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Full text of "The Palisades cook book"

m PALISADES 



COOK BOOK 




Class 
Book. 



/ /) 







Copyright N?._ 



COPYRIGHT DEPOSIT. 



THE 

Palisades Cook Book 



PUBLISHED BY THE 



LADIES' AID SOCIETY 



OF THE 



Tenafly Presbyterian church 

REV. FISHER HOWE BOOTH, Pastor 






PRICE $1.00 A COPY 

(Mailed postage prepaid on receipt of price sent to the president of the society) 



TENAFLY, NEW JERSEY 

LADIES' AID SOCIETY 

President, MRS. FREDERIC L. COLVER Secretary, MRS. CARL O. GEISSLER 

Vice Pres.. MRS. EDWARD K. MEIGS Treasurer, MRS JOHN H. DEMOTT 

ADVERTISING COMMITTEE 

MRS. WATSON G. CLARK MRS. N. R. PENDERGAST 



^ 



Copyrght, 1910, by 
Ladies' Aid Society of Tenafly, N. J. 



Englewood Press 
Englewood, New Jersey 



(£ HI. A e 6 n 8 7 7 



I ft 



THE PALISADES COOK BOOK 

Compiled by MRS. F. L. COLVER 

CONTENTS 



y 



Beverages 



211 



Bread 80 

Arranged by Mrs. Louis E. Tnttle. 

Cakes and Icing 126 

Arranged by Mrs. Virginia L. Clarke. 

Canning and Preserving 204 

Arranged by Mrs. John H. DeMott. 

Chafing Dish Recipes 179 

Arranged by Miss Nannette Tuttle. 

Cheese 189 

Arranged by Mrs. Clinton H. Fuller. 

Confectionery . . ' 230 

Arranged by Miss Ada Clark. 

Cookies and Crullers i - ;> 

Arranged by Mrs. Geo. \Y. Kyburg. 

Custards, Creams and Jellies 116 

Arranged by Mrs. Henry B. Palmer. 

Eggs 177 

Entrees ^ 

5 



Fish and Sea Food. . 20 

Ice Cream and Frozen Dainties 109 

Arranged by Mrs. Clara A. Swift. 

Invalid Recipes 213 

Arranged by Mrs. Emma G. Clark. 

Meats 39 

Arranged by Mrs. W. J. White. 

Meat and Fish Sauces 51 

Arranged by Mrs. Chas. R. Brown. 

Menus 254 

Arranged by Mrs. Fisher Howe Booth. 

Pickles and Catsup 193 

Arranged by Mrs. Edwin Demarest. 

Pies 165 

Arranged by Mrs. Chas. W. Potter. 

Puddings and Sauces 94 

Arranged by Mrs. Vernon E. Carroll. 

Salads and Salad Dressing 70 

Arranged by Mrs. J. B. W. Lansing. 

Sandwiches 172 

Arranged by Mrs. Samuel J. Baxter. 

Soups 7 

Arranged by Mrs. Charlotte Westervelt. 

Vegetables 57 

Arranged by Mrs. J. J. Haring. 

Weights and Measures 151 



SOUPS 

"For soup is but the first of those delights which go to 
make the coming bill of fare." 



STOCK FOR SOUP. 
1 lave a large pot on the back of the stove. Put in lean 
beef in the proportion of I pound beef to I quart water. 
Add pork rinds with all the fat taken off. This may cook 
slowly two or three days. When cold skim off all the fat 
and put into another vessel. This stock may be used for 
all soups in which meat broth is required. By adding for 
thickening either barley, rice, sago, macaroni or vermicelli, 
you have any of these soups. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



BOUILLON. 
Two pounds lean beef chopped fine. Pour over it i 
quart cold water, put in a porcelain kettle, cover tight and 
let it simmer four hours. Strain off the tea and let it cool. 
Beat the white of i egg and add to the tea; put it on the 
stove and stir until it comes to a boil. Let it boil until it 
becomes perfectly clear, skimming; then strain through a 
fine napkin and season to taste. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver 



CONSOMMfi. 
There are many ways of preparing this broth, but for 
excellence and economy, practitioners will find this worthy 
of attention : Procure from your butcher several good beef 
bones well broken or sawed through, and a pound or two 
of beef well chopped. Place the beef bones in a roasting or 
dripping pan, add a pint or so of water, and place in a mod- 
erate oven until the bones acquire a nice light brown color ; 
then place in a large pot or stew-pan and cover with cold 
water, when it will be easv to take the fat from the sr.j- 



face; then bring to a boil, skim, and add vegetables accord- 
ing to taste and convenience, such as a few onions, carrots, 
and turnips ; also about i blade mace, 4 cloves, 8 allspice, 
2 bay leaves, a sprig of thyme, and 2 of marjoram. When 
this has simmered several hours take the beef previously 
mentioned, add 2 eggs (yolks and whites), mix well in a 
stew-pan, add a gill or so of cold water or broth, and strain 
the stock just made into the mixture. Stir with a spoon, 
place again on the stove and simmer for an hour or so; 
then take a cloth, wet it well in hot water, wring it out 
thoroughly, and strain the consomme gently through this, 
taking care not to disturb the thick part. Place the broth 
on the fire, bring to a boil, skim,' and serve with toast, 
macaroni, poached eggs, julienne (vegetables shreded and 
cooked n broth or salted water), rice,, barley, quenelles, 
or in fact, any garniture which convenience and taste may 
suggest. Consommes of game or fowl may be prepared in 
the same manner. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



WHITE STOCK. 
6 lbs. shin of veal, 8 quarts cold water, 

1 fowl, Salt and pepper. 

Let come to a boil and then set back and let it simmer 
for six hours. Skim every once in a while. Next add: 

2 onions, 4 sticks celery, 

1 blade of mace, 1 stick cinnamon. 

3 tablespoons butter (not 

necessary if meat or 
fowl be fat), 

Let boil slowly one hour longer. Strain and cool 
quickly. In the morning take off all the fat, turn jelly 
gently into a deep dish and scrape sediment off. Put away 
in cool place in stone pot. Keep one week in Winter, three 
days in Summer. 

A. R. F. 



BEEF B( >UILL( >N. 
3 teaspoons extract of beef, i cup carrots, onion.-, and 

2 quarts of water, celery, cut in dices, 

l sprig parsley, i tablespoon salt, 

y 2 bay leaf, I tablespoon butter. 

54 tablespoon whole pepper, 

Take the water boiling hot, and add the extract, vege- 
tables and seasoning. Cook thirty minutes, strain and serve 
in bouillon cups. 

Mrs. Samuel Westervelt. 



ICED BOUILLON. 
Flavor beef bouillon with a small quantity of Sherry 
wine, chill and serve cold. 

Mrs. Samuel Westervelt. 



ITALIAN CONSOMMfi. 
2 tablespoons macaroni, 3 cups rich consomme, 

4 tablespoons mushrooms, 2 tablespoons butter, 

Cook macaroni in boiling salted water until tender, 
plunge into cold water and cut into rings. Cut mushrooms 
into slices, and saute mushrooms and macaroni in the but- 
ter. Heat consomme, and add mushrooms and macaroni 
and serve. 

A. R. F. 



VEGETABLE SOUP. 
Fifteen cents' of soup bones, y 2 cup rice, l / 2 cup tapioca, 
can of tomatoes, 3 carrots, 3 onions, bay leaf and a few 
cloves, gallon of cold water. Let simmer six hours. 

Mrs. Samuel Westervelt. 



POTATO SOUP. 
Six potatoes, 1 large onion. Boil till tender, put through 
a coarse strainer. Add gradually 1 quart of hot milk and 
boil up together. Beat up I egg in soup tureen just before 
pouring in soup to serve. 

E. S. W. 



•10- 



POTATO SOUP. 
3 potatoes, T 4 teaspoon white pepper, 

i pt. milk, i heaping teaspoon flour, 

i teaspoon salt, 2 heaping teaspoons butter. 

]/2 teaspoon celery salt, 

Wash and pare the potatoes and let soak in cold water 
about one hour, put into boiling water and cook until very 
soft. Boil the milk in double boiler. When potatoes are 
soft drain off water and mash them thoroughly. Add the 
boiling milk and the seasoning. Rub through a strainer 
and put on to boil again. Rub the flour into the butter and 
stir into the soup, let boil five minutes. Serve very hot. If 
too thick add boiling milk. Omit celery salt if desired and 
add one tablespoon of parsley or chopped fresh celery, or 
grated onion. If a richer soup is wished use I pint milk 
and i pint cream and pour on 2 well beaten eggs after 
removed from the stove. 

A. R. F. 



CORN SOUP. 
I pint rich milk, y 2 can corn, cook twenty 

minutes. 
Strain and thicken with teaspoon flour moistened with 
cold water. Add butter size of a large walnut, salt and 
white pepper. Turn soup upon i egg well beaten before serv- 
ing. Do not put on stove after egg is in. May be used 
without straining if preferred. 

A. R. F. 



CORN SOUP, 
i can of green corn. Flour, butter and I egg. 

t quart milk, 

Take I can of green corn and put it on. the back of 
the stove with 2 quarts of hot water ; let it cook gently 
one-half hour, then put where it will cook more rapidly. 
When the corn is tender, put in i pink of milk, season to 
taste, let it boil up, then add 2 tablespoon of flour mixed 



-II- 



with 3 of butter. If you like, you may, after removing the 
soup from the fire, stir in I well beaten egg, beating rapidly 
to prevent curdling. Mrs. E. H. Brown. 



CORN CHOWDER. 
1 can corn, 2 cups rich milk, 

i cup salt pork cubes. 2 tablespoons butter, 

1 cup parboiled potatoes cut 2 tablespoons flour (scant), 

in cubes, Yz cup bread crumbs (scant) 

y 2 cup chopped onion. Salt and cayenne. 

2 cups water, 

Cook salt pork in frying pan five or six minutes, add 
onion, and cook until yellow ; then put in potatoes, corn, 
and water and cook twenty minutes. Thicken milk with but- 
ter 'and flour cooked together. Combine the two mixtures, 
and add cracker crumbs and seasoning. 

A. R. F. 



CORN CHOWDER. 
Yz teaspoon extract of beef, I small onion, 
I can corn, 4 cups hot milk, 

4 cups potatoes cut in Y 8 common crackers, 

inch cube slices, 3 tablespoons butter, 

\y 2 inch cube of salt pork, Salt and pepper. 

Cut pork in pieces and fry out, add onion and cook five 
minutes, stirring to prevent burning; strain fat into a stew 
pan, parboil potatoes five minutes in boiling water to cover, 
drain and add potatoes to fat, then add 2 cups boiling 
water. Cook until potatoes are soft, add corn and milk, 
then heat to boiling point, season with salt and pepper, add 
extract of beef, butter and crackers, split and soaked in 
enough milk to moisten ; remove crackers, and turn chow- 
der into a tureen, and put crackers on top. 

Mrs. Samuel Westervelt. 



CREAM OF TOMATO SOUP. 
2 cans Campbell's tomato 1 Can Van Camp's Cream, 
soup, using 10-cent size each 

Place tomatoes in sauce pan to the bubbling point, then 



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add cream, stir well, serve, do not let stand any length of 
time, as it may cnrd. No seasoning of any kind required. 

Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



CREAM TOMATO SOUP. 
]/2 can tomatoes, 3)4 tablespoons flour, 

%. teaspoon soda, 3 tablespoons butter. 

4 cups milk, 

Salt and a little pepper to be added with the butter the 
last thing. Scald the milk, thicken with flour, stir thorough- 
ly and cook ten minutes. Cook tomatoes ten minutes, rub 
through a sieve, add soda, pour into hot milk. Strain if 
necessary. 

Mrs. Thomas K. Baker. 



CREAM TOMATO SOUP. 
1 pint milk, let boil, 
Add I 1 /* teaspoons flour, 

1 teaspoon salt, r moistened with cold water. 

1 teaspoon sugar, J 

Add butter size of an egg; 1 pint tomatoes (strained), 
let boil and add scant l /> teaspoon soda. Pour tomatoes 
into milk, etc., off the stove, after both have boiled, and 
do not put on stove again. 

Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



TOMATO SOUP. 
2 quarts water or beef stock. 4 onions, 
2 tablespoons rice, Salt and pepper to taste. 

1 large or 2 small pota- 
toes, 
When boiled, add 1 pink milk, bring to a boil, remove 
from fire, add Yz teaspoonful baking soda; serve. 

Mrs. Simeon Westervelt. 



TOMATO BISQUE. 
1 can tomatoes, put through Salt and pepper to taste, 
a sieve, A little grated nutmeg, 

Heat thoroughly but do not boil. Mix 1 tablespoon 



13 

of butter with 2 of flour, stir into tomatoes. Have warmed 
i quart of milk in double boiler; acid tomatoes, and just 
before serving add a pinch of soda. 

Mrs. C. O. Giessler. 



BLACK BEAN SOUP. 
Soak i quart of black beans over night in water 
enough to cover. In the morning rinse them off, put them 
in the soup kettle with 4 quarts of cold water and a small 
knuckle of veal. Let the soup simmer slowly for five hours. 
When it has cooked for one hour add a small white onion 
with a half a dozen cloves stuck into it, also a bay leaf. 
At the end of five hours remove the knuckle of veal and 
drain. Let it stand over night and remove the grease. Boil 
the soup up for about ten minutes to make an even puree. 
Season and serve with a sliced lemon, and hard boiled egg. 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



BLACK BEAN PUREE. 

2 cups black beans, iy 2 teaspoons salt. 

8 cups water, 6 cloves, l / 2 teaspoon mustard, 

4 tablespoons chopped salt 2 tablespoons butter, 
pork, 1 hard cooked egg, 

3 tablespoons chopped onion 1 lemon, sliced. 
2 tablespoons flour, 

Soak beans over night, drain, add water and cloves and 
cook until tender, say four hours ; pass through sieve. Cook 
pork in frying pan, add onion ; cook five minutes, and add 
beans. Melt butter, add flour and seasoning. Combine 
two mixtures, and strain. Garnish with egg and lemon. 

A. R. F. 



PEA SOUP. 
2 cans peas, uncovered for 1 bay leaf, 

two hours, 1 teaspoon salt, 

1 pint boiled water. 1 blade of mace, 

1 dozen pepper corns, 1 small onion, chopped fine. 

Cook slowly until peas are soft, strain and add boiling 



14 

water to make 2 quarts, add lump of butter. Blend 3 table- 
spoons of flour with a little cold water, rub through 
sieve, and stir into the simmering soup. When smooth add 
salt and pepper and simmer ten minutes. Serve with crack- 
ers. 

Mrs. Samuel Westervelt. 



MUSHROOM SOUP. 

2 cups mushrooms, 2 tablespoons flour, 

1 cup water, y 2 cup cream, 

2 cups chicken stock, Salt and pepper. 
2 tablespoons butter, 

Wash, scrub, and thoroughly clean mushrooms, then 
chop, not too fine. Cook until tender in the water. Melt 
butter, add flour and stock and cook five minutes. Add 
mushroom mixture, seasoning, and cream. Reheat and 
serve. Strain before reheating if preferred. 

Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



PEANUT SOUP. 
Take 1 pint of shelled roasted peanuts and 1 quart 
of boiling water and simmer until they can be rubbed 
through a sieve. Add 1 quart of milk and simmer for 
an hour;, then stir in 1 teaspoon of butter and 2 tea- 
spoons of flour rubbed to a paste. When thickened season 
to taste and simmer five minutes longer. 

Mrs. J. J. Haring. 



DUCHESS SOUP. 
1 small onion, sliced. Little celery in pan with 

y 2 small carrot, lump of butter. 

Fry for about five minutes, then add 4 cups of hot 
water, V/2 teaspoons beef extract, y 2 cup tomatoes, and let 
boil ten minutes. Then strain, melt 1 large tablespoon of 
butter in a pan, and stir in a tablespoon of flour, 2 cups of 
milk, then let come to a boil, add the strained stock, salt 
and pepper to taste. 

Mrs. T. R. Smith. 



CELERY SOLI'. 
Crush the outside stalks of three heads of celery with a 
potato masher in the pot you make the soup in, add a quart 
of milk, cook twenty minutes or until it boils, add salt, pep- 
per and butter to taste, remove the crushed celery and thick- 
en with a little corn starch. Mrs. J. T. Uailey. 

CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 
2 cups stock (veal pre- 3 cups celery cut in small 

ferred), pieces, 

2 cups water, Juice of small onion, 

Lump of butter, size of egg, 1 tablespoon corn starch, 
2 cups milk, Salt and pepper to taste. 

Cook celery in water twenty minutes or until celery is 
soft, rub through fine strainer, add onion juice and stock, 
place on fire. Rub corn starch smooth with little milk, add 
remainder of milk and blend with soup, let it just come, to a 
boil, adding butter and seasoning last. Serve with small 
squares of dried toast. Mrs. James Westervelt. 



CREAM OF CELERY SOUP. 
1 head celery, 1 pint water, 

1 pint milk, 1 tablespoon chopped onions 

1 tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon flour, 

l / 2 teaspoon salt, ]/ 2 saltspoon pepper. 

Wash and scrape the celery, cut into half inch pieces, 
put into 1 pint of boiling salted water, and cook until 
very soft. Mash in the water in which it was boiled. Cook 
the onion with the milk, in a double boiler, ten minutes, 
then add it to the celery. Rub all through a strainer and 
put it on to boil again. Cook the butter and flour together 
in a small sauce pan until smooth, but not brown, and stir 
it into the boiling soup. Add the salt and pepper, boil five 
minutes and strain. Serve very hot. 

Mrs. H. M. Rogers. 



CHICKEN BISQUE. 
Chop chicken into pieces ; put into pot with 2 table- 
spoons of pearl barley and 2 quarts cold water and boil 



-i6- 



five hours, skimming frequently, then add a handful of let- 
tuce leaves, cover over the pot, remove from fire and let it 
stand twenty minutes, strain through a cloth or fine sieve. 
For each half pint of broth take i egg, add a little flour 
(possibly y? tablespoon), beat well, stir in broth until it 
thickens. Just before serving add half teaspoon cream 
to each cup, slightly beaten. 

Mrs. V. C. Huyler. 



LOBSTER SOUP. 
2 quarts milk, i pint water, 

i cup pulverized cracker, 2 lobsters, chopped fine. 

Heat milk and water, together, stir in crackers, season to 
taste, with salt and pepper and a little water, when time to 
serve add chopped lobster, let boil up once and it is ready 
for the table. 

Mrs. Oliver Drake-Smith. 



CLAM SOUP. 
Twenty-five clams chopped ; add 2 quarts and a pint 
of water and boil half an hour, then add 1 pint of milk 
and 1 onion chopped fine ; thicken with flour and butter 
rubbed together; beat 1 egg and put in your tureen, and 
pour the soup into it while boiling hot, stirring briskly. 

Mrs. J. J. Haring. 



CLAM CHOWDER. 
Chop 30 111 e d i u m sized 3 potatoes, 

clams, A little parsley, 

2 large onions, Salt and little cayenne pep- 

% jar tomatoes, per. 

Let these boil slowly for 2 hours, then add % cup of 
butter and 6 soda crackers broken in small pieces. Let 
it boil twenty minutes longer. 

Mrs. Ct.ieford Demarest. 



NOODLES. 
Peat well 2 eggs and add 1-3 cup of water. Add 
flour until thick. Remove to the baking board. Divide 



into 3 pieces and work in more flour into each piece. 
Roll out each piece into a thin sheet of dough and 
place them on towels to dry. When nearly dry roll up 
tightly and cut very fine with a small sharp knife. Shake 
the cuttings on the board until dry and separated. Add 
half the quantity to chicken or vegetable soup and boil ten 
minutes. The remainder will keep a week if left uncovered. 

Mrs. S. A. Tiedemann. 



CROUTONS. 
Take a slice of stale bread, remove crust, cut the bread 
into half inch pieces and fry quickly in butter until they 
are brown, take out with a skimmer and throw them into 
the soup when serving. 

Mrs. Samuel Westervelt. 



SOUP BALLS. 
8 crackers reduced to fine l beaten egg, 

dust, i tablespoon flour, 

i tablespoon chopped pars- Grating of nutmeg, 
ley, 
Make into balls and drop into soup for about five 
minutes. 



EGG BALLS. No. i. 
Boil 4 eggs ten minutes, drop into cold water and have 
cool, remove yolks, pound yolks in a mortar, until reduced 
to a paste. Add ^ teaspoon salt, pepper and white of r 
raw egg. Form into small balls, roll in flour and fry 
brown in butter, be careful not to burn. 

FRIED BREAD FOR SOUPS. 
Cut dry bread into dice and fry in boiling fat until 
brown. Be sure fat is smoking hot when bread is put in. 
Takes only one minute to brown. 

EGG BALLS. No. 2. 
Boil 4 eggs ten minutes, put into cold water, remove 
yolks when cool, and add yolk of i raw egg, and I tea- 



spoon flour, pepper, salt and parsley. Make into balls and 
boil two minutes. 



EGG BALLS. No. 3. 
Yolks of 2 hard boiled eggs, 1 large tablespoon hot 
mashed potatoes, few grains cayenne, salt to taste, yolk of 
1 raw egg. Flour hands and make into balls and drop 
into soup a few minutes before removing from fire. 



MEAT BALLS. No. 1. 
Season finely chopped cooked meat (about 1 cup) 
with salt, pepper, 1 teaspoon onion juice, 1 tablespoon 
chopped parsley, 1 teaspoon lemon juice. Moisten all 
with 1 raw egg (or as much of it as needed), make into 
balls and poach them in salted boiling water, put in soup 
before serving. 

FORCE MEAT BALL. No. 2. 
Chop any kind of cold meat and add half the quantity 
of fine bread crumbs, pinch of Summer savory and thyme, 
1 raw egg, salt, pepper. Form into balls, fry in hot but- 
ter. Put in soup before serving. Test one before making 
all up. 



CURRY BALLS. 
Used for Mock Turtle Soup or for Veal or Poultry 
fricasse. Mash the yolks of 2 hard boiled eggs to a pulp 
with 1 tablespoon of butter, seasoned with currypowder, 
and a little salt, and bread crumbs until of right consistency. 
Wet hands in cold water and make into small balls and 
drop them in the soup or sauce. 



POTATO DUMPLINGS. 
Sprinkle two or three hot cooked potatoes with salt and 
plenty of flour and drop in soup by the spoonful while soup 
is boiling. 



1 9 

MARROW BALLS. 
2 slices of bread, grated, i tablespoon flour, 

Marrow from beef leg soup i egg, 

bone, Nutmeg, salt, pepper. 

Make into balls and drop into soup. Cook about ten 
minutes. 



DUMPLINGS FOR SOUP, 
i cup flour, i teaspoon baking powder. 

Salt, 

Make soft with rich milk and drop in soup by the 
spoonful and let boil covered about twenty minutes. (Make 
soft like biscuit dough). 



EGG DUMPLINGS, 
i cup flour, 2 tablespoons water, 

Salt, i egg well beaten, 

i teaspoon baking powder, 

Make a little softer than biscuit dough, roll and cut into 
small rounds. Drop into soup or gravy and cook covered 
from ten to fifteen minutes. 



FISH AND SHELL FISH 

"Master, I marvel how- the fishes live in the sea!" 
"Why, as men do on land! The great eat up the little ones. 

— Pericles. 



BAKED SHAD. 
Clean the shad. Cut through the backbone, cutting fish 
nearly in halves. Rub salt well into the fish and let 
stand while making the dressing. For the dressing chop 
fine i slice salt pork, 2 small onions and about half a loaf 
of bread; add 1 level teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon Bell's 
poultry dressing, a little pepper and a tablespoon melted 
butter. Mix quite moist with hot water. Lay 3 thin slices 
salt pork in roasting pan, place the fish upon them, stuff 
with the dressing; lay 3 thin slices of pork on top of fish, 
and add a little boiling water. Bake in a moderate oven 
five hours. Fresh mackerel fixed in the same way and 
baked about an hour and a half is equally good. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



BOILED FISH. 
* Have the fish thoroughly cleaned and scaled, then wash 
carefully, and wipe dry, wrap in a clean cloth, and sew or 
tie firmly. Put into kettle with cold water enough to well 
c ver it and add tablespoon ful of salt. Let come to a boil, 
and then keep it boiling till done, allowing fifteen minutes 
to every pound of fish (codfish does not require as much 
time). Open the cloth on a sieve or strainer, and roll the 
fish carefully out. Let drain a minute, and then turn upon 
the platter for the table. Serve with egg or white sauce. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 

TO BAKE FISH. 
Spread little pieces of bread with butter ; pepper and 
salt them, and lay them inside the fish; take a needle and 
20 



-21- 



thrcad and sew it up; lay it into a dish and put a few thin 
slices of pork on it, sprinkle over salt, and flour it well. 
Baste it with the liquor which cooks out of it. A fish 
weighing four pounds will cook in an hour. 

Mrs-. C. A. S. 



WHOLE BAKED HADDOCK. 

Have a four-pound haddock; clean and dry thoroughly 
as possible, then stuff with the following dressing, not too 
full : 

3 hard boiled eggs, chopped, 3 tablespoons melted butter, 
Grated rind of Yz lemon, 1 teaspoon grated onion. 

Salt, cayenne, celery salt, a small bowl of bread and 
cracker crumbs ; moisten with sweet cream slightly ; sew 
fish up. Cut four or five gashes on each side of the back- 
bone and insert in each a narrow strip of fat bacon ; have 
the gashes on one side come in between the cuts on the 
other side. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, and brush over 
with melted butter. Place in a greased pan. Bake in a 
very hot oven for the first fifteen minutes, then reduce the 
heat, bake about one hour or an hour and a quarter alto- 
gether. Garnish with tiny cucumber pickles, quarters of 
sour orange and bunches of parsley. May be baked out 
straight as it is or shaped into a letter "S" with skewers. 

A. R. F. 



SAVORY STUFFED COD. 
Buy 3 codfish steaks, weighing about a pound apiece; 
after drying thoroughly place one on top of the other (sand- 
wich fashion), with a layer of the following dressing be- 
tween : Place in bowl : 

1 cup grated Graham bread, y 2 pint chopped oysters, 
y 2 teaspoon salt, 1 saltspoon white pepper. 

2 tablespoons minced pars- 1 tablespoon sherry, 

ley, Pinch of Summer savory. 

Tie the fish firmly in position with cord or pieces of 
white muslin, and after rubbing over with lemon juice and 



-22- 



sprinkling with salt, wrap in a piece of cheese cloth and 
steam until tender ; serve with tartar sauce. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



SAUTfi SMELTS— ANCHOVY SAUCE. 
A dozen large smelts, washed and dried ; allow them to 
marinate in a dressing composed of equal parts of olive 
oil and lemon juice, highly seasoned, with salt and pepper, 
for about fifteen or twenty minutes, then drain and dip in 
heavy cream or beaten egg, and roll in cracker or bread 
crumbs or flour and saute in hot butter. Remove to a hot 
platter, and for the sauce add to the butter 2 tablespoons 
flour, blend thoroughly ; stir in gradually 1 cup of stock 
(chicken is best) and 1 1-3 teaspoons anchovy essence. 
Allow the sauce to just begin to bubble, seasoning with 
lemon juice, paprika and 2 tablespoons of minced parsley 
as it is removed from fire. A. R. F. 



SALMON SOUFFLE. 

Place in the upper part of the double boiler 1 cup rich 
milk, y 2 cup cream, and when about to boil add 1 scant 
cup of grated bread crumbs, y 2 teaspoon salt, 1 saltspoon 
white pepper, 3 grs. cayenne, 1 large cup flaked cooked 
salmon, Yi teaspoon Worcestershire sauce ; stir and let 
cook for a minute or two, then remove from fire and pour 
on the well-beaten yolks of 3 or 4 eggs. Place over hot 
water again for a minute or two, then allow to cool thor- 
oughly. Half an hour before you wish to serve it fold 
in lightly the stiffly whipped whites of the 3 eggs, pour into 
a well-buttered baking dish and bake in a rather quick 
oven for about half an hour, standing in a pan of boiling 
water. Serve immediately with egg sandwiches and olives. 

Two hard-boiled eggs chopped or grated may be added 
10 the salmon before it is allowed to cool, in the morning 
if wished. Mrs. F. R. Warren. 



ROYAL HALIBUT. 
Arrange in a baking dish 6 thin slices of salt pork, cov- 
ering with 1 small onion sliced and a layer of minced celery ; 



23 

upon this place a 2-pound slice of halibut, pour over all a 
generous cup of tomato catsup and bake for about forty 
minutes, basting often. Ten or fifteen minutes before 
serving cover fish with paste made from sifted bread 
crumbs and melted butter and crisp to a golden brown. 
Serve garnished with bunches of crisp cress and accom- 
panied by the following sauce: After removing the fish 
and pork, skim off the fat, leaving the vegetable puree 
(there will be about four tablespoons), to which add I 
cup brown stock, thicken with a scant tablespoon flour 
moistened with cold stock. Season highly with paprika 
and "Kitchen Bouquet." 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



TO FRY EELS. 
After the eels have been skinned, wash in several waters 
and dry on a linen towel, cut into lengths of about four or 
five inches and roll in flour which has had a little salt sprin- 
kled in it. Have your frying pan piping hot on the range, 
with a small quantity of olive oil in it. Drop in the eels 
and fry, turning at intervals till all are a golden brown. 
They will require thorough cooking, as the flesh is very 
concentrated. From fifteen to twenty minutes should suf- 
fice. When done take out with a fork and lay them on a 
sheet of white paper to drain off any superfluous oil. I 
find the oil superior to any other kind of fat in frying fish, 
as it requires but very little and keeps the fish from stick- 
ing to the pan. 

Mrs. C. C. Converse. 



SALT MACKEREL IN CREAM. 
Freshen as for broiling, then lay the fish in a baking 
pan. To one mackerel add y 2 pint of new milk, put into 
the oven and bake twenty-five minutes. Five minutes be- 
fore taking up add a small piece of butter. 



COD-FISH BALLS. 
Peel 5 medium size potatoes, put on stove to boil, have 
cup full of cod-fish, shredded and free from bones, lay 



24 

on top of potatoes and boil ; when done drain off water and 
mash fine, season with butter and salt if needed. Stir into 
this i egg beaten light, and whip all very light with spoon; 
when cold form into balls, dipped into beaten egg, and roll 
in cracker or shredded wheat crumbs and fry a light brown, 
putting into wire basket and placed into hot lard or cotto- 
lene. Prepared at night they can be fried in the morning 
for breakfast in short time. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



COD-FISH BALLS. 
Three large potatoes, Y^ cup picked codfish (soaked). 
Pare potatoes, boil them, and picked-up cod-fish until done, 
then mash all together and add well-beaten egg. Beat un- 
til light and drop in hot fat with teaspoon. 

Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



SCALLOPED OYSTERS. 
One quart oysters, butter a deep pudding dish, cover 
the bottom with cracker crumbs, season with salt, pepper 
and bits of butter, then a layer of oysters seasoned, a 
layer of crackers, then oysters until the oysters are used, 
having cracker crumbs on top, pour over this cup of cream 
or milk and the oyster liquor; cover and bake one-half 
hour, then uncover and bake another half hour. 

Mrs. F. L. C. 



CREAMED OYSTERS. 
One pint of oysters cooked in their liquor until puffy, 
take from fire and drain; pour over them the following 
sauce : 2 cups milk, 1 cup cream and 2 tablespoons of 
flour cooked until it thickens ; season with salt and pepper. 
Serve on buttered toast. 



Drain off the liquid, plump the oysters by dropping 
them into a heated sauce pan until they ruffle, and then 
pour them with their liquid into an equal quantity of hot 
cream sauce. Put on a pint of milk to heat, melt 2 table- 
spoons of butter and stir into it 2 teaspoons of flour, x / 2 



-:r 



teaspoon of salt, x /z teaspoon pepper, and the juice of I 
lemon if you like it. Mix in a little of the hot milk, and 
add to the rest of the milk i cup cream. Cook slowly five 
minutes ; add oysters. 

Mrs. F. L. C. 



CREAMED FISH. 
Remove the bones from cold, cooked fish. Place the 
fish in a sauce pan, covering it with water. Season with 
sliced onion, pepper, salt and a small piece of butter. When 
this has boiled add a cupful of sour cream. Bring it to a 
boil and thicken it with flour mixed with water. Serve 
on buttered toast. Parsley, celery, strips of red or green 
peppers, or a small piece of chili may also be used as fla- 
voring if desired. 

Miss Ruth Blankenhorn. 



SALMON FRITTERS. 
Take i large can of salmon, remove all bones, etc., and 
mince fine with fork. Into this break 3 eggs ; stir well. 
Drop from spoon into pan and fry. 

Mrs, C. W. Potter. 



DEVILED SALMON. 
Make a dressing of 2 hard-boiled eggs, rubbing the 
yolks in 2 tablespoons of melted butter. Add to this 4 
tablespoons of vinegar, little cayenne pepper, mustard and 
salt to taste. Then stir in the yolk of a well-beaten egg, 
and add the white, having first beaten it, then add the 
chopped whites of the hard-boiled eggs. Mix the dressing 
well through the meat. Wash the shells and fill them 
lightly. Sprinkle the tops with cracker dust and bake a 
delicate brown. Baste with melted butter. 

Mrs. Clifford Demarest. 



SALMON PUDDING WITH PEAS. 
Remove bones and skin from one can of salmon. Flake 
the fish, and put into a dish with alternating layers of day 
old bread crumbs ; and a sauce made by placing 2 table- 



-26- 



spoons of butter in a sauce pan with 2 of flour, then 
add l / 2 pint hot milk, }i teaspoon each of salt and pepper; 
cook until creamy. Have first and last layers of crumbs. 
Bake in a moderate oven until top is brown. Serve in 
baking dish with hot buttered peas and garnish with slices 
of lemon. 

F. V. V. 



SALMON IN A MOULD. 
1 can salmon, 4 eggs, 

4 tablespoons butter, ]/ 2 cup cream. 

Salt, pepper, chopped pars- 
ley, 

Drain oil from salmon and free it from bones, rub into 
it the 4 tablespoons butter until smooth, add the eggs, cream 
and seasoning and parsley. Put into a buttered mould and 
steam about one hour. Serve hot with cream or tomato 
sauce. 

F. E. F. 



TURBOT A LA CRfiME. 
Boil 5 or 6 pounds of halibut or haddock, take out all 
bones and shred the fish very fine. Let a quart of milk, 
34 onion, and a piece of parsley come to a boil. Then stir 
in a scant cup of flour, which has been mixed with a cup of 
cold milk and yolks of 2 eggs, season with salt, pepper, 
half a cup of butter, and a teaspoon of thyme. Butter a 
pan, and put in first a layer of sauce, then one of fish, finish 
with sauce, and over it sprinkle cracker crumbs and grated 
cheese. Bake one hour in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



FINNAN HADDIE. 
Cut fish in strips, put in baking pan, cover with cold 
water, place on back of range and allow water to heat to 
boiling point ; keep water below the boiling point twenty-five 
minutes. Drain fish and rinse thoroughly. Separate in 
flakes, add half cup heavy cream and 4 hard-boiled eggs, 



27 

thinly sliced ; season with cayenne, add i tablespoon butter, 
and sprinkle with chopped parsley. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



SHREDDED WHEAT OYSTER, MEAT OR VEGE- 
TABLE PATTIES. 
Cut oblong cavity in top of biscuit, remove top care- 
fully and all inside shreds, forming a shell. Sprinkle with 
salt and pepper, put small pieces of butter in bottom, and 
fill the shell with drained, picked and washed oysters. Sea- 
son with additional salt and pepper. Replace top of biscuit 
over oysters, then bits of butter on top. Place in a covered 
pan, and bake in a moderate oven. Pour oyster liquor or 
cream sauce over it. Shell fish, vegetables, or meats may 
also be used. 



PICKLED OYSTERS. 
Take I quart of oysters and drain thoroughly through 
a collander. Take the liquor and add to it vinegar to taste, 
i small onion chopped very fine, several small pieces of 
mace, a few whole cloves and allspice, also a little cayenne 
pepper and salt to taste. Boil slowly for fifteen minutes 
and skim off the scum ; pour over the drained oysters while 
hot and let them stand for a day, or over night, then serve 
with slices of lemon cut in points. 

Mrs. J. J. Haring. 



DEVILED CRABS. 
Boil i dozen crabs for twenty minutes with a little 
salt in the water. When cooked put aside to cool. Open 
the crabs and take out carefully all of the spongy part; 
pick out the meat and wash and dry the shells. Make a 
cream sauce with a pint of milk thickened with flour and 
butter rubbed together. Cut the crab meat fine, add a 
little mixed mustard, an egg beaten and a little cayenne 
pepper, put in the cream sauce and cook for a few min- 
utes, then fill the shells, cover the tops with fine bread 
crumbs, put a lump of butter on each and bake brown. 

Mrs. T. I. Haring. 



-28- 



CREAMED CRAB MEAT, 
i can crab meat. 2 tablespoons butter, 

1 cup milk, 2 tablespoons flour, 

Cream butter and flour, heat one minute, then turn milk 
in slowly and cook until thick, stirring constantly. Season 
with salt, pepper and lemon juice or nutmeg. Mix cream 
with minced crab meat and serve in ramekins. Shrimp, 
oysters, clams or minced lamb may be used with equal 
success. C. A. S. 



BAKED CLAMS. 
1 dozen clams, 1 tablespoon flour, 

1 cup milk, 1 tablespoon butter. 

Chop the clams fine, thin with the broth, salt and pep- 
per to taste. Bake with bread crumbs top and bottom. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



CLAM PIE. 
Twenty-five clams, chopped fine, 3 hard boiled eggs 
sliced, butter size of an egg, pepper, a little flour, J / 2 pint 
cream. Put a crust top and bottom. 

Mrs. N. R. Pendergast. 



LOBSTER FARCI. 

Chop fine meat of boiled lobster, prepare a sauce of 
cream, or rich milk, good sized piece of butter, chopped 
mushrooms, parsley, slight dash of cayenne, some finely 
chopped chives and bread crumbs (small cup crumbs). 
Mix lobster into sauce, beat thoroughly. The sauce should 
be hot when lobster is added, cut lobster shell into small 
pieces and butter them. (It will make about six with the 
claws). Fill with farci, put a piece of butter on top, 
sprinkle with fine bread crumbs and bake brown, serve 
very hot. Mrs. H. S. Ernst. 



LOBSTER A LA NEWBURG. 
One large lobster boiled and cut in small pieces. Put 
2 large tablespoons butter in chaffing dish, let melt, add I 



29 

pint of milk, salt and pepper; when it boils add 2 teaspoons 
of cornstarch which has been dissolved in a little milk. 1 
wine glass of sherry wine, 1 egg well beaten; stir well, add 
lobster and cook three minutes. 

Mrs. Oliver Drake-Smith. 



LOBSTER CUTLETS. No. 1. 

2^ lbs. lobster, 1 heaping tablespoon of 

3 tablespoons butter, flour, 

y 2 cup of stock or cream, Salt, two eggs, 1 pint bread- 

crumbs. 
Cut meat of lobster in fine dice, season with salt and 
pepper. Put butter on to heat, add the flour and when 
smooth, add the stock and one well beaten egg and the lob- 
ster. Season and boil up once and take from the fire di- 
rectly. Add one tablespoonful lemon juice, butter a platter 
and place the mixture upon it about one inch thick, cut into 
chops, when cool dip in bread crumbs and egg and fry. 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



LOBSTER CUTLETS. No. 2. 

1 pint chopped lobster meat, % teaspoon mustard, 
% teaspoon salt, 1 cup cream sauce. 

Cayenne, 

Mix the salt, mustard and cayenne together, and add 
them to the lobster meat, which has been chopped fine, add 
the cream sauce. 

1 cup cream and milk, % cup flour, 

2 tablespoons butter, White pepper. 
Yx teaspoon salt. 

Make a white sauce and cook until thick. Add the lob- 
ster mixture, spread the mixture Yi inch thick on a platter, 
when cold shape into cutlets and dip in seasoned bread 
crumbs, then in egg and again in crumbs. Cook in deep 
fat until brown. Put a lobster claw or paper frill in the end 
of each cutlet. Serve w r ith a sauce. 

Miss Allie Davis. 



ENTREES 

"Variety's the only spice of life, 
That gives it all its flavor." 

— Cowper. 



SWEETBREAD PATTIES. 
Soak 2 fresh sweetbreads in salt and water for half 
an hour, put in a saucepan, cover with water and set over 
the fire to boil for fifteen minutes, when cool trim free of 
skin, fat and gristle, cut into small pieces and lay aside. Put 
half a cup of white stock into a small sauce pan; stir in an 
ounce of butter mixed with a tablespoonful of flour; when 
thick add a small cup of stock with the sweetbreads, and 
let simmer for fifteen minutes, thin with 3 tablespoonfuls 
of sweet cream, season with salt and pepper. Fill the warm 
patty cases with the mixture and serve. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



SWEETBREADS. 
2 cups sweetbreads (cooked) 1 cup cream, 
l /2 cup mushrooms, 2 tablespoons butter, 

1 tablespoon oil, 3 tablespoons flour, 

^2 tablespoon vinegar, Salt and white pepper. 

Melt butter, add flour, seasoning, and cream. Cut 

sweetbreads and mushrooms into dice and let stand in oil 
and vinegar twenty minutes. Drain and add to sauce, re- 
heat and serve. A. R. F. 



SWEETBREAD PATTIES. 

1 pint sweetbreads, White pepper, 

2 tablespoons butter, Cayenne, 

2 tablespoons flour, 1 cup cream. 

l /\ teaspoon salt, 

Take 5 large mushrooms or half as many canned mush- 
rooms as there are sweetbreads. Sweetbreads spoil very 

30 



3i 

quickly, remove from paper at once, soak in cold water ten 
minutes and parboil fifteen minutes. Add salt five minutes 
before they are done. Put them in cold water for fifteen 
minutes, then remove the tough portions. Cut the sweet- 
breads into small pieces and chop the mushrooms fine. 
Make a white sauce of the butter, flour, seasoning and 
cream. Add the sweetbreads and the mushrooms and when 
hot serve in patty dishes or timbales. If desired the mush- 
rooms may be omitted and twice as many sweetbreads used. 

Miss Allie Davis. 



SWEETBREADS LARDED AND BASTED. 
After the preliminary cooking as explained, leave them 
whole and carefully draw through each three or four small 
strips of pork l /% inch square. Put in a baking pan 
a teaspoonful chopped onion, a tablespoonful chopped car- 
rot, a little celery, bits of salt pork and a pint of tomatoes 
or 2 fresh good sized tomatoes cut fine. On these place 
the sweetbreads and bake in a good oven from twenty to 
thirty minutes. They may be served alone or with green 
peas, seasoned and arranged in the center of the dish. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



SWEETBREADS BROILED. 
After boiling .split the sweetbreads, sprinkle with salt 
and pepper, roll in flour and broil a light brown, turning 
often. Serve with cream or tomatoes sauce. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



SWEEBREAD PATTIES. 
Take loaf of stale bread, cut round, about two inches 
high with hole in the center, fry until a brown color, fill 
with creamed sweetbreads. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



32 

EGG CUTLETS. 
6 eggs (boiled hard), 1 can mushrooms, 

i green pepper, 2 onions. 

y 2 bunch parsley, all chopped 

together, 
1 pint milk, y 2 cup flour, cook until thick as paste. 

Mix together and shape into cutlets, roll in bread crumbs 
and fry in hot lard. Mrs. W. F. McKinlay. 



CHICKEN PATTIES. 
Take the breast of a boiled chicken, cut into small 
pieces, put a teacup of chicken broth into a small saucepan, 
add a tablespoonful of flour and a tablespoonful butter and 
mix smooth. Pour in a Y2 teacupful of sweet cream; set 
over the fire to cook until thick; add the chicken and the 
beaten yolks of 2 eggs. Fill the patty cases with the mix- 
ture, put on the top and serve. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



CHICKEN MOUSSE. 
1 cup chicken stock, Whites of 2 eggs, 

Yz teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons gran, gelatine, 

Little celery salt, 2 tablespoons cold water, 

Little paprika, 1 cup beaten cream, 

1 cup cold chicken (cut into 1 tablespoon chopped olives, 
cubes), 

Heat chicken stock, add seasoning, then gelatine which 
has been soaked in cold water, when dissolved add chopped 
chicken, beaten cream, whipped thoroughly, and beaten 
whites. Pour into moulds moistened with white of egg ; 
chill ; serve with mayonnaise on lettuce leaf, with nest of 
celery straws. A. R. F. 



CREAMED CHICKEN. 

1 pint shredded chicken, 2 tablespoon fuls melted but- 

1 pint rich milk and cream, ter, 

2 tablespoon fuls flour, Salt and pepper to taste. 
Pinch of ginger. 

Mix all well together and put into a baking dish with 
cracker crumbs on top. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



33 

CHICKEN LIVERS. 

I cup chicken livers, I cup chicken stock, 

l /4 cup salt pork cubes, 2 tablespoons flour. 

y 2 cup mushrooms, 

Chop livers and saute in salt pork. Add flour, stock, 
mushrooms ; cook five minutes, season to taste. Serve in 
Fontage cups, or patty shells, or on squares of buttered 
toast, or on diamond shaped pastry. 

A. R. F. 



CROQUETTES. 
Two cups of cold fowl or veal cut fine, y 2 teaspoonful 
celery salt (for veal), 1 teaspoonful lemon juice, -14 tea- 
spoonful salt, 6 drops onion juice, dash of cayenne pepper, 
2 teaspoonfuls chopped parsley. Mix meat and seasoning, 
add thick white sauce. Enough sauce must be used to have 
a creamy croquette when served, from 1 to V/z cups will be 
needed for the amount of meat given. Chill the mixture, 
shape quickly, crumb, egg and crumb and fry in deep fat. 
but 6 at once as more cools the fat to much. 

Miss Gertrude Stites. 



CROQUETTES. 
Chop meat in chopper, add onion, salt and pepper, 
celery or celery salt. Soak bread in boiling water until 
entirely soft, add to meat until it sticks together, mould and 
fry in deep fat. 

Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



FOR BEEF CROQUETTES. 
Make tomato sauce. One-half can tomatoes, cooked and 
strained ; add pepper and salt and thicken, serve with 
croquettes. 

Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



34 

CHICKEN TERRAPIN. 
I quart cold chicken cut in i level tablespoonful salt, 

dice, 3 tablespoonfuls butter, 

Cooked liver of i or 2 chick- 1 tablespoonful lerhon juice, 

ens, 3 hard boiled eggs, 

Yolks of 2 uncooked eggs, 1 cup chicken stock, 

1 cup cream, Slight grating of nutmeg. 

One-third teaspoonful pep- 4 tablespoonfuls sherry, 

per, 2 tablespoonfuls flour. 

Chop livers and boiled eggs rather coarse and add to 
chicken ; sprinkle salt, pepper and nutmeg over this ; now 
put butter in pan and melt, add flour, and stir until smooth, 
then gradually add chicken stock, heat thoroughly for three 
minutes, add cream, except 4 tablespoonfuls, stir for one 
minute, add chicken, and simmer for ten minutes. During 
this period beat yolks of eggs and the 4 tablespoonfuls 
cream, pour yolks and cream into pan, stir one minute, re- 
move pan, add sherry and lemon juice and serve at once. 

Mrs F. H. Booth. 



CHICKEN, LOBSTER. SWEETBREAD, AND FISH 
CROQUETTES. 
All made same as recipe for "Shad Roe Croquettes," ex- 
cept leave out lemon juice in chicken and sweetbreads. 
(See page 36). A. R. F. 



CREAMED LOBSTER. 
2 cups cooked lobster, 2 tablespoons butter, 

2 tablespoons flour, y 2 cup cream. 

Yz cup chicken stock, I or 2 egg yolks. 

Salt and pepper, Onion if liked. 

Melt butter, add onion, and cook two minutes. Add 
flour, stock, and cook five minutes. Season, and put in 
cream, and when it cooks pour on egg yolks ; add lobster, 
and heat over water. 

( nib flakes, shrimps, and mushrooms may be done the 
same way. 

You may use 2 tablespoons chopped mushrooms in place 
of onion. A. R. F. 



35 

LOBSTER CHOI'S. 
2 cups cooked lobster, Salt, pepper, nutmeg, 

i tablespoon lemon juice, i tablespoon parsley, 

2 hard cooked egg yolks, I cup croquette sauce. 

Mix in order given. Shape, dip in egg and crumbs and 
fry. Make incision and insert small claw. A. R. F. 



MOCK TERRAPIN. 

1 cup chicken livers 2 tablespoons flour, 

(cooked), i cup cream, 

]/ 2 cup cooked rice, j/4 teaspoon salt, 

2 hard boiled eggs, Cayenne, nutmeg, 

1 teaspoon parsley, 2 tablespoons butter. 

Melt butter, add flour, seasoning, cream, livers, eggs 
(chopped fine). Cook five minutes. Add rice, reheat and 
serve on toast, or pastry, or in timbale cups, or pate shells. 

A. R. F. 



IMPERIAL FISH TIMBALES. 

1 cup cooked fish, 1 scant teaspoon salt, 
}4 cup chopped almonds, A little cayenne, 

2 tablespoons butter, 1 teaspoon parsley. 
2 tablespoons flour. 3 eggs (whites). 

1 cup cream, 3 eggs (yolks). 

Melt butter, add flour, cream, seasoning, parsley; cook 
five minutes. Add fish and almonds, cook two minutes, 
pour hot mixture on egg yolks well beaten, cook thoroughly 
and add whites 'of eggs beaten very stiff. Fill mould with 
mixture, set in pan of hot water and bake twenty minutes. 

A. R. F. 



TIMBALES OF HALIBUT. 
One and a half pounds of halibut for 12 persons. Mash 
well, cut up or chop fine and press through sieve, add to 
pulp a gill of cream, whipped. One teaspoon salt, I grain 
cayenne. Stir in well beaten whites of 5 eggs. Put into 
greased timbale moulds, and steam for half an hour. Serve 
with lobster sauce. F. L. C. 



36— 

LOBSTER SAUCE. 
Cut claws of good sized lobster into dice. Melt 2 table- 
spoons butter in a saucepan, add 2 tablespoons flour without 
browning; ]/ 2 pint milk; stir constantly while boiling, add 
lobster, salt, bit of white pepper. Keep warm until needed 
by standing pan in hot water. Mrs. Prosser. 



SHAD ROE CROQUETTES. 
2 cups cooked roe, 1 tablespoon chopped pars- 



— »,„^„ , — „ — „ . „~, ~ ~ L 

1 cup croquette sauce, ley, 

Salt, pepper, and cayenne, 2 eggs, yolks, 

Lemon juice. 

Cut roe in pieces, add seasoning, sauce, parsley, egg 
yolks. Shape, dip and fry. A, R. F. 



CROQUETTE SAUCE. 

4 tablespoons butter, 1 cup cream, or chicken 

5 tablespoons flour, stock, 

Salt, pepper and cayenne, Onion juice if liked. 

Melt butter, add flour, cook three minutes. Add cream 
and seasoning. A. R. F. 



CLAM FRITTERS. 
10 large clams chopped, 1 egg. 

Enough flour to make a thin batter or just enough to 
hold clams together. If they are dropped in hot lard just 
as you would crullers they look nicer and cook browner, 
but they can be fried in a pan of very hot lard and kept 
smoking hot. Mrs. DeWitt Colemax. 



FRESH MUSHROOMS STUFFED WITH SWEET- 
BREADS. 
The largest mushrooms are selected and they are 
stuffed with minced sweetbreads, then baked, basting often 
with butter and plenty of sweet cream. These are served 
on round pieces of toast with the cream gravy poured over. 

Mrs. J. B. Laxstng. 



37 

MEAT CROQUETTES. 
One pound of chicken or meat of any kind ; i or 2 
onions, chopped together fine or run through a meat chop- 
per, season; 1 cup sweet milk boiled; 3 tablespoon fuls butter 
melted, add 1 tablespoonful wheat flour while hot, stirring 
briskly until smooth, add the boiled milk, pour this mixture 
over the chopped meat, mix thoroughly, then beat 2 eggs, 
turn into the mixture, work it all together, mould into cones 
or shape of any kind, when cold, roll in beaten egg, then 
cracker crumbs and fry in lard. 

Mrs. Simeon Westervelt. 



CREAMED OYSTERS AND CELERY. 

1 pint oysters, 2 eggs, 

2 tablespoons butter, ^ or ^4 cup cream, 
2 tablespoons flour, Salt and pepper, 

2 tablespoons wine, 1 cup chopped celery. 

(Madeira or Sherry). 

Melt butter, add oysters (well drained), and cook one 
minute. Remove oysters ; add flour, seasoning, and cream. 
Pour on eggs (well beaten), add oysters, after it thickens, 
and wine when taken from fire. Serve in pate shells. 

A. R. F. 



MUSHROOMS WITH OYSTERS. 
Wash, scrub, and remove stems from 12 large fresh 
mushrooms. Saute in butter five minutes. Place on rounds 
of buttered toast, gills up. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, 
and dot with butter. Decorate each mushroom with large 
oyster, and sprinkle with buttered crumbs. Bake fifteen 
minutes in hot oven, basting every five minutes with melted 
butter. 

A. R. F. 



DEVILED MUSHROOMS. 
Mix 1 teaspoon mustard, and dash of cayenne, 1 tea- 
spoon Worcestershire sauce, % teaspoon paprika. Cover 
broiled mushrooms' with mixture, and serve on buttered 
toast. A. R. F. 



38 

BAKED MUSHROOMS. 
Wash, scrub, and remove stems from 12 large mush- 
rooms. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Saute in butter. 
Add 1 cup chicken stock, or cream, and simmer fifteen min- 
utes. Place on rounds of dried bread on a buttered platter; 
cover, and cook in oven fifteen minutes, basting once with 
melted butter. A grating of nutmeg may be used if liked. 

A. R. F. 



OYSTER CRABS WITH EGGS. 
Cook oyster crabs in butter. Cut bread in slices, shape 
with doughnut cutter, toast and butter and place in bottom 
of ramikiri. Fill rings with crab, break egg on top of each. 
Sprinkle with grated cheese, and bake about ten minutes 
until egg is cooked to taste. 

A. R. F. 



CHESTNUTS TO SERVE AN ENTREE. 
For an entree at a course dinner or luncheon, try chest- 
nuts served in browned rolls or in croustades. Boil the 
nuts first until shells and skins can be removed, then steam, 
or boil until tender. Prepare a rich cream sauce, using 2 
tablespoonfuls of butter melted with 1 of flour, then adding 
when bubbly 2 cupfuls hot milk or cream. Season highly 
with salt, pepper, and if liked a little nutmeg. Stir the 
chestnuts into the hot sauce, then turn into rolls that have 
been hollowed out and crisped in the oven, or bread crous- 
tades buttered and browned. 



MEATS 

"Sonic hac meat and canna cat 
And some wad eat, that want it; 
But we hac meat and wc can eat; 
Sac let the Lord be thank-it." 

— Robert Burns. 



ROAST TURKEY. 
A turkey weighing from ten to twelve pounds steam 
two hours (if not tender). Take the giblets with i small 
onion and chop fine, add I pound of crackers or i small 
loaf of bread chopped, add butter the size of an egg or more, 
i egg, i teaspoon salt, J / 2 teaspoon pepper, i scant teaspoon 
of sage, moisten with cold water, rub salt and pepper on the 
outside of turkey. Put in dripping pan with i cup boiling 
water, basting often with butter, little salt and pepper. 
Bake two hours or until done. H. M. S. 



FRIED CHICKEN. 
For ten persons prepare three young chickens. Singe, 
draw and carefully wipe them with a damp towel. Cut 
off the legs, separate the second joints, take off the wings, 
and make four pieces of the breast. The rough pieces 
save for soup another day. You will have ten pieces from 
each chicken. Dip the pieces in beaten egg then in bread 
crumbs and fry in hot fat. Put about a pound of fat in a 
baking pan, when hot put in the chicken ; when nicely 
browned push it back a little and cook slowly about thirty 
minutes. Dish after resting each piece on soft brown 
paper to dry. Pour over cream sauce. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

Put 2 tablespoons of butter and 2 of flour into a sauce- 
pan, when melted and well mixed add 1 pint of top milk. 
Stir constantly until boiling; add a teaspoon of salt and a 
saltspoon of pepper. A. M. A. 
39 



40 

CHICKEN PIE. 
To a quart of flour, add 3 teaspoonfuls of baking pow- 
der, a little salt, butter the size of an egg (butter and lard 
mixed is better). Wet up with sweet milk, mixing soft as 
for biscuit, roll out. Remove the larger bones from 
chicken, season with butter, salt and pepper. Thicken some 
of the broth and pour over chicken before putting on crust. 
Use remainer of the broth for gravy. 

Mrs. J. G. Pitkin. 



JELLIED CHICKEN. 
Boil a good sized chicken in water to which has been 
added 2 tablespoon fuls each diced carrot, onion and celery, 
2 sprigs each of parsley and thyme, 2 cloves and salt to sea- 
son. Cool in the water in which it was cooked. The next 
day take out the chicken and cut in dice. Take the fat from 
the stock, heat and clear by bringing to a boil, with the 
white and shell of an egg. Skim as fast as the scum rises, 
then strain through a flannel. To 3 cupfuls of this strained 
stock allow Yi box of gelatine that has been soaked for an 
hour in a ^ cup of cold water. When this is dissolved in 
the hot stock set all aside to cool. As the jelly begins to 
.stiffen, wet a mold with cold water and set in a pan of 
broken ice. Pour in a thin layer of the jelly and as it 
stiffens lay in chicken dice. Pour in more jelly, then as it 
cools more of the chicken, and so on until all of the chicken 
has been used, having the jelly at the top. Set on the ice 
to form. When ready serve on a bed of crisp lettuce. If 
preferred the chicken may be arranged in little individual 
moulds. Mrs. J. J. Haring. 



CHICKEN TERRAPIN. 
One quart of cold chicken cut in dice, cooked lover 
of 1 or 2 chickens, 3 hard boiled eggs, 1 cup of chicken 
stock, 1 cup of cream, slight grating of nutmeg, one- 
tbird teaspoon ful pepper, 1 level tablespoon ful salt, 4 
tablespoon fuls sherry, 3 tablespoonfuls butter, 2 table- 
spoonfuls flour, 1 tablespoonful lemon juice. Chop 
livers and boiled eggs rather coarse, and add to the 



4i 

chicken. Sprinkle salt, pepper and nutmeg over this. 
Now put in pan and melt, add flour and stir till smooth, 
then gradually add chicken stock ; heat thoroughly for 3 
minutes, add cream, except 4 tahlespoonfuls, stir for one 
minute, add chicken and simmer for ten minutes. During 
this period beat yolks of eggs and the 4 tahlespoonfuls of 
cream. Pour yolks and cream into pan, stir one minute, re- 
move from pan. Add sherry and lemon juice and serve at 
once. Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



PRESSED CHICKEN. 
Boil 2 chickens until dropping to pieces; pick meat off 
the bones, taking off all the skin; season with salt and pep- 
per. Put in deep tin or mould; take l /\ box of gelatine, dis- 
solved in a little warm water. Add to the liquid left in the 
kettle and boil until it begins to thicken. Then pour over 
the chicken and set away to cool. Cut in slices. 

Mrs. W. J. White. 

PARISIAN CHICKEN LOAF. 
Boil a medium sized chicken a half an hour, shred the 
meat from the bones and chop quite fine. Chop 23 cooked 
mushrooms, 15 stuffed olives and with a handful of bread 
soaked in the chicken liquor, onions to taste, 2 or 3 bay 
leaves, a few cloves, remainder of chicken liquor and 3 
tahlespoonfuls of brandy and mix with the chopped chicken. 
Make a pastry as for pie with the addition of baking pow- 
der, 1 teaspoonful.to each cup of flour, line a bread pan or 
mould with the pastry and fill with the chicken. Cover 
evenly with pastry and cook in moderately hot oven. 

Mrs. Wilbur W. Ballagh. 



CHICKEN OR TURKEY HASH. 
Make a white sauce of 1 tablespoon butter and 1 table- 
spoon flour rubbed together. Stir into 1 pint hot milk and 
stir until it thickens. Chop the chicken quite fine, salt and 
add hot sauce. Serve on toasted bread squares. 

Mrs. Iohn Pitkt\ t . 



42 

ROAST BEEF. 
About 8 pounds beef, first and second ribs, cut full and 
fixed for standing roast. Do not put in water but scrape 
with knife. Rub with salt and pepper and sprinkle with 
flour, place standing fat up in baking pan, add i cup boiling 
water. Roast in hot oven half hour then let oven gradu- 
ally cool. Roast about two hours. 



ROAST BEEF WITH YORKSHIRE PUDDDING. 
When meat is almost cooked put around it this batter: 
i cup flour, y 2 teaspoonful salt, i teaspoonful of baking 
powder, i egg and iy 2 cups of milk. Bake until brown. 

Mrs. Samuel Westervelt. 



ENGLISH YORKSHIRE PUDDING. 
I pint milk, 2 teaspoons baking pow- 

4 eggs — whites and yolks der, sifted through 2 

beaten separately, cups flour mixed very 

i teaspoon salt, smooth. 

About half an hour before you take your roast beef 
from the oven, prepare pudding and bake on two biscuit 
tins into which you have poured some drippings from your 
roast, pour half the pudding into each pan, remove from 
the oven and serve hot, with roast. 

Mrs. Carl O. Giessler. 



BEEF STEAK. 
Have steak cut two inches thick, cook eight minutes on 
each side, turning often, season with pepper, salt, and but- 
ter and place in oven covered for a few minutes. 



STUFFED STEAK. 
Take a good sized steak, slash until tender. Have ready 
a dressing of bread crumbs, well seasoned, spread dressing 
on the steak, adding bits of butter. Roll up and tie firmly, 
put in a covered pan and bake in a moderate oven basting 
frequently. Serve with brown gravy. 

Mrs. H. F. Yorke. 



43— 

STUFFED BEEFSTEAK. 
Take a rump steak about an inch thick, and make a 
dressing of bread, etc., spread it over the steak, roll it up, 
and with a needle and coarse thread, sew it. Lay it in an 
iron pot on a couple of skewers and put in just sufficient 
water to cover it. Let it stew slowly two hours. Serve in 
a dish with the gravy browned over it. 

M iss Dutcher. 



SAVORY BEEF. 
Take a shin of beef, from the hind quarter, saw it into 
four pieces, boil until the meat and gristle drop from the 
bones, and chop the meat very fine. Put it into a dish and 
season with a little salt, pepper, cloves and sage to your 
taste, pour in some of the liquor in which the meat has 
been boiled and put away to harden. To be served cold. 

Mrs. W. J. White. 



BEEF LOAF. 
Four pounds round steak, Ffamburged, 3 beaten eggs, 1 
cup of cracker crumbs, 2-3 cup of milk and a scant 
]A cup of butter. Season with salt and poultry seasoning, 
mixing well, put in a loaf pan and bake. Mutton and veal 
may be used in the same way. Mrs. H. F. Yorke. 

BEEF LOAF. 
1 pint or more of chopped 2 eggs beaten, 
beef. Salt to taste, 

8 crackers (soda biscuits) 1 tablespoon butter, 
broken and soaked in 
hot water, 
Enough milk to make the mixture the consistency of a 
stiff batter, pour in a baking dish and bake about one hour. 

Mrs. Simeon Westervelt. 



SAVORY MEAT. 
Take V/i pounds of chopped beef and 1 large slice of 
ham. also chopped, and mix well together. To the meat 
add 3 eggs. 2 tablespoon fuls of melted butter (or olive 



44 

oil), and five crackers, rolled or chopped. Mix well. Sea- 
son generously with salt and pepper. Make into a four inch 
roll and cook in the oven for one hour. Put some butter 
in the pan and baste frequently with the butter and water. 
This may be served hot as a "roast" but is nicer cut off 
cold for picnics, cold suppers, etc. 

Mrs. H. M. Rogers. 



BEEF A LA MODE. 
5 lbs. of the top round Bouquet (parsley and eel- 
carded), ery), 
20 small white onions (fried Pepper and salt, 

whole), 6 whole carrots (large), 

12 whole peppers, 4 whole cloves, 

Pinch of thyme, Small piece bay leaf, 

1 clove garlic. 
Put meat, three hours before cooking, in large bowl, with 
y 2 cup vinegar, and y 2 cu^- water, add all spices, baste oc- 
casionly. Melt in sauce pan 1 tablespoon butter, i l / 2 
tablespoons of flour, cook until dark brown, add 2 onions, 
cut fine, cook five minutes longer. Add meat, whole car- 
rots, and seasoning and let simmer for three hours, stirring 
occasionally. Add the whole onions which were previously 
fried a light brown and cook one hour longer. Remove 
meat, place on hot platter and garnish with the carrots, cut 
in thin slices, the whole onions arranged neatly and 
bunches of parsley. Strain the gravy, pour a little over 
meat and rest in gravy dish. If the gravy appears thin, 
do not add more flour, but reduce the quantity by allowing 
it to boil rapidly, uncovered, for a few minutes. 

Mrs. A. A. Goubert. 



BEEFSTEAK ROLL. 

Select a thin slice of steak. Make a dressing of bread 
crumbs and shredded onion, melted butter, pepper, salt, 
and sage. Spread on meat, roll and tie, put thin slices of 
bacon, and suet on top and baste often with the drippings. 
Bake about one-half hour. Mrs. W. F. W. 



45 

ESCALLOPED MEAT. 
Chop meat of any kind fine (beef best), chop 3 hard 
boiled eggs fine by themselves, then make a cream sance by 
taking 1 tablespoonfnl of butter, 1 full tablespoonful of 
flour, and 1% cups of milk. Put in a pudding dish a layer of 
meat, then of eggs, then the sauce, seasoning as you put on 
until the dish is filled, putting the sauce last. Then add a 
layer of fine bread crumbs, some pieces of butter, a little 
hot milk. Bake slowly, a nice brown. 

Mrs. Ball. 



MEAT BALL. 
Three pounds round beef steak, % pound salt pork 
chopped fine, add a little salt, pepper and sage, 1 egg, mix 
well, make into a loaf and bake three hours. Baste often 
as you would roast beef. When cold slice for tea. 

Mrs. E. H. P. 



MEAT CAKES. 
1 cup chipped meat, 1 cup bread crumbs, 

1-3 cup milk, 2 eggs, salt and pepper. 

Make into cakes and fry in butter, 

Mrs. E. H. P. 



TO COOK BACON. 
Take thin slices of Swift's Premium Bacon, place in a 
tin and cook in oven till crisp. " 



FRIED TRIPE. 
Put tripe into boiling water and boil until tender, drain. 
Make a batter of flour, egg, salt and pepper, dip the tripe 
and fry. Mrs. F. H. S. 



PORTUGUESE PIE. 

Take lean pieces of cold steak or roast beef and pass 

through a chopper. Cover the bottom of a baking pan 

(earthen) an inch or two deep with the meat, season this 

layer. Add a generous layer of tomatoes, season, and seal 



4 6— 

with a thick layer of mashed potatoes. Smooth over and 
scatter small bits of butter on top and bake until nicely 
browned. Miss B. Osborn. 



ROAST VEAL. 
Remove the bone from the ham of veal, with a sharp 
pointed knife; make incisions about three inches apart, 
season well with salt and pepper, press in each incision a 
piece of salt pork about one by two inches in size; put 
water enough in dripping pan to cook it nicely; do not 
baste it but turn it over when necessary. Cook until well 
done and brown. Mrs. W. J. White. 



SOUTHERN VEAL CUTLETS. 
Cut cutlets in pieces about the size of your palm. Shake 
pepper, salt, and flour in hot fat but do not burn. When all 
is cooked leave a little fat in the pan, add a large spoonful 
of flour and about 2 cups of milk to make gravy enough to 
cover the meat. Place in a shallow pudding pan, set on 
the back of stove and let bubble slowly for about three 
hours when it will be tender. Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



A RAGOUT OF COLD VEAL. 
Cut the veal into slices, put a large piece of butter in a 
frying pan, and as soon as it is hot dredge the meat well 
with flour, and fry a nice brown. Remove the meat and 
put in the pan as much of cold gravy as desired ; season 
with pepper and salt and a wine glass of tomato catsup. 
Cut a few slices of cold ham, lay into the gravy and add 
slices of veal. It must be served hot. Mrs. Cameron. 



VEAL LOAF. 
Three pounds veal chopped fine, 6 rolled crackers. 3 
beaten eggs, 1 tablespoonful salt, */> tablespoonful black 
pepper, 3 tablespoonfuls thyme, 1 tablespoonful melted 
butter. Work the ingredients well together, and after 
pressing down in a buttered dish, pour over the melted but- 
ter and 1 tablespoonful of water. Bake two hours. 

Miss Dutcher. 



47 

PRESSED VEAL. 
Boil 2 pounds of veal with ] 1> pound of pork, very 
tender. Drain off the liquor and chop the meat very fine. 
Boil the liquor down to l / 2 cup. Season the meat with salt, 
pepper and cloves. Place in a dish slices of lemon and 3 
hard boiled eggs, alternately, then put in the meat, pour the 
liquor over all. Set in a cool place to harden. Cut in 
slices. Mrs. W. J. White. 



MUTTON A LA VENISON. 
Take a fat loin, remove the kidney, let it hang a week 
(if the weather will permit). Two days before dressing it 
for cooking, take ground allspice, cloves and pepper, mix 
them. Rub into the meat a tablespoonful twice a day. 
Before cooking wash it off and roast as a leg. To preserve 
the fat and keep it in make a paste of flour and water, 
spread thickly over the meat. Over this tie a sheet of 
coarse paper well buttered. About a quarter of an hour 
before it is done remove the paper and paste, return to the 
oven and baste and dredge with flour. 

Mrs. Cameron. 



PORK LOAF. (Eaten Cold). 

2 lbs. chopped pork, y 2 teaspoon salt, 

5 soda crackers rolled very Little sage, pepper, and 

fine, small onion chopped 

1 egg beaten, ' fine. 

Roll loaf in more cracker crumbs, put drippings on top 

and bake an hour. Shape in long round loaf and slice thin 

when cold. Mrs. W. H. Childs. 



PORK CHOPS BREADED. 
One egg broken on a soup plate with salt and pepper, 2 
tablespoonfuls of milk. Dip the chops in the eggs, then in 
cracker crumbs and fry a nice brown. 

Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



4 8 

POTATO STUFFING FOR DUCKS. 
Have hot mashed potatoes about one quart when 
mashed. Season with salt, pepper, sage and thyme. Mix 
all well together and add 2 good sized onions chopped fine. 
Make the dressing very salt and very hot with pepper so 
much so that one would think it too highly seasoned before 
it goes into the ducks, but when cooked it will be all right. 

A Iks. F. E. Fosdick. 



STEWED KIDNEY. 

Take as may lamb kidneys as required, boil whole slowly 
for five or six hours, till tender. Change water once dur- 
ing boiling. Put a bit of salt and pepper in the water, when 
tender remove and slice using only the soft parts. Make 
sauce of drawn butter, flour, rind and juice of a lemon and 
chopped parsley. Thicken until of creamy consistency, mix 
with sliced kidney and serve hot on toast. 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



BROILED BEEF OR CALVES LIVER. 
Cut about Yi inch thick, broil over a slow fire about fif- 
teen minutes, place on a warm platter using plenty of 
butter, a little salt and pepper. Press the butter thoroughly 
in the liver. H. M. S. 



FRIED LIVER AND BACON. 

Soak liver in milk or scald with boiling water to draw 
out blood, dry thoroughly and sprinkle with flour. Fry Yt. 
pound bacon and when crisp remove bacon and put liver in 
hot bacon fat and fry brown on both sides. 

A.Irs. F. L. Colver. 



CREAMED LIVER. 
Quantity for six. 1Y2 pounds beef liver put in cold 
water and let boil one-half hour. Take from water and 
chop with 1 onion, boil with 1 quart fresh boiling water for 
a few minutes. Thicken with I tablespoonful butter, 1 full 
tablespoon flour. Toast bread and pour over slices. 

Mrs. L. E. Tuttle. 



49- 

LIVER LARDED. 
Lard liver and press into mould. Bake an hour and a 
half, season with butter, salt and pepper. When cooked 
turn on a platter and put a glass of currant jelly over it 
and serve hot. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



MINCED HAM. 
( )ne large cup of Swift's Premium Ham fine chopped, 
enough milk to cover it. Thicken with flour about as thick 
as rich cream, cover over nicely toasted bread and serve 
at once. Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



HAM BALLS. 
One cup of chopped ham (or other meat can also be 
used), pepper, chopped parsley, 4 tablespoonfuls of bread 
crumbs, 1 gill milk and yolks of 2 eggs. Cook milk and 
bread crumbs until thick, add yolks, remove from the fire 
and stir in the ham. Set aside to cool, then form into 
shape desired, and dip into egg and bread crumbs. Fry in 
smoking fat. E. S. W. 



TO BOIL HAM. 
Ham should be put into cold water to boil. If it is 
very salt the water should be changed just after it begins 
to boil, a little vinegar, and J / 2 cup sugar added to the water 
improves the ham very much. Boil it three or four hours, 
according to size, then skin it and place it in the oven for 
half an hour. Then cover with bread crumbs and replace 
in the oven for another half hour. Swift's Premium Ham 
is recommended. Mrs. H. Owens. 



BAKED FRESH HAM. 
Select a small fresh ham, have the butcher remove the 
bone, wash and scrape and cut deep gashes on the outside, 
rub inside and out with salt, pepper and sage. Make a 
dressing as for turkey and fill opening left from removing 
bone, sew up. Place in hot oven and roast from four to 
six hours according to size. Mrs. Geo. Straus. 



50 

JELLIED TONGUE. 
One boiled tongue, 2 ounces of gelatine dissolved in 
y 2 pint of water, 1 teacup of browned gravy, 1 pint of 
liquor in which tongue was boiled, 1 tablespoon of sugar, 
3 tablespoons of vinegar, 1 pint of boiling water. Cut 
tongue in slices as for table. Let jelly cool and begin to 
thicken. Wet mould in cold water. Put in little jelly, then 
tongue, and so on till mould is filled. Set in cool place. 

A. M. A. 



TO MAKE MEAT TENDER. 
When cooking meat or a fowl that is tough, put a table- 
spoon of vinegar in the water you boil it in. It will make it 
very tender. 



A spoonful of stewed tomatoes in the gravy of either 
roasted or fried meats is an improvement. 



MEAT AND FISH SAUCES 

"Take the good the gods provide thee.'' — Drydex. 



CREAM SAUCE. 
Use a half pint of cream, 2 ounces of butter, 1 tea- 
spoonful of flour, salt and cayenne to taste, when liked a 
small quantity of mace or lemon juice. Put the butter in a 
sauce pan, dredge in the flour, and keep stirring until the 
butter is melted. Add the seasoning and cream and stir 
the whole until it boils ; let it simmer for five minutes, then 
add pounded mace, or lemon juice to taste. 

Mrs. C. R. Brown. 



PARSLEY SAUCE. 
Take 2 teaspoonfuls of minced parsley, l / 2 pint 
of melted butter, l / 2 teaspoonful of sweet herbs. Put 
into a sauce pan a small quantity of water slightly salted, 
and when it boils throw in a good bunch of parsley, which 
has been washed, and let it boil for five minutes. Then 
drain and mince the leaves very fine, put in a bowl and pour 
over it half a pint of smoothly made white sauce, stir once 
that the ingredients may be thoroughly mixed. 

Mrs. C. R. Browx. 



EGG SAUCE. 
Make a white sauce with 4 eggs, ]/ 2 pint of melted 
butter, when liked, and a very little lemon juice. Boil the 
eggs until quite hard, which will be in about twenty min- 
utes, and put them in cold water for half an hour. Take off 
the shells and chop the eggs into small pieces, not too fine. 
Make the sauce very smoothly and when boiling stir in the 
eggs, and serve hot. 

Mrs. C. R. Brown. 
51 



52 

BREAD SAUCE. 
Take I pint of milk, ^ of a pound of stale bread 
crumbs, i onion, a little poundfed mace, cayenne pep- 
per and salt to taste, also i ounce otf butter. Peel 
and quarter the onion and simmer it in milk until perfectly 
tender. Break the bread into small pieces, put it in a very 
clean sauce pan, strain the milk over it, cover it up and let it 
remain for an hour to soak. Beat with a fork very 
smoothly, add a seasoning of pounded mace, cayenne and 
salt, with i ounce of butter; let the whole mixture boil and 
serve. To enrich this sauce a small quantity of cream may 
be added, just before sending it to the table. 

Mrs. C. R. Brown. 



CELERY SAUCE. 
Take 6 heads of celery, i pint of white stock, some 
mace, a bunch of savory herbs ; thickening of butter and 
flour or a half pint of cream, and a little lemon juice. Boil 
the celery in the stock with mace and herbs until tender, 
then rub the celery through a sieve. Add thickening of but- 
ter mixed with flour, or what is still better, with arrowroot. 
Just before serving put in the cream, boil, and squeeze in a 
little lemon juice. If necessary add a seasoning of salt and 
pepper. 

Mrs. C. R. Brown. 



MUSHROOM SAUCE. 
2 tablespoons butter, 2 tablespoons flour, 

J/2 cup cream, J / 2 cup chicken stock, 

y 2 can or y 2 lb. mushrooms, y 2 teaspoon salt, 
Dash of pepper, Few grains cayenne. 

Melt butter, add flour, seasoning, stock and cream, chop 
mushrooms not very fine and add last. If fresh mushrooms 
are used they must be washed, peeled and sauted in butter 
before adding. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



53 

BECHAMEL SAUCE, 
i tablespoon butter, i tablespoon flour, 

*/2 cup stock, l /2 cup cream, 

Yolk of i egg, l /z teaspoon salt. 

2 dashes pepper, 

Melt butter without browning, add flour, mix till smooth, 
add stock and cream, stir till boils. Take from fire, add 
salt, pepper and egg yolk well beaten. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



MOCK BERNAISE SAUCE. 
Chop a small onion very fine, and cook in I tablespoon- 
ful of vinegar, add 2 tablespoonfuls of Worcestershire 
sauce, 2 tablespoonfuls butter and the beaten yolks of 2 
eggs, stirring all the time over hot water. When thick add 
one more tablespoonful of butter and serve with beefsteak. 

Mrs. S. J. Baxter. 



DARK SAUCE. 
Mix together 2 tablespoonfuls of flour, 1 ounce of 
butter, Yz pint of stock or gravy, 1 glass of port wine, 2 
tablespoonfuls of black currant jam, 1 tablespoonful of 
vinegar, 1 bay leaf, 3 cloves, lemon peel, salt and pepper. 
Chop an onion and put it with the flour and butter to brown 
in a sauce pan ; add the stock, a small piece of lemon peel 
and the other ingredients. Boil for six minutes and then 
strain. Mrs. C. R. Brown. 



• ROBERT SAUCE 
Put 2 ounces of butter in a stewpan, set it on the fire, 
and when browning throw in 3 onions, which must be 
cut into small slices. Fry brown and add 1 teaspoonful 
of flour, turn the onions in it and give them another fry. 
Add 4 tablespoonfuls of gravy or stock, salt and pepper 
to taste ; boil gently for ten minutes, skim off the fat and 
add 1 teaspoonful of made mustard, 1 teaspoonful of 
vinegar, and the juice of 1 lemon. Let it boil once, and 
then pour around the steak or other meat for which it has 
been prepared. Mrs. C. R. Brown. 



54 

TOMATO SAUCE. 
i onion, i can tomatoes, 

i tablespoon ful butter, 3 tablespoon fuls flour, 

1 tablespoon ful sugar, 

Melt butter in pot and put in sliced onion, let it brown. 
Then take off stove and strain onions out of butter, and mix 
flour with butter, then add 1 can strained tomatoes, salt 
and sugar. This sauce can be used for meat, macaroni, etc. 

Miss Jennie L. Grahn. 



CUCUMBER SAUCE. 
Two cucumbers, 2 tablespoonfuls olive oil, ^2 tea- 
spoonful onion juice, 1 tablespoon ful vinegar, salt and 
pepper to taste. Peel the cucumbers and either grate or 
chop them finely, and drain well to get rid of all the mois- 
ture possible. Add the onion juice, oil, vinegar and season- 
ings beaten together. Serve as soon as made. This sauce 
is good either with broiled or fried fish or cold meats. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



TARTAR SAUCE. 
Half a teaspoonful salt, 1 teaspoonful dry mustard, 
yolks of 2 eggs, stir together. Squeeze a dozen drops of 
lemon juice on the yolks and stir in with a fork until the 
mixture begins to thicken, then add the oil drop by drop, 
stirring, not beating. When it become too thick thin with 
lemon juice, then vinegar, alternately with the oil. Add 
juice of l /2 onion and chopped parsley. 

Mrs. C. W. Potter. 



MINT SAUCE. 
Use 4 dessertspoonfuls of chopped mint, 2 dessert- 
spoonfuls of white sugar and T 4 of a pint of vinegar. 
Wash the mint leaves and mince them very fine. Place 
in a bowl, add the sugar and vinegar, and stir until 
the sugar is dissolved. This sauce should be made two or 
three hours before it is needed. 

Mrs. C. R. Brown. 



55 

SAUCE TARTAR. 
i/2 pint mayonnaise dressing, 3 olives, 
1 gherkin, 1 tablespoon capers. 

Chop olives, gherkin and capers very fine, add to dress- 
ing and it is ready for use. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



HORSE RADISH RELISH. 
Peel and grate a tart apple. To two parts grated apple 
add one part grated horse radish. Serve with cold meats. 

Mrs. S. A. Tiedemann. 



HORSE RADISH SAUCE. 

Grate 4 tablespoon fuls of horse radish and mix it 
well with 1 teaspoon ful of powdered sugar, 1 teaspoon- 
ful of salt, a half teaspoonful of pepper, and 2 teaspoon- 
fuls of made mustard. Moisten with sufficient vinegar to 
give the consistency of cream, and serve in a gravy dish. 

Three or four tablespoonfuls of cream added to the 
above will very much improve the appearance and flavor 
of this sauce. Mrs. C. R. Brown. 



SAUCE HOLLANDAISE. 
y 2 cup butter, Yolks of 2 eggs, 

Pinch cayenne, Pinch of salt. 

Juice of 1 lemon, 

Put butter in bowl or small saucepan, add yolks of eggs, 
pepper, salt and lemon juice and stir well, then add ^ cup 
boiling water and stir constantly until like custard, 
which will take a few minutes only. 

Mrs. V. C. Huyler. 



OYSTER COCKTAIL SAUCE. 
Enough for six covers: Mix together 3 tablespoon- 
fuls each of vinegar, grated horse radish and tomato catsup, 
add 6 teaspoons lemon juice, three drops of tabasco. 
Keep cold. When ready serve oysters in chilled glasses, 
pour over sauce. Serve with slices of butter toast and slaw. 

Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



56 

SAUCE FOR STEAMED CLAMS. 
Melt 2 tablespoon fuls butter, add i teaspoon ful 
sugar, i teaspoonful catsup, cocktail or chilli sauce, a 
dash of cayenne pepper, juice of a lemon and ^4 a tea- 
spoonful of tarragon vinegar, i large spoonful of clam 
juice before serving. Sauce to be kept warm. 

Mrs. S. A. Tiedemann. 



VEGETABLES 

'The onion strong, the parsnip sweet, 
The training bean, the ruddy beet. 
Yea, all the garden brings to light, 
Speak it a landscape of delight." 



SCALLOPED WHITE POTATOES. 

Cut in thin slices 6 raw potatoes, and put a layer of 
them in a baking dish. Dredge a little flour, over them, 
also a little salt and two small lumps of butter; then add 
other layers like the first until the dish is full, and pour over 
all a pint of milk. Bake until well done. 

Mrs. T- T. Haring. 



POTATOES STUFFED. 

5 medium sized potatoes, Pepper, salt and yolk of one 

Yi an ounce of butter, egg. 

i tablespoonful grated 
cheese, 

Bake the potatoes in their skins and when done cut off 
a small slice from one end, scoop out the inside, and rub 
through a wire sieve, add to it y 2 ounce of butter, i table- 
spoonful grated cheese, pepper, salt, and the yolk of egg. 
Mix well and refill the skins, fit on the slices which were 
cut off, and put into the oven again for ten minutes before 
serving. Mrs. E. H. Brown. 



POTATOES WITH CHEESE. 

Cut thin boiled potatoes and arrange in a bake dish. 
Grate cheese over each layer of potatoes, pour a thin cream 
dressing over all the layers, grate a layer of cheese on top 
and bake until brown. Mrs. Johx T. Bailey. 

$7 



5« 

POTATO PANCAKES. 
12 large potatoes, grated Salt to taste, 

raw, 5 whole eggs, 

4 tablespoons flour, i small onion, grated. 

Fry. in half butter and lard, the size of griddle cakes. 

Mrs. M. G. Probst. 



SWEET POTATO CROQUETTES. 
Boil as many potatoes as you need. When cooked peel 
and wash them, add i egg beaten, make into oblong cro- 
quettes and roll in cracker crumbs. Put aside for several 
hours and then fry brown in hot lard. When done put on 
a sheet of brown paper in a warm dish to absorb the grease. 
Remove the paper carefully before serving. 

Mrs. J. J. Haring. 



POTATOES A LA MARYLAND. 
Boil 6 sweet potatoes with their skins on, peel, cut in 
halves, lay in shallow pan and cover with sweet cream. 
Add a little salt and a large piece of butter to each half. 
Put into hot oven and bake a rich brown. E. S. W. 



BAKED SWEET POTATOES. 
Boil 6 potatoes. When done drain off the water and 
let them dry for a few minutes on the back of the range. 
Peel and cut in half lengthwise; grease a pan and place the 
potatoes in it with a small lump of butter on each piece. 
Sift sugar over the potatoes with a little cinnamon and 
bake until brown. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



HASHED BROWN POTATOES. 
Chop cold boiled potatoes rather fine; to each half pint 
add 3 tablespoons of cream, Yz teaspoon salt, dash of pep- 
per. Mix, put a tablespoon of butter into a frying pan, put 
in the potatoes, and see that they are perfectly flat, cook 
slowly until golden brown, fold one-half over the other; 
turn out on a heated dish. Mrs. N. R. Pendergast. 



59 

POTATO PUFF. 
One pint cold mashed potatoes, season to taste with salt 
and pepper, celery salt and parsley if desired, butter the 
size of a large walnut. Moisten with i cup of warm 
milk or cream ; beat thoroughly. Beat and add separately 
the yolks and whites of 2 eggs, beaten thoroughly. Turn 
into a shallow baking dish, do not smooth over, and bake 
in a quick oven twenty minutes or until puffed and brown. 
Some add chopped meat for variety. C. A. S. 



POTATOES ROASTED IN MEAT. 
Pare the potatoes and place in pan on rack with meat, 
basting when you do the meat. 



POTATO RISSOLES. 
Take 2 cups of mashed potatoes and press them 
through a vegetable press, to make them very light and 
flaky. Melt a tablespoon of butter and add to the potatoes. 
Stir in the yolks of 3 eggs a teaspoon of finely chopped 
parsley, a little cayenne pepper, a teaspoon of salt, 34 tea- 
spoonful of onion juice, with a very little grated nutmeg. 
After mixing all well together, make the potatoes into balls 
the size of a walnut, dip in beaten yolk of egg, then in very 
fine bread crumbs. Half an hour before they will be ready 
to cook place on the fire a pan of deep fat and see that it is 
boiling before the potato balls are placed in it. Only one 
minute is required for cooking them if the fat is in the 
right condition. This is a delightful dish when properly 
prepared, and should be garnished with parsley. May be 
served with cream dressing:. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



POTATOES RE-HEATED. 
Chop cold boiled potatoes quite fine and season with 
salt and pepper. Have a spoonful of smoking hot fat in a 
small frying pan. Put in the potatoes, press them down 
firmly and smoothly and add two or three tablespoons of 
hot water. Cover and cook for ten minutes on a moder- 
ately hot stove, and if a brown crust has been formed, turn 



-OO- 



it over like an omelet and transfer to a hot vegetable dish. 
Potatoes will be crisp outside and tender and moist inside. 

F. L. C. 



CREAMED POTATOES AND EGGS. 
6 good sized white potatoes 3 eggs boiled hard, 
peeled and boiled, 

When thoroughly cold cut potatoes into dice, cut whites 
of eggs into pieces and grate yolks of eggs. Butter baking 
dish, put in white potatoes, then a layer of white of eggs, 
then sprinkle with yolks, season with salt and pepper, and 
dot with butter; go on this order until all are used, then 
pour over all a rich cream sauce and bake twenty minutes 
to half hour; brown nicely on top. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

i cup cream, 2 tablespoons butter, 

Salt and pepper, 2 tablespoons flour. 

1 cup milk, 

Melt butter, add flour and cook a few minutes, then 
milk gradually, then season and last add cream slightly 
beaten. 

A. R. F. 



FRIED POTATOES WITH EGGS. 
Slice cold potatoes and fry them with small pieces of 
salt pork until brown, then break in 2 or 3 eggs and stir 
well until cooked. Serve immediately. 



BAKED GREEN PEPPERS. 
1 cup cold meat, 1 medium sized tomato, 

y 2 teaspoon salt, 1 tablespoon butter. 

%. cup uncooked rice, 

Chop the meat fine before measuring, peel the tomatoes 
and cut into dice, drain well. Mix all together and nearly 
fill the peppers with the mixture. Stand them in a baking 
pan. Put in the pan sliced onion. One tablespoon butter, 
the juice from draining the tomato and enough water to 
reach to half the peppers. Bake one hour in a slow oven, 



-6i- 



basting every fifteen minutes. Lift the peppers from the 
pan, thicken the gravy and pour over the peppers. Enough 
for three peppers. After the peppers are filled replace the 
top and tie on. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



SCALLOPED ONIONS. 
Boil onions till tender ; then lay them in an earthen bak- 
ing dish ; cover with cream sauce ; over the whole sprinkle 
bread crumbs moistened with melted butter and milk. Sea- 
son with pepper and salt and bake until crust is brown. 

Mrs. G. W. Kvp.urg. 



SPINACH. 
Put y 2 peck of spinach into cold water to freshen; pick 
it over carefully, removing all wilted leaves. Pass it through 
five changes of water to free it from grit. Put it in a sauce- 
pan ; enough water will cling to it for the cooking. Cover 
the saucepan; stir occasionally so it does not burn. After 
fifteen minutes add a tablespoon of salt, and cook five min- 
utes longer ; then turn it into a colander to drain. When it 
is dry, chop it very fine. Put into a saucepan i l / 2 table- 
spoons of butter, and i tablespoon flour. After they are a 
little cooked add a teaspoon of salt, dash of pepper, and the 
spinach. Cook five minutes. Then add a l /> cup of cream 
or milk, and cook another five minutes. Stir constantly, 
to prevent burning. Taste to see if the seasoning is right. 
Serve in a vegetable dish or in the center of a dish with 
chops around it. Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



CORN PUDDING. 
i can corn put through the i cup milk, 

grinder, Butter, salt and pepper, bake 

I egg, half an hour. 

I green pepper. 



GREEN CORN FRITTERS. 
To 6 ears corn scraped, allow 6 crackers, rolled fine ; 2 
tablespoons flour, season with salt and pepper to taste, i 



-62- 



teaspoon baking powder. Mix with milk enough to make 
a rather stiff batter. Fry in thin cakes and serve hot. 

Miss Ellen M. Smith. 



OYSTER CORN CAKE. 
Take i quart green corn grated with a coarse grater or 
crushed with a rolling pin, 2 cups new milk, 1 cup flour. 
Mix the batter well together, add 2 eggs well beaten. Sea- 
son the batter with salt and bake on griddle. A good imi- 
tation of the taste of oysters. Miss Ellen M. Smith. 



BAKED CORN. 
Take 1 can of corn or grated corn to make 1 pint. Add 
to it 2 well beaten eggs, salt to taste, and 1 tablespoonful of 
milk. Put in a greased baking dish 1 layer of the batter, a 
lump of butter, and dredge a little flour over it ; repeat this 
until your dish is full, then bake a light brown, and serve 
at once. Mrs. J. J. Haring. 



CORN AND PEPPER CASSEROLE. 
1 can corn, 2 green peppers, chopped 

Butter size of walnut, fine, 

Salt and pepper to taste. 
Mix all together in a baking dish. Cover with ^ cup 
bread crumbs, browned in a tablespoon of butter. Bake one- 
half hour. C. A. S. 



STEWED CELERY. 
Cut the coarse pieces of celery and ends of stalks, using 
the fine leaves also, into inch (or less) pieces. Pour over 
boiling water to nearly cover. Boil until tender (about one 
hour). If water is not all absorbed pour off, and add 1 
pint white sauce. F. L. C. 



FRIED SUMMER SQUASH. 
Wash and slice about Yi inch thick. Sprinkle with pep- 
per, salt and roll in flour, then fry in y 2 butter and )/ 2 lard 
until brown. A half hour or less should be enough to fry. 
Cook slowly with cover over frying pan. 



63 

ASPARAGUS. 
Wash carefully; cut the ends until the tender part is 
reached. Boil in salted water gently until tender, about 
fifteen or twenty minutes. Drain; serve with white sauce. 



CREAMED CABBAGE. 
y 2 cup vinegar, l A cup sugar. 

y 2 cup milk, i lump butter, size of egg, 

2 eggs, Salt and pepper to taste. 

Place milk in saucepan, let come to boil, add sugar, 
eggs, salt, pepper, butter. Slowly add vinegar until all 
has bubbled up once. Have about ji of medium sized cab- 
bage cut as slaw; pour over cabbage, set aside to cool. 
In Winter it will keep for days. 

Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



CREAMED SLAW. 
Chop a head of cabbage fine and sprinkle on a little 
salt; let it stand while you make the cream. Mix well 
together, and cook slowly until quite smooth and creamy, 
i tablespoon flour, I tablespoon sugar, 

i tablespoon butter, J / 2 teacup sweet milk or 

y 2 teacup vinegar, cream. 

I egg. 

When done, pour over the cabbage. After you put it in 
the dish, sprinkle with pepper. Excellent if kept in a cool 
place. ' Miss Julia Black well. 



RED CABBAGE. 

I medium sized cabbage, cut 3 sour apples, 

fine, 3 large onions, sliced. 

Arrange the above in layers, seasoning each layer with 
salt and pepper. Then put T / 4 pound of butter, x / 2 pint of 
claret in the saucepan, cover tightly and let it stew on the 
back of the range for two and one-half to three hours. 

M. G. P. 



64 

CREAMED TURNIPS. 
Pare and cut turnips, in cubes ; boil in salted water until 
tender; drain. Rub 2 tablespoons butter and 2 of flour 
together until creamy, add 1 pint hot milk and pour over 
turnips. Season to taste. Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



BEETS IN WINE. 
Cook beets in morning to be served in evening. If any 
are little white put all in covered dish after paring until 
all are same color. Cut fine.* Two tablespoons butter, 2 
tablespoons sugar. Put in a skillet and brown three or four 
minutes. Add beets, stirring constantly three or four min- 
utes, add l /2 tablespoon flour stirring two or three minutes. 
Then add 3 tablespoons claret wine. Cook five minutes, stir 
constantly, cooking in all fifteen minutes. Put in double 
boiler to keep warm until served, adding 1 tablespoonful of 
tarragon vinegar when putting in double boiler. 

Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



STUFFED GREEN PEPPERS. 
Cut the tops off from the bell of green peppers, carefully 
remove the seeds, chop together very fine 1 small onion and 
1 large firm tomato, peeled, add an equal amount of stale 
bread or cracker crumbs, the former being preferable, salt 
and pepper to taste, moistening with melted butter. Fill the 
peppers with the mixture, replace the tops and bake twenty 
minutes to half an hour in a slow oven. 



PARSNIP BALLS. 
Boil parsnips in slightly salted water until tender, re- 
move the stringy portions and mash fine the remainder, 
form into balls after seasoning with salt and pepper, then 
fry these balls brown in butter. 



FRIED APPLES. 
Fry eighths in butter. 1 cup water. 

Add 3 tablespoons molasses, 

Cover ; steam till tender. Uncover and brown. 

Mrs. Howard E. Brown. 



— 65 

BAKED TOMATO. 
A layer of sliced tomato, with skins taken off; a layer of 
grated bread crumbs; pepper, salt and tablespoon of butter 
spread over all, also large kitchenspoon of sugar, and an 
onion cut in small pieces. Mrs. V. L. Clarke. 



FRIED TOMATOES. 
Place the tomatoes in boiling water to remove skins. 
\\ lien cool, slice the tomatoes about Yi inch thick. Dip 
in yolk of egg beaten, then in bread crumbs. Fry in lard 
till brown. Cover with thick cream sauce, using yolk of 
egg in sauce. Sprinkle with green peppers, chopped fine. 
Serve hot. Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



ESCALLOPED TOMATOES. 

Place a layer of tomatoes in a dish and sprinkle on them 
a little salt and pepper. Make a dressing of 
i cupful of bread crumbs, i tablespoon of butter, 

i teaspoon of salt, 34 teaspoon of pepper, 

i teaspoon of sugar, 

Rub the butter into the crumbs and add the rest. Spread 
the mixture on the tomatoes and add another layer of to- 
matoes, then dot the top with bits of butter, dust with pep- 
pei , a little sugar and cover with dry crumbs. Bake covered 
one-half hour, uncover and cook until browned. 

Mrs. W. B. Ingalls. 



SPAGHETTI A LA ITALIEN. 
Break in half l / 2 a package of Italian Spaghetti, and 
throw in boiling water. Cook until tender; it will be about 
half an hour. Throw in colander, drain and place colander 
over a saucepan of boiling water to keep hot. Make the fol- 
lowing sauce: Put in a sauce pan a good sized onion cut 
very thin, with 2 tablespoons of butter, cook until onion is 
done, then add i cup rich soup stock, i cup strained toma- 
toes, thickened with a little flour, i can of mushrooms or ]/> 
pound fresh mushrooms, salt and pepper, and a chopped 
Spanish pepper. To serve: put the spaghetti in the center 



-66- 



of a platter, pour the sauce over it, and on top of all put 
plenty of grated Parmesan cheese. Recipe of Antonio 
Barili. Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



TOMATO SAUCE, 
i can tomatoes, . S cloves, 

2 tablespoons butter, 2 tablespoons flour. 

1 small slice of onion, 

Cook tomatoes with cloves, 1 teaspoon salt, 1-3 teaspoon 
pepper and onion for ten minutes. Heat butter in small 
frying pan, add flour, stir over fire until smooth brown, 
then stir into the tomatoes and cook two minutes. Rub 
through fine strainer. Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



BAKED MACARONI WITH CHEESE. 
One-half package of macaroni boiled in salt water until 
tender. Make a cream sauce of a pint of milk, tablespoon- 
ful of butter, flour enough to thicken, salt, pepper, and a 
dash of paprika. Have ready a ]/i pound of grated cheese. 
Put a layer of the macaroni in a baking dish, then cream 
sauce and then the cheese and so on alternately until the 
dish is full. Dots of butter on top and bake until brown. 

Mrs. C. H. Fuller. 



MACARONI WITH TOMATOES. 

One and one-half cups macaroni broken into 1 inch 
pieces, cook in boiling salted water until very tender, then 
put into very cold water to remove starch. 
2 tablespoons butter, 2 tablespoons chopped green 

2 tablespoons chopped eel- pepper, 

ery, 2 medium sized onions 

2 cups strained tomatoes, chopped fine. 

Heat butter, cook chopped onion in it and when a little 
yellow add pepper and celery, 
1 teaspoon salt. Dash of pepper, 

i teaspoon sugar, Pinch of soda. 

Cook tomatoes, add salt, sugar, pepper. 

Put tomatoes into other mixture and thicken slightly if 
necessary. Butter dish, put in half macaroni, pour over 



6 7 

it Yi the sauce then remainder of macaroni and rest of sauce, 
dot with hutter and cover with crumbs, stirred into melted 
butter. Bake twenty minutes, if baked right away; if pre- 
pared in morning, cook about half hour before wanted. 

A. R. F. 



BAKED BEANS (Yankee Fashion). 
One quart small pea beans washed and soaked in cold 
water over night. Next morning turn off water and put in 
saucepan with" fresh cold water, cook Until tender. Take 
some out on a spoon and blow on them; if the skins loosen 
take them off the stove, pour off water, but do not throw 
away. Have ready a ^ pound square piece of pork, lean 
and fat. Put beans in a little b'rown stone pot until you 
have nearly all in, then score pork rind and lay on top of 
beans and put in remainder and cover pork so only a little 
rind can be seen. Put 5 tablespoons N. O. molasses and 1 
tablespoon of salt in water to which beans were cooked, pour 
over beans so they are covered. If all is not used save to add 
later. Put beans in oven and bake slowly all day, look at 
them every hour or so and add a little water (boiling), so 
as not to stop the cooking. Add no more water when within 
about three hours of serving, but let them cook in the pork 
fat. When ready to serve take out pork, place in center of 
platter, place beans around it and turn juice over beans. 

Mrs. F. E. Fosdick. 



STUFFED BAKED TOMATOES. 
Wash 4 ripe tomatoes; cut out the tops carefully and 
scoop out the seeds. For dressing, roll 10 to 12, crackers 
fine ; add */? teaspoonful salt, a little pepper and butter, the 
size of an egg, melted with enough hot water to make quite 
moist. Stuff the tomatoes and replace the tops. Pour a 
little hot water into the baking pan, and bake in a hot oven 
for thirty to forty minutes. Mrs. J. J. Haring. 



TOMATO JELLY. 
Take 1 quart can tomatoes, stew until very soft. Strain. 
Season to taste with salt, pepper, sugar and a small piece of 



butter. Dissolve enough gelatine to solidify i quart and 
add to tomatoes. Mould in cups and chill. To remove dip 
cups for an instant in hot water. F. L. C. 



BRUSSELS SPROUTS. 
( ut the sprouts from 2 medium sized stalks (pick off all 
tarnished leaves), and lay them for an hour in salted water. 
Drain them well and cook them in plenty of boiling water, 
uncovered, till tender, from ten minutes to half an hour, ac- 
cording to their age ; drain in a colander and serve with a 
hot sauce. C. A. S. 



CAULIFLOWER WITH CREAM SAUCE. 
Pick off the outer leaves, and cut off the stem close to 
the bottom of the flowerets ; wash the head in cold water ; 
then soak the top downward, in clear, cold water one hour. 
Place the head in a kettle of boiling water, stem downward ; 
cover the kettle and boil thirty minutes or until cauliflower 
is tender. When done spread the cauliflower in a dish and 
pour over it a sauce made as follows : Beat thoroughly i 
tablespoon butter, i dessertspoon flour, i teaspoon salt and 
a dash of black pepper. Add a pint of milk, cook until it 
thickens. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 

FRIED CUCUMBERS. 
Slice, sprinkle with salt and pepper, dip in beaten egg, 
then in cracker dust, fry brown. 



RICE CROQUETTES. 
Boil i cup of rice until all the water is absorbed and the 
rice is quite soft. To boil the rice, put a scant cup of rice 
in a saucepan in which there are 2 cupfuls of boiling water, 
slightly salted. Let the rice boil violently for ten minutes; 
then set it back on the stove or in a double boiler, where it 
will cook slowly. Do not stir the rice or touch it while it is 
cooking. When the rice is done and the water evaporated 
each kernel will be separate and expanded to four times its 
size before cooking. While the rice is hot add to it a tea- 
spoonful of butter. 2 tablespoonfuls of sugar, the well beaten 



-69- 

yolk of an egg, and if not moist enough, add a little hot milk. 
Whip all these ingredients to a smooth mixture, and when 
cool shape into cork-shaped croquettes ; then roll them in 
very fine cracker dust, then in beaten egg; then again in 
cracker dust. Let them stand for an hour or two in a cool 
place; then drop them in smoking hot fat, deep enough for 
them to float, and fry a golden brown. Do not put so many 
of the croquettes in the fat at once that they crowd each 
other. When done, lift them from the fat with a skimmer; 
drain them for a moment over the kettle, then lay them on 
coarse brown paper two or three minutes until quite free 
from fat. Mrs. J. J. Haring. 



TIME FOR COOKING SUMMER VEGETABLES. 

Greens — Dandelions i l /> hours 

Spinach i hour 

String beans 2 hours 

Green peas ]/i hour 

Beets 1 hour 

Turnips 1 hour 

Squash I hour 

Potatoes 1-3 hour 

Corn 1-3 hour 

Asparagus 1-3 hour 

This applies to young and fresh vegetables. 



TIME FOR WINTER VEGETABLES. 

Squash 1 hour 

Potatoes, white ]/ 2 hour 

Potatoes, baked y 2 hour 

Sweet potatoes ^4 hour 

Turnips 2 hours 

Baked sweet potatoes 1 hour 

Beets 3^/2 hours 

Parsnips 1 hour 

Carrots 1 T /> hour 

Cabbage 3 hours 



SALADS AND DRESSING 

"We may pick a thousand salads 
Ere we light on such another." 



The essential thing is to have the salad fresh and cold ; 
and if green, to have the leaves crisp and dry. All greens 
should be carefully washed in cold water. After they have 
stood for an hour in cold or ice water, free them from mois- 
ture by swinging them in a wire basket, or dry, without 
bruising, each leaf carefully with a napkin. 

Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



Two or three drops of vinegar put in the yolk of each 
egg when making mayonnaise dressing, before stirred at 
all, will prevent eggs from curdling. 

Mrs. H. S. Ernst 



FRENCH DRESSING. 

Four tablespoon fuls of olive oil, 2 tablespoon fuls of 
vinegar, 1 level teaspoonful of salt and Yi teaspoonful 
of black pepper. Beat well. The amount of oil may be in- 
creased or decreased to taste. If desired the bowl may be 
rubbed with half an onion. Mrs. J. B. Lansing. • 



MAYONNAISE SALAD DRESSING. 

One teaspoonful of mustard, 1 saltspoonful of salt, 3 
shakes of black pepper, 3 shakes of paprika, yolk of 1 
egg, 1 pint of olive oil and 3 tablespoonfuls of vine- 
gar. Put mustard, salt, pepper and egg in soup plate and 
stir until stiff. Then add oil by drops until well formed, 
then a few drops of vinegar, then oil alternately until fin- 
shed. Miss Margaret Delahanty. 
70 



— 7 I — 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 
Mix i teaspoonful of mustard, y 2 teaspoonful of salt, 
34 teaspoonful of cayenne pepper together. Add the yolks 
of 2 raw eggs, mix well. Add i pint of olive oil slowly, 
thin with lemon juice, add more oil, thin with vinegar. 
After mixing the mustard, salt, pepper and part of the oil, 
beat thoroughly and as it is beaten it will thicken. 

Mrs. J. T. Bailey. 



CREAM DRESSING FOR FRUIT SALAD. 
Yolks of 2 eggs, scant l /i cup of milk, 2 teaspoonfuls 
mustard, i teaspoonful sugar, vinegar to make a thin 
paste, butter the size of a butternut and a pinch of salt. 
Boil these ingredients together in a double boiler until 
creamy, then set away to cool. When ready to serve add *4 
cup of whipped cream and whip all together. This dressing 
is delicious served on any combination of fruit and nuts. 

Miss Harriet Westervelt. 



CELERY AND APPLE SALAD. 
Two cups of celery chopped fine, grated rind of i 
orange, i cup of apple cut into dice. Mix the above with 
the following mayonnaise : I very cold egg yolk, with 
2 drops of vinegar on it and i teaspoonful of onion 
juice and yolk of i boiled egg, i cup of cold olive oil, a 
tablespoonful of sugar, a tablespoonful of vinegar, a table- 
spoonful of lemon juice, a little salt and cayenne pepper 
and a half teaspoonful of mustard. Mix thoroughly by 
stirring oil drop by drop to the egg, and a few drops of vine- 
gar, lemon, salt, pepper, etc., which have previously been 
thoroughly mixed together. Serve either on white lettuce 
or in the apple cups, with cheese balls rolled in the chopped 
walnuts. 

Mrs. H. O. Pond. 



72 

POTATO AND CUCUMBER SALAD. 
6 large potatoes, i beet, 

i large cucumber, i onion, medium, sliced thin 

DRESSING. 

i large cup sour cream, -pjBjsnui uoodsBa; i 

i tablespoon butter, < s gg a a3Jll ; JO s>j[o^ 

i teaspoon sugar, 'jaddad puB ;pjs a^n 

Allow to cook until thick, take from stove and add vine- 
gar to taste. Put in bowl layer of potatoes, beet, cucumber, 
onion and dressing, then potato, etc., until bowl is full. 

Mrs. H. S. Ernst. 



CHICKEN SALAD. 
Cut cold cooked chicken into dice one-half inch square 
or into pieces of any shape, but not too small. Use only 
the white meat, and be very particular as to appearance, but 
the dark meat is also good. Wash and scrape the tender 
stalks of celery, cut them into small pieces, and dry them 
well. Use equal amounts of celery and chicken. Mix with 
the chicken, oil, vinegar, salt and pepper, using 4 table- 
spoonfuls of vinegar, 2 of oil, one teaspoonful of salt, and 
l /2 teaspoonful of pepper to about 2 quarts of chicken. 
Stir into the meat and let it stand a couple of hours ; drain 
off any of the liquid which has not been absorbed, before 
combining the chicken with the other parts of the salad. 
Keep in a cold place until ready to serve, then mix with it 
the celery and part of the dressing. Put lettuce leaves 
around the dish, fill with the salad and pour over the re- 
mainder of the dressing:. 



CHICKEN SALAD DRESSING. 
Use mayonnaise dressing and just before serving add 
whipped cream to the dressing to give it delicate flavor and 
nice color. Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



SALMON SALAD. 
One quart of cooked salmon, 2 heads of lettuce, 2 
tablespoonfuls of lemon juice, 1 of vinegar, 1 tea- 
spoonful of salt, one-third teaspoonful of pepper, 1 cup- 



73 

ful of mayonnaise dressing. Break up the salmon, add to it 
the salt, pepper, vinegar, and lemon juice. Put in the ice- 
box for two or three hours. Serve on lettuce with may- 
onnaise. 

Mrs. |. B. Lansing. 



LOBSTER SALAD. 
Cut the boiled lobster into inch pieces. Take one part of 
oil and three of vinegar, with pepper and salt to taste. Stir 
into the lobster and keep in a cool place until ready to serve. 
Drain off any of the liquid which may be left unabsorbed. 
Serve on lettuce leaves with a thick covering of mayon- 
naise. Sprinkle over it the powdered coral of the lobster. 

Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



TUNNY FISH SALAD. 

Cut the fish into small pieces and mix thoroughly with 
the oil of the fish and with mayonnaise dressing. Serve on 
crisp lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



SHRIMP AND TOMATO SALAD. 

Place shrimps on lettuce leaves, then slice tomatoes. Add 
mayonnaise dressing: 

Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



SPANISH SALAD. 

Cut into small pieces i cup of celery, 3 cooked beets, 2 
cold potatoes, and yi a raw apple. To this add the boneless 
part of 6 sardines. After removing the skin, reduce to a 
pulp. Mix all ingredients together thoroughly, pour over 
French dressing and serve on lettuce. 

Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



74 

HARLEQUIN SALAD. 
i cup French peas 2 heaping tablespoons chop- 

( finest grade), ped chives, 

1 cup French string beans 2 heaping tablespoons chop- 

( finest grade), cut, ped parsley, 

1 cup pickled beets cut into 2 heaping tablespoons green 

cubes, pepper, 

1 cup celery cut into cubes, 1 cup cucumber, cut into 
3 hard boiled eggs, cubes, 

3 medium sized potatoes 1 hard head lettuce, 

(cold boiled), 4 large tomatoes. 

Cut 3 cold boiled potatoes into cubes and mix with 
the whites of 3 hard boiled eggs cut into pieces ; add 
chives, parsley and green pepper. Mix with French dress- 
ing. Mix peas, string beans, beets, celery and cucumbers 
(all cut about the same size) and cover with French dress- 
ing. Cover both combinations and let stand in ice-box one 
hour. Wash and fix lettuce and select two leaves for each 
person. Peel tomatoes and cut into halves ; grate yolks 
of eggs. When ready to serve mix the two mixtures 
together and put in strainer for a few minutes, then 
mix 4 tablespoons of mayonnaise with it. Place half 
of a tomato on two leaves, and put a heaping tablespoon 
of mixture over top of tomato, then a teaspoon of dressing, 
and sprinkle with grated egg yolks. Serves eight or ten peo- 
ple. If wanted for ten, have five large tomatoes in place 
of the four eiven above. Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



POTATO SALAD. 
Cut cold potatoes into dice shape. Add a little finely 
chopped onion as desired. Set into dish of nice crisp let- 
tuce. Serve with mayonnaise dressing. 

Miss Margaret Delahanty. 



VEGETABLE SALAD. 
Cook lima beans until tender. When cold add about 
equal amounts of beets, potatoes, celery, and one good sized 
onion cut up. Serve on crisp lettuce leaves with mayon- 
naise dressing. . Mrs. Mary Elliott. 



75 

CUCUMBER SALAD. 
Take half as many medium sized cucumbers as there 
are persons at dinner, cut the cucumbers in halves length- 
wise, scoop out the pulp. Mix with this cucumber pulp, 
half as much ripe tomatoes, cut in small bits, quarter as 
much chopped green peppers (seeds removed), enough 
grated onion to season well and moisten with French dress- 
ing. Fill the cucumber shells with the preparation and dec- 
orate the top with olives and sprigs of parsley. Serve very 
cold. Mrs. J. T. Bailey. 



SPANISH PEPPER SALAD. 
Fill the peppers with cream cheese, and serve on crisp 
lettuce leaves with French dressing. 

Miss Florence Palmer. 



AMERICAN SALAD. 
I cup firm white grapes, cut 12 dates, stoned and cut into 

into halves and seeded, halves, 

1 cup celery cut into cubes, 12 walnuts, broken into 
1 cup pineapple cut into pieces, 

cubes, 
Serve with mayonnaise on white leaves of crisp lettuce. 

A. R. F. 



STUFFED TOMATOES. 
1 cup chopped celery, not too 1 tablespoon chopped chives, 
fine, 1 tablespoon chopped parsley 

1 cup chopped cucumber, 12 walnuts, chopped. 

2 tablespoons chopped green 

pepper, 

Mix all ingredients together and season. Peel and cut 
tops from number of tomatoes needed, remove some of to- 
mato to leave space. Add the tomato removed to chopped 
mixture and then fill the spaces of tomatoes left with the 
mixture. Put a teaspoonful of mayonnaise on top of each 
and a perfect walnut half. Serve on a lettuce leaf, or a nest 
of celery straws. Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



-76- 



CABBAGE SALAD (French Style). 
2 red peppers, chopped, not i cup chopped celery, 

too fine, 4 hard boiled eggs. 

*/> cup walnut meats, broken 
into pieces, 
Shred half of a hard cabbage and let lay in ice water in 
ice box one or two hours, or until ready to use. 

Mix red peppers with cabbage and heap in center of 
dish. Cut eggs into halves lengthwise and remove yolks. 
Fill centers of whites of eggs with celery and walnuts 
mixed together and moistened with mayonnaise. Place 
around cabbage. Grate yolks of eggs over all. Serve with 
mayonnaise. Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



CELERY SALAD. 

Wash and scrape the tender stalks of celery, cut them 

into Y\ inch pieces, or into straws two inches long. Place 

them in ice water for a few minutes. Mix with either 

French or mayonnaise dressing and serve on lettuce leaves. 

Mrs. T. B. Lansing. 



CELERY AND WALNUT SALAD. 
Mix with the celery, cut into small pieces, one-third of 
the quantity of English walnut meats broken in two, and 
enough mayonnaise to moisten it well. Serve on lettuce 
leaves. Mrs. T- B. Lansing. 



SWEETBREADS WITH CELERY SALAD. 
Cut cold cooked sweetbreads into dice and mix with an 
equal quantity of celery. Cover with mayonnaise and serve 
on lettuce leaves. Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



TOMATO JELLY. 
Cook slowly together for one-half hour, Vi can toma- 
toes, \]/ 2 pints of chicken stock, 2 or 3 stalks of celery, 1 
small onion, and salt and pepper to taste. Soak l A package 
of gelatine in cold water, and after the tomato and stock 
have cooked one-half hour, add the gelatine and strain, 
pressing through a fine sieve all the juice and pulp of the 



77 

tomatoes possible. Put in individual moulds and serve on 
lettuce with mayonnaise. Color with a little cochineal. 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



LETTUCE AND TOMATO SALAD. 
Slice fresh tomatoes, put into a salad dish, cut a small 
onion in little pieces over the tomatoes. Arrange lettuce 
leaves around the dish and over the tomatoes and pour 
French dressing over it. Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



LETTUCE SALAD. 
Use only the tender leaves. Let them stand half an 
hour in cold water, then dry carefully. Rub the inside of 
the salad bowl lightly with an onion. Arrange leaves in the 
bowd in circles, the heart leaves in the center. Sprinkle 
over them a teaspoonful of parsley and chives, chopped fine. 
Pour over French dressing. The parsley and chives may be 
omitted if preferred. Mrs. J. P>. Lansing. 



TOMATO AND CELERY SALAD. 
Skin whole tomatoes, take out inside, mix with celery, 
cut fine and put back again. Place on lettuce leaves and 
cover with mayonnaise. Mrs. Watson G. Clark. 

ORANGE SALAD. 

Slice oranges in thin round slices. Place on lettuce 
leaves and cover with French dressing. 

Mrs. Watson G. Clark. 



CHEESE BALL SALAD. 
Roll cream cheese balls in finely chopped peppers. Place 
on lettuce hearts and serve with French dressing. 

Mrs. Watson G. Clark. 



CHEESE BALL SALAD. 
Mix a very little chive with cream cheese and finely 
chopped English walnuts, roll into small balls with butter 
patties. Place on or under lettuce leaves and serve with 
French dressing. Mrs. V. C. Huyler. 



78 

CUPID SALAD. 

4 oranges, I large tart apple, 

2 bananas, I egg, 

1-3 cup of sugar, 1 tablespoonful of brandy. 

1 pint strawberries, 

Cut the oranges in halves, scoop out the pulp, keeping 
the peel intact. Slice the bananas, and hull and slice the 
strawberries. Place all the materials on ice. Make a dress- 
ing of the apple, egg, sugar and brandy. Grate the apple 
and sprinkle it with sugar as you grate so as to keep it from 
turning dark ; add to it the brandy and unbeaten white of 
egg, and with a wire egg beater beat until it is stiff and 
fluffy. With sharp scissors cut the orange cups near the 
top into scallops, and tie them together in pairs with baby 
ribbon. When ready to serve fill the orange cups with the 
prepared fruit and heap the dressing on top. 

Mrs. Chas. R. Brown. 



NUT SALAD SERVED IN BANANA BOAT. 
One-half pound of English walnuts cut in small 
pieces, an equal amount of celery. Add mayonnaise, salt, 
pepper, and stuffed olives. Cut banana in half, lengthwise, 
take out fruit and fill with nut salad. Put skewer through 
a lettuce leaf and use for a sail. 

Mrs. Watson G. Clark. 



ASPARAGUS SALAD. 
Put tender asparagus tips on crisp lettuce leaves and add 
strips of the Spanish peppers which are put up in oil. Serve 
with French dressing. Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



CREAM CHEESE SALAD. 
Put cheese through a potato sieve, sprinkle on lettuce 
leaves, with small quantity of strawberry jam. Serve with 
French dressing. Mrs. V. C. Huyler. 



79 

ROQUEFORT CHEESE SALAD. 
Finely grated roquefort cheese put on lettuce leaves and 
serve with a French dressing makes a delicious salad. 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



FRUIT SALAD. 

Cut 2 oranges, i apple, i banana (if desired), 3 
slices of fresh pineapple into small pieces. Take the skin 
and seeds from y 2 pound of malaga grapes, cut 1 
dozen maraschino cherries into halves, quarter a dozen 
English walnuts. Mix all together and serve on crisp let- 
tuce leaves. Pour French dressing over it and add a few 
halves of walnuts and whole maraschino cherries. 

Hawaiian Sliced Pineapple is recommended. 

Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



WALDORF SALAD. 
Place some chicory on lettuce leaves, add tomatoes and 
hard boiled eggs cut in quarters, and celery and beets cut 
fine, and pour over it a French dressing. 

Mrs. N. R. Pendergast. 



BREAD 

"The very staff of life — The comfort of the husband- 
Thc pride of the wife." 



BREAD. 
Three-fourths compressed yeast cake, dissolved in cup 
of warm water, 3 cupfuls warm water ( 1 quart in all) to 
which add 

1 tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon salt, 

1 tablespoon lard, ( All even spoonfuls.) 

1 tablespoon sugar, 3 qts. sifted flour. 

(A good recipe for bread mixer). 

Mrs. L. E. Tuttle. 



MILK AND WATER BREAD. 
For 4 loaves : 
1 pt. scalded milk, 1 tablespoon lard, 

1 cake compressed yeast, 1 tablespoon butter 

2 teaspoons salt, 1 tablespoon sugar* 
1 pt. warm water, 3 qts sifted flour. 

Into the quart measure put the shortening, sugar, salt 
and milk. Fill it up with warm water ; when all is cooled 
to lukewarm pour it into the bread maker, reserving about 
]A cup of the liquid in measure in which to dissolve the 
yeast. Pour it also into bread maker and add lastly the 
flour. Mrs. J. E. Morrison. 



ENTIRE WHEAT BREAD. 

T pint milk, 1 tablespoon lard, 

t pint tepid water, 1 tablespoon butter, 

t cake compressed yeast, i teaspoon salt. 
1 tablespoon sugar. 

Dissolve the yeast cake in the pint of water, add the 
other ingredients, lastly 1 pound white flour and 2 pounds 
whole wheat flour. Mrs. John H. DiAIott. 
80 



-8i- 



ENTIRE WHEAT BREAD, 
i cake Fleischmann's yeast, 3 pints entire wheat flour, 
1 cup lukewarm water, 2 teaspoons sugar, 

1 cup lukewarm milk, I teaspoon salt. 

Put milk, salt and sugar into bowl ; add to it water in 
which the yeast has previously been dissolved. Then add 
the flour gradually, reserving a little for use in kneading. 
This dough should be kneaded thoroughly, but must be kept 
soft. After kneading set in a warm place to rise for from 
two to two and one-half hours. When light, turn out on a 
floured kneading board, divide into two equal parts and 
knead again thoroughly. Place in well-greased pans and set 
to rise for from three-quarters of an hour to an hour. When 
well risen bake for one hour in a slower oven than is re- 
quired for white bread. After bread is baked, remove from 
pans and cool by contact with the air on all sides. One 
tablespoonful of butter may be added with the sugar, if de- 
sired. If set over night, use */£ cake of yeast. In Summer. 
use the liquid cold; in Winter, tepid. The entire process 
takes four hours. 

Note. — Entire wheat bread may be made by following 
any good bread recipe and substituting whole wheat flour 
for the ordinary wheat flour. 



WHITE BREAD— Sponge Method. 
(For use in the morning). 
1 cake Fleischmann's yeast, 1 tablespoon salt, 
i]/> qts. lukewarm water, 4^ qts. sifted flour. 

Dissolve. the yeast in 1 quart of the lukewarm water and 
add to it 2 quarts of the sifted flour, or sufficient to make an 
ordinary sponge ; set aside to rise for about two hours or 
two hours and a half. When well risen, add to it the pint 
of lukewarm water in which the salt has been dissolved ; 
then add the remainder of the flour to make a moderately 
stiff dough. Knead thoroughly and set aside to rise for 
from one and one-half to two hours. When light, turn out 
on a well floured kneading board and knead thoroughly ; di- 
vide into four equal parts and place in well greased baking 



-82- 



pans. Let rise again for about one hour. When light, bake 
for one hour in a moderate oven. After bread is baked, re- 
move the loaves from the pans and lean them against the 
empty pans, so as to cool the loaves by contact with the air 
on all sides. This recipe makes four large loaves. The 
whole process takes from six to six and one-half hours, and, 
if followed closely, will produce very good results. 



BREAD SPONGE. 
3 cups sifted flour, i tablespoon salt, 

i tablespoon lard, rubbed i cup milk, 

through the hands, i cup water, boiled and al- 

i tablespoon sugar, lowed to cool until blood 

warm. 
One yeast cake moistened with warm milk and water 
and added to rest of liquid. Beat all together and let stand 
three or four hours. Let rise over night ; make into loaves 
in the morning, let rise again and when light bake fifty min- 
utes to one hour. Make 2 loaves. A. R. F.' 



GRAHAM BREAD. 
2J/2 cups graham flour, Lard or butter size of an 

2,y 2 cups white flour, egg, 

2-3 cup sugar, y 2 yeast cake. 

1 teaspoon salt, 

This quantity will make 2 loaves. Quantity of liquid 
used V 2 as much as of flour. Mrs. Swain. 



OATMEAL BREAD. 
One cup rolled oats, scald with 2 cupfuls boiling water, 
add 1 teaspoon salt when cool, y 2 cup molasses or less, a 
little sugar, y 2 yeast cake dissolved in 1 cup cold or luke- 
warm water ; add this to the scalded oatmeal, into the whole 
stir 5 cups wheat flour, stand aside to rise, when light, 
mould, put in pan to rise again, when light bake one hour. 

Mrs. Simeon Westrrvf.lt. 



8 3 

RUSK. 
2 cups milk, i cup sugar, 

y> cake yeast, i egg., 

Lump of butter size of Little salt, 
walnut. 

Mrs. H. C. Tunis. 



PARKER HOUSE ROLLS, 
i tablespoon lard, Small spoon salt, 

2 qts. flour, 2 tablespoons sugar. 

i teaspoon butter, 

Mix together well. After mixing heap flour around the 
sides of dish, leaving a space in center in which to pour i 
pint of scalded milk, cold, i cake of compressed yeast which 
has been dissolved in a little warm water. Do not mix liquid 
with flour. Let stand in a warm place until foamy in center, 
about three hours. Then mix and knead. Let rise and 
knead again, and roll out on bread board about half an inch 
thick. Cut with a biscuit cutter. Butter one-half the roll 
and fold over. When light, put in a hot oven and bake. 

Mrs. L. E. Tuttle. 



PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 
Scald i pint of new milk and let it partially cool, add 
j/ 2 cup melted butter, i yeast cake dissolved in l / 2 cup warm 
water, 3 tablespoons sugar, salt, flour to make it thick 
enough for bread. Mix about nine o'clock a. m. ; let it rise 
and mould, and rise again. Mould and cut with biscuit cut- 
ter. Lay them on moulding board, let them rise, then turn 
over one side upon the other, putting a little piece of butter 
in where it is folded. When light put into hot oven and 
bake. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



ENGLISH HOT CROSS BUNS. 
At night make a sponge of 3 cupfuls of milk, 1 yeast 
cake dissolved in 1 cupful lukewarm water, and flour 
enough to make in a thick batter. Cover, put in a warm 



84 

place and let rise over night. Acid l / 2 cup melted butter, i 
cup sugar, ]/ 2 nutmeg grated, i l / 2 teaspoons of salt, flour 
enough to knead. Cover and let rise. Turn on a board and 
roll half an inch thick. Cut in rounds, put in buttered pans 
and let rise light. Cut a deep cross on each with a sharp 
knife, and bake. Draw from the oven and brush over 
with the white of an egg beaten with powdered sugar. Leave 
out nutmeg and icing, and use only \ x / 2 tablespoons of sugar. 
Will make good rolls. 

Mrs. Virginia L. Clarke. 



RAISED MUFFINS. 
Three cups of flour sifted, a little salt, ]/ 2 a cake of com- 
pressed yeast dissolved in a y 2 cup of warm milk, 2 eggs 
beaten very light, 1 teaspoonful of melted butter, and mix to 
a batter with milk. The batter must just drop from the 
spoon. Let the batter rise over night. These muffins can 
be baked in the oven, or in rings on the griddle. 

Mrs. T. T- Haring. 



BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 
1 qt. flour, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 

1 tablespoon butter, I tablespoon lard. 

Little salt. 

Add cold water to make dough as soft as can be handled 
to roll. Milk may be used. 

Mrs. Chas. White. 



BISCUIT. 
Sift 3 coffee cupfuls of flour and take out ]/\ cup to 
flour the board. Add 3 rounding teaspoons of baking pow- 
der. Sift into this y 2 teaspoon salt, stir well, melt 1-3 cup 
of butter and add the butter and 1 1-3 coffee cupfuls of milk 
at same time, one in each hand. Stir together with a spoon. 
Flour the board, turn dough onto it and mix into shape with 
a spoon and a knife, and then gather to the center with the 
hands. Roll lightly and cut out. Grease pan with butter 
and bake biscuit as soon as put into pan. 

Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



85 

TEA BISCUIT. 
2 pints flour, 3 heaping teaspoons Rum- 

1 tablespoon butter, ford's Baking Powder, 

1 teaspoon salt. 
Make a soft dough of sweet milk, knead as little as pos- 
sible, cut out with the usual biscuit cutter and bake in quick 
oven. Mrs. E. H. Brown. 



EGG ROLLS. 

2 cups flour, l / 2 cup milk, 

3 teaspoons baking powder, 3 tablespoons butter, 
y 2 teaspoon salt. 1 egg. 

Mix dry ingredients and sift twice. Cut the butter into 
the flour. Beat egg and add to the milk; add this gradually 
to flour, mixing with a knife to a soft dough. Toss on a 
floured board, pat and roll lightly to one-half inch thickness. 
Cut into oblong pieces, and with a floured knife crease 
through the center of each roll. Roll lengthwise. Brush 
over the top with white of egg and sprinkle with granulated 
sugar. Bake from twelve to fifteen minutes. 

Miss Gertrude Stites. 



HUCKLEBERRY BISCUIT. 

1 qt. berries, ' 1 qt. flour, 

1 cup sugar, Butter size of egg. 

Milk to make like soft biscuit, 3 large teaspoons Rum- 
ford's Baking Powder. 

Mrs. H. S. Holley. 



NUT BREAD. 

2 cups whole wheat flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
1 teaspoon salt, 1 cup chopped walnuts, 

1 cup milk, t cup water, 

Bake forty-five minutes ; add nuts last thing. 

Mrs. W. H. Childs. 



-86- 



NUT BREAD. 
2 cups sour milk, i cup chopped nuts, 

i scant cup granulated i teaspoon soda in milk, 

sugar, i teaspoon salt, 

2 cups graham flour, i teaspoon baking powder. 

Bake in bread pan, slowly. Mrs. H. E. B. 



BROWN BREAD. 
One and one-half cups of rye flour, i cup of Indian meal, 
y 2 cup of wheat flour, 2 eggs, i cup of molasses, y 2 tea- 
spoonful salt, 2 teaspoonfuls soda. Mix soft with sour milk. 
Steam three and one-half to four hours. 

Mrs. H. F. Yorke. 



BOSTON BROWN BREAD, 

i cup corn meal, Milk enough to make soft bat- 
i cup wheat flour, ter, 

2 tablespoons melted but- i cup raisins, 

ter, i good pinch salt. 

i teaspoon soda dissolved i cup rye flour, 

in milk, i cup molasses, 

i egg- 
Boil three hours in pudding boiler. 

Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



BOSTON BROWN BREAD. 
i 1 /* cups granular corn meal, i cup N. O. molasses, 
2 cups rye flour, 2 cups sour milk, 

I teaspoon salt, 2 tablespoons melted butter. 

i teaspoon soda, 

Mix dry materials. Put together molasses and l A of 
milk ; combine two mixtures, add balance of milk and melted 
butter. Put into greased tins, steam or surround with water 
kept constantly boiling for five hours. Take from can and 
dry off in oven five minutes. If rye meal and white whole 
meal, both unsifted, are available, the bread is more like 
the original New England Brown Bread. 

Miss Gertrude Stites. 



8 7 

BROWN BREAD. 

i cup corn meal, well i cup graham flour, 
scalded, i cup molasses, 

i teaspoon soda, dissolved i cup sour milk, 
in little water, i cup wheat flour. 

A pinch of salt, 

Stir well and bake immediately two hours, or steam three 

hours. Mrs. L. M. Sisson. 



BROWN BREAD. 
iy> cups corn meal, i cup flour, 

y 2 cup molasses, I teaspoon soda in cup of sour 

I egg, milk. 

Steam three hours. Mrs. C. W. Coyte. 



GRAHAM BREAD. 
Two and one-half cups sour milk, add a little cream, 2 
teaspoons baking soda in the milk, i teaspoon salt, % cup 
sugar, light brown best, or half molasses and sugar, 3 
cups graham flour, 1 cup wheat flour. Let rise one hour in 
a warm place. Bake slowly one hour. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



GRAHAM BREAD. 

1 pint sour milk, 1 teaspoon salt, 

1 teaspoon soda mixed in Y\ cup molasses, 
little molasses, 
One pound graham flour, or enough to make as stiff as 
can be stirred with spoon. Bake in moderate oven two or 
three hours. Miss Mary E. Carroll. 



POPOVERS. 
1 cup flour, 1 egg, 

I cup milk. Pinch salt. 

Put flour, egg and salt together, in bowl, rub smooth 
with little milk, add all the milk and beat well, put in hot 
greased tin and bake thirty-five or forty minutes. Have 
oven hot when put in, then turn gas very low. Makes 8 
lar^e or ten small ones. Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



GRAHAM GEMS. 

2 cups graham flour, i cup wheat flour, 

3 tablespoons Rumford's J tablespoon lard and butter, 
Baking Powder, A little salt. 

y 2 cup sugar, 

Rub the shortening in dry and mix with sweet milk. 

Mrs. L. E. Tuttle. 



CORN BREAD, 
i pint flour, i pint corn meal, yellow or 

2 eggs, white, 

y 2 teaspoon salt, y 2 cup sugar, 

2 teaspoons baking powder, 2 tablespoons melted lard. 

sifted into the flour, 
Guess at the milk, about as cake batter. 

Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



JOHNNY CAKE, 
i pt sour milk, 2 eggs, 

i l / 2 cups flour, i l / 2 cups corn meal, 

y 2 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon butter. 

1 teaspoon soda, 

Mrs. H. S. Holley. 



CORN BREAD. 
1 cup corn meal, y 2 teaspoon salt, 

1 cup flour, 1 cup milk, 
y A cup sugar, 1 egg, 

2 teaspoons baking powder, 1 tablespoon melted butter. 

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add milk and egg well 
beaten ; then melted butter ; bake in shallow buttered pan 
twenty minutes in hot oven. 

Mrs. Wilbur W. Ballagh. 



CORN BREAD. 
One egg, rounding tablespoonful of butter, 2 tablespon- 
fuls sugar, 1 cup of sweet milk, 1 cup of sifted yellow corn 
meal, 1 cup of sifted flour and 2 teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. Mrs. Alice Littlefteld. 



89 

MUFFINS. 
Make the same as the corn bread, using 2 cups of flour 
in place of the corn meal. 

Mrs. Alice Littlefield. 



GRAHAM MUFFINS. 
1 cup graham or entire 1 cup white flour, 

wheat flour, 1 teaspoon salt, 

l / A cup sugar, 1 egg, 

1 cup milk, 4 teaspoons baking powder. 

1 tablespoon melted butter, 

Mix and sift dry ingredients; add gradually milk, egg 
well beaten, and melted butter, put in buttered gem pans 
and bake in hot oven twenty-five minutes. 

Mrs. Wilbur W. Ballagh. 



MUFFINS. 
1 tablespoon butter, 1 tablespoon sugar. 

Two cups flour with 2 teaspoons baking powder added, 
salt, 1 egg and iy 2 cups sweet milk. Bake in gem pans. 

Mrs. Swain. 



FLOUR PUFFS. 
2 scant cups of flour, ' 1 quart milk, 

8 eggs, Little salt. 

Bake about half an hour. 

Mrs. Marion* Kirkby. 



SALLY LUNN. 
1 quart flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, 

1 teaspoon salt, 1 pint milk, 

3 teaspoons baking powder, 2 tablespoons softened butter. 
3 well-beaten eggs, 

Beat well, makes sixteen muffins. 

Mrs. Tohn Ff. DeMott. 



9° 

SHREDDED WHEAT BISCUIT FOR BREAKFAST. 
Warm the biscuit in the oven to restore crispness — 
don't burn — pour hot milk over it, clipping the milk over it 
until the shreds are swollen ; then pour a little cream over 
the top of the biscuit. Or, serve with cold milk or cream, 
according to individual taste. 



SPANISH BUNS. 
y 2 cup butter, i cup sugar, 

]/ 2 cup milk, 2 eggs, well beaten, 

i large cup flour, i teaspoon baking powder. 

i tablespoon cinnamon, 

Bake in shallow pan and ice. 

Mrs. W. H. Childs. 



SCOTCH CURRANT BUN. 

CRUST. 

Three-quarters of a pound of flour, y 2 a pound of but- 
ter, teaspoon of baking powder. Rub butter and flour 
together and add baking powder. Make into a paste with 
water and line a greased cake tin with it reserving a piece 
for the top. 

MIXTURE. 

One pound flour, y 2 pound of sugar, 2 pounds large blue 
raisins (stoned), 2 pounds currants. T 4 pound of orange 
peel, T 4 pound of almonds, y 2 ounce of ginger, y 2 ounce 
cinnamon, )A ounce Jamaica pepper, y 2 teaspoon black 
pepper, 1 small teaspoon of baking powder, 1 teaspoon 
of cream of tartar and enough milk to moisten. Mix all 
together and put into lined tin making quite flat on top. Wet 
edges and put on lid of paste. Prick all over with a fork 
and brush with egg. Bake about three hours. 

Mtss J. MacKeller. 



POTATO SCONES. 
1 lb. potatoes, Flour. 

Salt, 

Have about 1 pound of potatoes well boiled with a little 
salt, pared and mashed very smoothly. When this is done 



9i 

take i tablespoonful out on a baking board, and work it 
into a small handful of flour until it feels firm and sticks 
well together. Roll this out to a round thin scone, which 
cut in quarters and put on a hot girdle, prick the scones all 
over with a fork, and let them bake for a few minutes, turn 
them over and bake for one or two minutes on the other 
side, then pile them on a plate They are good either hot or 
cold. Mrs. Adams. 



BUTTER CAKES. 
3 cups flour sifted together, Y\ level teaspoons salt. 
4^ level teaspoons baking 
powder, 
Into this rub 2 tablespoons butter until the flour feels 
mealy, add i}4 cups sweet milk. Beat to a smooth dough. 
Turn out in a well floured board, and toss in a ball, using a 
knife instead of hands. The dough will be very moist. A 
little flour will probably have to be added when turning it 
with the knife. After rolling the dough about */\ inch 
thick, cut out with a biscuit cutter and bake on a hot 
griddle, well greased. Do not put the cakes close enough 
to touch and do not have the fire too hot. As soon as the 
cakes puff to double their size, turn and bake on other 
side. Split and butter ; serve hot. 

Mrs. V. L. Clarke. 



' WAFFLES. 
i cup sour milk, 2 eggs (beaten separately), 

Yz teaspoon soda, %. teaspoon salt, 

3 tablespoons melted butter, i% cups flour. 

Dissolve soda in milk, add stiffly beaten whites of eggs 
last. Mrs. Thomas K. Baker. 



WAFFLES, 
i pint flour, i tablespoon melted butter 

i teaspoon salt, i pint milk, 

2 teaspoons baking powder, 3 eggs, 

Beat whites of eggs, separate and add last. 

Mrs. A. B. Powers. 



9 2 

WAFFLES. 
One cup of cold boiled hominy boiled soft. Add i well 
beaten egg, salt to taste, i l / 2 cups of sifted flour, an even 
teaspoonful of baking powder, a small lump of melted but- 
ter, and milk enough to make a moderately thin batter. 
Bake in a well greased waffle iron. 

Mrs. J. J. Haring. 



WHEAT PAN CAKES. 
2 eggs, Salt, 

Yeast cake, 2 qts. milk (i l / 2 qts. at night). 

Save the remainder till morning. Flour enough to make 
thin batter. Raise over night. Place in a large bowl 2 well 
beaten eggs, saltspoon of salt, yeast that has been dissolved 
in a little milk, a cup of flour at a time until you have used 
up i T /2 quarts. Cover, let raise over night. In the morn- 
ing thin out with the remainder of milk. Fry on a hot 
griddle. Serve with Karo Corn Syrup. 

Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 
1 pint sour milk, 1 quart cold water, 

1 tablespoon salt, 1 yeast cake. 

Flour enough to make stiff batter. Set aside to get light, 
add a ]/> teaspoon baking soda. 

Mrs. L. E. Tuttle. 



FRENCH TOAST. 
2 eggs, well beaten, Little salt. 

I pint milk, 

Dip slices of bread in this mixture, and fry on both sides 
until nicely browned ; serve with maple syrup, or Karo Corn 
Syrup. Mrs. L. E. Tuttle. 



DUTCH CAKE. 
When baking bread take a piece of dough, size of a 
large apple, 1 egg, 2 tablespoon fuls brown sugar, 2 table- 
spoonfuls milk, butter size hickory nut, mix all into the 
dough with a little flour to make it soft, set to rise; then 



93 

roll out in the pan that it is to be baked in; when light 
enough moisten top with milk, sprinkle sugar, cinnamon 
and small lumps of butter on the top and bake. 

Mrs. N. R. Pendergast. 



SPETZLE. 
Beat 2 eggs until light, add 1-3 cup of water, and stir in 
flour until a medium thick paste is formed, using a fork for 
the stirring. Have ready a pot l /z filled with boiling water 
into which a teaspoonful of salt has been added. Pour the 
mixture upon a plate which has been dipped into cold water, 
then with a knife cut the paste quickly into thin pieces as it 
drops into the salted water. Boil ten minutes, strain and 
pour melted butter over them. 

Mrs. S. A. Tiedemaxn. 



PUDDINGS AND SAUCES 

"A bay pudding the Queen did make and stuffed it full 
of plums, and in it put two lumps of fat as big as my two 
thumbs." 



PLUM PUDDING. No. i. 



i^4 CU P S chopped suet, 
i cup N. O. molasses, 
2 teaspoons cinnamon, 
2 teaspoons cloves (evened 

off), 
2 cups flour to which has 
been added scant tea- 
spoon salt and i even 
teaspoon soda, 
2 eggs, 
y 2 cup milk, 



y 2 cup brandy or sherry. 

i cup currants, 

i cup (Sultana) raisins 

(seedless), 
2 cups (Muscatel) raisins 

(seedless), 
y 2 cup shredded citron, 
y 2 cup chopped almonds, 
]/ 2 cup broken walnuts, 
l cup (Malaga) raisins 

(seedless), 



Have water boiling when you put it in and let boil four 
hours. Never let the water stop boiling even one minute. 
Grease and fill Y\ full, 2 small moulds or one very large 
mould. A. R. F. 



PLUM PUDDING. No. 2. 



2 cups chopped suet, 

1 cup raisins, 

2 cups currants, 
1% CU P S molasses, 

2 cups sour milk with two 
teaspoonfuls soda add- 
ed ; water can be used 
in place of the sour 
milk, 
Steam three hours. 



2 level teaspoons salt, 
1 teaspoonful cinnamon, 
y 2 teaspoonful cloves, 
Nutmeg, mace — good with- 
out the latter, 
4 level cups flour, 
Hard or boiled sauce, 



Mrs. Swain. 



-94- 



95 

PLUM PUDDING. No. 3. 
1 lb. bread crumbs, 1 teaspoon baking powder 

1 lb. sugar, 1 lb. suet (ground fine), 

2 lbs. raisins, 2 lbs. currants, 
8 eggs, 1 lb. citron, 

1 pint milk with a pinch of [ \ _> cups Hour, 
salt, 
Boil three hours, or longer. Mrs. H. C. Tunis. 



PLUM PUDDING. No. 4. 

1 cup suet, chopped fine, Enough milk to make a stiff 

2 teaspoons baking powder. batter, 
]/ 2 cup raisins, 1 egg, 

Not quite a half cup sugar, 2j/> cups flour, 

1 teaspoon cinnamon. 1 pinch salt, 
Little cloves, l / 2 cup currants, 
The grated rind of a lemon )'\ teaspoon allspice. 

and orange peel, 2 tablespoons molasses. 

Steam three and one-half hours. 

SAUCE FOR ABOVE. 

2 tablespoons sugar, 1 dessert spoon corn starch. 
1 tablespoon butter, 

Moisten this with a little cold water; pour it into i l ' 2 
cupfuls of boiling water; boil five minutes; flavor with va- 
nilla. A very little salt can be added. 



HARD SAUCE FOR PUDDING. 

l / 2 cup powdered sugar, 2 tablespoons butter, 

1 teaspoon water, Flavor with vanilla. 

Mix until white. Mrs. John H. DeMott. 



AMERICAN PLUM PUDDING. No. 5. 
One pint of bread crumbs; pour over them l / 2 pint boil- 
ing milk and let it cool, then add 1 pound stoned raisins and 
]/ 2 pound currants, 1 tablespoon of butter, 1 tablespoon of 
flour, 1 tablespoon sugar, teaspoon cloves, nutmeg, and cin- 
namon each. Five eggs beaten light, flour the fruit and boil 
three hours. Eat with braivly sauce. 

Mrs. Samuel YVestervelt. 



96 

SUET PUDDING, 
i cup of suet, 1 cup raisins, 

2^4 cups flour, i cup molasses, 

i cup milk, i teaspoon soda, 

i teaspoon cinnamon, i teaspoon nutmeg. 

Y? teaspoon salt, 

Mix flour and suet well together, add spices and raisins. 
Dissolve soda in milk, add molasses, and mix all together. 
Boil three hours. Mrs. Thomas K. Baker. 



STEAMED GRAHAM PUDDING. 
I cup sweet milk, i cup molasses. 

i cup raisins, 2 cups graham flour. 

i small teaspoon cinnamon, i heaping teaspoon soda, 
Chopped almonds, or Eng- 
lish walnuts, 
Steam three hours. 

SAUCE. 

Cream 2 or 3 tablespoons of butter, then put in a cup of 
powdered sugar. Into this put an unbeaten yolk of an egg, 
and then the flavoring. Put this in a pan of hot water and 
set on stove. Mrs. V. E. Carroll. 



GRAHAM PUDDING. 
2 cups graham flour, y 2 teaspoon cinnamon, 

1 cup bread crumbs, y 2 teaspoon allspice, 

Yz cup molasses, %. teaspoon cloves and nut- 

]A cup milk, nieg, 

Yz teaspoon soda, 2 eggs ; raisins and currants. 

Steam three hours ; serve with sauce. Mrs. Swain. 



GRAHAM PUDDING. 

2 cups graham flour, l / 2 teaspoon cloves, 

]A teaspoon cinnamon. Nutmeg and salt, 

1 cup milk, 1 teaspoon baking soda dis- 

1 cup molasses, solved in milk 

1 egg, t good cup raisins. 

Steam for three hours. Serve with cream, or custard 
sauce. Mrs. Charles R. Brown. 



97 

STEAMED CABINET PUDDING. 
Butter a quart mould; sprinkle mould with currants 
raisins or citron, cut small. Break in small pieces 2 pints 
stale bread or cake. Beat 3 eggs, add 3 tablespoons sugar, 
1 pint of milk, and 1 teaspoon salt. Pour this over the 
cake or bread. Let it stand one hour. The bread or cake 
pieces to be put in the mould after the fruit is sprinkled in. 
Steam one hour and a quarter. Serve with a creamy sauce. 

Mrs. V. E. Carroll. 



FIG PUDDING. No. 1. 
Mix Y\ of a pound of grated bread with a J^ pound of 
the best figs, 6 ounces of suet, 6 ounces of sugar, 1 teaspoon 
of milk, a little nutmeg and 1 egg. Boil for four hours. 

Miss Dwyer. 



FIG PUDDING. No. 2. 
Chop Yz pound figs, 1 teacup bread crumbs, mixed with 
1 cup sugar and 2 tablespoons melted butter, 2 eggs. Turn 
into a greased mould and steam two and one-half hours. 
Serve with sauce. Mrs. Clifford Demarest. 



CARROT PUDDING. 

2 large carrots grated, 3 large potatoes grated, 

l / 2 lb. suet, 1 pint molasses, 

1 lb. stoned raisins, 2 cups flour. 
1 teaspoon soda, 

Mix well together and steam three hours. Serve with 
hard and soft sauce. 

SOFT SAUCE FOR CA.RROT PUDDING. 

1 small cup sugar, 1 tablespoon flour, 

1 piece butter the size of a 1 egg, 

walnut, 2 tablespoons cold water. 

Beat together and pour into */> pint of boiling water. 

Mrs. Zabriskie. 



NEW YORK STEAMED PUDDING. 
One teaspoon butter softened. Beat the yolks of 3 eggs 
light ; add gradually Y\ cup of sugar and beat light. Add 



—98— 

3 tablespoons of sweet milk, i cup flour in which 2 tea- 
spoons of baking powder have been mixed, and the beaten 
whites of eggs. Mix well. To make a chocolate pudding a 
square of chocolate or some cocoa can be added. Fill cups 
half full; steam twenty minutes. If the pudding is made 
plain, cocoa or chocolate can be added to the sauce. Recipe 
of sauce same as for plum pudding. 

Mrs. John H. DeMott. 



INDIAN PUDDING. 
1 quart milk, 2 heaping tablespoons of In- 

3 e gg s > dian meal, 

Yi cup raisins, 4 heaping tablespoons sugar, 

1 teaspoon salt, 1 heaping tablespoon butter. 

Boil the milk in the double boiler, sprinkle the meal into 
it, stirring all the while. Cook twelve minutes, stirring 
often. Beat together the eggs, salt, sugar, and a }4 tea- 
spoon ginger. Stir the butter into the meal and milk, pour 
this gradually on the egg mixture, add raisins. Bake one 
hour. Serve with hard sauce. Mrs. John T. Bailey. 



BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. (Made Quickly.) 
1 quart milk (boiled), 3 tablespoons gran, ltmian 

1 heaping tablespoon butter, meal, 

Y? cup molasses, 1 teaspoon salt, 

1 quart cold milk, 2 eggs. 

Boil milk, pour it gradually on Indian meal, put it back 
in double boiler, and boil one hour, stirring often. Add 
butter, salt, molasses, eggs, and milk. Mix well, and pour 
into a well buttered dish, and bake one hour. Serve with 
cream or butter. Mrs. S. G. Clarke. 



SWEET POTATO PUDDING. 
Grate 1 large sweet potato ; into this break 3 eggs ; add 
3 cups brown sugar, ]/?. cup butter, 1 cup sweet milk, 1 
tablespoon powdered ginger. Beat all together and bake 
one hour in hot oven. Stir occasionally to mix the brown 
through. If the batter is too stiff, it may be thinned with 
milk. Mrs. C. W. Potter. 



99 

BREAD PUDDING. 
I quart milk, 2 cups bread crumbs, 

4 e SS s (whites and yolks 1 large lemon (juice and 

beaten separately), grated rind), 

1 cup sugar, Butter size of an egg. 

Heat the milk, and pour over the bread crumbs ; add the 
butter; cover and let it soften. When cool beat the sugar 
and yolks of eggs and add to the mixture, also the grated 
rind. Bake in a buttered dish, until firm and slightly 
brown, from a half to three-quarters of an hour. When 
done cover with a meringue made of the whites of the eggs, 
4 tablespoons of sugar, and the lemon juice. Brown in the 
oven. Mrs. H. M. Rogers. 



CRACKER PUDDING. 
6 crackers, 2 cups sugar, 

l /2 cup molasses, 1 cup raisins, 

Yi cup brandy, Y? cup butter, 

1 cup currants, Salt and spices to taste. 

5 eggs, 

Mrs. S. G. Clarke. 



COTTAGE PUDDING. 

1 cup milk, 2 tablespoons melted butter, 

1 egg, 1 teaspoon baking powder 

y 2 cup sugar, sifted with 1 pt. flour. 

Serve with liquid sauce, or both hard and soft sauce. 

Mrs. Amelia B. Powers. 

THE QUEEN OF PUDDINGS. 
1 pint bread crumbs, 1 quart milk, 

1 cup flour, 4 eggs. 

Juice and rind of one lemon, 

Save out the whites of 2 eggs and some juice of lemon. 
Bake the above and when done cover the top with a little 
jelly. Then frost the top with whites of 2 eggs, beaten 
stiff, to which add 1 cup of sugar and lemon juice. Put 
in the oven just to brown a little. 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



■IOO- 



AMBER PUDDING. 
Yz pint cold boiled rice, y 2 pint milk mixed with the 

i tablespoon sugar, beaten yolks of 2 eggs. 

Butter pudding dish, put in a layer of rice mixture, 
then a layer of drained cooked apricots, another layer of 
rice and one of apricots. Bake fifteen minutes in hot oven, 
then cover with meringue made of the whites of the eggs 
and add sugar. Return to the oven until a delicate brown. 
Serve with a sauce made with juice drained from the apri- 
cots, butter and a little flour. Mrs. Swain. 



RICE PUDDING. 
Boil 3 tablespoons rice twenty minutes, then drain and 
put in baking dish, cover with 1 quart of milk. Add a little 
salt, 1 teaspoon vanilla, Yi cup sugar, 1-3 cup of seedless 
raisins. Stir well, then put in oven and bake about half an 
hour, or until brown on top. 

Mrs. Watson G. Clark. 



APPLE JOHN. 
One large cup of flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 1 
large tablespoon butter mixed well with flour and enough 
milk to make a soft dough. Pare and quarter five apples. 
Put in deep pie dish, grate a little nutmeg over it, also a 
little sugar. Cover with crust and bake. Serve with maple 
syrup or Karo Corn Syrup. Mrs. E. K. Meigs. 



BAKED APPLE PUDDING. 
Slice five apples and put them in bottom of pudding 
dish. Cover with a Y* cup of sugar. Make a batter of 
2 tablespoons butter, 2 cups flour, 

creamed with ^2 cup r teaspoon vanilla, 
sugar, 1 cup milk, 

2 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Pour this batter over the apples and bake. (Do not 
mix apples and batter together). Serve with hard, or soft 
sauce. Mrs. V. E. Carroll. 



-IOI- 



APPLE AND NUT PUDDING. 
3 apples, peel and chop fine J / 2 cup nuts (any kind), 

(greenings preferred), 3 tablespoons currants, 

1 cup bread crumbs, Y? cup sugar. 

Juice of 1 lemon, half of rind. Mix well, and stir in 3 
eggs. Place in a well greased steamer, covered closely. 
Boil two hours. Mrs. DeWitt Colemax. 

BROWN BETTY PUDDING. 
Put in baking dish a layer of chopped apples, over which 
is sprinkled sugar, nutmeg, bits of butter, and a few raisins. 
Cover this with bread crumbs, or dried bread chopped very 
fine. Repeat until dish is filled, and add about a J4 cup of 
water. Cook in slow oven for two or three hours. Serve 
with a hard sauce. Mrs. V. E. Carroll. 



FRUIT TAPIOCA PUDDING. 
Fill a baking dish two-thirds full of apples, sliced very 
thin. Cover with small cup sugar. Over this pour 2 small 
tablespoons of tapioca which has been cooked until clear, 
on the top of the stove, in a pint of water, to which has 
been added a pinch of salt. Cover the dish with a plate 
and cook in the oven for two or three hours. Serve cream 
with this pudding : Sliced peaches and strawberries are 
delicious cooked in this way. In Winter, when fresh fruit 
is hard to get, dried fruit makes a very good substitute, if 
first let stand in water until swollen. 

Mrs. V. E. Carroll. 



TAPIOCA PUDDING. 
Four tablespoons tapioca soaked over night. Next morn- 
ing put it in a steamer with 1 quart milk. Let it get hot, 
then beat the yolks of 4 eggs. About 1 tablespoon of sugar 
to each egg. Flavor with vanilla. Pour the hot milk gradu- 
ally over the eggs and sugar, return to steamer, and cook 
until of the consistency of custard. Put in a dish and pour 
the beaten whites over, then put in oven to brown. 

Mrs. Clifford Demarest. 



-I02- 



DESSERT OF PEACHES. 
Fill halves of fine, large canned peaches with Maras- 
chino cherries. Mix the fruit juice and the liquid from the 
cherries, boil down, and pour over the fruit. Have ice cold. 
Eat with a light plain cake. A. N. A. 



CHERRY PUDDING. 
i heaping cup flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

% tablespoon butter, ]/z cup sweet milk, 

1 cup canned cherries, Pinch salt. 

Steam one hour. Sauce : One-half cup cherry juice, 1 
cup boiling water, 1 teaspoon corn starch, l / 2 cup sugar, 
butter size of a walnut. F. L. C. 



ALMOND HOT BALLS. 
To the beaten whites of 3 eggs add % cup seeded rai- 
sins, cut in halves or chopped a little. First soak the rai- 
sins in 2 tablespoons of sherry. Allow the mixture to stand 
for an hour, beat whites of 6 eggs to a stiff meringue with 
6 tablespoons of powdered sugar, then add the raisins and 
egg mixture. Turn into buttered baking dish and bake in 
rather quick oven. Remove from the dish when serving in 
round spoonfuls and serve with cream. A delicious dessert. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 

SHREDDED WHEAT BISCUIT WITH STRAW- 
BERRIES. 
Prepare berries as for ordinary serving. Warm biscuit 
in oven before using. Cut or crush oblong cavity in top of 
biscuit to form basket. Fill the cavity with berries and 
serve with cream or milk. Sweeten to taste. Peaches, 
blackberries, raspberries, blueberries, pineapple, bananas, 
and other fruit, fresh or preserved, can be served with 
Shredded Wheat Biscuit in the same way. 



AMBER JELLY. 
One quart water and 1 cup pearl tapioca soaked over 
night. Put in a double boiler only until clear and free from 



103 

Jumps. Take from fire and beat into it, with an egg beater, 
2 cups maple sugar (not syrup), a pinch of salt, and bake 
until a delicate brown. Serve cold with whipped cream. 

Mrs. Emma G. Clark. 



CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 
6 eggs, 4 ounces butter, 

3 ounces chocolate, 5 ounces sugar. 

Rub sugar and yolks of eggs together, add chocolate and 
hot butter. When cool beat into mixture whites of eggs 
beaten stiff. Bake in little cups, which are set in pan of 
water. Serve with cream or hard sauce. 

Mrs. Prosser. 



CHOCOLATE BREAD PUDDING, 
i square chocolate melted, Yolks of 2 eggs beaten, 
i cup sugar," 

Mix i cup fine dried bread crumbs with 2 cups hot 
milk and add to first mixture ; flavor with vanilla. Bake in 
buttered dish one hour. Put pan in hot water while baking. 
Serve whipped cream with pudding. 

Mrs. W. H. Childs. 



CARAMEL PUDDING. 
Melt i cup of granulated sugar and i tablespoon of 
water in a sauce pan. Stir only long enough to melt, then 
cook until it becomes a light brown color. Add I cup of 
boiling water and let stand on back of range until the cara- 
mel is dissolved. Reserve half this quantity to pour around 
the pudding. Stir the remainder with a J / 2 teaspoon of va- 
nilla, and good pinch of salt, into a pint of hot milk. Pour 
this over 2 whole eggs, and 4 yolks slightly beaten. Pour 
into a shallow mould or pan, and set in pan of hot water 
and cook until firm in the center. This should take not less 
than forty minutes in a moderate oven. Serve very cold 
and place spikes of almonds on top, with sauce around the 
pudding. Mrs. S. J. Baxter. 



104 

MACAROON PUDDING. 
Scald 12 macaroons in i% cups of milk; add a little 
salt, pour gradually upon the well beaten yolks of 3 eggs 
and cook over hot water until it thickens. When cool fold 
in the beaten whites of the 3 eggs, add 1 teaspoon vanilla. 
Put in the buttered tin and bake twenty minutes in hot 
oven; stand tin in pan of hot water while baking. Let get 
very cold, cover top with chopped almonds and candied 
fruits and surround with whipped cream. M. R. J. 



FRITTER BATTER. 
1 cup flour, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 

Yz cup milk, 1 teaspoon melted butter, 

Yz teaspoon salt, 1 egg. 

Beat egg light, add milk, butter, and salt; then pour 
slowly on the flour. Suitable for apples, bananas, etc. Fry 
in deep lard and sprinkle with powdered sugar. Serve with 
soft sauce. Mrs. V. E. Carroll. 



LEMON PUDDING. 
Mix together 3 ounces of bread crumbs, 1 ounce of 
flour, 4 ounces of suet, the grated rind of 2 lemons and the 
juice of 1 lemon. Add 3 ounces of sugar, 1 egg and a little 
milk. Steam for two hours. Miss Dwyer. 



ORANGE PUDDING. 
Peel 4 or 5 oranges, sprinkle as you put in with y 2 cup 
sugar. Beat together 3 teaspoons corn starch, ]/i cup sugar, 
yolks of 3 eggs, little salt. Heat 1 pint milk, when at the 
boiling point pour the beaten mixture in and stir until it 
thickens. Flavor to taste with vanilla. When cold pour 
over the oranges. Beat whites of eggs with 3 tablespoons 
powdered sugar. Spread over top and brown in quick 
oven. Serve cold. Mrs. L. E. Tuttle. 



BAKED RHUBARB PUDDING. 
Cut rhubarb in V/> inch pieces, wash, place in a drip- 
ping pan. Let only the water that clings to the rhubarb re- 
main, cover well with sugar, place in a good oven ; when 



lO: 



tender set aside to cool. It never loses its shape, and is 
more pleasing to the eye than stewed rhubarb. This is a 
good way to can for the Winter. Will keep in jars. 

Mrs. DeWitt Colemax. 



PEACH CUP PUDDING. 
Pare and rub through a colander sufficient ripe peaches 
to make i pint of pulp, add yolks of 3 eggs and 1 whole 
well beaten egg, 1 dessertspoon flour, mixed with 4 table- 
spoons of granulated sugar. Mix thoroughly and put into 
buttered cups. Place these in pan, nearly full of hot water. 
Bake. Make a meringue with 3 tablespoons of powdered 
sugar, and whites of the eggs ; brown. 

Mrs. Watson G. Clark. 



A PEACH SNOWBALL. 
1-3 box gelatine, Pinch salt, 

Whites of 3 eggs, Juice and rind of 1 lemon. 

Cover gelatine with cold water, when soft add boiling 
water to make a full pint, strain it on a platter, when cool 
break into it the whites of the eggs and beat until it begins 
to stiffen. Add a little sugar, lemon juice and grated rind, 
salt and vanilla. Put a pint can of peaches reduced to pulp 
through a colander. Have the fruit very sweet and beat 
all together until stiff and foamy. Then mould with egg 
cups, set aside to harden. Serve with whipped cream. Put 
moulds on platter with whipped cream around them. 

Mrs. C. D. Spaldixg. 

BLACKBERRY SPONGE PUDDING. 
y 2 box gelatine, -;4 cup sugar, 

y 2 cup cold water, Juice of 1 lemon, 

2 cups boiling water, 1 cup blackberry juice. 

Whites of 4 eggs, 

Soak gelatine in cold water, add boiling water, sugar, 
juice of lemon, and blackberry juice. When sugar is dis- 
solved strain mixture through cheese cloth. When just 
beginning to set, beat till light and thick with an egg beater. 



106 

then add the beaten whites of eggs. Mould and serve with 
whipped cream, or with a custard made with i pint of milk 
and yolks of eggs. 

Miss Gertrude Stites. 



PRUNE WHIP, 
lb. stewed prunes. Re- Whites of four eggs beaten 
move the stones and until stiff, 

chop fine, i small cup of sugar. 

Beat all together. Serve with whipped cream. 

Mrs. T- R- Smith. 



PINEAPPLE SOUFFLE. 
One pint jar pineapple, 10 cents worth of marshmallows. 
Soak marshmallows and pineapple together over night. 
Whip y 2 pint cream, and mix with pineapple and serve. 

Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



ORANGE WHIP. 
Mix i pint cream whipped with 2 tablespoons sugar and 
2 tablespoons cocoanut, juice and grated rind of 1 large 
orange, and egg (whole). Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



FRUIT SOUFFLfi. 
}i cup fruit pulp, peach. Whites of 3 eggs, 
apricot, Sugar. 

Rub fruit through a strainer, if canned, drain the syrup. 
Heat and sweeten if needed; beat whites of eggs until stiff, 
add gradually hot fruit pulp, and continue beating ; turn 
into buttered individual moulds having them V4 full ; set 
moulds in pan of hot water and bake in a slow oven until 
firm, serve with sabyon sauce. 

SAP.YON SAUCE. 

Grate rind and juice of V2 r j cup white wine or 

lemon, % cup sherry, 

2 eggs. 1-3 cup sugar, 

Mix lemon, wine, sugar and yolks of eggs ; stir vigorously 
over fire until it thickens, using wire whisk; pour onto 
whites of eggs beaten stiff. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



ro7 

STRAWBERRY SHORT CAKE. 
Butter, flour, strawberries, sugar, whipped cream. Make 
a rich short crust with butter and flour allowing I ounce 
more of flour than butter, bake in flat tins of equal size, the 
pastry when baked should be about an inch thick ; open the 
short cake, butter it well, and cover one-half with a layer 
of strawberries previously mixed with sugar ; have alternate 
layers of berries and pastry, finishing with the former, over 
which place a layer of whipped cream. 

Mrs. E. H. Brow. v. 



RASPBERRY SHORT CAKE. 
For two layers of cake mix together 3 eggs, 1^ cups of 
sugar, 1 cup of butter, 1 cup of milk, 2 teaspoons of baking 
powder, and enough flour to thicken sufficiently. ' Bake in 
buttered cake tins. Use 3 boxes of raspberries. Take i l / 2 
boxes and leave on the range until all the juice of the fruit 
is extracted. Strain and sweeten the juice to taste. Leave 
on the range until the sugar is dissolved. Keep the fruit 
for use in the cake. Whip J / 2 pint of cream and spread 
between the layers; then spread half of the raspberries 
over the whipped cream. Use the rest of the berries on the 
top of the cake. Serve the syrup from a bowl, and cover 
each slice of the cake with some of the same. 

Miss Dwyer. 



APPLE SNOW. 
Whites of 3 eggs, Powdered sugar. 

24 cup apple pulp, 

Pare, quarter, and core 4 apples, steam until soft, and 
rub through a sieve ; there should be ^4 CU P apples. Beat on 
a platter whites of the eggs until stiff, add gradually apple 
sweetened to taste, and continue beating. Pile lightly on a 
glass dish, chill, and serve with boiled custard. 

C. A. S. 



TIPSY CAKE. 
Take twelve small square sponge cakes and soak them 
over night in a sufficient quantity of the best sherry to 



-io8- 



soften and thoroughly moisten the cakes. Then make a 
rich custard allowing the yolks of 4 eggs to pint of milk 
mixed with cream, and pour over the cakes while the cus- 
tard is still hot. Stick each cake full of blanched almonds 
and put aside to cool. When ready to serve whip up the 
whites of the eggs and spread over the tops of the cakes, 
then whip up a pint of cream, spread over the top, and deco- 
rate with Maraschino cherries. Miss Dwyer. 



CREAMY SAUCE. 
Yz cup butter, 4 tablespoons wine, or 1 tea- 

34 cup cream, or milk, spoon of vanilla, or 

1 cup powdered sugar, lemon extract. 

If lemon or vanilla is used, add 4 tablespoons of cream, 
or rich milk. Beat the butter to a cream. Add the sugar 
gradually, beating all the while. When light and creamy 
gradually add the wine, and then the cream, a little at a 
time. W'hen all is beaten smooth, place the bowl in a basin 
of hot water, and stir until it is smooth and creamy; no 
longer. It will take only a few minutes. This is a delicious 
sauce, and if well beaten, and not kept in the hot water long 
enough to melt the sugar, it will be white and foamy all 
through. Mrs. V. L. Clarke. 



HARD SAUCE. No. 1. 
14 cup butter, 1 teaspoon vanilla, or 1 

1 cup powdered sugar, tablespoon brandy, 

Whites of 2 eggs. 
Beat butter to cream, add sugar gradually, beat until 
very light. Add whites, one at a time. Beat all until light 
and frothy ; add gradually the flavoring. Beat again. 
Sprinkle with nutmeg. Put on ice to harden. 

Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



HARD SAUCE. No. 2. 
1 cup powdered sugar, y 2 cup butter. 

Cream well ; add 2 tablespoons hot water and whip with 
egg-beater. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



ice: cream and frozen 
dainties 

"Thou art all ice; Thy kindness freezes." — Richard III. 



ICE CREAM. No. i. 
Make a syrup by putting a quart of granulated sugar 
and 1^2 pints of water into a pan and boiling until it beads. 
Take from stove and let it cool. This amount of syrup 
will be about enough to use three times for the amount of 
ice cream given in the recipe, and will keep for some time 
in a cool place. Use I pint of milk and V/2 pints of cream. 
Let the milk come to a boil. Beat 2 eggs very lightly. Take 
some of the milk from the stove and pour it into the beaten 
eggs and then pour the mixture into the hot milk on the 
stove, and let it get scalding hot, but do not let it boil. Stir 
all the time. Add enough of the syrup to sweeten to taste, 
and strain through a fine strainer. After it cools, add the 
cream and 2 teaspoons of vanilla, and freeze. 

Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 

ICE CREAM. No. 2. 
4 eggs, 1 cup sugar. 

I quart of milk, 

Cook together in double boiler like a custard. When 
cool, add y 2 pint of cream, whipped, and whip all together 
before freezing. Flavor to taste. 

Miss Harriett YVestervelt. 



ICE CREAM. No. 3. 
Make a custard of a large pint of milk scalded in a 
double boiler. Mix 1 teacup of sugar with 1-3 cup of flour 
and 2 eggs and stir in the scalded milk. When cool put in 
the refrigerator. In the morning add about a quart of 
fresh fruit, sprinkled with 1^2 cups of sugar, or more if 
fruit is very sour. Then add enough sweet cream to fill a 
small freezer. Mrs. F. L. C. 
109 



-IIO- 



CHOCOLATE ICE CREAM. 
i l / 2 quarts of milk, Vanilla to taste, 

6 tablespoons grated choc- l /i pint of cream, 
olate, 2 cups sugar. 

Melt the chocolate and mix in warm milk. Beat the 
eggs and sugar together, and add the milk and chocolate and 
boil all together until it thickens. When cool add the vanilla 
and cream. Miss Irma Demarest. 



CARAMEL ICE CREAM, 
i quart cream, i tablespoon flour, 

2 cups milk, Y% teaspoon salt, 

1^2 cups sugar, i 1 /* tablespoon vanilla. 

i egg, 

Mix flour, sugar, and salt, add egg gradually, beaten 
slightly with milk. (Use half the sugar). Cook over hot 
water twenty minutes, stirring constantly at first; caramel- 
ize the remaining sugar and add to the hot custard, stirring 
until dissolved. Freeze and pack. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



PINEAPPLE CREAM. 
2 cups water, I can grated Hawaiian 

i cup sugar, pineapple, 

2 cups cream. 
Make syrup by boiling sugar and water fifteen minutes; 
strain, cool, add fruit and freeze to a soft mush ; fold in the 
whip from the cream and let stand before serving. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



MACAROON ICE CREAM, 
i quart cream, ^ cup sugar, 

i cup macaroons, i tablespoon vanilla. 

Dry, pound, and measure macaroons ; add to cream, 
su°:ar and vanilla and then freeze. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



PEACH ICE CREAM. 
One pint of peaches run through a sieve and sweetened 
to taste; i pint cream, i pint milk, sweetened; whites of 2 



■III- 



eggs beaten stiff. Put milk and cream in the freezer; when 
it sets add peaches and freeze five minutes ; add the whites 
of eggs and freeze hard. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



BISQUE ICE CREAM. 
Make a soft custard of I quart of milk, the yolks of 
4 eggs, and i cup of sugar. When at the boiling point stir 
in l /i pound of rolled macaroons and stir until they dis- 
solve. When cool, flavor with vanilla, add 2 quarts of 
whipped cream and freeze. 

Mrs. Arthur Oppenheimer. 



BISCUIT GLACE. 
One-half cup water, 2-3 cup of sugar, boil slowly 
together for half an hour, 3 eggs well beaten, stirred into 
the boiling syrup and beaten eight minutes. Take oft* fire 
and stand in a pan of cold water and stir until cold. One 
pint of cream, 1 teaspoon vanilla, beaten to a froth ; when 
it is well beaten add the cold mixture and stir well. Put in 
boxes and sprinkle rolled macaroons over the top. The 
macaroons should be browned in the oven and when cold 
rolled fine. Place in a tin box and cover with ice and salt. 

Mrs. Oliver Drake-Smith. 



BISCUIT TORTONI. 
1 pint cream, whipped 4 tablespoons powdered 

stiff, sugar, 

1 wine glass of sherry, add Whites of 3 eggs, beaten 
little at a time, stiff. 

Vanilla. 
Dissolve 1 dessertspoon of gelatine, and add to cream 
as you whip, then add 5 tablespoons of powdered maca- 
roons. Pack in freezer, and cover with salt and ice ; and 
let stand three hours. Mrs. W. H. Childs. 



CHOCOLATE SAUCE. 
1 cup water, l / 2 cup sugar. 

Melt %. cake chocolate and add to the water and sugar. 



-112- 



Then cook until the mixture has boiled, stirring constantly. 

Miss Irma Demarest. 



JUNKET ICE CREAM. 

Warm i quart of milk until luke warm, add i cup of 

powdered sugar, and 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract. Also 

one junket tablet, dissolved in a tablespoon of cold water. 

Just as it begins to thicken add 1 pint of cream, and freeze. 

Mrs. J. R. Smith. 



MILK SHERBET. 
1 quart milk, 1 pt. sugar (full measure). 

3 lemons, 

Mix lemon juice and sugar and let it stand. Chill the 
milk and just before freezing add the sugar and lemon. 

Mrs. G. W. Kyburg. 



ORANGE SHERBET. 
1 quart orange juice, 1 quart of water, 

1 pound sugar. Juice of 3 lemons. 

Boil sugar in a little water to make a smooth syrup, 
strain and freeze. Just before it is frozen add the whites 
of 3 eggs. Mrs. H. K. Sheldon. 



RASPBERRY SHERBET. 
Boil 1 quart water and 3 cups sugar for five minutes ; 
add 3 cups raspberry juice. When it begins to thicken in 
freezer add the beaten whites of 3 eggs and 2 cups cream. 
Delicious. ' M. E. B. 



CANTON GINGER SHERBET. 
4 cups water, y 2 cup orange juice. 

1 cup sugar, ]/i cup lemon juice. 

; cup Canton ginger, 
Cut ginger in small pieces ; add water and sugar ; boil 
fifteen minutes; add fruit juice, cool, strain, and freeze. 
Enough to serve to twelve persons. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



ii3 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET. 
One can of grated pineapple, 1 pint of sugar, i pint of 
water, i tablespoon of gelatine, i lemon, the white of I 
egg. Strain the pineapple through a sieve, dissolve the 
gelatine in a little hot water, beat the egg and mix all 
together and freeze the same as ice cream. 

Mrs. D. W. Luke. 



STRAWBERRY MOUSSE. 
i quart thin cream, J4 k° x gelatine or 

i box strawberries, i% tablespoons granulated 

i cup sugar, gelatine, 

2 tablespoons cold water, 3 tablespoons hot water. 

Wash and hull berries, sprinkle with sugar, and let 
stand one hour ; mash and rub through a fine sieve ; add 
gelatine soaked in cold water and dissolve in hot water. Set 
in pan of ice water and stir until it begins to thicken; then 
fold in the whip from the cream, put into a mould, cover, 
pack four hours, in ice and salt. Raspberries may be used. 
Cafe Mousse : Make same as strawberry mousse, using 
1 cup boiled coffee in place of fruit juice. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



PINEAPPLE FRAPPfi. 
2 cups water, 2 cups ice water, 

1 cup sugar, 1 can grated pineapple, or 

Juice 3 lemons, 1 pineapple shredded. 

Make a syrup by boiling water and sugar fifteen min- 
utes ; add pineapple and lemon juice; cool, strain; add ice 
water and freeze to a mush, using equal parts of ice and 
salt. Serve in frappe glasses. If fresh fruits used, more 
sugar will be needed. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



CAFfi FRAPPfi. 
2 cups strong coffee, 2 cups granulated sugar, 

1 quart milk, 1 pint cream, whipped. 

1 teaspoon vanilla, 

Stir sugar, coffee and milk ; when cool add whipped 
cream. Put in freezer for four hours. When in two hours 



ii4 

open and beat hard for a few minutes. Cover and let 
stand for remaining two hours. 

Mrs. H. S. Ernst. 



MAPLE MOUSSE. 
4 eggs, i pint cream, 

i cup maple syrup, 

Cook yolks of eggs and syrup together until thick; when 
cold add the cream whipped, the whites of eggs. Put in 
form, pack in salt and ice four hours. 

Mrs. Oliver Drake-Smith. 



FROZEN CREAM. 
Take a y 2 pint of whipped cream and the white of I 
egg beaten stiff, and mix thoroughly. Add 2 tablespoons of 
powdered sugar, 1 tablespoon of sherry, and Maraschino 
cherries and almonds chopped fine. Freeze in a mould. 
Have the ice ready for packing before the cream is whipped. 

Miss Dwyer. 



FROZEN PUDDING. 
One generous pint of milk, 2 cups of granulated 
sugar, a scant y 2 cup of flour, 2 eggs, 2 tablespoons gela- 
tine, 1 quart of cream, y 2 pound French candied fruit, 4 
tablespoons wine. Let the milk come to a boil. Beat the 
flour, 1 cup of sugar and the eggs together, and stir into 
the boiling milk, cook twenty minutes and add the gelatine, 
which has been soaking one or two hours in cold water 
enough to cover it. Set away to cool. When cool, add 
wine, sugar and cream. Freeze ten minutes, then add the 
fruit and finish freezing. Take out the beater, pack smooth 
till ready to use. Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



FROZEN DESSERT. 
1 cup granulated sugar, %. coffee cup water. 

Dissolve sugar in water and let it boil until it begins to 
string. Beat yolks of 4 eggs very stiff. Pour the hot syrup 
gradually over the eggs, whipping fast with egg beater. Add 
about y> cup of cream, and put on the stove and let it cook 



ii5 

gently about three minutes, stirring constantly. Then put 
into a pan of cold water with ice in it and whip until it is 
thick and cold. Add vanilla to taste (about dessertspoon). 
Whip i pint or \ x / 2 pints of cream, very stiff, and add to the 
mixture. Stir together very lightly and pour into mould. 
Rub white of egg over inside of mould before filling. This 
quantity is for a quart mould. Put into freezer for five 
hours. Candied cherries may be put into mould before fill- 
ing and a few Maraschino cherries added after freezing, if 
desired. Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



BISQUE GLACE. 
One pint of cream, I dozen macaroons, 3 eggs, y 2 cup 
water, 2-3 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla. Boil sugar and 
water until it spins a thread without stirring. Place sauce 
pan of this mixture in another of boiling water. Then add 
the eggs well beaten and cook about eight minutes, beating 
all the time or until it begins to thicken. Take from fire, 
place sauce pan in another of cold water and beat until cold. 
Then add flavoring and whipped cream. Have macaroons 
rolled fine and browned in oven. Put in paper cases. Cover 
with macaroons and freeze. 

Mrs. V. E. Carroll. 



MERINGUE GLACfi. 
Whites of 4 eggs, l / 2 teaspoon vanilla, 1% cups powdered 
sugar, or 1 cup of granulated sugar. Beat the whites 
until stiff, add gradually 2-3 of sugar and continue beating 
until the mixture will hold its shape, fold in remaining 
sugar and add flavoring. Shape with a spoon or pastry bag 
and tube on wet board covered with letter paper. Bake 
thirty minutes in slow oven, remove from paper and put in 
pairs together, or if intending to fill with whipped cream 
or ice cream, remove soft parts with spoon and place mer- 
ingues in oven to dry. Miss Allie Davis. 



CUSTARDS, CREAMS 
AND JELLIES 

"Ant please your Honour," quoth the peasant, 
"This sonic dessert is very pleasant." — Pope. 



CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 
One pint of whipped cream having been previously sweet- 
ened and flavored, 1-3 box Cox's gelatine dissolved in a cup 
of milk. The whipped whites of 2 eggs. Mix lightly and pour 
into a mould lined with lady fingers or cake. Put on ice 
until ready to serve. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



ANGEL FOOD PUDDING. 
One loaf of Angel Food cake, cut through the center, 1 
pint cream, partly whipped, to which add : 1 scant table- 
spoon gelatine, dissolved in water, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 4 
tablespoons sugar. Let it stand in a cool place, until it gets 
firm. Spread between the layers of cake, and over the top. 
Sprinkle with chopped almonds, and candied cherries. 

Mrs. C. T- Lynn. 



GELATINE BLANC-MANGE. 
Soak l /2 box of Cox's gelatine in i*/> pints of milk for 
an hour. Put it over a kettle of boiling water. When it 
boils add the beaten yolks of 3 eggs and 4 tablespoons of 
sugar, stirring briskly a few minutes. When partly cold 
add the whites of the eggs, beaten very light, and flavor 
with vanilla. Cool in mould and serve with sugar and 
cream. Miss T. Osborn. 



CHOCOLATE BLANC-MANGE. 

One quart of milk, 1 ounce of Cooper's gelatine, soaked 

in a cup of the milk one hour, 4 heaping tablespoons of 

grated chocolate rubbed up with a little milk ; 3 eggs, whites 

and yolks beaten separately, % CU P of sugar, and 2 tea- 

116 



ii7 

spoons of vanilla. Heat the milk to the boiling point, pour 
in the gelatine and stir until it is dissolved ; add the sugar 
to the beaten yolks, and stir until smooth. Beat the choco- 
late into this, then pour the scalding milk on the mixture, 
spoonful at a time, stirring constantly. Return to sauce pan 
and heat slowly, stirring, until it almost boils. Then remove 
and after pouring in bowl, whip in the whites of beaten eggs 
and the vanilla. Set to form in moulds. 

Mrs. Edwix Demari.st. 



PRINCESS PUDDING. 
Soak for an hour in a pint of cold water i box Cox's 
sparkling gelatine, and add I pint boiling water, i pint of 
wine, the juice of 4 lemons, and 3 large cups sugar. Beat 
the whites of 4 eggs to a stiff froth and stir into the jelly 
when it begins to thicken. Pour into a large mould, and set 
in ice water in a cool place. When ready to serve, turn 
out as you would jelly, only have the pudding in a deep 
dish. Pour 1 quart soft custard around it and serve. 

Mrs. V. L. Clarke. 



FRUIT PUDDING. 
y 2 box gelatine, or 2 table- Juice 2 lemons, 
spoons gran, gelatine, y> cup cold water, 

1 orange, 4 figs, 

6 dates, 2 bananas, 

iy 2 cups boiling water, 16 blanched almonds, 

2 cups sugar, *4 pound Malaga grapes. 

Soak gelatine in cold waiter ten minutes. Make a 
syrup of cold water. Make a syrup of boiling water and 
sugar. Pour in the gelatine mixture, strain, and when quite 
stiff stir in the fruit, slice the bananas, and cut the oranges, 
figs and dates in small pieces before adding to the mixture. 
Turn into a wet mould, let harden, and serve with whipped 
cream. Miss Gertrude Stites. 



SNOW PUDDING. 
One-half box Cooper's gelatine, pour over it ij4 pints 
of boiling water, let it dissolve. Add 2 cups white sugar, 



-n8- 



the juice of 2 lemons, and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Strain, let 
it stiffen, but not as stiff as wine jelly. Then mix with it 
the beaten whites of 3 eggs. Make a boiled custard of 1 
quart of milk, the yolks of the eggs, and 1 or 2 additional 
eggs, a little salt, and 1 teaspoon of vanilla. 

Mrs. H. B. Palmer. 



CUSTARD FOR ORANGE PUDDING. 
Scald a pint of milk in which is dissolved a cup of 
sugar, add a tablespoon of butter and a pinch of salt. Dis- 
solve a tablespoon of cornstarch in a little cold milk. Stir 
into the mixture and bring to a boil ; add the yolks of 4 
eggs. Boil one minute ; add the rind and juice of 1 orange. 
Cool this slightly before pouring over the sliced oranges. 

Mrs. Emma G. Clark. 



CORN STARCH PUDDING. 
Put a pint of milk on to boil, with sugar enough to 
sweeten. When it comes to a boil, stir in 2 tablespoons of 
cornstarch, which has been dissolved in a little cold water. 
When it thickens take it off and stir in the whites of 2 or 3 
e ggs> well beaten, and put away to cool. 
cream for pudding. 
Put a Yz pint of milk on to boil, add the beaten yolks of 
the eggs, with sugar, and flavor to taste. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



IMPERIAL PUDDING. 
Yz cup rice, 1 quart water. 

2 cups milk, y 2 teaspoon salt, 

1 ounce gelatine, 1 cup sugar, 

Yz cup cold water, Flavoring, 

Y cup hot milk, 1 pint whipped cream. 

Wash rice : cook in water, put into milk in double boiler 
and cook ; soak gelatine, add hot milk, strain, and add 
sugar and salt. Stir in the rice until mixture thickens. Add 
flavoring with cream. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



ii9 

GELATINE PUDDING. 
Put one-third of a box of gelatine in the dish you make 
the pudding in, and cover with cold milk (about a pint) 
and let it soak two hours. Take the grated peel and juice 
of 2 lemons, i cup of sugar, and the yolks of 4 eggs, and 
beat together in another dish. Stir this mixture of lemon, 
sugar and egg with the dissolved gelatine, add 1 pint of 
boiling milk, and stir the whole well together. Beat the 
whites of the 4 eggs with 1 cup of powdered sugar to a 
stiff froth. Put it over the pudding and bake one minute 
in a hot oven. Mrs. John T. Bailey. 



ORANGE SPONGE. 
Melt Y\ package of gelatine in y 2 cup hot water, add 1 
pint orange juice, 1 cup sugar. Stir until cool ; then add 
beaten whites of four eggs. Pour into mould, and put on 
ice until firm. Mrs. H. E. Brown. 



RICE CREAM. 
Boil y 2 scant cup of rice in 1 quart milk, two hours. 
Add Y\ cup sugar ; l / 2 box gelatine, soaked in little water. 
Boil all together. When cool add teaspoon vanilla. Cook 
this in double boiler ; do not stir. When pudding is cold 
stir in 1 pint whipped cream. This is nice for invalids. 

Mrs. H. E. Brown. 



DELICIOUS DESSERT. 

Whip half pint cream, sweeten with confectioner's 
sugar, and set away to chill. Chop fine : 
1 large banana, 12 marshmallows, 

1 orange, y 2 cup ground English wal- 

y 2 cup preserved pineapple, nuts. 

Just before serving beat fruit and nuts through the 
whipped cream. Serve in glasses. Mrs. C. J. Lynn. 



-I20 



MARSHMALLOW PUDDING, 
i tablespoon granulated I heaping cup sugar, 
gelatine. i cup boiling water. 

Stir till dissolved. Whites of 3 eggs, beaten very stiff. 
Add gelatine mixture, and when cool beat one-half hour. 
Add x /z teaspoon vanilla, chopped nuts, pulverized maca- 
roons, or any fruit like grapes, or cherries, cut in dice, may 
be used. Mrs. C. J. Lynn. 



TAPIOCA CREAM. 
Heat in a double boiler 1 pint milk, beat 1 egg and the 
yolk of another with 2-3 cup of sugar and % teaspoon salt, 
and stir into the hot milk. Then stir in slowly i 1 /* table- 
spoons pearl tapioca that has been soaked over night. Just 
before serving stir in the beaten white of the other egg. 

Mrs. H. F. Yorke. 



TAPIOCA CREAM. 
% cup pearl tapioca, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 

or 2 eggs, 

1^ tablespoons granulated 1-3 cup sugar, * 

tapioca, 54 teaspoon salt. 

2 cups scalded milk, 

Pick over the tapioca, and soak one hour in cold water, 
enough to cover, drain, add to milk and cook in double 
boiler until tapioca is transparent. Add half the sugar to 
milk, remainder to egg yolks, slightly beaten, and salt. Com- 
bine by pouring hot mixture slowly on egg mixture, return 
to double boiler, and cook until it thickens. Remove from 
range, add whites of eggs, beaten stiff. Chill, and flavor. 

Miss Gertrude Stites. 



HAMBURG CREAM. 
Seven eggs ; beat the yolks with ?4 lb. sugar until very 
light, add grated rind and juice of three lemons, and boil 
in double boiler, then add whipped whites of the eggs and 
pour into tall glasses when cool. 

Mrs. Samuel Westervelt. 



-121- 



GINGER CREAM. 
Yi box gelatine, J/> tablespoon ginger syrup, 

y 2 cup cold water, i teaspoon flavoring, 

i pint milk, Y\ cup stemmed ginger cut 

4 eggs, fine or to suit taste. 

l /2 cup sugar, I pint whipped cream. 

y 2 teaspoon salt, 

Soak gelatine one hour in the water. Make a soft cus- 
tard of the milk. When thickened add the softened gela- 
tine, strain into a bowl and set on the ice. Add the flavor- 
ing and cut ginger. When about stiff enough to mould 
beat in the whipped cream and turn into a wet mould. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



COFFEE SPANISH CREAM. 

One large cup of strong coffee, strained through cheese- 
cloth. Add enough milk to make one and one-half pints of 
liquid, and place in top part of double boiler over the fire. 
Soak 2y 2 tablespoons of granulated gelatine in 1-3 cup of 
cold water ten minutes, and add to hot liquid. When thor- 
oughly dissolved add the well-beaten yolks of 3 eggs and 
Yz cup of sugar stirred through the egg yolks. Take from 
the fire when it thickens and pour over the stiffly-beaten 
whites of the eggs and pour into a mould to harden. 

Serve with whipped cream sweetened and slightly fla- 
vored with vanilla. This dessert should be made and set in 
a cool place at least seven hours before it is to be used. 
More gelatine should be used if time is limited. 

Mrs. G. XV. Kyburg. 



MACAROON CREAM. 
% box of gelatine, Yolks 3 eggs, 

or 1-3 cup sugar, 

1 tablespoon granulated % teaspoon salt. 
gelatine, 2-3 cup pounded macaroons. 

% cup cold water, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 

2 cups scalded milk, Whites of 3 eggs. 

Soak gelatine in cold water. Make a custard of milk, 
e gg yolks, sugar, salt, add soaked gelatine : when dissolved. 



-122- 



strain into pans, set in pans in ice water. Add maca- 
roons and flavoring, stirring until it begins to thicken ; then 
add whites of eggs beaten until stiff, mould, chill and gar- 
nish with macaroons. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



PINEAPPLE BAVARIAN. 

i pineapple, or can of pineapple, put through a grinder. 
Add to this ]/ 2 cup water and I cup sugar. Simmer slowly 
until cooked. Soak half a box Cox's gelatine in a cup of 
cold water for ten or fifteen minutes. Add this to the pine- 
apple, take from the fire and set in a cool place until like 
jelly (little stiff). Whip I pint of cream with i teaspoon 
vanilla, pinch of salt. Add to the pineapple. Whip until 
stiff enough to put in a mould. 

Hawaiian canned pineapple preferred. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



PINEAPPLE BAVARIAN CREAM. 
Yi box gelatine, i can grated pineapple, 

or y 2 cup sugar, 

2 tablespoons granulated i tablespoon lemon juice, 
gelatine, Whip from 3 cups cream. 

l / 2 cup cold water, 

Soak gelatine in cold water. Heat pineapple, add sugar, 
lemon juice and soaked gelatine; chill in pan of ice water, 
stirring constantly; when it begins to thicken, fold whip 
from cream, mould and chill. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



FRUIT CREAM. 
Peel 4 bananas, mash and rub through a sieve ; add pulp 
and juice of 2 oranges, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 1 table- 
spoon sherry wine, 2-3 cup powdered sugar, and % table- 
spoon granulated gelatine dissolved in water (% cup hot). 
Cool in ice water, stirring constantly, and fold in whip from 
cream (2 cups). Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



123 

BAVARIAN CREAM. 
y 2 lemon, grated rind and 2 eggs, 

juice, 1 teaspoon gran, gelatine, 

y 2 cup white wine, 1 tablespoon cold water, 

1-3 cup sugar, 

Mix lemon, wine, sugar, and yolks of eggs; stir vig- 
orously over fire until mixture thickens, add gelatine soaked 
in water and beat until stiff enough to hold its shape. Turn 
into a mould lined with lady fingers and chill. Orange juice 
may be used and the mixture served in orange-baskets. In 
season strawberries may be used and a mould lined with 
large fresh berries cut in halves. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



HEAVENLY DESSERT. 
One-half box gelatine dissolved in cold water; add 1 
cup boiling water, juice of 1 lemon, 1% cups of sugar. Stir 
and strain, then add 1 can Hawaiian pineapple. When cool, 
and beginning to set, add J / 2 pint whipped cream, 1 bottle 
Maraschino cherries and x / 2 cup English walnuts. This will 
serve twelve people. Mrs. C. J. Lynn. 



RIBBON JELLY. 
Take 1-3 strawberry jelly, 1-3 lemon jelly, 1-3 coffee 
jelly. When all are cold and begin to form, wet a mould, 
pour in about Y\ of the red jelly, set on ice to harden. Keep 
the rest in a warm room, or near the fire. As soon as the 
jelly is firm in the bottom of the mould, add carefully some 
of the lemon jelly; return the mould to the ice. When this 
will bear the weight of more jelly, add the coffee. Proceed 
in this order, dividing the colors by lemon until all are used. 
Serve with whipped cream. Mrs. C. W. Potter. 



SAUTERNE JELLY. 
Soak 2 tablespoons granulated gelatine in y 2 cup water, 
and dissolve in 1^ cup boiling water. Add 1^2 cups Sau- 
terne, 3 tablespoons lemon juice, and 1 cup sugar. Color 
with leaf green, strain into a shallow pan, chill, and cut in 
inch cubes. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



124 

ORANGE TRIFLE. 
y 2 lemon, grated rind and y> cup boiling water, 

juice, 2 eggs, 

2 tablespoons granulated i cup orange juice, 

gelatine, Grated rind of I orange, 

]/ 2 cup cold water, i tablespoon lemon juice. 

Whip from $y 2 cup cream, 

Soak gelatine in cold water, dissolve in hot water; add 
sugar and fruit juices. Chill and when quite firm add whip 
from cream, stirring constantly until stiff enough to drop. 
Line a mould with the sections of a seedless orange (if 
slightly dried they will adhere better to the sides of the 
mould), and fill the mould with the orange trifle mixture. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



ORANGE SPONGE, 
i pound sugar, y 2 cup cold water, 

Juice of 6 to 8 oranges, y 2 cup boiling water, 

Juice of iy 2 lemons, Whites 4 eggs, 

3 sheets Russian gelatine, Pinch of salt. 

Soak gelatine one hour in cold water, then dissolve in 
the boiling water. Strain through a cloth. Press the fruit 
juice through a strainer onto the sugar and add the pre- 
pared gelatine and salt. Cool to a smooth syrupy consis- 
tency. Beat the white of the eggs to a stiff froth, and then 
beat into the fruit mixture. Blend and beat until thick 
enoueh to mould. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



COFFEE JELLY. 
1 cup strong coffee, y 2 cup sugar (scant), 

2 i y 2 teaspoons gelatine, y 2 cup boiling water. 

Dissolve gelatine in coffee, add sugar, then water. Serve 
with cream. Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



TRILBY. 

Whip 1 pint of cream. Add 3 tablespoons of powdered 

sugar and a few drops of vanilla. Cut marshmallows in 

pieces, opera chocolates in half, walnut meats in broken 

pieces, and add with a few chopped dates to the cream. 



125 

Pile in a sherbet glass and garnish each dish with a toasted 
marshmallow in the center of the cream. A college girl's 
dainty. E. E. K. 



COFFEE JUNKET. 
Dissolve i junket tablet in one tablespoon of cold water. 
Heat i quart of milk, lukewarm, then add half a cup sugar, 
half a cup of very strong coffee, and then add the junket. 
Stir well, set in a cool place until it thickens. Serve with 
whipped cream. Mrs. J. R. Smith. 

NORWEGIAN JELLY. 
Remove the stones and cut in quarters y 2 pound cooked 
prunes. To the prune water add enough boiling water to 
make 2 cups. Soak 2^2 tablespoons of gelatine in J^ cup 
of cold water, dissolve in hot liquid. Add 1 cup of sugar 
and l /4 cup of lemon juice. Strain, add the prunes, mould, 
and chill. Stir while cooling to prevent prunes from set- 
tling. Serve with whipped cream. F. V. V. 



JELLIED WALNUTS. 
*4 cup cold water, 1-3 cup boiling water, 

1 tablespoon granulated }i cup sugar, 
gelatine, J /2 cup sherry wine, 

or J /2 cup orange juice, 

J 4 box gelatine, 3 tablespoons lemon juice. 

Make same as other jellies, and cover bottom of pan 
with mixture. When firm, place over it, one inch apart, 
halves of walnuts. Cover with remaining mixture. Chill, 
and cut in squares for serving. Use a shallow pan. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



CIDER JELLY. 
2 qts. sweet cider, 2 lbs. cut sugar. 

1 oz. stick cinnamon, 6 lemons. 

1 box gelatine, 

Soak gelatine in 1 pint cider. Cut lemons in slices and 
take out seeds. Add sugar, cinnamon, and Itmons to the 
remainder of the cider. Let it boil. Add the gelatine, and 
strain. Mrs V. E .Carroll. 



cake: and icing 

"Sufficient to have stood tho' free to fall." — Milton. 



ANGEL CAKE, 
i large coffee cup flour n eggs, whites only, well 

sifted five times, beaten, 

i large coffee cup granu- I teaspoon vanilla, 
lated sugar sifted five Salt, 
times, 
One heaping teaspoon cream of tartar sifted in the flour 
(no soda). 

Beat eggs stiff, add sugar, then flour and cream of tar- 
tar with no extra stirring. Bake in a quick, not hot, oven 
forty minutes, using a two-quart pan with a tube in the 
center, three handles on the upper edge i l / 2 inches high, on 
which to stand the cake inverted, after it is baked. Do not 
butter or paper the pan as it will sweat while cooling. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



SUNSHINE CAKE. No. i. 
Whites of 7 eggs, Yi teaspoon cream of tar- 

Yolks of 5 eggs, tar, 

i cup granulated sugar, ^4 CU P °f flour. 

Beat whites and sift sugar into them; then stir in beaten 
yolks ; add sifted flour and flavor. Do not grease tin. Bake 
in slow oven forty-five minutes. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



SUNSHINE CAKE. No. 2. 
1 tumbler sugar, Pinch of salt, 

Yolks of 5 eggs, Yz teaspoon baking powder. 

y 2 tablespoon lemon juice, 

Beat fifteen minutes. Add 1 tumbler flour and whites 
of 5 eggs which have been stiffly beaten. Bake in slow 
oven. Mrs. Bentley. 
126 



12/ 

SPONGE CAKE. No. i. 
6 eggs, i teaspoon of orange or 

i cup of .sugar, lemon juice with a little 

i level teaspoon of cream of the grated rind and 
of tartar, I scant cup of pastry flour. 

Sift the flour and sugar several times before measuring. 
Beat the whites of the eggs until frothy, add the cream of 
tartar and continue beating until stiff and dry, then care- 
fully fold in the sugar. Add the grated rind and juice to 
the yolks and beat until thick and light, then add to the 
whites. Now gently sprinkle in the flour, folding it in 
lightly. Bake in an ungreased form as a loaf or in a sheet. 

Mrs. Clifford Demarest. 



THE "FAIR ALICE" SPONGE CAKE. No. 2. 
i/^ cups flour. Rind and juice of 1 lemon, 

1 cup sugar, 4 whole eggs and 2 extra 

y 2 cup boiling water, whites. 

Beat the yolks and sugar and grated lemon peel until 
creamy, add the boiling water, and beat. Then add half the 
flour sifted four times with the baking powder. Then half 
the well beaten whites of six eggs, then the rest of the 
flour, and then the rest of the eggs and lemon juice. Bake 
in a slow oven about one 'hour. 

Mrs. H. B. Palmer. 



SPONGE CAKE. No. 3. 
1 cup sugar, Juice and rind of 1 lemon, 

4 eggs, 1 scant cup of sifted flour. 

Separate the eggs, beat the yolks well, add the sugar, 
and beat again. Add lemon, add the whites of the eggs 
(whipped stiff) very gently, then the flour. Stir gently, do 
not beat. Bake in a moderate oven for three-quarters of an 
hour. Mrs. F. H. Booth. 

SPONGE CAKE. No. 4. 
Beat separately whites and yolks of 3 eggs. Add to the 
yolks 1 cup of granulated sugar, 5 tablespoons' of cold 
water. 1 teaspoon vanilla extract, 1 cup of flour, and 1 tea- 



-128- 



spoon baking powder. Beat all well, then at the last add 
the stiffly beaten whites of the eggs. Bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. Alice Littlefield. 



SPONGE ROLL. No. 5. 
Yolks and whites of 5 eggs beaten stiff. Add 1 cup of 
sugar to the yolks and 1 tablespoon of lemon juice. Add 
the stiffly beaten whites; fold in lightly 1 cup of flour. 
Bake. Put jelly on while hot and roll at once. Very good 
served hot with liquid sauce. Mrs. Nathan. 



SPONGE CAKE. No. 6. 
1 cup sugar, Even teaspoon baking pow- 

3 e gg s > der > 

3 tablespoons of water, 1 teaspoon vanilla or lemon, 

Scant cup flour. 

Little salt added. Bake in quick oven. The grain is 
fine unless the amount of baking powder is increased. 

Mrs. Swain. 



GOLD LOAF. 
Yolks of 8 eggs, 2,y 2 cups flour, 

i}4 CU P S granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon cream tartar, 
2-3 cup butter, Scant ^2 teaspoon soda, 

2-3 cup milk. Flavor to taste. 

Sift flour once, then measure, add soda and sift three 
times ; cream butter and sugar thoroughly, beat yolks about 
half, add cream tartar and beat to a stiff froth ; add this to 
creamed butter and sugar, and stir thoroughly; add milk, 
then flour, then flavor and stir very hard. 

Mrs. Clifford Demarest. 



WHITE CAKE. 

\y 2 cups sugar. Whites of 4 eggs, 

]A cup butter, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Y\ cup milk, 2 cups flour, 

Mrs. Clifford Demarest. 



129- 



PLAIN WHITE CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 2 heaping teaspoons baking 

2 cups sugar, well creamed powder, 

together, Whites of 5 eggs well 

334 cups flour, beaten, 

1 cup warm water (not Flavor to taste. 

hot). 
This will make four layers. Put two together with icing 
between and on top. Use chocolate or jelly filling with 
icing on top for the other two. Mrs. C. T- Lynn. 



MARBLE CAKE. (White Part). 
34 cup of butter, 1 cup flour, 

Y\ cup of sugar, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 

34 cup of sweet milk, 1 teaspoon flavoring. 

Whites of 3 eggs, 

DARK PART. 

34 cup butter, 1*4 cups of flour, 

l / 2 cup sugar, t teaspoon baking powder, 

34 cup molasses, ^ teaspoon cloves, cinna- 

34 cup sweet milk, • mon, and nutmeg. 

Yolks of 4 eggs, 

Mix the two parts separately, beat until very light, then 
put in a spoonful at a time, taking pains to have the light 
and dark alternately. Mrs. V. L. Clarke. 



POUND CAKE. 
2 cups butter, 2 cups sugar, 

10 eggs, 3 pounds stoned raisins, 

34 pound citron, 23/2 cups flour, sifted four or 

1 wine glass of Madeira, five times. 

1 nutmeg grated, 1 wine glass brandy. 

Mix thoroughly and bake in a moderate oven. 

M rs. Zabriskte. 



-130 



IMPERIAL CAKE. 

i pound stoned raisins, 

I pound sugar, 

i l / 2 teaspoons baking pow 

der, 
i pound English walnuts, 
Yl pound citron. 



i pound butter, 

10 eggs, added one at a 
time without beating be- 
fore hand, 

i pound flour, 

i tablespoon ground mace, 

Wine glass of brandy, 

Will keep a long time in tin box. 

more brandy, use judgment. 



May need a little 
F. E. F. 



WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

, i pound almonds, 
(blanched), 
All chopped fine ; 
l /4 pound citron, 
i cup grated cocoanut, 
i teaspoon lemon extract, 
i cup sweet milk. 
Mix all ingredients (except the fruit and nuts) as usual. 
Mix baking powder thoroughly with the flour before adding 
it to the other ingredients. When the batter is ready, sift 
a little flour over the fruit and stir it in, then add almonds 
and cocoanut. Bake slowly for two hours. 

Mrs. H. M. Rogers. 



1 cup butter, 

2 cups sugar, 
2.y 2 cups flour, 
Whites of 7 eggs, 

2 teaspoons baking powder, 
I pound seeded raisins, 
i pound figs. 



ENGLISH FRUIT CAKE. 



i pound flour, 
i pound sugar, 
I pound butter, 
4 pounds raisins, 
4 pounds currants, 
io eggs, 

Bake in moderate oven. 



i cup syrup, 
i wine glass of brandy, 
i tablespoon cloves, 
i tablespoon mace, 
i tablespoon cinnamon, 
t tablespoon nutmeg. 
Mrs. Samuel Westervei.t. 



PLAIN FRUIT CAKE. 
One cup of butter, 2 cups of molasses, 2 eggs, I cup of 
milk, i l /> teaspoons soda, i teaspoon essence of lemon, 4 



131 

teaspoons mixed spice, flour to make a stiff batter; then 
add i pound of raisins, iJ/> pounds currants and % pound 
of mixed peel. Mrs. V. L. Clarke. 



RICH FRUIT CAKE. 
( >ne pound butter, i pound sugar, 3 pounds raisins, 2 
pounds currants, 2 pounds flour, y pound lemon peel, 1 
tablespoon cinnamon, 2 teaspoons cloves, 2 nutmegs, y 2 cup 
of molasses, 10 eggs and 1 teaspoon baking soda dissolved 
in a glass of boiling water. Cream butter and sugar, beat in 
the eggs two by two, add spices, molasses and soda. Have 
your flour sifted and put in the fruit in part of the sifted 
flour, then add the remainder. This will make two very 
large, or four medium cakes. Keep in a tin box. 

Mrs. V. L. Clarke. 



FRUIT CAKE. 
iy 2 cups sugar, 4 eggs, 

2 cups molasses, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

1 cup black coffee, 3 teaspoons cinnamon, 
y 2 pound butter, 3 teaspoons cloves, 

2 pounds raisins, • 1 teaspoon mace, 

2 pounds currants, 1 teaspoon nutmeg, 

1 pound citron, 1 pound chopped walnuts, 

y 2 pound lemon and orange 4 cups flour, 
peel, 
Bake three hours in moderate oven. 

Mrs. F. D. Baker. 



SPICE FRUIT CAKE. 
i}i pounds powdered sugar, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, 
y pound butter, 1 tablespoon cloves, 

1% pounds flour, 1 tablespoon allspice, 

iy cups milk, y pound raisins, 

2 teaspoons baking powder, T /> pound currants. 
5 eggs, T 4 pound citron. 

Mrs. Y. L. Clarke. 



132 

SPICE LOAF CAKE. 
Cream i cup of butter with iy 2 cups of sugar, and i cup 
of molasses. Dissolve a heaping teaspoon of soda in a little 
milk and add to the other ingredients, then pour in 1^2 cups 
of milk, 5 well beaten eggs, and a y 2 pound each of well 
cleaned and floured currants and raisins, candied citron 
chopped fine, and a y 2 pound of dates also chopped fine. 
Add enough sifted flour to make a stiff batter, then flavor 
with a teaspoon each of ginger, allspice, cinnamon and 
cloves. Bake in a slow oven for one and a quarter hours, 
or, until a broom straw thrust in the center comes out clean. 

Mrs. Charles R. Brown. 



SPICE CAKE. 
y 2 cup molasses, 1 egg, 

1 cup sugar, 2.y 2 cups flour, 

5 tablespoons melted butter, 1 cup hot water, 
y 2 teaspoon cinnamon, y 2 pound citron, 

l /i teaspoon ginger, 1 box raisins, 

1 teaspoon salt, y 2 pound nuts. 

1 teaspoon soda, 

Put molasses in bowl, add sugar, melted butter, cinna- 
mon and ginger, put soda and salt in cup and fill with hot 
water and stir into first mixture, add flour, then well beaten 
egg, beat hard. Bake for thirty minutes in a well greased 
pan ; watch oven closely as this cake burns easily. 

Miss Jennie L. Grahn. 



SPICE CAKE. 
3 eggs, whites of 2 saved 3 cups of flour, 

for frosting, 3 tablespoons of- shortening, 

1 cup of sugar, 1 teaspoon saleratus, 

1 cup of molasses, 1 teaspoon each kind of 

1 cup of sour milk, spice. 

Bake in layers. Put together with boiled frosting. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



133 

CHOCOLATE LOAF CAKE. No. i. 

2 cups sugar, 4 squares chocolate, 

2-3 cup butter, 2% cups flour, 

1 cup milk, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 

3 e gg s > l teaspoon vanilla. 

Cream sugar and butter with pinch of salt added. Add 
hot melted chocolate and well beaten yolks of eggs. Alter- 
nate with milk and flour until all is added. Beat thor- 
oughly, fold in the well beaten whites of eggs and bake in 
moderate oven. This makes two good sized loaves of cake. 

Mrs. G. \V. Kyburg. 



CHOCOLATE LOAF CAKE. No. 2. 
4 ounces chocolate, 1% cups flour, 

y 2 cup milk, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 

y 2 cup butter, 1 heaping teaspoon baking 

2 cups sugar, powder. 

4 eggs, 

Dissolve the chocolate in 5 tablespoons boiling water. 
Beat butter and sugar to cream, add yolks, then milk, then 
melted chocolate and flour ; beat vigorously. Beat whites of 
eggs to a froth and stir into the mixture. Bake in moderate 
oven forty-five minutes. Mrs. Kirkby. 

DARK CHOCOLATE LOAF CAKE. 

Yolk of 1 egg, y 2 cup butter, 

y 2 cup of milk, 2 eggs, 

4 squares of chocolate, 2 cups flour, 

cooked together in double j/ 2 cup milk and 
boiler ; cool ; 1 teaspoon soda, 

ij4 cups sugar, Vanilla flavoring. 

Cream butter and sugar ; add eggs and other ingredi- 
ents ; combine with first mixture and bake in moderate oven. 
Use white of 1 egg for frosting. 

Mrs. Bentley. 



PLAIN DARK CHOCOLATE CAKE. 
Shave two squares Baker's chocolate into a cup, pour 
over y 2 cup boiling water, add 1 cup sugar, pinch salt. 1 



—134 

tablespoon butter, melted, and i beaten egg. Stir all well. 
Then add \ l / 2 cups flour, with i level teaspoon baking 
powder. Put level teaspoon soda into ^ cup boiling water 
and flavor with vanilla, and bake in two layers. Put whipped 
cream sweetened and flavored between layers and on top. 

Mrs. W. H. Childs. 

DARK CHOCOLATE CAKE, 
i cup butter (scant), I teaspoon soda, 

3 cups sugar, y 2 cake Baker's chocolate 

3 cups flour, dissolved in a cup of boil- 

i cup sour milk, ing water, 

3 eggs, 2 teaspoons vanilla. 

If sweet milk be used take 2 teaspoons of baking powder 
instead of soda. A. W. W. 



CHOCOLATE LOAF CAKE. 
Two and one-half cups of sifted flour, 2 cups of sugar, 
y 2 cup of butter, ]/ 2 cup of sour milk (thick), l / 2 cup of hot 
water, 2 eggs, % or X A cake of chocolate and I teaspoon 
soda. Flavor with vanilla. Grate chocolate and dissolve 
with soda in the hot water. Use a white icing. 

Mrs. H. F. Yorke. 



DEVIL'S CAKE, 
i cup butter, 3 cups flour, 

2 cups sugar, i cup sweet milk, 

5 eggs, 3 teaspoons Rumford's Bak- 

4 teaspoons vanilla, ing Powder. 

One cake Baker's chocolate (i cup reserved for frost- 
ing) mixed with i small cup sugar. Add a little milk and 
heat until dark and creamy. Then put in cake, just before 
flour. 

FROSTING FOR CAKE. 

I cup grated chocolate, 4 tablespoons milk. 

i]/ 2 cups sugar. 

When hot add 1 well beaten egg and boil fifteen 
minutes. Take off fire and add fresh grated cocoanut. 
Flavor with 4 tablespoons vanilla. Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



135 

DARK CHOCOLATE LAYER CAKE. 
Beat to a cream, I cup sugar, 2 tablespoons of butter, 
add 3 eggs, saving out the whites of 2, y 2 cup milk, 2 cups 
flour and 3 teaspoons of baking powder. Melt Y- cup sugar, 
l / 2 cup milk ; boil for ten minutes or until thick, remove 
from the fire and when cool add to the cake batter, bake 
in layer tins. Use boiled icing between layers. 

Mrs. C. O. Giessler. 



CHOCOLATE LAYER CAKE. 
y 2 cup butter, 3 eggs, 

i]/ 2 cups sugar, 3 cups flour, 

t cup milk, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Bake in three layers in hot oven. 

FILLING. 

1 cup sugar, Ya cup hot water, 

2 squares Baker's chocolate, 

Boil up slowly to a thick cream, flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



CHOCOLATE CREAM CAKE. 
Cream well 1 cup pulverized sugar, l / 2 cup butter; add 
whites of 3 eggs, yolks of 2 eggs well beaten, Y^ cup milk, 
iy 2 cups flour, 1 teaspoon Rum ford's Baking Powder. This 
will make three layers. 

BOILED ICING. 

Boil 1 cup granulated sugar with 4 tablespoons cold 
water until it drops from the spoon in threads. Have ready 
the beaten white of 1 egg and pour the syrup slowly into 
it, beating all the time. Flavor and spread on cake while 
warm. Take Y cake of Baker's unsweetened chocolate ; 
put into a bowl and place over the kettle to melt. When 
melted spread first a layer of white icing and then the 
chocolate. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



-136- 



GOLD LAYER CAKE. 
y 2 cup butter, I teaspoon vanilla, 

Yolks of 4 eggs, I cup sugar, 

i heaping teaspoon baking \y 2 cups flour, 
powder, y 2 cup milk. 



F. E. F. 



SILVER LAYER CAKE. 
l / 2 cup butter, I cup sugar, 

Whites of 4 eggs, i T / 2 cups flour, 

i teaspoon baking powder, l / 2 cup milk, 
i teaspoon almond, 

Bake in layers, put gold cake together with orange fill- 
ing and silver cake with almond filling with chopped 
almonds. F. E. F. 



ORANGE FILLING FOR GOLD CAKE. 
One-half of the white of i egg, 2 or 3 tablespoons orange 
juice and some grated rind if liked. Add confectioner's 
sugar until the right consistency. F. E. F. 



ALMOND FILLING FOR SILVER CAKE. 
One-half of the white of 1 egg, 1 generous teaspoon 
almond extract and enough cold water to make 2 table- 
spoons, or 3 if much filling is desired. Confectioner's 
sugar, y 2 cup blanched chopped almonds. F. E. F. 



ORANGE CAKE. (Layer). 
y 2 cup butter, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 

1 cup sugar, y 2 cup milk, 

2 eggs, y 2 level teaspoon salt. 
\y 2 cups flour, Flavoring. 

FILLING. 

Rind and juice of 2 small \y 2 tablespoons Duryea's 

oranges, cornstarch, 

1 cup sugar, y 2 cup of water. 

Boil until thick stirring constantly. 

Mrs. V. L. Clarke. 



137 

MOCHA LAYER CAKE. 
2 eggs, I '>cat eggs with sugar, 

2 cups flour, iy 2 cups sugar, 

2 heaping teaspoons baking i cup boiling milk, 
powder, 
Mix baking powder with flour. Add half the hot boiling 
milk to the eggs and sugar with half the flour and beat thor- 
oughly, then add the other half of the milk with the rest of 
the flour. Bake in well oiled jelly cake tins. F. E. F. 

FILLING. 

One-half cup butter, creamed with [.cup confectioner's 
sugar, 2 teaspoons cocoa or grated chocolate and 2 table- 
spoons of strong hot coffee. F. E. F. 



MOCHA TART. 

Yolks of 4 eggs, 2 scant teaspoons baking 

i cup sugar, powder, 

beaten to a cream; i J /2 tablespoons Mocha ex- 

i cup flour, tract. 

Add the well beaten whites of eggs last and bake in 
three layers. 

FILLING. 

Whip i pint of cream ;add 3 tablespoons confectioner's 
sugar and spread between layers and on top. 

ICING. 

Ice top (over the filling) and sides taking 2 cups of con- 
fectioner's sugar and 2 tablespoons of mocha extract to 
moisten it. A little cream may be added if the icing seems 
stiff. The mocha extract is put up by Crosse & Blackwell. 

Mrs. G. \Y. Kyrurg. 



MARSHMALLOW CAKE. 
Beat Y\ cup of butter to a cream, and yolks of 2 eggs 
until thick. Then gradually beat y 2 cup of sugar into each 
and combine the two mixtures. Add 4 ounces of chocolate 
melted over hot water; then alternately, Yz cup of milk and 
i 1 /* cups of sifted flour, sifted again with 2 level teaspoons 
of baking powder. Lastly, beat in whites of 2 eggs, beaten 



138- 

dry and a teaspoon of vanilla extract. Bake in two layers 
about eighteen minutes. Put layers together with marsh- 
mallow icing and ice top. 

MARSHMALLOW ICING. 

Boil 2 cups granulated sugar with }/ 2 cup water to 240 
degrees F., or until it spins a thread about three inches long, 
then pour in a fine stream over the well beaten whites of 4 
eggs, beating constantly meanwhile. When cool, add y 2 
pound of fresh marshmallows, each cut in four pieces with 
a pair of scissors. The marshmallows should not melt in 
the icing which should be exceedingly light and fluffy. 
Flavor with vanilla. Mrs. G. D. Prosser. 



MARSHMALLOW CAKE. 
y 2 cup butter, l / 2 cup pastry flour, 

y 2 cup sugar, 1 full teaspoon Rum ford's 

y 2 cup milk, • Baking Powder. 

1 teaspoon vanilla, y 2 teaspoon cream of tartar, 

y 2 cup cornstarch, Whites of six eggs. 

Mix the starch, flour, baking powder and cream of tar- 
tar. Cream the butter and sugar, add the flavoring, then a 
little of the flour mixture, then milk and flour alternately, 
and lastly the stiffly beaten whites of the eggs. If preferred, 
use 2 cups of flour and omit the cornstarch. Bake in two 
shallow pans and when done frost with 

MARSHMALLOW FROSTING. 

Cut a y 2 pound of marshmallows in small pieces, put 
them in the double boiler with 4 tablespoons of hot water, 
and stir until melted and smooth. Boil 1 cup of sugar and 
1-3 cup of hot water without stirring, till the syrup threads 
when dropped from the spoon. Have the white of 1 large 
egg beaten stiff, and pour the syrup gradually into the egg 
while beating, then add the melted marshmallows gradually 
and flavor with 1 teaspoon of vanilla and a few drops of 
lemon juice; beat until cool and thick enough to spread. 

Mrs. M. G. Probst. 



139 

LAYER CAKE. 

2 small cups sugar, 2 heaping teaspoons baking 

i small cup milk, powder. 

4 tablespoons melted but- 3 cups Hour. 
ter, 3 eggs, 

Bake in three layers. 

FILLING. 

1 cup raisins, 1 cup sherry or port wine 

2 eggs (yolks), or little less wine filling 
1 cup walnuts chopped fine, up the cup with cream, 

1 teaspoon vanilla. 
Spread on layers sifting over each a little sugar. Use 2 
whites of eggs for top frosting. Oranment with nut meat. 
Very delicious. Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



VARIETY CAKE. 
\y 2 cups of sugar, ]/ 2 cup of milk, 

y 2 cup of butter, 2 cups of flour, 

3 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Take out one-third; add to it the following: 
2 teaspoons of cinnamon, J / 2 of a nutmeg, 
1 teaspoon of cloves, y 2 cup of chopped raisins. 

This will make the middle layer of a three layer cake. 
Put together with frosting. . Mrs. F. R. Warren. 



RIBBON CAKE. 
2.y 2 cups sugar, 1 cup milk, 

2.y 2 cups flour. 4 eggs, 

1 cup butter, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Divide into three parts and to one part add 
1 cup of raisins, y 2 teaspoon cloves, 

1 cup of currants, 1 nutmeg. 

2 teaspQons cinnamon, 

Miss Amy T. Brewster. 



( >NE EGG LAYER CAKE. 
2 tablespoons butter, t cup sweet milk, 

1 cup sugar, 2 cups flour, 

1 egg, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 



izj-O 

Mix well and bake in hot oven. Add the whites beaten to 
a froth after the batter has been well mixed. 

•Mrs. J. H. DeMott. 



SNOWBALL CAKE. 
2 cups of sugar, 3 cups flour, 

l / 2 cup butter, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 

1 cup sweet milk, Whites of 5 eggs. 

Bake in a deep square tin. The day following cut into 
two inch squares, taking off the outside so as to have it all 
white. Cut off the corners to make it round. Take each 
piece on a fork and frost upon all sides and roll in freshly- 
grated cocoanut. Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



SOUR CREAM CAKE. 
Break 2 eggs in coffee or teacup and fill the cup with 
sour cream. Beat well, add 1 cup sugar, and i l / 2 cups flour, 
with i l / 2 teaspoons cream tartar sifted in flour, 1 teaspoon 
soda dissolved in a little water. Beat well. Very nice for 
layer cake, as well as baked in a loaf. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



NUMBER CAKE. 

1 cup butter, 4 eggs, 

2 cups sugar, l / 2 cup milk, 

3 small cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

Miss Amy J. Brewster. 



PLAIN CAKE. 

Three-quarters of a cup of butter rubbed with one full 

cup of sugar to a cream; add 3 well beaten eggs, 2 cups of 

flour, 1 full teaspoon of baking powder, l / 2 cup of milk and 

a little grated nutmeg. Beat thoroughly together and bake. 

Mrs. T. T. Haring. 



-141- 



WASHINGTON CAKE. 
Yz pound butter, i pound flour, 

i pound sugar, 2 teaspoons Rum ford's Bak- 

4 eggs, ing Powder. 

1 cup milk, 

Mrs. Simeon Whsteryelt. 



PINAFORE CAKE. 
i l /> cups sugar, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

1 cup butter, l /> cup cornstarch, 

y 2 cup milk, 4 eggs. 

V/2. cups flour, 

Cream together sugar and butter, then stir in the beaten 
yolks of eggs, add milk, then the flour, baking powder and 
cornstarch sifted together and lastly fold in the beaten 
whites of eggs and flavor to taste. , 

Mrs. Walter Westeryelt. 



NUT CAKE. 
Yi cup butter, Y- CU P c °ld water, 

i l /> cups sugar, • 4 eggs (whites only), 

2 cups flour, 1 cup chopped walnut meats. 

Cream sugar and butter; add water and flour. Stir 
with the nuts ; then the remainder of the whites, to which 
you have added the baking powder. Pour the mixture 
into square pans and bake about thirty-five minutes in a 
moderate oven. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



NUT CAKE. 

1/^2 cups powdered sugar, 



2 cups flour, 

Y pound English walnuts. 



Y2 cup butter, 
Y2 cup milk, 

3 e gg s > 

Y2 pound raisins, 

Cream butter and sugar, add yolks of eggs, then milk 
and flour, last the whites, stir little as possible and bake in 
a quick oven. Mrs. Oliver Drake-Smith. 



142 

WALNUT CAKE. 
y 2 cup butter, 2.y 2 teaspoons baking powder. 

1 cup sugar, Whites 2 eggs. 

Yolks 3 eggs, 24 CU P walnut meats, broken 

y 2 cup milk, in pieces. 

1^4 CU P S flour, 

Mix ingredients in order given. Bake forty-five min- 
utes in a moderate oven. Cover with boiled frosting, crease 
in squares, and put one-half walnut on each square. 

Miss Gertrude Stites. 



WALNUT CAKE. 
l /z cup butter, 1 cup chopped nuts, 

1 cup sugar, \ l / 2 cups cold water. 

2 eggs, iy 2 cups flour, 

1 teaspoon vanilla, 1 tablespoon baking powder. 

Bake in two layers. Spread with frosting. 

FROSTING. 

Take 1 cup of granulated sugar, dampen it with 5 table- 
spoons of milk. Place on fire and stir until it boils, then let 
boil for five minutes without stirring. Remove, set in dish 
of cold water, flavor and stir constantly until thick and 
creamy. F. V. V. 

HICKORY NUT CAKE. 
One and one-half cups sugar, y 2 cup of butter, Y\ cup of 
milk, 2 eggs, 1 cup chopped raisins, 1 cup of chopped nuts, 

2 cups of flour and 2 teaspoons baking powder. Cream but- 
ter and sugar together and add the yolks and beaten 
whites of the eggs. Add milk and flour with baking powder, 
then the raisins and nuts. ' Mrs. C. W. Coyte. 



GRANDMOTHER'S APPLE CAKE. 
Three cups dried apples washed and stewed slowly in 
iy 2 cups of molasses. Then set to cool (must be firm like 
citron). 

3 cups flour, y 2 lemon and orange peel 

24 cup butter, mixed, 

2 cups brown sugar, 1 grated lemon peel, 

r pound currants. 4 eggs. 



143 

Spice to taste, cloves, nutmeg and cinnamon.' i teaspoon 
soda, dissolved in 8 teaspoons water; i wine glass brandy. 
Bake in a moderate oven in a well greased and papered tin 
about one and three-quarter hours, if in one tin. 

Mrs. M. B. Palmer. 



DRIED APPLE CAKE. 
One and one-half cups dried apples, to be soaked over 
night, in the morning chop them and simmer in Y> cup of 
molasses until they are well cooked. Stir to a cream. One- 
half cup butter and i cup sugar, add 2-3 cup of sour milk 
and 2 eggs beaten well. Two teaspoons of cinnamon, 1 tea- 
spoon of cloves, 1 teaspoon of nutmeg, 1 teaspoon soda dis- 
solved in a little water. After mixing well together stir in 
the apples and 2 cups of flour, add 1 cup raisins, J / 2 cup cur- 
rants, 1 ounce sliced citron. Bake in a moderate oven one 
hour. Mrs. Oliver Drake-Smith. 



APPLE SAUCE CAKE. No. 1. 
i l /> cups of apple sauce y> cup chopped raisins, 

made quite thin, y 2 cup chopped nuts (wal- 

2 l /z cups flour, " nuts), 

y 2 cup butter, 2 teaspoons even full of soda, 

1 teaspoon cinnamon, 1 cup brown sugar. 

y 2 teaspoon cloves, 

Stir the soda in the apple sauce. Cream the butter and 
sugar together and then add to the apple sauce ; then add 
the spices, nuts, raisins and flour, and bake in shallow pan 
9x9. Mrs. W. H. Wendover. 



APPLE SAUCE CAKE. No. 2. 

1 cup sugar, A little nutmeg, 

l / 2 cup butter, 1 teaspoon (level) soda dis- 

A little salt, solved in 1 cup of hot ap- 

Y\ teaspoon cloves, pie sauce, 

y 2 teaspoon cinnamon. \Y\ cups flour. 

Yolk of 1 egg, 1 cup raisins. 



^—144 

Mix sugar and butter together, add soda and apple sauce 
and other ingredients. The batter should be a little stiffer 
than ordinary cake batter. I use the yolk of i egg and the 
white for frosting. Mrs. Byron Huyler. 



BREAD CAKE, 
i cup bread sponge, i cup raisins. 

i even teaspoon soda in 3 i cup brown sugar (large), 

tablespoons coffee, 1 egg, 

Spices to taste, ; 

Beat egg, add sugar, spices and coffee ; mix into dough 
and add raisins well floured, allow to rise as bread, and 
bake about forty to fifty minutes in moderate oven. 

Mrs. H. S. Ernst. 



COFFEE CAKE. 

Four eggs beaten separately, Y\ cup of flour, 1 cup of 

sugar, 1 teaspoon baking powder and 1 tablespoon coffee 

extract. Beat the yolks and sugar together, then add flour 

and flavoring and lastly the whites of eggs. Bake in layers. 

filling. 
One pint of cream beaten very stiff, sweeten to taste and 
flavor with 1 tablespoon coffee extract. 

ICING. 

One cup of confectioner's sugar, 1 tablespoon coffee ex- 
tract, 1 tablespoon water. Beat and spread on top as soon 
as cake is cool. Do not put filling in until ready to send to 
the table. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



COFFEE CAKE. 
Sift V/2 pints of flour with 2 teaspoons of baking pow- 
der, cut in bits a heaping tablespoon of butter and mix it 
through the flour, stir in a cup of syrup and mix it with cold 
coffee to the consistency of soft dough. Work into the 
dough a teaspoon of ground cloves, 1 of cinnamon, and 1 of 
allspice. Also l / 2 pound of seeded raisins and )A pound of 
currants well floured. Bake in oblong pans in moderate 
oven for one hour. Mrs. E. H. Brown. 



H5 

COFFEE CAKE. 

Beat i large spoonful of butter to a cream; add: 
Y 2 cup sugar, i egg, 

i l /z cups Hour, i full teaspoon Rumford's 

y 2 cup milk, Baking Powder. 

Salt, 

Spread evenly into a large deep tin pan, put small pieces 
butter over tbe cake, sprinkle with sugar, cinnamon and 
chopped almonds. Bake about fifteen or twenty minutes. 

Mrs. H. Amend. 



GINGER BREAD. 

One cup of molasses, Y\ CU P of granulated sugar, 5 large 
tablespoons melted lard, 1 even teaspoon of ginger and cin- 
namon, 1 saltspoon of salt and 1 egg. Mix well, then stir in 
very thoroughly 2 cups of sifted flour. Then the last thing 
put in a cup of boiling water in which a full teaspoon of 
soda has been dissolved. Bake in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. Altge Littlefield. 



PLUM GINGERBREAD. 
1 cup sugar creamed with l / 2 teaspoon cloves, cinna- 
y 2 cup butter, 111011, allspice and little 

Yi cup molasses, mace, 

Y2. cup sour milk, 1 cup seeded raisins, 

1 teaspoon soda, 2 cups flour, 

Y> teaspoon salt. 2 eggs. 

Cover top with chocolate icing, flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. W. H. Childs. 



MOLASSES CAKE. 
y 2 cup shortening, butter Y\ CU P sugar, 

and lard mixed. 2 eggs, 

1 cup molasses, 1 cup water, 

One large teaspoon baking soda dissolved in a little 
hoi water, then put in the cold water and make medium 
batter, add cloves, ginger, cinnamon or any spices to suit 
the taste. Mrs. A. B. Powers. 



146 

CREAM PUFFS. 
One cup hot water, l / 2 cup butter; boil together and 
while boiling stir in 1 cup sifted flour. Take from the stove 
and stir to a smooth paste, and after this cools, stir in 3 
eggs not beaten. Stir it five minutes. Drop in tablespoon- 
fuls on a buttered tin, and bake in a quick oven about twen- 
ty-five minutes, being careful not to open the oven often 
while baking. Do not let them touch in the pan. This 
makes 12 puffs. 

CREAM FILLING. 

I cup milk, 3 tablespoons flour, 

y 2 cup sugar, Flavor with vanilla. 

1 egg, 

When both this and the puffs are cool, open puffs a little 

with a sharp knife and fill with cream. These never fail to 

puff. Whipped cream may be used for filling. 

' E. S. W. 



DROP CAKES. 
Mix together a y 2 pound of butter and a % pound of 
sugar, and beat very thoroughly. Add 2 eggs, 1 pint of 
flour, y 2 a grated nutmeg, a large pinch of carbonate of 
soda and a handful of currants. Drop from a tablespoon 
into buttered cake tins and bake in a slack oven. 

Miss Dwyf.r. 



CORN STARCH CAKES. 
y 2 pound butter, 4 eggs, 

y 2 pound brown sugar, 1 teaspoon baking powder, 

y 2 pound cornstarch, 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

P>eat the butter to a cream with the hand, then add 
sugar, eggs, one at a time, then the vanilla. Put baking pow- 
der into the corn starch, sift and mix into the mixture with 
the hand. Bake in small round muffin tins putting into each 
pan 1 teaspoon. A good hot oven is required. These must 
never be beaten with a spoon. 

Miss Gertrude Lindsay, 



147 

CORN STARCH CAKE. 
Whites of 3 eggs, Y> cup of corn starch, x / 2 cup of hutter, 
Yz cup of milk, i cup of sugar, i cup of flour, i heaping 
teaspoon of baking powder and flavoring. 

Mrs. H. F. Yorke. 

LADY FINGERS. 
i tablespoon butter, x / 2 cup flour, 

2 tablespoons sugar, y 2 teaspoon baking powder, 

2 tablespoons milk, l / 2 cup chopped nuts. 

i egg, well beaten, 

Hake in slow oven in buttered finger pans. 

Mrs. W. H. Childs. 



CHEESE CAKES. 
One-half cream cheese, 4 tablespoons sifted saltine 
crumbs worked smooth with wooden spoon; add T /> cup 
powdered sugar, 2 eggs well beaten. Blanch and chop 2-3 
cup almonds, 6 teaspoons milk, l / 2 cup heavy cream, 2 tea- 
spoons melted butter, pinch of salt, ]/ 2 teaspoon nutmeg 
(scant), Y teaspoon almond extract. Line patty pans with 
rich pastry ; fill and bake twenty minutes in moderate oven. 

H. A. 



BOILED WHITE ICING. 
One cup sugar, 5 tablespoons water. Boil until it spins a 
thread, have ready the whites of 2 eggs beaten stiff, drop 
slowly at first the boiling syrup and beat briskly. A delicate 
creamy icing. Mrs. C. O. Giessler. 



MAPLE CREAM ICING. 
Boil 1 pint of maple syrup in a granite pan until it makes 
a soft ball in cold water, let syrup cool until just warm and 
stir with a spoon until it forms a soft fondant like cream 
candy. Add 1 tablespoon of cream, or a little more, until it 
is a proper consistency to spread smoothly on cake. 



148 

MAPLE SUGAR FROSTING. 
One cup maple syrup, l / 2 cup white sugar, white 01 i 
egg. Boil the syrup and sugar together until it will grain. 
Stir until nearly cold, then stir into this the white of the 
egg beaten stiff. 



MRS. OSGOOD'S ORANGE FROSTING. 
Grate the rind of i orange, add i teaspoon brandy, i 
teaspoon lemon juice, i tablespoon orange juice. Let stand 
fifteen minutes, strain, add yolk of i egg and thicken with 
confectioner's sugar till stiff enough to spread. 



FILLING FOR COCOANUT CAKE. 
i cup milk, 4 tablespoons sugar, 

2 tablespoons cornstarch, Yolks of 2 eggs, 
A little salt, 2 teaspoons vanilla, 

i cup cocoanut, 

Mix corn starch and beaten yolks with a little of the 
milk. Heat the rest of the milk and sugar. When at a 
boiling point stir in the starch and egg, boil till it thickens. 
When cool add cocoanut and vanilla. 



OPERA CARAMEL FROSTING. 
One and one-half cups brown sugar, Y\ cup thin cream, 
l /> tablespoon butter. Cook until a ball is formed, when 
the mixture is tried in cold water. Beat until ready to 
spread. 



WALNUT CREAM FILLING. 
One small cup chopped walnuts, i cup sour cream, i cup 
sugar. Boil till it hairs a very little. 

FRUIT FILLING FOR CAKE. 

( )ne cup sugar, white of i egg, 2-3 cup strawberries or 
raspberries. Beat egg very stiff and add half the sugar and 
beat again. Add the rest of the sugar to the berries and stir 
well, then mix all together and beat bard. 



149 

APPLE FILLING FOR LAYER CAKE. 
White of i egg, i large tart apple, grated, 

i cup granulated sugar, i teaspoon vanilla. 

Beat up thoroughly and put between layers of cake. 



FIG FILLING. 

Chop i pound figs, Chop }j pound raisins, 

Add l / 2 cup sugar, 1 cup water. 

Stew till soft and smooth. 



COCOANUT ICING. 
One cup of granulated sugar, 5 tablespoons water. Boil 
until it spins a thread. Put slowly into the beaten whites 
of 2 eggs. When smooth and thick spread on cake, sprinkle 
at once with grated fresh cocoanut, using cocoanut to keep 
icing from going over side of the cake. This is much easier 
than stirring cocoanut into the icing. 

Mrs. Thomas K. Baker. 



CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 
Melt 2 squares chocolate in double boiler with 2-3 cup 
confectioner's sugar and 3 tablespoons boiling water. When 
melted boil over the fire for one minute. Have ready the 
stiffly beaten white of 1 egg with the remaining 1-3 cup of 
confectioner's sugar stirred through it. Pour over this the 
hot mixture, beat for a moment and spread upon the cake 
while hot. E. E. K. 



CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 
One-third cake Baker's chocolate ; put over hot water to 
melt. Five tablespoons cream put in when chocolate is 
melted, add 2 cups powdered sugar, beat, then add 1 egg 
well beaten. Does not harden. 

Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



150 

CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

1 cup sugar, i teaspoon cornstarch, 

24 cup milk, Butter size of an English wal- 

2 squares chocolate, nut. 

Boil in double boiler for several minutes, stirring con- 
stantly, until as thick as desired. When cool add i well 
beaten egg and flavor with vanilla. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



CREAM FILLING. 
I pint milk, 2 eggs, 

3 teaspoons cornstarch Sugar to sweeten, 
slightly heaped, Vanilla flavoring. 

Boil milk, stir in the cornstarch blended in part of the 
milk, sweeten, then add the well-beaten eggs, and stir to a 
custard. Flavor, and when cold spread between the layers. 

Mrs. V. L. Clarke. 



LEMON FILLING FOR LAYER CAKE. 
i tablespoon butter. Grated rind and juice of i 

i egg, lemon. 

l / 2 cup sugar, 

Boil until it thickens. Mrs. J. T. Bailey. 



SUGGESTIONS IN CAKE MAKING. 

The smaller the cake the hotter the oven should be. 
Large, rich cakes require very slow baking. 

Grease cake pans with lard or drippings, as butter will 
be likely to make the cake stick, owing to the salt in it. 

In making fruit cake, add the fruit before putting in the 
flour, as this will prevent it falling to the bottom of the cake. 
Flouring the fruit is unnecessary unless the fruit is damp. 

In creaming butter and sugar when the butter is too 
hard to blend easily warm the bowl and if necessary, warm 
the sugar, but never warm the butter as this will change both 
texture and flavor of the cake. 

To get fine grained cake, beat thoroughly after the flour 
is added. 



i5i 

Always sift flour before measuring — then it may be 
sifted again with the baking powder to ensure being thor- 
oughly blended. 

For the rich cake that seems about to fall try inverting 
it on the cake board when it has partially cooled and prop 
the edges of the pan so the cake is an inch or so above the 
board. If the pan is floured before the cake is put in, the 
cake will cling to the bottom of the pan and it will often 
offset the tendencv to fall to invert and cool in this manner. 



WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 



4 teaspoons of a liquid equal i tablespoon. 

4 teaspoons of a liquid equal y 2 gill or l /± cup. 

l /2 cup equals I gill. 

2 gills equal I cup. 

2 cups equal i pint. 

2 pins (4 cups) equal 1 quart. 

4 cups of flour equal 1' pound or 1 quart. 

2 cups of butter, solid, equal 1 pound. 

j/2 cup of butter, solid, equals 34 pound, 4 ounces. 

2 cups of granulated sugar equal 1 pound. 

2*4 cups of powdered sugar equal 1 pound. 

1 pint milk or water equals 1 pound. 
1 pint chopped meat equals 1 pound. 

10 eggs, shelled, equal 1 pound. 

2 tablespoons of butter equal 1 ounce. 

2 tablespoons of granulated sugar equal 1 ounce. 
4 tablespoons of coffee equal 1 ounce. 
1 tablespoon of liquid equal )A ounce. 
4 tablespoons of butter equal 2 ounces, or J /± cup. 
All measurements are level unless otherwise stated in 
the recipe. 



President, 
HENRY B. PALMER 



Vice-President, 
CHAS. E. HEAL 



Secretary, 
WM. CHEYNE 



BARRETT, NEPHEWS & CO. 
Old Staten Island 
Dyeing Establishment 

DON'T WORRY „ 

We clean and dye everything for the wardrobe or home, from the 
Delicate Lace to the Heavy Wilton Carpet, at our extensive works on 
Staten Island — the largest and most complete in America. 

New York and Brooklyn Stores 



334 Canal Street 

near Church Street 

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BROOKLYN, N. Y. 

482 Fulton Street 1177 Fulton Street 

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Over 1,000 Agents 



Offices in Philadelphia, Baltimore and Boston 



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BARRETT, NEPHEWS & CO. 
Old Staten Island Dyeing Establishment 

Executive Offices: 334 Canal Street, New York. 



COOKIES AND CRULLERS 

"It is sometimes pleasant enough to consider the differ- 
ent notions which different persons have of the same thing." 

Addison. 



SUGAR COOKIES. No. i. 
1/^2 cups sugar, 1-3 cup milk, 

1 cup shortening, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 

2 eggs, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

Flour enough to make very stiff, with pinch of salt 
added. Roll very thin, sift granulated sugar over top, and 
bake in good oven. Mrs. Baxter. • 



SUGAR COOKIES. No. 2. 
1 cup sugar, 1 cup butter, 

Three eggs, all beaten together to a cream, use just 
enough flour to mix and roll thin. 

Mrs. Clifford Demarest. 



SUGAR COOKIES. No. 3. 
5 eggs, 2 teaspoons cream tartar, 

2 cups sugar, 1 teaspoon soda, 

1 cup butter, Flour to roll. 

Mrs. Bentley. 



VANILLA COOKIES. 

1 cup sugar, 1 tablespoon milk, 

2 e gg s > 2_ 3 CU P butter, 

3 teaspoons baking powder, Pinch of salt. 
1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Add enough flour to roll out. 

Mrs. J. R. Smith. 

153 



154 

WHITE COOKIES. 
2 eggs, 3 cups flour, 

i cup sugar, 3 teaspoons baking powder, 

Yx cup melted butter, i l / 2 teaspoons flavoring. 

Yx cup milk, 

Makes about fifty. Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



RICH COOKIES. 
Y2 cup butter, Ya cu P flour, 

1-3 cup sugar, y 2 teaspoon vanilla. 

1 egg, well beaten, 

Cream the butter, add sugar slowly and work in well, 
beat egg until very light; to the mixture add flour slowly, 
then vanilla. Drop from tip of spoon in small portion on 
well greased pan, about two inches apart. Spread evenly 
with knife dipped in cold water. Place on each cookie small 
pieces of nuts, raisins, or citron. 

Mrs. James Westervelt. 



CREAM COOKIES. 
1 cup butter, 3 eggs, 

3 cups sugar, 1 teaspoon soda. 

y 2 cup cream. 

Flour, caraway seeds. Roll thin. 

Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



SOUR CREAM COOKIES. No. 1. 
Two eggs well beaten, 1^2 cups sugar, 1 cup melted 
butter (scant), 1 cup of sour cream or milk, and 1 teaspoon 
soda, dissolved in the milk. Flour to roll (about 3 cups). 
Flavor with essence of lemon. Do not roll very thin. 

Mrs. Emma G. Clark. 



SOUR CREAM COOKIES. No. 2. 
1 cup sour cream thick, A little salt, 

1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

1 teaspoon saleratus. 

Flour enough for a stiff dough, roll thin, bake quickly. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



155 

SOUR MILK COOKIES, 
i cup butter, 2 eggs, yolks and whites 

i l / 2 cups sugar, beaten separately, 

1 teaspoon soda (small). 3 tablespoons sour milk, 

Add as little flour as will make them stiff enough to roll. 
Sprinkle with sugar and grated nutmeg before baking. 

Mrs. James Westervelt. 



NEW YEAR'S COOKIES. 
1^2 cups sugar, l / 2 pint water, 

24 cup butter, 2 teasrJoons baking powder. 

Flour to roll, cut out and stamp with print. 

A. R. D. 



OATMEAL COOKIES. 
3 cups fine Scotch oatmeal, l / 2 cup lard or butter, 
2 cups flour, 2 teaspoons baking soda. 

l / 2 cup sugar, 

Pinch of salt, enough milk or water to hold together, 
roll out with oatmeal on the board. 

Mrs. J. R. Smith. 



OATMEAL COOKIES WITH DATE FILLING. 
Yz cup butter, i l / 2 cups rolled oats, 

y 2 cup lard, 2 cups flour, 

y 2 cup sugar, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

2 eggs, 1-3 cup of flour for rolling. 

1 dessert spoon vanilla, 

FILLING. 

Boil 1 pound stoned dates with 1 tablespoon of sugar and 
1 tablespoon of lemon juice. 

Mrs. A. T. Donali.v. 



-156- 

OATMEAL MACAROONS. 
2 tablespoons of butter, 3 cups rolled oats, (oatmeal). 

1 cup sugar, ' 2 teaspoon salt, 

2 eggs. 

Cream the butter and sugar, add eggs well beaten but not 
separated ; then salt, rolled oats and Rumford's Baking 
Powder. Bake in hot oven until brown and crisp. 

Mrs. V. E. Carroll. 



OATMEAL KISSES. 
Beat 1 egg very light, ]/> cup sugar, 

Y\ teaspoon salt (small), i T 4 cups (large) rolled 
Y^ teaspoon vanilla, oats, 

y 2 tablespoon softened but- )/ 2 teaspoon Rumford's Bak- 
ter, ing Powder. 

Beat together thoroughly, drop on well buttered tin, and 
bake in slow oven. A. N. E. 



SCOTCH MACAROONS. 

1 cup sugar, 2 eggs. 

2 cups oatmeal or rolled 1 teaspoon Rumford's Bak- 
oats. ing Powder, 

y 2 cup chopped peanuts, J4 teaspoon salt, 

1 tablespoon butter, J4 teaspoon almond flavor- 

ing. 
Make into small balls and bake on buttered tins. 

Mrs. George W. Kyburg. 



THIN CHOCOLATE COOKIES. No. 1. 
2 eggs, 1 square melted chocolate. 

1 cup butter, Flour enough to make a 

1 cup sugar, soft dough. 

y 2 teaspoon soda, 

Roll very thin and bake quickly. 

Mrs. A. J. Donally. 



30* 

Pound 
Can 



HUMFORD 

baking 

POWDEP 




RUMFORD 

THE WHOLESOME 

BAKING POWDER 



158 

THIN CHOCOLATE COOKIES. No. 2. 
l / 2 cup butter, }/\ teaspoon salt, 

1 cup sugar, 2 ounces Baker's chocolate, 

2,y 2 ounces flour (scant), 2 teaspoons baking powder, 
1 egg, ! 4 cup milk. 

Cream butter, add sugar gradually, then egg well beaten, 
salt and melted chocolate. Beat well, add flour mixed with 
baking powder alternately with milk. Chill, roll very thin, 
cut in fancy shapes, and bake in moderate oven. 

Mrs. James Westervelt. 



DROP CHOCOLATE COOKIES. 
Cream y> cup of butter and 1 cup of sugar, 1 egg, y 2 
cup sweet milk, i i y 2 cups flour, y 2 teaspoon soda, y 2 tea- 
spoon baking powder, 1 cup of chopped raisins, Y\ cup 
chopped nuts, and 1 teaspoon vanilla. Drop from spoon. 

Mrs. C. H. Fuller. 



CHOCOLATE JUMBLES. 
y 2 cup butter, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

1 cup sugar, 2 cups flour and enough 

2 eggs, more flour to roll, 
2 squares Baker's chocolate, 1 tablespoon milk. 

Mix well, toss on a floured board and* roll to an inch in 
thickness. Cut out with a doughnut cutter, dust with granu- 
lated sugar and bake ten minutes. L. C. B. 



SOFT MOLASSES COOKIES. 
1 cup molasses, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 

y 2 cup Swift's Lard, 1 teaspoon soda in 2 tea- 

1 teaspoon ginger, spoons hot water. 

Mix soft, bake in a hot oven. 

Mrs. DeWttt Coleman. 



GINGER COOKIES. 
1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon ginger, 

1 cup molasses, t teaspoon nutmeg, 

1 cup shortening, T {> teaspoon cloves. 

I teaspoon cinnamon. 



159 

One heaping teaspoon soda dissolved in a little hot water 
and Yi cup milk. One well beaten egg and flour enough to 
make a stiff batter, roll very thin, and bake in a good oven 
until nicely browned. Mrs. Baxter. 



GINGER SNAPS. No. i. 
i cup molasses, i teaspoon each ginger and 

y 2 cup brown sugar, cinnamon, 

Large y 2 cup Swift's Lard, y> teaspoon each allspice, 
i tablespoon vinegar. cloves and nutmeg, 

One teaspoon saleratus dissolved in 1-3 cup boiling water. 
Do not put any more flour in than required. Bake in a 
quick oven. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



GINGER SNAPS. No. 2. 
Heat 1 cup of molasses and y 2 cup butter and lard mixed 
until it is melted, do not let it boil; take from the fire, cool, 
and then stir in 1 teaspoon ginger, y 2 teaspoon soda, and 
flour to make a stiff dough. Roll as thin as paper. 

Miss Gertrude Lindsay. 



GINGER SNAPS. No. 3. 
One cup sugar, l / 2 cup butter, y 2 cup lard, 1 cup mo- 
lasses, y 2 cup milk in which dissolve \ i y 2 teaspoons of soda, 
1 teaspoon of ginger, and a little salt. Flour to roll (about 
5 cups or a little more). Roll very thin and handle as little 
as possible. Mrs. Emma G. Clark. 



HERMITS. No. 1. 
4 eggs, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 

4 cups sugar, % cake chocolate, 

1 pound butter. 1 nutmeg, 

6 cups flour, 2 teaspoons cinnamon, 

1 pound chopped walnuts 1 teaspoon soda, 

(not too fine), 1 cup milk. 

1 pound seeded raisins 

(chopped). 

Drop from spoon on greased pan. Above is large recipe, 
try half. Hermits keep well. Mrs. C. J. Lvxx. 



-i6o 



HERMITS. No. 2. 
One and one-half cups of sugar, 1 cup of butter, y 2 cup 
of molasses, 1 cup of raisins, 1 cup of currants, 1 cup of 
nuts of any kind, 3 eggs, 1 teaspoon soda and 1 tablespoon 
each of mace, cinnamon, cloves and salt. Mix as stiff as 
possible and allow Y? teaspoon to each cookie. This will 
make sixty and will keep like fruit cake. 

Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



SHORTBREAD. 
Seven ounces of flour, 1 ounce rice flour, l /\ pound but- 
ter, 2 ounces of sugar. Put all on a table and knead the 
butter and sugar together, then gradually draw in the flour, 
kneading well and keeping the lump firm in both hands. 
When all is worked up into a stiff paste, cut it into two or 
three pieces, and make each piece round or oval, as desired, 
and about a half an inch thick: pinch the edges, dust some 
sugar on top, and bake in a slow oven until they are a nice 
brown color. Miss J. MacKellar. 



SCOTCH CAKE OR SHORT BREAD. 
Melt ^4 pound butter, ^4 teaspoon salt, y± pound of lard, 
and 1 cup of granulated sugar together. Stir into this when 
cool as much sifted flour as the mixture will absorb. Place 
upon the baking board and work in more flour with the 
hands. Roll into sheet half inch thick. Cut into large 
round cakes, pinch the edges firm. Sprinkle candy caraway 
seeds over the cakes. Invert dripping pans, place tissue 
paper on the bottom and place the cakes upon it, removing 
them from the board with a pan-cake turner. Bake in a 
moderate oven a half hour, turning the pan to prevent burn- 
ing. When brown they are cooked. 

Mrs. S. A. Tiedemann. 



MAPLE SUGAR COOKIES. 
1 cup granulated sugar, 2 tablespoons water, 

1 cup maple sugar. 2 level tablespoons baking 
t cup butter, powder. 

2 well beaten eggs, 



-i6i- 



Enough flour to roll out. Sprinkle dough with chopped 
nuts, then roll out and cut. Bake in a quick oven. 

Mrs. N. R. Pendergast. 



ROLLED WAFERS. 
y 2 cup hutter, i^4 cups flour, 

i cup powdered sugar, i teaspoon vanilla, 

Y? cup milk, Pinch salt. 

Cream hutter and add other ingredients. Spread on in- 
verted buttered tins. Bake in quick oven, cut in squares 
and roll. If this is done on top of the range while wafers 
are hot there will be less danger of the wafers breaking. 

E. K. 



NUT WAFERS. 
%. cup butter, i cup nut meats, chopped 

i cup sugar, fine, 

i egg. i cup flour, 

This makes a stiff dough and must be kneaded with the 
hand and patted into little cakes ; bake in hot oven. 

Miss Gertrude Lindsay. 



HAZEL NUT COOKIES. 
One-half pound powdered sugar beaten to a cream with 
5 eggs. To this add Y\ pound of hazel nuts grated or 
ground coarse. The juice and rind of i lemon and about a 
y 2 cup grated and sifted bread crumbs dried. Mix thor- 
oughly and drop with a teaspoon in little heaps on buttered 
pan. Bake in moderate oven. H. A. 



ALMOND COOKIES. 
Beat to a stiff froth the whites of 3 eggs. Add y> 
pound powdered sugar and y 2 pound shelled almonds, 
ground with skins on, 1 tablespoon cinnamon, % teaspoon 
cloves. Dust pastry board with flour and sugar, roll out 
dough one-half inch thick and cut out and bake on buttered 
tins. H. A. 



-l62- 



PEANUT COOKIES. 

i cup chopped peanuts, i l / 2 teaspoons baking pow- 

y 2 cup sugar, der, 

i cup flour, I egg, 

2 tablespoons butter, iJttie salt, 

i tablespoon milk, Mrs. Swain. 



NUT KISSES. 
Whites of 2 eggs beaten very stiff with l / 2 teaspoon fine 
salt. When very stiff add 8 or 9 tablespoons of powdered 
sugar. When thoroughly beaten add l / 2 a cup chopped nut 
meats. Hickory are the best, but almonds, walnuts, pea- 
nuts, pistachio, etc., may be used. Place by teaspoons on 
well oiled tins and bake in moderate oven. A. R. F. 



SAND TARTS. 
1 lb. sugar, 3 eggs. 

]/ 2 lb. butter, 

Flour enough to stiffen so that it can be rolled out in 
thin cookies. Miss Alue Davis. 



BROWNIES. 

1 cup sugar, 2 squares melted chocolate, 

2 eggs, 1 cup chopped walnut meats, 
J / 2 cup melted butter, 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

1 cup flour, 

Spread thin on a buttered pan ; bake, and when cool 
cut in squares like fudge. 

Miss Gertrude Lindsay. 



BANGOR BROWNIES. 
Cream l / 2 cup butter with 1 cup brown sugar, melt two 
squares of chocolate and add ]/ 2 cup chopped walnut meats. 
2 eggs, l / 2 cup flour. 

Bake in cake tins and cut out while hot. 

Mrs. W. H. Childs. 



1 63 

FRUIT I" IX WHEELS, 
i pint flour, y 2 teaspoon salt, 

i tablespoon sugar, 2 teaspoons baking powder, 

2 tablespoons butter, x / 2 pint milk (scant). 

Roll until about an inch thick, spread on this a heaping 
tablespoon of soft butter, and then spread cup of sugar and 
cup of currants on. Roll like a jelly roll, and cut in slices 
and bake. Miss Gertrude Lindsay. 



MARGUERITES. 
Whites of 2 eggs, 1 cup chopped pecan nuts. 

1 cup powdered sugar. 

Put on zephyrette crackers and bake in slow oven. 

Mrs. Clifford Demarest. 



CRULLERS. No. 1. 
1 quart flour, 2 small cups sugar, 

1 cup milk, 7 teaspoons melted lard, 

2 eggs, 3 teaspoons baking powder. 

Nutmeg and about ^2 teaspoons salt. 

Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



CRULLERS. No. 2. 
1 cup sugar, 2 teaspoons baking powder 

1 tablespoon butter, 1 teaspoon salt, 

2 eggs, 1 teaspoon nutmeg. 
1 cup milk, 3 cups flour, 

Cut small with a napkin ring, drop in hot lard ; when 
cold roll in confectioner's sugar. Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



SOUR CREAM DOUGHNUTS. 
1 cup sour cream, 1 teaspoon soda in a little 

3 eggs, hot water, 

1 cup sugar, Pinch of salt. 

Nutmeg to flavor. 
Beat cream and sugar until very light. Add eggs well 
beaten, then soda, salt and nutmeg. Flour enough to roll. 
Handle as little as possible, after flour is in. 

Mrs. C. D. Spaldixg. 



-164- 



RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 
1 cup butter (scant), 2 cups sugar, 

1 cup milk, 1 yeast cake, 

1 cup water, 2 eggs, 

Little salt, Flour enough to knead soft. 

Sift 2 cups flour into a bowl, add salt and sugar, scald 
milk, add water and butter. Dissolve yeast cake in l / 2 extra 
cup warm water. Stir yeast into milk and water, etc., and 
stir all into flour, etc. Stir in 2 eggs well beaten. Add 
enough flour to make a soft dough that can be handled. 
Mix at noon and let rise till night, knead down and let rise 
until morning. Roll out and cut and let stand until light 
and fry in hot fat. Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



SOUR MILK DOUGHNUTS. 
2 eggs, well beaten, 1 teaspoon melted shortening, 

1 cup sugar, 1 teaspoon soda, 

1 teaspoon salt, l /\ teaspoon cream tartar, 

1 coffee cup sour milk, Nutmeg. 

Cut out and let rise thirty minutes on the board before 
frying. Mrs. Henry G. Ely. 



GERMAN ROSETTES. 
2 eggs, well beaten, 3 tablespoons milk, 

4 tablespoons sugar, l / 2 teaspoon salt, 

1 tablespoon melted butter, T /\ teaspoon soda. 

Season with nutmeg, mix stiff, roll ^ inch thick on 
board. Form in rosettes and fry in hot lard. 

Mrs. George W. Kyburg. 



RAISED DOUGHNUTS. 
To 1 quart of bread sponge add 2 beaten eggs, l A cup 
sugar, 1 dessertspoon butter. Chop all together and work 
until smooth, adding as little flour as possible. Roll, cut 
out, placing them some distance apart on board, cover with 
a light cloth and let rise until very light. When ready re- 
move carefully with pastry knife and fry in hot lard. 

N. E. Cook Book. 



PIEIS 

"No soil upon earth is so dear to our eyes, 
i Is the soil we first stirred in terrestrial pies. 



LEMON MERINGUE PIE. 
One cup flour sifted with l / 2 teaspoon salt and y 2 tea- 
spoon baking powder. Put in chopping bowl and chop in 
y 2 cup lard or lard and butter mixed ; when chopped fine, 
and looks like Indian meal, add ]/\ cup of ice water, make 
into balls and place on plate on ice for one hour. Take half 
of pie crust, roll thin and line pie plate, pinch bottom with 
silver fork, so it will not lift from plate in baking. 

FILLING. 

i cup boiling water, Pinch of salt. 

i cup granulated sugar. 

When it boils, stir in 2 tablespoons cornstarch moist- 
ened with a little cold water, and let boil until it is grey, 
stir all the time to prevent burning, add piece of butter size 
of an egg. Grate the rind of 1 lemon and squeeze the juice 
of 2 lemons into a bowl, add the yolks of 4 eggs and beat 
thoroughly. Pour the hot mixture onto the eggs and 
lemon, and when thoroughly blended pour into baked crust. 
Beat the whites of the 4 eggs very stiff with a pinch of 
salt, add 4 tablespoons of powdered sugar and spread on 
the top of pie, brown slightly in oven. 

Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



LEMON MERINGUE PIE. 

Grate 1 lemon and add to it the juice of another. Beat 

the yolks of 3 eggs and sweeten to taste. Stir in 2 full 

cups of milk with 2 tablespoons of flour dissolved in it 

smoothly, add to the lemon, stirring all the time until mixed. 

165— 



i6( 



Dust a little flour over the bottom of the crust, pour in the 
mixture and bake. When baked take out and cool a few 
minutes, then beat the whites of 3 eggs to a stiff froth, add 
3 tablespoons of powdered sugar, beat together and cover 
the top of the lemon filling. Bake quickly until brown. 
This pie has no top crust. 

PIE CRUST. 

One cup of butter and lard mixed, 2 cups of flour, salt 
to taste, and mix with sufficient cold water to convert into 
dough. Roll out thin and cover the pan. 

Mrs. J. J. Haring. 



ORANGE AND LEMON PIE. 
Three eggs, Y\ cup of sugar, 2 tablespoons of butter. 
Beat the butter and sugar together ; then put in the yolks 
of the eggs ; then grate the rind of half an orange and half 
a lemon; then add half a cup of milk or water. When 
baked, whip the whites of the eggs, add a little sugar, and 
spread on top and brown. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



LEMON PIE. 
One and one-half cups of sugar, 3 eggs, 1 cup of cream, 
small y 2 teaspoon salt, 2 teaspoons cornstarch, 1 lemon, 
grate peel, then mix sugar, lemon and yolks of eggs all 
together. Dissolve cornstarch in the cream and then add 
the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth. Bake with 
one crust. Mrs. H. F. Yorke. 



LEMON MERINGUE PIE. 
Put in shallow sauce pan 1 cup granulated sugar, t cup 
water. Juice and grated rind of 2 lemons, yolks of 8 eggs 
and white of one, beaten with 1 tablespoon flour, blend 
thoroughly and cook until it thickens. Put in baked crust 
and set in oven for a few minutes, remove and add remain- 
ing whites beaten with )A cup powdered sugar and set in 
oven to brown. Mrs. Hine. 



1 67 

CREAM PIE. 

4J/2 tablespoons sugar, 2 tablespoons flour, 

1 tablespoon butter, 1 saltspoon salt. 

Beat the yolks of 3 eggs until light. 

Mix thoroughly, pour in i*/> pints of scalded milk, cook 
in a double boiler until thickened, then remove from the 
fire and flavor with 1 teaspoon of vanilla, turn into a baked 
crust, cover with whites of the eggs beaten with 2 table- 
spoons of powdered sugar and set in the oven to brown. 

Miss Julia Blackwell. 



APPLE CUSTARD PIE. 
Peel sour apples and stew until soft. Rub tbrough 
colander. Three eggs, ^2 cup sugar for each pie, 1-3 cup 
butter. Season with nutmeg. Mrs. C. W. Potter. 



CUSTARD PIE. 
2 eggs, 2-3 cup sugar, 

1 tablespoon flour, 1 pint scalded milk, 

Salt, Vanilla, lemon ,or nutmeg. 



ORANGE CREAM PIE. 
Yolks of 2 eggs beaten 1 even tablespoon cornstarch, 

thoroughly, dissolved in milk. 

1 heaping tablespoon flour, 
J/2 cup sugar, 

Pour this into 1 pint milk (boiling), let cook about three 
minutes, let cool and flavor with extract of orange, and 
pour into a baked crust. Beat the whites to a stiff froth, add 
Yi cup sugar, and flavor with extract of orange. Spread on 
top, put in oven and brown slightly. 

Mrs. H. S. Holley. 



SOUR CREAM PIE— ONE CRUST. 
1 coffee cup sour cream, 2 eggs, 

1 cup sugar, A little cloves, cinnamon and 

1 tablespoon of vinegar at salt, 
the last, 

Mrs. F. R. Warren. 



-i68- 



SOUR CREAM PIE. 

Yolks of 4 eggs beaten with I cup sour cream, 

i cup of sugar, i cup seedless raisins, 

y 2 teaspoon cloves, chopped fine. 
Salt, 

Bake in an open crust, using whites of 2 eggs for 

meringue. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



PUMPKIN PIE. 
Pare pumpkin, cut in small pieces and stew in little 
water four or five hours. Put through colander. For three 
pies: 

1 quart pumpkin, £4 P m t granulated sugar, 
3 e gg s > x quart milk, 

2 tablespoons ground china- 2 tablespoons cornstarch, 
mon, dissolved in little milk. 

2 tablespoons ginger, 

Mrs. Abram Powers. 



PUMPKIN PIE. 
1 pint strained pumpkin, 1 pint milk, 
l /z cup sugar, 
1 cooking spoon flour, 
1 saltspoon salt, 

This makes one pie. 



1 egg, 

1 cooking spoon molasses, 

1 teaspoon ginger. 



1 cup lard, 

y 2 cup cold water, 



CRUST. 

1 pint flour, 
y 2 teaspoon salt. 
Yz teaspoon baking powder, 

Always place a spoon of toasted bread crumbs under 
bottom crust. Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



CHOCOLATE PIE. 
Two eggs (yolks), 1 cup sugar, 2 level tablespoons 
melted chocolate, mix with hot water, pour over gradually 
1 cup milk (cold), 1 tablespoon butter melted. One heap- 
ing tablespoon flour. Use whites for meringue when pie 
is done. Mrs. C. D. Spaldixc. 



169 

CHOCOLATE TARTS. 
Grate ' 2 teacup of chocolate and put in a sauce pan with 
1 cup of hot water, a piece of hutter the size of an egg, 1 
tahlespoon of vanilla, 1 cup of sugar, the heaten yolks of 2 
eggs and 2 tablespoons of constarch dissolved in a little 
water; mix well and cook until thick, stirring constantly. 
Pour into tart shells and let cool. Beat the whites of the 2 
eggs to a stiff froth. Add 2 tablespoons of powdered sugar 
and spread on top of the tarts. When ready to serve add a 
Maraschino cherry. This will make twelve tarts. This fill- 
ing may also be used in chocolate pie. 

Miss Irma Demarest. 



SQUASH PIE. 
One and one-half pints Hubbard or Boston squash, 
boiled soft, and put through the colander. 
1^2 cups milk, 2 eggs, 

1 cup sugar, Salt and nutmeg to taste. 

2 teaspoons vanilla, 

Bake with bottom crust only. 

Mrs. H. B. Palmer. 



MOCK CHERRY PIE. 
Two cups of cranberries, cut in halves and soaked in 
cold water half an hour to remove the seeds. One cup of 
seeded raisins. Dissolve a tablespoon of cornstarch in a 
little cold water, and add 1 cup of boiling water, stir until 
it thickens, then add cranberries and raisins, a cup of sugar, 
pinch of salt, 2 teaspoons vanilla. Bake between two crusts. 

Mrs. H. L. Blodgett. 



RHUBARB PIE. 
Enough rhubarb cut in small pieces to fill your pie dish, 
2 tablespoons flour in a coffee cup. Then fill the cup with 
molasses and beat the molasses and flour together, and pour 
over the rhubarb. Also sweeten with i l / 2 cups of sugar. 
Bake with top crust like a tart. 

Mrs. H. B. Palmer. 



170- 



APPLE POT PIE. 
i pint flour, i coffee cup sweet milk, 

1^2 teaspoons baking pow- Pinch of salt, 
der. 

Take nice juicy apples, pare and cut in slices, put in 
stew pan, partly cover with cold water. Let them cook 
until soft, drop crust by spoonfuls on top of apples. Cover 
tightly and let steam until done. Serve with cream and 
susrar. Mrs. Hawley. 



RAISIN PIE. 
i lemon, juice and grated i cup raisins, 

rind, i cup rolled crackers. 

i cup water, 

Stone the raisins and boil in the water to soften them. 

Mrs. Hawley. 



MINCE MEAT. 
2 pounds lean beef boiled, i pound suet, 
5 pounds juicy apples, 2 pounds seeded raisins, 

2 pounds currants, i pound citron, 

y 2 pound lemon and orange 3 tablespoons cinnamon, 
peel, t tablespoon allspice, 

2 tablespoons mace, 1 tablespoon nutmeg, 

t tablespoon salt, Yi gallon sweet cider. 

3 pounds brown sugar. 

Chop beef, suet, apples and citron ; cook slowly two 
hours, and put away in stone jar. 

Mrs. F. D. Baker. 



BLACKBERRY CUSTARD PIE. 
i cup sugar, 1 egg beaten, 

1 cup cream, T /j cup milk, 

1 pint fresh blackberries, A little salt, 

Put all in a crust on a deep plate and bake. Canned 
berries may be used by first pouring off the juice and using 
the berries but canned berries are not as good. 



i;i 

SUMMER MINCE PIE. 
i cup brown sugar, 1 cup raisins (cut in half), 

i cup vinegar, i cup molasses, 

2 cups hot water, 2 cups broken bread, 

1 tablespoon ground cinna- 'S teaspoon salt. 
mon, 1 cup currants. 

1 teaspoon ground cloves, 

Put over fire and let simmer for five minutes. This por- 
tion will make two pies. A few cherries or berries will 
improve. Mrs. V. C. Huyler. 



PATTY SHELLS. 
Roll puff paste one-quarter inch thick, cut with a patty 
cutter and remove the centers from one-half the round into 
a small cutter. Dampen the round near the edges and fit a 
ring on each pressing lightly ; place in a towel between two 
pans of ice and chill the paste until stiff. In cold weather it 
may be chilled out of doors. Place the patties on a baking 
sheet covered with two thicknesses of brown paper and bake 
in a hot oven for about twenty-five minutes. They should 
rise to full height and begin to brown in 12 or 15 minutes. 
The pieces cut from the rings may be baked and used for 
patty covers. When the patty shells are baked remove the 
soft inside with a fork. Mtss Allte L. Davis. 



SANDWICHES 

"All the labor of man is for his mouth, and yet the ap- 
petite is not filled." — Solomon. 



WALNUT AND CHEESE SANDWICHES. 
*/2 cup chopped walnuts, }4 cup Neufchatel cheese. 
Dash of pepper and salt, 

Spread between slices of thin white bread. 

Mrs. S. J. Baxter. 



EGG SANDWICHES. 
Boil hard 6 eggs ; when cold remove yolks and mash 
fine. Put whites of eggs through fine knife of meat chop- 
per. Add to yolks and mix with French dressing. Cut 
white bread thin, spread with mayonnaise dressing, then a 
leaf of lettuce followed by egg mixture and another slice of 
buttered bread. Cut in rounds and serve before lettuce 
wilts. Mrs. S. J. Baxter. 



HAM SANDWICHES. 
]/2 lb. butter. Dash of cayenne, 

2 tablespoons mixed mustard, Little salt, 

3 tablespoons olive oil, Yolk of 1 egg. 

Rub the butter to a cream, add the other ingredients, 
mix thoroughly, and set away to cool. Spread the bread 
with this mixture and put the ham chopped finely between 
slices. Mrs. S. J. Baxter. 



HAM AND VEAL SANDWICHES. 
1 cup cold ham, chopped fine, 2 teaspoons grated iiorse rad- 
1 cup cold veal, chopped fine, ish, 

1 teaspoon mustard. 2 tablespoons mayonnaise. 

4 drops tobasco sauce, 

Spread between entire wheat bread. 

Mrs. S. J. Baxter. 
172 



+73 

SALMON SANDWICHES. 
Drain the oil from a can of best salmon ; remove all 
skin and bone. Mash fine, with the yolks of 6 hard 
boiled eggs, ]/ 2 teaspoon of salt, Y\ teaspoon of paprika. 
2 tablespoons lemon juice, 2 tablespoons chopped parsley, 
Y2 cup of boiled salad dressing, or mayonnaise. Spread 
between white or entire wheat bread. 

Mrs. S. T. Baxter. 



SHRIMP SANDWICHES. 
1 pt. shrimps, chopped, 2. l / 2 tablespoons lemon juice. 

3 tablespoons mayonnaise, 

Spread between slices of white or graham bread. 

Mrs. S. J. Baxter. 



ANCHOVY CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

1 cottage cheese, 2 tablespoons chopped pars- 

2 teaspoons anchovy essence, ley. 
Small teaspoon paprika. 

Spread between slices of entire wheat bread. 

Mrs. S. T- Baxter. 



■MOCK CRAB SANDWICHES. 
Y2 cup grated cheese, 4 tablespoons creamed butter, 

Y2 teaspoon salt. Y* teaspoon paprika, 

Yi teaspoon mustard, 1 teaspoon anchovy paste, 

1 teaspoon vinegar, 2 tablespoons chopped olives. 

Spread between white or graham bread. 

Mrs. . S. J. Baxter. 

CHICKEN AND CELERY SANDWICHES. 
Put between finest knife of meat chopper 1 cup cold 
chicken. Add to it 1 cup of celery cut fine, and 4 table- 
spoons of mayonnaise. Spread butter on round pieces of 
bread. .Mrs. S. T. Baxter. 



174 

SWEET POTATO SANDWICHES. 
Mash with a wooden spoon 8 boiled and carefully 
peeled sweet potatoes. Add half cup of cream, I tablespoon 
butter, enough salt and pepper to season nicely. Then whip 
with fork until very light and stir in )/ 2 cup chopped hick- 
ory nuts, and ^ cup grated cocoanut. Spread between 
slices of graham bread, and stamp with a round cutter. 

Mrs. S. J. Baxter. 



FRUIT SANDWICHES, 
i cup walnuts, chopped, (Hawaiian canned pineap- 

i cup marmalade, pie is good), 

i cup pineapple, chopped, 

Spread between thin slices of white bread and serve 
while fresh. 

Mrs. S. J. Baxter. 



DEVILED CHEESE SANDWICHES. 
yi lb. Roquefort, Yi lb. Philadelphia or Neuf- 

2 tablespoons tomato catsup, chatel, 

i teaspoon Worcestershire Yz teaspoon paprika, 

sauce, 8 chives, chopped fine. 

]/? teaspoon salt, 

Mix thoroughly. This is especially good on saltines. 

Mrs. S. J. Baxter. 



SANDWICHES.— (50 Sandwiches). 

Eight eggs, 3 heads lettuce (just the hearts). Season to 
taste. Boil eggs hard, chop fine with lettuce and cream 
with knife. 

Mrs. V. C. Huyler. 



CHICKEN SANDWICHES. 
Boil chicken soft, use both meats, chop very fine, one 
chicken, one pound butter and season. Cream and spread 
with knife. 

Mrs. V. C. Huyler. 



i/5 

AMERICAN SANDWICHES. 
i cup pickled beets, chopped, 2 tablespoons chopped wal- 

i cup celery, chopped, nuts. 

i tablespoon onion juice, 

Season and mix with heavy mayonnaise and spread 
between thin slices of white, rye or wheat bread. 

Mrs. A, R. Fosdick. 



INDIAN SANDWICHES. 
12 dates, stoned, i cup celery, 

12 walnuts, Chop all together. 

2 apples, sour. 

Season, mix with mayonnaise and spread on white 
bread, cut thin. 

Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



CUCUMBER SANDWICHES. 
Cut i large cucumber after peeling into thin slices, 
cover with French dressing and let stand one hour. Chop a 
green pepper very fine and mix with 2 tablespoons may- 
onnaise. Drain cucumber and put one or two thin slices 
on rounds of bread (cut -from thin slices with biscuit cut- 
ter) and on top mayonnaise with peppers chopped. It is 
best to put the mayonnaise between the slices of cucumbers 
so bread will not absorb. 

Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



CREAM CHEESE AND HONEY. 
Spread thin slices of graham or Boston Brown Bread 
with cream cheese mixed with melted butter and then spread 
with honey. 

Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



MARMALADE SANDWICH ES. 
Butter thin slices of bread, put together and toast in 
wire broiler. Spread with marmalade. Cut with a circular 
cutter and serve hot. 

Mrs. S. T. Baxter. 



-176- 



CHERRY SANDWICHES. 

Stone, crush and drain the cherries. Add one- fourth 

the quantity of blanched almonds, a little lemon juice, and 

' sugar to make very sweet. Spread between thin slices of 

bread and butter, or between slices of sponge cake. Serve 

while nice and fresh. 

Mrs. S. J. Baxter. 



WATER CRESS SANDWICHES. 
Lay water cress thickly between very thin slices of 
smoothly buttered brown bread. Dress with a shake of 
salt, and a squeeze of lemon. 

Mrs. H. P.. Palmer. 



SALAD SANDWICHES, 
i cup chopped chicken, 2 tablespoons chopped olives, 

1 cup chopped celery, 1 tablespoon chopped onion. 

2 hard boiled eggs, chopped, 

Seasoned and moistened with mayonnaise, spread be- 
tween thin slices of white bread. 

Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



TOMATO SANDWICHES. 
Peel and remove seeds from tomato and chop ( not too 
fine). 

1 green pepper, chopped, 2 tablespoons chopped pars- 

2 tablespoons chopped chives. ley, ■ 

Mix all ingredients together and season, highly with 
white pepper and salt and cover with 3 tablespoons oil 
and 1 tablespoon tarragon vinegar. Let stand one hour 
and drain. Add mayonnaise and spread between thin 
slice> of white bread. 

Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



EK3GS 

'The ::uhjar boil, the learned roast an egg." Pope 



PLAIN OMELET. 
4 eggs, i teaspoon salt, 

2 tablespoons boiling water, i tablespoon butter. 

Beat the eggs separately, then mix the eggs, hot water 
and salt. Have the pan very hot. Put a tablespoon of but- 
ter in the pan. Shake over a hot part of the stove until it 
has risen. Then put in the stove oven for a few seconds 
until it browns. Run the knife between the sides of omelet 
and pan, fold and turn on a hot dish. Add the boiling water 
the last thing before pouring into the hot pan. 

Mrs. J. R. Smith. 



CHEESE OMELET. 
The same as plain omelet, only grate cheese on omelet 
before turning over. 

Mrs. J. R. Smith. 



EGG OMELET. 
3 egg*< ¥i cup milk, 

Scant tablespoon flour. Baking powder size of pea. 

Into the beaten yolks of eggs, add milk slowly; then the 
flour, and baking powder dissolved in a little of the milk. 
Add the well beaten whites of eggs and cook in a buttered 
pan. Before serving place in oven and brown. 

Mrs. \Y. A. W estervei/t. 



CREAMED KGGS. 
To each person use i hard boiled egg. cover with cream 
or milk thickened, i teaspoon flour to I cup of liquor, salt, 
pepper to taste. Pour over fresh hot toast ; serve at once. 

Mrs. DeWttt Coleman. 

177 



1 7 8 

BAKED EGGS. 
Into 2 tablespoons cold milk break i egg. Season 
with salt, butter and pepper. Bake in hot oven until the 
white is congealed. Served at once in the cup baked in. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



LUCANIAN EGGS. 
Cut 5 hard boiled eggs in eighths, lengthwise ; add i 
cup cooked macaroni, ^ cup grated cheese, and 1^4 cups 
white sauce. Season with salt, paprika, onion juice and es- 
sence of anchovy. 

WHITE SAUCE FOR LUCANIAN. 

Melt 3 tablespoons butter, add 2 tablespoons flour, rub 
butter and flour together, pour over gradually V/2 cups hot 
milk. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



. FILLED EGGS. 
Filling for six eggs. One teaspoon ful of mustard, 1 
tablespoonful vinegar, 1 tablespoonful olive oil, 3 table- 
spoonfuls chopped ham (yolks of 3 boiled eggs). Boil the 
eggs twenty minutes ; shell, cut in half, take out the yolks 
and fill. Rub the yolks smooth with mustard oil and vinegar 
before adding the ham. 

E. S. W. 



STUFFED EGGS. 
Take as many eggs as required. Boil till hard. Split 
in the middle, removing the yolk, but leaving the whites 
whole in halves. Mash the yolks in a soup plate ; mix them 
slowly with salad oil, the yolk of a fresh egg, mustard and 
vinegar, salt and pepper and a dash of onion. Place these 
mixed yolks in the whites, keeping them warm, but not al- 
lowing them to dry. Make sauce of drawn butter, using 
yolk of 1 egg. Add 1 hard boiled egg, chopped fine, 
through the sauce. Cover the stuffed eggs with the sauce 
and serve hot on toast. 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



CHAFING DISH 

RECI PES 

'The spirit of each dish, and zest of all, 
Is what ingenious cooks the relish call, 

For though the market sends in loads of food. 
They are all tasteless, till that, makes them good. 



CHEESE FONDU. 

1 tablespoon butter, I teaspoon dry mustard, 
i cup milk, Cayenne, 

i cup bread crumbs, 2 eggs. 

2 cups grated cheese, 

Melt the butter in the chafing dish, add the milk, bread 
crumbs and cheese and mustard. Season with cayenne, 
stir constantly, add the two lightly beaten eggs just before 
serving. C. A. S. 



CHEESE FOXDU. 
54 lb. dairy cheese, Onion juice, 

1 gill wine, 1 tablespoon butter, 

Paprika, 6 eggs. 

Put thinly sliced cheese into the chafing dish with a 
little onion juice, a gill of wine and a tablespoon butter. 
Stir till melted, then break in 6 eggs, season with paprika 
and simmer till eggs are set, stirring occasionally with a 
fork ; serve on hot toast and sprinkle with parsley. 

Mrs. Caroline F. Poxd. 



CHEESE SOUFFLE. 

2 tablespoons butter. 2 tablespoons flour. 

3 eggs, l /i cup milk, 

1 cup grated cheese, 54 teaspoon salt. 

Dash of red pepper. 

Mix dry ingredients. Melt butter, add flour, and when 
smooth add milk. Place over hot water pan. add cheese 

179 



-i8o 



and lastly beaten eggs. Cover and cook for twenty min- 
utes without uncovering. Miss A. D. Tuttle. 



CHEESE OMELET. 
4 eggs, V2 cup grated cheese. 

Yx cup milk, 

Beat the yolks and the whites of the eggs separately un- 
til stiff, join, add milk, and season with pepper and salt. 
Put into hot chafing dish well buttered, and just before 
turning sprinkle the cheese into: it. Turn and cook thor- 
oughly. Serve with saltines. 

Miss Mildred Yoppke. 



CHICKEN TERRAPIN. 
Chop one cold roast chicken and one parboiled sweet 
bread, moderately fine. Make i cup cream sauce (with i 
cup hot cream, a 54 CU P of butter, and 2 tablespoons flour. 
Do this on the blazer). Put in the chicken and sweet- 
bread, salt and pepper to taste, put the hot water dish under 
and heat eight minutes. Just before serving add the yolks 
of 2 eggs well 'beaten andi wine glass of sherry. 

Mrs. E. B. Baxter. 



CHICKEN HOLLANDAISE. 

1 pint cooked chicken, 1 cup chopped celery, 

2 tablespoons butter, 2 tablespoons flour, 

1 teaspoon chopped onion, 1 pint boiling water or chicken 
1 teaspoon salt, liquid, 

1 saltspoon pepper, 2 eggs. 

Juice of y 2 lemon, 

Melt the butter in dialing dish, add onion and cook until 
yellow. Stir in the flour and add the water or stock gradu- 
ally, add celery, salt, pepper and lemon, and chicken cut in 
small pieces. When well heated add the yolks of eggs; well 
beaten. Serve on toast. Miss Eva Kipp. 



181 

CREAMED CHICKEN. 

Two tablespoons of butter melted; add 2 tablespoons of 
flour. When nicely mixed add about i pint of bot milk oi 
enough to have a nice creamy consistency. Then add i 
good sized onion grated, ' j of a small green pepper, 
chopped, y 2 a can mushrooms cut in halves, a dash of pap- 
rika and salt enough to flavor nicely. Then put in cold 
chicken of which there should be about 4 cups, let coqk 
long enough to have all thoroughly heated. 

Mrs. E. B. Baxter. 



LUNCHEON CHEESE AX!) EGQS. 
Put on 1 pint of cream (or milk) into a "spider" and let 
heat to the boiling point, and then break in (so as to keep 
them whole) six eggs. When they are set the same as 
poached eggs put them on a hot platter. Add to the cream 
left, 2 tablespoons of grated cheese and reason, then p. ."'- 
over the eggs. Serve very hot with thin buttered toast. 

F. V. V. 



DREAM CAKES. 
Make sandwich of bread with slice of American cheese 
sprinkle dry mustard, red pepper and salr Fry sandwich 
in plenty of hot butter in chafing dish. 

Mtss A. D Tutti.i •:. 



EGGS WITH CHEESE. 
6 eggs, 3 tablespoons grated cheese. 

1 large teaspoon of onion 1 saltspoon paprika, 
juice or chopped onion. Little salt, 
Mix the cheese, butter and onion, paprika and salt in 
the hot pan, and stir until the cheese is melted. Break the 
eggs into a bowl, pour them into the cheese, reduce the 
flame of lamp and stir till done. Stir in chopped parsley and 
serve with toast. Mrs. William Borman. 



-1 82- 



CREAMED EGGS, 
i pint cream, i dozen eggs. 

Pinch salt and pepper. 

Heat cream hot, but do not allow to boil. Have eggs 
well beaten. When cream is thoroughly heated put in eggs, 
stir constantly five minutes or until eggs are cooked. Just 
before removing from dish add salt and pepper. Serve on 
round pieces of toast. Paprika may be shaken on top if 
liked. Mrs. H. S. Ernst. 



CREAMED EGGS. 
Slice 8 hard-boiled eggs, Heat i pint milk. 

Rub together i tablespoon butter and i heaping table- 
spoon flour. One-half teaspoon salt. Dash of red pepper, 
little anchovy or Worcestershire sauce. Slowly stir in milk 
until all is dissolved, then let boil a few minutes. Pour over 
eggs and serve hot. Mrs. L. E. Tuttle. 



CREAMED EGGS. 
Put a piece of butter the size of a walnut in the chafing 
dish and let it get very hot. Beat up 4 or 5 nice fresh eggs 
very light and add about 3 tablespoons of cream or top 
milk and a little salt. Turn this into the hot butter and stii 
well until it thickens. Then stir in a tablespoon of grated 
cheese and serve on squares of buttered toast. 

Mrs. H. O. Pond. 



SPANISH EGGS. 
Cook 1 tablespoon of finely chopped onion and 2 table- 
spoons chopped pepper in 2 tablespoons butter for three 
minutes. Add 3 or 4 mushrooms broken in pieces and l 
cup tomato. When this mixture is hot add 4 beaten eggs, 
$4 teaspoon salt, a little cayenne and 1 tablespoon capers. 
Cook until the mixture thickens, stirring constantly. 

Mrs. E. B. Baxter. 



18 3 

LI >BSTER A LA NEWBURG. 

Meat of a boiled lobster cut I glass of sauterne, 

into large dice, I gill sherry, 

Good sized lump of butter, Yolks of 2 eggs, 
i pint cream, 

Pul the lobster in the chafing dish with tbe butter and 
stir till butter is melted and lobster heated through. Mix 
the sherry with the cream and yolks of eggs, first blending 
the latter with enough cream to make them thick as a may- 
onnaise. Pour the mixture of the lobster, let it simmer a 
moment, then pour the sauterne over the whole and serve 
hot. Mrs. William Borman. 



LOBSTER A LA NEWBURG. 

2 lbs. lobster meat, i tablespoon butter, 

3 eggs, i cup sherry. 
y 2 pint cream, 

Melt butter in blazer, add lobster, pour wine over and 
cook ten minutes, add the beaten yolks of eggs and cream, 
and a dash of red pepper, let all come to a boil and serve 
immediately. Mrs. John T. Bailey. 



LOBSTER A LA MODE, 
i large lobster, or, Bring i pint milk to boiling 

i large can lobster, washed point, 

and shredded, Put in lobster, 

i tablespoon butter, Salt and pepper. 

Have rolled 8 soda biscuits and 2 eggs boiled hard and 
chopped fine. Add to milk and lobster and serve hot. 

Mrs. L. E. Tuttle. 



FRESH MUSHROOMS, 
i lb. medium sized fresh y 2 pt. cream, 

mushrooms. Salt and pepper. 

y 2 cup butter, 

Trim stems, and peel tops of mushrooms and set on ice 
until needed. Into the upper blazer of chafing dish put a 



184— 

generous l /> cup of butter. When hot, turn in the prepared 
mushrooms and cook, stirring often until tender from ten to 
thirty minutes according to size and tenderness of mush- 
rooms. Stir in cream, and when hot season with pepper 
and salt and serve on slices of fresh buttered toast. If the 
mushrooms are large, 'they should be cut into pieces. 

Mrs. Thorton B. Penfteld. 



ENGLISH MONKEY, 
i teaspoon extract of beef, i cup stale bread crumbs, 
i cup milk, ]/2 cup fresh cheese cut in 

1 tablespoon butter, pieces, 

r egg, Salt, pepper (paprika). 

Soak crumbs in milk, melt butter, add cheese. When 
cheese is melted add soaked crumbs, extract of beef and 
egg slightly beaten. Season, cook three minutes and serve 
on toasted crackers. 

Mrs. Charlotte E. WesTerVf.lt. 



CREAMED OYSTERS. 
Scald a cup of cream, over hot water, add 2 dozen plump 
oysters washed and freed from bits of shell. When heated 
thoroughly stir in the well beaten yolks 'of 2 eggs mixed 
with y 2 cup of cream. When slightly thickened, add a 
scant x / 2 teaspoon of salt and a little pepper. Serve on but- 
tered toast. ' Mrs. H. O. Pond. 



CKEAMED OYSTERS. 
Put 1 quart of oysters with ihe broth into the chafing 
dish and let oysters heat through. When their edges have 
curled take them out and add 2 cups milk and 2 tablespoons 
of butter, when boiling, add 2 tablespoons of flour which 
has been stirred smooth in a little cold milk with salt and 
pepper. When thickened add oysters and serve at once on 
toast. Mks. Caroline V. Poxn. 



1*5 

PAX Et< >AST. 
i doz. large oysters, ' _■ pint oyster Liquid, 

i tablespoon butter, Salt and pepper. 

.Melt the butter in the chafing dish, and as it creams, add 
the oysters, liquid, salt and pepper. Cover and o><>k aboul 
two minutest Pour oysters on toast and enough liquid to 
moisten it and serve. Mrs. William Borman. 



OYSTERS A LA Pkn\ IDLXCE. 
Melt 2 tablespoons butter, then add 4 tablespoons 
chopped mushrooms, took two minutes, add 2 tablespoons 
flour and 1 pint of oysters. Cook until the edges curl, a'dd 
a few drops of onion juice, a few drops of tabasco and x / 2 
teaspoon each of lemon juice and salt. Add 1 beaten egg, 
cook until it thickens and serve on round toast. 

Mrs. E. B. Baxter. 



PIGS IN BLANKETS. 
Scald large oysters and drain. Wrap each oyster in thin 
slice of bacon, pin with wooden skewer, then brown in hot 
blazer. Miss A. D. Tuttli;. 



RINKTUM DIDDY. 
Put 1 chopped onion with 2 butter balls in chafing dish, 
cook thoroughly, add x / 2 - can (thick part only) tomatoes, 
slowly, add 1 pound American cheese, cut fine. After that 
is melted add 1 teaspoon mustard. 1 teaspoon salt and 1 
tablespoon Worcestershire sauce, a pinch of cayenne. Serve 
on toast. Miss Irma Demarest. 



SABLENQGLIA. 

Put into the chafing dish the yolks of 4 eggs and 2 table- 
spoons of powdered sugar, which have been mixed together 
with a fork. Then light the chafing dish lamp and pour into 
the sugar and egg 2 wine glasses of cooking sherry; beat 
until it is of the desired consistency. Line sherbet glasses 
with lady fingers or sponge cake, place 2 tablespoons of it 
on cake and serve. Mrs. F. 11. Tiedemann. 



-i86- 



HOT SANDWICHES. 

Take boiled ham and chop fine, put into a chafing dish, 

adding 2 tablespoons of soup stock or beef extract, i of 

cream and a dash of pepper. Stir into a thick paste. 

Spread between daintily cut slices of bread and serve hot. 

Miss Estelle B. Scholey. 



GRILLED SARDINES, 
i box boneless sardines, ■ Juice of i lemon. 
Lump butter, 

Heat butter in chafing dish, when very hot put in sar- 
dines and allow to stand until thoroughly heated. Serve on 
oblong slices of toast with lemon juice over them. 

Mrs. H. S. Ernst. 



SHRIMP RIGGLE. 
Have ready i large can of shrimps and i can of peas, 
heat i pint milk. Rub together i heaping tablespoon butter, 
the same of flour. Salt and pepper. Make a sauce of this 
with the hot milk, into this turn the shrimps and peas. Serve 
on warmed crackers. Miss Overbeck. 



TOMATO RAREBIT. 
Drain through a sieve i large can of stewed tomatoes. 
Put the pulp in the chafing dish, with a lump of butter, 
pepper and salt and heat thoroughly. Into this drop 6 eggs 
and cook for three minutes. Serve on hot toast. 

Mrs. William Bormax. 



WELSH RAREBIT. 
2 cups grated cheese, 2 eggs, 

]/ 2 cup milk, Pinch salt, 

Cayenne, Toasted bread. 

Place milk in sauce pan, when hot add cheese, when boil- 
ing hot add eggs, stir well until melted. Pour over hot 
toast buttered, serve at once. If allowed to cool it is spoiled. 

Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



i8 7 — ' 

WELSH RAREBIT. 
2 lbs. American cheese, i bottle Bass' ale, 

i egg, x / 2 teaspoon mustard, 

Yz teaspoon salt (scant), Little cayenne pepper. 

Scrape the cheese and put it in the chafing dish, add ale 
very slowly, beat the egg with the seasoning and add when 
the rarebit is almost done. Stir the' rarebit hard until all 
the cheese is melted and is smooth and creamy. Serve on 
hot toast. Mrss Gertrude Lindsay. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 
Cut fine about Yz pound of cheese, beat together i egg, 
i teaspoon mustard, y 2 teaspoon salt, and a pinch of red 
pepper. Put all in a chafing dish and stir until smooth, 
then add ale, or milk if preferred, till thin enough to spread 
on toast. This will serve six persons. 

Miss Irma Demarest. 



RAREBIT. 
Grate y 2 pound American cheese, i tablespoon corn- 
starch, ]A teaspoon dry mustard, i teaspoon salt, pinch of 
cayenne pepper and i tablespoon melted butter. When mix- 
ture is melted stir in either i cup of cream, V 2 bottle of 
Bass' ale, or a glass of sherry. Serve on dipped toast. This 
will make four portions. Miss L. F. Pond. 

SPANISH RAREBIT. 
One large Spanish onion, )/ 2 pound cheese. Cut onion 
fine and fry in plenty of butter in covered pan. When 
onions are thoroughly cooked without browning, add cheese 
cut in dice. Serve on toast. Add salt and pepper to onions 
while frying. Mrs. T. J. Boland. 

PEANUT BISQUE. 
Grind i quart of roasted peanuts very fine, place with 
i quart of milk, lump of butter, T /% teaspoon salt into the 
upper pan of chafing dish and cook three-quarters of an 
hour. Thicken with a little cornstarch and serve. 

Miss Estelle B. Scholey. 



-i88- 



SCOTCH WOODCOCK. 
y 2 teaspoon beef extract, i 1 /* cups cream or rich milk, 



Y\ cup of English walnuts 

(cut up), 
i tablespoon butter, (if milk 

is used). 



y 2 lb. New York Cream 

cheese, 
i egg (well beaten), 
1-3 cup olives (cut up), 
Yx saltspoon paprika. 

Put the cream in a top pan of the chafing dish, when hot 
add the cheese and stir until dissolved. 

Miss Estelle B. Scholey. 



CHEESE 

"The latter end of a fray, and the beginning of a feast. 

Fits a dull fighter, and a keen guest." — IIknky IV. 



CHEESE SOUFFLF. 
One cup grated cheese, )/\ teaspoon salt, 

I cup bread crumbs, I cup milk, 

i teaspoon Worcestershire 3 eggs, 

sauce, '4 teaspoon dry mustard. 

These ingredients are all beaten well together, and 
baked in a well greased dish for about twenty minutes in a 
hot oven. 

Mrs. \Y. S. White. 



CHEESE SOUFFLE. 

2 tablespoons butter, 1 cup grated cheese, 
y 2 cup milk, y 2 teaspoon salt, 

3 eggs. Speck of cayenne. 
1 heaping tablespoon flour, 

Put the butter in a sauce pan. and when hot, add the 
flour, stir until smooth, but not browned. Add the milk 
and seasoning. Cook two minutes, then add the yolks of 
the eggs, well beaten, and the cheese. Set away to cool. 
When cold add the whites, beaten to a stiff froth. Turn 
into a buttered dish, and bake them from twenty to twenty- 
five minutes. Serve the moment it comes from the oven. 
The dish in which this is baked should hold a quart. 

Mrs. F B. Lansing. 



SCALLOPED CHEESE. 

In the bottom of a small sized baking dish put a layer 

of thin crackers. Sprinkle over them little bits of butter. 

and a little pepper and salt. Cover this with a layer of 

189 



190 

cheese, cut in rather thin slices. Repeat with the crack- 
ers, butter, etc., until the dish is full, having the cheese for 
the top layer. When this is done, take 1 egg beaten very 
light and mix it with a large cup of milk, and pour this over 
cheese and crackers, and bake from ten to fifteen minutes 
in a hot oven. Miss Tessie Benson. 



1 

ESALLOPED CHEESE. 
2 cups stale bread, cut into Salt and pepper to taste, 

dice, i cup grated cheese, 

1 pint of milk, 2 eggs. 

Put the bread and cheese into a baking dish in alternate 
layers, until the dish is about two-thirds full. Beat eggs 
and add to the milk with the seasoning (not forgetting that 
cheese is sometimes quite salt), and pour over the cheese 
and bread. Bake half an hour in a moderate oven. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



CHEESE SCALLOP. 
Slice bread thin and butter each slice. Cut in pieces to 
fit across the bottom of a buttered earthen-ware baking 
dish. Sprinkle with grated cheese, and season with pepper 
and a little celery salt. Repeat with layers of buttered 
bread and cheese until dish is filled, using the grated cheese 
more plentifully upon the top. Beat 1 egg with 1 cup 
of milk, pour over the bread and cheese and bake one-half 
hour in a hot oven. Serve at once 

Mrs. G. W. Kyburg. 



CHEESE BALLS. 
One-half pound of grated cheese, seasoned well with salt 
and a pinch of cayenne pepper. Add the beaten whites of 
2 eggs. Make into soft balls, fry in hot fat until a golden 
brown. Mrs. C. W. Potter. 



ipi 

CHEESE PUFF. 
4. soda crackers rolled, i pint milk, 

2 eggs, Coffee cup grated cheese. 

Salt, 

Put crackers in baking dish. Beat eggs, milk, salt and 
cheese together and pour over the crackers. 

Mrs. Clifford Demarest. 



CHEESE. 
Take 3 olives, and x /\ of an onion. Chop fine, and mix 
well with a soft cream cheese. Serve with salad, or toasted 
crackers. Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



CHEESE TOAST. 
1 tablespoon butter, 1 cup milk, 

i J /2 tablespoons flour, 1 cup grated cheese. 

Salt and cayenne pepper, 

Make the toast first and keep it hot while preparing 
the sauce. Melt the butter, add the flour and blend 
smoothly. Season, and put in the milk a little at a time, 
stirring constantly. After cooking five minutes, put in the 
cheese, and when melted, pour over the toast and place in 
an oven for five minutes before serving. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



A CHEESE DISH. 
One egg, 2 pounds grated cheese, 1 teaspoonful butter, 
or tablespoonful milk, and a little salt and pepper. Beat 
the egg, add the other ingredients and cook in a double 
boiler until smooth. When thickened pour it on moistened 
toast. 

Miss Mabel Westervelt. 



LEFT-OVER CHEESE. 
Pieces of cheese which have become dry can be grated 
and moistened with a few drops of Worcestershire sauce, 
and enough sherry to form into balls the size of walnuts. 
Serve on lettuce leaves as the cheese course. 

Mrs. T. T. Boland. 



— ■ — 192 

CHEESE STRAWS. 
Four ounces of flour, 2 ounces of grated cheese, 1 
level teaspoonful salt, Yi teaspoonful white pepper, 1 dust 
of cayenne pepper, juice of one lemon, yolks of two eggs, 
and enough melted butter to make a paste. Roll paste to 
one-third or one-fourth of an inch in thickness, cut in strips, 
and bake in floured pan in a moderate oven until brown. 

E. S. W. 



X( )ODEES AND CHEESE. 
After boiling the noodles, in salted water, drain and add 
about 6 ounces melted butter, l /\ pound grated Parmesan 
cheese and white pepper and a few rubs of nutmeg. Shake 
over the fire until the cheese is melted and serve at, once. 

Mrs. T. J. Boland. 



CHEESE TART. 
One-half pound pot-cheese, 2 tablespoon fuls of flour. 3 
ounces melted butter, y 2 cup of sugar, 3 eggs, 2 ounces each 
of currants and raisins, l / 2 pint sweet or sour cream, a little 
ground cinnamon and salt. Flavor with 2 tablespoon fuls 
of rosewater. Wet the flour gradually with milk, then add 
beaten eggs and the rest of the ingredients. Bake in a pie 
crust in a quick oven. Mrs. T. J. Boland. 



PICKLES 

'Unquiet meals make ill digestions." 

Comedy of Errors. 



FAVORITE PICKLES. 
2 qts. raw cabbage, chopped 2 tablespoons salt, 

fine, 2 teaspoons black pepper, 

2 qts. boiled beets, chopped J/> teaspoon red pepper, 

fine, 1 teacup grated horseradish. 

1 1 /2 cups sugar, 

Cover with cold vinegar and keep sealed from the air. 

Mrs. Edwin Demarest. 



CHILI SAUCE. 
12 large ripe tomatoes, 2 cups vinegar, 

2 large onions, 1 tablespoon salt, 

4 long green peppers, 1 teaspoon cinnamon, 

4 tablespoons sugar, y 2 teaspoon cloves. 

Chop the onions, tomatoes and peppers and boil all 
together three hours. Seal in fruit jars. 

Mrs. Edwin Demarest. 



MUSTARD PICKLES. 
1 qt. cucumbers, Boil and stir until smooth: 

1 qt. cauliflower, 1 qt. vinegar, 

1 qt. green tomatoes, Yi lb. mustard, 

1 pt. small onions, Vz cup sugar, 

2 large green peppers, Yz cup flour, 
Cut up and soak over night Some celery seed. 

in salt and water, Tablespoon tumeric powder, 

Drain and cover with boil- Pour over vegetables. 
ing vinegar, repeating 

same for three days. Mrs. Edwin Demarest. 
193 



1 9 4 

CHILI SAUCE. 
One peach basket of ripe tomatoes, peal and cut fine as 
for stewing, and after boiling two hours add 6 green pep- 
pers and 8 white onions, chopped fine, 3 cups of cider vine- 
gar, 5 cups of sugar, 1 cup of salt. Let it boil down until 
no water appears, then add 1 tablespoon of ground cloves 
and 2 of ground cinnamon. Let boil fifteen minutes longer, 
put in large mouthed jars hot, but it keeps better in Mason 
jars. Mrs. V. L. Clarke. 



PEPPER HASH. 
10 green peppers, 10 red peppers. 

10 onions, chop very fine, 

Pour over mixture boiling water and let stand twenty 
minutes. Then squeeze water off until dry, then add 2 
cups sugar, 2 tablespoons of salt, and pour over it 1 quart 
of boiling vinegar. Mrs. V. E. Carroll. 



GREEN TOMATO PICKLE. 

Slice 1 peck green tomatoes and cover with salt twenty- 
four hours. Drain the brine off and cover with 2 quarts of 
water and 1 quart of vinegar. Boil fifteen minutes and 
drain again, then add 

12 large sliced onions, 1 stick cinnamon, 

2 tablespoons whole cloves, \y 2 lbs. sugar, 
1 tablespoon mustard seed, 2 qts. vinegar. 
1 tablespoon celery seed, 

Boil altogether slowly one hour and put in stone jar. 

Miss Sarah Watson. 



SWEET GREEN TOMATO PICKLE. 
Eight pounds green tomatoes sliced, over which sprinkle 
l /z cup of salt and let stand a few hours, drain and wash off 
salt. Add 4 pounds sugar and let stand over night. In the 
morning place over fire and simmer until tender. Heat 1 
quart of cider vinegar, spicing with 1 tablespoon of cloves, 2 
sticks cinnamon; pour over tomatoes and cook fifteen min- 
utes. Then cool, put into jars and seal. 

Mrs. James Westervelt. 



195 

PICKLED TOMATOES. 
One peck green tomatoes cut in thin slices, i cup of salt 

sprinkled through them over night. In the morning drain 
off juice. Three green peppers chopped fine, 10 large onions 
sliced, y 2 cup of white mustard seed, i pound brown sugar, 
i cup of molasses. Sprinkle these through tomatoes and 
cover with vinegar. Simmer or boil slowly about one hour, 
keeping covered. Mrs. E. E. Cattelle. 



PICCALILLY. 
i peck tomatoes, 6 peppers, 

3 heads cabbage, i pt. salt, 

12 onions, 

Let stand twenty-four hours, then drain off the salt 
water and add : 

i tablespoon allspice, i teacupful mustard or celery 

i tablespoon cloves, seed, 

i gallon vinegar. 

Mrs. Edwin Demarest. 



BORDEAUX PICKLES. 
4 qts. cabbage, • 2 lbs. sugar, 

4 green peppers, shredded 2 qts. tomatoes, 

fine with knife, l / 2 oz. tumeric, 

y 2 oz. celery seed, i tablespoon salt, 

2 oz. mustard seed, 2 qts. vinegar. 

Cook until tender, then bottle. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



BORDEAUX SAUCE, 
i qt. green tomatoes, Y\ tablespoon mustard seed, 

2 qts. cabbage, y 2 tablespoon whole allspice, 

5 small onions, Yz cup sugar, 

2 green peppers, cut fine, i teaspoon celery seed, 
I red pepper, 2 teaspoons salt, 

2-3 tablespoon tumeric i carrot, 
powder. T qt. vinegar. 

Boil together until tender. 

Mrs. Edwin Demarf.st. 



196 

BORDEAUX SAUCE. 
Two gallons chopped cabbage, 1 gallon green tomatoes, 
1 dozen onions, 10 tablespoons salt sprinkled through and 
let stand over night. Squeeze out in the morning, and rinse 
out some of the salt. Add 1 ounce whole cloves, J-4 ounce 
whole allspice, ^ ounce whole black pepper, ]/ 2 pound mus- 
tard seed. 1 ounce tumeric powder, 1 ounce celery seed, 1^ 
pounds brown sugar and 1 gallon vinegar. Cook twenty 
minutes. Mrs. E. E. Cattelle. 



GREEN TOMATOES. 

One peck of green tomatoes, sliced thin. Sprinkle with 
salt and let stand over night. Slice 12 onions; put with the 
tomatoes in layers, with the following spices : 
4 oz. ground mustard, 1 oz. pepper, 

4 oz. white mustard seed, 1 oz. cinnamon, 
1 oz. cloves, 1 tablespoon salt, 

1 oz. allspice, y 2 lb. brown sugar. 

1 oz. ginger, 

Boil two hours in vinegar enough to cover. 

Mrs. J. R. Smith. 



TOMATO BUTTER. 
10 lbs. fine ripe tomatoes, 1 tablespoon of cinnamon, 
5 lbs. brown sugar, cloves, allspice and mace. 

1 pt. cider vinegar, 

Boil gently for three or four hours. Skin the tomatoes 
before using and remove all hard parts. 

Mrs. H. B. Palmer. 



PICKLED ONIONS. 
Peel 2 quarts small white onions, and put in brine of ^2 
cup salt to 1 cup water. Let stand twelve hours. Put on 
fire in the same brine and just bring to a boil, then drain. 
Have ready boiling 2 cups of white wine vinegar and 1 cup 
of water, t tablespoon sugar. Put in the onions, just scald 
them, then seal while hot. Mrs. F. D. Baker. 



197 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 
2 qts. vinegar, cup sugar, 

y 2 cup salt, l / 2 cup mustard. 

Stir all together and add as many small cucumbers 
(freshly picked) as the vinegar will cover. This will keep 
any length of time. Mrs. White. 



CHOPPED PICKLES. 

One-half bushel of green tomatoes, 12 onions, and 8 
green peppers, all chopped fine; sprinkle over them a pint of 
salt and let stand over night; then drain them, cover with 
strong vinegar and cook half an hour, then drain again; 
2 lbs. sugar, 2 tablespoons ground mustard, 

1 qt. vinegar, 2 tablespoons cinnamon, 

Yi pt. grated horseradish, 2 tablespoons cloves. 

Let this boil, putting in the peppers, and mix all while 
hot. Mrs. J. R. Smith. 



RIPE CUCUMBER PICKLES. 
Prepare and quarter ripe cucumbers, take out the seeds, 
clean and lay in brine that will float an egg, for nine days, 
stirring every day. Take out and put in clear water one 
day. Lay in alum water (a lump of alum the size of a 
medium hickory nut to a gallon of water) over night. Make 
a syrup of 1 quart of brown sugar to 1 quart of vinegar, 2 
tablespoons each of broken cinnamon, mace and whole pep- 
per. Make syrup enough to cover the slices, lay them in 
and cook until tender. Mrs. T. R. Smith. 



FRENCH PICKLE. 
1 head of cabbage, y± peck small onions, 

1 cauliflower, *4 peck small cucumbers. 

All whole except cabbage land cauliflower. Put all 
together and add 1 cup of salt and let stand over night. 
Rinse well, then cover with vinegar. While cooking add 1 
pound sugar, 1 ounce tumeric powder, 2 ounces celery seed, 
small box mustard. Boil twenty minutes and then bottle. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



198 

DELICIOUS PICKLES. 

One hundred medium size (thumb) cucumbers sliced 
across, sprinkled with a cup of salt and left over night. In 
the morning drain well. Take : 

1 coffee cup olive oil, J /\ lb. white mustard seed, 

Yz lb. black mustard seed, 2 teaspoons sugar. 
l /\ cup celery seed, 

Mix well together, then mix with pickles so that every 
slice is covered with the dressing. Pack in a large jar and 
cover with cider vinegar. Ready for use in ten (10) days. 

Mrs. C. J. Lynn. 



HIGDOM PICKLES. 

1 head cabbage, chopped fine, 1 small cup salt. 

Mix and let stand twenty-four hours, then squeeze out 
juice. 

2 qts. green tomatoes, Y\ lb. mustard seed, 

1 qt. onions, 1 tablespoon ground cinna- 

3 or 4 red peppers, mon, 

Chop all fine, 1 tablespoon ground cloves. 

Put all together and cover with vinegar. 

Mrs. White. 



CHOPPED FRENCH PICKLE. 
1 qt. chopped celery, 1 qt. green tomatoes, 

1 qt. ripe cucumbers, chopped, 

chopped, 1 qt. white onions, chopped, 

1 qt. green cucumbers, 1 qt. cauliflower, chopped, 
chopped, 3 red and 3 green peppers, 

^j large teacup mustard seed. 
Mix thoroughly together and pour boiling salted water 
over all and let stand all night. Strain ; scald in 1-3 vinegar 
and 2-3 water. 

1 qt. vinegar, 2 cups sugar, 

y 2 oz. tumeric, 2 heaping teaspoons mustard. 

1/2 cup flour, I 

Heat the vinegar and sugar together, mix flour, mustard 
and tumeric together, and moisten with cold water or vine- 
gar and sugar and let cook until it thickens, then stir in 



199 

chopped mixture. Put away in air tight jars in a cool 
place. Mrs. A. R. Fosdick. 



CHOW CHOW. 

Yi peck green tomatoes, cut As many large pickles as you 

in small pieces, desire cut in small pieces, 

I qt. small onions, Yi doz. ears of corn, 

i pt. lima beans, 3 tablespoons yellow mustard, 

1 qt. string beans, cut in 4 tablespoons mustard seed, 

pieces, 3 tablespoons celery seed, 

1 qt. small cucumbers, 1 lb. brown sugar. 

Cut tomatoes and onions and lay them over night salted, 
drain water off in morning. Boil lima beans until tender, 
then add all together and cover with vinegar and boil for 
half an hour. Mrs. White. 



CHOW CHOW MUSTARD PICKLE. 
y 2 lb. English mustard, >4 oz. tumeric powder, 

2 tablespoons mustard seed, Y* S 3 ^- vinegar, 
1Y2 cups sugar. 1 gill salad oil, 

Y> cup flour, 1 qt. small cucumbers, 

1 qt. string beans, cut small, 1 large head cauliflower. 

2 qts. button onions, 

Boil each separately in salted water, put cucumbers in 
salted water for two or three hours. Mix all together and 
stir into boiling vinegar. Mix flour, mustard, and tumeric 
powder with little cold vinegar and stir into boiling vinegar. 
Stir constantly to keep from burning. Pour vegetables in 
dressing, stir and put in jars. 

Miss Sarah Thomas. 



CUCUMBER RELISH. 

Take large cucumbers, full grown, that are slightly 
yellow, pare, remove seeds and chop. Put pulp in 
bag, drain and measure. Two cups pulp to 1 cup vinegar, 
1 saltspoon red pepper, level saltspoon of salt, T 4 cup grated 
horse radish. Mix thoroughly and seal in bottles. One 
onion added to every six cucumbers improves the flavor. 

Mrs. C. D. Spalding. 



-200 



TO CAN GREEN BEANS. 
Wash and remove strings, slice lengthwise, and fill jars 
which have been sterilized, let cold water run into jar until 
it overflows, adjust the cover of the jars without rubbers. 
Fill a wash boiler with cold water first laying boards on 
bottom, put jars on boards, place over the fire and let boil 
three hours, steadily watching that the jars are kept covered 
with water over the tops. At the end of three hours remove 
from the fire, allow jars to cool in the boiler, so they can be 
handled quickly, adjust rubbers and covers, screw air tight, 
keep in a dark place. Mrs. Carl O. Giessler. 



DAINTY RELISH. 
Chop fine : i lb. brown sugar, 

2 qts. green tomatoes, i medium sized head cabbage, 

4 onions, 2 green peppers, 

1 red pepper, seeds taken 2 heads celery, 
out, 34 oz - tumeric, 

Yz oz. celery seed, 2 qts. vinegar. 

2 oz. white mustard seed, 

Mix all together; boil two hours; add salt to suit taste. 

Mrs. C. W. Coyte. 



COLD SLAW. 
Chop cabbage very fine, Yolks of 4 eggs, 

Yz small teacup water, T / 2 pt. vinegar, 

24 small teacup sugar, 1 teaspoon salt, level, 

l /z saltspoon pepper (cay- 1 teaspoon English mustard, 
enne and white, equally 2 rounding tablespoons flour 
mixed), (or i]A of cornstarch), 

r cup butter, mixed with little water. 

Put water, salt, pepper, mustard, butter and sugar into 
vinegar and boil all together; add thickening and boil for ten 
minutes. Beat the eggs well. Take the mixture from the 
stove and add the eggs. Put back on the stove and let it 
come to a boil. Then put through a strainer. Will keep 
some time in cold place. Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



-201- 



TOMATO CATSUP. 
i peck ripe tomatoes, 2 tablespoons mustard, 

4 onions, boiled together, 1 cup sugar, 

strained and boiled until i l /> tablespoon> allspice, 
nearly thick, 1 tablespoon salt, 

Add ]/ 2 teaspoon red pep- 3 cups vinegar, 
per, 

Mrs. C. W. Coyte. 



TOMATO CATSUi'. 
Peel ripe tomatoes and cut up in 10 quart pan ; add 4 
red pepper pods, boil until soft enough to strain through a 
sieve, stirring frequently to prevent burning. After strain- 
ing 2 quarts of tomatoes add : 
2 level tablespoons salt, 1 tablespoon allspice, 

2 tablespoons white pepper, 1 teaspoon cloves, 
2 tablespoons ground nuts- 1 pt. strong apple vinegar, 
tard. 
Simmer to one-half, stirring frequently over slow fire; 
let it cool before putting into bottles. Cork very tight and 
keep in cold dark place. 

Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



WATER MELON PICKLE. 
Ten pounds water melon rind boiled in salted water until 
tender, drain off water and make syrup of 2 pounds of 
white sugar, 1 quart vinegar, l / 2 ounce of cloves, 1 ounce of 
cinnamon. The syrup to be poured boiling hot over the 
rind, after the rind is thoroughly drained. 

Miss Sarah Thomas. 

JUMBO. 
5 lbs. grapes, 5 lbs. sugar, 

2 lbs. raisins, 3 oranges (peel and all). 

Pulp grapes and cook pulp until seeds are loosened, then 
strain. Grind raisins and oranges in a meat chopper, then 
put skins of grapes, juice, raisins, oranges and sugar 
together and cook briskly for twenty minutes. 

L. W. W. 



-202- 



PICKLED PEACHES. 
10 lbs. of fruit, 5 lbs. sugar, 

I/^ pts. vinegar, 1 oz. whole cinnamon, broken. 

2 tablespoons whole cloves (put spices in small bags), 

Pare fruit and lay in sugar one hour. Drain off syrup 
and add 1 cup of water; let boil five minutes, skim and add 
fruit, let cook until tender. Take out and lay on plates 
until cool. Put in jars when cool. Take syrup, vinegar and 
spices and cook fifteen minutes; pour over fruit hot; then 
seal. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



PEACH CATSUP. 
Seven pounds peaches after they are stoned, peeled and 
cut up. Three and one-half pounds brown sugar, 1 quart 
vinegar. Put y 2 ounce allspice, cloves and cinnamon buds 
in bag and cook all two or three hours. 

Mrs.'w. H. Childs. 



SPICED PEACHES. 
7 lbs. peaches, 1 qt. vinegar. 

3 lbs. sugar, 

Boil vinegar and sugar, pour over fruit, let stand over 
night, pour off and boil again, pour over once more, let 
stand until next day, put altogether over the fire with 1 
ounce cinnamon sticks, ^2 ounce cloves in bags, and let sim- 
mer until peaches are tender. Put in stone crock, cover 
tightly. These are better when kept several months. 

Mrs. N. R. Pendergast. 



BRANDY PEACHES. 
Three and one-half pounds sugar; boil down in little 
water. Put in the peaches and cook until you can put straw 
through, take out and lay on dish. Cut up some and let cook 
all the time in the syrup, when done add 2 pounds more of 
sugar, then take 2 cups of syrup and 1 cup brandy. Put 
into jars hot. Mrs. Marion Kirkby. 



203 

BRANDIED PEACHES. 

Put the peaches in boiling water for a few minutes, 
when the skin will come off easily. Make a syrup of l / 2 
pound of sugar and l / 2 teacup of water for each pound of 
peaches. Skim as the scum rises in boiling, then put in 
the peaches and boil them gently until tender, no longer. 
Take them out carefully and fill jars. Remove the syrup 
from the fire and add to it y 2 pint of the best brandy to 
every pound of peaches. (You can use less brandy if pre- 
ferred). Mrs. J. B. Lansing. 



SPICED CRABAPPLES. 
6 lbs. crabapples, cored and 2 lbs. seeded raisin-. 

chopped fine, 1 pint vinegar, 

2 oranges, with peel chopped 2 teaspoons cinnamon. 

fine, y 2 teaspoon cloves. 

6 lbs. sugar. 

Heat vinegar, sugar and spices hot. Add the other in- 
gredients, boil slowly twenty-five minutes. Put into a gal- 
lon jar and cover with a buttered paper. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



GRAPE CATSUP. 
1 pt. vinegar, 3 lbs. sugar. 

5 lbs. grapes, 

One tablespoon each of cinnamon, cloves, black pepper 
and salt. Wash the grapes, then stem, mash and rub 
through the wire strainer. Then add the other ingredients 
and boil until the desired thickness. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



CANNING AND 

PRESERVING 

"Without good company, all dainties lose their true 
relish, and like painted grapes are only seen — not tasted." 



TO PRESERVE STRAWBERRIES IN THE SUN. 
Take 7 pounds of berries and 7 pounds of sugar. 
Place them on the back of the stove until the sugar is dis- 
solved. Shake the preserving kettle to prevent burning. 
After the sugar is dissolved boil gently about ten minutes. 
Then pour in shallow dishes and place outside in the sun. 
They must be stirred occasionally. No stated rule can be 
given for the time it will take, but they must be left out 
until the juice is quite thick. Do not leave them out at 
night. When thick enough place in jars and seal. If the 
preserving kettle is small take a smaller quantity as crowd- 
ing will mash the berries. 

Mrs. John H. DeMott. 



CANNED STRAWBERRIES. 
Five pounds of berries make three quart cans. Take 5 
pounds of fruit, 2^2 pounds of sugar. Place them on the 
back of the stove until the sugar is dissolved. Boil about 
ten minutes. In order to keep the berries whole do not 
boil them too hard. Mrs. John H. DeMott. 



BRANDIED PEACHES. 
Make a syrup the same as for preserving; let it come to 
a boil, then skim ; lay in peaches enough to cover the bot- 
tom of the preserving kettle and cook until they are tender 
and transparent, but not "mushy." Take out the fruit 
with a skimmer and place carefully in jars. Crack some of 
the pits, put in the syrup and cook fifteen minutes, or until 
slightly thickened, add brandy, l / 2 a cup to 2 cups of syrup ; 
strain the hot syrup, then pour it over the peaches in the 
jars and seal at once. Mrs. J. J. Haring. 
204 



205 

CANNED PEACHES. 
3 pounds sugar, i quart water. 

Keep on stove and use as needed. Can 2 cans at a 
time. Miss Sarah Thomas. 



PEACH MARMALADE. 
7 pounds of fruit, Juice of 1^ oranges, 

3 pounds of sugar, 1 pound of seeded raisins, 

Grated rinds of 2 good chopped. 

sized oranges, 
Cook until thick. Mrs. John H. DeMott. 



GOOSEBERRY TUTTI FRUTTI. 
4 pints sugar, 3 pints gooseberries, 

1 pint water, 2 oranges, cut in small pieces. 

y 2 pound seeded raisins. 

Cook twenty-five minutes and put in glas-r-. 

Mrs. C. D. Spaldixg. 



SUNSHINE CHERRIES. 
Pit the cherries, saving juice of cherries. One cup 
sugar, 4 tablespoons cherry juice or water. Boil until it 
spins. Drop in cherries and boil ten minutes. Pour on 
platters and put in sun. When juice is like thick syrup 
put in jelly glasses, add a tablespoon of brandy to each 
glass and cover with parafine. Strawberries or gooseber- 
ries prepared in same way are delicious. 

Mrs. C. D. Spaldtng. 



PLUM RELISH. 
One-half peck blue plums. Stew a little and put in bag 
and squeeze. To 1 cup of juice add 1 cup sugar. Two 
pounds of seeded raisins, grated rind of 2 oranges, juice of 
6 oranges. Boil twenty minutes and put in glasses. 

Mrs. W. IT. Childs. 



-2o6- 



PLUM CONSERVE. 
3 pounds plums (pitted), 4 oranges, juice, skins of 2 
i l /2 pounds Sultana raisins, grated. 
5 pounds sugar. 

Boil one hour. Mrs. E. E. Cattelle. 



PRESERVED WATERMELON RIND. 
Fourteen pounds raw rind, 8 pounds sugar, and 4 
lemons; three large ones will do. Boil the rind soft in 
water, then add the sugar, a little at a time. When thick 
enough add 4 sliced lemons, removing all the seeds. Let 
cook a few minutes. Pour in jars and seal. 

Mrs. John H. DeMott. 



MARMALADE. 

1 grape fruit, 4 oranges, 

2 lemons, 2^2 quarts water (10 cups). 
5 pounds sugar, 

Wash and shred fruit and cover with water and let 
stand over night. Boil slowly three hours, then add sugar 
and let boil three-quarters of an hour. Makes six pint 
jars. K. L. 



ORANGE MARMALADE. 
3 oranges, 10 glasses water, 

1 lemon, 4 pounds sugar. 

Grate yellow rind off lemon and oranges, throw away 
bitter white part, slice pulp. Cover with water and let 
stand twenty-four hours. Add sugar. Boil one hour, or 
until thick. Makes eight or ten glasses. To be eaten with 
meat. Mrs. L. B. 



CRANBERRY JELLY. 
Add 1 teacup of water to a quart of cranberries; cook 
ten minutes, strain, return to fire, add 2 heaping cups of 
sugar and cook ten minutes longer, stirring often. This 
will make a solid jelly. Mrs. J. T. Bailey. 



207 

GRAPE FRUIT MARMALADE. 
Cut into halves 2 grape fruit, remove the hard white 
center and the seeds. Remove the seeds from 2 lemons. 
Grind hoth these through the meat grinder and place into 
an agate pot, cover well with boiling water. Let stand over 
night. In the morning place upon the range and cook until 
tender. Then add 1 pound of granulated sugar, and cook 
one-half hour until it thickens. Remove from the fire, 
place into glasses and seal with wax or paper. 

Mrs. S. A. Tiedemann. 



CHIP PEARS. 
Eight pounds of fruit, sliced very thin; 6 pounds sugar. 
Let stand over night; in the morning add \Y\ pounds 
of candied ginger, sliced thin; add 5 lemons, peeled and 
sliced thin. Cook slowly on back of stove all day. Place in 
glass jars and seal with wax paper. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



GINGER PEARS. 
Eight pounds of pears cut in thin slices, 8 pounds of 
sugar, the juice of 4 lemons (the rind chopped fine if you 
use it), 2 ounces of ginger root soaked over night in a little 
water, then chopped fine. Make a syrup of the sugar, add 
the other ingredients and boil slowly about four hours. 

Mrs. C A. Swift. 

CANDIED ORANGE PEEL. 
Wash orange peel, boil in water till it can be pierced with 
a broom straw ; drain ; when cold scrape white part from 
rind with a silver spoon. Make a syrup of equal parts of 
sugar and water, and when boiling add peel, as syrup will 
cover well. Simmer slowly until peel is clear, then seal in 
tumblers. W. B. 



PINEAPPLE SAUCE. 
Eight pounds fruit. 8 cups water; cook till tender; 
add 6 pounds sugar. Cook till transparent; seal. 

Mrs. F. L. C. 



-208- 



QUINCE HONEY. 
5 good sized quinces, i pint water. 

5 pounds sugar. 

Grate or put through a meat chopper the quinces, place 
in large preserving kettle, stir all together, boil one-half 
hour. This makes n glasses. Cover as jelly. A pleasing 
change from jelly or preserves of quinces. 

Mrs. DeWitt Coleman. 



APPLE GINGER. 
8 pounds sweet apples, 8 pounds sugar, 

chopped fine, i quart boiling water. 

Yi pound ginger root, cut 
fine, 
Boil until you cannot see any of the white specks of the 
apples. Mrs. H. C. Tunis. 



STRAWBERRY AND RHUBARB JAM. 
2-3 pound strawberries, Y\ pound sugar. 

1-3 pound rhubarb, 

Cook until it jells. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



RHUBARB AND ORANGE JAM. 
4 pounds rhubarb, 4 oranges, 

4 pounds sugar, Juice 1 lemon. 

Slice oranges very thin and cook in a little water. Add 
the rhubarb and cook until tender. Add sugar and lemon 
and cook until thick. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



GRAPE JUICE. 
Wash and crush grapes with a potato masher ; boil 
until it is a soft pulp. Drain over night through a jelly 
bag. 1 coffee cup sugar to 3 quarts juice ; bring to a boil- 
ing point, and bottle hot, running over the bottles to get the 
air out. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



209 

GRAPE JELLY. 
Stem and mash the grapes. Cook them in a sauce pan 
without water until soft. Put them into a hag of thin cloth; 
let drip over night. Measure the juice, then measure out 
an equal amount of sugar. Cook the fruit juice without 
the sugar fifteen or twenty minutes; then add the sugar, 
and when dissolved strain into jelly glasses. 

Mrs. C. A. Swift. 



PRESERVING PEACHES, PLUMS AND PEARS. 
Scald peaches and plums first, pare pears, and halve. 
Use 4 quarts sugar to i quart water for 8 quarts fruit. 
Cook and seal. Mrs. F. L. C. 



QUINCE PRESERVE. 
Choose fine, yellow quinces, pare them and remove the 
hlossom ends, but do not put the latter in with the parings. 
Core and quarter the fruit, and drop into cold water. When 
all are pared, weigh the quartered quinces and allow i 
pound sugar to i pound fruit. Add to the parings and cores 
enough water to cover them; boil till very soft and strain 
through a jelly bag; return the juice to the fire, add a little 
water if necessary, and boil the quinces in it until tender. 
When tender, skim off the fruit and lay it on a platter, add 
sugar to the juice, and when the sugar is dissolved return 
the fruit ; cook until boiling hot, and then can according to 
general rule. Mrs. F. L. C. 



GREEN TOMATO PRESERVE. 
Take a peck of green tomatoes, put them in cold water 
and bring to a boil ; boil until tender. Take them out and 
drain the water from them. Take some of the water in 
which they were boiled, enough to cover them; adding 
sugar enough to make a thick syrup. Slice about l /i dozen 
lemons and add; boiling all together about an hour or until 
thev seem to be tender and soaked through. Can. They are 
very rich and nice. Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



-2IO 



DANDELION WINE. 
One quart dandelion flowers, 4 quarts boiling water, y 2 
cup yeast, 1 lemon. Put all together and let stand six days, 
stirring every day; then strain. Put in a jug after adding 
the beaten white of an egg. Let it ferment all it will before 
bottling. R. T. J. 



DRIN KS 

"Why should every creature drink but IF 
Why, man of mortals, tell me why?" — Cowley. 



FRUIT PUNCH. 
6 lemons, l /> pound Malaga grapes, 

5 oranges, I small bottle Maraschino 

l / 2 pineapple, cherries. 

i quart strawberries ( fresh or canned ) . 

Squeeze the lemons and 3 of the oranges. If the straw- 
berries are fresh, mash Y\ of them through a fine colander. 
Seed and quarter the grapes, cut the pineapple in small 
cubes, slice the remaining oranges and strawberries into 
small pieces. Add water and sugar to taste and serve in 
tall glasses with chopped ice and garnish with 2 cherries. 

Miss Ethel Blankenhorn. 



CANADIAN PUNCH. 
1 dozen oranges, 3 lemons, 

1 pint water, 1 pound sugar, 

1 bottle Maraschino cher- 3 bottles (small) ginger ale. 
ries, 
Just before using add 3 bottles (small) soda, 3 bottles 
(small) ginger ale. Serves twenty- four people. 

Mrs. W. H. Childs. 



FRUIT PUNCH. 

The juice of 3 lemons, juice of 2 oranges, ^ pint 
grape fruit, 1 quart of water, 3 tablespoons of sugar and 
large slices of pineapple. Hawaiian canned pineapple in 
slices is excellent. Mrs. N. R. Pexdergast. 
211 



-212- 



CHILD'S PUNCH. 
Boil together for five minutes I quart of water and 1^4 
pounds sugar, add grated rind of I lemon, and i orange. 
When cool, strain; then add juice of 2 oranges and 4 
lemons. Pour in a punch bowl over a block of ice, add 1 
pint more of water, a % pound of candied, cherries cut 
fine and the same of pineapple. Serve in small glasses. 
If too sweet, add more lemon. 



GRANITA. 
Juice of half a lemon, juice of whole orange in a tum- 
bler nearly full of cracked ice, add 3 tablespoons of sugar 
or sweeten to taste. The ice should be shaved very fine. 
Eat with a spoon. This is a drink that is much served in 
Italy. It makes a very acceptable dessert on a hot day. 



INVALID DISHES 

'All our knowledge is, ourselves to know." 

Pope: Essay on Man. 



ORANGEADE, 
i orange, i lemon, 

Water, Sugar to taste. 

Squeeze the orange and the lemon into a glass ; fill up 
the glass with water and sweeten to taste. 

Mrs. W. G. Clark. 



EGG AND SHERRY. 
White of i egg, beaten stiff; add 2 tablespoons sherry, 
or if stomach is weak, whiskey instead of sherry, 1 tea- 
spoon sugar, or more if desired. 

Mrs. H. S. Ernst. 



KUMYSS. 
2 quarts milk, 2-5 yeast cake. 

2 tablespoons sugar syrup, 

Fill quart bottles, three-quarters full of fresh milk. 
Add one-fifth of a yeast cake to each bottle after dis- 
solving it in a tablespoon of milk, also pour into each bot- 
tle 1 tablespoon of sugar syrup (directions below). Shake 
the bottles for some minutes, then fill nearly full and shake 
again. Cork and fasten securely and stand in a cool place 
for a day ; turn on the side in an ice box and use as needed. 
sugar syrup. 
One tablespoon sugar, 4 tablespoons of water ; cook 
slowly without stirring for a minute; use as directed. 

Miss Lilian Palmer. 

213 



214 

COCOA, 
i teaspoon cocoa, i teaspoon sugar, 

White of i egg, i cup milk. 

Scald milk, mix sugar and cocoa and moisten it with a 
little of the milk. Pour it into the hot milk and bring to a 
boil. Pour this over egg beaten dry. L. P. 



RICE WATER. 
2 tablespoons rice, i quart cold water. 

Wash the rice ; then let it come slowly to a boil in the 
water. "Let it boil for at least one hour ; salt, sweeten and 
flavor with a little cinnamon. L. P. 



OATMEAL WATER. 
Follow directions for rice water, but do not flavor with 
spice. L. P. 



PANADA. 
Sprinkle a little salt or a little sugar between hard 
crackers. Put them in a bowl and pour over them just 
enough boiling water to soak well. Set this in boiling 
water for fifteen or twenty minutes until the crackers are 
quite clear. Lift carefully into a hot saucer. Add a little 
sugar, and cream if allowed. Serve at once. 

Lillian Palmer. 



OATMEAL GRUEL. 

J / 2 cup oatmeal, l / 2 teaspoon salt. 

2 cups boiling water, 

Boil the ingredients until thoroughly cooked. Strain 
this and dilute to a creamy mixture with milk. A little 
sugar improves it. Mrs. E. G. Clark. 



ARROWROOT GRUEL, 
i pint boiling milk, A pinch of salt. 

I tablespoon arrowroot, 

Scald the milk. Mix the arrowroot with a little cold 
milk and pour into the scalding milk, stirring rapidly. Let 



215 

it cook for ten minutes, or longer ; then remove from the 
fire, salt and sweeten. L. P. 



BARLEY GRUEL. 
Boil i ounce of pearl barley a few minutes, to cleanse 
it, Pour off this water and add i quart of cold water and 
Yi. teaspoon of salt. Let it simmer for an hour or until 
reduced one-half. Strain it, sweeten and flavor. L. P. 



BEEF TEA. 
Cut i pound of lean beef very fine. Put in top of 
double boiler. Add i]/ 2 pints cold water and set in cold 
place for two or more hours. Then place over kettle of 
boiling water, covering tightly and cook two hours. Strain, 
season, and serve. Mrs. G. W. Kyburg. 



BEEF TEA. 
One pound of lean beef cut in squares ; put in bowl and 
put 2 tablespoons of cold water over the meat. Paste brown 
paper over the top of the bowl, and let stand in a hot oven 
twenty minutes or a half hour. Pour off juice and season 
with a little salt. . Mrs. H. B. Palmer. 

MUTTON BROTH, 
i mutton chop (leg). Remove all fat, add I quart cold 
water and i teaspoon barley. Bring to boiling point; then 
allow to simmer until reduced to i cup. Strain and salt. 

Mrs. H. S. Ernst. 



MILK SOUP. 
One pint boiling milk poured over 3 tablespoons of 
fine cracker or bread crumbs. Salt to taste. 

Mrs. H. S. Ernst. 



CLAM BOUILLON. 
Scrub clams before opening them. To 1 cup of clams 
and juice add V/2 cups water. Let boil and skim off the 
froth ; then add butter and pepper to taste. 

Mrs. F. L. Colver. 



-2l6- 



IRISH MOSS LEMONADE. 
y% of a cup of Irish Moss, i lemon, 
I cup boiling water, Sugar to taste. 

Soak the moss in cold water; then wash and add the 
boiling water; let it cook for ten or fifteen minutes. Then 
add the lemon and sugar; drink hot. (Good for colds). 

Lillian Palmer. 



MILK EGG NOG. 
Heat 3/4 of a cup of milk very hot (not boiling). Beat 
the yolk and white of 1 egg separately until very light. 
Add to the yolk a pinch of salt. Stir into this the milk and 
stir briskly. Add the whites and beat lightly. Serve at 
once while very hot. L. P. 



MILK TOAST. 
Cut slices of stale bread y* inch thick, and remove 
crusts. Bake them in a moderate oven until brown. Heat 
sufficient milk to more than cover the toast. Season with 
salt and pour over the toast. Cover closely and set in a 
warm place until the toast has absorbed the milk. Serve 
at once. L. P. 



CREAM TOAST. 
Prepare the toast as for milk toast. Dip it quickly into 
boiling water three times, then cover with hot cream, 
slightly seasoned with salt. L. P. 



SOFT COOKED EGGS. 
Into a cold sauce pan put the egg and pour over it boil- 
ing water to more than cover it. Set it on the back of the 
range, where it is warm, for five minutes, keeping it closely 
covered all the time. Do not let it boil. E. G. C. 



HARD BOILED EGG. 
Pour boiling water over the egg and boil at least twenty 
minutes, longer if possible. E. G. C. 



-21' 



CREAMED POTATOES. 
Almost cover cold cut potatoes with milk, after placing 
them in a double boiler; add 2 or 3 spoons of butter and a 
little salt. Let them cook about three-quarters of an hour, 
stirring frequently. They should be creamv. 

E. G. C. 



CREAMED SWEETBREADS. 
y 2 teaspoon chopped pars- 1 cup cream sauce, 

lev. Slices of toast. 

1 pair sweetbreads, ! 

Soak sweetbreads in cold water for an hour. Boil them 
in water with 1 tablespoon of lemon juice for twenty min- 
utes. Let them cool, remove the membranes and pipes and 
cut them in dice. Reheat the cream sauce, adding the pars- 
ley with the sweetbreads. Serve on toast. 

Lillian Palmer. 



CREAM SAUCE. 
Rub 1 tablespoon of flour, 1 of butter, % of a teaspoon 
of salt and a few grains of pepper to a smooth paste in a 
small sauce pan; then pour in a cup of milk, heat slowly, 
stirrinsf until it has boiled. L. P. 



FRENCH OMELET. 
3 eggs, 3 tablespoons water. 

3 pinches salt, 

Break the eggs into a bowl and beat until the stringiness 
disappears. Add the other ingredients and mix. Heat a 
small sauce pan and grease it with a small piece of butter. 
Pour the mixture into it, and as the egg coagulates lift it 
with a fork, allowing the liquid part to flow under. This 
should be continued until the liquid is used. Let it stand 
until a light brown on the under side : then roll, turn on a 
hot plate and serve at once. Mrs. E. G. Clark. 



-2 1 8- 



FOAMY OMELET. 
3 eggs, 3 pinches salt. 

3 tablespoons water, 

Beat the eggs separately, the yolks from the whites. 
Beat the yolks until thick and add to them the water and 
salt. Beat the whites dry. Heat a frying pan quite hot, 
grease it well with butter and when all is ready, the hot 
platter too, turn the yolks on to the dish with the whites ; 
and beat only long enough to mix them. Turn this im- 
mediately on to the pan. Let it cook very slowly until a 
delicate brown, then set it in the oven to dry on top. Re- 
move, fold it double, and turn on the platter. 

Miss Lilian Palmer. 



POACHED EGGS. 
Toast as many pieces of stale bread as you wish eggs, 
first cutting off the crusts. Butter them delicately, set 
them on a hot platter in a warm place. Nearly fill a frying 
pan with boiling water, and put into it a pinch of salt. 
Break into cups the eggs, being careful not to break the 
yolks. Slide them into the water and with a spoon dip the 
water over them until the whites are a jelly-like mass. Lift 
quickly with a skimmer and slide them onto the toast. 
Garnish with a little parsley. L. P. 



SCRAMBLED EGGS. 
5 eggs, y 2 teaspoon salt, 

]/ 2 cup milk, 2 tablespoons butter. 

Beat eggs slightly with a silver fork ; add salt and milk. 
Heat omelet pan, put in butter and when melted, put in the 
mixture. Cook until of creamy consistency, stirring and 
scraping from bottom of pan with knife. 

Mrs. E. G. Clark. 



CANVALESCENT DISH. 
Throw 2 tablespoons of rice into a pint of boiling, 
salted water, and cook half an hour briskly. Drain and 
place on a plate making a depression in the center of the 



Edmund W. Wakelee Wendell J. Wright 

Clarence E. Thornall Garrett Z. Demarest 

LAW OFFICES 

Wakelee, Thornall and Wright 

Lawyers 

Hudson Terminal-Fulton Building 

50 Church Street, New York New Jersey Office: Englewood 

Telephone Connections 

Watson G. Clark 

M. AM. SOC. C. E. 

Civil Engineer, City Surveyor 

30 Church Street Tenafly, 

NEW YORK NEW JERSEY 

BEFORE LEAVING TOWN DEPOSIT YOUR VALUABLES 

WITH THE 

PALISADES TRUST & GUARANTY COMPANY 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 

MODERN BURGLAR AND FIRE-PROOF SECURITY 
VAULTS AND STORAGE ROOMS 

Security Boxes $5.00 a Year and Upward 
Open 8 A. M. to 4 P. M. 

Englewood Riding School 

Corner Jones Road and Linden Avenue 

EXCELLENT SADDLE HORSES FOR HIRE OR SALE 

Terms Reasonable 

Special Rates for Children in Class 
Telephone 612 ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



-220- 



mound of rice, and into this break a fresh egg. Season with 
salt and pepper and a bit of butter, and place all on a grate 
in the oven until the egg is cooked enough to be palatable, 
but not over done. Mrs. G. W. Kyburg. 



BOILED RICE. 

x /2 cup rice, 5 or 6 cups boiling water, 

i teaspoon salt, 

Boil the water and salt (fiercely), then wash the rice 
and drop in slowly that the boiling may not cease. Cook 
until kernels are soft, and no longer (about a half hour if 
the water is kept rapidly boiling). Drain in a colander, 
cover with a clean cloth and set in a warm place for ten 
minutes; toss it lightly into a hot dish uncovered. 

Mrs. E. G. Clark. 



SCRAPED BEEF SANDWICHES. 
Use beef from the round, three-quarters of an inch 
thick. Scrape the beef pulp from this. Cut the crust from 
a part of a loaf of bread, butter one end ; spread with pulp, 
add a little salt and cut in thin slices. Butter this end of 
the loaf again, cut another thin slice and lay over the slice 
covered with pulp. This may be toasted. L. P. 



INVALID MEAT BALLS. 
Cut pieces of round steak into strips one and one-half 
inches wide. Lay on meat board and with a medium sharp 
knife scrape out the soft part until only the connective tis- 
sue is left. Season with salt, pepper, melted butter, and a 
little sweet milk. Form into balls about the size of a 
hickory nut. Place in slightly buttered frying pan and 
shake the pan over the fire to keep the balls in motion, for 
about three to four minutes. Serve while hot. 

Miss Ona B. McEachren. 



RENNET CUSTARD, 
i pint milk, i tablespoon liquid rennet. 

Heat the milk until it is lukewarm, then stir in the 
rennet. Let it stand in a warm place until it is firm. Set 



R B. CAPESTRO 

Fine Fruits, Vegetables and Imported Olive Oil 
Groceries, Butter, Eggs, Nuts 

3 I -33 Palisade Avenue 
ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



McQUAID BROS. 
Florists 

ENGLEWOOD 
'Phone 226-L 



G E. DUTTON, Jr. 
Electrical Equipment 

BERGEN BUILDING 
ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



GEORGE E. KRAUSE 

•Pirtitrre anil Jfirhtrr iffrantr b. 

Plain ano SSmrlrn fHtrrnrs 

^tatnary, &r. 

BERGEN BUILDING 

ENQLE STREET 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



Mrs. A. E. Chamberlain 

Dry and Fancy Goods 
Stationery Supplies 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



THREE STORES 

ROBERT LIVINGSTON 

STATIONERY, NEWSPAPERS, OFFICE SUPPLIES, CIGARS 
1 5 Palisade Avenue, Corner Dean Street 
TOYS, SPORTING GOODS AND KODAKS 

7-9 Dean Street 

CIGARS, TOBACCO AND NEWSPAPERS 

Depot Square 

'Phone Call 376 ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 

private exchange connecting alt. stores. 



-222- 



at once in a cold place. Serve with flavored sugar and 
cream. The custard must be poured at once into the dish 
from which it is to be served. (Cups are best for the sick 
room). It cannot be used for a second meal, as the curds 
and whey separate after cutting. L. P. 



BAKED CUSTARD, 
i quart milk, 3 eggs (well beaten), 

Pinch salt, 1 cup sugar. 

1 teaspoon vanilla, 

Put in small cups and sprinkle with nutmeg. Bake in 
medium oven in a pan of water. 

Mrs. W. G. Clark. 



SOFT CUSTARD. 
3 eggs, separated, y 2 teaspoon vanilla, 

1 pint milk, 2 tablespoons sugar. 

Scald the milk; beat the yolks until thoroughly broken 
up, but not light. Add the sugar, then the milk slowly, stir- 
ring constantly. Turn back into double boiler and cook 
until the mixture coats the spoon. This must be stirred 
all the time. Strain into a cold dish and set into a pan of 
cold water ; when cool add the vanilla and serve ice cold. 
Make a meringue of the whites of the eggs and 1 tablespoon 
of sugar and heap on top. Mrs. H. B. Palmer. 



CARAMEL JUNKET. 
Put y 2 cup sugar into a small sauce pan with water 
enough to cover the sugar; place the sugar over the fire, 
and when the sugar is dissolved let the syrup boil quickly, 
without stirring, until it becomes brown. Remove from the 
fire and cool a little, then turn into a pint of milk to which 
has been added y 2 cup of cream. Set the dish containing 
the mixture for a few minutes in a pan of hot water; when 
lukewarm add two-thirds of a junket tablet dissolved in a 
little cold water. Stir slightly and turn into sherbet 
glasses. Let it stand in a warm room until firm, when set 
on ice and chill. L. P. 



FOR THE BEST QUALITIES OF KITCHEN 
UTENSILS GO TO 

C. W. VALENTINE'S 

Hardware and Housefurnishings 

37 East Palisade Avenue 
ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



Gilliam D. Bogkrt 

71 TKNAFLY ROAD 
INW.EWOOD, N. J. 



Arthur D. Bogkrt 

grand AVENTE 
LEONIA, N. .1. 



G. D. BOGERT & BRO. 

Englewood and Leonia 

Carpenters and Builders 

Shop Opposite Depot 
'Phone 274-R Englewood, N. J. 



Palisade 
Hand Laundry 

B. P. Barstow, Prop. 

40 West Street 
'Phone 274-L Englewood, N. J. 



B.J. 




First Class 



Meats i Provisions 



7 East Palisade Avenue 
'Phone 14 Englewood, N. J. 



If you are interested in securing 
a coffee of great delicacy and rich- 
ness, and will write to our "Private 
Customers' Department," we will 
gladly send you a generous sample 
of FLORELLA COFFEE, which we 
sell at the exceptional price of 28 
cents per pound in 10-pound lots, 
delivered at your door. 

Private Customers' Department 
ANTILLES COFFEE CO. 

I 33-137 Front Street 
New York City 



224 

BLANC MANGE. 
l /2 box gelatine, i scant cup cold water, 

Yi cup sugar, i teaspoon vanilla. 

i pint scalded milk. 

Soak the gelatine in cold water and after ten minutes 
pour over it the hot milk. Boil it for a minute. Then add 
the sugar and vanilla. Strain through a flannel bag and set 
away to jell in a cool place. Miss A. E. Clark. 



CORN STARCH PUDDING, 
i pint milk, 2 tablespoons sugar, 

2 eggs, 2 tablespoons cornstarch, 

l / 2 teaspoon vanilla, Pinch of salt. 

Bring the milk to a boil, dissolve 1 tablespoon of corn- 
starch in a little cold milk and stir into the hot milk, 
together with the well beaten eggs, 2 tablespoons of sugar 
and a pinch of salt. Boil five minutes, stirring constantly. 
Remove from fire and beat for a minute with an egg beater ; 
flavor with j4 teaspoon of vanilla. Pour in a mould and 
serve cold with a chocolate sauce. 

CHOCOLATE SAUCE. 

1 cup boiling water, 1 cup milk. 

1-3 cup granulated sugar, Boil five mintues. 

Shave two squares of Baker's chocolate and dissolve in 
a sauce pan. Turn in gradually the boiled mixture. Add 
butter the size of a hickory nut and boil a minute. Flavor 
with a teaspoon of vanilla. Mrs. E. G. Clark. 



WINE JELLY. 
¥> box gelatine or 2 table- 1 cup sherry wine, 

spoons granulated gela- 3 tablespoons lemon juice, 
tine, 1 cup sugar, 

3/2 cup cold water, 1-3 cup orange juice. 

1 2-3 cups boiling water, Makes six glasses. 

Soak gelatine twenty minutes in cold water. Dissolve 
in hot water. Add sugar, wine, orange juice, and lemon 



TAILOR MADE SUITS 



$45.00 



(ACTUAL VALUE $75.00) 

Including best materials and linings. 

Fit and workmanship of highest excellence. 



MAYER "CHIC" CO. 

No. 1 2 West 22nd Street (near 5th Avenue) 

I Block from 23d Street Station of Hudson Terminal 



OUR SPECIALTY 

A SHIRT WAIST PATTERN Cu. to Measure. 
Perfect Fit Guaranteed. 



CHIC" PATTERNS ARE DIFFERENT 

"THEY FIT" JVC 



50. 



PLEISCHMANN'S 


COMPRESSED YEAST 


HAS NO EQUAL 




Used by Leading Chefs and 



Eminent Teacher of Cookery. 



E PALISADE MFG.CO. 353 CLINTON AVE. WEST HOBOKEN, N.J. 



-226- 



juice; strain, mould, and chill. If a stronger jelly is desired 
use additional wine instead of orange juice. 

Mrs. E. G. Clark. 



TAPIOCA CREAM, 
i pint milk, 34 CU P pearl tapioca, 

2 e gg s > Sugar to taste. 

2 teaspoons lemon extract, 

Soak 34 CU P tapioca in cold water until soft. Drain off 
the 'water. Put i pint of milk in a double boiler and bring 
to a boil. Stir in tapioca, a pinch of salt and keep on the 
fire until it thickens some. Then stir in the yolk of 2 eggs 
(well beaten). Sugar to taste. Cook for a few minutes. 
Pour into serving dish and when cool, stir in lightly i well 
beaten white of an egg and a teaspoon of lemon extract. 
Beat the other white of the egg to a stiff froth, beating in 
gradually y? cup powdered sugar and i teaspoon lemon ex- 
tract. Pour over the pudding as a meringue. Serve ice 
cold. E. G. C. 



ORANGE JELLY. 
y 2 box gelatine or 2 table- J / 2 cup cold water, 
spoons granulated gela- 3 tablespoons lemon juice, 
tine, I cup sugar, 

\]/2 cups boiling water, 13/2 cups orange juice, 

Makes six glasses. 

Soak gelatine twenty minutes in cold water; dissolve 
in boiling water. Strain, and add to sugar lemon juice and 
orange juice. E. G. C. 



LEMON JELLY. 

3/ box gelatine or 2 table- 1 cup sugar, 
spoons granulated gela- 3^ CU P c °ld water, 
tine, 23^ cups boiling water. 

3/2 cup lemon juice, 

Make the same as orange jelly. Makes six glasses. 

Mrs. E. G. Clark. 



Ladies' Household Accounts 

Are Always Welcome at this Bank 



A Checking Account will enable you to keep 
a correct record of your household expenses 
and avoid disputes, an endorsed check being the 
best kind of receipt. 



We Invite Small Accounts 

And Allow Interest On All Daily 
Balances of $100 and Over 



Banking can be satisfactorily conducted by mail, 
avoiding the necessity of frequent visits to the 
bank. 



of Englewood, N. J., offers every Accommodation to its Depositors 

CAPITAL $50,000 

SURPLUS AND PROFITS (Earned) 124,000 

DONALD MACKAY CLINTON H. BLAKE GEO. W. SPRINGER 

President Vice-President Cashier 



SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES TO RENT 



-228- 



CREAM GELATINE. (Individual Rule). 
I teaspoon granulated gela- 4 tablespoons thick cream, 

tine, 1 tablespoon sugar, 

1 tablespoon cold water, A speck of salt, 

3 tablespoons scalded milk, Vanilla to taste. 

Soften gelatine in cold water and dissolve in scalding 
milk. Add sugar, salt, cream and vanilla. Stir occasionally 
until mixture thickens. Pour into small cold moulds and 
chill. Serve with soft custard or cream and sugar. 

Miss Mabel McEachren. 



IRISH MOSS JELLY. 
y 2 cup Irish Moss, 1 lemon, 

1 pint boiling water, 1-3 cup sugar. 

Soak the moss in cold water until soft. Pick over and 
wash. Pare off the thin rind (yellow) of the lemon and 
boil it with the moss and water until it jells when dropped 
on a cold plate. Strain and serve ice cold. L. P. 



SPANISH CREAM. (Individual Rule). 

1 teaspoon granulated gela- l /4 teaspoon vanilla, 
tine, 1 tablespoon cold water, 

3 tablespoons boiling water, 2-3 cup milk, 

2 tablespoons sugar, Yolk of 1 egg, 
Speck of salt, White of an egg. 

Soften gelatine in cold water. Add boiling water and 
dissolve. Heat milk in double boiler. Beat yolk of egg, and 
sugar, and salt, and pour hot milk gradually into the mix- 
ture. Return to the double boiler, and cook until it thickens, 
stirring occasionally. Add the strained gelatine and flavor- 
ing. Fold in carefully the well beaten white of the egg. 
Pour into cold wet moulds to harden. Serve with soft 
custard and with whipped cream. 

Miss Mabel McEacitrf.x. 



You Cannot Cook Without Them 

FRESH EGGS 

Hatching Eggs in Season 

White Wyandottes, S. C. White 

and R. C. Brown Leghorns, 

White Plymouth Rocks 

and Black Orpingtons 

Five Varieties of Bantams 

Smokeless Wicks 

Write for circulars and our 
Book, "Fifteen Years With 
Poultry." 

CONNISCLIFE POULTRY FARM 

'Phone 333-L Englewood 
Box 9, Tenafly, N. J. 



ELMER BOGERT 

PRACTICAL PLUMBER AND 
GAS FITTER 

Plumbing, Hot Water Heating 

Tenafly and Cresskill, N. J. 
Tel. 422-J Englewood 

THE IMPERIAL STORE 
I. Sabin 

Gentlemen's and Ladies' Furnish- 
ing Goods, Dry Goods, Clothing, 
Hats, Caps and Shoes, No- 
tions and Hosiery 

Browning Building 
TENAFLY, N. J. 



Charles L* A» Wenger 
BAKER and CATERER 

Ice Cream and Water Ices a 
Specialty 

Churches, Fairs and Parties Sup- 
plied at Short Notice. 

Special Prices 

Washington Street 
'Phone 359-R - TENAFLY, N. J. 

W* H» Mowerson & Son 

DEALERS IN 

LEHIGH & PITTSTON 
COAL 

Mail Orders Promptly Attended To 

Yards: Westervelt Avenue and 

George Street 



'Phone 198-L 



TENAFLY, N. J. 



SHAFER & HERMAN 

AT TENAFLY 
Can Supply you with the very 

FINEST and BEST 
MEATS, FRUITS 
and VEGETABLES 

Telephone 411 Tenafly, N. J. 



CONFECTIONERY 

"Sweets to the sweet." — Shakespeare. 



OLD FASHIONED MOLASSES CANDY. 
2 cups good molasses, i cup sugar, 

i tablespoon vinegar, Small piece butter. 

A little water, 

After taking from the fire add a pinch of soda and pull 
it until it is white. Miss G. E. Lindsay. 

MOLASSES TAFFY, 
i pint molasses, 2 tablespoons butter, 

i pound brown sugar, 2 tablespoons vinegar. 

Boil together. When a little hardens in ice water take 
from stove, beat in a level teaspoon of baking soda, turn 
into buttered tins and, as soon as it is cool enough, pull 
with buttered fingers until light in color and so hard you can 
pull it no longer. Miss A. R. Clark. 



POP CORN BALLS. 
Make popcorn as usual (a large bowl full). Use the 
above taffy recipe and, when ready to pour out of kettle, 
mix it in the popcorn and then form into balls and wrap in 
wax paper. Miss A. R. Clark. 



PEANUT CANDY. 
1 pound sugar, granulated, 1 quart unshelled peanuts. 

Shell, skin and chop finely the peanuts and add % tea- 
spoon salt. Put sugar in granite sauce pan on range and 
stir constantly, until melted to a syrup and then remove im- 
mediately. Add nuts and pour at once into warm buttered 
tin and mark in squares. Miss A. R. Clark. 
230 



TO GET THE 

WHITEST 
LIGHTEST 
and NICEST 

BREAD and BISCUIT use 



Pillsbury's Best Flour 



We live but once. While 
we are here why not have 
the best. Quality at right 
prices is my motto. 



H. LE ROY DEMAREST 



Groceries 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 

GENERAL HARDWARE 

Tenafly , N. J. 



TENAFLY MARKET 

GUCKENBERGER BROS. 

Choice Meats and Provisions. Sea 

Food and Vegetables. Poultry 

in Season 

WEST CLINTON AVENUE 
'Phone 324-J 



CLIFFORD DEMAREST 

Real Estate 

Demarest Building, Highwooc! Ave. 

TENAFLY 

Telephone 10 Englewood 



232 

PEANUT BRITTLE. 
2 cups granulated sugar, I cup peanuts, shelled, skinned 

and chopped. 
Melt sugar in sauce pan without water, stirring con- 
stantly. When melted add peanuts and pour in buttered tin. 

Miss A. R. Clark. 



BUTTER SCOTCH, 
i cup New Orleans mo- I cup butter, 

lasses, Pinch of soda. 

2 cups powdered sugar, 

Boil until it just hardens in cold water. Pour in thin 
sheets to cool. Mrs. W. Kinnear. 



BUTTER SCOTCH. 
I cup sugar, I cup butter. 

I cup molasses, 

Boil until it will harden in water and spread thinly in 
buttered pans. Miss A. R. Clark. 



SALTED ALMONDS. 
Take skins off the almonds by putting into scalding 
water. For a pound of almonds, put a large tablespoon ful 
of butter into pan on stove. When very hot put into it the al- 
monds and stir until a delicate brown. Throw into a col- 
ander and salt freely, stir well, and lay on a sheet of blotting 
paper until cool. 

Mrs. Lansing. 



VANILLA CARAMELS, 
i pound sugar, y 2 cup cream, 

i ounce honey, *4 teaspoon butter. 

% cup hot water, 

Boil until a few drops in cold water crackle slightly on 
contact with the water. Add a small teaspoon of vanilla 
and pour candy into tin pan to cool. Cut in squares. 

Miss L. F. Pond. 



JOHN J. DEMAREST 



COAL and LUMBER 



Phone 59 CLOSTER, N. J. 



Established 1870 

G. D. ECKERSON 

Carriage Manufacturer 

Horse Shoeing and General Black- 
smithing, Automobile Repairing, 
Painting, Trimming etc. 

CLOSTER, N. J. 



Visit the 
HINT SHOP 



For exellence in Hair Work, Mani- 
curing and Facial Treatment. Here 
you get the benefit of sixteen years 
experience as a Scalp Specialist. 
Toilet Articles, Buffers re-covered, 

Children's Hair Cutting 
a Specialty 



Annexed and under Mrs. Dunn's 
supervision is a dainty Tea Room 
where dainty Sandwiches, English 
Muffins, Tea and Light Lunches are 
served, from 11 to 5.30 daily. 

Opposite Palisades Trust Co. 
ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 




EVERYBODY IN TENAFLY 
USES 

BARRINGTON HAIL COFFEE 

or ought to use it, be- 
cause nothing is too 
good tor the people of 
Tenatly. 

FOR SALE BY 

It LE ROY DEMAREST 

at 35 cents per pound in 
sealed tin cans. 

BarringtotiHall 

Ti«SSSM\rt Coffee 



234 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS, 
i cake Baker's chocolate, i cup molasses, 
i cup milk, 2 cups sugar, 

i teaspoon flour, Pinch of soda. 

Pinch of salt, About teaspoon vanilla. 

Boil about forty minutes, testing in cold water, and put 
in buttered pan to cool. Mrs. Travis. 



COFFEE CREAM CARAMELS. 
2 pounds sugar, i cup cream. 

54 cup butter, Extract from 2 ounces of 

' coffee, 
Melt sugar with as little water as possible in a sauce pan 
over the fire. When sugar bubbles, pour in the cream very 
slowly, stirring gently and constantly and add butter and 
coffee. As soon as syrup is brittle in cold water, pour in 
pans. 



VANILLA CARAMELS. 
Use vanilla instead of coffee, stirring into boiling sugar. 



CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 
Two squares of Baker's chocolate may be used instead 
of coffee. Miss A. R. Clark. 



OPERAS. 
2 cups sugar, i cup milk or cream, 

2 squares chocolate, Vanilla. 

Mix sugar, milk and chocolate together. Let it boil 
about seven minutes (not as long as fudge) ; then place the 
dish in pan of cold water. Let it remain there until it be- 
comes hard around the outside. Take it out of the water 
and beat to a stiffness, but not too long. Take 2 spoons and 
drop on plate. Miss Martha Westervelt. 



Commissioner of Deeds 



Notary Public 



DANIEL PAUL 

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE 

Special attention given to Renting and Selling of Improved and Un- 
improved Property. 

TENAFLY, N. J. 

Telephone 359-J Englewood 

BRANCH OFFICE, CRESSKILL, N. J. 



Paul McKcon 

COAL DEALER 

Office, Opposite Depot, TENAFLY, N. J. 

Telephone 535-L 



E. J. MARSH D. A. SPEIGHT 

Hackensack Laundry Co* 

Formerly August Matthews 
158 Main Street, Hackensack, N. J. 

HIGH CLASS LAUNDERING 

Goods called for and delivered promptly 

Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Phone 832-J E. J. MARSH, Manager 



Shampooing, Hair Dressing, Scalp 
Treatment, Manicuring and Massage 

By appointment at your home 

Florence E* Probert 

P. O. Box 246 'Phone, 45-R 

CLOSTER, N. J. 



IMPORTED and DOMESTIC 

HOLLANDS 



OPAQUE and DUPLEX 
CLOTHS 



HARRY SAWYER 

WINDOW SHADES, AWNINGS and SCREENS 
ESTI MATES FURNISHED 



phone: connection 
r. o. box, 246 closter, n. j. 



236 

NUT OPERAS. 
2 cups sugar, i cup English walnuts 

2 squares Baker's chocolate, chopped fine, 
1 cup milk, 1 teaspoon vanilla. 

Cook about fifteen minutes or until it thickens when 
dropped in a cup of cold water. Remove from stove and 
let it cool ; then add the nuts and vanilla. Beat until light 
and creamy and drop separately on paper or in a dish. 

Miss Harriett Tuttle. 



NUT BAR. 
Put 1-3 cup of nut meat in pan and cover with 1 pound 
melted sugar, as in peanut candy. Miss A. R. Clark. 



TUTTI FRUTTI. 
White of 1 egg well beaten, J / 2 cup each of cut dates, 
1 teaspoon cream or butter, figs and nuts, 

1 tablespoon vanilla. 
Add enough confectioner's sugar to make a stiff paste, 
knead well with the hands, spread out with a knife until 
about a half an inch thick and cut into squares. 

Miss Bertha E. Westervelt. 



STUFFED DATES. 
Wash dates and remove the pits. Stuff with part of 
English walnut or any shelled nut. Close the date and roll 
in powdered sugar. Mrs. W. G. Clark. 



FLUFF KISSES. 
1 cup brown sugar, 1 cup broken walnuts, 

1 cup granulated sugar, 1 teaspoon vanilla, 

y 2 cup water, Beat white of 1 egg stiff. 

Boil the sugar and water until they form a soft ball in 
water. Then pour slowly over the beaten egg white. Beat 



Z. ML Vineburg 



JEWELER 



Repairing a Specialty 

Clocks called for and 
delivered 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 

31 EAST PALISADE AVE. 
ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 




SANITAS 

IS DURABLE BECAUSE IT IS 
MADE ON CLOTH. IT IS 
STRONGER THAN PAPER, 
AND IT WILL NOT TEAR. 
IT IS A WALL-PRESERVER. 
PLASTER WILL NOT FALL 
WHERE "SANITAS" IS USED. 
IT CAN BE HUNG ON IM- 
PERFECT WALLS, FOR IT 
HIDES ALL CRACKS AND 
STAINS. 



GEORGE M. BREWSTER 



GENERAL CONTRACTOR 



Telephone 169 Englewood Tdiatly, N. J. 



2 3 8 

until somewhat thick and cool, add the nuts and flavor. 
Drop with a teaspoon on a marble slab or plate. 

A. W. W. 



MEXICAN KISSES. 
Put 2 pounds maple sugar and Yi pint sweet cream into 
a graniteware sauce pan and place over a slow fire. After 
it has boiled for ten minutes, test it by taking a small por- 
tion of it in a small saucer, and stirring it briskly until you 
can form it into a soft ball in your fingers. Remove from 
the fire and stir briskly until it begins to thicken. Have 
ready 2 cups of pecans, cut not chopped, and add to the 
candy ; stir again until it is hard to stir. Then drop from a 
spoon on waxed paper. If maple sugar cannot be obtained, 
use coffee, confectioner's sugar and maple extract. 

Miss Carolyn C. Donally. 



TO GLACfi FRUITS AND NUTS. 
Let boil in a porcelain lined kettle between ten and fif- 
teen minutes without stirring, i pound of granulated sugar 
and Yz a cup of water. At end of this time test by taking 
a small portion upon end of spoon, dipping into cold water 
and breaking quickly off. When it is brittle without being 
sticky, it is ready for use. Remove from fire, add table- 
spoon of lemon juice, and stand in bowl of hot water. Use 
sections of oranges, white grapes, pineapples or cherries 
which are thoroughly dry and set aside to dry upon oiled 
paper in a warm dry place. Dip almonds, walnuts or pecans 
the same way. Miss L. F. Pond. 



CANDIED ORANGE PEEL. 
Remove peel from 4 thin skinned oranges. Cover with 
water, bring to a boil, and cook slowly until soft. Drain, 
remove white portion with spoon, and cut yellow portion in 
thin strips with scissors. Boil ^ cup water and 1 cup of 
sugar until syrup will thread when dropped from tip of 
spoon. Cook strips in syrup five minutes, drain and coat 
with fine granulated sugar. Miss A. R. Clark. 



Near R. R. Station <=£vNlT AR Y £, A / Telephone 

^<Z^ ^^ ^'Vtof?* Connection 

CLOSTER, N. J. 

Cl.an Sanitary Laundry Work should appeal to all members of the household. 

Shins that are ironed to fit, collars and cuffs a perfect pearl white, DOMES- 
TIC FINISH, our specialty. 

Our facilities for finishing flat work enable us to do family work at very 
reasonable rates. 

A postal card or telephone call will bring our wagon to your door. Try us. 



T. W. Lydecker 



FLORIST 

Roses and Carnations a Specialty 

220 Grand Avenue 
'Phone 80 Englewood, N. J. 

Telephone 342-W 

George C. Murphy 

TRENTON MARKET 

Meats, Provisions and Vegetables 
Special Sales Every Wednes- 
day and Saturday 

3 East Palisade Avenue 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



E. J. Sheridan 



ENGLEWOOD LAUNDRY 



'Phone 93-J 



ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



G. P. Sinsabaugh 

PHOTOGRAPHER 

"THE STUDIO" 
TENAFLY, N. J. 

Southern Pacific 

Tea Company 

DEALERS IN 

TEAS 
COFFEES 

AND 

HIGH GRADE 
GROCERIES 



TENAFLY, N. J. 



240 

FUDGE. 

2 cups sugar, j4 cup milk, 

3 squares Baker's chocolate, Butter size of an egg. 
i teaspoon molasses, 

Stir constantly while boiling and test in cold water ; add 
butter before removing from fire. Add vanilla, beat and 
put in buttered pan. After removing from fire, marsh- 
mallows, cocoanut or nuts may be beaten in. 



COFFEE FUDGE. 
Make like ordinary fudge, using strong cold coffee in- 
stead of milk and chocolate ; then add walnuts. 

Miss A. R. Clark. 



COFFEE EXTRACT, 
i tablespoon coffee, J /> cup boiling water. 

Put coffee in fine flannel ; place in small funnel set in 
cup. Pour boiling water slowly through coffee, gently 
pressing flannel ; then pour what is in cup back through 
coffee, pressing again, but do not squeeze. The process 
should take place on stove. Miss A. R. Clark. 

FUDGE. 

3 cups granulated sugar, }4 ca ^e chocolate, 

Butter size of egg, i l / 2 cups milk. 

Flavoring to taste, 

Put sugar, milk and butter to boil. After it has started 

to boil, add the chocolate grated and then keep stirring until 

it starts to thicken. Take off stove, add flavoring, beat 

until creamy and then put in buttered pans. 

Miss Anna Y. Grahn, 
Miss Laura Huyler. 

DIVINITY FUDGE, 
i can Karo syrup, I pint chopped nuts, 

Equal quantity granulated Equal quantity of cream, 

sugar, Small lump butter, 

y 2 quantity water, Whites of 2 eggs. 

Yi teaspoon vanilla, 



Daniel Reeves 

RELIABLE GROCER 

1 1 E. Palisade Ave., ENGLEWOOD 



TEA, 60c per pound 
70 STAMPS FREE 



PURE VANILLA, 25c per bottle 
20 STAMPS FREE 



35 RETAIL BRANCHES 

We Give S. & H. Green Trading Stamps 
with Every Purchase 





CANDY 
SHOP 



WHOLESOME SWEETS 

For Children. Afternoon Tea 

291 Fifth Ave., Above 30th St. 
509 Fifth Ave., Above 42nd St. 



E 




This is the great syrup 
for candy, table use and all kinds of 
cooking. Makes the finest taffy, 
butter scotch and fudge you ever ate. 



K*r° 



Agrees 




CORN SYRUP 

spread on bread is fine for children. It 
is the one wholesome syrup for griddle 
cakes. In cooking it imparts a natu 
flavor where some sweet is needed, 
with everybody. 

Send for free "Karo Cook 
Book," showing the 
many uses of Karo in 
cooking and candy 
making. 

CORN PRODUCTS REFINING CO 

Dept. X NEW YORK P. O. Box 161 




242 

Boil syrup, sugar, water and butter until it hardens in 
cold water. Take from flame and stir in vanilla extract. 
Have whites of eggs stiffly beaten and stir in a little at a 
time to the boiled mixture, when it is cooled a little. Add 
the nuts and spread on buttered plates and cut into squares. 

Miss R. R. Clark. 



PINOUCHI. 

i cup dark brown sugar, 2 cups light brown sugar, 
1 cup cream. Butter size of an egg. 

1 cup chopped nuts, 

Boil about twenty-five minutes and test in cold water. 
Remove from fire, add nuts and little vanilla. Beat until 
it becomes light in color, but not too stiff to spread in pan 
(about ten minutes). 



MAPLE SUGAR PINOUCHI. 
Make the same as ordinary pinouchi, using maple sugar 
instead of dark brown sugar. Miss A. R. Clark. 



HICKORY DICKORY. 
1 Yz cups brown sugar, \y 2 cups broken maple sugar, 

1 cup sweet cream, % cup butter. 

Boil slowly ; try in cold water ; stir while boiling. When 
done, add 1 pint chopped hickory nuts. Score just before 
cold. Miss A. R. Clark. 



PINOUCHI. 
2 pounds dark brown sugar, I cup nut meats, chopped, 
Small piece of butter, not too fine. 

34 cup milk, 

Pour into pans as with fudge. 

Miss G. E. Lindsay. 



BOILED FONDANT. 

4 cups granulated sugar, ]/ 2 teaspoon of cream of 
t cnp water. tartar. 

Tut 4 cups of the best granulated sugar (the soft fine 
granulated is not good) into a graniteware sauce pan. Add 



Telephones 



EDWARD G. BURROWS 

FLORIST 

Cut Flowers, Palms and Potted Plants 

Wedding and Funeral Designs a Specialty 

57 Dean Street (Depot Square) 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 

Greenhouses and Residence, 472-W 

Store, 65 6- J 



Taveniere & Johnson 
GENERAL CONTRACTORS 

Livery, Sale and Exchange Stables 

Carriages at all hours. Trucking 
and Teaming in all its branches. 
Pianos and Furniture removed 
with care. Horses kept by the 
day, week or month. 



G M, GLESNER & CO* 

BUILDING 
CONTRACTORS 

Painters' Supplies Window Glass 
Phone 508-W 



HELLO! 

Give me 321 — Sweeney's Ten- 
afly store. Would you have 
the choicest and most up-to- 
date for your table? Ask 
central to give you 321. 

D, F. Sweeney, Inc. 

Englewood and Tenafly 



West Clinton Market 

Mildenberger & Scheffler, Props. 

Dealers in 

Prime Beef, Veal, Lamb, 
Mutton and Provisions 

Poultry and Game in Season 

Clinton Avenue and George Street 
Tel. 338-W Tenafly, N. J. 




We offer you the opportunity of making a 
selection away from the confusion of public 
stores, also individual attention and interest. 

We fill every conceivable want pertaining 
to jewelry — resetting of diamonds and re- 
modeling of jewelry by expert workmen. 

PALMER &o EADIE 

DIAMONDS AND PEARLS 

ORIENTAL AND UNIQUE JEWELRY 
AND OTHER JEWELRY 

WATCHES 



DESIGNING, SETTING 
AND REPAIRING 



'I hone, Murray Hill 3.o 



OflBce: No. 711, 366 Fifth Avenue 
S. W. Cor. ?..">th Street, New York 



244 

l cup water and a scant j/> teaspoon of the best cream of 
tartar. Put it over a slow fire until it melts. Take a damp 
cloth and carefully wipe all the granules from sides of 
sauce pan ; then skim. Then place it over a quick fire and 
boil for a few minutes ; then test it by droping a little of 
the syrup in a cup of ice water. If it forms in a soft mass 
so that you can lift it from the cup and it remains in a soft 
ball in the fingers, remove it from the fire and pour it into 
deep soup plates, and put it aside to cool. Be sure not to 
cool too quickly in a frosty atmosphere as it may cause it 
to grain. Test the syrup by putting your hand on bottom 
of plate. When it is about lukewarm, stir briskly with a 
large silver fork, until you cannot beat it any more, then 
take it on a large platter, or marble slab, and knead it like 
bread for a few moments. It should be creamy, resembling 
lard; if grainy it is too hard. If put in a porcelain dish 
or jar and covered with oiled paper, and a tight cover, it 
will keep for weeks. This quantity will make less than 2 
pounds of fondant. If you desire more candy repeat the 
quantity as many times as you desire, as I have found that 
with the small quantity I have the best results. 

Miss Carolyn C. Donally. 



CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINTS. 
Take some fondant ; put in a few drops of oil of pepper- 
mint ; then mould into round flat discs the size of a quarter. 
Melt some fondant and add some syrup and to this add 
enough melted, unsweetened chocolate to make a rich 
chocolate color. Be careful to only melt the chocolate and 
fondant. Dip quickly and drop on oiled paper. The 
melted chocolate and fondant can be used for dipping any 
bon-bons or candy desired. 

Miss Carolyn C. Donally. 



BON-BONS. 

Take some of the fondant and roll around any kind of 

nuts, candied fruit, ginger or white raisins; mould them 

into round balls. Take some fondant and put it in a small 

sauce pan and place it into a 'dish of hot water or over a 



NO TABLE IS COMPLETE 
WITHOUT A JAR OF 



To please your friends and give 
them something new, try our NUT- 
LET CHICKEN SALAD. 

Beat up 3 raw eggs,, add a dash of 
pepper, 6 tablespoon fuls of vinegar, 
2 tablespoonfuls prepared mustard, 
2 tablespoonfuls Nut-Let, salt to 
taste, mix up thoroughly and boil 
to consistency of cream. Cut cold 
boiled chicken into half-inch cubes 
and mix with an equal quantity of 
celery cut in small pieces, and mix 
with above dressing and serve on 
lettuce leaves and garnish with hard- 
boiled eggs and celery. 
Absolutely free from all animal fats. In a class by itself. 
Try it. If your grocer does not keep it, send us his name on 
postal card and we will send your sample free. 




BOSMAN & LOHMAN CO. 



NORFOLK, VIRGINIA 
From Old Virginia the Land of Peanuts 



246 

tea kettle and, as it melts, stir with a fork. Have ready 
some light syrup made from granulated sugar (be sure 
there are no granules in it). Put into the fondant that you 
have melted, 1 tablespoon of this syrup. Add whatever 
flavors and colors you desire. Use only the best extracts 
for flavoring and vegetable colorings. Take the fondant, 
that you have moulded, and dip it into the melted fondant, 
and drop quickly onto waxed paper. If you desire nuts 
or candied fruits on top of the bon-bons, put them on 
quickly after dropping on the waxed paper. 

Miss Carolyn C. Donnally. 



CREAM WALNUTS. 
2 cups granulated sugar, A salt spoon cream tartar. 

Pour 2-3 of a cup of boiling water on the mixture and 
let stand ten minutes, then set on the stove and stir until 
sugar dissolves, then let it boil four minutes or until it 
forms a soft ball when dropped in cold water. Do not 
stir while boiling. Take off stove and beat like fudge until 
cool enough to mould in hands. Mould into shape and place 
walnuts on either side. A. W. W. 



COFFEE FONDANT. 
2 cups granulated sugar, ]/ 2 cup strong black coffee. 

Cook and work as in white fondant. Cream of tartar is 
not needed. 



MAPLE FONDANT. 
1 pound maple sugar, 1 pound granulated sugar, 

Y\ cup hot water, y% teaspoon cream of tartar. 

Cook and work as in white fondant. 



CREAM NUT BARS. 
Melt fondant and flavor. Stir in any kind of nut meat 
and cut in bars. Miss A. R. Clark. 



StilL 



& H 



iman ex rioag 

Chestnut and Engle Streets 

MOTOR CARS 

LOCOMOBILE, BUICK, STEARNS, WHITE, 
WELCH-DETROIT 

Telephone 242 - ... ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



The Old Reliable Confectionery Store 
Established 1896 

BERGENDAHL'S 

45 E. Palisade Ave., Englewood, N. J. 
'Phone 438 

Delicious Ice Cream 
and Soda Water. 
Home-Made Candies. 



B. C. FESSENDEN 

President 

B J. WHITTAKER 

Manager 



Dumont Coal 
and Lumber Co. 

Successor to Wm, Scott Ferdon 



COAL AND LUMBER 

Real Estate and Insurance 



OFFICE AND YARDS: 

Near West Shore R. R. Depot 

DUMONT, N. J. 



Constantine's Bazaar 

Millinery 

Dry Goods 

Notions 

Fancy Goods 

Telephone 168-R 

THE LADIES' STORE 
36-38 Palisade Ave Englewood 



The Misses Blankenhorns' 
SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Tenafly — Englewood — New York 
Telephone 214 Englewood 




Miss Ruth Blankenhorn 
CLASSES for DANCING 

Tenafly — Englewood — Leonia 
Telephone 214 Englewood 



248— 

FONDANT— FRENCH CREAMS. 
To white of i egg, add same quantity of water and mix 
in confectioner's sugar until stiff enough to mould with 
hands. Flavor with any extract. Make into balls with 
nuts or fruits, or cover with melted chocolate. In making 
Coffee, Orange, or Chocholate Bon-Bons, orange juice, 
strong coffee or chocolate, melted in hot water, may be 
used with the egg in the place of water. 

Miss A. R. Clark. 



CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 
White of i egg well beaten, i tablespoon milk, 
i teaspoon butter, i teaspoon vanilla. 

Add enough confectioner's sugar to make a soft ball ; 
put on slightly buttered dish and set in cool place to dry. 
Melt four squares of Baker's chocolate and when creams 
are dry drop them into it. Remove quickly with fork and 
drop on oil paper. Miss Bertha Westervelt. 



CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINTS. 
Beat white of I egg very stiff, stir in confectioner's 
sugar until able to mould in little flat cakes and lay on oiled 
paper, add i teaspoon essence of peppermint. Melt % 
cake of Baker's chocolate, hold each cake on fork and cover 
with melted chocolate. E. S. W. 



CHOCOLATE CREAMS. 
Beat white of i egg to a frost; add flavor; add enough 
sugar to make them stiff enough to drop on waxed paper. 
Melt the chocolate, without any water, and drop balls in it. 
Take them out with a fork. 

Miss Martha Westervelt. 

CHOCOLATE PEPPERMINT CREAMS, 
i pound granulated sugar, Jq cup boiling water. 
Y\ teaspoon cream tartar. 

Pour water on sugar and moisten thoroughly; set on 
stove and boil five minutes after it begins to boil, but do not 



W. H. NOYES, Pres't J. OSTERMAN, Jr., V. Pres't R. C. VAIL, Cashier 



The First National Bank 





of Tcnaily, 


N. 


J. 






HOURS— 8 A. 


M. to 3 P. M. Saturdays, 8 
DIRECTORS 


to 12 


A. M 


, 7:30 to 9 


P. M. 


E. STANLEY CLARKE WILLIAM H. FLEET 

ARTHUR COPPELL W. H. NOYES 

H. NELSON FLANAGAN JOHN OSTERMAN, 


JR 




WILLIAM M. SEUFERT 
J. SPENCER SMITH 
R. C. VAIL 



\iOWta 



The 

Favorite 
Table 
Water 






n 



Delights, refreshes and gives an 
added touch of enjoyment. 

Every drop means health — every 

glass means cheer — every bottle means 

another. When you want a drink that 

will do you good ask for it by specifying 

Londonderry. 

Unapproached as a home table water. 

The sparkling (effervescent) in the usual three sizes. 
The still (plain) in half gallon bottles. 

Londonderry Lithia Spring Water Co., Nashua. N. H. 






250 

stir, jar or move pan while boiling. Take from stove ; add 
peppermint flavoring to suit taste and stir until it becomes 
creamy ; then drop with spoon on oil paper. When cold 
roll in half cake of Baker's chocolate, melted on fire, and 
drop on oil paper. Mrs. W. Kin near. 



ORANGE BON-BONS. 
Grate the skin of i orange. Use juice of y 2 an orange, 
y 2 teaspoon butter and enough confectioner's sugar to 
make a soft ball. Beat well and drop on wax paper with 
a spoon. Miss Bertha E. Westervelt. 



TURKISH PASTE. 

i ounce sheet gelatine, soaked two hours in water enough 
to cover. 

Put 2 cups granulated sugar with ]/ 2 cup of water. Let 
it come to a boil. Slip in the soaked gelatine and boil twenty 
minutes. Add juice of I lemon, I orange, the grated rind 
of the orange, and almonds cut fine. Pour into a wet pan 
with cold water. Miss A. R. Clark. 



CREAMED WALNUTS. 
White of i egg, 2. l / 2 pounds confectioner's 

Cold water same quantity as sugar, 

egg, i pound English walnuts. 

Flavoring to taste, 

First put sugar in dish, add egg and water, then add 
more sugar until thick enough to knead, then add flavoring, 
after this roll in little pieces and put nut on each side. 

Miss Jennie L. Grahn. 



PEANUT KISSES, 
i pint peanuts, shelled and ]/ 2 teaspoon butter, 

ground, i tablespoon milk, 

White of i egg well beaten, Pinch of salt, 
i teaspoon vanilla, 

Add enough confectioner's sugar to make quite stiff; beat 
well and drop on wax paper with a fork. 

Miss Bertha E. Westervelt. 



J. M. HUNTER & SON 

GRAND AVENUE 



Telephone 686 



ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



Trees, Shrubs, Old Fashioned Flowers, 
Plants, Cut Flowers, Designs, Church 
Decorations, Landscape Architect, Etc. 

Consultations 




Englewood Pharmacy 

William R. Kent, Ph. G. 

41 E. Palisade Ave. 
Next Door to Post Office 

PURE DRUGS 



" DUS'TROY " 

Buy a can. Its cost is small. No 

scrubbing of floors when Dus'troy 

is used. 
Will help you keep the house clean. 

Ask your grocer. Do not accept 

any other. 
Destroys all dust. A scientific prep 

aration. Kills germs. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The Ideal Dust Destroyer Co. 

Tenafly, N. J. 



VEGETABLE 



AND 



FLOWER 



SJiiJ^DS 



LAWN GRASS TOOLS PLANTS 



WEEBER & DON 

Seed Merchants and Growers 

1 1 4 Chambers Street 
Send for Illustrated Catalogue Free NEW YORK CITY 



252 

NUT AND FRUIT CONFECTION, 
i pound walnut meat, I pound figs, 

Yi pound dates, ]/ 2 pound candied cherries. 

Grind or chop fine, mix thoroughly, roll to a quarter inch 
thickness on a board, using plenty of powdered sugar to 
keep from sticking, cut into long sticks and roll in sugar. 
Improved by keeping several weeks. 

Miss A. R. Clark. 



CONSERVED GRAPE FRUIT. 
Take the rind of 2 grape fruit and pull stringy part away. 
Cover with salted water, change each day until it does not 
taste bitter. Two or three days. Then put on the stove and 
cover with water, boil one hour, changing water four times. 
When fruit is cold weigh. For each ounce of fruit add 
ounce of sugar dissolved in sherry wine. Boil until clear 
and when cold roll in sugar. Miss Celia J. Bower. 



"A good fire makes a good cool(" 

EDWIN DEMAREST 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 

HAY, GRAIN, FEED AND POULTRY SUPPLIES 

COAL AND WOOD 

Lime, Lath, Cement, Drain Pipe and Builders' Supplies 
The Best Grades of Lehigh and Pittston Coal 

TENAFLY, N. J. 
"t/se Demaresfs Coal and get a good fire." 



Established 1882 Phone 324-W 

Tenafly Pharmacy 
F« G. BOWER & SON 

Walton's Oxygen delivered day or 
night. 

JOHN A* GRAHN 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

Plumbing 
and 
Tinning 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

Tenafly, New Jersey 

PHONE 324-R 



Upholsterer and Cabinet Maker 

Draperies, Awnings and Window 
Shades Made to Order. 

All kinds of Upholstering done. 

All kinds of Furniture repaired, re- 
modelled and finished in French 
polish, any shade desired. 

Agent for Austrian bent wood fur- 
niture. 

R, G. PICINICH 

P. O. Box 159 TENAFLY, N. J. 



JAMES WESTERVELT 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiin 

Insurance 
Agent 

iimiiiimiiiiiiii 
Hillside Avenue 

Tenafly, New Jersey 

PHONE 301-J 



MENUS 

"Now good digestion wait on appetite, and health on 
both." — Macbeth. 



DINNER. 

Oysters on the half shell 



Consomme. 



Crab meat a la Newburg 



Fried chicken with cream sauce 
Broiled sweet potatoes Spinach 



Lettuce and grape fruit salad, French dressing 

Cream cheese toasted crackers 

Caramel Custard Cake 



Coffee Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



DINNER. 
Anchovy on toast 



Cream of Tomato soup 



Lobster a la Newburg 



Saddle of mutton 
Currant jelly String beans Mashed potatoes 



Lettuce salad with grated Roquefort cheese and French 

dressing 
Toasted crackers. 



Lemon water ice Cake 



Mrs. F. H. Booth. 
-254— 



If you wish to surprise your family and friends with 
tasty dishes which they probably have not eaten before, 
write to The Kellogg Food Company, Battle Creek, 
Mich., for their Healthful Living Booklet, which will tell 
you all about the Battle Creek Diet System, and will 
give you many new thoughts in the culinary art, as well 
as point out to you how your living expenses may be 
materially reduced. 



KELLOGG FOOD CO. 



BATTLE CREEK MICHIGAN 



The Best Recipe for a Good 
Night's Rest is a Quilted Mat- 
tress Pad on Your Bed 



Quilted Mattress Pads Made by 
EXCELSIOR QUILTING CO. 

15 Laight Street NEW YORK CITY 

For Sale At Dry Goods Stores 



-256- 

DINNER. 
Cantaloupe, iced 



Consomme 



Boiled Salmon, Hollandaise Sauce 
kned tomatoes with green peppers and cream sauce 



Broiled chicken 

Green peas Mashed potatoes 

Currant jelly 



Asparagus and lettuce salad, French dressing 
Cheese crackers 



Strawberry ice Cakt 



Coffee 

Mrs. F. Ff. Booth. 



DINNER. 
Caviar o%toast 



Cream of celery soup 



Fried smelts, tartar sauce 



Broiled mushrooms on toast 

Broiled Squab on toast 
Currant jelly 

Pineapple and lettuce salad, mayonnaise 
Cream cheese and toasted crackers 



Wine jelly, whipped cream and Maraschino cherries. 
Cake 



Coffee A Iks. F. H. Booth. 




flOOSIERspEuai/ 



Every up-to-date kitchen 

should have a "Hoosier 

Kitchen Cabinet." 

SAVES STEPS 

C. W. VALENTINE 

37 East Palisade Avenue 
ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



G. A. Smalbein 

THE MOST PROMINENT BAKER 
IN BERGEN COUNTY 

Makers of Domestic Cake, and anything 
made on the European style 

Telephone 536 



Frank Ullrich 

AGENT FOR 

Edwin E. Burt Shoes 
for women 

AND 

King Quality Shoes 

for men 

23 East Palisade Avenue 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



H.P. COLE 



DEALER IN ALL GRADES OF 



Coal, Wood 
Hay, Feed 

Cor. Linden Ave. and Dean St. 

Branch Office, 49 Dean Street 

Phone 319-J Residence 620-R 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



John Lange 



FLORIST 



(Eut SUuwrs anu pants 
in £>raB0tt 

32 James Street Phone 135 
ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



2 5 8- 

LUNCHEON. 
Boullion 



Stuffed eggs Hot rolls 



French Chops 
Peas French fried potatoes Jelly 



Lettuce and tomato salad, French dressing 
Cream cheese, toasted crackers 



Chilled fruit in individual dishes 
Cake 



Coffee 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



LUNCHEON. 
Grape fruit in glasses with sherry and Maraschino cherries 



Bouillon Crackers 

Lobster a la Newburg 
Hot rolls 



Chicken croquettes 
Peas Jelly Cream potatoes 



Apple and celery salad, mayonnaise 

Cream cheese and toasted crackers 

Biscuit Tortoni Cake 



Coffee 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



EDWARD G. BURROWS 

FLORIST 

Cut Flowers, Palms and Potted Plants, 

Wedding and Funeral Designs a Specialty 

57 Dean Street i Depot Square) 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 

J Store, 656-J 

P \ Greenhouses and Residence, 472-W 



R. D. Lydecker Co. 

Dealer in 

HARDWARE, HOUSE 
FURNISHINGS 

Seeds, Garden Tools, Paints, 
Oils, Etc. 

20 East Palisade Avenue 

'Phone Connection 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



MABIE & DEVER 
Merchant Tailors 

REPAIRING, CLEANING, ALTER- 
ING. PRESSING LADIES' AND 
MEN'S GARMENTS. 

Depot Square South 
'Phone 621-R Englewood, N. J. 



TUTTLE BROS. 
LUMBER 

Masons' Materials 
Grain, Hay, etc. 

L. E. TUTTLE 

ENGLEWOOD, N. J. 



McQuillin & Vanderbcek 



CHOIC E GROCERIES 



48 and 50 NORTH DEAN ST. 
Corner Depot Square 



'Phone 461 



Englewood, N. J. 



THOMAS TIPPING 

FINE GROCERIES 

FLOUR, FEED, HAY and GRAIN 

Dean Street 

Telephones 528—529 

Englewood, N. J. 



260 

LUNCHEON. 
Bouillon 



Ice tea and lemon Devilled clams Soda biscuits 



Stuffed green peppers 



Individual veal cutlets, breaded, with gravy 
Creamed potatoes J e hy 



Lettuce salad, cream cheese balls 
Toasted crackers 



Strawberry shortcake 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



LUNCHEON. 

Clam Bouillon 



Broiled Sardines on toast Hot tea and soda biscuit 



Omelet a la Espagnol 



Creamed sweet bread French fried potatoes 



Orange sherbet Cake 

Mrs. F. H. Booth. 



STUMP & WALTER CO'S. 

Vegetable, Flower, Grass and Field 

SEEDS 

BULBS, PLANTS, AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS, 
FERTILIZERS, INSECTICIDES 

STUMP & WALTER CO. 

50 BARCLAY STREET NEW YORK 

CATALOGUES MAILED ON REQUEST 

ESTABLISHED AUGUST, 1905 

TENAFLY 
BUILDING AND LOAN ASS'N. 

(INCORPORATED) 

W. P. EAGER, Pres't ' CLIFFORD DEMAREST, Sec'y 

J. OSTERMANN, JR., Vice-Pres't R. S. MAUGHAM, Treas'r 

Assets $86,248.05. Earnings for the past four years, approximately 

8 7.87c yearly. 

Join the Association and acquire the saving habit. 

<&\)t GUnsfrr National lank 

M. J. BOGERT, Pres. DAVID D. ACKERMAN, V. Pres. 

ALBERT E. COOK, Cashier 

RESOURCES OVER $250,000 



262 

MENU FOR SUNDAY. 

BREAKFAST. 

Grape fruit in glassess 

Codfish balls Baltimore cornbread 

Coffee 



LUNCHEON. 

Clear soup with vermicelli 

Roast chicken 

French fried potatoes Wax beans 

Chocolate ice cream Wafers 

Coffee 



SUPPER. 

Colds cuts of meat 
Cream Cheese 

Tea 



Lettuce 
Brown bread 



Just open one can ! 



and you w 
any pi 



ver eat 




Hawaiia 




The pig ripe, c 
right, so pnerent kin* 
sliced, crushed or grai 

If your ocer hasn't Hawaiian s 
name and receive a free booklet 

HAWAIIAN PINEAPPLE GRi 
113 6 Tribune Building, 






KITCHEN "TIMEI TABLE! 

TIME REQUIRED FOR BAKING. 

Beans, 8 to 10 hours Pudding, rice, tapioca, 1 hour 

Beef, sirloin, well done, per lb. Turkey, 10 lbs., 3 hours 

12 to 15 minutes 
Bread, brick loaf, 40 to 60 

minutes 
Cake, sponge, 45 to 60 min. 
Custards, 15 to 20 minutes 
Duck, tame, 40 to 60 minutes 
Fish 6 to 8 lbs., 1 hour 
Mutton, rare, per lb., 10 min. Pie Crust, 30 to 40 minutes 
Mutton, well done, per lb., 15 Pork, well done, per lb., 30 min. 

minutes Pudding, plum, 2 to 3 hours 

Potatoes, 30 to 45 minutes Veal, well done, per lb., 20 min. 



Beef, rare, per lb., 8 to 10 min. 
Biscuit, 10 to 20 minutes 
Cake, plain, 20 to 40 minutes 
Cookies, 10 to 15 minutes 
Chickens, 3 to 4 lbs., 1 to 1% 

hours 
Lamb, well done, per lb., 15 min. 



BOILING. 



Asparagus, 15 to 20 minutes 
Beans, shell, 1 to 2 hours 
Beets, young, 45 to 60 "minutes 
Cabbage, young, 30 to 45 min. 
Chickens, 45 to 60 minutes 
Corned Beef, 4 to 5 hours 
Eggs, hard boiled, 15 to 20 m. 
Onions, 30 to 45 minutes 
Parsnips, 30 to 45 minutes 
Potatoes, 20 to 30 minutes 
Squash, 20 to 30 minutes 
Turnips, 30 to 45 minutes 
Winter vegetables, 1 to 2 hrs. 
Bass, per lb., 10 minutes 



Beans, string, 2 hours 
Brown bread, 3 hours 
Carrots, 45 to 60 minutes 
Cauliflower, 30 to 45 minutes 
Corn, green, 5 to 8 minutes 
Eggs. 3 to 5 minutes 
Ham, 5 hours 
Lamb, 1 hour 
Oysters, 3 minutes 
Peas, 15 to 20 minutes 
Salmon, per lb., 15 minutes 
Tomatoes, 15 to 20 minutes 
Veal, 2 to 3 hours 



BROILING. 
Chickens, 20 minutes Fish, thick, 12 to 15 minutes 

Steak, 1 inch thick, 4 to 6 Chops, 8 minutes 
• 'minutes Fish, thin, 5 to 8 minutes 

FRYING. 
Bacon, 20 minutes Croquets, 1 minute 

Doughnuts, 3 to 5 minutes Fish balls, 1 minute 
Fritters, 3 to 5 minutes Muffins, 3 to 5 minutes 



-264- 



HELPFUL HINTS 

Sprinkle a little flour over suet when chopping it. to prevent 
the pieces sticking together. 

Keep cranberries in a cool place In cold water; will keep foi 
weeks. 

To make whites of eggs beat up quickly, add a pinch of salt. 
The juice from a ripe tomato will remove stains trom the 
hands and whiten them. 

Cabbage chopped and seasoned well with celery salt is a good 
substitute for celery in a salad. 

The following is a table of weights and measures that will be 
found useful: 

One quart sifted flour 1 lb. 

One pint of granulated sugar 

Two cups of butter, packed 

Ten eggs 

Five cups flour 

One generous pint of liquid 

Two cups granulated sugar " 

Two heaping cups of powdered sugar 

One pint of finely chopped meat, packed 

solidly 

The cup used is the common kitchen cup, holding y 2 pint. 
To one quart of flour use 2% teaspoons of baking powder. 
To one quart flour use one teaspoon of soda, and two tea- 
spoons cream tartar. 

To 1 quart of flour use 1 cup of sour milk, 1 teaspoon soda. 
To remove peach stains from linen, saturate the stain with 
spirits of camphor before washing and the stain will disappear. 

A tin can of washing soda should be kept on hand to clean 
pots and pans and sweeten the sink. The dishcloth should be 
boiled in soda water frequently. Ammonia can be used for the 
same purpose but it is more expensive. 

A frying basket, which costs only a trifle, saves much labor 
and material. 

A jar for bread crumbs, which should never be thrown away, 
but dried in the oven and rolled out for dressing and thickenings. 
Keep a pot for fat. Never allow r any fat liquor to be thrown 
away, it will serve as a basis of good vegetable soup to-morrow. 
Save all skimmings from same, and all drippings from the roast. 
When bread or pastry is in danger of burning, a basin of cold 
water set on the upper grate protects the bread and lowers the 
temperature, and is much better than covering with paper or 
leaving the door open. 

265 



'JMN 



One copy del. to Cat. Div. 



JUN 22 i' > 






LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 




014 489 022 A *