quintet in A Minor. Miss Burton's play 
ing of Carpenter's Tango Americain elicited a fine re 
sponse from the audience. Miss Rogers pleased in si> 
solos of which Deep River (Burleigh) was the mosi 
impressive. Mr. Bacon's performance of the Sowerbj 
Rejoice, Ye Pure in Heart, showed to excellent advan 
tage that young composer's great talent. The progran 
in full: (a) Intermezzo (from the Symphony Storm Kin( 
(Clarence Dickinson), (b) Ue.ioicc. Ye Pure in Hear 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



ANIL DEER 



''SoulfuV 
COLORATURA SOPRANO 

Address: 

ADOLPH KNAUER 
79 Central Avenue, San Francisco, Calif. 



(Leo Sowerby), Allan Bacon: (a) The Day Is No More 
(John Alden Carpenter), (b) Stars (Harriet Ware), (e) 
Rain (Pearl Curranl, (d) Deep River (Burleigh) (e) 
Twilight (Glenn), (f) Love's In My Heart (R. Hunting- 
ton Woodman), Nella Rogers: (a) Dreams (Howard 
Brockwayl, (b) Scherzino (Howard Brockway), (c) 
Tango Araericain (John Alden Carpenter), Miriam Bur- 
ton: Intermezzo (from Quintet in A Minor) Op. 3S 
(Arthur Foote). Conservatory String Quintet. 

Two Unusual Invitation Musicales were given at 
Santa Cruz on Monday evening. May 28, and Tuesday 
afternoon. May 29, by Josephine Rittenhouse. violinist, 
and Marie L. Cain, pianist, at the home of the former, 
the same program being given on both occasions. They 
gave the first movement and Andante theme of the 
Kreutzer sonata; Mrs. Rittenhouse played the Bee- 
thoven Romance in G, and the Beethoven-Kreisler 
Rondino, also the Cottenet iVIeditation. Mrs. Cain's 
group included the Lachner Toccata and Fugue, two 
Schubert Impromptu and Debussy s La Cathedrale 
Engloutie. These two artists are great favorites in the 
seaside city, their names on a program always giving 
pleasure. Mrs. Rittenhouse who was a pupil of the late 
Henry Holmes, and afterwards of Giulio Minetti, has a 
great deal of personality as a soloist. Mrs. Cain, pupil 
of Albert Elkus, is a very intelligent pianist. 

Notre Dame's Last Commencement in San Jose will 
be a memorable one on June 14. Always before, gradu- 
ation exercises have been held in the assembly hall, but 
this year the college is to give a magnificent pageant 
in the picturesque elm grove in the playgrounds park, 
presenting Longfellow's Masque of Pandora, instead 
of the customary musical and literary program. Rosalie 
Balmer Smith Cale's compositon will be used for the 
musical setting of the Masque of Pandora. Mrs. Cale 
has an enviable reputation as a composer, and her 
musical setting of the Masque is particularly lovely and 
will afford splendid opportunity to show the musical 
training of the performers, both singers and instrumen- 
talists. A group of talented Notre Dame students is to 
play the orchestral music. Notre Dame's orchestral play- 
ing has always astounded musicians, for no leader 
directs them with baton, yet their ensemble work is 
perfect in tempo, technique and interpretation. There is 
a cast of 200 in this production, all parts enacted by 
Notre Dame students. 

Warren D. Allen, organist of Stanford University, will 
render the following program in the Memorial Church 
on Sunday afternoon, June 10, at 4 p. m.; Choral — Im- 
provisation on Nearer My God to Thee (written in 1912, 
and dedicated to the victims of the Titanic disaster) 
(Sigfrid Karg-Elert); Russian Boatman's Song on the 
River Volga (arranged for organ by Clarence Eddy) ; 
Canon in B minor (Schumann); Cradle Song (Franz 
Schubert 1797-1828); Fantasie Symphonique (Rossetter 
G. Cole). The next and final recital for the quarter will 
be given on Baccalaureate Sunday, June 17, at S p. m. 
The summer series of recitals will begin on Sunday, 
July I, at 4 p. m. 

The Institute of Music has announced an intensive 
summer course in its various departments, beginning 
July 16 and continuing for seven weeks. 

The Pupils of Josephine Louise Sinclair will appear 
in recital at the Institute of Music the evening of Thurs- 
day, June 14. This is the second group of Miss Sinclair's 
pupils to appear this month, the tiny ones having played 
recently. Miss Sinclair is assistant piano instructor to 
LeRoy V. Brant, the director of the Institute. 

The Misses Olive Hangar and Selma Simonic will 
appear in joint recital at the Institute of Music next 
week, playing a recital of Mendelssohn and Schumann. 
Both young ladies are pupils of LeRoy V. Brant. Miss 
Simonic will play a group of the Songs Without Words, 
by Mendelssohn, while Miss Hangar will play the fanci- 
fully beautiful Scenes from Childhood by Schumann. 
Assisting the pianists will be Conley Plummer and 
Henry Triana, in violin duets, pupils of Josef Halamicek 
who is head of the violin and viola departments at the 
Institute. 

(To be concluded next week) 



ELIZABETH SIMPSON'S PUPILS ACTIVE 

The Berkeley and Alameda County Music Weeks, 
which took place recently with such decided success, 
were periods of great activity for Elizabeth Simpson's 
pupils. On April 28 a studio musicale attracted a large 
audience to IVIiss Simpson's Berkeley studio, where the 
following program was presented: Ballade Op. 47 (Cho- 
pin). Perpetuum Mobile (Weber), Country Gardens 
(Percy Grainger), Miss Helen Merchant: hu Couvant 
(Borodin), Etude F minor (Chopin), Waltz (Chopin), 
George Kelly; Etude F major (Chopin), Impromptu 
(Chopin), Prelude G minor (Rachmaninoff), Hungarian 
Etude (MacDowell), Miss Margaret Fish; Romance 
(Sibelius), Miss Ruth Hoskinson; To a Water Lily, 
From an Indian Lodge, Will o' the Wisp (MacDowell), 
Miss Myrtle de Vaux; Nocturne (Schumann), Polichi- 
nelle (Rachmaninoff), Miss Eleanor Chamberlain; II 
Rosignuolo (Nevin), Golliwog's Cakewalk (Debussy), 
Miss Margaret Lyman; Suite for Two Pianos (Arensky), 
Miss Merchant and Miss Fish; Invention (Bach), 
Papillons (Grieg), Miss Jacquelin (Otto); Gavotte 
(Gluck-Brahms), Etude A flat and Etude G flat (Chopin). 
Predication aux oiseaux (Liszt). Miss Ethel Long Mar- 
tin; Capriccio Brillante (Mendelssohn). Miss Margaret 
Fish, orchestral accompaniment on second piano by 
Miss Simpson. 

On May 6 Miss Eleanor Chamberlain played with 
great success at the Oakland concert of the student 
section of the Alameda County Music Teachers' Asso- 
ciation. On May 8 Miss Helen Merchant and Miss Mar- 
garet Fish played at Haywards Theatre. On May 7 
Miss Ethel Long Martin, assisted by Mrs. Asa Henion, 
soprano, gave a brilliant program at Miss Simpson's 
studio and on May 12 little Mary Robin Steiner, a very 
clever and talented child pianist, gave a delightful re- 
cital, assisted by Mrs. Zilpha Ruggles Jenkins, soprano. 
Another event, originally scheduled for Music Week, 
took place at the Twentieth Century Club in Berkeley 
on May 22. when Miss Helen Merchant and Miss Mar- 
garet Fish, two of Miss Simpson's most promising 
young pianists, gave a concert composed of brilliant solo 
groups, two concertos, and Arensky's lovely and colorful 
Suite for Two Pianos. 



Margaret Bruntsch, the distinguished contralto, will 
be the soloist at the concert of the Orpheus Club which 
will take place in the Auditorium, Oakland, under the 
direction of Mr. Crandall, next Tuesday evening, June 
12, Miss Bruntsch will sing the following compositions: 

(a) The Blind Girl's Song from La Giaconda (Ponchielli), 

(b) Beaux yeux que j'aime (Massenet), Prelude (A 
Cycle of Life) (Landon Ronald); (a) Still wie die Nacht 
(Bohm), (b) Trees (Rasbach), (c) Happiness (Hage- 
man). 



h^ritone 



FANTNINCi 

BER.Tli.AND - Bft-OWN 
P£RSONAL RBPRESBNTATIVC 
AEOLIAN HALL ■ HEW YO«K 



Unless you are known to everyone who engages artists 
or who attends concerts you can not possibly secure 
engagements. Your mere say-so does not constitute 
proof of your experience and success. Therefore mak« 
your name valuable by advertising. 



RIBBE 



SOLO PIANIST 

STUDIO 683 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



HAZEL JOHNSON 

COLORATURA SOPRANO 

PUPIL OF DOMENICO BRESCIA AND FERNANDO MICHELENA 

TEACHER OF VOICE AND SOLFEGGIO 



studio:— Kohler & Chase BIdg.,— Kearny 5454 



Residence Studio:-— 2720 Filbert SL,— We«t 815z 



Ben Moore 

PIANIST— COACH— ORGANIST 

Organist and Director Trinity Episcopal 

Church — Beth Israel Synagogue 

2636 Union St. Tel. Fillmore 1624 

Appointment Only 



WILL C. HAYS 

Violinist 



-(?ywri_ 



Pupil of Kilian, Munich, and of 

Ondricek, Vienna 

Studio: 1753 Van Ness Ave., Fresno 

Telephone 7499 



Walter Frank Wenzel 

PIANIST— ACCOMPANIST— COACH 

«•> 

Studio: 601 Kohler & Chase BIdg. 
Res: 1916 Golden Gate Ave. Fillmore 4733 



LOEWS WARFIELD 

Theatre 

Market at Taylor 

FINAL WEEK 

Commencing Saturday, June 9 

America's Leading Tenor 

ORVILLE 
HARROLD 

Caruso's successor with the Metro- 
politan Opera Co., IN PERSON 

ENTIRE NEW PROGRAM 

ON THE SCREEN 

Leroy Scott's 

"Cordelia The Magnificent" 

With Clara Kimball Young 

LIPSCHULTZ AND MUSIC MASTERS 

Singing Saturday and S unday at 2:20. 4:35, 7:20 
and 9:35. Three tim es Daily Thereafter 



AUGUSTA HAYDEN 

SOPRANO 

Avullable for Concerts and Recltala 

AddreMs: 471 37th Avenue 

Tel. Pac. 832 



PACIFIC COAST MUSICAL REVIEW 



THE AMPICO 




THE FINAL TEST 



"To me the real test of the Ampico is in its accompaniment for the 
singer. If there is any place where a mechanical quality, or a musical 
weakness would appear it would be in this direct contrast with a living 
thing— the human voice. But they never appear. I have sung with the 
Ampico many, many times, and to me it is like a living being. As a 
matter of fact, it does one thing that few professional accompanists can 
do— hold me with absolute fidelity to a constant, and to the highest 
standard of interpretation. 

"As I listen to the recordings conducted by Bodanzky, I feel myself again 
under his masterly baton, as I am accustomed to have him lead me, 
faithfully through the mazes of grand opera at the Metropolitan. 
"And is it not wonderful that all this wealth of music may be had 
through the Knabe? To many of us artists that is the crowning glory 
of the Ampico." 

ROSA PONSELLE. 



KOHLER* er » CHASE 



26 O'FARRELL STREET- SAN FRANCISCO 

14lh and Clay Slrett) J ^ S. SACRAMENTO 



OAK LAND 

KNABE 




SAN JOSE 

AMPICO 



Are you planning to spend the Summer Vacation in Los Angeles? _ 
// so, you uill be glad to know that 

TWO MASTER CLASSES 

in VOICE and PIANO 
will be conducted by two well known teachers 




f eatman <6riffitf) 

"Recognized authority on Voice Produc- 
tion and the Art of Singing — Teacher 
of Teachers throughout Europe 
and America." 

July 2nd to August 11th 



mxth iWirobitcl) 

Pianist — Composer — Teacher 

(Graduate Pelrograd Conservatory of 

Music — otily concert pianist of the 

Essipoff School in America.) 



June 11th to July 21st 




-For Detnlled Inforniatlo 



L. E. BEHYMER, Manager ' REN.\ MacDONALD, Associate 

705 Auditorium Bide.. Los Angeles, Calif. 



GODOWSKY 



has such an ideal climate, unless ar- 
rangements have been made for me to 
give some concerts in Europe I shall take 
advantage of the rest and spend a few 
weeks on the PaciHc Coast. There is no 
possibility of my coming here in concert 
this coming season, but after that I ex- 
pe