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COTTADE HOMES- 




L I B R_AR.Y 

OF THE 
UNIVERSITY 
or ILLINOIS 

g r^Q .6 
?\T a 

ja 70, 



'.ir'lv'ERSITY OF, ILL'I 



PALLISER'S 

AMERICAN 

COTTAGE HOMES. 



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PEEFACE. 



vr iTN presenting to the public a new work on Architecture, we have endeavored to meet a demand that 

-- ""^1^ has been made on us, for some time past, for practical designs of low and medium priced houses 
suited to the masses of our country. 

We have endeavored, by careful study of proportion and distribution of parts, to combine good de- 
\^ sign with practical, convenient plans and sound construction ; in fact onr aiin has been, to get the best effect in 
design in the simplest, most common sense, and least expensive manner, as it is not expense and ornate 
decorations, which so many ignorantly believe to be the highest attainment of architecture, but design, which 
produces true beauty and graceful appearance. The same materials and expense thrown away on an ugly, 
ill-proportioned building, if guided by good design, would produce an elegant building, and this is why the 
architect is brought into requisition, to treat the materials placed in his hands so as to give an expression 
of beauty to the simplest form. 

It is an erroneous idea, that it is necessai'y to enclose convenience and comfort in the internal ar- 
rangements with ugliness, or that it is impossible to obtain a pleasing and effective design with a good plan 
and a modern construction. We have seen buildings which, externally, were perfect, but their plans of 
interior arrangement were absolute failures, being without a closet or pantry and devoid of the comfort and 
conveniences which one would expect to find. The first and main object of consideration should be the 
plan, the design being of a pliant nature and easily adapted to the ever-varying forms of comfortable and 
convenient plans. 

One of the objects of this work is to show, that in the erection of buildings the last named principles 
may be combined; also, we hope that it may prove suggestive to those intending to build and to mechanics 
engaged in the erection of buildings. We are inclined to think that, in many instances, the ideas 
contained will be something more than suggestive, and they will no doubt be found useful in assisting 
those who propose the erection of buildings, to decide on the character of the building they wish to 
erect. 

It has not been stated on the Plates where and for whom the buildings have been erected, yet the 
greater portion of the designs have been executed, or are in progress of execution in different parts of the 
country. In this we hope to have shown what can be done in obtaining good and convenient plans, with 
tasty and effective exterjors, at very low prices ; the present state of the country has made this a necessity, 
and has been one of the chief considerations in preparing these designs. 

The prices given will only do for the same specification the designs were executed by, and the same 
locality, and will vary according to location and style of material and finish used in construction. 

PALLISER, PALLISER & CO., 

Bridgeport, Conn., January i, 1878. 



PLATE 1 

Represents the title-page of this work, which it has been deemed best to make a useful plate, by showing 
the perspective views of Designs i, 2, 3, and 23, these designs being without views on the plates where 
they are illustrated. 

The large perspective view is of a neat cottage, now in course of erection at Seaside Park, one of 
the most charming places in New England. The first story is built of fine Trenton pressed brick, 
trimmed with buff and chocolate-colored brick and Longmeadow brown stone, the second story being of 
timber construction ; roofs covered with black slate, ridges of terra cotta ; upper part of all windows filled 
with stained glass ; windows fitted with Wilson & James's rolling Venetian blinds. The first floor is de- 
signed to be finished in ash, with paneled ceilings and hard-wood floor ; second floor in pine, finished in 
natural color. All rooms have open fire-places, built of buff brick and furnished with hard-wood mantels. 

First floor contains main hall, ten feet wide, with large open fire-place in same, and is connected with 
parlor by sliding doors, so that on special occasions they can be thrown into one. The dining-room 
and library are connected in like manner. A toilet- room is placed in rear of main hall, which is con- 
venient to the stairs and back hall. The kitchen is in rear wing, and communicates with dining-room 
through waiter's pantry. Store pantry and ice-closet are on the north side, the ice being put into ice-tank 
from outside, through a door provided for that purpose. Back hall contains back stairs, also communi- 
cates with cellar, kitchen, and main hall. 

Second floor — Five chambers, three dressing rooms, bath-room, cedar and linen closets. A fine 
room on third floor is provided for servant and there is also a large attic for storage. 

The room in Tower is 10 x 12 feet in size, with large open fire-place ; is designed for use, and 
commands an excellent view of Long Island Sound and the surrounding country. 

Laundry and drying-room are placed in basement under kitchen. 

This cottage is intended for a first-class residence, is furnished with all modern improvements and 
conveniences, and heated by indirect heat. 




PUBLISHED BY PALLISER. PALLISER & CO., ARCHITECTS, BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



PLATE 2. 

Design i — Shows plans and elevations of a plain Cottage house of eleven rooms, suited to the 
wants of a family requiring a large amount of room at a small expense, and was designed for a Wesfern 
farm house. Cost, $1,500. 

Design 2 — Represents a tasty Cottage, with four rooms on first fioor and two rooms on second floor, 
and contains all the conveniences generally required in a house of this class, having good closets and pantry, 

with cellar under the whole house, making a very desirable cottage residence for the very small sum of 
$850. (See Specification latter part of book.) 

Design 3 — Is a small, neat Cottage house, with three rooms on first and two on second floor, 

which would make a good house for the south-western part of the country, estimated cost of which is 
$800. 



DESIGN i, 2, 3. 



PLATE 2. 





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PLATE 3. 

Design 4 — Illustrates a one-story Cottage, having four rooms on first floor and room for two bed- 
rooms in attic, which, for convenience and economy, speaks plainly for itself, and when executed makes a 
home which no one need be ashamed of; it is equally adapted to city or country and can be erected in a 
neat and substantial manner for $700. 

Design 5 — Six-room Cottage, suitable for erection on a small city lot. Cost, $900. 

Design 6 — Is a small Cottage of two rooms on first floor, with good pantry and closet ; stairs to 
loft over, and cellar under. Cost, $325, 



DESIGN 4. 5. (J. 



PLATE 3. 




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COPYRIGHT 1878, BY PALLISER, PALLlSeR 4 CO.. BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



PLATE 4. 

Design 7 — Shows plans and elevations of a two-story Cottage house, so arranged as to accommodate 
either one or two families. Cost, ^i.ooo. 

Design 8 — Illustrates a neat six-room Cottage, giving two sets of floor plans for same elevations, the 
changes in plans being brought about by a change in the location of stairs. Cost, ^875. 



I DESIGN 7. 8. 



PLATE 4. 




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COPYRIGHT 1878, BV PALLISER, PALLISEH i. CO., BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



PLATE 5. 

Design 9 — Illustrates a two-story and attic Cottage the floor plans of which explain themselves. The 
exterior is very plain yet neat in design. The mantel is designed to be of wood and the cut work picked 
out in color. Cost, $1,400. 

Design 10 — Is a good study for a four-room Cottage, suited to the requirements of a small family, 
and was designed for a farm-laborer's cottage. Cost, $600. 



Design 9, io. 



PLATE 5. 




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COPYRIGHT 1H7S, BY PALLISER. PALLISEH d. CO., BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



PLATE 6. 

Design ii — Is a six- room Cottage, of a very plain and neat design. Cost, $850. 

Design 12 — Shows a Cottage with two rooms on first floor, with room for two bed-rooms on second 
floor, and which would make a neat house for any one requiring the amount of room and conveniences here 
illustrated. The sink is designed to be enclosed, shelves being arranged above it. Cost, $375. 



I Design ii. 12, 



Plate 6. 




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PLATE 7. 

Design 13 — Illustrates a fire-proof brick Cottage, proposed for erection in blocks of five or six together. 
Estimated cost, $1,150. 

Design 14 — Represents a view in elevation of five fire-proof brick Cottages. Plans similar to 
design 13. 

Design 15 — Plans and front elevation of two-story five-room fire-proof Cottage, for erection in blocks. 
Cost. $850. 



Design 13, 14, 15. 



PLATE 7. 




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COPYRIGHT 1«78, BY PALLiSER, PAILISEH A CO , BRIDOErORT, CONN. 



PLATE 8. 

Design i6 — Shows plans and elevations of a six-room Cottage, suitable for a working man ol small 
means. Cost, $ 860. 

Design 17 — Plans and perspective view of an attractive little Cottage of four rooms, with bath-room 
and conveniences ; laundry in cellar. Is suitable for any one having a small family. Cost, $ 900. 



Design i6, 17. 



PLATE 8. 




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PLATE 9. 

Design i8 — Illustrates a very attractive Cottage of six rooms, with bath-room and dressing-room 
on second floor, spacious piazzas on front and rear, together with all the necessary conveniences required 
for comfort and economy, making this a very desirable house for those requiring the comforts of a home. 

This house should have a location suited to the design, to be in harmony. A hill-side or mountainous 
back'-ground being most desirable, and best calculated to give the desired effect. Cost, $1,500. 



PLATE 10. 

Design 19 — Shows plans, elevations, and perspective view of a pair of picturesque Cottages, of five 
rooms each. The first story is designed to be built of brick, faced with pressed brick, trimmed with moulded 
buff brick, black brick, and brown stone, laid up in red mortar ; the centre division wall is of brick, built 
hollow so as to prevent the transmission of sound. The second story to be built of wood, in the usual 
manner of frame buildings. Cost, $1,400 a side. 



Design ^9. 



Plate 40. 



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PLATE 11. 

Design 20 Illustrates a House adapted to a site on a hill-side, the kitchen and offices being placed 

in the basement, which on rear, is entirely out of ground. The dumb-waiter, from the closet in kitchen 
to waiter's pantry on first floor, connected with dining-room, is a very desirable and convenient feature. 
Second floor contains four sleeping rooms, and there is a good attic over the whole house. Cost. $ 1,700. 

Design 21 — Is a two-story seven-room and attic Cottage, suitable for a mechanic's home, and can be 
erected on a lot of small frontage. Cost, $1,600. 



I Design 20, 2^ 



Plate 11. 




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PLATE 12. 

Design 22 — Shows a pair of frame Cottages of seven rooms each, which, when executed, make a 
very attractive home for any one requiring the amount of room this plan gives, and which can be erected 
for $ 1,200 each. 



Design 22. 



PLATE 12. I 



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COPYRIGHT 1878. BY P/VLLISER, PALLISER 4 CO., BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



PLATE 13. 

Design 23 — Is a very attractive Cottage residence of seven rooms with attic ; cellar under the wfhole 
house : laundry in cellar ; gives a large amount of room for the cost. 

The first story is designed to be clapboarded, and the second story shingled. Cost, $ 1.300. 
See Plate i for Perspective View.) 



Design 23. 



Plate i[ 




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COPYRIGHT 1B78, BY PALLISER. PALLISER A CO.. 



PLATE 14. 



Design 24 — Gives plans, elevations, details, and perspective view of a comfortable, convenient Cottage 
home of six rooms, with Tower, which is designed to command a view of the surrounding country where 
erected. Cost, $ 1,700. 



I Design 24. 



PLATE -14. I 




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PLATE 15. 

Design 25 — Shows plans, elevations, and perspective view of a neat Cottage House, of six rooms, 
suitable for erection in the suburbs or country. The interior is designed to be finished in pine, in a pleasing 
manner and finished in natural color of wood — no paint. Mantels in parlor and dining-room to be of black 
walnut. The roofs to be slated ; clapboards painted Venetian red ; casings, corner-boards and bands, Indian 
red; the chamfers and cut work black. Cost, $1,600. 



DESIGN 25. 



PLATE 15. 



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COPVRIGHT 1878. Bv PALIISER, PAILISEH A CO.. BRIDGEPORT. CONN. 



PLATE 16. 

Design 26 — Illustrates a seven-room House, furnished with all necessary conveniences. First floor, 
main part finished in hard-wood, with hard-wood floor in hall, hard-wood mantels in parlor and dining- 
room. The small panes in top saslics are filled with plain stained glass, the center light with ornamental 
ground glass ; bottom sash, which is the only one accessible for view, being of plain glass, and furnished 
with inside blinds. Cost. $ 2.000. 



Design 26. 



PLATE 16. 





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COPYRIGHT 1878, BV PALLISER, PALLISEH 4 CO., BRIDGEPORT, CONN 



PLATE 17. 

Design 27 — shows plans, elevations, details and perspective view of a two-story House, arranged for 
two families, with front and back stairs, bath-rooms, &c., and is just such a house as every mechanic 
of small family should own, as it would give him the required amount of room on first floor, and the second 
floor would rent for almost enough to pay the interest on the whole ontlay. Cost, $ 2.500. 



DESIGN 27. 



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COPYRIGHT 1878, BY PALLISEH, PALLISER 44C0., BRIDGEPORT, CONN 



PLATE 18. 

Design 28 — Illustrates an attractive pair of Cottages, with good accommodations and the required 
conveniences. It is becoming quite a common practice to erect houses in pairs, which is a very economical 
way of building, and if the design is treated rightly, they can be made very effective. Cost, $ 1,850. 



Design 28. 



PLATE 18. I 




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COPYRIGHT )S7B bY PALLlbEH, PALLIStH A CO.. BHIOGEPOHT CONN 



PLATE 19. 

Design 29 — Shows plan, elevations and perspective view of a tasty little Cottage of six rooms, with 
necessary conveniences for making a comfortable and attractive home. The first floor is finished in ash ; man- 
tels and side-board are executed in ash ; floor in dining-room laid with yellow pine and black walnut. Second 
floor finished in white pine ; all interior wood-work tilled, and the chamfers and cut work picked out in black. 
Roof slated. Cost, $ 2.300. 



I Design 29 



Plate rl9. 




PLATE 20. 

Design 30 — Is a pair of six-room Cottages, designed for a working man having a lot in the city and 
wishing to put up a house suitable h^r himself and another member of his family, at a reasonable expense 
Cost, $1,350 a side. 



Design 30. 



PLATE 20. 





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COPYRIGHT 1S78, BY PALLISEB PALLISER 4 CO., BRIDGEPORT CONN 



PLATE 21. 

Design 31 — Shows plans, elevations, and perspective view of a neat, square Cottage house, of eight 
rooms, suitable for erection in almost any location, and makes a very attractive house with a good amount, 
of room and conveniences, Cost, $ i .950. 



DESIGN 31. 



PLATE 21. 




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COPYRIOHT 1878, BY PALUISER. PALLISER i. CO., BHiDGtPORT, CONN. 



PLATE 22. 

Design 32 — Is illustrated by plans, elevations, and perspective view. This design is a very handsome 
Cottage of seven rooms, with the necessary conveniences, the interior to be finished in good style. The walls, up 
to first story window-sills, are of brick, faced with North Haven brick of even color, relieved with bands of 
black brick — the red brick laid in red mortar, and the black brick in black mortar ; roofs slated, ridge of 
terra cotta. Cost, $2,900. 



Design 32. 



PLATE 22. 




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COPYHIOHT 1«7« BV PALIISER, PAILISEB 4 CO . BHIDOEPORT CONN 



PLATE 23. 

Design 33 — Gives plans, elevations and perspective view of a Southern Cottage of eight rooms, which, 
with some slight changes, is snitable for erection in almost any part of the country, and is a very attractive 
and convenient house at a very reasonable price. Cost, $ 1,500. 



Plate 23. 




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187H, BY PAILISER, PAlllSEB ». CO., BRIDQEPORT, 



PLATE 24. 

Design 34 — Shows plans and elevations of a handsome Cottage. The rooms are large, well lighted, 
and conveniently arranged. The mantels, sideboard, and book-case are designed to be of ash ; all mterioi 
finish of white pine — no mouldings— finished in natural color. The piazza is very spacious, and is an attrac- 
tive feature in the design. Cost, $3,000. 



DESIGN 34. 



PLATE 2^ 





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ment. 



PLATE 25. 

Design 35 — Is a comfortable Cottag-e of nine rooms, with modern convieniences and adapted to the reqiiire- 

of a siiliiirb.in residence. I'ir.t ll ^->r tn 1, i";i; h 1 in hard-A-->od. Cost, $ 2,Soo. 



Design 35. 



Plate 25. | 




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COPYRIOHT'1878, BY*PALLI«ER, PALLI6ER A CO., BRIDGEPORT COHUi 

Li. OF ILL UBo 



PLATE 26. 

Design 36 — Shows plans, elevations and perspective view of a sea-side Cottage, and it will be seen 
by a careful perusal and study of the plans and design, that it is well adapted for a summer residence, and 
by some slight changes in plan, could be made to suit a Southern clime. Cost, $2,600. 



I Design 36. 



PLATE 26. 




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PLATE 27. 

Design 37 — Shows a barn and stable remodeled and made into a handsome residence, the parlor, 
toilet-room and piazzas being added. First floor is finished in yellow pine and ash ; floors of hard-wood ; 
mantels in parior and dining-room of a neat design, executed in ash. Cost, $ 3,500. 



DESIGN 37. 



PLATE 27. 




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COPVHir.HT 1678. OV PALLISER, PALLISER A CO., BRIDGEPORT. COKN. 



PLATE 28. 

Design 38 — Shows plans and view in elevation of a block of four brick and bay window Houses, o< 
nine rooms each, in Queen Anne st) Ic of architecture. Cost, $2,400 each. 



I DESIGN 38. 



PLATE 28. 




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COPYRIGHT m;H, BY PAlllSlH PALLlbLH & CO., BBICX-CPOOT CONN 



PLATE 29. 

Design 39— Illustrates a pair of compact and convenient Cottages, of seven rooms each, suitable for 
either city or country; would make a splendid country farm house, for a farmer and his son to reside to- 
gether, and yet have separate homes. Cost, $1,200 each. 



DESIGN 39. 



PLATE 29. 




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COPYRIGHT ltl?(J, bV PALLlbtfl. PALL 



PLATE 30. 

Design 40 — Shows plans, elevations and perspective view of a country House, containing eleven 
rooms, large attic, cellar under whole house, having laundry, &c., designed to he finished in a plain manner. 
Cost, $3,200. (See Specifications, latter part of book.) 



I DESIGN 40. 



PLATE 30. 



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COPYRIGHT 1878 BY PALLISER, PALLISEH 4 CO., 



PLATE 31. 

Design 41 — Illustrates a Cottage house, of seven rooms, designed for erection in the country. We 
give elevations in two different styles of architecture, suited to entirely different locations ; in this we wish to 
show how diffierent designs can te adapted to the same plan in a satisfactory manner, and they are in- 
tended to become a part of, and be in harmony with the acres that surround them. 

The rooms, ' are conveniently arranged, but could be diffierently disposed to suit any one's ideas, 
and still the same or either of the designs carried out, as could also any of the plans given in this work, 
and the site has much to do with the arrangement of rooms, which we can readily adapt to diffierent require- 
ments. Cost $3,100. 



I DESIGN 41. 







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COPYHIOHT 1878, BV PAILISER, PALLISER & CO., BRIOOEPORT, CONN. 



PLATE 32. 

Design 42 — Gives plans, elevations and perspective view of a conveniently arranged Cottage home of 
six rooms, with all modern conveniences, and was designed for erection on a corner lot. The interior to be 
finished in a neat manner; first floor in hard wood. Cost, $2,500. 



I Design 42. 



PLATE 32. 




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COPYRIGHT 1878, BY PALLlSER PALLISER i. CO., BRIDGEPORT CONN 



PLATE 33. 

Design 43 — Shows plans and elevations of a plain country House, with drive porch. On exami- 
nation of the plan, it will be seen that a large amount of accommodation is given in a compact form and 
a minute description is not necessary as the plans sufficiently explain themselves. Cost, $3,300. 



DESIGN 43. 



PLATE 33. 





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COPyniOHT 1678, BV PAlll&ER. PAllltf.B * CO., BRIDGEPORT 



PLATE 34. 

Design 44 — Gives plans and elevations of a neat every-day House, which, with its large projecting 
roof and spacious varandas, makes a perfect gem of a house, and one that is well adapted for erection in 
suburbs, village or country. As will be seen by the plans, the rooms are conveniently arranged — there is no 
waste room — and the necessary conveniences are provided to make it a comfortable home. Cost, $3,000. 



Design 44. 



PLATE 34. 




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COPYRIGHT 1878 BY PALLISER, PALLISER 4, CO., BRIDOIPOHT 



PLATE 35. 

De.sicjk 45 — Illustrates a very attractive summer residence. The design was prepared for a particular 
site, and gives considerable variety in outline and also an impression of solidity and breadth which should be 
prominent characteristics in a house of this kind. The roof presents an overshadowing, sheltering effect 
which is very desirable in a summer house. Cost, $3,325. 



I Design 45 



PLATE 35. 




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COPYHiOHT 1878, BY PALLISER, PAILISEB i. CO., BRIDGEPORT, 



PLATE 36. 

Design 46 — Shows plans, elevations and perspective view of a two-family House, with the desired con- 
veniences for making a house of this kind what it should be. The rooms are compact and well arranged, and 
a large amount of room is given, and is calculated to be a good investment. Cost, $3,750. 



DESIGN 46. 



PLATE 36. I 





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COPYRIGHT 1«7S BY PALLISErt PALLIbER 4 CO. bHiDGEPORT CuNN. 



PLATE 37. 

Design 47 — Illustrates a handsome brick and timber Cottage, the plan of which is very compact and 
convenient. The laundry is located under kitchen. The first story is faced with selected North Haven brick, 
oi even color. The second story is of timber construction, and painted a warm red color, trimmed with black. 
Cost. $ 4,000. 



DESIGN 47. 



PLATE 37. I 




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COPYRIGHT 1878, BY PALLISEH, PALLISER & CO. BRIDGEPORT CONN. 



PLATE 38. 

Design 48 — Shows plans and elevations of a country House of nine rooms, to be finished in a very 
plain manner. Cost $ 2,600. 



1 DESIGN 48. 



PLATE 38. 



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COPYRIGHT in78, BV PAILISER PALLISER & CO., BRIOQEPORT, CONN. 



PLATE 39. 

Design 49 — Illustrates a pair of brick Houses, of large accommodation, with convenient and compact 
plan giving twelve rooms each with conveniences. The underpinning of Longmeadow brown stone, also 
water-table and window sills; the exterior walls faced with North Haven selected brick of even color, laid 
in red mortar, and finished with a black joint; slopes of roof slated; exterior wood-work painted a warm 
red color and trimmed with black; interior finished in a neat manner and painted. Cost, $3,100 each. 



Design 49. 



Plate 39. | 




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COPVHIGHT 1878, BY PAILISER PAILISER A. CO., BRIOSEPORT, CONN. 



PLATE 40. 

Design 5o^Gives plans, elevations, and perspective view of a nine-room compact Cottage, designed 
for a summer residence by the sea-side. Cost, $3,500. 



The Plates in this work are all very plain and are intended to tell their own story, therefore but little 
explanation is necessary to enable any one to understand all their parts. In the matter of cost. 

localities will have much to do with it, and the business management is a very important part and will afl'ect 
the cost more or less. The designs have all been carefully studied, with a view to get the greatest amount of 
room at as small an expense as possible, which is a very different matter from designing houses regardless 
of cost. 



Design 50. 



Plate 40. 




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COPYRIGHT 1878, BY PALLISEH, PALLISER 4 CO., BRIDGEPORT. 





JACKSON'S 

Heat Safini aail ?8DiilaiiDg Grate 

Equals three ordinary grates 
or the best fire-place heat- 
ers, witlioiit their defects. 
Thoroughly heats the largest 
rooms, and on one or two 
floors, with fuel of one grate. 
Warms, and introduces into 
rooms pure air from out-door 
and removes an equal amount 
of vitiated air from near the 
floors. Full radiant fire of 
the open grate. No drafts, but 
even temperature through- 
out. Equal in design and fin- 
ish to the best grates made. 

ADDRESS EDWIN A. JACKSON & BROTHER, 

77 Beeknian St., New York. 



KELLEY & CO.. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



NEW DESIGNS 
FOR 



STAINED 



GLASS 

AND MEMORIAL AND FIGURE WINDOWS, 

In MODERN and MEDI/EVAL STYLES, for Churches, Halls, Dwellings, Bank and Office Screens, Etc. 

ORNAMENTAL jCS ^^^^^f^^ ^^TP Wr^^S^^^ GLASS WINDOWS 
Executed in EVERY STYLE, at short notice and most moderate prices. 

MEMORIAL WINDOWS A SPECIALTY. IMPORTED ROLLED CATHEDRAL GLASS, 

OF EATER^Y IDESII?.^BT_iE SH^IDE, OUT TO J^lffl^ SIZE ISTEEIDEID. 
EMBOSSED PLATI<: 

CUT &LA_SS 

Tor Door Panels, Bank Counters, Counting Rooms, etc. Ground Glass and Plain Stained in all colors, 
constantly on hand. All inquiries shall have prompt and polite attentiop. 



TO ANY DESIRED 

P.ATTERN. 



SPECIFICATIONS. 



I Working and netall Drawlnit».] 



Of the works and materials required in the erection, construction and completion of Design No. 2, Plate 2. 
Dimensions. — The drawings and details must be accurately followed according to their scale, and in all cases preference must be given 
to figured dimensions over scale. Tlie building to be in size as shown on plans (figured on drawings). Cellar, C C" ; first floor, 
'J'O'' in the clear, divided, subdivided, and built in exact accordance with plans and specifications. 

MASON WORK. 

ExciVATiNO. — Do nil necessary cxfav.itiii'; rcini 
and all founilatious, to flrin and solid ground, uud u 



)e iu depth so 
that foundations will be clear of frost. 

Stone Wohk. — Build the foundation walls of good, flat building stone, 
of firm bed, well bonded through the wall, laid up in elean, sharp sand, 
lime and cement mortar, in parts of one of cement to two of lime, laid by 
and full to a line on the inner face, aud flushed and pointed at completion. 
These walls to be 1' 4" thick. Put down in like manner foundations un- 
der all piers, chimney and exterior steps, all to be clear of frost. 

Drains.— All drain pipes to be of the flrst quality cement drain pipe, 
in sizes as marked ou the plan, aud to be connected with sewer in street. 
These pipes to be properly graded, trapped and the joints cenienteil tight. 

Unukki'INNing.— From the top of stone wall, at grade level, extend up 
two feet in height with 8" brick wall, laid up with best hard-burned brick 
and clean, sharp s.ind lime mortar; face walls with selected brick of even 
color, laid iu red mortar, close joints, jointed, properly cleaned down at 
completion, aud finished with black joints. Window sills of blue stone. 

Piers — Build piers in cellar, as shown, of best hard-burned brick, 
laid in clean, sharp sand lime mortar, aud cap with flat stone size of piers. 

Chlmney.— Build chimney as shown, plastered on the inside and out- 
side, furuished with propei- stove collars and ventilating covers where re- 
quired; turn arch to fire place and turn trimmer arch under hearth. Hearth 
to be of slate properly bedded in cement. Top out the chimney above the 
roof, t's shown, with selected brick iu like manner to underpinning. 

Lathing. — All stud partitions, ceilings and work that is furred ofl', 
on flrst aud second floor, to be lathed with sound spruce laths, and joints 
broken every tenth lath. 

Plastering. — All walls, partitions and ceilings, throughout flrst and 
second floors, to be plastered one good coat of brown, well haired mortar — 
and finish with a good coat of white hard-fiuish. All walls to be flnishL-d 
straight and plumb; all angles to be maintained sharp and regular in foim, 
and the plastering, iu all cases, to extend clear down to the floor. 

CARPENTER. 

Timber. — All timber not otherwise specified, to be of good seasoned 
spruce and put together iu the most sulistanllal and thoroughly work- 
manlike manner known to the trade. 

Framing.— The frame to be what is known as a balloon frame, well 
nailed together; second floor girts to be notched into and well spiked to 
studs. Do all necessary framing around stairways and chimneys, proper- 
ly mortised and tenoned together. 

Frame Timber.— Girders. 4"xC"; sills 3"x7"; posts,4"x5"; girts of 
yellow pine, ll"x4"; plates, 2"x4", doubled and well spiked into ends of 
studding. First floor tiinl)ers, 2"x 6" ; second floor, 2"x G" — 16" centres ; 
header aud trimmer beams, 3" thick; roof rafters, 2"x5"— 2 fl. centres; 
door and window studs, 3"x 4"— intermediate studding, 2"x 4"— 16" cen- 
tres; studdings in partitions, 2"x3"— 16" centres. Verauda sills and 
cross sills. 3"xC"; floor timbers, 2"x6"— 20" centres; plates 4"x5". 

BniuiiiNG. — Bridge the floor timbers with l"x2" cross-bridging, prop- 
erly cut ill between timbers, and nailed at each end with two lOd. nails. 

Fi!Ri!ixG. — Furr overhead on rafters, &c., for rooms on second floor, 
and do any other furring required ; also furnish any other timber, as re- 
quired by the design, of the requisite sizes aud quality. 

Sheathing. — Cover all sides of frame with tongucd and grooved 
boards, not to exceed C" in width, nailed through each edge to every 
stud with lOd. nails. 

Lumber. — The lumber to be of white pine, unless otherwise specified, 
free from kuots, shakes and other imperfections impairing its durability 
and strength. 

Watek Table to be J" thick, furred off, 1", and capped with a bevel- 
ed and rabl)eted cap for clapboards to lap. 

CoKXER Boards, casings and bands to be li"xC"; bands to be rab- 
beted top and bottom for clapboards and beveled on top. 

Clapboardinu. — Co*'er all sides with clear piue clapboards, 4i" wide, 
put on with «d. box nails, to have not less than IJ" lap, and underlaid 
with rosiu-sized waterproof sheathing fell, which, also, place under all 
casings, water-table etc., so as to lap and make tight job. 

Cornices to be formed, as shown, on 3"x B" rafter feet, spiked on to 
rafters at plate; gutter formed on same, and lined with tin, so us to shed 
water to points Indicated on plan; the plancler to be formed by laying 
narrow pine matched boards, face down ou rallerfcet; barge boards 2" 
thick as nIiowu, and all as per detail drawings. 



Window Fka.mes to be made as siiown ; cellar frames of 2" plank rab- 
beted for sash ; sash hinged to top, and to have suitable fasteners to keep 
open or shut ; all other sa.shes to be double hung with hemp cords and 
cast-iron weights, and to be glazed with best American sheet glass all 
sashes 1 J" thick, of seasoned pine, window sills 2" thick. 

Blinds. — Outside blinds to uU windows, except cellar, hung in two 
folds, properly secured and painted two good coats of dark green paint. 

Door Frames. — Outside door fi-ames of plank, rabbeted, and to have 
2" oak sills. 

Porches to be constructed as shown by the detail drawings; steps 
I J" thick, 5" risers, to have cove under no.sings; lay floors with U"x4" 
flooring, blind nailed to beams, and to have white lead Joints; ceiling ceil- 
ed witlr narrow bended battens of even width and molded in angles. Col- 
umns, rails, newels, panels, &c., all as per detail drawings. 

KooiiNG. — All roofs to be covered with 18" sawed pine shingles, laid 
on l"x 2" strips nailed to ratters with lOd. nails; each shingle to be nail- 
ed with two white metal nails, to be well laid, joints properly broken, and 
made tight. 

Floors. — Lay the floors throughout with J" flooring, not to exceed 
6" in width, to be well laid, joints broken, and well nailed to every tim- 
ber; the best to be selected and laid ou flrst flaor. 

Partitions.— Set partitions, as marked on plans, to foot on girders, 
and to have 3"x3" plates to carry second floor; all angles to lie formed 
solid; all partitions to be bridged once in their height. 

Grounds.- Put up all necessary grounds to skreed plaster to, to be }" 
thick and left on. 

Wainscoting.— Wainscot walls of kitchen aud living room 3ft. high, 
with beaded battens 3" wide, and cap with molded and beveled cap. 

Casings iu front hall and living room to be cut and stop chamfered, 
as shown, U"x6"; all dnors and windows elsewhere to be cased before 
plastering with J" casings, and flnish with a i"xl}" b.ind mold ; put down 
7" bevelled base in front hall and bed-rooms after plastering; iloor jambs 
to be 5" thick, and rabbeted for doors and beaded on edges : windows to 
be flnished with neat stool and apron finish. 

Doors to be made in size as shown; outside doors to be sash doors, 
as shown; all other doors six-panel, ogee, molded solid. 

Saddles. — Put down neat hard pine saddles to all doors. 

Stairs. — Cellar stairs to be of plank, no risers ; stairs to second floor 
as shown, U" treads, I" risers, properly put together and supported. 

Sink.— Ceil up under sink with narrow beaded battens, to match 
wainscoting; hang door to form closet under; ceil up splash back 16" high; 
also place drip board complete. 

Pantry to have counter-shelf and four shelves above ; also put up one 
dozen pot-hooks. 

Closets to be fltted up with shelves and double wardrobe hooks, 0" 
apart, on neat molded strips. 

Furniture to front door Qemacitc Eastlake pattern elsewhere Hema- 
citc plain. 

Locks to all doors to be mortise lock's, brass fronts and keys ; out- 
side doors to be secured with suiiabic shove bolts. 

Stops. — Insert hard-wood door stops in base where requisite. 

Hinging.— Haug all doors with loose joint butts of appropriate size. 

Mantel to be constructed, as shown, of ash. 

Cellar. — Partitions in cellar to be boarded with matched boards; 
coal bin to be boarded up 4 ft. high, to have slides complete. 

Final. — Also do any other carpenter work as shown by and as re- 
quired to carry out the design. 



PAINTING. 



All wood-work, both on interior aud exterior, unles.; otherwise .spec- 
ified, to be painted two good coats of best white leai) and raw linseed 
oil paint. Paint clapboards Venetian red; casings &c., Indian red, us- 
ing lilack for all chamfers and cut work. Grain wood-*ork In kitchen in 
oak; bed-rooms paint in one color; wood-work in hall and living room 
to be properly filled with Wheeler's patent woo<l filler and finished with 
one coat of Crockett's Preservative No. 1. in a flrst class workmanlike 
m,inner ; chamfers and cut work pick out in black ; paint roofs dark 
shite color, tin work Indian red. Also, do, any other painter's work as 
required by the design. 

TINNING AND PLUMBING. 

Tixxiso.— Line the gutters with tin, well soldereil iu rosin; furnish 
aud^ut up the necessary number of tin leaders to convey the water from 
gutters to grade level, and there connect wilh drains. These leaders to 
be llrmly secured to building, aud to be graded iu size to suit amount of 
service rcquireil. 

Sink to be a 20"x 30"x6" cast iron, supplied with water through |" 
lead pipe and |" bra-ss draw cork, to have 2" cast-iron waste, properly 
caulked at joints, trapped and connected closely to drain. Extend 
waste pipe above roof for vent. 



I Working and Detail Drawings.] 



SPECIFICATIONS. 



Of the xwvIa and materials required in the erection, construction, and completion of Design 40, Plate 30. 
Dimensions.— The drawings must be acciiratelj- followed according to their scale, and preference given to figured dimensions over scale. 
Detail drawings will be furnished, any work constructed without such drawings must be removed if required, and work replaced 
at contractor's expense. The building to be in size as shown and figured on drawings. Cellar, G' 9" ; first floor, 9' 0' ; kitchen, 
8' 3"; second floor, 9'0"; over kitchen, 8' 0" ; all in the clear, divided, sulxlivided, and built in exact accordance with plans and 
specifications. 



MASON WORK. 

Excavator.— Excavate in depth for the cellar, area, foundations, 
and footings of all the walls and chimneys, also for all drains, cistern and 
cess-pools. Dig trenches for footings of all walls 8" below level of cellar 
bottom; fill in around walls as laid; grade the excavated earth around 
the building as may be directed. Lay aside the top soil, at commence- 
ment, and replace over the graded surface at completion. 

Stone Wokk.— Build foundation walls of good building stone, of 
flat bed and flrui build, laid in clean, sharp sand, lime and cement mortar, 
in parts of one of cemeni. and two of lime. Lay down footings under 
all the walls of the building of flat stones, not less than 20" long and 
6" thick, bedded crosswise of the walls on the natural, undisturbed earth ; 
build the wolls from thence to grade level, by and full to a line ou the 
inner face, and flusli and point at completion. These walls to average 
1' 6" in thickness, the greater breadth at the base. Lay down substan- 
tial foundations under chimneys and piers in cellar ; put down clear of 
frost, solid foundations under piers supporting porches and verandas, al- 
so under all exterior steps. Area copings and steps to be of blue stone, 
steps properly walled in on each eud. 

Undkupinnino.— Build the underpinuing walls IG" tliick from grade 
level, and extend up 2' 4" in height, with good underpinning stone, level 
beds, plumb joints; all angles and jambs to have chisel draft ou edges, 
also on top to receive woodwork, and to be properly pointed and penciled 
with a white joint at completion. Window sills to be of blue stone; 
such portions of walls as arc covered up with veranda to be rough work, 
Cess-Pooi.. — Stone up cess-pool 3 feet in diameter and 8 feet deep, 
covered with rough flag, provided with man-hole, etc., complete; make 
the necessary connections with the cistern to receive the overflowthrough 
cement pipe of the required size. Also stone up, in like manner, cess- 
pool, to receive wastes from house, and connect with G" cement drain-pipe. 
Bkick WoiiK.— To be laid up with best quality hard-biu-ned brick 
and clean, sharp sand, lime mortar. 

Piers.— Build piers in cellar IG" square, as shown, and cap with flat 
stone, size ol" piers ; piers supporting porches and verandas 12" square. 

CiiiMxr.vs.— Build the chimneys as shown on plans; carry up the 
flues of uniform size, to be well plastered, furnished with proper stove 
collars and veutilatiug flues where required; turn arclies to all flre-places, 
and turn trimmer arches under all hearths ; top out above the roof, as per 
detail drawings, with selected brick laid in black mortar, close joints, 
jointed and cleaned down. Face the throat, breast and jambs of kitchen 
rtre-place with selected brick, laid in black mortar, provided with slate 
shelf, to have blue stone hearth as showu on plans. Build fireplace in hall 
with bufl' brick, laid in red mortar, angles molded and as per details, also 
furnisli tlie necessary brick, mortar and plaster for setting the mantels 
and range. 

Cistern.- Build a cistern where directed, 10 ft. diameter and 10 ft. 
deep, with S" walls laid in and smoothly coated on the inside witli ce- 
ment; cover man-hole in neck with flag -stone, connect to leaders with 4" 
and G" vitrified pipe. 

LATiii.NCi.- Lath all walls, ceilings, and work that is furred ofl', 
throughout first and second floors, with sound, seasoned lath, secinuly 
nailed to each stud, and joints broken every tenth lath. 

Plastering.— All walls ami ceilings throughout first and second 
floors, plaster with one good coat of brown, well haired mortar, and fin- 
ish with one coat of white hard-finish. All angles to be sharp and regu- 
lar in form, walls to be straight and plumb, ;uul in alUascs to extend 
clear down to floors. 

Cornices.— Run stucco cornices, as shown liy the details, in hall, 
parlor, library and dining-room of first floor. 

Centres.— Put up four neat and appropriate centres, of such pattern 
as selected by owner. 

AuciiES. Finish and mold the arches in hall as showu by the detail 
drawings. 

I'iNAL.— White wash walls in lnuudry, and do all iiecussary mi'uiliug 
of walls after other craftsmen, and deliver the niason work up in tlior- 
ouglily good order at completion; make the floors bro(mi-elean fi'om 
time to time as re(iuired ; also remove all mason's waste materials and 
rubbish accnmulated during the progress of the works, from ott' the prem- 
ises and leave everything in a perfect, complete and satisfactory state. 



CARPENTER. 

Timber.— The whole of the timber nsed in and throughout tihs build- 
ing to be the best of their several kinds, well seasoned and free from sap, 
shakes and other imperfections impairing its durability and strength. 

Framing. — The frame to be what is known as half balloon, the studs 
to be tenoned into sills and plates, to be i)raced with long angle braces 
cut in barefoot and well spiked. The girts to be of yellow pine, notched 
into and well spiked to studs. Do all necessary framing around stairways 
and chimneys, all pioperly mortised and tenoned together and all to be 
done in a thoroughly workmanlike and substantial manner. 

Fba-me Timber.— Sills' and girders, G"xG" ; posts, G"x6" with inside 
angle cut out to make them 4" from faces. Girts U"x4"; plates, 4"x5"; 
first floor timbers, 2"xl0"; second floor, 2"x8"; attic 2"xG" — all 16" 
centres; header and trimmer beams, 3" thick, all floor timbers under 
partitions running same way to be 4" thick, roof rafters, 2"xG"— 2 ft. 
centres; hip and valley rafters, 3"x8". Door and window studs, 3"x4" 
intermediate studding, 2"x4" — IG" centres; long braces, 2"x4". All 
main partitions to be set with 2"x4" studding — 16" centres, to be set as 
the frame is raised, and foot on girders, to have 3"x4" plates on which to 
foot second story partitions and carry floor timbers ; other partitions set 
with 2"x3" studs— 16" centres, and all partitions that are directly over 
each other to be set in like manner to above, all to be well braced and 
spiked; all angles to be formed solid, and all partitions to be bridged once 
in their height. Porch and veranda sills, 4"xG" ; floor timbers, 2"xC" — 
IG" centres; plates, 4"x5"; rafters, 3"x5" — 2 ft. centres. 

Bridoino. — All the floor timbers to be bridged through centres with 
2"x2" cross-bridging, properly cut in between timbers and nailed with 
two lOd. nails at each eud, also furnish any other timber of the required 
size and necessary to fully complete the works. 

Furring. — Properly support and furr under stairs, fUrr for arches, 
and do any other furring required by the design. 

Sheathing. — Cover the entire frame with tongued and grooved 
boards, not to exceed G" in width, nailed through each edge to every 
stud with lOd. nails ; this includes all roofs. 

Lu.MBEU.— The lumber to be of white pine, unless otherwise specified, 
well seasoned and dry, and free from shakes, loose knots and other im- 
perfections. Sashes and panel work to be perfectly clear lumber. 

Clapboarding. — Cover all sides with clear pine clapboards, put on 
with 8d. box nails, with not less than IjJ" lap. These boards to be under- 
laid with beaver-brand, rosin-sized, waterproof sheathing felt, which al- 
so place under corner boards, casings, etc., so as to lap and make a 
tight job. 

Corner Bo.\rds, casings, and bands. lj"x 7": bands to be rabbeted 
top and bottom for clapboards. 

Water Tabi-e.— T» be furred oft" from fi-ame, and to have beveled cap 
14" thick. 

Cornices. — To he formed on 3"x.'>" rafi.er feet, cut as shown, and 



■med by laying narrow 
irge boards and gable 
• shown, and all as per 
,o shed water to points 



spiked on to rafters ;,t i>l:\tiv llu- planei-^r 
pine matched hi>:n^l-. \':f<- ^t.nvn mi imii.' 
stafls to be2i" lllirk :mi.I :i- -ll.iu n. r.ij 
details. Gutters In I,,.- ..| -Mhani/ed iron, 
indicated on plan. 

Leaiiers. — Furnish all the required leaders of sufllcient size to con- 
vey tlie water from the gutters to the cistern and the tank iu attic : said 
leaders to be flrmly secured to building. 

FiNiAi.. — To be of wrought iron, as per details, to liave galvanized 
iron cover to base. 

WiNnow Frames. — To be made iu the ordinary manner; cellar 
fi-amcs to be made out of 2" plank, rabbeted for ;<iish : sash hinged to t(>|> 
and to have suitable fasteners to keep open or shut: all Siish to be of 
seasoned pine, 14" thick, and double hung with best hemp cords, iron 
weights, and 1}" sham axle pulleys, and to be glazed with English sheet 
glass, all to be well bedded, braddcd and puttied ; window in dining-room, 
on to veranda, to be hinged : window sills 24" thick. 

Blinds.— Outside blinds to all windows, except cellar, hung in two 
folds, with the best kind of hinges, and secured with best style fasteners, 
and painted three coats of paint, invisible green. 



Door Frames.— Oiitsiile door fnuiu-s to be of pliuik, rablxteO, ami 
to have 21'' oak sills. 

Verandas. — Construct veranda and porches, as sliown, and as perde- 
lail drawings ; steps, U" thick, risers 1", to have cove under nosings ; lay 
the floors with 1 J"x SJ" flooring, blind nailed to beanis, and to have paint 
joints; rafters to be dressed and chamfered; lay on rafters, face down nar- 
low beaded ceiling of even widths. Columns, rails and brackets to be as 
shown ; cornices formed with beaded ceiling on rafter feet in like manner 
to main roof; rafter feet to be cut as shown; panels formed under floor 
as shown. 

Floors.— Lay the kitchen floor with yellow piue, l"xU", blind nailed 
to every beam; all other floors lay with wliite pine, uot to exceed 5" in 
width, to be well laid, joints broken, and blind nailed in a thorough man- 
ner. Lay front hall floor with yellow piue and black walnut in alternate 
strips, to have neat border. 

Waisscotinu. — Walk of kitchen to be wainscoted 3 ft. high with 
beaded battens J" x 3"., aud to have neat bevelled molded cap. 

Casings. — Case all doors and windows throughout, before plastering 
with J" casings, and trim hall, parlor, dining-room and library with a IJ" 
x3" band-mold ; elsewhere trim with l"x ij" band-mold ; windows in above 
rooms to be fluished down to floor with framed and molded panel-backs to 
match doors ; other windows to have neat stool aud apron finish ; door- 
jambs to be 1", beaded on_edges, and rabbeted for doors; no moldings in 
closets. 

Base.— Put down after plastering, 8" molded base lu principal rooms 
first floor; 7" plain beveled elsewhere. 

Doors.- To be made in size and thickness as marked on plans ; fl-ont 
doors as per details ; top panels glazed with colored glass ; all other doors 
to be six-panel ogee molded solid. 

Saddles.— Put down molded hard-wood sadilles to all doors. 

Stairs. — Stairs to cellar to be of plank, no risers, to have flat rail on 
side; main stairs iis shown 1" risers, 1\" treads, with returned molded 
nosings, to be well supported aud rough bracketed, steps housed into 
strings ; newel posts, rails and balusters to be of black walnut, as per 
details. Back stairs, and stairs to attic to be box stairs. 

Wash Tubs.— To be constructed out of 2" plank, rabbeted aud put 
together with white lead joints, and to have hinged lids — these tubs to be 
U" deep. 

Sink. — Ceil up under sink with narrow beaded battens ; to have door 
properly hung ; ceil up splash back 16" high, and cap same as wainscoting 
also place drip board complete. 

Wash Bowi.s.— Ceil up uuder with narrow beaded ash battens, and 
hang door to form a closet under. 

Bath-Kooms.- Wainscot walls of bath-room, 3 ft. high, with narrow 
beaded ash battens, and cap with neat cap ; water closet to be fitted up 
with seat, riser and mitre-clamp flap, hung with brass butts. 

Bath-tub to be cased in most approved manner, all of ash. 

Tank. — Construct out of 2" plank, a tank in attic, over bath-room 7 ft. 
long, 5' 6" wide aud 3 ft. deep, framed, braced aud supported in a substan- 
tial manner; the bottom of tank to be furred and plastered in bath room, 
and finish 7' 6" in the clear. 

Pantry.— To have counter-shelf and four shelves above; closet for 
barrel of flour, with lid in counter-shelf; also put in two dove-tailed draw- 
ers, and put up one dozen pot-hooks. 

Passage.— To have table with closet under, and three dove-lailed 
drawers; also shelves as shown. 

Closets. — To have shelves on neat strips, and double wardrobe hooks 
tS" apart, on neat molded strips. 

FtmNiTURE.— To front doors to be Tucker bronze; other doors, first, 
floor, principal rooms, Hemacite Eastlake pattern; other doors, mineral 
japanned, sash fasteners to correspond; all small closets to have suitable 
catches; all drawers to have suitable pulls, locks, etc., complete. 

Locks.- All doors throughout to be secured with mortise locks, of 
best city make, brass fronts, bolts aud keys ; outside doors to have suita- 
ble shove bolts. 

Stops.— Put rubber-tipped door-stops in base where required. 

Hinging. — Hang all doors with loose joint butts, of appropriate 
sizes ; all doors over 7' C" high to have three butts each. Sliding doors 
to ran on brass track and patent slot sheaves. 

Bell.— Front door to have bell connected with kitchen, with pull, 
etc., complete. 

NioiiT-LATcn to ftont door, combined with lock, and supplied with 
two keys. 

Coal Bins, and partitions in cellar, to be boarded np with matched 
boards, as shown; doors In cellar to be batten doors. 

Mantel.s. Construct mantel lu hall of ash, as per details; furnish 
aud put up four slate mantels; all hearths of slate, to have summer fronts, 
etc., complete, and to cost 8 100 and be selected by owner; mantels lu 
bed-room on first floor, and two chambers, to be ueat wooden mantels. 



Final.— Any other work that is shown by the drawings, aud neces- 
sary to fully complete the work, to fully complete the same to the true in- 
tent and meaulug of these particulars, is to lie done without extra charge. 

SLATER. 

Cover all roofs with best Bangor, I'a., black slate, of small size, laid 
with a lap of at least 3" of the third over the first ; each slate to be nail- 
ed with two galvanized iroiT nails ; lay under slate heavy tarred felt 
paper; cover the ridges with zluc, also flash valleys aud chimneys with 
heavy zinc, and secure wiih slater's cement. To be a first class job, and 
« arranted tight for two years. 

PLUMBER. 

Iron Soil-imi'i:.- Furnish, aud connect with drain, a 4" cast iron 
soil-pipe, extend np aud couuect with water closet in bath-room through 
Clb. lead trap; soil-pipe to be properly .secured and the joints caulked 
tight with lead, aud extend up above roof and cap with ventilator. All 
traps in plumbing to have 1" vent pipes of lead run up to attic and con- 
nected with soil or outlet pipe up above roof. 

SUPPLY-Pipi:.— Furnish a |" B lead pipe, connect with the attic tank, 
and run to aud connect with boiler in kitchen ; tank to be lined with -Jib. 
lead, and to have 2" overflow run through outside wall. 

Boiler. — To be a 35-gallou, galvanized iron, of the best construction, 
connected to water back of range, through double A lead pipe and bras.-, 
couplings; these pipes to be left ready for connection. 

Sink.— To be 20" x 30" x C" cast iron, galvauized, supplied with hot 
and cold water through |" B lead pipe, 8" brass draw cocks, to have 2'' 
waste, properly trapped aud connected. 

Pump. — Put in a combination lift and force pump, to cost $12: con- 
nect the same with cistern and well through 1^"B. lead pipes, provided 
with stop cocks, one on each pipe, placed beneath the pump, connect 
with tauk in attic through 1" B lead pipe and run tell-tale back from 
tank to sink. 

Wash tubs.— Supply the two wash tubs in lanndiy with hot and cold 
water, through |" B lead pipe and brass thimble tray draw cocks, to 
have 2" main waste and li" branch wastes, properly trapped and con- 
nected. 

Wash Bowls.— To be of Wedgewood ware, aud to have marble coun- 
ter sunk tops aud surbases, supplied with hot and cold water through 4" 
B lead pipe and compression double nickel plated draw cocks, and plated 
plug and chain; to have 1" lead wastes, properly irapped aud connected: 
lead pans to each witli i" leail waste run down to underside cellar ceil- 
ing. 

Water-closet to be a Harrison best closet, with patent drip tray: 
also patent shutofi' cock to regulate flow of water to bowl; to be set and 
flt up in a perfect, tight and complete manner. 

Bath Tub.— To be a 12oz. sheet-copper tub, well tinned and planished, 
supplied with hot and cold water through J" B lead pipe aud nicklc-plat- 
ed draw-cocks ; also to have plated plug and chain ; also rubber hose 
shower-bath attachment; wjiste, li" lead, properly trapped and connect- 
ed. 

Cocks.— Put in the necessary stop-cocks over the boiler to shut the 
water ofl'from the upper part of the house; also put in a lead branch con- 
nected with drain with slop-cock for emptying the boiler; also put in one 
draw-cock in cellar and all other stop and draw-cocks necessary to make 
a complete and first-class job ; all pipes to be graded, so that if the water 
is shut olf they will drain dry, and Ihe whole of the work to be done in 
the very best and workmanlike manner, and delivered up in a complete 
aud perfect state at completion. 

PAINTER. 

Properly stop and olliorwise pre|)are for and paint all wood work tliat 
is customary iind usual to paint, both on the interior and exterior, two 
good coats of the best white lead and raw linseed oil paint. 

Paint finlal invisible green, aud gild the tips with gold leaf. 

Grain the wood work iu kitchen and back hall light oak ; grain din- 
ing-room and liarary walnut and maple; paint parlor aud hall in lints : 
elsewhere paint lu one color. 

All hard wood to be properly filled with Wheeler's patent filler aud 
finished with two coats of Crockett's Preservative No. 1. properly applied 
and rubbed down smooth; all grained work to be varnished. Fill the 
front doors with Wheeler's filler aud flnlsh with two coats of Crockett's 
Spar Composition and rub down. 

Paint clapboards light olive drab; paint corner boards, casings, etc., 
Indian Ked ; pick out all chamfers and cut work in black, paint sash 
Veuetlan red ; Veranda ceilings ultramarine blue, with rafters Indian 
red; and do any other painting as rerinircd by the design, and necessary 
to fully complete the same. 



Articles 0f Agreement, 

in the year One Thousand Eight Hundred and_ 



FORM OF CONTRACT. 



MADE and entered into this day oL 



, By and Between- 

, of the of , County of_ 

and State of , as the part of the First Part, and 

of the. of , County of , and State of — 

as the part of the Second Part, 

Witnesseth: First— The said part of the first part do hereby, for 



heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, covenant, promise and agree to and with the said part of the second 

part, heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, that , the said part of the first part, 

heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, shall and will for the consideration hereinafter mentioned, on or before the 

day of , in the year One Thousand Eight Hundred and 

well and sufficiently erect, finish and deliver, in a true, perfect and thoroughly workmanlike manner, the 



for the part of the second part, on ground situated. 



, in the ^_of , County of , and State 

of , agreeably to the plans, drawings and specifications prepared for the said works by 

, Architect, to the satisfaction and under the direction and personal supervision of 

, Architect, and will find and provide such good, proper and sufficient materials, of 

all kinds whatsoever as shall be proper and sufficient for the completing and finishing all the 



and other works of the said building mentioned in the 

specifications, and signed by the said parties, within the time aforesaid, for the sum of 

Dollars. 

Second — The said part of the second part do hereby for ! heirs, executors, 

administrators or assigns, covenant, promise and agree to and with the said part of the first part, 



heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, that , the said part of the second part heirs, executors, 

administrators or assigns, will and shall in consideration of the covenants and agreements being strictly executed, 

kept and performed by the said part of the first part as specified, will well and truly pay or cause to be 

paid, unto the part of the first part, or unto heirs, executors, administrators or assigns, the sum of 

Dollars, lawful money of the 

United States of America, in manner following : 

First payment of $ 



Second pavment of & 






Third 








Fourth m\rmpnt nf « 






Fifth 









when the building is all complete, and after the expiration of days, being the number of days allowed by law 

to lien a building for work done and material furnished, and when all the drawings and specifications ha\e been returned 

to , Architect ; 

Provided, that in each case of the said payments a certificate shall be obtained from antl signoil by 

^ , Architect, to the effect that the work is done in strict accordance with 

drawings and specifications, and that he considers the [laymcnt properly due ; said certificate, however, in no way 

lessening the total and final responsibility of the part of the first ]iart ; and, Provided further that in each 

case a certificate shall be obtained by the part of the first part, from the clerk of the office where liens are recorded, 



and signed and sealed by said clerk, tliat he has carefully examined the records and finds no liens or claims recorded 
against said works, or on account of the said part of the first part. 

And it is hereby further Agreed by and between the said Parties : 

Third. — That the specifications and the drawings arc intended to co-operate, so that any works exhibited in the 
drawings and not mentioned in the specifications, or vice versa, are to be executed the same as if they were mentioned 
in the specifications and set forth in the drawings, to the true intent and meaning of the said drawings and specifications, 
without extra charge. 

Fourth. — The Contractor, at his own proper costs and charges, is to provide all manner of labor, materials, appara- 
tus, scaffolding, utensils and cartage of every description needful for the due performance of the several works ; and render 
all due and sufficient facilities to the Architect for the inspection of the work and materials. 

Fifth. — Should the Owner, at any time during the progress of the said works require any alterations of, deviations from 
additions to, or omissions from the said Contract, he shall have the right and power to make such change or changes, and 
the same shall in no way injuriously affect or make void the Contract ; but the difference shall be added to or deducted 
from the amount of the Contract, as the case may be, by a fair and reasonable valuation. 

Sixth. — Should the Contractor, at any time during the progress of the said works, refuse or neglect to supply a 
sufficiency of material or of workmen, or cause any unreasonable neglect or suspension of work, or fail or refuse to comply 
with any of the Articles of Agreement, the Owner or his agent shall have the right and power to enter upon and take 
possession of the premises and provide materials and workmen sufficient to finish the said works, after giving forty-eight 

hours notice in writing, directed and delivered personally to the part of the first part ; and the expense of the notice 

and the finishing of the various works will be deducted from the amount of Contract. 

Seventh. — Should any dispute arise respecting the true construction or meaning of the drawings or specifications, the 

same shall be decided by , Architect, and his decision shall be final and conclusive ; 

but should any. dispute arise respecting the true value of any extra work, or of works omitted by the Contractor, the same 
shall be valued by two competent persons— one employed by the Owner and the other by the Contractor— and these two 
shall have the power to name an Umpire, whose decision shall be binding on all parties. 

Eighth. — No work shall be considered as extra, unless a separate estimate in writing, for the same, shall have been 
submitted by the Contractor to the Architect and the Owner and their signatures obtained thereto. 

Ninth. — The Owner will not in any manner, be answerable or accountable for any loss or damage that shall or 
may happen to the said works, or any part or parts thereof respectively, or for any of the materials or other things used 
and employed in finishing and completing the said works. 

Tenth. — The Contractor will insure the building before each payment, for the amount of the payment to be made ; 
and the policy will not expire until after the building is completed and accepted by the Architect and Owner. The Con- 
tractor will also assign the policy to the Owner before the payment will be made. 

Eleventh, — Each artisan and laborer will receipt the Architect's certificate, that he has been paid in full, and the 
Contractor will make oath according to the Architect's certificate, that all bills have been paid and that there are no un- 
paid accounts against the works. 

Twelfth. — Should the Contractor fail to finish the work at or before the time agreed upon, shall pay to the 

part of the second part, the sum of _ _ ^dollars per diem, for each and every 

day thereafter the said works shall remain unfinished, as and for liquidated damages. 

^a ^PPltafSS ^^fecrCOf, The said parties to these presents have hereunto set their hands and seals, the day and 
year above written. 

Witnesses, \ Part of the First Part \ [seal.] 

[seal.] 

Part of the Second Part \ [s^f^u] 

[seal.] 



Be sure and have a right contract before going ahead, as by so doing you may save an endless amount of trouble 
and it may be some money. A poor contract has often cost J 500 to g 1,000. 

PALLISER'S BUILDING CONTRACT FORMS with Bond (copyrighted and revised April, 1881) are sent 
postpaid to any address on receipt of price, viz., 5 cents each or 40 cents per dozen. Address 

PALLISER, PALLISER & CO., Bridgeport, Conn. 



NEW AND BEST BOOK ON BIIILDIN&; 

PALLISER'S 
M: OPE L H OJ^E S. 

Showing a variety of designs for IModel Dwellings, Cottages, Villas, 
Farm and Country Mouses ; also Faini Rain and Hennery, Stable and 
Carriage House, School House, Bank and Library-, Masonic Associa- 
tion Building, Town Hall, and an Episcopal, a Catholic, and a Con- 
gregational Church; 28 full page Gx9 plates. Full information on 
building, full descriptive text, &c., owners' names, location, actual 
cost. Also chapters on selection of sites and building construction 
on the employment and responsibilities of architects. Buildings de- 
signed and erected the past summer. One 8vo. volume, handsomely 
bound in cloth. Price One Dollar. 

The price of this work. One Dollar, is a mere nothing compared 
with the valuable information contained for all people intending to 
build or otherwise interested in building. 



EXTRACTS FROM THE PRESS. 



I low a price. There is 

• adaptefl to all classes, 



NEW, REVISED, ENLARGED AND IMPROVED EDITION. 

JUST PUBLISHED, NOVEMBER, 1880. 

A :Xcn Ealilion in Inauvd aa often aa every Tno Yrara. 

PALLISER'S SPECIFICATIONS, 

C( INSISTING OF 

MASONS'. CARPENTEES', PAINTERS', SLATERS', TIN- 
NERS'. PLUMBERS', HEATERS', AND GAS PIPER'S 
SPECIFICATIONS FOR BRICK OR FRAME 
BUILDINGS COSTING $5,000 AND UPWARDS. 



tnvaluablo to Builders and those who design buildings, as by their use 
they will save hundreds of pages in writing and copving, besides having a 
more complete, fUll and practical specification than is usually written. 

Those who write specifications will find a full reminder of everything re- 
quisite in the erection of such buildings as they apply to ; and parties not used 
to specifying for work will find them worth twenty times the cost. 

Tiiese specifications are complete in every respect ; blank spaces are left lor 
everylhing that changes with the difference in class and cost of buildings, as 
sizes of timber and other material, in fact everything not shown on plans. 

Where the buildings are inexpensive and require no slate roofing, plumbing 
or heating, pages can be closed up or cut out, and by drawing the pen through 
a single word or by adding a word in writing, a desired change can be made. 

Builders can read what they are required to do with greater facility than 
they can in manuscript, and are less liable to make errors, and therefore exe- 
c-uie the work better. 

NOTICES FROM THE PRESS. 



■oulii be no mure prulitabk- investment than a dollar for areh 
; the plans. 'SVe have scanned it with care and interest.lpro*' 



complete set for brick buililiage as 
I i -e to say that with the pruperamount 
;ii- buildings, for which ample spaces 
'Unhand full i " 



■ readers.- 



rritten in i 



Peodle who ' 
<-oura7iC. 
The plans sin 



I plain matter-of-fact style, 

k. Persons intending to build will do 

- ^ ' '-' Secretary. 

II' I I.I I 'ill I 111 III. h. architectural improvement.— C/irtsfian 

find ideas here that are rery serviceable.— i/ar(/brrf Ct., 



ntly l)Ui 



, thus I 



■ification is nearly 
lition to the whole. 



thoroughly experien- 

■ _ rietj ' 

model ; and i 



I great variety of 
model ; and that 
-From tkeAmeri- 



They have 
hensive anrl 



II. . aiuuipt to hide the roof, 
r\\\here the importance and 
iL^raved, ai-e accompanied by 



every luver of the useful and Itcautiful combined 
! on architecture, and elaborately ilhistrated.- »n 



IiidUinti 1 
Of inter 

erection o 
The dc^ 



lio means to build hnil i 
t.~Fromthe Spriii'tri' 
rdinall particulars, im . 
From the Iron Aiji. 



t ItnokselUr. 

■ lation to the finish, and throughout shows 

1 1 ! I _\ I lie work of experienced men. — From 

ml read them than trust to an impromp- 



parts as there ii 



ler, and especially import! 
-.—AnsonUi, Ct., Sentinel. 
ntents, form an interesting work upon the i 



' architectural beauty. 



1 those who contemplate the . , , , . „ „ .. . . 

Every .Architect in the country should use them. Every Builder should 
i treated, iiave these Specifications and become acquainted with their contents. 
ma afriie-l Those who Intend to build should get a .set and study them. 

■j The principal Arcliitects use them in theii practice. The forms of contract 
, „ .,^ , ^ , ,. . , are the Standard and cover fully all the points and have stood the test every- 

I . Arclutects and Builders, but to peoplo who wish to secure' ^y^g,.g f„j. jjjg ^^^ ^^^.^^ y^^r,, 

ill ,, ii, III III iiii,, lull V .1 f/i . . , r/ , poMrier. 1 Printed on one Side of sized paper, 9xU inches in size, suitable for filling in 

II ' """"(or <4 Cown/ry blanks with pen and ink, handsomely bound in pai<er cover with fiistenings, 

, , I I, Ill I II i I , II . I I ihem to the result ''"=••*'"'' P°^'"'''"*"=- 

, I. ,:, ,1, ,p i„ II I. 1 I, 'I Price 50 cents per set, including two forms of contract, or 8 +.00 per dozen. 

. I.., I. Ill I iii.iuu, 1- uiU.ui 111 I ;. ^i.'i'iieiown,Ct.,Conati-\ Forms of contract for building, 5 cents each or 40 cents per dozen. 

I I .■i'l'i'l I'/i'rmrslubuiuZgTf he h^ Palliser's Specifications and Bnilding Contracts are indorsed 

I III. I Even tb.iM p. iMasiefui and elegant.- "•y^h* Leading Architccts and Bnilders in the United States 

> propose building will do well to consult its pages.— Canadian Poat. and CanadaS. 

"^ I Specifications Ijy the quantity at S 15.00 per hundred copies, and Contracts 

It is a very low-priced book for so manv valuable suggestions ; at its (imluding bond) at 8 2.50 per hundred copies, 
price it shoukl be in the hands of many who contemplate buildin" ; but , Hh m Contracts (revised April 1st, l»8l,) .are highly commended by all the 
Mnft.vtTinMfelv for tliP pniintiv the m<>rp io-nnrint i nerson pno'io,.,! i,, Ai . hiu . liual and Building Journals printed in the English langu.tgc, and the 
inloitunaUli loi tlie coiinti\ , the moie ignoiant a person eng.io, ,i m ^^ ^^^ ^^^^..^^ ^^^ profcsslous pronouncethem perfect in all particulars 

buililing, the more he prides himself on his knowledge of archituiturr. .||,,| ^^i,.,, j|.,j. iQ„g ij^„ wanted. 

Old ignorance is a stupid tyrant; a grafted nature which can only' rhoy are applicable to any part or division of building work or sub-ccn- 
be changed in the young. itracts. 



iri7//;/i 



Wc can furnish any book or periodical on Architecture, Building and Mechanics published in this or any other country. In f;tct we can fUruish any 
kind of book |inlilislie<l. 

NEW 'WORKS on Building and Architecture issued by us every Spring and Fall. Circulars with full List of Contents of 
our Publications mailed free on application. Address, 

PALLISER, PALLISER & CO., Architects and Publishers of Fine Architectural Works, 

BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT. 
Alter November Ist., 18SJ, NEW YORK till. 



PALLISER, PALLISER & CO., 



lAIRCHITECTS. 



Rooms 5, 6, 7 and 8 PEOPLES' SAVINGS BANK BUILDING. - 328 MAIN ST., CORNER BANK, 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN., 

After November 1, 1882, New York City, 

TD "CD ~pn ~[ — 1 A T ~> ~C^ 

iESiaNiS, DRAWINGS & SPECIFICATIONS 

FOR EVERY DESCRIPTION OF JJLILDiNGb, 

For erection in .iny p.irt of the world. (Public Buildings, as Churches, Schools, Court Houses, .Jails, etc., are Specialties.) 
They also cive spe<'ial attention to the reniodelini: of existins; structures, and the desiirnine of 

Consultations on matters pertaining to Building, Drainage, Sanitary Works, 
Ventilation, Machinery, Valuations, &c., &c. 



CAN REFER TO OVER A THOUSAND BniLDIN&S EREC TED IN ALL PARTS OF THE WESTERN WORLD. 

If any wish to employ us, we sliall be pleased to hear fiom them, and will undertake to serve them in the best, most careful, and faith- 
ful manner, but it is usually expected that inquiries will be accompanied with stamp for reply. During past years, we have answered, at 
considerable cost in time, postage, etc., several thousand letters of inquiry, from people everywhere, who omitted to enclose stamp ; and, in 
a great many instances, these inquiries were of little account. We have "no desire to be troubled for nothing, though as a matter of courte- 
sy, we answer all letters promptly, and shall continue to do so. 

It matters not whether our clients reside in the States of Connecticut, Massaclnisetts, or New Yoik, near to us, or .3,000 miles away 
— distance is no obstacle, we can serve them equally as well, as hundreds in every State and Territory in the Union, Canada, Nova Scotia, and the 
Brazils, can testify; and wherever our designs .are carried out, clients are pleased, press and public e.xtol on the art and conveniences, which 
are being the wonder and admiration of everyone ; and builders everywhere are unanimous in their statements that the drawings, speciflcations, 
and all tlie instruments of service are rendered in the most thorough, complete and practical manner for them to work from, and to enable them to 
put the work together without error, of any they ever had to do with ; and everyone may certainly rest assured that we shall not, at 
this stage of our practice, do a service in any manner that will not give the fullest satisfaction. Our study is faithful service for our clients" 
best interests. 

Any one about to build, and desiring our services, will please send two three-cent stamps, and we will send full particulars as to our 
terms and method of furnishing General Drawings, Details and Specifications for buildings, plain and cheap or elegant and costly, to be erect- 
ed anvwhere. 



NEV/ V/ORKS ON CARPENTRY, BUILDING AND ARCHITECTURE. 



PALLISER'S USEFUL DETAILS. 

(Just publlshcil, April, 1(W1). Forty pbitcs, size of cnch, 20x20 Inches. Working 
' drawings to large scales, which arc iixlicatcd on each plate. Eleven hunilrcd de- 
signs, reprcacnUng every des<-rlptlon of modern architectural detail. 

Jn FlexUiU Cover. Price, f3 00 

Ei'crv Architect, Carpenter, BulUler, Woodworker, SUir-Bulliler, Sash, Blind, and 
Door Maker, Cabinet Maker, Mason and IMasterer, should get » copy of this valuable 

PALLISER'S SPECIFICATIONS. 

(JuMt Published. Sept. lfW-2). For Frame nr Brick Itiiildinffrt.postlnp fmm *:»00t<i ^.'i.OOO. 
FvrtM of Cotttrart for ItnUdiun, 3/i rents rarh or $ 3 f/(/ per 



Prict', inctudiny t 



FULL PLANS, PALLISER'S .HODERN 8 ROOM COTTAGE 
WITH TOWER. 



so that It can Ije liullt, If 
Tower, and not Injui-e, or materially alTect 
leand properly Ogurcil, etc., for working; 



(,Ju8t Puljllshed, Sept. 1SK2.) Full 

the appearance. Complete Drawings to i 

also full specifications of the work. Price, po$t paid, fil on. 

This Cottage has twen ai:tiutliy built more than Ave hundred times; which speaks 
plainly us to Its popularity. 

PRACTICAL STAIR-BUILDING and HAND RAILING and 

the American Carpenter's and Joiner's Guide. 

The ron'*triirli.,n nf si.-ilr--^ and cvi-ry ,lc-«riptloii of rsirpenlry and Joincrj- plainly 



and fully explained from the very foundation, so that even the apprentices may 
understand, Concise, original and reliable mcthmls. Thomughly U'sted, 8lmplei>t 
yet dcviscil. :<talr Kalis constnicled with smallest possible material and lalior, and 
with fewest lines ami couipiicatious. All fully Illustrated on a large working scale; 
details for stair work and finish of every description ; also Furniture, 



This Is uudoubte<llv I 



be ready for press. 



very Carpcnior, Stair I 



r, anil Cabinet Maker 



PALLISER'S NEW AMERICAN COTl AGE HOMES. 

Will soon bo rca<ly for press. Sixty-four 9\V2 plates. I.V) Modern Designs for ever>" 

description of Amerlcjin Coltajcts, glvlnK plans, elevations »iid pcrspertlvc vicwit; 

also full details on sixty-funr ttxD,nr half plates, toffethcr with sperlflcatlons. form of 

contract, descriptions, etc., also AO designs fiir City Front«. 

All entlndy new and original rleslgns and a coniplelc volume In Itself, dealing with 

the Bubjert In a most full ami comprchcnslvo manner. 

PALLISER'S MODERN DWELLINGS & PICTURESCJUE 
AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE. (In Preparation.) 

.strong ill Illustration. Designs for every Descriptitm of CUy, Suhurltan, Town, 
Country and seaside Dwellings, as Cottages, Villas, .Mansions. Blocks, etc I.atesl 
styles, iH-st and most original designs. The best American Work on Archlle<-- 
ture ever issued, and especially valuable to people ab<iut lo builil. New and recent 
designs, erected in Ish2, and preceding year, exact cost given for each, locaUon, 
etc. An elegant Work on building at a very moderate price. 




HARRISON'S 



PATKXT - 



DRIP TRAY SLOP-HOPPER, 



WITH IMPKOVED FLLSHIXG-RIM AND VP:NTILAT0R. 

ESPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR 



HOTELS, PUBLIC 



OFFICES, STORES, TENEMENT HOUSES, RAILROAD DEPOTS, HOSPITALS, OR PLACES 
EGLECT TO LIFT THE PULL OF AN ORDINARY WATER CLOSET. 

SUPPLIED WITH WASTE PREVENTING CISTERN, SEAT. 

LEGS AND ALL ATTACHMENTS EXCEPT LEAD PIPE. 

THE SUPPLY FROM CISTERN TO FjOPPER SHOULD BE 1 1-4 INCH PIPE. 
Drip Tray and Hopper one solid piece of earthenware, combining 
Urinal, Slop-Hopper and Water-Closet. 

t///if>i. fw ffJ-e fi ^/»f7U s/ie<i»i /ur/t'/t\i f/civit /^ ^arA e/ //if 
^^/^./i^icl ; n//<l, /At lUfi/ r4 ifUe^vef/. a /fMyr /'c</i/ ^ i4.tt/eiiS IfrV, = 



//>y r^r/^/^.y /^..y/ /L 



i'A^. 



■ftii'/t4-'na = ti/ni 



7= 



at^ui^yta tt uflti. cc/if 



e/ at //tan. a//€'l,=c^ti<i-/i^j //t&Utia/Uu c/^ 



PLUMBERS 



tnf/ 



ARCHITECTS WILL PLEASE DESIGNATE AS 



HARRISON'S No, 4 HOPPER COMBINATION. 



HARRISON'S 
PATENT T HAOLE SELF-CLOSIN& 

FOR HOTELS, PUBLIC BUILDINGS, HOSPITALS AND APARTMENT HOUSES. 



CHARLES HARRISON & CO., 

NO. 16 WEST FOURTH ST. NEW YORK. 




itomTir^i^K 1*001^ coBai^A.sffY 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



DOOR LOCKS AND LATCHES, PADLOCKS AND KNOBS, 

ORNAMENTAL BRONZE & OTHER BUILDERS' HARDWARE. 

SOUTH NORWALK, CONNECTICUT, U. S. A. 

NEW YORK OFFICE. 82 CHAMBERS ST. 



REGISTERED 

Door Knobs, 

. Dra^ver Knobs, 

Shutter Knobs, 

''tISa'lB ^ ip '''168 % W ^I'^W WmJ ''!ffi'« Wai • 'iiiii 

For all interior work these Knobs are unsurpassed. Fully guaranteed to 
stand as long as the doors. 




ARCHITECTS' DESIGNS EXECUTED. 
Address 



New and beautiful Designs; moderate in price. 
Write for Price List. 



f)ieei<s; >i^:Kti"^^c^'i'iJ'?iKGi co., 



Over 40 000 Doors already in operation 



Trenton, N. J 

" Sales rapidly increasing." 




Warner's Patent 

DOOR HANGERS. 

M Cutting of Carpets, 
Entirely Conceale 
¥0 Rail on the Floor. j ^^ 




Entirely Concealed from Yiew.*"^ ^«^-^5 



■£d^ 



Rail on the Eloor. ix ^$^^^^£fe 

Ifo Flanged Wheels to Ride ^5™tX/S^c5^ 



Or get Off the Track. 



0„L 



'niteil states 
chitects and 



E. C. STEARNS & CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 



CHAPMAN & SODEN, 



112 SZ, lis "v^^?L.TEI^ STIBEET, 



EOSTOIsr, nvT^^SS- 



. SOLE MANUFACTURERS OF- 



BEAVER BRAND ROOFING 

AND BUILDING PAPERS 



AND DEALERS IN 



ROOFING MATERIALS OF ALL KINDS. 

SAMPLES AND PRICES FUMISHED ON APPLICATION. 







The only 8-Flange Safe in the World, 

More Improvements than any other Safe made, such as the 

pATEpT IWpIDE BOLT m\\. 

More Secure from Burglars than any other Fire-Proof Safe, requiring no expense 
in repairing Bolts or Locks. 

PATENT HINGED CAP, 

FOUR-WHEEL LOCKS, 

INSIDE IRON LININGS, 

SOLID ANGLE CORNERS. 



These SAFES are now being sold in the States in large numbers, and give the greatest satisfaction, being 
the most highly finished, best made, and cheapest first-class SAFE ever produced. 

These celebrated SAFES had the CHAMPION RECORD IX THE GREAT BOSTON FIRE and since 
that time great and important improvements have been made. 

Refore giving your order to any other concern, send for prices and Descriptive Catalog4ic. 

MORRIS & IRELAND, 



The Bridgeport Wood Finishing Co., 

WHEELER'S PATENT WOOD FILLER. 

The only composition jet discovered for perfectly Filling and Finishing Wood and developing and preserving all the natural 
beauties of Grain, Figure and Color. It is applicable to all kinds of wood. 

Though a recent discovery, it has revolutionized the old systems of finisliing woods, and all who use it gladly testify to its grea* 
saving in cost, and superiority of finish. 

It fills the pores of wood so perfectly smooth and solid, that a fine Finish is obtained with only one coat of varnish. 

It being non absorbent, damp atmosphere or water will not affect it. The solid part of this Filler being composed of sharp, angular 
particles, it readily adheres to and unites with the pores and fibres of the wood, so that nothing can disturb it when dry. 

It is perfectlj- transparent, eonsequentl3' will not impair, but when properly rubbed, greatly increases the natural brilliancy of tha 
wood. 

To Owners, Architects, Builders, Painters and Furnitup Manufacturers and to all who are engaged in finishing, or have any occasion 
to finish any kind of wood work, from a Piano to a Butler's Pantry, we confidently recommend this "Patent Filler" as the best and 
cheapest means of producing a good and desirable finish. 

When once thoroughly tested it will never be dispensed with. 



DI R.ECTIOTV S FOR USE. 

First fill the pores of the wood with "WHEELER'S PATENT WOOD FILLER" and let it stand a sufficient length of time to 
dry; after which apply one coat of the OIL FINISH and when dry, rub down with Oil and Pumice stone. When an e.xtra finish is re- 
quired, add a second coat of the OIL FINISH (without rubbing first coat), and when dry rub down with Oil and Pumice stone. For Pol- 
ished Work, proceed the same as when using Rubbing or Polishing Varnish. 



ALSO MANUFACTURERS OF AND DEPOT FOR 

D. e. Br^EINIG'S LCITHOGEN Bl^IMEI^, lilTHOGEN ^HI^HE IiEAD, 
DISINFECTANT PAINT, WHITE JAPAN, WHITE DRIER, WOOD DYES OR STAINS, 

BREINIG'S LITHOGEN SILICATE PAINT, 

In all tints and colors ; prepared for use ; requiring only thinning with turpentine or linseed oil, according to the character of the work. The 
various tints and colors will be found brighter and more uniform than when mixed by hand, and will not f.ado. For wearing purposes, sur- 
passes the best white lead. It is non poisonous and superior to mixed paints. Send for sami)le card of colors. 
J®" Breinig's Paste Paint coniaiiis no silidate of soda and is the only silex paint in the market. Other so called paints are only so in name, "^t 



GRANVILLE M. BREINIG, Agent, 40 Bleecker Street, New York. 



"Send for Circulars and any and all desired inforn-iation 



▲ Fiw iuaeii^ioifs oi^ °^bi 4ei qw natveal wood Fmissma, 

BY A PRACTICAL WOOD FINISHER. 



The processes heretofore use.T in lliifly fini^liiiiK l.ar.l wn„.ls li.-iv.- .ill Ik^ti slow :in.I l>l:ii,o Willi llio s,,n.l |.'iils « illi .1 li:ir.I, nrnily. (1x0.1. (inil unchangahlc subsbniee This Iw. 

Otpcnsive. Hence Ihc Irirsi-r imrtln,, nf hnv.l ^yr...,y^ „ ,,1 i-, f,ir.n:.n--, ,„„-\,-,] in-fni iii.-l..ii ■, :i liMI.' v:,v,ii-i| will L^iv.. 'I|'' "'■■-; '':'"'''\',|',',ji"^'g*'jj^fl^,g""'*''*''*'"*'''°- ^' 

3SsoiV'"l'»'h»"^'>''''i^-"''l''"'"''^ " " ' ' '" ' ■ ' ; IV, ■nngHnil should bo cnUrelyaban- 

The dilUculty of a.-i ipii-iiin^ .1. n ' ; !, r , v i . 1 I \ <i-hlng, will sec, upon H moment's rc 

ccsscB havin^bccii scM ri'h i> li i.r i. i. . . i . i . : i : '■'■ 1 li.'id tlie cflTect of swelling the fibres, 

hii'Hrt iu'\vis"ii'ii In a ili'.r.Mi'_-ii iii\.--ii'. I li .1 •! I. iiiiiM I, II',. . ■• . I ..I ..Mi'. i omes entirely dry or alsAppcaro. 

;),., 1,,'.^. I - . N\ ir.'ii ,- M...A •! I. ,.i. ■! ■. , I ■:. I ,:, • ' ,' • I Ml I .■..-. '' i : ! • • 1 1 ,' . . I ',.:••, . ,' I , ' , . I • . . : ' i ■ , I , ' - ' 1 k I iijc, And oonsequcntlv moving anil 

,.,, , I ; ** I Mil Ume gives Ita (lark, ilisagreeabi* 

, , I \,.,, I •. ,1, I ,,i,i ... , .. [ >. , :. i. II |.i. ,1 In; u .! . ■':. II. r. . .!. :i . ■ i •• • .' I i-"y lng tlic contmst which consUtulM 

"',[.. II ..,' ',1.'. I.. ''I'l.i'iiir'.'i.. I.'.. in...i i,:.-i,|.. i.ii.'i .1 ' ii..i. ...i. I' I ..■„ | .,....■..■.. ■ !.■..; I I i ,..•.! ;i n. I 1 hiii with a largoramonnt of driers, ao 

Hire iiiore hfauUful llian tlie vancale'l colors oi nur iiartl w i . n i . |. i tM-r..iiics i-fi u-ciu or, nn-t liiii.i in ii u-v\ hours, preventing any swelling or 

pruuer lluisli'. ^ i 1 1 , i . . i t he librus of the wood 'after the varuish Is applied, or any change of color by 

This development cannot be thoroughly aeoompllshed, ox. ■! I i i v i . f lime. .... 

material and process for tilling the softer or porous parts Willi , ,i - i ..f .Scraping Varnish for polished work, although long practised for the waiU 

sUincc, 11 ml al Ihi' sani.' Iliiii- ftiviiit,'a .=imonth polish to the |. ,. i i ' i .11 ii. 1 1 1 1,1; hotter, is not only slow and expensive, but very objectionable on other 

1^, .''/.], ,,'i,i,i'i .|. ii. 1 iiii. H|...n ihi. -Ill 1 1. .., • M III i.i'ii.ii... 1!' ■! I ..| :i|i].|'. ".^ -. I . I li .... 1; - ..I ih.' very poorest rosin varnish thatcan he made, 

jil I I . . I I ; .11 1 11. insistent to bC' entertained foramomenu A 

I I iiih a llller cannot possibly be as good .as on* 

jj,, I i N iirh 80 tlioroughly unites wiUi the flhrcs of tfa« 



■F:Rxa'Ei XjTst. 



THE CLARK COLORED BRICK aid TERRA COTTA COMPANY— 

GLENS FALLS, N. Y., SEPTEMBER 1, 1882. 
Delivered here on Cars or Boat- Best Rates of Freight obtainable to any Points. 



RED. BUFF 

Plain Pi-cssed Front Brick, per. 1 ,000 »20 00 to 22 00 t%'> 0( 



Moulded do. (sec Uliiatrated sheets) - 
per. 100 

Nos. *,»,»- ■ ■ ■ per 100 4 00 

" 2, 3,11. 12,2.'!, 24,34, 35,36,39 " 4 50 

" 1, 10, 21,25, 2«, 31 - - " 5 00 

" 5, 6, 13. 14 1«, 33, 38, - " i M 

" 17, Id, 20, 30, A * B, 32, 37, " 00 

" 7, 15, 19, 23, 27, 28, 31, A & B ■' 6 60 

Returns to most of above kept or made to onler. 

BLACK BRICKS (on surface), 

Per lOO 3 50 to 5 I 



STRING COURSES AND CORNICES 



N08. 20'2. 204,208, 209, 7« In. high, per 
foot (lineal) 
205, -Js in. high, per foot (Uiiial) 
306, 207, 7« In. high, per foot 
(lineal) .... 
107, 200, 6Ji In. hl|;h,per foot (lineal) 
102, 103. 12 Inrh clrrulnr, each - 
220. 1" Inch circular, each. 



2 .V) 

4 00 

5 0« 
3 00 to4 00 



KEY STONES. 

Nos. 22, 23, each • 



201. per square foot.2 
203, per loot, run 12>i Inch wide, 
230, per foot, run, 15 Inches high, 
2.50, each, . . - . 



PANELS. 

ACCOUDING TO DESIGN AND COLOR. 
Foot - - - $ 1 00 to 6 00 



DIAPER TILES, ORNAMENTAL, 



Kos. Ill to 116, size 5 X 5 X Ui, each, 
" 104, 10.5, 8 inch circular, each 
" 109, 110, 8 X 6 X 3, each 
" 106, 108, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 7X 



CRESTINGS 



Per Lineal Foot 



" ]00andll7.design,12iixl2M: 



FINIALS, WINDOW CAPS, MOULD- 
INGS, WALL COPING, TO ORDER. 

RED PRESSED PAVING BRICKS 

EXTRA HARD. 

ORDINARY BUILDING BRICK VERY 

CHEAP. 

Work exocntod from spoci.il designs. ^ 

Samples und IlUistnited Sheets sent on appli- 
ontiim. 

We endeavor to keep n stock of about 100 
Shapes and Designs in onr Catalogue always on 
hand, but for special shapes of Moulded Brick, 
or of otiier designs, rea.wnable time should bo 
given before goods are actually required, to pre- 
vent disappoinliucnt from delay. 

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED SHEETS. 

I^Connecteil by railroad switch through our 
premises, .and by wire of the Western Union in 
r,.„™ tn^ t„ « 1 or our office, with the entire system of Railroad and 
fiom 30c. to 9 1 3.> .rg,„g,.,^p,, i„ ^,j^ country. 

Packing in barrels or boxes charged extra. 



Can refer to leading Architects and Engineers in the country for qu.ality of our goods. AVo employ high skilled artists for our artistic. Terra 
Colta. Our w.ires are now introduced into public and private buildings in New Orle.ans, St. Paul and Milwaukee, .as well as other cities. 
Our White or Buff Bricks are largely used for interior lining of Chnrches, H.ills and Courts, and are imperishable, and retain their color. 
Our lied Fronts are of excellent quality and take the place of Philadelphia at a lower price. 

T. M. CLARK, Managing Director. 



MORRILL'S 



IMPROVED MORTAR RL,^CK. 

Is used by the leading Masons on the finest work, where Jet Black color and permanency is required. 

IT MIXES READILY WITH MORTAR AND UNDER ALL CONDITIONS. 

It does not have the greasy nature of lampblack, and for that reason does not weaken the mortar. Manufac- 
tured only by 

CiEORGtE II. 3IORRII^L, Ac CO., 



NEW YORK OFFICE, 25 ROSE STREET. 



30 HAWLEY STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



SEND FOR CIRCULAR. 




FIRE OIV THE HEARTH. 

STOVES, AIR WARMING GRATES, FIRE PLACE HEATERS. 

(Five Sizes.) (Two Sizes.) (Two .Sizes.) 

NO. 18 F. 0. H. STOVE, NEW AND ELEGANT DESIGN. 

Our I-'Ire on the Hearth Apparatus, in each variety, combines 
the advantages of an Open Fire, with the Power and Economy 
of an Air Warming Furnace. 

Our A. W. Grates fit any Mantel without change of brick 
woKK, keep fire continually, and are as portable as any common 
.Stove. Uniform temperature throughout suites of connecting 
rooms. I'or hard or soft coal or wood. 

SEND FOR CIRCULARS AND PRICE LISTS TO THE 

OPEN STOVE VENTILATING CO., 

'T'O I3eek:mo.n Street, TVe\v "Voi*lc. 





IMPORTERS. 

SOLE AGENTS IN THE U. S. FOR 
MINTON'S Stokeupo. Trent, Eng. 

(SAMPBELL ©ILE (©0. 

STOKE-UPON-TRENT, ENG. 

Tiles of all Descriptions 

FOR 

Halls, Vestibules, Churches, Hanks, 
Public Buildings, A:c. 

Walls - Hearths - Fireplaces 
Facings - Decorations. 



MANTELS— in wood or slate. 



GRATES-imported & domestic. 
OPEN FIREPLACES, 

FENDERS, ANDIRONS, etc. 
ART POTTERY. 

Designs & Estimates free of charge. 
75 & 77 WEST 23d. ST., 

NEW YORK. 

(MASONIC TEMPLE.) 



THE BEST HEATERS IN HE WORLD. 




GOLD'S PATENT "HEALTH" HEATER. 
SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED, DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUE, CONTAINING REFERENCES AND TESTIMONIALS, TO 

Gold's Eeater Manufacturing Company, 

62^ TO 642 EJ^ST l^Tii STi^EET, 

Beuveen Avenues B and C NEW YORK CITY. 

MANUFACTURERS AND CONSTRUCTORS OF 

STEAM & HOT WiJTER l^Ei|TING & VENTILATING ^PPi^RATUS. 

WARMING AND VENTILATINa OF riRST-CLASS EESDENCES A SPECIALTY. 




jK^ LUCAS' ^^% 



^M( 



^@> 



^ 



xv"^ 












^^^ 



'^^ 



^ 



4' , 



^^ 



n^ 








\" 



..% 



ROU&M^POLISMED PIATE, 

AND ALL KINDS PLAIN AND FANCY 









HESE PAINTS are Mixed by MACHINERY, 
hence more thoroughly incorporated. 

They are less liable to fade, as we use no Umber in 
'producing the different Shades and Tints. 




4S 



Different Colors. 

OTHERS MADE TO ORDER. 

Wl ISl 10 illllll 

And Painters will Experience no Disagreeable Effects from their Use. 




feltefi PaMmg §mM mbw^ hi imi ^bmpBi tMan at P^senL 

johTiucasTco. 









WM. E. LUCAS, 89 Maiden Lane, N. Y. 




s