(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Pacific hardware journal"

fF 

850 
PlZ9 

v.l8:6 




BANCROFT 
LIBRARY 



THE LIBRARY 

OF 

THE UNIVERSITY 

OF CALIFORNIA 



ATKINS SAWS-FINEST ON EARTH 




HARDWARE 



SPORTING GOODS 



HOUSE FURNISHINGS 



Vol. XVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO 



JUNE, 1913 



OAKLAND 



NO. 6 



Business Promotion Through 
Trade Press Efficiency 

is to he the keynote of the most notable gathering' of technical, class and trade journal 
editors and publishers ever held in America. No live manufacturer, sales manager, ad- 
vertising man, trade paper editor or publisher can afford to overlook the 

Eighth Annual Convention of the Federation of 
Trade Press Associations in the United States at 
the Hotel Astor, New York, Sept. 18, 19, 20, 1913 

Two sessions will be held daily. There will be editorial, circulation, advertising and pub- 
lishing symposiums under competent leaders. Many of the leading editors, business man- 
agers, buyers and sellers of advertising, and authorities on modern merchandising meth- 
ods will take part. On Friday afternoon, September 19, there will be a mass meeting with 
addresses by representative business and professional men, on subjects of timely interest 
to editors, publishers and advertisers. Distinguished guests and worth-while speakers will 
be at the annual banquet, which will be made a memorable social occasion. No matter 
what may be your connection with the trade journal field, if you are interested in the idea 
of business promotion through trade press efficiency, if you believe in business papers for 
business men, you will be welcome at all sessions. 



Full information may be obtained from 
THE COMMITTEE OF ARRANGEMENTS 

WM. H. UKERS, Chairman, 79 Wall Street, New York 



The Federation of Trade Press Associations in the United States 



President 

H. M. S WETLAND 

New York 



Secy.-Treas. 
Edwin C. Johnston 
New York 



Yice-President 

E. C. Hole 

Chicago 



Where to Buy Goods. — See Classified Reference, Page 40 
See the Sporting Goods Department 



OVER HALF A MILLION IN USE 

The 400 is the Blower that has 

REVOLUTIONIZED 
the World in Making Hand Blast 



Made with 
Ball 

Bearings 
Only 

FAMOUS 

400 




Champion Patented Combination Auto- 
matic Self- Feed and Double Compound 
Lever Feed Upright Post Drill 

The Double Compound Lever Feed pro- 
duces 8U ; r more pressure, or drills holes 
80% larger, with the same labor, than 
any other Lever Feed Drill manufactured. 

MADE WITH BALL BEARINGS ONLY 





No. 20! Self Feed ami Double 
Compound Lever Feed Drill 



No. SO Champion One-Fire Variable Speed No. 200 Self Feed arid I ever '- .— " t. — . -^J^ x% ~ 

Electric Blacksmith Blower with a Universal Feed Drill / .^U*-^-— ^*- ( 

Motor lor lioth Direct and Alternating Cur- A jk for our late.t Catalog show- t J ll S.T 'l 'n. WJ: F I J. 1 ,1 

rent, either 110 or 220 volts, with Detached ;„ E tnc larcest and most up-to-date -iiii-im in 

Rheostat for six speeds, and Steel Pressure lllH . of Blacksmith Tools manu- ., ,. ., 

Case, for all kinds of general Blacksmith (actured under one Control in the N °' 5b t:1SV Scrcw P[m ' , 

work. world. It will pay you to ice it VVc make Screw Plates cutting up to 1' > inches 
Our Goods Are Sold by Your Jobber 

Champion Blower & Forge Co. Lancaster, p a ., u. s. a. 



.hHJU.-tl.'UUJJ:. J ■!».». 




The 0. K. Electric and 0. K. Power Washing Machines 



Lead the Way to 
Immediate Profits 
and Increasing 
Business { 




No Hardware or Implement dealer 
can afford to be without one or both 
of these machines — they are the sim- 
plest and strongest in construction 
and never fail to give absolute sat- 
isfaction to the users. Our guaran- 
tee is back of each machine. 

Today is the time to write for par- 
ticulars. 




The 0. K. Electric Washing Machine, 
with Reversible Wringer Lrive 



The (). K. Lower Washing Machine 
with Reversible Wringer Drive 



H. F. BRAMMER MFG. COMPANY, Davenport, Iowa. 




&iPi]w®ff©JteQflma 



The Pioneer Paper Devoted to the Hardware and Kindred 
Interests of the Pacific Coast and West 



Vol. XVIII 



SAN FRANCISCO 



June, 1913 



OAKLAND 



No. 6 



Retailers Form Credit Association at Los Angeles 

An organization embracing practically all of the largest re- 
tail business institutions of Los Ajigeles has jusl been perfected 
for the purpose of co-operation in establishing a better system for 
the extension of credit. 

The marvelous growth of Los Angeles has emphasized to the 
Leading merchants the need for such an association, and steps 
were taken some time ago to bring about such an organization, 
which has just been accomplished. 

The new organization is to be known as the Retail Merchants' 
Credit Association, and is to be conducted upon a mutual plan of 
operation. 

This present co-operative effort is the outcome of an associa- 
tion formed about four years ago by E. M. Hitchcock, from whom 
ill rights have been secured, and who has been appointed man- 
ager. 

A suite of rooms on the eighth floor of the W. I. Holling- 
worth building, corner Sixth and Hill streets, has been leased 
for three years, where the organization will maintain headquarters 
and establish its cooperative information service. From the mem 
bers a board of seven directors has been selected to govern the 
affairs of the organization, consisting of the following parties: 
]•'. A. Barnes of Barker Bros.; H. Henneberger, Jr., of II. Jevne 
Company; J. H. Lashbrooke of J. W. Robinson Company; C. A. 
Parmelee of Parmelee & Dohrmann Company; A. J. Pickarts of 
Harris & Frank; W. G. Trimble of Bullock's, and C. H. Wolfelt 
of Bootery. 

The following is a partial list of the membership, which is 
expected to bo greatly increased as soon as the merchants of 
I ho city generally become familiar with the scope and purpose 
of the work: 

Barker Bros., Bullock's (In.-.), I'dackstone Company, Brock & 
Company, Beeman & Hendee, A. K. Brauer Company, Bryant, 
Upholstered Furniture Company, C. H. Baker. 

California Furniture Company, California Wall Paper Com- 
pany, Cass-Smurr-Dameral Company, Chanslor-Lyon Motor Supply 
Company, Coulter's Dry Goods Company, Cunningham, Curtiss & 
Welch ( 'ompany, Dyas-Cline Company. 

C. C. Desmond, Diamond Rubber Company. 
Fowler Bros. A. Pusenot & Company, A, K. Featberstone Company. 
A. Creene & Son, Grimes-Stassforth Company, Gudc Shoe Com- 
pany, Henry Guyot Hardware Company. 

Harris & Frank, Harburger & Sons. Howe Bros., Howard & 
Smith Company. 

innos Shoe Company, Isaac Bros. Company, 
Jacoby Bros., Jevne Company. 

Lane .Millinery, Charles Levy & Sen. A. E. Kittle Company, 
Los Angeles Furniture Company, Lyon, McKinnej ..v Smith Company. 
Macliin Shirt Company. Logan The Hatter, John L. Mathison, 
A. E. Morro, Mullen & Bluett. 

A. E. Newman, New York Cloak & Suit House, Nichol The 
Tailor, Nordlinger & Son, Newcomb Corset shop. 

Paris Cloak & Suit House, Pease Bros. Furniture Company, 



I'armolee-Dohrmann Company, Pacific "Wood & Coal Company. 

J. W. Robinson Company. 

Sanborn-Vail Company, Standard oil Company, Swelldom 
(The), Hugo Schmidt, Siegel-Myer Company. Walter E. Smith 
Company, P. B. Silverwood, S. S. Spier, Southern California Elec 
trie Company, Schuck Cleaning & Dyeing Company. Silk Store. 

Terrill Company. 

Union Oil Company, Union Well Supply. 

Wctherl.y Kayser Shoe Company, C. H. Wolfell Company, Wal- 
berg Bros. . . 

Proposed Tax on Mail Order Houses 

Tt has been a matter of annoyance and chagrin to the aver 
age retail man in business to feel that one of his principal 
competitors, the mail order house, has in the past been permitted 
to come into the retailers territory, sell a large volume of goods 
in the community and take away from town, money which never 
will return. For this privilege the mail order house has con- 
tributed nothing to the local community. 

The injustice of this has been apparent, bul the law govern 
ing the interstate commerce has so far acted as a barrier that 
was difficult to surmount in trying to remedy the evil. 

Now comes Congressman Hinebaugh of Illinois with a plan to 
tax the mail order houses, and while the money derived from 
this source would not be returned directly to the local com 
munity, it would indirectly help the entire country, the same 
as any other material increase in the revenue of the Federal 
Government does. 

Representative Hinebaugh proposes a tax of one per cent 
on the cash value of all interstate sales made by mail order 
houses, and this amount seems like a modest impost to place 
upon a business, which, by its very nature, is having a tendent 
to accentuate the centralization of money and population in 
the larger cities, an evil which is considered to be one of the 
greatest problems with which the people of the country now 
have to deal. 

Whether or not Representative Hinebaugh's proposed plan 
represents the best method that could be decided upon or not 
is still a question, but the principle which ho advocates is 
based upon good reasoning and it would seem to be in order 
for merchants to acquaint their Congressmen and Senators with 
the fact that they are in favor of some form of legislation of 
I Ins kind. 

It it were possible to apply the tax collected from this source 
to the credit of the community from whirl, the business on 
whhh the tax was levied was received, the idea would un- 
doubtedly receive the active endorsement of the merchants in 
everj small town and city in the country, but granted that the 
above arrangement is not feasible, there is no reason why these 
same merchants should not encourage the general tax plan of 
Mr. Hinebaugh's and thereby assist in building up the idea 
that tin- catalog houses should be require.! to contribute a fair 
a„,onnt for the privileges which thej bom enjoy. 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



° 1 ^^*** 




BLACK 
DIAMOND 




Files and Rasps 



Perfect Always 




For Sale Everywhere 

Copy of Catalog Sent Free to any Interested File User 

Upon Application 




G. & H. BARNETT CO. 

BLACK DIAMOND FILE WORKS 

Philadelphia, Penn. 



Owned and Operated by the Nicholson File Company 



BAKER & HAMILTON, Sole Agents for San Francisco 





Pacific hardware journal 



Panama-Pacific International Exposition Notes The United States Steel Awarded Contract 



Tlic concessions district .'it the Panama Pacific [International 
Exposition, corresponding to the wonderful "Midway" in Chi 
eago, will be one of the most marvelous and attractive sections 

of the Exposition. Many of the amus ots will be presented 

for the lirsi time and will be notable no! onlj for their size and 
artistic excellence, but ;ilsn because they are selected with a 
\ i<-\\ to their educational value. The art of presenting cj 

cloramas and dioramas upon an elaborate scale has advai I 

rapidly in the past few years, ami the Exposition will present 
the world's progress in tliis respect. 

The number of applications for concessions is said by the 

director of concessions to be totally unpri lented in the 

history of expositions. So far more than six thousand appli 
cations for concessions have been received and seventy five 
applications, involving an expenditure of $6,800,000, have been 
accepted. The remainder are rapidly undergoing the scrutinj 
of experts. Applications from all portions of America and 
Europe are increasing. Ideas for striking features or novelties 

are welcomed. 

More than seven thousand people, it is estimated, will be 
employed, and between ten and twelve million dollars "ill be 
spent in installation in the concessions division when the Ex 

position is nniler way. 

Director Burt lias received hundreds of suggestions for nam- 
ing the main street of the concessions section. Chicago had 
the ••Midway," St. Louis "The Pike," Portland "The Trail," 
and Seattle the "Pay Streak." 

The concessions and admissions committee is seriously con- 
sidering adopting a name that will be significant of the com- 
pletion of the Panama (anal, which is to be celebrated in this 

city in 1915. Among the n: s suggested are "The Locks," 

"The Canal," "The Zone." "The Isthmus" and "The Hitch." 

It has been suggested that the gates of the concessions dis- 
trict l>e replicas of the great locks at Gatun, and the entranci 
he made through "Spillways," and during Exposition hours the 
locks open like huge gates to admit spectators. 

The whole concessions thoroughfare will he three thousand feel 
in length and will run through the center of the concessions district, 
■ sixty-five acres in area. 

Half way along the length of the thoroughfare will lie the 
superb "Plaza of Wonders," and area iTiiix.'Siio feet. Surrounding 
the plaza will be buildings of impressive Roman architecture, in 
which will lie housed many amusement novelties. Mere also will 
be located a greal bandstand, the sub-offices of the division of 
concessions, and a tire station where methods of preserving life 
will be illustrated. 

In the decorative scheme around the plaza will be 140,000 
lights, rendering it the glory spot of the nighl life of the Exposi 
turn. In the center of the plaza will be the highest flag pole in the 
world, a giant flag stall' donated by the ch\ of Astoria, 246 feet 
high and over five feet in diameter at its base. 

"The concessions section," said Director Kurt, "will lie one 

of the most brilliant and attractive sections of the Exposition. 

The concessions will be n. liable not only for their great size and 
splendor and artistic excellence of their presentation, but also 
for the fact that they are being selected with a view to theil 

educational value." 

Leading Merchants Read the Pacific Hardware 
Journal. 



Tin- San Francisco Board of Public Works has awarded the 
contract for furnishing the fabricated steel for the building of 

tile lleW Citj Ball t" til'' I'lllted Staler Steel PjodUCtS I'olUpaliy, 

despite the protests of tic- Calif a Home Industry League, the 

Labor Council ami numerous local Iron Works companies. The 

United States Steel Products Company's led of $476,283 was the 
lowest l.\ $55,717, made l,\ the Pacific Rolling Mill Company. In 

the protest by the Building Trades C eil it was asserted 

the sj Lfications were unfair to local steel interests. It declared 

that if the contract were awarded to the Eastern linn it i 
be contested iii tic- courts, and that local union men might refuse 
to work on the new ('it\ Hall, since the United States Steel Prod 
nets Company was a foe to organized labor and did not ob i i 

the union hours or wage, ami asked that all bids be rejected and a 

call for new bids issued. It complained that the eight ii labor 

provision of the charter and the $3 minimum wage eruditions had 

bee Bitted fr the spec i tica t ions, and insisted that the charter 

provisi equiring local residence should .also be inserted in the 

contract. 

On being advised that the contract had been awarded. Mayor 
Rolph of San PrancisCO issued a statement settine forth why 
the Board of Works was bound legally to make the award to the 
Eastern linn, despite the protests made by representatives of the 
Home Industry League, the Labor Council and local Steel and 
Iron Works. 

Rolph show e.l t hat t hen- was an actual difference between the 

bid of the Eastern firm and the lowest local bid of $73,417, tin. I a 

difference of four weeks in the beginning of delivery, to saj noth 
ing of other possible delays which the local bidder provided for 
in his price by adding a sum to offset penalties. 

The Mayor pointed out that by awarding the contract to the 

lowest bidder tlie constructii f the Citj Ball would begin on 

schedule time, thus affording work in the near future for till 
classes of labor. The statement is as follows: 
"TO THE PEOPLE OP SAN FRANCISCO: 

"'I have urged the Hoard of Public Works to award the City 
Hall steel contract to the lowest bidder, who happens to be the 
United States Steel Products Company, an Eastern corporation, 
and F take full responsibility for i hat action. 

"The lowest bid is $476,283, with completed deliveries in San 
Francisco in :'.! weeks from tic date of tic contract; the first 
delivery commencing within 1.". weeks. 

"The lowest local bill — which, by the way. is not the - 
lowest bid — is $532,000, with completed deliveries in San Francisco 
in :;:; weeks from .late of the contract; the first deliver) com 
meneing within 1 7 weeks. 

"The difference mi the tace of the bids between the h-.. 
bid ami the lowest local bill is. therefore, $55,717, plus a saying 
in freight rates allowed the city of tit least $17,700 ital of 

$73,417, in money, and four weeks in the commencing of de- 
liveries, if no extensions of time tire .asked for. The commence- 
ment of deliveries is of vital importance, because the conn 
ment of practically till other work on the City Hall must wait 
upon the erection of the steel. 

■■A demand has been made bj interested citizens that the con- 
tract be awarded to the lowest local bidder, in order that the job 
and tlie money might remain at home. To this demand I have 
given very careful consideration, because, other things being equal, 
if the interest of the taxpayers could be protected and the law 
obeyed, 1 would, of course, prefer that the work should be done 
in San Francisco. 

"But. in the first place, if the contract were awarded 

Local bidder, the greater porti I the monej would go 

for the material, which must be iced ami rolled in the East. 

"In the second place, the sum set apart for tlie construction 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 







It's Easy To Sell 

goods that have superior qualities because you can 
point out their advantages and conveniences to cus- 
tomers that make them want what you are selling. 
When you are selling machinist's tools, you want to 
be able to talk about accuracy, convenience and fin- 
ish, the three points that make up quality in tools. 

Starrett Tools 

are perfect in accuracy, being graduated by the orig- 
inal Starrett method. They are designed to give the 
widest range of usefulness and years of service. 
They are finished so as to make attractive displays 
as well as to appeal to the machinist. Many other 
dealers find Starrett tools their most profitable line. 
You can, too, if you will display them and push the 
line a little. Send for Starrett Catalog No. 1910 
and see if your line is complete. 

The L. S. Starrett Co. 



ATHOL, MASS. 



New York 



/"London 



Chicago 






l.ilUJi.ili.il.ii.J iiluiiJiilli.ili.ll iiiiiili.iliJnn.LilE 












\~' 




— ^ 




PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



of the City Hall is limited to $3,250,000. Il will require all of 

thai amount, nomically expended, to complete the job. II' thia 

differential or bonus of $73,417 is donated to the lowest local bid- 
der, the :ii hi available to be spenl for the labor of workers 

in other trades than the iron trades is correspondingly reduced. 

The actual erecti f the steel will be done, of course, by local 

union structural iron workers, uo matter who supplies the material. 

"Not loss important than the difference in money, however, is 
the difference in time between the lowest bid and the lowest local 

bid. Not onlj must the City Hall be built within the ai m( of 

the bond issue, so that it will not be necessary to ask the peopli 
to approve an additional bond issue to complete the work, as they 
had to do in the eases of the hospital and the Sail of Justice, 

but the City Hall must I ompleted and ready for occupancy by 

I'.H.",, if human skill and effort can accomplish it. The old City 

Hall was designed originally to cost $1,500, and to I ompleted 

in three years. It actually eost $5,723,794.18 and took 26 years 
to build. I am determined that, in the erection of the new City 
Hull, there shall not be a repetition of that scandal. 

"The steel contract provides a penalty of $300 a daj Eoi 
delayed deliveries. The lowest local bidder has stated that, in 
computing the price, he added to his customary profit an addi 
tional amount for anticipated penalties for delayed deliveries. 
This would enable the lowest, local bidder to deplay deliveries 
for at least seven months without losing a dollar on the eon 
tract. 

"From information obtained by me, moreover, I am con- 
vinced that neither the lowest bidder ' all the local iron 

manufacturers combined could produce and deliver the steel for 
t he ( lity Hall on tune. 

•■It, has been asserted that the United states steel Products 
Company does not intend to abide by the charter provision that 

'every I tract for work to be performed for the city ami county 

must provide that in the performance of the contract eight 
hours shall be the maximum hours of labor on any calendar 
day and that the minimum wages of laborers employed by the 
contract. IT in the execution of his contract shall be $3 a day.' 

■I ei nly say that the steel contract, already prepared, 

contains a douse in the precise language of the charter and 
that the United States steel Products Company is willing to 

sign it. 

"So much for the business aspects of the matter. Bui there 

[ 9 another aspect. The eharter provides that thi tract must 

be awarded to the lowest bidder, except that the Hoard of Pub- 
lie Works may, in its discretion, reject any and all bids. 

"The only legal alternative, therefore, is eithei to award the 
bid to the United States Steel Products Company, which is the 
lowest bidder, or to reject all bids and call for new bids. But 
the architects advise me that the price asked bj the United 
States Steel Products Company is reus.. liable and lower than the 
usual prices. There is no assurance that, if new bids are called 
for, the city will get as good a bargain on the second bidding. 
The local manufacturers can not underbid Eastern competitors 
for structural steel on an order of this size. 

•With these considerations in mind, I think that II would not 
on ly be imprudent and unfair to the city, but highly improper 
,,, ,,.„„,, the bids of the United state, steel Products Company. 

••As for the demand that the bid be awarded to ;ni> but 
,1,,. lowest bidder, m spite of the law making it a .-rime lor a 
,„,,,!,,. officer to do such a thing. 1 have only to say that I will 
g far fur the sake of home industry, but I must refuse to 

commit a \ iolation of law. 

.1 W1KS Kill. I'll. Jr.. Mm o, 



Opening of Rhul-Goodell Co's New Store 

■ More than three thousand people ['.aid tribute to the enter- 
prise of the Ruhl-Goodell (' pany at Stockton on May 24th. 

when the firm held a public reception in it. handsome and modem 

ishment mi Weber avei Brilliantly illuminated, ami with 

■ mi it- twentj departments stocked with new g Is, the 

establishment was hailed as one of tic- finest ol its kind on the 

and recognized as a credit to tie- city in which it 
The re, -option, which continued from 7 until in in the evei 

w.-is ,-i most delight fni affair, the ent in st -■ 

as a, reception committee. Hundreds of patrons took advantage 
of the opportunity to congratulate the management npoi 
quick recovery from the disasti - iri rinter, and an 

equal number of Btrangers made ,-i thorough in--! tion of thi 

tablishinent. I-'. I' - .. (loo, loll, the manager, who began his work 
with the firm under P. A. Ruhl on March 31, lss|. -toted that 
during his twenty nine years of service la- leel 
ed He- number of friends the Ruhl-Goodell Companj has madi 

The guests were entertained with a program by Mi-- Blai 
Steele's orchestra, ami a score of beautiful floral pii 
t,t which were -ent from San Francisco, wen- prominently dis- 
played. 

Tn convenience and spick-and-span cleanliness the establish- 
ment is a revelation. Two features that will appeal strongly to 
i he public are the system of big, legibli brass signs marking 
the departments and the cash-carrier system that gi astest 

l„, S sible so i x ice io i ustomers. An automatic elevator that is built 

I,, pe i rapid travel to an\ portion of the store, is anothei 

feature worthy of attention, further convei I the kind 

appreciated by the public is afforded l..\ the system of di 
coses, built especially for the store by Snyder i Sons. There 

ar e 100 feet of glass il ■ displaj .-uses and thirty-two wall 

cases ' taining one of the best equipments of n tools 

e\ n exhibited in this city. 

In the basement are supplies of rope, pipe ami plumbing sup 
plies. The main floor has ui least ■■< dozen departments, including 

,-nt glass ami sporting g Is. On the mezzanine floor are 

hold goods, builders' supplies, hammocks, tents and a ladies 

r i. The next floor has stoves, ranges, hose, pumps, windmills, 

and a display room for bath tubs and other large tixtures. The 
top floor is a well-equipped ami roomy warehouse. The lighting 
system is perfect and customers may reach any portion oi 
building within a few seconds aftei entrance. 



To Enlarge Plant 



Leading Merchants Read the Pacific Hardware 
Journal. 



If the plans of John A. M. i - or, president of the Union 
iron Works, who returned to San Francisco recently from an 
extended eastern trip, materialize, a fully equipped steel plant 
w iH be installed ai the Union iron Works, placing that great 
manufactory on a par with the big industries of the east. 

President McGregor -aid I ' ; . Schwab, head of the 

Bethlehem Steel Company, is seriously considering the prop 
os, torn of placing the Pacific < oast metropolis permanently on 

the map of steel ma n 11 f act II re. 

"1 am convinced that the Union Iron Works needs a fully 
equipped steel plan, and I believe the proposition is perfectly 
feasible," said Mr. McGregor, "The steel plant tentatively 
planned for San Francisco would be of the highest degree of 
efficiency and would furnish employment for more than a 
i I -and men. 

■• \t the present time we are con pelled to ship from the I 
every ounce of steel that goes into ships and machinery built at 
the Union Iron Works. It costs about - I it here, 

and thus we are handicapped il 'ion with eastern yards." 



10 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



GIVE YOUR CUSTOMER SATISFACTION 
AND HE'LL COME BACK TO YOU 



A satisfied customer is the besi advertisement — after all 
needs another tool, he'll "come hack." 

Build your business on this basis and you need not fear competition 



Sell him a Saw thai makes g 1 and when he 

'he confidence of the people will 



prove an asset that — like knowledge — cannot he taken away from yon. 

We wanl you to examine closely the two beautiful manufacturers brand I land Saws shown below. It i^ 
impossible in a picture to bring out the graceful lines and attractive finish which these Saws possess. Their 
beauty is recognized and appreciated by high class mechanics and when you show them an ATKINS SIL- 
\ ER STEEL HAND, RIP, PANEL, BACK, MITRE COMPASS or other Saw. they instantly appre- 
ciate the fact that you are offering them standard g K which will give them satisfaction. 




One of Our Popular Skew Back Saws 




A Favorite Among the Straight Back Saws 

ATKINS I't l e v e er l SAWS 

You are always safe in showing goods like these. They hear the name of the maker. They are covered 
h\ a money-back guarantee which protects both you and your customer. They are worth a fair margin of 
profit. They are trade builders. 

"WE HELP YOU TO SELL" 

We do not believe that our duty ends when your order is taken. We believe 
that our interests are mutual and we want to work hand in hand with our custom- 
ers. We are willing and anxious to give our customers the direct benefit of the 
money which we spend for advertising. < >ur "From Consumer to healer Cam- 
paign" is yours for the asking. Its the best Saw proposition in the world today. 

WILL YOU ACCEPT OUR OFFER? 

We are not only asking the I hardware Trade to take advantage of our old 
and favorable reputation (which is excelled by none) but we are instilling new 
I wentieth ( entury ideas in Saw construction and salemanship which you as a live 
buyer, should accept. Try \ TKINS SILVER STEEL S WVS this Spring. < >r- 
der through your jobber. If he will not supply you, then write to the nearesl 
address below and get quick action. 

YOURS FOR MORE BUSINESS 

E. C. ATKINS & COMPANY, Inc. 



PORTLAND 



THE SILVER STEEL SAW PEOPLE 
SAN FRANCISCO 



SEATTLE 



Home Office and Factory: Indianapolis. Indiana. Canadian Factory: Hamilton, Out. 

Branehei I arrying l omplete Stocks in the Following cities: Address E. C. ATKINS & CO.. Atlanta, Chicago, Memphis, 
Minneapolis, New Orleans, New York City, Vancouver, B. C, Sydney, N. S. W. 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



11 



POPULAR TALKS ON LAW 

IMPORTANT TALKS TO BUSINESS MEN 

Copyright 1913 by Walter K. Towert, A. B., J. D. 



Checks and Bank Accounts 



John McGee owed Warren Gordon five dollars for :i couple 
of loads of cordwood. Gordon, having delivered the wood at 
McGee's residence, went to McGee's store to secure his money. 
McGee drew out his check book and signed a check in the usual 
form, instructing his bank to pay to Gordon the sum of (i\ c 
dollars. This was on Tuesday afternoon about 2 o'clock. The 
bank did not close until four, but Gordon, knowing thai McGee 
was a responsible man of means and nol needing the fash at 
that time, decided he wouldn't rash the check at once, but 

would keep it until he needed the m y at the end of the 

week. Wednesday passed with the bank open for business in 
the usual way, lint again Gordon did nut present the check 
for payment. On Thursday Gordon heard rumors that the bank 

was in difficulties and might fail, so he hastened to its d 'S 

only to find that he was too late and thai they had already 
been closed. The failure proved complete. 

Gordon went to McGee and asked that he be paid his five 
dollars, insisting that it was McGee's haul; that had failed and 

that he had never received his paj fur the w I delivered. 

McGee inquired into all the circumstances ami pointed out that 
ha«l Gordon presented the check for payment on either Tues- 
day afternoon or any time Wednesday it would have been paid 
in full. McGee further Stated that lie had had the money on 
deposit in the bank and it had been lost. Had Gordon presented 
the check within a reasonable time Eve dollars, at least, would 
have been saved, and there was no reason why McGee should 
lose the five dollars a second time. Before the law McGee's 

position was correct, he was not required to make g 1 the 

cheek, Gordon having failed to present it for payment when In' 
reasonably might have at a time when it would have been paid 
in full. 

The payment of obligations by cheeks en bank accounts is 
a familiar business procedure in every community, ami an exam 
ination of the legal relations of the banker, the depositor who 
si^ns the check and the person to whom he give it. is of the 
greatest practical importance. Lei us examine the legal sig- 
nificance of a check, the requirements of a good check and the 
obligations of the various parties to it. 

The term of a bank check is familiar enough to all of us. 
It is Usually prepared by filling in ink or pencil blank spaces i i 
the printed form provided by the bank. Hut the entile check 
may be written, and checks have been prepared en manj sub 
Stances besides paper. Lumbermen have whittled out a smooth 
shingle and written their checks thereon. A young profligate in 

jail after a spree one,' ton- off his cuff and wrot( it a check 

te obtain funds to secure his release. The requirement is that 
the check lie in writing of some kind, which includes typewrit- 
ing, etc. It is addressed to a stated bank, which is directed 
to "Pay to the order of John Jones," or "Pay to the order of 
Bearer," a certain sum of money. These words, "pay to the 
order of," are necessarj to the negotiability of the check — that 
is necessary so that it may fulfill all the legal requirements 
and be capable of passing by indorsement, etc. A check may 

be drawn to "Bills Payable," or "Rent," or "Cash," ami is 

then payable to bearer. 

There is no legal requirement that a check be dated, but 
this is a wise and almost invariable custom. Any legal holdet ol 
a check may fill in the true date where il has been left blank. 



A check maj be dated in th< pa t, ••< in tin- future. If dated 

in the past il is payable at once, and if dated in the future it 
is payable on or after its date. While the words "on demand" 
are md used in a cheek, they are implied iii law. the under 
standing being thai the bank is instructed by it- depositor to 
pay to the order of John Jones en demand. 

A check must be signed by the depositor ami usually in bl- 
own hand, though contract relations between bank ami de 
positor ma\ authorize the use of a rubber stamp, or some Buch 
device in place of a written signature. 

In law the person who draws a check and gives it to anol 
is understood to agree that he will stand bad. of tin- , 

ami see to it that the pei receii ing it sec - the uieiie\ I'm 

which it calls, provided he handle- n in a proper ami lea-enable 

manner. If the person receiving a check presents it to the bank 
within a reasonable time, and the bank dishonors the check, 
and he then gives notice of this to the person who drew it. that 
drawer is bound to pay to him the amount id' the check. A 
check should be presented during business hours by a | ■ 

entitled to receive money en it on the next business day after 

receipt, at the latest. As «e noticed in the case of John McGee 
and Warren Gordon, if the check is not presented within this 
time, and the hank fails, the loss must fall upon tin person 
who failed In present it. But if the depositor suffer no less be 
cause of the delay in presenting the check he cannot escape 
liability if it is dishonored. Thus if Warren Gordon had care- 
lessly kept McGee's check several days before presenting it 
for payment and in the meantime Mctlee had withdrawn i 
account from the bank, there being no failure. Mctlee would have 
been bound to see that Gordon received the amount of the check. 

If a check, is received drawn upon a bank in another city it 
cannot, of course,-be presented for payment on that or the next 
business day. so it is sufficient if the check is put in course of 
celled ion on the business day following its receipt. One 
should b«> as prompt in giving notice to the drawei of the refusal 
of the bank to pay a check as to put it in course of collection. 

A check that is drawn payable to "Bearer" may bi 
ferred simply by delivery, banding it from en,' t.. another. If 
the check is drawn payable to "John Jones," John .(ones may 
transfer it by indorsement — thai is, bv writing his name on 
the back. If he indorses in blank he simply writes his name. 
"John Jones," across the end of the back of the check, when it 
is payable te anyone who nun- held it. If John denes should 
write "Pay to the order of Sam Smith. John Jones. - 
Smith alone would then have the right, to present it for pay- 
ment or transfer it by further indorsement. The blank in- 
dorse ut of the person presenting the check at the bank is. of 

course, sufficient to transfer the legal rights in the che.de to 
the bank. 

line who takes a check from another usually requires that 
he indorse it even though it be already indorsed in blank or 
payable to bearer. This mse the person who indi 

a check to another is understood in law to make certain prom- 
ises t,, the person to whom he indorses the .heck even though 
he does nothing further than write his name on the check. The 
indorser eueaees that when the check is proper!-, presented al 
the bank it will be paid, and if it is not [.aid and notice is 
eiven to him he will pay the amount to the person te whom he 
transferred the check or tiny other who may subsequently re- 
ceive it bv proper indorsement. Thus when you indorse a 




WIDE AWAKE DEALERS WILL 
MAKE THIS A "D-LITE" YEAR 



DItIZ 
NEW "D-LITE" LANTERN 

THE LANTERN 

THAT SELLS ITSELF" 



TALKING POINTS 



NEW SHORT GLOBE 

EASILY CLEANED 



NEW"CONELESS"BURNER 

ONE INCH WICK 



WICK EXPOSED FOR 
CLEANING, TRIMMING 

AND LIGHTING 



INTENSE WHITE LIGHT 
OF 10 CANDLE POWER 



THE SHORTEST 
"COLD BLAST" LANTERN 
ON THE MARKET 

ONLY 13 INCHES HICH 





DitIZ LANTERNS UGHTThE WORLD 

DIQ7 MADE THEM GOOD 

TH'r DIIQliP MAHFTHFM FAMfllK 



>1ETZ COMPANY. 

NEW YORK CITY FOUNDED 1840. 



ALL GENUINE DIETZ LANTERNS 

vDIETZ 




REFUSE ALL IMITATIONS 



WARREN McARTHUR, Exclusive Sales Manager 

20 East Lake St., Chicago, III. 



DIETZ "D-LITE" 
THE LATEST LANTERN TRIUMPH 



Write for our complete 1913 Catalog and Price List 
showing over 100 styles Lanterns and Lamps 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



13 



cheek you make that promise to all future holders of the check. 
If you are compelled to make it good you may have recourse in 
turning against those who transferred the cheek to you and 
whose names appear on the back as indorsees, or on the face 
as signers. 

While the bank owes a duty to depositor to pay his 
proper check drawn against an adequate deposit, the banker is 
not bound to pay any chock as against a holder of it. The 
rights of the holder are against the signer of the cheek, and 

those who transferred it to him. But if a bank -tines a 

check, it becomes bound to pay it to a proper holder. Certifies 
tion of a check is secure, I by presenting it to the cashier of the 

bank against which it is drawn. Upon determining that the 
signer has funds sufficient to cover the check on deposit, and 

seeing to it that they are set aside for that purpose, the cashier 
marks -Cert died" across the face of the chock and adds his 

official signature. The fun. Is to cover this cheek are then with- 
drawn from the control of the depositor who signed the cheek 
and he may not stop payment of it, or withdraw the funds to 
cover it. The bank becomes absolutely bound to pay it, and 
the check is as good as the bank. Usually the person who 
signs a check has it certified in order than one to whom he 
would give it in payment of an obligation will lie more, ready 
to receive it. His liabilities on the check remain the same if 
he has it certified. But if one who holds tlio chock, other than 
the person who drew it, has it certified, ho then in effort says 

that he chooses to look to the bank for payment of the el k, 

and the depositor who signed it ami all who indorsed it before 
him are relieved from their liabilities, the bank alone becoming 
liable to the holder. 

If an ordinary check comes to you the safe procedure is to 
either present it to the bank on which it is drawn and secure the 
cash, or to deposit it in your own bank for collection, and do 
,1,,, within twenty-four hours after it is received, or at least on 
the next business day. It may seem immediately convenient to 
turn another's check over to a third party, but if you do so 
recognize the risks involved. The safe procedure is to cash 
the check you have ami pay the third party by your own per- 
sonal check on your own account or with the ensh received. 



Henderson Bros. New Store 



Parcels Post C. O. D. 



The work of remodeling Henderson Bros. Co's Btore at 
l,odi, Cal., is fast uearing completion. The addition of the - 

hie work which is to adorn the front, laying of tile entrance, 
installing tin- fixtures winch are novi arriving and Btraightei 
the stock will take aboul ten days, when the -tore will ta 
,,,, a new appearance. The arrangement of the Btore has i , 

improved. The new front emits a "rent deal of light during 
the ,|:,v ami at night the entire store blazes with 40 electric 

lights in eighl clusters in the ceiling. Seventj ted of plate 

glass shew enses have b i installed. 'I he cases, nine in number. 

each having adjustable shelving. They will be placed in ho 

shoe form through the central part of the store and will afford 

one of the best displays of any store in the county". The stoch 
will be classified in the different cases. There will be a con 

plete case of scissors, one of knives, etc. Everj one in the I 

is now busily engaged arranging the goods -I. hand, togethei 
with I he vast amount that is daily arriving. 



Instructions to postmasters have been issued for handling of 
CO. I', parcel post packages. The regulations will bo effective 
■luly 1st. 

Charges on packages will be collected from addresses on 
and after that date, provided the amount on a single parcel 
,|„ C s net exceed $1110. The fee for collection will be 10 cents 
ln p ar ce] post stamps, to be affixed by the sender. This fee 
also w,ll insure the package against loss to the actual value 
of the contents, not exceeding $50. 

The sender will get a receipt showing the amount to be 
collected, the amount also appearing on a tag attached to the 
package The addressee will receipt for the package on the 
,ag. Which will serve as an application for a money order. C. 
0. D. parcels may be accepted for mailing by rural carriers. 
and will be delivered by city and rural carriers and special 
deliver) messengers. Such packages will not be mailable either 
t„ the Philippines or to the canal zone. 



Australia Field for American Hardware 



In one of the recent consular report- that have been proving 
of great value to the readers of them, it was stated thai at 
Australian firm is enlarging its business held and would like 
to get in touch with American manufacturers of hardware that 

are anxious to sell their goods in that country. ( f tie 

linn's members will be in New Fork soon and would like to 
secure agencies for saws, tools, la winnowers, emery wheels, wire 
cloth, wringers, washing machines, spades, shovels, fork- and 
padlocks. Fuller information may be obtained by writing the 
State Department. Washington, 1 1. C. 



To Facilitate Shipments 



The Smith & Ilemenway Company, 150-152 Chambers street, 

New York City, inform us that instead of carrying stock in 
two places they have arranged to carry at the factory. Irving 
ton Mfg. Company. L30 Coit street, [rvington, X. J., a complete 
-lock alter duly 10th, and all shipments will be made fron 
[rvington Mfg. Company after that date. 

This enterprise is a movement in the right direction, a- n 
means facilitating shipment to customers and making more 
prompt delivery. Also, they have largely increased the facilities 
of the factory and stock room to take care of additional stoch 
and of their increasing business. 

It might be well to mention the fact that they are maun 
facturers Of the largest line of hand tools made in the United 
state-, and are owners of the famous trademark, the Genuine 
"Bed Devil." The Coast representative of the company is 
Vorhies, I". 0. Box L83, Fresno. Cal. 



At a recent meeting of the Alameda County Hardware Dealers' 
Association, held in Oakl I. the following gentlemen were ap- 
pointed as the Executive Committee: Frank A. BittigStein, A. S. 
Cooley and John 1'. Maxwell. 



Geo. King is Now a Fan 

A telegram from ChicO, Cal.. gives what is considered a 
most K lerful piece of news. This is the new-: "After trav- 
eling U p and down the valley for twenty-five years and ma 

his "headquarters in San Francisco, G ge King, traveling 

salesman for llolbrook. Merrill & Stetson, attended here what 
he says is the first baseball game he ever saw. It was the 
Chico-Sacramento game, and King was so impressed that he 
declares he will be a regular fan hereafter." We believe that 
Mr. King is the only traveling man in the United Stales that 
can show such a record. 



14 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 




The LIGHTNING, GEM and BLIZZARD 

are always in demand and well advertised. They are easily sold and stay sold, which 
means a good net profit to the dealer. They bring trade and help to keep it. You should 
order now for shipment later if you like. 

Your Jobber Will Supply You 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO 

PHI LADELPH I A, PA. 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



15 



Fixed Prices Versus Cut Prices 



One of the industrial questions of the day which is likely in 

the near future to demand a large a unl of public attention .- 1 1 1 ■ I 

discussion is this: Shall manufacturers be permitted to fix the 
retail price of a Nationally advertised article and to maintain thai 
price by the aid of the law? This was the subject of discussion 
of a largely attended and very pleasant dinner of the Association 
of National Advertising Managers, which was held at the Hotel 
Aslor in New York City recently. The chief speaker of the even 
inn was Mr. Louis D. Brandeis, the distinguished Boston lawyer, 
who is one of the champions of the anti-monopoly movement in 
this country. His well-known opposition to artificial industrial 
monopoly and his equally well-known insistence that natural or 
semi-natural monopolies, like the railways, shall lie stringently 
regulated by the Government, give special value and interest to 
his views on the above-stated question regarding retail prices. 
He believes, as he stated at this dinner, and "The Outlook" heartily 
shares his belief, that social justice requires that the manufacturer 
of an article for which he has created a National reputation by 
his honesty, efficiency, and advertising shall be permitted to name 
and maintain the retail price at which that article shall be sold. 
Many people have a vague impression that this is fostering 
monopoly, and Mr. Brandeis took the occasion to say that there 
should be made in the public mind a clear distinction between a 
combination of all the manufacturers in a certain line of trade 
to fix the price of the entire product of that trade, which is 
monopoly, and the perfectly proper ami desirable effort of a 
single manufacturer to fix the price of a single article which he 
alone makes. 

Questions of this nature can often be illumined by illustrations 
drawn from the common and ordinary affairs of every-day life. 
For instance, there are two white floating soaps manufactured in 
this country, which, because of their special qualities and their 
very wide advertising, have been made known to every house- 
keeper in the land. One is Ivory Soap, made by the Proctor 
& Gamble Company; the other is Fairy Soap, made by the N. K. 
Pairbank Company. It is to the advantage of the housekeeper 
to know when she pays five cents for a cake of Ivory Soap or of 
Fairy Soap that every other housekeeper in every other com- 
munity of the United States is paying the same price. Special 
privilege to destroy, which is one of the great ends of the modern 
movement for social justice, is thus eradicated, for every house- 
keeper is receiving equal treatment with every other housekeeper. 
But this is not monopoly, for Fairy Soap and Ivory Soap are 
constantly and everywhere competing against each other. If the 
manufacturers of Fairy Soap and Ivory Soap combine to raise the 
price to ten cents, some other soap manufacturer will at once 
enter the tield on a five-cent basis. What the Government must not 
do is to permit all the soap manufacturers to combine tor a 
control of all soap fats and other ingredients and of the patented 
machinery for making soap, so that they can raise the price to 
an exorbitant figure ami keep out of the trade any manufacturer 
who wishes to compete with them. This is putting in plain language 
tin- fundamental distinction between price fixing and price mo- 
rn i poly. 

At the dinner to which we have referred, Mr. Henry B. Joy. 
president of the Packard Motor Car Company, in his address, 
.•ailed attention to the fact that the Department of Justice at 
Washington is on record as desiring to enjoin or forbid manu- 
facturers of specially branded and advertised articles "from ex 
acting in any manner an agreement or understanding from the. 
retailers of said product that they shall sell the same at a price 
axed, or at any other uniform price." If this is a correct in- 
terpretation of the attitude of the present Administration as to 
retail pricing, we believe that the Government in its honest en 
deavor I" promote social justice is really undermining it. 



SAFETY FIRST 

These days a manufacturer has a hard job in- 
ducing Hardware healers to handle a Lantern 
thai is not safe. 

That's because Dealers realize 
thai iit buying Lanterns safety 
must be considered first. 

M IJ STYLE 

SAFETY 

is guaranteed by 
that double-locked- 
in steel burner, 
which is but one i il 
Ham's M il STYLE 

Cold Blast Lanterns 
features. 

Write for our three- 
color Ml I STYLE 

poster to let 
folks know you 
\ carry 

"The Brightest 

Whitest Light 

of All" 

C. T. Ham 
Mfg. Co. 

THE NUSIlLf WAY Rochester, N. Y. 




. 



Another speaker at the dinner. Mr. William EC. Cngersoll, of 
the firm which supplies Americans with an excellent and serviceable 
watch at the extraordinary pri( f one dollar — a price which can- 
not by the most enthusiastic anti-monopolist be called excessive — 
pointed out that Denmark, a country which has been most ion 
gressive in pro-social ami 'anti-privilege legislation, has passed 
laws making indiscriminate price-cutting illegal. Mr. [ngersoll 
also quoted German court decisions which have sustained the prin- 
ciple that price-cutting by retailers is often destructive of real 
competition. The intelligent discussion and the proper soli 
of this question of retail prices of standard articles of trad.- is 
one. in our judgment, of great political and social importance to 
the consumer as well as to the manufacturer. 



Are You Selling Fly Traps? 

Dealers should take advantage of the Nation-wide move 
ment for fly extermination by pushing the sale of fly traps, etc. 
The public is generally alive to the fad thai flies carry dis- 
ease thai kills more people annually than all other causes 
combined and is ready and willing to rid the community of 
the pests. Om- of the safe ways to exterminate flies in quan- 
tities is by means of :i g I trap made of wire screen. 

After the trap is full of the pests, it should be immersed in 
scalding water. The thousands of dead flies can then 1m 
to the chickens. A trap that is successful in performing this 
duty and is meeting with large sale nil over the I'm; 
is called the "Perfect," manufactured by the Ludlow Si 
Wire Co., of St. Louis. Mo. Dealers should not overlook this 
profitable trade, as but one word will sell a trap to every 
family in the community. 



16 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



The Hammer Every Carpenter Will Eventually Buy" 



Drop Forged from 

VANADIUM STEEL 

The Toughest Steel Known 
Perfect Balance and Grip 




Stock These Hammers, They 

are Ready Sellers. All Van 

Doren Hammers are Sold 

Under a 

"No Question Asked 
Guarantee." 



VAN DOREN MFG. CO., CHICAGO HEIGHTS, ILLS. 

COAST DISTRIBUTORS 

E. B. SUTTON & CO. A. P. WORTHINGTON 

25 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 1220 SAN PEDRO STREET, LOS ANGELES, CAL 



GENUINE 

Hunter's Sifter 

The Standard for a 
Quarter-Century 

Order from your jobber 

Combines strength, beauty, usefulness and durability. 
Cleanliness always possible. Made in one piece of extra 
heavy tin plate, nickel trimmings. Handle swedged to body. 
No soldered joints to come loose. Easy to remove all parts 
for cleansing. 




Sectional View Showing 
Construction 



Bender Street 



THE FRED J. MEYERS MFG. CO. 



ii 



amitton 



Ohi. 




■V 



Mr. Dealer 



Guaranteed the Best Cart made, 
Steel or Rubber Tires 

Or.lcr Direct or Through Your Jobber 
Made bj 



Dozens of people in your 
town needing this cart — 
you can supply them. 

NEW LEADER 

PUSH CART 



ILLINOIS IMPLEMENT CO., PEORIA, ILL. 



I NST 

USE GLASS 



EAD OF 

CASTERS— 



Onward" Sliding Furniture Shoes 



Protect Floors and Covering from injury 

and Beautify Furniture. If your jobber 

will not supply, write to us direct. 




.ilium ""'" 

"-« hi n:it 



ONWARD MFG. CO. 

Berlin. Ont. Menasha, Wis. 



Claims for Commissions 

The secretary of one of the implement associations Ins received 
a number of complaints from members who assert that manufac- 
turers and jobbers have refused to pay commissions on sales of 
heavy machines effected through the work of the dealers, the sellers 
claiming in some cases that the prices obtained were not largi 
enough to permit payment of commissions, in others that the 
dealers were not giving the sellers sufficient business I" warrant 
them in demanding commissions on a single sale. 

Of course, there are two sides to every story, according to the 
Farm Implement News, and it would be unfair to pass judgment 
"ii any of these cases without hearing from the manufacturers or 
jobbers, it is almost inconceivable that any concern would refuse 

to pay a i [mission on a sale resulting from the efforts or the 

assistance of a dealer on the ground that the volume of business 
given the seller is small; but if it is true, the dealer should lose 
no time in taking legal steps to collect his claim. 

We are familiar with other eases in which manufacturers or 
jobbers have refused to pay commissions because the dealer, 
in his eagerness to get the order, cut the price below instructions, 
the reduction having absorbed the dealer's percentage of the seller's 
retail price. Where definite instructions are given as to price, and 
the commission is to l>e figured thereon, if the dealer ignores in- 
structions and sells the machine at the net price he is in the 
same position that he would be had he sold at cost a machine 
bought outright. 

Dealers often cut the lisl price, knowing the reduction will be 
deducted from their commission; if the reduction equals the com- 
mission, it is optional with the seller whether anj commission will 
lie paid. In the absence of positive instructions as to price, we are 
of the opinion that the seller who accepts an order is obligated 
to compensate the dealer, regardless of the price obtained. 

It, is of the utmost importance that the terms and conditions 

under which sales of the character indicated are to be made si I, l 

be definitely stated in writing. When this is dt there is little 

or ii" chat for a cont roversj . 



.Mrs. Butler of Thusles, Ireland, died recently, leaving con 
siderable property to a number of relatives in the United 
States. Among the relatives were a number of Hardwaremen 
of the Pacific i east. 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



17 



Coast Hardware Associations 

California State Retail Hardware Association — President, 
I. C. Walker, San Francisco; First Vice-President, A. s. Cooley, 
Berkeley; Second Vice-President, L. .1. Klemmer, Willows; Sec- 
retary-Treasurer, L. B. Smith, Oakland. Kxecntivc Committee: 
Geo. E. Allen, Livermore; If. \V. Johnson, San Rafael; U. A. 
McC'all and M. M. Brown, San Franciseo; .1. P. Maxwell, Oak- 
land; John W. Baxter, Watsonville; J. C. Clark, Fresno; F. E. 
Goodell, Stockton; K. ( ). Kimbrough, Sacramento; A. D. Eetter- 
lin, Santa Rosa, Cal.; Fred T. Duhring, Sonoma; I,. Ballschmidt, 
Eureka; John Simpson, Tehama; C. E. Kocher, Merced; F. T. 
Barker, Ukiah; J. D. Turner, Modesto; Geo. II. Smith .-11111 P. 
A. Rittigstein, Oakland. 

Southern California Retail Hardware and Implement Dealers' 
Association — President, J. G. Pease, Whittier; Viee President, 
Frank B. McKenney, Tropico; Secretary-Treasurer, Jared Wen- 
ger, Trust aud Savings Building, Los Angeles. Executive Com 
mittee: W. F. Marks, Los Angeles; H. (J. Mason, South Pasa- 
dena; Wm. Andrews, Van Nuys; T. M. George, Santa Barbara; 
R. W. Foundstone, Los Angeles; Fred M. Gazlay, San Diego; 
W. C. Barth, Coroua; Chas. F. Hersee, El Centro; A. B. Avis, 
Pomona. 

Colorado Retail Hardware and Implement Association — 
President, C. C. Huddlestou, Lamar, Colo.; Vice-President, Geo. 
Wilson, Florence, Colo.; Secretary-Treasurer, Edward Arps, 
Ouray, Colo. Directors: Win. Troxel, Denver; R. W. Isaacs, 
Clayton, N. M.; W. H. Enderley, Thennopolis, Wyo. 

Oregon Retail Hardware and Implement Dealers' Association 
— President, Glen G. Goodman, Roseburg; Vice-President, J. R. 
Craven, Dallas; Secretary-Treasurer, II. J. Altnow, Woodburn. 
Member of the Executive Committee, N. D. Cool, Drain, Ore. 

Idaho Hardware and Implement Dealers' Association — Pres- 
ident, S. D. McLain; First Vice-President, L. W. Spaulding, 
Payette; Second Vice-President, V. C. Kerr, Boise; Secretary- 
Treasurer, L. M. Parrish, Boise; Member of Executive Committee, 
W. T. Wood, Twin Falls. 

Pacific Northwest Hardware and Implement Association — 
President, H. D. McMillen, Ephrata, Wash; First Vice-President, 
Hugh Eaton, Endicott, Wash; Second Vice-President, H. L. 
Thomason, Sandpoint, Idaho; Secretary-Treasurer, E. E. Lucas, 
Spokane, Wash. Board of Directors, II. E. Anderson, Tacoma; 
A. L. Forbes, Lewiston, Ida.; N. A. Steinke, Spokane; II. \V. 
Demuth, Pasco; C. A. Frantz, Moscow; J. W. Lipscombe, Seattle; 
A. Urbahn, Grangeville, Ida. 

Some Facts About San Francisco 



>JEL 



(lore are a few interesting facts about San Francisco: 

It is the fifth wealthiest, city in the United States. 

It is the eleventh city in size in the United States. Greater 
San Francisco will be the fourth city in size. 

San Francisco lias 2023 hotels and lodging houses. Ninety pec 
cent of them are new. New York City is the only city ex- 
line; this number. 

It is the greatest cafe and restaurant city in proportion to 
population, having 767 in addition to hotel dining rooms and 
grills. 

Population of the city. 1913, estimated on figures of public 
service corporal ions. 530,000. 

It ranks eighth in bank clearings of American cities. 

Over half of the population are savings bank depositors. 

The total amount of money expended in rebuilding was equal 
to the cost of building the Panama Canal. 

In average capital per National bank. San Francisco is only 

exc led bj New York and Chicago among American cities. In 

total National banking capital, the city ranks fifth. 

In total deposits in National banks the city ranks sixth. 

It is the best lighted city in America. 

It is the only large city in America owning and operating 
a street railroad. 

Golden Gate park is one of the largest and most beautiful 
in the world. It is four miles long and two miles wide. 

San Francisco has the largest "Chinatown" in America with 
a population of 15,000. 



TRADE 




MARK 



^osro 1 




Cleveland Grindstones are all 
stamped with this new Trade Mark 

A distinctive trade mark clearly stamped on 
every stone — 

The best quality of grindstone known to the 
manufacturing world, and 
A publicity c a m- 
paign for the benefit 
of the trade — a cam- 
paign designed to in- 
terest the consumer. 
Think what these 
mean in grindstone 
business for you. 
As Cleveland t inn. I 
stones are sold ex- 
clusively throti g h 
the retail trade, we 
have adopted this 
new trade mark For 
the protection of 
users as well as deal- 
ers and ourselves. It is the buyer's guarantee 
that he is getting a genuine Huron or Berea 
grindstone. 

Do not be misled by the term "Berea Grit" into 
thinking you are getting "Berea Stone." "Berea 
Grit" is merely a geological name for stone of a 
certain age. It does not even refer to grinding 
qualities for agricultural or genera] uses which 

constitute your grind- 
stone market. We own 
the original I! e r e a 
quarry, the stone from 
which for 60 years lias 
en the world's stan- 
dard. You can get this 
quality only through us. 
Cleveland Grindsti 
are made in various 
sixe> for general pur- 
pi ises, and in any size 
for special purposes. 
They can be had in fine 
i it ct tarse grit, and are 
designed for power, hand or treadle. 
If you are not fully posted on the difference in 
grindstones, write us for information and let us 
at tin same time quote you our attractive prop- 
i isil Li >n. 

THE CLEVELAND STONE CO. 

Pacific Coast Office, 360-362 Fremont St., San Francisco 




18 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 




We are now manufacturing a complete line of BREAST DRILLS, and the 
same careful attention is given to their construction and genera] finish as 
distinguishes all "STANLEY TOOLS." 

Only two numbers are shown here, but we offer twelve different styles 
from which you can make up your assortment. 

Among them will he found Single and Double Speed Drills (the latter with 
two speeds), three methods of frame construction, four distinct styles of 
jaws, as well as a variety of finishes. 

We have a special circular telling all about these tools. Your customers 
will be interested to receive it. 



"New Brit/» in.Conn.U.SA. 



A 



An Attractive "Silent Salesman" 



Another Step Forward in Modern Sanitation 



The Van Doren Manufacturing Company, Chicago Heights, 111., 
is presenting the trade with a very attractive easel card, upon 
which is displayed a "Vandor" Vanadium Hammer. This is a 
counter display easel and dealers are finding it a Aery profitable 
silent salesman. The "Vandor" Hammer is provided with a num- 
bered guarantee tag, which states that the buyer can return it. 
at any time if it proves defective. The company states that the 



-THE NEW WARRANTED HAMMER 



DROP FORCED FROM 

VANADIUM STEEL- 



PRICE ©1,00 
R" No. 21 '/a 




NEW HEXASON REINFORCED PATTERN 

PERFECT BALANCE AND ORB* 

SECOND GROWTH HICKORY HANDLE 

THERE \% NOTHING AS 6000 



WILL OUTLAST THE ORDINARY 
HAMMER 3 TO 1 

TRY ONE AT OUR RISK 



An Easel Card Furnished by Van Doren Mfg. Co. 

warranty is given with the knowledge of what "Vanadium" steel 
"ill stand up to. II is the toughesl steel known and the goods 
are tempered right. II is stated thai the tool will outlast any 

ordinary hi iei three to one. The handle is the choices! selected 

sec 1 growth hickory, the very besi thai can be obtained, and 

the goods are iii a class by themselves. The Pacific ('oast selling 

ire E B. Sutton & Company, a California street, San 

l''n isco, aid A. P. Wort hinglon, 1220 San Pedro street, Los 

les, I a I. 

be shipped by parcels post, C. 0, IV, on July 1st 

and therea it i i 



In referring to the fitness of materials for preventing sound 
transmission in buildings, Edward \V. DeKnight of the Hydrex 
Felt & Engineering Co. states that wonderful strides have been 
made in modern sanitation, i. e., in the extermination of the 
mosquito, the stamping out of the white plague, the abolishing 
of the public drinking cup and common towel, instruction of 
public school pupils in personal hygienics, the prevention by 
the State of diseases peculiar to trades and occupations, etc., 
but it seems rather remarkable that no public attention has 
been directed, and no health authority has taken action, to 
prevent the use in the floors of our schools, churches, residences, 
apartment hotels, etc., for sound-proofing, of such unclean, 
unsanitary materials as, for instance, felts composed of cattle 
hair and sea grass. Cattle hair matted into a felt (commer- 
cially called "hair felt") comes from hides dragged through 
the dirt and filth of slaughter houses. Any amount of washing 
cannot take away the danger of deriving from the hair that 
insidious disease "anthrax." Place the hail" in water or leave 
it in a damp place and note the result. 

There is real menace to health in placing, especially under 
a bedroom floor, such a material. Its use, at least under floors, 
should be prohibited by law until some process has been devised 
and adopted by which the material has been rendered truly 
antiseptic. The floor is the receptacle of all dust, dirt and 
spillings which sift through to the underlying material, tending 
to set up decomposition in any animal and vegetable matter, 
which becomes the more filthy and vermin-filled the longer 
it remains. There should be used under a floor only on abso 
lately sanitary, non-absorbent, vermin-proof material. 

We are admonished by medical authorities against leaving 
over night in our sleeping rooms flowers, fruit parings, etc., 
i.e. ans,. there is ilirown off carbonic acid gas the very poison 
exhaled by our lungs. Vet we go to the very opposite extreme 

in placing under sleeping and even nursery II > (our first 

playground) such unclean animal matter as cattle hair and 

vegetable matter as seaw I. neither of which improves with 

age and both of which harbor and nourish vermin. 

We bave seen, around a steam pipe, hair felt alive with 
fleas, which nol only nest in but live on the animal matter. 
We have also seen iii storage a roll of grass fell harboring 
mice and rats, which scampered away when the roll was ovet 
turned. II hardly seems like the exercise of average intclli- 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



19 



gence to use under any floor any lining which will nol only 
harbor but will attract moths, bugs and other vermin, when 
we are constantly seeking methods and materials to eradicate 
and keep oul vermin and instinctively abhor those things which 
nourish and breed them. 

Another serious drawback to sea grass is thai it contains 
i considerable quantity of salt; the sail not only corrodes the 
nails in the floor, but in damp weather attracts moisture, caus- 
ing, in time, the floor boards to warp badly. 

It matters not that hair felt or Beaweed and grass felts 
arc admittedly good sound deadeners. They also arc admittedly 
unclean and hazardous. Therefore, they should not, under any 

circumstances, be used, especially when then! can 1 btained 

clean, safe, sanitary and more modem materials. There is 

n. i need whatever that soundproofness be had al tl xpense 

of sanitation. After all, the comfort afforded by soundproof- 
ness is not as vital as good health. 

Aside, therefore, from all other consideration of the prin- 
ciples underlying the prevention of sound construction, the 
paramount consideration must always be: 

What is the character of the material, i. e., is it i 

absorbent of dirt, moisture and odors? Is it proof against 
vermin? Is it clean and sanitary? 



The Life of the Engine 



Secretary II. R. Urate of the National Gas Engine Association 
has undertaken to gather statistics to determine the average life 
of the farm engine. In a recent bulletin to the members he 
calls attention to the importance of this subject and suggests 
that such facts as the individual manufacturers may have pertain 
ing to this matter be submitted to him for compilation. 

This is a commendable undertaking and we hope engine manu- 
facturers will respond with alacrity. Aside from the demonstrable 
efficiency of the gasoline engine in handling farm tasks one of the 
most effective arguments is that of economy. Clearly economy 
includes long life as well as such other factors as low repair lia- 
bility and low fuel consumption. An engine should last in efficient 
condition long enough for ordinary business depreciation ratios to 
wipe out its original cost before replacement becomes necessary. 
If facts prove that the ordinary engine lasts that long or longer 
then force is given to the economy argument. In the present 
state of dealer knowledge on this point the argument rests too 
much upon theory. 

Engines in abundance have been at work long enough on some 
farms to warrant conclusions of value in this connection. It is 
a timely move to collect such information as it is possible to se- 
cure, and where manufacturers have not hitherto taken any in- 
terest in the matter, it is to be hoped that Secretary Urate's re- 
quest will suffice to enlist their active participation in investiga- 
tion. 

Pig Iron Again Lower 



Further break in pig iron prices after predictions had been 
made thai bottom had been reached, is regarded as discouraging 
development. There are a large number of consumers who are 
now reluctanl to buy steel, believing they will be aide to satisfy 
their wants at lower price later on, bul all mills are in verj 
si nine position with well-filled order books and anj sharp break 
in price is not looked for. As one manufacturer put it, the small 
dealers might shade prices, but the Steel Corporation and other 

large independent plants have sufficient business on their 1 ks 

to maintain quotations al present level for indefinite period, steel 
mills are operating full. 



THE 



WHITE 

Mop 



Wringer 




BPXAUSE 





SELLS 



IT 



WRINGS EASILY 
QUICKLY 

NEATLY 

and 

Pleases Housekeepers 

and 

Janitors 



(I 



If Your Jobber Fails to Supply You 
Write to the Old Reliabl- 



WHITE 

Mop Wringer 
Company 



FULTONYILLE, N. Y 




20 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



COVERT 

"HOLDFAST" Hame Fastener 




"^^ /r : \ 

CLOSED Ari) 



THE PEER OF ALL HAME FASTENERS 

Will outwear a dozen Hame straps. Ii is made to (it the 

ive, and "ill not damage the roll of the collar. Is quickly 

adjusted, attached or detached. 

NO PINS TO LOOSE 

SNAP holds Fastener secure to Hame when not in Use. 

EVERY "HOLDFAST" IS GUARANTEED 

Your |obber Will Quote Prices 

COVERT MFG. CO. 

TROY, N. Y. 



For Retail Merchants 




"SALES PLANS" 

(282 Pages) 

A handsomely bound 
book containing: 

333 successful ways of 
getting business; 

1 minding a great vari- 
ety of practical plans 
that have been used by 
retail merchants to ad- 
vertise and sell goods. 

Price $2.50 



Will send "Sales Plans" to any address, charges pre 
paid, and the Pacific Hardware Journal for one year 
on receipt of $3 l 

Address PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 

112 MARKET STREET SAN FRANCISCO 



"PELOUZE" ELECTRIC IRON 



Has Heat Control at 
Finger Tip 

No need to reach up to the chan- 
-i- lier switch — nor disconnect the 
cord al iron. Hea i s quickly a bout 
half usual time. Has hoi poinf and 
edges consumes less current than 
any other iron. 4 or §y 2 lb. size $5. 
Send for catalog electric devices. 





You Can't Burn 
Your Hair 



with a Pelouze Electric 

Cmling Iron. Never gets 

too not. Handle revolves. 

Cord can't kink. Shield 

is removable. No flame, 

no danger from fire. Cost 

of current less than one-third cost of alcohol lamp. Iron 

always bright and clean, Complete with nickel plated stand, 

$3.50. Ask for booklet. 



PELOUZE "QUALITY" SCALES 

The new Pelouze Slanting Dial 
Family Scale is invaluable in the 
home Capacity 24 pounds by 
ounces — made of steel. Double 
upright supports insure accuracy 
— a great advantage. Remember 
the name "Pelouze" and look for 
the "double posts." 



<Z» 




A Pelouze 

Postal 

Scale 



is invaluable to the office and home. 
Gives amount of postage in cents and 
also the exact weight. Accuracy 
guaranteed. 14 styles. For sale by 
all the best dealers. Write for catalog. 

Pelouze Manufacturing Co. 

250 E. Ohio St., Chicago, 111. 




We want the name 
of every young man 
who is ambitious to ^§1 

BE A LAWYER 

and we want to hear from every business 
man who wishes that he knew BUSINESS LAW. 



Write today and let us tell you how we have made lawyers out of hun- 
dreds of young men just like you, and equipped business men with a 
Ii 11 , 1 1 training, that has been of immense benefit to them. This School, 
founded 23 years ago, has graduates who have passed bar examinations 
in every State. Courses endorsed by Bench, Bar and Business men. 
L,-ani about (it our Complete College Law Coune 
which tit* 1.1 practice, and (-> "ur Complete, Practi- 
cal Business Law Coura ' Bu Eneas Men. Fiud 
out iii". tit Hi- I-"' Coat and see how rually you can 
, obtain n thorough knowledge at the Law while 
Continuing your present "■■rk Easy Terms! 

Send today for handsome catalog and list of suc- 
cessful graduates all over the U. S. who grasped 
their opportunity by once answering an ad. like this! 
THE SPRAGUE CORRESPONDENCE 

SCHOOL OF LAW 
401 American Building, Detroit, Mich. 



STUDY 
LAW 



HOME 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



21 



i ■' ■ VISfMMUU-K „JI w 



The Nation-Wide Anti-Fly Crusade 
paves the way for you to sell 

FLY TRAPS 



Made of 

Extra 

Heavy 

Specially 

Woven 

Galvanized 

Wire 
Cloth 



M 



Display 
Talk Sell 



PACKED, 
NESTED, 
ONE- HALF 
DOZEN 
IN A BOX 




1 



Fly 

Traps 



Make the 

Height. 20 inches; diameter, at the "»OSt 01 1 HIS 
bottom. 1 1 ' j indies: diameter at top. 

9 inehes. Approximate weicht per Onn«rrilllifv 1 

dozen. 60 lbs. V|l|IUrillllUJ . 

Distributors 



Hexagon Netting 

Galvanized Before Woven 

THIS 

POULTRY NETTING 

is made of 

SELECTED STEEL WIRE 
OF STANDARD GAUGE 

And is heavily coated with refined 
spelter. Has three-strand twisted 
wires in selvage. 

Uniform in Mesh and Wire 



Accurate in Length and Width 



ROLLS OF 150 LINEAL FEET 



W. W. MONTAGUE & CO. 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Quality Stock for the Progressive 
Dealer 



Distributors 



UNION HARDWARE & METAL CO. 

Los Angeles, Cal. 



Manufactured by LUDLOW - SAYLOR WIRE COMPANY, ST. LOUIS 




How to Repair and Maintain the Roads 



The making of good roads is one of the most important duties 
of the American people and their prompl repair and careful main- 
tenance is essential. There is probably no subject in which the 
progressive fanner is more deeply interested than that of having 

roads meeting him with his markets over which he may lie able 

to haul the greatest possible load. Good roads, like all other 
good things, are too expensive to build and of too much value 
to lie neglected. 

The office of public roads of the Department of Agriculture 
has published a bulletin on "Repair and Maintenani f High- 
ways." This bulletin does not treat the subject of road building, 
but takes up the repair and care of roads alter they are built. 
\ll idasses of roads, from the natural earth road to II"' macadam 
loads with bituminous surfacing, have received attention. The 
action of automobiles on road surfaces is explained. The systems 
of mad management iu Massachusetts, New York, England and 
France are given, with tables of costs. 

The writer concludes that on account of the use of heavier 
vehicles and motor trucks the tendency of road building is toward 
a heavier and more substantial foundation and a consequent re- 
ducti f the cost of maintenance. 



the scarf, taking pains to procure a smooth surface. Apply rule 
ber cement and wait until it is almost dry. Then take patching 
rubber in the form of tape, and, commencing on the scarf near 
its lower end. wind the tape spirally across the bare netal to 
the corresponding point on the other side, keeping it under all 
the tension it will stand. Keep winding back and forth, rising 
higher and higher each time, until the tape is wound to a diameter 

slightly larger than ll riginal insulation. Then vulcanize the 

patch, or if this is not done, cover the patch with ordinary 
tion tape, and paint with a good insulating compound. 



How to Make a Rubber Patch 



The Simplex Manual (a new edition of which is about to be 

published by the Simplex "Wire & ('able Companj oi Boston) 
gives the following directions for making a rubber patch: 

First of all, scarf down the insulation on each side of the 
place to be patched, just, as you would sharpen a pencil. Then 
scrape the insulation thoroughly clean some distance back from 



Steel Industry Reported Booming 

A rding to leading steel urers in Pittsburgh the 

decline in unfilled orders for May, as shown by the steel Corpora 
tion, is regarded as a most favorable sign of improvement. They 
sa] thai there is sufficient unfilled tonnage to permit of full op- 
erations to the end of the current year without change in the buy- 
ing, but there is going to be a decided improvement in aew busi 
ness. It is stated that the production of -tool ingots and heavier 
forms of steel in finished shape during -out year, com- 

pared with the same period iu 1912, i- so nearly tin' same that a 
change of a week in increased supply would make the figures 
same. The leading interest reports practically no free tonnage 
in steid bars for sale this year. Plates and shapes cannot be had 
from the mills within five months ami then only in limit i-. i 
□age. Kails are above normal in output and orders for this 
season, with special reference to light sections are moving at a 
record-breaking pace. The Carnegii tmpany is out of the 

semifinished steel market for this year, having no steel to sell. 
There have been cancellations of orders reported and none look- 
ed for. 



22 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



i'^dk^iRiJ bmrad ! 



Established 1901 

SAN FRANCISCO— OAKLAND 

Devoted to the interests of the Hardware, Sporting Goods and House 

Furnishing Goods Trades of the Pacific Coast and the West 

An Independent Publication for the 

MANUFACTURER : WHOLESALER : : RETAILER 



Issued Monthly by 

GEO. L. EVERETT, Publisher 

279 Twelfth St., Oakland, Cal. 

Address all Communications to the 
BUSINESS OFFICE 

112 MARKET STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Subscription Rates: 
Domestic, $1.00 a year; Foreign, $1.50; Single Copies, 10c. 
Advertising Rates on Application. 
Please mention this journal when writing Advertisers 



Entered at the Post Office, Oakland, Cat., as second-class matter 



June, 1913 



NEW ADVERTISEMENTS 



New advertisements in this issue are as follows: 

E. C. Atkins & Co., page 10-44. 

Clayton & Lambert Mfg. Co., Detroit, Mich., Fire Pots, 
page 27. 

Cleveland Stone Co., Cleveland, Ohio, and San Francisco, 
Grindstones, page 17. 

Federation of Trade Press Associations of the United States, 
front cover. 

C. T. Ham Mfg. Co., Rochester, N. Y., "Nustyle" Safety 
Lanterns, page 15. 

Illinois Dnplement Co., Peoria, 111., "New Leader" Push 
Cart, page 16. 

Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co., St. Louis, Mo., Fly Traps and 
Poultry Netting, page 21. 

Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Gladstone, Mich., "Marbles" 
Auxiliary Cartridge and Nitro-Solvent Oil, page 29. 

Fred J. Meyers Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ohio, "Hunters" Sifters, 
page 16. 

Onward Mfg. Co., Menasha, Wis., "Onward" Sliding Fur- 
niture Shoes, page 16. 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., San Francisco, Gasoline En- 
gines, page 4. 

Peters Cartridge Co., Cincinnati and San Francisco, page 28. 

Phinney-Walker Keyless Clock Co., New York, N. Y., Keyless 
Auto Clocks, page 30. 

Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co., New York 
and San Francisco, back outside cover. 

J. W. Reynolds Decoy Factory, Chicago, Automatic Canvas 
Decoys, page 30. 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain, Conn., "Stanley" 
Breast Drills, page 1H. 

S. L. Starrett Co., Atliol, Mass., "Starrett" Tools, page 8. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., Chicopee Falls, Mass., "Stevens" 
No. 181) Hammerless Shotgun, page 33. 

V;m Doren Mfg, Co.. Chicago Heights, 111., "Vanadium" Steel 

Hammers, page 16. 

C. R. Zacharias, Ashbury Park. N. J., Lawn Mower Grinders, 
page 26. 



EDITORIAL 



Mercy! Mercy! Medical authorities say that fast auto- 
mobiling "induces conjunctivial inflammation from a hyperemia 
to a contagious lesion." Give us back the good old horse! 



The Senate's additions to the Underwood free list to an ag- 
gregate loss of $2,000,000 in the revenue of the country now makes 
a total loss to the annual revenue from the free list about $27,- 
000,000. Iron and steel raw materials, with an estimated dutiable 
value of over $600,000 a year have been added to the list. 



The contract for furnishing the structural steel for San Fran- 
cisco's new City Hall has gone to the United States Steel Prod- 
nets Company upon the lowest bid, which was $476,283. Other 
bids for the material were: Phoenix Iron Company, $545,000; 
Union Iron Works, $571,000; Pacific Polling Mills Company, 
$532, i, and Dyer Bros., $585,099. 



One of the best methods for bringing people into town to 
trade at your store during the dull season, when the farmers are 
busy with farm work, and especially in towns where there are 
moving picture theaters, is to arrange with the theater people to 
allow you a number of tickets to give to your customers. The 
theater managers will gladly redeem the tickets at a reduced rate, 
and it is surprising what a taking piece of advertising this is. 



Patented articles sold under price restrictions by manufac- 
turers may be resold by retailers at cut rates. The United 
States Supreme Court so decided on May 26th, in the case of 
a newly patented nerve tonic. Safety razors, talking machines 
and thousands of other patented articles are affected by the de- 
cision. The court's decision was 5 to 4, with Justices McKenna, 
Holmes, Lurton & Von Devauter dissenting. Justice Day an- 
nounced the majority decision, which held that, while the patent 
law gave the owner exclusive right to "vend" articles, that right 
was not the same as a right to "keep up the price." That, 
the court held, was not granted by the patent law. 



The use of aluminum wire as a conductor in long-distance 
[lower transmission schemes is not new, but recent departures 
from the ordinary practice bid fair to enlarge this application 
of the metal. It is reported that a steel reinforced aluminum 
cable, consisting in all of seven strands, has been placed upon 
the market. The six outer strands are made of aluminum and 
the inner strand is made of steel of very high tensile strength. 
It is asserted that this conductor both transmits the electric 

,, nt and has the requisite strength for use on the towers 

which are rapidly displacing poles in transmission lines. The 
Pacific Light & Power Co. of Los Angeles, Cal., has adopted 
this product for its new transmission line. 



There should lie no delay on the part Mf proposed exhibitors 
at the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in making applica- 
tion tin' spi The excuse that there is plenty of time is erroneous 

and unless immediate action is taken, many manufacturers will 
he unable to exhibit their products at this, the world's greatest 
shew. The exhibits at the Exposition will be of goods of the 
period only. This will be a world's fair ..t today— a twentieth 
century shew, h is to celebrate the beginning of a new era in 
the world's history, nut to commemorate seme pas! heroic deed 
of our forefathers. It is t.. shew to the world the achievements 
of today. The origin of goods dating prior to 1905 will not he 
allowed, unless it be for evolutionary purposes. The demand for 

space is greal and the matter should be given immediate atten 

tion. 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



23 



Re-Sale Price Agreements 

In commenting upon the r nl Supreme Court decision <>n re- 
sale prices several attorneys have expressed the opinion that the 
decision 'lees not apply to contracts between manufacturers and 
dealers, covering re-sale prices on patented articles. In the case 
decided the defendant <liil not purchase the goods direct from 
the manufacturer, but from a jobber, and he 'li<l not bind.himself 
by contract to maintain the price fixed by the manufacturer. Bach 
article bore a notice to retail dealers warning them that it was 

not to be sold for less than .+ 1 . but the dealer ignored this notice? 
.and cut the price. The curt held thai the notice was not bind- 
ing upon the dealer, and thai having purchased the article he 
could sell it at whatsoever price he chose. The inference drawn 
by the aforesaid attorneys is that a contract between a manufac 
turer and a dealer would be binding. The court, referring I" a 

previous decision, stated that resale prices cannot I stablished 

by agreement on articles not covered by patents, and added: 

"It was doubtless within the power of Congress to confer 
such right of restriction on a patentee. Has it done so? The 
question has not been determined in any previous case in this 
court as far as we are aware." 

This implies that the legal status of re-sale prices fixed by 
contract will have to be decided when that particular phase of 
the subject is brought to the attention of the court. 



Important Transfer of Business Interests 



The John Deere Plow Company of San Francisco has brought 
suit in the Federal Court against the Pacific Surety Company 
to recover $75,000 on the bond given by the company as surety 
for J. R. Bowles. The complaint sets forth that Bowles aban- 
doned a contract to build a four-story concrete building for 
the Deere Company and that the plow company was com- 
pelled to finish the building at an expense of $201,244. 



An important transfer of Hardware interests lias taken 
pi. at Modesto, Cal. W. B. Wood & Son have sold their bus- 
iness to Baer Bros. Thi- b > established 34 years 

under the firm name of W I <\ Turner. In 1SS9 the firm 

dissolved, Theodore Turner retiring and established the Turner 
Hardware & Implement ' ompanj and W. B. Wood, continuing 
under the firm name of \V. B. Wood & Son. About ten 
ago, Mr. W I died and since then the business has been con- 
ducted by the son. M. C. Wood. 



Large Corporations Consolidate 



The Ifolr Mfg. Company, Stockton. Cal., has taken over tie- 
Souser >V Haines Mfg. Company and the Aurora Engine Company. 

Both of th.se plaids have been affiliated with the Holt Company 
for. a number of years, but have been operated independently. It 
is stated that the Holt Caterpillar Company of Peoria, HI., the 
Best Mfg. Company of San Loandro, Cal., and the Holt Company 
of Canada. Limited, will be taken over in consolidation, with 
headquarters at Stockton. 



[f any of our readers have any idea that they would like 
to study law under competent guidance, and while following 
their regular pursuits, we would advise that they write for 
the catalog and full particulars of The Sprague Correspondence 
School of Law, No. 4nl American building, Detroit, Mich. This 
is an old-established school of an excellent reputation, and one 
that can refer to successful graduates in every State and locality 
in the United States. The expense is not large and can be met 
on the easy-payment plan. 



THE SUCCESSFUL MERCHANT 

INSISTS UPON 

QUICK ACTION AND ACCURACY 




THE OPEN BOOK TO SUCCESS 

Ladd's Discount Hook will give the correct answers to over 150,000 discount problems 
in five seconds. When you turn to the answer, it is absolutely correct 

PRICE, EXPRESS PREPAID IN THE UNITED STATES. $4.00 net 

PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 

EXCLUSIVE COAST DISTRIBUTOR 
112 Market Street - San Francisco, Cal. 



24 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



UP AND DOWN THE COAST 

(Items of Interest for the Busy Merchant) 



PERSONAL 



AMONG THE TRADE 



C. E. Kocher, Merced, Cal. visited San Francisco this month. 



The patent "ii ii Live-Bait Tie has been awarded to Jolin II. 
Nelson of Portland, Ore. 



Mi. Martin, manager of the J. R. Bradley Company, Reno, 
New, visited California trade centers this month. 



Many of the hardware drains throughout the ' loast are 
adding Automobile Supplies to their stocks. 



s. .1. Dean, San Francisco, lias moved his store to lower 
Market street and will carry a full line of Sporting G Is. 



(). V. Williams. San Francisco, lias moved his hardware store 
i" nru quarters on [rving street, Sunset district. 



C. L. Cragin, Secretary and Treasurer of Cragin & Company, 
Seattle, Wash., is visiting manufacturing centers of the East. 



The California Master Plumbers' Association beld its animal 
meet inn at Santa Barbara on June 3d and 4th. 



C. V. Harris, manager of the Courtland, Ariz., store of < 'has. 
M. Kenaud, is visiting California cities with Mrs. Harris and 
daughter. 

Eugene Fairbanks, Holland, Mich., has accepted a position 
with Browning Brothers Sporting Goods Co., Ogden, Utah, 
as gunsmith. 

Eugene 0. Blethen, for many years connected with Hol- 

l It, Merrill & Stetson, San Francisco, died at his home in 

Oakland May 29th. . 

F, II. Mason of the Holly-Mason Hardware Company, Spokane, 
Wash., died suddenly while playing golf on June 120th. Heart 
disease was given as the cause. 



The Lemoore Hardware Company, Lemoore, Cal., have moved 
ito new quarters in the Bank of Lemoore building. 



The Farmers' Mercantile Company, Haines, Ore., has com- 
pleted a wand se addition at the rear of its store. 



Beckman, Welch & Thompson, Lodi, Cal., suffered a burg- 
lary less the middle of April. The burglars were caught. 



M. Pearl has moved his hardware store to 14, (lenient 
street, San Francisco. The old location was I'llo I lenient street. 



\V. II. Stanley, Pacific (oast representative of the L. S. 
Starrett Co., Athol, Mass., will attend a general meeting of the 
Belling force of tl mpany at Athol in July. 



R. ('. Xissen has retired from the linn of Almind-Nissen 

I'aiiy, the hardware people of Berkeley, Cal. Mr. Xissen 

will engage in the Automobile business in the South. 



The Square Deal Hardware Company, Richmond, Cal., has made 
sonic interior improvements and will increase its sleek of house- 
hold e Is. . 

The Wrought Iron Range Co.. St. Louis, Mo., furnished the 
kitchen equipment of the new Argonaut Hotel that opened this 
month at Denver, Colo. 



F. n. Dayton, one of the California representatives of lie 
Shapleigh Hardware Company of St. Louis, was killed this 
month in an electric Irani accident near Valle.jo. Mr. Dayton 

was ai one li employed by the Pacific Hardware & Steel 

company, with headquarters at Portland. 



S. .1. Dean, who for many years has conducted a hardware 
store at the civic center of San Francisco, has moved to the 
lower Market street section. 



About twenty in, •ml, ers of the Southern California Retail 
Hardware & Implement Dealers Association met at a banquet 
at one of the hotels in Los Angeles on June 18th. 



Chas. W. Boynton ,,f the c. W. Boynton Hardware Company, 
Seattle, Wash., died on June Kith. Mr. Boynton was formerly 
in Imsiness in Portland, Ore., and Brooklyn, N. Y. lie was born 
in Ohio, He leaves a widow. Samantha Boynton, and daughters, 
Mrs. (i. II. Lewis, Frankfort, Mich,; Mis. Dr. Alice Griff, Port 
I;, lid, and a son. Ilallam Boynton of Portland. 



Klemmer Bros., Willows, Cal.. are enlarging their store, and 
when completed, will have one of the longest stores on I he 
Coast. The room will he 50x300 feet in floor space. 



Tli,' Canby Hardware & Implement Company, Canby, Ore., 
has moved into new ami larger quarters in the Odd Fellows 
building. George Meeks has retired from the linn. 



II. L. Foresinan, the hardware merchant of San Dimas, Cal., 

has received letters of patent on : w Solar Water Ileal,! 

The new healer has an oiitiieh new form of radiation and will 
heat a iii iii- 1 1 greater amount of water with less olnss space than 
mix heatei on the market, it is claimed. It will also allow the 
<toring of sufficient watei in the boiler to last over two days of 

,1 l\ weather. Mr. Foresinan hap received several flattering 

offers for his new patent. 



The inlton Hardware Company, Colton, Cal., has been award 
,,,! |he contract of furnishing Keen Kutter Tools I,, the value 
of $248.33 for the manual training department of the Grant 
School of that city. 



A i i who is always so busy that he scarcely has time to 

cat lunch will stand and watch a pile-driver at work for fifteen 
ei nutes. 



The Valley Hardware & Plumbing Company, Phoenix, Ariz., 
successor to the Long Hardware Company and the Sanitary 

PI bing Company, has moved into the building, which, until 

recently, was occupied by the Postoffice. The new quarters has 

1 n refurnished and is now one of the handsomest stores in 

the Southwest. 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



25 



BUSINESS CHANGES 



S. II. St t & Sons have purchased the Implement business of 

Bice Bros, .'it Woodburn, < )re. 



The Upland Eardware Company, Uplands, Cal., has been 
sold to Ware & Sons, formerly of Medford, Ore. 



cliff Lowe lias sold his interest in the Colusa Hardware Com- 
pany, Colusa, i'al., tu bis partners, J. I'. Campbell and .1. B. Power. 



J. H. Wellington, St. Helens, Ore., has disposed of his gen- 
oral merchandise business, with the exception of Hardware, 
which he will continue. 



B. M. Beebee has bought out the hardware business of IT. 0. 
Dutcher, at Lakeport, Cal. Mr. Beebee will move his uewlj 
acquired business into larger quarters and increase the stock. 



J. C. Lawrence of Spokane, Wash., has bought the business 
of the Plough Hardware Company at Wilbur, Wash. It is 
stated that $20,000 was the consideration. The name will be 
changed to the Lawrence Hardware Company. Mr. Lawrence 
was the Progressive candidate for Governor at the primaries 
last fall and was defeated in the nomination. 



Fred L. Nay. Vacaville, Cal., has purchased the business of 
Schroeder & Frahni and will conduct it under the linn name of 
the Nay Hardware Company. Mr. Schroeder will remain in Vaca- 
ville until he disposes of other property thai he owns, after 
which he expects to move to some other section of the State. Mr. 
1'iahin expects to move to Fresno and go into business in thai 

city. 

New Enterprises and Incorporations 



P. B. Bartlett, Hollywood, Cal., has added Hardware to his 
general stork. 

Otto Muller has established a hardware store at 604 Mar 
donahl avenue, Bichmond, Cal. 



The Studebaker Brothers Company of California has incor 
porated. Principal place of business is San Francisco. Capital 
all subscribed. $100,000. 



The Pacific Hardware Company. Tacoma, Wash., has in- 
corporated with the following officers: Geo. Hood, president: 
F. A. Huffer, vice-president; P. A. Haines, secretary-treasurer. 



The Chappell Beutter Company, Gustine, Cal., has incorporat- 
ed — capital, $25,000; incorporators, William L. chappell, Charles 

F. Beutter, A. I). Davenport, William I'lit er and Frank P. Kel 
logg. 



George C. Comstock Company, Williams, Cal., has incorpo- 
rated. Capital $50,000. The incorporators are George C. C 

stock, Emily J. Comstock, Geo. II. Simmons, Gus. K. Franke 
and Emily A. Brim. 



The Globe Hardware Company of Globe, Ariz., will open a 

branch store at Miami, Ariz., on .Inly 1st. This is a g I 

move, as Miami has been in a I of a g 1 hardware store 

owing to the number of active mines in the vicinity. 



MAN MADE 

A FORTUNE IN 

ROOFING— 



Once lie was "just selling 
roofing" — now he's selling 
over 100 car loads a year — 
write for the plan and story 



The Paraffine Paint Co. 

Makers of Roofings That Make Good 

34 First Street San Francisco 







jl 



This is the first book ever written devoted exclusively 
to HARDWARE DISPLAY. There are 256 pages 
and over 200 illustrations, with full working descrip- 
tions. Every display is the work of an expert in 
his line. 

"Hardware Window Dressing" is a copyrighted book, 
8x11 inches in size, printed on specially made, high- 
grade white paper and substantially bound in at- 
tractive cloth cover. 

The price of this book is $'2.50. We will send it pre- 
paid with the PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL for 
one year for $3.00. 

PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



1 12 MARKET STREET 



SAN FRANCISCO 



26 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



The in D'Alene Iron Works, Wallace, Idaho, has estab- 
lished a store department and will handle a full line of Mine and 
Mill supplie together with Machinists Tools, etc. 



Hogg Brothers of Oregon City, Ore., have established a new 
Hardware and furniture store in that progressive city. The 
new store is located just below the Postoffiee. 



Fred M. Roth has severed his connection with the < ' : 1 1 1 1 ■ n- 
Hardware & Implement Company at Canby, Ore., and will es- 
tablish a store in some Southern Oregon town. 



Selling on Approval 

Hue of t he costly mistakes made by many inexperienced 
dealers during their first year in business is to convey to 
prospective buyers the impression that machines are sold on 
approval, and after trial may be returned if not satisfactory. 
I'.\ the time several machines have been condemned unjustly 
and returned in a condition that makes them unsalable except 
at, a sacrifice of a large part of the cost, the dealers begin to 
realize that selling on approval is a thing for them to avoid. 
unless the conditions are such that no other plan promises 
Buccess and the manufacturer is willing to accept and credit all 
mac hin'es that are returned. 

Occasionally one hears of a dealer laying the foundation 
of a big trade by permitting a number of trustworthy farmers 
to use certain machines with the understanding that they will 
keep and pay for them if satisfactory results are obtained from 
their work. Sometimes farmers are persuaded against their 
will to try cent certain machines. They have not the remotest 
idea of keeping the implements under any conditions, yet once 
they have seen what the machines will do, decide to retain 
them. 

These are exceptional cases and are not to be accepted as 
proof that selling on approval is a safe plan. As a general 
proposition it merely invites trouble and loss. Your unprin- 
cipled competitor, if you have one of that stripe, approves 
of your selling on trial, because he knows that it is within 
his power to sow the seeds of dissatisfaction in the mind of 
your customer. He often does this and causes you trouble 
even when the customer has bought the machine uncondi- 
tionally. Selling on approval is equivalent to asking him to 
annoy you. 

Selling on approval meets with the warm approval q/ the 
crook who makes a practice of using machines until the sea- 
son's work is done, then returning them and asserting that 

they lefective or incapable of doing what is required of 

them. This fellow also makes trouble enough when sales are 
cm. lit iorial; selling on approval gives him free reign. 

Selling on approval is the same as guaranteeing satisfaction. 
This is a safe plan with some buyers; with others it is unsafe. 
Probably most machines sold on approval "stick," but when 
one is condemned without good reason and thrown back on 
the dealer's hands the loss wipes out the profit on half a dozen 
vales, farm Implement News. 



Trade in Push Carts 



The Illinois Implement Company, Peoria, III. is calling the 
trade's attention in the "New Leader" Push ('art. There is pos- 
sibility of a large sale of Push Carts in everj comn it.y. Mcr 

chantf in all line Rnd them money savers in delivering ami 
collecting light g Is. Printers and newspaper offices find them 

ab lute necessity. The Push Carl is a very handy tool 
around the farm and house and is rapidly displacing the wheel 
barrow with the womenfolks and gardt 



Lawn Mower Grinding 

My Money Making Lawn 
Mower Grinder has merit. 
Sold under positive guar- 
antee. Send for calalog 
of this Power Driven Grinder. Easy Payments. 

C. R. ZACHARIAS 

ASHBURY PARK - - - NEW JERSEY 




Substituting the Old-Time Caster 



The Onward Mfg. Company, Menasha, Wis., calls attention to 
the ''Onward" Sliding Furniture Shoe. This is an invention 
that is revolutionizing things in the way of an article to take 
the place of an old-time caster. Casters have been a necessity, 
but they have much damage to answer for. The "Onward" 
Sliding Furniture Shoe has come to the rescue of all furniture 
users. They do' all that a caster will do, and do it better with- 
out their defects. They are neat in appearance and cheap in 
price. Attachable to any furniture. No sockets required and 
perfectly noiseless. They will not injure the floor, carpet, 
linoleum or rug, nor wrinkle the rug on a polished floor. The 
"Onward" Sliding Furniture Shoe is made with flat glass or 
metal base and universal joints, capable of adjusting itself to 
all uneven surfaces. They are made in all styles and sizes, suit- 
able for all weights of wood furniture and metal beds. Write 
to the company for descriptive matter, showing the different 
styles, sizes, lists, etc. 



Under a new tariff rate to go into effect July 11th, Carlin, 
Nov., will secure a reduction on freight from Salt Lake City and 
Ogden. This will bring the freight much lower than the present 
freight rate between Carlin and Sacramento and will result in 
much of the business going to the Utah cities. 



The man who sits down and waits for luck to make him 
successful will never be the proprietor of a big store. 



POSITION WANTED 
A man thirty-four years of age, with ten years' ex- 
perience in all branches of hardware desires a position of 
manager or outside representative. Address "S. M." care 
Pacific Hardware Journal, 112 Market street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 



POSITION WANTED 

A young man with several years' experience in whole- 
sale and retail hardware of the general line, desires a po- 
sition. Has had road experience and can furnish best of 
references. Address, "Howard," care Pacific Hardware 
Journal, 11" Market street. San Francisco. 



FOR SALE 

An old established Hardware Store in San Francisco 
on one 1 of the leading thoroughfares; one of the best loca- 
tions in the city. Address "A. I'..," care Pacific Hardware 
Journal, 11" Market St., San Francis,.., I il 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



27 




No. 1 FIRE POT 
Price each $6.00 Net 



A HOT ARGUMENT 

Is presented by every Clayton & Lambert Fire Pot and Torch in their per- 
fect operation, durable construction and the intense heat produced. The im- 
proved burners generate hot blue flames, the tanks are made of heavy gauge 
seamless drawn brass and strongly reinforced. The patented automatic brass 
pump maintains constant air pressure. Their economy in the use of fuel will 
soon save the user their cost. Your nearest jobber can supply at factory 
price, or we will ship direct when cash accompanies the order. Send for 
Booklet — it's free. 

Clayton & Lambert Manufacturing Co. 

DETROIT, MICHIGAN, U. S. A.' 



THE GENUINE 




»» 



PHILADELPHIA 

LAWN MOWERS 

Are the STANDARD of the World 

The new All Steel Mower called "Graham," put on the market this season, is the 
finest product of mechanical skill, and created quite a sensation at all the 
exhibitions wherever shown. 
We make in addition 18 styles of High Grade Hand and 5 styles of Horse Mowi rs 
For 42 years manufacturers of Highest Grade Lawn Mowers. 

Send to Our Agents for Catalog and Best Prices 

The Philadelphia Lawn Mower Co. 
WESTERN SALES AGENCY, Inc., 21st and Indiana Sts., San Francisco 



FOR SALE 

A well established Hardware and Implement business 
in a thriving city located in the heart of the largest and 
richest agricultural section of Idaho. The stock is not 
largo and can be bought right. Reason for wanting to sell 
is sickness. This is an excellent opportunity for a busi- 
ness investment. Address the Editor of the Pacific Hard- 
ware Journal, 112 Market street, San Francisco. 



WANTED 

High-Grade Salesmen to ban, He our line of popular priced, 
mounted Casserole Cooking and Serving Dishes, Pin 
Cookers, Vacuum Cleaners, and other high-grade specialties 
which we manufacture. All up-to-date patterns. \\ 
TIONAL CLOCK & MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 20 
West Lake Street, I liicago, HI. 



u 



STANDARD" 



DOUBLE ACTING 
SPRING FLOOR 



HINGES 




It Is a door check and hinge 
combined. 

It automatically closes the door, 
without a slam. 

It prevents children from being 
knocked down. 

It prevents Injury to hands If 
ght when door is closing. 

It stops door exactly at center. 

it holds door open automatic- 
ally when desired. 

It renders the action of door 
absolutely noiseless. 

It will outwear three of the 
.spring hinges now in com- 
mon use. 








UNCONTROLLED KIND 

We also make pivot check to be 
used in connection with any make of 
double-acting spring floor hinges. 



CHECKING HINGE 



THE STANDARD MANUFACTURING CO., Shelby, Ohio 



28 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 




Pacific Coast 
Sporting GoodsNews 

ARMS, AMMUNITION. STREAM AND FIELD GOODS 




El \\Vi - 



The Bicycle and Motorcycle Industry 

The Government report on the Bicycle and Motorcycle industry 
shows that the number of bicycles made decreased from 1,182,691, 
valued at $23,656,487, in 1899 to 250,487, with a value of $3,- 
740,923, in 1904, and 233,707, valued at $3,228,189, in 1909, while 
the output of motorcycles increased from 160, valued at $33,674, 
in 1899, to 2328, valued at $359,180, in 1904, and 18,628, with a 
value of $3,015,988 in 1909. 

The evolution of the bicycle from primitive and unserviceable 
types to a useful and attractive means of travel may be said to 
have taken place between 1868 and 1890, and its perfection and 
standardization into practically one form of structure, the modern 
"safety," between 1890 and 1895. During this latter period the 
popularity of the bicycle became so widespread that the industry 
grew very rapidly, but after about 1897 it began to decline. 

In lfvSS) there were twenty-seven establishments engaged in 
the industry, which gave employment to an average of 1797 wane 
earners and reported products valued at $2,568,326. At the 
census of 1899, after the industry had begun to decline, the av- 
erage number of wage earners was nearly ten times and the value 
of products more than twelve times as great as in 1889. 

During the live-year period ending with L904 the industry de- 



clined very rapidly. The number of establishments decreased from 
312 to L01, or ii7.ii per cent; the average number of wage earners 
from 17,7)25 to 3319, or 81.1 pei cent; the value of products from 
$31,915,908 to $5,153,240, or 83.9 per cent; and the value a. hie, I 
by manufacture (value of products less cost of materials) from 
$15,123,857 to $2,525,094, or 83.3 per cent. 

A considerable recovery of the industry as a whole is indicated 
by the statistics for 1909. While the number of establishments 
in that year shows a decrease from the number in 1904. the av- 
erage i iber of wage earners increased Ills, or :i:i.7 per cent, 

ami the value of products $5,545,327, or 107.6 per cent. The 
most important factor in the renewal of activity in the industry 
lias been the growing demand for motorcycles. 

The average number of persons engaged in the bicycle and 
motorcycle industry during 1909 was 5017, of whom -H.'!7, or 88.4 
per cent were wage earners. Of the total number of persons cn- 
^age.l in the industry only 3..". per cent were females. Of the 
establishments reported in 1909 about half were operated by indi- 
viduals. The value of the products of such establishments, how- 
ever, represented only 5 per cent of the total value reported. 
Nearly all of the business is done by establishments under cor- 
porate ownership. 

There was a considerable increase in the relative importance 



Itefa® Factory Loads 



Continue Their Winning Pace at Recent Tournaments 



HIGH AMATEUR (tie), Wallow;!, Ore., May 18th, 141 ex 150 

HIGH EXPERT, Wenatchee, Wash., May 20-21 289 ex 300 

SECOND EXPERT, Wenatchee, Wash., May 20-21 284 ex 300 

HIGH AMATEUR, Ogden, Utah, May 28-29 441 ex 480 

THIRD EXPERT, Ogden, Utah, May 28-29 415 ex 480 

HIGH GENERAL, Eugene, Ore., June 2-5 431 ex 450 

SECOND AMATEUR, Eugene, Ore., June 2-5 420 ex 450 

HIGH GENERAL, Spokane, Wash., June 10-12 437 ex 450 

SECOND EXPERT, Spokane, Wash., June 10-12 419 ex 450 

HIGH GENERAL, Boise, Idaho, June 16-18 .. . 433 ex 450 

LONGEST RUN, Boise, Idaho, June 16-18 .. 136 STRAIGHT 

"STEEL WHERE STEEL BELONGS." 



THE PETERS CARTRIDGE COMPANY 

Pacific Coast Branch 583-587 Howard St. San Francisco Cal. 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



29 



of establishments having products valued al $100^000 and over; 
this class of establishments reported 90.6 per cent of the total 
value uf products in 1909. 

As already stated, the industry was declining al the census 

of 1899, yet more than 1 .iioii.niii) bicycles were made in thai year. 
The output in L904 was barely one-fifth as great and there had 

been a further decline liy limit. No tandem bicycles or tricycles 
for adults were manufactured in 1909, although their manaufac- 
ture had been reported at two preceding census. On the other 
hand, the development of the motorcycle branch of the industry 
has practically all taken place within the decade L899 1909, and 
inure particularly in the second half of the decade. 



Keyless Automobile Clocks 

The Phiuney-Walker Keyless Clock Company, 79 East One 
Hundred and Thirtieth street, New York, N. Y., call the trade's 
attention to the line of Keyless Clocks that are popular with 
automobile owners and a very profitable addition to liues of 
Automobile Supplies. These clocks are handsome in appear- 
ance and made to withstand the hard usage and vibration of 
automobile travel. They are dust and moisture-proof by reason 
of a double ease, the movement being enclosed in an inner 




Keyless Rim-Wind Auto Clock 

case. The clocks are fastened to the dash from the inside of 
the case and locked. 

These clocks are what is termed ''rim-winding" — the nec- 
essity of a key is entirely done away with. To wind the clock, 
simply turn the bezel once a week to the right and to set the 
hands, remove the bezel by turning to the left. There are 
no better time-keepers than the Phinney-Walker clocks and 
these, combining the novelty, simplicity and practicability of 
the rim-winding device, together with the dust and moisture- 
proof case, a perfect Automobile Cluck is offered to the trade. 
For further particulars write to the company and ask for a 
copy of their new catalog. 



TRADE NOTES 



Remington Arms-UMC 

The shooters using Remington-UMC guns and ammunition 
showed their class at the Fresno shoot on May 17th and 18th. 

All the high honors and first, second and third amateur 
averages were won by the following shooters. 

O. N. Ford of San Jose finished first, shooting Arrow "Speed" 
shells — 94 per cent. 

E. Hollo of San Francisco finished second, shooting a Rem- 
ington-UMC gun and Arrow "Speed" shells — 92. ti per rent. 

R. H. Bungay of Venice, Cal., finished third, shooting a 
li'einington-XJMC gun and Arrow "Speed" shells — 92 per cent. 

The 100-bird handicap brought laurels to three other shoot- 




.22 H. P. SAVAGE MODEL 



AUXILIARY CARTRIDGE 

Like all other Marble Goods, this Auxiliary Cartridge Is 
being advertised and sold all over the world. Enables the 
sportsman to Indulge in target practlci Without using hi 
ammunition provides tin- hunter with an emergency shot 
for small game when oul with a big game rifle. 

Made tor .22 H. P., 25-35, 30-30, 10 Ri m 10 10 K h 
Gov't New Springfield, 303 Sav. and .32 w. 

Loaded in magazine or breech. HuM 
tridge in its front end. Firing pin of gun 
strikes firing pin In auxiliary explodli 
ridge I'.uMet starts with a twist and can't 
strip nor become deformed. Approved bv 
Illinois National Guard. 




MARBLES 

utomolvHT 

Oil 




Marbles 

NITRO-SOLVENT OIL 

Best in the world for guns and ritles. 
Dissolves the residue of all black and smoke- 
less powders, including cordite. Contains 
no acid. Won't gum. 

Put up in two-ounce bottles to retail at 
2:> cents, and screw top six-ounce cans at 
50 cents. Packed in nice carton, twelve in 
light safety shipping carton. 

Send for free sample and catalog of Mar- 
ble's sixty Outing Specialties and GAME GETTEK GUN. 

MARBLE ARMS & MFG. CO. 

557 Delta Ave., Gladstone, Mich. 



ers, who finished first, second and third, and each one of I 
shot a Remington-UMC gun and the famous Arrow shells. 

D. C. Davison of Modesto finished first, from 18 yards. 
shooting a Remington-UMC pump gun and Arrow shells — 
96x100. 

A. P. Haliburton of Lindsay, second, from 17 yards, shoot- 
ing a Remington-UMC pump gun and Arrow shells — 93x100. 

Geo. B. Smith of Los Banos, third, from 16 yards, shooting 
a Remington-UMC auto-loader and Arrow shells — 92x100. 

In the rank of winners. Pick Reed, with his Remington- 
I M> pump and Arrow' "Speed" shells came through with the 
high general average — 96 per rent. 

Almost 40 per cent of the shooters attending this tourna- 
ment pinned their faith to Remington-TTMC guns and ammuni- 
tion. 

There is merit to popularity when quality makes it so. 



The South Bend Bait Company, South Bend, Ind.. has issued 
a new catalog — No. 2d — illustrating and describing its high- 
grade Fishing Tackle. This is one of the handsomest catalogs 
that has been added to our library and one that should be in 
the hands of every dealer handling this line of goods. The 
company will gladly send one of the catalogs to any di 
upon request. 

William R. Johnson, Seattle, Wash., lias been awarded a 
patent on a collapsible and folding Decoy. 



The Billings Hardware Company, Billings, Mont., has increas- 
ed its capital tu $100,000 and will erect an addition of I 
Btories, 25x75. 



30 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 




A W/SE DUCK 



OR THE WILDEST GOOSE 

is easily lured within 
Gun Range by use of 
our make of 



AUTOMATIC CANVAS DECOYS 

None Better, Write for Prices of Decoys and Duck Calls 



J. W. REYNOLDS DECOY FACTORY 

117 N. MAY STREET CHICAGO, U. S. A 



An Expert Rifleman 



The accompanying illustration shows Chris Jansen with his 
Stevens l.lca I 'target Model and Stevens Telescope. Mr. Jansen 
was one of the promoters of the recent extensive Davenport, 
Iowa, Rifle Tournament. It is a curious fact, that this experl 
rifleman won his own donation, a handsome gold medal, with 




Chris Jansen 

his Stevens Rifle and Telescope. Hi' scored 7 1 mil of a possible 
7"i mi a :: , inch -'> ring German target 200 yards distance. 

This is. hi' course, phenomena] si ting, Mr. Jansen lias been 

shooting Hie Stevens for many years and lias invariably pro 
ilini'il very high scores. 



E. I''.. Otey, Juncti lity, ore, and Albert L. shears, Se- 
attle, Wash., have each been awarded patents mi Oar-Locks. 




tfEVEIK 

°ARMS° 

GIVE UNIVERSAL 
SATISFACTION 




MODEL M 



Keyless Auto Clocks 



Wound by simply turning the 
Rim once a week. The hand- 
somest, most reliable and best 
selling Auto Clocks on the mar- 
ket. The kind the trade demands. 



PHINNEY- WALKER KEYLESS CLOCK CO. 

76 East 130 Street, New York, N. Y. 




In the recently begun Short Range Rifle League Competition, 
the high score to date — team totals— is held by the Champion 
Park Rifle Club, Bridgeport, Conn., with a score of 2324. This 
well-known rifle club uses Stevens Rifles exclusively. 

The West Virginia University Rifle Team of Morgantown. 
West Virginia, recently won the Intercollegiate Rifle Shooting 
i hampionship of the United States with Stevens No. 414 Semi- 
Military Rifles. 

At the tournament of the National Miniature Rifle Asso- 
ciation, Adelaide, South Australia, Stevens rifles won all the 
leading prizes. There were over 2iii) entries for each of the 
first three events and 33 per cent of the rifles used in this 
important Australian tournament were Stevens ideal models. 

Stevens rifles won all leading prizes at the recent Welsh 
tournament. 

At the Georgia State Tournament, Americus,. Ga., .1. K. 
Warren won the championship of Georgia at doubles, with n 
Stevens repeating shotgun. 

In the Preliminary Southern Handicap, Montgomery, Ala., 
J. K. Warren was first and E. E. Little second. Both shut 
Stevens repeating shotguns. 

High ever all at Stratford, Ont., Registered Tournament, F. 
M. Pay, with the score of 144x151). 



WINCHESTER ^/JVN/NGJ 

Every tournament and almost every trap-shooting event adds 
another Bed W victory to the long list. 

Al Spokane, Wash., .lime loth. 11th and 12th, where the 
Northwest Sportsmen's Tournamenl was held, practically every 
trophy was won by shooters using either Winchester Guns or 
Ammunition, or both, and the blue ribbon win, the amateur high 
average, was captured by S. A. Huntley of Vancouver, Wash., 
with the remarkable score of 134x450. Mr. Huntley used Win- 
chester Leader factory loaded shells, "the kind the champions 

use." 

At Wenatcl Wash., ihii 20th and 21st. ai the Washington 

Slate si t, I). W. Fleet of Montesano, Wash., won the I'. I. 

medal, emblematic of tin- championship of the stale of Washing- 
Ion, with a score of 25 straight, using a Winchester Repeating 

Shotgun and Leader shells. At this same shoot I-:. .1. Chin 

gren of Spokane, Wash., tied for bigh amateur average, scoring 
291x300. Mr. Chingren used Winchester Leader shells. 

\i Portland, Ore., May 12th and 13th, .1. L. I>. Morrison won 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



31 




No. 2380 
ADJ. JUVENILE CAST IRON WHEELS 




No. 2282 
ADJ. JUVENILE CAST IRON WHEELS 




No. 3282 

ADJ. JUVENILE PLAIN STEEL 

WHEELS 




TACKLE 
BLOCKS 

Wood and Steel 



_J4*_ 



,«A.-. 



JL. 



STEEL FISH RODS 



TOWERS 




POLICE GOODS 




No. 15 
RINK BALL BEARING 



UNION 

HARDWARE CO. 



Notwithstanding the fact 

that the Union Hardware 
Co. are the largest Roller 
and Ice Skate manufac- 
turers in the world, they 
are leaders in the manu- 
facture of several other 
lines, as well. This rep- 
resents just a few items 
showing the variety. 

Write for Details 
Catalog and Prices 

Electrotypes for advertising 

furnished to customers 

without charge 



UNION HARDWARE CO. 

TORRINGTON, CONN. 
New York 99 Chambers St. 




DOG COLLARS 



CHAMPION 



SCREW DRIVERS 




HACK SAW 




No. 12 
ADJUSTABLE PLAIN BEARING 




He 





No. 5 
ADJUSTABLE BALL BEARING 



■P 



<? 






No. 6 
ADJUSTABLE BALL BEARING 




NAIL 
PULLERS 








WHISTLES 




GUN IMPLEMENTS 



32 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



high amateur average with a Winchestei Repeating Shotgun, scor 
ing 383x400. 

At Wallowa, Ore., May 18th, P. Lewis won bigh amateur av- 
erage with Winchester factory loaded shells, scoring 141x150. 

At Victoria, B. ('.. Canada, May 25th, J. P. Sylvester won the 
■'Crowe Trophy" with Winchester loaded shells and a Winchester 
Shotgun, scoring 47x50. P. J. Holohan, with Winchester loaded 
shells, landed professional high average 



Automatic Canvas Decoy Ducks 

.T. W. Reynolds, 117 North May street, Chicago, 111., manu- 
facturer of Duck ami Goose Decoys and Due]; (alls, under 
the name of the J. W. Reynolds Decoy Factory, calls the trade's 
attention to this line of Sporting Goods which includes the 
"Automatic Canvas Decoy Ducks." 

This decoy was invented by duck hunters of many years' 




New Home of the Peters Cartridge Company, San Francisco. 



At. Stockton, Cal., June 8th, Prank Newberl of Sacramento 
won high average, beating nut a field of fifty four contestants 

anil shunting under hard weather <■ litions, with a score of 

91x100, including a long run of '>'■'■ straight. Mr. Newbert always 
uses a Winchester Repeating Sin it l: 1 1 n and Leader slnlls. 

The San Diego amateur high average was won by E. .1. Chin- 
gren, using Leader shells. 

Tin' California Nevada Trap-Si ters' Association Tournamenl 

is scheduled for July 1th, 5th ami 6th a\ Reno, Nev. following 
this big shunt, the crowning evenl of the season, the Pacific Coast 
Handicap, is bulletined for Sacramento in September. The win 
ners of these big tournaments will doubtless us.' Winchester goods, 
aol I"' a 



experience hunting wild fowl, and placed on the market after 

testing the same thoroughly. All important features to make 
a good article have been studied out and combined in a decoj 
th.it has many points of merit. The precaution was to insure 
a natural appearing decoy that would give long satisfying ser- 
vice that would he simplicity throughout — that could lie raj>- 
1 1 1 1 \ handled and guaranteed to he exactly as represented. 
These decoys have an unequaled reputation lor luring the 

duck species, which has been proved by the practical test of 
constant service while used by men who Knew. 

The springs which open up the automatic decoys are of the 
best material ami will expand the decoys if they have been 
collapsed for years. The ca,nvas covering is of the best grade 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



33 



AT ANYWHERE NEAR THE PRICE 

There is Absolutely no Single Barrel Hammerless Gun on 

the Market in a Class with the 



STEVENS 

No. 180 

LIST PRICE $10.00 

Prove our claims by strongly stocking 
STEVENS. 

A gun that weighs 6 1-2 pounds. Made in 
12, 16 or 20 gauge. For any standard factory 
loaded shell. 

Furnished with 26, 28, 30 or 32 inch barrels. 

Compressed Forged ' 'Electro' ' steel barrel 
— bored for nitro powder. 

Automatic ejector — automatic safety. 

Drop-forged, case-hardened frame — finely 
checkered English walnut stock. 

A Gun that sells EASILY. 

(Price and Quality the reason.) 

A Gun that's widely POPULAR. 

(There are thousands of enthusiastic users.) 

A Gun that bears you a fine margin of 
PROFIT. 

$ELL $TEVEN$ 
CASH IN ON THK QUICK "TURNOVER" 

Effective Advertising Matter yours on re- 
quest. 




J. Stevens Arms and Tool Company 

620 MAIN STREET 

CHICOPEE FALLS, MASS. 

Largest Makers of Sporting Firearms in the World 



ru 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



and colored to closely imitate the Mallard specie. Look a( the 
points of merit: The decoys open up automatically, pack in 
a small space, are light in weight, can be collapsed quickly, will 
instantly come right side up, uo matter how carelessly tossed 

out, ve about in the slightest breeze, and closely resemble 

the living bird. The buoyancy is not affected by stray shots. 



A Composite Target 



The accompanying cut illustrates a composite target of fifty 
shots fired by Alfred G. Schmidt, District of Columbia Rifle 
Association, in the International Small Bore Match with Eng- 
land. The score was 499 out of a possible 500 and is a record. 

The District <>f Columbia Rifle Association got nine men on 




the Small Bore team. These nine men have all shot their 
scores and the average for .-ill is 49.". — the high score being 199 
and the low seore 188. All the shooting was done with Stevens 
No. 114 Semi-Military Rifle. 



The Rifle Club of Everytown 



Here are some farts about a group of young men in Every- 
town, which is a little New England factory place, but might 
be anywhere in the United States. Tins town is doubtless much 
like your own, and so you have the same sort of materia] right 
at homo. 

There must lie about two dozen of these young fellows ami 
they all have jobs down at the Everytown tool works. Ages 
eighteen to t wenty -t hree, or maybe twenty-four. Too old to 
run with a gang. Not quite old enough to lie married and set- 
tled. A little too serious to go around with the girls. 

Serious'? Why. yes. These young fellows are busy nine 
hours a day, six days a week, with considerable overtime work 
in winter. If you saw them at hard, dntv jobs of grinding 
and machining and assembling parts, you might think the 
work called for little skill or intelligence. But il is exacting 
and prettj well paid, nevertheless, for those greasy, dusty parts 
are worked down and calibrated to the thousandth of an inch. 
All this "efficiency" business started at that kind of work, 
you know. These young fellows are the pick of the tool works. 

follow the techniqi f their trade and want to qualify for 

supervision and ownership. Yes, the\ are serious, and it affects 
their amusements. 

Not a great deal of good ■linns,' ni in that section of 

Everytown. Saloons, pay dances, i I, billiards, cards, theaters 

and moving pictures. About Hie only organized sports are 
liasolia II and l)OV\ li ng. 

Most of the people down then- -and especially the other 
voting people find the saloons, theaters and dances sufficient for 
then need-. 

But these lads are thinkers. In their way they have sized 
up the staple amusements of the town and decided thai there 

isn't goo, I value for time and i \ i drinking, dancing oi 

-hows. So they have looked around foi something more to 



their own taste, and the result is the Rifle Club of Everytown. 
Space required for the club's indoor range is not great. Ten 
feet wide mi, I ninety feet long is enough. Cost is not high — 
$150 will put in a fine ranee 

But the strongest point of all is that rifle shooting under 
tin' direction of a competent instructor, and linked with com- 
petitive advantages, is an irresistible attraction for all sorts 
Of boys and youths and men up to middle age. Rifle shooting 
appeals to these young fellows. It calls for judgment and 
steady nerves. A rifle is tin instrument of precision, and even 
a small calibre bullet, tired on a miniature range, offers prob- 
lems in ballistics. 

When a young man begins shooting he stops drinking and 
the use of tobacco, usually, because he wants his eyesight and 
nerves and muscles iii the best possible shape. He learns to be 
very careful with a. gun, loaded or unloaded. lie follows rifle 
matches with keen interest. His patriotism is aroused when 
the American team wins ever all countries, as it did last 
year at the Olympic games in Sweden, or goes across the border 
and carries oil' the Canadian trophy, or Outshoots everybody 
else at the Pan-American match in Argentine. 

Do you know there, is today a healthy, growing National in- 
terest in rifle shooting.' Four thousand lads in the New York 
high schools are now shooting under an enthusiastic instructor. 

The interest is really international. Oreat Britain has 
more than four thousand rifle clubs, with maybe half a million 
members. 

What was that statement about rifle shooting as a factor in 
character building? Looks like an odd combination at first 
sight. Few persons see the connection at once. 

When Airs. Smith first hears that her boy Johnny has joined 
a rifle club and is learning to shoot, the usually jumps to the 
conclusion that he is in danger either of shooting himself or 
soineliodv else, or being shot by the gun that wasn't loaded. 
Every newspaper has accounts of accidents due to guns and 
revolvers. I'.ut the ease for rifle shooting is strong and sen- 
sible. Who is hurt in firearm accidents, as a rule.' Watch 
the reports yourself ami yon will see that it is the careless 
and the uninstructed. 

.Mrs. Smith will not allow Johnny to have a gun and learn 
how to use and respect it. Johnny can go camping with other 
boys, however, tint in the woods, nil the surroundings mi«»is| 
a gun to healthy boys. Somebody sneaks in a cheap rifle or 
revolver. Nobody knows how to handle it. There may be an 
accident. Matches, edged tools, photographic chemicals, boats, 
motorcycles, horses, electric current and many other things 
handled by boys are dangerous if misused. 

Hut organized shooting is safe. The boy or man who takes 
up rifle practice systematically, with safe anus anil ammuni- 
tion, under proper instruction, is following a sport that is 
study, and .a study that is sport. Its eh nts of character 

bllihli ng a re V el V deti nite. 

lloro is a siinnnaiv of the good points of rifle practice, 
written by a New York high school boy: 

Rifle shooting develops us physically. First, il trains the 
eye, which is ;ni important factor in our physical welfare. It 
strengthens the muscles of the arm. This is evident from the 

fact that the ritiemaa must held a gun weighing several pounds 
at arm's length for comparatively long stretches of time. 
Lastly, il is healthful in that it takes us out of doors. 

Its power as a mental developer is easily seen. It takes a 
great deal of practice all year round. This develops will power. 
determination and sticktoitiveness. M.-mv are Die matches 
where victory or defeat depends on the man shooting. There 
is more individual work mi this spoil than in any other. In 
baseball or football il is teamwork that counts. One man 
may have an oil' ,l:iv and not make much difference to the team, 
lull this is not true in si ling. Rifle practice develops lespon 



Pacific hardware journal 



35 



sibility. The rifleman can have few bad habits, for he is is 
practice all the year round, lie can neither smoke oor < 1 1 i 1 1 U . 
;ni(l must keep regular hours. 

In New York rifle si liny Inis been taken up by the high 

schools as :i sport for the lust, six yeaTS, and has proved a 
success. Not :in accident 1ms happened. At the Inst sports 

man's show 38,000 ro Is of ammunition wore Bred without ac 

cident. Could there be a better MT.inl,' Then there is the sub 
target gun. This gun gives the same practice as a real rifle, 
but is a mechanical de\ ice which uses no ammunition, yet 
registers your shot, perfectly by electricity or chanically. 

Rifle shooting does not call for physical strength or prowess, 
like athletic sports. But it does demand mental and physical 
control in marked degree, and develops these qualities. 

It is .-in individual sport, which a boy or man may follow 
alone, at moderate expense, up to s certain point. 

Give a boy or man a good rifle, unlimited ammunition and 

the free use of a fine range. As s i us he becomes skillful 

in marksmanship, he will look around for competitors to si I 

against. 

Benefits are far greater than those which come from win 
ning rifle matches, however. Shooting is peculiarly rich in the 
elements of discipline. Marksmen are held together in small 
units under monitors and coaches, and learn to obey, to accept 
technical decisions in close scores, to be cheerful in defeat, and 
to banish belief in "luck" and "fate." 

An authority with wide experience in the supervision of 
rifle shooting among school boys puts the matter thus: 

"Your shooter becomes a delicate galvai eter, and he 

must learn self-control at all times; for in shooting, of all 
sports, 'there is nothing hidden which shall not be revealed.' 
Tobacco, impure thinking, excesses and mistakes in diet and 
sleep are recognizable foes, and the boys of the shooting squad 
will gradually come to understand the reasons for their avoid 
ance in life fur more clearly than the boys sitting under the 
arbitrary hygienic dicta of the lecture room. Our young shoot- 
ers will lie citizens of tomorrow, and there will lie larger oppor 
tunities to apply these lessons in devotion to business, sacrifices 
at home and patriotism for country." 



Retail Prices on Tools and Staples 

The following prices of tools and staples are those adopted 
by the retail hardware dealers of Oakland, San Francisco and a 
number of cities of California. They represent the selling prices 
of the commodities mentioned and are published for the benefit 
of our readers with a view of having uniform prices among the 
retail merchants. CHANGES 

Changes arc made under the following headings: 
Galvanized Wire i lot h. 
Roofing Paper. 
Liquid (Hue. 

A 

APRONS — Carpenter's, White or Brown 77c 

AUGERS— Ship— All Make: 

4 ami under $ .:,n s*A to ii .1 00 

4% to 5 60 v.. to in i in 

5% to 6 70 1in.. in n I 20 

li'i in 7 80 llVi to 12 I ::."> 

7' L . to S HO 

Treenail 1% L.25 It, lie 

AWI.S AND TOtM.S: 

Millers' Palls— No. t $ I 25 No. 5 

BOXES— Mitre— B 

Langdon, Acme, Stanley, Goodell, Marsh-Ayer at List. 
Olmstead 1 2 3 I 

1.25 1.75 2. mi 

BRACES Rachet 6 s In 12 11 

Frays $2.00 $2.25 $2.50 $2.75 

11 lell-IPn 2.00 2.25 2.50 2.75 

Stanley No. 921 1.77. 2.00 2.25 .0 2.75 

Stanley No. S>23 , 2 en 2 50 

Sampson ■ ;;;, :; , hl 

Millers' Falls — 

61 62 83 10 ::i 32 34 

$2.00 $1.75 $1.50 $2.7.0 $2.25 $2.00 $i 7:. $1 .... 



BUILDERS' HARDWARE On lobs costing up to $20, add 10 
cent I., cost prices; *ji to ) ! i0 idd 13 1 l pen 
add 30 per cent to cost price, 

GLAZED BUILDING PAPER 10 per cent ..it list. 

ROSIN-SIZED SHEATHING 

20 II. $ .77, per roll 

25 11. 90 per roll 

3" II' 1.00 per roll 

10 II. 1.40 per roll 

BEVELS- Sliding 'I': 6" 8" I"" 111" 11" 

No. 1* $.55 $ .On $.07. 

N... 25 35 .40 .60 

BITS -Auger: 

Rui • 11 
Ji nnlngs Fords Irwin Lightning 

Size 3 $.30 $.30 $.25 $.25 

Size t 30 30 .25 25 

Size :, 30 .30 25 .25 

Size 6 :■ .30 

Size 7 11 .40 .35 

Size 8 15 1 In 10 

Size a 50 50 .45 .40 

Size in 7.0 ,n .17, .40 

Size 11 |u 

Size 12 on 60 

Size 13 . ., , 

Size II 70 .70 

Size 17, 77. .77. .70 

Size 16 80 .so , , .75 

Size 17 85 .85 .85 

Size IS 90 90 .85 

Size 1:1 I. on 1 .in .90 

Size 20 I mi 1. 00 .90 

Size 21 1.17, I, 17 I ii" 

Size 22 1.17, 11:, 1. 1. 11 

Size 23 1.25 1.25 1.17, 

Size 24 1.27, 1.25 1.15 

SETS— 

Size Wl'-. $ $4,50 $5.00 

Gimlet Bits, 10c each; 3 for 25c. 

— Cutters — 
Expansive Large Small L 2 3 4 7, 

Clark's or similar $1.50 $1.25 $ .27. $ .27. $ .37, $ .10 $ .77, 

Steers 2.00 L.50 .25 .30 .40 .50 I'm 

Ship 7 in 1 1 ' ■ I.. ;, ;' : to 6 t.. 7 7V4 to 8 

Syracuse 

.40 .50 .60 .70 .80 

2-32 3 4 5 fi 7 s 9 10 11 12 13 

.15 .15 .17) .15 .20 .20 .20 .30 , , .::, .40 

14 17, 10 18 I'u 22 24 26 28 30 32 
.40 .47) .50 .50 .60 .65 .65 .70 .77, .85 1.00 
Screw Driver Bits — 

Jennings No 100 200 300 400 

Buck Bros 25 25 .30 .35 

C 

t'< UtNER BEAD— Galvanized, small quantities per foot .0314 

In 500-ft. lots perl. 11 

In 1000-ft. lots and oyer per foot .03 

CJL.OTH- Wire 
Galvanized — To trade. 7.e s.|. ft.. 10 contractors, 4%c sq. ft. 
Galvanize.] Full Rolls— 4c so. ft. 
Hardware Grades '," y," 

.06 sq. ft. sq. ft. .05 sq. ft. 

Bronze Cloth, 7%c sq. ft. 
CHISELS— Brick, 85c. 
Butt— Jennings Socket 1 IVi P. 2 

Bevel Edge % 65 I 75 $.80 $.85 $.90 

Plain Edge 50 60 .65 .70 .75 

Barton or White Tans: 

Bevel Edge 65 .75 .80 .90 

Plain Edge 50 .60 .65 .75 

Pocket 1 ■ ■ 1 1 2 :•', 

English ,60 .60 6 i 77 

Whites .85 1.00 L.OO 

Ripping— I to 18 ',\is 

$ .77, 
Socket — Buck Bevel Plain B Plain 

1 ■ 

14 .40 .40 

% 60 10 .60. .45 

% 65 15 61 .50 

% .70 .57. 

% 7ii .75 .60 

% 77. .60 .65 

1 so 60 85 .65 

i 1 , 85 65 .90 7n 

1> 2 90 .7" .75 

1% 1.10 .75 .80 

1.20 .85 .90 

Sets of \Z $8.50 $6 50 

C. E. Jennings Be\ el set 12. $8 00 

Tang \ ', % <A ■"'. % 7 s 1 1U ' 

20 7 . 7., 10 10 i 10 .45 .50 .60 .07 .77 

Buck :: 

Turnins-, Light 

Leather Tip Handle for Buck's a.l\ size. 

D 
DEADENING FELT— 3 rolls or less 04 per lb. 

1 :: rolls, 1 and 1 ' ■ lbs 03V4 per lb. 

1 n .1 :: rolls, J lbs . per lb. 

DIVIDERS Angle 

Stanles No 30, $1.25. 

Wing— 7" 6" 7" 8" 

.30 .40 

DRILLS Automatic: 

Yankee No 13 N U No II 

Goodell No 01 No. 1 N No 3 No 

SI. 35 $1 

Extra Points Yankee and Goodell, • et of s. 50c 

With Chuck, 6 



36 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



DRIDLS-Bil Stock. 

:-32 LOc 

:: Id 8 

I L5i 9 

5 15c I" 

20c 11 

'. . ;ist 

< .iain — 

Hand Drills— 



EXTENSIONS 
Bit- Size 



20c 12-32 I"' 

10 13 1"'' 

25c 14 15' 

30c 15 

35c 16 60c 

1 2 1 3 1 6 

1.75 $4.00 

0307 307 316 

J2.IHI ' '0 $3.75 

No. I No. 2 No. 4 Nci. 5 

$1.50 $2 50 $ .60 $1.75 



12 16 18-20 22-24 30 

Jl.iin $1.25 $1.50 $1.7! 



LOO 
1.15 
1.35 



FELT Saturated Asphaltum, Hulls 500 feet $1.00 

Tarred •■ '■"" 

FILES— „ _ 

Slim Taper and Extra Slim. Per Dozen: 

3 to l%" 5" 5%" 6" 7" 8 ' 

$ .85 $ .90 $ .95 $l.im $1.25 $1.50 

3" to 6" :i for 25c; 7" 2 fur 25c; 8" 20c each. 

W 's Special Blunt, 5", 5%" and 6" 15c each, 2 for 25c, 

3 with handle, 10c, 

G 
GAUGES— 

Hit Stanley No. 40. 75c. 

Butt— Stanley No. 95, 75c. No 92, $1.50. 

Goodell No. 227, 90c. 
Hatchet, 20c. 
Marking— Stanley or Similar: 

Noa 61 62 64 64% 65 68 70 71 72 r3 

in 2ii .30 .til r i" .50 .35 .65 .35 .65 

'74 76 77 XI 85 85% 88 89 ' m 91 

1.00 .90 .85 .90 .30 1.50 .fill .60 ."ill .75 

GOUGES Buck Bros. Socket. 

1 inisiilt- Inside Tans 1 urning 

14 } 50 $ .60 $ .25 $ ."•:". 

14 50 .60 .25 .35 

% .." .7" .30 .in 

2 60 .7H 30 .45 

if. 65 .7.-. .35 15 

% 65 .75 .HI .50 

7i 711 .80 .40 .55 

1 75 .85 .45 65 

IV. 80 .'"I .50 .80 

114 90 I."" .65 

1\ 1.00 1.1 1" •'•"' 

2 1.15 t.25 .85 

Sets of 12 7.00 7.1U I. mi 

Leather Tip Handles advance - r "' each size. 

GLASSES Level. Proved, all sizes, 10c each. 
Ground— -"-" '■■" 3%" 4" 1% 

$ .60 $ .65 $ .7r. $1.1111 $1.00 

GLUE— Liquid: Half pints, 25c; pints, 15c; quarts, 80c. 

H 

HAMMER— Mavdole 11 1 1'- 12 13 711 711% 

$ ,7.-, $ .65 $ .till $ .50 $ .7.-i $ .711 
712 612 611% 611 
$ .60 $ .90 $1 00 $1.00 
II. and B. Nos. 13 I 1 L5 16 

$ .r,n $ .60 $ .65 $ .75 
Germantown Nos. 43 44 

$1.00 $1.IMI 
Van Doren, "Vandor" Vanadium, Nos 21% 22 

$1,1111 $1.00 
"Shield" Brand, Nos. in II 11% 12 13 
'.in .75 65 .60 .50 
711 7Ui/' 712 
.75 .65 .60 
Inter-Ocean," Nos, 11 11% 12 

60 .55 50 
HATCHETS— 

Broad or Bern h 2 ■• 4 .. 

Hunts 01 Similar $ .90 $1 00 $1.15 $1.25 

1 2 3 

Claw ■" • i * -85 

Shingling $ .60 * .65 $ .... 

Lath l'i il'ill x l; " w '■' llow '" ] { " w 

$1.60 $1.75 $2,1111 

HOES Mortar, 9 Inch 80c, 10 inch 90c. 

II ANGERS Sliding 1 IV| . S V' 

Cycle or Similar - JiS.bO 

Imitation '■'■■■" 

improved ■' 

standard :; 50 

Proul • . Single 8 11 2. no 

Double, M 11 L00 

Johns. Single 6 l'i 1 

Double 1,2 fl 1. 50 

1 : 1 , , Ti :"'i. on ,''i Ha ngei ■ . 10c fool 



LAWN MOWERS- 
Philadelpha Style M. 
10" 12" 

$;', mi $6.00 

Stearns Ball Bearing. 
12" 
$8.00 
LEVELS ■ 
1 ,, onhart, Straight Edge 
Bitl & Square, Stanley No. 44 
Unique, Bi 

Nickel ' 
iron 1 >a\ is (Machlni 1 1 
No. 1 

[nche 6 '- 

Price $200 $2.50 



14' 


• 


$7.(lii 


1 1 


• 


$9 


mi 




i0 








75 







16" 

$8.00 



16" 
$10.00 



3 

18 
J1 00 



18" 
$11.00 

18" 

$11.00 



1 

24 
$3.50 



9 09 or 46 
24 24 

$2.75 $4.50 

117 113 119 

12 18 24 

$1.75 $2.00 $2.25 



18 24 

$1.80 $2. Of 



Davis (Carpenters) 

No. 6 7 8 

Inches 6 12 18 

Price $1.75 $2.00 $2.25 

Jennings 

No. 6 12 18 24 

Inches 6 12 18 24 

Price $1.00 $1.50 $1.75 $2.00 

Starrett, No. 132 

Inches 4 6 9 12 

Price $1.25 $1.35 $1.50 $1.60 

Stanley, No. 34 

Inches 4 6 8 10 

Price $1.00 $1.25 $1.75 $2.25 

Stanley, No. 36 

Inches 6 9 12 IS 24 

Price $1.00 $1.23 $1.50 $1.75 $2.00 

Stanley, No. 37 

No. 12 18 24 

Price $2.00 $2.50 $3.00 $3.50 $4.00 

LEVELS— Wood. 
Akron 

No. 3 C 06 05 

Price $1.50 $2.00 $2.50 $4.25 

Stanley 

No. 9 09 10 010 11 011 18 19 

Price $2.00 $2.00 $2.50 $2.50 $3.50 $3.50 $2.00 $4.00 

No. 90 95 96 25 30 3 03 104 

Price $3.00 $5.50 $6.00 $2.25 $1.50 .85 $1.35 $1.25 .65 

Mason's Plumb Rules 

No. 20 35 45 24 25% 26 70 80 

Prices 2.50 1.65 3.00 2.25 2.25 2.50 4.00 4.50 

N 
NAILS— Wire or Cut Common. 

Lots of 25 to 49 lbs. sizes 3d to 60d per lb 4c. 
Lots of less than 25 lbs. sizes 3d to 60d per lb. 5c. 
Lots of one-half keg, add 30c. to keg price. 
In keg lots — Market Base. 
Finishing Nails 

Cut or Wire 2d 3d 4d to 20d 

Per pound 8c 7c 6c 

3d Fine Blued. 

2d Fine Blued Lath. 

3d Electro Galvanized. 

1 to 24 lbs. 7c; 25 to 49 lbs., 6c lb. 

Lots of 50 lbs. and over, add 30c. to keg Pr. 

NETTING— Plasterers", 1 in. by 18 80% discount 

(Or any Netting used by plasterers.) 

NUMBERS— House. 

Aluminum, 3" 5c each. Aluminum Cast, 3" 10c each. 
Fancy BB. LB. & AC 3" & 4" 20c. each. 
Fancy set of four, 3" & 4" 75e. set. 
In lots of 24 or more, price is open. 
Staples 

15c a lb.; 2 lbs. 25c; 25 lbs. 10c per lb. 

NIGHT LATCHES— Tale. 

No. 25 22 042 42 44 

Price $1.50 $1.50 $1.75 $2.00 $2.50. 

O 

OVERALLS— 

Heavy Duck, all makes, to 40 inches $1.25 

Heavy Duck, all makes, over 40 inches $1.35 

Light Duck, all makes, to 40 inches $1.00 

Light Duck, all makes, over 40 inches $1.25 

P 

PADLOCKS— Tale. 

No. 813 823 833 943 853 863 

Price .75 .85 $1.00 $1.25 $1.50 $1.75 

No. 8013 8023 8033 8043 8053 

Price $1.00 $1.10 $1.25 $1.50 $1.75 

PAPER— Building. , „, 

1 Ply 2 Ply 3 Ply 4 PI} 

P. & B. $2.70 $4.00 $5.40 $7.20 

Malthine $2.00 $3.00 $4.00 $5.35 

Roofing Paper- -33 I 3 per cent discount, 

Sand Paper, Baeder, Adamson & Co., per quire 25c. Reams open 
PLIERS— Swedish Diagonal. 

5" 90c. 5%" 90c. C" $1.00 pr. 

PLASTERING TOOLS— See Tools. 

PLANES— Stanley. , _ , 

No Price No. Price No. Price No. Price No. Price. 

1 $1.50 12% $3.00 28 $1.90 57 $4.00 85 $3.00 

2 1 80 13 2.75 29 1.90 67sec 1.00 87 2,00 

3 1 95 15 1.10 30 2.10 60 1.10 90 2.00 

4 2.00 15% 1.30 31 2.10 60% 1.00 92 2.00 
4% 2.25 16 1.15 32 2.40 62 2.50 93 2.50 

5 " 2 25 17 1.25 34 2.60 65 1.25 94 3.00 
5% 2.75 18 1.15 35 1.75 65% 1.10 97 2.20 

6 3 00 19 1.25 36 1.90 66 1.00 98 1.00 

7 3^50 20 3.75 37 2.00 69 .75 99 1.00 

8 4 25 20% 3.15 39 1.65 71 1.86 100 .25 

9 3 75 21 1.35 40 1.10 71% 1.65 101 .20 
qu 110 22 1.35 40% 1.50 72 2.25 102 .35 
9% L00 23 1.35 45 7.00 72% 3.00 103 .50 
9% 1 20 24 1.35 46 6.50 74 5.00 104 1.85 

10 2 75 25 1.35 48 2.75 75 .50 105 2.35 
10% 2.35 26 1.50 49 2.75 78 1.65 110 .55 

11 2 25 27 1.66 50 4.50 SO 1.00 112 2.00 

12 225 27% 1.76 55 14.00 S3 1.00 113 3.00 
120 75 132 2.00 147 2.20 191 1.25 604 2.50 
122 125 135 1.60 14S 2.20 192 1.25 604% 2.90 
127 1.60 140 1.25 180 1.10 22(1 .75 60a 2.90 
jo., 175 141 71111 1SI 1.10 340 1.65 60o% 3.35 

; 30 143 5.50 182 tin 602 2.15 606 
131 1 40 146 2.20 190 1.25 603 2.30 607 



Extra Irons 



603 



3.50 
4.20 
6.00 



"Nos 9% 15, 16. 17, 18. 19, 60, 60%, 65. 65%, 120, 220. 131 20c. 
\,. 100, 101. 102. 103 
Nos. 110. 130 15c 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



37 



l-LANES- Wood. 



Smooth 
$ .90 



Jack 



$1.00 
$1.25 



Common 
Razee 

Fancy Wood — All Makes 
Center Bead — *4 inch and under 
Side Bead — *4 inch and under 
Match Plated — 1 inch and under, per pair 
Side Handle Jack Rabbet— All widths 
Side Stop Dado— All widths 
Screw Stop Dado — All widths 



Fore 
$1.50 
$1.65 



Skew Rabbet 

*4" .70 

%" .70 

V .70 

1" .70 

1*4" .75 

1*4" .85 

1%" .95 

2" $1.00 

Hollows and Round 

12 and under 14 to 18 
Per Pair $1.25 
Cutters — Stanley 
No. 40 

Price .25 

No. 140 

Price .25 



Casing 
.90 
.90 

$1.00 
$1.00 
$1.25 



Nosing- 1 
Single 

$1.00 
$1.00 
$1.00 
$1.00 
$1.25 



Jointer 
$1.65 
$2.00 



70c. 
60c. 
$2.00 
$2.00 
$1.25 
$1.65 
ron 
Double 

$1.25 
$1.25 
$1.25 
$1.25 
$1.35 



24 

$1.70 



$1.40 $1.60 
or Similar 

40*4 340 71 & 171% 
.30 .30 .35 

12 & 12V4 62 

.25 .35 



26 

$2.00 

90 92 
.35 .35 

75 
.15 



28 
$2.10 



30 

$2.20 



93 
.35 



98 
25 



Tooth Cutters 
No. 
Price 



12 
.35 



12% 
.35 



112 
.35 



PLUMB BOBS— Stanley or Similar 



No. 1 

$1.50 
POINTS— Trammel. 
No. 1 

$1.25 
IRONS— Plane. 



2 5 

$1.75 $1.00 
Stanley or Similar. 
2 3 4 

$1.50 $1.75 .75 



99 
.60. 



1*4 

1% 

1*4 

1% 

1% 

1% 

2 

2*4 

2*4 

2% 

2*4 

2% 

2% 



Buck 
Double 
.65 
.55 
.55 
.65 
.55 
.60 
.60 
.65 
.70 
.75 
.75 
.85 
.90 



Bros. 



Single 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.30 
.35 
.35 
.40 
.45 
.50 
.50 
.60 
.65 



Stanley 
Double Single 

.40 .20 



.40 
.40 

.45 

.50 
.50 
.60 

.65 



.25 
.25 

.30 
.35 
.35 
.40 

.45 



For Block Plane Irons, see Block Plane List. 



RAKES— Garden, bow. 



ROPE— Manila 
Per pound . . 

rules- 
No. 



12 
.70 



1/3 



No. 



68 61 84 
.10 .15 .30 
94 66*4 



to 5 li'" 
.20 



14 16 

.80 .90 

3/8 and over 
.18 



$1.25 
Zigzag — Stanley, white. 



.25 



No. 



102 
.35 

Stanley, yellow. 
No. 

Other brands. 
White 
Yellow 



103 
.40 



54 

.40 

66*4 

.35 

104 
.50 



62 

.40 
53*4 
.50 

105 
.55 



42 
.25 



18 

.15 



12 

.50 



62V4 
.40 



66 % 
.75 



106 
.50 



108 
$1.00 



2 
.25 



.20 
.25 



3 

.30 



.25 
.30 



4 
.40 



.30 
.35 



5 

.45 



.35 

.40 



RULE TOOLS— 

W. H. Stanley 3 Angle with Level, 
SAWS— Hand. Atkins Silver Steel. 



50c. 



Size 

No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 



53 

54 

64 

65 

68 

69 

70&71 

400 
Disston. 
12 Grade 
7 Grade 
D. 8 
D 100 
No. 120 
SAWS— Back. 



Atkins $1.10 

Disston 1.10 

Mitre Box 20-4 
Atkins $2.00 

SAWS — Compass. 



18" 
$1.70 
1.35 
1.80 
1.70 
1.75 
1.75 
1.35 
2.85 

1.75 
1.00 



20" 
$1.80 
1.45 
1.90 
1.80 
1.85 
1.85 
1.45 
3.00 

1.85 
1.25 



10" 

$1.20 
1.20 
22-4 

$2.20 



22" 
$1.U0 
1.55 
2.00 
1.90 
2.00 
2.00 
1.55 
3.25 

1.90 
1.35 



12" 

$1.35 

1.35 

24-4 
$2.35 



24" 
$2.00 
1.65 
2.25 
2 nil 
2.25 
2.25 
1.65 
3.50 

2.00 
1.40 



14" 
$1.50 

1.50 
26-4 
$2.50 



6 
.50 



.40 
.45 



26" 
$2.25 
1.75 
2.50 
2.25 
2.50 
2.50 
1.75 
4.00 

2.25 

1.65 
1.85 
1.90 
2.50 

16" 

$1.65 
1.65 
28-4 

$3.00 



10" 
.35 
.35 



12 



.40 
.40 



14" 
.43 
.45 



Atkins 
Disston 

Nest Sets $1.00. 

Extra Blades — Keyhole, 15c. Compass 25c. 

Pruning 40c. Handles 20c. 

Atkins Nest Sets with Metal Cutting Blades $1.50 



16" 
.50 

.50 



8 

.85 



.75 
.80 



28" 
$2.50 
2.00 
2.75 
2.50 
2.75 
2.75 
2.00 
4.50 

2.50 
1.90 
2.00 
2.15 
2.75 

18" 

$1.85 

30-4 
$3.75 

18" 
.60 
.60 



SAWS— Coping. 

Atkins No. 50, 75c. F. P. M. 75c. Wire Frame 25c. 

Atkins and F. M. P. extra blades 10c; 3 for 25c; 75c. doz. 

Wire Frame extra blades, 15c doz; 2 doz. 25c. 
SCRAPERS— Steel Hand. 

Atkins, Silver Steel, or Disston, 2*4x5", 15c; 3x4", 15c; 3x5", 

20c; 3x6",. 25c; 3i/4x6", 25c. 
SCRIBERS— Gem, 25c. Movable Leg, 30c. 
SETS— Nail. Buck Bros. 15c. 2 for 25c. 
Knurled 10c. 3 for 25c. 



SCREWDRIVERS— 1 




2 


3 22 


Goodell $1.00 




$1.25 


$1.50 $1.50 


30 




31 


35 


Yankee $1.23 




$2.00 


$1.25 


2*4 3 3*4 4 


4*4 


5 5% 6 


6*4 7 7*4 8 


Champion .25 .25 .25 .30 


.30 


.35 .35 .4 


5 .45 .50 .50 .60 


8*4 10 10*4 








.60 .75 .75 








Hurwood, Stanley, Victor and Elmore same 


as Champion. 


Machinists — 51 


52 


53 




Stanley .65 


.75 


1.00 




SAW SETS— 








Morrell's "Special" $1.00 


Triumph 


H. ' .85 


Mi 'ii ell's Genuine, No. 1 Old 


.75 


Monarch 


Pol. .85 


Morrell's New No. 1 


.90 


Monarch 


Jap .75 


Morrell's No. 95 


1.00 


Hammer, 


Aiken, Gen. .75 


Taintor H. 


.85 


Hammer, 


Aiken, Imlta'n .50 


SHOVELS 








Common Smooth Back 


.75 


Ames 


1.25 


Carters 


1.00 


D. and L 


ong Handle, same. 



Lots of *4 dozen or more, price open. 

SPADES— Same Price as Shovels. 

SIGHTS— 

Level No. 1, .75 

SPOKESHAVES— Stanley 

No. 51 52 53 54 55 58 59 60 

Price .30 .30 .40 .40 .30 .30 .30 .40 

No. 72 73 75 76 81 82 

Price .85 .85 1.00 1.00 1.15 1.25 

Cutters, .10 each. 

SQUARES— Steel 

No. 14 10 12 3 1 100 

Price 1.00 .75 1.00 1.25 1.50 1.25 

Nicholls Framing 1.75 1.50 

All Copper Plated, .50 extra; Blued, .25 extra. 

SQUARES— Try 



No. 2, .75 



64 65 
.25 .50 
84 
1.15 



67 
1.25 
85 

1.25 



200 
1.75 



0100 
2.00 



No. 1 
Price 
No. 2 
Price 
No. 10 
Price 
No. 12 
No. 20 
Price 
No. 15 



4" 
.45 

iW 
.40 
4" 
.65 
.30 

4*4" 
.25 



6" 
.50 
6" 
.45 
6" 
.75 
.35 
6" 
.35 



8" 
.60 

7*4" 
.50 

8" 

1.00 
.40 

7*4" 
.40 
.75 



9" 
.60 

10" 

1.25 

.50 

9" 

.45 



12" 
.75 
12" 

.65 
10" 
.50 



12" 
.65 



15" 
.75 



SQUARE & MITRE— Fox Figure 4 .75 

STONES— Oil. Carborundum at List. 

No. 115 116 119 108 109 122 125 

Price 1.00 .80 .60 1.25 1.00 .60 .45 

No. 181 105 184 101 190 191 145 

Price .35 .25 .30 1.50 .20 .25 .25 

No. 108 in Wood Case, $1.50; Alum., $2.00. 
No. 109 in Wood Case, $1.25; Alum., $1.75. 
Knife Sharpeners, .25. 

Emery Combination, 8x2x1, .50; 7x2x1, .50. 
India — at List. Box, .25 extra; all sizes. 
No. 1 1V4 2 3 13 

Fine 1.50 1.50 1.15 .75 .45 .45 

Coarse and Medium 1.00 1.00 .75 .50 .30 .30 

No. 16 7 24 4 

Fine .75 .50 .60 .45 

Coarse and Medium .50 .35 .40 .30 

For Wood Boxes advance .25; Iron, advance .35. 

OIL STOVES— See "O." 

T 
TAPES— Steel. 

Challenge, Leather 

Rival, Steel 

Starrett, Leather 

Reliable Jr., No. 100 

Reliable Jr.. No. 103 4.25 

TOOLS— Machinist's. Starrett. At List. 
PLASTERING TOOLS— 

Darbv, .50. Float, .25. Hawk 



18" 
1.00 



161 
.70 
146 
.20 



14 
.45 

.30 



11 

.60 
.40 



25 ft. 


50 ft. 


75 ft. 


100 ft. 


3.25 


3.75 


4.75 


6.00 


3.00 


3.50 


4.50 


5.75 


3.00 


3.50 






3.75 









Mitre Rods, .08c. 
TROWELS— Brick. 



75. Det. Handle Hawk, 1.00. 



per inch. Small Tools, .50c. each. 



Rose-Disston 
Plastering 
Atkins Silver Steel, Nos. 4 & 5 
Atkins No. 1 
Cincinnati 
Disston 
Marshalltown 
Richardson 



W 



WH EELBARROWS— 

Garden 

Steel Tubular, $6.50 each. 
WRENCHES— 



10 
1.25 

lii-lilU 

2.00 
1.15 
1.15 
1.15 
2.00 
1.15 



No. 1 
3.50 



11 12 

1.25 1.35 
11 
2.00 
1.25 
1.25 
1.25 
2.00 
1.25 



13 

1.50 
ll 1 .. 
2.00 
1.35 
1.35 
1.35 
2.00 
1.35 



No. 2 
4.50 



No. 3 
5.50 



14 
1.50 

12 

2.00 

1.50 

1.50 

1.50 

2.00 

1.50 



No. 4 
6.50 



Agricultural 

Knife Handle 

Pipe 

Stillson or Trimo 



.35 

4" 

.50 
6" 



40 

6" 

.'.n 
8" 



10" 
.50 
8" 
.75 

10" 
.85 



12" 
.65 
10" 
.85 
14" 
1.10 



15" 
1.00 
12" 
1.00 
18" 
.60 



15" 
1.65 
24" 
2.75 



18" 
2.00 
36" 
6.75 



21" 
2.50 
48" 
9.75 



:m 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



MARKET QUOTATIONS 

SAN FRANCISCO PRICES 

WIRE PRODUCTS 
Prices of Standard Wire Products from stock: 

STANDARD WIRE NAILS Base, per keg, $2.75 

Add extras as per Nail Card for all other than base sizes. 
GALVANIZED STANDARD WIRE NAILS, 

One inch and over extra, per keg, $1.10 

Under one inch extra, per keg, $1.60 

BARBED WIRE— Per 1U0 Lbs. 

Galvanized Glidden $3.15 

Galvanized -ply No. 12 plain twisted 3.15 

Galvanized Baker Perfeet 3.20 

Galvanized Colorado Perfect 3.20 

Galvanized Minnequa 3.25 

Galvanized Waukegan 3.25 

Galvanized Waukeganito (No. II wire) 3.65 

Galvanized Minnequa Special 3.65 

GALVANIZED FENCE STAPLES 3.15 

FENCE AND BALING WIRE— 

Annealed Pen No. 9, $2.55; No. 10, $2.60; No. 11, $2.65; 

No. 12, $2.70; No. 13, $2.80; No. 14, $2.90. 
Galvanized Fence— No. 9, $2.95; No. 10, $3.00; No. 11, $3.05; 
No. L2, $3.10; No. 13, $3.20; No. II. $3.30; No. 15, $3.70; 
No. 16, $3.75; No. 17, $4.35; No. is, $4.50. 
Vnnealed Baling— No. 12, $2.85; No. 13, $2.95; No. 14, $3.05; 
No. 15, $3.15; No. 16, $3.25; No. 17, $3.40; No. 18, ^..r,r,. 

Gah anized Coil Spring Wire Fence, No. 9 $3.00 

Galvanized Coil Spring Pence Wire, No. hi $3.05 

Fence Wire in catch weight coils, Baling Wire in 100-lb coils. 
Special prices apply ou Market and Stone Wire, which are 
not covered by the above price list. 

Solder Prices 
The Sell.y Smelting & Lead Co. 
der date of June 13, 1913: 

Ton Lots 
'... & '-_. .$28.55 

mi & 100 27.35 

mi & 100 26.00 

Extra \\ i pi n- . 24.00 

Wiping 23.00 

Triangular Strip Solder — Same as Bar. 

Smooth Wire Solder, Vs-in or larger — Vic per lb. above Bar. 
Rough Wire Solder, Vs-in- or larger — Vic per lb. above Bar. 
Triangular Drop Solder, up to 400 drops to the pound — Same as 
Bar, 401 to 800 drops to the pound, Vic above Bar; sol or 
more drops to the pound, lc above Bar. 
Wire Drop Solder — Vic above Triangular Drop. 
Shot Prices 
The Selby Smelting & Lead Co. quotes shot as follows, under 
the date of Nov. is, L912: 

I imp sh,,t, per 25 II,. bag, Nos. I to 12 $1.95 

Large Drop Shot ( B and up I 2.20 

Chilled, Nos. I to 12, and Buck, pel 25-lb. bag 2.20 

liust Shot 2.55 

I ii per bag less on orders of 80 bags at one time 

ed in 5 lb. or 1 '2 '5 H, sacks, 10c extra per 25-lb. bag. 
Air Rifle Shot in I lb. bans. 10c extra for 25 lb bags. 
A discount of 10c per bag of 25 lbs. allowed or orders for 80 
bags at one time 

ROPE 
1 1 ■■■■• . basis per pound, I :'. ' ■ cents, 
mnd ; 7 16-in., ' ■ in. a nd '■' 16-in., ' . cenl 
1 cenl over basis; ' , in. a ml 5 16-in., 1 ' •_• 
3 Mini, 2 cenl over basis, 
via. and larger, I cent o\ er basis; '.' I fi in. 



Jo. quote 


Solder as 


foil 


ows un- 




100 to 


L 


;ss than 


500 ll.s. 


500 lbs. 




100 lbs. 


$29.05 


$30.55 




$31.55 


27.85 


29.35 




30.35 


26.50 


28.00 




29.00 


24.50 


26.00 




27.IHI 


23.50 


25.00 




26.00 



M a ii i la : \ in and 
Sisal '.I cents per | 
i.\ ci basis; '% i n 
cents over basis 
I ■■i,i St .a lul Rope 



a in 



i llci . ] cut over basis 



Boll Rope Via., :i or + straml and larger, :: cents over basis. 
Transmission Rope -3 or l -nan, l, t cents over basis; under 

; ft. lengt h, 5 cents iner basis. 

I tioiled Rope -I cent over basis. 

PAINTS AND OILS 
Varnish Makers and Painters' Naptha Per gal. 

In eases 22V'>c 

In barrels or drums 15L.e 

Linseed Oil 

(Basis 7% lbs. per gallon) 

R aw, in barrels ,„,,- ga l, 5 g c 

Raw, in cases ,„.,- ga i. Q3c 

Boiled, in barrels )„,,. ga ], 6 Qc 

Boiled, in cases ,,,., gsl i. 65c 

Five barrel lots, le per gallon less. 

Turpentine 

(Basis 7 lbs. per gallon.) Per gal. 
Strictly pure, ill eases .,;,. 

Strictly pure, in .hums goc 

Ten-ease lots, le per gallon less. 

Aroturps 
(Turpentine Substitute) Per gal. 

Cases 30c 

Iron barrels or drums ^3c 

Five-barrel lots, lc per gallon less. 

Miscellaneous Per gal. 

Benzine, in bulk ifj c 

Benzine, in cases, 2-5s 17 Vic 

Gasoline, in bulk (Red ( Irown) 16Vic 

Gasoline, in cases, 2-5s (Red Crown) 23y.c 

Engine Gasoline, bulk 37 ,. 

Engine Gasoline, cases 44 e 

Engine Distillate, in drums 8 e 

Engine Distillate, eases, 2-5s 15 c 

tibia. Cs. 

Lard Oil, strictly pure Soc 90c 

Superior W. S 75 c 80c 

No - 1 65c 70c 

Red Lead and Litharge Per lb. 

1 ton and over at one purchase, in 100-lb. kegs, net weight. .8 c 

500 lbs., and less than 1 ton, in 100-lb. kegs, net weight 8%c 

Less than 500 lbs., in 100-lb. kegs, net weight 8%c 

25-lb. or 50-lb. kegs, Vie, and 12Vi-Ib. kegs, Vic advance. 

White Lead Per lb. 

1 ton at one purchase 7%C 

500 ll.s, and less than 1 ton 8 c 

Less than 500 lbs 8Vic 

25-lb. or 50-lb. kegs, Vic, and 12Vi-lb. kegs, >ic advance. 

In 25-lb. tin pails, Vie per lb, above keg price. 

In 12Vi-lb. tin pails, lc per lb. above keg price. 

In 1 to 10-lb. cans 2Vic above keg price. 

I 'rj White I' 'a. I. in barrels. I tun a a. I ovei 7 •"•,,■ 

Drj w bite lead, in kegs, 30 to 60 lbs., less than 500 lbs m, 

Neats Foot Oil Per gal. 

i loopers, pure, in l.bls 85c 

< loopers, pure, in cases 90c 

Extra in bbls 70 c 

Extra, in cases 7<5 C 

No. 1, in l.bls 65c 

No. 1 , in eases 70c 

Kerosene Per gal. 

Fear) Oil, in drums lie 

Pearl Oil, in cases, 2 5s 26c 

Elaine Oil, in cases, 2 5s 26c 

Eocene Oil, in drums lie 

Eocene Oil, in cases, 2 5s hi,- 

Headlight i ill, in drums 10c 

Headlight Oil, in case:.. :' v 17,. 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



39 



OLDEST 



ESTABLISHED 1838 



LARGEST 



THE FRANK MILLER COMPANY 




Manufacturer of the Preparations for use on Harness known as 

"THE STANDARD OF THE WORLD" 

Highest Awards Centennial, 1876. 
Highest Awards World 's Fair, 1893. 

Harness Dressing 




Jill mi ( f s 
fiSKNESS 




HARNESS OIL The very best article of its 

Preserves and softens the kind. Unequalled for use by 

leather, consequently adds life. botn manufacturer and owner 

Compounded with pure neat 's , , 

, i •■ r of harness, 
foot oil. 



FRANK M1LLEH5 

HARNESS DRESSED 



I. X. L. HARNESS OIL 
Second in quality only to 

our Frank Miller Harness Oil. 

Superior to all others. 




S TC-i— t-- : - 



mtun nuaoo 



CARRIAGE TOP DRESSING 

Gives an elastic, durable, 
water-proof gloss, and is pos- 
itively safe to use on finest 
stock. 




| EDGE, COLLAR AND 
HARNESS INKS j 



.^A-UK ""^j,, 



ft 



4/?NESS $° K? 



t 



AXLE OIL 

Superior to Castor Oil; lasts 
longer and will not gum. 



HARNESS SOAP 
Unrivalled for cleaning and 
softening the leather; abso- 
lutely pure. 





Our Preparations are uniform in quality and the quality the best 



THE FRANK MILLER COMPANY 



Office and Factory 

349 and 351 West 26th St., New York, U. S. A. 

ORDER FROM YOUR JOBBER 



European Office 

Tower Chambers, Moorgate, London, E. C. 



40 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 




If you do not find what you want in these columns, write to us, and we will advise you 

where you can buy the goods desired 



Adjusters, Hammock, Rope 

and Strap 

Covert Mfg. Co., Troy, N. T. 

Agricultural Implements 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal.; Sacramento, Los 
Angeles. 

Ammunition 




PETERS 
CARTRIDGE CO. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
■ San Francisco, 
•tr Cal. 



Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 

San Francisco, Los Angeles, 

Portland. 
Remington Arms-Union Metallic 

Cartridge Co., New York and 

San Francisco. 




CHALLENGE 
j 5UPERIDR 
EXCELSIOR" 

SELBY SMELTING Si LEAD CO- 

San Francisco Seattle 




U. S. Cartridge Co., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

•Winch esti r 

RED W 

Winchester Repeating Arms Co., 
San Francisco. 

Augers, Ship 
Snell Mfg. Co., Fiskdale, Mass. 

Automobile Supplies 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Axes, Safety and Belt 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

Axle Oil 
The Frank Miller Co., N. Y. 

Babbitt Metal 
Selhy Smelting & Lead Co., San 
Francisco. 

Baseball Goods 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Bicycles 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 

cisco. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 
Simmons Iblw. Co., St. Louis. 

Bicycle Sundries 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 
I'.m in. i [ardware & Steel i !o 
Sim Francisco, Los Angi ii 
Portland. 

Bits & Augers 

I [ardwa re & Steel Co., 
San Fra ncisco Los '< : 
I'm l land. 

Blowers 
Champion Blower ,t Forge Co., 
er, Pa. 
Bluestone 

Selhy Smelting & I 

San Francisco. 



Blowers — Power 
Champion Blower & Forge Co., 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Bolts 
(Stove, Tire Bolts) 
American Screw Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 

Brackets, Shelf 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Brass Goods 
Wooden & Little, San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Buggies 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Builders' Hardware 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Building Paper 
Parafflne Paint Co., Oakland, 
Cal 



Paraffine Paint Company 
MALTHOID ROOFING 

34 First St. San Francisco 



Butchers' Saws 
IC. C. Atkins & Co., San Fran- 
cisco, Portland, Seattle and 
Indianapolis. 




Patterns 
Butchers' 



Saws 



Butts, Door 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co.., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles 
Portland. 
The Stanley Works, New Brit- 
ain, Conn. 

Cans, Oil 
Standard Oil Co. 

Calipers and Dividers 
The L. S. Starrett Co.. Athol, 
Mass. 

Cartridges 
Pacific Hardware ,v Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles. 
Portland. 




PETERS 
CARTRIDGE CO. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 

San Francisco, 
Cal. 



Remington Arms-Union Metallic 
Cartridge Co., New York and 
San Francii 

U. S. Cartridge Co., San Fran- 

< i co, < 'al. 

Winchester 







RED 


w 




Wil 


che 


ster Repeating 


Arms Co., 


Rl 


n 1 


'rancisco 


Cal 


, and New 


II 


tven, Conn. 








C; 


rtrldges, 


Aux 


lllary 


\1 


hie 


A i in- & 


M IV 


Co., Glad- 


.si 


• ne 


Mich. 








Carvers, Safety 


Camp 


Ma I 

sl 


me 


Arms & 


M fg 


Co., Glad- 



Chain 
Covert Mfg. Co., Troy, N. Y. 

Christmas Tree Holders 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 

Clamps 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 

Clocks 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Clocks — Automobile 

Phinney- Walker Keyless Clock 

Co., New York, N. Y. 

Cloth, Hardware 

The Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co., 

St. Louis. Mo. 



The Ludlow-Saylor Wire 
Company 

WIRE CLOTH 

St. Louis Missouri 



Cloth, Fly Screen 
The Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co.. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Cocks 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Cordage 
Columbian Rope Co., Auburn, 

New York. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco. 

Cream Separators 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Cultivators 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Cultivators, Hand 
C. S. Norcross & Sons, Bush- 
nell. Ills. 

Cut Glass 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Cutlery 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 
Simmons Hardware Co. 
KEEN KUTTER 

Decoy Ducks 
I. w. Reynolds Decoy Factoi s , 
Chicago, Ills. 

Dog Leads 
Brlttain & Co., San Francisco. 

Door Checks 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles. 
Portland. 

Drawing Instruments 
The L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, 
Mass. 

Draw Knives 
Brlttain & Co., San Francisco. 

Drill Presses 
Champion Blower & Forge Co., 

La Ilea sl or, Pa. 

Drills — Blacksmiths' 
Champion Blower & Forgo Co 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Egg Beaters 
Hollow Cable Mfg. Co., Hor- 
nell. N. Y. 

Elbows, Stove Pipe 
Hammer-Bray Co., Oakland, 
Cal 

Electrical Supplies 
Simmons Ild%v. Co., St. Louis. 



Elevator Enclosures and Cabs 
The Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co., 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Enameled Ware 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Engines, Gasoline 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 
Extractors, Broken Shell 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

Faucets, Iron 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Forges 
Champion Blower & Forge Co., 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Files 
G. * H. Barnett Co.. Phlla., Pa. 



& H. Barnett Company 
BLACK DIAMOND 




FILES AND RASPS 
Philadelphia Pa. 



Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco and Sacramento. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 

Filters, Water 
Hammer- Bray Co., Oakland, 
Cal. 

Fire Pots 
Clayton & Lambert Mfg. Co.. 
Detroit, Mich. 

Fishing Tackle 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

Floor Scrapers 
Consolidated Mfg. Co., Hartford, 
Conn. 

Flour Sifters 
Consolidated Mfg. Co., Hartford, 
Conn. 

Fly Swatters 
Spencer Wire Co., Worcester, 
Mass 

Fly Traps. 
Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co., St. 
Louis, Mo. 

Forges 
Champion Blower & Forge Co., 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Fuse 
Parrott & Co., San Francisco. 

Garden Tools 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portia n.i 

Gaffs 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

Gas Stoves 
American Foundry Co., Hamil- 
ton Ohio. 
Baker-Smith Co., San Francisco 
Hammer-Bray Co., Oakland. 
Cal. 




PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



41 



JCS & If you do not find the articles you want, write to us ; we will tell you where they 

can be purchased 



Gas Plates 
American Foundry Co., Hamil- 
ton, Ohio. 
Baker-Smith Co., San Francisco 

Gasoline Engines 
Pacific Hardware >v Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 
Wooden & Little, San Francsco, 

Cal. 
Gauges, Pressure, Steam, Vac 

uum, Water 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Ln.s Angeles, 
Pol tland. 

Grass Collectors 

The Philadelphia Lawn Mowei 

Co., Philadelphia and London. 

Glass Cutting Boards 

The Lufkln Rule Co., Saginaw, 

Mich. 

Gopher Traps 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Grindstones 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 
Cleveland Stone Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 





Cleveland 


Stc 


ne 


Co 




G 


RINDS 


T 


o 


N 


E S 




Geo. P. Eberh 


Till 


Co 




San Francisco 








Cal. 



Gun Cleaners 

Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., 
Chicopee Falls, Mass. 

Guns 

Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

Remington Arms Co., New York 
and San Francisco 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 

Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co., 
Chicopee Falls, Mass. 



J. Stevens Arms & Tool Co. 
620 Main St. 
STEVENS ARMS 
Chicopee Falls Mass. 




Winchester Repeating Arms Co., 
San Francisco. 



Winchester Repeating 




Arms Co. 




WINCHESTE 


R 


New Haven, Conn. 





Harness Snap*; 
Covert Mfg. Co., Troy, N. Y. 

Hack Saws 
R. C. Atkins & Co., San Fran- 
cisco, Portland, Seattle and 
Indianapolis. 




The L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, 
Mass. 

Hack Saw Blades 

E. C. Atkins & Co., San Fran- 
cisco, Portland, Seattle and 
Indianapolis. 



E. C. Atkins <£. Company 

HACK SAW BLADES 

Indianapolis, Ind. 

San Francisco 

Portland Seattle 



The L. S. Starrett Co., Athol. 
Mass. 



L. S. Starrett & Company 
HACK SAW BLADES 

Athol Mass. 



Halter Chain 
Covert Mfg. Co., Troy, N. Y. 

Hame Fasteners 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Hammers 




VAN DOREN 

MFG. CO. 

Chicago 

Heights, Ills. 

San Francisco 

Los Angeles 



Hammers — Power 
Champion Blower & Forge Co., 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Hardware, General 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Manufacturers' Agents 
The Geo. F. Eberhard Co. 360- 

362 Fremont St., S. F. 
C. W. Gause Co., 6H3 Mission St., 

San Francisco. 
John F. Graham & Co.. 268 

Market St., S. F. 
Robert F. Haight Co., 616 Cen- 
tral Ave., San Francisco. 
Hughson & Merton, 544 Van 

Ness Ave., San Francisco. 
Chas. H. Knight, Hooker & Lent 

Bldg, San Francisco. 
A. Rannie, 693 Mission St., San 

Francisco. 
Chas. Sonntag & Co., 268 Mar- 
ket St., San Francisco. 
Wm. H. Stanley, 112 Market St., 
San Francisco. 

Harness 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Harness Oil 
The Frank Miller Co., N. Y. 

Harness Soap 
The Frank Miller Co., N. Y. 

Harness Sundries 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Haying Tools 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Hinges 
Standard Mfg. Co., Shelby, Ohio. 
The Stanley Works, New Brit- 
ain, Conn. 

Hinges, Spring 
Standard Mfg. Co., Shelby, Ohio. 

Hose 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 

Knives, Hunting 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone. Mich. 

Household Goods 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 

, - i - 1 ■ i * 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 



Knives, Machine 
E. C. Atkins & Co., San Fran- 
cisco, Portland, Seattle and 
Indianapolis. 

Ice Cream Freezers 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phlla., Pa. 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Iron and Steel 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 
Jacks, Wagon, Automobile 
Covert Mfg. Co., Troy, N. Y. 

Kick Plates 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Kindl»rs, Asbestos 
N. H. Palmer & Co., West Med- 
ford, Mass. 

Kraut Cutters 
E. C. Atkins & Co., San Fran- 
cisco, Portland. Seattle and 
Indianapolis. 

Lamps 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Lanterns 
K. E. Dletz Co., New York, N. Y. 
C. T. Ham Mfg. Co., Rochester, 
N. Y. 



C. T. Ham Mfg. Company 

HAM'S RELIABLE 

LANTERNS 

Rochester New York 



Lamps, Automobile, Carriage 

K. )•:. Dietz Co., New York. 

C. T. Ham Mfg. Co., Rochester, 

N. Y. 

Lathing Wire 
The Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co., 

St. Louis, Mo. 



m-'CV*"* « » LATHING 

Y<1\^,& WIRE 

The Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co. 

St. LOUlS 



Lawn Mowers 
Philadelphia Lawn Mower Co., 
Philadelphia. 



Genuine "PHILADELPHIA" 

LAWN MOWERS 

Western Sales Agency, Inc., 

Agents, San Francisco 



Lawn Mower Grinders 
C. R. Zacharias, Asbury Park. 
N. J. 

Lawn Sprinklers 

The Philadelphia Lawn Mower 
Co., Philadelphia and London. 
Lead Goods 
Selby Smelting & Lead Co., San 
Francisco. 

Locks and Knobs 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 
Corbin Cabinet Lock Co., New 
Britain, Conn. 

Lockers, Wire 
The Ludlow-Saylor Wire Mfg. 
Co., St. Louis, Mo. 
Match Boxes, Waterproof 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

Meat Choppers 
Kollman Mfg. Co., Mt. Joy, Pa. 
Metals 
Smelting & Lead Co.. 
San Francisco. 

Micrometers 
The L. S. Starrett Co., Athol, 
Mass. 

Miter Boxes 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., New 
Britain, Conn. 



Mop Wringers 
The ■■White" Mop Wringer Co. 
Fultonville, N. Y. 



WHITE MOP 
WRINGERS 
White Mop 
Wringer Co. 

Fultonville, 
N. Y. 




Nails, Wire and Cut 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co.. 

San Francisco, Los Angeles, 

Portland. 

Nail Sets 
The L. S. Starrett Co., Atho. 

Mass. 

Nettings, Hex Galvanized 
The Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co.. 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Night Latches 
Brittain & Co.. San Francisco. 

Oil, Nltro-Solvent 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

Oil Cans 
Standard Oil Co. 

Oil Stoves 
Hammer-Bray Co., Oakland. 

Cal. 





r 0,L 
£ STOVES, 
► ALL 
• KINDS 


S> BRAY 93 
2p^ COMPANY AS 


^'Jjil'.iQf 



Pad Locks 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 
Corbin Cabinet Lock Co.. New 

Britain, Conn. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 
The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co., 
N. Y. 

Paints 
Parafflne Paint Co., San Fran- 
cisco. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co.. 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 
Pipe, Etc. 
Hardware & Steel Co.. 
San Francisco, Los Ai 
Portland. 

Pipe Fittings 
Pacifii 
San Francisco, Los Ai j 
I 'ortlajid. 

Plows 
Baker & Hamilton. San Fran- 
cisco. 

Poultry Netting 

I ! ! CO., 

San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 
The Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co. 
St. Louis, Mo. 



■Mtfy&' 



POULTRY 
NETTING 



The Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co. 
St. Louis 



Pruning Shears 
Rhodes Mfg. Co.. Grand Rapids. 

Mich. 



42 



PACIFIC HARDWARE JOURNAL 



UE^" If you do not find the articles you want, write to us ; we will tell you where they 

can be purchased 



Pumps 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 

Punches 
Champion Blower & Forge Co., 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Punches, Belt 
E. C. Atkins & Co., San Fran- 
cisco, Portland, Seattle and 
Indianapolis. 



Hammer- Bray Co. 

STOVES AND RANGES 

Oakland, Cal. 



Simmons Hdw. Co.. St. Louis. 

Ranges, Gas 
Hammer-Bray Co.. Oakland. 

Rasps 
G. & H. Barnett Co., Phila., Pa. 



BLACK DIAMOND 




G. & H. BARNETT CO. 



Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco and Sacramento. 
Brittain & Co., San Francisco. 

Razors 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co.. 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 

Razor Hones 
Brittain & Co., San Francisco. 

Razor Strops — Safety 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 

Refrigerators 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 

S.m Francisco. Los Angeles. 
Portland. 

Repairers, Boot 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

Rod, Cleaning 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

Roofing Paper 
Parafflne Paint Co., San Fran- 
cisco. 

Rope 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 

and Sa crameni o. 

Columbian Hope Co., Auburn, 

N. V. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 

San Francisco. 

Rope, Anti-Rust 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

Rules 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Stanley Rule & Level Co., New 
Britain, Conn. 







Lufkln 


R 


u le 


Co. 


R 


U 


L E S A 


N 


D 


TAPES 






Saginaw, 


Mich. 

I 



Sad Irons 

Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Saws 

E. C. Atkins & Co., Indianapolis 
and San Francisco. 




Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 

Saws, Safety 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 
stone, Mich. 

Saw Sets 

E. C. Atkins & Co., San Fran- 
cisco. Portland, Seattle and 
Indianapolis. 

Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Sewing Machines 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Scales 
Pelouze Scale & Mfg. Co., Chi- 
cago, 111. 

Screens, Coal and Sand 
The Ludlow-Saylor Wire Co., 
St. Louis, Mo. 

Screws, All Kinds 
American Screw Co., Provi- 
dence, R. I. 
The Corbln Screw Corp., New 
Britain, Conn. 

Screw Drivers 

Brittain & Co., San Francisco. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Phlla., Pa. 

Screw Plates 
Champion Blower & Forge Co., 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Scythe Stones 

Cleveland Stone Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Shears, Metal Cutting 
Champion Blower & Forge Co., 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Sheet Iron 
r-.i.iii. Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
I'oi Hand. 

Shoes — Furniture 
i m« a rd Mfg. <'o.. Menasha, 
Wis. 

Sights, Rifle and Shotgun 
Marble Arms & Mfg. Co., Glad- 

I "in>, Mich. 

Skates, Roller 
Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

i i rdware < !o , Torring- 
lon. Conn. 



Solder 

Selby Smelting & Lead Co., San 
Francisco. 

Soldering Furnaces 

Clayton & Lambert Mfg. Co.. 
Detroit, Mich. 

Sporting Goods 

Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co.. 
San Francisco, Los Angeles. 
Portland. 

A. J. Reach Co., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Squares 
Nicholls Mfg. Co., Ottumwa, la. 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., New 

Britain. Conn. 
The L. S. Starrett Co.. Athol, 

Mass. 

Stoves 

Hammer- Bray Co., Oakland, 
Cal. 



The L. S. Starrett Co., Athol. 
Mass. 




Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 



Sweepers, Horse 

The Philadelphia Lawn Mower 
Co., Philadelphia and London. 



Tanks 

Woodin & Little, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Tapes 
Brittain & Co., San Francisco. 
Measuring, Lufkln Rule Co., 

Saginaw, Mich. 
L. S. Starrett Co., Athbl, Mass. 

Tents 

Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 
Brittain & Co., San Francisco. 

Tinware 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Tin Plate 
Simmons Hdw. Co., St. Louis. 

Tire Benders 

Champion Blower & Forge Co.. 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Tire Shrinkers 

Champion Blower & Forge Co., 
Lancaster, Pa. 

Tools 

Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 



The L. 


S. 


Starrett Company 


STARRETT'S 


TOOLS 


Athol 






Mass. 



Torches, Plumbers' 

Clayton & Lambert Mfg. Co.. 
Detroit, Mich. 

Trowels 

E. C. Atkins & Co., San Fran- 
cisco, Portland, Seattle and 
Indianapolis. 

Try-Squares 

Slanley Rule & Level Co., New 
Britain, Conn. 

Tubing (Braided) 
Chicago Tubing & Braiding Co., 
Chicago, 111. 

Twine 

Columbian Rope Co., Auburn, 

N. Y. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 

San Francisco. 

Ventilating Locks 
The H. B. Ives Co., New Haven, 



Wagon Covers 

Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Wagons and Implements 

Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Washing Machines 

H. F. Brammer Mfg. Co., Dav- 
enport, Iowa. 



H. F. Brammer Mfg. Co. 

WASHING MACHINES 
Davenport Iowa 



The Maytag Co., Portland, Ore. 
Hammer- Bray Co., Oakland. 
Cal. 

Watches 

"Ingersoll"— The Geo. F. Eber- 
hard Co., San Francisco 

Wind Mills 

Wooden & Little. San Francisco. 
Cal. 
Weeders — Hand and Horse. 

C. S. Norcross & Sons, Bush- 
nell, 111. 

Wire Fencing 

Baker & Hamilton. San Fran- 
cisco. 
Cyclone Fence Co., Waukegan, 

111. 
Globe Fence Co., North Chicago, 

Ills. 
Pacific Hardware & Steel Co.. 

San Francisco, Los Angeles, 

Portland. 
The Ludlow-Saylor Co., Si 

Louis, Mo. 
The Ward Fence Co., Decatur, 

Ind. 

Wrenches 

Baker & Hamilton, San Fran- 
cisco. 

Pacific Hardware & Steel Co., 
San Francisco, Los Angeles, 
Portland. 



Atkins Always Ahead 



We 

FIRST 
to the 
FRONT 




again 

With a ^ 
£ NEW 
Ide 



Our new and beautif 
Embossed Handle 
will hereafter b 
furnished on all 
Silver Steel Hand 
Saws that have 
heretofore bee 



A 



apfefe. > 




4yZi/.-« 



(( 



JHK?v. / 






/" 



4 



Saw 
slock 
last minute- 
to offer 

■ 
and latest i d m a s and 
improve merits in S 
then you must show them 

atkins : n rr saws 

y with, the 

^►* Re m em her we arc the 

>►* ciiuinat-TS. It is our idea. No 

Hand Saws in the wor! J are made 
with fin ■ ■■ td/ts, > oiir . ■ sto n 

appi i .< rut originality ol 

fine ineriufai mi ! .irpcnte.r tn 

town wiii want ne or more >>i rhese Vnvs with 
the *««; konktc. S* \ \s the tunc t ;> get in at the 
S* start. Q'r*irr a supply ot the n 

/' ATKINS SKE SAWS 

with the linK- ,-••: 'ji'.-, ,j i novelty. Put it i 

■.nw with a card. t,i r : t.,rs with 

this new idea. Your jobbi'i 
i write to the nearest address bel 

E.C. Atkins & Company, Inc. 

The Silver Steel Saw People 



Home Office and Factory. Indianapolis, Int) 



Canadian Factory, Hamilton, Ont. 



Elranrho trurying complete *tockj» in thv fulloHir . iti«. Address f- C- ATKINS & CO., 

Atlanta MioM PottlanJ Vanconver. B C 

Chicago ■ ivl^an.1 Saa Frincivoo N S. W. 

New > ..fit City Suede 



AecnN for (ri 



3 Ro« Scribr, Paru-. Franc* 
iltuflawtrasse, iian.lvirg. Genmoy 



WWCffHTEK 



MODEL 1912 20 GAUGE 



Hammerless Repeati ng Shotgun 

"Trap" and "Pigeon" Grades 

We are now furnishing our new Model 1 ( )12 Hammerless Repeating Shotgun in "Trap" 
and "Pigeon" grades, with specifications as follows: 




'Trap" Crade 



20 Gauge, 25-inch Nickel Steel full choked barrel, with handsome matted rib, 
chambered for 2 T 2-inch shells. Selected fancy walnut, hand-made, oil-finished stock, 
with either straight or pistol grip, checked, and checked rubber butt plate. Action slide 
handle of fancy walnut, oil-finished and checked. The standard style of stock has 
straight grip and the following" dimensions: Length l.T<4 inches, drop at comb 1 
inch, drop at heel 2/$ inches. The comb is heavy and rounding. \s the stock is hand- 
made, any length or drop desired will be furnished without extra charge, but in the ab- 
sence of special specifications, standard stocks as above will be supplied. Weight of 
gun about 6% pounds. List price $55.00. 




"Pigeon" Grade 



The "Pigeon" grade gun is made to the same specifications as the "■Trap" grade, 
and in addition the frame is elaborately engraved and considerable hand work put upon 
the gun. List price S 105.00. 

When specified, either the •'Trap" or ••Pigeon - ' grade gun will be furnished with 
cylinder bore or modified choke barrel without extra charge. 

Send in your orders to your jobber at once, it" you want to be one of the first to 
be supplied. These guns will be well advertised. 

Send for descriptive circulars. 

WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO.. New Haven. Conn. 



FIND THIS 
TRADE MARK 

On every coil of rope you buy. 
We put it on COLUMBIAN 
Cordage as your guarantee and 
our pledge of the best rope and 
twine that money can buy. It is 
yourpositive assurance thatyou 
are getting what you pay for. ^^PPE5^\L 

PACIFIC HARDWARE & STEEL CO 




San F 



rancisco 



DISTRIBUTORS 
Portland Los Angeles 



Seatth 



DEM 




GTON 



Your Customers For 
22 Calibre Rifles 



HERE comes a boy or young man to buy a .22 calibre rifle — in most cases a single shot. 
Now, right here is the place to stop and decide to recommend him the Remington .22 at 
$3.00 and upward, produced by the same people who make the Remingtor .22 Repeater, 
some models of which sell as high as $75. 

As you know, there is a tendency in some quarters to look on the .22 single as "only a boy's 
rifle" — and to cheapen these models to sell at a price. And this, mind you, when every man who 
figures in the Who's Who of rifle shooting got his sound training in the sport with a .22 calibre. 

The whole secret of keeping your arms and ammunition business up and coming is — Get the 
boy started right. 

Tell him the facts about .22 calibre rifles — about the Remington ammunition he ought to have. 

And if you haven't enough Remingtons to make a strik- 
ing feature — order more. Get the boy started right! 

Remington Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Go. 
299 Broadway, New York City