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Full text of "Pages and pictures from forgotten children's books"

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y have eacaped hiii notice, more eapeeially thoae with qnaint ami 
strationa. ftO. Leadenhall Htreet. B.C. 



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' • • • • 




JOHNNY GILPIN 




Forgotten 
(HIIPHENS Bgdks 



Andrew W. Tuer, f.s.a. 




i8g8-9 

LONDON : 

The Leadenhall Prefs, Ltd : 50, Leadenhall Street, E.C. 

Smptin, Ma-iliill. HamilUK, Kint & d^ Lid : 
Nmi rtrk: OerUi Scibrar'i &m, ISJ-I;?, Fifth Avtmt. 



Mh 



THE NEW YORlS-JI 

PUBLIC li:rary 
103964 



ASTOR, LENOX AND 
TlLDtN FOUNDATIONS. 

1LJ98 



The Lkadenhali. Press, Ltu : 
50, leadknhall street, london. e.c. 



• * • * 
• • •• • 

• • • • 
• • • • 






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Pages and PicturCvS 



FROM 



Forgotten Children's Books/ 




-^ 




HE love of things rendered quaint 
and interesting by lapse of time 
and change of surroundings seems 
to grow on one imperceptibly. We 
have all wondered whether the elders who 
presented, and the children who read these 
forgotten little books, recognised the uncon- 
scious humour of the writers of the text and 
the drawers of the pictures. What will a 
modern child say to a picture of a liberally 
bebuttoned self-satisfied little prig who, 
suddenly remembering a weakness of his 



^ A captious and exceedingly unpleasant i)erson, who is deaf to 
the mu-sic of a tripping title, tells nie that what I really mean are 
** Pages and Pictures from Cliildren's Forj;otten Books.'' I am not 
responsible for the vagaries of the English language. 

5 



Pages and Pictures from 

mother*s, invests his sixpence in prawns rather 
than gratify the craving of his soul for a second- 
hand Horace? And what will be thought of 
a spider's web which would engulf a goat, 
a little girl contemplating a robin as big as a 
pigeon, or ten feet of attenuated gracefulness 
meant for Mamma ? 

The illustrations, which were both plain and, 
coloured, were usually printed from engraved 
wooden blocks (for examples, see p. 28)," or 
copper-plates (p. 185), and occasionally they 
were lithographed from stone (p. 447), or etched 
(p. 40). The colouring was done by children 
in their teens, who worked with astonishing 
celerity and more precision than could be ex- 
pected. They sat round a table, each with a 
little pan of water-colour, a brush, a partly 
coloured copy as a guide, and a pile of printed 
sheets. One child would paint on the red, 
wherever it appeared in the copy ; another 
followed, say with the yellow, and so on until 
the colouring was finished. The cut of Johnny 
Gilpin (from an original wooden block) is 
in the frontispiece shewn plain, and its repeti- 
tion on the next page with lights and shades is 
meant to illustrate a coloured cut. 



Forgotten Children s Books 
The outside of many of the children's books 
published in the last century and in the early 
years of this, was rendered attractive to young 




eyes by a covering of Dutch paper stamped 
with designs in bright colours and gold foil. 
Such paper, peculiar to Holland, was rather 




Pages and Pictures from 

expensive, and has not been made for nearly 
three-quarters of a century. What little is left 
is preserved in the cabinets of the collector. 
The piece attached* 
is a genuine old 
specimen. Should 
the supply give out, 
an engraved block 
will have to be sub- 
stituted. 

The astute second-hand bookseller has been 
known to offer for much money a meritless 
child's book as unique because there is no copy 
in the British Museum. But in the B. M. are 
piles and piles of children's books — mostly of 
the "penny plain and tuppence coloured" order 
— which no one yet has had the courage to 
catalogue. 

The material is so great that in a single 
volume — which has no object but to amuse — 
the fringe only can be touched. In these 
" tastes " the reader will miss the names of 
authors and artists of conspicuous repute, and 
it will be observed that others of no repute 
whatever are conspicuous by their presence. 
The insertion of notes made by the writer 



Forgotten Children s Books 

would have much curtailed these pages and 
pictures, with which, as it is, occasional liberties 
in the way of space-saving backing of title 
pages, etc., have been taken. Two specimens 
of these notes may therefore suffice : 

**A capital little book, notable as being a 
favourite with our Queen-Empress when a child, 
is 'Ellen, or the Naughty Girl Reclaimed,'^ 
which formed one of a series of a dozen or 
more under different titles. The prettily tinted 
cut-out illustrations were on cardboard, separate 
from the text. A movable head, which, through 
much handling soon shewed signs of wear, 
fitted into a groove behind the neck, and com- 
pleted one of the pictures at a time. These 
little book-toys, which ran into many editions 
and were copied by German and French 
publishers, were prime favourites with two or 
three generations of children, and are now 
difficult to find." 

**When Mr. Ruskin published his re-print 
of * Dame Wiggins of Lee,' '^ he was probably 
unaware that the same cuts did duty in an 
edition of * Dame Trot and her Comical Cats.' " 



^ See p. 245. 2 See p^ ^i^. 

9 



V 



Forgotten Children s Books 

The serious or antiquarian side of the subject 
— the evolution of nursery stories/ with notes 
on the histories and achievements of the 
writers- of forgotten books for children, the 
designers, engravers, and their thrice-removed 
cousins — must wait. 

Had I not already possessed copies of most 
of the treasures kindly placed at my disposal 
by Miss Chamberlayne, Mrs. Field, Miss 
Edith C. Pollock, Mr. James F. Armstrong, 
Mr. J. Potter Briscoe, Mr. Joseph W. 
Darton, Mr. F. Hockliffe, Mr. Elkin 
Mathews, Mr. George Potter, and other 
collectors of forgotten children's books — whom 
I heartily thank — they would have been drawn 
upon much more largely. 



* See What Mr. Andrew Lang has to say in the introductions to 
his various collections of Fairy Tales and elsewhere. 

* For much about such matters see *' Books of Fiction for Children" 
and "Children's Books" in the Quarterly Review for March and 
June, 1844; *'On Some Illustrated Children's Books," by Michael 
Angelo Titmarsh, in Frazer's Magazine for April, 1846 ; "Children's 
Literature of the Last Century," by Miss Vonge, in MacmillaiCs 
Magazine for July, August and September, 1869; **S()me Notes on 
the History of Books for Children," by Chas. Welsh, in Neivbery 
House Ma/^azinc, August, 1 890 to February, 1891 ; ** Children's Books 
of Fifty Years ago," in The Sunday at Home for March, 1894; the 
writer's introduction to ** Dame Wiggins of Lee " (The Leadcnhall 
Press, Ltd.); Mrs. Field's interesting work, **The Child and his 
Book" (Gardner, Darton and Co.). There is a lot of literature 
bearing on the subject which, without undue diligence, the student 
may gather together. 

10 



Pages and Pictures 



FROM 



f^RGOTTEN 

< 

(HIIPHENfe BGDKS 



Instructor and guide 

for 

LITTLE MASTERS 

OH THE 

School of Virtue and Good Manners 

CONTAINLWG 

DireHions for C/ii/dren and Youth to behave 

and carry theiiifelves on all oceafions 

And Illuftraied with 
Thirty Copper Plates neatly engraved 

FOK THE USE OF SCHOOLS. 



Printed and fold by Kdw. Rylanii, 
in the Old Railey. 




Think this to be the wheel of fortune, and thou 
engaged with labour and induftry to keep it 
turning to thy good liking. Its roundnefs 
inftrufls thee that there is no end to a man's 
care and toil : that we enter upon life with 
uncertainty, and muft improve every incident 
with prudence, diligence and anxiety. 

Our pleafures and wealth (hall have an end : 
our forrows and affliiSions (hall have an end, and 



the days of a man's life are but a fpan long and 
fede away fuddenly like the grafs. But the 
wheel of fortune is for ever turning round ; 
though its changes are uncertain. 

Therefore place not too much dependence on 
fortune. To great men fhe is deceitful, to good 
men fickle ; and unfure to all in high eftate. 

In all thy anions take reafon for thy guide ; 
avoid floth ; be diligent and cautious : for not 
only great men and great afl^airs, but cities and 
kingdoms have been utterly loft and deftroyed 
by idlenefs, negligence, and too much truft in 
fortune. 

Never put off bufinefs till to-morrow that can 
and ought to be done to-day ; nor be content 
with promifes where it is poflible to get better 
fecurity. And thofe promifes which appear moft 
fmiling are moft to be doubted. For fortune is 
never more deceitful than when ftie feems moft 
to favour. If thou would'ft be fortunate treat 
her as thou doft thy hoop ; fafliion her according 
to thy way of life : for every man muft work his 
own fortune. 



l6 



TI«Tin5^^c.ll>«II 




When all nature droops with cold, and froft with 
its congealing quality makes one plain of earth 
and water ; and the afpiring youth, relaxed from 
ftudy, or the bufinefs of the day, difdains to 
indulge himfelf in idlenefs and a chimney corner, 
throws up the Ball for a fignal to his active 
fellows, to feek a more efTedlual means to warm 
the blood and to enure them to labour. 



The challenge is begun. Each fide enters the 
lift with hopes of victory. The ball flies from 
the foot. They run, they fly, they trip up each 
other, they fall ; and happy is that party which 
in defiance of the ftrength, adlivity and art of 
their antagonifts, ruflies through the crowd, fears 
no colours, and carries off the ball with refiftlefs 
ftrolces amidft the vanquifhed throng, without 
regard to the friendfhip fubfifting between him 
and his neighbours and fellows, Tom, Will and 
Jack. He gives no quarter : every person and 
thing must give way to courage and the honours 
of the game. 

How lively do we fee life figured in this 
exercife ! There is nothing a man purfues in 
this world but he meets a rival ; it becomes to 
them a ball of contention. And he who does 
not ufe his whole ftrength, diligence, and cunning 
to carry the point in view is fure to be deprived 
of the thing contended for. Therefore where 
intereft or glory is at ftake there is no regard to 
be paid to civility or friendfliip. All is juft and 
right that can be obtained by honour and honefty. 



i8 




A Manly exercife ! But full of admonition. 
It is only fit for athletic or ftrong conftitutions. 
It requires great labour, a conftant quick motion 
of the body ; and caufes a profufion of fweat in 
proportion. The fecret pleafure in this exercife 
is to prove yourfelf a better man than your 
antagonifl. But take care you do not overplay 
your part, and inflead of excelling work your 
ruin and deflrudtion. What wilt it avail in fuch 
a conteft to fay I have conquered Will or Tom 



with the lofs of my life ! or with a broken con- 
ftitution ! 

Neither let it become a temptation to grow 
up with you. Let it be ever fo agreeable to 
conftitution, or take ever fo much pleafure in 
batts and balls, let it not interfere with the duties 
of a man's life. Recreation is not finful, is not 
forbidden by the law of God or nations, except 
it diverts a man from his bufinefs by which he 
is to live or confumes his fubftance or fortune, 
which he holds in truft from Providence to pro- 
mote his own intereft in life, to fupport his credit, 
and to provide for thofe committed to his care. 

Upon the whole when you take a batt in your 
hand, imagine yourfelf at the rudder of fortune ; 
wherever you happen to ftrike the ball it deter- 
mines your fete : you watch it with anxiety ; 
you ftrike it with all the ftrength and dexterity 
you are capable of. Ufe the fame diligence in 
the purfuit of your calling. Endeavour with all 
your might and underftanding to catch the ball 
of commerce ; and to complete your work in 
whatever branch Providence has placed you, and 
you will as certainly fucceed, and get the better 
of the indolent, lazy, and negledful man, as you 
conquer your rival at batts and balls. 



20 



COBWEBS 

To catch 

FLIES: 

OR, 

Dialogues 



IN 



Short Sentences 
Adapted to Children 

fiom 

The Age of Three to Eight Tears 
IN TfVO VOLUMES 



Vol. I. Containing 
Eafy Leflbns in Words of 

Three Letters 
Four Letters 
Five Letters 
Six Letters 

Snited to Children from 
Three to Five Years of Age 



Vol. n. Containing 
Inftnictive LefTons in Words of 

One Syllable 
Two Syllables 
Three Syllables 
Four Syllables 

Suited to Children from 
Five to Eight Years of Age 



Vol. II. 



London : 

Printid and Sold by J. Marlhall & Co., No. 17 
Queen Street^ Cheapfide^ and No, 4 Jidermary 
Church^Yard in Bow Lane. 



COBWEBS TO CATCH FLIES 52 

In another part of the fair the boys faw fome 
. children tofled about thus. 




They were finging merrily the old nurfe's 
ditty. 



53 



COBWEBS TO CATCH FLIES 



The voices founded pleafantly to NecPs ear ; 
his heart danced to the notes ; jumping he called 
to his brother yames, " Dear yames ! look ! if 
I thought that our mamma would like it, I 
would ride fo." 

James 

My dear Ned! I am fure that my mamma 
would object to our riding in that. 

Ned 
Did you ever hear her name the Tofs-about ? 

James 

I am certain that if flie had known of it, fhe 
would have given us the fame caution as fhe did 
about the Merry-go-round. 

Ned paused a moment ; then said " How 
happy I am to have an elder brother who is fo 
prudent ! " 

yames replied — " I am no lefs happy that you 
are fo willing to be advifed." 



24 




From The Juvenile Magazine for April 1788. London: 
Marshall & Co., Aldermary Chutch-Yard, Bow Lane, 
Cheapside. 

25 



2^ 



^^ 



ASTo 



^'^Of/V;'^'*0jf 



Ot/A/o. 






PROVERBS EXEMPLIFIED 



AND ILLUSTRATED BY 



PICTURES FROM REAL LIFE. 



Teaching morality and a knowledge of 

the world ; 



WITH PRINTS. 



Designed as a Succession Book to /Esop's Fables. 

After the Manner, and by the Author, of 
Hogarth Moralized. 



Printed for, and published by the Rev. J. Trusler, 

and sold at the Literary Press, No. 62 Wardour- 

Street, Soho, and by all Booksellers. 

Entered at Stationers' Hall. 

[Price three shillings, half- bound.] 

London, May i, 1790 




Experience is the Mistress of Fools 

In vain did the inventor of gunpowder perceive 
its strength in blowing up lai^e pieces of rock. He 
doubted its power until he had placed himself on a 
lai^e stone over some ; but his experience was fatal 
to him, having lost his life upon the occasion. 



A Burnt Child dreads the Fire 

In illustration of this truth, see the picture before 
us. The little rt^ue has incautiously purloined the 
honey, and the bees have shewn their resentment. 
They have done him all the ill they could : they 
' have stung him. 



s lift their heels. 




Scald not vouk Lips in another 
Man's Pottagk 

A man and his wife had been quarrelling, and 
their words had ended in blows. A good-natured 
man passing by, interfered in her behalf, and whilst 
the man was beating his wife, he beat the man to 
make him desist. And what was the consequence ? 
The woman's resentment against her husband im- 
mediately dropped ; she took up the cudgels in his 
defence, and flew at the stranger, with a " Has not a 
man, you rascal, the liberty to beat his own wife if 
he pleases?" And the only thanks he got was a 
broken head for his pains. 
29 




A Faint Hkakt never won Fair Ladv 
This Proverb figuratively implies that courage and per- 
severance are absolutely necessary to effect any end we 
may have in view, and is by no means confined to the 
literal sense ; for as a faint heart never won fair lady, so 
cowardice and supineness will infallibly produce a failure 
in the accomplishment of any other purpose we may aim 
at Before, however, we determine to persevere, we 
should maturely consider the object of our attention, and 
how far it may tend {if successful) to our honour, our 
interest, or our happiness. The Tar in our print, like the 
element on which he gains his livelihood, has his calm and 
boisterous moments ; but in the most violent of the 
latter, he acts with prudence : and in the smoothest even 
of the former, carefully avoids everything that is indiscreet. 
A wife is the object of his wishes. He meets with a 
woman whom he fancies he should like, attacks her with 
boldness, accosts her under the consciousness of acting 
honourably, and declares his passion for her with his 
natural bluntness and honesty. She listens to his proposals, 
and crowns his wishes by accepting his offers. 
30 




THL RETURN KROM SCHOOL 



From Trifiti for Children, part 3. London, Published 
by W. Daiton, Gracechurch Street, June 20, 1798. 






then;:-/. yohkJ 
PUBLIC ..'jHARy' 



A8TOB. I l-NOX AND 
TILOrN FOl'r;DAT;QN^ 



PRESENT 



A LITTLE BOY 




Honton 

Publiflied by Darton & Harvey 

No. 5 5 Graccchurch Street 

June i4//r 1798. /"r/.v U. 



A Present for a Little Roy 



'TT^HIS Book is for the ufe of thofe little boys who 
-^ drive to do as they are taught by their friends 
fuch as do not cry when going to be wafhed or 
combed, nor pout nor grumble when fent to fchool ; 
and for thofe who fubmit to the requefts of their 
parents, who know what is proper for little boys to 
do. Some children have not been careful to attend 
to the advice of their friends, and have often brought 
themfelvcs into pain and trouble. A little boy and 
girl were once fent into a garden, to walk and play ; 
they were told not to pick any of the fruit, nor to 
eat fuch as had fallen from the trees. For feme 
time they amufed themfelves with trying to repeat 
the names of the flowers and running up and down 
the walks ; when the little boy feeing a pear upon 
one of the flower beds took it up, his fifter defired 
him not to eat it without aflcing leave. 

34 



AMUSEMENT 

FOR 

GOOD CHILDREN 

Bv G. S. C. 

OR A\ 

Exhibition of Comic Pictures 

By Bob Sketch 




London : 

Printed for and published by H. Iretr 

2Z Coppice Row, Cold Bath Squart 

Price I/. Pluin, or \i. f>d. Coloured 



PriaCed by Nicholson 

Sold by T. Hurst, Lane, Newman and Co. 

Newbury, Murray, Wallis. 



THE 

PUBLIC 



IC LIBRARY 






A8T0R, LENOX AND 
TILDEN FOUNDATIONS. 







.'< 



The unaffected and graceful Iww made by Master Kol)ert Sketch, 
which was taken notice of by the whole company and much spoken of 
al)road. Made from a drawing by himself while standing in front of a 
looking-glass. 



38 




At length they reached the very spot, and sure 
ough there was a tall thin figure standing in a 
lite sheet, with a pale face, and from its eyes, nose 
d mouth there was seen a kind of blazing fire, 
ic good clergyman was determined to put an end 
the apprehension of those about him, by going up 
the Ghost, as they called it, himself, and stripped 
of its mantle ; when lo and behold, it proved 
thing more than a tall mop-stick with a scooped 
"nip stuck upon the top of it, in which there was a 
htcd candle placed ; and this was the way the 
od clei^yman vanquished the alarming Ghost. 
iO 




The I'kKjuiMCK oi" I-'ashiox 

Here is presented to you a Beau of the last and 
of the present age ; one is an old bachelor, and the 
other a young one ; the old one has never changed 
his fashion since his youthful days and the other 
chauf^es with e\'cr\' new fashion that is adopted 
e\'erj' year. You e\idcntly see also that their 
dresses are preposterous, and j'et each thinks his own 
dress the best. They happened to meet one day in 
the I'ark, made a full stop, and took a sijjnificant 
view of each other ; then burst into a iioarse laugh 
at the absurdity of each other's dress. 
40 




Two Belles, one of the Past and the 

OTHER OF THE PRESENT A(;E 
This is the same subject as the preceding one, 
and differs only in point of sex. The contrast is 
just as great as the former one, and the effect which 
it produces is just as ridiculous. Aa old maid and 
a young flirt happened to meet some time ago at a 
rout in the neighbourhood of St. James's, and casting 
their eyes upon each other expressed no little degree 
of disapprobation at the novelty and absurdity of 
each other's dress. At length Miss Dolly Dabcheek 
was overheard to say to a young lady who was glid- 
ing with her along the room, and casting her eyes 
askance at Miss Fanny Furbelow as she passed. Did 
you ever see such a fright as that in all your life? 
41 




Hari.kquin, Columbink and I'ero 

Little Bob having seen the horseriding went one 
evening to sec a Pantomime. He could not help 
laughing at their tricks and tumbling about, and 
thought it appeared to him one scene of hurry- 
scurry. He was surprised to see a pretty Httle fair 
woman dressed so beautifully, fall in love with such 
an odd-looking creature as Harlequin, with a black 
face, running about like a squirrel in a cage, and 
dressed in a jacket which seemed to be made out of 
one of his old grandmother's patchwork quilts ; and 
as for Pero, he could make nothing at all of him. 
42 




JOEIN GlI.PIX AND THE Cl.OWX 
You may set the Clown down in this place as a 
ind of arch and wicked ostler at one of our stablc- 
ards in Moorfields, who findin^j that he has got an 
wkward kind of customer (and one that is very 
ttle used to riding) plays tricks with poor Gilpin 
nd puts him on one of the most restive horses he 
as in the stables, for the amusement of himself and 
is fellow servants, or merely to create a laugh, 
"his, however, is a wicked business, and such jokes 
ave often proved of the most serious consequence ; 
omctimes a broken arm or a leg, and too often a 
Token neck, which terminates in death. 
43 




Tni; Oi.u Ai-ru; Woman 

One winter evening young Pickle, a schoolfellow 
of Robert Sketch, contrived to tie a string to one of 
the wheels of the coaches ; then brought it slyly to 
the old Apple Woman's basket, and pretending to 
be a good customer, desired she would pick him out 
sixpennyworth of her best Pippins ; in the mean- 
time he contrived to fasten the other part of the 
string to the handle of the old woman's basket with- 
out being discovered ; then taking his apples made 
the best of his way to the corner of a street about 
twenty yards off and cried Coach ! Coach ! with all 
his might Off went the coach, away went the 
basket, down fell the old woman crying out, I am 
ruined ! I am ruined ! 

44 



THE 



JRATIOWAL 

Exhibition 




For Children . 



'i LoiKlon. Printed Ijy Darton flnclHwvey, 
Grnce Chiirrh Strpei.ISOO. 



( 



THEN.Vs ■ 

PUBLIC WSP, 




The Hoc. Cart 
In the print before us we have a representation of two 
dogs, that belong to a baker at I.ewishani, which by 
the help of a boy, draw a very great weight of bread 
and flour from village to village. They appear to work 
willingly, seem to be in good health, and wag their 
tails, with cheerful -looking faces. — Moderate labour 
conduces to health and cheerfulness both in men and 




The Husbandman 



Ye pamper'd great, who proudly ride 
In gilded coaches, as ye glide 

Along the crowded street ; 
Scorn not the man who tilts the fields 
Who reaps the fruits which autumn yields, 

That rich and poor may eat. 

Tho' Fortune adverse, for his home 
Has rajs'd in state no splendid dome, 

Nor spread upon his board 
Delicious dainties — and his name 
Unblazon'd in the rolls of Fame 

Is lost among the crowd. 




The Fallt amended 



A little boy who had discovered a bird's nest in a 
thicket, felt a mistaken joy at finding such a prize, and 
hurried away with it : as he walked towards home 
he met his sister, who upon seeing the nest, remnrked 
to him how curiously it was formed : moss, hair and 
wool combined together, and these were lined with 
feathers by the industrious and tender parents. 




The Barber's Shop 



This is a view of a barbtr's shop wlien every barber 
was a surgeon, such as the poet Gay describes. In 
addition to this they made wigs. At length the more 
skilful in surgery forsook the barber's trade, and ob- 
tained an act of parliament to become a company 
corporate, independent of the Andent Company ef Barber 
Surgeons. The barber's pole represents the staff usually 
put into the hands of those who are bled, and of the 
handle with which the arm is bound. 



PKIZE 



iYOtrrsPUL 'obedience* 




JLonbon : 

TUKTtD AND SOLD BY DfttTOH AND HaRVET, 

Gracechvkch- Street. 



( 



THEis 



K* 




PUBLIC LIBRARY 



ASTOF<. '. rNOX AND 
TILDEN rOUND^.TiOS" 




The Littlk Frui'i- Ski. 



Every one who pafTcs this little girl cannot 
help flopping to admire her ; (he is fo clever 
and underftands her bufincrs To well, and never 
eats any of the nice things without leave. 

Though the fruit is very fweel, 
Sufan knows (lie muft not eat, 
Till her parents do her treat. 




Breakfast 



The walls of the grotto were covered with 
ivy. Francis handed the bread and butter to 
his mamma, papa, and fitters, and then helped 
himfelf laft. 

His papa and mamma were quite charmed 
with his politencfs. Indeed his manner of 
behaviour, at this time, ought to be obferved 
by all little folks. 




The Walk into the I-'ields 



They were all very hot ; poor Chloe was 
fatigued and could go no farther. I'apa then 
faid " I fee a pretty little wood clofe by ; let 
us try to reach it," which they at length accom- 
plifhed. This little wood was a perfect bower ; 
it was delightfully fhady and cool, and full of 
charming fingingbirds. Papa then made them 



all fit down without ceremony on the grafs 
under the fhade of a fine fpreading oak, and 
there they feafted on the ham, the fruit and 
the cakes. 

Anne, Jane and Francis were very dv}^ and 
hungry ; they thought it right, however, to give 
poor Chloe fomething to eat before they helped 
themfelves : " Poor little creature, flie is very 
hungry," faid Francis, They then gave Chloe 
and Growler fome victuals : Chloe expreffed 
great pleafure and fatisfaction ; fhe raifed her 
head and wagged her tail to thank Jane and 
then fell to eating heartily. As foon as good 
papa had helped them all, after being thankful 
for what was fet before them, they made a 
moft hearty meal ; then had a glafs of wine, 
which cheered their hearts, and put them quite 
in order. 



56 



THIRD CHAPTER 



ACCIDENTS 



REMARKABLE EVENTS 



Caution and Instrj 






ChilLiren 



LONKiN : 

I*rinted bv .ind for Danon A: Hancv 

Gracechurch Street 



iSoi 




Htfere fuH of pafTengers, many 
of them fcreaincd out for fear, 
left ihe poor woman Oiould 
have been liurt; but (lie crcapcd 
with only the frijjht,ancl telling 
herhufljand thtii before fiie got 
into the Ci'rt. again. Hie fliouhl 
^ee that die plug.s wererufLeiied 




room, and undrawing his cur- 
tains, he faw the lion growling W 
over the body of ihe nian^^WJ 
whom it had jull killed, and ^ 
fepazaied his head from his 
body. The terror of ihe gen- 
tleman may be eafily conceiv- 
ed; he flew out of the room, 
and ha.d the lion fecured. 




Danger of TratplUng in Foggy 
Heather. 

As the flage from London 
to Stoke Newington was pafs- 
ing through Kingfland Road, 
on a very foggy night, ihe 
coach going too near to the 
fide of a brick field, oppofiie 
to Haggerliofle, ihe horfes 




his 1 --, - " 

and ut ii yuudi killiuj^ lii^ be- 
loved friend, without either 
having any fuch intention. On 
llie ni^ht of the late gentral 
illumination on account of 
peace, as Edward Thumbwood 
was pafTmg along King Street, 
i Golden Square^ n piftol was 



TRIFLES 

CHILDREN. 






Thefe children appear to 
ride very quietly. Dogs are 
capable of drawing a great 
weight, and two of them may 
travel feveral miles in a day 
with a child or two in a chaife. 
In Newfoundland dogs are ufed 
for drawing wood from the fo- 
refb to the houfes. 



64 




This is good exercife, and 
.we know no reafon why girls 
ftbuld not ufe it, in modera- 
tion, as well as boys ; for, when 
they have been working with 
^a! needle for fome time in 
I cold weaiher, the exercife will 
I tend much to promote their 





put them on ih 
; the horfe (hould go to lirinK 
' in a pond, or pafs through a 
brook, lie fhould loolen the 
bridle-rein, and be upon his 
guard, for fome horfcs thruft 
their heads fo very fuddenly 
down, as to thro\v^ the rider in- 
to llie water. 



I 



THE 

HISTORY 
SANDFORD & MERTON 

A Work 

intended for the ufc of Children. 

I!v THOMAS DAY, Ks',.. 

SiifTi-r link- diiMrun 1o c-diir- miui im-, 

EMHEl.l.lSHEn irr/'N I-'J^O.VT/SrjF.CES. 
The Tenth Edition Corrected, 

IN THREE VOLUMES 



London ; 
Printed for John Stockdale, Plcc.-idilly 




Sandford and Merton 

Harry, who happened to be walking near the place, 
CAine running up, and alked what was the matter ? 
Tommy, who was fobbing mod piteoufly, could not find 
words to tell him, but pointed to his leg, and made Harry 
fenfible of what had happened. Harry, who though young 
was a boy of a mod courageous fpirit, told him not to 
be frightened, and innanily fdzing the fnake by the neck 
with as much dexterity as refolution, tore hjm from 
Tommy's leg and threw him to a great diftance off. 



69 





Sandforo and Mekton 

When Tommy returned lo the room, he had aiiered 
his whole appearance, having difcarded all (he gaudy 
decorations of his perfon, and made himfelf as neat and 
plain as polVible. Tommy next morning arofe early and 
begged Mr. Barlow's company lo farmer Sandford's, 
whilher he took the lamb he had delivered from the dog 
with the Highlander's afliftance. He prefenlly faw Harry 
driving his father's flock and ran eagerly to him. They 
mutually embraced, and were inflantly reconciled. 




L0N]>ON, 

fVinlril Ia- Dnrtoit XrllBii-py, 

l&Ol. 

Frier 5Upmr«. 



Peg Top 

I knew a little boy who nearly lofl one of his toes by 
a violent blow from one of thefe tops : the peg entered 
his foot, and if immediate care had not been taken it 
might have been dangerous. Surely then peg top is 
hardly fafe. It often happens that by wetting the firing 
too much it fo faAens around the top as not ealily to be 
difengaged : and when this is the cafe the byAanders are 
in great danger of receiving hurt, as many little boys can 
affert the truth of, who have gotten hurt by ftanding too 
near the ring. Many think too little of danger when 
any favourite amufement is at hand. But what a pity 
it is that young folks will not take warning by the mis- 
fortunes of others but go on the old way till the like 
befal themfelves. 



73 



Cricket 

This play requires more flrcn^'^th than fomc boys 
poffefs, to manage the ball in a proper manner ; it mufl 
therefore be left to the more robuft lads, who are fitter 
for fuch athletic exercifes. It muf\ be allowed to be 
good diverfion, and is of fuch note, that even men 
frequently divert themfelves with it. IJat and ball is an 
inferior kind of cricket, and more fuitable for little 
children, who may fafely play at it, if they will be 
careful not to break windows. 



Skating 

This, though a pleafing diverfion, is attended with 
much danger. In mild climates the rivers are feldom 
frozen fo hard, but they will foon crack and give way, 
and fometimes the (kater is drowned. In colder 
countries where the winter is more rigorous, there is very 
little danger of the ice breaking, and (kating on the frozen 
river is nearly as fafe as walking on the land, and they 



79 



MORAL SONGS 



FOR THE 



Instruction and Amusement 

OF 

Children 



Intended as a Companion to 

DR. WATTS'S 
DIVINE SONGS 



By John Oakman, & Others 



London : 

Printed and sold by Darton & Harvey, 

Gracechurch Street 

I 802 



Price Sixpence 




INTRODUCTION 



:r of another who has 
way, however fucccfsful 
*ill only gain the fervile 



Whoever follows il 
been happy in any p 
he may prove in his 
name of an imitator. 

A man fo eminent as Dr. Watts has been in his 
Hymns and Moral Songs, for the edification of 
children, it muft be granted, there is Itttlc hope of 
following with much fuccefs. 

The facility of his numbers, his knowledge of the 
Divine Scriptures, his attention to the duty he was 
called to as a clergyman, and his fmcere regard to the 
flock over whom he was appointed fhcphcrd, no doubt 
muft have placed him firft in this ufeful and truly in- 
llructive method of writing. 



But as he declared himfelf there is much room left 
to proceed in the fame way, and has in a manner ex- 
horted others to purfue his ideas, the Author of this 
little book hopes to be excufed for the attempt if not 
applauded. 

There cannot exift any religion without morality ; 
therefore to mingle it in an eafy manner fo as to be 
underftood by infant minds muft be right, and the 
intention excufc the faintnefs of the performance. 
The formal practice of religion is eafy, but the real 
knowledge of it not fo foon attainable ; therefore, 
morality may be ufed as a ladder for young minds to 
climb, till they are capable of underflanding more 
fublime truths. 

I would have it underftood that the prefent per- 
formance is not confined to any particular fe<fl, but in 
general, that the good of all denominations may fafely 
recommend it to their children. That it may amufe 
and edify, for which it was intended, is the finccre 

^'* °*" The EnrroR. 



85 




ft LH cbarity with kind good wril, 
With iill ln-r charmit, Hiisod you flitlj 
All I'cHiHi iiotiuni Jithcstvixy, 

Ami yuu'll be liippy every il*y. 

4 The grcsicD bIc(Cng fiom above, 
li tureljr uiiivut'al love j 
Ti* that ceiueuti at ill you'll lind. 
Then love)uucpIajaitltciuiid beklud. 



I 




2 Thfite Vanity, deck'd with the flowreM 
of May, 
Drliifiire snd wanton, her charm* did 

IdifplajF J 
And many, ibe dupes of her whim, or 



J 1 foon faw flie beckonM me forth to ad- 
' Tajoininihd'ongpOtlalripia ibc datiec. 




STOUT labour I law, » be went to 
hi* work. 

So clicerfully oxer the dalCt 
In bii mouth was a pipe, in ooe band 
was a fork. 
At hit back bung hi> wallet aocl 4ail. 

2 Ruddy Iienlih In liii countcn.iocc fecin'd 

to have place, 

For his mind was a flrangnr locare; 

Contentment was fcaced, I faw, in liif 

face: 

Sucb bafpinefs who would not Aare. 




^l,. DMgtr tf a!/},^>iJlHg Timr. 

HOW crnfiily (he (bider weaves, 
Aiiil drnws her (Irnclrr thre;<>l» 1 
Yet Aidden chai;ce her hupM deceives 
' And fpoils the net! (lie tptcaJn, 

i Let roe ti'it fpcnd my prcriouB hooiB 
~ tn trifling work* like ihefei 
But dill employ my aflivc powVi 
In wbit ntay irnly plcerc 

12 




And fwift ia the circuit ihry take on the 

gfounii ; 

The U<ii all purdiing, each doiibk] hit 



And the (aH^t they fcourgc ibcm, tbc 
better ibff go. 



LITTLE 

PkATTLE 

OVER 
A BOOK Ol' PRINTS. 

WITH 
FOR, CHILDHEN. 




londok: 

ruUifliedby Vr^DaEion and WHtrvey. 

aeeor^ng to Act of FurlUnMiii.S cptTti) j8o.t . 

Price 6pciici;.. 




pailful, i^ich fhe is ca^^^f 
to hermafter's houfe. J 




A lady was one day walk- 
mg in the fields* with her lit- 



Who is this little child in 
a go-cart? I hclieve it is 
Charles. See how kind the 




nutfe is. She is teaching 
him to walk, and (ays, take 
care Charles; now this way 
Charles. If he can be taught 




Here is a ctaimingpifture ! 
Sophia and Caroline draw- 
ings their little fifters, Lucy 
ind Charlotte, in a chaife. 




* How kind and affeftionate 
are the elder girls* and how 
pretty and cheerful the little 



DAME PARTLET'S FARM 



CONTAINING 



AN ACCOUNT 



OF THE 

GREAT RICHES SHE OBTAINED BY INDUSTRY, 
THE GOOD LIFE SHE LED, 

And alas. Good Reader/ 
HER SUDDEN DEATH ; 

TO WHICH IS ADDED 

A HYMN 

Written by Dame Partlet 
Just before her Death, 

AND AN 



EPITAPH 
For her Tomb-stone 



HonHon : 
Printed for J. Harris, corner of St. PauPs Church Yard 



I 804. 



At Harris's, St. Paul's Church-yard, 

Good children meet a sure reward ; 

In comfng home the other day 

I heard a little master say, 

For every penny there he took 

He had rcceiv'd a little book, 

With covers neat, and cuts so pretty. 

There's not its like in all the city ; 

And that for twopence he could buy 

A story-book would make one cry ; 

For little more a book of riddles : 

Then let us not buy drums or fiddles, 

Nor yet be stopt at pastry-cooks, 

But spend our money all in books ; 

For when we've learnt each book by heart 

Mamma will treat us with a tart. 



96 



DAME PARTLET'S FARM 

Dame Partlet was a widow left, 
With children young and poor ; 

But her industry obtain'd 
A comfortable store. 



Her uncle left her fifty pounds 
And golden guineas twenty 

Her sister left her three pound I 
And silver she had plenty 



Her home brew d ale shi. made so strong, 
The Sexton came and proied U 

The Rector thought twas not amiss — 
And harvest men ill lovd it 




Her dress was always clean and neat, 
Her face was never nasty ; 

She always wash'd her hands before 
She made an apple pasty. 
97 



Of cowslip, elder, currant wine. 
She made three little casks, 

And when it stood till it was fine 
She corked it up in flasks. 

A slice of cake and glass of wine 
A cheesecake and a pie, 

She gave to each good boy and girl 
That never told a lie. 



* 



* 



But oh ! alack ! and well-a-day ! 

Such news I have to tell, 
'Twill make you children sob and sigh, 

Your eyes with crying swell. 

Dame Partlet on the tenth of June 

Was sixty-nine years old, 
And 'twas upon that very day 

She caught a dreadful cold. 

That cold a fever soon brought on, 
The fever brought on death. 

So, after having made her will 
She yielded up her breath. 

Yet stop your grief, for she has left 

Each little girl and boy 
Who gets by heart this little hymn 

A cheesecake and a pie. 



98 



YOUTHFUL 



A NEW EDITION. 




LONDON. 
,]Pld)lil^aV^^I>arton andJoCHarveji 

niceflpeikcc. 



1 0^964. 



lo Tossing* ihe Ball . 
> e 




II bliiidinatrslluff. 



Plate 23. 

Riding in a Chair drawn by Dogs, 

The boy who can make harnefs for two 
dogs fhews much ingenuity, and when 
dogs are ufed in proper command they 
will draw a great weight, and travel 
quickly with a light one. Some years 
fince, a poor man who was lame in his 
legs made harnefs for four large dogs, and 
placed them in a light chaife, capable of 
holding four or fix little children, and 
with thefe he travelled from town to town, 
each child paying a halfpenny for a ride : 
he obtained a decent living for himfelf 
and his dogs. 



104 



26 AiT Balloons. 




27 Drcssiiig' Polls. 







From " The Looking- Glass. A True History 
of the Early Years of an Artist. By 
Theophilus Marcliffe. London ; Thomas 
Hodglcins, at the Juvenile Library, Hanway 
Street. 1805." 



THE Ki:w YORK/ 

PUBLIC LIBRARY' 



Iastoh. 
TILDLN' F 



ASTOh. Lr.NCX AND 
TILDLN' KOLWDATIONS. 



MODERN LONDON 



BEINC THE 



HISTORY 



AND 



PRESENT STATE 



OF THE 



BRITISH METROPOLIS 



ILLUSTRATED WITH NUMEROUS COPPERPLATES 



lonlion: 

Printed for Richard Phillips, 

No. 71 St. Paul's Churchyard 

By C. Mercier & Co., Northumberland Court, Strand. 



1805. 



r 



/ 



DESCRIPTION of the PLATES, representing the 
Itinerant Traders of London in their ordinary 
costume ; with notices of the remarkable places given 
in the background. 

Lavender. 

" Six bunches a penny sweet Lavender " is the cry that 
invites in the streets the purchasers of this cheap and 
elegant perfume. The distillers of Lavender are supplied 
wholesale from the nursery grounds, and a considerable 
quantity of the shrub is sold in the streets to the middling 
classes of inhabitants who are fond of placing Lavender 
among their linen (the scent of which conquers that of the 
soap used in washing) yet are unwilling to pay for the 
increased pungency of distillation. 

Temple Bar. 

This Gate was erected to divide the Strand from Fleet 
Street in 1670 after the great fire; previous to which 
there were only posts with rails and chains. On the east 
side which forms the background of the Plate, in the 
niches, are the statues of James and Anne of Denmark ; 
and on the opposite side are those of Charles the First 
and Charles the Second : all executed by Bushnell. On 
the top of this Gate were exhibited the heads of the un- 
fortunate victims to the justice of their country for the 
crime of high treason. The last sad mementoes of this 
kind were the rebels in 1746. This Gate is the western 
extremity of the city of London. 



Ill 



f^i^e--*-/ '^r^.'t«ii. 




S 'JTH A"W'JB]E JR KT :B S , 



,«/.„«..>. .'/I-,, 




MATrwni-. 



'iJflr''jl'!^'S^^"f"'' U ^'ilflC 




Butt a TSintj. or a'MK Pjt.ay. 




BANIi) BOTSES. 



A 



PRESENT 



FOR A 



LITTLE GIRL 



BtH^r- 



ILontion 

Printed by and for 
Darton & Harvey, Graccchurch Street. 



i8os 



[Price One Shilling.] 



A Present for a Little Girl 



THERE GOES LITTLE ANN ! 




Never climb on chairs, they were made to fit on, not 
to ftand upon. See here we have the print of a little 
girl who did not mind what was faid to her, for fome- 
times (he would get upon the window feat and be in 
danger of falling out of the window ; at other times flic 
would ftand upon the fender before the fire and try to 
rtep upon the brafs footman, fo as to be in danger of 
getting her frock on fire, or of being fcalded by the 
fteam of the boiling water in the tea-kettle. 



A Present for a Little Girl 




I once heard of a little girl who was much ruder than 
(he Oiould be and did not always do as (he was bid, for 
one day at breakfaft time (he ftood upon a leg of the 
tabic and was trying to reach fomc toa(t in great hafte, 
inflead of aiking for it in a proper manner as (he (hould 
have done ; when the ftool flipping from under her feet, 
(he caught hold of the table to fave herfeif from (ailing, 
and down fell the urn with the boihng water ! 



A Present for a Liltle. Girl 




Fron 



t unhmvn kund. 



I,m>K, filter, liH)k at yon i«K)r lad, 
How pale he loiilcs ! how meanly clad ! 
We went tii aunt's the other day, 
And had a penny to fjKnd in play. 

Now Lucy I will give him mine. 
And hope thou'lt alfo give him thine. 
- -Yes, that I will, with all my heart 
Aiid glad I have not fpcnt my part. 

Here, little bov without a hat, 
Take this halfixmnv, alfo that ; 
For we have clothes and victuals too, 
We do not want, tlio' others do, 
122 



THE 



PRETTY, PLAYFUL, TORTOISE-SHELL 



CAT. 



A NEW GAME 



OF 



QUESTIONS AND COMMANDS. 



EmbeHiBhed with 14 Ck>loiired EngraviiigB. 



London : 
Printed (by assignment of E. Marshall) by 

D. CARVALHO, 
74 Chiswell Street, Finsbury Square. 



DIRECTIONS 



FOR PLAYING THE 



ENTERTAINING GAME 



OK 



"THE PRETTY, PLAYFUL, TORTOISE-SHELL CAT." 



When the Company are seated, they first proceed to 
choose a Treasurer, who is likewise to play, and subject to 
the same forfeits as the rest of the Company. The first 
person, generally the Treasurer, begins with his command 
to the next — " Take this^ The second person asks — 
''Whafs this?'' The first 2imyiQXS—'' A pretty, playful, 
tortoise-shell Cat'' Whether it be a marble or a pin- 
cushion, or anything else, the name the first player 
gives it must be received by the rest of the Company. 
Then the second person goes on to the third, and 
so through the Company, always passing it from right 
to left, till it comes to the first again, who on passing 
it adds each time a division of the Game, as thus : 
—''Take this,"—'' Whafs this!"— "Two Cows, each in a 
hat ; with a pretty, playful, tortoise-shell Cat'' Everyone 
who blunders in passing it is to be fined by the Treasurer, 
and the command passed to the next. When all the 
divisions of the game are completed, the Crier is to be 
blindfolded, and laying his or her head in the Treasurer's 
lap, the Treasurer shall draw out the forfeits one by one, 
saying aloud — " What shall the person do w/io owns this ? " 
To which the Crier answers, by informing the Company 
what punishment he chooses to inflict. 

124 




vmntand — Take this. Ques/ion — What's this ? 
tr — Ten Ladies with their flounces high. 

And feathers reaching to the sky. 

Nine Poets in a garret, 

Writing a dirge upon a Parrot. 

Eight wise Kittens, busy all. 

Sorting silver, large and small ; 

On their sagacity depend, 

And to the Bank your silver send. 

Seven Bears, with gloomy looks, 

Making up their yearly txwks. 

With bad debts lill'd, and other losses ; 

Sure never Bears met with such crosses. 

Six Barbers dressing wigs 

For a dozen learned pigs. 

Five Hens going to France, 

To learn a fashionable dance. 

Four Hares making a mat. 

Three Tigers catching a rat. 

Two Cows, each in a hat. 

With a pretty, playful, tortoise-shell Cat 
12S 



Command — Take this. 
Question — What's this ? 

Answer, 

Twelve Cocks, with cambric kerchiefs white, 

Lamenting that all is not right ; 

Sobbing, sighing, moaning, crying. 

That Britain's glories all are dying. 

Eleven Greyhounds in a boat, 

Tow'd up the river by a Goat. 

Ten Ladies with their flounces high, 

And feathers reaching to the sky. 

Nine Poets in a garret, 

Writing a dirge upon a Parrot. 

Eight wise Kittens, busy all, 

Sorting silver, large and small ; 

On their sagacity depend. 

And to the Bank your silver send. 

Seven Bears, with gloomy looks. 

Making up their yearly books. 

With bad debts fiird, and other losses ; 

Sure never Bears met with such crosses. 

Six Barbers dressing wigs 

For a dozen learned pigs. 

Five Hens going to France, 

To learn a fashionable dance. 

Four Hares making a mat. 

Three Tigers catching a rat. 

Two Cows, each in a hat, 

With a pretty, playful, tortoise-shell Cat. 

126 



INSTRUCTIVE HINTS 



IN EASY LESSONS 



FOR CHILDREN 



Part I 



London : 
Printed for Darton & Harvey, no. 55 Grace- 
church Street, 
1806 



Price One Shilling. 




t is a plea-fanl thing to learn to re.td. If you would 
well, you muft at firfl, read llow. K-ve-ry mark you 
3e-tween the words is a paufc or flop, where you may 
breath. Some chil-dren by not mind-tng thefe al-ways 
ill, and fpoil the fenfe. If it is worth while to read at 
is right to try to read well. You (liould ne-ver hur-ry 
■ a-ny word, without mak-ing it out right. If you do 
enow it try to fpell it and a(k the per-fon who is teach- 
you to tell you how to di-vide it. You need fel-dom 
your breath but where there is a |>aufe, and if you try 
o this you will much foon-er make out the fenfe of 
you read. 




Come ht-lher lit-tle girl and tell ine what you did yef-ter- 
day, I came to fchool, read a lef-fon, work-ed at my 
nee-dle, and got fonie fpell-ing. \Vhen 1 went home I 
wait-ed on my mo-ther, went on an er-rand, and mend-ed 
my a-pron. Very well. You can al-fo lell- me what you | 
ex-pect to do to-mor-row. Yes, I mull go and fee how i 
my grand-mo-ther does be-fore break-faft, and take her 
a Itl-tle new milk. At fchool I mufl read my lef-fon and I 
try to fm-i(h my needle-work ; and m the e-ven-ing I am i 
to go and play with the girls on the green. 




Some boys when they take hor-fes to water or to grafs 
are apt to kick, beat, and ride them too hard. This 
fright-ens and makes them run away in order, if they can, 
to get from thofe who ufe them fo cru-el-ly. Such boys are 
of-ten thrown for their fol-ly, and fome-times kick-ed and 
killed. The moft beau-ti-ful and the mod fpi-ri-ted hor-fes 
in the world, live in a coun-try a great way ofT. They are 
ne-ver beat-en, and they are fo gen-tle, that if the ri-der 
hap-pens to fall they fland quite (liU till he mounts and 
never of-fer to kick him, as ours, by be-ing u-fed ill, fome- 
times do. 




In fome coun-lries where the dogs are lar-ger than ir 
ours, they car-iy bur-dens, and draw lit-tle herb-carts tc 
mar-kct. i'our of them when yok-ed to-ge-lher will dra« 
a load of one-hun-dred and nine-ty pounds weight, be-fide; 
the dri-ver, a dif tance of twenty miles. There are a great 
_ma-ny o-ther ufe-ful ways in which the dog is em-ploy-ed 
Who could hear to kick and life his dog illP It is noi 
on-ly while liv-ing that the dog is a help to man. In fome 
coun-tries his (lefli is eaten, and thought ve-ty good : and 
fome per-fons who have taf-ied it, fay it is not much un- 
like mut-ton. 



MORAL AND ENTERTAINING KABLES 




The old fly having, as she thought, suffi- 
ciently cautioned her, flew about her business. 
Directly she was gone the young one turned up 
her nose and said to herself, " How over-cautious 
these old-folks arc! Here I am denied the 
innocent amusement of flying over this steam- 
ing cauldron. Indeed, if I had no wings, or 
were so simple as to be regardless of my own 
safety, it would be a different case. So, good 



3J 



MORAL AND ENTERTAINING FABLES. 



mother, notwithstanding your fine experience, I 
shall divert myself by flying about it, and let me 
see who will draw me into it/' — This said, the 
conceited thing hovered over the pot, and being 
involved in the boiling vapour, suddenly lost her 
strength and dropped into the dreadful gulph. 
As she perished she exclaimed, " How wretched 
is the child who disregards the admonition of 
its parent, and prefers its own wisdom to 
maternal experience." 



From Moral and Entertamin^ Fables ; with copper- 
plates, for the Amusement of Children. Part I. 
London : Printed for Darton and Harvey, no. 55 
Gracechurch Street, 1806. Price one shilling. 



134 



HOOK SHOl' 




Frontispiece to Fortunk's Footbali.. Dedicated to 
the young family of the Rt. Hon. Lady Ann 
Hudson. London : Tabarl & Co. Juvenile 
Library, 157 New Bond Street. 1806. 



THEN .^ ~ rRK 

IPUBLIC Ui::/-P^" 



ASTOrv ITNOX AND 




THE 



DAISY; 



OR, 



Cautionary Stories in Verse 



ADAPTED TO THE 



IDEAS OF CHILDREN 



FROM 



Four to Eight Tears Old 



■vy^^-v/ 



Illustrated with thirty engravings on 
copperplate 



Eonbon: 
Printed for J. Harris, successor to E. Newbery, 

corner of St. Paul's Church Yard j and 

Crosby & Co., Stationers Court 

1807 



THE DAISY 




PRETTY PUSS 

Come, pretty Cal I 
Come here to me ' 

1 want lo pal 

You on my knee. 

Co, naughty Tray ! 

By barking thus, 
You'll drive away 

My pretty Puss. 



138 



THE DAISY 




MISS FEGCIY 

As Peggy was crying aloud for a cake. 
Which her mother had said she should felth 
from the wake, 

A genlleman knock'd at the door ; 
He enter'd the parlour, and shew'd much surprise, 
That it really was Peggy who made all the noise, 

For he never had heard her before. 

Miss Peggy asham'd, and to hide her disgrace. 
Took hold of her frock, and quite cover'd her face. 

For she knew she was naughty Just then ; 
And instantly wiping the tears from her eyes, 
She promis'd her mother to make no more noise. 

And kiss'd her again and again. 



139 



THE DAISY 




COME WHEN YOU ARE CALLED 

Where's Susan, and Kilty, and Jane ? 

Where's Hilly, and Sammy, and Jack ? 
O '. there they are, down in the lane, 

(Jo, Beuy, and bring ihcm all back. 

But Billy is rude and won't come, 
And Sammy is running too fast ; 

Come, dear hllle children, come home, 
And Hilly Js coming at last. 

I'm glad he remembers what's right, 
For though he likes sliding on ice, 

He should not be long out of sight. 
And never want sending for twice. 



140 



THE 



COWSLIP, 



OR 



More Cautionary Stories, 

in Verse 



By the Author of that much admired little 

work entitled the 

DAISY. 



London: 

Printed for J. Harris, corner of St. Paulas 

Church Tard ; and B. Crosby, Stationers 

Court, 

1811 



THE COWSLIP 

THE SASH 

Mamma had ordered Ann, the maid, 
Miss Caroline to wash ; 
And put on, with her clean white frock, 
A handsome muslin sash. 

But Caroline began to cry. 

For what you cannot think : 

She said, " Oh, that's an ugly sash," 

" I'll have my pretty pink." 

Papa, who in the parlour heard 
Her make the noise and rout, 
That instant went to Caroline, 
To whip her, there's no doubt. 



LISTEN TO REASON 

One afternoon, as Joseph West, 
The boy who learned his lesson best, 
Was trying how his whip would crack, 
By chance hit Headstrong on the back. 

Enrag'd he flew, and gave poor Joe, 
With all his might, a sudden blow : 
Nor would he listen to one word. 
When Joe endeavoured to be heard. 

Joe finding him resolv'd to fight, 
For what was accidental quite, 
Although he never fought before, 
Beat Headstrong till he'd have no more. 

142 



•THE COWSLIP 

GOING TO SCHOOL 

Good children, when they're sent to school, 
Will never loiter on the way : 
With them this is a constant rule, 
And not to stop to stare and play. 

They never speak to any one. 

Who talks when he should mind his task, 

F*or dunces frequently have on 

A very black and frightful mask. 

But when they\c been at school all day, 
Their tasks and lessons finished ; then 
Their friends will give them leave to play, 
When they return from school again. 



THE GOOD GIRL 

Miss Lydia Banks, though very young, 
Will never do what's rude or wrong. 
When spoken to she always tries 
To give the most polite replies. 

Obser\'ing what at school she's taught, 
She turns her toes as children ought ; 
And when returned at night from school, 
She never lolls on chair or stool. 

Some children when they write, we know. 
Their ink about them, heedless throw ; 
But she, though young, has leam'd to think 
That clothes look spoiPd with spots of ink. 

Perhaps some little girl may ask, 
If Lydia always learns her task ; 
With pleasure I can answer this, 
Because with truth I answer, " Yes." 



THE COWSLIP 



THE HOYDEN 

Miss Acnes had two or three dolls, and a box 

To hold all their bonnets, and tippets, and frocks 

In a red leather thread case, that snapped when it shut 

She had needles to sew with, and scissors to cut : 

But Agnes lik'd better to play with rude boys 

Than work with her needle, or play with her toys ; 

Young ladies should always appear neat and clean, 

Yet Agnes was seldom drest fit to be seen. 

I saw her one day attempting to throw 

A very large stone when it fell on her toe. 

The boys who were present, and saw what was done. 

Set up a loud laugh, and call'd it fine fun. 

But I took her home, and the doctor soon came. 

And Agnes I fear will a long time be lame, 

And from morning till night she laments ver)- much, 

That now when she walks she must lean on a cnitch. 

And she has told her dear father a thousand times o'er. 

That she never will play with rude boys any more. 



144 



THE 



BUTTERFLY'S BALL 



AND THE 



Grasshoppers Feast 



By Mr. Roscoe 



To which is added 



AN ORIGINAL POEM 



ENTITLED 



A Winter's Day 

By Mr. Smith, of Stand 



ilonbon: 

Pfinted jor J. Harris, successor to E. Nevvbery, 

At the original Juvenile Library^ comer 

of St. Paul's Church-yard 



1807 




THE BUTTERFLY'S BALL 



Come take up your Hats, and away iet us haste 
To the Butterfly's Hall, and the Grasshoppcr^s Feast, 
The Trumpeter Gad-fly has summon'd the Crew, 
And the Revels arc now only waiting for you. 
So said little Robert, and pacing along. 
His merry Companions came forth in a Throng. 




And the Squirrel well pleas'd such Diversions to see. 
Mounted high over head, and look'd down from a Tree. 
Then out came the Spider, with Finger so fine. 
To shew his Dexterity on the tight line. 



From one Branch to another, his Cobwebs he slung, 
Then quick as an Arrow he darted along. 



i6 

Then the boisterous Winds, of their Music so proud, 
As they sweep the wild Heath, pipe so surly and loud, 
That the terrified Brutes, at the Storm of their Song, 
The safe Covert to gain, swiftly scurry along. 
And the Canoneer, Thundery with horrible Sound, 
From his sulphurous Cloud, pours his VoUies around . 
While the Light-troops of Hail, that his Vanguard 

compose, 
Pelt their sharp-pointed Shot in the face of their Foes. 
But the Waterman, Rain, from his weeping Urn pours 
The mild Tears which distil from his fast-falling 

Showers. 
These with magic Effect, the rude Blusterers astound, 
While the rest, all dissolved, in his Bosom are found. 
Yet more pleasant and mild than the Waterman's 

Sway, 
Is the Archer's, who guides the bright Orb of the Day : 
Through calm Ether he shoots his mild Arrows of 

Light, 
Till reflected they shine from the Queen of the Night 

THE END 



148 



THE 



ELEPHANT'S BALL 



AND 



Grand Fete Champetre 

Intended as a Companion to those. much admired Pieces 

THE BUTTERFLY'S BALL 



AND 



THE PEACOCK "AT HOME" 



lUiutrated with Elegant Engravings 



By W. B. 



Eontion: 

Printed for J. HARRIS, successor to E. Newbery, at the 

Original Juvenile Ubrary^ The corner of 

St, PauVs Church-yard 

1807 



THE 



ELEPHANT'S BALL 



AND 



GRAND FETE CHAMPETRE 



.^C. c^C. 



The insects and birds, with the balls and their feasts 

(^aus'd much conversation among all the beasts : 

The Elephant, famous for sense as for size, 

At such entertainments express'd much surprise ; 

Says he, " Shall these impudent tribes of the air, 

" To break our soft slumbers thus wantonly dare ? 

" Shall these petty creatures, us beasts far below, 

** Exceed us in consequence, fashion, and show ? 

" Forbid it, true dignity, honour and pride ! — 

**A grand rural fete I will shortly provide, 

" That for pomp, taste, and splendor, shall far leave behind, 

" All former attempts of a similar kind." 

The Buffalo, Bison, Elk, Antelope, Pard, 

All heard what he spoke, with due marks of regard. 



150 




Here first came the I-ion so gallant and strong. 
Well known by his mane thai is shagfiy and long; 
The Jackal, his slave, follow'd close in his rear, 
Resolv'd the good things wilh his master to share. 
The leopard came ncvt— a gay sight to the eye, 
— With his coat spotted over — like stars in the sky— 
The Tiger his system of slaughter declin'd, 
At once, a good supper and pleasure to find. 




The musical band on a terrace appearing, 
Perform'd many tunes that enchanted the hearing ; 
The Ape on the haut-boy much science display'd — 
The Monkey his fiddle dehghtfully play'd — 
The Orang Outang touch'd the harp with great skill, 
The Ass beat the drum with effect and good will, 
And the Squirrel kept ringing his merry bell still. 



THE 



PEACOCK ^^AT HOME" 



SEQUEL 



TO THE 



Bzttterjly' s Ball 



WRITTEN 



By A LADY 



AND 



Illustrated with Elegant Engravings 



l^ontjon: 

Printed for J. Harris, successor to E. Newbery, at the 

Original Juvenile Library, the corner of 

St. PauFs Church-yard 



1807 



THE 

PEACOCK "AT HOME" 

The Butterfly's Ball, and the Grasshopper's Feasts, 

Excited the spleen of the Birds and the Beasts : 

For their mirth and good cheer — of the Bee was the theme, 

And the Gnat blew his horn as he danced in the beam. 

'Twas humm'd by the Beetle, 'twas buzz'd by the Fly, 

And sung by the myriads that sport ^neath the sky. 

The Quadrupeds listen'd with sullen displeasure, 

And the Tenants of Air were enrag'd beyond measure. 

The Peacock displayed his bright plumes to the Sun, 

And addressing his Mates, thus indignant begun : 

"Shall we, like domestic, inelegant Fowls, 

"As unpolished as Geese, and as stupid as Owls, 

" Sit tamely at home, humdrum, with our Spouses, 

" While Crickets and Butterflies open their houses ? 

" Shall such mean little Insects pretend to the fashion ? 

" Cousin Turkeycock, well may you be in a passion I 

" If I sufl*er such insolent airs to prevail, 

" May Juno pluck out all the eyes in my tail ; 

" So a Fete I will give, and my taste I'll display, 

" And send out my cards for St. Valentine's Day." 



154 



K 


a^^l 


v^^^j^ 


"^•^^^i^llra 




I^^kH 


^^^^ 


^^^B 



The Dowager l^dy Toucan first rut in 

A\ith old Doctor > uz/ard ind Adm nl Pengnin, 

Krom hy bush I ower cime Dime Owlet the Wise, 

And Counsellor Crossbill sit by to aduse 

The Birds past their prime o cr w liose /irads it was fated, 

Should pass nnnj St Vtlentines — yet be iinmaled. 

Looked on and retmrk d thit the prudent and sage, 

Were quite overlook d in this frivolous age 




The Razor-Bill carv'd for the famisbing group 
And the Spoon-Bill obligingly ladled the soup ; 
So they fill'd all their crops with the dainties before 'err 
And the tables were cleared with the uttnost decorum. 
When they gaily had caroll'd till peep of the dawn. 
The Lark gently hinted, 'twas time to be gone ; 
And his clarion, so shrill, gave the company warning, 
That Chanticleer scented the gales of the morning. 



THE 

LION'S MASQUERADE 

A 
SEQUEL 

TO THE 

Peacock at Home. 

WRITTEN 

By A LADY 
Illustrated with Elegant Engravings 



Zronfton: 

Printed for J. Harris, successor to £. Newbery, corner 

of St Paul's Church-yard ; and B. Tabart, 

Old Bond-Street 

1807 



THE LION'S MASQUERADE 

As Aurora stept forth from the gates of the East, 

With her garland of roses, and dew-spangled vest, 

A clamour unusual assaulted her ear. 

Instead of the Lark, and her friend Chanticleer, 

At least though their voices she sometimes could trace, 

They seem'd overpowered by the whole feathered race : 

And such was the chirping, and fluttering then. 

It rouz'd an old Lioti asleep in his den ; 

Enrag'd at this racket so much out of season. 

He roaring sent out to ask what was the reason. 

And the Jackal soon learnt from some stragglers about 

'Twas the company come from Sir Argus's rout. 

The gdc^ feathered people pursuing their flight. 

Were soon out of hearing, and soon out of sight. 

But the King of the Quadrupeds vainly sought rest, 

For something like envy had poison'd his breast. 

What then were his feelings the following day, 

When every creature he met on his way, 

Could talk about nothing, both early and late. 

But the Peacock's most sumptuous, and elegant fete, 

His name, through the woods as he wander'd along, 

Was still made the burthen of every song. 



158 




And now at the door was a terrible clatter, 

The beasts all about wondcr'd what was the matter. 

A poor Cat in pattens came running so fast, 

Her ticket was almost forgot as she past ; 

Hut there was, it appear'd, quite enough to alarm her, 

For close at her heels came a great Hog; in armour. 

Then foUow'd his friend in a very large wig 

As a deep-read Professor — the fam'd learned Pig. 



gMJ 


^J„^|^R^^*#J^ 



At the banquet the guests in amaKement were lost, 

And the King of Siam took the right of his host. 

Beside him, a vase fill'd with water was plac'd, 

Of chrysUl, and gold, very skilfully chac'd : 

\Vith flowers of the orange the iiandles were bound, 

And Otto of Roses was sprinkled around — 

Before him were cocoa nuts, figs, wheat and rice. 

The wood of acacia, banana and spice : 

^Vith arrack, and every delicate wine. 

That each nation can press from the clustering vine. 



THE 



BOOK OF TRADES 



OR 



LIBRARY 



OF THE 



USEFUL ARTS 



Eontion: 

TABART & CO. 

157 New Bond Street 

And to be had of all dealers in Books. 

1807 



M 



£^ d 


m 


WmM 


i, 


i 


7/' 


/fefc. ■ •, . /MX/: -_,t^ 



163 









ff j/u^ . ia^ 



167 



HALF HOLIDAY 

TASK BOOK: 

MIRROR OF MIND: 

CONSISTING OK 

Numerous Stories and hitcrcsting Talcs 
in Prose and Verse ; 

To enlighten the Minds and impyove the Hearts 
of Yowig Children of either Sex. 






Printed by and for HODGSON & CO. 

JUVENILE PRESS 

No. lo NEWGATE STREET 
Half-a-Ctvwtt Beund. 



A Gentleman met a little Girl in the street selling 
water -cresses ; and although he did not just then 
want any cresses he was so pleased with her neat, 
clean and modest appearance that he kindly gave 
her a penny ; which of course greatly delighted her, 
so she went along full of gratitude crying " Water- 
cresses ! Water-cresses ! " and she soon sold all her 
stock. Now when she went home, her mother thought 
she had been asking more for her cresses than she 
ought because she had so much money ; but the 
girl told the truth, for 

'Tis a sin, to cheat one's mother, 
As great as cheating any other. 



170 




A poor little boy refused to take his food : a 
doctor was sent for, who could not account for the 
lad's loss of appetite ; but, when questioned, he at 
length confessed that he could not bear to see his 
poor brothers and sisters want ; and as his parents 
could not get sufficient for them all, he feigned 
sickness, that they might eat what he could not. 
This was really kindly meant; but 

God forbids that we should do 
Evil, that goodness may ensue. 




These fjciitlcmcn were once schoolfellows. They 
had not seen each other for many years, when one 
evcninjT one of them called upon the other, who was 
glad to see his old friend. He had been residing 
abroad, and having gained much useful information^ 
he is here represented as communicating it to his 
friend : doubtless it was very instructive, for he was 
a man who travelled, not for idle curiosity but to 
acquire useful knowledge. 

Still WQ slKiiilfi have, in all we say or do, 
Some pleasing and some useful end in view. 





nnut(7i^^ 



POETICAL PA11APHRASE» 




^in^ 



PENCE TABLE. 




Publto'hed in/ S. 9^a/iix ^f 4if.Sk4fUt^ Street. 



<Mfui J. WalUs Su/nuii44A 



20 Pence are i Shilling and 8 pence. 

You've guessed it at once, so I'll give you this Cake. 

30 Pence are 2 Shillings and 6 pence. 

Be sure, Master Harry, you make no mistake. 

40 Pence are 3 Shillings and 4 pence 

My Aunt just that sum to the Pastry cook paid. 

50 Pence are 4 Shillings and 2 pence. 

I shall never remember it all, I'm afraid. 

60 Pence arc exactly 5 Shillings. 

Here take it, good Woman, you seem in distress. 

70 Pence are 5 Shillings and 10 pence. 

You have too many flounces, dear Miss, to your dress. 

80 Pence are 6 Shillings and 8 pence. 

Papa says a Lawyer has that for a fee. 

90 Pence are 7 Shillings and 6 pence. 

One half is for you, and the other for me. 

100 Pence are 8 Shillings and 4 pence. 

That Woman has met with a shocking disaster. 

1 10 Pence are 9 Shillings and 2 pence. 

I shall tell your sad tricks, naughty boy, to your master. 

120 Pence must be Ten Shillings. 

Puss has just caught a mouse which she found on the shelf. 

130 Pence make 10 Shillings and 10 pence. 

Which I think master Peter deserves for himself. 

144 Pence make even twelve Shillings. 

Now I've got through my task, so I'll bid you adieu. 



174 




40 Pence are 3 Shillings nnd 4 Pence. 

My Aunt just that sum to the Pastiy cook paid. 



■^ 


1^ 




IMHIK^^ 




jaT^ 


p.^^ 


.. _ -vv -.i:SfS"lS*--i » 



So I'l'Dce arc 6 Shillings nml 8 I'l'rcp. 
{"npn says a Lawyer has [Iml far a lee. 




« 8 Shillings and 4 Pence. 

hu met with n shocking disaster. 






-^sr/ 



>•*. 






MEMOIRS 

OF 

The Little Man 

ANI> 

The Little Maid 



1 



Some Interesting Particulars of their 
Lives never before published. 



Lu^DON : 

Published by B. Tabart & Co. 

At tluir Juvenile and School Lilirary, 

NEW BOND STREET. 

i8o» 



'->■ 




Tlicre woa u Httte man, 
AnU he wooed b, little iiiatil, 
And \i<i said " Little luaiil, 

Will you wed, wed, wed / 
I Imve little more to say, 
Tlian will you, aye or noy, 
Fur tlic leant said 

Is eouiiest amended, ded." 
iSs 




Tim liulc maid ruplicci, 
"SiiouM I be your little brid.-, 
Pray wbiit fball wt bnve 

Fur. to ent, cat, cat 1 
Will the llauie you're only ritli iti 
Light a fire in the kitchen, 
Or the little god of love 

Turn the spit, epit, spit 1 '' 
t86 




Tlie little ninii rcplieii, 
And Rome »ay a little urieil, 
For his liUlr heart was big 

With sorrow, socrow, sorrow, ■ 
'■ My oirer3 are but amall. 
But you hftvu my little all, 
AdiI whiit \vc have not got 

We must borrow, borrow, burrow." 

1S7 



Tliu littlu man thua spokt, 
IIJR lienrC was almost brukc, 
And all for the ^akc 

Of her charms, charms, charms ; 
The little maid ri;leDl«, 
And Kofiencd, she conecntn 
Tliu liltlt' man to take 

To her iiriiis, arms, anus. 
188 




Tlie little iiinid'a conncnt 
Obtniiieci, to church Uiey went. 
Where the parson joined their lianJs 

With plesBure, pleasure, pleasure 
With rapture now. he eyed 
His blooming little bride, 
Hi» all ! his house and lands \ 

His treasure, treasure, treasure ! 

189 




Thi-v luiwi-d their duvit uml iii;^lii« 
111 iiKhisutu tiiul <lcli}i)it.s 
In tiiiftiu'.', luii'th, iiiid jilar, 

Anil (lanciiijj, ilmii'ini.', ibitit'.iii" 
Tin. liUk-i.Jaiil, llR-vsav,' 



Wil 



Li-litl 



r. ]ir.Liii 




'I'iit li 01 icy 11 II Km »Hni over, 
.No moil! n llniiiin^' lover, 
■I'lii- liltli! mail K-|iuiiLs 

Of lii« fiJIv, folly, fnllv; 

Ilislitltoc-aHlilinrl Ik'il, 
Wliili! )iu ilriio{iii liJK ]H:iisiv<? liPiiil. 
Anil in si^'liM liis winuw vmitH, 
A prey to iiU'Iunchuly. 




The little niaid grew bold, 

She would iwnt and ehi; would scold, 

And call her little man 

A great oaf, oaf, oaf. 
He wished the deuce wimld Uike Iier, 
While the butcher or the baker 
Would not truHt him fur a chop, 

Or a lo&f, loaf. loaf. 
192 



^ETli 




^^^^^^^^^T^^^^^B 


H 






1^' 


1 




'. ifl 
1 '' 


it 


1 


tm 




wji 


iiii 


■1 


/../...;,./.'/..> 


"SS?!? 


IH 



The little maa rcllecteil, 
His little means neglected, 
Would nerve but to increase 

His sorrow, boitob-, som 
To his little wife he cried, 
" Let us laj our feuda aside, 
And endeavour to provide 

For to-morrow, morrow, 
■93 



1 


^«^^^^^**^^^H 


/«,,/.« /A//,. t^.V... 'oVU^n lUL.^l /^7 Xf- H.'.J St^.l 



10 
His liltk' wife repented, 
Tu liis wiBlii'K slie conseiitcil. 
And naid slie could worh 

With lnT nc-c()l«, McL-dU-, ii,-ih1 
Thu little man w»8 nol idle, 
He plftyed upon thu fiddle. 
And tie eamt'd a guoil living 

Witb his tweedle, tweedlc, tw 
194 




To the little man's f;reat joy 

n had a little boy, 
Which made his little heart 

Quite -liii!. y.UA, ;;!,-..!. 
'TiviiH tlie littk' iiiuliicr^ j.leaaiire 
To nurse her VdiW: treasure, 
Which rapture iliit impart 

To hia dad, dad, dad. 











& 


"% 




m 


mn 


H^^^§ll 


I 


y 


Bfi ' "••■'' •' ■'■•■ 'j '■ ■■■ ■ ■ 







12 

Now everything was amiling, 
There was no more reviling, 
WhOe eheerrul plenty crowntil 

Their labours, lalnmrs, lalwiirR. 
Tlie little man with joy, 
Would take liia litt)<? lloy. 
And show him all around 

To his neighbours, sei^thbours, neighbours. 
[96 



Think before you Speak : 

or, the 

Three Wishes. 

A Tale. 

By the Author of (he 

Peacock at Home. 



London: 

Printed for M. J. GODWIN, 

At the Juvenile Librahv, no. 41, Skinner Street, 

And to be had of all Booksellers. 




Alul wdriim'cl hnnii' I 
I'll his clcin hcntt]), 1 

i''..r ll..iiu'«|>unnn.1 )i 
W.TC honest fuRs in I 



.\n,i l..v\l thi: o.nir...l 




When »u>I>I<;tilr n Il.-i.-.h of li^ht 
Kt-vi-alM lu thvir nstcmuili'il sighl, 
A link r<.rm of Unci)- mk-ii, 
lCpil»iUL' iif lh:aii(y\ CJuL-un. 

I srant 1<> y<m ami ymr j;.ki.1 I lam.' 
Tht ihrc.; lir-t \\ii.ln- ihal yt.u iiaiiKr ! 
Tliink whal will Ik'XI ymir slatv uiiil'IiiI, 
Anil claim it tiom yuur graurul rrktid. 




Susan ihc liappitKl will' on unilli. 
Sit ill i> nghls, and lirusIiM hor lu^artl 
\n I ^iiH, These finlKTS burn s.i clcsr, 
/ k-hA kk hitii a /■lul.lhix /"'■■ ■' 
Melhinka 'twinilil limil su ck'aii and iii< 
t'<l niike it rcxiy in :i ttk'u : 
Sht spukc^ — and in Ihi; chamlxrr luiiihk 
A noist- ami diiwn a puddmy lumlilcd 




Such want of thought your foUy shows, 

/ Tvish the pudding on iw«r tto^e ! 

The words escap'c], he gain'd his wish. 

The pudding rising from the dish, 

On Goody Homespun's nose wax stuck 

So faiii, no power on earth could pliick 

The sad incumbrance away. 

What could be done ? Oh, hapless day ! 



THK 



ADVENTURES 



or 



POOR PUSS 



//V Tll'O /'.IA'7'.S 



By miss SANDHAM 

AuTiioK OK I'liK Twin Sistkms, Oki'IIAN, He*., /fcc 



lonton: 

Printed for J. HAKKIS, 

Comer of St. Paul's (Church-yards 



I 809 



POOR PUSS 42 

So upstairs she took me and presented me to 
my lady, who had no less than three cats in her lap 
at that time ; but the moment she saw me she put 
them all down, and in rapture of joy screamed out : 

* What ! is my poor dear Tabby found ? ' * I don't 
know. Ma'am/ said the servant, * but a boy has 
brought this cat here, and I think it is like her.' 

* Like her,' exclaimed the old lady, * it is her, her 
very self; here are all the marks I have so often 
admired down her back ' ; and she almost devoured 
me with kisses. * The boy is waiting below to know 
if your ladyship is pleased to give him anything.' 

* O yes ! to be sure, give him half a crown,' returned 
my new mistress, ' I always said I would give that 
to anyone who would bring my poor dear Tabby 
home again ' ; and now again she caressed me, 
stroking and kissing me all over, while the rest of 
the household seemed very happy to be left without 
notice to lay at their ease upon the carpet 



205 



'aa: ' 


-Ar d\ 


1 




Xf "P^ 




'^rr, .y^'. 1 



POETRY 


FOR 


CHILDREN 


Entirely Original 

1 



I!y the Author of 
"Mrs. Leickster's School" 



LV TJVO VOLUMES 



I.ONDON : 

Printed for M. J. Godwin 
At the Juvenile I.ibmry, no. 41 Skinner Street 

1809 



28 



No sound she utters ; and she soon 
Sees the child hft up its spoon, 
And tap the snake upon the head, 
Fearless of harm ; and then he said. 
As speaking to familiar mate, 
** Keep on your own side, do, Grey Pate : " 
The snake then to the other side. 
As one rebuked seems to glide ; 
And now again advancing nigh, 
Again she hears the infant cry, 
Tapping the snake, " Keep further, do ; 
Mind, Grey Pate, what I say to you." 
The danger's o'er — she sees the boy 
(O what a change from fear to joy I) 
Rise and bid the snake " good bye ; " 
Says he, ** Our breakfast's done, and I 
Will come again to-morrow day : " 
Then lightly tripping ran away. 



209 



\ 




THENrW YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 



A8T0R 
TILDCN FOU 



lENOX AND I 
OUNDATIONS. I 



THE 

uvENiLE Spectator : 

PyiRT THE FIRST. 
Being 

OBSERVATIONS 

ON THE 

TEMPERS, MANNERS AND FOIBLES 

or 

VARIOUS YOUNG PERSONS 

Interspersed 

PFith such lively matter as it is presumed 
will amuse as well as instruct. 

By ARABELLA ARGUS. 



*' Teach mc to feci another's woe. 
To hide the fault 1 see ; 
The mercy J to others show, 
That mercy show to me." 



Eontian: 

Printed by and for W. DARTON, Jun. 
58 HOLBORN HILL. 

1810 



JUVENILE SPECTATOR 



** I cannot kiss you just now, grand- 
mamma," said Lucy, ** for I am writing 
to such a funny old woman about my 
wax doll. Harriet wants me to let her 
nurse it sometimes, but I am deter- 
mined she shall not ; so I shall ask 
Mrs. Argus if I have not a right to do 
what I please with my own doll." I 
was on the point of replying, when 
Harriet overturned the inkstand, 
which unfortunately defaced the half- 
finished epistle of William, who, en- 
raged at the accident, turned in great 
anger to his sister, and in reaching his 



224 



E^ 


1 


P|j|Tfl|iiW 


1^9 


k^faj 


H 




1 



7 JUVENILE SPECTATOR 

hand to give her a slight chastisement, 

* threw his elder sister, who was sitting 

on one corner of a chair, on the floor : 

in a moment all was confusion ; my 

daughter, whose weak state of health 

makes her incapable of that exertion 

so requisite in a young family, was so 

alarmed by Fanny's accident as to be 

near fainting. I united with William 

in quieting her fears, and a small piece 

of gold-beater's skin being applied to 

Fanny's wounded elbow, tranquillity 

was in a few minutes restored. 



226 



"BEAUTT 



AND 



THE BE^sr 



OR 



A Rough Outside with a 
Gentle Heart. 

<i4 Poetical Version of an <tAncient Tale 

Illustrated with a 

Series of Elegant Engravings 

And BEAUrr'S SONG at her SPINNING WHEEL 

Set to Music by Mr. Whitaker 



LONDON: 

Printed for M. J. Godwin 

At the Juvenile Library, 41 Skinner Street ; 

And to be had of all Booksellers and Toymen 

throughout the United Kingdom. 

Price 5s. 6d. Coloured, or 3s. 6d. Plain. 



BEAUTY AND THE BEAST 



A Merchant who by generous pains 

Prospered in honourable gains, 

Could boast, his wealth and fame to share 

Three manly SONS, three Daughters fair ; 

With these he felt supremely blest — 

His latest bom surpassed the rest : 

She was so gentle, good and kind, 

So fair in feature, form and mind. 

So constant too in filial duty. 

The neighbours called her Little Beauty ! 

And when fair childhood's days were run. 

That title still she wore and won ; 

Lovelier as older still she grew, 

Improved in grace and goodness too. — 



228 




239 



FELISSA; 



OR, THE 



LIFE AND OPINIONS 



OK A 



Kitten of Sentiment 



We'll have our Mottos and our Chapters too, 
And brave the thunders of the dread Review : 
Misses no more o'er Misses' woes shall wail, 
But list attentive — to a Kitteti's tale. 



Eontion: 

Printed for J. HARRIS, 

Corner of St. Paul's Churchyard 

1811 



FELISSA 

With no small degree of pleasure can I assure my 
readers that I was bom of an illustrious race, and that 
their time will not be wasted in perusing the memoirs 
of a Cat whom " nobody knows." Both my parents 
were of high celebrity. My mother was a naiive of 
Persia, and named Lily on account of the exquisite 
whiteness of her skin, which might have been said 
to rival the snow. My father, whose first name was 
Tom (which had been a favourite family name for 
successive generations) was a most beautiful tortoise- 
shell, and as fame reports was once purchased at the 
enormous price of fifty pieces of gold by a respectable 
maiden lady who had always a strong predilection for 
our species. He was also known to be a descendant 
in a right line from that most excellent and exceed- 
ing wise Cat (scarcely his superior in genius and dis- 
cretion) who owed his honours to the liberality and 
gratitude of the celebrated nobleman the Lord Marquis 
of Carabas, and thus became the founder of the 
fortunes of our house. 



232 



i^Hpr''^'it. 


m 


fWSM 


w^ 


i 


rVJ 




f^ 


r^l 




% 


gy| 



■\Vhen the <iay of departure arrived I went to pay 
my respects and take leave of my mother, who was 
then busied in suckling one of her last litter ; but she 
looked at me with more displeasure than affection. 
My father was engaged that morning in a rat-chase, 
and there was no chance of his returning home till 
night ; I therefore left my duty and departed with- 
out seeing him. Mrs. Handy, with her usual kind- 
ness, placed me in my basket, and the little Louisa 
ran with me to shew her grandpapa how pretty I 
looked ; be smiled, kissed her and bid her be a good 
girl, and not waste too much of her time upon me, 
and we proceeded to the carriage. 




I could then beur it no longer, but leaped up, and 
not being able to appeal to her pity in her own lan- 
guage, and utter my sufferings in a comprehensible 
manner, I made them known by sticking my little 
claws with all my force in her pretty face. It was 
torn in the moat mercilesB manner ; her shrieks 
brought the whole family to her assistance, and the 
apartment in which we were in being next to her 
mother's, brought her also. They were all horror- 
struck at my mistress's appearance — her face stream- 
ing with blood, and scored all over as if with a 
knifa She accused me in the bitterest manner, and 
vowed never to play with me again. 



\ 



Tk 



Good Boy's 



Soliloquy ; 



CONTAINING HIS 



Parents' Instructions 



RELATIVE TO HIS 



Disposition and Manners 



By the Author of the 

INVITED ALPHABET, &c. 



LONDON: 

Printed by and for W. DARTON, Jun., 58 Holborn Hill. 

181 I 




236 



Prince Dorus: 



OR 



Flattery put out of Countenance. 



A Poetical Version of an Ancient Tale. 



ILLUSrRArED friTH A SERIES OF ELEGANT ENGRAVINGS. 



London : 
Printed for M. J. GODWIN 

At tke Juvenile Library^ no, 41 Skinner Street; 

And to be had of all booksellers and toymen in the 

United Kingdom. 

181 I 



PRINCE DORUS: 



In days of yore, as Ancient Stories tell, 
A King in love with a great Princess fell. 
Long at her feet submiss the Monarch sigh'd, 
While she with stern repulse his suit denied. 
Yet was he form'd by birth to please the fair, 
Dress'd, danc'd, and courted with a Monarch's air ; 



R 



241 



But Magic Spells her frozen breast had steel'd 
With stubborn pride, that knew not how to yield. 
This to the King a courteous Fairy told, 
And bade the Monarch in his suit be bold ; 
For he that would the charming Princess wed, 
Had only on her cat's black tail to tread, 
When straight the spell would vanish into air. 
And he enjoy for life the yielding fair. 
He thank'd the Fairy for her kind advice. — 
Thought he — " If this be all, TU not be nice ; 
Rather than in my courtship I will fail, 
I will to mince-meat tread Minon's black tail." 



243 



I ELLEJV, X 

Y OR i 

Y TAc Naughty Girl Reclaimed^ h- 

.X EXEMPLIFIED IN A A 

SERIES OF FIGURES. A 

A 

' A 

■ A 

PRINTED FOR S. AND J. FULJLBR;> J 

AT THK TEMPLB OY YAHCT, KATABOMl PLACE, ^ 

Where are also sold Books of Instruction in j^ 

Y Avry Branch of Drawings Colours^ and every ^ 

^ requisite used in Drawing. A 

I 1811. { 



Koimont 



ELLEN, 



08. 



The Naughty Girl Reclaimed. 



Ellen niakes Iter First Appearance in a 
White Frock^ xcith a Bool at her FecU 

This little girl, whom now you see. 
To mind mamma will not agree. 
And though her face is fair and mild^ 
You view a stubborn, naughty child ; — 
Nay» Ellen is so wayward grown. 
Her book upon the ground is thrown, 
And kind mamma, who loves so well. 
Can neither mak« her read or spell : 



246 



i. 



u 



MUen stands in a disgraceful Situation^ 
xdth the Foolscap on her Head. 

Ellen arrives at Nurse's door. 
Began her conduct to deplore ; 
But there^ instead of being good, 
She sat her down in sulky mood. 
The good old dame to coax her tried. 
But only met with scornful pride : 
At last, when bade her lesson trace, 
The book she threw in Nurse's face. 
Who on her head the foolscap plac*d. 
And here she stands in school disgraced. 



248 



19 

Ellen makes her Last Appearance sitting 
in a CJiair tcitli a Book in Iter hand. 

Ellen once more appears in view. 

To bid you all a kind adieu , 

Her sorrow from her faults begun. 

She therefore hopes those faults you*!! 

shun ; 

Both books and work now give delight^ 

And Ellen learns to read and write ; . 

Her studies all performed with care. 

Praise and improvement take their share. 

Anxious her dear mamma to please. 

No longer does she fret and tease. 

But happily her time she spends, 

LovM and esteem'd by all her friends* 

FINIS. 



»ii4"'" 



sJ 



if 



3 

r • 
1 

i 

a 



D. 1L IBVATi Berwick SlfCfltWM» 



250 



r 



■y JUST PUBLISHED 

r By S. and J. FULLER, ■ 

'f At the Temple of Fancy, Ralhbone Place, 1 
YOUNG ALBERT, theRoscius, ^ 

Exhibited in a Series of Ckarzclrrs from SHAK£P£AS£ asd J 



V 



other Authuri. 



ir '• 

t FRANK FEIGNWELL's 

V ATTEMPTS TO AMUSE HIS FRIENDS, j 

"QT Exhibited in a Seriei of Character*. J 

I 77/tf Sixth EdiHon of LITTLE FANNY, j 

'^ Exemplified in a Seriet of Figures. t 1 

¥ i 

i^ T/;e FourOt Edition of LITTLE HENRY, j 

V Being a Companion to Little Fannt. j 

y J 

ir -^ iVi?M; Essay on Flower Paintings j 

V By EDWARD PRETTY, ia 4 Noi. 7«. 6d. each. j 

> Where also may be had the greatest Variety of } 

I FANCY ARTICLES. -j 

■i Drawings lent to copy. -j 



2^2 




From " The History & Adventures of Little Henry, ex- 
emplified in a Series of Figures. The seventh edition. 
London: S. & J. Fuller. iSii." 



m 



time reached him from his father, ooq- 
tainiDg a full pardon for hi* past of-, 
fence, rendered him the happiest crM^ 
turein the world."--'- '"' 



^k drested m Aw m« 

JRegmenttd$. ■■■'■■. '■ 



Bbiks quite recovered, eUhoagh he > 
was obliged to wear hie iann in a sling, ■ 
, he accompanied his colonel toEngland,- 
and, dressed in his new regimentals, 
be was presented to his parents as a 
repentant son, who had seen his error 
— ^had smarted sufficiently for it— and 
was fell; resolved to err no more. 

After making this atonement to liis 
parents, he felt that a similar duty was 
dne to Mr. Falconer. He accordingly 




From "Frederick, or the Effects of Disobedience, Ex- 
emplified in a Series of Characters. London ; S. & J. 

Fuller. 1816." 



PR 




i 


^V Flawersj^ 


^^MgaVtcred, 


■ 


B Fhabe witli^L 


^3^3ka.SSis, 




wM And to tJ^H 


^^^H repair}; 


« 


From strec^^H 


l^^^elrat^^B 


Fcodain^^n 




^B 


tr^ ^t^KMrn 


ilBI> 




ll 




'1 u 

1 w. 


I^^^Ej ' 


1 



From " Phctbe, the Cottage .N(aid Exemplified in a 
Series of Rural Figures. London : S. & J. Fuller. 



PARLOUR AMUSEMENTS; 

OR, A 

NEW BOOK OF GAMES 



FORFEITS. 

Embellished vjilh three neat Engravings 
From designs by Stennett. 



WE 


m 


4Wm 


'm 



London : 

Printed for 

A. K. Newman & Co., Leadenhall Street, 






CkYJNC THE KOi 



I LOVE MY Love 

Clara, I love my love with an A, because he is ami- 
able ; I will send him to Andover and feed him with sweet 
almonds ; I will give him an air-balloon that he may come 
back to me the sooner ; and present him with a bouquet 
of amaranthus. 

Come, Emmeline, why do you love your love with 
an A? 

Emmeline, Because he is affable ; I will send him to 
Abingdon, and feed him with asparagus ; I will give him 
an almanack, and present him with a nosegay of amomum. 



Manner of Crying the Forfeits 

One of the party takes the office of crier, another that 
of dictator ; the crier sits down, holding the forfeits, so that 
he (or she) may examine them unperceived by the others, 
especially the dictator who kneels blindfolded or with his 
(or her) face in the crier's lap. — The latter then takes the 
first forfeit that comes to hand, and says — 

Here's a pretty thing, 
A very pretty thing, 

(or a comical, or an ugly, or a useful, useless, ridiculous or 
mischievous thing) 

What is he (or she) to be done to 
Who owns this pretty thing ? 



259 



Game of the Old Soldier 

Oh ! pity an aged soldier^s sad plight, 

Worn out in his country's wars : 
All ragged behold him ; ah ! heart-rending sight ! 
Averting his eyes in despair from the light ; 
Let us raise a subscription, to clothe him complete ; 
Put cash in his pocket, and shoes on his feet. 

In regard to his numerous scars. 
Each some article of dress 
Must put on his back ; 
But when questioned don't express 
Yes, or no, or white, or black. 



260 




Cricket 

Cricket is a game universally played in England, not by 
lioys only, for men of all ranks pique themselves on playing 
it with skill. In Mary-le-bone parish there is a celebrated 
cricket ground much frequented by noblemen and 
gentlemen. 

The wicket consists of two pieces of wood fixed upright 
and kept together by another piece which is laid across the 
top and is called a bail ; if either of these pieces of wood 
be thrown down by the ball the person so hitting them 
becomes the winner. 

The ball used in this game is stuffed exceedingly hard. 
Many windows and valuable looking-glasses have been 
broken by playing cricket in a room. 

From " A Nosegay for the Trouble of Culling ; or. Sports of 
Childhood." London : Wm. Uarton, junr., 58 Holborn 
Hill. i8n. 

261 




OlIRTSMir andMARMIAdE 





J EBKY & KITTT; 



Illustrated 



JEfegant Engravings, 



LONDOKi 



J.ttarHs corner ofSSPaulr, 




I AM come Miss for lo see, 
Jeny was bold, Jerry was 

I am come Miss for to see, 
Jerry spoke bolil lo she, 

I am come Miss for lo see 

If thai you can fancy inc. 

Vou nre my fancy, 

Parlex-vous Kranfois? 

Allcz-voua-en, said she. 



264 




Old Uncle Mat gnvc liis consent, 

Jerry was glad, Jerry was glad. 

Old Uncle Mat gave his consenl. 

That Ihey should married be. 
Old Uncle Mat gnve his consent, 
And so away to Church they wen 
Kitty M' Carey — Jerry O'Leaiy, 
What a sweet pair are we ! ! 



(.J> 




Fui when he wa& sleepy he took a Nap, 

Jetiy my son, Jerry my son. 
Fur when he was sleepy he took a Nap 

So pretty on Nurse's knee. 
For when he was sleepy he look a Nap, 
And cry'd and squall'd when he wanted pap. 
Mrs. O'Leary, look at your deary. 
What a wise child is he • 



BIOGRAPHY FOR GIRLS; 



OR, 



MORAL AND INSTRUCTIVE 
EXAMPLES 



FOR 



THE FEMALE SEX. 



SIXTH EDITION 



BY 



Mrs. PILKINGTON 



LONDON: 

Printed for J. HARRIS, 

Corner of St. Paul's Chnrch-Yard 

1814 



ISO BIOGRAPHY FOR GIRLS 

A figure adorned in so conspicuous a style 
could not avoid attracting the attention of the 
whole assembly ; and the exultation that glowed 
in the young lady's countenance, proved the 
gratification she derived from general observa- 
tion, and the excess of her vanity, in believing 

herself admired, Mr. W respectfully 

approached them, but when he heard she in- 
tended dancing a minuet, it was with the 
utmost difficulty he could refrain from laughter, 
and was obliged to make an excuse for divert- 
ing his head. 

If every eye had been directed towards Miss 
Lutridge upon her first entering the room, how 
must they have been fixed on her when they 
perceived her led out to dance, and with the 
utmost effort of good-breeding, it was absolutely 
impossible to suppress a smile. The prince, 
who had fortunately entered just as she was 
leading up the room, stood perfectly trans- 
fixed with surprize : but when he saw the con- 
fidence with which she acquitted herself, he 
thought it no longer necessary to disguise his 
feelings, and loudly expressed the entertainment 
he had derived from the exhibition ; declaring 



268 




Lucy Lutridce, or Vanity Punished 



269 



iSi BIOGRAPHY FOR GIRLS 

he would not but have seen it for a hundred 
pounds. 

This satirical assurance was received as a 
compliment by the person to whom it was in- 
tended as a reproach : who drawing herself up 
with an appearance of delight, walked majestic- 
ally towards her seat, viewing the dress of a 
young lady who sat next to her with a most 
contemptuous and supercilious stare. Nothing 
could be greater than the contrast of their 
persons : one all loveliness, elegance and ease, 
seemed totally unconscious of her numerous 
attractions — whilst the other without a single 
trait of beauty, appeared to claim a general 
admiration. Their dress was as completely 
opposite as their persons ; the one wore a plain 
white muslin, without any other ornament upon 
her head than an exuberance of fine hair, 
formed into the most fascinating and becoming 
shape — whilst the other was adorned in a vest 
of crape and silver trimmed with a variety of 
different coloured velvet, ill chosen, and vulgarly 
displayed, whilst her head seemed scarcely 
able to sustain the load of plumes, bands and 
ribbons. 



270 



THE 



History of an Old Woman 



WHO HAD 



THREE SONS 

JEERY, JAMES, AND JOHN, 



TOGETHER WITH 



AN ACCOUNT OF WHAT BECAME OF THEM, 

HER PROPERTY, 



AND LAST OF ALL 



HERSELF. 



ILLl'STRATRD WITH 



Sixteen Beautiful Engravings, 



London : 
Printed for J. HARRIS, comer of St. Paul's. 

1815 




This ramoiis old.~V\'<Hiiau liad tlneo Stidis 

Ivory li^Luii S: Gold 
Th* Ivory split tUe Gold got a croci 
' JinS. thp FJbon she lirole about the maids Imdc 
So there ivas an end of her three sticks 
IvoTT TTbon k. Gold 




niuous Old IVbiuan had Uii'ee Clutirs 

ow A: HomeliAir b Caur 

Ihow t HorsBhair. her Cliildreu thcr- broke 

r Ml flu-o' Ae Cnur.n4urh.uigU|iroved a badjoik 

:e ivas an end of her ihree CJiairs 

3W /.- Horsehair A- Cane. 




Tlus f'Uiious OldWimnn lui I tin e Pciict 

The Silver X- Ciiiipcr she ^"ave at rJie door 

And tlif BrasA Feiinv sliytt thro' a hoU> iu the flnur 

! So thf r*" »vaB nil pud of Jier Uiri'e ft'm-e 

' .Silvec A- Copper .t Brnas. 



MONTH'S VACATION; 

AN ACCOUNT OF THE MANNER IN WHICH A 

JUVENILE PARTY 

PASSED THEIR TIME IN BAKER STREET. 

ENTERTAINING DESCRIPTION 



Principal Places of Amusemeni 

they visited in London. 



WITH ENGRAVINGS. 



LONDON : 

TOR WILLIAM COLE, 

' NtwGATE Street. 



25 A MontKs Vacation 

Mr. Taylor wished to treat the boys with a visit to 
the menagerie at Exeter Change in the Strand. 
Accordingly they went there about eight o'clock, that. 
they might be in time to see the inhabitants sup, and 
to see the elephant ring the bell, which he did by the 
same kind of motion with his trunk that a man uscss 
with his hand. Mr. Taylor called the boys' attenticm 
to the docility with which this large animal obeyed the 
commands given to him. "Come Tuny," said the 
keeper, *'pull the bell and let your companions all 
know it is supper time." Upon which the elephant 
thrust his long trunk through the opening of his cage, 
and turning it upward, took hold of the noose of the 
rope, which was very high, and pulling it down rang 
several times ; then let it go and rested himself : — but 
the same man addressed him, saying, " Try again my 
good fellow ! " The elephant immediately set to work, 
rested and worked again, whenever he was ordered. 
On hearing the bell, Nero, a noble lion that had for 
twelve years occupied the first iron cage in the apart- 
ment, roared tremendously. 



276 




TilK Witl) Beasts at Exf.tkr Chani 



Ill 



A Month^s Vacation 




AsTLEY'S Amphitheatre 

Mr. and Mrs. Taylor having engaged a box for 
own use, took Smith with them to the theatre^ 
case the younger ones should become tired 
frightened she might be at hand to return with 
so many unpleasant incidents had occurred when 
had l)een left at home, that Mr. and Mrs. Taylor..^ 
themselves most comfortable to have them all 
geiher. 'I'he piece was Bonaparte's •' Invasion of 
Russia/' To the Ix^ys this exhibition appeared veiy 
interesting. Master Blackstone's |\atriotic spirit made 
him fancy himself a hero : and though he thought it a 
ver\* h.ird case that the French should molest the 
Ru:vsians in their own coun:n\ \et he so admiied the 
sentiments uttered by the invading general, that he 
soon foniot to l>e an^^n- with him, and ever>' time that 
he had oiXMsion to come for>\.ird was sure to exclaim, 
" How much more noM\ Bv^naivinc >i»eaks and looks 
than the Kmjx^ror Aicxar.der 



-r^ 



123 -^ Month's Vacation 

The last four days had been fine and warm, and it 
was fixed the young party should go to Vauxhall on 
the eighteenth of June, that being announced a great 
gala night, in honour of the victory of Waterloo. 
They remained in their box during the concert, but on 
finding a juggler, one Monsieur Robfert, was about to 
perform his exploits, the boys requested Mr. Taylor to 
accompany them near the stage, where they watched 
him balance various things upon his face, and once a 
gun with the bayonet pointed upon his forehead. Mr. 
Taylor then fetched Mrs. Taylor and the young ladies 
to view the cross walk, the trees of which were illumin- 
ated to represent in a natural and easy manner fruits 
and flowers. Finding the Fantoccini was about to be 
displayed, they all repaired to the Rotunda, the 
scenery of which had been newly painted, and with 
the tasty chandeliers wore a very gay appearance. 
The Fantoccini acted the Babes in the Wood, and 
contained many figures on foot and on horseback ; 
much surprise was expressed how the figures could 
be moved in such good time. " This exhibition out- 



280 



A Month's Vacation 



124 



does every attempt of the kind," said Mr. Taylor, "and 
is conducted by Mr. Gray, who has got several new 
figures purposely for the use of this place : it must be 
acknowledged," he continued, " that the present pro- 
prietors have not spared any trouble or expense to 
render this a pleasant and entertaining place of amuse- 
ment ; everything bears the mark of great and recent 
improvement." They next visited Fingal's Cave, and 
proceeding along the left walk came within sight of a 
hermit with whose figure the young ones were all much 
taken, but more with a white cat that came into his 
cell and seated herself by his fire. "I will make a 
hermit with my moss," said Francis Taylor; "and I 
do think," said his sister Jane, " I can do the cat." 
They stayed here till Mrs. Taylor reminded them that 
the ground was damp. In their way round they were 
pleased with the Cosmoramas. 



281 



v--- 




The first object Henry saw when he left the hut, was a 
very pleasa.nt looking grey-headed old man. {From Henry : 
A Story intended for Little Boys and Girls. By Frances 
Bowyer Vaux. London : W. Darlon, jun., 58 Holborn 
Hill. 1816.) 

283 









Om am en te d 



Appropriate tEn g ravin g s 









SfwiuS< 



DAME TRUELOVE'S TALES 



Jane Primrose 

Jane Primrose had the care of her mother's 
poultry ; she was not a very poor woman, so she 
told her little girl she should have all the money the 
eggs sold for, to buy her a new frock and a straw 
bonnet in the summer, and desired her to be very 
careful of them and give plenty of meat to her hens 
and to be sure to put all the poultry into the hen- 
house at night, and fasten the door, that she might 
find them safe in the morning. "The care of these 
pretty little creatures will be a very good thing for 
you, Jane," added her mother, " for I think you are 
rather lazy in the morning, and do not much like to 
get up." 



287 






i- 




"They come from Waterloo," replied Frederic, "my Papa 
told me they were coming this way, and he is gone on horse- 
back to meet them, for we have an uncle and a cousin among 




Here comes a jolly Tar! but not Nelly Wilmot's brother 
Williiim, though he is just a? good a boy, and as happy as he 
is, when he comes home from sea, and finds all his friends 
well, and his liiile brothers and sisters smiling and pleased to 




The rest of the compinj were loo well bred to laugh or 
appear to tike noure of the bo«ing ind twisting of ihe gentle 
m-in and lid) but ( eorge tnd f-inn) stood up behind them, 
lie iinitating one and Finn) the other 




'1 he fi h ni, Lucj d 1 i to i k I e h 1 er o I Ip 
t e he If u[ on the rope ^ncl 1 eg to nt o I 
t ] Hj 1 1 le \nnc ds rraid o look n I 




She «cnl imc [imrnintj iiHi> her (Imndmamma's iwim 
ivlicn slie «ns rcailiiij;, Iw.itiiii,' the ilrimi with onu hand and 
lioMin^' a Iriiinpcl lo Iut imujlli wltli [lie oihcr, and the jwrnT 
old lady was aliiiosi disir^irtcd. 




" [ whispered to the maslcr of the shop [as 
cnji>y Henry's sur|iriiM;) the pur|)»rt of our 
lieggci) him 1» lake ihe lUtlc Uiy into ai 
equip him complelcly in a sailor's dress." 



(From The Jmtnile Journal, by Mrs. Cockle. 
London: C. Chappie, 66 Pall Mall, iStj.) 



TH 



IPCJS 






r r-i 






'■'-i^S-s. 




iffi " Food for ihe Voung, adapted to the Mental 
Opacities of Children of 'I'ender \'cars. By a 
Mollier. Ix>iidon : I'rintud by and for W. Darton, 
jun., s8 Holborn Hill. i8i8." 




From Stories by n Mother fur Ike Use <>J h^r own 
Children. London : Darton, Harvey and Darton, 
Gracechurch Street, iSi8. 




•■MV MffniF.R LIKES PRAWNS." 

From "The Affectionate Brothers. By Mrs. Hofland. 
London : A. K. Newman and Co, Leadenhall 
Street." 




l*'rom "Somulhing New fiom Aunt Mary. By Mary 
Hughes, Author of ' The Ornaments Discovered,' 
Szc London ; William Darton, 58 Holborn 
Hill. 1820." 




From " Rural EmploymerHs ; or A Peep into Village 
Concerns. By Mary Elliott. London : Wm. 
Darton, 58 Holborn Hill. i8zo." 




From "Rural KmiiloynieDis ; or A I'cep imo Village 
Concorns, By Mary Elliott. Ixindon : W'ni. Darton, 
SS Holborn Hill. 1820." 



(•iy/nny/ tvf//i /'VrmYy-.r) 

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306 



^ VISIT 



TO 



%\)t 3Sa?aar. 



By the Author of 

Juliet, or the Reward of Filial Affection ; 
and the Port Folio of a School Girl. 



THE THIRD EDITION. 



LONDON : 

Printed for HARRIS Sc SON 

Corner o/St, Paul's Church Yard ; 

and may also be had at several shops in 
The Bazaar, Soho Square. 

1820. 



THE BAZAAR 28 

She was just quitting the counter when 
Caroline burst into a loud laugh, pointing to 
the opposite counter which was occupied by 
a hatter. Mrs. Durnford instantly saw the 
cause of her risibility, and although a smile 
which she could not repress dimpled her face, 
yet she cautioned her little girl not to give way 
again to her demonstrations of merriment in 
so public a manner, especially as by so doing 
she might inadvertently wound the feelings of 
an individual. The objects which had excited 
the laughter of Caroline were a short thick 
made vulgar- looking woman and a tall thin 
boy who stood as stiff as a poker, with his 
hands fixed to his sides, while his mother tried 
to force a hat on his head evidently too tight 
for him. 



309 



".♦' •'. 



ROWLANDSON'S 



CHARACTERISTIC SKETCHES 



OF 



THE LOWER ORDERS 



INTENDED AS 



A COMPANION 



TO THE 



NEW PICTURE OF LONDON 



CONSISTING OF 



FIFTY -FOUR PLATES 



NEA TL \ ' COL O URED. 



LONDON : 
Printed for SAMUEL LEIGH, i8 Strand 



1820 



Price ys. half-boufui. 



ADVERTISEMENT 

The British Public must be already acquainted with 
numerous productions from the inimitable pencil of 
Mr. Rowlandson, who has particularly distinguished 
himself in this department. 

There is so much truth and genuine feeling in 
his delineations of human character, that no one can 
inspect the present collection without admiring his 
masterly style of drawing and admitting his just 
claim to originality. 

The great variety of countenance, expression and 
situation, evince an active and lively feeling, which 
he has so happily infused into the drawings as to 
divest them of that broad caricature which is too 
conspicuous in the works of those artists who have 
followed his manner. Indeed we may venture to 
assert that since the time of Hogarth no artist has 
appeared in this country who could be considered 
his superior or even his equal. 

This collection may be had, bound with Leigh's 
New Picture of London, price 15s. 



314 



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SAHTB.En'-WARE. 



318 




DOIlS UKAT. 



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.,«-S*SS.SHftA'i-''---' 1 



MAMMA'S 

Present 

of 

Pictures and Poetry. 



By ADELAIDE. 



LONDON: 

PRINTED FOR HARVEY & DARTON, 

55 GRACECHURCH STREET. 



1820 



THE SEE-SAW 

" Come, boys, a see-saw ! 
Tho' 'tis against the law, 
I'll place these two boards well across, 
Then up in the air 
111 first mount, that is fair ; 
And to Johnson I'll give a good toss. 

" The usher is here 
And what do I care ? 
I'll have all my sport, that I will. 
So go up, see-saw : 
Ho ! that's it, my boy ! 
Tho* usher says * down ' I'll play still." 

So on they both went. 
On their pastime quite bent : 
They did not see master behind, 
Until he called out, 
" Wiiat are you about ? 
So thus, boys, my orders you mind." 

Then down both the boys 
Fell with a loud noise. 
But did not get up again soon. 
The first lay as dead, 
And Johnson's nose bled : 
To excuse himself he then began. 

" I told you this play 
Would surely, some day, 
Some acciilent cause ; and now see : 
A bone is soon broke ! 
And then 'tis no joke. 
Be in future both governed by me." 



326 



THE SWING 

(A True Story) 

« I WISH I was at home, then I could swing 
In our great bam, a very pleasant thing ; 
But here at school the master is so cross, 
To find out plays we're ever at a loss ; 
Nor leap-^g, see-saw, swing he will allow, 
And what he grants indeed I scarcely know. 
He says that we may all fine races run : 
In racing I could never see much fun ; 
For I'm so fat and short, they me outstrip, 
And some sly fellow gives me a sly trip. 
At battledoor and ball, and bat he lets us play ; 
But I'm soon tired, and cannot run all day. 
Now sitting at my ease, in my own swing. 
Two boys to push behind, is just the thing. 
I've got a good strong cord : among these trees 
I'll hang it up and swing just as I please. 



328 



'Tia vain I know to ask the boys to help ; 
Tbej master all obey. I'll try myself." 

He climbed the trees, and tied the rope quite fast : 
Another ronnd a tree before faim cast ; 
With which when seated firm, himself he swung. 
Thus merrily employed, he loudly sung; 
When suddenly, crack went the bough on high. 
See on the ground the toss'd-otit schoolboy lie ! 
He soon sprang up and quick forgot his pain : 
The tree he climb'd, and tied the rope again. 
At first lie balanced slow frum side to side. 
And then to twist himself all round he tried ; 
And this he did by grasping firm a tree ; 
He then let go his hold ! when instantly 
Whirl went the ropes, so rapid witli a bound, 
The schoolboy was thrown out, and there was found 
Full three honrs after, bleeding on tlie ground. 
When well recover'd, he observed, " A swing 
Is, as my master said, a dang'rous thing." 



SKETCHES 



OF 



JUVENILE CHARACTERS, 



EXHIBITED 



IN THE 



Curious Girl Cured ; 



AND 



W^z lL\lz 



OF 



an angrp Bop. 



LONDON: 
Published by E. WALLIS, 42 Skinner Street 



1820 



•I 



CURIOUS GIRL CURED 

Emma possessed a number of good qualities that 
caused her to be admired and beloved ; but these 
brilliant traits were obscured by an insatiable 
curiosity which nothing had yet been able to conquer. 
The servants had often caught her listening to their 
conversation. Mrs. Williams herself had more than 
once surprised her at the door of her room whilst she 
was receiving a visit from any particular friend : she 
had also found her hid in a closet in order to observe 
more clearly what was passing, while neither the 
shame she suffered on discovery, nor the reproaches 
of her mother, had hitherto availed to cure her of 
this dangerous propensity. Even in walking along 
the streets, her attention to what was passing was so 
great that she could not answer any questions which 
were put or profit by any observations that were 
addressed to her. 



333 



Mrs. Williams had tried several methods to break 
her of this sad habit, but without efTect, till at last 
she determined to punish her in such a manner that 
it should be some time before she would forget it. 
For this purpose, she took her one fine evening in 
Spring, to walk in Kensington Gardens, where a 
great number of people were assembled. Whilst 
Mrs. Williams was telling Emma the names of the 
dififerent shrubs and flowers that grow in that charm- 
ing place, instead of attending to her mother, she was 
listening to the conversation of those who were 
around her ; and was, as Mrs. Williams expected, so 
much occupied with what they were saying that she 
seized an opportunity to leave her in the midst of the 
crowd, unobsei'ved by any but the old servant, to 
whom she had intrusted the secret, and who had 
orders to hide himself behind an arbour to observe 
all her motions, and also to follow her at a distance 
unperceived. 



334 




rurioiitty iiiciirithli' A/jrf 



336 



HENRY PHILLIPS, 
OR The Life of The Angry Boy 

Henry Phillips was the son of a rich and respect- 
able merchant in the city of London. He was a boy 
of good natural dispositions, but being an only son, 
or to speak more correctly an only child, he was 
indulged by his mother in all his whims and caprices, 
which naturally served to increase to an alarming 
degree the violence of a temper naturally hasty, so 
much so that by the time he was four years old he 
would fly into the most ungovernable passions at the 
least thing he did not exactly approve. He could 
not be washed if it did not happen to suit his con- 
venience. 



On the morning of his execution after he had 
taken leave of his friends, his father was introduced, 



337 



of whom he anxiously enquired after the fate of his 
mother ; and on being informed of her death, although 
it was done with the utmost caution, he appeared 
very much affected, saying " it was through him she 
was brought to an untimely end." At last he be- 
came more composed, and received the sacrament: 
he then bad adieu to his father, and was conducted 
to the place of execution, where after a few minutes 
spent in prayer, he was launched into eternity. 

Thus fell, before he reached the age of seventeen 
years, Henry Phillips, a youth who was naturally 
addicted to no particular vice, but owing to a passion 
which if indulged no one can tell what may be the 
ruinous consequences, was hurried to commit a crime 
which destroyed a mother's life, brought down a 
father's grey hairs with sorrow to the grave, and 
entailed upon his own name the shame and infamy of 
a public execution. 



339 



Flowers of Instruction 



OR 



FAMILIAR SUBJECTS 



IN yERSE. 



** Truth is the natural nourishment of the Mind ; most salutary, 

when simply dressed." 



By MARY ELLIOTT 

(Uitu Belson) 



LONDON : 
WILLIAM DARTON, 58 HOLBORN HiLL 



1820 



Price One Shilling. 



J 



What is so hateful lu ihe sight. 

What can so soon dtforni 
Features intended to delight. 

As passion's angry storm ? 

Where nature stamp'd the brow of yout 
With all that's fair to see — 

With candour, cheerfulness, and truth 
And sweet simplicity — 

How shocking to derange the work, 

To spoil her fairest page, 
To suffer discontent to lurk 

Till it burst forth in rage. 

And then when passion's rage is o'er, 
What does it leave behind ? 

Sorrow and shame with many more 
Regrets, to wound the mind. 



-THE LOST CHILB " fJM 


W^^ r.~ "^fc "<«^i3p 


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*T Indiir'a linle Liici- to jmi 

Aullier luoUirr Gccgol for ilie iliinr. 





THE LOST CHILD 



Hark ! the Village is all in alarm, 

Each countenance saddened with care ; 

There's only one face looks calm, 
And that is the calm of despair. 

Oh 1 look at her pale cold cheek, 
Which seems as if turned to stone ; 

If her tongue had power to speak, 
It would tell you her child is gone. 

The darling so priz'd in her heart 
Whose prattle delighted her ear ; 

What mother could bear thus to part 
With an object so tender and dear. 

What tempted young Lucy to stray? 

Little rover ! she knows not the pain 
She has given her mother this day, 

Or quick she would come back again. 

The showman, with grotto of shells, 

Induc'd little Lucy to go ; 
She has followed his musical bells 

And her mother forgot for the show. 

But when to a distance she roves 

And pleasure gives way to new fears ; 

When her eye looks for all that she loves, 
And no smiling mother appears ; 

Ah ! Lucy what grief will be thine, 
How sore will thy pretty eyes weep ; 

In sorrow thy head will recline, 

And no bosom to which thou may'st creeps 

Then hasten kind neighbours to seek. 
And the poor little wanderer restore 

To the arms of her mother, whose cheek 
Shall press her dear Lucy's once more. 

346 



THE Ppli-Y. 




Look at my pony's flowing mane ! 
Cried smiling Tom tu sisier Jane ; 
Would you not like lo have a ride ? 
Yes, answered Jane, if I had iried. 

Oh, never wait to leam, said he ; 
Nothing like courage — look al me ! 
Stop, Jane exclaimed, and caught his hajic 
Have you forgot pa^w's command ? 

Tom, hesitating, answered No, 
Declared he only wish'd to show 
How well his little horse could trot 
And should not venture from the spot. 

Now mounted he wuuld lain display 
His skill, to make the beast obey ; 
But, without bridle, spur or whip 
What signified his horsemanship. 

In vain his effort to restrain 
The pony, or dismount a^^ain : 
He tried to check the unruly steed. 
Who, frightened, but increased his speed. 

Losing all power to keep his seal, 
Tom soon lay at the ponj's feet ; 
Whence he was taken up as dead. 
And not for months could quit his bed. 



348 



Plain Things 



FOR 



Little Folks; 

SEASONED WITH 

INSTRUCTION 

BOTH 

FOR THE MIND AND THE EYE. 



BY THEIR FRIEND 

MARY ELLIOTT. 



LONDON : 

WILLIAM DARTON, 58 Holborn Hill. 
Price One Shilling, 




U . NTHSK OITTWrrTKn 
Yniii- bvat li-g lirai ^uuit nunc I p 



ai . THK i»r»cK. 

nii* is m. atttn t« otru u* ■ 
Onre -avn Vw- wCftm <o •* 




Sophia and Mary 



OR 



THE SISTERS: 



AN INTERESTING AND INSTRUCTIVE 

TALE. 



iLontion: 
Published by E. WALLIS 

42 SKINNER STREET 
I 820 



2 A 



r- 



Sophia and Mary 

" What is the use of your tantaliziug that poor cat, 
Mary 1 " said her twin sister, Sophia ; " you had much 
better leam your lesson." 

Mary. " I wish to teach pussy to beg ; look how 
tedious the little animal is ; as often as I put her up, 
does she scratch and struggle to break loose from me." 

^r ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^"^ 

Sophia, from a window of their schoolroom, seeing the 
bird upon a tree concluded something was amiss, and in 
consequence came down to enquire the cause. " Let us 
fetch the cage," said she — " possibly on seeing that the 
Parrot may come down." The cage was brought out, 
and Miss Polly turned each side of her head alternately 
round, to examine it minutely, with both eyes. 

♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ « 

The sisters were speedily in the parlour embracing 
their governess; though seeing her in deep mourning, 
they guessed the cause, and delicately forbore to enquire 
about Mrs. Hunt, lest it should renew her grief for the 
recent loss she had sustained. Pug was extravagantly 
wild in his joy. 



355 




356 




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Mr. Jennings had for some years been engaged in a 
ruinous law suit, concerning an estate he claimed, while 
another family held the land he considered himself 

entitled to. 

^p ^p ^p ^p " 

A border of garden daisies in full flower separated 
the walk to the house from a small lawn on each side, 
while a light veranda at the door covered with wood- 
bines, interspersed with jessamine and roses, attracted 
universal admiration at the elegant neatness of the tout 

ensemble. 

# # « # # 

Mrs. Hartop replied : " These are the young ladies, 
Miss Towiiley, whom I feel a pride in acknowledging I 
have educated — you have my consent to retire, my dear 
girls — this lady will dispense with your attendance at 
present." 



362 



Juvenile Games 



FOUR SEASONS. 




EDINBURGH -. 



OLIVER AND BOYD, HIGH-STREET j 



[Priee Tivs .Sii/lingi. half iouxd.] 



ADVEKTISEMENT 



n 



This little Work contnins a deBcription of a 
great variety of Games suited to the Fuuk Seasons 
of the Year, and is intended Bolelj for the amtise- 
iHent of Young Persona, As theBe games are 
fiorfeetly free froiD any thing that ran in the 
Binaliest degree injure the health or luoraU of 
youth, it is hoped tliey will be aceeptable to the 
Public. A Work of tiiia kind b calculated, in 
Tuany reajiects, to be useful. Emtilation, in any 
thing that is uot bad, has always a good tendency ; 
and if this lautiabie spirit is engendered at play, it 
will undoubtedly be retained, perhaps increased, in 
the pursuit of learning ; by which the most 
beneficial effects may flow from it. 

It is necessary here to explain the reason of the 
Games represented on the Plates being difierent 
from the description given of them in the Dialogues, 
[n the Dialogues, Young Persons, of both sexes, 
are introduced in the Games, to render the Work 
interesting to young ladies as well as gentlemen ; 
but, in the plates, they are played at esclusively 
by young gentlemen, and the reason of this is, that 
most of the Games require strength and dexterity. 





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Angvstina. Willingly — This game only requires 
a little practice — look well — you see that I firat 
hold these two little sticks tied together by this 
small conl, keeping them at a little distance, that 
the ball may keep its balance in the bending of 
the cord. I ruse my hands alternately, to impress 
it by the motion; and I elevate my right hand 
much higher, by slight jerks, which makes it turn. 
I gradually quicken this motion, to increase its 
rapidity, that the ball may keep its balance, which 
accelerates its movements, as you may perceive, 
and causes it to hum. This is the effect of the air 
which enters by these little holes; the noise 
augments in proportion as its celerity increases, 
and almost resembles that of the harmonica. — 
Come, try in your turn. 



365 




Adolp/iug. The only way to learn to play well 
ia to use it frequently. My profeiisor approyes of 
my playing at it, because it requires some address 
and an exact eye. The most aiiuple manner is 
tijis — to keep the ball upon the point ; it is more 
difficult to holil it at the flat end. When you have 
tried these two ways, then yoii will eome to what 
they call the censer ; the ball is thrown with more 
grace, and we receive it upon the point in this 

Amelia. I think I begin to play ; I have caught 
it several times tolerahly well. 

Advlp/ius. Good; hut that ia only the small 
game ; there are other modes of playing, which are 
more ditlicult. I throw the ball and the cup 
alternately — I receive the cup in the ball, or the 
ball in the cup, sometimes on the point. 




Adolphun. I huff you — 

Amelia, Howt 

Adolp/ius. I gave you that man to take, and 
you have not taken him ; I therefore take up your 
man, and play ag&in ; it is from this that the 
proverb comes — Huffing ia not playing. 

Amrlia. Oh ! but I will remember. Come, put 
down my man, and I will take you. 

Adolpktis. That's well, and now I will take 
three of yours, see — one, two, three ! 

Amelia. Id that case I lose two men ; I would 
rather you should huff me. 

Adolpkus. Yes, but you have not the choice, 
and I can force you to take them ; here, I again 
take these two — and crowu mine. 

Amelia. Oh ! if I were to play seriously, this 
would put me out of all patience. 



367 




Charles. We take a certain number of niarbleB, 
which we throw proiniBcuously ; anil thcu arraoge 
each marble, at an agreed distance, one aft«r the 
other ; anil whoever, in throwing, ConcheB them 
wins. We may also make a. hole, to throw the 
marbles into. 

EdiBiird. Well ! let us play promiscuously. 

Chai-les. There, my marbles are thrown and 
separated ; now arrange them. You hold your 
marble wrong, Henry. Here— place it npon the 
fir>tt finger with the thumb behind, and you will 
drive it out better : — all those you touch arc won. 

Adolphtu. That's well played ; but the gaine 
requires more skill if you play at Pitch-hole, be- 
cause you must not only touci) the marbles, but 
arrange them so as to drive into the hole all those 
which remain out. 



368 




I will trace lines for the Scotch hoppers upon 
this pavement. You will play nt the Grtal 
Marelle, — will you notT — the Little is only fit for 
infantR. You miist trace one long square, with 
four divisioDS in it ; then draw a semi-circle at the 
□arrowcBt end, and iii it St. Andrew's cross. In 
the triangle make a little round, which is colled 
the copper ; and in the last, to the right, a key. — 
Very well. 

Charlft. Here, Edward ; here is our marelle : 
Put your quoit in the first division, and strike it 
with your toe whilst hopping upon one leg, from 
one division to the other, without putting the 
other foot to the ground, or letting the quoit on 
the line. 

Edward. How arc the points counted 1 

Charlet. By the divisions from one to eight. 



369 




Adolp/itit. Here is the great cord ; — Henry, do 
you take one cDtl, unii Edward the other, and I 
will akiji while you turn it. 

Ilnirtf. Bravo! AdolphuB ^liold the cord; — 
'tia my turn. — 'Tis you now, Edward. — Ah ! still 
better ! But here are James, Lewis, Constant, and 
Alphonso, with Tour other of our friends coming ; 
BO our party for Prison-BorB is secure. 

Ailolphii*. Well, let ua join them, — The ladies 
are going into the pavilion, where they will see the 
gaino witltout feeling the cold. 

Mn. ValmoTit. I consent to that ; bnt see that 
none of jou attempt to imitate AleKander, who 
always played in his own way, and never followed 
the rules. Last mouth, in playing at Bars, when 
lie was made prisoner, instead of surrendering, as 
he ought to have doue, he climbed up a tree. 



Early Seeds 

To produce 

Spring Flowers 



By MARY ELLIOTT. 



Accompanied with Copper-plates. 



LONDON : 
WlLLJAM DARTON, 58 Holborn Hill. 

Price One Shilling with plain Pieties ; or 
with the Plates colouredy Eighteenpence, 



I 




3. Greediness Defeated 



A pretty pictare we have here 1 

I need not aay iclu> is to bUm 

But this I think is very clear- 



That greedy tricks di 



it lead to Bbame. 



This is a speaking picture and tells its own tale. 
Here is a silly child, whose greediness is so great that she 
has not patience to await the cooling of her bread and 
milk, and the consequence is that she has burned her 
mouth severely. Her papa seems to be chiding her, and 
no wonder, for she looks much too old to be guilty of so 
disgusting a habit. Why should we laugh at pigs and 
ducks for their greediness, when children who can both 
speak and think, act in the same manner t 



373 




0. Effects of Climbing 

Those who in c1imb[ag are exjiett 
Seltlom escape dUgriice or hurt ; 
And when commsada they disregard, 
A Tall iB bnt a just reward. 

Here U an instructive result of a silly habit. We 
certainly do not envy the young gentleman hia present 
situation. He does not look very comfortable ; but, as it 
was his own seeking lie has no right to complain. By the 
time he is quite ou the ground, and the chair upon him, 
he will have enough of pain to make him remember the 
folly of hia conduct. If children had no better way of 
employing time than this, it would be well if they slept 
all their lives ; but we know they have plenty of books 
to improve their minds, and others that will amuse their 
fancies. 



374 




10, Innocent Sports 

These barm leas aporta we like to see ; 

No mischier here appears ; 
The boys sll sboiv activity 

Well Hiiiteil to their yean. 

Look at this smart little fellow ; how neatly he skips l 
He must have practised much, or he could not manage the 
rope 30 gracefully. Skipping is a lively exercise and very 
good for the health ; so is hoop trundling. See that boy 
in the background ; he runs with all his might, and still 
keeps trundling the hoop. You may observe he holds the 
stick in bis left band, as much as to say he is so expert 
that be can use it as well with one hand as the other. 



37S 




12. FaI,SEHO0II PUKISHEIJ 



Dill 3'ou ever bpb a couiite nance bo full of terror t 
Cowardly boy, you were not afraid to tell a falsehood, but 
tremble at the jninislinient it so justly brings. How 
angry his pajMi looks 1 He must indeed be sorely vexed 
by such conduct in his child, who is (|uite old enough to 
be sensible of ihc wicktidnuss of a lie. Tiiis vile habit 
should be checked in time, otherwise it will lead to 
crimes of the worst kind. We cannot put any trust in 
the word of a h'nr ; no, we disbelieve and shim him ; be is 
despised by all. 

376 



Ostentation S^ Liberality 



a %9L\t 



IN TIVO VOLUMES 



By ARABELLA ARGUS 

Author of " Ihe Juvenile Spectator " ; " T/ic Adventures of a 

Donkey;' &c. 



There is in Virtue sure a hidden charm, 
To force esteem, and Envy to disarm. 

Ducheu of Dcvomhire to Fenelon. 



VOL. I. 



Honnon : 
WILLIAM DARTON, 58 Holborn Hill 

1821 



!■ .-; 



fl 



OSTENTATION AND LIBERALITY 

A TALE 

" Well, I have seen your paragon of excellence," 
said Frances Austen ; " and I know you will say I 
am prejudiced : but indeed, my dear Miss Colville, 
I do not think so much of her." 

" So much and so little are relative terms," replied 
Miss Colville smiling, " and when applied to character 
often mislead us. But who is this wonder? I do 
not recollect such a being in my small circle of 
friends." 

"Why who could it be but Lady Jane? " returned 
Frances : " you will not understand me ; and I am 
certain before I say another word, that you will 
think I am prejudiced." 

" Not unless I find you so," said Miss Colville ; 
" yet allow me to observe, my dear, that the mind is 
not at all times equally open for the reception of the 
most truths ; as such, suppose we defer this subject 
till to-morrow?" 



379 




380 




38l 





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THE 



Rebellious School-Girl 



A TALE 



By MARY HUGHES (late Robson) 

Author of "The Ornaments Discovered/' 
"The Alchemist," &c. 



LONDON: 
WILLIAM DARTON, 58 HoLBORN Hill. 



1821 



2 C 



THE REBELLIOUS SCHOOL-GIRL 

Tinkle, tinkle, tinkle ! " There goes the 
bell for walking ; " — " and for talking too," 
cried Clara Gordon, startuig up from a seat in 
the school-room, on which she had for some 
hours sat in silence. "One may now speak 
plain English for the next two hours : I 
believe, if it were not for the time between 
twelve and two, I should forget the way to 
speak English altogether ; for there is no other 
time to practise it." 

" And, after all, you practcese Scotch more 
than English," said Maria Evans, repeating the 
word practise witli the same Scottish accent 
hi which Clara had pronounced it " Thank 
you," said she, laughing good-temperedly, " I 
am much obliged to you for correcting me." 



386 




387 




■jgflSitJf*"^ pe ill. 



389 




M« GrK4- nnlorltrJ il . 
'ikiirA nnwrrs.hvmiUfol 

4kF lori at'lsaal 




|THENf;v, , , , 

pBUCLlBSAK- 



THE 

HISTORY 



OF 



SIXTEEN 

WONDERFUL OLD WOMEN 

Illustrated by 
AS MANY ENGRAVINGS 

exhibiting their 
PRINCIPAL ECCENTRICITIES 

and 
AMUSEMENTS 



Much credit is due to our Artist, I ween ; 
VoT such pictures as these can seldom be seen. 



LONDON: 

Printed for HARRIS AND SON, 

Comer of St. Paul's Church-yard 



1821 



1 




Old Woman of Crovdon 



There was an Old Woman of Croydon 
To look young she affected the Hoyden 
And would jump and would skip, 
Till she put out her hip ; 
Alas ! poor Old Woman of Croydon. 



395 




Oi,n Woman ok Gostokt 



There was an Old Woman of Gosport, 
And she was one of the cross sort, 

When she dressed for the Ball 

Her wig was too small, 
Which cnrag'd this Old Woman of Gosport. 



396 




Old Woman of Ealing 



There was an Old Woman of Ealing, 

She jump'd till her head touch'd the ceiling, 

When 2164 

Was announced at her door, 
As a prize to th' Old Woman of Ealing. 



397 



Mistress Towi. 
There was an Old Woman named Towl, 
She went out to Sea with her Owl, 

But the Owl was sea-sick 

And scream'd for Physic ; 
Which sadly annoy'd Mistress Towl. 

S 
Old Woman ok Harrow 
There was an Old Woman of Harrow 
Who visited in a wheel-barrow, 
And her servant before 
Knock'd loud at each door ; 
To announce the Old Woman of Harrow. 



Olu Woman ok Glo'ster 
There was an Old Woman of Glo'ster 
Whose Parrot two guineas it cost her ; 

But his tongue never ceasing, 

Was vastly displeasing 
To the talkative Woman of Glo'ster. 



Old Woman ot* Lynn 
There liv'd an Old Woman at Lynn 
Whose nose very near touch'd her chin. 
You may easy suppose 
She had plenty of Beaux 
This charming Old Woman of Lynn. 
398 



YOUNG WILFRED; 

or^ the 

PUNISHMENT OF FALSEHOOD 



A TALE OF TRUTH AND CAUTION, 



FOR 



'Ihe Benefit of the Rising Generation, 



By W. F. SULLIVAN, A.M. 

TEACHER OP ELOCUTION AND BELLES LETTRES. 



A NEfy EDITION 



LONDON : 

Printed and Sold by 
DEAN AND MONDAY, Threadneedle Street 

1821 



42 Youn^ Wilfred 

The whole school was by this time assembled. 
The Doctor ordered him immediately to prepare fiNr 
punishment, while he addressed the criminal in the 
following impressive words : — " Thou unparalleled, un- 
grateful hypocrite ; thou prince of liars ! — ^beifore I send 
you back to your unfortunate parents, as a disgrace to 
them and to human nature, I will endeavour, with 
God's blessing, to expel the evil spirit out of thy little 
body ; for if ever mortal being was possessed with a 
devil thou art he. Hand those two letters round the 
school. You see here, young gentlemen, a little moiH 
ster of deceit, fraud, falsehood, treachery and cunning. 
During the twenty-five years I have kept school, and 
the many hundred pupils who have passed through 
my hands, I have never met even the shadow of his 
resemblance. Who would have thought so small a 
duodecimo could have contained such a folio of 
atrocious lies ? I am truly shocked ; I feel for your 
unhappy parents, and your miserable mother who must 
curse the hour in which she brought you into the 
world. I foresee, with pain I say it, unless a miracle 
work a speedy reformation, you inevitably must come 
to an untimely end. As it is, it is my duty to 



400 



43 



Young Wilfred 




make you remember this day as long as joa 
Uve." 

On this the serving-man entered with a new birch- 
broom, which the Doctor opened and gave a sprig to 
every boy in the school : the culprit was now ftstened 
to a desk, and each young gentleman advanced in 
rotation and inflicted a stripe, till the number of 
was unsparingly bestowed. We may judge of 
spectacle his back exhibited ; for he gained no & 
from the boys, especially the four he caused to be 
unjustly punished; and who were on that aocoanl 
ordered to inflict three stripes for the others* one. 
When taken down his wounds were dressed, and he 
was confined in a dark room, and no longer admitted 
among the boys. As soon as he was able to be 
removed, he was sent back to his father accompanied 
by one of the assistants, bearing the two letters he 
wrote, and an explanatory one from the Doctor him- 
self. On his quitting the academy he was saluted 
with the groans and hisses of the whole school 
assembled ; and had they not been strictly prohibited, 
they would have pelted him to the imminent danger 
of his life. 



402 




. Thief whom a halter will stretch 



A Lad when at school, one day stole a pin, 
And said that no harm was in such a small sin. 
He next stole a knife, and said 'twas a trifle ; 
Next thing he did was pockets to rifle, 
Next thing he did was a house to break in, 
The next thing — upon a gallows to swing. 
So let us avoid all little sinnings, 
Since such is the end of petty beginnings. 



Frc 



n " The Ranks in Life. For the Amusement and 
Instruction of Youth. London: J. Drury, 36 
Lombard Street, comer of Plough Court, 1831." 



.*^4^%v oU 




Edward's Decision 

An ivory box the right haml i.. . 

From which by curious spnn^s, 
A little bird of fine-wrought gold 

Comes forth and sweetly sings, «. 

He pictures all his friends' surprise 
When hearing its sweet voice ; 

And thinlts it would be fair and wise. 
To make the bird his choice. 

From "The Sunflower." A Collection of Original 
Poems. By Mary EUiott. London i William 
Darton. 58 Holbom Hill, 1832. 
404 




From " Original Poetry for Young Minds. By Miss 
Horwood. London : A. K. Newman & Ca 
Leadenhall Street, & Dean & Munday, Thread- 
needle Street. 1B22." 



THENf.W YORK 

PUBLIC LIBRARY 




rl^ 



^^r^. 






h>l.)iHlM'.|.\t<-j.. ,;i.-,.l.^ IL.I 



CONTENTS 



TALES OF MOTHER GOOSE 



Little Red Riding-Hood . 

The Fairy 

Blue Beard ..... 
The Sleeping Beauty in the Wood . 
The Master Cat, or Puss in Boots . 
Cinderella, or the Little Glass Slipper 
Riquet with the Tuft 
Little Thumb .... 

The Discreet Princess 



TALES OF MOTHER BUNCH 

Prince Lupin and the White Cat 

Adventures of the Princess Frutilla . 

The Yellow Dwarf. 

The Pigeon and Dove 

Miranda and the Royal Ram . 

The Story of Fortunio 

History of Elmedorus and Alzayda . 

History of the Princess Zamea and Prince Almanzor 

History of Zaimayda and Alinzor 

History of Prince Zalmandor and Princess Amandiva 

The Story of Little George . . . . . 



Pace 
I 

J 

6 
II 

21 
26 

33 
40 

50 



73 

79 
82 

88 
95 

114 
117 
124 
130 

140 



POPULAR TALES 



Tom Thumb .... 






148 


Prince Fatal and Prince Fortune 






'55 


Jack and the Beanstalk . 






165 


Beauty and the Beast 






178 


Jack the Giant Killer 






195 


Aladdin, or the Wonderful Lamp 






213 


Fortunatus, or the Wishing Cap 






230 


Nourjahad, an Oriental Tale . 






249 



408 



THE 



DANDY'S Wedding 



OR THE 



Loves and Courtship 



of 



Peter ^^uince 




Phoebe Clove 



«^^^¥l#^»#M»#^#MM^^»# 



Embellished with Sixteen Coloured Engravings 



»»»^^^»#M^#N^MMM^ ^ 



LONDON: 

Printed and sold by 

JOHN MARSHALL 

140 Fleet Street 

From Aldermary Church Yard 

1823 



Price 1/. 6^. 




The table was witli iieatncBs spread, 

A chicken graced the board j 
He to a seat Misa Phcebe led. 

And then the wine he poured. 
ISoon after supiwr Quince arose, 

Her hand with fondnese took, 
Kissed it, and left her to repose. 

With the most lovins look 




She held her fan up to her face, 

And blushing very high, 
Then answered with a lovely gnce, 

I cannot you deny. 
He took her hand, We'll to the play 

And talk it over there. 
And settle then the happy day 

That will end all my care. 



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The handsomo veil, of Mechlin lace, 

A sister's love bestows, 
It adds new beauties to her face, 

Which now with pleasure glows. 
Friends, brothers, sisters, cousins meet, 

To attend the happy bride ; 
And Quince's joy is quite complete ; 

The nuptial knot is tied. 



Dame Wiggins of Lee 



AND HSR 



SEVEN WONDERFUL CATS. 



81 I?umorou0 Cale. 



WRITTEN PRINCIPALLY BY A LADY OF NINETY 



Embellished wUh Sixteen Coloured 
Engravings, 



PRICE ONE SHILLING. 



LONDON: 

DEAN & MUNDAY, Threadneedle Street; and 

A. K. NEWMAN & CO., The Minerva Press, 

Leadenhall Street, E.C. 

1823. 




Dame Wiggins of Lee 

Was a worthy old soul 
Aa e'er threaded a needle 

Or washed in a bowl : 
She held mice and rats 

In such antipathy 
That seven fine cats 

Kept Dame Wiggins of Lee. 




The Dame's heart was nigh broke, 

So she sat down to weep ; 
When she saw them come back, 

Each riding a sheop : 
She fondled and patted 

Each purring Tommy ; 
" Ah ! welcome, my dears," 

Said Dame Wiggins of Lee. 




You see them arrived 

At their Dame's welcome door : 
They show her their preaenta, 

And all their good store. 
" Now come in to supper. 

And sit down with me : 
All welcome, once more," 

Cried Dame Wiggins of Lee, 



416 




ijc^jf^/^ ;f^ 



mi "Rainsford Villa, or Juvenile Independence. 
A Tale. By A Lady. I-ondon : J. Harris & 
Son, St. Paul's Churchyard. 1823." 






There's hardly a Person but asks for my first ; 
And my second's of use, from the best to the wont 
My third is a mixture of falsehood and truth, 
A Companion much litter for age than for youth. 



(From "The Whim Wham, an Entire New Set (rf 
Kiddles, Charades, &c I,ondon: William Carton 
& Son, Holborn Hill.") 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^F "^ 




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Plate 12 
423 



Her prayers said, she soon is dresi, 
Not caring what " becomes her best,'" 
__Her aim is of a nobler kind — 



By study to improve the mind. 
To turn the leaf of history o'er 
And arts and sciences explore. 



Languid and pale, the Mother lies. 
She speaks not, but her speaking eyes, 
In language plain, express the pleasure 
She feels in having such a treasure, 
A Daughter, who in early days. 
Maternal tenderness repays. 



Here Laura by her Mother led. 
With pleasure sees before her spread, 
Proofs of a Parent's kind regard, 
Gifts for the Poor her own reward. 
For Laura felt and understood 
The luxury of doing good. 



Anecdotes 



AND 



Adventures 



OF 



Fifteen Toung Ladies 



BY THE AUTHOR OF 



Anecdotes and Adventures of Fifteen Gentlemen 



Printed and sold by 

E. MARSHALL 

140 Fleet Street 
From Aldermary Church Yard 



Price IS. 6d. 



k 




'J'lit'ii: WHS a joung lady of Camberwell, 
?>he had an idea she could clamber well ; 

But in taking a. nest, 

She fell up to her lu-east 
In II pond, in the middle of Camlwrwell 



4^ 




There was a young lady of Wales, 
Too fond of biting her nails ; 

They made her eat mustard, 
Instead of a custard, — 
O, naughty young lady of Wales ! 




There wus a young laily lumu'il ilyder, 
Slio ahriuik at thu sijjlit of ii sipidcv ; 
She once yiivc a. seceaiii, 
Ami leaped into the stream, 
When slic siiw one crawliii;; liesiile lier. 



428 



SIX STORIES 

for 

THE NURSERY 



IN WORDS OF ONE AND TWO SYLLABLES. 



Intended as 



A Sequel to the " Mouse-Trapy 



By a mother, 

For the use of her own children. 



LONDON: 

Printed for M. J. GODWIN & CO. 

At the French and English Juvenile and School Library 

195 (St. Clement's) Strand; 

Where may be had the same work in French, for young Beginners 

in that Language. 

I 824 






i 



SIX STORIES 
FOR THE NURSERY 



STORY I 



Mary 

The Lit-tle Girl who was so sil-ly as to cry for all she 
want-ed in-stead of ask-ing her Nurse for it. 

I once knew a lit-tle girl call-ed Ma-ry, 
who had got a sad trick of cry-ing when 
she want-ed a-ny thing. This lit-tle girl 
had a good Mam-ma and a kind nurse, 
who were fond of her when she was good ; 
but, when she cried and scream-ed it made 
them an-gry. Ma-ry had ro-sy cheeks, 
blue eyes and brown hair; she look-ed 
ve-ry nice when she smil-ed ; but at last 
cry-ing and fret-ting made her quite pale 
and her eyes red. One day she was out 

431 




oil dpar MmmuLif IIuiA dnnr aa jrou bode me. [ 
■Ihiu^. not lunv JmA A Oat poai* 




Wlinl ill tlip milur wrth Abb Kllpnt <lw looks M if | 





. 


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aud <irl. nramng «A>m.j«^ m 


flKli.U*. 



French and English Juvenile and School Libras 

195 (St Clement's) Strand. 

M. J. Godwin & Co., at their Repository for the Amu 
ment and Instruction of Children, keep on hand an extens 
assortment of Books and Alphabets, with many Plates, and 
a low Price. 

1. The Little Woman and the Pedlar. 

2. The King and Queen of Hearts, with the Rogueries of 1 

Knave who stole the Queen's Pies. 

3. Gaffer Grey, or the Misfortunes of Poverty. 

4. Tom and his Cat ; the surprising History of a Good B 

5 . The Three Wishes, by the Author of The Peacock at Hoi 

6. Mounseer Nongtongpaw ; or John Bull in Paris. 

7. Mounseer Tonson ; a new Version of a Merry Tale. 

8. The Force of Example, a Nursery Rhyme, from 1 

celebrated Lessons for Children by Mrs. BarbaukL 

9. Six Stories for the Nursery, in words of one and two s^Iabl 
I o. Simple Stories in words of one syllable. 

1 1. A Book of the World, or Knowledge made Easy. 

1 2. £sop*s Alphabet, in Counters, with Illustrative Pictiires. 

13. The Babies' Alphabet on a Millboard. 

14. A New Alphabet of Beasts by Timothy Lovechild. 
I 5. A New Alphabet of Birds by the same. 

16. Outlines of English History by Baldwin. 

17. Mrs. Fenwick's Lessons in words of one, two and thr 

syllables. 

1 8. Beauty and the Beast, or a Rough Outside with a Gen 

Heart. 

1 9. Prince Dorus, or Flattery put out of Countenance. 

20. The New Book, and other Pretty Stories. 

21. Foolish Fears, or the History of Clara Hammond. 

22. Ellen and Judith, or True and False Charity. 

23. The Village Friends, and other Stories. 

24. The Curious Girl. 

25. The Spoiled Child. 

26. The Dangers of Gossiping. 

27. The Little Coxcomb. 

28. The Fib Found Out. 

29. Hector, or the Plotter caught in his own Trap. 

30. Stories for Little Boys and Girls, in words of one syllabi 

by the Author of Stories of Old Daniel. 

438 



"IklY SISTEIt, 

J . ■ lur S3iaT>' kelson, 
arv«-wii«i.i sou-g-kt to hill a n.^ 

'■Wtto tkeli to save its lU'e -wonlil tr,V. 
And. BH^ 't\vit s cruel to inuktr il tile' 

3CV SiSTBR 



1 




i^WKo sxw m.e nioiuil tlic^l.loobm.g;' Horse-.' 
And tlven. stood by. to clipck its coui-so, 
I 3iBmt her dewxr ^oy sliould g-et a tofs ? 

,^ My RISTIEIL .. 




.Viid when 1 suntcl.M lioi- m-w wnx doU^ 
WJio KwlTt'c'd it. without upiUvoL? 



'^flit-n up tke X.AdAeX X -would g-o, 
(How wcoiig^ it W»s. I note ivulllinnw ) | 

"WJio cmpA, Tjul held it I'ltat In-low' 

ilr SISTKU. 




OrtCe too I threw 

', Ittoufk'd Uiv chee 

Who ti'ipfl lii hidf 



L, ;in.d. Ii>A a scar! 
it. ri'omi ^Iniiima, 
My SlSTKR;> 



i-To See m» in. llin coacli. depMi-l. 

■in. 1i.»r tnilil vyc tttc trar imiiltt arar 

5 



I ran itboid n-atn 1 



j:.t^i 



^4 



were raiitv. J 

oohIh t" room, j 



Of tlilug'B 1 had. nat seen, before^ 
And »hcw uie pteturps, o'er and 6-*i 

COoi> SiSTBl 




Hut, O! you !ico»i'<t H(i lorrifiVd. 

To see voiu- I'.tirit, I cuuUI liwvp cri' 

MS 818' 



1 




I IpH thi' sport , to give you oa*9i* 
¥ov iiovvr did 1 Avtsli to t«rase 
Ot; do n ttiiiip- tHat vroii.Ul jint please 



The Story 

OK 

CDe 3lh3Satuxtb JBop 

COLORED ENGRAVLSGS 
I'RICE 0.\K -SHILLING 



1.0 K DON: 

Sold by W. IJARTON, Holborn Hill, 

AN]i W. LAKE, L'XBHllM-.l.^ 



THE 

ILL-NATURED BOY 



There liv'd a man, I know not where, 
Who at the ale-house spent hie days ; 

He had a eon who from hta youth 
Waa brought up in his father's ways. 



Rude weix' his manners ami his speech, 
His temper quarrelBome and froward : 

A tyrant to a!l younger boys, 
With older ones a cowiwd. 



Just like himself, by neighbours haled. 
This boy a snarling cur possessed — 

A snappish, surly, sneaking dog, 
Of horses and of sheep the pest. 



One morn his father went away 

\\'ith ale-house friends to stay the night ; 
And sent his son to pass the day 

Id mirth or mischief aa he might. 






446 




" Oh, by all means," the hoy replied, 

And raised the jug— then slipping round 

Behind he gave a little push, 

Down fell the pitcher on the ground. 



25 
The girl dismayed, in Borrow saw 

That every drop of milk was spilt; 
She wept in vain, the cruel boy 

Triumph'd the more in his own guilt 



ft e.C# im^^^ 


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70 
In vain he struggled to escape, 

If on lie ran, why tliey ran too ; 
They were for ever at hia heels, 

In spite of all that he could do. 

71 

In woeful plij^ht, ut length he spies 
The injui-cd donkey by the w;iy. 

And hoping that he may csuujje 

Springs on his bnck and rides away. 



448 



THE ADVENTURES 

OF 

CINDERELLA 

AND HER 

GLASS SLIPPER 




To which is added 
THE POPULAR STORY 

PUSS IN BOOTS 

EMBELLISHED WITH ELEGANT ENGRA VINGS 

HonDon: 

Printed and Published by G. MARTIN, 

6 Gl. St. Thomas Apostle 

Price Sixpence 



rUSS IN SOOTS 



1 



The boat was a great way from land wJieii 
a storm seemed gathering. Suddenly the 
lightning darted down, a thunderbolt fell ; the 
wicked and unjust nobleman was struck dead, 
and the boat shivered to pieces, God's anger 
has no respect to persofis, and a poor man is 
as safe in a thunder-storm as the richest Lord ! 
The beautiful princess sank down in the water, 
and her husband, unable to swim, only thought 
of perishing with hi^ wife. Each one was 
anxious to save himself, all but Petrus, who 
darted down like a rocket and seized the 
Princess by her beautiful hair as she was sink- 
ing. The Marquis in the meantime had clung 
to a piece of the galley, till he was taken up 
by a boat from the shore. Petrus succeeded 
in rescuing his prize from a watery grave, bore 
her on his arm to the shore, and placed her 
in safety under the royal tent. 



CINDERELLA 



It happened that the king's son g^ve a baU 
and invited all persons of fashion to it. Ol 
course our two young misses were invited^ and 
they made a very grand figure among th 
quality. They were mightily delighted witt 
the invitation, and wonderfully busy in choaa 
ing out such gowns, petticoats, and head 
dresses as might best become them. This 
was a new trouble to Cinderella ; for it was 
she who ironed her sisters' linen, and plaited 
their ruffles. 

They talked all day long of nothing else 
but how they should be dressed : they sen1 
for the best tire-woman they could get tc 
make up their head - dresses and to adjusi 
their double pinners, and they had their rec 
brushes and patches from Mademoiselle de U 
Pochc. 



452 




From "The New Doll; or Grandmamma's Gift. London: 
R. Ackcnnaiin, loi Strand, 1816." 



I: 







EARLY IMPRESSIONS 

OR 

MORAL AND INSTRUCTIVE 
ENTERTAINMENT 

FOR 

CHILDREN 

IN PROSE AND VERSE. 
WITH TWELVE DESIGNS BY DIGHTON 



r 




LONDON: 
J. HATCHARD & SON, Piccadilly 

MDCCCXXVlll, 




[Observe the father in the picture reading the commenda- 
ion which the master had bestowed on Adclphus for his good 
•ehaviour. The father rejoicing to learn that Adolphus is a 

■ood boy, and his mother tenderly embracing him.^ 

This behaviour of Adolphus was very pretty. 
It therefore pleases me. 
I will please my parents. 

How much pains must not parents take before their 
children learn to walk ! 

I myself was once feeble and helpless. 

My parents have brought me up till now. 

They have given me meat and drink. 

To them I am indebted for the clothes I wear. 

They instruct me in useful learning. 

I am a great expense to them. 

What return can 1 make to them for this ? 

Alas ! none at all. 




Charlotte saw a beautiful ox, 

Which, she heard, was about to be killed by the bmc 

This grieved her very much. 

She went home and complained of it to her father. 

" I do not know," said she, " how [>eople can be so ci 
as to kill an animal." 

"My dear child," answered her father, 

"An ox is not in ihe world for nothing. 

" It is designed to answer some end. 

" Beef, as you know, is a very necessarj' and wholesc 
article of food. 

" Tlie very skin and horns of the ox have their uses. 

" But we should not have the flesh, skin or horns if 
did not kill it. 

" Man is therefore not cruel to kill the ox. 

" He puts it only to ihe use for which it was iniende 

" But when lie prolongs the agonies of its death, 
is then cruel," 

45S 



The History 

of 

Jack the Giant Killer 

fVITH MJNT ENGRAl'INGS 




A NEW EDITION 
Adapud for 'Juvenile Readers of the Praent Day 

1830 



London ; 
Dean & Co., Threadiieedle Street 



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Jack the Giant Killer 




The Giant now endeavoured to get out ; but 
Jack struck him such a tremendous heavy blow 
on the crown of his head with his pickaxe, that 
it killed him. 

Now when the justices of Cornwall heard of 
this valiant action, they immediately sent for 
Jack and declared that he should always be 
called Jack the Giant-Killer, and they presented 
him with a sword and belt upon which was 
written in letters of gold : 

This is the valiant Cornish man, 
That slew the Giant Cormoran, 




Jack now stood by the side of the moat, and 
jeered at him, saying : You told me that you 
would grind my bones to powder: when shall 
you begin ? 

The Giant foamed with fury, and plunged 
from side to side of the moat, but he could not 
get out. 

At last Jack ordered a cart-rope to be 
brought to him. He then threw it over his two 
heads, and by the help of a team of horses, 
dragged him to the edge of the moat, when he 
cut off the monster's heads. 



462 




In a car the fair ladies at Brighton he drew, 

Marrowbones, cherrystones, 
Bundle 'em jig. 
And jogging along with a joDy fat crew. 
Quite into the sea for coolness flew. 
And made some fine pastime for dandies to viet 

Like an ambling, scambling, 

Braying sweet, turn-up feet, 

Mane-cropt, tail-lopl, 

High-bred, thistle-fed, 

Merry old Bundle 'em jig. 



From " Deborah Dent and her Donkey. London ; 
Uean and Munday, Threadneedle Street; and 
A K. Newman and Co., Leadenhall Street. 
Price One Shilling." 



463 






Johnny Fig was a green 

In business as brisk as a 

None than John to the s 

Which Madam l-'ig thouj 

Sing turnips, and 

Sing candles, red 

Of all the gay jiai 

"I'Js Madam Fig's 



From "Madiini Fig's 




K L 

k knocked it down. 
1 laughed at it. 



From "The Life and History of A, Apple-Pie, who was 
cut to pieces and eaten by twenty-six young ladies and 
gentlemen with whom little folks ought Co be acquainted 
London : Dean and Munday, Threadneedle Street ; 
and A. K. Newman and Co., I,eadenhall Street, Price 
One Shilling." 



2 H 



465 




Command, Take this. Que 

Ans2vcr. 
Six beetles against the 
Close to an old woina 
Five Piippies by our 1 
Who daily for their br 
Four horses stuck in z 
Three monkeys tied i( 
Two puddings' ends (hat w 
Nor a gaping, wide-moulliei 




From "The Child's Toy Rook ; or, Pleasing Tales In 
words of one and two syllables. By J. llishop. 
London: Dean and Miinday, 'l"hreadnecdle 
Street ; and A. K. Newman and Co., I-eadenhall 
Street. Price One Shilling." 
467 




From "The New Stor)' Book In words of 
syllable. Hy Mrs. Martin. London : Dean 
Munday, Threndneedle Slrcet. Price Six-per 
468 



rm 




January 

Children are all partial to this month, as it is the be- 
ming of a new year ; but it is very cold. There are now 

leaves upon the trees, and sometimes a great deal of 
jw falls ; pools and ponds are froiien over, and not un- 
quently the large rivers also ; youths now enjoy the 
ngerous amusements of sliding and skating. It is dark 

four o'clock in the afternoon. A comfortable room, a 
Dd fire and warm clothes, are now the greatest luxuries. 



im " Mamma's Gift ; or, Pleasin); Lessons, adapted for 
children of an early age. By Mrs. Meeke. London : 
Dean & Munday, Threadneedle Street. Price One 
Shilling." 



469 




Strawberkies and Cream. 

George had some strafl 
ber-ries giv-en to 
he asked the 
to give him a Ut-tle crean 



him, s 
dairy-mai 



im "Tlie Evergreen : comainina stories about Elltn A h' 
Fawn, Sleepy Francis, &c. ISy Mrs. Martin. Londm 
Ucan iL Munday, Threadncedle Street. Price Six-pence 




Once when walking backwards in the garden, he came 
in contact with ihe garden- roller, which if he had looked 
where he was going he would certainly have seen ; but as 
it was, down he came backwards, and gave his head a 
violent blow, which not only caused a great bump thereon, 
but made his nose bleed, and he was confined to his bed 
all day, so severely was he bruised. 



From "The Birth-day Present; or, Pleasing Tales of Amuse- 
ment and Instruction. By Mrs. Mecke. London : Ucan 
& Munday, Threadneedle Street. Price One Shilling." 




All ' preily moon ! you sliiiie su bnghi. 
I love lo see your peaceful li^hi. 




Agreed from school to run away 
And ramble in the snow. 

From "The Flower-Basket ; or. Original Nursery Khyines and 
Talcs. By Susanna Strickland. London : Dean & 
Munday, Threadneedle Street ; & A. K. Newman and Co. 
Leadenhall Street. Price One Shilling. " 




Trundling the Hoop. 

When youth enjoy a holiday, 
And wish to pass the time away 
In pleasant sport, to bowl the hoop 
Will surel}' please the merry troop. 



im " Pleasing Talcs for I.iltle Folks. By J, Kishop, 
London : Dean & Munday, Threadneedle Street ; & A. 
K. Newman & Co. Leadenhall Street. Price Sixpence." 




Come perch on th 
Some bread anc 

I have crumbled f 
Which you're w 



Punch's Opera 







But Punch so liiiowing wae and sly, 
Always liia head the noose popp'd by ; 
To shew him right, the haTigman through 
His own head put^the rope Punch drew ; 
Then caper'd, jump'd, and danced and sung, 
And round and round poor Ketch he swung. 




Look .' there is a mfiii witli a 
jj^-uii. He is ^'oiMj:^ to slioot a 
bird. What a loud noiae the 
gun made ! Ah 1 the dog is 
bringing a dead partridge in his 
inoutli 1 Its pretty feathers 
are covered with blood. 



Hidiiml-uns Nui 


I'riiii 


r. ])erb)- : liicluu'.i^o. 


&S<,i,, 17:; Flua S 


. L-.iii 


.11, & 1) (_'ii[.L'l SI. Dulilii 


3,1, {\H-i«). 








Life and Adventures of Tom Thumb 

The king aent for him in a rage, Tom, to escape 
hia fury, crept into an empty Bnail shell, and there 
lay till he was almost starved ; when peeping out of 
the shell, he saw a fine butterfly settled on the 
ground. He now ventured out, and getting astride, 
the butterfly took wing and mounted into the air 
with little Tom on his back. 

Away be flew from field to field, from tree to tree, 
tilt at last he flew to the king's court. 



From The Life tl- Ailventuref of Tom Thumb. 
Dean & Son, Threodneedle Street, 



ALDIB0R0NTIPH0SKYPM0RNI0STIKO5 




Odds Nippeukins ! cried Mother Hunch on her liroom- 
stick, here's a to do ! aa Nicholas Hotch-Potch said. Never 
were such times, when Muley Hassan, Mufti of Moldavia, 
put on his Barnacles to see little Twecdle gobble them up, 
when Kia Khnn Krciiac tranamogiificd them into Pippins, 
because Snip'K wife cried, lllikipilliky ! lass a day ! 'tis too 
bad to titter at a body, when Hamet ol Mammot, the Ixittle- 
iiosed Barber of Balsora, laughed ha ! ha ! ha ! on beholding 
the Klephant spout nuul over the 'Prentice, who pricked 
his tniiik with ;v needle, while Dicky Snip the Tailor read 
the proclamation of Chrononhotonthologos, offering a 
thousand acquina foi- taking Bashaw of three tails, who 
killed Aliliborontiphoskyphomiostikos. 



Fn>m"Alclilx)nintiplioKkyphoniio,ttikoB. Limilon: l>eaii& 
Munday, Tlircadncudle Street : ami A. K. NcwiiiBn & 
Ci). Iiciulonli'iU Street Priw One Sliilliug." 




GDD Blgcks 





ifit, 




I"r<im ■■ Ncivi-.i>tli- Sircet Cik'-, Kii;,T;ivf<l liy Tlioiiias llcuicl;, 

[■MlilishL-.i by AcLtiiis .S: fl;irk. NL-wi-asllc-on-Tync^' 

490 




Il 


..J^ 


'& 






From " Newcastle Streci Cries, Engraved by Thomas lieivick. 

Published l)j- Adams & Clark, Newcasile-«n-'l"ynL-.' 

491 




Illlllll 
.niiiiil 




496 




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INDEX 



Adventures of Fifteen Young Ladies .... 425 

AdveDturea of Poor Puss 2113 

Affectionate Brothers 297 

Affectionate Sisters 25 

AldiboTontiphoakyphorniostikoB ..... 478 

Amusement for Good Cliildren 37 

Beaut; and the Beast 227 

Biography for Girls ....... 267 

Birth-day Present _ 471 

Book of Trades ' 161 

Butterfly's Ball 145 

ChUd's Toy Boolt 467 

Cinderella and her Glass Slipper .... 449 

Cobwebs to catcli Flies 21 

Court of Oberon 407 

Courtship and Marriage of Jerry and Kitty . 263 

Cowslip, or More Cautionary Stories .... 141 

Daisy; or, Cautionary Stories . . . . .137 

Dame Partlet's Farm 05 

Dame Tnielove's Tales 285 

Dame Wiggins of Lee - .413 

so; 



fniKl.VB Wedding . 
I Deborali Dent anil lier Donkey . 

Early ImpresBJoas 
I Early Seeds 

Elegant Girl . 

Elepkiint'a Bull .... 

Ellen, or the Kanghtj Girl Hevlaimed 

iEvergrepn 
Felissa 

Flower-Baaket ; or, Original Nursery Rhymes aud Tales 

Flowers of Instruction 

Food for the Young . 

Fortune's Football .... 

Frederick, or the Effects of Disobedience 

. Gaping, Wide- mouthed. Waddling Frog 

t Good Boy's Soliloquy 

Good Child's Book of Stojis 

Half Holiday Task Book . 

Henry, a Story for Little Boys and Girls 

Henry Phillips, or the Life of an Angry Bi 
History of an Old Woman 
History of Sandford and Merton 
Instructive Hints .... 
Instructor and Guide for Little Masters 

Jack the Giant Killer 
Juvenile Games .... 
Juvenile Journal .... 
Juvenile Spectatitr .... 

Life and Adventures of Tom Tiiumb . 
Life and Hbtory of A, Apple-Pic 
Lion's Masquerade .... 
5 OS 



Index 

Little Heniy, History and Adventures of 

Little Jack of All Trades . 

Little Prattle . 

Lobster's Voyage to the Brazils 

Looking-Glass . 

Madam Fig's Gala . 

Magic Lantern 

Mamma's Gift . 

Mamma's Present of Pictures and Poetry 

Memoirs of the Little Man and the Little 

Modern London . . 

Month's Vacation 

Moral and Entertaining Fables 

Moral Songs . 

My Sister 

New Doll 

New Primer 

New Story Book 

Nosegay for the Trouble of Culling 

Original Poetry for Young Minds 
Ostentation and Liberality 

Parlour Amusements 
Paths of Learning . 
Paul Pennylove's Poetical Paraphrase 
Peacock **At Home" 
Peter Prim's Pride . 
Phoebe, the Cottage Maid . 
Plain Things for Little Folks 
Pleasing Tales for Little Folks 
Poetry for Children . 
Present for a Little Boy 
Present for a Little Girl . 
Pretty, Playful, Tortoise-Shell Cat 

S09 



Maid 



PAfiK 

253 
215 
91 
181 
107 

464 
217 
469 
325 
183 
109 
275 
133 
83 
439 

453 
476 

468 
261 

405 
377 

257 
301 
173 
153 
211 
256 
349 
473 
207 
33 
119 
123 



Index J 

Prince DoruB . 239 

Prize for Youthful Obedieuue ..... 51 

Proverbs Exemplified 27 

Punch's Opera 47S 

RainaforU Villa, or Jnvcnile Inilepeoileuce . ^'" ( 

Ranks in Life 403 ] 

Rational Esliibition . .... 

Rebellious Sohool-GJrl 3l 

Rowtnndson's Characteristic Sketches ... 3 

Rural Etoploynienta 299 

Six Stories for the Nursery 129 

Sixteen Wonderful Old Women 393 

Sketches of Jurenile CbaracterB . S31 " 

Something New from Aunt Mary . 298 

Sophia and Ihlary .... 353 

Stories by a Mother ....... 296 , 

Story of tlie Ul-NatureJ Boy 44S 

Sunflower 404 

Tales of Childhood 474 

Think before You Speak 197 

Third Chapter of Accidents 57 

Trifles for Children . . ' 31, 63 

Visit to the Bazaar . . 307 

Whim Wham 418 

Young Wilfred 399 

Youthful Sports 71,99 



' ..1 ■ 



.' •■ ■ 



.11 




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I^cadcnball 
press 

( tCD.) 

Book List 

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London. 



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THE CHILD SET IN THE MIDST: By Modern Poets 
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( n ) 

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( IJ ) 

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ENGLrSH AS SHE IS SPOKE: or a Jhst in Sober 

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i Bards. I.— THE HOLY ISLE. 

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HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY. By . L^y. a aimpUfitd 

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( 17 ) 



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TABLE OF DISTANCES IN NAUTICAL MILES 
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TABLE OF DISTANCES TO AND FROM THE 

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