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Full text of "Pacific wine and spirit review"

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CLASSIFIED INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS, PAGE 3 



•".tg'-^c,. 







VOL. XXVI, NO. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 26, 1891. 



$3.00 PER YEAR. 




I!. F. Bai.kk. rrcs't. (i. \V, Swkarinoex. Vice I'res't. W. H. jACons, Scc'y and Tieas. E. O. Lit)iy, Supt. 



IWelldiood OistilleFy Go. 

I-OUIS:^II-I-E, KY. 




-^-•^ Distillers and Proprietors of< 



<<■■< 



"MELLWOOD," 



FIRE COPPER BOURBON. 



"NORMANDY, 



JJ 



PURE RYE. 




11 




HAND MADE SOUR MASH. 

"DUNDEE," 

FIRE COPPER BOURBON. 




CORKS I CORKS I 

COLCAN 5^ CO., 

inyi::poi?.TEi^s oif coi^kis, 

NEW YORK. 

U< riin-y the l(U(ji,4.l)t,fl and iuukI ciircjnUy^dti-itd .-lui-L nj lI,t,iil-( 'nt 

Gorki, milablefor Fine Wine Bo1tlii\g, Chp Giiu/er Ale. 

I'linii Soda and Mineral Waters. 

Lowest Prices in the Market. 

Price Lists Furnished on Application. Coriospondenee Solicited. 

CilOOd & Scott, Pacific Coast Agents, 

10.' FllltW ST.. .SI.V II{i\( IS(0. ill.. 



^ -^ iii. 



P/ceifie WIJME /fJ^D Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



2;i8660 



C;cp5$ipi^D I|^DE/ op /^DV/EI^JI5E/T\EflJ8. 



CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES. 

Page. 

Beck, Pyhrr & Co 22 

Boyd, F. O. & Co 34 

Caiifornia Wine Growers Union 34 

Crabb, H. W 34 

Carpy, C. & Co , 34 

Chauche, A. G 35 

DeTurk, I 34 

Donnelly & Brannan 34 

Ginullacli, J. & Co 36 

Greenebaum, A. & Co 36 

Haraszthy, Arpad & Co 36 

Haber, F. A 30 

Harris, Kingston & Reynolds 35 

Holtum, C. & Co 32 

Hirschler& Co 22 

Kohler& Van Bergen 32 

Kohler & Frohling 36 

Kolb & Denhard 34 

Knbls, Schwarke&Co 38 

Lacbman & Jacobi 36 

Lacbman, S. & Co 36 

Luyties Bros 6 

Los Gatos & Saratoga Wine Co 36 

Melczer, Joseph & Co 36 

Napa Valley Wine Co 21 

Natoma Vineyard Co 5 

San Gabriel Wine Co 34 

St. Helena Wine Co 32 

DISTILLERS AND BROKERS. 

Belle of Bonrbon Co r 40 

California Distilling Co 36 

Daviess County Distilling Co 27 

Dillinger, S. & Sons 42 

Gleumore Distilling Co 27 

Halle, Max M 5 

Levy, Jas. & Bro 46 

Mellwood Distillery Co 1 

Monarch, R 27 

Moore & Selliger 21 

Murphy, Ed. & Co 21 

Overholt, A & Co 43 

Pepi)er, Jas. E. & Co 6 

Shields, Wm. H 6 

Taylor, E. H. Jr. & Sons 5 

Thompson Distilling Co 43 

FRUIT BRANDY DISTILLERS. 

Mihalovich, Fletcher & Co 40 

Rheinstrom Bros 40 

Walden & Co 5 

West, Geo. & Son 3 

SAN FRANCISCO WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS. 

Cassin, P. J. & Co 38 

Hey, Grauerholz & Co 38 

Hencken & Schroder 38 

Hotaling, A. P. & Co 4 

Moore, Iluut & Co 4 

Martin, E. & Co 38 

Naber, Alfs & Brune 38 

Siobe Bros. & Plagemann 4 

Shea, Bocqueraz & Co 32 

Spruance, Stanley & Co 38 

Taylor, Thos. & Co 38 

Wichman & Lutgen 38 

Wilmerdiug & Co 38 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CHAMPAGNES. 

American Champagne Co 35 

Chapman, W. B '. 28 

Finkc's Widow, A 40 

Haraszthy, Arpad & Co 36 

Lachman, S. & Co 36 



Macondray &Co 34 

Meinecke, Chas. & Co 28 

Werner, A. & Co 35 

Wolflf, Wm. &Co 25 

IMPORTERS. 

Chapman, W. B 28 

Macondray & Co 34 

Meinecke, Chas. &Co 28 

Wolff, Wm. & Co 26 

SPECIAL BONDED WAREHOUSES. 

Bode & Haslett 

Overland Freight Transfer Co 

Sherman, J. D. W ., 6 

Sibley, Hiram & Co 34 

SYRUPS, CORDIALS, ETC. 

Blumenthal, M. &Co 40 

Dryden & Palmer 19 

McMillan, R. G ; 32 

Rudkin, Wm. H 32 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Beck, Pyhrr & Co 45 

Bonestell & Co 45 

California Furniture Co 44 

Coon, M. F. &Co 44 

Easton, Eldridge & Co 23 

Electric Vapor Engine Co .,. ;..... 22 

Fairbanks & Hutchinson 44 

Garratt, W. T. & Co 44 

Gall & Dunne .' 44 

Goodyear Rubber Co 45 

Golden Gate Woolen Mfg. Co — ■ 

Henley Bros 45 

Hobbs, Wall & Co 44 

Improved Automatic Gas Machine 44 

Jordan, Dr. & Co 45 

Klipstein, A 44 

Kohler & Chase.. 20 

London Assurance Corporation — • 

Loma Prieta Lumber Co 44 

Mclver, C. C 44 

Meinecke, Chas. & Co 40 

Movius, J. & Son 4 

Naber, Alfs & Brune — 

O'Brien, James — ■ 

Occidental & Oriental S. S. Co 45 

Oceanic Steamship Co 45 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co 45 

Pacific Saw Co 45 

Pierce & Co 45 

Rosenfeld's Sons, John 45 

Sanders & Co 45 

Southern Pacific Co 46 

Steele, E. L. G. & Co 40. 

Truman & Hooker 45 

Tubbs' Cordage Co — 

Wagner, L 44 

Waas, Henry — 

Wood & Scott 2 



Established 1853. 

CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

WINE VAULTS, EL. PINAL, STOCKTON, CAL. 

Sonoma Wikk anp ISiiANnv Co., • No. 1 Fiiont Street, New York. 



f/reifie WIJ^E /rJMD SflF^IT f^EVIEW^ 




A. P. HOTALING & CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 



IMPOItTCRa o^ 



\ WIHES AHDJilQUORS. 

T XT CfTXTTIEI?/ 

OLD BOURBON AND RYE WHISKIES. 

A29 to 437 J«ck«on Street. - - San Francisco. Cal. 



JlillV I>. HIKIIR. 



J. F. PLAOEMANN. 



F. C. KIEBE. 




SlEBE BHOS. 8t PliflGEmflflJl, 

WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

01. Rosedale Bonrkii & Rje Wbisfa 



AND THE 

Celebrated Belle of Bourbon. 

Southeast Cor. Sacramento and Sansome Sts 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Important pot' dline Prodacet^s. 

SACCHHRINB, 

300 TIMES SWEETER THAN SUGAR. 

An unBnrpaflWMl ii^rrtsliont for wino«, an excellent corrigent of anj' unpleasant taste; entirely innocuous. 

Soccharinu haw verj- viiliuil>li> anti-fennsntativj an;l anlLseptic properties. An addition to an alcoholic Bolution of 0.00.5 per 
cent Hawharino hIojih the fcmientatiou entirely, alHO Iho formation of mould and vinegar acid. Testimonials by authorities and any 
ftirthcr information will Ik- ehoerfully furnisluHl l»y api)lying to 

J. MOVIUS & SON, Successors to Lutz & Movius, 

Sole Ucenseea for the United States of A merica , 79 MURRAY STREET. NEW YORK 

JESSE MOORE WHISKIES, 

DIReCT fROM 

We have fiilli/ GstahlishGcl the reputation of these whiskies on the 
hiaifia Coast, and wo guarantee them as represented 

STRICTLY PURE. 

— — \i'U*:i ch'on a trial tlirv »:H>nk f.n- lli(.'ms<.-lrii. For ohIc In i|iinniiiii-i> to kiiU nt 

LOUISVILLE OR SAN FRANCISCO BY 

MOORE, HUNT & CO., 

soLfr AOf/vrs pacific coast, 
-404 FRONT ST., - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 




fA(BIFl6 WII^E /fNO SPIRIT REVIEW. 




r)isTiLr.Er) by 



»M 



E. HI- rrjL.izrx^(DTt, j'Tt. 



n 



E. H. TftYkOR, JR. & SONS, - Frankfort, Ky. 



<^^i^^^^ l^^^^^B -^>^^^^^ ^'"'^rif^ 




*«/. 



'%." 



- - WALDEN IK COGNAC " -« . , 

/^ Trade l^^:!Z!!C--<^ I Mark, ^^^ 



#■=^0' ^* iU^PJ *■■** 

V Trade ll.^>;«3ll^^ I Mark, ^"^4. r, 

Tlus Brand}-, made after llic French formula, from selected fresh grapes, has been successfully introduced, and is now regularly sold in the principal markets of 
Eur(>|K', in competition with French Cognac. Ollicial German and English chemists liavo pronounced it the purest Brandy whioli comes to tlieir markets. 

It is especially suited for the drug trade and others, where purity is demanded. While abroad these goods successfully compete, paying same duties as the French, 
the American buyer has the advantage in price, between tlie Internal Revenue tax assessed here and the custom duties on foreiijn bi-andies. Samples will be Bent on 
application. 

-V7'J^Xj1D:H11<T &d CO-, 

Eastern Office, 41 licaver Street, New York. GEYSERVILLE, SONOMA COVNTY, CAL. 

NATOMA VINEYARD CO. 

TABLE GRAPES, TOKAYS, MUSCATS, ETC. 

Red and White Ul'mes and Brandies 

Vineyards, Winery ^and Distillery, Principal Office, 

Natoma, Sacramento County, Cal. 508 California St., San Francisco. 

a H. SCHUSSLER, Siipt. D. HENSHA W WARD, Gen. Mgr. 

MAX. M, HALLE, 

Distillers' Agent and Commission Merchant, 

142 W. MAIN STREET, LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Special Attention Paid to the Unbending and Shipping of Whiskies, 

and the Placing of Insurance. 



f^e\pe WI^IE /rj^D Spilx^lT f^EVIEW. 



OLD "PEPPER" WHISKY 

DWilM «i)r V •'«* * '*W»^»* <• '*»•• I-""^'"!.'!.!!!. Kt.. under llir nmr fomiiiU 
ffir »orf than lOO yemnt, U Mir f*Hrrat ami Itrta tn thr n'orld. -lYpitrr" 
ITMaky b in i>l<t-la»iik>iM«l «liu>ky. madr In ll»- old liinr tmy frtiin ■ ftorm- 
Mto ^M ranra than MO tfrar* hy fltrr** ffrHrrnllnitH nf ihr IV|i|>it family. 
It li aadt Iroa mrleHfd ryr, iMrlry mhiI rwrn. Thr iiiatrrial U inanlied liy 
kaad. MW hthcl at a llmr. In mnall tulw, iirarlr oiHt lhi>ii»and n( wliiih air niii- 
aiaatljr mialml f<>r lb? |>ur|<ofr. No ,«nu>l If rmpliiycd lo »ii-uic nii iiiiiintiiral frr- 
rMMalkm or lanrr yk-ld. and wc •Ingle ami dnulile tlimuuli rop/trr MtUli oivr 
mftm /ImL All llir water UMd U fr>>in tbc rrlrlirated *■ H7fw>n Sprlufi" on uur 
fmntM*. wblrli I* tliF lareeft iMlfMrof mprlng of purr Hmmloiir tmirr In 
rriilfml Krnlorky. Oar r<i«|irnM;e i* the lieot and of our own manufailiirr. IVrftrt 
•longer warelMtDM*. Oar M* Jamw E. rKrrxK U llir only one of liin name who 
ha* been roKaced In llw DUIilUnK bnainea* In Kenlurky for over twenty yearr, and 
Ibmforr any whbiky oVercd I" the trade a» Rrnulm- "l^per" whUky \* fmud- 
tilml nnlTM dtetrhrri by us. 

JAS. E. PEPPEtt * CO. 




■1 




Model Mammoth Wine Cellars 

Under Approach of Brooklyn Bridge, Block E. &. G. 

ENTBAHGEm WIULJAM ANO ROSE STREETS. 



STORAGE WAREHOUSE AND COMMISSION DEPARTMENT, 

**//(»•»• Entrance, William St., lit HltM-k K 



Correapondence Solicited. 



ADDRKW4, Luytle» Brothern, Itroolclyn Bridge, ffetr York. 




S|)ecial BoiiiM Warehouse h 1, 

FIRST DISTRICT, NEW YORK. 
J". ID. ^w. sT£:Ei:Etis/LJLi>r, :pi?.o:pi?/Ietoi^. 

The only air-tight Special Bonded Warehouse in the world. Fire proof with iron roof 
and shutters and glass windows. Heated by hot-air engines, giving an even tem- 
perature the year around, thus insuring rapid development and high proof, and 
yielding the best possible results at the end of the bonding period. Cooperage 
cared for. No excessive outage. Storage and insurance the lowest. Freights 
advanced, and your business carefully attended to. Loans negotiated and sales 



made for cash when requested. 



CORRESPONDENCE AND SHIPMENTS SOLICITED. 



NO. J4> tMATCH STREET, NEW YORK. 



Incorporated 



BODE & HASLETT, 



June 12, '90. 



:PI^On^IETOI?.S 



Special Bonded Warehouse, No. 1, First District. 

r^io'ial fariiilii-f (or llic Hloniee of Oraiic and Fruit Bmndy. Lowe* t Rates of RtorAKcniul IiiKurance. Also Propriolorn of tiie Greenwich 
I)iH-k Itnllwl Kiatn> llondfil \Var<-bou»»v, and llic Ilallcrv Htreet Free Warolionses for General Sloraiic. 



OVERLAND FREIGHT TRANSFER CO. 

TEAMING AND STORAGE. PROPRIETORS OF 

Special Bonded Warehouse, No. 6, First District. 

WIna and Brandy for shipment or storage consigned oara of O. F. T. Co. San Franoisco, will receive proper attention. 



THIS SPKCE ReSER^ED FOR 

jxim. H- SHIELDS, 

WHISKY BROKER 

No. 6 West Third Street, - - Cincinnati, O. 







ratpiiji^i^ 



VOL. XXVI, NO. 1. SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 26, 1891. $3.00 PER YEAR 

Issued Semi -Monthly. iWercAan* it was purchased by the present publishers in March 

E M WOOD & GO . - . PROPRIETORS. 1^89. That journal was a sixteen page paper in very bad health, 

patiently waiting for the newspaper morgue wasron to call around. 

WINFIELD SCOTT B. M. WOOD. r J o f i b i, 

The wagon never came. On the contrary the sheet was rapidly 

Tlie I'AClPic WINE AND SI'IKIT UKVlEn In the only paper of revivified and within the short period of twenty-two months it 

».s cinioi WeM of Chictujo. It circulates amony the wine makerx and ],j^g j^gg^ transformed into the forty-six page Review of to-day. 

brandy dMUlefs of Callfovnla; the wholenale wine and Hptrlt trade , ■ ■, ■ i i /. . i ^ ^ j_ -, ,.., ,, 

^ ,. T. ,^ ^, . , ., . . •> .III I , ii„.„ e ti „ whicli IS now ranked as one of the greatest trade papers of the world. 

of the I'actflc Voast, and tlie Importers, distillers and Jobbers of the " ^ ^ 

Eastern States. Its growth has been steady and upon a substantial basis, and its 

' "" ~ ; ~ ' ~ T] circulation has been extended at a rate unparalelled in the history 

Subscription par year— lu advance, postage paid: ' '' 

For tiic United States, Mexico and Canada *3 00 of trade journalism. Not Only is it read by every wholesale 

sinsie'copS^^^ ^ 20 dealer and jobber upon the Pacific Coast and by every prominent 
wine producer, but its field lias been pushed into the territory east 

Entered at the San Praucitco Post Otilce as second-class matter. /. i -r. , ^r • -i ■ -^t -it- . ^i . 

_ . of the Rocky Mountains, and now in New York, Chicago, Pittsburg, 

A rT-TnTsmTTHTif^ : Cincinnati, St. Louis, New Orleans and the other trade centers of 

the East, it is read and known as the sole representative of the 

PITTSBURGHAGENT. ,,. ., , ^utjc-i^^i *• 4^t 

^ ^.^.Ti^.T^T ,„.,,r ,. . T^.., , T. wme and liquor interests on the Pacinc Side of the continent. In 

R.RAPHAEL, 190 Wylie Ave, Pittsburg, Pa. , „,...,,, „ „ „ , , 

,, , . „ „ , . , -..-r ., ^,^ ,^ the matter of advertising it has been equally well favored and 

Sole Agent for Pennsylvania and North-western New York. ,,, ^ ,-, -^ , n-.,r.... ., 

among the trade 01 the East and West it IS recognized as the only 

CINCINNATI AND KENTUCKY AGENT, medium with which to reach the varied branches of the wine and 

WM. H. SHIELDS, No. 6 West Third Street, Cincinnati, O. liquor trade of the Pacific coast and Rocky Mountain regions. 

The publishers are naturally and reasonably proud of these 

i_i p "p p, TT/p TV •p p TVOT^I/M achievements. They herewith extend their thanks to the many 

patrons of the Review for past favors and hope with their co- 

With this issue the Review appears in a handsome and operation to repeat during the present year the success of the 

greatly improved form, having been e(£uipped with an entirely P*^ " 

new plant, printed on the best book paper and enlarged from NEW ADVERTISEMENTS 

thirty-four to forty-six pages. An ornamented cover has been 

added, the reading pages increased in number and more diversified ^j^^ attention of the readers of the Review is directed to the 

in subject matter, and several valuable departments added. The following new advertisements which appear elsewhere in this 

new features to which we call attention are the departments of issue: 

correspondence from Chicago and New York concerning the Moore & Selliger, distillers, Louisville, Ky. 

eastern wine market, and from Louisville and Cincinnati regard- Ed. Murphy & Co., distillers, Lawrenceburg. Ky. 

ing the market for whiskies. The facilities for obtaining strictly ^""P^ ^'^^V ^^'^ ^**-' *"""'*' ^nerclumts. San Francis. 

accurate prices on all whiskies, whether bourbons or ryes, have ^'"^^ ^''^*" ^ ^''•' '"""' '«*:«'^«™<^' *"^ Francij^eo, (eidarged). 

- , , T , ,. , . , , , Jos. Melezer & Co.,%vine merchants, San Francmco, (enhirqed). 

been perfected and can bo relied upon. Another valuable tt- n p n • i , <j v 

'^ ^ Htrschler & Co.. wme merchants, San rrancisco. 

improvement will be found in the classification and index of ^^ jj^ena Wine Co., wine merchants, San Francisco. 

advertisements. Electric Vapor Engine Co., San Francisco. 

This issue of the Review may be considered, in a measure, Easton, Eld ridge & Co., Auctioneers, San Francisco. 

a holiday or annual number, as it gives aU the statistics concern- ' 

the status of the wine and liquor trade during the past year, and The distillers of Baltimore county, Maryland, are refiising to 

presents the views of many of the leading members of tlie trade P'^y ^^^ ^^'^^ ^'P""^ ^^^^''^ "' '^«'"^- «lai""ng t^'^* 't i« '"^'^e to 

J . , • .T ii 1 i^ >.i- /^ i rr,. order or sold under contract, and does not belong to them. We 

and wine producers concerning the outlook for the future. These , , . , ■ . , i / , , , , , • , 

- , . are glad to see this stand taken, and we have always claimed 

articles from the pens of able and thoughtful men will be found ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ ^^.^ p^i^^ ^^j^^ ^^p^^ ,,.,,j,ky i^ bond. Warehoiuse 

not only instructive but entertaining. receipts are certainly recognized as property and are taxed where 

By reason of the foregoing facts we feel justified in reverting ever held, and there is no reason why the whisky called for in 

to the phenomenal career of the Review. As the San Francisco these warehouse receipts should be taxed. 



8 



f^lf le Wlf^E Jkf40 Sflt^lT REVIEW. 



MAt^KET -REVIEW. 



/©ALIPORNIA WINE8.— The market in nliHolutoly fla« and 
^^ without fcotarr. Holders are backwanl in offering their 
atodu, no huyen« iH-ing in the market. An improvement netnl 
not bs expected until Home weekH. Chir UHual HtatiHtic8 n'lninling 
moTcmrats, in addition to the annual ittatetnentH will be found 
rlwwbere. 

^^ALIPOBNIA BRANDIES.— The market in dull, the only 
^^ topic of intere8t being in connection with Uie fortification of 
Bweet wine*. After conHiderahle trouble and telegraphiuK to 
Washington, a modification in the interpn^tatiou of the new 
Bww^ Wine Law has been obtained, pcnnitting vwre than one for- 
tification of the wines while in process of manufacture. TIum 
UMimwinii was greatly need<><l and whm dictatinl by the iMHMiliar 
eooMiooB needAil in making Hweet Wini«. The telugrum from 
CommiflBkNMr Maaon granting this privile^ is as follows: 

"I have the honor to infonn you that this day the following 
tele^tnun was addressetl to Horace W. Byington, E«q., Collector of 
Internal Revenue at Bacramento, Cal.: 

■•Referring to the application of Kohler and Frohling and 
others to put a<lditional alcohol in wine heretofore fortifie<l by 
then, you are advised that i)ackage« may Im" opened, fortilicsitions 
oontin'ued within the limit allowwl by law, and then repealed, re- 
marked and re«<tamped, being particularly careful to keep account 
of the alcohol so used, and to notify the party that assessments 
will be made for the same shall it hen>after appear that the 
additional alcohol was made necessarj' by their fault or n^li- 
gence." 

A similar telegram was also sent on the 17th instant to 
William H. Sears, Esq., Collector of Internal Revenue at San 
Francisco, Cal. Respectfully yours, 

Beoeipta of brandy are very heavy but the exports are largely 
in ezoeas of receipts. Our annual statement will be found in 
another column. 

*f^ENTUCKY WHISKIES.— Whiskies are steady and in 
^/^ g<xxl demand. The annual st4iti>ment ap]M>iiring in another 
column shows that the receipts of whiski(« arv H]>proxiniating 
very closely to the receipts of spirits. This improvement in the 
situation is welcome to the h%<ling desilers. The stringency in 
the money market has had no other effect than to clieck the rise 
in prioee. 

*7^YE8. — Are steady and the demand is slowly improving. 
^^ The eastern brands are gradually gaining the reirognition 
which they well deserve. 



THE gEAK 1890. 



Baewhere in this issue of the Rrview will be found the 
llgnrea giving the total exports and imports of wines, brandies, 
whiakieM, etc., for the year 18JK) with comparative rticords of other 
years. It is without doubt the most compU-te and accurat*; annual 
exhibit ever made in this city and as a statistical record will be 
firand of great value to the trade and pro<lucers. It will be seen 
that in nearly all lines there has t>een a marked increase in the 
Tdune of businc-ss transacted, the exports by sea and rail of wine 
malrlng a particularly good showing over those of 1K80. During 
the year nearly 200,0(HJ gallons more were exported to New York 
Iqraeaand there was a healthy growtii of trade with C^-ntral 
America, Mexico, British Columbia, Hawaii and Tahiti, giving a 
grand total by sea of 4,ir>(i,.')<):t gallons as against 3,945,235 in the 
previoaa twelve months, or a gain of 206.108 gallons. The ex- 
porta of eased wines to domestic iH)ints aggr«'gate<l 1240 cases as 
compared with 607 cases in 1889 and to fcveign porta 7818, making 
a total of 90S8 oases as against 5(i.'>» cases in 1889, or an increase 
of over lllly per cent TTiis is highly gratifying as it indicates a 
derekqiement of trade in a line greatly to >><> d«>sire<l. 

One of the highly enoooraging featunti of the export tables 
will be foond In the shipments of bulk wines overland. Tlie 



shipments of cased goods by rail have not, up to the present time, 
been obtainable, but we hope to give a monthly statement of 
these exports in the columns of the Rkview hereafter. The cx- 
portations from San Francisco were more than 400,000 gallons in 
excess of those of 1889. Sacramento shows an increase of over 
200,000 gjillons and Stotrkton nearly 50,000 gallons; and we have 
a grand total of rail shipments of 4,941, <)89 gallons as against 
3,945,794 for the preceding year. This gives an increase which 
lat^ks but a few gsillons of being a round million, and shows that 
thert^ has lHH»n a very rapid expansion of the wine business in the 
east during the yojir just passed. 

For the grand total of all wine exports we have 9,091,997 
gjillons and 9,258 cases for 1890, against 7,920,9'59 gallons and 
5,658 cases in 1888. We thus have a total gain for the past year 
1,171,058 gsiUous and 3,400 cases, which is the best showing that 
has been made in the California wine business for many a year. 

By reference to the tables showing receipts of wine in San 
Francisco from interior cellars, it will 1 e seen that they were 
11,561,076 gallons oi- 1,037,572 gallons in excess of those of 1889 
and 79,486 gallons less than the total exports for the year. 

In the exportations of brandy there was but a slight increase, 
the total being 600,097 gallons and 436 ca-ses, as against 590,265 
gallons in the previous year. Receipts of brandy in San Fran- 
cisco for the twelve months were slightly more than in 1889 and 
59,740 gallons less than the total exports for 1890, showing that 
the reserve stocks were drawn on to this extent. 

There was a heavy growth in the exports of whisky by sea, 
the total being 4732 cases and 31,189 gallons. 

The importations of whi kies by rail and sea show that these 
gomls are being more extensively liandle<l in this market than 
ever before, the rail imports having been 3973 cases and 15,442^ 
barrels, and those by sea from Atlantic ports 275 cases and 4153 
barrels. The foreign and re-importetl whisky aggregate<l 4188 
cjises, 1560J barrels, 275 octaves and 542J casks. During the 
same periwl the imports of spirits and alcohol were 28,028 bar- 
rels and these figures show that the whisky imports are fast 
csitching up with those of spirits. 

In the tables of importations of foreign champagnes will be 
found conclusive proof that the people of this coast are fast 
becoming champagne drinkers. The imports for 1890 were 
25,267 cases and baskets, an increase of 3159 cases over importa- 
tions for 1889 and 5122 cases over those of 1888. A better 
indication of the healthy growth of trade in this line could not be 
shown in any part of the United States, and we doubt if it could 
l>e equaled. These figures do not include the large quantity of 
champagne produced in this city. 

From the fon^oing facts it will be readily seen that the year 
1890 brought a substantial increase in nearly all branches of the 
wine and liquor trade, a fact upon which the Review congratulates 
its patrons with the wish that 1891 may be even more prosperoUB. 



ATN APOLOGg. 

We owe an apology to the patrons of the Review for the delay 
which has occumnl in getting out this issue. Work on this 
!mml)er has been kept up almost night and day, but it was impossi- 
ble to issue the Review in its new form sooner, and we hope its 
increastnl excellence will Ix* deemtnl an ample excuse for our other 
short comings. This (nlition is a large one and will be sent broad- 
cast thn)ugliout the United States. 

Joseph R. Peebles' Sons Company of Cincinnati, who are the 
largest distributors of "Pepper" whisky, in the trade, and who 
rea^ntly ci'lebrate<l the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of 
their house, have sent out a magnificent wmvenir of the occasion. 
It is in the form of a white silk iNinner, attached to an ornamen- 
tal bronze Iwr. The striking feature of the banner is a colored 
lithograph of a large spniy of splendid navel oranges. 



f/reif le WIME AND Sf IRIT [REVIEW. 



THE YEHf^ 1890. 

Total Exports and Imports of Wines, Brandies, Whis- 
kies, Etc., With Comparative Figures 
of Other Years. 



EXPORTS OF WINE. 



TO NEW 

Mouths. Cases. 

January 35 

February 30 

March 759 

April 27 

May 45 

June 29 

July 129 

August 14 

September 65 

October 1 

November 55 

December 71 



YORK BY SEA. 
Gallons. 
387,357 
80,408 
379,759 
.303,841 
299,868 
396,536 
315,586 
352,612 
400,675 
189,843 
310,447 
375,010 



Total 1,240 

" in 1889 697 

" in 1888 1,244 

" in 1887 1,335 



3,791,942 
3,603,315 
3,052,755 
1,680,227 



TO CENTRAL AMERICA. 



Mouths. Cases. 

January 374 

February 368 

March 82 

April 217 

May 206 

June 293 

July 59 

August 544 

September 184 

October 627 

November 404 

December 792 



Total 4,150 

" in 1889 2,781 

" in 1888 3,026 

" in 1887 2,534 



Gallons. 
3,610 
10,582 
4,173 
3,889 
4,452 
4,293 
3,538 
3,643 
5.912 
3^241 
8,969 
4,863 

61,165 
44,769 
45,683 
31,260 



TO MEXICO. 



Months. Cases. 

January 78 

February 69 

March 60 

April 66 

May 192 

June 47 

July 90 

August 55 

September 107 

October 80 

November 40 

December 224 



Total 1,108 

" in 1889 767 

" in 1888 641 

" in 1887 290 



Gallons. 
7,094 
7,424 
3,417 
1,162 
3,404 
6,894 
4,824 
7,707 
9,099 
4,836 
8,152 
4,550 

68,563 
52,358 
51,084 
30,391 



April 30 

May 166 

June 125 

July 87 

August 116 

September 246 

October 25 

November 15 

December 160 



Total 1,035 

" in 1889 471 

" in 1888 342 

" in 1887 215 



1,764 
2,787 
1,312 
2,032 
2,135 
328 
616 
3,573 
2,021 

20,380 
12,800 
12,782 
13,313 



Value. 

$ 119,085 

44,.358 

160,268 

130,617 

133,315 

161,674 

132,130 

153,549 

163,144 

69,594 

141,238 

161,287 

$1,570,429 

1,595,893 

1,266,200 

696,412 



Value. 
4,525 
9,800 
3,574 
5,171 
4,448 
4,358 
2,762 
5,439 
5,662 
4,813 
8,276 
7,409 

66,237 
43,639 
46,077 
34,654 



Value. 
3,501 
4,983 
2,673 
1,007 
3,216 
3,659 
3,191 
4,877 
5,655 
3,814 
3,691 
3,856 



TO HAWAII. 



Months. 



Cases. 



January 29 

February 53 

March 66 

April 25 

May 40 

June .r ... 101 

July 

August 113 

September 56 

October 47 

November 24 

December 117 



Total 671 

" in 1889 501 

. " in 1888 492 

" in 1887 612 



Gallons. 

14,245 
9,489 
5,359 
8,514 
5,027 

11,700 
6,773 
8,830 

12,601 
5,971 
9,853 

21,624 

118,986 
99,537 
66,667 
71,150 



TO CHINA AND JAPAN. 



Months. 



Cases. 



January 119 

February 10 

March 5 

-April 63 

May 6 

June 8 

July 

August 

September 72 

October 31 

November 2 

December 8 



Total 324 

" in 1889 117 

" in 1888 214 

» in 1887 526 



^ Gallons. 

1,695 

510 

2,128 

1,488 

1,792 

54 

578 

1,184 

3,908 

2,469 

5,256 

2,014 

23,076 

22,710 
30,266 
28,378 



TO EUROPE. 



Months. 



Cases. 



44,123 
33,543 
31,403 
20,023 



TO BRITISH COLUMBIA AND CANADA (BY SEA.) 

Months. Cases. Gallons. Value. 

January 1 881 $ 698 

February 39 1,886 1,784 

March 25 1,045 758 



January 30 

February 82 

March 

April 8 

May 14 

June 18 

July 2 

August 18 

September 175 

October 47 

November 4 

December 7 



Total 305 

" in 1889 260 

" in 1888 248 

" in 1887 1642 



Gallons. 

4,627 

3,044 

2,642 

139 

646 

7,016 

2,850 

3,952 

7,340 

10,138 

1,207 

86 

43,687 
51,305 
62,662 
26,3.55 



1,224 
3,060 
1,416 
1,5!- 7 
2,100 
1,578 
571 
2,579 
2,319 



19,673 

11,388 

9,563 

9,717 



Value. 

9,287 
7,204 
3,994 
6,00(t 
3,945 

11,232 
4,453 
6,610 
8,830 
4,614 
7,561 

14,997 



88,733 
77,159 
56,434 

62,888 



Value. 

1,451 

230 

916 

788 

676 

52 

262 

517 

1,579 

1,034 

2,160 

876 

; 10,531 
10,571 
14,106 
16,401 



Value. 

S 3,012 

2,812 

1,514 

140 

384 

3,546 

1,660 

1,680 

4,540 

4,271 

1,063 

100 

$ 24,722 
25,.304 
36,112 
20,562 



10 



f/teifie Wl/^E /rjsiD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



TO TAnm. 



UoaOm. CMOS. 

JanuMj 7 

Ffbniary 

iC=:= :::: 

Jane. 

July S 

August 

Ootober 8 

HoTonber 6 

Deoembcr. 

Total 26 

OSAND TOTAL OF 
Destination. Cbbcs. 

To New York 1,240 

" Ci'ntnU America... 4,150 

" Mexiw 1,108 

" Brit, ('oluinl)ia ) , ^.y. 
and Canada.. \ ''"^^ 

" Hawaii 671 

" Cliina and Japan... 824 

" Europe. 305 

" Tahiti 26 

" MiiioeUaneouD 200 



Total by aoa. 9,058 

" « " 1889...5,659 
" " " 1888...6,485 



Gallons. 

1,S0« 

6,658 

2,668 

020 

427 

887 

681 

2,056 

1,269 

1,870 



Value. 

I 685 

2,100 

987 

288 
223 
846 
285 
681 
446 
766 



17,736 


1 6,776 


EXFOBT8 


BY SEA. 


Gallons. 

3,7tfl.{J42 

61,166 

68,563 


Value. 

1 1,570,429 

66,237 

44,123 


20,380 


19,673 


118,986 
23,076 
43,687 
17,J36 


88,733 
10,531 
24,722 

/q?) 3,766 



4,150..S!>3 
3,94.'>,2:J5 
3,316,912 



$ 1,834,990 
1,753,256 
1,418,043 



WINE SHIPMENTS OVERLAND. 

FROM SAN FRANCISCO, 



January 

February 

Mardi 

April............ 

May 

June 177^953 

July 238,564 

Augui* 314,109 

September 414,268 

October 506,162 

November 392,795 

December 276,535 

Total 3,741,365 

FROM OAKLAND. 
January 2,699 



February 

March 

April., 

May... 

June.., 

July... 

AuKUst 3,178 

September 478 

Ortoljer «...., 6 471 

November '713 

Tkaeaiyet 2,468 



Total. 



January.. 
February. 
March ' 
April. 
May. 



FROM BACRAMEinX). 

56,796 

41,876 

48,648 

33,777 
63,879 



J"?® .- 69,755 

J«"y •. ■ , 44,313 

August.. : 04 355 

September 00 703 

Octolier 74,094 

Novnnber ,,., 575'>'> 

J>«aembar 62|776 

'^^°**^ 668,495 



FROM SAN JQSE. 

GallonH. 

January 3,479 

February 6,607 

March ...«. 4,715 

April 15,798 

May 5,501 

Jane ...,. 7,068 

July 4,785 

AuguHt 10,864 

September 8,743 

October 19,624 

November 6,618 

December • 12,440 

Total 105,242 

FROM STOCKTON. 

January 7,799 

February 8,208 

March 17,140 

April 5,766 

June 3,134 

July 3,167 

August 8,196 

S«'ptember 6,267 

October 23,100 

November 8,060 

December 26,902 

Total 117,739 

FROM M.VRYSVILLE. 

January 

F'ebruary 94 

March 56 

AprU 2,330 

May 346 

July 2,021 

Septemljcr 143 

November 110 

December 69 

Total 5,168 

FROM LOS ANGELES. 

January 4,623 

February 6,783 

March 3,718 

April 23,380 

May 6,480 

June : 5,768 

July 6,413 

August 11,413 

September 7,234 

October 8,743 

November 12,965 

December 4,508 

Total 101,018 

FROM OOLTON. 

January 23,671 

February 11,191 

March 7,201 

April 21,832 

May 10,970 

June 22,453 

July 8,9.64 

August 14,268 

8«>pt<'ml)or 2,797 

OctolHT 20,513 

Novemlier 8,789 

December 26,;M1 

Totol 178,990 



Gallons. 
152,887 
229,770 
360,305 
400,752 
277,265 



136 
2,809 

628 
2,661 
2,864 

317 



25,321 



f/rSlfie WIJvlE /cJSID Sfll^lT PREVIEW. 



11 



V GRAND TOTAL WINE SHIPMENTS BY RAIL. 

fanuary 251,954 

Tebruary • 302,664 

"March 444,592 

April 504,163 

May 367,091 

June 279,005 

July 306,523 

August 426,384 

September 501,033 

October 658,709 

November 487,572 

December 411,999 

Total 4,941,689 

" in 1889 3,945,794 

" in 1888 3,875,232 

GRAND TOTAL OF ALL WINE EXPORTS. 

Destination. Cases. Gallons. Value. 

Domestic points by sea... 1,240 3,791,94 $1,570,429 

Foreign ports 7,818 :^53,G03 264,567 

Overland * 4,941,689 2,133,730 

Miscellaneous 200 4.758 3,766 

— ^ — ^-SY " ^ 

Grand Total ,»^^r , 9,091, 997 ^U.- $3,972,492 

In 1889 5,658 7,920,939 3,774,258 

In 1888 6,485 7,235,994 3,022,392 

In 1887 t 6,901,771 3,140,305 

•Case goods shipped oveiland not obtainable. fNo record of case goods for tliis year. 

BRANDY EXPORTS TO FOREIGN PORTS BY SEA. 

Months. Cases. Gallons. Value. 

January 5 51 $ 223 

February 68 28,145 71,545 

March 108 5,801 3,871 

April 54 642 1,469 

May 26 654 1,042 

June 34 13,858 9,686 

July 3,379 2,393 

August 6,005 8,444 

September 6 11,010 8,453 

October — 1,991 1,905 

November 33 1,449 1,969 

December 32 1,635 1,827 

Total 356 75,220 $ 109,827 

BRANDY EXPORTS TO DOMESTIC POINTS BY SEA. 

Months. Gallons. Value. 

January 45,396 $69,207 

February 3,424 1,945 

March 26,523 41,408 

April 25'415 39,623 

May 16,088 21,121 

June _43,231 .52,756 

July 4,039 7,526 

August 6,006 9,430 

September 7,808 15,756 

October 2,079 3,887 

November 13,537 26,407 

December 34,481 64,228 

Total, 80 cases.... 228,037 $353,294 

BRANDY SHIPMENTS OVERLAND. 

FROM SAN FRANCISCO. Gallons. 

January 7.907 

February 10,818 

March 19,234 

April 25.742 

May 10,717 

June 8,175 

July 1;956 

August 12,754 

September 15,061 

October 16,597 

November 17,745 

December 11,708 

Total 159,014 

" in 188a 118,624 



FROM LOS ANGELES. 

January 189 

February 503 

March Ml 

April 307 

May 719 

Juno 230 

July 3,698 

August 2,725 

September 2,750 

October 7,834 

November 540 

December ; 1,721 

Total 21.793 

" in 1889 64,175 

FROM COLTON. " 

January 5,730 

February 5, 1 34 

March 350 

April ; 2,729 

May 8,554 

June 4,056 

July 166 

August 1,398 

December 762 

Total 28,879 

" in 1889 .-. 33,791 

FROM SACRAMENTO. 

January 3,789 

February ■. 8,657 

March 720 

April 351 

May 4,t564 

June 1^7 

July 5,491 

August 9,«78 

September 1,250 

October " 7,515 

November '. 5,274 

December .' 5,9o<> 

Total 53,241 

" in 1889 65,578 

FROM SAN JOSE. 

January 207 

February l"^"* 

March 192 

April 3,058 

May 300 

June 697 

July 681 

Angust 1,041 

September 803 

October 865 

November 2,38o 

December 766 

Total 11,150 

" m 1889 11,832 

FROM STOCKTON. 

March 13,055 

May 128 

June 2,927 

August ■- "7 

Septemlxjr 2,091 

December ""^ 

Total 18,363 

FROM OAKLAND. 

April : 25 

FROM MARYGVILLE. 

January ^\^ 

April • 2,175 

Total 4,376 



12 



J^lfie WIJ^E >»^P SfltjIT {REVIEW. 



OBAIO) TOTAXr BRANDY SHIPMENTS OVEBLAND. 

JaBoaiT 20,028 

FMmury 25^^ 

SuSr!:. 34,068 

April 34,447 

M^. 24,782 

Jane. 

July 

Angaat 

flapto mb cr 

OololMr 

IfoTunbor ■ 

December 



10,282 
11,992 
27,663 
22,665 
32,811 
25,944 
21,007 



Ultld 296,840 

" in 1889 294,000 

QBAND TOTAL OF BRANDY EXPORTS. 
DmliiiBtloii Omcb. Gallons. Value. 

DomoiUo points by Hea... 80 228,037 $363,294 

" " by rail... 296,840 *453,120 

Foreign porto. 866 75,220 $109,827 



Tot*l 

" 1889..... 

" 1888 

" 1887 

•BtUmiaed Value 



436 



600,097 
590,265 
451,080 
472,752 



$ 909,641 
985,742 
690,152 
774,313 



WINE AND BRANDY RECEIPTS IN SAN FRANCISCO. 

Wine. Brandy. 

Janoary 618,630 

February 864,466 

Mardi 1,049,360 

April 1,088,169 

May 1,281,889 

June 1,133,265 

July 921,920 

AuguHt 972,537 

September 754,460 

October 1,031,960 

November 972,700 

December 872,200 



Total, 1890 ll,r,(;i,076 

" 1889 10,52.%504 

" 1888 S,S.V2,611 

" 1887 8,496,344 

WHISKY EXPORTS BY SEA. 



Montlw. Cases. 

January 510 

February 414 

Mait^ 



April. 
May.. 



435 
579 
374 
221 
191 



June. 

July 

August : 663 

Sefrtembcr 312 

Ck^ober 429 

Novonber 296 

December 388 



GallonH. 

851 
2,190 

764 
1,278 
1,107 

236 

945 
2,137 

617 
1,753 

475 

836 



70,570 
23,195 
23,953 
25,660 
27,884 
51,075 
27,060 
17,810 
39,000 
58,940 
92,130 
83,080 

540,357 
517,243 
227,585 
256,104 



I Value. 
5,329 
9,997 
5,126 
5,274 
4,920 
2,646 
2,713 
7,769 
3,924 
7,635 
3,750 
4,723 



Total 4,7.32 31,189 43,806 

Tte laipofli of Brmad}'. Hum and Oin by rail were: -nrandy. 810 caaes and 0,461 
(allout: Ciin. !:» raw^ nml WMti gallon!-; Kiim. 'J.IMCJ eaUona, 

WHISKY IMPORTS BY RAIL. 

MontliH. 

January 400 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

Dooemlicr 



.!am"«. 


BarrclH. 


QalluuH. 


400 


1,(X)4 


31,867 


878 


1,353 


58,819 


1,097 


1,677 


70,406 


67 


1,773 


95,735 


816 


l,(>r,9 


64,797 




9254 


39,115 


86 


OS 4 


31,488 


70 


1,1 s;j 


45,826 


190 


i,:mi 


64,918 


26 


1,0694 


44,294 




1,573 


72,369 


344 


1,2314 


65/)65 



IMPORTS OF WHISKY BY SEA. 



FltUM ATLANTKJ TUKTS. 

Canes. 



January 

Febtaary 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

Novemlier 

December 

Total, 1890 

FOREIGN 
Barrels. 

January 

February 249 

March 

April 

May 120 

June 296i 

July 30 

August 335 

September 

October 455 

November 

December 75 



25 



25 



150 
40 
40 



275 
AND RE-IMPORTED. 



Cases. 
1,055 

310 
20 

325 

10 

501 

1,216 
484 
267 



Octaves. 
20 



Barrels. 
1724 
99 
356 
108 
4424 
300 
444 
689 
5194 
■689 
414JI 
3244 

4,155 
Casks. 



10 



25 



145 



56 



H 
1 
543 



20 



Total 1,5604 4.188 275 

GRAND TOTAL OF ALL WHISKY IMPORTS. 

SEA AND RAIL. 



546J 



Barrels. 

By Bail 15,4424 

Atlantic ports ) . j-- 

Domestic j ' 
Re-imported) ^ ^qqi 
and Foreign j ' ^^ 

Totiil. 



Cases. 
3,973 

276 

4,188 

8,436 



Octaves. 



276 



Casks. 



545i 



21,158 8,436 275 545J^ 

IMPORTS OF ALCOHOL AND SPIRITS BY RAIL 

Barrels. Gallons 

January 1,090 42,.33y 

February 3,393 131,775 

March 3,030 119,732 

April 1,802 71,427 

May 2,029 57,498 

June 2,820 110,581 

July 2,0.39 80,893 

August 2,117 84,043 

September 2,319 91,667 

Octoljer 2,128 82,615 

NovemlMjr 2,564 95,621 

December 2,697 99,091 



Total. 



Total 3,973 



16,4424 



669,378 



2S,02.S 1,093,92'J 

IMPORTS OF CHAMPAGNE. cu^. 

January 3.287 

February 1,430 

March 860 

April 1.936 

May ; .-{OO 

June 3,.')73 

July 3,010 

August 45 

September 1,136 

October 3,190 

November 5,400 

IXHwmlMjr 1,100 

Total 25,267 

" in 1889 22,108 

" in 1888 20,145 

EK'RATUM. 

The ExjMjrts of Native Wine to Tahiti during tlie month ol 
August should be increased by 2,978 gallons, valu(>d at $908. 



f/reifie WIJNJE /fJ^JD Sfll^lT (REVIEW. 



13 






■HA-RASZTHg O/N FI/NE WI/NES. 



Ill regard to fine wines I think that our greatest success lies 
in the future, because heretofore none of us engaged in the busi- 
ness have looked for anything but goo<l bearers and have been 
satisfied with an average quality of wine. It is only within the 
last seven or eight years that any extended notice has been given 
to the higher grades. In the early days there were few or no 
wine makers who would exchange a yield of 'five and six tons of 
grapes to the acre for one or two tons by planting the finer 
varieties. 

Some hea<lway in the right direction has been made in the 
last seven or eight years, on a small scale it is true, and possibly 
just to see how the experiment would turn out. The people who 
are experimenting are not generally found among the large 
growers, but are more likely to be discovered jimong the hills and 
retired nooks in the counties nearest the bay. I find that they 
have worked cautiously. Most of them are men of small property 
and limited means, and do the greater part wf the work them- 
selves. I think that the finest wines of the State will eventually 
be found to have been made by just this class of viticulturists. 
They have time and they use it properly; they have ambition 
and follow it. They do not reckon their time at so many dollars 
an hour. Very likely it will require some length of time before 
their products are appreciated, but the time will come either in 
their lives or in those of their children following. I know several 
people, the exact counterpart of those above described, and 
believe them the forerunners of a new era of wine making in our 
State. 

Small quantities of wine have been produced on accidentally 
discovered soil, with the proper grapes planted thereon, and these 
have given in a few instances, very fair results — wines that com- 
mand the approval of their quality of any true connoisseur or bon 
vimnt, provided he always divests himself of any prejudice of 
country, climate or race. The latter is very hard for ninety- 
nine of every one hundred wine drinkers tto do. Even with 
the presentation of the finest of our products — products that 
would rank with the better classes of foreign wines — the remark 
is made in a patronizing manner, galling to the true Californian 
presenting the wines, that the "wine is very good for California." 
These people evidently forget, or never knew, that there are 
no two vineyards in the world which make a wine exactly alike. 
Nevertheless differences are found even among the higher classes, 
where there is such an enormous difference of character — only 
the type remaining the same. Our critics limit our quality to 
the present standard of ordinary wines and are loth to admit that 
we can produce anything better than that, whereas any number 
of small lots of wine that have been made in the last six or seven 
years, are fully capable of holding their places among the finer 
grades of European wines. 

The future of fine wines in this State depends upon the 
willingness to sacrifice quantity to quality, and to wait patiently 
for an income, coupled with the good luck of being able to find 
the varieties best suited to the different soils, and to the different 
climates. I mention especially climate because within the last 
ten years I have concluded that in our State at least, climate is 
even more important, within reasonable limits, than the soil, in 
giving quality from certain types, notably those of the Medoc 
red varieties. Our future red wines of high type will no doubt 
be limited to three or four varieties now grown in the Medoc 
district on the Gironde, and to some extent already in California, 
and I believe that a lasting monument ought and possibly will 
be erected to the Great Unknown of France who discovered and 
first planted the Cabernet Sauvignon and the Cabernet Franc. 
These grapes will produce the grand wines of the future, as they 
have done in the past around Bordeaux. I think that every 
vineyard within forty miles of the ocean, from San Diego to 
Siskiyou counties should have an acre or two of these varieties 
planted irrespective of the quantity produced, in order to join in 



a grand effort to discover where the propw soil lies and the right 
climate can be had to produce the highest type of wine capable 
of being made from these grapes. It is only through such general 
efforts and public spirit that these facts can be made known; and 
that we will be enabled to discover the choice spots of land which 
will carry the renown of our viticultural products to the ends of 
the earth. 

I have matle up my mind that red wines are often left too 
long in the packages before bottling and sold too soon after 
bottling. There is a certain bottle flavor discovered in good 
ordinary wines from Europe, which is entirely lacking in our own. 
I understand the reason why w6 have not gone more extensively 
into this branch of wine handling. It is atributable partly to 
the great cost of bottling, the additional capital required, the 
contingent formation of sediments and the consequent discolora- 
tion of wines, the precipitation of albuminous substances and 
other causes. The sediments occur partly fi-om improper fermen- 
tation in making the wine, but mostly from our anxiety to hurry 
the wines from an unclear to a bright state, and likewise from 
bottling before the wines are as bright as they should be. There 
is a way — though a costly one — to rid wines of these sediments. 
This is by decanting the bottle. It may be costly, but I believe 
that in a few years it will be found that a large number of con- 
sumers will quite willingly pay the additional cost in recognition 
of the added quality. 

The future of our fine wines of course will depend upon our 
ability to discover the proper class of soils and climate. That 
the business of making and marketing these wines will pay, I 
have no doubt. I have, in my own experience, found many 
people who are willing to pay a fair price for a first-class article. 
Of course there will always be those who will think that though 
California wines may be as good in their several classes as French 
wines, they ought to be sold at a much lower price. This is 
unfair, barring the difference in freight and duty. If the quality 
of our wines is as good as the wines of France and Germany, then 
we should receive the same remuneration which is paid for the 
vintages of those countries. If our wines are better, we should 
receive a better price. In my mind there is nothing that will 
prevent us from making the production and sale of our fine wines 
as profitable as is the sale of the limited proportion of fine wines 
produced in France and Germany. Therein lies the possibility 
of making one's own price when we have a larger number of con- 
sumers who will be willing to pronounce upon the quality of the 
wine, before examining the label or cork brand, or inquiring 
where the wine came from. 

The vine growers of California have had uphill work. They 
are not yet at the apex of prosperity nor of the quality of their 
products. With all that they have to contend with, they have 
made great strides in breaking down prejudice, and in teaching 
the people that California produces wines of many qualities, the 
largest number of which are agreeable and drinkable. They have 
also made a more restrictedquantity of the better quality of wines, 
and still smaller quantities which attract attention and admira- 
tion from those competent to judge. 

With the education of the masses, the deserved recognition 
will come. I can remember the time when the old red Mission, 
with all its harshness and defects, was drank and approved. Now 
such wines are rare in this market, and usually find their way 
into the stills. The day is near at hand, I believe, when the gilded 
youth of the East will Strike upon the idea of being Americans and 
of patronizing America. It will have become tame, by reason of 
travel of our people in European countries, to hear the same old 
song — admiration and exaltation of the products of the Old Country 
when ours are so much more favored by Nature, soil and climate. 
Those days which are to come, will be the halcyon times of our 
State, and let us hope that they will soon come. 



^^ 



^ /fa^t^e^^^^ 



14 



jyteifie Wl;^^E /c/^P SflF^IT t^EVIEW. 



FUTUnE OF OU-R WINES. 

Ill uiKtiiiK a rvtniK|if<-t and cuiii|>»rinK not only the output, 
litit the quality of our wiii.t* in tlu-lnKt tl«-<wli'. th«'jrro\v«'riiiMl«l««UT 
huvc iiiuHi tu c'uninT«t»l«t<' llifinwlv«'« on. and wliicli nliould give 
a furthtT iin|M*liiH to |M>puIiu-ia> onr pnnliu-t by Kiving niow at- 
triitiun to tin- U-IUt «|nality and liandliiig of onr wiintf. Talm- 
lutt"*! HtnliKlii* foun<l i-Iih-w lifrt- in llu- coluniiiH of tliiH valnabh' 
jiHinuil will jtiv«' till' jjndifyinu r«>8nltH alMno nu-ntioni'd. The 
priiu'i|<al fau'tor in lirinpii); our wint-H U-fort- I he c-onnoinw'ur and 
|h« diwi-rniitj; (■onsunn-r. in to phuv In-fon' thein our Im-wI >jnid'n 
of wiint* iindor tlnir true nanni* aiul hilH'Is. lM>ttUKi by the 
grower, and htaniped with the legal guaniutee of purity aud the 
growerV endorwenientof vintage. 

It ix true ill xoiiie tiieamire that the |)opularity and eoiiHuni])- 
tion of California wiiiet* hiw Ikh'ii aii-ompiisheil hy marketing our 
ortliiiary wiiiwi at very low prictw; but we inUHt not forget that 
thiH nt«iilt liiiH Imimi materially iu<«int«Hl by the neareity and high 
priee of the Kn'iich and (lermaii wineM of the poorer gnide. 

Having jiartieularly itlueateil our jH'ople to appreciate the 
purity, fair priei* ami eeouoiiiy of our California wiius. it should 
b.« the endeavor of every one engage<l in this gi-eat induHtry to 
ceiuent the progintw that we have nuule by bringing directly before 
the eonxunier our Utst priMluct, liottled iu California, and under 
the growen* name; and in c«un«> of time, the public will hv, able 
to liixcriminate and establinh the rt>pntation of etu*h wine diBtrict 
iu our xtate. Then- is j-et niueh to Ik' dime todiHjilace the preju- 
dice that Htill existH among our people, and to educate Aviericans 
to drink Amr)-lrun H'liii-ji wider Anwrimn litbcU. To illuHtnite this, 
a n-prcxeiitative of one of our oldest and largest wine housi'H in 
Nbw York and Chitiigo, iiifornie<l the writer that it is next to 
)ni|Mi»mble to find any large eastern wine jobln-r who will bottle 
and sell a ijo<»i (^ilifornia wine under a California laln-l, and that 
at leiiKt si'venty-live jht cent of our wines are sold Eiust under the 
i«l«*re«»ty|K'<l nanii's of " St. Julieii,'' "Margaux," ''Pontet Canet,"' 
"Rud«i«heiiiier," "Liebfrauniilch," etc., aud such well worn stock 
lalM*ls. and our |K>or California priMluct under its own patronymic. 

.XnotlM-r gn-at mission of our wine men is to educate the 
wine driiikerH of this country to the }>alpable frauds that are 
pnwticeil u|>oii them, and to ex|>ose the foreign and domestic adul- 
tenitioiis that still form a great part ofthe»<u^that is sold under 
the name of wine in this country. No more couviiiciiig illustra- 
tion of this fm-t is mH?de<l than the following Associated Press 
telegram, which a]>peared in our daily papers of December 20, 
IWK). 

DOCTOKED FRENCU WINES. 

Paris, France, December 19, 1890. 

"The Minister of Justic<; hiw instructwl the police to prtise- 
outo sellers of win(' containing iulphurU- acid. The side of wine 
treated with pliu<ter of paris will lie tolerated until April Ist." 

Here is a ta4-it admission on the part of the French wine 
producers ami Uicked by their government, of the adultenition of 
wine sent to the outside liarbarians; for the laws of France are 
verj' wven- and the |M>nalti<>s, imprisonment and confiscation for 
the adultenition of wine or food for home consumption. To 
illustrate |K'r contni how c^wily it is to change public opinion and 
ditftroy the prejudice of national Aiiglomaniacism and the fallacy 
that "nolhiiuj if fit In rtit, drink or tmir, Ihnt doe« not hear the impreux 
of a foreign labd,'' see whitt our California dri«'«l fruits have ac- 
complish in len than a de<ii4le. Foreign i»runes to make them 
more mleablc an- now markete^l to a gn-at extent inuh'r California 
bmndM, and we ran ccrtaiidy a<roniplish this ''devoutly to be 
wisluil <-onsnmmation"forour wim-s by carrying out the object of 
this commuiiicalion — to wit; market our lieat wincH, Inittled at 
home and under their true names. 

Afl4T jK-rsistent effort we have suc<'ee<le<l in obtaining a nitc 
of freight on <iu«hI wiiieH. which enables us to lay our wines in 
glaiirdown at ^^lstem cfmiinoii iKiints at fair nit<-s, although the 
railroad eom|mnies i-onld n-nder iis much more UMsistanw, by 
making the nit«'.s of cum%\ win. thtm mrlixul rates lower 

aud more etjuitable. 



The fact that ourgiKwl wines have Ikm'u nH-ogniwMl by French 
iind'({i*rniaii (■onnoisseurs, should encourage the policy which I 
have ailvi^Kiiti-il. Ix't every grower and (h-alcr guard religiously 
his braiuls, exercistithe same care, pa tienceantl finesse iu handling 
and iHittliug as our comiK'titors of the old wine countries, and 
we will solve not oiilj' the qni^tion of protw^tion but the cvila of 
prohibition. When the AmeriKin Im^couk^ a wine instead of 
a spirit drinker we will havi? no more use for sumptuary laws, 
for we will have Ih-coiuc a tcin|M'nit<' nation. 

What further incentive to greater elTortft is nee<lcd by the 
grower or dealer than the ex[K'rieuc(' (')f the hwt ten yeiirH in the 
history of the wine trade of this Statel Ten years ago our Wines 
were <-<)mparatively unknown, our exjtorts not a tenth of the 
prt'Si'ut and our home consumption a bagatelle. To-day our ex- 
ports are ten million gallons of wine, a million of braitdy, 
and our home consumption (the Pacific C'oawt) nearly six million 
giillons. Bi'sides, our exports to Mexico, Centnil America the 
Pacific Islands, China and Japan, an* steadily increa.siug and 
Fr:inc«> is looking with longing eyes to our virgin 'viands and our 
e<iuable climate to replace her phylloxenv-strickeu and depU't<'d 
vin(!yards. Will it not surprise the ordinary reader to learn that 
France, the oiure leading prwlucer of wine iu the w'orld, imported 
a third more of wine than she grew or exiwrtwl in 1889-90? These 
are undeniable facts, and gathered f;om official statistics from our 
Consular reports. When one refk-cts that France in 187() reached 
her maxiinuin in pro<luction of wine — nearly two bUlions of g-al- 
lon.s — aud iu 1880 her output fell to al>out Six hundred million 
— cause phylloxera — a loss of one billion, four liundretl million 
gallons, ami from which she has never up to. this day recujierated; 
and when the city of Paris alone con.sumes one liuiidred 
million gallons of wine per annum or more than double the 
quantity consumed by the Unittnl States, what a field for our en- 
terprise' and our wine industry is opened! California with every 
f(M)t of amble land in her great domain susceptible of viticultui-e 
is destined iu time to l)ecome the vineyard of the world; but we 
cannot wait for the grape or its juice to drop into our mouths. 
Ix^t us agitate and educate the world to our virgin aud unlimited 
resources renew our efforts to proiluce excellence, stamp out 
adulterations, market our wines under their true names, ask the 
State's ai<l in enforcing our pure wine law, aud I am sure the next 
dwade will show greater results financially and place our gnuil 
industry on a siu-e and prosperous footing. 
Sau Francisco Jauuai-y V2, 1891. 




VITICULTURAL RESTAURANT AND CAFE. 



BUSINESS Sl^CCESS. 

If you li»ve a line of Koo<t«, or a eiieciaUy, (Kwsessini; (|uality and nii-rit 
IT r.\Y8 TO LET THE I'UHLIO KNOW IT. 

Every IxiHlncHK man Willi coHHultK liiK lieallli and iuc<vk» In biiKJncsf tniii'l cat 
and not only cat renularly, but mnst oat such food as w ill Im; readily diirc8(«xl will] 
such surroundluKH as will make Iii8 meal not only ■> s . i^u 

A BUSINESS MATTEIt OF NECESSITY 
hut a pleaxuralilr ditrression from huidnc»i< tart-. 

When anili a meal <nu he ohtained at a IrillinKr cx{)viise, and be pioduelive of 
llaI)|line^h and renewed. If ni>t inerea^cd cuerifv, a huplnens man is foolish Indeed to 
not enihraee the |irii»iM:etire opjiortunity. 

Sueh a meal ran he ohtained, and the atiove dewrllied resuitit attaiiinl hv taking 
a lundi with m. U'lween the houm of tl A. M. and a:."*) p. M. We ser\c a gli eours. 
luneli for .'>() eenlB. 

In the evening wcBervc, from 4:80 to 8:30 v. m., an eijcht-coursc dinner for 
75 cvnl» 

B«ilde»ourBcrvlrealacarte receive* prompt attention, and our rv«taurant i6 
moiit ek-Kantly furnli>hc<l. 

Ileferrinttio our exiKTienee. both In the Old and New Woild, «< res lauranleuns 
with the fael tlinl the eiilsine and dinlni; room is under our direct and continual 
huiicivlfiiin, we (.'naranlee Uie lieiit sat i«fact l<m. 

Iteliic t onfident that we can pIcaM jou In the smalkst pai1lcular«, we resuect- 
fully Dolieit your iMktnmaKc. ' 

ALBEKT FllANCKX am> OTTO IMHLEMANN, 

Vitiruttural t'afe and Itentaurant, 
„ , _, ills I'iKit Stukkt, San Frajmibco. 

I "; -J"" *'"«• 'U"'l»lied to our enotts »i« Ku»ranteed to be pure, and are 
punliaaod direct fn.m the iH!rmancnt cxlilblt of Uic State VltlcuUural ConimlMloiT 



f;^(5lfie WIJME /rjVJD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



15 



CASED GOO-DS I/N THE EAST. 



In response to your note requesting me to state in what con- 
dition I found the Eastern Market, (luring my recent trip in the 
oast, and in what particuUvr direction the greatest improvement 
was shown, I can say that a liiarked increase in volume is shown 
in all lines of the California wine trade, but most particularly 
in cased goods. 

The increase in the cheap bulk wine sales seems to be only 
normal with the increase of population, or in territory newly 
opened up by California wine houses. My experience in now 
territory has been that sales are made more through inducements 
in price than through any merits of the goods offered. Conse- 
quently should the wines furnished be good of their class the 
quicker will the consumption increase and the sooner will a de- 
mand create itself for fine bulk wines and together with it for 
cased goods. 

As a sample of the slow increase of trade where poor wines 
were originall}' introduced I can cite no better instance than New 
Orleans and adjacent territory, although I can now say with 
pleasure that after remaining stationary for a long period there 
has developed during the past two years a healthy demand for 
our fine wines in both wood and glass. 

In remarking on the phenomenal growth of the trade in 
wines bottled in California, and "Which I found on the wine lists 
of many Eastern Hotels under the labels of reputable California 
bottlers, I must state we owe much to the action of the railroads 
some time ago in reducing the rate on wines in glass to the same 
figure as that for wines in wood, when in car lots. This advan- 
tage has been greater than we at first realized, for it has enabled 
the large Eastern houses to handle our cased goods With a reason- 
able profit, even if they make only the difference between the 
car load and less than car load rate on the freight. 

I am glad to state that many Eastern jobbers and more par- 
ticularly the wholesale grocers are pleased to avail themselves of 
this means of getting their fine wines in cases, for they realize 
with us, that owing to their unfamiliarity with delicate wines 
and inexperience in bottling, that no matter how fine the wine 
miiy have been in wood, the article when bottled by them falls 
far below their expectations, and so discourages them in their 
attempts to handle our fine products. This is obviated when 
wines are purchased direct in glass. It enables buyers to handle 
them as any other article connected with their business and also 
guarantees them, when dealing with a reputable house, fi'om loss 
when any bottling turns out below its standard, which happens 
oeeassionally with the best of bottlers. 

Notwithstanding the inducements offered in freights by the 
railroads and in the case of the Pullman Palace Car Co., which, I 
think I am reliably informed, has no freight whatever to pay on 
their supplies, many hotels and restaurants buy California labeled 
wines bottled under name of some Eastern house at prices which 
should secure them the best product of our vineyards,' but which 
in quality I should consider a disgrace to any of our reputable 
bottlers. On the Pullman cars as a whole, biit tnore particularly 
on those east of the Mississippi the wines are horrible and As I 
have before stated, bore the label of an Eastern house. I was 
obliged to send back the wine, but what was worse than the wine 
was the unsolicited information from the Dining Car Conductor 
that the wine served me was the best California wine they 
could obtain, and if I desired a more palatable article I should 
take recourse in tlieir foreign labels. All this to me seems 
wrong. If dictated by parsimony it is contemptible in a corpora- 
ation of this character, for the matter of a few dents does not 
deter the traveling American from obtaining what he desires. If 
for any otluji- cause, it shows either the inability of their purchas- 
ing agents to select a good^ article or a prejudice in favor of some 
local acquaintance. 

A ridiculous custom which I am sorry to state is practiced 
more by California bottlers than by Eastern houses is that of 
placing on their labels "California Wine, Medoc Type" or "Pro- 



duced from cuttings obtiiinod fi'om the celebratetl Yquem Vine- 
yards," etc. This is wrong: first, because wine if produced from 
cuttings obtained from these vineyards can hardly be said to even 
resemble wines from these vineyards; second, if they l)ear the 
word California at .ill, the consumer drinks them on their own 
merits only, utterly ignoring ajjy claim of foreign descent. This 
lea.d8.pie to remarl^ that if California wine men desire to build 
up a permanent an^l liisting reputation for their products they 
must sti<!k to names now in vogue among themselves or at lcas.t 
to names whi(!h have no connection or suggestion of the foreign 
market. If they desire for sj)ocial purposi! names more euphon- 
ious than can be supplied by the English language they can with 
propriety use words of Spanish derivation now applied to many 
localities of this state, of coui-se avoiding those names which are 
used by well known Spanish vinej'ards. 

Now, if all Californians visiting the East, and appreciating 
a good glass of their own country's product, would follow Senator 
Stanford's example and insist upon having none other than Cali- 
fornia bottling placed before them, our wines would lead the 
lists at the prominent hotels and restaurants instead of occupying 
the obscure place they do at present. 

After having now stated the progress I found and the points 
of demerit in tlic trade methods, let me suggest that your paper 
can lend us material aid by publishing the exports of cased goods 
by rail. 




San Francisco January 16, 1891. 



THE LIVE-RMO-RE DIST-RICT. 

The famous white and red wines of the Livermore Valley 
are certainly among the best produced in the state. The valley 
has an elevation of about 600 feet above sea level and up to tlifi 
present time has been entirely free from the most destructive in- 
sect pests and baffling diseases which are met with in other sec- 
tions. 

The vines which produce the most famous of our wines have 
been imported from France and other countries and the quality 
of the wine made by the careful vintners has been and is such as 
to commend the highest admiration of connoisseurs in this country 
and abroad. Our wines received at the Paris Exposition, two out 
of the three gold medals awarded to California for wines only, one 
of which was won by my wines. 

I have found in my experience that it is positively necessa,ry' 
to keep the red wine in wood not less than fi'om four to five yearS^ 
before bottling or placing on the market in bulk. The white' 
wines of this valley should be kept from three to four years ac- 
cording to the vintage. 

Our red wincs^ when properly handled, are noted for their 
fine color, bouquet and softness, and the white wines are dis- 
tinguished by their beautiful greenish jellow color and a bouquet 
and flavor which' Mother Nature gives only to the finest wines of 
Europe. Our best wines compare favorably with the fiimoua* 
Medoc Clarets and with the Sauterne, Burgundy and Chablis of 
France which have been known for centuries as the Ixist wines of 
the world. 

The valley can also produce a Rhine wine which will vie 
with the famous "Johannisberg." 

To produce such wines it is necessary to have a peculiar com- 
bination of soil and climate supplemented by the planting 6f the 
finest varieties of grapes and with it an unusual degree of skill 
on the part of the wine-maker and cellar-master. 

These natural and acfjuired advantages we have in the 
Livermore Valley to a marked degree and our wines stand pre- 
eminent among those of the country. 




Proprietor of the Mont Rouge Vineyard and Cellars. 
Livermore Valley, January 10, 1891. 



16 



f^lfie WIJ^E /tfia SJ»II^IT I^EVIEW. 



PKOOUei/SC FI/ME WI/NES. 



Throe thinifR arc nccnvnr}* for the produrtion of fine dry 
winea viz. hoiI. IcHMtlity ami varictioH of (n^ip4>H. 

Th(> rtxi Hoil which pruduotw the iiiiuiroiiii, the hlaek uak, the 
rpdwood and the lunnuuiitn w the Ixttt. The deiMxitM that an" 
made on the xidiw of vall<>y>« hy the wuMh from tlie niountainH, 
compoMHl of volcanic tufa, elay and dM'oniiKMMHl nK'k, w aInioHt 
e(|ually aa good. Alluvial, a4h>lH> and wet Hoiln are the niout un- 
miitable. They produce enomiouH cropei, hut the wine lackH flavor, 
color and duntltility. Any loeality that iH nioiHteniHl and 
ten»|«Te<l l>y the m'a bn-cze w well adapte<l to grape growing and 
thin would include nearly all the coa^t counties of the 8tat«. 

From a collection of four hundrecl varieties, I would select 
the following varieties for re<l winm in the order uained, viz. 
Bewae, Mondeum>, Durifl^, Beclaii, K«>fosco, Alicante Bouschct, 
Moarafltel Bouschet and Petite Bouschet. These arc all good 
bearers and strong growers except the Beclan and Duriff. While 
the BouHi'hets do not make fine wines, they are valuable for their 
color. The Cabernet Uauvignon does not bear enough to be profit- 
able and neither does the llalbec. The Serene resembles the 
FMit4> Sirrah in every resijoct and fully equalH it in quality, but 
baa the additional advantage of being a good regular bearer. It 
ia alao called Marsanne Noir and Petite Sirrah ,but is quite different 
in the quantity of its fruit. The Mondeuse is a good bearer and 
ri|>enH two or three wwks later, which is very desirable. It is 
called also Gros Sirrali and its wine is very similar in character 
and quality to the Petite Sirrah. The winos of both are very 
dark, high flavored and contain an abundance of tannin. 

For white winos I would select in the order named, Pedro 
Ximines, Semillon Blanc, Listan, Pinot Chardonay and Burger. 
The Listan is known as Golden Chasselas, and the Ximines, as 
Saovignon Verte. These an; all good bearers and vigorous 
growers. The first two when allowed to hang on the vine until 
they contain thirty per cent sugar, make a very gootl Sauteme 
when pr«H)erly handled. When gathered at twenty-two per cent, 
they make a fine wine of the Ri(«ling type, and blended with 
more or leas Burger, niakes a distinctive Hock. The Listan and 
Burger blended make a wine of the Chasselas type. The Pinot 
Chardonay gathenxl at twenty per cent produces the renowned 
Chablis. 

The next requisite for fine wine is a quick and perfect fer- 
mentation. The white graixw when crushed siiouUl lie on the 
skins twenty-four hours, then pressed out and the must put into 
■hallow open tanks to avofd a violent fennentation. When the 
■agar has been reduced by fermentation to four or five per cent, 
the wine should Ije puminnl into flouble-luiulcil tanks which should 
be fillwl uji once a (hiy until the fermentation is finished and the 
wine cooled off. Jn Dc«emt)er the wine should be drawn off into 
Btrongly sulphured tanks and clarifietl with one jmuud of the be«t 
gelatine and four ounces of tannin to the thousjuid gallons. Rack 
again in two w«<ks and again in two months anil again in three 
months by which time the wine will be clear, sound and in a 
stable c-ondition. The sooner the young wine can be frcnnl from 
all impure and foreign Hulwtanw's which endanger its life, the 
betU'r. It will then rijH'n and develoin; quickly and safely. All 
that is required now is racking at the projK'r time and blentling 
until the wine is old enough for use when it should have another 
fining and tlm><' ounc4>s of tannin. 

The red grajies should be crushed and stemmc<l into open 
tanks. As noon as fermentation is over pn-ss them, and jmt the 
wine into tight tanks. Knck anfl clarify them in Dt^oemljer and 
rack every two months thensifter, not burning any sulphur, or 
very little, in the empty Unks. When old enough for use, they 
ahoald lie clarifie<l again as in the case of the white wines. 

B<Hh red and whiU; wines are usually throe years old before 
they are liottle riIK^ B..fore InUtling they should Ik- drawn off 
into small piickag.* of fn.ni fifty to <,n(. hnndn^l and sixty gal- 
lons and elarifle<l with isinglass. In two weeks they sli<»uld be 



raeke*! and allowed to stand for one month in order to become 
brilliant wlnni they are ready for bottling which should be dcMie 
in cltrar weather. The standard French bottles for claret, for 
Sautome and Cc^ac only should be used, and the long amber and 
green Rhine wine bottles for the white wines. The lal)els should 
Ix' plain, neat and representative. They should be a uniform dis- 
tan«^ from the bottom of the bottle, say from one to one and one 
half inches. User only ttie best corks and not too long, about one 
and one quarter inches so as not to show below the cap. The 
eye must be pleased in order to catch the palate. 




Chikville, January 15, 1891. 



To-Kalon Vinej-ard. 



WEST OM B-RA/NIDIES. 



The passage of the Sweet Wine bill will assuredly lead to an 
increased pro<luction of sweet wines, and will bring into the busi- 
ness many people who have hitherto been precluded from manu- 
facturing such wines. The market for our product is an extensive 
one, and will no doubt be develope<l to a still greater extent. It 
is to be hoped that all the producers and those intending to 
become such will make it a point to see that the standard of 
excellence is maintained and improved from year to year. 

The brandy situation is extremely favorable— much more so 
than as regards wine. A good article commands a reatly sale at 
remunerative figures, and the prices that are realiwHl are much 
better than a ye^r ago, while the general tone of the market is 
infinit«!ly better. As soon as the eastern sweet wine makers 
are permitted to use our brandies for fortification, free of Internal 
Revenue taxes, the prices will take another leap ui)ward. 

Our brandies arc improving right along as to quality. Our 
distillers are more careful than they ever were before, and the 
proportion of pomace brandies to the entire pro<luct is Incoming 
loss with each year. Other uses for pomace aside from distillation 
are being taken advantage of, much to the improvement of our 
brandies as a class. 

The methods of distillation are superior to what they were 
in times gone by. The continuous still, which is in very general 
use, wrought a great improvement in the average quality of all 
our brandies, it being much easier for the average distiller to 
make a brandy that will meet with the approval of buyers in 
them, than in the old-fasliioned apparatus. Then it has become 
generally known among distillers, after years of talking and 
struggling against prejudices, that only white wines should bo 
distilled. It does not seem nowadays that it would be difficult 
to have this admitted by the distillers, but they were longer in 
learning this lesson than might be supposed. 

The next 8t*;p in the brandy business will be the establisli- 
ment of brands. Several of the larger producers, I am glad to 
see, have moved in that direction, and the success that has 
attended them is certain to act as an incentive to others. Yet it 
is doubtftd if there are more than six or seven brands which are 
genemlly known. The number will increase as time go«« on 
and the brandy business gets on the footing towmls which it is 
gradually drift mg. 

In my opinion the distilling interest is destined to assume a 
greater relative importance in the viticultural industrv than it 
now occupies. The distillers in every part of the State "are all in 
g«KMl sj.uits over the prospect which is b«'fore them, and thowine 
inak.'rs genemlly fi-el more interest in it than has Umm, the laise 
m any i»eno«l in the past history of viticulture in California 




Ht<K'ktou January 1(>, 1891. 



El Pinal Vuieyard. 



f>jke\f\e WI^IE ;«cjsj0 Sffl^lT f^EVIEW. 



17 



OLD SO/NOMA'S WI/NES. 



S A/NT A e-RClZ WI/SES. 



The vines in the Sonoma District are in an excellent condi- 
tion, excepting in the Sonoma and Los Guilicos valleys, and in 
the lower end of Bennett valley in all of which the phylloxera is 
still extending. In Santa Rosa, Mark West, Windsor, Russian 
river, Healdsburg, Geyserville and Cloverdale the vines are in a 
thriving condition, but as a rule large yields to the acre are not 
expected, as most of the vineyards are situated on uplands and 
on the hill slopes. The yield to the acre is therefore relatively 
smaller than on the heavy soils in some other sections. 

The quality of the wine if properly handled, is equal to the 
product of any other section in the State. Sonoma wines have 
always borne a deservedly high reputation, and the vintages of 
recent years have sustained their good name in every part of the 
country. The vintage of 1890 is superior to anything that we have 
ever produced. When it is placed on the market it will greatly 
increase the reputation of the wines among all people whose 
opinions are worth consideration. 

Replanting has been carried on to some extent, but not as 
largely as it should be, as the people are somewhat discouraged 
over their experiences during the period of depression which is 
passing away. The expense of planting resistants is so consider- 
able that many people are deterred from setting out such vine- 
yards while the immediate prospects for returns are so small. 

As for the market for our wines, I can only speak for myself. 
My wines have met with very encouraging sale, and that they 
have been received well the many complimentary letters received 
from my agents show. It is my experience that there is always a sale 
for good wines. The average quality of all the wines produced 
in the State is so much superior to the quality which obtained a 
few years ago, and is improving so rapidly that there will be a 
very satisfactory extension of the better class of trade. 

Our future success in the eastern field depends to a very 
great extent on our ability to place a fine class of case goods 
before the consumers. In fact the very key note of business 
success is in our ability to do this. The eastern trade has out^ 
grown the big bulk method of doing business, though this will 
always be carried on to a great degree. In order to meet the 
requirements of the new trade which is springing up it is desir- 
able that the bottling should be done in the cellars of the produc- 
ers, unless done in the east by thoroughly reliable men. 

New York is now our best market, and will be, I think, for 
all time to come. Chicago is second and is apt to remain so. 
New centers are constantly assuming importance, such as Mil- 
waukee and Kansas City. As for New Orleans, there is some 
demand for the better grade of goods and always will be, though 
I think that the trade conditions there are apt to remain where 
they are for some little time yet. 

In aiding the growth of the demand for the better class of 
goods the Viticultural Commission has exerted as marked and as 
meritorious a service as it has and is exerting in promoting the 
industry in California. The Commission has endeavored to cover 
the whole ground from the preparation of the soil for planting, to 
the marketing of the wine. If the Commission has failed in any 
particular it is not through any laxity or wilful failure. It has 
been remarkably successful in most respects, as shown by the 
work that has been accomplished, and the correspondence which 
has been received from every wine growing country. Our work 
is considered careful and absolutely reliable by the best authorities 
of Europe, which are the best in the world. 




Santa Cruz county is entering, or has already entered into a 
new era in wine making. The Mission, Rose of Peru, Hamburg, 
so called Black Malvoise, and Charbouo vines are condemned for 
the Cabernet,Semillon,SauvignonVert, Sirrah and Pinot. Not that 
the vines of quantity are all eliminated, would that they were half 
or third eliminated, but they are no longer being planted, and 
are being grafted over as fast as circumstance will permit. Indeed 
you can find some vineyards in the county entirely devoted to 
vines of quality; others where not even the Mataro, Mondeuse, or 
Tannat is tolerated, though on the other hand the Zinfandel and 
Chauche Gris are retained; the former for its admirable blend with 
twenty per cent Cabernet, the latter for its unquestionable adapta- 
tion to Champagne. 

Besides the new ideal in vines, the system of vinification 
which that ideal calls for is essayed and the practices of the Rhine 
and Gironde sought after. Whether always wisely I am not 
called on to answer. 

Moreover there is a call for underground storage of wines, 
and there have been built lately a few winehouses which have 
cellars down twenty feet in the ground beneath them, while the 
Santa Cruz Wine Company have three tunnels each 110 feet deep 
in the solid rock by 16 to 24 broad and 18 high. 

Considering all this then, I think that the prospects of the 
future of wine-making in Santa Cruz county are good; that is, 
good as to the kind of wine to be made. 

Whether or not the devotion to the high class vines and to 
the vinification of their products will pay in Santa Cruz county 
is an open question with some, but the devotees point to the pres- 
ent ruinous prices for common wines, not in America alone, but 
in Europe, and to the slight probability of any improvement 
especially in the face of improper restriction of adulteration. They 
show too that placed as they are on the sloping hillsides, they 
have no chance against the vignerons of the valleys whose capac- 
ity for production will surely drown them; that where they can't 
hold their own in quantity they must in something else, and that 
else they maintain is quality. In other words, they say it is 
high class vines with us or death, if not aU at once, not the less 
painful. Moreover they triumphantly call attention to their 
unique position overlooking the bay of Monterey, whence comes 
to them the ever fresh and balmy south wind — a wind tamed 
and tempered into simple life giving ozonic properties of the 
great north west and to their protection from all the cold blasts 
and true northers by the Santa Cruz range. With this, they add 
combined with the soil of Montillo and Malaga what should we 
not achieve? If answered that no soil or aspect outside of Europe 
has given the equivalent of that in it, and therefore the pursuit 
of the high class notion except in Europe is irrational, they beg 
attention to the fact that this is a non-sequeter, inasmuch as the 
French experts at the great Vienna exhibition, according to 
Vizetelly's governmental reports, adjudged that the Hermitage of 
the colony of Victoria was no other than fine wine of the Drome 
sent to Australia and back, and insisted on their judgment, and 
refused to taste farther till a distinct official declaration was 
given them that the wine was not French Hermitage. 

The vines of the Gironde and the Rhine may lose their pres- 
ent favor in Santa Cruz county, where, with the exception of one 
hundred acres, the counterpart of the soil of Medoc is nowhere 
found, though in this one hundred acres thej are, just as if they 
been transplanted from Medoc; but certainly the vines of the 
Cote d'Or will grow in esteem, since they have been found to be 
perfect for champagne, and promise to rival Montrachetndeed. I 
should the future of Sauta Cruz county veer round from its pres- 
ent bearing towards the Rhine and the Gironde to that of the 
Cote d'Or, I for one should not wonder. Some men are in earnest 
here, possibly in too much hurry. 



-U^sif^ (^ v2Auo»/v 



Sauta Rosa, January 14, 1891. 



Sainta Cruz, Cal., January 16, 1891. 



Etha Hill Vineyard. 



18 



f^lfie WI^IE /r^D Sf>IJ^IT ^^.EVIEW. 



i 



PIO/MEEK WIME MAKIMG. 



Nni« coiinly han l»oon many ycare coniddered the loading 
wino county of the ntat*-. 

Tho n>«iilt of tho firnt vintage IWVK wiw al»ont twolvp hun- 
ilrwl gallonH. The gn\\Hti wen> eruHlu-*! niul prewe«l with a little. 
w> ralUn) rider |>nt«H. whi«-h Colonel llaniHzthy, of Sonoma. 
allowed me to ui«< in Nn|m, aft«'r he had eniHhe<l at the Htiena 
VtKta Vineyard that jtort ion ofthegrai>eHwhi<-li riiM'ne«l early and 
were grown on Ktnaip noil. When through with my little vintage 
work in Na|»a. the Colonel finisluMl with thit* returned mnohine 
the iMlanee of hin erop of grapt*. This ohl pionwr prenH was 
a)M>ut twenty yean* afterwnnla presented to me by the then liqui- 
dating Huena Vista Vineynr*! ('flmjiany. I eon«ider it a valuable 
oniament of my eellar at jireHcnt. The (luantity of wine made 
in 1868 in Sonoma and Napa eountie8. (most all made with thin 
old pntw) amounteil to al)Out nix or w v( n thouHSind gallons, while 
the vinttigi> of 1H87 undouhtwlly Kurpas-wd eight million gallons 
in both cHHinti**, three million in Sonoma and five mjllion in 
Napa county. 

In the neighborhood of St. Helena every year since 18C1 a 
eouKiderable numlK'r of aen>« were planted with vines. From 
here the excitement in thi« linespreatl south towanls Kutherford, 
Oakville and to Napa. The number of acres of vineyard in the 
county in 1S7() was al)out four thousand, over half In'longing to 
the St. Ili'lena district. Ihisiness looked very promising then. 
The white grape vines, representetl mostly the character of the 
Oennan vines as Riesling. Gutedel, and Burger, a great 
many of which were received from San Jose and (Jreen Valley, 
Holano county and some directly imj)ortcd from the Rhine. The 
Golden C^asselas — proj)er name Palomino, a Spanish variety — 
was personally brought herefrom Chili by a man named Schmidt, 
then the pniprietor of a small vineyard next to the Nai)a Soda 
Springs. A groat deal of white wine wiis that time also pro- 
«lnre<i from Mission grapes. The Zinfandel and Malvoisie were 
prociinHl from Sonoma. 

After 1870 the price of wines commenced to go down. Sev- 
eral energetic parties tried then to dispose of their products by 
estnbli.«hing winehouses in the Eastern States and in San Fran- 
cisco. Some 8uc-ceede<l well. The Sonoma, Napa and Solano 
Wine Growers Association assisted this plan, besides dissemina- 
ting information in regard to viticulture and the improvement of 
the ('hanu'ter of the wines. Major Snyder, of Sonoma, at that 
time one of the best known citizens of the state, acted as Presi- 
dent and Dr. Ijockwood, of Napa, as Secretary. Napa city was 
usually the place for our meetings as only a few parties of Sonoma 
county had joine<l us. Signs of improveuK nt of pri(*es for grapes 
and wines soon appeare<l. The estiiblishmc iit of a large wine- 
house in the city aided the rise in value. By and by a new en- 
thusiasm for viticjilture grew up. Napa count j' boasted of about 
t'U thousiind acres of vineyard, which amount aft -r 1880, par- 
ticidarly after the organization of the Viticultural Commission, 
soon incniiwHl to over sixteen thousand acres. Tliis Commission 
oonmHte*! of the leading wine men of the state, and even the 
enemies of the Boanl cannot deny the grand result of its work- 
lugB in all branches of vitindture. R«>ad its publications about 
grafting, fennentation, ini]M)rtation «>f fine varieties of vines, in- 
tnxluction of ri>sistant st<K'k and in short all im|K)rtant questions 
of viticulture and vinieidture and their value will l)«> seen. 
Perfect enthufiiaiim for our business was crcattKl. Tbousjind of 
aeren of vinen were planted and a gmMl many of them with the 
finest varietiea, particularly of the clarets and Sautenies. New 
and fine oellans were built, new pnw-tical machinery for elevating 
grap<-H to upper Rtoriea, for cnisbing and pressing were intro<luc<Hi, 
an<l the price of grapes went up to (w.-nty-five and thirty-three 
dollars p<'r ton. The price of wine rais<'<l in sympathy to twenty- 
eight and thirty-three cents per gallon, when less than a year old. 
Only a few years later the situaiiott was ehangt-d again. 
The enthusiasm commenced to cool down in ilw fall of 18Hr>. I 



will state the caus«' of this crash. It wiw not over-prcMlucticm of 
gcMMl wines, but the (nvr-prmlurtion «/ inferior wiue» and thrir ivih 
If the inferior wines had Ikhju disi)OS(Hl of by distilling instead 
of iK'ing sold together with the gcnwl wines for a like price to tin- 
trade. th«' reputation of California wine would not have suffered, 
the demand for them woubl have increased and goo<l prices woubi 
have rewarde<l our business. But you cannot exiK-et that the 
jMK)r wine-makers were able to refuse a chance to sell their gotul 
and bad wines store<l in cheap, wooden cellars. The result Wiih 
that most of the wine-i)ro<lucers grew jjoorer. 

Still we will sei' iK'fore long a change of this condition. Tin 
last five years of greatest trouble did not break the courage of u 
great many of the wine prmlucers of our count}*. Signs of an 
imjd-ovement in our situation are not to \Hi denied. Phylloxera 
is one of our l)est friends. A good many of our grajw-growers 
transformed their destroyed vineyards into well-paying orchards.. 
The wine-makers rej>lantcd their ruined vinej-ards with resistant 
stwk and graft<'d them with the finest varieties of vine*, partic- 
ularly lately for clarets. Most of this class of wine-makers will 
in future not ofler inferior wines for sale but distill this material. 
(i(MMl wines, partly very fine w'ines will bring a fair tog(H>d i)riee. 
There cannot bo an over-production of goo dwines. Such good to 
sph^ndid wines have enabled quite a number of wine-makers in 
the upper Napa Valley, with solid cellars, to build up an inde- 
pendent traxle and their numlxT will stesulily be increased. A 
tra<le with great winehouses in I'jigland and Germany will 
soon 1k> established. T 

In a recent article in a county journal one of my neighbors, 
a prominent wineman, reconnnended lately the organizatif)n of 
the wine-producers. Organizsition for that pur[)Ose will l»e a long 
step upward. Therefore, I have no doulit, we will sfK)n enjoy 
Ix'tter, and even good times and see our business in a flourishing 
condition before long. 




St. Helena January 12, 1891. 



FO-R E I G/N CM AMP AG/S ES 
ST-RAIGHT WHISKg 



Replying to your request to communicate our views regsird- 
ing the future of foreign champagne and straight whiskies in this 
market, we regret not to have devote<l sufficient study to this 
Kubject to funiish you with more accurate information. If, how- 
ever, our own imiKirtations of these commo<lities ciin be considcicd 
a criterion of their prospects, we have no hesitancy in sjiying Hint 
notwithstanding all efforts to improve the quality of native wines 
there always will be an appreciative custom for a high gi-ade 
imported champagne like Pommery Sec. We are glad to state 
that our imixn-tnlions of this brand in 1890 reached 14,675 
cjiscB, and should the theory of estimating the standard of a hotel 
by the qmUity of its wines, also apply to the class of a country's 
w"in(> drinkers, there is no doubt but that the Pacific Coast con- 
tains a i>r()portionately larger element of real connoisseurs of a 
meritorious wine than any station of the globe. 

Regarding whiskies wo also find tho denuind for sti-aight 
goods on the increjuw. Whether this is due to the recent intro- 
<luction of the rajtid developing protH'ss, which often rendei-s the 
handling of these gcMxls more profitable to thejoblwr than their 
own blends, or to the constant influx of eastern visitors and their 
known pn'ft'rence for straight whisky, we are unable to say. 
What \vv do know is that our consignments of straight whiskies 
move off pn)niptly aft«'r arrival. 
San Francisco January 7, 1891. 




I 



f/reifie WIJSJE AJ^D Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



19 



BLE/NDS A/ND STRAIGHT WHISKg. THE LOS A/NGELES DIST-RICT. 



High-grade blended wlii.skie« that are composed solely of 
various ages of straight goods, are very i)0[)ular on this coast and 
during the last few years have greatly eneroaeluid upon tlie field 
so long occupied by compounded whiskies. I have handled the 
former (^lass of goods for fifteen years and during that time the 
demand for such whiskies has steadily increased and I find that as 
eacii year goes by there is more readiness on the part of retailers 
to pay better prices for a fine quality of uiuform goods. I account 
for tliis on the ground that their customers more than ever before 
demand uniformity in their beverages and that in order to meet 
this demand the retailer has had to look to the fine blends and 
straight whiskies. Tliis fact explains the luuivy increase in the 
Sivle of such blends and straight goods in this market dur- 
in" the past year. In other words the public taste is calling for 
a better qnality of whisky and the demand must be supplied. 
This is why I consider the outlook for these goods very flattering. 
The growth of trade in the Northwest in tliese lines of whisky 
in the i)ast year has been greater than in any other part of the 
(Joast and it is still increasing. In the Soutli business is picking 
up and trade appears to have nearly recovered from the set-back 
it received when the boom collapsed. In conclusion I would say 
that business seems to be growing in all parts of the Coast, and 
I look for a continuation of this development for many years to 
come. 

Tlie trade here in ryes, whether straights or blends is not what 
it should be, for the reason that our people have not been edu- 
cated u]) to the drinking of these whiskies which are so char- 
acteristic in flavor and rich in bouquet. The fact is that they 
have not been pushed in this market as they ought to have 
bt'cn. Had they received the same attention as has been ac- 
corded the bourbons, I have no doubt they would be proportion- 
ately as popular as they are in the east. 

Our business in 1890 was much larger than that of any pre- 
vious year, and I believe the past season was a prosperous one 
for the wine and liquor trade generally, and that in '91 it will be 
even better. 




CH AMP AGM ES AM D 
WI/NES. 



Moore, Hunt & Co. 

I MPOKTEB 



Tlie sale of champagnes and other descriptions of fine 
imported wines has been very satisfactory during the past year. 
The consumption of champagnes on this market while not nearly 
so large as some people might be inclined to imagine, is steadily 
increasing, and this is greatly owing to the fine qualities received 
here. It is to be noted that the general taste is now running 
more and more towards a drier class of wine, which cannot but 
be satisfactory to the importers of the higher grades, because it 
is a known fact that while a sweet champagne of poor (piality 
may be disguised (until the following morning) by a judicious 
employment of ice, a dry wine is not palatable unless it is really 
good. When once, however, it fulfils this requirement, there 
can be no question as to its being the healthier beverage. There 
are so many good brands on tliis market that it would be invidious 
to mention any one in particular. 

The taste for the finer grades of imported clarets is also 
improving and the public is showing great judgment in sticking 
to good brands and vintages when they once discover them. The 
consumption of California wines, although continually on the 
increase, does not appear to interfere in the least with those of the 
imported. On the contrary, it creates a taste for wine drinking 
which (sannot but help all sorts and (pialities, and, while it is 
pleasant to notice the great and constant improvement that is 
going on in the quality of the native wines, it may yet bo a long 
time before they can quite take the place of the imported article. 




The past vintage in Southern California wa« the be«t 
in quality for many years, the gi'apes lieing in fine condition for 
wine-making and fermentations goods. So '90 wines will Ik; in 
demand and should command good prices. The price paid for 
grapes was high, which will proliably induce many producei-s to 
hold their stock instead of selling at tlie prescfiit exceptionally 
depressed prices. Very many grapes were dried the past fall, 
and while the crop was large per iicre, the production was only 
about one-quarter that of 1886. 

The production of brandy will be comparatively large witli 
but little old goods left in the warehouses. We note with pleas- 
ure the recent large exportation of brandy and wines by tlie L. 
J. Rose Co., Limited, to people in England, and we hear 
very favorable reports of the interest taken in our wines and 
brandies in that country. As the English have large investments 
in vineyards and wineries here, the natural inefernce is that in 
the near future we will be large exporters of sweet wines to Great 
Britain. The Government has at least begun to acknowledge our 
industry and the Sweet Wine bill will undoubtedly put our 
wine-makers in a much better position. Capital will take hold 
more cheerfully and make the business what it should be — legiti- 
mate — besides stimulating the producers to take more pains and 
do more justice to themselves than heretofore. Very few have 
availed themselves of its privileges this year, the season being 
too far advanced when the bill passed. However we hope to see 
it in general use another season. It will, if rightly interpreted, re- 
sult in the planting of many thousand acres of wine grapes in 
this part of the state. 

Owing to the vine disease the Mission grape is almost a thing 
of the past, only a few vineyards along the mountain slopes re- 
maining. Its entire disappearance would be a thing very much 
to be regretted. The old Padras made it famous, and it has been 
the basis of all our Southern California sweet wines. That it 
makes a good sweet wine can be proved when one tastes the rich 
old Ports, Sherries and Angelicas of some of our pioneer wine- 
makers. What other grape could take its place it is hard to say. 
Many other kinds are being experimented with, and in time no 
doubt we shall produce as good wines as Spain or Portugal. The 
TVousseau, Zinfandel and Malvoisie furnish most of our Port 
wines, and the demand for Sherry has stimulated its production, 
it being less easy to counterfit than Port. 

The vine disease has apparently gone whence it came. Many 
of the old vineyards at Anaheim are being replanted with wine 
grapes, but on a limited scale. Raisin grapes will be planted quite 
extensively in some localities. So far the season has inclined to 
be dry and cold. Pruning has just commenced, and many will 
evidently prune for a (h-y year. 

The out-look for the future is not as brilliant as we antici- 
pated last fall, yet with the evident improvement in the financial 
condition of the country, we look forward to one of the most 
prosperous seasons for the wine industry for many a year. By 
the way "our tourist friends" are getting good impressions of our 
wines these days and are worth cultivating. 

ALBERT lllliaitEX. 

Sierra Madre Vineyard. 



We can supply Caramel or Burnt Sugar Coloring at !<eventy- 
five cents per gallon in barrels, as strong and as brilliant as any 
that was ever manufactured. Not one complaint has readied us 
the quality of our Sugar Coloring for over a year, and our sales 
extend to every State in the Union. 

If the price Wfis $10, instead of seventy-five cents per gallon, 
we could not produce a superior article. Every package guaran- 
teed. Samples on application. 

19 Hudson Street, New York 



20 



f^eifie wi^iE >vrjD sfif^iT f^eview. 



(^inoinnaii ^o'partmont. 



RifMW of ll}« Whisky Mark«t For lb« Year 1880 -The 
Future Outlook. 



Cincinnati, Januarj' 1*2. IWM. 

TIm' ixwt ywir hiu* Uh'h an exceedingly fortunate ami pniw. 
|M.nmi* i»n«-. Tin- <1< nnuul for all linimln «»f \vlii(*kv.rv»r« iim w.-ll its 
iMHirlNiiu* lia»< Kt«»«lily a«lvan<«-<l until mi-ntly. wlnn tlu- striuK- 
cnry in lh.> nnmoy uiarkH lia«l midi a nuietingtm-ct on all lines 
(inHiHiin-wi. Tlioiv ii* no rea»«)nal>h« foumlation for tin* i<U'a that 
ihc pn-wnl (Inlliu-MH in tho whisky market is due to over-prtxluc- 
tifMi. Then' has l>e«*n no over-pHxlnetion. and the e.\istin<; 
siln-ition wt.nhl not have b^-en exiH'riencHMl ha<l it not been fcrr 
the fait that during neveral yean* jumt eapitalistH have IxH'n 
making heavy and fiMilish invt-stnients in unpnMluctive lands and 
other luoiiey-alxH.rhing HiKHndaticms. exiK-eting rapid returns and 
failing to n>alize them. TIk- Inilt ha« Uhmi «ille<l and within a 
short time we nuiy n-jisonahly expec-t all lines of k^itiinate 
businetw to move on pnwperously. 

We elaim that whiski** are excee<lingly good pn)perty to-day 
and will Ih> more so as the seaHon advances. The demand is 
heatlthy anil linn prioes an> maintained. We also speak of the 
esdtern rye market whii'h has received a »et-back, owing to tlie 
monetary disarrangentent. 

My'iulviee to the readers of this journal is this: Hold with 
an iron grip to the sto«'k on hand; insist on an advance before 
you sell and the n-snlt will l)e tliat goo<ls three months hence 
will be s<'arc'e and in as good demand as they were six months 
siin-e. The com cmp iH'ing short, the making of whiskies has 
coHt fully twenty-five p«'r wnt more than a year ago, and the 
remilt will l>e that less than half a crop will Ije ina«le during the 
filming ««'ason. The 'S!» whiskii>s will therefore take the r.iiik of 
the 'sSs, and the ''.Wis will rank with the "HDs. Nothing iM-ing 
iMck of '8««. inakeH us fully lielieve that holders and investors in 
■S«t and "IMI will realize a Imiulsome margin and profit on their 
holdings. 

The I'niim Distilling (\)inj>any, distillers, compoundors, 
blenders and general distributors of whisky, of Cincinnati, O., are 
favonibly known throughout the entire country. Catering to 
every want of theirmany |mtrons they aim to please by uniformity 
in the goods they supply — nicety in appearance of package, 
brandit. courteous treatment and fair dealings, all of which has 
made this young house a reputation they may well l)e proud of. 
Although the Inion einlKKlies the experiences of a combination 
of iieveral old houaefi, they speak of it as a young house on ac- 
count of the younger generation now conijioHing its management 
and under whirh it has swung into prominence. It's genial 
IVesident Mr. (Jeo. (lerke Ix^n his connei^tion with this house 
as sole owner of the Union Distillery as early as 1875, at hardly 
twenty yi'ars of age. Its nuMlest and untiring KtK-n'tary -and 
Tniisiin-r, (t<>o. F. Dieterle, has serveil this business since 1S7(). 
While the lu-tive management devolves uinm these two j>eople. 
they are willing to share the cnxlit of having increaseil their 
buinncM* fully thirty js-r ei-nt. during this year with their sales- 
men, who do HO much to bring aUint their success. In IHHH the 
Union Distilling Co.. |>ut forwanl the " Zeno" brand. The Zt^no 
Disliller)' Co.. at McHniyer. .\nders<m Co., Ky., inakmi a strictly 
old-fashioneil hand-made sour mash. 

To "The Teople" of the < iolih-iv. Ktate and the land of (|uiet 
Hewiwe exti'iid the compliments of the seasim with the wish that 
the proBpcrity of the year IS'.m may In* rejMsated in 181)1. 

KlIAW. 



DO.HT BITV A PIANO. OUnAX OR AXY OTHKII Mt'HICAI. INHTnUMKNT 
■ illioiit Hr»t writinK <•' •" i^.hlt-r A <'li».<>. Kill Markrl KIrcrl. S«n 

fi«m I...I, llip lAritcol Biiil <>IU>- '. Iliin lltiF on llic lom.!. Thcv Imvi- all 

Krmdo i,f Irirlruriifiilr ftiid kvll \i... ii.r i'ii..|i or on lll^latllnclltl•. tliin In itii 

old relUlilc Kriii lliat lia* > Kill rdifv rrpulatlon ma4c b;r bonmt dralliiK, "■"I alwavs 
guaranlccitiK Mtl«{*c'lioii, 



Iy(>ii8Vii.i.E January 10, ISitl. 

.\s it cannot be otherwise exju'ctwl business is very ijiiiet nn 
yet and the tnide seems to be still under the influence of the 
holidays. However. I am glad to state that a much bi-tter feel! 
prevails and prices of Kentucky whiskies are stiflening up «i . 
I)y day. In a few days hence the army of salcBinen will be in 
the field and no doubt Inisinens will be pretty lively iiwideof two 
wifks. 

The Kentucky whisky market has kept up iM'yond all 
exiMi-tations during the panicky times we have nuist fortunat -ly 
leH behinil us. and but four failur.-s have Imhmi ri'|M>rlc(l ihiriiig 
all those tinii-s in the whisky line. But one of tlu-se wiis caused 
by the stringency of the money market and another one was ■ 
regular steal, while the r.\><t ar,- too uiiimiK)rtaiit to refer to. 

The houses which failed were Venable & Heynian. New 
York; .\. H. Lawrence. Dallas, Texas; Sthwalwcher & Selig in 
Indianapolis and Jno. K. (Sibljon & (^o., of Boston. There is ih> 
aiipreheiiHioii of any further disiisters and barring imforesitii 
events you may look for a pro.spcrous ywir in the whisky business. 

Our visitors were Mr. Geo. W. Harris of Ja«. Lavy & Bi 
Cincinnati; Mr. R. Mimarch of Owensboro; Mr. "N. HofTheiinfi- .n 
New York: Mr. P. K. Payne of Owen»lK)ro,Ky; T. B. Kii.y of 
Lawronceburg; Mr. M. V. Monarch of Owensboro, Ky., and Cli 
Kobert of Lebanon, Ky. 



CiiKAco January I'l. ISfll. 

We have no change to rejMirt in the market during the past 
fortnight. Tnwle still remains comparatively dull and it is not 
expwteil that there will be any renewed activity till the latter 
part of next month. 

A review of the situation shows that California w iiies have 
made considerable headway in this market in the past year, and 
that their reputation is improving witli their ([iiality. 

The article in the last issue of the Kkview regarding the 
the small shipper and the bad iKirrel-house man and his methods, 
created a great deal of talk here among the tnnle and arousiHl the 
ire of the B. h. man to a high degree. The reputable dealers 
were pleastnl with the manner in which the subject was handled 
and it is hoped that it may serve to warn the small hhipper 
against these sharks, and thus help the market. 

Brandies are in good demand at fair prices and are considen^d 
first-class property. 

New York, Jan. 12, 18JM. 

The market here for Ixith dry and sweet wines is of the (piiet 
order, with no immediate prosiKH-t of a material change in the 
sit^iatiou. The mcn'hants are just now devoting the mo.st of their 
time to figuring out how much they made in 18!»0. and with few 
exceptions the rtv^ults are deemed quite satisfactory, all tliiiii.'s 
considennl. 

Brandy is holding uj) inginxl shaiK'and an advance in jirices 
within the next few wii'ks would not be uiiexpei'ted by the trade. 

All the old wine houses re|>ort increaseil business for 185K), 
and liMik for a sternly improvemeut in tlie future. B. 



The holiday nuinlHT of the Criterion wa« what we call a Jim 
Dandy, out this way. It i-ontaineil a great deal of valuable 
information and much of interest coniH-rning distillers and the 
ilistilling business. The (Wmoa begins the new year in c«mditi<m 
to make a great race in "Dl against all competitors, and we wish 
it all possible success, 



\i^\u pdu(^rtiseme9l:8 Opiy O9 Jl^is pa^e. 



11 



Ivroof^E 



& SElihlGER, 




B^e/T)OflJ ar)d f\SEO\\ are distilled 
from finest of (^raii) ai}d purest of vuater 
upo[) tl;>e )^a9d /T)ade Sour fT\a8\) pro- 
cess. ^aGl7 apd euery barrel (^uarapt^^d 
to be 5tri(;tiy pure apd free from a[)y (T\u5t. 



•*>-^ 




^^FIRE COPPER^ 



fAe NUTWOOD is a strictlij old fashioned "Fire Copper" Sweet Mash Whisky, in 
the distillation of which we guarantee the use of 40 per cent small grain, giving to 
the ' Whisky a heavy hody and excellent flavor, which, for compounding purposes, is 
unexcelled in Kentucky, 



Willi 



KENTOGEY 



The BELMONT, ASTOR and NUTWOOD Whiskies are stored in the latest 
improved bonded warehouses, with patent racks, metal roof, iron shutters and doors. 
Giving our personal attention to the safe handling and care of these goods, with 
every advantage and facility for shipping the same, we can guarantee full satisfac- 
tion in every particular to the trade. Soliciting your favors, we remain. 

Very respectfully, MOORE & SELLIGER. 




ftblrEY 



PURE CALIFORNIA " 



SPECIALTIES: 



PRIVATE STOBK H06K, 

PRIVATE STOGK EL gERRlTO, 
PRIVATE STOSK SAUTERNE, 

PRIVATE STOGK GLARET, 
PRIVATE STOKK BURKUNDY, 

PRIVATE STOGK VINE GLIFF, 






BRANDIES ^ I 



^^.WINESandBRANDIES 



WINERIES ANO DISTILLERIES: 



J^/rf/c eiTY, YOUJMTVIbbE /rJND 
ST. JHEbEJM/r. 



OTTFICHIS: 



11-13 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 
200-202 S. FOURTH ST., ST. LOUIS. 




ED. MURPHY & CO., 



■DISTILLERS OF- 



"The Belle of flndefsonGoanty" 

Hand-Made Sour Mash Whisky. 

Pure Fire Copper Whisky, made from the best of Grain and Cold Lime Stone 
Spring Water in the Old-Fashioned Way by Mashing in Small Tubs, and • 
yeasting back pure sour mash. Whisky unbonddd by us and 
shipped F. 0. B. on boats free of charge 

Headquarters, Lawrenceburg, Ky. Post Office, Murphy, Ky. 



22 



rM.ll PTNkB. 



Hew /^duertlsem^ots Or^ly Or) 517I5 pa^^. 




Choice California 

100 to 108 O'FARRELL STREET, 

San Freincisco, Cai. 






Wines & Brandies 

Silver Medal Awarded at 
The Perfected "Safety" 

ELECTRIC VAPOR ENGINE, 

The Most Powerful and Economical Motor in the World 

Always Ready. No Boiler. No Fire. No Smoke. No Ashes. No Engineer. 

No License. No Danger. 



VxeM City Gnu and \atufal (Ian. or trill make tttt oint Vapor, trhlrh In If/nlIrO 
automatically by a Hmall dry clertric battery. 

OUR WINE PLANT 

MounliHl on a small hand truck, with a powerful 
n)tnry bronze luinp. will foroo from .')()0 to.'itMKtgiil- 
loiiH |K'r hour.and nst'lcss than <mo gpillon of gjiKoline 
in t«'n hours run; gasoline coHte seventeen cents per 
{Tiillon. 

We also hnild Stationary Vai>or Engines from 
^^ to 20 horse [lower. Send for close estimate. 



Office, 218 California St., San Francisco. 

Works. ^'11 aiul L'i;i Main KIm-t, 





JOSJElUZEIt&CO. 

Oruwen xid Uealen In 
(allfornla 

WINES AND BRANDIES 



PripriMrn Gloi Bloi MTist Vaults. 



Fine Table Wines a Specialty 



604-506 Market St., 

'. Jill I'litiM imui, Cftl, 



'■^ OFFICE8SBlESRO°'^,j„^,4 

638/>^RKErsV-"sVNteco 



Wendrll Easton, Precident, 

Oko. W. Fkikk, Vice-President. 

F. B. WiLDK, Secretary. 



HIRSCHLER & CO., 

ifW Iri an, ;m,m)MK STRglT. Ka.X FHASClmfl, Cau 

Wine I Liquor Me rchants 

Proprietors of Hi mmit Nineyahu, ^'aI^a Co., Cal. 
— Al»<> (bita rrf>|>rh!ioi« of the Oelebrst«d — 



EASTON, ELDRIDGE k CO. 

(COnPOIIATION.) 

Real Estate- Agents and .^iiclioiieei's. 

House and Insurance Brokers. 



REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE, 

IKW Market Si reel, OpiKiBlIc Pnlace Hotel, - - - Ran Franci>- 

Regular Auction Sale Day, Tuesday. 



SITUATION WANTED CELLAR-MASTER. 



A eom|H'tent cellnr-nijvsti^r, wine and hmiidy maker and 
distiller. KirrKKN vkaks kxpkkiknck. thnn* years lis nian:i^er of 
one' of the largest wineries in the State. I'nderstands double 
entry lMM>kke<'ping: desires a change, city or i-ountrj-. Address 
"<!<»MrKTKNT" this ofljoe. 



f/reifie WIJME /rJMD SflF^IT F^^EVIEW. 



23 



EXPORTS AND IMPORTS 

DURING THE PAST FORTNIGHT. 



EXPORTS OF WINE. 



TO HONOLULU — Per Steamer Australia January 2, 1891. 



MABK8. 

■ G W M & Co 

H N G.Kaklakekua. 

W C P 

UevF L 



G W M & Co... 
H C & Co 



G W M&Co. 
UevF 8 



SHIPPERS. 



F A Haber 

JolinT Ward 

B Dreyfus & Co 

J Pinet & Co 

Miscellaneous 

Koliler & Van Bergen . 

Arpad Haraszthy & "Co. 



Goldberg Bowen & Co. 
C Carpy &Co 



CONTEHTS. 



GALLONS VALUE 



28 cases 

9 cases 

1.50 kegs 

1 hf-barrel... . 
174 jiackages.. 

20 barrels 

340 kegs 

5 barrels 

110 kegs 

10 cases 

4 cases 

4 hf-casks . . . , 
1 keg 



Total amount Wine 41 cases and. 



1,000 
27 

i.aw 

1,005 

1,6.50 

2.55 

725 



143 
6,114 



»150 

.54 

725 

15 

l,0(i8 

625 

1,160 

190 

5,5:^ 

38 
75 

81 

9 i.rn 



TO NANAIMO— Per Steamer Empire December 30, 1890. 



J B, Nanainio. 

8H, 

P & 8, " 

JH, 

C M, 

JD, 

J I. 

J F, 

JM, 

GD, 

TEP, '• 

T & W, " 

L it D, " 

McDAH •' 



E 8, 
F M, 



Cal Wine Glow's Union 



Munzaito & Valeangia'o 
N Cersiola 



1 lif-b^rrel. . . 
1 hf-barrel. . . 

1 barrel 

1 barrel 

1 barrel 

1 barrel 

1 bairel 

1 hf-barrel. . . 
1 bbl 1 keg., 

Ikeg 

1 hf-barrel. . , 

1 bbl 1 case. 

Ikcg 

8 barrels 

8 lif-barrels. 
10 kegs 

2 hf-barrels. 
1 barrel 



Total amount Wine 1 case and. 




TO VICTOKIA— Per Steamer City of Puebla December 31, 1890. 



M in di'd, Victoria... 



B &Co, 



A GreenebBum & Co... 



G Migliavacca. 



71 cases 

5 cs Champagne. 
14 half-barrels. . . 
5 barrels 



Total amount Wine 76 cases and. 



277 
2.50 



321 



$ 180 

30 

213 

100 



» 523 



TO HONOLULU— Per Brig G. W. Irwin December 29, 1890. 



H W S & S. iKuther & Bendixeu 

G in di'd 



1 20 kegs., 

40 cases . 

D W Gedge 'SO kegs. , 



Total amount Wine 40 cases and. 



100 
'2.50 



350 



f 70 
145 
169 

$344 



TO TAHITI 


—Per Barkentine Tropic Bird December 30, 1890. 


A 8 


J Pinet 


4 half-barrels 106 

1 barrel 1 59 

2 half-barrels ' 54 

10 barrels ' 520 

8 barrels 400 


»4S 


S D 


A Crawford* Co 

I E Thayer 


30 


EH 


27 


A C & Co 


169 




140 


CC 

JE 


2 barrels 1 octave. 122 
4barrels | 19:3 


47 


Lilienthal& Co 


75 



Total amount Wine. 



1,4.54' » 548 



TO 


NEW 


YOKK— PER Steamer Acapulco January 5, 1891. 




M in diamond 

B B 


B Dreyfus it Co 

Lenormaud Bros 

A Greenebaum & Co. . . 

Overland FT Co 

A Greenebaum & Co.. . . 


100 barrels 

30 barrels 


4,994 

1,530 

51 

96 

578 

97 

336 

5,165 

518 

518 

327 


* 1.1.50 
4.56 


J P W, West Point. . . 
1 C 


1 barrel 


36 


2 barrels 


68 




12 barrels 


232 


W 1? M K Po 


2 barrels 


'31 


X M 


7 barrels 


101 




103 packages 

10 barrels 


1,360 


B H P 


Lachraan A Jacobi 

Kohler & Frohling 


281 


L T 


10 barrels 


231 


K&F 


5 casks 


180 


Total amount 


Wine 




14,300 


$ 4,066 



TO CENTRAL 


AMERICA— Per Steamer Acapulco January 5, 1 


891. 


A P, Corinto 

FZC, 

J M L, OcoB 


B Dreyfus & Co 

FMeeks 


30 kegs 

33 half-barrels. . 5 

13 half-barrels 

1 half-barrel 

16 kegs 


1,073 

351 

19 

160 

105 

505 

60 

80 


¥900 

230 

35 


F S Corinto 


133 


E L, Puntas Arenas. . 

CB, 

J M A, Cliamptrico.. 

DG, 

BB, 

A P Opiir 


90 




10 barrels 

10 kegs 


379 

8!^ 


EL G Steele* Co 

Cabrera Boma & Co 


8 keirs 


115 




60 


35 cases 




75 


P O, Corinto 

NS 

M V A, LaLibeitad.. 

TTW, Corinto 

M V, Cham]>crico 

F H, Aeajutla 

G B, La Libcrtad. . . . 
B Bit Co, La Libert ad 

Total amount 


3 barrels 


iis 

21 


153 


1 keg 


18 




50 




30 cases 




105 


Urruela & Urioste 




30 

20 

105 

150 

2,723 


31 




15 


5 barrels. 


69 


3 barrels 


90 


Wine 75 cases and 




» 2,611 



TO MEXICO— Pee Steam'ek 


Acapplco Hntuaj S 


, mi. 




K & V B, Mazatlan 


Kuther & Bendixen . 
L F Lastrcto 






204 
55 
50 


$116 




5 kegs 


51 


JB, 


1 barrel 


25 


Total amoun 


t Wine 










809 


$ 192 









TO EUROPE— Per Ship California January «, 1891. 



G O it Co, London. 



PF, L 

G Oit 
OC, L 
S in di 



iveipool 

Co, London. . . 

iverpool 

d, Liverpool. . 



F A Haber 5 casks 

il lialf-bblMust. 

Geo Frank 's cases 

A G Chauchc |10 barrels 

Wilkens & Co 5 barrels 

J Gundlach & Co 42 barrels 



Total amount Wine 8 cases and. 




1.50 
13 

a) 

205 
160 
271 

¥829 



TO NEW YORK— Per Ship Alex McCullum January 9, 1891. 



Kohler it Frohling 

Kohler & Van Bergen. . 

Lachinan A Sacobi 

Clias Stern & Sons 

Gamier Lancel & Co. . . 
Marshall Spcllman & Co 



K it F 

M M ill dia'd 

E B it J 

8 in star 

J P 

M in dia'd 

WTW, Westfield.MassL T Snow 

'Miscellaneous 

C & M 'Carpy & Co 

8 W& BCo Sonoma Wine & B Co.. 

E AH I A Haraszthy it Co 

A C Co I AmericaiiChainpagueCo 

B D it Co IB Dreyfus it Co 



1200 barrels 

375 

700 

100 

65 

3.50 

1 

,50 

7:iO 

1006 " 

1 half-barrel boxed 

10 cs Champagne 

1300 bariels 



Total amount Wine 10 cases and. 



60,267 

13,652 

M.HUl 

4,800 

3,251 

12'342 

.52 

2,527 

36,673 

.50,'>03 

25 



58,865 



:io,i:« 

6,8'36 

17.418 

2,400 

1,625 

6,121 

26 

1,263 

18,336 

25,401 

30 

75 

29,432 



277,994 |!139,0U 



TO NEW YORK— Per Steamer City of New York January 13, 1891. 



H in di'd 


Overland Freight T Co.. 

Kohler it Fiohling 

A Greenebaum & Co . . . 
Beringer Bros 


12 barrels 

1.50 " 

5 

4 

100 " 

4 

10 '• 

.50 " 

2 " 

3 half-barrels 

10 barrels 

1 barrel 


578 

7,.5:« 

341 

197 

4,800 

206 

.500 

2,.5:37 

80 

80 

503 

,50 

5.026 

2,435 

100 


f231 


K it F 


3,012 


B H 


t!0 


W & Co 


50 


E W 


Natoma Vineyard Co 

J F McGovern it Co 


2,(X)0 


HP&Co, Washington. 
C B R '.... 


183 
325 


FOB 


Junset F & S Co 


7:« 


S 


Dresel & Co 


60 


M 


A Netter it Co 


60 


HC, Philadelphia.... 
K " 


320 
50 


F Bros 


30 packages 

.50 barrels 

2 barrels 


2,513 


P R it Co 




606 


G A 


8 Lachman & Co 

Laelman & Jacobi 

Garnier Lancel & Co.. . . 

CO cases and 


.50 


R 


20 cases 


320 


S L & Co 


3(K)barrelf ( 

Ikeg \ 


14,998 

361 

1,395 

1,806 

1,087 

547 




MB 


6.000 
147 




25 " 
35 " 
32 " 
11 " 


402 


E it B 


6:^8 


J P it Co 


a56 


8 it R 


•269 






Total amount 


44,847i $ 18,388 



TO CENTRAL AMERICA— Per Steamer City of New York Jan. 13, 1891. 



C C, La Union 

K 8, Amapala 

B B & Co,LaLibcrtad 

E C, La Libertad 

T R H. La Libertad. . 

P H, Panama 

S A, La Libertad 

J L, San Jose de Guat 



W V L, Corinto.... 

T 8. Corinto 

S I, La Union 

P 0, Granada 

ND, Ocos 

PS&Co, SanJdeGuat 



Monteleagie it Co 10 kegs 

6 kegs 
Bloom Baruch it Co 



E DeSabla &Co., 
John T Wright..., 

A G Chauche 

W R A Johnson. . 
J Gundlach & Co. 



1 half-barrel... 

13 barrels 

13 kegs 

3 kegs 

1 case 

.50 cases 

3 half-bar. els . 
30 cases 

2 half-barrels . 

4 kegs 

1 case 

5 barrels 



A Haraszthy it Co , 

E L G Steele 43 cases 

Ui ruela & Urioste 1 14 cases 



Total amount 1.S9 cases and. 



100 

72 

28 

725 

120 

20 



SS 



53 

50 



257 



|i75 

4:i 

25 

.525 

140 

15 

5 

2.50 

34 

103 

43 

31 

4 

183 

195 

52 



1,478 $ 1.722 



TO MEXICO— Per Steamer City of New York January 13, 1891. 





Tliannhauser & Co 

W Loaiza&Co 

Kohler & Van Bergen . . 

Dieckman & Co 

Cabrera Roma it Co 

John T Wriirht. 


12 kegs 

2 kegs 


34o 
32 


f 2,55 


P, Manzanillo 

Q C, Puerto Angel... 

P DC. San Bias 

ABC, San Benito... 

E M O, San Bias 

J A A C, Mazatlan.... 
K&VB, Salina Cruz. 

T P, Manzanillo 

AS,' " 

F L T, Salina Cruz. . . 


31 




48 


4 casks 

28 kegs 


338 

380 

61 

15 

150 

M 

10 
130 


92 
215 


1 caGk 


32 


1 keg 


10 


15 kegs 

10 cases 

1 barrel 


li5 
60 
35 


Ikeg 

8 kegs 


125 




85 


R M, Acapulco 


8 k-eira 


96 


77 






Total amount 


cases 43 and 




1,892 


$ 1,197 



TO SOUTH AMERICA— Per Steamer City of New York Jan 13, 1891. 



G & L, Lumaco I E de Sabla & Co i 2 barrels 

" I " I 6 kegs 



Total amount . 



100 
80 



180 



t86 
60 



$146 



24 



j&^ftreifie WINE AN© SflF^IT F^EVIEW. 



MISCCLLANCOUS FOREIGN WIN E SHIPME NTS. 
Fioai IXrwabvr SB. UWO la Jannar; 14. IWI. 



Watti Wt l* 

■ WWiktua 
OaaMMla. — 
UaiMlUa..... 

Oily ol P«klD 



0«k-rtllATIO!l. 



nHimw. 



tnltTBirTK. DALLAm 



DHIIJ*r«Vlrra.,li Oniidlarli * »'<•.. J lianrli" . . . 
W WT.H.MKilulu! Willi! W.>HaiiK III keifa. . . 

— Honolulu. ')liM-<-ll«iip.ui» . , M» <H-la«T». 

OF. Honolulu.. IsIhk !.«• I. Miic. 4 i-aMW 

r M, VMoria...,!CalTnici.fir lo 'HiMiarrrl. 

g A H. •• lA<lrr.-n<-l.»uiii.V<'o;l •••I'li 

T K. Ti»lil« Inrrliicrr Hnw 14 barrel*.. . 

S I. Voki>luuna..l|jH-bman A Jar»b|ll rate 



« 

ino 
I, mo 

"as 

68 



Tt'tkl ktii-'iiiil 



, >r..I 



»45 
NO 

I.I75 
18 
•JO 
IB 
SO 
S 



■■■■■ 



• l.«B 



EXPORTS OF WHISKY BY SEA. 



Plum Dirembcr 90. tmo to January !W. iMll 






vnan.. 


narrtxATioH. 


■HirrcBH. 


COaTKIITII. 


(lALLON* 


VAt.UK. 






Aflrwneliaum.tro 
Itulliir \ IIimkIItpii 
Wllinrrtlini; iV Co.. 
8pru'c«.8laiiry*C» 

SberwnodAHhcrw'd 
I.llieiitlial JtCa... 
Wllmenlini; A Co.. 

Spru'ee.Stanl'jACo 

Hrhwarlic Bnw 

MvliiKvloii * Co. .. 
Ilullier .V Ik'iicllxen 

Jobn T Writfhl 

Hi'llinan Ito* .t Co 
Wllmerdlnc A Co.. 

WliiK WoSaiiK 

I, TSnow 

lll(M>m Baruc-b W-o 

Jobn T Wriiflit 

rrruela .^ iTliitite. . 
WllmerdliiK&Co.. 

J niinillarh JkCa.. 






«I75 




as •• 
15 •• 
50 " 
40 " 
15 " 
15 " 

s •• 

45 •• 

3 liarrel*. . . . 

4 •• 




130 


AwtralU 


Hl'.t«'uHnn<ilnlu 
WCP, 

awK AOo •• 

WSI.. 

SF. 

liWMftC.) •• 
WSI.. 

iU'..*ro. •• 

I. * I'o, " 

J M L. Oco. 

<i<ii>rnruiit*« A 

It/.. M ami Ian... 
Vr. H Jilr(iu»l. . 
t,H.t(',('liatn|MTi<-o 
H I) ('. Honolalu 
W W T 

OWI.AroXaj5Vhl 
BIMCoIJiI.lbr'd 
K M. Ania|>ala... 
I.SA. SJ lie (iiial 
A C 1). Acajulla.. 
Er. ArajulU.... 
F.\,runta»Aren'« 

J I. KJ>fa>nnal . 




140 




435 


„ 




xn 


• 

•4 

Arapalro 

M WinklMnan 


si 

IHS 


134 
I3« 

17 
.t30 
1.55 
335 
.170 

93 


Hlwrrel*.... 
1 k.v 

10 |-«K(H 

40 rai*c* . . . . 

7 barrel* 

10 ra*e* 


114 
5 

aw 


401 
18 
93 
360 
4.W 
100 


CUyof Pckln. 
CIlyofNY... 

• • 
*• 


.j case* 




43 


2 barrels 

1 keir 

20 cMiie* 

2 barrel* 

1 barrel .... 

3 barrels.. . . 


85 
13 

fW 

.14 

100 


90 
30 
178 
304 
173 
403 
10 


• 








Tolal 


unouiil 34.1 ra»e> 


•nd 


i.02:< 


9 .5,109 



EXPORTS OF MISCELLANEOUS LIQUORS BY SEA. 



TBMBt. 


BMTniATIOII. 


8HIPPEBS. 


CONTKHTS. 


VALITE. 


kmnSlM. 


OWMACo, Hon'lu 


Spmanre Stanley A Cn 


ecsBlttc.s 


»4S 


" 


W H L. 


•• 


3 Of Bitter* 


32 


•• 


h8. 


Bbera ood A Hberwoud 


30 .» Gin 


48 


•• 


HP 


" 


10 <■* Stout 


72 


•a 


V V, 


A Vljoiler 


5 <■» Liqueur 


33 


•• 


OWMACo " 


Junes Mnndy A Co... 


30 <•* Cbainp'ne. 


318 


•• 


»• •• 


•* 


30 c* Stout 


l.'>3 


»• 


•t »• 


.. 


10 0* Gin 


32 


•• 


HB. 


Lillenlhal A Co 


5 r* Kuininel 


15 


•• 


C V, 


•» 


3<i' liilleii' 


11 


" 


UWMACo •• 


" 


1 (f Kuinmcl.... 


12 


•• 


.. t. 


J De Fremery A Co . . 


IOi*Gin 


15 


TiopieBinl.... 


A C A Co.Papeete 
DAB, Naiialmo.. 


A Cra»fi>rd A Co 


3 c* Bitten. 


14 


FjDPlre 

WO Irwin 


Hliwbler .V Co 


4 C-* I.ii|Uor 


10 


W r P. Hiiiiolulu. 


Win Wolff .V Co 


10 c* Tonic 


140 


City III i'arbla.. 


Mlndl'd.Vlf'toila 


A (Ireenebniiiii A Co.. 


4lif bblOraiiL'eW 


87 


Arapulro 


]l B. Cliainiieriro. 


ELG Steele A C<i.... 


4c»GlH 


13 


Tarawa 


n .t C.i. ialull . . . 


A CrawfonI A Co 


SScsOln 


119 


•• 


J. Jalull 


" 


3 CR Bitter* 


14 


MaryWInklnn'o 


~ Homtlulu 


I.lllentlial A Co . ... 


15 bbls Alc'obol. 


864 


Oly ol Pekin . . 


HEUAro.HloKu 


Henry Mobiia 


3bblK Alcohol.. 


48 



Tolal anoani t5l> 



t 1173 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO DOMESTIC PORTS BY 


SEA. 


Prom IX-crombcr Ml. 1890 to January 14. 1891. 


rammu 


DMTtllATIOl). 


kiiiprcK*. 


•■ONTtUTS. 


OALLOMH 


VALDB. 


Aeapulro 


KATB. NewTork 


KohlerAVanBenten 


10 liarrel*.. 


488 


$344 


M A K 


•♦ 


35 liMmrrel* 


600 


330 


.. 


F.BAJ 


Lac-bman A Jac-obi. 


10 barrel*.. 


484 


778 


A Mr<''allc>m. . 


M K 


WalcliMi A Co 


:Mm liarrel*.. 


13,486 


26,972 




M K 


Koliirr A FroliliiiK. 


221 barrel".. 


.5.812 


11.024 


«. 


M K 


Clovi-rclale Wine Co 


2*17 barrel*.. 


7,102 


14,204 


„ 


C H 


Clias Stern A Sonr. 


120 barrels.. 


4,56A 


9,l.'i2 


„ 


C H, Cbleajfo 




120 barreU . 


4.567 


9,134 


Cllyof N V... 


It J I). New York 


OverUnd F T Co. . . 


21 hf- barrel* 


576 


435 


IIDAC' 


B Drevf u» A (^>. . . . 


25 lif-barrel* 


587 


1,060 


.. 


J H G, 


Dresel A <'o 


1 bf-barrel.. 


35 


.55 


•' 


K, 


o 


Ihf -barrel.. 


36 


60 


Tntnl nmt)iint . . cnsc* n 


1(1 




:ts..S79 


» Ti.9K>i 



EXPORTS O F BRANDY TO FOREIGN PORTS BY SEA. 

Fruin Ueceinber HO, 18U0 to January 20, 1891. 



VEfWIL. 


DEfcTINATIOK. 


BHIPPriBS. 


COHTKNT*. 


OALLONK 


VALCB. 


Cllv of I'uebla 
W U Irwin . . 


M in di'd Victoria 
(i iiicii'd.llono'lu 
lill'Co. Vaiicou'r 
GL.VCo.Acajutia 
MVALaLiliertac". 
G O & Co London 
F A S. Honolulu. 

— Honolulu 

Q C. PurrloAn>.'i-l 
LKA, SJdcGuat 
A C D, Acajulla.. 
CFH, Corinto.. 


A Orocnebauin A Co 

D \V (icdirc- 

J (iiiiidlacli A Co.. 

Goldtrcc Bro* 

E De Rabla 

FA Haber 

WilliainHDiin'dACo 

Misceilaneou* 

ThaniiliauHe* A Co. 
Urruela A Urioste.. 
Wilinerdiii); A Co.. 
Cabrera Itoina A Co 






• 44 


10 catea 




50 


(;ity of I'culila 
Aeapulro 

M Wiiikleman 

City of NY... 

Califomta. . . . 


10 oases. . . . 




60 


6 barrel*.... 

3 rases 

5 bf-barreU. 
lOO rase*.. . . 
5 ortavee... 

2 rases 

5 case* 

3 barrel* 

4 barrels 


240 

103 

120 

m 

97 


1.W 

:«i 

200 

VVi 

125 

IB 

.50 

:«« 

134 


Tolnl 


iinotinl 183 catiet- 


»iui 




* l.iiiil 


I.IIHI 



WHISKY AND SPIRIT IMPORTS BY RAIL, S. P. CO. 



From Dcrember .SO. 1890 to January 14. 1891. 




W^HISKY. 


SPIBITS. 






Barrel 


>^-bbl. 


Case. 


Barrel | >i-bbl 




Liiientbal A Co..; 


80 
125 
160 

10 




.544 

387 
492 







Jone* Mundy A Co 

C W Craii; 

JL Nirkel 


110 












Order 










30 bf- l>bl Brand V 


Meyer A Co 


4 




25 








Heal brote Dexter A Co 








G Colin A Co 


83 
1 
1 

1 
60 
65 












A G reenel)Hiiin A Co . . 












Old Time DIsCrCo.... 












H Walker 












Moore Hunt & Co 












J 8 Ilowinan A Co 












Jos MclrzerACo 


10 










Wilmerdintr A Co 


65 

50 
1 
1 
60 
60 
3 
2 
6 
1 
1 










MevrrfirklMitc-iicIlAS 


25 










P I' Koliiike 










F Giossberg 












Both A Co 












Lariiinan A JarobI 












J DFeidtinan 












F Mandelliauin 












F Clc-valier 












A Chandler 












MFHcadly 
























Tolal 


840 


145 


25 


1.42:H 1 


:iOlif-l.bllliftiidv 



BEER 


IMPORTS 


BY RAIL. S. 


P. CO. 






BOTTLKD. 


BlTLK. 




Barrels! J^-bbl 


¥-bbl 


Case 


Barrel* 


X-bbI 


>^-bbl 


Sherwood A Shejwood 

W Loai/.a 

Tbannbauser A Co. . . . 


1 
1 125 




"iso" 




lU 


184 
















Total 


I 185 




ISO 





124 


184 



WM. WOLFF & CO., 

Importers and General Agents, 

327-329 Market Stre et, - San Francisco, Cal. 

IP^CII^io CO.A.ST .A^OEIsTTS I^^OIR 



POHHIRT 810 (HAMPiOIfi; 

i. k r. Misnu, ooeific, 

■maai bu&, port st. hart's .shbrrib 

DOOn DOOBU DUHOHD PORT, 

OOBOB nmm, BOROI&OI Obnk ami SuUnm, 



JOHN d« KUTPHl A SONS, ROTTHIDAII, OW, CANTRELL & OOCHRANKS Btlfiut Oinnr Ak 

OILXA KUMMEL, BASS & DO'S Pale aod Biitoi AU. io Htahwdt, 

PABST BKEWINO CO. (formerly PHILUP BBT), ODINinSS & 00*8 (Dublin) bin Sloit &iBoob«ai 

MILWAUKEE Export Beer, Select Blue Ribbon ORBlfLBS BROS' Lome HichUnd (Seekh) Whitkr 

THE •• BEST" T0i5l(3. jaMBON & CO., IRISH WHMT 

THEO. LAPPES GENUINE AROMATIQUB, LONDON Dry Doc* Jamaica Rum 

" DOO'S-HEAD'' BRAND of Oninnea' Stout and Baa' Al^ Muieral Water^ 

ne-tmrorira Iwrrlran IfhlMklm HO Hrlnionl X' Chic kcnccK-k; '8:1 lllucifini.* '85 Illpy, and olhrr staple brands. 

Lown>t market i|uotatlons furni»be«l on a|>|>lic-alicin. 



DL Obnti ai 
1. BmIuII* 






V 



f/reifie WIJNSE >)rJME) SflRIT [REVIEW. 



25 



IMPORTS OF WINES AND LIQUORS BY SEA. 

FKOM NEW YOKK— Per Ship I. F. Chapman December 30, 1890. 



FKOM PHILADELPHIA— PEn Ship Standabu December 39, 1890. 



Paris Allen & Co. 
J A Burke 



W K Freeman . 



Paris .\llen ifc Co. . 

J A Burke 

Alvin Wood & Co . 



14 packages Wbisky. 

1 barrel " 
5 barrels " 

2 barrels " 
2 paekaires " 
1 package ** 
1 barrel " 
1 " 

1 " 
1 " 



10 packages 
1 half-barrel 
8 barrels 
3 barrels 



CONSIGNEE. 



Mellwood Distilling Co 


6.5 barrels Wliiskv 

2 barrels Whisky 


Sroufe & McCrum 


Aurora Distilling Co 

D Lawrence iVc Sons 


G W Ciumraey 

A Vigniei 

Jones Mundy & Co 


10 barrels Hum 


Cliapin Trull ^ Co 


2.5 barrels Hum 




10 barrels Whisky 

5 pac'kages WhJKky 


Booth &Co 







Boot h <fe Co 

J C Houghton 

Blossom iV Blossom 

Fitzmeyer & Ambrust. . . . 

W Colson (% Co 

I Karu 

I M Uyason 

M Lewis 

N Ueinecker 

F F Daduz 

L Sliippa 

.\lex Meister 

Geo Meialer 

Bugbee Bros 

E H Mueschke. 

P .T Losky 

Friend-Degginer Imp Co. 

Booth A Co 

Meyer A Sanger 

Occidental Hotel 



FKOM NEW YOItK— Pek Ship James Nesmath January 3, 1891. 



H W Smith <fc CO | 11 barrels | A Cereghino. 

IMPORTS BY RAIL IN BOND. 



S V Fornarls li, Co. 



Boord A Son, London . 



20,5 eases Wine 

100 cases Wine 

1 case Cordials 

1 case Wine 

80 cases Coi dials 

100 cases Old Tom Gin... 



Jas De Fremery & Co. 
WB Chapman 



J Simpson 

Chas Meinecke <fe Co. , 



FROM NEW YOKK— Per Steamek City of New York Dec. 30, 1890. 



H JBuliay, New York.... 

A^ig Bolten. Hamburg. . . . 
PliOM LONDON- 



2 barrels Kye Whisky. 

5 cases Licpieurs 

1 case Kuminel 



Hasley & Martin. 
Lebenbaum Bros. 
F L PajM! 



■Pek Ship General Kobekts December 31, 1890. 



FKOM NEW YOKK— Per Ship St. Mark December 29, 1890. 



Sutton & Co I 2.5 barrels Whisky | Sutton & Beebe . 



Lucaze A Co 

J>is Morrison & Son. . . . 
John Jameson A Co. . . . 

Marteil A Co 

Patterson Hibber A Co. 



.50 octaves Slierry C Meinecke A Co 

167 cases Beer H M Newball A Co.. 

50 cases Whisky C W Craig. 

1.50 cases Brandy Wm Wollf A Co 

.50 casks Beer iHellman Bros A Co. 



^rade J^oies. 



F. P. Dilley & Co., Philadelphia, agents for " Eclipse" cham- 
pagne, report a large demand for their goods for the holidays. 

8. Dillinger & Sons have enlarged their distillery and com- 
pleted a 1 1 ,000 barrel warehouse for the accomiuodatiou of the 
ever popular "Dillinger." , 

M. Durner of Cincinnati, has issued a calendar for '91 that 
is <iuite artistic and very catchy. The principal feature is a fine 
lithograph representing the famous chariot race in " Ben-Hur." 

A. Overholt & Co., are floating along on the top wave of 
success. They have just built a storage warehouse with a capac- 
ity for 18,000 barrels of "Overholt" and will erect another during 
the suininer. 

Among the visitors during the fortnight were Charles Stern 
of New York, and Mr. Rosenthal, the manager of Mr. Stern's 
house in Chicago. Mr. Stern is still standing on the platform 
that the "rectifiers mii-d go." Mr. Stern has undertaken a big 
contract. 

A five story brick warehouse with a capacity for 14,000 barrels 
is being completed by the Thompson Distillery Company. Sec- 
retary Sunstein reports that the past year has been a very success- 
ful one for the "Sam Thompson," and the outlook for the future 
is very cheering. 

We have received a very handsome calender from A. Over- 
holt & Co., who produce the only " Overholt." It bears the 
portrait of the founder of the famous distillery and also a colored 
lithograph showing a pretty harvest scene in which the taking 
feature is "a beautiful damsel reaping rye." 

J. De Barth Shorb, President of the San Gabriel Wine Co., 
has been seriously ill during the past fortnight. He has been 
unable thus far to attend a proposed meeting of the Special Com- 
mittee of the Viticultural Commissioners for the purpose of 

submitting a final report on the sweet wine regulations. 

— • 

Chas. Meinecke & Co., are closing up their books for 1890 
and fine a most gratifying result of their labors during the past 
year. They did a large business, much in excess of that of 1889, 
and if energy, square business methods and first-class goods are 
the test of success, they will make a still better record for 1891. 

Albert Lacliman, of S. Lachman & Co., New York, jjaid the 
city a flying visit during the past fortnight. He says tliat com- 
petition in the New York market is very sharp indeed, but that 
fts the demand grows there will probably be less rivalry [among 



the trade. 
Inst 



Mr. Lachman returned to New York on the 12th 



It is expected that tlie number of saloons in Chicago will be 
reduced to 4,000 next year. There are now 5,600 in the city. 
All the syndicate breweries have decided to cease advancing 
money to saloon keepers for the purpose of procuring licenses, 
and this radical step will probably result in the closing of the 
doors of about 1600 saloons about the first of the year. 

We acknowledge the receipt of a case of " Reihlen" cham- 
pagne from the American Champagne Co., the kindly holiday 
remembrance of Messrs. Bunton and Wood, the local managers 
of the company. " Reihlen" speaks for itself, and the wine that 
is now being turned out by the company is meeting with public 
approval. Tlic t^ompany report that the wine produced Rue year 
ago is developing qualities far beyond their expectations. 

One of the neatest and most artistic remindere of the new 
year was sent out by Messrs. Hoff"heimer Bros., of Cincinnati, to 
their mtiny friends and patrons. It was in the shape of a small 
pocket memorandum book, the cover of which was composed of 
sheets of ivory celluloid substantially bound in leather. On the 
front cover a fine lithograph calls attention to their " Whit« 
Mills" and " W. B. Samuels" whiskies. The back cover beare a 
calendar. 

An article in the Argonaut of a recent date, descriptive of the 
Inglenook vineyard has been widely read by the wine producers 
and merchants of this State. The excellence of the Inglenook 
wines, the beauties of the vineyard and the completeness of the 
vaults were all described in an exceedingly apt and convincing 
manner. The article in question was written by Frona E. Waite, 
who some time ago published a book on "The Wines and Vines 
ofCalifornia-" 

Wm. Wolfl" & Co., report a steadily increasing demand for 
'• Pommery." Their importations for the last half of December 
were 1100 cases, which brings the total of their imports for 1890 
to a figure far beyond that of any previous year since they be- 
came the agents for this celebrated wine. Their success in 
handling " Pommery" has been very gratifying, and the outlook 
for the future could hardly be better, as the brand promises for 
1891 to improve upon its present record in the same ratio that 
has marked its career in the past few years. 



The American Champagne Co., have made a formal demand 
upon the State Viticultural Commission for space in the Exhibi- 
tion Hall to display "Reihlen" Champagne. Thus far Manager 
C. J. Wetniore has de(!lined to give space to the company on the 
ground that the champagne was not produced by natural fermen- 
tation. In their demand, however, the company declare that the 



26 



f^ifie wi|:e /ijd sfif^iT (review 



wii.i- i- iiiiiurally fwim-ntwl «ii<l in utliiiixHithlc tn the oxhibition 
HiuliT tho pniviHloiw of the Van' Wiiio law «>f tht« Stair I li< 
IVHiiniirMoii haK w yet taken no action in the nuitU-r. 

F. A. IIuIht, the wtirhlV ap-nt fi»r Tnnh'iKN.k wim-n. <K-<-ii|.i«'M 
a very attreeiilile i>ocitioii liy n-anon nf tliv faet that the <mU'rs for 
the wiiiii* from thin e«>lehnite(l \ iiieyani an* laiyely in exeenH of 
the mi|.|.ly. I iider the ruh- whi<li ohtainH at Ingh-nook. no 
wint* are iiottl*-*! until tliey have n-»M IuhI the proiKT maturity, 
»n<l no matter what tlie preh»<ure of ortlerx may Ih'. tliiH niU- iH 
nev4'r hn>k.'ii. Caiit. Nielmunt tlu< proprietor of Innleiuwk, iH 
workinc for tlie future aw well m tlie prefwut and hin ntrict ml- 
hert-m-e to th«> iM)liey al)ove n>eiiti<mwl i« bringing him tlic reward 
to whieh he i?» ;«» jtwtly entitled. 

Tlif (••luipliuientary dinner \*hieh wan given to l'.\ (iovenior 
Komauhlo raehe<-<i. now ruit«'<l Stat<'H Miuister toC^^ntral Anvi- 
im. at the MaiM>u Kiehe on the .'Ird inst.. was one of the most 
notable of the present W4iw)n. \'ery proin'rly and appropriately 
only California win«« were M'rv«'<l. TIkhh- having a plae,! on tho 
nteiiu wen- the Siuiterue antl Hurguiidy (Inith "Private Sl(K'k"') of 
the Na|>a Valley Wine ComiMUiy. and the "Chateau d'OrleaMs'' 
ant] ehaniiMigne "Eeliiiw'" <)f MewrH. ArjMMl HaraHzthy & Co. 
Mr. K. C. Prilier, the Manager of the NajKi Valley Co., and Mr. 
liantKZthy wen among those who hitl fanwell to the Minister. 



They have a dwidedly original way of advertising u|> in the 
State of Waxhingington, as the following uniijue "!ul" will te.s- 
tify: 

OffE Hl'NDRED IM)L,LAK8 REWARD, LOeT! 

A nnall iKiy. aliout the size of a man, lmre-f(M)ted with his 
father's sIkk-s on, he wore a muttonn-hop eoat with Ix'an-soup 
lining; he ha»l an empty Ixig on his Imk-R containing two railroad 
tunnels and a bundle of hung-holes; his hair wiis cut short but 
«iirly on the Iwek of his neek; he waw Inirn before his elder 
bn>lhei*, his mother U'ing present on the ocea«iou. When la«t 
s»fn he was shoveling wind off a sc^ln)ol house to niise money to 
go to Roehl IJn)thers and get a Iwttle of Jesse Moore's ''C." or 
"A. A..'' and a Ijottle of Pure Wine, from Carpy & Go's Wine 
Cellars. Napa. Califoniia, to feast liimsi-lf and treat his friends on 
('hristmsis. For further iuformatiou, apply to Roehl Brothers, 
Elk Stm-t, Si'home. 

Among the most {mpular brands of strictly old-fiuihioned 
sour mash whiskies of Kentucky is "The Belle of Anderson 
Comity." pnxhiej'd by E«l. Murphy & Co., near Ijawrencehurg. 
Anderson county is tiic home of some of the most famous brands 
of whi.Hky in the world and the al)Ove named brand possesses all 
the cliaraeteristic.-t that have given the whiskies of this sw^tion 
their high reputation. Metwrs. Murphy & ('o., have conscientiously 
adhen'<1 to the tinie-honore<l methods of distillation that have given 
K<-ntueky its pri<'/les« fami; as a jtrfKlucer of fine whiskies. "The 
Belleof A iKh-rsoii County" is a fin copper whisky made in the most 
can-fill manner uiuh-r the iH*rs<mal supervision of Mr. Ed. Murphy, 
one of the most eaiMible distillers in the ''Blue Grass State," and 
the |tosition o<-eupie<l by the bnind, which wius jthu-xMl on the mar- 
ket in t.ssl.Hhows the suct-i-ss which has attencled his eflort«. In 
the pnjtiuetion of this whisky only the finest grain and pure lim^ 
st<me spring water an; use<l, an<l the facilities of the firm for 
storage an; so excellent that the go<Hls invariably (;ome out of 
lM)nil at the end of time y»;ars, aliove proof. The distillery bae 
a «ii|»aeity <»f eight hiindn;*! bushels per day and the product 
always meetM with a rea<ly sale. 

"Ctiateau d'<h-h«iiH, " a magnifitxint table claret which clial- 
leng«-n (-om|Miris<m with the lH*t French vintages, is the latest 
brand of win«- inlnMliicd Iiy Arpad Harasxthy & Co.. and is the 
[Kirticiilar pride and p. i ..f Mr. Hiiras/.tliy, after the '-J-Iclipw-" 
ehamimgne. The wine i- taking well with all who have tH«t<Hl 
if. and is having a most hiiliHfa<lory run at the dubs and the high 
class n-staiirants. There ia a little sU>ry in conniHtion with the 



naming of the tiino, whieh will U^r n'i>etition iniwmuch a« th< 
brand is (-ertain to Ixh-oiiu' known as widely and as favoniblv 
as tlu- "lu-lips*;." The story wa.-« tohl by Mr. Hanuiztliy at ;i 
wK-ial gathering not long sinot;, and is as follows: "Not lon^ 
ago, as you all know, the Count of Paris wa« in America andasli. 
was visiting us, lu- followinl the Kiiropean custon of drinking tli. 
wineaofthe country of which he wiw a guest. This intnHliucd 
him to ,\iiierican wimw, and he wiw pleased with them too, if tlic 
re|Mirt»< bnaiglit by telt^aph are correct. .\l)out the same time 1 
was hunting for a name for the new brand of claret, and tlii 
action on the part of the Count so pleased iiil-, that 1 det.'rinined t- 
take the name of his family for the wine. Then the name coim 
doubly applicable too, as the vineyanl in Yolo county is willed 
the "Orleans." 1 am more than suited with the name, and the 
lK)pularity that has thus far l)een met is very encouraging." 

Our po<;t after assimilating some of the I>avie« county pnMliict 
known to the world as " R. Monarch" whisky, broke <mt iuto 
rhyme, and as he seems to have thrown his soul into the effort 
we are constrained to give it publicity. It follows herewith. 

In the land of whisky, good and straiiilit. 

Of glorious women fair to see, 

Of splendid hoi-ses. swift of gait, 

There doth a Monarch hold levee. 

Out from the 1-^st and from the West, 

From the far North and sunny South, 

The people rise to ctill him blessed. 

To give him pniisi; by word of mouth. 

List to the sounds of loud acclaim 

That float upon the ambient air. 

And tribute pay to a high name 

That shines among the great and fair. 

Father of "Glenmore" and "Short Horn." 

Of royal " Monarch" good and pure. 

To whom " Kentucky Club" wa« born, 

Long may thy lofty fame endure. 

Let men of letters pa.ss aw'ay, 

Let warrioi-H fall ueath foemeus' spears. 

Let Kingdoms crumble to decay, 

But spare our Monarch long, long years. 

The "Astor," "Belmont" and "Nutwowl" Distilleries of 
Louisville, are known to the trade of the country a» the iikmU I 
distilleries of Kentucky. Messi-s Moore & Selliger gsvined this 
reputation for their plants by the iutnxluction of an innovation 
by which the entire process of converting grain into whisky i.s 
carried on u}K)n the ground floor, therely avoiding all the incon- 
venience and complications of j)lant.s that re<iiiire two or thnn- 
floors. Through the courtesy of Mr. Max Si-lliger. than whom 
there is no gentleman in all Kentucky more courteous and 
accommodating, the writer was reeently aftbnled the i)lea.sure of 
visiting these distilleries. A casual inspe<'tion showed that 
Messrs. Moore & Selliger spai-e no effort or expense- to provide 
themselves with every available medium for the proiluetiou of 
first-class goods. Their machinery is of the latest and most 
approved i)atern and their still-houses are theacinc of ck'anliiies.s. 
That their efforts to produce fine whiskies have been successful i- 
attested by the high reputation enjoye<l by these three braml 
throughout the Uiiite<l States. The "Astor" and "Belinoni 
wlii<;h are among the most impular straight whiskies on the 
Pacific coast, an- sour ma.sh })nKlu(-tions, fermenti-el in the old- 
fashioned Kentucky style in small tubs. These brands wore 
established in ISSO and have Inul a remarkably succt-ssful career. 
" Nutwooil" is a sweet mash whisky and though a young brand, 
launcluMl in 1SX7, has won its way to an envial)le jK)sition with 
the trade. No small degree of its j>(>pularity is due to its heavy 
Innly and excellent flavor which adapts it es]H-cially tocomiM)uiid- 
iiig purixmes. It has a fine n-putation and growing demand on 
this coast. The prcwluct of thes(> fhrei- distilh-ries is stored in 
four large fire-pnM)f wan-h<mses. |H'rf(-elly ventilat<-d and ei|uipp(-<I 
with ])ateiil racks, i-tc. The cai>a<-ity of the distilleries is .S(M» 
bushels |M'r ilay each, and the total, running full time. 4.'">,(KH) bar- 
rels for the season. Tin- storage eaimeity of the United Statr 
Internal Revenue waivhoustw is .").">,(HK» barrels. 



f/reifie WIJME /fJ^JD SflF^IT PREVIEW. 



27 




^--^^Lj^l^.J^^''''^ DISTILLED BY ■-) 

Baviess County Distilling Co 
Owensboro.Ky. 

Our Cooperage is our oWa manufacture 
OUTS »ND PROOF CUKRKNTe6D'=2> 
Qoods deli\^ered F. 0. B. either Boat or Gars, 



R.MONAROM,Pres. 
OwENSBORO,Kr. 



We hace spared tlelther effort nor expense to make 

G LEN MORE" the finest earli] maturing Sour-Mash 

Whiskey ecer produced in Kentucky and the flattering recog-j 

nitton extended to that brand by the trade is proof enough \ 

to U8 tbat our efforts hace been croicned icith entire success. 

GLENMORE DISTILLING CO. 



28 



f^eifie WIJME /rJSID Sflf^lT {REVIEW. 





CHAS. MEINECKE & CO., 



#Vlt(ETARD PROPRIETORS'COO^ 


E 


L B0UT|ELLEAU(8fCO.y 
^ MANAGERS.!/^ 



314 Sacramentol Street, 



Km 

J .1 v. 
I A I N 

G;kiut. \'iM k anil 1> 
Il.'on! * Hon, l,nii<l"ti Jni 

J..' 



i3^:poi^tbi^/S. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR 



San Francisco, Cah 



I.. 



.SA:iU dill. 

IMS 

. Ktr. 

SL,,i.h Wlilskr. 
Cniwii Slierrieii. 



DiifT (luril.in .t Co., Tort 8t. M»r}'i< Fine SliiTries. 

l,Bi»vc A (••>., Hevllla Queen Olives. 

1). M. Kenerlieertl. Jr. ifc Co., Ojiorlo Fine I'orlK. 

llonxomH. .Mnller>V Itaeiit, TarrnKona TortK. 

A. de 1,11 ire .tHlf.,Dord''[.. Flue Clare t»,8auterne«, Olive Oil. 

C. .Marey .V M(ter-Hclalr, XuiU BurKundiei*. 

O. .M. Talvtmann Holm. .Mainx Hook Wiiitw. 

Silmltz .V Warner. Frankfnrl-o.-tlie-M' Hook Winei*. 

HauKxmann Junr, Tralien. Mokc! winef. 

Cicbr. Maclioll, .Munich ...Kirsiliwaiiser. 



(ienoveva Natural Sparkling Mineral Water. 

Hoyal PruMlan Kprint!:i> Selteis Water. 

Itakoczy Bitter Water Co.. Iludai>eKt, Mineral Water. 

Moore * Sinnott, IMiiladclpliia Wliiskies. 

A. Cli«vallier-.\p|)ert Paris Wine FiniuKs. 

.\. Boake Roberts A Co., Londou Wine Finin);6. 

.1. J. W. Peters. Hamburg Clierry Cordial. 

Ktandard Mineral Water Co., Liverpool. . .Glnj^er Ale. 
Prune .Juice Extract. Batavia Arrack. 

St. Croix IJnin. Medfon) liuin, Etc., Etc. 








SWAN GIN. 



Boord's Old Tom Gin. 



TRIPLE FLAVOR GIN. 



SANDEMAN, BUCK A, CO. 



H. CUVILLIER & KRECKHJ 



-J01 





SANDEMAN A. CO. 
OPORTO. 



•o^ ^ ^o-. 



BOR IDE AU; 



^^ 







-?»» 




-^< 



^ 



'Orcie:a.tA*' 



'^^ 



^n.s: (Cot« 



d'O*-^ 



W. B. CHAPMAN, 

123 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



P/ceifie WIJME /rJMD Sfll^lT r^EVIEW. 29 

J^ "HOTTE/N FAI LU'RE,. the look of current jelly, and indeed as a jelly nothing could In; 
more agreeable to the taste than this i>r(Hluet. 

... . ,, 1 1 1 • c i^ Tj 1 e In manufacturing the condeiwed nnist the grciilcst can- mnst 

The faihire of the wholesale wine firm of Bamberger & , , , , .. x? i .. i- r^i .1*1 

,. . , , . . . 1 • 1 11 - «. • ■ T> be taken to prevent the destruction of tlie gerniH contained m the 

Kaciunfer is developing into a deculedly nasty afiair suice Re- , , , -^ n ^. m ^i • i *■ 

' ,. ,1 1 .t ^1 1 r J.^ n ■ ^ must and to preserve its fermenting powers. To this end the 

ci'ivcr Simonscn has brought the membei-s of the hrni into ,../.,, • , •, i , .1 

^, . ^1 1 /. 1 • , ■ 1 1 1 1- 1 expressed uuce of the grape IS boiled down at low temi)ei"dture m 

court where their nietliods ot (hniig business could l)e discovered. ^ •* rr,i--i .l^x-^i 

^, . , ^ i 1 i.1 • 1 V e .L 1 i. XI • 1 1 vaccuum pans. The original sugar content ot the grai>e must in 

Till' insolvents saerjtad their books of account, but their book- ,,,,,. ^ ^x . .^ 1 x- • V n • i, 

„„,,.,„ . ,., 1 , , T, about twenty-five per cent, so tiiat the reduction in bulk or weight 

keeper hiially "found' a set wJuch were proven to be bogus. By . , ^ ^ •^^, . , ' _ , . » . , . ^ ■ , ■ i 

^ „ , X , /. :, . . , , , IS about two-thirds. To make wine of this material one has only 

means of a search-warrant several of the missing books and , , , ^ .^ , . ,1 i. ^ 1 1 • ^i 

. ,, , , X X, X ,^ o.../irv L IX X ,• 1 X to add to it as much pure water as has been extracted during the 

neirotiable checks to the amount of $2400, were brought to liglit ^ ^ .■ ■ ^ ■ • 1 -xi ii 

"^ , , ., rr,i T. • XI ,1.. , process of condensjition — 1. e. water is mixed with the conc:M.- 

m Bamberger's resid3nc3. ihe Keceiver then had the partners i ^ , x x-i xi 1 x- 1 x x c x r 

, ..'^ ,. ., 1 XX X- . 1 ,. 1 trated must until the solution shows twenty-hve percent of sugar 

arrested for concealing evidence and attempting to defraud ^ ^ -,,., xu- i, i. 1 * i * r Tf.o 

,. , ^, ^ , , „i,.r>,> 111 ^^ XI content. Wlien this has been done at a temperature of 70° 

creditors, and tliey were released on 81000 bonds each. On the t^ , , x x- x • • x -i 1 • xi i- ■ • e 

,,,'„.•',, ^, ^. , , , . Falir., fermentiition sets m lUst as it does m the ordinary juice of 

20th Mr. Simousen had the parties re-arrested on a charge of ^, xi. • /• 1 1 xi 11 

... .^f... ,i,.,i the grape, within a few hours, and the same chemical processc s 

eiand larceny which consisted in buying a car-load of brandy xi 1 -xu xi, x x 1 1 ■ n e i- r • 

^ T ^ , , X, . . ^ ,. . are gone through with that take place in the fermenting of wine 

from L. P. Drexler when they were in iin insolvent condition, , ,. ,.,. 

„ . ., , .1 X X X /. .™.,^„ under ordinary conditions. 

and transfering it to another party to secure a uote for *2000. —,, j 1 x 1 r xi n u 1 

*' , ,. , , ,...,... The condensed must keeps perfectly well even when exposed 

Mr.Simonsen also discovered another peculiarity m their busi- to hot weather as has been shown repeatedly in sending it to 

ness arrangements, in the fact that a brother of Kaempfer, who ^^ ^^^^j^^^ ^^^^ ,^^^^^^^ ^j^^ ^^^^ ^^ ^^^^.^^^ substance of 

is siii)i>()sed to be proprietor ot the Crescent Wine Company, 343 , . , • -x. xi „ ,x x„ „„„^,„ :+ „„a +1,^ „^„„,= ^e 

' ii ,,,. , ,,.,,. any sort IS put in with the must to preserve it, and the excess of 

Broadway, New \ ork is, on the contrary, a dealer in clothing. ^^^^^^^^ fermentation from taking place. 

It is suspected that a $20,000 shipment of goods made to him in ^ j^ ^^^^j^ ^^ ^^ advantage to eastern wine makers to 

November, was immediately hypothecated Book accounts that try this condensed must for sweetening then- wine. California 

were estimated at «lo,000 have been found to be worth not ' ^^^ ^^ . ^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^ it is a question whether it 

more than $4000, and the investigation thus far has disclosed ^.^^j^ ^^. ^^^ ^^ ^^^^^ condensed must of eastern grapes, 

such a rotten state of affiiirs that the creditors have given Re- ^,^j^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^^^^j f„^ the above named purpose-i. e. 

civer Simonsen full power to prosecute the case as he deems ^.^^ ^,^^. ,^^^^ ^.^^ sweetening, to great advantage, but it can 

best. Tne energy and shrewdness that is being displayed by ^^^^ ^^^ ^^^^^ .^ ^j^^ manufacture of jellies, jams and confectionery 

that gentleman gives promise that he will either make the firm ^j.,^jj ^^^.^^ ^j^^ company manufacturing this article is called 

disgorge or endeavor to put them where it is not possible to carry ^,^^ American Concentrated Must Co.. location of plant. Geyser- 

on a wholesale swindling business. ^.^^, ^, ^^^^^^^ ^,^^^^ ^^^^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^ ^f the finest grapes in 

Following is a list of the creditors and the amounts duo them: , , 0,. x 

C. W. Craig, $5750; Sierra Madre Vintage Co., $5750; Eisen ' . ' 

Yhieyard Co., $3500; Julius P. Smith, 3000; Abramson, Bacon & TH El VITI CU LTUIRT^L CT^FE, 

Heuuisch, $1800; David Weriitr, $2900; Martin Fusier & Co., • m- viii>^ r\ 

$2300;Mrs. Osery, $1300; Wm.AVoifr& Co., $1300;- Landsberger rjij^g M\ms Transacted Fof The Year 1833-A Handsonje 

& Son. $1400; L. P. Drexler, $1800; J. C. Amelung, $1500; Jones, Sbowine Made 

Mundy & Co., $1200; Slierwood & Sherwood, $1300; Jos. Melczer ^ 

& Co. and Mihalovittlhh,Fletcher & Co.,$1200; San Gabriel Wine rpj^e ^jng business of the Viticultural Restaurant and Cafe. 

Co., $900; Rheinstrom Bros., $1000; Macondray & Co., $800; M. conducted by Messrs. Franckx& Rulilemann,had made very rapid 

Petar, $800; G. Rottanzi, $1000; Fluke's Widow, $1200; John advance during the past few months, the sales of bottles having 

Crellin, $1000; Mt. Diablo Wine Co., $500; John Hiltell, $700; grown from 437 in January to 1131 in December. Following are 

Lachman & Jacobi, $3500; I. De Turk, $1800; S. Lachman, $380, [he detailed figures as furnished by W. H. McNeil, clerk of the 

H. Brunhild. $500; Schussler & Co., $500; Miller & Waugh, $500; '^oard: ^^^^ ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^ 

Chas. Meinecke & Co., $250; Mercantile Bank $13,000, fully se- Rec'd. sold, dispos'n. '^orkage. jjjjgtj 

cured; Bank of California, $1(5,000, — $5000 secured. Various On hand Jan 1st. ..4,827 

smaller sums will bring the total up to $100,000. January 460 437 24 $ 36.30 $ 1 82.05 

The operations of this firm appear to have been rascjilly in the February 669 492 236 32.40 197.25 

extreme and it is to be hoped that their victims may get full sat- March 471 350 32 32.65 177.25 

. „ .. „ 1-1 X r xi Anril 1,042 014 00 00.10 zuii.iv 

isfaction of some kind out of them. ^ '^^^ ^^^ ^^ ^g.io 128.75 

June 120 280 14 23.65 117.80 

July 379 551 146 37.90 226.35 

eO/NDEyNSEB GKAPE MUST. August 858 425 756 41.05 185.85 

September 2,834 930 597 92.80 390.20 

October 1,524 721 437 90.30 297.35 

The manufacture of condensed must from the fresh juice of November 1,185 724 477 70.85 299.35 

the grape is now being carried on successfully in Sonoma county. December 1,914 1,131 384 94.45 463.10 

Until this year, 1890, the product of the Sonoma county plant has On hand Dec. Slst.. ().405 

beeu shipped to England, where it has been converted into wine. ~ oTiT^ a T~^"i n 

This year, however, the company manufacturing the condensed Total 16,667 7.014 9 ,6o3 $613.00 $2,871.00 

must has been selling large quantities of the product to wine r\rtu onKfrw/ ff)r>\/CTOrc 

makers for the purpose of sweet wine making, and tlie best success l^0sr\ s^^DY \,I^Y®J|1L®. 

has been attained in this line. These goods, which we are selling largely to wine and cham- 
The must is eminently and necesstirily the best sweetening pagne manufacturers throughout the country, are perfectly free 
substance that cau be obtained for the wines, for the sugar it from the smallest speck of dirt or du.st. and are beautifully trans- 
contains is absolutely pure grape sugar. The product of the plant parent. They are not like the sugary stuff sometimes sold as 

is made up for the most part of Zinfandel, Mataro, Mission and roek candy. , , x ,• , x „,,„„..■ .^ ^„ 

^ ^ 1, ^ X ,- X • 1 X *^ „p In ten barrel lots, we sell the crystals at a slight advance on 

Burger grapes and has from seventy-five to eighty per cent of the cost of refined sugar. Samples on application. 

sugar content, and is in substance very much like molasses. DR-^^DEIISI & FAT TyrTr/F?, 

That made from black gi-apes has a reddish hue which gives it ig Hudson Street, New York. 




fyteifie WlfJE /rjSiD Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



Chang** and Di**elutlon* 
Partn*rshlps. 



In 



r<>nri«ri|tbl A f n»l. ukmn. OUI MtMloii 
Idaho. dl«M>IVTd: PnMl ruiillniK*. 

■»•-«■ A ElUwiirtb, iH'Irl, Eurrka. C*J.. 
dt><»lvr<i. 

IVrry A Nonnond. nur<>d«. Wub., dl>- 
• ilntl: C. Norroond nucctwl*. 

Karl A Enii*, »*iuoo, Lclil City. DUh, 

dt*M>lT«d. 

W. B. Wc«l, MUoon, Portrrvllle, •urrced«-d 

by T. a. Wwl. 
N«IU» A Ovdner, Mloon, Wllllun*. An- 

ami*, dbaolvwi. 
8Maw>: Iforv A Co.. ll<|Uon>, Han Pran- 

rUro. Cat, dlwolTsd; C. Jfrll. Itaillh 

reUrta. 
MaHIn Rnw. llqnnr. Ijt* Tf«a«. N. M., 

dUaolrnl; ixiw P. J. Martin. 
Qall A Dannc. MUtiun. Han Fram-Ucu. C'al., 

dbMtlTCd; J. D. Gall rrlim. 
rinwii A Cstca, »aluon, Hiln-r City, 

Idalm. •orrccded !>}' E. I^. \Villlami>. 
Joyrc A Houmlm-lirl, oalmin, Bultc.Monl.. 

dbfolrnt; C. Itoumlicrkel retire*. 
Durkx A Boualt. wiiw», etc.. Las Crucea, 

N. M.. dlMolTcd. 
Kain A Wall(lu». «al<w>n, ric, Heattl«. 

Warhln^on. Q. E. Kaln rnntlniws. 
Wbitaltcr A Mtl^UKhlin. bold. Gait, Cal., 

dIaaolTrd: Mtl^uithlln (■untlnue*. 
It. Qcmuin, lUiaor*. L>* Aiu(rlc*, Cal., 

lanwwlrd by Callfuniia Wine Co. 
Hewman A Warren, ralnun, Dayton, Ncv., 

•orceeded liy O. Hcbroeder. 
Ooanley A Lamb. raliMin, Douglas, Wash., 

dlstolTcd; Connlry oontlnne*. 
tUlTCfinao Bins., liquors, etc., Great Faih', 

Mont., diasolvtd. 
O. Ltoo A Co., betel and saloon, Taooma, 

Wasb., petition for dissolution and 

rrreirer ap|i<>lnted. 
Miller A Haltei. sal(M>n, Los Angeles, Cal., 

sureecded by P. Hollrnbark A Co. 
Hbclby A Bav, Kal<H>n, Elma, Wash., dls- 

rolved; J. C. Hbelby, conlinues. 



FailurMi, Attaehmanta, Ete. 

M D. Barry, saloon. Watsonville. Cal.. 

|ii;tilion>< insolvency. 
Nick BaaliE, sal<M>n and liottler, Marysville, 

Mont , IKM. 
(- M. Miller, Mineral Water*, San Fran- 

cImii, Cal., |ictlllons Insolvency. 
AuKust Erickson. saloon. Portland, Or., 

allacbed *HO. 
V. II. Periey. saloon. Ban Francisco, Cal.. 

a> lac bed WO. 
Wm. Blair, saloon, Han Fianclsco. Cal., 

attached tl5fl. 
Kate F. Warfield, vineyard. Honoma, Cal., 

atlacbed f IfiOU. 
Cbas. Beams, saloon, Hacramento, Cal., 

attached. 
S. B. Brown, laloo*, Los Angelw, CaL, 

alla< lied. »4a8. 
II. ('. HmlMi, saloon. 8an Francisco, CaL. 

•ttacbed. 
Mf<'<iinbBro*. A Marshall, saloon, iieattle, 

Wssh..atlaclwd«U7. 
1. B. Boyd. roliMin. Hnohomlsli. Wash.. 

attacfied fl(l57. 



Jbo. Holiinsun, saloon. Pu|ialn|>. Wash., 

allarlied. 
Kulllvan A llvan, ssIimmi, Han Francls<f>, 

Cat.atlai'lied •31). 
Joa. Frcliaii ^al<M■n, Han Francbro. Cal.. 

atlarlie<l «:IT4. 
Hi-biiridrr .t llusb. saliMin. Portland. Or., 

allarlietl >1.V«. 
Pbllll|i Ariari, saliMin. Crescent Mills, Cal. 

in insolvency. 
John Collincwortb, saltKin,Albu<|aen|uv. 

N. M , allacbed. 
J, P. Healv. Post Trader. Fort Bherman, 

Idaho, allacbed. 
L. Ix-|<n>b A Augustine, restaurant. 

Heal He. Wasl... attached f.'>a*t. 
J.H. Jai'kson, hotel, Hansallto, Cal., pe- 
titions liuHilvcncy. 
Helnds A Cody, saloon, Portland. Oi., 

IHS7. 
H. HIein A Co.. reslaurant. Han Francisco, 

Cal., alla<liwl rjei -rcU»si-<l. 
C. Ruilller, saliM)n, San FrancliMo, Cal.. 

alla<'licdf3:.>0. 
Adams A Briiius, salcHin, Heatlle, sold out 

and atlacbed «l(r<~. 
Lalerra A Bolllii, saloon, Hcalllc, bill of 

sale $tl.^ aiul attached t:i£). 
P Hnffman. Iiolel, Los .Vngeles. Cal , at- 
tached fUOl. 
M. H. Nevis, winery. Hacraiueuto, Cal.. 

failed. 

Sold Out. 

J. W. Blackwood, salixm, lUiswell, N. H. 
Geo. Bentz, sal<M>n, Granite, Mont, to P. 

Larsen. 
Williamson A McKcan. salmin. Granite, 

Mont, to Geo. IJentz. 
Peter Hoffman, saloon, Ia)8 Anjfeics, Cal, 
Gordon A Bondurant. saloon, Aransas 

Pass. Texas. 
A. B. Mulligan, saloon, Lovelady Texas. 
M. GeroKbty, Aaloon, Port Angeles, Wash. 
Letiert A Xagle saloon. Granite, Mont., 

to Rolwrls A Haven, 
fi. H. P. Davi«, saloon, Colufa Cal. 
Hatton A HIater, saloon Butte, Mont., to 

Mullen A Cordwell. 
W. W. Morrison, saloon, Oakland, Cal. 
O. A. Monolian, hotel, Oakland, Cal., 

succeeded by F. K. I'vuv. 
Pat Flnncrty, sahxiu, Gallup, N. M., to 

Jas. CavaiiaiiKli. 
John Carlin, laloon. Fort Worth, Texas. 
Carrt>ll Kiiij;, saloon, Jirody, Texa.". 
H. L. Patton. hotel, Stockton, Cal. 



Daeaaaad. 



A. Churchill, saloon. North Yakima, 
Wasb. 

Johnson A Raymond, saloon, Salt Lake 
City, Utah, Johnson deceased. 

John Kclfer, sabwu. Turn water, Wach. 

H. Tweifel, saloon. Auburn, Cal. 

J. H. W. Bumell, liquors, Kan Francisco, 
Cal. 

Jas. Jewell, saloon, VIrKinia City, Nev. 

Damaga by Fire. 

John Herlwr. saloon, San Francisco, Cal., 
burned out. 

Alex. Henrv, winery, Anaheim, Cal., 
damaged. 



Ja*, &»lllns. General Wore, Kan Au|tus- 

llne, Texas, bnmedonl. 
E. E. Sinilh, liquois, Han AuKualine 

Texas; damaucd. 
B. J. Welly, hotel, Tewecula, Cal, dam- 

aced 
Vena A Marotta, saloon, Seattle Wash. 

burned out. 
W. P. Khaw. sahMin, Seattle, Wash., 

bunietl out. 
Polk A Garretl, sabxMi, Han AuKUstlne, 

Texas, l>uriic<l out. 
A. P. Hossanian, sabH>i(, San Augustine, 

Texas, burned out. 

Out of Businas*. 



Jas. Wheeler, saloon, Siseons, Cal. 
Ericlcson A Ileedail, saiiKin, Salt Lake, 

Utah. 
Isabel KarKenI, hotel, Nueva, Cal. 
T. McMabon, hotel. Auburn. Cal. 



Spaoial Inquiries Advisable. 
Hchramm A Grace, isaloon, Madera. C»l. 



Deeds and Transfers. 



H. Kennev. saloon, Portland, Or., jtivet 

deeds" »1000. 
Wm. Hiliuri;, liolllcr, etc., Tacoma, Wash., 

bill of sale foOOO. 
Matt Anderson, saloon, Spokane Falls, 

Wash., bill of sale »i:«. 
Secbtcm A Stroblc, saloon, Portland, Or., 

L. Sccbtem receives deed »IO,0(lO. 
Harry Carson, aaloon, Seattle, Wash., 

liives bill of sale $100. 
P. O. Elbe, saloon. Willows, Cal., con- 
veyed realty $450. 
Cbas.Ounther, iiotel and store, Inglewood, 

Wash., hill of salefSSO. 
John E. Francis, saloon, Vancouver, 

Wash., JSMO. 
N. P. Justv, saloon, Fresno, Cal., receives 

deed »10. 
T. E. Walker, hotel, Los Angeles, Cal., 

re<-eives $:iU,000 and gives deed $35,000. 
W. O. Cogswell, hotel. Sierra Madre, gives 

deed $.55,0110. 
W. J. Clcndenin, saloon. Log Angeles, 

Cal.. bill of sale $.5. 
W. W. Ilaliiey, saloon, Occaii.«ide, Cal., 

conveyed "realty $640. 
M. M. Dec, saloon, Portland, Or., con- 
veyed really $150. 
Jos. Watkins, saloon, etc.. Seattle, Wash , 

gives bill of sale on one-half interest 

Wm. Siburg, Eagle Bottling Works, Ta- 
coma, Wash., bill of sale to E. Siburg 
$5000. 

N. S. Gregory, hotel, lone, Cal., received 
deed, $290. 

J. Bergman, i-aloon, S|iokane Falls, given 
bill of sale $1,000. 

Paul Bitter, saloon, Sau Francisco, Cal., 
conveyed realty $10. 

H. B. Cook, saloon, Portland, Dr., re- 
ceives deed $500. 

Stegman A Jewel, saloon, Portland, Or., 
bill of sale to L. N. Beauchemin. 

B. H. Bennett, hotel, S|>okane Falls, 
Wash., gives deed $225. 

Caesar Bruns, liquors, etc.. Kan Francisco, 
Cal., conveyed realty, $10, $10, $10. 



IdaCbapin, hotel. Heatlle, Wash., bill i 

sale $l(MO. j 

Estrella Kaisin Vineyard, Fresno, Cal., i 

ceivcs deed $10. I 

B. J. Turner, liolel and saliMin, HaiifoN 

Cal., conveyed n-aity $5. 
J. H. Von Olahn, lli|Uors, etc., Kan Frai 

Cisco, Cal., conveyed really $10, H 

$10. 
Aniold Bnis., liquors, etc., Han Fnu 

Cisco, Cal., H. B. Arnold, et al. r 

cclved deed $iKlO. 
A. Hein, sahKiu, Denver, Colo., bill of sai 

$SO0. 
J. C. Alexander, saliMin, Denver, Cola 

bill of sale t&». 
Seeba Bros., wines and liquois, Han Frsi 

Cisco, Cal., J. H. Hc-eba rei-elved dM 

$10. 
Oarslen Kcheiier, liquors, etc., San Frai 

clsco, (!al., received deed $10. 
J. Woodson, saloon, Fresno, Cal., receivi 

deed $5. 
B;baslian Ktrasser, saliM>n, Ramona, C»l 

conveyed realty $<>5<', 
A. Rossi, winery, Stockton, Cal., receive 

dci-d $10. 
Z. Brewer, saloon, Denver, Colo., givt 

bill of sale $1,150. 
II. I.augblln, saloon, Los Angeles, Cal 

with wife gives dce«l $I,OOI>. 
Heide llror., saloon, Tacoiiia, Wash., gi' 

bill of sale to H. I><H|jiiboff $1,400. 
Elizabclh Biiscb, liquors, etc., .\laniedi 

Cal., conveyed really $10. 
Peter Garrman, sahH>n, Taconis, Wsfb 

bill of sale to F. A. Gappiiigcr $1(111. 
V. T. Oslxirn, saloon, Seattle, Wash., hi 

of sale $656. 
John Kannitz. saloon. San Francisco, Cal 

received deeds $5, $10. 
Wm. Clendenin, saloon. Los Angeles, Cal 

gives bill of sale to J. V. Swift. 



Realty Mortgages, 

T. O. Abbott, hotel, Tacoma, Wash 

$4,300. 
Caspar Dii, liquors, etc., San Franclscc 

Cal., $2,000. 

A. Treybal, hotel and saloon, Tipton, Cal 

ri,638. 
Carsten Scbeper, saloon, etc., San Frai 

Cisco, Cal., $2,500. 
Secblem A Co., saloon, Portland, Or.. I 

Hechtem nx-eived mortgage $2,250. 
Victor Dessert. Iiotel and saloon, H|H)kaii 

Falls, Wash., $4<X)0. 
Lena Knack, hotel, San Francisco, Cal 

$3,500. 

Chattel Mortgages. 

Cbas. Wright, hotel. Astoria, Oi., $1,I.V 
C. A. Beamer, saloon, Denver, Colo., $(iO( 
P. Lutr., saloon, Pueblo, Colo., $401). 
T. S. Humphrey, saloon, Tacoma, Wash 

$728. 
O. Strouble, saloon. Portlanl. Or., $.V)t 

B. Freimann, restaurant, Portland, Or. 

$4,000. 
M. S. Stewart, saloon. West Seattle 

$1,200. 
H. Kruimaiin, saloon, Denver, Colo. 

$1,500. 

C. B. Wood, saloon, Denver, Colo., $2, OOC 
M. Marsh, saloon, Pueblo, Co!o., $1,40(] 
O'Bakcr A Co. saloon. S|iokaiic Falli! 

Wash., $4,500. 
B. F. Rickeit, saloon. Spokane FalU 
Wash., $1,000. 




-A 



F. A. HABEIR, 

Wine & Spirit Commission |VIerchant 

Utg SANSOME STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, 
SOLE AQENT FOR THE INQLENOOK VINEYAKO. IfUTHEftFORO, NAFA OO., 04L. 



^^ Also Makes a Specialty of Handling Only the Choicesi 
^''" Vintages of Dry and Sweet Wines 

Produced in California. 

CorrfHiioiulciicc^^Solicitetl from rrwlucere, as well "us Dealers thruughout Uie lluite«l Statm 



f/reifie Wlf^E /cJMD SflF^IT I^EVIEW. 



31 



e. A. Jones <fe Co., saloon, Tacoinu, WaBli., 

C. A. Joni's *y3L'. 
Sci-lileni i*c SInilile, f^iiloon, PoHland, Or., 

L. .Seohteni, filMH). 
Frcd'k Kni'lm, hotel, Spokane Falls, 

Wash , UlOtW. 
T K Humphiioi', saloon, Tacoma, Wash., 

«72f<. 
Do.yle ite Gilbert, saloon, Leadville, Colo., 

' «!i,a2.5. 

F. it C. Lund<iuist, saloon, Seattle, 
Wash., ifittO. 

C. T. O'Donnell, saloon, Seattle, Wash., 

$.50. 
John Ellis, f-aloon, Portland, Or., $318. 
Munn c^ Cotlinj^ham, saloon, Spokane 

Falls, Wash., fUUU. 
Wnj. Itawlev, saloon, Spokane Fails, 

Wash., IS(H). 

Chas. A. Meyers, saloon. Spokane Falls, 

Wash., #8(X). 
Geo. Lacour, saloon, Los Angeles, Cal., 

JS2.50. 
H. Allenberft & Co., saloon, Spokane 

Falls, WaBh.,$l,8S7. 

G. W. Gardner, saloon, Denver, Colo., 
i?.'i,SOO on saloon and stock. 

r. H. Flynn, saloon, Pueblo, Colo., $419. 
Biikir i& Lord, saloon, Seattle, Wash., 

H. Schwartz, hotel, San Francisco, Cal,, 

' »(iOO. 

V. Kraiitz, saloon, Portland, Dr., $500. 



Ueed it Edwards, restaurant, Seattle, 

Wash., *2IJ0. 
M. A. McDermott. saloon, Denver, Colo., 

P. \y. Kokett, saloon, Denvei Colo., fh50. 
P. Straub, 8ah)on, Portland. Or., *300. 
Jno. C. Schaden, liquors, etc., Sacramento, 

Cal., 1400. 
D. M. SjKJUsiler, saloon, Pueblo, Colo., 

$1187. 
P. O. Olsen, saloon, Tacoma, WaBh.,|!l.W. 
C. A. Wctmore, wines, etc., Oakland, Cal., 

*5,50O. 
S. & A. Baker, saloon, Denver, Colo., 

»a.ooo. 

It. C. Cumminfjs, saloon, Leadville, Colo., 

*a,'jo. 

Chas. Morgan, restaurant, Laramie, Wyo., 

*137. 
Watkins & Considinc, saloon, etc., Seattle. 

Wash., J. Watson, »1,500. 
Geo. Gardiner, saloon, Seattle, Wash., 

*;i,150. 
T. Drew, saloon, Denver, Colo . »2,500. 
S. M. Jones, hotel, Albiua, Or., rJOO. 
Philip Erzgraber, saloon, Denver, Colo., 

*700. 
Allen ife Donovan, saloon Laramie, Wyo., 

$;mo. 

M. 8. Nevis, winery, Sacramento, Cal,, 

*4O,.500. 
A. Bauer, saloon, Pendleton, Or., $340. 
W. W. Norton, saloon, Denver, Colo., $500. 



THE DIVIDEND, 

5 Leidesdorff Street, 
JAMES O-ISRIEX, I'llOP. 

Importer of FINEST WINES, LIQUORS, 

Irish and Scotch Whiskies, Bass' Ale 

an.lGuinness Stout. 

Moore, Hunt & Go's Whiskies a Specialty 



JOHN D. GALL. 
( i 



JAME.S P. DUNNE. 



THE RESORT" 

1 Stockton St; i>»: of Ellis, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



AUIKL LATIIROP, PrcS.T. HOPKINS, Treas. 
HM. HAKNKY, Mi;r. and Scc'y. 

GOLDEN GATE WOOLEN MFG. CO. 

— MANUFACTURE — 

Blankets, Cassimeres, Tweeds 

FLANNELS. 
535 Market St., San Francisco. 



Aggregate Assets, S4l),l)(ll),ie 



Loudon Assurance Corporation of Lon- 
don (Establislied by Koyal Charter 
1720). 

Northern Assurance Company of London 
(Established 1836). 

Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool 
(Established 1857). 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of 
Hartford, Conn, 



How's This? 



We ofter One Hundred Dollars reward 
for any case of catarrh that cannot be 
cured by taking Hall's Catarrli Cure. 
F. J. CHENEY & CO., Props., 

Toledo, O. 
We, the undersigned, have known F. J. 
Cheney for the last 15 years, and believe 
him perfectly honorable in all business 
transactions, and financially able to carry 
out any obligations made by their firm. 
West & Truax. Wholesale Druggists, To- 
ledo, O. 
Walding, KiNNAN & Marvik, Wholesale 
Druggists, Toledo, O. 
Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internally, 
acting directly upon the blood, and mu- 
cous surfacer of the system. Testimonials 
sent free.. Price 75c. per bottle. Sold by 
all druggists. 



A'-f- 



ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

Cor. Sacramento & Montgomery Sts. 



Founded 1856. Incorporated April, 1889. 



Tubbs Cordage Company 

Manufacturers of all kmds of 

Cordage, 

GRAPE-VINE TWINE, ETC. 

till-ai.i FRONT STREET, 



SAN FHANCISOO. 




Cl^. 



SAW MANUFACTURING 





Saws of Every Description on Hand 
and made to order. 

H. Koyers Lace Leather — Agents for 

C. S. Paul's Files. 
17-19 Fremont St. San Francisco. 



HENRY WASS, WOOD TURNER. 




WI/NE A/MD B-RA/NDg 

Wine. 

December 30 .34,320 

" 31 15,870 

Total for December 972,210 

January 2 39,.560 

" 3 24,000 

" 5 13,100 

■ 6 l^,(ir)() 

" 7 l(i,410 

" 8 .3.5,920 

" 9 19,800 

" 10 29,270 

12 14,160 

13 4.5,160 

14 31,7.30 

" 15 43,630 

" 16 29,.365 

" 17 27,110 

" 19 29,960 

" 20 49,780 

" 21 .30,290 

" 22 49,690 



•RECEIPTS. 

Brandy 
1 ,820 
1,800 



— MANLFACTUKEU Of— 

Wooden Bimgs, Tape, Plugs, etc.. Oak 
liungs. Soft and Hard Wine Plugs. Soft 
and Hard Ta|) Plugs, Wine Samplers, 
linng Starters, etc. 

720 MINNAST., BET. EIGHTH ANDNINTH, S. P. 
Established siuce 1856. 



83,580 

7,810 

6,080 

2,(K)0 

15,770 

17,400 

2,150 

4,700 

7,810 

3,270 

9,840 

2,600 

500 

100 

960 

1,700 



3,.300 
5,050 



B-RA/NDy P-RO-DUCT OF 1890. 

Below will be found the comparative totals of the State as 
shown by the official figures furnished by Collectors Sears of the 
First, and Byington of the Fourth District: 

Produced in Eirst District 218,810 gallons. 

Produced in Fourth " 762,423 " 

Total product for 1890... 981,2.33 " 

Total product for 1889 1,043,.503 " 

In bond, all districts, Jan. 1 1890, 1,389,661 " 

In bond, all districts, Jan. 1 1891, 1,. 347,41 6 " 

Deficit 42,245 " 

It will be seen by the above that notwithstanding the opera- 
tions of the Sweet Wine Law and the suppose increased demand 
for grape spirits, the product of brandy in 1890 was 62,370 gal- 
lons short of 1889. 

In the next issue of the review will be given a complete 
detailed record of all bonded brandy transactions by months in 
both Internal Revenue districts. 



SWEET WI/NE MAKE-R'S WOES. 

At a meeting of the prominent sweet wine producers in the 
rooms of the Viticultural Commission on Thur.sday afternoon 
last, there were present George and F. A. West, of Stockton, 
Julias P. Smith and C. A. Wetmore of Livermore, C. K. Kirby 
of Fowler, H. C. Eggers of Fresno, F. L. Watkins of the San 
Gabriel Wine Co. Juan Gallegos and others 

The main question discussed was the action of the Internal 
Revenue Collectors in retiuiring an additional revenue on sweet 
wines that contain more than 10 per cent of alcohol before for- 
tification. The wine makers rightly claim that this additional 
tax is unjust for the reason that the Internal Revenue Depart- 
ment have taken the saccharine average of Eastern wines a,s a 
standard by which to judge California grapes. This is wrong for 
the grapes of this State often yield a percentage of alcohol 
amounting to asjnuch as 15 per cent before fortification. This 
unfair ruling has forced the wine makers in many instances to 
pay for the brandy used for fortifying purposes and in one case a 
certain firm was compelled to pay $9000 on this account. 

A telegram has been sent to Commissioner Mason a.sking 
that this latest ruling be suspended until the matter can b thor- 
oughly investigated. 

OIL.IVES! 

Twenty-six Thousand Trees For Sale. 

Manzanili.o, Navaoillo, Ui.anco, Pkiiolink, also other choice varieties in 
limited number, ranging from one to four feet in heighth. 
Price according to Size and Variety. Address 

JOHN COOK, Nurseryman. 

BERKELY, ALAMEDA COUNTY CAL. 



32 



f^eifie WIJ^E /rJMD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



HAg/NE'S FLIGHTg SCHEME. 

We notie*' in tlip I'AriKir Wixk and Si-ikit Rkview, an 
mtUoU* (Ml Mr. F. W. Haym«. of thw oily, n-jjHnlinji liiw aiition 
mlc». Whilo Wf an* not in any way inton-HUnl in Mr. Hayni' or 
hilt •flitint. yet wo mn«t take i>xc«*ption to the nMnarkn in tlie 
Kkvikw n-pinling thin matter. TIht*' in no w^nw in Hilling sm-li 
an unth-rtakin}: an tin' pn-xcnt one of .Mr. Hayno. "a rattl«'<l- 
hniinc*! H-hoino." anil it in wrtinj; to way that "fionif of tlu- clarctH 
won- KoM at tlu' fam-v |»ri<H> of It-n vonXn a jpillon." without nion- 
tioninj; that tin- wimt* rffi-rnnl to wrrt' un.>iol(l. The' writi-r wa.x 
prt*Miit at Mr. IIayn<-V fintt auction sal*' and knows that thoHt- 
MNtnd Tv*\ wincx otTt'rtHl in tninxit hroiiKht more than ruling; 
MUotatiouH in this niarki-t. Wo «in not agrt'O with the Kkvikw 
that mu'h auction hiUvm will ilcuionilizi> the New York market, 
hut would rather tniy that thit* in aNnit the (»nly means left of 
hrinfpnK our tnide in direct etmimunieatiou with the jjn)wer of 
the wint-s. and tier rrrmt. Could jwrt of the market for wine.-i 
and hrandit-x U- tninsferriHl to New York. instea<l of beiiijj ahso- 
Intely i-ontrolle^l in San Fnuicisco, we do not hesitate to pre<lict 
that the wine pxiwer wouhl fjet a much more siitisfiu-tor^- n-sult 
for his lalMirs than he now obtains: and should Mr. Hayne. 
llir«»U(;li prvjndiir, jejilousy or «)tlierwise. fail in this venture, 
then* will, jierhaiiM, ere long bo some one else to carry his idejis 
to a MuxH'ssful ••onelusion. We would also a<Ivise our estoi'nied 
c«mteni|Mirary that the " lt>gitiniate" wine mark(*t of New York 
is. with the pn»iK-r sup|K)rt fnwn those who ought to sup|K>rt such 
Halox. in no more ilanger of being demonili»><I titan is London by 
the wwkly sjili>«* hold there. 

The alK>vo is from the New York correspondence of the 
LouiKviUe HTjw and Spirit BtiUetin, which in advocating the more 
or \em eelebrat*^! '• Hayno auction" In'trays not a little ignonuice 
of the California wine trade and the conditions which surround it. 
Hayne's scheme looks well in theory. It aouuds well for 
instancv, to say that the discriminating wine buyers will pick out 
the go<Kl wines at such sales and reject the bad, thus insuring 
the grower of go<Ml wines a ssitisfactory price. It looks well that 
such sales should lie (inducted as art! the fruit sales, vMih buyer 
knowing what ho getH. 

This is the |>iiiH'r side of it. What are the facts? Is our 
friend of the Uulhtln aware of the truth that thei-e are compara- 
tively few American buyers, espwially in the east, who know 
what wiiM-s sitv'i Is it not a fact that fine wines are not wanted 
ex«fpt under French label? Is it not true that wj little are the 
American wine* under their real colors apppreciated that there is 
to-day offered a lot ofa»)out 20,000 gallons of one of California's 
choioeHt vintageH at fifty cents f. o. b., at San Francisco, with not 
a single buyer? Our Louisville friend knows little and should 
talk hfw about the wine trade. How many wholesale liquor 
<I«ilerH are there in his own city— a city of 200,000 people — who 
ran tell whether a new claret is worth nothing, or ten cents, or one 
dollar jier gallon? Not one. 

The wine tr»de ib in to early a stage to make auctions a 
BUci'eMs. Buyers in Ixmdon for instance, purchast! goods of 
Mitablisheil merit and reputation. That happy day when indi- 
vidual reputation and merit of California wines will bring pro- 
IKirtionate prices is (-oming. We see evidences of it all the time. 
Hut it is not here yet and Hayne will not help matters by ciuising 
a new smash in prirres and consequent discouragement among 
protluwrs. 

Possibly the friends of the Hayne scheme will admit that I. 
!>.• Turk is one of the iH-st known wine men in America. We 
know of no man who can more readily still wines on his own 
name and winimand gixid prices. His reput^ition rests on the 
solid merit of his wines. Mr. De Turk is a pr<Mlucer, and has 
fought his way into prominence by the slu^-r fono of worth. Vp 
to a few wtN-ks ago Mr. I)e Turk had Hayne as his ag<'iit in New 
York, but the coiiibiiiation is now dissoIve<l, dwinj^ to Havno's 
auction plan. Mr. Ih- Turk thinks that the time is not riiK' for 
the auction plan. His judgment, foundetl on years of ex- 
pi'Henco, and his ability to ostiiiiatc the sitinition in New York, 
will Iw atM-optwl by the gra|M' gniwors and wine maki-rs of this 
State. They have winfidence in his foresight and honcstv, and 
we arc loth t« U^lieve that they will su|.jMirt Haviu' when it is 
known to a certainty that his Hrst cflort was a rank failure. 



RONALD G. McMillan, 

MkDufkcturcr and Dealer In 

^•jijrwps, QordialSf fitters, Qyztraots 

Pure Sugar Coloring 



jft. SF=E:CIi=a-T-Y. 



Into. 714 IFI^OnSTT ST., 



TEl.KrilONK S7. 



WkITK Foil I'|<I(-E8. 



San Francii 



22>28 Taylor St., San Trancisco, Cal. 

California Wines L Brandies. 

Vineyards, Cellars and Distilleries at 
ST. HEIdEJM/t, J^J/cf/r eOUJMTY, e/rb. 



Kohler &Van Bergen, 



CALIFORNIA 



•;^BxJi 





Main Ollico iiiul Vaults: f> - 
661 to 671 Third St.^^C 



WiiKTv and I)iD(iller> 
\V.C>i Sacrannanto, Cal. 



Brand.: '(% ^; 

417.419 Mo.NT«;(.MKKY St.. 't, 

San Francisco. 




£a»ti-rn Brancli: 
42 MiKKAY Btukkt, 

New York. 



AKTOINK JJOClilEUAZ. 



JA.ME8 8IICA. 



CUines and biquors. 

Ini)M»rtfi!< of anil .\|;entg for the Celebrated llrand»<.f 

Golden a nd Tea Kettle W hiskies. 

Cl)K. 1-lloXT AND JacKSO.N- Stk., - SaN FUANrtSCO, CaU 



Liquor Flavors 

WILLIAJirOODKIN, 

74 WIULmm STRCCT, new YORK, 

GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICES. 

A Complete Oatalotfue will be forwurdwl l.v mail on re<ei|)l of l>u»liieM rani. 
Cwtdtt Fiir Sale In Call/'ornla onlij h» 

REDINGTON & CO., ga-gr Fmar ar.. sm fkmcisoo. omu 



p/reifie WIJ^E /cJMD SflF^IT I^EVIEW. 



33 



Prices Current. 



Tlicse are the lonf; prices. The rate of 
llscdiint on purchases of a considerable 
[iiaiility, can be learned by applyinj; to 
lie ai;ents or dealers. We urgently re- 
uest dealer:', at;ents and producers to 
lotify us when a change occurs in the 
)rices current of the {foods they handle. 



California Wines & Brandies 

The I'riees niven are for quarts and pints, 
put up in cases of twelve and twenty- 
four bottles. 



A1{P.\D HAUASZTHY & CO, 
.WO Washiunton street, San Francisco. 
Prices Per cake. 

QUARTS. 

?icslini; fi.OO 

iutcdel 0.03 

lint'andel 5.00 



PINTS. 

7.00 
7.00 
(i.OO 



J. GUNDLACH & CO., 
Second & Market Sts. San Franciscc 



Praniiner, 82 » .5.00 

Sulcdel. 82 6.0J 

JuriTundy, 84 6.0J 

linfandel, 83 5.0J 



0.0, 
7.0(1 
7.00 
(i.lKI 



I. De TURK, 
21'2 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 



Port, 1884 

'ort,188() 

3rv .Sherry, 1884. 
[)rv Sherry, 1886. 
Vnuelica, 1884. . , . 

rokav, 1881 

5infaudel, 1884. . 

Bnrirundv, 84 

l{ieslini,',"l88.'5 

3ntedel, 1884 

dock. 188.5 

Srandy, 1882. ... 



t (i.O!, 
4.00 
6.01, 
4.01 
4..50 
8.0U 
3.. 50 
4.00 
4.00 
4..50 
S..50 
13.00 



GEORGE WEST & SON, 
Stockton, Cal. 

Brandy, 1879 fiQ.Ol 

Brandy, 188:^ 1.5.0J 

Brandy, 188,5 1.5.0J 

front iguan 9.00 

Shei ry' "J.OO 

Port (old) 12.00 

Port O.OJ 

SAN GABRIEL WINE CO., 
Rainona, Los Angeles county, Cal. 

Riesling $ 4.75 $5.75 

Qutedel 4.75 5.75 

Port 5.50 

Angelica 5..50 

Muscatel 5.,50 

Jilierry 6.00 

Brandy, 1882 12.00 

LOS G.ATOS & SARATOGA WINE CO. 
478 Tenth street, Oakland, Cal. 

Zinfandel » 3.,50 Jit.,50 

Sautcrne 4.00 5.00 

Drandy 9.00 

Port ,5.00 



Sweet Mnseatel 5.00 

GrapeCordial 6.50 



6.00 
6.00 
7.50 



JOSEPH MELCZER & CO., 
504 and 506 Market street, San Francisco. 



Claret, 1886 

Zinfandel. 1885 

Burgundy, 1885 

Hock, 1885 

Itic^ling. 1885 

liicsling,Joliannisberger,1884 

(luledel, 1884 

Sonilai Hungarian Type, 1885 
Szatmari '* ** *■ 

Szegszardi FeherHun'Type " 

1885 

Port, 1884 

Sherry, 1885 

"■ 1884 

Angelica and SweetMout'n,84 
Mad'a,MalagaifeSw'tTo'y'85 

Brandy, 1883 

1885 



INQLENOOK WINES. 
F. A. Ilaber, agent, 122Sansoine St 
Table Claiet blended from 

choice foreign grapes, 

rtntage 188.5.. 

Zinfandel 

Extra Table Claret, Medoc 

type red label, 1885 

Burgundy type 

Sauternedry,Hauvig'nVert'85 
Guledel.Chasselas Vert, 1885 
Hock, Rhenish type " 

Burger, Chablis type •' 

Riesling,JohauniBberg type " 
Pints of tw(t dozen^i per case additional 
None genuine except bearing seal or cork 
brand of the pioprietor — each bottle bears 
the legal pure wine stamp. 



, S. F. 



fa.M 
4..50 

.5..50 
5..50 
5..50 
4..'-)0 
6.00 
5.00 
.i.,50 



CAL. WINE GROWER'S UNION. 
Cor. Sutter and Grant ave. San Francisco, 

EL QUITO VINEYARP, 

Riesling $ 3.00 t 4.00 

Claret 3.00 4.(K) 

FRESNO VINKYAKD CO. 

Burger » 3..50 t 4..50 



Claret 3.,5(1 

Port .5..50 

Angelica .5..50 

Slierry ,5..50 

Cognac Brandy 10.00 

ST. HUBERT VINYAHD. 

Claret, Cabernet « 8.00 

Sauterne 8.00 

Cognac 12.00 

ST. geobge'.s vineyard. 

Sauternee iji 4.50 

Claret 3.50 



4..5() 
6. .50 
6..50 
6. .50 
11.00 

$ 9.00 
9.00 
13.00 



5..50 
4. .50 



C. CARPY A CO. 
511-517 Saciamento street, San Francisco 

La Loma, Grand Meiloc » 7.00 f 8.00 

Burgundy ,5.00 

Zinfandel 3..50 

Santerne .5.00 

Riesling 4.00 

Stt-eet Muscatel, 1882 9.00 

Sherry, 1882 9,00 

Port, 1882 8.00 

Cal. Roehelle Brandy 12.00 



6.00 

4. .50 

6.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

9.00 

13.00 



C. HOLTUM & CO., 
40U Sansome street, San Francisco. 

Zinfandel. 1884 ISlOO 

Burgundy, " 3.00 

Riesling, " 3.25 

Riesling, Marcobrnnner.l88;i .5.25 

Gutedel, 18*4 4.00 

Santerne, ■' 4.00 

Port Old (Fresno Co.).1882. «.00 

Port, 1885 ...... 4.00 

Sherry, Dry, 1884 4.00 

Shei ry , Old, (Fresno Co. , ) '82 6.(M) 

Angefica,1885,(LosAng'sCo) 4.00 

Muscatel (Fresno Co.), 1885. 5..50 

Tokay, 1884 5.00 

Mt. "Vineyard, 1885 4.00 

Madeira and Malaga, 1885.. 5..50 

Pineapple w ines 4 00 

Brandy, 1882 11.00 

Brandy, 1885 9.00 

Strawberry Brandy 9.<H) 

KOHLER & FROHLINO. 
601 Folsom Street, San Francisco. 

Riesling t 4.00 » 4..50 

" " 4.00 

,5.00 
5.00 
4.25 
5.00 
4..50 



Hock 3..50 

Gutedel 4..50 

Santerne 4..50 

Zinfandel 3.75 

Zinfandel, old 4. .50 

Burgundy 4.00 

Superior Port 10.00 

Sherry 7..50 

Angelica 6.00 

Muscatel 6.00 

Madeira 0.09 

Malaga 6.00 

Biandy 10.00 



*;?.oo 

?,.50 
4.00 
3.50 
4.00 
5.00 
5,03 
3..50 
3,.50 
4.00 
5.00 
6,00 
5.00 
6.00 
4..50 
5,00 
12.00 
10.00 



TO KALON VINEYARD. 

H. W. CRABIS, OAKVILLE, NAPA COUNTY. 

Jas. L.Dayi8&Co.,:«S California Bt,S.F, 

Riesling * 4.00 $ 5.03 

Santerne 4.00 5.03 

Gutedel 3..50 4.03 

Cabernet 5.09 6.00 

Beclan 5.03 6.00 

Burgundy 4.03 .5.00 

Zinfandel 3..50 4.00 

La Gi ande Claret 12.00 12.50 

Madeiia ,5.00 6.00 

Malaga ,5.00 6.00 

Tokay .5.00 6.03 

Muscatel 5.03 6.00 

Port, 1876 12.00 12..50 

Port, 18S;i 6.00 7.00 

Port. 1880 4.00 ,5.00 

Sherry 4.03 .5.00 

Brandy 9.00 

NAPA VALLEY WINE COMPANY. 

11 and 13 First Street, San Francisco. 

Hock » 3..50 * 4..50 



Gutedel 4.03 

Riesling 4..50 

Cabernet 4. .50 

Zinfandel 3..50 

Private Stock Claret 5.03 

Burgundy 4.03 

Port, (old) 4..50 

Angelica 4.50 

Sherry 4..50 

Brandy, 1881 1.5.00 

Biandy, 1887 8.00 

Private Stock Burgundy 7.00 

Private Stock Santerne 8.00 

Vine Clitf Claret 15.00 

Private Stock Hock .5.00 



5.00 
5.50 
5..50 
4..50 
6.00 
5.00 



8.00 
9.00 



6.03 



KUHLS, SCHWARKE A CO., 
123 Sutter street, San Francisco. 

Zinfandel * 3.25 *4.25 

Zinfandel 4.00 .5.00 

Burgundy 4.00 ,5.00 

Santerne 5..50 7.00 

Port, Old 6.00- .... 

Old Sherry 6.03 

S. LACHMAN <fc CO., 
4,53 Brannan street, San Francisco. 

Old Port »7.00 »8.00 

Zinfandel 3..50 4.00 

Riesling 4..50 5.00 

Madeiras 8.00 

Malaga 8.00 

Cognac 14.00 



Domestic Champagnes. 



ARPAD HARASZTHY * CO., 

.530 Washington street. San Francisco. 

Eclipse *14.50 J17.00 



S. LACHMAN & CO., 
4.53 Brannan street, San Francisco. 

Imperial * 7..50 f 8..50 

€arte Blanche 7.00 8.00 

Choice Cuvee 11.00 12 00 



A. FINKE'S WIDOW. 
809 Montgomery street, San Franci.^co. 



Gold Seal »11.50 

Gold Seal, Extia Dry 12.00 

Nonpareil 12 00 

Private Cuvee, Dry 11. .50 

" Extra Drv... 12.00 



WM. WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market gtreet, San Francisco 

QUARTS. PINTH 

Pom m cry Sec »o2.50 I34..50 



MACONDRAY & CO., 

First and Market streets, San Francisco. 
Louis RoedererCaite Blanche. 31. 00 33.00 



fl2.00 
13.00 
13.00 
12.03 
13.00 



BECK, PYHRB & CO., 

108 O'Farrell street, San Francisco, 

Santa Rosa Zinfandel. '86. .. $3.00 

Santa Clara Cabernet, '87. .. 4..50 

Cuijcrtino .'«edoc, '84 6.00 

St. Helena Hock' '86 3.,50 

Gutedel (Chasselao), '86 4.50 

Tivaininer. '82 5..50 

Santerne (silver leaf) 6.00 

Haute Santerne (gold leaf) . . 7.00 
California Cognacs. 

♦Silver Bronze Leaf 8.00 

**Red " " 10.00 

»»»Green " '• 12.00 



ALFRED GREENEBAUM & Co. 

51 to 61 First street, San Francisco. 

Johannisberg Riesling * .5..50 $ 0.50 

Seinilhm, Santerne 4..50 5..50 

Chasselas, Gutedel 3..50 4.50 

Cabernet Sauvignon, Medoc 4.,50 5..50 

Franc Pinot, Burgnndy 4.50 .5..50 

Zinfandel 4.00 .5.00 

Claret 3.00 4.00 

MONT ROUGE WINES. 

A. O. Chauce. Livermoie, 
Otliee and Depot, 61,5-617 Front St., 8. F. 
Quarts. Pints. 

Sauterne »6.00 »7.00 

Haul Santerne 7.00 8.00 

Claret, Table 4.00 ,5.(W 

ACIaret,F 9.00 

AA Claret, V 9.00 



AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE CO. (Lt'd) 

839 to 849 Folsora street, San Francisco. 
Reihlen 15,00 17.00 



Imported Wines. 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 
123 California street, Han I^raneigcot 

RR0 WINE8. 

(Barton & Guestler. Bordeaux.). 

Quarts. 

Floirac $ 7.,50 

Panillac 8..50 

St. Julien 9.00 

St. Estephe 9.00 

Chateau Laeroix 10.00 

du Gallan, '78-'81.. 10.50 

le Pain, 1878 11.50 

Pontet Canet, 1881 13.50 

Cliat. Beychevelle, 1881 15.00 

Diicru Beaiicaillou, 1881 16.00 

Chateau Lagrange, 1878 22.00 

Brown Caiitenac, 1876. . . . 22.00 

Chateau Langoa, 1874 22..50 

Leoville, 1874-1878. 24..50 

Larose, 1874 34.,50 

Lafite, 1874 29.00 

Latour, 1870 31.50 

MargBUX, 1874 39.00 

(H. Cuvillier & frere, Bordeaux.) 

Panillac, 1881 10..50 

Ducasse Grand Puy, 1878. . . 14..50 

Chat. Kirwan. 1878 17..50 

" Beycheville, 1874 19..50 

Cos d'Estouinel, 1878 22.00 

Chat. Larose, 1870 22..50 

" Latour, 1868 29..50 

" Mai gaux, 1881 32.00 

" Mouton RothBchild'80 35.00 
(Bouchard pere ifefils, BeanneCoteD'Or.) 

Macon, 1884 10..50 

Pommard, 1884 12.50 

1881 15.00 

Clos de la Mousse, 1884 17.00 

Chambeitin, 1884 21..50 

1881 25.00 

Romance, 1884 24.50 

Clos de Vougeot, 1887 20.50 

WHITE WINEF. 

(Barton & Guest ier, Bordeaux.) 

Sauternes 9.25 

Vin de Graves, 1878 10..50 

Barsac, 1878 11.00 

Haut Sauternes, 1874 17..50 

Chateau Yquem, 1874 30.50 

(H. Cuvillier & frere, Bordeaux.) 

Sauternes 11.50 

Cliateau Giraud, 1S84 27.50 

LaTourBlanche'84 27.00 
(Bouchard pere & tils, Beaune, Cote D'Or) 

Chablis, 1884 11.50 

Montiachet Bouchard, 1884. 80.50 

SHERRIES, 

(Sandeman, Buck <fe Co., Jerez.) 



A. WERNER & Co, 

52 Warren street. New York. 

Extra Dry » 7.00 f 8.00 



Imported Champagnes. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

DEUTZ 4 GILDEKMANN, AY., CHAMPAGNE. 

Gold Lack Sec. per case *32.00 »3t.03 

Gold Lack Sec. 6 Magnums 

per ease 31.00 

Chachet Blane per ease 30..50 

Cabinet Green Seal, per bskt 25..50 

DUPANLOUP 4 CO., REIMS. 

Carte Blanche, per case 21.00 

Carte Branche, extra dry, per 

cass 21.00 



Pcmartin Brut 

" Umbrella . 



PORTS. 

(Sandeman & Co., Oporto.) 



oo 

oooo. .. 
ooVoo . 



19.00 
20.00 



16.(H) 
19.00 
21. .50 



32..50 
27.50 

22.00 
22.00 



W. B. CHAPMAN, 

123 California street, San Francisco. 
PerrierJouet*Co."Special"*;«..50 |;«.50 

" Reserve Dry 32..')0 :>4..50 

Pel rier .Toilet .V Cx. Brut.. . . XiAX) 35.(K) 
Half pints "Special" $40 in cases of 4 doz. 



CHARLES MEINECKE Sc CO. 
314 Sacramento street. San Francisco. 
A. de Lnze & Fits, Bordeaux 

Clarets, per case. . . ...*8.00 to |i28.00 

A. de Luze & Fils, Bordeaux 

Sauternes, per case 12.03 to 26.03 

C. Man y A Liger Belaii ,Nuits 

iJurgundies, white and 

red, per case. 15.00 to 21.75 

D. M. Feuerheeid, Jr.,ifeCo., 

Oporto, Port wines 

per case... .. .15.00 to 20.00 

D. M. Feuerheerd, Jr., &Co., 

Oporto, Port Wines, . 

in wood per gal 2.00 to 4.50 

Duff Gordon & Co.. Sherries 

in wood i>er gal 2 00 to 5..50 

Lacave A Co., Sherries Crown 

Brand in >^ 1.40 to 1.75 

South Side Mafleira 2.00 to 2.50 

St. Croix Rum, L. B ,5..50 

Arrack "Royal" Batavia ,5.00 to fi.OO 

Boord & Son, London Dock 

Sherry, i>er case 12.00 to 15.00 

G. M. Pabstmann Sohn, Mainz 

Rhine Wines per case.. 8..50 to 2S 00 
Schulz & Wagner, Frankfurt 

o M Rhine Wines per 

case 11.00 to 14.00 



d4 



f^eifie WI^IE /rJ^D Sflf^lT K.EVIEW. 



t t njk»%»» 



I ) tmftlKI.I.I 



J^onneZZy & '^rannan, 



im AMI 




BIUMIIKS 



- K. rovin 
(UitinkAlMnjSli 

San Franolsoe. 
C«l. 



-•—*,• 



KOLB &, DENHARD, 

OkbAnMOkMiKM 

Wki*T. eW 
■■ami wMMs m 

OldNonpaiTilRyc 




CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

o^Fiom MMO VMitTM. *20'*2* MOHTOomemr 9T., saw r/r4MC/sco. 




I. DE TURK, 



CLARET, 

SAUTERNE, 
. . , , SHERRY, 

•?^-^f-<- MUSCAT. 

RIESLING, 



BRANDY 
ANGELICA. 
ZINrANOEL. 
HOCK. 

PORT, 

TOKAY. GUTEDEL. 

Vineyards and Cellars: 

Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, Cal. 

Branch: 
212 Sacramento St., San Francisco, Cal., 

C. M. MANN, Manager. 
Naw York Office, - - 22-24 Monroe Street. 




Pure California Wines & Grape BrandievS. 




lei 




OF SA\ (It URIEL, 
Imh AngeleH I'nunty, Cal. 

A re now pre|>arc<l wiili a iarecctock of wlm* and 
lintiidio (if their >iwn criiwtli t.i Kiipply tlic tn-idi- 
anil llif niarkft uoifDtll.V' Tlile ('(>in"|iaii.v imiih 
Ihi' larirt-ol viiii'varil In the wiirhl. roverini: over 2,.')U0a<res. Tliey have held tlui] 
» hiiT and lirandies fur several vi-ar* In their own eellarc, and do not offer any i>t 
their pnMlnrI until II Iwik U-eoine proiwrlv niatured. Their lar^e stock of nia- 
liirrd wlntT and hraiiiHcK IhuK aieiimulaled ie now o|H'n to the purchaner. All 
KihhIk under t hell trade mark are warranted pure and nnailnlteratml. Iteln>rllif 
• ue^e^•on< to II. I). \ViLhO."« A Co., and to .T. Dk IIaktii Kiioiih. thev have iK-eonic- 
iMii-MiMtrrK of the "KHOlur' IlKA^n of IlitANiiv. and •MorXT VINEYAIili" 
Wink. <'orm>p<indenee KollcitwI. 

HARSIIALI. SI'KLLMAX^ CO., J. DE HARTH SHORlt. 

No. 5 New York and IlriMiklvn Ilrldtfe Vault. President Han Gabriel Wine Co 

Fkaskfout Kt., New YoiiK. San Oai.kiei,. Cai,. 




TMS HMAM MtUV rMC-PROOf WAaiMOuaU. 



I 



>KIKI. n;riT>i ..Ml <1KNKIIAI, MKKl IIANI.lKK Wc r." *■ 

atofT. |ay i»i, ilrlltrr „r n^Mi> to any |wrl of Ibv munlrr 

a* mwHiablc rain. IHrert all romaiumlenre lu 

HIRAM SIBLEY & CO., Props. - CHICAGO, ILL. 



XTAI1I l>IIK|i Ki7 



F. O. BOYD St CO.. 

CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

N..1. f..i.r., *u'.ni f..r HMiTdS K.,.|ri..,i. ' •> ..rt Wiiir.. Kn-.no, Cal. 
Advanoaa Made on Conalgr^manta. 

li.-lrr.iMr. i,\ I', trill' •!.>»: Tin llAKK or Tiir St » t r of Nnw Yo«« 

Kit Ilo»»«T lUiiT..^. Kf->M... <'*l. Ma. AarAK IIaiio/tiit. Han rraiM'l*r<i('al 

Ma. Ilomi r V^ »:n>Tni Sail Kra»r(M-... lal Ma II II >< iii in or. I'lii. aen III 



TD=KRLDN. 



( Itecli'tered Tra.li- .M.iii^ i 

Vineyards, Cellars and Distilleries Situated at 

OAKVILLE, NAPA CO., CAL. 
H:. MT. CRjPlBB, - - FR.OI=PiIE,TOF5.. 

•'TO-KAI.ON " haii nvelved more Hedalr, niplomaK and l>reiniuint> 
than anv other hrand of Wines and linindio in America. 

JAS. L. DAVIS & CO., Sola Agenta, 

:«>SCAI.IF()|INIA .STIiKKT, - SAN FliAXriSCO, CAI,. 




iiomia Wiiie Growers Dijion 

Wines and Brandies, 

(or. Siiltrr A Gratit At<r. Sail Fmtid^ro. Cal. 




The llith.'^l (in„|,. Cl,iiinp«>:iu. in the Worl<l. 



WHITE LABEL, 
'Cahtk Ulamiik." 



BROWN LABEL. 

"ORA^n ViK Skc," 
\ MaKiilBefninichWIne. PerftHlion of a Dry Win. 



Sto lliat every Iloill,. |„.ar» the private lalwl of 

MACONDRAY & CO 

'^'l'' Au.Mi. I,,, i|„. !■..„, I,,., ■,,„^| 



f/reifie WIJ^E /jsiE) SPIRIT F^EVIEW. 



35 



WM. WOLFF <fe CO.. 

329 Maikit ^ll•eel, Sail Fianeisc'o. 

(Diilioa frei-es, liorUeaux.) 

Clialeau de I'Ysle, in casks.. f9r).00 

(Jouiiiu frere=, Bordeaux.) 
Clarets and Sauternee, per 

case from ^T.-W to »30.00 

Miiriiiitle-l'icaid & Co., Cliassasne, Cote 

U'Or wiiieh *l-i.O,l to 25.00 

(Henkell & Co., Mayence.) 

Hock winqs from *7..50 to *.S6.00 

(Morgan Bros., Port Ht. Mary.) 
Ports and Slierries in wood, 

pev K^""" *1.75 to $4..'>0 

Port and Slierries in cases, 

per case »S.OO to ll.-j.OO 

(Mackenzie & Co., Jerez.) 
Ports and Slierries in wood 

from .- ^l.W to UM) 



American Whiskies, 



HENCKEN & SCHRODER, 
210 Front street, San Francisco. 

Per Gallon. 

Onr Favoiite OK *2.7r) to *S..5(I 

Our Choice 2.M " 3.00 

Paul Jones 2.2.> " 2.5(. 

Star of 71) 2.00 

Old Crown 1.7,') " 2 00 

Old Bonrtxm 1.50 



WM. WOLFF A CO., 

32!) Market stieet, San Francisco. 



W. H. McBrayer, IS85.. 



»2.75 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
John GiliscMi's Son it Co.. 
Philadelphia, Bourbon 
and Rye whiskies J1.90 to »;i..50 



KOLB & DENHARD. 

422 Montj;oinery street, San Francisco. 

Nonpareil Ryeand Bonrlion $2..50 to ♦.5.00 



Imported Whiskies, 



CHARLES MEINECKE A CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
Boord ifc Son, London Finest 

Irish Malt Whiskey. . . . Jil2..50 

Royal H(;liUl Scotch Whisky. 12..50 

John Ramsay. Isiay Malt 

Scotch Whisky 13.00 

WM. WOLF A CO., 
33!) Market street, San Francisco. 

Lone Hi(j;hl.ind per case *11..50 

Jonnangh, liisli " 11. .50 

Win. Jameson & Co " 11.50 



SPRUANCE, STANLEY & Co.. 

410 Front street, San Francisco. 

Kentucky Favorite $ 

Extra Kentucky favorite 

O. P. T 

O. K. Old Stock 

Harri's' Old Bourh.m 

Kcntiickv Favorite, in cases 

H. (). B.'jnfjs 

O. F. (; juits 

African Stomach Bitters, cs. 



3.00 
3..50 
2..50 
5.00 
2.00 
8. .50 
9.0(1 
10..5(l 
11.. 50 



SIKBE BROS. A PLAGEMAN. 

322 Sansonie street, San Francisco. 

O K Extra f3..50 to mOO 

() K Rosedale 2..50 to 3.00 

llvaiii 2.75 

Golden Pearl 2.25 

Maivhall 2.25 

Olil Fainilv Bourbon 1.75 

Old Bourbon 1..50 



Imported Brandies. 



WM. 
329 Mai kel 



WOLFF & CO., 
street, San Francisco. 



Martell's Brandy, * per case 

.1 .1 *# .. 

VSO •• 
' WSOP '• 



$17.00 
1!).0I) 
22.00 
28.00 
.50.0.1 



NABER, ALFS & BRUNE. 

323 and 325 Market street, San Francisco. 

PlKcnix Old Bourbon, Al. . . *2.75 

" Old St'k 3.00 

" Al, 90 pf 2..50 

" OK,100|.f 3..50 

" Pony.Priv St'k 4.00 

Club House Bourbon. Old.. 4..50 

Gold Medal Bouibon, 100 pf 3..50 

Union Club '• " 2.25 

Superioi Whiskv 1.75 

BB Whisky 1.75 

Liquors — In cases. 

Per Case. 

Plupnix Bourbon OK, in .5s if 10.00 

Al, " 7..50 

Al,24pts 8.00 

Al,4Si^pt 9.00 

Union Club Bourbon, 21 pts 7.50 

" 4Si^pts 8..50 

Rock and Rye Whisky in .5s. 7..50 

Rum Pnncli Extract, in 5s.. 8.00 

Blackberry Brandy, in 5s. . . 7.50 

MOORE, Hunt A Co, 
401 Front street, San Francisco. 

Per Gallon. 
Extra Pony in bbls or J^-bbls $6.00 to *S.OO 

A A " " " pf 4.00 

15 '• " " " 3.50 

(! " " " • 3.00 

No. 1 " " " " 2..50 
Rye in bills and >^-l)bls from 3..50 to 5.00 

A A in cases 11.00 

A A in 5 case lots 10..50 

A A Ml 10 to 25 lots, 10.00 

A A in pint Hint llasks 2 

dozen to case 12.00 

C in cases 1 dozen to jjalion 8.25 

C in 5 case lots, 1 dozen, Ss 8 00 

No. 1, in cases, .5s 8.00 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
Oliam]i Vineyard Proprs. Co., 

Bouteileau & Co. man- 

aijers Cof;nac in Octaves 

per gal *5.0I) to *8. 

The Vineyard Proprs. Co. 

Bouteileau ife Co. mana- 

f;;ers Reserve Vintafjcs. 10.50 to 14. 

Swan (iin in }^ casks 3. 

Double Eaj;le Gin in ^ casks. 3. 

Jolin Ramsay Islay Scotch 

Whisky, in }^ casks 4. 

Boord's I'ineapple brand 

Jamaica Rums In ^ 

casks .5.25 0, 



01) 



.50 



W. B. CHAPMAN. 

123 California street, San Francisco. 

(H. Cuvillicr A frere Co}j;nac. ) 

(Quarts. 

Fine Champagne, 1870 $32.00 

Grande Fine Cliampasne, 18ti0 30.00 
Grande Fine Champagne lie- 
serve, 18.58 40.00 



Imported Goods, 

(MISCELLANEOUS.) 



KUHLS SCHWARKE & CO. 
12;^ SutteV street, San Francisco. 

O K Goldwater ¥ 4.00 

" '• per case 7. .50 



JOSEPH MELC/ER & CO. 
501 and .500 Market street, San Francisco. 
Native Pride. Old Bourbon, 

(per bbl) per gallon .... $3.50 

Old Rip Van Winkle 2.50 

Nevilles Old Bourbon 1.50 



WM. WOLFF A CO., 
329 Market street, San Francisco- 
J. de Kuyper & Sons Gin, large hot $18..5(l 
mcd. " .... 10.00 
Evan's Belfast Ginger Ale per barrel 13..50 
" " " percs.4doz 0.00 

Theo. Lappe'B Genuine Aiomatiqne 

per case 13. .50 

Gilka Knniinel per case 1.5.00 

Vermoutli Francesco Cinzanipr. case 6. .50 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Market street, San Francisco, 

(BOORD & son's, LONDON.) 

Old Tom Gin, per case 

Pale Orange Bitters, per case 

Ginger Brandy, Liqueur " 

Jamaica Rum, Old " 12.00 to 

IAIN Koval Batavia Gin in 
cases of 15 large black 

bottles per case 

in cases of 15 large 
white bottles per case 

Kirschwaseer, Maclioll Freies 
Bavarian Highland, per 
case 

Cherry Cordial, J. J. ^W. 
Peters' jiei case .'. . . 

Eummel, Bollmann's jiercase 






11.00 
11.. 50 
12.00 
14.00 



23.50 
24.50 

19.00 

12.00 
13..50 




1889. 
G0LDME3D&L 

^f\CE§>DePo>. 

^ 615-617 . 



MONT-ROUGE 

VINEYA RD, 
1885. 

UVERMORE VALLEY, 

CALIFORNIA. 

A.G.CHAUCHE 

PROPRIETOR, 
SAN FRANCISCO. 



R. ^ht^pn^p 8t Co., 




SPARKUNG 
WINE 



ONLY. 



American Champagne Co. 

LIMITED. 

REIHLEN CHAMPAaNE, 

BRUT AND EXTRA DRY. 



SAN nuNnisco owice and factory, 
839-849 Folsom Strest. 



NEW YORK OFFICE, 

50 New St. and 52 Broad St. 



II. II. 1!A1UU:> 



M. I,. IIKYNOLDS. 



T1IO.S. KI>X!STON. 



Harris, Kingston 4 Reynolds, 

WINE GROWERS, DISTILLERS AND 

Dealers in PURE CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES 




VraEV/lRDS* CELLARS: ' \ 
Rutherford, 

Napa Co., Cal 



VAULTS: 

123-127 Eddy St. 

Under HackmelerV Hotel, 
San Pfrt»iW«co, Cal, 



J 



36 



f>jke\f\e WIJME /r|^D Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



ORLEANS VINEYARD, 



(4UU ACIIBKt. 

.pROinCF.US OF 



AM> WHOt.KKAI.K DKALRRA 

CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES. 

630 Washington Street, San rranciceo, Cal. 



S. LACHMAN & CO. 



FlHrmt and fMdemI Stock of- — 



California Wines, Brandies 



-AND- 



CHMTV^PACNeS. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SHIPMENTS TO 
ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD. 



Sa H /■'ifi iirlHrn, 
4>Vt In 441.; Itniniian .<0>fyf. 



Ayir i'ork Otfice. 
Sti, •J4. -Jli Kim SIreel. 




CARRY & CO., 



Vroprirlom 

Ijiiie Sam Winerv and Dislillorv. 



i-.iUFOHMA. 



orricc aho *Ai.Bi>>ooM 

515-517 Sacramento St, - San Francisco. 

WINERY AND DISTILLERY, 

NAl'A. <AI,. 



CARRY & MAUBEC, 
m rKDAit sTiir.i'T. - m:w yoiik. x. y. 



Iiaehman & Jaeobi, 



DEALEJiS IN- 



California Wines and Brandies 

mtirAMT MHO scoowo »rHeKTB. •4w muMoimoo. 



Eastern Agents, 

EDINGER BROS. & JACOBI, 

for. I><iv<rit I'.:iil S\h.. J{r.M,klyn Hri<lp' Stfin- No.',', N«'w York 



A JlAl-f*'. .M»iia;;rr. 



il. A. .Mkuuiam, Sui«iTliileiidciil. 



Ds Gatos & Saratoga Wliie Go. 

PKODVVEltS OF CHOICE 

WINES and BRANDIES 



MUSCAT. 
ANGELICA, 
ROYAL NCCTAR, 

ZINFANDEL, 

SHERRY, 



HOCK, 

SAUTERNE, 

OLD PORT, 
GUTEDEL. 
RIESLING, 



FROM FOOTHILL VINEYARDS. 

VINKYAHK.S AM) iMI.I.AltS: 

Los Gatos snd Saratoga, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

Branch OfHeo: 4T8 Tenth Street. Oahland, California. 



C(\tt*SAtnd*cku 










ROPRIETORS.^ 

MARKET4SEC0NDST.SAN FRAN CI S C .C A L I FO R N.1 A. 



New York Office, 



52 Warren Street. 







WINES & BRANDIES 



3Brancb an6 lUaulta. too & 102 fixet Street. 

Wholeiwie and ICetail. 

Si-licled Slock nl Cliciic Old Wine- a .Specialty. 



KIOHILEI^ & TP-R.OTT T .T-K Tr^^ 
PIONEER WINE HOUSE. 

E<tabUslied 1854. 

VineyanU in Ijw Angelet County, Sonoma County. 

Merced Cmmty and Fremo Cwiniy. 



Cor. Second and Folsom Sts., 

San F"ra.ncls<so. 



41-45 Broadway, 



ALFRED GREENEBAUM & CO., 
Shippers of California Moines, 

61, 63, 66, 57, 66 and 61 F.rst Street, 



Cnlon FMundry Illut^k, 
SfiO Orrrrtirlrh fit., Xnr Yurk ( lli/. 



SaN FRANCISCO. 



f/eifie WIJ^E /rJ^JD SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



37 



Quotations at Cincinnati and Louisville. 

E. G. B.-Export Gauge Bremen; N. Y.-New York; N. Y. C. H.-New York Custom House; L. P. W. H.-Louisville Public Wan^iouse 
Lou.-Louisville; Cin.-Ciucinuati; Dist'y-Distillery; C. C. H.-Cincinnati Custom House; St. L. C. H.-St. Louis Custom House 

E;^ These prices are for lots of not lepR tlian twenty-five barrels and upwards, easli, and if in bond, original Range, aecraei charges paid 



BKANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 

'89. 

60 


Fall 

'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall 

'90. 


Spr'g 

'87. 


Fall 

'86. 


Si)r'g 
'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 
Whiskies. 


Remarks 






50 




225 






Spr 81 285 


LouCH 


Anderson Co. Club 
















Anderson Co. Sour Mash 








50 


40 
40 


37i 
37i 












240 






Ashland •. 














210 








A stor 






















A thertou 








50 




m 

37* 




207* 




225 






Fall 81 260 


CinCH 


Ballard & Lancaster 






55 






Beechwood 



























Bel-Air 




75 




52i 
65 
55 
50 

65 
75 


50 


40 

47* 














Spr 81 275 


Lou 


Belle of Anderson 
















Belle of Anderson Co. (E. Murphy) 
B"lle of Louisville 














225 




























257* 






Belle of Marion 




80 


80 




40 




210 
230 








Spr 81 275 




Belle of Nelson 














Bebnont 














240 










Berkele, Wm 






60 


55 

55 

67^ 
52^ 
82* 
45" 

75 


45 

321 
62| 


42* 

40 

40 

55 

40 

62* 

30 

55 
















Berry, E. C 






















Bi" Spring (Nelson Co. Distg. Co.)., 














205 






Spr 81 260 




Blakemore 




















Rbie Gra.ss 











200 
235 




220 
250 




250 
265 


•Spr 81 270 
Spr 84 275 








97i 


85 




Bond, M. S 






Boone's Knoll 










230 




250 




275 






Bowen, H. C 








Spr 80 300 


Nev Ex 


Bowen. J. A 


























Brownfleld, W. W 








65 
60 




55 
50 






































Spr 81 275 


LouCH 


Callaglian 




















Carlisle 








67i 

65 

52^ 

45 

45 


■■■421 
40 


55 
50 
40 
37* 








225 










Cedar Run 


80 




















Chickencock 


67i 
60 


50 















Fall 82 260 
Spr 81 275 




Clay, Samuel 


















CliflF Falls 


















Clifton 





























Commonwealth 




62i 




55 
45 
65 


'35' 


40 
30 
50 


















Cook, C. B 
















Fall 80 270 




Coon Hollow 























Craig, F. G 
























Cornflower 












37* 

35 

47* 

35 

37J 

45 

37^ 

45 

40 

40 


















Cream of Anderson 




75 
65 
75 




47i 

65 

50 

47i 

60 

55 

57* 

52J 

57i 


■■■37J 

50 

42^ 


















Criterion 




















Crystal Spring 




















Cumberland 
















Spr 80 300 




Cummins, R. & Co 






















Dant, J. W 
























Darling 
























Daviess County Club 
























Dedman, C. M 




72J 










200 










Double Spring 


















Dundee 












37* 
40 



















Durham 




70 
80 
80 




52^ 

60 

65 

70 

52^ 

40 





















Early Times 


82i 


















Edge Cliff. 




52J 

56 

42* 

30 

33i 


















Edgewatcr (T. J. Megibben.) 






200 




230 






Spr 80 290 


Lou C H 


Elk Run 














Excelsior (Megibben & Bro.) 










190 














Fall City 




















Femaiff. 
























Fible & Crabb 




75 








32i 




200 














Field, J. W. M 






















Franklin 












40 

40 

55 

42^ 

35 

37* 


















Frazier, W. J 














207i 






















65 
55 
50 
62i 


57i 
45 
35 
40 














Garland 

















































Glenarme 


























* 















38 



f^eifie WI|^E /rJMD 



SflF^IT F^EVIEW. 




yUPORUjtSaWHOLfSy^tf 




323-325 Market St., S. F. 



MAKTIX HdCKKX. 



IIKMIY W IIKOIIKK. 



Mencken & Schroder, 

— >l * rK^stius 'i u — 

HENRY BRICKWEDEL & CO. 

Jmjiorim and Itruh-r* in 

CClincs and liiquors. 

Sale Agent* for Dr. Sehmdrr'ii Handturg JiiUcra, and 
Our Farorlle 0. K. and Jlmd Jones Wil»kif*. 

Nos. 208-210 Front Street, - San Francisco, Cal. 



ToiTTTiTtn-x. 



\\. )■. \Vl. IIMA.N. 



WICHMAN & LUTGEN, 

Importers of 



"Tj^iriQQ & 



Muintarlaren and 

Pmpri«lor» of 

Dr. Feerctvr'a 

umn 

Stomarh liiHtr*. 




^iquors. 



318-320 Clay St 

B<«L ymnt i Bsttory, 



San Francisco. 



1>. V. B. 11»J«AK1£. 



E. MARTIN &, CO., 

' IMI'OKTEItS AND WHOLESALE 

LiiQUOH mefjcHflNTS, 

408 Front St., San Francisco, Cal. 

snt.K ACJENTH Fdll 

J. F. CUHER AND ARGONAUT OLD BOURBONS. 



Hey, Grauerholz & Co., 

iMmSTCSa AHP WIIULKVALK DKALKRI- IN 

WINES & LIQUORS 



KOLF. AfiENT« FOK 



PAVY CROCK^rt WHISKY, 

BE SURS YOU ARB RIGHT, THEN GO AHEAD. 



wo. »IB SACRAMeHTO »THeeT, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



THE CELEBRATED 



PERUVIAN BITTERS. 

A SOPBB APPinZER. A ROTAL TONia CURB DTSPIP81A. 



^WILI^dlEie/IDIlSrO & CO., aoenth. 

214*216 Front St., - San Francisco, Cal. 

Also Agents for Delmonico Champagne. 



P.J.CASSIN &,CO., 

I.MI'(IIiTI".l!S OK I'lKF. 

Kentucky Bourbon Whiskies 

.Sf»/«- AgenlH for O. K. OOLDEJi PLAffTATlOX WHISKY. 



-WIIOLSMALK DKALBRS IK- 



Foreign and Domestic Wines and Liquors. 

■*33 BATTERY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Kuhls, Schwarke & Co. 

Wholesale Wine and Li(iiior Merchants. 

Salifoniia Wiiies aiiil W0i 



-SOLR AOKKTU FOR- 



O.K. Goldwater Bourbon & Rye Whiskies, 

1J.1-J29 Stttlrr St., Cor. Kearny, - - Siin Frandwo, Cal. 



11. FlUTM II. 



l . CKl.LAlill«. 



Thonias Taylor & Co. 

— nil-Tll.l.KIU* OF ASI> I>F.AI.K1UI IN — 

Aa£INES KND LaIQ UQRS 

Sole Aj^ontft for 

Alpine and Champion Cocktail Bitters. 



Kl First Strciet, 



Sa_n Frs_n<risco. 



('. JtWT, hr. 



0. JOKT, .) R. 



— Distiller* mnd Rcrtlhers of— 

SPIRITS AND ALCOHOL 

Office: 306-308 Clay Street, 

DISTII.I.r.KY .\T ANTIOCH. SA\ FnANTISCO. 



CIIAH. W. roKS, 



JOHN Ki-iirAN>'K. 



Spruance, Stanley & Co. 

IMPOHTEUS AKD JOnnEIiS OF FIXE 

wpies, Wliies aiid Lipis. 

Sole agenU for the Celebrated African Stomach Bitters 

410 FiioNT SritrKT. - - San Fkanciw o. Cai.. 





pyveifie wijme 


/rJ^D 


Sflf^lT 


f^EV 


lEW. 








39 


BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 
'89. 


Fall 

'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall 

'9(». 


Spr'g 

'87. 


Fall 
'86. 


Spr'g Fall 

'86. '85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


• Old 

Whiskies. 


Remarks 


Cil<^iic*oft .\... 
















Spr81 275 














47i 


42^ 
40 

35 


















1 




















Spr81 275 
Spr 81 3fJ0 












60 


40 








250 








( iirylock (The Mill Creek Dist'g Co.) 
(ireystoiie 












































G W. S 




75 


(55 
55 


60 
60 

52* 


""47i 
40 

m 


45 

45 

37i 


















Hacklv, S. O 






200 




225 










Haiiuing, Jiio 










Spr80 300 




Harris, N 




















•Hawkins 
























Hayden, R. B. & Co 








52^ 




37* 

37| 




200 














Head, F. M 




















Head, W. H 








50 

87i 
55 


























95 
60 


42^ 


70 
40 

m 

40 












275 


Spr 81 375 




Hill & Hill 




72i 
52^ 














I lorseShoe (The Mill Creek Dist'g Co) 

IIuiUG 


57i 




















52i 








220 






Spr 81 280 




Indian Hill 








25 












.rpssiiniiiift 










36 


35 

m 
















.Icxikftv Club 


























Kellar, A 






57^ 


52J 

75 

52^ 


38| 

65 

40 








225 
240 






Spr 84 2.')0 
June 81 350 




Kentucky Club 






52i 
37* 
37| 


"32* 


220 










Kentucky Comfort (Paine's) 














Kentucky Cyclone 






















Kentucky Dew 




65 




50 
55 




















Kentucky Tip 




m 


40 






210 




250 








1 Lancaster, R. B. (Maple Grove) 


















1 Lancaster. S. P 








52i 
52^ 




37* 


















1 limestone 




72i 




40 




210 




235 










McBrayer, J. A 












McBrayer, J. H 








55 

92^ 




42* 

70" 


















McBrayer, W. H 






100 




250 


265 






275 


Fall 84 280 




McKennai.. 












Marion Co. Distilling Co 








50 
50 
60 
62i 


40 
■■■47^ 


37* 
37* 
50 
45 


















Mattingly & Son , J. G 




















Spr 84 2.30 




Mattingly & Moore 










■ 




225 








Mayfield 






65 




■ 






Spr 81 285 




Medallion 


















- 


Mell wood 


72i 


70 

80 


57^ 
75 


55 

60 

521 

65 

72i 

57i 


45 
45 


40 

40 

37* 

52* 

55 

42* 

40 














Fall 81 265 


* 


Mercantile CJlub 


35 














Miles, E. L 


















Monarch, M. V 
























Monarch, R 










230 
110 










Spr 81 280 
Fall 81 275 
Spr 81 275 


NYCH 


Monarch, T. J 








EG 


230 




240 




Moore, D. L 








Lou 


Moore & Grigsby 


























Murphy, Barber & Co 




80 




57i 

65 

50 


42^ 
40 


40 
50 
37* 








110 


EG 




Spr 81 275 


Lou CH 


Nail, A. G 












Nelson 






55 




195 




215 




225 






New Castle 




60 






New Hope 






65 

52i 

60 

78i 
52| 
95 


55 


52* 














Spr 82 275 




Nutwood 






55 
















Oakwood 




80 




45 


















0. F. C 






240 








285 


Fall 80 400 




Old Charter 










35 

72* 
37* 












Old Crow 






100 












300 


Spr 81 400 




Old Tjcxington Club 












115 


EG 




Old Log Cabin 




75 




















Old Pepper, (Petter, Jas. E. & Co).. 




• 


72i 

75 

57^ 

47i 




60 
62* 




250 
235 




275 






Spr 84 290 




Old Oscar Pepper 




97J 






300 




Old Tarr 










Spr 81 290 
Fall 79 375 




Old Time (Pogues) 








m 

40 


















Old Times 








37* 


32* 














Parkland 
























Parkhill 












30 


















Patterson , 




























Payne, P. E 








50 
55 
52^ 


45 




















Peacock 








42* 

45 

52* 

35 

37* 

40 

45 

35 

37* 


















Pepper, R. P 






55 






225 








Fall 81 275 




Pilgrimage .. .. 


















Purdy & Co 




























Rich Grain 








50 

58^ 
45 

m 




















Rich wood 
























Ripy, T. B 






65 




205 




225 




245 


Spr 81 275 


LCH 


Rohrer, D 




57i 




Rolling Fork 



















40 



f^eifie WIJME /r;JD SflF^II F^EVIEW. 



"BOD BLESS YOU!" 

Is the Heart- Felt EKpreesion that Cornea to Us from all 
over," from those who have used 



THE BELLE OF 30URB0N COMPANY, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

MSTILI.EItS OF THE FAMOIT 




"BEkliE OF BOUW 

Hand-Mdide Sour Mash Whisky 

1 ■■ i»r iiiil Sinnll Ciaiii.) 
none SOTTLCO UMOC/t EIGHT YEARS OU3. 



SIEBE BROS. L PLAGEMANN, 

AGENTS, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



TO WINE-MAKERS! 



FATHERS! MOTHERS! CHILDREN! 

Tbi* wonirrful runllal, HbU-h I* u »«mt w wiU liiiiiu..', aiiii u i ivii;i>nitlnK bk 
■n rlrrlriral battrrr, 

DIARRHOEA, DYSENTERY, MALARIA, 

And kll allmi-nlK nf llir l> iirrl». Li-iulliii; IMivoiriiinK prtwrilK- il for ADULTH and 

CHII.DItK.V. K»rK«tr liv Mivmk. Mtvrrfi-ld. Mitilifll .^ Hu-I>eiih«urr. 

Saii FraiH-itM-o, aiM* all driic^ii*!^ and dealerv. 

RHEINSTROM BROS. Sole Props., 

DISTILLERS FINE LIQUEURS, 

ci3srci]snsr-A.T]:, xr. s. a.. 

Monarch Blackberry Brandy, 

THE ONLY RELIABLE IN THE MARKET. 
tyFOn I'lltlTY. STHEXC.T't AM> IT.AVOU. IT HAS NO K(.H M. , j 

Milialovitcli, Fletcher k Co. 

DIKTILLEHS OP 

FUriT BlIWDIIX 

Kottl ns and Pcalern l:i 

N'^TIVE ^/^INES. 



The iinderi>iKi) tl l>.-e to call tlie attention of Wine Makers, Dealers, dr.. to H. 

<'lievalliiT-.\pper1'i< 

"OENOTANNIN" 

A» a corrcclivi- and a purifier to all li-ilit Taliie Wines, IVIiltr iiuil Red. 
AND 

1= TJ L^ E I^ I IN" E 

Fob CLABirvtnci Wiiitk and Heo Winei.. 

And to 

A. BOAKE ROP.KRT;^ & CO'S 

LIQUID ALBUMENS 

For rlarUyinj;. pri-MTV I ■■.-', n-KloriiiL' and corriMlin;; bolli Wliile and Ited Winec. 
IHrectlonn for n«e on appltrtittnn. 

For Sale by Charles Meinecke & Co., Sole Agents, 

Ht4 Stn-riimcuto SIrrrt. S4in I'riiiivlsco. Cat. 




ESTABLISHED 



A. Finke's 



168-70-72 East Pearl St. 
Cincinnati O. 



Manufactiirerit nf 

CALIFdRMA 

ABSOLUTELY PURE 



M. Blumenthal & Co., 



■ PIMTILLKIUi AMD MAMrrAC-rKltRII OF - 



SYRUPS, CORDIALS, BITTERS, EXTRACTS, 

Pure Sugar Coloring 



809 MONTGOMERY- ST., 

San Francisco. 

Ttlepbone ,501>4. 




1864 



Widow, 



First Premium 

CLUII'AGNES. 



Gold Seal, 

CaKTE BlANCHE, 

Imperial. 



tV'"'"'* Premium for Oold 

FINk; " a1 ***■' ^"* California riiam- 

yrt^u.^.'^^MI Pai-nH* awarded hv llie HIate 

iFRANOI^H Fail. 1S9((. and wherever vx- 

liiliiteii. 



A SPECIALTY. 



E. U C. STEELE St CO. 

Sucw'HHorH to C. Adolimi Ix)W & Co. 



Wine and Liquor Merchants. 

6S8<6eO Mission St.. Bst. Sseond and Third. San Franelso, Cal. 
UOOK liOLD AT LOWITS r¥uRI& SERD Nft SAMPUS AND PRIC88. 



aOLC IMPORTERS Or 



HARMO NY SHE RRIES. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants. 

'_'<»s (',\i.iF<)UMA Stukkt. - San Fkani imo. ('ai.. 



f/eifie WII^E /cJMD Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



41 



BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 

'89. 


Fall 

'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall 
'90. 


Spr'g 

'87. 


Fall 

'86. 


Spr'g 
'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

■85. 


Old 
Wliiskies 


Remarks 


Saffell, W B :.... 




















CH 






Samuels, T. W 






62^ 






45 

42^ 
47A 
47| 








240 


Cin. 






Samuels, W. B. & Co 






55 

57i 












Fall 83 265 




Searcy, J. S 






















Searcy, Wiley, (Old Joe.) 




90 




















Sharpe 






55 




















Shawhan 










40 

37i 

40" 


















Small Grain 




























Smith & Smith 
























































Southall 


















225 












Sovereign 








55 




















Split Rock 








37i 
""37^ 


35 
47i 
. 50 
45 


















Spring Hill 








62A 
65" 
62i 
45" 














SprSl 325 




Spring Water 
































210 




225 










Sweetwood 
















Tippecanoe 








37|^ 


















Taylor (Old) 




95 


97^ 






















Tea Kettle 




52i 




40 


















Tenbroeck 
























Tip Top (Rock Spring Dist'g Co 




75 


60 


57^ 


m 


40 
40 
37^ 
40 


















Van Arsdell 
















Spr81 275 


Lou 


Van Hook 








50 

57i 

55 

52i 

72i 

50 

62i 

67| 

47i 







200 










Walker, F. G. (Queen of Nelson)... 




















Walker, J. M 
























Warwick 




























Waterfill & Frazier 




90 
65 
























Wathen Bros 




"sil 


37i 

55 

60 

35 

32i 

45 

55 


















Welsh, J. T. (Davies Co.) 




















Welsh, J. T. (McLean Co) 
























White Mills 




57^ 


52| 


















Willow Run 




















AV'oodlaud 








57^ 
72i 


47^ 
60 


50 


200 








240 






Zeno 




90 







































iCEISTTTJOiCY 


I^Y"F!R. 












Ashland 








62i 

67| 




42* 
60" 










« 




Atherton 


















« 




Belle of Anderson 




















1 




Belle of Louisville 






m 




















1 




Belle of Nelson 




















267i 




( 


■ 


Blue Grass 






82^ 


77^ 


60 


57i 




215 








1 ■■ 




Clarke's 


















Criterion 








52^ 






















Crystal Spring 




























Curley, J. E 






























Edgewater 


























Spr 80 350 




Excelsior 






















, 






Franklin 








75 
55 


55 
50 




225 
















Greylock 






















Greystone : 


























Hermitage 






100 


95 


82^ 


77i 












300 


Spr83 376 




Highland 


















Horse Shoe (Mill Creek Dist'g Co... 








55 


60 




















I iynchburg 


























Marion Co. Distilling Co 








70 
52i 






















Mattingly & Son , J. G 










46 


















Mel wood 




80 


65 


















Miles, E. L 




70 
60 


66 
55 
65 
60 




















Millcreek 


























Monarch. M V. 


























Nelson 




























Normandy 








75 

80 




















Old Pepper (Pepper Jas. E. & Co... 








67^ 

52i 

m 

65 




265 




290 






Spr 84 300 




Paris Club 














Ptiticock 




























Penner. R. P 








65 


50 








235 










Rolling Fork 












216 










Short Horn (Dougherty's) 










50 
















Sovereiern 


















225 










Sunny Side 




82i 




67^ 

65 

45 

62 i 


52^ 
52A 
40" 
52^ 
42| 


50 
















Susquehanna 




















Sylvan Grove (Fleishmann's) 

Wathen Bros 


60 


55 


50 
65 


36 
































White Mills 






40 










• I 






- 















42 



f^eifie WlfJE /r|^D SflF^IT (REVIEW. 



XjEJLiDzisra- 



ADORCSS, INSURANCE. 



BRAND. 



ANDKKSON & NKI^)N DISTS 00. 
.\il(l: .VmlcrMHi & Nfliwn I>ti*tilleri(t« 
Co., Ixiiixvillc. 

Kat«>. 90c > 



Amieraon, 
Neltmn. 



BKM.Kof ANDKItSON I)<J VO. 

Add; 8. J. GnviilMuin. I^niiMvillo. 

Rate. 1.25. 



IWIo of .VikKthoii. 
(ilfiiariiif, 
Jt<t«<tiiiiin(>, 
Arlington. 



M. P. MATTINCSLY. 

Owfii!»lM»r«>, Ky 
FVeeW. II., 1.50. 



Old W. 8. Stone. 



M ELL WOOD DISTY CX). 

I»ui8villc. 
K4it<>. K5t;. 

MtMtKK & 8ELLI(iKK, 

IxHiiHville. 
Rat«', JCk-. 



Mcllwuod, 
DuiiUiw, 
O. W. 8. 

.\stor. 
It4>linoiit. 
Xutwoud. 



EI). MIKPHY &(X).. 

Ijiwn'iui'hiirR, Ky, 
No. 1. l.:«. 



Ik'lk' of .\ii<U>rHOii County 



OU) TIMKS IHST'Y CO.. 

I>()uiHvillc. 
Ratw, 85c. & $1.50. 



Old TimcM. 
OladHtonc. 



8. DILLIN(;KK & SONS. 
^Kufl"« Dale, Pa, 



Dillinfrer. 



!«r 



TILXjEI^S. 



ADDRESS, INSURANCE. 



BRAND. 



J.VS.E.PEPPKK &("<).. 

Ix-xingtou, 
Rate, Rk;. 



Pepper. 



E. H. TA VI. OR, JR. &St>NS. 

Fninkfort. 
Rate, 8.-)c. 



Old Taylor. 



nKLI.KOF NK1>M>N DV ("O. 
AiUl: lU-llc of Nelson DistUliu},' Co.. 
I»iiiHville. 

Rate, 85c. 



Belle of Nelson. 



J. A. IX)l UHKKTY & SONS. 

rhiladt'lpliia, Pa, 
Rate, 90c. 



Dougherty. 



A. OVERHOLT & CO., | 

Add; A. OverlioU & Co., PittHburg, Pa. 

Rjite, 80c. I 



Overholt. 



THOMPSON DIST'G CO., 

Wtwt BrownHvillf, Pa. 
Add; Office 1.34 Water St., Pittshuig.Pa, 
Rate, 80c. 



Sam Thonij»Hon. 



SUStlUEHANNA DIST'G CO., 

Milton. 
Add; Jiw. Ix'vy & Bro.. Cincinnati. 
Rates, 8.-JC & 1.25. 



Susquehanna. 



BETHANY DISTILLERY. 




fSTABLIBMED 18 24 



^^P'SDALE. WESTN/IOF^EbAHD CO. P/V. 



EsUblishad 1844. 



Pur 



^Sam Thompsoni^ 



R 



Wh 



E nVE WHISKY 

UNEQUALLED IN QUALITY. 



^Aompson distilling Qo. 

Offle*! 134 Water Street, 



ON THE MONONGAHELA RIVER, 
West Brownsville, Pa. 



f/reifie WIJSIE /rJSlD SflF^IT F^EVIEW. 



43 





EJ^STEI^nsr I^/lTES. 




BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spi-'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Sprg 
'89. 


Fall 
'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall Spr'g 
'90. '87. 


Fall 

'86. 


Spr'g 

'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 

Whiskies. 


Remarks 


Braddock 




115 

90 

85 

90 

108i 

105" 


82^ 
'96 


87^ 

77^ 

70 

70 

85 

82i 

57* 

82i 

77| 

85 

62^ 


77i 
60 


72A 
52| 


""m 


275 






( 






Bridgeport 


95 


245 












Brookdalc 












Dillius^er, S. & Sons 




62i 
75 

G7i 


52i^ 


















Douglicrty 




62* 


















Punch's Golden Wedding 


•120 


60 


















Frontier 


















Gibson 


127A 

98| 


122i 
95" 


100 
82A 
92i 
67| 


67^ 
05 
75 
65 


60 
60 
67A 
47| 








360 
295 










Guckenheimer 


52* 
60 
40 
45 


242i 




310 




Spr81 465 




Hannisville 




Jones, G. W 


82i 


75 


215 














Ijippencott 














Meadville 








70 


62^ 


60 
60 
















Melvale 
























>|,ontieello 




105 
75 


'70' 


80 










265 










Mont rose 






40 

55 

70 

47* 

60 

62* 

37* 

55 

50 

50 


35 
45 

62| 














Moore, Tom 






60 
75 

65 
65 
60 
60 
60 
60 
















Mt. Vernon 




120 


107A 


87i 

Gil 

75 

80 

45 

75 








350 






. 


Orient 
















Overholt 




115 

100 


8.7^ 

85 

50 


"35 


265 

267* 


285 
272* 


310 






Spr80 700 




Sherwood 










Somerset 


75 












Stewart 
















Tom])son, Sam 








42* 
42 
















V an degr i ft 

























































7J^^dcd' y/MP. 



^^^Mm. 








ADDKE55 ALL CSMMUNICATIONa TO 

QCNEi^AL crncn;, 

FiTT^BLii^Qli Pa. 



SA/NTA CLA-RA CH AMPAC/NE. 



Santa Clara valley has already won the proud distinction of 
producing the highest colored and most delicately flavored claret 
wines produced within the State, and of late her Sauternes and 
other types of white wine have been very closely approximat- 
ing the very best. We are not aware that any attempt has 
been made to produce champagnes and in fact only one house in 
all California has attained any distinction in that line. 

It appears, however, that Messrs. Lefranc & Masson, the 
successors of Charles Lefranc, who established a vineyard in 1852 
some eight miles south of San Jose, have been quietly experi- 
menting for some time with such favorable results as to induce 
them to enter upon the manufacture of champagne on a scale 
large enough to put it on the market through their wine 
house in San Jose which has been in operation for the past six 
years. They secured a practical champagne man from France 
and for about a year a vintage has been going through the pro- 
cess. It will still be some time, six months or more, before it 
will be ready for sale, but from the superior quality of the 
original wine used and the great care taken in the preparation, 
the resulting champagne must be of the best quality. It is not 
yet determined to send it out under any particular brand. 
Probably the name of Lefranc & Masson will be as gowl a 
guaranty of purity and quality as anything that could be placed 
upon the bottles. Lovers of champagne will be on the lookout 
for the new product and we shall be disappointed if it does not 
prove equal or better than anything ever made in the State. — 
Saivta Clara Valley. 



OF 

Prominent California Vineyards. 



[These Cards inserted for $5 per Year in advance.] 



EL PINAL VINEYARD. — Establislicd 
18.52. Wines and brandies. Georuc 
West & Son, Stockton, Cal. 

SIERRA VISTA VINEYAUD—. Wines 
and brandies. Sierra Vista Vineyard 
Co., Mintnrn, Fresno, Co., Cal. 

I. BE TURK VINEYARDS — Estab- 
lislied 186i. Wines and brandies. I. 
De Turk, Santa Rosa, Cai. 

INGLENOOK VINEYARD— Established 
1880. Wnies and brandies. Gustavc 
Niebaum, Rutherford, Napa Co., Cal. 

SUNSET VINEYARD— Establislied 18S1. 
Wines and l)raiidies. Wclister it Sar- 
gent, Minturn, Fresno Co., Cal. 

OLIVINA VINEYARD— Establislied 1881 
Wines and brandies. Julius P. Smith, 
Livermore, Cal. 



MONT ROUGE VINEYARD —Estab- 
lished 188.5. Dry wines. A. G. 
Chauehe, Livermore, Cal. Offlcc 61f- 
017 Front St., San Franeieeo, Cal. 

ELECTRA VINEYARD. — Established 
1881. Dry wines. Clarence J. Wet- 
more, Livermore, Cal. 

LINDA VISTA VINEYARD— Established 
18.58. Dry and sweet wines. C. C. 
Melver, Mission San Jose, Alameda 
Co., Cal 

CRESTA BL.ANC.\— E.TClusively hne high 
grade wines in bottle, fine Sauternes 
and Medoc tyjies. Only cash orders 
solicited. Charles \. Wetmore, Liver- 
more, Cal. 

FRESNO VINEYARD— E«tabli6hed;i880. 
Sweet and dry wines and brandies 
Fresno, Cal,. L. P. Drexler, 409 Cali- 
fornia St., San Francisco, Cal, 



44 



fyreifie WIJ^E /r|^D Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



mi MlKINfi RflXK AT TIIE OLD STAND, 

3i4 SPEAR ST., SAN KNANCISCO. 

Hobbs, Wall )^ Co., 

y.>inujarinrrr* nf F.rrry Vnrifty of 

BOXES. 

All kindm of Boxes on h^n6 and made to ordttr with 
promptness. Wine and Liquor Cases a Specialty. 

Redwood Cargoes Sawed To Order. 

Linda Vista Vineyard, 

MISSION SAS JOSH, VAl. 

Grape Cuttings 

C^lKTiM't Kiiuvif(iu>n, CjiU'riu't FraiH-. Si'iiiillim, Vcnlot. M»Tl(»t, 

13(><'l»ii, IVtit Syrah. Fnuikfii Rit-xliiif;. .lohannislM'rg 

KifHling. MoniU'iitH". Miiwiwh'l du Ilonlflaint', 

tar OR Ayr other variety wanted."^ 

FirKtH'liu*H Cuttinp* of any oC the ailiove for KiNitiiif^ or Grafts 
will be HUpplictl at %{\AX) pur tliouMaiuI on IxMird curs 

Address, C. C. MclVER, Mission San Jose, Cal. 

W. T. GARRATT & CO., 

Brass and Machine Works. 

- MANUKACTUHEBH — 

Special Steam and Hand rmiips foi' Wineries. 



Spraying Pumps 

AM) KITTINOH. 

Irrigation Pumps 

HOt'HE PfMI*H. 

Windmill Pumps, 

Dmt Wdirwpi, 

Engineer's Findings 




Wine Cocks 

And nil iitlier 

Brass Fittings 

FOR WINERISS. 

Rubber Hose. 

INPOKTBBH 

Iron Pipe and 

FJITIKOH. 



EGG ALBUMEN. 

GUARANTEED ABSOLUTELY PURE, 

CLARIFYING WINES. 

A. KLIPSTEIN, 

S2 CEDAR STREET, - - NEW YORK. 

Gas For Country Residences! 

DYKES' 



COR. FRCmOHT A NATOmA aTKeeTS, 8AN FRANCiaCO. 

CALIFORNIA FURNITURE COMPANY, 

Hur('i-.»<>iT to N. r. COLE A Cf). 

FURNITURE AND UPHOLSTERY 

Office Furniture, Etc. 

KUrr Kiiiif HuiMiiiL'. IIT |<> |-.>1 (Icurv Hln-il. Mnii FrBDrlm-ii, r«l. 

M.F.COON&CO. 

410 Sanaoma Straat, San Franelaoo. 




IIVIPROVED 



Antomalic tos .^lacliine Co. 

Jacob Schreiber,H.i;>'. J.G.Llebcrt.Jr. Sec. 
43-45 Stevenson St., - S. L. 



Success Achieved- 

Perfection Complete. 

Till' lalcBt and mcint \)erfeca AiitoinatU' Gae Macliiiic now in nse Is llic one iK-ini; 
niannfactiircd at -tiJ-tS HtevcnHon ulrcet bv llic Dykes' Improved Autoinalic Ga* 
Macbine ("oin|>anv. Ills |iarlieularly for llliiniiiiatin!; country rci-idencei-. It In 
cK|Kviall> adapted for Cburcben and I'ublic In!>titiitiiine, HotelK.Wineries and Cellars; 
tbe llfbtlf BrlKlit, Steady, PleaHanl, Soft and remarkably eootbiii^; to tbe eyes, and 
i; i» oidy alMiul balf tlie exiXMiKC of tbe coiiRumption of city ;;a8. No danjier wbat- 
ever need be feared from explof Ion wbicli if fo common in ilie use of coal oil lamps, 
from wbicli «o many beart-rendini; accidents liave Inren recorded in our daily news- 
pa|>erh. Tbe safety of tbese Ga^ .Macliines is alisidutety a^snred. In comlnsion we 
would say tbat no modern built bouse or ))ublic institution sliould be witbout these 
Gas MacliincK. as tbe litfbt is so far sui>erior to otber methods. Bend for CalaUigue, 
4:i and 4.'i Stevenson Stivct. San Francisco, Cal. 



— SrCCESSOltS TO— 

•WjOlxsonvillh: m:. & l. 

Have Constantiv on Hand a Full Supply 
of tbe FollowiuK Sizes of 



Co. 



2x2--4 Feet Long, 2x2--5 Feet Long, 

2x2--6 Feet Long. 

Which will be Hold at reajmnable rates. 



LOMA PRIETA LUMBER CO. 



Loma Prieta, 



Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 



TO :■: flMilUVHlS. 



Pacific Copper Worlds, 

h. \\ MiSKK, ri«)I'KlKr<»K. r>((."( Ml«iK).N St., S. F. 
Manufacturer of all IX-scrlptionr of 

And Especially of Brandy Apparatus. 

Maiiufnctuirr of tin.' — 

Newest Improved Continuous Still. Leads all others. 

Itrandy distilled In my Continuoi'k Htili, riMTlved this and last year, the 
IIK.IIKST market price. For i-itrity and riNK klavok none can e<|ual II. 

Ilcfcrs to tbe VaclHi' Winet'o., Han Jose; Kisen Vincvards, Fresno. Cal.; Ekki"'''' 
VIncyanI, Fresno. Cal.; Fresno Vinevanls. Frwno. Cal.;' Hill »V: Marshall, Lacuna, 
Sonoma counlv. Cal.; Co-O|>eiallve UlatillInK Co., St. Helena, Cal.. and Walden iV 
Sons, (levservll'le, Sonoma county, Cal. Cbamiw^ne and Soda Machines manufar- 
lnie<l. I'rlci-s as low as any. 

Fairbanks' Standar Scales, Trucks, Etc. 

FAIRBANKS & HUTCHINSON, 

.•{Hi-'UH MAKKirr .Sthkct. - - s.w FRA.\ci«tx), C.\i . 



f/c(Blfie WIJvJE /cJMD Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



C;C/^55ipi|^D IffDE/ op flDl/EI^JI5E/T)EffJS. 



CALIP'ORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES. 

Page. 

Beck, Pyhrr & Co 16 

Boyd, F. O. & Co 34 

California Wine Growers Union 34 

Crabb, H. W 34 

Carpy, C. & Co 34 

Chauclie, A. G 35 

DeTurk, 1 34 

Donnelly & Brannan 34 

Gundlacli, J. & Co new 

Haraszthy, Ai'pad & Co new 

Haber, F. A 30 

Harris, Kingston & Reynolds 35 

Holtiun, C. & Co ^ 32 

Kohler & Van Bergen 31 

Kohler & Frohling 36 

Kolb & Denhard 34 

Kuhls, Schwarke & Co 38 

Laclimau & Jacobi 36 

Lachman, S. & Co new 

Luyties Bros : 6 

Los Gatos & Saratoga Wine Co 36 

Melczer, Joseph & Co 36 

Napa Valley Wine Co 16 

Natonia Vincj'ard Co ' 32 

San Gabriel Wine Co 34 

St. Helena Wino Co 31 

DISTILLERS AND BROKERS. 

Belle of Bourbon Co 40 

California Distilling Co 36 

Davioss County Distilling Co 27 

Dillinger, S. & Sons 42 

Glenmore Distilling Co 27 

Halle, Max M 32 

Leading Distillers' Cards 42 

Levy, Jas. & Bro 46 

Mellwood Distillery Co 1 

Monarch, R 27 

Moore & Selliger 5 

Murphy, Ed. & Co 5 

Overholt, A & Co 43 

Pepper, Jas. E. & Co 6 

Shields, Wm. H 42 

Taylor, E. H. Jr. & Sons 32 

Thompson Distilling Co 43 

FRUIT BRANDY DISTILLERS. 

Mihalovich, Fletcher & Co 40 

Rheinstrom Bros 40 

Walden & Co 5 

West, Geo. & Son 3 

SAN FRANCISCO WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS. 

Cassin, P. J. & Co 38 

Hey, Grauerholz & Co 38 

Hencken & Schroder 38 

Hirschler & Co 22 

Hotaling, A. P. & Co 4 

Moore, Hunt & Co 4 

Martin, E. & Co 38 

Naber, Alfs & Brune 38 

Siebe Bros. & Plageniann 4 

Shea, Bocqueraz & Co 31 

Spruance, Stanley & Co 38 

Taylor, Thos. & Co 38 

Wichman & Lutgen 38 

Wilmerding & Co ■. 38 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CHAMPAGNES. 

American Champagne Co 35 

Chapman, W. B 28 

Finke's Widow, A 40 

Haraszthy, Arpsul & Co 36 

Lachman, S. & Co - 36 



Macondray &Co 34 

Meinecke, Chas. & Co ^ 28 

Werner, A. & Co 35 

Wolfl; Wm. &Co 16 

IMPORTERS. 

Chapman, W. B 28 

Macondray & Co 34 

Meinecke, Chas. & Co , 28 

Vignier, A uew 

Wolff, Wm. &Co 16 

SPECIAL BONDED WAREHOUSES. 

Bode & Haslett 6 

Overland Freight Transfer Co 6 

Sherman, J. D. W 6 

Sibley, Hiram & Co 34 

SYRUPS, CORDIALS, BITTERS, ETC. 

Blumenthal, M. & Co 40 

Dryden & Palmer — 

Henley Bros 45 

McMillan, R. G 31 

Naber, Alfs & Brune 36 

Rudkin, Wm. H 31 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Beck, Pyhn- & Co 46 

Bonest«ll & Co 45 

California Furniture Co 44 

Coon, M. F. &Co 44 

Easton, Eldridge & Co 23 

Electric Vapor Engine Co 6 

Fairbanks & Hutchinson 44 

Garratt, W. T. & Co 44 

Gall & Dunne 31 

Goodyear Rubber Co 45 

Golden Gate Woolen Mfg. Co 31 

Hobbs, WaU &Co 44 

Improved Automatic Gas Machine 44 

Jordan, Dr. & Co 45 

Klipstein, A 44 

Kohler & Chase 20 

London Assurance Corporation 31 

Loma Prieta Lumber Co 44 

Mclver, C. C 44 

Meinecke, Chas. &Co 40 

Movius, J. & Son 4 

O'Brien, James 31 

Occidental & Oriental S. S. Co 45 

Oceanic Steamship Co 45 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co 31 

Prominent California Vineyardists 31 

Pacific Saw Co 45 

Pierce & Co 49 

Rosenfeld's Sons, John 45 

Sandere & Co new 

Southern Pacific Co 45 

Steele, E. L. G. & Co 40 

lYuman & Hooker 45 

Tubbs' Cordage Co 31 

Wagner, L 44 

Waas, Henry 31 

Wood & Scott 2 



Established 1852. 

CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

WINE VAULTS. El. PINAL, STOCKTON, OAL, 

80KOMA Wink and Brandy Co., - No. 1 Fuont Stekkt, Nkw Yobk. 



j^lfie WINE .AJ^P Sflt^lT K.EVIEW. 




A. PnTOTALING & CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 



impoitTCRS OF 



WINES AHD mouoRs. 

OLD BOURBON AND RYE WHISKIES. 

429 to 437 Jackson Stre'it, - - San Francisco, Cal. 



JOIIX I). 8IEBE. 



""J.'F. I'l.AliF.MANN'. 



F. C. SlEliK 




SiEBE Bnos. & PliflGEmflni^, 

WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

01. Rosedale Boiirlion & Rye Whiskies 



AND THE 



Celebrated Belle of Bourbon. 

Southeast Cor. Sacramento and Sansome St».. - - - - " - -_ S an Francisco, Cal. 



Important por Clline Prodaeet^s. 

SMCCHKRINE. 

300 TIMES SWEETER THAN SUGAR. 

I An unsurpaased iugredieut for wines; au excellent corrigenl of any nnpleasant taste, entirely innocuous. 

Saccliariuo has very vtvluable anti-fennentativc and antiseptic properties. An addition to an alcoholic solution of 0.005 per 
cent Bocchariuc etope the fermentation entirely, also the formation of mould and vinegar acid. Testimonials by authorities and 
ainy ftirtlier infonqation \<U1 l>o cheerfully furnished by applying to 

J. MOVIUS & SON, Successors to Lutz & Movius, 



Sole Licensees for the United States of America, 



79 MURRAY STREET. NEW YORK. 




JESSE PORE WHISKIES, 

OmeOT FROM 

We have full}/ Getahlialiod iho roputation of these whiskies on the 
I'acifiG Coast, and we guarantee them as represented 

STRICTLY PURE. 

■.. Ii .1 kIvcii n trial llii'> i> viiK f ,r I Ir.'iniicl viit. Fur miU- In i]iiiiiillllfh to kutt at 

LOUISVILLE OR SAN FRANCISCO BY 

MOORE, HUNT & CO., 

•our Asrwrs fMCiFic coast, 
404 FRONT ST., - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



f^veifie wi|^E /rj^D sfif^ir i^eview. 



5 



^00^B & SEIililGEf?, 




B^C/T)0f/7 apd /^S50I^ are distilled 
from finest of (^raip apd purest of u/ater 
upoi? tl?e flapd /Hade Sour /T)asl? pro- 
cess, ^ael; apd euery barrel ^uarapti^i^d 
to be 5tri(;tly pure apd free from ai>y /T)U5t. 



' ■'■y*"v* 





The NUTWOOD is a s^Wc/Zy old fashioned "Fire Copper" Sweet Mash Wlmliij, in 
the distillation of which we guarantee the usg of 40 per cent small grain, giving to 
the Wiiiski/ a heamj hodij and excellent flavor, wliicii, for . cornpoiinding purposes, is , 
unexcelled hi Jieiitackj/, 



The BELMONT, ASTOR and NUTWOOD Whiskies are stored in the latest 
improved bonded warehouses, with patent raclcs, metal roof, iron shutters and doors. 
Giving our personal attention to the safe handling and care of these goods, with 
every advantage and facility for shipping the same, we can guarantee full satisfac- 
tion in every particular to the trade. Soliciting your favors, we remain, 

Very respectfully, MOORE & SELLIGER. 





SECOND DISTRICT, NEW YORK. 



The only air-tight Special Bonded Warehouse in the world. Fire proof with iron roof 
and shutters and glass windows. Heated by hot-air engines, giving an even tem- 
perature the year around, thus insuring rapid development and high proof, and 
yielding the best possible results at the end of the bonding period. Cooperage 
cared for. No excessive outage. Storage and insurance the lowest. Freights 
advanced, and your business carefully attended to. Loans negotiated and sales 
ade for cash when requested. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND SHIPMENTS SOLICITED. 



NO. 39 WATER STREET, NEW YORK. 




ED. MURPHY & CO., 



■DISTILLERS OF- 



"Tbe Belle of flndersoDGoaDty" 

Hand-Made Sour Mash Whisky. 

Pure Fire Copper Whisky, made from the lest of Grain and Cold Lime Stone 

Spring Water in the Old-Fashioned Way hy Mashing in Small Tats, and 

yeasting lack pure sour mash. Whisky unbonded by us and 

shipped F. 0. B. on boats free of charge 

Headquarters, Lawrenceburg, Ky. Post Office, Murphy, Ky. 



fyteifie WIJ^E JkfiO S flf^lT f^EVIEW. 



OLD "PEPPER" WHISKY 

Di*ltU«d only by JtUk K. njtprr 41 (la., LpxIdkIoii, K^.. undrr the Munc (ormuU 
for moiT thAn lOO pearm, !• (be Pttrtml and Itfml In Ihr World. "fV}>}M>r" 
H'hlak^ U an <i|fi-ia*lil»nr>l whtoky. miMir In the old I line iray (rum it fVirm- 
nlm OMd more than lOO ftearw 6y Ihrre grnrratlona of the l*<-|>|><>r fanill> 
II l» wade from melcdrtl ryf, harlfft and rorn. The material !• nia«li<-(l liy 
hand, <mm boabel al a timr. in unall tuba, nearly une lliounaml of whirh arc nui- 
•iMllly i«i|b1i«iI fur the |<ur|><>»e. Nu yeu>t I* employed to •:fuii.- an unnatural ti-r 
iMnlatlon or Urirr yield, and we alnicle wmI double tkrouKh rnpprr hIIIIh arrr 
mpnt Jlrtm. All tl>e water uacd U from llie crlchratrd " H'llMin Spring" on our 
p r wi h w . whicli ia the lancnt natural mpring of pure lliufHttmr trairr In 
cwUrtt Kcutarky. Oar r««|irra«;e In tlic ImvI and of our own manufarlun'. IVr(r<-t 
atoracc wmrebooM*. Our Mu Jamu E. J*KrrEit l< the only one of liU name who 
baa been enKaced in the DlalllltoK bualnna in Kentucliy for over twenty yean>, and 
therefore any whiak) oSered tu lb« trade a« (genuine "i^fpper" whUky i» fraud- 
ulent unlcM dteti:i«d by m. 

JA.S. E. PEPPER * CO. 





Model Mammoth Wine Cellars 

Under Approach of Brooklyn Bridge, Block C. & G. 

KNTHANCea WILUMM AMD WOSf aTREBTS. 

BORAGE WAREHOUSE AND COMMISSION DEPARTMENT, 

<}gice Entranct; H'Ullam St., In lllwk £L 



Correapondence Solicited. 



RiaTIIOLD Ptiikk. 
Fklix I'tiibb. 




Choice California 

100 to 108 O'FARRELL STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal. 




AnnRKM. LuylleH tlmthem. Itrttnklvi Itrltloe, \ew York. 

AtMJI.PIl Bk<k 




Wines & Brandies 

Silver Medal Awarded at 
FjPlr.is exfosixion, isae. 



Incorporated 



BODE & HASLETT, 



June 12, '90. 



-F>Tt(Dip:EtTBrra-R3 



Special Bonded Warehouse, No. 1, First District. 

flpeelal farllltlc* for the Htnraec of Ora|K.- and Fruit Brandy. Lowect Raten of Storage and TiiHurance. Also Proprietors of the Oreenwicll 
Doric riillFcl Hlatos Kondt-fl Wart'liouKoi', and llic Hatlcry Street Free Warehouses for General Stora);c. 

The Perfected "Safety" 

ELECTRIC VAPOR ENGINE, 

The Most Powerful and Economical Motor in the World 

Always Ready. No BolUr. No Firo. No Smoke. No Ashea. No Engineer. 

No License. No Danger. 




Vi>e» City Oa* and Katural f>'a«, or \rlll make IIm oirn Vapor, which In Ignited 
aulomatlrally by a small dry electric battery. 

OUR WINE PLANT 

MdiiiitiKl oil ii siiiiill liaiid truck, witli a |K>w(>rriil 
rotjiry lironzc pump, will foi-fc from 500 t<>.'?(KK>pil- 
loiiH |K'f lioiir,iiii(l iiscli'HM tliaii one oalloii ofptMilino 
ill t»'ii hoiin* run; gUHoliiie cobIb »fVoiitc'C'ii criitM jht 
gtillon. 

Wf iilw) liiiild Htationary Vapor Knjjiiu>« from 
J to 20 liort«> |M)w<'r. Kciid for olow' cHtiiiiato. 

QlQctvio T^a'poT Qnginc ^o., 

Office, 218 California St., San Franclseo. 

Work*, iill and ^>i:i Main Strait 





VOL. XXVI, NO. 2. SAN FRANCISCO, 

Issued Semi- Monthly. 

E. 31. WOOD & CO., - - - PROPRIETORS. 

WINFIELD SCOTT R. M. WOOD. 

The PACIFIC WINE AND SPIRIT REVIEn Is the only paper of 
its c/«.s.s Went of Chicago. It circulates among the wine makers and 
brandy distillers of California; the wlmlesale wine and spirit trade 
of the I'aclfic Coast, and tlie Importers, distillers and Jobbers of the 
Eastern States. 

Sabsciiption pur year— hi advance, yostage paid: 

For the United States, Mexico and Canada t3 00 

F(ir Europijan countries 8 75 

Single copies 29 

Entered at the Sau Francitco Post Offlce as second-class matter. 

PrXTSBURGH AGENT, 

R. RAPHAEL, 190 Wylie Ave, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Sole Ageut for Pennsylvania and North-western New York. 



FEBRUARY 14, 1891. 



$3.00 PER YEAR 



CINCINNATI AND KENTUCKY AGENT, 
WM. H. SHIELDS, No. 6 West Third Street, Cincinnati, O. 



THE MA-RKET. 



/California wines— The market for dry wines remains 
^^ unchanged. Few transactions are reported owing to the 
fact that prices quoted by buyers are not at all satisfactory to 
producers and those who can do so prefer to hold their stocks in 
the hope of an advance in values with the coming of spring. 

The sweet wine market has been very much rattled on ac- 
count of the alarming rulings of the Internal Revenue Depart- 
ment, and prices can not be expected to reach a settled condition 
until it has been decided whether or not the revenue tax must be 
paid ou brandy used in fortifying a large quantity of the '90 
sweet wines, which have been assessed and await the final action 
of the government wliich will fix their values. 

/California brandy— The brandy market is in a much 
^^ better condition and so active has been the demand of the 
distributors that there are at this early season practically no 90*8 
in first hands. They are ruling strong at fifty cents and have a 
fine future. The 89's are not plentiful and are quoted at 
sixty to sixty-five cents. On account of the reduced product of 
90's an advance all along the Ime may be confidently expected. 
At present the 91 's are too young to cut auy figure in the 
market. 

*ifj>ENTUCKY WHISKIES— The market is decidedly dull 
^ ^ owing to the fact that the weather is not propitious and 
jobbers are holding back orders to see what the rain clerk will 
do. The demand for ryes is also slack and local trade on whiskies 
is quiet in sympathy with all lines of business and in improve- 
ment need be looked for at'present. 



Louisville ^Q-pavtrnQnt, 

[spe:5Ial correspondence.] 

^TTiie whisky market is not in a very satisfactory condition at 
Ji the present writing and there is no immediate prospect of a 
change for the better. The trouble lies in the fact that the 
distillers and the trade are again haunted with the fear of over- 
production. Th3 situation is certainly serious and calls for 
prompt action on the part of the distillers, but whether they see 
their danger in time to guard against it, remains to be seen. 
Thus far the trade have displayed their good judgement by 
refusing to encourage producers to turn out a big '91 product 
by not contracting for goods to be made. If they will stick t3 
this position and refuse to buy during the " distilling season, the 
distillers will perforce adopt a conservative policy. If not, the 
cloud of depression will again settle down upon the entire trade. 
It would seem that the recent history of the business should have 
taught the producers to avoid over-production as they would 
a pestilence, but the unprecedented boom of last year apparently 
blotted out their recollection of past experiences. 

There are several of our foremost distillers, however, who 
recognize the gravity of the situation and are doing all in their 
power to prevent impending disaster. Among these are the 
Mellwood Distillery Company, R. Monarch, Moore & Selliger, 
E. H. Taylor Jr. & Sons, The J. M. Atherton Co., and others too 
numerous to mention, all of whom will greatly reduce their in- 
tended product for 1891. They are setting a good example for 
their competitors, and ought to have a good effect. In this 
connection I would state that an attempt is being made to get 
the distillers of Kentucky together for the purpose of arriving at 
a general understanding regarding this seasons production and 
if possible to materially shorten the distilling period. If this 
can be accomplished, a great danger will have been averted. 

Trade is quiet and is confined practically to the actual needs 
of retailers. The '89's are not being unbonded as fast as could 
ba desired and the value of '90's is hanging in the balance, 
pending the output of '91 's and holders of the former age are 
naturally in a very anxious frame of mind. 

Travelers in the whisky trade have been few and far between 
They are probably remaining at home till the clouds roll by. 



NEW ADVERTISEMENTS. 



The attention of the trade is directed to the following new 
advertisements which appear in this issue on our "new advertis- 
ing pages" and are not classified in the index: 

S. Lachman & Co. wine merchants, (enlarged.) 

J. Gundlaeh & Co. wine merehants, (enlarged.) 

F. A . Haber, wine merchant, (enlarged.) 

Arpad Hara.^zthy & Co., wine merchants, (enlarged.) 

A. Vignier, importer and wine dealer. 

Sanders & Co, eopper-smitkw, ' 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co. 

Henley Bros., Bitters, (changed.) 



PAeipie WIJ^E Jk^Q Sfll^lT t^EVIEW. 



TO eOMTNAISSIO/NEK MASO/M. 

7V> //<»n. JoAw H'. MoMu. CfmrnuwioHrr of Intrrttal Revrnur: — 
You havo up to tli«> |m<Hent wwmmi l»c«*'n a i-onMiMtt-iit frii'ml «f 
tJi«> vititniltunil intcnirt «if thin Stat**, but hiih-*' the HWtvt 
wiiif law Wfiit into ••fKn-t your (-(Hirm' Iium Ihimi hucIi im to iiii- 
p«<th« oiiil iiit«Tf«'n' with cv«>ry inaktT of Hwwt wine. Thf 
ntniloli""** wl'ich you have mn-n lit to foriiuilatc to jtoveni the 
uw> or Itnindy for fortilioition fWvfroni tux.aresuehiwtounui'WH- 
Harily luiiiijMT mill illHf-ouragt' every hfjitiuiat*- pHMhut-r. 

We do not think that you have intentionally inijKJWHl the 
present hanlnhipt* upon the wine nuikeTH, but rather Ix-lieve that 
vou have drawn your idiiis fiom ciLHtern wine niakinn or from 
lH'r\erte«l Ktatemi'UtH nm<l<' 1>\ < a>t. m ntakerx. You arc not fa- 
miliar with the Hituation in t'alifornia, hut it w to Ik> miid for tin- 
intelli)^'ui-«> and fainiexM of your milM>rdinate8 in thiw Ktate, from 
the ColU-ctorH ilown. tliat eaeh and all have done what they 
oouhl to net you ri^ht on t)u> vital |H)intH at is^ue. 

In the firxt plaee we do not tliink. that you are re«|>onHihle 
for nmkini; the fiMtlixh xtatenuMit that no numt can leptiniately 
i-«)ntaiu over twenty-six and one-half jM'r eent of Ku>r<»r. We 
Khould like next Hea»*on to unilertake to wud you all the gniiK's 
you want which will nhow a »till richer muHt when expresHed. 
You muHt know that heretofori' but little att«'ntion han InH'n given 
to the couditiouK Hurroundin^; swwt wine niakin>j. by the Viti- 
cultunil C'onunittw of the State University. AU their work 
pmrtically has U-en <U'vote<l to dry winw for making; which rich 
niustM are not (Imrttl. If you fall back on analyses of musts in 
France or (Jennany. reniemlier that the climatic conditions 
arf wholly <li««iniilar to ours. They csmnot get the sugar con- 
tents which we can. Nature has denie<l it. If j'ou think their 
analvw-s of wini* prove anything we deny it. How do you know 
that those same dry wint-s have not In-en fortiliinl ? 

Se<-ond: Wc do not think that it was you who threw dis- 
cr«Mlit on the statements of Fn»fessor llilgjjrd of the State I'niver- 
sity and I'rofcssor Kising the State Analyst iis to the sugar 
contents of niustH. That act was one wholly unworthy of you and 
your station. The statements of either is worth a down opin- 
ions of non-<'Xi>erts in Washington. Meswrs. Kising and Hil- 
gartl stand high in their killings and to seek to throw a cloud 
directly or in«lirectly on what they say is neither wise nor crtnlit- 
ablc. Neither gentleman is an intereste<l party in the matter 
and de|>end ujion it they are familiar with what thej' say. 

Thinl: We w<mld call your attention to the fact that in 
making sweet wine abroad, and in making such dry wines a^ the 
Y«|uem for instanc.-. dcsicciition before crushing the gr.ijies is 
usually pra<;ti<re<l. N«> pnu-tice in wine making or handling is 
more legitimate and in making s«>nut wines, it is almolutely indis- 
|H'usable. Are you se<'king to reform the time honore<l. uiH-cssary 
and honorable pra<ii<'es of the old world and to establish a new 
scho«il of wine makers in California, simply lK><%iuse sonu' one in 
your I><-|>artm"nt thinks graiK" must should not run over twenty- 
Mix and one half jK-r cent of sugar? Such a {K)flition is simply 
untenable. 

Fourth: We would lieg to remind you that the Sweet Wine 
Bill was itusseil to aid the wine nuikers and not to hamper them. 
It was not di-sigiunl to enable some one in your ofli<T to display 
his unfaniiliarity with our wine making by ruling ()u< your regu- 
lations imply) that when gm|M's cost twelve dollars a ton, it is 
profitable to buy supir at one hundre<l dollars jK'r ton to u«ld for 
sweetening purisw** when we <«n g«'t all the sugar we want in 
Natun-s Ijilsinitory. 

Fifth: We think that a trip to California in the vintage 
neaiton would prove plcjisint and instnictive to you, and a (JcmI- 
wnd to thi- wine men. It would enable you to «•«« wine made 
without iwlding sugar or wat4 r t.> must, a pnwticv which you have 
not observed in New York, Oi i.. ami elsewhere, and it would 
c<'rtainly<-learupi»ome<»ther f.. -you have on our industry. 

We should fare U-tter we knou ,,u were U-tter inlormed. 



Sixth. W«< would n-siiectfuny propose in conclusion that 
you jmv more attention to the suggi-stions and recommendations 
of your sulK)nlinates here, who we might suggest, arc far lH'tt«r 
pr.-iMir.-<l to give you n-liable information on the facts than any 

, ,„w in Washington. Your sulK>rdinates here are faithful, 

7..alous gcntl.iuen and ai-e woHliy of tlu' fii-st hearing as between 
them and y«>ur present Washington assistants. 



A CHAMPAG/NE STEAL. 



/^TTlie champagne importers and consumers of two cities are 
J^ just now in the clutches of a jury of highway robln-rs under 
the guisi> of hotel and rest^iurant keepers who have found a new- 
way to cinch the public and at the siune time injure the busineas of 
the houses handling foreign champagnes. Under "the New Tariff' 
Bill and the Customs Administration Bill the duty on these 
wines wa* practically raise*! $1.50 pt^r ciise. The opportunity 
has been st^iztnl by the hotel men to put up the prica from 84.00 
to 84.50 i)er bottle on the strength of the "McKiuley Bill" being 
in force. This amounts to a raise in retail price of 8<).00 per 
case, which is in plain terms a steal and should not be tolerated. 
The retailers are getting $.'J4.(K) per case for a wine which costs 
them $.*}'2.00 U«s a lil)eral discount. In other words they want 
to encourage the trade by comi>elling their patrons to pay an 
outrageous and unrea.Honable price for an article which could and 
should be sold at a lower figure. 

In New Y'ork 83.50 is the standard bottle price for 
champiigne at the highest class restaurants. Here a man is 
victimized to the extent of 84.50 or 85.(M) a bottle. Frwiuent 
attempts to raise prices in New Y'^ork have been promptly met 
and defeate<l by the patrons of the l>etter restaurants. We in 
California bear i>etty swindles with more e<iuanimnit}'. 

We suggest to the champagne importers that they are in a 
position to stop this infamous piece of robbery and at the same 
time greatly popularize their wines, by combining and setting 
down on the retailers ring. There is no doubt but what sjvlcs 
would largely increase were the retailer's prices curtaiknl to 
something within reason and justice. The champagne business 
is practically in the hands of six or eight houses and they avn 
put a check rein on imposition if they will get together and have 
a fifteen minutes talk over the matter. 

Such action is to the advantjvge of all and can Ije endorsed 
by all. It is only recently that the New Y'ork importers 
promptly nipi)ed a projected retail advance in the bud by 
merely threatening to cease selling to those who wanted to plead 
'•McKinley Bill" as an excuse for gauging the public. Let the 
public. Let the importing houses here act similarly and they 
will greatly increase their rates and at the same time conciliate 
an ugly though not very o^Hiu feeriug of resentment among 
consumers. 

O/NE O/N THE "BCILLETI/N." 



" In recording the visit of Mr. Tolw Hurt to this market 
recently, the Pacific Wink and Simkit Rhvikw cjists a rellcction 
on the size of Mr. Hurt's auricular organs by remarking that 
'Big. fat Lobe Hurt was here."" — Vinrinituii Correxpomh m; ]]'!,„<• 
atul Spirit Jdilliiin. 

This is one on our proof reader we will admit, i)ut how is 
this for the Jlulletln coming from an alhrged wirrespondciit at 
Santa Rosa: 

'• Walden & Co.. of Geyserviile. have nmmifactured 4(K),0(K) 
gallons of brandy this season." — JliiUttitk, January d<l. 

We don't know who the "corn«si)ondent'' of the liulletin isati 
Santa R<ma, but we do know that Mi>ssi-s. Walden are alnait 
3(K).(MK) gallons short of the amount stattnl. though they are 
among the for(>most brandy distillers of the world. Are we even 
friend Wttshburne? 



PAeifie WIJNE ANE) Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



9 



SWEET WI/NE MAKE-RS. 

The Serious Trouble They Have Been Having and its 

Causes. 



Tlio piist three weeks have been marked by unusual commo- 
tion ivmong tlie sweet wine makers in c()nse<iuence of a ruling by 
Commissioner Mason, arising out of a misunderstanding on his 
part of the conditions under which sweet wines are made. 

The trouble began by his ordering the stamps taken off from 
many packages of sweet wiues in the first and fourth districts, 
in cases where the sugar and alcoholic perc3ntago of the wine 
before fortification showed that there had originally been more 
than tweney-six and one-half per cent, of sugar in the must before 
fermentation was begun. His niling was, no doubt, actuated by 
his experience in the east where it is absolutely out of the ques- 
tion to get as high a percentagr of sugar in the must as it is 
here. 

Commissioner Mason does not S33ni to have known this. 
His ruling came unexpectedly and though known by the Internal 
Revenue CoUec^tors to be iuirea:-5o:iablo and unjust, they had to 
enforce it. The result was that many wine makers were assessed 
for the brandy used in fortifisation, instead of being seized as 
they should have baen. The ass3:«tment plan operated better to 
the purposes of the Revenue Department, and was a stinging 
blow at the wine makers who could ill afford to pay up without 
a legal chance for their lives. This was the hardest part of the 
whole matter, and it was made doubly severe by the fact that 
the parties seized were as absolutely guiltless of any fi-aud or 
fraudulent intent as was Commissioner Mason. 

Immediately on the enforcement of this ruling there was a 
meeting of the sweet wine men and after much discussion the 
following telegrams were agreed upon and seut on to Washington: 

San Fkancisco January 23, 1891. 
Hon. John W. 3Iason, Washington, D. C: — From recent decisions 
of your department we infer that you are not fully informed re- 
garding the saccharine strength of grapes used in sweet wine in 
Califoania and would urge you to suspend action in such cases 
until facts can be presented. It can be proved to your satisfiic- 
tion that our gi-apes readily attain a saccharine strength of twen- 
ty-live to thirty-five per cent. I. De Turk. 

San Fkancisco, January, 23, 1891. 

Leland Stanford, Joseph McKenna and California Delegation: — 
Sweet wines fortified under the new law are being detained by 
the Internal Revenue Department. The result will be disas- 
trous to every wine maker in California unless action is suspend- 
ed. Commissioner Mason evidently does not understand the 
saccharine strength of our grapes. Please urge him to suspend 
action until wine makei's can be heard. It will be proved to his 
satisfaction that grapes in our sweet wine districts obtain from 
tweuty-five to thirty-five per cent of sugar. Please advise us of 
j'our actions. 

I. De Turk. C. K. Kerry. 

Geo. Wkst. H. W. Crabb. 

J. De Barth Shorb. Juan Gallegos. 

E. B. Rogers. C. A. Wetmori^ 

Prof. Hilgard of the State University also sent the Commis- 
sioner a telegram to the same effect and Professor Rising sent a 
dispatch to C. A. Ci-ampton the Government Chemist reading as 
follows: 

San Francisco, January 23, 1891. 

C. A. Crampton, Washington D. C: — Recent decisions of the 
Department affect many wine makers in this state veries serious- 
ly. I can assure you from personal knowledge that the sugar 
in gFape's juice often varys from twenty-five to thirty-five per 
cent. This can be substantiated by abundant evidence. 

W. B. Rising, State Analyst. 

The replies that were received in response to these tele- 
grams were as follows: 

Washington, January 24th, 1891 

J. De Barth Shorb, San Francisco, CaL: — The Commissioner 
will hear you. See letter to the President of the Viticultural 
Commission. J. McKenna. 



Washington, January 24th, 1891. 
/. DeTurk aiul others, San Francisco, Cat.: — Your telegram re- 
ceived. I have reriuested Commissioner Mason to grant your 
retiuest. Leland Stanford. 

President De Turk of the Commission osi^ received a re- 
ply from Commissioner Eason, and the data asked for by that^ 
official is being prepared. Commissioner Mason's request was 
as follows: 

Washington, D. C, January 24th, 1891. 

/. De Turk, Pre.ndeut Viticultural Commissioners: — Furnish de- 
tailed statement of all published analys&s of pure grape juice un- 
fermented containing twenty-six and one-half per cent grape sug- 
ar and upwards; not the total solids or concentrated must. Send 
statement of method of sugar determination. 

John W. Mason, Commissioner. 

But of still great3r importance as far as practical results go. 
were the dispatches which passed between Collector Sears and 
the Commissioner, as through tjiem the sweet wine detained in 
the wineries was set free. After others had taken action Collect- 
or Sears camj to the point with the following proposal: 

San Francisco, January 26th, 1891. 

Commissioner of Internal Revenue, Washington, D. C: — In view 
of hardships to sweet wine makers, caused by the detention of 
large quantities of wine, preventing sales and thus causing possi- 
ble financial failures, I recommend that a quart sample of each 
cask of wine be taken in presence of the sweet wine maker, Dep-. 
uty Collecton and the ganger. The samples to be a true and 
agreed upon average of the winein such cask. The bottles to 
be sealed and labelled, numbered and signed by the sweet wine 
maker, Deputy and Ganger. When samples have been taken 
the labels signed and attached, then the order for detention to 
be revoked and the wine released to owners for sale or removal. 
The samples to be held as evidence in all questions arising. It 
would seem that the government is thus fully protected, while 
thewine makers are saved from financial complications, if not 
insolvency. Can this be granted? AV. H. Sears, Collector. 

To this dispatch came the subjoined answer from Commis 
sioner Mason which temporarilly relieved all the wine makers of 
their troubles. 

Washington, D. C, January 27th, 1891. 

W. H. Sears, Collector, San Francisco CaL: — Plan suggested in 
your telegi-am may be followed, except in cases where parties 
are guilty of fraud. John W. Mason, Commissioner. 



A HIGH eOMP LI ME/NT. 



Chicago February 4, 1891. 

Publishers Pacific Wine and Spirit Review, San Francisco, Cat., - 
Gentlemen: We are pleased to hand you herewith our latest 
list of offerings of California wines for the ensuing season. It 
will give you an idea of our method of introducing California's- 
best wines. 

In this connection we desire to express our favorable opinion 
of your issue of January 26th. In general appearance and in- 
formation contained, it excels any other paper in the trade, at 
least in our ehtimation. The information contained in reference 
to the wines, expressing the views of standard authorities should 
be profitably and attentively perused by the trade throughout 
the East, tending as the information does to stimulate increased 
efforts in behalf of one of California's grandest industries. 

Assuring you of our cordial support in your efforts to bring 
California's wines properly before the public, we are, 

Yours trifly, 

Delafield, McGovern & Co. 



These goods, which we are selling largely to wine and cham- 
pagne manufacturers throughout the countiy, are perfectly Iree 
from the smallest speck of dirt or dust, and are beautifully trans- 
parent. They are not like the sugary stuff" sometimes sold a« 
rock candy. 

In ten barrel lots, we sell the crystals at a slight advance on 
the cost of refined sugar. Samples on application. 

19 Hudson Street New York 



10 



fiew pduertiscm^pts Opiy Op 51715 pa^^. 



'I ' M l <=t S1P.A.OE3 I^ESEK/'^TEX) IPOK/ 

ARPAD HARASZTHV & CO. 



FJWDUCKJl.S (IF 



CHAMPAGNE ECLIPSE, 



■AND DKAI.EHH IN- 



California l^ines and "^randies. 

Proprietors of 

ORLEANS VINEYARD. 

530 Washington Street - - - - San Francisco, Cat. 

F. K. HKBBR, 

122 SANSOME STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Wine & Spirit tanioii irciiaiit 




SOJ-e AQENT FOR THE INQLENOOK yiNEYARO, RUTHERFORD, NAPA CO., CAl.. 



Also Makes a Specialty of Handling Only the Choicest 

Vintages of Dry and Sweet Wines 

Produced in California. 

Correspondence Solicited from Producers as well as Dealers Throughout the Entire United States. 



IMPORTANT TO DISTILLEHS AND WINE MAKEIIS. 




TbU cut reprenenU our Utett /m- 
prot^ed t^tntlnuouM Stilt wliicli ku 
"tfii iwrfiHied »fliT )i«nt of cxiivrimciito 
and larK<- rxiwiiKv. 

Thin Still hati the advantage 
over all otttrm, u il Ik wonomlckl, 
euil)' (i|M!ralid and wparalw tlii' aldv^ 
liyde and iitlier infviinr llil^ and mftkiv c 
pure and IiIkIi cla** hrand.v.atid rvtlucfM 
titr nmt fully ninety per rent In 
latior and (ufl. II miuircK viT)- lillli- or 
nnwaleraml ntlllzeaall lieat lierelofurv 
waalnl 

We refer to Gko. \V«kt A Son, Htock- 
l4>n; Juim Wiikklkh, Hi. Helena. 



I kUL iim or "nrrni work dohi at short notice. 

SANDERS &L CO. 



421 AliD 418 Miaalo* St.. 



Hah PKANciauo, Cal. 




NATIONAL 

GVSH fiEGISTEB 

PieFce&Go. 



Geuci'al Western Agents. 



li'M.M 12, rnRoNicLit Brii.iiiN.i, H. F 
071 Broadway, Oakland, Oal 



fleu; /^du^rtisemeF)ts Oi>ly O9 Jl^is pa^e. 



11 



DON'T BVY A riANO, ORGAN OR ANY OTHER MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 
without first writinj; tu or visiting <Ki)hler & CliaCe, lOU Market Street, San 
FrancisTO, the largest and oldest dealers in this line on the coast. They liavc all 
grades of instruments and sell very close (or cash or on installments. Tins is an 
old reliable firm that has a gilt edge reputation made by honest dealing, and always 
iiuaranieeiug satisfaction. 



Tlie Most Delicious Clmmpagnd of the Age. 



-I-*-)- 



Vi^llou; Isabel, 
Dry. 




-l-:t-H 



U/I?ite labial, 



j^. "^ria-nsriEi^ 



4:294-31 Battery Street 



[Sole Agent for tlie Pacific Coast.] 

San Francisco, Cal. 



•DICK MA/M-DLESAUM SKIPS. 



Try Dr. Henley's Specialties 

TAMARACK i I. X. L BITTERS. 



USE C?P(enLEY'S ^ 

FOR DYSP£PSIA AND 
/NDlG£STION 



Depot and Laboratory, 23 Montgomery Ave., S. F. 




As the Review goes to press it is announced that Raoul 
Mandlebaum, of the firm of Mandlebaum & Sons, has aljsconded 
to Australia leaving his house involved to the extent of 8104,0(X). 
His downfall is attributed to women and a generally fast life. 
Particulars of the firm's financial condition are not now obtain- 
able. 



A FI/SE PAPE-R. 



The holiday number of the Louisville Bulletin is a book of 
which Editor Washbume may well feel proud. It is a handsome 
publication of one-hundred-aiid-six pages printed in excellent 
style and is good evidence of what can be accomplished by energy 
and business ability coupled with the well-known enterprise and 
liberality of Kentucky's distillers. We understand that Mr. 
Washbume proposes to devot« his whole time and talents to the 
Bulletin in the future and we can only wish him all possible good 
fortune and many repetitions of his latest success. 



THE LARGEST COMPANY WEST OF NEW YOllK. 



fllESffi 



OSURMCE 




COMPMY 



^ OF CALIFORNIA. (^ ^:g^ 



D. J. Staples, Pres. Wm. J. Button, Vice-Pre.-!. B. Faymonville, Sc,-'y. 

Geo. H. Tyson, Ass't Sjc'y. J. B. Lkviso.n, Marine Soj'y. 

HOIUB OFFICE, 401-403 CALIFORNIA STREET, 8. F. 



S. LACHMAN & GO. 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN- 



QalifoTnia X^'iTLes and ^vandios. 



Old and Well Matured Wines a Specialty. 



LARGEST SHERRY PRODUCERS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

Sfl/V FRANCISCO: NEW YORK: 

453-465 Brannan Street. ^1-^H"*~Kj-1<? 22, 24, 26 Elm Street. 



This Space l^eset'Ved pot? 

J, GUNDLACH & CO, 



DEALERS IN- 



California Wines and Brandies. 



Cor. Second and Market Streets 



San Francisco, Cal. 



12 



fyteifie wi/^e ;ficj^D sfiF^u i^eview. 



^Todo JYotcs, 



Th^ Natonui Vln««yaH Co. u< Hhippini; conHiilfrublewim* aiitl 
hramly <>f liitt* nmi itx giMidi* on* n>|Miri<-4i to U* tfiviii); cxirllt-iit 
mtiafiMiinii 

Wiu. \N oiti liitM gnnp on n fljriog trip to Now'York mitl muy 
mil lU'niHH to Kur<i|N* iM-fort- liin return. Sliouhl h<* conchule nut 
to.cmw tht< trtifi |m>ii(I he will lie lionic (iuriii|{ the wis-k. 

Moorp, Hunt & Vo., have rr«vivi<d unf>tlu>r lot of ".I)>t«)e 
Moore" around tin* Horn. Tlivflv** niontliH of (■ontinuouH motion 
on tii(> watt-r iin|MirtH u Immujii**! un«l flavor to whiHky that can Im- 
gained in no other way. 

Alfn-*! (in-»'nflmuin & Co. have necnrcd the C<«u«t agency of 
tlie Nehnittka Dixtilliii); (V>.. an indciM-nilcnt iiiHtitiition which hiu* 
oonie into thii« Held for the |>ur}MitH> of coinpt*ting with the TniHt 
for the trade in HpiritM and alcohol. 

There are 400.00<» gallons of hrnnd}- in Ixind at S<»nator 
AtanfortlV Vina Vineyard. Home of it w coming (»ut of Ixmcl now 
and Standford hnindy wilt no doubt l>e iiiKtn the market in n 
short, time. We prtHlict for it a ver>- succetiHful eutre into tnulc 
aocietv. ' 



Becretary Riet^rly of the Union DiHtillerj- Co., Cincinnati, 
announces the introduction of a new l.rand to the tnide. It is to 
lie known itn " Tii)pe<«n<H'," and in a fire copjM'r whisky with a 
large |MTi*entjifrt> of xmull grain in the mash. We l)CHp(^ak a 
liright future for the new candidate for public favor. 

IlarriH, Kingxton & Reynold8 have Huccocded in Kulwtantiallj- 
eatabliHhing themttelveH as «»ter»>rH to the tnwle only. Their 
winet« and branditw rej»ri'«ent the l»eHt prtKluctH of Napa county 
and arc a cre«lit to that section. The firm report busiiu^sa little 
quiet at preticnt, but say they have no cauac for complaint. 

Superintendent Roark, bi Ed. Murphy & Co., informs'us that 
their distillery is running smoothly and that they are making a 
good <T«)p and fine (piality of the '• lit'Ur of Anderson County" 
Hour maah. We know that anything in the shape of whisky 
tunie«l out by Ed. Murphy & Co., is goo<l enough for the most 
fastidious. 

Jas. L. Davis, the enterprising agent for To-Kalon, II. W. 
Crabb's famous braii<l of wines and brandies, retjiu'sts us to 
inform his many friends and patrons that owing to the groat 
incmae in his busineMs and lack of room in lii.s pr(>s(>nt quarters, 
he will shortly remove to his fine new o.TiCi! on Market Street. 
We wish him in the future, as in the pa.st, unbounded success. 

The lion. E. H. Taylor, Jr, to whom the trade require no 
intnMhiction. has resigne<I the position of Mayor of Frankfort, on 
account of the fiu-t that he eontemjilat** removing verj* s<H)n to 
his handsome new residence outside of the city limits. Mr. 
Taylor has Ixh-ii .Mayor of the Capital City for some eight or ten 
years, and might have eontinue<I to hold that position, had ho so 
chosen, for an indefinite peritNl. 

Delafield. MKiovem & Co., of Chicago, have issued a very 
unique and artistic pric«'-list of California wines and brandii>s for 
the spring and summer of 'iM . It is bound in jMiste-ltoard and 
the covers repn's«>iit I. I>e Turk's wine c-ases. .Messrs Delafield, 
McQovem & Co., ar(> Chicago agents for I. I)<' Turk. Im Keld 
Vineyard, Eisen Vineyanl Co., Lislwu Winerjand the California 
Wine Orowos' Union. They axv. meeting with very flattering 
raooeaB in placing California wines in thier field, and are earnest 
workers in the cause of pure California wines (iirect from the 
vineyard of the grower. 

Beck, Pyhrr & Co., an; very (ronfident of the futum of Cal> 
foniia wines, itartifnilarly the Uwt gradw in Ixittles, of which 
line Uu'y make a sp«<cialty. Tliey have always adhennl to the 
wise policy of buying only the best wfnes to Im' hatl, and of never 



plaring the pswls on fbe market till they were in as perfect a 
condition as intelligent celhir lri«tnient could make them. The 
rapid growtli in the popularity of the wines handle<l by the firm 
and the retvnt gn-at incn'iwe in their facilities for doing business 
indicjite the apprt^-iation in which their goo<Li and methods are 

hehl by the gi-neral public 

Wine and l»randy men who are in need of a cheap, econom- 
ictil niot«)r, should examine that made by the Electric Vapor 
Engine Co. Its principal merits arc that it is always ready for 
use, riMpiircH no Uiiler. fire, engineer or license, makiw no smoke 
or ashes, and is entirely safe. A sjjccialty of the company is a 
"wine plant" mountinl on a tnick and t'<iuippc<l with an engine 
and rotary brona;- pump which will foi-ce from .">0() to'.MM gallons 
of win*' or wat«T \n'r hour, and consume less than one gallon at 
pi.Koline in ten hours, at a cost of 8event«M'n cent«. .For wineries 
and distilleries this should Iw a very valuable piece of machinery. 
The comiMiny's offices are at 218 California street this city. 

The many friends of A. P. Hotaling will receive with 
plejisnrc the announcement that he is enjoyin^ better health than 
fi>r many years" past and that his failing eyesight has been so far 
n-stored as to enable him to once more give his attention to his 
widely extended busine.sH interests. To his ability and untiring 
energy is largely due the great prestige of the "J. H. Cutt«r" 
whisky on the Pacific coast. W^hile he will bo welcometl ivgain 
to the ranks of the active trade, he will have to divide honors 
and populai'ity with A. P. Hotaling Jr., who has so ably handled 
thi^ business of the house during his sire's indisposition. The 
junior member's strict attention to businos.^, affable m.vuners and 
many manly qualities have won him many friends among the 
trade, who predict for him a bright and successful career. 

On our recent visit to Kentucky we visited one sour mash 
distilh'rj- which is deserving of special mention, bj' reason of the 
high reputation it has attsvine<l as a prwlucer of high grade whis- 
kies. W'e refer to the institution of the Eagle Distillery Co., 
which was organiz«Hl by T. J. Monarch, an old-fashioned sour 
mash distiller. His methods of j)roduction have been continued, 
but the plant is anything but old-fsishionetl. On the contrary it 
is a magnificent brick structure, three stories high, with slate 
roof and cement fi(K)r.s. The macliinerj' is of first-class manufac- 
ture and though plain in construction is of the very best quality. 
In this house you find the old-fash ione<l kettle stills of copper, 
coi)iM'r doubler, iron and wooilen tanks, small wooden tubs, mash 
tubs and a complete equipment for making strictlj' sour mash 
whisky, which is known to the trade as " T. J. Monarch" and 
'• Imperial." The Ejigle Distillerj- is situate<l ten miles west of 
Owenslx)ro, on the Ohio river and a short distance from the L. 
St. L. & T. R. R., thus having perfect facilities for transportation 
by rail and water. Quick shipments and low rates of freight are 
other advantages cnijoyed by those dealing w ith this company. 

The storage warehouses are built on a high knoll, are 
thoroughly ventilattnl and well adopted for improving and ageing 
whisky. 

This distillery plant was ree.'iitly i)urchased by Mr. R. 
Monarch, who is President of the company, a fact which is a 
guarantee to the trade that only first-class goods will be protlucod 
and that conservatism w ill always govern the proiluction, to the 
end that tlu' interests of the patrons of the company may bo pro- 
tect«Hl. 

Bdi^f/j ^iiQf\\\ c;oipi^if^c. 

\Ve can supjily Caramel or Burnt Sugar Coloring at teveiKy- 
fiw cntt» prr ijaUim in barrels, as sti-ong and as brilliant as any 
that was ever manuracturiHl. Not one complaint has reached us 
the <iuality of our Sugar Coloring for over a year, and our sales 
ext^'iid to every State in the Unicm. 

If the price was 810, iiistea<l of seventy-five cents per gallon, 
we could not pnHliicc a su|H'rior article. Every package guaran- 
teed. Hampl<<s on a|iplication. 

19 Hudson Street, n«w York 



f/r(?iFie WIJ^E j^^Q Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



13 



A WROMG POL I eg. 



Through the instrumentality of the irrepressible publisher of 
a senile "boss" paper, his side partner, ex-aecidency Waterman 
and a few others equally interested parties, an effort is being 
made in the Legislature to cripple or abolish the State Viticul- 
tural Commission. This opposition all grew out of the ill feeling 
existing between Waterman and a gentleman, who until recently 
was a member of the Commission. On account of this personal 
matter Waterman has used every possible means, fair and other- 
wise, to cast discredit upon the Viticultural Commission, not 
because it was not a worthy institution, but because he wished to 
be revenged upon an enemy. 

In the skeleton of the Appropriation Bill which was sub- 
mitted during the fortnight, we see some of the fruits of Water- 
man's efforts, in the reduction of the estimate for the appropria- 
tion, from $35,000 to $20,000 for two years. To show the con- 
sistency of the law-makers who hatched out the financial measure 
it is only necessary to state that while they propose to fatally 
handicap the Viticultural Commission they provide $25,000 for 
the Forestry Commission, which in the whole course of its ex- 
istence has not accomplished anything whatever in the preserva- 
tion of the forests of the State. However, it is backed by an 
active lobby and will therefore be cared for, while a worthy in- 
stitution that should require no lobbying to establish its claims 
to substantial support, is put under the knife. This is carrying 
personal politics too far,and we are confident that if the members 
of the Legislature understood the situation, they would lose 
no time in sitting down on this Waterman-Boruck scheme. 

There are several useless commissions that might well bo 
dispensed with, but the Viticultural Commission should not be 
classed among these, for it ranks with the Horticultural Com- 
mission in the matter of its importance as a promoter of one of 
the great industries of the State. Viticulture in California is in 
its infancy yet and it needs all the fostering care and encourage- 
ment that the State can give it. No one conversant with the 
situation doubts that California is destined to eventually become 
one of the greatest wine and brandy producing countries in the 
world, or that she will derive a vastrevenue from her viticultural 
products, which at the present time bring millions of dollars into 
the State annually. To say that a State Commission represent- 
ing such an industry should be deliberately hampered and ren- 
dered helpless, because a soreheaded politicial outcast wants to 
gratify his personal spite, is the wildest folly. 

If the law-makers at Sacramento will investigate the matter, 
they will find that there is a general desire among all classes of 
wine men, that the Viticultural Commission should be fostered, 
by reason of the fact that it is doing good work in promoting the 
wine industry. This is the feeling even among those in the 
trade who were at one time bitterly opposed to the continuance 
of this institution. 

These are facts which our legislators should carefully con- 
sider before taking any action on the appropriation. 



Tarr" Whisky and will bottle it exclusively, making it the hand- 
somest package that has ever been put on the market. 

Mr. S. Tarr, of Wm. Tarr & Co., Lexington, has been here 
with their right hand bower, Tom Pepper. He reports that they 
have sold all their '89'8 and '90's and have not a barrel to sell 
except some few '88's. They come high but the people must 
have them. 

Mr. Chas. Roth, of Moore & Selliger, paid Cincinnati a visit 
a few days ago. 

Mr. J. A. Cunningham, vice president of the J. G. Mattingly 
Co., was chaperoned around Cincinnati this week by their rep- 
resentative Louis Pook. Louis is a hummer and is no doubt 
selling his share of goods. 

Mr. E. M. Bramble, president of the F. S. Ashbrook Co., 
distillers of the Van Hook, reports all of their '89'8 and '90'8 
disposed of. Shaw. 



Qinoinnati ^Ql^artinQni. 

[special correspondence.] 

Since our last advices there has been no change in the whisky 
market worthy of mention. In fact both bourbons and ryes are 
at a standstill in all ages younger than 88's, and probably will be 
for some time to come. Old goods — '87's and '88's are in active 
demand. The market, however, has a fairly firm tone and there 
are no groiinds for anxiety regarding the immediate future. 

W. S. Barnes, the well-known distiller of Lexington, was in 
the city last week for a brief visit. 

Tom Pepper, the Lexington giant and representative of 
the Wm. Tarr Distillery, was into see us a few days ago. He 
says that his firm has bought up all the '81, '82 and '83 "Old 



E/NCOU-RAGI/NG FACTS. 



After permitting phylloxera to run riot for years, the promi- 
nent growers whose vineyards have been devastated by the pest, 
have decided that it is best U) save their property from total 
destruction. As a result there is a demand for resistant stocks 
that is far beyond the supply. : 

We have long urged the necessity for such action on the part 
of growers, and it is gratifying to know that they have at last 
discovered the unwisdom of their course and are preparing to 
stamp out the destroyer of their property. The time is certainly 
ripe for calling a halt inthisdirection,for it requires no prophetic 
vision to see that the margin of supply over the demand for 
California wines is becoming very close. The annual figures 
published in the last issue of the Review show that the exports 
for 1890 were over 9,000,000 gallons. The consumption of native 
wine in this State is growing at a very rapid rate and is now 
estimated at 7,000,000 gallons per annum. This gives us a total 
of 16,000,000 gallons accounted for. A very liberal estimate of 
the '90 vintage is 19,000,000 gallons — a figure far beyond the 
approximations of those in a position to give an intelligent idea 
of the product. Upon this basis we would have a surplus of 
3,000,000 gallons, aside from the stocks carried over from former 
years, and it is well known that these were much less in the 
aggregate than they have been for several years past. 

Taking these facts into connection with the production of 
brandy during the past distilling season- — representing in round 
numbers 5,000,000 gallons of wine distilled — it does tot appear 
that there is much wine in the cellars of this State for which 
there should not be a fair demand during the current year. 

In considering these figures of production and consumption 
it is proper to remember further the fact that the increase of ex- 
ports in 1890 was about 1,200,000 gallons against an increase of 
684,945 gallons in 1889. In is reasonable to suppose that the 
growth of demand will be in an equal ratio with that of last year 
and as there can be no marked increase in production for several 
years to come, there is every reason to believe that within two 
years the demand for our wines will be as great or greater than 
the supplJ^ With such a condition of affairs it is well to begin 
replanting diseased vineyards with resistant stocks and put an 
end to the diminution of the product to the end that when the eia 
of renewed prosperity comes the growers will be in a position to 
profit by it. 

OLIVES! 

Twent"-six Thousand Trees For Sale. 

Manzanillo, Navadillo, Bi-ANco, Pkiioline, also other ohoioc varieties in 
limited number, raiifjiiif; from one to four feet in liei{;Iitli, 
Trice aeeordiu); to Size and Variety. Address 

JOHN COOK. Nurser»man. 

BERKELY, ALAMEDA COUNTY CAL. 



jwk jyeifig wtj4E /^J^g,,,^!^"^ ^^^^1 

SHOKT CHOP OF BKATTDg. A VALUABL E PE PAKTMEMT. 

The (k>tail<<«l aci<uunt of tlio tranwu-tionM in ImmicI.mI l>niiidy With tluH i««ue of the Rkvikw wf present a department of 

in b<»th «lii«trict'< of thin State for the y<i»r IM'.N). whieh a;.|H»ar». rtatiHtics wliicli the trade and pnxhicerH of California Irnvo 

cUiewhen- ill ihiM i..Mi.-. willh- f.iiiii.l viihnthh> to dirtlilh-r.' and |„„„ ,j,.^ir,.,i. |„it could not prx-uro. It eonsistH of a monthly 

•*^'**- , . , . t«l)leKh.)wii.L' tin- HhipmentH of wine and hnmdy from variom 

portion of the StaU» wiiuh t.f Stoekton. dow n')t make an «UMrHi« •" imi"". , , „ • i r .1 

,...,... ..1 1 _ . „ „f 1..I tail -hiiimi'iilH of winw and hrandu'H in cjiwt! and bulk, lucluumg the 

encouraging Bhowin^, indiciiting as* It doen a d«HTea 10 of l-'4,l!H» Hnipnu iii« m HiinT.iiiii 

KnlhmR fW>m the prmhiet of the previouH ye^ir. Taking tli ■ iK>intH of distrihiition throughout tlie Uniteil HUiiM. IhiH is the 

priMhiction. rwipts from other dtHtricH a:i 1 with Ir.iw.ilH, Ui\ ,„m{ valnal.le HUitiHtical matter ever presented to the wine men 

paid, and for export, we have a defleit of S»4,.')i:5 jC'dlon« for th • „f {'alifoniia as it pives them an accurate monthly stsitement of 

year. The i>xi)ortN. tranHferr»'<! and tax-)Hiid jfoods a«f«^t«'<l the.<h-niand and developement of tnule in every portion of the 

M0,05« galloiw, withdnin-alH for foreign exportationn a-gn«.it.'<l ^^^'^^^^^_ ^^^^^^1^ ^^,^,j,^ ^^^^ ^j„,, ^^.^^^ 

9S,«.'>s pillons. • 

Tlie Fourth Distriet, which includes the noHlieni half of j^ VISIT TO SACRAME/NTO. 

Ihe State, nukeB • bett«r exhibit in the matter of production with 

a total for the year of7«t2.423 gallons, or an increiuse of (il.'i'iO ^^^^ ^,i^. j,,j^,j i,,^^^ President I'c Turk of the Vitioultural 

gallons. The bonde<l goo<b< on hand at the end of the year we«« C.iininission. Chief Vitioultural Oftic r Wetmore. Mana;;er C. J. 

52:2S6 gallons in excess of the amount on bond in January Ist Wetmore, andS«'cretarySeott wentlocJacramentotoapix'ar iK'fore 

1S5I0. There were i:W,501 g:illons withdrawn tax paid, S,H3J f )r the Special Anwrnbly Committee on Commissions to give their 

export and :>11AM gallons f<)r transfer to other districts. views as to the advisability of continuing the Vitioultural Com- 

From a review of th" fore^ioinjj figuriM it will h:' wen that niission. » , , <. ,.. . *i.„* -u^ t* .,.o;„ „ ,.«... 

,, , . _^ ^. . , , \ I -.I, ♦!.„» It was reported before they went that Mr. B usie, a young 

there is a shortage in the brandy product, as compartnl with that ,,,^.,„,^.^ from S-icramento had bloo,! in his eye. and was about to 

of 1H89. and this being the ca.so there is every reiuson to expect r(.j^„.t j„ f^yor of consolidating all the Commissions into a 

an a«hlitional lulvanec in prioes over tlio:^e of bust year. a goiioral department of Agriculture, with headquarters in 

Knowing tjie soarity of all ages in Hrst hands we are Siicraiiiento. When Messrs De Turk and Wetmore were on the 

confident that TH wilt witn-JH grjatar aotivity in the brandy stand they gsive very conclusive reasons why such a course wluM 

niarket than Iuvh Invn tvcporieneel for yt^ars i>ast. l.r.iclieally make the Commissioii entirely useless, and they 

™, I II I I • * I . 1.., t *„ ^,.„* «iw. staUnl that they would rather see the Commission abolished than 

There should have Iwen an incrajisod product to meet the 1 . t, * * i * 1 .«• 1:*: :„. „ 1 „ 

,' , , , moved to Sacramento to become a tool of politicians, and a use- 

unumial dfm^ind that Wiis created last year, but the brandy was j^^^ machine 

n<»t ni id'! and th • dem uil is still growing. The na'nral jj^ (1 \ Wetmore was the chief spokesman, and in the 

c«nsoquen<'"s should therefore follow. discussion whitrh followed the first examinations, he took a 

— r leading part. His concluding remarks to the Committee were: 

CTT/ppT ^X/I^R /WP^ OPGA^IZE "Abolish the Commission if you St* fit, ra^ther than bring us up 

' to Saciamentt" to lie the prey of politicians. Our work is such 

During the ,«ist fortnight the prominent sweet wine makers that it <-an only be rairied (Hi by specialists. We want to do our 

r .t ... r • I 1- /. xtr !l T I. I. I /< I.' !.'• 1 work in the way that has met with the approval of all who are 

of the suite, inelml.ng (.cH.. Wejrt, L.P.I)n^xle^^ j,^ ^,,^. ^^^^n^,^/ ^s a tax-payer I here and now object to 

l-rank W.-st. F. T. fcisen, P. C. Rossi, II. \\ . toU>b, K. C. casting money on a lot of political Iwards or on one i^litical 

rriber, Chjis. Kohler, I. lYi Turk and Julius P. Smith, have held board in Sacrainento. If you cannot see your way to letting the 

several mt*tings for the puriio.-w of deciding U|M»n the Ix'st means wine men, the fruit men, and others work in their own manner, 

to secure a proper nding fn)in the Internal Revenue I)ei>artinent then don't make and pretence of doing their work in Sacramento." 

or the Sweet Wine I^w. Under Cxjinmissioner Masons present ^, , ,^ p ^^ ^ -Q^^/M TmT "D P rM= I -D-TC 

constnietion of the law, the makers of sweet wine arc fatally w l/^ c:. ^1^ u D t\J^iy uy r\CV..^IZ,l K I O. 

handi(»p|M-<i and it is al>solnt.'ly nt«eessary that a more reasona- ~" . 

ble and favorable ruling be obtained. For this reason the . jn^^j Brandy 

gentlemen named have formed themselves into an association ., ^ X,, oi 'o^/^ ,,. „V,! 

*.., , o .- , I, 1 . 1 u I «' * u ♦ -•' 21,840 10,840 

with L. P. Drexler as Pn>sident and rrank West as S«M;retary. ., 27 38 810 60 

They have concludiHl that the (iuick«'st waj' to solve the vexing .. 28 ''(i'sCK) 2 100 

prttldem lK<^fore them is to send a (H)in|M't<-iit man to Washington „ .mi ci'un •>/•/•« 

to lay the casi! U-fore the ( oinmissioner of Iiit4-rnal Kevemie. and .. ^q 19 MIO KK) 

ecMivincM' him of the error of his |K)sitif>n. The expenws of this u gj 47'."i'>0 

mission have \n^n jirovided for by an assessment of one-half w^nt '' " 

upon ea<:h gallon of sw€>et wine pnHluce<l by the several meinlwrs. Total for January 830 675 108 100 

Tlie party who is to perform this important si-rviee has not l.Vbruarv 2 31 "(SO o'c-jr 

yi-t iieeu seie<t<Mi. » 3:.:::::::::z:z"'Z'.'.'.'. 54,050 "^sm 

MiDA's piKE CTOHg. || t::::::::::::::::::::::::. 'S 5;?^ 

We are phiise<l to acknowl«><lge the receipt of a copy of " 7 ...!!!. 43 810 100 

" .Mida's l)in><'tory of Whoh-sale Liquor Dealers and Distillers'' " 9 30.5.30 

•for the year 18SK). The publication is a valuable one to the trade •* 10 2t)!l00 4 070 

of the (country, having lM-4>n c(mipile<l with great car(>^ to the end " n ."...".. 22.420 6''0 

that it might tic "a reliable eon]M*ndiuin whieh c<Hild Ik* utiliuHl << 12 ........! 36(520 2 300 

for pnw'tical business purisis**." The names of the small and ' " ' 

unim|s>rtant distillers have ls'«'n elitninat<xland toavoid the uw- AGE/NT ^VA/NTETD 

less mailing of neveral circulars the nanicwonly of real controllers ' 

and their bninds and hH-atioii are given. On ea<>h page a margin We want a young, active and reliable man to represent our 

Tor Remarks is left in order that e^wh sul>s.rilHr may rate bous*. in San Franciw-o. and are prepartMl to offer sivtisfactory 

firms .u-,jord...g to his own J»<lgineiit. iiulueenients io tlu- right party. Corn-spondenw, solicitcHl. 

Published in cloth, by the Cntrmm Ihthluhtiuj ( ., . CliKnt;.., ' Dkyden & Palmkr 

'""• 1» Hudson St., New York. 



f/reifie VVIJ^E /rJ^D Sf|[^IT I^EVIEW. 



15 



EXPORTS AND IMPORTS 



DURING THE PAST FORTNIGHT. 



EXPORTS OF WINE. 



TO NEW YORK— PER Steamek Han Ulas January 23, 1891. 



MARKS. 


.SHIPPERS. 

A Haraszthy & Co 

Cal Wine Glow's Union 
Kohler & Van Bergen.. 
A Gieenebaiim & Co.. . . 

8 Lacbman & Co 

Kohler & Fiohling 

Natonia Vineyard Co. . . 


CONTENTS. 


<1ALL0NS 


VALUE. 


B F & Co, W Hoboken 


16 barrels 


797 

573 

5005 

1243 

1205 

473 

7567 

4049 

4877 

10484 

150 

300 

36 

1690 

96 

3726 

2601 


*23;i 

222 


E F P, Boston Mass. . 


12 barrels 


D M & Co 


100 barrels 


2736 
630 


B indi'd 


L M 




304 


indi'd 


10 barrels 

150 barrels 

80 barrels 


162 
3500 
2024 


8 L &0o 


K &F 


E W 


101 Ijarrels 

214 barrels 


1951 




3660 


T M Providence 


Dresel & Co 


90 


J H 


Cal Transfer Co 

Lenormand Bros 

B FrapoUiA Co 

WK A Johnson 

J Gundlach & Co 

Wine 12 cases and 


6 barrels 


150 


F M Manchester 

Pin dl'd 


1 hf-barrels 

35 barrels 


18 
682 


AF 




39 


■O 


77 barrels 

1 half-barrel ' 

16 Puncheous 

12 cases 




G 


1900 


S in star 


963 


G 


60 










Total amount 


44872 


119324 



TO MEXICO— Per Steamer Mexico January 25, 


1891. 




E A P Guaymas 


J F Schleiden 2 barrels 


104 
15 
20 

190 
20 

100 


49 




Ikeg 


8 




Thannhauser >fc Co 

J Meyerink 




51 


M (i La Pas 


28 kegs... . 


180 


H C Guaymas 


2 kejjs 


-ao 


W BEnston 


10 ke^s 


so 


AW 




7 




J M Peterson & Co 

Cabrera Roma & Co 

F Meeks 




ISO 
100 
155 


40 


B B Guaymas 


10kej<8 


40 


10 octave . ... 


62 


i: t( 


10 oat>e8 


40 


C J Ensenada 


Ihf-barrel 

3 kege 


33 
44 
119 
107 
80 
46 


15 




W Loaiza . 


29 


B D & Co Guaymas.. 


2 ca^kB 


48 


S & H 


J Gundlach & Co 

A Carpentier 




69 


JZ 


3 hf-barrel 


49 
25 


B indi'd 


10 cases 


50 




B P Rountree 


20 barrels 


1000 
50 
66 
23 
30 


839 


B M & M 


5 kejjs 


52 


P H Mazatlau 






S9 


P 8 Guaymas 


F Chevalier * Co 

W Loaiza 


1 octave 


10 


IB 


3kee8 


25 


C a& Co Guaymas.. 


10 cases 


35 


YH 






32 
155 


80 


FT 


5 packages 


116 


Total amount Wine cases 32 and 




2,639' »1,477 



TO CENTRAL AMERICA— Per Steamer San Blas January 23, 1891. 


A Z & Co, Chamijerico 
AV 


J Gundlach* Co 

Goldtree Bros 


8 kegs 

10 kegs 


80 
100 


54 
65 




18 cases 


90 


CBA&Co " 


21 bbls bottled. . 
6 cases 







mo 

26 


BH 


40 bbls bottled 




790 




10 kegs 


100 
115 
750 
158 
172 
120 


55 


B P La Union 

G L & Co Acajutla. .. 


2 bbls 1 keg 

26 half-barrels.... 


82 
158 


HLC Puntts Arenas 


Castle Bros 


400 


FP&CoLaLibertad 
D F Champerieo 


Urruela AUrioste 

John T Wright 


6 half-barrels 

12 kegs 


132 
90 


F B Puntas Arenas. . . 


J Trejos & Co 




37 


M D La Union 


F Meeks 


120 cases 




370 


A C D Acajutla 


B Dreyfus* Co 


32 kegs 


330 
528 

250 

200 

735 


350 


V J La Union 


9 barrels ) 

10 kegs 5 


475 
260 


M C S Puntas Arenas 
EC 


20 kegs 

20hf-bariels.... ) 
20 kegs 5 


225 
725 


Total amount 


Wine 154 cafes and 




3628 


«47l4 



TO NEW 


YORK— Per Steamer 


Comma February 


8. 1891. 




CB R 




5 barrels 

5 barrels 


250 
245 
520 

777 

1594 


200 


L O & Co 


W R A Johnson 

LacLman & Jacobl 

B Dreyfus & Co 

S Lacinnan & Co 

Dresel & Co 


50 


Triangle 




224 


LT 


15 barrels 


231 


B B 


20 barrels ) 

20 hf-barrels.... J 
2 cases 






644 
10 


BD & Co 


12 barrels . . . 


600 
7429 

513 

710 
1865 

606 
1603 
1485 
54 
2510 
2874 

499 

2408 

2372 

12687 

100 
11282 

833 

149 

53965 


400 


SL &Co 


150 barrels 

4 barrels ) 

2 hf-barrels J- 

5 barrels ) 

10 barrels 


3000 


C E 




Overland FT Co 

W Hoelscher&Co 

Gamier Lancel & Co. . . 

B Frapolli & Co 

Kohler & Van Bergen.. 
J Gundlach & Co 

Kohler & FrohJing 

Cal Transfer Co 

Miscellaneous 

cases and 


372 


JP 




Various Mark^ 


395 


A H 


27 barrels 


850 


H B 


12 barrels 


352 


Kit K Baltimore 


16 casks 


891 


F in di'd 


30 barrels 


591 


MDTCo 


2 hf-barrels 

50 barrels 


54 


B B 


728 


Sin di'd 


60 barrels 


862 


C indi'd 


10 ban els 


250 


G . .. . 


51 barrels 


747 


C& H Brooklyn 

K AF 


50 barrels 


711 


250 barrels 

2 barrels 

230 barrels 

17 barrels 


5075 


E F 


100 


Washington 


4000 
350 




50 


Total amount 2 




$21136 



TO CENTRAL AMERICA— Per Stemer Colima February 3, 1891. 



B J SLaLibertad. 
F B Corinto 



TO MEXICO— Per Steamer San Blas January 23, 1891. 



U in di'd Acapulco. .. 


J Gundlach & Co 

I Gutte 


2 barrels 


122 
50 
50 
80 
52 

344 


30 


C indi'd 




98 




W Loaiza <& Co 


1 barrel 


25 


41 H 




47 


PUC 


1 barrel 


34 


Total amount 


Wine 




$225 



TO JAPAN— Per Steamer City of Rio de Janeiro February 5, 1891. 



C W Co Yokohama. . . 


Cal Transfer co 

Sing Fat & Co 


50 barrels 


25)0 


600 


W Y 




5 


Liudia'dCo " 






518 


130 










Total amount 2 cases and 


3018 


1735 



M H C Puntas Arenas 

R A R Corinto 

JM B Acajutla 

M D 8 San J de Guat 



F&BCorinto.. 

G J&Co 

J L 8 J de Guat. 

B B & Co LaLibertad 

M B T Corinto 

M P LaLibertad.... 

FS Ocob 

F A Coriuto 

TS 
PA 
C De S Puntas Arenas, 



F Meeks 

John T Wright. 



Italian Swiss Colony.. 
B Dreyfus* Co 



Bloom Baruch & Co . . 
Cabrera Roma «fe Co. . 



J Gundlach & Co 
E de Sabia 



2 cases 

20 cases 

1 hf-barrel 

2 kegs 

5 kegs 

50 cases 

6 hf-barrels 

231 cases 

10 hf barrels. . . 

3 hf barrels 5 kegs 

3 barrels bottled 
5 barrels 

1 barrel 

Ikeg 

114 cases 

4 packages 

3 packages 

20 barrels 

2 hf barrels 



Total amount 3 barrels bottled 417 cases and. 



158 



280 
159 



250 
35 
10 



117 
56 

997 
51 



7 
TO 
18 
14 

85 
200 

lot 

947 

140 

160 

45 

150 

29 

11 

463 

69 

41 

648 

74 



22341 $3275 




IxLEY 



PURECALlfORNlA 



SPECIALTIES: 

PRIVATE STOGK flOSK, 

PRIVATE STOKK EL gERRlTO, 
PRIVATE STOKK SAUTERNE, 

PRIVATE STOGK GLARET, 
PRIVATE STOGK BUR6UNDY, 

PRIVATE STOGK VINE GLIFF, 





"'\WINESakpBRANDIES 

WINERIES ANO DISTILLERIESl 

JN/cf/t eiTY, YOUJMTVIbbE /rJMD 
ST. JHEbEJ^/r. 

OITF-ICHIS: 

11-13 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 
200-202 S. FOURTH ST., ST. LOUIS. 



16 



fyrtSifie wij^E /^fl5L_?Ci^1__SEXl?^' 



h 

K * V D. 



TO mEXICO-Pm anAMm Oouil* Febnuu; a, IMI. 
. . il b«rf«l 



"mXTrrlo" 



CMP 

1 U 



MiUAliftii .fiiuiiirr4% iK-iMiiKm 



W hottm. 




W 
fli 

a 

M 

m 

IS 
81 



IMal MBonot SS 



10 HONOLULO— Pn Bnuan Aranuu* «Mmu7 >7, MM. 




#'Ht 


H fjM-hiiian A Co. 

)| t»<'i llimi lUK 


SInuttI* 

lObMTcb 

8 lianvl* 


511 
9154 

aon 

4.V) 
401 
408 
809 
8» 

ao 




lie 


Hc'*'r.> ■■■■■' .. 

wr 1 

L Jk i 

BH* Co 


\T\»a Hiirawilhjr A Co.. 

II DrP3rfB* * Co 

Iju-hman * JkruM 

KublrrA FrublInK 

M KrulnlMittm A C»... 
Kohlrr * Van Ikrvrii .. 

D W Otigx 

D Q CamariiK)* 


2 ft 


TUkrK* 

15 III barrvto 

5 hf itunrh 

6r«»K« 

10i|usrter ca«k«.. 
10 krip! 


3:1 
;mi5 

I'tv 

a-'i 


M R n A Ca 


X rMr» 


10 


O WMJk Co 


IK burrels 


WKI 

too 

49 


S.V) 


l.Hl kiin 


070 


a ladi'd. 
PO < 


isa |»<k»g««. 

Wrwr* 

1 barrel 


000 

tiO 


Tut*l >nii>uiil 


Winr S CMC* mm! 




8l» 


tsViO 



TO MOXOLULU~P«« BA«KBirrni« W 
f 6 !> /k Co jB DrajfiM * Co. . . 



H. DiMOXP Jantwry ^< li^l- 



WWT iWlngWoSMit* Co. 

Total amuant 5 ra«<« and 



10 lif barrel*. . 

:iS0 kega 

5ea«ea. 

nOktft* 



noes 



1510 
35 

81775 



TO VICTORIA— I'KK Htkambb Walla Walla January 30, 1891. 



AVirtoils 

»OD 

FF Vancouver 


~KorlH!ll & nr«« |1 barrel 

Cal Trannler Co '1 lif barrel 

Cal Wine Grow* Union. 1 bl barrel 

Ihf barrel 


1^ 

37, 
37. 


44 

35 

IS 
»4 


Total anomd 




iw: 


8131 



TO NANAIMO— Pu 8TKAMM Kmpirk January 31. 1891. 



S'ti .» t\% WftttBlmfk Wiillafm Itnta J^ Hn 1I twrr»>l 


40; 


M 


3 lit barrel* 

J M •• Cal Wine Qniw's Union 4 kvuf 


83 
60 






Total amount Wine 


143 


817IS 



TO CHINA * JAPAN— Pbb Btbambb Ocbahio January 33, 1891. 
IflMi H U yoktiliunaHnirriKru Pacllir Co. 



Mladrd 



jKolilrrA Van Beriren.. 

! J F Mca..veni A Co. . . . 

H *Co FoorlKiw '\Vilkriu> A Co 

HlBdl'iiro Yiikiiliama llrrnnaii A Co 

AindI'd. Manila. S F...tri A Co 

V>>k<>luiroa MiH't'llaueou* 



I c««e 

18 " 
40 •■ 
35 rare*... 
10 barrel* . 
18 caMS... 
3 barrels.. 



485 



95 



13 

90 

171 

ISO 

123 

flu 

35 



Total amount 



113 and. 



570l 



(689 



TO BBITI8H COLUMBIA— Peb Ktbamkb Wam.a Walla Februarj- 4, 1»»1 



FOW VIclorU sF Korl»ll 

FB 

AHMrM" 

BIPCoNrwWMeader A arcemliaum A Co.... 

aBCoVlctorU 

iJ Gundlarb A Co 

Total amoant IB eaae* aad 


3 ca«ii> 

8 caMM 

Ica«e 

4 barrel* 






■■ 196 
198 


10 

16 

4 

137 


4 barreU 


48 


10 caae* 


M 








8»4 


8JS9 



TO BBITIHH COLUMItftA -Pbb Htbambb City or Pdbbla, January 39, 1881. 
F3riSryicU.ria.;;7. J Oundlarb AC 



M* Mr A 

TAM 

WJM 



Koblcr A Van Berxen. . 



1 barrel..., 
a Iwrn-lK. . 
3 l«rrelii . . 

1 hf hnrr.-l 



Total amount WIni- 




an 

75 
65 

8 

|i|77 



TO HOKOLULtt— Pbb li.M:i.i.MiM ;<. C. Allbh January 89. 1891. 



itfA 6. ihohlei A KrohlliiK |Bc»«k»... 

*" ,. .. 13 qr. casks 

330keKH 



Tiklal amount 
TO IIIIITIHH 



894 
896 

1600 

3390* $1195 



197 

198 
800 



COLUMBIA— Pm Stbambb Umatilla January 85, 1891. 



O M Vanouuvcr 

Q» Victoria 

JM 

HN 

8 A J •• 

LM 

A In dl'd Vancouver 



Cal Transfer Co 

A Qreenobaum A Co. 
Bacb Mecae A Co 



34ca*eis ..... 

1 Itarrel , 

•> lif-barrels. . 
Ihf-barrel.. 

2 barrels 

4 barrels 

3 barrels 



Total amount w4 ca»e« and. 



48 

55 

37 

97 

195 



130 
17 
68 

41 
113 

87 



!M| 71 

5171 1 516 



IMPORTS OF WINES AND LIQUORS BY SEA. 



FKOM NEW VOUK— Pbb Ship A. O. Bopbh January 35. 1891. 



eiltPPKBii. 



Lllienlbal A Co... 
Jesse Moore A Co. 

JB .Mi'Ilvaine 

Llllonthal ACo... 
J A Burkf 



W K Fi-ecinan. 



COHTBWTe. 



10 barrels Ttuni 

03 barrels Whisky. 
.50 " 

.57 pkgs •' 

3 Iwriels " 
5 
1 

t* " 
1 

5 

3 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 



OORSIUMBB. 



LilK'iitlial ACo ... 
Moori' Hunt & Co. 

C WCralir 

LiHcntlial A Cj ... 

J 8 McKay 

Cortcz A Miner. . . . 

Mrs It Meyer , 

liarnes A Borland. 

.IT Baker 

Win M'lore 

W Bfii;;! 'V 

KMansHcId 

OliasFclI 

F Weii'cliendorff . . . 

F W Huckstop 

UGilbrlde 

Han V Stej;e 

BK Haley 

Hoiman A Asbill . . 



FKOM NEW yOBK— Pbr Siirp Frkdekick Bxllingk January 19, 1891. 





1 barrel Whisky 




1 


t. ii 




3 


" •' 




1 


»• •* 




1 


** *• 




1 


1. il 




7 


(i .. 




6 


" 







.. 4i 




1 


.. 




j> 


.t .. 


»« , 


1 


.. 




1 


.. 




5 


.. 




5 


H .. 


Jas Lew A Bro 


75 


.. 


WK Freeinau 


111 


.. 


i« 


6 
3 
3 
1 
1 
1 
8 


1* t 


Aurora Distilling Co 


3 


t. ., 


ASBrownoU 


« 


" Wine 



LDillier 

Geo Ley 

,Iames ituble 

H 8 Starle 

Order 

Seitz & Kemberger 

Clias Deitz A Co 

A Ford A Co 

Paul Polscn ■. 

Dreiz Bros 

Order 

I Fitzpatrick.: 

Curran A Mangan 

Various Orders 

Moore Hunt A Co 

Slica Itocijueraz A Co. 

Wtn Faher 

Eilis A Kaliler 

Peter Htrciflf 

H Bradbury 

Isaac Cooper .• 

J C Jacobs 

E T Dixon 

Various orders 

Cayo A Co 

FC Harris 



FBOM LIVEUPOOL— Pbb Br. Ship Eloinsiiiuk January 30, 1891, 



W A Boss A Co 

T B Hall A Co 


lUU barrels Uin^er Ale 

100 cases Stout 

800 cases B.'cr 

50 barrels Gin){er Ale 

2t) ipiarter ca«™ Hlicrry. . . 

48 octav.?» Slicrrv 

3,50 easef BollUti Beer. . . . 

50 cases Beer 

5 bhds Beer 


Sherwood A Sherwood 

Liliuntlial A Co 


W E .lohnston A Co 


Order (marked F In dia'd).. 


Macfarlanu McCrindell A Co 

it 

J A U Teiinent A Co 


Clias Mcinecke ACo 






G A Witt 


Win Wolff A Co 



WM. WOLFF & CO., 

Importers and General Agents, 

327-329 Market Stre et, - - - San Francisco, Cal. 



POMMBT 810 CHAMPAGNB, 

i. 4 r. MARTILL COGNAC 

■OBOAM BROS.. PORT ST. MARrS SHBRIB 

Dooira Donnj dumohd fort, 

DnBOe rRBB) BORDUUX, OUnti aad Sutmm, 
BOOK WnnM«a Itan. ImUI 4 Oa.. lUjmm, 
PRAMBOO OnUKO, Tarioo, ItalUa Tarwtlk, 

Kr-lmporlnl AmerU.-an 



4OHN do KUTPn 4 SONS, ROTTEROAM, OIN, 
OILKi KUMMSL 

PiBST BblWnro 00. (Ibnnorly PHOXIP BBST), 
mLVADUB bport B«er, Select Hint Ribbon 
THE "BEST" TONIC. 
THEO. LAPPED GENUINE AROMATiQUB, 
"DOO-S-HEAD" BRAND of OuinDMi- Steal aad Baa>' Air, 
iriitofclCTi Hf! Belmont hJ ciilckciicKk; Wt llliictirass- '85 BIpy, 
I,,owait inarkri iiuolallons lurnislied on application. 



CANTRELL & GOCHRANE'S B«lhst Oing«r Al^ 

BASS & GO'S Pale and Burton ALE, in Hogsbtads, 
OUINNffiS & WB (Dnblin) Extra Stent in Ewsbtads 
GREKNLKBS BROS' Lome Higfalaad (Sooteb) WbiakT 

JAMESON & CO., IRISH WH&KT, 

LONDON Dry Dock Jaaaia Rao, 

Mineral Waten, 

and oilier staple brands 



f/reifie WIJVJE >V|vlD Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



17 



FROM NEW YORK— Per Steamer Sah Blas January 17, 1891. 



MISCELLANEOUS FOREIGN WINE SHIPMENTS. 



H J Bullay, Supt PM 8Co. 



5 barrels Kye Whisky iC F Sliter 

1 " " Fowler & Brooks. 

1 " " OeoHBarlell 

6 " " John Robinson 

2 half-barrels Rye Whisky I 



FROM LONDON via VICTORIA— Per Steamer City of Puebla Jan. 24 1891. 



PaciHc Coast 8 S Co '225 cases Gin 

8 quarter-casks Gin . 

8 octaves Gin 

225 cases Gin 

8 quarter casks Gin. 
8 octaves Gin 



Wm Woltr & Co. 



CW Craig. 



FROM GLASGOW— Per Br. Ship Glenbreck January 22, 1891. 





From January 34 to Februan 


11, 1891. 






VESSEL. 


destination. shippekk. 


CONTEHTg. 


OALIiOnS 


talub. 


City of Puebla 
8 N Castle 


C M Victoria Lenormand Bros... 

C C Honolulu. . . . EL G Steele & Co. 
A K Tahiti A Vignlcr 


1 barrel 

4 cases .... 


48 


12 
48 


City of Papeete 


1 cask 

1 barrel 

Ihf-barrel.. 

2 kejfs 

6 kegs ... 
1 barrel... 
Ihf barrel.. 


24 
49 
27 
10 
60 
39 
25 

282 


24 


FH " J Plnet 


24 


Farallon 

it 

Monowai 

E mpire 

Total 


S D " 

P 8 Ocos Oliver &Co 

J R Cliamperico.l " 

Z Bros Auckland. L Feldman <fe Co . . 

F V Nanalmo. . . . Vesuvio Paste Co . 

imount 4 eases and 


19 

8 

43 

85 

6 

9218 



J ife It Tennent 


lOlihds Beer 










Mack it' tfe Co 


50 cases Wliisky 

25 cases Whisky 

,50 cases Wine 

40 cases Whisky •:... 

50 cases Whisky 


Wm Wolff A Co 


Inne A Gueve 


Slierwood <fe Sherwood 




Wm Wolff A Co 


Thorn & Cameron 


Middleton & Co 


Frank Baily «& Co 


Wm Wolff A Co 


tt 
A a Thompeon & Co 

Gilbert I McCaul & Co 


15 eases Beer 

73 cases Wliisky 

Ihhd Wliiskv 

34 casks Bottled Beer 

35 octaves Whisky 

.50 cases Whisky 


WHCampbell 

Wm Wolff & Co 


Buchanau AVilson & Co 


C WCraig 

ti 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO DOMESTIC PORTS BY SEA. 



FROM LIVERPOOL via PANAMA— Peb Steamer San Jose Jan. 24, 1891. 



Raynal «fc Co | 10 packages Cognac | E Thomas & Co. 



FROM LIVERPOOL— Per Br. Ship Wayfarer January 26, 1891. 



Apolinaris Co 


1100 cases Mineral Water. 
300 casts Mineral Water. . 

2 packages cased Wiue 

33 cases Wine 

1000 cases Vermouth 

300 cases Vermouth 

150 cases Absintlie 

,50 oases Brandy 

5 cases Blue Geneva 

15 casks Geneva 




John P Best & Co 




E Gomez 




Ronaldson & Co 




Noilly Prat & Co 


J Dp Fremery & Co 


Ad Yaeggi 


1 A I Nolct 




John de Kuyper & Co 


Wm Wolff & Co 


Meyer & Co 


10 Oct pipes Geneva 

5 si.vteentli-cases Geneva.. 
30 cases Mineral Water. . . 




John P Best ife Co 


Goldberg Bowen & Co 

E Thomas & Co 


G Preller & Co 




10 casks Wine 




J P Best & Co 


25 eases Mineral Water 

1 case Wine 


Edwin Goodall 





From January 24 to February 


11, 1891. 






VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPEBS. 


CONTENTS. 


GALLONS 


VALUE. 


San Bias 


E FBBoston.... 


A Haraszthy & Co , 


1 hf bbl . . . 


2:^ 


61 


" 


8 L Co New York 


8 Lachman A Co. . . 


5bbl8 


245 


473 


' 


MK 


Martin Feusicr & Co 


ISbbls... 
22 hf bblE S 






" 


" " 


It 


1.329 


665 


Colima 


BD&Oo " 


B Dreyfus & Co 


2bbls,... 






" 


" " 


tt 


68 hf bbls {■ 


1,818 


3,800 


'■ 


t4 (1 


tt 


17 kegs.. 






'* 


8 L & Co " 


8 Lachman 1% Co. . . 


10 bbls 


480 


840 


" 


HB&Co" 


Joseph MeiczerA Co 


10 hf bbls 
2 bbls.... { 






*' 


11 (I 


tt 


519 


289 


" 


SH 


DreseliSs Co 


3hf bbls... 


78 


78 


4, 


P M 


tt 


1 hf bbl.... 


27 


27 


" 


AH 


It 


1 hf bbl ... . 


26 


26 


" 


M L & Co " 


Edge Hill Viney'dCo 


10 hf bbls.. 


277 


498 


** 


Washington 

imount 


Miscellaneous 


Ibbl 


47 


85 


Total ! 






4,869 


6,842 



EXPORTS OF WHISKY BY SEA. 



From January 24 to February 11, 1891. 



Empire . 
Oceanic . 



San Bias . 



FROM ANTWERP— Per Ger. Ship Occident January 25, 1891. 



Apolinaiis Co 1100 cases Mineral Water. Jones Mundy tt Co 

J J Medei & Zoon '2 iir-pipes Geneva Chas Meinecke & Co. . . 

" |40 octaves Geneva : " 

Blaaw & Go 1(K) octaves Geneva J De Fremery & Co 

John P Best ife Co '40 cases Mineral Water. . . A Vignier 

" j35 cases Liquors Jas De Fremery <& Co . 

Ad Yaeggi |l80 cases Liquors A Vignier 

" JS casks Rum I ~^ " 

;; 30 casks Wine I '^ 

FROM GLASGOW— Per Bb. Ship Glenmorao January 33, 1891. 

Slater Rogers tS Co 342 cases Whisky iForbes Bros. 



Australia 



DESTINATION. 



McDtfeHNanalmo 
Mnidi'd Yoka'ma 

A V Champerico 

C 

E K S J de Ouat 

A S Acajutla. , 

W 8 L Honolulu 

GWM&Co " 



SHIPPPERS. 



L S Haas 

A P Hotaling A Co. 

J Gundlach & Co.. 

Dicckman & Co 



W H Dimond ' 
Mexico . 



Jas Wilson ,fe Co 31 cases Whisky 



Ord Distilling Co. 



Journu Freres. 



30 casks Wliisky. 
38 cases Wliisky. 
130 cases Wine . . 



W H Campbtl 
Geo Stevens.. 



Wm Wolff & Co. 



WCP&Co " 
WWT 

Y Ensenada 

" WL.%Co Guay'as 

" J M Ensenada. .. 

City of Pueblo H B Co Victoiia 

B P V Vancouver 

JHAMcA Victoria 

L S Honolula ! 

Mindi'd " 
HitMcA Victoiia 
R M Aacajutla. . 
M D 8 8 J de Guat 



B'kFo'stQu'n 
B'k Discovery 
Walla Walla 
Colima 



FROM PHILADELPHIA— Per Ship Relce January 37, 1891. 



Sutton ifcCo 


. |250 cases Whisky .Order 

125 barrels Whisky \ " 


FROM NEW YORK- 


-PEB Steamer City of Sydney February 3nd 1891. 



City of Rio.. 



JZ 

G B Ocos. 
G H Acajutla. 



A Fenkhausen 

Spi u'ce,Stanl'y &Co 
Lilienthal &Co., 
Spru'te.Stanry &Co 

Wing Wo Sang 

Tliannhauser £ Co. 
Henry Lund <& Co. . 
Heatficote D it Co. . 
J G Walker & Co. . . 
Moore Hunt & Co.. 
Kolilei'ifc VanBergen 

C W Craig 

William8Dim'd<fe Co 

L 8 Haas 

John T Wright. . . 



Lilieuthal tfe Co 

Cabrera Roma & Co 
Wilmerding & Co.. 



Lindi'dCo Yok'a L S Haas . 



Total. 



bbl Whisky. 



F W Miller. 

Lander & Ellis 

W G Meyer... 

Henry Berlsderff & Co. 

J Le Conee 

L Sarel , 

Chas Ostward 

A A Gedmau 



CONTENAS. 


aALLON^ 


1 Puncheon 


13; 


3 bbls 


91 


18 cases 








Ibbl 


41 


Ibbl 


4! 


20 cases 




30 cases.... 




70 cases .... 




.50 cases 




.50 cases 




10 cases 




Ibbl 


3', 


1 octave 


ir. 


Ibbl 


40 


10 cases . . . 




36 cases.... 




10 cases 




5 bbls 


150 


49 cases 




1 puncheon 


130 


Ibbl 


39 


30 cases 




Ibbl 


33 


2 cases 


30 


10 cases 




60 casts.... 




3 bbls 


77 


5 bbls 


214 












1,0711 



15'J 

15S 

171 

72 

72 

148 

'£i6 

129 

579 

3.50 

425 

100 

61 

01 

80 

100 

308 

75 

300 

300 

im 

158 

18U 

100 

60 

92 

700 

232 

139 

45 

.5,613 



WHISKY AND SPIRIT IMPORTS BY RAIL, S. P. CO. 

From January 10 to 26, 1891. 



FOR EUROPE— PER city OF SIDNEY, February 2, 1891 



Lhersette Kane & Co 125 cases champagne iGeo Marcus & Co. 

Hopgraf & Broadwater .ll case mineral water Ia Crawford ife Co. . 



IMPORTS BY RAIL IN BOND. 



Heidsick & Co, Loudon ,300 cases Champagne 

8 P Co, Liverpool 30 (piarter-casks Sherry. . . 

8 V Fornaris & Co, .4nlweri> 3(X) cases Champagne 

" " Bordeaux 010 cases Champagne, 

" •' " 100 cases Wine 

'■ " Havre. 



.50 baskets Champagne.. 
20 cases Chamiiagiie. . . 

100 cases Absinthe 

5 cases Wine 

35 cases Wine 

10 cases Cordials 



HH Vueve 

8 PCo 

A Vignier 

Macondray & Co 

C Meinecke ifc Co 

Pascal Dubedat A Co. . 

A Vignier 

Wm Wolff &Co 

Pascal Dubedat & Co. 







Whisky. 




Spirits. 






Barrel 


M-bbl. 


Case. 


Barrel 


K-bbl 




C W Craig 


140 
144 




374 
415 
861 




Jones Mundy & Co 








Lilienthal A Co 












25 
3 




40 bblBBBrandy 


Overland F T Co 


3 

8 








J L Nickel A Co ; . . . 














2 








Braunschweiger A Co. 
Vincent Drum 


.55 

35 

1 

50 

75 

1 

5 

1 

45 

1 










30 










J H Mitchell 










H C Busch Agt 

Wolff A Co 


35 


















Rathjen B W. .. 












P Chevalier A Co 












Jno H Schmidt 












Meverlield M S 


15 


10 




• 




J AHairis 




















Total 


564 


108 


12 


1183 




40 bbls B Brandy 



18 



f^eifie WIJ^E /rJ^D SflF^IT I^EVIEW. 



KXPOirrs or MisccuANEoufi liquors by ska. 

rriMi Jmmtj M to n&tmrj lU ML 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO FOREIG N PORTS BY SEA. 
Prom Jmmit »*, to Februiy U. Wn. 



nt) of X Yurli A T fUn KIm W Loaln « Co 

Hut Itlu 'HAIlMtr.H^. ■■■tn'a (iol<lrii (Ulc Dkl'yCo 

AMlralk* jK J K !■ Hiinclulu A VlKiilrr 



Bcdliwlon A Cu. . . . 
Jour* MuDdf A Co. 
Lllinittial A Co 



Dmxllla 



Junn Mundjr A Co , 
OoldberK li<iir^ A Co 
Bw'b Mrrw ACo... 



Mrxlro . 



Cllr of Paeblo 



Cllr ol 
Coillaw 
Moaoval . 



B8AC0 

CPBB 

aWMAOo 

DAC 

H In dl'd Vk-lurU 

J M 

H .N 

AitMil'd VanroBTW 

A O KiuwtuuU 

W LA('u Oiwjrma* 

U A U Eiuenada 

J M 

H A MrA VlctorU 

J LHdeOaM 

AacUod U D Hprerklcs A Broa'9 c« CbanipsKDC 



4 raw Vermouth 

4 t>l>U ^|>lrll 

Hr* ('liani|«i;nr 

1 rMC CordUl 

ttr»niani|i«t;iic 

3 (-• riiUMV ('ale 

3 raCnranw 

tea Cbain|iaKne 

10 « 

10 cf Ll<|uur«.., 

&ca 

Sea 

W bbl Bl'kb-f W 

ISra rhain|«K>K 

At'ii IlillcrH 



JFSrblclden 

Hrnrv I.uiid A Co 

UralLmlr Dexter A 1'4>,H I'liir (iln 

>i n Hum 

Knhirr A Van Bef(eii»r« BlkbyBr'}- 
LlllrnlhalA C.> 'ScaOin 



Totalamooat '. •1,5" 



TALOB. 



13 

137 

388 

8 

2TB 

17 

» 

53 

12« 

7'i 

Si 

8i 

42 

2.V) 

»9 

10 

W 

:» 
10 
85 



City of Pueblii 
Han Dlaa-^ . . 

t)o<»nl«' — 

Mrxlfo 

Colima 



l>EIITIKATIOIi. 



M III did Manilla 
it huU'd Viikab'a 
\VI..V('<>(luavinai> 
MDHSaiiJdcCiiat 



fllllPPEIU). 



H VancouverjNalunia W & M Co 
Cal \Vliiei:i'n<L'ni'n 

O L ACoAcajutIa floldtree Broh 

Loul^ KimollkUll... 



H Fotiter A Co... 
KdlilerAVanBertccn 
HiMirr Lund A Co 
Jolm'WrlKbt 



COHTBHTR. 



Itaak 

1 " 

•M bbU 

•• ....} 
U bf bbl* ) 

1 cane 

1 b( bbl.... 

1 keg 

80 rases 



Tiiliil nln<'iiiil. 



:i 



ill 



OALIiOns 



185 
18t) 

ess 



27 
30 



1,4«B 

9a 



VALCB. 



05 

loa 

875 

814 
U 
SO 
86 

347 



Ll» 



BEER IMPORTS BY RAIL, S. P. CO. 





bOTTLKU. 


Bulk. 


l-ORSItlNBBIl 


Barrels 


K-bbl 


K-bbl 


Case 


Bari«ls 


K-bbl 


J^-bbl 


w.iir.v «'o 

JoiH-ii M undv A Co 

CAZinkland 


"iai" 


80 


....... 


10 










■■ioo" 


•••••.f- 


.Total 


385 


80 


40 


10 




100 





P«p Southern Paoifio Co's Unes During January, 1891, Showing Destination and PoinU of Shipment. 



TO 



Wine 



Caae Oalloiis 



Boston 

Oilier North(«8t pointe 

New York 

Buflalo 

Other New York points 

Philadelpliia 

PittHburg 

Other PcnuHylvania points. 

Baltimore 

Washington 

Other Va. and W. Va. points.... 
N. and 8. Car. and Ga. points... 

New Orleans 

Other Louiiiiana points 

Mobile 

Otlier Gulf State points 

Galveston 

Houston 

Son AntoniH 

Other Texas points. 

Hot Springs 

Other Ark. and Ind. Ter. points 

Memphis 

Other Tenn. and Ky. points 

Cineiii iiat i 

Other Ohio points 

IiidiaiiaiioJis 

Other Indiana |K>ints 

Chicago 

Other Illinois |M>iiits 

" Mifhigan points. 

Milwaukee 

Other WiMConsin |H>ints 

St. Ix)iiiH 

KaiiHas (Mty 

Other Missouri points 

Iowa |M>inta 

Omaha 

Other Neb. and Kans. points..... 

Minnea|>olis 

8t.I'aul 

Otlier Minnesota points 

Dakota |MiintH 

iVnver 

Other (.'olorado |>oi nts 

Foreign 



494 



47 
12 



90 
40 

110 
2 

216 



4 

29 
11 



35 
2 
4 



7 

'.i 

10 

15 



Total I l,m) 



349 

87 

2,879 

125 

80 

308 

\(H.i 

393 

140 

93:j 

108 

84 

187,716 

229 

1,954 

1.597 

9,371 

1,930 

7,64£ 

6,995 

2,000 

220 

45 



5,641 
721 

2,471 
185 
15,263 
415 
(520 
57 
177 

2,479 



120 

413 

(55 

.560 

1,945 

840 

47 

458 

5,524 

1,065 

19 



21ML274 



Brandy 



Case Gallons 



40 



2i) 
6 



82 



26 
7,045 



75 



88 



46 
338 
112 



214 



Wine 



FROM 



Brandy 



215 

10 

3,007 

58 

54 



188 



245 



53 

25 

(59 

361 

1,.583 



179 
550 
128 



14,6(59 



Sjin Fmuciflco 

Oiikland, 16tli Street. 

Livermore 

Martinez 

San Jose 

Warm Springs 

Irvington 

Santa Clara 

Mountain View 

LosGatos 

Santa Cruz. 

St<x'kton 

Fowler 

Fresno 

Sacramento 

Calistogii 

King Station 

St. lloleiia 

Rutlierford 

Oakvillo 

Napa 

Santa Rosji 

Glen Ellen 

Shellville 

Cordelia 

lone 

Diamond 

Ivoomis 

liOH Angc'leH 

Santa liiirhara 

San tJahriel 

Alhanibra 

I'oinona ..." 

Miirysville 

Wintbrope 

Anaheim 

Downey 

Sant4i Ana 



Tota 1,180 290,704 




82 I4,m9 



SITUATION WANTED-CELLAR-MASTER. 

A eoiniM't^Mit eellar-mast^r, wine and brandy maker and 
distiller. FirrKKS vkaiw kxi'kkiknck. Hhhh' yearn a.s manager of 
one of (he largest winerie.s in the Stale. rndcrstuiuLs tlouble 
entry iHKtkkeeping; dt>sir»'8 a cliango, city or eoiintry. Addr(>HS 
" Comi-ctk-nt" IIiIh oflice. 



f/ceifie WIJME /rJMD SflF^IT F^EVIEW. 



19 



SAeCHAHI/Ne l/N MUST. 



Soine Facts for the Internal Revenue Department to Gare- 

fully Gonsider. 



In response to Conimissioner Mason's request to President 
De Turk to furnisli what information he could on tlie saccharine; 
contents of must used for sweet wine making, (Jharles A. 
Wetmore, acting as Viticultural officer of tlio State Commission 
prepared the following report which was transmitted to 
Commissioner Mason: 

San Francisco, February 2nd, 1891. 

/. D^ Turk, President Board of State VUieultural Commmionem, 
San Francisco, Ca^-^Dear Sir: In reply to your request for a re- 
port upon the saccharine strength of natural grape musts in ('al- 
ifornia and elsewhere, such as are commonly used in making 
Bweet wines, permit me to submit the following: 

By reference to the numerous reports of discussions before 
the State Viticultural Conventions and other meetings of vine 
growers assembled for the exchange of opinions and the dissem- 
ination of information of practical value, you will find frequent 
allusions to grape musts containing high degrees of sugar. From 
these allusions you will observe that the fact of such high degree 
existing should never be questioned, and therefore no formal 
statements as to degrees of sugar in all cases has ever been made 
— no occasion having ari.sen requiring it. The published analy- 
ses of Scientific Societies and Professors of Chemistry are nearly 
all confined to experience in countries where only dry wines are 
produced; and to those who are not familiar with practical wine- 
making, the information should be given that, generally, when 
talking of wines and the chemical composition of pure musts for 
wine making, it is understood that only musts for di-y wines are 
considered. For this reason, for instance, every wine maker is 
provided with a saccharometer. In countries where it is diffi- 
cult to get a sufficiency of sugar to make a sound, durable wine, 
this saccharometer is used in connection with other means of ob- 
servation, to determine when grapes are ripe enough to pick in 
order to make a good, sound, dry wine. On the Rhine and in 
nearly all parts of France, this is the common question because 
the musts never attain an excessive degree of sugar, and the 
great difficulty is only to get sugar enough. In California and 
in such countries as Spain and Portugal, this rule of practice is 
ditVereut. In those countries the wine maker is constantly on 
his guard to prevent the grapes from acquiring too much sugar, 
if he desires to make dry wines. The saccharometer, therefore, 
Avith him is used for the purpose of knowing when he imi-d begin 
to pick, in order to prevent the grapes from getting over-ripe. 
So common is this knowledge among our wine makers that it is 
scarcely referred to, not being a subject to question. 

Notwithstanding tliis condition of our viticultural information 
60 far as published reports go, you will find numerous allusions 
in printed reports of the past, to the high degree of sugar fro- 
quently obtained in practical work. For instance turn to the 
report of the State Viticultural Convention held at Irving Hall, 
San Francisco, in March 1886, which report we do not have as 
a State document, but as published by the S%n Franelieo Merchant 
from the official notes of our own stenographer. In the record 
of the proceedings of the third day, afternoon session, you will 
find a discussion of the problems of fermentation arising from the 
unusual climatic influences of the preceding year, during which 
muisual high degrees of sugar were obtained, and constxpient dif- 
ficult fermentations were experienced in the cellars in which dry 
wine were made. In this discussion, you will find Prof Ililgard, 
of the State ITniversity, saying as follows, with regard to the ex- 
periences of the vintage of 1885: 

"In the first place, as you all understand, the vintage came 
around in a great hurry. The grapes in nearly ail portions of 



the country liad a very large amount of sugat; they ripened in 
hot haste. I Jiave seen a great many gra[>es go to the ferment- 
ing vat with twenty-nine, thirty, and oven thirty-two per cent. 
of sugar. Of course the fermenting under those circumstances 
was a somewhat criticial question. You know that any wine 
with more than twenty-eiglit per cent, of sugar is apt to ferment 
out with some difficulty. It requires peculiarly favorable cir- 
cumstances to bring about a thoroughly dry wine in that ca«e. 
Of course it can l)e done. You may ferment out thirty per cent., 
provided the cir<!umstancx;s are all favorable." 

Again in the same address, you will find him saying 
further on: 

"I had one wine sent me which originally started at thirty- 
five per cent, of sugar, and those that sent it imagined that it 
could be fermented out, which of course it could not. The wine 
happened to remain sound because it fermented out to fifteen 
per cent, of alcohol, and that was enough to prevent its going 
wrong. But in other cases wines that have as much as twenty 
eight per cent, of sugar, fermented out ten per cent, of alcohol, 
and all the rest of the sugar remained." 

By reference to the discussion which followed, you will per- 
ceive that the fact of high degrees of sugar was never questioned, 
and the only question was what to do under such circumstances 
in making dry wines. 

Now again, turn to the report of the Third Annual State 
Convention, held in November and December, 1884, published 
also by the San Franckco Merchant. Be it remembered, however 
that the reports of these conventions, while not coming from the 
the State Printer's office, were practically official, because this 
Commission furnished all the material from our own stenograph- 
ic reports, and revised all the proofs before publishing. 

On page 97 of his report, you will find that I was engaged, 
in discussing the difficulties of the 1884 vintage, which were dia- 
metrically opposite to those of 1885, referred to before. In 1884 
climatic influences prevented a high degree of sugar, and in many 
cases, the wines did not acquire a sufficiency for perfection and 
durability. The remarks, however, serve to illustrate the fact 
which I am attempting to explain, and the high degrees of sugar 
are commonly understood, and required no formal report, explan- 
ation or analyses. For instance, I quote from the short hand 
report of what was said by myself on that occasion, regarding 
the vintage of 1884: 

"In our blends which will be noticed here, we have attempt- 
ed to explain that, but unfortunately we have had a bad season. 
Zinfandel usnallj-^ shows in Napa County, 34 to 36 per cent, of 
sugar, and the Mataro say 24. We intended for one experiment 
to mix the Zinfandel which had a superfluity of sugar, witli the 
Mataro which had an abundance of tannin, and a white grape 
that had only 22 per cent, thus bringing it down to an average of 
24, but we found it impossible to carry this out. You cannot 
take this vintage as a staple for the future. In Folsom this year 
they have found it difficult to get 20 per cent, of sugar in the 
Zinfandel, and I have been informed that they did not get that 
much. In Stockton, they got about 19 to 20 per cent, where 
they usually get from 26 to 28 per cent." 

Again on page 101, second column, you will find the follow- 
ing remarks in the address made by Mr. Portal, of Santa Clara. 
He said: 

"I have picked Mataro with 26 degrees of sugar, and I have 
picked Poulsard at 32 degrees of sugar, and it was one of these 
that I fermented in 24 hours." 

I make these references to reports published years ago be- 
before there was any issue as to the facts concerning the sacchar- 
ine develojmient in musts. Since receiving your inquiry, I have 
been surprisetl not to find as I had expectetl, abundant reference 
in numerous works on wine making in the sweet wine countries, 
to the saccharine contents of grape musts. No one seems to have 
taken the trouble to publish what every wine maker must know. 
I find, however, touching on this subject, a casual remark on 
page 143 of the work entitled: "Facts about Port and Maderia," 
by Henry Vizetelly, an established authority in England, who 
represented the British Government at several of the great 
World's I^airs, and who is the author of numerous important 
works on wine, as follows: 

"It is not his intc^rest to add spirit in excess, as its cost is 
much greater than the best wine; besides which, the wine ship- 
ped with the smallest amount of adventitious spirit is certainly 
the wine to be preferred. Mr. M. J. Ellis of the firm of W. & J. 
Graham & Co., who liad ample opportunities for arriving at a 



f>f^\f\e WIJ^E /tJSID Sflf^lT (REVIEW. 



POTTPCt coiMdowioiirii*^^— W'<ed that in ^lao ^'u°» ''"' k'*'!'*'-*' 
have thurau|{liK ri|>»Md, perfe<-tl,v f(*niifiit«-<l \^/ffl>ttunt wine 
will th'vi'lopJK (K-^nroK of pnxif Hpirit, uiid wlim nuulf fxrlunivt-- 
\y ttitm th<* ^jit<litr|(i> (rrH|M-. iix initiiy hm .'<4 (l«>)n^N-H." 

Yoii will iiiiclcrxtaiKl tluit in the liritinh workH rfffrrin); to 
the nicoholif Htn>nf;th of winet«. tlu-y rt-fi-r to the (Uyn^-H of |tnMif 
iipirit. and not to the nlM«>lute aleoliol. ho that in tlie |ire<-e4lin); 
pxtmet, we would underxlanil .'{•'< de}rrc4>s to nieiin III |M-r cent liy 
volume. .'{4 degn^-H to mean 17 |H>r e«'nt. indimtinK *'■'** '''*' >■>>■>*( 
fruni which the wine wui< made wiih from 'Mt to .'{4 |M'r cent of supir. 
Now droppin); thiit Hide of the (piextion. which in im|M>rlant 
only ad inditniting the eoninion knowle^lfje of the fact tlial nnixlH 
in cwuntrieH like S|MUn and California run very hi^h in HUfpiv un- 
lem the grniMW an> pieke<l at the |»ro|K'r moment to prevent it. 
I can mort> nutily Hatiufy the inquirer who iH not familiar with 
wine makini; in hucIi countrien. hy making tlie following hrief 
BtatemcntH which all wine makerx here know to U- true: 

FirHt: — With miitahle varietie»< <if gnijK'h, and in Huilahle lo- 
cationM, BU<'h ait moHt of our wine dixtrictH an*, and in vintage 
aeMKMW which ar«> xuflii-iently dry and warm, then- in practically 
no limit 4o tlit« amoHnt ofHUgar that cjin Ik- ohtained at will l»y 
the vine grower, if he (h-Hires ri<-h muHtn. For instjUKt'. iuKtea*! 
of it lieing a matter of wonder that a natunil gn»|M' must may Im- 
found containing from .'{<> to .'!.") |K'r cent ofsugar.it is n-aiiy a 
matter of wonder why the nntjority of the sw«H't wines of the 
State are not made from must** naturally containing 4(» |M-r cent. 
All readers of \-iticultural literature ar»> familiar with the 
IJict that in making such wines a« the firaiid Tohtyrr. of Hungarj-. 
and the celebratetl Tin* De I\iUle of Southern Fnuice. an «'xcw- 
sive degree of sugar is Horaetim(>s ohtaincHl by twisting the stems 
of the grapes while hanging on the vines, thereby dun-king the 
flow of watery sap and causing by evaporation and drying pn)- 
eoooai an increase of saccharine; or sometimes by laying the 
grapes after picking and Itefore crushing. «iiK>n straw until they 
become panh>sic«ite<l; and by other similar metluMls jurording to 
the taste of the wine maker, all of which are iR-rfeetly legitimate. 
and necessarj' to the highest develoiH'nient of quality in swwt 
wines. In Oilifoniia. it is |)ossible in most years, by "leaving the 
grik|H'M on the vines to rii)en a long while and then by partial des- 
icxrjition after pi<>king and l»efore crushing, to obtain musts of 
saocharinc strength at any degree, according to l<K-al circuni- 
Btancxss running from thirty to forty or even Jifty j)er cent, of 
migar. The <-omplication of this ai)parent question, which is 
reaily no question at all, arises from the fiwt that verj' few wine 
makers make swwt wines by actual prefertmce. The majority of 
the aweet wines are made from grapes which ac<'idently get t<x) 
high in sugar for dry wine making, or which are of a iiiiality not 
suited for dry wines. If we are ever to have swwt wines of' very 
high quality suited to the tastes of connoisseurs, the policy of the 
CJovemment must lH'precis<'ly the opposite from that which lias In-en 
a-lopteil through a want of knowledge of the actual con<lition of Cal- 
ifornia wine making and the conditions abroad. I mean by this 
that a sw«-et wine should have as little addition of distilled spirit 
as iHjflsible, and to accomplish this the must, when fermente<l. 
must have as high a degree of sugar as possible. If any swet^t 
wineaare to be looked upon with suspicion so far as public policy 
is conoemcd, those which are che<-ked most in the prcM-i'ss of fer- 
mentation with the largest addition of spirits should Ik' the <)n«>s 
disoourage<l. I, mys(«lf. during the last vintage, by partially 
dealocating a jwrtion of a crop of Matai-o grajx-s. and "keeping ol» 
the vines more of the sjune kind until they Ix'gan to shrivel, ol)- 
teined a must of over thirty jM-r cent, on a varit^ty which usually 
gives not more than twenty-four or twenty-five per cent. Crush- 
ing the late picked grapes ujwn the partially desiccatetl grap««s, I 
obtained a fermentation which n-fjuircil no che<'king. the a<lvan- 
tage consisting in this: The wine when through with a fermen- 
tation which lastwl tlm-*! wwks instead of twentv-four to forty- 
eil^t hours, as is usual, i)oss«-sw<l all the valuable tonic i)roiK'r- 
tleaof awell fernient«-<l chm't. contain<'<l sixte<-n-and-two-tentlis 
per wnt. of alcohol, and sufficient unfermented sugjir to give that 
peculiar mellow tast4- so much a<lniire4l in the Knglish market in 
high grade I'orts. This wine might [Missiblv. with great care, Ixi 
kept without any fortifn-sitifm, but t«) satisfv trmh', and prevent 
any |Missible <listurlmnce of tlu^ «'lemcnts o"f the wine, it would 
be iKwt to a<l<l now two |M-r cent, of brandy. This I was intend- 
ing to do at my leisure, until deterr<'<l from having anything 
further to do with swe«-t wine and free fortification by the 'ns-ent 
rulings of the Internal Revenue l)c|Mirtnienl. If there is any 
doubt as to whether our grapes may under projwr cinumstuncwj 



. (.main a high d. gi<e of Mi;;:ir. I might suggest that some lot of 
wine, such as that of mine, which contains sixteen i>er cent, and 
over of ah-ohol. should Im- wizcil. on Mi.«picioii that the alcoholic 
stn-ngth .•ontaiiuHl therein must have Imi-u fraudulently obtainwl. 
If the wine which I have, containing sixtcH-n jkt cent, of alcohol 
shall In- found, as wouhl U- the cas«'. absolutely pure and legiti- 
mate wine, and if in the course of the investigiition it should Iks 
disc<»vere<l that such wines are frequently to Ik' met with, the 
lc<liiii<al quesli<»n as to the natural stnngth of the musts in our 
swtH-l wine making would forever Im- diKj»os«'d of. 

Hscond: The rules of the Internal Revenue Department 
with reference to sweet wine making in difl'erent sections of the 
riiit«<l Stati-s. should vary in accordanc*' with known variations 
in the natural conditions for wine making. As a matter of fa<'t, 
the iK-partnient should look with suspicion ni>on oinj swe»'t wine 
coming from ninj Stat*- east of the Ro<ky Mcmntains. claiming 
the privileges of the Sweet Wine Law. this is <lue to the fact 
that Hoic/ifTf east of the R<Mky Mountains is there any nalunil 
must of (iiiy graiw lit to make a natural and pure sweet wine. If 
such wiiH-s arc pnMliiccd cast of the Rocky Mcmntains, under (ikj/ 
<(>iiditions worthy of rcs|K'ct l)y the Department, it should 1h' 
only ill the c-.ise of wines niaile with the aid of conctnlrahd 
iiiu.Ht.H. Any riih' of the Departiiieiit which s«'«'ks to diwredit 
and disciiiirage tiie use of concentrated musts in making swi-et 
wines, will surely encourage lictitioiis wines, sweetened fraudu- 
lently in imitation of natural projM'rties. 

Pure grape juict', in any form, whether obtained fr< in grajH-s 
aesicciitiHl before picking from the vines, or desiw«ted after pick- 
ing and l»eforc crushing, or dessicat<'d after expression by conct»n- 
tration, alwajs provided that no foreign suljstaiice is added, 
should be considere<l as legitimate by the Department, and in- 
stead of being discourage<l, should be encouraged, in order to 
promot<' legitimate work, and discourage fraudulent mcthotls of 
iiiiitating sweet wines. 

Third: It is only in certain yeare and in certain localities in 
California, where it is not absolutely nwessary in order to pre- 
vent many varieties of vines from prmlucing a saccharine strength 
in the must of over twenty-six, t\venty-eight and even thirty jK'r 
ciMit., to gsitlier the crop hurriedly, the saceharoiueter lieiiig uhi'<1 
continually in the field to jirevent the grapes from gottiugaway from 
ctintrol. No fact is better known, than that by r.'a.soii of iiuex- 
pwted or unavoidable delays in gathering crops, or sudden spells 
of hot weather, during the vintage, that it Ikm-oiucs nwessary in 
all wineries devoted to making dry wines, to add water to the 
musts in order to reduce those which run al)ove a certain degree 
of sugar, or elsi- to mix with those running high in sugar, musts 
of some grapes as the Burger, which runs low in sugar, 

I will close this rcfwrt by calling your attention to the en- 
clo8e«l cojiy of a report made to me by the Manager of the Rx- 
perimental Cellar of the Commission, in which he gives a list of 
a numlK'r of tests made of wines submitted to him, known to W. 
natural and pure, and containing high degrees of alcohol. In 
some of tliest' instances, where for instance he finds fifteen per 
cent, of alcohol, there has been naturally in the wine still unfi r- 
mente<l sugar to the extent of sometimes three to five deuces. 
These stat«'ments should be sufficient to satisfy all govi*nment 
officers that the alcoholic strength of a wine and its siux-harine 
strength also, by reji.sou of large degrees should not be a cau.st' of 
suspicion. 

Let me also state, in conclusion, what we all know, but what 
may not be fully underst<HKl in the Ka.stern States, that to add 
any form of sugar to our wines or musts, when grapt^ sell at ' 
twelve dollars ($12) jht ton. would 1k' wholly iinj)racticable, and 
unprofitable, the natural sugsir iK-ing the cheaiH'st of all, and 
rich musts only too easy to obtain. 
RcsiKH'tfully. 

C. \. WnrrMoRK, 

Chief Kxecutive Viticnltiiral Officer. 
When Pn^ident De Turk, Mr. Wetmore and others were in 
SiM-ranieiito(liiiiiigth«- past fortnight they met Colle<-tor Hyington. 
at whosfi suggestion President De Turk Sent <m a telegram 
retpiesting that ass«'ssments Ik- suspended until Wetmore's reiM)rt 
should reach Washington. This was readily act^tnled U) as tli<' 
following tel.igrani will show: 

WAsniN<;ToN, D. ('.. February .'i. ISDl. 
/, T)f Ttirk, IWxiiieiit Stntr Vi'tlnillunil Cmi'iiiKgion: — All 
assessments suspended awaiting consideration of your report 
relation to t<act;hariue content o( must, 

John W, Mason, Commissioner. 



|s/reifie WIJME /cJ^D Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



^ 



San Francisco, February 2, 1891. 

(Jliurlei< A. Wctmorr, Kx(j, ('ht('f Kxemtivc Viticiilfvriil Officer — 
Sik: At your request I furnish you tlic following list of wines that 
I liave tested during the past year, and which contained over 
thirti'eu ])er cent, of alcohol. The wines given below were natural 
wines and had not been fortified. 

Kind of Vintage. Name of Percentage of 

wine. maker. alcohol by 

volume. 

Sauterne 1887 C. A. Wetmore. 13.3 

MoselUi Riesling 188!) George West, 14.5 

Sweet Sauterne 188!) C. A. Wetmore. 14. 

Dry Sauterne 1889 C. A. Wetmore. 15.1 

Chiret 1889 George West. 13.(5 

" 1889 R. A. Swain. 13.8 

" 1888 H. B. Wagoner. 13.25 

" 1889 J. Concaunon. 13.75 



White Wine 


1889 


Dr. Perry. 


13.75 


Sauterne 


1890 


W. Wehuer. 


14.1 


Zinfandel 


1890 • 


C. A. Wetmore. 


16. 


Mataro • 


1890 


C. A. Wetmore. 


16.2 


White Wine 


1890 


J. Hague. 


16.25 



Yours Respectfully, 

Ci.ARKNCE J. Wetmore. 
Manager of the Hall and Experimental Cellar. 



THE SA/S JOAQCII/N DISTHICT. 



Tlie following extracts from the report of Viticultural Com- 
missioner West referring to viniculture, will be of particular 
interest to the wine men: 
To the Board of State Vitietdttt/ral Commmioyiers: 

Gentlemen: — In reviewing the progress of grape growing in 
the San Joaquin District since my last report, a greater devel- 
opement will be shown than in any other part of the State. 

In the coimty of San Joaquin there has been no marked in- 
crease in tlie acreage of vines. The entire acreage will not ex- 
coed three tliousand. These vineyards are devoted exclusively to 
table and wine grapes, both of which are profitable. Many 
of tlie wine vineyards have paid one hundred dollars per acre at 
the prevailing price of twelve and thirteen dollars per ton for 
grapes. 

Table grapes are more profitable and have been sold at from 
thirty-five to sixty dollars per ton. Tlie demand seems unlimited 
and it is probable that a larger acreage will be planted. The pro- 
duct of wine for 1890 was ab^ut 500,000 gallons. 

Stanislaus county has done little so far, but contains thous- 
ands of acres of fine land which will soon be developed by the 
si\ eral irrigation schemes now materializing. The county is well 
adapted to the growth of raisin grapes, to which the most atten- 
tion will probably bo paid for the present. There will be a large 
planting this winter. 

Merced county has done considerable planting in the past 
year, and this season will see a large aci-eage planted in Muscats, 
which will undoubtedly thrive. Wines and brandies of good 
quality have been produced. The county now contains nearly 
two thousand acres of vines. 

Kern county has about twelve hunderd acres of Muscats, 
mostly young vinos, all of which are doing well. A larger plant- 
ing will follow this winter. 

Tulare county has done more than any county in the dis- 
trict, except Fresno, in developing the grape industry. The 
growers now number four hundred and sixty-five owning ten 
thousand acres of vineyard, two thousand five hundred acres 
of whicli are in bearing. Few wine grapes are grown. All the 
raisin vineyards are in good condition and those in bearing are 
paying handsomely. The present winter will see an exceedingly 
large acreage of new vines planted. We now turn our attention 
to Fresno county, the banner grape growing county in the state. 

The county contains 49,500 acres of vineyard owned by 
about 1,600 gi'owers; 5,600 acres are planted in wine grapes and 



43,900 acres are in raisin gi*apes. 

The conHuini)tion of raisins in this couittry increased only 
400,000 boxes in the seven years from 1884 to 1890. Allowing 
for a much greater proportionate increase of consumption for the 
next few years, the consumption in America, when the California 
vineyards of to-day are in bearing, may be placed at 4,000,000 
boxes. From these estimates we may place the California prod- 
uct of 1895 at 7,600,000 boxes and the American consumption at 
4,000,000 boxes. 

The wine vineyards are nearly all in full bearing now and 
are good paying investments. The vintage of 1890 was probably 
the largest that will be seen in California for many years and as 
tlie production and consiunption are nearly equal, the consump- 
tion increasing and the production as large as it will be for many 
years, the growers can look forward with tolerable certainty to 
at least ten years of good prices even if the condition of market- 
ing were not changed. I can however see nothing to encourage 
or stimulate the planting of wine vineyards at present. 

Tlie market for the past two years has been greatly relieved 
by the drying of many tliousand tons of wine grapes which were 
sold as dried grapes. 

A general impression prevailed last season that these grapes 
wore largely used in making wines in the East. In this opinion 
I do not sliare, as I know positively that very large quantities 
were actually sold to take the place of other dried fruits especially 
prunes. There will be a market for this product until supplanted 
by the Muscat, but by that time the quantity now dried will not 
in any way aftect the market when turned into wine. 

Fresno county produces Ports, Sherries, Angelicas, Sweet 
Muscats and Brandies of excellent quality. The sweet wine in- 
dustry, developed under the new sweet wine law, will undoubtedly 
assume large proportions and the growers are certainly to be con- 
gratulated on the bright prospects for good prices and a constantly 
increasing demand for tlieir products. A vei-y considerable export 
trade has been built up in the business of shipping California 
brandies to Europe, which will have a tendency to relieve the 
market of any surplus and insure good prices. 

In tlie wineries of Fresno county about 12,000 tons of grapes 
were cruslied during the vintage of 1890, the product being 
turned into sweet and dry wines and brandy. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Geo. West. 

Commissioner. 

T-RADE ei-RCClLA-RS. 



Louisville, Ky., December, 1890. 
Our attention has been called to the fact that unlawful use 
is being made of our trade mark, which consists of a crescent or 
half-moon, by distillers and dealers in whisky, who should, and 
do, know that they are appropriating that which belongs to 
others. 

We now, therefore, take this public method of notifying one 
and all, that any further infringement of our trade mark will be, 
vigorously prosecuted to the end of the law without further notice. 
Belle of Nelson Distillery Co., 

By Rob't J. Tilford, President. 



To the Trade: — We desire to inform our friends and the trade 
in general, that the production of tlie celebrated Thomas Moore's 
Possum Hollow pure rye whisky during the present year will 
only be 3.000 barrels. This is for the purpose of protecting the 
holders of the goods and is done without solicitation, it being a 
well-known fact that not a barrel is being offered on the market, 
and all are held by the leading dealers of the country. 

Tliankful for courtesies extended to us in the past, and 
soliciting a continuance of your valued orders, we remain 

Youi"s truly, 

Weiler Brothers, Sole Agents. 



22 



^;flK2lfie WIJME /rjMD SflF^IT F^EVIEW. 



Taylor' s C ircular. 

Fkankfort, K v., December .HI, 1«1KI. 
7b Ae Wkohmde IIA^ry Tnule,- 

QBrrunnDi: Our r«>t(|H*<-tM (»f Ortohrr 31i<t pmvnttMl the 
■t»tlrtfa»l oooditioii ur till* Hituntioii of KtMitiicky wliixkitv on 
Beptembor .10. 181N>. vis: Tlu> iMmilf*! HttM-kn of tlii> mmumui <>r 'SS, 
'89 aiitl 'Mt, th<> pnxluHion uf tin* current milhoii of '!•! iim foiii- 
pared with tlu* pnMluction uf tin* H«>aM>ii of 'W for the Mtiw 
period, Hiid tin* ainount of tlii' Hiiid '!M iirtHliictioii then iniiuiiiiiif; 
in t>oiid. 

In tho i>r(<iH>ut ixHUt* wo Huhniit, for the cxaniination of tlie 
trade, niniilar information for the nionthH ending; Octol>«>r •ilHt 
and November .'{(HJi, rt^inftively. 

BONDKU HTOt-KH OK '>Wt«, 'X'.h» AND '90(1. 



'88*. 

la IwDd Sept., ao, W S,TW.MS 

UaboiMbd in Oct., tod DUI. 8,8W 
Sth '■ UKKSSU 
(Mb ■■ s,ota 
7th ■■ U.M1 

Mb ■■ i,ia» 



•An- 

17,ST3.«05 

a0,ssa 

18,IHl 
8S,W3S 



Tol«: IM.974 

LrmTlDK In buud Ort. 81, 'W..S.M»,U« 



808,483 
17,0fll>,IIS 



IWK. 
8S,04«,7M 

au,i« 

1^5, 1 M 
1».4&» 

i7.«in 

4W.71H 

»:2..UT.«i<> 



Tot«l. 

-•.»,.1IW " 

♦Kl.:.'!:) • 

•.'i'l.Ill •• 

II7-)H« •• 

82,142 " 

UN(l,4l5|:ali'. 
52,IW,4U0Kali>. 



PRODICTION '91 CROP. 

To Sept. 30th, ineluxive. tlie pr«Mluction 

for the I'urrent ni>««on had reaeiied l.S7r>,.')04 pds. 

To wliich we add the prtMluetion for Oct.: 

'Jnd Distriet 27,!»l7galH. 

.'ith •• .37:{.CM!(! " 

«th " 120,4(M) " 

7th " 187,5K»7 " 

Sth " 4,W)1 " 714,151 " 



Mnkinj; a totad pro<1uction for firnt four 

niontliH of Jtl erop 2,58«,(!.5.5 galf. 

For the Banie peritnl of the '}>0 crop 
there waw pHxluetHl, viz: 

In July, '89 801,0,10 galB, 

In AugUKt, '89 3(M,r>r>8 •• 

In September, '89 288,404 " 

In October, '89 767,397 " 2,161,989 " 



Or an increase in '91 crop for finrt four 

monthH 427,666 jriilH. 

BONDED STOCK OK '91 CROP. 

There remained in iKind S<'pt. .'{0, '!K) 1,577.6,38 gidfl. 

to whicli mid the proiluctiou for Oct., uljove shown 714,151 '' 



2,291,78!) galH. 
and Rtd)tmrt the withdrawalH for Oct., viz: 

2iid Dintrict 9,267 gals. 

5th •• 182,1(5<5 " 

6th " .38,195 " 

7th •• 18,,'«M} " 

8th •' 1,868 " 249,8,52 gals. 



leaving in Ijond on Ootolx-r 31, •90 2,041,937 gain. 

BU.VDKD KTOCKM OK '88«, '898 AND '908. 

'88». '8IK 'Wta. Total. 

In bond Ort.. 81. IW 8,388,188 17,080,182 82,557,tl»e 53.llKS,40tl kiIk. 

UaboodwIiiiNov., 2ndDbi(. 874 48,781 3.V744 (W.I4U ■■ 

Mb ■• 88,878 117,i»i 2-Jtl.H2U 427,I(XI • 

8lb " 84,488 7II..M0 IIO.UOB 324,U1H ■' 

7lh " 81,000 02,1174 tl.lWH 10t.2fll " 

81b " 86.488 41,n» 4,.'«2 72,407 •■ 



Total 175,880 848898 87l9,nS8 8»7,U25 KalK. 

LcmTlni(lnboiidNoT.,80, '0O.8,afW,MM lO.TJS.Wm 88,I7M,0(» S1,2W,«41 kbIk. 

pwuncriox '91 ckup. 

On October 3lHt tlie |>nMiuelion for tho 

current HcaHon ha<l n*u(;he<l 2,589,655 gals. 

To which we luld the priMluction for Nov.: 

2iid DiMtrict 10^1.818 gals. 

6tli " 895.917 " 

6th " .V)3,691 " 

7th •' 423,023 " 

8th '■ 258.297 "2,035,776 " 



I'or the hjiiiie |M riiMl of the 'ilU <lop 
there was |ii-iMliiee4l, viz: 

In Julv, 89 801 .6,30 gals, 

III .\ii;:iist. 89 304,5,58 " 

In S'pt.mU-r, -89 288,404 " 

In (><tolKr, 'M> 767,.397 " 

In .NovemlK-r, '89 2,428,740 " 4,590,72<» gals. 



Or an iiien-ane in '91 crop forlirHt five 

inonthH :.' 34.702 gals. 

I«>N|IKI) HTtlCKS OF '91 CKOP. 

There remained in IkjikI on Oft. 3l8t 

of Kiiid crop, say 2,041,9.37 gals. 

to whieli we add the production forNov.above8hown2,0,35,776 " 

4,077,713 gals. 
antlHiibtract the withdrawals for Nov. viz: 

2nd District 9,.369 g-alw. 

.5th " 17.5.807 " 

6th '• 60,.356 " 

7th " 17,628 " 

8th •' 372 " 26.3,5.32 g-als. 



leaving in IkiikI Novenil)er 30, 'JM), 

of '!K)-'91 crop 3,814,181 gals. 

The convalescence of our senior, lately advised, has now 
culminated in coinpl(>te recovery of his usual health, and, after 
the liijts*' of tlie period j)res<Tilx'd l)y his j>liysiciaiis for alwolut© 
alisti'iition from all biisincHS matters, he will 1k' pleaH<'dto address 
you with his own hand in pursuancK of the subject uiidertiiken 
jtrior to liis illiu>ss. 

Your olxHlicnt servants, 

E. H. Taylor Jr., & Sons, 

Frankfort, Ky. 



SOMETHI/NG ABOUT BITTEKS. 



Making a total pHMliitrtion for Arst five 

inontliH of ''.t| enip. 



4.625.431 gids. 



Of bitters wo have many kinds and qualities. There is the 
extremely nauseous mixture usually called "stomach bitters," 
which many makers are in the habit of turning (mt, but this is 
a mistake, for an article where the bitter principle is too pro<lom- 
inant is not a success. Though it is a bitter it must be a palat- 
able one, or the jjublic will not have it at any price. Take for 
instance, the celebrated "Angostura," "Leslie's Stomach," and 
"Hostetter's." These bitters have been before the world for a 
considerable periotl, and still bold the highest position amongst 
tlii'ir class. They contain a bitter principle, but only to a slight 
extent, but they are aromatic, and it is to the blending of the 
aromatic flavors that their success is due. 

Hitti'i-s should l>c manufactured solely from the herbs, roots, 
barks, 8ee<ls or peel necessary; the use of essential oils, I do not 
(•(msider ju(li<'ious; by using tho tincture of the herbs, etc., you get 
the real jiiire flavor and aroma nniuired, delicate and true. For 
the bitter principle we have chiretta, gentian root, columbo root, 
chichona bark, worm-wood and (luassia; for aromatics — calamus 
r<M)t, galangel root, cinnamon, anise, cardainon seeds, nutmeg 
and snake r(M)t; for an astringent — Catechu; for fruit flavors — 
lemon and orange jhh^Is; and to im])art fullness, raisins, prune-, 
soluzzi or li(|iiorice juice. II<mey is usihI in many higlwl.i 
bitters to impart the uwessary swei'tness, but should only Ihmiso*! 
in those containing a large tpiaiitity of spirit. For coloring j»ur- 
IM>H(>s we have cochineal, saffVon, turmeric, alkanet root, saiulal- 
w<mm1. carinel, etc.; fniin tht^w articles, taken acnmling to the 
flavor r.><iuired, the U»«s bitters an> manufacturiHl. A gmxl way 
for makers who wish to try something new is to extract a tincture 
from each article si>pamtely. and then exiwrimont as desired; if 
you are devot«'<l to your business a little trying will amply repay 
you and add <>oiisiderably to your reputation as a cordial maker. 
— Cordiul Milker. 



f/ceifie WIJSIE jfk^Q Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



23 



FAMOUS DISTILLE-RS. 

The following deserved tributes to some of the famous dis- 
tillers of the United States, appeared in the holiday issue of 

Mida's Criterion: 

Jairies Levy & Bro. 

(jTT HE great interest of straight Kentucky whiskies owes to no 
A other firm, nor to any other half dozen firms, so great a 
measure of its present recognition among the masses, as it does 
to that of James Levy & Bro., of Cincinnati. The amount of 
work in this direction and the quantity and quality of the goods 
liandled by this house would, if it could be recounted, fill a vol- 
ume. To such a degree have fine whiskies and Jim Levy been 
identified that whatever brand this firm has taken hold of rises 
ai once in value. The trade throughout the United States recog- 
nizes their standing and the value of their endorsement. Cohfi- 
dence, the basis of all transactions, follows their every move. The 
combination of the best talent in their respective spheres works 
most harmoniously in the membership of this firm. 

lio salesman of the present generation has ever approached 
the talent displayed by Mr. James Levy. His untiring industry, 
extending over a quarter of a century on the road, studying the 
wants of the trade and keeping his finger ever on the business 
pulse, enabled him to keep at all times abreast of the popular 
movement. 

Mr. Albert Levy, in his sphere as the head of the office 
department, watching the home interests with tireless zeal, can- 
not be excelled. With such two motors, the acquirement of fame 
and wealth could easily have been predicted. 

Of late years, Mr. Harris, a graduate of the firm, who, in 
addition to his natural talents, has been constantly under the in- 
spiring influences of two such master minds as James and Albert 
Levy, has proved to be a great adjunct to the business. No 
wonder that among the younger generation no one is a more 
accomplished business man, commanding the confidence and re- 
spect of the entire trade in a higher degree than Mr. Geo. Harris. 

And last, but not least, the scion of Mr. Albert Levy, Harry 
Levy, who, during the past few years, has been relieving to a 
great extent the work of his father, follows faithfully and with 
signal ability the footsteps of his prototype, bidding fair to be the 
worthy son of a worthy sire. 

It would be superfluous to enumerate all the brands controlled 
by this firm, and the mere statement that the destiny of " W. H. 
McBrayer," " Susquehanna Rye," "Tea Kettle" and "Richwood" 
is in their hands is sufficient to place these among the foremost in 
the ranks of popular brands. 

Thompson Distilling Go., Ltd. 

^TT^HE Thompson name first became known in connection with 
^ the distilling business during the Revolutionary war. Son 
succeeded father until the present company was formed in the 
fall of '89, at which time they purchased the distillery and brand 
from Samuel Thompson. 

The plant was purchased with a view of manufacturing a 
strictly pure rye whisky— as fine as could be made, and to give it 
as good a storage as could be constructed. To carry out that 
purpose, all the old machinery was torn out and the house was 
equipped with the best and latest machinery known to the dis- 
tilling trade; a new brick warehouse, which is not excelled in the 
country, was also built. 

This gave the company a total storage capacity of 20,000 
barrels, at an insurance rate of eighty cents per hundred. 

Their first mash was made on December 23, 1889, and by the 
end of the present year they will have manufactured nearly 4,800 
barrels, of which they hold less than 200 barrels. 

Their fall '90 product amoiints to less than 1,800 barrel8,but 
had they run at their full fermenting capacity they could have 
made over 3,000. 



Their spring '91 pro<luct will not exceed 3,000 barrels, of 
which over two-thirds is already placed. 

The policy of the company has always been to sell simply at 
a manufacturer's legitimate profit, charge no premium on a limited 
crop, and give the brand as wide a distribution among the best 
distributing trade of the whole country, as quality, energy, fair 
dealing, attention to details and judicious advertising would give 
it. 

At the end of spring '91 the original holders of the brand will 
number over 100, and they are considered the best in their re- 
spective sections. 



A. Overholt & &>. 



(Z^ 



HE " Overholt " brand of whisky was established in 1810,by 
^^ Abraham Overholt, who, at that time mashed about one 
bushel per day in a mortar. Owing to the limited demand the 
production was not increased to any extent for a number of years, 
and then only to about two barrels per day. The output from 
then on steadily increased to ten barrels per day. When the fire 
of 1884 took the entire plant the house was immediately rebuilt and 
the capacity increased to twenty-five barrels per day, and owing 
to the continued and increased demand for this whisky they de- 
cided in the spring of 1889 to increase to fifty barrels per day, and 
they have been producing since that date at the rate of about 
12,000 barrels per annum. 

When they contracted for fall '90 and spring '91, they were 
besieged by a number of parties to increase their production and 
supply them, but after giving the matter careful consideration 
they decided it unwise to do so, and as a safeguard to their 
customers their production this year will be several hundred bar- 
rels less than last year. In addition to this they have always 
adhered strictly to their policy outlined some years ago, viz: To 
act as distillers only, and not carry any of their own whisky in 
any shape or form, and thus not enter into competition with their 
distributors, and they can say truthfully that they are not the 
holders of any whisky and shall endeavor always to car^y out 
this policy. 

Until a few years ago, two customers took their entire pro- 
duction, but now they have eighty-four original customers on 
their books which allows an average of less than 100 barrels per 
annum to each customer. 

Their 87's have all been unbonded, 88's have almost ceased 
to be a factor owing to a very limited amount remaining, and 
their customers are drawing heavily upon spring 89 's for their 
supply. 

Owing to the success that has been meted out to them we 
cannot but predict for " Overholt " a brilliant future. 



R. Monarch. 

(Z^Tm.01^G the most conservative distillers, who reflect lustre 
^r\j^ upon our interest, R. Monarch stands unrivaled. In eyery 
movement calculated to promote the best interests of the trade 
Mr. Monarch has ever been found in the vanguard, entirely obliv- 
ious to his self interest, and to such an extent has this sterling, 
honest and upright man been recognized by the trade that no 
movement can inspire confidence that has not " Uncle Dick," as 
he is familiarly known, among its advocates and promoters. 

The possession of wealth can be attained by many; a name, 
however, such as R. Monarch enjoys among his confreres, is the 
fortune of but very few. To attain both name and afiluance is 
the lot of still fewer. No wonder, therefore, that those handling 
brands which are the creation of such a man, or with which he is 
identified, must have their confidence inspired in their intrinsic 
merits and in their value. 

Mr. Little, who is at the head of the office, manages that 
department with promptness, uniform courtesy, and such thor- 
ough competence that he wins friends even among those who have 
not been fortunate enough to come in personal contact with him 



24 



f^lfie Wir^E /tjMD SflF^IT F^EVIEW. 



mill ItiinuHi to kiKiw liini only Ity liir> cairrfriiMiiuh-iKf. 

AiiKMig llii' tnori* r«<(i'iit iUM|uii«ili<iiiH urtli*- Morkiii^; Ktatl' Mr. 
Dnvid ii« ntakiiig moMt rair]»rimti(; iiiul nipitl litiKlway. If hi> eon- 
tiiiiHf« »t thf Kj»iin' nHii> iu« Im' liii*< <l<iin> froin llif ntaii. Iiin ••JinH'r 
cannoi fail !<• |tn>v«> a iiiark)^! our ImiIIi in tin- inla-nvl oriiiH liriii 
nml liiinMfir. 

Hoflb«in?«r Bros. 

^7*^111^ hwdiiii; liotim* hai> Ikh'Ii in the liqiutr liiiKinctw i«incv 
]^*^ 1K.VJ. At that tinu* n-<-tirn><l wliinky wat* tlic principal 
artirlo of cx>nuni-rit>. larp> liitiiMt* at Cincinnati and cIscwIut*'. 
liandhHl nt>thin){ but rectifiiHl whiHki<>H. and wicli l»rand>« ax 
"Olive Hrnnch" woro «>nm<l«'nMl a very fino wliinky. loiter «)n 
mIii>tillin);<-omn)c>nci>«l, and SM» |K'r «>nt. n-^lintilliNl wliixky was 
oosidervd ne piu* ultra. In lK(tl and during the war |iooplo Ih>- 
ottnt' aci'UHtonicHl to U'ttor and nion* fXiXMinivi' gmdon of whinky. 
and tht* houHC of IIoflDicinu'r Itrox.. wan one of tlic fon>niost to 
inlroducx' a finer gradt> of i-oni|M>undtMl an<l liU-ndiMl wliinkii-H in 
tho market. Their hramlH "(lolden Crown," "Fairfax." "I >ave 
WhitelxTk." "llarrj" HowoH" and "Kninnwick Trivate St<H'k." 
were well and fiivorahly known to the tnule. and the "Fairfax" 
brand Un-anie alnu>$<t a houHehold word in the whole country 
fmm the Atlantic to the Pacific Cotixt. 

All the blendH and eoni|M>unds reijjiMsl supreme until 1SX.3, 
when, by overpnKluction, ntraight wlii: kies wen- Hold so low in 
the market that it curtailed the demandn of the other whiskicH 
ami for nome timer dove the blends to the Imck^round. For the 
last few years, however, an increaiH- demand forpMKl com|M)unds 
and blends haM made itwlf felt again, which will rtnlountl to the 
lienefit of the whole tnide, for after all fine com[M)unds and blends 
are the mot*t pn>fltable to handle for the jobln-rs. 

BeBidcM their largt« lines of blends and fruit brandies. lIofT- 
heimor Brtm.,ar«»thediHtillerBof the well-known bnind of ■' White 
Mills B«Mirbon and Rye." They are making 4,."»()0 Iwirrels a year' 
and every barrel is sold to the l(>gitiniate tnule. They are al.so sole 
contn)ller« of the well-known brsind "\V. IJ. Sjimuels" fine hand- 
made Hour maxh whiflky, Nclmn Co., Ky.. of which they make 
2..VJ0 liarri'ls jn-r annum, and we are ph>;is«il to siiy that they 
mwt with gn-sit succeMH in handling this excellent brand. 



CHOICE PEKCIVIA/S WIMES. 



TH E WO-RLD'S WINE PRODUCT I O/^. 



. Following in the protluction of wine in the world during 1890 
aooording to Le Momitrur Vinieole: 

ynnee 2f).f.77.0JtS hectolitrw. 

Algeria 2,K44.I.{(t 

Tunis : „...,„ i>(>,(mm) " 

Italy ' 27.S47,(KK» " 

H|>ain .'?(),( MK»,( MM) " 

Portugal 4,5<Mi,(MM) 

C^bnary and Mailcira Islands 1.')(>,(K)0 " 

AuHtna 4.()40.«)0 «• 

Hungary 5,000.(K)0 ' 

(itrnumy 4,2(MMMM> 

■■"■*• .'J,(MM».(MM» 

Turkey and CypniN , 2,.')(M».(MMt " 

Bulgaria 2,!MM),(MM) 

8«^ia 2,(MKMM)«) 

iirwKO l,r»0<MMM» 

Boumania l.JWMt.fKK) " 

Swltwirland l.WMMHMI " 

United HUtt<-s 1/»2<».(K)0 " 

ArgniUne KepubUc l,ri(MMX>0 

<<J»i'» 1,>«MMMMI " 

OapeColony ](Mi.(mm) 

AuMtrslia ..„ Khi.cmm) " 

QOM-T Tirr A riA>ro. nnoAV on aw .miKii MtsicAi, instiiimknt 

^SLJ:., ' ' *<'li»-«-, IIMI Murki-I Slmi. Kiui 

gnd^..i !' ' I''"- ">« lh<T..iii.|. TlK2l.iivr.il 

7,1,, , , ".■■ '";•.' """• '"r ' f on iiiHallincnIo. till. Ik kn 

g.i ... l'"„.' '^" "*• •*•*«'»" »• IV 1,..,H„I .|e«ll,,K. ....I .Iw.j" 



The gniiH-H grown herealnrntH (at Pisco, KK) miles south of 
CaUao) arc as iK-Iicious as tlios*' of southern France and s<'«-m to 
liavi- al>s4.rl»c<l tin- breath of the near-by s<^'a, as w«'ll as the sun- 
shine of |sTiH-tual summer. (Jreat ciuantities of wine and brandy, 
calle<l -Italia" and " Pis*-!!," aiv exported from this pla(«, and 
their nianufacliin- is the, principal industry <)f the valley. We 
visited the storehouse of the wine maker and found it to contain 
nearly a thousand casks, each csisk holding nearly .100 gallons. 
The anumiit of liquor made is marvelous, considering the limited 
<listrict. and the value of the exports is in full j)roiM)rtion. 

" Italia " is the favorite' white wine of Peru, though much 
t<H> strong for general use; and •Pis<'o." though a most inn<K-ent- 
l*N>kiiig Ix'venigi'. iK'ing <'olorless as water, contains more intoxi- 
cation to the cubic inc^h than any other known liquid, unless it 
may be the m;'.'«'al of Mexico. There is a Portuguese hen- who 
prfsluces thr.-e distinct kinds of wine from the siime gnij)e. one 
similar to the bcjit Hucehis, and a third much like the inferior 
Rhine wines. There is also a very fine and correspondingly 
exj)ensive li(|iior distilled from the large white grajx-.tlavort'd with 
chiriinojas. the latter being the most delicious fruit to la' found 
in the tropics. All along the beach are immense warehouses 
where the coininon "Pisco" is stored in huge red jai*s shajMHl 
much like an eggshell, waiting shipment to the various jjorts of 
Peru and Phili. 



E. H. 



TAgLO-R J-R., 
HIBITIO/N. 



O/M P-RO- 



E. II. Taylor Jr.. of " Old Taylor" whisky fame, who is 
Mayor of Frankfort. Ky., has iigiiin had occasion to veto a sumj)- 
tuary law i»ass«'d by the council of that city. It was an ordinance 
prohibiting the sale of cigsirettes. Liist year a similar law was 
piissed over his veto, but this time the Colonel came out on top. 
In the course of his last veto which wa.s sustained by the council, 
he uses the following unanswerable argument, and calls attention 
to the anomalous jwisition of s(>veral memlH>rs of the councU, 
connected with the distilling interests of that section: 

" In princijjal the ordinance is wrong. The excessive use of 
tobacco is genenilly rwogiiized as an evil. The excessive use of 
intoxicating licjuor has lieen, and is, to a greater extent, recog- 
nized as harmful to tlie human race. Therefore, by legislation in 
the way of licence and revenue laws, government has taken up<m 
itself a suiH'rvisi(m of the tratTic in lK)th tobacco and spirits. It 
hits even given to the people in certain districts the right to pro- 
hibit the sale of liquor in their Iwunds. It has not g<me so far 
in the matter of tobacco. IJut the princij)le is the same in Unh 
cas«'s. The sam«' jM)wer must lye exercised in the one csme as. in 
the other. I am unable to find any act of the Ix'gislaturc giving 
this extraordinary jwwer over the siUe of tolmcco to your honor- 
able ImmIv. In the abs<'nce of sucJi a provision, it would jM'rhajis 
not 1k' risking too much to say that the jwwer rests only with 
the iKH^ple at the ballot-box, and not even with them until the 
General Assembly indicates how it shall l)e exercised. 

Three members of your honorable iKHly are c-onnwted with 
the whisky interest which forms so large a part of our material 
wealth. One is an oflicer of the comi)any which controls the 
'• Hermitage" and " Old Crow" Distilleries"; another is, jn-olwbly, 
the most prominent saloon keejier in the city of Frankfort; the 
third is S<vretary and manager of the "O. F. C." and "Carlisle" 
.Distilleries. Thes«' gentlemen, it is true, advwatid and vot<d 
for this ordinance. Hut I am sure that they did not consider the 
matter carefully. Had they done so, they would have wen that 
tlu' absolute authority which your pr«'s«-nt a<'tion implies would 
also enable you to pi-ohibit the sjile, gift or l>arter,or nuinufacture 
of ardent spirits in the city limits." 



f/reifie Wlj\£ /fJMD SflRIT [REVIEW. 



25 



-RECE/NT T-REASU-Ry BECISIOMS. 



MARKING, STAMPING, BRANDING, ETC., OF IMPORTED GOODS AND PACK- 
AtiES UNDER SECTION 6 OF THE Atrr OF OCTOBER 1 , 1890. 

Treasury Department, December 20, 1890. 
To Officers of the Ciistoms and otliers concerned: 

Section (i of the act of October 1, 1890, provides as follows: 
That on and after the first day of Man^h, eighteen hundred 
and ninety-one, all articles of foreign manufacture, such as are 
usiuilly or ordinarily marked, stamped, branded or labeled in 
legible Engli.sh words, so as to indicate the country of their origin; 
and unless so marked, stamped, branded or labeled they shall not 
be adniitt 3(1 to entry. 

While the question as to whether goods imported on and 
aftt'i- March 1, 1891, are properly "marked, stamped, branded or 
labeled" under the above provision is to bo decided by collectors 
of custom at the time of importation, and the language of the 
section is so plain as to hardly reciuire an interpretation by the 
Department, yet, in view of the great number of inquiries re- 
ceived from importers and others, it is deemed proper to publish 
some of the conclusions reached by the Department in the prem- 
ises for the information of all concerned. 

1. AV'hile only such goods or articles of foreign manufacture 
"as are usually or ordinarily marked, stampsd, branded or 
labeled" are required to be so marked, etc., on and after the first 
of March, 1891, j'ct it will be observed that all packages, outside 
or other, containing any imported merchandise must be so marked, 
etc., to entitle the contents thereof to entry at the custom-house. 

2. In the case of champagne wines, mineral waters, etc., in 
hibeled bottles, the law will be substantially complied with if the 
outside packages are marked with the name of the country of 
origin. 

3. In the case of bottles with more than one label contain- 
ing imported goods, the law will be complied with if but one of 
the labels thereon bears the name of the country of origin. 

4. The prefix "from" placed before the nam i of a country 
of origin, as, for instance, ''from France," "from Germany," etc., 
is not essential, the law requiring simply the name of the country 
of origin to appear. 

5. Goods coming from England, Scotland Ireland and Wales 
may be marked "Great Britain," but gootls marked "England," 
"Scotland," etc., would not be excluded. It is held, however, 
that the name of the mother country of origin appearing on 
goods instead of the names of kingdoms, states, or divisions of 
countries, would more closely meet the requirements of the law. 

6. The law does not require the name of the importer, 
shipper, or maker, to be marked, stamped, etc., on imported 
articles or packages. 

7. Marking by stenciling with some indelible material would 
be a compliance with the law. 

8. It is held that the word "Scotch" appearing on goods 
coming from Scotland would be sufRcient under said provision. 

CHINESE WINES. 

New York, November 15, 1890. 
Before the Board of United States General Appraisers at New 
York, November 14, 1890, 

In the matter of the protest. No. 962(», of Sun Kwong On, 
against the assessment of duty at various rates by the collector 
of customs at New York on certain Chinese wines, imported per 
Wandering Jew, April .30, 1890. 

Opinion by Stackpole, General Appraiser. 

In this case the importers protest against the collector's 
action in assessing duty at the rate of $2 per gallon and 3 cents 
per bottle (under T. I., new, 310, 311 and 313) upon certain so- 
called Chinese wine, and at 50 cents per pound and 30 per cent, 
ad valorem on the bottles containing the same (under T. I., 118 
and 133), on certain other Chinese wine, claiming that the first 
so-calied wine is dutiable at oue of the following' rates, viz: $1.60 



per 12 qvxart on 24 pint bottles, under T. I., 308; 20 per cent, ad 
valorem under T. I., 301, or $2 per gallon on the alcohol contained, 
and 25 per cent, ad valorem under T. I., 103; and that the second 
class should be assessed either on one of these classes, or under 
T. I., 311, or as a propriety preparation under T. I., 99. 

Examinations of both classes of wine have recently been 
made. The first class of wine appears to be neither a juice ex- 
l)ressed from fruit manufactured into a wine of commerce, nor a 
natural fruit juice, but a spirituous liquor produced by a process 
of distillation. (G. A. 40, Sept. 20, 1890.) The second class 
appears to be a medicinal preparation containing alcohol (see 
Synopsis 9083), and there is no reason to think that it is prepared 
under any special private formula, that it is used for cure of any 
special disease, or has any other attribute to bring it within the 
class of "propriety preparations." 

The assessment of both classes being in accordance with the 
true nature of theso so-called "wines" as thus ascertained, was 
correct and hereby affirmed. 

GINGER ALE BOTTLES. 

New York, November 19, 1890. 
Before the Board of United States General Appraisers at New 
York, November 6, 1890. 

In the matter of the protests, 768a, etc., of E. J. Burke and 
W. A. Ross & Bro., against the assessment of duty by the col- 
lector of the ports of New York on certain ginger ale bottles, 
imported per various steamers in August and September, 1890, 
described in the accompaning schedule. 

Opinion by Wilkinson, General appraiser. 

Duty was assessed at 20 per cent., the collector holding that 
under the act of June 10, 1890, the bottles constituted an element, 
in the foreign market, of the merchandise. Appellants claim 
free entry under paragraph 317, act of March 3, 1883. 

Paragraph 317 provides: "Ginger ale or ginger beer, 20 per 
cent, ad valorem; but no separate or additional duty shall be 
collected on bottles or jugs containing the same." 

The courts held this limitation to mean that the bottles were 
not subject to any duty. 

The question now at issue is whether this proviso in para- 
graph 317 was repealed by the general repealing clause, section 
29 of the act of June 10, 1890,' thus making the bottles liable to 
duty as a covering or cost incident to placing the merchandise in 
condition packed ready for shipment. 

It is a well-settled principle of law (Enlich on Statutes, 
Generalia speckiUbus non derogant") that a general provision for re- 
peal does not repeal a specific clause. The limitation in para- 
graph 317 is therefore not abrogated. 

The claim of the appellants is sustained, and the entry should 
be reliquidated accordingly. ' 

FILLED BOTTLES. 

New York, November 26, 1890. 
Before the Board of United States General Appraisers at New 
York, November 26, 1890. 

In the matter of the protest. No. 21836, of F. H. Shallus, 
against the rate of duty assessed by the collector of customs at 
Baltimore on filled bottles, imported per Nessmore, October 13, 
1890. 

Opinion of Sharretts, General Appraiser. 

It appears from the papers submitted to us in the present 
case, that duty was assessed upon an importation of jams and 
marmalades at 35 per cent, ad valorem, the correctness of which 
assessment is not in dispute. Protest was duly filed, however, 
against the exaction of40per cent, ad valorem upon bottles or jars 
containing the same, the protestant claiming that in accordance 
with the provisions of paragraph 104 of the act of October 1, 
1890, the value of the bottles or other vessels should have been 
added to the contents and the whole returned for duty as an en- 
tirety at 35 per cent, ad valorem. 

It is quite apparent that the determination of the question 



26 



|yr<2lfie WIJ^E /rJ^D Sflf^lT I^EVIEW. 



•t iiMie in d<>p(<ii<k>nt upon the acope of the proviw) att;i<lied to 
pam^n^ph 104, which proviim thi> ap|M'lliint conU'tidtt r«'liit4W to 
the cnunierated articleii uperilU'*! in |mni(n^pli Kt-'i, ami not to 
tilled (lottlflB oovcred b^ paragraph 104. The two piirafpntphti in 
(incaUon are m» foUown: 

lOS. OreMi and colored, molded or preMWHi. and flint and 
lime fchuw )M>ttlett holding nion' than on(> pint, * * * one cent 
per |iound: * * * holding not niort> than one pint, and not Ichh 
than one quarter of a pint, one and oiit>-liair ivnt« imt poiintl: if 
ht>lding \em than one-fourth of a pint, fifty wntM jht jjnmn. 

104. All artiel«<H enumerattHl in the |>r«'<'e<linu |Niragraph. if 
fUleil and not otherwim* provi<led for in thin a<-t.an(l the content i 
are »uhje<'t to an a<l valorem rate of tluty <)r to a nite of duty 
baaed up<m a value, the value of mich lM>tth>H, vialH or other vci- 
aeb shall Im* adde<l to the value of the contentM for the aMC(>rtain- 
ment of the <lutialile value of the latter: * * * /VoriW«/, 
That no article manufacturo<l from gla*« dewcrilKHl in the precxil- 
ing paragraph Hhall pay a lem rate of duty than forty per c(>ntuni 
ad valorem. 

Paragraph 103 is complete; there are no conditiouH inipoHed 
therein. Certain t(pii-ifie<l articlcH are Kubjected to fixed duticH 
dependent u\Hm their weight and holding cajmcity — two require- 
menta cany of determination with rt-gstrd to empty iMittlcH. 

Paragraph 104 then provider for similar articles am those 
enumerated in iiaragraph KW, the weight and holding capacity 
of which can not be discovered without injurj- to their contents, 
and in onler to overconu' this difficulty it re<piircs that the value 
of the U>ttlet<, vials or other vessels containing goods subject to 
ad valorem raten of duty shall Ihs addnl to the value of their 
contentM for the ascertainment of the rate and amount of duty 
chaiigeable thertntn. Inasnuich, however, as this rule would lead 
to great variations in the rate« of duty applicable to filled Iwttlcs 
unlcHH restricttnl in sonM» manner, a proviso was adde<l to jiara- 
graph UH. which fixwl the minimum rate at 40 per <«nt. ad va- 
loM'm. Th<' intent of ("«mgn>ss is manifest, and the principle 
enunciatiHl obtains, we entertain no doubt. It is a maxim of law 
that a proviso n>lat4>s to the subjc<-t imnuKliately prwwling it. 
The subji'4-t-malter fulfilling the.s«' conditions in the present in- 
atanoe is IxMtles of a similar kind to those df^tTilxnl in {mragraph 
103, when filletl; consequently the proviso must be eonstruwl a« 
lieing applioible to |Ninigritph 104 in its entirety, but not to para- 
grajth lo;j, which relates to a «lifl"er»-nt class of gomls, viz, Iwttles, 
vials, etc., that are not fille<l. The use of the words "preceding 
paragraph" in the pnniso is merely descriptive of the kind of 
articleM when filhsl that arc to have imposed nim\ them athlitional 
limitations. The concluding |>ortion of |Miragraph 104 must, 
then-foH', Im' hehl to reml i\n follows: IVovUled, That no article 
nuuiufactured fn)m glass similar to those descrilnHl in the pre- 
ce<ling iMiragraph shall pay a less rate of duty when filled than 
40 jwr cent, od valorem. 

Theanenoncnt of duty upon the bottles under consideration, 
being in acertnhince with the alx>ve ruling, is affirmed. 

ANCIIOK BITTERS. 

Nkw York, r)e«it>mber 1, 1««0. 
Before the Board of I'nit^tl Kutt-s (Jeneral Ai)praiser8 at New 
York.lH-^vmls'r 1, IHJK). 
In the niatt<-r of th.> proti-st, No. !MX)a, of Knauth, NucIkkI 
& Kulin. againut the rate of duty assessed by collector of cus- 
Uims at New York on Anchor Bitt<'rs, imiwrted per Dania Julv 
10,1890. ' 

Opinion of Wilkinwm, (iencnil Ajipraiser. 

Duty was asaessed at $1' jn-r gjilbm on the bitters, under 
paragraph ;n 3, and at 3 mits on the iM.ttU*, under jwragraph 
310, of III.. jM-t of Man-h .'{, 1«K.'J. 

Ap|M-llanti4 claim that the menliandiw should Ik- classified at 
fiO per cent, on the bitl«rs as a proprietary pnparation, und.r 
pamgraph OH, and at 30 per .-.nt. on the fille<l bottli!S, under 



It is unn<H'«'ssary to consider whether Anchor Bitters is a 
pn>prieUiry pr«'i>anvtion or not. If it is, it can l>e classified with 
wjual propriety iw a spirituous l»everage, and the higher rate of 
duty must pn'vail. 

This bitters is sulwtantially similai to the spirituous leverages 
euumenitiMl in paragraph '.WA of the act of 1883. Its laln-l 
riH'ommends it as a drink, whether mixed with ice-water or as a 
flavoring to a cock -tail; to Ih' taken to stimulate the api)etite 
iM'foH' anil to assist digestion after eating, and as a stomach 
strengthener at all tinuw. 

The dwision of the collector is affirme<l accordingly. 

In the opinion of this Board, use determines theclassifiattion 
in the («se at bar. Paragraph 117 of the a<'t of March 3. 1883, 
is as follows: "Coloring for brandy, .")0 per ctuit. ad valorem." 
If the chemical comiMJund in question is coloring for brandy, it is 
more sj>e<'ifically provided for in sjiid paragraph 117 than in 
paragraph 92; indtHMl, it falls exactly under i)aragraph 117. The 
most vital fact in the case is the original return of the appraiser 
— the rftum on the face of the invoice — and this return is "brand}- 
coloring." There is not a single fact in the case which supports 
appellant's legal conclusion that their iniportaticm is classifiable 
under said paragraj>h 215. On the contrary, all the facts nega- 
tive the assumption of the protest that it is a crude mineral sul)- 
stance. 

We therefore fall back u|)on the original return of the ap- 
praiser as the determining fact in the (Si.se, and the conclusion 
would Ih' the ssime if it held that the rates provided by paragraphs 
9'J and 1 1 7 are ecjually applicable luider section 2491) of Uie Kc- 
vised Statutes. 

The decision of the collector is affirmed. 

BOONEKAMP BITTERS A rKOI'UlKTARY PKKI'AKATION. 

New York, November 24, 1S9U. 

Sir: The protest (No. 4496) receive<l with your letter of the 
l.'ith ultimo, of Me-ssrs. Luyti^s Bnithers. agiiinst your assi'ss- 
ment of duty, at the rat« of 82 per gallon and 3 centw per bottle, 
on certain Boonekamp bitters, imi>orted per Jiahne, September 
19, 1890, is hereby sustained, iKung in accordance with our ruling 
of the 14th instant, not yet printed. 

The claim of the importers that it is entitled to entry as pro- 
prietary preparaticm under paragraph 99 of the tarifl* act of 
March 3, 1883, is considered as well founded. 

Collector of Customs, San Francisco Cal. 



The Supreme Court of South Dakota has decide<l against the 
defendents in the original package case of the state of Stuitli 
Dakota vs. Chapman et al. The court held that in order for de- 
fendents to have immunity under the decision of the Supreme 
Cjurt of the United States in the cjuse of Li'isy vs. Hardin, known 
as the original package case, they must show: (1) That they are 
fortugn importers or agents of a foreign iniiH)rter of IxH'r or 
liquors; (2) that as such agents they receive an importation of 
beer or liquor from another state or foreign country; (3) that 
they are, as such importers or agents, selling this imfMirtation by 
the original, unbroken package in which it was ini])orte(l; (4) 
that they are not making their house of business a ti]>pling cou- 
ceni or rendezvous of i)ersons, bringing it within the police 
power of the state to declare it a nuisance. All these fa<'ts must 
b«> fully estaldisluHl by the defendents in order to make the trans- 
action legitimate' under the decision. The failure to establish 
any of tlu^se projK)sitions makes a st>ller of intoxicating litpior 
amendable to the state law. The court further holds that when 
iKrttles of whisky orln'er, cju-h sealed uj) in a paia-r wrapjK'r and 
closely pack<>d together in uncovered wiKxlen l>oxes, funiisluHl by 
the importer, and these woo«Ien boxcj* marked to the a<ldress <)f 
the ogi'ut, and shipment from one state to another, the woinlen 
l)oxes and not the lK)ttlfs constitute the original package within 
the meaning of the <hHisiou of the SupriMue Court of the United 

Ut»t«H. 



f/ceifie WiJSIE /cJ^D Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



27 





-^5:ll!:!l_r-^'^ DISTILLED BY 

BaviessCdumty Distilling CO 
Owensboro^Ky. 

Our Cooperage is our oWrv mar\ufacl\ire, 
OUTS AND PROOF CUKRHNTe6D'==s 
Qoods delivered F. 0. B. either Boat or Gars. 



Owensboro^Ky^ 

Our Cooperage is our oWrv marvufacture. 
OUTS AND PROOF GUKRKNTe6D"==» 
Qoods deiiv'ered F.O. B. either Boat or Cars. 



28 



fAeipie WI|NJE /rj^O Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 





CHAS. MEINECKE & CO., 




314 Sacramento Street, 



I3Sd:i=OI^TEI?.S. 



San Francisco, Cal 



l>.-i.l7 A I.. ).l.ilii.-.r. \. 



,1 



'I -Uia^vl".- .. . ' 

rt\i 

lAT 

lUid Dnablv EaKle (ili 
Tnmai<'a ttiiii' 
Siiilcli \' 
' "WU Slam. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST 

Puff fhirdon * To., Vnrt SI. M . Fine Sherj i 

(iui'Cll Olive.-. 
, .Kim- I*ortB. 

:;.ii.,t. luinicima I'ortn. 

X. . Fiiu- ( 'lari'ls.Sttiilerni's.Ollve Oil. 
l.nr\ ,v l.i-i laUlr, Xiiil.- .Itiirmiiulies. 

M. I'ali-iiiiiiiin Si.liii, Mttliu H,)i k WiilCfi. 

A WftciHT, Kriiiikfiirt-o.-tht-.H Hock Wiiici'. 

Mil Juiir, Tralii'ii Mofc! wlm-s. 

!. .Miii|iiil\, Miiiii. h Kirnliwar-- 



FOR 



• MiioTBTa Natural Sparklinc Mineral Wati-i 

Kiiyal rnifKiaii KprliiKH KoltfiK Water 

Itakooxy Hitter Water Cd.. Hii(la|)ett. Mineral Water 

Mi)<)re .V .Sinnott, Plilladelplila Wlii 

A. (,'liKvallier-.\|i|)ert Paris Wine 1' 

A. Hi>ake liiilierts >V Co., London Wine Ki 

J, J. W. Peters. Hamlxirf; Clierry ('• 

Standard ^(ineral Water Co.. Liverpool. . .Oini;er .\ i 
Prime Juice Kxtraet. liatavia .\rra<K 

■^1. Croix Hum. Medford Hum, Etc., Ki 






IJOHN RAMSAY) 

DISTILLER 

I SLAY. 




SWAN GIN 



Boord's Old Tom Gin. 



TRIPLE FLAVOR GIN. 



PEHF^IEF^-JOUET & CO. 





CHAMPAGNE 

"Special," "Reserve D ry," "Brut." 

W. B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR PACIFIC COAST, ^ 

123 CPiLIFORNIT^ STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 




For Sale by all First-class Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

Specialty alto of High-grade Clarets, Sauternei and Old Cognacs. 



i 



f/reifie WIJvIE /c^lD Sfll^lT [REVIEW. 



29 



IHTtJi^JsTTD-Yr FTtOJDU^CT OIF 1890. 

[OFFICIAL FIGURES.] 



Montlis. Produced in tliis 

DiHtnct. 

January 47,975 

Fcl)ruary 9,270 

March 12,329 

April 5,706 

May 4,029 

June 5,906 

July 4,952 

August 8,280 

September 4,371 

October 16,056 

November 40,171 

December 59,765 

Total 218,810 369,545 

" in 1889.... 342,300 

Decrease 124,490 



Ji'lK.ST 


OISTI 


Received From 




Other Districts. 


Tax-paid 


55,812 


21,690 


8,775 


31,119 


10,037 


26,572 


23,128 


31,248 


11,598 


2,596 


19,031 


11,330 


22,163 


17,085 


14,521 


25,024 


22,142 


31,891 


47,342 


46,006 


65,852 


33,240 


69,144 


39,768 



315,569 



y, , , Transferred In Bond End 

'' to Other Districts. of Month. 

16,661 9,219 832,570 

29,299 13,948 772,505 

50 22,580 742,213 

679 12,309 730,533 

9,441 13,750 695,336 

5,709 27,946 674,701 

484 4,990 678,205 

9,726 7,893 654,495 

6,870 13,664 628,667 

831 13,600 627,306 

1,038 12,499 685,902 

12,570 20,333 738,057 

93,658 171,831 

On hand January 1, 1890 832,570 

'• " 1,1891 738,057 

Deficit 94,513 



foxjis-Th: distk-ICt. 



Months. 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November... 

December 

Total 

" in 1889.... 

Incr'se product. 



Produced in this Leak'ge& evaporat'n 



District. 

Wine Gallons. 

38,063 
35,495 
40,764 
28,651 
28,791 
26,244 
23,264 
26,081 
55,788 
84,700 
164,118 
210,.361 



on tax-paid spirits 

Tax Gallons. 

210 

465 

323 
1,143 
1,483 

592 

499 

250 

332 

634 

593 
1,816 



With-drawn 
Tax-paid 

Tax Gallons. 

4.671 

9,246 

10,830 

15,270 

17,758 

8,863 

9,493 

6,083 

11,591 

9,744 

16,087 

13,865 



Withdrawn 
for export 

Tax Gallons. 



2,849 



54 

53 

4,476 

53 

53 
1,197 



97 



Transferred 
to other districts 

Tax Gallons. 

25,900 
16,724 
30,605 
25,514 
49,311 
18,593 
23,883 
25,234 
34,920 
64,130 
89,146 
113,391 



Total in bond end 
of month 

Tax Galloug 

557,091 
554,738 
567,205 
552,271 
513,367 
509,338 
500,197 
497,491 
494,214 
510,967 
533,676 
609,359 



762,423 
701,203 

61,220 



8,341 



133,501 



8,832 517,460 

In bond January 1, 1890 557,091 

1, 1891 609,359 



Increase i 52,286 



A LOT OF S/NOBS. 



VITICULTURAL RESTAURANT AND CAFE. 



We would be pleased to have somebody accommodate us by 
classifying the gentlemen who had the management of Governor 
Markham's inaugural ball. From our point of view we regard 
them as "plain ordinary" donkeys, but it is possible that they 
are jackassfcs in disguise. We are led to these observations by 
the fact that the committee in charge gave the wines of this State 
no place on the menu cards. 

The event was for the purpose of lending eclat to the in- 
auguration of California's Governor. It was purely a California 
aii'air, and as such the products of California's vineyards should 
have been accorded the honor and attention due them on such an 
occasion. 

This is no animadversion to the wines that were drank at 
the grand supper, nor do we suggest that only California wines 
should have been used, but we do say that the action of the 
committee, which was certainly intjutional, was a gratuitous 
insult and an indirect injury to those who are struggling to pro- 
mote the interests of one of the great industries of the State. 
There was no excuse for such an action and those responsible fcr 
it deserve general condemnation as a lot of unpatriotic snobs. 



BUSINESS SUCCESS. 

If you bave a line of goods, or a specialty, possessing quality and merit 
IT PAYS TO LET THE PUBLIC KNOW IT. 

Every business man wbo consults bis healtli and success in business mue^t eat 
and not only eat regularly, but must eat sucb food as will be readily digested, witb 
sucli surroundings as will malie bis meal not only 

A BUSINESS MATTER OF NECESSITY 

but a pleasurable digression from business care. 

Wben gueli a meal can be obtained at a tritling expense, and be productive of 
bappiness and renewed, if not increased energy, a business man is foolish indeed to 
not embrace the prospective opportunity. 

Such a meal can be obtained, and tlie above described results attained by tailing 
a lunch with us, between the hours of 11 A. M. and 2:30 P. M. We serve a six course 
lunoli for 50 cents. 

In the evening we serve, from 4:30 to 8:30 P. M., an eight-course dinner for 
75 cents 

Besides our service a la carte receives prompt attention, and our restaurant! > 
most elegantly furnished. 

ifeferring to our experience, botli in the Old and New World, as restauranteurs 
with tlie fact that the cuisine and dining room is under our direct and coutiuua 
supervision, we guarantee the best satisfaction. 

Being confident that we can please you in the smallest particulars, we resiiect- 
fuUy solicit your patronage. 

ALBEKT FEANCKX and OTTO RUHLEMANN, 

Viticultural Cafe and Restaurant, 

81.') Pine Stkeet, San Francisco 



N. B. — The wines furnished to our guests are guaranteed to be pure, and 
purchased direct from the jxjrmanent exhibit of the State Viticultural Commiss 



are 

ission 



30 



j^lfie WI^IE /r^lP Sfll^lT {REVIEW. 



Business Reconl. 



Ckans** an^ DtosolwtJens In 
Partnerships. 

HalUnd A MrCrmnr, ul<M>n. rlr..H|>ikMM 
I'alU, Wwb.. dU~>lr«d. HaiUint 



Juc BMW A Oo.. wkolwaU Ui|ao(», Lot 
SriM. Cal.. dlm>l««d. 



Dafton A Itr^uotd*. mUooo, HookMW 
' Pall. Wuh., diMolVMl: O. & Bmj- 
IHddii roatltiiHV. 
H. Ktiblmoii. mlaiiranl, IHirtUud Or., E. 

M. Kublnron ■dinlllcd. 
Hanllloo A Hrallnc. wkwo, 8»l«ai, Or., 

diMOlTcd. 

Gold A Moiln. mIooo, IM Bluff, C«l., 

dlwolfcd. 
BdwMd Ounniui. MiliMin. Duiuikt, C«I., 

partner adniitlrd. 
Hm4w a Cu., ••luuo, Ktwriiljui, Idalm, 

dlMolvvd. 
Oorui A Nrlll,. Mkton, Hm> FranrlM-u, 

Cal.. diMolrtd. 
UsTllI A Vm) .Vlatinc. bllters, etc.. Ban 

KraiH'tiHsi, I'ml., dl«»<>lTed. 
<». K. I>urinrr A Co.. wkran, SnUtle, 

Wvli., Klrkru»h rvtirc*. 
TItomixin A Blnkley, laloon, (ten Bvr- 

lutrdlDo, Cal., diMolved Tbompcou 

conllnim. 
Hoot <K Arormrk, wloon. Ban Prmnrl*ru, 

Cat, dhMulrcd. 
Aoeka A Martin, mIiwh. Pn>rlic, N>t., 

dhaolTtd, Martin A I'almar continue. 
Honcan A RoUndi. luUoon. Gallup, N. M., 

•ocncded by Morican <t Mnirelli. 
Jobnaon A Meek*, uluun, Buawell, N. 

M., auccccdrd b) W. B. Meek*. 
W. P. Cucbran, aaluun, H«ven RlTcra, N. 

M., now Kenlm A Corbran. 



Failaraa, Attaehmants, Eto. 



Charlca Ucanu, aalnon, etc., Bacrameuto, 
Cal., In InrulrcDry. 

Wn. Itlair, Miloon, Han Francltco, Cal., 
allacbcd and In lufutvcmy, 

P. II. I'crter, aaluoo. Ban Franrlaco, Cal., 
allarbed. 

E. McLaflln, aalooo. flan Fraociico, Cal.. 
allachad. 

Kate F. WarSeld. rlneyardeat, Glen Ellen. 
Cal.. atlacbed. 

Oco. H Bcbole, rcatauranl. Ban Franciaco, 
Cal., Id InaolTCDcj. 

JaoMa Hoejr, aaloOD, Martinez, CaL, at- 
tached 

W. H. Colrer, saloon. WiUowa, CaL, in 
Inaolrenry. 

Peter NrUun A Co., restaurant, Denver, 
Colo., atlacbed. 

O. M. Kelly, aaloon. Baker City, Or., at- 
tacbcd. 

C. M. AadenoD, aalouni OakUnd, Cat., %l 
lachni. 

B, Mjrers, aaluon, HauU Cruz, Cal., at- 
lacbed. 

M. K. Van Htack. hotel, Oceanalde, Cal., 
at tar bed. 

B. F. Dallinc, hotel. Han Pranctaco, CaL, 
allarbed. 

P. Tatl«r«all, kaloun, Bonae, Colo., at- 
tached. 

Hall A Co., laloon, Loa Augelea, CaL, at- 
tachvd. 

t. Muipinr, laloon, Bedondo. Cal., at- 

J. Kubhlmi, aaloon, t.<ainMida Park, CaL, 
altar lied. 

P. Kranz, «alo«n, Eaat Portland, Or., at- 
tar bed. 

J. t>. Kolilnwin. realaurant, Loa Angelea, 
Cal., al tallied. 

Barrett A Burkejr, realaurant, Hacrameolo, 
Cal.. Inrolunlary Inxilvency. 

L. O Abbul, hotel, Taroma, Waab., at- 
tached. 

8. H. Hall, bottler, Han Franckco, OaL, in 
Inatilvencjr. 

W. T. Hai.iner, aaloon, Wltl<>»». CaL, at- 
tached 

Kranz, Futz A Co., oaluon, Porthuid, Or., 
allarbed. 

P. Harder, aaloon, etc.. Tacona, Waab., 
altaclied. 



B. O. Voatl, waooB. Blanco, Cal., In inaot- 

Tencjf. 
D. H. BarroaKha, mOoob, Oraol'a Pa**. 

Or., attaetMd. 



Sold Out. 



H. R. MaUlnta, aaloon, Han Fianrlaco, 

Cal., lu K. Btirca. 
TtMW. Qanrin. aaloon. Victoria. B C. 
Towoaend A HarrUon. hotel, Kuicrne, Or., 

lo DuIkiIh llnM. 
J. N. Paniiliii;. Iiolel. Medford, Or., to C. 

C. KacMlalr. 
Jamr* Mrrlian. •al<M>n, Jark«<in. Cal. 
A. Faber, mIimiu. Loa Gatoa, CaL, lo J. 

Kicbardii. 
John Waireu, aaloon, Laa VeKaa, N. M., 

to A. A. Quinle}. 
K. Kroltb. hotel. Lebl City, Utah. 
H. D. Rowland. »al<Miii. rrinevllle. Or. 
H. U. Whitney, Hal<H>ii, I,o<li. CaL 
Tbutna* Gomez, oalmin, I'lcaoaiiton, CaL. 

to T. L, I.e\y. 
J. W. Powers. i>al<M>n, Aiililand. Or. 
Coimlam-e Broa., »aliM>ii, Port Towiun-iid. 

Wai>h.,tuJ. WaildtiiKlon. 
Oeorxe Frank, naliMin, Cliico, Cal. 
Geo. M. WviKel. »al<H>u. Walla Walla, 

Wan b., to .V. It. IliAcbof!. 
A. Welch, i>al»i>n. Cactle IIiH'k, Wa«h., to 

W. Studebakcr. 
Sanchez Ilruk., saloon. Monterey, Cal. 
Fred (Joulet, naliMin, PrinevUle, Or. 
Miller A Owen, Mloon, Fre«no, Cal. 
R. L. Thompaon, hotel, Kelaeyvllle, Cal., 

to R. J. .Nile*. 
J. W. Powers, saloon, Ashland, Or. 
Fred Kin;:, saloon, Healdsbnrg, Cal. 
Healy A Ashley, saloon, Hlieridan, Wyo. 
H MellUr, saloon, Portland, Or., to 

Jacolfs A Martell. 
Bonsall A Hchrclbcr, hotel, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 
Henry Moeller, saloon, Portland, Or. 
D. Rowan, saloon, PrinevUle, Or., to Har- 
rington A Lewis. 



Daeaasad. 



George H. Davis, hotel. Ban Miguel, Cal. 
Henry Oetz, saloon, Oe<jrgetown, Colo. 
J. P. Kchardin A Co., wholeuaio liquors, 

Ban Francisco.. Cal, J. P. Bchardin 

deceased. 



Damage by Fir*. 



H. Carlyle, saloon, Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Henry Peterson, saloon, Han Frauclaco, 
CaL, damaged. 



Out of Businaas. 



Wm. B. Tripp, saloon. Sandy, Utah. 
Bnrkbead A Collins, saloon, Aspen, Colo. 

Spaoial Inqulrlaa Advisable. 



Wm. Rawley, saloon, Spokane Fails 

Wash. 
H. J. Well, saloon. Ban Bernardino, Cal. 

Deeds and Transfers. 

L. Pie|ier, Iiolel, Windsor, Cal., conveyed 

realty HO. 
W. J. Van Hchuyver, wholesale liquors, 

Portland, Or , conveyed realty (MS. 
C. D. ChanilNTS, hotel Keattle, Wash., 

gave bill of sale «I.VMI. 
Oco. E. Kain sai<Min,Heatlle, Wasli., gave 

bill of sale p»». 
F. O. Hrlineidei, saUmn, Fresno, Cal., 

conveyed r»'»lly. 
A. FubrlHTi:. ouloiin, Lo* Angeles, Oal., 

conveyed realty ( . 

Bramy A Co., wbohnale lii|Uon>, Han Jose, 

CaL. F. Brassy received deed flO. 
H. O. Matthews, liquors, Blocktuu, Cal., 

received deed f 1. 
Charles Cnhn A Co., wboleaale liquors, 

Portland, Or. N. Colin received deed 

MS5. 
Mara A Jorgenaen, wholrraie lli|Uors, 

Portland, Or., D. Marx conveyed 

realty (too. 
Ji, H. Harms, saloon, etc,. Baa Piaocisco, 



Cal.. conveyed realty tlO. 
J. B. Mead. sal«K.n, Hunm CaL, received 

deed tV-Si. conveyed realty $l»U. 
W. F. Magner, sabMin, Han Francisco, 

" CaL, re«-elved deed »I00. 
M TIniieliaii. saloon, San FranciB<-o. CaL, 

bill of sale fTM. 
n. Lamalle A Co.. hotel, etc., San Jose, 
Cal.. It. I.amaile, retelved deed »10. 
Itapp.V nebarrv, bottles, San FraneUsco. 

CaL, John itapp lereived deedfiO. 
A. McGulre. «il<K.n, H|H)kane FalU, Wash., 

bill of sale (ITUJ. 
F A. (iappliiKer. sabion, Tacoma, Wash., 

bill of sale (IU>I. 
C Dillnian A Co , wholesale liquors, Los 

Angeles, CaL, conveyed realty «35»I0. 
M. M. Dee. saloon, Portland, Or., con- 
veyed realty r!M 
J. Meyer, saloon, Portland, Or., bill of 

sale to E. T. Hweeiiey $750. 
P. Gailiard. saloon, Han Francisco, CaL. 

received deed $10. 
A. P. Holallng A Co . wholesale ll<|tlors, 

Han FraniiM-o. (^al., and Porilsiid 

Oi., received deed »IOJ,000. 

A. McQuarrie A Co., saloon, Seattle 
Wabb., J. H. Hnuddcn givis bill o 
sale. 

Pete O. Olsen, saloon, Taxuna. Wa«li 

bill of sale to C. A. Htokes $150. 
Geo. W. Clieslev A Co., wbolesaie liqiioih. 

Sacramento. CaL, conveyed reailj 

Grant. 
Charles Juraens, saloon, etc., Oakland 

CaL. received deed ♦10. 

B. Dreyfus A Co.. whole^ale wines. 8ai 

Francisco, CaL, Jacob Froweiifeli 
received deed $10. 
George Greunig, saloon. San Francisco, 
Cal., received deed $10. 

C. Ludwig, hoteL Tracy, CaL. received 

deed $350. 

P. 0. Elbe, saloon. Willows, CaL, received 
deed $70. 

C. Cohn A Co., wholesale liquors, Port- 
land, Or., received deed $2t750 

L. 8. Cavalaro, saloon, etc , San Jose, CaL, 
bill of sale one-half interest. 

A, H. Lang, saloon, Sau Francisco, OaL, 
to A. Friedman. 

Megler A Wright, saloon, etc , Astoria, 
Or., received deed $5. 

F. Timmerman, wholesale liquois, Port- 
laud, Or., received deed $2<50. 



Realty Mortgages. 



Gam brlnns Bottling Co., San Francisco, 

Cal., G. H. Liebold $1200. 
Wright A Harris, restaurant, Astoria, Or., 

Charies Wright $3000. 
Charles Cohn A Co., wholesale liquors, 

Portland, Or., N. Cohn $3135. 
N, Eweis, saloon, etc., Sacramento, CaL, 

$3700. 
Eate F. Warfield, vineyardlst. Glen Ellen, 

CaL, $6000. 
John C. King, hotel, Sau Bernardino, CaL, 

$900. 

C. W. Robic, hotel, Portland, Or., $7000. 
Moriarity A Creede, saloon, San Fran- 
cisco, CaL, J. Moriarity $1500. 
H. Heltmeier, saloon, San Francisco, CaL, 

$4000. 
H. Bishop, saloon. Ban Francisco CaL, 

(SUO. 
Graves A Bemis, wholesale liqnors. Ban 

Jose, CaL, C. Graves $1000. 
Paton A Newman, saloon, Stockton, CaL, 

Paton $1500. 



Chattel Mortgages. 



M. Prolwt, restaurant, Denver, Colo., $100. 
F. E. Johnson, restaurant. Denver, Colo 

$a,6.')0. 
J, Joachim, saloon. Denver, Colo., $1,750, 
G. Btuble, saUion, Portland, Or., $500. 
M. A. Ciough, hotel, Heattle, Wash., $500. 
B. W. Woodworth, saloon, Portland, Or.. 

$«45. 
T. A. Oassett, saitHin, BiMikane Falls, 

Wash., «W0. 
A. D'Entressangle, saloon, Denver, Colo., 

$1,000. 
J. H. Gralmw saloon, Denver, Colo., 

$1,000. 
Callagban ACo., saloon, BalUu'd, Wash., 

mi. 

Wbealon A Mackay, saloon, Salt. Lake 



City. Ctah. $818. 

E. L. Plllman. boteL BUughter, Wash. 

$175. 
M. M. Jones, restaurant, Denver, Colo. 
$».V). 

A. Grether, saloon. Portland, Or., $000. 

F. H Oman, saloon, Spokane Falls, Wash 
Werner A Wasbendorf, saloon, Tacoini 

Wash., $450. 
P. Salter, saloon, Dunver, Colo.. $208. 
C. C. Carter A Co., saloon Pueblo, Colo. 

$149. 
H. Hciinelzei, saloon. East Portland, Or. 

$125 
J R. Mooney, saloon, Seattle, Wash. 

$:t,250. 
Powers A Welsh, saloon, Seattle, Wash. 

$1,796. 

B. E. Haynes, saloon, Tacoma, Wash. 

$1,«72. 
J. Harrington A C-j., saloon, Leadville 

Colo., $1,800. 
P. H. Itiley, saloon, Pueblo, Colo., $1,891 
R. Dwyer, saloon, Portland, Or., $996. 
M. J. italdwin, hotel, Portland, Or., $1.VI 
H. Maultzsch A Co., saloon, Denver 

Colo., $250. 
H. E. Kimball, saloon, Denver, Colo., $I4<I 
Frank L. Crow, saloon, Spokane Falls 

Wash., $1,00,). 
:ienrv Hteln, restaurant, San Francisco 

Cal., $.)<K). 
.V. V. Tasclier, saloon, Denver, Colo. 

$1,0J0. 
A. Curl.-y, saloon, Portland, Or.,$l.S0U. 
f. Behnlie, saloon, Portland, Or., $250. 
H. H. Heath, hotel, Los Angeles, Cal 

$3,267. 



Vortgages Discharged. 



L. Knack, hotel, saloon, San Francisco 

CaL, $:),500. 
Marshall A Nye, saloon. Ban Francisco 

CaL, D. B. Nye, $400. 
N. Eweis, saloon, etc., Sacramento, Cal. 

Scott Bros., wines, Oakland, CaL, Rlchart 

Scott $1,000. 
J. W. Bums, saloon, Pelaluma, Cal., $600 
Powers A Welch, saloon, Seattle, Wash. 

$5,258. 
Graves A Bemis, wholesale liquors, Sai 

Jose, CaL, C. Graves $1,000. 



Judgments, Suits, Etc., 



W. B. Stuhlmacher, saloon, Han Fiaii 

Cisco, CaL, judgment against bin 

$124. 
Lee Goodman, saloon. Portland, Or., aaei 

$2,9!«. 
Matt. Anderson, saloon, Spokane Falls, 

Wash., chattel mortgage foreclosed. 
Petei Hanson, saloon, Spokane Falls, 

Wash., chattel mortgage foreclosed. 
John Cort, saloon, Seattle, Wash., sued 

$337. 
T. O. Abbott, boteL Tacoma, Wash., lien 

$2,687. 
Gondalfo A Mclntyre, hotel, Tacoma, 

Wash., Gondalfo sues for dissolution 

and apjiointment of receiver. 
Walden A Co., hotel. Vancouver, B. C, 

mortgage forei'losed. 
P. Schrunz. saloon, Albina, Or., sow]. 
Alien A Tangen, saloon, Tacoma, Wash., 

lien $69. 



Miscellaneous. 



D. Kuck, saloon, Lo* Angelee, CaL 
sheriff's sale. 

H. E. Rlckert, hotel. Chloride, N. M., 
leased to Mrs. H. J. Worthlngton. 

S B. Davis A Son, hotel. Las Vegas, N. 
M., advert ised to sell out. 

A. F. Kautz, saloon, ColtoD, Wash., ad- 
vertised to BClL 

James Urannan, saloon, San Francisco, 
CaL. sheriff's sale. 

G. W. ClKhlev A Co., wbolesaie liquors. 
Hacrniiierilo, CaL, A. Cheeley filed 
homestead. 

E. Yowell. saloon, Ogdeo, Otab, adver- 

tised to sell. 

F. U. Perley, saloon, San Francisco, CaL, 

sheriff's sale. 



f/ceifie VVIjNE /cJMD Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



31 



Liquor Flavor s 

WILLIAM H. RUDKIN 



J 



74 WILLIAM STREET, NEW YORK. 



GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICES. 

A Complate Catalogue will be foiwarded by mail on receipt of businees eai;!. 



Goods For Sale in California only by 
REDINGTON & CO., 26-27 first st., san francisco. cal 



RONALD G. McMillan, 

Manufacturer and Dealer In 

2if2nzps, Qordials, ^iHqts, Qp/ziraots 

Pure Sugar Coloring 



Tei.ki'Iio.m-: ST. 



jPs. SP=E,CIjPLLT"5r. 



3^0- 714 ZFI^/OISTT ST., 



W'KiTE Fou Pricks. 



San Francisco, 



22-28 Taylor St., San Trancisco, Cal. 

California Wines 4 Brandies. 

Vineyards, Callars and Distilleries at 
ST. HEbE|^/f, JM/rf/f eOUJMTY, ©/rb. 



Kohler &Van Bergen, 



CALIFORNIA 



arG 




Main Offlce and Vaults: 
661 to 671 Third St. 



Branch: 

417.41U MONTGOMEBY ST., 

San Francisco. 





Winei-y and Distillery: 
Sacramento, Cal. 



w®- 



Eastern Branch: 

42 MuKBAY Street, 

New York. 



AKTOINE BoClJUEIiAZ. 



James Shea. 



CCiines and liiqaot^s. 

Imjiorteis of and Agents for the Celebrated Brands of 

Golden a nd Tea Kettle W hiskies. 

CoR. Pko.n-t and Jackson Sts., - San Fisancisco, Cal. 



.1 



THE DIVIDEND, 

5 Lcidet-tlnill Sticet, 
JAMES O'liRIKN, PROP. 

Importer of FINEST WINES, LIQUORS, 

Irish and Scotcli WhiBJiies, Bass' Ale 

andGuinness Stout. 

Moore, Hunt & Go's Whiskies a Specialty 



JOHN D. CALL. 



JAMES P. DUNNE. 



THE RESORT" 

1 Stockton St., Cor. of Ellis, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



ARIEL LATHROP, PrCS.T. HOPKINS, TrCaS. 

WM. HARNEY, Mgr. and Sec'y. 

GOLDEN GATE WOOLEN MFG. CO. 

— MANUFACTURE — 

Blankets, Cassimeres, Tweeds 

FLANNELS. 
535 Market St., San Francisco. 



How's This? 



We offer One Hundred Dollare reward 
for any case of catarrli that eannot be 
cured by talking Hall's Catarrh Cure. 
F. J. CHENEY & CO., Props., 

Toledo, O. 
We, the undersigned, have known F. J. 
Cheney for the last 15 years, and believe 
him perfectly honorable in all business 
transacthins, and financially able to carry 
out any obligations made by their firm. 
West & Truax, Wholesale Druggists, To- 
ledo, 0. 
Walding, Kinnan & Uabvin, Wholesale 
Druggists, Toledo, O. 
Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internally, 
acting directly upon the blood, and mu- 
cous surfacer of the system. Testimonialg 
sent free. Price 75c. per bottle. Sold by 
all druggists. 



Aggregate Assets, S'i6,«)0,i0 



London Assurance Corporation of Lon- 
don (Established by Koyal Charter 
1720). 

Northern Assurance Company of London 
(Established 1836). 

Queen Insurance Company of Liverpool 
(Established 1857). 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Company of 
Hartford, Conn. 



ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

Cor. Sa&amento & Montgomery Sts. 



Founded 1856. Incorporated April, 1889. 



Tubbs Cordage Company 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 

Cordage, 

GRAPE-VINE TWINE, ETC. 

011-613 FRONT STREET, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 




SAW MANUFACTURINC 





Saws of Every Description on Hand 
and made to order. 

H. Eoyers Lace Leather— Agents for 

C. S. Paul's Files. 
17-19 Fremont St. San Francisco. 



HENRY WASS, WOOD TURNER. 




—MANUFACTURER OF — 

Wooden Bungs, Taps, Plugs, etc.. Oak 
Bungs, Soft and Hard Wine Plugs. Soft 
and Hard Tap Plugs, Wine Samplers. 
Bung Starters, etc. 

720 lUNNAST., BET. EIGHTH ANDNINTH, S F. 
Establislied since 1856. 



OF 

Prominent California Vineyards. 



[These Cards inserted for 15 per Year in advance.] 



EL PINAL VINEYARD. — Established 
1852. Wines and brandies. George 
West & Son, Stockton, Cal. 

SIERRA VISTA VINEYARD— . Wines 
and brandies. Sierra Vista Vineyard 
Co., Minturn, Fresno, Co., Cal. 

I. DE TURK VINEYARDS — Estab- 
lished 1862. Wines and brandies. I. 
Dc Turk, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

INGLENOOK VINEYARD— Established 
1880. Wines and brandies. Gustave 
Niebaum, Rutherford, Napa Co., Cal. 

SUNSET VINEYARD— Established 1881. 
Wines and brandies. Webster I'c Sar- 
gent, Minturn, Fresno Co., Cal. 

OLIVINA VINEYARD— Established 1881 
Wines and brandies. Julius P. Smith, 
LiveiTOore, Cal, 



MONT ROUGE VINEYARD -Estab- 
lished 1885. Dry wines. A. G. 
Chauche, Livermore, Cal. Offlce 615- 
617 Front St., San Francisco, Cal. 

ELECTRA VINEYARD. — Establislied 
1881. Dry wines. Clarence J. Wel- 
more, Livermore, Cal. 

LINDA VISTA VINEYARD— Established 
18.58. Dry and sweet wines. C. C. 
Mclver, Mission San Jose, Alameda 
Co., Cal. 

CRESTA BLANC.A.— Exclusively fine high 
grade wines in bottle, fine Sauternes 
and Medoc tyi>es. Only casli orders 
solicited. Charles .\. Wetraore, Liver- 
more, Cal. 

FRESNO VINEYARD— Established ISSo! 
Sweet and dry wines and braudies 
Fresno, Cal,, L. P. Drexler, 409 Cali- 
fornia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



32 



J^eifie WI/sJE /r/^D Sflf^lT flEVjEW. 




JDISTIT .T .E3D BY 



imot 



E. n. t.a.'Z'XjOI^, cri^. 



PI 



E. H. TflYIiOR, it & SONS, - Frankfort, Ky. 



,,-fe^.. 



s^ 



^V 



,.<00*^' 



WALDEN 



.^«-i 



Trade 




^. 



<«»?. 



GOeNAC 



^^< 



■^. 



■^^. 



'*!> 



'^ 



*7. 



-t-6- 



<V/, 



Mark. 



<«a 



'^^ 



^^. 



•v;rj^LDE3sr. 



This Dnndy, made nfttr Ibe Fremli fortnuln, frutn KvU^'lvd fro«li graiH-s, lia» bt-cu sucTosefully iiiti-oduced, and is now rejjularly sold in tbc piiuei|ial markuts of 
Kufupc, in cumiwl llloii » illi Frfocli C«i(;n«c. Olliiiul (icrnian and En^'litli clifmists liavc i>rononncod it llie purest Brandy wliicli comen to their markets. 

It beciH-eially Hiiiled fur the diu^ trade and otiiens, uliere purity is demanded. Vi'liile aliroad tiles;; (roods sueeessfully comixite, jmying same duties as tbc French, 
Ibe Amcrit-an buyer bu Ibc Mlvaula^je in price, iM'tween tbc Internal Ilcvcnuc tax assessed here and Ibc custom duties on forci(;n brandies. Samples will be scut ou 
ap|>lic»ltuu. 



"W"j^Xjr)E35r & GO., 



Ofllor, 41 Iteovfr Strtvl, Xetr York. 



OEYSEItriLLE, SOyOALi COUyTY, C.tL. 



NATOMA VINEYARD CO. 

TABLE GRAPES, TOKAYS, MUSCATS, ETC. 

Red and White GQines and Brandies 

Vineyards, Winery 'and Distillery, Principal Office, 

Natoma, Sacramento County, Cal. 608 California St., San Francisco. 

^ l>. IIESSIIAW WMll). (;,„. M,ir. 



('. //. scurssLEU. ,s,i,,i. 



MAX. M, HALLE, 

Distillers' Agent and Commission Merchant, 



1*2 W, MAIN STREET, LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Special Attention Paid to the Unbending and Shipping of Whiskies, 

and the Placing of Insurance. 



f/reifie WIJ^E /rjNJD SflF^IT (REVIEW. 



33 



Prices Current. 



Tliese are the long j)iiees, Tlie rate of 
diBcouiit on puTcliases of a eons^iderablu 
quantity, can be learned by applyinfj to 
the ai^ents or dealers. We urjjently re- 
quest dealer:-, aj^ents and produeers to 
notify us when a eliaufje occurs in the 
prices current of the goods they handle. 



California Wines &, Brandies 



LTl, 



„■ Trices given are for quarts and pints, 
put up in cases of twelve and twenty- 
four bottles. 



ARP.\D HARASZTHY ife CO, 
530 Washington street, .San Francisco. 
Prices Pek case, 
quakts. pints. 

Riesling li.OO 7.0U 

Giitcdel 6.00 7.00 

Zinfandel 5.00 6.00 



J. GUNDLACH Sc CO., 

Cor. Second & Market Sts. San Francisco. 

Trainincr, 83 f. 5.00 * 6.00 

Gritedel. Hi 

Burgundy, 84 

Zinfandel, 83 



6.00 


7.00 


6.00 


7.0(1 


5.00 


6.00 



I. De TURK, 

213 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

Port, 1884 $ 6.0:) 



Port, 1886. 
Dry Slierry, 1884. 
Dry Sherry, 1886. 
Angelica, 1884.... 

Tokay, 1884 

Zinfandel, 1884.. 

Burgundy, 84 

Kicsling, 1885 

Gutedei, 1884 

Hock. 1885 

Brandy, 1883. ... 



4.011 
6.011 
4.01) 
4.,50 
8.00 
3.50 
4.00 
4.00 
4.50 
3.50 
12.00 



GliORGE WEST & SON, 
Stockton, Cal. 

Brandy, 1879 $20.00 

Brandy, XSSS 15.00 

Brandy, 1885 15.00 

Frontignan 9.00 

Sherry 9.00 

Port (old) 12.00 .... 

Port 6.00 

SAN GABRIEL WINE CO., 
Ramona, Los Angeles county, Cal. 

Riesling * 4.75 $5.75 

Gutedei 4.75 5.75 

Port 5.50 

Angelica 5.50 .... 

Muscatel 5.50 

Sherry 6.00 

Brandy, 1882 12.00 

LOS G.YTOS & SARATOGA WINE CO. 
478 Tenth street, Oakland, Cal. 

Zinfandel $ 3..50 * t..50 

Sauterne 4.00 5.00 

Brandy 9.00 

Port 5.00 6.00 

Sweet Muscatel 5.00 6.00 

GrapeCordial 6.50 7.50 

JOSEPH MELCZER * CO., 
501 and 506 Market street, San Francisco. 



INGLENOOK WINES. 
F. A. Haber, agent, 122 Sansoine St 
Ta\>lc Claiet blended from 

choice foreign grapes, 

vintage 1885 

Zinfandel 

Extra Table Claret, Medoc 

type red label, 1885 

Burgundy type 

Sauterne dry, Sauvig'nVert'85 
Gutedei, Cliasselas Vert, 1885 
Hock, Uhenish type " 

Burger, Chablis type ■' 

Riesling,.Joliannisberg type " 
Pints of two dozen $i per ease additional. 
None genuine except bearing seal or cork 
brand ot thejuoprietor — each bottle bears 
the legal pure w ine stamp. 



S. F. 



f3..50 
4. .50 

5.. 50 
5.50 
5.50 
4.50 
8.00 
5.00 
O..50 



CAL. WINE GROWER'S UNION. 
Cor. Sutter and Grant ave. San Francisco. 

EL HIIITO VISEYAUD. 

Riesling $ 3.00 



Claret 3.00 

KliESNO VlNEYAKl) CO. 

Burger $ 3.50 

Claret 3.50 

Port 5..50 

Angelica 5..50 

Slierry .5..50 

Cognac Brandy 10.00 

ST. I1UHEKT VINYARD. 

Claret, Cabernet * 8.00 

Sauterne 8.00 

Cognac 13.00 



$ 4.00 
4.00 

$ 4..50 
4.50 
6..50 
6.50 
6. .50 
11.00 

$ 9.00 

9.00 

13.00 



C. CARPY & CO." 
511-517 Saciamento street, San Francisco 

La Loma, Grand Medoc $ 7.00 * 8.00 

Burgundy .5.00 

Zinfandel 3..50 

Sauterne 5.00 

Riesling 4.00 

Sweet Muscatel, 1883 9.00 

Sherry, 1883 9.00 

Port,"l8S3 8.00 

Cal. Rochelle Brandy 13.00 



6.00 

4. ,50 

6.00 

5.00 

10.00 

10.00 

9.0) 

13.00 



MONT KOUGE WINES. 

A. G. Chauce. Livermoie. 
Office and Depot, 615-617 Front St. 
Quarts. 

Sauterne $6.00 

Haut Santcrne 7.00 

Claret, Table 4.00 

AClaret, F 9.(H) 

AA Claret, V 9.00 



, 8. F. 

Pints. 

$7.00 

8.00 

5.00 



KOIILEK & FROHLING. 

601 Folsoin Street, San Francisco 
Riesling $ 4.00 » 4.,50 



Hock 3..50 

Gutedei 4..50 

Sauterne 4..50 

Zinfandel 3.75 

Zinfandel, old 4..50 

Buigundv 4.00 

Superior Port 10.03 

Sherry 7..50 

Angefica 6.00 

Muscatel 6.00 

Madciia 6.00 

Malaga ■ 6.00 

Biandy 10.00 



4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
4.25 
5.00 
4..50 



WM. WOLFF & CO. 
829 Market street, San Francisco 

QUARTS. PINTS 

Pommery Sec »32.50 $34.50 

MACONDKAY & CO., 
First and Market streets, San Francisco. 
Louis Koederer Carte Blanclie.31.00 33.00 



JA8. L. DAVIS & CO., 
SOLE AGENTS. 
308 California St., San Francisco 
Xer Desbordes & Pils, Dry 

Vergcnay $28.00 $30.00 

" Desbordes & Fils, Pri- 
vate Curvec 29.00 31 00 



NAPA VALLEY WINE COMPANY. 

11 and 13 First Street, San Francisco. 

Hock $ 3..50 $ 4..50 



Claret, 1886 

Zinfandel. 1885 

Burgundy, 1885 

Hock, 1885 

Riesling. 1885 

Riesling, Johannisberger, 1884 

GuLedel, 1884 

Sonilai Hungarian Type, 1885 
Szatmari " " 

Szegszardi FelierHun'Type ** 

1885 

Port, 1884 

Sherry, 1885 

" 1884 

Angelica and SweetMout'n,84 
Mad'a.Malaga & Sw't To'y'85 

Brandy, 1883 

1885 



Gutedei 4.00 

Riesling 4..50 

Cabernet 4..50 

Zinfandel 3..50 

Private Stock Claret 5.00 

Burgundy 4.00 

Port, (old) 4.50 

Angelica 4.50 

Sherry 4.,50 

Brandy, 1881 15.00 

Brandy, 1887 8.00 

Private Stock Burgundy 7.00 

Private Stock Sauterne 8.00 

Vine Cliff Claret 15.00 

Private Stock Hock 5.00 



5.00 
5..50 
5.50 
4..50 
6.00 
5.00 



8.00 
9.00 



6.00 



TO-KALON VINEYARD, 

Jas. L. Davis & Co., Sole Agents, 

308 California St., San Francisco. 



3.,50 
4.00 
3.50 
4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
3..50 
3..50 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 
5.00 
(i.OO 
4..50 
5,00 
13.00 
10.00 



BECK, PYHRR & CO., 

108 O'Farrell street, San Francisco. 

Santa Rosa Zinfandel '86... $:3.00 

Santa Clara Cabernet, '87... 4.50 

Cupertino Medoc, '84 6.00 

St. Helena Hock' '86 3.,50 

Gutedei (ChasBelao), '86 4..50 

Traminer. '83 5..50 

Sauterne (silver leaf) 6.IK) 

Haute Sauterne (gold leaf) . . 7.00 
California Cognacs. 

♦Silver Brouze Leaf 8.00 

*'Red " " 1 10.00 

***Greeu " •• 13.00 



Reising Johannisberg 5.00 

"Chronicle" 4.50 

" 4.00 

Sanlerne, "J. L. D." 6.00 

Haut 4.50 

4.00 

Chablig 4.00 

Gutedei 3.50 

Cabernet 5.00 

Burgundy 5.00 

Beclan 5.00 

Zinfandel 3..50 

St. Laurent 8.00 

La Granada 8 00 

Lazrine 7.00 

Nebbiola 7.50 

La Grand Claret 13..50 

Madeira 5.00 

Malaga 5.00 

Muscatel 5.00 

Angelica 5.00 

Tokay 5.00 

Sweet To-Kalon 6.00 

Sherry, Dry 5 50 

" 5.00 

Port, 1876 13.00 

" 1883 6.00 

' 1880 4.00 

Grape Brandy 9.00 

'• 8.00 

Blackberry Brandy 10.00 

Strawberry " 9.00 

Cognac 14.00 

'' 12.00 



6.00 
5.,50 
5.00 
7.00 
,5.50 
5.00 
5.00 
4.50 
6.00 
6.00 
6.00 
4.,50 
9.00 
9.00 
8.00 
8.50 
13.50 
6.00 
6.00 
6.00 
6.60 
■ 6.00 
7.00 
6.50 
6.00 
13.00 
7.00 
5.00 
10.00 
9.00 
11.00 
10.00 
15.00 
13.00 



C. HOLTUM & CO., 
409 Sansoine street, Han Francisco. 

Zinfandel. 1884 $:100 

Burgundy, " 3.00 

Uiesling, " 3.25 

Riesli«g, Marcobrunner,1883 5.25 

Gutedei, 1884 4.00 

Sauterne, " 4.00 

Port Old (Fresno Co.),1882. 6.00 

Port, 1885 4.00 

Sherry, Dry, 1884 4.00 

Sherry, Old, (Fresno Co.,) '83 6.00 

Angelica,1885,(Los Ang'sCo) 4.00 

Muscatel (Fresno Co.), 1885. • 5..50 

Tokay, 1884 5.00 

Mt. Vineyard, 1885 4.00 

Madeira and Malaga, 1885.. 5..50 

Pineapple wines 4 00 

Brandy, 1883 U.OO 

Brandy, 1885 9.00 

Strawberry Brandy 9.00 

S. LACHMAN & CO., 
453 Biannan street. San Francisco. 

Old Port $7.00 $8.00 

Zinfandel 3.,50 4.00 

Riesling 4.,50 5.00 

Madeiras 8.00 .... 

Malaga 8.00 

Cognac 14.00 

Domestic Champagnes. 

ARPAD HARASZTHY & CO., 

530 Washington street, San Francisco. 

Eclipse $14.50 $17.00 

A. FINKE'S WIDOW. 
809 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

Gold Seal $11.50 $12.00 

GoldSeal. E.xtiaDry 12.00 13.00 

Nonpareil 13 00 13.00 

Private Cuvee, Dry 11.50 13.00 

" " Extra Dry... 12.00 13.00 

TO KALON VINEYARD. 

H. W. CRABB, OAKVILLE. NAPA COUNTY. 

Jas. L. Davis & Co., 308 California st,S. F. 

To-Kalon Sec $12.00 $13.00 

Sparkling U.OO 12.00 

AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE CO. (Lt'd) 

839 to 849 Folsoin street, San Francisco. 

Reihlen 15.00 17.00 

A. WERNER & Co. 

53 Warren street. New York. 

Extra Dry $ 7.00 $ 8.00 



KUHL8, SCHWARKE vfe CO., 
123 Sutter street, San Francisco 

Zinfandel .'. .$ 3.35 $4.25 

Zinfandel 4.00 5.00 

Burgundy 4.00 5.00 

Sauterne 5..50 7.00 

Port, Old .- 6.00 

OldSherry 6.00 



Imported Wines. 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 

133 California street, San Francisco. 

BED WINES. 

(Barton & Guestier. Bordeaux.) 

Quarts. 

Floirac $ 7.50 

Pauillac 8.50 

St. Julien 9.00 

St. Estephe 9.00 

Chateau Lacroix 10.00 

duGallan, '78-'81.. 10.50 

le Pain, 1878 11.50 

Pontet Canet, 1881 13.50 

Chat. Beychevelle, 1881 15.00 

Diicru Beaucaillou, 1881 16.00 

Chateau Lagrange, 1878. . . . 33.00 

Brown Cantenac, 1876 23.00 

Chateau Langoa, 1874 23.50 

Leoville, 1874-1878. 84.50 

Larose, 1874 24.50 

Lafite, 1874 29.00 

Latour, 1870 31..50 

MargBUX, 1874 29.00 

(H. Cuvillier & frere, Bordeaux.) 

Pauillac, 1881 10.50 

Ducasse Grand Puy, 1878. . . 14..50 

Chat. Kirwan, 1878 17.50 

" Beycheville, 1874 19..50 

Cos d'Estournel, 1878 22.00 

Chat. Larose, 1870 82.50 

" Latour, 1868 29.50 

" Mai gaux, 1881 32.00 

" Mouton RothBchild'80 85.00 
(Bouchard pere <fefil8, BeauneCoteD'Or.) 

Macon, 1884 10.50 

Pommard, 1884 12.50 

1881 15.00 

Clos de la Mousse, 1884 17.00 

Chambertin, 1884 21.50 

1881 85.00 

Romance, 1884 84.50 

Clos de Vougeot, 1887 20.50 

WHITE WINES. 

(Barton & Guestier, Bordeaux.) 

Sauternes 9.25 

Vin de Graves, 1878 10.50 

Barsac, 1878 11.00 

Haut Sauternes, 1874 17..50 

Chateau Yquem, 1874 30.50 

(H. Cuvillier & frere, Bordeaux.) 

Sauternes 11.50 

Chateau Giraud, 1884 27,50 

LaTourBlanche'84 87.00 

(Bouchard pere & fils, Beaune, Cote D'Or) 

Chablis, 1884 11.50 

Montrachet Bouchard, 1884. 80.50 



Imported Champagnes. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

DEUTZ * OILDERMANN, AY., CHAMPAGNE. 

Gold Lack Sec. per case. . . .$.33.00 $34.00 
Gold Lack See. 6 Magnums 

per case 31.00 

Cliacliet lilane per ease 30.,50 

Cabinet Green Seal, per bskt 35.50 

DUPANLOUP * CO., REIMS. 

Carte Blanche, per case 31.00 

Carte Branclie, extra dry, per 

case 31.00 



33.50 
87.50 



23.00 



22.00 



W. B. CHAPMAN, 

123 California street, San Francisco. 

Perrier Jouet &Co."SiKcial"*32..50 $34.50 

" Reserve Dry 32.,50 34.,50 

Peirier Jouet A Co. Brut... . 33.00 35.00 
Half pints "Special" $40 in cases of 4 doz. 



SHERRIES. 
(Sandeman, Buck <fc Co,, Jerez,) 



Pemartin Brut 

•' Umbrella . 



(Sandeman & Co., Oporto,) 



00 

oooo.. . 
ooVoo . 



J9.00 
80.00 



16.00 
19.00 
81.50 



WM. WOLFF & CO., 

339 Market street, San Fraucisco, 

(Dnbo« freres, Bordeaux.) 

Chateau de I'Ysle, in casks.. $95.00 

(Journu freres, Bordeaux.) 

Clarets and Sauternes, per 

case from $7.50 to $80.00 

Mignotte-Picard & Co., Chassagne, Cote 

D'Or wines $l'3.go to 35.00 

(Henkell & Co., Mayenee.) 

Hock wines from $7.50 to $36.00 

(Morgan Bros., Port St. Mary.) 

Ports and Sherries In wood, 

per gallon $1.75 to $4.50 

Port and Sherries in cases, 

per case $8.00 to $15.00 

(Mackenzie & Co., Jerez.) 
Ports and Sherries in wood 

from $L75 to $4.50 



34 



f^eifie WI^IE /rj^D Sf li^lT I^EVjEW. 



T. J MIAikll*!!. 



J. J. iMijixKixr. 



J^onncZZy (SI ^rannan, 



WINtS AM) 



AiiKXTo m« 

Straight 
Kentucky 
Whiskies. 




lilUNIllKS 



K. K. rOKNKK 

Oa)itaiiU A Keanj Sif. 

San Francisco. 
Cat. 



KOLB &. DENHARD, 



OldNooparcilRye 



Imported 
and liiqnon. 

OourbonWliiskv 




CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

O^FIOm AMO VAULTS, 420-A24 MONTGOMERY ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 




I. DE TURK 

l^ines and '^randi'sc 



BRANDY, 
ANGELICA, 
ZINFANDEL, 
HOCK. 

PORT, 

TOKAY, 



CLARET. 

SAUTERNE, 
. . , , SHERRY, 

"'■^ ^■^' MUSCAT, 

RIESLING, 
GUTEDEL. 



Vineyarcls and. Cellars: 

Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, Cal. 

Brarxch: 
212 Sacramento St., San Francisco, Cal., 

C. M. MANN, Manager. 
New York Office, - - 22-24 Monroe Street. 



Pure California Wines & Grape Brandies. 
THE 

Sail GaUiiel Wiiie Go. 

OF .S.I.V (lAItRIEL, 
ZjOK Angeles County, Cal. 

ArenowprepaieU wiili a iargectook of wines anil 
brandies of tlirir own growth to supply tiio trade 
and tlie inarl^et generally. TliU Company ownf 
the largcRt vineyard in the world, eovering over 2,M> acres. They have held their 
wines and l)randies for several years in their own eellars, and do not offer any of 
tlieir product until it has liecoTne jiroiK'rly matured. Their large stock of ma- 
tured wines and l>randies thus accumulated is now o)ien to the purchaser. All 
goods under tlieii trademark are warranted pure and unadulterated. Being the 
successors to IJ. D. Wiijrf)N & Co., and to J. De Baktii Siiokb. Iliev have become 
ix.ssessers of the "SHORB" Bbasd of Bba.vdy. and "MODNT" VINEYAKD" 
Wi.NK. Corres(H>ndence solicited. 

MARSHALL. SPELLMAS S CO.. ./. VE RARTH SHORR. 

Xi>. .'■> \cw York and Br<M>klyn IJridgc Vault, President .San Gabriel Wine ('■ 

Fkankport St., New Vokk. Sa> {jAiiRiEi,. C"ai,. 





TMt HIRAlii aiBLEY FIRE-PHOOF WAREMOOSEfl. 

TOI?,JLa-El 

OBIPE I' IX BOXI); aUofoi CAI.IFOUSIA WIXES, CHAMPAQNE8, 

1' i ITS and (iKXKHAI, MEHCHAXDISE. Wc receive, 

-..M. ,.jy tar. deliver or rc-ship to any |>»rt of the country 

at rauhinablc rate*. Direct all corm|>undence to 

HIRAM SIBLEY dt CO.. Props. - CHICAGO, ILL 



P'-'' ' IM.l'-MI^ I> is 



F. O. BOYD & CO.. 

CoMMIMIIOH MnillA' Nkw Yomx. 

CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 



S..I.. luii-tcrn Ageiil U<r llAll'I'o.NK leleliratcl ■ . ,| \\ i,i,.». Fmno.Cal. 
Advances Made on Consignments. 

' Statu or Nrw York. 
;AiatTIIY. Han Kraiiclsco.Cal. 
; II. MrHt'fltll.T, Chicago, III 



lleferel.. 

Mn. llonriiT I 

Mk Mi>iia( I 



Til r. II. 

'Ill Mil 

. i [uncl^cn. (';: 



¥ TD=KRLDN- 



■Hi 



(Regi8terc<l Trade Mark.) 



Vineyards, Cellars and Distilleries Situated at 

OAKVILLE, NAPA CO., CAL. 

5i. "w. cr.jPs.:b:b, - - fi?.of=r.ie:toi^. 

"TO-K.\I.ON" has received more Mitlals, Diplumas and Premiums 
than any either brand of Wines and Brandies in .\merica. 

JAS. L. DAVIS & CO., Sole Agents, 

.TOS CALIFOIiXIA STREET, - - SAX FBA.VCISCO. ( A i 




ifoip Wiiie Growers Oijioii 

Wines and Brandies, 

Cor. SuUfr & Grant Ave, Han Franeiteo, Cal. 




The Hlghent Grade Champagne In the World. 



WHITE LABEL. 

"Carte 11i.an<iie." 
A .Mngnlfi<.enl lllch WInf. 



BROWN LABEL. 

"(iKAMi VlN Ski , 

Perfccthinof aDryWliu 



8w that every Butlle bears ine private label of 
MACONDRAY A. CO., 

Sole Ai;i Ills (nr Ihc I 'mi tic Coast. 



f/^eifie WI/slE f^^Q Sf>lf^lT I^EVIEW. 



35 



CHARLES MEINKCKE & CO. 
314 Sairaiiieiito utreet, San Francisco. 
A (le Luze .t Fils, Bordeaux 

Clarets, per ease *8.00 to |28.0n 

A. lie liiizc it Fils, Bordeaux 

SauterncB, per case 12.00 to 20.00 

C. Marey ife I-isf^r Belair.Nuils 

liurgiindies, white and 

red, per cat.e 15.00 to 21.7.5 

D. M. Fcuerlieerd,.Ir.,iteCo., 

Oporto, Port wines 

per case 15.00 to 20.00 

D. M. Fcuerlieerd, Jr.,&Co., 

Oporto, Port Wines, 

ill wood per gal 2.00 to 4.50 

Duff Gordon & Co.. Sherries 

ill wood per pal 2 00 to 5.50 

Laeave A Co., Sherries Crown 

Brand in >g 1.40 to 1.75 

South Side Madeira 2.00 to 2.50 

St. Croix Hum, L. B 5.50 

Arrack •Itiival" Batavia.... 5.00 to 6.00 
Boord & S,)n, Loudon Dock 

Sherry, per case 12.00 to 15.00 

G. M. Pahstinann Sohn, Mainz 

lihiiif Wines per case.. 8.50 to 28 00 
Scluilz ife Warner, Frankfurt 

o M lihine Wines per 

case 11.00 to 14.00 



American Whiskies. 

HENCKEN & SCHUODEK, 
210 Front street, San Francisco. 

Per Gallon. 

Our Favoiite OK $2.75 to *;i.5(l 

OurChoice .....2.50 " 8.0;. 

Paul Jones 2.25 " 2.51; 

Star of '76 2.00 

Old Crown 1.75 "2 00 

OlQ Bourbon 1.50 



SPRUANCE, STANLEY & Co. 
410 Front street, San Francisco. 

Kentucky Favorite I 

Extra Kentucky favorite — 

O. P. T 

0. K. Old Stock 

Harries' Old Bourbon 

Kentucky Favorite, in cases 

H. O. B. juKS 

O. F. C jusfs 

African Stomach Biltei"s, cs. 



3.00 
3..'j0 
2..50 
5.00 
2M 
8.50 
9.00 
W.M 
11.50 



KUHL8 8CHWAKKE & CO. 
12:^ Sutter street, San Francisco. 

O.K Goldwater t 4.00 

per ease 7..')0 



\i 



WM. WOLFF & CO., 

32i) Market stieet, Kan Francisco 

W. H. McBrayer, 1885 »2.75 

CHAIILES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
John Gibson's Son it Co., 
Philadelphia, Bourbon 
and live wliiskies fl.90 to »;i.50 



KOLB & DENHAKD. 

422 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

Nonpareil Kye and Bourbon *2.50 to $5.00 



Imported Whiskies, 

CHAKLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
Boord it Son, London Finest 

Irish Malt Whiskev .... 112.50 

Soyal Hghid Scotch Whisky. 12.50 

fohn Kamsay, Islay Malt 

Scotch Whisky 13.00 

WM. WOLF & CO., 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

L,one Highland perc'sj $11. .50 

,'onnaiigli, Irish " 11. .50 

iVm. Jameson cfe Co " 11. .50 



SIEBE BliOS. & PLACEMAN. 
322 Sansoine street, San Francisco. 

OK Extra $3.50 to $6.00 

O K llosedale 2.50 to 3.00 

Ilvain 2.75 

Golden Pearl 2.25 

Marshall 2.25 

Old Family Bourbon 1.75 

Old Bourbon 1.50 



NABER, ALFS & BRUNE, 
323 and 325 Market street, San Francisco. 



Phcenix Old Bourbon, Al. . . $2.75 

" Old St'k 3.00 

" Al, 90 pf 2..50 

" OK.lOOpf 3.,50 

" Pony.Priv St'k 4.00 

Club House Bourbon. Old.. 4.,50 

Gold Medal Boui bon, 100 pf 2.,50 

Union Club '• " 2.25 

Suiierioi Whiskv 1.75 

BB Whisky L75 

LiQDORB — In cases. 

Phoenix Bourbon OK, in 58 $10.00 

Al, •• 7.50 

•' " Al,24pts 8.00 

Al,48Xpt 9.00 

Union Club Bourbon, 24 pts 7.50 

'• 48>^pt8 8.50 

Rock and Rye Whisky in 5s. 7..50 

Rum Punch Extract, in 5s.. 8.00 

Blackberry Brandy, in 5s. . . 7.50 

MOORE, Hunt & Co, 
401 Front street, San Francisco. 

Per Gallon. 
Extra Pony in bbis or >^-bbls $6.00 to $8.00 

A A " " pf 4.00 

B " " " 3.50 

C ..... 300 

No. 1 " " " 2..50 
Rye in bbis and i^-bbls from 3.50 to 5.00 

A A in cases 11.00 

A A ill 5 case lots 10..50 

A A in 10 to 25 lots 10.00 

A A in pint tliut flasks 2 

dozen ( o case 12.00 

C In cases 8..50 

C in 5 case lots 8.25 

C in 10 to 25 case lots 8.00 



Imported Brandies. 

WM, WOLFF it CO., 
329.Maiket street, San Francisco. 

Marten's Brandy, * per case $17.00 

** " 19.00 

" «** " 22.00 

VSO •' 28.00 

'• WSOP •• 50.00 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

Champ Vineyard Proprs. Co., 
Bouteileau & Co. man- 
agers Cognac in Octaves 
per gal $5.00to$8.50 

The Vineyard Proprs. Co. 
Bouteileau it Co. mana- 
gers Reserve Vintages. 10.50 to 14.00 

Swan Gin in j^ casks 3.75 

Double Eagle Gin in )4 casks. 3.65 

John Ramsay Islay Scotch 

Whisky, in % casks 4 75 

Boord's Pineapple brand 
Jamaica Rums in )^ 
casks 5.25 6.50 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 

123 California street, San Francisco. 

(H. Cuvillier & frere Cognac.) 

Quarts. 

Fine Champagne, 1870 $32.00 

Grande Fine Champagne, 1860 36.00 
Grande Fine Champagne Re- 
serve, 1858 40.00 

JAS. L DAVIS & CO., 

308 California Street, San Francisco. 

W.Barriassonife Co., Cognac. 26.00 28.00 



Imported Goods. 

(MISCELLANEOUS.) 

WM. WOLFF & CO., 
329 Market street, San Francisco- 
J. de Kuyper & Sons Gin, large bot $18.50 
med. " .... 10.00 
Evan's Belfast Ginger Ale per barrel 13.50 
" " " percs.4doz 6.00 

Theo. Lappe's Genuine Aromatique 

per case 13. .50 

Gilka Kiimmel per case 1.5.00 

Vermouth Francesco Cinzani pr.case 6.50 



JOSEPH MELCZER & CO. 
504 and 506 Market street, San Francisco. 
Native Pride. Old Bourbon, 

(per bill) per gallon $2..50 

Old Rip Van Winkle 12..50 

Nevilles Old Bourbon 1..50 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Market street, San Francisco 

(BOORD 4 son's, LONDON.) 

Old Tom Gin, per case 

Pale Orange Bitters, per case 

Ginger Brandy, Liqueur " 

Jamaica Rum, Old " 12.00 to 

IAIN Roval Batavia Gin in 
cases of 15 large black 

bottles per case 

in eases of 15 large 
white bottles iier case 

Kirschwaseer, Maclioll Freres 
Bavarian Highland, per 
case 

Cherry Cordial, J. J. W. 
Peters' per case 

Kummel, BoUmami's per case 



11.00 
ll.,50 
12.00 
14.00 



23.,50 
24..50 

19.00 

12.00 
1S.50 




1889. 

GOLDJMEDAL 

OfT\CE&D£:Po> 



MONT-ROUGE 

VINEYARD, 
1885. 

LIVERMORE VALLEY 

CALIFORNIA. 

A.G.CHAUCHE 

PROPRIETOR, 

SAN FRANCISCO 



J 



A, ^ht^pn^p 8t Co., 




SPARKLING 
WINE 



ONLY. 



J 



American Champagne Co. 

LIMITED. 

I^ie^OIDTTOEI^S OIF 

REIHLEN CHAMPAGNE, 

BRUT AND EXTRA DRY. 



SAN rRANCISCO OFFICE AND FACTORY, NEW YORK OFFICE, 

839-849 Folsom Street. 50 New St. and 52 Broad St. 



II. II. IIAIUUS. 



yi. I.. KKYKOLIIS. 



TIIOS. KINOSTO.N. 



Harris, Kingston L Reynolds, 

WINE GROWERS, DISTILLERS AND 

Dealers in PURE CALIFORNIA WINES 6l BRANDIES 




VINEYARDS <CELUR& 
Rutherford, 

Napa Co., Cal 



VAULTS; 

123-127 Eddy St. 

Under Hackmeier's Hotel, 
San TrafuHsco, Cat-. 



36 



f^eifie WIJ^E /rJMP Sf I^IT J^EVIEW. 



rroprielon <rf tht 

ORLEANS VINEYARD, 



(100 4CBU). 

-PHODVCKKS OF 



AND WHOLEMALE DEAI.EKH 

CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES. 

630 Waahington Str«*t, San Francisco, Cal. 



C. CARRY & CO., 

I'Titprletom 

Dnfle Sam Winery and Dislillery. 

f'ALIFOUMA. 




orriCB ASD HALEfiBOOM 

515-517 Sacramento St., - San Francisco. 

WINERY AND DISTILLERY, 
NAPA. CAL. 



CARPY & MAUBEC, 

18 CEDAH 8TIIEET, - - NEW YOKK. N. Y. 



liaehman & Jaeobi, 



DEALERS IN- 



California Wines and Brandies 

BRYANT AHO mKCOND »THemTU, BAN FKANCISCO. 



Eastern Agents, 

EDINGER BROS. & JACOBI, 

Cor. I>t>v<T & I'cjirl StH.. I{r«M)klyii Hridp" St«)r(> Xo.'.'. New York 




JOSJElDZEt&GO. 



Gtuwvrit and iMalvra In 
t'altftitmia 

WINES AND BRANDIES 



fnfMm 01« IU« Wim Tialti. 



Fine Table Wines a Specialty 

504-506 Market St., 

Snn ]-'inn('lj«4 o, Cal. 



\ Mau-a», Mauafcrr. 



H. A. Mkisriam, SuiicrintendPiit. 



Los M & Saratoga Wiie Go. 

I'JIODITEUS OF CHOICE 

WINES and BRANDIES 



MUSCAT, 
ANGELICA, 
ROYAL NECTAR, 

ZINFANDEL, 

SHERRY, 



HOCK, 

SAUTERNE, 

OLD PORT, 
GUTEDEL. 
RIESLING, 



FROM FOOTHILL VINEYARDS. 



Los Gates 
Branch Office 



VIXEYAHDS AND C'EI.LAItK: I 

IS and Saratoga, Santa Clara Co., Cal. I 

: 478 Tenth Street, Oakland, California I 




.f^^'^yM^^^ 



<J2! 



/^^CALIFORNIAN^^ 



WINES & BRANDIES 



JStancb an^ IDaults, 100 & 102 first Street. 

Wholesale aiid Retail. 

Selected Stock of Clioiee Old Wlnef a Specialty. 



PIONEER WINE HOUSE. 

Establlclied 1854. 



^/^UpOI^f^l/^ U/lflEJ f^p BI^flfiDI^S 

Vineyards in Los Angeles County, Sonoma County, 

Merced County and Fresno County. 



Cor. Second and Folsom Sts., 

San. Francisco. 



41-45 Broadway, 



HIRSCHLER & CO., 

312 to 210 Sakkohi Stbbet. Sam Fbanoisco, Cau 

Wine I Liquor Me rchants 

Proprietors of Suhmit Vinbtvakd, Napa Co., Cal. 



— AUo Bole Proprietura of tbe Celebrated — 

^* JflQTi8/xTi* Jlentucli'i^ l^hisky 




TRADE 



Damiana Bitters. 

Till' Ciii-at .Mixliaii Henu'ilv for Disonloif of 
llir KliliicVK niid ItladdtT, and NcrvoiiK niwan'-. 

Damiana W moLMiiw^l by atiriiVKli'Iaiiii a^llii' 
Ik'kI NiTVnui> Siliimlaiil. wlih a Ri«vial acll'ni on 
till' KcxiialaiiiKifiicrativcOrcaiiii. For llic al>ovc 
action II Ik ri'i'onim.indfd hi all cnccK of Soxiinl 
Wcaknivf ami Wnnt of Si-xiial l)l•^l^^• 

NABER, ALFS & BRUNE 



Sole Accnl-, 



■■f£i-:>-::, M.irk.l St., s r 



f/reifie WI^IE /rJMD Sfll^lT [REVIEW. 



37 



Quotations at Cincinnati and Louisville. 

E. G. B.-Export Gauge Bremen; N. Y.-New York; N. Y. C. H.-New York Custom House; L. P. W. H.-LouisvUle Public Warehouse; 
Lou.-Louisville; Cin.-Cincinnati; Dist'y-Distillery; C. C. H.-Cincinnati Custom House; St. L. C. H.-St. Louis Custom House. 

ji^" These prices are for lots of not lees than twenty-five barrels and upwards, cash, and if in bond, original gauge, accrued charges paid. 







I3sr Bon^i: 


). 




t.a:x 


IP^IID. 






BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 
'89. 

60 


Fall 

'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall 
'90. 


Spr'g 

'87. 


Fall 

'86. 


Spr'g 
'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 
'85. 


Old 
Whiskies. 


Remarks 








50 








225 






SprSl 285 


LouCH 


Aiidorson Co. Club 


















Anderson Co. Sour Mash 






GO 


55 
50 


42^ 
40 


40 
37^ 


37^ 


210 








240 






Asliland 








210 






































50 




37^ 
37i 




207i 




225 






Fall 81 260 


CiuCH 


Ballard & Lancaster 












Hfiooliwood 




























Bel-Air 




75 




65 
55 
50 
65 
75 


"50" 


40 














Spr81 275 


Lou 


Belle of Anderson 
















Belle of Anderson Co. (E. Murphy) 
B(^lle of Tjouisville 














225 




257i 


























Belle of Marion 




80 


'"so" 




40 
55 




210 
230 




225 






SprSl 275 




Belle of Nelson 










T^elTnoiit 








240 










T^erkele AVm 






60 


55 

m 
55 

67i 
52* 

■ 85 
45 

75 


45 

""m 

32| 
62| 


42i 

40 

40 

55 

37J 

65 

30 

55 
















Berrv E C. . 






















Bi<T Anrino" TNelson Co. Distsr. Co.^., 














205 






Spr81 260 




Bliikeiiiore 




















Blue Grass 








60 


200 
240 


:::::::: 


220 
250 




250 
265 


Spr81 270 
Spr84 275 




Bond & Lillard .. . 




97J 


60 




Bond, M. S^ 






Boone'ft Knoll 










230 




250 




275 






Bowen H. C. 








Spr 80 300 


Nev Ex 


Bowen. J. A 




























Brownfleld, W. W 








65 
60 




55 

50 






































SprSl 275 


LouCH 


Callaghan 






























65 
50 
45 
45 


40 


55 
50 
40 
37i 








225 










Cedar Run 


80 






















64 
60 


""56" 














Fall 82 260 
Spr 81 275 




Clay, Samuel 


















Cliff Falls 


















Clifton 
































62^ 




55 
44 
65 

47i 


"35 


40 
30 
50 
35 
37^ 

35 

45 

37i 
45 
40 
40 


















Cook, C. B 
















Fall 80 270 


























Craig, F. G 
























Cornflower 
























Cream of Anderson 




75 
65 

75 




65 

50 

60 
55 
65 


'"37^ 
"55" 


















Criterion 




















Crystal Spring 




















Cumberland 
















Spr 80 300 




Cummins, R. & Co 






















Dant, J. W 




90 
65 


85 




205 


215 


240 










Darling 












Daviess County Club 
























Dedman, C. M 




m 




67J 










225 
















36 

40 

m 

52| 

55 

42J 

30 

33i 
















Dundee 








52J 
60 
65 
70 

40 

42J 

35 
























70 
80 
80 




















Early Times 


82| 


















Edge Cliff. 


















Ederewater (T. J. Meeribben.) 






210 




230 






Spr 80 290 


LouCH 


Elk Run 














Excelsior (Megibben & Bro.) 










190 






235 








Fall City 


















Fern aiff. 










32^ 


















Fible & Crabb 




75 












200 














Field, J. W. M 










40 

40 

60 

42i 

35 

37i 

37i 
















Franklin 




























Frazier, W. J 








75 

55 

50 

52J 

55 


62i 

45 

35 

40 

37i 




207^ 


































Garland 
























Gladstone 








32| 
















Glenarme 







































38 



j^lfie WI|slE J^^Q Sfll^lT ^lEVIEW- 




•iliQUllERCI " 



FOR 



BOURBON nilBOURBON] 




^^^ 



323-325 Market St., S. F 



V v..:;-! uui(.'KK5. 



■IKMlY HniltoIlKIU 



Mencken & Schroder, 

8rCCF.S8f)IlS TO 

HENRY BRICKWEDEL & CO. 

Jmporten atul J>iulrr» in 

cnines and liiquoi:^s. 

&fa AgetiU for Dr. Sehrxider^$ Hamburg BiUen, and 
Our FaroriU 0. K. and Jhtd Jonet MTiinkiai. 

No». 208-210 Front Street, - San Franciscc, Cal. 



WICHMAN & LUTGEN, 



Importera of 



l^ines (S 



Muialartnrrr* ftnd 
rn>prletnr« of 

Dr. Fo«r*t*r's 

ALPOT 
Slomarh Bitter*. 




^i(JUOT$, 



318-320 Clay St 

Bet yront & Batlny, 

San Francisco. 



V. V. IJ. ilK.NAIIIK. 

E. MARTIN & CO., 

mroBTERa and wholesale 

iiiQUOH mei^cHflNTS, 

408 Front St., San Francisco, Cal. 

HOI.K AOKXTH FOU 

J. F. CUTTER AND ARGONAUT OLD BOURBONS. 



THE CELEBRATED 



PERUVIAN BITTERS. 

A : i'hi'.i; Ai i mzi.;;. A ROTAL TONia CURB DT8PBP8IA. 



'WrLTJ2^:ETtJDTl<TC3t &c CO., agents, 

214-216 Front St., - San Francisco, Cal. 

Also Agents for Delmonico Champagne. 



Hey, Grauerholz & Co., 

IM1-..1.IK]:~ \Mi WllOLWALB DCALBBS IH 

WINES& LIQUORS 



SOLE AOENTH FOR - 



PA\/V CROCKS WHISKY. 

BS SURB rOD ARE RIGHT, THEN 00 AHKAO. 



NO. 21B SACRAMENTO STftCET, 



SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



P.J.CASSIN & CO., 

IMl'OltTEltS OF I'UKE 

Kentucky Bourbon Whiskies 

Sole Agentufov O. K. GOLDEX PLANTATION WHISKY. 



-WIIOLKHALK DEALERS IN- 



Forelgn and Domestic Wines and Liquors. 

*33 BATTERY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Kuhls, Schwarke & Co. 

Wlioteale Wine and Lipor Merctiants. 

Callfonila Wiiies ^ Biaiiilies. 



-SOI.R AdENTS FOU- 



O.K. Goldwater Bourbon k Rye Whiskies, 

12S-rjn Sutfrr St., Cor. Keaniii. - - San Francisco, Cal, 



IS. FuiTitlH. 



C. CEIXAJUI's. 



Thomas Taylor & Co. 

— DIhTIM.KKH or AND HEALKBS IS — 

iA£ I N ES A ND^-IQUO RS 

Sole .\gi'nl« for - — 

Alpine and Champion Cocktail Bitters. 



El F'lrst Stre;e;t, 



Ss-TL Fra-ncisco. 



('. J OUT, su. 



C. JOKT, J R. 



— Distiller* iknd Itcrtihers of— 

SPIRITS AND ALCOHOL 

Office: 306-308 Ciay Street, 

])ISTILLEI1Y AT AXTIOCH. SAN FRANCISCO. 



CIIAK. W, FOIIE. 



JOHN M'UtAM K. 



Spruance, Stanley & Co. 

IMPORTEna AND JOBBERS OF FIXE 

Wliskies, Wiiies aiid Lipors. 

Sole agents for the Celebrated African Stomach Bitters 

■110 FuoNT Stiikkt, - - Sin I'l; wiini o, Cm.. 



J 





f/reifie wijsiE 


/r/^E) 


Sflf^lT 


f^EVIEW 


1 






3^ 


BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 

'89. 


Fall 

'89. 


Sj)r'g 
'90. 


Fall 
'90. 


Sl)r'g 

'87. 


Fall 

'86. 


Spr'g 

'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 
Whiskies. 


Remarks 


Glencoe 














Spr 81 275 




Gleninore 










47* 


42* 
40 
42* 
35 
















Glen Springs 






















Spr 81 275 
Spr 81 300 




Greenbrier 








60 


■■40 ■ 








250 








Greylock (The Mill Ci-eek Dist'g Co.) 
Grevstone 










, 


































G. W. S 




75 


"65 
55 


60 
60 

52^ 


■■■■47* 
40 
42* 


45 
45 
37* 
42* 


















Hackly, S. 







200 




225 










Hanuing, Jno 










Spr 80 300 












210 












Hawkins 




















Hayden, R. B. & Co 








m 




37* 

37* 




200 














Head, F. M 




















Head, W. H 








50 

87^ 

55 




















Herniitiige 






95 
60 


'"42* 
40 


70 
40 
37* 
40 












275 


Spr 81 375 




Hill&Hill 




7H 

52| 














HorseShoe (The Mill Creek Dist'g Co) 


57i 


















Hume 




50 








220 






Spr 81 280 




Indian Hill 








25 












Jessamine 










36 


35 

42* 
















Jockey Club 


























Kellar, A 






57i 


52| 

75 

52J 


38* 

55 

40 








225 
240 






Spr 84 250 
June 81 350 




Kentucky Club 






52* 
37* 
37* 


■■■■32* 


220 
























Kentucky Cyclone 






























50 
55 




















Kentucky Tip 








42* 


40 






210 




250 








Lancaster, R. B. (Maple Grove) 


















Lancaster, S. P 








52| 




37* 
40 






















72i 







210 




235 










McBrayer, J. A 












McBrayer, J. H 








55 

92^ 


'"76" 


42* 
67* 


















McBrayer, W. H 






100 




250 


265 






275 


Fail 84 280 
















Marion Co. Distilling Co 








50 
50 
65 
60 


40 
55 

47* 


37* 
37* 
50 
45 


















Mattingly & Son, J. G 




















Spr 84 235 




Mattinglv & Moore 






70 
65 








225 








Mayfield 
















Spr 81 285 




Medallion 




















Mellwood 


72i 


70 
80 


57i 
75 


55 

60 

60 

72i 

.57^ 


42* 
45 

45 


40 

40 

35 

52* 

55 

42* 

40 














Fall 81 265 




Mercantile Club 


35 














Miles, E. L 


















Monarch, M. V 


































230 
110 










Spr 81 280 
Fall 81 275 
Spr 81 275 


NYCH 


Monarch, T. J 








EG 


230 




240 












Lou 


Moore & Grigsbv 


























Murphy, Barber & Co 








57* 
65" 
50 


42* 
""46" 


40 
50 
36 








110 


EG 




Spr 81 275 


Lou CH 


Nail, A. G 




80 


55 










Nelson 






195 




215 




225 






New Castle 




60 






New Hope 






65 
52i 

lo 

75 

52* 

95 


55 


52* 














Spr 82 275 




Nutwood 






65 
















Oakwood 




82J 




52* 




210 
240 














O. F. C 










285 


Fall 80 400 




Old Charter 










35 

72* 
37* 












Old Crow 






100 












300 


Spr 81 400 




Old Lexington Club 












115 


EG 




Old Log Cabin 




75 




















Old Pepper, (Petter,Jas.E.& Co).. 






82* 

75 

57* 

50 

50 




60 
62* 








275 






Spr 84 290 
Fall 83 325 
Spr 82 325 




Old Oscar Pepper 




100 






235 






300 




Old Tarr.... 












Old Time (Pogues) 








62* 
40 


50 
35 


40 
32* 














Old Times 






















Parkland 






















Parkhill 












30 


















Patterson 




























Payne, P. E 








45 
55 
52* 


45 




















Peacock 








42* 

45 

60 

50 

35 

40 

45 

35 

36 


















Pepper, R. P 






55 






225 








Fall 81 275 




Pilgrimage 






50 












Purdy & Co 


























Rich Gi-ain 








52* 

55 

57 

45 

52* 


■■■42* 
47* 


















Rich wood 






60 
65 


35 
















Ripy, T. B 






205 




225 




245 


Spr 81 275 


LCH 






57i 




Rolling Fork 










225 











40 



J^lfie WljME /t/4D Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



"GOD BLESS YOU! 



f9 



THE BELLE OF BOURBON COMPANY, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Is the Heart- Fait Expression that Comes to Us from all 
over," from those who have used 



DISTILLERS OF THE FAMOU: 




"BEliLE OF BOUOT" 

Hand-Made Sour Mash Whisky 

(M) JUT ii'iil Small Oralii.) 
MOfte BOTTLEO UNDER EIOHT VEAHS OLO. 



SIEBE BROS. ^ PLAGEMANN, 

AGENTS, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



TO WINE-MAKERS! 



FATHERS! MOTHERS! CHILDREN! 

Tbi* woDderfol ronlUI. inhlrh in w •««■! iw wild liniiey, and an iiivlxnratin); ai> 
an dwtriral hallcrv. 

DIARRHCEA, DYSENTERY, MALARIA, 

ADd all ailnitnlr of ihc li ihcIo. Lcadliii; I'liVhicianK iirrixribi' It for ADl'LTR AND 

CHILOKEN. Forule lir Ht*n*. Mtyerfrld. Mitclirll .<E Hiebenliaurr, 

Kan PranciwHi, an<' all drii|;i:l«lii and dralem. 

RHEINSTROM BROS. Sole Props., 

OiaTILLERa FINE UQUEUN3, 

ciisrci]snsr-A-Ti, tj. s. -A- 

Monarch Blackberry Brandy, 

THE ONLY RELIABLE IN THE MARKET. ' 

typon ruRixy, kthfaoth and flavor, it has no equal. -^^J 

MWorifch, Fletcher k Co. 



The iimlcmljfncd hjjr to call the attention of Wine Makeni, Dealers, etc-., to M. 

Clu'vallici-.Siiporfii 

"OENOTANNIN" 

Ai> a rorrertive and a puritier to all light Table Wines, Wlittr ami Hed. ) 

Fob CLABifTiNu White and Red WisEb. 

And to 

A. BOAKE ROBERTS & CD'S 

LIQUID ALBUMENS 

For riarifyin);, preservinK, restoring and correcting both White and Red Winca. 
Mrectlons for xise on appUcatton, 

For Sale by Charles Meinecke & Co., Sole Agents, 

3t4 Sacramento Street, San Franct^co, Cat. 




ESTABLISHED 



DISTILLERS OF 



A 



A. Finke's 



KotlU-ni and Dealers In 

Native ]^ines. 



168-70-72 East Pearl St. 
Cincinnati O. 



Mamtfachtrerx of 

CALIFORNIA 

ABSOLUTELY PURE 



M. Blumenthal & Co., 




1 864 



Widow, 



First Premium 

CIIAMPAdNES. 



(lOi.i) Skal, 

Carte Blanche, 

Imperial. 



I>I^TII,I.F.K^ AMI MAMI CAl I IlKK* OF 



SYRUPS, CORDIALS, BITTERS, EXTRACTS, 

Pure Sugar Coloring 



809 MONTGOMERY ST. 

San Francisco. 

Telephone 5024. 




; -•■Flr»t rreinuitn for Qold 
^<al Reul California Cham- 
I>«j.'iH> awarded bv the Slate 
Fail, isyii, and Hherever ex- 
hibited. 



A SPECIALTY. 



Wine and Liquor Me rchants. 

658-660 Mission St., Bet. «eoond end Third, San Franelso, Cat 
GOODS SOLD AT L0WIT8 nOUBB. SBtD FoTsAiPLK AND PRICE. 



E. U C. STEELE & CO. 

KuMvwHora to C. .\ix)i.i'H l><>w & Co. 

SOLE IMPONTENS OF 

HARMO NY SH ERRIES. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 

208 Caijkornia Street, - 8an Francwoo, Oal. 





f/reifie WIJME 


/eJ^E) 


Sfll^lT 


f^EV 


lEW. 








41 


BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall Spr'g 
'88. '89. 


Fall 

'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall 
'90. 


Spr'g 

'87. 


Fall 
'86. 


Spr'g 
'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 
Whiskies 


Remarks 


Saffell, W B 


























Samuels, T. W 






G2i 


60 
55 

57^ 




45 
42| 

47i 








240 


Cin. 


CH 






Samuels, W. B. & Co 












Fall 83 265 




Searcy, J. S 






















Searcy, Wiley, (OldJoe.) 




90 




















Sharpe 






55 




















Sliawhaii 










40 

37* 
40 


















Small Grain 




























Smith & Smith 
























































Southall 








55 
55 










225 






































Split Rock 








37 
""32^ 


35 

50 
45 

■■"37^ 


















Snriusr Hill 








62| 
65 

45 














Spr81 325 




Spring Water 






















Stoue, W. S. (Old) 








""29" 


210 




225 










Sweetwood 
















Tippecanoe 






















Taylor (Old) 




95 


97i 


72i 
52| 




















Tea Kettle 






37i 


















Tenbroeck 
























Tip Top (Rock Spring Dist'g Co 




75 


60 


67^ 


42i 


40 
40 

40 


















Van Arsdell 
















Spr 81 275 


Lou 


Van Hook 








50 

57^ 

55 

55 

72^ 

50 

Q^ 
67^ 
47i 






200 










Walker, F. G. (Queen of Nelson)... 




















Walker, J. M 
























Warwick 








45 


m 




200 




230 










Waterfill & Frazier 




90 
65 


67" 










Wathen Bros 




"si'i 


37| 

55 

60 

35 

32| 

45 

55 


















Welsh. J. T. (Davies Co.) 




















Welsh, J. T. (McLean Co) 
























White Mills 




57^ 


55 


















Willow Run 




























57i 
72it 


47i 
60 




50 


200 








240 






Zeno 




90 







































KZEIDTTTJOIKIY 


I?.Y"F!S. 












Ashland 








62^ 
67^ 




42* 
50 






. .' . .! 




Atherton 












: ■; i; 1: i 




Belle of Anderson 














1 


1 




Belle of Louisville 






57^ 
















...I ..... 




Belle of Nelson 




- 
















257i 


1 




Blue Grass 






82i 


77| 


60 


57J 




215 






« 




Clarke's 
















Criterion 








52^ 






















Crystal Spring 












. 
















Curley, J. E 






























Edge water 


























Spr 80 350 




Excelsior 




























Franklin 








75 
55 


55 
50 




225 
















Grey lock 






















Greystone 


























Hermitage 






100 


95 


82J 


77i 












300 


Spr 83 375 




Highland 




















Horse Shoe (Mill Creek Dist'g Co... 








55 


50 




















I jynchburg 


























Marion Co. Distilling Co 








70 
52i 






















Mattingly & Son, J. G 










45 


















Melwood 




80 


65 


















Miles, E. L 




70 
60 


55 
55 
55 

60 




















Millcreek 


























Monarch, M V. 
















250 










Nelson 


























Normandy 








75 

80 




















Old Pepper (Pepper Jas. E. & Co... 








67i 
52^ 
47* 
55 




265 




290 






Spr 84 300 




Paris Club 














Peacock 




























Pepper, R. P 








65 


50 








235 










Rolling Foi'k 












215 










Short Horn (Dougherty's) 










50 
















Sovereign 










50 

52i 

55 

40 

52i 








240 










Sunny Side 




75 




65 
45 

"m 


50 

52| 

35 
















Susquehanna 




45 
















Sylvan Grove (Fleishmann's) 

Wathen Bros 


60 


55 


50 
65 
































White Mills 






40 












t 





















42 



f^lfie Wl/^E /rfJD Sfll^lT R. EVIEW. 



LE^IDIliTa- IDISTIXjLEI?.S. 



AODRCSS. INSURANCK. 



BRAND. 



BOTJE/BOITS. 



ANDKRSON & NELSON I)IST*S (X).i 
Add; Andonton & Nebon DiMtilli-ricK 
Co., I^ouiMville. 

Rjito. lX>c, 



Anth-rHon, 
Nelwiii. 



BKLLKof ANI)ERm)N DO CO. 

Add; 8. .T. (rnynlmum, liOuiHville. 

Kat«, 1.25. 



Ik'Ui' of Aii»l«'i-w>n. 
(ili'iiuriiu', 
Jemamine, 
Arlington. 



M. P. MATT1N({LY. 

Oweumboro, Ky. 
Free W. H., l.«0. 



Old W. 8. 8tone. 



J. O. MATTINGLY CO. 

Louim'ille, 
Bate 86c. 



J. G. Mattingly & Sons. 



MELLWOOD DISTT CO. 

Louisville. 
Bate, 85c. . 



Mellwood, 
Dundee, 

a. w. 8. 



MOOBE & 8ELLIGER, 

Louisville. 
Rate, S.'ic. 



Astor, 
Belmont, 
Nutwood. 



ED. MURPHY & CO., 

Ijawronceburg, Ky. 
No. 1. 1.36. 



Belle of Anderson County 



OLD TIMI">> DIST'Y CO., 

Louisville. 
Bates, K6e.& 11.50. 



Old Times. 
Gladstone. 



ADDRESS. IHSORANCE. 


BRAND. 


JAS. E. PEPPER & CO., 

Ijexington. 

Rate. 85c. 


Pepper. 


E. H. TAYLOR, JR. & 80N8, 

Frankfort. 
Rate, Hr>c. 


Old Taylor. 


BELLE OF NEI^SO.N 1) V CO. 
Afld; Belle of Nelson Distilling Co., 
Louisville. 

Rate. K'ic. 


Belle of Nelson. 



EJLSTEI?/nsr I^ITES. 



M. CBICHTON & CX). I 

Baltimore, Md.l 

'A" 1.70, "B" 1.60, "C" 1.35. I 



Monticello. 



J. A. DOUGHERTY &'SONS, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Rate, 90c. 



Dougherty. 



A. OVERHOLT & CO., 

Add; A. Overholt & Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Rate, 80c. 



Overholt. 



S. DILLINGER & SONS, 

Ruft's Dale, Pa, 



Dillinger. 



THOMPSON DIST'G CO., 

West Brownsville, Pa, 
Add; Office 134 Water St., Pittsburg.Pa, 
Rate, 80c. 



Sam Thompson. 



SUSQUEHANNA DIST'G CO., 

Milton, 
Add; Jas. Ijcvy & Bro., Cincinnati. 
Rates, 85c & 1.25. 



Susquehanna. 



BETHANY DISTILLERY. 








ESTABLISHED 16 34 



^^F'SDAII,. WESTMOf^ELAHD CO. PA. 



THIS SPT^CE ReSER^ZED FOR 

aam. H- shields, 

WHISKY BROKER 

No. 6 West Third Street, - - Cincinnati, O. 



- 


f>>reifie wijsiE 


/c^lD 


Sfll^lT 


f^EVI 


EW. 








43 


E.^STEK.ISr K/ITES. 


BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 
'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 
'89. 

874 

774 

70 

70 

85 

824 

57* 

824 

76 

85 

624 


Fall 

'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall Spr'g 
'90. 1 '87. 


Fall 

'86. 


Spr'g 
'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 

Whiskies. 


Remarks 






115 

90 

85 

90 

1084 

105" 


824 
'"96 


774 
60 


724 
524 


■■■474 


276 









- ; 




95 


245 






1 










1 








624 
75" 
65 


47* 
624 
624 












( 






l~)rtii*T}iorf,v 






















120 






































127* 
98| 


1224 
934 


100 

824 
924 
674 


674 
62* 

75" 
55 


60 

57* 
674 
474 








360 
295 










(riiokt^nlipiniBr 


524 
6O" 
40 
45 


2424 




310 




SprSl 465 




TTn.TiTiiKvill*^ 


. 


.Tones G W 


824 


75 


215 




































624 


624 


60 
60 
















IVlolvalo 




























105 
75 


'"674 


80 










265 
















40 

55 

70 

47* 

60 

624 

35' 

55 

50 

50 


35 
45 
624 
46 

51 
35 




















60 
75 
55 
65 
65 
45 
60 
60 
CO 
















ATf Voni on 




120 
1024 
115 
100 
65 


1074 

85" 
874 
85 
574 


87* 

70" 

75 

80 

50 

75 








350 










115 
















265 
2674 


285 
2724 


310 






Spr 80 700 


- 














75 


1 














1 








T^Am r*Krm ftii in 








42* 
45" 






1 








V '» ni"! pfri'i fYi- 














1 1 
























^ta/^^ed^ y/d/a 



6y 







An.DRE5.5 ALL CSMMUNICAnONJ TO 

QCNZRAL orncc, 

Pjtt^bui^qm, Pa 



Established 1844. 



■^Sam Thompsoni^ 



Pur 



R 



Wh 



E riYE WHISKY 

UNEQUALLED IN QUALITY. 



.Office: 134 Water Street, 



ON THE MONONGAHELA RIVER, 
West Brownsville, Pa. 



ftWIfie WIJ^E /tj^D Sf II^IT R^EVIEW. 



SniL MAKINfi Wl^rn AT THE OLD STAMI, 

314 SPCAR ST.. SAN rRANCISCO. 

Hobbs, Wall ^. Co., 

Manufiuiurer* of Every VarHiy of 

BOXES. 

All kinds of Boxes on hand and made to order with 
promptness. Wine and Liquor Cases a Speciaity. 



Redwood Cargoes Sawed To Order. 

Linda Vista Vineyard, 



MISSIOS SA\ JOSK, CAL. 



Grape Cuttings 

CUiemet Sauvi^^ion, Calx'niet Franc, St'iiiilloii, Vt-nlot. Merlot, 

Beclan, Petit Syrah, Tranken Riexling, JuhunniHberg 

Rietding, MoiuUnuM>, MuHcatlol du Bordelaiw, 

aSrOR ANY OTHEK VARIETY WANTED.'^ 

First-dam CuttingH of any of the alwve for RootingH or Grafts 
will be supplied at $6.00 per tliouHand on board cars 

Address, C. C. MclVER, Mission San Jose, Cai. 

W. T. GARRATT & CO., 

Brass and Machine Worlts. 



-MANUFACTUKEnU— 



Sjifcial Steam and Hand Piimps for Wineries. 



spraying Pumps 

A.\D PITTING8. 

Irrigation Pumps, 

HOUHE PCJfP8. 

Windmill Pumps, 

Dmt W«U Pnpi, 

neer 




Wine Cocks 

And all (it Iter 

Brass Fittings 

FOR WINHUKS. 

Rubber Hose. 

IMrOBTKRll 

Iron Pipe and 

FITTINOK. 
CO/». FKKMONT S NATOMA aTHCET», SAN FRANCISCO. 

CALIFORNIA FURNITURE COMPANY, 

HuiiifiMirr Id .N. V. COI.K iV ('<). 

FURNITURE AND UPHOLSTERY 

Office Furniture, Etc. 

HUrr KliucBulMlnK. 117 l» 121 (inirv Hlnt-I. H«n Franolm'n. C>l. 

M.F.COON&CO. 

410 Sansom* Street, San Franolaco. 

) :-; AM) : : I'llllTH :-; LM;itAVEIi.S. 



EGG ALBUMEN. 

GUARANTEED ABSOLUTELY PURE, 

CLARIFYING WINES. 



A. KLIPSTEIN, 

52 CEDAR STREET, 



NEW YORK. 



Gas For Country Residences! 

DYKES' 

liM PROVED 

Automatic Gas Jlacliine Co. 

Jacob SclireibLT.Mirr. J.G.Llebert.Jr. Sec. 

43-45 Stevenson St., - S. L. 

Success Achieved- 

Perfection Complete. 

The latest and most jierfect Automatic 0«» Maolilne now in use is the one being 
manufactured at 43-45 StevcuBon street by the Dykes' Improved Automatic Gas 
Machine Company. It is |>arlicularly fur Illuminating; country residences. It is 
es|>ecially adapted for Churches and Public Institutions, Hotels.Wineries and Cellars; 
llif litihl if Itrinlit, Steady, Pleasant, Soft and remarkably soothin>r to the eyes, and 
i; is only about half the exjx'nse of the consumption of city gas. No danger what- 
ever need lie feared from e.X)>losiou wliich is so common in tlie use of coal oil lamps, 
from which so many heart-rendini; accidents have been recorded in our daily news- 
pa|iers. Tlie safety of these Oa» Machines is absolutely assured. In conclusion wc 
would say that no modern built house or public institution should be witliout these 
Gas Machines, a» the iittbl is so far sujK-rior to other methods. Send for Catalogue, 
4:i and 45 Stevenson Street. San Francisco, Cai. 

UOl^A PBl^TA UUM^^R CO. 




— SUCOESSOnS TO— 

■WiPLXSONVILLEl 3xr. & L. 

Have Constantly on Hand a Full Supply 
of the F<illowinK Sizes of 



Co. 



2x2- -4 Feet Long, 2x2- -5 Feet Long, 

2x2- -6 Feet Long. 

^yh^ch wltl be MtUl at featuntable r-nlfft. 



LOMA PRIETA LUMBER CO. 



Loma Prieta, 



Santa Cruz Co., Cat. 



Pacific Copper Works, 

1j. W'Ati.NKK, PKOPRIl-noK, rAth JIlsSlON St., S. F. 

Manufacturer of all Descriptions of Coi-pf.r Wouk, and es|wcialiy of 

Brandy Apparatus, and 

Newest Improved Continuous Still. Leads all others. 

Ilrandv distilled in my CoNTlNHotis Htili. received tills and last year, the 
IIK.IIKST market price. For ri'RiTY AND riNR rLAV<ii< none can e4|nal iU 

llefers to the Pacific Wine Co., San Jose; Elsen Vineyards, Fresno, C«l.; Eggers 
Vineyard, Fn-sno. Cai.; Fiesno Vinevanis, Fresno, Cat.;" Hill A Marshall, Lagnna, 
S<inoina counlv, Cai.; Co-OiK'iativc l)islllling Co., St. Helena, Cat., and Waldcn A 
Sons, (ievservllle. Sonoma county, ('ill. Cham|>agne and Soda Machines mauufac- 
tuied. f'riciv as low as any. 

Fairbanks' Standard Scales, Trucks, Etc. 

FAIRBANKS &, HUTCHINSON, 

31t'-'{18 MAiiKhn- SiHKK-r, - - Sa.n FKAMUstx>, Cal. 



f/ceifie WIJME /cJSID Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES. 

Page. 

Beck, Pyhrr & Co 16 

Boyd, F. O. & Co 34 

Ciilifornia Wine Growers Union 34 

Crabb, H. W '', 34 

Carpy, C. & Co 36 

Chauche, A. G 35 

De Turk, I 34 

Griindliich, J. & Co 25 

Grarnier, Laucei & Co new 

Haraszthy, Arpad & Co 25 

Elaber, F. A 30 

Harris, Kingston & Reynolds 35 

Holtum, C. & Co ;. 36 

Kohler & Van Bergen 34 

Kohler & Frohling 36 

Kolb & Denhard 36 

Kuhls, Schwarke & Co .' 38 

Lachman & Jacobi 36 

Lachman, S. & Co 25 

Lay ties Bros 6 

Los Gatos & Saratoga Wine Co 36 

yielczer, Joseph &Co 34 

ffapa Valley Wine Co 15 

ffatoma Vineyard Co 32 

5an Gabriel Wine Co 34 

5t. Helena Wine Co 36 

DISTILLERS AND BROKERS. 

Belle of Bourbon Co 40 

California Distilling Co 38 

Daviess County Distilling Co 27 

Dillinger, S. & Sons 42 

jlenmore Distilling Co 27 

Halle, Max M 32 

Leading Distillers' Cards 42 

Levy, Jas. & Bro 46 

VIellwood Distillery Co 1 

Monarch, R 27 

yioore & Selliger 5 

Murphy, Ed. & Co .......'....... 5 

3verholt, A & Co.... 43 

Pepper, Jas. E. & Co 6 

Shields, Wm. H 42 

raylor, E. H. Jr. & Sons ..:!..!!!...!'...' 32 

rhompson Distilling Co 43 

FRUIT BRANDY DISTILLERS. 

Mihalovich, Fletcher & Co 40 

Rheinstrom Bros 40 

Walden & Co 32 

West, Geo. & Son 3 

SAN FRANCISCO WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS. 

Dassin, P. J. & Co 38 

Hey, Grauerholz & Co 38 

Hencken & Schroder " 38 

Hirschler & Co 36 

Hotaling, A. P. & Co ..^........^^...]^.. 4 

Moore, Hunt & Co 4 

Martin, E. & Co ".'.!.'.'.".".'.'.!!! 38 

Naber, Alfs & Bruno 38 

5iebe Bros. & Plagemann 4 

5hoa, Bocqueraz & Co 34 

5pruance, Stanley & Co 38 

raylor, Thos. & Co 38 

Wichman & Lutgen 38 

Wilmerding & Co - 38 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CHAMPAGNES. 

^.merican Champagne Co 35 

IJhapman, W. B ...."".." 28 

Finke's Widow, A 40 

Haraszthy, Arpad & Co """!!!!!"!" 25 

Lachman, S. & Co '..'"' 36 

A.. Vignier .' 34 

Macondray & Co 34 



Meinecke, Chas. & Co 28 

Werner, A. & Co 35 

Wolff, Wm. &Co 16 

IMPORTERS. 

Chapman, W. B 28 

Macondray & Co 34 

Meinecke, Chas. &Co 28 

Vignier, A 34 

Wolff, Wm. &Co 16 

Nicholas Rath & Co new 

SPECIAL BONDED WAREHOUSES. 

Bode & Haslett 6 

Sherman, J. D. W 6 

Sibley, Hiram & Co 31 

SYRUPS, CORDIALS, BITTERS, ETC. 

Blumenthal, M. & Co 40 

Dryden & Palmer — 

Henley Bros 36 

McMillan, R. G 31 

Naber, Alfs & Brune 38 

Rudkin, Wm. H 31 

WINE FININGS ETC. 

Meinecke, Chas. &Co 40 

Movius, J. & Son 4 

Klipstein, A — . 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Baker & Hamilton new 

Beck, Pyhrr & Co 45 

Bonestell & Co 45 

California Furniture Co 31 

Coon, M. F. &Co ] 45 

F. J. Cheney & Co 31 

Electric Vapor Engine Co q 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co 44 

Franckx & Ruhleman ig 

Fairbanks & Hutchinson 22 

Gall & Dunne 45 

Goodyear Rubber Co 45 

Golden Gate Woolen Mfg. Co 31 

Hobbs, Wall & Co 44 

Improved Automatic Gas Machine 44 

Jordan, Dr. & Co 45 

Kohler & Chase . 

London Assurance Corporation , 31 

Loma Prieta Lumber Co 44 

Mclver, C. C 44 

O'Brien, James 45 

Occidental & Oriental S. S. Co 45 

Oceanic Steamship Co 45 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co 45 

Prominent California Vineyardists 44 

Pacific Saw Co. 45 

Pierce & Co 31 

Rosenfeld's Sons, John 45 

Sanders & Co 44 

Southern Pacific Co.. 45 

Steele, E. L. G. & Co '.].]][[ 40 

Trumbull & Beebe new 

Tubbs' Cordage Co 45 

Wagner, L ^ 44 

Waas, Henry 45 

Wood & Scott ."".'.' 2 



Established 1852. 

CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

WINE VAULTS, EL PINAL, STOCKTON, OAL. 
Sonoma Wink and Bkandy Co., - Xo. 1 Frost Street, New York. 



JJ^Ifie WIJME /r^!D SflRIT REVIEW. 




A. P. HOTAUNG & CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 



IMPOItTERS Of 



WIHES AND LIQUORS. 



.^-.,-«r^2^ OLD BOURBON AND RYE WHISKIES. 



429 to 437 Jackson Street, - - San Francisco, Cal. 



JOHN' I). BIEilE. 



J. F. I'LAOEMANV. 



F. C. SIEIJE. 




SlEBE BnOS. Bt PliflGEmA^^jSl, 

WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

O.K. Rosedale Boiirlion k Rye Whiskies 



AND TIIE- 



Celebrated Belle of Bourbon. 

Southeast Cor. Sacramento and Sansome Sts., -____-- gan Francisco, Cal. 

Important pof CUine Prodaeet's. 

SMCGHMRINE. 

300 TIMES SWEETER THAN SUGAR. 

An unsurpaascd ingredient for wines; an excellent corrigont of any nnpleasant taste^ entirely innocuous. 

Saochoriuo has very valuable anti-fermentative and antiseptic properties. An addition to an alcoholic solution of 0.005 per 
cent Saocharino stops the fermentation entirely, also the formation of mould and vinegar acid. Testimonials by authorities and 
•ny ftirther information will bo cheerfully fumisheil by applying to 

J. MOVIUS & SON, Successors to Lutz & Movius, 

Solo Licensees for the United States of America, - - - - - 79 MURRAY STREET. NEW YORK. 




JESSE POI^E WHISKIES, 



■ OWEOT fHOm- 



1^0 Aai/e M]y oslahlishGd the reputation of these whiskies on the 
Pacific Coast, and we guarantee them as represented 

STRICTLY PURE. 

WUeil kIvcu • trial llif) Kiniik fi.r IIii'Iiiki'Ivi-h. Fi.r sale lii •|iiuiitilii-M to kult a| 

LOUISVILLE OR SAN FRANCISCO BY 

MOORE, HUNT & CO., 

90L* AQENTa fAOIflO OOA»r, 

404 FRONT ST., - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 



f/reifie wijsiE /cj^D sfif^ir f^eview. 



5 



JVTOORE & SEIiLIGEl^, 

B^C/T)OflX 3i?d /\S50I^ are distilled 
from finest of ^rai^ apd pure$t of u/ater 
upop tl^e fiapd /r\ade Sour /r\asl7 pro- 
cess, ^ael; apd euery barrel (^uarapti^^d 
to be 5tri(:tly pure ai^d free from apy /T)U5t. 








^riEECOPPlR^ 



TAe NUTWOOD is a strictli/- old fashioned "Fire Copjier" Sweet Mash Whisky, in 
the distillRtioii of which we guarantee the use of 40 per cent small grain, giving to 
the Whisku a, heaui/ Mhj and excellent llauor, which, for compounding purposes, is 
unexcelled in Kentucku. ■ 



WWII 



KENTaCKY:^ 



The BELMONT, ASTOR and NUTWOOD Whiskies are stored in the latest 
improved bonded warehouses, with patent racks, metal roof, iron shutters and doors- 
Giving our personal attention to the safe handling and care of these goods, with 
ever}; advantage and facility for shipping the same, we can guarantee full satisfac- 
tion in every particular to the trade. Soliciting your favors, we remain. 

Very respectfully, MOORE & SELLIGER. 





SECOND DISTRICT, NEW YORK. 

The only air-tight Special Bonded Warehouse in the world. Fire proof with Iron roof 
and shutters and glass windows. Heated by hot-air engines, giving an even tem- 
perature the year around, thus insuring rapid development and high proof, and 
yielding the best possible results at the end of the bonding period. Cooperage 
cared for. No excessive outage. Storage and insurance the lowest. Freights 
advanced, and your business carefully attended to. Loans negotiated and sales 
made for cash when requested. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND SHIPMENTS SOLICITED. 



NO. 39 WATER STREET, NEW YORK, 



ED. MURPHY & CO., 



■ DISTILLERS Or - 



OlSTlLLEf^?. 



"The Belle of flndefson Coanty" 

Hand-Made Sour Mash Whisky. 

Pure Fire Copper Whisky, made from the test of Grain and Cold Lim.&) Stone 

Spring Water in the Old-Fashioned Way iy Mashing in Small Tabs, and 

yeasting hack pure sour mash. Whisky unbondod by us and' 

slapped F. 0. B. on boats, (ree of charge 

Headquarters, Lawrenceburg, Ky. Post Office,- Murphy, Ky. 



J^lfie WIJME jk^Q Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



OLD "PEPPER" WHISKY 

PtolUM only hj JiUL £ fV|qm* 4 <'*'., Lexlnt^lon, Kr.. undrr the Mtmr inrmuU 
(or mure th*ii lOO ptmrm, b lb* nirMf aiMl Oemt In Ikr H'oW<l. "I^pprr" 
Wfclalry U BO ulil-(a»Uuae<l whisky, made In the old tlmr tray fnim * l-\trin- 
wto OMd mon than lOO ytwm by tkrrr f/rnrralloHM u( the rr|>|>rr faiiiil.v. 
It I* mad* from m 4 » tt ti d fye. barley and corn. Tli« material l» iiia*lit'<l !>.. 
bUMl, une boabrl at a time, In tmall tuba, Dcarljr unc tiiuuaand <>f which aro t-t>ii- 
•UDtlj teqnlied fur the |>ur|><i»e. No yeaal la empluj-ed tn aM'uie an unnatural fer- 
■••alalloa or UrKe yield, and we iIiikI* and doulile throuch copper hIIIIm «iy;- 
•fWi* /frra. All the water u*«d U from the rrleliratrd " n'tlmm Spring" <>u uur 
|>reaiM*, whirh i* the lar|^l nmturmi Bfrtng of pure Umeatnne water In 
cantral Keuliirkjr. Onr roopentKC la lb* beat and of our own manufaiiurv. I'rrftvt 
aloraee warrhonte*. Oar Ma jAUca B. TsTMa Is the only unc of his name wlxi 
baa been enicaired in the PiotlllinK huaincM In Kentucky for over twenty yearr. and 
tlMnforc any wbUk> offered to tb« trade aa genuioc "Pepper" whiaky Ufraud- 
ldi*li!led byua. 

.M.S. /.. rr.ri'f.n a ( i: 




Model Mammoth Wine Cellars 

Under Appi^ach of Brooklyn Bridge, Block E. &, G. 

CNTRANCea WILLIAM AND ROSE STREETS. 



STORAGE WAREHOUSE AND COMMISSION DEPARTMENT, 

Office Entrance, WUllam St., In Jllock E. 



Corres|>oudcnec Molioited. 



.\iii>KK.-H, l.iiiillcM llrolherH, ISriM>1;l\jn Itrldge, Setr I'orl'. 



ItKirriioLti Ptiibk. 
KcLix I'Tiiaa. 




Choice 'California 

100 to 108 O'FARRELL STREET, 

San Francisco, Cal. 




Ai-OLPii BKcr. 




Wines & Brandies 

Silver Medal Awarded at 

F'jPlR.IS EXF^OSITION, ISBS. 



Incorporated 



BODE & HASLETT, 



June 12, '90. 



fi?,o:pi?.ietoi?.s 



Special Bonded Warehouse, No. 1, First District. 

Kiic iul fa<ililic» for llie RIoracc of Orajie ami Fruit Brandy. Lowest Rates of Btoracc and Insurance. Also Proj)rielore of the Greenwich 
I>Mk riillrd .stntrs Itcmdcd Warehousep, and the Battery Street Free Warehouses for Oeneral Sturai^e. 




The Perfected afety " 

ELECTRIC VAPOR ENGINE, 

The Most Powerful and Economical Motor in the World 

Alw«ya Raady. No Boilar. No Fir*. No Smoke. No Aahea. No Engineer. 

No Licenae. No Danger. 

Vmw Olfy UuH and \alural (Iom, or will make Ittt own Vapor, tchtch Is lanlled 
: automatically by a itmall dry electric battery. 

OUR WINE PLANT 

MtniiitiHl on 11 Hiiiall liaiid truck, witli a powerful 
nitary UnmrA' piiiii]), wiU force fiHmi 5(10 to. 'UKtOfjal- 
loiiH jHT liour.Hiul iiHohtw tliaii oiu> (pilloii of jiawoline 
ill t<'ii lioiii-M niii; piHoliiiocoHtwHt'veiiUH'ii <'ciitHiH>r 
((iinoii. 

We alw) build Ktatioiiary Vapor Engiiiett from 
4 U> 20 liortH! |»owt<r. Send for close OHtiiiiHte. 



Qloctvio *JJapor Qngino Qo.^ 



k 



Offloe, 218 California St., San Franoiaoe. 
Worka. !ill and 213 Main Utreet. 





VOL. XXVI, NO. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 28, 1891. 



$3.00 PER YEAR 



Issued Semi - Monthly. 

R. M. WOOD & CO., - - - PROPRIETORS. 

WINFIELD SCOTT K. M. WOOD. 

The PACIFIC WINE AND SPIHIT ItEVIEW is the mily paper of 
if.s elasii West of Chicayn. It clreiilittps atnotiff the wine niakvi'H and 
biuindfi dMlllem of California; the wholesale wine and spirit trade 
of the Pacific Coast, and, the importers, distillers and Jobbers of the 
Eastern tales. 

Subscription pel year — In advance, postage paid: 

For tlie United States, Mexico and Canada tS 00 

For Euroijean countries 4 00 

Single copies 20 

Entered at I he San Francitco Post Office as second-class matter. 



PITTSBURGH AGENT, 

R. RAPHAEL, 190 Wylie Ave, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Sole Agent for Pennsylvania and North-western New York. 



CINCINNATI AND KENTUCKY AGENT, 
WM. H. SHIELDS, No. 6 West Third Street, Cincinnati, O. 

THE MA-RKET. 



/©ALIFORNIA BRANDY— The taarket is in a healthy condi- 
^^ tion and improving steadily. Young goods of fair quality 
are in active demand at forty-seven and one-half to fifty cents for 
half barrels and a proportionate increase for cooperage in larger 
packages. Older ages than 1890 are not to be quoted, as they are 
not in the market. There is every indication that the supply of 
'91, will be far short of the demand. This is indicated not only 
by the present situation, but by the further fact that a prominent 
brokerage firm in this city has received an order for 100,000 gal- 
lons of brandy, and other calls aggregating 60,000 gallons, and 
that this quantity is not in the market, and the orders cannot 1x5 
filled. Such facts ought to convince producers that there is a 
field in the distillation of brandy which they are not properly oc- 
cupying. 

Exports by sea for the fortnight were 13 cases and 72,800 
gallons, of which 53,096 gallons were to domestic points, and 19,- 
704 to foreign ports. 

^J^ENTUCKY WHISKIES— In sympathy with all other lines 
^/ ^ of trade, the market is sluggish and will continue so until 
the Spring trade opens. The out look for business during '91, is 
excellent. Local trade is quiet. Imports during the fortnight have 
been of usual volume. 

*^^ YES — The market is in the same condition as that for bour- 
^1^ bons, and there is no prospect for a change for the better, 
until the Spring season opens. 



/©ALIFORNIA WINES— The market for dry wines is flat 
^^ and without feature, unless it is a decided inability of jobbers 
and producers to come to an agreement upon the question of 
price delivered at San Francisco. The margin of difierence is 
very slight, and it would seem that there ought not to be such a 
stagnation as prevails at present when all the conditions govern- 
ing the market are considered. There is something radically 
wrong in the situation which allows of such a wide divergence be- 
tween the prices and demand for wines and brandies. While the 
latter are in good demand at fair figures, the former are waiting 
for buyers, and on this account, it would seem tliat the wine mak- 
ers could not only protect their own interests, but greatly benefit 
the industry by distilling a goodly portion of their ordinary stocks. 
The market certainly needs some such relief, and the difierence 
in the prices of wine and brandy, offers inducements to adopt this 
course. The slack demand for dry wines, can be partially ac- 
counted for by the fact that the Eastern and Western states are 
experiencing a severe winter which is having a very quieting 
effect on the market. With the opening of Spring, however, it is 
probable that business will assume a more satisfactory status. 
Well made sweet wines are in fair demand at prices rang- 
ing irom thirty-five cents up. Exports by sea for the fort night 
aggregated .599 cases and 3.50,171 gallons of which 26 cases and 
336,825 gallons were domestic, and 573 cases and 13,346 gallons 
were foreign. 



OF l/STE-REST TO WI/NE BOT- 
TLE-RS. 



A London maker has succeeded in producing wine bottles 
having an unpolished, or rather roughened interior surface. It is 
anticipated that this property will favor the deposition of any 
solid matter which may be held in suspension in wines and similar 
liquids which may be put into bottles. The roughened surface is 
produced, says a contemporary, after the bottle is made, by inject- 
ing the sand blast. Not only will the formation of deposits be 
accelerated by this surface, but the crust which is formed is so 
adherent that bottles of port, etc., may be freely moved without 
danger of injuring the contents. 



NEW ADVERTISEMENTS. 



The attention of the readers of the Review is called to the 
advertisements of the following named firms on piige eleven, 
which are not classified in the index: 

Gamier, Laneel & Co., wine merchants, San Francisco. 
Nicholas, Rath & Co., importers. New York. 
Baker & Hamilton, vineyard implements, San Francisco. 
Trumbull & Beebe, nurseryinen, San Francisco. 



8 



PAeipie WI|^JE /rJMD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



IM JUSTICE TO THE TRADE. 

Tho povcltttioiif. |>iiliIii«h(Hl n few davB njto ronooniing oflV-nw* 
commit tt^l iiftniiixt tin- li<|ii<>r Ihwh hy \vliol«'«»li> (Iwih-iv tJiniiifjh- 
out the Kl4iU> luiv<> not Inm'Ii without Mtliilarv t>flt><'t. A iiiiiiiImt 
of d««len« who did not (ran* to U* rnnkiHl in thfcriniiniil <iit<*);ory 
mndt' haMt<> to w^-k tlu> n'Vt'niif ii^i-nt und atljiixt |K>sj«il»l<' dflin- 
qm-ncitw. So far nfjirly $M.(MM» jiavo Ihm'h |mid in l>y dt-altTH 
whdMP f^MMlft had U'4-n M>iz>>d. 

Sinct' thc> n-venut' offiwrn onmmcncMl thoir invi^xtigatiouB 
over 7<H) lMm>lM of whiiUcy have boen Heinsl Im>(9ius<' of variouM 
fraudii tUm-overwl in th«-ir wmiiection. Kither tlic warvhoiine 
(]aU« have btHMi fliant^Hl, nn in the caM> uf tlfty Imrn-lH Heizcd in 
this city, or th«- Htan)|u< have not Ik><mi onuuHl. and in inHtanctw 
these bam-ltt liavi' Ut-n flllwl a wn-ond tinif. It was IcariuHl 
yeRterday tliat in tliin city alone, twenty wholewile ilealers have 
been oalie«l to atfonnt for Itn'akin^ the laws. They have lKH>n 
fin««d in every cjitte from IKK) to f5<K». in proportion t»> their 
ofleniteH. Throughout the State fully fifty dt-jilen* liave In-en 
fined. Not one oflentler haM b<H>n dealt with in the eouiiH. It 
appcArs that it is left to the diHcn-tiun of the I'nitwl Staten I)i»- 
trict Attorney to make arruMtM upon the re|H)rt8 fiirniHlu'<l by the 
revenue agents. Aj)j>arently there w a tendency to smooth over 
the matter in a way entailing the leai<t publicity to the jKirsonH 
threatened. The investigatiouH are Htill continuing. 

The above was publiHliwl in the Chronicle of this city a few 
days ago and i» nothing lotw than rank ii\juKtice to the wholenale 
trade of San Francineo and the State, (hi the face of it the 
article appears to be emanations from the brain of some space- 
killing reporter, but at the same time there are sufficient figures 
and aUi>gation» to indicate that some one connecte<l with the 
Intenuil Revenue De|>artment in the First District is using i. 
penny-a-line pencil-pusher to ca«t a reflection upon the entire 
trade. We njBpectfully suggest to Collector Sears that this is a 
matter which calls not only for personal investigiitiou, but for 
the punishment of the guilty subordinate. 

Considering the high standing of the wholei<ale liquor trade 
of this city and their importance as contributors to the Govern- 
ment's revenues, it is certainly a gratuitous insult to csist such a 
cloud uiKm their integrity, and knowing Collector Sears, we are 
confident that he will regard the matter in this light if it is 
properly brought l>efore him. 

We do not accvpt as facts, the foregoing allegiitions published 
by the Chronide. but we must say tliat if the Revenue Department 
has discovered any such irrt^ularities as are charged against some 
of the dealers of this State, the CoUiKitor should not only punish 
the oflienders, but make their identity known. It is a matter in 
which the general public as well as the tnule is concerned, and 
justice demands that such imposters, if they exist anywhere ssive 
in the brain of an imaginative reporter, should be |>ointed out in 
order that they may be avoided by buyers who want what they 
{>ay for and nothing more or less. 

We would further sjiy to Collector Sears that the large Ixxly 
of the wliok^sale liquor tnwle of San Francisco fivl sorely hurt by 
these charges which apparently origiimtwl in his oflice and they 
fed justified in demanding that the names of tlies*' allege<l im- 
ptMrtemand infractors of the revenue lawslx* miwle known, to the 
end that innocent parties may not b«« implicate<l in an oflfense of 
which they art' not guilty. 

The matter is a grave one and calls for the Collator's prompt 
ctmHideration an<l iwtion. We await his n-ply and w ill readily 
give his explanation publicity in the columns of this journal. 

H I GH L y en E P I TAB L E. 

The issue of the Pacikk Wink AND Simkit Rkvikw of the 
26th ult., was cn-<liU»ble to «>ur friends, Messrs. Wo<m1 & Co., 
iKsing print*-*! from new tyiK', on lx*t Injok jmpf'r, with ormunental 
cover, and enlargi'<i fnmi thirty-four to forty-six pages. The 
reading matter has Ih-cm incren«4>d and jna<le nion- diversified by 
the a<ldition of s.'veral new departments. We nn- i>l«'as»'<l to note 
this evidene«- of prosjM-rity in our vigorous and able cont«'m|K»- 
ary. which has r-«-rtainly a fine fieUl in the wine interest of 
Calif' r-ia.- 3/iVAw Crllarioti, Chinujo. 



AGAIM AGO/Ng IM OAKLA/ND 

O.iklaiid is agjiin in the throes of female politics and her 
la1)ors j.roniis.- to result as usiuil in defeating the rational majority 
and eliH-tinj; I lie minority on a falw platfoi-m. 

For H >ni.-liine past the "Athens of the Pacific" has been un- 
•pieslionably entithnl to the reputati<m of i)OS8e88ing the most com- 
plete aggregation of female cranks west of Missouri 

For s»'v«'ral we«'ks iwst tlu-st^ Oakland liwlies have been putting 
the tliuml>-screw xiyHm the hel|)less biisinesH men of their city and 
threatening them with Ijoycott and ruin unless they attache*! their 
signature to petitions to the city council demanding a provision 
by which hn-jil opticm can be iufiicte<l upon the community. That 
tlie.s<' jM'titions are In'ing signe<l and that they are the subject of 
dire anathemas, it is hardly necessjiry to say. Unusually high 
licenw and restricticms on the trade do not satisfy these refonners. 
They have their war-paint on and are out for Proliibition with 
a capital "P". They ignore the experience of their female 
compatriots in some of the leading cities of Southern California, 
where local option was given years of trial only to find that it 
made sneaks, liars and law-breakers of former respectable citizens 
and was a prolific promoter of inebriety. These cities have l)een 
forced to return to a reasonable license regulation and the change 
is acceptable to all parties. In the face of these facts the ladies of 
Oakland are exerting themselves to bring alx)ut local option and 
the establishment of "Speak-Easys" and all the accompanying 
evils. They know they are in the wrong but like a tailless kite 
they are irresponsible for their erratic conduct. 

It is to l)e regretted that the men of Oakland are not possessed 
of sufficient vertebrae to enable them to effectually sit down on 
these meddlesome masculine women. They have the power but 
do not know how to use it. 



OWR F-RIE/MB THE E/NEMg. 

The ProhibitioniM has evidently Ixsen having a rough tinio 
lately in the financial way. It has adopted plate matter for its 
columns and the funniest part of it is that one of its articles in 
the issue of January 29th was in regard to the imports of foreign 
liquors into America, well written, and in realty booming tlie 
trade. 

AVe liave a suggestion to "our friend the enemy." It is a 
long time between drinks and between elections at the office of 
the I^ohlbitionlst. Why not go to our friend Dr. R. H. McDonald 
who made his fortune out of "Vinegar Bitters" (stated to be 
"non-alcoholic"), and have him supply the sinews of war for a 
really first chws paper. We think that the liquor trade here 
would have no objections, for when the IVohibitionist publications 
go on the rampage they are as great a detriment to the cause 
they champion as are the political "saloon" papers to the liquor 
interest. 



WHg MOT BE FAI-R. 

The interest taken by the Vitieultural Commission in wani-- 
ing fruit growei-s against an over protluction of raisins, is as 
strange; as their z»'al in encouraging the planting of more w ine 
graiK's is natural. If the warning came from a more di.-^intereste*! 
source, it woidd Ih' more worthy of attention. — J'rohibitioiiUt. 

BiawHl as usual. The Vitieultural Commissioners do not 
recommend the immediate planting of wine grapes. The i)n>- 
duction of wine in California is at present large encmgh to nuvt 
the consumption. When the smash in raisins comes there will 
Ik* fewer Prohibitionists in Fresno, and limny of their vines will 
Ik> graft*-*! to w ine varieties. Brother Slu-ahan is invited to rea<! 
tlu' reiK)rt of Mr. West carefully. Mr. West is one of tli«- 
prin*>i]>al *!istillers of the state and yet he says. "I can. however, 
sei' nothing to en*'ourage *)r stimulat*- the planting of wine vin*-- 
yanls at present." IJrolher Slu-ahan is t*M) fair a man ix^rsonally 
to st<Mijt to Voice lying tuid misrepi-i^sent^Uion. 



f/reifie WIJME /rJ^D Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



HON. JOHN W. MASO/N. 

Views of The Internal Revenue Commissioner on the Sweet 
Wine Eonjplication. 



In reply to our open letter published in the last issue of the 
Review, Hon. John W. Mason, the Commissioner oj Internal 
Revenue, has sent us the following statement of his position : 

R. M. Wood & Co., Publishers of " The Pacific Wine and Spirit 
Review" San Francisco, Cal. 

Sirs : — I am in receipt of your letter of the 5th instant, en- 
closing a copy of a letter, together with an editorial, which have 
baon or will be published in your paper. 

I do not desire to exercise any censorship over your paper. 
You publish what you deem to be of interest to your people, mak- 
ing such comment as seems to you proper. I would suggest, how- 
ever, that as the law to which you refer is a now one, this Office 
would be benefited by a statement of facts rather than by an arti- 
cle indulging almost purely in criticism. 

There can, of course, be no question as to my duty under the 
law. The Act of Congress clearly authorizes a certain kind of 
wine to be fortified to a certain extent by the introduction of a 
certain kind of spirits. It is wholly immaterial whether this Of- 
fice is friendly or unfriendly to the Act. 

My duty would still be a very plain one ; for it must always 
be borne in mind, that the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, is a 
mere executive officer charged with the duty of executing such 
laws as the Congress of the United States may see fit to require of 
him. As a matter of fact, however, I have no feeling on the sub- 
ject. The people of my State have no interest directly or indi- 
rectly in the fortification of sweet wine. Among the other dis- 
advantages under which I labor, is that of never having had any 
experience iii the wine business. It may, however, be assumed 
that I can construe with reasonable accuracy, an ordinary act of 
Congress. It is very clear that under the statute, the producers 
of pure sweet wine, made from fermented grape juice only, and 
which contains no other substances of any kind whatever, may 
be permitted to use, free of tax, in the fortification of that wine, 
80 much wine spirits as may be necessary to fortify the wine for 
the preservation of the saccharine matter contained therein, pro- 
vided that the alcohol strength thus introduced, shall not exceed 
14 per cent, of the volume of the wine after use, and provided 
further that the wine after fortification shall not contain more 
than 24 per cent, of alcohol, and provided further that the wine 
after fermentation shall contain not less than 4 per cent, of sac- 
charine matter. This is the kind of wine to be fortified, and the 
character of the product after fortification. 

It will also be observed that the process must be begun and 
completed at the vineyard of the grape grower, whore the grapes 
are crushed and the grape juice is expressed and fermented. The 
statute also requires a certain kind of spirits to be used in fortifi- 
cation which is the product resulting from the distillation of fer- 
mented grape juice, or what is commonly known as grape brandy, 
so that the product, when completed, will contain nothing ex- 
cept what has been extracted from the grape. 14 per cent, of the 
volume may have been extracted by distillation ; the residue is 
the pure fermented juice of the grape. Now it would seem that 
there should be no difficulty, or if any, but little, in introducing 
the kind and quantity of spirits specifically named in the statute 
into this pure fermented grape juice for the purposes aforesaid. 

You have been pleased to call my attention to the diSerence 
of opinion as to the saccharine matter contained in California 
grapes. In reply, I would say that this is a question of fact to 
be ascertained as in other cases of the kind. This Office has never 
pretended to assert that wine containing any greater or less 
quantity of sugar was not entitled to be fortified under this law, 
provided that after the fermentation is complete, it still con- 
tained 4 per cent, of saccharine matter. The trouble in, this re- 



lation, has arisen from a misapprehension of the facts. The pub- 
lished statistics upon this subject, show that the grapes of Cali- 
fornia do not contain much, if any, over twenty-six and one-half 
per cent, of sugar, and relying upon this as being true, or practi- 
cally so, when wine has been presented, which, by reason of the 
amount of saccharine matter still remaining, together with the 
alcohol found, would appear to have contained more than twen- 
ty-six and one-half per cent, of sugar before fermentation, we 
have simply regarded this as grounds for investigation. Where 
the wine after fermentation contains a large amount of sugar and 
alcohol, it creates at least a suspicion that either one or the'other 
has been added, and if either has boon added, Of course the wine 
cannot, under the statute, be fortified. If, however, upon inves- 
tigation, it is found that the wine contained a greater amount of 
saccharine matter than was expected, thb suspicion would be re- 
moved. 

In other words, this Office recognizes fully that the right to 
fortify the wine does not depend upon the per centtim of saccha- 
rine matter contained in the grapes, provided only that the juice 
after some fermentation contains 4 per cent, when presented for 
fortification. 

It should be borne in mind that this act became a law on the 
first day of October, 1890, which was in the midst of your vintage 
season. There was then no time to consider regulations or pre- 
scribe rules. It is sincerely hoped that after a little more experi- 
ence on the part of the officei-s of the Bureau, and with the hearty 
co-operation of the wine makers, there will be no trouble jDj exe- 
cuting the law. Very truly yours, 

John W. M^vson, Commissioner. 

Responding to the above communication from Commissione'' 
Mason, we have sent the subjoined letter: 

San Francisco, Feb. 25, 1891. 

Hon. John W. Mmon, Commissioner of Internal Revenue, Wash^ 
ington; D. G. 

Dear Sir: — ^We are in receipt of your letter of the 20th inst. 
in regard to the difficulties now surrounding the sweet wine mak- 
ers. 

There is little to add to the letter already sent to you by I. De 
Tiurk, President of the Viticultural Commission enclosing a letter by 
Mr. Charles A.Wetmore, concerning the saccharine degree of must, 
except by reference to the reports of the College of Agriculture of 
the University of California of 1888, in which you will find many 
analyses of must running over twenty-six and one-half degrees of 
sugar. We might say in addition, that while-the musts for dry 
wine making in this state, are generally kept at or below twenty- 
six and one-half per cent, of sugar, there is practically no limit to 
the degree of sugar that can be obtained. Years of experience 
in the vineyard, and the teachings inculcated by the State Viti- 
cultural Commission and the College of Agriculture of the Uni- 
versity of California, have taught the wine makers not to attempt 
to get high degrees of sugar in musts when they are making dry 
wines. If you or some one connected with your office, will go 
over the published reports of analyes, you will find that the grapes 
mentioned, are those used for making dry wine, and it is a fact 
that cannot be disputed that the efforts of the Commission and 
University have been almost entirely divided toward assisting the 
wine makers to produce dry wines, these representing the highest 
types of the wine makers art. 

We are glad that you have determined to investigate the whole 
subject as fully as possible. It is for this reason that we extended 
you a very cordial invitation on behalf of the wine men, either to 
visit the coast personally, or to send an unprejudiced agent, not 
connected with the business either in the East or California, in or- 
der that you might deal understandingly with this question. We 
do not see that there is any question whatever, as to the right to 
fortify, and no wine maker in this State, asks for the riglit to forti- 
fy anything but grape juice; nor do they ask that the wine after for- 
tification may contain more than twenty-four percent, of alcohol, 
and four per cent of sugar. What they do ask, and what they 



10 



f^eifie WIfJE /rj^D Sflf^lT_5JEVIEW. 



arfiiititl.ll t.. iiml.r tlw law. w that rich imiHtu which they ol>- 
taiu in a natural and legitimate way. Hhall be rocogniml «ih law- 
ftiUy coming under the Act. 

ColleetorH Byington and Searn. and Deputy Collector Young- 
berg, all of whom* an« wmiIoum ofHwn* and have the wlvantage of 
ramiliarity witl» the «iuwti<mt« of innue. are aware of tlu' iincalltHl 
fordiffleultiew which confront Uie wine men of this State. Any 
one of them c-an an hon«rtly aud c«»rnvtly explain the ca»*e to you 
an well tu^ could we. We know that they have mmle 8tiitenient« 
to you which cover the case, but which have not Ikhjii accepted by 
your department. 

We agnM' with you that the diffcrenceB of opinion as to Bac- 
charine matter contained in California grapes w a question of 
forts to be ascertained as in other awes of the kind. If you do 
not accept the statements of the StaU> .Vnalyst (Proft>88or Rising) 
Mr. Chaa. A. Wetmore and others, whose word is al>ove doubt, 
we suggest that the Department, instea<l of assessing, as noW 
proposed, aeiie some of the suspected wine, carry the case into 
court and have the qu«>stion whether or not gn>pe musts can run 
over twenty-six and one-half per cent. »ettle<l finally. This is 
the only course that can be fair and satisfactory to both parties, 
while to assess the wines, is a virtual avoidance of the issue for 
six months, and places the producer at the mercy of men who do 
not understand the businees. 

We can assure you that you will get the cordial and 
hearty co-operation of the wine makers in executing the law. 
They are all interested in having grape juice only, fortifie<l. They 
ask that the regulations be formulated so as to permit them to 
partially desiccate their grapes either before or after picking, in 
order to obtain rich musts, and at the same time not to exceed 
the Btatutorj- alcoholic limit of twenty-four per ctnit and four per 
cent of sugar. Musts running over twenty-six and one-half per 
cent of sugar can easily be obtainetl without desiccation, but it is 
only right that the Department should recognize Jis legitimate, 
prooenee which are as old as the sweet wine producing industry 
of Europe. 

In conclusion, on behalf of the wine producers of this State, 
we thank you for the fair and friendly sentiments which you have 
expressed towards them in your letter to us, and assure you that 
in all your efforts to construe the law fairly to both parties you 
will have tlieir and our hearty co-operation. 

E. M. Wood & Co, 
Publishers. 

OFF FOK CHICAGO. 



Tli« Naw ViticultursI Rtstaorant aqd 6afe Soon to be Estab* 

lisbed. 



Albert Franckx and Otto Ruhlemann the caterers who have 
made such a success out of the Viticultural C'afe in connection 
with the exhibit of the State Viticultural Commission are atK)ut 
to open a nwtaurant in Chicago, in which California wines and 
branditw only will bo sold and which will be conducted in the 
t)ost manner known to the restauranteiir's art. 

Mi-ssrs. Franckx and Ruhlemann are capable and competent 
men and their place will no doubt prove a surprise and a pleasure 
to the lovers of good living in the Windy CMty. Certain it is 
that they will make "Kinsley's" and the "Richelieu" and places 
of a similar character, look to their latin>ls. The fact that they 
will be able to place California wines, l)ottle<l by the pnKlucers and 
trade and lK)ttle<l in this state. Iwfore their patrons will be a great 
drawing card and a si>lendid advertisement for the wines and for 
the state. 

During the iNUit month several m<K>tings have lNH>n held in 
the rooms of the Viticultural Commission and the artichw of 
agreement iM'twwn the f«t<'nTH and the wine men have l)oen 
drawn up. It is setthnl that those whose wines aud bnuulios can 
be fr»und on the tables fW»in the first anv 



J. (JuiKlhuh & Co., wine merchants, San Francisco, and 
proprietors of Rhine Farm. Sonoma. 

ArwMl Haraszthy & Co.. wine merchants and champagne 
pro«luce>s. San Francisco, and proprietors of the Orleiins vineyard, 

Napa Valley Wine Co., wine merchants, San Francisco, and 
pnwhuers at St. 'Helena, Yountville and Napa. 

(Iiarle.s A. Wetmore, wine merchant, Oakland, and pro- 
prietor of (Yesta lUanca Viueyanl. Livermore. 

I. Dt» IHirk, wine merchant, San Francisco, and producer at 

Santa Rosji. .„ „ , ,r. j ^^i -n 

H. W. Crabb. proprietor of To-Kalon Vineyard, Oakville. 

John Crtfllin & Sons, vineyard proprietors, Livermore. 

F. Korbel & Bros., vineyard proprietors, Santa Rosa. 

B<?u Ltimond Vineyard Co., vineyard proprietors, Santa Cruz. 

F. A. HalMjr, agent for the Inglenook Vineyard, Captain 
Gustav Nicbaum proprietor, Rutherford. 

Jacob Schram, producer of the "Schramsberger" wines, St. 

Helena. . „^ „ i 

Tiburcio Parrott, vineyard proprietor, St. Helena. 
John L. Beard, proprietor of the Marciana Vineyard, Warm 

Springs. 

Charies Krug, vineyard proprietor, St. Helena. 

Julius P. Smith, proprietor of Olivina vineyard, Livermore. 

Beck, Pyhrr & Co., wine merchants and vineyard proprietors, 
San Francisco. 

A. G. Chauche, wine merchant, San Francisco, and proprietor 
of the Mont Rouge Vineyard, Livermore. 

This, it will be noticed, includes the most prominent men in 
nearly every section except Fresno and the south. The dry 
wines from these sections do not command the attention that 
those from the north do, the two districts being particularly 
adapted for sweet wines. The Napa, Sonoma and Livermore 
valleys are particularly well represented. 

Mr. Franckx goes East in the course of a few weeks and he 
has already had his attention directed to several first class loca- 
tions in Chicago. He will carefully look the field over before 
deciding on any particular place and expects to have everything 
in readiness for a grand opening on the 15th of May. 

T-RADE MOTES 

Shea Bocqueraz & Co., are meeting with their usual good 
success in handling their specialty, known to the trade of the 
lTnite<l States as "Tea Kettle" whisky. It is one of the most 
famous productions of the stills of Kentucky and was awarded a 
gold medal at the Paris Exposition in 1889, for its purity aud 
general excellence. 

The ship Elizabeth from New York which was wrecked north 
of North Heads on the night of the 21 st inst. had a large quantity 
of liquors on board, including: 132 barrels and 25 cases whisky; 
2 casks gin; 648 cases, 10 kegs and 1 barrel wine; 10 barrels, 3 
packages rum; and 4 barrels brandy. Among those who had 
goods on board were F. A. Haber, C. Carpy & Co., Sroufe & Mc. 
Crum, Wichman & Lutgen and A. Vignier a^ well as other 
consignees who had small lota on her. 

Naber, Alfs & Brune have just made a shipment of 50 cases 
of the well-known Damiana bitters to an Eastern firm. The 
fame of "Damiana" becomes greater every day and deservedly so. 

Wm.WolfT, the well-known importer, returned during the fort- 
night from a flying trip to New York for business and pleasure-. 
He struck the metropolis just in time to meet tlie great blizzard, 
and is mighty glad to get back to God's country. 



•DEATH OF WILLIAM H. SEAHS. 

As the Review goee to press, the death of Wm. H. Sears, 
Collector of Internal Revenue for the First District, is an- 
nounced. Mr. Si-ars passed away on Friday evening last, of 
Bright's diseast* of the kidneys, which ha<l afflicted him for some 
time. He came to California in 1851, and had acheckeretl career 
as miner, lawyer, speaker of the Assembly, and later as Collector 
of the Port under Pnwdent Arthur. Last year he was appointed 
Collector of Int4'nial Revenue for this district by President Har- 
rison. Dec«'as(Hl was an able lawyer, an afVahle gentleman of the 
old sch(M>l, and one of the Republican leadcix of this State. His 
unexptxjted demise will be sincerely regn'ttcd by a host of friends. 
He was a man of ample fortune, aud leaves a widow and two 
daughters. 



Qnlxj- JT/sic ^dvQTtisQTriQnts Qn ^his J^age. 



11 



Baker & Hamilton, San Francisco and Sacramento. 

Manufactory, Benicia Agricultural Works, Benicia, Cal. 




WEED CUTTERS. 



14 TOOTH IRON AGE HARROWS: 



Established 1869. 

NICHOLAS RATH & CO. 

30 South WiUlaiii Street, Sew Yorh. 

Sole Manufacturers of the 

ORIGINAL AND GENUINE PRUNE JUICE. 

JONES, MUNDY &. CO., Agents. 

N. B. — Imitations Bearing Similar Namss are Useless 
as Substitutes. 



WI/NE A/NB B-RAMDg -RECEIPTS. 



Wine. 

February 2 31,260 

" 3 54,050 

" 4 27,370 

" 5 42,210 

" 6 44,690 

" 7 43,810 

" 9 30,530 

" 10 29,100 

11 22,420 

" 12 36,620 

13 41,970 

14 39,820 

" 16 31,620 

" 17 34,000 

" 18 26,150 

" 19 60,060 

" 20 58,530 

" 21 70,830 

" 24 66.180 

" 25 28,810 

26 61,348 

27 21,460 



Brandy 
2,635 

350 
5,660 
5,740 
7,130 

100 



4,970 

620 

2,300 

1,260 

920 

100 

2,400 

160 

1,240 

600 

350 

280 

2,580 



Garnier, Iianeel & Go. 



Office and Salesrooms 



618 Sacramento St., San Francisco, 

California Wines and Brandies 

WHOLESALE DEALERS, 
GROWERS, DISTILLERS. 

Wine Vaults, 617-627 Commercial St., S. F. 



TRUMBULL L BEEBE, 

Gbowebs, Ihfobtebs and Dealers in 

Seeds, Trees and Plants 

419 and 421 Sansome. St, Bet. Commercial and Clay Sts, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

AGE/NT WA/NTED. 

We want a young, active and reliable man to represent our 
house in San Francisco, and are prepared to offer satisfactory 
inducements to the right party. Correspondence solicited. 

Dryden & Palmkr, 
19 Hudson St., New York. 



12 



f^eifie WIJ^E /r^lP SflF^IT^f^EVIEW^ 



^Todo J/otos, 



Harrj- ('. Kohlor. non of II««nr>- Kohler, of Koliior & Van 
ItfrgtMi, liuM iptiic to Kun>|M- for ii VH4-iition. 

Charh« Ktihler, of Kohler & Frohlii»K. han fc""*' «»» » *>"»'- 
ncMM trip to New York to !»•• ^'<>iir n ininith. 

K. n. Taylor Jr. hn*« Im-*-!! it|i|M>iiii4-4l S««or»-tarj' of tlip Com- 
mimioM to n-]in<Ht*iit K*-iitiu-ky at tlu- WorldV Fair. 

J. De Barth Sliorb hiut almut entirely rwoven-d from the 
rp<<w>iit attach of illiu>tw which i-ODfiiuMl him to hin bed for over two 
months. 

Knnfk>ni & Oo have just completed one of their improved 
continuouH Htilli* for Ewer & AtkiiiHon of Rutherfortl. It haw a 
capadty of lUUO gallons per day. 

Coloni'l H«>riimii Il«'iid<'l in me<'tiiiR with wiceeBB in making 
orraugenu-ntK to phuv the Natonia win«'Hon the Fjinteni market. 
The Natoma Wine (\mi|iany deHerves well at the hand of Ea«tem 
buyers. 

Walter Fenkhausen has been admitted m a jwirtner in the 
firm of A. Fenkhaiwen & 8on». The new jmrtner in well up in the 
trade and his acceHsion to tlie Ann is welc-ome news to his many 
friends. _^ [^ 

Capt H. W. McIntjTe, Superintendent of Senator Stanfonl's 
Vinej'ard at Vina, is in the East in the interest of the Stanfonl 
brandies, and will diMjbtless establinh itgencies for thwc goo<lH 
before retuniing. 

Wilm»T»ling & Co., have removed from their ohl quarters, 
whieh they have oo«'upie<l for many years, and an; now locsit^nl at 
21 »i Culifomia street. The new estahlishment could not be better 
situated and is fitted up in very handsome style. 

J. D. W. Sherman, the well-known special bondtnl warehouse 
man and e«>mniiHsion merchant, has furnished his patrons and 
friends with an artistic calendar, directing attention to the fiu;t 
that he is sole agent for Cliapin, Trull & Co's rum. 

The handsomest csilendar that has come to our desk this 
MOflon is from the Live Oak Distillery Co., of Cincinnati. It is 
a richly coloreil chninio of a iH'autiful wonum in riding habit, 
embellished in gohl and formed in a golden horse shoe. 

Mi-twrs. J. R. I'arkington & Co.. of London, notify lis that 
the shipments of Port for January amount to (),0:{2 pi|>es (Great 
Britain. 2,K7K pipes), agsiinst 5.1(K» pipes in 1890. The Sherry 
shipments were 4',576 butts against 3,767 butts in 1890. 

Colgsin & CV)., the big New York cork ini|)orting house an^ 
nending their friends in the trade a vi'ry artistic and unique ntl- 
endar. It is a fine cliromo entitled "Anticiimtion," and repre- 
sents a ("ranciscan monk gazing admiringly at a lM>ttle of fin(> 
old wine. 

Beck, Pyhrr & Co., have finally arrange<I their exhibit of 
wimw and brantlira in the Viticultural Commissitm's exhibition 
hall. The display is eU^intly arrange<l and shows the gwat care 
and fine taste employed by the houses in putting th«'ir goods on 
the market. 

It is expect«Hl that Col. E. H. Taylor Jr., of the well-known 
house of K. II. Taylor Jr. & Sons, and author of the famous 
''Taylor Circular," will Ihj in Sjin Francisco very shortly in the 
the interest of "Old Taylor." He «in de]>end on a warm recei>- 
tion from the tnukv 

Captain Harrj- Hunt is getting up a reputation as an after 
dinner s[>eaker. At the rt^cent ent4>rtainment and Imnquet of the 
Knights Templar he miule one of the ad<lress4's and succctsleil in 
scoring as big a hit in the field of oratory as the only "Jesse 
Moore" has made in the coast trade. 



We H4-kn<)wle<lge the compliments of the GottHchalk Co., <>t 
Biiltiniore in the shape of a very hanthwme calendar, the princi- 
pal feature of whicli is a pictun' of a retiirneil hunting party, 
enjoying a glass of the only "Pointer Maryland Rye," of whicli 
the (iottschalk Co., are the distillers. 

Martin Hencken. of Hencken & Schroeder, has almost entirely 
recovered from a persistent siege of rheumatism which has an- 
noye<l him sevenil months. Hyron Springs water and Col. John 
Roster's wit arc; to be cre<litetl with making Mr. Hencken a well 
man. What the water wont cure, Roster's will. 



\'euve Cli<i|Uot yellow laljel. is on the top wave of prosperifx 
in this market. The '"yellow label" is estt^emed by all coniioir- 
seurs to 1mi one of the finest wines for its class obtainable an<l 
tin' succ^-ss which the brand has achieved on this coast is dm- 
largi'ly to the able management of A. Vignier. 

Luyties Bros., the New York firm which will soon be engage<l 
extensively in the California Wine business has been quietly ai 
work in this state during the past few weeks, quietly closing for 
small lots of fine wine through their agent. H. A. Diehl, tli<- 
well-knowai broker, has been attending to their business. 



Beck, Pyhrr & Co. are sending out circulars to every part <pl 
the Unite<l States to all houses handling California Wines. The 
principjil circular consists of a fac-siniile of the first page of tin- 
Rkview of Septemlxir 15, 1890 in which was given a full acconni 
of the rise and prosperity of this successful firm of young men. i 

John D. Siebe is alremly makin;j; a Rwi rocard for himself in 
the Assessor's Office. Mr. SielM-'s success as a business man in 
the house of Siel)e Bros. & Plagemann was a guarantee to tlic 
voters of the city that he would fulfill his trust, when electe<l. 
He has already made scores of new friends in his new capacity. 



Messrs. E. H. Taylor, Jr.. & Sons announce that on account 
of the very excessive production of whisky in Kentuckj" this 
season, the have ordered their Newmarket house closed, after an 
outjmt of only two hundred barrels. It would l)e a blessing to 
the trade if other distillers would follow the example set by this 
house. 



J. Gundlach & Co. are developing their southern trade at an 
astonishing rate. The last two steamers on the Panama line 
carried largo shipments from this reliable house, to say nothing 
of recent shipments by rail. Mr. Bundschu evidently understood 1 
the lay of the land in Mexico and Central Ameri«i when li> 
decide<l that his firm should make a special bid for the business. 



W^. B. Cliapman reports a large and increasing spring trade 
in 'iPerrier Jouet" and the specialties in importe<l wines which 
he is handling. Mr. Chapman has always exerted special care in 
selecting only the In'st stwks to be obtained and what he otfers 
may be dept'nded upon. His motto is to deal in the highoi 
grades only and his position is understood by true oonuoissini 



In the last issue ofthe REvijrw a tyjiographiwil error made n~ 
say that the daily msushing capacity of the "Belle of Anderson 
County" Distillery was 800 bushels. The figures should have 
be<Mi 2(M>, and in this connection we would mention the fact that 
the grain is masluMl in small tubs and that the whole prwe-^-^ 
of making this popular whisky is cflnduct«Hl in the old fashion' 
way. 

The Jajw are evidently Ix'coming iutercsttnl in the culture 
of wine grapes grown in ('aliforuuv. Thisisshown by thefiu-t that 
the last China steamer carri«><l a shipment of grape cuttings to !"■ 
trans|>1ant4><l in the land of the Mikado. Ja]>iin is In-ginning to 
use our wintw and it nmy 1m« that the ex|>ortation of cuttings and 
root^il vines will b<MM>me an imiM)rt4Uit jxirtof the viticultural in- 
dustry. 



f>/reifie WIJSIE /rJMD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



13 



Colonel Malcolm Crichtou of Baltimore, distiller of "Monti- 
cello" rye whisky, died at his honwe on January 27th. He was 
widely known to the trade of the country and enjoyed the reputa- 
tion of being one of the most hospitable and companionable 
gentlemen in the monumental city. His demise will be regretted 
by a host of friends. A widow, two daughters and four sous 
survive him. 

The big importing house of H. Brunhild & Co New York has 
established a branch in this city under the management of Mr. S. 
Glaser, a gentleman who is well known to the trade of this coast. 
Tlie establishment of a branch in San Francisco is for the purpose 
of more thoroughly handling their trade in this territory. Messrs 
Brunhild & Co. make a specialty of selling goods in bond and 
filling orders for direct shipment. 

Gustav Cless the head of the Vienna Company manufactur- 
ing Reihlen Champagne was in the city during the past fortnight 
and gave the works on Folsom street a thorough inspection. 
He came to America to represent the foreign stockholders in the 
American Champagne Company and before leaving San Francisco 
stated that he was immensely pleased with what was being done 
here and the quality of the wine produced. Mr. Cless left for 
New York in time to attend the meeting of the company on 
February 23d. 

L. P. Drexler, of the Fresno Vinyard Company, which is 
represented in San Francisco by the California Wine Growers- 
Union, has succeeded in purchasing a selected lot of the new 
wines of the Cresta Blanca Vineyard of Charles A. Wetmore. 
The wines secured are all of 1890 and are considered by Mr. 
Wetmore to be the finest for their age that he has ever produced. 
The Wine Growers' Union and its active head Capt. J. Chamon 
de St. Hubert are to be congratulated on having secured such a 
stock as this to handle. 



Thomas Taylor & Co. are having a good demand for the 
pure article of cherry brandy which they get from a well-known 
St. Helena distiller. We should like to see more of the distillers 
of this state experiment with fruits other than grapes. There is 
no question whatever but that California can excel the country 
in all fruit brandies if only proper attention is given and proper 
experiments made. We have the finest fruits going and why 
not produce the finest peach, cherry and pear, to say nothing of 
prune and other brandies that might be distilled. 

H. T. Dewey & Co., have issued their regular annual 
pamphlet in the interest of pure American wine. It consists of 
thirty pages with a handsome cover and contains a great deal of 
instructive and entertaining reading matter, including a his- 
tory of their well known house, observations on the uses and 
virtues of good wines, when and how to drink them, and descrip- 
tions of Eastern and California wines. Messrs. Dewey & Co., 
are doing a good work in teaching Americans to drink American 
wines and we wish there were more houses like their big popular 
New York institution. 

C. Holtum &Co., met with an accident the other day which 
resulted in the destruction of about 3000 bottles of their choicest 
old wines, while Mr. Holtum and foreman Lindeck had a narrow 
escape from serious personal injury. In fitting up their new 
branch at First and Mission streets, a large case was built against 
the wall for displaying bottled goods. This gave way under the 
great weight and went to the floor with a crash that could be 
heard for blocks. The wine was all lost by breakage and the 
damage amounted to several hundred dollars. 

Paul Wack, the wine grower and merchant of Los Angeles, 
has issued a circulai" to the trade from which we extract the 
following: 

" California wines and brandy are becoming with every year 
more popular in our Eastern markets, as well as foreign countries. 
Evidence is fast accumulating to show that they are rapidly gain- 



ing in favor by the consumer and connoisseur, and are already 
cx)nspicuously taking the place of the costly imported article. This 
being mainly due to the fact that the wine industry of California 
has grown out of its infancy, its great imiiortance l>eing recognized 
as the richest resource of the countrj% and taken hold of by 
experienced and educated winemen from abrog^l, and as a result 
a much better class of goods has been produced in the last decade 
than of yore." 

W. Culman, Manager of the Napa Valley Wine Co.'s branch 
house at St. Louis, is in the city on business in connection with 
the rapidly growing interests of this company. Mr. Culman is 
one of the young men in the wine trade, but liis fine success in 
St. Louis has prove<l that old heads sometimes grow on young 
shoulders. The gentleman informs us that the outlook for Cali- 
fornia wines in the metropolis of Missouri is highly encouraging. 
The present demand for the Napa Valley Company's goods is 
excellent. Thej' ai'e steadily extending their market and at the 
same time securing the very best class of trade. ''So far as the 
future of California wines in the St. Louis market is concerned" 
said Mr. Culman, "I am satisfied that it is all right, and that 
the market will continue to grow for many years to come. My 
opinion is based on the success we have had in introducing the 
wines of our company." Mr. Culman will remain in San Fran- 
cisco about two weeks. 

Articles of incorporations of the South San Francisco Land 
and Improvement Company have been filed at San Mateo. 

This is the company with which Peter E. Her; the Omaha 
distiller and stockyard man, is connected, and which has acquired 
about 4000 acres of land around Baden, in San Mateo county, 
where it is intended to establish stockyards and abattoirs, to 
errect livery and sale stales for the sale of horses, arid to build a 
hotel for the accomodation of stockmen and other.-? who may go 
to Baden on business or pleasure. All of its arrangements have 
now been completed, and with the filing of the articles of incor- 
poration begins the work of detail which will result in the practical 
working of the company. The purposs of the corporation as set 
forth in its articles are to purchase, acquire and deal in lands 
and all kinds of dwelling houses, stores, hotels and other buildings; 
to construct canals, ships and docks for the proper carrying on of 
its manufacturing interests; to carry on a general storehouse and 
merchandise business; to deal in corporation stocks and other 
evidence of indebtness; to loan money; to supply fresh water to 
people for various purposes; to deal in canals, aqueducts and other 
waterways and other water rights, and to carry on a lighting busi- 
ness. The principal place of business is to be at Baden, San Mateo 
county. The capital stock is $2,000,000, divided into 20,000 
shares. The amount of stock subscribed is 16,995 shares or 81 ,69 5, 
000. P, E. Her took 4000 shares; Nelson Morris, 4000 shares; 
Edward Morris, 2000 shares; G. F. Swift 1000 shares, and Armour 
& Co., 950 shares. Among other shareholders are J. B. Greenhut, 
president of the spirit trust, Henry J- Crocker, Miller & Lux, 
Livingston & Co., A. Bocqueraz, E. R. Lilienthal, A. H. Veeder, 
H. S. Crocker and William L. Merry. The trustees for the first 
year are Gustavus F. Swift, Nelson Morris and Edward J. Martyn 
of Chicago, Peter E. Her of Baden and Henry Miller, E. R. Lilien- 
thal and Charles W. Smith of San Francisco. The gentlemen who 
will be at the head of affairs are nearly all of them to the fore in 
the liquor trade not only is Mr Her at the helm but their is also 
President Greenhut, Livingston & Co., Antoine Bocqueraz of 
Shea Bocqueraz & Co., Y,. R. Lilienthal of Lilienthal & Co. and 
others. The Review wishes all a full measure of success. 



W. H. Shields the well-known whisky broker of Cincinnati, 
and agent for the Review, has an unique device for keeping his 
business before the trade of the country. It consists of a hand- 
some and useful memorandum book containing a price-list of 
whiskies, whihc, by a patent arrangement, can Ijc substituted by 
other lists, the oc ver. which is of morocco, being presei-ved. There 
are also blank spaces for remarks, and the whole affair is so gotten 
up as to be useful and convenient. 



14 jJ^eifie yviJ^E /rJSlO Sf>l(^IT f^EVIEW. 

I- I -- - . I lai I , , III ,., ,, . ■ — I ■ I ■ . - — I- . I — p - . ■ III I 

OF FIRST DISTRICT FOR JANUARY "91, 
[OFFICIAL Fl( J I KE«.] 

Bomlwl 73,952 Gallons 

R<><'eiv«Ml from (Htitilleries in other cliHtricts 44.939 " 

Ko<vivcMl fniin warchoiiiHiH in otlu*r (liHtric'ta 2,962 " 

TranBforriMl frtim iliMtillcriw* to waroliouHeH in eastern distrieta 14,441 " 

TniiiKft'rrt>d from warehouses to eastern (Ustriots 32,279 " 

Tax-paid 27.665 " 

Exported ! 3,054 " 

R«'fnaining in bond Januarj- 31, '91 794,006 " 

" 1, '91 738,067 " 

Increase 55,959 " 

R(>maining in bond January 31,1890 832,570 " 

Decrease for January '91 38,564 " 



eOMPLIME/NTS FHOM THE TIRADE 



SWEET WIME SITCIATIO/N. 



For the following words of appreciation and encouragement 
we extend our hearty thanks, with the promise to ever strive in 
the future as wc have in the jMUst, to make the Revikw of increas- 
ing value and interest to its many patrons: 

New York February 9, 1891. 

Meun R. M. Wood & Co., San Francisco, Col. — Gentlemkn: 
Inclosed please find Postal Note for subscription for the 
year 1891. 

The January niunber of the Review was very interesting to 
us. If your hiding wine makers would contribute a letter for 
every number it would add greatly to j'our circulation. 

We feel that we get full value for our money from the 
Review, as frwjuently we get a suggestion that is worth many 
times its cost. Very truly yours, 

H. T. Dewey & Sons. 



OwENSBOKo, Ky., February 7, 1891. 
Mettrt. R. M. Wood & Co., San- Francisco, Cal. — Dear Sirs: 
My absence from the city ciiuse for not writing sooner. I am very 
much pleased with your new edition and will alwaj-s bo ready to 
have it reach my oflfice. It is interesting from begiimiug to end 
and a great cre<lit to its publisliers. Your little poem takes well 
and has been rcmarkc<l on often. With kindest regards to 
you and yours, I am. Yours truly, 

R. Monarch. 



New York February 12, 1891. 
Paeifie Wine and Spirit Revimc, San Francisco, Cal: — Dear Sirs: 
Your notification Of our expirwl sul>scription to hand this day. 
Inclo8e<l find check to settle the same and renew it for 
another year. Send it right along. We knew your paper when 
Mr. Bell had the San Francisco Merchant. It was a measly thing 
then. But your last iinprove<l issue tickled us to death. No! 
that's all right; no tlmnks nectwsary! When you step over hero 
again drop in and sec us. We'd like to show you something. 

We are sincerely, 

EisEN Vineyard Co, 

Per F. P. Taliaferro. 



We can supply Carumcl or Burnt Sugar Coloring at sevrufy- 
fire cents per gallon in barrels, as strong and as brilliant as any 
that was ever inanufa<tur('(l. Not one complaint has reached us 
the quality of our Hugar Coloring for over a year, and our sales 
extend to every Ktate in the Union. 

If the price was $10, instead of seventy-five cents per gallon, 
we could not produce a su|K?rior article. Every package guaran- 
teed. Hainples on npplictition. 

19 HudsonStrMt, IN«w York 



Some one who has the interests of the Sweet Wine men 
heart should take Professor Hilgard in hand and chain him don 
Without the slightest cause, and without the slightest judgmc 
that jiieddlesome individual has succeeded in embroiling hir 
in a controversy with the Internal Revenue Department, 
course during the past fortnight in attacking the Department 1 
been to say the least of it, idiotic and suicidal. 

Professor Hilgard at the Ixiginiiiiig of the present troubU 
with the Department acted with mmleration and starto<l on tlM 
right course to convince the Commissioner of Internal Revenii 
of the justice and fairness of the claims set forth by the swe< 
wine men. All of a sudden some one side-tracked him and le 
him into a bitter controversy with Dr. C. A. Crampton in whio 
Commissioner Mason naturally took a hand in the defense of hit 
sulwrdinate. The question seems to have degenerated from oiU 
of iinportiince to the people at large to a nasty little dispati 
batween Hilgard and Crampton, in which the rights of our wiw 
makers may be swamped. 

We do not know anything about Dr. Crampton's ability 
a lighter, but we can cheerfully accredit Hilgard with a bem 
to unnecessarily meddle in matters not of great importance to any 
question and smash the whole in consequence. He may Ik? a 
great scientist and all that, but he is about as poor a specimen 
man to impress the Department of the justice of what the swtri 
wine men want, as could well be imagined. Some one should 
apply the gag law instanter. All that is needed of Hilgard 
his chemical analyses of musts, the correctness of whioli a 
unquestioned. 

Another thing which has arisen in the course of this sweet 
wine controversy and which re<iuires attention is a statement 
made by Commissioner Mason that the Department is not legi> 
lative and is purely executive. If this is so how does the Com- 
missioner come by that law that no grape must can legitimately 
run over twenty-six and one half per cent of sugur. We fail t" 
see any thing of the sort in the Sweet Wine Bill. Are we to 
have to add water to our musts for sweet wine milking because 
some one under Mr. Mason, presumably Mr. Crampton, thinks 
he knows it all about sweet wine making when in fact he knows 
nothing? 



CELLA-R TO "RE/NT. 



i 



The basement under the Commercial Hotel. Monfgomeiy 
Ave. and Keaniy strwt, formerly occupietl by J. Gundhich& Co., 
as one of their wine cellars, is now for rout. The cellar has a six- 
teen foot ceiling, is drj' and well ventilated, has elevator full 
width of the sidewalk. Anyone in ucihI of a go<Hl wllar in a 
first class hx-ation are invited to call at the Commercial Hotel 
and ins^Mict the above. 



f/reifie Wl/^E /rJMD Sflf^lT PREVIEW. 



15 



EXPORTS AND IMPORTS 

DURING THE PAST FORTNIGHT. 



EXPORTS OF WINE. 



TO NEW YOKK— Pke Steamer Cit-j 


OF Sydney February 13, 1891. 


MARKS. 


SHIPPERS. 


CONTENTS. 


GALLONS 


VALUE. 


PL , 


Bergcs & Domeniconi.. 


,50 barrels 


2,396 
1,570 
3,5,58 

7,540 
264 
250 

1,000 
50 


1 776 


V. E . . 


7.50 


} 


J Gundlach & Co 

Overland F T Co. 


75 barrels 

40 puncheons. .. ) 

17 barrels ) 

,5 barrels . 


1,363 


I & Co 


7 S 


2.948 

78 


J, Philadelphia 

r E, 

J S Lebanon, Pa 


ii 
Kohler & Van Bergen. . . 

A Greenebaum & Co. . . 
Lacbman & Jacob! 

* 
Kohler & Prohling 

Dresel & Co 


5 barrels 


87 


20 barrels 

1 barrel 


350 
25 






70 


Ml it Co Buffalo.... 

: V 13 in di'd 

i. In di'd 


10 barrels 

40 barrels 

25 barrels 

25 barrels 


481 

2,057 

l,2ftS 

1,268 

1,284 

5.724 

1,548 

540 

100 

.30) 

253 

1,961 

511 

2,516 

7,393 

96 

4,800 

990 

2.224 


607 
709 
395 


in di'd 


395 


^A 




399 


C&F 


114 barrels 

10 puncheons 

5 casks 


2,862 
774 
189 


I M 


>L 




57 


fifeT. Brooklyn.... 
LB 


14 


6 barrels . . 


171 




132 


L 


33 barrels 

10 barrels 

50 barrels 

150 barrels 

2 barrels 


990 


J K S 


315 


IB S 


600 


L <fe Co 


S Lachman & Co 

W E A Johnson 

Natoma Vineyard Co. .. 
F AHaber 


2,7.5C 
38 


L C & Co 


: w 


100 barrels 

20 barrels 

47 barrels 


2,000 




450 






1,200 




cases 16 and 




Total amount 


50,642 


$31,470 



TO CENTEAL AMEEICA— Per Steamer 


City of Sydney February 


1.3, 1891. 




John T Wright Sk^irs 


30 S! ai 


I M,San J de Guat.. 


Horace Davis A Co 

EdeSabla&Co 

A Gieenebaum & Co 

Oliver & Co 


13 cases 




.50 


; M, Amapala 


8 kegs 


96 
40 

84 

81 

20 

80 

210 

181 

12 

485 

240 

97 

1,200 

190 

160 


76 




22 


L, M, Amapala 


7 kegs 


68 


H, San Juan del Sur 


31if-barrels 


63 
15 




10 kegs 


70 


¥ voni, Corinto 

"• V, San J de Gnat.. 


8 hf barrels 

12 octaves 

2 packages 

25 kegs 


182 

1.55 

15 


' A A, Puntas Arenas 


B Dreyfus & Co 

Cabrera Koma & Co 

Bloom Barueh & Co 

J Gundlach & Co 


500 


^ T, Amapala 


24 kegs 


252 


!H D, Corinto 




59 


SB.feCo, La Libertad. 
t S G, Champerico. .. 


23 barrels 


700 
163 


& A, 


Monteleagre & Co 


16 kegs 


112 


ii 11 




130 


j&C, 


160 cases 




640 


(i n 


100 cases 




250 


E, 




94 

107 


77 


t E, Amapala 


4 hf barrels 

12 cases 


107 
48 


Total amount Wi 


le cases 324 and 





3,407 


*3,775 



TO CHINA & JAPAN-Per 


Steamer Gaelic; February 14, 1891. 


J in di'dCo.Yokoha'a 


Herrman & Co. . 


10 barrels 


482 


f 122 


J A T Co, Hongkong 


RH Delafield... 
Cal Transfer Co. 
0&0S8 Co... 




117 


! WCo, Yokohama.. 
i A, Yokohama 


50 barrels 


2,500 

100 

10 


900 
50 


)iiuli'd, Hongkong . 


John Koenitr 




14 


" 






Total amount 


30 case and 


3,992 


*1,203 



TO MEXICO 


—Feb Steamer City of Sydney Pebrnai 


y 1.3, 1891. 


J B.San Benito 


Uruela & Urioste 

Cabrera EomaA Co 

Butlier & Bendixen 

it 

Thannhauser & Co 

it 

J Gr.ndlaob & Co 


4 barreU 


2001 > in? 


" 




40 

80 

306 

60 


44 


J EC, Sal Ina Cruz... 


8 kegs 


96 


K&VBindi'dMazat'n 




174 


4* 


4 kegs 


39 


" 


16 cases 


72 


D A M, San Bias 


1 barrel 


51 

40 

80 


28 


J M, San Bias 


3 kegs 


' 40 


AOC, Manzanillo.... 


5 kegs 


46 


Q & C, Puerto Angel. 


10 cases 


40 


EO Manzanillo 


6 kegs 


60 
59 
92 


60 
29 
46 


LD, San Bias 


8 Lachman <Sc Co 


Ibbl 2keg8;;!!!. 


Total amount 28 casee and 




a.068 


<821 



TO MEXICO— Per Schooner Twilight February 14, 1891. 



C&VB in di'dMazati'n 



J M E, Altata. 

J V, 

TA, 



Euther ifc Bendlxen. 



W Loalza. 
IGutte... 



6 barrels 

18 kegs 

4 hf-barrel«. 

6 casks 

2 kegs 



Total amount. 




; 163 
160 

59 
136 

17 



<585 



TO BEITISH COLUMBIA 



B&C, Victoria 

J H G. 

H B Co. " 

P ife M, Vancouver. . , 

D G, Wellington 

H B Co, Victoria ... 



Per Steamer City of Puebla February 4, 
Kohler '& Van Bergen. . 



J Gundlach & Co. 

F A Haber 

A Macchia 

F Korbell & Bro.. 



5 barrels.. . 

1 hf-barrel. 
4 barrels.. . 

2 cases 

2 barrels. .. 
2 barrels . . . 



Total amount 2 cases and. 



260 
26 
189 



99 
104 



678 



1891. 

20 
90 
10 
30 
64 



$284 



TO' LIVERPOOL— Pee Br. Ship Eivbbsjde February 13, 1891. 



A K 

W H 


A Koenig 


1 case 




5 


J M Crawford 




10 

650) 

.50 5 


95 


WM 


W M Muller 


13 packages 

1 package 

10 cases 


B 


C Meinecke&Co 

W E Fortune 


400 
40 


A BE & Co, London. 


JP, Scotland 


2 barrels...- 

14 barrels 


100 
667 


100 


WH 


Wm Hiiro-s 


294 






Total amount 


11 cases and 


1,477 


$864 



TO NEW YOEK-Pek Steamer S 


an Juan February 


21, 1891. 




H B & C 


Jos Melczer ife Co 

Berges & Domeniconi. . 
A Greenebaum <& Co . . . 

B Dreyfus* Co 

S Lachman & Co 


'27 barrels 

2 barrels 

6 barrels 

50 barrels 

25 barrels 

175 barrels 

150 barrels 

15 barrels 

35 barrels 

50 barrels 

1 hf-barrel 

4 barrels 

145 barrels 


1,328 

95 

302 

2,497 

1,249 

8,6,50 

7,607 

760 

1,785 

2,533 

27 

196 

7,300 

154 

256 

256 

100 

51t 

1.441 

100 

6,846 


$850 
29 


JP 


H G 


130 


K Bros 


749 


P H M, Newark. N J. 
BD&Co 


375 
3,900 
3,500 

185 


S L & Co . 


p B 


M in SQuare 


Lenormand Bros 

WE A Johnson 

F KorbeltfeCo 


525 


J W M, Philadelphia.. 
P T, Fall Elver, Mass 
AC 


797 
15 
79 




3,800 
80 


EM 


C & C 


Dresel & Co 


5 barrels 


92 


AS 


J Gundlach ife Co 

Kohler & Frohling 

Natoma Vinsyard Co». . . 
Beri nger Bros 




125 


H&C, Philadelphia.. 
AF 


2 barrels 


55 


10 barrels 

28 barrels 


270 


J K 


650 


K & K.Baltimore 


80 


G 


145 barrels 

10 casts 


2,536 




35 


K & Co 


10 barrels 


472 
5,052 
4.800 
100 
280 
1,282 
2,362 
3,755 


2.59 


K <& F 


100 barrels 

100 barrels 

2 barrels 

5bblslh£-bbls... 

25 barrels 

.50 barrels 

75 barrels 


2,520 


E W 


2,000 


C B E & Co 


100 


AL 


Lachman & Jacobi 


75 


F A 


398 




1,000 


F in diamond 


Kohler & Van Bergen . . 
Wine 10 cases and 


1,000 


Total amount 


62,101 


$25,215 




IfLEY 



PURE CALIFORNIA 




SPECIALTIES: 



PRIVATE ST06K R06K, 

PRIVATE STOgK EL gERRITO, 
PRIVATE STOGK SAUTERNE, 

PRIVATE STOCK KLARET, 
PRIVATE ST06K BURGUNDY, 

PRIVATE ST06K VINE KLIFF, 



"BRANDIES ^ V 



"WINESandBRANDIES 



WINERIES ANO DISTILLERIES: 



JN/rf>)r eiTY, YOUJSITVIlobE /rJ^D 
ST. jHEbEJM/r. 



OlTFICEi 



11-13 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 
200-202 S. FOURTH ST., ST. LOUIS. 



16 ^ 



PjMSIfie WII^JE /fj^D Sfll^lT flEVIfW. 



I . t.,»mrf SI. IWt. 



Il lfT« liw- A I «* . 



r a. La r«iM 

M I'. 

HAM. A<ii)«ll>... 
FLU " 
» Y. 

vv. 

A A. Otmmjmt*n>. 
BH. Ar«li>IU 
r C. La t'lOo^ 



1^ LlhMlwL »»«>•• nmtmrh M On 



JUundUiliAl'o 



Pam>(l * Co 

Ijf.hn T WridK 

I'lrurU A rrit-lr .. 
« *l>nrrs lt4>n<B.tCu. 



I 



-■■ ^'X' 

,» hl-hwrrU 

lil rM«* . . 

[SbK»8l»r»t».. 
|« hMorirU 

tu bl-lwrr«U>.. 

5 barirl* 

» b( bMTrl* 

3kt«« .. 

aOraxo 

U 

2S 

&ktr> . 
5knc>.. 
ascMw 



T*'*!** *m.kMttl llt'i i-a*«« I 



lu;. 






Ml 

m 



I.W 



"ITS 

25 
115 
SUO 
lU 

15" 

aar* 
I5U 
5N 
SU 

i:u 
54 

1(15 
Xi 
75 



•-'5 
lUO 

• l.MW 



TO NKW VOnK PUK SHIP ST. 

' .. — — ' . "" '7~ji»niii»irsiirirni»ii a <■" 

,,.'.^ .'ciia* KIcrii & Son 

;i,Mliiu»n \ J»ii'l>l 

. ...:\Vliiltli-i KiilliT .V ('<!... 

,..jj (• MtTlllii-w 

. iKi.lilerA V»ii Birucn .. 

...Ill Dn-vfiti'it Co 

'C (•»rj.v A ('.I 

, . K I.sciiiiian A Cit 

'J Oumllarli A Co 



^rUKWl 



H H. .*. 

M R. 

AH*c. 

I'DaC 



>|Hlkw.. 



J I > M< <i rink 

,.. r i.»»iiTiu 

frrurU * l'r»o»l« 



B*a JCAli February »\ 
...»krf T hl-bbCTr. 



IWI. 



• caik*. 



Tola) amtmntlO ra««« aixl 
"to BBITIHH COMMBIA -l> 



Ml 
«7 



118 



• 57 
l» 

ao 



K Waixa Waixa Febraarjr 80, 1«1. 



Oil, Vlrtoria 

T M. N WcaialKKlrr. 

BD. 

B H P, Vi 



A (Irrrnrliauui Jc l'< 
ilrHnirrr llnia 

CalTranaterOe.... 



. 1 1 ItarrrI 

jl lialMtarrcL. 



BirCu, X «c»lm'*l«H 

Tulal amonni t 



Sbwreb. 
*ktg»... 
Sbarrvb. 



and 



51 
87 



181 
80 



8 411 



T«> HEXICt* -!■«« 8TBA««B SkwbkK!*. February 25, ISUl . 



KAVBIndi'd Maaa'ln 



Cdrl P Ual'at.... 

KB 

rev Maallan. . 

B J M r Ciaayawa- 

JAW 

H I. H Id dl'd anajraaa 

DBMaalUa 



M BH 

HP 

C « C I^ I'aJ: 

CC OwjrfBaa. 

SBT " 

fAAH " 

TBC 

CA 1- 

BAi' 



Kalber A Bendlxru . 



4 barrria 

lOkPKs 

akeK* 

Bke** 

Ikeie 

5 raa<v 

8 k«|C» 

5kcj{» 

lOraica.... 

lUkcft* 

I barrel .... 

! •• 1 barrel 

8 bf-barrela. 

4keK 

i* kru* 

lOkev* 

8 l«rtel» 

J PHthlelden 'lokt-u- 

** I barn-l, . . . 



ItediiuctaiiAGo 

DM Pelenwn *&>.... 

JO Mererink 

Caivera Koma A Co. . . 

J OaudUt-b A Co 

Tbannliauaer A Cu 

W LimOoi 



Total amuunl Wine IS eaae* and 



JM 

ISO 

8U 

80 

5 

80 
SO 

m 

61 

60 
40 
40 
80 
100 

no 

80 
40! 



J- 



»84 

10 
80 
48 
6 
08 

• 184 



103 
88 
ID 
48 
5 
30 
IS 
SO 
4S 
47 
81 
21 
18 
38 
U 
58 
71 
0» 
47 



1,1801 



784 



TO HON(ILt'M;--PEB ttTKAMca Ai'ittkaua Febuary 84, 1801. 



Ail«C« 

OWMAO* 

AH 

J B M Jr. 


FAMaber .......*.. 

Kobler A Van Bereeo.. 
JU8|nn'kfl»ABi.»... 
Cal Tranafer Cx> 

*• 

*. 

D W 0«dge 


4 caM* 

8»3k«f[( 

Ifaae 

2barreUi 

Ibf barrel 

5 ket{« 


■■i;»7i 
■■■■idoV 

85t 
"^5 


1,880 
5 

100 


Ola4lHHNMl 


lOS keit» 


ass 


D Camarlnoa 

WliMC Wo HaiiK .« Co... 

I.rn»rmaiid llr<>» 

Sn"^ Harsniliy ft Co.. 

H Ijubman * Co 


10 caaca 


so 


P C 






4 


I barrel 


SO 
44 
131 

8SU 


17 


W WT 
W H L. 
HCACu 


8 b( IwrreU 

it barrel* 


14 
138 


4 barrela 


143 


60 k«n. 


878 




•1 raMW 


IS 


W 8 1. 


ISbarrab 


7se 

10 
4,4»- 


sat 


• • 


IkcK. 


9 


Tola! amnnnl 


«ln» IVraaraand 




3.23U 



Mark February 7. 1891. 



M 

F . 

H 111 
Kll 

w r 

F<1 
.\ III 
H |) 
<• 111 
SI) 
(i. . 
S In 
K.t 



• tar 
.V .1 
.« <■. 
II 
III 
.V ('.) 
dill 
,V Co 

>tar 
F .. 



'Koblir A Frolillii);. 
Miirellaneouii 



Tolal amonni Wlne.^.^ • 
TO LONDON— P«B H" siiii ini 
O'O A Co." 



aiMI barreU 

NO haireU 






18,988 


• 9.461 


.'i8 puiicbeont 


7,880 


3.ftl0 


700 barrel* 


84.788 


17,868 


- packaKea 


50 


85 


:iy packaRea 


1.894 


M7 


l.'Ki liarrcU 


7,4S3 


8.re6 


s<m lmrrel» 


89,400 


19.745 


ii75 liarrcla 


38.869 


16.6.'« 


425 |>acka)^ 


88,105 


11,050 


201 pa<kaKee...: ) 
JW piiiK'beoni*. .. ) 






15,471 


7,786 


700 liaricia 


88.384 


19.192 


lOObaircIs 


5.036 


2,518 




884,0S8 


•112,040 



.1 York, February 25, 1891. 



WB A Co. 

<1 OACo . 
HAG 



A O Chauclii- 

(;al Transfer Co.. 
IMiSabatine 



Overland Frelgbt T Co.. 



Total amount Wine 21 caeea and. 



i barrels 


101 

1.50 

aa5 


6 
75 


4 barrel* 

15 caaea 


100 
50 


17 barrela 


850 

1,2110) 

75 5 


255 


24 barrel* .... 


400 
20 


n hf-barrels 










• 2.581 


MO 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO FOREIGN PORTS BY SEA. 



From February 11, to Felruary 86, 1891. 



TCmBL. 



Itlvei»ide.. 



CilyofHydncy 

San Juan 

City of NY... 



DESTIKATION. 



LlndlULIverpI 
Hlndi'd " 
WLlndid " 

ABHACo London 
W H, LIverpiKil 
JHC, SalinaCruz 
It r. La Union 
H in di'd. Loudon 



SHIPPPEBg. 



COHTBIITS. 



aAI,L0II6 



L J Rose A Co Lt'd 197 bbls. . . . 
NatomaVineyardColaO lif-bbl. . . 
Wra LichciiberK .. . .'20 bbls . . . ) 

9 hf-bblB. . ) 
Chas Heinacke ACo 3 cages 

3 bbls 

10 eases 

IkcK 

125 bbl*.. ) 
95 hf-bbls $ 



8845 
600 

1,503 



Wm Hitri;. 
Cabrera Itoina A Co 
J Uubdlat'b A Co.. 
NatoinaViiicyardOo 



Total amount 13 ca!>es and. 



152 



8,600 
19,701 



• 7,960 
480 

751 
27 
92 
75 
12 

4,300 

•13,697 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO DOMESTIC PORTS BY SEA. 



From February 11. to February 86, 1891. 



St Mark. 



City of Sydney 



Ban Juan. 



OBhTtSATlOH. 



C 8. Chicafco... 
C 8, New York . 
WFACo " 
A V Co " 
BLACo " 

BDACu " 



O 

a 

KAF 

A B 

JL 

JP 

BDACo 

J 1' 

KAF 



Cbas Stern A Co. . . 

WhilticrFiillerACo 

J H Wheeler 

Htamer Bros 

,T Dowdeil 

W B Bourn 

Pacific Wine Co. 

HCEpjters 

JSinii 

Cba» Qundlach. . 
Sonoma W A B Co. 
KoUler .t Fi-oblin);. 



Drescl A Co.. 



CONTBNAS. 



4fl pckgs.. ) 
38 pckgs.. S 
-pckpi.... 
893 pckj;*. . . 
74 pckgs.. ) 
140 pckgs. \ 
251 pk^. 
246 pkifs. 
103 pk^s.. 
pkes. . . 



:\ 



BerResADomenlc'ul 
B DreyfuF A Co 

Drescl A Co 

Koblei A Fiobling.. 



SOpkRs...) 
ISSnkKS.. 5 

Ek^s 
f-bbls . . 

8bbli 

1 hf-bbi . . . . 

1 lif-bbi . . . . 

2 bbls 

il08lif-bbls. 
2lif-bblB... 
25hf-bbU.. 



Total amniinl. 



4,9U 

SO 

10,189 

5,624 

20,424 



2,4a5 

4,:«u 

1,206 

aa 

26 
26 
91 
2.910 
.52 
656 



• 9,828 

100 

20,278 

11,884 

40,848 



4810 

8.738 

777 

198 

52 

.52 

162 

2,10) 

in 

:8j 



53,096 



»9!',T5a 



WM. WOLFF & CO., 

Importers and General Agents, 



327-329 Market Street, 



San Francisco, Cal. 



IP^CIFia CO^ST ^OEHSTTS i^oi^ 



rwmr tm ohampaori. 

i. * r. ■uTMi ooexia 

MMAM moL, ratr st. lUBrs sbbub 

man oomu mamhd ran. 

FUMBOO aWAM. TMks IUm T«Mlk, 



40HN d^ KUYPER & SONS, ROnERDAM, OIN, 
GII.KA KUliMEI.s 

PABST BKEWINO CO. ifcnMrlT PHHXIP B8ST), 
HILWAUKEB Bxport Bmt, Bdwl Else RibboD 
THJ "BBT" TOlnC. 
THM. UPITS ORNUIKI AROHATIQUI, 
• DOe'8-HUD'- BRAND of OiiiuMH' Sfc«t ud Bm' Ale, 



tt»^mp»rt*^ AmriHran HhUklrm 'W BelinonI 'K2Cblrkencork; '83 Illneifrasa: '85 KIpy, and oilier staple brand* 

Lowe»l market iiuotatlon* famUbed im application. 



CANTRELL & COCHRANE^ Btlbst Ougtr Ala, 
BASS & GO'S Pal« and Barton ALB. in Hogshwdt, 
OUINNKSS & GO'S (DaUinI Bxira Stoat in Honhwd 
OREBNLEES BROS' Lorn* HicUand (Scotch) WbtskT 
JAMESON & CO.. IRISH WHMT, 
LONDON Dry Dock Jaoaiot lUm, 
Miatnl WalMi, 



f/reifie WIJME /cJSID Sflf^lT (REVIEW. 



17 



MISCELLANEOUS FOREIGN WINE SHIPMENTS. 



From February 11, to February 26 1891. 



VESSEL. 



Zealandia. 
Albert. . . . 
Umatilla.. 



DESTINATION. 



SHIPPERS. 



HH&Co. Hono'lu Jos Melczer & Co. . 
WCP, " |B Dreyfus A Co. .. . 

FMcL,Vancouv'r,J Gundlach & Co.. 

JIM, " WM Murray 

J J 8, •' ICal Wine G Union.. 



CONTENTS. 



1 barrel 

43,5 kegs . . . 

1 bbl 

2 barrels... 
1 barrel . . . 



Total amount. 



■50 

2,950 

48 

195 

50 



■$62 

2,200 

28 

90 

27 



3,293 $ 3,407 



EXPORTS OF MISCELLANEOUS LIQUORS BY SEA. 

From February 11, to February 26, 1891. 



VE.SSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPEKS. 


CONTENTS. 


VALUE. 


StMark 

Zealandia 

Gaelic 


AM&C, New York 
BFD, Wilkesbar. 

— Honolulu 

C H, Yokohama. . 
M it Co, Shanghai 
B & B, Mazallan . 
J M E, Altata .... 

AP, Ocos 

R H, San Benito.. 
JWW. Puerto Ang 
GCRR, Guatemala 

— Victoiia 

D K, Acajutla.... 
WL&Co,Guaymas 
GWM&Co,HonoUi 
HC&Co, Honolulu 

nount £13 cases. . . 


Wilmerding* Co 

Naber Alfs & Brune . . 

Lilienthal & Co 

Wilmerding & Co 

S Foster & Co 

Ruther & Bendixen. . . 

EL G Steele &C 

Thauuhauser & Co 

Pacific Imp Co 

Moore Hunt & Co ... . 

J Gundlach & Co 

Henry Lund & Co 

Kohler & Van Bergen. 
A Harasztby & Co.... 


100 cases Bitters 
50 eases Bitters. 
20 bbls Alcohol. 
5 cases Bitters . . 
10 cases Bitters. 
5 cases Bitters.. 
1 case Liquors.. 

1 keg Gin 

8 bbls Ging Ale. 
5 cs Angostura.. 


$600 

300 

612 

40 

125 

14 

10 

26 

116 

35 

23 


Twilight 

City of Sydney. 


Walla Walla.... 

San Juan 

Newbern 

Austrania 

Total ar 


25 csChampagne 
2bblsGingerAle 
2 cases Bitters.. 
2 cs S W Punch. 
5 cs Champagne 


440 
31 
42 
20 
50 

f 2,494 



EXPORTS OF WHISKY BY SEA. 



From February 11, to February 26, 1891. 



VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 


CONTENTS. 


GALLONS 


VALUE. 


Gaelic 

City of Sydney 


C H, Yokohama . 
C, Cliaraperico . . 
S&Co, SanJ de G 
RSG,Char.iperico 
HN A, Victoria.. 
Z&C.Champerico 
GL&CoSantaAna 
GL&Co, Acajutla 
N R T, Guaymas 
G in di'd, Hono'lu 
WCH&Co, " 
W S L, 
HC&Co 


Wilmerding & Co .. 
J Gundlach & Co . . 

Scliwartz Bros 

J Gundlach & Co . . 
Braunschwei'r & Co 
Hellmau Bros & Co 

L SHaas 

Goldtree Bros 

W Loaiza & Co 

D W Gedge 

Spru'ce,Staiiry &Co 

Wilmerding & Co.. 


2 bbls 

1 barrel 

60 cases 


78 
38 


$198 

30 

527 


Walla Walla.. 


Ibbl 

31 casts 


40 


50 
280 


San Juan 


24 oases. . . . 




232 


Newbern 

Australia 


2 bbls 

2 bbls 

Ikeg 

10 cases 


81 

80 

5 


91 

100 

26 

62 




20 cases ... . 




170 


1. 






30 


i< 


2 barrels 

10 cases. . . . 


74 


216 
100 


Total amount. 1.58 cases 8 


n ^ 




39( 


$ 2 112 











IMPORTS OF WINES AND LIQUORS BY SEA. 

FROM HAMBURG— Per Br. Bark Dee February 10, 1891. 



SHIPPERS. 



Hugo Rheinhold & Co. 

M Maas & Co 

L VReiche Jr 



F C VanderPont Jr.... 



Blankenheym & Nolet. 



N Luchting &Co... 
T Scherbeuck Sons. 

Wm Foerster & Co. 
N Luchting & Co... 

Krunel & Co 

G Dubedat 



CONTENTS. 



Wm Wolff & Co.. 

Ruther & Bendixen 

Order (marked C C L R). . . 

Order (marked S B) 



Sherwood & Sherwood.. 
Weil Bros & Sons 



150 cases Gilka Kummel. 

32 cases Wine 

80 cases Beer 

100 cases Giu 

1 casks Geneva 

20 cases Green Geneva. . . 
50 cases Mineral Water. . 
3 barrels Geneva 

2 octaves " 
2 " " ' 
10 " 
10 " 
375 cases Mineral Water. 

10 cases Madeira 

5 cases Port 

170 barrels Whisky 

52 cases Wine 'Braunscliweiger & Co 

.57 cases Wine 'Mitchalitschke Bros. . 

100 cases Claret 'Pascal Dubedat & Co 

50 cases Mineral Watei ... I " 

10 barrels Rum '• 



CONSIGNEE. 



Loewe Bros 

Hellmau Bros & Co 

Meyerfield, Mitchell & S. 

Order 

Wm Wolff & Co 



FROM HAMBURG— Pep Br. Ship Candida February 18, 1891. 



Wm Mullers Succrs. . 
Leazaii & Scharbrun . 

Julius Danielson 

L V Reiche Jr 

Julius Ruderl 

Elkins &Co 

M Rohde & Co 



8 cases Wine 

112 cases Mineral Water.. 

5 cases Beer 

1 " 

100" " 

10 cases Mineral Water. . . 

141 cases Mineral Water.. 



A L Tubbs 

J Renz 

F SKordt 

Order (marked C C R R). 

Order (marked AD) 

Order (marked HK S)... 
Order (marked H S) 



FROM ANTWERP— Per Bk. Smi' Mobe February 13, 1891. 



Blankenheym & Nolet. 

A Andre 

Adolphe Deppe 

A Andre 

Blankenheym & Nolet. 
Martell & Co 



15 barrels Gin 

50 eases Gin 

1001 caB2s Mineral Water. 
5 cases Wine or Cognac. 

279 cases Champagne 

15 octaves Gin 

150 cases Brandy 



DonaldBon &Co. 



Order 

L Bernstein & Co. . . 

Order 

Hellman Bros & Co. 
Wm Wolff & Co 



FROM LONDON- 


-Per Br Ship Reliance, 


February 20, 1890. 


Asterlik Son & Fuller 

TTrappA Sons 


2 cased X '-^''^ Sherry 

310 cases Wine 


Pacific Union Club 


Martell & Co 


20 casks Brandy 


Wm Wolff & Co 


Patterson & Hibbert 


1.50 cases " 

.50 casks Bottled Beer 

50 eases Gin 




8 Bailey & Co 


Wm Wolff & Co 




150 cases Spirits 

25 cases Whisky 

10 cases Wine 


Cbas Mcinecke & Co 

Carroll & Carroll 


Grierson Oldham & Co 


Vichy & Co 


25 cases Whisky 

100 cases Vichy 

900 cases Absinthe 

16 octaves Wine 


(for J De B 8) 


Les Fils de Berger 




Morgan Bros 


Wm Wolff & Co 


Read Bros 


1.50 casks Beer 

10 small barrels Brandy.. 

45 cases Beer 

3 cases Champagne 

.500 cases Vermouth 

20 casks Brandy 

75 cases Brandy 


Order 


Godet Freres 


Jas De Frcmery & Co 

A Greencbanm & Co 

Dickson De Wolf & Co 

Pascal Dubedat & Co 


SAllsop&Sons 

Heat ley Wotton & Co 


G Dubedat 




4t 


60 cases Champagne 

18 one-sixth Sherry 

60 cases Bitters 


ii 


James Morrison & Co 


50 case mineral water 

3.34 cases Beer 


Order (marked H M N) 



FROM NEW YDRK viv 


PAMAMA— Per Steamer Acapulco Feb. 22, 1891. 




1 barrel Whisky .... 


F KleinsteiD 




3 '• 

2 " " 

1 " 

3 " 

2 " 

1 barrel >^ cask Whisky. . 
1 barrel 1 hf barrel " 

10 barrels Whisky 

1 barrel }^ cask Whisky. . . 


W B McrJiiire 




J H Becker 




G W McCready 

S D Merritt 






Wilton Honey 






Felix Tegamore 








Popular Drug Store 




D Muligan 




1 




Order (marked F S) 

Order (marked Fin diamond) 




10 cask 



FKOitt LIVERPOOL. 

W A Gilbey | 50 cases Spirits | Lilienthal & Co 

FROM LIVERPOOL— Per Br. Ship Hespeijides February 21, 1891, 



TBHall &Co 

WE Johnston* Co. 



James Hennessy& Co. 

J & R Teunent 

Wilson Meyer & Co 

E&JBuike 



James Moss & Co 

Frank Barclay & Co. 

Ismay & Co 

W A Ross & Co 



John Ramsay. 



100 cases Bottled Stout. . 
51.S cases Bottled Beer. . . 
10 barrels Mineral Water 

150 cases Brandy 

2.50 casks Bottled Beer. . . 

30 qr. casks Wine 

230cases Bottled Beer... 
15 cases Bottled Whisky. 

100 cases Wine 

50 barrels Ginger Ale 

10 hhds Stout 

35 barrels Ginger Ale 

25)^ cases Ginger Ale. ... 
15 octaves Whisky 



Lilienthal & Co. 
Forbes Bros. ... 



Order 

Forbes Bros 

Chas Meinecke& Co. 
H H Sherwood 



Order (marked G B & Co). 

Wm Wolff & Co 

H H Sherwood 



Charles Meinecke & Co . 



FROM GLASGOW— Per Br. Ship Iverna Feb. 23, 1891. 



Geo Younger & Son 


25 casks Bottled Ale 

10 hhds Ale 


Wm Wollf & Co 


Frank Bailey & Co 


it 


J&RTeunent & Co 


10 " 

265 casks Bottled 


Forbes Bros 






E Hayton & Co 


1 quarter cask Whisky.. . . 
20 casks Mineral Water. . . 


Order (marked EH &Co)... 
H M Newball&Co 


WRDick & Co 



FROM NEW YORK— Per Ship Cyrus Wakefield Feb. 19, 1891. 



J A Burke 

Gourd & Tournade. 

J A Burke. 

Jesse Moore & Co... 



2 barrels Whisky W Jepson 

50 cases Cordials Order 

2 barrels Whisky .A Jenson 

159 packages Whisky 'Moore Hunt & Co. 



FROM ANTWERP— Per Br. Ship Sierra Nevada Feb. 20, 1891. 
Apolinaris Co , | 1200 cases Mineral Water | Charles Graef & Co. 



FROM HONOLULU— Per Bark C. D. Bryant Feb. 1891. 



I 140 barrels Whisky | Lilienthal & Co . 



FROM HONOLULU— Per Steamer Australia January 31, 1891. 



|51 kegs Wine B Dreyfus & Co. 



FROM HONOLULU— Per Barkentine W. H. Dimond January 17, 1891. 



.|110 barrels Whisky (Order. 



FROM NEW YORK— Per Steamer San Juan February 14, 1891. 



H J BuUay Supt P M S S Cojll barrels Whisky Order (marked J B G) 



1 barrel Whisky. 



G Bensen , 



FROM SPAIN— PER Steamer San Juan, February 14, 1891 



Pio Morro fu Tumaro. 
Rlccioni & Co 



Sandeman Buck & Co. 



40 cases Wine 'Granucci Bros 

25 cases Wine " 

25 cases Vermouth | " 

15 octaves Wine Goldberg Bo wen & Co. 



FROM LONDON— Per Br. Ship Albyn, February 18, 1891. 



W & A Gilbey |105 cases Spirits 

T Trapp & Sons 3 hhds Wine 

G Gaden Klipsch |235 cases Wine 



Order (marked H J N india'd) 

B Moulet 

Catton Bell & Co 



IMPORTS BY RAIL IN BOND. 



Southern Pacific Co . 
H Brunhild & Co.... 



S V Fornaris & Co. 



25 cases Wine. 

5 cases Slierry 

5 eighth casks Sherry. 

37 cases Wine 

82 cases Wine 



Granucci Brot 

JosMelczer & Co. 



J De Fremery & Co. 
WB Chapman 



18 



f^eifie. WIJ^E /t/^D Sflf^lT {REVIEW. 



WHISHV AND SWUIT IMTOMTS BY «AIL. ». P. CO. 





luiaw; 9T lo r«bn«ni U. IWt. 






«■•■■-« • 


!lllM-ILL*IIRnl°« 


nMMannM. 


J»;^' . 



m 

ST- 
UD 


('«M-. 


Itaml 


H-ubi 




jMwIlvMyJlCn.... 

lili«MiMi«ro 
WatanaAfh 4>*i 
IIM«iln»ArUctt.^ 
TMtwvBrlarlAtVi... 

rMMHlWbM» 

i H 0«w 

W|l»ii<ti«t * <^> 

If V&«<l A <\» 




4fi 
MO 


Sn 






























lao 

13 

1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
t 

4 

■ 
S 
1 














, 








w ' — • . 

A m * Co. . 
»„,,..»..•... «0<> 






















JTIWI 

K f WaaA 


















n J Kl^ 












rrarf'riSiMr < ' . . 












Owitaa^FTOo 

A rnNMM 


4 


















J L IWwl 


S 










R J Haadl 






















flMclfauMca 












Total 


TM 


toa 




IftU 


SO 





■ecu 


IMK>IITS 


■V RAIL. S. 


P. CO. 






boTTLBD. 


BrLK. 


copdanu* 


CaA 


Bvrelt 


CMe 


H-bbl 


Barrelf 


K-bbl 


V-bbl 


Mtarvtiod Jk iMwrwood 
Wai WoUIAOo 












lUl 
10 


276 


n 










MO 


UO 


800 








W« WoUTACo 


n 


















•no 


40 


ffnM^ ll^M<t« A tfVk 






UO 
UO 








y^^^^^^ A On 














aaiwknMt AOo..... 


n 












77 


77 






















.»ptol 


IM 


»T 


8S7 






431 


456 



NATIONAL IMPORTS AND EXPORTS. 



IMrORTH- 



lU-baportad (piiila. prDuf KmlluM. 

Matt lh<nni». bolllot, nlloM 

Mall llniMir*. Imlk, ipUlun* 

Brawl) . iH'-tl Kaltuna 

All itttmr apirlU, pmuf italloM 



mill ■ 
WUl «iM». 



December. IWO. December. 1MS9. 



Qiiantliy 



187,775 
105,704 
U5,S88 

48,456 
140.871 

48.005 
854,000 

83,580 



ValD 



•155,?78 
88,444 
66.361 
llI.fliM 
110,868 
565,508 
845,868 
176.189 



Quantity 



•103.567 

U2.56II 
154,37U 

52.tMIU 
185,006 

55,004 
827,568 

S5.3!IV 



Value 



8106..S45 
74.IW) 
52.475 
l»:l,145 
10U.W7 
7a4.a«5 
a»3,746 
ia5..S37 



BXPOBTS. 



Mallllqaan.4 

Mall liqaofa, balk. Kallooc 

Alruhal. tie, front ollow 

B »i. pruut pMom 

B o w fco w whbii*, imnif Kallonii. 
Km «khk*. immtl eaiimi. 
All otter apiilfa 
Whw. 

WIM.0MSW 

(ATMadi^ ta -aB oUMr apiirita." 



iVl'>l*< pnwf Kalluna. 



Det-vnitwr, 18W0. 



Quaaliljr 



86,510 

18,081 

0,415 

1,889 

119,985 

I6,5a7 
4.965 
8.0IH 
1.M17 

43,098 



Value 



•SS,875 
8,887 
U 
8,890 

148.851 

15.0»l 

5.505 

1.000 

7.688 

87,007 



Decemlwi, 1889. 



Quautit; 


Value 


85.802 


V)6 KM 


12.821 


3.088 


23.357 


6.224 


(A) 
148,038 


(A) 
188,028 


11,090 


15,246 


1.940 


2.785 


18.14(1 


17. m 


870 


4,829 


87,751 


18,849 



BXPOBTR or rOREION LIQOOUH 


December, 1800. 


December, 1889. 




Quantity 


Value 

580 

981 

70 

1,878 
1.048 
1,041 

:i.2in 

995 


Quantity 


Value 


R«-laiparted <n|r4t« rx|M>H«i. imMl Kalluii*.. 

Mall ll<|a»r«. hHlM. Kalloiw 

Mall ll'iu.>r. i.iilk. Kallun* 


M7 
!«l 
17U 

l,l»* 
917 
146 

4,480 
88U 


81 
1,675 


80 
974 


Braixt I..W 


8,?49 
0.781 

224 
3.:i2ll 

311 


7,186 
4.6.'i9 
3,502 
1,908 
1,144 


All f.li inxif KalloM 


riiMa|BK>K«. wioni 

Will •!«■§. eariw, Kallow „.... 

mui erlnw, doaea 



NATIONAL IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

For th* Yaars 1889 mn4 1890. 



l«t>OBTR. 



R*-lnin»r1e4 »|Hrll*. imMtf nalloM. 

Mall ll>|a.>r». tioiiln. KaUoM 

Mall ll'ianr*. hnlk. ualluM.. 
?f»^/. prnml Kall.Mi. 
All otter aplriu, |>rii.>( i;>U«i>. 
•»■""—'—. d.iarii. 
^" '••«■. icalkMi. 

>>otlle», iluMii 



-OBsr 



UM9. 



Qoaatlly | Value 

l.!l«7.<«7HVl,539,«rifl 
l,i«S,.-.75 I.IKl.fVm' 

I RT;. kihI •,■.( «ii* 



.'I' 



1 



1890. 



KXrOliT.^. 



Quaiility Value 



Malt l(.iu..r», ■l../<-n..... 

Mall 11 |U T*. iMilk. nall.-nii 

All ..lull. il. .. pr.H.I i:ttll.)n» 

lltaiiilv. i.r..i.l i!»ll.iii 

Hum. pr."'! f»!li'ii«... 

Il,.url»in »lil»kv. |.r.>nl (;»ll'>'«' 

1(1.- olil-kv, l>r.">l Kall"»» 

All.illxi -I'liilf. i.r.M.f nallonn 

WiiH'. IhiIi1<«. ilown 

Wiiir, l>ull>, i.'»ll"'"'-. 

(»1 111. IndiHl In "all otiief »i>lrl(». 

( I.) K..r II..' MX moiitli" endini: Dwember 31. 1890; for the prececdhiK six months 
imluilrd 111 ••all •>""•' •I'lrKi'- 



409.417 

349,067 

391.904 

31,208 

722.300 

.S3(>.IK{4 

73.790 

85,922 

8,872 

438,461 



$582,865 

70,080 

194,884 

(b) 89.138 

861,954 

,350.722 

103.215 

61..35 

40..524 

863,564 



Quantity Value 



40:i.204 
220.641 
876,430 



517,533 
1,421,635 
387,394 
383,640 
7,725 
361,938 



(605,419 

63,090 

150,909 

(») 
615,915 
1,201,375 
3.M,,')00 
218,245 
»4.0flO 
336,441 



EXI'OHTB OF FOIIEION LIQCOIIS. 



Ilc-lmiiurled npirllatiported, proof gai.. 

.Mnl! II'IUOFK. tiotllei". gallonB 

Mull llqiioni, hulk. Ballonn 

Ilraiidv. priKif K»ll<>n<< 

All iitber •plrlln. proof Kaltona 

('tiain|>a<nc, duren 

Klill wine*. ra«k>. ^allona 

Still wine*. Ixittlea, doien 



1890. 



Quantity 



1,947 

6.530 

338 

18.435 

41,045 

l.,'i79 
35,775 

4.875 



Value 



$2,063 
4,859 
130 
36.045 
32.711 
19,511 
22,199 



1889. 



Qoantity 



2.281 

11,084 

520 

18,135 

29,218 

2..'567 
34,.M4 

4.:i«3 



Value 



$ 3,156 
7,831 
301 
83,983 
19.679 
33,350 
19,079 
14,.550 



WHISKY AND SPIRIT IMPORTS BY RAIL, S. P. CO. 

From February 11, to February 27, 1891. 





Whirky. 


HPIBITd. 


CONSIOIIBBS. 


Barrels 


Ket? 


Case 


Barrels 


>i bbi HlSCBLLANKOtTS 


Jonffl Mundy A Co. . . . 


' 70 






331 
360 
808 












T ilinntlial t^ On 










Klelw Hnis <te Placeman 

Wilmerdiiii; &Co 

Mvertivld Mil.licll & 8 
A'l>H..taliiiKA Co.... 

LouU Tau8filK 

Hliea l)o('<|ueraz <& Co.. 


80 
65 
40 
182 
86 
60 
40 
15 
10 
6 

551 


50 














80 


40 


































«r 










ItediiiKton * Co 

MaHoii ,^ Feldman.^ 




















Overland F T Co 


5 
4 










H Well 










J L Nleliel 










J Connell 












M W Kent 


1 










J H MUfbell 










O WllkiniiitCo 












CPcdiina 
























Total 


1.58 1 40 


989 







BEER 


IMPORTS 


BY RA 


IL, S. 


P. CO. 






BOTTLKD. 


BtlLK. 




Cask 


Barrels 


}ibbl 


Case 


Barrels 


Xbbl 


Xbbl 


Jones Mundy & Co 




115 
130 












Hlierwood ,^ Klierwood 










62 

too 


92 


C \ Zinklaiid 








60 


Wm Wolir <S Co 


45 
















. 











Total 


45 


335 


I......... 




163 


152 

















VITICULTURAL RESTAURANT AND CAFE. 




BUSINESS SUCCESS. 

If you have a line of k"o(1«. or a 8pe<-l8lty, imssessin;; quality and merit 
IT PAYS TO LET THE PUBLIC KNOW IT. 

Every biisiiicKK man who consults his health and cuccess in Imniness miihl eat 
and not only eat reKUlarlv, but must eat s h<Ii food as will be readily dlcesled. willi 
sueb surroundincx as will make his meal not only 

A BUSINESS MATTER OF NECESSITY 
but a pleasurable di);rehsii>n from business care. 

Wlien audi a meal can t)e obtained at a tri«in){ expuiwe, and lie productive of 
happliMtki* and rtMHw..d. If nut increased energy, a business man is foolish indeed 1" 
not embrace llic ptuBiKclivc iip|K)rt unity. 

Su.li a meal can 1k' obtaiiu-d. and llie alM>ve descrll>ed results attained by takiiir 
a lunch Willi UH, bciwcen the hours of 11 A. M. and 2:.30 i>. M. We serve a six course 
lunch fur .VI cents. 

In the cvenhiK we serve, from 4:80 to 8:30 r. M.. an eiKlil-coursc dinner for 
75 cents 

Besides our service a la carte receives prompt attention, and our restauranti 
most elcKanlly furnislutl. 

„ui".'.'''7'".'''.!" ""! '"I^rlcnce, twth in the Old and New World, as rcstauranteun- 
wiin tiic lad dial ihe cuisine and dlnini; r.«>m is under our direct and contlnun 
su|iei virion, we Konraiilee the Im-sI satisracllon. 

I II ''♦'""."'"'•''♦•111 that we can please you in the smallest tiart iculars, we rcsiMM I 
fully solicit your |iatroiin|;e. 

ALItKItT FKANCKX ANn OTTO HUHLEMANN, 

Viticullural Cafe and Itestaurant, 

315 I'iNc Rtkkkt. San Francisco 



N. B. 
purcbaaed 



-The wines furnisliiil to our Ktiestt arc Knarantced to lie pure, and ar« 
direct Irom the iM-rniancnt exhibit of the Htaic Viticullural Commission 



f/ceifie WIJ^E Jk^Q SflF^IT F^EVIEW. 



19 



Taylor's Circular. 

Frankfort, Ky., January 31, 1891. 
To the Wholesale Whhky Trade: — We offer herewith, without 
jomnientary, tables in the usual shape aud as of date December 
11, '90, showing the bonded stocks of the three seasons of '88, '89 
md '90, the production of the '91 crop as compared witli thepro- 
luctiou of the '90 crop for the same jjeriod, aud the amount of 
;he said '91 production then remaining in bond. 

BONDED STOCKS OF '889, '89s AND '90s. 

'888. M98, '90s. Total. 

tn bond Nov. 30, '90 2,386,5(58 16.80.5,H;« 32.098,08;i 5l,2J0,4Sl Rals. 

Unbonded in Dec, 2nd Diet. 7,302 42,(m 3.5,421 84,747 " 

5th " 92,2.54 119,076 320,1.52 .5:^2,082 ' 

6th " 32.8.56 £108,870 68.7:« 210,460 " 

7th " 01,0U 39,717 29,547 130,305 " 

8th " 30,882 5.5,601 ,5,778 92,261 " 



Total 221,335 365 888 4.59.6:12 1,019.8.55 gals. 

Leaving in bond Dec. 31, '90.2,162,233 16,439,912 31,638,451 50,240,626 gals. 

PRODUCTION '91 CROP. 

On November 30th the production for tlie cur- 
rent season had reached... 4,595,839 gals. 

to whicli we add the production for December: 

2ndDisti-ict ^40,485 gals. 

5th " 1,7.38.568 " 

0th " 605,.337 " 

7th " 684,969 " 

8th " 631,662 "4,001,021 " 



making total produc'n for first six months of '91 crop 8,596,860 " 

For the same period of the '90 crop the production was 

In July, '89 801,630 gals. 

In August, '89 304,558 " 

In September, '89 288,404 " 

In October, '89 767,397 " 

In November, '89 2,428,740 " 

In December, '89 3,937,850 " 8,528,579 " 



>r an increase in '91 crop for first six months 68,281 " 

BONDED STOCK OF '91 CROP. 

There remained in bond on November 30th of 

laid crop, say ..3,813,474 gals. 

» which we add the production for December 
ibovesliown 4,001,021 " 



7,814,495 gals, 
ind subtract the withdrawals for December, viz: 

' 2iid District 16,155 gals. 

5th " 126,695 " 

6th " 48,417 " 

7th " 8,515 " 

8th " 1,334 " 201,116 gals. 



saving in bond on December 31, '90 7,613,379 gals. 

Your obedient servants, 

E. H. Taylor Jr., & Sons, 

Frankfort, Ky. 



eOL. L EOS EH ON THE T-RADE. 



Colonel Leoser of BonforVi Cireular in a fatherly letter to the 
iitor of the Louisville Bulletin makes the following sage observa- 
ons on the wine and spirit trade: 

It is certainly the most manly, and probably the most hon- 
it, mercantile pursuit in which a man can be engaged. I would 
ither buy and sell wines and spirits than anything else. The 
msumption is mainly among men, and so the spirit of the trade 
masculine. Wines and spirits have brought more happiness 
ito the world than any other one of the instrumentalities with 
liich the good God has blessed us. Let us remember that we 
% in a certain way (I mean the wine and spirit trade) the mill- 
's of tliis good gift to men, and try so to manage our business 
(to make it productive of all the good of which it is capable. 



PLASTE-REB WI/NES. 



It is now an ascertained fact in the Gironde that lime in the 
vintage counteracts the fermentation and discolors the wine. 
The vat-full at the outset works with more impetuousity than the 
ordinary, but this admirable readiness is of short duration, and 
aft«r 48 to 72 hours it slackens all of a sudden, and ceases complete- 
ly before the normal period. 

This is sometimes nothing but a false start, for the first 
racking is not finished before the secondary fermentations enter 
into activity, and although the wine be well fined, racked, and 
so on, this must be done over and over again, and yet you do not 
attain and maintain that clearness which is especially sought after. 

The color follows an identical course to that of the fer- 
mentation—clear and brilliant during the two or three months 
immediately following the vintage, it gradually weakens up to the 
point of withdrawing from the wine another of its qualities. The 
action of the wine resembles that of wines made by the mixture 
of our wines with the bouschet hybrids. 

But while in the case of the wines in our Bordeaux climate, 
the color is in suspension, and not in solution in the liquid, 
it deposits itself in time; in the "plastered" or limed wines it is 
destroyed in the course of time, without doubt, by special oxyda- 
tion of the coloring matter; different phenomena cause the same 
result, which is worth no more in one case than in another. 1 
have heard it said that in vatting the bo%isehet separately, and 
mixing their wines with that of our vines, the loss of color of 
which I have just spoken was avoided. It is very possible, it 
would require several conclusive experiments to have it put beyond 
doubt. — La Petite Gironde, August 12, 1890. 



EVOLUTIO/N m SA/STA CRCJZ. 



In a letter supplemental to his interesting article whicli 
appears in the current issue of the Review, Dr. John A. Stewart, 
of Santa Cruz, has the following to say regarding the changes in 
viticulture that are taking place in his county: 

" The more recent coming to the front of the champagne and 
white Burgundy producing vines is patent, and whether they 
won't eventually turn aside the Eieslings and Cabernets, and win 
the day over them against the Missions, and all that poor lot, is 
quite on the boards. 

I may add that where 100 gallons of Cabernet were madd 
last year, 5000 must be made this, and where 200 gallons 
Sauvignon-Semillon were made last year, 6000 must be made this; 
and that three years hence these quantities wUl be respectively 
quadrupled, if not sextupled. 

Three years hence the quantities of fine Pinots for champagne 
and Montraehet will be distinctive items by all present appear- 
ances, and should the adaptation of Santa Cruz county for Pinots 
be fully verified, I would not dare say to what they might amount 
as there are inquiries now from London into the matter. 

I have begun to think we of California have gone too far in 
our fashion for Eieslings, Cabernets and Sauvignons, We went 
away too quickly from the Pinots, having plante<l them in our 
fat valleys and converted them into red wines. We will turn 
back, in my opinion, and the now neglected Pinots, especially the 
PLnot Gris which is a fair bearer with me, will advance to the 
front. Whj% the soil of California is, as a rule, suited to the 
Pinot family, and not to the Riesling, Cabernet or Sauvig* 
non. Out of all Santa Cruz county we have only 100 ^cres, a« I 
say in my paper, of pure Medoc soil, and a like proportion will 
hold I believe, for all California. Mumm said we had no cham- 
pagne soil; we have little else. 

OUn MEW D-RESS. 

The new plant from which the Pacific Wine and SPiRit 
Review is printed was furnished by the great printers' supply 
house of Tatum & Bowen, of this city. The tj'pe is of the latest 
designs and composition and is a credit to Messrs. TatUm & 
Bowen as well as the Review. 



20 



fyKBIfie WlfvJE /rfJD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



DISTILLEKS AND eO/NTHOLLEHS. 

From the h«Jid«y »<dition of MiilaV Crilrrio,, w<- tak.- tlu- 
IbUowinK lnt«Twtiiijt nkHihon of |ir»iiuiuut du«tiUen« ami con- 
trolkvw. 

/J^HK »i»iiun«« of 8. lievi & Dro. ww foiin.UNl in 1H41». 
jP ana in that i-x«.'ntlt><l i^-rioil thoy hnv.- riwn t<» a 
praminrat rank ainonK tlu' larm* »»»ii«ky lumw* of the ••cKintn-. 
•nd Ihxn thrir n*-knowl«l«.»d fliMUH-ial HtnuKtJi an«l tli.ir l.iKh 
ilMMliiilC. thi-y pumtim the grwtwt nii-awun- of «t.nfl»UMK-»' of tiu' 
genanl tr«d««. wJiich they un e*er rwuly to n-tiprot-aU* liy taking 
prominent an«l artiv«« i«rt in even- movenu'nt for t»n« t-onunon 
iatcn«t of the liquor tnwle. Tlu'y are hirp' tlistriljutorH of the 
DtadlUnft & CWttlc Fi-edinfc Co.. rf-diHtillont aiul blcmU'rH of fine 
»hiHki««. lar^p- handlen. of all kindn of K.-ntu.ky IwurlHUw and 
KMtern rjw. Tht-y liavf cmtrolh-il thf "T. W. SanuulH." Xt'lwm 
Coanty. aour ma«h. nine* 1887. and by their Hkiilful <li«trilnition 
Umj have »lr«dy con«i<lt«rably devatod th«' Htandiiig of the 
bnuid. In 1888 they mmle of thin popular brand '-'.(!(>8 bbls.; in 
"90, 2,400 bbb*. For tlie current Ht-aHou.dwirinK to hIiow by tlu'ir 
own action that the prtiduct of Kentueky whinkieH Hhould bo 
limited no an to prot««ft value** of the pHxlt* tlieir friends have 
bou{{ht and now own. they have reHolvwI to make l)ut 1,8<K) bbls.. 
which will be diirtributcd among the regular cuHtomen* of the 

brand. 

Thin houiM' ab*o makjt* in the Sixth Dintrict of Kentueky 
"Hhenandoah" pun- rje and •' .Salvator" liourlnHi, lH)th of which 
bruidit have been ijucw'«*ful!y t*old an<l diHtribut*-*! for the fwuit 
two yMTH, thrce-fourthB of the 'S'.M U'ing aln'a<ly withdrawn 
from bond. 

*f ^.\NPICGRIFT wa« ro-organize<l by the present firm in 1889, 
^/ rince which time they have In-eu nteadily and continuouHly 
operating, having manufactured and diKiMJWHl of Fall '89. and 
Hpring "Wi. 2,<K»<) l>l>li*. Thin wawon's crop of Full '90 and Spring 
•91 will amount to alnMit .5.(MX) bblt*.. all of which ha« been dis- 
pOMd of U) PenuHylvania jobbers, who are fully cognizant of the 
merita of the gtMtdM. "Vandegrift" in a high grade pure rye 
whii>ky. Hin«' the prewnt owners have atwumtKl control they 
have added new Ht<K'k jK-ns. a new (i.OOO bbl. warehouse and re- 
fitted the dintillerj- building throughout. The warehouses are all 
aU-ani-he«t«^l, and are loeute<l on the banks of the classic Mouon- 
galiela Kiver. with sliipping facilities unsur{>asse<l. 

JULIAS BIX)CK &HOX8 finn was first established by Mr. Elias 
Q^ IU<K-k in the year 1846. It grew and multipli(>d until the 
year 1870. when the pn*ent (-ombination consisting of Elias 
Block, Louis T. Bhx-k. Samuel lihx-k and f/lwunl J. Mack, was 
fw M i d, oouKtituting the firm of Elias Blo<-k & Co. Later Mr. J. 
E. Block. Jr., was admitte<i into the ]>artnership. In 1880 they 
purchased the ••OKI Darling" distillery, which was then run and 
operated by the original owner of the bnind. Andrew W. Darling, 
who eKtabliMlie<l the brand and distillery- in 18m). Elias Ijlock & 
Bonn have ojK'rat<-<l this plant sine*' 18K0 as the "Old Darling" 
difltiller}'. making the famous "Old Darling" whisky, which by 
re—on of comtenative mantigement and excellenoe of quality, 
a^nds to-day in the fr<mt ranks uf fine Kentucky wliiski«>s. 

In 1883 thoy eslabli(«he<l the '• Merchant ile Club Rye." and 
t"ie MUne oonacrvative c«iun<4- was ]>ursued r«>gHrding this brand, 
■O that it now occupies a foremost |K>siti(m in the ranks of Ken- 
todty rye*. 

The branch of their businem devoted to the manufacture of 
blended whlskiea, oordiala, fruit brandiiw, etc.. having been com- 
menoed in 184H, they have atMiuiretl in that long |K-ri(Ml a degre4> 
of perfection that has deaerveclly t-iinfemHl on thcni a natiimal 
reputaticm. and the stamp of Elias Hhx-k & S«ms, identifying the 
goods with tliat firm, is suflTicient to in»«un> at ontf the highest 
atanding and recognition aa tlie l>e««t that can l»o pHKluci-d. In 
addition to their owning the diMtilh'ries rcrirre<l to, they an* 
among the largest contn.llen. of ih<- ImwI »iiin<lanl brands, and 



this nn»k.^ their establishment so thoroughly con>p ete that .t 
eiv.-s th.n. unrival.sl facilities for supplying the wholesale trade 
with .very arti.U- r.-«iuired in the liquor line. Their production 
has always IKHU niarkwl by fortnight and conservatism, which 
thcv hnv.- n-solvc.! to continue in the best interests of those 
handling their brands. The large trade establishetl in the past 
fortv-four vears, and their well-n"<-ogiiize<l ample capital and the 
steadily growing demand would justify in producing a larger crop 
for th.' current season than in the past, yet in the interest of the 
entire trade they have concluded to curtail tlieir '91 crop very 

niateriallv. . 

Messrs. Elias Block & Sons, in expressing their views upon 
the prm-nt status of the market, state: ^'We believe the current 
cn)p of whiskies to b<> made in Kentucky will be greatly d«5cr.Mised 
bv reiison of the high price of grains, the stringency in the money 
niarket and the large pro<luction of '90s", This view may serAC 
as a key-note to the trade, and could emanate from no more 
authoritative source than Elias Block & Sons, 

*QHEINSTR0M BROS, with pride can point to the fact that 
/\^ they are the pioneers in their line viz: the manufacture of fruit 
brandies, and fine liiiuors of every description. They also do a 
verv- extensive trade in dry and sweet Ohio wines, from the Erie 
Islands direct, having a cotatrolliug interest in one of the lar-. 
wine estJiblishinents at Sandusky, O. They are manufactu. - 
also of champagne in the American and French stj-les. 

When the extent of the business is considered it may be a 
surprise to learrt that the firm started but fifteen years ago, 
during which time all this businose has been accomplished. It 
nHjuires a combination of two men, both perfect in their sphere, 
one for the office and the other for the manufacturing department, 
and in truth Abe, the elder brother, has never had a superior as 
an office manager, and of Ike the same may be said as a manu- 
facturer. They both grew np and attained the highest proficiency 
in their lines with one of the leading firms of the countrj-. The 
work devolving upon these gentlemen became so onerous and ex- 
tensive that they subsequently admitted their third brother 
Sigmuud, to the firm, to iaid them in the discharge of theii 
arduous duties. 

Soon after they had started they at once signally asserted 
themselves and have ever since maintained a commanding posi- 
tion. Their growth was so steady that at the end of their firel 
year in business they louud it necessary to look for largerfluarters, 
and they have gone on successively increasing their accomnuKla- 
tions until we find them now in their present extensive quiutcit 
at 54-56 East Third street. 

In order to bring the distillation of fine liquors and fruil 
brandies to the highest point of purity, and to be the equal of the 
imported article, the firm has made the new departure of dis" 
tilling directly from the raw material and pure fruit as is done bj 
representative houses in France. The method which they h«v« 
ever pursued is well explained in their recent holiday circular, 
from which we extract the following: 

" The line of jwlicy marked out at the very beginning of oui 
business career and rigidly adhere<l to since, has been to furnisli 
our patrons with what they want and in the most attractive and 
desirable shajH'. 

Our cardinal principle is "dispatch and ffeir dealing" witl 
all. 

And it is with a feeling of pride we say the public has fulij 
and geiiennisly resiH)iuUKl to such business methods. Ourpiesinl 
success has been (juite commensurate with our most sanguine 'v 
IKH-tatious." 

/N the pioneer days of distilling in Kentucky the little 
still houw in Daviess County, five miles west of Owensl" 
was built in 1855, where to-day stands the splendidly w|uii 
"Old W. S. Stone Distillery," now, as then, distilling Kentu( 1 
famous old-fashioned band made sour mash ^vbisky. 

In 187«> M. P. Mattingly, then "a youth, to fortune ami t< 



f;^eifH:i WIJSIE /cJSIP Sflt^lT f^EVIEW. 



2t 



fame unknown," became the proprietor of this distillery,, and 
with the energy, capacity, skill and honesty inseparable from the 
successful man of business, managed it so judiciously and admir- 
ably that the "Old W. S. Stone" brand has found its place in the 
front rank of the most popular of Kentucky whiskies, and is dis- 
tributed by the leading and largest wholesale dealers to a trade 
extending from ocean to ocean. 

In the spring of 1881 the "Daviess Co. Club" Distillery was 
built, one and one-half miles west of Owensboro, Ky., and is also 
owned by Mr. Mattingly. It is a sour mash distillery, and its 
product, differing in the water used and formula of grain from 
the "Old W. S. Stone" brand, is recognized as a beverage of the 
fiixest quality. 

The career of Mr. Mattingly as a distillery proprietor is 
marked by prudence and conservatism in the number of barrels 
annually produced at the distilleries, and with the single excep- 
tion of 1888, he has annually produced a crop to meet the wants 
of the patrons of his brands in the United States, but never for 
"export trade." 

The trade in general and the patrons in particular are familiar 
with the fact that quality and quantity of yield is the aim at 
these distilleries, and each brand synonymous for fine storage, 
cooperage, etc. 

The rewards of commercial honesty and integrity when 
united to produce skill and unselfish conservatism has been re- 
ceived and are being enjoyed by "Miles" Mattingly in an ample 
competency of means, the confidence of his trade and enviable 
fame. 

In the future, as in the past, the management of the distiller- 
ies and brands will be on the lines which have proven so profitable 
and satisfactory to patrons and proprietor. 

^7"^HE J. B. Wathen & Bro.'s brand of whisky has been on the 
^'^ market since 1875. From that year to 1880 it was made in 
Lebanon, Ky., and since the latter year it has been made at the 
present headquarters of the firm at Louisville. They first made 
"Kentucky Criterion" in the fall of 1886, during which season 
they made 6,500 barrels. In the season of spring '90 they made 
6,300 barrels, and also 7,500 barrels "Wathen." The demand 
for their "Wathen" and "Criterion" has increased so materially 
during the last three years that it is safe to say they could easily 
distribute each year some 7,500 barrels of each, but they intend 
to persue the same conservative course in the future as in the 
past, and will limit their output to 5,000 barrels "Wathen" and 
4,500 barrels "Criterion." At no time in the future will they 
make more whisky than they have a legitimate demand for. 
No brands have had to undergo a more crucial test at the time of 
the memorable depression of all whiskies than these, and none 
have emerged from the conflict more victorious. This is due to 
the close attention bestowed on their manufacture and to the in- 
domitable energy of Mr. J. B. Wathen in personally creating 
avenues of distribution among the leading merchants throughout 
the country. We can not forbear also to give due credit to their 
ofiice managment, which is marked by prompt attention to the 
wants of their customers. Their warehouses are unexcelled in 
the State, which is evidenced by iusurance being but eighty-five 
cents on the $100. No distiller enjoys to a higher degree the 
personal esteem of his customers and general popularity among 
the trade in a higher degree than Mr. J. B. Wathen. 



Eg-RAUD AMO/SG THE WI/NE ME/N. 



'U/N -RIVAL LED." 



The Pacific Wine and Spirit Review of San Francisco is 
unrivalled in its special field. It is a large and handsome semi- 
monthly publication, of which the wine and liquor interest has 
just cause to be prpud. It is much above the average of class 
publications in editorial ability and is conducted in a dignified, 
oaanner. The proprietors, R. M. Wood and Winfield Scott, are 
Did" and experienced newspaper men, who merit the patronage 
which has been so liberally bestowed on them. May their Review 
soatinue to prosper and to enrich them. — Fremio Republican, 



The French strangler Eyraud, who was recently guillotined 
in Paris, will be long remembered by many of the wine men and 
others in this State. He was not known as Eyraud here, but 
he cut a wide swath as a prominent wine merchant and distiller 
of Bordeaux. Although actually fleeing from justice, he prop ojed 
to establish extensive distilleries in this State for the purpose of 
making cognac, which ho declared could be produced as well in 
California as in Cognac. Whether or not he really intended to r 
go into business will never be known, but he went so far as to- j 
negotiate for the purchase of a distillery site and ordered the con- . 
struction of twelve stills at one of the copper works of this city/' 
The material was procured by the coppersmith but the stills w^ere 
not constructed. Eyraud also contrived to borrow considerable : 
money from some of the French wine makers and it is hardly • 
necessary to say that they still hold his notes for the same. 

One thing is certain and that is that the strangler was au 
expert in all things connected with the brandy business, and had 
he carried out his plans he would undoubtedly have done much 
to improve the reputation of California brandy. 

Captain Niebaum of the Inglenook vineyard, who received a 
visit from Eyraud, declares that he was the most remarkable 
"brandy sharp" he ever met. The strangler was an accurate 
judge of brandies, could immediately detect their good and bad 
qualities and describe them, and taking a half dozen samples of 
different ages and by the senses of taste and smell tell the age of 
each one. Captain Niebaum properly regarded Eyraud as a 
wonder in this respect and heartily regrets that the fellow was 
destined for the guillotine instead of the management of the still 
house at Inglenook. 

On the other hand there are several victims here who bemoan 
the fact that Eyraud and Gabrielle Bompard did not meet their 
final destiny before they reached California. 



OBITUAHy. 



On Wednesday January 28th, Joseph P. Schardin, of the 
firm of J. P Schardin & Co., this city passed over to the silent 
majority. Mr. Schardin, a pioneer of 1851, was born in tlie 
northern part of Germany in 1835, and at the age of three years 
came with his parents to this country and settled in the then 
almost unknown wilderness of Missouri, in the embryo city of 
St. Louis. He remained n that place, receiving such education 
as could be there afibrded, until the news of the discovery of 
gold in the new El Do-ado stimulated his young heart and he 
determined to join his "ortunes with the large army of fortune 
seekers who then thronged the plains and crowded the decks of 
steamers and sailing ves els to the golden shores of California. 
Instead, however, of crossing the plains he decided to go by sea, 
and in the early part of 1851 arrived in this city. Mr. Schardin 
immediately started for the mines, selecting Nevada county as 
his base of operations. After a more or less successful career in 
the mines he engaged in the teaming business between Sacra- 
mento and points in the interior, finally settling in North San , 
Juan, where he went into the wholesale and retail butcher busi- 
ness. Here he was successful in accumulating a large fortune,, 
which he invested in mining and water properties. By the de- 
cision of Judge Sawyer in the debris cases these properties de- 
teriorated in value, and hence Mr. Schardin determined to remove 
to this city. 

This he did, and associated himself with Frederick Loy in 
the wholesale wine and liquor business, which he conducted up 
to the time of his death. "Joe," as his friends loved to call him, 
was one of the most lovable and truest of men. No one ever . 
appealed to him in vain. He never lost a friend. He was the . 
embodiment of all that was good and true in liie, and goes to his ; 
long rest with the sincere respect of all who who ever knew him,, _ 



2Z 



f^eifie wij^E yvfjD sfif^iT f^eview.^ 



THE EXPECTED ATTACK. 

Wh«i III.- Sw.-.-t Win.- ImII whm ]m^'*\ at tlxc liwt h*.*.!..!. of 
CVilign<Mi wi. iMilin|«l.Ml itn Httiuk fn.in Ui.- f«-w HW«t wiiiu 
mmkm of cMilniJ X«» York. Ohio. Viiyiiiia inul MinwHiri. 111.. 
IMT nt.w on th.- Hialul.- IhwIu* w w> .•xa.-t in itn lauKUiij:.' that 
Mdtr m. i-»*il.l. rulinj: hy th- Tr.<«i«ur>- IV'partin.nt .-an i*|.inti* 
not prutlurwl from Ih.- k™!"' '"• «"«■*• f'"" f'TtirKiitiun without 
MiyaHnit oTthf tju. (}lu."«*«' ami <iiii.' Hiyptr an- al«> phi.f«l 
mllnly out of the qumtion for i4W«i>t«'nin>{. Tliat th«' t:u»t«ni 
wine BMikcn* to* uaeuKy an«l an- pn-jmrinj: t«. .1.. iMitth- \x >howii 
hy tiM following nrtlclt- takm fr..iii th.- Vinrymliti. |.\il.hHh.<l 
ni l»cn« Ynn. In thi« hmrt of the I.«ke Keuka n-gion in N. w 
York. lOrf irpn*«-ntinK the eiwteni wint- int»T»*t. 

• Tho« who havi> k<pt thenwlvw wfll infoniuMl on the wino 
makinK intownt* of our <-ouiitn. an> wrll iiwan- tliat throunh tin- 
nrUv« effort* of the wino niakcn* and manipulators <.f California, 
H i>rovirian wm hwerteil in thf Uiriff law. ik»««(1 at tli<- tirst 
i«<»Mon of the Flftv-flnrt Conpr.w. which whil.- greatly iKiufittiiiK 
the wine pro<lo«-ei^ of that Paoifio Slope State, in «-«l<ulat«<l t.) 
MTiooidv injure the Mtill wine niaken* of theejwt. inohuliiiK tho^i-, 
CHWCtal'lv of Sew York: and it ha** iHTome an iniiK)rtJUit question 
wUh the'wineraakcrwofthiKwttion of thin Htate. lu* towlutlier 
In nelfMlefeuw. thev oujcht to unite in favor of Hucli n»o<lifuation 
of the law ao will iH-rmit the uw of npirit.». ne<-eh«irily uwd in 
forti^nnjc winei*. up to a o«-rtain per j-ent. without lu-inR Kuhject 
to the internal tax n<»w impowHl on the name. 

" And it hftH l)een Hujot«i«t«Hl tbat in <'onne<'tion with the 
(Atrt to thm» help our home inten'Ktw. it nii>{ht 1m- well to come out 
in favor of « ••natural pun' wine law." (Uiinj; away entirely with 
the UM' of i.uj{an» of any kind in Mill wine makinj;. or any othtr 
ntaterinl. exi'«'pt jthiim-h. in the making; of >f«".ii>e wiin-n. with the 
prtiviiiion that npiritn may Ik- uw<I. fr»-«' of tax, to fortify, and 
nyrup to hiend into sweet wint-n. 

•• It is U'liev«-<l that with such a law. under the United 
St«t«'«< Internal Revenue I>«'|Mirtnient. our vincyani and wine 
intenwttt would enjoy |>ermanent pnwjMTity, and the fpn-nt 
luoount of ••stuff"' now'nmde. with not a particle of piiiK« jui(« 
in it. and eallwl an«l sold as ipni\n.' wine (prolwbly amounting to 
onf^halfof all the wine njade) would have to '•step down and 
«»ut" and give pla*-*- to honest made grai)e wines, while the 
fraudulent wine makers would have to purclias*' grain's and 
mipply the tnuh- with a genuine artich-. or abandon their swind- 
ling husin»'»*s. and give phwe to thos«' that will. 

" We an' quite sure that the larger wine (•om|)anies of Jjako 
Kcaka will heartily uniti' in some gi'neral movement to seouni 
th*" n-forms so gnmtly n<'<'<le<l for their own and the pul)li(! good; 
and, Bn an unconipmmising tlefender of pure gra|)e wines, and 
thp IntereHtu of thorn- in our grai>u growing n^on, who are 
dt-tH-r^ing of em'ouragement and proteetion in their efforta to 

firo<lu<v them, the Vlnryanilxl is n'ady to sei-ond, advfxrate, and, 
n all |KM«i)>le ways, aiil in bringing alxmt the very deuirablo 
remits no hitstily imtlini-<l in this article. 

This is just the kind of atUwk which we anticipated and just 
wbcre Kueh an attack was to l>e looktnl for. There itt in our 
opinion but one way to m(.>et it to the satisfaction of all concerned 
Wld it in a mode which c»n In- aihiptcil by the Commissioner of 
latemal Beveniie without in any manner invalidating the intent 
ftod purpoMH of the Swe4-t Wine law. 

To iHM-t till- di-iiriiid for sweetening material solely fn»m 
th«" graiM-. the <'<iiiiiiii~-i<iner •■am |ii'rmit the use either of <-oncen- 
tratvd must or of grapi- syrup. iMith of which are manufuctunnl 
in this State and can Im- phui-il on the market at a price which 
will p<*nnit their employment by the eastern manufactun-rs. 
Tbwe in nothing in thiiM- materials except pure grape pnxlucts. 

For fortiAcation of ttisti-m wines we s<-e no olista<-le in tho 
WftjT of permitting CMtem gniwers to with<lraw California brandy 
from bonil in the wan-houMt* in New York. Chicago and other 
pofaltB and using them for fortification wt occasion di-mands. 
Ewtcm grape brandies are out of the iiumtion for fortifiention, 
•• tlMgr not only ooat too much, but »n^ so harsh that tlu-y would 
hmwB to be rectifled boTore using. Tin' (|uantity ofetuttem bmndy 
that can bo used is sawll, as an examination of the statistics of 
the Internal Bevenue Bunwu wUI show. In the nseal year end- 
ing June 30, 1890, tho total Anurican production of grapo 



iced 



Lnindv wjis onlv a few th.-u-^ind g-.illcms above of what is pnxlu 
in Ciififornia The Calilornia prodm-tiim Wiis 1.07l',:iO« gnlloiiH 
•uid in.rt'.i.<<aincNew York with 7S.93.3 gallons, Ohio with 
oo-'lo galbmn. New M.-xi.o with 2.(K!'.t gallons and 1(543 gallons 
[n Virjcini >• There were no other Stati-s producing over 1000 
galliiiih. 

Th.r.- is soon to be a meeting; of a spwial committee of the 
Viti.ultunil Commissioners, at which the tinal re<-omiiiendation8 
will be made to the ("omnuKsioner of Internal Revenue on the 
projHiscd swct wine r.-gulations. This committee consisting of 
Mcssr:*. Dc Turk. West and Shorl>, is fully awaro of the difii<iilty 
which tin- eastern sww-t wine producers will have in complying 
with the law if it is strictly enfon-ed ae<-ording to the present 
rulings. It is lik(-ly that the committ.-e will ask that Commis- 
sioner Mason make theee conccstsions which will naturally place 
theeimtcrn pniducerson aplanc with tho.« of California, and 
still in no wise iini)i!ril the rcv.-nuw. 



THE ASSOCIATION'S /NEGLECT. 



The State Protective Association has let another session of 
the Ijegislature go by without attempting to secure the adoption 
of the much noe<led change in th? license laws. 

For the past few months the belief that the Association would 
do something to settle this vexed question, has l)een very general 
among the wholesale tra<le the members of which l>ear the brunt 
of the expense in supporting the oi-jjanization and who naturally 
expect some return for tlijjjr money. It wsis a«serte<l at one tiiii- 
that the Ass<K-iation had a measure drawn up and ready to intro- 
duce, but those in charge of the inatt4-r have allowed things to 
drift along until the si»ssion is uliout over and when a two-thirds 
vote is necessary for the intrcKluction of any new bill. 

We would respectfully inquire what the functions of the 
Assm-iation are. if not to look after the interests of the tra<le? 
The license question is l)eyon<l all others the most imiwrtant one 
with which the California trade has to deal. Here is Oakland 
with its high license, and its Prohibition element clamoring for 
more, or preferably the closing of all drinking places; Riverside 
with its 62,000 license and one saloon; and dozens of other places 
with almost prohibitive licenses. Plainly the only relief was in 
getting a State measure through, either for a gradwl or uniform 
license as deemed best. But the Association allows the oppor- 
tunity to slip by without so much as introducing a bill and 
ascertaining the feeling on the subject. Two years must now go 
by before there can be any change and by that time the situation 
is certain to Ijc much more strained. 

The only possible excuse for the present failure is that in 
case the Association asked for any legislation some ambitious 
legislator with a desire to attnw-t a sack to Ssieramento might 
have brought in a fine cinch bill. We do not want to be to criti- 
cal but we do not think that there is a single member in the 
present Legislature who has enough brpins to get »ip a really 
formidable bill which would attract a ssu-k of any dimensioiis 
The lM)ys have failed to do it yet and they have triinl it on tli<' 
gas c<»mpanies. the water companies, the street railroad an<l cal>l>' 
companies, the proiM)se<l electric railway c-ompanies. the insuraiK i 
coinimct and in a mild sort of a way against the Southern Pacific 
n)ad in the shape of a Re-assessment bill. This would have IxM-n 
the s«'ssion for work and success but the chance ha« been 
neglwte<l. 

We now ask the Association's leaders what they propo.se t.. 
do to get relief? Do they expect to fight every high licen 
|>ro|M)Hition sprung on them in every city, town and county? II 
they do they will Ih' kt-pt gloriously busy. 

Fairbanks' Standard Scales, Trucks, Etc. 

FAIRBANKS A, HUTCHINSON, 

310-318 MAUKbT .SruKhT, - - Sa.\ Fkaacihco, Cal 



f/reifie WIJME /cj^JD Sflf^lT F<.EVIEW. 



23 



CABE-R/NET AS A BLE/St) WITH 
ZI/NFA/NDEL. 



It is eight years ago since I was first struck by the effect of 
the Cabernet in blend with the Zinfandel. I had been searching 
for some fine wine and liad met witli indifferent success, tlirough 
my own fault I suppose, when I received a consignment of 
Noireau, including one bottle marked "Zinfandel Blend," from 
Mr. Gillet of Nevada City. I drank the Noireau, thinking 
nothing of the Zinfandel blend, because I had become rather 
dubious about Zinfandel owing to certain disappointments I had 
had in connection witli that name. The Noirean was very good, 
if not up to what I had been accustomed to in Europe though, 
because it was but two years old and having no more of 
it, and nothing better as I imagined, I essayed the blend. I was 
hardl V ever in my life as astonished as I was then. The Zinfandel 
blend was altogether another thiug from the Zinfandel I had been 
accustomed to, and enthusiastically calling to me a friend, the 
two of us tasted it, and sipped it, and sipped and tasted till 
there was nothing left of it, and the virtue of it is on our palates 
still. The blend was a ten per cent Cabernet Franc in a ninety 
per cent Zinfandel. 

When Mr. Gillet hit on the idea of blending his Zinfandel 
with Cabernet he must have offered an extra propitiatory sacrifice 
to the vine-crowned God of wine, and obtained in return one of 
his precious secrets, for the action of Cabernet on Zinfandel is 
like raising earth to the sky. The excessive if clean sharpness 
of the Zinfandel, like ones mouth were touched with the bite of 
bi-artrate of potash, retires from it, aiul softness with fullness 
steals into it. That tendency which the Zinfandel lias to thinness 
is toned up to towards fullness. The delicate lightness of the 
Zinfandel — that is of mountain Zinfandel — is not impaired, 
while its bouquet happily married to that of the Cabernet is 
chastened. 

There was a board of wine experts sitting in San Francisco 

not much over a year ago, and the question was put by a member: 

" What am I to do with Zinfandel; now you California 

fellows tell me, for I am from New York, and I happen to have 

a lot of Zinfandel and I don't like it." 

"Do you mean the vine or the wine?" said a Napa man, 
"If the former, root it up, and if the latter, throw it away." 

I thought it was not worth the knowing what a Napa man 
does not know. "But hold" I cried, "I have a tip worth two of 
that, blend your Zinfandel with Cabernet, of course 
provided your Zinfandel is Franc de Pied as a Frenchman 
' might say, and a product of the hillside." I was laughed at, 
when I asked in some astonishment "Has no one here tried 
Cabernet upon Zinfandel, if any one has not, why let him try and 
speak afterwards?" "I tell you," I added, "that the table wine 
of California and the vin ordinaire, aye vin superieure of the 
world is Zinfandel — mountain Zinfandel plus Caberuet." Who- 
ever at the board was convinced I had overvaulted myself, I was 
not, nor am I now, nor likely to be. 

The ten per cent blend of Cabernet to ninety of Zinfandel is 
naturally much behind that of twenty Cabernet to eighty Zinfandel, 
but I don't know but it is the most useful blend since you convert 
what is good into excellence by it at little cost, whereas if you 
carry the good beyond excellent and into my denomination of the 
fine by a twenty per cent Cabernet, look at the concomitant cost. 
I should say that for a vin ordinaire, by which I mean a wine 
unsurpassable for the strict daily use of mid-day and evening 
meals, the ten per cent Cabernet should not be exceeded, while 
for a vin superieure, by which I mean again a wine fit to be used 
at dessert on all except high days, and holidays, and grand enter- 
tainments, the twenty per cent Cabernet is hardly too nnich. 

I can't see why one should go above a twenty per cent 
Cabernet blend. Above that you begin to lose more than you 
gain. There is a balance in all blends and I think the balauce is 
lost at any figure above twenty. I may come to the twenty, but 



when I would surpass it, I feel my Cabernet is too precious to me 
and I stop. 

The open arms so to speak that the Zinfandel has for the 
Cabernet, and the perfect enthusiiism, if I may use the word, 
with which it gives and accepts from the Cabeniet, accepting 
even more than it gives, is a fretpient source of wonder to me. 
I do not know a more unwilfish wine than the Zinfandel, yet 
there are only two conditions in which I would put its nature on 
trial. I would not subject it to the Cabernet except when in the 
fermenting vat or within a month after the first racking from the 
vat. 

This is my manner of procedure: Five days before I vin- 
tage my Zinfandels, I calculate how much of them I am likely to 
have; proportionate to that, say in ten or twenty per cent pro- 
portion, I pick my Cabernets and set them to ferment. The five 
days over, my Zinfandels are in their vats, and the Cabernets 
proportioned to them are in tumultuous fermentation; then I 
pour the Cabernets in all their tumult into the Zinfandels, stir 
the two well up and leave them together. 

I see there are Gironde vignerons who now write to the 
Feuille Vinieole that the addition of the Cabernet while in a state 
of fermentation to the yet unfermenting Saint Macaire for instance, 
or Gros Mancin, gives to these second class vines the qualities of 
the first. Their theory is that every vine has its own particular 
micoderm, and that it is this particular micoderm which deter- 
mines the particular wine, and not the cepage, though the cepage 
is of no account, but of course it is a help. Hence if you start 
up the Cabernet micoderm in the Saint Macaire, or Gros Mancin, 
mass, and give that the sway before a Saint Macaire or Gros 
Mancin mic!)derm can get on its feet, the Cabernet intruder won't 
allow a Saint Macaire or Gros Mancin native to as much as 
move, and what ought to have been a Saiut Macaire or Gros 
Mancin wine, will be a Cabernet or thereabout. At any rate, 
not so prodigiously far from it. 

Whether or not Girondists are wild in their theory I have 
too high an opinion of their powers for self defence to attempt to 
defend them, but this I do asseverate, that Cabernet grapes 
mixed while fermenting with Zinfandel as I have told, does give 
the resultant wine a Cabernet cast; and that beyond what could 
be expected in my opinion from the proportion of Cabernet to 
Zinfandel. I think it might be expected that the Zinfandel 
would drown the Cabernet and not that the Cabernet would im- 
press so much of its own character on the Zinfandel. 

What affords me as good, if not even better success than 
adding Cabernet in fermentation to Zinfandel freshly crushed 
into the vat, is as follows: At my fii-st racking, which is in 
November, or about a month after the withdrawal of the wine 
from the vat, and just as soon as the Cabernet issues out of the 
puncheon it begins to lose its clearness, I stop the racking, and 
pour Zinfandel upon the residue. That is, I rack my Cabernet from 
any given puncheon down to the initial appearance of the lees, 
then I fill up the puncheon with clear Zinfandel, itself newly 
racked, bung, and leave things to themselves for a month or six 
weeks. By that time the Zinfandel has lost its objectionable 
sharpness, and its rather unnecessary thinness; it has become 
mellow or soft, taken on color and more body, and has begun to 
afford promise to seve. Now I rack this Zinfandel from the 
Cabernet lees, and after attending to it properly for a year or 
two, it is as good a wine at any rate as the Bordeaux merchants 
make out of good Roussillon and selections of Medoc, and which 
the not over rich but ambitious Frenchman places before his 
guests as "Chateau" this and "Chateau" the other. I have paid 
fifteen dollars a dozen, free on board at Bordeaux, for such 
"Chateau" and did not deem mj'self cheated. 

The immediate pouring of a lower wine upon the lees of a 
higher I have learned from French practice, and take no credit 
for it. 



•^»>Av ^ >2AuD*/»" 



Santa Cruz, Cal. 



24 



f^lfie Wlf^F. AJ^B SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



WIME A/SD WI/SE TASTIMG. FAVORABLE E/NGLISH CHITICISM. 



N>;m Yokk F.'limiiry M. IVH. 
hittor hifi/tf H-inr <i»t{ .Spirit lUriru^—lir.SH Slit: Will yon 
kimlly Ki«'<< m<' mihic mikp^'oiim iu> to thi< |ir<>|H-r iii<'tli<Mls of 
Uwtiiiie «im« mmI ju<l|Oit|: thfir iiM-rilH. 

A Sk.\K4-iikk For Tiutii. 

In n»|»ly •«» ••••' iil">vi' intiiiiry wo wmiUl olTi-r tlio follow iiijj 
MHIjiniliiiiiii I'tiiir till' Mint' to Im' tiixttsl into a v<M-y i*l«-iin iiixl 
traoafMUvat rryNtul ulinut, or l><>tt<*r into u <>li)inn<>ll*-<i mlvcr i-uit. 
Ihr |»«>li<«h«t| fiMvtit of wliM-h n'rtt"rt to |M»rfis-tii>n tho liKlit tlintnjjli 
tbr litpiul. 

A flmt invfHiiKalion with tlu> iifiw* (liM'ltMtw the Hnicll unit 
'•boui|Uft" |M<culiar to t-nrU wino. or (IcttH'tt* tin- pri'xt'nc*' <tf 
fiMvittn nintlcr. II KlMn<v with the t-yo in<lic«t4'n the ilcjn^t« of 
dMUiUncMt Mid trani«|Nirt>nfy. Then nlowly <|iiutr u inoiitlifiil. 
taking ran' to Ihonmphly nioixtcn nil jmrtK of tlit- tasting orpint^. 
After thin iMtiui* tin- in the lialiit of t'jfi-tinK it. tlioii^li tliiH in 
rathi>r «li(ninilt wJm'H tho wine is a g<HMl one. Tlicir ro »hoii for 
duing Ml in to Have tlieir ju(l)!tn(>nt from ht-ing inttucni-«Hi by the 
pmrerftil Miggtwtiuiut of their xtoniueh. At »ll eventH the wiue 
muMt lie kept for a little while in yonr mouth, the natural heat of 
wbieh (limntt-gnititi itx ciinHtiluent {Nirts and releasee it.s volatile 
ether*, no that each ner\-uui« agent in enahliMl tu <IutM-t tlie t^iMtc 
it in fitl*-*! fiir. The u|i|hi |.ai I <»f the tip of the tongue will 
ap|ire«-inte dryneiw or ^\^l■.■tll.-s. whilwt the glottis intiinatt-ly 
coaiiM*t<Hl with the Hmelling organs, will |H-n-eive "l>ou<|uet°' 
and fragranif. and not allow the pasMige «>f tlu- lt(|ui(l without 
diMXiVering iti* stuirness or aeidity if there an- huch in it. 

A had wiue luut a e<iin|MHiiul smell of methylat<-<l or burnt 
Kpirit: itM color ii« uucvrtain and muihly, what the French call 
furdhly lourkft: on the tongue it priMhieiii a repulsive impression 
of hani spirit or sugan'«l vineg-ar; it ciium-s the glottis to shrink 
back under the action of a<'ids, as if it liatl been bitten by a snake. 
But a good wine hai« always the [MH-uliar tiouquet and fi~ig- 
ranct* whieli (mmI in his kindness has imjiartctl to each sjx-cies of 
Krape. It is tnins|»an'nt. like crystal or ruby, its color varying 
frtMn pak> gretw to melte<l gold for the wliit*-. and from light roHu 
to dark pnrpio for the nsl. In the mouth it |)r(>duces an uni(|ue 
and agreaiible sensation, the white (lowing away without leaving 
any ntriking trHcex. like a br<Kiklet on an Ici'-ImhI. whilst the rtnl 
ha« to l4<ave a slight anertaste of a-itringcnc-y jiroduci-d by the 
tannin it <iintains. 

(Keours»' such summary indicsitions apply to all wines at 
large, wilh<iut any regani to the difl'erent kinds, the ]M-4-uliarities 
of which ninnot lie ex|in-M<e<i by our langimge. and have to lie 
learaod by c<im|iaris4iii and ex|ieriments. Should it hap|M>n that 
they are lieyond th«'*re»M-h of mime |H-ople. these latt«'r would not 
neraMuily U- deprive«l of the privili^e of enjoying the gcnl's 
bevrraftr; for they still have the|MisHibility of judging of wines by 
tbv i4{ift it prtMhices on them. 

Ifait in this cns4> you should <lrink a full glass of the li(|iud. 
If, after having done so. yon feel your stomach burning, your 
digmtion ini|M-4te<l. your head sleepy, your mind sluggisii as if 
bardmiil with an inm weight, do not us<- such wine, whatever 
might Im- its reputation, or the niimlN-r of awiirds it has re<-eived 
at exbibititins where it had toc<im|N-te only withsimiliarpHMlucts, 
anti under loo indulgent judgett. 

Hut if. on the ••ontrary, the wine caus<>s your digestive organs 
to fivl an ngn«-abb- hi-at, the dig<-«lion to In- lielpe<l. your mind 
to lie in full |MN<seMsion of all itsi-iipabililii-n, your soul generous and 
kindly tlis|M>M-<l tow anis yonr lin-tliren. then you have got the right 
Wirt of wine! Ilavea Isitth-of it on yonr table at evi-ry meal, drink 
it yourself to n-xton- your strength, and make certain of a sound 
b«*nlthy future in life: give it to your wife who. sharing vour 
hilmr and toil. Inis a full right to i"t. anil will s<N>n j.refer it" ex- 
clusively when she n-marks that freshness and gissl health 
rcpliU-e the iNde cheeks and nervousneiw imii><<| bv the heal of 
our climate and the n\mm> of stning t«>a; gi\ ii alsii t<i vour cbil- 
dn-n, who will grow up joyousand hejilthy. L.t vour .•xpericncc 
U> known among yinir neighlsin* who will lie |K'rsua<l< d anew ..f 
the ol.l truth taught by history and ex|H-ricn«-, Unit tnW WW,./,/,.., 
nnlioii* itrr tlir 1111114 i»tl>rr. 



\\r have r.'c.-ive<l the following from Cha«. F. Oldham, of 
(;ri<i»Mi. (HiUiain & <'o.. wine merchants. London: 
1 1 KwiKNT Rtkeet. Pai-l Mall, 8. W. 

Ijomk)N January 20, 1891. 

A;/,V«r I'arlfie Wine and Spirit /?fr,Vi,-— Sir: In your issue of 
the I.'.ih of .Sept«'nil>er la-st. you calle<l attention to some unfavor- 
able ccinmeiils on ("alifornia wines and brandies, mmle in an 
F.nglish paper. I'uder the.s<' circumstanceH I think it may inter- 
est you to s«>e the enclos«Hl w hich appeannl in the January iasue 
of the IIV/i.' rrarfr /^(-I'lVu-. I am. sir. Yours faithfully, 

Chas. F. Oldham. 

[Following is the <!omplimontary extract referred to by Mr. 
Oldham. — V.u. Rkvikw.] 

•• Distinct jjrogreHS wax inmle by the wines of California laat 
year. The j)roduccrs are evidently ao^iuiring greater skill in the 
"preparation of the wine, and a larg.' proportion of the consign- 
ntents to this market is now well suitinl to the English ta«te. 

In nsl and white wines alike improvement is noticeable, and 
ju<lging by some of the more favorable siimples we have tasted, 
w.' slumUi sjiy the growers in California are fully justifitnl iu look- 
ing for a considerable expansion of their trade with England. A 
good deal of the wine made is sent to the distillery, and the 
brandy produced from it has some of the highest qualities well 
d'vebiped. At present the brandy industry is quite iu its infancy, 
but we shall be surprised if it fails to exercise an appreciable 
influence upon European markets." 

IMP-ROVEME/NT I/N CALIFOR/NIA 
WI/NES. 



Within the the la«t eiglit or ten years there lias been a revo- 
lution in the character of California wines. Any one familiar 
with the output of (California vineyards of ten years ago would 
not recognize the wine now put on the market. Instead of a 
coarse, rough, fruity wine, we have now as smooth, pleasant a 
iK'venige as one would wish to drink. Most people ascribe this 
to the improvement that has fciken place in the character of the 
grapes, but as a matter of fact this has very little to do with it. 

The grapes of ten years ago were nearly as good as they are 
now, but few people knew how to treat them. When wine mak- 
ing first liecame an imiwrtant industry, the owners of vineyards 
went to F^urope for experts to superintend the manufacture of 
their wine. The result was disjistrous failure. Each manager tried 
to treat wine as he had been accustomed to at home, to press it 
in the same manner, and to keep it in tlie same kind of cellars, 
without nuiking any allowance whatever for difference of climate 
and difference of gra{>e. A crude, rough wine was the result. 
The vineyar*! owners were greatly discouraged, and the super- 
intendents went ba<'k to their native countrit» convince<l that there 
was no future for California wine. A few remaincHl and under- 
t<M)k to adapt their F]un)pean experience to changed conditions. 
FAperimenls wen> made. Where one nuKle of treatment failed, 
another was tried, and finally the secret of handling the differtMit 
kinils of California wine was discoverwl. To-day, not only is the 
home (Mmsumption largt\ but millions of giillous of claret are an- 
nually sent to France to In- re.shipped from that country with a 
French laln-l, and pronounced excellent. The grapes are about 
the sanu' as tlu'y were ten years ago, but inij)roved methods of 
of treating the Juice have revolutionized the California wiue in- 
dustry. — Amrrioni A)i<ilij*t. 

[The uImivc remarks re^irding the improvement in the 
qimlity of California wines are correct, but the statement that 
"millions of gallons of claret are annually shipped to France 
to Im- reshippe<l from that country under a F'rench lal)el", is the 
veriest rot. California wine dcM-s not need to go to I'>]ince to be 
nmske<l under a French label. That can 1h' and is accomplished 
in New York and Cliiiago mu<li to the detriment of the win« 
industry of the tsUitc— l',n. Hi- vii:w]. 



f/reifie WIJ^E /rj\ie) SflRIT REVIEW. 25 



THIS SDPJLOE I^ESEI^-V^EID IFOI?/ 

ARPAD HARASZTHV & CO. 

PRODUCERS OF 

CHAMPAGNE ECLIPSE, 



-AND DEALERS IN- 



(California 'J^mes and ^vandios. 

Proprietors of 

ORLEANS VINEYARD. 

530 Washington Street - - - - San Francisco, Cal 

S. LACHMAN & CO. 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN- 



(California l^inos and "^randioo. 



Old and Well Matured Wines a Specialty. 



LARGEST SHERRY PRODUCERS IN THE UNITED STATES, 

SAN FRANCISCO: NEW YORK: 

453-465 Brannan Street. "^l-^H-f-K^-I^J 22, 24, 26 Elm Street. 



This Space Reserved J^op 

J. GUNDLACH & CC, 

DEALERS IN 

Califot^nia Wines and Brandies. 

Cor. Second and Market Streets - - - San Francisco, Cal. 

PACIFIC Wll m SPIRIT REVIEW, 

The Only Wine and liiqaot^ Tt^ade Paper CJClest 

of Chicago. 

stjbsoi?.i:ptio:n" ss.oo i^eii^ i^:ej^t^ xi<r j^iD'VJL.i<r(o:E2. 



26 f^lfie WlfJE /r^JD SflF^IT I^EVIEW 

TRADE eiRCULA-RS. 



•_»tM»-.'»7.'» RiioAnwAY, ) 

Nkw York Jiiniiar> '-'H. IXJU. |" 
Ji,gf Sh^f—Wf U-ti to infonii you tlmt w.- liiivo lninHf«'m«<l 
«mr ro«ln i»fflcc l.i HI«k K. and (J.. Hn«.klvn Hri.lK«' An lu*. 
Spw York. Kntmiw- "ii WilliMiii. iiwr Fniiikfort Ktrfot. 
KuliciUnff ■ coiitimuuiw of jour fiivon*. w»« remain, 

Vourn viTj- truly, 

LoTin* Bkotiikio*. 

n<«Mo a»Wr«'»« lt»lt«»ni. 

Luythw HrothiTR, 

Bridge Arc'hw. 
IlHw<<<>n William and Ktm- Ktn>otji, New York. 



4-'> Hk-wkii ■'^THK^r^. \ 

New Y'ukk .lanunrj-, 1891. ) 

Sir: — Aa antioijiatwl by our rireulnr of Oetoln-r liwt, wo have 
now to inform you of tin- jrrmit fw-an-ity of roally fnu', dry 
i«|wrkliim wintw iii tli«> clianiiujcn*' dixtrirt, and iho high pricos* 
coatinually gaining in (-(tuM-^iuonro. 

A« other Hhi|t|M>n< have IntMi <«ompf'lle<l to_do, the proprietorw 
of the famouH hnind of '• PijM'r HeidHii«ck, See," are at last 
rehu-tantly fon-c*! to niiikc an advanci'. in order to keep up a 
re|Hitation for a xtandard of uni|nextional>le <|uality, Huch att haw 
bwa «\joyi«d by them alone for ovi^r a century^ 

A limite«l utoek will In* n'<'eiVMl by e;ieh »tcamer, which wo 
will he pieiiMHl to (lixtrilMite among (Uir eustomerH. a» far a8 it 
Knot, up to the end of next Man-h. Then our "long prices" will 
be inerwwwl $1.75 |M>r Imnket.and then'afl»'r may we r.-qiicst j'ou 
l« kindly fix your j«»l>l»ing rati'.-* at 9'2(>J>0 for cpiarts and $'2S.')() 
for pint*. 

Awaiting the pletmure of your commands, which sliall have 
our («rliet«t attentitm, we remain, Y'ours faitlifully, 

John Obhorn, Son & Co. 



8an Francim-o Febnmrj- 14. 1891. 
Drar Sir: — Owing to the warcity of fine wincH and the largo 
inrtMuie in the e<»*t ther.-of. MesHri* Vve Pommory Filw & C'o., are 
oltliged to advance the prici- of their champagne. We thereforo 
Uy to inform you, that from March Ist. our prices for Pommery 
& Oreno, "Htsr," will 1m- $.'{4.(M) for quart.s. $:<0.(M) for pints. 

The OMuU trade and t-anh din-ountH will Im> allowed to such 
of our ouMtomerH who will strictly adhere to above prices. 

Y'ours very truly. 

WiUJAM Woi.Fr& Co., 

Sole Pacific C^wst Agent8. 



ttear Sir: — We beg to draw your attention to the fact of our 
hHng tiie ownent and sole manufactun'rs of the original and 
genuine Prune Juice which we introduce<l to tho trade twentj'- 
ooe yeant ago. 

Tho article owing to it« great merit waa from the finrt an 
immenw xm^wHa — mt much so that now numerous iM-opli- who 
know nothing BM to its com|Minent parts or the process of its 
Wniilhcture, try to wll all sorts of nauseous sweet Htofis, which 
they name hk nearly like the genuine as ]M>ssible. making (as is 
alwuya neeeiwnr)- in selling imitation gcMsIs) most untruthful 
■tatMuents in order to efKN-t sales. Kvery order given to these 
people in taken on the strength of the reputation of our gocsls. 
PuroluMeni who cannot Is- deccivetl when they buy win(w an<l 
liqoon, of which theyran judge by the taste. onen make mistakw 
In porcfaiiMing them- Hcw<nlle«i prune juices, they iK'ing. as a nile, 
nothing more than tincturvH of fhiit with the greater portions 
f(lnooM>. TImm articles which vfftt-X nothing mon* than sweeten- 
ing with an immenae re<luction in proof, somvtimeti absolutely 
apoil tho liquors in which they arc naed. 

The original an<l gennlne Pnin.' Jnic*- eflre<fually removes 
tho smell «,f new li,|u..rH. and pnHl.i.-ea a delicious flavor as it 
exist*, in the tini^t and old.*t whiskioa and brandies, while the 



<Mist. taking (liUcnnce of loss in proof into account, renders it 
n>ally c-Iichiht than <'ommon synip. 

\Ve shall Ih- most happy at any time to mipply sample for 
<-ompariH<in prepaid! feeling assiinnl that on examimition you will 
tiiul the (i.iiuiii.- Prune .Juice not <mly viu<tly superior, but that 
it will even cwt less than its so-callwl cheap imitations. 

\\\- shall give you a special discount when you order a 

(plant it V. 

Awaiting your onleiw which shall have our liest care and 
nttciitioi). wc are. Yours very truly, 

New York Kcbruar}' 20, 1 891. Nicholas Rath & Co. 

/SEW gO-RK'S PUK E WIME LAW. 

The New York statue prohibiting the manufacture and 
Side of adulteniti'd wine defines pure wine as the ferment<!d juice 
ofundrie<l grain's, or other undried fruits; provided, however, 
that tiKMiddit ion of pure sugar to perfect the wine, or the ad- 
dition of pure di.stilled si>irits to preserve it, not to exceed eight 
per cenliim of its volume, or the using of the necessary things to 
clarify and fine the wine, which are not injurious to health, shall 
not Ih> construe<l as a<lulterations; but such pure wine shall con- 
tain at lca.«t seventy-live jkt centum of pure gnii)e or other 
undried fruit juiw. Manufacturing for sale or selling impure 
and adulterated wine is made a misdemeanor, punishable 
by a fine of ?200 to $1,000, or by imprisonment from six 
months to a year, or both. The offender is also liable 
to a penalty of one dollar, for each gallon manufactured, 
sold or ofTerecl for sale, and the wine is dec-lared a 
public nuisance and forfeit«Hl to the State. Any wine contjvining 
iHJtween fifty and seventy-five per cent of pure grape or other 
undried fruit juices, and Ix-ing othenvise pure, is to l)e known as 
"half wine," and the words "half wine" mu8tl>e branded on every 
package. Wine containing less than fifty per cent of pure gra{K> 
or other undried fruit juice, and otherwise pure, is to be known 
as "ma<le wine" and so labeled. To sell any "half wine" or 
"made wine" without the proj)er label or brand, is a misdemeanor, 
punishable by a fine of 8200 to 81,0(K), or imprisoiunent for three 
months to a j'ear, or both. The law would be very benefical if 
it were enforced. To enforce it is another matter. 



EDITOR 



WASHBUR/NE 
SITUATIO/S. 



ON THE 



The wine merchants, or rather makers have during the past 
year, done more to elevate the quality of wines prtMluced in Cali- 
fornia than during any preceding period. A large part of the 
low grade wines have been run into brandy, so that everything 
offered of this year's product has boon first-class and sound. The 
large increase in the consumption of wines has been something 
phenomenal. In 1888, two years ago, New York reoeive<l 2.800 ,- 
0<K) gallons, while this year the receipts at New York show 
3,(M)<),000, an increase of almost 800,000 gallons. The increasetl 
demand for California brandy in the Ka.st has also shown a very 
large increase, In 1888 New Y'ork receivcHl 3;i,()00 gallons, while 
in the year 1890 receipts wore 230,000, an increase of almost 
2(K),000 gallons. If this increase, or anything api)roaching it. is 
kept up for the next few years to come, the wine interest of Cal- 
ifornia will lx> the largest sectional industry in the known world, 
— Antitial number IjOxiixviUe Btdletin. 



These goods, which we are si'lling largely to wine and cliam- 
]>agne manufacturers througlunit the country, are perfectly tree 
fV«mi the smallest sp«><-k of dirt or dust, and are l)eautifiilly trans- 
parent. They are not like tho sugary stuff sometimes sold as 
ro<>k candy. 

In ten Imrrel lots, we sell the crj-stals at a slight a<lvance on 
the cost of n-fined sugar. Samples on application. 

10 Hudson Str««t - . .... i^,^ York 



f;<^eifl(2 WIJVJE /cJsID Sfll^lT [REVIEW. 



27 




R.MOHAR0M,Pre5. 

Owensboro.Kt 



We hace spared neither effort nor expense to make 
"GLEN MORE" the finest early maturing Sour-Masb 
Whiskey ecer produced in Kentucky and the flattering recog- 
nition extended to that brand by the trade is proof enough 
to us that our efforts hace been crotcned with entire success. 
GLENMORE DiSTILLING CO. 



R./V\ONAR<>M^ 

0wen5boro,Ky, 

^ Our Cooperage is our oWr\ irvarvufacture. 
OUTS AND PROOF GUHRHNT6eD'==s 

Qoods delivered F.O. B. either Boat or Gars. 



28 



J^lflC WI|JE /r J^B Sflf^lT f^EVlEW. 






CHAS. MEINECKE & CO., 

314 Sacramento Street, _j San Francisco, Cal 

- »Oir AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR -:^ -" -^ 



I 'Mrta * OaMwrnan. 
I 'afkny * Co., 



( T mn p ipi*. 

I TfaMfard ProprMon' ro...BrmiMilc«. 
BoaMtaM A Co.. Mmmgm...Coga»e. 

J i ■«4(r*l0aa.lteklMUai 8wui OIn. 

I « I N.4H, WnMiton IAIN. 

OMMCoek UMl DoaUc KaKir Olm. 

B».>nl* Km. UMMlaa„ Ja«alM Baaw. F.tr. 

i«to KaMMkr, Ulajr Reotdi Whbkj. 

Lacsv* 41 Oa.. OmUl . Orowa Blu rriai. 



Doff (Ionian .t Co., Port flt. M»ry'(i Fine Hhorrlcc. 

Ijm^tc a Co.. Berllla Qn*eii Ollvei.. 

D. M. rMWrlMenl. Jr. * Co., 0|iarto Fine Port*. 

Boncoro*. Mul kr A B«cot , T>rr»t;onii Ports. 

A.deLu»*fil»,B<«nri..Finf('liirfU,«»ntern<!»,011veOil. 

O. M*re.T A I.lKrr-H<-lair. .\ult» BurKOndles. 

O. M. P»l»lm»nn Holm, Mainz Hock Wine«. 

S. hullit A W»Bner. Fraiikrurt-o.-lhe-lt' Hock Wine*. 

Ilaii'amann Junr, Tnilien Monel wine*. 

«Jelir. Maebiill, Mnnirli Kinioliw«»»er. 



Oenoveva Natural Hparkliuji; Mineral Water 

Royal ProMlan 8prlngi> Selu-ie Water. 

Kakoozy Bitter Water Co., Badaprat. Mineral Water. 

Moore i6 Kinnott, Philadelphia Whii>kieB, 

A. Cbcvallier-.\ppert Paris Wine Finlnj^, 

A. Boake Kolierts & Co., Lundou Wine FininiE^. 

J. J. W. Petem. Hambnr); Cherry Cordial. 

Rtandard Mineral Water Co., Llverpc.ol . . . Ginger Ale 
Prune Juice Extract. Batavia Arrack. 

81. Croix Rum. M«dford Rum, Etc., Etc 








SWAN Gl N 



Boord's Old Tom Gin. 



TRIPLE FLAVOR GIN. 



SANOCMAN, BUCK A. CO. 



H. CUVILLIER & KKEKia) 



SANDEMAN &. CO. 
OPOfrro. 








Bordeaux 






^^^^Di-E^^^ 



'■**»ir, Gii.a.<^^ 



*tf^ 



1^^ 




^ 




^, 



orciea.tJt*" 



^^U^c rCot« <i'<^-^ 



W. B. CHAPMAN, 

123 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



f/ceifie WIJME /cJMD Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



29 



Qkica^o ^Q'partment, 



Chicago, February 18, 1891. 
A calm always follows activity in any line of trade or busi- 
ness, and the wine and liquor interest is no exception to the rule. 
During the holidays the trade was unusually active hero in 
Chicago especially in tlie line of California wines. During the 
run of the exposition last fall Mr. H. W. Crabb did a good lot of 
very profitable advei-tisiug for his business by having a fountain 
of pure wine playing in the sunlight and glinting 'neath the 
shafts of the electric arcs. 

But the clouds are lightening up a little of late, and the ten- 
dency of tlie market is toward better feeling and more activity. 
Restauranters and caterers are beginning to make active pro- 
visions for the coming summer's trade, which gives promise of 
being the best ever known in the city, owing to the fact that the 
town is being filled full to the brim, and even to running over, 
with strangere who have been attracted hither by scheme's con- 
nected with the World's Fair. It is probable that within the 
next two weeks most of tliat stock will be ordered, as the 
spring now gives promise of being very forward, and they must 
needs keep in advance. 

The retail trade has been absolutely quiet, and will remain 
so for the next two weeks, or, more likely, a month. 

There is a growing disposition on the part of social clubs, 
for, which, by the way, Chicago is quite noted, to use California 
wines exclusively on their tables and sideboards. There are 
many strong advocates of such a course among their membership. 
This is simply the result of the fact that many of Chicago's club 
men are wealthy, and use their money often for purposes of 
traveling. In their journeyings they have not slighted the 
wonderland by the sun-set sea, yclept California, and while there 
tliey drank of the smiling juice of her purple vintage, and lost 
their hearts to the blushing wine. 

That any objection to California wine is more prejudice than 
fact was amply demonstrated not long since in one of our leading 
clubs. The caterer was fully satisfied that California wines were 
the equal, if not superior, to anji;hing that was in the house in 
the way of an imported article, but could not induce some of the 
club members to yield the point to him. One day a party of 
three of the strongest opponents to California wines chanced to 
sit at the same table and the wiley caterer saw his opportunity. 

The gentlemen ordered Pont e Canet, and the caterer ve^y 
dextrously served them with some California Cabernet Sauvignon. 
"When they had finished the wine they were asked how they 
liked it, and replied that it was the best Ponte Canet they had 
ever seen, going even so far as to assert tliat all others they had 
drank must have been adulterated. When the caterer, midst an 
outburst of merriment, told them what he had done, their as- 
tonishment knew no bounds, and from that day on California 
wines had a trio of very strong advocates upon all occasions. 

One very undesirable feature of the California wine trade in 
the city of Chicago, is the method pursued by some firms. They 
announce to the world that they are the owners of certain vine- 
yards in California, and that the stuff they have for sale is direct 
fiom their own cellers. I have in mind a case that meets my 
eye almost daily, of a firm advertising its wines as being from a 
certain vineyard, when I happen to know that there is positively 
no such vineyard in existence, and never was. If there had been 
it would have been destroyed by the phylloxera years ago, as 
were all the vines within miles of the place. No good wine ever 
came from the sections of the State where it is claimed that 
most of their cellars are located, and even those said to belong to 
it in Napa county were seldom ever mentioned in my hearing 
during a residence of many years in the county and almost con- 
tinual association with wine men, L. L. Palmeu, 

February 18, 1891. 



U/NFAI-R e'RiTieis/v\. 



In a recent number of Belford's Magazine, Cliampion Bissell 
under the head of "The Truth About Wines" has considerable 
to say regarding the products of the wines of California- While 
some of his remarks about our wines are correct and interesting, 
lie makes some statements regarding the qualities of our wines 
that probably would not have been matle had Mr. Bissell been 
better posted on the subject he treats. He passes by the merits 
of our best wines with the offTiand remark thafsome day" "they 
will be called for at high-class restaurants by connoisseurs and 
will deserve to be". The gentleman is very kind in thus holding 
out a little encouragement to California wine men by telling them 
that their wine will be sold in first-class eating houses. It would 
presumably hardly be proper for a connoisseur such as Mr. Biasell, 
to acknowledge that our wines have these merits at the present 
time and that they are justly entitled to admission in the best 
restaurants, but that they are kept out by the silly prejudice of 
fishy brained Americans who see no good in anything that does 
not appear on its face to be foreign. 

If we are to believe Mr. BisseU, we are not "in it" when it 
comes to the question of champagne making. In fact he has not 
one word of praise for the success that has been attained in this 
branch of the industry. We venture to suggest that Mr. Bissell 
is not and does not deserve to be aware of the fact that California 
champagne, for which he has only a sneer has heretofore success- 
fully masqueraded among connoisseurs, such as Mr. Bissell, in 
the guise of the imported article, and at the same time received 
unstinted praise for its excellence. At least these are facts which 
the gentleman's position would not permit him to comment upon. 

For our sweet wines Mr. Bissell has a kind word and he 
really "does himself proud" when he refers to the brandies of this 
State in the following language: 

"Now comes California with a pure, sound brandy, made 
from distilled wine and grape pomace, as it ought to be; and we 
buy it at an average price by the barrel of two dollars a gallon; 
so that the retailer can furnish it at a dollar a bottle, and can 
afford to furnish it in purity. When the brandy has acquired 
age, we can snap our finger at the Cognac district of France and 
its fraudulent efforts to furnish to the world more brandy that 
it can honestly come by." 

Mr. Bissell, judging from his foregoing remarks, is better ac- 
quainted with California brandies than with her wines. We 
know and he ought to have known before he attempted to instruct 
the public on the subject that in point of excellence the best wines 
of California are equal to her best brandy, and that whatever 
praise is due to one is also due to the other. 

Taking all these facts into consideration Mr.Bissell's criticism 
may fairly be regarded as having been written in an unfriendly 
spirit. 



eO/NeE-R/NI/NG -DISTILLATIO/S. 



A new work on distillation entitled "Die Cognac und Wein- 
spirit Fabrikation," by Antonio del Piaz has just been published 
by A. Hartleben who has houses in Vienna, Pesth and Leipsic. 
The work is one of 152 pages and is profusely illustrated with 
thirty-seven cuts. While there is little that is new in the book it 
tells very well what is known of distillation and distillery appar- 
atus up to the present time, and all the processes are faithftilly 
described. The book is one that should be read and possessed by 
brandy distillers. 



DON'T BUY A PIANO, ORGAN OR ANY OTHER MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 
without first wiitiiif; to or visitiiif; Koliler «S: Cliace, KMl Market Street, San 
Francisco, the larjjest and oldest dealers in tliis line on the coast. They liavc all 
grades of iiiBtrumeiitf and sell very close for cash or on Installments. This is an 
old reliable firm that has a gilt edge reputation made by boueet dealing, and always 
guaranteeing satisfaction. 



30 



JVWBIfie WI^IE /c|MD SflR.iT f^EVIEW 




PartiMratitM- 
tl MfHuiif. wl<MM. CMlIumI. Cal.. O 

B, Kkab A r<> . Ml-on. Hratllr, WB>b., 
» fi «»0»J bjt lUab A RnuMll. 

A. VMiha*«i A To , ■ iH^lnalr llaBon, 
iha rmartK«. Cat., Wallw Ptaktau- 



M DawwAOO., Mlooa. ■■■ rraartcrA. 

QO.. toMltrfd: ■. Oiaao eoallanc*. 
O. Bakar * Oo., taioaa, fyoktam P«ll>, 

WmIl. »iji»i4:C. A. lf)rar«Nillnani. 
Wa« * ae&idWfc, aakion. tan DIrro. Cal., 

«^ * RpaalMr, Miocra. nr-Klnm.Wwh., 
illMiiliall JU Mmm nnillntm. 

piiiilMrl * Moaacbam mUuoii. Frwnu, 
OM^ ■ 



U M. BoacbMi. Mkloon, PortUad, Or., at 

lacMd. 
CH Biaam. —Utan. Del Mar. Cal., at- 



P. Hatdcr, •aloon, Taronta, Waah., al- 

UdMd. 
■eXaaBi * Ltaivr. bold. Haa FraorUm, 

Cal., altacbcd. 
Badaoa * Hooker, aaloon. Lot Aagalaa, 

Cal^ allaclMd. 
Oao. Ohanaahlw, aalooo, Wockton, Cal.. 

la laaolircfirjr. 
Jofca Cart, aakiaa. etr., Portland, Or., at- 



R. T. HUoclnbiilbam, ll<|Oon, Pmno, 
Cal., Id lufculirnrjr. 

Jalbi* BUII. •alixiD, Han Pedro, Cal., at- 
tar brd VIM I. 

Martlnrx A Mturllte, aaloon, Fre»no, Cal., 
lalaaolmmcT. 

J. B. Hoiaa, MtooB, Aaiwa, Colo., at- 



B. Hapm 



iaa. HatM, aalooii. Ban FranclM-o. Cal.. 

A BcnitCB, rotaurant, Denver, 

Colo., allarbcd. 
O. W. Plaator, Mluon, Hpriiisfield, Or., 



l8«l£Oirt. 



DaKKill. 



I.. J 



Cordlnrr A Falronrr, •»1.h>ii. 

Cat . !•■ A Kalronvr 
M II lliirttr. ■«l<Min. FolMtm, Cal. 

r. Hurir. 
Julr IliMM-.iT. iHiltl, Hwerl Home, Or 
Trrliitirr A lirunrtiiaiiii, iuil<u>n. lUtl'iitlti, 

Cal 
Joba Kranrtla. >al<Hin, Haiiltafarl. <'i>l.. I> 

N'oarllA Fram-lla. 
H. V, Mrver. utix-n. K«iil* lUrliarn, C»', 
V. C. Mc'IKtnaM. uIimiii. llutiy. W»li., I. 

C It. l'<im«i>K-l(. 
I. Janir*<>ii. i<-»laurant. S|hikKiH' Fitllf*. 

Waab . bill of Mir to O. .S. Ithixlra 
Ktruxxl A Mom I. mI<><iii, H.K-orrt». X. M.. 

to Hatexna A I>rl Coota. 
Jolinaun A l|i>iiM>r. »liHin, Tarcmia. 

Waah.. to U. M HniKaii. 
W. II (iaM. bxtrl, lliinu. Or., I<> T 

Olaniil. 
W. Ilubjr, •aliMin. .\lbu<|uer<|uc, N. M., I<i 

Itaniliiiil A (ilonii. 
J. Davi*. naliHiu, It«d I,<nIi;c Miint., to F. 

Uellrr. 
MIIt a Wall, ubiun. Hed lAiigt, Mont. 
H. Forlroan, aaloon. Harramenlo, Cal. 



"T.: ' - - 


- - 


Krli'-r ^-•■'l > 1 ■ ■ >• l""""'a'<" 


mI», N'V. 
Il.,u.ii>. Sac- 




I.ln.clii. Cal. 


!• \\M' T -i,i.-:. -Ml Krnii' 


i«u, Cal. 


Ooceaaad. 





Out of Bualnaas. 

P. gulnlaiid, nalonn. Baker City, Or. 
Eran* A lllddell, uluon. Haker City, Or. 
Kweetland A Orton, Hloon, Buzetnan. 

Munt. 
Htone A Quick, aaloon, Handanre, Wyo. 
B. A. OrUwold, taloon, Azusa, Cal. 



L. n. Btatlwln. aaloon, PortUnd, Or. 

altaifcuil 
lata * Walklna, aaloon, Seattle, Waab., 

allarlM4. 
B. K. Malalarta * Co., rcataarant, Han 

Piaarlara, Cal., attached. 
Joa. Brkwab, aaloon, DenTcr, Colo., at- 



S.W.Crai(aa. aalooa, Hao DkKo, CaL, 
atlarlwd. 



Oamaga by Fira. 

H. Hanaon, oaloon, San Franclaco, Cal., 

damaKed. 
J. II. Hturia, taloon. Han Franc-isco, Cal., 

damaged. 
Murrlx Wolf A Co., ralouu, etc., Creaccnl 

City. Cal. 
lUibert KoiilKcr, brewer, Ketclium. Idah>i. 
C. C. JoliiiKon, botel. Fort lirafci;, Cal., 

damaited. 
fl. A. Dyson, hotel, Clayton, N. M. 
E. Bmwn, A Co., salnou. New Weetmin- 

inter, B. C. 
J. Jullllard, winery, H«ba»topol, Cal. 

Spadal Inquiriaa Adviaabla. 



Geo. W. Obealey A Co., wbolecale liquors, 

Hacraniento, Cal. 
Joseph Baumelster, saloon, Montesano, 

Wa.b. 
If W. Dillon, saloon Rawlins. Wyo. 
Bocca Bros., restaurant San Francisco, 

Cal. 
F. Mandlebaum A Sons, wholesale llqoore, 

Han Francisco, Cal. 
E. Baldwin, saloon. Tmckee. Cal. 



i:,| NmU. ni»iir<i. >-i>l"«'ii, l.cadvlllc, Colo. 
K w liii. rinsii. wlii'Ui-ale Ihiuoni, Han 

r. MU'r-l!'!... Ci'l. 
Will .Miii'i.'H'vr. (.rliMin, Bock Springs, 

Wvo. 
> i: Kitui' iisloi'ii, SniKly. I'lali. 
p. Siilmt, i-nlooll, ItaKlalld, Cul. 

Oeada and Tranafara. 

DtiL'an A Miirtlier, saloon, Han Francisco, 

Cal.. Duirsii leccivcd deed $10. 
\ H. I.aii. >-al<">ii. .San Francisco, Cal.. 
bill of Kale f-VM. 

C Itit'liardKoii. italiKin, Lo« Angeles, Cal., 
rc<i-iv<Ml deed •2500. 

R.O. Ha««». aal»)on. Tacoma, Wash., bll' 
of flak' fl. 

\V. I'. Fine. Halooii, Petaliima, Cal., con- 
veyed realty W. 

KubU. St-hwarke A Co., wholesale ll<|uors 
Kan Fraiiclm-o. Cal., Wm. Schwarkt 
conveyed realty »10. 

John F. Plumel. saloon. San Francis* o, 
Cal.. conveyed realty $10. 

J H Scliade, saloon. Portland. Or., con 
veyed realty »a)00. 

C. A. Slack, saloon, etc., Tracy, Cal.. re- 
ceived deed $325. 

H D. Stevenson, saloon, Pueblo Cal., 
bin of gale 13000 

Henry Varrath. saloon, etc.. San Fran- 
cisco. Cal.. conveyed realty $10. 

Lilientbal & Co.. wliolesale li(|Uoni. Han 
Francisco. (;al.. E. K. Lilientbal. con- 
veyed lealty »:«.0OO. 

S. W. Cralitue. salo<in. San Diego, Cal., 
conveyed really $800. 

J. F. Conrad saloon. San Jose, Cal., con- 
veyed realty lo wife. 

8. De kcyer. >>aloon, Portland. Or., bill of 
sale $:>T5. 

M. Tennchan. saloon. San FranclBco, Cal., 
(fave bill of sale $750. 

K. Choate, saloon. San Bernardino, Cal., 
conveyed realty $2000. 

Livlntrston A Co.. wholesale liquors. San 
Francisco. Cal.. A. P. Williams, con- 
veyed realty $10. 

Franz Felder. saloon, Portland, Or., re- 
ceived deed $300 

Geo. W. Morrow, hotel, Hcio, Or., con- 
veyed realty $550. 

W. W. Bowers, hotel. San Diego, Cal., 
conveyed realty $8500. 

John Atcheson. saloon, etc.. Berkeley, 
Cal.. received deed $10. 

Watson A Mitchell, saloon. San Francisco. 
Cal.. Walter Watson received deed $10. 

B. Dreyfus A ('o., wholesale wlnea, San 



Franclaco, CaL. E. L. Goldatein con 

veyed realty $10. 
C C Churchill, hotel, Sau Diego, Cal. 

Iilll of sale $2025. 
M A AidriilKe. hotel. East Portland, Or. 

bill of sale $500. 
J. Mailiii-soii, botel, Portland, Or., con 

veyed realty $275. 
Dtederick Meyer, saloon. Kan Franclaco 

Cal.. conveyed realty $2200. 
A. A L. Carson, hotel, Kent, Wash., bll 

of sale $500. 
J B llaub A Co., bottlers, Tacoma 

Wasii.. bill of sale$ll.V). 
Lllienfbal A Co., wholesale liquors, Kai 

Francisco. Cal.. J. Leo. Llllentha 

conveyed realty $10. 
J. W. Carr, hotel, Rico, Colo., trust dee< 

$15,054. 
A Pink & Co.. saloon. Seattle, W^asb 

bill of sale $1500. 
J. Labal, saloon. Han Francisco, Cal. 

conveyed realty fjift. 
H. Nakacnchi. restaurant, Kealtle, Wash. 

bill of sale $150. 
Cbas. Juritens. saloon, etc., Oakland, Cal. 

received deed $6250. 



Realty Mortgagea. 



F. Zlninierinan, wholesale liquors, i'orl 

land, Or., $137.5. 
f. Brunjes, hotel. Gladstone, Cal., $1750 
Jbas. F. Holton, saloon, Olvmpla, Waab. 

$2269. 
Watson A Mitchell, saloon, San Francisco 

Cal., $1200. 
iiimnierman A Mcver. wholesale liquors 

East Portland, Wash.. H. Meyer $1.>(10 
O L Mesnager. wholesale liquors, Loi 

AiiKelcs, Cal., $3740. 
T. Hurley, hotel, Oakland. Cal., $500. 
Itamona Winery, lianiona. Cal., $4000. 
B 1(. Everett, saloon, Tacoma, Waab. 

$8574. 
M. Dolan, i-aloon, Llvermore, Cal., $112. 
Chas. Jurgcus, saloon, Oakland, Cal. 

$40fO. 
Charles Kreuckel, saloon, San Francisco 

Cal.. $.'>00. 



Chattel Mortgages. 



J. Bebnke, saloon, saloon, Portland, Or. 

$200. 
R. A. Cbisholm, hotel, Seattle, Wash. 

$460. 
Johnson A Ranto, saloon, Seattle, Wash. 

$500. 
J. C. Ryan, saloon, Leadville. Colo., $600 
A. Roiitledge, saloon, Tacoma, Wash. 

$800. 
C. W. Allen, saloon, Spokane Falls, Wash. 

$500. 
Lewis Jensen, saloon, Spokane Falls, 

Wash., $200. 
Lockwood & Bush, saloon. Denver, Colo., 

$289. 



F. 7\. HMBER, 

122 SANSOME STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Wine & Sjiirit CoiiiiiiiH Maiit 

mOLK AOKMT FOH THK INQLKHOOK VINBY/MO, KUTHKRFOIfO, NAPA CO., OAL. 




t . I 



.V Also Makes a Specialty of Handling Only the Choicest 
'"^ Vintages of Dry and Sweet Wines 

Produced in California. 

Correspondence Solicited from Producers as welCas Dealers Throughout the Entire United States. 



f/ceifie WIJME ;<VJMD SflF^IT I^EVIEW. 



31 



J. W. Figge, saloon, Denver, Oolo., $1000. 
P. Anderson, saloon, Denver, Colo., $4.50. 
Hanv Klein, saloon, Walseiiburg, Colo., 

J2J7(). . 

W. S. Kelly, hotel, San Joso, Cal.,?1500. 
F. L. Crow, saloon, Spokane Falls, Wash., 

attached. 
L. Ballin, saloon, Portland, Or., 1275. 
J. Janner, saloon, Denver, Colo. 
J. Riley, baloon, Denver, Colo., fSOO. 
Moore & Boone, saloon, D;;nver, Colo., 

1875. 
S. Barrett, saloon. Leadville, Colo., $1500. 
C. H. Mellue, saloon, Seattle, Wash., $400. 
A. P. Hanson, saloon, Tacoma, Wash., 

«275. 
J G. Bennett, hotel, Los Angeles, Cal., 

$10,585. 
S. M, Johns, restaurant, Albina, Or., $500. 
C H. McGrew, saloon, Seattle, Wash., 

»400. 
Brennen A Gillespie, saloon, Tacoma, 

Wash., $1,454. 
T. J. Kelly, saloon, Tacoma, Wash., $1,000- 
3 3. Weeks, restaurant, Denver, Colo., 

$400. 

E. O. Magon, saloon, Albina, Dr., $.500. 
John Feurer, saloon. Portland Or., $300. 
Wilson Meade, saloon, Spokane Falls, 

Wash., $ 

Gus La Fontaine, saloon, Pendleton, Or.i 

$500. 
J J. Madigan, saloon, Seattle, Wash., 

$000. 
J. M. Welch, saloon, Seattle, Wash., $500- 

F. Hesford, saloon, Spokane Falls, Wash.' 

$3,667. 
M. J. Miller, saloon, Tacoma, Wash., $410. 
Z. Heath, hotel, Los Angeles, Cal., $146. 
C.Jones, restauiant. Denver, Colo., $200. 
E. L. Mountfort, saloon, Bieo, Colo., $200. 

G. Leon, saloon, Tacoma. Wash., $5,075. 
Wilson & Anderson, saloon, Seattle, 

Wash., $600. 
Wahl & Loth, saloon, Denver, Colo., $464. 
M. C. Murphy, saloon, Denver, Colo., $900. 
J. Nessel, saloon, Denver, Colo., $.3,000. 
E. P. Gillett, hotel, Spokane Falls, Wash., 

$1,160. 



Mortgages Discharged. 



Henry Haltmeyer, saloon, San Francisco, 

Cal., $4000. 
Henry Bishop, saloon, San Francisco, 

Cal.. $600 and $400. 
Heniv Fried, saloon, Healdsburg, Cal,, 

$1000. 
Hartman Bros., saloon, San Jose, Cal., 

$1200. 
H. Hal)ermehl, saloou, etc., Selma, Cal., 

$2000. 
S. S. Cohen, saloon, Oakland, Cal., $1250. 
W. P. Fine, saloon, Petaluma. Cal., $:i500. 
Alex. fflcGulre, saloon, Spokane Falls, 

W. W. Bowers, hotel, San Diego, Cal., 
$:^,000 and $6,300. 

Anderson & Sachau, saloon, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., $500. 

H. Habermehl, hotel, Selma, Cal., $1,200. 

Mathe <& Givanovich, liquois, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal., L. Matlie $ 

B. F. Rickert, saloon, Spokane Falls, 
Wash., $ 

M. Mitrovieh, restaurant, Petaluma, Cal., 
$900. 



Judgments, Suits, Etc., 



vs. him $3,000. 
E. Casey, hotel, Valoua, Cal., judgment 

against him $1136 
R. S. Perkins, hotel, Portland, Or., lien vs. 

him $375. 
C. M. Wilson, hotel, Tacoma, Wash., 

sued $:f00. 
Jos. Borde, saloon. Portland, Or., sued 

$257. 
John Cort, saloon, etc., Portland, Or., 

judgment vs. him $21,704. 
Miller Bros., saloon, Spokane Falls, 

Wash., sued $267. 
Allen & McCauley, restaurant, Seattle, 

Wash., chattel mortgage $366 fore- 
closed. 

Van Oorscliot & Co., saloon, San 

Francisco, Cal., Van Oorechat sues for 

dissolution. 

J. Wetmore, saloon, Seattle, Wash., 

sued $:i96. 



W. 



Miscellaneous. 



John Cort, saloon, etc., Portland, Or., 

sued $1990. 
Donan Brewing Co.. brewere, Tacoma, 

Wash., judgment against, $12,187. 
T. O. Abbott, saloon, etc., Tacoma, 

Wash., lieu against him $5,000. 
J. D, Morgan, hotel, Puyallup, Wash.. 

confessed judgment $298. 
R. A. Chisholm, restaurant, Seattle, Wash., 

sued $500. 
J. J. Butlcdge, saloon, Tacoma, Wash., 

sued $400. 
Geo., Gardiner, saloon, Spokane Falls, 

Wash., sued $479. 
P. Harder, saloon, Tacoma, Wash., lien 

vs. him $210. 
■U. 8. Brewing Co., brewers, Tacoma, 

Wash., sued $540. 
L. Dumont, hotel, Los Angeles, Cal., lien 



John Klement, saloon. Deception, Wash., 
moved to Anaeortcs. 

Gandalfo & Mclntyre, hotel, Tacoma, 
Wash., in hands of receiver. 

Schneider & Henry, saloon, Fresno, Cal.. 
transferred assets. 

Geo. Betz, wine maker, Ramona, Cal., 
wife filed homestead. 

J. F. Nash, saloon, Colton, Cal., wife de- 
clared sale tiader. 

Wm. McManus, hotel, SanFranciseo, Cal., 
sheriff's sale. 



How's This? 



We offer One Hundred Dollars reward 
for any case of catarrh that cannot be 
cured by taking Hall's Catarrh Cure. ; 
F. J. CHENEY & CO., Props., 

Toledo, O. 
We, the undersigned, have known F. J. 
Cheney for the last 15 years, and believe 
him perfectly honorable in all business 
transactions, and financially able to carry 
out any obligations made by their firm. 
West <& Teuax. Wholesale Druggists, To- 
ledo, O. 
Walding, KiNNAN & Mabvin, Wholesale 
Druggists, Toledo, O. 
Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internally, 
acting directly upon the blood, and mu- 
cous surfaeer of the system. Testimonials 
sent free. Price 7.5c. per bottle. Sold by 
all druggists. 



NATIONAL 

GUSH HEGISTEB 




Pierce & Co. 



Qeneral WeMevn Agetita. 

Room 12, Chronicle Buildino, 8. F 
97J Broadway, Oakland, Cal; 



Try Dr. Henley's Specialties 

TAMARACK^! I. X. L BITTERS, 



USE D?){enlEY'S ■ 

rOP DrSP€PSI/1 AND 
INDIGESTION • X 
SOI D B YXIL L D£/IL£fiS ' i' 



Depot and Laboratory, 23. Montgomery Ave., S. F. 




Liquor Flavor s 

WILLIAM H. RUDKIN 

74 WILUAM STREET, NEW YORK. 

GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICES. 

A Complete Catalogue will be forwarded by mail on receipt of business catd. 



J 



Goods R>r Sale in California only by 
REDINGTON & CO., 26-27 first st., san francisco, oal 




THE HIRAM SIBLEY FIRE-PROOF WAREHOUSES. 

GRAPE BRANDIES IN BOND; also for CALIFORNIA WINES, CHAMPAGNES, 

DRIED FRUITS and GENERAL MERCHANDISE. We receive, 

store, pay tar, deliver or re-ship to any part of the country 

at reasonable rates. Direct all correspondence to 



HIRAM SIBLEY & CO., Props. 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



CALIFORNIA FURNITURE COMPANY, 

Successors to N. P. COLE & CO. 

FURNITURE AND UPHOLSTERY 

Office Furniture, Etc. 

Starr King Building, 117 to 121 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. ; 



AgregiiteAss(!ls,$46,MO,(IO(l 

Queen Insurance Company 

Of Liverpool, Established 1857. 

Connecticut Fire Ins. Co. 

Of Hartford, Connkotkut. 



ROBERT DICKSON, Manager, 

Cor. Sacramento d' Montgomery Sin. 



ARIEL LATHROP, PrCS. HOPKINS, Trcas. 

WM. HARNEY, Mgr. and Sec'y. 

GOLDEN GATE WOOLENIMFG.CO. 

— MANUFACTURE — 

Blankets, Cassimeres, Tweeds 

FLANNELS. 
535 Market St., San Francisco. 



32 



J^lfie WI|^E /rj^B SflR.1T R.EVIEW 




THE PREMIER KENTUCKY WHISKY. 



E H. TJlYIiOR, JR. & SONS, - Frankfort, Kv. 



»"* -.N^' 



V^' 






.-.'^^. 


^wbK^^bm 


»^.^^Pi^ 


WALDEN 


CORNAG 


Trade 


Mark. 



^■^^/. 



^. 



c 



^. 



'^. 



'^^, 






-^/. 



^V^^A^XjIDEiT. 



TIltoBfaodjt, madeaftir tbc FmH'h funniila, frum wlM-tcd fre«li grai>ci', lia^ U-fii successfully iutrodoced, and is now regularly sold In the priociinl markets oi 

, la eiMB|»4lli<>n » Ilk FrciM h Coriuic. OlBcial Gt-rinan and Engli«li olivinUls liave pronounced it tbe purest Brandy wljicli comes to their markets. 
It li t>|m tally aaitwl fur Ibe drag trade and others, where purity is demanded. While abroad these goods suceeesfully eomi>ete, jnying same duties as tbe French, 
Ika JwwIfM buyer has tlw ailvauta(;e la price, between the Internal Itevenuc tax assessed here and the custom duties on foreign braudjcs. Samples will be sent on 



^TsTJ^LIDEIsr <Sc CO., 



ttfUee, 41 llraiirr Strtrt, New York. 



GErsERVILLE, SONOMA COUNTY, CAZ, 



NATOMA VINEYARD CO. 

TABLE GRAPES, TOKAYS, MUSCATS, ETC. 

Red and White Wines and Brandies. 



Vineyards, Winery aod Distillery, Principal Oice, 

Natoma, Sacramento County, Cal. 508 California St., San Francisco. 

('. u. scurssi.Fjt. su,.i. j,_ HKXsif.wr ir.t />•/>. 6v». ^fgr. 



MAX. M, HALLE, 

Distillers' Agent and Commission Merchant, 

142 W . MAIN STRE ET. LOUISVILLE, KY. 

Special Attention Paid to the Unbending and Shipping of Whiskies, 

and the Placing of Insurance. 



f>/reifie WIJME /cJMD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



33 



PricesJCurrent 

These are the Ioiik prices, The rate of 
discount on purdiases of a cunt.iderable 
qnantity, can be learned by applying to 
the agents or dealei-s. We urgently re- 
quest dealers, agents and producers to 
notify us when a change occurs in the 
prices cuiTent of the goods they handle. 

California Wines A . Brandies 

[The Prices given are for (luarts and pints, 
put up in cases of twelve and twenty- 
L tour bottles. 



t . ARPAD HARASZTHY * CO, 
f 580 Washington street, San Francisco. 
' Prices Per case, 

quarts. pints. 

Riesling (i.OO 7.00 

Gutedel 6.00 7.00 



Zinfandel ,5.00 



6.00 



J. GUNDLACH & CO., 
Cor. Second & Marlcet Sts. San Francisco. 

Traminer, 82 f ,5.00 * 6.00 

Gutedel. 82 6.00 7.00 

Burgundy, 84 6.00 7.00 

Zinfandel, 83 ,5.00 6.00 



I. De TURK, 
312 Sacramento Btreet, San Francisco. 

Port, 1884 $ R.Oa 

Port, 1880 4.00 

Drv Shcrrv, 1884 6 Of) 

Dry Sherry, 1886 . . . : 4.00 

Angelica, 1884 . 4.,50 

Tokay, 1884. 8.00 

Zinfandel, 1884 S..50 

Burgundy, 84. 4.00 

Riesling," 188,5 4.00 

Gutedel, 1884 4,50 

Hock. 1885 S..50 

Brandy, 1883 13.00 



GEORGE WEST & SON, 
Stockton, Cal. 

Brandy, 1879 $20.00 

Brandy, 1883 15.00 

Brandy, 1885 15.00 

Froutignan 9.00 

Sherry y.OO 

Port (old) 12.00 

Port 6.00 



SAN GABRIEL WINE CO., 
Rainona, Los Angeles county, Cal. 

Riesling t 4.75 »5.75 

Gutedel 4.75 5.75 

Port ,5.,50 

Angelica. . .' 5..50 

Muscatel 5..50 .... 

Sherry 6.00 

Brandy, 1882 12.00 



LOS GAT08 & SARATOGA WINE CO. 
478 Tenth street, Oakland, Cal. 

Zinfandel $ ,S..50 <4.,50 

Sauterne 4.00 5.00 

Brandy 9.00 

Port 5.00 6.00 

3weet Muscatel 5.00 6.00 

SrapeCordial 6.50 7..50 



JOSEPH MELCZER & 
i04 and 506 Market street, San 

31aret, 1886 

Sinfandel. 1885 

Burgundy, 1885 

'H(Hk, 1885 

liic^ling. 1885 

i;ii>ling,Johauni8berger,1884 

iuicilel, 1884 

•^iiiiiliii Hungarian Type,1885 
">z;iiinari " *'. »• 

■^zi -szardl FeherHun'Type " 

1885 

I'"n,1884 

-hrirv, 1885 

'■ 1884 

\nu. Ilea and SweetMout'n,84 
Ha I a,Malaga&Sw'tTo'y'85 

in.iidy, 1883 

1885 



CO., 

Francisco. 
13.00 
3..50 
4.00 
3.50 
4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
3.,50 
3..50 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 
5.00 
6.00 
4..50 
5,00 
12.00 
10.00 



BECK, PYHRR & CO., 

108 O'Farrell street, San Francisco. 

;.iiita Rosa Zinfandel '86... 13.00 

•aula Clara Cabernet, '87... 4.50 

'ui>crtino Medoc, '84 6.00 

lit. Helena Hock' '86 3' ,50 

(Jutedel (Cliasselas), '86 4!,50 

jiVaminer. '82 5.,50 

siauierne (silver leaf) 6^00 

laute Sauterne (gold leaf) . . 7.00 
California Cognacs. 

•Silver Bronze Leaf 8 00 

"Ked " " 110.00 

"Green " '• 12.00 



INGLENOOK WINES. 
F. A. Haber, agent, 122 Sansome St., S. F. 
Tal)lc Claiet blended from 

choice foreign grajjcs, 

vintage 1885. t3.,50 

Zinfandel 4.50 

E.vtra Table Claret, Medoc 

type red label, 1885 5.,5fl 

Burgundy type 5.50 

Sauterne dry,Sauvig'nVert'8.5 5.,50 

Gutedel, Chasselas Vert, 1885 4.50 

Hock, Rhenish type " 6.00 

Burger, Chablis tyi)e •' 5.00 

Riesling.Johaunisbcrg type " ii.,50 
Pints of two dozen $1 per case additional. 
None genuine e.vcept bearing seal or cork 
brand of the piopnetor— each bottle bears 
the legal pure wine stamp. 

CAL. WINE GROWER'S UNION. 
Cor. Sutter and Grant aye. San Francisco. 

EL QUITO VINEYARD. 

Kiffling $ 3.00 f 4.00 

Claret 3.0O 4.00 

FRESNO VINEYARD CO. 

Burger $ 3..50 » 4.,50 

Claret 3..50 4..50 

I'urt 5.50 6..50 

Angelica .5.,50 6..50 

Rlierry ,5.,50 6..50 

Cognac Brandy 10.00 11.00 

ST. HIIUEUT VINYARD. 

Claret, Cabernet * 8.00 f 9.00 

Sauterne 8.00 9.00 

Cognac 12.00 13.00 

C. CARPY A CO.' 
511-517 Sacianiento street, San Francisco 

La Loma, Grand Medoc * 7.00 * 8.00 

liurgundy ,5.00 6.00 

Zinfandel , 3.,50 4..50 

Sauterne 5.00 6.00 

Riesling 4.00 .5.00 

Sweet Muscatel, 1882 9.00 10 00 

Sherry, 18.82 9.00 10.00 

Port, 1883 8.00 9.0O 

Cal. Rochelle Brandy 12.00 13.00 

NAPA VALLEY WINE COMPANY. 

11 and 13 First Street, San Francisco. 

Hock I 3.,50 f; 4..50 

Gutedel 4.OO ,5.00 

Riesling 4.,50 5.50 

Cabernet 4.50 ,5.50 

Zinfandel 3.,50 4..50 

Private Stock Claret .5.00 6.00 

Burgundy 4.00 5.00 

Port, (old) 4.50 

Angelica 4..50 

Sherry 4.,50 ...I 

Brandy, 1881 15.00 

Brandy, 1887 8.00 

Private Stock Burgundy 7.00 8.66 

Private Stock Sauterne 8.00 9.00 

Vine Cliff Claret 15.00 

Private Stock Hock 5.00 6.00 



TO-KALON VINEYARD, 

Jas. L. Davis & Co., Sole Agents, 

308 California St., San Francisco. 

Reising Johamiisberg 5.00 6.00 

" "Chronicle" 4.50 5!.50 

" 4.00 5.00 

Santerne, "J. L. D." 6.00 7.00 

Haut 4.50 5.50 

4.00 5.00 

Chablis 4.00 5.00 

Gutedel 3.50 4.50 

Cabernet 5.00 6.00 

Burgundy 5.00 6.00 

Beclau 5.00 6.00 

Zinfandel 3.50 4.,50 

St. Laurent 8.00 9.00 

La Granada 8.00 9.00 

Lazrine 7.00 8.00 

Nebbiola 7.50 8.50 

La Grand Claret 12.50 13.50 

Madeira 5.00 6.00 

Malaga 5.00 6.00 

Muscatel 5.00 6.00 

Angelica 5.00 6.60 

Tokay 5.00 6.00 

Sweet To-Kalon 6.00 7.00 

Sherry, Dry 5.50 6.,50 

" 5.00 6.00 

Port, 1876 12.00 18.00 

." 1883 6.00 7.00 

' 1886 4.00 5.00 

Grape Brandy 9.00 10.00 

" 8.00 9.00 

Blackberry Brandy 10.00 11.00 

Strawberry " 9.00 10.00 

Cognac 14.00 15.00 

" 12.00 13.00 

KUHLS, SCHWARKE A CO., 
123 Sutter street, San Francisco 

Zinfandel $ 3.35 ft.25 

Zinfandel 4.00 5.00 

Burgundy 4.00 5.00 

Sauterne ,5..50 7.00 

Port, Old .".. 6.00 

OldSherry 6.00 



MONT ROUGE WINES. 

A. G. Chance. Livermoic, 
Office and Depot, 615-617 Front St., 8. F. 

Quarts. Pints. 

Sauterne $6.00 $7.00 

Haut Sauterne 7.00 8.00 

Clarct,Table 4.00 ,5.00 

A Claret, F 9.00 

AA Claret, V 9.00 



KOHLER & FROHLING. 
601 Folsoin Street, San Francisco. 

liiesling $ 4.OO $ 4.,50 

Hock 3..50 4.00 

Gutedel 4..50 5.00 

Mauterue 4..50 5.00 

Zinfandel 3.75 4.35 

Zinfandel, old • 4.50 5.00 

Burgundy 4.00 4.50 

Superior Port 10.00 

Slierry 7.50 

Angelica 6.00 

.Muscatel 6.00 

Madeira 0.(K) 

Malaga 6.00 

Biandy..* 10.00 

C. HOLTUM & CO., 
409 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

Zinfandel. 1884 $3.00 

Burgundy, " 3.OO 

Riesling, " 3.05 

Riesling, Marcobrunner.1883 5 25 

Gutedel, 1884 4.OO 

Sauterne, '" 4 OO 

Port Old (Fresno Co.),1882. 6.00 

Port, 1885 4 00 

Sherry, Dry, 1884 4.00 

Sbeiry, Old, (Fresno Co.,) '82 6.00 

Angelica,1885,(LosAng'sCo) 4.00 

Muscatel (Fresno Co.), 1885. 5 .50 

Tokay, 1884 5.(X) 

Mt. Vineyard, 1.S85 4.00 

Madeira and Malaga, 1885.. 5..50 

Pineapple wines 4 00 

Brandy, 1882 11.00 

Brandy, 1885 9.00 

Strawberry Brandy 9.00 

S. LACHMAN & CO., 
453 Brannan street. San Francisco. 

Old Port $7.00 $8.00 

Zinfandel 3.50 4.00 

Riesling 4..50 5.00 

Madeiras 8.00 

Malaga 8.00 .... 

Cognac 14.00 ...'. 



Domestic Champagnes. 



ARPAD HARASZTHY & CO., 

5.30 Washington street. San Francisco. 

Eclipse $14.50 $17.00 

A. FINKE'S WIDOW. 
809 Montgomery sti-eet, San Francisco. 

Gold Seal $11.,50 $12.00 

Gold Seal. Extra Dry 12.00 13.00 

Nonpareil 12 00 13.00 

Piivate Cuvee, Dry 11. ,50 12.00 

" Extra Dry... 12.00 13.00 

TO KALON VINEYARD. 

II. W. CRABB, OAKVILLE. NAPA COUNTY. 

Jas. L. Davis & Co., 308 Californiast, S. F. 

To-Kalon Sec $12.00 $13.00 

Sparkling 11.00 12.00 

AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE CO. (Lt'd) 

839 to 849 Folsom street, San Francisco. 

Reihlen 15.00 17.00 

A. WERNER & Co. 

52 Warren street, New York. 

Extra Dry $ 7.00 $ 8.00 



Imported Champagnes. 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 
314 Sacramento street, Sau Francisco. 

DEUTZ a OILDERMANN, AY'.. CHAMPAGNE. 

Gold Lack Sec. per case $.32.00 $34.00 

Gold Lack Sec. 6 Magnums 

per case 81.00 

Chachet Blanc per case 30..50 33..50 

Cabinet Green Seal, per bskt 2.5..50 27.50 

DUPANLOUP 4 CO., EKIMS. 

Carte Blanche, per case 21.00 22.00 

Carte Branche, extra diy, per 

case 21.00 22.00 



W. B. CHAPMAN, 

123 California street, San Francisco. 

Perrier,TouetifeCo."8ptcial"»32.50 $.S4.,50 

" Reserve Dry .32..50 34.50 

Pel rier Jouct & Co. Brut.. . . 33.00 JiS.OO 
Half pints "Special" $40 iu cases of 4 doz. 



WM. WOLFF & CO. 
329 Market street, San Francisco 

QUARTS. PINTS 

Pommery Sec $32.50 $34.50 



MACONDRAY A CO., 
First and Market streets, San Francisco. 
Louis Roederer Carte BIanche.31.00 38.00 



JAS. L. DAVIS & CO., 
SOLE AGENTS. 

808 California St., San Francisco 
Xbr Desbordes & Fiis, Dry 

Vergenay $28.00 $30.00 

" Desbordes & Fits, Prl- 

vateCurvec 29.00 3100 



Imported Wines. 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 

123 California street, San Fraflclsco. 

BED WINKS. 

(Barton & Gnestier. Bordeaux.) 

. Quarts. 

Floirac f 7 ,50 

Pauillac 8.50 

St. Julien g'oQ 

St. Estcphe 9^00 

Chateau Lacrolx 10 00 

duGallan, '78-'81.. 10 50 

le Pain, 1878 11 50 

Pontet Canet, 1881 1350 

Chat. Beychevelle, 1881 15^00 

Ducru Beaucaillon, 1881 16.00 

Chateau Lagrange, 1878 22!oO 

Brown Cantenac, 1876 22]oo 

Chateau Langoa, 1874 22 50 

Leoville, 1874-1878. 24'.50 

La rose, 1874 24.50 

Lafite, 1874 29.00 

Latour, 1870 31.,50 

MargBUX, 1874 29.00 

(H. Cuvillier & frere, Bordeaux.) 

Pauillac, 1881 10.50 

Ducasse Grand Puy, 1878. . . 14,50 

Chat. Kirwan, 1878 i7].5o 

" Beyclieville, 1874 19^.50 

Cos d'Estournel, 1878 22^00 

Chat. Larose, 1870 22^50 

" Latour, 1868 29!,50 

" Mai gaux, 1881 32!oO 

" Monton Rothschild'80 35.00 
(Bouchard pere & fits, Beaune Cote D'Or.) 

Macon, 1884 10.50 

Pommard, 1884 12 50 

18«1 15:00 

Clos de la Mousse, 1884 17.00 

Chainbertin, 1884 21.50 

1881 25;00 

Romance, 1884 24.50 

Clos de Vougeot, 1887 20.50 

WHITE WINES. 

(Barton & Guestier, Bordeaux.) 

Sauternes 9.25 ' 

Yin de Graves, 1878 10.50 ' 

Barsac, 1878 n.oo 

Haut Sauternes, 1874 17.50 

Chateau Yquem, 1874 30.50 

(H. Cuvillier & frere, Bordeaux.) 

Sauternes 11.50 

Chateau Giraud, 1884 27.50 

" La Tour Blanehe'84 27.00 
(Bouchard pere & tils, Beaune, Cote D'Or) 

Chablis, 1884 11,50 

Montiachet Bouchard, 1884. 20.50 

SHERRIES. 

(Sandeman, Buck & Co., Jerez.) 

Pemartiu Brut 19.00 

" Umbrella 20.00 

PORTS. 

(Sandeman & Co., Oporto.) 

00 16.00 

0000 19.00 

ooVoo 21.50 



WM. WOLFF & CO., 

329 Market street, San Francisco. 

(Dnbos freres, Bordeaux.) 

Chateau de I'Ysle, in casks.. $95.00 

(Journu freres, Bordeaux.) 
Clarets and Sauternes, per 

case from $7.50 to $30.00 

Mignotte-Picard & Co., Chaseagne, Cote 

D'Or wines $12.00 to 25.00 

(Henkell & Co., Mayence.) 

Hock wines from $7.50 to $36.00 

(Morgan Bros., Port St. Mary.) 
Ports and Sherries in wood, 

per gallon $1.75 to $4.50 

Port and Sherries in cases, 

per case $8.00 to $15.00 

(Mackenzie & Co., Jerez.) 
Ports and Sherries in wood 

from $1.75 to $4.^ 

i 



d4 



f/^eifie WIJ^E /c^gD SflRLlT R.EVIEW. 



<«bi^. o 



Kohler &, Van Bergen, 



CALirORNIA 

WlfESP 

Mktn oOUr tiHl Vault* 

eei t* en Thtnt st. 



Braart.: 
«ITI11» MoirrooilwiT itr.. '^<o} 



S«n Fr«ncl»oo. 





WmcrT »ml UlUlll.- > 
■ S«er«m«nto, '.Cil. 



Eiutrm llrmmli: 
SIrniMV KTiiri 
N»w York. 



!.•♦■■ 12 MinlMY KTIIKKT. 



AJROISB liotMCMlA*. 



Jamks Kiika. 



alines and liiqaoPS. 

Im...r1r.. ..r «,»! .>.i:cl.l» fur the rcUbret.Hl I»r«i..l«..f 

Golden a nd Tea Kettle W hiskies. 

C««. rB«« AKD Jac-wox B™.. - Pa:. Fkasosco. Cau 




'C)out)o ^ica^ot "ponsardin 
The Most Delicious Champagne of the Age. 



y^llovu label, 
Dry. 




-I-*-)- 



U/t?ite labial, 



|Si>lr Atriil fiT llie I'uriKc Cimi't.) 
ig9-i3i BaUrry SIrrrt - - - Siiu Fniiirlyro. Val. 




JOSJEIJiZEt&CO. 

Oiuwcrs aiiU Uoilcn In 
Cttttfortiia 

WINES AND BRANDIES 



Prnprieton Oleo Ellen Win* Taolls. 

Fine Table Wines a Specialty 

604-506 Market St., 

Sftii I'mii'lwtt, C'al. 



F. O. BOYD St CO., 

fVlHMIMiKlM }Ur.U< IIAXT*. NkW YokK. 

CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

Hole Ewlrm Agenl f..r HAHTOS'H C. l.l.rat.d Swirl WiiHi-. Fm.m'. Cnl. 

Advaneca Mada en Conalgnmanta. 

lirfrrriMTi liv rcrtnlooimi: Tilic ltA>K ••> THIt Htatk nr Xrw YiiKK, 

Mb. lloNiiKT llAKTnx, FmtH>, ('■!. Mm. ,\i:i'ti> llAiti>Ar.TliY. Hmi KruiK'lM-u.Cnl. 

Mr. IIona) r WKHMTltit. HanFr»m-iM<>i.('ii|. .Mm II.II.H< iiicki.iit.CIiIi'iii;''.!!! 



I. DETURK 

'IXJinss and '^randies 



BRANDY, 
ANGELICA, 



CLARET, 

SAUTERNE, 

ZINFANDEL. ^.^^^ MulcAT. 

PORT RIESLING. 

TOKAY. GUTEDEL. 

Vineyards' and. Cellars: 

Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, 

Bran.cln: 
212 Sacramento St., San Francisco, Cal., 

C. M. MANN, Manager. 
New York Office, - - 22-24 Monroe Street. 



Cal. 



Pure CaUfornia Wines & Grape Brandies. 
THE 

Sail Ganriel Wiiie Go. 

OF SAy OABRIEL, 
Lou Angeleti Cmtnty, Cal. 

Are now prejiaied wiib a iarue stock of wines ami 
brandies of tlieir own prowth t.) supply the trade 
and llie niarlcet Kenerally. This Company own^ 
tlie largest vliievard in the world, covering over 2,,500 acres. They have held thcii 
wines and brandies for several years in their own cellars, and do not offer any of 
their product until it lias become properly matured. Their large slock of ma- 
tured wines and brandies thus accumulated Is now open to the purchaser. All 
L'oods under Iheli trade mark are warranted pure and unadulterated. Beint; the 
Micces-on' to B D Wilmis & Co., and to J. De Barth Shokb. they have become 
nossesscn, of tiie "SHOKB" Brasd OF Brandy, and -MOUNT VINEYAUD" 




possesserb 

WINE. Corrcsixmdence solicited. 

MAKSHALL. SI'KLLMAIfa CO., 

No. ,5 New York and Brooklyn Bridge Vault, 
Frankkout St., New York. 



J. UE BARTH HHORB, 

President San Gabriel Wine Co. 
San GAbHiEL. Cal. 




TD=KRLDN 



(Itetristered Trade Mark.) 



Vineyards, Cellars and Distilleries Situated at 

OAKVILLE, NAPA CO., CAL. 

h:. "w. cr.jPs.bb, - - FK.or=K.iH:xoK.. 

"TO-KAI,ON" has received more Medals, Diplomas and Tremlums 
than any other brand of Wines aud Brandies in America. 

JAS. L. DAVIS & CO., Sole Agenta, 
3tW CALIFOBNIA STREET, - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Gaiiloip Wiiie Growers Uw 


FUK.E CjP5.LIFOP5.KrijPL 


Wines and Brandies, 


Vor. Suffer & Grant Ave, San Francisco. Cal. 




ipd 1$ l^o^D^^Q^^p/l^lPPC^?^ 

The HlKliest Grade Champagne In the World. 



WHITE LABEL, 

"Cahtk Bi.anciik." 
A MaKUlKeent ItlchWine. 



IIBROWN LABEL. 

"CiRANn VlN SKf," 
Perfection of * Dry Wine 



See that every Bottle liearn (he private label of 

MACONDRAY & CO., 

Bole At'cnls fur the I'acific <V>a»t. 



314 Sacramento stieet. San Francisco. 
A. de Liize & Fils, Bordeaux 

Clarets, per case *8.00 to $38.00 

A. de Luze & Fils, Bordeaux 

Sauterues, per case 12.00 to 26.00 

C.Marey & Lifter Belalr.Nuits 

Burnundies, white and 

red, per cas.e 1.5.00 to 21.75 

D. M. Feuerheerd, Jr.,&Co., 

Oporto, Port wines 

per case 1,5.00 to 80.00 

D. M. Feuerlieerd, Jr.,* Co., 

Oporto, Port Wines, 

ill wood per fjal 2.00 to 4.50 

Duff Gordon tt Co.. Hlierries 

in wood per gal 2.00 to 5.50 

Lacave & Co. ,Slierrie3 Crown 

Brand in >^ 1.40 to 1.75 

Soutli Side Madeira 2.00 to 2.50 

St. Croix Rum, L. B 5..50 

Arraclv -'Royal" Batavia 5.00 to 6.00 

Boord & Son, London Doel< 

Siierry, per ease 12.00 to 15.00 

Cr. M. Pabstmann Solin, Mainz 

Rhine Wines jwr case.. 8.50 to 28.00 
Schulz & Wai^ner, Frankfurt 

o M Riiine Wines per 

case 11.00 to 14. CO 



P/reifie W\^E /rJMP SPIRIT f^EVIEW. 



3^ 



American Whiskies. 

HENCKEN A .SCHRODER, 
210 Front street, Sau Francisco. 

Per Gallon. 

Our Pavoiite OK $2.75 to $;i..50 

Our Clioice 3.50 " Ji.OO 

PaulJones 2.2,5 " 2.50 

Star of '76 2.00 

Old Crown 1.75 "2 00 

Ola Bourbon 1..50 

SPRUANCE, STANLEY & Co., 
410 Fnnit street, San Francisco. 

Kent ucl<y Favorite I 3.00 

Extra Keutucl<y favorite 3.,50 

O. P. T 2..50 

O. K. Old Stoclv 5.00 

Harries' Old Bourbon 2.00 

Kentucky Favorite, in cases 8.50 

H. O. B. juffs 9.00 

O. F. C jugs 10..50 

African Stomacli Bitters, cs. 11.50 

SIEBE BROS. & PLACEMAN. 

322 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

O K Extra $3..50 to $0.00 

O K Rosedale 2.50 to 3.00 

Ilvain 2.75 

Golden Pearl 2.25 

Marshall 3.35 

Old Family Bourbon 1.75 

Old Bourbon 1.50 

NABER, ALFS & BRUNE. 
323 and 335 Market street, San Francisco. 

PlKcnix Old Bourljon, Al... $3.75 

Old St'k 3.00 

'■ Al, 90 pf 3..50 

OK.lOOpf 3..50 

" Pony,Priv St'k 4.(X) 

Club House Bourbon, Old. . 4 ,50 

Gold Medal Boui bon, 100 pf 2..50 

Union Club '• " 2.25 

Superior Whisky 1 75 

BB Whisky 1.75 

LiQCOKS— In cases. 

Per Case 

Pha>nix Bourbon OK, in 5s $10.00 

Al, " 7.50 

Al,34ptB 8.00 

Al,48J^pt 9.00 

Union Club Bourbon, 34 pts 7..50 

" * " '• 48Kpts 8..50 

Rock and Rye Whisky in 5s. 7..50 

Rum Punch Extract, in 5s. . 8.00 

Blackberry Brandy, in 5s. . . 7.50 

MOORE, Hunt & Co, 
404 Front street, San Francisco. 

Per Gallon. 
E.xtra Pony in bbls or ^-bbls $6.00 to $8.00 

A A •• " pf 4.00 

B " " " 3.50 

f " " • 3.00 

No. 1 ■" " • 2.50 

Rye in bbls and >^-bbls from 3.50. to 5.00 

A A in cases 11.00 

A A in 5 case lots loiso 

A A in 10 to 35 lots, . 10.00 

A A in pint flint flasks 3 

dozen to ease 12.00 

C in cases 8.50 

C in 5 case lots 8.25 

C in 10 to 35 case lots 8.00 

JOSEPH MELCZER & CO. 
504 and 506 Market street, San Francisco. 
Native Pride, Old Bourbon, 

(per bbl) per fjallon $2..50 

Old Rip Van Winkle 2 50 

Nevilles Old Bourbon tl.50 



KUHL8 8CHWAHKE & CO. 

123 Sutter sti-ect, San Francisco. 

K Goldwater $4.00 

"" '• per case i 7!,50 



WM. WOLFF & CO., 

329 Market street, San Francisco 

W. H. McBrayer, 1885 $2.75 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
John Gibson's Son it Co.. 
Philadelphia, Bourbon 
and Rye whiskies $1.90 to iS.M 



KOLB & DENHARD. 

433 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

Nonpareil Rye and Bourbon $3.50 to $5.00 



Imported Whiskies, 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
Boord & Son, Loudon Finest 

Irish Malt Whiskey. . . . $13..5o 

Royal Hfthld Scutch Whisky. 13.50 

John Ramsay, Islay Malt 

Scotch Whisky 13.00 

WM. WOLF & CO., 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

Lone Hiiihland per case $11. .50 

Connaugh, Irish ..." 11. .50 

Wm. Jameson & Co " 11. ,50 



Impor ted Bra ndies. 

WM. WOLFF & CO., 

329!Maikcl street, San Francisco. 

Marten's Brandy, * per case $17.00 

«* " 19.00 

*** " 33.00 

VSO " 38.00 

'■ WSOP '• .50.00 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, Sau Francisco. 
Champ Vineyard Proprs. Co., 

Bouteileau & Co. man- 

ajjers Coj^nac in Octaves 

I>er Kal $5.00 to $8.50 

The Vineyard Proprs. Co. 

Bouteileau & Co. mana- 
gers Reserve Vintages. 10.,50 to 14.00 

Swan Gin in >g casks 3.75 

Double Eagle Gin in ^ casks. 3.65 

.lohn Ramsay Islay Scotch 

Whisky, in )4 casks 4 75 

Boord's Pineapple brand 

Jamaica Bums in >g 

casks 5.25 6.50 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 

123 California street, San Francisco. 

(H. Cuvillier & frere Cognac.) 

Quarts. 

Fine Champagne, 1870 $33.00 

Grande Fine Champagne, 1860 36.00 
Grande Fine Cliampagne He- 
serve, 1858 40.00 

JAS. L DAVIS & CO. , 

308 California Street, San Francisco. 

W.BarriasBon& Co., Cognac. 36.00 38.00 



Imported Goods. 

(MISCELLANEOUS.) 

WM. WOLFF & CO., 

329 Market street, San Francisco- 

J. de Kuyper & Sons Gin, large hot $18.,50 

med. " 10.00 

Evan's Belfast Ginger Ale per barrel 13.50 
" " " percs.4doz 6.00 

Theo. Lappe's Genuine Aromatique 

per case 13..50 

Gilka Kummel per case 15.00 

Vermouth Francesco Cinzanipr.case 6.50 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Market street, San Francisco. 

(BOORD & son's, LONDON.) 

Old Tom Gin, per case 11.00 

Pale Orange Bitters, per case 11. .50 

Ginger Brandy, Liqueur " 12.00 

Jamaica Rum, Old " 12.Q0 to 14.00 

IAIN Royal Batavia Gin in 

cases of 15 large black 

bottles per case 23.50 

in cases of 15 large 

white bottles per case 24.50 

Kirscliwaseer, Macholl Freres 

Bavarian Highland, per 

case 19.00 

Cherry Cordial, J. J. W. 

Peters' per ease." i 12.00 

Kummel, BoUmaun's per ease ; 13.50 



^^ HIG//^^^ ^hHo 



<: 




1889. 
GOLDJMEDAL 

ofncE§DE:po 
^615-617 



MONT-ROUGE 

VINEYARD, 
1885. 

LIVERMORE VALLEY, 

CALIFORNIA. 

A.G.CHAUCHE 

PROPRIETOR, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



A. Wernet^ 8t Co,, 




SPARKLING 
WINE 



ONLY. 



American Champagne Co. 

LIMITED. 

REIHLEN CHAMPA6NE, 

BRUT AND EXTRA DRY. 



SAN nUNCISCO OmCE AND PA(7rORY, NEW YORK OFFICE, 

839-849 Folsom Street. 50 New St. and 52 Broad St. 



H. II. ll.viiui::. 



M. L. ):IiYi;oLI)S. 



THOS. r.IXOSTON. 



Harris, Kingston &, Reynolds, 

WINE GROWERS, DISTILLERS AND 

Dealers in PURE CALIFORNIA WINES k BRANDIES 




VIHEyARDSXCEUARS: " v 
Rutherford, "^ 

Napa Co., Cal 



VAULTS: 

123-127 Eddy St. 

Tnder Hackmelcr's Hotel, 
San Fraiielsro, Cah 



36 



J^eifie Wl/^E >>r|^D Sflf^lT (REVIEW. 




C. CARRY & CO., 

I ni'k' Sam Winery and Dislillpry. 

n/if-oKV/.i. 

..nil r »?<i' i>Atit»«n<>il -~ 

515-517 Sacramento St.. - San Francisco. 

WINERY AND DISTILLERY, 
NAPA, fAI.. 



CARRY & MAUBEC, 

IS CK-IIAH STKKKT. ■ - NKW VOIiK. N. Y. 



'A. M*U-A>. Jl>i>a4;rr. 



11. A. .Mkukiam, Sii|fcTliileii<li-nt, 



Uis m & Saratoga Wiiie Co. 

PRODUCERS OF CHOICE 

WINES and BRANDIES 

MUSCAT. HOCK, 

ANGELICA. SAUTERNE. 

ROYAL NECTAR. OLD PORT, 

ZINFANDEL. GUTEDEL. 

SHERRY. RIESLING, 

FROM FOOTHILL VINEYARDS. 

VlNKYAItDS AND CKl.I.AiJS: 

Los G«toa and Saratoga, Santa Clara Co.. Cal. 

■rwteli OWIe«: 478 Tenth Street. Oakland, California. 



Iiaehman & Jaeobl, 



DEALERS IX 



California Wines aTd Brandies 

mHTAirr mmo •mooNo aritetTB, saw fitAiiciaco. 



Eastern Agents. 

EDINGER BROS. & JACOBI, 

(Vm-. I>i»v*t & P.ttrl 8tH., Brooklyn Uridgv Store No.2, New York 



KOLB & DENHARD, 






IiBport«d 

GhampagDM, Wioea 

ud Uqaon. 



OldNoopaitilRye 





CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

I OPPIOK »MO VAULTm, 430-124 MOHTOOMK/tT ST., »»N FlfANCiaCO. 



RONALD G. McMillan, 

Manufactnrer and Do»ler In 

SjJ'^T^f ^orifaZs, fitters, Qyztracts 

Pure Sugar Coloring 



iTo. 714: iFi^onsrr st.. 



TKi.rnmNE ^7. 



WkITE rOU PKICE8. 



San Francisco. 




^^CALIFORNIANys 



WINES & BRANDIES 



J5tancb anO Waulte, 100 & 102 SUet Street. 

Wholesale and Keiail. 

Selected Stock of Choice OM Wine:, a SiH-cialty. 



PIONEER WINE HOUSE. 

EsUblished 185*. 



Vineyards in Ijos Angeles County. Sonoma County, 

Merced Cminfy a7id Fretmo County. 



Cor. Second and Folsom Sts., 

San Frajnciseo. 



41-A5 Broadway, 

ISTe-ur "Y'ortc. 



HIRSCHLER &, CO., 

212 to 316 Sarsomk Strkkt, Sad Franoisoo, Cal. 

Wine and Liquor Merchants. 

I'UOI'RIETORS OF 

Summit Vineyat^d, 



NAPA COUNTY, CAL. 



22-28 Taylor St., San Franciaco. Cal. 

California Wines <^ Brandies. 

Vineyards, Cellars and Distilleries at 
ST. HEU>EJ^/r, ^l/rf/r eOU^ITY, G/fb. 



f/reifie Wlf^E /cjND SflF^IT [REVIEW. 



S7 



Quotations at Cincinnati and Louisville. 

E. G. B.-Export Gauge Bremen; N. Y.-New York; N. Y. C. H.-New York Custom House; L. P. W. H.-Ix>ui8ville Public WareJioUSfl' 
Lou.-Louisville; Cin.-Cincinnati; Dist'y-Distillery; C. C. H.-Cincinnati Custom House; St. L. C. H.-St. Louis Custom Housei 

1^" These prices are for lots of not lesB tlian twenty-five barrels and upwards, {-asli, and if in bond, original gauge, accrued charges paidi 







iisT Boisrr). 




T.AJX 


: FJLllD. 






BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 
'89. 

62^ 


Fall 

'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall 
'90. 


Spr'g 

'87. 


Fall 

'86. 


Spr'g 
'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 
Whiskies. 


Remarks 










55 


52^ 




225 










SprSl 300 


LouCH 


Anderson Co. Club 
















Anderson Co. Sour Mash 






60 


55 

50 


42i 
40 


40 
37i 


37| 


210 








240 






Asliljind 








210 








Astor 






























52i 




37^ 
37i 




207^ 




225 






Fall 81 275 


CiuCH 


T^fiHrtrd & Tjfiiioastrer 












Beechwood 




























Bel- Air 




75 




52J 

65 

55 

50 

70 

75 


50 


40 

47^ 














8pr81 285 


Lou 


Belle of Anderson 
















Belle of Anderson Co. (E. Murphy) 
Belle of LiOuisville 














225 




257^ 


























Belle of MMrioii 




85 


""so" 




40 

55 




210 
230 




225 
275 
240 






Spr81 300 




Belle of Nelson 










Belmont 














Berkele. AVm 






60 



55 

55 

67* 

52| 

86 

45 

75 


45 

421 
67^ 

m 


40 
40 
55 
40 
65 
30 
55 
















Berrv. E. C. 






















Big Spring (Nelson Co. Distg. Co.).. 














205 






Spr81 275 




Blakemore 




















Blue Grass 








'"'c^o' 


200 
240 




220 
250 




260 
275 


Spr81 270 




Bond & Lillard 




m 


90 




Bond, M. S 


















230 




260 










Bowen, H. C 












Spr 80 300 


Nov Ex 


Bowen, J. A 








50 
65 

62J 




37i 
55 

52i 
















Brownlield, W. W 
























Buehanan ... .... 










225 










Spr81 300 


Lou C H 


Callaghan 






























55 
50 
40 
37i 








225 










Cedar Run.. 




80 
65 
60 


50 


65 
52J 
45 
45 


40 
































Fall 82 260 
Spr 81 285 




Clay, Samuel 


















Clifi" Falls 


















Clifton 




























Commonwealth 




62| 




55 
54 
65 


35 


40 
30 
50 
35 
37i 

m 

35 

37J 

45 

37i 

45" 

40 

40 


















Cook, C. B 
















Fall 80 270 


























Craig, F. G 
















































Cream of Anderson 




75 
65 
75 




65 

50 

60 
55 
65 


""sil 

55 

m 


















Criterion 




















Crystal Spring 




















Cumberland 
















Spr 80 300 




Cummins, R. & Co 






















Dant, J. W 




90 
65 


85 




205 


215 


240 










Darling 












Daviess County Club 






57^ 


















Dedman, C. M 




72J 










225 










Double Spring 










37 

40 

m 

52| 

60 

42i 

30 

35 
















Dundee 








52i 

60 

67^ 

75 

55 

40 

45 

35 
























70 
80 
85 
















I • i 


"i 


Early Times 


82J 


















EdgeCliif. 


















Edgewater (T. J. Megibben.) . 






210 




230 










Elk Run 
















Excelsior (Megibben & Bro.) 
























Fall City 
























Fern Cliff. 










32| 


















Fiblo & Crabb 




75 










200 














Field, J. W. M 










40 

40 

60 

42i 

35 

37i 

37| 












































Frazier, W. J 








75 
55 
50 

m 

55 


62^ 

45 

35 

40 

37J 




207i 














Freeland 




















Garland 
























Gladstone 








32^ 














. 


Glenarme 






. 

































3a 



f>/veifie wi^E /tj^k) sfiK.IT K.eview. 





■RlQUORMERC" 



^^^ 



323-325 Market St.. S. F. 



I HAKTl* HMCKKS. 



Mencken &. Schroder, 

— srcvKKso us TO 

HENRY BRICKWEDEL & CO. 

Jmjxnirr* and Itmlrn in 

Olincs and Liiquors. 

&!• AfoUt for I)r. SchnuUr'* Hnmhurij JlitUr*, uinl 
Our Farorile 0. K. and Jlnid Jour* 1(7jm/-iVj<. 

Nos. 208-210 Front Street, - San Franciscc, Cal. 



WICHMAN & LUTGEN, 

Impertara of 



II. I'. WlI'llMAN. 



Wr 



ITiOS 

Maaatactwct* and 
ProprMon of 

Dr. Feerstor'e 




^i^OTS, 



318-320 Clay St, 

B«L Front & Battery, 

San Trancisco. 



1). Y. b. UENAItUl 



E. MARTIN &. CO., 

mruUTEIUi XSD \VH0LE&U.£ 

blQUOl^ mei^cHANTS, 

408 Front St., San Francisco, Cal. 

— Bor.K AOKXTs pon — 

J. F. CUHER AND ARGONAUT OLD BOURBONS. 



THE CELEBRATED 



PERUVIAN BITTERS. 

i 80PBB iPPinZB. A ROTAL TONIC CURB DTSPIPSU. 



"WTILIMIER/DIITO- <fe CO., A(}KX'i's. 
216 California St., - San Franciaco, Cal. 

Also Agents for Delmonico Champagne. 



Hey, Grauerholz & Co., 

IM1-.I 'Mi- »M' Wll'ILKKAI.K DEALKKS in 

W1NES& LIQUORS 



HOLE A0ENT8 FOB 



DAW CROCKS WHISKY, 

BE SURB you ARB RIGHT, THBJi 00 AHEAD. 



?. g/6 aACftAMKNTO STREET. - - SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



P.J. CASSIN &, CO., 

IBCPOnTERS OF PURE 

Kentucky Bourbon Whiskies 

Sole .igentHfor O. K. GOLUBX PLANTATION WHISKY. 



-WIIOLEH I.E DEL KKS IN- 



Foreign and Domestic Wines and Liquors. 



433 BATTERY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Kuhls, Schwarke & Co. 

Wholesale Wine and liquor Merchants. 

California Wliies aiiH Biafies. 



-80LE AOKNTB FOR- 



O.K. Goldwater Bourbon & Rye Whiskies, 

JJ.I-JJ.') Siiltir St., Cor. Krannj. - - Son Fnninsro. Col. 



li. KiiiTscii. 



C. C'ELLAKirS. 



Thomas Taylor & Co. 

— DIs-ni.LEKS OF ASl) DEALERS IN — 

iA£INES KND LIQUORS 



Sole Agents for 

Alpine and Champion Cocktail Bitters. 



El First Sfcr<z<zrt, 



Sajd Frs-ncriscro. 



C. JOKT, (in. 



C. JoST, Jil. 



Q/^Llpoi^i^i/^ i>i5rUJI^C ^0., 



-r)i»tilleni and Itcclihcrs of — 



SPIRITS AND ALCOHOL 

Office: 306-308 Clay Street, 

DISTILLEllV AT AXTIOCH. SAX FRAXCISCO. 



CHAH. W, FOKK, 



JDIIN M'UrAM K. 



Spruance, Stanley & Co. 

IMPORTERS AND JOBBERS OF FINE 

WlilsKies, Wliies aiid Upis. 

Sole agents for the Celebrated African Stomach Bitters 



llii I'u'>\r Stiikkt. 



San 1'i:am'1s( .1. Cm., 





f/eifie wijsiE 


y^JMD 


SflF^IT 


f^EV 


lEW. 








39 


BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 

'89. 


Fall 

'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall 

'90. 


3pr'g 

'87. 


Fall 

'86. 


Spr'g 

'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 

Whiskies. 


Remarkfi 


Glencoe '. . 














Spr 81 285 




Glenmore 










47* 


42* 
40 

42* 
















Glen Spriugs 






















SprSl 300 
Spr 81 300 




Greenbrier 








60 










250 








Greylock (The Mill Creek Dist'g Co.) 




















Greystone 






























G. W. S 




80 


"m" 

55 


60 
60 

52i 
47i 


■■■■47* 
40 
45 


45 
45 
37* 

42* 


















Hackly, S. 







200 




225 










Manning, Jno 










Spr 80 300 




Harris, N 








210 
































Hayden,R. B. & Co 








52^ 




37* 
37* 




200 














Head, F. M 




















Head, W.H 








50 

87^ 
55 




















Hermitage 






95 
60 


42* 
40 


70 
40 
37* 
40 












275 


Spr 81 375 




Hill&Hill 




7H 

52i 














HorseShoe (The Mill Creek Dist'g Co) 


57i 


32* 
















Hume 




50 






220 






SprSl 280 




Indian Hill 








25 












Jessamine 










36 


35 

42* 

40 

62* 

37* 

37* 










































Kellar, A 






57J 


52J 

75 

52| 


42* 

55 

40 








225 
240 






Spr 84 260 
June 81 350 




Kentucky Club 






" "32* 


220 










Kentucky Comfort (Paine's) 




































Kentucky Dew 








50 
55 




























42* 


40 






210 




250 








Lancaster, E. B. (Maple Grove) 






























40 
40 


















Limestone 




72^ 




52i 






210 




235 






















McBrayer, J. H 








55 

92i 


'"76" 


42* 
67* 


















McBi-ayer, W. H 










250 


265 






275 


Fall 84 280 




McKenna 














Marion Co. Distilling Co 








51^ 
52^ 
65 
60 


40 
55 

47* 


37* 
37* 
50 
45 


















Mattingly & Son, J. G 




















Spr 84 235 










70 
65 








225 








Mayfield 
















SprSl 300 
























Mellwood 


72^ 


70 
80 


57^ 
75 


55 

60 

52i 

60 

72i 
57i 


42* 
45 

"52* 
45 


40 

40 

35 

52* 

52* 

45 

40 














Fall 81 265 




Mercantile Club 


35 














Miles, E. L 


















Monarch, M. V 






















, 


Monarch, R 











230 
110 










SprSl 280 
FaU 81 275 
SprSl 275 


NYCH 










EG 


230 




240 




Moore, D. L 








Lou 




























Murphy, Barber & Co 








62* 
65" 
52J 


45 
40 


50 
37* 








110 


EG 




Spr si" 300 


Lou CH 


Nail, A. G 




80 


57^ 










Nelson 






200 




215 




225 






New Castle 




60 






New Hope 






65 

52J 

70 

75 

95 


55 


52* 














Spr 82 275 




Nutwood 






55 
















Oakwood 




82^ 




52* 




210 

240 














0. F. C 










285 


FaU SO 400 




Old Charter 










35 

72* 
37| 












Old Crow 






100 












300 


SprSl 400 




Old Lexington Club 












115 


EG 




Old Log Cabin 




75 




















Old Pepper, (Pepper, Jas. E. & Co).. 






82* 
75 




60 
62* 





260 
265 




285 






Spr 84 290 
Fall 83 325 
SprSl 290 




Old Oscar Pepper 




100 






300 




Old Tarr 












Old Time (Pogues) 








50. 


52* 
40 


50 
35 


40 
32* 














Old Times .-. 






















Parkland 
























Parkhill 












30 


















Pattei-sou 




























Payne, P. E 








50 
55 

52* 


45 




























42* 

45 

60 

35 

37* 

40 

45 

35 

37* 


















Pepper, R. P 






55 






225 








Fall 81 275 




Pilgrimage 






50 












Purdy &Co 


























Rich Grain 








50 
55 

57* 

45 

52* 


■■■42* 

47* 


















Richwood , 






60 
65 


35 
















Ripy, T. B 






215 




230 




245 


SprSl 275 


L CH 


Rohrer, D 




57i 
























1 


....... 


( 




1 












• 1 1 1 


r 1 1 


'# 







40 



"60D BLESS YOU! 

Is thm HMrt-F«lt Eapreaalon that Cornea to Ua from "all 
ovar," from thoae who have uaad 



js^eifie WljSlE /f|^D SfIR.IT F^EVIEW. „ 

M I THE BtLLE OF BOURBON COMPANY, 



LOUISVILLE, KY. 

KISTILLEKS OF THE PAJCOU> 




FATHERS! MOTHERS! CHILDREN! 

TM» voodrrfal rorUUI. inhirh ln.w twrct ar wilil honey, and bi< invli;oralln|; an 
an clrrlrlcal halterv, 

DIARRHGEA, DYSENTERY, MALARIA, 

And aii aitamU of IIh- iH.wrU. Lratlinu riioiilanK i>ns( riln- II for ADl'LTS AND 

CHtLOKKX. For Mir l>) M«>m». Mt.vtrfild. Mitrlull .te Hlflx-nlmuer, 

Kan Fram Ui'o. am* all ilriit'i.'l*'i' »n(l dfalen". 

RHEINSTROM BROS. Sole Props., 

oiBTiLUiita rime liqucurs, 

cr]<rciiT3srA.Ti, tj. s. a. 

Monarch Blackberry Brandy, 

THE ONLY RELIABLE IN THE MARKET. 
£VI'"B I'laiTi. SVJIKMITH AND FLAVOR, IT HAS NO EgUAL."^ 

Miklovilfli, Fletcher & Co. 

DISTILLEnS OF 

FItl lT lilUMI llS. 

]'.Mt:ler8 and Dcalem In 

Native ]^ines. 




16870-72 East Pear! St. 
Cincinnati O. 



M. Blumenthal & Co., 



»I«TII.I.KR« MtU MAHirAI I UKKll or 



SYRUPS, CORDIALS, BITTERS, EXTRACTS, 

Pure Sugar Coloring 



A specialty. 



Wine and Liquor IVIepchants. 

688-660 Mi..ion St., ■#!. •eooiK aw^ Third. San Franel.o, Cal 

MOW 8oii> AT lowra mom an m samples and pricb. 



"BEliliE OF BOUOT" 

Hand-Made Sour Mash Whisky 

{ H) ix-r c-enf Small drain.) 
MONK BOTTLED UNDER EIQHT YKAKS OLO. 



SIEBE BROS. & PLAGEMANN, 

AGENTS, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



TO WINE-MAKERS! 



Tlie underslKnccI Ik^k Io call the attention of Wine Makers, Dealers, etc., to U. 

ClicvalliiT-ApiHTl's 

"OENOTANNIN" 

As a rorrei'tivc and n puriticr to all li);ht Table \Vinc8, H'hltf itnd Red, 
AND 

Fob CLAKiKYiNii White and I!ku Wi.NKk, 

And to 

A. BOAKE ROBERTS & CO'S 

LIQUID ALBUMENS 

For clarifvin,;, prcBervhiK. rcBtorini: and correcting both White and Ued Wines. 
IHrectlontt for use on application. 

For Sale by Charles Meinecke & Co., Sole Agents, 

314 SaciHimento Sti-eet, San Fvaneinco, Cal. 



established 



A. Finke's 



Manttfadurer^ of 

CALIFORNIA 



ABSOLUTELY PURE 



809 MONTGOMERY ST., 

San Francisco. 

Telephone 5034. 




1 864 



Widow, 



First Premium 



1/0. 



Gold Seal, 

Carte Blanche, 

Imperiai,. 



t:F"FI"'frremlnin for Gold 
Seal Hesl California Cham- 

Iia^nrit awarde<l by the 8tate 
•■ail, ISyo, and «"herever ex- 
hibited. 



E. U G. STEELE St CO. 

Suew8w>i-hi to C. AiK)M'n I>ow & Co. 

aOLE IMPORTERS OF 

HARIVIO NY SHE RRIES. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 

208 California SrKEhrr, - San Francisoo, Cal. 



f/reifie WIJSIE /rJMD SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



41 



BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 
'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 
'89. 


Fall 
'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall 
'90. 


Spr'g 

'87. 


Fall 
'86. 


Spr'g 
'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 

Whiskies 


Remarks 


Saifell, W B .".. 




























Samuels, T. W 






65 


62i 

55 

57i 




45 
42^ 

47i 








240 


Cin. 


CH 


Spr 81 300 
Fall 83 266 




Samuels, W. B. & Co...: 














Searcy, J. S 






















Searcy, Wiley, (Old Joe.) 




90 




















Sharpe 






65 




















Shawlian 










40 

37^ 

40 


















Small Grain 


















. 










Smith & Smith 




























Snyder (Freiberg & Workum) 






50 




m 






























225 












Sovereign 








55 




















Split Rock 








37 

■■■■47* 
37i 


35 
47^ 
50 
45 


















Spring Hill 








62* 
65 
62i 
45 














Spr 81 325 




Spring Water 






















Stone, W. S. (Old) 






** 




210 




225 


























Tippecanoe 








37^ 


















Taylor (Old) 




95 


97* 
60" 


72i 
55 




















Tea Kettle 




42i 


40 


35 




































Tip Top (Rock Spring Dist'g Co 




75 


60 


m 


42^ 


40 
40 
374 
40 


































Spr 81 300 


Lou 


Van Hook 








50 

67* 

55" 

55 

75 

50 

62* 

67* 

47i 






200 










Walker, F. O. (Queen of Nelson) .. . 




















Walker, J. M 
























Warwick 








45 
60 

■■■■371 


42* 

57* 

37^ 

55 

60 

35 

32^ 

45 

62* 


235 


200 




230 










Waterfill & Frazier 




90 
65 


80 










AVathen Bros 


















Welsh, J. T. (Davies Co.) 




















AV^elsh, J. T. (McLean Co) 
























White Mills 




57i 


55 






































Woodland 








57* 

70" 


47* 
57^ 





200 








240 




































. 



KlEItTTTJOiC:^" I^^YES. 



Ashland 








62* 

m 




42* 
50 








I 


1 




Atherton 


















■ 1 




Belle of Anderson 


















■■ 1 




Belle of Louisville 






m 


















'} 




Belle of Nelson 






76 

77J 


"eo" 


60 

67| 






^ 




257* 


1 




Blue Orass 






82^ 




215 






f 




Clarke's 












1 




Criterion 








62^ 
















1 




Crystal Spring 




























Curlev, J. E 






























Edgewater 


























Spr 80 360 




Excelsior 




























Franklin 








75 




55 


















Grey lock 
























Greystone 






























Hermitage 






100 


96 

70 
55 

62i 

70 

52^ 


82^ 

65 

50 


77* 
55 












300 


Spr 83 375 




Highland 


















Horse Shoe (Mill Creek Dist'g Co... 
























I jynchburg 








40 


















Marion Co Distillini? Co 
























Mattingly & Son, J. G 










45 


















Mel wood 




80 


65 


















Miles E. L 




70 
62| 


47i 

55 

65 

60 

60 






















Millcrp,ok 


































60 








250 










Nelson 
























^ormandv 








76 

80 




















Old Pepper (Pepper Jas. E. & Co... 








67* 
52* 
47* 
65 




260 




300 






Spr 84 300 




Parift Club ... 














Peaeook 




























PeDoer. R. P 








65 


60 








235 










Rolling Fork 












215 










Short Horn (Dougherty's) 










50 

50 

60 

52J 

36 
















Sovereifni 










66 

62* 

55 

40 

56 

42i 








240 










Sunnv Side 








67^ 

65 

46 

52^ 






















46 
















Sylvan Grove (Fleishmanu's) 

Wathen Bros 


60 


65 


50 

70 
































WMte Mills 






40 












:::::::.. 1 





















42 







AODflCSS. INSURANCE. BRAND. 

BOUK/BOITS. 



ADDRESS. INSURANCE. 



BRAND. 



ANPl i;-<'N -v N"K1^>N l»l.'<T"Sa). 
Add; An«l«Ti««n \ NoWm IHrtillcrie*' 

Rato, flfp, 

BEU.K of ANDKIWON !>'(» <X). 

Add; S. J. (}m«ul«uui, liouwville. 

Rate, 1.35. 

M. P. MATTIXCJI.Y. 

Owuiu<l>uro, Ky 

FreeW. H., 1^. 



AikUtk*'". 



.1 \s 1,. I'KITER&CO., 

Tjoxington, 

Uat<'. STk'. 



1,. II. TAYLOR. JR- &S0N8, 

Frankfort. 

RntP. 8oc. 



Pepper. 



Old Taylor. 



Ik'llo of Aii'l'Tf^on. 
(ilcnariiK'. 

J(XNllllilli>, 1 1 

Arlington. 
Old W. S. Stun.'. 



iiKlJ.K OF NKIi^N D'Y CX). 
Add: 1»<-11»' "<■ Nelson Distillery Co. 
Louisville. 

Rnt«>, 85o. and «1.25 



Belle of Nelson. 



J. O. MATTINOLY CX). 

liouisville. 

IUte86c. 



J. G. Mattingly & Sons. 



MEUAVOOI) DISTY CX). 

Louisville. 
. Bate, 85c. 



Mellwoml, 
Dundee, 
G. W. 8. 



MCM)RK & 8EI.LKJKR, 

IxHiisvillc. 
Rate, 86c. 



Astor, 
R4*lniont, 
Nutwooil. 



KD. Ml'RPHY & (X).. 

liBwrenceburg, Ky. 
No. 1, 1.35. 



Belle of Anderson County 



EJLSTBi2.nsr le^iTES. 



M. CRICHTON & CO. 

Baltimore, Md. 
"A"' 1.70, "B" 1.60, "C" 1.35. 



Monticello. 



J. A. IX)UGHERTY & SONS, 

Philadelphia, Pa 
Rate, 90c. 



Dougherty. 



A. OVERHOLT & CO., 
Add; A. Overholt & Co., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Rate, 80c. 

'~ 8. DILLINGER & SONS, 

Ruft's Dale, Pa. 



Overholt. 



Dilliuger. 



OLD TIMl-X DIKT'Y (X)., 

Ix>uisvillc. 
BatMS 85c. & 11 .50. 



Old Times. 
(»la<lstone. 



THOMl'SON DIST'G CO., 

West BrowniHville, Pa. 
Add; Office 134 Water St., Pittsburg.Pa. 
Rate. 80c. 



Sam Thompson. 



SUSQUEHANNA DIST'G CO., 

Milton. 
Add; Jiis. I^evy & Bro., Cincinnati. 
Rjites, 85c & 1.25. 



Susquehanna. 



BETHANY DISTILLERY 




CBTABLIBHCO 18 3 4 



^UJF'SDME. WESTMOf^EbAHD CO. PA. 



THIS SPACE ReSER^ED FOR 

cam. H- sHiEiiDs, 

WHISKY BROKER 



No. 6 West Third Street, 



Cincinnati, O. 



f/reifie WIJME /rJMD Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



43 



EJLSTEKylsr IS^ITES. 



BEANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 
'89. 


Fall 

'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall Spr'g 
'90. 1 '87. 


Fall 

'86. 


Spr'g 
'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 

Whiskies. 


Remarks 


Bi'iicldock 




125 

95 

85 

90 

110 

105 


87^ 

80 

9^4 


87* 

77| 

70 

70 

85 

82* 

57* 

82* 

75 

85 

62* 


80 
60 

60 
75 
62* 


75 

55 

55 

52* 

62* 

62* 


67* 
50 


275 
240 














Bridg(^j)ort 


100 


255 












Bi'ookdiile 












Dilliugor, S. & Sons 




















Douffhortv 


115 

120 


55 

57* 


265 


285 












Finch's Golden Wedding 












Frontier -. 
















Gibson 


1.30 
98^ 


122J 
95 


100 

97| 
67i 


65 
65 
72* 
55 


60 
60 
67* 
47* 








360 
2'95 
320 










Guckenheiiner 


52* 
57* 
40 
45 


245 
275 
215 


360 


310 
340 




Spr81 465 




Hiinnisville 




Jones, G. AV 


82J 


75 








Lippen(H)tt 






















70 
75 

82* 
57* 


62* 
62* 
67* 

60 
75 
55 
65 
65 
45 
60 
60 
60 


60 
60 

57* 

40 

55 

70 

47i 

60 

62* 

42* 

55 

50 

50 
















Melvale 


115 
110 


105 

102^ 

75 


90 

92^ 

67^ 






, 














52* 

.35 

45 

62* 

45' 

55 
35 






265 










Montrose 
































Mt. Vernon 


1,30 
105 


125 
102i 
115' 
100 
65 


107* 

85' 
87* 
85 
57* 


87* 

70' 

75 

80 

50 

75 








350 








r ien t 














Overholt 


265 
272* 


285 
272* 


310 






SprSO 700 














Somerset 


75 












Stewart 
















Tonipson. Ram 








42* 
45 
































































^^i^^ded'JW. 



'V^IS^' 




J&i^a^ %Ja'M^ T^' 



ADDKE55 ALL CSMMUNICATlONa TO 

QctsrRAL orncn, 

FlTT.5BUi^Qr-l. Pa. 



Pu 



Established 1844. 



^Sam Thompsoni<^ 



RE 



R 



YE 



Wh 



ISKY 



UNEQUALLED IN QUALITY. 



Office: 134 Water Street, 



ON THE MONONGAHELA RIVEFI, 
West Brownsville, Pa. 



44 f^eifie wijME f'fiB 

STILL MAklNi; Wm AT THE (ILU STA.M), 

314 8PCAR ST.. SAN KHANCISCO. 



Sf If^iT F^EVIEW. 



Hobbs, Wall ai^ Co., 

MaHuj-trlurrr* of AVrjf T'trtrfy of 

BOXES. 

All kinds of Boxes on hand and mada to order with 
promptness. Wine and Uquor Cases a Specialty. 

Redwood Cargoes Sawed To Order. 



Linda Vista Vineyard, 



MlSSHty .S-.4.V ./O.SK. <AI. 



Grape Cuttings 

(^iM'nift SjMivipion. CiUH'niot Fmno, Si'inillon. Vcnlot, Merlot, 

Ik-«!jiii. IVtit Synih. Fnuikon Rir.xliiiK. JolmnnislHMT; 

KicMliii);. MoimU'uh*', Muw-ikU'I <lii IJordi-liiise, 

m-OK AXV OTHER VARIETY WANTED.-'&^ 

Firwt-<'lMKH(\illiiip* of any of tlu> ulH»ve for RootinpH or (Srafts 
will U- mi|>|ilic<l at lii.iKt |»«t tliiuisimd on l)oanl cai-s 

Address,- C. C. MclVER, Mission San Jose, Cal. 

LOlViA PPI^TA uUMp^p CO. 

— 8Ut:i:E8KOIiH TO— 

^XTi^XSONVII-I-E 1A. & L.* Co. 

Have Cuiwliintlr <>ii Hand a Full Hiipply 
• >f llic PulluwiiiK Hixm of 

2ii2--4 F««t Long, 2x2--5 F««t Long, 

2x2- -6 r««t Long. 

Ifklrk vill br mtUl nt iftittiinable rates. 



LOMA PRIETA LUMBER CO. 



Loma Pr 



Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 




OK 

Prominent California Vineyards. 



iThw Caida liuwrted for ^5 per Ye«r In •dvance.] 



Kl riWI. VINKV.MID. — EMahlUlied 
1S.V.'. Wlii.T mill l>iamlU*. tleorKe 
Writl * K.in, Slixkton, Cal. 

HI Kit II A VIKTA^vrNEYAKD -. Wlnw 
mill l.rniiill.i'. «l»rr8 > iKla \ Ine.vard 
t'o., Miiiliirii. Krf»ii», Co.. Cal. 



Gas For Country Residences! 

DYKES' 

IMPROVED 

Auloniiilie (Jas Jlachine Co. 

Jacob Hcbreibcr.HKi'. J.O.Liebcrt.Jr. Hec. 

43-45 Stevenson St., - S. L. 

Success Achieved- 

Perfection Complete. 

"•I iirricrt Autoinatli' (la* Mai-hlm- imw In imc lt< Hit- nne IwinK 
Wai. . ■ tS HtrvmMin •l.vrt liv tlir Dykm' ImpnivcU Aiiloniatic Oaa 

Ma< liiiir ( <jui(iaiii li I* |>artl< nlarl\ lur lllnmliiatlni; inuntrv nwUUixi'i-. It In 
r*|irrlall) adaplnj (or Ctiiin Ik* an<l j'lililli Inrtltullour, Hotcli>,^VImTiii> anil (Vllan.; 
Ibr ili^-l.i i« lirifhi Mi«.i> 11, •.■III. S<i(i ■ml rrm^rkalily fimiIIiIiik Io IIk' evfu. ■lid 
III- III thf i'iiiif>uin|>lli>n of rlly Kan. No ilaiiKcr wlial- 

'V' '-n Willi li in ro riimmon In llir iiM-of roal oil lamiw, 

frmii Mil , lilrtilr liavr lut-n mi inlcil In our il«ll> iu'«i>- 

|iaprr«. LIim-o in al'voliitrh n-xiirril. In i onrliirloii wt- 

would Mv <'ur I'lililli- liintllullonfiliouUI W wlllioiit tlu-rv 

Om Jfsrfaiuca. aa tlw IikIiI I» ••< (at »uiicf|..r to other iDrtbuilii. Head for CataloKue, 
« •Dd i» Btcireiwoa HIrevI, ><aa Fram Irro, Cal. 



I DE Tl'ltK VINEYAItDS- Ental)- 
ll«li«l IKfia. WIni* and brandli*. I. 
I)i' Turk, KanIa lioea. Cal. 

IXCI.KXOOK VINEYAKD— EataWlshed 
ISKO. Wiiu* and braiidlca. Ouslave 
NU-liaiiin, Jtutlierford, Napa Co., Cal. 

SCNSET VlNEYAliD— EstablWied 1881. 
Wliif!' mid brandies. Webster & 8»r- 
(jent, Minlurn. Fresno Co., Cal. 



OLIVINA VINEVARD— Established 1881 
Wines and brandies. Julius P. Smith, 
Llvermore, Cal. 



MONT HOrOE VlNEYAIlD— Eatab 
liflied 1K8.5. Dry wines. A. O. 
(^Iiauclie, Llvermore, Cal. Olflce 615- 
(117 Front St., San Franclsfo, Cal. 

ELECTHA VINEYAUD. — EsUblisbed 
1881. Dry wines. Clarence J. Wet- 
more, Liv'crmore, Cal. 

LINDA VISTA VINEYAUD— Eetabltahed 
18.W. Dry and sweet wines. C. C. 
Mrlrer, Mission San Jose, Alapieda 
Co., CaK 

CllESTA BLANC.\— Exclusively fane hlRh 
jjrsdc wines in bottle, fine Kantenies 
and Medoe types. Only cash order* 
solicited. Charles A. Wetmore, Llver- 
more, Cal. 

FRESNO VINEYARD— E«tBbli6bed 1S«0. 
Sweet and dry wipes and brandies 
Fre^no, Cal,. L. P. Drexler, -KM) Cali- 
fornia St., San FranclBCo, Cal. 



IMI'OmCT TO yiSTILLEIlS AND WINE IIAKEIIS. 




This fut represents our latest /»i- 
proi-ed (jonttnuou-H Still which has 
been iK'rfected after years of eiix!riments 
and larce cxi)ense. 

This Sllll h»n the advantage 
over all othern, as it is economical, 
easily oiierattd and separates the alde- 
hyde and other inferior oils and makes a 
pure and hi^h class brandy, and I'educm 
the cosf fully ntiwly per ceitt in 
lalwr and fuel. It requires very little or 
no water and iitilizeH all heat heretofore 
wasted 

We refer to Geo. West & Son, Stock- 
ton; Joiis Wheklek, St. Helena. 



ALL KIND OF COPPER WORK DONE AT SHORT NOTICE. 

SANDERS L CO. 



421 ASH 413 Mission St.. 



Sas Fkancisco, Cal 



THE LARGEST COMPANY WEST OF NEW YORK. 




INSUBMCE 



COMPANY 



^a^ OF CALIFORNIA. @ ;^ 

D J. HTAn.Ks, Pre*. Wm. J. DuTTOS, Viie-Pres. B. Favmonvii.i,e, See'y 

OKI). H. Tykon, Asii'l Sec'y. J. U. Lkvison, Marine Scc'y. 

lUtytr. (tFI'lJE. 40I-40.-, <tLIFOK\IA .STKf.f.r. -S. F. 

Pacific Copper Works, 

L. Wa(}NKR, Proprietok, 565 Mission St., 8. F. 

Manufacturer of all Descriptions of CoirKR WonK, and especially of 
Brandy Apparatus, and 

Newest Improved Continuous Still. Leads all others. 

llraiidv distilled in my Coktimuouh Still received this and last year, the 
lllullluiT market prli'e. For I'fRiTY and riN« flavor none can equal it. 

llcfeis to the Pacific Wine Co.. Kan Jose; Eisen Vineyardti, Krisnii. Cnl '" " 

Vineyard. KriTno. Cal.; Fiesiio Vinvvnrdi', Fresno, Cal.; Hill A Mnrvbali 
Sonoina countv. Cal.; Co-0|ieiatlvellistlllinK Co., St. Hclciin, Cal.. and >> 
Sons, Oevservlllc, Sonoma county, Cal. Chamjwgtte auU Soda Machines uiauuUi.. 
luied. l'rlcc» as low Ml any. 



fys^eifie WIJvJE /tJvID SflF^IT [REVIEW. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES. 

Page. 

Beck, Pyhrr & Ck) Ifi 

Boyd, F. O. & Co 34 

California Wine Growers Union 34 

Ci-abb, H. AV 34 

Carpy, C. & Co .36 

Chauche, A. G 35 

De Tiuk, 1 34 

GuudLach, J. & Co 25 

Gamier, Laiicei & Co 23 

Haraszthy, Arpad & Co 25 

Haber, F. A 30 

Harris, Kingston & Reynolds 35 

Holtum, C. & Co 36 

Kohler & Van Bergen 34 

Kohler & Frohling 36 

Kolb&Denhard .36 

Kuhls, Schwarke & Co 38 

Lacbman & Jacobi 36 

Lachman, S. & Co 25 

Luyties Bros 6 

Los Gatos & Saratoga Wine Co 36 

Melczer, Joseph & Co 34 

Napa Vallej' AVine Co 16 

Natoma Vineyard Co 32 

San Gabriel Wine Co 34 

St. Helena Wine Co 36 

DISTILLERS AND BROKERS. 

Belle of Bourbon Co 40 

California Distilling Co 38 

Daviess County Distilling Co 27 

Dillinger, S. & Sons 42 

Glenmore Distilling Co. ." 27 

Halle, Max M 32 

Leading Distillers' Cards 42 

Levy, Jas. & Bro 46 

Melhvood Distillery Co 1 

Monarch, R 27 

Moore & Selliger 5 

Murphy, Ed. & Co 5 

Overholt, A & Co 43 

Pepper, Jas. E. & Co 6 

Shields, Wra. H 42 

Taylor, E. H. Jr. & Sons 32 

riiompson Distilling Co 43 

FRUIT BRANDY DISTILLERS. 

Mihalovich, Fletcher & Co 40 

Rheinstrom Bros 40 

Walden & Co 32 

West, Geo. & Son 3 

SAN FRANCISCO WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS. 

Dassin, P. J. & Co .' 38 

Key, Grauerholz & Co 38 

encken & Schroder 38 

jrschler & Co 36 

:otaling, A. P. & Co 4 

iloore. Hunt & Co 4 

tfartin, E. & Co 38 

l^aber, Alfs & Brune 38 

Jiebe Bros. & Plagemann 4 

Jhea, Bocqueraz & Co 34 

Jpruance, Stanley & Co 38 

Taylor, Thos. & Co 38 

iVichman & Lutgen 38 

rtfilmerding &.Co : 38 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CHAMPAGNES. 

Imerican Champagne Co 35 

)hapman, W. B 28 

i'inke's Widow, A 40 

iftraszthy, Arpad & Co 25 

jachman, 8. & Co 36 

facondray &Co 34 



Meineeke, Chas. & Co 28 

A. Vignier 34 

Werner, A. & Co 35 

Wolff, Wni. &Co 16 

IMPORTERS. 

Chapman, W. B..... 28 

Macondray & Co 34 

Meineeke, Chas. & Co 28 

Vignier, A 34 

Wolff, Wm. &Co 16 

SPECIAL BONDED WAREHOUSES. 

Bode&llaslett 6 

Sherman, J. D. W 5 

Sibley, Hiram & Co 31 

SYRUPS, CORDIALS, BITTERS, ETC. 

Blumenthal, M. & Co 34 

Dryden & Palmer , — ^ 

Henley Bros 36 

McMillan, R. G 31 

Naber, Alfs & Brune 23 

Nicholas Rath & Co ,34 

Rudkin, Wm. H 31 

WINE FININGS ETC. 

Meineeke, Chas. & Co 40 

Moving, J. & Son 4 

Klipstein, A 40 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Baker & Hamilton 18 

Beck, Pyhrr & Co 45 

Bonestell & Co 45 

California Furniture Co 31 

Coon, M. F. &Co 45 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co neW 

F. J. Cheney & Co 31 

Electric Vapor Engine Co 6 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co 44 

Franckx & Ruhleman 44 

Fairbanks & Hutchinson 44 

Gall & Dunne 45 

Goodyear Rubber Co 45 

Golden Gate Woolen Mfg. Co 31 

Hobbs, Wall &Co 44 

Jordan, Dr. & Co 45 

Kohler & Chase — • 

Loma Prieta Lumber Co 44 

Mclver, C. C 44 

O'Brien, James 45 

Occidental & Oriental S. S. Co 45 

Oceanic Steamship Co 45 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co 45 

Prominent California Vineyardists 44 

Pacific Saw Co 45 

Pierce & Co 31 

Rosenfeld's Sons, John 45 

Sanders & Co 44 

Southern Pacific Co 45 

Steele, E. L. G. & Co 40 

Trumbull & Beebe new 

Tubbs' Cordage Co 45 

Wagner, L 44 

Waas, Henry 45 

Wood& Scott 2 



C3-EO. "WIDEST & SOHST 

Establislied 1853. 

CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

Wf/VE VAULTS, EL PINAL, STOCKTON, CAL, 

Sonoma Wink anu Hhanhy Co., - Ko. 1 Fuont Stkkkt, New York. 



J 



FTfirGipie wi|NE Ar'£> ^^riK'T review^ 




A. p. HOTALING & CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 



OLD BOURBON AND RYE WHISKIES. 



429 to 437 Jackson Street, - - San Francisco, Cal 



JOHN D. BIKBIk 



J. Y. I'LAGEMAXN. 



F. C. SIEBK 



SlEBE BnOS. 8t PliflGEmfll^l^, 

WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS. 




Celebrated Belie of Bourbon. 

Southeast Cor. Sacramento and Sansome Sts., -___--- San Francisco, Cal. 



Important por CCiine Prodaeers. 

SAGCHMRIN E. 

300 TIMES SWEETER THAN SUGAR. 

An unsorpaaaed ingrediont for wines; an excellent corrigent of any unpleasant tastci entirely innocuous. 

Soochorino haa very valuable anti-fennentativo and antiseptic properties. An addition to an alcoholic solution of 0.005 per 
cent Saodiarinc stopa the fermcntutiou entirely, also the formation of mould and vinegar acid. Testimonials by authorities and 
any furtlier information will be cheerfully fumislicd by applying to 

J. MOVIUS & SON, Successors to Lutz & Movius, 

Sole Licensees for the United States of America, - .... 79 MURRAY STREET, NEW YORK. 




JBSE POI^E WHISKIES, 



■ DIRECT FROM. 



Wo have My ostablthod tho reputation of these whiskies uu 
Pacific Coast, and wo guarantco them as re.presented 

STRICTLY PURE. 

\71ien (fix-on a trial lliey aiMiak for thetnii-lvM. For ule In qiuntitle* lo >ult *t ' 

LOUISVILLE OR SAN FRANCISCO BY 

MOORE, HUNT & CO., 

SOLE AOEftrS PACIFIC COAST, 

404 FRONT ST., - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



f/eifie wijME /cj^jD sfiF^ir [review. 



5 



JVIOOI^E & SEIililGEfJ, 

^ouisville, Jly, 

B^C/T)Of(X 3i?d j\Sm^^ are distilled 
from fipe$t of ^rali^ apd purest of u/ater 
upop tl^e \\aT)d /T)ade Sour /r\asl7 pro- 
cess, ^ael; apd euery barrel ^uarapti^i^d 
to be 5tri(;tly pure aijd free from apy /T\u5t. 






y/ie NUTWOOD is a striotfy old fashioned "Fire Copper'' Sweet Mash Whiski/, in 
iho distillation of which we guarantee the use of 40 per cent small grain, giving to 
iho Whisky a heavy body and excellent flavor, which, for compounding purposes, is 
unexcelled in Kentucky. 



The BELMONT, ASTOR and NUTWOOD Whiskies are stored in the latest 
improved bonded warehouses, with patent racks, metal roof, iron shutters and doors. 
Giving our personal attention to the safe handling and care of these goods, with 
ever^r advantage and facility for shipping the same, we can guarantee full satisfac- 
tion in every particular to the trade. Soliciting your favors, we remain. 

Very respectfully, MOORE & SELLIGER. 





SECOND DISTRICT, NEW YORK. 



The only air-tight Special Bonded Warehouse in the world. Fire proof with iron roof 
and shutters and glass windows. Heated by hot-air engines, giving an even tem- 
perature the year around, thus insuring rapid development and high proof, and 
yielding the best possible results at the end of the bonding period. Cooperage 
cared for. No excessive outage. Storage and insurance the lowest. Freights 
advanced, and your business carefully attended to. Loans negotiated and sales 
made for cash when requested. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND SHIPMENTS SOLICITED. 



ED. MURPHY & CO., 

DISTILLERS OF —— 

"Tbe Belle of fliKjefsoDGoanty" 

Hand-Made Sour Mash Whisky. 

Vure Fire Copper Whisky, made from the best of Grain and Gold Lime Stone 

Spring Water in the Old-Fashioned Way by Mashing in Small Tubs, and 

. yeasting back pure sour mash. Whisky unbondgd by us and 

shipped F. 0. B. m boats free of charge 

Headquarters, Lawrenceburg, Ky. Post Office, Murphy, Ky. 



pAeifie WIJ^E /r!MD Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



OLD "PEPPER" WHISKY 

OMUM orty bt Jmm. K IViV" * '*»•• I-»»l'>««-"'. Kt . nndcr Ibf Mmr (..r::i iU 
loraKM* Ihaa too yrar^ U Ibr fMrvW and Itrmt Im ffcr ll'or/<l. ■■IVf/;M-r" 
ITMafcv b •• nkttvtil •nnl vhtakv. m>dr in iIk- old tlinr tray from a /tiriii- 
«(• »«-4 ■•»€» Ihin 1 10 y^an *y Ifcn* (/rnrrariona of lli«r IVpiT frmlU 
ll h marf* fnMB artf^ir^ rye karl^y aimI com. Tbr malrrUI i« iiixlitil '<;. 
haM. oat lii>il at a llmr. in aoMll lab*. OMrly one Ibotwand <■( vhu-ti nr.' roii- 
•IMHif nsain^ '"^ >)■> p«n>"**- No yM*t I* cnplujrcd lu crruir an iinn*<nnil li-r- 
mmUllua »r late* jrtaM. hmI wa «Ib(Ic and double throucli mpprr mttlln arrr 
•yMl frm, All Iba wmlar wad ia (nnn tbc rrlrbraird ■■ ir««on SitHnij" on our 
prralaaa. whirh U Ibt larcwl nmhiral mpring of purr HmnUone tratrr l.i 
raalial Kavlarkj. Oar f<»op»nm» U Ibe Iml ami of our own manufactarr. IVrfrcl 
alonm* varakoaaw. Oor Ml Jamu R. PirrKK l< (he only one of liln lumr «li.i 
baa baaa » mn« d la lb* iHallllliM; boalncaa in Kraturkjr for »xrr twrnlr Tean>. ami 
Ibnaforr aay vblakt aflrrad lu tbc trade aa gniainc "i¥|>|M>r" abUk.v \» fraud- 
t diall!M b; M. 

JAS. K PKl'PBn a CO. 




l/^^/7^M 



Model Mammoth Wine Cellars 

Under Approach of Brooklyn Bridge, Block E. &, G. 

eNT/IMNCeS WILUAM AND KOSE STKEETS. 



STORAGE WAREHOUSE AND COMMISSION DEPARTMENT, 

,ttipv*' Kntrance, M'Ullam St.. In Mttrk E. 



CorresponUeiioe Holirited. 



AnnRRKK, LuyUm Itrothent, Brooklyn Bridge, Neir York. 



IlKBTNOtK I'Tiiaa 
Faux I'TMaa. 




Choice California 

100 to 108 O'FARRELL STREET 

Sa.n F'rfiLncisco, Oal. 




iti^<^ 



Al>l>I.|-|( liKCK. 




Wines & Brandies 

Silver Medal Awarded at 



Ineorporated 



BODE & HASLETT, 



June 12, '90. 



FI^OFI^IETOI^S 



Special Bonded Waxehouse, No. 1, First District. 

filarial faritllira fur llif Rlnrai;e of Gra|ie and Fruit Brandy. LowcKt Hates of Storage and Insurance. Also Proprietors of the Greenwich 
n M-li t^nllwl Htatn. llondi>d Waretiousei', and tlic Battery Street Free Warehouses for General Storage. 

The Perfected "Safety" 

ELECTRIC VAPOR ENGINE, 

The Most Powerful and Economical Motor in the World 




Always Ready. TNo Boiler. No Fire. No Smoke. No Ashes. 

No License. No Danger. 



No Engineer. 



l»i«i CUy iioM and Malurnl (Ian, or trill make Uh otrn Vajx)!; trhlrh Im liinllrti 
autotnatlrally by a nmall dry electric battery. 

OUR WINE PLANT 

MoiintisI on a Hiiinll hiuid truck, with u iK)werfuI 
rotary hn»\M' |»uinp. will forw from .5(10 to .'{(KIO fj-.il- 
loiiK jH-r lioiir.aiui iisH-h-xH than oin' (^aUon of jra.-^oline 
in ti'ii hours run; gaHoliuc costs scvmtoon cvntH per 
Kiiih>n. 

W«' also huiUl Stationary VajMir Knfjiiu's from 
\ to 20 liorm- iK>wer. S«'nd for dose estimate. 



Office, 218 California St., San Francisco. 

Work., ail and LMM Main Street. 




^"''^^^ 




'O 



VOL. XXVI, NO. 4. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JVIARGH 15, 1891. 



$3.00 PER YEAR. 



Issued Semi- Monthly. 



Ji. M. WOOD & CO., 

WINFIELD SCOTT- 



PROPIUETORS. 

-E. M. WOOD. 



The PACIFIC WINE AXD SI'IRIT REVIEn te the only paper of 
ttn clasM ll'csf ()/■ Cliiviiiio. It eireiUatett amnny the wine niakerH and 
brandy dlnllUers of Cullfornla; tlie ivliolenale wine and spirit trade 
of the Pnclflc Coast, and tlie Importers, distillers and Jobbers of the 
Eastern States. 



Subscilption pel year— in advance, postage paid: 

For the United States, Mexico and Canada f3 00 

For European countriee • ■ * 00 

Single copies 20 

Entered at tlie Sau Frauciteo Post Oftice as second-class matter. 



PITTSBURGH AGENT, 

R. RAPHAEL, 190 Wylie Ave, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Sole Agent for Pennsylvania and North-western New York. 



CINCINNATI AND KENTUCKY AGENT, 
^VM. H. SHIELDS, No. 6 West Third Street, Cincinnati, O. 



THE MA-RKET. 



/©A LIFORNI A WINES- The market is exceedingly quiet, and 
^ what trtiding is being done, is not at satisfactory figures. 
The feature of the fortnight haa been the sale of about 400,000 
gallons from tlie Bourn cellar at St. Helena, to a local house. Th« 
demand for sweet wine.s, wliile paor, is batter than for dry wines. 
p]xports by sea during the past fortnight aggregated 210 cases 
and 69,(518 gallons, valued at $31,194. The rail shipments for 
February will be found elsewhere. 

/©ALIFORNIA BRANDIES— are strong and the demand 
^^ good. The last of the '90 goods are fast passing out of first 
hiinds, aud it will not be long before only a few scattered lots will 
remain so. The denumd is reported as good. '90 are quotable at 
forty-seven and a half and fifty cents, and '89 at fifty-five cents. 
Exports by sea during the past fortnight to domestic ports, 
were 1060 gallons valued at $1489 and to foreign ports 61 cases 
and 11,710 gallons valued at $5158. The shipments overland by 
rail will be found in the usual monthly table. 

*1I>ENTUCKY WHISKIES— Handlers report the market as 
^^ very good and with the promise of a fine year before the 
itate, the trade is looking for correspondingly heavy orders. 
Merchants are watching the Eastern situation very closely aiul 
"Jie progress of the movement to limit production inaugurated by 
he leading distillers, is being carefully noted. 



T^YES — Are not as strong as two weeks ago. The market 
J^ V never large, is well supplied with goods. 

Exports of whisky by sea during the past fortnight were 31.3 
cases and424 gallons, valued at $3,536. The receipts by rail and 
sea will be found in the usual tables. 



THE THCIST'S STATEMEMT. 



The Distilling & Cattle Feeding Co., has furnished us the 
following statement concerning the charges against Ex-Secretary 
Gibson in relation to the Shufeldt Distillery: 

We are holding our regular monthly meeting in Chicago 
instead of Peoria, for the purpose of ascertaining, as far as possible, 
the truth in respect to the charges against the Secretary of the 
company. 

Such widespread publicity has been given to these charges 
and so many false rumors are being spread, through the press, 
that we deem it our duty to make a brief statement. 

Since our election, as directors, we have devoted our time 
and best endeavors, by honorable methods, to the establishment 
of the business of this company upon a paying basis. 

We have made such progress, in this direction, that for many 
months the company has been earning and paying monthly 
dividends of a half of one per cent. , equal to six per cent, per annum 
on its stock and has, in addition, put aside a surplus each month. 

Our business is showing continually a large increase in out- 
put for every month over the output for the corresponding month 
in preceding years. Outside competition has never been felt as 
little as during the last six months. 

In the midst of such unexampled prosperity, that any one 
interested in the company should imperil the immense interests 
of its stockholders in such a scheme, as is charged, we think no 
sane man will believe. 

In regard to Mr. Gibson we have to say that he is a gentle- 
man of character and high standing, that he has been a faithful 
and efficient Secretary to this company, and that we do not credit 
in the least that he is guilty of the crime charged against him. 

The interests of this company will, in our judgement, be in 
no wise affected by this charge. Mr. Gibson's resignation has 
been tendered and accepted. 



NEW ADVERTISEMENTS. 



The attention of the readers of the Review is called to the 
advertisements of the following named firms. 

Pacific Copper Works (enlarged). 

F. Korbell & Bros., Wine Tanks. 

F. A. Haber, Inglenook Wines, (changed). 

Connecticut Inmirance Co., (changed). 

Baker & Hamilton, Vineyard Implements, (changed). 



g p^eipie wl^lE /r^i 

IMCKEASE OF EXPORTS. 



D Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



iHirinR Ih.. imwihH of JHiiuiirv iin.l F.-I.niury. tli.-n' wiw a 
mcirt « mifvinjj liM-n-ftM. in tho .'M-rt- "f <ulif.irniii win.* an-l 
bnuHlH* ».v mvk. Willi.. Ih.' mil .-mxtIm uum- thHii h.-I.J th.'ir ..wn 
with Ihc p'\|-Hli. for Ih.- .-..m^iH.n.linjc inoiUlm ..f laxl y.'ur. 'I In- 
,.\l..nt .»f III." rail lMiKiiii.«». huM iiln«a.ly Iw.mi jciv.n in tli.- n.'W ta 
bl.1. »l»i«'h ««• .vii..«-i«illv pn>|ian.<l f«»r tliij» journal. 

Till- Mi<»l nolir.«hr.- in<n-.iw in tlu' tnwl.' hy w^a luw. I«vn in 
niM> K.--1*. iMU-li.nilarly t.. (".lUnil Ani.Tini. Jn.lKinK from tlu- 
HUui ttlniuly nm.l.«. it w.hiI.I not Ik« Kun.minK if tl.«> .aw- k-xx'-* 
fSfMirtM to til.' littlo p.'|.ul.li«* in CVntral AuH-ri.ta would ivacli 
S,U»lii tTM.** for lWM.»«|uantity hitlifrto iWui.hI all but iniiMK**i- 
ble to attain. 

Tin' .-siHHiH bv MOO in January to Ni-w Y<»rk. w.t.- forty-two 
CMW will :{SI.S»1:J ln»lloui< v«lu..«l at «I.S1.7H». whih' in F.bruary. 
|lMTPWen'twfnty-<'iuht.iw.«*and.«K».7!K>pillonH valii.d al «17y.- 
M\. Thif. inrluiU* th.' i*liipm.>ntn by Tanania Ht^anurrt ami by 
eJip|H>r. It 'w a notoworthy fa<"t that already two cILpiK'r,^ hav.* 
Ailed thiK yt-ar. «m.- with '271.WI gallonH and the othi-r with 224,- 
0R2 KallonM. \ third will g.'t away In-fore the »nid of the nianth 
with almoMt at. much and with more brandy than has twer yet 
pm.' annin.l th.> Horn on one nhip. The olipi)or bunin.'SH is there- 
f.»n' in a ver>- HatinfaHory condition and bidi. fair to continue so. 

The Central .American tnwlc alrwwly alluded to above, 
whih' ..ontn>ll.'<l to «i)me extent by the gem»ral traders, Ih being 
HiuKle<l out by two or ni<»r«> Htrictly wine housert and with satisfac- 
tory iwnll*.. ' January rei>ort« were 'MtH «u«« and 7,Hi)!> gallouH 
valu.'«l at $5l!«»7. and FVbruary ex|>ort« reawh.Hl !H.") riiM-n and thnw 
hiim*k. UjIII.-.! win.', anil 7121 gjillons valu.'d at iXWil. This in 
m truly remarkabh' showing and one whi.-h wo hope ti) see ini- 
i(nive«l u|M»n still nion' when the California wine houses take more 
inten-xt in tli.' Inidi' and buihl it up upon the foundation alresidy 
lai.l by the .•onimission hous.-s. We see no n'iiHon why this ave- 
nw of sale shouUI not Ik- largely augnientwl. 

While the volume of the Mexican wise go<Kls busineHS is not 
HO targe as we w.)ulil like to s«hs trade has bi'-n fairly sjitisfactory. 
Khipnienti. f.w January aggregat^'dwventy four-aiwes and 4.^84 gal- 
lon!, valued at 13091. The February buHinees was eighty cases 
and 4fil4 gallons valued at $20.3.1. The Mexican trade should be 
built up faitter, and should l>e built up faster and would be even 
tnwle rvlations Itetween this country and Mexico as satisactory 
m between this (H)untry and Central America. 

Little Hawaii is iH'<'omingan enormous consumer of our wines, 
the January shipments alone reaching fiily-nine cases and 20,758 
aUlons value^l at $1 4.K(K). This is o(|ual to one-tenth of the total 
cane giMsls ex|K>rl*.and .me-sixth of the bulk exports there for 1890. 
Tlie February shipments w.'re nineteen cases and 7408 gallons 
valunl at $'>4i>2. Hawaii is one of the best foreign markets at 
pn-twHt o|M'n to California wines and the state of trade is very 
flatt'-ring. 

British Columbia is hK)mingup as a purchaser of our wines. 
The January busini mh by sea rt>ache<l one hundred and one cases 
and 2944 galt.ms, valneil at $2480, and the February business 
Mnount«'«l to tw.-nty-four cases and Id'.i] giillons, value<l at $878. 
The imwpects for the pn-si-nt y.'ar an' very gocnl. 

Tlie deman.I fwm across the riu'ific from China and Japan, 
iimteady and incn'asing. Ja|)an is by all means tliebett.T buyer 
«>f th«' two, the exjKtrtM to China iM'ing less than one <|uarter of 
the whole. Trade to Ja|Hin is growing at a great rate and sever- 
al new shipiMTH have a|>|M«re4l in the field lately. The exports 
in January were .»ne liiiii<lr<'<l and tliirt'.'n ois.'s and 7(18 gallons, 
valu.ll at $704. February business was much In-tter, the total be- 
ing 4M cwMwand 1NI7I gallons, value.1 at $2<(.'{(}. 

Til.' Km ' is picking up slowly, but shipments to 

the cMintri. i are linding favor in the eyi's of buyers 

which argiKi. well for the futur.'. In January we shippcl eight 
cast* and 1«74 gallons to variouH iioiuft, via Cape Horn, and in 
February, thirty-two ciumw and 40.-,n gallons, valued at $1804. 



TlM- l.ran.iv Lumucs^ l.as Im-.m, b.'uvier in .p.ant.ty and more sat. 
iMufuv ail aroun.l than tbe wine tnule; but exiM>rtt'rs and nier- 
,.hi,„t^ U:n xw^ .-...nu-.tions abn)ad, are in a hopeful state of mind. 
1 1„. r ,l>iii tia.l.- is small and fluctuating. Shipnu-nts forthe. 
I,,., ,«.. inonil.s of this vcar. wero only 545 galh.us, valu.Hl at 
?277. IIm- ir.i.l- is wholly in the hantbi of a few commission 

The l.r iiidy cx|K)rtt both to domestic and foreign ports are 
l,„Mniu^ ui. IniMv. T.. fon'ign countries we sent .me hundn-il and 
(w ntv-n.ur .•a.'.."s and 248!) gallons, valued at $1988 in January, 
and the February exjK.rtsa^jgrt^gat ^d f..rty-thr..e cast«and 19,7(H 
gallons, vain '.I at $1.1,944. The February exports were the larg- 
est for any months for some time, and the bulk was to FDngland— 
in fact all Of th" go(Ml< not i-asiHl. went to that country. 

To domwtic port? (practically all to New York by Panama 
steanu-rs or .•lip;K'is,) the «xi)ort.s reached 39.97(i gallons, vahud 
at $75.IS.-> n Jinuary, and .^.().:{(iS gallons valued at $1(»5,:«)2 in 
F.'bruary. This is a truly magiiificnt showing?, and yet it is bc- 
lieve<l by the b'st inform -.l to be merely a starting to what the 
trade will ultimately grow. 



THE CHAMPAG/NE GOCIGE-RS. 



The hotel and restaurant me:i who have seized upon the 
"McKinley Bill do<lge" as an excuse for charging $4.50 and $5.(K) 
per bottle for imported champa.?ne do not like the statements 
made in the last iasue of the Rkview in regsird to their imiK)si- 
tions. 

Jo.seph Hord, of Hord & Kinzler, the proprietors of the 
California Hotel, has sprung to the defenses of the ban.l of roblnM-s, 
yclept hotel k.'epei-s, with whom he is iuss<Knat<'d. He says that 
the fizzing fluid co.sts them $2.70 to $2.75 per bottle and thinks 
that is an excuse for charging $4.50 and $5.00. Then he claims 
that at Iwist two bottles in every tsiseare worthless which practi- 
cally raises the price of cjidi lK)ttle to $:{.;!0 or therealKjuts. 
Then, with petniliar irritation, he SJiys that as each host hius to 
carry a big stock no one can sell for less than $5.00 and make 
anything. 

This is all rubbish as any one conu»M,'ted with the trade 
knows. The fact of the matter is that Mr. Hord and his fellows 
thought they saw a chance to squeeze the public and they seized 
it quickly. There isn't a house in New York, Delmouicos in- 
cluded, which charges over $4.00, and $3.00 is the figure at the 
Gilsey House. 

We think that the best thing the champagne men can do is 
to go in and stop this infamous steal practiced by the local men. 
Five dollars for champagne is too much and the public will not 
stand it. The agents, such as W. B. Chapman, Wni. W'olfT & 
Co., MjU!ondray & Co., A. Vignier, James De Fremery & Co., 
Hellman Bros. & C'o., Harry Veuve. Jont^s, Muudy & Co., and 
sonje othei-s are in a |)o«ition to settle things and down the r.'- 
tailers ring inside of a day. Four dollars is sufficient, at most, 
for im|K>rt.Hl champagne, <and the agents am compel this rate and 
increase their sales by doing so. 



A -DESE-RVE-D APPOI/NTME/NT. 



A deserviMl (mnpliment was paid Deputy ( 'ollwtor of Internal 
Revenue John E. Youngls'rg by his appointment as ColUn-tor ad 
tntrrim until the IVesi.lent s«'KH;tc<l thesuc'cssor of the late William 
II. Sears. Few if any men in the (iov.'rnnunt st'rvice are so well 
a.'.iuaint.'.l with their dutii^sasMr. YounglM'rgan.lnone exwl him 
in zeahmsness, a desire to fulfil all his duties, and in the |K>ss«'ssi(Hi 
of all those qualities which go to make a gentleman. We do not 
know of any man who hjts shown more capability for his duti< ~ 
He has the good will and the confidence of the tnule and all witli 
whom he comes in contact. 



J 



fAeifie WIJME AJSIE) Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



SUPP-RESS M-R. HILGA-RD. 



The sweet wine situation has been needlessly complicated 
during the past fortnight by a series of tests made at the local 
Internal Revenue office to decide on the best methods of determin- 
ing alcohol in sweet wines. The question which is not by any 
means a new one, was raised by Professor Hilgard of the State 
University and the sole result of the inquiry has been to foster 
the breach already extending between him and the department. 

The lat33t trouble aross after the last issue of the Review 
went to presa. At that time Commissioner Mason had assured 
us in a letter evidently intended for publication, that as fiir as he 
could do so he would aid the swijst wine producers of the state; 
he had promised a thorough investigation of the matter, and he 
has and still does treat with the utmost courtesy and attention 
any one who calls in person on him. 

Early in the month Hilgard went to the local Internal 
Revenue office and wanted to test the accuracy of the spindles in 
use there. He was politely informed that to do so he would have 
to get permission from the Washington office. This was of course 
promptly given as a matter of courtesy and Hilgard set to work. 
He made his tests and officers of the Internal Revenue Depart- 
ment made theirs, and no material variance was found. With 
this avenue to pick a flaw in the office closed, Hilgard raised the 
old, old question of the differenca between the ordinary tests and 
the results obtained by the use of the Salleron still. In a few 
days he had the local office all torn up with his useless tests to 
prove what was already known. The tests ware made in due 
time and the result was what the daily papsrs call "an ex- 
tremely length}^ and abstrusely technical" document, aimed at 
the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, the meat of which is 
that the Salleron stills are usually more accurate than the sacchar- 
ometer method. The experiments showed higher percentages of 
from one, to three and six-tenths by the Salleron. All of which 
is, of course, very new to Hilgard but is hardly new to others in 
the business. 

We are at a loss to understand this latest movement on the 
part of the Sage of Barkeley, unless it was laid on the same lines 
as all of his work has been. We do not see what he had to gain 
by making these tests except the pleasure of seeing flaring head- 
lines in the daily papers reading "Professor Hilgard favors the 
use of the Salleron." If notoriety was his aim, he has certainly 
gained it and in a manner not at all to the benefit of the wine 
men. The saccharonieter method which has long been in use 
has given results satisfactory to the wine men and to the Depart- 
ment; and if the Salleron method is substituted the sweet wine 
men will merely have Hilgard to thank for the privilege of hav- 
ing less alcohol in their wines or paying for one to three per cent 
more in case they are assessed. 

It was not to be expected of course that Professor Hilgard 
would let slip the opportunity to get into the papers and accord- 
ingly, on the 9th inst. the Chronicle and Examiner had a full state- 
ment of the contents of the letter which he sent to the Commis- 
sioner of Internal Revenue on the 7tli. 

We have not the slightest doubt but that copies of this letter 
were taken to the journals in question either by Hilgard or his 
agents. It was a gross piece of official discourtesy to give out 
the contents at all and when that "lengthy and abstruse" docu- 
ment on the virtues of the Salleron still and the saccharometer 
gets to Washington its contents will be stale and spent and the 
afficial to whom it is addressed will very naturally and justly 
?ive it little attention. 

We think that the time has come for the suppression of the 
Dfficious gentleman from across the bay. He has sufficiently en- 
ieared himself to the Internal Ktevenue Department .already to 
warrant his retirement. Every California wine man who has 
ately been in Washington has wired back to keep Hilgard out of 
;he papers as much as possible. 

To the Commission 3r of Internal Revenue we offer the 



apologies of the wine men of California whose misfortune it has 
been to have Hilgard meddle in this matter and delay a settle- 
ment. We would beg the Commissioner to remember that Hil- 
gard represents nobody except Hilgard, and that the sweet wine 
men have formed an association of their own. They are ready, 
through this Association and through the other Viticultural 
bodies as well as the State Analyst, to give him all the assistance 
in their power. All that we ask from the Department is fairness 
and right and we ask it not seeking notoriety, but in the interests 
of the industry we serve. 



HAg/NE TO THE FQ-RE. 



F. W. Hayne, the New York wine manipulator has published 
a circular of which the following is a part: 

"I propose publishing a paper in the interests of the 
California vineyardists. I shall endeavor to make it dependent 
on subscriptions; therefore at first it will not be an extensive 
publication. If it has merit, I hope to make a success without 
either blackguarding, blackmailing or puffing in order to obtain 
advertisements. The circulation cutting no figure as an 
advertising medium it will be perfectly independent. 

"P. S. — My next Trade Auction Sale will take place next 
September." 

We are pleased to see Mr. Hayne in the field, but we are 
rather dubious about his success in his newly chosen work. He 
might learn something to his financial advantage by applying to 
the erstwhile proprietor of the Whistle- Vitigraph,-CaHfornia 
combination of San Francisco or Mr. B. F. Clayton, of New York, 
with referenc3 to their exparienca in publishing a paper for 
subscription only. 

We have already paid our respects to Mr. Hayne's wine 
auction scheme, but would say that with a level-headed man to 
conduct it and $1,000,000 to back him, it might possibly be made 
a success. 

OU-R eHieAGO EXHIBIT. 



Governor Marknam has approved the bill appropriating 
$300,000 for a separate State exhibit at the World's Fair. Active 
preparations for arranging the details and collecting the materials 
will therefore soon begin. 

With the sum at the disposal of the State it is possible to 
make a splendid showing at the P'air and at the same time it is 
possible that most of the money may be frittered away. There 
will, to a certainty, be a sharp attack on the fund by the politi- 
cians and it stands to reason that some friends of this or that boss, 
great or small, will have to be "cared for." 

But with an ordinarily great drain from this source there will 
still be enough left to make a creditable showing. It is expected 
of course that the developments of Viticulture and Horticulture 
will be under the control of the State bodies devoted to these 
pursuits of life. This is only just, proper and right. The Viti- 
cultural Commission is in a position to do more effective work in 
collecting a suitable and decently representative display of Cal- 
ifarnia wines and brandies than is any other organization in the 
Sta,te. The Horticultural Commission is similarly situated and 
it is to be hoped that to these Commissions will be assigned the 
duty of bringing together the materials which will go to make up 
the greatest attraction to visitors in the entire California exhibit. 



A/NOTHE-R OPI/SIO/N. 

San Feancisco, March 2, 1891. 
Editors Pacific Wine and Spirit Review: 

I am glad to see that your paper has become a first-class one. 
Such a paper is a credit to California and to the publishei-s. I 
hope that the trade will help you to continue to be what intelli- 
gence and energy have made the Review already. 

Respectfully, 

Capt. J. Ch. de St. Hubert. 



10 fyireifie WIJ^E /rrJE) 

PKOMIMEMT WIM£ MEM. 



SflfllT I^EVIEW. 




&kiUb No. t, Georis West of StocktoR. 



Aliont a iiiiU> and » half north of Kt<H'ktoii, close to the rail- 
nxMl running from St<K'kton to Sa<'raiiifiito, ih a great dustor of 
buiUlingrt alinont like a Hmall village, mirrounded by a vineyard, 
orohard and all the arceNiurieH of a gentleman 'h country home. 
The ptaw ii* tin* property of Georgo Wi'st, the subject of thin 
■ketrh. whow winen and brandiea are famous wherever the Cali- 
fornia prtMluct ix w>ld. 

Mr. Wittt ii4 a native of MaHHat-huwttiiand wan Iwrn at Taun- 
ton on January 12th, IHJH). He received a common school edu- 
cation in hin native town, and when scarcely a man in years, he 
went to Beaton and entcnnl the lumbL'r biminess. While pursu- 
ing tliin <M-cu|mtion, the news of the gold discoveries in California 
wan ret-eivwl and in common with all the young and ambitious men 
of the |HTiod. he waM s4-i/.4-<l with ndtvin* to visit the new Kl Dora- 
do. I're«'«"«le<l a few months by his eliler bn)ther, W. H. West, he 
mil<*<l for Cnlifoniia by way of ('a|M> Horn late in \H4\t, and land- 
e<l in Hon Francisco in the Spring of l!i50, starting at once for the 
tniocB. 

He flnt locat«><l in Tuolumne countrj', remaining until 1852. 
Like many others, he sue*-*-*-*!!-*! fairly well in th«' placers, but un- 
like the gn-at majority, he held a fair share of the w<'alth taken 
from the nitiuntains. 

In 1H52 Im- pun-hnwHl the pro|MTty which has sin*-*^ In-en 
known HM the"KI I'inal \iiieyar«l." When he l<M-atc<l there, there 
WttJt nothing but the iNire plain. Iiut in a short time the vineyard 
wiu« set out and improvement-^ were conHtantly made. His Hrst 
vine* came from abniad by wiiy of Itoston. anil one variety oIh 
tained in thin way Iuin never b.. n certainly identi(ie<l with any 
Kuro|M-un grape. Certain it ia that it is a for.-ign grape, but in 
California it is always known a« "W<>Hts White rroliftc' 



Mr We*t lAf "t »"^< '" Partnership with his brother, Mr. 
W B We«t Since s.'ttliug at .Stwkton. he has made the wine 
and br.u.dy busine-s bis constant study, and neither i«un8 uorex- 
p,,nse have iK^n spar.-<l in building up a reputation for hisgcnxls, 
now •«'cond to non.- in Ameri(-a. ,,.,,•, . 

•■nie "Kl rinal Vineyanl," is in feet, a mo<lel wtablisbment. 
U .-..vers an area of one hundrtMl acres, but it must not be sup- 
,„med that the produ<-t of this vineyard alone gm-s into the win- 
erioa. In the vinUvge s«>iu«)n, grapes are bought in Livermore, 
Santii Clara valley «n<l ..tlier sections. The capacity of the win- 
cry is about 4(KK) tons of grain* annually. The cellars are spa- 
cious and iulmirably adapttnl to their purpoae^. The distillerj' is 
one of the most complete in the world. 

Th.' fame of ' Kl I'inal " re«t8 principally on the sweet wines and 
brandies produce<l. The West Ports. Sherries, Frontignan and 
other sweet winw are re<-ogni/.i'd everywhere hh sUmdard, while 
W«>st llnuidy is among the iM'st distilled in the State. 

In perwrn, Mr. West is a tall, splendidly built man with a 
massive figure. «|uiet in his demeanor and ctmversation, but with 
a lasting fund of bright storiiw, which, however, are rarely heard 
except by his intimate friends. When at his best, no one could l>e 
more companionable than he. In his businws relations, he has 
the confidence and rmpect of all. his quietness, firmness and abil- 
ity combined, making him one o' the pillar.^ of strength in th<> 

iuduatry. 

Mr. West is identified with many enterpiises aside from the 
vineyard at StcK-kton. Some year.s a-jo, he as.sociated himself 
with" the late Charles Kohler of Kohler & Fi-ohling and T. R. Min- 
tum, and the firm at once set out the great (iSO acre vineyard at 
Mii.turn, now the property of Kohler, West & Minturn (iuccr- 
poratcd). He also has an interest in the wholesale houBC of 
(teorge West & Co.. of Stwkton. and his c<mnecti(m with the 
Sonoma Wine and Br.nidy Comi)auy of New York, is well kni.wn. 

Mr. West t« iimrritt«l, and h:us one son and one daughter. The 
former, F". A. West, is a partner in the vineyard, the firm 1k- 
ing (leorge. West & Son. In all his life, no political office has ever 
U'mpted Mr. West to emerge from hit busy vineyard. The 
only official place he has ever held, is Viticultural Commissioner 
for the San Joaquin District to which he was appointe<l in 1880 
when the Board was organized, and which he still holds. 



SOME MOKE eOHHEGTIO/NS. 

Under the caption of "A Few Corrections," our friend Min- 
use the New York manager for the Ixmisville Wine and Spirit 
Bulletin, pays his resi)ect8 to us in the following terms, regarding 
our attitude conceniing the Hayne auction plan of selling wine 
in New York: 

To treat our contemporaries with justice and to regard them 
without prejudice, is one of the principles upon which we stand 
a« a trade journal. To enter into personalties in protecting a 
principle or in proving a fact, is an abhorence to us; but to stand 
by and uphold our convictions, is to us l»oth a matter of right and 
of justice. Some time ago we learned that one of our conimis.'<i(m 
merchants, Mr. F. W. Hayne proposed holding auction ssiles in 
this city, of California wines and brandies. We looked carefully 
into the idwis he presented to us; we attended pi'r.<(niuny tlie first 
sale he held here, and have given from time to time such partic- 
ulars reganling this matter as would be of interest to our n-ad- 
ers. Our friend, the /fmni', .commenting upon this sale, and also 
upon the position of the wine trade here, states that there are 
comparatively few American buyers, especially in the Jjist.who 
know what wines are. Aside frtmi the absurdity of such a state- 
ment, we are sorry that the editor of the iWi/Jc Wiue and Spirit 
]{rrinv <leriv(Hl such little Inmefit from his re<'ent trip pjist, and 
we iH'g to state for his information that then' is prolmbly more 
cxiHTt judg«*of winw and brandiw in the city of N«'w York 
alone, than there ar»' in all the States west of the Mississippi river, 
;mt If. It re<iuires very little argument to show that where the 
consumption of wiue is the largest, that their knowle<lge regard- 
ing thesubjwt is more apt to prevail than in wctions where wine, 
as an article of consumption, is almost unknown. In answering 
another question which the Jifvlmv puts to us we would say '''iit 
fine wines, aside from those bearing French labels, are want*" »» 



J , 



©nZy JT/etO ^dvertiseinents Qn ^KU ^age. 



11 



CONNECTICUT FIRE INSURANCE COMPANY, 

Of Haitfoit. {onnectlciit. 

QUEEN INSURANCE COMPANY OF LIVERPOOL, 

ROYAL EXCHANGE ASSURANCE, 
of LiOntUyn, Incorporated 1730. 

ROBERT DICKSON, Manager. 

N. W. CoK. Sackamento am) MoNTiiOMEKV Sts. , San Francisco, Cai,. 




F.KORBEL&BROS. 

821 BRYANT ST., S. F. 

Or at NORTH FORK MILL, Hu mloldt CountyCal. 



Pacific 

L. Wagnek, 



Copper Works, 

Proprietor, 565 Mission St., S. F. 




Manufacturer of all Descriptions 

OF 

COt'PKU WOttK, 

and esiK'clally of 
Brandy Apparatus, and , 

Newest Improved Continuous Still 
Leads all others. 



Brandy distilled in my Co«- 
TiNiioOK Stili- received tliis and 
last year, tiie iiKiiiKST marl<et 
price. For pukitv and fiSe 
flavor none can equal it. 

Itefers to the Pacific Wine Co., 

San Jose; Einen Vineyards, Fresno; 

EjrjferB Vineyard, Fresno, Fiesno 

Vineyards, Fresno; Hill & Mar- 

sliall, Laguna, Sonoma county; 

Co-Operatiye DislillinK Co. St. 

Helena, Lay, Clarl< & Co., Santa 

iiosa; Waldcn & Sons, 

Geyseryillc, Sonoma 

county, C'al. Cliam- 

pagne & Soda Machines 

manufactuied. 

Prices Low as Any. 

Tliis cut represents tlie latest improvement in continuous stills, and a i;lance at 
tile construction of it in comparison wi'liany otherstiii manufactured, will convince 
any practical di-stiller of its immense superiority overall others. I claim the foliow- 
ing points of superiority: 1st. The amount of heat in my still is only two per cent, 
thus affecting an enormous saving in steam and fuel. 2d. Distilling double amount 
of any other still. 3d, Facility of liandling and reirnlating. 4th. Simplicity of con- 
struction. 

Fairbanks' Standard Scales, Trucks, Etc. 

FAIRBANKS & HUTCHINSON, 

136-318 Markih' Street, - - San Francisco. Cal 



this city, aud are used here. We would go a little further and 
say, that were it not for the very large amount of refuse stock 
thrown on this market, the appreciation which the sound products 
of the California wine grower deserves here would be greatly ex- 
tended, and the 20,000 gallons of wine which our friend says is 
offered at fifty cents f. o. b., San P>aucisco, could, if it showed 
proper quality, find a ready sale here. The Reveiw states further 
that buyers in London attending auction sales purchase goods of 
established merit and reputation, and liow foolish is this state- 
ment, when nine-tenths of the goods he refers to are sold strictly 
on their merits and are of comparatively unknown brands. We 
are ashamed of our contemporary for saying that Mr. I. de Turk 
has dissolved his relation with Mr. Hayne, owing to his (Haynes') 
auction plan, when he certainly must be in a position to know 
that such is not the fact. To show our California friends that 
there are some people besides ourselves who do not look with dis- 
favor upon auction sales of California wines and brandies in this 
market, and for the benefit of the Review, which calls such sales 
"A rattle-brained scheme for the demoralization of a market," 
we give below a copy of a letter received from Senator Stanford 
in reply to our inquiry as to whether he intended to dispose of 
som3 of his enormous stosk of brandy by auction in New York. 

Office of Leland Stanford, U. S. S., ") 
1701 K Street, [• 

Washington, D. C, Feb. 7, 1891. ) 
Mr. Wm. T. Minme, Room 12, No. Jf5 Beaver Street, New York City : 
Dear Sir: Your letter of February 3d to Senator Stanford in 
relation to sales of brandy at auction has been received. 

In reply I am directed to inform you that the matter has not 
been fully determined as yet, though under consideration. 
Yours respectfully, 

John B. McCarthy, Private Secretary. 

Casting aside the little homily, which friend Minuse indulges 
in at the opening of liis article, we are in a position to repeat and 
do repeat that there are comparatively few Americans East of the 
Rocky Mountains who are able to judge of wines on their merits. 
That there are many experts in the trade in New York, and 
among the importers, is not to be questioned for a moment, nor 
did we question it. But the fact still remains that American buy- 
ers of our wines are few when compared to the foreign buyers. 
If the Bulletin knows what it is talking about as far as New York 
J8 concerned, it must admit that the bulk of California wines is 



consumed by the French, Germans, Italians and other foreign peO" 
pie resident there. California wines in incst cases are looked up- 
on with disfavor in the clubs, altliough they are making headway 
against this false prejudice. Some day it will be the fad to drink 
them under their own labels exactly as it is the "proper thing" in 
the East, to use California fruits. Wiiile the importers are un- 
doubtadly expert judges of wine on their me rits, veiy few ofthtm 
buy California wines, for sale under their tru3 colors. They regard 
them as of sufficient excellence to be entitled to masquerade un- 
der such alluring labels as " St. Julien ", " Hochheimer ", " Deides- 
heimer," "Liebfraumilch", etc. This is at the same time a tribute 
from the importers to the merits of our wines, and a sorry re- 
flection on the American wine drinkers of New York. 

The idea that wine as an article of consumption is unknown 
in California, is, to say the least, very amusing. 

In regard to the wine auction scheme, the facts and figures 
that have been purchased in connection with the first (and we 
hope the last for some time) effort to sell onr wines in New York, 
is the best answer that can be made. The auction was a failure 
and we see no reason for qualifying the statement in the least. 
As to Senator Stanford's consideration of the plan to di.spose of 
his brandies at public sale, it seems to have been limited to "filing 
away" the letter of the auction promoter, inasmuch as he has 
sensibly established special agencies for the sale of his product, 
in New York and Chicago and gives no evidence of dependence 
on fleeting auction sales. Referring to the relations of Mr. De 
Turk and Mr. Hayne, we have nothing further to say and have 
no qualifications of our statement already made, to offer. 



VALE LOCAL OPTIO/N. 



Oakland has beaten the local optionist clear out of siglit, and 
henceforth the city across the bay will be governetl bj^ license laws. 
The victory is decisive; aud the W. C. T. U. will have to take a 
back seat in consequence. The election clearly demonsti-ated that 
the male population of Oakland will be governed just so far by the 
women, but that at local option, they di-aw tlie line. 
• Vale local option. 

Alameda has raised the license from 8200 to $501) annually and 
the most satisfactory results are anticipated by the high license 
party in that place. We are less sanguine. 



12 



f>;M5lfie WIIJE /tj^ 

^Todo J/otos, 



F. A. W«»4. of iUttryp' W«*t & Sou. Stockton, liiu« Ikhiu in 
|Im> ril) (luriiw thr |MUd fitrtniKht. 

A. I»uvail, thf w««ll-kii.»wn Livenimrv prmluwj- w Mlii|>iiiiij! 
,#tnnifl«««M<> wine to the I/iniion market. 

Hamiwl K. SimmLhuii ofSumuoI Stn-it ofSiuniH'l Stn-it &("<).. 
IIki Nfw York iiii|Kirt«'ri». i» vixitiiiK th«> c «uj*t on Imsini'.sx. 

M. V. Monanh. prwidcut of the M. V. Monarch Co., in m'u\ 
to hr Jiettrr off by wvrral hiindrf*! thouMUKl tloUarH than \u' w;n 
two yrmr* ago. 

(1iari<« Kohlrr yew in Waahlnjjton m-ontly and wliili- tli«r.> 
had a long talk with t'ommitwioiHT <if Int.rntii R«ven»u» Miiw)ii, 
ovtT the Hwcft wine aitiiAUoa. 

niaH«« A. W'Hmon' han \n-*'n n (•aiididat*- for I'nitisl Stateti 
Henator to i«uc<-«tHl thi- hito (Jforpe Heartrt. One thing in crtain 
and that iit he would make a brilliant r«><'onl. 

Oamier, I.Anc<-l \ ('<>. an- iiuikinK quite a conrndfrable hole 
in the Kantern market. Tlie firm in uliipping liirgi'iy, and han 
the advantagi! of being growcnt an well ax nierchantH. 

Luytim Bros, are rapidly perfecting the arrangementH for 
their new eelUn* under the Hrookiyn Bridg.'. When everything 
b complete the cMlan* will have no wjual in New York. 

Hhea, lVK»|Uen« & Co. are doing well with the "Tea Kettle." 
"Tea K«'ttle" ii« the sort of whisky that Hpi-akt* for itself, and Mr. 
Hhea im juHt the man to handle Hueh winex lus thiu. 

J. MoviiiH & Hon have l>«>en meeting with mueh 8uc«e«8 in 
the intrtMluclion of Hiiccharine. It is being experimented with 
by many of the wine morehautu and handlern of the State. 

Wilnienling & Co. are pushing the Hale of their Peruvian 
lUttent in the Kattteni market. The Hhip St. Mark took one 
hundn^l iiww of theae goods. There ia a fine opening in tlie Eaiit 
for HU<'h gooda. 

Cliarlea Jacob, of "Sunnyaide" fame, in hea<led this way. 
He will receive a genuine California recvplion fnnn the trade. 
The new diatillery of the company in Pennsylvania in iaat near- 
ing completion. 

We are iuformeil by the J. G. Mattingly Co. that the total 
oatput of Mattingly during Fall '!K) an<l Spring M>1 will amount 
to only A.o:mi liarrelH. TIiIh in right and the example Hhould be 
emulated by more di!«tillerH. 

William Wolff and Co. re|M»rt a Ht4'a<lily growing demand for 
the n-iniport'Ml whixkiei handled by thehouHL'. The "Ik-imont,'' 
"Chickentvck" mid othern which they tn'U, are going particularly 
well for the aeoMon. 



D SflR.IT R.EVIEW. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

Inioii I'.i. li. luu.l, lia.« Kii.d the Union Pacific Company to 
r.-...N. r *l"l i7'.t .lamiig.rt. due to the 1oh» of her protector's life. 

Ir.-.l Klll.l^ of Kuhls. 8chwarke&Co.,i8 very much pleased 
will. III,..;, iiiii;;!! •li.i-'miaein th'j G jrm vn trad'j in consequence 
„f liiH r.- • •:it trip to th- Fatiierlaud Tiie firm is ext'mlin^ its 
,-,.mir.tio,.h ra)>idly. Good wines and businees ability always 
will. 

Hiram Sibley & Ca are doing well with their l)onde<l ware- 
lioiis4> l.iisinewH in Chicago. When the Internal R-venus D^jpart- 
m<nt He-s lit to allow greater privileges in unbonding to the East- 
ern sweet wine producers, the bu8in339 will extend at a still fastr 
er rate. 

Among the recent callers on Commissioner Mason in rt^rd 
t » the Sweet Wine I^aw were Mr. Johnson, the son-in-law of H. 
W. Crabb. and F. Pohndorflf. Every one who ha.s seen the Com- 
missioner recently is convinced that the sweet wine question will 
soon 1h' wttled. 

Champagne still keeps on its upward marcli. The recent 
advance which wius in no wise due to tlie "McKinley Bill" may 
result in a further advance on the part of our hotel and restau- 
rant shariw. Make it six dollars gentlemen next. You have 
enough assurance to do it. 

H. W. Crabb is planting large numbers of resistant vines this 
year. It is [his intention to keep planting year by year, as the 
old vines are killed by the phylloxera, and in this manner, his 
large traJe in the East and in San Francisco can be kept supplied 
with the famous "To-Kalon" Wines. 



CharlcH Meineeke & Co. an* iloing well with their numenm •• 
•pedaltleM. From all quarters, tntde isre|»<irted as brighter than 
•t any time sincie the holidnyM. Mr. Ilenr>- Kunz is showing re- 
nkrkable buxinem ability in his mamig«-ment of atfairs. 

IflBac I)e Turk is wat4-hing the IJaden st<H'k-yard and |*acking 
boiwe ent -rprise very ehuwly. lie ami Peter K. Her. the famous 
Omaha tlistiller are clone p -r^oniil frien<N and .Mr. I)e Turk Is al- 
most OS great an enthusiast over the enterprise as is Mr. Her. 

Ludwig Wagner, the well-known still maker, has just com- 
pl«t«4l one of his hu|{eat ailed stills for I/iy. Clark \ Co., the 
wine makers of Sania Kosji The still is a s|iiendid one, an<l will, 
doubtleiwt, do exct^llent w<»rk for the firm for wliieh it was miwle. 

Row Rtmenblatt, widow of the late K Kos«.nblatt. founder of 
the Rosenblatt Wine Co., who wan kiiUd |i»st summer on the 



The trade and wine industry are well represented in the 
contt^t for the seat of the late Senator George Hearst. What 
with M. M. Kstae, A. P. Williams, of Livingston & Co., G. G. 
Blanchard and C. A. Wetmore in the field, there is little else that 
the wine and liquor interest could ask. 



The ''Globus", a permanent exhibition Company in Berlin 
with extensive connoctions in every portion of the world, is solic- 
iting exhibits from the leading California producers of wines and 
brandies. Special inducements are offered exhibitors who will 
give an agency to the Exposition Company. 

S. A. Scott the storekeeper at the 8t. Helena bonded ware- 
house, has just shipped 729 packages of brandy from the ware- 
house, which will ba sent to New Y'ork on the ship Alexander 
Gibson. The brandy belongs to a local house and the shipment 
is the largest ever made at one time from St. Helena. 



The Napa Valley Wine Co., here are doinj; a fine business in 
their California wines, and sell largely their '88 and "89 brandies. 
The prices of California wines are getting more firm, which is 
partly accounted for by the fact that a good deal of the ■9J crop 
is distilled into brandy. — St. Louis Correspondence Bonfort«. 

Hjnry Postel & Co., thts wholesaler under the Flood Building 
are sufferers from the defalcation of their collector and salesm.m, 
llisrmin L ik"inin, who h%^ vanishel with $3l),i;), or thareabouts, 
of the firm's m)ney. Lukemann mid'j sale.^ and piK-keted the 
money as well as conducting operations in several other crooked 
ways. 

George Carroll continues along in the even tenor of trade, 
pa<'king uj) sales at a remarkable rate. " Straight g<M>ds a spw- 
ialty" is a motto which is coining money for Carroll & Carroll. 
wjHH;ially when the motto is ba<'ke<l up by such goods as "Old 
Pep|)er.''"W. H. McBrayer" and other whiskies of like merit and 
reputation. 

Messrs. E. Remy Martin & Co., of Rouilla •, near Cogna4\ 
inTorm us that they have mlmittiHl as an tn/«!rr«w of their old- 
estiiblishtMl firm, their friend and relative, Mr. K. Hagemann 
Seguin, who will devot<' his spwial attention to their busines*< in 



f/re(j-l(B WIJME ;^JMD Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



13 



the United Kingdom. Hellman Bros. & Co., will continue as the 
Pacific Coast agent. 

George H. Moore, the Louisville capitalist, banker and dis- 
tiller, has purchased the Jesse Moore interest in the firm of Jesse 
Moore & Co. of Louisville and all other distilleries in which Jesse 
Moore had an interest. It is needless to say that there will be 
no change whatever in the San Francisco management of the fa- 
mous "Jesse Moore" Whisky. 



The Napa Valley Wine Co. is so pushed with orders from 
the East, that it is all but impossible tiO got out the wine fast 
enough. The Company is about a thousand cases behind with 
their orders. This speaks volumes for the active and successful 
management of the company's affairs, and for the quality of the 
goods they offer their patrons. 

Julius P. Smith is now placing his wines on the English 
market under their own label. The first sale publicly reported 
was 2 cases Zinfandel at 13s; 5 cases Haut Sauterue at 138 6d; 
5 cases Malbec at 148 6d; 5 cases Burgundy at 15s 6d and 5 cases 
Riesling at 17s 6d. The prices are not large it is true ranging 
from $3.12 to $4.20 per case but this cannot long be so when 
their merits are better known. 



Madeira bids fair to become a popular wine in society once 
more. Ever since Ward McAllister, the leader of the New York 
Four Hundred, has set his seal of approval on this famous wine 
in h's book, "Society as I Have Found It," there are indications 
of a general revival of Madeira drinking among the wealthiest 
classes. McAllister has all the old Southern fondness for this old 
wine and he can popularize it to no little degree if ho sees fit. 

We have been recently shown a sample of a sour ma.sh 
whisky made by The J. G. Mattingly Co., the flavor of which is 
80 exquisite as to be indicative of a new departure in the manu- 
facture of this class of goods. Mr. Cunningham can well be 
proud of the ijuccess so far attained, and if the whisky should 
continue to develop with time as it has shown up for the past 
few months since it was made, we predict for this new grade a 
most brilliant future. — Criterion. 



Mr. Norbert Becker, the popular representative of S. Lach- 
man & Co., has recently returned from Europe and is on the 
war-path. Mr. Becker's pleasure trip to Europe was well earned 
and well deserved. He combines the enviable qualities of know- 
ing how to work as well as how to enjoy himself. On his busi- 
ness trips none can excel him in zeal and hard work, and outside 
of business he is the soul of geniality and the life of the com- 
pany. He has recently established his headquarters in Chicago. 
— Mida's Criterion. 

The trade in spurious Cognac brandy has assumed such pro- 
portions that the municipality of the town of Cognac, whence the 
beverage derives its name, has found itself called upon to issue a 
public notice warning purchasers and consumers of Cognac that 
there are over two hundred fictitious firms who respresent them- 
selves as manufacturers of the article, and brand their cases with 
an address in Cognac, but who have no existence whatever in 
that city. The work of returning letters addressed to these 
imaginary houses is a serious source of trouble to the Cognac 
post-office. 

Adolphus Busch, of St. Louis, and the San Francisco gen- 
tlemen who are associated with him in the plan to erect a new 
brewery here are making considerable headway with their scheme. 
The great difficulty thus far has been to get a suitable site. 
Several locations have been proposed and it is understoo<l that 
the Company has about closed with several parties for the neces- 
sary land. It is a difficult matter to get all the property necessary 
for such a large establishment in the central portion of the city 
at a reasonable price and necessarily the Company does not dare 
to announce that it will buy in any location until all the property 
has been bonded. 



One of the best known brands in the State is the "J. H. 
Cutter," owned and controlled by Messrs. C. P. Moorman & Co. 
The brand was first introduced to the trade by Mr. J. H. Cutter 
in the year 1850, Mr. C. P. Moorman becoming associated with 
him in '58, and in '60 purchased the brand at the death of Mr. 
Cutter for something like $51,000. This was, perhaps, the high- 
est price that was ever paid for a brand of whisky. Besides 
owning the above brand, the company carry a large assortment of 
the principal brands of the State in bond and free, always using 
care in selecting goods made strictly under the old-fashioned 
hand-made sour-mash plan. The trade of the house extends all 
over the country, being represented by local agents in as remoto 
points as Boston on the one side and San Francisco on the other. 
— Louisville BvUetin. 

In the following extract from an interview in the Louisville 
Thnes, Major D. W. Sanders pays a handsome compliment to 
Capt. George H. Moore, of Moore, Hunt & Co., and of Moore & 
Selliger and Jesse Moore & Co., of Louisville. So modest is Mr. 
Moore regarding his military exploits, that this little bit of history 
will come as a revelation even to many of his intimate friends: 

"I once had a view of Sherman's entire army, and the sight 
was a most magnificent one, and one which I will never forget. 
It was at the time when Johnson's army occupied the line on 
Kenesaw Mountain. Stretched out to the north at the base of 
the mountain was one of the most beautiful and fertile valleys of 
the south, every inch of ground being under cultivation. Into 
this valley marched Sherman's entire army of 110,000 men, with 
their muskets, artillery, camp utensils and stores. From the 
top of the mountain they could be readily seen as they marched 
and countermarched in the valley. At that tim3 a spiritsd con- 
flict took place. Major Stores planted two batteries of artillery 
on top of the mountain and opened fire on Sherman's men. 
Capt. George H. Moore, of this city, was in comnmnd of the 
skirmish line, and was well down on the mount.iin side in Sher- 
man's front. Capt. Moore, who was considered one of the 
bravest, coolest, and best of the young officers, covered himself 
with especial glory on that occasion. Sherman, with his char- 
acteristic decision, massed one hundred and thirty pieces of 
artillery, and opened a continuous fire on Major Stores' men 
while he shelled Capt. Moore's skirmish line with sixty pieces of 
artillery. It was a sight never to be forgotten, and every move 
could be seen from the summit of the mountain." 



It is doubtful if any other house connected with our trade 
has ever succeeded in doing a business of so great magnitude as 
that done by C. P. Moorman & Co., of Louisville, with so little 
stir and noise. Mr. Moorman is by nature a quiet, unobtrusive 
man, and so well has he handled the famous J. H. Cutter, that it 
has naturally fallen into his ways, and without a bit of fuss, 
without any contention with rivals, without any beating of drums 
or waving of banners, it just "gets there." 

Mr. Moorman has never followed in the beaten tracks of 
trade, but with ideas of his own he has quietly cut out a path for 
himself. His plan has never been a selfish one, but based rather 
on the conception that to make money himself he must help 
others to make money. Acting on this idea, he has always 
worked through agents, and by protecting them in their 
territories, by giving them only good whisky to sell, and by in- 
spiring them with his wonderful faculty of waiting in patience 
the development of appreciation on the part of the public of a 
superior article, he has placed more than one on the high road to 
fortune. Mr. Moorman is opposed to "hurry" in our business. 
He holds that Time is our great friend — Time, the great fiictor in 
the development of a fine whisky. The bonded period is never 
too long for him, and after his goods are tax-paid, he stores them 
away for yeai-s on his capacious floors. Tiiero he blends them 
after his own peculiar methods, and again stores them away to 
complete their maturity. Nor does this satisfy him, for in ship- 
ping to California, for instance, he does not use the fast freight 
lines, but rather ships in large lots by the slow-sailing vessels 
around Cape Horn. For six long months these consigunu>nts to 
the Golden Stiite are tossed upon "old ocean blue," crossing the 
equator twice during the voyage, and when finally they are 
greeted by Messrs. A. P. Hotaling & Co., of San Francisco, they 
send up a fragrance that fairly rivals the scentetl flowers of that 
favored clime, and the fortunat;; C'alifoi-nians, whr)se i)alates are 
ever tickled with the good things of life. ar(^ always ready to 
admit that "it is a nectar fit for the gods." The J. H. Cutter 
whiiky is au institution in itself. — T. M, Gilmore in Bonforts. 



14 



j^lfie WII^E /r|4D Sflf<.IT f^EVIEW 



ST A/S FOLD'S EASTEK/S AGE/NTS. 

Ckptaln II. W. M«Ii»tyro. tin- Ku|MTint.ii<l<iit of tin- Vina 
Vliioynrtl of St'iwHir Suinfonl. hun i>'liinM-<l from liii« Fjij*!* m 

tri|>. 

Ana rwull uf lib" vwil lln- Strt«f"r«l linimlM* will m.w U 
|>lii<t<«| on iIm- niHrkrt «m n lurpT m-i*U- than rvir iMf.in-. 

Ckiplain <". hi KhilliiUT who in imuumiT of II. \V. Cnil.l'V 
(1ii«-ii|{<> «««•«>••>■ ••«»* •"•••" «|»lH»iiit«"«l w.lf apnt for tin- Vina 
l.niii«lini frtiin tin- R^H-ky Mouiitaiiin to «li<- .VII.k'"'"' "^ '"'•' '" ' * 
lloyd & ('".. will •'ontiniH' in coiitrul of tin- Niw York l.nr-incw-. 

Th«' m'iMtion of Ctepliiin SliilliilMT for tli«' ('lli^•Jl^'<• a);»-n<-y is 
« iwrtiini'.urly k*""! ""•' wl»>l»' •''•• '»l»'l«t.v of H"- <*• '^'.^'1 ^^ <'"• |" 
look iift«T Ihiir iip-n«y pnt|HTly ix U-yond i|U<'.xtion. Captain 
SliilUlMT fiuriiiK liw n»idfiHv in thin HtaU- madf a fint- n-piitation 
for hitnM>lf in lli«' win*- l.nMnt-w and what In'ha.Hdonc in Cliinipi 
for To-Kalon in w.-11-known. \U- will, of cours*- still r< tain his 
runnttnion with th«< Conli'lia \Vini» (*o. 

Tin* StanfortI hnindy will ten on the mark<-t lH)tli in l>«lk 
Slid liotth'. Tin" MtH-k in j-onwdt-nHl jwrtifularly lino and with 
i»u«-h ruj«tl«'n« aw Captain ShillalHT and F. <>. I{«y<l & Co. JH-hind 
it. it mnnot fail to ({t» in tho FjiMt. whili- in thii* nuirkt't a HjMrial 
bid (ur huKinfw will xliortly Im' niad<>. 

TRADE emeu LARS. 

OwKX»i«)Ro, Ky.. Ft'hniary 1801. 
\V«' tnk« pU-Mnurr' to inform the triMh-, wiMyially onr i)atr<)nH. 
that mir proiluH ion for tho Mi-aaon of 1891 will Im« iv« follow h: 
l..Vii» Urr»«lH "Hill & Hill." '-'(Ml iMirrt-la "J. T. Wtlch." MtLeau 
Co.. 2«>i» laim-lj* "J. T. Wi'lch," I>avio»« Co., 8(H) ImrrclH "Tip 
Top," 'JtNJ l«am*lH. privatf prands on orders. 10I» ImrrelH "Kcu- 
turky Colom'l" (our now hnind): total .■{.<»IMI iNirrclH an ajjuinst 
T.4<iii l«m'b» unid*' IK'.MI and .'LriiH) Itarrt'ls ma<U' in 188!». With 
many thankit for |>a»t fav»»rH, wo roniain yours, with liijjhoHt re- 
pM^ta. R(KK Sl'KI.Nii DisT. Co. 

39 Rkoadw-ay, New Yokk, February, 1891. 

'I'll*- iMwition and Htandiu); of M(>wrH. .Vrinand, Lalandc & 
C;». in Ml well-known that to mention them in such a connection. 
wiHihl lie a u.'H'h'Ms attempt to improve an already lU'knowiedgetl 
mi|N*rlative. But our purpow* w to call your partic-ular attention 
to what lia»< (K-cumHl within the puHt few months re<pir(linf? their 
future i>liipment<« to this country. 

Hinivour ap|M>intment lu* their apents. we have placed before 
them a number of facti* relating; to the Bordeaux wine business 
in thiit country that were at once uppn\'iatwl by tlH»8e gentlemen, 
with the n-xult. that we are now in a |H>sition to offer the In-st 
valuiw in both clarett* and Sauternes that have ever In-en known 
in the UdUmI Ktatex. and although their brand has always b^un 
noted f«»r fine (lualilit-s, their jirestMit standards surjtass their 
former on<i« in everything that go.-x to c«uistitute a p;'rfect wine. 

If you have lK*en familiar with thesis wines you will know 
wliat this means, and, we feel a-<sun*<l, will cimtinue to use them; 
and, if not, it will Ik* tim>' well <K-cupie<l to write for samples an<l 
com{Mre with what you iir<- using. 

Sttliciiing your communications, and an op^xtrtunity to suIh 
mit sampUtt for your ins|M<ction, we remain, 
Very truly yotirs, 

Cl'UiiCKT & Tayixjk, Sole Agents. 

DtVTorative art receives in thepr«*s«'nt day iM*rhaps as striking 

I'lificittion in the interior fittings of restaurants anil U'tter- 

xjiiril sho|is. as in any other class of phwes "where men do 

voiignaate" indiscrimiiialily. The multi-moulded wainscoting. 

the daiborate. many-bmnchcd. and mostly liigbly-cliasc<l chande- 

liiTM and wall-brackets, the stainisl glass work, anil the largi* 

•"'""" -•■■■" "Ih. with their oriiat*- tnw»'ry. t<» Is- wi'n in 

'" "»us<' of <>nt«'rtaiiiment," an*, at least, fur re- 

III'... ■; .,. t;.M.,i la-u* and )'triHiiveiM'-<M Croni the lliuinting. gaudy 
embelliHlimiiiiB of IbeJuHUy^wTici •gin paliu-." of a few vears 
ago. — .\<Uionul (iiiitnllan, UUufote 



/NOTES. 



■ji,, I iix. son .-pi fits for the year ending 1889 brought the 
Hii-iaii <i..\.niiiicnt -.'Tri.iMMi.tMKI roubles, alwmt 1(I,(HM).(KM» more 
tlian III.' pivcdin^' year, and 3;{,()UO,000 above the average in- 
conn- for tell y«at> previous. 

C.orgc F. Kibling, of Norwich, Vt., has been fined $8,00() 
foi s.lling 71 ■"> drinks. . As he didn't have the money, he was 
.-.•iit.n.-.! to si.\ty-(meyeai-s. seven months and twenty days haixl 
lalHir. l-Acn Kditor Sheahan and the Prohibit'wnid couldn't ask 
for more than this. 

The viiita^'c of 1890 inSmilli Au.stralia was very gooil owing 
to till- fiivorable weatlier. The wines show a marked improve- 
ment in jMiint of elegance and lightnws of character, (jualitics 
wliicii will be appreciatL'd in the English market. Victoria was 
als'> favored witii a splendid crop, and the wiaoj of 1890 will be 
rememlK-red for (juailty and be much sought for in the future. 

An ingenious invention has lately iKH'n patente<l for oj)ening 
soila water Isrttles. which forms at the same time a stand for the 
Isittle. Everyone knows the perverse way aerated waters havi 
of freeing themselves from their corks, usually at the expense of 
the clothes around. But in the "indispensable," the corkscrew 
iH'ing firmly attiiched to the frame holding the bottle, the cx)rk 
can only escape at the will of the opener. The only points to 
observe are to insert the corkscrew before removing the wire, and 
not to take the cork out too suddenly; moreover, if only half the 
contents of the Iwttle are recjuired, the cork can be imme<iiately 
replaced by reversing the action of the cork.>screw. 

The j)rohibition law has been in effect in North Dakota since 
June 30th hist, but was not enforced owing to the original ])ackage 
controversy. Since the recent decision by tlie Supreme Court on 
this point, for the first time in the history of Bismarck the sjiloons 
have closed their doors for an indefinite periotl, an^ not a drink 
cau be had. A crisis luu* now been reachetl in the fight for i)ro- 
hibition in North Dakota. The State is now al)out evenly divided 
.on this question. A strong effort will be made to secure the 
passage of the re-submission bill. The probability is, however, 
that the measure will l)e defeated, as the latest canvass of both 
Houses shows a majority in favor of the present iron clad pro- 
hibition laws. 

It is gratifying to note the increasing demand for California 
wines in the East, but this demand ought not to mislead some 
California w ine growers to plant more vines. The quality of the 
wine should lx> improved rather than the quantity. Only a small 
l)roportion of the California wine which comes here is first-class 
wine. The great bulk is heavy and somewhat deficient in flavor 
and delicacy, which does not suit palates jccustomed to the light 
wines of the Garonne or the better grades of Burgundies. Our 
wholesiile dealers as a rule are gocnl judges of a first-class wine. 
California nuist ctmcjuer the wholesjile trade if she desires a 
permanent market for her wines here at remunerative price.s, 
(Quality is as important as quantity. — N. Y. Wine and Spirii Gn- 
zrUi: 




W. Tn=KnLDN. 



( IlfKlslerttl TraUf Mark.) 

Vineyards, Cellars and Distilleries Situated at 

OAKVILLE, NAPA CO., CAL. 
H. Mr. CFijPs-BB, - - FR.OFI^IETOI^. 

•• TO-K.\r,<»X " lia» r«'i'lvod inort- Mtilalf, niplomaK ami rrvmlums 
lliaii any iillii'i' brand of Whit'x and llrnndii-ii in Ainvrica. 

JAS. L. DAVIS &. CO., Sole Agents, 
:tlH CAI.II'OltM.V STKKKT, SAN rii.WCISrO, OAT,. 



f/reifie WIJ^E /rJND SflF^IT (REVIEW. 



15 



EXPORTS AND IMPORTS 

DURING THE PAST FORTNIGHT. 



EXPORTS OF WINE. 



TO NEW 


YORK— Pkk Steamee 


ACAPULCO March 8, 1891. 




MARKS. 


6HIPPERS. 


Contents. 


VALUE. 


«ALLONB 


B ife Co 


J Gundlacli & Co 

•• 
Dresel & Co. . 




236 

798 

152 

2,4)0 

4.967 

6 814 

1,205 

1,000 

498 

707 

5,000 

127 

1,.531 

302 

224 

52 

25 

1,287 

770 

776 

515 

2,134 

2,5.55 

146 

2,400 

11,156 

2,500 


182 


U in dia'd 


15bbls2lif-bbl8.. 
3 barrels 


379 


T M I'rovidence 


«0 


LB 






1,860 

i,6;« 

4,088 


DMcG&Co, 

K & F . . .-. 


Cal Wine Grow's Union 

Kobler A Fiohling 

B Dreyfus & Co 

Overland Freight T Co.. 

A Carboni 


100 barrels 

135 barrels 

25 barrels 

20 barrels 

10 barrels . . . 


F in dia'd 


400 


B D & Co 


060 


H in dia'd 


200 


Fin dia'd 


14 barrels 

100 barrels 

2bblslhf-bbls... 

30 barrels 

6 barrels 


285 


N C . ... 


1 500 


D F, Fall Biver. Mass 
B B 


Lenorniand Bros 

A Greenebaum & Co. . . 
Emiie Zange 


67 
459 


1 C 


198 


G D, Brookljn 

J P 


2bbls5hf-bbls... 
1 barrel 


125 


Cal Transfer Co 

Lacliman & Jacob! 

J M Dow 


40 


H Bros 


Ihf-barrel 

25 barrels 

15 barrels 

15 barrels 


20 


B M, Brooklyn 

T<te R 


399 
304 


H T 


280 


BHP 


10 barrels 

45 packages 

,50 barrels 

3 barrels.. 


220 


M C 


853 


E in ring 


S Lacbtnan & Co 


1,300 


N P 


36 


A C Co Ltd 


15 packages 

225 barrels 

50 barrels 


600 


S L & Co 


4,000 
1,000 


N in dia'd 








50,337 


$21,174 











TO CENTRAL AMERICA— Per Steamer Acapulco, March 3, 1891. 



C P, Acajntla... 
M G C, 
GH, 
M A A, 

J G, Corinto 

A B, LaLibertad. 
E A, 



J L, San J de Guat. . . 



■J Gundlacli & Co. 



H W, Corinto 

M H, 

J M, 

B F &Co " 

B M B, " 

F B, " 

NAE, " 

Bd'A, " 

B B & Co, LaLibertad 

V A C. 

M V, Champerico 

E G, Corinto 

L R M, Champerico, . 
BAN, SanJ.de Guat 



EL G Steele* Co... 

EdeSablacfc Co 

Cabrera Roma & Co. 



B Dreyfus & Co. 
F Mceks 



Bloom Baruch & Co. 
John T Wright 



Oliver & Co. 
Castle Bros, 



2 kegs 4 hf-bbls. , 

6 kegs 

2 barrels 

2 bbls 2 kegs 

.52 kegs 

1 barrel 

1 barrel 

8 cases 

2 hf barrels 

45 cases 

46 cases 

3 bbls 1 keg 

3 barrels 

1 barrel 

11 kegs 

6 cases 

3kegs 

Ikeg 

10 barrels 

2 kegs 

4 kegs 

Ikeg 

15 cases 

25 kegs 



Total amount Wine cases 120 and. 



146 

121 

94 

135 

260 

4' 
47 



52 



134 

51 

169 



20 

10 

500 

40 
15 



500 

I 

2,519| 



109 
92 
61 

122 

180 
42 
43 
48 
33 

138 

193 
82 

125 
38 

170 

21 

13 

6 

275 

27 

33 

7 

111 

416 

$2,385 



TO MEXICO— Per Steamer Acapclco March 3, 1891. 



JN.Mazatlan 


W Loai;!a 


2 barrels 


112 
119 
357 
310 

58 


60 


U, Acapulco 


J Gundlacli & Co 

Ruther & Bendixen 

I Gntte 




83 


K&VBindla'd,Maz'n 




1.56 


I, ' .. 


22 kegs 


200 


B8 " 


1 cask 


36 


Total amount 


Wine 






956 


535 



TO CHINA & JAPAN— Per Steamer China February 87, 1891. 



K H T Co, Yokohama 
MB&Co, 


A Greenebaum & Co 

Macondray Bros & Co. . 

Lenormand Bros 

Hermann «fe Co. 


10 barrets 

10 cases 


512 


$129 
100 


J C A Co, 

L in dia'd Co, " 


10 barrels 

20 barrels 

6 casetf 


.V)3 
1,046 


16.S 
264 


MK in di'd, ShanghailCuttting Packing Co.... 
Total amount 16 case and 


36 




2,061 


$692 



TO BRITISH COLUMBIA— Per Steamer Mexico March 1, 1891. 



W AM, St Johns, NB 


AMcLeod&Co 

L G Inchon 


1 case 




5 


L G, Victoria 


3 barrels . . . 


152 
126 

48 
96 
50 


75 


R & H, Victoria 


A G reenebaum & Co . . . 
Bach Meese & Co 

Beck Pyhrr&Co 


2 casks 


81 


D in dia'd, Vancouver 


1 barrel 


72 


L in dia'd, Vancouver 


2 barrels 


48 


LZ, 


1 barrel 


20 


(• ii 


1 case 


a 


8 S V, 


11 barrels 


500 
25 


200 


W J M, '■ Kohler & Van Bergen . . 


1 half-barrel 


20 


Total amount 1 case and 


1,047 


474 



TO HONOLULU— Per Steamer Zealandia, March 10, 1891. 



E H <feCo 


J D Spieckles & Bros. . 
F AHaber 


1 case . 




5 


G M&Co 


28 cases 




100 


H in diamond B 


Hyman Bros 






6 


L & Co 


Laclman & Jacobi 

D G Camavinos 

Kohler & Frohling 

Wine 26 cases and 




497 

51 

450 

998 


875 


P GC 


1 barrel 


20 


EH& Co 


60 kegs 


270 


Total amount 




776 



MISCELLANEOUS FOREIGN WINE SHIPMENTS. 





From February 27, to March 


12 1891. 






VESSEL 


DESTINATION. 


.SIIIPPPER.S. 


CONTENTS. 


GALLONS 


VALUE. 


Galilee 


M J V, Taliiti... 

J L J, " - 

JB, 

upn, Amapala 


J Pinet 


6 bbls 

ll.f cask... 

2 bbls 

15 kegs 


309 

33 

103 

150 


1.55 
17 
.38 
45 
36 


HC Wright.. 


P G Sabatie 

Wright Bowne & Co 

Miscellaneous 

A Crawford & Co., 
Rotli Blum & Co.,. 
Thos Westwater 

L Feldman & Co, . . 
P G Sabatie 

Hermann & Co 

KolilerifeVanBergen 

Beringer Bros 

Kohler & Frohling, 


Acapulco 

Pannonia 


10 barrel... 


476 


160 
64 


A C & Co,Jaliut . 
J M P Vladivos'k 
MT, Scotland... 
ASS, " 
A A C, LiveiTJOol 
L FA Co in d M'e 
W J M, Vaneou'r 

L in di'd Co, Yoa 
M in di'd, " 

TK, Tokio 

EHifcCo, Hon'u 


W S Bowne. . . 
Otlielio 

Alameda 

Walla Walla.. 


37 bbls 

1 barrel 

1 barrel 

115 bbls.... 
6 barrels.... 


1,009 
51 
62 

7,1.30 
216 


750 

23 

34 

2,500 

116 
20 


Belglc 


2 bbls 

lObbl 


103 

484 


50 
122 
100 


C D Bryant. . . 


2 bbls 

4 casks 

6 qr casks,. 
150 kegs.... 

5 cases 


100 

263 

196 

1,025 


25 
157 
114 
615 

17 












Total i 


imount 61 cases ai 


id 


11,710 


,5,1.58 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO FOREIGN PORTS BY SEA. 





From February 27 to March 12 


, 1891. 






VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS, 


CONTENTS. 


GALLONS 


VALUE. 


Acapulco 


JHGCorinto,., 
E A, LaLibertad 

a I, 

Acajutla 

G C 8 Victoria, . . 

AY Jaluit 

M in dia Yokoh'a 


J Gundlach & Co,. 

4, 

Urruela & Urioste . 
Beck Pvhrr & Co.. 
A Crawford* Co.. 
Kohler&VanBerL'en 


2 keg 

2 hf-bbl .... 
1 case 


10 

54 


22 
81 

12 


K 


5 cases 




47 


Mexico 


1 case 




8 


Pannonia 


12 cases. . , , 




90 


Belgic 






20 




■^ 








Total 


imount, 21 cases a 


nj 




64 


880 




JtlrkExY 



PURE CALIFORNIA 



r b r c A Liro R N I A 




SP£CIAL.TIES: 

PRIVATE STOBK flOGK, 

PRIVATE STOGK EL gERRITO, 
PRIVATE ST06K SAUTERNE. 

PRIVATE STOGK GLARET, 
PRIVATE STOGK BURKUNDY, 

PRIVATE STOSK VINE GLIFF, 





"\WINESandBRAND1ES 

WINERIES ANO DISTILLERIESl 

J^/cf/: eiTY, YOUJ^TVIlobE /rJMD 
ST. JHEbEJ^/r. 

11-13 FIRST ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 
200-202 S. FOURTH ST., ST. LOUIS. 



16 



ftMSIfie WI^IE /r^lE) SflF^IT REVIEW. 



CXIK>RT8 or WHISKY BY 8tA. 



l<ft»tlft *li*>» 



At%tmlro. 



»Hlra 



« IB dia U Mt«rr J 8rh«ar1< 



EJL 

■ «. Cflrtnio 
FH, l»cm. 






(1 W M A Co. 
C D BrraM. . R H A Co, 

•w r p * Co 



r U t«dto.Ar»|» IHcrkmiui * Co.... 

L B X I'hjinii"-" <''"«■' * <■" 

t Im . "■ lluiil A I'". 

g It , )«< lortl A t'i>. 

H in ._ •■• Mundy *C« 

K T «...*«, k"tw t J Taltuu 

Q R Y.4»4uuua. llJItcalW A Co . 

U WM A Co. UtM fl|irn'r«.Slanl'xA Co 

L A r«. 

UltaBtlwl A Co 

KoktarArrotiliitK. 



3 r»»r« 

3S ••»»« . . 

4 rax* 

3 bbU 

^ mu» 

larvrr... 
k r**r* . . . . 

I rftM* 

} bill* 

ah( bbl*.. 

I v»»K 

SO rsM* . . 
35 raM«. . . 
(tl i-uc*. . . 

•JU l»M^ . . . 

M r*M« . . . 



UALU'"' TAME. 



Ml 



Rnra'e* Wanrjr.ti 

Win* Wo Hani: A C"o 3 caa<«. 

^pirv'rcfllanrjr A t'o'flO ca»* 



caM*. 



Ill SlSra 



SSS 



4'.M 



»3 

3t 

■.'12 

I Til 

» 

4111 

««l 
lOl) 

3,.Vl<i 



EXPORTS or MISCCLLANCOUS LIQUORS BY SEA. 

rnUB rcbruaf> at. l" ManliU' IWUI. 



»Mn*ano«. 



A V lUilll. 
T K. U UliMtad 
O In <lln. Vaaraav 
HAO. 



L R, JalhiL. 
HBOo. " 
A C A fti. •• 



WalU Walla.. 
Znlaadia ... 



aHirrsaa. 



. A CravfonI A Co.. 
TJofcnT Wright 

Barhl lM ia r ACo. 

Btek r;brr A Cu. . 



A Crawford A Co. 



COKTKMTfc. 



lOraaea Abainlh 
Iraae I.li|unr*. 
3caaeiLli|Uoi» 
I iMi Orange Jul 
1 ra»e Hitlern. . . 
lilO rtun (iiii. .. 
tf CliamiiaKne 
8 " B li Brand; 

a "Blltem 

10" ('liani(HM(nc 



H 8 Vlnofla. Macimlray A Cii. 

W (> r A Co Hi«n CaiKoniU I)i»lllllii|{»'o 6 l)hU Hpirlln 
OWMACo, '• iLlliailUal A Co Ilu lamr* Ulii. 



Total ainonni IMraw*. 



OK 
7 
14 

iin 

7 

3»6 

fSi 

8 

3S 

ISO 

189 

'M 



885 



WHISKY AND 


SPIRIT IMPORTS 


BY RAIL, S. P. CO. 


From Frbruarv JO. to March II, 1891. 




Whukt. 


HPIRITH. 


teiHiii»U«. 


BMTrla 


Hbbl. 


Caae 


Barrel* 


Kbbl 


MlM'KLI.AKBOCS 


rWfialcACo 

JowaMaadyACo... 


SIO 






240 
S18 
SOU 


















BmUmUmACo 

r iw3V 








5bblsl44kex«Oin 


10 






















)-(t M»yr 












i Kr* nan. 


1 




















irrrriBDa t T Oo 

Ciw|CMa.Ont. 

W 11 Krai " 










































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tin 


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Bccn 


IMMRTS BY RAIL. S. P. CO. 



«a»M. 



U Bond Coll Port.. 
HMrwood A Micrvoad 

C A Ziohlaod 

WmWulir ACo.... 
jMMllnndyACo. 



ToUl. 



"BoTTLtO." 



CMk 



Barrela 



85 



U5 



KbW 



Ca*e 



U3 



Bulk. 



Barrela 



Kbbi 



62 
1») 



ISO 



182 



JibbI 



U2 



«2 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO DOMESTIC PORTS BY SEA. 



K. l.ruarj 8 to March 12, 1»1. 



l.K-TiNATI>.S. 



aHIPFIM. 



.\..>1" 



K y V. H Y<.rk..;Kob!ei * Fitihllng.. 
, i„ ilia •• G Garpy & Co 

I) K, r»ll It. Mar«'Lenonnond Broe.. . 

'I'.IbI »m"»iil 



COKTBim. 



oAixona 



SO kegs 

85 kegs 

lOhf bbta... 
2 kega 



SOD 

800 

8S0 

10 

.1 1,080 



850 
000 

sao 

19 
1,489 



IMPORTS or WINES AND LIQUORS BY SEA. 



FKf)M NKW YOBK— P«B Ship Chabmbb March 1, 1891. 



rlllPI'KIUi. 



F O Bovd A Co. 
J llui-kf 



Eilinifcr IlroK A Jarobi. 

I.illriitbal A Co 

W K Frtfinan 



J Schweppe A Co... 
Cook »<: B«iiihelnier. 
Crown Dictilliiin Co. 
Alviii Wood A Co. . . . 



.S7 i>ackaf;e« Wine 

3 barrels WbUky 

1 •• 
5 " 

2 hf-bbl» " 
1 liarrel " 
.V) barrels ■' 
ItIO \M-kK» •• 
S barieU " 
8 •• 

1 '• 
1 " 
1 " 
8 " 
8 .. 
1 " 
1 " 
10 bble Mineral Water. 

20 cBBeo Liquors 

10 iwckaKeK Whieky.... 
a barrels " 



COH8IOIIKB. 



Order (marked AHA Co). 

J J Becker... 

Louis S<'bultz 

Adolnli Bay 

E M Bauni 

W O Cahoou 

Lacbman A JacobI 

Lilienthal A Co 

I'edlar A Etlner 

Itabatzki A Lehfeld 

E A Bacon 

Lower);au & Newman 

F Reebman 

L W Walker 

J Jeffrey 

Buss Bros 

Hoqulam Hotel Co 

W H Campbell 

Livinsrston A Co 

Lul liiT A Scliroeder 

Occidental Hotel 



FIIOM PHILADELPHIA— Pbb Ship St. Charlbs. March 1. 1»1. 



Hut ton A Co. 



112 cases Beer 

."lO bblu Whisky 

18 cases Fruit Juice. 



Order. 



FBOM LIVERPOOL— Pbb Bb. Ship Scottish HitLS March I, 1891, 



Onstav Meyer — 
DuTemple&Co., 



O I Van Wart A Co 

W A 1 Lockett 

Simpson McKirdy A Co. 



E& J Burke... 
J Sbanks A Co. 



2 casks Wine 

1 cask Spirits 

50 cases Stout 

45 cases Ale 

26 Oct. Geneva , 

4 cases Wine 

8 bbls Mineral Waler. . . , 

12 cases " 

175 cases Bottled Beer. . 

187 " 

25 cases Mineral Water. 

25 qr cases Wine 

50bblsainger Ale 

80 bbls 

Isi cases Liquors 



Hacandrew & Co 

Frank Bailey A Co. . . . 

W A Boss A Co 

Wilson Meyer A Co 

FBOM NEW YORK via PAMAMA— Pkb Stb. City of New Yobk, March 2, 1891. 



Henry Plagemann. 
WHOanptiell 



Geo Stevens 

Dickson De Wolf A Co. 
H M Newhall&Co 



Order (Marked 8 E). 
C WCraig 



Order (Marked H In dia'd) 
Order (Marked E B C in s) 

Order (Marked 8 4 8) 

Chas Meinecke A Co 



1 barrel Whisky Frank Hill 

1 •• " |H Kllnescbmldt 

1 

1 

1 

25 cases Mineral Water. 



|L A Stewart. 

iTliOi- Brown 

IB I Buckley 

'Lebenbaum Bros. 



MaillacACo. 



FROM LIVERPOOL. 

I 4 cases Wine I L Schwabacher. 

3 cases Wine | M Weill 



FROM HONOLULU— Pbb Schoonbb Rosb Spabks, March S. 1891. 



I 47 kegs Wine | B Dreyfus A Co. 



WNI. WOLFF & CO., 

Importers and General Agents, 



327-329 Market Street, 



San Francisco, Cal. 



IP^CIFia COj^ST J^O-EIsTTS jhoir 



i. A r MAKnU. OOSRAO; _ 

MOMAi M&. pen n. lun mnRn 
oDUNTi Mvau Duwin pon. 

P0K »fMM 8> BOaMADX. Obnli ui 
BOOi Wn%i!« Hmh. BmU] a Ox. ■«! 

ntMammun, tmm, teuia ywmmtk, 

Rm-imporUd Am»HemH 



11/' 



40HN d« KDTPIR k SONS, ROTTIRDAM, OIN, CiNTRELL & OOCHRANTS Btlfiut Oingv il^ 

OtUA KDMHIL, BASS & OCra Pals and Barton ALI, in HoplMHli, 

PAB8T BUWIKO 00. (fcraieriy PHILLIP BEST), QUINNffiS & GO'S (Dublin) bin Stat ia Hoahwda 

ULWAVKRE Export B««r, Selwt BIm Ribbon 6RKENLEBS BROS' Lores Highland (Sooldi) Whoky 

THS •■ BET" TONIC. JAMBSON A 00, HUSH WHBKT, 

THim. UPPrs GBNUnn AROMATIQDB, LONDON Dry Dock Jamaica Ram, 

I>OCiVHBAD" BRAND of OuuMi' Stoat and Bam' Ale, Mineral Waten, 
-kliH '»>n lU'lnioiit '82Chirkenrork; '8a BlucKrass' '85 RIpy, and oilier sUple brands 
Uiwrat market quotatlona (iirnished on application. 



f/ceifie WIJME ^^Q Sflf^lT I^EVIEW, 



17 



WINE AND BRANDY OVERLAND, 

Per Southern Pacific Co's Lines During February, 1891, Showing Destination and Points of Shipment. 



TO 



I 



Wine 



Boston 

Other New England points 

Albany 

New York 

Buffalo 

Other New York points 

Philadelphia 

Pittsburg 

Other Pennsylvania points 

Baltimore 

Washington 

Wheeling 

Other Va. and W. Va. points. . 
N. and S. Car. and Ga. points. 

New Orleans 

Other Louisiana points 

Mobile 

Other Gulf State points 

Galveston 

Houston 

San Antouia 

Other Texas points 

Hot Springs 

Other Ark. and Ind. Ter. points 

Memphis 

Louisville 

Other Tenn. and Ky. points..., 

Cincinnati 

Other Ohio points 

Indianapolis 

Other Indiana points 

Chicago 

Other Illinois points 

Detroit 

Other Michigan points 

Milwaukee 

Other Wisconsin points 

St. Louis .-. . , 

Kansas City 

Other Missouri points 

Sioux City , 

Other Iowa points , 

Omaha 

Other Neb. and Kans. points.. 

Minneapolis 

St. Paul 

Other Minnesota points 

Dakota points 

Denver 

Pueblo 

Other Colorado points 

Foreign 



Total. 



Case Gallons 



11 
13 



47 
1 
4 
3 



6 
10 



3 



4 
3 
9 
2 
45 
355 



97 



1 

21 

127 

3 



16 
6 



2 
10 
11 



3 

102 

17 

4 

3 



950 



2,939 

130 

27 

18,311 

15 

2,578 

9fi 

11 

424 

491 

5,893 



Brandy 



Case Gallons 



141,756 
3,564 
2,100 
3,132 

2,670 



12,519 

8,476 



1,744 

2,000 

2,163 

27 

3,033 

24 

100 

139 

17,916 

241 

108 

764 

3,043 

217 

13,263 

68 

38 

10 

184 

2,928 

660 



142 
48 

292 
4,278 

259 
5,855 



264,830 



14 
14 



5 

8 

24 



82 



294 



45 

76 



48 
54 



586 



140 
119 
457 



44 

41 



42 
10 



74 

1,903 

43 

98 



20 

24 

147 



93 
10 

844 
93 

655 



5,962 



FROM 



San Francisco 

Oakland, 16th Street. 

Martinez 

Livermore 

Pleasanton 

San Jose 

Warm Springs 

Irvington 

Santa Clara 

Mountain View 

Meulo Park 

Mayfield 

Hollister 

Gilroy 

Stockton 

Milton 

Fresno 

Sacramento 

St. Helena 

Rutherford 

Oakville 

Yountville 

Napa 

Bello 

Santa Rosa 

Glen Ellen 

Cordelia 

Woodland 

lone 

Marysville 

Los Angeles 

Santa Barbara 

San Gabriel 

Winthrope 

Anaheim 

Santa Ana 

The Palms 

Cucamonga 

Pomona 



Wine 



Case Gallons 



785 



2 
40 



21 



25 

8 



Total. 



950 



176,811 



66 
50 

1,332 
154 

2,893 
69 
33 



22 

26 

47 

5,540 

29 

5,770 

1,947 

10,463 

27 

25,189 



3,664 
23 

9,558 
99 
96 
20 
109 
28 

6,300 



Brandy 



Case I Gallons 



401 



36 



4,278 
3 

7 



232 



25 

44 



39 



13,726 
111 

442' 

148 

10 

28 



I 



264,830 



82 



127 
46 
40 



10 



289 



701 
90 



10 



5,962 



We can supply Caramel or Burnt Sugar Coloring at seventy- 
five cents per gallon in barrels, as strong and as brilliant as any 
that was ever manufactured. Not one complaint has reached us 
the quality of our Sugar Coloring for over a year, and our sales 
extend to every State in the Union. 

If the price was $10, instead of seventy-five cents per gallon, 
we could not produce a superior article. Every package guaran- 
teed. Samples on application. 

DK-^S-DEIISr ^St FjOs-LIXIEII?.. 
19 HudsonStreet, New York. 



BUeHA/SA/N'S BOOK. 



tinder the title of "Whisky Trade Facts", George C. Buchanan, 
the well-known Louisville broker, has published a little book which 
contains a vast deal of information to the trade. Among the facts 
presented are: tables showing production on Kentucky, Pennsyl- 
vania, Maryland, West Virginia, Tennessee and the United 
States for ten years; withdrawals from bond, withdrawals for ex- 
port, Stocks remaining in bond June 30th in the same states for 
the same time; and a mass of statistics well arranged, in regard to 
the status of old whiskies. Mr. Buchanan's well-known reliabil- 
ity as a compiler coupled with his soundness of views, makes the 
work particularly valuable. 



The work of the National Protective Association in checking 
prohibition fanaticism, has been very effective, and a great num- 
ber of our trade deserve credit for the liberal way in which thej' 
supported the organization. With the matter of prohibition well 
in hand, we now have time and should employ the means of let- 
ting the public know the exact position of our trade as regards 
temperance or good government. During the period of existence 
of the National Protective Association, it was taxed to its utmost 
to defeat prohibition in the different States and territories. We 
would like to see the organization continued in existence with 
sufficient funds at its command to distribute literature setting 
forth our real position regarding intemperance and our complete 
contempt for the lawless. We owe it to society and to ourselves, 
— Wine and Spirit Bulletin. 



18 f^eifie Wl/^E /r|^D Sflf^lT f^EVIEW 

WI/ME AMD BT^A/MDg HECEIPTS. 



THE MEW eOL LECTOR. 



Wiin». 

F^^mMwy 2 'MMm 

S M.tvVi 

4 •_'7,a7o 

5 V2MUi 

a u.mtit 

7 43.HIO 

» .TKMO 

10 'Jtl.liM* 

II 'J-2A.H> 

r.' :{r..(!-,'o 

1.1 41.»7o 

U :i!>.s2t» 

irt 31, «'-»<> 

17 34.«K» 

18 I'li.irio 

19 1 WMHWt 

•JO r»s.ft:M> 



•.»i. 

•2.^.. 



7(».s.'J(» 

(Mi.lSO 

2N.S1(I 

<ii.;us 

-'" 21,4(H) 

•-W 61,480 



Total for Ffliruar)- 954.318 

Murt-h 2 ! 14.930 

3 18.12() 

* 27.370 

ft 22.5X0 

6 (J.VJW) 

7 28,180 

» 25,010 

10 10,300 

11 37.490 

12 22.720 



liruitdy 

2.«!.V) 
3.')(l 

5.»;»;(» 

5.740 
7.i;{(» 

|(NI 

4.»70 

020 

2,300 

1,2(10 

92(1 

100 

2,4(Mt 

Kid 

1,240 

(MM) 

;{.50 

2S0 

2,680 

«,700 

44,796 

12.130 

4,2(X) 

120 

1.080 

100 

2,100 

4,090 

1,000 



rrcsiihiil llimiwin it is luulerstmxl, will appointa John C. 
(^iiiiiii as llif >iii<-<Ht<sor of tlu> late Collfctor of Internal Revenue, 
^\ illiimi n.S'ar-s. 

Mr. (iiiinn i.* ft young man. but thirty-Uiree years of age. 
He was lM»rn in Kl Donulo eounty, April 7, 1868, and has never 
l«-<n fiir(h«T out of the State than one hundred yards over the 
Stiitf line into Mexico. AVhen lie wan but two years old, his par- 
ent.x went to North S»in Juan, Nevada eounty, where he livetl and 
att«-n(Ied stliool until he was fifteen ye^rs old. 

Willi one liundred dollait* in Iuh pcx-ket, he came to San 
Kraneiwo whiii a mere youth, and started to leurn the molder's 
trade. Wiien his apprenticeship was over, he had wived up two 
Inuuhtcl doihirs with whicli he wtaldished tlie Mechanic's Koun- 
ilry on First street. At the close of the first year, he bought out 
all his partners, and managed the business alone for the next 
four yeai-s. At the end of this time, the business collapsed, and 
he was left with a debt of $3,(M)0 on his hands. 

He I(M>k('d ab<mt for some other occupation, and took up a 
patent oil burner with success, but after a year went back to min- 
ing, amid the first scenes of boyhood. Tliis proved very unprofit- 
able, aiul after a year and a half, he returned to Ssm Fi-ancisco 
last April and applietl to Postmaster Bjickus for a position. This 
was given him, and in July 1890, he entered into the duties of 
Deputy Postmaster. 

The bond refjuired for the new office is $600,000. Mr, 
Quinn will rewMved the support of the entire delegation, cimsisting 
of S«'nator Stanford, Congressmen Cutting, Loud, Bowers, Morrow 
and McKenna. 

parTn er^ wa nted. 

A reliable party with $4,000 to $5,000 capital, wanted to take 
an interest in a well established winery in Fresno County. For 
further particulars apply at this office. 



Baker & Hamilton, San Francisco and Sacramento. 

Manufactory, Benicia Agricultural Works, Benicia, Cal. 





C...m«yK DISC HARROW. 



BENECIA WOOD & STEEL FRAME HARROWS 



VINEYARD PLOWS. 



We Carry The Largest Stock of VINEYARD 
TOOLS On This Coast. 



LEABI/MG TKADE FI-RMS. 



f/reifie WIJ^E /cJ^E) Sfll^lT {REVIEW. 



19 



The following additional trade notices are taken from Mtda's 
( 'literion (Holiday Number). 

Tlie M. V. Monarclj Go. 

SHOW us a man of success and \vt! will show one who posses- 
ses the requisite elements which are bound to assert them- 
selves, and raise him above the masses. Such men, like oil on 
water, are bound to rise to the top, and M. V. Monarch has proved 
to be such a man. He seems to be endowed by nature to take a 
commanding position everywhere, and his physique is in perfect 
harjnony with his mental force. He is not alone valuable as a 
friend, but even as an antagonist he is appreciated, being bold, 
open and above-board. There is neither hypocrisy nor deception 
about him, nor about anything he does. Such characters cannot 
produce anything second rate or allow themselves to be surpassed 
by any one. This fully exj lains why "M. V. Monarch," "Sover- 
eign," and his entire cordon of braiuls, have always maintained 
so enviable a place in the realm of Kentucky whiskies. His con- 
stant and vigilant study has been to attain the best, and the ap- 
proval of dealers in every secticm of the country, which is the true 
basis of actual demand, at all times testifies that he has attained 
this end. 

In the selection of his very able corps of assistants, Mr. Mon- 
arch has also demonstrated his judgment, for no better nor more 
loyal and efficient co-workers can any firm boast of than Mr. Fred 
W. Clark as an office manager, and P. E. Payne as a representa- 
tive on the road. 

Barrett & Go. of New York. 

(^^TmONG other important New York concerns that have had 
^Ta. to move into much larger premises may be mentioned the 
prune juice manufacturing house of Barrett & Co., now at 127 
and 129 Broad street. These gentlemen found their business 
growing at an extraordinary rate of lata, so that greatly enlarged 
facilities became absolutely necessary, and hence they secured 
the spacious five-story and basement building at 43 Front street, 
to which they removed about the first of December. Those new 
premises permit of a production of 1,000,000 gallons of prune 
juice per annum. "Barrett's Unrivaled" prune juice is unques- 
tionably as fine an article of its kind as can be found in any of 
the markets of the world, and it is on this basis of absolute 
supsriority that the enor.nou? d3niind has been built up. And 
not only is the home demand growing at a wonderful rate, but 
the company are also shipping it to Great Britain and Australia 
— in fact, all over the world. 

The new building is admirably adapted for the conduct of 
such a line of business as this. The basement is used for the 
storage of raw material; the first floor for shipping rooms; the 
second for offices; the third for gauging and stamping depart- 
ments, and the fourth and fifth for manufacturing purposes. As 
already stated, there will be a capacity for producing 1,000,000 
gallons of prune juice annually. 

High praise is due to Messrs. Barrett & Co. for the ability 
and energy and integrity they have brought to bear in the build- 
ing up of their splendid business, and the future now lies brighter 
before them than ever. 



Wiley Searcy. 

0NE of the oldest, if not the oldest, distillery in Anderson 
county, is that of Wiley Searcj% at McBrayer Ky., whose 
"Old Joe" first saw the dawn of light in 1818. The same mode 
of distillation has been strictlj'' adhered to ever since the incep- 
tion of the brand, and at the same old place. Mr. Searcy has 
had an experience of over twenty years in distilling, and has 
witnessed many innovations during that period, but as none of 
these has commended itself to his judgment he has.preferred the 
good old way and the result is the incomparable "Old Joe." He 



is using a two chambered wood burr still, and the whisky is 
doubled in a copper still over a wood fire. No steam whatever 
goes into the still.- He mashes one bushel at a time in small 
tubs. In short the whole plant is a living type of the old-fasii- 
ioned hand-made sour mash whisky, which has created the de- 
mand for that justly meritorious product of the Kentucky still. 
Dealers throughout the country handling sour ma«h goods should, 
in their own interest, when visiting the Kentucky distilleries, 
not miss seeing this one, and compare the results of distillation 
as between the old and the new methods. Facts speak more 
forcibly than theories, and while some may claim that nuishing 
in large tubs is as good as in small, and that using Hungarian 
yeast in place of natural yeast, and wood fire instead of steam 
makes no difference in the results, a visit to Mr. Searcy's distillery 
will, he claims, help to solve the question. 

He has just finished a new and perfect warehouse in which 
every barrel is well aired and the utmost care and attention are 
bestowed upon the proper storing and maturing. The capsicity 
of the distillery is but one hundred bushels a day, running six 
months to the season, hence the output can not exceed 1 ,500 
barrels in all. No over-production need therefore be apprehended 
from this source at least. "Old Joe," although old in years as a 
brand is full of youthful vigor and is steadily gaining with each 
year in popularity, and the consumption is bound steadily to 
increase, for every gallon of "Old Joe" reaching the consumer, 
speaks for itself. 

A-RTIFieiAL WI/NES. 

The production of artificial wines has been greatly de- 
veloped. It is divided into two categories, viz: sugared wines 
and raisin wines. The first ones comprise natural wines, to which 
the growers add sugar to increase their alcoholic strength (in 
France we grow natural wines containing only six to seven de- 
grees of alcohol). These sugared, or i-ather those alcoholized 
wines, the strength of which is increased three degrees by the 
help of refined sugar, are evidently a little less good than wines, 
which are naturally rich in sugar, but their quality is greatly su- 
perior to that of raisin wines, or of wines, the strength of which 
is increased by the addition of spirit, such as those, which 
were made up in Spain and which are still being made up 
in Italy. Wines made from marcs, commonly called piquettes, 
are also looked upon as sugared wines, growers adding sugar to 
them. These marc wines form a very healthy beverage, but one 
of inferior quality. The crop having been a very abundant one, 
sugared wines have been made up in larger quantities— 1,946,720 
hectolitres against 1,479,122 hectolitres. 

The making of raisin wine appears to be on the increase 
also; it would appear to have more than doubled (4,292,850 
hectol. in 1890, instead of 1,826,129 hectol. last year). The law, 
which puts the works, where these wines are made, under a very 
.severe control, has very much contributed to this enormous in- 
crease. In looking over the Custom House returns, we fiiul that 
the consumption of raisin wine went up from 7.3,835 tuns in 1889, 
to 95,306 tuns in 1890, during the first ten months of the year. 
From this we calculate that the production of raisin wine in 1889 
amounted to 3,200,000 hectol., and that it increased one-third in 
1890. As to the 2,000,000 hectol. omitted in 1889, they were got 
secretly out of works. (It was discovered that, about a year ago, 
defrauding to the extent of a 700,000 francs to the Treasury was 
committed in one establishment alone). 

On the whole, according to the official retui-ns. France would 
appear to have produced this year 33,655,9(X) hectolitres of 
natural or half-natural wines. — Remie Des Vim Et Liqueurg, Paris. 

AGETNT WATNTED. 

We want a young, active and reliable man to represent our 
house in San Francisco, and are prepared to offer sjitisfactory 
inducements to the right party. Correspondence solicited. 

Dryden & Palmer, 
19 Hudson St., New York. 



20 f^e\f\(B WIJ^E /rJ^P ^flf^^EVlEW. 

WHISKg TO^ CHEAPENEdT the FHE/NeH WI/SE i/sDasT^g. 



Ifaili»|«trh from nUcHfio'* «^»"""<'*- ♦'»* public may look 
rnrrhmp whiiUcy in the not vm- far <lii*tniit futun". or an mon 
Man nlli-jrf*! now diw'ovcrj- in the nrt of clij<t illation in put into 
pnini<-:il t.ff.'<-l. Vtt\. J. !*. H.-nntwy. tho new H«>on'tary of the 
Spirit Tnwt. in njM-aking of thi- niatler, is* r«'|M)rt«-<l nx Kjiying: 

"A WW proe •!« of inanufarture ha*< Imn-ii diwovennl wliifh. 
in my jutljonent ami in the judgment of our offieerH. will mat«'ri- 
itlly n<<liie<> the (■O'tt of nianufarture. 

"Thin ij« the «lit«-«)very of a Ja|uine8(> ehemixt nanie<l Taka- 
mine. now a rewdent of Chicago, Ho came to thin country Home 
yi'tirn ajp>. aji the repn-wntative of the (tovernnient of his nation 
at the New Orlt-auH KxiM»«iti<m. and fell in love with an AniericJin 
girl. 

"After having vimt«>d Win native country, and aAer having 
n»p«rte<l the i<uc'ct>i«< of hit* miiwion here to the MikadoH Council, 
he rt'tnrmMl. marri«><l the American girl, and immwliatcly set up 
in ItUAinetw ax an exi>ert chemixt. 

"IIij« attention was early turned to the process of distillation 
(rota com. He thought that tlie yieUl under the prevailing pro- 
c«H WTW inndecpiate and nither too expenHive. He net alwut to 
convrt the matter. Under the old procoHS, after the corn had 
nwchwl a certain stage of fermentation, distillers had to add malted 
grains, such as oats, barley or rice, to bring about 'conversion.' 
This wa*« the most co«tly feature of the process, jls the malt and 
Bmill grain are, of courijc, much dearer than the corn. Now, 
Takamin(> ha« cliscoveretl a process which does away with the ne- 
ci-Hswity for the use of the small gniins or malt. The conversion 
of the com mash can be brought about without the addition of 
either. How this is done, is Takamine's secret. The fact that 
tlie additions need not be made, of courae, reduces the cost of man. 
ufarture. 

"The process not only re<luces the cost of production, but it 
increases the <|uantity of the spirits to l)o obtainc<l from the com — 
about from 10 to I.j \>er (-ent. We have entennl into a contract 
with Takamine for the use of his process in our distilleries. The 
ooutrart was nuwle Wwinesday evening, and wo control the pro- 
oem all through the United Htates." 

Following up the discovery of the Japanese, the Trust has or- 
ganic hI a c<im{Miny known as the Takamine Ferment Co., and the 
capital stock has l>een increased $1(»,()(M),0(K). The salient factoi* 
in the proc»"a«, is a micnibc or ferment cell of HUj>erior power, pro- 
duced from a fungus growth on rice. Its usti permits the com- 
pletion of fermentation in forty-two hours, as against seventy-two 
heretofore. iM-siih-s gri^itly chea|HMiing it and enlarging the volume 
of pnxluction from a like (pumtity of grain. 

A calculation , bused on the output of maltsters, brewers, dis- 
tilleni and others iwing ferments, makes the yearly value of the 
discovery npiivalent to $'j:},0<XJ,(X)U. 



AME-RICA/N VI/SES \N FRA/SCE. 

Notwithstanding the objections urged against replanting 
with Ameri<iin stocks the pnK-j-ss of nHimstnurtion has nuule 
atMuly prtjgriiss in France during the last decade, as the following 
ofllciaJ data tt^ify: 
Year. Collective an'a rowt. 



IHKI 

1H81'. 

IH.S3. 

1SX4. 

1HH.'i. 

IMHX. 



K.5M>4 lu>ctarrs in 
17,0J»« " 



.« 2«,<I12 " " 

52.777 " " 

75.'_ini " " 

11(1. <iN7 " " 

lOTv^lT " " 

214,687 

1H»« 209,801 " " 

The de|iartments sh«»wing the larjr.-Mt areas under Aincru-sin 
rrjHujfji in 1HM» w«!n': llernult, with 110.(KM» luvtanw; Ande wiUi 
27,(K)(»; (lanl. with '-M.fWf); (Jironde, with l!i,(KX); Pyren«H-s, with 
30,000, and Var with 1»,0<M). 



I)«'pjirtn»ents. 

17 

22 

28 

34 

til 
:{8 

4:{ 

•14 



111 a riHcnt number we published the official figures of the 
wine pro<luclion in France o"" 18!tO. showing tlje total quantity 
ma<l.- to 1k' nither more than 603,0()0,(Hi() gsillons. An estimate 
of the value of the wines has since been made, and, according to 
this, the years wine crop was worth nearly 40,(KKJ,0()0/. Figures 
like t lies*" convey a good idea of the vast im|)ortanee that the cul- 
ture of the vine still hoMs amongst the industries of P'rance. Fur- 
ther evidence of a similar kind is to be found in the annual return 
of imports and exports which is issued by the French (iovem- 
ment. I^ist year, it seems, the value of the imiM)rts was 4,423,- 
25.5,000 francs, and of the exports 3,720,121, 0(M) francs, and 
towanls these totals, wines, spirits and beer contributed 42.'),479,- 
(KK) francs and 320.646,000 francs respectively. It will be of some 
Interest to our readers, however, to have the particulai-s in detail. 

The imports are represented by the following figures: — 

1890. • 1889. 

Francs. Francs. 

Wines 402,475,000 383,742,000 

RpiritB'-' 13,411,000 12,300,000 

ljLM..r 9,593,000 12,336,000 

Total 

425,479,000 408,378,000 

It will thus Ik! observed that there was a slight increase last 
year, and the subjoined statement of the quantities imported will 
show that the proportions were maintained in this respect: — 



1890 
Hect. 

Spain 7.824,733 

Italy 99.654 

Portugal 202,551 

Algeria 1,971,887 

Tunis «,962 

Other countries 707,639 



1889. 

Hect. 
7,008,629 

337.263 

875,203 

1,591,952 

1 ,972 

815,425 



Hectol ." 10,816,426 10,630,444 

Wine in bottle 7,656 5,531 

Vins de liqueurs 334,328 • 257,986 

CMder 7,099 8,299 

Beer 185,481 242,685 

Spirits 142,956 141,4.52 

Alcohol 29,874 15,213 

Liqueurs (litres) 368,442 281,421 

Italy, which occupied a leading position in this list prior to 
the lapse of the commercial treaty, fell further tehind last year, 
and there was also an enormous diraiuutiou in the imports from 
Portugiil. On the other hand, Spain sent a much gi-eatcr quan- 
tity of wine, and considerable progress wsismadeby Algeria, and, 
on a smaller scale, by Tunis. In the aggregate the imports show 
an increase, contrary to the experience of the previous year. As 
to the exports, there was a slight augmentation of value last 
year, but it was due entirely to spirits, wines, indeed, falling 
below the amount returned for 1889, The statistics are sib 
under: — 

1890. 1889. 

Francs. Francs. 

Wines 246,497,000 251,038,000 

Spirits and liqueurs 72,355,000 67,317,(X)0 

lieer 1,794,000 l,925,0(io 



Total .320,646,000 

The imports in quantity were: — 

1890. 
Hect. 

Wines in cask — 

From the Gironde 967..5.50 

From other districts 1,122,263 

Wines in InUtlc — 

From the Gironde 81,268 

Vnnn other districts 256,284 

Vins de liqueurs 68,668 



Hectol 2,495,933 

Cider and perry 9,105 

Ue«>r 47,449 

Spirits 271,231 

A IcoIioIh 75,796 

Liqueurs (litres) 1,984,784 



320,280,00(1 

1889. 
TT.Ht. 

l,l(il.s;t2 

1,117,291 

79,44 1 

235,S.i^ 

()6,52i 1 

2,6(M),94'-' 

1 1 ,8'J I 

57.K1JL' 

2(i.S.8l(. 

4(i.41ii 

2,158.4(1". 



f/ceifie WIJME /cJMD Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



21 



CAKBOMie ACm l/N WI/NE. 



Spcakiug of the retention of carbonic acid in wines and the 
possibility of increasing it artificially, Die Weinlaube, the organ 
of the Research Station at Klosterneuberg, near Vienna qnotes 
some remarks of Dr. Hermann Muller, of Thurgau, at the Wine 
Growers' Congress at Triers last year. Dr. Muller observed: 

The researches of Delbruck, Hayduck, and others have 
demonstrated that in beer fermentations the carbonic a«id affects 
yeast growth, but its influence on fermentation is inappreciable. 
Similar researches relating to wine fermentations, which have 
engaged my attention for some years past, have given analogous 
results. The carbonic acid has no appreciable effect on the 
progi'ess of fermentation, even with an increased pressure of a half 
to one atmosphere at the surface of the liquid. Initial yeast 
formation was not materially affiected by it, so that the total fer- 
mentative effect, the resultant of the numerical aggregate of 
yeast cells, and the activity of each individual cell, was not 
altered to any material extent by the evolution of carbonic acid. 
But my researches likewise showed that, as regards renewal of 
yeast growth in finished wines, and the invasion of disease germs 
and other affections therein, the case is entirely different. The 
carbonic acid contained in the wine exerts an exceedingly power- 
ful influence, and if present in sufficient quantity, constitutes an 
excellent preservative. Finished wine, with some added sugar, 
was treated with different volumes of carbonic acid, and it was 
found that the multiplication of the fugitive traces of yeast was 
in onecase rapid, in the other tardy, or wanting altogether. 
These results, which are somewhat at variance with the preceed- 
ing, may be explained on the ground that the wine contained 
alcohol enough to all but prevent further yeast growth. Under 
the repressive influence of carbonic acid in quantity such further 
growth was impossible; with a small amount of carbonic acid, it 
was possible to a limited extent. These points are of much im- 
portance in the wine cellar. We know that after fermentation 
is over new wine contains an abundance of carbonic acid, and 
that large quantities are lost in racking and replaced by atmos- 
pheric air. With common wines, in their youth, this loss of 
carbonic acid entails no risk, as it is compensated by the oxida- 
tion changes which quickly follow. It however, should not be 
carried too far, and with weak wines repeated racking, such as is 
often recommended for the improvement of the wine, appears to 
me to be an expedient not to be generally resorted to without 
careful consideration and a fuller understanding of the results in 
practice. With older wine, in which experience shows us the 
oxidation changes are less, any considerable loss of carbonic acid 
will involve greater risks. Not only should the empty spaces 
above the wine in the cask be kept filled, but every effort should 
be made to enable the wine to retain its carbonic acid as far as 
possible. Such wine will sample better, and will find in its car- 
bonic acid a safeguard against various maladies. Not only 
mould and acetic ferment, but various bacteriological agencies 
affecting the color and soundness, have here to be kept in mind 
Although at present commercial carbonic acid is not employed 
as an aid in vinification, nor used for the conservation of wines, 
or the treatment of sickness therein, I am firmly convinced that 
the day is not far distant when such will be the case. For the 
present, it remains to recognize the importance of carbonic acid 
in wine, and to do all that is practicable to insure its retention, a 
few points need to be further touched upon. Although the sepa- 
ration of the carbonic acid and its replacement by atmosperic air 
may be good for young wine, there comes a stage — sooner or 
later according to the vintage and character of the wine — where 
loss of carbonic acid should be prevented as much as possible. 
Such wine should not be i-acked periodically according to any 
hard and fast rule, but only when absolutely necessary. The 
racking should be done with the pump, for the reasons already 
insisted on. In filtering, the loss of carbonic acid is especially 
ip«at, as the wine is brought into cohtact with the solid substance 



of the filter in so highly comminuted a form. Practical men 
know how wine suffers in this respect, and how long it is in re- 
covering itself, particularly more aged wine. Filters should be 
used in which the loss of carbonic acid is least, and the filtering 
should be 3one out of the reach of the air and under pressure, the 
pressure being maintained not only during filtration, but some 
time after the wine is in cask. An excellent method of retaining 
acid in wine is not to defer the bottling too long. Carbonic acid 
introduced with the wine or subsequently formed in the bottle, 
not only acts as a preservative, but is a recommendation of the 
wine in the opinion of experienced judges. By keeping wine that 
has been bottled young in sound condition, it meets one of the re- 
quirements of consumers. 

In the discussion that followed. Dr. Barth spoke of the appli- 
cation of the principle to the wines of Alsace, which are very lia- 
ble to clouding and are then difficult of sale. Commerzieu-Ralk 
Wegeler, of Coblentz, called attention to a new filter employed in 
France for small wines, which has a supply of carbonic acid. Dr. 
Muller spoke of the effects of temperature in bottling — the lower 
the temperature, the less the loss of carbonic acid. Dr. Pulisch, 
of Giesenheim, cited instances of the practical value of retaining 
the carbonic acid in wines. The Swiss high-class wines in the 
Lausanne district are bottled when four months old. If kept 
longer they are apt to cloud. W'nes of a like description in Ba- 
den are very liable to clouding. There the bottling is deferred 
till later, when the wine does not contain carbonic acid enough 
to preserve it. Dr. Pulisch's researches showed that fruit wines 
contain a relatively larger amount of carbonic acid than grape- 
wines, to which he attributes their keeping properties with a very 
low alcoholic percentage. Some of the carbonic acid appears to 
be produced by the decomposition of constituent principles other 
than sugar. 

The Weinlaube, whilst acknowleding the value oi the carbon- 
ic acid in wine, attaches little importance to the foregoing sugges- 
tions. The retention of much of the carbonic acid now lost in 
racking and fining would not compensate for the disadvantages to 
which wine wherein the albuminous matters have not been elim- 
inated by aeration is liable on the slightest changes of temperature 
on exposure to the air. Bottled wines, too, must always form an 
inconsiderable part of the total consumed. The idea of retaining 
carbonic acid to a greater extent than at present is, therefore re- 
jected as impracticable. The supply of carbonic acid by artificial 
means may be effected in three ways: 1. By decomposing lime or 
other mineral in a receiver with acid, and leading the gas into the 
volume of the wine. Experience has shown that imless mechani- 
cal means are provided for agitating the wine in contact with the 
gas, the amount of the latter taken up by the wine, whether it be 
supplied by the decomposition of mineral substance or led from 
fermenting must, is insufficient for any practic il purp3se. The 
addition of carbonic acid in this way is, accordingly, too complex 
an operation for general use. 2. By fermentation with added 
sugar. This method is likewise impracticable, inasmuch as the 
fermentation set up does not end with the production of the car- 
bonic acid sought, but induces other undesired changes in the 
wine. 3. By the employment of the commercial carbonic acid 
now sent out in a highly compressed form in cast-iron cylin- 
ders. Whether this costly and difficult method would admit of 
practical application, remains to be proved. If the object be 
merely to increase the volume of carbonic acid in a particular 
wine, it is suggested that mixing with a younger wine of the same 
kind, containing a larger proportion of the gas, would be the sim- 
plest and most effectual method. 

WA/NTED. 



The agency for New York and vicinity of a first-class wine 
house who can ship all kinds of wines. The advertiser has had 
a very long experience in the wine business, and commands a 
large ti-a<le. The payment of all wines could be guarantired. 
Address Caxjfoknia, care BonJorV-i Win« awl Spirit Vireular, New 
York, 



22 



f^eifie WIJME j/k^Q SflF^IT F^EVIEW. 



A eO/M/SOISSEUK'S FA/MCg. 



ElvH Clatm iH Taokards OwMd by Mr. P. A. Haber 
of loglipook Fair*. 



K. A. ilalMT. tlu>ii|;fiit for the In^l<>ii<M>k Wines, in an i-ii- 
Uiuiaa>4i«- (itllti'lttr <>r fuif f;liiM«^%'an* iiikI tiinkanlH u-«<mI in davM 
giHif liy. •<> lh«" lov«T>« t>r tlu'juii-*' «>f llu' K"'!"'- "'" '""* ***•""' 
truly iiiM|n>ilii-cnl i>|M-ciiiu*nt« of ItoliiMnian ((laMH, pnM-unsI aflor 
ttiilltiw Iniiilili' anil no liltlf <'X|M>nm'. 

Of liinknnU h«- Idim two of which Ih* in uniiHually prou'l. lK)th 
haviuK conic from Vienna, an<l whiU' they are copii-x. tliey are 
not by any uieanit of re<M'nt nuinufaeture. 

Two tunkartlH are ei<|M'cially exteenuHl liy liini. The hirp-r 
ill ovpr twenty inehett hi);h anil in a fine niMi-inien of tlie vck-m-I 
fWini which the wine-liiverx of the niiilille a|reHilr>ink. Itt< ca|ia<-- 
ily iit over a pillitn. The (Iit«i<;n cMiimHtri uf tliree panels, the twu 
up|MT ouiw {Mirtniying the imnihle of DiveH anil JiazuruH. DivcM 
bMcn fttiHtin); and enjoying hiinself with hin conipanionH in the 
faUKSr portion of the panel, while in one (*orner i.M a fiirnaci> 
vomitinn. flaniex. Diveit in their miclitt and a devil fee<liiig the 
fiit>. AtinUuun fla-tpin^r the poor man in his 1)o>4on) is m*en al>ovc. 
while Divea' gmic r<-sts u{>on them. The middle panel shows a 
nuilellateii mansion, I>ive»« in the doorway, while two of Iii8 ser- 
vautM in the fore^n^nind are Iteating Lazarns and two dogs are 
■ItMckinf; him. On the upptT and lower corners are the date 
1M8 and "I.ajuirus." The lower panel reprtwt'nts three figureB 
of men — ^^imekiM'iwrs who have mught a jKMieher. A deml buck 
iit<H im the in^Hind and the puaeher, eroueluHl over the body, \» 
\n-\n)i wiwil by the kivpi-rs. The kii-pers are <-lotlieil in jerkins, 
with bnMul brimnicil hats and U-ar Ixfws and arrow.s. J)iviiling 
the thn-*' {nuicIk are dix-orations of lion and ssityr heads. Foliage, 
anliipie ikiitnitions and S4-roll work i-iiniplete the ornanientulion. 

The smaUer vi-ssel is ei);hteen inches high. A few inches 
truui the top is a eireular me<lallion having in its center the arms 
of the Holy U-iman Knipire with the doubk>-heade4l eagle sup- 
|M>rteil l»y winged griltins. Around the arms is a blue baud on 
which, in niised white letters, is the following inscription: 

■■I><-<i|Mil<lvs Dei (iratia Electvs Romanorvm Imperator. 
Hemier Avg\stvH(iennaniie Hvugariie Bohemiw Dalmatia; Croatiaj 
Selavonia- Kixan-hidvy Avstriie l)vx Bvrgvndite Stvense Cariuhai 
Camiouvet WirtemU-rgia- Mestvrolis." 

Surrounding the incription are small raised plaques showing 
the jeweled ii.llar of the onler of the Golden Fleece. Around 
the top and \nx\y of the vessel an- floriated and aral)es<iue orna- 
mentations of the-media'val tyiK-. The lower |K)rtiou contains 
entablatnri's having lilies with leaves and on either side around 
the <up an- |K>«U-stals U-aring heails prolMibly intended ok. portraits 
f»f the Km|M-ror. The Emis-ror Iieo|M>ld reigned in i:52() and the 
iro|>rint of this replicn Iniirs the date 172.'}. 

Itoth the tankanls an« of light gray faience in their l)ody. 
The decorations an- prinii|mlly of tunjuoise blue, the minor de- 
Uibi of a broHiiish tint, forming a very handsome contrast. The 
cover of this larger drinking vessi-l hail the figure of a soldier, 
clothMl in the style of the middle agi-s, st«'<-l helmet and leather 
coat, MBtvil oil its top. The soldier has a large n)unil wineiup 
in hill IimmIn and is liMiking into its dejiths and evidently regret- 
ting that the contents has disapiM-art^. 

Kentucky has the npuiation of making a great deal of 

whisky, yet it is not generally known that finy of the one huii- 

ilml and eight<-<>n connth-s in K.-ntu.kv an- prohibition counties 

by a vote of the ,HH,p|c in them. Then- is a sln.ng s^-nlinu-nl in 

Kentucky against the exc-s^ivo um of li.,uor. It will di-stroy 

any mans.T.Mlit iiowa-lays to »» Keen i>.to,icati-<l on the stn-ets 

whem«| thirty y^rsag,. It wa« not th.M.Khi enough out of the 
w*y to be meiitiiHKMl. 



DISTILL MOKE B-RA/NBg. 

Ill view of the jircHi-nt (|uietue88 of the wine market and 
t!ic viiiljigc of last year, many of the leading distillers will in- 
crease their jiriMliict this sea.-^on. It is a well-known fact that the 
brainlv market is in a far better wmditiou than the wine market. 
Distillers have the advantage of a lj<'tter demand for their 
jtnslucl. of an ability to 1m»itow money on their goods and of a 
mure widely spread demand. 

Of late orders have come to many distillers from the Kjust 
anil KurojK' for large ((uaiititii-s of brandy, which up to the proB- 
cnt they have Ix-en unable to fill. For instani-e George West 
& Sons, the well-known Stockton hou.se, has an order for a large 
i|uantity for shipment to England, and the L. J. Rose 
<"o. is r.'|(ortc(l to have another large one from the ssimc dirwtion. 
The I'jistcrii orilci-s are undeniably growing and it would not be 
suijirising if the shipments in that direction would Ihj sixty to 
seventy-live per c;'nt greater this year than tliev wen- in IXSK). 

Altogether the outlook for brandy is promising and a move- 
ment is suggested in the Napa Valley for the distillation of say 
one-fourth of the crop of 1 800. Such action would inevitably 
hi'lp all couceriuHl and it has even been suggested to the banks 
in St. Helena and Napa that they back up such an enterprise for 
their own good and for the prosperl y of the valley from which 
they make their earnings. The banks could well aftbrd to see 
that distillation is carried on in a satisfactory manner and few 
investments that could be made would pay better. 

Various estimates of the product of 1891 are already being 
made. If distillation is conducted on the scale that it should be the 
product will be large. We would like to see the output reach 
1,5(M).()00 to 1 ,800,(KM) gallons and with a product a« large a.s this 
there would be no danger of oM-r production a.s it is a well-known 
fact that a«ide from the Stjiuford brandy there is now ])ra<.'ti(silly 
no old brandy in first hands and the total bonded stocks do not 
greatly exceetl oneyesir's priwluction. 

Prices arc low we admit, but the moment some relief is given 
the wine market, the price of brandy will go up in sjmpathy. 
The reverse; is true at present, but it would not be were 18!K) wine , 
stocks rcducwl 2,.50<),O00 to 3.(M)0,0()0 gallons by distillation. 



IMPROVED GOPPER PLANT FOR DISTILLERIES. 



The attention of distillers may b3 usefully directed to the 
new description of copper piping known as the Elmore copjH-i . 
The specialty consists in the fact that the pipes or tubes ai( 
seamless, whilst additional advantages arc found in the great 
purity of the copper, and its superior conductivity to heat, li 
may be added that the process of manufacture is extremely inter- 
esting. A mandrel of the diameter of the pipes to be made i> 
taken and suitably coated; it is then immersed in a trough con- 
taining a saturated solution of copper sulphate, and when the 
whole is at a suitable temperature, a current of electricity is 
passed through the metallic mandrel, so that jturt; copjMjr is de- 
positee! from the salt in fine particles, and these adhere to the 
mandrel, which meanwhile is kept slowly revolving, so that all 
sides get equally coated. The acid set free by this electric action 
gnulually dissolves more of the rough copper crystals, which lie 
in a heaj) at the bottom of the trough, so that the solution is 
always satumtwl with the sulphate. The mandrel lies in a hori- 
zontal iK)sition in the trough, which can Ik- of any length or 
depth, and it is nuived along gradually so that the dcpo.sit of 
copper is regular. The piiw can be ma<le very thin or tan be 
i-qually made very thick, according to the period of exiH>sun> to 
the eltitrical action. Eventually the eovcnnl mandrel is remove 
fnim the trough, burnishers are applied to smooth of the ro«_ 
ness, and the mandrel is then withdrawn, leaving the hollow tuli 
or piiH>, The marks of the buniishers are plainly visible u{K)| 
the pi|K-s. For use as copper coils for heating or CH)oling, fa 
worms, and for many other pur))osos, these seamless 
pilK» will be found extremely serviceable. 



copf 



f/ceifie WIJME /rJMD Sflf^lT F<^EVIEW. 



23 



POH/SDO-RFRS GUESS. 



An Interestinjg Estimate of the Number of 

Wine. 



e Using 



F. Polindorff, the former Californian, has made an estimate 
of the number of people iu the world who use wine and the 
quantity they consume. His figures which are of some little 
interest are as follows: 



Percentajje of 
poyiilat'iit'on- 
eumiiig wine. 



33 
25 
23 
25 
25 
25 
20 
20 
12 
10 
30 
16 
10 
15 
25 
17 
8 
5 
33 



20 
4 
17 
16 
17 
10 
10 
10 
10 
16 
12 
10 
8 
20 
10 
25 
20 
10 
8 
10 



12>^ 



CountrieB. 



France 

AuBtro-Hungary 

Italy 

Spain 

Germany 

I'lirtugai 

Switzerland 

Enjrlaiul 

Scotland 

Ireland 

Belgium 

Holland 

Sweden and Norway . . 

Denmark 

Bulgaria 

Servia and Boumania. 

Busbia 

European Turkey 

Greece 



Total for Europe. 



Britifli poesessions in South Africa etc.... 

Egypt, north and west coast of Africa 

British East India, Japan, Syria and Asia. 

Australia and Oceanica 

Chili 

Brazil 

Argentine 

Paraguay 

Uruguay 

Peru 

Bolivia 

Ecuador 

Colomhia 

The Guianas 

Venezuela , 

Guatemala, Honduras 

Nicaragua and San Salvador 

Cuba 

Hayti and San Domingo 

Jamaica and British Honduras 

Porto Rico, etc 

Costa llico 

Mexico 

Canada 



Total 

Which would leave for the United States. . 
Grand total 



Consuming 
individuals. 



13,225,000 

9,470,000 

9,4S5,000 

4,500,000 

11,800.000 

1,750,000 

560,000 

5,200,000 

470,000 

500,000 

1,00(1.000 

700,000 

640,000 

290,000 

400,000 

1,200,000 

2,620,000 

225,030 

630,000 



Gallons 
consumed. 

1,300,(H)0,000 
2.50,000,000 
500,000,000 
400.000,000 
125,000,000 
20,O0J,OO0 
15,000,000 

( 42,003,0r0 

5,503,000 
4,030,000 
2,500,000 
1,000,000 
5,000,000 
5,000,030 

12,030,000 
2,000,000 

10,030,003 



67,065,000 


2,703,003,000 


400,000 


1,000.030 


200,000 


850,000 


1,503,000 


3,500,000 


900,000 


1,6.50,000 


450,000 


88,000,000 


450,000 


6.500,000 


500,000 


27,000,000 


58,000 


4,000.000 


75.000 


6,500,000 


270.000 


7,0(K1,(K)0 


230,000 


1,500,000 


6.5,000 


1,000,000 


403,030 


4,030,030 


65,000 


1,0(KJ,000 


75,030 


1,500,000 


173,000 


2,000,000 


81,000 


1,. 500,000 


300,000 


6,000,000 


97,003 


4,000,000 


92,000 


1,000, 0(X) 


150,000 


1,503,000 


19,000 


500.000 


800,000 


8,1)00,000 


430,000 


4,500,000 



74,855,000 2,887,000,000 
8,500,000 38,000,000 



83,355,003 2,875,000,000 



We think, however, that the stated number of consuming 
individuals in the United States is rather too high. 



A/NOTHE-R -RAISE I/N CH AMPAGME. 



Dispatches from Paris indicate that there is shortly to be 
another raise in the price of champagne. The dispatch is as 
follows: 

"The vintners announce an advance of twelve and one-half 
francs per dozen on champagne. The reason given for this ad- 
vance is that they apprehend considerable damage to future vin- 
tages by the ravages of the phylloxera. This, however, is 
considered to be only a pretext to obtain higher prices. Experi- 
ments made in various parts of France prove that the wine-growers 
are now able to successfully combat the phylloxera. The real 
reason for the advance in the price is that the growers, who have 
hitherto been at the mercy of the shippers, have formed a com- 
bination and raised the price of champagne. The shippers, in 
turn, have increased the price to consumers." 

This is a pretty prospect for consumers of foreign chami)agnes 
considering the advances already made on account of the ])iissage 
of the McKiuley Bill and the determination of hotel men to 
cinch the public. 



/NEW METHOD OF -PUKIFgiA^G 
LIQUO-RS. 



We "find in our esteemed contemporary, the Brewers^ and 
Dealers' Journal, of Philadelphia, the following in its January 
issue: 

A new process for the purification of distilled liquors is at- 
tracting considerable attention. Dr. Ira B. Cushing, of Brookline, 
Mass., made a discovery some ten years ago, the outcome of which 
is the " Cushing Process" for the mellowing and refining of 
liquor.^. From time to time attempts have been made to hasten 
results by an artificial process, but all such have proved either 
too expensive or were found to abstract important properties. 
The Cushing process, however, claims to do its work without 
detriment to the quality or flavor of the liquor. The company 
does not manufacture liquors; its sole business is to purify them. 
Heat and air are the factors employed in the process, the work- 
ings of which, in miniature, are exhibited in the window of the 
New York store, and as described by Dr. Cushing, are as follows: 

" First, the air is washed and purified by Tyndall's well- 
known method, which destroys animal and vegetable impurities. 
It is then moderately heated and is forced by a steam air pump, 
through perforated pipes, into a large tank. It enters the liquor 
in minute streams, which permeate every portion and create a 
violent agitation. The air thoroughly oxidizes the fusel oil and 
at the same time volatilizes and expels into the open air the 
light, poisonous ethers, leaving the liquor.s perfectly pure and 
free from the aldehydes which produce headache, stupify and 
destroy the brain tissues." , 

The liquors treated by tliis company ara obtained from the 
United States bonded warehouses. 



Garnier, kneel & Co. 



Office and Salesrooms 



618 Sacramento St., San Francisco, 

California Wines and Brandies 

WHOLESALE DEALERS, 
GROWERS, DISTILLERS. 

Wine Vaults, 617-627 Commercial St., S. F. 



KSTAHI.1SHED 1857. 

F. O. BOYD S^ CO., 

COMMl.'^KIO.N Mf:KCIIANTS, NkW YOHK. 

CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

Sole Eastern Agent for BARTON'S Celebrated Sweet Wines, Fresno, Cal. 
Advances Made on Consignments. 

Kcferenecs by reiniisj^ion: TiiK Hank of tiik Statk of New York. 

Mr. lioiiKUT ISaktok, Fresno. Cal. Ml!. .ViJi'AO Hahsazthy, San Francisco. f'al. 

Mh. HoiiAiK WmisTKit. SanFraiici.-ico.Cal. Mji. H.H.SriiFFKi.PT, (^liicafjo.Ill 




Damiana Bitters. 

The (ileal jMexican Iteniedy for Dii?order» ol 
Uie Kidneys and liiaddei. and Nervous Disease*. 

Dameana is recof;nized by all Physicians as the 
best Nervous Sliniulant, hUIi a special aclioii on 
the Se.tual and (icncralivc Organs. Forthe abovt 
action it is reconmi.inded in all cuses of Se.tual 
Weakness and Want of SL'Xual Desire. 

NABER, ALPS & BRUNE, 

S,.lc Aiiciil^;, H-':i-:i:.'5 Market St.. S. F 



24 



f^\f\Q WJ/^E /rj^B Sfl^nr_5EVIIEW. 



PI/SE OLD BHAAJDIES. 



I LoHof Wrttir'i ivUmtigf AccohqI of Tb«ir ProducUop 
iM SbaracUrisUcs. 



B«^l»rdin;; the old limiuli*-" <>f Fniiuf. tin- I»ii(li>n WuM r.- 
rvutly iKiWiiAwl th«' follimiiin int.n-»«tinj{ nii<l iiiMnutivi' «rti<lf: 

•'•I'litil lli«> ili'VHMtjUi"!! of tin- vini'vanli* liv tin- iiliijllox>r<i. «>|tl- 
fivliiuni^l fjunily NVim- M.nliuiilM. IhhikIU im«l h.-hl IJnindics a.-* 
.rth«T |H«o|.U> .lo railwiiy Ht<xk. unci f.w iiiv.-Hliiuiits |>aiil iMtf.r. 
It iKMiiamlttl B»»«»lut«'lynoHtt»'iUion.aml went on iniprovin;;. ami 
■itinii«*ntiuff in m«»m««an- valu*-. fipmitivHy KlH-akinj,'. fon-vor. 
Sin<i< thi> failun* of tlif vintajp". the <x>nKiwn]ition lia.-t fallen — 
ttuutk« in a icniit nu-aitun- t«i faU" rumorn. tosiiy notliiiij; oftho 
cJuui|{t> of fawhion, which ha*» <'ttni*wl our chH-tor» to 'jr.f«TiU' oth- 
.•r HiinmUuitJ*— to aj« gniit an extent that there c-oiiM have been 
no fitir as to the »upply of jp-nuine Cogna*- for yean* to eoiue. 
M«irv«iver. the fkfUoxera did uni|uet«tional»ly make nhort work of 
th«» vim-t*. Then> i« no exajo;«'nition in tlie ntatement that fr )n» 
ISHl to 1SS8 the niakinK of legitinjate Hnindy virtually eeaweil. 
Sincv the latt«r yjiir, however, jjreat <'han)te.H have U'eii worked, 
itwultinK in a vintafjeof nwirly eleven million p»llon» of excellent 
quality in I«H). ThuH. happily, the future \» Mxnin'; although 
this quantity in merely an indiesiticm of revival. As rt^inls the 
other countM, it iu a faet tlmt a g»KKl deal of the hnindy nold at 
■|iopuUir prie**' ia not grown in the Charento district. Much of 
it ii« none thehtw of very re.H|KM-tahle ehan»<-ter. It is made from 
pure gra|R' juiif. and is s<Mnetinies distilled with an admixture of 
r»«l Cognac. r«'ndering the blend tndy artistic. The lif^hter .Jerez 
Winex havi- Ihn'u found suitable to this pur|K»se. and arc being 
uiMsl with (•ousidenible suec«'«s. Of the <li-eadful compound la- 
licllwl 'Ftm-igii (Vjjrnac Hnuidy." and retailwl at thrw .shillings 
and Hix|>cnee a Ixrttle — (Jerman jwlato-spirit, wliii-h luusniiidea 
trip to Franw to n><H'ive a final |K>liHh — it is im|>OHsible to speak 
t(Ht wven-ly. and it is to Im' n-grettinl that our Customs' arrange- 
ments do not pn>hibit its entry into this country under the same 
tJth- ait the gi*nuino article. 

.\s to the tenn fine Chnmjxiijne. In old Fn-nch, the won! 
chani|Mgne signified a cultivat<-<l |>lain as <-ontni-di.stinguislied 
from lan<l coven**! with timlter. The original Hnindy district wiiM 
a cham|mgne around Cogniu-. The increasiNl demand for Hrandy 
which aro.-M' during the present century. le<l to the clearing of the 
a«^a<'rnt forest lambt. and to their U'ing plan t<>d with vines. But 
though this foreKt soil wbh similar, it w;is not found e<iual to that 
of tlie eliam|Higne. and deteriorated in pn>{K>rtion to the distance 
fnim the favoretl 8jM>t. Thus the Brandy rni* were classed in 
onler of merit Champayiut and Ihpu. thi^' in turn iK'iug sulxlividiKl 
into gmmde or fine ( 'hampnyiu- and petite Chamjxiijite borderien or 
yivmien bou,fin* bou, botu Imi*, and Imhk ordlnnire*. 

The lan«l in tht-w districts is almost entirely jmrcelbnl out in 
ten, twenty and thirty acre lots am<mg peasjint ])ro]>rietors. In 
the goo<l old times. thes<' iH>a.Hants gr«'w their wine and converted 
it Into spirit by means of a primitive little still which most of them 
paww w i M Hl. Thorn who were without a still, Iwirrowed their neigh- 
bors*. When thi-y want4><I money, they clap]H-d on their Sunday 
blouse, put a i-ask of bnindy on a truck, and went off to nmrket 
to nit^t the brokent of the greait blending Hous(>s. But thcBO 
good people were elthw grwsly or fiwiish. They exliauste<l the 
hUMl yearftfter year, and n-turne<l nothing to it. And so when 
thi' fihylloxern came, the vines suc<-umlM>4l at once. After the la«t 
good vintagt- in l«7H,eametwol.iiny«-airs. the n-sult of Iwd weath- 
er; then, in IHMl, came the inse«'t scourge. In di-spair they tore 
out of the ground what reniaine<l of the witherc<l r<M)ts of their 
vines, and bade farewell to vin<>-gr<)wing. Itut tli<' great sliip|M-rs 
ha<l faith— anil money. They formiHl a |MiwerAd symlical.-, im- 
|>ort«-«l hmlthy young vinoH fnim Ameri.a. an<l engngi'd the most 
skillful viticulturista. They lAtuttl evcrvtl.ing, new vinesan.l the 
highest technical skill, virtually at Uie frc liMiswition of the iM-aa- 



ant proprietors, tlnrngh the cost of replanting amounts to £40 iwr 
ucr.'. Ihit so (lishearteiKHl were the peasants, that comparatively 
little progress wsis made till 1K88, when something happened to 
ivvivc th.ir hope. In (.ne si>ot near Cognac, a few withertnl vines 
had Ihhii allowe<l to n-nuiin in the ground. In "that year— the 
year of a splenilid vintage, it will Ixi reuieml)ered— thest; planta 
nturned. a.- it were. unexfKK-tedly to life. The phenomenon 
s4M'me«l of g<sMl augury, and since then, the replanting haspro- 
c.-<-d.Hl Silt isfactorily. .Nor is it likely, after their piwt exis-ri- 
en<-.-. tliat thes*' chess-l)oard agriculturists will agsiin so nt^lect 
their pat.lic.x as to render their vines an e^asy prey to the first 
mis<-hievous grub that comes strolling along. 

Indeed, it would seem that after years of vicissitude, and 
.•vcn threatened extinction, brandy is gaining ground all alon-; 
the line; for simulta:i:>ously with the revival in supply and quali- 
ty which enabk's it to silence traducers, then' has been an increase 
in c->usumi»tion. The whirlgig of time brings aljout strange n- 
vengcK. and good old brandy, the universal medicine of our griind- 
niothers. is at last emerging from the cloud. 'Brandy and .Salt" 
was an elixir of life within the memory of people not particularly 
ohl — not older than gentlemen may confess to be; and a good gla> 
of brandy-and-water was once the favoritj beverage of Philistin 
fiction, from Mr. Pickwick to the late Lord Lytton's philosophic 
rogue, who ssiid there was no earthly trouble it would not teniiw- 
rarily alleviate. The craze of fashion — medical fashion particu- 
larly — ."xalts this stimulant and depresses that, according to it- 
whim; and the swing of the pendulum denotes that brandy is ju>i 
now on the upwarn turn. Fortunate are they who {ws-sess that 
rarity, a decent cellar of it; and next to the.se, fortunate are those 
who. having confidence in their merchant, can seize the present 
oi)pi)rtunity of purchasing and laying down with confidence what 
will undoubtedly 'earn its money,' and much more, during the 
years immediately before us." 



THE THI-RB STAMP SCHEME. 



The Kentucky distillers who produce the fine hand made 
whiskies are discussing the third stamp idea but up to the present 
tlu'v have not agreed upon any definite plan of action. The plan 
is for the producers of su<th whiskies to adopt a thinl stamp for their 
goods so as to distinguish them from the flood of cheap early 
maturing whiskies which aree<iually entitled to the double stamp. 
Should this have been carrietl into effect there would have Ikhmi 
three instesid of two classes, the single stamp whiskies beinj; 
blended or compounded, the double stamp Ix^ing the quick matin 
ing goods and the triple stamp whiskies rei)rescuting the ohl 
fiushioncd hand made, sweet or sour ma^ih whiskies which an 
suitable for agi'ing. 

It is a matter of regret that the distillers did not com& to an \ 
.igret'ment at their recent meeting in Louisville when the mattc'i- 
was discus.sed. The objwtion wa.s that were there to l)e a third 
stamj) it might guarantee that all whiskies produced in the 
manner specified would be of iniual merit. However as the 
distillers are to meet monthly there may yet be a way of over- j 
coming this objwtion. The thinl stamp would effectually prevent 
the sjile of cheap goods as "fine Kentucky whiskies", and would 
«U» away with some of the c<nniH>titioii to which the distillers by 
the old proc-esses are subjecttnl. 

Thest' goods, which we are selling largely to wine and cha 
pagne.manufactun'rs throughout the country, are jH'rfectly 
from the smallest sjK'ck of dirt or dust, and are iK'autiftilly tr 
]iarent. They are not like the sugary stuff sometimes .sold 
rock candy. 

In ten loirrel lots, we sell the crystals at a slight advance 

the<-ost of refined sugar. Sampleson applicjitioii. 

DR.YDH:N & FjOlLIKIEK.. 
18 Hudson Str««t N«w Yer 



f/eifie WIJSE /rjMB Sflf^lT REVIEW. . 25 

THIS SI^J^OE I?.ESEI?.-VEID IFOI?. 

ARPAD HARASZTHV & CO. 

PRODUCERS OF 

CHAMPAGNE ECLIPSE, 



-AND DEALERS IN- 



^aUfornia l^inoa and "^randios. 

Proprietors of 

ORLEANS VINEYARD. 

530 Washington Street - - - - San Francisco, Cal. 

S.LACHMAN& CO. 



WHOLESALE DEALERS IN- 



Qalifovnia '^jQinQS and "Qrandies. 



Old and Well Matured Wines a Specialty. 



LARGEST SHERRY PRODUCERS IN THE UNITED STATES. 

SAN FRANCISCO: NEW YORK: 

453-465 Brannan Street. ^I-^H"H<^-K> 22, 24, 26 Elm Street. 



This Space f^eset^Ved por 

J. GUNDLACH & CO. 



-DEALERS IN- 



California Wines and Brandies. 

Cor. Second and Market Streets - - - San Francisco, Cal. 

m\W WIIE MD SPIRIT REVIEW, 

The Only Wine and liiqaor Tt^ade Paper CJClest 

of Chicago. 

STJBSOI?/II=TIOISr ^3:00 IPEI?. '2'EA.I?/ IIsT AJD'V-AJtTCE. 



26 fyWSIfie Wlj^E ;^|4D 

KECEr^T TREASURg -DECISIO/MS. 



Tiiiu*. PwT.. OrncK or thk 8w rctaby, \ 
\VA*nix«iTi»N. I). *'.. Jniiimry '2S. IK91. ) 
7'.. fifkm tflkf <\uionu aiui nlkrm nmftnii^: 

In view of I|m< •■«>iitiiui«l iiiiiiu*n>iiH iniiuiric>M r«H-<'iv«Ml at t!iin 
; ■ inMit nv»nlii>jr llio .Hinntnu-tion to lio plnt')^*! <>n .S-^-tion <» 

,1 .if IVU.IHT I. IWMi. a* to tho inarkiiiRof iiiijKirt*^! 
itohUhikI iwickufpw. wIim*I» ih r.'<|uin><l on nn<l iiftor Man-h 1. 
i.v.t|. it iit tlwrnwl |im|MT to |iublu(li nomo of tho c-onrlimioiiH 
michrti liy tho I)i'|«rtmfiit in th«« pn-iiiin**. in adilition to tho»«> 
ixHitaiiKHlinitK Circular No. l.'MJ of DcwniUT '_>(), ISlMi, art fol- 
hiu ••. \ i/.: 

I Ihickafp'M containing Umt nmnufiu-tunHl in CJonnaiiy. of 
(.. rm.iii malt iuhI AnHtrian hofM«. HhouM 1m- niark*^! ••(Jormany," 
a- iixli.-jitinjt th»' rountry of orijfin of thoarticU'. it In-ing Iho opin- 
ion «if thf I>i>p«rtincnt that liirpnivimonKof S^-tion (J of said Act 
r»'lat«« to thf manufartHri-il iirtich' an a wlioli-. and do not contoni- 
plat.' a wMiHidcrntion of tin- ditfj-n-nt infjHHlients of an article for 
tho pnrjHiw of unrh mnrkin);. stanipin>;. hnindinjj. «'l<'. 

3. Alt fonMRti nmnufartur»'<larti<-li's, dutiabU'or free, which 
arc "UMially or orxlinarily nmrkwl. Htunii>e«l, l)rande<l or Iain-led" 
are r«|uinMl to be nuu-ke«l. etc., witli the name of the c-onntrj- of 
oriiTtii. 

Tlie marking of ]Hiekaget< of pkmIh in thin country, an the 
aauc an- U-ing «lii««-harg«-<l fn»ni the imiMtrting vesw-l. it* inadmiH- 
atblf>. and contrary to the Hpirit and intent of the waid provision 
of lau . 

28. The law dcM-ttnot rctpiire the invoices of goo<lH importetl 
on and after March 1, IKin. shall exhibit the name of the coun- 
try of ori^n of til'- fixnK .■i.v< nil ilwii-by. 

» * :: * 

.'Jl. fto<Kl» wliicli anivi ill llie I nitcd States on and after 
Man-h 1. IWI, aiul ap|M-ar by the bills of lading and other d«K-u- 
mentii, to Iw men-Iy intendt^I for transit to Mexico or other for- 
eign ctiiintry. the sume not In-ing importations within the mean- 
ing of tin- statute, do not c<jnu- within the M'(>\Mi of S-f-tion (> as to 
marking, stamping, branding, etc. 

.Ti. Then- is no authority under tin- provi.si4)ns of .Section (> 
ffir rei|uiring the uanu-of the maker or manufacturer of an article 
to ap|Miir theroon, in addition to the nanu- uf the country of ori- 
gin. WlM.IAM WlM><)M, Strrrhiril. 



Bkxkdktixr axp I<<itti.h» CosTAiNiNo Samr. 

Nkw Yokk, January 14. lS«tl. 
Bf'forp the lloAnl of Uniti^l Stiil'-^ <;• iK-ml Appraisci-s at New 
York, Janiutr}' — , IHUl. 

In the matter of the prol4wt. l.'iTii <i. of (jouni & Tournade. 
again.Ht the rate <»f dut)' ass«'sse<l by the (Jollector at tin- Port 
of Ne« ^iiik on certain ■•|{«-nedictine" and lM)ttles, importe<l 
jM-r /m liniirtjwjnr, S<'ptendN>r '1'2, IKIH). 

OriKioK BV Wii.Kism>x, General Appraiser. 

Duty was a-^j^cK-M-d on tin- liipu-ur IU-n(-di<-tine, uniler para- 
graph .'{l.'i, at two dollars |M>r gidlon.and on the lK)ttles containing 
it at thn-** wntu i^nch, under pnragniph 31(», act of March ."{, iss;i- 

Ap|H-llants claim that the rat«- should 1h- fifty per cent, ad 
valorem on the lU-nedictine as a proprietarj- prepamtiou, under 
Itnragraph ninety-nine, and thirty js-r cent, on the ItottU-s, under 
INiragm|ib ]:{.'<. 

raragniph ninety-nine provi<l. m for proprietary cordials roC- 
ommendi-d to Uie public w» renuHlii^ i diwiwcs, at fifty per cent, 
lul valorem, 

l'anigra]>h 313 in enuinernting varioim Ix-verugw, provideu 
for li<|uorH c«mtaining spirits at two dollni \>v\- gallon. 

It is notorious that li((ueur ik^uediiiim ■ .-itainH spirits, and 
in comnuudy uwhI and coniiu<mly known asa , nituonslM-verage. 
Tli»-refore even if this lii|ueur <-ome within the il;; <r jiroprietary 
arlich-H mentioned in ])ai-iignipli ninety-nine, it »mi;|>| Im-^ liy vir- 



SflF^IT F^EVIEW. -_:^===^ 

tue of Beftion 245«», Reviseil StatuteB, eubjoct to the higher rate of 
diitv nnm«-<l in panigraph .313. 

The (ht-ision of the collector is accordingly aflfirmed, both as 
to the Ik'ni-<lictiiHi and lK)ttle«. 



Amendment of Warehovsing Bond. 

Tbkascbv Department, January 19, 1891. 

To Collrrtori nml other Offirrrf of the Chutottu: 

In I>epiutment circular No. 53 of 1890 it was decided "that 
s.rt ion 20 of the new law (act of June 10, 1890) pennite the 
retcutioii of merchandise in Inrndeil warehouses for more than one 
vear, and not more than three years, from date of imimrtation, 
without the imjMwition of the additional duty often per centum 
vidi-il by section 2970, Bevised Statutes, upon its withdrawal for 
consumption."' 

In a<-(!ordance with the alwve decision, the clause "with ten 
|M'r centum addtMl up<m the amount," should be stricken from 
the (-(uulitiou in the "warehousing l>ond'" as it api)ear8 in Form 
137, General Customs^Catalogue No. 704, and New York Customs 
Catalogue No. 697. A. B. Nettleton, Acting Secretarj-. 



KxTKv OF Goods Valued at Less than $100. 

Treasury Department, January 3, 1891. 

Sir: The Department is in receipt of your letter of the 10th 
ultimo, transmitting the application of Messrs. S. L. Jones & Co. 
for a cliange in the practice now prevailing at your port concern- 
ing the entry of importe<l merchandise without consular invoic-es 
value<l at less than 8100. 

It appears that when satisfied that the claim is valid, and 
that the importation was not purposely broken up into small val- 
ues to eva<lc the requirement of the statute, you allow entry to lie 
made by appraisemuut, while the applicants claim the privilege of 
making such entries by pro forma invoices in the same maimer as 
is now custonmry at the port of New York and elsewhere. 

Upon investigating the matter, the Department is of the opin- 
ion that while it is right that you should exercjse all projH'r dis- 
cretion under the provisions of section 4 of the act of June 10, 
IHHO, in such matters, yet that no objection exists to allowing en- 
try of merchandise where the value is $100 or leas on uncertified 
invoices, and without exacting bond for the subsetjuent production 
of consular invoices, provided that the importer comi)lit-s with 
the conditions of such section in the manner indicat<Hl in the 
blank affidavit herewith inclosed. 

The collector's action must, of cxjurse, be dependent upon the 
conditions and circumstiinces developed in each case. 

This practice which prevails at the port of New York and 
elsewhere, is believed to be the safest and best course to pur- 
sue in order to insure the proj)er collection of the revenue on 
such importations. Y'ou will be governetl accordingly. 
Respectftdly yours, 

O. L. Spaui.dixo, Assistiint Secretary. 
Collector of Customs, San Francisco, Cal. 



^7*'HE custom of "toasting" our favorites, appears to have had 
^ its rist^ in the reign of Charles II. Dr. Johnson observes 
that the meaning of the word at its first ust> was " a celebrated 
woman whose health is often drunk;" and the reason of her In-ing 
BO ternuHl may be found in the "Tatler," which says: — "It haj - 
pt'ued that on a public day a celebrated Ixaxuty of the these tinn - 
(King Charles II.) was in the Cross Bjith, at Bath, and one of tin 
crowd of her a<lmirers took a glass of the water in which the fair 
one sto(Ml, and drank her health to the company. There was in 
the pliuH-, a giiy young fellow half-fuddliHl. who offered to juni|> 
in, and swore, though he liked not the liiiuor, he would have tin- 
toast. He was opjwstHl in his r»>s<)lution, yet this wliiin g-.r 
foundation to the present honor which is done to the lady w 
mention in our li(iuor, who has ever since been called a 'toast." 

DON'T BUY A PIANO, ORGAN OR ANY OTHEn MUSKAI. IXSTRUMFN 
williciit fir»t MTllliiK to nrvlHiliiiK KoliliT * ('1111.0, 1<M1 Mnrkfl SIn-cl, S 
i'v-> ■' ' .>! mill <il(l»-i.t ili-alt-rx In lliid lliu- on It Tlii> linvr 

pr:i ,1- niid sell viT)' clow (or <'iu*li or on i 'I'Iiik ii- 

oM ,1 hnn n gUI i-dKV rviiutnlloil made liy be i i:,-, mid nlw:i: 

Kuui«iiU»:iiiK Mktittfavtion. 



i 



f/ceifl(3 WI/vJE ;^J^E) Sflf^lT PREVIEW. 



27 




DISTILLED BY 



Daviess County Distilling Co 
Owensboro^Ky. 



all* 



Our Cooperage is our oWrv marvufaclure. 
OUTS AND PHO0P GUHRHNTeeD'-=» 



^" 



Qoods deli^^e^ed F. 0. B. either Boat or Cars. 



'R.MONAR<>M,PREa 
OwENSBORO,Kr. 



W« hare spared neither sJPort nor ejcpense to make 
"OLEN MORE" the finest early maturing Sour-Mash 
Whishey eccr produced in Kentuckij and the flatterincj rccog-|' 
nition extended to that brand by the trade is prooS enough! 
to U8 that our efforts hace been croicned tcith entire success. 
GLENMORE DISTILLrNG CO. 



28 



f^e\f\e WI|JE /rJMD SflF^IT F^EVIEW^ 




CHAS. IVIEINECKE & CO., 




314 Sacrnmpntn Strnnt. 



Xl^FO'RT:ETtS. 



San Francisco, Ca\ 



I'. 



J J M 
I A I s 



n.~.f,i.t S-. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE PACIFIC COAST FOR 
I'ort 8t. Ml. 



(i. M. in 

Si-tilllfr .V 



.,, OjKirlo l-iu« l'»i th. 

Triiraitoua Torts. 

rotii,B«uleriK-!',01ivf Oil. 

lliirKimdii's. 

luz Hock WiiuT. 

rtn.-tlK'-M". Hock Wiiico. 



(ifiiovcva Natural Hparkling Mineral Water. 

Koyal PrufKian 8prinf;(< Kellcm Water. 

Hakoczy Hitler Water Co.. Bu(la[)est, Mineral Water. 

Muure it Siiinott. I'liiladelphia Wliis-kie*. 

A. Clicvallier-Appert I'aris Wine Fininj;*. 

A. Boake UoIktIs A Co., London Wine FininKf 

J. J. W. I'elerf . Hamburg Clierry Cordial. 

Htandard Mineral Water Co., Liverpool. . .Oiufter Ale. 
J'rnne Juice Extract. Batavia Arrack. 

SI. Croix Rum. Medford Rum, Etc., Etc. 








SWAN Gl N 



Boord's Old Tom Gin. 



TRIPLE FLAVOR GIN. 



PEfJf^IEP-JOlJET & CO 





CHAMPAGNE 

"Special," "Reserve D ry," "Brut." 

W. B. CHAPMAN, 

SOLE AGENT FOR PACIFIC COAST, 

123 CKLIFQRNI T^ STREET, SM N FRT^NCISCO. 

For Sale bv all First-class Wine Merchants and Grocers. 

8p«olaity also of High-grade ClareU, Sauternes and Old Cognacs. 




f/eeifie WIJME /rJ^D SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 
A BESE-RVED COMPLIME/NT. 



29 



Til a iv(!ont article ivfjanlins I-'r)e Turk of Santa Rosa, the 
I>()uisvillo Wine and ,Spirlf Bulletin says: 

Mr. Do Turk dates his exporienco as a gi-ower from the feehlo 
befrinuing of the pr()(luctioii, down tiirongli tlio dark and profitless 
years of exjK'rinient, stL-niniiugtlie tide of prejudice and opposition, 
until to-day he stands on the apex (Sf success and views with satis- 
factory pride the grand results of his own and confreres' years of 
labor. 

His wines have always been sent out under true colors, 
labeled '-Califoi-nia Wines," and tlie enviable reputation they 
have attained wlierever introduced speaks volumes for their 
l)urity and general excellence. 

California owes much to such men as Mr. I)e Turk, who at a 
sacrifice of priceless years of life and private fortunes have com- 
pelled attention and admiration from people of every clime for 
the golden dew and purple tear.s, crushed from the oldest of the 
world's known fruits, nurtured on the sunny hillsides of California. 

Mr. Do Turk is an extensive shippar of wines to this market 
and has established in Chicago a central de]K)t where the wines 
are received from his vineyard, clarified, racked and re-shipped to 
his many customers throughout the East. 

This depot is controlled exclusively by the well-known house 
of Delafteld, MctJovern & (;o., in whoso spacious cellar Mr. De 
Turk's wines are rested and where all the bottling is done for 
the trade east of the Rocky monntains. In thus placing his 
wines in the care of a reliabl,e house, Mr. Do Turk feels assured 
that his interests are ably and faithfully represented. 

THE CHICAGO CAFE. 



On the 5th. inst. the final mooting of the merchants and 
producers who aro identified with the plan to establish a Viti- 
cultural Cafe in Chicago, was held at the Viticultural Commission. 
Nearly all of the parties who are going to have their wines on 
sale at Messrs Franckx & Ruhlemann's Chicago estiiblishment were 
at the meeting. 

The final arrangement between the wine men and Franckx 
& Ruhlemann were concluded. On the Gth. Mr. Franckx took 
a run up to St. Helena where he was entertained by Tiburcio 
Parrott and others, and on the 7th. he left for Chicago. 

By this time Mr. Franckx has arrived in Chicago and the 
active work of establishing the Cafe has now begun. 

Mr. Franckx should make a great hit with his place in Chicago. 
Ho is an indefivtigable worker and will push the place prominent- 
ly to the fore. Mr. Ruhlemann, who is not a whit loss capable, 
will no doubt continue to make the local cafe what it is now— a 
first class restaurant with first class attendance and the best thin<rs 
foi- the inner man. 

The Chicago trade will find Mr. Franckx's place well worth 
visiting once it is established. 



A WINE DEALER of Odcssa has conceived the idea of manufac- 
turing champagne out of Caucasian, Bessarabian and Crimean 
grapes. He put himself into communication with manufiicturers 
of that article in the Champagne district, and succeeded in interest- 
ing in his nndertaking some of the wealthiest among them. A 
careful trial was made of the Russian grapes, and it was found 
that they would yield the finest qualities of champagne. Accord- 
ingly a company of French wine producers has been formed, a 
largo factory with all the necessary machinery for producing 
and bottling champagne has boon built in Odessa, and experts 
have been engaged. The whole outfit of the factory was import- 
mI from France; and oven the first million of bottles wore 
wdored from there. But if it will bo found that bottles strong 
Jnough can bo made in Russia, a special glass factory will be 
Juilt in Odessa to supply th(> roquiroments of the neiv company. 



Cincinnati ^QtavtmQni. 

[special corkkspondence.] 

Cincinnati, O. February 24, 1891. 
Being located in the principal wliisky market of the country, 
and having had years of expt^rience in the trade, I desire to give 
the readeis of your valued journal, a warning as to the situation 
in this city and Kentucky. 

In a previous letter, I said that business was somewhat back- 
ward; this is still the condition of trade. Nevertheless prices 
have not receded, but on tho contrary they have strengthened 
somewhat. 

Tho older have almost all gone into consumption, and the 
time for the withdrawals of the '888 still in bond has arrived. 
They will all bo withdrawn during the next three months, leaving 
the trade dependent on the '8!)s and '90s. As time goes along, 
these goads are bound to advance in price, and holders of them 
have every reason to bo confident over the situation. 

As for the '91 crop, it is only right to say that great uneasi- 
ness is felt. Buyers are not as numerous as the distillers would 
like to see, and it is undeniable that the crop is to a largo extent 
left on the distillers' hands. The distillers have two obstacles 
confronting them; one the high price of grain, and tho other tho 
reluctance of purchasers to invest. Consequently a reduction of 
the crop is to be anticipated and it would not surprise me in view 
of the recent dotormination of tho loading distillers to shorten 
their output, to see a considerable reduction from last year's quan- 
tity. Po.ssibly this reduction of Bourbons may amount to one- 
half. This is the safest and most conservative plan and the fore- 
most distillers are prompt to see it. 

The prices of Eastern ryes are not so firm as they have 
been. Still there is a fair movement in the different brands of 
those goods. 

The California wine trade is good. In the city of Cincinnati 
tho demand is constantly improving. 

R. Culbert of Culbert & Taylor, New York, stopped over here 
a few days recently. He reports a fine trade. 

Nicholas Oester, distiller of the Greendale Bourbon, Law- 
renceburg, Ind., was in the city recently and reports having 
pla33d S3veral nica lois of his goods of different ages. 

George C. Buchanan, the prominent Louisville broker, was 
one of our recent visitors. Old whiskies are his specialty, and 
he has placed some lots of favorite brands. 

Mr. M. Mihalovitch, of Mihalovitch, Fletcher & Co., fruit 
brandy distillers, will leave New York next Monday for Europe, 
and will bo gone for two months. 

Mr. W. S. Hume, distiller of the celebrated W. S. Hume, paid 
Cincinnati a short visit of one day, last week. 

Mr. Lehman, representing I. De Turk of San Francisco, was 
here and reported sales large in his line. 

Mr. Fred Lyons of Louisville, was here representing the firm 
of Weeks & Campbell. Fred is a hustler from wayback. Keep 
it Up Freddie, we are with you. 

Mr. Coblens was on change recently in the interest of the 
Phillip Hamberger Co., Pittsburg. Mr. Coblens sold some large 
lots of Eastern rye and bought several lots. 

Mr. E. H. Taylor Jr., of the Old Taylor fame, calle<l la.st 
week. 

Mr. Charles Schubert, one of the largest wholosal(> dealers o( 
Ft. Worth, Texas, was one of tho visitors on change last week, 

Shaw. 

We have just received a copy of the first issue of the Antl- 
Prohibitionist, a monthly magazine, published at Mount Holly, N, 
C. The subscription is fifty cents per year. It is well put to- 
gether, and of a very convenient size. It will be devoted to the 
interest of personal liberty and equal rights against all class 
legislation. The editors state that it's columns will always he 
o^jon to a full and honest discussion of any theory. We wish 
our bright littl(> contemporary all success and prosperity. 



30 



f^eifXa WIfJE j^fiQ 3f>\H}T flEVIEW. 





Chant** •-* Olasolutlens In 
PaftiMrshlM- 



J T r-' --* --^-»o. R»*««U. S. M., 

IV . - V » 'tl 

J I' w liiMnrll. N M.. no* 

Mlllrf llf» . Miortl. HnnktUtr r»ll*, 
UmIi . df»<>l<«d. W. P. mitvr con- 
ltniM«, 

i.!>^ llnM,. Mtoaa, Forltead. Or., dto- 

1'Ki.lrt. * Crow, wloan. C««|iar, Wjro., 

llrlltucham lUr (<>.. «linl<«al« liqnor*. 

Xra WbalrVim, Wa»h.. dtaoolrtd: I. 

K ItaaratiamB mm! D WnrtniberK rr- 

lltv. 
Parrvll A WUIIk. riUmn. tx* AiiKrlf*. 

t'aL.dtaxiUrd. I>. rarrrllrnnllnar*. 
Conoa * Cunoo, b<>lrl, Krnl. Or., di*- 

•ulWd. 
MfOwl^ A Barker. rtstauranl.San Fran- 

rl»o). dlwulnd. 
nmlna .t Adam*, (akmn, Colfax. Wa»h.. 

dlwohnl.K II. IWnInn cuitf lnur>. 
I>rrkrr1 A Italtlirl. aaUHtn, t>niilnK. N'- 

M, dlM.>ltnl. 
Illarkaood A llamrll. Mlixtn. Ilonwell, 

Ti. U: dlMoInd: Jolin Blackanod 

oinllour*. 
Illrrh A TriKT. bold. Ukiab. Cat., dU- 

•••Ivrd; Illrrh rcmllniM*.' 
Bnlirr A Krilrt. »li>>m. Pbomit, Arlx., 

dl«*<>lTvd. II. Itutlcr ronllnon. 
KuUrr A HUl. mI<>od, Bnttc, Mont., dis- 

wilnd. 
Mr l>rnnoll A Itv*n. uloon, etc., Oreen 

lllvrr. Wv.. iliMMilvtM. 
t'imllnrr A Falriinrr. Mlmm, Dagirrtt. 

I'al., dlaaulvcd: A. Falcuner runllii- 

ttn. 
TrnMwrll A PraM-r. Itolrl. Honllnedon. It. 

C, duMiivrd; T. P. Trunlwell miilln- 

P. F«rln» A Co., Mil'Kin, etc., Trinidad. 

Colo.. Nra-man r«rllr»». 
L,lTln(*lon A McManu*, Mioon, Ogden, 

Tlab. dlMolrad. 



railatr**, Attaohmants, Eto. 



t. J. Biadjr. taloon, Han Frandfco, Cal., 

■Itarbed. 
C lirwirir. taloon, San Francltro, Cal., 

all ached. 
J. laaU. ;;al<>on. Pljnaoulb. Cal., attached. 
A. Cbri*lofanlni A Co., mIoou, Haula 

Cnu. Cal., attached. 
H. B. Malalnta, rtaUarant, 8an Fran- 

rbro, Cal.. attaclMd In InfoUenrT. 
A. ilarl, MlrMin, Collon, Cal , In inxd- 

»™rjr. 



J riii«tfaia. mlauraol. Iaw Aiijri'lca, 

Cal . altarbrd. 
lU.lirn K»art. »ali".n. Kali PranrUro. 

Cal . allarbcd. 
John O (Volt. Mioon. Han Pranrl«-», 

Cal.. allarbrd 
F H lUirlay. holrl, HuuUnd, Cal.. at- 

larhrrl. 
W H. tiardlnrr, iral.ion. Sail Pian<liM-o. 

Cal.. altat'lirO. 
P. Natflr. u|iH>n, (irrmwumL Cal , in in- 

tolvrwjr. 
J. Kballo. mlaurant, Tacoma. \Va»h..al- 

tat'brd. 
Jo*. Walton, aaloun, roiiland. ()i., al- 

ta<~hnl. 
O, W. Owena, aaloon, Brlma. Cal.. at- 
tached. 

C. A. Beamer. aaloon. Denver, Colo., at- 

tached. 

I'. C. Motilii»on A C.i..»al(K)n, I.lvlnK»ton. 
Muni., allarlirrl. 

M. E. Xlilioli-. nalooii, Iaw An|;elii<, Cal., 
attarlwrl. 

J. B. Margin, hotel. Oakland, Cal. at- 
tached. 

a. W. Owen*, uioon, Selma, Cal.. al- 
larbrd. 

J. MrKce. aaloon, Loa Anfjele*, Cal., al- 
tar lied. 

J. Plligtcrald. realaurant, Loa AiiKele«, 
Cal., attar-bed. 

D. Oetx,Ml<>on, ManhHrld, Or., allarbrd. 
.\. W. Fltrb. aaloon, New Caatle. Wy., 

altar bad. 

E. L. A W. E. Hr-booley, realaurant, Loe 

AnKelva. Cal., attarlied. 
H. D. HopkliiD, iialoon. Taroma, Wash , 
altarbed. 

C. E. Oraut, saloon. Ban Franciaco, Cal., 

attached. 
Kain A Walkln*. aaloon, Seattle, Wa«b., 

attar-bed. 
H. W. Oardiiirr, oalrmn. Ban Franciaco, 

attached. 
H. Ell. Ixitller Denver, Colo., attached. 

D. Radovir-h, aalrmn, Han Franrlaro, Cal., 

attached. 
Haiwler Bron., realaurant. Tumbatone, 

Ariz., as«ii;ned. 
J. W. Powers, saloon. Aahland, Dr., in 

liisolvenry. 
Cbaa. Wc«ti>lial, aaluon, San Francisco, 

Cal., in liisulvency. 

F. Pocneruy, hotel, Lompoc, Cal., in in- 

solvency. , 

F. HpraKue, restaurant, Denver, Colo, at- 
tached. 
Hoppe A Labr, saloon, Los Angelea, Cal., 
attached. 



Sold Out. 



B. Egan, aalor>n, Portland, Or. 
KobertHhortell, saloon, Portland, Or. 
McTrue, aaloon, etc., Pullman. Wash., to 

C F. McClary. 
.\rthur Fairbanks, restaurant, Seattle. 



Wai-li . t" »'• ^V. Fairbanks. 

II .MillT. '^1 1. .-^i-iUiie Falls, Waab., 

t., W. K .Miilrr. 

ll,.lHTt«.ii .V lil'i-'lit. liotel. Vancouver, B. 
r K. William" .*; I.ce. 

NiitMiil A Murphy. Kalooii. Denver. Colo. 

F A. I'rall, •»l"'i'>- Heallle, Wash. 

\Vii:i»iii Wnllaie. "»loon. Portlalul. Or. 

A. Flrlrhrr. holrl, Santa Rosa. Cnl., to 
Jiihii ll.ibiiison. 

r. O OUrii. ml.ion. Tacoma, Wash. 

r M. mi ran, holrl. T.-mecula, Cal. 

I^lrd .V Harlnian. sahMin, Albliia, Or. 

Kuiiklr A Hark, wh..lr-ale li.iuors, Port- 
land. Or., to F. Kranr. A ( o. 

Ward A Co.. I>'>lel. L'»*«'« "°'''' *»»''•• 
1.1 B. Boyle. 

Wm. Ootrall. saloon. Bonlder, Colo. 

J. E. Taylor, ►alooii, Iji Orande, Or. 

P. Lapui.Saii Fraiirlsro, Cal. 

J. A. Rankrii, saU)on, San Francisco. Cal. 

H. S. Dalil. saloon. Tar-oma, Wash , to 
Muhieiibruch A Bentley. 

8- L. Tavlor, saloon, Evans, Colo., to Wil- 
lis Bros. 

Gu« Brown, saloon, Seattle, Wa»h., to 
Patterson A Co. 

E. B. Moore, saloon, Copjieropolis. Cal, 
Mrs. Sullon. hotel, Hawthorne, Nev., to 

O. W. Wblllng. 

F. C. Zliietla. Haioon Bradley, Cal. 
Marr-o, saloon. Los AnKcles, Cal. 

Geo. Marshall, restaurant, Seattle, Wash 
J. Bakke, saloon. Portland, Or. 
Jno. O'Leary, saloon, Seattle, Wash. 
Powers A Welsh, saloon. Seattle, Wash. 
W. Laferty, saloon, San Francisco, Cal. 
A. H. Davis, hotel, Puyallup, Wash., to 

M. J A J. Gardner. 
Harry Husl, restaurant, San Bernardino, 

Cal., to Cobu A Pasata. 
L. Lyon, saloon. Tombstone; Ariz. 
M B. Shechan, restaurant, Los Angeles, 

Cal. 

Out of Business. 



Watson A Sterry, restaurant, Boswell, N. 

M. 
L. Graimeiser, restaurant, Bohnervlile, 

Cal. 
A. M. Jacobus, saloon. Crescent City Cal. 
W. McMillan, saloon, Cloverdale. Cal. 



Damago by Fire. 

Joseph Bundsclmk, saloon, Seattle, Wash. 
J. A. Smith, saloon, Portland Or., 

damaged. 
Holt A Blew, saloon, Junction City, Or. 
Harpole Bros., saloon, Junction City, Or. 
Schraeder A Malt, saloon, Junction City' 

Or. 
Clark A St. Clair, saloon, Denver, Colo. 
Frontier House, Los Animas, Colo. 
D. Mudgett, saloon, Fortuua, Cal. 
Fremont House, Fortuna, Cal. 



Speelal Inquiries Advisable. 

J. Chrii'l, saiiMin, San Franrisro, Cal. 
Wilson A Hinkey, hotel, Nam|>a, Idaho, 
John Snyder, hotel. Blue Canyon, Cal. 
H. Foitinan, sab>on, Sacramento, Cal. 
W. J. Kenny, salrwn, Bonner's Ferry, 

Idaho. 
Walker A Dean, restanrant, Oakland. Cal. 
Walker A Dean, restaurant, Oakland, Cal. 
F. B. MrLerMl, saloon. Han Fram-isro, Cal 
Geo. Westerman, rr-slanrant. Denver, Col, 
J. Doyle, saloon, Julian, Cal. 
H. W. Gardiner, saloon, San Francisco, 

Cal. 
John Mills, restaurant, Albina, Or. 
J. A. Agnew, salortn. Baker City, Or. 



Oeoeased. 



M. J. Rcilly, hotel, Tacoma, Wash. 
Wm. Miller, hotel, Napa Cal. 
John C. Eddy, salrmn. Darwin. Cal. 
Forbes A Wilson, saloon. Liukville. Or. 

J. F. Forbes deceased. 
E. Clements, hotel. Lake Valley, Cal. 



Deeds and Transfers. 



Osmer A Co., saloon, Han Francisco. Cal. 

C. Osmer conveyed realty 93X0. 
Chas. Harding, saloon, Gallup, N. .M. 

D. R. Good A Co.. saloon. Tekoa, Wash., 

conveyed realty t:iM:i, gave bill o 

sale. 
C. Kohn A Co., wholesale liiiuors. Port 

land. Or., N. Kohn received dce< 

13750. 
B. B. Dobbas, saloon, San Francisco, Cal. 

rec-eived deed flu. 

E. L. A H. Lockharl. Iiotel, Albnquer<|ii« 

N. M., trust deed »fiOO. 
L. Glese. saloon, Portland, Or., receivei 

deed »200. 
Franz Fclder. saloon, Portland, Or., con 

veyed realty $400. 
Carmeilla Vineyard Co., Fresno, Cal. 

received dtedf82,000 
H. C. Dougherty, saloon. Vernon, Cal. 

conveyed realty $600. 
Q. Seaman, saloon, Oilroy, Cal., conveye< 

realty »250. 
Fabian Bros., saloon, San Francisr-o 

Cal., C. A. Fabian, received deedi 

«I0. «10 and (10. 
Botefur A Co., wholesale liquors, Port 

land. Or.: F. Botefur, received deei 

$1000. 

Realty Mortgages. 

G. W. Meylert, hotel, Albuquerque, N 
M., $17,500. 

B. B. DobbhB, saloon, San Francisco 
Cat, $3050. 

C. Deleval A Co., wholesale liiiuors, Sai 

Diego, Cal., C. Deleval »'2,000. 



H. HMBBR, 

SOLE AGENT FOR THE WORLD FOR THE 

^alle 1J[)ines and Jtins ^randicc 

GROWN and BOTTLED at the Celebrated 

IMGLENOOK VINEYARD. 

OF RUTHERFORD, NAPA CO. CAL 

Also Makes a Specialty of Handling Only the Choicest Vintages of Dry 
^^^ ln!^f^.^L..^7.!}.^^'^' and Sweet Wines Produced in California. 

cowwcapo/voe/vcr »ouciTto rmott pitoouceitt «• wstx as oe*LKR» thkouohout the entire uniteo states. 




i 



f/reifie wiysiEj^E) sfii^u f^eview. 



31 



C. Kolin & Co., wholesale liquors, Port- 
land, Or., N. Kohn $1,375. 

W. F. Cook, hotel. Canyon City, Colo., 
$4,500. 

U. S. Brewing Co., Tacoma, Wash., 
$1,500. 

C. Lanijert, wholesale iiiiiiors, Taeoina, 
Wash., *U,000. 

It. Rosenthal, saloon, Seattle, Wash., 

$::,uoo. 

M. Murnane, saloon, Los Anj^elee, Cal., 

$1,030. 
E. J. Levy, saloon, San Francisco, Cal., 

$3500. 
John O'Keufe, saloon, San Francisco, 

Cal., $2,400. 
Geo. Stevens, wholesale liquors, San 

Francisco, Cal., $:i,500. 



Chattel Mortgages. 



Suisher ife Creek, saloon, Denver, Colo., 

$709. 
E. Oakley, restaurant, Denver, Colo.. 

$1,390. 
V. Pfeflfer, saloon, Salicia, Colo., $429. 
T. N. Moore, saloon, Portland, Or.. $135. 
Risdon & Co., saloon, Seattle, Wash. 

$420. 
Matt. Anderson, saloon, Spokane Falls, 

Wash., $375. 
W. H. Hartley, hotel, GuernevlUe, Cal., 

$600. 
G. p. Seidler, restaurant, Portland, Or., 

$1.50. 
A. Mangin, saloon, Denver, Colo., $500. 

E. Tiegenson, saloon, Denver Colo., $800. 
R. Rosenthal- saloon, Seattle. Wash., 

$1,100. 
W. H. Bell, hotel, Spokane Falls, Wash., 

$248. 
Hanson & Co., saloon, Tacoma, Wash., 

$S50. 
Bielser & Co., hotel, Denver, Colo., $1,765. 
S. S. Keffich, saloon, Denver, Colo., $250. 
J. Wolf, saloon, Denver, Colo., $692. 
W. O'Brien, saloon, Denver, Colo., $457. 
Nichols & Bennett, saloon, Salida, Colo , 

$300. 
Charles Heiman, saloon, Portland Or 

$500. 

F. Kranz & Co., saloon, Portland, Or 

$400. 
J. Schwab, saloon, Denver, Colo., $663. 
H. F. Jones, saloon, Denver, Colo., $1,190. 
J. H. Hilderbrandt, saloon, Denver, Colo. 

$1,500. 

Doyle ife Gilbert, saloon' Leadville, Colo , 
$235. 

E. P. Gillette, hotel, Spokane Falls, 
Wash., $1,000. 

L. Gerhard, saloon, Albina, Or., $1,000. 
Wm. Scourlield, saloon, Seattle, Wash 
$1,350. 

L. N. Beauchemin, saloon, Portland, Or , 
$1,283. 

J. W. Hartwell, saloon, Ballard, Wash . 

$600. 

John McNeil, hotel, Seattle, Wash , 
$5,000. 

T. Hanley, restaurant, Seattle, Wash., 
$105. 

H. D. Longaker, hotel, Seattle, Wash., 

$:318. 

A. L. McDonald, hotel, Seattle, Wash., 
$186. 

Lncker & Schoen, saloon. Spokane Falls. 
Wash., $172. 

F. Burcher. hotel, Denver, Colo., $2118. 

E. Hoffineister, saloon, Denver, Colo , 
$750. 

F. S. Hesse, saloon, Salida, Colo., $500. 
A. Malstrom, saloon, Denver, Colo., $150. 
F. Kranz, saloon, Portland, Or., $662. 
Geo. O'Kada, restaurant, Portland, Or. 

$230. 
8. B. Benton, saloon, Colfax Wash , $800. 



Judgments, Suits, Etc., 

D. R. Good & Co., saloon, Tekoa, Wash., 
sued $2,313. 

Tweedy & Callahan, saloon, Ballard, 

Wash., $119. 
Sunberg & Nyman, hotel, Tacoma, Wash. 

sued $570. 
Dinkelspiel & Karr, restaurant, Seattle, 

Wash., chattel mortgage foreclosed 

$450. 

M. & K. Gottstein, wholesale liquors, 

Seattle, Wash., sued $2405. 
Kaiu & Watkins, saloon, etc., Seattle, 

Wash., sued $590. 



Mortgages Discharged. 

J. J. Hanitin, saloon, Oakland, Cal., 
$2,000. 



Miscellaneous. 



T, O. Abbott, hotel,- Tacoma, Wash., 

leased to M. J. Reilly. 
Mrs. E. Casey, saloon, etc., Martinez, 

Cal., slierclF's sale. 



A man who h.-.s practiced medicine foi 
forty years, ought to know salt from sug 
ar; read what he says: 

Toi,Buo,.0., Jan. 10, 1867. 

Messrs. F. J. Cheney & Co*— Gentle- 
men; — I have been in the general practict 
of medicine for most forty years, and 
would say that in all my practice and ex- 
perience, have never seen a preparation 
tliat I could prescribe with as much con- 
fidence of success as I can Hall's Catarrh 
Cure, manufactured by you. Have pre- 
scribed it a great many limes and its effect 
is wonderful, and would say in conclusion 
that I have yet to find a case of Catarrh 
that it would not cure, if they would take 
it according to directions. 
Yours truly, 

L. L. GORSUCH, M. D., 
Office, 215 Summit St. 

We will give $100 for any case of Car- 
tarrh that cannot be cured with Hall's 
Catarrh Cure. Taken internally. 
F. J. CHENEY & Co., Props., Toledo, 0. 
iJv.^Sold by Druggists, 75c. 



NATIONAL 

Cf SH (EGISTEB 




Pierce & Co. 

Oeneral Western Agents. 

Room 12, Chronicle Building, S. F 
971 Broaoway, Oakland, Cal; 



AKIEL LATHEOP, PrCS. T. HOPKINS, TrSB. 
WM. HABNEY, Mgr. and Sec'y. 

GOLDEN GATE WOOLEN MFG. CO, 

— MANUFACTUKE — 

Blankets, Cassimeres, Tweeds 

FLANNELS. 
535 Market St., .San Francisco. 



Try Dr. Henlev's Specialties 

TAMARACK i I. X. L BITTERS, 



USE D?){enLEY'S - ^ 

ro/f DYSPEPSIA AND 

INDIGESTION - .- 

SOLD BY JILL D£/tLERS 



|nJSE^'»^HENLEY'5 



ll\m°s\::^ sold 
^.BYML DEALERS' 



Depot and Laboratory, 23 Montgomery Ave., S. F. 

Liquor Flavor s 

WILLIAM H. RUDKIN, 

74 WILLIAM STftEET, NEW YORK.. 

GREAT REDUCTION IN PRICES. 

A Complete Catalogue will be forwarded by mail on receipt of biisiness c'lul. 



Goods For Sale in California only by 
REDINGTON &. CO., SB-27 first st.. san francisco. cal 




THE HIRAM SIBLEY FIRE-PROOF WAREHOUSED 

GRAPE BRANDIES IN BOND: also for CALIFORNIA WINES, CHAMPAGNES, 

DRIED FRUITS and GENERAL MERCHANDISE. We receive, 

store, pay tax. deliver or re-ship to any part of the country 

at riisonable rates. Direct all correspondence to 

HIRAM SIBLEY & CO., Props. - CHICAGO, ILL 



CALIFORNIA FURNITURE COMPANY, 

Successors to N. P. COLE & CO. 

FURNITURE AND UPHOLSTERY 

Office Furniture, Etc. 

Starr King Building, 117 to 121 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



TRUMBULL &, BEEBE, 

Gkowees, Impoeters and Dealers in 

Seeds, Trees and Plants 

419 and 421 Sansome St, Bet. Commercial and Clay Sts, 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



32 



f)M5lfie WI^^E /rJMD Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 




tarn 



IP 



THE PREMIER KENTUCKY WHISKY. 



E H. TflYIiOK, it St SONS, - Frankfort, Ky. 



\^ 



.^ 



^ 









^^.^.^^ ^PHB 


^^^l^^ti.^^ 


WALDENK[ 


mm 


Mark. 









^^.. 



■W^JLXj DEIST. 

TUi Drmndj, roadeaftir Ihc French formala, from selected frcsli grapes, lia> been sacccssfuUy introdnced, and is now regularly Bold In tbc principal marlvcts f>f 
Banip*, ta eoin|<r(lli<>n with Frcmh Ctignac. OlDcial German and English chemists have pronoanced it the purest Brandy which comes to their marlicts. 

It I* rapcriall} toitcd fur the drug trade and others, where parity is demanded. While abroad these goods successfully compete, paying same duties as the Frencli, 
Ibe Amcriraa haycr lias the advantage in price, between the Internal Revenue tax assessed here and Ihc custom duties on foreign brandies. Samples will be sent ou 
•ppikatioa. 



"w^^LiDEnsr <sb go.. 



Ihliri I II Office, 41 nearrr Street, New York. 



GEYSERVTLLE, SONOMA COUNTY, CAX. 



NATOMA VINEYARD CO. 

TABLE GRAPES, TOKAYS, MUSCATS, ETC. 

Red and White Wines and Brandies. 



Vineyards, Winery and Distillery, Principal Office, 

Natoma, Sacramento County, Cal. 508 California St., San Francisco. 

''■ ff f^cUlKSLKli. S„p(. J), HENSHAW WARD, Gen. Mgr. 



MAX, M, HALLE, 

Distillers' Agent and Commission Mercliant, 



142 W. MAIN STREET, LOUISVILLE, KY. 



Special Attention Paid to the Unbending and Shipping of Whiskies, 

and the Placing of Insurance. 




Prices Current. 



f/reifie WIJME /rJSID Sflf^lT (REVIEW. 



33 



Tliese are the lonR prices, The rate of 
discount on purchases of a considerable 
quantity, can tie learned by apply inj; to 
the aijcnts or dealers. We urgently re- 
quest dealers, agents and producers to 
notify us when a change occurs in tlit 
prices current of the goods they liandle. 



California Wines &. Brandies 



[The Prices given are for ijuarts and i>ints, 
put up in cases of twelve and twenty- 
four bottles. 



AKPAD HARASZTHY & CO, 

5oU Washington street, San Francisco. 
PK1CE.S Peh cake. 

QUARTS. PINTS 

Bicsling (5.00 7.00 

Gutedel 6.00 7.00 

Zinfandel .'5.00 6.00 



J. GUNDLACH & CO., 
Cor. Second it Marliet Sts. San Francisco. 

Traminer, 83 t 5.00 $ 6.00 

Gutedel, 82 6.00 7.(H) 

Burgundy, 8J 6.00 7.00 

Ziufaudel, 83 5.00 0.00 



I. De TUKK, 
212 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

Port, 1884 $ 6.00 

Port, 1886. 4.00 

Drv Sherry, 1884 6 00 

Dry Sherry, 1886 4.00 

Angelica, 1884 4.,50 

Tokay, l^il 8.00 

Zinfandel, 1884 3.50 

Burgundy, 84 4.00 

liiesling, 1885 4 00 

Gutedel, 1884 4 50 

Hock. 1885 S50 

Brandy, 1882 12 00 



GEORGE WEST & SON, 
Stockton, Cal. 

Brandv, 1879 $20.00 

Brandy, 1883. 15 00 

Brandy, 1885 15.00 

Front ignan 9.00 

Sheiry 9.00 

Port (old) 12.00 

Port 6.00 



SAN GABRIEL WINE CO., 
Kamona, Los Angeles county, Cal. 

Biesling $ 4.75 ^5.7,5 

Gutedel 4.75 5.75 

Port 5.50 

Angelica 5.5O 

Muscatel 5.50 

Slierry 6.00 '.'" 

Braudy, 1882 12.00 



LOS GATOS & SARATOGA WINE CO 
478 Tenth street, Oakland, Cal. 

Zinfandel | 3.,50 J;t.50 

Sauterne 4.OO 5.00 

Brandy 9.OO 

I'ort 5.00 6.00 

Sweet Muscatel 5.00 6.00 

GrapeCordial 0.50 7!50 



JOSEPH MELCZER & 
51)1 and 500 Market street, San 

Claret, 1886 

Zinfandel. 1885 

Burgundy, 1885 

H.jck, 1885 . 

Riesling. 1885 

Eiesling,Johannisbergjr,1884 

Gutedel, 18S4 

Boiulai Hungarian Typc,1885 
Szatmari " " >• 

Szegszar Ji FeherHun'Type " 

" 18S5........r.. 

Port,18S4 

Sherry, 1885 

" 1884..., 

Angelica and SweetMout'n,84 
Mad'a,Malaga & Sw'l To'y'85 

Brandy, 1883 

1885 



CO., 

Francisco. 
13.00 
3..50 
4.00 
3.50 
4.00 
5.00 
5.00 
3.50 
3.50 
4.00 
5.00 
6.00 
5.00 
6.00 
■4..5O 
5,00 
12.00 
10.00 



BECK, PYHKR & CO., 

108 O'Farrell street, San Francisco. 

Santa Rosa Zinfandel. '86. .. fS 00 

Santa Clara Cabernet, '87... 450 

Cupertino Medoc, '84 6 00 

St. Helena Hock' '86 3' 50 

Gutedel (Chasselas), '86 450 

Traminer. '82 S'SO 

Sauterne (silver leaf) .'. 6!oO 

Haute Sauterne (gold leaf) . . 7^00 
California Cognacs. 

*Silver Bronze Leaf 8 (X) 

"Red " " (10 00 

**»Green " '• 1200 



INGLENOOK WINES. 
F. A. Habcr, agent. 122 Sansome St., 8. F. 
Table Claiet blended from 
> choice foreign grapes, 

vintage 1885 J8..50 

Zinfandel 4 50 

Extra Table Claret, Medoc 

tyiH! red label, 1885 5.50 

Burgundy type 5.,50 

Sauterne dry,Sauvig'nVert'85 5..')0 

Gutedel, Chasselas Vert, 1885 4..50 

Hock, Rhenish type " 6.00 

Burger, Chablis ty|)e •' 5.00 

Riesling, Johannisberg type " o..50 

Pints of two dozen*! per case iidditional. 
None genuine except bearing seal or cork 
brand of the proprietor— each bottle beai-s 
the legal pure wine stamp. 

CAL. WINE GROWER'S UNION. 
Cor. Sutter and Grant ave. San Francisco. 

EL QUITO VINEYARD. 

Hieeliug $ 3.OO * 4.00 

Claret 3.00 4.00 

FRESNO VINEYARD CO. 

Burger $ 3.50 | 4.,50 

Claret 3.50 4.50 

Port 5.50 6.50 

Angelica 5.50 6.50 

Slierry 5.50 6..50 

Cognac Brandy 10.00 11.00 

ST. HUBERT VINYARD. 

Claret, Cabernet t 8.00 $ 9.00 

Sauterne 8.00 9.00 

Cognac 12.00 13.00 



C. CARPy & CO.' 
511-517 Saciamento street, San Francisco 

La Loma, Grand Medoc $ 7.00 $ 8.00 

Burgundy 5.OO 6.00 

Zinfandel 3.50 4.50 

Sauterne 5.00 6.00 

Riesling 4.OO 5.00 

Sweet Muscatel, 1882 -. 9.00 10 00 

Sherry, 1882 9.00 10.00 

Port, 1882 8.00 9.00 

Cal. Roehelle Brandy 12.00 13.00 

NAPA VALLEY WINE COMPANY. 

11 and 13 First Street, San Francisco. 

Hock $ 3.50 { 4.50 

Gutedel 4.OO 5.00 

Riesling 4.50 5.50 

Cabernet 4.50 5.50 

Zinfandel 3.50 4..50 

Private Stock Claret 5.00 6.00 

Burgundy 4.00 5.00 

Port, (old) 4.,50 

Angelica 4.50 

Sherry 4.50 

Brandy, 1881 15.00 

Braudy, 1887 8.00 

Private Stock Burgundy 7.00 8.66 

Private Stock Sauterne 8.00 9.00 

Vine Clilf Claret 15.00 

Private Stock Hock 5.00 6.00 



TO-KALON VINEYARD, 

Jas. L. Davis & Co., Sole Agents, 

308 California St., San Francisco. 

Reisiug Johannisberg 5.00 6.00 

" "Chronicle" 4.50 5.50 

" 4.00 5.00 

Santerne, "J. L. D." 6.00 7.00 

Haul 4.50 ,5.50 

4.00 5.00 

Chablis 4.00 5.00 

Gutedel 3.50 4.50 

Cabernet 5.00 6.00 

Burgundy 5.00 6.00 

Beclan 5.00 6.00 

Zinfandel 3.50 4.50 

St. Laurent 8.00 9.00 

La Granada 8.00 9.00 

Lazrine 7.00 8.00 

Ncbbiola 7.50 8.50 

La Grand Claret 12.50 13.50 

Madeira 5.00 6.00 

Malaga 5.00 6.00 

Muscatel 5.00 6.00 

Angelica 5.00 6.60 

Tokay 5.00 6.00 

Sweet To-Kalon 6.00 7.00 

Sherry, Dry 5 50 6.50 

" 5.00 6.00 

Port, 1876 12.00 13.00 

iJ' 1883 6.00 7.00 

•' 1886 4.00 5.00 

Grape Brandy 9.00 10.00 

" 8.00 9.00 

Blackberrv Brandy. 10.00 11.00 

Strawberry " 9.00 10.00 

Cognac 14.00 15.00 

" 12.00 13.00 

KUHLS, SCHWARKE Sc CO., 
123 Sutter street, San Francisco 

Zinfandel t 3.25 «1.25 

Zinfandel 4.00 5.00 

Burgundy 4.00 5.00 

Sauterne 5.50 7.00 

Port, Old 6.00 

OldSberry 6.00 



MONT ROUGE WINES. 

A. O. Chauce. Livermoie, 
Office and Depot, 6U-617 Front St., S. F. 
Quarts. Pints. 

Sauterne JW.tX) 17.00 

Haut Sauterne 7.00 8.00 

Claret. Table. 4.00 5.00 

AClarct,F 9.00 

AA Claiet, V 9.00 



KOHLER & FROHLING. 

001 Folsom Street, San Francisco. 

Riesling |i 4.00 $ 4.50 

Hock 3.50 4.00 

Gutedel 4.50 5.00 

Sauterne 4.50 5.00 

Zinfandel 8.75 4.25 

Zinfandel, old 4..50 5.00 

Buigundy 4.00 4.50 

Superior Port 10.00 

Sherry 7.50 

Angelica 6.00 

Muscatel 6.00 

Madeiia 6.00 

Malaga 6.00 

Biandy 10.00 



C. HOLTUM & CO., 
409 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

Zinfandel. 1884 JCKX) 

Burgundy, " 3.0O 

Riesling, " 3.25 

Riesling, Marcobrunner.1883 5^25 

Gutedel, 1884 4.00 

Sauterne, " 4 00 

Port Old (Fresno Co.),1882. 6.00 

Port, 1885 4.00 

Sherry, Dry, 1884 4.00 

Sherry, Old, (Fresno Co.,) '82 6.00 

Angelica,188,5,(LosAng'sCo) 4.00 

Muscatel (Fresno Co.), 1885. 5.50 

Tokay, 1884 5.00 

Mt. Vineyard, 1S85 4.00 

Madeira and Malaga, 1885.. 5.50 

Pineapple wines 4 00 

Brandy, 1882 11.00 

Brandy, 1885 9.00 

Strawberry Brandy 9.00 



S. LACHMAN & CO., 
453 Brannan street, San Francisco. 

Old Port $7.00 IS.OO 

Zinfandel 3.50 4.00 

Riesling 4.50 5.00 

Madeiras 8.00 

Malaga 8.00 

Cognac 14.00 



Domestic Champagnes. 

ARPAD HARASZTHY & CO., 

530 Washington street. San Francisco. 

Eclipse $14.50 $17.00 

A. FINKE'S WIDOW. 
809 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

Gold Seal $11.50 $12.00 

Gold Seal. Exti a Dry 12.00 13.00 

Nonpareil 12 00 13.00 

Private Cuvee, Dry 11.50 12.00 

" Extra Dry... 12.00 13.00 

TO KALON VINEYARD. 

II. W. CRABB, OAKVILLE. NAPA COUNTY. 

Jas. L. Davis & Co. , 308 California st, S. F. 

To-Kalon Sec $12.00 $13.00 

Sparkling 11.00 12.00 

AMERICAN CHAMPAGNE CO. (Lt'd) 

839 to 849 Folsom street, San Francisco. 

Reihlen 15.00 17.00 

A. WERNER & Co. 

52 Warren street. New York. 

Extra Dry $ 7.00 $ 8.00 

imported Ciiampagnes, 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

DEUTZ & GILDERMANN, AY., CHAMPAGNE. 

Gold Lack See. per case $32.00 $34.00 

Gold Lack Sec. 6 Magnums 

per case 81.00 

Chachet Blanc per case 30.50 32.50 

Cabinet Green Seal, per bskt 25.50 27.50 

DUPANLOUP 4 CO., REIMS. 

Carte Blanche, per case 21.00 82.00 

Carte Branehe, extra dry, per 

case 21.00 22.00 



W. B. CHAPMAN, 

12:3 California street, San Francisco. 

Perrier.Iouet&Co."Si)i;cial"$:i2..50 $a4..50 

" Reserve Dry 32..50 :>t.50 

Peirier Jouet & Co. Brut.. . . 33.00 35.00 
Half pints "Special" $40 ii) ca(>«e of 4 doz. I 



WM. WOLFF & CO. 

329 Market street, San Francisco 

QUARTS. PINTg 

Pommery Sec $82.50 $34.50 



MACONDKAY & CO., 
First and Market streets, San Francisco. 
Louis Koederer Carte Blanche.31.00 33.00 



JAS. L. DAVIS <fe CO.. 

SOLE AGKNTiS. 

308 California ,St., San Francisco 
Xeh Desbordes & Fits, Dry 

Vcrgenay $28.00 $30.00 

" Desbordes & Fils, Pri- 
vate Curvec 29,00 31 00 



Imported Wines. 

W. B. CHAPMAN. 
123 California street, San Francisco. 

RED WINES. 

(Barton & Guestier. Bordeaux.) 

Quarts. 

Floirac $7.50 

Pauillac 8.50 

St. Julien fl.oo 

St. Estephe 9.OO 

Chateau Lacroix 10.00 

duGallan, '78-'81.. 10.50 

le Pain, 1878 11.50 

Pontet Canet, 1881 13.50 

Chat. Beycbevelle, 1881 15.0'J 

Ducru Bcaucaillou, 1881 16.00 

Chateau Lagrange, 1878 22.00 

Brown Canteiiac, 1876 22.00 

Chateau Langoa, 1874 22..50 

Leoville, 1874-1878. 24.50 

Larose, 1874 24.50 

Lafite, 1874 29.00 

" Latour, 1870 31.50 

■' MargBux, 1874 29.00 

(H. Cuvillier & frcre, Bordeaux.) 

Pauillac, 1881 10.50 

Ductose Grand Pny, 1878. . . 14 50 

Chat. Kirwan, 1878 n'.M 

" Beycheville, 1874 19 50 

Cos d'EetOurnel, 1878 22.00 

Chat. Larose, 1870 22 50 

• " Latour, 1868 29.50 

" Mai gaux, 1881 32.00 

" Mouton Rothschild'80 35.00 
(Bouchard pere & fils, Beaune Cote D'Or.) 

Macon, 1884 10.50 

Pommard, 1884 12 50 

1881 isioo 

Clos de la Mousse, 1884 17.00 

Chambeitin, 1884 2150 

1881 25.00 

Romance, 1884 24.50 

Clos de Vougeot, 1887 20.50 

WHITE WINES. 

(Barton & Guestier, Bordeaux.) 

Sauternes 9.25 

Vin de Graves, 1878 10.50 

Barsac, 1878 n.oo 

Haut Sauternes, 1874 17.50 

Chateau Yquem, 1874 30.50 

(H. Cuvillier & frere, Bordeaux.) 

Sauternes 11.50 

Chateau Giraud, 1884 27.50 

" L* Tour Blauche'84 27.00 
(Bouchard pere & fils, Beauoe, Cote D'Oi) 

Chablis, 1884 II.50 

Montrachet Bouchard, 1884. 20.50 

SHERRIES. 

(Sandeman, Buck & Co., Jerez.) 

Pemartin Brut 19.0O 

" Umbrella 20.00 

PORTS. 

(Sandeman & Co., Oporto.) 

00 16.00 

0000 19.00 

ooVoo 21.50 



WM. WOLFF & CO., 

329 Market street, San Francisco. 

(Dnbos frer«s, Bordeaux.) 

Chateau de I'Ysle, in casks. . $95.00 

(Journu freres, Bordeaux.) 
Clarets and Sauternes, per 

case from $7..50 to $30.00 

Mignotte-Picard & Co., Chassagne, Cote 

' D'Or wines $12.00 to 25.00 

(Henkell & Co., Mayence.) 

Hock wines from $7.50 to $36.00 

(Morgan Bros., Port St. Mary.) 
Ports and Sherries in wood, 

per gallon $1.75 to $4.50 

Port and Sherries in cases, 

per case $8.00 to $15.00 

(Mackenzie A Co., Jerez.) 
Ports and Sherries in wood 

from 11.75 to $4.50 



34 



f>;8K5lfie WIJ^E ;8t^D SflR.IT R.EVIEW. 



Kohler &Van Bergen, 



CALirORNIA 




Mmln «HBrr »«><l T»oll«. Q -'^'jS 

e«i to en Thir* st.^'^i. 



BnHirL: 
San rr«n«ia««' 





^, Wim-f.v «nd DUllllcn. 
J^ Sacramanto, Cal 

4J MiURAV Ktukkt. 
Naw York. 



jLxn>i!<> D«ii\ii it»AX. 



Jamks tillt.A. 



alines and liiquors. 

Importn* of ■iM -Mtenl* forlbe Cek-br«t.nl Ilnii..l»..f 

Golden a nd Tea Kettle W hiskies. 

(..11, Ii...>T \yv Jv.KM.N Stk., - Pan I'ltAXcIsrn, Cal. 



t?ouT?c (2^3C<JUOt "ponsardin 
The Most Delicious Champa.gne of the ^ge. 



-t-*H 



V^llovu Isabel, 
Dry. 




-t-Hi+- 



U/I^ite [abq\, 
l^iCl?. 



(H<ile Affiil fi.r tlir I'm Itii Co."!.-!.! 
iJ.'t-i-il Unllrry Sirrti S<tn Fraitrlsro, Vnl. 



M. Blumenthal & Co., 



' blXTILLKRk A.HU MAM°K.tl'TrBE8H OF- 



SYRUPS, CORDIALS, BITTERS, EXTRACTS, 

Pure Sugar Coloring 



A SPECIALTY. 



Wine and Liquor Mercliants. 

esa-aeO Misalon St., Bat. Saeond and Third, San Franoisc, Cal 

OOOtB SOLD AT I/)WBRT TOURB. SBND TOR SAMPLES AND PRICES. 



BRANDY, 
ANGELICA, 

ZINFANDEL, 

HOCK. 

PORT, 




I. DE TURK 

l^inss and'^randies 



CLARET, 

SAUTERNE, 
, ^ ,_ , SHERRY, 

■^'^ ^"^ MUSCAT, 

RIESLING, 



TOKAY, GUTEDEL. 

Vineyaxcis arxd. Cellars: 

Santa Rosa, Sonoma County, Cal. 

Branch: 
212 Sacramento St., San Francisco, Cal., 

C. M. MANN, Manager. 
New York Office, - - 22-24 Monroe Street. 



h>TtMI.|HIIKI> 1H)IU. 

NICHOLAS RATH & CO. 

H*tU' MnitufiM tiin-n* of llir 

ORIGINAL AND GENUINE PRUNE JUICE. 

JONES. MUNDY A, CO., AgenU. 

^ It liiill,in„nm Itriirlnii ^liiilliir .\>mm<-n atf I'm-lt-MM 

am Stilmlllllli-u. 



Pure California Wines & Grape Brandies. 

rp -pq — i^n 

Sail Gatiniil Wine Co. 

Ol- .S.l.\ 11. mil I EL, 
IjOS Angelett County, Cal. 

Are now prepared wiili a larKe stock of wiiien ami 
l)raiKliof of llieir own jirowtli l.> supply llie trade 
and tlie market generally. Tliis Company owns 
the lar(te»t vineyard in the world, eoverinfr over 2,5m) acrtV. They have held their 
wines and brandies for several years in their own cellars, and do not offer any of 
their iiroduet until it has tweome properly matured. Their larfje stock of ma- 
tured wines and brandies thus accumulated is now ojien to the purchaser. All 
L'oods under theii trademark arc warranted i)ure and unadulterated. BeinK tbr 
8ucce»"«r» to B. D. Wii*oN & Co., and to ,T. Dk Darth Hiiorb. Ibcy have Ix-coim- 
imssessen. of the "KHORIJ" Brand ok Brandy, and -MOUNT VINEYAIil) 
WINK. Corre«i)ondence solicited. 

MARSHALL. SVKLLMAN & CO., J. UK ItAHTH SHOHU, 

No. ft New York and Brooklyn Bridge Vault. President San C.abriel Wine i'x. 

I'KANKFciltT St.. NkW YoKK. SA.N (lAliRlKI.. CAI.. 




JOS.|II£[iiZE(&CO. 

Growers and Dealers in 
California 

WINES AND BRANDIES 



Proprielors Glen Ellen Wine Taults. 

Fine Table Wines a Specialty 

504-506 Market St., 

S:in FianciHfo, Cal. 



GaiKoip Wiiie Giowei's upn 


FUP2.E: CjPlLIF-OF2.NIjPl 


jWines and Brandies, 


Cor. tiitUvr & (Irunt Ax^, Han jAJtiwro, Cal. 




Tbc lllL'bci-l (irade Champapie in the World. 



WHITE LABEL, 

'•Caktk Blamub." 
A MaKniKccnt KleliWino. 



BROWN LABEL 

"(IKAND VlN SKC," 

I'erfeetlon of a Dry Wine 



Bee that every Bottle liears the private label of 
MACONDRAY & CO., 

Snlr \L:rnl' I. 'I tin: l':n ilii C..!!!-!. 



f>/ceifie WIJME /rfJD SpiRIT REVIEW. 



35 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO. 
ot4 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
A. de Luze & Filii, Bordeaux 

ClaretK, per case W.OO to $28.00 

A. de Luze & Fits, Bordeaux 

Wautemes, per cai^c 12.00 to 26.00 

( '..Marey & Lifrer Belair,Nuits 

Bur!;uiulie«, white and 

red, per ease 15.00 to 21.75 

D. M. Feuerlieerd, Jr.,ifeCo., 

Oporto, Port wines 

per case 15.00 to 20.00 

]). M. Feuerlieerd, Jr.,ifeCo., 

Oporto, Port Wines, 

in wood i)er j^al 3.00 to 4.,50 

Uuff Gordon & Co.. Slierries 

in wood per j;al 2.00 to 5.50 

Laeave A Co., Sherries Crown 

Brand in X 1.40 to 1.75 

Soutli Side Madeira 2.00 to 2.50 

St. Croix Itum, L. B 5.50 

Arrack 'lloyal" Batavia... 5.00 to 6.00 
iJoord iSc Son, London Doeli 

Slierry, per case 12.00 to 15.00 

(J. M. PaljstmannSolin, Mainz 

llhine Wines per case.. 8.50 to 2S.00 
Schulz it Waf^ner, Franl<furt 

o M lihine Wines per 

case 11.00 to 14.00 



I, American Whiskies, 
I . HENCKEN & SCHKODEIi, 
I 210 Front street, San Francisco. 
I • Per Gallon. 

?Our Favorite OK *2.75 to |a.50 

OurCIioiee 2.,50 " 3.00 

PaulJones 2.25 " 2.50 

Star of '70 2.00 

1 Old Crown 1.75 " 2 00 

Ola Bourbon 1.50 



SPR0ANCE, STANLEY & Co., 
410 Front street, San Francisco. 

Kentncicy Favorite $ 

Extra Kentucky favorite — 

O. P. T 

O. K. Old Stock 

Harries' Old Bourbon 

Kentucky Favorite, in eases 

H. 0. B. jugs 

O. F. C ju^s 

•African Stomach Bitters, cs. 



$ 3.00 
3.50 
2.50 
5.00 
2.00 
8.50 
9.00 
10.50 
11.50 



SIEBE BUOS. & PLACEMAN. 
322 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

O K Extra $3.50 to ¥6.00 

O K Kosedale 2.50 to 3.00 

Ilvaiu 2.75 

Golden Pearl 2.25 

Marshall 2.25 

Old Family Bourbon 1.75 

Old Bourbon 1.50 



NABER, ALFS & BRUNE. 

:!'.'o and 325 Market street, San Francisco. 

Pliu;uix Old Bourbon, Al. . . $2.75 

" Old St'k 8.00 

" Al, 90 pf 2.50 

" OK,100ijf 3.50 

" Pony,Priv St'k 4.00 

Club House Bourbon. Old.. 4.50 

Gold Medal Boui bon, 100 pf 2.50 

Union Club '■ ", 2.25 

Superioi Whisky 1.75 

'• BB Whisky 1.75 

Liquors — In cases. 

Per OsLSfi 

PhaMiix Bourbon OK, in 5b $10.00 

Al, " 7.50 

Al,24pt8 8.00 

Al,48|^pt 9.00 

Union Club Bourbon, 24 pts 7.50 

48Kpt8 8.50 

Bock and Rye Whisky in 5b. 7.50 

Rum Punch'Extract, in 58.. 8.00 

Blaekberry Brandy, in 58... 7.50 

MOORE, Hunt & Co, 
404 Front street, San Francisco. 

Per Gallon. 

Extra Pony in bhls or K-bbls $6.00 to $8.00 

A A '■ " pf 4.00 

B " " " 3.50 

C " ■■ • 8.00 

No. 1 " " • 2.50 

Rye in bblsand i^-bbls from 3.50 to 5.00 

A A in cases 11.00 

A A in 5 case lots 10.50 

A A in 10 to 25 lots 10.00 

A A in pint Hint liasks 2 

dozen to ease 12.00 

C in cases 8.50 

. C in 5 case lots 8.25 

C in 10 to 25 case lots 8.00 

JOSEPH MELCZER & CO. 
504 and 506 Market street, San Francisco. 
Native Pride, Old Bourbon, 

(l)er bbl) per irallon $2.50 

Old Rip Van Winkle 2.50 

Nevilles Old Bourbon 1.50 



KUHL8 SCHWARKE & CO. 
123 Sutter street, San Francisco. 

O K Goldwater $ 4.00 

" '• per ease 7..50 



WM. WOLFF X CO., 

329 Market stieet, San Francisco 

W. H. McBrayer, 1885 $2.75 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
John Gibson's Son A Co.. 
Philadelphia, Bourbon 
and Rye whiskies.. . . . . $1.90 to $3.50 



KOLB <fe DENHARD. 

422 Montgomery street, San Francisco. 

Nonpareil Rye and Bourbon $2.50 to $5.00 



Imported Whiskies. 

CHARLES MEINECKE A CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 
Boord & Son, London Finest 

Irish Malt Whiskey $12..50 

Rpyal Hghld Scotch Whisky. 12.50 

John Ramsay, Islay Mall 

Scotch Whisky 13.00 

WM. WOLF & CO., 
329 Market street, San Francisco. 

Lone Highland per case $11.50 

Connaugh, Irish " 11. .50 

Wm. Jameson & Co " 11.50 



Impor ted Bra ndies. 

WM. WOLFF & CO., 

329 Maikel street, San Francisco. 

Marten's Brandy, * per case $17.00 

" » ** " 19.00 

*** " 22.00 

VSO " 28.00 

'■ WSOP '• 50.00 



CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Sacramento street, San Francisco. 

Champ Vine.yard Proprs. Co., 
Bouteileau & Co. man- 
agers Cognac in Octaves 
per gal $5.00to$8.50 

The Vineyard Proprs. Co. 
Bouteileau & Co. mana- 
gers Reserve Vintages. 10.50 to 14.00 

Swan Gin in 3^ casks 3.75 

Double Eagle Gin in }^ casks. 3.65 

John Ramsay Islay Scotch 

Whisky, in 3^ casks 4 75 

Boord's Pineapple brand 
Jamaica Rums in }^ 
casks 5.25 6.50 



W. B. CHAPMAN. 

123 California street, San Francisco. 

(H. CuviUier & frere Cognac.) 

Quarts. 

Fine Champagne, 1870 $32.00 

Grande Fine Champagne, 1860 36.00 
Grande Fine Champagne Re- 
serve, 1858 40.00 



JAS. L. DAVIS & CO., 

308 California Street, San Francisco. 

W. Barriasson& Co., Cognac. 26.00 28.00 



Imported Goods. 

(MISCELLANEOUS.) 

WM. WOLFF & CO., 

329 Market street, San Francisco- 

J. de Kuyper ife Sons Gin, large bot $18.50 

" med. " 10.00 

Evan's Belfast Ginger Ale per barrel 13.50 
" " " percs.4doz 6.00 

Theo. Lappe's Genuine Aromatique 

per ease 13.50 

Gilka Kummel per case 15.00 

Vermouth Francesco Cinzani pr.case 6.50 

CHARLES MEINECKE & CO., 
314 Market street, San Francisco. 

(BOOKD 4 son's, LONDON.) 

Old Tom Gin, per case 11.00 

Pale Orange Bitters, per case 11.50 

Ginger Brandy, Liqueur " 12.00 

Jamaica Rum, Old " 12.00 to 14.00 

IAIN Royal Batavia Gin in 

cases of 15 large black 

bottles per ease ' 23.50 

in cases of 15 large 

white bottles per case 24.50 

Kirschwaseer, Macholl Freres 

Bavarian Highland, per 

case 19.(K) 

Cherry Cordial, J. J. W. 

Peters' pel case 12.00 

Kummel, Bollmann'&per ease 13.50 



^ HIG^^^^ ^AHO 





1889. 
GOLDJMEDSL 

.615-617 . 



MONT-ROUGE 

VIN EYA RD, 
1885. 

LIVERMORE VALLEY, 

CAUFORNIA. 

A.G.CHAUCHE 

PROPRIETOR, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 



R. Wernet^ 8t Co., 




SPARKUNG 
WINE 



ONLY. 



American Champagne Co. 

LIMITED. 

:pi?/OIdtjoei?/S oif 

REIHLEN GHAMPABNE, 

BRUT AND EXTRA DRY. 



SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE AND FACTORY, NEW YORK OFFICE, 

839-849 Polsom Street. 50 New St. and 52 Broad St. 



n. It. iiAiutis. 



?i. I.. i:ky;;<jlos. 



TIIOS. i;iNCiST0N. 



Harris, Kingston 4 Reynolds, 

WINE GROWERS, DISTILLERS AND 

Dealers in PURE CALIFORNIA WINES &. BRANDIES 




WHEYARDSiCElURS! ' '\<A 
Rutherford, 

Napa Co., Cal 



VAULTS: 

123-127 Eddy St. 

TJiider Hackmcier's Hotel, 
■£* San Frtim-isco, Cal. 



36 



f^eifie WIJ^E /rJ^D SflK.IT PREVIEW. 



C. CARRY & CO., 

/•rtiyHHorm 

Incle Sam Winery and Dislillcry. 




r,il.lfo«.vi.i. 



— orri< K Aso »Ai.«»«<Mi« 

515-517 Sacrtmento St. - San Framisio. 

WINERY AND DISTILLERY. 

NAI'A. CM . 



CARRY & MAUBEC, 

1-. CKIlMl HTIIKKT. - M.W V(H;K. N. V 



RONALD G. McMillan, 

MkDuiacturer Biid Dvali-r In 

5yri:p5, QordiaU, fitters, Q:Ktracis 

Pure Sugar Coloring 



A. SFEICIAJLXY. 



IsTO. 714: :FT2/03iTT ST., 



TkI.KI'IIONK 



Wkitk roil ruici 



San Francisco. 



A. Malt*.', H»ii»i:rr. 



)l. A. Mkuiuak. Sii|«<Tliili-mlfiil. 



Los Katos & Saratop Wiiie Co. 

PROmCEIiS OF CHOICE 

WINES and BRANDIES 

MUSCAT, HOCK, 

ANGELICA. SAUTERNE, 

ROYAL NECTAR, OLD PORT, 

ZINFANOEL. GUTEDEL. 

SHERRY, RIESLING, 

FROM FOOTHILL VINEYARDS. 

VINKYAIlltS ASH ( i;i.l.AliS: 

Los Gatos and Saratoga, Santa Clara Co., Cal. 

Branch Offlc«: 478 Tenth Street. Oakland, California. 




©VT^pi |p, 




WINES & BRANDIES 



1o9 (^AMioAvE- (§Tf^E-e-T. 
aStancb anb IDaulta, 100 & 102 jflrat Street. 

Wholesale and Uetall. 

Sfk-ilc i Stdik i<i (;iiiiite Old Wines a .S|K-(ialty. 



liaehman & Jaeobi, 



DEALERS IN- 



California Wines and Brandies 

mmrnMT mho aecowo BTReera. saw prancisco. 



Eastern Agents, 

EDINGER BROS. & JACOBI, 

Cor I>i.v«T& IN-sirrHti-.. lirookl.vii 15ri(l>;i' Ston; No.2, New York 



PIONEER WINE HOUSE. 

i'lUblirlied 18M. 



^/^l^ipOl^fli/) U/lt^E5 f{p BI^/^f(DI^S 

Vineyards in Imh A ngcles County, SonMiut County, 

Merced County and Fresno County. 



Cor. Second and Folsom Sts., 

Sarx Francsiseo. 



41-45 Broadway, 



KOLB & DENHARD, 



Ohittnhi 

Wki*T,8k 
KiMfil WaMnTBi. 



IiDporlfld 

ChampagnM, Wmu 

And Liqnora. 




^«yl^ 



CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

OFFICe AND VAULTS, 420-424 UtOHTaOMKRY »T.. BAN rHANCIBOO. 



HIRSCHLER & CO., 

212 to 216 Sahsome Stbkbt, Bah Fbahcisco, Cal. 

Wine and Liquor Merchants. 

I'Kltt'Rir.TOUS OF 

Summit Vineyard, 



NAPA COUNTY, CAL. 



22-28 Taylor St., San Francisco, Cal. 

California Wines L Brandies. 

Vineyards, Cellars and Distilleries at 
ST. HEbEJSI/r, fJ/rf/r eOUJMTY, e/rb. 



f/reifie WIJVJE /rJSID Sflf^lT f^EVIEW. 



37 



I^EI^TUCKV BOU^BOI^S RJilD J^VES. 

Quotations at Cincinnati and Louisville. 

E. G. B.-Export Gauge Bremen; N. Y.-New York; N. Y. C. H.-New York Custom House; L. P. W. H.-Louisville Public Warehouse; 
Lou .-Louisville; Cin.-Cincinnati; Dist'y-Distillery; C. C. H.-Cincinnati Custom House; St. L. C. H.-St. Louis Custom House. 

V^ These prices are for lots of not less than tw(!nty-fivc barrels and upwards, cash, and if In bond, original gauge, accrued charges paid. 







IlsT BOIsriD. 




T. 


A-K 


: :e'j^xjd. 






BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 
'89. 


Fall 
'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall 
'90. 


Spr'g 

'87. 

225 


Fall 
'86. 


Spr'g 
'86. 

225 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 
Whiskies. 


Remarks 


Andf^rson 




60 
57^ 
62^ 
50 


55 


m 








SprSl 300 


LouCH 


Andci'soii Oo. Club 














Atulerson Co. Sour Mash 








40 
40 


40 
36^ 





210 
205 








240 
















210 
225 
































52^ 




37i 




210 






225 


Fall 81 275 


CiuCH 


TJallard & Tja.n master 
















T5ftftf*]iwood 






























Bel-Air 


























Spr81 286 


XjOii 


Belle of Anderson 








m 




45 
















Belle of Anderson Co. (E. Murphy) 
Belle of Louisville 





82i 


67^ 












257^ 






50 

70 

77i 

65 

56 

46 

55 




















Belle of Marion 




85 


""so" 




40 
55 




210 




225 






Spr81 300 




Belle of Nelson 










Belmont 






















Berkele, Wm 






60 


46 


42^ 


















Berrv EC 






















Biff Snrinff ("Nelson Co. Distsr. Co.l . 










42i 


32^ 












Spr 81 275 
























Blue Grass 








52| 

80 

45 

75 


65 
32 

62^ 


37^ 
60 
31i 
55 




, 




220 
255 




250 
267i 


SprSl 270 




Bond & Lillard 




100 


55 




235 






Bond, M. S 
















230 




250 










Bowen H C 












Spr 80 310 


Nev Ex 


Bowen, J. A 








50 




37i 


32J 


203 










Brownfield, W. W. 




















TJurlianan 








62^ 




52i 




225 










SprSl 275 


LouCH 


Oallaerlian 
























60 

65 

52^ 

43i 

45" 


"■42^ 
40 


55 
50 
40 
37i 








225 






Fall 80 325 


Nev Ex 


Cedar Run 


80 


80 
65 
62i 


"'47^ 


























Fall 82 260 
SprSl 285 




Clay, Samuel 


















Cliff Falls 


















Clifton 


















227^ 










Commonwealth 




62i 




55 
45 

67^ 




40 
30 

35 
















Cook, C. B 
















Fall 80 270 


























Craig, F. G 








37^ 






































Cream of Anderson 




75 




65 
50 
50 
60 
55 
65 
55 
57^ 


"■37^ 


47i 

35 

37^ 

45 

37i 


















Criterion 




















Crystal Spring 
























Cumberland 




















Spr SO 300 




Cummins, R. & Co 






















Dant, J. W 
























Darling 








40 


37i 
40 


















Daviess County Club 




72^ 
75" 




















Dedman, C. M 






210 














Double Spring 






52i 

60 

67i 

75 

55 

38^ 

45 

35 




37^ 
40 

52i 
60 
















Dundee 




























70 
80 
85 




















Early Times 


82i 


















Edge Cliff. 


















Edgewater (T. J. Megibben.) 






210 




230 










E'k Run 










30 
35 












Excelsior (Megibben & Bro.). 














215 




235 






Fall City 


















Fern Cliff. 











32^ 


















Fible & Crabb 




























Field, J. W. M 








60 


37^ 


40 
40 
60 










































Frazier, W. J 








75 
55 


62i 
45 





207^ 














Freeland 




















Garland 
























Gladstone 








52i 
60 






















Glenarme 






...:.... 


35 


32i 



















38 



j^eifie WI^E /cl^W 6flR.IT f^EVIEW, 








MABTtX HEUCSKX. 



IIKMIY KI'IIIIOPKII. 



Mencken & Schroder, 

BrCCE««OBH TO 

HENRY BRICKWEDEL & CO. 

Imporiert and Jfralen in 

Ulines and liiquot^s. 

SuU AfcnU fur Dr. Schroder' » Hamburg JiiUeni, and 
Our FaruriU 0. K. and J'iiid Jones \Vhi*He«. 

Nos. 208-210 Front Street, - San Francisco, Cal. 



JoliX l.l I-i > 



nm'. wic iiMAN.- 



WICHMAN &. LUTGEN, 

Importars of 



Wi 



iriQQ 



Mmnolarlarrra and 
rr«i|>r)rti>f» of 

Dr. Feerstar's 
Sinmnrk Ilitlrn. 




318-320 Clay St. 

BcL Front & Battery, 

San Francisco. 



i>. V. It. IIKNAIIIK. 



E. MARTIN &. CO., 

• IMI'OK'n.niH .\M) WHOLEH.VLE 

liIQUOH mEF^CHAI^TS, 

408 Front St., San Francisco, Cal. 

— HOLE AOENTH EUlt 

J. F. CUHER AND ARGONAUT OLD BOURBONS. 



THE CELEBRATED 



PERUVIAN BITTERS. 

A i^i'ibilii Ai-PiCTlZEH. A ROYAL TONia CURES DYSPEPSIA. 



216 California St., - San Francisco, Cal. 

Also Agents for Delmonico Champagne. 



Hey, Grauerholz & Co., 

IW|-<iKTEIW AM> WllOLEXALK IJEALritf IN 

WJNES& LIQUORS 



HOLE AOEXTK FOK 



DAVY CROCK^ff WHISKY. 

BE SURE YOU ARE RIGHT, THEN GO AHEAD. 



NO. 2ie SACRAMENTO STREET, 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



. 



P.J.CASSIN &CO., 

IMI'OUTEltS OF PURE 

Kentucky Bourbon Whiskies 

Sole Ayeniti for O. K. GOLDEN PLASTATlOti WHISKY. 



-WilOLEHALB DELAERS IN- 



Foreign and Domestic Wines and Liquors. 



A33 BATTERY ST., SAH FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Kuhls, Schwarke & Co. 

flliolesale Wine and Lifiuor Mereliants. 

Gaima Wiiies aiid BiaiiUles. 



-SOLE AOENTK FOK- 



O.K. Goldwater Bourbon & Rye Whiskies, 

12S-129 Slitter St., Cor. Kearny, - - San Franeiteo, Cul. 



B. FiuTM II. 



C. C'KLL.M.ns. 



Thomas Taylor & Co. 

— IIISTII.I.KII.S OF AND l)E.M,Elt.S IN" — 

iA£ I N ESANDJ-IQUO RS 

Sole Agents for 

Alpine and Champion Cocktail Bitters. 



21 First Street, 



Sa-TL Frajncisco. 



(.'. J osT, ^■•u. 



^/^Ijpoi^t;!/^ C)'5T'UL!I^Ci ^0- 



C. JOKT, J ii. 



-Distillcra and Kcotlhcrs of — 



SPIRITS AND ALCOHOL 

Office: 306-308 Clay Street, 

UISTILI.F.IlV AT AXTIOCII. SAX FUAX0I8CO. 



CIIAK. \V, FOliF., 



.milN M'KIA.M i:. 



Spruance, Stanley & Co. 

IMroi!TF.l:S AND .701!1!EI;S OF FIVE 

Wliskies, Wiiies Liprs. 

Sole agents for the Celebrated African Stomach Bitters. 

■til) FliilNT KtKKKT, - - SVN FlUNTlSCO. CaI.. 





f/reifie wijNE 


/rJsID 


SflF^IT 


I^EV 


EW. 








39 


BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 
'89. 


Fall 
'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Falll 
'90. 


^pr'g 

'87. 


Fall 

.'86. 

■(■ 


Spr'g Fall 
'86. '85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 

Whiskies. 


Remarks 


















Spr 81 285 















50 


















(iHftn Sijriiijrfi 
























• Spr 81 300 
Spr 81 300 




f irfiPiibrier 








60 




42i 








250 








Greylock (The Mill Creek Dist'g Co.) 
Grevstone 
















































G W S 




77^ 


55 


60 
60 
50 
45 


""m 


45 
42^ 
37| 
40 


















Hackly, S. 










230 


























Spr 80 300 
















































Havden R B. & Co 






























Head F. M 






























Head W. H 








85 
60 




























92i 


72i 

■■■40" 
42^ 














280 


Fall 81 325 




Hill& Hill 




71 
52^ 


40 

37^ 
37| 














HorseShoe (The Mill Creek Dist'g Co) 
Hume 


57^ 


32^ 


















60 






225 






Spr 82 265 




Indian Hill 








25 












•Tf^sftamine 








































40 


















Kellar, A 






fi7i 


52^ 
67^ 


40 

52^ 








110 
235 


EGB 














37i 
37i 










- 




Kentucky Comfort (Paine's) 








32| 




































Kentucky Dew 




































55 


m 


40 






210 




250 








Lancaster, R. B. (Maple Grove) 


























55 




40 


















Limestone 






















































McBraver, J. H 








57i 
92^ 






















McBrayer, W. H 








72i 


70 




265 














McKenna 




























50 

48i 


40 


37i 


















Mattinglv & Son, J. G 














215 






Spr 84 235 




Mattingly & Moore 






62^ 
65 














Mavfield 






60 


47* 


•45 








235 






Spr 81 300 






















Mellwood 




72i 


57| 


55 


m 


40 














Fall 81 275 




Mercantile Club 


















Miles, E. L 








50 

62i 

65 

57i 


52^ 


37^ 
52i 








215 










Monarch , M. V 






















Monarch, R 








50 
42i 








225 








NYCH 












110 


EG 




245 


Spr 81 300 




Moore, D. L 












Lou 
































Murphy, Barber & Co 








62i 

65 

50 


45 
40 


42^ 

50 

37^ 








110 


EG 




Spr 81 300 


Lou C H 


Nail, A. G 




80 


""eo 










Nelson 






200 




215 




225 


Fall 81 275 








60. 




New Hope 






65 
52| 
70 
75 




50 














Spr 82 275 




Nutwood 






55 
















Oakwood 




82^ 


65 


52i 

62i 




210 
240 














0. F. C 












Spr 84 295 




Old Charter 


















Old Crow 






100 


95 




70 
35 












300 


Spr 84 325 




Old Lexington Club 


















Old Log Cabin 




75 
























Old Pepper, (Pepper, Jas. E. & Co).. 






72i 
75 
60 
52i 




60 

62| 




260 

247i 




285 






Spr 84 290 
Spr 84 325 
Spr 82 325 




Old Oscar Pepper 




100 










Old Tarr 














Old Time (Pogues) 








42i 
40 


38J 
37| 
















Old Times 








32| 
















Parkland 
























Parkhill 






























Patterson 






























Payne, P. E 








50 
55 


45 




















Peacock 








42i 






225 












Pepper, R. P 






m 












Fall 81 275 




Pilgrimage 










60 


50 














Purdy & Co ." 


























Rich Grain 








50 
■55 
57^ 
45 
62^ 


■■■■421 
46| 


■37^ 
40 
45 
35 

37^ 


















Rich wood 






60 
65 


35 
















Ripy, T. B 






212J 




225 






Spr 81 300 


LCH 


Rohrer, D 




60 




























1 


......... 







1 




••••••••I 








40 



j^eifie Wlj^E >)cj^D SflF^lT flEVIEW. 



"60D BLESS YOU! 



>> 



U U»« H««rt-Folt E«pr«Mlon that Come« to Ut from all 
ov«r," from thofo w)io havo used 




FATHERS! MOTHERS! CHILDREN! 

Thl. woodertul i^.nlUI. wUiilj-U u »wi*l bo wild boiiey, aud a» iiivlKoniliiiS B« 
•11 rlwlrii-al ballrry, 

DIARRHGCA, DYSENTERY, MALARIA, 

Aad all •lliutiiU o( llw iK.wrU. I,p»<liiiK riivi-i. iiiiii' i.rt-M ril.c il for ADULTS ANU 

CHILDIiEN. K.-rMlrliv Mctm*. M.viTf.'Id. Mil.liill .V Sielxfiiiiaiicr, 

Sail Krai" i" 11 """' nil ^lnlL'L■i^Il■ htiiI di'aliTK. 

RHEINSTROM BROS. Sole Props., 

oiariLUsna Fine uaueuKS, 

cnsrciiosrjLTi, tj. s. j^. 



Monarch Blackberry Brandy, 

THE ONLY RELIABLE IN THE MARKET. 

t^yrou i-rniTV. ktkength asd flavob. it has no equal. ■^:3 

.\likloviteh, FIclclier k Co. 

DISTILLERS OP 

FRUIT BRANDIES. 



THE BELLE OF COURBON COMPANY, 

LOUISVILLE, KY. 

— -DIKTILLEKS OF THE FAMOD 

"BEIiIiE OF BOUW 

Hand-Made Sour Mash Whisky 

( W i«iT cent firaall Orain.) 

None BOTTLED UMOBF CIQHT YEMRS OLO. 



SIEBE BROS. &i PLAGEMANN, 

AGENTS, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL 



TO WINE-MAKE RS! 

The iinderi'lKned beg to tall tlie attention of Wine Makers, Dealers. oU-.. to M. 

Cliuvallier-Ai'iHTl'B 

"OENOTANNSN" 

Ab a corrective aud a purifier to all liKlit Table Wiuct, niilte and lU'd. 



■AND- 



cc 



PULVERINE" 

FOK Cl-AKIKVING WlllTE AM) ItKI) WlNES 

And to 

A. BOAKE ROBERTS & GO'S 

LIQUID ALBUMENS 

For clarifying, preBerving, rcstorinp aud correcting both White aud lied Wim 
nirecttotis for use on appllcattoiu 

For Sale by Charles Meinecke & Co., Sole Agents, 

314 Sttvramento Street, San Franrtttro, Cat. 




liottljre and Dealers in 

Native J^ines. 



168-70-72 East Pearl St. 
Cincinnati O. 



EGG ALBUMEN. 

GUARANTEED ABSOLUTELY PURE. 

CLARIFYING WINES. 



ESTABLISHED 



A. Finke's 



Muntifadurers of 

CALIFORNIA 



ABSOLUTELY PURE 



809 MONTGOMERY ST., 

San Francisco. 

Telephone 5034. 




1 864 



Widow, 



First Premium 

CHAMPAGNES. 



J tioi.u Skal, 

Carte Blanchi';, 

Imi'ekiai 



E"(,'"Firi<t Premium for Gold 
Seal Best Oalifornia Cliam- 

Iiattues awaiiled by the State 
■'ail, ISIH), aud wherever ex- 
liiliitcd. 



A. KLIPSTEIN, 



52 CEDAR STREET, 



NEW YORK. 



E. U C. STEELE St CO. 

Successors to 0. Adolph Low & Cto. 

SOLE IMPORTERS OF 

HARMO NY SH ERRIES. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 

208.C'aukornia HTKKfTT. - .San Fkanci»«), Cal. 





f/reifie wij^E 


/rJME) 


SflF^IT 


f^EV 


EW. 








41 


BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 
'89. 


Fall 
'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall 
'90. 


Spr'g 

'87. 


Fall 
'86. 


Spr'g 
'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Spr'g 

'85. 


Old 

Whiskies 


Remarks 


Saffell, W B : 




























Samuels, T. W 






62^ 


62^ 
55 

57^ 




45 

42^ 




21 7i 














Samuels, W. B. & Co 














- 




Searey, J. S 




85 
90 




















Searcy, Wiley, (Old Joe.) 
























Sharpe 




























Shawhan 






























Small Grain 












37| 

40 

37^ 


















Smith & Smith 




























Snyder (PYeiberg & Workum) 








50 
































225 












Sovereif^n 








55 


"37' 


35 
35 

47i 
50 
















Split Rock 
























S 1 )ring Hill 








62i 
65 
60 
45 




245 




255 






Spr 81 325 




Spring Water 














Stone, W. S. (Old) 










210 




220 


















35 














Tippecanoe 








37i 


















Taylor (Old) 




95 














275 










Toa Kettle 




60 


61i 


42| 


38^ 


36^ 


































Tip Top (Rock Spring Dist'g Co 




75 


60 


m 


42i 


40 
40 
34 
40 


































SprSl 300 


Lou 


\';in Hook 








m 
















Walker, F. G. (Queen of Nelson)... 










210 














Walker, J. M 








52i 

55 

70 

48^ 

62^ 

67| 

45" 
















Warwick 








45 

57^ 


42i 
55 




200 
225 














Waterfill & Frazier 




90 
65 
















Watlien Bros 
















Welsh. J. T. (Davies Co.).... 




""37J 


55 

60 

35 

32J 

45 

52J 


















Welsh, J. T. (McLean Co) 
























White Mills 






52J 


















Willow Run 






















Woodland 








65 
70 


47i 
57^ 


■"47^ 


210 




230 




240 






Zi^no 































IKIEn^TTJOSZY I5.YES. 



A sliland 








62i 










215 






1 




Atherton 








50 












< 




1 >elle of Anderson 






















... . ^ 




B611e of Louisville 






57i 


















1 




Belle of Nelson 






75 

77^ 


60 


60 
57i 










252J 








Blue Grass 






82i 




215 












Clarke's 


















Criterion . . . . . 








52| 






















Crystal Spring . 


















230 










Curley, J. E... .. ..".... . 




























Edgewater 








55 


















Spr 80 350 




Excelsior 


























Franklin 








75 




55 


















Greylock 
























Grevstone 






























Hermitage 






100 
65 


95 

60 

55 

52J 

65 

50 


80 
65 
50 

50 










280 




300 


Spr 84 350 




Highland 






55 










Horse Shoe (Mill Creek Dist'g Co... 






















I 'j'nchburg 








40 


















Marion Co Distillins' Co 
























Mattinclv & Son .7 G 


























Melwood 




80 


65 






















Miles, E. L ... 




70 


55 

65 
60 
60 




















Millcreek 


























Monarch, M V. 








60 








250 










Nelson 
























Norniandv ^ 








75 

80 




















01(1 PoDDer rPonnftr .Taa E. & Oo . 








67J 

52^ 
47J 




270 




300 






Spr 84 300 




Paris Club .. 














Peacock . . . 




























Ponner R P 
























- ' 




Rollina' Fork 










50 








215 












Short Horn rDoujrhertv's^ 










50 

50 

53^ 

50 

35 
















Sovereign 










55 

""52i 
40 
55 
42^ 








240 










Suiinv Side 




75 




65 
65 
45 

" "52i 
















Susfluelianna, 




45 
















Svlvan Grove rFleishinann's") 


60 


55 


50 
70 
















Wathen Bros 


















White Mills.... 







40 



















42 



j^eifie WI^E_/r|JD SflR.IT f^E VIEW._ 



LEJ^IDIItTa- IDISTIXjXjE^^ 



AOORCSS. INSURANCE. 



BRAND. 



BOUTRBonsrs. 



AM>KK.>«»N in .NKI-S<».N IHSTS i\\ 
Add; Andrrmin & .Nolmiii Dwlillfriiit 
(V>.. l/tiiiixvillt'. 

Rail'. OOe. I 



Aiidfivon. 
Nelwin. 



BEIXKof AM>KK.S<>X h'O (X>. 

Add: H. J. ttn<«>iiliaun), IxHiixvilU'. 

Rate, 1.25. 



Ik^llo of AndorHon. 
(ilfniiriiu'. 
J<t*Muninc. 
Arliiigioii. 



M. P. MATTINiSLY. 

OwtntHlMiro, Ky. 
Free W. H., IJW. 



Old W. 8. Htone. 



J. G. MATTINULV CX). 

Louwville. 
Bate 86c. 



J. O. Mattingly & Bons. 



MKLLWOOD DIST'Y CO. 

LouiHvillo. 
Bate, 86c. 



Mellwood, 
Duiidoe, 
O. W. 8. 



M(H»RK & 8EIJJGER, 

Louiaville, 
Rate. 85c. 



Astor, 
Ik^lnioiit, 
Nutwood. 



ED. MIRPHY & CO., 

L»»wr»'n«'burg, Ky, 
No. 1, 1.35. 



Bolle of Anderson County 



OLD TIMES DIST'Y CO.. 

IjOuiHvillc. 
Ratw, 85c. &tl.50. 



Old Times. 
Gladstone. 



ADDRESS. INSURANCE. 



BRAND. 



JVS E. PEPPER & CO., 

Ix'ixington. 

Kate. S5c. 



I K.U. TAYIX)R. JR. & SONS, 

Frankfort. 

Rate, 85c. 



Pepper. 



Old Taylor. 



UEI.LE OF NEI>SON D'Y CO. 
Adil; IJt'ile of Nelson Distillery Co., 
Jyouisville. 

Rate, 8.'>c. and $1.25 



Belle of Nelson. 



ELASTEK/IST I?.YES. 



M. CRICHTON & CO. 

Baltimore, Md. 
"A" 1.70, "B" 1.60, "C" 1.35. 



Monticello. 



J. A. DOUGHERTY' & SONS, 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
Rate, 90c. ■ 



Dougherty. 



A. OVERHOLT & CO., 
Add; A. Overholt &Co., Pittsburg, Pa, 
Rate, 80c. 



Overholt. 



S. DILLINGER & SONS, 

Ruft's Dale, Pa, 



Dillinger. 



THOMPSON DIST'G CO., 

AVest Brownsville, Pa. 
Add; Office 134 Water St., Pitt8burg,Pa. 
Rate, 80c. 



Sam Thompson. 



SUSQUEHANNA DIST'G CO., 

Milton, 
Add; Ja«. Levy & Bro., Cincinnati. 
Rates, 85c & 1.25. 



Susquehanna. 



BETHANV DISTILLERY. 

Tut -•; 








CBTABLI5HEO 1834^ 



Ruff's Daii,. westmof^elahd co. pa 



THIS SPACE ReSER^ED FOR 

mm. H- sHiEiiDs, 

WHISKY BROKER 



No. 6 West Third Street, 



Cincinnati, O. 





fyveifie wijsiE 


/rJMD 


Sflf^lT 


F^EV 


EW. 








43 


E^STEi2.isr -RirJEi&: 


BRANDS. 


Fall 

'87. 


Spr'g 

'88. 


Fall 

'88. 


Spr'g 
'89. 


Fall 

'89. 


Spr'g 
'90. 


Fall 
■90. 

674 
60 


Spr'g Spr'g 
'91. 1 '87. 


Fall 

'86. 


Spr'g 
'86. 


Fall 

'85. 


Old 
AVhiskies. 


Remarks 


Hraddock 


125 




87* 

77* 

70 

75 

85 

82* 

57* 

82| 

75 

85 

62i 


80 
60 

65 
75 
674 


75 
55 

55' 
55 

62* 
62* 




275 

240 










Bridjjcport 




255 










l^rookdiilo 




85 

95 
107i 
105 


85 
92^ 










nilHiifjer, S. & Sons 




50 
55 

57* 


47* 
260 














1 )()iiulu'rtv 


120 
120 


265 












Fincli's Golden Wedding 












Frontier 














(ribson 


127^ 
98| 


122* 
95" 


■■'82* 
97i 
fi7* 


65 
624 
75 
55 


60 

57* 
67* 
474 










y 








CJuckeulieimer ; 


52* 
60 
40 
45 




242* 


.300 


295 


310 


SprSl 466 




Hiinnisville 




Jones, G. W. 


m 


75 














Jjippencott 
























67* 
75 


624 
62* 


60 
60 
574 
40 
















Melvale 


115 
107i 


105 
105 

75 


90 




































Montrose 


65 






374 






















75 
55 
65 
65 
45 

60 












• . ' 


1 


iMt. Vernon. ...." 






105 
82* 
87* 
85 
57* 


6... 

74 
75 
80 
50 
75 


70 

474 

60 

62^ 

42* 

55" 

50 

50 


574 
45 






340 


350 


400 






( )rient 














( )verliolt 




115 

100 

65 




265 

267* 


285 
272* 


310 




SprSO 700 








55 




, 




75 










Stewart 


^5 

47* 
45 
















ToiiiDSon Sam . 
































60 


































^ 




\^%^' 






^MM: 



^^Vy 




ADDKE55 ALL C?MMUNICAriON3 TO 

QENcr^AL erricc:, 

PlTT^BURQli. Pa. 



Established 1844. 



^Sam Thompsons 



p 



URE 



R 



YE 



Wh 



..itc- 



ISKY 



UNEQUALLED IN QUALITY. 



Office: 134 Water Street, 



ON THE MONONGAHELA RIVER 
West Brownsville, Pa. 



44 



f>/reifl<5 WIJJE ^^e> SflF^lT f^EVIEW 



STILL MIKLM; B()\^)^ AT THE OLD STAND, 

314 SPEAR ST.. SAN TRANCISCO. 

Hobbs, Wall ^ Co., 

Manui,ifiur,rt nf Frry ]'ariiiy of 

BOXES. 

All klndt of Boxes on hand and mad* to ordor with 
pramptnosa. Win* and Uquor Cases a Specialty. 



IDII^ECTOI^"5r 



Redwood Cargoes Sawed To Order. 

Linda Vista Vineyard, 



tUMIOX SA!f JOSB, CAL. 



Grape Cuttings 

Qtbemct flauviioion. CaU'nit't Franc, Somillon, Venlot, Merlot, 

Bwlan. r<>tit Kyrab. Frnnken Rit«ling. Johannisbcrg 

Riewling. Mondcuso, Muw>)ul('l du Bordclaisc, 

•0- OR ANY OTHER VARIETY WANTED.'^. 

Kirvt-rlaM* riitiiiip< of any of the almvc for Rootingn or GrailA 
will be Hup{ilic<l at Ki.OO per Uiouwiud on board cars 

Address,- C. C. MclVER, Mission San Jose, Cal. 

10|\/IA PBl^TA (.UM^^R CO^ 

—SUCCESSORS TO— 

\x;-A.xsoisrviLLE: ixr. & l. co. 

Have CoiwlantiT on Hand * Full Supply 
of Ibe ^ullowInK Sice* of 

2i2--4 F««t Long, 2x2->5 F*«t Long, 

2x2- -6 r««t Long. 

mieh mHU be mtld at reamntable ratea. 



LOMA PRIETA LUMBER CO. 



Lema Priata, 



Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 



IIII'OIITANT TO DIST1LLEI{S AND WINE MAKEIIS. 



Thin cut rrpmx-iilK uiir l«lc«t 7in- 
;>r»iy(I Ctm InuotiH Sllll uliicli lias 
iKfii |ierfiTt«d after yc«r» of extierimenis 
and larfce ez|>eni>e. 

ThiM Sllll han the atUanage 
ot-er all nthem, an It in tronnnilrar, 
e»n\j <i|ieral(d and iie|>arateii the alde- 
hyde and other Infeilor ollr and make* • 
pure and hicli da's brandy, and frdtirea 
Ihe ramt fully ninety per rent In 
lalxir and fuel. It rc<]utrn> very little or 
no water and ntilizeaall heal heretofore 
wantetl 

We re<«r to Obo. Wwt A Son, Wock- 
ton; Joim WiitBLU, 81. Helena. 



ALL KIND or OOPm WORK DONI AT SHORT NOTICE 




SANDERS &i CO. 



4'.'l All! 4ia MUWIOM ST.. 



Hah VuAtK'UKO, Cau 



OF 



Prominent California Vineyards. 



ITIitve Card* Innerled for $5 (wr Year In adranre.l 



KI, I'lNAI. Vl.NEYARD. — EKtaMlfhed 
IS.'C'. \Vlne» and tirandlei". GeorRC 
Wiiit A S<in, Stockton, Cal. 

sfKirHA VISTA VINEYARD -.Wine* 
and l.randle*. Sierra Vmta Vineyard 
Co., MInturn, Frcono, Co., Cal. 

T. I)E Tt'RK VINEYARDS- Eatab- 
llfhed l>t«2. Wluec and brandies. I. 
De Turk, Santa Rosa, Cal. 

INOLENOOK VINEYARD— E«tabli»hed 
IHNO. Wnies and brandies. Gugtare 
Nlebauni, Rutherford. Napa Co., Cal. 

SUNSET VINEYARD— Established 1881. 
WlncK and brandies. Webster <S Sar- 
gent, MInturn, Fresno Co., Cal. 

OLIVINA VINEYARD— Established 1881 
Wines and brandies. Julius P. Smith, 
Llvermore, Cal. 



MONT ROUGE VINEYARD -EalaL- 
lislied 1885. Dry wines. A. O- 
Chauche, Llvermore, Cal. Office 615- 
617 Fiont St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

ELECTRA VINEYARD. — Established 
1881. Dry wines. Clar«nce J. Wet- 
more, Llvermore. Cal. 

LINDA VISTA VINEYARD— Eelabllsbed 
1858. Dry and sweet wines. C. C. 
Mclver. Mission San Jose, Alameda 
Co., Cal. 

CRESTA BLANCA— Exclusively hne high 
Krade wines in bottle, tine Sauteroes 
and Medoc ty|)es. Only cash order* 
solicited. Cliarles A. Wetmore, Liver- 
more. Cal. 

FRESNO VINEYARD— EMablished 1880. 
Sweet and dry wines and brandies 
Fresno. Cal,. L. P. Drexler. 409 Cali- 
fornia St.. San Francisco, Cal. 



THE LARGEST COMPANY WEST OF NEW YORK. 




INSURANCE 



COMPANY 



^a ^ OF CALIFORNIA. (^^^ 

D. J. Staflks, Pres. Wm. J. Dutton, Vice-Pics. B. Faymonvillk, Sec'y 

Oko. H. Tvson, Ass't Sec'y. • J. B. Lkvisos, Marine Sco'y. 

HOME OFFICE, 401-40S CALIFORXTA STREET, S. F. 

Fairbanks' Standard Scales, Trucks, Etc. 

FAIRBANKS & HUTCHINSON, 
316-318 MARKtrr Street, - - San Francisco. Cal. 

VITICULTURAL RESTAURANT AND CAFE. 



BUSINESS SUCCESS. 

If yon have a line of ^oods. or a Bpecialty, ])os<>esslnK quality and merit 
IT PAYS TO LET THE PUBLIC KNOW IT. 

Every business man who consults his health and cuccess in business must eat 
and not on!y eat reKularlv. but must eat such food as will be readily digested, with 
lueh surroundings as will make his meal not only 

A BUSINESS MATTER OF NECESSITY 

but a pleasurable digression from business care. 

When such a meal can be nl>talned at a trilling expense, and be productive of 
haiipincss and renewed, if not lncrease<l energy, a business man Is foolisli Indeed to 
not embrace the prosiiectlve i>pi>orlunlty. 

Such a meal can be obtained, and tlie above described results attained by taklni' 
a lunch with us, between the liours of 11 a. m. and 8:80 r. M. We aerre a six coui - 
lunch for 50 cents. 

In the evening we serve, from 4:80 to 8::)0 p. M.. an cigbt-coursc dinner for 
75 cents 

Besides our service a la carte receives prompt attention, and our rcslauranti 
most eleganllr furnislie<l. 

Referring' to our ex|wrlcnoc. both In llie Old and New World, as restauranteurs 
with the fact that the cuisine and dining room Is under our direct and continua 
*u|iei vision, we gimranlee the U'st satisfaction. 

Being confident tliat wc can iiiease jou in the smallest particulars, we re»|ieol- 
fully solicit your iwtronage. 

ALBERT FRANCKX AND OTTO RCHLEMANN. 

Viticultural Cafe and R«!stauranl. 

Hl.'i Pink Sthkrt, San Fkancisi" 

N. B.— The wines fundshcd to our gueats are guarantee*! to tie pure, and art 
pnrebaaed direct frtim the |M-rmanent exhibit uftbc State Viticultural Cuniniission 



fAeifie WlfvIE AND SPIRIT F^EVIEW. 



CLASSIFIED INDEX OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



CALIFORNIA WINES AND BRANDIES. 

Page. 

Beck, Pyhrr & Co 16 

Boyd, F. O. & Co 23 

California Wine Growers Union 35 

>abb, H. W 24 

:;arpy,.C. & Co 36 

Chauche, A. G 23 

DeTurk, 1 34 

Jundlach, J. & Co 25 

larnier, Laucel & Co 23 

Elarasztliy, Arpad & Co 25 

Elaber, F. A 30 

Harris, Kingston & Reynolds 36 

Soltum, C. & Co 23 

Kohler & Van Bergen 34 

[Cohler & Frohling 36 

Kolb & Denhard 36 

Kuhls, Schwarke & Co 38 

Lacliman & Jacobi...., 36 

Lachman, S. & Co 25 

Luyties Bros 6 

Los Gatos & Saratoga Wine Co 36 

yielczer, Joseph & Co 34 

ffapa Valley Wine Co 14 

ffatoma Vineyard Co 32 

5au Gabriel Wine Co 34 

it. Helena Wine Co 36 

DISTILLERS AND BROKERS. 

Belle of Bourbon Co 40 

California Distilling Co 35 

Daviess County Distilling Co 27 

Dillinger, S. & Sons 42 

jHenmore Distilling Co 27 

Halle, Max M 32 

Leading Distillers' Cards 42 

evy, Jas. & Bro 46 

elhvood Distillery Co 1 

onarch, R 27 

oore & Selliger 5 

urphy, Ed. & Co 5 

)verholt, A & Co 43 

*epper, Jas. E. & Co 6 

Shields, Wm. H 42 

:aylor, E. H. Jr. & Sons -. 32 

Thompson Distilling Co 43 

FRUIT BRANDY DISTILLERS. 

lihalovich , Fletcher & Co 40 

Iheinstrom Bros 40 

Valden & Co 32 

Vest, Geo. & Son 3 

SAN FRANCISCO WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS. 

lassin, P. J. & Co 38 

[ey, Grauerholz & Co 38 

[encken & Schroder 38 

[ir8chler& Co 36 

otaling, A. P. & Co 4 

toore. Hunt & Co 4 

[artin, E. & Co 38 

aber, Alfs & Brune 38 

ebe Bros. & Plagemann 4 

iea, Bocqueraz & Co 34 

pruance, Stanley & Co 35 

ylor, Thos. & Co 38 

^ichman & Lutgen 38 

^ilmerding & Co 38 

FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC CHAMPAGNES. 

merican Champagne Co 34 

impmp.u, W. B 28 

in^e's Widow, A. 40 

araszthy, Arpad & Co 25 

MJhman, S. & Co 36 

a«ondray &Co 35 



Meinecke, Chas. & Co 28 

A. Vignier 34 

Werner, A. & Co 38 

Wolfr, Wm. &Co 15 

IMPORTERS. 

H. Brunhild & Co new 

Chapman, W. B 28 

Macondray & Co 35 

Meinecke, Chas. & Co 28 

Vignier, A 34 

Wolfif, Wm. &Co 16 

SPECIAL BONDED WAREHOUSES. 

Bode & Haslett 6 

Sherman, J. D. W 5 

Sibley, Hiram & Co 31 

SYRUPS, CORDIALS, BITTERS, ETC. 

Blumenthal, M. & Co 34 

Dryden & Palmer — 

Henley Bros 36 

McMillan, R. G 31 

Naber, Alfs & Brune 23 

Nicholas Rath & Co 34 

Rudkin, Wm. H 31 

WINE FININGS ETC. 

Klipstein, A 40 

Meinecke, Chas. & Co 40 

Movius, J. & Son 4 

MISCELLANEOUS. 

Beck, Pyhrr & Co 45 

Bonestell & Co 45 

California Furniture Co 31 

Coon, M. F. & Co 46 

Connecticut Fire Insurance Co new 

F. J. Cheney & Co 31 

Electric Vapor EngineCo 6 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Co 44 

Franckx & Ruhleman 44 

Fairbanks & Hutchinson 44 

Gall & Dunne 45 

Goodyear Rubber Co 45 

Golden Gate Woolen Mfg. Co 31 

Hobbs, Wall&Co 44 

Jordan, Dr. & Co 45 

Kohler & Chase — 

P. Korbell&Bros 25 

Loma Prieta Lumber Co 44 

Mclver, C. C 44 

O'Brien, James 45 

Occidental & Orientals. S. Co 45 

Oceanic Steamship Co 45 

Pacific Mail Steamship Co 45 

Prominent California Vineyardists 44 

Pacific Saw Co 45 

Pierce & Co 21 

Rosenfeld's Sons, John 45 

Sanders & Co 44 

Southern Pacific Co 45 

Steele, E. L. G. & Co 40 

Trumbull & Beebe ; 31 

Tubbs' Cordage Co 45 

Wagner, L » 44 

Waas, Henry 45 

Wood& Scott 2 



Established 1852. 

CALIFORNIA WINES & BRANDIES, 

WINE VAUUTS, EL. PINAL, STOCKTON, CAL. 

Sonoma Wink and Brandy Co., - No. 1 Fkont Street, Xkw York. 




f^\f\Q WIfJE /r^'D SfiR.IT flEVl EW^ 

A. P. HOTALING & CO, 



ESTABLISHED 1852. 



iMPonrens o^ 



\ WIHHS AjMDJiIQUORS. 



OLD BOURBON AND RYE WHISKIES, 

429 to 437 Jackmon Street, - - San Francisco,_Cal. 



JnfIX I>. BIEBE. 



J. r. I'LAOF.MAN'X. 



F. C. 8iEB&. 




SlEBE BnOS. 8t PuRQECnRm^ 

WINE AND LIQUOR MERCHANTS. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

O.K. teedale Boiirkn & Rje Whiskies 



AND THI 



Celebrated Belie of Bourbon. 

Sowtheatt Cor. Sacramento and Sansome Su.. ------- San Francisco, Cal 



Important pof CUine Pt^oducers. 

SKCCHMRI N B. 

300 TIMES SWEETER THAN SUGAR. 

An unHurpai)8e<l ingre<Uont for wines; an excellent corrigent of any unpleasant taste, entirely innocuous. 

Saccharine has very valuable aiiti-fermentativo and antiseptic properties. An addition to an alcoholic solution of 0.005 pei 
cent Baocliariuc stops the fermentation entirely, also the formation of mould and vinegar acid. Testimonials by authorities anc 
any ftirtber information will be cheerfully fumislied by applying to 

J. MOVIUS 6l son, Successors to Lutz & Movius, 



Sole Licensee* for the United States of America, 



79 MURRAY STREET. NEW YORK 




JESSE POI^E WHISIOES, 

OIKEOT FROM J 

We have fully ostahlishcd tlw reputation of these- whiskies on ■ 
Paoiflc Coa,st, and we guarantee them as represented 

STRICTLY PURE. 1 

Vi'hcii kIvo-.i a trial llii-y ii|>eak for tliPtnRflrrs. Fur »«lf In fiuantities to cult »t 

LOUISVILLE OR SAN FRANCISCO BY 

MOORE, HUNT & CO., 

BOLe Aoenra pucific coast, 
404 FRONT ST., - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



PACBipie WljME 7<\N0 SflF^ir REVIEW. 



d 



"Louisville, Ji^* 

B^Z[r\0\iJ apd /^S50I^ are distilled 
from finest of ^raip apd pure5t of u/ater 
upop tl7e j\aT)d /T)ade Sour /T^asl; pro- 
cess, ^ael; apd euery barrel ^uarapt^i^d 
to be 5trl(;tly pure apd free from apy /T)U5t. 






??]e NUTWOOD is a strictli/ old fashioned " Fire Copper " Sweet Mash Whisk;/, in 
the distillation of which we guarantee the use of 40 per cent small grain, gluing -to 
the Whisky a heavy hody and oiicellont flavor, which, for compounding purposes, h 
unexcellod in Kentucky. 



The BELMONT, ASTOR and NUTWOOD Whiskies are stored in the latest 
improved bonded warehouses, with patent racl<s, metal roof, iron shutters and doors- 
Giving our personal attention to the safe handling and care of these goods, witii 
ever}^ advantage and facility for shipping the same, we can guarantee full satisfac- 
tion in every particular to the trade. Soliciting your favors, we remain, 

Very respectfully, MOORE & SELLIGER. 





SECOND DISTRICT, NEW YORK. 

J. ID. ^W. SH:EI?/Ivd:.A.lsr, FTtO'FTtX'BYrOTt. 

The only air-tight Special Bonded Warehouse in the world. Fire proof with iron roof 
and shutters and glass windows. Heated by hot-air engines, giving an even tem- 
perature the year around, thus insuring rapid development and high proof, and 
yielding the best possible results at the end of the bonding period. Cooperage 
cared for. No excessive outage. Storage and insurance the lowest. Freights 
advanced, and your business carefully attended to. Loans negotiated and sales 
made for cash when requested. 

CORRESPONDENCE AND SHIPMENTS SOLICITED. 



NO. 39 WATER STREET, NEW YORK. 




ED. MURPHY & CO., 



- DISTILLERS OF ■ 






"Tbe Belle of IlndersoDGoanty" 

Hand-M ade Sour Mash Whisky. 

Pure Fire Copper Whisky, made from the lest of Grain and Cold Lime Stone 

Spring Water in the Old-Fashioned Way hy Mashing in Small Tuhs, and 

yeasting lack pure sour mash. Whisky nnhonddd hy us and 

shipped F. 0. B. on hoats free of charge 

Headquarters,- Lawrenceburg, Ky. Post Office, Murphy, Ky. 



f/ireifie WIJ^E j/kl^Q SflR.IT K.EVIEW. 



OLD "PEPPER" WHISKY 

DWin«d <Mjy hf Jm*. K IVfifirr * i>».. Ix-ilncl..n. Kt.. under Ibr Mmv (..rtniiU 
lor Biuf* tiMU* I0O ^rarm, l» Ibc /"Mrr"!! nM«l Itrmt In Ihr Unrlil. •• it-piirr" 

mtlal^ U an ••Mfvlil >n<Ht «lit«k>. mwU In il M llmr mif/ tr<>in n fv>i'»i- 

m$m u**^ m»«» lh«ii loo tirnin b^ Ihrrr f/rnrmllitn» uf Ihr IV|i|«t (eiiiil\. 
It te mtd* lrv.« mrirrint ryr. 6««r/rv nnil ••Mm. Tlio inalrrUl !• iii»»1mmI 1« 
^— -« on* bu«l>rt ■( ■ llmr, lu umall lutx, nriirly iinr IbouumI r>r wIikIi an- luii- 
MaallT mjulird l"f Om |>uri«»r. No >»«»l !• rmplnyrd In Mvuir an iiiinalural fcr- 
ownlallon or Utfr )WU. and we alnKlv and douMn llironeh ntpprr kIIIIm ntfr 
mptn /irtm. All lb« wairr twcd i* (r.>m Ibe rrlrbraird " H'drnxi Siirlim" on our 
|ii«t>«». «hkh t* Ibe larrnt natural mfHng of pttrr Ummlone trairr i.-i 
(««lrml Kralarkj. Onr rtai|irra(;r )• Ibr Ih-*! and of our own maniifarlurr. IVrfcct 
•tone* WBrabnnacai. Our Ma Jamu R. I*im-kk \* Ibr onir one of bU name who 
1^ bMa a^ a y j In Ibr DIalllllai: bualncw In Kmlurkt f<ir orrr twrnty rvarr. and 
liwfWorv My wblak) ofleird to «b« Irtde •• Kcnaloc "t^pprr" abinky l»/Vaiid- 
wU>M aakM dtail'M by oa. 

.M.S. K VKI'Pr.n rf- < O. 




Model Mammoth Wine Cellar 

Under Approach of Brooklyn Bridge, Block £.'&, G. 

£NTtfAHCE9 WILLIAM AND ROSE STREETS. 



STORAGE WAREHOUSE AND COMMISSION DEPARTMENT, 

•Jtffice Entrancr, WiHtam St., In Uloek Ji. 



Corr««|>oiiUence Solicited. 



APDiiKffi. I.uiitlrH lirttthcvH, lirooklyn ItHdf/r, \eir York. 



KcaTHOLK I'THBa. 
Pkui i'Tiiaa. 




Choice California 

100 to 108 O'FARRELL STREET, 

San FretnciBco, Cal. 




Adolpii BKcr. 




Wines & Brandies 

Silver Medal Awarded at 

FjPs.PS.IS exposition, 1BS€ 



incorporated 



BODE & HASLETT, 



June 12, '90 



:Pie.OFI?.IETOI?.S 



Special Bonded Warehouse, No. 1, First District 

.^i-.. i-l (aillilUT for tlw KloraKc of Ora|K' and Fruit Brandy. Lowcct Rales of StoraKe and Insurance. Also Proprietors of the Greenwich 
D«H-k United Htatek lionded Warcboiwc^, and the Battery Street Free Warehoiiges for Oeneral Stura{;e. 

The Perfected "Safety" 

ELECTRIC VAPOR ENGINE 

The Most Powerful and Economical Motor in the World 




Always Ready. .'No Boilar. No Fire. No Smoke. No Ashes. 

No License. No Danger. 



No Engineer. 



Vmtm City (>a» nnd Jiatural Gas, or irld m<ik« Its oim Vapor, which Is igtilte 
automatically by a small dry electric battery. 

OUR WINE PLANT 

Mtmiilotl on a sinall hand truck, with a i)0\vorfiil 
itdaiy ln'onw pmnp. will forct- from 500 to .'{000 gal- 
loiiH |M'r hoiir.andiisclcsH thiin onc^rallon ofgtumline 
in Ivii lionrw run; fpiMolint'contHwvi'ntot'u centuper 
^tllon. 

\Vf almj build Stationary Va|K>r Enginen from 
^ to '_'o hortM' |M>wer. S-nd ft)r flow estimate. 



Qlcctric 'J^a'por Qngine Qo., 

Office, 218 California St., San Francisco. 

Wurk«. -.'U aud 1'13 Halu Street. 





/OL. XXVI, NO. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, JVIARGH 30, 1891. 



$3.00 PER YEAR 



Issued Semi- Monthly. 

?. M. WOOD & CO., - - - PROPRIETORS. 

WINFIELD SCOTT 3. M. WOOD. 



The PACIFIC WINE ANU SPIRIT REVISn ts the only paper of 
ts class West of Chicago. It clrciUat,es among the wine makers and 
randy di.'ttlllers of California: the wholesale wine and spirit trade 
f the Pacific Coast, and the importers, distillers and jobbers of the 
Uistern States. 

Subscription per year — in advance, postage paid: 

'or tlie United States, Mexico and Canada $3 00 

'or Euro))ean countries • 4 00 

injjle copies , . 80 

Entered at tlie San Francitco Post Office as second-class matter. 



PITTSBURGH AGENT, 
R. RAPHAEL, 190 Wylie Ave, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Sole Agent for Pennsylvania and North-western New York. 



CINCINNATI AND KENTUCKY AGENT, 

WM. H. SHIELDS, No. 6 West Third Street, Cincinnati, 0. 

THE MA-RKET. 



California wines— Tliere is little change in the trade 
^ situation, the spring business having only fairly opened, 
ransactions between the merchants in the city, and the produc- 
•s are many, and the prices which have been realized, while 
irdly up to the ideas of the sellers, are better than was expected 
>me time ago. Sweet wines are in fair demand. There is a 
iarcity of Angelicas and Sherries, while Ports are in full supply 
id are somewhat weaker under a poor demand. 

Exports dul-ing the past fortnight were 88,927 gallons and 153 
ses, of which 69,843 gallons and 10 cases went to New York, 
sceipts from the interior during February aggregated 954,318 
illons. 

California brandies— The brandy situation continues 
^ to be satisfactory to holders of goods. There have been ru- 
ors afloat recently of the possibility of a combination among the 
incipal holders for the purpose of putting up prices, but the 
itter seems to be all talk at the present writing. It is not be- 
ived that any combination is possible. Prices range from for- 
-seven and a half to fifty cents for '90 brandies. Exports dur- 
; the past fortnight have been very small. Receipts from the 
terior during February were 44,795 gallons. 

"f!>ENTUCKY WHISKIES— The spring trade is opening up 
4 ' ^ very favorably for the best brands. The dealers are all 
:i aiting the result of the movement of the distillers to decrease 
tji production, with considerable interest. Every one looks for- 
Vrd to a fine year's business. 



Exports of whisky during the past fortnight amounted to 
77 cases and 590 gallons, valued at $1389. Receipts of whisky 
in the same period, by rail, were 729 barrels, and the receipts of 
spirits in the same were 1,350 barrels. 

^^YES. — There is little of interest to note in the market, 
^ V The demand, as with the bourbons, is picking up. The 
coming of several representatives of the best distilleries to intro- 
duce in a more satisfactory manner their brands is the only event 
worthy of note. 

OUR SEeOMD BIHTHDAg. 

The Review has now been under its present management 
two years, having been purchased in March 1889. 

Since that time it has made such a remarkable and in fact 
unprecedented growth in circulation, size and position that the 
facts concerning its developement may well be referred to on this 
the second anniversary of its real existence. 

In March, 1889, the journal was one of sixteen pages, with 
little or no original reading matter and printed in the cheapest 
possible manner. One year later it was greatly improved in ap- 
pearance, and had had a healthy growth of eight pages, being 
then a paper of twenty-four pages. 

To-day we take pleasure in calling attention to its forty -six 
pages of matter, interesting to the trade and producers; its varied 
departments; its correspondence; its statistical tables, which are 
the most complete of any class journal in America; and not the 
least, the latest feature of giving illustrations which has never 
yet been attempted by any trade paper with such care and artistic 
attention to details. 

The future of the Review is plainer and more definite now 
than it was in March, 1889, when it languished as the San Fran-' 
cuco Merchant. The outlook for the wine industry is brightef 
than it was then, the liquor trade is in a better situation and gen- 
eral business is in a more satisfactory condition. The growth of 
the Review in the future can best be predicted by what it ha 
been in the past. 

The wholesale liquor dealers of the State of Minnesota ard 
actively engaged in working up publiC sentiment in favor of a 
modification of the high license law which was passed in 1887, 
The present effort is to be especially directed towards the repeal 
of the part of the law relating to cities of ten thousand inhabi- 
tants or over. This would reduce the license fee in Minneapolis 
and St. Paul from $1,000 to $500, and put these two cities on the 
same plane as other Minnesota cities. It is understood tliat the 
members of the Alliance party are not pledged to high license, 
but favor the submission to the people of a prohibitory constitu- 
tional amendment. The fortj'-two Democrats would doubtless 
favor the repeal, and if enough Alliance men can be secured a 
bill will be introduced in the Legislatui'e. 



Mr. B. R. Kitteredge, of the Sanoma Wine and Brand}' Co., 
of New York, is on the Coast on his annual visit. He reports 
that business prospects are excellent, and that the West wines 
and brandies are going better tlian ever. 



HEKE'S A PRETTg FIX. 



D Sflf^lT [REVIEW. 



Wf havf iv«-«»iv»'«l tho mihjoiiHHl i-oiiiiiimiii'iitioim fn»in Dr. 
V. A. «>iim|»t«»M. Ilif Init.-*! Stat«» <iovfriimciit Cli.-iiiist at 
Wiwhini^on. D. I'., iiw(uii|wuii'<l by u mjiit^t tliat wo k'v«' «•"' 
nutl'T imliliciitioii. WhiU- thi> vi«'W« which In- cxpri'fws ar.' 
nol ill a<'<'<inl with our own in om- or two parti<iilurs \\r piililinli 
llw K'ttvr in unlor that all niilw may have a fair Hhowiii^ in thix 
Swifl Wim- (•«introv«T>«y. Tlio li'ttor w aw follown: 
iln^n. H. M. HW/ autl (V».. I\injif M'ittf aiUI SpIrK Rerifv. San 

t)nanr'uro, Cai. 

Sim: My attontion ha»« liwii drawn to a copy of yonr jmhli- 
calion in which a|>|M>ars an artich- c<imvrnin>; Prof. Hilfr*""*' '»"*' 
niyM-ir. which ci>ntains Htat(*iiu-iitt« that arc entirely incoriitt. and 
wiiicli I Hhuiild \n' j{hid to liavc yon rc<-tify. in justice to lH)th 
Trof. HiliranI and niyM-lf. I liaVc had no disjtiitc witli the neii- 
th'man naine<i. and have held no dinn-t i'oinnniiii<'ation with him 
on any Hiil>j«-<-t whatWM-ver. The only jn^>iin<l for the exaffgenited 
HtutenieiitK in your |M|K*r. coiiHintH in the tactn that Prof, lliljrsird 
wiM< rather too liaMty in printing an attJU'k n)M>ii the a<-curacy of 
a table in the regulationH for the enforcement of the Kweet wiin* 
prti%ii*ionn of the act of October 1, IWMt. whicii table I devised 
and cali'ulatwl. He haw Hinc«> written to (\niimis«ioner MaMon 
and a|iolo)rize4l for Ihix. admitting; that the table in correct. 

Thonch r«omewhat hurt and annoyed at the action of Prof. 
HilKiird in attiu-kin^ me in a letter he wrote to the (X)nimi««ioner 
and aluo in a i*onimunication to the AwiHtaut Stn-retary of Afjri- 
eulture, yet I have had loo inueli re^r<l for his |)08iti(m and n'.p- 
utation iw a scientitic man to make any controversial reply. The 
"dispute" hiu« l>«'«>n entin'ly on one side. 

Prof, llilpinl has n>udere<l efficient anddistinguisluHl services 
to the winegrowers of California and it wvinsto methat what was 
merely an error of judgment Ujion his part should not subject 
him \o the disr(>spe4-tful treatment he has received, in the article 
in <|Ue«tiou. 

Youre Verj' Truly, 

C A. Crampton, Cliemist, 
Ofllce of Internal Eevenue, Washington, D. C, March 13, 1891. 

Dr. Crampton has had no open and public oratorical set-to 
with Pr«>f. Hilgard. it is true. Htill, Prof. Ililgard has done any 
amount of indirect fighting at the gentleman and Dr. Crampton 
lias r«'iM-at4><lly shown his ability to look after his own interests 
in that sort of liattle. 

And now comcH the funny part of the whole performance. 
Hilgjinl angrily denies that he aiKdogi/.ed, and here is our letter 
from Dr. ( rampton to the effect that he did. Hilgard has further 
liackwl up his proposition with a communication to the Chronicle 
which we rrprint for the Ix^aring it has on the case. 

Tu Ihf Fjlitnr of the ChroiiieU — SiK: In correction of the mis- 
Htatements ma<le in the telegrams sent from Washington con- 
M-ming the n'Hulti< of the invt>Htigation on the alcohol determina- 
tion ill swwt win»w. I state tliat so far as the practical outcome for 
the winemaker is concerne<l the caw stands precisely as at lii-st 
Mated, the discre|>aiicies arising from the (Jovcrnment methml, 
Muhown in the public n-<-onl. iM'ing so great as to render the 
raultH utterly untrustworthy and mischievous. The only change 
mnilting from the t.-sts is the shifting of the resiwiisibility from 
the (Soveniineiit tables niMHi the inethwl its«-lf, and this is tlio 
onir retnwtion made in my letter t<» the commissioner. It is 
difficult to conceive on what tenable ground the chemiail experts 
of the de|mrtnient eouhl n-cominend so grossly inaccmmte a pro- 
tcm for the estimation of s«i highly taxwl a sulwtanc-e as spirits, 
for every gallon of which the (Jovenimeiit t-xacts an account 
from the distiller. How the latl«'r could iK>sMibly s«|uare his ac- 
oountit under the showing nia«l<' by the sa<-chaiomet«'r inctluMl in- 
volving differeDoai ranging froin nothing to one-fifth of the 
whole, is not Rtated in the telegrams, but the Commissioners ex- 
premed intention of dis<-ardiiig it for the one n-eommended by 
me provm that a comprelieuiiioa of tlie question liasdawn<sl uiKm 
the fiowcrH that l>o. 

1'. W. HlliAKI). 

Vp to the pnwent time Dr. Crampton has decid.Hlly the 
better of the situation and we do not blame liiin for Iniiig annoyed 
and h irt at Hilganl iuti(m— it was <mly natunil that he should 
be, not knowing Hilganls as well as he is known hen-. In Cali- 



fornia where Hilgiird's '•i)Osition and reputation as a scientific 
nuin" arc tN-tt<'r understowl, it is generally the custom to ignore 
th.' .'^agc of Berkeley alt«igether. This is the policy which haa 
Ikcii found most desirable by the State Boartl of Horticulture, 
the Hoard of State Viticultural Commissioners and other bodies 
whose ctaiiding is above (luestion. 

We fail to see bow Prof. Hilgard has "rendennl oflficicnt and 
distiuguisluKl services to the wine growers of California." If Dr. 
Cnimptfin inti'nde<l that as a balm to soothe the distinguished 
Professor s ftn-lings. he will learn bt>tter next time. Hilgard is 
not the kind whose hurts are assuaged in that manner. We in 
California, are more qualified to speak of Hilgards services and 
results. He has succeeded in involving the producers in a use- 
less row with the Department ami has fostered the idea in Wash- 
ington that he represents somebody, when as a matter of fact no 
man is more cordially disliked and ignored by the Ixist wine makers 
of the State. Otherwise his sole achievement during the past 
few years has been to advocate the Pasteurization of all wines 
lx>fore shipment. We all know what this is worth, if Dr. 
Crampton does not. 

As to Dr. Crampton 's remarks concerning disrespectful treat- 
ment of Hilgsird. we have only to say that Hilgard brought it on 
himself. His passion for public notoriety — for newspaper no- 
toriety — surpasses belief to those who do not know him. He 
will go entirely out of his way and out of his province at any 
time and place, to get a paragraph or two in the papers exalting 
himself. He hindered and delayed the settlement of the sweet 
wine qu««tion, and needlessly exasperated the Internal Revenue 
Department until we concluded that the time had come to give 
him notoriety of a kind he did not crave. We have assurances 
of the hearty support of our present course from the principal 
sweet wine makers of the State and while we appreciate the 
magnanimous spirit of Dr. Crampton toward one whom he has 
so completely used up, we feel compelled to say-that the tliorough 
beating which Hilgard has received was richly earned. — Ed. 
Review. 

OUK P-ROTECTIVE ASSOCIATIO/N. 



In republishing one of our recent articles on the State Pro- 
tective Association, Mida'* Criterion says: 

It appears they have a State Protective Association in Cali- 
fornia which, according to the Pacific Wine and Spikit Review, 
seems to be so named because it does not "protect." If so, it ap' 
pears to be like its prototype, the National Protective Associa- 
tion, which seems to be in a comatose condition, and allowed to 
die out of sheer lack of energj'. 

We do not know so much about the National Protective As- 
sociation as does our friend of the Criterion, but if it is anything 
like our State Association it needs galvanizing into life. The 
California Association permittt'd the present Legislature to slip by 
without so much as turning a hand to settle the trouble over the 
license and local option issues. This was pre-eminently the - 
Ix'gislature to get such a measure through; it could have betMi , 
passed had one active man gone to the Capital and done hisj 
duty. 

We must confess we do not see what the Assoi*iation lead< i 
have been thinking of to have allowed the matter to lapse througli 
inaction: probably it was because everybotly's business is no-, 
lH>dy's business. 

SEE MH. -HAy/NE. 



We take pleasure in re-publishing the following "ad" which 
recently appeare<l in Bonfori*: 

WANTED. 
White nr red wliu>K <-lH-*t> cnouKli for vincK*r msklnf;. Oknesh Fbmt i' - 
fAWY, lis Wurn-n Sirwl, Ni-w York. 

Why not stn; Mr. HayneV Ho will sell at "auction" cheaji 
enough for the puriMSO. 



f/reifie WIJ^E j^^Q Sfll^lT (REVIEW. 



Cincinnati X^'^f^T^^'"^^'^^' 

[regular correspondence] 

Various causes have arisen of late wliich produced a rather 
dull market. Tlie stringency of the money market, the general 
dullness of business throughout* the country together with unfa- 
vorable spring weather, causing bad roadSj and the unchecked pro- 
duction of '9l8 are no doubt the causes of the present dullness. 

Nineties have gone somewhat backward in value; '898 are 
not as firm as they were and '88s are at a stand-still. However 
we must expect at this season of the year, just at the beginning 
of Spring, a retrograde movement, and when Spring is fairly upon 
us, we have no doubt the uneasiness of values will have passed 
away and better prices will be maintained, especially for older 
goods. 

The trade has been.complaining of slow collections in tlii j sec- 
tion and business is not as brisk as they anticipated, which nat- 
urally produces an inactivity in the market. 

In what we have said as to the cause of this drop in the val- 
ue of whiskies, we have spoken plainly and put the responsibility 
where it belortgs — on the distillers who are running when they 
should not ruu, thereby depreciating the values of goods made 
previous to this time. 

The united action of the distillers of Keutucky and Pennsyl- 
vania, as well as the trade, should be taken towards making but 
a half crop of goods, in place of making an unlimited quantity as 
they are doing at present. 

Mr. George Dieterly, Secretary of the Union Distilling Co., 
has bought Mr. H. H. Lipelman's interest in the firm. 

Mr. Charles Robert, of "Rolling Fork" fame, called on 
the trade this last week. 

Mr. H. Hahn, of L. Sonenschem & Co., wholesale dealers of 
Chicago was introduced on change the last fortnight. 

Mr. Victor E. Tagliaferro, who represents the American 
Champagne Company of California and New York, was seen at 
the Gibson House and said he succeeded in placing in one whole- 
sale house in this city three hundred cases of his brand, "Reihlen 
Extra Dry." 

Mr. Culbert, of Culbert & Taylor, importers, New York, 
spent a week with us. So from the stay he made, Cincinnati 
business must have been good. 

J. T. Megibben Jr., of the T. J. Megibben Co., called. He 
tells the trade his firm will only make a small crop of '91s and 
has placed nearly all of it. 

Mr. Joseph Wolf, broker, of Chicago, was on change this 
week and was very successful in placing several lots of whiskies. 

Mr. Harry Traub, known on the road as "The Adonis," and 
Eastern representative of J. & A. Freiberg, returned home after 
an absence of six weeks. He says trade is not very brisk but he 
got his share of business. 

Mr. John Horn has charge of the Cincinnati office of the 
Louisville Bulletin and will welcome all callers. 

Mr. Bullitt, of Bullitt & Gilmore, brokers, Louisville, was 
with us last week. 

Duke (George) Washburn, of the Wine and Spirit Bulletin, 
has opened an office at 113 Sycamore street. So far nothing but 
hydrant water is the beverage offered to callers. 

Mr. Louis Poock has been confined to his home with La 

Grippe, but Lou has not lost his grip on the trade and has sold 

several good sized lots of "Mattingly" and "Honeymoon." 

^. Shaw. 

Cmomnati, March 21, 1891. 



A CHA/NCE FOn "OLD KgE." 

The announcement that Messrs. H. H. Livingston, of the 
Thompson Distillery Company, Clarence Hoffheimer, of Hoff- 
heimer Bros., and Charles Jacobs, of the Sunnyside Company, are 
all on the way to this Coiwt in the interest of the brands of rye 
whisky which they handle, is one which promises very satisfac- 
tory results for the future of the trade in ryes. 

Up to the present time the Pacific Coast has not borne a very 
high reputation as a market for ryes. The first whiskies which 
were sold here were the compounded bourbons. An evolution is 
going on in the trade which is resulting in the displacement of 
these goods by blended whiskies, and straight whiskies are daily 
finding new friends. 

The leading merchants such as A. P. Hotaling & Co., 
Moore, Hunt & Co., Naber, Alfs & Brune, Siebe Bros. & Plage- 
mann,^ Carroll & Carroll and others have had fine success with 
the best class of goods, the last named firm however, inclining to 
straight whiskies more than the others. It is believed by many 
of the merchants that were the best ryes properly introduced 
and pushed, they would make theu- own friends exactly as the 
best bourbons have done. 

The fact of the matter is that consumers in this western half 
of the continent have not had nearly the chance to learn to like 
and call for a fine rye, as have the eastern consumers. The 
standard bourbon brands are known but the consumer does not 
know the ryes. 

This is a state of affairs which the rye distillers propose to 
revolutionize. They understand full well that from Denver to 
San Francisco and from Seattle to San Diego, there is a splendid 
field for these goods, now scarcely occupied at all. It is safe to 
say that in all that vast expanse of territory — and it is a territory 
which is fully capable of absorbing in a ratio greatly in excess of 
the per capita consumption of the United States — not to exceed 
one barrel out of every forty sold, is rye whisky. Compare that 
with the records of Pennsylvania, Maryland and all the older 
States, and the rye distillers will see what enormous possibilities 
are before them. 

HIGH LieE/NCE BEATE/N. 



High license has been smashed in San Jose by a vote of fivfl 
to three in the City Council. The fight will have to be made 
all over again as the license people announce that they wilF make 
license an issue at the next election. 

We are not a little amused at the declaration of the San Jose 
Herald to the effect that the people of San Jose will rise in their 
might and "wipe the liquor traffic out of existence" unless its own 
particular cure-all is applied in the place. The idea of Prohibi- 
tion, which don't prohibit — in a city in Northern California — is 
in itself a jest. It will not do, even if our friend of the Herald 
thinks that it will. The people ot San Jose are not of the hide-- 
bound sort — ^not at all. 



PARTN ER WA NTED. 

A reliable party with $4,000 to $5,000 capital, wanted to take 
an uitercst m a well established winery hi Fresno County. For 
lurther particulars apply at this office. 



T-RABE emeciLA-Rs. 

Cincinnati, March, 189L 
The high standard of excellence that oiu- goods have at- 
tained is due entirely to the patient, assiduous and unremitting 
care of the constant perfecting of our line exclusively for the 
wholesale trade, together with the most scrupulous attention to 
the endless details connected with the manufacture of high grade 
liquors. None but the most skillful and careful scientific people 
are employed, the result being that each and every article wo 
manufacture, when completed, will bear the critical test of the 
most exacting. 

All business in the territory of Illinois, Minnesota, Wiscon- 
sin and Michigan, our Mr. I. Altman, 12 and 14 North Clark St., 
Chicago, will i)orsonally superintend, and will esteem it a pleas- 
ure to call upon you. Respectfully, 

MiHALoviTCH, Fletcher & Co. 



^Q f^eifie wl^lE ;^j^ 

PI^OMIMEMT WI/VJE ME/^ 



D Sflf^lT F^EVIEW. 



• ^Bk U 




SktUb No. 2. Isaac D« Turk of Santa Rosa. 



Few. if any men among the California wine producers or 
nicrf hanU. are better known to the trade eaat and west, than 
Imuic I)e Turk, the subject of this sketch. 

Mr. Do Turk ha« achieve<l in the few years that he has been 
placing his win** on the market, under his own name, a most 
enviable name, and has established a reputation second to none 
for the ex<-»'llence of his gootls. 

Mr. De Turk is a IV-nnsylvanian by birth but is descended 
from an old French family. He was bom in Berks County in 
IJCM and wh«Mi a m»-re l>oy his parents moved to Morgan County 
ludiaua. l(K»ting alxnit thirty miles east of Indianapolis. From 
the time he was Ave years old, until attaining years of manhood 
he s|»ent his life" as <Ud all of the boys of the period, at- 
tending the district school in the'day time and doing the farm 
boy druilger}- mornings and evenings. 

He started for Califtmiia in 1M.'>K and arriviil in the stat« 
October l»Uh of that year. The first year of his residence was 
*pent in traveling from one s«>ction to another l(K>king for a de- 
idnible plaw to locat4'. Finally in I WJ he d*>cided upon So- 
.noma county as his plac** of residena^ and bought a ranch 
near Hanta Kosa. In \W2 he S4>t out twenty acres of 
vineyard which was suliHe<|uently increas***! to thirty acres and 
then to fifty. His first vintage aggnyated only 10,000 or 15,000 
gallons. Iiut he wion entered the l)UHin<'SH more extensively and 
U^gan buying grape* ftt>m his neiglilxtrs. 

Year by year his business under (".ireful niiuingenu-nt, gradu- 
ally aMwmed larger pro)>ortioiut. His will' aim in t lieM<> y(>ars of 
experiment and hardest work waa to phmIuim' a iM-tter wine than 
hifl neighbors* for at that time he had not liniiichefl out as exten- 
idvely as now. In 1K78 the growing dcmnmlH <>f his trade made 
it imperative for him t4> supplant his wiuerv* in tlie eiiunlrv with 
a lai^ger one in Kantji Roita and a few years afterward another 
one waa built at Cloverdale. It was not found wise however to 



M r .he busim^s over too much territory and after a few years 
;i:i tL ClovenJe winer,- w^ sold and the plant at.Santa Rosa 

""' rMl"T^Lng«. came lat*r when the vineyard interest was at 
•. ... four vears ago. The original vineyard m liennett 
'C,.:;' whtl. wL Tt o^t in I8«2, was .>ld and a still larger one 
i„ I^,H(;uilieos Valley was purchased. 

Mr I)e Turks iM)sition in the wine industry is founde<l on 
,he r.Mk of solid merit. His establishment is one w-hich leaves 
„.„l,i„,, to Ik- desireil. Aside from the vineyard in the Los Gud- 
ieos Valley which alone couUinsone hundred acres, he has one 
.,f the n.ost complete wineries in the state at Santa Rosa, where 
,he pnKlu.t of his own vineyanl is made up as well as a large 
proportion of the grapes from the vineyards of the dujtrict. The 
annual pnKluction of wine is not short of 300,000 gallons. There 
is e.H)iH-rage for atout 600,000 gallons while the total capacity of 
the vaults were all the room utilized, would be 1 ,000,000 gallons. 
Mr I)e Turk is one of the firmest believers in the policy of 
placing wines on the market in glass. He believes that the very 
key note of success in the industry for all time to come is in 
the cased goocls and repeatedly states that were he in a position 
to do so, not one drop of his best wine would go out in bulk. His 
motto for five years past, for which time he has been extensively 
in the cased goods trade, has been the single word "Bottle." 

His business connections are extensive and "De Turk's 
Wine" in Chicago and New York is a synonym for excellence 
and merit. He has an establisliment at 212 Sacramento street in 
this city which is ably managed by Mr. C. M. Mann. In Cliicago 
his agents are Delafield, McGovem & Co.; in New Orleans he is 
represented by Graham & Boswew and his New York agency i>- 
ably handled. His wines are known and esteemed wherever the 
California product is sold in America. 

Personally Mr. De Turk is a rather quiet, reserved man but 
who is at the same time forcible and decisive in his speech 
and action. Integrity and honesty are his cardinal virtues. To 
those who have not the privilege of knowing him personally th< 
merits of his wines into which he throws all his abilities, are the 
best indications of his character. In his quiet circle at Santa 
Rosa no man stands higher and none could stand higher in pub- 
lic esteem. 

Mr. De Turk has never married. Like most men who have 
been successful in life, and still remain in business, he has his 
outside hobby and with him it is horses. On the trotting 
circuit in California he has achieved a remarkably good reputa- 
tion and last season his winnings were very large. He is the 
owner of the trotting stallion Silas Skinner, 2:19, and others of 
less note. His stable at Santa Rosa near his winerj' is the wonder 
of the county, not only for the fine stock which it contains, but 
for its convenience and adaptability for its purpose. Altogether 
there are about fifty high bred horses in his stables, many of 
them being by the famous trotting stallion Anteeo, 2:16|, which 
recently sold at auction for 85.5,000 and later at private sale for 
$G0,0O0; and indtMid up to a short time ago Mr. De Turk was one 
of the owners of that famous animal. Business can never be too 
pressing for him to refrain from talking "horse" or condemning 
the poor California roads which forbid fiist driving to the owners 
of fine horses. 

Mr. De Turk has never held but one public office — that of 
Vitieultural Commissioner for tJie Sonoma District. Nomina- 
tions to various positions have been oflfered him, but always in 
vain. In 18«7 when Mr. Arpad Haraszthy retired from tlie Vit- 
ieultural Commission and the Presidency of the body at the 
same time, Mr. De Turk was made Vice-President of the Com- 
mission, to succeed Mr. Charles A. Wetmore who ha<l In'on 
elected President. In 1890, when Mr. Wetmore retire<l, Mr. 
De Turk succeeded to the Presidency and still holds the office. 

HubscrilHj for the Pacific Wine and Spirit Review, the 
only wine and liquor trade paper west of Chicago. 



^nly J^QUCi ^dveTtissments Qn ^Ms ^ags. 



11 



H. BRUNHILD & CO. 

323 PEARL STREET, NEW YORK. 

sole: jPs.g;.h:]s[ts in TEiE xjisriTED stjPs-this for. 



Gebruder Eckel, - - Deidesheim, 
H. Eckel <Sc Co., - - Champagne 
Riuz, Mata & Co., - - Sherries 
Blankenheym & Nolet (Centaur) - Gin 



Rhine, Moselle and Pfalzer Wines 
J. Dupont & Co., - - Cognac 
Chr. Motz & Co., Bordeaux, Clarets dtSauternes 
Archannbeaud Freres, Bordeaux - Cordials 



jPs-LSO I3XrP=OP2.TEI=2.S OF" 
RAMSAY SCOTCH WHISKY; OTARD, DUPUY & CO., BRANDY; OPORTO AND 'TARRAGONA 

PORTS AND BURGUNDY WINES. 

OHVERS FOR niRECT IMPORTATION SOLICITED. PACIFIC COAST BRANCH 414 FRONT ST., SAN FRANCISCO. 



S. GLASER. Manager. 



A WO-RTHy MOVEME/NT. 



A Step WMcli Will Benefit Injporters and Domestic Wipe 

Producers. • 



The local importers, and to a less degree the California wine 
men are taking considerable interest in the movement to have the 
Internal Revenue Department assume the responsibility of protect- 
ing consumers from the numerous frauds which are now perpe- 
trated upon them, in the way of selling goods under false foreign 
labels. The matter was first agitated by the New York "Wine 
and Spirit Traders Society and protection was asked against the 
successful counterfeits of many brands of champagne. Commis- 
sioner Mason in reply notified the society that tlue persons who 
use the words "From France," "From Germany," etc., etc., on 
any domestic article, champagne or what not, could and would 
be proceeded against under Section 3449, R. S., which reads: 

"Whenever any person ships, transports, or removes any 
spirituous or fermented liquors or wines, under any other than 
the proper name or brand known to the trade as designating the 
kind and quality of the contents of the casks or packages con- 
taining the same, or causes such act to be done, he shall forfeit 
said liquors or wines and casks or packages, and be subject to 
pay a fine of five hundred dollars. 

It is a satisfaction to know that the society in question pro- 
poses to follow up the fraudulent dealers. The importers of San 
Francisco are large contributors to the revenue of the Govern- 
ment and it is equally to their interest to see that their brands 
are protected. Should the Commissioner of Internal Revenue be 
unable to proceed to the necessary lengths under the law now in 
force, new legislation should be secured which will cover all 
possible cases. This is a duty which the importers owe to them- 
selves and to the public. 

The extent to which this fraudulent traffic under false labels 
is carried on in this country is beyond belief. Take the case of 
wines alone. Many houses in New York offer to sell bottled 
wines without labels for $2.25 per dozen and the goods, once in 
the hands of jobbers are labeled to suit. In every large city are 
establishments where "skeletons" can be had. For instance we 
select at random the catalogue of the "Chicago Specialty Box 
Company" 226 and 228 East Kinzie street, Chicago, and among 
the offerings we find are those of "skeletons." Under the title 
of "Brandy Skeletons" the following information is given, which 
we give free of cost to the Company. 

"Brandy Skeletons — Contain Twelve Imported French Cog- 
nac Bottles, Branded Corks, Stamped Caps, Imported Labels, 
Tissue Paper, Straw Covers. Boxes neatly-printed or branded. 
We carry every imaginable brand in this line. If desired we 
furnish Bottle Wires at a small additional cost, and also put up 
this skeleton in pints !" 

Accompanying the announcement is a cut of a sample case 



bearing the brand "Latour et fils. Cognac." 

Admirable plan ! 

Under the Caption "Claret Skeletons" is this inscription — 
"Contain Twelve Imported French Claret Bottles, Fine Imported 
Caps and Labels, Corks, Tissue Paper, Straw Covers, and Boxes 
neatly-printed or branded, and if desired, chestnut straps are 
furnished free of any extra charge." The case accompanying 
bears the stock inscription "Pontet Canet" and the name of Jules 
Hegis & Co., Bordeaux. 

Under the caption of "Rhine Wine Skeletons" is a full de- 
scription of a similar outfit and a case bearing the inscription of 
"Niersteiner." 

Now does any one doubt for one instant what these "skele- 
tons are used for. We admit that some imported wines are 
brought to this country in bulk, but the relative quantity is small 
considering that only one gallon in ten drunk in the United States is 
imported wine. There cannot be the slightest question but that 
these skeletons have their greatest use in concealing the identity 
of California wines. This is not a new story, either. In fact it 
is a very, very old one. 

The counterfeiting of labels and the sale of wine under false 
labels is not by any means a rarity even in this blessed State. 
It is only recently that the defunct firm of Bamberger & Kaempfer 
was worsted for counterfeiting the Martell Brandy label. Only 
a week ago the writer saw another clever imitation of the Mar- 
tell label displayed in the window of a small house. The label 
bore the name of a fictitious house in "Cognac" and stupidly 
enough had a small imprint of a local printing establishment at- 
tached. Time and again we see bungling imitations. In the 
window of one of the most prominent restaurants over in Oak- 
land there are displayed various bottles of wine. Among the 
others are several quart and pint Bhine wine boUles hearing flaring 
labels "Haiit Sauterne, Bordeaux !" Just imagine offending a 
Frenchman's taste and sense of national honor by professing to 
have a Sauterne in a Rhine wine bottle. Labels such as "Pontet 
Canet," "St. Julien," "St. Estephe," "Chateau La Tour," etc., 
etc., are numerous, all being on cheap American bottles. 

It is to be hoped that the Internal Revenue Department will 
take hold of this matter in earnest. The importers will gain 
immensely in their business if this is done and the interests of 
the California wine and brandy men will at the same time be 
greatly aided. 

A man who has practiced medicine for forty years, ought to know Bait from 
sugar; read what he says: 

Toledo, O., Jan. 10. 1887. 

Messrs. F. J. Cheney & Co. — Gentlemen- I have been in the general practice 
of medicine for most forty years, and would say that in all my practice and ex- 
perience, have never seen a preparation that I could prescribe with as much con- 
fidence of success as I can Hall's Catarrh Cure, manufactured by you. Have 
prescribed it a great many times aud its effect is wonderful, and would say in 
conclusion that I have yet to find a case of Catarrh that it would not cure, if they 
would take it according" to directions. Yours trulv, 

L. L. GORSUCH, M. D., 

Office, 21.5 Summit St. 

We will give flOO for any case of Cartarrh that cannot be cured with Hall's 
Catarrh Cure. Taken internally. F. J. CHENEY & Co., Props., Toledo. O. 

JJ^Sold by Druggists, 75c. 



12 



j^lfie WI^IE /rJ^D SflF^IT R.EVIEW. 



^rado J/otcs. 



B. II. Taylor Jr. nml J. Knip-rt Tiivl<»r. of K. U. Tiiylur Jr. 
1^ Hnaii have guui' !•• Mi>ri<ln !•> n-4-u|M-ruto. 

flarviKv H<»fnipinM<r, «»f HofllHiiniT Bnin.. in uiiKinK the 
vWkm r*|«>c»«>«l in Iho wmrm' «f a fi-w w««t'ki». 

II. 11. i4vinjp»l<in. of th«« Tliom|iHoii I>ij«tillinK t'o.. of TilU*- 

borit. P«» . *«H »""'" '»' '"■"' "' •''*' '"♦♦■•^■'•^ "'^ ■•'*""' '"' I"*"" 

Ryr." 

ArtMwl llnnwailiy & Co. havf nwivwl tlu'ir Bilvor intHliil 
whirli tkiii* iiw«r«l.'<l tothi'in at the TariH Kx|K»Hition an well an a 
handwMiK* (iijiloina. 

Charley K<»th. tif Moore ft Relllger. i» on the Coast on hiH 
•aniuU trip, lie >« i\'»n» »«•'• «''•» "AHtor." •IVlmont" aii.l 
"Nutwood." Huch whinkii* di»«erve roiuly riH-oguition and sale. 

(herheard at a well-known wine vault :— " HereV BOine fine 
old Madeira— 171IO vintage." " Yuiinji man, I may look plain. 
but ver n«<«"*ln't try no He<-ond-hand ilrink on me. Gimme 1W>0, 
an' a clean bottle, or gimme nuthin'." 

Moore, Hunt & Co. received an unuaually large <|uantity of 
"Jcwe Mootv • whinky in February. The nhip CyruH Wakefield 
brought in 15y liam-N and the rail imiK)rtn were sixty iMirrels. 
KUll the HUpply doeu not e«iual the deman«l for the»e fine old 
goodii. 

Winfield Scott, Se<retary of the State Vitienltural Commiw- 
■ioners. haa receive*! from Se<ntary of State Blaine, a prize fac- 
ainiile of the (Jold Medal awanlwl the Comniiwion at the Paris 
ExpoMtion. for brandies. A handnome diploma eame with the 
medal. 

C. M. Mann, the active local manag«>r of I. De Turk, is doing 
well with the F^irtem trade. R^n-t'nt Hhipments included 255) 
barrela and many cane** of wine. Mr. Mann is a rustler and were 
he t«> go eant he would Huri»rise some of the members of the trade 
there. ^__ 

The diffieultien into wliich the firm of F. Mandlebaum & 
Co., wert' plunged by the extnivagance of "Diek" Mandlebaum 
have been iiettle<l. The firm has dissolvtHl an<l hereafter the 
boainen will Ik> eonduetod by F. Mandlebaum wlie has the best 
I of thin trade. 



Lachman & Jacobi Imve bought over 1,500,000 gallons of 
wine from interior eellars during the paxt six we«'ks, paying good 
prkxw. The Uix«*t single purehane was the 4(H»,000 gallon lot 
■eenrad from the lJ<»urn cellar of St. Helena. Fred Jacobi re- 
IMirtK that buHinem is prospering. 

AUtut 700 liam>ls of California winett in warchoum' at \o. 
94 North M<x»re trtrw-t, belonging to l{amb«'rgt'r & Kaempfer, of 
Han Francisco, wen* sold by the sheriff on the 7th inst., l)y virtue 
of neverul attaebnientH granti'd by .Judg^ Ingruham, of the 
Ku|tn!me Court. — M'inr ami Sfiirit (iazfUr. 

Mr. II. W. (>abb, of To-Kalon fame, although established 
in Chicago but a comiMiratively short time, has already <>btaine<l 
a reputation Mvtmil to none in his s|M-eialty of California wines, 
and with the pntM-nt prosiN^-ts he bids fair to make a great sue- 
I of it in thin city.— Jlirfo'* VrUerion. 



Memnt. Mihaloviteh, Met<-licr & Co., of Cincinnati, have 
•oqnired the sole control for the l°nit<*4l Stati-s, except Pennsyl- 
vania and iialtimore, of the culebrate<l " Ik-lle of NelHon " (in 
caww). which isguamnte<Hl to Im> ten years old, Itottled at, shipiHHl 
and billed direct from the diotillery to buyers. 

C. Iloltum & (To., have Mold out their old stand <m Kansome 
street and ha« mov<Nl all their buaineaa to the new and handsome 
quart«ra at Find and Miaaion atreete. BosineM* pruwHMl them so 



tlijit til.. (Mi.-.nti at ion. >rtlieir cellars waadeemed best. They have 
1^,^ lakitiga >,'r.at bid for jtublic Civor lately and are doing well. 

----- ^ 

\\ .• Iia\.- n-.-.iv.<l uotificsition from Messrs. S;inder8on & Co., 
..rciii.a;:... that tli.'ir s.-ni«>r partner Alfred .'Ninderstm has been 
very ill. llic 1- cliruary numlu'i-s of our valueil contemporaiy, the 
H»w.rii Hrukrr were in «mse<iuence omitted. We are sorry to 
hear .>r Mr. San.i.Tsons illness and trust that it will not l)e of 
long I'on tin uancc. 

Ki>!l> & Denhanl are having remarkable success in introduc- 
ing the •• Nonpareil " whisky. It is making headway against the 
iM-st t-stabilslied of the older brands. The detnand for the whis- 
ky is not only due to the fact that it is produced by one of the 
iM-st ilistilh-ries of Kentucky, but e<iually as well to the energy with 
which it is p\ished liy the young men of the firm. 

"Davy (Vocketf — frontiersman and judge of goo<l whisky. 
That wiw long ago; now it is "Davy Crockett" — fine old whisky. 
The well-known firm of lley, Grauerholz & Co. which handles 
this well-known brand, is having a fine spring trade. The whis- 
ky comes dir.^ct from the old Blue Grass region, and Messrs. Hey, 
(}rauerholz & Co. are meeting with a fine demand for it. 

Mr. II. W. Mclntyre, of Vina, Cal., on his way from the 
Ejist made a visit of a couple of days in this city, establishing 
busini»ss ccmnections which we have no doubt will prove remun- 
erative and will tend largely to popularize the excellent cla.ss of 
goods which his house offers, and at the same time extend the 
reputation of California's best products. — Midd't Criterion. 

The Southern Pacific Company has reduced the cjirload rate 
on wine from St. Helena to San Francisco from $26.00 to $2.3.50 
l>er carload. This was done on account of a disparity of rate 
from St. Helena and from Bello. But the rates from St. Helena, 
Bello and Rutherford are still unequal when distance is consid- 
eretl and another attempt is to be made to secure an equalization. 



The receipts of brandy from the interior have lately been 
very heavy and the bonded warehouse men are consequently in 
good humor. Messrs. Bode & Haslett are doing particularly well. 
Their facilities for storage are appreciated by the leading pro- 
ducers; their rates are low and the brandy which leaves their 
warehouse can be relied upon as having been stored to the best 
advantage for improvement. The firm is deservedly successful 
and popular. 

H. Brunhild & Co. are making a big hole in the Pacific Coast 
trade with their lino of imported goods. The local agent of this 
well-known New York house, is S. Ghiser who has an office at 
414 Front street. The firm is agent for Gebruder Eckel, Deides- 
heim Rhine wines; H. Eckel & Co., champagne; J. Dupont & Co., 
Cognac: Riuz. .>[ata & Co., sherries; Blaukenheym & Nolet's gins; 
Chr. Motz & Co., clarets and Sauternes; Archambeaud Frores, 
cordials; and also import Ramsay Scoth whisky, Otard, Dupuy & 
Co's. brandy, and a full line of port, sherries and other wines. 

Through the kindness of Messrs. Grierson, Oldham &Co., of 
London, .Mr. George (Carroll, of Carroll & Carroll, has been en- 
abltnl to wnd the Vitienltural Commissioners a case of the best 
Port for exaininati(m and tasting. It will be remembered that 
when Mr. Oldham was in California he criticizctl our Ports, 
Sherries and other fortifitnl wines very freely indeed and sjiid 
that he would take occsision to send out a case of Port which 
might b<^ considered a sample of what sort of wine suited the 
English taste. The wine is exciH'dingly dry and in all respects a 
remarkable one. 

Mr. M(H> Edinger, of Edinger Bros. & Jacobi. N'ew York, 
has ma(U' a very successful trip to the West during the current 
season, and has wendeil his way honieward in his usual happy 
frame of mind. The figures recently published in the CriUrion, 
of the large shipments of I.4ichman & Jacobi, of San Francisco, 
the finn with which E<linger Bros, and Jacobi are affiliated, re- 



f/reiFie WIJSIE /fJ^D Sfif^lT f^EVlEW. 



i3 



fleet the highest credit upon both firms. And such a record 
could be accomplished only after years of unremitting attention 
to business, giving their customers entire and perfect satisfaction. 

— Mida's Criterion. 

The most famous Madeira ever known was the " 1814 pipe." 
It was fished up from the bottom of the Scheldt, a short distance 
above Finishing, in 1814, having remained there since 1778 in a 
ship which had been wrecked at the mouth of the river in that 
year. It was sold by auction at Antwerp, the greatest portion of 
it having been secured for Louis XVIII., who despatched an 
agent with instructions to secure it regardless of expense. Sev- 
eral dozen were presented to the French Consul at Antwerp, 
which he sold to the Due de Raguse. In 1858 after the death of 
the Duchess de Eaguse, four dozen remained in her cellars, and 
they were sold for something over their weight in gold to Baron 
Rothschild. 

Mr. Swigert Taylor, the junior of the Old .Taylor Jr., has 
recently paid a flying visit to Chicago, and put in solid work 
where it would do most good. Of Swigert it may truly be said 
that he is a hustler from away back, and he can do more work 
aivl see more parties in one single day in Chicago than the great 
majority of his seniors could do in a week. He Avas accompanied 
on his tour by Mr. John Meagher, of Frankfort, who, although 
not universally known as a dealer, has been handling whiskies 
almost from boyhood, and is thoroughly conversant with all the 
minute phases in that line. — ilida'g Criterion. 

The following extract from a letter received during his re- 
cent Western trip, by Mr. Barrett, of Barrett & Co., New York, 
the well-known prune juice firm, from the home office, on Feb- 
ruary 28th, speaks more eloquently of the steady increase of 
their trade than any words that we can use :_ " With all our 
modern improvements we have difficulty in keeping up with 
orders. We have shipped this month more than double the 
amount in February, 1890, and exactly five times as much as in 
February, 1889, and we have orders on our books for as much as 
we shipped in February, 1890, waiting for the opening of navi- 
gation. 

Among the firms devoted to the interest of pure California 
wines, the Napa Valley Company stands firstamong the leaders for 
the fine grades of goods they carry in stock. This firm originated 
in St. Louis, and gradually grew to such proportions that they 
ibund it indispensable for their Eastern trade to start also a 
Ijranch house in California, whence they can readily distribute 
their product. The company handles wine in cases and in bulk. 
Devoting, however, their attention mainly to fine grades of 
goods they make a specialty of case goods. Such firms as the 
Napa Valley Wine Company are doing a grand work for the 
popularization of California wines among the masses, for each case, 
as it reaches the consumer or the medical faculty, carries with 
it the conviction that for wholesomeness one need seek 
no further, but should seek only the right firm to get it from. 
For the best and most wholesome wine that may be required for a 
beverage or stimulant we can confidently recommend the Napa 
Valley Wine Company of San Francisco and St. Louis, to the 
entire trade. — Mida's Criterion. 



Taylor' s C ircular. 

FKAidCFORT, Ky., February 28, 1891. 
■ To the miolesale Whisky Trade: — With this issue we present 
tables showing the status of whisky in Kentucky on January 
31st ultimo, viz: The bonded stocks of the three seasons of '88, 
'S9 and '90, the production of the '91 crop, as compared with 
that for the same period last season, and the bonded stocks of 
the said '91 manufacture. 

BONDED STOCKS Of '88s, '89s AND '90s. 



'88e. 


'896, 


'90s. 


Total. 


Ill bond Dec. 31, '90 2.162,2SS 


16.4:«,942 


31,638,451 


,50,240,626 frals. 


Uubouded iu Jan., 2nd Dist. 3,286 


53,187 


32,300 


88,77:^ " 


5th " 54,175 


166,328 


310,096 


530,599 ■' 


6th " 32,973 


58,r38 


121,347 


213,057 " 


7th " 77,203 


63,478 


21,700 


152,:«1 " 


8th " 12,980 


72,563 


10,300 
495.74.3 


95,843 '• 


Total 180,616 


404,294 


1,080.653 gals. 


Leaving in bond Jan. 31, '91.. 1,981,617 


16,035,648 


31,142,708 


49,159,973 gaU. 



PRODUCTION '91 CROP. 

On December Slst the production had assumed ' 

the proportion of. ...8,596,860 gals. 

to which we add the production for January: 

2nd District 458,804gal8. 



5th 
6th 
7th 
8th 



.2,146.891 " 



664,015 " 
646,813 " 
837,734 " 4,754,257 " 



Making total production to Jan. 31st of '91 crop 13,351,117 " 
For tlie same period of the '90 crop the production was 

In July, '89 801,630 gals. 

In August, '89 304,558 " 

In September, '89 288,404 " 

In October, '89 767,.397 " 

In Jf ovember, '89 2,428,740 " 

In December, '89 .....3,937,850 " 

In January, '90 4,488,555 " 13,017,134 " 



or an increase in '91 crop for first seven months 333,983 " 

BONDED STOCKS OF '91 CROP. 

There remained in bond on December 3l8t 7,613,379 gals. 

to which we add the production for January 

above shown 4^ 754 257 " 



, , , 12,367,636 gals, 

and subtract the withdrawals for Januaiy, viz: 

2nd District 46,098 gals. 

5th " 120,008 " 

6th " 58,735 " 

7th « 11,428 " 

8tli " 1,430 " 236,699 gals. 



leaving in bond on January 31, '91 12,130,937 gals. 

Without any intention to enlarge on the statistical situation 
shown in the foregoing tables, we beg to direct the especial atten- 
tion of the trade to the fact that, notwithstanding the unpreceden- 
ted proportion of the crop of '89-'90, the output for the present sea- 
son, to January 31st ultimo, as compared with the former, shows 
an increase of some three hundred and odd thousand gallons. 

This increased production is in the face of the extreme high 
price of grain, which high price, it was argued at the beginning 
of the season, would have the tendency to keep manufactur*} with- 
in reasonable bounds, combative to which we took, in our Circu- 
lar of August last, the following position, which the time seems 
to have verified: 

" One optimist says: 'But the com crop will prevent excesses.' 
We think the indications are that the probable price of com will 
figure little in the present crop. The crop of com, with an ordi- 
narily favorable future, will be a good one — not the redundant one 
of last year, but a good one. In Kentucky it is an unusually 
good crop. The cry of short crop is as yet premature. 

"The smaller crop will have more value, and will, for that 
reason, be better cared for, and will go farther. The 'Wichita 
Eagle' takes in and humorously illustrates our idea when it says: 
"It took five bushels of corn to get into a circus in Kansas last 
summer. This summer you can get into the main t«nt, stay to 
the concert, go to the side show and get a picture of the Cfrcassian 
beauty all for one bushel.' 

With this attractive purchasing power, no corn will , be 
burned in Kansas. 

We have distillers in Kentucky and elsewhere, who will 
manufacture at any price, and take any chances whatever, and 
the encouragement extended them by the dealer, the past season, 
measurably justifies them. 

To-day grain is yet higher than was then anticipated, and is 
daily advancing, and still overproduction continues unabated. 
Your obedient servants, 

E. H. Taylor Jr., & Sons, 

Frankfort, Ky, 



14 



f;^e\flQ WI|^E /r/^B SflK.1T f^EVIEV^. 



EXPORTS AND IMPORTS 

DURING THE PAST FORTNIGHT. 



CXPORTS OF WINE. 



to XKW fOMC »l« PA!<A«A"P«« HT». CiTT or K«w VoM. Han h IX.2«i»[ 
ftMirrta*. rujiTKiiT*. uALUixk valii. 



>L 

Kla t*m. 
JTC .... 

■ I 

OHO a. 

o 



F Borriu 
i M Oo« 
AQiw 






i*r 

ML* Co 

O MrO * Oe. 

NM 

K. PHI 

TM. 

Cte 

A JOo 

OABAOo. 

' P BnM. HobokM. . . 

JF 

>D*Oo 

ra 

Ala«*. 

B P 

Sladto 

B*Bla«a. 

r A 

H S, Wwl BobokM. 

or 

E H 

FBABMl 



Sbairela. 
nhorrrl*. 



Naps Vallr; Wlnr l'<> 
J llamtlu-b di <<> 



Co...»bt>U I hfl«rrrl 
III liliU.t hf-bbln . 



Koklct A PrublloK.. 

H l.aetiinan A <*»- . 

I'al Wlnr Oruw'a CnkmlMl l«rrrU... 



'S harrrU 

211 UrrrU ( 

.1 liMibln S 

til rttr* 

: lai barreU 
;IUU bairrU 



Umcl A Cu... 



IoUot a Tm Btfjcn. 

KUUc 

BarioKf Bnia 

a HlKliavarra 

Oaakr I.«n<-rl A Co. . . 
BUrvjrloaACu 



IjM-liM^n A Jacobt. 



A Domeolponi. 
MtocclUneoa* 



1 IwrirU I 

10 bf-lwrrrl S 

SbarirU 

IMbarrrU 

U barrri* 

7 harrrU 

M barrvit 

SO barrel* 

IM tiarrrU 

U tutrrele 

to barrels 

IS barrrU 

85 barrcl< 

4U barrebk 

25 bairrU... ... 

» barrria 

ISbarirb 

12 barrel* 

13 liarrel* 

00 barrels 



1.375 
W, 

liii; 
■ivi 

10, 1 v: 



TMd 



I0< 



6.54a 
4,tH4 

4.»7:i 

.V4I 

158 

O.NII-. 

4:(4 

:u.'> 

2,.V,'l 
■,'.4i».'. 
7.4«V.'i 
8.211 
l.(»27 
770 

2.0711 

1.29U 

1,288 

8l» 

815 

718 

8,0(» 



81 H 
21(,«l 

jni 
:t4ii 

aiH 

8,.'>2fi 
40 
4,57» 
2.IIIIII 
I.IUI 

*<1 

MO 

8.4110 

l.Vi 

IIUI 

8.VI 

U85 

1,700 

l,2IM 

357 

280 

400 

718 

4O0 

400 

819 

271 

2(2 

800 



00,843 27,853 



TO CBBTBAJL AJOBICA— Pbb BrtAiiEB Citt or Kiw Yobk March 18. 1881. 



wv. 

BJS.UUbwtad... 

CB 

BD. 

J D. 

PMACo •• 

BHACo •' 

JBCCC" 

BltAf«.- 

BBACo." 

BJW.aaaJdeOma. 

B H M. 

B M Amapala 

■ P. Panla* Armas. 



iMpCTiT A Co il barrel 

F Meeka 2ke(f 

J Onndlach A Co 8 hf-barrels S keys 

8 bf-bbl* 10 keifs. 

aokeifs 

\» kegs 

IW barrel 

" lb bf-barrcls 

** lO cases 

UbarreU 

SOcascs 

B«ck pThir A Co 4 case* 

Jobn T Wrifcbt W ken 

B Drvyfns ACo l87 bf-barrels . . . . i 

I '• IWkep; i 



ToUl aaouot WIm easM 00 ami. 



.47 
80 
203 
181 
200 
280 
27 
212 



659 



90 

1,028 



24 
2(XI 
189 
185 
1»> 

24 
1.H 

•U 
412 
127 

20 

77 

900 



8,022 2,515 



TO MEXICO— Pn STCAiin Cmr or Nbw Yobk, March 18, 1891. 



L O A Co. Toaato. 

OM 

AAO 

OA.ltea Bias 

BO 

TP. MaavoUlo 

X A T B U <Ua Mv'a 



X A T B la d 8a'a Crz 



T B, Baa BUs. 
■ B,ToMla.... 



|j Onndlarb A Co «barr«elr. 

Ubarrlf.. 
Skcga.... 

|i"k^... 

Dracknan A Co rases. . . 

Bather A BcodlMu |2 barrels. . 

10 kef. . . 
KoMer A Van Ber|:cii..llOkeKS — 

'leasts.. 



barrels. 



Tulal amonnl 45 eaac and . 



590 
199 

40 
198 

99 



101 
180 
100 



2(M 



298 
99 
28 

105 
.V5 
20 
50 
73 
80 

180 
84 

188 



1.0071 1,110 



TO 



lloNOMIl-Prs Htbambb Ao»tbaua March, 84. IWl. 



H 1 ,v < .. 



W S I. 



<i til itU't' 



Arpail HaraiKlliy * Co., 



!s Larliman A Co. 
(■ <'»r|iv <S Co 



1> W (iedKC. 



8 barreU 

75kef(* 

50 ca^es 

20 barrels... 
8 b( barrels. 

J90ke|<e 

i casks 

12 cases 

188 keKS... 

1 barrel 

80 cai>es.... 
8 cases 

2 barrels.... 
casea 



\ 



153 
500 



1,018 

98 

2,100 

128 



1.000 



100 



I'(i (' Id O Camarino* 

A H M DHpikckels A Bros. 

Total a mount 101 cases and 

TjT Ht).NOLt'LL'-P«B Rarksktimb 8. W. Ca htlb, March 21, 1891. 
(TwTm *To.~ 



5,092 



99 
SSg 
177 
750 

49 
1,700 

90 

52 

890 


80 
88 



4,848 



\V <• !• 



Kobler A Van BerKen . . 
B Dreyfus 4 Co 



280 kegs 

4 casks 

15 bf barrels.. 

2 barrels 

430 kegs 



Total amount. 



1,925| 
138 

8,586 



1,190 
70 

8,000 
8,800 



TO CHI.NA A JAPAN— Pke Steamer City or Pekmo March 21, 1891. 



I, in dla'd, Yokuliama 

K A Co 

I. F HbanKliai 



LaiicfelUt & Co Ltd... 



J Gundlacb & Co 

Dunham Carrigan A H. 



20 barrels 

10 barrels 

20 barrels 

1 barrel 

12 cases 



Total amount Wine 12 caaes and. 



1,012 

514 

980 

90 



8,562 



300 

139 

8T9 

25 

55 



057 



MISCELLANEOUS FOREIGN WINE SHIPMENTS. 



From March 12 to March 36, 1891. 



VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 


CONTENTS. 


GALLONS 


VALCB. 


Umatilla 

Empire 


WC, Victoria.... 
CGS&Co " 
HBCo 

McD&H NewY'rk 
E N, Nanaimo. . . 
P&M, Vancouver 
H B Co, Victoria. 
W Apia 


I DeTurk 

J Gundlacb A Co . . 
Cal Wine Gr« Union 
N CerlBoia 


10 cases 

3 bbls 

2 bbls 

8 bbls 

1 barrel 

2 bbls 

10 cases.. .. 


: '^ 

400 
4tt 
100 


• 35 

90 

88 

800 

11 


Mexico 


FA Haber 


80 


A Oreenebaum&Co 

Wiikins & Co 


40 


H W Almv 


8 bbls 

2bbU...... 

2 bbls 

2hf-bbl8.... 


150 
96 

100 
54 


96 


Walla Walla.. 


DHK&CoVict'ria 

H B Co, 

L D Vancouver. . 


J Gundlacb* Co... 
FKorbel&Bros.... 
Cal Wine Grs Union 


81 
65 
88 


Total 


iimount 20 cases. . 






1,157 


f 648 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO DOMESTIC PORTS BY SEA. 





From March 12, to March 26, 1891. 






VESSEL 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 


CONTENTS. 


GALLONS 


VALUE. 


City Of NY... 

It 


JTC New York. 
MI 

SL&Co " 
J P 


AGreenebaum & Co 

8 Laohman & Co.. 
Gamier LancelA Co 


1 hf-barrel.. 
liif-barrel.. 

2J)keg8 

3 bbls 


22 

230 
143 


55 

500 
808 


Total 


tmoant 






437 


• 918 



EXPORTS OF BRANDY TO FOREIGN PORTS BY SEA. 





From March 18, to March 26. 1891. 




VESSEL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 


CONTENTS. 


GALLONS VALUB. 


CItvof N Y... 
G H Douglass. 


G A San Bias. . . . 
Rindi'dButarit'i 


J Gundlacb A Co.. 
Wighlinan Broc 


1 hf-barrel.. 
20 cases 


25 $85 

50 



Total amount 20 cases and. 



851 



• 75 



(«^PURE CALIFORNIA^ 



LLEY 



PRIVATE STOCK HOCK. 

PRIVATE STOCK EL GERRITO. 
PRIVATE STOCK SAUTERNE, 

PRIVATE STOCK CLARET, 
PRIVATE STOCK BURGUNDY. 

PRIVATE STOCK VINE CUFF, 





D^Amj^RS IN 
\WINESanpBRAND1ES 

WINEftlES ANO OlSTILLERiear 

JM/rf>/r eiTY, YOUJ^TVIloloE /r^gB 
ST. JHEloEJM/r. 

11-13 FIRST ST, SAN FRANCISCO. 
200-202 S. FOURTH ST, ST LOUIS. 



f/reifie WIJME /rJND Sfll^lT f^EVIEW. 



15 



EXPORTS OF WHISKY BY SEA. 



J-'iom March 12, to March 26, 1891. 


VEaSEL. 


DEbTINATlON. 


SHIPPVERS. 


CONTENTS. 


GALLONS 


VALUE. 


Empire 


McD&HNanaimo 


L S Haas 


1 puncheon. 
1 case 


129 


$130 
9 


City of NY... 


C&CoToiiala... 
B&GLaLibertad 
L&Co Ltd Yoko'a 
MBA Co 


Cabrera Roma & Co 
L S Haas 


*' 


2 bbls 

5 bbls 

24 cases 


82 
215 


122 


CityofPekin.. 


APHotaling &Co. 

S Foster & Co 

Spru'ce,Staiiry& Co 
Lillenthal&Co.... 
Wilmerdiiii; & Co.. 

D W Gedge 

Slierwood <feSherw'd 
J D Spreckel8&Bro8 


140 
192 


" 


M A Co Slianghai 
J D Honolulu.. 
GWM&Co " 
W S L 
Gill diam'd " 






100 


Australia 


2 bbls 

20 cases .... 


88 


246 
200 


** 


2 bbls 

17 cases .... 


74 


127 
106 


*' 






12 


Total ! 


AH 


1 package . 


2 


5 


imoiint, 77 cases a 


nJ 




,590 


»1,389 



EXPORTS OF MISCELLANEOUS LIQUORS BY SEA. 

^ from March 12 to March 26, 1891. 



VEiSKL. 


DESTINATION. 


SHIPPERS. 


CONTENTS. 


VALUE. 


Umatilla 


Add, Victoria 


Wm WolflF & Co 20 csChampagne 


»500 


City of N Y 


A V, San Bias .... 


Thannhauser &Co 10 cs Vermouth. 


30 


'* 


K H, San Benito. . 


" 8 bbls GingerAle 


116 


*• 


JAC, LaLibertad 


John T Wright 2 bbls GingerAle 

Redington & Co 2 eaces Bitters. . 


31 


*' 


MC O, San Bias.. 


16 


Geo H Douglass 


Rindi'dButarita'i 

u 


Wightman Bros 


10 cases Bitters. 
10 cs Kummel .. 
50 cases Gin.. .. 


78 
31 
92 


Planter 


— Honolulu 


Lilienthal & Co 


15 bbls Alcohol. 


375 


" 


HH Co, Honolulu. 


Williams Bimond <fe Co 40 csChampagne 


602 


Australia 


GM&Coinsii •' 


Jones Mundy (fcCo 18 csChampagne 


175 


'* 


— Honolulu 


Sherwood & Sherwood 15 cases Gin. . . 


12 


■* 


A H, Honolulu 


J D Spreekels & Bros.jl case Liquors.. 


8 


Total an 


lount 176 cases 







m.om 



NATIONAL IMPORTS AND EXPORTS. 



IMPORTS- 



Ue-imported spiiits, proof gallons. 

Malt li(iuors, bottled, gallons 

Malt liquors, bulk, gallons 

Brand.v, proof gallons 

All other spirits, proof gallons. . . . 

Champagne, dozen 

Still wines, casks, gallons 

Still wines, bottled, dozen 



January. 1890. | January, 1891. 



Quantity Value Quantity Value 



165,933 
74,830 

20,5,313 
26,391 
81,144 
14,819 

134,661 
13,872 



$174,363 
70,295 
75,614 
63,970 
71,840 
237,755 
90,.526 
6U,.586! 



51,584 
70,671 

143,962 
38,217 
81,.540 
22,127 

188,74() 
16,1.57 



$.55,7.59 
,57,1.57 
45,336 

100,002 
85.6aS 

2'i4,013 

122,980 
78,769 



EXPORTS. 



Malt liquors, bottled, dozen 

Malt liquoi-s. bulk, gallons 

Alcohol, etc, proof gallons 

Brandy, proof gallons 

Rum, proof gallons 

Bourbon wliiskj-, proof gallons 

Rye whisky, proof gallons 

Ail other spirits, proof gallons 

Wine, bottled, dozen 

Wine, bulk, gallons 

(A) included in "all other spirits " 



January, 1890. 



Quantity Value 



29,691 

11,351 

1,051 

4,440 

88,034 

31,4.58 

1,928 

3,915 

.991 

58,732 



January, 1891. 



$ 41.976 

3,285 

571 

.5,169 

102,390: 

32,854 

4,297 

2,.55ll 

4,315j 

.33,6091 



Quantity 


Value 


24,005 


$38,913 


19,186 


5.138 


5,647 


2,270 


(A) 


(A) 


37,7.52 


36,211 


13,493 


17,096 


4,»i3 


4,892 


2,800 


2,617 


425 


1,831 


32,441 


20,072 



EXPORTS OF FOREIGN LIQUORS. 



Re-imported spirits exported, proof gallons.. 

Malt liquors, bottled, gallons 

Malt liquors, bulk, gallons 

Brandy, proof gallons 

All other spirits, proof gallons 

Champagne, dozen 

, Still wines, casks, gallons I 

Still wines, bottled, dozen ' 



January, 1890. 



Quantity 



199 

747 



2,395 
5,578 

273 
1,791 

594 



Value 



232 

777 



1,980 
2,451 
3,709 
S.30 
1,614 



January, 1891. 



Quantity 



270 



1,390 
3,369 

189 
9,848 

292 



Value 



133 



4,4;n 

3,294 
3,314 

6,187 
999 



IMPORTS OF WINES AND LIQUORS BY SEA. 



FROM NEW YORK via 


PAMAMA— Per Steamer 


San Blab March 2, 1891 


BHIPPEES. 


CONTENTS. 


CONSIGNEE. 




1 bbls Prune Juice 

2 bbl Whisky 






John Gillespie 




25 csaes Mineral Water. . . 
2 bbls Whisky 




Mejfers & King 



IMPORTS BY RAIL IN BOND. 



SVFornaris&Co. 



Southern Pacific Co . . 
Texas Pacific R R Co. 



Southern Pacific Co . 
8 VFornaris&Co... 



Southern Pacific Co. 
S VFornaris&Co.. 



600 cases Champagne 

375 cases Champagne 

600 cases Champagne 

15 cases Cordials 

51 cases Champagne 

50 cases Gin (old Tom)... 

3 cases Cognac 

200 cases Absinthe 

.50 cases Cordials 

25 cases Cordials 

37 cases Wine 

32 cases Wine 

11 cases Wine 

10 casks Beer 

25 cases Gin 

10 cases Cognac 

45 cases Wine 

72 cases Champagne 

5 Oct. Brandy 

10 cases Cordials 

15 cases Cordials 



Macondray & Co 

Sherwood & Sherwood. 

Wm. Wolff* Co 

Pascal Dubedat &C'o. . . 

A. Vignier 

Sherwood & Sherwood.. 

A Vignier 

J. De Fremery & Co. . . . 

A. Vignier 

A. Viguier 

J. De Fremery & Co. . . 

W. B. Chapman 

A. L. Tubbs 

Mrs. Chris. Brunnjg 

Goldberg, Bowen & Co. 

Tillman & Bendel 

J. F. Plumel , 



Chas. Melnecke & Co. , 
Pascal Dnbedat & Co. 



WHISKY AND SPIRIT IMPORTS BY RAIL, S. P, CO. 





From 


March 11, to March 26, 1891. 


CONSIGNEES . 


Whisky. 


Spirits. 


Barrels 


li bbl. 


Case 


Barrels 


}4 bbi [Miscellaneous 


Jones Mundy & Co 


60 






512 
364 
474 






Lilienthal & Co 








C W Craig & Co 


65 

50 

63 

00 

75 

70 

69 

60 

53 

40 

5 

2 

2 

1 

10 
5 

1 
1 
1 








Overland F T Co 


13 






Livingston & Co 










Moore, Hunt & Co 












E Martin & Co 












Lowe Bros 












F Chevalier 












M Greenberg t*fc Co. . . . 












Meyerfield.Mitchell & S 


.55 


3 








HcnkeuA Schroder 








E Van Bergen 












H Swords 








......... 


. ' 


C H Gillman 












AF Bolls 












Heathcotte Dexter &Co 












JL Nickel 


1 
1 










J Baker 










FS Kelly 


1 






Edwards* Holland... 


1 


1 








1 






Total 


693 


71 


3 1 1.3.50 







BEER 


IMPORTS 


BY RA 


IL, S. P. CO. 






Bottled. Bulk. 




Cask 


Barrels 


Case 


Xbbl Barrels 


Kbbl 


Xbbi 


Wm Wolff & Co 








2.5 
100 

lai 


200 


C AZinkand 










60 


Sherwood & Sherwood 




215 
195 






184 


Jones Mundy & Co 








J T Cutting 


100 










Thanhauser * Co 




i25 


1 ' 






W Watson & Co 


95 




. 






W Loaiza 


130 




1 


















Total 


192 


540 


125 


1 


349 


444 



WM. WOLFF & CO., 

Importers and General Agents, 



327-329 Market Street, 



San Francisco, Cal. 



:F>JLOIinio GO^^ST .A.(3-EII<TTS 'B'CDTl 



POMMERT SEC CHAMPAGNE, 

}. & F. MARTELL COGNAC, 

MORGAN BROS.. PORT ST. MARTS SHERROS 

DIXON'S DOUBLE DIAMOND PORT, 

DUBOS FRERES, BORDEAUX, Clarets and Sautemes, 

HOCK WINES, from Messrs. HenkeU & Co., Mayence, 

FRANCESCO CINZANO, Torino, ItaUan Vermouth, 

Ke-tmported American Whisktes- 



jOHN de KUYPER & SONS, ROTTERDAM, GIN, CANTREU & GOCHRANE'S Bel&st Gmger AIs, 

GILKA KUMMEL, BASS & CO'S Pale and Burton ALE in Hogsheai's, 

PABST BREWING CO. (formerly PHILLIP BEST), GUINNESS & CO'S (Dublin) Extra Stout in Hogsheads 

MILWAUKEE Export Beer, Select Blue Ribbon GREENLEES BROS' Lome Highland (Scotcb) Whisky 

THE "BEST" TONIC, JAMESON & CO., IRISH WHISKY, 

THEO. LAPPE'S GENUINE AROMATIQUE, LONDON Dry Dock Jamaica Rum, 

" DOG'S-HEAD " BRAND of Guinness" Stout and Bass' Ale, BImeral Waters, 
'86 Belmont- '86 T J Monarch;'83 Bluegrass: '85 Bipy, '80 T J Atherton and other staple brands 
Lowest market quotations furnished on application. 



16 



f>;<)r<2lfie WI^IE /r^lB SflR.IT f^EVIEW. 



FOURTH DISTRICT Or CALIFORNIA. 
[OFI-K'I.M- IKi' 1^1>] 



Biinik'*!. 



Traniifi'rml rWim diMillori«i» lo wnn-houHc* in Firwt I>iKtri<i, ("alifoniia ^''07^ 

•• wnn<hoiii«' to wan-houw' in Fii>t I>i.Mri< t. ('iilif«riiia. ^'o 



44,79(> tax gallons 



lut rn <listiii t-* 



526 



ExporUxl 



9,189 



Tat-|>Mi<l ->.« q-, 

R«-n»nining in wan*huuiH> at end of month ooo,»<i 

Bonded •^^'^•''2 tax gallons 

Transfemid from dlKtiiieriw to waivhouw in Fii>t DiMrict. Cnliloinia 5,175 '' 

M >• 44 »• •• •• castci n districts 1,996 

•4 « «4 44 .. .. y\tvt District, ("alifoinia 10,821 " 

•4 44 44 44 ti .. paxtorn dintric-ts 28,935 " 



Kxportrd 

Tax-|>aid..^..., 

Krmaining in warchoniw at the end of month 630,559 



10.106 



FIRST DISTRICT FOR FEBRUARY '91. 



Konded 



16.639 Gallons 



Rcopivp<i from dictilloriw in other di8trirtn '. ^*1?}? 

Recviviil fnini wareh<mm'«* in other distriftM 7.333 

Withdniwn for KxjKirt • 9,"<'0 

Trancfemd toother Dirtriet 21,109 

Withdrawn Tax Paid 17,431 

Rimaining in liond Jannarv 31. "91 794,006 

'• Fehruary 2«, '91 786,.^90 

Decrea«e in atock •••... 7,416 



WI/^E A/ND S-RA/SDg "REeEIPTS. 



Wine. 

Total for February- 954.318 

Mart-h 2 14,930 

8 18.12<, 

4 27,37(t 

" 5 22..">.S(> 

6 65.2(K» 

" 7 2K.1S(» 

9 25,010 

10 16,:«H) 

11 37.45M) 

12 22,720 

13 47.9<M>. 

" 14..../...-. 75.(KM) 

" 16 20.950 

17 62.140 

18 42.r)SO 

19 3K,(»I6 

20 54.240 

* 21 59,1S5 

23 41,210 

24 40..3,SO 

25 46.200 

20 31,290 



Urandj-. 

44,795 

12,130 

4,200 

120 

1,680 

ICK) 

2.1(M) 



4,090 

1,900 

100 

2100 



100 
4,350 

625 
1,880 
1,4.30 
1 ,!HM) 

380 



(SWEET WI/NE MAKERS. 



The Hweet Wine Maker .4 met on tin' IStli inst. to diHeuHH the 
■itoation. Among thow imw^nt were Charle.H Kohler, Frank A. 
Wewt, C. K. Kirl.y. H. W. (Val>l>. K. I'. Drexler, V. V. Roiwi, 
Ilerman ('. K^itt-VA, V. Korln-I and otIierH. 

Theai-tion of l*rof«"«iHor IlilKuni in |irf4-i|MtatingthediHeui«<ion 
with the Internal Kevenne Dipartnient «iv«'r the merits of the 
Kallerrm Htill and theHne<-harom*li'r. was wry fre^-ly eoniinent<>d 
njMjn, and the Intent aM{>e<-tM <)f llie sitnation wen- stattni by 
Charlw Kohler who hait jtiat rctumi-<| from his FJiHtern trij». 



No definite action was taken in regard to the proposition to 
send a man to Washington. It is generally understowl that the 
('omuu.ssioner of Internal Revenue has been shown that his posi- 
tion establishing a maximum of twenty-six and one-half per cent, 
of sugar as what musts can legitimately contain, is untenable. 
The common opinion was that the Commissioner must see the 
injustice of establishing such a limit or any limit at all, in fact, 
in view of the variations in sugar percentages which are obtained 
from year to year. 

BAMBE-RGE-R & KAEMPFER 
FAILUKE. 

The creditors of the defunct firm of Baml)erger & Kaempfer 
are managing to make things pretty lively for those worthies. 
During the past fortniglit, both partners were convicted on one 
mis<lenieanor charge, and were fine<l $.500 apiece which waa 
pnmijjtly pai<l. This shows that they are not without funds, 
however nuicli is said to the contrary. Another mi.s<lcineanor 
charge, the evidence being tlie same as the one on which they 
were convicted, is hanging over them and will 1m> vigonmsly 
pushed. The creditors regret that they cmilcj not make the 
charge of grand larceny hold, but on this cOupt, tlie men have 
Ix'en at-iiuitt^nl. • ' 

R«H'eiver Simcmson has been advised from New York of the 
sale of the linn's wines there, amounting to about 700 barrels. Of 
course this wine was simply slaughtered. 

We can supply Cnraniel or Burnt Sugar Coloring at newnty- 
fiw renU per f/itlloii in barrels, as strong and as brilliant aa any 
that was ever manufactured. Not one eonij)laint has reached us 
the ({uality of our Sugar Coloring for over a year, and our sales 
extend to every State in the I'nion. 

If the price was 810, instead of seventy-five cent« per gallon, 
wc could not produce a superior article. Kvery package guaran- 
te<Ml. Samples on application. 

DR.YDE:1SI 5t FjRlLIXIER.. 
19 HudaonStr«*t, ... ... J^%w YorK 



f/reifie WIJ^JE j^J^E) Sfl[^IT f^EVIEW. 



17 



THE SA/N F-RA/MCISeO CAFE. 



A Handson?e Establishrnept Where" Epicures '^Gongregate.— The New 

Chicago 



The accompanying illustration is a faithful reproduction of 
the interior of the Viticultural Cafe on Pine street which is al- 
ready well-known to San Francisco lovers of good living as one 
of the most famous places in the city. The establishment needs 
no description to the San E'rancisco trade, but its reputation has 
not extended east, yet, on account of the short time which it has 
been in existence. It is comfortable, cosy and everything that 
the epicure demands can be had on application. As the sole 
restaurant in San Francisco where California wines bottled by 



Cafe" has been shortened by the short speaking San Franciscans 
into "The Viticultural." As such it is known and visited by lovers 
of the best living and who have pride enough to drink the native 
wines. 

The latest news from Mr. Franckx, who is now in Chicago, is 
that he has leased commodious quarters at 294 Wabash avenue 
just a few doors from the Auditorium, in the heart of the busi- 
ness portion of the city, and in close proximity to leading hotels. 
The location is only a few blocks removed from the wealthy resi- 
dence portion of Michigan avenue. 

Mr. Franckx expects to open the establishment about the Ist 
of May and in all respects it will be equal to any restaurant in 
the city. 

The National Hotel Reporter of Chicago says the following 
about Mr. Franckx 's plans: Mr. Franckx and Ruhlemann, pro- 




Galifornia Viticultural Restaurant and Gafe, San Francisco, Gal. 



the producers and the best merchants can be obtained, it has al- 
ready achieved a wide local reputation. 

The restaurant is owned by Messrs. Albert Franckx and Otto 
Ruhlemann, who are two of the most capable caterers in the 
West, Mr. Ruhlemann now has entire charge since Mr. Franckx 
went East a few weeks ago to establish a similar cafe in Chicago. 

The new place in Chicago will soon be running but it is 
doubtful if, with all Mr. Franckx's love for the best features of 
the high class restaurant, it will be any cosier or more popular 
than the little room on Pine street where daily the best that the 
market affords the best wines that the State produces are 
dispensed. 

The Viticultural Cafe is a feature of San Francisco life. The 
cumbersome title of "California Viticultural Restaurant and 



prietors of the California Viticultural Restaurant and Cafe, in San 
Francisco, have leased the second floor of the building Nos. 294, 
and 296 Wabash avenue, Chicago, and will fit it up in a manner 
similar to their California establishment, and open for business 
about May 15th. Mr. Albert Franckx, of the firm, is now in Clii- 
cago making the necessary arrangements. The restaurant will ac- 
commodate about one hundred and fifty persons. It will be elab- 
orately decorated and appointed in first class manner. The wines 
served will be all of California growth, bottled at the vineyards 
under the supervision of Messrs. Franckx & Ruhlemann, and 
be of the choicest quality. The restaurant will be kept open 
from 8 a. m. to 1 a. m. The building in which it is to be located 
will be enlarged next year by the addition of three stories, all of 
which are to be devoted to the catering business. 



The largest whisky blending operation that has ever taken 
place in England was witnessed in Glasgow, The vat used is 
said to be the largest of the kind in Great Britain, and is capable 
of containing no fewer than twelve thousand gallons. In connec- 
tion with the present blend it was filled to its utmost capacity, 
the contents being made up of twenty-five different whiskies, all 
of a first-class quality. In order to give some idea of the enor- 
mous quantity of liquor contained in the vat, it may be stated 
that in weight it represented about sixty tons. The blend is said to 
have been a very fair specimen of what a Scotch whisky ought to be, 



The jjer capjito consumption of spirits in this country is 1.37 
gallons per annum. This is only seven drinks apiece every four 
weeks, or supposing that one-half of the inhabitants never con- 
sume any spirits, there will be left an average of three drinks and 
a half a week apiece for the rest; that is, one every other day. 
This seems pretty light for our climate. Our wine consumption 
is about one quart /)er capita per annum, or about one-half of the 
diurnal consumption of the Herault. In other words, our aver- 
age wine drinking capacity is only 1-730 of that of the dwellers 
in that happy land. 



18 



jyKSIfie WI^IE /r^lD SflF^IT I^VIEW. 



THE CEMSUS BULLETIN. 

■^ UtiM'% Rinrks Gonccrpiog tN Viti<ultur< of tb« 

Pacific StaUi 



Th« lonu proiniM-il wiii«m» hiinftin cm vitu-ultur." liim lK-«-n 
puliliMhtHl. Th«' (Mirtion n-frrrinjt to California ami Ariwma is iw 
1<>IIowh: Tin* r»'inain«l»'r of the ImllHin will l>t< pul>liHlu'«l in tli.' 
nest iMtup of the Kktikw. 

pAcinr DiviMox. — Thb divbiion einbnu'PM Arizona. N<'w 
Mexico and California. Vitiriilturc in Ari^aui an<l \<'\v Mcxit-o 
b coniiMralivfly n«'w. Imt ij« tlion^ht to have a |>n>siMTouf futim-. 
Not only «lo the native varietii* of frni|H>t« jjrow in tht-w tvrritor- 
i«», but the Kuro|M<an. or vinifera. alw) flouriKlifs here. The 
Miumt varieties. |fn>wn ho HUitH'wfnIly in ("alifornia for niiHinw, 
grow equally well in tln<««»' torritoriw; alwo varicti<t< tiiat i)r()- 
dure a fine uherrj- wine. TIuh i« one of the nioHt pnmiinent 
fmlurm of viticulture in Arizona. Mr. J. De Barth Shorb. a 
prominent wine jfniwer an<l wine maker of noutliern California, 
■Aer experimenting in Arizona, r»«port»« that the xherriw prmlucd 
there have the tme Hherr}' flavor and are made by the natural 
proceM*: that ia, without it l>eing neeusaary to "bake" them. 
They not only hav»' the flavor of the Spaninh slierries. but also 
the Mame excellent qualitiea. .S) far. the fine »hcrri<'H produced 
in thia country have «-onie from that territory. Tlie aame 
authority Htat*<e that Arizona will Im* to the United StatcH whiit 
8|iain it* now to Kurope. There were in 1 88it in Arizona 1 .(MX) 
acnw of la-aring vineti and Ij.^OO acn'n of new vineyards. The 
pnaluft wan 2.H5C) tons or 5,700.000 pounda of table grapes, of 
which l.V) tonn or .KMJ.CKIO [xninds were sold to wineries. 

In New Mexico in IHS'.t then- were 1,1M() acrc« of bearing 
vine* and 9M00 arrea of new vineyards, which produced 296,500 
g]tllons of wine and 1 .779 tons or 3,.5.')M,fK>0 ]M)undK of table grapes. 
The information rtnvived from New Mexic-o by the Census Office 
Hhowa a great advance in viticulture since irrigation has proved 
practicable. Two companies are building immense canals 45 
feet wide at the lM)ttom, capal>le of rarrying 7 feet of water. 
Thexe canals will irrigate 40(».0(K) acres of iw rich land a« can be 
found in the world achipted to the growth of fruit and grapes. 
Mr. H G. Hhields. a leading horticultural authority, sjiys: "I 
have ttwti'd thoroughly iH-aches. apricots, apples, nectarines and 
French and (ienuan prunes, and am much pleas<'d with their 
succeiw. - I hare alao planted olives. This is their third year. 
Referenc** is here made to the Pecos Valley, New Mexico, which 
for cultivation is yet in its infancy. I>a Mesilla Valley is next 
in importance. It has about 10,000 acres of vines of new plant- 
Inga. The Mission variety is grown almost exclusively in this 
locality, although the Muwat of Alexandria and Muscatel are 
grown by Mime. The varieties that grow successfully in New 
Mexico for raisins an- the Muscjit of Alexandria. Muscatel de 
(fordo Blanco and Sultana, and for wine the Zinfandel. Mataro, 
CalH'roet Franc. Mission. Petite Pino and Chaaselas Fontain- 
bl«<au. I f.«el assured that in two years there will be 1(K),000 
aereMofgrapeMin the Pe<-os Valley. I have now alwut 20,000 
vlnwt (.^^ ainvH) in fine rf>ndition. and will add KKJ acres." 

The industr}- in New .Mexico and .\rizona is aa yet too young 
to gpmk of an to ita possibilitiea, but the start already made 
■toemii to justify all that the piimei'm are claiming for it. 

CAi,m»KMA.— Then* an- fiOy-three <»unties in California, 
nearly all prtNluiing gnqM* in a gn-ater or less degree, the larger 
proportion of them pnMlucing wine for home c<msumpti<m or ex- 
port. There is an established demand for this wiiu- to the amount 
of I. fKKMKK) gallons iM-r month from this country alone, making 
12,0(K».(K»(» gallons annually, and an ex|)<irtation to foreign wun- 
trieHofSl 1,92) gallons in IJWJJ, valued at «2l7.(K».l. 

(Alifornia may Im- divid.-.! into tlire<. gra|M-growing districts : 
The Coant. which inclu<h-s Sonoma. Uike. Najm, Alameda. Santa 
Clara and Henta Cruz ccmnties ; the Siemi Neva<la FoothillH and 
Bwramento Valley district, which inchuh-s Placer, El Dorado. 



Calaveras. Tuolumne, Yuba, Yolo, Butte, Sacramento and 
Teliaiiia couiitifs ; and the Southern district, which includes San 
J..a.iuiii. M<r<-e«l. Fresno. Tulare, Kern, Ventura, Santa Barbara 
.Siiii |l.riianlino, Ixjs Angeles and Ban Diego counties. 

In th<- first district the finer grades of white and red dry 
wintv arc made. The choice varieties of the French and German 
t YIN'S w-cni to come nearer to reproducing themselves here than 
cIm-wIhtc. In this district are successfully grown the finest var- 
ieties (if I'rtiich champagne grapes, which yield a handsome pro- 
Ht to the iiurchasers. There is one cellar in this district with a 
capacity of S(M».(M)0 bottles, producing. champagne by natural fer- 
mentJition in the lM)ttle. The champagne industry in California 
is a growing one, and its future is bright with promise. While 
wine is the leading viticultural product, fine table grapes are also 
produced in this district. 

Some gooil, wholesome dry wines are produced in the second 
district, but they are of a different character from the German 
types. GraiMjs for table use and raisins are extensively grown, 
a large portion of the new plantings being for raisins. 

In the Ssicramento and San Joaquin Valleys, and in the 
southern district, some excellent dry wines are produced, but 
these valleys excel in their Port, Muscatel, Angelica and other 
heavy sweet wines. 

For the purpose of this bulletin it is only necessary to treat 
of the principal counties in each district where the heaviest viti- 
cultunri products are found. 

In Napa county, in the first district, there are 20,763 acres. 
Phylloxera has destroyed many acres of vines in this county, but 
the acreage has been kept up to about the same point by replant- 
ing on resistant stock and the planting of new vineyards farther 
up on the foothills, where a choice variety of grapes is grown and 
phylloxera is not such a scourge. There are 142 wine cellars in 
Napa, many of them of modern construction, containing all the 
appliances for the raanufticture and handling of wines. There 
were 3,000,000 gallons of wine made in this county in the census 
year 1889. 

Sonoma county, in this district, in 1889 had 21,683 acres of 
bearing vineyards. The same conditions exist here relative to 
the quality of grapes and wines produced as in Napa. The rav- 
ages of phylloxera were felt in Sonoma at an earlier day than in 
Napa, appearing about 1874, and a great many vineyards were 
destroyed. It is now generally believed that the destruction 
caused by the phylloxera can be stayed by growing the native 
resistant stock and grafting upon that the foreign vinifera. 

In Sonoma county in 1889 there were produced about 
1,756,300 gallons of wine and 250,000 gallons of brandy. The 
quality of the dry white wines was marked. 

Santa Clara county, in this district, contains some 12,600 
acres of bearing vineyards, and should enjoy a reputation for 
fine white and red wines equal to Sonoma and Napa. This and 
Santa Cruz county in 1889 produced 2,544,000 gallons of wine. 
As yet the phylloxera has troubled the vineyards but little in 
comparison with the counties before mentioned. There is said 
to be a deep gravelly bed underlying this whole surface, in which 
the growers say the phylloxera does not work with success. 

AlanuHla county, in the first district, has 6,500 acres of 
bearing vines, and produces a type of wine resembling the white 
and red wines of France, and in this part of the district, known 
as the " Livermore district," a high grade of Sauterne and claret 
is produced. The geological formation of the valleys and slopes 
of the Mount Diablo range more nearly repro<luce the soil condi- 
tions that characterize the department of the Gironde in France 
than any oth(>r sec-tion on the Coast. In this district there were 
produced in 1SS9 some 6(K) ,000 gallons of wine, noted more for the 
quality than for the quantity which it produces. This is com- 
paratively a new w ine district, and has grown up within the last 
di'icade. The first systematic planting of high grade grapes be- 
gan in 1882. 

There is in the second district a great viticultural interest, 
embracing table grapes, raisins, swwt and dry wines, and 
brandies, excelling in the latter. Sacramento, Placer, El Dorado, 
Tehama, Yuba, Butte and Yolo counties proiluce large quantities 
of table grajH's, an<l quit<^ a quantity of raisins is shipped from 
wune of thest! counties. Tehanui has the largest vineyard in the 
world, 3,800 acres, to which the manager says 1,000 aores of new 



f/cGlfie WIJNE /rJMD Sflf^lT (REVIEW. 



19 



vines are to be added within a year. There was in the distillery 
on this vineyard in April, 1<S!)0, when visited by the special agent 
of the Censns office, 300,000 gallons of brandy and 1,000,000 gal- 
lons of wine. Another large vineyUrd, the second largest in the 
State, contains 1,500 acres, and is situated at Folsom, Sacramento 
county. The winery belonging to the vineyard has a capacity of 
(JOO.OOO gallons. Many table grapes are shipped from this vine- 
yard to the eastern markets. The sales in this direction have 
largely increased during the past two seasons. 

Tlie third district is composed of San Joa^iuin, Merced, 
Fresno, Tulare, Kern, Ventura, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, San 
Bernardino, Orange and San Diego counties. Near Stockton, in 
San Joaquin county, is located one of the largest vineyards and 
wineries. Fine brandies are made in this district ; also sherries, 
ports and some excellent clarets. Fresno county contains at this 
time some 25,000 acres of bearing vines and 15,000 acres of new 
plantings, the larger portion of which is grown for raisins. 
Tliere are, however, a great many gallons of wine and brandj' 
made in tliis county. The wines are mostly sweet, and of excel- 
lent quality. The raisin pack in 1889 was 620,595 boxes ; the 
wine produced, 1,200,000 gallons. The California "Wines and 
Vines," speaking of the Muscatel de Gordo Blanco, the true rai- 
sin grape, says : " The soil seems to impart a vigor to the vines 
tliat is unknown elsewliere in the world. The second crop is 
often very nearly equal to the lirst, and the third comes before 
the leaves fall off." More than half the raisin grapes grown in 
California are prodnc-ed in Fresno county. 

San Bernardino county, in this district, is also principally 
devoted to the growing of raisin grapes. There are 9,562 acres 
of bearing and 4,125 acres of non-bearing vines, and the raisin 
pack for 1889 amounted to 375,000 boxes. Two wineries in San 
Bernardino county produced 279,000 gallons of wine in 1889. 
Tliere were also shipped from tliis district 1,700 tons of table 
grapes. 

Los Angeles county has 18,120 acres of bearing vines. A 
new and mysterious disease attacked the vines of the southern 
portion of this district about 1885, and ruined more than one- 
half of tlie acreage. Every effort has been made to discover the 
cause and remedy the evil. The mo.st expert scientists have been 
consulted by the State Board of Viticulture in California, and 
the De[)artment of Agriculture appointed an expert to investigate 
and report upon the matter. There were produced in 1889 in 
Los Angeles county 25,820 tons or 51,640,000 pounds of grapes 
foi- wine, and 1,(J00 tons or 2,000,000 pounds of grapes for table 
purposes. The wines in this county are justly celebrated, and 
were the first shipped from California to eastern markets. This 
county excels in its sherries, ports and brandies. There were 
20,000 boxes of raisins packed in 1889, the new disease having 
reduced the product about one-half. The product of Orange, a 
county lately formed from portions of Los Angeles county, is 
included in the above figures. 

In San Diego county there is an acreage of 6,000 bearing 
and 7,500 non-bearing vines. Of the latter, 6,000 were just com- 
ing into bearing in 1889, and did not add much to the product. 
W'iiile this shows a fair increase in the growth of the industry 
during the last four years, the increase is accounted for by the 
fact that the new disease that was so injurious in Los Angeles, 
did not affect San Diego county. It is in the El Cajon valley 
of San Diego county that the most progress has been made in vit- 
iculture. Tliere are 27,000 acres adapted to fruit growing, and 
3,0!J0 of bearing raisin vinej^ards in El Cajon. The rasins from 
this valley are among the finest produced in California. The 
product of the El Cajon valley in 1889 was 75,000 boxes; in the 
balance of San Diego county, the pack was 75,000 boxes; in all, 
150,000 boxes. Another successful branch of viticulture in this 
district, is tlie shipment of table grapes to the eastern market. 
Many of the elevated localities are so free fi-om frost, that grapes 
can be left on the vines until January. 

As it has been noted in this bulletin that California has the 
largest vineyard in the world, it may be well to state that she 
tias also tlie smallest. It is a vineyard consisting of a single vine, 
in Santa Barbara county. It was planted by a Mexican woman 
about sixty-eight years ago, and has a diameter one foot from the 
ground, of twelve inches, its brandies covering an area of 12,000 
feet, and produces annually from 10,000 to 12,000 pounds of grapes 
rf the Mission variety (many bunches weighing six and seven 
pounds), the crop being generally made into wine. The old lady 
who planted this one-vine vineyard died in 1865 at the age of 107. 
Viticulture, already a great industry in the Pacific tlivision, 
Momises to become still greater in the near future. - 



ESTABLISH MOHE BRA/NDS. 



The tendency of the principal producers and merchants 
during the past three or four years ha« been toward the establish- 
ment of distinct brands. We have encouraged it by every 
possible means, believing that the future of the industry does 
not rest so much in producing wines for bulk sale only, as in 
the cased goods business. 

It is a pleasure to note that the journals of the principal 
wine producing valleys of the State are waking to the neoessititw 
of the situation. In a recent article Editor Bartlett of the 
Livermore Herald has the following to say on this point: 

"Before Livermore wine makers began to bottle their products, 
the only opportunity we had to determine it's quality was in the 
competitive exhibitions at the annual conventions of wine-makers. 
The public had no opportunity to judge of their quality, because 
they were never sold under the Livermore Valley name. Bought 
by wholesale dealers in bulk they were either used in blending, or 
sold under general labels. We have been bottling but two or three 
years, yet our four or five brands are known quite well in this State 
and in many localities in the East, and several foreign countries. 
Within a fortnight, we heard a number of professional gentlemen in 
Oakland discussing the merits of "Wetmore's Claret, and Chauche's 
and Smith's Sauternes," with an earnestness and directness of 
favorable comment that showed that the vintage had in the 
opinion of these connoisseurs, stepped into the front rank of 
California wines. These wines are selling freely at many times 
the price of bulk wines. True, they are of good quality, some being 
from high type grapes, and of sufficient age. But the valley could 
soon put on the market twenty other brands, nearly, if not quite 
as good. This is the only way in which we shall ever secure a 
great reputation, and high price for out wines. Bulk goods will 
probably increase in value, to a considerable extent, but the 
reputation of local districts is never made by their production. 
And reputation only can make the vintage bring extra prices." 

Eight and true every word of it. The fact of the matter is 
that the truth is being recognized by the wholesale houses of 
San Francisco as well as the producers. The cased goods houses 
and those which sell solely in bulk are having their interests 
divided more than ever before. Such houses as the Napa Valley 
Wine Co., J. Gundlaoh & Co., Arpad Haraszthy & Co., F. A. Haber 
and Beck, Pyhrr & Co., as well as others understand the value of a 
brand just as fully as do such gentlemen as the JTeraWnames. We 
like to see it too. 

There is another grgLtifying feature of the cased goods trade 
which we are pleased to note, though some of the pioneers do not 
like it. Some man, Mr. A. for instance, goes figuring around 
with a small lot of fine wine which he has nursed and cared for 
like a baby. He thinks it ought to have a name and he casts 
about for a price remunerative to him. Almost before his new 
brand is launched, the other men who have a nice little lot are 
after the same trick. In this way a heathy rivalry for the 
name of having fine wines starts up and before any one under- 
stand just how or why it is done some one steps to the front and 
buys in a nice lot of really good wine from a producer unable to 
hold it, and pays a price which seems fabulous in these latter 
days. 

The establishment of brands is par excellence the encourageing 
feature of the wine trade. It is the beginning of that better time 
when all the fair to fine wine will not be dumped into the same 
cask with the poorest wine in the State. 

Ten years ago no one knew much about the wine of this or 
that valley let alone of the separate vineyards. Now we hear the 
leading men discussing the merits of " Inglenook," "Napa Valley 
Private Stock," " Rhinefarm," " Chauche," " Sehramsberger," 
" Cresta Blanca," " Haraszthy's Wines," " Olivina," " De Turk," 
" To-Kalon," " St. Hubert," " La Loma," " St. George," " Beck's 
brands," etc., etc. It is a recognized fact that this, that or the 
other vineyard produces distinctive wines and deserves distinc- 
tive brands. 

This is but the beginning. The end will be worked out with 
time and will be greatly hastened by the establishment of other 
cafes where wines are sold, similar to that in San Francisco and 
the one .soon to be established ui Chicago. 






20 



SUGA»( 



\fH MUSTS. 



SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



AiolUr Abl< mJ Iii^«cu<. i.«ii«r op tb< Subject rroip Mr. 
Cbritt A. Wstirore. 



IT'.jlilk Ifr. C A. <'niiii|>t<>ii, lli<M-li«-iiiixt ortlif Iiilrnial 
•M» iJVfMHtOMnt of Wiiitllin^oll, I>. ('. M-Ilt u l)-t(«-r to \\ ill- 

''4MM, thr K <-n-tary of tin- Vilirultun»M'oiiiiiii>.>'ioii. asking 

£<r iafcmuitiiui n'ltnnliii); tlit- Hiui'lmriiic (■oiit<-iit>< ofiiiiistH. 

Th«l4-ll<T »!U< rt'fi'iTtHl lo Mr. Churli* A. Wrtmon-. llu-Cliit'f 
VitM^oltiinil Ofliit-r, for n«|M»rt, unci tin- Ii'H«t wliii-h In- m-iit to 
Mr. .v-ott wno forwanlisl to \Vai«hiiiKt<>ii with the following U-ttor 
from Mr. Si HI: 

Hax FKAXCMt). Cal. Mimli '_>(•. ISKl. 
t\ A. (Vampton, Ktq.. lAih.of Intmtal ltn'muf,]\'<uhitujti>n. 1>. ('. 

I>K.\ic Sir: — I havi« refcrnHl your Ictlor of tin' 'JHli of Fi-lnii- 
arv ti» Mr. ('Imriw \. W«'tinon' for coiiHidt-nition ainl roport.aiul 
biit letter wliieli in ciu'IomhI, in i>oniiiii-ii(U><l to your attention. I 
oui uiily Hay that I heartily eoiieiir in all hir< xtateinentH. 

The Haiuplex of wine which he mentions will l)e sent to you 
ait iHMMi an they are rejuiy. I will alno seiul you a statement of 
how Hamplcx alreatly f«>rwanl»'<l to you were obtained. 

We art- lK>ttliu)( the rent of tin- siimjiles for analysis, which 
Wirt- eollecte<l for you last year, and the same will be sent to you 
1- '■<i>u as they an* rt^uly, by fr»»ij{lit, 
N'cry Truly Yours. 
Winfield Sn>tt. .St«cretary State Viticultural Commissioners. 
Mr. Wetinore's letter m a» follows: 

8a>- Fkaxcisco. March 20th, 1891. 
Winfittd SroM, Em/., Srcretary Board oj Viticitltural Commmioiierg, San 
Framrueo, (W. 

DK.1K Hik:— I have read the letter from Mr. C. A. Crampton 
which you have submitted to me. and wliich refers to the special 
(|UitttioD of how high a (h-gree of sugar may be obtained in a nat- 
ur»l must extracted from the grape without any artificial means 
or anistaoce. other than that of the pressure in crushing. 

I am sorry to say that I have never heard of any line of ex- 
periments that would enable me to answer this question fully. 

I know that I have seen grapes picked from the vines in a 
condition of partial desiccation which would yield a must of at 
leaxt liny {jer cent.— if not more— of sugar. I have frequently 
•sen grapes in an apparently fresh and unshriveled condition, 
•bowing as high as thirty-five jmt cent. In my own jmictice of 
making certain gra<K>s of Sjiuternes, some of the grapiM not being 
up to th.- rts|uir.Hl standard, I have ha«l them laid out on paper 
for a few .lays, with the result of obtaining a must of thirty-seven 
per eiMit. which- Hows very easily from the press. It has never 
be«'ii my intenwt to a.HcerUin in any way how high a degree of 
•wgar might Ik- obtaine<l. having Irh^h satisfied with wliat hiw 
been acromplish.Ml.and not dwiring in my own experiments more 
than thirty-five to thirty-seven jK-r wnt. 

I have inten.l.Hl, h».wever, to attempt a reform in ordinary 
meth-Jsof HW«.t wine making, and have imrtially succeeded in 
winning over to my side s<Hne who will h.-r.-after p:irtially <lesic- 
«te their gra|N-s inteiide.l for sw.H-t wines, in onler to iniprovo 
thegeneml quality, and avoid the large degree of .listille<l spirits, 
usually n,,uinM| for fortifi.-ation. Tlu- only reiison whv such 
»meth<Kl IS not mor.- g..nerally a.loi.t.-.!, is bw^uw- there ha« 

Ir^'**^'""''''"'"""** '■'•'"■'■ "" *•"• »""•' "'■ »•'« Government or 
the trade for the improvement of sweet wiiu«. Com|K..tition has 
favorwl the cheapest of all m.tli.,<ls; the savii^^ of hand I«l>or, and 
Inc nm* of inferior spirits. 

The j,n,vi»io«s of the Hw.H^t Wine law, howev.-r, have a ten- 
.leney to improve the nwwt wines, and as mn.n as the art of swiH-t 
wine making is ,u. well ui.,h-rst«KKl l,y the ofiic-rs <.f the (Jovem- 

aT.irl' i' ""*:''*' ""■ '""• ""■"""'•*' I'""»"^''^, w" I'ope to see 
a rarlicHl »-hangi. in our market«. 

Am an h«»a„c« of the oom|«»mtlvely high degrc-e of must^ j.ro- 



iliKf.l li\ I 111' jiartial desiccation of the berries before crunhing, 
am lorimiale enough to Ik- able to refer you to a couple of barrt 
|.ri--i<rv.<l lor experimental piiri>OBe8 by Mr. Henry B. Wagon 
of l.ivcruuire. lie has promised to give ine, under oath, the tr 
liisiorv of" this experinu-nt. and to furnish a sample for the exai 
iniition of llie Department. This. I will furnish to you a^ ho< 
us I <au. In this cas«-. the strength of the must has a particul 
.-.i;;nirnan(«'. and illustrates one of the necessities of the wine ina 
ei-s wliicli should not In- overlooked by the Department. AVe hi 
during the liist si-ason. a long sjK'n of dry weather during the vi 
tage time, which enabknl the late ripening grape« to become ful 
niatur«'<l; and even what is generally known as the "second crop 
which ai)iH'ars usually only on certain varieties of vines such : 
the Zinfamlel and a few others. Tliis second crop springs fro 
lat<'n»Is grow ing from the main shoots, and is usually when picke 
fit only for distillation, because it does not thoroughly ripen. ] 
some localities where dry weather prevails in the fall, the secoi 
crop, as in Livermore last year, runs high in sugar, but it com 
at a time when cooperage in fermentation time, is generally 
cupied, aud these late grapes are often lost or left for pigs to gat 
ex. 

Now, as it happened in Mr. Wagoner's case, he had a fe 
loads of second croo Zinfandel come to his winery, and being u 
prepared to ferment them, he laid them out on paper to dr 
Being so late, however, it was impo-ssible to dry them sufficient] 
for grocery uses as dried grapes; so, as soon as he wa« able to pr 
vide the facilities, he took them up. The grapes, then shrivele 
in appearance, were stemmed aud crushed as usual, and Mr. Wa^ 
ogner found that he had a must containing forty-two per cent, 
sugiir according to the saccharometer. Now he might have U8( 
this pure sweet must with great advantage by adding to any 1< 
of sweet wine which he might have been making, and which niigl 
have contained too low a degree of sugar. Such a practice is tl 
one which I have been trying, and still am trying to haveadoptc 
throughout the state, in order to perfect our methods of makin 
this class of wines. But in this particular case, Mr. Wagont 
preferred to make an experiment in preserving the must in tl 
unfermentcd form, in order to ascertain whether it could Ik» don 
should he desire to make unfermented wine for communion pu 
poses or otherwise, with these late grapes. His process of prese; 
vation was the simple and legitimate one known as mittage, whic 
is accomplished by burning sulphur in the barrel, then filling ha 
full of the must to be preserved, and rolling the barrels, until b 
this and repeated processes of the same kind, the living ferments 
tion germs are destroyed. I only mention this to explain how i 
happens that at this tim3, this small lot of must is to be founc 
At the same time that I last saw it, at Mr. Wagoner's winery, 
slight fermentetion had taken place, which had reduce*! the sa< 
charine strongth to about thirty-eight per cent. This will serve 
however, to inform Mr. Crampton as to the practicability of ol 
taining perfectly limpid musts with the degree of sugar as high a 
forty per cent. In many districts, with certain kinds of gnipes, 
am sjitisfied that a perfectly limpid must could be expressed wit 
sugar as high as fifty per cent. 

I know of no other practical illustration at present, tha 
would be of any use to the Department, except in the case of som 
pure juice of Sautorne grapes, which I have myself preserved will 
the aid of sulphuring. I will furnish you a sample containini 
about thirty-one per cent, of sugar, and you will be able to se 
how entirely limpid a fluid it is. If required, I could jus 
as easily have had forty per cent. I should say therefore, in re 
ply to Mr. Crampton's inquiry, that a must may naturally hav 
as high a degree of sugar as fifty per cent., and at the saiii 
time tlu- jui(-o may bo easily expressed from the skin ant 
pulp. I am inclined to think that the expression of tin- .juic 
coOld Ix- cjirried on in the ordinary manner were the 111 u-i- ii 
show a still higher siu-chariiie content. 

If by way of exiwriment, sugar is added to the natural nm-f.^ 
which I will send, the strength can be increased to any de- 



f/reifl6 WIJME /rJ^IE) Sflt^lT [REVIEW. 



21 



imount, and it will be poBsible to ascertain at what point the 
fluid conditions necessary for expressing would become checked. 

With respect to what shall be considered the maximum 
imount of sugar for fregh grapes, as plucked from the vines with- 
out desiccation, my previous remarks ought to show that it is whol- 
ly a question of season and locality, and is also dependent on the 
variety of vines cultivated and other conditions. For instance, 
it was the practice at the vineyard of Mr. F. T. Eisen at Fresno, 
for several years, to permit the Muscat grapes to remain on the 
vines until they were ready to pack as raisins. Now it can be 
readily seen that Mr. Eisen could have chosen any time he pleased 
between the ordinarj' condition of maturity, and complete desic- 
cation, for picking these grapes for wine making, and of course 
he alone should be the sole judge of when they were ripe enough 
for wine making purposes, in case he wanted them for that. I 
have already stated that I have repeatedly seen grapes picked at 
thirty-five per cent, and still looking fresh and unshriveled. The 
only reason why we have not more record as to what is possible 
in tliis line, is because it has been more to the interest of the pro- 
ducer to get a large quantity of the juice rather than a smaller 
quantity with a higher degree of sugar. Where men sell grapes 
to wineries, there is always a conflict between the wine maker 
and the grape grower, in case either brandy or sweet wine is de- 
sired, the grower desiring to pick his grapes as early as possible 
with the greatest weight, and the wine maker desiring more ma- 
turity and less weight. 

These remarks, I think, answer fully the inquiries contained 
in the letter of the Chemist of the Department. I do not think 
that the establishment of any limit of the saccharine content of 
musts is possible, because of the different conditions which pre- 
vail from year to year, and the changes which are made in the 
practice, as demanded. As I said in a letter to Hon. I. De Turk, 
the President of this Commission, sometime ago, I think that the 
establishment of any artificial limit is not in the best interest of 
the producer, the consumer or the Government, so long as the 
conditions imposed by the Sweet Wine law are met. 
Respectfully, 
Chas. a. Wetmore, Chief Executive Viticultural Ofiicer. 



•DK. MAM LOVE DEAD. 



M-R. HILGA-RD SUPPRESS ED. 



Professor Ililgard has retired from his struggle with the In- 
ternal Revenue Department uttarly worsted. . He has confessed 
that all the trouble he rais?d over the alleged inaccuracy of the 
Sweet Wine tables was unwarranted and premature, and very 
properly he has left the field. Let us hope that he will remain 
in retirement until the Sweet Wine troubles are settled, at least. 

Professor Hilgard presents the sorry spectacle of a scientific 
man who set a trap and then walked into it. He has "digged 
his own pit" and stumbled into it. Will he please remain caged? 
His advice and interference are not wanted or relished by the 
Sweet AVine makers. 

In the absolute defeat which has overtaken him, he strives 
to explain matters by attributing his mistakes to an "assistant in 
whom he had every confidence." We do not like to have to ex- 
pose Professor Hilgard to further ignominy, but we are in a posi- 
tion to assert and we do mo^t emphatically assert that he luas not 
misled by any "asskfant" at all. The gentleman to whom he sub- 
mitted his tables is a member of the faculty of the University 
and is not conmected in any manner with the Hilgard outfit. 
Had Hilgard beaten the Internal Revenue Department he would 
have claimed all the credit — now that he has been beaten, the 
other gentleman very promptly and decidedly refuses to be 
dragged into the same ditch. 

Vale Hilgard. 

DON'T Buy A riANO, ORGAN OR ANY OTHER MUSICAL INSTRUMENT 
witliout first writinf; to or visitiii}; Kohler & Chase, 1041 Market Street, San 
Franciseo, the largest and olde&t dealers in this line on the coast. They have all 
a:radep of instruments and sell very close for cash or on installments. This is an 
old reliable firm that has a gilt edge reputation made by honest dealing, and always 
guaranteeing satisfaction. , - 



Dr. W. S. Manlove, one of the oldest, best-known and most 
highly respected citizens of Sacramento county, died at his resi- 
dence near Brighton at six o'clock on the morning of the 1 7th 
inst. Four week ago he was attacked with pneumonia, which 
was developed from a malignant form of la gi'ippe. 

He was a native of Virginia, aged 67 years. He was one of 
the first in this section to engage in grape culture, and about one 
hundred acres of his vineyard were devoted to the finest varieties. 
He also had one hundred acres in small fruit. He was an authority 
on all subjects relating to fruit culture, and in 1887 was appointed 
a member of the State Board of Viticulture, a position which he 
filled with ability and credit. Sixteen years ago he was chair- 
man of what was known as the Farmers' Aid Association, which 
organization was merged into the "Patrons" or "Grangers" 
movement. Dr. Manlove being first master of the new organiza- 
tion. He was elected president of the Sacramento County 
Farmers' Alliance at a meeting held at Elk Grove on the 3d of 
the present month. 

A -RAKE CHA/NCE. 



A thriving and paying business in Napa County near 
railroad depot, consisting of a large and complete winery and 
distillery, including 30,003 gallons of good cooperage and cellar 
implements. Also dwelling house, barn, stable and three acres 
of land, (orchard and vines) at the very low price of $6,300. 
Terms $4300 cash; remainder secured by mortgage. Address 
" Bargain" this office. 



VITICULTURAL RESTAURANT AND 



CAFE. 



BUSINESS SUCCESS. 



If you have a line of goods, or a specialty, possessing quality and merit 
IT PAYS TO LET THE PUBLIC KNOW IT. 

Every business man wlio consults his health and euocess in business must eat 
and not only eat regularly, but must eat such food as will be readily digested, with 
such surroundings as will make his meal not only 

A BUSINESS MATTER OF NECESSITY 
but K pleasurable digression from business care. 

When such a meal can be obtained at a trilling expense, and be productive of 
happiness and renewed, if not increased energy, a business man is foolish indeed to 
not embrace the prospective opportunity. 

Such a meal can be obtained, and the above described results attained by taking 
a lunch with us, between the hours of 11 a. m. and 3:30 p. M. We serve a six course 
lunch for 50 cents. 

In the evening we serve, from 4:30 to 8:30 P. M., an eight-course dinner for 
75 cents 

Besides our service a la carte receives prompt attention, and our restauranti 
most elegantly furnished. 

Referring to our experience, botli in the Old and New World, as reetauranteurs 
with the fact that the cuisine and dining room is under our direct and coulinua 
supervision, we guarantee the best satisfaction. 

Being confident that we can please you in the smallest particulars, we respect- 
fully solicit your patronage. 

ALBERT FRANCKX and OTTO RUHLEMANN, 

Viticultural Cafe and Restaurant, 

315 Pine Street, San FbanciSco 

N. B.— The wines furnished to our guests arc guaranteed to be pure, and ar» 
purchased direct from the permanent exhibit of the State Viticultural Commission 




NATIONAL 

OSH PSTEB 

Pierce 8t Co. 



Genervl WeMern Agenta. 



Room 12, Chronicle Building, S. F. 
971 Broadway, Oakland, Cal 



22 



f|;M5Ifie Wi;«JE /JMD SflF^IT f^EVIEW. 



(Shioa^o X^'partmcnt. 



fnifa-iAi. <>iK«»«i*«>M»K>«r_] 

*Mhn< woni will MI y«>ii nit al><»m tin- iMiuor markcl in 
Clik«ffu Mt th«' pn-m-nt llnw," humI a |in»iiiltn«nt il«'aliT y<i<l«'r<liiy 
to BW, •• ami that won! ii» ' tlHll.' " IIit< HtatciiKiit w.ik r.-il«i-it<-<l 
bjr otWm au<l iIh'D- i^aii In> no iloiibt of it« truth. 

" II i* the linif of tlM» ywu-."' rvmarkwl uiiothcr wlioh'wilcr. 
" wln»n wt« pxiMfl inalton* to \n' xhu-k in our lin<'. TIk- \vint«T 
tni(li< in all out i»f th«' way now. an<! tho Hprinji; tnulc Urn* m>t 
openiHl yet. nor will It for a fi'W wwka yot.'" 

"The faH that thi- time in n««r at hand wlu-n thi' n-tailcr 
will ha«'<> to |Miy hiK annual liot'UM'ri." HiiitI a third wholi'sah- 
il<*«lfr, " inakii* huHin<<M« quiH at thin tiuio. They iiro not .H|M-iid- 
inK any more money for Ht<K'k than they are olili>fe«l ti> until they 
ha%v met that ver}- n«"<'«<(«Kary evil. There is hut little doinj; in 
the way of huyinjf f<»r futun* delivery." 

.