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Full text of "Pan Pacific; a magazine of international commerce"

'■*8m 



AY, 1919 



Price 25 Cents 



\i: 



apan's Place in the Family of Nations 




Tjackling World Job With Wrong Tools 






y 



^ Regeneration of Mexico 
Centenary of Singapore 
**?. ^Paths to Follow in Orient 




«/ *\* 



0' 




William Rutledge McGarry, David Starr Jordan, Thomas Fox, 
James King Steele, Douglas Erskine, J. B. Powell, Philip R. Kennedy 



A MAGAZINES INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE 



COMPANY 



NC 



"KEEP YOUR PRODUCT ON WHEELS" 



This Trade Mark Stands for the Best 



Electric Industrial Trucks, Trailers, Concrete Ma- 
chinery, Wheelbarrows, Gas Engines, Hoists, 
Lumber Trucks, Store and Factory Trucks, 
Hand Carts, Wheels, Casters, Etc. 

WE ARE MANUFACTURERS 



Two Factories 
Seven Branches 



San Francisco 
U. S. A. 



Cable Address "Quolansing 
San Francisco 



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PURNELL & PAGET 

| ARCHITECTS | 

AND 

| CIVIL ENGINEERS | 

CHAS. S. PAGET, A.S.M. A.M. S. C.E. 



Investigations—Inspections 
Reports and Valuations 
Design and Supervision of Construction 
for Industrial Plants and Buildings 
Power Plants 
Difficult Foundations 



Bridges and Steel Structures 

Wharf and Dock Construction 

River and Harbor Works 

Investigation and Development of Min- 
ing Properties 



ESTABLISHED IN CHINA 16 YEARS 

f Missions Building, The Bund, Canton, China 
OFFICES <^ Paak Hok Tung-Canton, Swatow, China 
j ( American National Bank Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telegraphic Address "PANEL" Western Union Code, A. B.C. 5th Edition 

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M a ■ y , 1 9 1 9 241 



Java-China-Japan Lijn 



BETWEEN 



San Francisco 



AND 



Netherlands East Indies 



DIRECT 




REGULAR _ W^ RELIABLE 



SERVICE 



BATAVIA 

SOERABAIA 

SAMARANG 

MACASSAR 

CHERIBON 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

General Agents 

2 Pine Street, San Francisco 



242 



Pan Pacific] 



D 

D 
D 

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WE GLADLY EXTEND OUR FACILITIES 

TO 

EXPORTERS, IMPORTERS AND FOREIGN BUYERS 



CORRESPONDENTS 
IN ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD 



Atlantic National Bank 



257 BROADWAY 



New York City, U. S. A 



WE SPECIALIZE IN ACCEPTANCES 
AND FOREIGN BILLS 



fESHSBS?SHSHSESHSHSHSHSHSE5H5E5ESSSE5H5H5HSasaSl 




TRADE ACCEPTANCES BANK ACCEPTANCES 
FOREIGN DOMESTIC 

CREDITS ESTABLISHED 



May,- 19 19 



243 



Foreign Accounts 

TF you are to receive the most 
benefit from your dealings 
with foreign ports you must 
have an efficient, careful bank- 
ing connection — one that spe- 
cializes in this branch of the 
business. 

Our Foreign exchange depart- 
ment fulfills this requirement 
and every other essential for 
safe, sound and prompt busi- 
ness dealings. 

The Merchants National Bank 

of San Francisco 
California 



Dependable Service 



HP HE annals of the Wells 
Fargo Nevada National 
Bank of San Francisco, a merger 
of the Wells Fargo & Co's 
Bank and the Nevada National 
Bank, is the history of banking 
in California. 

Since 1852 this institution has 
maintained its position of help- 
ful co-operation in commercial 
activities across the Pacific. 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Capital and Surplus over $11,000,000 



FOREIGN BUYERS 



Who Establish Commercial Credits 



The First National Bank 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Are Immediately Placed in a Most 
Favorable Position 



IN THE 



AMERICAN MARKETS 



CORRESPONDENCE IN ALL LANGUACES 



The Crocker National Bank 

Of San Francisco 

Capital $ 2,000,000.00 

Surplus and Undivided Profits.... 4,062,838.63 

Deposits November 1, 1918 30,490,412.03 

Through our 
FOREIGN DEPARTMENT 

we have established banking connections in every 
important city throughout the world, and are pre- 
pared to afford our Correspondents the benefit of 
these facilities for the Collection of Drafts, the 
Financing of Foreign Purchases, the Payment of 
Debts abroad and such other business as may be 
within the lines of legitimate banking. 

TRANSFER OF FUNDS 

We effect Transfer of Moneys by mail or by cable 

to all foreign countries and issue Checks and Time . 

Drafts on the Principal Cities of the World. 

FOREIGN MONEYS 

We buy and sell Foreign Gold and Silver Coins, 
Bank Notes, Gold and Silver Bullion. 

EXCHANGE AND DISCOUNTS 

We buy or collect Checks and Bills of Exchange 

drawn at sight or usance on Foreign Banking 

Centers throughout the world. 

WM, H. CROCKER 

President 

W. GREGG, Jr. 

Vice Pres. & Cashier 
JOHN CLAUSEN 
Vice President 
B. D. DEAN 

Asst. Cashier 
n. .1. MITRPHY 
Asst. Cashier 
F\ G. WILLIS 
Asst. Cashier 



J. AS. J. PAGAN 

Vice President 
J. It. McCARGAR 
Vice President 
G. W. EB.VER 

Asst. Cashier 
J. M. MASTEN 

Asst. Cashier 



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244 Pan Pacific 



JOOST BROTHERS, Inc. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Wholesale and Retail 

HARDWARE 

Direct From Factory to Dealer or Consumer 

We Are Direct Factory Agents For 

"Russwin" Builders Hardware 
General Hardware Household Goods 

Parlor Door Hangers Paints Stoves — Ranges 

Barn Door Hangers Tinware 

Roofing and Building Paper Oils Aluminum and Enamelware 

Tackle Blocks and Pulleys Varnishes Bathroom Fixtures 

Paint and Wire Brushes Electric and Gas Appliances 

Cordage and Chain Chinaware and Glassware 

TOOLS 

We carry a Complete Line of 
Wrenches - Files - Mechanics, Machinists and Automobile Tools, Drills and 

Edged Tools 



Manufacturers of 



Special Steel Tools — Fire Door Hardware — Crowbars — Chisels 
Punches — Ripping Bars 

Sporting Goods 

Arms and Ammunition — Cutlery — Baseball — Tennis and Golf Accessories 

We also handle the Celebrated Lines of 

EDWIN M. KNOWLES CHINA COMPANY 

FOSTORIA GLASS COMPANY 

BUFFALO POTTERY (Hotel China) 

Foreign Orders Promptly and Carefully Executed 

When ordering any of the above articles or asking for catalogs be sure to give full particulars 

CORRESPONDENCE IN ALL LANGUAGES 
Will act as purchasing agent on a brokerage basis for responsible houses 

— Address — 

JOOST BROTHERS, Inc. 

1053 Market Street San Francisco, CaL, U. S. A. 



May, 19 19 



245 



Clyde Equipment 
Company 



PORTLAND 



SEATTLE 



Machinery and Supply 
Merchants 



542 First Avenue South 



Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. 




Cableaddress 

Llewellyn 

Los Angeles 



V 



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Code Used 

ABC 1 

5th Edition = 




LOS ANGELE.S.CAL. 

IRON WORKS 



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Immediate Delivery 
From Stock 



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LOS ANGELES, CAL. 





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Bolts 
Chain 
Axes 



Steel 
Nuts 
Waste 
Saws 



Belting Pulleys 
Logging Tools 



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ROLLING MILL PRODUCTS 

INGOTS, BILLETS, BARS, SHAPES 

STRUCTURAL STEEL FABRICATORS 



| [ Mill and Mine Supply Co. 



Cable Address "Milesmine" 



Seattle, U. S. A. 



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246 



Cable Address: "DILL" 




Watch for this Trade-Mark 



Steel Products 
Acids 
Caustic Soda 



EXPORTERS OF 
Chemicals 
Hematine 
Soda Ash 



Rosin 



Turpentine 



and Raw Materials for All Industries 

IMPORTERS OF 
Fish Oil Cocoanut Oil 

Soya Bean Oil Rape Seed Oil 

Hides Beans 

Coffee Copra 

Rattans Etc. 



Dye Stuff 

Barytes 

Phenol 



Castor Oil 
Tallow 
Peanuts 
Silks 



Pan Pacific 

'Piiiiiiimiii imuiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiilllliliiiiiiiiinn iiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiniiiiiiiii iiinu mmk 

1 SEATTLE FAR EAST TRADING I 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Import — Export Merchants 

| Head Office, L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Wash., U. S. A I 

Branch Offices: 

SHANGHAI, 6 Jinkee Road HONGKONG 

KOBE, 23 Sakae Machi, 6 Chome 
TOKIO. 4 Nakadoro Marunouchi 

Cable Addresses: 

! SEATTLE, "Safetco" SHANGHAI, "Safetco" \ 

HONGKONG, "Safetco" KOBE, " Kelley" 

TOKIO, "Safetco" 



DILL CROSETT, Inc. 



235 Pine Street 

Branch Offices 
128 William Street New York 

328 Sannomiya'Cho, I Chome Kobe Japan 
Union Bank Chambers Sydney, Australia 



San Francisco I 



EXPORT SPECIALTIES 

Iron, Woodworking and Textile Machinery 
Iron, Steel, Pipe, Plates, Bars, Sheets, Rail- 
way Supplies, Rails, Cars, Locomotives, 
Etc. Wire Nails, Paints, Varnishes. 

Glass, Sanitary Ware, Plumbing Fixtures, 

Hardware, Tools, Chemicals, 

Electric Meters 



Correspondence Solicited 



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Cal-pa-co Paints and Varnishes 



r=gl PAINTS re- 
ceived Five First Awards at the 
Panama Pacific International Ex- 
position, 1915. 



WRITE FOR COLOR CARDS, CATA- 
LOGUE AND PAINT LITERATURE 



ENGLISH or SPANISH EDITION 




g§ PAINTS are manu- 
factured by Modern Methods in a 
Modern Factory. 



OUR PLANT IS EXTENSIVE, 
OUR WORKMEN ARE EFFICIENT 



WE SPECIALIZE IN EXPORT PACKING, AND 
EXPORT PAINT REQUIREMENTS 



Everything Reliable in Paints and Varnishes 



»» 



CALIFORNIA PAINT COMPANY 

Export Department "A" 

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA, U. S. A. 



Manufacturers since 1865 



Cable Address "CALPACO 



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247 



May, 1 '.) 1 '.) 

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Planting the 
Flag of the 
Admiral Line 
in the Orient 




L. DINKELSPIEL COMPANY 

INCORPORATED 

115-135 Battery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS 



r 



DRY GOODS 



FURNISHING 
GOODS 



Cotton Piece Goods — Linens — 

Towels — Napkins 

Dress Goods — Cotton and Wool 

Silks — Sheetings — Bleached and ; 

Unbleached Muslin 

Flannels and Flannelettes — Ticks ! 

— Prints — Etc. 

Mens', Ladies', and Childrens' 
Hosiery — Underwear 
Shirts — Sweaters 



Trans-Pacific Freight and 
Passenger Service 

Sailing from Seattle at Regular Intervals 

THE ADMIRAL LINE 

PACIFIC STEAMSHIP CO. 

Fifth Floor L. C. Smith Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

112 Market St., San Francisco 8 Bridge St., New York 

Manila, Hong Kong, Vladivostok, Shanghai, Singapore, Kobe, Yokohama 

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matiamo j \ Ribbons — Laces — Embroideries 

I NOTIONS and ) Thread „ 

FANCY GOODS j Notiong s of a]1 descrlptions 

BLANKETS — COMFORTABLES — QUILTS 

I Complete stocks carried. Correspondence all languages ! 

Cable Address "LIPSEKNID." 

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| National Products Company | | INGRIM-RUTLEDGE Co. | 



San Francisco, 519 California Street 

IMPORTERS FOOD EXPORTERS 

Orders Promptly Filled 
Liberal Terms Accorded 

Correspondence conducted in Every Language 

WE 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
413-15 MONTGOMERY STREET 



IMPORT— All edibles 
Beans, Rice, Teas, 
Coffee, Tapioca, Pep- 
per, Spices, Salad 
Dressings, etc. 



EXPORT-A11 food Pro- 
ducts — Wheat, Barley, 
Flour, Salmon, Tuna, 
Sardines, Dried 
Fruit, Canned 
Goods — direct from 
plant to dealer. 



PRINTERS 
| STATIONERS BOOKBINDERS 

ENGRAVERS 

Art and Color Work 

Catalog and Booklet Printing 

Copper Plate and Steel Die Engraving 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 
EXPORT ORDERS 



Will Grant Exclusive Agencies 

Cable Address "NAPRO" 

Correspondence Invited 

ADDRESS 



| Filing Devices Office Equipment 

Office Furniture 
Loose Leaf Systems 



National Products Company 

San Francisco 



I COMPLETE LINE OF OFFICE SUPPLIES 



INGRIM-RUTLEDGE CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



| 

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248 



Pan Pacific 



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NIPPON YUSEN KAISHA j 1 Skinner & Eddy Corporation | 



(JAPAN MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.; 
Capital, Yen $100,000,000 Head Office, Tokyo 




RECORD 

BUILDERS 



Fleet 99— Gross Tonnage, 500,000 

TRANS-PACIFIC PASSENGER SERVICE 

Between Seattle and Hong Kong via Japan Ports, Shang- 
hai and Manila, with Direct Connection for All 
Points in the Orient and Australia. 

Greatly Improved Fast Service of Large, High-Powered Modern 

Twin and Triple Screw Steamships with Unequaled 

Passenger Accommodations. 

DISPLACEMENT: 

S. S. Suns .Mil ru ....SMKiO K'iin S. S. Katort Mum 10,200 ton* 
S. S. Fusblml Marn.21,1120 tons S. S. Atsuta Mnrn 18,000 l mi* 
S. S. Kashima Maru.,19,200 tonx S. S. Kamo Maru... 16,000 tons 
For further information, rates, tickets, berth reservation, 
etc., apply to any office of the principal railways in the United 
States and Canada, also any office of Messrs. Thos. Cook & 
Son, Messrs. Raymond & Whitcomb Co., American Express Co.. 
and other tourist agencies in all parts of the world, or to the 



OF 






Steel Cargo 
STEAMSHIPS 






NIPPON YUSEN KAISHA 



Colman Building 
Seattle 



Railway Exchange Bldg. 
Chicago 



Equitable Bldg. 
New York 



SEATTLE 



WASHINGTON 



U. S. A. 



| Cable Address, "Connell' 



All Codes 



Connell Bros. 
Company 



GENERAL IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 



HOME OFFICE 
L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Wash., U. S. A. 



BRANCH OFFICE 
485 California Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 



A. 0. Andersen & Co. 

( California) 

SHIPOWNERS 
AGENTS 

BROKERS 

Importers and Exporters 

Direct cable connections between San Fran- 
cisco and Scandinavia, covering all Pacific 
Coast shipping business. 

IMPORT AND EXPORT 
DEPARTMENT 

Direct connections in Japan, China, Philippines, 
Straits Settlement-, East Indies and India, 
covering all commodities produced in these 
countries, and handling American raw and 
manufactured products. 



OFFICES ALSO AT 
Shanghai Manila Hong Kong 



nngapore 





OFFICES : 




ew York 


Portland, Ore. 


Seattle 


Copenhagen 


Christiania 


Elsinore 



Correspondence Solicited 



I 242 California Street San Francisco, Cal. 

Phone Sutter 1426 



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4-( £? < goT 



May, 19 19 



249 



iiiiHiimmmiiiiimt 




PAN PACIFIC 

A MAGAZINE OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE 



John H. Gerrie Editor 

Wm. Rutledge McGarry 

Consulting Editor 

San Francisco, California 

ASSOCIATED EDITORS and 
STAFF CORRESPONDENTS 

Wm. E. Aughinbaugh, M.D.; B.S.; L.L.D 

New York 

Juiji G. Kasai, A.M Japan 

Valabdhas Runchordas India 

George Mellen Honolulu 

Thomas Fox Straits Settlement 

W. H. Clarke Australia 

Lazaro Basch Mexico 

Vincent Collovich Chile and Peru 

L. Carroll Seattle 

P. J. Menzies Los Angeles 

Chao-Hsin Chu, B.C.S., M.A China 

H. M. Dias Ceylon 



1'AM PACIFIC is devoted to the friendly 
development of COMMERCE among ALL, 
countries bordering the Pacific Ocean. It 
aims to give authentic information bearing 
upon the creation of PERMANENT Foreign 
Trade; that the AMERICAN MERCHANT 
MARINE may rest upon an enduring basis 
of reciprocal benefaction to all peoples who 
look to America for aiding financial and in- 
dustrial advancement. 

AMERICAN CONSULS are privileged to 
send cards of introduction with Foreign 
Buyers to PAN PACIFIC fully assured that 
such cards will entitle buyers to all the 
PRIVILEGES of our EDUCATIONAL and 
INFORMATION Bureaus, while traveling in 
the United States. 

Pan Pacific is published monthly. Sub- 
scription price, $3.00 per year (gold) in ad- 
vance. Single copies, 25 cents. Advertising 
rates on application. Correspondence in any 
language. Address all communications to 

PAN PACIFIC CORPORATION, Publishers. 
61S Mission Street. San Francisco 



Special Features in This Issue 

New Era Dawns For Mexico David Starr Jordan.. Page 251 

Why Exporters' Agents Should Be Protected F. A. Reyes. Page 253 

Plan Rail Program To Aid China J. B. Powell.. Page 254 

Port of Singapore, Hundred Years Old Thomas Fox.. Page 256 

Japan's Place In Family of Nations William Rutledge McGarry.. Page 258 

Tackling Foreign Trade With the Wrong Tools John H. Gerrie.. Page 260 

Old Ports and New Walter Scott Meriwether.. Page 262 

Export Merchant, Instigator of Trade Douglas Erskine.. Page 266 

Removing the Risk from Buying J. H. Gosliner.. Page 268 

Paths to Follow In Oriental Trade James King Steele.. Page 272 

Pan Pacific Directory Page 273 

3 OC3 O OO < — * O t " * O ^Z> OO O < > O ' lOt — 5 O O O Oo ' > O C > O d^ OO O COO < 



niiniiiffii 



250 P a n P a c i f i e 




4Ub Ocean Transport Ob.,** 

( TAIYO KAIUN KABOSHIKI KAISHA ) 

OF KOBE. JAPAN 

Agents At All Principal Ports In Tnc World 

Qperaiinl Modern Freight Steamers 
100 Al Hpyte 

Regular Direct Service 

To St From 

San Francisco Seattle Vancouver 

And 

Yokohama, Kobe, Shanghai, 
Hongkong, Manila, 
Si ngapo re 

Fmcauent Sailings Tc 

Vladivostok * North China Ports 

We Solicit Your Inquiries For Cargoes 
To All Principal Ports In The World 

<rans Oceanic Gb. 

Pacific coas-t accnts 

San tftANcifco -%. Seattle -* V/acicouvc* 

524 SANSOne 9T AMFftiCAN 6a<** 0LP« YORKSHfrtC BIDS. 

Chicago ^ C*ew Vork 

646 Ma««uerfe Btoo. 71 SOoadwav 



1/ (I IJ , 19 1 9 



251 





a magazine o, 
international commerce 






■H^^^U 




New Era Dawns for Mexico and the Mexicans 

HUGE HALF-OCCUPIED FEUDAL ESTATES MUST SOON 
BE TURNED OVER TO GROUPS OF SMALL FARMERS 



THE day of great estates and 
mighty concessions, for natives 
as well as for foreigners, is over. Men 
of culture must lend a hand to build 
up the state. They must take their 
part in the new free schools spring- 
ing up everywhere as the war spirit 
subsides, even as fresh grass follows 
a prairie fire. They must meet tax- 
ation in the interest of the com- 
mon good; for the huge half-occu- 
pied feudal estates must necessarily 
be turned over to groups of small 
farmers. 

They must be content to see pass 
the regime of Porfirio Diaz, with its 
semblance of order, resting on force, 
affection, chicane and the interwoven 
interests of foreign capitalists. They 
must find their place in the coming 
republic, — crude, unsteady, pleasure- 
loving, bloody at times, but having 



By DAVID STARR JORDAN 

President Leland Stanford University, 
California. 



within itself the germs of real de- 
mocracy 

Is there hope in military interven- 
tion ? No, a thousand times no ! We 
would not, we could not restore the 
medieval past, with its reckless con- 
cessions to foreigners, its arbitrary 
control at home, its persistent main- 
tenance of ignorance, poverty, super- 
stition and disease. Intervention has 
a very different meaning to different 
people. To Don Luis, as to many, — 
not all — of the foreign concession- 
aires, intervention means simply the 
last chance. To the exploiters, native 
and foreign, and especially to the 
noisy swarm of agents along the 
Rio Grande, intervention means easy 



money. To the devoted friends of 
civilization i n Mexico, — those o n 
whom its future must depend — inter- 
vention means conquest, annexation, 
the loss of national existence, with 
a legacy of undying hate. 

Revolution is the historic means 
by which the serf in Europe has 
gained h i s freedom. The present 
conditions in Mexico are a survival 
of the medieval system of Old Spain. 
In the first revolution, the Mexicans 
freed themselves politically but not 
socially. By freedom, we mean the 
right to make the most of one's body 
and brain, and to direct the process 
himself. For the differences between 
the "cientifico" and the peon, between 
educated and illiterate in Mexico as 
in medieval Europe, are not a mat- 
ter of blood and brains. They are 
largely questions of "nurture" rather 
than nature. When equality of op- 







TYPICAL, SCENE ON VAST ESTATES IN MEXICO 



252 



Pan Pacific 



THE BEST INTERVENTION IS TO MAKE FRIENDS 



portunity comes to be, present diffi- 
culties will largely disappear. 

Revolution i s never a pleasant 
thing. It is unjust, indiscriminating. 
We have been taught to look on its 
excesses with horror, — while the 
vastly more terrible incidents of war 
— of any kind of war — are invested 
in our minds with a sort of dignity. 
This is a part of the age-long super- 
stition which justifies killing when 
performed on a large scale with the 
sanction of the state and the blessing 
of the church. 

One may not like the methods of 
the revolution, and can imagine much 
better ways of reaching desired re- 
sults. But armed intervention is not 
a good way. To bring security and 
order does not demand more killing, 
nor the restoration by force of for- 
mer conditions. It is not for us to 
hand back to Don Luis his lost 
hacienda. Neither is it our duty to 
restore to the religious orders, either 
"Charitable" or "Contemplative" the 
lands and privileges forfeited to the 
state under Benito Juarez's "Law of 
Reform." 

The clericos as well as the cienti- 
ficos must take their chances in the 
revolt for which their new blindness 
is largely responsible. We cannot as- 
sume that the sweeping concessions 
held in New York and London, se- 
cured from Porfirio Diaz in his 
senile days, and virtually covering 
all that was left of national prop- 
erty, are valid titles to be sealed 
with the blood of our young men. 

Revolution By Force 
Never Law Abiding. 

The American public in general re- 
gards as all of one piece, the revo- 
lution against the unbearable con- 
ditions, the anarchy which the revo- 
lution brought on (and which it has 
thus far failed to subdue), and the 
ignorance, poverty and injustice for 
which the revolution sought a rem- 
edy Revolution by force is never 
law-abiding. In its appeal to higher 
law it lifts the lid from society. 
Whenever traditional or conventional 
restraints are dissolved, injustice and 
robbery are likely to find place. But 
once under way, it must go forward. 
No backward movement by whomso- 
ever led or supported could endure. 

For this reason the administration 
of General Huerta, avowedly reaction- 
ary and virtually supported by British 
oil interests, was not and could not 
be properly recognized by the United 
States. It gave no promise of per- 
manence or peace. The era of Por- 
firio Diaz has gone forever. The 



nation could no more return to it 
than France to the regime of No- 
poleon III. 

The Mexican people will find peace 
only by deserving it, and to this end 
military force, their own or any other, 
can contribute very little. Bandit 
violence, however mischievous, is a 
feature of transition. It is not the 
revolution itself, but a temporary, 
though hideous, excrescence upon it. 



HERE IS THE IDEAL 

FOR WHICH WE STRIVE 

Our fathers fought with Washington 
With Lincoln our sons died, 

BtU at the birth of freedom 
All arms were laid aside. 

In other lands men fought for power 

And some for kingly state; 
America thine aim endure 

To make the people great. 

For thee no foreign conquest 

No fratricidal strife 
No anarch, no oppressor, 

Strikes at the nation's life. 

Be thine, star of destiny, 
Child of great nature's plan 

To show the fatherhood of God, 
The brotherhood of man. 



A great wound heals from within: 
Mexico will be saved by the leaders 
in the individual states. One of my 
Mexican friends complains with reas- 
on that our northern newspapers give 
more space to a chance hold-up below 
the line than to the building of a 
thousand free schools. He observes, 
"The American people naturally de- 
sire that the Mexican social recon- 
struction shall complete itself rapid- 
ly. But it should not escape their 
comprehension that the solution of 
the complicated problems of Mexico 
cannot be attained through simple 
desire, nor from the outside. The 

Under date of March 17, in a letter 
to Mr. Lazaro Basch, Commercial Agent 
of the Secretary of Industry, Commerce 
and Labor, of Mexico, accepting an in- 
vitation to visit the Mexican Products 
Exhibition which is under Mr. Basch's 
direction, Dr. David Starr Jordan took 
occasion to give his views regarding 
Mexico. 

phenomena manifested in Mexico are 
in obedience to social laws whose ac- 
tion cannot be hurried." 

In international law, the remedy 
for unfair treatment lies in channels 
of diplomacy and arbitration. Dur- 
ing revolution these channels may 



for a time be closed. In awaiting 
their reopening, let us err on the side 
of patience. 

The best intervention is the inter- 
vention of making friends. This will 
not be easy, for the Mexican people 
do not like our ideals of personal and 
industrial efficiency. Their contact 
with the "Colosseo del Norte" along 
the border of the Rio Grande has not 
been reassuring to them nor credit- 
able to us. They have found our ex- 
ploiters contemptuous and grasping, 
our journalists contemptuous and 
careless. Even our kindness and tol- 
erance, always with a touch of con- 
descension, is resented as our domi- 
nation is feared. With the best of 
intentions we must move slowly and 
tactfully. The people of the United 
States have the worst manners and 
the best hearts of any of the great 
nations- Forms mean little to us; 
we are impatient with ceremony; we 
want to get at the pith of things, and 
instantly. 

Manner t o Them 
Is of Importance 

But there are others to whom man- 
ner is quite as important as matter. 
They are cut to the core when their 
rights or their self-esteem seem be- 
littled. If ever an official does waive 
a point in the interest of concilation, 
he is likely to lose caste and influence 
with his associates. Traditions like 
these, a heritage from the Spanish 
hidalgo, we must learn to respect 
when dealing with Latin America. 

The Mexican people are in sore 
need of land reform, financial sta- 
bility, education and sanitation. 
Land reform they will secure for 
themselves. Already great tracts 
have been bought by individual states 
— notably Yucatan and in small hold- 
ings are sold to peons who must work 
them or forfeit their titles. Finan- 
cial stability will come when the 
holders of concessions, native and 
foreign, can be induced to pay taxes. 
For no region on earth of its size is 
potentially richer than Mexico. In 
the matter of education, Mexico needs 
our help and will soon receive it in 
large measure- 

The sanitation of Mexico, its sal- 
vation from three most widespread 
infectious diseases, typhus, small- 
pox and typhoid fever, has long been 
an aim of American medical research. 

Meanwhile, let the rest of us for- 
tunate citizens of a more advanced 
republic, be patient, tolerant and sym- 
pathetic, and above all let us not be 
hasty to join in the cry for conquest, 
either as a painful duty or as a golden 
opportunity. 



May, 19 19 



253 




Photo by International Film Service 

PHILIPPINE TRADE COMMISSION to the UNITED STATES 

Members of the Philippine mission who arrived in San Francisco March 23 * 
en route to Washington on a mission to enlighten the United States as to 
the commercial and agricultural value of the islands. The party consists 
of officials and representatives active in trade promotion for the Philippines. 



WHY EXPORTER'S AGENTS 

.-. v SHOULD BE PKOTECTED 



I By F. A. REYES 

Acting Director of the Bureau of Com 
merce and Industry in Manila. 
t 



ROM time to time United States 
Chambers of Commerce and the 



business people of the United States 
generally are advocating the exten- 
sion of United States commerce, and 
to this end occasionally suggestions 
have been invited. The facts and 
points herein set forth are made in 
no spirit of carping criticism, but 
with a view to emphasizing in a small 
way some of the things which under- 
mine commercial development. 

A few months ago a large whole- 
sale and retail corporation doing busi- 



ness in Manila, Philippine Islands, 
and in other parts of the Far East, 
the Pink Corporation, received and ac- 
cepted an exclusive agency for the 
goods of the Brown house in the 
United States. Subsequently, in an 
anticipation o f local wants, Pink 
placed a considerable order for goods 
with Brown. 

Before Pink received the goods 
ordered there arrived in Manila, en 
route to other points of the Far East, 
a man, Green, who claimed to be and 
apparently was a special representa- 
tive of Brown's. The reader will 
recognize that the names are neces- 
sarily fictitious- 
Green called on Pink, and the man- 
ager of the latter concern, in the se- 



The appended letter received by 
James J. Rafferty, Director of the 
Bureau of Commerce and Industry 
of the Philippine Islands, in Washing- 
ton, presents a side of trade abuse, 
which is detrimental to the foreign 
trade of this country. 

curity of his exclusive agency with 
absolute confidence in Green as spe- 
cial representative of the United 
States concern, and perhaps in the 
spirit of letting the special repres- 
sentative know all local prospects for 
business, upon inquiry, casually men- 
tioned the names of some of his pros- 
pective local customers. 

Forthwith Mr. Green proceeded to 
"hurry the East" and to take orders 
of Pink's customers regardless of the 
fact that the Pink Corporation must 
necessarily depend for the sale of the 
goods already ordered by him upon 
the very customers Green proceeded 
(Continued on next page) 



254 



Pan Pacific 



PLAN RAIL PROGRAM TO AID CHINA 



HOW A DIFFICULT PROBLEM MAY BE SOLVED 
WITHOUT INJURING CONFLICTING INTERESTS 



THE general plan for the solution 
of the problem presented by the 
conflicting interests of the great 
powers in China that the American 
government is expected to propose is 
roughly as follows: 

1. The creation of a central rail- 
way board of the Chinese ministry 
of communications, composed of five 
members, one from each of the fol- 
lowing countries: China, Great Brit- 
ian, America, France, and Japan ; the 
Chinese member to be appointed by 
the ministry of communications, and 
the four foreign members shall be 
appointed by the Chinese government 
upon the nomination by members of 
the Consortium bank group, their 
salaries and expenses to be paid by 
the Chinese government. 

2. Department chiefs shall be 
chosen from foreigners or Chinese on 
a basis of merit only. The aim shall 
be to train Chinese for administra- 
tive positions as rapidly as possible. 

3. The railways shall be considered 
as one system, but for administra- 
tive purposes shall be subdivided into 
zones or districts as appears most con- 
venient for operation and adminis- 
tration. District and divisional offi- 
cers shall be selected from foreigners 
and Chinese, preference being given 
to Chinese to the extent that quali- 
fied men are available. 

The board sljall have full mana- 
gerial authority over the railways in 
operation and the construction of all 
new railways financed b y foreign 



By J. B. POWELL 

Special Investigator for the 
Chicago Tribune. 

loans subject to an accounting to the 
ministry of communications. All 
foreign loans shall be made on 
Chinese government account through 
the Consortium banks. 

The nationals of each nation in the 
Consortium shall be at liberty to sub- 
scribe to the loans up to but not in 
excess of 25 per cent of any particu- 
lar loan. Provided that in case any 
nation fails or can take only a portion 
of its quota, the balance may be se- 
cured in the most favorable money 
market. No bonds shall be issued for 
a period exceeding fifty years. 

The board shall refund all outstand- 
ing foreign loans so that the identity 
of foreign influence in any particular 
line may be eliminated. Any claims 
for losses that might result to invest- 
ors by reason of such loss of identity 
with a particular line shall be adjudi- 
cated and compensated fully. 

Board to Have Power 
To Purchase Concessions. 

The board shall purchase on the ac r 
count of the Chinese government at 
an agreed appraised fair value all for- 
eign concession railways and any 
other railways now built in Chinese 
territory, which it may seem expedi- 
ent to acquire, by paying for them 
out of the proceeds of the sales of 
Chinese government railway bonds. 



The security for railway bonds 
shall b e t h e consolidated national 
railway properties and the Chinese 
government general credit- No bonds 
for new construction shall be issued 
without the approval of the Chinese 
government. Net profits shall be 
considered as being the balance of 
earnings for consolidated lines over 
and above all capital, operating, main- 
tenance, depreciation, previous losses, 
and other proper charges. 

The Consortium bank group shall 
be entitled to receive not in excess of 
one-sixth of the net profits. Of the 
remaining four-fifths the Chinese gov- 
ernment shall be entitled to one-half 
and the other half shall be placed at 
the disposal of the board for better- 
ments, extensions, etc. The Chinese 
government's share of the surplus 
shall be released automatically. 

The board shall proceed as rapidly 
as practicable with the necessary pre- 
liminary surveys to be used in the 
preparation of a comprehensive plan 
for railway and port development in 
China. 

The construction of new railway 
lines, terminals, and harbor works 
shall be let upon the most favorable 
terms obtainable without reference to 
nationality or bidder. Materials and 
equipment shall be purchased without 
reference to nationality on the most 
favorable terms obtainable, except 
that Chinese products shall be favored 
and encouraged as far as is practi- 
cable. Neither the board nor the 
Consortium bank group shall be en- j 



THE FAMOUS CASE OF PINK, BROWN AND GKEEN 



(Continued from preceding page) 

to deal with, the field for the particu- 
lar line being more or less limited. 

One local purchaser, desiring the 
goods but having knowledge of the 
local representation of the United 
States concern, in fact having had 
some preliminary negotiations with 
Pink for the placing of an order, 
made inquiry as to the relations of 
Green to Pink and vice versa and 
their respective relations to the 
United States concern, the placing of 
the order, commissions, etc. The up- 
shot of the whole affair was that the 
customer, despite his desire to pur- 
chase the goods offered, refused to 
place the order except through the 
local agency. Green precipitately 
grabbed his hat and left. 

At this time the final reckoning has 



not been had. Undoubtedly, Brown 
upon learning of the facts, will credit 
Pink with their commission on the 
orders taken of their customers, al- 
though the orders were taken by 
Green. Undoubtedly a mistaken ar- 
rangement was responsible for the 
entry of Green in the field of which 
Pink held the exclusive agency. 

The moral o f this incident for 
United States manufacturers and ex- 
porters is evident, even as applicable 
to the transaction of business in the 
United States. Further, if they are 
to successfully compete with Euro- 
pean concerns in the Orient and the 
Far East they must obviate such hap- 
penings. And it is no answer to 
point out subsequent explanation and 
possible reparation. Such little un- 
pleasantnesses must not take place. 



Another moral is this: When this 
special representative attempted to 
deal with the last customer and 
learned of the customer's knowledge 
of the local agency, he should have 
been sufficiently broad minded and of 
sufficiently 'large calibre' as a repre- 
sentative of a United States concern 
to have grasped the opportunity, 
closed the order and stated to the cus- 
tomer that the order would be placed 
through the local agency. He should 
have had an eye to something else 
than his commission as special rep- 
resentative. A capable representa- 
tive would have made the most of 
the occasion and by doing so would 
have reflected credit upon himself, 
the local concern and the house in the 
United States represented by himself 
and the local agency. 



May, 19 19 



255 






titled to a commission on the pur- 
chase of supplies or materials and 
equipment. 

The construction of new railway 
lines shall be under the immediate 
direction of the superintendent of 
construction and maintenance. The 
Chinese government may appoint a 
Chinese director to represent its in- 
terests in connection with the exe- 
cution of the work. 

The construction of railway, port 
terminal, and harbor work shall be 
under the immediate direction of the 
superintendent of port terminals 
The Chinese government may appoint 
a Chinese director to represent its in- 
terests during the execution of the 
work. The board shall, in agreement 
with the Chinese government, include 
in its construction program a reason- 
able percentage of development lines 
into backward or outer territories. 
Such lines, which would not likely 
pay for a number of years, should be 
carefully balanced in proportion to 
the good paying roads in order to as- 
sure a reasonable net profit from the 
railway system as a whole. 

Colonization Bureau 
To Encourage Settlers. 

The board, in agreement with the 
Chinese government, shall organize a 
development and colonization bureau 
to encourage settlement along the 
railways in backward or outer terri- 
tories and to foster and promote such 
agricultural, stock raising, forestry, 
and resource improvement, and de- 
velopment as would benefit the 
country and increase railway earn- 
ings. 

It shall be the duty of the board to 
insure efficient management in order 
to protect the loan investments of the 
Consortium bank group, but the un- 
derlying intent of the board's powers 
and functions shall be to promote the 
proper transportational development 
of China for the Chinese and to train 
Chinese executives and operatives in 
the science of railroading with the 
view that at the earliest practicable 
date the board may step out of au- 
thority and the Chinese assume full 
control and responsibility. 

To summarize and fix in our minds 
the whole matter the following points 
should be remembered : 

China and central Asia are approx- 
imately three times the size of the 
United States or of the whole of Eu- 
rope. Large areas in outer China 
and central Asia are rich in unde- 
veloped resources and fertile lands. 
These areas may be made to produce 
large quantities of staple products of 
which the world is in need, providing 
they are made accessible by means of 
modern transportation facilities. 




STREET SCENE IN SHANGHAI 



China is a great storehouse of dor- 
mant wealth and untouched oppor- 
tunities. She has a tremendous man 
power, hardy and industrious, wait- 
ing to be directed into channels of 
constructive effort- 
China has approximately 7,000 
miles of railways in operation, as 
against approximately 30,000 miles in 
India and 250,000 miles in the United 
States. Most of the railways have 
been built by foreign capital through 
loan contracts or outright concession. 
With the advent of railways special 
spheres o f influence and exclusive 
privileges have developed that, par- 
tially or completely, in some in- 
stances, close the door to equal op- 
portunity. China's proper develop- 
ment is being retarded thereby. 

These spheres and exclusive con- 
cessions threaten the Chinese nation- 
al integrity and if perpetuated will 
continue to retard her proper develop- 
ment politically and economically. 

Worse yet, if the present conditions 
are permitted to remain, China will 
continue a hotbed of international in- 
trigues and jealousies threatening the 
peace of the world. The Chinese peo- 
ple are essentially peaceful and demo- 
cratic in tendency, presenting an op- 
portunity to foster a national organi- 
zation that will support and strength- 
en democratic ideals in the far east. 

The following things should be 
done: Wipe out the old sphere of in- 
fluence, concessions, and exclusive 
privileges in China and make a new 
start on the principle of "No special 
privileges, but equal opportunities to 
all and justice to China." 

Consolidate the contract loan rail- 
ways, forming a Chinese national rail- 
way system with only sufficient for- 
eign control to insure protection to 



may be more quickly and effectively 
the investments. Through this 
board provide the funds and pur- 
chase on China's account all the con- 
cession railways, making them a part 
of the consolidated system. 

Assist China to formulate a com- 
prehensive plan of railway and port 
terminal development, any foreign 
loans for construction and equipment 
to be handled through the central 
management board- 
Make adequate provision for the 
training of Chinese in executive posi- 
tions with the avowed purpose of 
turning full control over to the Chin- 
ese government as soon as ability to 
manage the system and safeguard 
the investment is proven. 

Consolidate Concessions 
At Various Treaty Ports. 

Consolidate the concessions at the 
various treaty ports, neutralize them 
under international administration 
that will assure the Chinese an in- 
creasing participation in municipal 
government until • the time is ripe 
for full control. Abrogate all leases 
of continental territories converting 
the settlements into treaty ports un- 
der neutralized international adminis- 
tration. 

These things should be done: Be- 
cause the world needs the things the 
unused and backward lands in Asia 
can produce; because China must be 
set aright and properly developed as 
a preliminary to making available the 
potential resources of Asia, for the 
reason that only by going forth and 
creating new wealth in the world can 
the huge burden of war debts be 
lightened. 

Also because it is good business in 
that China's enormous man power 



266 



Pan Pacific 




PORT OF SINGAPORE 
HUNDKED YEARS OLD 



THOMAS POX 

f\N Thursday, February 6 we cele- 
^^ brated the Centenary of Singa- 
pore. A hundred years ago Sir Stam- 
ford Raffles landed on the island and 
raised the British flag. At that time 
the island was covered with jungle, 
and in the area where Singapore now 
stands there was only a small spot 
on which the tents of the landing 
party could be erected. 

Much of the British Empire was 
secured by fighting. Singapore was 
won by peaceful methods. Raffles 
was in the service of the East India 
Company. He was a man of large 
vision, endowed with the quality of 
patience, and with an indomitable 
spirit. 

Only a man who could see far ahead 
could have formed an estimate of the 
value of Singapore to the Empire as 



By THOMAS FOX 

Staff Correspondent at Singapore. 

a military and business centre Pen- 
ang was then in existence, but Pen- 
ang today is a place of secondary im- 
portance to Singapore. The Malay 
States were then unexplored by white 
man, and it is no figure of speech to 
say that if it had not been for the 
founding of this Settlement there 
would not have been the rich terri- 
tory of the Malay States under the 
British flag. 

First White Inhabitants 
Were Raffles and Party 

I need not go into all the details 
connected with the acquisition or 
Singapore, as it will not interest you 
in America. Raffles when he landed 
entered into an agreement with the 
Malay chiefs. They ceded the island 
to the East India Company, and Raf- 
fles and his followers were the first 
white inhabitants of what is now one 
of the most important cities in the 
British Empire. 

Even then we stood to lose this 
prize. Raffles had his detractors. 
Great men always do. The Dutch 
declared that the island had been 
ceded to them, and at home there 
were statesmen who were prepared 
to meet the Dutch claims rather than 
risk the chance of being embroiled in 
war. These statesmen had no vision. 
They did not see what Raffles saw. 



They considered that Singapore was 
not worth while having trouble over. 
But, fortunately, the founder of the 
colony had friends of some influence 
and eventually the Dutch claim was 
resisted and Singapore remained 
British. 

But Raffles had his troubles, when 
after seeing the colony that he 
founded well on the way to pros- 
perity, he returned to London. A 
few years later, at the age of forty 
five he died. Before his death he 
had declared himself to be a "little 
shrivelled old man " After his death 
he was buried at Hendon in a grave 
that remained unknown for over 
ninety years. The grave was only 
discovered a few years ago by work- 
men who were carrying out repairs 
at Hendon Church. 

Britain often has been neglectful of 
her great sons during their lifetime, 
but she generally tries to atone after 
their death. In life she neglected the 
man who won for her, against her 
wishes, one of the fairest gems of 
her crown, and in death she long for- 
got him. But greatness in time will 
rise from the grave. It did so in the 
case of Raffles. 

The war has linked America more 
closely with Singapore than ever be- 
fore. It is one of the great ports that 
lie beyond the Pacific and it is worth 
while for your merchants to cultivate 
their acquaintance. China is a mag- 
nificent field for trade, and it is to be 
feared that many of you do not look 



JAPAN MAY OPPOSE CHINESE RAIL PROGRAM 



set at constructive work, which would 
increase the productive and consum- 
ing capacity of the Chinese, assuring 
a several fold multiplication of trade 
and investment opportunity for all. 

In conclusion it may be emphasized 
that fear and hesitancy in facing an 
unpleasant situation, with nations as 
with individuals, is fatal. A drifting 
policy will simply store up worse 
trouble for the future. 

In proposing this method of solu- 
tion for the transportation of devel- 
pment of China, America is bound to 
meet opposition. Needless to men- 
tion, the opposition now will not come 
from Great Britain, for it is known 
that the British already have them- 
selves evolved a similar solution of the 
difficulty. 

Opposition will come from Japan — 



certain, for she will not want to give 
up control of the South Manchurian 
railway and she will strive to main- 
tain control of the German railways 
in Shantung province that she seized 
at the beginning of the war and 
which she has been operating since 
that time. The French are also likely 
to object to bringing their railways 
in south China into this scheme- 
But the strongest opposition (on 
the face, at least) is likely to come 
from a certain group of the older type 
reactionary Chinese, who will fight 
against their private prerogative of 
"squeeze" being interfered with 
through honest and efficient control 
and management of railways. 

The opposition on the part of cer- 
tain well intrenched reactionary 
Chinese interests will receive the se- 



cret backing of other nationals not in 
sympathy with the plan, so the op- 
position may appear formidable. 

Here is where America and Great 
Britain will be forced to act together 
for the good of the future — their own 
interests, the best interests of China, 
and the future peace of the world. 

If the railway lines of China are 
permitted to come under the control 
of a selfish nation or a selfish group 
of nations, then China's great wealth 
of natural resources of agriculture, 
minerals, and man power will flow in 
that direction and the end will be cer- 
tain — another war. 

Strong decision and keen diplomacy 
will win for this plan and save China 
now. Ten years from now it will re- 
quire something stronger than diplo- 
macy. 



May, 19 19 



257 






beyond Hongkong. But if you sail 
five days beyond that port you will 
come across a small island, about 22 
miles across, divided from the main- 
land by a narrow strip of water, and 
with a city of over 300,000 inhabi- 
tants reared on it. This is Singa- 
pore. In commercial importance it is 



British North Borneo, Sarawak, Sum- 
atra, Java, etc. and is sold on the 
market. From here it is shipped 
either direct or via Hongkong or 
Japanese ports to your side. Rub- 
ber and tin from the Malay States, 
rice from Siam, sage flour from Sara- 
wak and other parts of Borneo, oils 



RUBBER EXPORTS FROM MALAY PENINSULA 

Official statistics of the exports of rubber from the Federated Malay States and 
the Straits Settlements show a falling off in shipments during 1918 when compared 
with 1917, attributable, says the India Rubber World, to lack of cargo space and to 
American restrictions upon imports. Many of the rubber companies in Malaya vol- 
untarily restricted their tapping operations, but, notwithstanding, there was at the 
close of 1918 a considerable amount of rubber stored at Singapore. The export figures 
of the past three years appear below: 



Month 



January ... 
Febrnary 

March 

April 

May 

Jnne 

Jnly 

August 

September 

October 

November . 
December 

Total 



Federated Malay States 



Tons 
4 471 
.">;207 
4,420 
3,014 

3,956 

."..III 

.-.,iir.:: 
5.782 

6,376 
5.068 
6 776 
s;718 



«2,7((1 



1017 



Tons 

5.995 

7,250 
7.088 
5,055 
7.170 
«,O0» 
5.798 
487 
7,OS7 
7,079 
6.1 SO 
7,724 



79,831 



Tons 
7,388 
6,820 
7.700 
7,428 
5 881 
5J161 

s,7oe 

5,201 

6,588 
5,001 
7,097 
7,085 



78,255 



Straits Settlements 



Tons 
4.443 
3 350 
4",481 
4,219 
3,274 
3,836 
5.106 
3,246 
2.087 
5,233 
5,247 
3 219 



48,650 



1917 



Tons 
3,562 
6,495 
8,290 
6,103 
6,282 
8,775 
7,351 
3,786 
5 679 
1.702 
5,555 
0,503 



73.002 



Tons 
4.302 
2,334 
8.858 
6,584 

13.587 
6 515 
1J987 
1.249 
6,200 
3,260 
2.661 
4,839 



62,376 



The Straits Settlements' totals include transshipments amounting to 7,416 tons 
in 1917 and 4,447 tons in 1918. 



greater than Shanghai, greater than 
Hongkong. It is in respect of ton- 
nage the seventh largest port in the 
British Empire. 

Look at a map of the Malay Penin- 
sula, and note its favorable position. 
It is the great port on the main route 
from England to the Far East. It is 
the port for trade between British 
India and China and Japan. Goods 
are transported here for the great 
islands of Java and Sumatra, for Bor- 
neo, for Siam, and for Indo China. It 
commands a host of other islands, 
mostly Dutch. The greater part of 
the trade of the Malay States passes 
through it. 

If you ship from Pacific ports to 
Bangkok, your goods arrive at Singa- 
pore, and are transhipped by local 
steamers to the Siamese port. If 
you ship to Borneo you have no direct 
route. You send to Singapore, and 
the goods are transhipped from here. 
Goods for Sumatra are also tranship- 
ped from Singapore, and even often 
in the case of goods for Java there 
is handling at this port It is true 
that you now have direct lines run- 
ning from Java to Pacific ports, but 
all goods cannot be sent by these 
lines, and those that are not have to 
be landed at this port for tranship- 
ment. 

This, too, is the great market for 
produce. It is brought here from 



from Java, tobacco from Sumatra, 
gunny bags from British India — all 
come here and are shipped to some 
foreign port or sold on the local mar- 
ket. 

Yet merchants of the United States 
neglect us, or they did up to within 
the last two years. Now they are 
showing increasing interest in this 
part of the world. I notice that the 
principals of some of your concerns 



are coming over here, and after all 
that is the best way to learn of what 
a country is capable. It is also the 
best way to learn the particular de- 
mands of that country. Your history 
gives hope that you will not be slow 
to adjust matters to meet local re- 
quirements- 
It may be your experience that a 
particular class of goods, packed in 
a particular way, is the best for your 
market, but do not allow that ex- 
perience to bind you to such an ex- 
tent that you cannot understand the 
demand of foreign merchants for a 
particular class of goods done up in a 
way to which you are not accustomed. 
If you have been packing say, 10 tins 
of an article to a case, do not hesitate 
to pack four tins to a case if a foreign 
market asks for it. There is a reas- 
on. Owing to special conditions it 
may not be possible for you to under- 
stand it. But the merchant at this 
end understands it, and further un- 
derstands that if he does not get the 
packing that he asks for, he is to 
have a difficult time in getting rid of 
his goods. It is a question of dollars 
to the merchant here, and he cannot 
afford to take any risks. 

But I have wandered from my 
theme a little. Singapore is not at 
the height of its power yet. It is 
still developing. Every year the 
trade of the port is growing. It is a 
natural port for Pacific Coast manu- 
facturers and merchants. Soon ship- 
ping facilities will improve, and there 
will be less handling of — your goods. 
There will be more in the way of di- 
rect shipments, and there will be no 
more difficulty in sending goods to 
Singapore than there is in sending 
them at the present time to Yoko- 
hama. Every year the Malay Penin- 
sula is being opened up more and 
more. That spells more trade. 



NICAKAGUAN COFFEE SITUATION 



By A. J. McCONNICO, 

Consul at Corinto 

• — o — 

THE coffee situation at Nicaragua 
is more favorable to-day than at 
any time during the last five years. 
The present market price of approxi- 
mately $20 per quintal has given en- 
couragement to all the planters, and 
has served to rehabilitate many of 
the estates of fincas. The former 
price of $6 or $8 per quintal was 
about to bring ruin and bankruptcy, 
for coffee can not be produced in this 
section profitably at 6 or 8 cents a 
pound. 

It is estimated that the production 
this season o f 1919 will amount 
to 300,000 quintals, or 30,000,000 
pounds, which quantity, if realized, 



will exceed that of 1918 by 50,000 
quintals, or 5,000,000 pounds. The 
increased production with the present 
market price, $20 per quintal, will 
bring into the Republic $2,000,000 
more than is usually realized from 
the coffee crop 

During 1917 there were exported 
from Nicaragua 18,542,246 pounds of 
coffee, valued at $1,761,607. More 
than 60 per cent of this was pur- 
chased by the United States; the re- 
mainder by France, Italy, Spain, in 
the order named. During 1918 the 
quantity exported was 25,266,454 
pounds, valued at $2,224,154. All of 
the 1918 crop, except 1,800 quintals, 
was taken by the United States. 

The present indications are that 
much o f t h e coffee exported this 
season will go to Europe. 



258 



Pan P a c i f i 



JAPAN'S PLACE IN FAMILY OF NATIONS 



By 
WILLIAM RUTLEDGE McGARRY 

IN this, my final international an- 
alysis of world conditions for Pan 
Pacific, I am asked to give my own 
interpretation of Japan and to render 
an accounting of my observation here 
and elsewhere of the position which 
the world accords and should accord 
to her. So what I say and the con- 
clusions I shall draw in this respect 
will reflect my own and no other one's 
opinions. 

I have always taken the position 
that in the household of nations, as 
before a court of Justice, every mem- 
ber of the family stands on the plat- 
form as sovereign equals. 

Obligations of Host 
Must Be Understood 

The mere fact that a nation is in- 
vited to a table carries with the in- 
vitation, itself, the necessary impli- 
cation that all who participate in the 
ceremonies do so on the basis of 
equality. In a diplomatic sense it 
could not be otherwise. Nor, even 
in the ordinary minor sense of social 
courtesy among well-bred men and 
women, is it conceivable in a host to 
extend an invitation to a person not 
qualified to fulfill all the obligations 
of a guest. 

The moment a guest is accorded the 
delightful privilege o f entering 
another's threshold, his person, his 
reputation, and all he stands for is 
regarded, among decent people, as 
privileged and sacred. And this is 
nothing but an abstract from the ele- 
mentary code of honor, acknowledged 
and accepted everywhere in the 
family circle as well as in the hall of 
princes. Wherever it has not been ac- 
cepted and acted upon, is to be found 
the lowest order of dignity as well 
as entertainment; and nothing noble 
or refining can gain inspiration from 
so mean a situation. 

These Principles 
Are Fundamental 

These principles are so fundamen- 
tal, socially and politically, that none 
but an ignoramus, a spy, or a social 
outcast will claim exemption from 
their binding force upon them. 

This being the situation in the in- 



ternational party at Versailles, the 
position occupied by Baron Makino at 
the table of Plenipotentiaries calls for 
the display of the finest dignity and 
finesse. 

He is precisely in the position of a 
guest at an elaborate social function 
which the "host" has staged to dis- 
arm his caution by a display of "hos- 
pitality" only the more closely to ob- 
serve his conduct. 

Now Japan was invited to that little 
dinner party as every other guest had 
been. As such she is entitled to the 
same confidence and courtesy as the 
others. There was nothing in the in- 
vitation to suggest that, instead of 
being accepted as a guest, she had 
been smuggled into the gathering to 
become an object of animadversion 
and suspicion, by a cabal of social and 
political pariahs who alone are cap- 
able of doing such an ill-mannered 
thing. 

Sanctity of Guest 
Should Be Respected 

The "hospitality" Japan believed 
she was accepting in the spirit of the 
Samurai pssessed no exterior mani- 
festations of crafty insincerity. It 
was apparently very candid and ab- 
solutely on the square. Had Japan 
suspected that the invitation was 
merely a theatrical display of ill-dis- 
guised civility she never would have 
consented to meet so curious a host. 
She would have indignantly despised 
the whole gathering as the necessary 
accessories of a spurious piece of 
insincerity. Honor is too rich a 
heritage not t o feel i t s feathers 
ruffled in the presence of an evil wind. 

It is easy to understand the fine 
sensibilities of the old time Samurai. 
It is nothing more than our old Ameri- 
can code of honor recognized among 
gentlemen and women to the manor 
born. The Samurai could not open 
their doors to the mockery of insin- 
cerity or false pretense without be- 
lieveing themselves branded as degen- 
erates and hypocrites who alone are 
used to betray a fellow by the exercise 
of social prostitution. And this in- 
stinct of decency holds good in poli- 
tics, as well as in good society. 

At the Peace conference it is to be 
assumed that Japan will stand upon 
her rights as a sovereign State, equal 
in a political sense, with all partici- 
pants. And aside from this fiction 
of political equality Japan has re- 
vealed her equality in every other 
attribute which goes to make up 
the vital and perpetuating impulses 
of national solidarity. 



Japan Possesses Keen 
Sentiment of Honor 

No nation at the table has so splen- 
did a history of long and uninter- 
rupted peace. None possesses a more 
noble literature. Few can reveal such 
a marvelous charm of art. None can 
display greater rewards of industry 
or a finer spirit of thrift. She is the 
only nation at the conference that can 
reveal a highly organized civilization 
that runs through the centuries like a 
silken cord to bind the present to a 
past of peace and beauty. 

When Marco Polo landed on Dai 
Nippon, in 1295, Europe was in dark- 
ness and quivering from centuries of 
war ; yet Japan was a land of sunshine 
exhibiting the refinements of a deli- 
cate civilization, that responded to an 
inspiring tone of morality and honor. 
It possessed a glorious history. There 
was an equally splendid tradition. A 
family name was more than a family 
tree. It amounted to family rever- 
ence. No stain was upon the escut- 
cheon and honor became the living 
article o f a loving national faith. 
Some travellers called this wonderful 
family pride, this inherited instinct 
of honor, by the name of Shintoism; 
and such it doubtless was, for there is 
nothing unreasonable in reverencing 
a line of ancestors who have trans- 
mitted to one's keeping, in its untar- 
nished splendor, a name and a shield 
that reflects nothing but dignity and 
glory, from the days of Yamato-dake 
and Oto-Tachibana to the present 
time. 

So we are not surprised when we 
read of Japan's plenipotentiary say- 
ing to the other plenipotentiaries at 
Versailles that Japan is "not too 
proud to fight" to maintain its honor, 
but that it is "too proud" to sit down 
at a table as inferior to any race on 
earth. 

Reverence and Efficiency 
Displayed in Nation 

I might easily enumerate the 
names of Japanese in every calling of 
life who stand second to none in our 
present industrial age. I might cite 
the name of many Emperors who 
have deserved the reverent name of 
"Father" of this very courteous race. 
I am on terms of intimate friendship 
with many of her Statesmen who are 
more democratic and constructive 
than some other men I know. I have 
been entertained in the homes of 
princes and barons and bankers and 
authors and scholars, and I have 
never beheld a more beautiful exhi- 



May, 10 19 



259 



MUST BE DECIDED NOW FOR ALL TIME 



bition of filial tenderness, uxorious 
affection and mutual domestic love. 
And I have a Japanese friend who, in 
competition with several thousand 
students in one of our American Uni- 
versities, walked away with the first 
prize in oratory in the language of 
Uncle Sam. 

To say that such a race is "inferior" 
to the mongrel half-breeds who are 
just now bursting from their chry- 
salis of bondage and clamoring for 
"equality" at Versailles is to make a 
mockery of ethics and substitute the 
jealousy of mediocrity for the inher- 
ent modesty of meritorious achieve- 
ment ! To say that such a race is not 
better qualified to guarantee the 
peace of the Pacific, if not of the 
whole world, than races who regard 
international covenants a s "mere 
scraps of paper" is to bastardize so- 
ciety and make a travesty of national 
good faith. Let us have no more of 
this reprehensible twaddle. Let us 
strangle this viper of intrigue with its 
venomous tongue of jealousy and hate. 
Japan is our little friend and no power 
in the universe can destroy our faith 
in her loyal attachment to the ideals 
which mean peace and prosperity to 
the whole Pan Pacific world. 

Nippon's Capacity 
For Universal Good 

I am not making the claim that 
Japan is "superior" to Uncle Sam, in 
anything, moral, intellectual or phy- 
sical. I am merely recognizing and 
recommending her worth. I am not 
saying that she has not inherited 
some of the habits of western civiliz- 
ation that are very selfish and thor- 
oughly up-to-date in the philosophy 
of self-interest lam merely ac- 
knowledging her intellectual capacity 
to grasp the economic principles of 
progress with an alertness and con- 
centration of purpose that reveals a 
capacity t o accomplish wonderful 
things for the good of humanity and 
the future peace of the world. 

I am not saying that she is so ar- 
tistic that she will embrace the doc- 
trines of Fourier so firmly as to for- 
ever tolerate insult after both cheeks 
have been cuffed by stimulated and 
cultivated blindness. I am only sug- 
gesting that the dignity of conscious 
honor while incapable of descending 
to the level of a serpent is, neverthe- 
less, under sufficient provocation, 
willing to display the strength and 
courage of the lion. In all of these 
qualities Japan resembles the United 
States from which her philosophy of 
progress is derived ; and to me, at 



least, such qualities suggest the very 
genius of achievement upon which 
mankind may confidently rely for 
nobler and finer things in the scheme 
of human life. 

Instinct of Peace 
and War Contrasted 

I say this because the Orient is as 
naturally peaceful as the Occident is 
naturally pugnacious. Europe always 
presents a picture of armed civility 
which accepts and recognizes hatred 
as an attribute of honor. One may 
sit for an hour in the Hotel Moscow 
at Belgrade and learn of more plots 
and counter-plots to disturb the peace 
of Europe than could be acquired in 
Tokyo in a hundred years. One may 
roam along the Donau Kanal or the 
Wien Fluss, at Vienna, and hear more 
whisperings o f meditated carnage 
than would be expressed in a life time 
in the United States and Japan com- 
bined. A stroll along the Madelain 
or the Haussmann in Paris or a lazy 
ramble in the perlieus of Berlin will 
reveal more evidence of "man's inhu- 
manity to man" than will be picked up 
in a generation among the American 
or Oriental people. 

Under these circumstances it is not 
surprising that wherever the Orient 
has been penetrated for commercial 
exploitation by European races we 
find the natives imposed upon by 
cruel and intolerable exactions. They 
are regarded as "inferiors" fit only 
to slave for the luxury-loving warriors 
of a "superior" and blood-letting race ! 
They are the "hewers of wood and the 
drawers of water" for the stingy and 
domineering interlopers who take 
everything and leave nothing to ex- 
cuse their penalizing penetration. 
Thus they have impoverished the 
Orient and deprived the largest part 
of the human family of the means 
of contributing towards the progress 
and enlightenment of the world. And 
for this reason it is incomprehensible 
that Japan can look on this flood of 
invented destitution without mani- 
festing a desire to raise the standard 
of Oriental productiveness and ef- 
ficiency- 
Japan's Destiny 
To Elevate Civilization 

As a matter of fact she asserts 
this right. She desires a rich Orient 
to trade with. She wants to see the 
earning capacity o f Oriental races 
raised from the prevailing pittance of 
today to a decent income for hours of 
honest toil. Her philosopny is the 
philosophy of the United States 



in stimulating productiveness and 
wealth. She believes i n bringing 
railroad communications to the mil- 
lions of non-commercial inhabitants 
who swarm on Oriental plains so that 
they may contribute billions every 
year to the wealth and solvency and 
happiness o f this war-embittered 
world. 

For this purpose her hand is now 
extended to the people of America in 
cordial amity and desire for co- oper- 
ation in such a beneficial and con- 
structive purpose. We have grasped 
that hand as friends ; and in all parts 
of the United States where our sin- 
cerity is genuine Japan nas been pour- 
ing in a golden flood of wealth. Res 
ipse loquatur. 

It must not be understood from 
this that I endorse the unwise asser- 
tion of extraterritoriality by other 
races in China or any other country. 
That is an inheritance from the bar- 
baric reign of Francis I. It was first 
expressed in the firmen or right of 
visitation which the Crusaders im- 
posed on the followers of Mahomet. 
It was subsequently asserted by 
Catherine the Great after a series of 
barbarous and successful wars. It 
became the habitual mask of diplo- 
matic brigandage, as time went on, 
and was moulded into inter 
national law as a fit memorial to 
bloodshed and encroaching cruelty. 
The sooner it is kicked from the mass 
of irritating lumber in the skeleton 
archives of international ill-will the 
better it will be for the sure and 
steady step of commercial progress. 

Statesmen Recognize 
This Economic Justice 

All forward looking Statesmen rec- 
ognize the justice and the economic 
value of cutting these unnecessary 
and insulting cords of acknowledged 
subjugation. They have learned to 
believe that in friendship alone re- 
sides the kernel of peace and the twig 
of prosperity that all good men are 
anxious to cultivate and encourage. 

When the conference turns its at- 
tention to this necessary phase of the 
situation, I am satisfied that Japan 
will stand with the United States in 
the belated liberation of humanity 
from the customs of barbarity, and 
allow the human family to respond to 
the natural and progressive forces of 
international good will. It will be an 
achievement worthy of America. It 
will be an achievement worthy of 
Japan ; and it will solemnize the wed- 
lock of man's humanity to man with 
the regenerated spirit of Freedom, 
Fraternity and Equality. 



260 



P a 



f i 



TACKLING FOREIGN TRADE 
WITH THE WRONG TOOLS 



By JOHN H. GERRIE 



THE United States enters upon 
world trade with the wrong 
kind of tools. At the outset of its 
expanded selling career this nation is 
seriously handicapped in the fierce 
competition with the advanced trad- 
ing nations of the earth. 

The French merchant, the German, 
the Dutch, will do business in the 
Latin-American market, in the Asi- 
atic market, with the weights and 
measures commonly used and under- 
stood by those potential buyers. The 
American merchant will attempt to 
sell American goods by weights and 
measures now obsolete among all but 
two nationalities and difficult, in the 
foreign mind, of comprehension. 

A French merchant and an Ameri- 
can merchant enter a certain over- 
seas market with the same class and 
quality of goods, at about the same 
price. The Frenchman sells by the 
metric system, well understood be- 
cause of its simplicity and long use 
in that market; the American intro- 
duces the cumbersome system still 
in vogue here. On terms otherwise 
equal which is the more likely to 
carry off the orders? There can be 
no question of it. 

Add More Salesmen 
Handicap Increases 

But just add to that one-sided 
competition, salesmen from Holland, 
from Denmark, from Norway and 
Sweden, from Spain, from Italy, even 
from Germany, not forgetting either 
the ever-alert Japanese trader, all 
offering goods in the remote corners 
of the world, on a plan of barter as 
familiar there as the names of the 
prospective buyers. What chance 
would a poor American have anyway ? 
Well, if there were ten other nation- 
alities represented, his chance would 
be less than one in ten, always 
granted that the goods offered were 
of equal merit in the eyes of the 
customers. 

Can the American merchant afford 
to enter the world's markets loaded 
with this terrific handicap? 

In the scramble for ships to carry 
American goods and in the thousand 
and one problems of world readjust- 
ment the question of simplifying the 
buying and selling of merchandise 
throughout the world has been lost 
sight of. Yet the question is of para- 
mount importance to two great mer- 
chant nations — Great Britain and the 
United States. 



For in this connection Britannia is 
in the same boat with America, 
though that does not ease the situ- 
ation for the latter. As a matter of 
fact England led the United States 
into its cumbersome jumble of 
quantity expression, which in turn, 
strange as it may seem, had been 
forced upon the British by the Ger- 
mans. The present coinage of the 
British Isles as well as the weights 
and measures of both Great Britain 
and the United States are German. 

Present British System 
Originated By Germans 

The British pounds, both sterling 
and avoirdupois, originated with the 
old German Osterling Hanseatic 
League, which for hundreds of years 
controlled the trade of England. In- 
deed, the dominance of the Germans 
continued until a competent business 
manager ousted the German Hanse 
League from England — a patriotic 
work — and it was a woman who did 
it: Elizabeth. 

The Germans forced these old 



nations, while relegating to her most 
formidable competitors so compli- 
cated and cumbersome a system as 
to almost handicap them out of the 
race for international trade. Can- 
not you imagine the slick German 
traders laughing among themselves 
over the trick of forcing a discarded 
jumble of weights and measures on 
the English speaking peoples, while 
themselves going forth to do business 
on a scientific and automatic plan 
that appeals to the least intelligent 
of peoples and the invention of an 
Englishman at that? If the issues 
it presents were not so tragic it might 
be considered the world's greatest 
joke. 

Not the least interesting feature 
of the situation is that the metric 
system is so simple an average child 
of ten years can master its essential 
features in ten minutes. It is that 
simplicity that has quickly made it 
the standard of the world outside the 
English races. It is the standard of 
all Europe outside the British Isles, 
practically all of Asia, all of Ameri- 
ca except Canada and the United 
States, all of Africa and all of Oceania 
outside of Australia and New Zea- 
land. 

All the world has adopted the al- 



MAP SHOWING WELL-MbH WORLD 1 SE OP METRIC UNITS 




BLACK — COUNTRIES XOW USING METP.R-L.ITER GRAM AND METRIC COINS 
SHADED— COUNTRIES USING METRIC COINS, METRIC UNITS IN ELECTRICAL 
INDUSTRY, SCIENTIPIC WORK, ALMOST EXCLUSIVELY, WORLD 
METRIC POSTAGE. AND ON EVE OP ADOPTING METER-LITER- 
GRAM POR WORLD TRADE. 
WHITE COUNTRIES USING OLD GERMAN JUMBLE, SCRAPT BY GER- 
MANS, 1S71. 



standards on the British who in their 
turn landed them on America. What 
is more remarkable is that America 
and Britannia continue to use these 
old German tools after Germany her- 
self has scrapped them, and adopted 
(1871) the simplest decimal system 
ever known to humankind — the appli- 
cation of the decimal to weights and 
measures, which was the invention of 
James Watt in 1783. 

In other words Germany, followed 
by other nations, has adopted a sys- 
tem of quantity expression invented 
by a Briton to simplify trading among 



phabet of letters for written expres- 
sion, each people in its own language. 
All the world has adopted the Arabic 
numerals, 1234567890, for mathe- 
matical computation. All the civi- 
lized world has adopted the metric 
units to express its weights and 
measures, meter-liter-gram, with the 
exception of the United States and 
Great Britain. 

It is a system of weights and meas- 
ures based on decimal computations, 
just as is the American decimal met- 
ric dollar. The metric system has 
only four principal units — dollar- 



.1/ ay, 19 1 9 



261 



HERE ARE NATIONS THAT USE METRIC SYSTEM 



Countries and peoples which have adopted 
the metric system are these 152: Argentina, 
Austria, Adalia, Algeria, Albania, Arabia, 
Andorra, Anam, Armenia, Anatolia, Azores, 
Abyssinia, Brazil, Belgium, Bolivia, Bul- 
garia, Borneo, Bali, British Honduras, Ba- 
varia, Bosnia, Bokhara, Balaerics, Buko- 
wina, Canada, Ceylon, China (the Chinese 
Government has definitely decided gradu- 
ally to turn its 426,000,000 to exclusive use 
of meter-liter-gram — it is the standard of 
28 ports now), Chili, Colombia, Costa Rica, 
Croatia, Czecho-Slova, Cuba, Caroline Is- 
lands, Cambodia, Cochin China, Dutch Celi- 
bes, Canaries, Cyprus, Corsica, Crete, Den- 
mark, Dalmatia, Dahomey, Dobrudja, Da- 



maraland, Egypt, Ecuador, Portuguese East 
Africa, Eritres, France, Finland, Formosa, 
Faroe Islands, Filippines, Germany, Greece, 
Guatemala, Greenland, Guiana, (French), 
Guiana (British), Guiana (Dutch), Gui- 
ana (Portuguese), German East Africa, 
German West Africa, Togoland, German 
Borneo, Guam, Hungary, Hongkong, Hol- 
land, Haiti, Honduras, Herzegovina, Italy, 
Iceland, Ivory Coast (French), India, Indo 
China (French), Japan, Java, Jugo Slovia, 
Juan- Fernandez, Kamerun, Korea, Kongo 
(French).Kongo (Belgian), Kongo (Portu- 
guese), Khiva, Lithuania, Liberia, Luxem- 
burg, Lombok, Marshall Isles, Mexico, Mo- 
rocco, Moravia, Montenegro, Mauritius, 



Monte Carlo, Martinique, Madura, Molucan, 
Macao, Madeira, Malay States, Namaland, 
Norway, New Guiana, Nicaragua, New- 
Granada, Nigeria, Newfoundland, O r o 
(Spanish), Odrar, Peru, Poland, Palestine, 
Paraguay, Patagonia, Panama, Porto Rico, 
Portugal, Pescadores, Russia, Ruthenia, 
Rhodes, Rumania, Siberia, Salvador, San 
Domingo, Serbia, Spain, Switzerland, Samoa, 
Samoa (German), Samos, Sardinia, Sicily, 
Siam, Sumatra, St. Lucia, St. Croix, St. Pier- 
re, Sahara, Senegal, Senegambia, Somali, 
Somali (Italian), Straits Settlements, Ton- 
quin, Tripoli, Tunis (French), Tunis (Ital- 
ian), Timor Islands, Uruguay, Ukrania, Vene- 
zuela, Virgin Islands, W. Africa (French). 



meter-liter-gram — and they can be 
multiplied by 10, 100, 1000, or divided 
into lOths, lOOths, lOOOths, in the 
same manner that we multiply or di- 
vide decimal metric money. Dollar- 
meter-liter-gram are simply names to 
indicate whether the computation re- 
fers t o money, length, mass or 
weight. 

Use Same Terms 

To Express Units 

We may use the same terms to ex- 
press meters, liters and grams as we 
do to express dollars as follows: 

1.111 is expressed as one dollar, one 
10 cent, one cent, one mill. 

1.111 is expressed as one meter, one 
DECl-meter, one CENT-imeter, one MILL- 
imeter. 

1.111 is expressed as one liter, one 
DECl-litcr, one CENT-iliter, one MILL- 
iliter. 

1.111 is expressed as one gram, one 
DECi-gram, one CENT-igram, one mill- 
igram. 

Just as you multiply and divide the 
dollar by 10-100-1000, so do you mul- 
tiply and divide meters, liters, grams. 
And as to definitions: — Kilo is Greek 
for 1000, Hecto is Greek for 100, 
Deka is Greek for 10. That is all. 

Watt's scientific and practical mind 
devised one simple decimal method 
which he submitted to various coun- 
tries in 1783, and it was this system 
that became the metric system. Tal- 
leyrand, the great French statesman, 
saw at once its immense practical 
value, simplicity, uniformity — world 
oneness. He caused it to be adopted 
in France, and France was soon fol- 
lowed by 33 other nations. 

System Was Favored 
Bv George Washington 

George Washington said: 

A uniformity of the weights 
and measures of the country is 






among the important objects sub- 
mitted to you by the constitution 
and if it can be derived from a 
standard at once invariable and 
universal, it must be no less hon- 
orable to the public council than 
conducive to the public conven- 
ience. 

Thomas Jefferson appreciated its 
simplicity and practicability, and 
urged its adoption in this country. 
We accepted it as the basis of our 
money in 1786, thus leading the world 
in metric money, but unfortunately 
neglected to adopt the other three 
principal units — meter-liter-gram. 

In 1816 James Madison brought the 
matter of standards to the attention 
of Congress and a committee re- 
ported in favor of Jefferson's decimal 
plan, but it was not done. In 1821, 
J. Q. Adams, Secretary of State, re- 
ported in favor of the metric system 
but it was not adopted. In 1866 
Charles Sumner did the same with 
similar result. 

The British House of Commons in 
1914 voted to adopt the metric sys- 
tem but the House of Lords rejected 
it. This decision had an important 
bearing upon the World War. 

Germany's Advantage 
Due To Metric System 

Germany has had everything met- 
rically standardized since 1871, so 
that in the war practically every Ger- 
man detail was instantly interchange- 
able, and they fitted and worked to- 
gether. Without this automatic unity 
and simplicity there could have been 
no such-great efficiency in the pro- 
ductive and military co-ordination of 
Germany. 

The Allies, on the contrary, had no 
such interchangeable uniformity. 
The metric standards of France, 
Italy, Russia, Rumania, Greece, Bel- 
gium, Montenegro, Portugal, Serbia, 



and the rest — 23 fighting allies and 7 
who had broken off diplomatic re- 
lations with Germany, including the 
nations of Central and South Amer- 
ica, that is to say some 30 of the 
allies — were not interchangeable with 
the British and American weights 
and measures. Even British and 
American measures were not inter- 
changeable with the result that great 
and grave difficulties, long costly de- 
lays, interfered with their co-ordi- 
nation and efficiency promptly to aid 
their allies. 

Eventually Forced 
To Adopt Standard 

But eventually both Great Britain 
and the United States were forced to 
adopt the metric system of standards 
for use in France. General order 
number 1 of the United States War 
department, issued January 2, 1918, 
states : 

"The metric system has been 
adopted for use in France for all firing 
data for artillery and machine guns, 
in the preparation of operation orders 
and in map construction." Ordnanco 
such as the 75 and 155 milli-meter 
guns have been adopted by the United 
States Army and are successfully 
made in America. 

Surely n o further reasons are 
needed why the English speaking 
peoples should immediately scrap the 
obsolete standards of war and trade, 
so complicated, difficult to learn and 
to use. The United States and Great 
Britain now looked to as world 
leaders in the present crisis of man- 
kind should at least be on even terms 
with other nations in the race for 
world trade. President Wilson and 
Lloyd George devoting ten minutes 
to this subject in Paris could make the 
metric standard universal and benefit 
all human kind. 



262 



Pan Pacific 



OLD 

PORTS 

AND 

NEW 



By 

WALTER SCOTT MERIWETHER 

— o — 

THE rehabilitation of the Ameri- 
can merchant marine will not 
only send American ships into com- 
merce upon the Seven Seas but will 
restore to their former high estate 
many of the now half-forgotten ports 
of the great seaboard of the nation. 

Portland, New Bedford, Gloucester, 
Marblehead, Bath, Rockland, Thomas- 
ton, New London, still possess the 
natural advantages that made their 
names as familiar to seafaring men 
in the days of the Yankee clipper 
ships as are New York, Boston, Balti- 
more, Norfolk, Philadelphia, New Or- 
leans, Galveston and San Francisco 
to the present generation. 

Some of these old ports, which once 
thrived and prospered through their 
overseas trade, together with dozens 
of others, perhaps never known to 
fame, already feel the quickening in- 
fluence of the new birth of our mer- 
chant navy upon the seas. All 
possess deep, sheltered water and 
form gateways to important indus- 
trial or manufacturing regions. 

There is no nation so bountifully 
blessed with natural harbor prospects 
as the United States. Its 21,000 miles 
of coast line, washed by the waters 
of the blustering Atlantic, the placid 
Gulf of Mexico and the lazy rollers 
of the Pacific, is serrated with land- 
locked bays and broad estuaries that 
offer safe harbor for ships of all 
classes. 

The British Isles, lacking most of 
these natural advantages, are never- 
theless bound round with a cordon of 
ports and harbors. Virtually every 
dent in the rugged coast of these 
islands has been utilized for the ac- 
commodation of the ships of her big 
merchant fleet, and all these ports 
and harbors serve their purpose in 
the complex but smooth-running ma- 
chinery of Great Britain's overseas 
trade. 



HARBORS OF PACIFIC COAST 

LOS ANGELES (San Pedro)— The harbor has a berthing capacity of 20,962 
lineal feet, with a capacity of 415,000 square feet of warehouse storage and 457,700 
square feet of enclosed shed storage reached by a harbor terminal railway. It has 
500 acres of anchorage area. Fresh water, electric current, bunker oil and crane and 
derrick facilities are available. The harbor also affords elevator equipment. Nine, 
steamship lines regularly use this port. 

SAN FRANCISCO— This great harbor has a berthing capacity of 78,704 lineal 
feet. It is fully equipped with dry docks, has an anchorage area of 40 nautical miles, 
and fresh water, bunker coal and oil, electric current and crane and derrick facilities 
are available. The harbor has 39 piers with a storage capacity of 4,591,903 square 
feet, and bulkhead wharves furnish an additional storage capacity of 1,120,000 square 
feet with an actual car capacity on piers of 1,000 cars. The port is equipped to handle 
25 to 30'/r more tonnage annually than it is now receiving. 

PORTLAND— This harbor furnishes berthing capacity of 20,994 lineal feet, with a 
shed storage capacity of 1,974,400 square feet and open storage of 1,008,340 square 
feet. Seven railway systems serve the port. It has dry docks and an anchorage area 
of 165 feet with a clear depth of 28 to 33. feet. Fresh water, electric current, bunker 
coal and oil and crane and derrick facilities are available. It has grain ele- 
vator equipment. Two steamship lines regularly use this port. 

SEATTLE — The harbor affords a berthing capacity of 41,776 lineal feet with a 
spur track capacity of 1,731 cars. The berthing capacity furnishes accommodation for 
100 vessels of 400 feet length. The harbor has dry dock equipment and an anchorage 
area of 11.80 square miles. It has grain elevators. Fresh water, electric current, 
bunker coal and oil and crane and derrick facilities are available. Twenty-nine steam- 
ship lines regularly use this port. 

TACOMA — Has a very large berthing capacity for vessels of all sizes and drafts. 
The port is served by four railway systems. The harbor is equipped with dry docks 
and furnishes safe anchorage for a large number of ships. There are grain elevators, 
fresh water, electric current, bunker coal and oil, crane and derrick facilities are avail- 
able. Six steamship lines make regular use of the port of Tacoma. 

(Descriptions furnished by the United States Shipping Board.) 



What Great Britain has done in the 
upbuilding of the port and harbor 
facilities o f t h e British Isles the 
United States will do in meeting the 
demands of her rapidly expanding 
overseas merchant marine. Already 
the Port and Harbor Facilities Com- 
mission of the United States Ship- 
ping Board has listed 71 ports and 
harbors on our coasts capable of ac- 
commodating vessels of 5,000 dead- 
weight tons. 

Future development of the ports 
and harbors now listed and classified, 
and others that may be located in the 
future at advantageous points, will 
depend upon development of harbor 
facilities, such as dredging operations 
and the building of piers, docks, ware- 
houses, elevators and termini of rail- 
way lines, and will be largely in the 
hands of citizens, corporations and in- 
dividuals interested in such port or 
harbor. 

The ports and harbors now listed 
with the Shipping Board as possess- 
ing facilities for overseas trade are 
divided into four classes. There are 
24 in Class A; 10 in Class B; 29 in 
Class C and 8 in Class D. In the 
latter class are listed Bahia Honda 
and St. Josephs Bay in Florida; San 



Pablo Bay in California; Coos Bay in 
Oregon, and Grays Harbor, Willapa 
Bay, Port Gamble and Port Madison 
in Washington — new names, surely, 
to the average citizen who believes 
himself well posted in the geography 
and commercial history of his 
country. 

Among the "come-backs" of the old 
days of the maritime glory of the 
nation may be mentioned Alexandria, 
Virginia, a few miles down the Po- 
tomac River from Washington. Alex- 
andria once ranked as a city and port 
of importance but is now almost for- 
gotten as ever having been the haunt 
of sailor men. It finds a place in 
Class C and again may know the de- 
parted activities of arrivals and sail- 
ings of vessels in overseas commerce. 

New Bedford, on the Massachus- 
setts Coast, h a s a fixed place in 
history as a seaport that once knew 
the commerce of the world. In the 
generation when New Bedford flour- 
ished Portugal had a rich trade with 
the United States and it was con- 
ducted almost exclusively through the 
gateway of New Bedford. Other 
ports almost as rich in the history 
and romance of the sea are brought 
to public attention again by the needs 
of the new merchant marine. 



May, 19 19 



263 



HONG KONG FLOUR SITUATION 



Noted Chinese Educator 



By GEORGE E. ANDERSON 
Consul General at Hongkong 

WITH the United States Gov- 
ernment guaranteeing farmers 
$2.20 gold per bushel for the 1918-19 
wheat crop American flour will not 
come into the Hongkong market dur- 
ing the coming year except at a loss 
to the Government of the United 
States. With such a price for Ameri- 
can wheat, imports of American flour 
into the southeast Asia field are prac- 
tically impossible even if there is no 
competition of moment, but there is 
every indication that Australia, North 
China, and perhaps Japan, will be in 
this market. 

The stock of wheat in North China 
has been quite fair since last July, 
and though the demand for the flour 
output of the Shanghai mills is so 
strong that orders from this part of 
the world are not accepted at present, 
it is likely that Shanghai will have a 
fair share in the imports of the south 
Asia field next season. The Japanese 
mills are short of wheat and have 
been buying Australian grain to mix 
with the Manchurian, Korean, and 
Japanese supplies, but it is possible 
that the Japanese mills, too, will come 
into this market during the coming 
year. 

At present the chief source of good 
flour is Australia, where the Govern- 



ment is now permitting exports and 
whence the supply is limited only by 
available tonnage. Regular service 
between Australia and Hongkong is, 
at this time, limited to five steamers 
of comparatively small capacity, but 
it is probable that tramp tonnage will 
be available during 1919 

The 1918 trade was particularly dis- 
couraging, the total imports amount- 
ing to only 706,509 bags as compared 
with 1,072,089 bags in 1917, 1,604,033 
bags in 1916, 2,075,129 bags in 1915, 
3,939,754 bags in 1914, and 5,176,623 
bags in 1913 and similarly large im- 
ports in pre-war years. Of the im- 
ports the past year Australia fur- 
nished 342,009 bags, North China, 
322,000; and Japan, 42,500 bags. 
These figures indicate that flour was 
imported almost wholly for the for- 
eign population, and that the price 
was much too high for any very ma- 
terial consumption by the Chinese. 
Prices ranged very high indeed for 
this market, and had stocks from 
Australia not been forthcoming the 
field faced a very serious situation. 

North China, too, was short of 
wheat and flour, no supplies were 
available from Australia o r the 
United States, and the field depended 
almost entirely upon Japan. The 
comparatively large imports from 
that country, which dominated the 
1917 market, continued into 1918, but 
in February the Japanese Govern- 
ment placed an embargo on further 
shipments except under special 
license. 

Europe also came into the Far 



HOW PACIFIC PORTS ARE OFFICIALLY RATED 



PORT 



(LASS "A" 

Los Angeles, Cal 

San Francisco Cal 

Portland, Ore 

Tacoma, Wash 

Seattle, Wash. 

CLASS "11" 

San Dlegro, Cal 

Astoria, Ore 

Everett, Wash 

CLASS "C 

Port I. on Angeles, Cal 

Santa Ilarhara, Cal 

San Luis Ohlspo, Cal. . 

Oakland. Cal 

.Monterey, Cal .. 

CLASS "D" 

San Pablo Bay, Cal. ... 

Coos Bay, Ore 

Grays Harbor, Wash. ... 
Wlllapa Bay, Wash. ... 
Port Gamble, Wash. ... 
Port Madison, Wash. ... 



Mean 
Tidal 
Water 



29 
35 
26 



Mean 
Tidal 

ItillllM- 



Feet 



5.8 

5.77 

7.5 



.Mean 
Hiith 
Water 



Feet 



84.8 
40.7 



7.5 33.5 

Deep enonKh for any draft. 
Deep enough for any draft. 



33.5 

34 

26 



33 
25 
27 
30 
24 



30 

18 

22 

26.5 

24 

12 



5.5 

8.0 

15.0 



3.75 

3.5 

3.75 

0.3 

4.0 



«.»2 

0.4 

9.1 

6.25 
11.75 
13.0 



39.0 
42.0 
41.0 



3«.7.'» 

28.5 

30.75 

36.3 

28.0 



30.02 

24.4 

31.1 

32.75 

35.75 

25.0 




DR. PIXG-WEN KUO 
NOTED CHINESE EDUCATOR 

AMONG recent arrivals i n San 
Francisco were Dr. Ping-wen 
Kuo, president of the National Higher 
Normal College in Nanking, and Dr. 
L. K. Tao, professor of the Chinese 
government university at Peking. 

Kuo and Tao are members of a Chi- 
nese educational mission to the United 
States and Europe, the forerunner of 
a great mission which will reach here 
next September, which will number 
about twenty of the leading educators 
of modern China, the largest of its 
kind that has ever come to the United 
States. 

Professors Tao and Kuo will join 
Professor S. T. Li in Paris and with 
the Chinese delegation to the peace 
conference will do the preliminary 
work of a nation-wide campaign of 
education soon to be launched in 
China. 

Eastern flour market for the first 
time in history, and, whereas in nor- 
mal years this part of the world im- 
ports flour to the extent of many mil- 
lions of bags annually, the past year 
witnessed considerable export flour to 
Europe, which represented eastern 
grain and eastern manufacture. 

Japanese flour sold in Hongkong 
market early in the year at $2.65 
local currency, or 1.88 gold per bag, 
but after the European shipments be- 
gan the price rose to as high as $3.70 
local currency, or $2.62 gold per bag. 
As consumption, except for purely 
foreign use, stopped at such prices, 
considerable quantities of this high- 
price flour was left on the hands of 
importers- 



264 



/' « n P a e i f i 




UNITED STATES FOR PEACE 



FOREIGN countries may rest assured that the United 
States will never be jealous of their achievements 
in the peaceful activities of life. They may take it for 
granted that this country regards with complacency the 
honest efforts of every race to express the best that is 
in them to suppress the ignoble impulses which spring 
from jealousy and hate. 

And it goes without saying that the best people in 
the United States have little sympathy with any scheme 
that organized rapacity may inaugurate to exploit the 
resources of alien races in order that the greedy and the 
crafty may absorb the riches of the earth. 

Nothing ever came out of such a system of propagated 
blindness but misery and poverty and universal blood 
shed. No inheritance descends from such a delirious 
disregard of decency but taxation, destitution and uni- 
versal debt. 

The war just witnessed, with all its agonizing creations 
of annihilating horror, should settle these questions in 
the minds of all but cannibals and selfish vultures who 
masquerade as men. And, while the agitations of the 
human breast, like the fury of an agitated sea, may 
require a time to sink into repose, tranquillity will ulti- 
mately follow to suggest a brighter and happier moment 
in human life and international conduct. 

The President of the United States has just spoken 
on this subject to the petulant politician who would re- 
vive race-hatred in the State of California. Naturally 
he has denounced the cheap, ignoble scheme. And 
naturally it brings into prominence a local political situ- 
ation that reveals the blindness of the average Lilliputian 
who presumes to play the game of politics. 

A United States Senator whose term of office is about 
to expire may assume that because the Japanese have 
no vote it will please the "labor vote" to take a wollop 
at the enterprising Japanese. An obscure State legis- 
lator attempts to "play the game" by introducing a bill 
antagonistic to that race. An inventive romancer "dis- 
covers" a Japanese colonizing scheme on the arid sands 
of Mexico, where a lizard can't exist, and forthwith in- 
vokes the aid of our Federal Government to make the 
comedy seem real. 

The net result of all this theatrical display of race- 
hostility is to elicit from the President a very stern re- 
buke and from the "labor" vote a smile of understanding 
that another candidate may recognize as the sign-manual 
of approaching favor and support. 

This other candidate is "playing" the soldier "game" 
with as promising a blare of trumpets as the blare itself 
is destitute of practical results so far as the soldier is 
concerned. The difference between these candidates is 
in the quality of solicitude and the character of that 
"smile." In America it is known as the Francis Heney 



"smile." The celebrated Doctor Fowler has supplemented 
Lavater in defining its significance for the benefit of those 
who are interested in the cryptic meaning of a politician's 
smile. It is a sort of universal language that even a 
Chinese "voter" may readily translate. And it must be 
very interesting to the Governor of California who may 
doubtless be influenced by its manifest suggestions of 
Senatorial honors awaiting a prudent patience in the 
shadow of a smile. 

The Governor, like the President and William Howard 
Taft, has little use for fomented racial hatred. In this 
he is very wise. The people of America understand the 
politician and they prefer an age of peace to one of a 
stipulated race hatred. 

* * * * 

OUR LITTLE PRESENT TO NEW YORK 



T 



HE fact that Oriental trade is being diverted to 
New York from San Francisco and other Pacific 
Coast Ports is significant of many things. 

Either Pacific coast importers and exporters are asleep 
at the switch ; or Pacific coast bankers are indifferent to 
their own interests, preferring to let New York banks do 
the advertising in the Orient rather than make a bid for 
the business themselves; or the East has a keener ap- 
preciation of the value of Oriental commerce than we 
have ourselves. 

The mere item of $1,800,000,000 in Pan Pacific com- 
merce that has been developed in California and Wash- 
ington during the past year may not mean much to an 
over rich body of foreign traders on the Pacific coast ; 
but it does have an attraction for our New York friends. 
They are out gunning for that business. At the present 
time they are quietly absorbing about $5,000,000 a month 
that should come to the Pacific coast. This is not much in 
figures, — only a little more than some of our Pacific coast 
ports develop in a whole year. But the significant fact is 
this: that commerce once given a certain direction keeps 
on going that way with increasing volume and rapidity 
until, like a suction dredge, it draws everything of a dis- 
tributive character into its capacious maw. 

It is hardly necessary to comment on such a condition. 
It speaks for itself. It furnishes a voluminous commen- 
tary upon the difference between business sagacity and 
the doctrine of lassaie faire. It also contains important 
lessons upon international civility which western poli- 
ticians should study. For it goes without saying that the 
ill-concieved, cheap, and altogether asinine playing to 
the grand-stand for the benefit of the "labor vote" and in 
misrepresentation of the Japanese, has been at the bottom 
of Japan's disinclination to develop trade with communi- 
ties in which she is so egregiously calumniated. The 
result is that the big Japanese trade goes to New York 



May, 19 19 



265 




NOT STIPULATED RACE-HATRED 



where the Japanese are respected and treated right. And 
a further result will be that by this cheap political clap- 
trap, the constituents of those ribald politicians, "labor" 
itself will be denied the advantages which comes from 
snappy conditions, while bankers, business men and the 
community in general will be constantly sustaining an 
increasing and monumental loss. 

Doesn't it seem about time for the Pacific coast to re- 
veal the real traits of American citizenship instead of the 
spurious characteristics of imported prejudice? Isn't it 
about time for the Pacific Coast to let the Orient know 
that there are banking facilities and business houses 
here capable of responding to the heaviest demands of 
international trade? It seems so to us; but it can't be 
done on the Rip Van Winkle order of business. 

* 4* ♦ 4 

WHAT PAN PACIFIC COMMERCE 
MEANS TO AMERICA 

AS early as February this magazine informed the 
world how trade with Russia could be developed. 
In our leading article it was stated that local Siberian 
Governments would support the credits necessary to sus- 
tain its imports from America; we also pointed out the 
necessity of reorganizing the finances of China if we 
wished to maintain the position we had acquired dur- 
ing the war. 

These predictions of Pan Pacific are all coming true: 
The Omsk Government has just authorized a loan of 
4,000,000 Rbs. to the Bodaibo Railway, 2,000,000 Rbs. to 
the Altai Railway, 1,000,000 Rbs. to the Bogoslof Rail- 
way, and 300,000 to the Kulundin Railway for the purpose 
of restoring the communications between the congested 
harbor of Vladivostok and interior points. As a matter 
of fact there were over 130,000 short tons piled up at 
Vladivostok at the beginning of the year. There was 
machinery, copra, rubber, chemicals, coffee, cocoa, tea, 
tanning materials, textiles, sugar, drugs, medicines, soap, 
railway materials and many other things for tranship- 
ment to regions this side of the Urals. 

In China progress is now being made in stabilizing the 
currency. America is taking the lead in making the 
necessary loan which will enable China to make its pur- 
chases direct from this country instead of through the 
middle-man as in pre-war times. In this program, as 
recommended by Pan Pacific many months ago, the 
American banker is taking the lead and we will doubtless 
make our investments and loans of such a permanent 
character as to guarantee the stability of our export 
market in the future. 

The value of this market to the American trader can 
not be over-estimated. Our Asiatic imports for 1918 



were 34% of all our imports. Our exports to the Orient 
equalled one third of all we exported in 1918; and we 
furnished the Orient a tenth of its entire purchases from 
foreign countries, while of our combined trade, both im- 
ports and exports, 18% was Oriental. On closer inspec- 
tion we find that the Orient furnished us three times 
more than the Latin- American Republics and bought over 
twice more than our neighbors to the south in 1918. 

The importance of holding this trade does not need to 
be stressed. Only in one way, however, can it be held. 
That is by American loans as we have already recom- 
mended. It may be that trade follows the flag; but 
without permanent loans trade will never accompany the 
flag which is the important thing. So after all, it is up 
to our investment bankers to reveal their capacity to do 
a great and patriotic service for their country in this very 
important hour ; for Pan Pacific trade constitutes the dif- 
ference between an age of prosperity and one of indus- 
trial death. 

* * * * 

PIONEERS AND FOLLOWERS 

THE GOOD WILL which has been established by Pan 
Pacific throughout the world is the source of con- 
siderable pride to the publishers of this Magazine. This 
good will has been illustrated in the many warm com- 
mendations from foreign readers, subscribers and patrons 
in every part of the habitable globe. 

Foreign Governments have come to recognize Pan 
Pacific as an honest exponent of American ideals and as 
a safe advisor upon diplomatic and commercial policies 
in all Pan Pacific lands ; they have signified their appreci- 
ation of this singular position of Pan Pacific by a free 
and open use of its columns, to reveal their position upon 
the great problems of the day, as well as to disclose the 
the attitude of their countrymen toward the commercial 
principles hereafter to be pursued. 

In every instance they have adopted the policies first 
enunciated by and in Pan Pacific as the only policies that 
should be perpetuated in the interest of permanent and 
universal peace; and these indorsements indicate how 
well the philosophy of honesty and business decency har- 
monizes with the spirit of the day. 

But there is another thing which causes the publishers 
of Pan Pacific considerable satisfaction: it was first to 
take a stand on a number of international and domestic 
problems that other publications seemed afraid to tackle. 
But, one after another, from the Saturday Evening Post 
all along the line, they are now adopting the policies Pan 
Pacific has pioneered, months and months ago. 

It is all very well and our advertisers are entitled to 
much credit for making this thing possible. 



266 



Pan Pacific 



THE EXPORT MERCHANT 
INSTIGATOR OF TRADE 



By DOUGLAS ERSKINE 



THE Export Merchant is an im- 
portant factor in foreign trade. 
He is an instigator and promotor of 
business in commodities and manu- 
factures and it is through his efforts 
that many markets abroad are opened 
up to the producers of the United 
States. 

In order to keep in touch with the 
constantly-changing conditions in the 
markets of the world he has to main- 
tain eternal vigilance. In addition to 
this he has to maintain close contact 
with factory representatives and 
producers of commodities in the home 
country and be well posted on the 
ever-changing rates of ocean trans- 
portation. In other words he must 
be in a position to render the best 
service not only to the foreign buyer 
but also to the home manufacturer 
or producer whose goods are to be 
disposed of abroad. 

Must Be Well Posted 
On All Formalities 

It is essential that he should be 
fully posted and up to date on the 
formalities required by consular and 
custom house laws of all countries. 
He must be prepared to handle the 
many details connected with the 
preparation of shipping documents so 
that the laws of foreign countries 
may be strictly complied with and 
also that the merchant receiving the 
goods may be able from his docu- 
ments to identify each separate com- 
ponent part of his shipment without 
having to go to the trouble of per- 
sonally overhauling the contents of 
the packages comprised in the ship- 
ment. As irregularity in documents 
is quite a serious offence in some 
countries, the correct preparation of 
documents will in most cases save the 
consignee from serious trouble and 
inconvenience, and frequently from 
severe fines. 

When the Export Merchant pur- 
chases goods on his own account and 
sells them in foreign markets he has 
to finance the purchases, which at 
times involves the outlay of large 
sums, in addition to which he has 
the disbursements for freight and 
shipping charges. As most foreign 
buyers expect extended credit the 
matter of handling the financial end 
of a big foreign sale is a matter re- 
quiring considerable standing and 



ability on the part of the Export 
Merchant. 

When the Export Merchant has 
paid for the goods shipped and is 
waiting for the financial returns from 
abroad he is in the position of a 
banker who has advanced money to a 
client and the merchant's care in ex- 
tending credit to foreign houses must 
be exercised with the same wide view 
of possibilities that the banker takes 
when he makes a loan. 

When the Merchant acts as a pur- 
chaser on commission for his clients 
abroad he undertakes the dual role of 
the representative of the foreigner in 
this country and of the home manu- 
facturer or the producer abroad. 
Both principals in the transaction re- 
ceive the benefit of the export mer- 
chants long experience and study of 
foreign markets. The manufacturer 
or producer has the satisfaction of 
knowing that he is delivering his 
goods into the hands of a responsible 
concern while the foreign merchant 
feels that his interest in the country 
of purchase is being protected by a 
firm in which he has confidence. The 
export merchant therefore provides 
that feeling of security at both ends 
which makes foreign trading trans- 
actions satisfactory to the seller and 
the purchaser. 

Under Another Plan 
Factory Is Relieved 

At times the Export Merchant 
makes an arrangement with a factory 
whereby he handles its products and 
delivers the goods without extra 
charge for his services to the custo- 
mer abroad. Under this arrange- 
ment the factory is relieved of all 
the details of selling abroad and in- 
cluded in its price the compensation 
given to the Export Merchant for at- 
tending to the multifarious details 
that accompany the handling of goods 
for export from the time they leave 
the factory until they are delivered 
to the foreign customer. 

These are the methods most com- 
monly in vogue among export mer- 
chants but they do not by any means 
exhaust the possibilities of service 
which are rendered by export mer- 
chants to sellers and buyers. Special 
circumstances are continually arising 
under which either the buyer or seller 
or both turn to the export merchant 
for aid in solving problems that may 
be new in their experience but which 
have most likely been previously en- 
countered by the merchant, whose 
experience has been varied. 



The export merchant, despite his 
keen and watchful attitude towards 
all branches of business which may be 
connected, even remotely, with his 
business, will occasionally find himself 
with stocks of commodities and man- 
ufactured goods in his possession for 
which he may find difficulty in secur- 
ing shipping space. Under circum- 
stances such as these the merchant 
finds himself with considerable capi- 
tal tied up and also bearing the carry- 
ing charges which accrue on goods in 
storage. He is also called upon to 
face the critical times which invari- 
ably follow upheavels arising from 
natural, political or commercial dis- 
asters. Such disasters, being gener- 
ally unforseeable, are a constant 
menace and, almost without excep- 
tion, result in serious financial losses 
to the merchant. 

May Not Appreciate 
Worth of Merchant 

The manufacturers and sellers of 
commodities do not always regard the 
export merchant as their friend. 
Overlooking the fact that the mer- 
chant by paying cash for the goods, 
safeguards the manufacturer or pro- 
ducer and stands between him and 
the worry and risk of a transaction 
with a customer thousands of miles 
away, they see only the profit which 
the export merchant takes for his 
work and risk and figure how this 
can b e diverted into their own 
pockets. It is seldom that a manu- 
facturing concern finds it profitable 
to maintain abroad a selling organiz- 
ation which can render the same ser- 
vice as that of the well-equipped or- 
ganizations maintained by export 
merchants of high class. 

Although export merchants are 
generally supposed to make a liberal 
margin on transactions conducted by 
them this is not the case, and many 
domestic merchants would be greatly 
surprised to find how small is the av- 
erage percentage of gain made by an 
export merchant. It is only by hand- 
ling a big turn-over that a merchant 
can place the right side of his profit 
and loss account in a position to offset 
the many contingencies that arise in 
foreign trade, including the inevitable 
bad debts which will creep in no mat- 
ter how carefully the credit man may 
scrutinize the standing of customers. 

Export Merchants have been an in- 
stitution of high standing in all com- 
mercial countries for centuries. To 
them is due in great measures the 
wonderful expansion o f business 
throughout the world. The export 
houses of Great Britain have been 
great factors in building up the enor- 
mous foreign trade which is one of 
the bulwarks of that Nation and one 
of its greatest sources of revenue. 



May, 19 19 



267 



yho>Whd ** ft * 




A Real Californian 



o 



SCAR C. MUELLER was born 
Colorado but he's a Cali- 



rn 



fornian by choice. He's a real Cali- 
fornian in that all his hopes and as- 
pirations are centered in this State 
and he has given and is giving practi- 
cal service in advancing the interests 
of the State. 

Though he happens to reside in Los 
Angeles he believes in the future of 
all California and for that matter of 
all the Pacific Coast. He sees in Pan- 
Pacific trade the greatest asset for 
California and for this coast and his 
efforts to bring about a cordial un- 
derstanding between foreign traders 
of Los Angeles and San Francisco 
have gone a long way toward im- 
proved team-work in the interests of 
both ports and of the coast. 

The son of Otto Mueller, the latter 
a merchant and native of Ohio, Oscar 
C. has resided in Los Angeles for 
thirty-nine years. For twenty years 
he was engaged in the practice of law, 
retiring temporarily in 1918 to de- 
vote his whole time and attention to 
the office of President of the Los 
Angeles Chamber of Commerce to 
which he had just been elected. 

That illustrates the character of 
the man. When he takes hold of a 
job he makes it the most important 
in the world for him while he's on it. 
As chief executive of the Southern 
Chamber o f Commerce h e made 
things hum from the moment of his 
induction. 

He discovered that enough atten- 
tion was not being directed to for- 
eign trade The magnificent and 
costly port of San Pedro was almost 
idle insofar as overseas commerce 
was concerned. He conceived the 
idea of making that port known 
throughout the world, o f bringing 
ships there from every sea and of 
shipping California products thence 
to all ports of the Pacific. 

The first thing he did was to re- 
organize the foreign trade depart- 
ment of the Chamber, bringing in ex- 
perts in various lines of export trade 
from other places, even from San 
Francisco. Then he organized the 
Foreign Trade Club in affiliation with 




OSCAR C. MUELLER 



the Chamber of Commerce and with- 
in a year the new body had a thou- 
sand members. He vitalized every 
movement in which he became in- 
terested and soon he had every live 
merchant in Los Angeles discovering 
foreign trade possibilities and plan- 
ning the building of factories to turn 
possibilities into certainties. 

Besides these activities, Oscar C. 
Mueller has been president of the Los 
Angeles Bar Association and in 1917 
was vice-president of the California 
Bar Association, sacrificing his op- 
portunity to become president of the 
latter organization in order to de- 



vote his time to the Los Angeles 
Chamber of Commerce, as stated. 

Mr. Mueller is married and has one 
child, Douglas, aged seventeen years. 
He is a member of the California, 
Jonathan, Los Angeles Athletic and 
Los Angeles Country clubs. Though 
frequently spoken of for public office 
he has no political ambitions, being 
content to serve the people in Cham- 
ber of Commerce and Bar Association 
work. His greatest expressed desire 
is to see all the products of California 
fields and factories shipped through 
California ports to all parts of the 
world. 



268 



Pan Pacific 





REMOVING 

THE RISK 

FROM 

BUYING 





By J. H. GOSLINER 

Inspector R. E. Noble & Co., 

Inspecting Engineers 

JOHN JONES, Ltd., "Somewhere 
Abroad," finds it necessary to 
construct several miles of railroad, 
many buildings, and to expend large 
sums of money for the purchase of 
equipment t o further the rapidly 
growing business requiring a large 
expenditure. Jones takes "pen in 
hand" and sends forth many orders, 
each one a co-ordinate part of the 
whole. Some time later he is the 
happy recipient of his order. 

"Fine !" you say ; why, all that was 
required was for Jones to make lists 
of materials, place these orders with 
reliable firms and upon the arrival of 
his merchandise proceed with the task 
at hand. Fine indeed, but for Jones 
a multiplicity of troubles has just 
begun. 

Often this is what will happen: 

Influenced by the fact that the 
houses who were honored with his 
commissions have previously given 
perfect service, and confident that 
there would be a repetition of this 
service, Jones naturally assumed that 
his specified 12 gauge plate would be 
received exactly a s ordered. But, 
through a pyramiding of errors in 
quantities, dimensions, etc. Jones is 
forced to indefinite delays in making 
long distance adjustments and wait- 
ing on long distance shipments. 

So from the time of order writing 
to order receiving, several months are 















1 

• IB** 


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. ,,.,^, 


1 # 4 *jj 

^M 


>™ ir.~ „W ^^H1P*"V'. Wt -jhI 

M KB!! m 

■k ad 





IXSPKCTEH RELAY RAIL LOADED ON CAR FOR SHIPJIEXT TO DOCK 



consumed and now through an error 
or series of errors, Jones is con- 
fronted with the problem of waiting 
until blunders can be untangled and 
remedial measures effected. 

Several firms may have shared in 
these orders and of these, one firm 
alone can and has worked havoc with 
the calculated plans of many John 
Jones's, setting back the purchaser in 
both time and money. 

An unintentional error on the part 
of the seller has caused delay, finan- 
cial loss, ill feeling, and an intangible 
distrust between buyer and seller. 
After one or two such experiences our 
buyer believes that the term "Caveat 
Emptor" was coined for his express 
benefit. 

On the other hand we must have 
consideration for the seller, for he 
too may have his tale of woe. 

Often the purchaser is not of the 
business caliber of John Jones, Ltd. 
This is even more conducive to cir- 
cumspection in caring for the orders 
of the smaller client; for it is safe 
to assume that the failure of the sel- 
ler to meet his obligations, might 



fltllXUXSL 



RELAY RAIL PROPERLY PILED FOR INSPECTION 



cause the smaller parties to suffer a 
harsh financial blow. 

Fortunately, many far seeing firms 
in South America and the Orient who 
have no establishments in the United 
States are "Removing the Risk From 
Buying" by availing themselves of 
the protection offered by "Inspection " 

As the great majority of exporters 
in the United States with foreign con- 
nections, utilize the inspection service 
this article is primarily written for 
those organizations abroad who are 
unaware of the protection of inspec- 
tion with its aims and accomplish- 
ments. 

There are several inspection firms 
in existance, and the tale of one is the 
story of all. 

The "Protection of Inspection" con- 
sists of entrusting the supervision of 
purchases to reliable inspection firms, 
who operate upon the basic principle 
of having qualified and experienced 
persons see that the particular pur- 
chase is in strict accordance with 
specifications, that substitutions are 
not effected, that shipments are 
properly marked and expedited, and 
that goods are cased to withstand 
rough handling in transit, this last 
minimizing the danger of damages 
with resultant troubles. 

The inspectors, in their respective 
lines, are familiar with the manu- 
facturing practice as well as the re- 
quirements of the finished product 
and able to appreciate the view point 
of either of the contracting parties. 

Friction between the inspection 
representative and the seller is rare 
for those submitting merchandise 
realize that they are also being safe- 
guarded, for the loss o f possible 
future business has been often 



May, 1919 

averted by the observance of errors in 
their incipiency. 

An Australian importer had placed 
an order for a large amount of ex- 
ceedingly valuable alloy. The inspec- 
tor found the material had been cased 
and marked for shipment. Under 
his instructions the cases were opened 
with the following result: A part of 
the contents consisted of the specified 
alloy and the balance of printers' lino- 
type metal. Investigation revealed 
that the order had been filled by a 
man who had been in the employ of 
the firm for less than one week. In 
filling the order he had mixed the 
two metals because of the similarity 
of color and weights. 

In a certain case the seller was 
saved a considerable expense by the 
discovery of a minor difference in the 
marking of the labels on an order of 
canned goods A two dollar grade 
had been ordered and approximately 
40% of the order had been filled with 
a $2.60 grade. 

A man of unquestionable integrity 
but without technical knowledge of 
rail was preparing to fill an order of 
50 lb. A. S. C. E. Section Rail with a 
54 lb. obsolete Section. It required an 
actual demonstration to convince him 
that these rails were not 50 pound, 
and that they could not be used in a 
50 pound track. One can easily real- 
ize the financial loss and trouble 
which would have occured if this ma- 

giiiiiiiiiiimiiniiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiniiiiinmn 



terial had been shipped to the Orient. 

A government ordered 12-pound 
woolen blankets specified to be like 
a sample which had been submitted. 
On examination the order proved 
satisfactory excepting in one minor 
detail. There appeared to be a slight 
difference in the spring and life of 
the materials. Investigation in the 
laboratory proved that the sample 
was 60% wool and 40% cotton while 
the order was 41% wool and 59% 
cotton. 

One of the most important sav- 
ings accomplished by inspection is 
the education of the manufacturer in 
proper methods of packing for ocean 
shipments. 

Experience has proved that errors 
which have been revealed by inspec- 
tion are seldom due to a deliberate 
evasion of the contractor but to a 
confusion in specifications and to the 
personal element introduced by the 
workman who manufacturers or fills 
the order. 

The United States Government's, 
Department of the Interior, Naval 
Stores, Ordnance, Etc., rely implicitly 
upon inspection to guarantee their 
purchases. The wisdom of this 
course is borne out in the occasionally 
published stories of the attempted 
defrauding of this or that branch of 
the government. Underlying all such 
exposures is the important fact that 
inspection i s a form o f insurance 

l!llll!l[ll|llll!ll!!!l!l!l[llll'lllll!!lll>iminill!!nil!lllll!l!!l!llllllllllllllll!lllllll!IIIIIIIIIIIlimillll!lllinilllllll|llllinilllllllllli; 



269 

without which the government, as an 
efficient organization, could not exist. 

A period of moral, intellectual and 
industrial welfare is dawning before 
a world that is emerging from a hid- 
eous nightmare of over four years of 
strife, slaughter and suffering. Peace- 
ful industry will again extend its 
unsuppressed activities with an in- 
tensity exceeding even the intensity 
of the war time activities of the past 
four years. Factories already work- 
ing at top speed will attempt to ac- 
celerate production and while the slo- 
gan of the manufacturer will be pro- 
duction, that of the buyer is quality 
and the abnormal forcing of oper- 
ation may have a tendency to favor 
the accomplishment of the first at 
the expense of the latter. 

In view of this contingency buyers 
should take steps which will prevent 
their falling heir to material classed 
as "rejected" by the government or 
by inspectors for other purchasers. 

The engineering corps of all firms 
engaged in commercial inspection is 
composed of men trained in the valu- 
able art of "knowing" materials, ma- 
chinery, and merchandise, their con- 
stant aim being to "REMOVE THE 
RISK FROM BUYING " It is a trite 
though somewhat aged axiom that 
says, "A stitch in time save nine," 
and just so surely is it true that 
"Inspection means Protection." 

i!iii:iui!iiiiiiininiiiiiiiimi!iiiiiiiiiiiiiinin>iiiiiiiiniiiiNiinii!iii!!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiii]iiii!iiiiiiiiuiiiiiii limning 



LANSING PORTABLE HOIST 




For Warehouse, Wharf or 
Plantation 

Fills the need for an effi- 
cient, economical hoist. 
Simple to operate, has few 
wearing parts, and is easily 
moved from place to place. 
Fitted with water-cooled 
gasoline engine. 

Write us regarding this and other hoists 
we manufacture 



Wheelbarrows, Store and Factory Trucks, Concrete Machinery, Gas Engines, 
Electric Trucks and Trailers, Hand Carts, Car Wheels and Axles 

WRITE FOR CATALOG UA 



San Francisco 
U. S. A. 




Cable Address 
•QUOLANSING" 

San Francisco 



270 



Pan Pacific 



Los Angeles Commercial Activities 



o 



NE of the most important in- 
dustrial transactions recorded 
in Los Angeles during the last year 
was the recent incorporation o f 
the International Magnesite Products 
Company, with a capital of $250,000. 
The corporation was formed through 
the consolidation of the International 
Magnesite Company of Los Angeles, 
the Tracy Brick & Art Stone Com- 
pany, of San Diego and the Pacific 
Refractories Company, of Los Ange- 
les. The main offices of the corpo- 
ration will be at 623-625 South San 
Pedro street, in the same building 
with the C. W. Hill Chemical Com- 
pany. 

The officers of the new corporation 
are: Dr. R. Schiffman, Pasadena, 
president; C. W. Hill, Los Angeles, 
vice president; William M. Crouse, 
San Diego, secretary; W. L. Hardin, 
Los Angeles, treasurer. The board 
of directors includes the officers and 
E. Elias and J. Thomas, both of Los 
Angeles. 

Raw magnesite will be obtained 
from Santa Marguerite Island and 
will be brought to the factories of the 
corporation by their own boats. The 
International Magnesite Company, of 
which Dr. Schiffman was president, 
has been bringing the crude product 
from the island to its plant for the 
past four years. It is said that San 
Marguerite island can furnish an al- 
most inexhaustible supply of the raw 
material, which is said by govern- 
ment reports to be the best found in 
America. 

The crude product closely resembles 
lime, except that it is much heavier 
and harder. It is used in the manu- 
facture of composition floors, stucco 
work on buildings, refractory bricks 
for furnace linings and numerous 
other purposes for which clay pro- 
ducts or cement are used. 

The plants included in the consoli- 
dation are those of the Tracy Brick & 
Art Stone Company at Chula Vista, 
valued at $118,000; the Pacific Re- 
fractories Company, Los Angeles, 
valued at $35,000 and the Inter- 
national Magnesite Company of Los 
Angeles, valued at $50,000. To this 
is added a subscribed capital of $47,- 
000, making up the total capitaliz- 
ation of $250,000. 

Harbor Bond Issue 
At Next Election 

One of the constructive enterprises 
that will have a place in the coming 



election in Los Angeles is the pro- 
posed $4,500,000 Harbor Bond issue. 
It is believed that the bonds will carry 
by a large majority, as activity at 
the harbor never has been so great 
and the foreign trade movement 
never so generally accepted as essen- 
tial to Southern California develop- 
ment. 

The Los Angeles Chamber of Com- 
merce is taking the lead in urging the 
issuance of the bonds, as this organ- 
ization has fostered the port improve- 
ments since the first piling was 
driven. 

When the harbor district was taken 
into the city limits, Los Angeles 
pledged itself to spend $10,000,000 
in development of the water front. 
Of this amount, $5,500,000 already 
has been spent besides approximately 
an equal amount by the government. 
The last Rivers and Harbor bill pro- 
vides for the diversion of waters 
from the harbor for the widening of 
the main channel and for the dredg- 
ing of an inlet between Long Beach 
and Bloomington, involving a con- 
siderable expenditure. Work is ex- 
pected to proceed rapidly on these 
and it is expected that the city will 
vote the $4,500,000 to complete other 
contemplated improvements. 

Situation Relieved 
By Government News 

That the government will not throw 
its large supply of canned goods on 
the open market was the news re- 
ceived by the Los Angeles Chamber 
of Commerce. The government has 
announced that it will keep it for its 
own use. 

This relieves the situation to a 
large extent, as it was feared that the 
huge supply of canned goods, a large 
portion of which came from Southern 
California, would be thrown on the 
market in direct competition with the 
goods in general trade. Also, this 
dispels the possibilities o f lower 
prices for canned tomatoes, peas, 
corn, string beans and other canned 
vegetables and, it is asserted, prob- 
ably will alter the plans of growers 
and marketing associations. 

In naming prices to canners this 
year, it is said, growers have been 
confronted with government holdings 
and have had to take into consider- 
ation the possibility of these being 
placed on the market. 



Los Angeles Is Selected 
As Distributing Point 

Emphasis was given to advantages 
of Los Angeles as a world distribut- 
ing point when recently the Ameri- 
can Encaustic Tiling Company, the 
largest concern of its kind in the 
world, purchased the plant of the 
West Coast Tile Company, at Vernon. 
This plant has been turning out about 
90 per cent of the white tile on the 
Pacific Coast and has been export- 
ing to the Orient and other Pacific 
countries. 

In confirming the deal, Frank Philo, 
local manager for the company, said 
that before coming to the Pacific 
Coast, the company had given atten- 
tion to the possibilities of export. 
There are unlimited quantities of raw 
clay products within easy distance of 
the harbor, which will allow for vast 
development of the export tile trade. 



THIRTY-FIVE YEARS 
OF PROGRESS 

The Pacific Coast, although yet young in 
industry, can boast of at least one concern 
that has developed from a struggling in- 
fant to the measure of an industrial giant 
in a period of thirty-five years. This is the 
Paraffine Companies, Inc., the story of 
whose development from small beginning 
in 1884 to the present, is a business ro- 
mance. 

The Paraffine Paint Company was or- 
ganized in 1884 for the manufacture of pre- 
servative paints and pile coverings. The 
company believed in advertising and con- 
sistent and persistent efforts in this direc- 
tion, coupled with goods of quality and a 
reputation for fair dealing, gave them even 
in their early days an enviable success. 

In the beginning the products were known 
as "P & B" and the trade mark covered the 
full line as then manufactured. After 
thirty-five years of constant use it is still 
recognized as the standard of quality for 
this line of material. 

In November of 1917, the Paraffine Com- 
panies, Inc., was organized to take over 
the business of several manufacturers of 
kindred lines and now operates six distinct 
factories under different divisions. 

The company in recent years has further 
extended its lines. Large and completely 
equipped plants and refineries have been 
built to manufacture a most extensive as- 
sortment of "Pabco Products," including ten 
and twenty-year guaranteed roofings, pre- 
pared roofings; floor coverings, known as 
Pabcolin ; building papers, deadening felts, 
asphalt felts, sheathing papers, wall board, 
industrial, marine and preservative paints, 
asphaltum, waterproofings, damp proofings, 
box board, paper boxes and fibre containers. 

The remarkable growth of this institu- 
tion, whose products are now sold through- 
out the world, is largely due to the sound- 
ness of the policy originally established and 
rigidly adhered to during all these years. 



May, 19 19 



271 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimniiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiii .mi us 



THE PORT OF LOS ANGELES 

LARGEST CITY ON THE PACIFIC COAST 
BEST OF MUNICIPAL HARBOR FACILITIES 
NEAREST PACIFIC PORT TO GREATER PART OF THE U. S. 
NEAREST PACIFIC PORT TO THE GREAT COTTON BELT 




PILOTAGE 



DOCKAGE 



RENT 



WHARFAGE 



MUNICIPAL PIER NO. 1, AN EARTH-PILLED PIER, li.lOO FEET LONG AND 050 FEET 

WIDE, WITH REINFORCED CONCRETE WHARF 3420 FEET LONG, A STEEL 

TRANSIT SHED ISOO x 100 FEET, AND A CONCRETE WAREHOUSE 

WITH TEN ACRES OF FLOOR SPACE. 

LOWEST PORT CHARGES 



No vessel, either in foreign or domestic 
trade, is required to use a pilot if its 
master is licensed to navigate his vessel 
in this port. If a pilot is required, he is 
furnished by the City of Los Angeles and 
the pilotage rate is $1.00 per foot draft 
and 1 cent per net registered ton. Half 
rates for vessels coming in for fuel, sup- 
plies or orders. 

Graduated scale up to $15.00 a day for 
2,100 net tons, and one-half cent per net 
ton above that figure. 

The City of Los Angeles charges steam- 
ship companies NO RENT whatever for 
the assignment of a wharf. 

Commodity rates varying from 2'/j cents 
to 10 cents a ton. These are the lowest 
wharfage rates in America. 



FREE TIME 



STORAGE 



STEVEDORING 



WATER 



FUEL 



Wharfage on outgoing cargo includes 
ten days free time. On incoming cargo 
the free time is 48 hourse after the final 
discharge of the vessel. 

Cargo on the wharf in excess of free 
time is charged 10 cents per ton per 
month storage. 

Handling of cargo is subject to private 
contract with stevedoring companies. 
Cost is as low or lower than at any port 
on the Pacific Coast. 

Municipal water is furnished at a cost of 
17 cents per thousand gallons f. o. b. 
ship. 

No port in America has better facilities 
than Los Angeles for furnishing oil to 
ships. Three great oil companies op- 
erate here, furnishing oil at low cost. 
Utah coal of good quality also can be 
obtained. If ordered at least ten days 
in advance, the City of Los Angeles will 
furnish this coal for $12.50 per ton f. o. b. 
ship. This price may be reduced as cir- 
cumstances warrant. 



Both steamship men and shippers are invited to use 
the municipal facilities of the City of Los Angeles 






mini iminiiiii iiiiiiiniiiii 



For Further Particulars, Address 



Suite 33, City Hall 



The Board of Harbor Commissioners 

LOS ANGELES, U. S. A. 



272 



Pan Pacific 



PATHS TO FOLLOW IN ORIENTAL TRADE 



By JAMES KING STEELE 

Manager Publicity Department 

Toyo Risen Kaisha 



HEREWITH is presented to 
readers of PAN PACIFIC the 
first of a series of especially pre- 
pared itineraries for American busi- 
ness men or travellers who contem- 
plate trips through Oriental countries. 
These itineraries will give railroad 
and steamship time schedules and 
fares together with names of leading 
hotels for tourists o r commercial 
agents and rates at same. 

The first itinerary is for a trip 
across China to Japan, starting from 
Shanghai and passing through Nan- 
king, Tientsin, Pekin, Mukden, Dair- 
en, Seoul, Fusan and Tokyo to Yoko- 
hama. This is a route popular with 
tourists and profitable to salesmen of 
American goods. 

First Day 

Leave Shanghai (North) 

Shanghai Nanking Railway 7.55 A. M. 

Arrive Nanking _ 2:10 P. M. 

Miles from Shanghai, 193. 

Bridge House Hotel, $6.00 per day. 
Sleeping car fare (Mex.)....lst class $2.00 
Extra fare for express train.. 1st class .40 

2nd class .20 

(Note. — While travelers using Japan- 
China Overland Tour tickets need not bother 
about sectional fares — the following sec- 
tional fares on the trip are given for their 
information.) 

Shanghai-Nanking (Mex.). ...1st class $8.40 

2nd class 4.20 

(At Nanking connections are made with 
steamer for Hankow, 3 days up Yangtse 
River or Ferry across river at Pukow.) 

Leave Pukow (across Yangtse 

River) 3:30 P. M. 

Arrive Hsuchfu 11:29 P. M. 

(This is the connecting point for the 
Peking Hankow rail line.) 
Leave Hsuchfu 11:36 P. M. 

Second Day 

Arrive Taianfu 5:56 A. M. 

(This is the station for China's sacred 
mountain — the retreat of Confucius.) 

Leave Taianfu 6:01 A. M. 

Arrive Tsinanfu 7:56 A. M. 

(This is the capital of Shantung province 
and junction connecting point with San-to 
Railway for Tsingtao, 150 miles away on the 
coast. Tsingtao is the finest seaside resort 
in the Far East and is worth a few days' 
visit.) 

Side Trip to Tsingtao 

Leave Tsinanfu approximately. .10:00 A. M. 

Arrive Asingtao approximately....9 :00 P. M. 

Or wait over day at Tsinanfu. 

Leave Tsinanfu 9.00 P. M. 

Arrive Tsingtao 9:52 A. M. 

(Returning on approximately same sched- 
ule.) 
Fares: 

Sleeping car, each way $ 3.00 

Railroad, each way Yen 12.50 



Second Day — Continuous Travel 

Leave Tsinanfu 8:06 A. M. 

Arrive Tientsin Central 4:31 P. M. 

Astor House Hotel rates from $6.00 per 
day upward (Mex.) 

Imperial House Hotel rates from $6.00 per 
day upward (Mex.) 
Fares: 

Sleeping car, Pukow-Tientsin, 

1st class (Mex.) $ 5.00 

Sleeping car, Pukow-Tsinanfu, 

1st class, (Mex.) 3.00 

Sleeping car, Tsinanfu-Tientsin, 

1st class (Mex.) 3.00 

Railroad fare, Pukow-Tientsin, 

1st class (Mex.) 38.25 

2nd class (Mex.) 25.50 

Note. — Passengers desiring to stop off 
at Tientsin should continue on this train to 
Tientsin east about 20 minutes more as this 
is the station close to the city's center. 
Tientsin Central is the junction for Peking.) 
Leave Tientsin Central 5:00 P. M. 

(Peking Mukden Line) 

Arrive Peking 7:50 P. M. 

Peking R. R. station is within five minutes 
walk of Grand Hotel dis Wagon Lts. 
Hotels: 
Grand Hotel dis Wagon Lts., 

Rates (Mex.) $8.00 per day up 

Hotel de Peking, 

Rates (Mex.) $6.00 per day up 

Rail Fares: 
Tientsin-Peking (Mex.).. ..1st class $5.20 
2nd class 3.25 
Distance, Shanghai-Peking, approximately 
909 miles. 

Peking, the fascinating city, deserves as 
much time as can be allowed. For purpose 
of continuing journey we will start fresh 
from Peking. 

Third — Continuous Travel — Or First Day 
From Peking 

Leave Peking 8.35 P. M. 

Arrive Tientsin East 12:00 A. M. 

Leave Tientsin East 12:15 A. M. 

South Manchuria Railway. 

Arrive Mukden 7:10 P. M. 

Miles from Peking, 523.89. 
Hotels: 

Yamato Hotel in Depot building. 

Rate 6.00 yen per day upward 

Fares: 

Sleeping car (Mex.) $ 5.00 

Rail Peking Mukden (Mex.) 

1st class 31.45 
2nd class 19.65 

Side Trip to Dairen 

Leave Mukden 8:50 P. M. 

South Manchuria Railway. 

Arrive Dairen 8:00 A. M. 

Yamato Hotel, American plan, rates from 
6.00 yen per day upward. 

Leave Dairen 8.00 P. M. 

Arrive Mukden 7:30 A. M. 

Or take day trip 
Leaving Dairen approximately. .10:00 A. M. 
Arriving Mukden 9.20 P. M. 

Fourth Day — Continuous Travel — Or Second 
Day From Peking 

Leave Mukden 10:00 P. M. 

Arrive Antung 6:30 A. M. 

Baggage examined here by Chinese of- 
ficials. 



Shingishu Station Hotel (across River 
Yalu), 6.00 yen per day upward. 
Fares — Dairen- Antung: 

Yen 

Sleeper 1st class 3:00 

Rail 1st class 8:51 

2nd class 5:96 

Leave Antung 8:20 A. M. 

Chosen Railways 

Arrive Seoul (Keijyo) 7:25 P. M. 

Chosen Hotel (one of the finest in the 
Far East), American plan, 6.00 yen per day 
upward. 

Yen 

Sleeping car 1st class 3.00 

Rail-Antung-Seoul- 

Shimonoseki 1st class 39.55 

2nd class 26.69 

Seoul, ancient capital of Korea, with its 
splendid hotel, deserves a stay of several 
days, as it has many places of interest. 

Fifth Day— Continuous Travel— Or Third 
Day from Peking 

Leave Seoul 8:40 A. M. 

Chosen Railways 
Arrive Fusan 7.00 P. M. 

Dinner at Fusan Station Hotel (or on 
steamer). Rates 6.00 yen per day upward. 

Leave Fusan (steamer) 8:30 P. M. 

Arrive Shimonoseki 7:50 A. M. 

Sanyo Hotel (at station). Rates 4.50 yen 
eer day upward. Get breakfast here. 

Sixth Day — Continuous Travel — Or Fourth 
Day From Peking 

Leave Shimonoseki 9:50 A. M. 

Arrive Yokohama 1:00 P. M. 

Fares: 

Yen 

Shimonoseki-Tokyo 1st class 15.80 

2nd class 9.43 
Ordinary express, 

Extra fare 1st class 1.50 

2nd class 1.00 
Approximate time for continuous travel 
on trains and boats, 5% days. 

o 

RICE CROP IN SWATOW 



(Consul M. S. Myers, Swatow, China) 

The principal rice crop now harves- 
ted is a very gocd one. From every 
district favorable crop reports have 
been received. The lowest estimates 
from a few sections are between 80 
and 90 per cent normal, but for the 
most part bumper crops are reported. 
The weather conditions on the whole 
were very favorable and the crop was 
comparatively free from pests. As 
the summer rice crop was poor prices 
rose about 35 per cent by the middle 
of July, but with the excellent harvest 
now entering the market normal 
prices again rule. One Mexican dol- 
lar $0.78 U. S. currency) now buys 
24 pounds of first-class rice or 26 
pounds of second-class. 



May, 19 19 



273 



DIRECTORY SECTION 



PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE will publish each month in 
this section, for the convenience of its readers, the following 
directories : 

[ EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS 

\ ADVERTISED MERCHANDISE 

\ STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND BROKERS 

CONNECTIONS WANTED AGENCIES WANTED 

MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES AND BROKERS 

EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS 



A directory of leading export and import concerns covering the Far East 
and Central and South America. Readers of this publication will find it much 
to their advantage to consult the concerns listed when desiring proper 
sources of supply. 



W. R. GRACE & COMPANY, 332 San- 
some Street, San Francisco, California. 
Exporters of all American products. Im- 
porters of all raw materials from South 
and Central America and Far East. Rep- 
resented in all parts of the world. Letters 
of credit, cable transfers, foreign exchange. 



WORLEY-MARTIN COMPANY, 6 1 7 
Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. Wool, hides, tallow, oils and ori- 
ental products. Hardware and steel pro- 
ducts, drugs and specialities. Represented 
in China and Japan. Desires lines to in- 
troduce. Cable address "WORLEY." 



THE HALE COMPANY, 16 California 
Street, San Francisco, California. Impor- 
ters of food products. Exporters of groc- 
eries, provisions, iron and steel products, 
drugs and wines. Cable address "HALCO." 



LANSING COMPANY, San Francisco, 
California. Manufacturers o f electrical 
trucks, trailers, concrete machinery, gas en- 
gines, hoists, hand carts, wheels, casters, etc. 
Export trade a specialty. Cable address 
"QUOLANSING." 



I 



S. L. JONES & COMPANY, 209 Califor- 
nia Street, San Francisco, California. Im- 
porters, exporters and commission mer- 
chants. Import food products, spices, fer- 
tilizers, oils, etc. Export Iron and steel 
products, canned goods, glass, leather, 
paints, chemicals, etc. Cable address 
"REDBOIS." 



JOOST BROTHERS, Inc., 1053 Market 
Street, San Francisco, California. Foreign 
orders promptly and carefully executed. 
General hardware, household goods, tools, 
sporting goods, paints, oils, varnishes. Cor- 
respondence in all languages. Catalogs on 
request. 

CONNELL BROTHERS COMPANY, L. 
C. Smith Building, Seattle, Washington. 
General importers and exporters. Repre- 
sented at Shanghai, Manila, Hong Kong and 
Singapore. Correspondence in all lan- 
guages. Cable address "CONNELL." 



QUAKER CITY SUPPLY COMPANY, 
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Manufacturers 
Exporters and Importers. Chemicals and 
dyestuffs for textiles and leathers. Sub- 
mit samples to be matched. Correspon- 
dence in any language. Cable address 
"MONSEN." 



A. 0. ANDERSEN & COMPANY, 242 
California Street, San Francisco, California. 
Ship owners, agents and brokers. Im- 
porters and Exporters with direct connec- 
tions in Japan, China, Philippines, Straits, 
East Indies and India. All commodities 
produced in above countries, and all Ameri- 
can raw and manufactured products. 



ASSOCIATED MANUFACTURERS IM- 
PORTING COMPANY, 871 Market Street, 
San Francisco, California. Manufacturers' 
representatives, importers and exporters. 
Import chinaware, crockery, enamel ware, 
oils, hides, brushes, produce and raw ma- 
terials. Export steel, iron, steel products, 
hardware, tools, chemicals, dyes, food pro- 
ducts and all raw materials. Cable address 
"AMICO." 



ROTHWELL & COMPANY, Inc., Hoge 
Building, Seattle, Washington. Importers, 
exporters and shippers. Branches at New 
York City, Havana, Cuba, and Kobe Japan. 
Import oils, silk goods, and food products. 
Export canned goods and fruits, chemicals, 
dyestuffs, iron, steel and machinery. Cor- 
respondence invited 



B. F. HE AST AND, 618 Mission Street, 
San Francisco, California. Exporter of 
glass ware, dinner services, vitrified hotel 
china. Prepared to fill orders immediately 
for any quantity. Correspondence in any 
language. Catalogues o n request. Cable 
address "HEASTAND." 



J. A. DRUMMOND, 245 Mission Street, 
San Francisco, California. Export and Im- 
port. Iron and steel products, metals of all 
kinds, machinery and industrial equipment. 
Building material, chemicals and construc- 
tion specialties. Operating in Far East, 
Central and South America. Bentley's 
code. 



J. ARON & COMPANY, Inc., 95 Wall 
Street, New York City. Branches at San 
Francisco; New Orleans, Chicago, London, 
England and Santos, Brazil. General ex- 
porters and importers. Correspondence 
solicited in all languages. Cable address 
"ARONCO." 



BRAUN-KNECHT-HEIMANN COM- 
PANY, San Francisco, California. Imports 
and exporters of chemicals. Laboratory 
apparatus for mines, universities and 
schools. Sugar, soap, wine, oils, iron and 
steel. Correspondence solicited. Cable ad- 
dress "BRAUNDRUG." 



274 



Pan Pacific 



IMPORT AND EXPORT CONCERNS-Continued 



ZELLERBACH PAPER COMPANY, 
San Francisco, California. Quotations and 
samples of paper for export. Represented 
at Yokohama and Shanghai. Cable address 
"ZELLERBACH." All codes. 



TOPPING BROTHERS, 122 Chambers 
Street, New York City. Exporters and 
importers of heavy and marine hardware, 
ship chandlery, railroad and contractors' 
supplies. Largest stock of merchandise of 
its kind in the United States. Inquiries 
solicited. All codes and languages. 



PACIFIC MARINE IRON WORKS, 
Portland, Oregon. Manufacturers of water 
tube boilers and marine machinery. Special 
castings to order. Foreign correspondence 
and inquiries solicited. 



AMERICAS & ORIENT COMPANY, 112 
Market Street, San Francisco, California. 
Export merchants, covering the entire Ori- 
ent. Correspondence in all languages. All 
codes used. 



INDUSTRIAL MINERALS COMPANY, 
Inc., Monadnock Building, San Francisco, 
California. Prompt attention given to in- 
quiries. Correspondence in all languages. 
All codes. 

MARVIN SHOE COMPANY, Inc., 216 
Market Street, San Francisco, California. 
Exporter and wholesaler of shoes. Men's, 
women's, boys' and children's shoes. Rub- 
ber boots, tennis and outing shoes. All 
styles on hand for immediate shipment. 
Export trade -solicited. Cable address, 
"VINMAR." 



SHERMAN BROTHERS COMPANY, 
208 South La Salle Street, Chicago, Illinois. 
Exporters and importers of shoes, hoisery, 
underwear, piece goods, rubber goods, chem- 
icals, food products, machinery, automobiles 
and hardware. Careful and prompt atten- 
tion given to all correspondence and orders. 
Cable address "CARNOT." 



MACDONALD & COMPANY, 454 Mont- 
gomery Street, San Francisco, California. 
Branches at Vancouver, B. C, and New 
York City. Importers, exporters and tea 
experts. Export steel and steel products, 
machinery, chemicals, liquors, etc. Import 
drugs, chemicals, food products and raw 
materials. Connections desired. Cable ad- 
dress "MACDONALD." 



SCOTT, SUGDEN & LAMOT, Monad- 
nock Building, San Francisco, California. 
Foreign and domestic merchants. Steel 
and iron and manufactured products. Ma- 
rine hardware and supplies. Quotations 
furnished o n request. Cable address 
"WALTERSCOT." 



WILLIAMS-MARVIN COMPANY, San 
Francisco, California. Exporter of shoes 
for men, women and children. Orders re- 
ceive prompt and careful attention. Special 
styles made to order. Send for our cata- 
logue. Cable address "WILMAR." 



ROLPH, MILLS & COMPANY, 149 Cali- 
fornia Street, San Francisco, California. 
General shipping and commission mer- 
chants. Export and imports. Direct rep- 
resentatives of manufacturers' of principal 
American goods. Offices at Seattle, Port- 



land, Los Angeles, New York and Chicago. 
Correspondence solicited. 



NATIONAL PRODUCTS COMPANY, 
519 California Street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. Importers and exporters of foods, 
spices, canned goods, etc. Will grant ex- 
clusive agencies. Correspondence invited. 



LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS, Los An- 
geles, California. Manufacturers and ex- 
porters of steamship power equipment, 
water, oil and fuel tanks, rolling mill pro- 
ducts. Ingots, bars and shapes. Struc- 
tural steel fabricators. Correspondence in- 
vited. All codes used. Cable address 
"LLEWELLYN." 



CALIFORNIA PAINT COMPANY, 
Oakland, California. Manufacturers and 
exporters of paints and varnishes. Write 
for color cards, catalog, and paint literature. 
We specialize in export packing, and export 
paint requirements. Established in 1865. 
Cable address "CALPACO." 



VICTOR PATRON, 112 Market Street, 
San Francisco, California. Branch at Maz- 
atlan, Mexico. Cable address "PATRON." 
Import and export representative. Prices 
and catalogues furnished on application. 



ARNOTT & COMPANY, 112 South Los 
Angeles Street, Los Angeles, California. 
Agricultural implements, engines and wag- 
ons. Export orders a specialty. Catalogue 
and price list on application. Cable address 
"ARNOTT." 



PAUL R. RUBEN & COMPANY, San 
Francisco, California. Importers, exporters, 
manufacturers agents, purchasing agents. 
All codes. Cable address "PAULRUBE." 



ROGERS SHOE COMPANY, 135 Bush 
Street, San Francisco, California. Shoes, 
rubbers, tennis and sport shoes, all kinds; 
all styles. Bentley Code used. 



DOLLIVER & BROTHER, 619 Mission 
Street, California. Leather for shoes, wil- 
low, calf, tan box, royal, vici, etc. Machinery, 
nails, eyelets, ink, shoemakers' supplies; 
elastic webbing. Fifty years of service. 



MURRY JACOBS, A. C. RULOFSON 
COMPANY, San Francisco, California. 
Direct mill representatives — Iron and steel 
products. Correspondence in all languages. 
All Codes used. 



F. E. BOOTH COMPANY, 110 Market 
Street, San Francisco, California. Im 
porters and exporters, Crescent Brand 
Food Products. All languages used. 



THE BEAVER BOARD COMPANIES, 
225 Fifth Avenue, New York City, New 
York. "Beaver Board," a wall board for 
interior construction; blackboards, varnishes, 
etc. Codes: Western Union, A. B. C. and 
Fifth Improved editions. Cable address 
"BEAVER." 



THE ACME WIRE COMPANY, 39 
Cortlandt Street, New York City, New York. 
Magnet wire, field coils, electro magnets, 
etc. Western Union Code. Cable address 
"ACME." 



ADDRESSOGRAPH COMPANY, 740 
Broadway, New York City, New York. Ad- 
dressing machines; type embossing ma- 
chines; and rubber type. Code: A. B. C. 
Cable address "ADDRESSO." 



AMERICAN CAN COMPANY, 120 
Broadway, New York City, New York. 
Branch at San Francisco. Ash, paper, 
and garbage cans; adding machines, fly 
traps, cartons, tin boxes, cigar and tobacco 
boxes, jar caps; druggists' tinware, etc. 
Western Union and Lieber's codes. Cable 
address "AMCANCO." 



THE AMERICAN LAUNDRY MA- 
CHINE COMPANY, 132 West Twenty- 
seventh Street, New York City, New York. 
Laundry machinery, dry cleaning machinery, 
washing machines, garment presses for tail- 
ors, etc. Cable address "ALMCO." 



HAMMER & COMPANY, 3 1 Clay 
Street, San Francisco, California. Im- 
porters of rice, beans, peas, hemp, rubber, 
tapioca. Export grain, canned sardines, 
canned vegetables, oranges, lemons, etc. ' 
C. I. F. prices a specialty. Correspondence 
solicited. Cable address "HAMMER." 



H. S. RENSHAW, Inc., 205 Metropolitan 
Bank Building, New Orleans, Louisiana. 
Export; Import; Commission. Freight for- 
warders. Correspondence solicited. Cable 
address "RENCO." Codes: A. B. C. 4; W. 
U. T.; Bedford McNeil. 



INTERSTATE PATTERN WORKS, 
Foot of 13th Street, Vancouver, Washing- 
ton. Makers of patterns for all kinds of 
metal castings. Quotations on iron and 
brass castings furnished on application. All 
languages. 

o 

KULLMAN, SALZ & COMPANY, San 
Francisco, California. Sole leather; tan- 
ners. Leather for export a specialty. 
Prompt attention to orders. Ask us to 
quote on your requirements. All languages. 



DILL-CROSETT, Inc., San Francisco, 
California. Exporters of steel products, 
acids, rosin, chemicals, dye stuff, phenol, 
etc. Importers of fish oil, hides, coffee, 
coconut oil, beans, copra, castor oil, tallow, 
silks, etc. Branch offices: New York, Kobe, 
Japan, and Sydney, Australia. All lan- 
guages and codes used. 



SEATTLE FAR EAST TRADING 
COMPANY, Inc., L. C. Smith Building, 
Seattle, Washington. Branch offices Shang- 
hai, Hongkong, Seattle, Kobe and Tokio. 
Exporters of iron, woodworking and tex- 
tile machinery, iron, steel, pipe, railway 
supplies, cars, locomotives, glass, plumbing 
fixtures, hardware, etc. Correspondence so- • 
licited. 



HARRON, RICKARD & McCONE, San 
Francisco, California. Machinery for mines 
and mills, garages, boiler shops, forge 
shops, shipyards, saw mills, planing mills, 
contractors, etc. All standard codes used. 
Cable address "AIRDRILL." 



MILL & MINE SUPPLY COMPANY, 
Seattle, Washington. Iron, bolts, chain, 
axes, belting, logging tools, steel, nuts, 
waste, saws, pulleys. Cable address 
"MILESMINE." Export orders solicited. 



May, 19 19 



275 



EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS-Continued 



SHIPBUILDERS MACHINERY COM- 
PANY, Inc., 201 Maynard Building, Seat- 
tle, Washington. Manufacturers of Ship 
Plate tightener; scarphing machines, motor 
driven machines, etc. Export orders so- 
licited. 



INTERNATIONAL TRADING COM- 
PANY OF AMERICA, Inc., Seattle, Wash- 
ington. Importers, exporters, forwarders 
and manufacturers' representatives. 
Branches in all Far Eastern countries. Ex- 
port iron and steel, machinery, plumbing 
supplies, heavy and light hardware, talk- 
ing machines, cotton and wool textiles and 
drv goods. Correspondence invited. Cable 
address "INTRACO." 



THE ARLINGTON COMPANY, 72 5 
Broadway, New York City, New York. 
Celluloid in sheets, rods, tubes, brushes, 
combs, mirrors, toilet sets, collars, cuffs, 
pipe bits and harness rings. Cable address 
"PYRALIN." 



HERBERT T. SMITH BROKERAGE 
COMPANY, 209 Washington Street, 
Chicago, Illinois. Import and export. 
Beans, peas, seeds, oils, etc. Write for 
quotations. 

— ■ o 

The AMERICAN STEEL PACKAGE 
COMPANY, 20 Vesey Street, New York 
City, New York. Steel barrels and drums 
for gasoline, oil and chemicals; steel cases 
with partitions for bottled goods. Code: 
Western Union. Cable address "AMPAX," 
Defiance, Ohio. 



PACIFIC SANITARY MANUFACTUR- 
ING COMPANY, 67 New Montgomery 
Street, San Francisco, California. Ex- 
porters of bath-tubs, toilets, lavatories, 
sinks, laundry tubs, plumbing fixtures, etc. 
Prompt and careful shipment of export 
orders. Correspondence in all languages 
and codes. 



AEROTHRUST ENGINE COMPANY, La 
Porte, Indiana. Manufacturers and ex- 
porters of the Aerothrust Engine for pump- 
ing machinery, lighting plants, agricul- 
tural implements, pumping jacks. Out- 
board Motors, etc. Correspondence solici- 
ted in all languages. All codes. Foreign 
orders our specialty. 



ling agents. Solicit export inquiries from 
the trade. Samples and quotations prompt- 
ly furnished on request. 

o 

DAVIS BROTHERS, Inc., 22 Sansome 
Street, San Francisco, California. Over- 
alls, Khaki pants, shirts, nightwear; men's, 
ladies' and children's sweaters, hosiery, un- 
derwear and work gloves. Cable address 
"DABROS." 



CLEVELAND IMPORT & MANUFAC- 
TURING COMPANY, Haas Building, Los 
Angeles, California. Commission mer- 
chants. Importers and exporters. Estab- 
lished 1873. Cable address "CLEIMPCO." 



CAMBRIA SPRING COMPANY, 916 
South Los Angeles Street, Los Angeles, 
California. Wheels and rims, spring 
bumpers, auto and truck springs. Code 
Western Union. All languages. 



A. J. & J. R. COOK, 743 Mission Street, 
San Francisco, California. Leather, calf 
skins, glazed kid, patent and upholstery 
leather, etc. Cable address "COOKBRO." 



THE AMERICAN PULLEY COMPANY, 
33 Greene Street, New York City, New 
York. Pressed steel split belt pulleys, reels, 
beams, spools, steel truck wheels, pressed 
metal shapes, etc. Codes, Lieber's and 
Western Union. Cable address "AMER- 
PULLEY." 



PACIFIC LUBRICATING COMPANY, 
715 W. Spokane St., Seattle, Washington, 
Manufacturers of greases, cup transmission, 
car, graphite and chain. Hair and wool 
flock. Represented at Manila, Sydney, 
Australia, and Valparaiso, Chile. Export 
orders promptly and carefully attended to. 
Special greases made to older. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE, 37-45 
First Street, San Francisco, California. 
Paper of all descriptions. A complete line 
carried in stock for export or domestic 
trade. Special papers made to order. Quo- 
tations and samples cheerfully submitted. 



PACIFIC AMERICAN TRADING COM- 
PANY, 112 Market Street, San Francisco, 
California. Imports and exports. Tea, 
coffees, copra, sago, beans, peanuts, coco- 
nut oil, etc. Exports hardware machinery, 
tools, metals and metal products, chemicals, 
dye stuffs, stationery, office supplies, dry 
goods, groceries, food stuffs, paints, etc. 
All codes. Cable address "ENERGY." 



KAAS-HOPKINS CO., Hearst Building, 
San Francisco, California. Paper Mill sel- 



C. HENRY SMITH, 311 California Street, 
San Francisco, California. Export and im- 
port merchant. Nitrates a specialty. Ship- 
ping and commission. Steamship agent 
and ship owner. All codes. Cable address 
CHENRYINC. 



STANDARD PRODUCTS COMPANY, 
260 California Street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. Exporters of all American pro- 
ducts, — iron, steel products, galvanized 
pipe, paints, varnishes, cutlery, explosives, 
plate and window glass, etc. Importers of 
raw materials from Asia, camel's hair, ani- 
mal hair, bristles, furs, skins, nuts, oils, etc. 
All codes used. Cable address "PERKINS." 



AMERICAN VULCANIZED FIBRE 
COMPANY, Wilmington, Delaware. Vul- 
canized fibre in sheets, rods and tubes, in- 
sulators, waste baskets, warehouse trucks, 
trunks, suitcases, etc. Codes: Lieber's 
Western Union, General Telegraph and A 1. 
Cable address "FIBRE." 



ANSCO COMPANY, Binghamton, New 
York. Photographic paper, films, cameras, 
chemicals, dry plates, etc. Foreign agent, 
Ansco Limited, 143 Great Portland Street, 
London, W., England. Codes: A. B. C, 
Lieber's Standard and Western Union. 
Cable address "ANSCO." 



CLYDE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, 542 
First Avenue, Seattle, Washington. Ma- 
chinery and supply merchants. Export 
orders a specialty. Quotations furnished. 
Special machinery made to order. Corres- 
pondence in all languages and codes. 



L. DINKELSPIEL, Inc., 115-135 Battery 
Street, San Francisco, California. Whole- 
sale dealers, jobbers and exporters of dry 
goods, furnishing goods, notions and fancy 
goods. Cotton piece goods, linens, dress 
goods, silks, flannels, hosiery, underwear, 
shirts, sweaters, ribbons, laces, threads, 
blankets, quilts. Correspondence i n all 
languages. Cable address LIPSEKNID. 



INGRIM-RUTLEDGE COMPANY, 413- 
15 Montgomery Street, San Francisco, Cali- 
fornia. Printers, stationers, bookbinders, 
art and color work. Catalog and booklet 
printing. Copper plate and steel die en- 
graving. Office equipment and supplies. 
Loose leaf systems. Export orders a 
specialty. Correspondence in all languages. 



The attention of readers and advertisers is called to the fact that PAN 
PACIFIC MAGAZINE will accept no advertisements of a doubtful nature nor 
from concerns in other than good standing. The publishers of this magazine 
believe that foreign buyers can place confidence in those concerns whose names 
appear herein. 



276 



Pan Pacific 



MARINE SECTION 



The following marine insurance companies, surveyors, brokers and ad- 
justers are reliable and of good standing. This publication believes that all 
dealings had with these concerns will prove satisfactory in every particular. 



MARINE INSURANCE 

(San Francisco, Cal.) 

Aetna Insurance Company. 
Atlantic Mutual Insurance Company. 
Balfour, Guthrie & Company. 
Fireman's Fund Insurance Company. 
Home Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of 

Calif. 
Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Co. 
H. M. Newhall & Company. 



MARINE SURVEYORS 

(Son Francisco, Cal.) 



Ernest Bent 
L. Curtis 
James F. Fowler 
W. F. Mills 



W. J. Murray 
John Rinder 
J. Seale & Company. 
Frank Walker. 



Thomas Wallace 



SHIP, CUSTOM AND 
FREIGHT BROKERS 

(San Francisco, Cal.) 

C. Beyful & Company. 

H. D. Bowly. 

W. J. Byrnes. 

C. D. Bunker & Company. 

John W. Chapman. 

Frank P. Dow. 

Davies, Turner & Company. 

F. F. G. Harper & Company. 

Frederic Henry. 

Fred Holmes & Son. 

Henry Kirchmann, Jr. 

Bernard Judae Company. 

Kincaid Shipping Company. 

Martins-Gardens Company. 



Page Brothers. 

George W. Reed & Company. 
W. S. Scammel & Company. 
W. B. Thornley. 

(Portland, Oregon) 

Else Shipping Company. 
C. V. Ericesson & Company. 
Taylor & Young Company. 
Tegen & Main. 



(Seattle, Washington) 

Frank P. Dow Company, Inc. 
Fankner, Currie & Company, Inc. 



MARINE ADJUSTERS 



When in need of the services of reliable 
marine adjusters, exporters and importers 
will find it to their advantage to consult 
any of the concerns listed below. 

(Saw Francisco, California) 

Creditors' Adjustment Company. 
Dodwell & Company. 
Insurance Company of North America. 
London & Lancanshire Fire Insurance Co. 
H. M. Newhall & Company. 
Pacific Coast Adjusting Bureau. 
Springfield Fire & Marine Insurance Co. 
Union Marine Insurance Company. 
Willcox, Peck & Hughes. 

(Seattle, Washington) 

Dodwell & Company. 
Willcox, Peck & Hughes. 



STEAMSHIP LINES 

OPERATING IN 

THE PACIFIC 

(Saw Francisco, California) 
CHINA MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

San Francisco to the Orient. 
OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

San Francisco to Sydney, Australia. 
ROBERT DOLLAR COMPANY 

Oriental Trade. 
EAST ASIATIC COMPANY, Ltd. 

Oriental Trade. 
W. R. GRACE & COMPANY. 

Central & South American Ports and 

Orient. 
GULF MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Central & South American Ports. 
PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Mexico, South America and Orient. 
CHARLES NELSON COMPANY 

Hawaiian Islands. 
A. F. THANE & COMPANY 

Australia. 
TOYO KISEN KAISHA 

San Francisco and Orient. 
JAVA-CHINA-JAPAN-LIJN 

San Francisco to Orient. 

San Francisco to Netherland East Indies. 
JOHNSON LINE 

San Francisco to Scandinavian Ports. 
MERCHANTS LINE 

Pacific, Atlantic & South America. 
OCEAN TRANSPORT COMPANY, LTD. 

San Francisco to Orient. 
TRANS-OCEANIC CO. 

San Francisco to Orient. 

(Oregon and Washington) 
PACIFIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Seattle to Orient. 
NIPPON YUSEN KAISHA 

Seattle to Orient. 
OSAKA SHOSEN KAISHA 

Seattle to Orient. 
SEATTLE STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Seattle to Australia and South Africa. 



FOREIGN EXPORTERS AND IMPORTERS 



JAPAN 

Andrews & George Co., Inc. Tokio 

Aki & Company Osaka 

Abe Kobei Yokohama 

Masuda & Company Yokohama 

Murato & Umtanni Kobe 

Nosawa & Company Tokio 

Samuel Samuel & Co., Ltd Tokio 

Yonei Shoten Tokio 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Parsons Hardware Co., Inc Manila 

W. F. Stevenson & Co., Ltd Manila 

Warner, Barnes & Co., Ltd Manila 



CHINA 

Andersen, Meyer & Co., Ltd Shanghai 

J. M. Alver & Company Hongkong 

Dodwell & Company Shanghai 

Okura & Co., Ltd Shanghai 

Shewan, Tonmes & Co Hongkong 

Harry Wicking & Company Hongkong 

STRAITS SETTLEMENTS 

Central Engine Works, Ltd Singapore 

Katz Brothers, Ltd Penang, S. S. 

Patterson, Simons & Co., Ltd... Penang, S. S. 
Straits Industrial Syndicate Singapore 



AUSTRALIA 

Brown & Dureau, Ltd Perth 

Capron, Carter & Co., Ltd Sydney 

Essex R. Picot Sydney 

Eliza Tinsley Melbourne 

A. H. & A. E. Humphries Melbourne 

A. Goninan & Co., Ltd New Castle 

James Hardie & Company Sydney 

Turnbull & Niblett Sydney 

NEW ZEALAND 

W. H. Long & Company Wellington 

F. W. Markham Wellington 

Herbert G. Teagle, Ltd. Wellington 



May, 19 19 



211 



MERCHANDISE ADVERTISED 



PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE publishes herewith a list of articles adver- 
tised in this issue for the convenience of its readers. The name of the 
advertiser will be found listed under each heading. This is a gratis service 
rendered advertisers and the publishers of this magazine accept no responsibility 
for omissions or errors, but make every effort to maintain an accurate list. 



ADDING MACHINES 
American Can Company. 

ADDRESSING MACHINES & SUPPLIES 
Addressograph Company. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
Arnott & Company. 

AUTOMOBILES 

W. R. Grace & Company. 
Sherman Brothers Company. 

BANKS AND BANKING 
Atlantic National Bank. 
'Wells-Fargo Nevada National Bank. 
Bank of Italy. 
First National Bank. 
Merchants National Bank. 

BATH-TUBS 
Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 

BLANKETS, QUILTS, ETC. 
L. Dinkelspiel Company. 

BOILERS, WATER TUBE 
Pacific Marine Iron Works. 

BOOKBINDERS 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 

BOOTS 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Williams Marvin Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 
BROKERAGE and COMMISSION 

DuPont Coleman and Company. 
BUILDING MATERIAL 

J. A. Drummond. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
CAMERAS 

The Ansco Company. 
CANNED GOODS 

Rothwell & Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

National Products Company. 

F. E. Booth Company. 

Western Canning Co. 
CANS, CAPS, TIN BOXES 

American Can Company. 
CASES, STEEL 

American Steel Package Company. 
CASTINGS 

Pacific Marine Iron Works 

Interstate Pattern Works. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 
CELLULOID, MANUFACTURED 

The Arlington Company. 
CELLULOID, SHEET 

The Arlington Company. 
CEREALS 

Sperry Flour Co. 
CHINAWARE 

B. F. Heastand. 

Associated Mfgs. Importing Co. 
COFFEE 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
CONCRETE MACHINERY 

Lansing Company. 

CONTRACTORS SUPPLIES 
J. A. Drummond. 
Topping Brothers. 



COPPER PLATE ENGRAVING 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
COTTON GOODS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
CROCKERY 

B. F. Heastand. 

Associated Mfgs. Importing Co. 
CUTLERY 

Standard Products Company. 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 
DRESS GOODS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 

DRUGS & CHEMICALS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

The Hale Company. 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 

MacDonald & Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
DRY GOODS, TEXTILES, ETC. 

International Trading Co. of America. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
DYE STUFFS 

Quaker City Supply Company. 
ELECTRIC TRUCKS 

Lansing Company. 

ENAMELWARE 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

EXPLOSIVES & POWDER 
Standard Products Company. 

FERTILIZERS 

S. L. Jones & Company. 
FLOCK, HAIR AND WOOL 

Pacific Lubricating Company. 

FLOUR 

Sherman Brothers Company. 
W. R. Grace & Company. 
Sperry Flour Co. 

FOOD PRODUCTS 
The Hale Company. 
S. L. Jones & Company. 
Rothwell & Company. 
Sherman Brothers Company. 
W. R. Grace & Company,. 
National Products Company. 
F. E. Booth Company. 
Hammer & Companv. 
Dill-Crosett, Inc. 
Pacific American Trading Co. 
Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

GAS ENGINES 

Shipbuilders Machinery Company. 
Lansing Company. 
Arnott & Company. 
Aerothrust Engine Company. 

GLASSWARE 
B. F. Heastand 

GLOVES 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 

GREASES 

Pacific Lubricating Company. 

GROCERIES 

The Hale Company. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

HAIR, ANIMAL 

Standard Products Company. 



HARDWARE 
Worley-Martin Company. 
Joost Brothers, Inc. 
W. R. Grace & Company. 
Sherman Brothers Company. 
Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
International Trading Co. of America. 

HIDES 

Worley-Martin Company. 
Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

HOISERY 

Sherman Brothers Company. 
Davis Brothers, Inc. 

HOUSEHOLD GOODS 
Joost Brothers, Inc. 

INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 

J. A. Drummond. 
LABORATORY APPARATUS 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 
LAUNDRY MACHINERY 

American Laundry Machine Co. 
LAUNDRY TRAYS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
LAVATORIES 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
LEATHER & LEATHER PRODUCTS 

Dolliver & Brother. 

Kullman, Salz & Company. 

A. J. & J. R. Cook. 
LIGHTING PLANTS 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
LOCOMOTIVES 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
MACHINERY 

Rothwell & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

International Trading Co. of America. 

Clyde Equipment Company. 
MARINE HARDWARE 

Topping Brothers. 

Pacific Marine Iron Works. 

Scott, Sugden & Lamont. 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 

Shipbuilders Machinery Co. 
MINERALS 

Industrial Minerals Company. 
MINE & MILL MACHINERY 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 

MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Connell Brothers Company. 

J. Aron & Company. 

Americas & Orient Company. 

Rolph, Mills & Company. 

Victor Patron. 

Paul R. Ruben & Company. 

H. S. Renshaw, Inc. 

Cleveland Import & Mfg. Company. 
NITRATES 

C. Henry Smith 
NOTIONS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 

Pacific American Trading Co. 



278 



/' a ii I' ii c i f i r 



MERCHANDISE ADVERTISED-Continued 



OILS 
Worley-Martin Company. 
S. L. Jones & Company. 
Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 
Rothwell & Company. 
Standard Products Company. 
Pacific American Trading Co. 
Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

ORIENTAL PRODUCTS 
Worley-Martin Company. 

OUTBOARD MOTORS 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 

OVERALLS 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 

PAINTS 

California Paint Company. 
S. L. Jones & Company. 
Joost Brothers, Inc. 
Standard Products Company. 
Certain-teed Products Corporation. 

PAPER 

Zellerbach Paper Company. 
Kaas-Hopkins Company. 
Blake, Moffitt & Towne. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC PAPER & MATERIALS 
The Ansco Company. 

PLUMBING FIXTURES 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 

PRINTING 
Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 

PROVISIONS 

The Hale Company. 

PULLEYS 

The American Pulley Company. 

PUMPING ENGINES 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
RAILROAD SUPPLIES 

Topping Brothers. 
RAW PRODUCTS 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

A. O. Andersen & Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

MacDonald & Company. 

Rolph, Mills & Company. 

Victor Patron 

Hammer & Company. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

ROOFING 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 

RUBBER BOOTS AND SHOES 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 
RUBBER GOODS 

Sherman Brothers Company. 



SHIP CHANDLERY 
Topping Brothers. 

SHIRTS 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 

SHOES 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 
SHOE MAKING MACHINERY 

Dolliver & Brother. 
SHOES, SPORT AND TENNIS 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 
SILK GOODS 

Rothwell & Company. 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Dill-Crosett. Inc. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 

SINKS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 

SOAP 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 

SPICES 

W. R. Grace & Company. 
National Products Company. 

SPORTING GOODS 
Joost Brothers, Inc. 

SPRINGS, AUTO AND TRUCK 
Cambria Spring Company. 

STATIONARY ENGINES 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
STATIONERY 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
STEEL AND STEEL PRODUCTS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

The Hale Company. 

S. L. Jones & Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

J. A. Drummond 

Rothwell & Company. 

MacDonald & Company. 

Scott, Sugden & Lamont 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 

Murray Jacobs. 

A. C. Rulofson Company. 

Interstate Pattern Works. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

Standard Products Company. 

International Trading Co. of America, 
Inc. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 

Cambria Spring Company. 

The American Pulley Company. 



SWEATERS 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 

TALKING MACHINES 

International Trading Co. of America. 

TALLOW 

Worley-Martin Company. 

TANKS, WATER, OIL AND FUEL 
Llewellyn Iron Works. 

TANNERS 

Kullman, Salz & Company. 
Dolliver & Brother. 

TEA EXPERTS 

MacDonald & Company. 
Pacific American Trading Co. 

TEXTILE MACHINERY 
Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

TINWARE 

American Can Company. 

TOILETS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 

TOOLS 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 
Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 
Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
Mill & Mine Supply Company. 

TYPEWRITERS 

American Can Company. 
UNDERWEAR 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
VARNISH 

California Paint Company. 

Beaver Board Companies. 

Standard Products Company. 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
VULCANIZED FIBRE 

American Vulcanized Fibre Co. 

WAGONS 
Arnott & Company. 

WALL BOARD 

The Beaver Board Companies. 
WHEELS, CASTERS, ETC. 

Lansing Company. 

Cambria Spring Company. 

The American Pulley Company. 

WINES 

The Hale Company. 
WIRE, ELECTRICAL 

The Acme Wire Company. 
WOODWORKING MACHINERY 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
WOOL 

Worley-Martin Company. 



CONNECTIONS WANTED 



POSITION WANTED — Secretarial, ex- 
ecutive or office position wanted by 
thoroughly experienced young lady. 
Prefer San FranciRco or vicinity; manu- 
facturing, exporting or mail order 
hoiiMe. Stenographer, typlnt and book- 
keeper. Loyalty and initiative. Ad- 
dreMH Box XI 0. Pan Pacitlc. 



SOKRABAIA — A firm in Soerabaia exporting 
all kinds of vegetable oils, teak, hard and 
wild wood, and several other East Indian 
products, and exporting- building materials, 
etc., would like connections with the Dutch 
East Indies. Address Box 607, Pan Pacific. 

SAN FRANCISCO — A San Francisco firm ex- 
porting new and used steam tested and 
guaranteed pipe and light screw casing, 
boiler tubes, valves and fittings, desires 
connections with all countries on the Pacific 
Ocean. Address Box 608, Pan Pacific. 

SEATTLE — A firm in Seattle, Washington, 
importing copra, hides, rice, vegetable oil, 
peanuts fertilizer, matches and hemp, cof- 
fee, tea." rubber, etc., and exporting nails, 
railway supplies, steel goods, box strap- 
ping, nail-less box strapping, lumber and 
heavy machinery, etc., would like connec- 
tions in China and Siberia or elsewhere. 
Address Box 609. Pan Pacific. 



CALIFORNIA — A California firm exporting 
electric motors from Vt to 100 H. P. desires 
to sell its product any place in the world 
where satisfactory connections can be es- 
tablished, with the exception of Australia 
Address Box 610, Pan Pacific. 

BURMA — A firm in Rangoon, Burma, import- 
ing steel, hardware, beer, old newspapers 
olive oil, currants, and exporting hides! 
tobacco leaf, shellac, gunnybags cutch, co- 
coanut oil, ground nut cake, beans, rice, 
desires connections with American im- 
porters and exporters. Address Box 611 
Pan Pacific. 

SAN FRANCISCO — A San Francisco firm man- 
ufacturing chemical fire extinguishers and 
watchman supervisory systems wishes to 
make connections with foreign countries 
Address Box 612, Pan Pacific. 

HONGKONfi — A firm in Hongkong importing 
piece goods sundries of all kinds, ma- 



chinery, marine motors — electrical, and ex- 
porting ramie fibre, wolframite, molybden- 
ite, tin ore, lead ore, buffalo and cow hides, 
peanut oil split bamboo, embroideries and 
filet laces! would like connections with 
buyers of filet laces and crochet laces. Ad- 
dress Box 613, Pan Pacific. 

SAN FRANCISCO — A San Francisco firm ex- 
porting writing ink, stamping inks, pas'e, 
mucilage, typewriter ribbons, carbon papers, 
desires connections in the Orient. Australia, 
and South America. Address Box 614, Pan 
Pacific. 

JAPAN. — A Japanese firm importing works of 
art, and exporting Japanese old and new 
pictures, picture cards, small wares, books, 
curios, Japanese pens (made of bamboo and 
haiir), works of art and Japanese groceries, 
etc. would like connections throughout the 
world. Address Box 615, Pan Pacific. 



M it n . 19 1 



279 



gMiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimiiiii iiiinitiiiiiiiiiiiiiinnnin minimum iiiuniiiim 




The 

Modern 

Outboard 

Motor 

Gives Speed, Simplicity and Satisfaction 

Will drive your boat wherever it will float. When trolling it will not disturb the water and frighten the fish. 
Easily attached to any boat and has enough power to tow three boats carrying four passengers each. 

BUILT IN TWO SIZES — THREE AND FIVE HORSE POWER 





Three and Five Horse Power 
Pumping Engine 

The Three and Five Horse Power 
Direct Connected Centrifugal Pump- 
ing Engines, are especially adapted 
for irrigation, drainage, sewerage, ex- 
cavation, general construction work, 
fire protection, pump and paper 
mills, mines, or anywhere it is neces- 
sary to pump water in qjantity. 

The Five Horse Power Pumping 
Engine delivers Two Hundred and 
Fifty gallons of water per minute at 
a total head of forty feet and weighs 
complete with all attachments Three 
Hundred and Eighty Pounds. It 
consists of an AEROTHRUST Gen- 
eral Utility Engine, direct connected 
to a three-inch centrifugal pump, 
mounted on light, strong base. 

Both the Three and Five Horse 
Power Engines operate on kerosene 
or gasoline, which means a saving 
in fuel cost. When using kerosene 
it is necessary to start and shut down 
on gasoline and the tank is equipped 
with two fuel compartments for this 
purpose. 





Five H. P. Pumping Engine 

THE AEROTHRUST LINE 

of light weight, efficient, air cooled, 
two cycle, two cylinder, opposed, en- 
gine is designed to meet the con- 
stantly growing demand for an en- 
gine of this type. 

We have eliminated the water 
jacket, water tank, large fly wheels, 
cams, and gears, necessary equip- 
ment of the heavy water cooled en- 
gine, and in their place have de- 
veloped STRENGTH, DURABILITY 
and SIMPLICITY. 

Distributors Wanted in All Principal 

Cities. Correspondence in 

All Languages 



Three and Five Horse Power 
Stationary Engine 

The Three and Five Horse Power 
General Utility Engines shown in the 
illustrations below are the lightest, 
most durable, and efficient engines 
on the market today. Complete with 
all equipment the Five Horse Power 
Engine weighs only 155 pounds. 

They are built to take an overload, 
are light, compact, and very desir- 
able for use in driving a line shaft 
from which a 1 1 farm machinery, 
such a s churn, cream separator, 
pump jack, sawing outfit, lighting 
plant, and washing machine can be 
driven. 

They are equipped with high ten- 
sion, built-in fly-wheel magneto. 
Holley Carburetor, Champion Spark 
Plugs, a three compartment kerosene, 
gasoline, and lubricating tank, cast 
iron base, double manifold muffler 
and throttle governor. 




Sawing. Outfit Engine 



Engine Company 

2 MADISON STREET 

La Porte, Indiana 




Stationary Engine 



I 



* 



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280 



Pan Pacific 



inii| em 



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Colombian 
Yearbook 

1919 



Investments in Hawaii 

Pay Dividends 

The First Trust Company of Hilo 



(ANUARIO COLOMBIANO) 



We have just published a small booklet on 

Japan's Part in the Great War 

which we will send free to any EXPORTING 
or other firm who will write or telephone us 

H. B. KING, Sales Agency 

244 CALIFORNIA ST. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Telephone Garfield 1566 



Limited 

Hilo, Hawaii, T. H. 

May be trusted to answer inquiries 

promptly and frankly 

STOCKS — BONDS — REALTY 

General Insurance 

I ^iiiiiiiiHfriiJir jiitfMiiiiittiiHiiiiiiiMiuiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiitfiiiiiiMiuiiiiiiinMtTiTniiidiiiiiiiiiitii nuintJ^tiiFiiNi m i n m i n i inn iiiiii)i9iirrtnriiiiiiiiiiiiiijmiitiiiittiiiini)iHU>tuM^P 

■■■MMnnmHflMamnaMMMMHMBaBDBMItlllliliillillliliigiitllllllill liiiillillinjllllilllllllillllilllllillinMllMllliiiiliillllllKmilin inimi i Kin^ 

BRADY & COMPANY 

5 1 Established 1892. SHIPPING AND COMMISSION. Importers and Exporters Salmon ! 
| | Fertiliicr. Oils, Steel. Lumber. 42-Story L. C. SMITH B1.DC, Seattle, Wash., L'. S. A. j 

| Siuintitii rcn ii rttu mii<<irjtr mtru ij i titiiiiiimthtin i mi Jin jjinitiiiniFFir jjitnm imir niiMitii; hi i n m u tin itrrun iMinniiriiiirri ti 1 1 u n u iiiiiiiiiini 

A HAND-BOOK O n Colombia i n Soanish and ^jnttPTiiiiirriiiiu tit:TrwJiis:i:irprnidiir rntniid iiniitJiii trt irrrFtiitiiiiiiiiing r i [rEEiinEiiiiiriiiiini I ihii: irtiTtui iijiiiiimiiii^ 

English. Printed on fine paper, profusely il- j 

lustrated with fine half-tones and color plates, taken j 

especially for this volume. 500 pages, bound in J 

cloth. This book should be read by every business j 

man who desires to do business in Colombia, and | § 

should be in every public library and Chamber of j 

Commerce. Contains an up-to-date map of Colom- ] 

bia, photographs and biographical notes of the Presi- | 

dent, Cabinet ministers, Governors and public ofli- | | 

cials; information for the shipper, customs regu- j § 
lations and requirements, consular information, his- 

aaia, sia . it s, eit. , special articles, on me j jaajmiiijitiiimiinnmiin^^ 

oil industry, mining, agriculture, Stock-raising, Writ- ^Jtriii iiiiitttitrtHtiiiiiiMiiiiiiinuiuini tMtMhNi}i]i]MtirTtiiiiii^rriiiNijiii;jiJiii:i>!rritiiiNij :i ini tiiiujii:jji;:i[j]iidi[iiijiii:i-itr[ririrriTiiitiii:u tiitMiiiiiiiu ruling 

ten especially for the YEARBOOK by authorities on j I p^kljpifv \ n Hawaii 

each subject; freight and passenger tariffs of every j | * UJJllL/liy 111 lid. Weill 
railroad, steamship and transportation line in the 

Republic; commercial directory of each department, j f 

giving names and addresses of leading merchants, | 

importers, exporters, factories, mines, doctors, law- j 
yers, engineers, etc.; A compilation of information 
from reliable, authentic sources. 

Now in press. Delivery will be made from j 

Chicago; when remittance accompanies order, vol- ! 

umes will be sent prepaid, otherwise by express or j 
parcel post, collect. ORDER NOW. | 

I si'FnntmTTTTTTTiinimiiiniMiiiirTtTTViiii iiiiiTiiiinti[irtn n [iiitiiiinritii rnm nn i riiiiuiiriEtttiiirtn iTi'iitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiirfiiirm imm iMiiiniiiHItt nrvri iiMHinrnta 

Date 1 | 

Colombian News Company, Inc. 
Barranquilla, Colombia, S. A. 
Gentlemen : — 

Please enter our order for j § 

copies of the 1919 Colombian Year Book- (Anuario Colom- | | 
biano) 1919, English-Spanish Edition, @ $5.00 U. S. Cur- | 
rency each. 

Name | | 

Address 1 I 

I i 

I I 
iiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniii iiiiifiiini uniiiiimiiiiiiiinii m iiiiniiimi mini imm iiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimm uiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJ Sim 



Is the first item on the program of 
an aggressive business 
campaign radiating from Honolulu, 
the cross-roads of the Pacific. 

SUCCESSFUL CAMPAIGNS 
use the 

HONOLULU STAR-BULLETIN 

(Hawaii's Greatest Newspaper) 

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JAMES P. DWAN 

1114 Hearst Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

EXPORTER—IMPORTER 

General Purchasing Agent for Foreign Buyers 

Building Materials 
Machinery, Ores, Metals, Oils 

OFFICES AT 

539 Citizens National Bank Building 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

Missions Building, The Bund, Canton, China 

Cable Address, "DWAN" 



May, 10 19 



28] 



Rolph, Mills & Company 

General Shipping and Commission Merchants 
EXPORTS and IMPORTS 

Direct Representatives of Eastern Manufacturers of Principal American Goods 

SEATTLE PORTLAND LOS ANGELES NEW YORK CHICAGO 

IJiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiM iliiliimimimiiimimiiimmiiinillliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiim^ Ill[nl11llll 

s^itur nil 1 1 MJd liiiiiittiiMriiiiMiiiiiiittiiiiiiiiiiiiiMtN rrMHimiiiiiMiiin iiiiiEitiiniri^i iiiiiiiiiiutniin^Li iiuiiMiiiiiiiniiiti rn li I lniiiii: mm miiiu^ '' inmiiiimi i FiirrriiiiiisiiiiiiiiiiitriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitniiiiMiiiiiiiiijjiiiiiiiiitrirrtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiritiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiJiJiiiiriiiiitiMiii'iittniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMJiiiriiiiiiiiiiiJifitLiiiiTrr^ 

A. J. y J. R. COOK c + j i r> i ^ 

leat standard rroducts Co. 

Asiatic — Import and Export 
Head Office, 260 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Sole, Calf Skins, Glazed Kid, Patent and T " A01 "*"« 

Upholstery Leather, Etc. 

Cable Address : " Cookbro." San Francisco 



743 Mission Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 




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nmamiiniiiin mil i iiiiiiiimimimiiiiiiuiiiiiinmiiiiinii nnmum iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi iimiiiiiiiniiiiiig j 

! Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

IMPORT EXPORT DOMESTIC 
Beans, Peas, Seeds, Oils, Etc. 

Write for Quotations 

209-211 Washington St. Chicago, 111., U. S. A. 

^LniiiErt in tin n i mi trtiri l in N 1 1 inunili. l j 1 1 1 mi: Nil jliiii.in illlbl u ill l M l Ji. : !illi Li 1 1 i juiMkitritl !J u : i ui].-: rru m 1 1 1 1 1 li M i n 1 1 .^ | 

^•t TLriimMit.iEkMUL jiHii.n;;L[Uii iiumircnr iNjiiiuiii:i:[jjinjii]:ii[it[rttit[iii jnuimiiiiriii ::tir[L[Lrir[[iiiinuiinii uiiu EtFiinir iL^ 

Puget Sound Tug Boat Company 

Incorporated 1891 

Washington's Pioneer Towing 
| Company §- 

Cable Address: TUG 



New York 

Pittsburgh 

Seattle 

Los Angeles 




Shanghai 
Singapore 
Manila 
Yokohama 



EXPORTERS, of all American products, especially Iron 
and Steel Products, Machinery, Black arM Galvanized 
Pipe, either American or English Thread, Paints, Var- 
nishes, Cutlery, Sanitary Fixtures, Railway Supplies, 
Asbestos, Leather Belting, Explosives, Imitation 
Leather, Automobile Trucks, Tractors, Lighting Fix- 
tures, Chain, Plate and Window Glass, Fabrikoid. 

IMPORTERS, Raw Materials from Asia, Camel's Hair, 
Animal Hair, Bristles, Furs, Hides and Skins, Human 
Hair, Egg Products, Nuts, Oils, Etc. 



Code Word "PERKINS." All Codes Used. 



1 SEATTLE 



WASHINGTON 



References, First National Bank, Bank of Italy, Dun's 
or Bradstreet's, San Francisco, U. S. A. 



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Cambria Spring Company 

Incorporated 





Wheels and Rims Spring Bumpers 

Auto and Truck Springs 

Gardner Loop Truss for Fords 

Code Western Union Office, 916-918 So. Los Angeles Street 

Factory, 913-921 Santee Street 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

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Pacific American Trading Co. 

112 Market St., San Francisco 

Branch Offices, Soerabaia, Java, D. E. I.; Shid- 
zuoka, Japan. Bank References Exchanged. 

IMPORTS— 

Tea, Coffees, Spices, Copra, Sago, Tapioca, Kapok, Beans, 
Peanuts, Walnuts, Australian, Copal and Damar Gums, 
Cocoanut Oil, Wood Oil, Egg Yolk and Albumen. 

EXPORTS— 

Hardware, Machinery, Tools, Metals and Metal Products, 
Chemicals, Drugs, Medical Goods, Saccharin, Dye Stuffs; 
Household Supplies; Builders' and Mill Supplies; Motor 
Vehicles and Supplies; Paper Stock, Stationery and 
Office Supplies; Dry Goods, Hosiery, Textiles; Groceries, 
Canned Foods, Provisions, Paints, Oil Leather, California 
Beverages. 

Cable Address, "Energy." All Codes. 



COMING— VICTORY LOAN! 



282 



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MATSON LINE | 

San Francisco to 
Honolulu Manila 

Freight and Passenger Service 

Rates and Sailings upon Application 



MATSON NAVIGATION CO. 

| 120 Market Street San Francisco, Cal. 

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References: 




Cable Address; 


Metropolitan Bank 




REN CO 


Marine Bank and Trust Co. 


Purchasing Agents 


Codes; A. B. C. 4 
W. U. T. 


= 




Bedford McNeil 



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-iMBiiii iiiiiiimuiuimi iiiiiii iiiimmu limn miiiimm 



iiiiiuiiimiiiiiiimmiiumi 



mmiiuuuiiiuuuumiiiiiliiiiiiiiiuuuui 



Pan Pacific 

Miiiiiiiiimiiii linn iiiuuii II imimi mm uiiuiiuii u iiiuiiiiiuiiiiiiniuiiiiimiu n mini lit 



Sea Foam wJl Bond 



A strong, beautiful sheet for manifolding; 
stocked in the following size and colors: 

17x22— 10 1b. 

WHITE : BLUE : PINK 

GREEN : CANARY 

GOLDEN ROD 



H. S. RENSHAW, Inc. 

Export - Import - Commission 
205-206 Metropolitan Bank Building 

Freight Forwarders NEW ORLEANS, LA. Correspondence Solicited ^ 

P.uimuuiuittiumiunniiiiiiuuuiiiiimiuuuniiiiiiiimiiiniiuuiimiimimiiimiiii iiittiuiiiiuiuiiiiuuiuiriiiiiiiuuininiimiuuiuuiiiiuiiuiinnimiiiuuinuumimmuniiiiii § 

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Interstate Pattern Works 

MAKERS OF PATTERNS 

for all kinds of 

METAL CASTINGS 

Quotations on Iron and Brass Castings Furnished on Application 
Foot of 13th St. Vancouver, Wash. Phone 241 



For price see page 11 of net price-list. Samples on request. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE | 

ESTABLISHED 1855 

3745 FIRST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
LOS ANGELES SAN DIEGO 



AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
-ENGINES -WAGONS- 



EXPORT ORDERS 

A SPECIALTY 
Immediate Deliveries 

and 
Prompt Shipments 

All Shipments Made F. O. B. 

ft V, Los Angeles or San Francisco 

250 Page Catalogue and Price 

List on Application 

| Cable Address "Arnott" Los Angeles 

Code A. B. C. 5th Edition 



Multigraphing 



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Mimeographing 




ARNOTT SCO. 

-LARGEST STOCK IN SOUTHWEST - 

HZ 118 50.LOSANGELEJ ST. LOS ANGELES 



BRUCKMAN 

Translating and Typing 
Bureau 

Experts for all Languages 

525 MARKET STREET 

(Underwood Building) 

San Francisco 
Telephone Douglas 1316 



Ocean Brokerage Co. Ocean Warehouse Co. 



U. S. BONDED STORAGE 



CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS 

Import and Export Freight Forwarders Weighing, Marking, Sampling, Reconditioning, 

Fire and Marine Insurance Distributing, Consolidating 

Head Offices: 762 Stuart Building, Seattle, Washington Branch Offices: 2141 Commerce Street, Tacoma, Wash- 

"Service First" W. R. COLBY, Jr., President "Service First" 



.1/ a U , 19 19 



283 



KAAS-HOPKINS.CO. 

PAPER MILL SELLING AGENTS 
Hearst Building San Francisco, Cal. 

PROTECTIVE PAPERS— Vegetable Parchment, Glassine, 

(Parchmyn), Parcnmoid. 
CREPE PAPERS— Napkins, Plain or Decorated; Crepe, Plain 

or Decorated; Toilet. 
WAX PAPERS— White, Colored, Plain or Printed. 
GLAZED PAPERS for Boxmakers, etc. White, Colors, 

Embossed, Novelties. 
PHOTOGRAPHIC COVER PAPERS and Mount Board. 
WRITING PAPERS— Bonds, Ledgers, Flats, Typewriter Papers, 
We Solicit Export Inquiries from the Trade. Samples and Quo- 
tations Promptly Furnished on Request 



DAVIS BROS. INC. 

Manufacturers, Selling Agents 
and Wholesale Distributors 

"HEADLIGHT" Overalls, Khaki Pants 
One Piece Overalls 

"Headlight" Manufactured in San Francisco 

'•RACINE" Shirts, Flannel, Work and Negligee 
" BRIGHTON CARLSBAD " Nightwear. 

Men's, La ies', Children's 

"BRADLEY" Sweaters. Men's, Ladies', Children's 

Mill Lines Hosiery, Underwear, Work Gloves 

; 22-30 Sansome St., San Francisco, Calif., U. S. A. j 

I Foreign Dept: Cable DABROS 

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The Cleveland Import & Mfg. Co. I 

Parent Company Established 1873 

IMPORTERS— EXPORTERS 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Laughlin Building, Los Angeles, Cal., U. S. A. 
IMPORTS— 

Tea, Coffee, Spices, Cocoa Beans, Chicle, Rubber, Copra, 
Peanuts, Palm Oil, Cocoanut Oil, Tapioca, General | 
1 Produce. 

! EXPORTS— 

Hardware, Machinery, Tools, Lumber, Dried Fruits, 

Canned Fruits, Canned Sardines, Canned Salmon, Canned 

Tuna, California Beverages, General Produce. 

Sole Export Agents for South and Central America of 

I "M. O. E." REFINED ELATERITE Carbonite Coating. Air 

Water, Acid, Alkali, Oxygen, Nitrogen and Electricity-proof. 

Write for catalogue and sample. Good territory open. 

' Cable Address "CLEIMPCO" All Codes 

Correspondence Solicited and Conducted in All Languages. 

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|i mini inn mil ninininnnmninnn minim mi mi niiini i i iiitiiuiiMiiuiiiiittuiiir iiiiinn linns 

BLACK BEAR GREASES | 

Cup, Transmission, Axle, Car, Graphite, 

Gear, Chain, Skid, Curve, Tractor, Hair 

and Wool Flock 

Manufactured under our exclusive 

patented process. 

A distinctive Grease of unusual wearing 

qualities and high heat resistance. 

Full information upon request. 

PACIFIC LUBRICATING CO. 

Manufacturers and Exporters. 
715 W. Spokane St., Seattle, Wash., U. S. A. j 
or any of our representatives. 

SYCIP HANSON WIXKEL CO., Inc.. 327 J. Luna Hinondo, 
■ Manila, P. I. P. M. SCOTT & CO., 7(1 Pitt St., Sydney, N. S. W 
P. I. W \lli;i !•:, Ca»llla 308, Valparaiso, Cbile. 

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Zellerbach Paper Company 



SAN FRANCISCO 



has established an 



EXPORT DEPARTMENT 

Under the Direction of Harold L. Zellerbach 

| and is prepared to make quotations and furnish samples on orders for 
| export shipment. 

Cable Address— "Zellerbach" 

Codes 
[ A. B. C, 5th Edition Bentley's Western Union -Liebere 

KNAPP & BAXTER, Agents | 

Yokohama and Shanghai 



C. HENKY SMITH 

MAIN OFFICE 

311 California Street, 

San Francisco. Cal. 

411-412 Arctic Building, 
| . SEATTLE, WASH, 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 
Steamship Agent and Ship Owner 

EXPORT AND IMPORT 

All Codes. Code Address: CHENRYINC. 

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F. GRIFFIN & CO. S 1S F I Industrial Minerals Co., Inc. 



SHIP BROKERS, CARGO SURVEYORS 
AND APPRAISERS 



341 Montgomery Street 



PHONE GARFIELD 2241 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Monadnock Building 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 

Phone Kearny 2184 
YOUR INQUIRIES WILL RECEIVE OUR PROMPT ATTENTION 



P. J. SEALE & COMPANY 

— -Cargo Surveyors and Appraisers Exclusively 



485 California Street 

San Francisco 
TELEPHONE SUTTER 4893 



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284 



Pan Pacific 




CHESTER WILLIAMS, Pies. 



CEO. R. WEEKS. Secretary 



J. E. PETERS, Vice-Pres. 

SHOES 

AT WHOLESALE 

The Largest Assortment of Men's, Women's and ' hildren"s Shoes for Immediate Delivery. 

EXPORT 
Export Orders Will Receive Our Careful Attention, and Any Special Styles or Other 
Details Will Be Considered. 

SEND FOR OUR CATALOGUE 

WILLIAMS-MARVIN CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO, U. S. A. 



Cable Address "WILMAR' 



" QUALITY " is our first consideration 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

Cary Cabinets, Safes, Vaults and Deposit Boxes | 



CARY SAFE COMPANY 

669-671 Mission Street, San Francisco, California, U.S.A. 

A CARY AGENCY WILL MAKE YOU MONEY 



Scott, Sugden & Lamont 

Foreign and Domestic Merchants 

O m"T1 T^ T Products of All Kinds -JT% /~\ "IV T 
^ I 1 1 I i \ l" r MiU "'"' Eastern kf* I IV 

Kj ± J_JJLjJ_J Stock Shipments LLWJ ll 

MARINE HARDWARE and SUPPLIES 

Monadnock Building, San Francisco 
Cable Address: "WALTERSCOT" 



j Cary Safes look the best, test the best and are the BEST I CHICAGO 



OFFICES IN 

SEATTLE 



LOS ANGELES 



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Americas & Orient Co. I I Inspection - Testing 



EXPORT 



I \ ii in 1 mi Hon s — Cert I flout ion 

Materials and Equipment 

fur >'.\|M>i( 

K. It. Material — Machinery 

Metal Product** — Geueral MdMe. 



Sampling, Aiiuljwh and 

Certlflcation of 

Olla, OrcM, Mineral* 

and other 
Imported Material* 



112 Market Street 



San Francisco, U. S. A. 



R. E. NOBLE & CO., Engineers 

Controlled by Abhot A. Hank* 

Established 1866 
Humboldt Bank Bldg. San Francisco, U. S. A. 

ItepreMentntlven in Principal CitleM and Porta 



Bran Yo e k S ohla gencies INTERNATIONAL TRADING COMPANY 



Kobe 

Vladivostok 

Tsing Tau 

Shanghai 

Saigon 

Colombo 

Singapore 

Soerabaya 

Manila 



of America, Inc. 

IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 

FORWARDERS and COMMISSION AGENTS 

MANUFACTURERS' REPRESENTATIVES 

— EXPORTS — 



Cable Address "INTRACO" ] 

Codes. 
Bentley's 
W. U. 
A. B. C. 5th Edition 

Import products of all 

countries where we 

are located. 



Iron and Steel, Machinery, Plumbing Supplies, Heavy and Light Hardware, Automobile 

Accessories, Paints, Tractors, Typewriters, Talking Machines, Cotton and 

Wool Textiles, Hosiery and General Dry Goods. 

We will purchase for foreign merchants on small commission basis of certified invoice. Correspondence and inquiries solicited 

Head Offices, SEATTLE, U. S. A. 

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■ a y , 19 19 



285 




iiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniinimniiiiiiiniimiiiiiiniiiiiMiiMllliilllll 



Monarch 

of the 

Oaks 
Sole Leather 



THE STANDARD 

=== OF 

GOOD LEATHER 



Tanned from Packer Hides 
with California Oak Bark 

It will wear better and 

turn water better than 

any other leather. 



Backs 
Shoulders 



Bends 
Heads 



KUILLM AN SALZ ^ CO, 



TANNERS 

San Francisco 



Chicago 



IHiiiiiiinimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM^^ 

| PAGE £r JONES | 

Ship Brokers 

and 

Steamship Agents 

Mobile - - Alabama 

U. S. A. 

Cable Address "PAJONES" 

ALL LEADING CODES USED 

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| VICTOR PATKON [ 

1 IMPOKT 1 

I EXPORT | 

SAN FRANCISCO 
OCEANIC BLDG., No. 2 Pine Street 

MAZATLAN, MEXICO 

CABLE: ••PATRON" 



Established 1862 
Cable Address: "HAMMER" 

CODES: 

Western Union, A. B, C. 

5th Edition, Bentleys 

Hammer & Co. 

Exporters and Importers 

Handlers of American Products 
and Manufacturers 

Offices: 

310 CLAY STREET 

Corner Front Street 

San Francisco, California 

Import Specialties: 
Rice, Beans, Peas, Walnuts, Peanuts, Vegetable and Fish 
Oils, Coffee, Copra, Kapoc, Spices, Hemp, Rubber, Tapioca, 
General Produce. 

Exporters of: 

Grain, Beans, Hops, Dried Fruits, Canned Fruits, Canned 
Salmon, Canned Sardines, Canned Vegetables, Provisions, 
General Produce, Beverages, Lumber, Paper, etc. Sole 
Packers "Eagle" Brand Apples, Oranges and Lemons. 
Correspondence Solicited 
Cif. Prices a Specialty 



SCHWARTZ BROS. 

INTERNATIONAL 
MERCHANTS 



Alaska Commercial Building 
310 Sansome Street San Francisco, Cal. 

IMPORTS 



Animal Oils 


Copra 




Nuts 


Beans 


Fertilizer 




Rubber 


Cereals 


Fibres 




Seeds 


Chemicals 


Fish Oils 




Spices 


Cocoa Beans 


Firecrackers 




Shellac 


Coffee 


Grease 




Tallow 


Copal 


Metals 

EXPORTS 




Tapioca 


Beverages 


Dried Fruits 


Machinery 




Beans 


Drums 


Nuts 




Baled Newspapers 


Enamelware 


Oil Cloth 




Barrel Shooks 


Food Products 


Paints 




Chemicals 


Glass 


Steel 




Canned Fruit 


Galvanized Wire 


Structural 


Materials 


Cattle Bones 


Leather 


Tinplate 


I 


Rosin Turp 


entine 





Branch Office — Schwartz & Company 
Guatemala City, Guatemala, C. A. 



i'nii" 



»iiii;miiiiiiii, 



286 



Pan Pacific] 



Melville S. Toplitz 



F. L. Willekes MacDonald 



MacDonald & Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO 
494 Montgomery Street 

Cable Addrea. MACDO. All Codea 

Vancouver, B. C, 744 Hastings St. W. 
New York City, 37 Liberty Street 

Cable Addreaa MACDONALD. VII Codea 

Importers, Exporters 
Tea Experts 

Buyer's Agents, Indentors, Warehousemen, Shipping, 
Commission, Consignments Financed 

EXPORTS— 

Steel Rails, Bars, Structural Materials, Machinery, In- 
dustrial Chemicals, Nails, Tinplate, Sheets, Rosin, Lin- 
seed Oil, Drums, Baled Newspaper, Enamelware, Oil 
Cloth, Food Products, Preserved and Dried Fruits, Beans, 
Liquors, Licensed Narcotics and Wholesale Beverage 
Dealers. 

TEA EXPERTS— 

Tea Valuations Furnished. 
| IMPORTS— 

Raw Products, Oils, Tea, Rubber, Chemicals, Tallow, 
Spices, Essential Oils, Fertilizer, Tapioca, Copra, Co- 
coa, Ground Nuts, Peas, Beans. 

We take complete charge of shipments, customs entries, 
warehousing, weighing, sampling, forwarding to inland con- 
1 signee, etc. 

SUBMIT YOUR OFFERS 



2 "IN 



MapBHHi> 06yBHa» Ko. Kopn. 

OnTOBAH nPO^AJKA 
216 MapKerb yx, Can/b OpaHinicKo, Kaji., C. III. A. 

BoflbLUOft Bbl60P"b pa3HbIXT> OaCOHOBTj 

MyjKCKOft, MMCKOfl h 4"BTCK0ft OByBH. 

06yBb Am nrpT> h nporyjioicb, 

a TaKHce Pe3HH0Baa 06yBb fifla mophkobt>. 

Cable Address "Vlnmar." Bentley's Code 

MARVIN SHOE CO. Inc. 

Shoes Wholesale 

216 Market Street 
San Francisco, Cal., I '. S. A. 

Large Stock of 

Men's, Women's, Boys' 
and Childrens' Shoes 

Tennis and Outing 

SHOES 

All styles on hand; also 
Rubber Boots and Shoes 




EXPORT TRADE SOLICIIED 



On hand for immediate shipment 

Cable Address "Vinmar." 

Bent.ey Cf de 



MARVIN SHOE CO. Inc. 

COMERCIANTES DE ZAPATOS AL POR MAYOR 

216 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal., EE. UU. 

Gran deposito de zapatos para hombres, senoras y ninos 

Zapatos para jugar tennis y para el campo. 

Tenemos toda clase de estilos, asi como zapatos de hule 

para embarcar inmediatamente. 

Se soliclta el comercio de exportation "Vlnmar," C6d. Bentley's 



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Parent Company Resources over 

$1,000,000 



Established 1857 







>£ 



El 



VOU save considerable money on freight rates and 
get faster shipments because of the convenient 
location of our factories. 

Write for a copy of Catalogue P D which illustrate, our 
complete line and contain* a price list. 

BA Jk|B|Jk Main Offices: 

1#AC I ■■ I * - Factories 67 New Montgomery 

W^^^i^0WrW^0 Richmond, Cal. Street 

PLUMBING FIXTURES U ' S ' A S * n STaT 1 C " L 
PACIFIC SANITARY MANUFACTURING CO. 

■WMWWdi 



Associated Manufacturers 
Importing Co. 

Manufacturers' Representatives 
LMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 

IMPORTS 

Chinaware, Crockery, Enamelware, 
Matches, Paper, Vegetable Oils, 
Essential Oils, Hides, Brushes, 
Bristles, Rattan, Copra, Kapok, 
Produce and Raw Materials. 

EXPORTS 
Steel Sheets, Bars, Nails, Wire and 
all Steel Products, Hardware and 
Tools, Aluminum, Rosin, Borax, 
Caustic Soda and Chemicals, Dyes, 
California Food Products and all 
Raw Materials. 

Cable Address, "AMICO," San Francisco 
All Codes 

| 871 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal,, U. S. A- 



May, 19 19 



287 



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ECONOMY!!! 


SPEED!!! 




EFFICIENCY!!! 




PATENTED 




; 


Ship Plate Tightener i 

A NEW INVENTION V 


¥^^ 




Portable — 22 inches over all— 
weighs but 58 pounds 


1 k 1 / 

1 M'i^' cafl ■ / 




EASILY operated by one man and helper. Does 
n. work formerly requiting 20 MEN: TAKES all 
^Ss, spring out o( the plates by its immense pres 
^. sure — a factor unobtainable by hand-pressure. 


20 Ton Pressure 








BY THE STROKE 


^HEfcXT 






OF 








THE HAND 






# 


1 






WRITE OR WIRE 


| 


H 


Shipbuilders Machinery Co., inc. 


THIS IS HOW 






201-2 Maynard Building 
SEATTLE, WASH. 


| The McBride Hydraulic 






SOLE DISTRIBUTERS 


Plate Tightener 






MANUFACTURERS OF 


= 






SKINNER & EDDY CORPORATION 


SPEEDS UP SHIPBUILDING IN 
SEATTLE YARDS 

No. 3 

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Exerts — 20 ton pressure 
Exerts— 1>0 ton pressure 


Angle 


Scarphing Machine 
Bevelling and Portable Countersinking 
Motor Driven Machines 

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J. A. DRUMMOND I R ot hwell & Co. i„c 



Export and Import 

Berkley's Code 

Manufacturers' Export Representative 

Prepared to Supply All Requirements in 

Iron and Steel Products 

Metals of All Kinds 

Machinery and Industrial Equipment 

Of All Descriptions 

Building Material 

Chemicals 

Construction and Supply Specialties 

Buy and Sell for account of foreign 

clients merchandise of 

every description 

Operating In 

Australia China Japan 

Dutch East Indies Philippines 

British India 

West Coast of Mexico 

Central and South America 

245 MISSION STREET 
San Francisco California, U. S. A. 



Hoge Building, Seattle, Wash. 

Importers— Exporters 
Shipping 

97 Warren St. Lonja Del Comercio 517 Kobe 

New York Havana, Cuba Japan 

| IMPORTS: 

! China Wood Oil, Peanut Oil, Soya Bean Oil, Perilla Oil, 

Fish Oil, Cocoanut Oil, Rapeseed Oil, Whale 

Oil, Castor Oil, Sesame Oil, Beans, 

Peas, Peanuts, Silk Piece Goods 

Ginger, Copra and Hemp 

! EXPORTS: 

I Canned Fruits, Canned Fish, Canned Milk, Resin, Dye- 
stuffs, Caustic Soda, Soda Ash, Paraffine, 
Iron, Steel, Machinery 

Correspondence Invited 



288 



Pan Pacific 



lilimmmmmiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiii 



Paul R. Ruben & Co. 

Head Office San Francisco, U. S. A. 




IMPORTERS — EXPORTERS 

MANUFACTURERS AGENTS 

PURCHASING AGENTS 



WE are now engaged by a great many of our largest 
Corporations to promote their Foreign trade. Our 
specialized service consumates sound business re- 
lations with the World's leading merchants. We open to 
you new channels of International trade and our agents co- 
operate effectively in creating a permanent demand for your 
products. We invite correspondence with American manu- 
facturers also Foreign traders seeking a market for their 
raw and manufactured products. 

PAUL R. RUBEN & CO. 

Reference: Anglo & London Paris National Bank, San 
Francisco. Cable Address: Paulrube. All Codes 



GLASSWARE! 

(For Table and Sideboard} 

Dinner Services 
Vitrified Hotel China 

The three CHOICEST PRODUCTS in the world 
Direct from Factory to Dealer 

(I am prepared to fill orders at once for any quantity. 
Write for catalogue and prices TODAY, Corres- 
pondence in any language.) 

Factories: Fostoria Glass Company 

Edwin M. Knowles China Company 
Buffalo Pottery 

Cable Address: "HEASTAND" 

B. F. HEASTAND 



618 Mission Street 



San Francisco, U. S. A. 



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Murry Jacobs | 

A. C. Rulofson Company 

DIRECT MILL REPRESENTATIVES 

IRON and STEEL PRODUCTS 

SEATTLE SAN FRANCISCO PORTLAND ] 



mom 




SHOES 

Rubbers Tennis 

Wholesale 



All Kinds 
All Styles 

ROGERS I I 

SHOE CO. 

135 Bush St., San Francisco 
119 Lincoln St., Boston 
"Bentley Code used" = |§ 

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T F A TITFR f° r SH0ES ' BAGS 

LjEjI\ I JLl!lil\ SUITCASES, ETC. 





7 



& ro 



Box Calf, Willow Calf, Tan Box, Patent Leather, Royal Calf Vici 

Kid fBlack Colors) Sole Leather 

Machinery, Nails, Eyelets, Inks, Shoemakers' Supplies of AH 

Kinds. Elastic Webbing 

Western Union Code A. B. C. 5th Edition Improved Cable Address, " Dolliver ■ 



| Dolliver & Bro. 

iittiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinmiiiiiininmiii minim imiimmmiiiiiimimi iiiimmiiimmiiii miiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiin mi u mini mini 



1868— Fifty Yesrs of Service-1918 

619-21 Mission Street, San Francisco 



BOOTHS 




CRESCENT 
RAND 



Sardines 

F. E. Booth Co. 

San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 

Importers 



AND 



Exporters 



Crescent Brand Food Products 



Head Office 

110 Market Street 

San Francisco, Cal. 



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11 iiiininiiiiiiiiw«™«i»iiiii»miiiiiimmimiiiimiiiiiiii nmiiin iiiiiiiiiiiniiiiuuimiiiiiiiiumitimiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiniiiiiiiniiiiiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiimmituiiiiiimtiiimmnmtiiiiiniiiiiij: 



W. R. GRACE & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 332 Pine Street 
NEW YORK, Hanover Square 

Importers Exporters 

Letters of Credit Foreign Exchange 

Cable Transfers 





AGENCIES. 






Seattle 


Peru 


Costa Rica 


Panama 


Los Angeles 


Guatemala 


Nicaragua 


Ecuador 


New Orleans 


Salvador 


Chile 


Bolivia 



General Agents 

JOHNSON LINE 

Direct Bi-Monthly Service Between San Francisco and Scandinavian Ports 

General Agents 

ATLANTIC & PACIFIC S. S. CO. 

Service temporarily suspended 
Atlantic and Pacific Coast Ports, Direct Service. No Transshipment. 

General Agents 

MERCHANTS LINE 
UNITED STATES AND PACIFIC LINE 

Operating Between Atlantic and Pacific Coast Ports and West Coast South America 



GRACE BROTHERS ( INDIA) Ltd, 
Calcutta, India 



GRACE CHINA COMPANY Inc. 
Shanghai, China 



EXPORTERS of all American products, 
including especially Iron and Steel, Salmon, 
Flour, Canned Goods, Dried Fruits, Chem- 
icals, Lumber and Machinery. 

— Also — 
Nitrate — Direct shipments from Chilean 
Nitrate Ports to Japan and other Far East 
destinations. 
Coffee. 



IMPORTERS of all raw materials from 
South and Central America, Japan and Far 
East, including: 

Wool, Cotton, Hides and Skins. 

All edibles — Rice, Beans, Cocoanuts, Pea- 
nuts, Tapioca, Pepper, Cassia and Tea. 

Oils, Copra, Rubber, Jute, Hemp. 



LARGE STOCKS OF ORIENTAL IMPORTS CARRIED AT 
SAN FRANCISCO AND SEATTLE 



GRACE BROS. & CO., Ltd. 
London and Liverpool 



W. R. GRACE & CO.'S BANK 
New York 



GRACE & CO. 
Rio de Janeiro BRAZIL Santos 




"SUNSHINE 
BELT" 




PACIFIC MAIL 

Steamship Co. 

"Sunshine Belt" to Orient 

PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT 



Trans-Pacific Service 

San Francisco, Honolulu, Japan, China and Philippines 

Monthly Sailings by American Steamers 

"Venezuela" "Ecuador" "Colombia" 



Manila— East India Service 

Direct Route to 

IN Bl A via Manila, Saigon, Singapore, Calcutta, Colombo 

Approximate Bi-Monthly Sailings by American Steamers 

"Colusa' "Santa Cruz" 



Panama Service 

Mexico, Central America, Panama and South America 

Fortnightly Sailings by American Steamers 

1 ' Newport " " Peru " " City of Para ' ' - ' 'San Jose ' ' ' 'San Juan 



Service and Cuisine Unexcelled 



FOR FULL INFORMATION APPLY 

General Office 508 California Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




Price 25 Cents 



U. S. Awakens to Pan Pacific Trade 




San Francisco nr 1920! 






•t* 



Wonderful Opportunity 
For Pan Pacific Trade 
ress is Presented 






■■£i3$3Z.rA.' 




CHICAGO CONVENTION NUMBER 



AMAGAZINE/ INTERNATIONAL COMMENCE 



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Trucks for 
Wharf 
Warehouse 
Store and 
Factory 





A Complete Stock 

Electric Freight Trucks, Concrete Machinery 

Wheelbarrows, Gas Engines, Hoists, Wheels 

Casters, Steel Scrapers, Etc. 

HAVE YOU A COPY OF OUR CATALOG? 




MANUFACTURERS 



SAN FRANCISCO 
U. S. A. 



Cable Address 
"OuolansinK" 
San Francisco 







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PURNELL & PAGET 



ARCHITECTS 

AND 

CIVIL ENGINEERS 

CHAS. S. PAGET, A.S.M. A.M. S. C.E. 

Investigations — Inspections Bridges and Steel Structures 

Reports and Valuations Wharf and Dock Construction 

°ir i AlffpSr »1 B C S r „gs tl0n *™ -0 Harbor Works 

Powp- Plants Investigation and Development of Mining 

Dif.K I; Foundations Properties 

ESTABLISHED IN CHINA 16 YEARS 

f Missions Building, The Bund, Canton, China 
OFFICES <^ Paak Hok Tung-Canton, Swatow, China 

[ American National Bank Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



> ... 



graphic Address, "PANEL" Western Union Code, A. B.C., 5th Edition 



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tie I 9 1 9 ■ 49 

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a 

Java-China-Japan Lijn | 



BETWEEN 



San Francisco 



AND 



Netherlands East Indies 



DIRECT 




REGULAR ^ 'MM RELIABLE 



SERVICE 



BATAVIA 

SOERABAIA 

SAMARANG 

MACASSAR 
CHERIBON 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. I 

General Agents 

2 Pine Street, San Francis.^ 

I 

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50 • Pan Pacific 

^imiimiitiiiimiiiiiiimimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiii mi mil iiiniiiiiiiiiiiii::iiiiiiim nun linn iiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii inn mi i i iiiiiiiiiini imiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiii inn iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiii iiiimiiiiiiii lining 

| JOOST BROTHERS, Inc. | 

I SAN FRANCISCO | 

Wholesale and Retail 

HARDWARE 

Direct From Factory to Dealer or Consumer 

We Are Direct Factory Agents For 
"Russwin" Builders Hardware 



General Hardware 

Parlor Door Hangers 
Barn Door Hangers 
Roofing and Building Paper 
Tackle Blocks and Pulleys 
Paint and Wire Brushes 
Cordage and Chain 



Paints 
Oils 

Varnishes 

TOOLS 



Household Goods 

Stoves — Ranges 

Tinware 

Aluminum and Enamelware 

Bathroom Fixtures 

Electric and Gas Appliances 

Chinaware and Glassware 



We carry a Complete Line of 
Wrenches — Files — Mechanics, Machinists and Automobile Tools, Drills and Edged Tools 

— Manufacturers of^= 



Special Steel Tools — Fire Door Hardware — Crowbars — Chisels — Punches — Ripping Bars 

Sporting Goods 

Arms and Ammunition — Cutlery — Baseball — Tennis and Golf Accessories 
We also handle the Celebrated Lines of 
EDWIN M. KNOWLES CHINA COMPANY 
FOSTORIA GLASS COMPANY 
BUFFALO POTTERY (Hotel China) 

Foreign ^Orders Promptly and Carefully Executed 

When ordering any of the above articles or asking for catalogs be sure to give full particulars 

CORRESPONDENCE IN ALL LANGUAGES 
Will act as purchasing agent on a brokerage basis for responsible houses 

— Address — 

JOOST BROTHERS, Inc. 

1053 Market Street San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 



fmNNiiiiiiiiiiimiiniiiiijiiinjiiiNiiMiiimiimiimiiimiiniiiiiM 



June 19 19 



51 



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MANUFACTURERS 



AND 



WHOLESALE DEALERS OF 

MENS— WOMENS— CHILDRENS AND INFANTS 

SHOES 



Cable Address 
"NESCO" Bentley's Code 



WE HAVE ONE OF THE LARGEST STOCKS ON THE PACIFIC COAST 
ALL STAPLE AND LATEST STYLES FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

SAMPLES WILL BE SENT CHARGES PREPAID 

25 FREMONT STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, U. S. A. 



NOLAN-EARL SHOE CO. 




• Pacific Coast j 

United States of America 

Buyers' Headquarters \ 
The 100% Club I 

Arcade Floor Monadnock Bldg, San Francisco | 

An extensive COMMERCIAL MUSEUM is maintained for the benefit of 1 
buyers, where the products of American manufacturers are displayed' 

THE FOREIGN MERCHANT IS INVITED 

To make his buying headquarters at The Club. An information bureau is | 
maintained. All modern office conveniences provided free to foreign buyers. | 

The Club represents two hundred of America's leading manufacturers and | 

merchants. Each member is selected for business efficiency, quality of goods I 

and ability to render SERVICE to the buying public. All are leaders in | 

their line. = 

We render the foreign merchant a service, free of all charge or obligation. | 

Business connections established. Correspondence invited in any foreign 1 
language. 

Send for the Complete Story 

WM. E. HAGUE, Sec.-Treas. | 

iiiiiiiimnimiiimiiuiiimimiimiimiimimiimiiimimiiimimiimimiimimimimiimiiiiiimimiiiiiiMiiiiiiimiimimiimimiimiimimi^ 
iiiiiiiinMiiiiiiiiiiMiuiiifiiiifiiiniiitiiiHiiniiiiiiiiniiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiuiiiuiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiuiiitiiiniiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

Cambria Spring Company I 

INCORPORATEDD 
"PROVEN QUALITY" 




F.muiiiiiiimiHtimfiiiimiiiiMiiMiiNitiMiimmMifiimiiiitiiiimiiiiMniMim 

^j jiiiiiiiiirriirfiiiiiEiiiriiiitiiiJiiiirMiiMiiiitiifriuriiiiiriiiiMiirtiiJiriiiir iitiiirriiirtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJitiiiriiiiriifTiiiiMijriiiTriiiiiiiitiiirMitiiiriiiijri iij ^ ■ iiriiiiiiirtiJirMijrEiiiriiiiMiiriiiJtiiiriiixrriirriijrriirFiiJiiiJiMJiiriiiriiiitiJiriiiitiiiriiiiMiiriiiiriiitiiiiLiJirtiJitiJiiiiiiMiiitiiiiEiiitiiiiriiiiMiirriiiEiMM *^ 

BLACK BEAR GREASES j 

Cup, Transmission, Axle, Car, Graphite, 

Gear, Chain, Skid, Curve, Tractor, 

Hair and Wool Flock 

Manufactured under our exclusive 
patented process 

A distinctive Grease of unusual wearing 
qualities and high heat resistance 

FULL INFORMATION UPON REQUEST 

PACIFIC LUBRICATING CO. 

Manufacturers and Exporters 
715 W. Spokane St., Seattle, Wash., U. S. A. j 

OR ANY OF OUR REPRESENTATIVES 
i SYCIP HANSON WINKEL CO., Inc., 327 J. Luna Binondo, Manila, i 
P. I.— P. M. SCOTT & CO., 76 Pitt St., Sydney, N. S. W.— 
P. LAFARGUE, Casilla 308, Valparaiso, Chile 

niiiimimiiimmimiimiimiimimiimiiiMimiiimiiMiiimmmMmiimiimimiiimmimimiimiimimimiimiimimmiiMmiiiiiimmimmiiiif; 

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[ JAMES P. DWAN | 

621 American National Bank Building 

EXPORTER — IMPORTER 

General Purchasing Agent for Foreign Buyers 

Building Materials 
Machinery, Ores, Metals, Oils 

Offices at 

539 CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

MISSIONS BUILDING, THE BUND, CANTON, CHINA 

Cable Address, "DWAN" 

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The Cleveland Import & Mfg. Co. 

Parent Company Established 1873 
IMPORTERS — EXPORTERS 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Laughlin Building, Los Angeles, Cal., U. S. A. 
= IMPORTS— = 

TEA, COFFEE, SPICES, COCOA BEANS, CHICLE, RUBBER, ! 
COPRA, PEANUTS, PALM OIL, COCOANUT OIL, TAPIOCA, I 
| GENERAL PRODUCE. 

§ EXPORTS- 
HARDWARE, MACHINERY, TOOLS, LUMBER, DRIED = 
= FRUITS, CANNED FRUITS, CANNED SARDINES, CANNED = 

SALMON, CANNED TUNA, CALIFORNIA BEVERAGES, 
GENERAL PRODUCE. 
I Sole Export Agents for South and Central America of "M. O. E." 
REFINED ELATERITE Carbonite Coating. Air Water, Acid, 
Alkali, Oxygen, Nitrogen and Electricity- proof 
Write for Catalogue and Sample. Good Territory Open. 
Cable Address: "CLEIMPCO." All Codes 
| Correspondence Solicited and Conducted In All Languages 

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1 



WHEELS AND RIMS SPRING BUMPERS 

AUTO AND TRUCK SPRINGS 

Office: 916-918 So. Los Angeles Street 

Factory: 913-921 Santee Street 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

Code: WESTERN UNION 

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52 Pan Pacific 

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I CHAS. M. PAGANINI EDWARD P. BARRY 1 



Edward Barry Company 

WHOLESALE PAPER DEALERS 

San Francisco, Calif. 



Agents for: 

L. L. BROWN'S LEDGER, BOND AND 

TYPEWRITER PAPERS 

Samples and Quotations Promptly Furnished 



MANUFACTURING DEPARTMENT 
| Largest Wholesale Bookbinders on the Pacific Coast | | 
Writing Tablets — Ruled Goods — Blank Books | | 
Loose Leaf Systems — Bookbinding Supplies 

fi)«li Jim ■iilJillrtillllflllllllllllllTtllliiiiliitiiijiiiiriiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiriiijiriiiiiiiiitliiiiiijriiijiiiijriiiiiiiiiiiurillitllllllllJilllliliiiiiijriiijiriijiriijiiiii iT^ ^7i iiiijiiiKiiirilllTllllllllliillJJliiKlllflllltllllJlllllllJllllJllllllllllllJllllJJliJiiiiiiiijriiiiriliiiillieiljrilijlliiiliiiriltiiiiriiiiiiiutillj il nr t iiiuiiiTt ■■■ ijii nfr. 

Km iiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimniiiiii iiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiimilMilimimiili mnimuiiiimiiiiniiniNiiminiiiiiii iiimnin iiiiiiliiiiliiiliiiilliini iiiilmlimimHlllimumilinimillllllimillimmilllliiimiimniiMmiiiiiiiiiiiiiillllllllMlllliminimiimillllllllllliy 




ECONOMY!!! 



SPEED!!! 

PATENTED 



Ship Plate Tightener 

A NEW INVENTION 



EFFICIENCY!!! 



Portable 22 inches over all — 

weighs but 58 pounds 

EASILY operated by one man and helper. Does 
work formerly requiting 20 MEN: TAKES all 
spring out of the plates by its immense pres- 
sure — a factor unobtainable by hand-pressure. 



20 Ton Pressure 

BY THE STROKE 

OF 

THE HAND 



THIS IS HOW 



The McBride Hydraulic 
Plate Tightener 

SPEEDS UP SHIPBUILDING IN 
SEATTLE YARDS 




Shipbuilders Machinery Co., i 



No. 2 Exerts— 20 ton pressure 
No. 3 Exerts— GO ton pressure 



MANVFACTVRERS OF 

SKINNER & EDDY CORPORATION 

Scarphing Machine 

Angle Bevelling and Portable Countersinking 

Motor Driven Machines 



S"ai ■■i>ii]iriiiiiiiirti]iiti)iitijirt)jiii]iitiiiiiiijiitiiiiiiiiriiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiijiii<iJtiiiitiiiJifiiiiiriiiiirijiiitjjii[iiiiiiiiiiiiiti>iiiiijiiiiiiitiiii>iJiifiiiir«iir>iijii>]itiijii>ijiriijii>aiiiiiiit>iiiiiaiiiiii[iijjiiiiiiiijitiiiiri)jitiiiiiii mini minimum i iiiimniiiniimimnmi miniiiiiiiiiiiin- 



June 19 19 

imiiiiiiiiiiHiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiinii iniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii nun nun n I MUM mm in i' 

| Clyde Equipment I 
Company 



53 



1 PORTLAND 



SEATTLE ! 



Machinery and Supply 
Merchants 



542 First Avenue South 



Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. 



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Cable address 

Llewellyn ^^^ 

Los Angeles ~^f^ 


m ^t y ww^t -^_. Code Used 
/" %/%/ r^ M W~ -^ 5th Edition 


^ 


made: in u 5A ^ ^^^ a 

LOS ANGELES.CAL. ^ 


IRON WORKS 




LOS ANGELES CAL. 




CARGO 


Cg, TANKS 






and 


r^ '*«***»^_ MARINE ENGINES 






CHAIN 


F Wttl^ MARINE BOILERS 




co 
O 

g 
3 


WENCHES 




GO 

a 

h 


P4 

o 

to 

>< 
> 

< 






CO 

< 
u 


X 






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CO 



ROLLING MILL PRODUCTS 

INGOTS, BILLETS, BARS, SHAPES 

STRUCTURAL STEEL FABRICATORS 




^nii iiiiiriiiitiiiifiiiriiiiiiiitiiitriiiiujfriitiatrtJiitriiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiJiiiiJiiiTiiiJiiiifriiiriiiiiiirriiitiiijriiiiiiiiriiiJiiiiitiiitiiiMiiiiiiiiiLiiiiiiii eiilh^ 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
FROM STOCK 



luiumimiimimii 



Iron 
Bolts 
Chain 
Axes 



Steel 
Nuts 
Waste 
Saws 



Belting Pulleys 
Logging Tools 



inimiiiinmnimi 



1 MillandMine Supply Co. 

I Cable Address "Milesmine" Seattle, U.S.A. 






~dJiiiiiiiiiriiiitiMiiiiitiiiiriiijrriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>iiiiiiiiiitu<fiiitJiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiMiiiii44iiitiiiiiiij[Eiiiiiiuiiiittiiitiiitiii)riiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJtiiiitiiirii7: fT»n j riiittiiiiiii4iiiiiiiiiiiiiii<iiitiiiiiiii[iiiiiiii]fiiii«iiiiMiiriiiiiiiiiitiiirriii4iiiJiiiii4iiiJFiiiJiiiiiiiiifiiiJitiiiiiiiiitiii*iiiiriiiiiiiii iiiitiiiitiiirtiiuiiiii«7^ 



54 



Pan Pacific 



^iiiiiiiniiii!ii]iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii[iiiiniiiiiiiii!i]iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii' 
Cable Address: "DILL" 




Watch for this Trade-Mark 

EXPORTERS OF 

Steel Products Chemicals Dye Stuff I 

| Acids Hematine Barytes I 

Caustic Soda Soda Ash Phenol 

Rosin Turpentine 

and Raw Materials for All Industries 

IMPORTERS OF 

| Fish Oil Cocoanut Oil Castor Oil 1 

Soya Bean Oil Rape Seed Oil Tallow 

| Hides Beans Peanuts | 

| Coffee . , Copra Silks 

Rattans Etc. 1 

| DILL CROSETT, Inc. I 

| 235 Pine Street San Francisco I 

Branch Offices 

128 William Street New York 

328 Sannomiya'Cho, 1 Chome Kobe Japan 

Union Bank Chambers Sydney, Australia 

.TTriiirMjiiijiiiiiiiiijMiitiiiiLMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMirjiiijiiiiiMiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriijiiDiriiirMriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiijr itMuriiiiiiijiiiiiriiirjiiijiiuitur? 

HJiiiniiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinMiniiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiniMUiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiil 

I ♦ 

I The Sumitomo Bank, Ltd. | 

SAN FRANCISCO 
315-319 California Street 

(¥100.=$50.) 

Capital Yen 30,000,000.00 

Paid up 26,250,000.00 

Reserve Fund 4,500,000.00 

Deposits (31st December 1918) 267,000,000.00 

BARON K. SUMITOMO, President 

Head Office: Osaka, Japan 
Home Offices in all important cities in Japan 

Foreign Branches: 

6 = 

Seattle, New York, London, Shanghai, 
Hankow, Bombay 

E E 

Affiliated Office: 
Sumitomo Bank of Hawaii, Honolulu 

The Bank buys, sells and receives for collection 
Drafts and Telegraphic Transfers; issues Com- 
mercial and Travelers' Letters of Credit avail- 
able in all important parts of the world. 

c " = 

H = 

E.iMimiiimiHiiiimiiuiiiiiiiiHiiii inn t i iiiiiiimmii iinimimnimimmimi nn innii i mmiimnT, 



^initinriii tiiiiuiiirniuriiJiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiif iiiiJiirtiiiftiiuMuiiiijriiiiiiritiiiiiiiiTiiiJJtiiJiiiiiMiiiiiitiiiiriiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiTiiiiii tiiiriiuiiirciiiiiiMiii[ii>i^ 

I SEATTLE FAR EAST TRADING I 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Import — Export Merchants 

I Head Office, L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Wash., U. S. A j 

Branch Offices: 

SHANGHAI, 6 Jinkee Road HONGKONG 

KOBE, 23 Sakae Machi, 6 Chome 
TOKIO. 4 Nakadoro Marunouchi 

Cable Addresses: 
| SEATTLE, "Safetco" SHANGHAI, "Safetco" 

HONGKONG, "Safetco" KOBE, " Kelley" 
TOKIO, "Safetco" 



EXPORT SPECIALTIES 

Iron, Woodworking and Textile Machinery. 
Iron, Steel, Pipe, Plates, Bars, Sheets, Rail- 
way Supplies, Rails, Cars, Locomotives, 
Etc. Wire Nails, Paints, Varnishes. 

Glass, Sanitary Ware, Plumbing Fixtures, 

Hardware, Tools, Chemicals, 

Electric Meters 



Correspondence Solicited 



illlllllllMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIMIIIIIIIllllllllllMllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIilMIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIII? 
HJIIIIMIIIMIIIMIIMIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIMIIIIIIMinilllllllMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIII IIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIMIIMMIMIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIII^ 

| Dependable Service I 



THE annals of the Wells Fargo 
Nevada National Bank of San 
Francisco, a merger of the Wells 
Fargo & Co's Bank and the Nevada 
National Bank, is the history of 
banking in California. 

Since 1852 this institution has 
maintained its position of helpful 
co-operation in commercial activities 
across the Pacific. 



Wells Fargo Nevada 
National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Capital and Surplus over $1 1 ,000,000 

.TiiiililiniiiiuiiMiiii!iiiiiiiiiitiiinii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiii!iiiiiniiMiiiiniiiiiiiiiitiMiiiiiiiiiiiiii:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiii!iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiif; 



June 1 9 I 9 



->:> 



^(nillllUIIMIIIIIIIIII!llllMIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIII!llli:ilMllltllllt!llltllllHlll!lllllllttllinilltlllilllHIIIIIMIII!IIIIIIIIMIIItllHIIIHIIIHIIIIIIIII!lllltlllltltll!lll^ ^MUlllUIIIIIIIIMIIIMinillinilllllUIIIUIIIIIIinMIIIMnillltllllMIIIIIIIMIllMIIIIIHMIIIIIIHIIItllllllllllllllllllMinillllllUIIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIinilllMIItJ 



PLANTING THE 
FLAG OF THE 
ADMIRAL LINE 
IN THE ORIENT 




L. Dinkelspiel Company 

INCORPORATED 

115-135 Battery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS 



DRY GOODS 



Trans-Pacific Freight and 
Passenger Service 

Sailing from Seattle at Regular Intervals 

THE ADMIRAL LINE 

PACIFIC STEAMSHIP CO. 

Fifth Floor L. C. Smith Bids., Seattle, Wash. 

112 MARKET ST., San Francisco 8 BRIDGE ST., New York 

Manila Hong Kong Vladivostok Shanghai Singapore Kobe Yokohama 



FURNISHING 
GOODS 



1 NOTIONS and 
I FANCY GOODS 



Cotton Piece Goods — Linens — 1 

Towels — Napkins 

Dress Goods — Cotton and Wool j 

Silks — Sheetings — Bleached and j 

Unbleached Muslin 

Flannels and Flannelettes — Ticks I 

— Prints, Etc. 

Men's, Ladies', and Children's [ 
Hosiery — Underwear — Shirts — | 
Sweaters 

Ribbons — Laces — Embroideries — | 
Threads — Notions of all 
Descriptions 



BLANKETS — COMFORTABLES — QUILTS 

j Complete stocks carried Correspondence all languages 

Cable Address: "LIPSEKNID" 



.aiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiMiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimimiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii; ^MiiMiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiT 

'^HiiiiuiiiiuiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiMiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiHiiniiiiMiiMiiininiiiniiuiiiniiiiMiiiinMiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit^ ^riiiriiiiriu irriiriiiiriiJiiiririiiriiirMiriMiriiiiiiiitiittiiirtiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiTiiirTiiiriiiitiiitJiiiiiiiiiiiriiitTiiiiiiiiMiitiiiTnittiiitriiiiiiiiiiii [tiiiiiiitiiitini^ 

I National Products Co. I ! Ingrim-Rutledge Company j 



GRAIN MERCHANTS 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

519 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Calif. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
413-15 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Exporters of 

Wheat, Barley, Corn, Flour, Beans, 
Rice, Dried Fruit and Canned Goods 



PRINTERS 

STATIONERS BOOKBINDERS 

ENGRAVERS 

Art and Color Work 

Catalog and Booklet Printing 

Copper Plate and Steel Die Engraving 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 
EXPORT ORDERS 



Importers of 

Grain, Grain Bags, Beans, Rice, Coffee, 
Tapioca, Spices, Hides, Tin & Gambier 



Filing Devices Office Equipment 

Office Furniture 

Loose Leaf Systems 



COMPLETE LINE OF OFFICE SUPPLIES 



CABLE ADDRESS—' ' NAPRO ' ' 

Correspondence Invited 



INGRIM-RUTLEDGE COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



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56 



Pan P a c if i 



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NIPPON YUSEN KAISHA] [ Skinner & Eddy Corporation 



(JAPAN MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.) 
Capital, Yen $100,000,000 Head Office, Tokyo 




Fleet 99— Gross Tonnage, 500,000 

TRANS-PACIFIC PASSENGER SERVICE j 

Between Seattle and Hong Kong via Japan Ports, § 
Shanghai and Manila, with Direct Connection for 
All Points in the Orient and Australia 

Greatly Improved Fast Service of Large, High-Powered Modern | 
Twin and Triple Screw Steamships with Unequaled 
Passenger Accommodations 

DISPLACEMENT: 1 

S. S. Suwa Maru 21,020 tons S. S. Katori Maru 19,200 tons | 

S. S. Fushimi Maru. 21,020 tons S. S. Atsuta Maru 16,000 tons s 

S. S. Kashima Maru. .19,200 tons S. S. Kamo Maru 16,000 tons | 

For further information, rates, tickets, berth reservation, etc., | 

apply to any office of the principal railways in the United States § 

and Canada, also any office of Messrs. Thos. Cook & Son, Messrs. = 

Raymond & Whitcomb Co., American Express Co., and other tourist = 
agencies in all parts of the world, or to the 

NIPPON jYUSEN KAISHA 



Colman Building 
Seattle 



Railway Exchange Bldg. 
Chicago 



Equitable Bldg. 
New York 



.^illiiiilllllllllllllillliniiiniiniliniiiinili'iiiniiiiiiMniiiniiniiiiiiiiiniiiniiliiiillliiiniiiiiiinillniiniiiniiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiHiMlfiliniiiniiiiiiiir. 
=±jiiiltllllJlltlllll llllllllllllllllllitiiiitiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiiiJiitiiiliiJifi]ii[iiiitiiiiliiiritijiiiiiEiirillliriiiiiiurtiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiltiiiiillllllflllliiiliLtliii_E£ 



! Cable Address, "Connell" 



All Codes 



Connell Bros. 
Company 

GENERAL IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 



HOME OFFICE 
L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Wash., U. S. A. 



BRANCH OFFICE 
485 California Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 



OFFICES ALSO AT 
I Shanghai Manila Hong Kong Singapore 



Correspondence Solicited 



RECORD 

BUILDERS 



OF 



Steel Cargo 
STEAMSHIPS 



SEATTLE 



WASHINGTON 



U. S. A. 



T^iiiiriiJiiiiJiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiriiJieiiiriiiiiiirLiiiiiiJitiiJiiiiiiiiJiriiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiriiJiiiiiiiiiiriiJFiiiiiiiiiiiiriiirtijjiiiiiiiiiiiiijriiaiiiiitiiiitiiiitiii 
^^- irEijitiiiiriiiiiiifiiiiiiiii[iiiitiiiriijiiiiitiiii(it]riiii[iiJiiiir[iiiiiii4tii]iiiiiriiiiiiiiriijiiii4«iiixriiJiiiJifiiiiii]tii]iriiJtiuitii]riii]riiiii[ii]iiiiifiiiiiiiii 

I Rothwell & Co. inc. 

Hoge Building, Seattle, Wash. 

Importers—Exporters 
Shipping 



97 Warren St. Lonja Del Comercio 517 
New York Havana, Cuba 



Kobe 

Japan 



IMPORTS: 

China Wood Oil, Peanut Oil, Soya Bean Oil, Perilla Oil, 

Fish Oil, Cocoanut Oil, Rapeseed Oil, Whale 

Oil, Castor Oil, Sesame Oil, Beans, 

Peas, Peanuts, Silk Piece Goods 

Ginger, Copra and Hemp 



EXPORTS: 

Canned Fruits, Canned Fish, Canned Milk, Resin, Dye- 
stuffs, Caustic Soda, Soda Ash, Paraffine, 
Iron, Steel, Machinery 

Correspondence Invited 



fiiMllllMllliiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiinMiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiilliiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiilliiiiHiillMiiniiiuiiiniiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiir niiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini 



June 19 19 






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atiimimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiitiniiiiiimiiiniits' 
JUNE, 1919 
Vol.111 No. 2 1! 



lllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllltlllllllllllllllllltllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIC 



FIllllllllltlllUllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllinillllMMII^ 






PAN PACIFIC 

A MAGAZINE OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE 



John H. Gerrie Editor 

Wm. Rutledge McGarry Consulting Editor 

San Francisco, California 

ASSOCIATED EDITORS AND STAFF 
CORRESPONDENTS 

Wm. E. Aughinbaugh, M.D.; B.S.; L.L.D New York 

Juiji G. Kasai, A.M Japan 

Valabdhas Runchordas India 

George Mellen Honolulu 

Thomas Fox Straits Settlement 

W. H. Clarke Australia 

Dazaro Basch Mexico 

Vincent Collovich Chile and Peru 

L. Carroll Seattle 

F. J. Menzies Los Angeles 

Chao-Hsin Chu, B.C.S., M.M China 

H. M. Dias Ceylon 



PAN PACIFIC is defoted to the friendly development 
of COMMERCE among ALL countries bordering the Pa- 
cific Ocean. It aims to give authentic information bear- 
ing upon the creation of PERMANENT Foreign Trade; 
that the AMERICAN MERCHANT MARINE may rest 
upon an enduring basis of reciprocal benefaction to all 
peoples who look to America for aiding financial and in- 
dustrial advancement. 

AMERICAN CONSULS are privileged to send cards of 
introduction with Foreign Buyers to PAN PACIFIC fully 
assured that such cards will entitle buyers to all the 
PRIVILEGES of our EDUCATIONAL and INFORMA- 
TION Bureaus, while traveling in the United States. 

Pan Pacific is published monthly. Subscription price, 
$3.00 per year (gold) in advance. Single copies, 25 cents. 
Advertising rates on application. Correspondence in any 
language. Address all communications to 

PAN PACIFIC CORPORATION, Publishers 
618 Mission Street, San Francisco 



I* 



1 

I 
1 



* 

to 



1 1 Special Features in This Issue 

rt]| Dawn of a New Era The Editor 59 

To Sell We Also Must Buy James A. Farrell 60 

(j) I We Want To Be Rid of Red Tape Edward N. Hurley 61 

Pleasing the Customer George Ed. Smith 62 

Acceptances in Foreign Trade D. C. Wills 63 

Fine Plans for Business F. R. Sites 6U 

Give the Buyer WJiat He Wants ..W. H. Knox 65 

jjjl Will Webb Law Work Out John Welch 66 

*:♦! New Flexible Tariff Law W. C. Culbertson 66 

Kjl Quote in American Dollars J. McCurrach 67 

Hi Future of Shipbuilding Industry Homer L. Ferguson 67 

Lowest Costs Will Get Orders Wm. Pigott 68 

Ml Parcel Post Expansion Urged M. D. Howell 68 

." j Choosing the Man To Go D. E. Delgado 69 

Kj!| Europe Will Not Be Competitor Maurice Coster 69 

j|l Editorial ,_ 70 

t|j What China Means To Civilization W. R. McGarry 72 

m | Mexico, Awakening, Asks Square Deal Lazaro Basch 7A 

§ 

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"8 Pan Pacific 

yililiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimiiiiiiuii Ulllllllllll in i nun nimiiinn in in i iniimnini iiiiiiiini iiiiiimimiimiiiiiiim in iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiniiiniiiiiiimimi miiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiini iiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiinj. 




I *" Ocean Transport G>^ | 

( TAIYO KAIUN KABUSHIKI KAISHA ) 

OP KOBE. JAPAN 

Agents At All Principal Ports In T*e Would 

Operating Modem Freight Steamers 
100 Al UojAs; 

Regular Direct Service 

To St From 

San Francisco Seattle] Vancouver 

And 

"Yokohama, Kobe. Shanghai, 
Hongkong, Manila, 
Singapore 

Frequent Sailings Tc 

Vladivostok * North China Ports 

We Solicit Your Inquiries For Cargoes 
To All Principal Ports In Tre Would 

<rans Oceanic G>. 

Pacific coast agents 

SAN fftANCtfCO -R*. ^cTAtTtE <%» \Za«COUV6« 

324 SANtfOCM ST AMfRiCAN BanR 0L»«. Y0*ksm<*« 0COO. 

Chicago ^ Mew Vork; 

646 MflR<5ue-ffe fftOG. 71 0ROADWAV 

^JllllllllHllltllllMIIIIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIilllilllMIIMillllilllllHIIIMIIinilllMlllilllllllllHIIlUllllllllllllinilinillllllHIIIII^ 



June 19/9 



59 




commerc 




Dawn of a New Trade Era 



THE dawn of a new era in world commerce was her- 
alded at Chicago. The Sixth National Foreign Trade 
Convention, opening America's door to it, outlined the 
trails and marked the rocks in a short cut to international 
ascendancy. It was an epochal assembly of American 
business Generals, that convened at the call of the National 
Foreign Trade Council, and its deliberations will be looked 
back upon as the starting point on a wonderful new road 
of barter and exchange. 

In the belief that Pan-Pacific trade and development 
will be best served by the exploitation of the trend of 
thought at the Chicago convention this number of PAN- 
PACIFIC magazine is largely given up to the views ex- 
pressed and counsel offered by recognized leaders among 
the two thousand trade and 
industrial chiefs gathered 
there from all sections of 
the United States. 

Naturally it is impossible 
to present all the conven- 
tion addresses here in their 
entirety, excellent though 
they were, but the list has 
been carefully surveyed and 
the subject-matter of papers 
of most immediate concern 
in the Pacific field, perused 
for selection or condensa- 
tion. The result is offered 
in a compendium of the con- 
vention, in which the high 
spots, at least, are touched 
with an occasional slower 
flight where the prominence 
of the speaker or value of 
his ideas demand it. 

Of particidar interest to 
this Coast and fraught with 
big possibilities for Pan- 
Pacific trade was the selec- 
tion of San Francisco as the location of the Seventh Na- 
tional Foreign Trade Convention. A San Francisco dele- 
gation one hundred strong, backed by delegations from 
other Pacific ports, found practically no opposition at Chi- 
cago to bringing the 1920 congress of overseas trade to the 
Golden Gate. 

The opinion was quite generally expressed by speakers 
i at Chicago that the year now unfolding will be decisive in 
| the overseas commerce of the United States. With this 
[ nation in the position of chief creditor of the world and 
; debtor nations likely to curtail purchases because of in- 
I ability to pay for same, action was urged in financing 
j crippled nations, that they may maintain their purchasing 
power and provide a free flow of goods from this country. 



Big Foreign Trade Convention 

In San Francisco in May 1920 



need was frequently expressed for immediate steps looking 
to the absorption in this country of foreign securities. The 
opinion seemed unanimous that American banks must lead 
the way in solving this problem upon which the future of 

American foreign trade largely rests. 

« 

A resolution unanimously adopted by the convention 
urged the earliest possible completion of the government's 
shipbuilding program and the removal of all restrictions 
on American shipbuilding, together with the free construc- 
tion of vessels for sale to foreign interests. Opposition to 
any continuance of government operation of the United 
States merchant marine was declared. It was further 
urged that government owned vessels be allocated to suit- 
able trades and trading routes for operation by any quali- 
fied- competent American 
shipping enterprise, under 
conditions of sale or charter 
that will permit of their send- 
ing the American flag to any 
port of the world on a fair 
trading competitive basis. 

Enactment of laws pro- 
viding a bargaining tariff 
for the protection of Amer- 
ican commercial interests in 
foreign countries was also 
called for by resolution. 
Extension of international 
parcels post service likewise 
was demanded. 

The revolutionary trend 
of the times was indicated 
in a resolution asking Gov- 
ernment action to develop 
aerial commerce. The plan 
for the air service was 
launched at the convention 
by Colonel Bingham, for- 
mer Yale professor and now 
an aerial expert. 
"This convention urges Congressional consideration of 
suitable plans for developing aerial navigation," read the 
report. "The establishment of the necessary aids to such 
navigation, the investigation and development of the fun- 
damental principles of commercial aeronautics, the promo- 
tion of airship service to overseas countries, are matters 
which demand the present establishment of a separate de- 
partment of the Government." 

No more vibrant chord was struck than when James W. 
Hook, president of the Allied Machine Company, declared 
that American goods should be sold abroad by Americans. 
Mr. Hook referred to America as the "greatest specialist 
manufacturer. ' ' 

Because of lack of space all the addresses summarized 
for this magazine cannot be printed in this number. 



THE Seventh National Foreign Trade Convention under the 
auspices of the National Foreign Trade Council will be 
held in the Civic Auditorium, San Francisco, May 12 to 16, 
1920, inclusive. The general committee in charge will consist 
of J. J. Donovan, Bellingham; William Pigott, Seattle; H. F. 
Alexander, Tacoma; Frederick J. Koster, J. K. Armsby and 
Capt. Robert Dollar, San Francisco, with one representative 
each from Portland and Los Angeles to be appointed later. 
Messrs. Koster, Armsby and Dollar will form the executive 
committee, having complete control of all arrangements. 

The 1920 convention promises to be an epoch making event 
in the history of the Pacific Coast, and particularly of San 
Francisco. The gathering will be given a truly international 
aspect through the development of a broad Pan-Pacific motif. 

Special steamers for the accommodation of American mer- 
chants located in the Orient and in South America are to be 
operated from Calcutta and Valparaiso, which will stop en 
route at the larger ports to take aboard delegates to the con- 
vention. It is planned to make it a great Pan-Pacific con- 
vention. 



60 



Pan Pacific 



To Sell, We Also Must Buy 

President of the United States Steel Corporation Discusses Problems 

of the American Merchant Marine 



IN connection with the development 
of American shipping from first to 
last the impelling force of the process 
has been the dictates of necessity. 
Anything which could properly be 
called policy that has guided the pro- 
cess has been the product of a felt 
want, and to that extent at least has 
lacked the element of deliberate 
choice. 

The temporary appearance, as a 
military necessity, of the Government 
of the United States as a shipbuilder 
and ship owner on a colossal scale 
does not render it any less a fact that 
the future of the American merchant 
marine must depend on the attractions 
which it offers to the employment of 
private capital and the application of 
private enterprise. The steamship 
business is one requiring special and 
exceptional aptitudes. The men en- 
gaged in it have to match their wits 
against the keenest in the world; have 
to be prompt in decision, resourceful, 
expedient and expert in the calcula- 
tion of probabilities. 

These are qualities which are not 
usually forthcoming when a govern- 
ment assumes the functions of private 
enterprise. As a commercial proposi- 
tion, government owned ships in for- 
eign trade could only result in disor- 
ganization of existing trade routes in 
which government ships might engage, 
while bringing about a complete 
paralysis of individual effort to obtain 
for private American ships a larger 
share of American seaborne commerce. 
Thus, in the event of government own- 
ership and operation of merchant ves- 
sels becoming a settled policy, the 
problem of the future of American 
shipping would solve itself by the ex- 
tinction of private endeavor. 
. Any policy which places at the dis- 
posal of any single class of producers 
a fleet of Government steamers is 
bound to be unsuccessful. How, for 
example, under the policy indicated, 



By JAMES A. PARRELL 

President United States Steel 

Corporation 




JAMES A. FARRELL 

could it be determined in whos'e in- 
terest the necessity for the development 
of foreign trade was most pressing? 
What section of the country would it 
favor? And would it take into ac- 
count the transportation of manufac- 
tures wholly finished, half finished or 
of crude materials? 

Mr. Hurley's plan, with perhaps a 
few minor exceptions, appeals to many 
shipping men of experience having at 
heart the upbuilding of an American 
merchant marine as a plan dictated 
equally by business sense and equity 
and in the public interest. 

There will be no return, for some 
time at least, in any country to so- 
called pre-war prices of material and 
labor. Shipbuilding materials and 
equipment are on a lower level in the 
United States since the signing of the 



armistice than in any other producing 
country, ship plates and structural 
material having declined $12 per ton 
here, with a corresponding reduction 
in collateral forms of iron and steel 
products. 

Foreign ships in the past have 
worked their round of trade with 
profit because when they reached the 
regions of great production of bulky 
cargoes they found few or no rivals. 
This will no longer be the case, be- 
cause the foreign ship which goes in 
ballast from a coal station or South 
American port to the east coast of 
North America must reckon with the 
competition of the tonnage of the 
United States. 

If in other respects we are able to 
meet the competition of the world on 
equal terms, especially with types of 
ships, built or to be built, comparable 
with those of our competitors experi- 
enced in long voyage trades, the rela- 
tively high wages of American officers, 
engineers and seamen sufficient in 
numbers to operate economically with 
safety will not prove to be a serious 
handicap. Of course it is essential 
that laws requiring the employment 
of an excessive number of seamen or 
engineers be repealed by the establish- 
ment of a definite policy. 

One of the earliest requirements of 
the shipping situation is likely to be 
a general international agreement 
about the employment of the agencies 
of ocean transportation in the least 
wasteful and the most effective way. 

The freedom of the seas, as a work- 
ing formula of peaceful intercourse, 
should find a larger conception. It 
should stand for open ports and as 
free an interchange of commodities as 
the fiscal necessities of the nations will 
allow. To ourselves, with a merchant 
marine commensurate with the re- 
sources of our country, the lesson will 
come with new force that to sell we 
must also buy. 



Exports Will Avert An Industrial Crisis 



By EDWARD PRIZER 

President Vacuum Oil Co. 
— o — 

WE are now facing an industrial 
crisis unless we can largely 
and rapidly increase our exports of 
finished products ; for in no other way 
can our great industrial capacity be 
utilized. 

The export of raw or semi-finished 



articles unquestionably adds to na- 
tional wealth, but gives little aid to 
industry. We must export cotton in 
fabrics and not in the bale ; iron and 
steel in machinery and implements ; 
leather in shoes and other finished ar- 
ticles; use our coal under our own 
factory boilers ; and in every way mul- 
tiply the overseas movement of prod- 
ucts of hand and brain which our rec- 
ognized manufacturing and inventive 



skill, unequalled by any other country 
of the world, so eminently fits us to 
produce. 

There always will be opportunities 
for distinctive American specialties, 
unique in character, the product of 
American originality, but to secure ex- 
port trade in volume we must be pre- 
pared to supply what the foreign 
buyer regularly uses and always calls 
for. 



June 19 19 



61 



We Want to be Rid of Red Tape 

Chairman of the United States Shipping Board Discusses the New Merchant 

Fleet and the Winning of Markets 



SHIPS are the controlling factor in 
the development of foreign trade. 
Before the war only 9.7 per cent of 
our total exports was carried in Amer- 
ican bottoms. It is our hope, if our 
program is completed, to have suffi- 
cient ships to move fifty per cent of 
our total commerce in American bot- 
toms. 

We want to put the best American 
initiative behind the operation of the 
fleet; we want to get rid of red tape 
and the possibility of stagnation when 
moving these ships to the ports where 
they will carry American trade. But 
a very large part of the task that con- 
fronts the nation can be made easy 
and practicable if such organizations 
as the National Foreign Trade Council 
will concentrate in a movement to 
urge American manufacturers to study 
the export field. 

Must Not Build Up 
in Slip-Shod Style 

We can't build up our foreign mar- 
kets in a slip-shod manner. We must 
specialize in trying to meet the differ- 
ent needs of different markets, and 
we must purchase raw materials 
and manufactured products from 
foreign countries as well as to 
sell to them. We must take some 
chances in developing trade routes 
which are at present unprofitable, and 
a little of the pioneer spirit of the 
old days will not be out of place even 
in these modern times. 

We hear a great deal these days 
about what is going to happen to 
American business when Great Britain 
and the other nations, supposed to 
have certain advantages over us, get 
into full swing. We have heard such 
doleful predictions many times long 
before the war. 

After three months studying the 
situation in Europe I have not ob- 
served any outstanding advantage 
which they have over us, either from 
a production point of view, or a labor 
point of view, or from the character 
of products manufactured. This is 
true not merely of manufacturing, but 
with reference even to shipbuilding. 
Here we find some cloistered critics 
asserting that we will never be able 
to compete with British shipping. 
Over in England you will hear English 
critics telling their Government that 
Great Britain will never be able to 
compete with us. 

No Need to Worry 
About Competitors 

We needn't worry much about flank 

movements from our foreign competi- 

' tors. They will compete fairly. They 



By EDWARD N. HURLEY 

Chairman United States Shipping 

Board 



understand now, better than ever be- 
fore, the evil of unfair competition. 
Germany's commercial system reached 
the point where it became top-heavy. 
It was hard to distinguish between 
Germany's commercial enterprises and 
Germany's government, and it is my 
belief that combinations between gov- 
ernments and business are almost as 
dangerous as combinations between 
church and state. 



Foreign Trade Vital 

"The stimulation and development of 
the nation's international trade is vital 
to the country's prosperity and the solu- 
tion of its economic and industrial prob- 
lems. The members of this chamber, all 
business, agricultural and industrial as- 
sociations and organizations, should di- 
rect the attention of their members to 
the importance of this subject and the 
necessity for encouragement and sup- 
port of all measures which will facili- 
tate and enlarge American trade with 
other countries, extend American bank- 
ing and insurance to accompany and 
supplement the foreign enterprises of 
American commerce, and provide ad- 
equate cable and wireless facilities." — 
Resolution by United States Chamber 
of Commerce in St. Louis Convention. 



The best way to get new business 
is not to undermine a competitor, but 
to create new markets and encourage 



increased demand. We have reached 
the point in our business life where 
fair play is absolutely essential if 
there is to be continued freedom for 
American business initiative. 

Every market in the world is open 
to fair dealing Americans who are 
able to reduce their cost of produc- 
tion. The American wage scale is 
right because it represents American 
efficiency and skill. So long as the 
American workman gives his best ef- 
fort, he is fully entitled to the higher 
wages he receives. 

On the Threshold 
of New Trade Era 

We are today on the threshold of 
a new era. We must recognize that 
to be worthy of our boys who went 
to the front and worthy of the dead 
they left there, all of whom demon- 
strated to the world what American 
initiative can do when put to the test, 
we must now carry on the work for 
fair play which they have begun. 

We must show in our business af- 
fairs, both at home and abroad, that 
we are ready to apply to ourselves the 
same test of fair dealing that we 
would apply to others. We must 
show that we play fair in business, 
just as we demanded fair play in in- 
ternational law. When we couldn't 
bring about the observance of inter- 
national law, we fought for it. But 

(Continued on Next Page) 



Americans Should Sell American Goods Abroad 



By J. W. HOOK 

President Allied Machinery Company 

of America 

— o — 

THE world war has caused an ex- 
pansion of producing capacity in 
the United States that today is greatly 
in excess of the home demand. Export 
markets must be sought, new methods 
of selling must be introduced and the 
same thoughtful consideration must be 
given to overseas trade that in the 
past has featured our highly developed 
trade characteristics at home. 

I am a great believer in the theory 
that American goods should be sold 
abroad by Americans. We should have 
American leadership. We ought not 
to go back to pre-war days when the 
American producer handed over his 
foreign selling rights to foreigners, 
who, in a great many cases, only 
tested the market with American 
goods and then manufactured these 



goods as competitors. But American 
capital and American manufacturers 
have not prepared for the present-day 
conditions that the simplest foresight 
made apparent as the war progressed. 

America must immediately enter 
upon the serious business of building 
a foreign selling organization. She 
must not operate through foreigners 
any longer. She must lay the founda- 
tion of complete independence from 
every nation in the world in all mat- 
ters involving her export trade. 

Foreign trade is not a part of our 
national life, as it should be. And it 
will not be such \intil every person 
who produces anything understands 
what world trade and export markets 
mean specifically to him. The farmer 
must sense what they mean to him 
in the price he obtains for his corn or 
cattle ; the laborer must understand 
how they affect his wage scale; and 
the manufacturer must feel their ef- 
fect upon the price of his products. 



62 



Pan Pacific 



Pleasing the Customer 

President of the American Manufacturers' Export Association Talks 

on Selling Methods Abroad 



DIRECT selling might be defined 
as the method by which Amer- 
ican manufacturers will sell their 
products abroad when they really be- 
come exporters. It is the logical out- 
come of the change which is now going 
on before our eyes in the attitude of 
the American business man toward 
foreign trade. 

Five years ago the American manu- 
facturers who had a thriving and well 
established foreign business might 
have been numbered on the fingers of 
one's hands. At that time over half 
the nation's total manufactured ex- 
ports were the products of four .com- 
panies. Apd every one of these com- 
panies had built up its foreign sales 
by direct selling. 

Now Are Preparing 
For Foreign Trade 

Today the manufacturers of the 
country who have been forced by the 
war into a realization of the possibili- 
ties of foreign markets are preparing 
to establish themselves as exporters. 
The measure of their success, I be- 
lieve, will be the degree to which they 
are able to build up and energize the 
machinery for direct sales. 

We can thank our export houses, 
with few exceptions, for whatever 
prestige American goods enjoyed in 
foreign markets before the war. They 
were the pioneers in finding a demand 



By GEORGE ED. SMITH 

(President American Manufacturers' 

Export Association) 




SCENE IN HONG KONG HARBOR 

for our products and in meeting that 
demand where they found it. Our 
foreign trade in staple goods today is 
largely the result of earnest and effec- 
tive work by these export houses, and 
I believe that a large field exists, and 
will exist, in which they will continue 
to handle business more efficiently and 
more intelligently than the producer 
himself. 

Outside of raw or semi-raw mater- 
ials, however, the future of America's 
foreign trade lies with her manufac- 
tured specialties. Machinery, special 
tools, labor saving and time saving 
devices, the products of American in- 
genuity and American factories are 



destined, I believe, to form the great 
bulk of the new trade which awaits 
our exporters. And it seems to me 
to be a truism that abroad, as well as 
at home, no one can sell these prod- 
ucts as well or as successfully as the 
man who makes them. 

Create a Demand 

and Give Service 

The successful sale of these articles 
demands two things, which can only 
be afforded by the manufacturer him- 
self. The first of these is the creation 
of an intelligent demand for the ar- 
ticle. The second is provision for ser- 
vice after the article has been bought 
and is being used. 

The manufacturer who has learned 
by experience in domestic sales how 
to create a demand for his products at 
home is in a better position than any 
one else in the world to plan and put 
into execution a selling campaign 
abroad which will create a favorable 
interest in his product. He may not 
know the peculiarities of a particular 
market, and he may be ignorant of lo- 
cal customs, but he can secure this in- 
formation much more easily than he 
can persuade someone else to sell his 
goods the way he wants them sold. 

Furthermore, when the product 
which bears his name and his trade 
mark is introduced into some foreign 



Need to be Rid of Red Tape, Says Hurley 



(Continued from preceding page) 

the American instinct for a square 
deal is strong enough to bring about 
its establishment as a fundamental 
principle of national business conduct. 

There has been a general feeling 
that the time has come when some 
definite step shoidd be taken by the 
Government to clarify the rights of 
business — to establish a definite code 
of business practices, not merely with 
respect to the relation between one 
business institution and another, but 
with respect to the relations among 
business, labor and the public. It 
should not be necessary for business 
to obtain legal advice on economic 
questions. 

Most business problems require 
common sense, rather than legal ref- 
erence. They are economic, rather 
than legal. They require good judg- 
ment and honesty of purpose, rather 
than reference to the courts. I think 
it is true that most of the problems 
requiring Governmental decision 



should be determined by a supervisory 
body, rather than by suits and agita- 
tion. 

There is much help of a constructive 
character which the Government can 
give American business men, and the 
business men, during the war, demon- 
strated conclusively that they can help 
the Government. We must, of course, 
have specific laws to guide us in busi- 
ness and the Federal Trade Commis- 
sion and Clayton Acts have been help- 
ful in setting up plain standards of 
business ethics. 

Passage of the Webb law was an 
almost providential preparation for 
the searching competition ushered in 
by the great war. American firms are 
now free to present a solid national 
front against the competition of other 
nations. Unity of command, co-opera- 
tive effort, applied comradeship are 
the media through which our national 
interests and hopes may be consum- 
mated in foreign trade. 



There is business enough for all. 
Some of the markets of the world have 
been barely touched. We can aid 
countries with such markets in in- 
creasing their own wealth, and their 
purchasing power by increasing our 
trade with them. • 

Foreign goods should not be per- 
mitted to be dumped in our market at 
ruinous prices, nor should our business 
men employ similar methods in foreign 
markets. This is a vicious practice 
of. unfair competition. 

There is unfortunately a disposition 
on the part of some people to regard 
with a degree of suspicion and dis- 
trust a business or an industry which 
grows rapidly and is exceptionally 
prosperous, and an unwarranted feel- 
ing that its achievements are brought 
about by unfair methods. Its policy 
has been to increase the volume of 
production to the maximum and to 
reduce overhead expenses to the mini- 
mum. 



June 19 19 



63 



market, his future sales depend upon 
the manner in which his product 
stands up. If there is someone near 
at hand prepared to watch after his 
interests, to rectify his mistakes and 
give adequate service, the prospects 
for increasing sales are infinitely 
brighter than if he is compelled to 
throw his article on the market and 
trust to luck and the law of averages. 
Sell Goods Abroad 
Same as at Home 

This, of course, throws straight back 
to the proposition which is the basis 
of all our hopes for export business, 
an axiom which should be printed in 
capital letters on the cover of every 
text book, and every article on our 
foreign trade, the proposition that the 
way to sell American goods abroad is 
to sell them the way American goods 
are sold at home. 

Customs and tastes may differ in 
different countries, but it is just as 
essential to arouse interest and give 
satisfaction in one place as in another. 
The drummer may change his method 
of approach when he goes from New 
York to Alabama or from Alabama to 
Xew York, but when it comes to get- 
ting repeat orders on the dotted line, 
the fundamentals are about the same 
in both places. 

One of the fundamentals of a suc- 
cessful business is to make every effort 
to please the customer. If, without 
interfering with production, it is pos- 
sible to paint the product a particular 
color or finish it in a particular way, 
then by all means the customer's indi- 
vidual desires should be consulted and 
followed. I am willing to agree this 
far with those who counsel us to fol- 
low the example of other nations. 
Quantity Production 

fMust Be Maintained 
On the other hand, this country can 
afford to sacrifice the principle of 
quantity production in its foreign 
trade even less than in its domestic 
trade. With cheaper labor, European 
countries can produce specialized 
goods in small quantities for foreign 
markets and still be able to compete. 
Once this nation begins to disregard 
quantity production it is automatically 
eliminated from competitive markets. 

By all means let us adhere wherever 
possible to the doctrine of pleasing the 
customer, but when it comes to the 
point where we must choose between 
this and the standardization which has 
given us industrial leadership, we can 
only make one choice. We must op- 
erate along the line of our greatest 
strength rather than that of our chief 
weakness. 

The whole question of direct selling 
narrows down to that of whether or 
not the manufacturer desires to es- 
tablish a permanent and substantial 
foreign trade. If he does, and is pre- 
pared to pay the price in time and 
thought and money, he can start for 
the goal confident that it is worth the 
winning. 



Will He Open the Door? 




By JOHN T. McCUTCHEON in The Chicago Tribune 



Acceptances in Foreign Trade 



By D. C. WILLS 

Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland 

— o — 

THE first phase in the development 
of acceptances in the United 
States might be termed that of exploi- 
tation and explanation. The second 
phase has been the establishment of 
an open market and we are in the 
midst of that, phase at the present 
time. 

Through the medium of acceptances 
the American exporter or importer 
can confidently count on receiving as 
comprehensive and as favorable finan- 
cial assistance in dealing with his 
clients in other countries as is received 
by any of his foreign competitors. 

Now, however, since an open mar- 
ket capable of absorbing a consider- 
able volume of acceptances has been 
established, reserve banks are in most 
cases confining their purchases to en- 
dorsed bills, and the open market has 
shown its strength in absorbing and 
selling to primary purchasers nearly 
all the available unendorsed bills. 



A call money market in New York 
and at one or two other centres for 
call loans secured by acceptances has 
also stimulated the development of the 
open market. Quite a number of pri- 
vate houses handling investments or 
commercial paper have added depart- 
ments for dealing in acceptances. 

The formation of discount houses 
with substantial capital, starting in 
New York and now extending to other 
Federal Reserve cities, for the purpose 
of buying bills and selling them with 
or without their endorsement, is an- 
other significant feature of the growth 
of the acceptance movement. • 

The use of the trade acceptance in 
foreign trade has thus far in most 
part been limited to imports, foreign 
houses, especially in the Orient, draw- 
ing on mercantile distributors in the 
United States. There is no reason, 
however, when credit information on 
concerns abroad becomes more readily 
available, why trade acceptances orig- 
inating here and drawn on companies 
abroad shoidd not find their way into 
the discount market. 



64 



Pan Pacific 



Five Plans For Business 

Treasurer of Federal Shipbuilding Company Outlines Direct Sales 

Policy for the Far East 



IF you are contemplating direct rep- 
resentation abroad, you will prob- 
ably send first, the head of your sales 
department to survey the field. He 
will find the following five plans now 
existing as regards American business 
in the Par East. They are described 
in the order of the intensity and com- 
pleteness with which direct selling is 
conducted. One plan is applicable to 
certain lines of manufactured goods, 
and another plan to others. 

Plan one, referring to manufacturers 
having their own organizations in the 
Far East, for importing, for merchan- 
dizing, and for distributing their prod- 
ucts throughout the country: This 
plan is the one adopted by firms manu- 
facturing one article exclusively, or a 
small group of closely allied products, 
generally a class of goods which the 
masses of the people constantly re- 
quire in their every day life ; such 
firms as the big oil companies, tobacco 
companies, and sewing machine manu- 
facturers. 

Carry Large Staff 
of Mixed Employes 

They carry a large staff of British, 
American, and Chinese employes, who 
penetrate inland in China to arrange 
for the delivery of cargoes, to inspect 
the stock of native dealers, to investi- 
gate the credit of their wholesale 
agents, to collect payments of silver, 
sometimes amounting to a ton of 
metal, to recommend prices for meet- 
ing competition, and to advertise by 
distributing samples, posters and hand 
bills. 

On a smaller scale in the larger 
ports, certain manufacturers of shoes, 
for instance, are establishing their own 
retail stores. In the smaller outports, 
their agency would be placed with se- 
lected department stores. Commodi- 
ties have been introduced profitably in 
this way, even when the consumers 
consisted only of the European and 
American residents; for there are 
thousands of such "foreigners" lo- 
cated in each of the large cities, such 
^s Shanghai, Peking, Tientsin and 
Hankow. But, of course, sales are 
multiplied enormously when the native 
buying public can be reached and sup- 
plied with the style and quality which 
best meet their needs and tastes. 

Plan two, referring to manufac- 
turers having their own small staff of 
Americans or Europeans in China for 
the convenience of the local importing 
commission houses: They give out the 
latest market quotations as received 
by cable, and enter orders for ship- 
ments from the mills on the basis of 



By F. R. SITES 
Federal Shipbuilding Company 
— o — 
c. i. f. China ports. Certain steel 
manufacturers, locomotive builders, 
and others, have employed this plan. 
Their representatives may sell to vari- 
ous commission houses, who, in turn. 



Investments Abroad 

' ' The position of the United States as 
a creditor nation tends to stimulate 
American investment abroad. It is de- 
sirable that every possible encourage- 
ment be given such investment, as an 
essential factor in the development of 
American foreign trade. Legitimate 
American investment abroad is entitled 
to the same measure of protection in 
the countries where made that is given 
by this Government to foreign invest- 
ments in the United States. The United 
States should enunciate and enforce a 
firm policy for the protection of Amer- 
ican citizens and legitimate American 
enterprises and investments in foreign 
lands." — Resolution by United States 
Chamber of Commerce in St. Louis Con- 
vention. 



are the actual importers who sell to 
the large native dealers. Since many 
of the native dealers have a practice 
of passing their business around 
among the commission houses, it is 
well to be in a position to quote to 
any and all comers. 

Here is a Plan 

With Advantages 
Plan three, referring to manufac- 
turers having a representative in the 
field attached to one of the commis- 
sion house: Such a representative is 
often paid in part by the commission 
houses, and in part by the manufac- 
turer. This plan, employed by a num- 
ber of manufacturers of machinery, 
electrical equipment, watches, etc., of- 
fers the advantage of substantial co- 
operation on the part of the commis- 
sion house, the use of its large staff 
for keeping in touch with widely scat- 
tered markets, for financing and for 



Advertising Abroad 

"If you want your product known all 
over the world, you must advertise all 
over the world. Tour campaign must 
be planned carefully, and be compre- 
hensive enough both in plan and appro- 
priation to accomplish your purpose, or 
you had better not begin at all." — F. 
A. Arnold in Chicago Convention. 



handling the details of shipping. Mean- 
while, the manufacturer's own repre- 
sentative is at hand to maintain con- 
tinued live interest in pushing the 
sales, to give expert or enginering ad- 
vice, to keep his principals informed 



as to prevailing local prices and mar- 
ket conditions. 

But occasionally this plan has the 
disadvantage of hampering the move- 
ments of the representative, who finds 
that there would be greater chances of 
success in certain transactions if he 
had the opportunity of dealing through 
another house, or perhaps quite inde- 
pendently; for personal relationship, 
and personal likes or dislikes, are fre- 
quently more potent than price alone. 
Furthermore, national prejudices and 
other considerations frequently place 
one commission house in a much 
stronger position than another, if not 
in a dominating situation for winning 
certain business. For instance, on 
railroads financed with British capital, 
directed by a British engineer or gen- j 
eral manager, business quite naturally 
goes through a British commission 
house. 

One Representative 
For Group of Makers 

Plan four, referring to groups of 
manufacturers of allied products who 
have agreed together to send out one 
representative : This was done a few 
years ago by certain British steel in- 
terests, and under the name of the 
Representation for British Manufac- 
turers. Their progress was hindered 
by the war, and it was also rumored 
that they failed to receive the loyal 
sustained support of their sponsors — 
a natural result of a loosely combined 
effort of divergent interests. 

Plan five, referring to manufactur- 
ers' agents, either individuals or com- 
mission houses : Certain of these agents 
believe in carrying only a few lines, 
and in conscientiously and intensely 
developing the market for each of 
these lines. Others continue to acquire 
additional agencies without limit, 
sometimes even for competing manu- 
facturers, with disappointing and stif- 
ling results for some of those whom 
they are supposed to represent. Much 
success has attended the honest efforts 
of many of these commission houses, 
but it behooves the export manufac- 
turer to familiarize himself thoroughly 
with the character and activites of the 
firm with which he proposes to place 
his agency. 

One manufacturer says that he has 
had experience with American, British 
and French commission houses, and 
has found them all reliable; but they 
move along the lines of least resist- 
ance, and he has found it best to go 
out occasionally to give them his ad- 
vice and to check up on their activi- 
ties. 



June 19 19 



65 



Give the Buyer What He Wants 

Manufacturer and Exporter Tells of Problems to be Overcome in Overseas Trade 



By WILLIAM H. KNOX 

FOREIGN trade, both export and 
import, is a highly specialized 
field. Before the war we had a large 
and constantly growing volume of for- 
eign business, but the tremendous ex- 
pansion in the last four years, and the 
opportunity thus given for world wide 
distribution of our greatly increased 
productivity, calls for intelligent 
knowledge of the fundamentals on 
which that trade is based and the de- 
velopment of which is to mean so 
much for the future prosperity of 
American industry. 

Granted, of course, that your wares 
may be better and even offer more 
value than those of your English, Eu- 
ropean and Japanese competitors, if 
you want his trade, find a way to 
meet his needs. Last year you could 
sell him anything. 

Must Give the Buyer 
Just What He Wants 
In this and the years to come you 
will sell him what he wants to buy. 
Given intelligent production, we 
greatly need special commercial train- 
ing. Every large producing, shipping 
and banking center w T ould find it 
profitable to provide facilities for such 
education. 

Send your young men abroad, but 
see to it that they are properly 
equipped to produce the results de- 
sired. The "bustler," "live wire" 
and some other business freaks may 
have their place and time, but the edu- 
cated, tactful American business gen- 
tleman is your best and most produc- 



tive trade winner. If necessary to 
choose between knowledge of language 
and knowledge of goods, by all means 
give preference to the latter. If con- 
ditions permit, establish your own for- 
eign agencies and branch offices. 

The Webb-Pomerene bill now offers 
the opportunity for combinations of 
attractive kinds for just such pur- 
poses. On the other hand, the pio- 
neers in this foreign trade, represented 
by the old established and reputable 
exporters and foreign trade merchants, 
offer you every facility for the mar- 
keting of your products. 

They know every phase of the busi- 
ness, and as they usually are prepared 
to finance all purchases on attractive 
payment terms and assume for their 
own account all foreign credit risks, 
you may find it both convenient and 
profitable to develop your trade 
through such agencies. 

Tn none of the great foreign trade 
countries of the world do manufactur- 
ers require such payment terms as are 
exacted of the American exporter by 
our manufacturers. Putting it conser- 
vatively, 90 per cent of the enormous 
volume of such business calls for pay- 
ment — cash against documents, or at 
most, within ten days. Whereas the 
English and the European exporter 
buys on thirty, sixty, ninety days and 
even longer credit terms. 

Trade Acceptance 
To Solve Problem 

Some relief from this situation might 
be found in proper use of the trade 
acceptance method now being recom- 
mended by our banking authorities 



and a wider knowledge on the part 
of our manufacturers of foreign trade 
financing and its needs. When deal- 
ing direct with foreign buyers you are 
now exacting bank credit or sight 
draft terms, both highly desirable 
methods for the seller, but by no 
means conducive to the larger and 
more profitable trade to be obtained 
through the wise extension of more 
liberal credit conditions. 

As fast as war needs are filled and 
ships released from such service, they 
should be immediately placed in the 
hands of American operators, either 
through purchase or charter at rea- 
sonable rates. As soon as the Govern- 
ment can assume the responsibility for 
effective control of freight rates, there 
would seem to be no valid objection 
to this, provided assurances were 
given to owners and operators that 
such Government fixed rates would 
permit of a fair working profit on the 
capital invested. 

The Government has no business to 
be in business for other than war 
emergency needs, and the sooner this 
great problem of American shipping is 
placed in a position where American 
initiative and business ability can be 
given full play, the better for all con- 
cerned, but American capital cannot 
be induced to invest in shipping, the 
nrofitable operation of which would 
be subject to heavy losses through for- 
eign competition, and this is about the 
onlv assistance the American merchant 
marine now requires to permit of its 
winning its rightful place in the world 
trade. 



Export Advertising Gets the Business 



By W. G. HILDEBRANT 

— o — 

IT is difficult to understand why so 
many American manufacturers ap- 
proach the subject of export adver- 
tising somewhat as the average skep- 
tical individual enters a spiritualistic 
seance. 

Properly planned and well executed 
advertising pays. Whether it be the 
glaring poster or handbill in northern 
China or in the agricultural publica- 
tions of Australasia, the Malay news- 
paper in the Dutch East Indies, the 
illustrated weeklies or dailies of Latin 
America, or in our own export publi- 
cations, the right kind of advertising 



will pav 



The fundamental principles of sell- 
ing and advertising which apply in 
domestic markets, obtain absolutely 
and just as definitely in foreign fields. 



The first thing which must be consid- 
ered, thoroughly analyzed and under- 
stood, is your possible market. 

There are just as many reliable 
sources of information regarding the 
possibilities of selling a given product 
in foreign fields as there are for se- 
curing similar information relating to 
domestic sales. Data on consumption 
and demand, purchasing power, com- 
petition, deliverv costs, selling connec- 
tions, advertising methods and media, 
ean all be just, as readily secured and 
»i pRsilv applied to overseas trade as 
fhov e an to domestic trade. 

There is absolutelv no possibility of 
the American manufacturer success- 
ful^ and permanently establishing his 
overseas trade by hit-or-miss guess- 
w«Hr sales and advertising methods. 

Talcum powder is perhaps as easv 
to pack as any article the retailer sells. 



There are all kinds, good, bad, indif- 
ferent, expensive and cheap. In many 
overseas markets rice powder is even 
cheaper than the cheapest American 
grade of talcum. 

Six years ago an enterprising East- 
ern manufacturer decided that he 
wanted export trade. He appropriated 
$4,000 and placed well illustrated copy 
with a strong dealer appeal in the 
leading American export trade jour- 
nals. The second year he increased 
this appropriation. He has expended 
approximately $30,000 in the export 
publications. He has through these 
media established permanent connec- 
tions in seven principal trade centres 
and sold over $300,000 worth of tal- 
cum powder, not to mention dental 
creams, shaving sticks and cream, 
toilet waters, perfumes, etc. ' 



66 



Pan Pacific 



Will Webb Law 

Work Out 

As Expected 



By JOHN WELCH 

Former Chief Counsel to Federal 

Trade Commission 



TV^ANY advantages, such as greater 
1-1-*- efficiency in merchandising 
goods, freer opportunity for small 
manufacturers jointly to build up an 
export business, etc., are now being 
actually experienced and realized un- 
der the operation of the Webb law. 
As far as I am aware, the legitimate 
expectations placed in the Webb law 
as an effective instrument for further- 
ing our foreign trade have been and 
are being realized to the satisfaction 
of those who have availed themselves 
of that act. 

The ultimate success or failure rests 
very largely on our own business men. 
If the law is to serve as a vehicle for 
commercial aggrandizement, to benefit 
the strong at the expense of the weak ; 
or if it is to be used for selfish and 
unscrupulous exploitation of foreign 
markets, or for the purpose of ma- 
nipulating domestic prices — then the 
expectations of the high minded and 
broad visioned men who were its spon- 
sors would be shamefully thwarted 
and foiled. 

Although the act strictly defines ex- 
port trade and excepts from the pen- 
alties and restrictions of the Sherman 
act only "An association entered into 
for the sole purpose of engaging in 
export trade and actually engaged 
solely in such export trade," still it 
must be assumed that the Congress 
had in mind the fact that every cor- 
poration is vested automatically with 
certain incidental powers, and that it 
would be a practical impossibility to 
form a corporation with no powers 
other than that of being solely en- 
gaged in export trade. 

Therefore, it may fairly be assumed 
that an export association may, among 
other things, establish and maintain 
agencies and act as agent in foreign 
trade, acquire, equip and operate 
wharves, warehouses, elevators, ships, 
and acquire, dispose of, pledge, mort- 
gage or lease property, real or per- 
sonal, subject to legal restrictions, and 
to do many other acts incidental to 
the business of export trade. 



'■1 ' f 


■..^L^.-,, . I, -, J.< ■ Utojm-M- 


^v MB**- 



WATERFRONT AT MELBOURNE 



Need Flexible Tariff Law 



By W. C. CULBERTSON 
United States Tariff Commissioner 



THE National Foreign Trade Coun- 
cil was among the first to see the 
necessity of making our tariff system 
more flexible and to advocate the 
adoption of an adequate bargaining 
tariff. 

Desirable as such a measure was be- 
fore the war, it has now become es- 
sential to our commercial develop- 
ment. Our new and influential posi- 
tion in foreign commerce and finance 
makes imperative a bargaining tariff 
for the protection of American com- 
mercial interests in foreign countries. 

The attitude of the United States 
toward the bargaining possibilities of 
the tariff has been in marked contrast 
to the policy pursued by certain Eu- 
ropean countries. In the protectionist 
countries of Europe, the bargaining 
features of their tariffs have been 
given primary consideration. 

We find either the maximum and 
minimum tariff system as in France; 
or we find the general and conven- 
tional tariff system as in Germany, in 
which there is a general schedule of 
rates fixed by the legislature, and a 
lower conventional schedule of rates 
fixed by bargaining with other coun- 
tries and embodied in treaties or con- 
ventions. 

The present United States tariff, 
which repealed the 1909 bargaining 
provision, cannot be said to embody 
any principle of bargaining. Any 
powers granted the President to ne- 
gotiate concessions is counteracted by 
the required ratification by Congress. 
A war measure of 1916 provides for 
retaliation, but is not of a permanent 
nature. 



In passing a new law designed to 
obtain the desired flexibility, Congress 
should define in general terms the 
kind and degree of unequal treatment 
which is to be penalized, but should 
leave to the President the application 
of the law to particular cases. The 
mere possibility of the imposition of 
maximum or penalty duties will tend 
to secure for the United States and 
its products without formal action 
equality of treatment. 

The necessary flexibility cannot be 
obtained unless the President has 
power to proclaim, at his discretion 
and withouh further action by Con- 
gress, the maximum tariff on any or 
all of the articles enumerated in the 
law. 

The enactment of a bargaining 
tariff need not wait the general revi- 
sion of the tariff law. The protection 
of our commercial interests requires 
prompter action. 

Congress should enact a law pro- 
viding that the free list and the duti- 
able list of the present tariff act shall 
constitute the minimum tariff of the 
United States, and that they shall be 
applicable to the products of all coun- 
tries except in those cases in which 
the President shall ascertain as a fact 
that any country imposes tariff rates 
unfavorable to American commerce, 
which are not equally applicable to 
the commerce of all other countries. 

I believe that nations will come to 
recognize that the "closed door" in 
dependent colonies, and preference be- 
tween self-governing dominions of an 
empire, are not compatible with har- 
mony and good will in international 
affairs. ! ' 



June 19/9 



67 



Quote Selling Prices In American Dollars 



By J. McCURRACH 

Vice-President Continental Commercial 

National Bank 

— o — 

IT may be necessary for American 
exporters, for some time at least, 
to quote their selling prices in Amer- 
ican dollars, for the reason that dur- 
ing the present period of readjustment 
American invoices might appear at a 
disadvantage if quoted at a rate of 
exchange very much in variance with 
the prevailing market. Unless that 
practice is followed, a sale should be 
effected against cable quotations and 
the exchange sold by the exporter to 
the international banker immediately 
as a matter of self-protection. 

The term "foreign exchange" has 



always been looked upon as rather 
vague and ambiguous. If our mer- 
chants and manufacturers could be in- 
duced to look into the matter a little 
more closely from the proper view- 
point they would find foreign ex- 
change problems in reality very sim- 
ple. 

As a matter of fact, there is nothing 
which obtains in the general principles 
of domestic business which cannot be 
applied to international transactions. 
The principle of negotiating credits is 
exactly the same whether it involves 
the financing of a shipment to Osh- 
kosh or Timbuctoo. 

The manufacturer will find that his 
bank will gladly and readily take care 
of the general detail work, and fur- 



nish him with quotations in foreign 
currency which will invariably enable 
him to make a much larger percentage 
of profit than he could possibly make 
in handling domestic transactions. 

If the American manufacturer en- 
tering the foreign field will consult 
with his banker and discuss his prob- 
lems fully and clearly he will be con- 
vinced in a very short time that the 
foreign field offers inducements far 
more profitable than the domestic 
field; he will be able to give continual 
employment to the workmen in his 
factory and thus be able to el 1% n""? i, i 
the vexatious accumulation of material 
which he often in the past had to dis- 
pose of at reduced prices on the home 
market. 



Future of Shipbuilding Industry Uncertain 



By HOMER L. FERGUSON 

President Newport News 

Shipbuilding Co. 

— o — 

RATES of wages were substantially 
increased early in 1918 to attract 
workers to the new shipyards and to 
enable the old yards to increase their 
working force. The new rates were 
made substantially uniform all over 
the country to prevent one shipyard 
from being robbed by another. The 
effect of this and later increases was 
to increase the cost of vessels so that 
now the labor cost per ton is over 
twice what it was for similar .work in 
the same yard two years ago. 

The shipyards of the country now 
have equipment to build vessels in any 
size up to the largest vessels afloat, 
and to build the smaller sizes of less 
than 10,000 tons deadweight in any 
number required. The men who have 
been employed in shipyards will re- 



main if steady employment at good 
wages is assured. 

The possibilities of the future of the 
industry are not very bright, however, 
despite the interest which has been 
aroused throughout the country. A 
large amount of capital has been in- 
vested in building new and enlarging 
old shipyards, but it has been invested 
under abnormal conditions and is 
greatly in excess of the amount which 
would have been required in normal 
times. 

Shipbuilding wages have gone up 
over 150 per cent and wages in the 
steel industry have risen approxi- 
mately the same. The cost of steel 
vessels per ton, therefore, will be two 
or three times the pre-war prices until 
the industrial conditions change. 

Repetitive or manufacturing proc- 
esses in a shipyard are exceedingly 
small and, except for his ancient ad- 
version to labor saving tools, the Eu- 



ropean workman in a shipyard has 
had the reputation among shipbuilders 
of doing as much work as an Amer- 
ican workman; their greater skill and 
experience in the minor trades offset 
to a large extent our use of more 
modern equipment. 

Except in the use of pneumatic 
tools, the British and German ship- 
yards are not particularly different in 
their equipment from the American 
yards. 

American shipowners state that it 
is very difficult, if not impossible, for 
them to compete with foreign owners 
on account of high wages paid and 
more men required. 

It is interesting in this connection 
to note that the wages of seamen con- 
stitute probably from 7 to 12 per cent 
of the cost of operation of a vessel, 
whereas in the building of a vessel in 
a shipyard from 40 to 50 per cent of 
the total cost is labor. 



Mission of the Mississippi Valley Association 



By JOHN M. PARKER 

President Mississippi Valley 

Association 

— o — 

I AM sure that the National Foreign 
Trade Council will welcome the 
Mississippi Valley Association as a 
factor of huge potentiality in develop- 
ing the overseas trading capacity of 
the valley of the Mississippi and its 
great tributaries. 

Our people more and more are real- 
izing that steady employment requires 
steadily employed industry, which in 
turn requires easy access to foreign 
markets and regular foreign demand 



for our surplus production. And so 
it has followed that we of the great 
producing region known as the drain- 
age basin of the Mississippi and its 
tributaries have organized for the pur- 
pose of using our combined strength 
to accomplish the following objec- 
tives : 

(1) To develop an economic trans- 
portation system by utilizing our 
transportation lines of lowest natural 
resistance. 

(2) To develop, equip and use our 
ports of nearest access. 

(3) To develop our agricultural, 
mining and industrial resources in 



such a way as to enable them to profit 
most from economic transportation. 

"We feel that because of the extent 
of the valley and the magnitude of 
its resources, the region as a whole 
has a common interest and a common 
responsibility not only to itself but to 
the nation at large, and that in solv- 
ing our common problems of transpor- 
tation, of commerce and industry in 
the most economic manner possible we 
are serving our country and the world 
in the most effective way. 

By developing our economies we ex- 
pect to reduce the cause of unrest. 
If we can do that, we will safeguard 
our country against internal trouble. 



68 



Pan Pacific 



Lowest Costs Will Get Orders 

Seattle Manufacturer Charges That Greatest Handicap in Competitive Trade is 

American Extravagance 



IN my opinion there is very little dif- 
ference between the basic and fun- 
damental principles necessary to the 
development of foreign trade and the 
methods commonly used in the suc- 
cessful development of our home 
business. 

The elaborate training for foreign 
trade is much discussed, but 1 believe, 
in the final analysis, the salesman with 
the lowest cost and better quality of 
goods — speaking good plain American 
English and possessed of average 
American honesty, application and in- 
telligence — will in the end book more 
orders than the man who wastes his 
time and his company's money aping 
foreign habits, customs and peculiari- 
ties. 

We must investigate foreign mar- 
kets and territory wherein we can sell 
the commodity of which we have a 
surplus and buy and bring back to 
this country the thing that we need 
and that the other fellow has for sale. 
There is nothing sound in the expecta- 
tion that we can do all of the selling 
and none of the buying. 

Don't waste time or money trying 
to develop a foreign market for mer- 
chandise or commodities on which con- 
ditions make it impossible to compete 
with other foreigners. 

The richness of our country proves 
its greatest handicap in the develop- 
ment in foreign competitive trade; 



By WILLIAM PI60TT 
(President Seattle Car & Foundry Co.) 

— o — 
there being no necessity, there is no 
proper effort. 

Manufacturers and business men 
and salesmen of the United States, as 
Carlyle puts it, must get down to plain 



Agriculture Interested 

"Agriculture is interested not only in 
the direct export of raw farm products, 
but it has a very great interest in the 
export of manufactures produced at 
home from farm products. Cotton and 
tobacco manufactures of all kinds, 
leather and leather products, and many 
foodstuffs serve to swell the total of the 
nation's export trade by calling upon 
agriculture. It is estimated that in 
1918 approximately $400,000,000 worth 
of manufactured articles, prepared from 
the raw materials of agriculture, went 
into foreign trade." — J. C. Brand, Chief 
of Bureau of Markets, at Chicago Con- 
vention. 



living and high thinking before we 
can expect to secure any great pro- 
portion of competitive foreign trade. 

Costs must be reduced. Where and 
how can this be accomplished? The 
answer: First, by reduction of over- 
head expense, which seems outrag- 
eously flagrant and extravagant with 
many of our American manufacturers. 

During the past four years we have 
acquired many injurious, extravagant 



habits and customs that must be elimi- 
nated from our business life at once 
if ,we expect to secure our fair pro- 
portion of foreign trade. 

During the war certain leading east- 
ern hotels charged 40 cents for one 
baked potato — just about what a 
farmer gets for a bushel out West. 
At one particular hotel at the national 
capital, during the war when the 
menu cards were adorned with the 
slogan, "Help us win the war," right 
below the sign they quoted, water- 
melon at 60 cents a slice, while the 
negro venders were selling melons in 
the street at 15 cents each. 

A few ways to cut some of your 
overhead are these: 

First, cut out a third of your per- 
sonal expenses in the way of luxuries, 
and you and your families will live 
longer and happier. 

Second, cut one-third of the go-be- 
tweens and middlemen. 

Third, the higher-ups and supervis- 
ing class should accomplish at least 25 
per cent more actual work and could 
cut down their office room and ex- 
penses at least 33 1-3 per cent. 

Fourth, the laboring man could in- 
crease his efficiency and output at 
least 33 1-3 per cent without either in- 
convenience or injury. 

Fifth, cut out the present unrea- 
sonable waste of materials. 



Parcel Post Expansion is Waged 



By MAYNARD D. HOWELL 
(Montgomery, Ward & Co.) 



IF we are ever to become a truly 
great exporting nation, just as our 
troops at the front need the weekly, 
daily, hourly ministration of innumer- 
able supply forces, so our great indus- 
tries, sending their exports abroad in 
huge volume, need the steadying and 
ministering aid of a parcel post, so 
that its people, employes and others 
who carry on can readily and steadily 
obtain the little but important things 
of life. 

' There are numerous competent ship- 
ping organizations in this country for 
the satisfactory handling of orders of 
sufficient bulk and value to justify the 
minimum expense for a separate ship- 
ment by freight. How to deliver the 
small trial orders, samples, repair 
parts and articles urgently needed in 



quick time and at low cost is a ques- 
tion that many would-be exporters 
find it impossible to answer. 

England lists 195 countries, colonies 
or other overseas nations or groups as 
open to her exporters for shipment by 
parcel post. The United States lists 
ninety-four such countries and groups, 
so that for purposes of comparison the 
exporter of England can ship his 
wares by parcel post to 101 more 
countries of the earth than can the 
American exporter. 

The most inconsistent and indefen- 
sible inequality in the arrangement is 
the situation by which those British 
colonies which have no parcel post 
with this country, and to which our 
Government has provided no way for 
our sending parcels through the mails 
from America, may yet, on the other 
hand, send their parcels to the United 
States through the English post. 

As an example of the divergence of 
rates, a British merchant can send a 



package weighing 11 pounds to Dur- 
bar for $1.80; we can send it for either 
$5.40 by first class mail or $8.54 by 
express. To Singapore, where there is 
an immense demand for American 
wares, for which we are getting orders 
by every mail. To bring out 11 
pounds of our merchandise will cost 
the buyer $4.88 by express and $5.40 
by first class mail. From London the 
parcel postage would be 72 cents. 

To straighten matters out and to 
provide a medium for the future in- 
crease of foreign trade, a movement is 
now being organized with the object 
of extending the service to all coun- 
tries not now reached ; increasing the 
weight limit from 11 to 22 pounds; 
changing the system of charges from 
a fixed rate per pound to the group 
system ; establishing c. o. d. and in- 
surance features wherever possiblo 
and minor improvements in the detail 
handling. 



June 19 19 



69 



Choosing The Man To Go 

Kodak Man Says Greatest Trouble in Developing Foreign Trade is Lack of 

Competent Salesmen 






r I MIE greatest trouble manufactur- 
A ers have in developing foreign 
trade is lack of competent and plenti- 
ful help with expert knowledge of 
languages and details. 

A manufacturer going into the ex- 
port trade should begin by selecting a 
man to look after the development of 
the business; one who has traveled, is 
thoroughly posted in export dealings, 
and, if possible, one who has a knowl- 
edge of foreign languages. He should 
visit all the countries with which he is 
doing business, and do the missionary 
work necessary in new territories, so 
he may know where to send his sales- 
men and what to expect from them 
under the conditions. 

The export manager should control 
his export credits, as he is better able 
than the credit man to keep in touch 
with foreign conditions. The require- 
ments of a correspondent-salesman 
would be: 

First, experience in the shipping 
business; second, knowledge of some 
of the languages of the territory which 
he is to direct; third, traveling ex- 
perience; fourth, a man who can code 
a cable efficiently and economically 
and who will not hesitate to use cables 
when necessary; competent to corre- 
spond in the customers' languages, or 
at least capable of writing, in addition 
to English, French and Spanish. 

Among other duties of this sales- 
man, he should see to it by regular 



By D. E. DELGADO 
Eastman Kodak Co. 



-o — 



visits to the shipping room that his 
orders move regularly, to prevent 
packers from dispatching the smaller 
and easier orders in preference to 



Observe the Customs 

"Holidays are numerous in South 
America, and these and the customs of 
the country should be strictly observed. 
If you happen to pass one of the re- 
ligious processions, which are very com- 
mon, and your native companion doffs 
his hat, you should do likewise if you 
wish to avoid giving offense. If you 
meet your merchant friend on the street 
he will remove his hat and shake your 
hand in greeting. It is a breach of 
courtesy not to reciprocate in a like 
manner. When entering a merchant's 
place of business courtesy demands that 
you uncover and remain so until you 
depart." — P. S. Steenstrup at Chicago 
Convention. 



heavy and more complicated orders ; 
to see that stencils, binding and 
weights, gross, net and legal, conform 
to the requirements of the tariff of the 
country of destination, and also to be 
able to get an idea as to the size and 
weight of the shipments in order to 
write to his freight broker to engage 
space and secure shipping permit for 
the transportation of the merchandise 
to destination. 



He should also see that the invoices, 
which should be made in Spanish for 
Latin American countries, show the 
net, legal and gross weights, as well 
as the measurement of each case, and 
in addition the net weight of each 
class of item packed in such case. 
Great care must be used in marking 
and packing, as a customer in any 
one town is apt to wish his goods 
classified under a certain paragraph of 
the tariff and a customer in another 
town may require the same goods 
classified under a separate paragraph 
of the same tariff, and any deviation 
would be apt to cause heavy fines at 
the customs and the manufacturer 
would face a heavy payment in addi- 
tion to disturbing pleasant relations. 

The order clerk must have a good 
schooling and at least a course in a 
business college; be familiar with the 
metric system; a man with good 
judgment to interpret an order; who 
should be able to decode a cable mes- 
sage, and who should be somewhat 
familiar with foreign languages. 

The best man in the domestic pack- 
ing room, and by this I mean the most 
careful and not the man who turns 
out the most work, should be the one 
selected to do foreign packing, as very 
frequently each item, before being 
placed in the packing case, must be 
weighed for legal and net weights, 
and he must make a careful record of 
the contents of each case. 



Europe Will Not Be Competitor In Years 



By MAURICE COSTER 
Westinghouse Electric Co. 



NO one who has not talked at first 
hand with the business men of 
the allied nations can have an accurate 
understanding of their present situa- 
tion. In the first place, the war, while 
it may have brought prosperity to in- 
dividuals in the allied countries, has 
I^ft the nations, as nations, practically 
bankrupt. 

Creat Britain, for instance, in addi- 
tion to the enormous debt which she 
incurred during the war, has sold al- 
most all her foreign holdings with the 
exception of two billion pounds ster- 
ling of South American securities, 
which she has retained to prevent the 
severance of her trade relations in 
that quarter. 

The debt of France is so great that 
it has been estimated that every man, 



woman and child in France now owes 
the rest of the world one thousand dol- 
lars. 

Italy is laboring under an enormous 
burden of debt, and without adequate 
natural resources of her own, such as 
coal and iron, is in even a worse posi- 
tion than Great Britain or France. 

At the present moment our allies are 
engaged in a desperate endeavor to ef- 
fect the transition from a war to a 
peace basis. Their problem in this re- 
gard is infinitely greater than our own, 
because, unlike ourselves, they de- 
pended upon other nations during the 
war for peace time necessities, and 
transferred practically their entire in- 
dustrial strength to manufacturing the 
munitions of war. It will take at least 
two years to place the factories of 
England, France and Italy in the 
same position for peace time produc- 
tion which obtained before the war. 



This, then, is the picture which 
every American manufacturer should 
have before his eyes when he consid- 
ers developing his trade in the allied 
countries. Practically untouched by 
the war he is in a position to undersell 
the allied industries in their own mar- 
kets. If he were permitted to go 
freely into these markets and compete 
without restriction it would mean the 
temporary, if not the permanent, de- 
struction of Europe's industries. 

While the European countries are 
restoring their domestic affairs the de- 
mand of the rest of the world for our 
products will be greater than ever be- 
fore. What we lose in Europe by tak- 
ing the large minded view will in a 
measure be compensated for by the in- 
creased opportunities presented by 
those countries which formerly drew 
the greater part of their imports from 
Europe. 




SAN FRANCISCO 

MAY 12 to 16 

1920 



T 1 



HIS sign marks an 
EPOCH in the 
OVERSEAS COMMERCE 
of the United States of 
America. It signalizes 
THE AWAKENING of a 
great nation to PAN PA- 
CIFIC POSSIBILITIES. 
It flashes the continent-wide recognition of the new place 
of the Pacific Coast in the SUN OF WORLD TRADE. It 
points the way to the beginning of a NEW ERA. 

San Francisco, a year hence, will be the COMMERCIAL 
MECCA of the Western hemisphere. But its interest will 
spread to all corners of the Earth. The selection of this 
city as the location of the National Foreign Trade Conven- 
tion in 1920 is a further STEP FORWARD than indicated 
by the jump from Chicago to the Golden Gate. As the cen- 
ter of world trade activity steadily and irresistibly moves 
westward, so the sway of this Pacific edge of the North 
American continent in that trade will never lose the im- 
petus to be given by the seventh potential Congress of 
American industrial leaders. 

The winning of the Convention for San Francisco at 
the sixth assembly of the National Foreign Trade Council 
in Chicago was not alone a victory for this city. Primarily 
it was a recognition of and tribute to the NEW STATUS 
of the Pacific Coast, inclusive of all its ports, in the rapidly 
shifting map of world commerce. It was the good fortune 
of San Francisco, because of its favorable geographical 
position, its longer claim upon the nation as a Pacific outlet 
and its financial dominance of the western seaboard, to be 
awarded the convention in preference to any of the great 
ports to north or south of it. Illustrative of the splendid 
harmony now actuating the entire Coast it should not be 
forgotten that the claims of this port to the 1920 Assembly 
were enthusiastically backed by Seattle, Tacoma, Portland, 
Los Angeles and San Diego. It was this unanimity that 
won the Convention for the Pacific Coast and it will be this 
unanimity that will make the gathering here in May next 
the MOST NOTABLE TRADE CONFERENCE in history. 

* # * 

A PAN PACIFIC CONVENTION TOO ! 

THE assurance of a National Convention in 1920 offers 
to San Francisco and the Pacific Coast a wonderful 
opportunity that MUST NOT BE NEGLECTED ! It is an 
opportunity that had been daringly wished for but less 
than half expected. It is an opportunity for another and 
EVEN GREATER CONVENTION— that will challenge the 
attention of the whole world. It is an opportunity, at last, 
for a PAN PACIFIC CONVENTION ! 

The date is propitious; the circumstances alluring; the 
opportunity, in such favorable form, may never again be 
presented. It is expected that one thousand of the indus- 
trial and commercial chiefs of the nation from points east 
of the Rockies will be in attendance at the. Foreign Trade 



Congress. Probably half as many more will be present 
from this Coast. To these will be added American mer- 
chants located in the Orient, in Oceanfa and in Latin- 
America. The gathering will have a strong Pan Pacific 
flavor, but it will be purely NATIONAL IN CHARACTER. 

The value of this National Convention to Pan Pacific 
trade development can scarcely be overestimated. But 
that value may be vastly increased and immediately ac- 
celerated if the scheduled sessions could be combined with 
or merged into an INTERNATIONAL TRADE CONGRESS 
embracing the entire PAN PACIFIC AREA. In the course 
of a season hundreds of merchants from Asia, the Far 
East and Australia arrive on this Coast in quest of Amer- 
ican goods. Ordinarily they go straight through to New 
York. With little, if any, disturbance to their own plans 
a majority of these might arrange their itineraries so as to 
be in San Francisco during convention week. Undoubtedly 
a large proportion of these would do so if they had knowl- 
edge, sufficiently in advance, of a special session or sessions 
for Pan Pacific trade discussions of a get-together nature. 
Such sessions, of course, would be open to all interested 
nationalities and invitations for official representation 
should be sent to all Pacific countries. 

This matter is of such supreme importance at this time 
that the gentlemen in charge of preparatory arrangements 
for the National Convention are respectfully urged to take 
immediate action towards getting together Pan Pacific in- 
terests, with a view to calling an International Convention 
to be held simultaneously with or immediately following 
the assembly already scheduled. In the meantime the 
editor of this magazine will be glad to receive suggestions 
bearing on this subject from readers on both sides of the 
ocean. In any effort from an authoritative quarter toward 
a Pan Pacific Convention the hearty co-operation of this 
magazine is assured in advance. It would be WICKED 
TO NEGLECT THIS OPPORTUNITY ! 

• • # 

PERMANENT PAN PACIFIC EXPOSITION 

WHILE on the subject of a Pan-Pacific Convention in 
San Francisco it will be interesting to note that 
plans for a permanent Pan Pacific exposition in San Fran- 
cisco, as advocated by this magazine, have begun to take 
shape. A local syndicate has been organized with sufficient 
backing to erect a Pan Pacific building in the downtown 
district of San Francisco, several sites are under considera- 
tion and tentative drawings have been made of the pro- 
posed structure. These provide for a monumental pile, cal- 
culated to be an ornament to the city and an advertisement 
of Pan Pacific progress. Besides a huge exposition hall, 
with tiers of galleries, there will be suites of offices to be 
assigned to interested nationalities, besides offices and as- 
sembly rooms for Pan Pacific merchants, traders and 
agents. It is understood that in the event of a Pan Pacific 
Convention in May next an effort will be made to rush the 
plans to completion by that time. 







PACIFIC COAST WORKING AS A UNIT 

THE most encouraging sign of the times is the unity 
in which all Pacific Coast ports are working on mat- 
ters affecting the Coast as a whole. This has heen strik- 
ingly illustrated on two recent occasions. One was the 
award of the Foreign Trade Convention for 1920, in which 
the bid of San Francisco was backed by all Pacific delega- 
tions at the Chicago convention, and the other was the 
effort to obtain restoration of pre-war export and import 
rail rates via this Coast, in which a composite committee 
representing all Pacific ports did splendid service at Wash- 
ington. Recognition that this Coast has GOT TO FIGHT 
for an even break, insofar as rail and steamship rates are 
concerned, with Atlantic ports, has had the salutary effect 
of burying past differences and bringing all Coast interests 
together. It's an ill wind! 



ATTRACTIVE FEATURES ARE IN PROSPECT 

BECAUSE of the space devoted to the Chicago Conven- 
tion in this number of PAN PACIFIC magazine sev- 
eral attractive features, including illustrated articles, have 
been held over for the July issue. This magazine is building 
up a staff of capable and reliable correspondents in all Pan 
Pacific countries, who will keep the rapidly-widening circle 
of PAN PACIFIC readers regularly informed as to develop- 
ments in and trade needs of those countries. 



WHAT THE CHICAGO CONVENTION ACCOMPLISHED 

INDICATIVE of the character and volume of business 
that will be considered by the San Francisco Foreign 
Trade Convention a brief resume of Chicago Convention 
results may be of interest. That convention signified the 
awakening of the United States, but particularly of the 
great Middle West to the importance of looking beyond 
our own shores for industrial expansion — a step which 
marks the beginning of a new epoch in American foreign 
commerce. According to the report presented at the close 
of the convention by its chairman, James A. Farrell, presi- 
dent of the United States Steel Corporation, the carrying 
out of several bills recommended by the convention seems 
assured. 

The report particularly emphasized the importance of 
completing at the earliest possible moment the Govern- 
ment's shipbuilding program. It recommended discontinu- 
ing Government operation of Government owned ships and 
the immediate transfer of such vessels to general commer- 
cial service under sale and contract arrangements. It also 
pointed out the faults of our shipping, navigation, classifi- 
cation and measurement laws. 

Increased cable and wireless service, coal and fuel de- 
posits along trade routes, definite plans for aerial naviga- 
tion, free zones for facilitating manufacture and commerce, 
a bargaining tariff, the development of international parcel 



post, establishment of consular and diplomatic service on 
a basis that will attract more competent and ambitious 
young men and the reinstating of railroad differential 
rates were all recommended. 

Neither was the Mexican situation overlooked, for 
measures to protect investments abroad were suggested. 
The report stated that the convention had clearly demon- 
strated American need of expanding export trade to sta- 
bilize conditions at home, and emphasized especially the 
vital interest of labor and agriculture in the maintenance 
of foreign trade. 



DR. PRATT SCORES CONSULAR SERVICE 

ONE of the sensations of the Chicago Convention was 
the excoriation of the American consular service by 
Dr. E. E. Pratt, formerly chief of the United States Bureau 
of Foreign and Domestic Commerce. 

"Far too many irresponsible or malicious foreign con- 
cerns are able to defraud American business houses and 
'get away with it,' " said Dr. Pratt. "The chief reason is 
undoubtedly the distance. Too few of our consular and 
diplomatic representatives abroad are willing to go out of 
their way to assist American business men in getting their 
just dues when controversies with foreign concerns arise. 
Perhaps it would be too much to ask of our Government 
representatives abroad that they assist the American busi- 
ness man who finds himself in disagreement with his for- 
eign customer. 

"There is, however, a certain group of cases in which 
the American exporter should be protected and assisted by 
our representatives abroad. Such cases are those where 
frauds are perpetrated, particularly those frauds that are 
made easy by foreign legislation or lack of legislation. I 
refer particularly to cases where merchandise is imported, 
refused and then must be sold to meet Custom House 
charges." 



CULTURAL EQUIPMENT IN FOREIGN TRADE 

ONE of the most interesting addresses at Chicago was 
that by John F. 'Hara, C. S. C, of Notre Dame Uni- 
versity, whose topic was "Cultural Equipment for Foreign 
Trade." 

"Possibly the constructive work of the educational sec- 
tion of this convention," said Father O'Hara, "has stressed 
too much the importance of technical training and has 
overlooked the fact that college men are sought for com- 
merce because of the broadened vision and resourcefulness 
which the college is expected to develop." 

It was decried as lamentable that more consideration 
had not been given to the type of personality of the men 
American firms have been in the habit of sending abroad. ' 
R. S. MacElwee and Glen Levin Swiggett of the United 
States Bureaus of Commerce and Education respectively, 
voiced the opinion of the Government concerning this sub- 
ject and told of the work which is already being done to 
train the right type of young man for the foreign field. 



72 



Pan Pacific 



What China Means to Civilization 

With Her People Liberated From Bondage New Asiatic Republic May 
Develop Commerce of $300,000,000,000 Per Year 



IN one respect China is old ; in an- 
other it is exceedingly new. It 
possesses the dual aspect of being ven- 
erable with age and yet a child in the 
simple and unaffected manifestations 
of its national possibilities. 

China has 100,000,000 more inhabi- 
tants than Tndia and 30,000 miles less 
of railway communications. While 
India has about 36,000 miles of rail- 
way and 300,000,000 people, China has 
only 6,000 miles and over 400,000,000 
people. While India has been making 
progress and actually emancipating 
its women from an intolerable bond- 
age, China has been enchained by for- 
eign mercenaries and still regards its 
mothers and daughters as the orna- 
mental filigree of repressing custom, 
and, thus denies to itself the essential 
forces that progress necessarily re- 
quires to advance the step of happi- 
ness on earth. 

The trouble in the past has grown 
out of the superficial insight men get 
of different phases of international life 
by following the beaten paths of ob- 
servation and of history. They never 
seem to look beneath the surface of 
existing evil. They observe a fact, 
but never try to understand why that 
fact exists. 

What Average Traveller 
Will Observe in China 

The average traveller will take a 
run through China and see the Pu Yun 
Su temple, the Summer Palace, the 
Camel Back bridge, the . Temple of 
Heaven, the Yellow Temple of the 
Buddha over at Tatungfu; he may go 
out to Nankow and see the Wall, or 
the Pailou of the tombs of Ming; he 
may bump into the Tartar wall with- 
out recognizing what he has encount- 
ered, or amble across the Marco Polo 
bridge without stopping to consider 
what put it there or why the things 
he has been mentally devouring bub- 
ble up at every step to punctuate his 
solitary walk. 

Now, it does seem that the phenom- 
ena of a race of 400.000.000 people 
without more than 6,000 miles of rail- 
road, in this day and age, is worthy 
of graver and more thoughtful in- 
quiry. It does seem that among a 
people who prefer to deposit their 
savings in a sand bank instead of a 
trust company, who comprise one- 
fourth of the entire human family and 
less than one-sixtieth of its wealth, 
who drift through life on an earning 
capacity of less than six cents a day 
and who I' ; in an age of dynamic 
energy am' monumental indebtedness 
and taxatio ■. should interest the rest 



By 

WILLIAM RUTLEDGE McGARRY 

— o — 

of us who have enjoyed the luxury of 

war and the privilege of paying for 

it by our eternal sweat. 

Things That China 
Needs This Moment 

In this necessarily brief article 1 
shall not discuss the art of the Myng 
dynasty, nor speak about their tombs 
at Nankow, or the architecture of the 
Pagoda at Chin-Kiang, or the temple 
of Confucius with its marvellously 
carved columns and over-hanging en- 
tabliture, nor of the beautiful lakes 
near Hang-Chow, nor the thousand 
other inspiring subjects that cluster 
around antiquity like a halo around 
the head of a Lippi virgin to charm 
the artist and interest the gens d' 
lettres. I shall discuss only the things 
that China needs this moment, and 
what the whole world must recognize 
as necessary in China to enable the 
world itself to achieve a nobler and 
sublimer destiny than it has ever yet 
attained. 

We do not respect the business 
judgment of a man who builds a man- 
sion of a hundred rooms and seals 
himself in the living room and kitchen. 
We have little admiration for the head 
of a family who devotes his entire 
fortune to one of his sporty sons, 
keeps his daughters in ignorance and 
the rest of the family in drudgery and 
rags. 

And what must we think of a man- 
ager who undertakes a job with a 
gang of men and locks a fourth of 
them in the coffee house while he uses 
the whip and the lash on the backs 
of the rest to, complete the job on 
schedule time? That has been the 
situation of this world for the past 
4,000 years. It is the situation of the 
world today. 

China Walled Off 
from Human Family 

We have walled ourselves off from 
China. 

We have given our fortunes to the 
sports of war. kept our mothers and 
daughters in' ignorance, and forced the 
rest of the family . to struggle and 
sweat under the load of debt and ex- 
travagance that our barbarous chil- 
dren have created in their selfish and 
riotous contempt of decency and hu- 
man life. 

We have piled up an international 
debt of $200,000,000,000 in this war, 
told our manager to lock up a fourth 
of our man power and dig out of the 
soil with three-fourths of our help, the 



new wealth that the world must create 
to discharge the debt that our petted 
and pampered and greedy and riotous 
spendthrift of a warlike son has left 
as a legacy to the world he has too 
long dominated and abused. 

Now China needs railroads to en- 
able her to elevate her standard of 
living. She needs the organization of 
her finances ; to be taught the mean- 
ing of confidence in a banking system 
that will respond to the economic 
needs of the nation. And she must be 
liberated from all extra territorial 
limitations upon her sovereign right 
to reveal and express her national pur- 
pose and national capacity to elevate 
the economic lot of the whole human 
family of which she is so important a 
part. That's what China needs. And 
her needs are the imperative needs of 
the world in this blood-soaked genera- 
tion of ours. 

What War Debt Means 
Shown by Comparisons 

First, let me tell you what our war 
debt means: To pay what the United 
States, alone, has squandered in this 
desolating war. 

It will absorb all our potato crop 
for ninety years, our oat crop for sixty 
years, our wheat crop for forty-two 
years, our hay crop for forty-eight 
years, our cotton crop for for.ty-two 
years, our corn crop for twenty-four 
vears, all our animal products for 
forty-two years, and consume more 
than twenty-four times all the cash 
holdings of all our national banks in 
the year 1916. 

The entire international co?nmerce 
of the world is only $45,000,000,000. 
The commerce of the United States 
alone is over $190,000,000,000 with 
only 100,000,000 people to develop it. 
The reason for this is found in our 
marvelous railroad system under the 
management of the individual Amer- 
ican gentleman. In proof of this let 
me tell you how commerce has de- 
veloped throughout the world. 

How the Railroads 

Have Built Trade 
In 1816, with no railroads, t!:'> 
world's trade was only $1,500,000,000. 
Tn 1850, with 24,000 miles, it reached 
a mere $4,000,000,000. In 1870, with 
170.000 miles, it had mounted to $10.- 
500.000.000. Tn 1900, with 430.000 
miles it sprang forward to $21,000.- 
000,000. But in the sixteen years that 
followed with railroads pulsating 
a round the whole commercial world 
and winding around 630,000 miles of j 
throbbing fields of enterprise, the 



June 19 19 



73 




CANAL AT CANTON DIVIDING NATIVE AND FOREIGN SECTIONS 



commerce of nations leaped from $21,- 
000,000,000 to $45,000,000,000! 

Tt was the railroad that did this by 
increasing the purchasing power of 
nations and distributing the wealth of 
human effort among its own creators 
for the benefit of themselves and the 
entire human race. 

Now, if the United States with only 
100,000,000 people, has developed 
$190,000,000,000, with 248,000 miles of 
railway, what will China do with the 
same per capita mileage? 

It is incomprehensible ! And yet, it 
is not inconceivable if China will adopt 
the customs of the American people. 
If she will disentangle herself from 
the repressing customs of the past 
and get into the game with the Amer- 
ican idea of life, she will start build- 
ing her railroads at once; that is as 
poon as the Peace Conference liberates 
her from all foreign domination. 

She will begin raising the wage scale 
of her people, while they are engaged 
in building the roads, from six cents 



to a dollar a day. She will thus put 
wealth into circulation and develop a 
commerce of $300,000,000,000 every 
year. That will mean to the rest of 
the world the liberation of its indus- 
try from taxation and debt to a mar- 
vellous extent. 

What China's Awakening 
Means to Human Race 

If the balance of the world gains 
only a tenth of it in international 
traffic, we will receive a yearly item 
of $30,000,000,000 to discharge the war 
debt and ultimately liberate the hu- 
man race from the the appalling bur- 
dens of usury and taxation that bury 
our noblest impulses under a load of 
misery and selfishness and hatred of 
the human race. 

It has been my constant hope for 
many years that the sunlight of such 
an age would dawn upon the world. 
I have always insisted that the way 
to rid the world of war was to legis- 
late the profit out of war; and I have 
always said that the only way to drive 



poverty and shame from the face of 
this sin-embittered earth was to bring 
communications to half the human 
race who slumber in penury and stalk 
like shadowy forms of misery through 
the halls of economic death. 

I claim today that the money spent 
by Germany, alone, in this Pentacost 
of blood, if directed to the noble pur- 
pose of industrial activity, would 
have created a network of railroads of 
600,000 miles throughout the Orient 
and flooded the whole world with the 
supcrinvesting glory of tranquillity 
and happiness on earth. In the peace 
I hope to see established, I feel cer- 
tain that some of these ideas will be 
molded into international covenants 
in order that the people of the Orient 
may elevate their civilization, increase 
their productive power and vitalize 
their purchasing capacity so that the 
reign of idleness and hunger and des- 
titution that has cursed the human 
family in the past would be hurled 
forever from this world. 



74 



Pan Pacific 



Mexico Awakening 

Mexican Commercial Agent Tells of Aims and Needs 
of Troubled Republic 



By LAZARO BASCII 
— o— 

DURING the last few years there 
has been a great awakening 
among Mexican producers, who are 
beginning to realize the immense pos- 
sibilities of their wonderfully re- 
sourceful country, with its wealth of 
minerals, its vast stretches of virgin 
forests, its rich soil, as yet hardly 
scratched. The great strain of un- 
certainty and depression, mentally 
and economically, is being gradually 
lifted. 

In consequence of the world-wide 
metamorphosis, I feel it no exaggera- 
tion to say that very soon there will 
be adequate shipping facilities to ex- 
port Mexico's surplus raw materials. 
These include a variety of agricultural 
products, notably the famous garbanzo 
bean, which is produced in enormous 
quantities — the two states of Sonora 
and Sinaloa alone produce over a mil- 
lion tons annually — tropical fruits in 
endless variety, vegetables and the 
well known henequen or sisal hemp. 

Then there are the vast mineral 
products of almost every variety 
known to man, sea food products of 
many kinds, fine cabinet woods of 
wonderfully lasting qualities, sugar, 
alcohol and so forth, ad infinitum. The 
next crops will be far in excess of 



domestic needs, the surplus product 
awaiting the first buyer. 

Mexican Government 
Helping the Farmer 

The present Mexican administration 
is doing all in its power to help the 
farmer, especially he of the small 
holdings, supplying him with all man- 
ner of agricultural implements and 
machinery, which are sold at cost on 
long-credit terms. With the modern 
labor-saving machinery which this 
country is supplying and its effect 
upon intensified farming, it is impos- 
sible to estimate the possible results 
from the favored soil of Mexico. 

I frequently find that in discussing 
Mexican shipping the average Amer- 
ican business man has in mind only 
the Pacific Coast ports, notably Guay- 
mas, Mazatlan, Manzanillo, Acapulco 
and Salina Cruz. We must not ignore 
the Atlantic Coast shipping possibili- 
ties, from the ports of Tampico, Vera 
Cruz, Puerto Mexico and Progreso, at 
the entrance to the immense territories 
of Quintana' Roo, Yucatan, Campeche, 
Tabasco and Vera Cruz, all awaiting 
the happy day that shall give them 
a chance to export their treasures. 

It is difficult to give an idea of the 
extent of the fine henequen produced 
in these territories, the valuable and 
durable hardwoods, the tropical 
fruits, to say nothing of the immense 





IN THE FOREIGN SECTION OF HONG KONG 



LAZARO BASCH 

petroleum regions, whose production 
is retarded only by the cruel lack of 
transportation. The Mexican petrol- 
eum industry, yet only in its infancy, 
already ranks second in oil production 
only to the United States, owing to the 
chaotic conditions which hamper the 
oil industry in Russia, formerly con- 
sidered the world's greatest producer 
of petroleum. 

Can Do Nothing 
Without Shipping 

Yet what can we do when the big 
American steamship lines do not 
think it worth their while to make 
stops at the important ports of Guay- 
mas or Acapulco? It seems impossi- 
ble to impress the high administrators 
of these overly independent compa- 
nies that the crying need in Mexico 
today is for greater merchant marine 
facilities. 

Nevertheless, no matter how active 
are the political agitators in general 
and the "coupon-cutters" and happy 
members of Wall street's "La Haute 
Banque" in particular, in their efforts 
to belittle Mexico, she is striving with 
all her might and main to prove to 
the world her limitless resources, re- 
gardless of interference, obstacles and 
calumny. 

Mexico needs everything that the 
United States manufactures. In con- 
sequence of the United States Govern- 
ment now returning thousands of in- 
dustrial plants to their pre-war pro- 
ductions, and because of the myriads 
of returning soldiers, von will soon feel 
the need of new fields wherein to dis- 
pose of your surplus products. How 
can this be more easily done than by 
means of boats plying on both Amer- 
ican coasts and stopping at all Mex- 
ican ports? Onlv show the producers 
that they may have a way to ship 
their product and opportunities will 
open on all sides. 

In behalf of the mutual benefits to j 
both countries to be derived from 






June 19 19 



Asks Square Deal 

Coastwise Shipping a Great Need Along Both Sides 
of Latin- American Nation 



such a course, I earnestly and respect- 
fully ask the far-seeing directors of 
the steamship companies that now op- 
erate so indifferently between this 
country and Mexico, to take this seri- 
ous matter under consideration. They 
could easily open new branches to 
care for these neglected ports. They 
might even combine to avoid competi- 
tion. 

Beg For Service 
Between Countries 

All we ask is that we get the ser- 
vice. It is a crying need; it is an in- 
dispensable necessity for the growth 
and development of the commerce of 
both countries. 

Coastwise shipping (cabotaje) is of 
great importance on both the Mexican 
coasts, particularly on the Pacific. A 
great traffic could be operated, for in- 
stance, from the two small ports of 
San Bias and Altata. From the latter 
is a railroad passing the famous sugar 
refinery at Novolato, center of a great 
agricultural region and within a few 
hours of Culiaean, capital of Sinaloa. 



The small port of San Bias is the nat- 
ural outlet for materials assembled at 
Tepic, capital of the new state of 
Nayarit. Products such as rice, to- 
bacco and sugar are congested at these 
two ports and must await transporta- 
tion by small boats to Mazatlan or 
Manzanillo, where they must again be 
overhauled before they may be sent 
on to their final destination. 

This congestion of merchandise 
leads to the desirability of establish- 
ing a coastwise shipping trade that 
could profitably employ one hundred 
boats. These boats could make all the 
small ports, collect the goods assem- 
bled and deliver them to the large 
ports to be shipped away by the big 
steamers making regular stops at such 
places. 

Even if these small lines did not 
yield tremendous profits to the share- 
holders at first, they could be worked 
as a supplement to the large steam- 
ship lines and would be the trade sal- 
vation of the smaller producers who 
lack the facilities afforded by near- 
ness to the larger ports. 



Plumbing Fixture Industry 



By H. M. FRIESLEY 
Manager Export Division Pacific 
Sanitary Manufacturing Co. 

— o — 

MODERN plumbing fixtures follow 
close upon the heels of civiliza- 
tion and prosperity. You will find the 
largest percentage of sanitary plumb- 
ing fixtures installed wherever the 
peoples are most highly educated. 

Within the last century the plumb- 
ing industry of the United States has 
developed its production from crude, 

iperfect designs and quality to pres- 

it day perfection. Only about twen- 

-five years ago was the art of enam- 
eling first made practical. Today, 
dumbing fixtures as large as bath 

ulis are enameled in one place and 
the enamel covers both the inside and 

le outside. 

The process of manufacture of 
enameled sanitary ware is interesting. 

Afferent types of pig iron are melted 
large cupolas to form the proper 

lixture of iron. This molten iron is 
then run out and poured into moulds 
i)f the various types of fixtures. The 

inulds are made of sand packed 
around the pattern which is a dupli- 
cate of the fixture to be made. The 
Pattern is then removed from the sand, 



leaving the space which it took up to 
be filled with the molten iron when 
poured in, thus reproducing the fix- 
ture. In modern factories, all the lift- 
ing, turning, casting and carrying of 
the heavy castings is done by auto- 
matic machines. As soon as the cast- 
ing cools it is taken to the cleaning 
department. 

Metal Is Cleansed 
To Keep Dirt Free 

A strong sandblast is played upon 
it to cleanse the metal until the cast- 
ing is perfectly free from all dirt. 
The mould is then ground to an even 
smoothness under an abrasive wheel, 
which is kept whirling at a tremend- 
ous rate. When this process is com- 
plete the surface of the article is 
smooth, outside as well as inside, and 
is ready for the enameling. 

The enamel itself is the result of 
many years of experimenting and is 
composed of a great many substances, 
a few of which are feldspar, fluspar, 
flint, tin oxide, lead oxide, zinc oxide, 
barium carbonate borax, etc. These 
ingredients are mixed very carefully 
in proper proportions and are then 
melted in extremely hot furnaces. As 
soon as the mixture is melted, it is al- 
lowed to run out into a tank of cold 
water, which crystalizes it. It is then 



75 



ground extremely fine and has the ap- 
pearance of flour. 

The casting to be enameled is placed 
in an enamel furnace which is kept 
day and night at a temperature of 
about 1,500 degrees. When the cast- 
ings have been heated to a lemon col- 
ored heat, they are pulled out and 
held with large forks while this enamel 
powder is sifted on them. The enamel 
thus fused with the hot iron, forms a 
protecting glaze on it. . It is again 
thrust into the oven, brought out 
again and given two more coats of 
enamel, and after being thrust into 
the furnaces for the fourth time, it is 
finished and allowed to cool. 

There are various grades of enam- 
eled ware, some being very thinly 
enameled, and correspondingly cheap; 
others are finer and more carefully 
made. The enamel is often cheap- 
ened by leaving out some of the more 
expensive ingredients and therefore 
loses its lustre. 

False Economy 
In Cheap Ware 

My experience has proven that it is 
false economy to manufacture cheap 
ware. By employing skilled workmen 
and by careful inspection of the out- 
put, uniform high quality can be main- 
tained and cost kept within reason. 

Enameled iron bath tubs are su- 
perior to bath tubs made of any other 
material, but lavatories and some other 
fixtures made of vitreous china are su- 
perior in durability. 

Of all the materials used for sani- 
tary fixtures, vitreous china is gener- 
ally accepted as the undisputed leader 
for fineness, durability and satisfac- 
tion. Unfortunately, however, be- 
cause of the nature of the material, 
vitreous china cannot be made success- 
fully in very large pieces. Larger 
pieces have been turned out but are. 
liable to sag and warp and show un- 
evenness of texture which cannot be 
overcome. 

Vitreous china is, without exception, 
the most sanitary material used in the 
manufacture of table china. It is 
strong, durable, impervious all the 
way through, and of exceedingly close 
texture. The surface is highly glazed 
and is pure white, and with reasonable 
care will last indefinitely. It cannot 
be stained and dirt and grease do not 
stick to its surface. Any simple 
scouring preparation will remove all 
dirt without scratching. As the sur- 
face is part of the body of the ma- 
terial, there is no danger of peeling. 
The china is non-absorbent all the way 
through, while the danger with solid 
porcelain ware is that it is not vitreous 
and if the glazed surface is cracked 
or chipped, the clay being of courser 
texture and absorbent, it becomes 
water-soaked and foul. 

All vitreous china ware is made en- 
tirely of clay, each piece being hand- 
pressed into the mould while the clay 

(Continued on page 78) 



76 



Pan Pacific 



TO ATTRACT TRADE TO LOS ANGELES 



TO attract foreign commerce 
through the Port of Los Angeles, 
the Harbor Department of the City of 
Los Angeles has adopted a rule giving 
thirty days free time on foreign ex- 
ports; that is, the wharfage charge 
covers all storage on exports up to 
thirty days. 

The reason for this rule is that as 
much as thirty days is sometimes 
necessary to bring together a foreign 
cargo of 8,000 or 10,000 tons. Thus 
when rail shipments come from the 
East, they can be unloaded on the 
dock at Los Angeles and no storage 
accrues unless it is more than thirty 
days until the cargo is loaded on the 
ship. If cargo is on the wharf more 
than thirty days, a storage charge of 
10 cents per ton per month is made. 

The wharfage charge varies from 
2y 2 cents a ton on cement, plaster, 
borax and similar mineral products, 
up to ten cents a ton on general mer- 
chandise. The rate on flour, salt, su- 
gar, grain, coffee and similar products 
in bags, and on bolts, nuts, nails and 
such commodities in kegs, is five cents 
a ton. These are the rates that in- 
clude thirty days' free storage. 

No rent is charged a steamship for 
a berth assignment, but only a dock- 
age charge based on the net tonnage 
of the vessel. This charge ranges up 
to $15.00 a day for a vessel of 2,100 
net tons, and one-half cent per net ton 
above that figure. This makes the 
charge against the steamship, as well 
as against the cargo, very low. 

Labor charges likewise are very rea- 
sonable, pilotage is the lowest of any 
Pacific Coast port, and is not com- 
pulsory if the master of the ship can 
bring his own vessel into port, and 
water is furnished at 17 cents per 
thousand gallons. These charges make 
the cost of doing business through the 
Port of Los Angeles much less than 
through some of the so-called "free 
ports." 



Represented in Australia 

WITHIN a few weeks Southern 
California exporters, the Los 
Angeles Chamber of Commerce, har- 
bor commission and city will have di- 
rect representation in Australia. Al- 
bert Goldie, an Australian by birth, 
now is somewhere on the Pacific 
Ocean, bound for his native land, bear- 
ing letters from the chamber, scores 
of samples of Southern California 
products and plans for an extensive 
trade campaign throughout Australia. 
His headquarters will be in Sydney. 

For his lecture work before cham- 
bers of commerce and similar organ- 
izations, the Los Angeles chamber 



equipped him with numerous slides of 
Southern Californian scenes and more 
than 1,000 feet of motion picture film. 
Mr. Goldie is thoroughly familiar 
with Southern California and its in- 
stitutions. He came here from Aus- 
tralia more than two years ago and 
previously had traveled in all parts of 
the United States. He is intimately 
acquainted not only with Australia 
and New Zealand, but throughout the 
South Sea Islands, India and China. 
* * * 

Port of Los Angeles Chart 

SOME confusion has resulted be- 
cause of charts which appeared 
recently, establishing official rates for 
ports of the Pacific. In this chart Los 
Angeles appears under "Class A" and 
still another classification "C," in- 
cludes as its first entry "Port Los An- 
geles." 

This latter is a fishermen's entry 
near Santa Monica and has survived 
the old days when Santa Monica and 



San Pedro were fighting for the main 
Pacific outlet. Now that Los Angeles 
has come to rate with San Francisco 
and Seattle in Pacific Coast schedules, 
steamship companies, in printing their 
regular tariffs for general distribution, 
give the community rates that apply 
from San Francisco, Seattle, Los An- 
geles, etc. 

In order that there may be no mis- 
understanding and that rates so called 
from Los Angeles should be on a basis 
f. o. b. docks, it is felt necessary to 
specify this in some such notation as 
"Port Los Angeles" or "Los Angeles 
Harbor." In choosing the former ap- 
pellation, steamship companies run 
against a snag in the other location 
near Santa Monica. 

To simplify matters an effort is be- 
ing made to have "Port Los Angeles" 
struck from the records and charts as 
an obsolete term, so that when Los 
Angeles harbor is mentioned, or the 
Port of Los Angeles, it will be under- 
stood that they are one and the same. 



To Develop Los Angeles Harbor 



A PROGRAM of construction de- 
signed to bring Los Angeles 
Harbor to complete and highest effi- 
ciency was made possible when the 
bond issue for $4,500,000 was author- 
ized by the voters May 6. In author- 
izing this expenditure, the city of Los 
Angeles is carrying out its pledge, 
made years ago, to expend $10,000,000 
in harbor development. 

This action on the part of the city 
means that a total expenditure of ap- 
proximately $7,000,000 will be made, 
as there now is available government 
appropriations totaling more than $2,- 
200,000. More than $1,000,000 is avail- 
able for diversion of flood waters and 
almost an equal amount for the widen- 
ing of the channel, dredging the chan- 
nel to Long Beach and similar work 
coming under government jurisdiction. 

Coincident with the voting of these 
millions for improvement was the be- 
ginning of actual construction on a 
10,000-ton dry dock, which is being 
built by the Los Angeles Shipbuilding 
& Dry Dock Co. This will represent 
an investment of more than $1,000,000, 
all of which represents private capital. 
Government aid had no part in this 
enterprise. 

While the $4,500,000 voted by the 
city will be expended in equipping the 
harbor so that it may compete success- 
fully with any port on the Pacific, this 
sum really represents an investment 
on the part of the city that promises 
excellent returns. Included in the 



plans for development is reclamation 
of some 800 acres of tide lands. 

If this reclaimed acreage proves 
equal in value' to other land that has 
been reclaimed at the harbor, it will 
be worth more than the entire bond 
issue. The reclaimed land known as 
Fish Harbor, now filled with canneries, 
is bringing the city a rental of $1,350 
yearly for each acre. The estimated 
values of the reclaimed land ranges 
from $10,000 to $26,000 an acre. 

Former waste stretches are being 
converted into avenues of deep water 
and solid land bordering it, making 
ideal sites for manufacturing estab- 
lishments having to do with overseas 
trade. 

One of the most important improve- 
ments to be made will be the widening 
of the main channel from 500 to 1,000 
feet. The government has made lib- 
eral appropriation for this piece of 
work and all of the preliminary ar- 
rangements, including rights of way, 
have been made, so that actual dredg- 
ing may begin at once. 

Other items in the harbor budget in- J 
elude adequate coal bunkers and load- 
ing facilities, storage tanks for vegeta- 
ble oil, equipment for handling the 
cotton business that naturally should 
be handled through this port, com- 
pleting construction of a direct high- 
way, the widening of the harbor, the 
extension of municipal wharves and 
the increasing of the mechanical 
equipment on water and land. 






June 1919 



77 



AFTER FOREIGN TRADE 



THE PORT OF LOS ANGELES 

Offers the best port facilities and the lowest port charges of any port on the Pacific Coast — 
possibly in America — both to shippers and steamship companies. 

NO RENT whatever is charged to steamships for preferential berth assignments at Los 
Angeles Municipal Piers. Only a dockage charge is made against the ship, and this is very low, 
— $15.00 a day for a ship of 2,100 net tons, and one-half cent per net ton above that figure. 
Thus a ship of 3,000 net tons, five days at the wharf, would pay a total of $97.50 — and this 
would be the only charge against the ship. It would pay no rent whatever. 

THE CARGO pays a wharfage charge varying from 2 Yl cents to 1 cents a ton, de- 
pending upon the commodity, BUT THIS INCLUDES THIRTY DAYS FREE STORAGE ON 
FOREIGN EXPORTS. In other words, a ship has 30 days time to accumulate a foreign 
cargo, without storage charges. The cargo pays wharfage at rates varying from 2 Yl to 10 
cents a ton, and the ship pays a small dockage only for the time it is actually at the wharf. 



(!) 

"Si. 




S 



* 

(!) 

I 



y 



l 



PORT FACILITIES 



There are no finer wharves and wharf sheds in America than the municipal harbor facili- 
ties provided by the City of Los Angeles. There is no bar to cross at the harbor entrance — 
the water is 48 feet deep at low tide at the entrance — and the depth at the piers varies from 29 
to 35 feet at low tide. 

The local business of the Port is growing very rapidly, as Los Angeles, with a popula- 
tion of 650,000 — the largest city on the Pacific Coast — is going after water commerce. Los 
Angeles also is the logical port for the transshipment of transcontinental cargoes. 

The City of Los Angeles also is prepared to lease lands for industries which need 
waterfront locations. 



For further particulars address 



THE BOARD OF HARBOR COMMISSIONERS 

SUITE 33, CITY HALL, LOS ANGELES, U. S. A. 




78 



Pan Pacific 



Plumbing Fixture Industry 



(Continued from page 75) 

is wet and soft. The piece is then al- 
lowed to dry in ordinary atmosphere 
for ahout ten days, after which it is 
burned in large kilns for a period of 
eight days. During this burning the 
temperature reached is a's high as 2800 
degrees. The piece is carefully in- 
spected for fire cracks, or any other 
defects and is then dipped in liquid 
glaze. It is again allowed to dry for 
several days in an artificially heated 
room and is placed in the kiln for a 
second burning, which takes six days 
more and during which the tempera- 
ture reached is about 2200 degrees. 

It is evident from this that while a 
piece of enameled iron ware may be 
turned out completely from the raw 
pig iron to the finished product in 
forty-eight hours, it ordinarily takes 
at least five weeks to manufacture a 
piece of vitreous china. 

The ideal bath room arrangement, 
based upon the experience of success- 
ful architects and plumbing contrac- 
tors, seems to be an enameled bath 
tub and a vitreous china lavatory and 
closet. 

The proper crating of plumbing fix- 
tures for export results in a large sav- 
ing of ocean freight rates. Note the 




BATH TUB PACKED FOR SHIPMENT 

attached illustration of the Francisco 
bath tub, which was so designed that 
the tubs can be nested together, there- 
by saving space and weight. 

Freight costs limit the field of each 
manufacturer. While trans-continental 




PACKING FOR SHIPMENT 



freight rates make it practically im- 
possible for eastern manufacturers to 
compete for Pacific Ocean trade, these 
freight rates shut out coast manufac- 
turers from the eastern half of the 
United States. 

My travels through the Orient have 
demonstrated to me how necessary it 
is for American manufacturers to have 
first hand information from their mar- 
ket. Before my first trip, we did not 
manufacture any of the special types 
which we are now supplying for that 
market. Each nation has become ac- 
customed to certain types of plumbing 
fixtures and these types must be sup- 
plied to that particular country, al- 
though they are gradually being edu- 
cated to the use of the American types. 

The American plumbing fixtures 
manufacturers are producing the 
world 's highest quality of fixtures ; 



and by their policy of quantity manu- 
facture of quality plumbing fixtures 
are able to sell at fair prices. The 
enormous investment required before 
an organization can enter this busi- 
ness has limited the number of firms 
in this business to some seven Amer- 
ican large firms who supply the 
greater part of the world's plumbing 
fixtures. 

American plumbing fixtures are dis- 
tinguished by their consistent high 
quality which is due to rigid factory 
inspection and to the employment of 
only skilled, well-paid workmen. The 
labor problem is one of the most diffi- 
cult to solve in the plumbing industry 
for men have to really grow up in the 
pottery industry to be able to work 
on the more difficult designs. It seems 
to be one of those arts which is handed 
down from father to son. 



CONNECTIONS WANTED 



SOERABAIA — A firm in Soerabaia exporting all 
kinds of vegetable oils, teak, hard and wild 
wood, and several other East Indian products, 
and exporting building materials, etc., would 
like connections with the Dutch East Indies. 
Address Box 607, Pan Pacific. 

SAN FRANCISCO— A San Francisco firm ex- 
porting new and used steam tested and guar- 
anteed pipe and light screw casing, boiler 
tubes, valves and fittings, desires connections 
with all countries on the Pacific Ocean. Ad- 
dress Box 608, Pan Pacific. 

SEATTLE — A firm in Seattle, Washington, im- 
porting copra, hides, rice, vegetable oil, pea- 
nuts, fertilizer, matches and hemp, coffee, tea, 
rubber, etc., and exporting nails, railway sup- 
plies, steel goods, box strapping, nail-less box 
strapping, lumber and heavy machinery, etc., 
would like connections in China and Siberia or 
elsewhere. Address Box 609, Pan Pacific. 

BURMA — A firm in Rangoon, Burma, importing 
steel, hardware, beer, old newspapers, olive 
oil, currants, and exporting hides, tobacco leaf, 
shellac, gunnybags, cutch, cocoanut oil, ground 
nut cake, beans, rice, desires connections with 
American importers and exporters. Address 
Box 611, Pan Pacific. 

HONG KONG — A firm in Hong Kong importing 



piece goods, sundries of all kinds, machinery, 
marine motors — electrical, and exporting ramie 
fibre, wolframite, molybdenite, tin ore, lead 
ore, buffalo and cow hides, peanut oil, split 
bamboo, embroideries and filet laces, would 
like connections with buyers of filet laces and 
crochet laces. Address Box 613, Pan Pacific. 

SAN FRANCISCO— A San Francisco firm ex- 
porting writing ink, stamping inks, paste, mu- 
cilage, typewriter ribbons, carbon papers, de- 
sires connections in the Orient, Australia and 
South America. Address Box 614, Pan Pacific. 

JAPAN — A Japanese firm importing works of 
art, and exporting Japanese old and new pic- 
tures, picture cards, small wares, books, curios, 
Japanese pens (made of bamboo and hair), 
works of art and Japanese groceries, etc., 
would like connections throughout the world. 
Address Box 615, Pan Pacific. 

JAPAN — A firm in Seoul who are general im- 
porters are in the market for cotton piece 
goods, dyes and general sundries. Address 
Box L-502, Pan Pacific. 

PANAMA — An importer of books, stationery, 
art pictures, post cards, etc., in Colon, desires 
to get in touch with manufacturers of dee- 
orated mounted cardboard mats for photo- 
graphs and post card albums of morocco cloth. 
Address L-501, Pan Pacific. 



June / 9 f 9 



79 



DIRECTORY SECTION 



PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE will publish each month in this section, for the con- 
venience of its readers, the following directories: 

EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS 

ADVERTISED MERCHANDISE 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND BROKERS 

CONNECTIONS WANTED AGENCIES WANTED 

MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES AND BROKERS 



EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS 



A directory of leading export and import concerns covering the Far East and Central and South America. 
Readers of this publication will find it much to their advantage to consult the concerns listed when desiring proper 
sources of supply. 



W. R. GRACE & COMPANY, 332 Sansome St., 
San Francisco, California, Exporters of all 
American products. Importers of all raw ma- 
il rials from South and Central America and Far 
East. Represented in all parts of the world. 
Letters of credit, cable transfers, foreign ex- 
change. 

WORLEY-MARTIN COMPANY, 617 Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco, California. Wool, 
hides, tallow, oils and Oriental products. Hard- 
ware and steel products, drugs and specialties. 
Represented in China and Japan. Desires lines 
to introduce. Cable address "WORLEY." 

LANSING COMPANY, San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. Manufacturers of electrical trucks, trail- 
ers, concrete machinery, gas engines, hoists, 
hand carts, wheels, casters, etc. Export trade 
a specialty. Cable address "QUOLANSING." 

JOOST BROTHERS, Inc., 1053 Market St., San 
Francisco, California. Foreign orders promptly 
and carefully executed. General hardware, 
household goods, tools, sporting goods, paints, 
oils, varnishes. Correspondence in all languages. 
Catalogs on request. 

CONNELL BROTHERS COMPANY, L. C. 
SMITH Building, Seattle, Washington. General 
Importers and exporters. Represented at Shang- 
hai, Manila, Hong Kong and Singapore. Corre- 
spondence in all languages. Cable address 
"CONNELL." 

ASSOCIATED MANUFACTURERS IMPORT- 
ING 1 (X)MPANY, 871 Market St., San Francisco, 
California. Manufacturers' representatives, im- 
porters and exporters. Import chinaware, 
crockery, enamel ware, oils, hides, brushes, 
produce and raw materials. Export steel, iron, 
steel products, hardware, tools, chemicals, dyes, 
Bod products and all raw materials. Cable ad- 
- "AMICO." 



itood 
RO' 



;OTHWELL & COMPANY, Inc., Hoge Build- 
ing, Seattle, Washington. Importers, exporters 
and shippers. Branches at New York City, Ha- 
vana. Cuba, and Kobe, Japan. Import oils, silk 
foods and fruits, chemicals, dyestuffs, iron, steel 
ana machinery. Correspondence invited. 

B. F. HEASTAND, 618 Mission St., San Fran- 
eisro, California. Exporter of glass ware, din- 
ner services, vitrified hotel china. Prepared to 
fill orders immediately for any quantity. Corre- 
spondence in any language. Catalogues on re- 
quest. Cable address "HEASTAND." 

J. AROX & COMPANY, Inc., 95 Wall St., New 
York City. Branches at San Francisco, New 
nl.ans, Chicago, London, England and Santos, 
Brazil. General exporters and importers. Cor- 
respondence solicited in all languages. Cable 
address "ARONCO." 



BRAUN - KNECHT - HEIMANN COMPANY, 
San Francisco, California. Importers and ex- 
porters of chemicals. Laboratory apparatus for 
mines, universities and schools. Sugar, soap, 
wine, oils, iron and steel. Correspondence so- 
licited. Cable address "BRAUNDRUG." 

ZELLERBACH PAPER COMPANY, San 
Francisco, California. Quotations and samples 
of paper for export. Represented at Yokohama 
and Shanghai. Cable address "ZELLERBACH." 
All codes. 

MARVIN SHOE COMPANY, Inc., 216 Market 
St., San Francisco, California. Exporter and 
wholesaler of shoes. Men's, women's, boys' and 
children's shoes. Rubber boots, tennis and out- 
ing shoes. All styles on hand for immediate 
shipment. Export trade solicited. Cable ad- 
dress, "VINMAR." 

SHERMAN BROTHERS COMPANY, 208 
South La Salle St., Chicago, Illinois. Exporters 
and importers of shoes, hosiery, underwear, 
piece goods, rubber goods, chemicals, food prod- 
ucts, machinery, automobiles and hardware. 
Careful and prompt attention given to all cor- 
respondence and orders. Cable address "CAR- 
NOT." 

MACDONALD & COMPANY, 454 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco, California. Branches at 
Vancouver. B. C, and New York City. Import- 
ers, exporters and tea experts. Export steel 
and steel products, machinery, chemicals, li- 
quors, etc. Import drugs, chemicals, food prod- 
ucts and raw materials. Connections desired. 
Cable address "MACDONALD." 

SCOTT, SUGDEN & DAMOT, Monadnock 
Building, San Francisco, California. Foreign 
and domestic merchants. Steel and iron and 
manufactured products. Marine hardware and 
supplies. Quotations furnished on request. 
Cable address "WALTERSCOT." 

WILLIAMS-MARVIN COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Exporter of shoes for men, 
women and children. Orders receive prompt 
and careful attention. Special styles made to 
order. Send for our catalogue. Cable address 
"WILMAR." 

ROLPH, MILLS & COMPANY', Colman Bldg., 
Seattle, Wash. General shipping and commis- 
sion merchants. Export and imports. Direct 
representatives of manufacturers' of principal 
American goods. Offices at Seattle, Portland, 
Los Angeles, New York and Chicago. Corre- 
spondence solicited. • 

NATIONAL PRODUCTS COMPANY, 519 Cal- 
ifornia St., San Francisco, California. Importers 
and exporters of foods, spices, canned goods, 
etc. Will grant exclusive agencies. Correspon- 
dence invited. 






LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS. Los Angeles, 
California. Manufacturers and exporters of 
steamship power equipment, water, oil and fuel 
tanks, rolling mill products. Ingots, bars and 
shapes. Structural steel fabricators. Correspon- 
dence inviled. All codes used. Cable address 
"LLEWELLYN." 



VICTOR PATRON, 112 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco, California. Branch at Mazatlan, Mexico. 
Cable address "PATRON." Import and export 
representative. Prices and catalogues furnished 
on application. 

ARNOTT & COMPANY, 112 South Los An- 
geles St., Los Angeles, California. Agricultural 
implements, engines and wagons. Export or- 
ders a specialty. Catalogue and price list on 
application. Cable address "ARNOTT." 



PAUL R. RUBEN & COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Importers, exporters, manu- 
facturers' agents, purchasing agents. All codes. 
Cable address "PAULRUBE." 



ROGERS SHOE COMPANY, 135 Bush St., San 
Francisco, California. Shoes, rubbers, tennis 
and sport shoes, all kinds; all styles. Bentley 
Code used. 



DOLLIVER & BROTHER, 619 Mission St., 
California. Leather for shoes, willow, calf, tan 
box, royal, vici, etc. Machinery, nails, eyelets, 
ink, shoemakers' supplies; elastic webbing. 
Fifty years of service. 

MURRY JACOBS, A. C. RULOFSON COM- 
PANY, San Francisco, California. Direct mill 
representatives — Iron and steel products. Cor- 
respondence in all languages. All Codes used. 

P. E. BOOTH COMPANY, 110 Market St., San 
Francisco, California. Importers and exporters, 
Crescent Brand Food Products. All languages 
used. 

THE BEAVER BOARD COMPANIES, 225 
Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York. 
"Beaver Board," a wall board for interior con- 
struction; blackboards, varnishes, etc. Codes: 
Western Union, A. B. C. and Fifth Improved 
editions. Cable address "BEAVER." 

THE ACME WIRE COMPANY, 39 Cortlandt 
St., New York City, New York. Magnet wire, 
field coils, electro magnets, etc. Western Union 
Code. Cable address "ACME." 

ADDRESSOGRAPH COMPANY, 740 Broad- 
way, New York City, New York. Addressing 
machines; type embossing machines and rubber 
type. Code: A. B. C. Cable address "AD- 
DRESSO." 



80 



Pan Pacific 



EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS— Continued 



AMERICAN CAN COMPANY, 120 Broadway, 
New York City, New York. Branch at San 
Francisco. Ash, paper and garbage cans; add- 
ing machines, fly traps, cartons, tin boxes, cigar 
and tobacco boxes, jar caps; druggists' tinware, 
etc. Western Union and Lieber's codes. Cable 
address "AMCANCO." 



THE AMERICAN LAUNDRY MACHINE 
COMPANY, 132 West Twenty-seventh St., New 
York City, New York. Laundry machinery, dry 
cleaning machinery, washing machines, garment 
presses for tailors, etc. Cable address "ALM- 
CQ." 



H. S. RENSHAW, Inc., 205 Metropolitan Bank 
Building, New Orleans, Louisiana. Export; Im- 
port; Commission. Freight forwarders. Corre- 
spondence solicited. Cable address "RENCO." 
Codes: A. B. C. 4; W. U. T.; Bedford McNeil. 



INTERSTATE PATTERN WORKS, Foot of 
13th St., Vancouver, Washington. Makers of 
patterns for all kinds of metal castings. Quota- 
tions on iron and brass castings furnished on 
application. All languages. 

KULLMAN, SALZ & COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Sole leather; tanners. Leather 
for export a specialty. Prompt attention to or- 
ders. Ask us to quote on your requirements. 
All languages. 

DILL-CROSETT, Inc., San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. Exporters of steel products, acids, rosin, 
chemicals, dye stuff, phenol, etc. Importers of 
fish oil, hides, coffee, coconut oil, beans, copra, 
castor oil, tallow, silks, etc. Branch offices: 
New York, Kobe, Japan and Sydney, Australia. 
All languages and codes used. 

SEATTLE FAR EAST TRADING COMPANY, 
Inc., L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Washington. 
Branch offices Shanghai, Hong Kong, Seattle, 
Kobe and Tokio. Exporters of iron, woodwork- 
ing and textile machinery, iron, steel, pipe, rail- 
way supplies, cars, locomotives, glass, plumbing 
fixtures, hardware, etc. Correspondence solic- 
ited. 

HARRON, RICKARD & McCONE, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Machinery for mines ana 
mills, garages, boiler shops, forge shops, snip- 
yards, saw mills, planing mills, contractors, etc. 
All standard codes used. Cable address "AIR- 
DRILL." 



MILL & MINE SUPPLY COMPANY, Seattle, 
Washington. Iron, bolts, chain, axes, belting, 
logging tools, steel, nuts, waste, saws, pulleys. 
Cable address "MILESMINE." Export orders 
solicited. 



CHAS. A. BACON COMPANY, 417 Montgom- 
ery St., San Francisco, Cal. Importers and Ex- 
porters. General Merchandise. 



GENERAL PAPER COMPANY, 525 Market 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Paper Mill represen- 
tatives. Dealers in news, books, cardboard and 
paper stock of all kinds. 



JAMES P. DWAN, Hearst Building, San 
P'rancisco, Cal. Exporter and Importer. Gen- 
eral purchasing agent for foreign buyers. Build- 
ing materials, machinery, ores, metals, oils. 
Foreign office, Missions Building, The Bund, 
Canton, China. Cable address DWAN. 



NOLAN-EARL SHOE COMPANY, 25 Fre- 
mont St., San Francisco, Cal. Manufacturers 
and wholesale dealers in Men's, Women's and 
Children's shoes. Samples sent on request. 
Charges prepaid. Cable address "Nesco." Bent- 
ley's Code. 



OCEAN BROKERAGE COMPANY, Stuart 
Building, Seattle, Washington. Custom House 
brokers. U. S. Bonded storage. Import and 
Export freight forwarders, fire and marine in- 
surance. Weighing, sampling, reconditioning, 
distributing, marking, sampling. 



BRADY & COMPANY, L. C. Smith Building, 
Seattle, Washington. Shipping and Commis- 
sion. Importers and Exporters salmon, oils, 
steel, lumber, fertilizer. Established 1892. 



SHIPBUILDERS MACHINERY COMPANY, 
Inc., 201 Maynard Building, Seattle, Washing- 
ton. Manufacturers of Ship Plate tightener; 
scarphing machines, motor driven machines, etc. 
Export orders solicited. 



INTERNATIONAL TRADING COMPANY OF 
AMERICA, Inc., Seattle, Washington. Import- 
ers, exporters, forwarders and manufacturers' 
representatives. Branches in all Far Eastern 
countries. Export iron and steel, machinery, 
plumbing supplies, heavy and light hardware, 
talking machines, cotton and wool textiles and 
dry gods. Correspondence invited. Cable ad- 
dress "INTRACO." 



THE ARLINGTON COMPANY, 725 Broad- 
way, New York City, New York. Celluloid in 
sheets, rods, tubes, brushes, combs, mirrors, 
toilet sets, collars, cuffs, pipe bits and harness 
rings. Cable address "PYRALIN." 



HERBERT T. SMITH BROKERAGE COM- 
PANY, 209 Washington St., Chicago, Illnois. 
Import and export. Beans, peas, seeds, oils, etc. 
Write for quotations. 



THE AMERICAN STEEL PACKAGE COM- 
PANY, 20 Vesey St., New York City, New York. 
Steel barrels and drums for gasoline, oil and 
chemicals; steel cases with partitions for bot- 
tled goods. Code: Western Union. Cable ad- 
dress "AMPAX,55 Defiance, Ohio. 



PACIFIC SANITARY MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY, 67 New Montgomery St., San Fran- 
cisco, California. Exporters of bath-tubs, toil- 
ets, lavatories, sinks, laundry tubs, plumbing 
fixtures, etc. Prompt and careful shipment of 
export orders. Correspondence in all languages 
and codes. 



A. J. & J. R. COOK, 743 Mission St., San 
Francisco, California. Leather, calf, skins, 
glazed kid, patent and upholstery leather, etc. 
Cable address "COOKBRO." 



THE AMERICAN PULLEY COMPANY, 33 
Greene St., New York City, New York. Pressed 
steel split belt pulleys, reels, beams, spools, steel 
truck wheels, pressed metal shapes, etc. Codes, 
Lieber's and Western Union. Cable address, 
"AMER-PULLEY." 



PACIFIC LUBRICATING COMPANY, 715 W. 
Spokane St., Seattle, Washington. Manufac- 
turers of greases, cup transmission, car, graph- 
ite and chain. Hair and wool flock. Repre- 
sented at Manila, Sydney, Australia and Val- 
paraiso, Chile. Export orders promptly and 
carefully attended to. Special greases made to 
order. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE, 37-45 First 
St., San Francisco, California. Paper of all de- 
scriptions. A complete line carried in stock for 
export or domestic trade. Special papers made 
to order. Quotations and samples cheerfully 
submitted. 



C. HENRY SMITH, 311 California St., San 
Francisco, California. Export and import mer- 
chant. Nitrates a specialty. Shipping and 
commission. Steamship agent and ship owner. 
All codes. Cable address CHENRYINC. 



PACIFIC AMERICAN TRADING COMPANY, 
112 Market St., San Francisco, California. Im- 
ports and exports. Tea, coffees, copra, sago, 
beans, peanuts, coconut oil, etc. Exports hard- 
ware machinery, tools, metals and metal prod- 
ucts, chemicals, dye stuffs, stationery, office 
supplies, dry goods, groceries, food stuffs, 
paints, etc. All codes. Cable address "EN- 
ERGY." 



STANDARD PRODUCTS COMPANY, 260 
California St., San Francisco, California. Ex- 
porters of all American products — iron, steel 
products, galvanized pipe, paints, varnishes, 
cutlery, explosives, plate and window glass, etc. 
Importers of raw materials from Asia, camel's 
hair, animal hair, bristles, furs, skins, nuts, 
oils, etc. All codes used. Cable address "PER- 
KINS." 



AMERICAN VULCANIZED FIBRE COM 
PANY, Wilmington, Delaware. Vulcanized fibre 
in sheets, rods and tubes, insulators, waste bas- 
kets, warehouse trucks, trunks, suitcases, etc. 
Codes: Lieper's Western Union, General Tele- 
graph and A 1. Cable address "FIBRE." 



ANSCO COMPANY, Binghamton, New York. 
Photographic paper, films, cameras, chemicals, 
dry plates, etc. Foreign agent, Ansco Limited, 
143 Great Portland St.. London, W., England. 
Codes: A. B. O, Lieber's Standard and Western 
Union. Cable address "ANSCO." 






EDWARD BARRY COMPANY, 215 Leidsdorff 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Wholesale paper deal- 
ers. Manufacturers of writing tablets, loose 
leaf systems, ruled goods, blank books. Whole- 
sale bookbinders. 

PURNELL & PAGETT, Canton, China. Ar- 
chitects and civil engineers. Investigations, in- 
spections and valuations. Bridges, steel con- 
struction, wharves and docks. Cable address 
PANEL. W. U. Code and A. B. C. 

F. GRIFFIN & COMPANY, 341 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Importers and export- 
ers of rice, oil, drugs, chemicals, rubber goods, 
food products, iron, steel. Offices at Vancouver, 

B. C, Seattle and Portland. Correspondence in 
all languages. Cable address DRAGON. 

C. M. PETTIBONE COMPANY, L. C. Smith 
Building, Seattle, Washington. Importers and 
Exporters. Packers direct selling agents. Ship- 
ping and commission merchants. Cable ad- 
dress PETTIBONE. Codes used, Armsby, A. B. 

C. 5th Edition, Bentley's, W. U. 



AEROTHRUST ENGINE COMPANY, La 
Porte, Indiana. Manufacturers and exporters 
of the Aerothrust Engine for pumping machin- 
ery, lighting plants, agricultural implements, 
pumping jacks. Outboard Motors, etc. Corre- 
spondence solicited in all languages. All codes. 
Foreign orders our specialty. 



KAAS-HOPKINS CO., Hearst Building, San 
Francisco, California. Paper Mill selling agents. 
Solicit export inquiries from the trade. Sam- 
ples and quotations promptly furnished on re- 
quest. 



CLEVELAND IMPORT & MANUFACTUR- 
ING COMPANY, Haas Building, Los Angeles, 
California. Commission merchants. Importers 
and Exporters. Established 1873. Cable ad- 
dress "CLEIMPCO." 



CAMBRIA SPRING COMPANY, 916 South 
Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, California. Wheels 
and rims, spring bumpers, auto and truck 
springs. Code Western Union. All languages. 



CLYDE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, 542 First 
Avenue, Seattle, Washington. Machinery and 
supply merchants. Export orders a specialty. 
Quotations furnished. Special machinery made 
to order. Correspondence in all languages and 
codes. 



D. DINKELSPIEL, Inc., 115-135 Battery St., 
San Francisco, California. Wholesale dealers, 
jobbers and exporters of dry goods, furnishing 
goods, notions and fancy goods. Cotton piece 
goods, linens, dress goods, silks, flannels, hos- 
iery, underwear, shirts, sweaters, ribbons, laces, 
threads, blankets, quilts. Correspondence in all 
languages. Cable address LIPSEKNID. 



INGRIM - RUTLEDGE COMPANY, 413-415 
Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. 
Printers, stationers, bookbinders, art and color 
work. Catalog and. booklet printing. Copper 
plate and steel die engraving. Office equipment 
and supplies. Loose' leaf systems. Export or- 
ders a specialtq. Correspondence in all lan- 
guages. 



The attention of readers and advertisers is called to the fact that PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE will accept no 
advertisements of a doubtful nature nor from concerns in other than good standing. The publishers of this magazine 
believe that foreign buyers can place confidence in those concerns whose names appear herein. 



June 19 19 



81 



MARINE SECTION 



The following marine insurance companies, surveyors, brokers and adjusters are reliable and of good standing. 
This publication believes that all dealings had with these concerns will prove satisfactory in every particular. 



MARINE INSURANCE 

(San Francisco, Cal.) 

Aetna Insurance Company. 

Atlantic Mutal Insurance Company. 

Balfour, Guthrie & Company. 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company. 

Home Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of Calif. 

Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Co. 

H. M. Newhall & Company. 



MARINE SURVEYORS 



(San Francisco, Cal.) 



Ernest Bent 
L. Curtis 
James F. Fowler 
W. F. Mills 



W. J. Murray 
John Rinder 
J. Seale & Company 
Frank Walker 



Thomas Wallace 



SHIP, CUSTOM AND 
FREIGHT BROKERS 

(San Francisco, Cal.) 

C. Beyful & Company 

H. D. Bowly 

W. J. Byrnes 

Brady & Co. 

C. D. Bunker & Company. 

John W. Chapman 

Frank P. Dow 

Davies, Turner & Company 

F. F. G. Harper & Company 

Frederic Henry 

Fred Holmes & Son. 

Henry Kirchmann, Jr. 

Bernard Judae Company 

[ FOREIGN 

JAPAN 

Andrews & George Co., Inc Tokio 

Aki & Company Osaka 

Abe Kobei Yokohama 

Masuda & Company Yokohama 

Murato & Umtanni Kobe 

Nosawa & Company Tokio 

Samuel Samuel & Co., Ltd Tokio 

Yonei Shoten Tokio 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Parsons Hardware Co., Inc Manila 

W. F. Stevenson & Co., Ltd Manila 

Warner, Barnes & Co., Ltd Manila 



Kincaid Shipping Company. 

Martins-Gardens Company. 

E. Griffin & Co. 

C. M. Pettibone & Co. 

Page Brothers. 

George W. Reed & Company. 

W. S. Scammel & Company. 

VV. B. Thornley. 



(Portland, Oregon) 

Else Shipping Company. 
C. V. Ericesson & Company. 
Taylor & Young Company. 
Tegen & Main. 

(Seattle, Washington) 
Frank P. Dow Company, Inc. 
Fankner, Currie & Company, Inc. 



MARINE ADJUSTERS 

When in need of the services of reliable ma- 
rine adjusters, exporters and importers will find 
it to their advantage to consult any of the con- 
cerns listed below. 



(San Francisco, California.) 



Creditors' Adjustment Company. 
Dodwell & Company. 
Insurance Company of North America. 
London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co. 
H. M. Newhall & Company. 
Pacific Coast Adjusting Bureau. 
Springfield Fire & Marine Insurance Co. 
Union Marine Insurance Company. 
Willcox, Peck & Hughes. 

(Seattle, Washington) 

Dodwell & Company. 
Willcox, Peck & Hughes. 



STEAMSHIP LINES 

OPERATING IN 

THE PACIFIC 

(San Francisco, California) 

CHINA MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

San Francisco to the Orient. 
OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

San Francisco to Sydney, Australia. 
ROBERT DOLLAR COMPANY 

Oriental Trade. 
EAST ASIATIC COMPANY, LTD. 

Oriental Trade. 
W. R. GRACE & COMPANY 

Central & South American Ports and Orient. 
GULF MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Central & South American Ports. 
PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Mexico, South America and Orient. 
CHARLES NELSON COMPANY 

Hawaiian Islands. 
A. F. THANE & COMPANY 

Australia. 
TOYO KISEN KAISHA 

San Francisco and Orient. 
JAVA -CHINA- JAPAN-LI JN 

San Francisco to Orient. 

San Francisco to Netherland East Indies. 
JOHNSON LINE 

San Francisco to Scandinavian Ports. 
MERCHANTS LINE 

Pacific, Atlantic & South America. 
OCEAN TRANSPORT COMPANY, LTD. 

San Francisco to Orient. 
TRANS-OCEANIC CO. 

San Francisco to Orient. 

(Oregon and Washington) 
PACIFIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Seattle to Orient. 
NIPPON YUSEN KAISHA 

Seattle to Orient. 
OSAKA SHOSEN KAISHA 

Seattle to Orient. 
SEATTLE STEAMSHIP COMPANY » 

Seattle to Australia and South Africa. 



IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 



CHINA 

Andersen, Meyer & Co., Ltd. Shanghai 

J. M. Alver & Company Hong Kong 

Dodwell & Company Shanghai 

Okura & Co., Ltd Shanghai 

Shewan, Tonmes & Co Hong Kong 

Harry Wicking & Company Hong Kong 

STRAITS SETTLEMENTS 

Central Engine Works, Ltd Singapore 

Katz Brothers, Ltd Penang, S. S. 

Patterson, Simons & Co., Ltd Penang, S. S. 

Straist Industrial Syndicate Singapore 



AUSTRALIA 

Brown & Dureau, Ltd Perth 

Capron, Carter & Co., Ltd Sydney 

Essex R. Picot Sydney 

Eliza Tinsley Melbourne 

A. H. & A. E. Humphries Melbourne 

A. Goninan & Co., Ltd New Castle 

James Hardie & Company Sydney 

Turnbull & Niblett Sydney 

NEW ZEALAND 

W. H. Long & Company Wellington 

F. W. Markham Wellington 

Herbert G. Teagle, Ltd Wellington 



MERCHANDISE ADVERTISED 



PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE publishes herewith a list of articles advertised in this issue for the convenience of its 
readers. The name of the advertiser will be found listed under each heading. This is a gratis service rendered adver- 
tisers and the publishers of this magazine accept no responsibility for omissions or errors, but make every effort to main- 
tain an accurate list. 



ADDING MACHINES 

American Can Company. 
ADDRESSING MACHINES & SUPPLIES 

Addressograph Company. 
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 

Arnott & Company. 
AUTOMOBILES 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 
BANKS AND BANKING 

Wells-Fargo Nevada National Bank. 

First Trust Company of Hilo. 

Sumitoma Bank. 
BATH-TUBS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
BLANKETS, QUILTS, Etc. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
BOILERS. WATER TUBE 

Pacific Marine Iron Works. 
BOOKBINDERS 

InRiim-Rutledge Company. 

Edward Barry Company. 

m n its 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Williams Marvin Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

I :<>ners Shoe Company. 

Nolan-Earl Shoe Company. 
BROKERAGE AND COMMISSION 

Du-Pont Coleman & Company. 

('. M. Pettibone Company. 
BUILDING MATERIAL 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

'ames P. Dwan 



I 



CAMERAS 

The Ansco Company. 
CANNED GOODS 

Rothwell & Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

National Products Company. 

F. E. Booth Company. 

Western Canning Co. 

CANS, CAPS, TIN BOXES 

American Can Company. 
CASES, STEEL .... 

American Steel Package Company. 
CASTINGS 

Pacific Marine Iron Works. 

Interstate Pattern Works. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 
CELLULOID, MANUFACTURED 

The Arlington Company. 
CELLULOID, SHEET 

The Arlington Company. 
CEREALS. 

Sperry Flour Co. 
CHINAWARE 

B. F. Heastand. 

Associated Mfgs. Importing Co. 
COFFEE 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
CONCRETE MACHINERY 

Lansing Company. 
CONTRACTORS SUPPLIES 

Topping Brothers. 



COPPER PLATE ENGRAVING 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
COTTON GOODS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
CROCKERY 

B. F. Heastand. 

Associated Mrgs. Importing Co. 
CUTLERY 

Standard Products Company. 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 
DRESS GOODS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
DRUGS & CHEMICALS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

The Hale Company. 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 

MacDonald & Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

F. Griffin & Company. 
DRY GOODS, TEXTILES, Etc. 

International Trading Co. of America. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
DYE STUFFS 

Quaker City Supply Company. 
ELECTRIC TRUCKS 

Lansing Company. 
ENAMELWARE 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 
EXPLOSIVES & POWDER 

Standard Products Company. 



82 



Pan Pacific 



Merchandise Advertised — Continued 



FERTILIZERS 

Brady & Company. 
FLOCK, HAIR AND WOOL 

Pacific Lubricating Company. 
FLOUR 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Sperry Flour Co. 
FOOD PRODUCTS 

Rothwell & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

National Products Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

F. E. Booth Company. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

Chas. A. Bacon. 

F. Griffin & Company. 

C. M. Pettibone & Co. 

Brady & Company. 
GAS ENGINES 

Shipbuilders Machinery Company. 

Lansing Company. 

Arnott & Company. 

Aerothnist Engine Company. 
GLASSWARE 

B. F. Heastand. 
GLOVES 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 
GREASES 

Pacific Lubricating Company. 
GROCERIES 

Pacilc American Trading Co. 

C. M. Pettibone Company. 
HAIR, ANIMAL 

Standard Products Company. 
HARDWARE 

Worley-Martin Company. 
Joost Brothers, Inc. 
W. R. Grace & Company. 
Sherman Brothers Company. 
Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
International Trading Co. of America. 
HIDES 

Worley-Martin Company. 
Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 
HOSIERY 

Sherman Brothers Company. 
Davis Brothers, Inc. 
HOUSEHOLD GOODS 
Joost Brothers, Ins. 
INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 
James P. Dwan. 
Purnell & Pagett. 
LABORATORY APPARATUS 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 
LAUNDRY MACHINERY 

American Laundry Machine Co. 
LAUNDRY TRAYS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
LAVATORIES 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
LEATHER & LEATHER PRODUCTS 
Dolliver & Brother. 
Kullman, Salz & Company. 
A. J. & J. R. Cook. 
LIGHTING PLANTS 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
LOCOMOTIVES 

Seatle Far East Trading Co. 
MACHINERY 

Rothwell & Company. 
Sherman Brothers Company. 
Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
Harron, Rickard & McCone. 
International Trading Co. of America. 
Clyde Equipment Company. 
James P. Dwan. 
MARINE HARDWARE 
Topping Brothers. 
Pacific Marine Iron Works. 
Scott, Sugden & Lamont. 
Llewellyn Iron Works. 
Shipbuilders Machinery Co. 
MINE & MILL MACHINERY 
Harron, Rickard & McCone. 
Mill & Mine Supply Company. 
MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS 
W. R. Grace & Company. 
Connell Brothers Company. 
J. Aron & Company. 
Rolph, Mills & Company. 
Victor Patron. 
Paul R. Ruben & Company. 
H. S. Renshaw, Inc. 
Cleveland Import & Mfg. Company. 
Ocean Brokerage Co. 
NITRATES 

C. Henry Smith. 
NOTIONS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
OILS 
Worley-Martin Company. 
Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 
Rothwell & Company. 
Standard Products Company. 
Pacific American Trading Co. 
Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 
James P. Dwan. 
F. Griffin & Co. 
Brady & Co. 
ORIENTAL PRODUCTS 

Worley-Martin Company. 
OUTBOARD MOTORS 
Aerothrust Engine Company. 



PAINTS 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 

Standard Products Company. 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
PAPER 

Zellerbach Paper Company. 

Kaas-Hopkins Company. 

Blake, Moffitt & Towne. 

General Paper Co. 

Edward Barry Co. 
PHOTOGRAPHIC PAPER & MATERIALS 

The Ansco Company. 
PLUMBING FIXTURES 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
PRINTING 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 

Edward Barry Co. 
PULLEYS 

The American Pulley Company. 
PUMPING ENGINES 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
RAILROAD SUPPLIES 

Topping Brothers. 
RAW PRODUCTS 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

A. O. Anderseli & Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

MacDonald & Company. 

Rolph, Mills & Company. 

Victor Patron. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 
RICE 

F. Griffin & Co. 
ROOFING 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
RUBBER BOOTS AND SHOES 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 

Nolan-Earl Shoe Co. 
RUBBER GOODS 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

F. Griffin & Co. 
SHIP CHANDLERY 

Topping Brothers. 
SHOES 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 
SHOE MAKING MACHINERY 

Dolliver & Brother. 
SHOES, SPORT AND TENNIS 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 

Nolan-Earl Shoe Co. 
SILK GOODS 

Rothwell & Company. 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
SINKS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
SOAP 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 
SPICES 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

National Products Company. 
SPORTING GOODS. 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 



SPRINGS, AUTO AND TRUCK 

Cambria Spring Company. 
STATIONERY 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
STEEL PRODUCTS 

F. Griffin & Co. 
STEEL AND STEEL PRODUCTS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Rothwell & Company. 

MacDonald & Company. 

Scott, Sugden & Lamont. 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 

Murray Jacobs. 

A. C. Rulofson Company. 

Interstate Pattern Works. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

Standard Products Company. 

International Trading Co. of America, Inc. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 

Cambria Spring Company. 

The American Pulley Company. 
TALKING MACHINES 

International Trading Co. of America. 
TALLOW 

Worley-Martin Company. 
TANKS, WATER, OIL AND FUEL 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 
TANNERS 

Kullman, Salz & Company. 

Dolliver & Brother. 
TEA EXPERTS 

MacDonald & Company. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
TEXTILE MACHINERY 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
TINWARE 

American Can Company. 
TOILETS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
TOOLS 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 
TYPEWRITERS 

American Can Company. 
UNDERWEAR 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
VARNISH 

Beaver Board Companies. 

Standard Products Company. 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
VULCANIZED FIBRE 

American Vulcanized Fibre Co. 
WAGONS 

Arnott & Company. 
WALL BOARD 

The Beaver Board Companies. 
WHEELS, CASTERS, Etc. 

Lansing Company. 

Cambria Spring Company. 

The American Pulley Company. 
WIRE, ELECTRICAL 

The Acme Wire Company. 
WOODWORKING MACHINERY 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
WOOD 

Worley-Martin Company. 



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The I 

Crocker National Bank 
of San Francisco 

UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits, Over $6,000,000.00 

m (Trade, Exchange 1 

Foreign M ° ne y^ and 

& ( Credit Information 



Cable Address: "CROCKWOOL" 



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June 19 19 



8a 



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Zellerbach Paper Company 

SAN FRANCISCO 

has established an 

EXPORT DEPARTMENT 

Under the Direction of Harold L. Zellerbach 

and is prepared to make quotations and furnish samples on orders for 
export shipment. 

Cable Address— "Zellerbach" 



e A. B. C, 5th Edition 



Codes 
Bentley's 



Western Union— Lieberf 



KNAPP & BAXTER, Agents 



Yokohama and Shanghai 



C. HENRY SMITH 

MAIN OFFICE: 

311 CALIFORNIA STREET San Francisco, Cal. 

411-412 ARCTIC BUILDING, Seattle, Wash. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 
Steamship Agent and Ship Owner 

EXPORT AND IMPORT 

All Codes. Code Address: CHENRYINC 



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Puget Sound Tug Boat Company | 

Incorporated 1891 




Pacific American Trading Co. 

112 Market St., San Francisco 

Branch Offices, Soerabaia, Java, D. E. I.; Shid- 
zuoka, Japan. Bank References Exchanged. 



Washington's Pioneer Towing 
Company 



1 IMPORTS— 

Tea, Coffees, Spices, Copra, Sago, Tapioca, Kapok, Beans, 
Peanuts, Walnuts, Australian, Copal and Damar Gums, 
Cocoanut Oil, Wood Oil, Egg Yolk and Albumen. 

| EXPORTS— 

Hardware, Machinery, Tools, Metals and Metal Products, | 
Chemicals, Drugs, Medical Goods, Saccharin, Dye Stuffs; § 
Household Supplies; Builders' and Mill Supplies; Motor 
Vehicles and Supplies; Paper Stock, Stationery and § 
Office Supplies; Dry Goods, Hosiery, Textiles; Groceries, 
Canned Foods, Provisions, Paints, Oil Leather, California 
Beverages. 

Cable Address, "Energy." All Codes. 

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Cable Address: TUG 



SEATTLE 



WASHINGTON I 

ii 



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UNION OIL COMPANY 



OF CALIFORNIA 



PRODUCERS, REFINERS 

and 

EXPORTERS 



OF 



PETROLEUM and its PRODUCTS 

Gasoline, Distillate, Kerosene Lubricating Oils and Greases 

Paving and Roofing Asphalt 



Quotations Submitted Upon Request 



OFFICES: MILLS BUILDING 



SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 



Cable Address: ' PETROLEUM" 



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84 



Pan Pacific 



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CHESTER WILLIAMS, Pies. 



GEO. R. WEEKS. Stcietary 



J. E. PETERS. Vice-Pies. 

SHOES 

AT WHOLESALE 

The Largest Assortment of Men"s, Women's and ( hildren's Shoes for Immediate Delivery. 

EXPORT 
Export Orders Will Receive Our Careful Attention, and Any Special Styles or Other 
Details Will Be Considered. 

SEND FOR OUR CATALOGUE 

WILLIAMS-MARVIN CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, U. S. A. Cable Address "WILMAR" 



-iiimiiiiMUMiiMiininniimiiiiiiiiiMimiiiiMniiiiMiiiiMimiiiMimiimiim 

i'lHimnUHHWI it 1 1 1 1 1 1 r i ] j i n m 1 1 m 1 1 u i r i n 1 1 n 1 1 r 1 1 j i n i d 1 1 1 1 j r 1 1 1 1 r i r 1 1 iiiiiimiiiiim iiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiii' ^ m j r m i j r f 1 1 j r c u i [ 1 1 j j r j j r 1 1 1 1 n i j 1 1 m ; t n f r m 1 1 r c 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 r t m m u t c i m r 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 n e 1 1 r F 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t 1 1 1 1 r ■■ 1 1 r 1 1 1 i m i ; w e 1 1 j ^f i m t t t n m i 1 1 1 1 m i^ 

I Standard Products Co. I I Scott > Sugden & Lamont | 



Asiatic — Import and Export 
Head Office, 260 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



New York 

Pittsburgh 

Seattle 

Los Angeles 




Shanghai 
Singapore 
Manila 
Yokohama 



EXPORTERS, of all American products, especially Iron 
and Steel Products, Machinery, Black and Galvanized 
Pipe, either American or English Thread, Paints, Var- 
nishes, Cutlery, Sanitary Fixtures, Railway Supplies, 
Asbestos, Leather Belting, Explosives, Imitation 
Leather, Automobile Trucks, Tractors, Lighting Fix- 
tures, Chain, Plate and Window Glass, Fabrikoid. 

IMPORTERS, Raw Materials from Asia, Camel's Hair, 
Animal Hair, Bristles, Furs, Hides and Skins, Human 
Hair, Egg Products, Nuts, Oils, Etc. 



Foreign and Domestic Merchants 

DIRECT FACTORY REPRESENTATIVES 

ALL 

STEEL AND IRON PRODUCTS 

Heavy Hardware — Marine Hardware and Supplies 

| Main Office: 

MONADNOCK BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 

Offices in 

| Seattle Los Angeles Pittsburg New York Chicago j 

millllllimiiiiimilllllllililimiimniilimmilimiminmimimmmliimmimiimimimiilim niinminnnmn nnmnmnmnif 

iillimimiliniimiimimiimilimmimimiliniimimiimiinilllNinillllimmilllimimiinilimillliniimimilmillllllllimilllllllimiimillimm: 

Inspection - Testing 



Examinations — Certification 

Materials and Equipment 

for Export 

R. It. Material — Machinery 

Metal Products — General Mdse. 



Sampling:, Analysis and 

Certification of 

oils. Ores, Minerals 

and other 
Imported Materials 



Code Word "PERKINS." All Codes Used. 



References, First National Bank, Bank of Italy, Dun's 
or Bradstreet's, San Francisco, U. S. A. 



R. E. NOBLE & CO., Engineers 

Controlled by Abbot A. Hanks 

Established 1866 

Humboldt Bank Bldg. San Francisco, U. S. A. 

Representatives in Priueipal Cities and Ports 



Tiiiiii minium imiimimiimiu i nillim mnmniinninn i i i in i i m 51ml mini iinmninninn mnnni ninnin n i I mm milium 

jnnniinimniiininniin mill milliniinininnmiinnnllli imnmimninnninmni inn mil Ilium mm imimimm iinmimn inniiii mi nnmnnnniii mnlnimn i i mnnni i Ilimn| 



Branches and Agencies: 

YOKOHAMA 
KOBE 

VLADIVOSTOK 
TSING TAU 
SHANGHAI 
SAIGON 
COLOMBO 
SINGAPORE 
SOERABAYA 
MANILA 



INTERNATIONAL TRADING COMPANY 

of America, Inc. 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

FORWARDERS AND COMMISSION AGENTS 
MANUFACTURERS' REPRESENTATIVES 



Cable Address: "INTRACO" 

Codes: 
Bentley's 
W. U. 
A. B. C. 5th Edition 



Import Products of all 

Countries where we 

are located 



— EXPORTS — 

Iron and Steel, Machinery, Plumbing Supplies, Heavy and Light Hardware, Automobile 

Accessories, Paints, Tractors, Typewriters, Talking Machines, Cotton and 

Wool Textiles, Hosiery and General Dry Goods 

We will purchase for foreign merchants on small commission basis of certified invoice. Correspondence and inquiries solicited. 

Head Offices: SEATTLE, U. S. A. 



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June 1919 



85 



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IMATSON LINEi | Sea Foam S Bond I 



San Francisco to 
Honolulu Manila 

Freight and Passenger Service | 

Rates and Sailings upon Application 



A Strong, Beautiful sheet for manifolding; 
stocked in the following size and colors: 

17x22— 101b. 



MATSON NAVIGATION CO. 



120 Market Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



WHITE — BLUE — PINK 

GREEN — CANARY 

GOLDEN ROD 



j For price see page 11 of net price-list. Samples on request. 



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^iiiiiMiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiniiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiMiiniiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiji 

Investments in Hawaii 

Pay Dividends 

The First Trust Company, Ltd. 

Hilo, Hawaii, T. H. 
May be trusted to answer inquiries 

promptly and frankly | 

STOCKS — BONDS — REALTY 
General Insurance 

^lllll[illlllll<lllinilllMinillNIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIMII]IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIlUlinilUIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIII]lllinillllllllllllllllllllMIIIII!IIIIIIIIIIIIIIII||i= 

^5iiiittiiiiriijrtiiiiiiijriiii[iiij[iiiiiiiit*iifiiiirEiijfiiJiiijjiciif»iiiiiiiiiiijiiiJiti)ii*ijrii]]tiiiiiiiiriiiipiijriii^FijjtiijiFiJiri«jiiiiifiiitiiitiiirFijiiiiiriijiiijiti>^ 

BRADY & COMPANY 

Established 1892. SHIPPING AND COMMISSION = 
Importers ami Exporters Salmon. Fertilizer, Oils, Steel, Lumber § 
42-Story L. C. SMITH BLDG., Seattle, Wash., U. S. A. | 
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BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

ESTABLISHED 1855 

37-45 FIEST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
LOS ANGELES SAN DIEGO 



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AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
- ENGINES - WAGONS - 



AMI 



(,LMS*KT«£D™ 



jc f-v/mv^ . 



EXPORT ORDERS 

A SPECIALTY 

Immediate Deliveries 

Prompt Shipments 

and 

All Shipments Made F. O. B. 

Los Angeles or San Francisco 

250 Page Catalogue and Price 

List on Application 

Cable Address " Arnott' ' Los Angeles 

Code A. B. C. 5th Edition 



ARNOTT SCO. 

-LARGEST STOCK IN SOUTHWEST - 

HZ 118 SO. LOS ANGELES ST. LOS ANGELES 




MULTIGRAPHING MIMEOGRAPHING | 

BRUCKMAN | 

TRANSLATING and 
TYPING BUREAU 

Experts for all Languages 

525 MARKET STREET 

(Underwood Building) 

San Francisco 

Telephone Douglas 1316 



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^nniiiinininnininiiniiiiiniiiniiniiiniiinnnniiiiiiiininniniinMiniinnnniinMniinnininniilnnnniniiiniiinnnnnniniMininniininniiniiiiMiin 

I Ocean Brokerage Co. Ocean Warehouse Co. 1 

CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS 



Import and Export Freight Forwarders 
Fire and Marine Insurance 



U. S. BONDED STORAGE 

Weighing, Marking, Sampling, Reconditioning, 
Distributing, Consolidating 
Head Offices: 762 Stuart Building, Seattle, Washington Branch Offices: 2141 Commerce Street, Tacoma, Wash. 

"Service First" W. R. COLBY, Jr., President "Service First" 

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annum 



86 



Pan Pacific 



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Melville S. Toplitz 



F. L. Willekes MacDonald 



I MacDonald & Co. I 

SAN FRANCISCO 
454 Montgomery Street 

Cable Address MACDO. All Code* 

Vancouver, B. C, 744 Hastings St. W. 
New York City, 37 Liberty Street 

Cable Address MACDONALD. AD Codes 

Importers, Exporters 
Tea Experts 

I Buyer's Agents, Indentors, Warehousemen, Shipping, 1 
Commission, Consignments Financed 

f EXPORTS— 

Steel Rails, Bars, Structural Materials, Machinery, In- i 

dustrial Chemicals, Nails, Tinplate, Sheets, Rosin, Lin- § 

seed Oil, Drums, Baled Newspaper, Enamelware, Oil ! 

Cloth, Food Products, Preserved and Dried Fruits, Beans, j 

Liquors, Licensed Narcotics and Wholesale Beverage 1 
1 Dealers. 

I TEA EXPERTS— 

I Tea Valuations Furnished. 

I IMPORTS— 

Raw Products, Oils, Tea, Rubber, Chemicals, Tallow, | 
Spices, Essential Oils, Fertilizer, Tapioca, Copra, Co- 1 
coa, Ground Nuts, Peas, Beans. 

We take complete charge of shipments, customs entries, § 
warehousing, weighing, sampling, forwarding to inland con- | 
1 signee, etc. 

SUBMIT YOUR OFFERS 

=;iiiiiiif iiiuiii riiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJiitiiiiiriiiiiiijriiiiMiiiriiiiiiiiiEiiiiiiiJiiiiJiiiiJiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiFMiJiMiJiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiiiJtriiJtiiifiiiitiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiijr^ 



THE EXPORT TRADE DEMANDS THE BEST 




MONARCH 

af/fre 

OARS 

CfcCj — 

"BEAR BRAND" 

Sole Leather 

is more heavily used in 
the export trade than any 
other leather tanned on 
the Pacific Coast. 

Uniformly High Quality 
brings results 



New York 



TANNERS 

San Francisco 



Chicago 



^lliiiiiiilllllMllliliiiiliiiiriiltlllltMllllllinilltllllHillliiliMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNilillliltMiltMiiuiiinliiniiilillMlllllMiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiilllillllliuiiii^ 

MapBHHi> 06yBHaa Ko. Kopn. 

OIITOBAfl nPO^AHCA 
I 216 MapKert yji., CaHi> <t>paHUHCKo, Kax, C. III. A. 

BoJIbUIOft Bbl6opT> pa3HbIX'b OaCOHOBT. 

My)KCKOft, MMCKOft h ^-BTCKOH OByBH. 

06yBb /yia Hrpt h npory^om>, 

a TaKHce Pe3HH0Baa 06yBb /yia mophkobt>. 

I Cable Address "Vinmar," Bentley's Code | 

(TVIARVIN SHOE CaVlncTl 

Shoes Wholesale 

216 Market Street 

San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 

Large Stock of 

Men's, Women's, Boys' 

and Children 's Shoes 

Tennis and Outing 
SHOES 

All Styles on Hand; also = 
Rubber Boots and Shoes 
On hand for immediate 
shipment 
Cable Address "Vinmar," | 

EXPORT TRADE SOLICITED Bentley Code | 

MARVIN SHOE CO. Inc. 

COMERCIANTES DE ZAPATOS AL POR MAYOR 

216 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal., EE. UU. 

I Gran deposito de zapatos para hombres, senoras y ninos 

Zapatos para jugar tennis y para el campo. 

Tenemos toda clase de estilos, asi como zapatos de hule 

para embarcar inmediatamente. 

1 Se solicita el comercio de exportaci6n "Vinmar," C6d. Bentley's 

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g Parent Company 
§ Established 1857 



Resources Over ! 
$1,000,000 



Associated Manufacturers I 
Importing Co. I 

Manufacturers' Representatives 
IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 

IMPORTS 

Chinaware, Crockery, Enamelware, 
Matches, Paper, Vegetable Oils, 
Essential Oils, Hides, Brushes, 
Bristles, Rattan, Copra, Kapok, 
Produce and Raw Materials 

EXPORTS 

Steel Sheets, Bars, Nails, "Wire and 
all Steel Products, Hardware and 
Tools, Aluminum, Rosin, Borax, 
Caustic Soda and Chemicals, Dyes, 
California Pood Products and all 
Raw Materials. 

Cable Address: "AMICO," San Francisco 
All Codes 
871 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. j 



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I 



June 19 19 



87 



■ minium mmiiuimmiHHiiir mranimmiHiiiiiiiii nnmn inn mnnniniinniiiimniiinininniitnmiimnm| £ mm mm iinnmnnni i iinnnnmnmmnimnnn iininninniniinmnnmii i am nun | 

! THE CHAS. A. BACON CO. | [GENERAL PAPER CO. 

EXPORTERS, IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
REPRESENTATIVES 

417 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal., U.S.A. 

CABLE ADDRESS: "CABCO" Code A B C— 5th Edition 

What do you wish to buy? What do you wish to sell? 
Write or cable us at once. We have unexcelled facilities for = 

handling your entire business; selling, buying and forwarding 

REFERENCES: | 

Banca Popolare Fugazl R. G. Dun Mercantile Agency = 

^iiiiiiiiii[iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniMiii!iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiii!i~ 



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Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

IMPORT EXPORT DOMESTIC 
Beans, Peas, Seeds, Oils, Etc. 



525 MARKET ST., San Francisco, U. S. A. 
Cable Address: "EMCO," All Codes 

References: -^^T/V f"^ C*l^*^ um 

Bank of Italy f& A H T" K> . Ml " 

San Francisco ■ *. *^ ' =5 rK I Representatives 

BRANCH OFFICES: Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles 

Dealers in News, Book, Writing, Coated, Ledger, Bond, 

Cardboards, Label and Wrapping Papers 

^71 IIIIIIIIILIIllllllIIII*ll]IIIIJIIIItEIITrillllllltllllllllJllltlCIJJIIlJIEIllllllEllfJlllJLIIItlllttlllllll3lllllllllltlllFlll1lllllllllllllllllllllJIII£9llltIJIIIIlllli]JJ|>1II|I~ 

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F. GRIFFIN & CO. 



STEAMSHIP 
AGENTS 



Write for Quotations 



SHIP BROKERS 
IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

341 Montgomery Street 



209-211 Washington St. 



Chicago, 111., U. S. A. 



Phone Garfield 2241 



SAN FRANCISCO 



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Interstate Pattern Works 

MAKERS OF PATTERNS 

For All Kinds of 

METAL CASTINGS 

Quotations on Iron and Brass Castings Furnished on Application 
FOOT of 13th ST. VANCOUVER, WASH. Phone 241 



References: 
Metropolitan Bank 
Marine Bank and Trust Co. 



Cable Address: 

RENCO 
Codes: A. B. C. 4 

W. U. T. 
Bedford McNeil 



H. S. RENSHAW, Inc. 

Export — Import — Commission 

205-206 Metropolitan Bank Building 

Freight Forwarders NEW ORLEANS, LA. Correspondence Solicited 



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PAGE & JONES 

SHIP BROKERS 

AND 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

Mobile, Alabama, U. S. A. 
Cable Address "P A JONES" All Leading Codes Used 



A. J. £r J. R. COOK 

LEATHEK 

Sole, Calf Skins, Glazed Kid, Patent and 
Upholstery Leather, Etc. 

Cable Address : " Cookbro," San Francisco 

743 Mission Street San Francisco, Cal. 



TRADE MARK 




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Rolph, Mills & Company 

General Shipping and Commission Merchants 
EXPORTS and IMPORTS 

Direct Representatives of Eastern Manufacturers of Principal American Goods 
SEATTLE - PORTLAND LOS ANGELES NEW YORK CHICAGO 

=inliniiit[i[imiiin!iiinnliimiiiiniiiinniiiiinimiiniiiininiinimimiimiiiininnmnnninnim 
Jiinnnnnnniiiiinnminnnmiiiniiimiiminninininininiiinnnninnmimnmimiimnmninmnniiniinninilininm 



Cable Address: 

PETTIBONE 
Codes: 

Armsby, ABC 

5th Edition 

Bentley's, Western 

Union. 




Offices: 

1508-9 L. C. Smith 

Building 

Seattle, Wash. 

U. S. A. 



"Packers' Direct Selling Agents" 



3« minim mini 1 inilinilinilllllinillliniiniinniniinilllinninilllllllliniliniinininn in niiniiimiiniiniiiininiiiiniiminniniiiniin iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiniiiniin 11 niiniiiniiniiiiniiiniiinimiiiiiiiiniT. 

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I P. J. SEALE & COMPANY 485 ^::^ eet | 

-—Cargo Surveyors and Appraisers Exclusively TELEPHONE SUTTER 4893 

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PACIFIC MAIL 
Steamship Co. 






t nshine Belt" to Orient 



PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT 



Trans-Pacific Service 

San Francisco, Honolulu, Japan, China and Philippines 

Monthly Sailings by American Steamers 
''VENEZUELA" "ECUADOR" "COLOMBIA" 



Manila — East India Service 

Direct Route to 

INDIA via Manila, Saigon, Singapore, Calcutta, Colombo 

Approximate Bi-Monthly Sailings by American Steamers 
"COLUSA" "SANTA CRUZ" 



Panama Service 



Mexico, Central America, Panama, and South America 

Fortnightly Sailings by American Steamers 

"NEWPORT" "PERU" "CITY OF PARA" 

"SAN JOSE" "SAN JUAN" 



Service and Cuisine Unexcelled 



For Full Information Apply 

General Office 508 California Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




:\-:'_,-- ; .-y\-: : .< 



BaBMB^^BBMKgBI^HBi^jaMpBMa^'^^^^Sgg 



ULY, 1919ctft 

C^n i^ N 25 1919 



'>' 



Price 25 Cents 



MONEY TALKS ALL LANGUAGES 




Call To Bankers To Aid Foreign Trade 
Square Deal Promised Pacific Coast 
What Are We Going To Do With Our Ships? 




Charles F. Stern, Paul Clagstone, Wm. Rutledge McGarry 
L. R. Cofer, E. M. Herr, Sydney B. Vincent, H. M. Dias 




[llllll1llllllltllllH1l|i<li:itlllllllMIII(ll!illlltlll)llll[:i|iHIIIII|[IHIItlllll1HllllMIHI 



mmiiimimmi . 



HAVE YOU OUR CATALOG? 




REYNOLDS STORE AND 
FACTORY TRUCK 






CONCRETE MIXERS— Many Sizes 

We Will Gladly Send You a Copy and 
Quote Prices 



HAND TRUCKS 
For Every Purpose 



OUR STOCK IS COMPLETE 




MANUFACTURERS 



CASTERS 
Over 100 Styles and Sizes 



SAN FRANCISCO 
U. S. A. 




Cable Address 
"Quolansinvr" 
San Francisco 



STEEL AND WOOD 
WHEELS 



^iiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii ii tiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiuiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMluililliltiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiuiMiiiiiiimiiiinum urn 

•jimiiNmiiMiHMiiiiiimmiiimiiimmiiimiiniimmiiimiiiitiiliiiiiiliiiiiliillMlllllllinH IlllinuillllimilHlHimilllimuilllllilliiiiiiliui 

PURNELL .& PAGET 

ARCHITECTS 

AND 

CIVIL ENGINEERS 

CHAS. S. PAGET, A.S.M. A.M. S. C.E. 



Investigations — Inspections 

Reports and Valuations 

Design and Supervision of Construction 

for Industrial Plants and Buildings 
Power Plants 
Difficult Foundations 



Bridges and Steel Structures 
Wharf and Dock Construction 
River and Harbor Works 
Investigation and Development of Mining 
Properties 



ESTABLISHED IN CHINA 16 YEARS 

f Missions Building, The Bund, Canton, China 
OFFICES \ Paak Hok Tung-Canton, Swatow, China 

[ American National Bank Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telegraphic Address, "PANEL" Western Union Code, A.B.C., 5th Edition 



HiiiiiiniliiiiiiHiuiiiiiii fiMiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiiiiimniiimiimitiit: 



Jul)) 1919 89 

liiiiniHiiiniiiiimimiiimiiiiiiiHiimiiiimniiimimiiiminiimimiiimiiniiiimiimiimiiimmiin^ 

| Java-China-Japan Lijn I 



BETWEEN 



San Francisco 



AND 



Netherlands East Indies 



DIRECT 




REGULAR ^ ^^ RELIABLE 



SERVICE 



BATAVIA 

SOERABAIA 

SAM ARANG 

MACASSAR 
CHERIBON 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

i 

General Agents 

3 

2 Pine Street, San Francisco 

= = 

'I'liwiiimiiiiiiiiitmiimmiiimimiimiiiiiiimirmiimiiiiiimiimiiiw 



90 



Pan Pacific 



■L") iiimiiimiiiiimiiiiiiiMiimiii iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiii iimmiililillilliiiiiilllimilimilllimillliiiliNlltiiiiimmillllllll mill 11 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii I iiilllllimillliliiilniilll mm mini mint miiiiimminm llllllH 



JOOST BROTHERS, Inc. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Wholesale and Retail 

HARDWARE 

Direct From Factory to Dealer or Consumer 

We Are Direct Factory Agents For 
"Russwin" Builders Hardware 



General Hardware 

Parlor Door Hangers 
Barn Door Hangers 
Roofing and Building Paper 
Tackle Blocks and Pulleys 
Paint and Wire Brushes 
Cordage and Chain 



Paints 

Oils 

Varnishes 

TOOLS 



Household Goods 

. Stoves — Ranges 
Tinware 

Aluminum and Enamelware 
Bathroom Fixtures 
Electric and Gas Appliances 
Chinaware and Glassware 



We carry a Complete Line of 
Wrenches — Files — Mechanics, Machinists and Automobile Tools, Drills and Edged Tools 

— Manufacturers of 5 — 



Special Steel Tools — Fire Door Hardware — Crowbars — Chisels — Punches — Ripping Bars 

Sporting Goods 

Arms and Ammunition — Cutlery — Baseball — Tennis and Golf Accessories 
We also handle the Celebrated Lines of 
EDWIN M. KNOWLES CHINA COMPANY 
FOSTORIA GLASS COMPANY 
BUFFALO POTTERY (Hotel China) 

Foreign Orders Promptly and Carefully Executed 

When ordering any of the above articles or asking for catalogs be sure to give full particulars 

CORRESPONDENCE IN ALL LANGUAGES 
Will act as purchasing agent on a brokerage basis for responsible houses 

— Address — 

JOOST BROTHERS, Inc. 

1053 Market Street San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 



fiiiiiuiiinsm i r ■ : r ^ r e 1 1 j j e 1 1 ri j 1 1 i j j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j i j 1 1 2 j 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 i t j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 ^ j 1 1 1 i j 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 j ] 1 1 1 1 1 1 l 1 1 1 1 1 1 j j 1 1 1 j 1 1 l ■ j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 t e i m j r c 1 1 1 1 e 1 1 ] i m i ] J 1 1 1 3 1 e i m : 1 1 a J t j 1 1 ^ i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1^ 3 1 1 1 1 niimiiiniimiimiimimuimiininiiiiniiiH miiiiiiiii'imiHiimiiimiimiiimmiiiiniiHiiimiimiimiiiimimiimiimiiiimii 



jui\> 1 9 r 9 91 

gBMiu nun iiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiiimimiimimiiiiiiimimiimiii iimiiiiiiiimimnmi imimimmmiiiimiimiimimi imiimimimimiiimiimimiiiiiiimiimm mmmiiimimimiiimiiiiiini 




MANUFACTURERS 



AND 



WHOLESALE DEALERS OF 

MENS— WOMENS— CHILDRENS AND INFANTS 

SHOES 

WE HAVE ONE OF THE LARGEST STOCKS ON THE PACIFIC COAST 
ALL STAPLE AND LATEST STYLES FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

SAMPLES WILL BE SENT CHARGES PREPAID 



Cable Address 
"NESCO" Bentley's Code 



NOLAN-EARL SHOE CO. 



25 FREMONT STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, U. S. A. 



■MMBBBHMp 

ftONADNOCK BIDS. 




Pacific Coast 

United States of America 

Buyers' Headquarters 




| Arcade Floor 



The 100% Club 

Monadnock Bldg, 



San Francisco = 



FiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiuiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiHiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiniiiiiiiuiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiimiimimimiimiimiiiiiimimimiimiimimimimi miiMiimimiiiiimiiimiimiiiiiiiiiimiii i i miimimi iiiiiiimiiii? 

•smiiiimnmiim miimiimimimiiimimiimimiimimim iimiitmiiimiimi i iiiijiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiirniriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 'miiiiimiiiiiimimimiimimiimimiimim miiiiimiiimimimiimiiiimiiimiiiiiimimimiiiiiiii iiiimiimmiiimiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiig 

BLACK BEAR GREASES | 

Cup, Transmission, Axle, Car, Graphite, 

Gear, Chain, Skid, Curve, Tractor, 

Hair and Wool Flock 

I 
Manufactured under our exclusive 
patented process 

A distinctive Grease of unusual wearing W 
qualities and high heat resistance 

FULL INFORMATION UPON REQUEST 

PACIFIC LUBRICATING CO. 

Manufacturers and Exporters 

715 W. Spokane St., Seattle, Wash., U. S. A. j 
OR ANY OF OUR REPRESENTATIVES 
: SYCJP HANSON W1NKEL CO., Inc., 327 J. Luna Blnondo, Manila, E 
P. I.— P. M. SCOTT & CO., 76 Pitt St., Sydney, N. S. W.— 
P. LAFARGUE, Casllla 308, Valparaiso, Chile 

^Vi riiitii]Lttjitiijriij[iiirKiifjiiffiiiriiiiFiijriijrEiijrciiitiiJtEijrr«sirc]irciiirijitriiiriiiiEiji[ijiti3itEiirriiiiiairciiiFrijriX]rrriiiiriiir<ijitxiiiijjiriuiiFiiirpijitii iT^ 
v^iiif nt i rEijiriiiriif;riitEiiirEiir[iijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiriijriiiiri]iriijiri]iiEiiiiiJiti(iiicjiiF2i»tii[fiiiriijriij[iijjriiiiiiiiiriiiiiiijrriirFiiiiiiiiriiiiiriii[iiTCiii r^' 

I JAMES P. DWAN | 

621 American National Bank Building 

EXPORTER — IMPORTER 

General Purchasing Agent for Foreign Buyers 

Building Materials 
Machinery, Ores, Metals, Oils 

Offices at 
539 CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

Los Angeles, Calif. | 

MISSIONS BUILDING, THE BUND, CANTON, CHINA 
Cable Address, "DWAN" 

^^ iiijjiiiiiii]iFiii»iiiiEiijEiiirciiiEiijEii]riiiiEiiAiciiitiiJLiiiiiEsjiLijrriijiiiiiiijiiEiii*iiJiriiiLii4rEijiriijiiijjrriji(iuiiEiiirciiiiiiiiEi]iEiiiicijiLiiixtfeiiiicjiitiiiL7- 

^J_l EEEllE3irEEI1IEflllEElllEEJIEElJIEEllEEIIBEEJEEE3IIEEJIEE1IIEEIIEBIJIEE1IEEJI[EEJIECIIIEEIIFrilEEE]ll[1IIEE«lirillEEEIirilllEEIIIBEirrEJIIlEllEEE1IIEEirEE]IIEEEJEBl]IEElirtl]IEEET E_= 

The Cleveland Import & Mfg. Co. 

Parent Company Established 1873 
IMPOBTEES — EXPORTERS 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 

Laughlin Building, Los Angeles, Cal., U. S. A. | 
I IMPORTS— = 

TEA, COFFEE, SPICES, COCOA BEANS, CHICLE, RUBBER, = 
COPRA, PEANUTS, PALM OIL, COCOANUT OIL, TAPIQCA, = 
GENERAL PRODUCE. 
= EXPORTS- 
HARDWARE, MACHINERY, TOOLS, LUMBER, DRIED ! 
FRUITS, CANNED FRUITS, CANNED SARDINES. CANNED i 
SALMON, CANNED TUNA, CALIFORNIA BEVERAGES, § 
GENERAL PRODUCE. | 

1 Sole Export Agents for South and Central America of "M. O. E." |" 
REFINED ELATERITE Carbonlte Coating. Air Water, Acid, §- 
Alkali, Oxygen, Nitrogen and Electricity-proof 
Write for Catalogue and Sample. Good Territory Open. 
Cable Address: "CLEIMPCO." All Codes 
1 Correspondence Solicited and Conducted In All Languages 

miMIIIMIlMIIIMIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIimilMllllllllllllllllllMlllllllllllllllinillllllllMIIIMIIIIIIIIIII^ 



| An extensive COMMERCIAL MUSEUM is maintained for the benefit of 1 
I buyers, where the products of American manufacturers are displayed' 

THE FOREIGN MERCHANT IS INVITED 

To make his buying headquarters at The Club. An information bureau is I 

| maintained. All modern office conveniences provided free to foreign buyers. I 

The Club represents two hundred of America's leading manufacturers and 1 

| merchants. Each member is selected for business efficiency, quality of goods 1 

| and ability to render SERVICE to the buying public. All are leaders in I 
| their line. 

We render the foreign merchant a service, free of all charge or obligation. = 

; Business connections established. Correspondence invited in any foreign 1 
1 language. 

Send for the Complete Story 

WM. E. HAGUE. Sec.-Treas. 

Siimiiiiimmiiimimiimiimiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiimiimiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiimiiiiiimimiimimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiii lililiimniiinmiil 

1' '"in" mimiimiimiimimiii mmniimi niiiiiimiiiiiiiimmilmimilimiimmilmiiimimimimiiimimtmimiimllllE 






Cambria Spring Company 



INCORPORATED 
"PROVEN QUALITY" 





WHEELS AND RIMS SPRING BUMPERS 

AUTO AND TRUCK SPRINGS 

Office: 916-918 So. Los Angeles Street 

Factory: 913-921 Santee Street 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

Code: WESTERN UNION 

MiiiiitiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiMiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii; 



92 Pan Pacific 

-^J 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J M n [ ! i ] i [ 1 1 1 1 1 1 g 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 1 1 1 ■ l < I r 1 1 ] 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 < 1 1 [ m 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 ] 1 1 1 1 j [ ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 1 1 1 [ 1 1 1 1 [ l ! i [ 1 1 ■ l ! M 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 > 1 1 1 L M l r 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r J 1 1^ 'uiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiuiiiniiiiiiilniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiniMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiliiilllllliiiiiliiniiiiiniiiililllliiiiiiilii^ 



i CHAS. M. PAGANINI 



EDWARD P. BARRY = 



Edward Barry Company 

WHOLESALE PAPER DEALERS 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Agents for: 

L. L. BROWNS LEDGER, BOND AND 

TYPEWRITER PAPERS 

Samples and Quotations Promptly Furnished 



MANUFACTURING DEPARTMENT 
Largest Wholesale Bookbinders on the Pacific Coast | 
Writing Tablets — Ruled Goods — Blank Books | 
Loose Leaf Systems — Bookbinding Supplies 




^iiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiniiiniiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii? riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiii: 
^iiniiiiiiinmmiimimiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinmiiiiiiiiiimiiimmiiiNimiimijiiim 



ECONOMY!!! 



Ship Plate Tightener 

A NEW INVENTION 



20 Ton Pressure 

BY THE STROKE 

OF 

THE HAND 



THIS IS HOW 



The McBride Hydraulic 
Plate Tightener 

SPEEDS UP SHIPBUILDING IN 
SEATTLE YARDS 



SPEED!!! 

PATENTED 



EFFICIENCY!!! 



Portable 22 inches over all — 

weighs but 58 pounds 

EASILY operated by one man and helper. Does 
work formerly requiting 20 MEN: TAKES all 
spring out of the plates by its immense pres- 
sure — a factor unobtainable by hand-pressure. 




Shipbuilders Machinery Co., inc. 

201-2 Maynard Building 



SEATTLE, WASH. 
SOLE DISTRIBUTERS 



No. 2 Exerts — 20 ton pressure 
No. 3 Exerts— 1>0 ton pressure 



MANVFACTURERS OF 

SKINNER & EDDY CORPORATION 

Scarphing Machine 

Angle Bevelling and Portable Countersinking 

Motor Driven Machines 



I iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiniiiuimiiiinii niiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiinMiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiniiiir 



July 1919 



93 



iiiiiiiimiirmiiitiiimiimiiiiiiimimiimiii iimiii ilium i iniim i riirriiiiitriiii tuirt Miiiuit n iiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimimiimimiimiiiiiimimiii; ijmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiimii iiimiiiiiimiimiiiiiimiiiimiiiiiiiimimmiiimimiimimiiiiiiM'. 



Clyde Equipment 
Company 



PORTLAND 



SEATTLE 1 



Machinery and Supply 
Merchants 



542 First Avenue South 

Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. 

fi mi HiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiitiiniiiniiiiMiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiin iimihiiiimiumiimiimiimiiiiiiiiiiii^ 

klllllllMIIMIIIIHIIIIIHIIIIllll llllllllllllllllinilllllllllinilllllllMIIIIIIUIinillllllllllllllllllllllllllUIMHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIMIIIIIUIIUIIIIllllllllllll^ 



Cable address 

Llewellyn 
Los Angeles 




IRON WORKS 



LOS ANGELES CAL. 



C/3 

U 

z 

o 

> 
< 

8 



CARGO 
and 

CHAIN 
WENCHES 



TANKS 






MARINE ENG 


NES 




MARINE BOILEF 








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O 


, 




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en 



ROLLING MILL PRODUCTS 

INGOTS, BILLETS, BARS, SHAPES 

STRUCTURAL STEEL FABRICATORS 



I MARVIN SHOE CO. Inc. 

SHOES WHOLESALE 

I 216 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 




LARGE STOCK OH | 

Men's, Women's, Boys' and Childrens' Shoes 

TENNIS and OUTING SHOES j 

ALL STYLES ON HAND ALSO 

RUBBER BOOTS and SHOES [ 

ON HAND FOR IMMEDIATE SHIPMENT 1 

Export Trade Solicited 

Bentley Code 

7HiiiitiiiiiiiuiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiiMiiHiiiMiiMi]iiiiiMiniiitiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii]iM]iiiiiMiit[!ii[iiiiiMiiiiii[uiiniiiniiiitiiiiiiii'5 

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IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
FROM STOCK 




IIIIMIIIIIIlllllllllill 



Iron 
Bolts 
Chain 
Axes 



Steel 
Nuts 
Waste 
Saws 



Belting Pulleys 
Logging Tools 



iimiiiiiiiiiiiiiniii 



I MillandMine Supply Co. 

| Cable Address "Milesmine" Seattle, U.S.A. 



■^ < t c b t r l i ] 1 1 1 1 1 l 1 1 j j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ] j 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 e 1 1 1 i [ 1 1 1 j i c i j 3 1 m 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 j l e 1 1 j l 1 1 a i 1 1 1 j r 1 1 ] r 1 1 a ^ r r e 3 j l 1 1 1 j c 1 1 j i e 1 1 3 1 1 1 ^ j 1 1 1 ] ; c i a i r m i j 1 1 1 j r 1 1 1 j r 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 ] 1 1 1 ] j e 1 1 j r [ m r [ m j ; c i i j [ 1 1 ] r e 1 1 j t . ~ 



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94 



Pan Pacific 



'mnmiimnniniiinniininiiinnnniniNniiinmminiinninimniinmniinmniiiinMniiininnnmMmnm 

| Shippers Commercial Corporation I 



SEATTLE, U. S. A. 

L. C. SMITH BLDG. 



EXPORTERS 




Cable Address: SHIPCOMCO 

ALL CODES USED 

IMPORTERS 



Trade Mark 



CANNED 
SALMON 



Pacific Coast Products 



CANNED 

MILK 



rmniiiiiiiiniinninmniiiiiiiiimniinmimnmniinniniinniiniiniinimnmninimniinminiiiniiniinim 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiniiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiii; iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiijiiiiMiitiii(iiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiitiiiiiiitiiiitiiiiiiiriiiitiiiiMiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiriiriiiiitiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiniiiiii^£ 



Cable Address: "DILL" 




Watch for this Trade-Mark 





EXPORTERS OF 






Steel Products 


Chemicals 




Dye Stuff 


Acids 


Hematine 




Barytes 


Caustic Soda 


Soda Ash 




Phenol 




^osin 


Turpentine 






and Raw Materials for All Industries 






IMPORTERS OF 






Fish Oil 


Cocoanut Oil 




Castor Oi 


Soya Bean Oil 


Rape Seed Oil 




Tallow 


Hides 


Beans 




Peanuts 


Coffee 


Copra 
Rattans Etc. 




Silks 



SEATTLE FAR EAST TRADING 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Import — Export Merchants 

Head Office, L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Wash., U. S. A 

Branch Offices: 

SHANGHAI, 6 Jinkee Road HONGKONG 

KOBE, 23 Sakae Machi, 6 Chome 
TOKIO. 4 Nakadoro Marunouchi 

Cable Addresses: 

SEATTLE, "Safetco" SHANGHAI, "Safetco" 

HONGKONG, "Safetco" KOBE, " Kelley " 

TOKIO, "Safetco" 



DILL CROSETT, Inc. 



San Francisco 



| 235 Pine Street 

Branch Offices 
128 William Street New York 

328 Sannomiya-Cho, 1 Chome Kobe Japan 
Union Bank Chambers Sydney, Australia 



EXPORT SPECIALTIES 

Iron, Woodworking and Textile Machinery 
Iron, Steel, Pipe, Plates, Bars, Sheets, Rail- 
way Supplies, Rails, Cars, Locomotives, 
Etc. Wire Nails, Paints, Varnishes. 

Glass, Sanitary Ware, Plumbing Fixtures, 

Hardware, Tools, Chemicals, 

Electric Meters 



Correspondence Solicited 



Iiiimim mmiiiiiiiiiiiiniiin iiiiiniiiiiiii Mini imiiiiiimiii i milium iiimmi ft » mini mn mini n i milium n n i miimhimiiiiinmnminmiimi mil 

miiimtilllllliuill iimimniinminmnmiimii miimiiiniiiiiiimi ; mnmnmiim'liiliim i mn i i nun ininniinminiinminiiniii mm mm i niinminiiinmninm Illlllin i niiinminiinimj 

THOMPSON & CASTLETON 

Electrical and Mining Machinery 

Complete Electrical Shop — Specialists on Rewinding 
Machinery of All Kinds 

COMPLETE INSTALLATIONS MADE 



316 FIRST STREET, SO. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



= minim milium ininin mil i nininin iminiinmiin Illlllin nnninnininninminilliwi i nun miiimimiiniiimiiim mi i iiinmnmnnnn i i mini iiiiimiiumimiiiimni n mm 



July 19 19 



95 



-■iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiitiiiuiiiuiiiiitiiiiiiiHMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiitiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiniiHiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiE ^iniiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiitiiiuMiiiiiniiiiiiiHiiitiiiiiiiniiiiiMiniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiitiiiniiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiii^ 



PLANTING THE 
FLAG OF THE 
ADMIRAL LINE 
IN THE ORIENT 




L. Dinkelspiel Company 

INCORPORATED 

115-135 Battery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS 



I DRY GOODS 



Trans-Pacific Freight and 
Passenger Service 

Sailing from Seattle at Regular Intervals 

THE ADMIRAL LINE 

PACIFIC STEAMSHIP CO. 

Fifth Floor L. C. Smith Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 

112 MARKET ST., San Francisco 8 BRIDGE ST., New York 

Manila Hong Kong Vladivostok Shanghai Singapore Kobe Yokohama 



FURNISHING 
GOODS 



NOTIONS and 
FANCY GOODS 



Cotton Piece Goods — Linens — | 

Towels — Napkins 

Dress Goods — Cotton and Wool 1 

Silks — Sheetings — Bleached and I 

Unbleached Muslin 

Flannels and Flannelettes — Ticks | 

— Prints, Etc. 

Men's, Ladies', and Children's | 
Hosiery — Underwear — Shirts — 1 
Sweaters 

Ribbons — Laces — Embroideries — i 
Threads — Notions of all 
Descriptions 



BLANKETS — COMFORTABLES — QUILTS 

Complete stocks carried Correspondence all languages I 

Cable Address: "LIPSEKNID" 



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National Products Co. I I Ingrim-Rutledge Company I 



GRAIN MERCHANTS 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

519 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Calif. 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
413-15 MONTGOMERY STREET 



Exporters of 

Wheat, Barley, Corn, Flour, Beans, 
Rice, Dried Fruit and Canned Goods 



. PRINTERS 
STATIONERS BOOKBINDERS 

ENGRAVERS 

Art and Color Work 

Catalog and Booklet Printing 

Copper Plate and Steel Die Engraving 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 
EXPORT ORDERS 



Importers of 

Grain, Grain Bags, Beans, Rice, Coffee, 
Tapioca, Spiees, Hides, Tin & Gambier 



Filing Devices Office Equipment \ 

Office Furniture 
Loose Leaf Systems 



COMPLETE LINE OF OFFICE SUPPLIES 



CABLE ADDRESS— "NAPRO" 

Correspondence Invited 



INGRIM-RUTLEDGE COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



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96 



Pan Pacific 



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NIPPON YUSEN KAISHA) I Skinner & Eddy Corporation 

(JAPAN MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.} J i 



(JAPAN MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.) 
Capital, Yen $100,000,000 Head Office, Tokyo 




RECORD 

BUILDERS 



Fleet 99 — Gross Tonnage, 500,000 

| TRANS-PACIFIC PASSENGER SERVICE 

I Between Seattle and Hong Kong via Japan Ports, 
Shanghai and Manila, with Direct Connection for 
All Points in the Orient and Australia 

1 Greatly Improved Fast Service of Large, High-Powered Modern 
Twin and Triple Screw Steamships with Unequaled 
Passenger Accommodations 

DISPLACEMENT: 

I S. S. Suwa Maru 21,020 tons S. S. Katori Mam 19,200 tons 

i S. S. Fushiml Maru. ...21, 020 tons S. S. Atsuta Maru 16,000 tons 

I S. S. Kashlma Maru..19,200 tons S. S. Kamo Maru 16,000 tons 

1 For further information, rates, tickets, berth reservation, etc., 

= apply to any office of the principal railways in the United States 

= and Canada, also any office of Messrs. Thos. Cook & Son, Messrs. 

= Raymond & Whitcomb Co., American Express Co., and other tourist 

| agencies in all parts of the world, or to the 

NIPPON .YUSEN KAISHA 



OF 



Steel Cargo 
STEAMSHIPS 



= 



i 

= 
i 

! 
S 

! 



Colman Building 
Seattle 



Railway Exchange Bldg. 
Chicago 



Equitable Bldg. 
New York 



SEATTLE 



WASHINGTON 



U. S. A. 



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! Cable Address, " Connell " 



All Codes = 



Connell Bros. 
Company 

I GENERAL IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 



Rothwell & Co. inc. 

Hoge Building, Seattle, Wash. 

Importers— Exporters 
Shipping 



97 Warren St. Lonja Del Comercio 517 
New York Havana, Cuba 



Kobe 
Japan 



HOME OFFICE 
L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Wash., U. S. A. 



BRANCH OFFICE 

485 California Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 



OFFICES ALSO AT 
| Shanghai Manila Hong Kong Singapore 



Correspondence Solicited 



IMPORTS: 

1 China Wood Oil, Peanut Oil, Soya Bean Oil, Perilla Oil, 

Fish Oil, Cocoanut Oil, Rapeseed Oil, Whale 

Oil, Castor Oil, Sesame Oil, Beans, 

Peas, Peanuts, Silk Piece Goods 

Ginger, Copra and Hemp 

j EXPORTS: 

l Canned Fruits, Canned Fish, Canned Milk, Resin, Dye- 
stuffs, Caustic Soda, Soda Ash, Paraffine, 
Iron, Steel, Machinery 

Correspondence Invited 



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97 



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JULY, 1919 



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PAN PACIFIC 

A MAGAZINE OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE 



John H. Gerrie Editor 

Wm. Rutledge McGarry Consulting Editor 

San Francisco, California 

ASSOCIATED EDITORS AND STAFF 
CORRESPONDENTS 

Wm. E. Aughinbaugh, M.D.; B.S.; L.L.D New York 

Juiji G. Kasai, A.M Japan 

Valabdhas Runchordas India 

George Mellen '. Honolulu 

Thomas Fox Straits Settlement 

W. H. Clarke Australia 

Lazaro Basch Mexico 

Vincent Collovich Chile and Peru 

L. Carroll Seattle 

F. J. Menzies _ Los Angeles 

Chao-Hsin Chu, B.C.S., M.M China 

H. M. Dias Ceylon 



PAN PACIFIC is defoted to the friendly development 
of COMMERCE among ALL countries bordering the Pa- 
cific Ocean. It aims to give authentic information bear- 
ing upon the creation of PERMANENT Foreign Trade; 
that the AMERICAN MERCHANT MARINE may rest 
upon an enduring basis of reciprocal benefaction to all 
peoples who look to America for aiding financial and in- 
dustrial advancement. 

AMERICAN CONSULS are privileged to send cards of 
introduction with Foreign Buyers to PAN PACIFIC fully 
assured that such cards will entitle buyers to all the 
PRIVILEGES of our EDUCATIONAL and INFORMA- 
TION Bureaus, while traveling in the United States. 

Pan Pacific is published monthly. Subscription price, 
$3.00 per year (gold) in advance. Single copies, 25 cents. 
Advertising rates on application. Correspondence in any 
language. Address all communications to 

PAN PACIFIC CORPORATION, Publishers 
618 Mission Street, San Francisco 



Special Features in This Issue 

Money Talks All Languages Charles F. Stern 99 

Square Deal For Pacific Coast Paul Clagstone 102 

Pointers for Beginners J. B. Benson 103 

Portland Removed the Bar , Sydney B. Vincent 10 U 

19 § Misconceptions About Russia Wm. Rutledge McGarry 107 

Hji Capital Must Lead L. R. Cofer 108 

What Are We To Do With Our Ships? E. M. Herr 112 

Who's Who (Edward Cookingham) 113 

Cocoanut Palms Support Ceylon H. M. Dias 11U 

Oblique Stroke in Foreign Trade G. B. Carpenter 123 






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98 Pan Pacific 



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I * m Ocean Transport Q>.,m». 

( TAIYO KAIUN KABUSHIKl KAISHA ) 

OF KOBE. JAPAN 

Agents At All Principal Ports In Tmc World 

Operating Modern Fretftht Si earners 
100 Al UoyAS 

Regular Direct Service 

To St From 

San Francisco Seattlc Vancouver 

Amo 

\okohaha, Kobe. Shanghai, 
Hongkong. Manila. 
Si ngapo re 

Frequent Sailing* Tc 

Vladivostok & North China Ports 

We Solicit Your Inquiries For Cargoes 
To Aw. Principal Pouts In The Would 

'Trans Oceanic Co. 

Pacific coast Ac c nts 
San fttANCifco <* SEATTLE -* V/acicouv6R 

324 San$om« ST amfkican e*»n Bioo yokkshir* flt06. 

Chicago «* Mew Vork 

646 flRRoueffe slog. 71 Broadway 

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July 19 19 



99 




Money Talks All Languages 

Superintendent Stern Shows How To Make It Talk in Terms of Overseas Trade 

With the Pacific Coast 



OUT of five years of world's suf- 
fering has been borne a new 
heaven arid a new earth. Precedents 
have died as their futility has been 
disclosed. The world over, the things 
that have been are on trial for their 
lives before the bar of the things that 
are. The world has shrunk; rapid 
communication, allied interests, social, 
economical and political, but above all 
the pulsion of association of many 
men of many countries in common 
dangers for a common cause, have 
created an intimate world relation- 
ship. 

Our men who fought side by side 
with the men of twenty allied nations 
can never again regard those men or 
those nations as something foreign and 
apart. The personal touch is there; 
the community of interest. These are 
the things that will program the 
world's trade of tomorrow. 

Three million Americans — the best 
minds in the best bodies that this na- 
tion could produce, the minds and the 
bodies that will dominate our activi- 
ties for the next generation — will 
never again think of the Englishman, 
the Anzac, the Canadian, the French- 
man, the Italian, as an abstraction; for 
all time these men will be living, 
breathing personalities, men with 
known passions, with known virtues, 
with known capacity. They will rep- 
resent to us, the men of these foreign 
nations, almost as definite a thing in 
the world competition as our competi- 
tor or our buyer across the street rep- 
resents in domestic competition. The 
■Mociation, the understanding, the 
larger field of activities that are the 
major things that came to us for the 
price we paid "over there" will neces- 
sarily be the key to our foreign trade. 

For the purpose of this discussion, 
permit me to define "foreign trade" 
by a process of elimination. 

First, I do not mean conversational 
foreign trade. I am well aware that 
for many months discussion of this 
subject has been our finest indoor pas- 
time. It has occupied the attention of 
chambers of commerce, national 



By CHARLES F. STERN 

State Superintendent of Banks in 

California 




CHARLES F. STERN 

associations, and other resoluting 
bodies. 

These discussions have been predi- 
cated on the thought that the problem 
may be solved by resolution or joint 
rebate. To it has been brought all the 
eloquence of the after inner orator, all 



. 



For Us To Make Good 

OUR boys are coming back with 
these words: "Here is the flag 
you entrusted to us; dirty, torn, ragged, 
from one hundred battle fields, drenched 
with the blood of heroes, and in our 
hands it has never touched the ground; 
and under its leadership we have writ- 
ten in blood for all thd world to 
read this message: 'America never 
welches.' " 

It is for us in whatever may be our 
line of activity, as merchant, manufac- 
turer or banVer, to make good now and 
for all time that which those boys be- 
neath that flag made possible. 



of the energy of the professional 
propagandist. The foreign trade prob- 
lem of which I speak is not soluble 
in rhetoric. 

Nor do I mean catalogue foreign 
trade. The catalogue process is that 
by which a manufacturer of hobnails 
in Massachusetts undertakes to dispose 
of his surplus product in South Amer- 
ica, where bare feet are the prevailing 
style. He sends on this commercial 
quest not a man, but a catalogue writ- 
ten in English for buyers who use 
only Spanish, expressing in terms of 
the dozen and the gross to a people 
who use only the metric system, quot- 
ing prices in terms of dollars to buy- 
ers who pay in other money, and quot- 
ing these prices subject to an insert 
pink slip in the back announcing that 
the goods may be had at fifty, three 
tons, a five and a two off list ; and, 
finally, that the goods will be shipped 
on order, draft with bills of lading, 
to a country whose business dealings 
are based on long-time credits. 

I am not speaking of that large vol- 
ume of foreign business that comes to 
us almost without competition; busi- 
ness that is ours not by virtue of our 
energy or our salesmanship, but by 
virtue of the possession of certain nat- 
ural resources, certain coal, oil and 
mineral wealth ; certain agricultural 
peculiarities that give us a natural 
"inside" in the world's markets for 
these commodities. 

Nor am I speaking of spasmodic 
commercial raids whereby our bucca- 
neers of commerce have at times been 
driven by surplus production into the 
world's markets on the theory of 
caveat empter — let the buyers beware 
— with no thought or intent to estab- 
lish permanent trade connections. 

I am speaking here of the part I 
hope to see my country play as an 
open, tireless, consistent, successful 
competitor with all the world in the 
markets of all the world — a competi- 
tion in which our natural resources 
and peculiar advantages shall bring to 
their assistance the best brains and 
the best energy at our command in 



100 



Pan Pacific 



A Call to Arms to the Bankers of America 



order that American goods sold 
through Amreican agencies in terms of 
the American dollar shall dominate 
the markets of the world. 

Herein lies our national oppor- 
tunity; herein lies a responsibility that 
we may not evade with honor; herein 
lies the final and culminating fact that 
will decide whether the thing that we 
have done was worth the doing — 
whether the men who died that it 
might be done have died in vain. 
Now Is the Time 
To Realize Dream 
If this dream is to become a reality, 
it must be now. The new world is 
taking form ; the grooves for its future 
progress are being cut. While we 
theorize and debate, the Jap today 
and the German tomorrow are at 
work. 

In order that this or any other na- 
tion shall have and hold a profitable 
foreign trade requires three things: 
First — Goods the buyer wants, 
packed and shipped as he wants 
them. 

Second — Financing in accord- 
ance with the custom of the 
buying country, both through 
the financial agents of the seller 
on the ground. 

Third — Reciprocal purchases 
in kind from the buying 
country. 

Confidence between buyer and seller 
is a thing of growth, a thing to be 
carefully nurtured and never abused, 
and which reaches its fruition only 
with the process of time. Without 
mutual confidence no trade relation- 
ship can permanently stand. 

Understanding of the buyer's needs 
can only be reached through painstak- 
ing, exhaustive, conscientious study. 
This problem, like every other prob- 
lem, can be diagnosed only upon the 
ground and by competent diagnosti- 
cians. 

Germany Patiently 
Built Up Her Trade 
It was this genius of infinite pains, 
the patient building of a trade struc- 
ture stone upon stone, that gave Ger- 
many 80 per cent of the fabulously 
rich South American foreign trade 
prior to the war. A few weeks ago 
I talked with the Pacific Coast man- 
ager of a large Japanese trading con- 
cern with offices in the United States. 
I asked him what he was doing with 
reference to the South American field. 
His answer was that he is establish- 
ing branch offices in Valparaiso, Rio 
de Janiero and Buenos Aires. He said: 
"I am putting in each a manager, 
an interpreter and a clerical force. 
They are there not to get business 
today, but as listening posts. If, in 



three years, they can gain the confi- 
dence of the people and learn with 
what goods and under what condi- 
tions this trade may be had, I shall 
be repaid." 

I said to him: "While America is 
talking about this problem, Japan is 
doing," and he answered as quick as 
a flash: "Ah, when my company, 
through Pacific Coast offices, opens 
branch offices in South America, I wish 
to be considered not a Japanese, but 
part of the American commercial in- 
vasion of South America." 

The brilliant sophistry of that pres- 
entation needs no elucidation. 



The Fruits of Victory 

WE have made the world safe for 
democracy, we say, hut this is 
the form without the substance if the 
Hun or his counterpart may come again 
and where he has failed in war, succeed 
in peace. We have fought to make a 
free world, hut unless democracy can 
dominate the markets of the world, the 
fruits of victory are as ashes in our 
mouths. This is America's opportunity, 
this is America's responsibility, to this 
America is bound in honor. We have 
set our hands to the plow and we may 
not look back. When we turned from 
peace to war, we did it over night. We 
mobilized our man power and our wo- 
man power, and our money, our produc- 
tivity, everything. We discarded creed 
and sect and partisan politics. As one 
people with one voice we turned to our 
government and said, "All we are, all 
we have, all we can do, our lives, our 
fortunes and our sacred honor — here 
they are — take them, use them without 
limit and without stint. Only bring us 
back a victory if it takes the last man 
and the last dollar. ' ' 



This was the German method of 
yesterday; it is the Japanese method 
of today. Unless it finds its counter- 
part in the American manufacturer, 
co-operating with the American 
banker, then there will be no tomor- 
row for American foreign trade in 
competition. 

Bankers Must Stand 
Back of U. S. Traders 

For with the manufacturer and the 
exporter, you, the bankers of Amer- 
ica, must take your stand. Every 
other nation engaged in foreign trade 
recognizes this fact. England, Can- 
ada, China and Japan are financing 
their foreign trade here through 
branch banks in California — doing 
within our midst what the California 
law will not permit our bankers to do 
abroad. 

Section 58 of the California bank 
act, which will become effective on 
July 22, is designed to meet this need. 
Its provisions extend to California 



State banks the power already granted 
to national banks under Section 25 of 
the original Federal Reserve act, per- 
mitting, first, foreign branches estab- 
lished directly by a California bank 
of sufficient strength, and, second, col- 
lective branches established by groups 
of California banks through stock 
ownership. 

In other words, Section 58 permits 
for the first time our own manufac- 
turers and exporters to compete on 
equal terms through the exercise of 
powers the exact reciprocal of the 
powers we grant to foreign branch 
banks on California soil. This is the 
master key to American foreign trade. 
Money talks all languages ; ' but suc- 
cessful American foreign trade must 
be based on the American dollar as 
a standard of exchange and financed 
by American bankers through branches 
on foreign soil. 

Everybody's Business 
Is Nobody's Business 

Does this seem axiomatic to you? 
Then let me tell you this: When Sec- 
tion 58 was submitted, with other pro- 
posed amendments, by my office 4 to 
your legislative committee, it was re- 
turned to me with this notation pen- 
ciled in the margin: "No demand; 
no objection." Someone has said that 
what is everybody's business is no- 
body's business. Must we establish as 
a corollary, "What is everybody's 
knowledge is nobody's knowledge?" 
Consider the California branch bank 
on foreign soil in the light of the 
third essential for foreign trade, re- 
ciprocal buying and selling relations. 

The nation that would sell must 
surely buy; the tide of commerce can- 
not flow continually one way. At our 
doors and ready at our hand, if we 
will, is the South American trade. Do 
you realize the fabulous potential 
wealth and buying capacity of South 
America? Do you realize that the de- 
velopment of that potential field lies 
largely in our own hands? The problems 
of developing South America are the 
problems that we have faced and are 
facing — problems inseparable from 
those of finance. Public utilities must 
be financed and developed; irrigation, 
reclamation and subdivision projects 
are waiting there to pay royal tribute 
to the wealth that brings them into 
fruition. 

The nation that is the preferred 
competitor for South America's busi- 
ness will be the nation that with the 
one hand sells and with the other 
finances the internal development of 
South America, which alone can make 
possible an increase in her buying 
capacity. This means that American 
capital, through American banks and 






Jul], 19 19 



101 



To Take Their Stand in Foreign Commerce 



American investment companies, must, 
as part of their broader commercial 
campaign, look to the broader fields 
of the buying nations for long-time in- 
vestments. 

Banks Must Winnow 
Wheat From Chaff 

It seems that our American branch 
banks in buying countries must win- 
now the wheat from the chaff and 
present to the American investor long- 
term securities of unquestioned sound- 
ness. We are just scratching this field 
in the new amendments to the bank 
act, whereby we permit the investment 
of a certain proportion of our savings 
funds in bonds of certain foreign 
countries. It is the opening wedge. 

There are fundamental considera- 
-tions, and yet, on analysis, they are 
what every student of trade and every 
financier knows. With these thoughts 
might go a mass of detail, a discussion 
of the intimate phases of foreign ex- 
change, of international banking, of 
trade balances and their significance; 
but these details and these considera- 
tions are but incidental to the major 
situation. 

Frankly, I am concerned with the 
question of foreign trade not so much 
from the standpoint of a study of its 
mechanics, but of its spirit. Our days 
of splendid national isolation are past. 
We have taken our stand boldly as a 
world power standing for the ideals 
that make the world a fit place to live 
in, and backing these ideals with an 
armed force that was invincible. We 
are the colossus of the nations today; 
our influence felt in every land, our 
prestige at its zenith. 

Eyes of the World 
Turned Toward Us 

The eyes of the world are turned 
toward us; every nation in the world 
owes us money; every market in the 
world looks to us for supplies. Out 
of the world war we have emerged 
practically the only nation with man 
power, money power and productivity 
unimpaired.- Can we hold the ground 
that is now ours? Can we fulfill the 
destiny that seems within our reach? 
These are the questions that will be 
answered in the unwritten history of 
the next generation, and that answer 

I nil be founded upon what we do with 
sreign trade. 
For five years the world has been 
renched with blood. Ten million 
len, and women and children beyond 
umbering, paid the price, for what? 
Ve say that we have made the world 
afe for democracy, but that remains 
to be seen. The war of swords may 
now be over, but the real war has just 
begun. The wars of today are com- 
ercial. They are born of economic 



Must Be Finished Abroad 

OUT over your highways from your 
ports of entry and your centers of 
population lies your state. Go see her — 
learn her — sense her needs and her pos- 
sibilities. Then face to the West and 
see in your mind's eye those highways 
projected out across the Pacific into 
every land. See the products of your 
California moving out over those roads 
to their ultimate market somewhere be- 
yond the setting sun. Sense the inti- 
mate relationship between this, our Cal- 
ifornia, and the lands that are the des- 
tination of those products, and then it 
will begin to come home to us that the 
internal development of our beloved 
state may be begun at home, but it 
must be finished abroad. 



conditions and nurtured in the belly- 
hunger of nations. 

Lust for power demands its expres- 
sion in control of markets ; lust for 
territory is the expression of the need 
for markets and all the damnable ar- 
rogants of the Hun are predicated on 
these propositions. The war was 
made in Germany, and it was "made 
in Germany" that caused the war — 
not the jealousy of competing commer- 
cial nations but the culture that would 
short-cut a path to commercial domi- 
nance for Germany over the rights 
and bodies of her competitors. 

Democracy of itself means nothing. 
We hold to it; we fight and die for it, 
not as an abstraction but because we 
believe that democracy promises to a 
people more of life, liberty and pur- 
suit of happiness, mere fruits of their 
productivity and more chance for 
working out their individual destinies 
than any other form of government. 
It follows then that the proof of 
democracy comes now. 



. 



Master Key of Trade 

WITH the manufacturer and the 
exporter, you, the bankers of 
America, must take your stand. Every 
other nation engaged in foreign trade 
recognizes this fact. England, Canada, 
China and Japan are financing their 
foreign trade here through branch 
banks in California — doing within our 
midst what the California law will not 
permit our bankers to do abroad. 

In other words, Section 58 permits for 
the first time our own manufacturers 
and exporters to compete on equal 
terms through the exercise of powers 
the exact reciprocal of the powers we 
grant to foreign branch banks on Cal- 
ifornia soil. This is the master key to 
American foreign trade. Money talks 
all languages; but successful American 
foreign trade must be based on the 
American dollar as a standard of ex- 
change and financed by American bank- 
ers through branches on foreign soil. 



I am a native of California; my 
father is a native of California; my 
grandfather died on Humboldt bar 
fifty years ago. I yield to no man 
in love or loyalty for this my native 
State. I know here as the land where 
Nature has been pleased to express 
herself in superlatives — the largest 
trees and grandest harbor; the most 
fertile soil; the most diversified pro- 
ductivity ; the most wonderful climate ; 
a land where winter brings no deadly 
chill and summer reaps no grim har- 
vest of death; a land where every 
fruit, tree and flower of use to man 
finds somewhere a congenial soil. This 
is our California. I have said, in my 
pride, that there is food and living 
here for a quarter of the national 
census. 

Future Is Tied Up 
With Foreign Trade 

But the future of my State, the ul- 
timate limit of that which she may 
produce, and, therefore, the life and 
comfort that she may maintain, is tied 
up in the future of her foreign trade. 
Far flung our coast line, fronts the 
Pacific — the highway of the nations. 

For five wonderful years it was my 
privilege to have a part in the con- 
struction of the highways of Califor- 
nia. During that time I traveled up 
and down this State studying its needs 
and its possibilities. Over 150,000 
miles in five years by auto has given 
me more than a glimpse of California. 
I wish I might find words to tell you 
of the great new spirit that is working 
in this State under the influence of 
highway construction; of new centers 
of population springing up and old 
ones given new life; thousands of 
acres of unused land developed from 
potential into actual assets of Califor- 
nia. 

There are things that a nation may 
do or not do, as it chooses. There are 
other things that an individual or a 
nation may not refuse to do with 
honor, and there are those things that 
must be done for the primitive con- 
sideration of safety. It is in the light 
of these last two things that we must 
face the question of foreign trade. 

We have wrested from autocracy 
the markets of the world. Can dem- 
ocracy hold them? Will democracy 
hold them? Shall we prove now for 
all time that democracy is what we 
claim it is, or must we bow the head 
and acknowledge that when face to 
face with democracy we failed? Dem- 
ocracy is on trial today as it never 
has been before. 

(Note — Address before California 
State Bankers' Association Conven- 
tion, Catalina Island, June 6.) 



102 



Pan Pacific 



Square Deal for Pacific Coast 

Western Representative U. S. Chamber of Commerce Says It Is Inevitable That 

All Ports Enjoy Fullest Activity 



THE future of our foreign trade is 
possibly the greatest question 
confronting us today. As a result of 
the war, production of factories and 
farms was enormously stimulated, 
reaching a volume far in excess of our 
domestic market demand. As a re- 
sult, leading economists declare, unless 
a large export trade be built up, a 
great proportion of our industrial 
plants will stand idle six months in 
the year, with all the disorganization 
attendant upon unemployment. 

This situation was made clearly evi- 
dent as soon as the armistice was 
signed, and steps were soon taken by 
the proper authorities to solve the 
problem. The field to be covered is 
so vast, however, that it will be some 
time before various factors can be 
properly worked out, so that but little 
publicity has been given regarding the 
activities of those who are dealing 
with the question. 

Of Vital Interest 
To Pacific Coast 

To no section of the country is the 
successful solution of this question of 
more interest than to the Pacific 
Coast, with its magnificent seaports at 
San Francisco and other points. To 
our general public, however, the whole 
situation is obscure, and indeed dis- 
couraging, for a number of reasons. 

As stated, no general policy for the 
future has yet been announced. At 
the same time, large steel ships which 
are being constantly turned out on 
this coast are immediately withdrawn 
for shipments of food products from 
Atlantic ports to Europe, while Cal- 
ifornia and other Pacific states, with 
the largest food crop in their history, 
are faced with a serious situation un- 
less ships be allotted to this section 
so that regular sailings and shipping 
rates can be announced. 

Export Rail Rates 
Should Be Reduced 

Our principal Pacific Coast cities 
have become convinced that there 
should be a reduction in export rail 
rates and the addition of many com- 
modities, in order to equalize rates via 
the Pacific Coast with those via the 
Atlantic, and a short time ago sent a 
large and representative committee to 
urge these views upon Edward Cham- 
bers, Director of Traffic of the Federal 
Railway Administration. Some dis- 
couraged export houses have even de- 
clared that they would soon be ob- 
liged to close their Pacific Coast offices 
and move to New York. 



By PAUL CLAGSTONE 

Western District Secretary, Chamber 

of Commerce of the United States 



Look To Glorious Future 

THE American people as a whole 
are roused to the situation and 
determined to have a merchant marine 
that shall carry our goods over all the 
seas. That all our seaports should en- 
joy the fullest activity of which they 
are capable follows inevitably, and San 
Francisco, as well as our other Pacific 
Coast harbors, can look forward confi- 
dently to a glorious future. 



The object of this article is to show 
that these questions are being dealt 
with, and that the delay in working 
out the final solution is merely one of 
the many inevitable burdens of the re- 
construction period, soon to be light- 
ened. 

Foreign Trade Depends 
On Shipping Situation 

It must be evident that the whole 
question of our foreign trade depends 
largely on the shipping situation. 
Shortly after the armistice was signed 
Edward N. Hurley, chairman of the 
Shipping Board, called on the Cham- 
ber of Commerce of the United States 
to outline a program for our future 
merchant marine, and to obtain the 
support of American business, through 
its organization, for national legisla- 
tion that might be necessary. 

The national chamber at once ap- 
pointed a very able committee, com- 
posed of shipbuilders, exporters, mari- 
time lawyers, bankers and shippers, to 
deal with every phase of this tre- 
mendous question. Included in this 
committee was Homer L. Ferguson, 
president of the Newport News Ship- 
building Co., who has since then been 
elected president of the national 
chamber. The committee has recently 
made a preliminary report, dealing 
with a very important question, 
namely that of handling the immense 
fleet built by America, whether under 
Government or private ownership. The 
final report is expected before long, 
when the whole question will be sub- 
mitted to the country at large and 
then presented to Congress. 

The committee's preliminary report 
definitely opposes Government control 
and operation of our merchant marine. 
It advises that the fleet be immediately 
sold as a whole to private investors, 
pointing out that unless all the ships 
are sold, private capital will not in- 
vest considerable sums in order to 



compete against the Government, 
should the latter retain a portion. The 
committee also feels that the new pur- 
chasers should be free from Govern- 
ment direction as to routes or rates, 
except such regulations as are already 
embodied in the law, and that there 
should be no attempt to regulate ocean 
rates in foreign commerce. 

Prevent Transferring 
Of Ships to Foreigners 

The committee believes that it will 
be necessary to prevent purchasers 
from transferring vessels to a foreign 
flag for a few years, to prevent the 
sale from becoming merely a step in 
the transfer of the entire fleet to for- 
eign owners. It recognizes, however, 
that the Government has more vessels 
of less than 6,000 tons, not suitable for 
overseas trade, than can be profitably 
employed in coastwise or West Indian 
trade, and therefore recommends that 
these and all wooden ships be sold at 
the best price obtainable to either 
domestic or foreign buyers and trans- 
fer of the flag be permitted without 
restriction. It is intimated that popu- 
lar uneasiness over transfer of the flag 
is perhaps unwarranted in view of the 
almost unlimited shipbuilding facilities 
of this country. 

Plan Liberal Terms 
In Sale of Vessels 

In regard to the prices at which the 
larger vessels should be sold, it is 
stated that the original cost is irrel- 
evant, and the vessels are worth no 
more today than English or Scandi- 
navian competitors must pay for their 
vessels. The committee recommends 
that terms of sale should be liberal 
enough to enable new shipping com- 
panies to finance their purchases. 

As the question of financing is a 
vast one, involving the payment of be- 
tween one and two billions to the gov- 
ernment, and in order to secure a wide 
distribution and thus make the fullest 
use of all our seaports, the committee 
recommends the formation of shipping 
associations throughout the country, 
of a quasi-public nature, developed 
under the auspices of state and city 
governments and commercial organiza- 
tions which should represent all inter- 
ests in their localities and be respon- 
sible for the purchase and distribution 
of ships to shipping companies organ- 
ized in their own territories. Ships 
should be allotted to each district in 
proportion to the shipping interests 
and foreign commerce thereby repre- 
sented. The terms should be the same 
to each association and should include 



July 19 19 



103 



Here are 15 Pointers for Beginners in Foreign Trade 



By J. B. BENSON 
Advertising Manager Advance-Rumely Thresher Co. 



1. Don't attempt foreign trade unless 
you expect to ' ' stick ' ' and analyze the 
market before you start. 

2. Don't think of a foreign market as 
a dumping ground, an outlet for left 
overs and "seconds." Better stick to 
your home market — you are doomed 
before you start. 

3. Don't go into foreign trade just to 
"fill in" — a temporary expedient — if 
you start with a customer stand by him 
regardless of whether your domestic 
trade is slack or booming. 

4. It takes time to develop profitable 
foreign trade — unless the exporter is 
willing to so build he had best keep out 
of it. 

5. Careful planning and consistent, 
intelligent effort have developed the 
big foreign trade of England, Germany 
and France — haphazard tactics can de- 
velop nothing but disappointment and 
ultimate failure. 

6. The American manufacturer who 
has made a success of his domestic 
business owes it to a thorough knowl- 
edge of his market — the tastes and pe- 
culiarities of the potential users of his 
product — the use of merchandising 



methods that fit definite known condi- 
tions — and a broad vision. He can 
maYe the same success in foreign fields 
— if he plans as carefully. 

7. Put yourself in your customer's 
place. First see the foreign buyer's 
side of it — then educate him to see 
yours. The tastes of the foreign cus- 
tomer may seem strange, but he has his 
traditions and customs just as we have 
— change his tastes by education, not 
by force. 

8. Place service first and keep your 
promises. The first order is merely an 
opener — it taVes repeat orders to build 
a profitable foreign business. 

9. Be explicit in advertising, rates, 
terms, prices — don't leave anything to 
the imagination of the other fellow. 

10. Don't abuse your customer's con- 
fidence — he expects you to send exactly 
what he orders — not a substitute — and 
to send no more or no less than he or- 
ders — he expects you to bill at the 
prices you quoted — to pack and ship 
exactly as he instructs. 

11. Follow your customer's instruc- 
tions explicitly — he has learned by ex- 
perience what is essential and neces- 



sary. Some of the customer's specifi- 
cations for wrapping, packing and 
marking may seem foolish to your ship- 
ping department. You may be thinking 
in terms of a through shipment and de- 
livery at the dock. Your customer is 
thinking in terms of several transfers 
in lighters, or over land on mule back. 
If you could see them load and unload 
in lighters you would readily see why 
the foreign customer specifies one inch 
boards on packing cases, waterproof 
linings and steel strapping. 

12. A satisfied customer is your big- 
gest asset here at home — it's no differ- 
ent in a foreign country. 

13. Don't stop when you've put your 
goods upon the importer's shelves — 
help take them off, just as you do with 
a retailer in this country. 

14. Don't oversell the importer or in- 
duce him to stock goods that don't fit 
the market — that is imposing upon his 
confidence and leads to but one end. 

15. Don't jump at the selection of 
the importing house you appoint as 
resident agent — know that he means 
business — that he is going to push your 
goods and not throttle them. 



provisions, after an initial payment, 
for the payment of the balance in an- 
nual installments over a period of 
years at low interest. 

Definite sections are suggested, to 
which these ships should be allotted, 
Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Bal- 
timore, Charleston or Jacksonville, 
New Orleans, San Francisco, Seattle 
and one or more Great Lakes ports 
being named as centers. It is pointed 
out that by securing a very wide dis- 
tribution of vessels and making the 
greatest possible use of all our sea- 
ports on an equal basis, new blood and 
capital will be enlisted. If any asso- 
ciation should fail to purchase its 
quota, the other associations should 
be given an opportunity to become re- 
sponsible for the ships allotted to its 
district. 

Recognition Given 
All Shipping Centers 

It is clear that this provides for ab- 
solutely fair recognition of all our 
shipping centers, on the Pacific Coast 
as well as in the South, on the Atlan- 
tic seaboard and on the Great Lakes, 
and the number of ships purchased by 
each will depend simply on the wishes 
of those in that section of the country. 
The size of the fleet sailing under the 
American flag from San Francisco will 
be in exact proportion to the enter- 
prise and public spirit of our citizens. 

The committee recommends that the 
government at once get out of the 
shipbuilding business. Government 
subsidies are not dealt with in this re- 



port, although it is stated that if there 
is an economic loss and the policy of 
having an American merchant marine 
is still adhered to, then the loss must 
be borne by the nation as a whole. 

It may be stated, for those who have 
recently taken a pessimistic view of 
San Francisco's rail rate situation, 
that the Federal Railway Administra- 
tor announced to the members of the 
Pacific Coast committee which visited 
him in Washington recently that he 
took the same position as they did, 
namely, that there should be no dis- 
crimination in rail rates as against any 
section of the country, and would 
work things out along this basis. In 
any event, it is evident that the rail- 
ways will not remain much longer 
under government control. 

It will be realized by those who 
have feared for the future of Pacific 
Coast ports that the policy of the na- 
tional chamber's committee definitely 
provides for the utilization of all our 
American shipping centers, and that 
in order to ensure its success, any pos- 
sible rail rate discrimination against 
this section would have to be elimi- 
nated. The whole rate question will 
undoubtedly be finally settled in this 
broader way, involving Congressional 
action, if necessary. 

As regards the constant transfer of 
ships turned out on this coast to the 
Atlantic seaboard, Mr. Hurley stated 
to the representatives of the San Fran- 
cisco Chamber of Commerce who vis- 



ited him recently that this was done 
by order of the President, in order to 
transport foodstuffs urgently needed 
in Europe. The peak has been 
reached, however, and one or two ves- 
sels a week are being turned over to 
commercial use. Here too, we may 
look for early Congressional action to 
relieve the situation. 

Look For Early Action 
To Relieve Situation 

It will be seen that every effort is 
being made to deal with every angle 
of our vitally important shipping 
problem. A thoroughly well qualified 
and representative committee of the 
national chamber is complying with 
the desires of the Shipping Board and 
has already submitted a very valuable 
preliminary report. The complete re- 
port will soon be. ready, when it will 
no doubt be submitted to the whole 
country in the form of a referendum, 
by the very efficient machinery now 
possessed by the Chamber of Com- 
merce of the United States. The final 
judgment will then be brought before 
Congress for early consideration. 

The American people as a whole are 
roused to the situation and determined 
to have a merchant marine that shall 
carry our goods over all the seas. That 
all our seaports should enjoy the full- 
est activity of which they are capa- 
ble follows inevitably, and San Fran- 
cisco, as well as our other Pacific 
Coast harbors, can look forward con- 
fidently to a glorious future. 



104 



Pan Pacific 



Portland Removes the Bar 

Old Barrier To the Free Navigation of the Mighty Columbia River Has Been 

Entirely Cut Away 



IN these days of trade expansion, in 
which the maritime nations of the 
world are racing for supremacy, the 
question of port facilities, port en- 
trances and harbor conditions gener- 
ally is almost as grave as the matter 
of tonnage. 

The great European war has pro- 
duced changes in finance and business 
conditions which a few years ago 
would have been deemed fanciful. The 
balance of trade has shifted, and to- 
day the United States is the banker of 
the world. 

But this is not all. A new commer- 
cial spirit has been aroused. There is 
a determination that the United States 
must become the greatest shipping na- 
tion of the world, with the possible 
exception of Great Britain. This de- 
termination of the great commercial 
interests of the United States is re- 
flected in the wonderful activities of 
*her ports. Everywhere preparations 
are being made greatly to improve 
port conditions and to make ready in 
every conceivable manner for the 
great commerce which is to develop 
within the next few years. 

Great Changes Wrought 
On the Pacific Coast 

On the Pacific Coast great changes 
have been wrought, and the time is 
not far distant when the ports of the 
Pacific Coast will come into their own. 
The greatest single trade development 
in all the world will probably be on 
the Pacific. 

The wonderful advances of the 
Japanese, whose enterprise must prove 



By SYDNEY B. VINCENT 

one of the marvels of the world trade 
development, the awakening of Aus- 
tralia, the development of the Phil- 
ippines and Malayasia, the possibilities 
in China and Siberia and the sure ad- 
vancement, commercially and other- 
wise, of all the other Pacific Ocean 
countries and sections, all seem posi- 
tively to insure the employment of 
tremendous fleets of ocean carriers. 
Portland Fully Alive 
To the New Situation 

The Port of Portland is fully alive 
to the situation. Years ago it was 
realized by the people of Oregon that 
the old barrier to the free navigation 
of the mighty Columbia River, the sec- 
ond largest commercial river in the 
United States, the bar at its mouth, 
must be removed. It has been re- 
moved. There now is no bar at the 
mouth of the Columbia River. Engi- 
neering skill has positively cut it away 
until today there is a greater dep.th of 
water over what was formerly "the 
bar" than obtains at any other Pacific 
Coast port. San Francisco has less 
water at the entrance to her bay; Los 
Angeles and San Diego have far less, 
and the entrance to Puget Sound is 
shallower. 

To persons who knew the Columbia 
River bar of old, these statements will 
be a revelation. They may appear to 
the uniniated to be exaggerated, but 
they are not one whit over-stated. 
They can readily be confirmed by re- 
ferring to the latest maps of the 



United States Geodetic Survey. There 
the figures may be read without a 
magnifying glass. 

Columbia River Bar 
Is Entirely Removed 
However, there is still another 
proof, and to the informed a better 
proof. At a hearing at Astoria in the 
last week of March, 1919, before a 
committee of the Naval Affairs Com- 
mittee of the House of Representatives 
of the United States, Bar Pilot Michael 
Nolan, a man with twenty-five years 
experience on the Pacific Coast, hav- 
ing pilot licenses for San Francisco 
bay and entrance, Puget Sound and 
the Columbia River and other ports, 
made this wonderfully significant 
statement : 

I hold a license to San Fran- 
cisco Bay and entrance. This is 
what I wish to say: I consider 
the Columbia entrance to be 
safer to navigate than I do San 
Francisco Bay or any other Pa- 
cific Coast harbor entrance. 
The entrance to the great Columbia 
River was, in the eighties, a great 
handicap. The "bar" in those days 
was shallow. It was safe enough in 
calm weather. It easily could carry 
vessels of the draft which obtained in 
those days, but in rough weather ship 
masters feared it. 

Less Fogs Prevail 
Than at Other Ports 
A peculiar fact regarding the en- 
trance to the Columbia River has re- 
cently been unearthed. Investigators 
discovered that there is less fog at the 




SCENE IN PORTLAND HARBOR AFTER A LAUNCHING 
The Portland Shipbuilding District in the last three years has launched more vessels than any other district in the United States, 

considering both wood and steel construction. 



July 19 19 



105 



Columbia River than prevails on Puget 
Sound or San Francisco. 

Government fog statistics reveal 
that for the year ended June 30, 1918, 
the mouth of the Columbia River had 
but 811 hours of foggy weather, 
whereas San Francisco had 1802 hours 
and Puget Sound 1611 hours. 

Proving beyond question that the 
Columbia River is the safest port in 
this regard, reference to the Govern- 
ment's records for the past ten years 
show even greater advantage on the 
average for the Oregon port. The 
averages for ten years are: Columbia 
River, 696 hours; San Francisco, 1591 
hours; Puget Sound, 1306 hours. 

Federal Government 
Helped Remove Menace 

Years ago the people of Portland 
realized that something must be done 
to remove the menace of the bar and 
finally their appeal to the Federal 
Government for an appropriation to 
be used for the construction of a jetty 
system which would insure a greater 
depth of water, and which would 
cause the flow of the river to scour 
the bar was heard by Congress and 
the money was forthcoming. 

The first federal appropriation was 
used in the construction of a jetty on 
the south shore of the entrance to the 
Columbia River. Its beneficial effect 
in deepening the waters at the en- 
trance was almost immediately notice- 
able. Week in and week out, month 
" following month, the bar silently slid 
into the deeper waters of the ocean. 
Shortly a survey showed 25 feet of 
uater at "the bar" at low tide, and 
the great grain ships of the United 
Kingdom and Continental Europe 
came in increasing numbers to load 
wheat at the great Portland docks. The 
^ily grew in shipping importance and 
soon ranked as the second largest 
wheat shipping port in the world, an 
honor she has retained with becoming 
grace. 

The importance of maritime com- 
merce was manifest, and as the port 
grew out of its swaddling clothes, a 
new and wonderful spirit was de- 
veloped. The people of the city took 
a larger view of commercial matters. 
Great factories were established, 
splendid improvements were installed, 
and most important of all, the money 
was provided for improving river 
channel conditions. 

B River Channel Improved 
at Cost of Many Millions 
.Millions upon millions of dollars 
sre expended. The river channel 
improved and has continued to im- 
prove, until today, vessels drawing 
thirty feet easily can ascend the Co- 
lumbia, to take their cargoes at the 
docks of Portland, thus saving the 
heavy toll which would have to be 
paid if freight was carried on down 




LAUNCHING S. S. CITY OF EUREKA AT PORTLAND 



the Columbia in railroad cars. It is 
estimated that the loading of vessels 
in Portland will save shippers approx- 
imately 85 cents per ton on every ton 
of wheat shipped. 

Congress recognized Portland's pros- 
pective development as a great port, 
and more money was forthcoming for 
work at the mouth of the Columbia. 
The south jetty was extended, and 
work was begun and now is practi- 
cally finished, on a great jetty on the 
north shore. As the work progressed, 
the waters at the entrance deepened. 
Presently there was 30 feet of water 
on "the bar" at low tide. 

Portland was jubilant and so was 
the growing port of Astoria. So were 
the engineers who had charge of the 
work. Soon the effect of the two jet- 
ties was in evidence. The bar began 
to disappear. It was being pushed 
into the sea by the waters of the Co- 
lumbia. The scouring process con- 
tinued month in and month out. Meas- 
urements showed 35 feet of water at 
low tide. Foot by foot the depth in- 
creased, until now there is over 40 
feet of water over what had been in 
years gone by "the Columbia River 
Bar." 



One of Biggest American 
Engineering Achievements 

The work of the Government at the 
entrance to the Columbia represents 
one of the greatest of American mari- 
time engineering achievements. It 
has produced one of the most revolu- 
tionary changes in entrance conditions 
in the history of world commerce. Few 
harbors of the world have such a per- 
fect entrance ; few harbors are so safe. 
There are no maritime losses. The 
few scored against the mouth of the 
Columbia occurred years ago. In fact, 
in the past twenty years, probably no 
other large Pacific Coast port has had 
so few. 

And what has all this cost the Gov- 
ernment? Just a trifle over $16,000,- 
000, and most of this amount was ex- 
pended in the construction of the two 
great stone jetties, which narrow the 
discharge area from seven miles to 
about two and one-half miles. 

But that was not all; there is yet to 
be considered the work which has been 
done on the Columbia River between 
Portland and the mouth of the Colum- 
bia. The increased tonnage, and 
therefore, the deeper draft of vessels 
of more recent years, caused the Port 



106 



Pan Pacific 




ANOTHER VIEW AT THE PORT OF PORTLAND 



of Portland to make ready for the fu- 
ture. It was realized that the old type 
of vessel, drawing from fifteen to 
eighteen feet, soon would disappear, 
and that unless there was maintained 
a depth of water in the Columbia suffi- 
cient safely to carry vessels of the 
most modern type, that the port would 
be handicapped. 

People Gladly Paid Taxes 
To Improve the Harbor 

Surveys of the river from time to 
time indicated that much work would 
be required if vessels of 30 foot draft 
were to come to Portland at the zero 
stage of the river, and at all seasons 
of the year. The people of Portland 
readily accepted the decision of the 
Port of Portland. They paid addi- 
tional taxes. 

In a few years there had been ex- 
pended $5,000,000 of the community's 
money. A fine, deep channel was 
made which gave to the interior a 
rate of about five cents a ton for the 
wheat sent abroad in the 100-mile 
reach between Portland and the sea, 
as against the usual rail rate for the 
same distance of about 85 cents a ton. 

Then Federal aid was sought and 
granted, and now the work of keeping 
the river "in condition" and to insure 
a depth of 30 or more feet continues 
under government supervision. 

For several years vessels drawing 
from 28 to 30 feet have ascended the 
Columbia to Portland without diffi- 
culty. This year a vessel drawing 31 
feet 4 inches was dispatched from 
Portland. In due time Portland will 
have a channel down the Columbia to 
the Pacific of 35 feet at the zero stage 
of the river. Delays have been elimi- 
nated, and the fresh waters of the Co- 
lumbia and Willamette Rivers kill all 
sea growths which attach to the bot- 
toms of ocean-going vessels, lessening 
the frequency of dry-docking and in- 



creasing the speed of the ships which 
leave the port. 

New St. John's Terminal 
Is Completely Equipped 
Determination has removed all ob- 
stacles. That the world may better 
appreciate the spirit which animates 
the people of Portland, reference must 
be made to the $3,000,000 bond issue 
for a grain elevator. Changes in the 
method of shipping grain caused the 
port authorities to recommend that a' 
grain and terminal system be estab- 
lished. The money was provided and 
a great system is about to be turned 
over by the contractors to the authori- 
ties. It will be known as the "St. 
Johns Terminal," because of its loca- 
tion near the St. Johns District in the 
northernmost portion of the Portland 
city limits. 

The terminal comprises about 155 
acres, and has a frontage on the river 
of 2500 feet. It is completely equipped 
with trackage facilities, physical con- 
nection being had with all the rail- 
roads entering the city. The terminal 
was planned to permit of extensions 
in its several functions whenever addi- 
tional facilities were required, and in- 
deed plans are now being prepared 
greatly to enlarge the system in the 
very near future. The tentative plan 
for enlargement includes provision for 
large additional covered warehouse 
space, coal bunkers and oil fuel tanks. 
Four Municipal Docks 
Are Now in Operation 
Fifty acres have been reserved for 
factory site purposes, which will be 
leased for a term of twenty years at an 
annual rental of six per cent of the 
actual cost of the ground lease. Pier 
No. 1 is well over 200 feet wide and 
1200 feet long, most of which is under 
cover. The first unit of the elevator 
will take care of over 1,000,000 bush- 
els of wheat, with additional storage 
facilities for as much more. All struc- 



tures are of the most modern type, 
reinforced concrete being the principal 
material used. The most modern 
equipment is installed, including a 
complete system of fire protection. 
Grain in bulk and grain in sacks can 
be taken care of. Provision is made 
for handling all classes of grain, clean 
and smutty. 

There are in operation in Portland 
four large municipal docks, all under 
cover, and thoroughly equipped with 
facilities for the prompt and economic 
handling of cargo. The docks are 
provided with offices and comfort sta- 
tions, for passengers and crews, and 
with fire fighting equipment. The 
dock charges are the lowest in force 
upon the Pacific Coast. Every en- 
deavor has been made to make them 
convenient and adaptable for the 
handling of all classes of cargo. 

Within a short time two large coal 
bunkers will be in operation. They 
will have facilities for loading along- 
side the dock, or from barges in the 
stream or during the period of cargo 
unloading of grain, clean and smutty. 
The more efficient devices for the un- 
loading and loading of grain are em- 
ployed. In fact, the St. Johns Ter- 
minal forms one of the most complete 
and efficient grain-handling plants in 
the world. 

Not satisfied with the great step 
noted, the voters of Portland in No- 
vember, 1918, approved another bond 
issue of $5,000,000, which will be used 
for the construction of a series of 
modern wharves and warehouses, lar- 
ger lumber trans-shipment docks, a 
deeper and more commodious harbor, 
the construction of another large dry- 
dock, one of 12,000 tons capacity, coal 
bunkers and stream loading facilities, 
shop repair plant's and other port im- 
provements. 

(To be Continued) 



July 19 19 



107 



Misconception About Russia 

Noted Author and Traveller Seeks To Disabuse the Public Mind of the 
Caricature Perpetrated Against An Innocent People 



THE people of the United States 
have an affection for Russia that 
cannot be explained except on grounds 
of ethnological similarity. There is 
very little in common politically or in 
an educational sense to explain this 
historic and deeply rooted admiration. 
It springs from the existence of com- 
mon social problems which is most 
clearly expressed in the idea of each 
people being the melting pot of an 
heterogeneous aggregation of many 
races. And, in this similarity of prob- 
lem, a sympathetic union of aspiration 
has been developed into the cordial 
respect of America for • the national 
aspirations of the Russian people. 

This underlying and attractive force 
of social and intellectual amalgam has 
many elements of dissimilarity, how- 
ever, that possess an opposite effect to 
that which is eminently desirable. And 
these usually originate in the miscon- 
ceptions of Americans themselves con- 
cerning the character and characteris- 
tics of the Russian race. Nor are the 
American people entirely responsible 
for this. They have accepted, in this 
respect, the interpretation of Russia 
from the Russian artist, scholar, states- 
man and gens d'lettres, and carried 
the image thus presented, as a correct 
and proper portraiture. 

Point Is Illustrated 
By Two Famous Vases 

I may illustrate this point by re- 
ferring to the lesson given a traveler 
from an examination of those two cele- 
brated vases in the Museum of the 
Hermitage at St. Petersburg before 
the recent unhappy war. One was the 
silver vase of Nicopol belonging to 
the fourth century before Christ. It 
represented the Scythian horseman, 
with long flowing beard, broad fea- 
tures and warlike attitude, and de- 
lineated in the observer's mind the 
picture of ferocity which the historian, 
Herodotus, has given to the world of 
the early inhabitants of Russia. 
The other was the golden vase rep- 
esenting the royal cast of Scythian 
nomad and brigand. These two pic- 
tures have imparted a misleading les- 
son to the entire Western world and 
are doubtless the basis of many mis- 
conceptions that exist today concern- 
ing the authentic characteristics of the 
Russian people. For, it must be re- 
membered, Herodotus was a very cir- 
cumstantial historian. He pictured 
the Scythian as worshiping the sword, 
driven into the ground and bathed 
with the blood of human sacrifice. 






By WM. RUTLEDGE McGARRY 
(From the Russian Edition of 
Siberian Opportunities) 
— o — 
They were pictured, like our Amer- 
ican red Indians, as scalping their vic- 
tims and drinking blood from the 
skulls of the slaughtered innocents. 

He pictured for posterity the Isse- 
dones, who devoured their parents 
with ceremonious pomp ; the one-eyed 
Arimaspians; the snub-nosed and bald- 
headed Argippi; the Agathirsi, who 
held their wives in common; the Neuri 
who annually became werewolves; and 
the frosty Hyperboreans who repre- 
sented all that was horrid to the imag- 
inative mind. With such a picture, 
suggested by the Father of History, 
and apparently preserved in the art 
of Russia itself, the fundamental 
image the world has inherited of the 
Russian race has been the one accepted 
and unconsciously perpetuated in the 
minds of men. 

Problem of Russia 
Similar To Our Own 

I have always regarded this as a 
very great injustice; and for many 
years I have been trying to disabuse 
the world from this horrid and con- 
temptible caricature and libel. I have 
attempted to point out the problem of 
Russia in the Caucasus, so similar to 
our own, in assimilating different 
races in the midst of the most tumul- 
tuous migrations of peoples during the 
early Christian era where the native 
Russian absorbed them all, and was 
assimilated by none — illustrating the- 
law, as valid in history as elsewhere, 
of the survival of the fittest race. 

It would take several volumes to re- 
view all that I have said upon this 
subject to give a clearer and better 
conception to my countrymen of what 
Russia is and actually means to future 
civilization. It is sufficient to say in 
this short sketch, that the people of 
the United States have accepted my 
interpretation of the Russia of today 
and the future, if its destiny be guided 
right. 

We are quite willing to assist 
Asiatic Russia towards its wonderful 
self-enfoldment if our own ideas of 
orderly and regulated progress be of 
any value to them. We are a demo- 
cratic country. We believe in law and 
education. We know from genera- 
tions of experiments and experience 
what our system of government has 
done for us. We have before us 
everywhere positive and concrete ex- 



amples of the efficiency of individual 
enterprise in developing our country 
from a clutter of rudimentary pioneers 
into the wealthiest and most progres- 
sive industrial people of the whole 
world. 

We have no revolutions — because we 
know that revolutions can achieve 
only one thing, namely, give to the 
people the right of self government; 
and this we have in the ballot. We 
make and unmake our governors and 
legislators, enact and repeal our laws 
with ease and celerity, and always 
without violence. We do not believe 
in militarism nor the slaughter of hu- 
man beings to promote the cause of 
humanity. 

We Do It By Ballot 
And By Education 

We do it by the ballot. We do it 
in our schools. We believe in and we 
insist on universal education, the very 
thing that Russia has always craved 
and now requires more than ever to 
achieve her glorious resurrection and 
give an impetus to her onward step 
toward prosperity and international 
tranquility. We believe in railroads 
as the only thing that will develop 
new wealth and relieve the world from 
poverty. 

In our country our railroads are 
the underlying cause for our develop- 
ing an annual commerce of nearly two 
hundred billions a year, in comparison 
with only forty-five billions for the 
rest of the entire world as interna- 
tionally expressed in figures and ex- 
change. And we build our railroads 
better and cheaper than any other race 
of men on earth. Wherever we have 
built the railroads, we have saved the 
people from $10,000 to $100,000 a mile, 
and thus relieved them from a burden 
of taxation that has been imposed by 
other countries to keep the people in 
subjugation and penury and want. 
And we have done all this in the 
democratic and individual method 
without violence or socialistic mad- 
ness. 

If there be a message of light and 
progress that I can send to the people 
of Asiatic Russia in any of my writ- 
ings, it is to be found in what I have 
always said which may be reduced to 
this: Educate your people by a system 
of free schools ; imitate the American 
system of government in its constitu- 
tional safe guards respecting liberty 
and human rights; build your rail- 
roads in the American way so as to 
gain speed and carrying power at the 

(Continued on page 118) 



108 



Pan Pacific 



Capital Must Lead 

Bankers, Merchants and Manufacturers Should 
Co-operate in Development of Overseas Commerce 



IT is now an accepted fact that for- 
eign trade for the United States is 
essential to our prosperity. The last- 
ing result will depend our ability to 
convince bankers, merchants and 
manufacturers that they must co- 
operate in making full use of our na- 
tional resources, whether of material, 
capital or credit. Over two-thirds of 
our visible gold reserve's 'are accounted 
for in the latest combined statements 
of the twelve Reserve Banks. These 
gold resources aggregate $2,210,524,- 
000. 

This mobilization of gold, the build- 
ing up of reserves in banks, and in 
Federal Reserve Banks, has laid the 
foundation for a sound credit struc- 
ture. Owing to the restrictions that 
were in existence prior to 1913, bank- 
ing and commercial interests in the 
United States were greatly handi- 
capped by the National and State 
banking laws which had been in force, 
with only slight changes, since before 
the Civil War. 

As those of you know who are fa- 
miliar with the import business, before 
the Great War, if you wanted to buy 
goods in foreign countries it was 
necessary for you to provide credits 
that called for payments in London, 
France or Germany. Most fortunately 
we are now in a position to mobilize 
our national credit, and take our 
proper place in world finance, and this 
is possible because we have the "Ac- 
ceptance," and an open discount mar- 
ket. 

Part Banks Must Play 
Becoming Recognized 

The important part that American 
banks must play in pioneering the 
markets of the world is fast becoming 
recognized. The banks have already 
shouldered the responsibility, and are 
endeavoring to foster and encourage 
in many ways the active entry of our 
goods into foreign markets. For the 
past 400 years exports of British goods 
have always followed the exports of 
British capital. This is the secret of 
success and permanent and lasting 
pre-eminence in foreign markets. 

I will not attempt to go into details 
of the relation that American banks 
and American capital in foreign coun- 
tries will have in determining the fu- 
ture of the United States as a great 
export nation. Suffice it to say that 
if our capital is not already there, it 
should closely follow commerce; and 
the government should stand firmly 
behind our citizens in foreign lands, 
so that they may feel confident of full 
national protection at all times. 



By L. R. COFER 

Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 
— o — 
The demand for our goods during 
the war was so great that no selling 
effort was necessary; the buyers came 
begging for everything, paid any 
price, and on any terms, with the re- 
sult that most of our exporters refused 
to move merchandise from their doors 
unless they were in possession of a 
bankers' credit confirmed by an Amer- 
ican bank. This condition has al- 
ready changed, and the situation is 
practically reversed. 

To Sell Goods Abroad 
We Must Give Credit 

To sell in foreign countries we must 
extend credit; this is not essentially 
different from granting credit for 
domestic trade, but it requires a more 
complex study. A good definition of 
credit is the present worth of future 
promise ; once extended, the next step 
is to convert the future promise into 
immediate cash. 

As we all know, anyone entitled to 
credit is worthy of the best. The same 
methods used in this country of per- 
sonal knowledge and investigation are 
excellent ; where this is not convenient, 
or possible, the best way is to get in 
touch with a bank that has close and 
old-established connections with a 
first-class local foreign institution, in 
a position, and willing, to furnish full 
and reliable information. And the ex- 
porter should satisfy himself as to the 
nature and extent of credit that he is 
willing to give, which sifts itself down 
to the following: 

1. Obtain a confirmation from 
an American bank that they 
will pay at sight or accept your 
time drafts against documents. 

2. Get a confirmed credit pro- 
viding for the exporter's own 
draft on the customer's foreign 
bank. 

3. Have the foreign customer 
establish a cash credit with a 
bank here which would be avail- 
able here against shipping docu- 
ments. 

4. Ship and draw on the cus- 
tomer, and place the draft and 
documents for collection in the 
hands of the bank, and arrange 
for this to serve as the basis of 
an acceptance credit, so that 
the bank will accept drafts up 
to 90 days sight which can be 
readily discounted at finer rates 
than would be possible in 
straight advances. 




L. R. COFER 

5. Ship and draw on the cus- 
tomer and put the draft and 
documents • through a bank for 
collection abroad and await re- 
turns, or where satisfactory ar- 
rangements are made, secure an 
immediate advance. 

6. Ship on open account and 
await remittances from the 
buyer. 

It is apparent that with these dif- 
ferent methods, starting with the con- 
firmed credit and practically no credit 
risk, to the open account, with a di- 
rect credit risk, a buyer is naturally 
going to take advantage of the closest 
terms, so if all the credit risk is put 
on him, the seller must make more at- 
tractive prices, or bear some of the 
burden himself. 

The extent to which the banker can 
safely enter into these foreign tran- 
sactions is governed chiefly by his con- 
fidence in a customer, but he must 
also, for their mutual protection, have 
an exact and intimate knowledge of 
the condition of the foreign markets, 
and know something of the standing 
and financial responsibility of the 
buyer, which, of course, is only pos- 
sible through close relationship with 
a local foreign banker or a branch 
bank. This, in a general way, covers 
the exporter. 

Let us now see what help can be 
expected by our importer, who, while 
perhaps not so much exploited as a 
national necessity, is nevertheless most 
vital for the proper balancing of our 
foreign trade. Before the war, we 
were much larger buyers than sellers ; 
but now, besides being the creditor of 
most of the world, we must, if we are 
to keep our industry in full swing, 
and provide wages for our people that 
will permit of their enjoyment of life, 
be an active seller. Our imports 
should be in raw materials not pro- 
duced here. 

Probably the greatest value of our 
imports heretofore was in the nature 
of manufactured articles from Europe, 



July 19 19 



109 



We Must Give Credit 

To Sell Goods Abroad We Should Make It As Easy 
As Possible For Foreign Merchants To Buy From Us 



which we have now learned to produce 
here, so it is important that we en- 
deavor to attract a greater variety of 
raw materials than we have heretofore 
found necessary. 

As our previous experience has been 
more in importing than exporting, 
there is a greater familiarity in the 
methods of buying goods than selling. 
The same general rules of credit out- 
lined for our exporter hold true for 
the importer, but as the customer of 
a local bank you will be more inter- 
ested in those transactions that call 
for a bankers' credit, so I will briefly 
detail a typical service. 

Bankers ' Credits 
For the Importer 

The importer possibly already has 
some acquaintance in the foreign mar- 
ket, and has received an offer, but the 
financial responsibility of the custo- 
mer is not known to him. By appli- 
cation to his bank, providing that in- 
stitution has the proper facilities, he 
can immediately, or within a few days, 
if it is necessary to cable, secure a 
complete report. This knowledge of 
the standing and responsibility of the 
shipper is most essential, where a 
hanker 's credit is furnished, for, this 
instrument is one that is irrevocable, 
that is, it cannot be cancelled without 
the consent of the beneficiary, and as 
the terms calls for general shipping 
documents it is possible for an un- 
scrupulous shipper to make dishonest 
use of a credit. 

Assuming that everything is satis- 
factory, the merchant makes applica- 
tion to his bank for a letter of credit 
that will enable him to be assured that 
the -merchandise will arrive, and give 
him time to turn it over. The credit 
is issued in terms that authorize the 
drafts of the beneficiary on the bank, 
and provides for a draft at 90 days 
light, accompanied by full shipping 
documents which the bank agrees to 

I or if presented within specified 

time. 

This credit reaches the party on the 
other side, who, after he has shipped, 
takes his draft, accompanied by docu- 
ments in terms of the credit and of- 
fers it for sale to his own bank, or as 
is often the case, to the bank that is 
then bidding the best rate for that 
class of exchange; and here we come 
to the present benefits of the accept- 
ance and the discount market. For 
the foreign bank knows from cable or 
other advices, what the discount rates 
in the United States are, and can 
make a rate for buying the 90 days 
sight draft based on, say 4%% per 



annum, and so only charges approxi- 
mately this figure in basing his calcu- 
lation. 

Prior to the general use of accept- 
ances and the discount market, the 
foreign banker would make a rate 
usually based on his own overdraft 
rate, or possibly on a rate for the same 
kind of advances in this country, 
which is nearer 6%. As England, 
France, etc., always had a discount 
market, you can readily see the dis- 
crimination that was formerly made 
against a dollar bill drawn at other 
than sight in favor of sterling, francs, 
etc. 



sented and paid by the bank, who in 
turn recovers from their customer. 

A local bank of course enters into a 
transaction if the foreign merchant 
draws against draft and documents. In 
either instance it is customary for the 
foreign bank sending the draft to re- 
quest that the bill be discounted and 
his account credited immediately, both 
classes of paper being discountable, 
but the banker's acceptance, of course, 
commanding a finer rate than the mer- 
chant's acceptance. 

While this may apparently have lit- 
tle direct interest for our local mer- 
chants, it is really of the greatest im- 
portance that foreign banks should 
know that they may buy any class of 
marketable paper and feel sure that 
they can on arrival immediately dis- 
pose of it at a price which will com- 
pare favorably with other discount 
markets and not entail the lock-up of 
their funds after the merchandise has 
arrived. 




HEAD OFFICE OF THE ASIA BANKING CORPORATION IN THE FAR EAST, SHANGHAI 






When the merchandise arrives in 
this country, the bill drawn at ninety 
days sight is presented to the bank 
issuing the credit, who, in return for 
their acceptance receive the docu- 
ments, which are delivered to the mer- 
chant against his trust receipt, ware- 
house receipt, or some other satisfac- 
tory arrangement. At the end of 
ninety days the draft is again pre- 



lt is important to distinguish be- 
tween the trade acceptance and the 
bankers' aceptance. The former is a 
bill of exchange or a draft drawn 
upon and accepted by a merchant; the 
latter is a bill of exchange or a draft 
drawn up and accepted by a banker. 
They both have a valuable part in 
fully extending our national credit 
structure. 



110 




A WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY 



San Francisco is confronted with her greatest 
opportunity. If she grasps it these things will 
ensue : 

Fame and Fortune for this port. 

A Square Deal for this Coast. 

Unquestioned Leadership in Pan Pacific trade. 

* # * 

IN the Spring of 1920 the National Foreign Trade Con- 
vention will he held in San Francisco. It will he a 
momentous gathering. Billions of dollars will he repre- 
sented. The BIG men of the United States will he here. 
And they will discuss PAN PACIFIC COMMERCE. 

But what is Pan Pacific commerce? And why "Pan 
Pacific?" 

Manifestly it is an acknowledgement of the potency of 
the market which this magazine has heen developing in 
behalf of American merchandise in all countries bordering 
the Pacific Ocean. It is a recognition of the facts brought 
home to all alert business men by PAN PACIFIC, which 
have revealed the magnitude of the commercial possibilities 
which lie in the direction of the setting sun. 

To the west of San Francisco reside HALF THE 
HUMAN RACE. To the south are nearly 100,000,000 more 
aspiring human appetitites. And, due to insufficient trans- 
portation facilities in these vast uncultivated regions, 
BILLIONS in wealth annually GO TO WASTE. 

A three hundred billion dollar earning capacity and a 
consequent purchasing power of a similar amount lies 
slumbering in a hungry calm. To SAVE this waste, to 
DEVELOP this purchasing power, to ADD it to the world's 
creative energy will be the business of the Convention of 
1920! 

That will be BIG BUSINESS ! 

It will be the BIGGEST BUSINESS ever tackled by 
any convention in the history of the world. 
'But it must be tackled RIGHT! 

And it cannot be tackled right unless there is represen- 
tation at that convention or AT A CONVENTION of all 
the elements concerned in PAN PACIFIC AWAKENING! 

And that brings us to the point of San Francisco's 
OPPORTUNITY ! 

The 1920 assembly, strictly speaking, will be a national 
convention. The rules of the National Foreign Trade 
Council may not provide for international discussions, 
save among its own members. That clearly leaves the 
way open to San Francisco to disclose her genius, her 
right to leadership, her mastery of WORLD OPPOR- 
TUNITY. 

Let San Francisco issue a call for and organize 
a PAN PACIFIC CONVENTION to run concur- 
rently with or immediately follow the national 
convention, the dates of which are May 12 to 16, 
1920! 



There never again may be such a Golden Opportunity — 
in fact, there never again CAN be such an opportunity, so 
far as San Francisco and the Pacific Coast are concerned. 
For the longer the world's most potential market is 
neglected the more firmly will other competitors be en- 
trenched and the more difficult will it be for the United 
States to successfully campaign for the honors and the 
profits which now may be had almost for the asking. 

A PAN PACIFIC CONGRESS in San Francisco in May, 
1920, besides winning a vast trade for this country, will 
give to this port a world prestige that could not be at- 
tained by any other means in a score of years and will 
immediately establish the standing of the Pacific Coast as 
chief salesman in the Pan Pacific field. 

It will furnish a clearing house for international ideas 
along commercial lines and lay the foundation for bestow- 
ing upon the peoples of other countries a policy of con- 
structive energy that will lift half the human race into 
contact with prosperity and domestic happiness. 

It will awaken the human intellect everywhere to the 
advantages gained by AMERICAN methods in the distri- 
bution of wealth and the achievements that lie in the wake 
of honest compensation for energetic toil. 

It will reveal to the world that America is able and will- 
ing and eager to assist in the elevation of ALL the human 
race, and if it accomplishes nothing more than merely to 
indicate these facts and demonstrate how easily they can 
be achieved it will do more to direct human effort in the 
right lines than any other gathering in the history of men. 

A WONDERFUL OPPORTUNITY confronts San Fran- 
cisco. It would be almost CRIMINAL TO NEGLECT IT! 

A CALL TO THE BANKERS OF AMERICA • 

THE bankers of America must take their stand in for- 
eign trade. It took a banker of vision and nerve to 
tell this to the faces of five hundred other bankers in a 
bunch and get away with it. But the banker of vision and 
nerve turned up in the person of the State Superintendent 
of Banks in California and the telling was done in the con- 
vention of the California Bankers' Association on Catalina 
Island. 

It was easily the foreign trade address of the 
month. 
"With the manufacturer and the exporter, you, the 
bankers of America, must take your stand," declared 
Charles F. Stern in the soft breezes of Catalina. Then he 
masterfully summed up the whole situation in this simple 
and direct way : 

Money talks all languages; but successful 
American foreign trade must be based on the 
American dollar as a standard of exchange and 
financed by American bankers through branches 
on foreign soil. 
In elucidation the State Superintendent of Banks shot 
this across and drew applause: 




CONFRONTS SAN FRANCISCO 



"The nation that would sell must surely buy; the tide 
of commerce cannot flow continually one way. At our 
doors and ready at our hand, if we will, is the South Amer- 
ican trade. Do you realize the fabulous potential wealth 
and buying capacity of South America? Do you realize 
that the development of that potential field lies largely 
in our own hands? The problems of developing South 
America are the problems that we have faced and are fac- 
ing —PROBLEMS INSEPARABLE FROM THOSE OP 
FINANCE. 

"Public utilities must be financed and developed; irri- 
gation, reclamation and subdivision projects are waiting 
there to pay royal tribute to the wealth that brings them 
into fruition. 

"The nation that is the preferred competitor for South 
America's business will be the nation that with the one 
hand sells and with the other finances the internal develop- 
ment of South America, which alone can make possible an 
increase in her buying capacity. This means that Amer- 
ican capital, through American banks and American invest- 
ment companies, must, as part of their broader commercial 
campaign, look to the broader fields of the buying nations 
for long-time investments." 

It is a call to arms to the bankers of America to do 
their part in the development of overseas commerce. The 
eyes of the world are upon us ; every nation owes us 
money; every market looks to us for supplies. The world 
is ours— if the bankers help— but the BANKERS MUST 
HELP ! 

WHERE AMERICA FALLS DOWN 

A CHINESE writer thus summarizes the chief reasons 
for the alleged failure of American merchants to 
compete with those of other nations in the trade of China : 
Lack of shipping facilities. 
Lack of financial institutions. 
Lack of investment companies. 
Lack of American organizations. 
Lack of organizations of exporters. 
Lack of consistent government support. 
Lack of studying the market. 
Lack of adaptation to local demand. 
"This really is a terrible indictment of American busi- 
ness perspicacity," comments the San Francisco Bulletin, 
and adds: "But its unfortunate part is its apparent truth. 
The Chinese field, like the entire Pan-Pacific field, has been 
•so long neglected by American businessmen that competing 
nations have had no difficulty in walking off with the 
honors and the profits." 

WHY NOT PAN PACIFIC TOO? 

AT the recent Pan American convention in Washington 
assurance was given by the United States Shipping 
Board that new fleets of great liners would shortly be 
placed in the runs between the principal ports of North 
and South America along both seaboards. 



A pledge that no expense would be spared to create a 
cable service between the United States, Central and South 
America which would be the equal of any in the world was 
made by John L. Merrill, president of the All-America 
Cables. 

Frank B. Noyes, president of the Associated Press, told 
the conference the exchange of "true, ungarbled and un- 
biased news" between the North and South American con- 
tinents, now being brought about by the membership of 
South American newspapers in the organization, would be 
"more effectual in cultivating and maintaining the rela- 
tions of friendship and affection that should exist between 
the two continents of this hemisphere than all the propa- 
ganda that could be fed out by all the publicity agents that 
could be put to work." 

Among other constructive features discussed or planned 
for by the convention were the following : 

Establishment of a common code of business 
methods among the republics of the Americas. 

Working out of satisfactory financial arrange- 
ments with Latin-American republics who now 
turn to the United States for the capital which 
Europe no longer is in a position to supply. 

International agreements looking to the protec- 
tion of patents, trademarks and copyrights. 

Extension of trade through standardization 
and improvement of the parcels post. 

Improvement of consular offices, standardiza- 
tion of consular invoices and fees, and annulling 
of local laws and tariffs detrimental to general 
trade expansion. 

Extension of railroad and aviation communica- 
tion between all North and Latin-American re- 
publics. 

Improvement of banking facilities of the 
United States in Latin-American republics. 

More complete and systematic interchange of 
publicity and news between the republics involved. 

Increased study in the United States of Spanish 
and Portuguese languages and of the geograph- 
ical and political economy of Latin-American 
countries. 

A strong general support in behalf of the sec- 
ond Pan-American financial congress called by the 
Pan-American Union for 1920. 
This program is heartily endorsed by this magazine, 
but the suggestion is offered that a similar program in be- 
half of PAN PACIFIC trade would bring even quicker and 
greater results than may be looked for in the Pan Amer- 
ican field. 



112 



Pan Pacific 



What Are We To Do With Our Ships? 

Head of Great American Manufacturing Concern Discusses the Problem of 
the Merchant Marine In Relation To Foreign Trade 



IN 1915, owing to the adverse ship- 
ping laws and the generally un- 
favorable attitude of the United States 
Government for many years, our flag 
had practically disappeared from the 
seas except in local and coastwise ser- 
vice. It was late in that year that 
the purchase of the ships of the Pa- 
cific Mail Steamship Company by the 
American International Corporation 
prevented the disbandment of the only 
fleet of considerable size under our 
flag on the Pacific Ocean. 

This marked the real turning point 
in the decadence of our merchant ma- 
rine in foreign trade, for in 1916 the 
United States Shipping Board was 
created by Congressional action and 
$50,000,000 appropriated to build and 
acquire ships for the United States 
Government. The original plans of 
the Shipping Board have been enor- 
mously expanded and to date upwards 
of $3,000,000,000 have been appropri- 
ated and over 800 ship building yards 
employed — many of them newly 
created and some of unprecedented 
size and resources — until today the 
United States is well under way in the 
creation and operation of the largest 
maritime program ever undertaken by 
any nation, and one which bids fair 
to make our merchant fleet, if not the 
largest at least the equal of that of 
any nation. 

U. S. Merchant Fleet 
Must Be Completed 

This great merchant fleet must be 
completed regardless of the signing of 
peace. Our country must face the 
possibility of war in the future, for 
which we will need ships to furnish 
transport service, preserve trade bal- 
ances and keep our foreign trade. 
These ships, largely built by the Gov- 
ernment and adapted to war needs in 
case of necessity, must be maintained 
and kept at high efficiency at any cost. 

Having an adequate fleet under our 
flag and laying aside for the moment 
the fact that this fleet is owned by the 
Government, what other things are 
essential to the full development of 
our foreign trade? 

FIRST— This great fleet must be ad- 
equately manned. 

During the war these vessels will be 
entirely used by the United States 
Government and therefore will form 
a part of the U. S. Navy and Army 
Transport Service. As such they will 
be manned by our young enlisted men, 
who will thus be trained as sailors in 
much greater numbers than would 
otherwise be possible, and while many 



By E. M. HERR 

President, Westinghouse Electric 
& Manufacturing Co. 
— o — 
will return to other avocations at the 
termination of the war, a large num- 
ber will still be available for the man- 
ning of these ships in export trade. 
Many of the sailors of other nations, 
whose marine trade has to a greater 
or less extent been injured by the rav- 
ages of the great war, will also be 
available, so that it would seem reason- 
able to expect no very great difficulty 
in manning our new merchant fleet. 

SECOND— Will money be available 
to adequately finance this expansion 
of overseas transportation on which 
we are now embarking? 

Has Greatest Command 
of Financial Resources 

There is no doubt that the ending 
of the war will not only leave the 
United States the greatest creditor 
nation on earth, but also the nation 
with the greatest command of finan- 
cial resources. It should, therefore, 
be entirely possible and perhaps com- 
paratively easy to arrange the finan- 
cial resources necessary for the con- 
duct of this great business. 

With the ships, the men and the 
money provided, we are still face to 
face with the all-important problem 
of the proper utilization of our great 
fleet after the war. It is impossible 
to discuss this problem broadly within 
the limits of this article, not only on 
account of its vast extent, but also 
because of its many ramifications and 
manifold angles of approach. 

The American manufacturers are, 
however, so vitally interested in the 
successful solution of this problem 
and their interests so closely reflect 
the interests of the nation itself, that 
it is from this — the manufacturer's 
point of view — that I shall attempt 
a brief review of this important sub- 
ject. What then is the paramount in- 
terest of the American manufacturer 
in the proper utilization of the mer- 
chant marine of the United States 
after the signing of peace? Manifestly, 
cheap and efficient transportation in 
these ships of raw and manufactured 
products — or, in other words, favor- 
able freight rates and how they can 
best be attained in foreign trade — 
brings up at once the question whether 
the operation of these ships shall be 
under Government or private owner- 
ship. 



Government ownership of transpor- 
tation facilities has never brought 
cheap rates and efficient service and, 
in my judgment, never will — especially 
under a republican form of Govern- 
ment, or in fact any form of Govern- 
ment now to be considered. Why 
Government ownership is inefficient 
has been so thoroughly discussed and 
clearly explained that it is unneces- 
sary to repeat the argument. 

Government Ownership 
Will Not Cheapen Rates 

We must, therefore, turn to private 
ownership for the successful operation 
of our merchant ships. Under private 
ownership, for successful results our 
present shipping laws must be modi- 
fied and adjusted to the needs of over- 
seas traffic, so that our ships can be 
manned and operated in competition 
with those of other nations. This 
means the repeal of the La Follette 
Seaman's Act and the enactment of 
such new legislation as the necessities 
of our competition may require. 

To do this wisely will mean much 
careful study. Let us endeavor to 
shape this legislation so that while 
fair, even liberal, to American labor, 
it will place no embargo on the . em- 
ployment of such foreign labor as 
may be necessary on our ships to en- 
able them to be successfully operated. 
The higher wages and better condi- 
tions which our labor will undoubt- 
edly demand need not be a bar to 
cheap transportation and effective 
competition with foreign shipping. 
Improved Facilities 
Will Bring Economy 

In order that this may result, how- 
ever, we must manage our ships in a 
way to take advantage of thorough 
organization and co-operation in the 
American way. As an example, our 
railroads pay the highest wages and 
use the most expensive cars and en- 
gines of any railroads in the world 
and yet they receive the lowest rates 
and handle their freight and passen- 
gers far more economically and effi- 
ciently than the railroads of any other 
nation. 

When plans now being considered 
are fully worked out our railroad 
transportation, again under private 
ownership, will be still more econom- 
ically and efficiently handled. 

So with our merchant marine, al- 
ready by improvements in dock facili- 
ties and better methods of handling, 
our ships in the transport service have 
shortened the time of a round trip to 

(Continued on page 118) 



July 19 19 



113 



yhcfrWhd^ j^ P^ftdfic 



EDWARD COOKINGHAM 

'THOUSANDS of Edward Cooking- 

■*■ ham's friends have their own 
definition of his importance to the 
Pacific Northwest, to Oregon and to 
Portland as a banker, Liberty Loan 
chairman and port leader, but they all 
subscribe to the telegraphed tribute 
from Woodrow Wilson, President of 
the United States, accorded him at the 
close of the Fourth Liberty Loan cam- 
paign ; 

"Edward Cookingham, leader in 
making patriotic purpose speak in 
prompt and definite action." 

News of Mr. Cookingham 's recent 
election to the presidency of the great 
La dd & Tilton Bank of Portland 
caused profound interest among the 
banking and business circles of the 
Pacific Coast. Born in Albany, New 
York, in 1861, he began his financial 
career at the age of 6 years as a ven- 
dor of newspapers. 

He graduated from Albany High 
School at the age of 16 and after a 
few years of business experience in 
Albany, he became interested in the 
beckoning opportunities of the west 
and removed to Portland in 1882. 

His first work in» Oregon was with 
the executive department of the 
Oregon Railroad & Navigation Com- 
pany. Subsequently he became cash- 
ier of the old Commercial National 
Bank of Portland. He has been con- 
tinuously associated with the Ladd & 
Tilton Bank since 1897, and in the 
noted banking institution and the com- 
munity of which it is so important a 
part he has found expression for un- 
common financial ability and unsur- 
passed public spirit. His election as 
president of Ladd & Tilton came as a 
recognition of long-sustained, ener- 
getic and capable service. 

Mr. Cookingham has been promi- 
nently identified with the Portland 
Chamber of Commerce and the public 
activities of this and other civic or- 
gai i izations. He is a member of the 
Arlington, Multnomah and Waverley 
Country Clubs of Portland. 

He has performed no greater ser- 
vice to the community nor to his 
■country than as chairman of the Ex- 
ecutive Committee of the Oregon Lib- 
erty Loan Organization for the Third 
and Fourth Liberty Loan drives. Un- 
der his leadership Oregon was one of 




EDWARD COOKINGHAM 



the first states in the Union to go 
over the top with substantial over- 
subscriptions which have added much 
to Oregon's proud record in patriotic 
causes. At the close of the Fourth 
Liberty Loan campaign workers pre- 
sented him with a handsome cup upon 
which was engraved the tribute from 
President Wilson which already has 
been quoted. 

Mr. Cookingham is devoting his 
thought and effort to the restoration 
of Portland as a port to a position in 
the world of commerce and shipping 
which the city formerly occupied and 
to which it is again entitled on the 



basis of its strategically geographic lo- 
cation and the rich resources of its 
hinterland. With other constructive 
thinkers and workers in Portland he 
is advocating and planning large pro- 
grams for the increase of port facili- 
ties and the development of port busi- 
ness. He believes that Portland should 
be unsurpassed in these particulars on 
the Pacific Coast. 

Mr. Cookingham 's hobby is golf 
and nearly every Saturday afternoon 
finds him on the links. He believes 
that outdoor exercise is an essential 
factor in any successful business 
career. 



114 



Pan Pacific 



Cocoanut Palms Support Ceylon 

Staple Product of Far Eastern Island Used In Great Variety of Forms and 

Shipped To All Parts of World 



COCOANUT planting is the pre- 
mier industry in this Island and 
it remains the staple product of Cey- 
lon, being consumed locally in every 
household in the country, unlike other 
products, exclusive of its demand in 
foreign countries as foodstuff and raw 
material. Most of the other principal 
products, except tea, are not consumed 
locally, but are shipped overseas for 
foreign consumption. 

Almost all the inhabitants of the 
provinces along the sea coast round 
the Island are owners of cocoanut 
plantations. Even the poorest man 
possesses a few trees, on which he 
depends, except in the principal towns, 
such as Colombo, where the poorer 
classes are not land owners. 

At present about 800,000 acres are 
planted with cocoanut and a similar 
area of suitable land for the purpose 
is available. 

Toddy and Arrack 
Made from the Juice 

When the cocoanut tree reaches the 
age of yielding it is tapped and the 
juice thus obtained is called Toddy, 
which is very sweet to drink and the 
best juggery is made out of this. But 
the most paying industry is the distil- 
lering or conversion into arrack. Fine 
vinegar also is made from this sub- 
stance. 

Arrack is largely consumed locally, 
mostly by the poorer classes, as an 
intoxicating liquor, which is of a good 
taste and stronger than whiskey. This 
also is shipped overseas, but not on 
a large scale. Sale of arrack in the 
country is allowed to renters under 
license, .which contributes a large 
share of the revenue of the Island. 

The cocoanut palm begins to yield 
at the ages of six and seven years, 
and the nuts are eatable at the raw 
state even when they are young, when 
the water inside the nut is sweet as 
honey and the tender kernel is like- 
wise sweet, and this will serve as a 
substitute for meal on some occasions. 
We have six bi-monthly crops of ma- 
tured nuts for a year and when they 
are gathered they are consumed lo- 
cally for cooking ; some are exported 
as fresh cocoanuts (husked and un- 
husked), some are shipped in the form 
of desiccated cocoanut, after desiccat- 
ing the kernel at the mills, and the 
rest are shipped in the form of copra 
oil and poonae. 

Principal markets for fresh cocoa- 
nuts, husked and unhusked, are Port 
Said, Suez and Alexandria. 

Desiccated cocoanut is one of the 
paying departments of the cocoanut 



By H. M. DIAS 

Staff Correspondent, Colombo, 
Ceylon 
— o — 
enterprise and it is worthy of mention 
that Ceylon monopolizes the world's 
supply of this product. Before the 
war it was being shipped to all parts 
of the world, England, Germany, Aus- 
tria, Belgium, France and United 
States being the largest buyers. Since 
the prohibition of the export of this 
article to European countries, other 
than Great Britain and France, as 
a result of the war, this business suf- 
fered greatly. 




A SENTINEL AT SUNSET 

To make matters worse the Imperial 
British Government restricted the im- 
portation into the United Kingdom, 
except under license, to be obtained 
by the importers from the Board of 
Trade, for half the quantities imported 
prior to war, and consequently this 
was removed from the list of articles 
of national importance. In the mean- 
time, Australia, New Zealand, Africa 
and Canada came into the field, but 
owing to the exhorbitant rates of 
freight and the abnormal prices of 
lead, nails, hoops and timber, the 
trade could not make any headway 
until the beginning of this year. 

Owing to want of freight space it 
was impossible to do a good business 
with the United States and in the last 
year this market was altogether closed 



for this article, by the embargo placed 
on imports by the United States Gov- 
ernment. Consequent upon this the 
local market for this article fell to 
about 4!/£ cents gold per lb., which 
stood before the war at about 7 5-6 
cents gold per lb. But today the 
local market rate is 9y 2 cents gold per 
lb. This is due to the withdrawal of 
the embargo on imports by the United 
States Government from the beginning 
of this year. Since then America 
stands as the largest buyer up to this 
present moment. 

In 1914 Ceylon exported 311,864 
cwts. to the value of $2,626,808.33. 

In 1917 Ceylon exported 268,542 
cwts. to the value of $2,901,808.33. 

In 1918 Ceylon exported 203,386 
cwts. to the value of $1,726,507.75. 
Ceylon Also Claims 
Best Brand of Copra 

Ceylon copra is highly spoken of 
and is regarded as the best, containing 
a greater quantity of oil, as compared 
with copra of other larger producing 
countries in the East, viz., Java, Straits 
Settlements, South Sea Islands and the 
Philippines. The Philippine Islands 
produce nearly one-third of the 
world's output of copra and cocoanut 
oil and her exports are chiefly to the 
United States. But its copra fetches 
very poor prices in the world's mar- 
kets. British East African copra is 
suitable only for soap making owing 
to bad drying, but it is said that this 
could be improved. 

In the year 1913 the export of Cey- 
lon copra topped the record of 1911 
both in price and in quantity, having 
shipped 1,154,121 cwts. with an aver- 
age local price of $128.32 per ton, 
though in the latter part of the year 
it reached $160.00 per .ton. Out of 
this quantity Germany alone bought 
806,288 cwts. or 25,009 cwts. more 
than the total quantity imported by 
other countries. Russia was second, 
having bought 11,000 tons. 

As a result of the war the exporta- 
tion to European countries were pro- 
hibited in 1914, except to the United 
Kingdom and France, and the largest 
oil mill in the country, which was 
owned by the German firm of Frieu- 
denberg & Co., was closed. Conse- 
quently the price dropped until it 
came down to $30.50 per ton during 
the latter part of 1917. During this 
period there was great demand in the 
Marseilles market, but there was no 
available freight space, as the only 
regular line of French steamers from 
Colombo to Marseilles were comman- 
deered by that government and to add 



July 19 19 



115 



to it the Imperial British Government 
restricted the importation to the 
United Kingdom, as the demand for 
ships became acute during 1918 and 
only a very small quantity was ship- 
ped direct to Europe dui ing the year. 

But the prices gradually improved 
during the year, as our neighbor, In- 
dia, came to our rescue and bought a 
very large quantity of copra, the mar- 
kets being Bombay, Calcutta and 
Madras. India's imports were 950,- 
650 cwts. of the value of $3,114,036.66. 
Her 1917 consumption was only 565,- 
397 cwts. and the surplus 385,163 cwts. 
We believe she re-exported to Mar- 
seilles either in the form of copra or 
oil, taking advantage of the freight 
offered to Marseilles from Bombay by 
the Osaka Shosen Kaisha line, which 
privilege Colombo failed to enjoy. 

When the local price reached in 
about October last to $104.67 per ton 
the demand from British India de- 
clined. But in response to several ap 
peals made to- the home government, 
by the Low-country Products Associa- 
tion and other local bodies, the British 
Government, through the local govern- 
ment, called for tenders to supply 
3,000 tons of copra during December, 
to be. delivered January, 1919. As a 
result the stockholders in the city 
raised the local price to $121.33 per 
ton and a few transactions of small 
quantities were done during Decem- 
ber. But it was impossible to main- 
tain this price, which now stands at 
$100.00 per ton. 

Ceylon Cocoanut Oil 
Was Made in Germany 

Cocoanut oil, which is compressed 
from copra, was largely shipped to 
the United Kingdom and the United 
States prior to the war, but the latter 
was not a buyer of Ceylon copra at 
all, though she bought 60% of Cey- 
lon's cocoanut oil in 1913, and the 
former bought 7,500 tons of oil direct 
from Ceylon. Here it is interesting 
to note that there was a great demand 
for cocoanut oil in the United King- 
dom, though she bought only a small 
quantity direct. 

In addition to this purchase she im- 
ported from European countries some 
49,000 metric tons of Ceylon cocoanut 
oil, of which 30,000 alone came from 
Hamburg, where it is said the latest 
improved machinery for compressing 
cocoanut oil existed. To verify this 
statement I wish to point out that the 
United Kingdom bought 75 tons of 
Ceylon copra, whereas Germany 
bought 40,700 tons of copra in 1913. 
The surplus importation to Germany 
was converted into oil and shipped to 
England, as there was a very good 
market for cocoanut oil. 

England was also a buyer of Ger- 
man made margarine, butter, fats and 
foods of various kinds made of cocoa- 
nut oil. It is clear that England was 



acting blindly by obtaining Ceylon 
cocoanut oil through Germany. Being 
overlord of Ceylon, she could either 
buy the oil direct or buy copra and 
convert into oil and other articles in 
the United Kingdom itself and in fu- 
ture we believe she will open her 
eyes. 

In 1913 the market recovered from 
$185.00 and rose to the record price 
of $220.00 per ton, which was the 
highest ever paid locally for oil. 

Consequent upon war this trade had 
to suffer gradually as in the case of 



The Australian markets are quite 
new fields and should the rates of 
freight come down in the near future, 
we believe that the demand from that 
country would increase. Since the 
outbreak of the war the surplus stocks 
of this by-product of oil were sup- 
plied to local estates for manuring 
cocoanut and rubber plantations. 

Fibre and yarn are the secondary 
products of the cocoanut palm, ob- 
tained from the cocoanut husks, which 
were largely exported before the war 
to Germany and Belgium chiefly. Fibre 




COCOANUT GROVE NEAR COLOMBO 



copra, the Imperial British Govern- 
ment having prohibited shipments to 
foreign countries other than the 
United Kingdom and British posses- 
sions. During the early part of last 
year Canada came into the field and 
bought over 3,700 tons of oil of the 
value of $750,000.00, when the Imper- 
ial British Government placed a gen- 
eral prohibition about the middle of 
the year and controlled the imports 
of oil into the United Kingdom, the 
local government being the buyer here 
on her account. However, this kept 
the business going. 

Poonac or Oil Cake 
Also Went to Germany 
Poonac or oil cake, the residue left 
after the extraction of oil from copra, 
was shipped chiefly to Germany and 
Belgium before the war. The chekku 
or village oil mill poonac was con- 
sumed locally for livestock and 11,000 
tons of poonac from the city oil mills 
were shipped overseas in 1913. As a 
result of the war the shipments to 
Germany and Belgium were altogether 
stopped and the value gradually de- 
clined, and in the last year the total 
exports were 700 tons of the value of 
$16,037.67, out of which 250 tons were 
shipped to Australia. 



was also shipped to other countries in 
Europe, while Asia, Africa and Amer- 
ica were secondary buyers. The ex- 
ports to Germany and Belgium were 
made into brushes for the United 
Kingdom. 

Likewise there was a great demand 
for yarn from all parts of the world. 
This is manufactured mainly in the 
southern province of the Island. In 
1913 total exports of fibre and yarn 
were 18,615 tons and the prices for 
bristle and mattress fibre were $4.33 
and 83 cents gold per cwt. respec- 
tively. 

With the outbreak of the war these 
two suffered like most other products, 
having stopped exportation to foreign 
countries other than British posses- 
sions. But in last year the prohibition 
of export to Japan was withdrawn, 
and this helped us to sell 2,140 tons 
of bristle fibre and 325 tons of mat- 
tress fibre of the value of $132,145.00. 
The total exports in 1918 were 3,993 
tons of bristle fibre and 6,085 tons of 
mattress fibre valued respectively at 
$239,625.00 and $70,997.33. 

In conclusion it is worthy of men- 
tion that the Government waived the 
export duty on copra during the whole 
of 1918. Shipments of copra also are 
again allowed to Odessa. 



116 



Pan Pacific 



Los Angeles Has Distributing Advantages 



ALTHOUGH most people think of 
the Pacific Coast as a straight 
line running more or less north and 
south, such is far from the case. As 
a matter of fact, Los Angeles Har- 
hor lies closer to three-quarters of the 
United States than any other Pacific 
Coast port. 

Furthermore, the four trancontinen- 
tal lines over which commodities must 
travel for Pacific export, reach South- 
ern California without having to cross 
the High Sierras, and for consequent 
reasons of lesser grades, freedom from 
snow hazards and resulting lower cost 
per ton mile of haul, cars can be most 
advantageously delivered to the Los 
Angeles docks. This fact becomes all 
the more important when we remem- 
ber that no Pacific port produces or 
accepts more than ten per cent of the 
commodities handled. The other 
ninety per cent necessarily comes from 
the manufacturing centers largely east 
of the Mississippi River. 

Climatic Conditions 
Also Favor Los Angeles 

The additional features offered by 
Southern California in the form of cli- 
matic favor, under which cargoes may 
be stored in the open, handled with 
greater freedom and under better 
working conditions, and loaded or un- 
loaded at a minimum of weather pro- 
tection, all contribute to the low costs 
at which merchandise may be handled 
in and out of these docks. 

Schedules for handling, railroad ab- 
sorptions and other data pertinent to 
eargo handling and ship loading, are 
at present so changeable, and so sub- 
ject to alterations to meet specific re- 
quirements, that it seems quite impos- 
sible to set out a definite comparison 
of costs obtaining in the several loca- 
tions. Such as are available, however, 
entirely indicate the advantage which 
cargoes have over the Los Angeles 
docks from the standpoint of the ship- 
per, the railroad, or the ship owner. 

The variation in distance between 
the various Pacific ports and the 
Orient is not great enough to make 
any serious variations in ship sched- 
ules or costs. This brings Los An- 
geles well within the limits of parity 
with other Pacific ports engaged in 
Oriental service. For Australasia the 
equity is absolute; while for Latin 
America the geographical advantage is 
obvious. These points should estab- 
lish Los Angeles harbor as an accept- 
ing and distributing point for her full 



share in the important and export ton- 
nages passing through our western 
seaports. 

Cotton Export 
Facilities Too 

With a crop for this year estimated 
at ninety-three thousand bales of cot- 
ton, Imperial Valley bids well to be- 
come one of the largest contributing 
centers to Pacific export trade. Much 
of this cotton goes to manufacturers 
in China and Japan and in order that 
both growers and exporters may take 
advantage of the most direct routes, 
the City of Los Angeles has authorized 
the immediate purchase and installa- 
tion of a high density press at Los An- 
geles harbor, for accepting all grades 
of cotton for export over the adjacent 
wharves. 

In view of the favorable rates ap- 
plying to handling, car unloading, 
wharfage, etc., at Los Angeles harbor, 
this short-haul, direct-line service, re- 
ducing transportation and handling 
charges to a minimum, will effect a 
large saving to both exporters and 
buyers, and make it possible for ships 
to aecept these tonnages much nearer 
the source of origin than heretofore. 
Two Oil Mills 
Are In Operation 

So rapidly has the demand for oils 
increased among manufacturers, both 
local and farther east, that Los An- 
geles business has grown far more rap- 
idly than was anticipated. Two mills 
are now in operation accepting crude 
material from both Latin American 
and Oriental sources. 

These mills are in a position to ac- 
cept copra, soya beans, raw peanuts, 
cotton seed, sesame seed, etc., and any 
exporters having these articles for sale 
are invited to communicate with the 
Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce so 
that they may be placed in direct 
touch with these operators. 

Los Angeles Industrials 
Have Many Advantages 

The favored position which Los An- 
geles occupies in relation to the crude 
rubber from Latin America and the 
far east, combines with the large ton- 
nage of cotton offering in the Imperial 
Valley, to make this an ideal location 
for the manufacture of articles involv- 
ing these commodities. The re-estab- 
lishment of definite steamship service, 
over which the first of these commodi- 
ties might be delivered, has so settled 
this question in the minds of many 
eastern manufacturers that a number 



of new industries are already consider- 
ing early installation here. 

Many local concerns of longer estab- 
lishment are greatly increasing their 
capacity in order to answer the de- 
mands which export and import trade 
have already made upon them, and the 
large number of representatives now 
traveling in foreign territory in the 
interests of these houses, is indicative 
of the rapid growth of Los Angeles 
overseas trade. Many of these foreign 
representatives have gone specifically 
empowered to purchase as well as to 
sell, there already being in Los An- 
geles a demand for certain foreign 
crude, over and above that offering 
through other channels. 

For any information on importing, 
exporting, and of general commodity 
or commercial nature, those interested 
are invited to address the Los Angeles 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Local Manufacture 
Of Expanded Clay 

An interesting development of the 
war has been the manufacture in 
Southern California of an expanded 
clay material intended to take the 
place of aggregate in concrete con- 
struction. It is made from a clay 
found in the Santa Monica Bay dis-'J 
trict in unlimited deposit. It is pre- : 
pared by crushing and grinding, 
finally emerging from a regular brick- 
machine in an endless ribbon of 
formed clay. It is then burned in a 
muffled s kiln and when finished looks 
like charcoal. The cakes swell to 
about twice the size of ordinary brick 
but are some twenty per cent lighter. 

Used in concrete, it is said to have 
fully as high a test in strength and 
compression as the same material made 
from gravel, though is so much lighter 
as to weigh less than forty pounds per 
cubic foot. It is already being util- 
ized for shipbuilding and promises 
many other forms of development for 
insulating purposes, where an abso- ? 
lutely non-absorbent compound is de- 
sired. It is truly a marvelous product 
and is but one of the many clay de- 1 
velopments playing such a large part 
in Southern California development 
and export trade. 

Few people appreciate the import- I 
ance of the clay and cement deposits 
surrounding Los Angeles harbor, and 
we are therefore glad to bring this 
item to public attention as an exam- 
ple of one of the products of mention 
represented by this group of natural 
resources. 



July 19 19 



£v;SvSD+S 



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THE PORT OF LOS ANGELES 

Offers the Best Port Facilities and the Lowest Port Charges of Any 
Port on the Pacific Coast — Possibly in America — Both to 

SHIPPERS AND STEAMSHIP COMPANIES 

NO RENT whatever is charged to steamships for preferential berth assignments at Los 
Angeles Municipal Piers. Only a dockage charge is made against the ship, and this is very low, 
— $15.00 a day for a ship of 2,100 net tons, and one-half cent per net ton above that figure. 
Thus a ship of 3,000 net tons, five days at the wharf, would pay a total of $97.50 — and this 
would be the only charge against the ship. It would pay no rent whatever. 

THE CARGO pays a wharfage charge varying from 2 Yl cents to 1 cents a ton, de- 
pending upon the commodity, BUT THIS INCLUDES THIRTY DAYS FREE STORAGE ON 
FOREIGN EXPORTS. In other words, a ship has 30 days time to accumulate a foreign 
cargo, without storage charges. The cargo pays wharfage at rates varying from 2 Yl to 10 
cents a ton, and the ship pays a small dockage only for the time it is actually at the wharf. 




PORT FACILITIES 

There are no finer wharves and wharf sheds in America than the municipal harbor facili- 
ties provided by the City of Los Angeles. There is no bar to cross at the harbor entrance — 
the water is 48 feet deep at low tide at the entrance — and the depth at the piers varies from 29 
to 35 feet at low tide. 

The local business of the Port is growing very rapidly, as Los Angeles, with a popula- 
tion of 650,000 — the largest city on the Pacific Coast — is going after water commerce. Los 
Angeles also is the logical port for the transshipment of transcontinental cargoes. 

The City of Los Angeles also is prepared to lease lands for industries which need 
waterfront locations. 

For further particulars address 

THE BOARD OF HARBOR COMMISSIONERS 

SUITE 33, CITY HALL, LOS ANGELES, U. S. A. 




118 



Pan Pacific 



What Are We To Do With The Ships? 



(Continued from page 112) 

European ports upwards of twenty 
per cent over what was formerly 
thought possible, and only a begin- 
ning has been made. 

Broadly considered plans for co-op- 
erative management of ships, docks 
and terminals must be worked out to 
the end that this great transportation 
problem will be handled with maxi- 
mum efficiency from the warehouse of 
the producer to that of the dealer who 
disposes of the manufactured products 
to the ultimate consumer. Heretofore 
this transportation problem has been 
everywhere handled largely by the hit 
or miss plan of individual operation. 

The individual manufacturers them- 
selves truck their products to and 
from the railroad and steamship ter- 
minals with enormous loss of time 
waiting to load and unload and still 
further loss in an effort to do this 
hauling at the time of the greatest 
street traffic congestion. This truck- 
ing is part of the transportation prob- 
lem and should be done by the ship 
and railroad companies in a thorough- 
ly organized and systematic way with 
great resulting economies. 

Much of our overseas transportation 
was formerly done on tramp steamers 
making irregular sailings and waiting 
a long time often for a cargo. Or- 
ganization and co-operative manage- 
ment will in this field also produce 
very great economies which, if de- 
veloped by our people in the way our 
great merchant fleet will enable us to, 
will go far toward allowing us to com- 
pete with any shipping in the world. 

Must Be Capitalized 
With Regard to Value 

This great American merchant fleet 
must not only be manned and oper- 
ated economically, but it must be 
capitalized fairly and with due con- 
sideration for the real value of these 
ships when taken over by private in- 
terests. This will require that the 
Government amortize as part of the 
cost of the war whatever excess cap- 
ital cost has been entailed in their 
production during war times. 

Insurance is a most important con- 
sideration and must be dealt with 
broadly, fairly and adequately. On 
account of competitive conditions, 
various forms of insurance, now il- 
legal, must perhaps be legalized. 

Whatever plans are finally worked 



out for the proper disposition and 
regulation of our merchant marine, it 
is o.f vital importance that a fixed pol- 
icy be adopted so that confidence may 
be built up in the continuation of this 
service without interference or change 
from the principles under which it is 
established along the best lines of 
trade development and efficient man- 
agement. 

Our ships can and should be so han- 
dled and managed that they will serve 
trade routes not now regularly estab- 
lished, thus meeting the needs of the 
particular ports served in ways not 
now possible and always with the 
broadest consideration for the trade 
requirements of the peoples who are 
thus brought into commercial contact 
with our shores. 

Must Develop Imports 
Along With Exports 

Imports must be developed with ex- 
ports, as all true trade is reciprocal. 
Nature has endowed us so richly with 
raw materials and such a vast extent 
of territory, with a remarkably fertile 
soil, that we manufacturers are likely 
to forget that notwithstanding these 
blessings, we import a large quantity 
of raw and semi-finished products, 
amounting in the year 1917 to $1,500,- 
000,000. These imports will grow as 
time passes and the source of supply 
of the most important should be 
largely owned in the United States. 
Ownership in such properties would 
often necessitate control of railways 
tributary thereto, thus affording our 
ships a tonnage of coal when out- 
bound, often important to fill cargo 
space otherwise empty. 

It is said that one of the large fac- 
tors in Great Britain's predominance 
in ocean trade is the heavy tonnage 
of coal — approximately 50 per cent of 
the outgoing cargo of British steamers 
taken at times suiting their cargo 
space. "We can very profitably de- 
velop similar tonnage. 

The development of the spirit of the 
Monroe Doctrine will make the coun- 
tries in which ownership of materials 
suitable for import is sought prefer- 
ably those of the Western Hemisphere. 
These are also the countries where 
generally the lines of communication 
are the shortest and with which our 
relations will probably be the least 
disturbed. 

Our Greatest Problem 
Is In Distribution 

Let us remember that perhaps the 
greatest problem in economies is dis- 
tribution. Our ships, docks and the 
terminal facilities of our railroads are 
among the most important factors in 
this great problem of distribution. 
These must be co-ordinated and de- 



veloped in the American way. We have 
all the problems in connection with 
labor, industry and finance" which 
other nations have, but none of these 
problems are more serious for us than 
for others, while in many respects we 
are much more favored than any na- 
tion. If we pursue our course in the 
true American way, utilizing to the 
limit our demonstrated ability in or- 
ganization and the scientific develop- 
ment of improved efficiency, we can 
confidently look forward to an era of 
progress and development in the 
United States such as the world has 
never seen. 

We must not conclude from these 
possibilities that this prosperity will 
automatically flow into our hands. In 
many ways we are greatly lacking and 
unprepared. Our industries have 
heretofore been concerned very largely 
with domestic trade and it is only by 
the most diligent effort and hardest 
work along educational lines in for- 
eign trade and the transportation 
problems relating thereto that the 
splendid prosperity possible will be 
realized. 

Our competitors in foreign trade— 
the peoples of other industrial nations 
— are and have been hard at work and 
unless we bestir ourselves most ac- 
tively the great opportunities possi- 
ble of realization will not be attained. 
Let us all, therefore, awaken to these 
necessities and place our great country 
not only prominently in the foreign 
trade of the world, but where she 
ought to be — at the very head of those 
in this splendid field of endeavor. 



RUSSIAN MISCONCEPTIONS 

(Continued from page 107) 

smallest cost, and not absorb the 
wealth of the people by high freight 
and passenger tolls. 

Wealth belongs with the people, 
hence let the railroads be owned by 
the people and not by the government, 
for if the government comes into own- 
ership, the politician will insist on in- 
creasing these tolls so as to increase 
his own emoluments and perpetuate 
himself in power. This will mean the 
absorption of too much wealth from 
the people who create it and thus, 
maintain an institution of imposition 
and poverty for all time to come. 

Let it be clearly understood that 
progress can always be achieved when 
men possess the ballot and exercise it 
wisely in cutting all the bonds of im- 
position that press directly or indi- 
rectly against the individual man en- 
joying the rewards of effort under just 
restraints of law. This is the true 
theory of wealth and happiness that 
has made America what she is; and 
is imitating American customs, the 
people of Russia will erect a nation 
and a civilization that will glorify and 
redeem their splendid national ideals. 



July 19 19 



119 



DIRECTORY SECTION 



PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE will publish each month in this section, for the con- 
venience of its readers, the following directories: 

EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS 

ADVERTISED MERCHANDISE 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND BROKERS 

CONNECTIONS WANTED AGENCIES WANTED 

MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES AND BROKERS 



EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS 



A directory of leading export and import concerns covering the Far East and Central and South America. 
Readers of this publication will find it much to their advantage to consult the concerns listed when desiring proper 
sources of supply. 



THE ACME WIRE COMPANY, 39 Cortlandt 
St., New York City, New York. Magnet wire, 
field coils, electro magnets, etc. Western Union 
Code. Cable address "ACME." 



ADDRESSOGRAPH COMPANY, 740 Broad- 
way, New York City, New York. Addressing 
machines; type embossing machines and rubber 
type. Code: A. B. C. Cable address "AD- 
DRESSO." 



AEROTHRUST ENGINE COMPANY, La 
Porte, Indiana. Manufacturers and exporters 
of the Aerothrust Engine for pumping machin- 
ery, lighting plants, agricultural Implements, 
pumping Jacks. Outboard Motors, etc. Corre- 
spondence solicited in all languages. All codes. 
Foreign orders our specialty. 



THE ARLINGTON COMPANY, 725 Broad- 
way, New York City, New York. Celluloid in 
sheets, rods, tubes, brushes, combs, mirrors, 
toilet sets, collars, cuffs, pipe bits and harness 
rings. Cable address "PYRALIN." 



ARNOTT & COMPANY, 112 South Los An- 
geles St., Los Angeles, California. Agricultural 
implements, engines and wagons. Export or- 
ders a specialty. Catalogue and price list on 
application. Cable address "ARNOTT." 



J. ARON & COMPANY, Inc., 95 Wall St., New 
York City. Branches at San Francisco, New 
Orleans, Chicago, London, England and Santos, 
Brazil. General exporters and importers. Cor- 
respondence solicited in all languages. Cable 
address "ARONCO." 



BRAUN - KNECHT - HEIMANN COMPANY, 
San Francisco, California. Importers and ex- 
porters of chemicals. Laboratory apparatus for 
mines, universities and schools. Sugar, soap, 
wine, oils, iron and steel. Correspondence so- 
licited. Cable address "BRAUNDRUG." 



CAMBRIA SPRING COMPANY, 916 South 
Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, California. Wheels 
and rims, spring bumpers, auto and truck 
springs. Code Western Union. All languages. 



CLEVELAND IMPORT & MANUFACTUR- 
ING COMPANY, Haas Building, Los Angeles, 
California. Commission merchants. Importers 
and Exporters. Established 1873. Cable ad- 
dress "CLEIMPCO." 



AMERICAN CAN COMPANY, 120 Broadway, 
New York City, New York. Branch at San 
Francisco. Ash, paper and garbage cans; add- 
ing machines, fly traps, cartons, tin boxes, cigar 
and tobacco boxes, jar caps; druggists' tinware, 
etc. Western Union and Lieber's codes. Cable 
address "AMCANCO." 



THE AMERICAN LAUNDRY MACHINE 
COMPANY, 132 West Twenty-seventh St., New 
York City, New York. Laundry machinery, dry 
cleaning machinery, washing machines, garment 
presses for tailors, etc. Cable address "ALM- 
CO." 



THE AMERICAN PULLEY COMPANY, 33 
Greene St., New York City, New York. Pressed 
steel split belt pulleys, reels, beams, spools, steel 
truck wheels, pressed metal shapes, etc. Codes, 
Lieber's and Western Union. Cable address, 
"AMER-PULLEY." 



T 

■DAT 



HE AMERICAN STEEL PACKAGE COM- 
PANY, 20 Vesey St., New York City, New York. 
Steel barrels and drums for gasoline, oil and 
chemicals; steel cases with partitions for bot- 
tled goods. Code: Western Union. Cable ad- 
dress "AMPAX,55 Defiance, Ohio. 



AMERICAN VULCANIZED FIBRE COM- 
PANY, Wilmington, Delaware. Vulcanized fibre 
In sheets, rods and tubes, insulators, waste bas- 
kets, warehouse trucks, trunks, suitcases, etc. 
Codes: Lieper's Western Union, General Tele- 
graph and A 1. Cable address "FIBRE." 

ANSCO COMPANY, Binghamton, New York. 
Photographic paper, films, cameras, chemicals, 
dry plates, etc. Foreign agent, Ansco Limited, 
143 Great Portland St., London, W., England. 
Codes: A. B. C, Lieber's Standard and Western 
Dillon. Cable address "ANSCO." 



ASSOCIATED MANUFACTURERS IMPORT- 
ING COMPANY, 871 Market St., San Francisco, 
California. Manufacturers' representatives, im- 
porters and exporters. Import chinaware, 
crockery, enamel ware, oils, hides, brushes, 
produce and raw materials. Export steel, iron, 
steel products, hardware, tools, chemicals, dyes, 
food products and all raw materials. Cable ad- 
dress "AMICO." 



CHAS. A. BACON COMPANY, 417 Montgom- 
ery St., San Francisco, Cal. Importers and Ex- 
porters. General Merchandise. 



EDWARD BARRY COMPANY, 215 Leidsdorff 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Wholesale paper deal- 
ers. Manufacturers of writing tablets, loose 
leaf systems, ruled goods, blank books. Whole- 
sale bookbinders. 



THE BEAVER BOARD COMPANIES, 225 
Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York. 
"Beaver Board," a wall board for interior con- 
struction; blackboards, varnishes, etc. Codes: 
Western Union, A. B. C. and Fifth Improved 
editions. Cable address "BEAVER." 

BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE, 37-45 First 
St., San Francisco, California. Paper of all de- 
scriptions. A complete line carried in stock for 
export or domestic trade. Special papers made 
to order. Quotations and samples cheerfully 
submitted. 

F. E. BOOTH COMPANY, 110 Market St., San 
Francisco, California. Importers and exporters, 
Crescent Brand Food Products. All languages 
used. 

BRADY & COMPANY, L. C. Smith Building, 
Seattle, Washington. Shipping and Commis- 
sion. Importers and Exporters salmon, oils, 
steel, lumber, fertilizer. Established 1892. 



CLYDE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, 542 First 
Avenue, Seattle, Washington. Machinery and 
supply merchants. Export orders a specialty. 
Quotations furnished. Special machinery made 
to order. Correspondence in all languages and 
codes. 



CONNELL BROTHERS COMPANY, L. C. 
SMITH Building, Seattle, Washington. General 
importers and exporters. Offices at Shang- 
hai, Manila, Hong Kong and Singapore. Corre- 
spondence in all languages. Cable address 
"CONNELL." 



A. J. & J. R. COOK, 743 Mission St., San 
Francisco, California. Leather, calf, skins, 
glazed kid, patent and upholstery leather, etc. 
Cable address "COOKBRO." 



DILL-CROSETT, Inc., San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. Exporters of steel products, acids, rosin, 
chemicals, dye stuff, phenol, etc. Importers of 
fish oil, hides, coffee, coconut oil, beans, copra, 
castor oil, tallow, silks, etc. Branch offices: 
New York, Kobe, Japan and Sydney, Australia. 
All languages and codes used. 



L. DINKELSPIEL, Inc., 115-135 Battery St., 
San Francisco, California. Wholesale dealers, 
jobbers and exporters of dry goods, furnishing 
goods, notions and fancy goods. Cotton piece 
goods, linens, dress goods, silks, flannels, hos- 
iery, underwear, shirts, sweaters, ribbons, laces, 
threads, blankets, quilts. Correspondence in all 
languages. Cable address LIPSEKNID. 



DOLLIVER & BROTHER, 619 Mission St., 
California. Leather for shoes, willow, calf, tan 
box, royal, vici, etc. Machinery, nails, eyelets, 
ink, shoemakers' supplies; elastic webbing. 
Fifty years of service. 



120 



Pan Pacific 



EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS— Continued 



JAMES P. DWAN, Hearst Building, San 
Francisco, Cal. Exporter and Importer. Gen- 
eral purchasing agent for foreign buyers. Build- 
ing materials, machinery, ores, metals, oils. 
Foreign office, Missions Building, The Bund, 
Canton, China. Cable address DWAN. 

GENERAL, PAPER COMPANY, 525 Market 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Paper Mill represen- 
tatives. Dealers in news, books, cardboard and 
paper stock of all kinds. 

W. R. GRACE & COMPANY, 332 Sansome St., 
San Francisco, California. Exporters of all 
American products. Importers of all raw ma- 
terials from South and Central America and Far 
East. Represented in all parts of the world. 
Letters of credit, cable transfers, foreign ex- 
change. 

HARRON, RICKARD & McCONE, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Machinery for mines and 
mills, garages, boiler shops, forge shops, snip- 
yards, saw mills, planing mills, contractors, etc. 
All standard codes used. Cable address "AIR- 
DRILL." 



F. GRIFFIN & COMPANY, 341 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Importers and export- 
ers of rice, oil, drugs, chemicals, rubber goods, 
food products, iron, steel. Offices at Vancouver, 
B. C, Seattle and Portland. Correspondence in 
all languages. Cable address DRAGON. 



B. F. HEASTAND, 618 Mission St., San Fran- 
cisco, California. Exporter of glass ware, din- 
ner services, vitrified hotel china. Prepared to 
fill orders immediately for any quantity. Corre- 
spondence in any language. Catalogues on re- 
quest. Cable address "HEASTAND." 



INGRIM - RUTLEDGE COMPANY, 413-415 
Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. 
Printers, stationers, bookbinders, art and color 
work. Catalog and booklet printing. Copper 
plate and steel die engraving. Office equipment 
and supplies. Loose leaf systems. Export or- 
ders a specialtq. Correspondence in all lan- 
guages. 

INTERNATIONAL TRADING COMPANY OF 
AMERICA, Inc., Seattle, Washington. Import- 
ers, exporters, forwarders and manufacturers' 
representatives. Branches in all Far Eastern 
countries. Export iron and steel, machinery, 
plumbing supplies, heavy and light hardware, 
talking machines, cotton and wool textiles and 
dry gods. Correspondence invited. Cable ad- 
dress "INTRACO." 



MURRY JACOBS, A. C. RULOFSON COM- 
PANY, San Francisco, California. Direct mill 
representatives — Iron and steel products. Cor- 
respondence in all languages. All Codes used. 

JOOST BROTHERS, Inc., 1053 Market St., San 
Francisco, California. Foreign orders promptly 
and carefully executed. General hardware, 
household goods, tools, sporting goods, paints, 
oils, varnishes. Correspondence in all languages. 
Catalogs on request. 

KAAS-HOPKINS CO., Hearst Building, San 
Francisco, California. Paper Mill selling agents. 
Solicit export inquiries from the trade. Sam- 
ples and quotations promptly furnished on re- 
quest. 

KUDLMAN, SALZ & COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Sole leather; tanners. Leather 
for export a specialty. Prompt attention to or- 
ders. Ask us to quote on your requirements. 
All languages. 



MARVIN SHOE COMPANY, Inc., 216 Market 
St., San Francisco, California. Exporter and 
wholesaler of shoes. Men's, women's, boys' and 
children's shoes. Rubber boots, tennis and out- 
ing shoes. All styles on hand for immediate 
shipment. Export trade solicited. Cable ad- 
dress, "VINMAR." 



MILL & MINE SUPPLY COMPANY, Seattle, 
Washington. Iron, bolts, chain, axes, belting, 
logging tools, steel, nuts, waste, saws, pulleys. 
Cable address "MILESMINE." Export orders 
solicited. 



NATIONAL PRODUCTS COMPANY, 519 Cal- 
ifornia St., San Francisco, California. Importers 
and exporters of foods, spices, canned goods, 
etc. Will grant exclusive agencies. Correspon- 
dence invited. 



NOLAN-EARL SHOE COMPANY, 25 Fre- 
mont St., San Francisco, Cal. Manufacturers 
and wholesale dealers in Men's, Women's and 
Children's shoes. Samples sent on request. 
Charges prepaid. Cable address "Nesco." Bent- 
ley's Code. 



OCEAN BROKERAGE COMPANY, Stuart 
Building, Seattle, Washington. Custom House 
brokers. U. S. Bonded storage. Import and 
Export freight forwarders, fire and marine in- 
surance. Weighing, sampling, reconditioning, 
distributing, marking, sampling. 



PACIFIC LUBRICATING COMPANY, 715 W. 
Spokane St., Seattle, Washington. Manufac- 
turers of greases, cup transmission, car, graph- 
ite and chain. Hair and wool flock. Repre- 
sented at Manila, Sydney, Australia and Val- 
paraiso, Chile. Export orders promptly and 
carefully attended to. Special greases made to 
order. 



PACIFIC SANITARY MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY, 67 New Montgomery St., San Fran- 
cisco, California. Exporters of bath-tubs, toil- 
ets, lavatories, sinks, laundry tubs, plumbing 
fixtures, etc. Prompt and careful shipment of 
export orders. Correspondence in all languages 
and codes. 



VICTOR PATRON, 112 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco, California. Branch at Mazatlan, Mexico. 
Cable address "PATRON." Import and export 
representative. Prices and catalogues furnished 
on application. 

C. M. PETTIBONE COMPANY, L. C. Smith 
Building, Seattle, Washington. Importers and 
Exporters. Packers direct selling agents. Ship- 
ping and commission merchants. Cable ad- 
dress PETTIBONE. Codes used, Armsby, A. B. 
C. 5th Edition, Bentley's, W. U. 



PURNELL & PAGETT, Canton, China. Ar- 
chitects and civil engineers. Investigations, In- 
spections and valuations. Bridges, steel con- 
struction, wharves and docks. Cable address 
PANEL. W. U. Code and A. B. C. 



H. S. RENSHAW, Inc., 205 Metropolitan Bank 
Building, New Orleans, Louisiana. Export; Im- 
port; Commission. Freight forwarders. Corre- 
spondence solicited. Cable address "RENCO." 
Codes; A. B. C. 4; W. U. T.; Bedford McNeil. 



ROGERS SHOE COMPANY, 135 Bush St., San 
Francisco, California. Shoes, rubbers, tennis 
and sport shoes, all kinds; all styles. Bentley 
Code used. 



PAUL R. RUBEN & COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Importers, exporters, manu- 
facturers' agents, purchasing agents. All codes. 
Cable address "PAULRUBE." 



SCOTT, SUGDEN & LAMOT, Monadnock 
Building, San Francisco, California. Foreign 
and domestic merchants. Steel and iron and 
manufactured products. Marine hardware and 
supplies. Quotations furnished on request. 
Cable address "WALTERSCOT." 



SEATTLE FAR EAST TRADING COMPANY, 
Inc., D. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Washington. 
Branch offices Shanghai, Hong Kong, Seattle, 
Kobe and Tokio. Exporters of iron, woodwork- 
ing and textile machinery, iron, steel, pipe, rail- 
way supplies, cars, locomotives, glass, plumbing 
fixtures, hardware, etc. Correspondence solic- 
ited. 



SHERMAN BROTHERS COMPANY, 208 
South La Salle St., Chicago, Illinois. Exporters 
and importers of shoes, hosiery, underwear, 
piece goods, rubber goods, chemicals, food prod- 
ucts, machinery, automobiles and hardware. 
Careful and prompt attention given to all cor- 
respondence and orders. Cable address "CAR- 
NOT." 



SHIPBUILDERS MACHINERY COMPANY, 
Inc., 201 Maynard Building, Seattle, Washing- 
ton. Manufacturers of Ship Plate tightener; 
scarphing machines, motor driven machines, etc. 
Export orders solicited. 



SHIPPERS COMMERCIAL CORPORATION, 
Seattle, Wash. Exporters and importers Pacific 
Coast products. Cable address "Shipcomco." 
All codes used. 



C. HENRY SMITH, 311 California St., San 
Francisco, California. Export and import mer- 
chant. Nitrates a specialty. Shipping and 
commission. Steamship agent and ship owner. 
All codes. Cable address CHENRYINC. 



HERBERT T. SMITH BROKERAGE COM- 
PANY, 209 Washington St., Chicago, Illnois. 
Import and export. Beans, peas, seeds, oils, etc. 
Write for quotations. 



STANDARD PRODUCTS COMPANY, 260 
California St., San Francisco, California. Ex- 
porters of all American products — iron, steel 
products, galvanized pipe, paints, varnishes, 
cutlery, explosives, plate and window glass, etc. 
Importers of raw materials from Asia, camel's 
hair, animal hair, bristles, furs, skins, nuts, 
oils, etc. All codes used. Cable address "PER- 
KINS." 



THOMPSON & CASTLETON, 316 First St., 
So. Seattle, Wash. Electrical and mining ma- 
chinery. Specialists on rewinding machinery of 
all kinds. Installers of complete plants. 



WILLIAMS-MARVIN COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Exporter of shoes for men, 
women and children. Orders receive prompt 
and careful attention. Special styles made to 
order. Send for our catalogue. Cable address 
"WILMAR." 



LANSING COMPANY, San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. Manufacturers of electrical trucks, trail- 
ers, concrete machinery, gas engines, hoists, 
hand carts, wheels, casters, etc. Export trade 
a specialty. Cable address "QUOLANSING." 

LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS, Los Angeles, 
California. Manufacturers and exporters of 
steamship power equipment, water, oil and fuel 
tanks, rolling mill products. Ingots, bars and 
shapes. Structural steel fabricators. Correspon- 
dence invited. All codes used. Cable address 
"LLEWELLYN." 



ROLPH, MILLS & COMPANY, Colman Bldg., 
Seattle, Wash. General shipping and commis- 
sion merchants. Export and imports. Direct 
representatives of manufacturers' of principal 
American goods. Offices at Seattle, Portland, 
Los Angeles, New York and Chicago. Corre- 
spondence solicited. 

ROTHWELL & COMPANY, Inc., Hoge "Build- 
ing. Seattle, Washington. Importers, exporters 
and shippers. Branches at New York City, Ha- 
vana, Cuba, and Kobe, Japan. Import oils, silk 
goods and fruits, chemicals, dyestuffs, iron, steel 
and machinery. Correspondence invited. 



WORLEY-MARTIN COMPANY, 617 Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco, California. Wool, 
hides, tallow, oils and Oriental products. Hard- 
ware and steel products, drugs and specialties. 
Represented in China and Japan. Desires lines 
to introduce. Cable address "WORLEY." 



ZELLERBACH PAPER COMPANY, San 
Francisco, California. Quotations and samples 
of paper for export. Represented at Yokohama 
and Shanghai. Cable address "ZELLERBACH." 
All codes. 



The attention of readers and advertisers is called to the fact that PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE will accept no 
advertisements of a doubtful nature nor from concerns in other than good standing. The publishers of this magazine 
believe that foreign buyers can place confidence in those concerns whose names appear herein. 



/u/j, 19 19 



1 21 



MARINE SECTION 



The following marine insurance companies, surveyors, brokers and adjusters are reliable and of good standing. 
This publication believes that all dealings had with these concerns will prove satisfactory in every particular. 



MARINE INSURANCE 

(San Francisco, Cal.) 

Aetna Insurance Company. 

Atlantic Mutal Insurance Company. 

Balfour, Guthrie & Company. 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company. 

Home F'ire and Marine Insurance Co. of Calif. 

Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Co. 

H. M. Newhall & Company. 



MARINE SURVEYORS 



(San Francisco, Cal.) 



Kincaid Shipping Company. 

Martins-Gardens Company. 

E. Griffin & Co. 

C. M. Pettibone & Co. 

Page Brothers. 

George W. Reed & Company. 

W. S. Scammel & Company. 

W. B. Thornley. 



(Portland, Oregon) 

Else Shipping Company. 
C. V. Ericesson & Company. 
Taylor & Young Company. 
Tegen & Main. 

(Seattle, Washington) 
Frank P. Dow Company, Inc. 
Fankner, Currie & Company, Inc. 



Ernest Bent 
L. Curtis 
James F. Fowler 
W. F. Mills 



W. J. Murray 
John Rinder 
J. Seale & Company 
Frank Walker 



Thomas Wallace 



SHIP, CUSTOM AND 
FREIGHT BROKERS 

(San Francisco, Cal.) 



C. Beyful & Company 

H. D. Bowly 

W. J. Byrnes 

Brady & Co. 

C. D. Bunker & Company. 

John W. Chapman 

Frank P. Dow 

Davies, Turner & Company 

F. F. G. Harper & Company 

Frederic Henry 

Fred Holmes & Son. 

Henry Kirchmann, Jr. 

Bernard Judae Company 



MARINE ADJUSTERS 

"When in need of the services of reliable ma- 
rine adjusters, exporters and importers will And 
it to their advantage to consult any of the con- 
cerns listed below. 



(San Francisco, California.) 



Creditors' Adjustment Company. 
Dodwell & Company. 
Insurance Company of North America. 
London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co. 
H. M. Newhall & Company. 
Pacific Coast Adjusting Bureau. 
Springfield Fire & Marine Insurance Co. 
Union Marine Insurance Company. 
Willcox, Peck & Hughes. 

(Seattle, Washington) 

Dodwell & Company. 
Willcox, Peck & Hughes. 



STEAMSHIP LINES 

OPERATING IN 

THE PACIFIC 

(San Francisco, California) 

CHINA MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

San Francisco to the Orient. 
OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

San Francisco to Sydney, Australia. 
ROBERT DOLLAR COMPANY 

Oriental Trade. 
EAST ASIATIC COMPANY, LTD. 

Oriental Trade. 
W. R. GRACE & COMPANY 

Central & South American Ports and Orient. 
GULF MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Central & South American Ports. 
PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Mexico, South America and Orient. 
CHARLES NELSON COMPANY 

Hawaiian Islands. 
A. F. THANE & COMPANY 

Australia. 
TOYO KISEN KAISHA 

San Francisco and Orient. 
JAVA -CHINA- JAP AN-LIJN 

San Francisco to Orient. 

San Francisco to Netherland East Indies. 
JOHNSON LINE 

San Francisco to Scandinavian Ports. 
MERCHANTS LINE 

Pacific, Atlantic & South America. 
OCEAN TRANSPORT COMPANY, LTD. 

San Francisco to Orient. 
TRANS-OCEANIC CO. 

San Francisco to Orient. 

(Oregon and Washington) 
PACIFIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Seattle to Orient. 
NIPPON YUSEN KAISHA 

Seattle to Orient. 
OSAKA SHOSEN KAISHA 

Seattle to Orient. 
SEATTLE STEAMSHIP COMPANY 
Seattle to Australia and South Africa. 



FOREIGN IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 



JAPAN 

Andrews & George Co., Inc Tokio 

Aki & Company Osaka 

Abe Kobe! Yokohama 

Masuda & Company Yokohama 

Hurato & Umtanni Kobe 

Nosawa & Company Tokio 

Samuel Samuel & Co., Ltd Tokio 

Yonei Shoten Tokio 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Parsons Hardware Co., Inc Manila 

W. F. Stevenson & Co., Ltd Manila 

Warner, Barnes & Co., Ltd Manila 



CHINA 

Andersen, Meyer & Co., Ltd Shanghai 

J. M. Alver & Company Hong Kong 

Dodwell & Company Shanghai 

Okura & Co., Ltd Shanghai 

Shewan, Tonmes & Co Hong Kong 

Harry Wicking & Company Hong Kong 

STRAITS SETTLEMENTS 

Central Engine Works, Ltd Singapore 

Katz Brothers, Ltd Penang, S. S. 

Patterson, Simons & Co., Ltd Penang, S. S. 

Straist Industrial Syndicate Singapore 



AUSTRALIA 

Brown & Dureau, Ltd Perth 

Capron, Carter & Co., Ltd Sydney 

Essex R. Pieot Sydney 

Eliza Tinsley Melbourne 

A. H. & A. E. Humphries Melbourne 

A. Goninan & Co., Ltd New Castle 

James Hardie & Company Sydney 

Turnbull & Niblett Sydney 

NEW ZEALAND 

W. H. Long & Company Wellington 

F. W. Markham Wellington 

Herbert G. Teagle, Ltd Wellington 



MERCHANDISE ADVERTISED 



PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE publishes herewith a list of articles advertised in this issue for the convenience of its 
readers. The name of the advertiser will be found listed under each heading. This is a gratis service rendered adver- 
tisers and the publishers of this magazine accept no responsibility for omissions or errors, but make every effort to main- 
tain an accurate list. 



ADDING MACHINES 

American Can Company. 

3DRESSING MACHINES & SUPPLIES 

Addressograph Company. 
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 

Arnott & Company. 
VUTOMOBILES 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 
3ANKS AND BANKING 

First Trust Company of Hilo. 
3ATH-TUBS - 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 

3LANKETS, QUILTS, Etc. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
BOILERS. WATER TUBE 

Pacific Marine Iron Works. 
BOOKBINDERS 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 

Edward Barry Company. 
BOOTS 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Williams Marvin Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 

Nolan-Earl Shoe Company. 
3ROKERAGE AND COMMISSION 

Du-Pont Coleman & Company. 

C. M. Pettibone Company. 
BUILDING MATERIAL 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

James P. Dwan 



CAMERAS 

The Ansco Company. 
CANNED GOODS 

Rothwell & Company. 
W. R. Grace & Company. 
National Products Company. 
F. E. Booth Company. 
Western Canning Co. 
CANS, CAPS, TIN BOXES 
American Can Company. 
CASES, STEEL .... 

American Steel Package Company. 
CASTINGS 
Pacific Marine Iron - Works. 
Interstate Pattern Works. 
Harron, Rickard & McCone. 
CELLULOID, MANUFACTURED 

The Arlington Company. 
CELLULOID, SHEET 

The Arlington Company. 
CEREALS. 

Sperry Flour Co. 
CHINAWARE 
B. F. Heastand. 
Associated Mfgs. Importing Co. 
COFFEE 
W. R. Grace & Company. 
Dill-Crosett, Inc. 
Pacific American Trading Co. 
CONCRETE MACHINERY 

Lansing Company. 
CONTRACTORS SUPPLIES 
Topping Brothers. 



COPPER PLATE ENGRAVING 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
COTTON GOODS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
CROCKERY 

B. F. Heastand. 

Associated Mrgs. Importing Co. 
CUTLERY 

Standard Products Company. 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 
DRESS GOODS 

D. Dinkelspiel Company. 
DRUGS & CHEMICALS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

The Hale Company. 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

F. Griffin & Company. 
DRY GOODS, TEXTILES, Etc. 

International Trading Co. of America. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
DYE STUFFS 

Quaker City Supply Company. 
ELECTRIC TRUCKS 

Lansing Company. 

ENAMELWARE 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 
EXPLOSIVES & POWDER 

Standard Products Company. 



122 



Pan Pacific 



Merchandise Advertised — Continued 



FERTILIZERS 

Brady & Company. 
FLOCK, HAIR AND WOOL 

Pacific Lubricating Company. 

FLOUR 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Sperry Flour Co. 
FOOD PRODUCTS 

Rothwell & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

National Products Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

F. E. Booth Company. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

Chas. A. Bacon. 

F. Griffin & Company. 

C. M. Pettibone & Co. 

Brady & Company. 

GAS ENGINES 

Shipbuilders Machinery Company. 

Lansing Company. 

Arnott & Company. 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
GLASSWARE 

B. F. Heastand. 

GLOVES 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 
GREASES 

Pacific Lubricating Company. 

GROCERIES 

C. M. Pettibone Company. 
HAIR, ANIMAL 

Standard Products Company. 
HARDWARE 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

International Trading Co. of America. 
HIDES 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 
HOSIER? 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 
HOUSEHOLD GOODS 

Joost Brothers, Ins. 
INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 

James P. Dwan. 

Purnell & Pagett. 
LABORATORY APPARATUS 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 
LAUNDRY MACHINERY 

American Laundry Machine Co. 
LAUNDRY TRAYS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
LAVATORIES 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
LEATHER & LEATHER PRODUCTS 

Dolliver & Brother. 

Kullman, Salz & Company. 

A. J. & J. R. Cook. 
LIGHTING PLANTS 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
LOCOMOTIVES 

Seatle Far East Trading Co. 
MACHINERY 

Rothwell & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

International Trading Co. of America. 

Clyde Equipment Company. 

James P. Dwan. 
MARINE HARDWARE 

Topping Brothers. 

Pacific Marine Iron Works. 
- Scott, Sugden & Lamont. 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 

Shipbuilders Machinery Co. 
MINE & MILL MACHINERY 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 
MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Connell Brothers Company. 

J. Aron & Company. 

Rolph, Mills & Company. 

Victor Patron. 

Paul R. Ruben & Company. 

H. S. Renshaw, Inc. 

Cleveland Import & Mfg. Company. 

Ocean Brokerage Co. 
NITRATES 

C. Henry Smith. 
NOTIONS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
OILS . 

Worlev-Martin Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Rothwell & Company. 

Standard Products Company. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

James P. Dwan. 

F. Griffin & Co. 

Brady & Co. 
ORIENTAL PRODUCTS 

Worley-Martin Company. 
OUTBOARD MOTORS 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 



PAINTS 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 

Standard Products Company. 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
PAPER 

Zellerbach Paper Company. 

Kaas-Hopkins Company. 

Blake, Moffltt & Towne. 

General Paper Co. 

Edward Barry Co. 
PHOTOGRAPHIC PAPER & MATERIALS 

The Ansco Company. 
PLUMBING FIXTURES 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
PRINTING 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 

Edward Barry Co. 
PULLEYS 

The American Pulley Company. 
PUMPING ENGINES 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
RAILROAD SUPPLIES 

Topping Brothers. 
RAW PRODUCTS 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

A. O. Andersen & Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Rolph, Mills & Company. 

Victor Patron. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 
RICE 

F. Griffin & Co. 
ROOFING 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
RUBBER BOOTS AND SHOES 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 

Nolan-Earl Shoe Co. 
RUBBER GOODS 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

F. Griffin & Co. 
SHIP CHANDLERY 

Topping Brothers. 
SHOES 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 
SHOE MAKING MACHINERY 

Dolliver & Brother. 
SHOES, SPORT AND TENNIS 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 

Nolan-Earl Shoe Co. 
SILK GOODS 

Rothwell & Company. 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
SINKS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
SOAP 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 
SPICES 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

National Products Company. 
SPORTING GOODS. 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 



SPRINGS, AUTO AND TRUCK 

Cambria Spring Company. 
STATIONERY 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
STEEL PRODUCTS 

F. Griffin & Co. 
STEEL AND STEEL PRODUCTS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Rothwell & Company. 

Scott, Sugden & Lamont. 

Llewellyn Iron Work's. 

Murray Jacobs. 

A. C. Rulofson Company. 

Interstate Pattern Works. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

Standard Products Company. 

International Trading Co. of America, Inc. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 

Cambria Spring Company. 

The American Pulley Company. 
TALKING MACHINES 

International Trading Co. of America. 
TALLOW 

Worley-Martin Company. 
TANKS, WATER, OIL AND FUEL 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 
TANNERS 

Kullman, Salz & Company. 

Dolliver & Brother. 
TEA EXPERTS 

MacDonald & Company. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
TEXTILE MACHINERY 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
TINWARE 

American Can Company. 
TOILETS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
TOOLS 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 
TYPEWRITERS 

American Can Company. 
UNDERWEAR 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
VARNISH 

Beaver Board Companies. 

Standard Products Company. 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
VULCANIZED FIBRE 

American Vulcanized Fibre Co. 
WAGONS 

Arnott & Company. 
WALL BOARD 

The Beaver Board Companies. 
WHEELS, CASTERS, Etc. 

Lansing Company. 

Cambria Spring Company. 

The American Pulley Company. 
WIRE, ELECTRICAL 

The Acme Wire Company. 
WOODWORKING MACHINERY 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
WOOL 

Worley-Martin Company. 



Connections Wanted 



MADRAS, INDIA — Managing agents for two 
mining companies handling chrome, manga- 
nese and pyrolusite ores, desire to get in touch 
with interested importers. Details on file at 
this office. Address Box 620 Pan Pacific. 

BINDJEI, SUMATRA, DUTCH EAST INDIES— 
Export house desires to get in touch with im- 
porters of tea, coffee, copra, copra-oil, rubber, 
etc. Address Box 621 Pan Pacific. 

KOBE, JAPAN — Japanese firm desires to con- 
nect with importers of celluloid, celluloid 
manufactures such as combs, hair pins, toys, 
buttons and brushes. Address Box 622 Pan 
Pacific. 

PIRAEUS, SMYRNA— Firm desires to get in 
touch with packers of fish and preserved 
fruits. Address Box 623 Pan Pacific. 

GENOVA, ITALY — Party desires to communi- 
cate with exporters of fruit, desiring to do 
business in Italy. 

PRAGUE-KARLIN — Firm -wishes to communi- 
cate with exporters of grain, maize, forages, 
oil-cakes, etc., desiring to extend their foreign 
commerce to the Tscneeho-Slovack Republic, 
and importers of cloverseeds. Address Box 
624 Pan Pacific. 

HAVANA, CUBA — Established commission 
house wishes to represent in Cuba, dealers in 
Asiatic rice and California fruits. Address 
Box 625 Pan Pacific. 

VALLETTA, MALTA— A firm of chandlers and 
coal merchants are desirous of getting in 
touch with some reliable person in San Fran- 
cisco who would be willing to act as their 
agent, the terms to be arrived at by arrange- 
ment. Address Box 626 Pan Pacific. 

NOGALES, SONORA— Firm desires to com- 
municate with exporters of hardware, glass- 
ware, iewelry and groceries. Address Box 827 
Pan Pacific. 



DELHI, INDIA — Import and export firm desires 
to get in touch with merchants interested in 
trade with India. Address Box 628 Pan Pa- 
cific. 

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA — General merchants 
and importing firm in Sydney desires to secure 
the agency for firms desiring representation in 
Australia. Addess Box 629 Pan Pacific. 

HAVANA, CUBA — Broker and manufacturers' 
agent desires to get in touch with manufac- 
turers and exporters desiring a representative 
for their goods in Cuba. Addess Box 630 Pan 
Pacific. 

VANCOUVER, B. C— Firm desires to communi- 
cate with importers of India fibre for making 
brushes and brooms. Address Box 631 Pan 
Pacific. 

HAVANA, CUBA— Commission merchant de- 
sires to get in touch with dealers of rice, 
beans and peas, who are willing to do business 
in Cuba. Address Box 632 Pan Pacific. 

SHANGHAI, CHINA— Import and export firm 
in China desires to communicate with Amer- 
ican manufacturers and merchants. Especial- 
ly interested in hardware, metals, paper, glass, 
leathers, dry goods and machineries. Address 
Box 633 Pan Pacific. 

HAVANA, CUBA— Firm desires to secure the 
exclusive agency for manufacturers in this 
district for Cuba. Address Box 634 Pan Pa- 
cific. 

MANAGUA, NICARAGUA— Firm desires to con- 
nect with firms exporting foodstuffs, hard- 
ware, wines, preserves, boots and shoes, 
paints and household table goods, and import- 
ers of coffee, cocoa, hides, skins, rubber, hard 
and dyewoods. Correspondence in English 
and Spanish. Address Box 635 Pan Pacific. 



July 19 19 



123 



Oblique Stroke in Foreign Trade 

Hint in Salesmanship That May Win Orders Given by Los Angeles Expert 



WHEN Emerson told us the value 
of "The Ohlique Stroke," he 
cut far deeper into the ethics of for- 
eign trade than perhaps even he imag- 
ined ; for although the average Amer- 
ican merchant accepts a commercial 
rating, an engraved card or a litho- 
graphed catalogue as sufficient intro- 
duction to his source of supply, the 
foreigner, be he Latin American or 
Oriental, still associates a certain cour- 
tesy and decorum with his business 
transactions that often make our own 
tactics too abrupt for his acceptance. 
Many of our salesmen have returned 
from foreign fields and reported un- 
favorably on the territory visited, 
when in reality their own unfamiliar- 
ity with the right method of attack 
was entirely responsible. The clever 
way in which the oblique stroke in 
salesmanship can be utilized to "get 
under the skin" of the foreign buyer, 
and at the same time open the way 
to permanent business, is happily il- 
lustrated by an incident that came 
.under my observation some time ago. 

The Oblique Stroke 
Gets Under the Skin 

A salesman for a large collar house 
made his initial trip to Central Amer- 
ica, to look over that field as a market 
for collars. He carried a few of the 
most popular shapes in his suitcase to 
use as samples, though he made no 
effort to show them except upon re- 
quest. He went primarily on a trip of 
investigation, to look over the field, to 
see what collars were being sold, what 
were the popular styles, how the trade 
was handled, and what he and his 
house would have to do to secure their 
portion of the business. 

His first step in every city was to 
call upon the merchants, present his 
card, and after a few minutes' chat on 
general topics, arrange to call again in 



By G. B. CARPENTER 
Foreign Trade Adviser, Los Angeles 
Chamber of Commerce 
— o — 
a day or two, at their pleasure. Gradu- 
ally he built up an acquaintance with 
prospective clients, never assuming the 
aggressive in his business attack until 
three or four calls, and possibly a few 
games of billiards, had given him the 
ground work for personal appeal. Then 
in each case he made it a point to so 
express his approval of the lines the 
merchants were showing that they 
were in turn led to answer that they 
felt sure their goods were the best 
obtainable. 

Spectacular Method 
Caught Native Fancy 

"Right there is where I good-natur- 
edly disagree with you," was always 
his laughing reply. "How do you sell 
that collar?" 

On being told the price, he immedi- 
ately bought one and, tearing it in 
two, showed it to be a two-ply collar, 
usually of European make. 

"Our collar," he explained, "is a 
three-ply collar and obviously much 
stronger than this one. Furthermore, 
the extra stitching and patent folding 
about the button hole of our collar 
make it almost impossible for that por- 
tion to tear, as this one will" — where- 
upon, slipping his pencil through the 
eyelet of the foreign collar, he deftly 
tore it out through the fibre. 

"But I didn't come to bother you 
for an order," he would add, "and 
only took this occasion to indicate my 
assurance that you haven't the best 
collar until you have seen mine." 
Whereupon the conversation would 
drift into general channels, and his 
visits continue. 

As I say, outwardly he did not go 
to Central America to sell collars, but 
so close was his study of conditions, 



and so cleverly was his introduction 
presented, that when he left he carried 
out with him orders for forty-two 
thousand dollars worth of merchandise 
and the good will and esteem of every 
merchant upon whom he had called. 

Won the Confidence 
of His Customers 

His subsequent visits have only in- 
creased his popularity, and the fidelity 
with which his house has executed 
every detail of his orders has given 
him a prestige along widely diversified 
lines. In 1917, while a certain repre- 
sentative of a large American shovel 
manufacturer went through this same 
territory on an initial trip and re- 
turned, after having given away some 
three or four dozen samples, but with- 
out securing a single order, our collar 
salesman was loaded with orders for 
some four hundred dozen shovels, 
thrust upon him by his clients be- 
cause of their trust in him to execute 
any commission in their behalf. 

His trips are now a positive ovation, 
and all because of a direct personal 
understanding of conditions and a 
readiness to pay the price of success 
in the coin of good judgment. Might 
not this story be summarized in the 
following six sentences? 

1. Win confidence before talk- 
ing sales. 

2. Make your presentation in 
a gentlemanly and forceful way, 

but without haste. 

3. Sell to the buyer's needs, 
your own. 

4. Render complete fulfill- 
ment of sales contract, irrespec- 
tive of cost. 

5. Be prepared to make am- 
ple adjustments. 

6. Make your sale the begin- 
ning, and not the end, of the 
transaction. 



Connections Wanted — Continued 



KXOS AIRES, ARGENTINA— Firm desires 

to enter into business relations with several 

nerchants and manufacturers who are not 

epresented in Buenos Aires and who desire 

expand their business throughout the South 

nerican Republics. Address Box 636 Tan 

Pacific. 

XV — A party in Peru desires to receive cata- 
ogues, printed in Spanish, giving information 
oncerning bedroom, dining room and drawing 
oom furniture; also catalogues describing 
fixtures for kitchens and dining rooms, us 
veil as decorative articles for houses. Ad- 
dress Box L 640 Pan Pacific. 

IILE — A firm in Chile wishes to purchase 
duplicating, calculating and mimeograph ma- 
chines. Address Box L 641 Pan Pacific. 

ZEALAND — A man in New Zealand de- 
sires to secure an agency from manufacturers 
only, for the sale in Australia of paper of all 
kinds, printing machinery, bookbinding ma- 
chinery, printing ink, type, forms, fancy leath- 
er goods, stationery, office fixtures and book- 
binders' supplies. Address Box L 642 Pan 
Pacific. 



GUATEMALA — Representation is desired by a 
man in Guatemala for the sale of dry goods, 
hardware, jute bags, medicine^, groceries, 
etc. Correspondence should be in Spanish. 
Address Box L 643 Pan Pacific. 

PERU — Modern laboratory equipment and hos- 
pital furnishings are desired by the manage- 
ment of a large city hospital in Peru. Cata- 
logues are requested from manufacturers in 
this country. Address Box L 644 Tan Pacific. 

CHINA — The manager of a mines association in 
China wishes to receive catalogues covering 
railway supplies, machine tools and mining 
machinery. Address Box L 645 Pan Pacific. 

AUSTRALIA — A man in Australia desires to 
secure agencies for the sale of automobile 
accessories, novelties of all kinds, especially 
hotel and household novelties. Address Box 
L 646 Pan Pacific. 

NEW ZEALAND — An American firm which has 
recently been appointed as representative of 
a company in New Zealand desires to secure 
agencies for the sale of general lines of mer- 
chandise, especially dyes, colors, oils, canned 
goods, glass, electrical goods, etc. Address 
Box L 647 Pan Pacific. 



CHINA — An American firm that is preparing to 
open a permanent office in Shanghai, China, 
desires to secure agencies for the sale in 
China of several good lines of merchandise of 
the highest class. Address Box L 648 Pan 
Pacific. 

AUSTRALIA — A firm in Australia desires to 
secure agencies for the sale of hosiery, un- 
derwear, women's hats and hat trimmings. 
Address Box L 649 Pan Pacific. 

CHINA — A company in China wishes to be 
placed in touch with wholesale dealers In re- 
built automobiles, motorcycles and motors. 
It further requests catalogues covering hard- 
ware, house furnishing goods, agricultural 
implements and tools. Address Box L 650 Pan 
Pacific. 

AUSTRALIA — A company in Australia desires 
to receive catalogues of machinery for the 
manufacture and distribution of compressed 
air, fan and blowers for both air and gas, 
round tanks in wood, concrete and steel, wire 
rope, insulating materials, electric furnaces, 
hoisting, conveying and elevating machinery, 
machine tools, centrifugal and reciprocating 
pumps, steel, wood and earthenware pumps, 
fire tiles and bricks, refrigerating machinery, 
etc. Address Box L 651 Pan Pacific. 



124 



Pan Pacific 



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CHESTER WILLIAMS, Pies. 



GEO. R. WEEKS. Secretary 



J. E. PETERS, Vice-Pies. 

SHOES 

AT WHOLESALE 

The Largest Assortment of Men's, Women's and ( hildren's Shoes for Immediate Delivery. 

EXPORT 
Export Orders Will Receive Our Careful Attention, and Any Special Styles or Other 
Details Will Be Considered. 

SEND FOR OUR CATALOGUE 

WILLIAMS-MARVIN CO. I 

SAN FRANCISCO, U. S. A. 



Cable Address "WILMAR" 



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Standard Products Co. I I Scott - Su g den & Lamont 



Asiatic — Import and Export 
Head Office, 260 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



New York 

Pittsburgh 

Seattle 

Los Angeles 




Shanghai 
Singapore 



Manila 
Yokohama 



EXPORTERS, of all American products, especially Iron 
and Steel Products, Machinery, Black and Galvanized 
Pipe, either American or English Thread, Paints, Var- 
nishes, Cutlery, Sanitary Fixtures, Railway Supplies, 
Asbestos, Leather Belting, Explosives, Imitation 
Leather, Automobile Trucks, Tractors, Lighting Fix- 
tures, Chain, Plate and Window Glass, Fabrikoid. 

IMPORTERS, Raw Materials from Asia, Camel's Hair, 
Animal Hair, Bristles, Furs, Hides and Skins, Human 
Hair, Egg Products, Nuts, Oils, Etc. 



Foreign and Domestic Merchants 

DIRECT FACTORY REPRESENTATIVES 

ALL 

STEEL AND IRON PRODUCTS 

Heavy Hardware — Marine Hardware and Supplies 

| Main Office: 

MONADNOCK BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO 
| Offices in 

| Seattle Los Angeles Pittsburg New York Chicago I 
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=r I EEllEltllEEIIllEIIEEIllllllEIIIIEIIlEEIIIEIIirillirEllllllirillEIEIllllllllllEIIIEIIJIIIIIirillllllllllirillirillllllirilllllllllllEllllElllirEIIIIEIlllllllIJIirilllfJfll] lllllf Vf^ 

Inspection - Testing 



Examination** — Certification 

Materials and Equipment 

for Export 

it. It. Material — Machinery 

Metal Products — General Mdse. 



Sampling;, Analysis and 

Certification of 

Oils, Ores, Minerals 

and other 
Imported Materials 



Code Word "PERKINS." All Codes Used. 



References, First National Bank, Bank of Italy, Dun's 
or Bradstreet's, San Francisco, U. S. A. 



R. E. NOBLE & CO., Engineers 

Controlled by Abbot A. Hunks 

Established 1866 

Humboldt Bank Bldg. San Francisco, U. S. A. 

Ueprenenttltlves in Principal < if its and Porta 



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Branches and Agencies: 

YOKOHAMA 
KOBE 

VLADIVOSTOK 
TSING TAU 
SHANGHAI 
SAIGON 
COLOMBO 
SINGAPORE 
SOERABATA 
MANILA 



INTERNATIONAL TRADING COMPANY 

of America, Inc. 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

FORWARDERS AND COMMISSION AGENTS 
MANUFACTURERS' REPRESENTATIVES 



Cable Address: "INTRACO" 

Codes: 
Bentley's 
W. U. 
A. B. C. 5th Edition 



Import Products of all 

Countries where we 

are located 



We will purchase 



— EXPORTS — 
Iron and Steel, Machinery, Plumbing Supplies, Heavy and Light Hardware, Automobile 
Accessories, Paints,- Tractors, Typewriters, Talking Machines, Cotton and 
Wool Textiles, Hosiery and General Dry Goods 
for foreign merchants on small commission basis of certified invoice. Correspondence and inquiries solicited. 

Head Offices: SEATTLE, U. S. A. 



JlUlllinillllllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllMtlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllil'lllllllllllll irilMIIIIIIIllllllltlllTIIIILIIIIIIIII'llllllLlllMIIIIllllilltllllllllllllllKIIIIIIIIJIlllllllllllllllllllllllllKI'lI'llllllIllllEIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIFMJIIIIllIIIIIIIIIIMIlllllllIllll Illllllllllllllllllllliini ,r: 



July 19 19 125 

jmiiimiiimiiimiimiimimi minium iimiimiiiiiiimimi mimimmiimi nimm nun imimmmiii m jjMI iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimin imiimimiimiimiiimmiimiimiiim imiiimmiiiiiii iiimmmmimmimimiiimimmii m 

JMATSON LINE] ISeaFoamSrBond! 



San Francisco to 
Honolulu Manila 

Freight and Passenger Service | 

Rates and Sailings upon Application 



MATSON NAVIGATION CO. 



120 Market Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



A Strong, Beautiful sheet for manifolding; 
stocked in the following size and colors: 

17x22— 101b. 

WHITE — BLUE — PINK 

GREEN — CANARY 

GOLDEN ROD 



I For price see page 11 of net price-list. Samples on request. [ 



51 miillimimillimmllimmillllllimiiilmiiimiiiiiii mimliimmiiiiiiiimiiimimiimimiimiimimimiimiimmimiiimimiimmim- 

ilium i iiiiiiilillliHlniiliiMiiniiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiniiliiiiiiiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinillinilllMlllllinilllllllllluMiHliiiMlllllilllllllllllluiliiMliliiiMiji 

Investments in Hawaii 

Pay Dividends 

The First Trust Company, Ltd. 

Hilo, Hawaii, T. H. 
May be trusted to answer inquiries 

promptly and frankly | 

STOCKS — BONDS — REALTY 
General Insurance 

^iiiiiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiuiiiHiiiniiiiiiiMiiniiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiii^ 
^j iiiiTtiiiiriiiitiiiiiiiifiiitfiiiiiiiirlllfillifliiiriiifiijiiiiitiiitciiiiiiiriliTiilj[Fiijiii]iiiiriiliiillljril]lfllitlll]riijxiiirriijriiijiiiifiijrliilfiifriui[ijrililliiir"' 

BRADY & COMPANY 

Established 1892. SHIPPING AND COMMISSION 
Importers and Exporters Salmon. Fertilizer, Oils. Steel. Lumber 
42-Story L. C. SMITH BLDG., Seattle, Wash., V. S. A. 
t^iiiiii] LiiiiiiBiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiitiiijiiijriiijiiiiiiiiJtiiitiijifriJiiiKiiijEiijirBjiriijirijjriiiJiiiiiiciijiiijiriiiiiijjciiJiiiiiiiJitiijtiijiiiiiiiijriijriiiJtiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiT: miiiiiiiiMinMiiMiiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiniiiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiiitiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiniMNMMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & TOWNE 

ESTABLISHED 1855 

37-45 FIEST STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
LOS ANGELES SAN DIEGO 



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AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
- ENGINES - WAGONS - 



i^V 



EXPORT ORDERS 

A SPECIALTY 

Immediate Deliveries 

Prompt Shipments 

and 

All Shipments Made F. O. B. 

Los Angeles or San Francisco 

250 Page Catalogue and Price 

List on Application 

Cable Address " Arnott' ' Los Angeles 

Code A. B. C. 5th Edition 



ARNOTT SCO. 

-LARGEST STOCK IN SOUTHWEST - 

HZ II8 5O.L0SANCELES5T.L05ANGELES 



AIM! 




MULTIGRAPHING MIMEOGRAPHING | 

BRUCKMAN I 

TRANSLATING and 
TYPING BUREAU 

Experts for all Languages 

525 MARKET STREET 

(Underwood Building) 

San Francisco 

Telephone Douglas 1316 



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| Ocean Brokerage Co. Ocean Warehouse Co. I 

CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS U. S. BONDED STORAGE 

Import and Export Freight Forwarders Weighing, Marking, Sampling, Reconditioning, 

Fire and Marine Insurance Distributing, Consolidating 

Head Offices: 762 Stuart Building, Seattle, Washington Branch Offices: 2141 Commerce Street, Tacoma, Wash. 

"Service First" W. R. COLBY, Jr., President "Service First" 

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126 



Pan Pacific 



|MlllllllinillllllllMIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIMIIIMIIIIU 

| Zellerbach Paper Company 

SAN FRANCISCO 

| has established an 

EXPORT DEPARTMENT 

Under the Direction of Harold L. Zellerbach 

| and is prepared to make quotations and furnish samples on orders for § 
| export shipment. 

Cable Address— " Zellerbach " 

Codes 
A. B. C, 5th Edition Bentley's Western Union— Liebers 

| KNAPP & BAXTER, Agents 

Yokohama and Shanghai 

r linilinillllinMH!IIIIIIlMllUlllllinil]llllIIII]l!IH[ll]llllniliI[|lllllltM!IIIinillll!llllll]IM]iMI!lllll[llliIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMilllllt!linilllllin!lll[llir. 
glllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIIIIIMIIIMIIMIIIIMIIII IMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIMIIMIIIMIIMIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIL: 



Puget Sound Tug Boat Company 

Incorporated 1891 

Washington's Pioneer Towing 
Company 

Cable Address: TUG 



i SEATTLE 



WASHINGTON 



^MIIIIIIItlllllll|[|||IMinillUIIIMIIIIIinilllllll(lllilllUMllMllllllllllllllllllllIIIII!lllt!lllllllllllllll!IIIMIUIIIIUI!lM!IHIIIIIIIIttll!tlllinilltlllUMI]IIIIIIJf 

| C. HENRY SMITH 

MAIN OFFICE: 

I 311 CALIFORNIA STREET San Francisco, Cal. | 

411-412 ARCTIC BUILDING, Seattle, Wash. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 
Steamship Agent and Ship Owner 

EXPORT AND IMPORT 

AM Codes. Code Address: CHENRYINC 
RimimtiiHHiiiiminaniiiuniiiiiwiiuimiiniimiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiwiiiiiiuiHiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiMiiiiuiiiiiiiiuiiiiiimiiiiniiHiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiil 
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! KAAS-HOPKINS.CO. 

PAPER MILL SELLING AGENTS 

| Hearst Building San Francisco, Cal. 

PROTECTIVE PAPERS— Vegetable Parchment, Glassine, I 

(Parchmyn), Parcnmoid. 
CREPE PAPERS— Napkins, Plain or Decorated; Crepe, Plain j 

or Decorated; Toilet. 
WAX PAPERS— White, Colored, Plain or Printed. 
1 GLAZED PAPERS for Boxmakers, etc. White, Colors, I 
I Embossed, Novelties. 

| PHOTOGRAPHIC COVER PAPERS and Mount Board. 
1 WRITING PAPERS— Bonds, Ledgers, Flats, Typewriter Papers, | 
| We Solicit Export Inquiries from the Trade. Samples and Quo- ] 
tations Promptly Furnished on Request 



ulllMlilll][llllIlliniini!li!linil|[lllinillMillM]||||||||inillMIII!lllllllllllllllllllillMllltil|ll!|||||||||||Mlilllllllllll!lll!l]||||||[||||||j|||j|ni|inilil!lilllJ7- .7INII[!llllllll!IIMIIIII]l!llllllllllllllllllllll!IIIMIlM]lll!lllllillllll!llll!lllllllllllM]IIIIIIIIIIIMlllMllllllllllllllillllllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII!lllllllll!llllllillll|| 



USE "BEAR BRAND" SOLE LEATHER 



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5 Parent Company 
§ Established 1857 



Resources Over 
$1,000,000 



MONARCH 

afihe 

OARS 

C&Q — 

"BEAR BRAND" 

Sole Leather 

fulfills every requirement 
of 

Export Business 

"A bear for wear" tanned 
in vats from packer hides 
with California oak bark 



TANNERS 

JiSSaRa. New York San Francisco 



Chicago 



wmummmnrnm 



| Associated Manufacturers 
Importing Co. 

Manufacturers ' Representatives 
IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 

IMPORTS 

Chinaware, Crockery, Enamelware, 
Matches, Paper, Vegetable Oils, 
Essential Oils, Hides, Brushes, 
Bristles, Rattan, Copra, Kapok, 
Produce and Raw Materials 

EXPORTS 

Steel Sheets, Bars, Nails, Wire and 
all Steel Products, Hardware and 
Tools, Aluminum, Rosin, Borax, 
Caustic Soda and Chemicals, Dyes, 
California Food Products and all 
Raw Materials. 

Cable Address: "AMICO," San Francisco 

All Codes 

! 871 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. I 

^dllUllinMinilllllinillllMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllllllllllllllllllllMllllllllMIIIIIIIIMlllllllMlllltlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllT 



July 19 19 



127 



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THE CHAS. A. BACON CO- | [GENERAL PAPER CO. 



EXPORTERS, IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
REPRESENTATIVES 

417 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal., U.S.A. 

CABLE ADDRESS: "CABCO" Code A B C— 5th Edition 

What do you wish to buy? What do you wish to sell? 

Write or cable us at once. We have unexcelled facilities for 

handling your entire business; selling, buying and forwarding 

REFERENCES: 

Banca Popolare Fugazi R. G. Dun Mercantile Agency 

:inii!llll!l]llllllMIII|]inilinilUlllllllllMllt!!inMIMI!IMinillillllllM]|||||||||IMIIIIIIIIIIIinillll!llllllltlll)lllllllllllllllll(lllllllinillllllHllllt!IIIIIIH>l,- 

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| Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. | 

IMPORT EXPORT DOMESTIC 
Beans, Peas, Seeds, Oils, Etc. 

Write for Quotations 

| 209-211 Washington St. Chicago, 111., U. S. A. \ 

^i jiiiiiiMiiJiiiiJiiitiiitfJiitJJiitiiiitJMiJiiiJriiiitiiitiiiiMiJitiiJirujiiijrrMiiMJiMiJTLiiiii TriiiJMiiJMiipiiiiitifiiiiriiiiiiiiriiijriiiiiiijriiJfiiiifi;jti;ji = T : 

■MiMimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiimimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiHM 

| PAN PACIFIC CORPORATION sanf ^m^o^-- usa | 

Date 191.... § 

Enclosed please find $ for subscriptions [ 

for "Pan Pacific," beginning with the issue of 191.... | 

| Mail to 

Name 1 

Address § 

! SUBSCRIPTION PRICE, PER YEAR (12 ISSUES), $3.00 GOLD = 

25 CENTS PER COPY 
^tiuiiiiiMiiHiitniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiitiiiiniiiiiiiiiMiniiuiiiitiiiiiiiitiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiitiiiniiiiniiKiiniiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiii^ 

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PAGE & JONES 

SHIP BROKERS 

AND 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

Mobile, Alabama, U. S. A. 



I Cable Address "PAJONES" 



All Leading Codes Used 



525 MARKET ST., San Francisco, U. S. A. 
Cable Address: "EMCO," All Codes 

Bank ^0* =T"^r^ PaP^ 

References: .^^Si A I I r^ »^« 
Bank of Italy | pV"\ " E. R 



San Francisco 



Mill 
Representatives 



BRANCH OFFICES: Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles 

Dealers in News, Book, Writing, Coated, Ledger, Bond, 

Cardboards, Label and Wrapping Papers 

HiilllllllllitllllllllllllllllHIIUIIIIlllinilllllllllMIMIIMIIllllHllllllinilHIIIIIillllMIIIIIIIMIHIIilllllllllllllllflll 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 f I ■ i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 J f I > ■ 1 1 l?T 

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F. GRIFFIN & CO. 



STEAMSHIP | 
AGENTS § 



SHIP BROKERS 
IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

341 Montgomery Street 

| Phone Garfield 2241 SAN FRANCISCO 1 

HiiiiMiniiiniiiiiiHiiiiiiiiitiiuiiitniiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiuiiniiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiiiniiiitiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii^ 
^r ii iriijiciiiriijFiiitiiiirriiiriiiiiiiirillJriliipiiiriiiiiiiitiiiriiiiriiiiiiiiiiiJipiiiiiiiiiiiriiaiiiiiirlljilitriiiiiiiiiiiijriiijiEiiiriiiriiiiiFlllfiliiiriiijEiiiJiiuriiirL^ 



References: 
Metropolitan Bank 
Marine Bank and Trust Co. 



Cable Address: = 

RBNCO 
Codes: A. B. C. 4 = 

W. U. T. 
Bedford McNeil = 



H. S. RENSHAW, Inc. 

Export — Import — Commission 
205-206 Metropolitan Bank Building 

| Freight Forwarders NEW ORLEANS, LA. Correspondence Solicited § 

nllllilllMlllllinilllllllll]inilHllllllllMinilllMinilinillllllllllll!llliillllilMIJIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIt!IIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIHIIIIIMIII[|lilMlilllllll^ 

^iMiiiiiiHiiiiiiniiiniituiliniliiliniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiitiiiiiiiiiMiiillliiiiiMitiiiniiiiMiHiiutiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiillilliiiiiiiuilluilltllllllllfi' 

A. J. 6- J. R. COOK 

LEATHEK 

Sole, Calf Skins, Glazed Kid, Patent and 
Upholstery Leather, Etc. 

Cable Address : " Cookbro," San Francisco 



TRADE MARK 



743 Mission Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 




pMlllllllllllinilllllll tlllilllltlilnlilliiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiimiiniiniiiMiimiiiiiiiiminiiiniin nun nun uiuil in:. nil". .iiliiiiiiiiiminiilllim milium i liillliliiilln mi niiinin niniiiiniiiniiniiiiiiniiiii lliiiiiiiiinin^ 

gtwiiiniiitiiiiiiimiiiiiiiniiiiiiiliniiiniii iMiiMiiiTiiirtni iemiimii nn tiiiiiiin iiiiimiiiiii i tPiiiiiiitMiitiiiiiiiniii iiiiiiniiiii iiiiniiiiiiiuiiiiMiiiiiiiri in riii irn i miiiiii i imimm iiiniiiiiiiitFin niitriiiniiiMii mitiiii n:n in iiiiitMiiiinTiiiiiiiiinniiii tnitiiiiitntMiu nn inn imiumi i iiiiitniiiiiiniiitiiiiiii^" 

Rolph, Mills & Company 

General Shipping and Commission Merchants 
EXPORTS and IMPORTS 

Direct Representatives of Eastern Manufacturers of Principal American Goods 
SEATTLE PORTLAND LOS ANGELES NEW YORK CHICAGO 

'•mmiiiiiniMfimMiiMimiiiniiniiiJMMnimMiniimiimiiimmiiUM 
iMiiiirmiiniiiiiimimiiiimmiiniiiimmiiiiiiMiiiimiimimHiiiiiiim 



Cable Address: 
PETTIBONE 

Codes: 

Armsby, ABC 

5th Edition 
Bentley's, Western 
Union. 




Offices: 

1508-9 L. C. Smith 
Building 

Seattle, Wash. 
U. S. A. 



"Packers' Direct Selling Agents" 
i c r 1 1 n 1 1 e 1 1 i i r r t ? 1 1 m 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 [ t j 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 l 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 -t 1 1 1 j i ii l r 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 r J- 1 1 « i e 1 1 11 1 1 4 j i 13911:11 l 1 1 1 1 e 1 1 1 i e 1 1 j 1 e 1 1 1 r e 1 1 ] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 r t 1 1 1 ^ c 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 9 ^ e 1 1 ^ e 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 i 1 1 1 a j e 1 1 ^ r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 J 1 1 3 J e 1 1 3 ^ 1 1 1 x J 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 rj 1 1 1 r 1 e 1 1 r 1 1 1 ^ j e 1 1 ! 1 [ 1 1 1 l e 1 1 t 1 1 1 r j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ^ c 1 1 3 J e 1 a 1 J p 1 1 3 [ e 1 i j 1 1 1 a j e 1 1 j r i 1 1 J i e 1 1 j 1 1 1 3 i 1 1 1 j r 1 1 1 j ! ] 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ] j e e 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 ^ e 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 a : 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 ^ 111 7^ ; 



MiiiiiiimiiiiiiuiiiimiiiiNimimiiimiimimmmimiiuiiiiiiiuiiiimmiimiimiiiiiiim 



P. J. SEALE & COMPANY 

— Cargo Surveyors and Appraisers Exclusively 



485 California Street 

San Francisco 
TELEPHONE SUTTER 4893 



~ ^ 1 1 J 1 1 n t te : • 1 1 e 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ri 1 1 1 t t e 1 1 1 d 1 [ 1 1 i [ 1 1 1 ] 1 1 1 1 1 1 e 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 t e e 1 x l 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 x e 1 1 i 1 e 1 n 1 1 1 1 j > e 1 j 1 m 1 i 1 1 1 1 t r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ] r 1 1 1 1 1 1 u 1 m 1 r 1 1 1 1 } f c 1 1 p e 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 j m 1 j 1 1 e 1 d 1 1 1 1 1 x 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 m 1 3 1 e 1 1 1 3 e j c 1 m 1 m 1 j 1 1 1 1 1 l 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 1 ] e 1 1 1 m 1 1 j 1 1 1 3 r m 1 1 r e 1 1 j > m 3 j c 1 m i c 1 1 1 r e 1 9 1 r e i 3 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 j r 1 1 1 1 1 e 1 ^ 1 1 [ 3 1 1 r 1 1 a j r c 3 j 1 1 1 1 j 1 h e 1 j 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 j r e 1 1 1 4 i 1 1 i j t ! 1 j l 1 1 j 1 1 [ 1 1 } r 1 1 .- 



128 



Pan Pacific 



-in.,M mum iiiimiimimiimimiimiiiiiimimiimin imiiiiiii n iiimiimiimimiiimmiiiimmilllllmlii ni! mmiimiimiimiimimimiilliiimiimimiimimimmillimimimiimiimimiimilmlimimimiimiiimimiimiimiimiiimimimiiimiililimi;: 



Paul R. Ruben & Co. 

Head Office San Francisco, U. S. A. 




IMPORTERS — EXPORTERS 

MANUFACTURERS AGENTS 

PURCHASING AGENTS 



| ¥T7E are now engaged by a great many of our largest | 

| \\ Corporations to promote their Foreign trade. Our = 

| specialized service consumates sound business re- | 

| lations with the World's leading merchants. We open to | 

| you new channels of International trade and our agents co- 1 

| operate effectively in creating a permanent demand for your \ 

| products. We invite correspondence with American manu- | 

I facturers also Foreign traders seeking a market for their | 
| raw and manufactured products. 

| PAUL R. RUBEN & CO. I 

Reference: Anglo & London Paris National Bank, San 
Francisco. Cable Address: Paulrube. All Codes 

miiimimmiimimimimiimiimmiiimiimiiiiiiilimiiimiimiiiiiiiiiii iinmi Miniiiiiiiii ullliiil ! iniiliiiniin > iiiiiiiin ii'in,^ 

^i!K;:ii^^iiiiiiniiniiHiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiMiiMiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiinMiiMiiuiiniiiniiiMiiiiniiMiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiii]iiiiiiiiniiiiiii]iii!Miii!iL' 

I VICTOR PATRON I 



IMPORT 
EXPORT 



SAN FRANCISCO 
OCEANIC BLDG., No. 2 Pine Street 

MAZATLAN, MEXICO 
CABLE: PATRON" 

oiiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiNiiin!iiii!ii!iiiuiiiuiiiiiiiii!iiuiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiMi!iiiiiin 

^mimiimiimiimmiiimimiimmiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiimimiimimiimiimiimimiimiimiiniimiimimiimimiiimimimiimiimimiimiimimy 

I LEATHER oSHOESBAGS ' 



SUITCASES, ETC. 



9 



* 



© 



Box Calf, Willow Calf, Tan Box, Patent Leather, Royal Calf, Vici 

Kid (Black Colors), Sole Leather 
Machinery, Nails, Eyelets, Inks, Shoemakers' Supplies of all Kinds 

Elastic Webbing 
Western Union Code A. B.C. 5th Edition Improved Cable Address, "Dolllver" 

nrkllllT-cn* Ar T\m lg 68— Fifty Tears of Service— 1918 
■L/UlllVCI Ct. r>lO. 619-21 MISSION ST., San Francisco 



(GLASSWARE!) 

(FOR TABLE AND SIDEBOARD) 

Dinner Services 
Vitrified Hotel China 

The three CHOICEST PEODUCTS in the world 
DIRECT FROM FACTORY TO DEALER 
(I am prepared to fill orders at once for any quantity. Write for | 
catalogue and prices TODAY. Correspondence in any language) 

FACTORIES: Fostoria Glass Company 

Edwin M. Knowles China Company 
Buffalo Pottery 
Cable Address: "HEASTAND" 

B. F. HEASTAND 



= 618 Mission Street 



San Francisco, U. S. A. 



,IM!1 Mil I IIIUMIl Mill I1I1IMI1 [MitMl I LII1IMI1IMI llll 1 1 ! I i [ ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 < I ! 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 M ! 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ! I! 1 1 1 1 ! I ! I M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 tl 1 1 1 1 ■ ■ I 111 ■ 1 11 If 

^_i iiiiiiMiiiriiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiEiiiitiiitiiiiiiiiitMiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiitJiiLiiiiixiiitiiiiiiirfciiiittiiiiiiiiiii^ 

Murry Jacobs 

Jacobs & Gile 

DIRECT MILL REPRESENTATIVES 

IRON AND STEEL PRODUCTS 

Cast Iron Water Pipe 
Hydrants and Valves 



Railway Exchange Building 
Portland, Oregon 



L. C. Smith Building 
Seattle, Washington 



-miiimiiiiiimiimiimmiimimiimimimiimiimiimimiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinmiimiiiiiimiimimiimimiimiimiimiimiimiimiiimimimii'; 
^.t MiiiiitiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiriaiiiiiiiiiiiEiiiirifitEiiiiiiiiiiifEiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiriiiitiiiitiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitEiiitiijfEriifiiiiiEiiiiiiitaj 

BOOTHS 

CRESCENT 
RAND 




Sardines 

F. E. Booth Co. 

San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 

Importers 

AND , 

Exporters 



Crescent Brand Food Products 



Head Office: 

110 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



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qiniiiiiiiHiiiHiiiHiiiiiMJiimimiiiMiiiiiiiiiminniiiimi iiiiiuimiimiimiimiiimimiimiimiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiminiiiimjiimiiiminmiiiif? 



imiHiiiimuiiuuiiii iiiiiimiitiimmtmmmmiimtiiimiit itinuiimiMmiimiiiiiim i nil miiiiiiimiiHiiiiiiiiiiiniimiii miiiiiiiiiiiniuiiiiiiiuniiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiniimiiiiimiiiiiuiiimiiiiiii; 



W. R. GRACE & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 332 Pine Street • 
NEW YORK, Hanover Square 

Importers Exporters 

Letters of Credit Foreign Exchange 

Cable Transfers 





AGENCIES: 




Seattle 


Peru Costa Rica 


Panama 


Los Angeles 


Guatemala Nicaragua 


Ecuador 


New Orleans 


Salvador Chile 
General Agents 


Bolivia 



JOHNSON LINE 

Direct Bi-Monthly Service Between San Francisco and Scandinavian Ports 

General Agents 

ATLANTIC & PACIFIC S. S. CO. 

Service temporarily suspended 
Atlantic and Pacific Coast Ports, Direct Service. No Transshipment. 

General Agents 

MERCHANTS LINE 
UNITED STATES AND PACIFIC LINE 

Operating Between Atlantic and Pacific Coast Ports and West Coast South America 



GRACE BROTHERS (INDIA) Ltd, 
Calcutta, India 



GRACE CHINA COMPANY Inc. 

Shanghai. China 



EXPORTERS of all American products, 
including especially Iron and Steel, Salmon, 
Flour, Canned Goods, Dried Fruits, Chem- 
icals, Lumber and Machinery. 

— Also — 
Nitrate — Direct shipments from Chilean 
Nitrate Ports to Japan and other Far East 
destinations. 
Coffee. 



IMPORTERS of all raw materials from 
South and Central America, Japan and Far 
East, Including: 

Wool, Cotton, Hides and Skins. 

All edibles — Rice, Beans, Cocoanuts, Pea- 
nuts, Tapioca, Pepper, Cassia and Tea. 

Oils, Copra, Rubber, Jute, Hemp. 



LARGE STOCKS OF ORIENTAL IMPORTS CARRIED AT 
SAN FRANCISCO AND SEATTLE 



GRACE BROS. & CO., Ltd. 
London and Liverpool 



W. R. GRACE & CO.'S BANK 
New York 



GRACE & CO. 
Rio de Janeiro BRAZIL Santos 



niiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiii ihiiiiiiimiiiiiiihihuiii:h!i5 



nut 



• ■■ 



l'-k 



■ ■■ 



SUNSHINE 
BELT" 




PACIFIC MAIL 
Steamship Co. 

"Sunshine Belt" to Orient 

PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT 



Trans-Pacific Service 

San Francisco, Honolulu, Japan, China and Philippines 

Monthly Sailings by American Steamers 
"VENEZUELA" "ECUADOR" "COLOMBIA" 



Manila — East India Service 

Direct Route to 

INDIA via Manila, Saigon, Singapore, Calcutta, Colombo 

Approximate Bi-Monthly Sailings by American Steamers 5 
"COLUSA" "SANTA CRUZ" 



Panama Service 



Mexico,; Central America, Panama, and South America 

Fortnightly Sailings by American Steamers 

■^NEWPORT" "PERU" "CITY OF PARA" 

'SAN JOSE" "SAN JUAN" 



•<< 



Service and Cuisine Unexcelled 



For Full Information Apply 

General Office 508 California Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 










ifljpl 



"ttK.lST, 1919 



Price 25 Cents 



REPARING FOR WORLD TRADE 




djtt^^By John H. Gerrie 

W i « 




*& 



Kljtjia Awaits United States CommeiW 
Sellers Must Use Buyers' Language 
iresia's Need is America's Opportunity 






W. E. Aughiiibaugh, Wm. Rutledge McGarry, Dr. Angel C. Rivas 
F. R. Eldridge, Jr; r Lynn W. Meekins, Harvey P. Middleton 



AMAGAZiNE/ INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE 




^i' rBaiiii*Ni!rrii:r^(ii3fiiiriii3rEiiriTiirsiiitcii!Tiiiiciii»iiiitiiir<iii>Ltiirpiiifiiiriiii9 1 till rci:d heifi riiiJ lpii i ciiii leiijiiii i tiir-riiiiciiii [iiiiftirfiiirttiiiuiiriiiiiiiiij i iiifiii - J ■ ■■■ Liiiat^iiitiiirj PiisJiiiJt-iii»jiiii}iiia.4iii^i*iic4iiiLtiiij'iiiii iJiirtiiiJ i pii^fiiii pei« tjiiit^iii riiiii^ pii i rp>ji i tr jj rrii^Ertid i hii^jiiiiit^fir+tiiiii i rtiirt-^ 

] HAVE YOU OUR CATALOG? I 




REYNOLDS STORE AND 
FACTORY TRUCK 




CASTERS 
Over 100 Styles and Sizes 




CONCRETE MIXERS — Many Sizes 

We Will Gladly Send You a Copy and 
Quote Prices 



OUR STOCK IS COMPLETE 




MANUFACTURERS 



SAN FRANCISCO 
U. S. A. 



Cable Address 
"Quolansinjj" 
San Francisco 




HAND TRUCKS 
For Every Purpose 




STEEL AND WOOD 
WHEELS 



11 nniumi uuuiiiuiu minni niu uu uuii [uiuuniuniiiniiuumiimiiiiiimiiii nil i nil i muni inuiiuinuuiiinui nut nu^ 



=911 miimiimiimiu p mi in in i'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiiiiii: iiiiiiiinii. hi iir'Miiiin.'iii iiiiini .ii' iii'iiiiiiiiiiin in. in in, mi in uuiiuiiiiuuiuiumuiiii iiiiiiiiimiiiniiiiiimiiiiiiimn niiimni iinuinunuunuiuuunuuiuuinuu 

PURNELL & PAGET 

ARCHITECTS 

AND 

CIVIL ENGINEERS 

CHAS. S. PAGET, A.S.M. A.M. S. C.E. 

Investigations — Inspections Bridges and Steel Structures 

Reports and Valuations # Wharf and Dock Construction 

Design and Supervision of Construction R . , Harbor Work* 

for Industrial Plants and Buildings Klver . and Harbor Works 

Power Plants Investigation and Development of Mining 

Difficult Foundations Properties 

ESTABLISHED IN CHINA 16 YEARS 

f Missions Building, The Bund, Canton, China 
OFFICES <^ Paak Hok Tung-Canton, Swatow, China 

[ American National Bank Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telegraphic Address, "PANEL" Western Union Code, A.B.C., 5th Edition 



Juiumniuiiniinuuuiiu linn I iiiiiiiiiiiini mil iinin miimiimiimiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiimiiiiiii n m nun iimiimii miimii miimiimiimimnii u nun iiiii n liiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiu i mm 



August 1 9 I 9 129 

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I 

j Java-China-Japan Lijn I 

(JAVA PACIFIC LINE) 

BETWEEN 

San Francisco 

AND I 

■ 

I Netherlands East Indies I 



DIRECT 




REGULAR ^ mm RELIABLE 



SERVICE 



BATA VIA 

SOERABAIA 

SAMARANG 

MACASSAR 
CHERIBON 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

General Agents 

2 Pine Street, San Francisco 

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130 



Pan Pacific 



L ' ' ' ' ' ' ; ■ ' 1 1 . ■ 1 1 : .- 1 1 1 , _ 1 1 1 ; 1 1 1 , . : 1 1 r : 1 1 : . 1 1 1 ,- 1 1 1 . . ■ 1 1 i i i : : 1 1 , . j 1 1 i ■ i i i : : : i ! 1 1 : ; 1 1 1 . : 1 1 1 1 1 i : 1 1 1 : ! 1 1 1 1 ; ' I r r 1 1 1 r ; i 1 1 1 : 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 r e 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 : j 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 ■ ■ : ■ ! : : 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 i ' 1 1 1 1 ! 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 - 1 1 1 : - J iMiiiimiiiiimiimimilllllimiimiinilllilllMlllllllillllMiiiMllimimilimlimilllllimillMlllMlllllllllll!! 



JOOST BROTHERS, Inc. 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Wholesale and Retail 

HARDWARE 

Direct From Factory to Dealer or Consumer 

We Are Direct Factory Agents For 
"Russwin" Builders Hardware 



General Hardware 

Parlor Door Hangers 
Barn Door Hangers 
Roofing and Building Paper 
Tackle Blocks and Pulleys 
Paint and Wire Brushes 
Cordage and Chain 



Household Goods 

Stoves — Ranges 

Tinware 

Aluminum and Enamelware 

Bathroom Fixtures 

Electric and Gas Appliances 

Chinaware and Glassware 



Paints 

Oils 

Varnishes 

TOOLS 

We carry a Complete Line of 
Wrenches — Files — Mechanics, Machinists and Automobile Tools, Drills and Edged Tools 

===== Manufacturers of== 

Special Steel Tools — Fire Door Hardware — Crowbars — Chisels — Punches — Ripping Bars 

Sporting Goods 

Arms and Ammunition — Cutlery — Baseball — Tennis and Golf Accessories 
We also handle the Celebrated Lines of 
EDWIN M. KNOWLES CHINA COMPANY 
FOSTORIA GLASS COMPANY 
BUFFALO POTTERY (Hotel China) 

Foreign Orders Promptly and Carefully Executed 

When ordering any of the above articles or asking for catalogs be sure to give full particulars 

CORRESPONDENCE IN ALL LANGUAGES 
Will act as purchasing agent on a brokerage basis for responsible houses 

— Address — 

JOOST BROTHERS, Inc. 

1053 Market Street San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 



^tlllllllirilll II>>I>>]M!> Illlll lltlllllllllllll lllllll lllllllll lllllll IIMIII1IJII1I1J IlilllllllLltJII llllllli 1MIIMII11IIII lllllll llltllllMIIIIll IIMIII1IIIIIIII I1IIIM IIIIIII Jllllf III I mill III J IIIIMIJIIM lllim IIMI1J J11I1 till 1 Mill I IIUIII11MII Jll Htllll lllltlllt 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ) 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 > 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 F III ! I h I fe 



August 19 19 



131 



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MANUFACTURERS 



AND 



WHOLESALE DEALERS OF 

MENS— WOMENS— CHILDRENS AND INFANTS 

SHOES 

WE HAVE ONE OF THE LARGEST STOCKS ON THE PACIFIC COAST 

ALL STAPLE AND LATEST STYLES FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

SAMPLES WILL BE SENT CHARGES PREPAID 



Cable Address 
"NESCO" Bentley's Code 



NOLAN-EARL SHOE CO. 



25 FREMONT STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, LJ. S. A. 




Pacific Coast 

United States of America 

Buyers' Headquarters 




The 100% Club 

Arcade Floor Monadnock Bldg, 



San F 



hlimilUlllllllllllllllllllimilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMllllllllllllimllllllllllHIIIIIIIHIUin Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll ■ I : ' i - Ml! ' r : 1 1 : . i I i : ■ 1 1 1 : I ; . 1 1 : ' I ; . : 1 1 , 1 1 , ; i : : 1 1 ! : I ; : 1 1 ! ■ ; I i ■ ■ 1 1 : i i : ■ 1 1 . : I : . 1 1 1 : 1 1 . M I . ■ 1 1 ; ' 1 1 , , - 

^MiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiniitiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiniiiiiiitu '^iiiiiirrijiiiiiriiiiriiiriiiriiifiiiiriiiiriiifiiiiriiiiiiiitiiiirpiiriiitiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiiiiiriiiriiiifiiiriii^riiiitiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiTiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiriiiiiEiiiriiij iii*^ 

BLACK BEAR GREASES | 

Cup, Transmission, Axle, Car, Graphite, 

Gear, Chain, Skid, Curve, Tractor, 

Hair and Wool Flock 

Manufactured under our exclusive 
patented process 

A distinctive Grease of unusual wearing 
qualities and high heat resistance 

FULL INFORMATION UPON REQUEST 

PACIFIC LUBRICATING CO. 

Manufacturers and Exporters 
715 W. Spokane St., Seattle, Wash., U. S. A. | 

OR ANY OF OUR REPRESENTATIVES 
! SYCIP HANSON WINKEL CO., Inc., 327 J. Luna Blnondo, Manila, 1 
P. I.— P. M. SCOTT & CO., 76 Pitt St., Sydney, N. S. W.— 
P. LAFARGUE, Casllla 308, Valparaiso, Chile 

^iiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiMiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiMiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiniiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiniiiniiiiiiiiuii^ 
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| JAMES P. DWAN | 

621 American National Bank Building 

EXPORTER — IMPORTER 

General Purchasing Agent for Foreign Buyers 

Building Materials 
Machinery, Ores, Metals, Oils 

Offices at 

539 CITIZENS NATIONAL BANK BUILDING 

Los Angeles, Calif. 

MISSIONS BUILDING, THE BUND, CANTON, CHINA 

Cable Address, "DWAN" 

In mum iiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiini miiiiir 

'Jllllllllllllllllllllll lllllllllllllllllinillllllllllllllllllllllllMlltllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIU 

The Cleveland Import & Mfg. Co., Inc. | 

Parent Company Established 1873 
IMPORTERS — EXPORTERS 
COMMISSION MERCHANTS 
Laughlin Building, Los Angeles, Cal., U. S. A 

TEA, COFFEE, SPICES, COCOA BEANS, CHICLE, RUBBER, 
COPRA. PEANUTS, PALM OIL, COCOANUT OIL, TAPIOCA, 5 
GENERAL PRODUCE. 

I EXPORTS— I 

HARDWARE, MACHINERY, TOOLS, LUMBER, DRIED I 
FRUITS, CANNED FRUITS, CANNED SARDINES, CANNED = 
SALMON, CANNED TUNA, CALIFORNIA BEVERAGES, i 
GENERAL PRODUCE. 
Sole Export Agents for South and Central America of "M. O. E." 
REFINED ELATERITE Carbonlte Coating. Air Water, Acid, 
Alkali, Oxygen, Nitrogen and Electricity-proof 
Write for Catalogue and Sample. Good Territory Open. 
Cable Address: '"CLEIMPCO." All Codes 
Correspondence Solicited and Conducted in All Languages 

^tiflili iiitriiisiti>tiiiifJiir9iii»iiitiiiiiiEi>iiirirriif]iimiiitiiii;tiiirtiii>tiiitiiiittiittiijiiiiirtiiitiiiitiiiitiiitiiiiiiiiitiii.iriiiitEiiiiiiiriiiir nut mil t tiirrir nr iT=t 



an rrancisco 



| An extensive COMMERCIAL MUSEUM is maintained for the benefit of 1 
| buyers, where the products of American manufacturers are displayed' 

THE FOREIGN MERCHANT IS INVITED 

To make his buying headquarters at The Club. An information bureau is 1 
| maintained All modern office conveniences provided free to foreign buyers. = 

The Club represents two hundred of America's leading manufacturers and I 

| merchants. Each member is selected for business efficiency, quality of goods i 

| and ability to render SERVICE to the buying public. All are leaders in 1 
| their line. 

; We render the foreign merchant a service, free of all charge or obligation. 

I Business connections established. Correspondence invited in any foreign i 
[ language. 

Send for the Complete Story 

WM. E. HAGUE. Sec.-Treas, | 

= E 

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Cambria Spring Company I 

INCORPORATED 



"PROVEN QUALITY" 





WHEELS AND RIMS SPRING BUMPERS 

AUTO AND TRUCK SPRINGS 

Office: 916-918 So. Los Angeles Street 

Factory: 913-921 Santee* Street 

LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA 

Code: WESTERN UNION 
7 iiiiiiiiitiiiiiiitiiiniti tiuiitiiiiiuiiimiuiiMiitiiii [iiiiiiimin riinrniri mi itn i iiiitiinijiiimiiiiiii eiiiiiiii iiiitiiiiinii jii i un i un M 11 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 m irr 



132 



Pan Pacific 



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CHAS. M. PAGANINI 



EDWARD P. BARRY l 



Edward Barry Company 

WHOLESALE PAPER DEALERS 
San Francisco, Calif. 



Agents for: 

L. L. BROWN'S LEDGER, BOND AND 

TYPEWRITER PAPERS 

Samples and Quotations Promptly Furnished 




MANUFACTURING DEPARTMENT 
| Largest Wholesale Bookbinders on the Pacific Coast \ § 
Writing Tablets — Ruled Goods — Blank Books \ § 
Loose Leaf Systems — Bookbinding Supplies 

H^t ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 i i > i m t ■ u 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 ^ 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 ii ii 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 1 1^ niiiiiiniiNiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMimiiiMimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinmiiiiiiiniiimimnimiiiiiiiiuiii»iiiiii7: 

inniiiiiiimimiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiii mi iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiniiiniiiiiiiniiiniiiniiiniiiiiiiiniiitiiiiiniiiiiiiiniiiiii i± 

I MORELAND MOTOR TRUCKS I 




All Moreland motor trucks burn distillate instead of gasoline, assuring you of a 50% decrease in fuel cost. 

Moreland trucks are manufactured in Los Angeles — a Pacific Coast Port. 

Buy a Moreland and insure your investment. There are countless Morelands working in various 

Pacific Coast countries. 

MORELAND MOTOR TRUCK CO. 



General Offices, Factory and Sales Department 



1701-31 North Main Street 



Los Angeles, Calif., U. S. A. 



?iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiHiiiiiiiniiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiniiiiiiiiini BEST FOR THE WEST "<iii"Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii>iiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiniiiiiiiMiiiiiiMiiiiii! 



A u gust 19 19 



133 



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I OLDEST MATERIAL HOUSE IN SAN FRANCISCO ! ^E9M^. CTJ S\ Tj> O 

^ ^ ^ MEN'S, LADIES' AND I 

CHILDREN'S 
SHOES 

TENNIS and OUTING SHOES ! 

also 
RUBBER BOOTS and SHOES { 

on hand for immediate shipment 




WATCHMAKERS AND JEWELERS TOOLS 

Jewelry Boxes and Trays 
Watch Glasses Main Springs 

Watch Materials Jewelry Findings 




| SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, U. S. A. 



717 MARKET STREET I 



.^lllllllHllllinilllllll Illllllllllllllllll I IIIHII! 1 1 II 1 1 III II III I [III I III I till 1 1 III I Mil I III 1 1 III 1 1 [III I III 1 1 Illll III I Illll Mill III! Illll Illll III 1 1 III I Mill [III |||||[||||[|||||(7 



I MARVIN SHOE CO., Inc. | 

Shoes Wholesale 

| 216 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. | 

Cable Address "VINMAR" Benttey Code 

rillllllllNIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllljlllllll Illllllllllllllll I MIIMIIMMIMIIMIMMIMMMIMIIIMMIMir 



f""""""""" """""• mimiiitiiril iiiiiiiiiiinimiiiiiiimiii iiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiimiimii| -giiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiii mini imiiimiimmmmimihimimmmmimiimmiimiimmimmmmimmimiiimiimi^ 

I Standard Products Co. I lGLASSWARE!l 



Asiatic — Import and Export 
Head Office, 260 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



New York 

Pittsburgh 

Seattle 

Los Angeles 




Shanghai 
Singapore 
Manila 
Yokohama 



EXPORTERS, of all American products, especially Iron 
and Steel Products, Machinery, Black and Galvanized 
Pipe, either American or English Thread, Paints, Var- 
nishes, Cutlery, Sanitary Fixtures, Railway Supplies, 
Asbestos, Leather Belting, Explosives, Imitation 
Leather, Automobile Trucks, Tractors, Lighting Fix- 
tures, Chain, Plate and Window Glass, Fabrikoid. 

IMPORTERS, Raw Materials from Asia, Camel's Hair, 
Animal Hair, Bristles, Furs, Hides and Skins, Human 
Hair, Egg Products, Nuts, Oils, Etc. 



Code Word "PERKINS." All Codes Used. 



References, First National Bank, Bank of Italy, Dun's 
or Bradstreet's, San Francisco, U. S. A. 



(FOR TABLE AND SIDEBOARD) 

= = 

Dinner Services 
Vitrified Hotel China 

The three CHOICEST PRODUCTS in the world 

DIRECT FROM FACTORY TO DEALER 

| (I am prepared to fill orders at once for any quantity. Write for 1 

| catalogue and prices TODAY. Correspondence in any language) I 

FACTORIES: Fostoria Glass Company 

Edwin M. Knowles China Company 
Buffalo Pottery 

Cable Address: "HEASTAND" 

B. F. HEASTAND | 

1 618 Mission Street San Francisco, U. S. A. j 

= = 

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I Murry Jacobs 

Jacobs & Gile 

DIRECT MILL REPRESENTATIVES 

IRON AND STEEL PRODUCTS 

Cast Iron Water Pipe 
Hydrants and Valves 



Railway Exchange Building 
Portland, Oregon 



L. C. Smith Building 
Seattle, Washington 



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Branches and Agencies: 

YOKOHAMA 
KOBE 

VLADIVOSTOK 
TSING TAU 
SHANGHAI 
SAIGON 
COLOMBO 
SINGAPORE 
SOERABAYA 
MANILA 



INTERNATIONAL TRADING COMPANY 

of America, Inc. 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

FORWARDERS AND COMMISSION AGENTS 
MANUFACTURERS' REPRESENTATIVES 



Cable Address: "INTRACO" 

Codes: 
Bentley's 
W. U. 
A. B. C. 5th Edition 



Import Products of all 

Countries where we 

are located 



— EXPORTS — 

Iron and Steel, Machinery, Plumbing Supplies, Heavy and Light Hardware, Automobile 

Accessories, Paints, Tractors, Typewriters, Talking Machines, Cotton and 

Wool Textiles, Hosiery and General Dry Goods 

We will purchase for foreign merchants on small commission basis of certified invoice. Correspondence and inquiries solicited. 

Head Offices: SEATTLE, U. S. A. 

JMIIIIIIIIHIIIlllMIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIimillllMIIIM 



134 



Pan Pacific 



jiiuiiiiiiiililinillliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiimiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiHiiiminiM 

| Shippers Commercial Corporation | 



SEATTLE, U. S. A. 

L. C. SMITH BLDG. 



EXPORTERS 




Cable Address: SHIPCOMCO 

ALL CODES USED 

IMPORTERS 



Trade Mark 



CANNED 
SALMON 



Pacific Coast Products 



CANNED 

MILK 



^illllllllllllllimilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllillll Illlllllllllllll IIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIII III! Illlllll Illlllll limimiimillimmilimmmimiimimlMlllimiimiimmiimimiimiimmmillimiimmilimmiimilimiimiimiimimillllllimMlllimmmMmilimmillli,;: 

=:riiiiiillniiniiiHiiiiilliiiiiiiiiniiijiiluilliililllllilllillllllllllllluilinillilllllllllllllililliiliMlllllliiillilllllllllilllllilliliiiiiiiiilinlliiiiiiniliiiiiiiiiiu mmiimiimimiimimiimmiiimimiimimiimimitmimimiimimiimimimlimiimimiimiimiimiimillllimiimiimimilimmillimiiimi^ 



Cable Address: "DILL" 




Watch for this Trade-Mark 





EXPORTERS OF 






Steel Products 


Chemicals 




Dye Stuff 


Acids 


Hematine 




Barytes 


Caustic Soda 


Soda Ash 




Phenol 


I 


^osin 


Turpentine 






and Raw Materials for All Industries 






IMPORTERS OF 






Fish Oil 


Cocoanut Oil 




Castor Oil 


Soya Bean Oil 


Rape Seed Oil 




Tallow 


Hides 


Beans 




Peanuts 


Coffee 


Copra 
Rattans Etc. 




Silks 



SEATTLE FAR EAST TRADING 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Import — Export Merchants 

Head Office, L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Wash., U. S. A 

Branch Offices: 

SHANGHAI, 6 Jinkee Road HONGKONG 

KOBE, 23 Sakae Machi, 6 Chome 
TOKIO. 4 Nakadoro Marunouchi • 

Cable Addresses: 

SEATTLE, "Safetco" SHANGHAI, "Safetco" 

HONGKONG, "Safetco" KOBE, "Kelley" 

TOKIO, "Safetco" 



DILL CROSETT, Inc. 



235 Pine Street 

Branch Offices 
128 William Street New York 

328 Sannomiya-Cho, 1 Chome Kobe Japan 
Union Bank Chambers Sydney, Australia 



San Francisco = 



EXPORT SPECIALTIES 

Iron, Woodworking and Textile Machinery 
Iron, Steel, Pipe, Plates, Bars, Sheets, Rail- 
way Supplies, Rails, Cars, Locomotives, 
Etc. Wire Nails, Paints, Varnishes. 

Glass, Sanitary Ware, Plumbing Fixtures, 

Hardware, Tools, Chemicals, 

Electric Meters 



Correspondence Solicited 



nnu iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiii mini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiii milium h ffi niinn miimmini lllllll limiimiiiiiiimmil in i miiinimiimiii minim i lima 

'4miiiimmiiimiimiiiiiitmiimiimiimiimiimiiiiiiim nimiimiimiiMiimiimiiiimmiimiMiiimimiiMMiiiNiimiimiMMimiimiimiimiimiimiiiiiimiimiimiimiim 

THOMPSON & CASTLETON 

Electrical and Mining Machinery 

Complete Electrical Shop — Specialists on Rewinding 
Machinery of All Kinds 



COMPLETE INSTALLATIONS MADE 



316 FIRST STREET, SO. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



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August 19 19 



135 



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PLANTING THE 
FLAG OF THE 
ADMIRAL LINE 
IN THE ORIENT 




L. Dinkelspiel Company 

INCORPORATED 

115-135 Battery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS 



DRY GOODS 



FURNISHING 
GOODS 



NOTIONS and 
FANCY GOODS 



Cotton Piece Goods — Linens — 

Towels — Napkins 

Dress Goods — Cotton and Wool 

Silks — Sheetings — Bleached and 

Unbleached Muslin 

Flannels and Flannelettes — Ticks 

— Prints, Etc. 

Men's, Ladies', and Children's 
Hosiery — Underwear — Shirts — 
Sweaters 

Ribbons — Laces — Embroideries — 
Threads — Notions of all 
Descriptions 



Trans-Pacific Freight and 
Passenger Service 

Sailing from Seattle at Regular Intervals 

THE ADMIRAL LINE 

PACIFIC STEAMSHIP CO. 

Fifth Floor L. C. Smith Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 
112 MARKET ST., San Francisco 8 BRIDGE ST., New York § 
] Manila Hong Kong Vladivostok Shanghai Singapore Kobe Yokohama = E 

SiiiiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiliiiiiiiiiiniiniiiniiuiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiMiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuS ^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiniinii^ 

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BLANKETS — COMFORTABLES — QUILTS 

Complete stocks carried Correspondence all languages 

Cable Address: "LIPSEKNID" 




INGRIM-RUTLEDGE COMPANY 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
413-15 MONTGOMERY STREET 



PRINTERS 

STATIONERS BOOKBINDERS 

ENGRAVERS 

Art and Color Work 

Catalog and Booklet Printing 

Copper Plate and Steel Die Engraving 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 
EXPORT ORDERS 



Filing Devices Office Equipment 

Office Furniture 

Loose Leaf Systems 



COMPLETE LINE OF OFFICE SUPPLIES 



INGRIM-RUTLEDGE COMPANY 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



^lllllllElllltEIIIIIIJJlllIltllJItllltltlJIIIJIfllillllJttllJltlJIltllltllJIIIIJItlllLlllltllllllllflllJLIIIltlllllllJllllJIIIIJLEIIJllilJIilllllllJltllJIIIIIIEIJJIIIIjrillJIIIlJIIli^ 



136 Pan Pacific 

^iiiniiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiuiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiliiiiliiiiiliiiiiliilliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiir jimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimi iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiit: 

I NIPPON YUSEN KAISHAJ | Skinner & Eddy Corporation I 

(JAPAN MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.) J 1 

Capital, Yen $100,000,000 Head Office, Tokyo 




RECORD 

BUILDERS 



Fleet 99 — Gross Tonnage, 600,000 

| TRANS-PACIFIC PASSENGER SERVICE | 

I Between Seattle and Hong Kong via Japan Ports, | 

Shanghai and Manila, with Direct Connection for 

All Points in the Orient and Australia 

■£ = 

= Greatly Improved Fast Service of Large, Hlgh-Powered Modern 1 

Twin and Triple Screw Steamships with Unequaled 

Passenger Accommodations 

DISPLACEMENT: 

= S. S. Suwa Maru 21,020 tons S. S. Katorl Maru 19,200 tons | 

S. S. Fushlmi Maru. ...21, 020 tons S. S. Atsuta Maru 16,000 tons ~ 

S. S. Kashlma Maru. .19,200 tons S. S. Kamo Maru 16,000 tons .- 

| For further information, rates, tickets, berth reservation, etc., | 

= apply to any office of the principal railways in the United States = 

| and Canada, also any office of Messrs. Thos. Cook & Son, Messrs. § 

= Raymond & Whitcomb Co., American Express Co., and other tourist I 
| agencies in all parts of the world, or to the 

NIPPON YUSEN KAISHA 



OF 



Steel Cargo 
STEAMSHIPS 



Colman Building 
Seattle 



Railway Exchange Bldg. 
Chicago 



Equitable Bldg. 
New York 



! SEATTLE 



WASHINGTON 



U. S. A. 



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! Cable Address, "Connell" 



All Codes I 



Connell Bros. 
Company 

GENERAL IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 



HOME OFFICE 
L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Wash., U. S. A. 



BRANCH OFFICE 
485 California Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 



Rothwell & Co. inc. 

420 Alaska Building, Seattle, Wash. 

Importers— Exporters 
Shipping 

97 Warren St. Lonja Del Comercio 517 Kobe 

New York Havana, Cuba- ' Japan 

404 Insurance Exchange 

San Francisco . . 



IMPORTS: 

China Wood Oil, Peanut Oil, Soya Bean Oil, Perijla Oil, 

Fish Oil, Cocoanut Oil, Rapeseed Oil, Whale 

Oil, Castor Oil, Sesame Oil, Beans, 

Peas, Peanuts, Silk Piece Goods 

Ginger, Copra and Hemp 



| Shanghai 

i 
I 



OFFICES ALSO AT 
Manila ■ Hong Kong 



EXPORTS: 

Singapore j [ Canned Fruits, Canned Fish, Canned Milk, Resrn,'^Dye- 

stuffs,. Caustic Soda, Soda Ash, Paraffine, 
Iron, Steel, Machinery 

Correspondence Invited 



Correspondence Solicited 

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August 19 19 



137 



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AUGUST, 4919 J , y..;<^.v=^.V=^.V=^. vr^.V=^.V=^V=4P? 

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IP 

I 



[ij 



1 



PAN PACIFIC 

A MAGAZINE OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE 



John H. Gerrie Editor 

Wm. Rutledge McGarry Consulting Editor 

San Francisco, California 

ASSOCIATED EDITORS AND STAFF 
CORRESPONDENTS 

Wm. E. Aughinbaugh, M.D.; B.S.; L.L.D New York 

Juiji G. Kasai, A.M Japan 

Valabdhas- Runchordas India 

George Mellen Honolulu 

Thomas Fox Straits Settlement 

W. H. Clarke Australia 

Lazaro Basch Mexico 

Vincent Collovich Chile and Peru 

L. Carroll Seattle 

F. J. Menzles Los Angeles 

Chao-Hsin Chu, B.C.S., M.M China 

H. M. Dias Ceylon 



PAN PACIFIC is devoted to the friendly development 
of COMMERCE among ALL countries bordering the Pa- 
cific Ocean. It aims to give authentic information bear- 
ing upon the creation of PERMANENT Foreign Trade; 
that the AMERICAN MERCHANT MARINE may rest 
upon an enduring basis of reciprocal benefaction to all 
peoples who look to America for aiding financial and in- 
dustrial advancement. 

AMERICAN CONSULS are privileged to send cards of 
introduction with Foreign Buyers to PAN PACIFIC fully 
assured that such cards will entitle buyers to all the 
PRIVILEGES of our EDUCATIONAL and INFORMA- 
TION Bureaus, while traveling in the United States. 

Pan Pacific is published monthly. Subscription price, 
$3.00 per year (gold) in advance. Single copies, 25 cents. 
Advertising rates on application. Correspondence in any 
language. Address all communications to 

PAN PACIFIC CORPORATION, Publishers 
618 Mission Street, San Francisco 



Special Features in This Issue 

Preparing for Foreign Trade. Wm. Rutledge McGarry 139 

China's Arms Are Open Lynn W. Meekins 11*2 

Latin-American Harbors Dr. W. E. Aughinbaugh 11*3 

Potentiality of Portland Sydney B. Vincent 11*1* 

U. S. Aids Far East Commerce F. R. Eldridge Jr. 11*6 

Sellers Must Use Buyers' Language Dr. Angel Cesar Rivas 11*7 

Russia's Wealth 11*8 

Investment Opportunities in Mexico P. Harvey Middleton 152 

Mobilize the Soldiers for Overseas Commerce Herbert J. Spinden 153 

The Armistice and the Orient Arthur Rude 151* 

Why Buyers Should Visit Los Angeles..... M. M. Rathbun 156 

Seeing the Time in the Dark 0. E. Mack 158 



m 



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138 Pan Pacific 

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I 



I * H£ Ocean Transport <2>.,*n>. | 

( TAIYO KAIUN KABUSHIKI KAISHA ) I 

OF KOBE. JAPAN 

Agents At All Principal Ports | m Inc World 

Operating Modern Freiftkt Steamers 
100 Al Lloyds 

Regular Direct Service 

"To St F*oh 
San Francisco Seattle; Vancouver 

And 

Yokohama, Kobe, Shanghai, 

Hongkong. Manila, | 

Singapore 

Frequent Sailings To 

Vladivostok & North China Ports 

We Solicit Yovr Inquiries For C^rooes 
To All Principal Ports In Ire World 

<rans Oceanic Q>. 

PAClfIC COAtf ACE NTS 

San FRAwcisco <*, Seattle — V/ac*COUV€* 

324 SANJ*OM« ST AMERICAN 6*»R* 0L»«. Yo«KSM|R« EtDO. 

Chicago ^ Mew York 

646 MflR«8Li€ffe RC06 71 0flOADWAV 

= = 

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A ugust 19 19 



139 




Preparing for Foreign Trade 

The Ultimate Aim of Any Government Should Be the Promotion of Human 
Happiness, Says International Trade Authority 



A NATION which finds itself 
thrown suddenly into monu- 
mental debt has the alternative of 
universal bankruptcy or hard work. 
The nation, like the man who desires 
to succeed in business and be esteemed 
honest and progressive among his fel- 
lowmen, in such a situation must re- 
nounce the ignoble and easy highway 
of bankruptcy and repudiation, for the 
sterner and nobler duty of finding em- 
ployment for all of its people in order 
to discharge its obligations to civil- 
ized society. 

The government of any nation which 
ignores this elementary principle of 
social integrity is not only unfit to 
govern, but becomes a lingering in- 
dictment against the capacity of its 
people to discharge their obligations 
to the human race. Against such an 
unjust aspersion — against the ignominy 
of such an indictment — men of high 
purpose will always revolt and over- 
throw the government which thus ex- 
poses them to misery, dishonesty and 
tne. 
Trade and National 
Prosperity the Aim 
he ultimate aim of any govern- 
teiit should be the' promotion of 
human happiness. The means of satis- 

1 fying this human desire has, in all 
ages and in all countries, determined 
the methods and conditioned the at- 
tainment of this fundamental national 
purpose. It forms the very broad base 
of man's impulse to acquire, to build, 

: to barter and trade so as to develop a 
surplus or profit as a practical insur- 
ance against want and distress. 

Thus men and nations have co-oper- 
ated from time immemorial to acquire 
those strategical advantages in the 
trade relations of the world which 
best secure their country and them- 
selves from idleness and want. For it 
is ltut trite to say that where no com- 
merce exists poverty and idleness tri- 
umph, society starves, and the ema- 

I eiated nation sinks in subjugation to 
a more enterprising and inventive 
race. Hence, as a matter of SELF- 
DEFENSE, we find virile nations and 



By WILLIAM RUTLEDGE McGARRY 
— o — 




WM. RUTLEDGE McGARRY 

triumphant races sustaining the ma- 
chinery of commerce and trade, the 
world over, by negotiation or force. 

This has often produced war and 
been succeeded by public debt, which 
means INCREASED taxation, and tax- 
ation, in turn, means the confiscation 
of private property unless the tax- 
payers of a nation develop this taxable 
surplus in what we call "external," 
"foreign" or "international trade." 
This is the only way to escape confis- 
cation through taxation — this horrible 
penalty of war. 

One cannot get rich by trading with 
one's self. Nor can a nation create a 
balance in its favor without selling its 
products in the open outside markets 
of the world. And unless this market 
be created and this surplus be devel- 
oped the aim of government is de- 
feated and society becomes a prey to 
the device it has erected to promote 
the very happiness it may ignorantly 
destroy. 



It becomes, therefore, a manifest 
duty of organized society in this as 
well as every other country to pre- 
pare for and promote this foreign 
commerce more intelligently and less 
selfishly than has ever been attempted 
in the past : For the past reveals noth- 
ing but the short-sighted rivalry of 
races for the cultivated lands of other 
races which has resulted in universal 
bloodshed and international ill-will. 

It has overlooked entirely the fact 
that MORE THAN HALF the entire 
surface of the earth has NEVER been 
subjected to the wants and needs of 
man; that Europe has subsisted to 
this very hour on LESS than 28 per 
cent of its own soil ; that Asia, with 
more than HALF the human race, cul- 
tivates less than 19 per cent of its soil, 
while all the rest remains an unresist- 
ing witness of man's capacity to play 
the sybarite until brought face-to-face 
with calamity or national extinction. 

With so small a part of this earth 
subjected to productive enterprise and 
with the WHOLE human family strug- 
gling under a load of a TWO HUN- 
DRED BILLION DEBT, it is up to 
every nation to look more to unde- 
veloped resources and less enviously 
upon their neighbors' goods if the 
pride of race, the delights of home 
and the securities of organized society 
are not to disappear from earth. 

Americans to Be "Worked" 

Unless ! 

Notwithstanding this sine qua non 
to the tranquility and progress of the 
world it is still advisable to recog- 
nize the fact that commerce always 
picks out the line of least resistance 
and that our former co-belligerents 
will plan and plot to regain the mar- 
kets from which they have been tem- 
porarily displaced by war. They are 
ALL looking for QUICK returns, not 
the slower, surer and more elaborate 
method of DEVELOPING new fields 
and new wealth. They will cling to 
the DEVELOPED narrow little strip 
of earth where markets are erected and 
let the broad potential fields of future 
wealth go to the Japanese or some 



140 



Pan Pacific 



other enterprising race. 

Hence, we may expect to see Eng- 
land assiduously cultivating Siberia 
and South America even if she has to 
borrow from the United States to re- 
loan the credit to those necessitous and 
very grateful people. We will con- 
tinue to observe France blindly and 
CONFIDENTLY giving the traders of 
Turkestan ALL the credit she can 
manage in America and absorbing the 
silks, the oils, the bristles, the cocoons 
and the alfalfa that has been begging 
to gain an output DIRECTLY in this 
country, where they will ultimately 
come, burdened with a dozen profits, 
to encourage the enterprise and com- 
pliment the genius, of the French. 

And so it will be with Scandinavia 
and Germany and Holland, as well as 
Japan and Australia and South Amer- 
ica, and even those little vest-pocket 
"republics" that are puppet ridden 
and privately manipulated will "play" 
the UNITED STATES for the Altru- 
rian Traveller and the Sardanaplus of 
the age. Naturally, Americans expect 
all this ; we desire to be generous so 
that self-interest may pay, and we may 
be compelled to become the pioneers 
in developing untrodden paths .of 
commerce that have lain dormant since 
war became the vehicle of man's su- 
premacy over man. 

For this reason, and on THIS ac- 
count, I shall discuss some of the 
things that MUST be understood by 
all who are BIG enough to engage in 
the necessary enterprise of FOREIGN 
TRADE. 

In Foreign Trade 
There Is Profit 

Due to the fact that so small a por- 
tion of the earth is devoted to produc- 
tion and to the natural corollary of 
this condition, the destitute condition 
of more than HALF the human race, 
the total international traffic of the 
world has seldom exceeded $45,000,- 
000,000. Only a small percentage of 
the commercial world are connected 
with the trade ; yet ALL the human 
family are indirectly affected in its 
existence and orderly promotion. 

The very few men, firms and cor- 
porations that are actively engaged 
in its development must be recognized 
as benefactors of their respective races 
and the eyes of envy should not be 
authorized to elevate malignant 
glances to the profits of the enter- 
prise. They are entitled to their prof- 
its, and if we grant only a profit of 
2 per cent upon the annual turn-over, 
an item of $900,000,000 is distributed 
among these few enterprising men. 

But if the labor cost of producing 
this trade is taken into the accounting 
it is safe to assume that it will an- 
nually support the entire population 
of Great Britain, discharge the whole 
public debt of France and Belgium and 
reconstruct the entire railway systems 
of the world. When the purchasing 



power of the Orient and Siberia is de- 
veloped to a basis of an equality with 
Europe and America, it is conserva- 
tively estimated that an international 
trade of TWO HUNDRED BILLION 
DOLLARS may easily be achieved. 

A profit of 10 per cent upon this 
trade, if distributed among the recent 
belligerent nations, would pay all their 
annual interest, retire their huge war 
indebtedness and ultimately liberate 
industry from its intolerable load of 
usury and taxation. This is not mere 
speculation. From the raw product 
of the earth to its final consumption, 
PROFITS always exceed the mere pit- 
tance of "10 per cent." 

The DEVELOPED portion of Eu- 
rope, the Americas and Australia, is 
LESS than 6 per cent of the landed 
area of the world, where 90 per cent 
of the PRESENT international com- 
merce of the world originates and is 
absorbed. The other 10 per cent is 
assigned to Asia and Africa, with 
more than half the entire population 
of the world awaiting to be educated, 
clothed and fed. Hence the foreign 
trader with a vision, the statesman 
with constructive thought, the political 
organization with a patriotic program, 
will constitute the agencies to which 
the human race must hereafter look 
for the profits which will flow from 
enterprise responding to the demands 
of international trade. 

Mechanics Also in 
Foreign Trade 

No business man should be in ig- 
norance of what is meant by this. In 
a banker such want of knowledge is 
simply inexcusable. • 

It is NOT enough for such a man to 
be posted merely in the different kinds 
of bills of exchange, the price re- 
lationship of these bills, the position 
of our own to foreign money markets, 
or the profit possibilities of exchange. 
He should know something of the 
sources of supply and demand, under- 
stand the influence of money rates 
on the inter-changeability of commo- 
dities, be familiar with the practice 
of converting and be able to adjust 
an international balance without ex- 
porting the money media of his coun- 
try. If he does not know these things 
as well as the technique of foreign 
trade he is a poor custodian of the 
depositor's funds in this or any other 
country. 

Hereafter BANKING must BE, 
rather than SEEM, an actual mechan- 
ism in the instrumentalities of govern- 
ment that are erected to PROMOTE, 
as well as facilitate, the interchange 
of produce for the creation of NEW 
WEALTH. 

Hereafter PROGRESSIVE 
SCHOOLS WILL introduce a course 
in: 

(I) The history of commerce. 
(II) Sales practice in foreign 
trade. 



(Ill) Staple commodities of com- 
merce. 

(IV) The documental technique of 
foreign trade. 
(V) The principles of ocean 
transportation. 

(VI) The device of foreign ex- 

change. 

(VII) The influence of tariffs and 

treaties. 
(VIII) The propriety of export and 
import combinations. 
(IX) The influence of ports and 
terminal facilities upon the 
competitive forces of ALL 
industrial races. 
It is a very practical outline, easily 
within the grasp of common school in- 
telligence, and should be embraced by 
all people who are worthy to perform 
their appropriate share in the future 
reconstruction of the world. 

Analyze one of these sections and 
see how interesting it is to any vigor- 
ous mind. Take (II) "Sales Practice 
in Foreign Trade." The student nat- 
urally begins with the PRODUCER 
himself. He will make a survey of 
the SALES problem, investigate the 
markets and finally encounter the ex- 
port field with all its agencies, mid- 
dlemen, diversified needs and strat- 
egical advantages of place. 

He will organize his PROMOTION 
campaign, canvass the various "com- 
binations," balance the advantages 
and disadvantages of "exclusive" and 
"combination" salesmen, time his 
annual selling trips, do the routing so 
as to save time and money, organize 
his POLICY, learn when and how to 
shift his trade routes so as to take 
advantage of the "market seasons" in I 
the country which promises most ad- 
vantages to his enterprising brain. 

Will Be Fascinated 
By New Surroundings 

If he opens connections in China he 
will become fascinated by its history, 
its art, its multitudinous dialects, its 
compradores, the beautiful trade center 
at Hong Kong. He will select the winter 
season for his first visit to that place. 
Here he will penetrate the "British 
Sphere ' ' and find the ' ' Hongs ' ' of trade. 
Here he will realize how little river 
transportation actually advances a com- 
mercial country when compared to rail- 
ways, but he will also learn what a 
good harbor means as a base of inter- 
national trade. He will discover also 
that Mandarin, instead of French, is 
the official language of trade. And if | 
he is wise he will learn 3,000 of the I 
49,400 idiographs so as to master the 
trading polyglot that assumes a dif- 
ferent sound and form in nearly every 
province. He will also find it, if he 
advances to the interior, profitable to 
cultivate the Mongol chiefs and as- 
certain, for packing purposes, whether 
wheelbarrows, motors or camels are to 
be used in distributing his wares. 



August 19 19 



141 




THE UNITED STATES PRODUCES FORTY PER CENT OF THE WORLD'S OUTPUT OF 

IRON AND STEEL 



Of course, the latest trading condi- 
tions and the resources of the terri- 
tory, as well as the currency prob- 
lems and banking facilities, will form 
an important part of the salesman's 
study in every region where he desires 
to establish a PERMANENT and prof- 
itable trade. Back of it all will be 
the curious advertising problem — the 
psychology of business getting, which 
presents innumerable possibilities to 
the artistic and creative mind. 

The entire course easily classifies 
itself under five sections, embracing: 

(a) The technical handling of for- 

eign business. 

(b) The mechanics of importing and 

exporting. 

(c) The economics, geography and 

organization of international 
politics and commerce. 

(d) The financial mechanism of in- 

ternational trade. 

(e) The etiquette of business get- 

ting by the salesman in for- 
eign lands. 
This, it would seem, is quite enough 
if properly developed in the school of 
foreign trade. A graduate from such 
a course would know at once : 

(1) What a letter of inquiry should 

contain. 

(2) The full and comprehensive na- 
ture of the reply. 

(3) Where and how to get his credit 
report. 

(4) How to number, mark, code and 
invoice the order. 

(5) How to make use of the refer- 
ence and properly acknowl- 
edge the order. 

(6) How to pack and mark the 
consignment, get his shipping 
permit and dock receipt and 
the necessary licenses. 

(7) How to obtain his clearance, 
make his export declaration, 



certificate of origin and bill 
of lading. 

(8) What kind of insurance to pro- 

cure and what to do with his 
invoices. 

(9) How to make his draft, obtain 

collection and dictate appro- 
priate advice of shipment. 

He will also learn how to procure 
his drawbacks, understand the con- 
sular requirements of foreign coun- 
tries and the methods of protecting 
his trade marks in the regions pene- 
trated. 

Experts Are Needed 
And Not Alarmists 

It is not a difficult operation, but 
it is of such supreme importance in 
the economy of our future life that it 
should be comprehensive and com- 
plete. It should not be dallied with 
by itinerant preachers who appear be- 
fore some of our Foreign Trade Clubs 
and abuse the delicate civilizations 
they have scarcely examined and 
never understood. If it is to be taught 
at all EVERY SECTION should be 
placed under an expert in his line who 
will studiously render prominent the 
rationale of commercial movement, 
blazing his way through the jungle of 
ages along a course that will articu- 
late the progressive unity of scien- 
tific organization and render encour- 
agement and facilitation to the col- 
lateral reading indispensable to a com- 
prehensive and responsive knowledge 
of the fluctuations of market oppor- 
tunities and commercial possibilities. 

We hear very few of the latter. And 
the reason is sufficiently apparent to 
one who makes it his business to be 
posted on the diplomacy of interna- 
tional commerce, to justify the fore- 
going remarks. To be very candid, it 
is either the result of monumental IG- 
NORANCE among our friends or of 



plausible PROPAGANDA by the en- 
rolled and paid secret servants of com- 
petitive organizations. In either event 
it is well to be on your guard when 
you hear and read the alarmist. 

An instance occurred recently, when 
a camp follower returned from Si- 
beria, that may serve as an illustra- 
tion: "The Bolsheviks are every- 
where," he lamented. "It's impossi- 
ble to understand those people!" he 
dogmatized, thinking that none in the 
audience understood Russia or the 
Russians. "Why," he rambled along, 
heroically, "I'd like to know how a 
'white man' can do business among a 
bunch of mavaricks talking a lan- 
guage that turns a double somersault 
in a muchly bewhiskered mouth ! Why, 
when they were building the Tower 
of Babel one of the masons threw a 
trowel full of mortar into the face of 
another, and what THAT fellow said 
was— RUSSIAN!" 

Any one who might be influenced by 
such asinine criticism and such mani- 
fest ignorance of Russia and Russian 
ideals as are suggested in these quo- 
tations should stick to his onion patch 
as the appropriate atmosphere for the 
exercise of his mental attainments. 
He is too bucolic a dillitante to ever 
become sufficiently polished in the re- 
fining lapidary of international com- 
merce to make a success. 

Which of the Races 
Is Really Civilized? 

Manifestly sensible men will prefer 
to extend their commercial relations 
to races that are civilized. And the 
intelligent merchant, in making his 
trade survey and organizing his pro- 
motion campaign, will first test his se- 
lected "civilization" by the univers- 
ally recognized and accepted dogmas 
of elementary culture. He will ask: 

(a) Is the national morality wide- 
spread and reasonable? (b) How ex- 
tensive is the intelligence? (c) How 
complete is the social organization? 

(d) Are the means of wealth plentiful 
and capable of just distribution? (e) 
Does the government aid without 
preventing individual advancement? 

(f) To what extent is art cultivated 
for the general diffusion of good taste 
and refinement? (g) To all these does 
the nation assume an attitude of har- 
monious attachment? 

Judge by these standards, regardless 
of the temporary inebriety of political 
organizations, why should an intelli- 
gent trader or banker prefer Southern 
Asia to Asiatic Russia? India may be 
better organized, industrially, perhaps, 
but her resources are practically under 
the control of competitors. In all 
other respects the inhabitants of Asi- 
atic Russia excel in the foregoing re- 
quirements. 

(Continued on page 155) 



142 



Pan Pacific 



China's Arms Are Open to America 

Nation With More Than 400,000,000 Population Is Dropping Superstitions and 
Demanding Modern Merchandise and Supplies 



WITH Europe standing in the 
bread line and South America 
becoming better explored and ex- 
ploited, the Far East naturally looms 
up as the most attractive present mar- 
ket for the American manufacturer 
and exporter. The people are there 
and the money is there. It is simply 
a case of finding out what their needs 
are and supplying them with the goods 
desired. Outside of the United States, 
there are about sixteen hundred mil- 
lion people in the world, of whom four 
hundred million live in China. 

At present the Chinese buy about 
$1.50 worth of imported merchandise 
per capita each year. If this were in- 
creased to $2, the total purchases of 
foreign goods would advance to $800,- 
000,000 annually. So China is a mar- 
ket in which little things count, and 
just because shiploads of automobiles 
and grand pianos do not find a sale 
there now the American exporter 
should not infer that the trade field 
is either cheap or small. 

Purchasing Power Low 
Because Lacking Roads 

China's purchasing power is low on 
account of the uneven distribution of 
its large population, which is due to 
the lack of transportation facilities. 
There are practically no roads and 
only six thousand miles of railroads 
serving an area one-sixth larger than 
that of the United States, so that wat- 
erways afford the only means of com- 
munication in most sections of the 
country. 

In addition to presenting a remark- 
able opportunity to American manu- 
facturers who will provide the neces- 
sary road making machinery and rail- 
road equipment, the improvement of 
China's transportation will tend to 
equalize the supply of and demand foV 
labor and to make accessible the rich 
mineral resources of the republic, thus 
increasing the buying power of its 
people. 

Not long ago a young Chinese stu- 
dent in one of our Western universi- 
ties expressed his interest in opening 
five and ten cent stores in several ci- 
ties of North China. That way of do- 
ing business is apparently the best 
adapted to reach the majority of our 
Chinese customers. Their retail pur- 
chases are incredibly small. The cop- 
per cent looks big to them ; if they 
used American money we should have 
to mint new coins representing the 
mills into which our cents are nom- 
inally divided. That, however, is the 
retail side. 



By LYNN W. MEEKINS 

Trade Commissioner, United States 

Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 

Commerce 

The wholesale side is an entirely dif- 
ferent matter. It has not been cus- 
tomary for the American firm to deal 
directly with the Chinese firm. The 
business has been handled largely 
through import and export houses 
which operate upon the old principle 
of barter, exchanging American goods 
for Chinese products, and these con- 
cerns trade on an extensive scale. 
Vast Coal Fields 
Scarcely Touched 

An American engineer who travelled 
throughout China told me the other 
day that he was chiefly impressed by 
the ample quantity of available fuel. 
There are vast coal fields, containing 
the largest deposits of anthracite out- 
side of Pennsylvania, although the 
quality of the Chinese hard coal is not 
comparable with that found in the 
United States. Such resources presage 
an unlimited industrial development 
which is already under way as a direct 
result of the reduction of imports from 
war causes. Scores of articles previ- 
ously obtainable only from abroad are 
now being manufactured in China, but 
the market is so large that domestic 
production cannot begin to meet the 
demand. 

The point is that as fast as China 
becomes modernized American export- 
ers can sell more and more goods 
there, for the United States has been 
the favored nation in China ever 
since the Boxer indemnity was re- 
turned, and American merchandise en- 
joys a high reputation. Unfortu- 
nately for the Chinese, they have 
been handicapped by the two charac- 
teristics — ancestor worship and super- 
stition. 

While they have looked backward 
the world has gone on and left them 
hundreds of years behind. Those cen- 
turies cannot be eliminated in a few 
years, but China's recent progress is 
astonishing, and it seems reasonable 
to believe that what Japan has ac- 
complished in the past fifty years 
China can accomplish in the next few 
decades. 

Native Superstition 
Must Be Overcome 

A firm in Hongkong tried to intro- 
duce gas motors among the owners of 
fishing boats or junks in the trib- 
utary waters. Some fishermen were 
favorably impressed with the idea and 
went so far as to order a few, but 



backed out at the last moment, claim- 
ing that the installation of this mod- 
ern equipment would result in "bad 
joss," since their fathers had never 
used motor power on their fishing 
junks. This superstition can be over- 
come by the use of proper methods, 
for the Chinese are primarily utili- 
tarians, and it is simply a case of 
demonstrating to their satisfaction 
that efficiency will overbalance any 
possible hoodoo. 

When the British and the Germans 
began to confine their attention to the 
business of war, many countries whose 
trade they had conducted in whole or 
in part were left to shift for them- 
selves. A great deal of the foreign 
trade of American firms was handled 
by British and German houses abroad; 
a very considerable proportion of Chi- 
nese commerce was controlled by 
them. 

During the last few years the Amer- 
ican exporter has come to realize the 
value of Americanizing his foreign 
sales just as far as he conveniently 
can, and it is the present tendency 
in China for native merchants to par- 
ticipate more actively in importing 
and exporting. Out of these develop- 
ments should grow close co-operation 
between American and Chinese firms in 
handling their particular trade. 

That the Chinese are willing to meet 
us more than half way is evinced by 
the subscription of $3,000,000 by Chi- 
nese merchants toward the establish- 
ment of a new steamship line between 
San Francisco and Shanghai, and by 
the formation of a Chinese industrial 
and commercial association in Chicago, 
the first organization of its kind in the 
United States, to foster commercial 
relations between China and the mid- 
dle West. 

Now Seeking Orders 
for all Commodities 

In the past there has not been very 
much interest in China among Ameri- 
can manufacturers located far from 
the Pacific Coast. Such is not the case 
today; firms in New York, New Eng- 
land and the central states are now 
seeking orders from Chinese import- 
ers. It is recognized that there are 
few important commodities for which 
a demand cannot be created in China 
with time and proper methods. Shang- 
hai, for instance, is a cosmopolitan 
city with a fair foreign population 
and constitutes a market for most of 
the articles ordinarily sold in a large 
American city. 

In Shanghai and in the forty-seven 
other treaty ports it is possible for 



August 19 19 



143 



... 


■ 




$mm 




& 1 IH ^Bw 



DR. W. E. AUGINBAUGH 

OWING to the fact that most of 
our large seaports are provided 
with modern docks and are all practi- 
cally located in land locked harbors, 
we are prone to think of Latin Amer- 
ican ports as being similar. Nothing 
could be further from the true state 
of affairs. 

As a matter of fact, transportation 
methods in the countries to the south 
of the Rio Grande are far from ideal, 
and the open ports and sea tossed 
roadsteads of nine-tenths of the ports 
of our sister republics are the best 
arguments I know of for good pack- 
ing on the part of the American ex- 
porter, for nothing detracts so much 
from developing trade with foreign 
nations as for a consignee to have his 
goods arrive at their destination unfit 
for sale, due to badly constructed 
shipping cases. 

If American companies will under- 
take the construction of breakwaters 
and docks for the many Latin Amer- 
ican ports of this continent much will 

: be accomplished toward diverting this 

, trade toward our shores. 

On the Pacific Coast, starting at the 

i first Mexican port and continuing 

; down to Coronel, Chile, there are not 
half a dozen harbors safe and protected 
at all seasons of the year, and along 
all this long stretch of coast one can 



Latin - American Harbors 

Only Two Modern Docks and Few Protected Ports 
Along Southern Pacific Seaboard 



By DR. W. E. AUGHINBAUGH 
— o — 
find but two modern docks, designed 
especially to handle with facility mer- 
chandise of all kinds. One of these is 
at Salina Cruz, Mexico, the western 
terminus of the Tehuantepec Railroad, 
while the other is located at Callao, 
the port of Lima, the capital of Peru. 
The last named is at present too small 
to expedite the work for which it was 
originally designed and vessels are 
obliged to remain in the open roads 
awaiting their turn to be docked and 
to discharge their cargoes. 

The big port of Valparaiso, the 
gateway to the bulk of Chile's mar- 
kets, was for years notorious, many 
ships going down within a few hun- 
dred yards from the city streets when 
northers sprang up, as they do at cer- 
tain seasons of the year. Realizing 
that merchants could not be made to 
much longer tolerate such condition of 
affairs, the Chilean Government at last 
undertook to build a modern break- 
water and docks which are now in 
process of construction. These will 
cost millions of dollars, but the ex- 
pense is fully warranted by the lives 
that will be saved and the quickness 
with which cargoes can be handled. 

The other West Coast ports of Cen- 
tral and South America are open road- 
steads, dangerous at all times of the 
year, from which the sea exacts a 
yearly toll in lives and property lost 
or damaged. A typical port is Mol- 
lendo, Peru, the gateway to the in- 
terior of Peru, as well as to Bolivia, 
which, by the way, is the only West 
Coast Republic without a port of its 
own. 

Antofogasta and Iquique, Chile, the 
two leading nitrate ports of the world, 
are also without adequate protection 
from the fury of the ocean. When the 
northers are raging I have known ves- 
sels to lay at anchor tossing and 
straining at their cables for weeks at 
a time without being able to work 
their cargo. 



At such ports as these goods are 
discharged into open lighters, which 
await favorable opportunities to get 
their contents ashore, most of the time 
being deluged by spray or waves 
which wash over them from end to 
end. Passengers are taken from ships 
in small boats and hoisted to land by 
cranes adapted to lift to platforms, by 
means of cables, baskets or barrels 
in which the people are packed, a de- 
cidedly unpleasant sensation for the 
timid. 

Docking Systems 
Improved on East 

On the East coast there is a decided 
improvement in the docking systems. 
Montevideo, the port of Uruguay, is 
situated near the mouth of the La 
Plata River and is therefore not sub- 
ject to attacks of the sea. 

The docks of Buenos Aires are the 
finest on this continent, if not in the 
entire world, and were designed by 
the man who made the wonderful port 
works of Liverpool. These contain 
four basins, with six and one-half 
miles of quays, stretching along the 
flanks of this modern capital. On 
these are disposed immense ware- 
houses able to contain 29,000,000 tons 
of merchandise, as well as wonderful 
flour mills and grain elevators, with 
a yearly capacity of 2,400,000 tons of 
cereals. This harbor cost $35,000,000 
and plans are now being made to ex- 
tend it, for despite its magnitude it is 
unable to handle in a satisfactory 
manner the exports and imports of 
this republic. 

Rio de Janeiro is situated in the 
most beautiful harbor in the world, 
safe at all times from storms. Up to 
recently it had no modern docks, and 
vessels were obliged to remain miles 
from shore while discharging cargo. 
Wnthin the past two years some docks 
have been built, but there is ample 
need of more. This is equally true of 
all the ports of Brazil, even Manaos, 
located 1,000 miles up the Amazon, 
and the leading rubber port of the 
universe. 



American companies to conduct busi- 
ness under their state charters, regis- 
tering at the American Consulate for 
the district in which they are to 
erate. 

s to the best opportunities for 
ing American products in China, in 
staple manufactures, such as cotton 
goods, our market is mainly limited 
to certain of the better grades. In 
the case of a few raw materials and 
partly manufactured goods the abund- 
ance of our resources gives us a good 



; open 

I sellii 



share of China's trade under normal 
conditions. 

Among these are mineral oil prod- 
ucts, iron and steel products and lum- 
ber. The most important classes, how- 
ever, consist of machinery and spe- 
cialty lines, which need only the right 
kind of introduction work and effi- 
cient selling methods. Not only do 
they present the best chance to meet 
foreign competition, but the volume of 
business is perceptibly growing. 

An investment field of the first or- 
der, China is eager to welcome Ameri- 



can capital in the development of rail- 
roads and port works, public utilities 
on a smaller scale, mineral resources 
and manufacturing enterprises. Natu- 
rally, the bulk of the purchases ensu- 
ing from these projects will be made 
from the investing countries. Great 
Britain's wonderful foreign trade was 
built upon its investment abroad and 
its large mercantile marine. These 
factors have gained for Great Britain 
its generous share of the trade of 
China. 



144 



Pan Pacific 



Potentiality of Portland 

Development of the Great Hinterland Will Vastly Enhance the Commercial 

Importance of the Willamette River 



THE importance of the future of the 
maritime commerce of Portland 
can hardly be overestimated. The de- 
velopment of the great hinterland of 
Portland, some 250,000 square miles, 
reaching into Eastern Oregon, Eastern 
Washington, Idaho and a part of Mon- 
tana has begun. 

"With millions of horsepower await- 
ing development, with millions of 
acres of wheat and cattle-raising 
lands still unsettled, with rich de- 
posits of gold and silver, iron and 
copper, and other minerals, precious 
and base, inviting the world and 
the development of this immense area 
in a dozen other particulars yet to 
come, Portland's future development 
as a port holds rich promise. 

Industrial Portland 

In Rapid Development 

In the last ten years Portland's im- 
portance as a manufacturing center 
has grown by leaps and bounds. The 
development of the immense tributary 
territory has multiplied the demand 
for manufactured products and 
equipment. Many lines of manufac- 
tures are represented, as the follow- 
ing partial list of raw products will 
show : wool, hides, metals, clays, stone, 
wood pulp, which are converted into 
cloth and fabrics, clothing, shoes and 
harness, stoneware and paper, furni- 
ture and lumber, barrels and boxes, 
machinery and wood and iron pipe, 
cement and numerous other commodi- 
ties, to which may be added the prod- 
ucts of the livestock industry aggre- 
gating $75,000,000 a year, beside the 
conversion of the grains into flour and 
other cereal products mounting high 
into the millions of dollars annually. 

There is tributary to Portland the 
largest stand of timber in the world. 
In Oregon alone there are over 470,- 
000,000,000 feet of commercial timber 
and directly tributary from adjoining 
states another 200,000,000,000 feet. 
Based upon the lowest price known to 
the industry, this timber is worth over 
$6,000,000,000, and at the present sell- 
ing price double that amount. Lum- 
bermen expect that within a very few 
years the mills of Portland and Oregon 
will be cutting lumber at the rate of 
6,000,000,000 feet a year. 

It is not difficult to calculate that 
the mills have over one hundred years' 
work in front of them at that rate of 
yearly consumption, giving employ- 
ment in this single industry to 150,000 
men. It would require from eight to 
ten long trains daily and six hundred 



By SYDNEY B. VINCENT 

(Second Article) 

large ships annually to carry the prod- 
ucts of the forest to the ultimate con- 
sumer. 

When it is considered that the pres- 
ent cut of timber is but 2,500,000,000 
yearly, some idea of the enormous pos- 
sibilities of the business may be had. 
Second Largest Port 
For Wheat Shipments 

Portland is the second largest 
wheat-shipping port in the United 
States in normal times. In addition 
to shipping millions of bushels of 
wheat, Portland mills manufacture 
huge quantities of flour and cereals 



The cattle raising business in Or- 
egon and other Pacific Northwest 
states is in its infancy. There are 
available in Oregon and Washington 
millions of acres of logged-off lands 
suitable for pasturage, and vast areas 
in the drier sections of both states in 
which the cattle industry now thrives. 

In the manufacture of woolen fab- 
rics, rapid progress has been made in 
the city of Portland and at Oregon 
City, Salem, Pendleton and other sec- 
tions of the state. Portland is now 
the second largest woolen center in the 
United States, Boston ranking first. 
Climatic conditions and wonderfully 
pure water, of the same analysis as 
obtains in the best woolen centers of 




VIEW IN PORTLAND HARBOR 



which are sent to all parts of the 
world, particularly to the Orient. Port- 
land has half a dozen immense flour 
mills and several more large plants are 
in prospect. The value of the flour 
and cereal output for 1918 was $20,- 
000,000. 

Portland, by reason of her proximity 
to the greatest stock raising country 
on the Pacific Coast, has become the 
largest packing center in the Pacific 
Northwest. As an indication of the 
growth of this industry, it may be 
stated that in 1918 the packing in- 
dustry brought into Portland approxi- 
mately $75,000,000, of which nearly 
one-third was for food products 
cleared through the Portland Union 
Stock Yards. 



Great Britain, tend to place this indus- 
try upon a splendid basis for future 
operations and development. Proxim- 
ity of Portland to the great Australian 
and Oriental wool producing centers 
further indicates very substantial and 
rapid progress in the development of 
the industry. 

The great fruit and farming sec- 
tions of Oregon have developed to 
such an extent that Portland has be- 
come one of the great shipping centers 
for dried, canned and dehydrated 
fruits and vegetables, the export 
are a score of fishing and canning 
plants. The output for 1918 was 
business attaining large proportions. 
The enormous proportions of this busi- 
ness in Oregon may be estimated from 



August 19 19 



145 




VIEW OF PORTLAND BUSINESS DISTRICT 



the fact that the volume of business 
for 1918 ran into the millions of dol- 
lars, not taking into consideration the 
millions received by growers for the 
fresh product. 

The Pacific Northwest is the largest 
producer of edible fish and fish prod- 
ucts in the world. The greatest sal- 
mon stream in the world is the Colum- 
bia River. Thousands of men are en- 
gaged in catching fish, and additional 
thousands are employed in their prep- 
aration for the market. From the 
mouth of the river to The Dalles 
valued at $10,000,000. At Bonneville, 
on the Columbia River, is the largest 
fish hatchery in the world. It is esti- 
mated that the output for the Pacific 
Northwest and Alaska reaches the 
grand total of 750,000,000 cans. One 
firm in Portland last year printed ap- 
proximately 75,000,000 labels for cans. 

The paper industry of the Columbia 
and Willamette Rivers has attained 
enormous proportions in the last few 
years. Several large mills on both 
rivers, employing thousands of men, 
turn out vast quantities of pulp pa- 
pers. The output for 1918 was in ex- 
cess of 200,000 tons. 

Cheese and Dairy Products 
Also Important Factors 

Oregon rapidly is becoming one of 
tie great cheese producing states. The 
western coast of Oregon is peculiarly 
adapted to the raising of dairy herds. 
Green grass prevails for practically all 
the year; indeed, on the immediate 
coast where the damp air from the 



ocean penetrates, green grass is had 
all year round. The cheese product in 
1918 attained a total of $1,500,000, 
while the total manufactured dairy 
product was $20,000,000. 

Portland, the great wheat and flour 
center, is one of the largest producers 
of crackers and biscuits in the United 
States. Its manufacturers have de- 
veloped wonderful efficiency in all 
branches of manufacture and market- 
ing. Portland has half a dozen 
candy factories, some of which send 
their products all over the United 
States and to foreign lands. 

Portland is the furniture manufac- 
turing center of the Pacific Coast. All 



grades of furniture are made for the 
custom trade or on special account. 
The 1918 product of furniture .reached 
a total of $6,000,000. 

Largest Ship Producer 
in the United States 

During the last few years ship build- 
ing, both steel and wooden, has been 
an important feature of the industrial 
life of Oregon, and that this state 
played an important role in the war 
industries is indicated by the undis- 
puted fact that Oregon and the Port- 
land district was the largest producer 
of ships in the United States. 

In less than three years there were 
launched up to February 28, 1919, a 
grand total of two hundred and seven- 
teen vessels, of which one hundred and 
sixty-two were wood and fifty-five 
steel construction. A comparison of 
the output of all Pacific Coast ship- 
building districts shows that the Port- 
land district attained a higher effi- 
ciency than any other district, consid- 
ering the number of men employed. 

Government experts claim that there 
is 12,000,000 horsepower of potential 
hydro-electric energy, on a continuous 
current basis, in the Columbia River 
basin, and that for six or eight months 
of the year the potential energy avail- 
able reaches 20,000,000 horse power. 
Less than 300,000 of this has been har- 
nessed. No other like area in the 
world has available such a storehouse 
of hydro-electric energy. It is greater 
in its promise for the future than any 
coal field ever opened. It is always 
available. It is not impaired through 
development. "What opportunities this 
wonderful product of nature offers to 
manufacturers ! 



Aeroplane view 



Municipal Grain Elevator Terminal 
Dock With Two Story Transit Shed For 5acked Grain 

AND 

Open Docks For Bulk Cargo 



Portland Oregon 



Area Adaptable 
"^.Future Dock Development 




GRAIN ELEVATOR AT PORTLAND 



146 



Pan Pacific 



U. S. Aids 
Far East 
Commerce 



By P. R. ELDRIDGE, Jr. 

Chief Par Eastern Division, Bureau of 

Foreign and Domestic Commerce 

— o — 

THE work of the Bureau of Foreign 
and Domestic Commerce in pro- 
moting foreign trade is so well known 
among exporters and manufacturers 
that any further discussion may seem 
superfluous, but the activities of the 
newly created Far Eastern Division, 
extending over a period of a little less 
than a year, are not generally so well 
understood. 

Perhaps it would be easier to state 
first what the Far Eastern Division is 
not, rather than what it is, for its 
ramifications are so broad and its in- 
terests so varied that any attempt to 
describe in full its functions might 
pall upon the reader. 

To begin with, it is not a credit 
agency and has no facilities for giving 
strictly credit information of any na- 
ture. It is likewise not equipped to 
answer inquiries concerning the impor- 
tation of foreign goods which compete 
with American manufactures of a like 
nature. Other than these two excep- 
tions, there is hardly any foreign trade 
promotion work concerning the Orient 
which is not carried on in the divi- 
sion. 

Answering Inquiries 
Biggest Part of Work 

This work consists mainly in answer- 
ing inquiries from business houses. 
These inquiries were formerly ad- 
dressed largely to consuls in the Far 
East, entailing a delay in reply of 
anywhere from sixty to one hundred 
and twenty days, and sometimes 
longer. Copies of the replies with 
trade lists which the consuls have been 
making to these trade inquiries have 
been collected in the bureau for many 
years, in the course of which time the 
pertinent information contained in 
them has been digested and filed un- 
der commodites and countries. This 
information forms the basis of our 
files. 

Supplementing the work of the con- 
suls, who are supposed to maintain a 
local outlook on the commerce of their 
districts, the Commercial Attaches and 
Resident Trade Commissioners have 
maintained a national outlook on the 
commerce of the country to which they 
were assigned, and the reports of these 




MANILA BRANCH OF THE INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 



officers are likewise at the disposal of 
the business public through the Far 
Eastern Division. Under the increased 
appropriation which went into effect 
July 1, 1919, there will be Commer- 
cial Attaches in Tokio and Pekin and 
Resident Trade Commissioners in 
Yokohama, Shanghai, Canton, Singa- 
pore, Melbourne and Bombay, while 
the bureau will maintain a district 
office at Manila, P. I. 

The policy of the bureau is to an- 
swer every inquiry addressed to it 
directly from the information fur- 
nished by these officers which is on 
file. To round out this information, 
however, the division reads and clips 
weekly every publication of commer- 
cial interest from the Far East. It is 
now engaged in ascertaining which of 
these publications are on file in cham- 
bers of commerce and libraries 
throughout the country, so that se- 
lected reading references on special 
subjects, such as automobiles, machin- 
ery, shoes, hardware, etc., which ap- 
pear in these publications may be sent 
to inquirers together with the name of 
the nearest library or chamber of 
commerce where the publications may 
be found. 

A weekly digest of the more import- 
ant clippings is also published in Com- 
merce Reports under the title "Far 
Eastern Press Notes," and readers of 
these notes often write for the more 
specific information which the fuller 
article contains. 

All Customs Statistics 
Also Kept On File 

The division also keeps on file all of 
the latest customs statistics, year 
books, reports of commissions and de- 
partments of Oriental Governments, 
reports of American and other cham- 
bers of commerce, and is also build- 
ing up a reference library of books 
dealing with problems of exchange, 



currency, finance, sales methods and 
transportation as well as modern treat- 
ises on mining, industries, commercial 
laws, customs and natural resources 
of Oriental countries. 

In addition to these works the divi- 
sion is making a collection of stan- 
dard maps of countries, provinces and 
cities in the Far East, which are freely 
consulted by prospective travellers. 

Supervises the Policies 
of Trade Investigators 

But perhaps the most effective work 
of the division is the supervision it 
maintains over the policies and work 
of the travelling special investigators. 
After July 1 there will be in the Far 
East special investigators preparing 
reports on ports and transportation 
facilities of the Far East, advertising 
in the Far East, electrical goods in 
India and hardware and tools in the 
Far East. Each of these investiga- 
tions will cover at least a year and 
the results will be published in the 
form of special agents' reports, which 
will be sold at a nominal price by the 
Superintendent of Documents, Wash- 
ington, D. O, and at the district offices 
of the bureau. Certain preliminary 
reports on ports and transportation in 
China, prepared by Paul P. Whitham, 
are already on hand at the bureau's 
district offices. 

Another plan is to place in direct 
touch with each other, through a filing 
system in the division, foreign export- 
ers and importers who are looking for 
connections, and American manufac- 
turers, importers and exporters who 
are looking for representatives. These 
introductions will be handled with dis- 
crimination, but no responsibility will 
be assumed by the bureau. The ad- 
vantage of placing two firms in touch 
with each other who are actively seek- 
ing connections is manifestly greater 

(Continued on page 163) 



August 19 19 



147 



Sellers Must Use Buyers' Language 

Chief Stumbling Block in Progress of Americanism Has Been Caused by Loath - 
ness to Study Other Peoples and Their Customs 



LANGUAGE is the indispensable 
means by which we come to know 
others and by which we make others 
know what we are, what we can do, 
and what is to be expected of us. It 
is no less necessary in order to arrive 
at a comprehension of people with 
whom we seek to establish relations 
of any sort. 

Up to now the chief stumbling block 
to the progress of Americanism and 
consequently the development of com- 
- mercial relations between the United 
States and the other countries of 
America has arisen from the difference 
of language. 

Commerce is not merely a matter 
of exchange of products or of credits. 
An understanding of the people with 
whom we are to deal, a knowledge of 
their needs, of their tastes, of their 
habits and of their peculiarities is 
necessary. Likewise they too require, 
since in a great part commerce signi- 
fies rivalry, that we reveal ourselves 
for what we are, at least in the large, 
showing them our strength, our capac- 
ity, and how we compare with the peo- 
ple of other nationalities. 

Before buying and selling we must 
advertise ourselves, not in the atten- 
uated sense that the word has in mer- 
cantile or newspaper language, but in 
the broader and fuller meaning of hu- 
man relations and of the intercourse 
of people. 

Need of Advertising 
Equal on Both Sides 

It may be said that the need of ad- 
vertisement is reciprocal, that the 
work should be shared by both equally 
not only by the producer of manufac- 
tured goods, but as well by him who 
offers raw materials for sale. 

To a certain point this is true, but 
only up to a certain point. The man- 
ufacturer requires constantly raw ma- 
terials and such he looks for and ob- 
tains with little solicitation within or 
without his own country. It is only 
necessary that he made his needs 
known. 

On account of the difference exist- 
ing between manufacturing industry 
and extractive industry, whether the 
latter be agriculture or mining, those 
devoting themselves to the former have 
imposed upon them the initiative in 
the advertisement or the propaganda 
referred to. The stage of agriculture 
and mining precedes the stage of man- 
ufacture. In order that a people may 
arrive at the latter stage it is neces- 
sary that they should first have at- 
tained the former, or if not, to be able 
to dispose of the elements necessary 



By DR. ANGEL CESAR RIVAS 
Editor Spanish Bulletin, Pan-American 
Union 
Dr. Rivas, the author of this 
article, is a well known publicist 
and was formerly Under Secre- 
tary of Foreign Affairs of Vene- 
zuela. He is an authority on in- 
ternational law and has written 
several books on this subject. 

o 

to acquire the raw materials not pro- 
duced on their own soil. Even more, 
a truly manufacturing people is one 
that after having supplied its own 
needs overflows with its goods into the 
markets of others. 

Wealth Created 
For Reserve Fund 
Necessarily this presupposes an eco- 
nomic status in advance of the agri- 
cultural or mining status, assuming 
that through the accumulation or sup- 
ply of capital, and of technical ability, 
there may be created wealth not im- 
mediately needed, but which serves as 
a fund of reserve for use when needed. 
In the position that the United States 
and the Latin American countries oc- 
cupy economically in relation to each 
other, it is the former which is called 
upon to advertise itself, shouldering a 
double burden for itself and for the 
others. We say a double burden, be- 
cause to the end that the United States 
may occupy in Latin American com- 
merce, the place which it should have, 
it is necessary to tell its neighbors of 
the South, what it has and the terms 
of sale, and must inform its own peo- 
ple what it is that the others need and 
how to sell to them. 

For the first part it is essential to 
know the speech of the buyers as well 
as the art of advertising. Much pro- 
gress is being made at present in the 
diffusion of Spanish and even of Por- 
tuguese in the United States, all of 
which shows without doubt that while 
the desired end has not yet been at- 
tained the purpose exists. Prom what 
has been already done we may con- 
elude without exaggeration that Span- 
ish will come to occupy the position in 
the United States that German occu- 
pied before the war. This of itself 
would be incalculable progress and a 
force of undoubted value. 

Thanks to a knowledge of the lan- 
guage, the people of the United States 
would find themselves in a condition 
to know the Latin Americans, to fath- 
om their souls, to appreciate their 
qualities, to measure their needs and 
to formulate adequate plans to satisfy 
them. At the same time with the ac- 
quirement of the Spanish and Portu- 



guese tongues they would be able to 
make the Latin American see directly 
and without any intermediary what in 
reality they themselves are, the ends 
they seek and what advantages the 
goods they fabricate may offer. 

Good Translators 
Are a Necessity 

Catalogues in Spanish and Portu- 
guese are unquestionably good adver- 
tising mediums, but on condition that 
the Spanish and Portuguese in which 
they are written be in reality such. 
The greater part of the catalogues 
which are sent from the United States 
to Latin America are in truth filled 
from beginning to end with Spanish 
or Portuguese words, but one cannot 
say that they are written in Spanish 
or Portuguese. This is not a paradox, 
for one only needs to read these cata- 
logues to be convinced that, having 
been translated from some other lan- 
guage, they preserve the rules of con- 
struction peculiar to the language in 
which they were originally conceived. 

The manufacturer or advertiser in 
the United States must come to ap- 
preciate the fact that in order for his 
catalogues to produce the desired ef- 
fect in Latin America, it is absolutely 
indispensable that they be in good 
Spanish or good Portuguese. In Eng- 
lish there is a word which suits well 
the genius of the people of the United 
States; it is "efficiency." In treating 
of catalogues or of anything else, true 
efficiency consists in doing a thing as 
it ought to be done. 

It is not necessary that the cata- 
logues be voluminous ; it is necessary 
only that they be intelligible, that any 
one may understand them. In order 
to attain the highest grade of effi- 
ciency advertisers in the United 
States should judge with care those 
who offer their services as translators, 
and keep always in mind the fact that 
cheap and rapid work is generally in 
this field the worst work. 

In connection with the catalogue it 
would be well if associations of man- 
ufacturers and chambers of commerce 
in the United States would publish 
weekly or fortnightly well prepared 
bulletins in Spanish and Portuguese, 
advertising raw products, fluctuation 
of prices, the state of the market, 
financial and banking movements in 
relation to Latin America and special 
recommendations respecting the prep- 
aration of raw materials from Latin 
America, which would meet the ap- 
proval of importers in the United 
States, and other information of like 
kind and importance. 



148 



Pan Pacific 



Russia's 



MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF 



RUSSIA'S future lies in the de- 
velopment of her natural re- 
sources, says Dr. Joseph M. Goldstein, 
professor of political economy at the 
Moscow High Institute of Commerce 
and Industry and of the University of 
Moscow, in his new book, "Russia: Her 
Economic Past and Future." . 

In the years 1912 and 1913, the Urals 
furnished about 20%. of the total pro- 
duction of pig iron and about 17% 
of iron and steel in Russia. Now that 
coal fit for the production of coke has 
been found in the Basin of the Kuz- 
netsk, the future of the iron industry 
in the Urals may be looked upon as 
extremely promising. 

What splendid promise there is in 
this respect in the Urals may be seen 
from the fact that only one mountain, 
Magnitnaya, in the southern portion 
of this region (government of Oren- 
burg), has resources of over 100,000,- 
000 tons of magnetite ore. To summar- 
ize, the surveyed resources alone of 
high grade iron-ores in the Ural re- 
gion amount to at least 500,000,000 
tons. 

In addition, the Urals rank first 
among all Russian copper producing 
localities. On the average, the Urals 
have supplied in recent years over 
1,000,000 poods (about 17,000 metric 
tons) of copper, that means half of 
the total production of all Russia. Still 
further, the Ural region is one of the 
most important localities in Russia for 
the production of precious metals, and 
especially platinum. As far as this 
last metal is concerned, Russia has al- 
most a world monopoly. 

In the years 1912-1913 the Urals 
produced about 20% of the total pro- 
duction of gold in Russia. Russia pro- 
duced in 1913 about one-fifteenth of 
the total world production of gold. 
Russia's share in this respect can be 
largely increased through the develop- 
ment of new gold mines and the im- 
provement in the methods in gold pro- 
duction. 

The Caucasus can be mentioned as 
one of the richest parts of Russia. In 
addition to the large naphtha industry, 
which has won for itself an important 
place in the world market, the Cau- 
casus has one of the very largest de- 
posits of manganese and copper-ore, 
as well as deposits of silver and lead- 
ores. 

To show the important role which 
the Caucasus has played in the realm 
of Russian natural economy, the fol- 
lowing data are sufficient. The share 
of the Caucasus, in the total of each 




of the following products was: 
naphtha, about 85% ; copper - ore, 
about 31%; copper, about 30%; man- 
ganese-ore, about 70% ; silver and 
lead-ores, about 56% ; lead, about 
96% ; silver, about 24%. 

As regards Siberia, her natural re- 
sources are concentrated, for the most 
part, in the Altai Mountains, in the 
districts of Nerchinsk and Barguzinsk, 
in Ferghana, in the Yakutsk Province, 
in the Maritime Province, and on the 
Island of Sakhalin. 

Rich deposits of coal are found 
everywhere throughout Siberia. As 
far as gold is concerned, Siberia's 
share in Russia's gold production is 
about 80%. Rich deposits of silver, 
zinc, lead, tin, copper, pyrites, graph- 
ite, phosphate rock, mercuric ores, 
chromic ores, sulphur, semi-precious 
stones, rare metals (radium, vanadium, 
uranium), are to be found in very 
many places throughout Siberia. As 
regards forests, out of the 3,150,000,- 
000 acres of timber-land in Russia — 
2,700,000,000 acres, i.e. 86%, are in 
Siberia. 



THE PROBLEM I 



By E. MAE McGEE 

NOW that the war department has 
announced that the recruiting of- 
ficers have been instructed to make 
strenuous efforts to obtain enlistments 
for the Siberian expedition which is to 
sail July 26, it is, indeed, a problem 
to find the best methods of handling 
the Siberian trade. 

Congress has "power to regulate 
commerce with foreign nations." The 
numerous conditions under which ves- 
sels may fly the American flag, wireless 
equipment, life preservers, life boats, 
a definite limit to the number of pas- 
sengers, inspection of ships, etc. 

In this connection it may be sur- 
prising that the cost of our govern- 
ment exceeds $1,000,000,000 a year. 
But with this vast amount of money 
it is evident that we should have a 
United States academy for training 
diplomats as well as academies for 
training army and navy officers. Our 



August 19 19 



149 



SIA'S NATURAL RESOURCES 




BERIAN TRADE 



— 



diplomatic agents are not so well 
trained in foreign languages and in- 
ternational law as those of other coun- 
tries. 

The diplomatic service should be 
taken out of politics, as are the navy 
and army. It seems as needful to train 
men to prevent war as to train men 
make war. 

The railway that extends across Si- 
beria to the Pacific is the only one in 
this undeveloped eastern country. The 
great rivers are navigable and are the 
main highways of trade. Handicapped 
in so many ways, Siberia has pro- 
gressed very little commercially, as 
well as along other lines. The Rus- 
sian Empire comprises about one- 
seventh of the land surface of the 
earth, and Siberia is a large part of 
this great empire. 

Siberia trades with Moscow more 
than with any part of European Rus- 
sia. Irkutsk is the center of Siberia's 
inland trade. Vladivostok is the Pa- 



cific port and a great deal of its do- 
mestic commerce and practically all 
of its foreign commerce is through this 
port. 

More diplomacy is needed to deal 
with the Siberian situation. Our sales- 
men must become thoroughly conver- 
sant with this question. 

Siberia's needs and prejudices 
should be studied and the old adage, 
"Honesty is the best policy," should 
be strictly adhered to. Let America 
convince Russians that we are per- 
fectly honest and sincere in our deal- 
ings with Siberia. Bolshevism can be 
eradicated and eliminated in no bet- 
ter way than to establish confidence 
in America. 

No strategy is needed to deal with 
this important question — just honest, 
wise, business tact. And that is as- 
serting quite a lot, because the Sibe- 
rian trade question grows more com- 
plicated daily. America must endeavor 
to deal with this matter as successfully 
and as intelligently as she has with 
other problems if she expects to main- 
tain her exalted station among the na- 
tions commercially. 



Wealth 



\ CCORDING to careful calcula- 
l\. tions by Prof. Joseph M. Gold- 
stein, an investment of $56,450,000,000 
must be made in Russian railroad con- 
struction, agriculture, industries, pub- 
lic utilities, etc., during the next ten 
years, in order to bring Russia to the 
minimum of necessary economic de- 
velopment. Following are the main 
items in the table prepared by Prof. 
Goldstein : 

New Railroads — Ten years at about 
3,500 to 4,000 miles per year. Total 
35,000 to 40,000 miles at $150,000 
per mile $5,500,000,000 

New locomotives, new freight and 
passenger cars, repair of the old 
locomotives and ears 3,50,000,000 

Street-railways, subways, pavement 
of towns and cities, etc 3,000,000,000 

Public roads 1,500,000,000 

Inland river and canal improve- 
ments 4,000,000,000 

Improvements of ports 1,000,000,000 

Telephone and telegraph 1,000,000,000 

Water supply, sewerage and other 
hygienic improvements in towns 
and cities 2,000,000,000 

Central electric light and power sta- 
tions 4 2,000,000,000 

Public schools (7,500 primary and 
secondary schools in towns and ci- 
ties, at a cost of $60,000 to $100, 
000 each; and 100,000 rural schools, 
at a cost of $10,000 to $20,000 each 2,000,000,000 

Improvements in agricultural ma- 
chinery: 16,000,000 farms at $25 per 
year 4,000,000,000 

Improvements in cattle, poultry, 
stalls for cattle, etc.: 16,000,000 
farms at $25 per year 4,000,000,000 

Coal and coke, peat, iron and steel 

production 2,000,000,000 

Manufacture of agricultural, electri- 
cal and other machinery and im- 
plements 1,000,000,000 

Judging from the experience of the 
years preceding the war, it may be 
hoped that Russia herself will produce 
about half this sum. The remainder 
must come from abroad. It will come 
from abroad and especially from the 
United States, if the American people 
and their industrial and financial lead- 
ers will see the great opportunities 
lying before them in the great country 
in the East. 

o : — 

THERE are many bright pages in 
the economic past of Russia and 
a still brighter future lies before this 
great and rich country. 

The richest parts of Russia are al- 
ready in the hands of the anti-Bolshe- 
vist forces. Siberia and the Ural re- 
gion are controlled by the All-Russian 
Government in Omsk, led by Admiral 
Kolchak. The Northern Caucasus and 
the Basin of the Donetz are controlled 
by the Army of General Denikine, sub- 
ordinated to the All-Russian Govern- 
ment in Omsk. 

As soon as Russia finds herself — 
and she will find herself before long — 
she will need foreign capital for her 
development just as the United States 
needed it half a century ago. Russia's 
eyes turn to the United States. 



150 



Pan Pacific 




Must Place U. S. Foreign Trade 



NO politician, no matter how so noisy he may be, and 
often the emptiest vessels echo the loudest sounds, 
can ever again hope for advancement in America unless he 
stands on a political plank that places our Foreign Trade 
upon an equality with that of foreign competitors. 

We are on the earth and Ave must move with it or sink 
from sight like the microbes, incapable of creating, whose 
greatest powers are accomplished in the dark. 

Foreign Trade Clubs of America should begin NOW 
carving out that PLANK and see to it that it is inserted 
in every platform of our political parties in America. Let 
it ring true to the genuine instincts of America for the 
universal good that America is willing to and CAN do in 
the necessary business. 



$ 



$ 



WHY NOT THE PHILIPPINES? 

IT is interesting to note that while the United States is 
being encouraged by competitive powers to surrender 
the Philippines to the encroachments of maritime nations 
other COMPATRIOTS IN WAR are gobbling up all the 
strategical ports in the universe. 

The design is obvious. 

Let's recognize the situation without any further eva- 
sion of mind within our hoary old heads. 

The Philippines are much less capable of self govern- 
ment than Ireland ; and yet they ARE quite capable of 
looking out for themselves IF THE LEAGUE OF NA- 
TIONS IS NOT A MISNOMER AND TRAP. 

But if the League is to be what the activities of highly 
organized nations indicate it to be, THEN the Philippines, 
if left to themselves, will become the hewers of wood and 
drawers of water for more powerful races. They will 
never be developed. The people will ALWAYS remain in 
subjection and misery. 

UNLESS THE UNITED STATES DEVELOP THEM. 
And why the United States? Simply because the United 
States KNOWS how to develop a nation for its own good. 
It is not interested in suppressing the aspirations of the 
people. It has no IMPERIAL machinery to support by the 
device of poverty, ignorance, superstition — DEPENDENCE. 

It could not have survived ITSELF in the absence of 
development. 

It was railroads and telegraphs that did it. In their 
absence this country could never have been governed from 
Washington. It would have dissolved, as predicted by 
European observers, in the process of expansion. Nor 
could Germany have achieved its marvellous strength with- 
out its sensitively organized system of rail and telegraph 
communications. This is fundamental. 

So let us DEVELOP the Philippines — not permit their 
future exploitation. 

It will have a reciprocal advantage. It's a good Orien- 
tal base. In a highly organized state it will be a bulwark 



for peace and prosperity, and a standing guarantee that 
America means something in the economy of international 
life. 

$ $ $ 

CHINA AND THE IRISH QUESTION 

IN America there are millions sincerely attached to the 
principles enunciated by President Wilson in his cele- 
brated fourteen points pronunciamento. It was indeed the 
authoritive basis upon which American support was ac- 
cepted and volunteered when the United States redeemed 
the tottering cause of the allies by its very generous as- 
sistance and sacrifice. • Had it not been made absolutely 
certain that there would be no quibbling about these prin- 
ciples among our associates when we delivered a military 
decision to them there would not have been such unanimous 
approval of American prodigality of men, money and 
MIGHT in behalf of the allies. 

Now we observe a treaty that studiously dodges every 
vital issue in the original conception of national SELF- 
DETERMINATION and is as studiously assertive of EX- 
TRA-TERRITORIAL impositions as have ever been con- 
ceived since the Peace of Utrecht. 

Here we find Japan FOOLISHLY asserting CONTROL 
of a piece of China from which Germany has been kicked, 
- — and the treaty makers ' ' standing ' ' for it ! Here we find 
Italy, inflamed bj r Japan's success, demanding also a "con- 
cession" in China. Both point to Hong Kong and Shang- 
hai and Saigon as lingering reminders that FOREIGNERS 
still cling to their old pre-war exactions in the Chinese Re- 
public and exhibit little disposition to cultivate the prin- 
ciples of self-determination in China or any other country 
where a footing can be carved, captured or carbined. 

All this means nothing but WAR as soon as tired hu- 
manity becomes sufficiently rested to get mad again. It 
may take a period of twenty years, but no longer; so all 
this talk of a League of Nations, under such provoking 
certainties of international hatreds, is either nonsense or 
the propaganda of an international war syndicate in pro- 
cess of erection. 

Furthermore, the retention of Ireland against her 
wishes by the ARMED authority of Great Britain, is noth- 
ing but NAVAL STRATEGY pure and simple in the first 
instance and, in the next instance, an AUTHORATIVE in- 
dorsement of Japan's policy at Shantung. 

In COMBINATION the co-ordination of the two policies 
is simply a proclamation to the world that neither England 
nor Japan take any stock in our present covenant of 
PEACE. If they do they are taking mighty good care to 
"cover" their confidence by gathering in all the strategical 
positions essential to self protection regardless of the other 
fellow's feelings. 

And we had sincerely HOPED that there was sucli a 
thing as GRATITUDE and sincerity among aspiring hu- 
man beings. We did believe that a drowning crew had 



August 19 19 



151 




On Equality With Competitors 



some regard for the wishes of their deliverer; but it seems 
that humanity is HUMAN still, and that the Chinese and 
Irish questions wlil remain the festering stilettos in the 
side of an emasculated Peace until the race again, in its 
struggle for emancipation, resorts to war, — inconceivably 
horrible and hellish ! 

It would seem that the common sense of civilization 
should intervene to prevent such meditated courage, — such 
suicidal mania in a world grown sick of war. 

$ $ $ 
HOW SOME POLITICIANS HOLD ON 

IN some of our neighboring mock-republics is witnessed 
the spectacle of a man screwed into executive office like 
the old "fixtures" 
of the Common 
Law. They never 
resign and seldom 
die. And they 
often exhibit the 
appearance of na- 
tional benefactors 
and popular he- 
roes. 

, They are seldom 
either. 

Grafters by in- 
stinct, buccaneers 
by profession, sy- 
cophants by edu- 
cation and retain- 
ers by choice they 
are the mortal 

i enemies of their 
misguided people 
when they sell to 
the foreign ex- 
ploiters of their 
tive land, 
ec e n 1 1 y we 
v e witnessed 
the expulsion of 

I one set of officials 
and the installa- 
tion of another in one of our southern "republics" at the 
behest of a large shipping concern of foreign origin. Ap- 
parently it satisfied the impulses of the native population. 
In reality it was a cut-and-dried scheme of the foreign 
exploiters to gain CONTROL of the strategical harbors that 
would paralyze competition and perpetuate a monopoly 
from which nothing but HOSTILITY toward America 
among the native population would grow. 

It is a fine piece of propaganda for the rivals of the 
United States. 



And the beauty of the thing is that the CREATURE of 
the corporation, the "great-and-good-man" in office is con- 
gratulated by our politicians for making American activi- 
ties and investments in neighboring countries a sort of 
"first aid" to the down-and-outs of Janus-headed co- 
partners of American self-deception and gratuitous 
prodigality. 

In a future issue of Pan Pacific we shall give the his- 
tory of some of these political mountebanks and the forces 
back of them with offices in the United States and HEAD- 
QUARTERS in hostile countries. We will give the names 
of BANK DIRECTORS and their satelites in trade. It 
will be an interesting picture, — with plenty of dramatic ac- 
tion, to keep the reader awake. It will also be TIMELY, 
in view of the many conflicting opinions we are receiving 

from interested 
quarters upon the 
deceptive attrib- 
utes of "self-de- 
termination." 
$ $ $ 



3 




PUBLICITY 
NEEDED 



R 



(By Orr in Ch 
ALL SET FOR WO 



ECENT trav- 
ellers in the 
Orient have re- 
turned with Al- 
ladin-like reports 
of the marvellous 
o p p o r t unities 
awaiting Ameri- 
can enterprise and 
capital throughout 
Asia. Surprise is 
expressed by some 
of these that so 
little is known on 
this side of the Pa- 
cific of the won- 
derful industrial 
and trading needs 
of Siberia, China, 
India and the Far 
East. The opinion 
frequently has been expressed by returning travellers that 
lack of advertising has left us comparatively ignorant of 
trade conditions across the Pacific. - 

These assert that if Asia had been advertised as persist- 
ently and as intelligently as Latin America has been fea- 
tured during the last fifteen to eighteen years a far greater 
portion of our overseas trading would have been across the 
ocean. It is true that since 1914 our trade with the Far 
East has increased from 13 to 18 per cent of our total, while 
that with Latin America has increased since 1905 18 to 19%. 



icago Tribune) 
RLD TRADE RACE 



152 



Pan Pacific 



Investment Opportunities 
In Mexico Sugar Industry 



OWING to destruction of some of 
the eane sugar producing fac- 
tories in the State of Morelos, but re- 
cently freed from the grip of the ban- 
dit Zapata, and to rebel activities in 
the State of Vera Cruz, the production 
of sugar in Mexico during the last few 
years has been considerably reduced — ■ 
so much so that in 1918 it was neces- 
sary to import thousands of tons from 
Cuba to make up the amount needed 
for domestic consumption. In 1911, 
before the revolution, the production 
of Mexican sugar amounted to 160,000 
tons. 

The sugar mills are, however, re- 
suming operations in many parts of 
Mexico, and present prospects are for 
a crop of 115,000 tons for 1919-20. In 
the west coast states of Sonora and 
Sinaloa, where the irrigated sugar 
plantations of the Almeda Co., the 
Redo Co., and the United Sugar Com- 
panies (American) are located, rebel 
activities have had hardly any effect 
upon operations, which were only in- 
terfered with once, in 1916, by a Villis- 
ta raid. 

The Custotolaman sugar mill on the 
San Juan river in the state of Vera 
Cruz is running, and so are the fol- 
lowing sugar mills: Oaxaquena mill at 
Santa Lucrecia, Vera Cruz, the Santa 
Fe mill at Tlacotalpan, the Paraiso 
Novillero mill and the Motzorongo 
mill, both in the state of Vera Cruz. 

Planning to Extend 
Present Sugar Plant 

One of the leading sugar mills in the 
state of Oaxoca is that at Niltepec, on 
the Pan American Railway. The an- 
nual production of this plantation and 
mill is 1,000 to 1,500 tons of white 
sugar and 100,000 to 125,000 liters of 
alcohol of 96 per cent. The company 
is at present planning to extend its 
plant in order to increase its output 
to 3,000 tons of sugar a year. An- 
other sugar mill and plantation in the 
same state are located in Laolloag, 
producing each year about 300 metric 
tons of sugar, although capable of 
turning out 1,000 metric tons. A third 
company owns a plantation in Mixte- 
quilla, about four kilometers from Te- 
huantepec. The output of this state 
ranges between 160 and 165 metric 
tons a year. 

As a result of my recent tour 
through Mexico I met N. A. Helmer, a 
New York engineer, who specializes in 
sugar machinery, and who was down 
there making an extensive investiga- 
tion regarding the conditions sur- 



By P. HARVEY MIDDLETON 
Author of "Powerful Foreign Trade 
Combinations of Europe," "New 
Railways in Strange Lands," 
"Foreign Trade in Railway 
Supplies, " " Railway Sup- 
plies in Mexico," etc. 

rounding the operation of the irrigated 
sugar plantations of the United Sugar 
Companies located at Los Mochis, 
state of Sinaloa, about 600 miles south 
of Nogales, Ariz., and fourteen miles 
south of the port of Topolobampo, 
which is the terminus of the Kansas 
City, Mexico and Orient Railroad. 

There are two different plants at 
Los Mochis known as the Agrila and 
the Mochis, the acreage of the two 
plantations being about 140,000 acres, 
approximately one-tenth of which is 
under cultivation. The cane grown 
here is mostly a purple variety, fairly 
straight with a rind exceedingly hard 
and high fibre content never less than 
12 per cent and sometimes as high as 
16 per cent. Cultivation is largely car- 
ried on with traction engines, al- 
though mules and oxen are also used. 

Market For Products 
Is Entirely Mexican 

The labor is largely Indian and Mex- 
ican, housed in colonies located near 
the points where they are employed. 
To induce labor to remain supplies are 
sold at cost or less from the commis- 
saries operated by the company. There 
are two irrigating plants affording an 
ample water supply, the system of 
canals being complete and highly op- 
erated. 

The market for the products of 
these plantations is entirely Mexican. 
They grow about 25 tons of sugar to 
the acre, yielding about 10 per cent of 
white sugar and about three gallons 
of alcohol to the ton of cane — the al- 
cohol being about 9 per cent anhyd- 
rous. Manufacturing costs are about 
$12 per ton. 

The market for sugar is along the 
west coast to Mazatlan and large 
quantities are shipped north to No- 
gales thence in bond to El Paso and 
Laredo as distributing points to Cen- 
tral and Eastern Mexico. The market 
does not demand an extremely high 
grade of sugar. Only one grade is 
produced, namely, a fine grained hard 
cube sugar sold in paper lined sacks. 

In talking over political conditions 
in the districts visited by Mr. Helmer, 
he said : ' ' My observations have led me 
to believe that the newspaper reports 
of outrages are exaggerated and that 



the conditions are far better than 
those existing twenty-five years ago 
in Kansas or other poorly policed ag- 
ricultural states of the West. I be- 
lieve that conditions in Mexico would 
improve rapidly as soon as our gov- 
ernment assists Mexico by permitting 
the introduction of military supplies 
on the distinct understanding that ef- 
fective repressive measures are to be 
undertaken against brigandage of any 
description, so as to permit the de- 
mobilization of a portion of the labor 
now in military service." 

Equipment Needed 
by the Plantations 

The equipment needed by the sugar 
industry includes evaporating machin- 
ery, such as vacuum pans and multiple 
effect evaporators, boilers, pumps, pip- 
ing, valves, fittings, fire brick, struc- 
tural steel for buildings, tank material, 
distilling machinery, cotton and jute 
sacks for sugar, cans (and boxes to 
contain them) for alcohol, casks, coop- 
erage machinery, electrical machinery 
for lighting and power, hydro electric 
machinery, plantation railroad equip- 
ment, mechanical plowing equipment, 
agricultural tools, live stock, chemicals 
for clarification of sugar juices, office 
equipment, and internal combustion 
motors. 

The sugar industry in Mexico offers 
one of the most productive opportuni- 
ties for the investment of American 
capital and the introduction of modern 
machinery. Mexico is in many respects 
an ideal sugar producing country, and 
it might rank with Cuba if as much 
attention were given to the crop in 
the one country as in the other. 

Sugar cane grows in practically 
every state in the republic, and it is 
due to the primitive methods employed 
that Mexico has not entered more 
largely into the sugar export trade. 
Plantations of sugar cane covering in 
all hundreds of thousands of acres 
exist in the states of Puebla, Morelos, 
Vera Cruz, Oaxaca, Sonora and Sina- 
loa. 

Industry Carried On 
By Wealthy and Poor 

The industry is at present carried on 
both by the wealthy planter, with his 
hundreds of thousands of dollars in- 
vested in lands and refineries, and by 
the poor renter, with his few acres of 
ground, his wooden rolls and copper 
kettle. The rich man produces the re- 
fined white sugar, and the poor man 
produces the various classes of brown 
sugar, known in Mexico as "pilonicil- 
lo" and "panocha," which when fresh 
resemble maple sugar, and which are 
used to sweeten beverages. 

Lands on the elevated levels yield 
less but richer cane than those on the 
lowlands, and attempts in recent years 
to grow the sugar cane on the plateau 
have met with decided suecess. From 
twenty-five to forty tons of cane per 
acre is stated to be the average yield 



August 19 19 



153 



Mobilize Our Soldiers 

For Overseas Commerce 



I 



By HERBERT J. SPINDEN 

— o — 

THE rapid expansion of German 
trade in the decade before the 
great war was largely due to the size 
and personnel of German commercial 
colonies in foreign lands. 

Young men, trained in the details of 
buying and selling and of collecting 
and distributing, were encouraged to 
make their start in new lands as part 
of the German scheme to obtain and 
hold trade. In some countries they 
were even advised to intermarry with 
the strongest native families in order 
to strengthen the bonds of business 
with those of blood. And, although 
Germany is today beaten in her own 
territory, her foreign trade organiza- 
tions throughout the world are prac- 
tically unimpaired. 

While it is to be hoped that Amer- 
icans will never sink to the more cyn- 
ical devices of the Huns in commerce, 
still we can hardly succeed in foreign 
markets unless we follow them in hav- 
ing nationals on the ground to repre- 
sent us. Only Americans can adver- 
tise American goods and business 
methods. Moreover, we have as much 
to learn about our prospective custom- 
ers as they have about us. 

Mobilize the Soldiers 
For Overseas Commerce 

Young men who have drunk deep 
of adventure, who have seen visions 
beyond the skyline of other days, are 
returning home from France. To 
many of these the old life, once the joy 
of home coming has passed, will prove 
all but intolerable. The groove of 
farm or factory will be too narrow. 
But we may mobilize these new ad- 
venturers for a great and necessary 
service at the four ends of the earth. 

At this time our business houses 
which have foreign departments, or 
which intend to create them, should be 
prevailed upon to mobilize to the full- 
est their forces for foreign service, in 
Latin America, China, Russia, the Far 
East. Many young men are now re- 
urning to America who have "found 
hemselves" in trying months on the 
attle line. 



As commissioned or non-commis- 
sioned officers, some of these have been 
successful in handling other men, all 
have learned to obey orders, and have 
had two years of discipline. The pres- 
tige of having been part of the success- 
ful American Army that put the quietus 
upon the hopes of Germany will give 
these men social standing in a new 
community and their youth will make 
it easy for them to learn foreign lan- 
guages and adapt themselves to for- 
eign modes of life. 

Cause of Failures 
In Foreign Trade 

In the past there has been a very 
high percentage of failure among 
Americans sent into foreign lands. 
The causes of this failure are three- 
fold: First, the lack of proper techni- 
cal training; second, the inability to 
view sympathetically the habits of 
thought and modes of life that prevail 
in foreign countries ; third, moral re- 
laxation, which often results in loss 
of caste and national pride. 

As regards the first of these causes 
of failure, the war experience of many 
men has at least given them the be- 
ginning of an education in transporta- 
tion, an important branch of commer- 
cial service that cannot be learned in 
books. Members of the Quartermas- 
ter's staff have had to contend with 
port and railroad facilities differing 
from those in the United States. But 
the great handicap of ignorance of 
commercial usage in distant markets 
that might be urged against these men 
is really the common handicap of 
nearly every one in the United States. 

Commercial education here is either 
on a plane much lower than in Ger- 
many, or it is on such a high and 
academic plane that it attracts few 
students. Many so-called "business 
schools" are run without other con- 
sideration than to make money for 
their owners. 

Trade a Profession 
In Many Countries 

In Germany, and to a lesser extent 
in other European countries, foreign 



trade is a profession, and professional 
training is regarded as an antecedent 
condition for it. Commercial and in- 
dustrial schools have support from lo- 
cal and central governments, and are 
freed from the evils of exploitation. 
If our standard for commercial and 
industrial schools were raised to that 
for our schools of mining, civil, elec- 
trical, and mechanical engineering, to 
say nothing of the liberal arts, we 
should be able to meet all competitors. 

But while such a hoped-for condi- 
tion is being brought about we cannot 
be idle. At least one of the larger 
American houses engaged in foreign 
banking and investment is schooling 
its own men. Unfortunately, this 
method of meeting the situation is be- 
yond the average house that wishes to 
extend its activities. A careful selec- 
tion for foreign representatives made 
from returned soldiers who have had 
previous commercial experience in the 
United States will probably give good 
results in many instances. 

The second principal cause for fail- 
ure in the past among Americans who 
have been sent abroad has been incom- 
patibility. It seems strange that in 
the United States, which draws its 
population from the four corners of 
the world, there should be something 
that inhibits international sympathy. 

"Wear Good -Will 
Upon Their Sleeves" 

But there are Americans who have 
the gift of being what our Latin neigh- 
bors call "simpatico." Such persons 
wear good-will upon their sleeve, 
where it cannot be overlooked, and, 
whether their lot is cast in business 
or diplomacy, they make friends for 
the United States while they make 
friends for themselves. Almost al- 
ways they are persons who pick up 
languages and details of etiquette 
quickly. 

Among the 2,000,000 American 
youths who have passed through Eng- 
land and France there must be a great 
number who have discovered this en- 
gaging quality of sympathy. Other 
things being equal, they will make the 
best soldiers in the army of commer- 
cial penetration. 

The third cause for failure among 
Americans who seek their fortunes 
outside the United States is moral 
degradation that results from the 
change in their mode of life. In many 

(Continued on next page) 



on the elevated plantations and from 
forty to sixty tons in the tropical 
lands. The cane, especially on the 
Gulf slope, grows to an enormous size, 
and does not need a heavy outlay for 
its irrigation and cultivation. 

It is safe to say that not more than 
ten per cent of the land available in 
Mexico for the planting of sugar cane 
is utilized. There is a large field in 
the country for the best class of re- 



fining factories, although before the 
revolution there were over two thou- 
sand sugar mills in Mexico, large and 
small. There is a tendency to increase 
the acreage under cultivation and to 
modernize the methods in the refining 
of the raw material. 

It is in large scale operation that 
real money is to be made in Mexican 
sugar. For a plantation having 6,000 
acres in cane, with the proper machin- 



ery, buildings, the working capital 
should be about $1,250,000, exclusive 
of the land. Such a plantation would 
handle about 1,000 tons of cane a day 
of twenty-four hours. They would 
probably grind about 120 days in a 
year, which would mean that they 
would have to raise 120,000 tons of 
cane. The average cost of cane in 
Mexico should not exceed $2.50 a ton 
delivered to the factory. 



154 



Pan Pacific 



JUST prior to the cessation of hos- 
tilities between Germany and the 
Allies, the export business between the 
United States and Japan was flourish- 
ing to an extent that was unbeliev- 
able. The situation was that any com- 
modity, from junk to locomotives, was 
avidly sought by our cross-Pacific al- 
lies. 

November 11, 1918, brought peace 
to a harrassed world and also, unfor- 
tunately, brought with it a tremendous 
slump in the Oriental market. Japan, 
buying in great volume at high prices, 
found herself confronted with a vast 
wealth of almost every imaginable 
commodity, for which her outlet was 
at one fell stroke stopped. 

On the other hand, American firms 
were forced to cancel contracts for 
steamer space and merchandise, and to 
warehouse goods, that with the coming 
of peace were virtually a drug upon 
the market. 

Many importing and exporting 
houses of both Japan and the United 
States which, mushroom-like, had 
sprung up in a night, were forced to 
suspend, and others were keeping open 
only by virtue of patiently waiting for 
the dark clouds of business depression 
to roll by. 

In Japan thousands of firms closed 
their doors, and offerings of goods 
from this side, made by merchants 
anxious to dispose of goods even at an 
actual loss, were ignored. Some firms 
who had contracted to ship merchan- 
dise during late 1918 and early 1919 
were in bad straits through wholesale 
cancellations. 

Exporters meeting exporters would 
indulge in mutual condolence as to the 
state of business rather than in mutual 
felicitations as to "the big order just 
landed." 

Making matters worse was the fact 
that while foreign trade from the coast 
was at a practical standstill, rail and 
steamer rates continued high for long 
periods, and so, when at last through 
the medium of the United States Ship- 
ping Board, steamer bookings could be 
obtained at a reasonable figure, ves- 
sels were leaving coast ports light or 
were berthed for long periods await- 
ing cargo that would make their trip , 
profitable. 

It seemed like an inconceivable 
nightmare that foreign trade should be 
thus paralyzed in this manner. All 
knew that the armistice must bring a 
natural drop in prices and in volume 
of business enjoyed, but none dreamt 
that this condition would be effected 
to the extent that it was. 

Blithe, young brokers, figuring on 
purchasing limousines, and who, with 
the golden harvest of war time orders 
were feeling like potential millionaires, 
were gloomily speculating upon the se- 
curance of the next months' office 
rent. 



The Armistice 

and 

The Orient 



By ARTHUR RUDE 
o 

Iron, steel and industrial chemicals 
were the largest items of export, and 
these three took the worst drop. As 
an illustration of this condition let us 
bring to your attention the industrial 
chemical known as light soda ash. 

During the war the cost of this 
chemical was approximately $3.00 per 
hundred pounds, F. 0. B. eastern fac- 
tory, and with added freight, insur- 
ance and warehousing this price was 
brought up to about $5.00 per hundred 
pounds at San Francisco. With the 
coming of the armistice this item 
brought little more than $1.60 per 
hundred at San Francisco, bringing, 
when sold, little more than the rail 
freight paid to transport it from fac- 
tory to coast. 

It is encouraging to note that de- 
spite this business debacle, one very 
seldom heard regret as to the cause of 
same ; sadness there was indeed that 
business should be dormant, but rare 
indeed was the man who did not re- 
joice that four years of slaughter and 
travail should be ended, even though 
at the expense of his personal inter- 
ests. 

The situation as described continued 
in the first four months of 1919, and 
it is only recently that foreign trade 
has resumed an upward climb. Trade 



conditions with the Orient are now 
rapidly approaching what may be 
termed as "very good," and the feel- 
ing of commercial uneasiness as to the 
future has vanished. 

Market conditions in Japan are as- 
suming a favorable aspect, due to the 
gradual depletion of stock of merchan- 
dise held there. "Gradual inquiries" 
are becoming "gradual orders," and 
the next few months should witness 
a resumption of stabilized business. 

Aside from the statements of repre- 
sentative exporters as to this business 
improvement, this is borne out by the 
fact that steamer space is tightening 
and is not so free, for the scarcity or 
surplus of trans-Pacific cargo space is 
the export barometer working in in- 
verse ratio ; for poor business means 
ample steamer space and good, the op- 
posite. 

Industrial chemicals are still weak, 
but becoming more firm, while metal 
products are moving nicely, with the 
usual run of miscellaneous export ship- 
ments at about normal. Westbound 
from the Orient the situation is even 
more encouraging, as nuts, vegetable 
oils, albumen, camphor, foodstuffs, 
etc., are in great demand, with a firm 
and rising market. 

It is the writer's firm belief that the 
next six months will show a triple vol- 
ume of business, as compared with the 
first months of 1919, this applying both 
to and from the Orient. Of course, it 
cannot be expected that .the evil ef- 
fects of four years of world war can 
be eradicated in four months, and all 
things being considered, the situation 
is first rate. 

In conclusion, it should be stated 
that the time is past for saying "busi- 
ness is poor"; so now say BUSINESS 
IS GOOD— and then make it BET- 
TER. 



Mobilizing the Soldiers for Trade 

(Continued from page 153) 



countries the restraints put upon 
young men are much less than in the 
United States, and the restraints put 
upon young women are much greater. 
Freed from home ties and from the 
fear of criticism by acquaintances, 
Americans abroad often fall into easy 
ways of living, and then, not infre- 
quently, in a last flare of chivalry, 
marry native women far below them 
in the social scale. 

These men soon find themselves 
caught in a social matrix from which 
there is no escape. But the moral 
dangers largely disappear when Amer- 
icans are concentrated in sufficient 
numbers to provide society for one 
another, and especially when Amer- 
ican women are also present. In gen- 
eral, it is a wise precaution for busi- 
ness houses to provide that their rep- 
resentatives, especially those who are 
unmarried, shall have terms of service 
alternately abroad and at home. 



From these considerations it seems 
to follow that we should provide a bet- 
ter technical training for our youths 
who care to enter foreign trade, pre- 
ferably through an addition to our 
public school system, but that, in the 
meantime, we should use the best ma- 
terials at hand and not delay to es- 
tablish ourselves strongly in foreign 
lands. 

As regards the special features of 
the desired instruction, mention should 
be made of languages, especially Span- 
ish and French ; of geography and his- 
tory, both political and commercial; 
of economics, of transportation, of ex- 
change, banking, and commercial law, 
and of bookkeeping, stenography, etc. 
It might be possible to provide men 
deficient in certain lines, but other- 
wise qualified, with books and man- 
uals for home study. 



August 19 19 



155 



Preparing for Foreign Trade 



(Continued from page 141) 



China is not so well organized, 
either socially, industrially or polit- 
ically ; nor is it up to the desired living 
standards of Russia even now; fur- 
thermore, its present opportunities are 
confined if not monopolized. This con- 
stitutes a barrier against competitive 
endeavor in the absence of new stand- 
ards and will become a lingering 
cause of industrial repression, if not 
of international hostility and financial 
instability, that will sterilize the pur- 
chasing power of the Chinese race and 
threaten the development of trade. 
This will mean either diplomatic bri- 
gandage or military force from with- 
out, organized banditti and raiding 
from within, and perpetuate race- 
hatreds against and among ALL in- 
terveners who attempt to restore the 
economic equilibrium. 






Resources Unlimited 
In Russia in Asia 



Asiatic Russia does NOT display, 
even in her present MISREPRE- 
SENTED state, such an unattractive 
prospect to the aggressive foreign 
trader. Her resources are unlimited. 
She has gold BY THE TON securely 
in her vaults. Her agricultural and 
industrial and banking organizations 
and co-operative agencies are incom- 
prehensively RICH. 

Her people have recently organized 
free schools by the THOUSANDS, 
with over FIFTY THOUSAND volun- 
teer teachers, scattered through every 
i village and hamlet and city, dispens- 
ing the EDUCATION that has always 
been DEMANDED and never before 
known among these enterprising and 
| highly moral altruists who compose 
the finest specimens of honesty and 
: chivalry that the Caucasian race pre- 
sents. 

England recognizes this, and this 
very moment, although knee-deep in 
debt to America, is not bothering her 
head about the exchange value of the 
ruble, but is digging into that market 
as deeply as she can. 

France recognizes this, and notwith- 
standing her crippled condition and 
her inability to pay America a cent on 
what she borrowed, is right now 
plunging into Turkestan, the Crimea, 
and the rich fields of the Kurgan, and 
rushing breathlessly back to Marseilles 
and Lyons with mountains of silk and 
bristles and grain and fiber and wool 
to convert into fabrics and brushes 
and gew-gaws that Americans will 
ultimately absorb with the gusto and 
complacency of spendthrifts who re- 
joice in being fleeced. 

There is considerable ART in this. 
Art always recognizes the good, the 



noble and the true. France gets the 
good wares of Russia, retails them to 
the NOBLE men and women of Amer- 
ica, for the TRUE reason that she 
recognizes the profitable probability 
in the present organized incapacity of 
Americans to exercise the precaution- 
ary rudiments of international trade ! 
Even Tea Merchants 
Rushing Back to Russia 
Equally true is this among the mer- 
chants and bankers of Japan and 
Sweden and unobtrusive little Hol- 
land. And even the tea merchants of 
China are rushing back to Asiatic Rus- 
sia, WHERE THEY NEVER LOST A 
TAEL, while ALL NATIONS ARE 
LAUGHING at the AMERICAN 
SUPERSTITION respecting the evap- 
orative characteristics of the innocent 



quence the little we do get will pos- 
sess the real merit of soundness and 
common horse sense. 

Nowhere can it be better displayed 
than in our State Department, if we 
get the right men — men who REALIZE 
that it is the DUTY of the govern- 
ment to hereafter PROTECT the 
rights, the trade and the INVEST- 
MENTS of its citizens in ALL parts 
of the world — men who KNOW that 
PEACE and profit have a twin-birth 
among a people who keep progressive 
and well informed. 

Oriental Conditions 
Affected by the War 

The cry of "Bolshevism" whenever 
the name of Russia is mentioned is 
very largely intended for American 
consumption. It has a decidedly for- 
eign accent. It issues mainly from the 
countries that are already FIRMLY 
ESTABLISHED in China and is in- 
tended to dissuade Americans from 
contending for the unparalleled op- 
portunities offered in Russia until 



. 







MORE THAN HALF OF THE COAL CONSUMED ON EARTH IS TAKEN OUT OF THE 

MINES OF AMERICA 



little ruble that has terrorized our 
brave and gallant and marvellously 
puissant race ! 

Now the reason for all this commer- 
cial poltroonery, this miopic disre- 
gard of economic caution, this her- 
metically-sealed industrial vapidity 
that stutters its idiotic ineptities and 
inanities from the counting room to 
the gravel pits of America, is to be 
FOUND in the uncivilized insularity 
and illuminated IGNORANCE among 
people renowned for common sense. 

The best REMEDY for such an im- 
potent and short-sighted policy is the 
prescribed educational course here sug- 
gested which should be made COM- 
PULSORY upon all candidates for 
public office and such other persons 
Avho assume an ex-cathedra preroga- 
tive to advise and legislate against the 
best interests of their country. Such 
a course will, at least, keep them up- 
to-the-minute on the concatenation of 
human events, and if it does have 
a tendency to stop the flow of elo- 



such foreign traders are as firmly es- 
tablished there. 

Being a peaceful nation and always 
RESTRAINED from foreign activities 
by the absence of governmental sup- 
port or encouragement, the American 
people accept the retarding propa- 
ganda of their COMPETITORS re- 
specting foreign conditions as the 
GOSPEL TRUTH. The purpose as 
well as the result is criminally destruc- 
tive to the best interests of the world, 
for the CREED of Europe finds its 
only eulogy on battlefields and its fit- 
test elegy among the tombs of slaugh- 
tered men. Nothing has ever flowed 
from its sepulchral and deceptive ava- 
rice but an epidemic of hate-inflaming 
poverty to ossify the heart of industry 
and desolate the haunts of men. 

The very staples of the world that 
Europe has arbitrarily established tell 
a tale of nothing but MONOPOLY and 
greed. The very soils of earth that 
might be utilized by men to develop 

(Concluded on page 163) 



156 



Pan Pacific 




EXPORTERS and importers of Los 
Angeles are coming to a realiza- 
tion of the value of having potential 
customers make personal calls. 
Through the Foreign Trade Club and 
the Los Angeles Chamber of Com- 
merce those who select commodities 
are given to understand that they will 
be welcomed and extended every cour- 
tesy while in Southern California on 
commercial missions. 

The influx of representatives of for- 
eign houses, following the cessation of 
hostilities, has been steadily increas- 
ing. It was the first comers who 
brought Los Angeles dealers to real- 
ize the importance of such business, 
and these same trail blazers in for- 
eign trade paved the way for the re- 
ception of others. They also are carry- 
ing out the news to the world that 
there are decided advantages in a per- 
sonal visit to the port of Los Angeles. 
Elaborate Selection 
For Overseas' Buyers 

The buyer from the Orient, Austral- 
asia or the Latin-American countries 
is not only assured of every courtesy 
from Southern California dealers, but 
he may feel safe in finding as elaborate 
a selection as in any Pacific Coast 
city. Following the natural law of 
supply and demand, Los Angeles— one 
of the ten most populous cities in the 
United States— is a market for prac- 
tically everything that passes out or 
in its port. As approximately 90 per 
cent of exports from Pacific Coast 
cities of the United States come from 
east of the Rocky mountains, the buyer 
in Los Angeles is at no disadvantage. 
He is nearer to 65 per cent of the 
great producing area of the United 
States than in any other west coast 
city, at a port that is one of the 
main stations of the Sunshine Route 
around the world, foreseen years ago 
by the late James J. Hill. 

In the matter of commodities pro- 
duced west of the Rocky mountains, 
Los Angeles also is most favorably 
located. The city and contiguous ter- 
ritory are credited with $378,000,000 
of manufactured products annually. 
It is the central point for the great 
oil industry, which has an annual pro- 
duction of 100,000,000 barrels. Oil and 
its by-products are exported largely 
from this point. 

In Heart of Fruit 
Producing World 

In foodstuffs the visiting buyer may 
fairly revel. He will find he is in the 



By MORRIS M. RATHBUN 
Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce 
— o — 
heart of that part of the world which 
produces 100 per cent of the commer- 
cial lemon crop and also 100 per cent 
of the dried fig crop of the United 
States. A buyer in Los Angeles has 
access to 98 per cent of the almonds; 
96 per cent of the walnuts; 95 per 
cent of the olives; 97 per cent of the 
apricots ; 79 per cent of the oranges ; 
51 per cent of the beans; 41 per cent 
of the cantaloupes; 31 per cent of the 
peaches; 29 per cent of the onions and 
20 per cent of the barley grown in 
the United States. 

These percentages will be closely 
followed in the manufactured by- 
products of the foodstuffs mentioned. 

The center of the sea food industry 
also will be found here by the buyer. 
Canneries line the south coast line and 
annually add millions of pounds of 
canned sardines, tuna and albacore to 
the world's supply. 

Clay products, cement, clothing, 
mill products, food preparations, fur- 
niture, lumber products, paints, petrol- 
eum, chemical ores, meats, sugar, 
structural steel and oil well supplies 
are produced locally, so that the buyer 
may make personal inspection of these 
purchases. 

City Owns Big Part 
of Its Harbor Lands 

The city, which owns the greater 
part of the harbor lands, has some 
$6,000,000 available for immediate 
water front development, designed to 
facilitate shipping. One of the steps 
contemplated immediately is the erec- 
tion of a high density cotton compress, 
to prepare Southern California's crop 
of this staple for overseas shipment, 
at a port near to the fields where the 
cotton is grown. 

Buyers visiting Los Angeles also 
have the advantage of meeting per- 
sonally those who will handle their 
shipments. In view of future trade 
relations which it is expected will be 
permanent, this item is worthy of con- 
sideration-. All leading steamship 
companies operating in the Pacific 
have been furnished adequate data 
concerning Los Angeles harbor and 
the character of cargoes that may be 
expected to develop here, and most of 
the companies have sent their own 
representatives to compile this infor- 
mation. 

Many of the personal visits were 
brought about through invitations ex- 



tended by the Los Angeles Chamber 
of Commerce, which has an active For- 
eign Trade Department devoted to ex- 
tending trade through the most prac- 
tical methods. A surprising number 
responded to the request to come and 
make personal inspection of the har- 
bor facilities, and it would appear that 
buyers might act to advantage in sim- 
ilar capacities for the interests they 
represent. 

Inspect the Territory 
From Which Goods Come. 

The desirability of having represen- 
tatives inspect personally the terri- 
tory from which foreign trade prod- 
ucts emanate has been emphasized 
rapidly recently. Buyers who have 
made this territory for the first time 
have made discoveries decidedly to 
their advantage commercially. They 
have learned that in trading in vari- 
ous commodities they can shorten dis- 
tances of shipping. They require high 
grade goods and cut various little 
corners of bartering without suffering 
any disadvantage to offset their gains. 

There is another incentive for buy- 
ers to come to Los Angeles, which, 
while not strictly commercial, may well 
be given consideration. That is the 
charm of the city. Tourists for years 
have flocked by thousands to South- 
ern California, and its appeal is pe- 
culiarly powerful to residents of Latin- 
American countries and the Orient, 
who are accustomed to climatic con- 
ditions more nearly resembling those 
of Los Angeles than they may find in 
any of the other ports of the country. 

There is a fascination in the history 
of Los Angeles for all Spanish speak- 
ing people, as California's first set- 
tlers were the Spanish padres, who 
blazed the state's first trail from San 
Diego to the Oregon line, establishing 
a chain of missions the entire distance. 
Although all of them are more than 
a century old, many of those missions 
are still used as places of worship. 

Climatic conditions are favorable to 
semi-tropical verdure, so that resi- 
dents of many of the Latin-American 
countries find themselves amidst con- 
ditions that, though foreign to them, 
are nearly like what they have been 
accustomed to. 

Summing up, it may be said that the 
buyer visiting Los Angeles will find all 
advantages that he may enjoy in other 
coast cities and many that are distinc- 
tive of Los Angeles. 



August 19 19 



THE PORT OF LOS ANGELES 

Offers the Best Port Facilities and the Lowest Port Charges of Any 
Port on the Pacific Coast — Possibly in America — Both to 

SHIPPERS AND STEAMSHIP COMPANIES 

NO RENT whatever is charged to steamships for preferential berth assignments at Los 
Angeles Municipal Piers. Only a dockage charge is made against the ship, and this is very low, 
— $15.00 a day for a ship of 2,100 net tons, and one-half cent per net ton above that figure. 
Thus a ship of 3,000 net tons, five days at the wharf, would pay a total of $97.50 — and this 
would be the only charge against the ship. It would pay no rent whatever. 

THE CARGO pays a wharfage charge varying from 2 Yl cents to 1 cents a ton, de- 
pending upon the commodity, BUT THIS INCLUDES THIRTY DAYS FREE STORAGE ON 
FOREIGN EXPORTS. In other words, a ship has 30 days time to accumulate a foreign 
cargo, without storage charges. The cargo pays wharfage at rates varying from 2 Yl to ' 
cents a ton, and the ship pays a small dockage only for the time it is actually at the wharf. 




PORT FACILITIES 



There are no finer wharves and wharf sheds in America than the municipal harbor facili- 
ties provided by the City of Los Angeles. There is no bar to cross at the harbor entrance — 
the water is 48 feet deep at low tide at the entrance — and the depth at the piers varies from 29 
to 35 feet at low tide. 

The local business of the Port is growing very rapidly, as Los Angeles, with a popula- 
tion of 650,000 — the largest city on the Pacific Coast — is going after water commerce. Los 
Angeles also is the logical port for the transshipment of transcontinental cargoes. 

The City of Los Angeles also is prepared to lease lands for industries which need 
waterfront locations. 

For further particulars address 



THE BOARD OF HARBOR COMMISSIONERS 

SUITE 33, CITY HALL, LOS ANGELES, U. S. A. 



158 



Pan Pacific 



Seeing the Time in the Dark 

American Watches Now Made at Low Price With Luminous Figures Offer New 

Opportunity in Export Trade 



By 0. E. MACK 

THE evolution of watch construc- 
tion and of the methods of the 
distribution of watches through the 
channels of trade, required between 
three and four hundred years to reach 
their present stage of development. 
In the United States, this development 
has resulted in making the watch an 
article in almost universal use for the 
purpose of aiding the owner to lessen 
his waste of time, and thus to increase 
his power to accomplish results. 

This benefit is now not confined to 
a few as was formerly the case. Every- 
one has profited by this result, 
whether he could pay much for a 
watch, or little, because in the United 
States, watches which are good time- 
keepers are made and sold at prices 
low enough so that everyone is able 
to have them. 

Such a good record have these 
watches made that men who are amply 
able to afford an expensive timepiece, 
buy them, because they keep good 
time even under conditions which 
would be impossible for a watch with 
delicate adjustments. In addition to 
low price, which has put a watch in 
virtually every family in the United 
States, watches have been designed to 
fit the requirements of every member 
of the family, in all situations in which 
it is convenient to know the time. 

Useless In the Dark 
For Three Hundred Years 

But in all these three hundred years 
and more, with few exceptions, the 
watch has been useless in the dark. 
No way had been devised by which its 
service could be made continuous, re- 
gardless of light. 

It is true that repeaters were made 
which would strike the hour over 
again whenever desired, and perhaps, 
the quarters in addition. "Watches 
were also made with dial figures in 
relief and a hand or hands, by which 
the time could be approximately 
learned through the sense of touch. 
Such watches were costly, however, 
sometimes being sold for several hun- 
dred dollars above the price without 
such features. 

People at large were not benefited 
by them, because few were willing to 
pay, or could pay, the prices asked. 
Consequently, almost everyone de- 
pended upon having a match, or upon 
obtaining light in some other way. 
Thus during a large part of the twen- 
ty-four hours, the watch was of no 
use. 



Within the last few years — practi- 
cally since the Great War — this has 
been changed. How has it come 
about? To answer this question, it 
will be necessary to briefly review the 
conditions from which the solution 
was evolved. 

Light In Darkness 
Solution Long Sought 
The property of phosphorescence, or 
of emitting light in the darkness, had 
long been known ; and phosphorus had 
been generally familiar, at least by 
name, ever since the introduction of 
lucifer matches. Thus the idea that 
objects might give out light in the 



It was not satisfactory for the dial 
of a watch, because the uncertain glow 
was not sufficient at any time to make 
the dial easily read, and even this dim 
light would continue for only a small 
portion of the lifetime of a watch. 

A small degree of progress was 
made when it became known that some 
substances such as certain compounds 
of strontium or of zinc, had the prop- 
erty of emitting light for some time 
after exposure to bright sunlight. This 
light would not last throughout the 
night, however, and it was not always 
convenient or possible to expose the 
watch dial to sunlight so as to store 




NEW ENGLAND WATCH FACTORY— MAN AG ER'S OFFICE 



darkness, and so be visible, was not 
new, but no one knew how to obtain 
this property at will. 

Phosphorus is consumed after a time 
by slow oxidation and disappears. 
Moreover, it has a disagreeable odor 
and is poisonous. This renders it un- 
suitable for use on a watch dial. A 
beginning was made not many years 
ago in rendering surfaces luminous, 
by what was called phosphorus paint. 
This emitted a faint glow, which con- 
tinued for a more or less limited time, 
and finally disappeared. The use of 
this paint was confined to such pur- 
poses as rendering visible the sharp 
edges of furniture, or the outer edges 
of doors, or of sharp corners which 
must sometimes be passed in the dark- 
ness. 



up the light necessary to render it 
luminous later in the darkness. 
Radium Experiments 
Helped In Solution 
The last stage before final success 
was entered, was when in 1898, the 
Curies discovered radium. During the 
next fifteen years, various substances 
became known which contained ra- 
dium as a constituent element. Finally, 
it occurred to some one that if a small 
quantity of some substance containing 
a radium element were combined with 
zinc sulphide, the property of the sul- 
phide in holding light within its struc- 
ture could be made permanent by the 
luminous property of the radium ele- 
ment. This combination seemed to be 
a move in the right direction, but was 
not all that was desired, because the 



August 19 19 






-;:■ "■I'll 




NEW ENGLAND FACTORY OF ROBT. H. INGERSOLL & BRO. 



light given out was not very distinct, 
nor could it be always depended upon 
to be permanent. 

An attempt was made to illuminate 
watch dials by placing a tiny drop of 
the luminous compound at the top of 
each number on the dial. This made 
it possible to determine what the num- 
ber was ; and when the tips of the 
hands were also lighted up in the same 
way, the time could be read. The 
principle of illuminating watch dials 
was then fixed and the direction de- 
termined in which to look for improve- 
ment. 

The price charged by San Francisco 
watchmakers for rendering watch dials 
luminous with this compound • was 
from $2.00 to $3.50. This was an im- 
provement over the old prices for re- 
peaters, but it was more than later 
charged for a superior article with 
the watch included. 

Another step in advance was made 

by outlining the figures on the watch 

dial with the luminous material. This 

made it easier to read the time. 

Influence of the War 

Factor In Improvement 

When the war broke out in 1914, 
both the dials with the luminous points 
and those with the luminous figures 
were used. The points were preferred 
at first, because the luminous figures 
gave out a glow that could be seen 
by the enemy, and might bring a 
patrol into "No-man's-land," or a raid 
to a premature end. Later, however, 
devices were made for covering the 
dials when necessary. 

Even though the luminous material 
was not as bright as could be desired 
and sometimes lost its property, many 
thousands of radiolite watches were 
used in the trenches in France and 
elsewhere. Meanwhile the improve- 
ment of the luminous material was 
being studied in the United States. It 
was found that crystalline zinc sulph- 
: ide formed the best basis for the com- 
pound. 

The chief problem was to render 
this sulphide chemically pure. This 
was not an easy matter, for even sq 
small a proportion of chemical impur- 
ity as one one-hundred-and-fifty-thou- 



sandth had a perceptible clouding ef- 
fect. Attention was also given to find- 
ing the best radium element. This was 
found to be radium barium chloride. 
This is not radium itself, but a com- 
pound containing radium. It forms 
one of the stages in the production of 
radium. 

It is not cheap, for 250 tons of car- 
notite ore are necessary to produce 2 
grams of the radium barium chloride, 
or about 30 grains of avoirdupois 
weight, or a little more than one 250th 
of a pound. One 20,000th part of this 
quantity is used in the luminous ma- 
terial which appears on the dial of a 
Radiolite watch. 

First Offered to Trade 

Only Three Years Ago 

The present Radiolite watch was 

first offered to the trade in the United 

States in 1916. It had been delayed 

until the luminous material had been 

perfected and its exclusive control had 

. been secured, so that purchasers of 

Radiolite watches might know that no 

better illuminated dial could be had. 



159 

The strength of the new material was 
a little less than double that of the 
material which had previously been 
employed in the watches supplied to 
the armies in England and France. 
Tested by the United States Bureau 
of Standards, it has been graded as the 
best of the compounds submitted. 

No one can say that there will be 
nothing superior to this luminous ma- 
terial produced, but there is little left 
to be desired. Not only is the bril- 
liance of the material all that is 
needed, but there is no known limit 
to the time that it continues to give 
off light. That there may be no doubt 
about it in the mind of the purchaser 
of a Radiolite watch, the efficiency of 
the luminous material is guaranteed 
for the lifetime of the watch. 

When it was realized for the first 
time that it was possible for $3.00 to 
$6.00 to buy a watch that would tell 
the time in the dark, the demand 
quickly attained such large propor- 
tions that the manufacturers were un- 
able to supply it. To begin with, 
there were hundreds of thousands sup- 
plied to men in the armies. Every 
soldier wanted one. Every one wanted 
one, if not to aid him in his work, 
then as a matter of curiosity — doctors 
and nurses, automobilists and farmers, 
miners and watchmen, the policeman 
upon a dark beat or the man who 
woke up in the night and wanted to 
know what time it was. 

During the war, large bodies of all 
classes of workers were working con- 
tinuously and frequently needed to 
know the time in the dark. As in the 
case of many other things, the pres- 
sure of necessity working with oppor- 
tune developments, resulted in supply- 
ing the need. 




NEW ENGLAND WATCH FACTORY— AUTOMATIC MACHINE DEPT. 



160 



Pan Pacific 



DIRECTORY SECTION 



PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE will publish each month in this section, for the con- 
venience of its readers, the following directories: 

EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS 

ADVERTISED MERCHANDISE 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND BROKERS 

CONNECTIONS WANTED AGENCIES WANTED 

MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES AND BROKERS 

EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS ! 



A directory of leading export and import concerns covering the Far East and Central and South America. 
Readers of this publication will find it much to their advantage to consult the concerns listed when desiring proper 
sources of supply. 



THE ACME WIRE COMPANY, 39 Cortlandt 
St., New York City, New York. Magnet wire, 
field coils, electro magnets, etc. Western Union 
Code. Cable address "ACME." 



ADDRESSOGRAPH COMPANY, 740 Broad- 
way, New York City, New York. Addressing 
machines; type embossing machines and rubber 
type. Code: A. B. C. Cable address "AD- 
DRESSO." 



AEROTHRUST ENGINE COMPANY, La 
Porte, Indiana. Manufacturers and exporters 
of the Aerothrust Engine for pumping machin- 
ery, lighting plants, agricultural implements, 
pumping jacks. Outboard Motors, etc. Corre- 
spondence solicited in all languages. All codes. 
Foreign orders our specialty. 



AMERICAN CAN COMPANY,' 120 Broadway, 
New York City, New York. Branch at San 
Francisco. Ash, paper and garbage cans; add- 
ing machines, fly traps, cartons, tin boxes, cigar 
and tobacco boxes, jar caps; druggists' tinware, 
etc. Western Union and Lleber's codes. Cable 
address "AMCANCO." 



THE AMERICAN LAUNDRY MACHINE 
COMPANY, 132 West Twenty-seventh St., New 
York City, New York. Laundry machinery, dry 
cleaning machinery, washing machines, garment 
presses for tailors, etc. Cable address "ALM- 
CO." 



THE AMERICAN PULLEY COMPANY, 33 
Greene St.. New York City, New York. Pressed 
steel split belt pulleys, reels, beams, spools, steel 
truck wheels, pressed metal shapes, etc. Codes, 
Lleber's and Western Union. Cable address, 
"AMER-PULLEY." 



THE AMERICAN STEEL PACKAGE COM- 
PANY, 20 Vesey St., New York City, New York. 
Steel barrels and drums for gasoline, oil and 
chemicals; steel cases with partitions for bot- 
tled goods. Code: Western Union. Cable ad- 
dress "AMPAX.55 Defiance, Ohio. 



AMERICAN VULCANIZED FIBRE COM- 
PANY, Wilmington, Delaware. Vulcanized fibre 
in sheets, rods and tubes, insulators, waste bas- 
kets, warehouse trucks, trunks, suitcases, etc. 
Codes: Lieper's Western Union, General Tele- 
graph and A 1. Cable address "FIBRE." 

ANSCO COMPANY, Binghamton, New York. 
Photographic paper, films, cameras, chemicals, 
dry plates, etc. Foreign agent, Ansco Limited, 
143 Great Portland St., London. W., England. 
Codes: A. B. C, Lleber's Standard and Western 
Union. Cable address "ANSCO." 



THE ARLINGTON COMPANY, 725 Broad- 
way, New York City, New York. Celluloid in 
sheets, rods, tubes, brushes, combs, mirrors, 
toilet sets, collars, cuffs, pipe bits and harness 
rings. Cable address "PYRALIN." 



ARNOTT & COMPANY, 112 South Los An- 
geles St., Los Angeles, California. Agricultural 
implements, engines and wagons. Export or- 
ders a specialty. Catalogue and price list on 
application. Cable address "ARNOTT." 



J. ARON & COMPANY, Inc., 95 Wall St., New 
York City. Branches at San Francisco, New 
Orleans, Chicago, London, England and Santos, 
Brazil. General exporters and importers. Cor- 
respondence solicited in all languages. Cable 
address "ARONCO." 



ASSOCIATED MANUFACTURERS IMPORT- 
ING COMPANY, 871 Market St., San Francisco, 
California. Manufacturers' representatives, im- 
porters 2"d exporters. Import china ware, 
crockery, ^namel ware, oils, hides, brushes, 
produce and raw materials. Export steel, iron, 
steel products, hardware, tools, chemicals, dyes, 
food products and all raw materials. Cable ad- 
dress "AMICO." 



CHAS. A. BACON COMPANY, 417 Montgom- 
ery St., San Francisco, Cal. Importers and Ex- 
porters. General Merchandise. 



EDWARD BARRY COMPANY, 215 Leidsdorff 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Wholesale paper deal- 
ers. Manufacturers of writing tablets, loose 
leaf systems, ruled goods, blank books. Whole- 
sale bookbinders. 



THE BEAVER BOARD COMPANIES, 225 
Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York. 
"Beaver Board," a wall board for interior con- 
struction; blackboards, varnishes, etc. Codes: 
Western Union, A. B. C. and Fifth Improved 
editions. Cable address "BEAVER." 



F. E. BOOTH COMPANY, 110 Market St., San 
Francisco, California. Importers and exporters, 
Crescent Brand Food Products. All languages 
used. 



BRADY & COMPANY, L. C. Smith Building, 
Seattle, Washington. Shipping and Commis- 
sion. Importers and Exporters salmon, oils, 
steel, lumber, fertilizer. Established 1892. 



BRAUN - KNECHT - HEIMANN COMPANY, 
San Francisco, California. Importers and ex- 
porters of chemicals. Laboratory apparatus for 
mines, universities and schools. Sugar, soap, 
wine, oils, iron and steel. Correspondence so- 
licited. Cable address "BRAUNDRUG." 



CAMBRIA SPRING COMPANY, 916 South 
Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, California. Wheels 
and rims, spring bumpers, auto and truck 
springs. Code Western Union. All languages. 



CLEVELAND IMPORT & MANUFACTUR- 
ING COMPANY, Laughlin Bldg., Los Angeles, 
California. Commission merchants. Importers 
and Exporters. Established 1873. Cable ad- 
dress "CLEIMPCO." 



CLYDE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, 542 First 
Avenue, Seattle, Washington. Machinery and 
supply merchants. Export orders a specialty. 
Quotations furnished. Special machinery made 
to order. Correspondence in all languages and 
codes. 



CONNELL BROTHERS COMPANY, L. C. 
SMITH Building, Seattle, Washington. General 
importers and exporters. Offices at Shang- 
hai, Manila, Hong Kong and Singapore. Corre- 
spondence in all languages. Cable address 
"CONNELL." 



A. J. & J. R. COOK, 743 Mission St., San 
Francisco, California. Leather, calf, skins, 
glazed kid, patent and upholstery leather, etc. 
Cable address "COOKBRO." 



DILL-CROSETT, Inc., San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. Exporters of steel products, acids, rosin, 
chemicals, dye stuff, phenol, etc. Importers of 
fish oil, hides, coffee, coconut oil, beans, copra, 
castor oil, tallow, silks, etc. Branch offices: 
New York, Kobe, Japan and Sydney, Australia. 
All languages and codes used. 



L. DINKELSPIEL, Inc., 115-135 Battery St., 
San Francisco, California. Wholesale dealers, 
Jobbers and exporters of dry goods, furnishing 
goods, notions and fancy goods. Cotton piece 
goods, linens, dress goods, silks, flannels, hos- 
iery, underwear, shirts, sweaters, ribbons, laces, 
threads, blankets, quilts. Correspondence in all 
languages. Cable address LIPSEKNID. 



August 19 19 



161 



EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS— Continued 



JAMES P. DWAN, American Nat. Bank Bldg., 
San Francisco, Cat. Exporters and Importer. 
General purchasing agent for foreign buyers. 
Building materials, machinery, ores, metals, oils. 
Foreign office, Missions BuUding, The Bund, 
Canton, China. Cable address DWAN. 

GENERAL. PAPER COMPANY, 525 Market 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Paper Mill represen- 
tatives. Dealers in news, books, cardboard and 
paper stock of all kinds. 



W. R. GRACE & COMPANY, 332 Sansome St., 
San Francisco, California. Exporters of all 
American products. Importers of all raw ma- 
terials from South and Central America and Far 
East. Represented in all parts of the world. 
Letters of credit, cable transfers, foreign ex- 
change. 

HARRON, RICKARD & McCONE, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Machinery for mines and 
mills, garages, boiler shops, forge shops, snip- 
yards, saw mills, planing mills, contractors, etc. 
All standard codes used. Cable address "AIR- 
DRILL." 



F. GRIFFIN & COMPANY, 341 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Importers and export- 
ers of rice, oil, drugs, chemicals, rubber goods, 
food products, iron., steel. Offices at Vancouver, 
B. C, Seattle and Portland. Correspondence in 
all languages. Cable address DRAGON. 



B. F. HEASTAND, 618 Mission St., San Fran- 
cisco, California. Exporter of glass ware, din- 
ner services, vitrified hotel china. Prepared to 
fill orders Immediately for any quantity. Corre- 
spondence in any language. Catalogues on re- 
quest. Cable address "HEASTAND." 



INGRIM - RUTLEDGE COMPANY, 413-415 
Montgomery St., San Francisco, California. 
! Printers, stationers, bookbinders, art and color 
[ work. Catalog and booklet printing. Copper 
plate and steel die engraving. Office equipment 
[ and supplies. Loose leaf systems. Export or- 
| ders a specialtq. Correspondence in all lan- 
guages. 

INTERNATIONAL TRADING COMPANY OF 
AMERICA, Inc., Seattle, Washington. Import- 
ers, exporters, forwarders and manufacturers' 
representatives. Branches in all Far Eastern 
countries. Export iron and steel, machinery, 
plumbing supplies, heavy and light hardware, 
talking machines, cotton and wool textiles and 
dry gods. Correspondence invited. Cable ad- 
dress "INTRACO." . 



MURRY JACOBS, A. C. RULOFSON COM- 
PANY, San Francisco, California. Direct mill 
representatives — Iron and steel products. Cor- 
respondence in all languages. All Codes used. 

JOOST BROTHERS, Inc., 1053 Market St., San 
Francisco. California. Foreign orders promptly 
and carefully executed. General hardware, 
household goods, tools, sporting goods, paints, 
oils, varnishes. Correspondence in all languages. 
Catalogs on request. 

KAAS-HOPKINS CO., Hearst Building, San 
Francisco, California. Paper Mill selling agents. 
Solicit export inquiries from the trade. Sam- 
ples and quotations promptly furnished on re- 
quest. 

KULLMAN, SALZ & COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Sole leather; tanners. Leather 
for export a specialty.' Prompt attention to or- 
ders. Ask us to quote on your requirements. 
All languages. 



LANSING COMPANY; San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. Manufacturers of electrical trucks, trail- 
ers, concrete machinery, gas engines, hoists, 
hand carts, wheels, casters, etc. Export trade 
a specialty. Cable address "QUOLANSING." 



LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS, Los Angeles. 
California. Manufacturers and exporters of 
steamship power equipment, water, oil and fuel 
tanks, rolling mill products. Ingots, bars and 
shapes. Structural steel fabricators. Correspon- 
dence invited. All codes used. Cable address 
"LLEWELLYN." 



MARVIN SHOE COMPANY, Inc., 216 Market 
St., San Francisco, California. Exporter and 
wholesaler of shoes. Men's, women's, boys' and 
children's shoes. Rubber boots, tennis and out- 
ing shoes. All styles on hand for immediate 
shipment. Export trade solicited. Cable ad- 
dress, "VINMAR." 



MILL & MINE SUPPLY COMPANY, Seattle, 
Washington. Iron, bolts, chain, axes, belting, 
logging tools, steel, nuts, waste, saws, pulleys. 
Cable address "MILESMINE." Export orders 
solicited. 



MORELAND MOTORLAND TRUCK COM- 
PANY, 1701 North Main Street, Los Angeles, 
Cal. Manufacturers of motor trucks of vari- 
ous sizes, which will burn either distillate or 
gasoline, making possible a saving of 50% in 
fuel. 



R. & L. MYERS COMPANY, 717 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. Jewelers supplies, head- 
quarters for watchmakers. Oldest material 
supply house In San Francisco. 



NOLAN-EARL SHOE COMPANY. 25 Fre- 
mont St., San Francisco, Cal. Manufacturers 
and wholesale dealers in Men's, Women's and 
Children's shoes. Samples sent on request. 
Charges prepaid. Cable address "Nesco." Bent- 
ley's Code. 



OCEAN BROKERAGE COMPANY, Stuart 
Building, Seattle, Washington. Custom House 
brokers. U. S. Bonded storage. Import and 
Export freight forwarders, fire and marine in- 
surance. Weighing, sampling, reconditioning, 
distributing, marking, sampling. 



PACIFIC LUBRICATING COMPANY. 715 W. 
Spokane St., Seattle, Washington. Manufac- 
turers of greases, cup transmission, car, graph- 
ite and chain. Hair and wool flock. Repre- 
sented at Manila. Sydney, Australia and Val- 
paraiso. Chile. Export orders promptly and 
carefully attended to. Special greases made to 
order. 



PACIFIC SANITARY MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY. 67 New Montgomery St., San Fran- 
cisco. California. Exporters of bath-tubs, toil- 
ets, lavatories, sinks, laundry tubs, plumbing 
fixtures, etc. Prompt and careful shipment of 
export orders. Correspondence in all languages 
and codes. 



VICTOR PATRON, 112 Market St.. San Fran- 
cisco, California. Branch at Mazatlan, Mexico. 
Cable address "PATRON." Import and export 
representative. Prices and catalogues furnished 
on application. 



C. M. PETTIBONE COMPANY. L. C. Smith 
Building, Seattle, Washington. Importers and 
Exporters. Packers direct' selling agents. Ship- 
ping and commission merchants. Cable ad- 
dress PETTIBONE. Codes used,' Armsby, A. B. 
C. 5th Edition, Bentley'ff; WV U. •• ' 



PURNELL & PAGETT, Canton, China. Ar- 
chitects and civil engineers. Investigations, in- 
spections and valuations. Bridges, steel con- 
struction, wharves and dooks. Cable address 
PANEL. W. U. Code and A. B. C. ^ _ 



H. S. RENSHAW, Inc., 205 Metropolitan Bank 
Building, New Orleans, Louisiana. Export: Im- 
port; Commission. Freight forwarders. Corre- 
spondence solicited. Cable address "RENCO." 
Codes: A. B. C. 4; W. U. T.; Bedford McNeil. 



ROGERS SHOE COMPANY, 135 Bush St., San 
Francisco, California. Shoes, rubbers, tennis 
and sport shoes, all kinds; all styles. Bentley 
Code used. 



ROLPH, MILLS & COMPANY, Colman Bldg., 
Seattle, Wash. General shipping and commis- 
sion merchants. Export and imports. Direct 
representatives of manufacturers' of principal 
American goods. Offices at Seattle, Portland, 
Los Angeles, New York and Chicago. Corre- 
spondence solicited. 



ROTHWELL & COMPANY, Inc., Hoge Build- 
ing, Seattle, Washington. Importers, exporters 
and shippers. Branches at New York City, Ha- 
vana, Cuba, and Kobe, Japan. Import oils, silk 
goods and fruits, chemicals, dyestuffs, iron, steel 
and machinery. Correspondence invited. 



PAUL R. RUBEN. & COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Importers, exporters, manu- 
facturers' agents, purchasing agents. All codes. 
Cable address "PAULRUBE." 



SEATTLE FAR EAST TRADING COMPANY, 
Inc., L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Washington. 
Branch offices Shanghai, Hong Kong, Seattle, 
Kobe and Tokio. Exporters of iron, woodwork- 
ing and textile machinery, iron, steel, pipe, rail- 
way supplies, cars, locomotives, glass, plumbing 
fixtures, hardware, etc. Correspondence solic- 
ited. 



SHERMAN BROTHERS COMPANY, 208 
South La Salle St., Chicago, Illinois. Exporters 
and importers of shoes, hosiery, underwear, 
piece goods, rubber goods, chemicals, food prod- 
ucts, machinery, automobiles and hardware. 
Careful and prompt attention given to all cor- 
respondence and orders. Cable address "CAR- 
NOT." 



SHIPPERS COMMERCIAL CORPORATION, 
Seattle, Wash. Exporters and importers Pacific 
Coast products. Cable address "Shipcomco." 
All codes used. 



C. HENRY SMITH, 311 California St., San 
Francisco, California.' Export and import mer- 
chant. Nitrates a specialty. Shipping and 
commission. Steamship agent and ship owner. 
All codes. Cable address CHENRYINC. 



HERBERT T. SMITH BROKERAGE COM- 
PANY, 209 Washington St., Chicago, Illnois. 
Import and export. Beans, peas, seeds, oils, etc. 
Write for quotations. 



STANDARD PRODUCTS COMPANY, 260 
California St., San Francisco, California. Ex- 
porters of all American products — Iron, steel 
products, galvanized pipe, paints, varnishes, 
cutlery, explosives, plate and window glass, etc. 
Importers of raw materials from Asia, camel's 
hair, animal hair, bristles, furs, skins, ' nuts, 
oils, etc. All codes used. Cable address "PER- 
KINS." 



THOMPSON & CASTLETON, 316 First St., 
So. Seattle, Wash. Electrical and mining ma- 
chinery. Specialists on rewinding machinery of 
all kinds. Installers of complete plants. 



WILLIAMS -MARVIN COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California: Exporter of shoes for men, 
women and children. Orders receive prompt 
and careful attention. Special styles made to 
order. Send for our catalogue. Cable address 
"WILMAR." 

.-• ~J 77*17 

WORLEY-MARTIN COMPANY; '617 Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco, California. Wool, 
hides, tallow, oils and Oriental ' products. Hard- 
ware and steel products, drugs and specialties. 
Represented in China and Japan. Desires lines 
to introduce. Cable address "WORLEY." 



ZELLERBACH PAPER COMPANY, San 
Francisco, California. Quotations and samples 
of paper for export. Represented at Yokohama 
and Shanghai. Cable address^ "ZELLERBACH." 
All codes. 



The attention of readers and advertisers is called to the fact that PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE will accept no 
advertisements of a doubtful nature nor from concerns in other than good standing. The publishers of this magazine 
believe that foreign buyers can place confidence in those concerns whose names appear herein. . . -.' . 



162 



Pan Pacific 



MERCHANDISE ADVERTISED 



PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE publishes herewith a list of articles advertised in this issue for the convenience of its 
readers. The name of the advertiser will be found listed under each heading. This is a gratis service rendered adver- 
tisers and the publishers of this magazine accept no responsibility for omissions or errors, but make every effort to main- 
tain an accurate list. 



ADDING MACHINES 

American Can Company. 
ADDRESSING MACHINES & SUPPLIES 

Addressograph Company. 

AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 

Arnott & Company. 
AUTOMOBILES 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 
BANKS AND BANKING 

First Trust Company of Hilo. 
BATH-TUBS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
BLANKETS, QUILTS, Etc. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
BOILERS, WATER TUBE 

Pacific Marine Iron Works. 
BOOKBINDERS 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 

Edward Barry Company. 
BOOTS 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Williams Marvin Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 

Nolan-Earl Shoe Company. 
BROKERAGE AND COMMISSION 

Du-Pont Coleman & Company. 
BUILDING MATERIAL 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

James P. Dwan 
CAMERAS 

The Ansco Company. 
CANNED GOODS 

C M. Pettibone Co. 

Rothwell & Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

F. E. Booth Company. 

Western Canning Co. 
CANS, CAPS, TIN BOXES 

American Can Company. 
CASES, STEEL .... 

American Steel Package Company. 
CASTINGS 

Pacific Marine Iron Works. 

Interstate Pattern Works. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 
CELLULOID, MANUFACTURED 

The Arlington Company. 
CELLULOID, SHEET 

The Arlington Company. 
CEREALS. 

Sperry Flour Co. 
CHINAWARE 

B. F. Heastand. 

Associated Mfgs. Importing Co. 
COFFEE 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
CONCRETE MACHINERY 

Lansing Company. 
CONTRACTORS SUPPLIES 

Topping Brothers. 
COPPER PLATE ENGRAVING 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
COTTON GOODS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
CROCKERY 

B. F. Heastand. 

Associated Mrgs. Importing Co. 
CUTLERY 

Standard Products Company. 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 
DRESS GOODS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
DRUGS & CHEMICALS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

The Hale Company. 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

F. Griffin & Company. 
DRY GOODS, TEXTILES, Etc. 

International Trading Co. of America. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
DYE STUFFS 

Quaker City Supply Company. 
ELECTRIC TRUCKS 

Lansing Company. 
ENAMELWARE 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 
EXPLOSIVES & POWDER 

Standard Products Company. 
FERTILIZERS 

Brady & Company. 
FLOCK, HAIR AND WOOL 

Pacific Lubricating Company. 
FLOUR 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Knerrv Flour Co. 
FOOD PRODUCTS 

Rothwell & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

National Products Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

F. E. Booth Company. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

Chas. A. Bacon. 



F. Griffin & Company. 

C. M. Pettibone & Co. 

Brady & Company. 
GAS ENGINES 

Shipbuilders Machinery Company. 

Lansing Company. 

Arnott & Company. 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
GLASSWARE 

B. F. Heastand. 
GLOVES 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 
GREASES 

Pacific Lubricating Company. 

GROCERIES 

C. M. Pettibone Company. 
HAIR, ANIMAL 

Standard Products Company. 
HARDWARE 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

International Trading Co. of America. 
HIDES 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 
HOSIER'S 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 
HOUSEHOLD GOODS 

Joost Brothers, Ins. 
INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 

James P. Dwan. 

Purnell & Pagett. 
JEWELERS SUPPLIES 

R. & L. Myers Co. 
LABORATORY APPARATUS 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 
LAUNDRY MACHINERY 

American Laundry Machine Co. 
LAUNDRY TRAYS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
LAVATORIES 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
LEATHER & LEATHER PRODUCTS 

Kullman, Salz & Company. 

A. J. & J. R. Cook. 
LIGHTING PLANTS 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
LOCOMOTIVES 

Seatle Far East Trading Co. 
MACHINERY 

Rothwell & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

International Trading Co. of America. 

Clyde Equipment Company. 

James P. Dwan. 
MARINE HARDWARE 

Topping Brothers. 

Pacific Marine Iron Works. 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 
MINE & MILL MACHINERY 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 
MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Connell Brothers Company. 

J. Aron & Company. 

Rolph, Mills & Company. 

Victor Patron. 

Paul R. Ruben & Company. 

H. S. Renshaw, Inc. 

Cleveland Import & Mfg. Company. 

Ocean Brokerage Co. 
MOTOR TRUCKS 

Moreland Motor Truck Co. 
NITRATES 

C. Henry Smith. 
NOTIONS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
OILS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Rothwell & Company. 

Standard Products Company. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

James P. Dwan. 

F. Griffin & Co. 

Brady & Co. 
ORIENTAL PRODUCTS 

Worley-Martin Company. 
OUTBOARD MOTORS 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
PAINTS 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 

Standard Products Company. 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
PAPER 

Zellerbach Paper Company. 

Kaas-Hopkins Company. 

General Paper Co. 

Edward Barry Co. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC PAPER & MATERIALS 
The Ansco Company. 

PLUMBING FIXTURES 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
PRINTING 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 

Edward Barry Co. 
PULLEYS 

The American Pulley Company. 

PUMPING ENGINES 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
RAILROAD SUPPLIES 

Topping Brothers. 
RAW PRODUCTS 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

A. O. Andersen & Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Rolph, Mills & Company. 

Victor Patron. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 
RICE 

F. Griffin & Co. 
ROOFING 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
RUBBER BOOTS AND SHOES 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 

Nolan-Earl Shoe Co. 
RUBBER GOODS 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

F. Griffin & Co. 
SHIP CHANDLERY 

Topping Brothers. 
SHOES 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 
SHOES, SPORT AND TENNIS 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 

Nolan-Earl Shoe Co. 
SILK GOODS 

Rothwell & Company. 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

D. Dinkelspiel Company. 
SINKS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
SOAP 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 
SPICES 

W. R. Grace & Company. 
SPORTING GOODS. 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 
SPRINGS, AUTO AND TRUCK 

Cambria Spring Company. 
STATIONERY 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
STEEL PRODUCTS 

F. Griffin & Co. 
STEEL AND STEEL PRODUCTS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Rothwell & Company. 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 

Murray Jacobs. 

A. C. Rulofson Company. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

Standard Products Company. 

International Trading Co. of America, Inc. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 

Cambria Spring Company. 

The American Pulley Company. 
TALKING MACHINES 

International Trading Co. of America. 
TALLOW 

Worley-Martin Company. 
TANKS, WATER. OIL AND FUEL 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 
TANNERS 

Kullman. Salz & Company. 
TEA EXPERTS 

MacDonald & Company. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
TEXTILE MACHINERY 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
TINWARE 

American Can Company. 
TOILETS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
TOOLS 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 
TRUCKS 

Moreland Motor Truck Co. 
TYPEWRITERS 

American Can Company. 
UNDERWEAR 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 



August 19 19 



163 



Preparing for Foreign Trade 



(Continued from page 155) 



competitive foods and raiment were 
LEGALLY withheld from cultivation 
so as to subject the people and per- 
petuate the fiction of monarchial 
power. 

Such powers have always CON- 
I'lXKD the activities of the people to 
LESS THAN ONE-THIRD OP THEIR 
NATION'S SOIL. The balance was 
kept in PUBLIC OWNERSHIP so as 
to sustain the suppliant institution of 
poverty that made all men DEPEN- 
DENT on the bounty of some auto- 
cratic power — whether that be some 
fake democracy or aDsolutism but 
thinly screened from universal execra- 
tion. Whenever the race attempted to 
EXPAND upon these competing and 
uncultivated lands and thereby threat- 
en the STAPLES OP MONOPOLY and 
the puppet institution which sustained 
it, WARS OP AGGRESSION were in- 
augurated to subdue the natural as- 
pirations of our hungry and subju- 
gated race. 

Thus we see more than half the hu- 
man race WITHOUT RAILWAYS to 
develop NEW WEALTH, from 73% 
to 95% of the tillable earth WITH- 
HELD from private ownership and 
the competitive energies of all man- 
kind CONFINED within a FRACTION 
of the river basins of the earth ! This 
is the basis upon which the superstruc- 
ture of commercial diplomacy is 
erected; and it is the charnel house 
from which has flowed the propaganda 
against distributive happiness and 
wealth and the assertion of democracy 
and co-operation among institutions 
of civilized society. 

That's why the Orient has lain dor- 
mant — why it walled itself off from its 
belligerent neighbors, why Japan 
closed its doors to western "civiliza- 
tion" after witnessing the slaughter 
of Christians by Christians within its 
borders among Dutch and Portuguese, 
some centuries ago. 

The European conflagration that 
witnessed the last expiring gasp of 
these monopolistic tendencies was not 
content to confine its purposes within 
its natural borders. It diplomatically 



and otherwise spread its serpentine 
tentacles across the Orient and cast a 
blight on everything beneath its with- 
ering shadow. 

China was inflamed and brigandage 
and robbery and plunder and indus- 
trial delirium burst into riotous and 
demoralizing activity from Hankow 
to the plains of Tibet. In the interest 
of a commercial policy the strategy of 
Europe suggested the strangling of 
the sources of supply wherever un- 
controlled, and thus revealed, through 
military necessity, the skeleton diplom- 
acy that has always made the civiliza- 
tion of Europe a transparent patch- 
work of hypocrisy and lies. 

Where brigandage failed to aid its 
European military sponsor, open and 
direct PRESSURE was exerted and 
thus the border trade between Man- 
churia and Siberia was paralyzed by 
embargoes and the civil wars that fol- 
lowed like those which were similarly 
fomented in Siberia, laid waste the 
largest and fairest provinces of China. 
Nevertheless, the VALUE of the for- 
eign trade of China, during this period 
of aberration, was the greatest on rec- 
ord, being more than ONE BILLION 
Haikwan taels and" an increase of Hai- 
kwan taels 28,325,709 over that for 
1917. 

It does not appear that EUROPE 
was bothered with the fluctuations of 
EXCHANGE when it became pre- 
pared for the congested cargo artifi- 
cially created by itself. Only in the 
United States is EXCHANGE used as 
a scarecrow to frighten traders away 
from fruitful fields. Like children 
Americans alone believe in diplomatic 
ghosts ! 

There is hope, however, ahead for 
the entire world if the League of Na- 
tions and the Peace of Versailles au- 
thorizes our Government to support 
the commercial policies of American 
investors. The government will doubt- 
less do this in time, but no responsible 
government will support the foreign 
commercial policy of a people who 
hesitate to prepare. We have BIL- 
LIONS due us from foreign lands. 



They cannot pay us in gold; and if 
THEY could we could not afford to 
take it that way. Nor can we con- 
veniently accept the payment in goods. 
To adjust the unbalanced conditions 
we must become PERMANENT IN- 
VESTORS in the securities now held 
by our debtors. 

We must establish the program of 
the International High Commission in 
the Orient as well as in Latin Amer- 
ica. We must encourage the trust of 
American business in the solvency of 
the world and the purpose of the 
government to sustain that trust 
throughout the earth. This will dis- 
place our commercial hesitancy and 
financial timidity by the inspirational 
securities which flow from technical 
preparation strengthened and sus- 
tained by congressional approval and 
national guarantees. 



U.S. Aids Far 
East Trade 

(Continued from page 146) 



than under the old system of simply 
furnishing trade lists to each, a great 
many of the names on which were pos- 
sibly already represented or were rep- 
resenting similar lines of goods. 

Our trade with the Far East has al- 
ready reached considerable propor- 
tions, but our share of the total trade 
of all Far Eastern countries is still 
comparatively small. Of the total 
trade of the Far East probably not 
more than twenty-three per cent is 
with the United States, as is shown 
by the following tables: 

Statistics of Far Eastern Trade, 1917 

IMPORTS 

Country From United States Total 

Japan $179,853,926 $517,905,553 

China 62,789,600 566,004,337 

Philippines 37,620,647 65,797,030 

Straits Settlements 8,377,894 295,668,971 

India 35,496,818 519,163,717 

Australia 75,467,581 370,478,380 



Grand total imports $399,606,466 $2,335,010,988 

EXPORTS 

Country To United States Total 

Japan $239,268,423 $801,502,524 

China 97.029,815 476,819,578 

Philippines 63,234,358 95,604,307 

Straits Settlements 93,220,129 275,435,355 

India 100,881,124 789,472,735 

Australia 32,965,540 476,062,633 



Grand total exports $626,599,389 $2,914,897,132 



MERCHANDISE ADVERTISED— Continued 

VARNISH 

Beaver Board Companies. 

Standard Products Company. 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
VULCANIZING 

American Vulcanized Fibre Co. 

Braunen Vulcanizing Machinery Co. 
WAGONS 

Arnott & Company. 
WALL, BOARD 

The Beaver Board Companies. 
WHEELS. CASTERS, Etc. 

Lansing Company. 

Cambria Spring Company. 

The American Pulley Company. 
WIRE, ELECTRICAL 

The Acme Wire Company. 
WOODWORKING MACHINERY 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
WOOL 

Worley-Martin Company. 



NAGOTA, JAPAN — Manufacturer of violins and 
accessories desires to get in touch with dealers 
in United States. Address Box 655 Pan Pacific. 

OSAKA, JAPAN — Firm of importers and expor- 
ters in Osaka would like to get in touch with 
exporters of tool steel, hardware and etc. Ad- 
dress Box 656 Pan Pacific. 

TOKIO, JAPAN— Firm desires to get in touch 
with exporters of corn starch, dried apricots, 
raisins, mustard and importers of beans, pea- 
nuts, peanut oil, potato starch, sweet starch, 
salt codfish, etc. Address Box 657 Pan Pacific. 

PARIS, FRANCE— Party would like to com- 
municate with exporters of California canned 
meats, chemicals or grains, with a view to 
representing them in France. Address Box 658 
Pan Pacific 

PASADENA, CALIF.— Party desires to com- 
municate with exporters in this city in a posi- 
tion to place aniline dyes before the Far East- 



CONNECTIONS WANTED 



ern trade. Address Box 659 Pan Pacific. 

OSAKA, JAPAN — Firm desires to communi- 
cate with exporters of tin-plate, corrugated 
iron plate, lead, etc. Address Box 660 Pan 
Pacific. 

MADRAS, INDIA — Managing agents for two 
mining companies handling chrome, manga- 
nese and pyrolusite ores, desires to get in 
touch with interested merchants. Details and 
samples on file in San Francisco. Address 
Box 661 Pan Pacific. 

SAO PAULO, BRAZIL— A French firm recently 
established at Sao Paulo desires to communi- 
cate with importers and exporters interested 
in Brazilian trade. Address Box 664 Pan Pa- 
cific. 

SANTIAGO, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC — Firm 
desires to get in touch with exporters of Slam 
and Rangoon rice. Address Box 673 Pan Pa- 
cific. (Continued on page 165) 



164 



Pan Pacific 



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Clyde Equipment 
Company 



I PORTLAND 



SEATTLE 



Machinery and Supply 
Merchants 



542 First Avenue South 



Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. 

s ' I 

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Cable address 

Llewellyn 
Los Angeles 



V 




LOS ANGELES.CAL. 

IRON WORKS 



LOS ANGELES CAL. 



ft 

o 
g 

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o 

to 



TANKS 

MARINE ENGINES 

MARINE BOILERS 




C/3 

H 

1/5 

- 

- 
h 

en 



ROLLING MILL PRODUCTS 

INGOTS, BILLETS, BARS, SHAPES 

STRUCTURAL STEEL FABRICATORS 




Brown Three Cavity, Sectional Steam Vulcanizers 

The Brown Line of Vulcanizing Machinery is the very 

last word in design and construction. 
Catalogue A-P contains full description of the complete 

line together with full shipping dimensions for both 

domestic and foreign requirements. 

Wholesale Only 

Jesse F. Brown Manufacturing Company 

Los Angeles, V. S. A. 
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IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
FROM STOCK 

miimiimiimnmi 

Iron Steel 

Bolts Nuts 

Chain Waste ! 

3 

Blacksmith Coal 
Wire Rope 
Logging Tools 
Axes Saws 

Belting Pulleys | 

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MillandMineSupplyCo. \ 



I Cable Address "Mtllmine" 



Seattle, Wash. 



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A ugust 19 19 



165 



SAN JUAN, PORTO RICO— Firm is desirous of 
securing the representation for Porto Rico of 
a California firm desiring to export to this 
market, rice, beans, peas, canned goods, pork 
and beef products as well as other food prod- 
ucts. Address Box 662 Pan Pacific. 

KOBE, JAPAN — Japanese importers and expor- 
ters have recently opened a new department 
for ship's business with purpose of buying, 
selling, chartering steamers between Japan 
and other countries and would like to com- 
municate with interested merchants. Address 
Box 663 Pan Pacific. 

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA— Established firm in 
Sydney desires to communicate with manufac- 
turers and exporters. Especially interested in 
silks, cotton and hardware. Would like cata- - 
logues, samples and C. I. F. Sydney prices. 
Address Box 665 Pan Pacific. 

SLATINA, ROUMANIA— Firm desires to get in 
touch with manufacturers and exporters who 
might wish to enter into commercial relations 
with that country. Address Box 666 Pan Pa- 
cific. 

ANTWERP, BELGIUM— Firm would like to 
represent in Belgium, exporters of coffee, 
cocoa, cereals, seeds, oil cakes, food products, 



CONNECTIONS WANTED 

dried and fresh fruits, preserves, hides, rub- 
ber, ivory, wax, tobacco. Address Box 667 
Pan Pacific. 

SOFIA, BULGARIA— Import and export firm 
wishes to communicate with merchants and 
manufacturers desiring to extend their busi- 
ness to Bulgaria. Address Box 668 Pan Pa- 
cific. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.— San Francisco firm 
representing Oriental connections, handling 
hog and sheep casings, also pongee silks, de- 
sire correspondence with interested firms. 
Address Box 669 Pan Pacific. 

BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA— Company re- 
cently organized with the object of importing 
the American manufactures and exporting the 
products of the Argentine, wishes to be put in 
touch with the American houses who desire 
their goods to be introduced to the South 
American market. Address Box 670 Pan Pa- 
cific. 

CUBA COLOMBIA, and CHILE— American ex- 
port company having established offices ih 
Cuba and Colombia are about to establish an 
office in Chile and desire to represent Amer- 
ican manufacturers in these countries. Ad- 
dress Box L 682 Pan Pacific. 



PARIS, FRANCE — Party wishes to make con- 
nection with manufacturers and importers of 
textures for garments for men and women 
with a view to representing them in France. 
Address Box 671 Pan Pacific. 

WANGANUI, NEW ZEALAND— Timber mer- 
chants in New Zealand desire to get in touch 
with exporters of Oregon lumber and other 
building materials in cargo lots. Desire C. I. 
F. quotations. Address Box 672 Pan Pacific. 

ARITA, SAGA-KEN, JAPAN— Manufacturers 
of porcelain, electrical accessories and chem- 
ical apparatus desires to get in touch with in- 
terested importers. Details on file in San 
Francisco. Address Box 674 Pan Pacific. 

BOLIVIA, BRAZIL — American corporations with 
large estates in Bolivia and Braxil desire to 
make cash purchases of dry goods, hardware, 
wearing apparel, shoes, machinery, agricul- 
tural tools, canned food products, machines 
and general merchandise. Address Box L 675 
Pan Pacific. 

SALTILLO, COAHUILA, MEXICO— American 
Consulate at Saltillo desires catalogues and 
commercial communications from California 
merchants interested in promoting trade with 
his district. Address as stated. 



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MATSON LINE | 

San Francisco to 
Honolulu Manila 

Freight and Passenger Service ] 

Rates and Sailings upon Application 



MATSON NAVIGATION CO. 



120 Market Street 



San Francisco, Cal. 



MEXICO — Quantities of cheap laundry soap wanted by Mexican buyer. 
Terms cash or thirty days preferred. Address Box L 676 Pan Pacific. 

MEXICO — Mexican exporter desires outlet for limited quantity crude rub- 
ber. Address Box 677 Pan Pacific. 

HAVANA — Importing and exporting firm desires to represent concerns 
desirous of furthering their interests in that territory. Address Box L 
678 Pan Pacific. 

ASIA — Los Angeles merchant contemplating trip to Turkey, Asia, Turkey 
proper, Greece, Italy. Firms desiring commercial connections in these 
territories communicate with Box L 679 Pan Pacific. 

AUSTRALIA — Saleswoman going to Australia desires to make connec- 
tions. Address Box L 680 Pan Pacific. 

AUSTRALIA — Gentleman from Australia in this country on business trip 
desires to secure agency for automobiles and automobile accessories for 
export to that country. Address Box L 681 Pan Pacific. 

HAWAII and EGYPT— Firm in this country having agencies in Hawaii, 
Egypt and Australia desire to secure the representation of firms for the 
sale of talcum powder, pencils, cotton goods, silk hosiery and paper. 
Address Box L 683 Pan Pacific. 

SIBERIA — The purchase of lead, pure arsenic, footwear and dry goods 
is desired by a man in Siberia. Address Box 684 Pan Pacific. 

DUTCH ARCHIPELAGO — Dutch merchantman desirous of representing 
manufacturers of laundry machines, cutlery, household utensils, textiles 
(underwear, etc.), small tools (drills, saws, etc.). Speaks and writes 
Malay languages as well as Dutch, English, French. Address Box 685 
Pan Pacific. 

SPANISH TRANSLATIONS: Expert Translator; legal documental or 
any other matter; Spanish correspondence a specialty; reasonable; 
satisfaction guaranteed. Address ESW Co., Pan Pacific Magazine, 618 
Mission St. 



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AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 
-ENGINES -WAGONS - 



A£ no 4j ; 



r^V 



EXPORT ORDERS 

A SPECIALTY 

Immediate Deliveries 

Prompt Shipments 

and 

All Shipments Made F. O. B. 

Los Angeles or San Francisco 

250 Page Catalogue and Price 

List on Application 

Cable Address " Arnott' ' Los Angeles 

Code A. B. C. 5th Edition 



ARNOTT SCO 

-LARGEST STOCK IN JT0UTHWEST - 

IIZ-II8 50.LOJAN.CELEJ5T.LOSANGEI.es 



; MULT1GRAPHING MIMEOGRAPHING 

| BRUCKMAN 

TRANSLATING and 
TYPING BUREAU 

Experts for all Languages 

525 MARKET STREET 

(Underwood Building) 

San Francisco 

Telephone Douglas 1316 



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Ocean Brokerage Co. Ocean Warehouse Co. I 



CUSTOM HOUSE BROKERS 

Import and Export Freight Forwarders 

Fire and Marine Insurance 

Head Offices: 762 Stuart Building, Seattle, Washington 



Service First" W. R. COLBY, Jr., President 

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U. S. BONDED STORAGE 

Weighing, Marking, Sampling, Reconditioning, 
Distributing, Consolidating 
Branch Offices i 2141 Commerce Street, Tacoma, Wash. - | 

"Service First" 



ijimiiiimmMiiEiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimimiiiimmiiiimiiiiiiiiiii. 



166 



Pan Pacific 



^Miiiuiiuiiijminiiiniiiiiiimiimiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniimiiiiiiimiiiiiiim'iim 



Cable Address: "ZELLERBACH" 



All Standard Codes 



Established 1869 



PRINTING PAPER 
WRITING PAPER 
PAPER BOXES 
PULPS 



Zellerbach Paper Company 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, TJ. S. A. 
NEW YORK CITY, U. S. A. 

has an enlarged Export Department and will furnish samples and quotations on: 



WRAPPING PAPER 

CARDBOARDS 

TWINES 

PAPER CONTAINERS 



SOLID FIBRE 
SHIPPING CASES 
PAPER TOWELS 
CORR UGATED PRODUCTS 



ENVELOPES MANUFACTURED TO ORDER 
and everything made of paper 
WE OWN AND OPERATE OUR OWN MILLS AND FACTORIES 
YOUR CORRESPONDENCE IS INVITED 

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C. HENRY SMITH 

= i 

1 MAIN OFFICE: 

| 311 CALIFORNIA STREET San Francisco, Cal. I 

411-412 ARCTIC BUILDING, Seattle, Wash. 

Shipping and Commission Merchants 
Steamship Agent and Ship Owner 

EXPORT AND IMPORT 

All Codes. Code Address: CHENRYINC 

^~ll 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 [ J 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 J I M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J II 1 1 f 1 1 1 1 M ! i [ F 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 IJ I F 1 1 1 1 1 ■ U 1 1 1 U 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 T ! 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 F 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 ! J r I M i 1 1 1 1 1 F 1 1 1 1 M 1 1 1 1^ 




SHOES 

Rubbers Tennis 

Wholesale 

All Kinds 
All Styles 

ROGERS 

SHOE CO. 

135 BUSH STREET 

San Francisco 

119 LINCOLN ST. 

Boston 

"Bentley Code used'* 



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Parent Company 
Established 1857 



Resources Over 

$1,000,000 



The same unfailing quality, uniformity of 
selection and right prices have made 

Monarch of the Oaks 

"Bear Brand" 

Sole Leather 

the stardard sole leather for those who 

demand the best. 

"Look for the Bear on every side." 

Kuim«,SdIlZ8Co. 



TANNERS 



603 Wells Fargo BIdg. 
San Francisco, California, U. S. A. 



Associated Manufacturers 
Importing Co. 

Manufacturers ' Representatives 
IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 

IMPORTS 

Chinaware, Crockery, Enamelware, 
Matches, Paper, Vegetable Oils, 
Essential Oils, Hides, Brushes, 
Bristles, Rattan, Copra, Kapok, 
Produce and Raw Materials 

EXPORTS 

Steel Sheets, Bars, Nails, Wire and 
all Steel Products, Hardware and 
Tools, Aluminum, Rosin, Borax„ 
Caustic Soda and Chemicals, Dyes, 
California Food Products and all 
Raw Materials. 

Cable Address: "AMICO," San Francisco 
All Codes 
871 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. i 



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August I 9 f 9 

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167 

mm mimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiM minim mil milium nun imiimimiimii imimiim iimiimiimiiiiimi milium i n i miimiimm minim | 

CHESTER WILLIAMS, Pits. J. E. PETERS, Vice-Prts. CEO. R. WEEKS, Secreury 



SHOES 

AT WHOLESALE 



The Largest Assortment of Men's, Women's and < hildren's Shoes for Immediate Delivery. 

EXPORT 
Export Orders Will Receive Our Careful Attention, and Any Special Styles or Other 
Details Will Be Considered. 

SEND FOR OUR CATALOGUE 

WILLIAMS-MARVIN CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO, U. S. A. 



Cable Address "WILMAR" I 



References : 
Metropolitan Bank 
Marine Bank and Trust Co. 



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(GENERAL PAPER CO. I 

525 MARKET ST., San Francisco, U. S. A. 
Cable Address: "EMCO," All Codes 
Bank 1 1 _■ i_ - ''^ ^ Paper 

References: ^<oADP"^"S Mill 

Bank of Italy 
San Francisco 

BRANCH OFFICES: Seattle, Portland, Los Angeles 
Dealers In News, Book, Writing, Coated, Ledger, Bond, 
Cardboards, Label and Wrapping Papers 
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Gable Address: 

RHNCO 
Codes: A. B. C. 4 

W. D. T. 
Bedford McNeil 




Representatives 



H. S. RENSHAW, Inc. 

Export — Import — Commission 

205-206 Metropolitan Bank Building 

= Freight Forwarders NEW ORLEANS, LA. Correspondence Solicited [ 

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F. GRIFFIN & CO. 



TEAMSHIP = 

AGENTS 



SHIP BROKERS 
IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 



341 Montgomery Street 



Phone Garfield 2241 



SAN FRANCISCO 1 



A. J. & J. R. COOK 

LEATHEK 

Sole, Calf Skins, Glazed Kid, Patent and 
Upholstery Leather, Etc. 

Cable Address : " Cookbro." San Francisco 

743 Mission Street San Francisco, Cal. 



THAOC MARK 




;nmiimiiiiiiimiimiimiimiimiiiiiimiiiiiiimimiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiiiimimiim miniiininiiiiillimiinilininiiimiiiiiiniiinmiiin?. -mimimm imimmiimimiii ii iimimiimiiinimimimiimi i nm illmllimm iiiiiiiiiiiiini = 

mmmm niiniiiniiiniiiiniiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu[iiiiiiiiiiiHiiiniiiniiniiiniiniiiiMiiiiiniiiniiuiiniiiniiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiiiii>iii iiiim miiiiiiiiiimniiiiiiiimniiiimimimiimitmimiiiiiimimiimifmniiimimiiiiiiiiiiiniiimiiiiiiimiimiiiiiimiimimiimiiiilh' 

Rolph, Mills & Company 

General Shipping and Commission Merchants 
EXPORTS and IMPORTS 

1 i 

Direct Representatives of Eastern Manufacturers of Principal American Goods 

SEATTLE PORTLAND LOS ANGELES NEW YORK CHICAGO 

Sniiimiiinmniiinimiiminiimiiiiiniiiiiiiniiiniitiimiimniinm ■■■ttiiiiiiiirjiiitiiiiiiiijriiixiiiiiiiiiiiiTiiiiiriirtiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiTiiiiriiiitJTiiiitiitfiiifiiitiiiiiiiittiiitiiiiiiirtiiiTiiiifiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiriiii'iiii nniniiiniiniiimmnmniiiiiiiniinnl 

tijiiiirjii iiiiiiiiiiiitjiiitMii tiiriii iiriiiiiiiiir mi i)iiiriiir<ii irtiiiMiiiiiiirtiiiiti iiiiii ii tiiit iiiii Mil iiiii m iitiiit iiiiti iimiit iiiiiiiiMiittii iriniriiiriiiitiiit iiiitmimii- iiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiillilMiij 



Cable Address: 

PETTIBONE 
Codes: 

Armsby, ABC 

5th Edition 

Bentley's, Western 

Union. 




Offices: 

1508-9 L. C. Smith 

Building 

Seattle, Wash. 

U. S. A. 



"Packers' Direct Selling Agents" 

aiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii minimi imimiimiiiiiimiimiimiimiimiimiimiii u i n inn iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiii inn mm muni niitiiin inuiiii nil nun nniniiiniiiniinni imiinnnninniniiiniiiniiiiimniinninir;. 

n mini iiiiiimmnii iimmiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimiiiiii mm imiiiiiimiimiii itiiiiiini iiiiiiiiiiiini iiimiimiiimiimiiiii i iiimnii miiiiii nm iniiiminiiinmnmniiniiinmniinmnmnninmniiniiiniiiiiiiiniimiiinnmiiiiiniiiniE 



P. J. SEALE & COMPANY 

■—Cargo Surveyors and Appraisers Exclusively 



485 California Street 

San Francisco 
TELEPHONE SUTTER 4893 



mum n uiiiiimiimiiimmiiimiiii nm iniininnninniininniiniinniiniinnnnii niiiininm inmni iimi iiimnmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiimii iinmiiimii imimiiniiinii i inimiiin i i iiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiniiiis 



168 



Pan Pacific 



^_i 1 1 1 1 F 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 m M 1 1 1 1 1 > 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 minimi i iiiiiiiiiiiiimm mmiiii mimimiimimiiimimii iiiiimimiii urn iiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimiiimiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiiiiiii mil i minimi iiiimimiiimimiiiiiii i i u 

PAUL R. RUBEN & CO. 



Importers 



HEAD OFFICE: SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. 



General Agents for Japan 

PACIFIC TRADING CO. 

P. O. Box 234, Yokohama 




MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS— PURCHASING AGI 



Exporters 

General Agents for North China 

CHUNGMEI TRADING CORP. 

S-11 Ningpo Road, Shanghai 



Because of our specialized Service and the fact that we successfully represent many of our largest Corporations we are able 
to open new and profitable channels of International Trade to you. 

We invite correspondence with American Manufacturers and Foreign Traders; our object being to bring the buyer and the 
seller together with the least possible expense to both parties. 



I Reference: Anglo-London-Paris National Bank, San Francisco, Cal. Cable Address: Paulrube. All Codes. 

Tlllllllliliiilliiliiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimilllllllimillllllimillllllllllim 



^iiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iimiimm iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimimimiimiimimiimimimiiiiimiimimiimiummiimimiimimiimiimiiL 1 iimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiimiimmiiimimiiii miimiiiimniiiiiiimi i iimiimimiiimimiimiiimimiim ml- 



Puget Sound Tug Boat Company 



Incorporated 1891 



Washington's Pioneer Towing 
Company 



Cable Address: TUG 



I SEATTLE 



WASHINGTON 



miimiimiiimimimiminmiimimmimiiimnmimirmimimiiiiiiimmiiiiiiiimiiiiiimi iiiimimiimiimimimmiiimiimiimimiimiiir: 



= riiiiiMiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiiniiii itiiiiniiiiiu iniiiiiiiiiiii mimimmiiiiu i imimiii i it 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. I 

IMPORT EXPORT DOMESTIC 
Beans, Peas, Seeds, Oils, Etc. 

Write for Quotations | 

| 209-211 Washington St. Chicago, 111., U. S. A. [ 

^iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimimiiiiiiimimiimimiimiimimiimiiiiiimiimimimiiimmiiimiiiiiimimim iimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiimmmiiiT 



Investments in Hawaii 

Pay Dividends 

The First Trust Company, Ltd. 

Hilo, Hawaii, T. H. 

May be trusted to answer inquiries 

promptly and frankly 

STOCKS — BONDS — REALTY 

General Insurance 

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^MiiiiiilllillilllllltllllllitllllillllMiiililillliillliiiiililnliiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiHilllllllliilluilluilHliliiilliillitiilliiiitiiiitiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 

BRADY & COMPANY 

Established 1892. SHIPPING AND COMMISSION 

Importers and Exporters Salmon, Fertilizer, Oils, Steel. Lumber 

42-Story L. C. SMITH BLDG., Seattle, Wash., U. S. A. 

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i^j tiiiTiitjritiJrMJJMiijriiJFiiJJiiiiiiiiJtiii'rMiitiJiriiiiiiJiriiiiiiJiiriiiriiiiiiiiriJiFiiiiriiiiEiitriiJiiiiiiriiiiiiiiMiiiiiiJiriiiiiiiiiriiitiiiiiEiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiJiii j^ 

BOOTHS 

CRESCENT 

RAND 




Sardines 



^ ii;:i:m>m,imimiitmmiiimimiimimiimimiimimiiiiiiiimimimiimimimiimiiiiiimiimimiimiiiiiimiimiimiimimiiiimm |M|ml 

PAGE & JONES 

SHIP BROKERS 

AND 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS 

Mobile, Alabama, U. S. A. 
[ Cable Address "PAJONES MOBILE" All Leading Codes Used I 

-Tiiiiimiiimimimiiimiiiiiimiimimiiiimimi iiiiiiimmiimiimiimiiiiimiiimmiimiimiimiiimimi n iiiiiiimiiiiiimiimir :m:: 



F. E. Booth Co. 

San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 

Importers 

AND 

Exporters 



^_' i i r 1 1 1 r j j 1 1 r 1 1 1 ri 1 1 1 1- j 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 r m 1 3 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r i ; 1 1 1 > 1 1 1 1 f t m 1 1 > 1 1 1 j r 1 1 1 1 t m ; i r e 1 1 j e 1 1 a r 1 1 1 1 ? 1 1 1 x e 1 1 g 1 1 m i i 1 1 1 f 1 1 1 r ; 1 1 u c 1 1 1 1 ] c 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 j 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 J ! i i i m 1 1 t r i <_= 

| THE CHAS. A. BACON CO. | 

EXPORTERS, IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS 
REPRESENTATIVES 

417 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal., U.S.A. 

CABLE ADDRESS: "CABCO" Code A B C— 5th Edition 

What do you wish to buy? What do you wish to sell? 

Write or cable us at once. We have unexcelled facilities for 

handling your entire business; selling, buying and forwarding 

REFERENCES: 

Banca Popolare Fugazl R. G. Dun Mercantile Agency = 

^MMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMlllllllliniMIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIINIIMMMIIIIIMIIinillllllinillllllinilllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMlllllllinillllllllllllllllllllllllllllll'l.- 



Crescent Brand Food Products 



Head Office: 

110 Market Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



^?iiJtiii<nii j riiijiii]iEMiiriijiriiJtjiiJiriiTJiiiifiiiiriiJiiiiJtiiijiiiijrFiijiriiirtiijiiiiiriiiitfiiiriiiiiiiiiriiijiriii4TfriiiiiiiirFiiiirMiiiffiiiJrriiiriiiiiJitiiTtriiijrit4f7 



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W. R. GRACE & CO. 

SAN FRANCISCO, 332 Pine Street 
NEW YORK, Hanover Square 

Importers Exporters 

Letters of Credit Foreign Exchange 

Cable Transfers 



AGENCIES: 

Seattle Peru Costa Rica Panama 

Los Angeles Guatemala Nicaragua Ecuador 

New Orleans Salvador Chile Bolivia 

General Agents 

JOHNSON LINE 

Direct Bi-Monthly Service Between San Francisco and Scandinavian Ports 

General Agents 

ATLANTIC & PACIFIC S. S. CO. 

Service temporarily suspended 
Atlantic and Pacific Coast Ports, Direct Service. No Transshipment. 

General Agents 

MERCHANTS LINE 
UNITED STATES AND PACIFIC LINE 

Operating Between Atlantic and Pacific Coast Ports and West Coast South America 



GRACE BROTHERS ( INDIA) Ltd, 
Calcutta, India 



GRACE CHINA COMPANY Inc. 
Shanghai, China 



EXPORTERS of all American products, 
including especially Iron and Steel, Salmon, 
Flour, Canned Goods, Dried Fruits, Chem- 
icals, Lumber and Machinery. 

— Also — 
Nitrate — Direct shipments from Chilean 
Nitrate Ports to Japan and other Far East 
destinations. 
Coffee. 



IMPORTERS of all raw materials from 
South and Central America, Japan and Far 
East, including: 

Wool, Cotton, Hides and Skins. 

All edibles — Rice, Beans, Cocoanuts, Pea- 
nuts, Tapioca, Pepper, Cassia and Tea. 

Oils, Copra, Rubber, Jute, Hemp. 



LARGE STOCKS OF ORIENTAL IMPORTS CARRIED AT 
SAN FRANCISCO AND SEATTLE 



GRACE BROS. & CO., Ltd. 
London and Liverpool 



W. R. GRACE & CO.'S BANK 
New York 



GRACE & CO. 
Rio de Janeiro BRAZIL Santos 



Slim niimn mill i minium mi mil nun i in inn iinnimiimi mini i n in minim mini nun iiiuiiiuiiium mill mumniiiumii imnmniimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiminiiiiimniiiiiiniiniiMiiimimii 





Hasa paa 



g% 



"SUNSHINE 
BELT" 



PACIFIC MAIL 

Steamship Co. 

"Sunshine Belt" to Orient 

PASSENGERS AND FREIGHT 



Trans-Pacific Service 

San Francisco, Honolulu, Japan, China and Philippines 

Monthly Sailings by American Steamers 
"VENEZUELA" "ECUADOR" "COLOMBIA" 



Manila — East India Service 

Direct Route to 

INDIA via Manila, Saigon, Singapore, Calcutta, Colombo 

Approximate Bi-Monthly Sailings by American Steamers 
"COLUSA" "SANTA CRUZ" 



Panama Service 



Mexico, Central America, Panama, and South America 

Fortnightly Sailings by American Steamers 

"NEWPORT" "PERU" "CITY OF PARA" 

"SAN JOSE" "SAN JUAN" 



Service and Cuisine Unexcelled 



For Full Information Apply 

General Office 508 California Street 

SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 




■ gnMrn g MBrofiMBMHTOSBM BBial 



SEPTEMBER, 1919 



Price 25 Cents 




FOREIGN TRADE PROBLEMS AHEAD 










Edi'eri By John H. Gerrie 



R 



r 







**. 









Big Construction Era in the Ori 
Pl^in Distributing Port in Manil 
business Follows Loans In Latin-America 









Dr. W. E. Aughinbatigh, F. H. Williams, C. C. Batchelder, F. R. Eldridg< 
Lazaro Base h, A. A. Preciado, Lucie M. Morgan 



AMAGAZINE/ INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE 



^tiiif*fitiriiiirfirtiiJitiiriitriiiiiiiJiiJjiiitiic]i:iJiiiij[riirriJFtit]Tifiii)iirt)JLiijfriiJFtiiitiJiriiTiTiiiitijtt:iitiiJiiiiiiii»tsiiiriiitiiiiiiTritiiiiiiit:jitiiiii)iiiiiirti»«iiiF iiiiriiiriiifrEiii[iiiriii][tiJitij)iiiitiiirtiirtitiiiii»iiiiiJiiiiiiiTiiJittiifiiifjj|iiiiiririijrriifKifi«tiit4«iiitiii[ifitiitricriLiiit:[itJtii]Tiit]ifiiTiritt>tiiiiFrTiif[TiJir^ 

| Java-China-Japan Lijn | 

(JAVA PACIFIC LINE) 

BETWEEN 

San Francisco 

AND 

I Netherlands East Indies I 



DIRECT 




REGULAR ^ l"""^ RELIABLE 



SERVICE 



BATAVIA 

SOERABAIA 

SAMARANG 

MACASSAR 
CHERIBON 



J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. CO. 

General Agents 

2 Pine Street, San Francisco 



^iiitiJiiiiJiiiiiriiiiiiiiiiJitiiiiiiJiiiiiiiiiciiiiiiiiicifiiiiRiitiiiiirt iii>iiitfiiiJiiiiiJiiitiiiiiiiiiJiii;iiiiiji<iiiifiiiiiffit]iiiiJiriiiiijjiiJiiiijiiiciii<fiiruiifiii 



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September I 9 / 9 169 

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Cable Address: ^_ _ __ _^_ Code Used: 

Llewellyn ^ %./ lVT I i J #\ A Y A. B.C. 

Los An B €lra, « B ^f I XI E ■"% I I I % I W 5th Edition 

^fc m A MADE IN U S A. - M ■ M*^^^ 



LOS ANGELES, CAL. 



Hammered Steel 



SHOES 

and 

DIES 




CAST STEEL 



SHOES 

and 

DIES 



Rolling Mill Products sS^i" 



HEAVY 

and 
LIGHT 

Forgings 

Of 
Every 
Descrip- 
tion 




HEAVY 
and 

LIGHT 
Steel or 
Grey Iron 

Castings 

Of 

Every 
Description 



7,000 Pound Steam Hammer 



Structural Steel Engineers & Fabricators 

MILL BUILDINGS— STEEL STRUCTURES— TOWERS— TANKS — RIVETED PIPE— HEMISPHERICAL 
BOTTOM TANKS AND TOWERS— FORGE SHOP— FOUNDRY— MACHINE SHOP 

£ itiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiijiiiitiiiutiiiiitf ■■iifijiitiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiijiMitjiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiriiiiitJi>fijj||iii(j|MflllttJlir>t]ii>iiiJiiii>iiiiiiiiiiiiiriiitiiiiiiiii imtiiitrivniiMiKiuiiiiittiiiiiiiiiiiittiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMitiriiiiMiiitiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiii inn mi niiiujiiJiiiiIiiiitiiiiiiiKiiiiiiiii miij i nil i f im inn i mtiiiii iiint mi iiiiitiiuf m^ 



170 



^_> ■■''■■rjiiifiiiiriJiriijrriJitiiiriiirEiiiciiJtiiirEiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiJiiiaiiiiiiitiiitiijrEijiiiijicijiiiiiriiiJtiiiriEifiiiiiriiiriiiiiiiiiiiiJiiiJtiiiJiiiJLiiifiiiTriiiiiE^ 



Pan Pacific 

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HOTEL 
WHITCOMB 

SAN FRANCISCO 

One of a group of magnificent public build- 
ings at the Civic Center of California's metro- 
polis, within a few minutes walk of theater, 
business and shopping districts. 

The Whitcomb makes a specialty of cuisine, 
serving either la carte or special breakfasts, 
luncheons and dinners. Afternoon tea in the 
beautiful Sun Lounge. 

A telegram or wireless at our expense brings 
the Whitcomb representatives to the steamer. 
Whitcomb bus meets all steamers. 

Rates for Room and Bath from $2.50 a day 
J. H. VAN HORNE, Manager 

niiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiuiiiNiiiiiiiniiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiHiuMiniiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiinMiHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiuiiiiiiiiniinii:- 



F< 



Study ^-r 

^i£n rade 

ji 




— under personal instruction of inter- 
national experts — greatest course in 
Foreign Trade ever offered on the 
Pacific Coast — most practical and 
thorough — will teach you the busi- 
ness of Foreign Trade — how to get 
into it — how to carry it on — how to 
succeed at it— no one interested, or 
likely to be, in Foreign Trade can 
afford to miss this course. 

Send us your name and address, and 
full information regarding this Course 
will come right back. 

BUTLER SCHOOL OF COMMERCE 

New Call Bldg. Next to Palace Hotel 
on New Montgomery Street 




Brown 

Dry Cure 

X Circle 

Retread 

Mold 



| T^HIS retreading 
plant is a profit 
| maker for the tire 
1 repair man. 



TT is built to withstand continual use. This plant can I 
| be furnished with either gas or gasoline burner or it I 
! can be connected direct to steam boiler. 

Write for Catalog A-P 

JESSE F. BROWN, MANUFACTURING CO. 

LOS ANGELES, U. S. A. 

Reference: Citizens National Bank, Los Angeles 

^nif r iiittidi riiiiriiiitiiiiriirtii]iiiiiiiiii[iiiiiiiiEiiiEiiiiiiittiiiFiiiiiiiriiiiFiiii[ijiiii<iriiitiiiiiiiuiciij[iiiiitiiiriiji[iiiitiii[iiiiiiijiriiiitiiiriiiii r bi jtiiiiiiT^ 

j'MniiiiniiiiiiiiitiiiniiiiiiiniiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiniiiiMiuiiniiiiiiiitiiiiMiiiMiiMiiiMiiiiiiiMiiiMiniiiuiiiiMiitiiiiiniuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiii^' 

IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 
FROM STOCK 

I iiimiiiimiliiilliiil 

| Iron Steel 

Bolts Nuts 

Chain Waste 

Blacksmith Coal 
Wire Rope 
Logging Tools 
Axes Saws 

Belting Pulleys 



imiiiiijimimiini 



I MillandMineSupplyCo. 



I Cable Address "Millmine" 



Seattle, Wash. 



=iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii"iMiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiii. 



September 1919 



171 



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MANUFACTURERS 



AND 



WHOLESALE DEALERS OF 

MENS— WOMENS— CHILDRENS AND INFANTS 

SHOES 

WE HAVE ONE OF THE LARGEST STOCKS ON THE PACIFIC COAST 

ALL STAPLE AND LATEST STYLES FOR IMMEDIATE DELIVERY 

SAMPLES WILL BE SENT CHARGES PREPAID 



Cable Address 
NESCO" Bentley's Code 



NOLAN-EARL SHOE CO. 



25 FREMONT STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, U. S. A. 



;,in n miiiiiiiiiiiii iimimniiii r in [ hi it iiiiiuiiiiiiii i ilililHilillilllilliliiiilll lllllllll I I llililiil nil I illllllillllllllill llllllllll i mil iiiiiiimimf 



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! Parent Company 
[ Established 1857 



Resources Over I 
$1,000,000 



Associated Manufacturers I 
Importing Co. 

Manufacturers' Representatives 
IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 

IMPORTS 

Chinaware, Crockery, Enamelware, 
Matches, Paper, Vegetable Oils, 
Essential Oils, Hides, Brushes, 
Bristles, Rattan, Copra, Kapok, 
Produce and Raw Materials 

EXPORTS 

Steel Sheets, Bars, Nails, "Wire and 
all Steel Products, Hardware and 
Tools, Aluminum, Rosin, Borax, 
Caustic Soda and Chemicals, Dyes, 
California Food Products and all 
Raw Materials. 

Cable Address: "AMICO," San Francisco 

All Codes 

| 871 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. I 
| | 

piniiiMiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiMiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiMiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiimiiiiMiiiiiiitMiiiiiuiiiniiuiiimiiiiiiiiiimimiMiiimiiiilr 



mmmmmmmmmm 




The same unfailing quality, uniformity of 
selection and right prices have made 

Monarch of the Oaks 

"Bear Brand" 

Sole Leather 

the stardard sole leather for those who 

demand the best. 

"Look for the Bear on every side." 

TANNERS 

603 Wells Fargo Bldg. 
San Francisco, California, U. S. A. 






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| "World-Wide 



LD-WlDE <*[* . t OLi ~ * A TTT X- /-it AGENCIES IN ALL 

charterers ilmiierHai flipping $c ®ramng (En* *™*™ **» 

SHIPOWNERS, SHIP BROKERS, IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

MARINE CARGO SURVEYORS AND APPRAISERS 

i 

HEAD OFFICE: ALASKA BUILDING, SEATTLE, U. S. A. 
Branch Office: 149 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 

Cable Addresses: "Usatco" Seattle. "Unshipstrad" New York 



IMPORTS 

Copra, Vegetable Oils, Rice, Peanuts 
Australian Skins, Gums, Rubber 
Menthol, Camphor, Etc. 



EXPORTS 

Canned Salmon, Dyes, Steel and Steel 
Products, Paints, Ducks and Sail Cloth. 



.1 1 r 1 1 1 n f 1 1 1 r i m i i f c 1 1 1 u m 1 1 n i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ j i m i a l i ■ ■ 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 ■ n 1 i l u i in 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 > 1 1 1 1 r i u m 1 1 n 1 1 1 m ■ m 1 1 1 1 m i j 1 1 1 1 1 r r ■ ■ 1 1 j i i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 < t m i f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 n 1 1 1 1 t e [ u i ■ 1 1 1 r 1 1 n t ■ ■ 1 1 l ■ i < l e 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 f 1 1 j i r 1 1 1 m 1 1 1 1 1 1 j > 1 1 u i h 1 1 r ■ ■ 1 1 1 m i 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 » m 1 1 f i d i r 1 1 4 u i ■ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j t ti 1 1 J 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 l rr 






172 



Pan Pacific 



^iiMiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiii mnmimiimimiimimk' iiiimimiimnmiimiimm miimiimimimnm mm milium mnmiiii i i iiiimiii mi ■ 



CHAS. M. PAGANINI 



EDWARD P. BARRY 



Edward Barry Company | | Clyde Equipment 

Company 



WHOLESALE PAPER DEALERS 
San Francisco, Calif. 



PORTLAND 



SEATTLE I 



Agents for: 

L. L. BROWN'S LEDGER, BOND AND 

TYPEWRITER PAPERS 

Samples and Quotations Promptly Furnished 



Machinery and Supply 
Merchants 



MANUFACTURING DEPARTMENT 
I Largest Wholesale Bookbinders on the Pacific Coast 
Writing Tablets — Ruled Goods — Blank Books 
Loose Leaf Systems — Bookbinding Supplies 



542 First Avenue South 



Seattle, Washington, U. S. A. 



■ 
■ 

i 

^lUiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiniiiiiiiiniiniiiiMMiiiiniiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiuiiiniiiiiiiiiiiniiiniiiniiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiW .TOiimiimiiiiiimimiiimmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim imiiimiimiiiiiimiimiiimimiii ';. 

^imiimiiimiimiimimimiimiimimimiimimiiiMimi iiMiriiiraiiiiiiniriiifiiidMiirMifEMiti JiiiiiiiirriiiriM^FMiiriiirniriMDtMiiMiiriiitiiiriiiJi iiiiiiriiiiiiiit lrciiitiiiiiiuMiiiMiiiiiiJ it riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiijiiitiMitMiiiiMiiiiiitiiiiiiiuiiutiiiit ]Mi:tiiiijiMiiMi iiirnma 

PURNELL & PAGET 



■ 
| 

i 

— 

= 



ARCHITECTS 

AND 

CIVIL ENGINEERS 

CHAS. S. PAGET, A.S.M. A.M. S. C.E. 



Investigations — Inspections 

Reports and Valuations 

Design and Supervision of Construction 

for Industrial Plants and Buildings 
Power Plants 
Difficult Foundations 



Bridges and Steel Structures 
Wharf and Dock Construction 
River and Harbor Works 
Investigation and Development of Mining 
Properties 



ESTABLISHED IN CHINA 16 YEARS 

f Missions Building, The Bund, Canton, China 
OFFICES <^ Paak Hok Tung-Canton, Swatow, China 

( American National Bank Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Telegraphic Address, "PANEL" Western Union Code, A.B.C., 5th Edition 



iiuuiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiuuiiiniiuiiiimiiuiiimiiiiiiimiimiimiimiiiiiiimiimiimiiimimiiii iimiiimiiimiimnm Minium 



September 19 19 



173 



allium iiiiiiiiiiiiimiiimiiiiiiiii iiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiMiiiMMiiiiimiiMniiiiimiiiiiiiiniiimmiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiMiiiM- 

SHOES J 

MEN'S, LADIES' AND 
CHILDREN'S 

SHOES 

TENNIS and OUTING SHOES j 

also 
RUBBER BOOTS and SHOES { 

on bind for immediate shipment 

I MARVIN SHOE CO., Inc. | 

Shoes Wholesale 

I 216 Market Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. ) 

Cable Address "VINMAR" Bentley Code 
^iiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiimimiimimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii i tn i i nil tint n in tin i mi > in [iiiieni i iiu iiiiinii niiir m mi jFinr? 

i'liiiMiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiuiiniiiiMiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinuiiiiiiiiiiiiiinMiiiiiiitiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuMiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiMiniiiiMiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiniiii^ 



2™ iiiiliiiiiiiiiiniiiilllll ■ ■ I r ■ I j 1 1 1 1 1 1 [ i ■ 1 1 1 1 1 [ 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 r f 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j r 1 1 iilllliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiuiiiiiiillilii imiii 'j 




BLACK BEAR GREASES | 

Cup, Transmission, Axle, Car, Graphite, 

Gear, Chain, Skid, Curve, Tractor, 

Hair and Wool Flock 

Manufactured under our exclusive 
patented process 

A distinctive Grease of unusual wearing 
qualities and high heat resistance 

FULL INFORMATION UPON REQUEST 

PACIFIC LUBRICATING CO. 

Manufacturers and Exporters 
715 W. Spokane St., Seattle, Wash., V. S. A. ! 
OR ANY OF OUR REPRESENTATIVES 
= SYCIP HANSON WINKEL CO., Inc., 327 J. Luna Blnondo, Manila, I 
P. I.— P. M. SCOTT & CO., 76 Pitt St., Sydney, N. S. W. — 
P. LAFARGUE, Casllla 308, Valparaiso, Chile 

fTi 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ] 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 r 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 j 1 1 1 1 ininiiii 1 1 ii 1 1 i ii 1 1 ii 1 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 ■ 1 1 1 m i ii 1 1 ii 1 1 ii 1 1 i 1 1 imiii nun 1 1 ,S 

^jmillMIIII I IIIIIIM1 1 Ml I III] IIIIIMM MM I MM rill I III IMIl III]] III lllll I Mil [Ml I Fill MM I [IIIIMKIMI 111111111 1111 IIIIIMIIIMIIIIIII MM 1 1 1 1 1 1 f I M 1 1 II 1 1 M 1 1 1 1 II 1 1 1 ij^f 




Standard Products Co.1 (GLASS WARE! 



Asiatic — Import and Export 
Head Office, 260 California Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



New York 
Pittsburgh - 
Seattle 
Los Angeles 




Shanghai 
Singapore 



Manila 
Yokohama 



EXPORTERS, of all American products, especially Iron 
and Steel Products, Machinery, Black and Galvanized 
Pipe, either American or English Thread, Paints, Var- 
nishes, Cutlery, Sanitary Fixtures, Railway Supplies, 
Asbestos, Leather Belting, Explosives, Imitation 
Leather, Automobile Trucks, Tractors, Lighting Fix- 
tures, Chain, Plate and Window Glass, Fabrikoid. 

IMPORTERS, Raw Materials from Asia, Camel's Hair, 
Animal Hair, Bristles, Furs, Hides and Skins, Human 
Hair, Egg Products, Nuts, Oils, Etc. 



(FOR TABLE AND SIDEBOARD) 

Dinner Services 
Vitrified Hotel China 

The three CHOICEST PRODUCTS in the world 
DIRECT FROM FACTORY TO DEALER 

(I am prepared to fill orders at once for any quantity. Write for 
catalogue and prices TODAY. Correspondence in any language) 

FACTORIES: Fostoria Glass Company 

Edwin M. Knowles China Company 
Buffalo Pottery 
Cable Address: "HEASTAND" 

B. F. HEASTAND 



= 618 Mission Street 



San Francisco, U. S. A. j 



Code Word "PERKINS." All Codes Used. 



| References, First National Bank, Bank of Italy, Dun's ! 
or Bradstreet's, San Francisco, U. S. A. 



^MIlMIIMMMMIMMIMMIMIMMIMINMIIMIllMIIMIlMIIIMIMMIIIMIMMMMMMIMMIMIIMMIMMMIlIMIIMMIMIIMIIIMIIIMIIMIIIMlllMIIIMIIMIIiMliMlllllllllliir 

^_n rii]riiitiiiiriiiiiiiitiiiTiiii[iiiiiiiiiiiitiiixiiiifiiJtjiiiiiiifiiiiriiiriiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiriiiitjiijjiiiiiitriiiiiii»tjiiitiiiiijiirjiirfiijftiiiriiiri4iiiiniciiitiii^ 

Murry Jacobs 

Jacobs & Gile 

■ i 

DIRECT MILL REPRESENTATIVES 

IRON AND STEEL PRODUCTS 

Cast Iron Water Pipe 
Hydrants and Valves 



Railway Exchange Building 
Portland, Oregon 



L. G. Smith Building 
Seattle, Washington 



! ^IIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII IMIMMIMIIIMIIIMIIIMIMMIIMIMIIIIMIIMIMMIIIIIIMIIIMIII?. ni|||||llllllllllllllllllllllll MIIMMMMIMMIIMI MM Mill Mill Mill 11111111111111111 lllllllll MM I Mil Mill IIIIIMM Mill MM I MMIIMIM MMMIMMlll- 



iiiii milium MMmiimiiMiiMMmiiiimiiMimim iiiiimnmNiimii iiiiiiimiiiiiinmit iniiim immiimimiiii iiinmim mi iiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiimiii mini iiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiii 11111111111111111111111111111111 it 



; 



Branches and Agencies: 

YOKOHAMA 
KOBE 

VLADIVOSTOK 
TSING TAU 
SHANGHAI 
SAIGON 
COLOMBO 
SINGAPORE 
SOERABAYA 
MANILA 



INTERNATIONAL TRADING COMPANY 

of America, Inc. 

IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 

FORWARDERS AND COMMISSION AGENTS 
MANUFACTURERS' REPRESENTATIVES 



Cable Address: "INTRACO" 

Codes : 
Bentley's 
W. U. 
A. B. C. 6th Edition 



Import Products of all 

Countries where we 

are located 



— EXPORTS — 

Iron and Steel, Machinery, Plumbing Supplies, Heavy and Light Hardware, Automobile 

Accessories, Paints, Tractors, Typewriters, Talking Machines, Cotton and 

Wool Textiles, Hosiery and General Dry Goods 

We will purchase for foreign merchants on small commission basis of certified invoice. Correspondence and inquiries solicited. 

Head Offices: SEATTLE, U. S. A. 

■in 11HU111111111 iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiniiiii ijiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiliiiitiiiniiiii! it iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiniiiiiiiimMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiNiiiiiiiiiiiiinii^ 



174 



Pan P a c if f 



^ fiiijiiiifjiia^iiitiiiifiiii-fiiitiiij ^iiiitiiJiiiiitiiiiiiJiLiiJi J!ii-ii»i4Jiciiirii^iii4itEii.iiiiiFiic:ii]-itiiiiiiiiiiiJJiEiiiiiiiiiijtiii*iiiJtiii.iEiii Lii.iir jiliijifij j-LiiiiisijiiiJiiiiJiiiiii-iiiiriiiiiijiEiiJiiiiixiiiiiriJ Fii«LiiJii-iiifiiijriiir-kiiiiiriiJ.fiiir.iiiiJiiiiJEiiiitpiJj.iiiic4iiij-.eiiii-iiiia-iiiiiciiiii.sj||[iiiiLi«ii t=r 

1 Shippers Commercial Corporation I 



SEATTLE, U. S. A. 

L. C. SMITH BLDG. 



EXPORTERS 




Cable Address: SHIPCOMCO 

ALL CODES USED 

IMPORTERS 



Trade Mark 



CANNED 
SALMON 



Pacific Coast Products 



CANNED 

MILK 



=^re aiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiJLiiiiEiiiLiiiiEiiiEEiiiiiJiEiiitiaiciiiJEiiJtEiirEiiJi-Eiiii-iijiiiiFiiiiiiiJEiiiJiiiJ-JiiJriiiiiiiiriiiiiiiiEiiJrtJj JiriJiEiJiitiJiriJ FiiiriiiiFiJir iirEiiiiiriJJiiiiiiiiiiiiijriiiJiiiiLiii jiiiiliiiifeijiiij ii;iiiiFiJitEiiJ»iijriiJ i-iiiiiiijiiii JitiiiiLiJii.piiJi-iiJiiiijjriiJitiiJiiiii-ieiiiJi-iajiiiiJii.iiiJjEiiJij.,— 

^lI.< ITIIIEfllliEII11llirilllllllllllfllIJII]IIIIilEI]IEIIirilirillllllllll1IEIII[lll[llllllJIEIlJ(ll}rilirilltEIIJEIIJ[CI]ltllllllJ[lliri|]JllilIlljrEI]rEIIJtElirrilJXI|]J[|||IEIUEIt-^ ^11111 IIUIUIUHIeJIeUeI ItlllEllllllllIIIIMJEltilllllllEEtllllUIIHIIIIIIIIIIitllllll llltlltllEtftllll llllEJIUUltlf Bl EtHtftiaillHItHf tlfll llititiittllUUill inuimB 



Cable Address: "DILL" 




Watch for this Trade-Mark 



EXPORTERS OF 

Steel Products Chemicals Dye Stuff 

Acids Hematine Barytes 

Caustic Soda Soda Ash Phenol 

Rosin Turpentine 

and Raw Materials for All Industries 



Fish Oil 
Soya Bean Oil 
Hides 
Coffee 



I DILL CROSETT, Inc. 

I 235 Pine Street San Francisco 

Branch Offices 

128 William Street New York 

328 Sannomiya-Cho, 1 Chome Kobe Japan 

Union Bank Chambers Sydney, Australia 



SEATTLE FAR EAST TRADING 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Import — Export Merchants 

Head Office, L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Wash., U. S. A 

Branch Offices: 

SHANGHAI, 6 Jinkee Road HONGKONG 

KOBE, 23 Sakae Machi, 6 Chome 
TOKIO. 4 Nakadoro Marunouchi 

Cable Addresses: 

SEATTLE, "Safetco" SHANGHAI, "Safetco" 

HONGKONG, "Safetco" KOBE, " Kelley " 

TOKIO, "Safetco" 



IMPORTERS OF 




Cocoanut Oil 


Castor O 


Rape Seed Oil 


Tallow 


Beans 


Peanuts 


Copra 


. Silks 


Rattans Etc. 





EXPORT SPECIALTIES 

Iron, Woodworking and Textile Machinery 
Iron, Steel, Pipe, Plates, Bars, Sheets, Rail- 
way Supplies, Rails, Cars, Locomotives, 
Etc. Wire Nails, Paints, Varnishes. 

Glass, Sanitary Ware, Plumbing Fixtures, 

Hardware, Tools, Chemicals, 

Electric Meters 



Correspondence Solicited 



aiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiimniiiiiiii 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiniiim iiiMiiiiiiiuiiiniiii i 111111!= Shi 1 mini mm 1 1 1 imimiimiiimimiil minim 1 immimi 11111 r. 



? iiimiimii miniiiiiiinniimi 1 iiiiiiiimiiiiiiimiiniiiiiiMimiiiimiiiiii iiiiiiih lummimmmimiimimiii 1111 1 mmiiii 1 mum nmiimiii 1 1 iiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimiimu iiiiiiiiiiini 1 iiiiiiimiiiinii nittj 

THOMPSON & CASTLETON 

Electrical and Mining Machinery 

= = 

Complete Electrical Shop — Specialists on Rewinding 
Machinery of All Kinds 



COMPLETE INSTALLATIONS MADE 



316 FIRST STREET, SO. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



,-iin!MU[MiniinnMliiiiiiiiiii[iiiniiiniiniiiniiiniiniiin:iiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiii[iiiniiiniiiiiiiniiniii;iiiiitiiiniiniiiniiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiii 



BnmaniginiHiiwinmiiiiiwiiiiiiawHnniiiiiniiimH tinmnnitiiiiiiiHiiintiiiim»w mm iit t niim t nitim v of mri" ' " " ">• 



September 19 19 



175 



^i!i!iiiiiiiiiiiii[iiiniiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiil!Mii[|iinii:iiii!iiillliliiliiiiii[iHiiiiniiilii!!niiiiifiiiiiliiiiiii[iiniiiiiiiiiiMiiiiHiiiiiiiii]iiiii[iiiitlilniii[iiiiiiii^ 

PLANTING THE 
FLAG OF THE 
ADMIRAL LINE 
IN THE ORIENT 




Trans-Pacific Freight and 
Passenger Service 

Sailing from Seattle at Regular Intervals 

THE ADMIRAL LINE 

PACIFIC STEAMSHIP CO. 

Fifth Floor L. C. Smith Bldg., Seattle, Wash. 
112 MARKET ST., San Francisco 8 BRIDGE ST., New York = 
j Manila Hong Kong Vladivostok Shanghai Singapore Kobe Yokohama | 

fl lllllllllllllllllMIIIIIIIIIIINIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIinlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllliniMlllllinilllMIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIlllllllllllllr, 



I 

! 

1 

(!) 

1 

I 

1 

I 

1 

1 
1 

C) 

I 



^llllllllllMlllllltlllltlllllllinilllllltlllllMlllllllllll[lllllllllllllllllllllllllllli:iUIIIHIII[IIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII)IIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIIK' 

The Policy of this Bank during Nine- 
ty-five Years has been outlined by 
Honorable Hugh McCulloch, the 
first Comptroller of the Curren- 
cy, in the first report issued 
by his office: 

"Do nothing to foster and encourage speculation. 

"Give facilities only to legitimate and prudent trans" 
actions. 



•:♦ 



"Distribute yourloans rather than concentrate them 
in a few hands. 

"Pursue a straightforward, upright, legitimate 
banking business. 

"Treat your customers liberally, bearing in mind that 
the bank prospers as its customers prosper." 

We are seeking new business on our record 



Oltjtfmtral National Hattk 



of Nftu $ork 

(Established 1824) 



IIIIIIHllllllllllllfllllMlllllllllllllllllltllllllllUlllllllllllllinillllllllllllllllltllllllllllllHIIIIIIIillllllllllllllUlllllllllMllltlllllr 



^MIIMIItllllMllltlllllllllllltlllHIIIUIIIIMIIIM!lllllltll!IIIIIMIItllinilllllllllllllllinillMllllllltllllllll!llllllllinilHIIIIIIIII!IIIHIIItllllllllllllllIlllinilli^ 

1 L. Dinkelspiel Company I 

INCORPORATED 

115-135 Battery Street 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS 



DRY GOODS 



FURNISHING 
GOODS 



NOTIONS and 
FANCY GOODS 



Cotton Piece Goods — Linens — I 

Towels — Napiins 

Dress Goods — Cotton and Wool § 

Silks — Sheetings — Bleached and | 

Unbleached Muslin 

Flannels and Flannelettes — Ticks | 

— Prints, Etc. 

Men's, Ladies', and Children's 1 
Hosiery — Underwear — Shirts — | 
Sweaters 

Ribbons — Laces — Embroideries — 1 
Threads — Notions of all 
Descriptions I 



BLANKETS — COMFORTABLES — QUILTS 

i Complete stocks carried Correspondence all languages I 

Cable Address: "LIPSEKNID" 

^EII LI III IMI Jtlllllll III! J M lllllllllllllllMlirill IIM1 1 1 lllllll jllli Mil llll III I J Mil I III HIM 1M1I llll Jill] Mil llll ill IIMII I MM Mlltllll Jll J J tllll IIIIlMIIIIir I! 1 1 1 J .7^ 

ynilll!IIIMM!IIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII! MIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIItlllllMIIM IIIIMMIIIUIIUIIIinillllllMlllllinMllllllllllinillMIIIIIIIMIird 

= 5 

I INGRIM-RUTLEDGE COMPANY | 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
413-15 MONTGOMERY STREET 



PRINTERS 

STATIONERS BOOKBINDERS 

ENGRAVERS 

Art and Color Work 

Catalog and Booklet Printing 

Copper Plate and Steel Die Engraving 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO 
EXPORT ORDERS 



Filing Devices Office Equipment \ 

Office Furniture 
Loose Leaf Systems 



COMPLETE LINE OF OFFICE SUPPLIES 



INGRIM-RUTLEDGE COMPANY I 



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



^lIlMMlMIUMIIIIIIllMllMIIIMIIlMIIIMIIIIlllMlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllMIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIMMIIIlllMllllllllMllllllllMIIIMllMinMinilllliinillllllinillllir- 



176 Pan Pacific 

-'iiimiilliillinii i linn illlllllll iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii; jmilimiillillllillilll lliiiiiiiilliiliiiliiiiiliin nun mimiii lininii i n iiiiiimimiiimimiimiiillllimi^ 

| NIPPON YUSEN KAISHAJ | Skinner & Eddy Corporation I 

(JAPAN MAIL STEAMSHIP CO.) <* *- 
Capital, Yen $100,000,000 Head Office, Tokyo 




Fleet 99 — Gross Tonnage, 500,000 

[ TRANS-PACIFIC PASSENGER SERVICE 

1 Between Seattle and Hong Kong via Japan Ports, 
1 Shanghai and Manila, with Direct Connection for 
All Points in the Orient and Australia 

I Greatly Improved Fast Service of Large, High-Powered Modern 
Twin and Triple Screw Steamships with Unequaled 
Passenger Accommodations 

DISPLACEMENT: 

| S. S. Suwa Maru 21,020 tons S. S. Katori Maru 19,200 tons 

I S. S. Fushimi Maru....21, 020 tons S. S. Atsuta Maru 16,000 tons 

| S. S. Kashima Maru..19,200 tons S. S. Kamo Maru 16,000 tons 

| For further information, rates, tickets, berth reservation, etc., 

= apply to any office of the principal railways in the United States 

| and Canada, also any office of Messrs. Thos. Cook & Son, Messrs. 

| Raymond & Whitcomb Co., American Express Co., and other tourist 

I agencies in all parts of the world, or to the 

NIPPON YUSEN KAISHA 



Colman Building 
Seattle 



Railway Exchange Bldg. 
Chicago 



Equitable Bldg. 
New York 



^illlllllllSIIISllJltlSI tllllllllllllltJII tt ■■■(■■'^■■■'■■■(■■■■■f ■■■! ■■■■IIIITIIIIfilllllllJIIIltlllllllllBlllJlllIllllllllLIIIIIBIlJIIIItllltllHEIIIllllItlllllliajllllirilJFIIiritf^ 

^rraill*lllls>Jirsilll*lirsllLfllirilll>llliBliiiiirllll>llllTlllltaiiiaillfiiiiEiiirllliilllltllllll3JillllllllBllTiiliiEiiifii9riaiiiiiirEiiitiiiFiiif[Eiirrlliiriliflllllllll eiiit^ 



1 Cable Address, "Connell" 



All Codes 



Connell Bros. 
| Company I 

I GENERAL IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 



HOME OFFICE 
L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Wash., U. S. A. 



BRANCH OFFICE 
485 California Street, San Francisco, Cal., U. S. A. 



OFFICES ALSO AT 
! Shanghai Manila Hong Kong Singapore 



Correspondence Solicited 



RECORD 

BUILDERS 



OF 



Steel Cargo 
STEAMSHIPS 



SEATTLE 



WASHINGTON 



U. S. A. 



- -Ill 111 I Mil I lllll III I llll [III I Mil I III I III I llll till I HI | [|| 1 1 Ml mi | III | [111 | mi [||i 1 1 Ml | Ml 1 1 111 | MM 1 1||| Illlllllll I II! I [Mil 1111111111111111)111111 1 IIMIMII lllll Illlll [lllh. 

^. riiiiniiiiiiittMuiiitiiMiiiitiiiJiiiniiiniiniiutiiiiiiniiii liiij i mm riruiiiniiiiini run riiiniiiniriiiiiaiirniirriiiniiiniiiriiiiriiiiniiiniiirjiiiii^ 

I Rothwell & Co. inc. | 

420 Alaska Building, Seattle, Wash. 

Importers— Exporters 
Shipping 



97 Warren St. Lonja Del Comercio 517 
New York Havana, Cuba 

404 Insurance Exchange 

San Francisco 



Kobe 

Japan 



IMPORTS: 

China Wood Oil, Peanut Oil, Soya Bean Oil, Perilla Oil, 

Fish Oil, Cocoanut Oil, Rapeseed Oil, Whale 

Oil, Castor Oil, Sesame Oil, Beans, 

Peas, Peanuts, Silk Piece Goods 

Ginger, Copra and Hemp 



EXPORTS: 

Canned Fruits, Canned Fish, Canned Milk, Resin, Dye- 
stuffs, Caustic Soda, Soda Ash, Paraffine, 
Iron, Steel, Machinery 

Correspondence Invited 



=.iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii imiimimiimiimimiimiimiimiimiiiiiiiiiiimiimiimimiiimimiimiimiimiimimiimiiimmi;. miniiiiiiiiiiiiii i mini i mimiin iiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiimn.i miiimiii iiimiiiiiiiuiinii i u i 3 



September 19 19 



177 



' 'liiimniimiiiimiiiiiniiiimimiiiuiiiniiimiiiimimiiminiiiiiiiiimniimiiinimimimiimiimiiiinmni » '- '" 



3lllllllllmilltllimiimiin!lllllllMIIIMINIimillll 

SEPTEMBER, 1919 



. fs^m^^^*- 



llinilt!IMI[[!llllll!MllllllltlllllllllllllllliIIIIIMIltlllllllilllllllllltllllllilll!IIII<IIIIIIMII[|lllllllll!IIMIIMIIlil!'| 



.TumilltlllilllUMIIflllllllllllllllllitlllllllllllllMlia 



PAN PACIFIC 

A MAGAZINE OF INTERNATIONAL COMMERCE 



John H. Gerrie Editor 

San Francisco, California 



ASSOCIATED EDITORS AND STAFF 
CORRESPONDENTS 

Wm. E. Aughinbaugh, M.D.; B.S.; L.L.D New York 

Juiji G. Kasal, A.M Japan 

Valabdhas Runchordas India 

George Mellen Honolulu 

Thomas Fox Straits Settlement 

W. H. Clarke Australia 

Lazaro Basch ... v : Mexico 

Vincent Collovich Chile and Peru 

L. Carroll Seattle 

W. W. Wilmot Los Angeles 

Chao-Hsin Chu, B.C.S., M.M China 

H. M. Dias Ceylon 



PAN PACIFIC is devoted to the friendly development 
of COMMERCE among ALL countries bordering the Pa- 
cific Ocean. It aims to give authentic information bear- 
ing upon the creation of PERMANENT Foreign Trade; 
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Special Features in This Issue 
1 1 

Hi Foreign Trade Problems Ahead.... , 179 

Jflll Big Construction Era in Orient 187 

Siam's Opportunities 182 

An Evidence of China's Awakening 183 

Manila a Great Shipping Center 18U 

Java Offers Field For American Goods 185 

British Malaya Ready To Trade 186 

r, Mexico Making Progress 187 

v Investments in South America 190 

v Peruvian Copper Investments 191 

Publicity an Art in Latin-America 192 

M\ Rio Janeiro a City of Activity 193 

&| New Zealand Seeking Trade ;. 19U 

ii 



178 Pan Pacific 

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I *" Ocean Transport G>.,ui>. I 

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September 19 19 



179 




Foreign Trade Problems Ahead 

United States Alone Among the Nations is in Position to Most Thoroughly Enjoy 

the Business That Will Follow Peace 



W 



AR completely changes commer- 
cial currents. The victor takes 
the established and profitable trade, 
leaving the vanquished the harder 
lines of business and the development 
of new fields. This is as true of the 
first war as it will be of the last. 

The Napoleonic wars gave to Eng- 
land the strong position she now oc- 
cupies in the financial and commercial 
world. Her bankers and shippers, her 
merchants and manufacturers, with 
one accord grasped the opportunity 
that presented itself then and have 
held the supremacy thus gained for 
more than a century. 

Will Take Germany 
Fifty Years To Regain 
A perusal of the peace treaty signed 
by Germany will convince anyone that 
it will be easily fifty years before 
Germany can possibly enter the field 
of foreign commerce as an important 
factor. This statement will be true 
whether the peace treaty be lived up 
to or not. Several essentials are vital 
— the enormous indemnity which must 
ibe paid the victors by way of com- 
pensation; the complete elimination of 
Germany's commercial fleet and the 
stern obligation that she must repay, 
ton for ton, the allied and neutral 
vessels so wantonly and ruthlessly de- 
stroyed by submarines; her loss in 
pnan power, now estimated at more 
than 7,600,000 in killed and maimed; 
"ler loss in money approximately $6,- 
000.000,000 and the loss of materials 
ilvanced for the purpose of helping 
liter cohorts in the war, none of which 
will ever be paid ; and last, but not 
least, the terrible plight in which the 
Fatherland now finds itself, both eco- 
nomically and socially. 

There are other factors which might 
be considered, too — such, for instance, 
is the return of Alsace-Lorraine to 
'ranee; the domination of the Saar 
Valley ; the general partitioning of ter- 
itory and the distribution of her col- 
onies to other nations to control. Prom 
liese last mentioned sources she de- 
• ved much revenue and raw products 
hat were essential to her existence as 



By W. E. AUGHINBAUGH, 

M.D., L.L.B., LLM., 

Professor of Foreign Trade, 

New York University 




DR. W. E. AUGINBAUGH 

a manufacturing and exporting na- 
tion. 

Germany's Pre-War Trade 
Of Enormous Proportions 
In 1914 Germany sold merchandise 
to the Latin-American nations to the 
extent of approximately $62,000,000. 
Her shipments to the Oriental coun- 
tries were slightly larger. Her for- 
eign trade with the British colonies, 
particularly Canada and Australia, 
was of enormous dimensions and these 
markets were growing rapidly in the 
volume of business. 

With her own possessions scattered 
over the globe, she did a lucrative 
trade. Her commerce with Africa was 
growing by leaps and bounds. There 
was not a corner of the world — even 
its most remote spots, where the Ger- 
man trader was unknown and from 
which he did not exact his profit. 



Today these markets are irrevocably 
lost to those who spent such painstak- 
ing energy in their development and 
before Germany reaches a degree of 
commercial potency that will warrant 
her in casting glances toward them 
again, others more worthy and more 
honorable will have entrenched them- 
selves so securely therein that there 
will be no chance for the suave Teuton 
salesman to make an impression, no 
matter how superior his goods or how 
enticing the terms of sale he. has to 
offer. 

World Stores Depleted, 
Opportunity Unrivalled 

These markets must be absorbed. 
Stores all over the world are depleted 
and stocks were never so low in the 
history of our times. Obviously the 
great demand will be for necessities — 
for food, clothes, building materials, 
hardware, tools, machinery, mine, fac- 
tory and railroad equipment. 

Due to the paucity of labor and the 
scarcity of coal, as well as its high 
price, there will undoubtedly be a won- 
derful development in the line of hy- 
draulic and electric machinery, espe- 
cially in Europe, where it is estimated 
there are billions of horsepower going 
to waste. 

We in the United States must not 
assume that the markets of the world 
will purchase as they did before Eu- 
rope was bathed in blood. The volume 
of buying will be materially smaller 
and confined to the lines mentioned. 
Because, for example, the Latin-Amer- 
icans purchased nearly $62,000,000 
worth of goods from Germany before 
the war, it does not mean that they 
will be ready for many years to spend 
the same amount of money with other 
nations for similar products. 

In Reciprocal Trade 
Germany Was Active 
We should keep in mind the fact 
that perhaps a minimum of 65% of 
the raw materials of Latin America, 
Asia, Africa, Australasia, Mexico, the 
East and West Indies found their way 
to European manufacturing centers, 



180 



Pan Pacific 



there to be elaborated into finished ar- 
ticles, to be exported to the overseas 
markets. In this reciprocal trade Ger- 
man}' was particularly active. 

With Belgium devastated; France, 
the stage on which this bloody drama 
was enacted, shattered; Russia in the 
throes of an apparently hopeless strug- 
gle, Portugal, Italy and Great Britain 
stunned and weakened from the blows 
which they inflicted and received, with 
Germany and Austria-Hungary dis- 
membered, broken and unable to buy 
the materials they formerly needed to 
keep their factories going, it must be 
apparent that the purchasing power 
of Europe will be greatly lessened. 
Just how much no one can say, but I 
believe that I am within the bounds 
of conservation when I state there will 
for perhaps five years be a falling off 
of fully 50% in Continental purchases 
of raw stuffs. 

Homes and factories must be first 
rebuilt, economic conditions rectified 
and rehabilitated before the hum of 
industry will be heard again in this 
part of the world, and then the en- 
trance into foreign markets will be 
only gradual. This condition in turn 
will be reflected upon the purchasing 
power of Latin America, the Orient 
and the other world markets, so that 
years will pass before the nations of 
the earth reach their maximum ability 
to both buy and sell. 

Larger Purchasing Public 
For the United States 

The markets which Germany and 
Austria-Hungary have lost, coupled 
with the limited production of several 
years to come of Great Britain, 
France, Belgium, Italy, Portugal, and 
the neutral countries such as Holland, 
Switzerland, Norway, Sweden and 
Denmark — for they, too, have been 
weakened by the war and their losses 
have been relatively heavy — mean that 
the United States must cater to a 
larger purchasing public than ever 
before in history. And it naturally 
follows that if the things which we 
supply these new clients are adapted 
to their needs, if our prices are right, 
our banking connections efficient, our 
business based on reciprocity and on 
foreign investments, and our common 
carriers able to deliver goods as agreed 
upon — then these markets will be ours 
for all time to come, and it will re- 
quire more than an extraordinary cir- 
cumstance to dislodge us from them. 

Briefly, the peace treaty which Ger- 
many has accepted, may be properly 
called the prosperity treaty for the 
United States, for we alone of all the 
nations of the world are in a position 
to most thoroughly. enjoy the business 
which must naturally result from its 
mandates. 

But we cannot hope to achieve such 
results unless we prepare ourselves 
for the wave of prosperity that fate 
is fashioning for this favored land. 

Let us consider some of the weaker 



spots in our commercial fabric. While 
to some extent our business men and 
our trade bodies are to blame for the 
apparent indifference to foreigu trade 
possibilities, still the great responsibil- 
ity for the lukewarm attitude toward 
overseas markets may be directly 
charged to the Government of the 
United States. With the single ex- 
ception of the Department of Com- 
merce, which has done its work in a 
manner reflecting credit on all the bu- 
reaus and every one of its employes, 
the other branches of the United 
States Government which should co- 
operate with the Department of Com- 
merce and with the business men of 
the country have treated with scorn 
our attempts to properly enter foreign 
trade fields. 

We know that British supremacy in 
foreign trade throughout the world is 
due to the fact that the Britisher in- 
vested, his surplus funds in high grade 
foreign securities. It was his custom 
to make foreign investments upon con- 
dition that those whom he financed 
should purchase their requirements 
with the country making the loan — a 
perfectly proper arrangement, and one 
that was economically sound. 

This gave British engineers an op- 
portunity to force upon the borrowing 
countries their products and methods, 
provided employment for their coun- 
trymen who in return created a de- 
mand for articles of home production. 
British capitalists have invested today. 
in the Argentine $1,788,705; Brazil, 
$1,120,000,000; Chile, $400,000,000; 
Uruguay, $250,000,0; Peru, $150,000,- 
000; Venezuela, $50,000,000 and in 
other countries of Latin America pro- 
portionate amounts to the total of over 
$5,000,000,000. In the Orient their 
holdings of this nature are actually 
higher. In Latin America, excluding 
Mexico, we have a total investment 
of less than $300,000,000. 

All Trade Treaties 
Should Be Redrawn 

The investment of American money 
in foreign securities will be relatively 
small until the Government of the 
United States announces to the world 
a definite policy for the protection of 
the American investor in foreign lands 
as well as for the American residing 
abroad, and demonstrates to the na- 
tions of the earth that it proposes to 
carry out this policy by every means 
at its command, with promptness and 
dignity. 

All of our trade treaties should be 
redrawn. We have not a modern 
treaty today. Most of our commercial 
documents of this nature were drafted 
when we were an agricultural nation 
pure and simple — when we shipped 
wool, cereals and meats to Europe. 
Today we have become a manufactur- 
ing people and are actually importing 
foodstuffs. But our trade treaties are 
still the same old antiquated ones of 
bygone ages. 



We bought in former days as much 
from France as her three next best 
customers put together. Yet, due to 
indifference of our State Department, 
we enjoyed the same trade treaties 
with France that she extended to such 
countries as Liberia, Abyssinia and 
Portugal. Germany had a preferential 
tariff with France in force since 1871. 

France would willingly favor us in 
this connection if we asked it, but 
despite the numerous petitions to our 
authorities, the matter has been con- 
siderered too trivial for consideration. 
This same story is true of the majority 
of nations with which we are doing 
business. Yet, those who steer our 
ship of state refuse to see any need 
for changes of any kind in our trea- 
ties. 

Our much talked of shipping board 
has not yet solved the vital trade 
problems before them. We are today 
almost as far as ever from having the 
necessary bottoms to get our goods to 
foreign markets. We have not yet : 
made a foreign terminal connection in 
overseas lands. To operate our own 
ships so that we may land goods as 
cheaply as our competitors we must 
have docking facilities, literage sys- 
tems, warehouses, repair shops, dry- 
docks, and means whereby goods may 
be taken from ships with the least de- 
lays and shipped via rail into the in- 
terior. None of these important de- 1 
tails of shipping have been worked 
out. 

Without them what is to prevent 
competitors from delaying the dis- 
charge of vessels when they arrive atj 
their destinations, until demurrage 
and other charges shall have accumu- 
lated against the goods in their holds, 
so that markets will be closed to us, 
despite the price of our goods and the 
other favorable conditions which our 
salesmen have offered customers? 
Without our merchants being able to 
make c. i. f. quotations to foreign buy- 
ers, we can never hope to compete 
with England or other European na- 
tions who have the facilities necessary 
to do so. Should this condition be 
allowed to exist another moment? 

Educational Campaign 
Is Needed For Bankers 

The Treasury Department of the 
United States should begin an educa- 
tional campaign, destined to instruct 
bankers in every city, town and ham- 
let throughout the land regarding the 
new monetary laws, and especially how 
the Federal Reserve act can help the 
exporter and importer. I know of a : 
small manufacturer in a little city in j 
Iowa who was obliged to turn down 
an order for $1,500 worth of goods 
from China, and another of $900 from 
Guatemala, because he did not know 
how to finance his order, despite the 
fact that his home bank could have 
rendered him every service necessary 
to start him in foreign trade. 



September 19 19 



181 




BIRD'S EYE VIEW OF THE BU N D— SHANGHAI, CHINA 



Big Construction Era in Orient 

Hotels, Factories, Schools and Public Works Are Among the Most Immediate 

Needs of the Far East 



CHINA has reached a place where 
she needs the best that the 
United States can send forth in the 
way of construction engineers and ma- 
terial for building, factories and ho- 
tels. 

There probably is no field in the 
world where large modern hotels are 
needed as in the Far East. The Chi- 
nese have the capital to go ahead and 
build but they don't know how. China 
lias several natural cement deposits, 
as has Japan, so that so far as cement 
is concerned, she is well provided. 

China is ready for more factory 
building, such as canning factories, 
cotton spinning and weaving works, 
aerated water factories, gas works, ice 
and cold storage plants, iron and steel 
works, leather factories, tanneries and 
the like, match factories, oil mills, pa- 
per mills, printing and lithographic 
works, railway works, rope factories, 
sugar refineries, tobacco factories, wa- 
ter works, woollen factories and ship- 
yards. 

Will Raise Chinese 
Earning Capacity 

Development along these lines will 
mean much in raising the earning ca- 
pacity of the Chinese, and she needs 
all the assistance in education that we 
can give. 

How best to develop the sale of the 
thousands of items that go into con- 
struction of buildings is a problem. 
My own opinion is that it should be 
dune in the Far East through news- 
paper advertising, showing factories 
here in the United States with exterior 
and interior views and their approxi- 
mate cost, with short outlines of free 
architectural assistance to any Chinese 
interested in work along these lines. 

No American manufacturer of steel 
construction materials for use in con- 
crete building construction would 
make a mistake in having his own 



Bv F. H. WILLIAMS 



offices at Shanghai, Manila and a few 
other important points. 

Needs of Philippines 
For Public Buildings 

The Philippine Government must, 
sooner or later, enter into great con- 
struction plans for public buildings. 
It is only a question of a few years 
now when they will need a new post 
office at Manila, a Senate and an As- 
sembly building and hundreds of other 
important buildings for Government 
work throughout the islands. 

The Chinese Government sooner or 
later, must start the construction of 
thousands of school buildings through- 
out China, and in this respect she no 
doubt will follow in the footsteps of 
the Philippine Islands and erect con- 
crete buildings. 

With school building will come the 
opportunity for all arteries entering 
into the construction thereof, as well 
as the particular articles needed for 
schools, such as steel blackboards and 
the like. 

The Philippine Islands are still us- 
ing the composition boards in the 
classrooms and these are eaten up by 
the ants and do not last at the most 
more than about two years. In some 
parts of the Philippine Islands they 
must be renewed every year. 

With schools also comes the oppor- 
tunity for American school furniture, 
and now the American manufacturers 
of school furniture should begin to 
advertise in the Chinese newspapers, 
so that when China gets ready our 
goods will be ready for sale. 
Field Is Unlimited 
For All Construction 

Side by side with the network of 
railways that will be built in the fu- 
ture in the Far East, we will see mod- 
ern concrete railway stations. All of 



these offer their opportunity for the 
use of many items manufactured in 
the United States. 

Irrigation schemes will not depend 
upon the present primitive way of do- 
ing things but will call modern ma- 
chinery into use. Oil and gas en- 
gines, power driven rice mills, seed 
mills and the like will come into wider 
use, just as fast as the American man- 
ufacturer will advertise them and 
bring their advantages to the front in 
these markets. 

It must be borne in mind that labor 
is plentiful, and so far as capital is 
concerned, that throughout the Far 
East, hundreds of millions of dollars 
in gold are hoarded away. It is an 
educational process to get these for- 
tunes into the open, and in a way that 
the Chinese need not fear the expos- 
ing of his wealth. 

Increase In Mills 
Is Need In India 

In India there will be an increase 
of wool mills, tanneries, sugar factor- 
ies, sawmills, paper mills, rope mills, 
linseed and castor oil mills, jute, 
presses, flour mills, cotton and jute 
mills and printing works. As one goes 
over the list and compares it with 
China, with the exception of sawmills, 
for which there would be but a limited 
field due to lack of lumber, the items 
are about the same. 

However, in the Philippine Islands, 
where there is plenty of lumber, there 
is a big opportunity for sawmills. 
Electrical machinery for them is a 
most important item in all of these 
countries. 

Construction of some kind of build- 
ing for the indigo planters offers a 
wide field of study and one that would 
• prove worth while. These planters 
desire to keep abreast of the times and 
have the money to pay good prices for 
the best that can be procured. 

(Continued on page 182) 



182 



Pan Pacific 



Siam's Opportunities 

Kingdom Occupying Strategic Position in Asia Has 
Need of American Goods 



By B. T. WARREN SUMNER 

Siamese Consul in New York City 

' — o — 

SIAM is little known to the average 
American six months after he 
stops studying geography in school. 
As a rule it is associated with white 
elephants and Siamese twins. 

I might mention an incident which 
occurred a short time ago when I had 
a package to send to Bangkok. I took 
it to the general office of one of the 
large express companies and asked the 
rate for forwarding it. After waiting 
for some time I discovered that the 
clerk, a man of about forty years of 
age, was looking up the tariffs of Cen- 
tral and South America for the town 
of Bangkok. 

A few facts about Siam might be 
of interest, therefore, as so few people 
have ever stopped to consider the im- 
portant position that this country oc- 
cupies in Asia. Siam is bounded by 
Burmah on the west, French Indo- 
China on the east, the Federated Ma- 
lay States on the south and China on 
the north, and is not nearly so small 
a country as most people imagine. In 
fact Siam is larger than Belgium, 
Greece, Portland, Montenegro, Cuba, 
Hayti and Panama combined and only 
a trifle smaller than Germany, al- 
though its population is only a little 
more than 9,000,000. 

An Industrious Race 
and Eager to Learn 

The Siamese people are essentially 
a peace loving and industrious race 
and the industries of the country have 
shown marvelous development within 
the last few years, largely owing to 
the wonderful influence of the king, 
who, because of his European educa- 
tion, has had the foresight to obtain 
the services of men fully qualified to 
lead his people and introduce modern 
methods and ideas throughout the 
country. 

The currency of Siam is based on 
the tical, which is equivalent to about 
36 cents in United States gold. The 
chief export commodity is rice, the 
average value of which for the past 
five years being about 94,000,000 ticals. 
Teakwood comes next, and during 
1917-18 the value of this wood ex- 
ported from Siam was 5,148,966 ticals. 
Other goods, consisting principally of 
ivory, coffee, tobacco, pepper, nut- 
megs and other spices, kapok, cotton 
and vegetable fibres, rubber, resin, da- 
mar and tin and zinc ores, are also 
exported. 

I believe there is an excellent op- 
portunity for American concerns deal- 



ing in any of the above products to 
purchase them very advantageously 
from the producers in Siam. In fact 
this has been brought forcefully to my 
attention within the last few months 
by the large number of letters I have 
received and also from the number of 
passports I have had to vise for rep- 
resentatives of concerns who wish to 
visit Siam with the object of purchas- 
ing some of the articles mentioned. 

As regards selling articles of Amer- 
ican manufacture in Siam, without 
question there is a good field for 
American export houses. Siam has for 
many years purchased a great part of 
its imports from Germany, a large per- 
centage of which was of inferior 
grade. I was told recently by a Sia- 
mese merchant that Germany consid- 
ered Siam and China dumping grounds 
for everything that they could not dis- 
pose of elsewhere. 

The import duties of Siam are very 
low, there being a flat duty of 3 per 
cent ad valorem on all articles except 
beer, wine and spirituous liquors, 
which are assessed at 8 per cent ad 
valorem ; if under the strength of 25 
degrees duty is paid as of the strength 
of 25 degrees, and if 25 degrees or 
over the duty is at the rate of 1.6 sa- 
tangs a degree per litre. Treasure, 
gold leaf and opium are exempt from 
duty, but opium can be imported only 
under a special permit from the Gov- 
ernment. 

J have frequently been asked what 
articles are imported into Siam and 
the briefest answer I can give is: 
"Practically everything, as very little 
is manufactured in the country." 
Not So Difficult 
To Transport Goods 

The transportation of American mer- 
chandise to Siam is not nearly so diffi- 
cult as many think, and though a large 
percentage of the goods sent from the 
United States to Siam has to be trans- 
shipped either at Hong Kong or Singa- 
pore, there are several steamship con- 
cerns which have frequent sailings for 
those ports and which in most cases 
will issue a through bill of lading to 
Bangkok. 

The reason for the necessity of 
transshipping at Hong Kong is that 
the amount of cargo offered does not 
make it remunerative for ship owners 
to send steamers to Bangkok, or at 
least as near thereto as possible, as 
the depth of water and the harbor fa- 
cilities cannot accommodate large 
steamers. The vessels used for trans- 
shipment are never more than 3,000 
tons deadweight and the time con- 



sumed is about one week from Hong 
Kong to Bangkok and four days from 
Singapore. 

The Siamese Government recently 
built what is known as the Southern 
Railway, which, I understand, is now 
completed and will, in the case of mail 
and passenger traffic, save about one 
week between the United States and 
Bangkok. 

I might add that there are a number 
of steamers going to Bangkok an- 
nually and often shipments can be 
made direct. In the year 1917-18 
1,009 steamers were entered at the 
custom house at Bangkok. The na- 
tionality of some of these steamers 
might be of interest and is as follows: 
British, 215; Chinese, 168; Dutch, 45; 
French, 37; Norwegian, 287, and Sia- 
mese 168. The remainder were di- 
vided between other countries. Only 
three American vessels entered Bang- 
kok during 1917-18. 



Orient Needs the Best 

(Continued from page 181) 



Roofing materials are in great de- 
mand in all parts of the Far East. In 
fact this market starts at the Ha- 
waiian Islands, goes to Australia and 
New Zealand and travels to India, up 
through the Straits Settlements, on to 
China and then right up to Russia, 
over to Alaska, down into Canada and 
back to the doors of the American 
manufacturer. 

Skeletons for concrete structures 
are a big item, and this business alone 
could be developed into millions of 
dollars annually for the American 
manufacturer. 

Retaining walls for canals is an- 
other important item in the Far East. 
It is all a matter of education, and in 
China it can be done through adver- 
tising in the native newspapers. 

Metal ceiling would prove a good 
seller in the Far East; in China again 
particularly if the American manufac- 
turer would develop the dragon de- 
sign or flower designs of Chinese 
flowers. 

Conduits and culverts for telephone 
and telegraph systems offer a wide 
field, all worth developing. Referring 
to China, of course, I refer only to the 
cities of Hong Kong, Shanghai, Tien- 
tsin and Pekin. One will understand 
that in the smaller cities of China 
there is at present but little field for 
telephone work that could not be car- 
ried over telegraph poles and wires. 

Articles that would enter into the 
construction of shipbuilding yards 
would find a large sale in both Shang- 
hai and Hong Kong, at Hankow and 
at Tientsin. This is also true of al- 
most every important city of the Far 
East. Shipbuilding also offers a won- 
derful opportunity to the American 
shipbuilding concerns. 



September 19 19 



183 




LARGEST DEPARTMENT STORE IN ASIA HAS FORTY DEPARTMENTS AND CARRIES AMERICAN GOODS 



I"T may be surprising to untravelled 
'■*■ Americans to learn that in China 
: are department stores as modern and 
i comprehensive as any to be found in 
New York, Chicago and San Fran- 
cisco. Herewith is an illustration of 
one of the latest and most modern of 
LChinese emporiums, presented on this 
page as proof that Chinese merchants 
I are not lacking in business enterprise 
and acumen. 

The view presented is that of the 
Shanghai department store building 
of Wing On Co. Ltd., opened in Sep- 
tember 1918 and said to be the largest 
and most complete shop on the Asiatic 
continent. This great enterprise, rep- 
resenting an investment of $3,500,000, 
is owned, financed and managed en- 
tirely by Chinese merchants. 

F. T. Young, general manager of 
Wing On Co., recently arrived in the 
United States to purchase goods and 
'while in San Francisco called to pay 
ihis respects at the office of Pan Pa- 
cific, copies of which are on sale in his 



"Rig Store." From him the photo- 
graph and accompanying data were 
obtained. 

This modern establishment is lo- 
cated at Nanking and Chekiang roads 
in the business heart of Shanghai. It 
occupies one square block, more than 
two hundred feet square, the main 
building being six stories in height 
with an up-to-date hotel annex, the 
Great Eastern, owned by the same 
company. 

Wing On Co., like Whiteley's in 
London, will sell anything on which it 
receives an order. It is stocked very 
largely with American goods, though 
it carries British, French and other 
lines for which there is any demand. 
Among the American merchandise 
may be found California canned goods, 
provisions, confectionery, hardware 
sundries, boots and shoes, piece goods, 
notions, furnishings, wearing apparel, 
dress goods, haberdashery, jewelry, 
cutlery, silverware, glassware, pottery 
and electrical goods. 



Last year the retail business ex- 
ceeded $5,000,000. The American 
goods are bought mostly in New York, 
Chicago and San Francisco. The store 
is patronized by tourists, by mission- 
aries throughout the Orient and Far 
East and by Chinese. There are 40 
different departments and 650 regular 
employees, the sales force being com- 
posed entirely of Chinese youths. De- 
liveries are made by motor lorries of 
American manufacture. 

Wing On Co. have a branch store in 
Hong Kong and other branches 
throughout China are possibilities of 
the future. The company also manu- 
factures silverware and has its own 
silk mills, being r a large exporter of 
silks and other Chinese goods. The 
Great Eastern Hotel, which it owns 
and operates, is modern throughout, 
with baths, electric light, elevators and 
other American comforts and conven- 
iences. It caters to the best class of 
tourist trade. 



184 



Pan Pacific 



Manila a Great Shipping Center 

Philippines Government, With Aid of Strong American Organization, Plans To 

Make It Distributing Port for the Far East 



THE Government of the Philippines 
and prominent business interests, 
with the strong support of the Bureau 
of Foreign and Domestic Commerce 
and other organizations in the United 
States, are making efforts to cause the 
necessary steps to be taken to make 
Manila a great transshipping and dis- 
tributing center for American products 
in the Orient and thus liberate our 
commerce from its present dependence 
on Hong Kong, Shanghai, Kobe, Yoko- 
hama and Singapore. 

The natural advantages of Manila 
are very great, as it has an excellent 
harbor, and there is a population of 
nearly 126,000,000 within a radius of 
1,700 miles (a little over half the dis- 
tance across the United States), while 
within a radius of 3,500 miles there 
are the 760,000,000 souls of China, Ja- 
pan, India and other Oriental coun- 
tries, whose combined purchasing 
power is even now enormous and will 
be increased immensely in the near 
future through inevitable industrial 
and economic development. 



By C. C. BATCHELDER 

Assistant Chief, Far Eastern Division, 

Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 

Commerce 

Even now the total commerce with 
the United States of French Indo- 
China, Siam, Straits Settlements and 
the Dutch East Indies, which would 
naturally be served by Manila, 
amounted in 1918 to $278*,712,748, to 
which should be added the commerce 
of the Philippine Islands, of $126,526,- 
500, or a total of $405,239,248, which 
will undoubtedly be tremendously in- 
creased by the determined efforts 
which our manufacturers are making 
to push their sales in Oriental markets. 

While no one imagines that the bulk 
of this trade will pass through Manila, 
nevertheless a substantial proportion 
might do so under favorable condi- 
tions, as the greater part of the huge 
commerce of Hong Kong and Singa- 




ON THE PASIG RIVER AT MANILA 



pore consists merely of transshipments 
from larger transoceanic vessels into 
the smaller craft which distribute the 
goods to the innumerable small ports 
which serve the consuming population. 

Terminal Advantages 
Of Other Great Ports 
Hong Kong, Singapore, Shanghai, 
Kobe and Yokohama have advantages 
in location in being the termini of 
many established steamship lines and 
in attracting tramp vessels by the cer- 
tainty of being able to secure return 
cargoes to almost any destination. If, 
however, Manila were to be favored 
by the Shipping Board in the way of 
freight rates and steamer facilities it 
could soon build up a most profitable 
trade in transshipments to French 
Indo-China, the Dutch East Indies, 
Malaysia and other neighboring places, 
whose trade at present cannot handle 
to advantage full cargoes of our mis- 
cellaneous manufactures. 

Superior port facilities and labor 
"saving devices often, as is well known, 
more than compensate for the natural 
advantages of rival harbors, and Ma- 
nila is already engaged in carrying out 
plans which will place her in the front 
rank, as some of her competitors have 
inadequate wharfage facilities, so that, 
many vessels have to lie out in the har--, 
bors and load and unload with lighters. 

Safety For Shipping 
In Manila Harbor 

Manila Bay is a good harbor in it-* 
self, and the construction of an ad-J 
equate breakwater increases the safety 
for shipping. The main harbor is 
dredged to a depth of 30 feet, which 
can be increased if necessary. The, 
Philippine Government has already 
spent about $7,000,000 in improving 
its facilities, including the construe-? 
tion of three large reenforced concretJ 
piers, measuring 70x600 feet, with am- 
ple covered sheds for storage, at which 
the largest steamers now in use can 
dock with ease. 

A new reenforced concrete pier if* 
now under construction, 750 feet long, 
and 210 feet wide, with 110,000 square 
feet under cover, designed to be the 
finest west of San Francisco. This 
will accommodate four vessels at once 
and will be equipped with the most 
modern machinery, including a sprink- 
ler system and two great travelling 
cranes, mounted on rails, which will 



September 19/9 



185 



enable vessels to load and unload 
twice as rapidly as at present, thus 
decreasing operating expenses by less- 
ening the unprofitable delays in port. 
Labor Saving Devices 
Will Give Manila Lead 
It is clearly recognized that we can 
only compete with our trade rivals by 
cutting down the cost of operation by 
labor saving devices, and while these 
facilities will be of great assistance, 
the success of two other projects will 
put Manila far in the lead of any other 
Oriental port. 

The first of these is the construction 
of direct terminal connections between 
the piers and the railroad, and the sec- 
ond is making the port district a free 
port like Singapore and Hong Kong. 
While goods of American origin can 
now be imported and exported free of 
duty, yet the customs formalities re- 
quired cause very considerable trou- 
ble, expense and delay, and so an at- 
tempt is being made to secure the 
necessary legislation to build up a 
great free port. 

The comparatively unused port dis- 
trict area, made by filling the flats 
with the material dredged from the 
iharbor, is ideal for the purpose, and 
■with relatively little cost can be 
adapted to all requirements. It is 
planned not only to have warehouses 
for storing, regrading, repacking and 
reshipping American products destined 
to .other countries, but also to erect 
factories in this district for the manu- 
facture of raw materials from any part 
of the globe into articles required by 
international trade. 

Government Taking Hand 
In Free Port Project 
Manila business men are enterpris- 
ing, are straining every nerve to de- 
velop the resources of the country, 
and are being assisted by the Insular 
Grovernment, which has a system of 
nspection of the exports of tobacco 
ind hemp for the purpose of maintain- 
ng a uniform high standard of qual- 

ty 

Tli ere are now over 755 miles of rail- 

oad in operation in the Philippines, 

Imd the innumerable bays afford most 

xcellent means for water transporta- 

ion. ; !'*!'| 

American commerce in the Orient is 
it present largely dependent upon the 
Hips, ports and trade facilities con- 
rolled by our trade rivals, and it 
vould be too much to expect them to 
insist us deliberately in competing with 
hem. We need American distribution 
(inters and ports to use to the best 
advantage the American shipping 
.Inch has already been provided by 
nr Government, and in Manila we 
ave just what is required. 

All that is necessary is the co-opera- 
"m of the American and Philippine 
livernments with our shipping, man- 
i'acturing and importing business 



Java Offers Field 
for American Goods 



By F. R. ELDRIDGE, Jr. 

Chief, Far Eastern Division Bureau of 

Foreign and Domestic Commerce 



THE situation in the Dutch East 
Indies is not complicated by any 
lack of local capital nor any scarcity 
of return cargo. On the other hand, 
this colony is already selling us much 
more than it is buying from us, for it 
has supplied us with just the raw ma- 
terials we need. 

The question arises, can we supply 
the Dutch East Indies with just the 
manufactured goods they need in re- 
turn? That we can make these goods 
and sell them to some extent now in 
the Dutch East Indies is not a suffi- 
cient answer. Nor is it enough to say 
that we should get "our share" of the 
total trade. Until we sell the Dutch 
East Indies as much, dollar for dollar, 
as we purchase from them we are not 
taking full advantage of the favorable 
situation which exists. 

Problem of Selling 
At Present Baffling 

The very simplicity of this selling 
problem is baffling. Perhaps it could 
be said that the same principles which 
make for successful salesmanship in 
Kansas hold good in Java, but this 
would be only part of the truth. This 
knowledge could be taken as a ground 
work, but each class of goods in Java 
presents a separate problem in the 
solution of which the mere knowledge 
of the general rules of the game do 
not suffice. Thus, in order to be suc- 
cessful in the sale of dyestuffs it is 
necessary to know something of the 
native botik, or piece goods industry, 
which is quite different from any 
weaving industry in this country. 

The sale of sugar machinery cannot 
be consummated by simply talking and 
demonstrating in the same manner that 
we are familiar with in the sale of 
similar machinery either in the United 
States or in some foreign countries. 
And so examples might be added in- 
definitely, all of which would show 
that the selling problem in the Dutch 
East Indies is somewhat different in 
every line from anything within our 
ordinary experience. 

Dutch Cautious Buyers 
Of American Products 

Whether this is because of the cli- 
mate, the people or the tradition or a 
little mixture of each is for the psy- 
chologist to decide. What the busi- 



ness man is interested in is just how 
these differences affect his business. 
In the sale of machinery, iron and 
steel, plantation hardware and acces- 
sories and the like he must expect to 
meet the conservative Dutch importer 
or plantation owner who has long been 
catered to by European houses, and 
who knows nothing of America or 
American methods except what he has 
read in books. 

This has been very wide, for the 
Dutch colonial finds time heavy on his 
hands, with few of the diversions af- 
forded by other climates, and is a care- 
ful reader of American magazines of 
the better grade, and forms a pretty 
accurate idea of American customs 
and products from them. This read- 
ing, however, teaches him nothing of 
American business methods, and these 
he must learn from first hand experi- 
ence with American business houses. 
The insignificant mistakes, therefore, 
that are occasionally made by our pio- 
neers loom large when translated into 
dollars and cents by the Dutch col- 
onial, while to our exporter they are 
merely an incident in a busy day. 
Chinese Jobbers Astute 
and Live up to Contract 

But there is another class of trad- 
ers which deals in all the smaller ar- 
ticles of commerce, such as household 
goods, - small hardware, piece goods, 
etc., and this is a group of Chinese job- 
bers and importers. These Chinese have 
sometimes been in the islands for many 
years, sometimes for generations, and 
in many cases have accumulated large 
amounts of wealth. They are astute, 
dependable business men, who live up 
to the letter of every contract, and 
expect us to do the same. Their word 
is as good as thejr bond, for once 
they have lost "face" they can never 
regain a position of respect. Their 
own code is their best security. 

These intermediaries sometimes im- 
port direct and distribute to the vari- 
ous retail markets, and sometimes act 
only as jobbers and distributors. This 
often depends upon the character of 
the goods. In the best German lines 
before the war the agency was gener- 
ally placed with a large Dutch house 
through its Holland office. In this 
case the Chinese simply act as dis- 
tributors. 

Commercially these are the only two 

groups of Dutch East Indian traders 

with whom American exporters are at 

all likely to have much intercourse, 

(Continued on page 194) 



186 



Pan Pacific 



British Malaya Ready for Trade 

People Are Prosperous and There is a Growing Demand For Foreign Goods With 

Leaning Toward American 



A S business men of British Malaya 
■*• *■ and the community in general 
are kindly disposed toward Americans, 
this seems to be an opportune time for 
the establishment of trade between 
that country and the United States, 
especially as the people are prosperous 
and there is a growing demand for 
foreign goods. 

The purchasing power of the Pe- 
nang district is very considerable, as 
indicated by the exports to the United 
States, w y hich alone during 1918 
amounted to more than $82,000,000, 
notwithstanding the scarcity of ton- 
nage. The principal articles exported 
to the United States are tin, rubber, 
copra, tapioca and patchouli leaves 
(used in making perfumery), but our 
markets do not demand large quanti- 
ties of cloves, pepper, nutmegs and 
other spices, mangrove bark and other 
local products which could be ex- 
ported. 

Detailed specifications of the im- 
ports into the Penang district from 
the United States are not available, 
and if they were they would not be 
entirely accurate, as much of the com- 
merce of this region is carried on by 
rail and local steamships through 
Singapore. 

Straits Settlements 
Imports from U. S. A. 

An idea of the nature of this trade 
can, however, be gained from a study 
of the statistics of the Straits Settle- 
ments, which imported from the 
United States in 1917 goods to the 
amount of $9,446,071, against $6,776,- 
812 in 1916. 

These imports in 1917 included the 
following: Bacon and hams, books and 
maps, boots and shoes, bottles, brass 
ware, building and roofing materials, 
butter and cheese, cabinet ware, can- 
vas, cards (playing), chains and an- 
chors, chemicals, clocks and watches, 
confectionery, copperware, corrugated 
iron, cotton piece goods, cutlery and 
hardware, druggists' and dentists' 
sundries, drugs and medicines, engines 
and boilers, fancy goods, toys and 
sporting materials ; fruits, preserved 
and dried; glass and glassware, India 
rubber goods (including tires), iron 
bars, nails, ironware (excluding cook- 
ing utensils), lamps and lampware, 
lard, leatherware, lubricating oil, elec- 
trical and other machinery, milk, con- 
densed and sterilized ; motor cars, 
cycles, etc. ; musical instruments ; oil, 
petroleum; oilmen's stores, paints, pa- 
per, machinery and paper goods; per- 
fumery, photographic and cinemato- 
graph materials, railway and tramway 



By a Par Eastern Correspondent 
of the Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce 
— o — 
materials, sewing machines, silk piece 
goods, soap and soda, steel, tinplate, 
tobacco, cigars and cigarettes; tools 
and implements, wearing apparel, ho- 
siery, etc. ; wire rope, woodenware, 
wooden cloth. 

Necessary to Study 
Tastes and Conditions 

While little increase can be ex- 
pected in the demand for a number of 
these articles, which are used only by 
the small European and wealthy Chi- 
nese and native population, in many 
cases an energetic sales campaign in 
certain lines would probably show 
good results, provided a careful study 
were made of local conditions and of 
the customs and tastes of the popula- 
tion. 

It might be well to investigate with 
care the trade in sewing thread, knit 
underwear, hosiery, cheap cotton 
blankets, cotton piece goods, cotton 
handkerchiefs, prints and other tex- 
tiles, boots and. shoes, metal and enam- 
eled table and cooking utensils, wood- 
enware, glassware, crockery and por- 
celain, cutlery and hardware, clocks 
and watches, sewing machines, paints, 
soaps, medicines, drugs and chemicals, 
motor cars and trucks, nails and iron- 
ware, tools and implements, electrical 
and steam machinery of various kinds, 
especially for railroads, mines and ag- 
riculture ; tin plate, dry and salted fish 
and condensed milk, butter and can- 
ned goods of various kinds. 

It may be possible to sell some 
glass, crockery or metal cups for tap- 
ping rubber trees. Considerable quan- 
tities of all these articles are supplied 
by other countries. The resumption 
of building operations, almost entirely 
suspended during the war, is likely to 
create a demand for corrugated iron, 
structural steel and other classes of 
building materials. 

Few Customs Duties 
Exacted in Penang 

Trade is favored by the absence of 
customs duties in Penang, except on 
intoxicating liquors, opium, petroleum, 
cigars, cigarettes and tobacco. 

The import business in this district 
is carried on largely by local British 
and Chinese importers, who "indent" 
or order from abroad the goods which 
their retail customers desire. The lat- 
ter are almost entirely Chinese, and 
local commission houses perform a use- 
ful service in consolidating small or- 
ders, financing the transactions and 



conducting correspondence, while sev- 
eral export agencies have built up ex- 
tensive businesses by working the ter- 
ritory systematically. Few concerns, 
however, specialize in particular lines 
and most of them are willing to han- 
dle anything in which there is a profit. 
While good results may be secured 
by corresponding with local mer- 
chants, whose names may be secured 
through the Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce, and sending di- 
rectly to them catalogues and other 
printed matter, visits from American 
commercial travellers would certainly 
be more effective in establishing defi- 
nite relations. Arrangements for joint 
representatives in non-competing lines 
might be made by American manufac- 
turers who prefer not to sell through 
commission houses and whose foreign 
trade is not extensive enough to war- 
rant the expense of a travelling sales- 
man of their own. 

Advertising Is Advisable 
To Create Local Demand 

As most of the purchases are made 
by consumers at scattered plantations 
and mines, it has been found that the 
best way to increase business is by ju- 
dicious local advertising in the daily 
papers, supplemented by wall posters 
and circulars. The local dealers ex-j 
pect the manufacturers to bear at least 
part of the expense involved, and some 
of the enterprising Chinese retailers 
have secured good results for their 
American connections by carrying ad- 
ditional advertisements on their own 
account and by sending out hundreds 
of letters. Many of these Chinese 
merchants are most energetic and effi- 
cient in their methods of distribution 
and have built up a large trade in 
American products throughout the 
Straits Settlements and the Federated 
Malay States. 

Some of the prominent business men 
from Penang are planning to visit the 
United States in order to secure agen- 
cies for the sale of larger lines of 
American products, and it is hoped 
that our exporters will take advantage 
of this opportunity to establish closer 
relations with this relatively unknown 
market. The Bureau of Foreign and 
Domestic Commerce will afford every 
possible assistance through its district 
offices to those who wish to come in 
contact with these visitors, and if our 
exporting houses send representatives 
to study the requirements of this field, 
a considerable increase in trade be- 
tween the two countries may be con- 
fidently expected. 



September 19 19 



187 




Mexico Making Progress 

In Spite of Unjustified Calumnies Republic is 
Developing Immense Resources 



LAZARD BASCH 

N spite of the cruel, unfounded and 
unjustified calumnies daily poured 
towards Mexico by those who desire 
to make more valuable their millions 
of acres of land, or who, seeing Mex- 
ico's immense quantities of the greatly 
needed and always in more demand 
"Black Liquid Gold" (oil), would like 
to make same their own private Mecca, 
Mexico, in spite of all, laboriously, 
seriously and honestly goes ahead in 
developing her immense resources and 
will soon demonstrate that she is in 
reality today the treasure house of the 
world. 

On September 16th Mexico will cele- 
brate the one hundred and ninth an- 
niversary of the revolt against Spain, 
led by one of the most remarkable 
personalities in the history of the 
American Republics — Miguel Hidalgo 
y Costella, a priest of the parish of 
Dolores in the State of Guanajuato. 
The struggle for independence thus 
begun was the signal for a series of 
'conflicts which finally resulted in the 
formal declaration of independence 
of 1821. 

Spain's Fatal Mistake 

BCost Her Possessions 
Spain's fatal mistake in Mexico, as 
,in all the other countries of Latin 
America, consisted in her utter inabil- 
ity to appreciate the possibility of 
maintaining her influence through 
some means other than political domi- 
nation. Her attempts to regain this 
ontrol only served to increase the 
*iatred of the native population. Had 
me accepted political separation as an 
nevitable and accomplished fact, and 
oncentrated her efforts on the 
jitrengthening of her moral and intel- 
ectual influence over the revolted col- 
>nies, she would have remained the 
,'reat spiritual power of the New 
World. 

The elimination of Spain as an in- 
•illectual force in the destinies of 
Mexico opened the door to new influ- 



By LAZARO BASCH 
Commercial Agent of the Secretary of 

Industry, Commerce and Labor, 
Mexico (representing in San 
Francisco, Cal., the Mexican 
Products Exhibition). 
— o — 
ences which immediately made them- 
selves felt. Like so many other coun- 
tries of Latin America, Mexico turned 
to Prance for intellectual guidance. 
During the last century Prance has 
furnished the models for educational 
organization. Not only have French 
pedagogical methods dominated the 
system of public instruction, but text- 
books modeled after French standards 
have been used in both the lower and 
higher grades. In fact, in both the 
secondary and higher schools the same 
text-books are used in the "lycees" 
and universities of France. 

Increase in Trade 
Greatest With U. S. 

The extension of French intellectual 
influence was accompanied by a 
marked increase of commercial influ- 
ence. In fact, during the last decade 
the commerce of France with Mexico 
has been on the increase, although far 
behind when compared with that of 
the United States. Moreover, the in- 
vestment of American capital and the 
consumption of American products 
have increased so rapidly that the 
position of other countries is insignifi- 
cant when compared with that of the 
United States. 

In spite of its actual world com- 
manding commercial position, the 
spiritual and intellectual influence of 
the United States in Mexico is rela- 
tively insignificant ! Although there 
is a large American colony in Mexico 
City, and in almost every one of the 
smaller towns, there is little, if any, 
social or intellectual contact with the 
native population. In fact, with a 
few very notable exceptions the atti- 
tude is either one of undisguised con- 
tempt, or of absolute lack of social 
diplomacy so necessary today for mak- 
ing friends in order to gain confi- 
dence, respect, and consideration, now 
absolutely indispensable to foment per- 
manent international trade on a solid 
basis. 

Among the broad-minded, intelligent 
people of the United States there has 
been recently a real awakening of in- 
terest in Mexican affairs, but the pre- 
vailing ignorance as to actual condi- 
tions is still so great that the most 
sensational reports concerning polit- 
ical and social conditions are accepted 
without any question. 



This situation involves not only a 
real injustice to Mexico, but is fraught 
with serious dangers to the interna- 
tional relations of both countries. The 
history of American policy is filled 
with instances of gross misunderstand- 
ings with Mexico, thus arising out of 
ignorance of the true, chivalrous char- 
acter of the Mexican people and in- 
ability and unwillingness even to be- 
gin to appreciate their point of view. 

In spite of all this, it is an interest- 
ing and noteworthy fact that, regard- 
less of the attitude of the people of 
the United States toward Mexico, there 
is a noticeable and growing desire on 
the part of all progressive, broad- 
minded Mexicans in general and able 
and earnest leaders of the actual ad- 
ministration of Mexico in particular, 
not only to become thoroughly ac- 
quainted with conditions existing in 
the United States, but to profit by the 
best that the latter has to offer. 

This is particularly true of every- 
thing relating to education, industrial 
and commercial matters. With ecah 
year an increasing number of Mexican 
youths are being educated in the 
United States. There is also a notice- 
ably marked tendency on the part of 
those who are directing the educa- 
tional affairs of the country to give 
preference to American methods. 
Position Carries Obligations 
As Well As Opportunities 

It is most important that this wide- 
spread desire to introduce American 
educational methods should find a 
ready response in the United States. 
The fact that Mexico is a geograph- 
ically perpetual neighbor carries with 
it obligations as well as endless op- 
portunities. If, as you constantly af- 
firm before the world, American civ- 
ilization stands for the spirit of help- 
fulness, you must be ever ready to 
respond to any call. 

To do this effectively, however, good 
will must be supplemented by a seri- 
ous and earnest study of Mexico's 
needs, and a conscious, serious effort 
to understand and absolutely appre- 
ciate the Mexican point of view. In 
so doing Americans will be rendering 
a real service to their own country as 
well as to Mexico. Failure to under- 
stand this country of over twenty 
million inhabitants of indomitable 
courage — the Mexican people are the 
most sensitive of all races, more sus- 
ceptible to arbitration than to force — 
is a constant menace to the preserva- 
tion of cordial relations between the 
two nations. 




This Coast Must Speed U{ 



OPPORTUNITY comes but once! It has been dang- 
ling so long and persistently before the Pacific Coast 
of America that those who ought now to be profiting most 
by it have come to regard it as a permanent Prize, to be 
reached out for when the spirit moves. 

But the Great War has played all sorts of unforeseen 
pranks and one of these pranks is to turn the eyes of the 
Atlantic Coast of America upon the identical Prize that the 
Pacific Coast had long considered as its own. As every- 
body knows, when the Atlantic Coast sees anything it 
wants it goes after it and therefore it is with decidedly 
mixed feelings that the West Coast, of the United States 
watches the East Coast of the same nation make a head- 
long dash for the Prize that had seemed just about to 
drop into the West Coast's hands. 

That Prize is the greatest on earth! 
That Prize is Pan Pacific trade! 

Two thirds of the Human Race dwell across the way 
from the Pacific Coast of America. Steeped in a Civiliza- 
tion of their own they are just coming to life in the Civili- 
zation in which we revel. The Great War was also a Great 
Awakener and by various methods, not unconnected with 
mind, matter and the stomach, it has succeeded in awaken- 
ing most of the Human Race to a new sense of their sur- 
roundings, their shortcomings and their discomforts. 

That which most immediately concerns us in America 
is the quite patent development that countless appetites 
are beginning to crave just those sorts of things that we 
produce or turn out in sufficient quantities to sell. With 
an Asiatic population alone of more than 600,000,000 souls 
can you visualize what those developing appetites might 
mean to all of America but more particularly to the Pacific 
Coast of America? 

If this Coast became chief caterer to that appetital 
craving it would mean six or more great world ports on 
this edge of the United States, flanked by as many huge 
manufacturing cities, and the Pacific Slope, from moun- 
tains to sea, humming with productivity, industry and 
prosperity. This, without taking into consideration the 
added impetus of similar development throughout Oceania, 
Australasia and Latin America. 

A dream? Perhaps so! But this is an age of 
dreams; of wonderful dreams that come true — be- 
cause men get together to make them come true. 

But this is a dream that may not come true for the 
Pacific Coast — because this Coast has procrastinated just 
long enough to afford the Atlantic ('oast an insight into 
what it might have lost. So the latter with the prestige 
of its Pan Atlantic conquests, its backing of billions in 



wealth and the timely assistance of the United States Ship- 
ping Board, has entered the race for the Pan Pacific prize. 
And, as has been observed, it is with mixed feelings that 
this Coast regards the unexpected entry. 

Mention of the Atlantic Coast in this connection means 
more specifically the port of New York — because New 
York dominates the shipping situation in the East as mas- 
terfully as she controls the financial situation in the 
nation. It is no disparagement of the greatness of that 
metropolis to make note of the undisputed fact that in her 
ambition for world-leadership New York brooks no rivals. 
Her men of vision, as much as they may love their country, 
have no desire to see another, and perhaps greater, New 
York built up on the Pacific Coast through development 
of Pan Pacific trade when that trade can be attracted to 
the New York of their bank accounts. 

So the Atlantic Coast enters the race for the 
Pan Pacific prize. 

It may have been due to the exigencies of circum- 
stances, as claimed, but the aid of the Shipping Board 
has more than atoned for the remoteness of New York 
from the scene of Pan Pacific activities. In the allocation 
of ships New York had vessels headed for every point of ! 
the compass before the Pacific Coast had even begun to 
raise its voice in polite request for more. San Francisco 
and Seattle exporters, unable to obtain cargo space to the i 
Orient in the handful of ships making Pacific ports, had 
recourse to the round about route out of New York, thereby 
supplementing vexatious delays and added costs by play- 
ing the New York game in educating consignees in the 
New York route. 

But there's a limit even to patience. Increasing losses, 
in business, coupled with the growing belief that Atlantic 
ports were being unjustly favored, finally spurred Pacific 
Coast merchants to a concerted demand for allocation of! 
ships for Pacific trade. This demand was at first parried, 
then finally acceded to and, as told elsewhere, forty-eight 
vessels have been assigned tentatively to Pacific service 
and more are to follow. 

The jubilations of those who thought the Pacific Coast! 
had won a considerable victory were shortlived, for while 
the shipping authorities gave with one hand they took 
away with the other. The ships were promised but Pacific 
rates were raised, with no corresponding increase in rates 
from the Atlantic Coast. The natural tendency of this 
apparent discrimination will be to divert Pan Pacific ex- 
ports to New York and though the Shipping Board has; 
hastened to announce that any unfair rates reported to 
the board will be adjusted, the time consumed in complet- 



September 19 19 



189 




Hold Own in Pacific Race 



ing all adjustments necessary will afford the powerful 
Atlantic port further opportunity to clinch Pacific suprem- 
acy over Pacific ports. 

So, the race is on in earnest for the Pan Pacific 
Prize. 

That prize ought to have gone to the Pacific 
Coast without contest! 

The Pacific Coast may yet win — but she must 
speed up! 

* « * 

SHIPS FOR THE PACIFIC 

AS the result of agitation among foreign traders of the 
Pacific Coast for more ships on the Pacific 78 addi- 
tional vessels for western service have been promised by 
the Shipping Board. Here is the tentative general pro- 
gram of allocation of ships for this service as prepared by 
H. H. Ebey, Pacific Coast director of operations for the 
Shipping Board, agreed to by the Pacific Coast conference 
committee and approved by John H. Rosseter, director of 
operations of the board: 
15 ships (weekly sailings) San Francisco to Japan, China 

and Philippines. 
2 ships, San Francisco to Vladivostok, Manchuria, China 

and Japan. 
2 ships, San Francisco to India and Dutch East Indies. 

2 ships, San Francisco to Tahiti, Tonga, Apia and Hono- 

lulu. 
4 ships, Los Angeles to Japan, China and Philippines 

(weekly sailings). 
4 ships (weekly sailings), Portland to Japan, China and 

Philippines. 

14 ships, Seattle to Siberia, Manchuria, Japan, China and 

Philippines. 
10 ships, from general Pacific Coast ports to Europe. 
4 ships, from general Pacific Coast ports to Australia and 
New Zealand. 

3 ships, from general Pacific Coast ports to west coast of 

Mexico, Central and South America. 
:j ships, from general Pacific Coast ports to West Indies, 
Venezuela and Colombia. 

15 ships, on tramp service. t 

78 ships for Pacific service. 

The fifteen tramp steamers will be placed in service 
from Pacific Coast ports to China, India and Australia and 
will call at any port offering sufficient cargo. There will 
be available for August-September allocation, part of which 
has already been allocated, forty-eight ships aggregating 
approximately 400,000 tons. These ships will be divided 
as follows: Twenty to San Francisco, twelve to Portland 
and sixteen to Seattle. 



PLAN FOR STUDY IN THE ORIENT 

A COMMENDABLE plan for the study by Americans 
■*■ *- of Oriental languages and customs is sketched in out- 
line by Julien Arnold, IT. S. Commercial Attache at Pekin, 
in a recent issue of Commerce Reports. He proposes the 
study of the three principal languages of the Far East, 
Chinese, Japanese and Russian, not in New York, Chicago 
and San Francisco, but in the capitals of China, Japan and 
Russia. Mr. Arnold calls attention to the tremendous op- 
portunities in Asiatic commercial fields, but finds that 
Americans are more or less handicapped at the outset by a 
deplorable lack of knowledge of the peoples among whom 
these opportunities are available. 

"We need first to train in an intensive way a small 
army of American college men and, if possible, women also, 
in the languages and literatures of the principal peoples of 
the Far East," he writes. "For the present we might 
well confine our attention to the study of Chinese, Japa- 
nese and Russian." He then gives this outline of how such 
a scheme should be conducted. 

"There should be established at Pekin, at Tokio 
and at Petrograd special schools for the training 
of Americans in Chinese, Japanese and Russian. 

"Facilities should be provided at each of these 
schools for 100 men at a time, on a two year 
schedule of courses, with a post graduate course 
of one year for twenty-five selected students. 

"The United States Congress should provide 
funds for the maintenance of these schools and 
offer scholarships carrying $1,200 a year, exclusive 
of travelling expenses, to American graduates of 
higher schools of learning, including teaching 
schools, and so arrange as to embrace men of vary- 
ing talents and training and from all sections of 
the United States. * * * Funds should be 
provided to guarantee the continuation of the up- 
keep of these schools with a full quota of students 
for a period of ten years. 

"Thus fifty students would enter each school 
each year, and in ten years' time each school will 
have graduated about 500 students specially 
trained in the language and civilization of each of 
these countries, or a total army of 1,500 Americans 
capable of assisting in interpreting China, Japan 
- and Russia to the people of the United States." 
Mr. Arnold asserts that more Chinese and Japanese 
know our language and customs than Americans do theirs, 
which is not altogether flattering to the business perspicac- 
ity of the American people. His recommendation is de- 
serving of immediate and serious attention. 



190 



Pan Pacific 



Investments in South America 

Best Way to Insure Increased Trade is to Follow the European Plan of Making 

Loans For Improvements 



THE writer remembers how in Cal- 
ifornia the mountaineer woods- 
man would drop down into the valley 
at the approach of each winter with 
a load of wood for sale to the dealers. 
Instead, of returning to his mountain 
home with an empty wagon the moun- 
taineer teamed back a wagon load of 
provisions that would serve as his 
winter's supply. These provisions 
were bought out of the money he re- 
ceived from his wood. This transac- 
tion continues from year to year with 
clocklike regularity. The people in 
the valley must have their wood; the 
mountaineer must have his flour and 
coffee and sugar. It is an exchange 
that benefits all parties to the transac- 
tion. 

Now suppose the woodsman, after 
selling his wood at one place, drove 
his team to another point farther up 
the valley to purchase his supplies. 
This would involve travel with an 
empty wagon and the loss of consid- 
erable time and in time the loss of the 
patronage of the dealers of the first 
city. 

Ordinarily the same principle is in- 
volved in export trade to South Amer- 
ica. Each year we ship millions of 
dollars worth of manufactured articles 
to the various countries of the South- 
ern continent and theoretically our 
ships should return with a full cargo 
in order to maintain a trade balance 
that would justify future growth of 
commerce. We cannot afford to have 
an excessive favorable trade balance 
if we wish to encourage purchases in 
our home market. An excessive fav- 
orable trade balance ordinarily raises 
the cost of dollar exchange. 
Necessary To Buy 
To Hold the Market 

The quality of American manufac- 
tures, the punctual shipment of orders 
and the extension of liberal credits 
will surely produce a favorable im- 
pression in South America and justify 
the absorption of a tremendous amount 
of business, but in view of the success 
of other nations along different lines 
in the same territory it seems that the 
American business men must do more 
than sell goods and collect money from 
their foreign customers. This state- 
ment refers to the necessity of foreign 
investments. We must not only sell, 
but we must buy as well, whether it 
be merchandise or securities. 

The most successful exporting na- 
tion in the world before the war — 
Great Britain — built up her gigantic 
traffic in merchandise over the foun- 



By A. A. PRECIADO 
— o — 
dation of foreign investments. The 
United Kingdom before the war al- 
ways kept a billion dollars in reserve 
ready to rush to the assistance of some 
country needing cash for internal im- 
provements or other enterprises. There 
isn't a country in South America 
where British capital has failed to 
obtain representation in some form or 
other. 

Why has Great Britain maintained 
its great trade with the Argentine Re- 
public? When it is known that the 
United Kingdom has invested over 
$2,000,000,000 in Argentine alone the 
answer should be simple. England's 
railroad investments alone amounted 
to $800,000,000. The advantages in 
foreign investments may be seen from 
the following figures showing Argen- 
tine's purchases from England and 
the United States for four years: 

United Kingdom — 

1913 1914 1915 1916 

$120,367,811 $102,149,424 $164,972,021 $159,755,301 
United States — 

$ 22,894,809 $ 42,866,995 $ 89,842,833 $113,488,289 

This is due largely to England's for- 
eign investments. The railroads, port 
works and the great number of enter- 
prises in which British capital was in- 
vested — all required supplies from 
time to time. These supplies were 
purchased in the country from whence 
the capital was obtained. 

British Investments 
Bring British Goods 

Not alone in Argentine has Great 
Britain made large investments. In 
the Republic of Chile one will find in- 
dustrial development in many lines en- 
couraged by the British pound ster- 
ling. Telephone systems in many ci- 
ties are controlled by British capital. 
Where do the supplies for these indus- 
trial enterprises generally come from? 
Prom England. 

Germany's establishment of branch 
banks in South America was merely 
the forerunner to the investment of 
capital in enterprises. German capital 
before the war financed hundreds of 
enterprises. This served as the seed 
out of which grew that tremendous 
South American trade for the once 
powerful German empire? 

Before the war the French held Ar- 
gentine securities to the amount of 
nearly $300,000,000. It was French 
capital that operated the tramways 
and electric service of Buenos Aires. 
Three of the great railways were prac- 
tically owned by French capital. 
French engineers under the guidance 
of French capital constructed some of 



the principal ports of that country. 
Her investments extended to agricul- 
ture and stock raising and to the 
grape industry in Mendoza at the foot 
of the Andes. 

With the financial condition of Eu- 
rope producing a delicate throb at the 
present time, it is doubtful if capital 
from that continent will be able to 
pour into South America with the free- 
dom that characterized its pre-war ac- 
tivities. Germany is helpless for the 
present; France must conserve her re- 
sources and England must follow a 
similar course. 

The United States today is in a posi- 
tion to extend financial assistance 
wherever the nature of the enterprise 
justifies a safe investment. Not only 
South America, but the entire world 
is looking to us today with the deepest 
interest in our programme of financial 
extensions. 

In South America alone there are 
unlimited opportunities for develop- 
ment of backwood sections with Amer- 
ican capital. The potential riches of 
Ecuador, for instance, lie dormant for 
the lack of money to bring out the 
most valuable that is in them. Ecua- 
dor needs railroads, improved harbor 
facilities, improvements such as the 
development of water power and the 
construction of highways. 

In Peru American capital can find 
considerable work to do. Peru's 
wealth in mineral resources are prac- 
tically unknown. Her mining indus- 
try needs development. Irrigation 
systems must be constructed in order 
to place her agriculture on a solid 
basis. Peru, like other countries on 
the west coast, needs railroad exten- 
sions to tap rich sections at the pres- 
ent time inaccessible for ordinary com- 
mercial purposes. 

Peru is rich in water falls, whose 
water power is needed to aid the coun- 
try 's infant manufacturing industries. 
Not only is the country rich in miner- 
als and agriculture, but her timber re- 
sources are practically untouched. In 
the north and northeast of Peru lie her 
vast forests which have not yet 
reached the bark of the woodsman's 
axe. Some day capital will utilize this 
timber for world consumption. 
Need For Railroads 
Realized in Bolivia 

Bolivia needs railroads. There have 
been in the country representatives of 
the Bolivian Government endeavoring 
to negotiate a loan for $12,000,000 for 
the construction of railroads in the 
country. One of these lines is aimed 



September 19 19 



191 






to tap the rich agricultural belt of the 
republic, while the other will give the 
country a connection between the Pa- 
cific and the Atlantic oceans. Upon 
the completion of this line it will be 
possible to reach Buenos Ayres by rail 
from Arica on the Pacific Coast 
through La Paz and over the Central 
Argentine Railroad to the Argentine 
capital. The floating of this loan in 
the United States will mean that 
American engineers will construct the 
road and that the necessary supplies 
will be purchased here. 

Chile is now engaged in municipal 
improvements and in the construction 
of highways in which she, like other 
South American countries, has been 
rather backward. The development of 
her water power, her mineral and ag- 
ricultural resources, is dependent on 
the available capital for such pur- 
poses. Chile, like Peru, is rich in 
natural resources, most in extensive 
forests. There is plenty of wood pulp 
in these forests for the establishment 
of paper mills. 

Trade Follows the Loan 
Is Modern Adaptation 

It is the old saying that trade fol- 
lows the flag, but it is more appro- 
priate to state that trade follows the 
loan. Wherever there is American 
capital invested one is sure to find a 
healthy exportation of American made 
articles. 

The South American countries, how- 
ever, must do their part in bringing 
about this strengthened commercial 
relationship. They must convince the 
American people that investments in 
their countries will be fully appreci- 
ated. They must conduct campaigns 
of education in this country unfolding 
the true story of their resources and 
the multiplicity of opportunities await- 
ing the arrival of American money. 

It is difficult to find an investor who 
will put his money in a proposition in 
a country he knows little about. Some 
years ago a wealthy Western cattle- 
man was approached by an American 
who had just returned from Argentina 
on the subject of an investment in a 
cattle land proposition in northern 
Argentina. The proposition was sound 
enough, but the Westerner could not 

exactly see it." 
It may be all right just as you say, 

rown," he said, "but I'll tell you 

mething. If you have got a nice 
cattle proposition for me right around 
here, where I can lay my hands on it, 
I '11 listen to you because I know you, 
but, on the other hand, when you come 
to me with a proposition that will send 
my capital several thousand miles 
away to a country I know nothing 
about, and whose people speak a dif- 
ferent language, why, even the Presi- 
dent of that country could not get me 
to invest. It's too far away." 



Peruvian Copper 
Rich Investment 



: 

B, 

so 



By CARLOS GIBSON 
First Secretary of the Peruvian 
Embassy, Washington 
— o — 
CUJRPRISING results have been de- 
^ rived from the investment of 
American capital in different enter- 
prises in Peru. The principal and 
most important is the Cerro de Pasco 
Copper Corporation, whose gross 
earnings for 1918 from the sale of cop- 
per amounted to $22,867,807, notwith- 
standing the momentary fall in the 
price of copper, while the profits for 
1917 were $2,106,275 higher, with net 
receipts of $5,078,868 and $4,393,352 
as dividends. 

The original capital of this company 
was $30,000,000 and the claims which 
it has registered with the Peruvian 
Government now number 1,800, which 
represent an extensive area of most 
valuable property situated in the 
heart of the richest copper district of 
the world. 

Monthly Net Income 
From Mines $1,000,000 

The value of the properties is in- 
creased by the coal mines of Collaris- 
quisca and Quishhuarcancha ; by water 
rights and agricultural establishments 
of more than 25,000 hectares in ex- 
tent; by the hydro-electric power plant 
of La Oroya of more than 12,000 horse 
power, and lastly by the smelter, 
which daily treats hundreds of tons 
of ore, the whole concern employing 
more than 15,000 persons in the mines 
and offices, all earning very good sal- 
aries and well looked after in the 
buildings erected for the purpose, 
which include a model hospital 
equipped with the most recent appli- 
ances. The monthly net income of the 
concern is estimated at $1,000,000, pro- 
duced by its Cerro de Pasco and Moro- 
cocha establishments. 

A new smelter, that of La Oroya, 
has recently been started, capable of 
treating 4,000 tons of ore daily. It is 
worthy of note that the Cerro de 
Pasco Copper Corporation is able to 
place its copper on the New York mar- 
ket at the lowest possible cost— as low 
as any other producer and lower than 
most. This result, it was stated at 
the last annual meeting of the com- 
pany, is due to the high proportion of 
gold and silver which the ore contains 



and the cheapness of labor in Peru. 
Apart from the 200 American, British 
and Canadian employees working for 
the company, the remaining 5,000 are 
natives belonging to the mountainous 
regions of the Andes and able, there- 
fore, to withstand labor in the mines 
without hardship. 

The Morococha Mining Company 
owns about 1,200 "pertenencias," or 
claims, situated in the district of 
Morococha, with a powerful plant of 
44,000 horsepower for the exclusive 
use of the mines. This is another of 
the very flourishing American concerns 
of the region. 

Has Rail System 
To Move the Ores 

The Cero de Pasco Railway Com- 
pany carries the ores and metals from 
the mines to the port of embarkation, 
taking advantage of a branch line 
which unites Cerro de Pasco with the 
Oroya, where it joins the Central Rail- 
way, which continues on to Callao. 
The branch line is 132 kilometres long ; 
its freight rates are fair and the roll- 
ing stock comfortable and well cared 
for. 

The barometer for appreciating the 
development of the district is un- 
doubtedly the returns of the railroad 
which, with its shops and regular 
schedules, co-operates efficiently with 
the neighboring towns for their ad- 
vancement. The continuously prosper- 
ous condition of this line can be appre- 
ciated by the fact that since 1914 to 
date the monthly quantity of mineral 
freight conveyed has been 488,544 
tons. 

Other American companies of not 
less importance, although they have 
not developed as rapidly as the above 
mentioned, are to be found in Que- 
yuipa, Carabaya and Sandia, southern 
provinces of Peru. Such are the An- 
des Exploitation Company, which 
works the copper mines of Cerro 
Verde; the Inca Mining Company, the 
Inca Gold Company, both gold mining 
concerns; the Inambari Dredging 
Company, which achieved very good 
results from the drainage of the auri- 
ferous rivers in the region from which 
the company takes its name, and the 
Humboldt Gold Placers Company, 
which exports considerable quantities 
of gold obtained from Montana de 
Puco. 



192 



Pan Pacific 



Publicity an Art in Latin America 

Strong Appeal Found in Poster Advertising Among the Masses, But Novelty and 

Merit Are Quickly Appreciated 



SEVERAL years ago, while work- 
men were tearing down an an- 
cient building in Lima, Peru, which 
had been erected by one of the Gov- 
ernors immediately succeeding Pizzaro, 
news spread through the city that a 
great treasure safe had been discov- 
ered imbedded under a stone floor. 
Xow there had long been a legend that 
one of the Governors from Spain had 
secreted stolen wealth under his castle 
before his recall to Spain and that 
the wealth was still hidden away. 

So when the authorities verified the 
report that a safe had really been dis- 
covered they formally took possession 
of it and declared it the property of 
the state. It was a very ancient safe, 
of wrought iron, mildewed with age. 
Grunting workmen, aided by block 
and tackle and little Spanish horses, 
pulled it from its lair under the earth, 
and with much pomp the police au- 
thorities opened it with crowbar, 
chisel and sledge hammer. 

The safe was empty save for a small, 
compact, neatly tied package, which 
was opened with chagrin and amaze- 
ment. For the package was wrapped 
in neat, modern looking paper and tied 
with very fresh string. Inside the 
package were a few boxes of a well 
known American proprietary medicine 
and a set of posters declaring its mar- 
vellous properties. 

Paid Fine Gladly 
and Booked Orders 

The throng which had gathered to 
witness the disclosure of age-hidden 
wealth screamed with glee, and the 
disgruntled police rushed off and ar- 
rested the agent for the American pro- 
prietary medicine. He paid a fine of 
some $100 with a delighted grin and 
went out and began to book orders 
for his product among the druggists. 
He had bought the safe at a second 
hand store several days before, and at 
night, with the aid of a few workmen 
and a dray, had buried it where he 
knew it would be found. 

The newspapers carried columns 
about the fiasco, and the public, hear- 
ing and reading about it, grew con- 
fused, as a rather superstitious and 
illiterate public will, finally coming to 
half believe that this medicine had 
come into the ancient safe in a mirac- 
ulous way because of its great curative 
powers. The medicine is still selling 
in great quantities in Peru and can be 
purchased at the meanest apothecary 
shop from north to south of the coun- 
try. 

This "stunt" in the United States 
would be treated humorously as a 



By F. EUGENE ACKERMAN 

Editor of Export American Industries 

— o — 
rather shopworn effort by a press 
agent, but in Peru it had novelty and 
to its ordinary appeal of mystery it 
added the strength of a legend and a 
superstitious belief which is strong 
among the mestizo population, whose 
religion is a queer mixture of medieval 
Catholicism and the remnants of the 
sun-worship creed of Inca days. 

It proves, I believe, what many ad- 
vertisers in South America told me, 
and that is, fundamentally, advertising 
in South America does not differ from 
advertising in the United States. Ap- 
plication and technique are a little dif- 
ferent, but the so-called American 
style of advertising finds the greatest 
response in South America, as its use 
by the most successful advertisers has 
proved. 

Direct Sales Methods 
To Reach the People 

During the period I spent in various 
parts of the continent endeavoring to 
reach every class of person with a 
message from the United States Gov- 
ernment as to its reasons for declaring 
war on Germany, I decided that news- 
paper and periodical advertising af- 
fected only a small percentage of the 
people, because it is only a small per- 
centage that can read. The others 
had to be reached by "direct sales" 
methods. 

This was particularly true of Peru, 
Bolivia, Ecuador, Venezuela and Co- 
lombia, where the percentage of illit- 
eracy is not only high, but where tran- 
sit facilities are such that all appeals 
must be made locally ; there is no me- 
dium by which a general national ap- 
peal may be made. 

So we took a leaf from advertisers 
who were most successful in South 
America, and we used postal cards, 
colored prints, buttons, enlarged pho- 
tographs and billboards. We mounted 
sets of stirring photographs on easels, 
which we placed at vantage points in 
far flung settlements, and we put col- 
ored pictures in store windows and on 
store counters for the people to take 
home with them after the fiesta. There 
is no doubt that this direct appeal had 
an effect where our newspaper and 
periodical advertising could not reach. 
Strong Appeal Found 
In Poster Advertising 

Poster and billboard advertising are 
well advanced in South America, par- 
ticularly in those portions where trans- 
portation is the most modern. In all 
of the countries the railroad station 



and the plaza are the two local points 
where the entire population gathers at 
certain periods of the day to prom- 
enade and to gossip. 

We have no custom here by which 
to make a comparison. In our smaller 
cities the people when idle come to 
the depots to see the trains come in 
and leave; but in South America the 
visit to the station or the promenade 
about the plaza is a social function. 
And South American cities — especially 
the smaller ones — are so barren of 
recreation opportunities that none is 
missed. 

The people are intensely curious. 
They all make leisurely inspections of 
the new posters that are put up at 
railroad stations, particularly if the 
poster has some artistic merit or is 
done in bold outlines in striking col- 
ors. Those in the audience who do 
not know how to read have the text 
explained to them. It is no unusual 
sight to see little knots, particularly 
on fiesta days, or on market days, 
gathering about the billboards, gravely 
discussing the posters. 

Illustrations should play a large 
part in advertising American goods 
in South America. The less text the 
better the advertisement. The mass of 
advertisers in South America use 
quantities of text and a bad selection 
of type. They have no particular 
standard of style and follow no school, 
unless it may be that they base their 
general ideas on the French pattern. 
The few big advertisers, however, who 
spend hundreds of thousands of dol- 
lars a year, follow the American plan; 
they play on a trade name, constantly 
hammering it at the public from every 
angle. Trade names are as valuable 
in South America as they are here. In 
fact, I have been told by many suc- 
cessful merchants there that they are 
more valuable. 

Confidence Once Obtained 
Has Far Reaching Effect 
Once the customer has placed his 
confidence in a certain commodity he 
is loath to accept a substitute. It re- 
quires a certain responsibility to at- 
tempt a departure in his habits, which 
he does not want to assume. And then 
the confidence of the South American 
is hard to get, but once obtained, is 
more far reaching than that of his 
more sophisticated North American 
brother. 

The preparation of copy for adver- 
tising in South America is the weakest 
link in our chain of endeavor. A mer- 
chant related to me an incident which 
illustrates this point. He received an 



September 19 19 



193 



Rio Janeiro a City of Activity 

Life is Replete With Commercial Interest But Spirit of Condescension is a Business 

Handicap to Anglo-Saxons 






[ IFE in Rio de Janeiro today is 
■*— ' full of interest commercially. I 
am living at the Hotel des Estran- 
geiros, one of the largest and oldest 
hotels in the city. It is a very com- 
fortable, homelike, clean place and is 
always full of travellers from all over 
the world. It would be difficult to 
ind a more cosmopolitan place in 
i-hich to live, with almost all the 
languages of the world sounding in 
one's ears. Every time a boat enters 
the port we know it by the new faces 
in the house, and each departing 
steamer carries away friends and ac- 
quaintances. 

Since the armistice we have had 
much more frequent service on the 
lines coming into Rio de Janeiro from 
America, England, France, Japan and 
Holland. The English boats have ap- 
peared in greatest numbers, seconded 
by the Japanese, there being three 
lines running direct from Japan here. 
American lines are still advertising 
and promising and with one exception 
we so far have not seen any unusual 
activity. 

Every steamer entering this port for 
the last three months came greatly 
overcrowded, but left a large propor- 
tion of passengers in Rio de Janeiro. 
This has filled hotels to a point here- 
tofore unheard of during the warm 
season and some hotel owners who fol- 
lowed the usual custom of closing for 
repairs are bitterly regretting the har- 
vest they are missing. 

Brazilian Indoor Sport 
Watching U. S. Arrivals 

It is fun to watch the new-come 
Americans. The day after they land, 



elegantly made up booklet, accompa- 
nied by a letter — both in Spanish — 
asking him to take up the line which 
the booklet illustrated. He read both 
enclosures, then he wrote the Amer- 
ican manufacturer in English: 

Your communications in an 
unknown dialect have been 
received and their humor ap- 
peals to us. If you will be so 
kind as to send us a transla- 
tion of the same either in 
Spanish or in English we will 
have much pleasure in read- 
ing them. 
Some of the translations which have 
been used for advertising purposes — 
in newspapers, periodicals, catalogues, 
letters and enclosures — have been 
pathetic. They have been made either 

Iby men who knew English badly and 



By LUCIE MULLER MORGAN 

— o — 
out they hustle with their sample or 
despatch cases in a mad rush to land 
orders or whatever their business may 
be ; they career madly around in taxi- 
cabs and make appointments with the 
same diligence they display at home. 
In a few days they settle down to 
using the street cars, taking their time 
in the mornings and making fewer 
appointments per day. 

It's no use, one must conform to 
the local customs, and no one who 
knows, expects appointments to be 
kept punctually. I even know some 
who keep an appointment twenty-four 
hours after the time set, with the calm 
assurance that all will be well, and 
often it is, although this is really a 
bit exaggerated. 

Nevertheless we all go to appoint- 
ments expecting to wait from twenty 
to ninety minutes. If one gets restive 
and does not wait, it is all to do over 
again, so it's best to cultivate patience. 
"Patiencia" is the Brazilian's answer 
to every reproach. We all learn that 
a deal is rarely accomplished in the 
first visit ; in Brazil, snap decisions are 
rare, even if made they are held over 
for appearances' sake. Every one who 
has had commercial experience here 
knows that the longer the salesman 
stays the greater the confidence he in- 
spires and it is wisest to give the im- 
pression of plenty of time, even when 
it is not true. 

To my mind the greater success of 
the Europeans in this market is due 
to the fact that they have more per- 
manent representations here than 



American houses have and the Brazil- 
ian naturally prefers dealing with the 
people who will be on hand when his 
orders arrive to safeguard him in case 
of unsatisfactory conditions. I have 
recently talked to one of the Amer- 
ican representative houses established 
here for a good many years and they 
tell me that during this troublous pe- 
riod since the signing of the armistice, 
when everybody has been deluged with 
cancellations of orders, this old house 
has not had one single cancellation. 
I can believe what they say, for per- 
sonally I have, had no cancellations 
and my customers are about the same 
class as the house I mention. 

I have wandered from my intention 
of telling how the different nationali- 
ties among the salesmen impress me. 
When we have an English steamer 
bringing in a collection of newcomers, 
we do not see so much hustle ; in most 
cases the men have been out before 
and are returning from the war or 
their vacations. They spend the first 
week or two looking up old friends, 
visiting about and are in the hotel a 
good deal, where many people call on 
them. 

This also applies to Americans who 
have made previous trips and learned 
the mannerisms. One advantage shown 
by the average American is his ability 
to make acquaintances easily and min- 
gle with strangers, while the Britisher, 
true to form, flocks by himself or quite 
exclusively with his brother Britishers. 
Spirit of Condescension 
Handicaps Anglo-Saxons 

Neither the American or the British 
can equal the Frenchman in his way 

(Continued on next page) 



knew Spanish as a speaking language, 
English as an ambition, and the line 
of which they wrote — not at all. 

Not Castilian Spanish 
Is Language of South 

Good Spanish is applicable to any 
of the Spanish speaking countries of 
South America, but it always must be 
borne in mind that the Spanish of 
South America is not Castilian. It is 
Spanish with colloquialisms that have 
become part of the language. Certain 
expressions that are harmless and so- 
cial in Chile have a dynamic meaning 
in the Argentine. 

I recall a poster advertising a popu- 
lar motion picture star in an equally 
popular picture that was shown in 
Chile. The poster had been done into 
Spanish in the United States. The 
emphasized word on the poster meant 



something in Chile that it did not 
mean in polite Castilian circles, so a 
white strip of paper was pasted over 
it and a substitute word was used. 
This could have been avoided had the 
translation been made more carefully, 
or had it been vised by some one with 
a knowledge of Chilean colloquialisms. 
But aside from preparing copy with 
care, having beforehand a knowledge 
of the country to which you are going 
to appeal and making certain that you 
are saying in Spanish what you have 
said in your English text, there is lit- 
tle mystery in advertising in South 
America. American agencies with for- 
eign connections are becoming better 
equipped every day to handle Amer- 
ican advertising in South America in 
the proper way. It is a matter though 
that should be handled only by ex- 
perts, not by tyros. 



194 



Pan Pacific 



New Zealand Seeking 
Interchange of Trade 



By J. B. CLARKSON 

Of Wellington, N. Z. 

NEW ZEALAND and Australia are 
buying large quantities of manu- 
factured goods from the United States, 
and as yet there is very limited quan- 
tities of goods being sent in return. 

New Zealand has 400,000,000 pounds 
of butter and cheese in cold storage, 
besides large quantities of hides, tal- 
low and hemp, all waiting shipment, 
and at the present time there are not 
enough available refrigerator ships in 
the world to shift the meat and butter 
in a reasonable time. The meat has 
cost the Imperial Government approxi- 
mately an average of ll 1 /^ cents a 
pound, and is comprised of beef, mut- 
ton and lamb of the best quality. The 
butter has cost 32 cents a pound. 

Now the great difficulty is transpor- 
tation, but if the United States Gov- 
ernment can solve this and arrange 
with the Imperial Government to re- 
lieve some of the huge stocks, and 
then later with the New Zealand Gov- 
ernment for a regular supply so that 
the working people of the United 
States could have a reasonable quan- 
tity of the best meat and butter the 
world produces, the cost of living 
would be much reduced and the peo- 



ple made happier and much more con- 
tented. 

The climatic conditions of New Zea- 
land are such that she produces for 
nine months of the year, and the high- 
est point of production is reached 
when the United States is in the throes 
of winter, so that rapid transportation 
would mean a constant supply of fresh 
foods without the necessity of carry- 
ing huge volumes of stocks. 

Of course, New Zealand wool is also 
a very important trading factor. New 
Zealand produce is not only of the 
highest quality but can be traded in 
with absolute security because all food 
products for export are Government 
graded, and carry the. Government 
stamps, which factor is a guarantee of 
grade and quality. New Zealand is 
now considering sending trade com- 
missioners to the United States. 

Australia has tremendous stocks of 
wheat waiting for shipment, and also 
large quanaities of meat, butter and 
wool. 

Co-operation is needed everywhere 
to secure quick and economical trans- 
portation, and education and transpor- 
tation must go hand in hand in up- 
lifting democracies and securing for 
the multitudes a reasonable supply of 
the best the world can produce. 



Commercial Activity in Rio Janeiro 



(Continued from page 193) 



with the Brazilians; he can meet them 
easier as to language, in the first place, 
because practically all educated Bra- 
zilians speak French, while only a fair 
percent speak English. Language helps 
a lot, but the more important factor 
in the success of the French is the 
lack of a spirit of condescension, as 
shown generally by the Anglo-Saxons. 

With all the talk going on about 
"closer relations" why do we condes- 
cend to those whose trade we want? 
Think it over, those at home expecting 
to come to Brazil or any other Latin- 
American country. 

Just now it is the fad here to adopt 
styles and things North American. 
"Yankee" is a great word everywhere 
and I think this country is in a par- 
ticularly receptive mood towards us 
and our merchandise, more than at 
any time in the past several years. 
This is a frame of mind that should be 
helped and would be if we were a 
more physcological people. 



Japan is taking this market seri- 
ously in every department of trade. 
Each steamer brings in salesmen — 
they come in groups and naturally 
stick together. They are competing 
in heavy chemicals, oils, toys, silks, 
cotton goods, chinaware, and knit 
goods. Some American houses have 
their representations. Some salesmen 
tell me that they have not felt this 
competition, but I know it is here and 
sooner or later we are all going to feel 
it. The Japanese have three lines of 
steamers which I understand are sub- 
sidized. 

Not long ago while waiting to talk 
to one of the big buyers who is con- 
sidered the meanest man to sell in all 
Brazil, I watched three Japs trying to 
sell him. They had knit underwear. 
One of them spoke a little Portuguese; 
the head man spoke fair English and 
used it for all he was worth on the 
Brazilian buyer, who I know does not 
know English at all. Prices must 



have talked, for the Japs made the 
sale and took the buyer's ragging 
smilingly, when an American would 
have felt like banging him. 

So much has been said for such a 
long time about the poor packing done 
by American manufactures for foreign 
shipments, it is rather a relief to hear 
a new sort of complaint. This time 
it is the ruthless handling of the goods 
by the loading or unloading people. 
Several houses have recently been re- 
ceiving shipments in very bad condi- 
tion, and they admit is not the fault 
of the packing this time, but because 
of the handling by certain steamship 
lines. 

A particular case brought to my no- 
tice was a shipment of American 
paints, perfectly packed in heavy 
metal drums. Some of these drums 
arrived here in such a delapidated 
state they are scarcely salable, al- 
though the contents are uninjured. 
Direct blows with a heavy hammer 
make no impression on these drums 
and we are all wondering what could 
have happened to them en voyage. 

Poor packing, badly handled ship- 
ments and carelessly filled orders make 
the life of a salesman in Brazil any- 
thing but a bed of roses and my cry 
is still for home co-operation. 



Java Offers Field 

(Continued from page 185) 



The Javanese, Malays and Arabs form 
the agricultural, fishing and industrial 
labor elements, and it is to their wants 
that the American exporter must cater 
through the Chinese and the Dutch. 
So, while adopting his methods of do- 
ing business to the latter, the tastes 
and limitations of the former must al- 
ways be kept in mind. 

Through several centuries the 
whole policy of the Dutch administra- 
tion of the islands has been to increase 
production without increasing the de- 
sires of the producers. We have 
therefore an anomaly of an extremely 
fertile and productive soil sustaining 
a population of only comparatively 
simple wants. The natural result has 
been that for many years before the 
war little of the actual proceeds were 
spent in Java, but by establishing the 
markets for Java's exports and the 
assembling place for Java's imports 
in Holland, the greater proportion of 
the excess wealth from the colony ac- 
cumulated there as well. 

With the old European trade routes 
closed by the war, however, these 
products now began to find their way 
to other markets, notably Japan and 
America, and manufactured goods 
from these countries were naturally 
the logical return cargo. 



September 19 19 



195 



Tremendous Expansion 
of Westinghouse Works 



TO many it will seem only a few 
years that a horse-car rumbled 
over the cobblestone pavement in 
front of home; and most of us re- 
member that one of the wonders at 
the World's Fair in Chicago was the 
electric lighting of the grounds and 
buildings. In thirty years has the 
tangible world about us been com- 
pletely modified by the successful ap- 
plication of that strange, unseen force, 
electricity. 

The growth of the electrical indus- 
try is almost a mushroom variety, re- 
garded from the standpoint of time, 
but it has become one of the largest 
in the world. Journals that record 
the first Niagara development furnish 
an amusing insight into the skepticism 
of the passing generation. "Carry 
electricity from Niagara Falls to Buf- 
falo, impossible ! ' ' Today transmission 
lines from Niagara furnish power to 
industries two hundred and fifty miles 
west. 

Progress Largely Due 
To Men of Great Force 

Perhaps the possibilities for such a 
tremendous development in such a 
brief span of years would never have 
been realized had it not been for the 
force of such men as the late George 
Westinghouse and Thomas A. Edison 
who not only parted the veil that 
clouds the future by conceiving, in- 
venting and perfecting the seemingly 
unknowable, but organized their in- 
dustries on a vast scale. 

Westinghouse lived to see the ideas 
he gave birth to, grown to an extent 
that the entire world is more comfort- 
able and better cared for as a result. 
He lived to see the Westinghouse Elec- 
tric and Manufacturing Company at 
East Pittsburgh cover over ninety 



acres of floor space and include in its 
payrolls 30,000 people. 

The Westinghouse works at East 
Pittsburgh are among the largest in 
the world, making everything electri- 
cal from a small electric traveller's 
iron for ladies, to a huge electric loco- 
motive capable of hauling a heavy 
Pullman train sixty miles per hour. 
From Small Beginning 
To the Size of a City 

Beginning in 1886, with a force of 
two hundred men in a small shop in 
Garrison Alley, Pittsburgh, it has 
gradually grown to its present size, 
' a plant employing people, enough for 
a good-sized city. The site chosen 
when the company had outgrown its 
quarters at Garrison Alley is now no 
longer large enough and another plant 
known as the Essington Works at 
South Philadelphia, already in opera- 
tion, bids fair to equal if not exceed 
the mother plant at East Pittsburgh. 
Besides these, works at Newark, New 
Jersey, Mansfield, Ohio, and others are 
exclusively devoted to the manufac- 
ture of electrical products. 

The Westinghouse Electric & Manu- 
facturing Company has been contin- 
ually a leader in evolving new appli- 
cations, but never are these placed oh 
the market until they have been tried 
out under the most severe conditions 
and the most captious critics are satis- 
fied with their operation. As soon as 
an application has successfully passed 
all tests and is ready for commercial 
application it is placed on the market 
but not before, and in the meantime 
the engineers are constantly striving 
to find some other application which 
will be of service to mankind. 

To attempt to describe the works 
of the company as they stand today 



in any detail would be impossible in 
this space, but a general glimpse of 
some of the salient features of this ex- 
tensive industry will give the reader 
an idea of its magnitude. 

The power house supplying energy 
for the works has a capacity of 20,000 
horsepower, consuming from 400 to 
500 tons of coal per day, large enough 
to supply a town of considerable size. 
The power is generated by Westing- 
house Parsons steam turbines, at 2,200 
volts 25 cycles, alternating current. 
It is transmitted at this voltage to 
various parts of the works and there 
stepped down to voltage suitable for 
application. 

Section R, where locomotives and 
other machines are erected, is 70 feet 
wide and nearly one-third of a mile 
long, making it one of the largest sin- 
gle areas in the world devoted to 
manufacturing purposes. When at one 
end it is hardly possible to see clearly 
to the other end. Five huge electric 
cranes are required to handle the 
work in this aisle. There are alto- 
gether 108 of these cranes in the 
works, varying from one pound to 100 
tons in capacity. 

Tour of Ten Miles 
To See Whole Works 

With the exception of some of the 
buildings recently erected all of the 
works are under one connecting roof 
and to see it all completely would re- 
quire a tour of approximately ten 
miles. 

The works are, in construction and 
equipment, models of American manu- 
facturing enterprises. Each section is 
organized and equipped for the pro- 
duction of work of a particular char- 
acter. Section A, located on the ex- 
treme left as one enters the main 
building, is devoted to the manufac- 
ture of alternating and direct current 
street railway motors; section C to 
the production of alternating and di- 
rect current generators and motors of 
capacity less than 100KW, and in sec- 
tion B and D larger machines are con- 
structed, the latter section especially 
being equipped with tools of gigantic 




EAST PITTSBURGH WORKS OF WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC 



196 



Pan Pacific 




ASSEMBLING ELECTRIC MOTORS 



size capable of handling heavy mater- 
ial of large dimensions. 

In all departments, production is 
carried on with a minimum handling 
and transportation of material. The 
raw material or rough castings enters 
a department at one end and passing 
through successive stages of manufac- 
ture is carried steadily forward to 
final assembly and test. The machine 
is generally tested and prepared for 
shipment in the department in which 
it is constructed, the large apparatus 
being there mounted on railway cars. 

For this purpose tracks of standard 
gauge enter every aisle and a number 
traverse the entire building. A nar- 
row gauge, storage battery operated 
railroad runs in and out among the 
various buildings at East Pittsburgh. 
Electric storage battery trucks also are 
operated between the various sections 
for transfer of material. 

Interesting Processes 
Involved in Manufacture 

Many interesting processes are in- 
volved in manufacturing the various 
types of apparatus. Electric welding 
machines are used for welding of large 
castings that have been broken or are 
incomplete. This is the Bernado, or 
Arc Weld, and is used on account of 
its simplicity, requiring from 200 to 
500 amperes at 70 volts, alternating 
current ; processes of acetylene weld- 
ing used in the construction of small 
steel tanks for switches and transfor- 
mers and for heating devices; winding 
the armature and fields insulating the 
slots, holding the coils in the slots, 
making them fire proof for the large 
machines are used in steel mills; the 



erection of large electric locomotives 
which are now so rapidly replacing 
those driven by steam on many rail- 
roads. 

To ship the vast output of these 
works requires an average of 1,200 
carloads a month. As an example of 
the range in size of apparatus it may 
be mentioned that the company builds 
generators from 1/10 of a horsepower 
to 80,000 horsepower in capacity. 

Nor have all the energies of the 
company been devoted to manufactur- 
ing facilities and increasing output, 
for extensive arrangements have been 
made for the welfare of the em- 
ployees. 

Welfare of Employees 
Provided by Company 

This company has always been a 
pioneer in providing modern and up- 
to-date methods for increasing the 
safety, comfort and convenience of its 
employees, and has been the recipient 
of numerous medals and awards at 
various expositions in recognition of 
this work. Throughout the works 
every possible safeguard is thrown 
around the employee by means of 
guards, enclosures and warning signs, 
to lessen the danger of accidents. 

So carefully are machines and ap- 
pliances guarded that according to re- 
cent analysis only from one-quarter to 
three-tenths of one per cent of the ac- 
cidents that occurred during the pre- 
ceding year were due to lack of safe- 
guards. 

Convenient sanitary wash rooms are 
provided throughout the works. The 
various sections of the shop are all 
provided with ample lighting, each 



system designed with particular ref- 
erence to the work that is performed 
therein. 

Technical Night School 
For Employees ' Benefit 

One of the most important features 
of the company's plan for the better- 
ment of its employees is the Casino 
Technical Night School, operated un- 
der the auspices of the company. Ses- 
sions are held nine months a year, 
three nights per week, in the Turtle 
Creek Public School buildings adjoin- 
ing the works. 

The general purpose of the company 
in its relief, compensation and pension 
plans as far as it reasonably may, is 
to provide sa that no employees or 
their families shall come to want 
either through accident to employees 
when on duty, or because of disability 
from other causes such as sickness or 
accident when off duty, or by reason 
of reaching old age while still in the 
service of the company. 

The relief department is under the 
direction of a trained corps of medical 
experts and maintained for the benefit 
of the employees. Dr. C. A. Lauffer, 
the Medical Director, who has achieved 
national reputation in the resuscitation 
of supposedly dead people, devotes a 
portion of his time to instructing the 
employees in the use of the prone pres- 
sure or Schaeffer method of resuscita- 
tion. As a result many lives have 
been saved by Westinghouse men fa- 
miliar with this method who hap- 
pened to be near when some one re- 
ceived a shock, electric or otherwise. 
Accident Compensation 
For Benefit Payments 

The company supports, for the 
benefit of all employees an accident 
compensation fund for the payment of 
benefits in case of disability or death 
from accident occurring to employees 
while at work, as such, and for the 
further payment of accident compen- 
sation pension to widows, children and 
other dependents in case of death 
from such accidents. 

Service pensions are awarded to all 
employees who are members of the re- 
lief department and who upon retire- 
ment or above the age of seventy 
years, have been twenty or more years 
continuously in the service of the com- 
pany. The pensions are one per cent 
of the average monthly wages or sal- 
ary during the last ten years of ser- 
vice for each year of continuous ser- 
vice with a minimum pension of $20.00 
per month and maximum of $100 per 
month. 

Pittsburgh has long reigned su- 
preme in the industrial field and her 
reputation for doing big things has 
spread abroad and throughout the 
world. In the achievement of this 
reputation, however, women have not 
played a particularly prominent part, 
because of a general belief perhaps, 
on the part of the male sex that the j 
work was beyond their capabilities. 



September 19/9 



197 



But the war has caused us to look 
at things in an entirely different light. 
Jobs, formerly considered too difficult 
or intricate for maidenly hands and 
minds are now being performed by 
women to the entire satisfaction of 
those in charge. 

Women Are Employed 
In Industrial Jobs 

Long before the war, however, the 
Westinghouse Electric & Manufactur- 
ing Company had employed women in 
a number of industrial occupations for 
which they were particularly well 
fitted, and since the scarcity of labor 
is beginning to be felt more keenly, 
other positions are filled by the fair 
sex. 

The tasks they do require no great 
physical strength. Rather the work 
is one of the sort where they sit at 
tables and put small things together, 
or wind fittings with taps, or wield 
varnish brushes on objects they have 
made. 

Some of the more venturesome of 
the women are running drill presses 
and milling machines. This is nothing 
new over in Europe, but here in Amer- 
ica is not yet so often met with — ap- 
parently largely because women have 
not learned that such work exists. 

Probably the most obvious occupa- 
tion of the girls employed at the big 
East Pittsburgh Works is that of wind- 
ing coils. In one section of the shop, 
there are several hundred girls en- 
gaged in operating winding machines 
and they seem to enjoy the work. A 
steady procession of coils of all kinds 
come from their busy whirring raa- 
i-hines. The company offer excep- 
tional opportunities for women, and 
>ver 2,000 of them are now at work 
in various jobs. 

Railway Electrification 
a Specialty of Company 
Electrification of railways has al- 
ways been one of the most successful 
of endeavor of the Westinghouse 
Company and Pittsburgh has again 
added to its laurels in the way of in- 
dustrial supremacy, having furnished 
the equipment for many of the fore- 
most steam railway electrification pro- 
jects in this country. 

Now Pittsburgh products are used 
transporting thousands of passen- 
gers daily over some of the world's 
greatest railways, such as: 

The Pennsylvania Terminal Sys- 
tem in New York. 

The Long Island Railroad. 
The New York, New Haven & 
Hartford R. R. 

The Hoesac Tunnel of the Boston 
& Maine R. R. 

The Italian State Railway, Giovi, 
Italy. 

The Sarnia Tunnel, Detroit. 
The Bluefield-Vivian Section of 
the Norfolk and Western R. R. in 
West Virginia. 
Recently a contract was received for 
locomotives for the Chicago, Milwau- 
kee & St. Paul R. R. 
Some facts in tabloid form about 



the Westinghouse Electric may prove 
of interest. 

Capital stock, $75,000,000. 

Coal consumption 400 tons per day. 

A total floor space of over 90 acres. 

Organized In 1886 with 200 em- 
ployees. 

Capacity power house, 30,000 horse 
power. 

Monthlv output averages over $7,- 
000,000. 

Monthly works payroll averages 
$3,250,000. 

Monthly shipments average over 
1,200 carloads. 

To traverse entire East Pittsburgh 
works would require a walk of over 
ten miles. 

Total number of employees of the 
company exceed 30,000. 

Total of 108 electric traveling 
cranes in capacities of 1 pound to 100 
tons in use. 

Section R, 1657 feet long, 70 feet 
wide, one of the largest single areas 
in the world devoted to manufactur- 
ing. 

Installations of electrical appara- 
tus made and installed by the com- 
pany in every civilized country on 
the globe. 

Average monthly output equals 
approximately one-half million horse- 



power, exclusive of detail apparatus 
such as switchboards and accessories, 
fans, meters, heating devices, and 
other miscellaneous material not 
generally rated in horsepower or 
kilowatts. 

In addition to the works at East 
Pittsburgh, the company owns plants 
at the following points: Newark, N. 
J., arc lamps and meters; Cleveland, 
iron castings; Shadyside, Pittsburgh, 
manufacture of starting, lighting and 
ignition systems for automobiles; 
Bridgeport, Conn., Bryant Electric 
Co., manufacturer of switches and 
electrical wiring devices. 

Bloomfield, N. J., Milwaukee, Wis., 
Trenton, N. J., and New York City, 
works of the Westinghouse Lamp 
Company, a subsidiary organization, 
employing 2,500 persons engaged in 
the manufacture of incandescent 
lamps, with an average of 3,000,000 
per month. Pittsburgh, Pa., R. D. 
Nuttall Co., manufacturer of gears, 
pinions, trolleys and flexible couplings, 
the largest gear manufacturer in the 
world. 




COOKING ON AUTOMATIC ELECTRIC RANGE 



198 



Pan Pacific 



Growth of a Los Angeles Industry. 

Llewellyn Iron Works has Rapidly Developed Into One of the Largest Plans of Its 

Kind in the Country 



WHEN, in the year 1917, the 
call for ships came from the 
Emergency Fleet Corporation of the 
United States Shipping Board, among 
the first to respond was the Llewellyn 
Iron Works of Los Angeles. 

The Llewellyn Iron Works was es- 
tablished, as a small foundry, in 1886, 
incorporated in 1894, and at present 
has a capital stock of $1,500,000.00. It 
operates two large plants, the manu- 
facturing and fabricating plant, con- 
sisting of machine shop, boiler shop, 
structural shop, plate shop, electrical 
equipment and forge shop, located at 
Los Angeles, while the rolling mills, 
gray iron foundry and steel foundries 
are located at Torrance, making the 
Llewellyn Iron Works the only self- 
contained plant of its kind west of the 
Rocky Mountains. 

The Emergency Fleet Corporation, 
seeing the advantages of this plant, 
placed with it orders for a large num- 
ber of 1,400 H. P. and 2,800 H. P. ma- 
rine engines, besides marine boilers, 
fuel and oil tanks for its ships, and 
the Llewellyn Iron Works was among 
the few , contractors in the United 
States who completed their orders 
ahead of specified contract time. 

An idea of the speed that was at- 
tained at these plants on the Emer- 
gency Fleet Corporation's contracts 



can be arrived at when it is stated 
that one 2,800 H. P. marine engine, 
complete, was shipped every six days, 
or two 1,400 H. P. marine engines 
every six days ; also one marine water 
tube cross drum type boiler every day, 
besides other equipment for the ships 
such as anchor windlasses, cargo 
winches, capstans, davits, and soforth. 

At the Torrance plant all of the re- 
inforcing bars for the concrete ships 
built by the Emergency Fleet Corpora- 
tion, both at Oakland and San Diego, 
were rolled; besides a large quantity 
of rods used in the wooden ships in 
Southern California. 

The plants of the Llewellyn Iron 
Works cover approximately thirty-five 
acres, with more than four miles of 
standard railroad track. All machin- 
ery is driven by electricity and nat- 
ural gas is the only fuel used in the 
plant. All buildings are of fire-proof 
steel construction and the entire plant 
represents an investment of more than 
$2,000,000. 

In its Los Angeles plant, where are 
located its general offices, are the ma- 
chine shops, forging plant, engine 
erecting shop, and boiler, tank and 
structural steel shops. 

The forge shop, equipped with a 15 
ton electric traveling crane and eight 
large jib-type cranes, as well as five 



heating furnaces with boiler and 
power equipment, contains also six 
steam hammers, one of which is of 
8,000 pounds capacity. 

Nearby stands the machine shops, 
well ventilated, cement-floored, and 
equipped with every device for finish- 
ing the raw material produced at the 
Torrance plant. Engine lathes, screw 
machines, vertical and horizontal 
mills, planers, borers, shapers and slot- 
ters, gear cutters and grinders, drill 
presses — all of the most modern and 
efficient type — are here ready for large 
or small work. 

The boiler and tank shop, covering 
.38,300 square feet of ground space, 
contains the plate and angle shears, 
the riveters, rolls, hammers, 200 ton 
hydraulic presses, drills, planers, calk- 
ers, etc., and is ready at all times to 
• produce tanks, boilers and pipe of any 
size. 

Six 2,800 H. P. marine engines may 
be erected at the same time on the 
floor of the erecting shop. All parts 
are handled by gigantic cranes, one 
being capable of handling a load of 
more than forty tons. Under the effi- 
cient methods used, only six days are 
necessary to assemble, test and pre- 
pare for shipment a omplete 2,800 H. 
P. triple expansion marine engine. 




LLEWELLYN MACHINE SHOP 



September 19 19 



199 



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LLEWELLYN MARINE WATER TUBE BOILERS 



The Torrance plant, designed and 
furnished with equipment built in 
great part at the Los Angeles plant, 
is where the raw material is produced, 
lere are formed the great ingots, 
varying from one-half ton to twenty- 
ive tons in weight. Castings for ma- 
rine engines, ship and shipbuilding 
equipment are made here in great 
piantity. 



A complete rolling mill, foundry 
with forty-two inch and seventy-two 
inch cupulos, an electric steel furnace, 
and a machine shop prepared to make 
repairs in all parts of the plant are 
maintained at a high degree of effi- 
ciency. 

Llewellyn equipment has earned a 
high reputation in all parts of the 
world and it is becoming quite a usual 



thing for the traveler to see in far 
quarters of the globe the words 
"Llewellyn Iron Works" cast in the 
highest class iron and steel products. 
In addition to its large domestic 
trade, the Llewellyn Iron Works is 
now exporting rolling mill products 
and large quantities of their manu- 
factured products to all Pacific ports. 




LLEWELLYN 1,400 H. P. ENGINE 



200 



Pan Pacific 



DIRECTORY SECTION 



PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE will publish each month in this section, for the con- 
venience of its readers, the folio wring directories: 

EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS 

ADVERTISED MERCHANDISE 

STEAMSHIP AGENTS AND BROKERS 

CONNECTIONS WANTED AGENCIES WANTED 

MARINE INSURANCE COMPANIES AND BROKERS 

EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS 



A directory of leading export and import concerns covering the Far East and Central and South America. 
Readers of this publication will find it much to their advantage to consult the concerns listed when desiring proper 
sources of supply. 



THE ACME WIRE COMPANY, 39 Cortlandt 
St., New York City, New York. Magnet wire, 
field coils, electro magnets, etc. Western Union 
Code. Cable address "ACME." 



ADDRESSOGRAPH COMPANY, 740 Broad- 
way, New York City, New York. Addressing 
machines; type embossing machines and rubber 
type. Code: A. B. C. Cable address "AD- 
DRESSO." 



AMERICAN CAN COMPANY, 120 Broadway, 
New York City, New York. Branch at San 
Francisco. Ash, paper and garbage cans; add- 
ing machines, fly traps, cartons, tin boxes, cigar 
and tobacco boxes, Jar caps; druggists' tinware, 
etc. Western Union and Lieber's codes. Cable 
address "AMCANCO." 



THE AMERICAN LAUNDRY MACHINE 
COMPANY, 132 West Twenty-seventh St., New 
York City, New York. Laundry machinery, dry 
cleaning machinery, washing machines, garment 
presses for tailors, etc. Cable address "ALM- 
CO." 



THE AMERICAN PULLEY COMPANY, 33 
Greene St.. New York City, New York. Pressed 
steel split belt pulleys, reels, beams, spools, steel 
truck wheels, pressed metal shapes, etc. Codes, 
Lieber's and Western Union. Cable address, 
"AMER-PULLEY." 



THE AMERICAN STEEL PACKAGE COM- 
PANY, 20 Vesey St., New York City, New York. 
Steel barrels and drums for gasoline, oil and 
chemicals; steel cases with partitions for bot- 
tled goods. Code: Western Union. Cable ad- 
dress "AMPAX.55 Defiance, Ohio. 



AMERICAN VULCANIZED FIBRE COM- 
PANY, Wilmington, Delaware. Vulcanized fibre 
in sheets, rods and tubes, insulators, waste bas- 
kets, warehouse trucks, trunks, suitcases, etc. 
Codes: Lieper's Western Union, General Tele- 
graph and A 1. Cable address "FIBRE." 



ANSCO COMPANY, Blnghamton, New York. 
Photographic paper, films, cameras, chemicals, 
dry plates, etc. Foreign agent, Ansco Limited, 
143 Great Portland St.. London. W., England. 
Codes: A. B. C, Lieber's Standard and Western 
Union. Cable address "ANSCO." 



THE ARLINGTON COMPANY, 725 Broad- 
way, New York City. New York. Celluloid in 
sheets, rods, tubes, brushes, combs, mirrors, 
toilet sets, collars, cuffs, pipe bits and harness 
rings. Cable address "PYRALIN." 



ARNOTT & COMPANY, 112 South Los An- 
geles St., Los Angeles, California. Agricultural 
implements, engines and wagons. Export or- 
ders a specialty. Catalogue and price list on 
application. Cable address "ARNOTT." 



J. ARON & COMPANY, Inc., 95 Wall St., New 
York City. Branches at San Francisco, New 
Orleans, Chicago, London, England and Santos, 
Brazil. General exporters and importers. Cor- 
respondence solicited in all languages. Cable 
address "ARONCO." 



ASSOCIATED MANUFACTURERS IMPORT- 
ING COMPANY, 871 Market St., San Francisco, 
California. Manufacturers' representatives, im- 
porters a"^d exporters. Import chinaware, 
crockery, enamel ware, oils, hides, brushes, 
produce and raw materials. Export steel, iron, 
steel products, hardware, tools, chemicals, dyes, 
food products and all raw materials. Cable ad- 
dress "AMICO." 



CHAS. A. BACON COMPANY, 417 Montgom- 
ery St., San Francisco, Cal. Importers and Ex- 
porters. General Merchandise. 



EDWARD BARRY COMPANY, 215 LeidsdorfC 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Wholesale paper deal- 
ers. Manufacturers of writing tablets, loose 
leaf systems, ruled goods, blank books. Whole- 
sale bookbinders. 



THE BEAVER BOARD COMPANIES, 225 
Fifth Avenue, New York City, New York. 
"Beaver Board," a wall board for interior con- 
struction; blackboards, varnishes, etc. Codes: 
Western Union, A. B. C. and Fifth Improved 
editions. Cable address "BEAVER." 



F. E. BOOTH COMPANY, 110 Market St., San 
Francisco, California. Importers land exporters, 
Crescent Brand Food Products. All languages 
used. 



BRADY & COMPANY, L. C. Smith Building, 
Seattle, Washington. Shipping and Commis- 
sion. Importers and Exporters salmon, oils, 
steel, lumber, fertilizer. Established 1892. 



BRAUN - KNECHT - HEIMANN COMPANY, 
San Francisco, California. Importers and ex- 
porters of chemicals. Laboratory apparatus for 
mines, universities and schools. Sugar, soap, 
wine, oils, iron and steel. Correspondence so- 
licited. Cable address "BRAUNDRUG." 



CAMBRIA SPRING COMPANY, 916 South 
Los Angeles St., Los Angeles, California. Wheels 
and rims, spring bumpers, auto and truck 
springs. Code Western Union. All languages. 



CLEVELAND IMPORT & MANUFACTUR- 
ING COMPANY, Laughlin Bldg., Los Angeles, 
California. Commission merchants. Importers 
and Exporters. Established 1873. Cable ad- 
dress "CLEIMPCO." 



CLYDE EQUIPMENT COMPANY, 542 First 
Avenue, Seattle, Washington. Machinery and 
supply merchants. Export orders a specialty. 
Quotations furnished. Special machinery made 
to order. Correspondence in all languages and 
codes. 



CONNELL BROTHERS COMPANY, L. C. 
SMITH Building, Seattle, Washington. General 
importers and exporters. Offices at Shang- 
hai, Manila, Hong Kong and Singapore. Corre- 
spondence in all languages. Cable address 
"CONNELL." 



A. J. & J. R. COOK, 743 Mission St., San 
Francisco, California. Leather, calf, skins, 
glazed kid, patent and upholstery leather, etc. 
Cable address "COOKBRO." 



DILL-CROSETT, Inc., San Francisco, Califor- 
nia. Exporters of steel products, acids, rosin, 
chemicals, dye stuff, phenol, etc. Importers of 
fish oil, hides, coffee, coconut oil, beans, copra, 
castor oil, tallow, silks, etc. Branch offices: 
New York, Kobe, Japan and Sydney, Australia. 
All languages and codes used. 



L. DINKELSPIEL, Inc., 115-135 Battery St., 
San Francisco, California. Wholesale dealers, 
jobbers and exporters of dry goods, furnishing 
goods, notions and fancy goods. Cotton piece 
goods, linens, dress goods, silks, flannels, hos- 
iery, underwear, shirts, sweaters, ribbons, laces, 
threads, blankets, quilts. Corresnondence in all 
languages. Cable address LIPSEKNID. 



JAMES P. DWAN, American Nat. Bank Bldg., 
San Francisco, Cal. Exporters and Importer. 
General 'purchasing agent for foreign buyers. 
Building materials, machinery, ores, metals, oils. 
Foreign office, Missions Building. The Bund, 
Canton, China. Cable address DWAN. 



September 19 19 



201 



EXPORT AND IMPORT CONCERNS— Continued 



GENERAL, PAPER COMPANY, 525 Market 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Paper Mill represen- 
tatives. Dealers in news, books, cardboard and 
paper stock of all kinds. 



W. R. GRACE & COMPANY, 332 Sansome St., 
San Francisco, California. Exporters of all 
American products. Importers of all raw ma- 
terials from South and Central America and Far 
East. Represented in all parts of the world. 
Letters of credit, cable transfers, foreign ex- 
change. 

HARRON, RICKARD & McCONE, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Machinery for mines and 
mills, garages, boiler shops, forge shops, snip- 
yards, saw mills, planing mills, contractors, etc. 
All standard codes used. Cable address "AIR- 
DRILL." 



F. GRIFFIN & COMPANY, 341 Montgomery 
St., San Francisco, Cal. Importers and export- 
ers of rice, oil, drugs, chemicals, rubber goods, 
food products, iron, steel. Offices at Vancouver, 
B. C, Seattle and Portland. Correspondence in 
all languages. Cable address DRAGON. 



B. F. HEASTAND, 618 Mission St., San Fran- 
cisco, California. Exporter of glass ware, din- 
ner services, vitrified hotel china. Prepared to 
fill orders immediately for any quantity. Corre- 
spondence in any language. Catalogues on re- 
quest. Cable address "HEASTAND." 



INGRIM - RUTDEDGE COMPANY, 413-415 
Monigomery St., San Francisco, California. 
Printers, stationers, bookbinders, art and color 
work. Catalog and booklet printing. Copper 
plate and steel die engraving. Office equipment 
and supplies. Loose leaf systems. Export or- 
ders a specialtq. Correspondence in all lan- 
guages. 

INTERNATIONAL TRADING COMPANY OF 
AMERICA, Inc., Seattle, Washington. Import- 
ers, exporters, forwarders and manufacturers' 
representatives. Branches in all Far Eastern 
countries. Export iron and steel, machinery, 
plumbing supplies, heavy and light hardware, 
talking machines, cotton and wool textiles and 
dry gods. Correspondence invited. Cable ad- 
dress "INTRACO." 



MURRY JACOBS, A. C. RULOFSON COM- 
PANY, San Francisco, California. Direct mill 
representatives — Iron and steel products. Cor- 
respondence in all languages. All Codes used. 

KAAS-HOPKINS CO., Hearst Building, San 
Francisco, California. Paper Mill selling agents. 
Solicit export inquiries from the trade. Sam- 
ples and quotations promptly furnished on re- 
quest. 

KULLMAN, SALZ & COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Sole leather; tanners. Leatner 
for export a specialty. Prompt attention to or- 
ders. Ask us to quote on your requirements. 
All languages. 

LLEWELLYN IRON WORKS, Los Angeles, 
California. Manufacturers and exporters of 
steamship power equipment, water, oil and fuel 
tanks, rolling mill products. Ingots, bars and 
shapes. Structural steel fabricators. Correspon- 
dence invited. All codes used. Cable address 
"LLEWELLYN." 

MARVIN SHOE COMPANY, Inc., 216 Market 
St., San Francisco, California. Exporter and 
wholesaler of shoes. Men's, women's, boys' and 
hildren's shoes. Rubber boots, tennis ana out- 
ng shoes. All styles on hand for immediate 
hipment. Export trade solicited. Cable ad- 
"VTNMAR." 

MILL & MINE SUPPLY COMPANY, Seattle, 
Washington. Iron, bolts, chain, axes, belting, 
ogging tools, steel, nuts, waste, saws, pulleys, 
"able address "MILESMINE." Export orders 
olicited. 

JORELAND MOTORLAND TRUCK COM- 
PANY, 1701 North Main Street, Los Angeles, 
Cal. Manufacturers of motor trucks of vari- 
ous sizes, which will burn either distillate or 
gasoline, making possible a saving of 50% in 
fuel. 



R. & L. MYERS COMPANY, 717 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Cal. Jewelers supplies, head- 
quarters for watchmakers. Oldest material 
supply house in San Francisco. 



NOLAN-EARL SHOE COMPANY. 25 Fre- 
mont St., San Francisco, Cal. Manufacturers 
and wholesale dealers in Men's, Women's and 
Children's shoes. Samples sent on request. 
Charges prepaid. Cable address "Nesco." Bent- 
ley's Code. 



OCEAN BROKERAGE COMPANY, Stuart 
Building, Seattle, Washington. Custom House 
brokers. U. S. Bonded storage. Import and 
Export freight forwarders, fire and marine in- 
surance. Weighing, sampling, reconditioning, 
distributing, marking, sampling. 



PACIFIC LUBRICATING COMPANY. 715 W. 
Spokane St., Seattle, Washington. Manufac- 
turers of greases, cup transmission, car, graph- 
ite and chain. Hair and wool flock. Repre- 
sented at Manila, Sydney, Australia and Val- 
paraiso, Chile. Export orders promptly and 
carefully attended to. Special greases made to 
order. 



PACIFIC SANITARY MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY, 67 New Montgomery St., San Fran- 
cisco, California. Exporters of bath-tubs, toil- 
ets, lavatories, sinks, laundry tubs, plumbing 
fixtures, etc. Prompt and careful shipment of 
export orders. Correspondence in all languages 
and codes. 



VICTOR PATRON, 112 Market St., San Fran- 
cisco, California. Branch at Mazatlan, Mexico. 
Cable address "PATRON." Import and export 
representative. Prices and catalogues furnished 
on application. 



C. M. PETTIBONE COMPANY, L. C. Smith 
Building, Seattle, Washington. Importers and 
Exporters. Packers direct selling agents. Ship- 
ping and commission merchants. Cable ad- 
dress PETTIBONE. Codes used, Armsby, A. B. 
C. 5th Edition, Bentley's, W. U. 



PURNELL & PAGETT, Canton, China. Ar- 
chitects and civil engineers. Investigations, in- 
spections and valuations. Bridges, steel con- 
struction, wharves and docks. Cable address 
PANEL. W. U. Code and A. B. C. 



H. S. RENSHAW, Inc., 205 Metropolitan Bank 
Building, New Orleans, Louisiana. Export: Im- 
port; Commission. Freight forwarders. Corre- 
spondence solicited. Cable address "RENCO." 
Codes: A. B. C. 4; W. U. T.; Bedford McNeil. 



ROGERS SHOE COMPANY, 135 Bush St., San 
Francisco, California. Shoes, rubbers, tennis 
and sport shoes, all kinds; all styles. Bentley 
Code used. 



ROLPH, MILLS & COMPANY, Colman Bldg., 
Seattle, Wash. General shipping and commis- 
sion merchants. Export and imports. Direct 
representatives of manufacturers' of principal 
American goods. Offices at Seattle, Portland, 
Los Angeles, New York and Chicago. Corre- 
spondence solicited. 



ROTHWELL & COMPANY, Inc., Hoge Build- 
ing. Seattle, Washington. Importers, exporters 
and shippers. Branches at New York City, Ha- 
vana, Cuba, and Kobe, Japan. Import oils, silk 
goods and fruits, chemicals, dyestuffs, iron, steel 
and machinery. Correspondence invited. 



PAUL R. RUBEN & COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Importers, exporters, manu- 
facturers' agents, purchasing agents. All codes. 
Cable address "PAULRUBE." 



SEATTLE FAR EAST TRADING COMPANY, 
Inc., L. C. Smith Building, Seattle, Washington. 
Branch offices Shanghai, Hong Kong, Seattle, 
Kobe and Tokio. Exporters of iron, woodwork- 
ing and textile machinery, iron, steel, pipe, rail- 
way supplies, cars, locomotives, glass, plumbing 
fixtures, hardware, etc. Correspondence solic- 
ited. 



SHERMAN BROTHERS COMPANY, 208 
South La Salle St., Chicago, Illinois. Exporters 
and importers of shoes, hosiery, underwear, 
piece goods, rubber goods, chemicals, food prod- 
ucts, machinery, automobiles and hardware. 
Careful and prompt attention given to all cor- 
respondence and orders. Cable address "CAR- 
NOT." 



SHIPPERS COMMERCIAL CORPORATION, 
Seattle, Wash. Exporters and importers Pacific 
Coast products. Cable address "Shipcomco." 
All codes used. 



C. HENRY SMITH, 311 California St., San 
Francisco, California. Export and import mer- 
chant. Nitrates a specialty. Shipping and 
commission. Steamship agent and ship owner. 
All codes. Cable address CHENRYINC. 



HERBERT T. SMITH BROKERAGE COM- 
PANY, 209 Washington St., Chicago, Illnois. 
Import and export. Beans, peas, seeds, oils, etc. 
Write for quotations. 



STANDARD PRODUCTS COMPANY, 260 
California St., San Francisco, California. Ex- 
porters of all American products — iron, steel 
products, galvanized pipe, paints, varnishes, 
cutlery, explosives, plate and window glass, etc. 
Importers of raw materials from Asia, camel's 
hair, animal hair, bristles, furs, skins, nuts, 
oils, etc. All codes used. Cable address "PER- 
KINS." 



THOMAS & COMPANY— Importers and Ex- 
porters. Importers, and buyers of copra, cocoa- 
nut oil, peanut oil, soya bean oil, China wood 
oil, whale oil. fish oils and tallows. Cable ad- 
dress "THOMAS" Seattle. 



THOMPSON & CASTLETON, 316 First St., 
So. Seattle, Wash. Electrical and mining ma- 
chinery. Specialists on rewinding machinery of 
all kinds. Installers of complete plants. 



UNIVERSAL SHIPPING AND TRADING 
COMPANY, Seattle, Washington— Shipowners, 
ship brokers, importers and exporters. Marine 
cargo surveyors and appraisers. World wide 
charterers. Agencies in all principal ports. 
Cable address "USATCO" Seattle. UNSHIP- 
STRAD New York. 



WESTERN COMMERCIAL COMPANY, Los 
Angeles, Cal. — Brokers between Japan and 
America. Direct representation in the Orient. 
Buy or sell goods in the Orient. Anything — 
any amount. Cable address "WECO." 



WILLIAMS-MARVIN COMPANY, San Fran- 
cisco, California. Exporter of shoes for men, 
women and children. Orders receive prompt 
and careful attention. Special styles made to 
order. Send for our catalogue. Cable address 
"WILMAR." 



WORLEY-MARTIN COMPANY, 617 Mont- 
gomery St., San Francisco, California. Wool, 
hides, tallow, oils and Oriental products. Hard- 
ware and steel products, drugs and specialties. 
Represented in China and Japan. Desires lines 
to introduce. Cable address "WORLEY." 



ZELLERBACH PAPER COMPANY, San 
Francisco, California. Quotations and samples 
of paper for export. Represented at Yokohama 
and Shanghai. Cable address "ZELLERBACH." 
All codes. 



The attention of readers and advertisers is called to the fact that PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE will accept no 
advertisements of a doubtful nature nor from concerns in other than good standing. The publishers of this magazine 
believe that foreign buyers can place confidence in those concerns whose names appear herein. 



202 



Pan Pacific 



MERCHANDISE ADVERTISED 



PAN PACIFIC MAGAZINE publishes herewith a list of articles advertised in this issue for the convenience of its 
readers. The name of the advertiser will be found listed under each heading. This is a gratis service rendered adver- 
tisers and the publishers of this magazine accept no responsibility for omissions or errors, but make every effort to main- 
tain an accurate list. 



ADDING MACHINES 

American Can Company. 
ADDRESSING MACHINES & SUPPLIES 

Addressograph Company. 
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS 

Arnott & Company. 
AUTOMOBILES 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 
BANKS AND BANKING 

First Trust Company of Hilo. 

BATH-TUBS 
Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 

BLANKETS, QUILTS, Etc. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
BOILERS, WATER TUBE 

Pacific Marine Iron Works. 
BOOKBINDERS 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 

Edward Barry Company. 

BOOTS 
Marvin Shoe Company. 
Williams Marvin Company. 
Sherman Brothers Company. 
Rogers Shoe Company. 
Nolan-Earl Shoe Company. 

BROKERAGE AND COMMISSION 

Du-Pont Coleman & Company. 
BUILDING MATERIAL 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

James P. Dwan 
CAMERAS 

The Ansco Company. 
CANNED GOODS 

C M. Pettibone Co. 

Rothwell & Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

F. E. Booth Company. 

Western Canning Co. 
CANS, CAPS, TIN BOXES 

American Can Company. 
CASES, STEEL .... 

American Steel Package Company. 

CASTINGS 

Pacific Marine Iron Works. 

Interstate Pattern Works. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

CELLULOID, MANUFACTURED 

The Arlington Company. 
CELLULOID, SHEET 

The Arlington Company. 
CEREALS. 

Sperry Flour Co. 
CHINAWARE 

B. F. Heastand. 

Associated Mfgs. Importing Co. 
COFFEE 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
CONTRACTORS SUPPLIES 

Topping Brothers. 
COPPER PLATE ENGRAVING 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
COTTON GOODS 

D. Dinkelspiel Company. 
CROCKERY 

B. F. Heastand. 

Associated Mrgs. Importing Co. 
CUTLERY 

Standard Products Company. 
DRESS GOODS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
DRUGS & CHEMICALS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

The Hale Company. 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

F. Griffin & Company. 
DRY GOODS, TEXTILES, Etc. 

International Trading Co. of America. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
DYE STUFFS 

Quaker City Supply Company. 
ENAMELWARE 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 
EXPLOSIVES & POWDER 

Standard Products Company. 
FERTILIZERS 

Brady & Company. 
FLOCK, HAIR AND WOOL 

Pacific Lubricating Company. 
FLOUR 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Sperry Flour Co. 
FOOD PRODUCTS 

Rothwell & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

National Products Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

F. E. Booth Company. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

Chas. A. Bacon. 



F. Griffin & Company. 

C. M. Pettibone & Co. 

Brady & Company. 
GAS ENGINES 

Shipbuilders Machinery Company. 

Arnott & Company. 

Aerothrust Engine Company. 
GLASSWARE 

B. F. Heastand. 
GLOVES 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 
GREASES 
Pacific Lubricating Company. 

GROCERIES 

C. M. Pettibone Company. 
HAIR, ANIMAL 

Standard Products Company. 
HARDWARE 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

International Trading Co. of America. 

HIDES 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 
HOSIERY 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Davis Brothers, Inc. 
INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT 

James P. Dwan. 

Purnell & Pagett. 
JEWELERS SUPPLIES 

R. & L. Myers Co. 
LABORATORY APPARATUS 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 
LAUNDRY MACHINERY 

American Laundry Machine Co. 
LAUNDRY TRAYS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 

LAVATORIES 
Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 

LEATHER & LEATHER PRODUCTS 

Kullman, Salz & Company. 

A. J. & J. R. Cook. 
LOCOMOTIVES 

Seatle Far East Trading Co. 
MACHINERY 

Rothwell & Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

International Trading Co. of America. 

Clyde Equipment Company. 

James P. Dwan. 
MARINE HARDWARE 

Topping Brothers. 

Pacific Marine Iron Works. 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 
MINE & MILL MACHINERY 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 
MISCELLANEOUS PRODUCTS 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

Connell Brothers Company. 

J. Aron & Company. 

Rolph, Mills & Company. 

Victor Patron. 

Paul R. Ruben & Company. 

H. S. Renshaw, Inc. 

Cleveland Import & Mfg. Company. 

Ocean Brokerage Co. 
MOTOR TRUCKS 

Moreland Motor Truck Co. 
NITRATES 

C. Henry Smith. 
NOTIONS 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 
OFFICE EQUIPMENT 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

OILS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Rothwell & Company. 

Standard Products Company. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 

James P. Dwan. 

F. Griffin & Co. 

Brady & Co. 
ORIENTAL PRODUCTS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

PAINTS 

Standard Products Company. 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
PAPER 

Zellerbach Taper Company. 

Kaas-Hopkins Company. 

General Paper Co. 

Edward Barry Co. 



PHOTOGRAPHIC PAPER & MATERIALS 

The Ansco Company. 
PLUMBING FIXTURES 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
PRINTING 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 

Edward Barry Co. 
PULLEYS 

The American Pulley Company. 
RAILROAD SUPPLIES 

Topping Brothers. 
RAW PRODUCTS 

W. R. Grace & Company. 

A. O. Andersen & Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Rolph, Mills & Company. 

Victor Patron. 

Herbert W. Smith Brokerage Co. 
RICE 

F. Griffin & Co. 
ROOFING . 

Certain-teed Products Corporation. 
RUBBER BOOTS AND SHOES 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 

Nolan-Earl Shoe Co. 
RUBBER GOODS 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

F. Griffin & Co. 
SHIP CHANDLERY 

Topping Brothers. 
SHOES 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 
SHOES, SPORT AND TENNIS 

Williams-Marvin Company. 

Marvin Shoe Company. 

Rogers Shoe Company. 

Nolan-Earl Shoe Co. 
SILK GOODS 

Rothwell & Company. 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Dill-Crosett, Inc. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. . : , 

SINKS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
SOAP 

Braun-Knecht-Heimann Company. 
SPICES 

W. R. Grace & Company. 
SPORTING GOODS. 

Joost Brothers, Inc. 
SPRINGS, AUTO AND TRUCK 

Cambria Spring Company. 
STATIONERY 

Pacific American Trading Co. 

Ingrim-Rutledge Company. 
STEEL PRODUCTS 

F. Griffin & Co. 
STEEL AND STEEL PRODUCTS 

Worley-Martin Company. 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Rothwell & Company. 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 

Murray Jacobs. 

A. C. Rulofson Company. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Harron, Rickard & McCone. 

Standard Products Company. 

International Trading Co. of America, Inc. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 

Cambria Spring Company. 

The American Pulley Company. 
TALKING MACHINES 

International Trading Co. of America. 
TALLOW 

Worley-Martin Company. 
TANKS, WATER, OIL AND FUEL 

Llewellyn Iron Works. 
TANNERS 

Kullman, Salz & Company. 
TEA EXPERTS 

MacDonald & Company. 

Pacific American Trading Co. 
TEXTILE MACHINERY 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 
TINWARE 

American Can Company. 
TOILETS 

Pacific Sanitary Manufacturing Company. 
TOOLS 

Associated Mfrs. Importing Co. 

Seattle Far East Trading Co. 

Mill & Mine Supply Company. 
TRUCKS 

Moreland Motor Truck Co. 
TYPEWRITERS 

American Can Company. 
UNDERWEAR 

Sherman Brothers Company. 

L. Dinkelspiel Company. 



September 19 19 



203 




TRUING CRANK SHAFT 2,800 H. P. ENGINE 



MARINE SECTION 



The following marine insurance companies, surveyors, brokers and adjusters are reliable and of good standing. 
This publication believes that all dealings had with these concerns will prove satisfactory in every particular. 



MARINE INSURANCE 

(San Francisco, Cal.) 

Aetna Insurance Company. 

Atlantic Mutal Insurance Company. 

Balfour, Guthrie & Company. 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company. 

Home Fire and Marine Insurance Co. of Calif. 

Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Co. 

H. M. Newhall & Company. 



MARINE SURVEYORS 



(San Francisco, Cal.) 



Ernest Bent 
L. Curtis 
James F. Fowler 
W. F. Mills 



W. J. Murray 
John Rinder 
J. Seale & Company 
Frank Walker 



Thomas Wallace 



SHIP, CUSTOM AND 
FREIGHT BROKERS 

(San Francisco, Cal.) 

C. Beyful & Company 
H. D. Bowly 
W. J. Byrnes 
3rady & Co. 

2. D. Bunker & Company. 
John W. Chapman 
"Prank P. Dow 
Davies, Turner & Company 
". F. G. Harper & Company 

rederle Henry 

red Holmes & Son. 
lenry Kirchmann, Jr. 
Bernard Judae Company 



Kincaid Shipping Company. 

Martins-Gardens Company. 

E. Griffin & Co. 

C. M. Pettibone & Co. 

Page Brothers. 

George W. Reed & Company. 

W. S. Scammel & Company. 

W. B. Thornley. 



(Portland, Oregon) 

Else Shipping Company. 
C. V. Ericesson & Company. 
Taylor & Young Company. 
Tegen & Main. 

(Seattle, Washington) 
Frank P. Dow Company, Inc. 
Fankner, Currie & Company, Inc. 



MARINE ADJUSTERS 

When in need of the services of reliable ma- 
rine adjusters, exporters and importers will find 
it to their advantage to consult any of the con- 
cerns listed below. 



(San Francisco, California.) 



Creditors' Adjustment Company. 
Dodwell & Company. 
Insurance Company of North America. 
London & Lancashire Fire Insurance Co. 
H. M. Newhall & Company. 
Pacific Coast Adjusting Bureau. 
Springfield Fire & Marine Insurance Co. 
Union Marine Insurance Company. 
Willcox, Peck & Hughes. 

(Seattle, Washington) 



Dodwell & Company. 
Willcox, Peck & Hughes. 



STEAMSHIP LINES 

OPERATING IN 

THE PACIFIC 

(San Francisco, California) 

CHINA MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

San Francisco to the Orient. 
OCEANIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

San Francisco to Sydney, Australia. 
ROBERT DOLLAR COMPANY 

Oriental Trade. 
EAST ASIATIC COMPANY, LTD. 

Oriental Trade. 
W. R. GRACE & COMPANY 

Central & South American Ports and Orient. 
GULF MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Central & South American Ports. 
PACIFIC MAIL STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Mexico, South America and Orient. 
CHARLES NELSON COMPANY 

Hawaiian Islands. 
A. F. THANE & COMPANY 

Australia. 
TOYO KISEN KAISHA 

San Francisco and Orient. 
JAVA -CHINA- JAPAN-LI JN 

San Francisco to Orient. 

San Francisco to Netherland East Indies. 
JOHNSON LINE 

San Francisco to Scandinavian Ports. 
MERCHANTS LINE 

Pacific, Atlantic & South America. 
OCEAN TRANSPORT COMPANY, LTD. 

San Francisco to Orient. 
TRANS-OCEANIC CO. 

San Francisco to Orient. 

(Oregon and Washington) 
PACIFIC STEAMSHIP COMPANY 

Seattle to Orient. 
NIPPON YUSEN KAISHA 

Seattle to Orient. 
OSAKA SHOSEN KAISHA 

Seattle to Orient. 
SEATTLE STEAMSHIP COMPANY ' 

Seattle to Australia and South Africa. 



FOREIGN IMPORTERS AND EXPORTERS 



JAPAN 

\ndrews & George Co., Inc Tokio 

\ki & Company Osaka 

\be Kobei Yokohama 

lasuda & Company Yokohama 

iurato & Umtanni Kobe 

■Josawa & Company Tokio 

Samuel Samuel & Co., Ltd Tokio 

Eonei Shoten Tokio 

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS 

Parsons Hardware Co., Inc Manila 

F. Stevenson & Co., Ltd Manila 

Earner, Barnes & Co., Ltd Manila 



CHINA 

Andersen, Meyer & Co., Ltd Shanghai 

J. M. Alver & Company Hong Kong 

Dodwell & Company Shanghai 

Okura & Co., Ltd Shanghai 

Shewan, Tonmes & Co Hong Kong 

Harry Wicking & Company Hong Kong 

STRAITS SETTLEMENTS 

Central Engine Works, Ltd Singapore 

Katz Brothers, Ltd Penang, S. S. 

Patterson, Simons & Co., Ltd Penang, S. S. 

Straist Industrial Syndicate Singapore 



AUSTRALIA 

Brown & Dureau, Ltd Perth 

Capron, Carter & Co., Ltd Sydney 

Essex R. Picot Sydney 

Eliza Tinsley Melbourne 

A. H. & A. E. Humphries Melbourne 

A. Gonlnan & Co., Ltd New Castle 

James Hardie & Company Sydney 

Turnbull & Niblett Sydney 

NEW ZEALAND 

W. H. Long & Company Wellington 

F. W. Markham Wellington 

Herbert G. Teagle, Ltd Wellington 



204 Pan Pacific 

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IMPORTERS AND BUYERS 
OF 

Copra Cocoanut Oil 

Soya Bean Oil Peanut Oil 

Cottonseed Oil Sesam Seed 

China Wood Oil Whale Oil 

Fish Oils and Tallows 




Full Trainload of Copra 



THOMAS & COMPANY 



Cable Address: 
THOMAS, SEATTLE 



IMPORTERS and EXPORTERS 

SEATTLE, U. S. A. 



CABLE US YOUR OFFERINGS 



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CONNECTIONS WANTED 



BATAVIA, JAVA — Firm desires to correspond 
with manufacturers and exporters interested 
in trade with the Dutch East Indies. Address 
Pan Pacific, Box 690. 

KUALA LUMPUR, STRAITS SETTLEMENTS 
— Firm desires to get in touch with exporters 
and manufacturers of goods suitable for mar- 
ket in the Federated Malay States and Straits 
Settlements. Interested in machinery, elec- 
trical supplies, hardware, underwear, paints, 
estates and mining requisites. Address Box 
691, Pan Pacific. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.— Firm in Holland de- 
sires to get in touch with importers of demi- 
johns, 1, 2, 3 gallons with matting around 
them, used for containing chemicals. Address 
Box 692, Pan Pacific. 

JAFFA (TEL-ABIB), PALESTINE — Firm 
would like to communicate with exporters of 
candies and chocolate. Desires samples, 
prices and conditions. Address Box 693, Pan 
Pacific. 

ALEXANDRIA, EGYPT— Firm desirous of es- 
tablishing connection with firm desirous of 
exporting cotton goods, especially in cabots, 
to Egypt, Sudan and Abyssinia. Also inter- 
ested in chemicals. Address Box 694, Pan 
Pacific. 

JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA— Firm is 
seeking managership for an insurance 
company, wishing to transact business in So. 
Africa. Also seeking representations for ship- 
ping companies desiring to be represented in 
that section. Address Box 695, Pan Pacific. 

CONSTANTINOPLE, TURKEY— Firm would 
like to represent in the Near East and the 
Balkans American firms dealing in leathers, 
shoes, rubber and manufactured articles. Ad- 
dress Box 696, Pan Pacific. 

COLIMA, MEXICO— Party desires to get in 
touch with firm making a specialty of small 
elevators and dirt scrapers. Apply Box 697, 
Pan Pacific. 

SANTIAGO, CUBA — Commission merchant de- 
sires to represent in Cuba exporters of food 
products. Especially interested in Rangoon 
or California rice. Address Box 698, Pan Pa- 
cific. 

SAIGON, INDO-CHINA— Firm would like to 
communicate with manufacturers of confec- 
tionery who wish to export to Saigon. Ad- 
dress Box 699, Pan Pacific. 

MADRAS, INDIA — Automobile dealers in Ma- 
dras desire to get in touch with exporters of 
motor vehicles and accessories. Address Box 
700, Pan Pacific. 

ZAGREG, JUGO SLAVIA— Firm desires to com- 
municate with manufacturers and exporters 
desiring to extend their foreign commerce to 
Jugo Slavia. Address Box 701, Pan Pacific. 

MONTEVIDO, URUGUAY— Firm with office in 
Argentina, Chile and Uruguay desires to get 
in touch with manufacturers and exporters 
desiring to extend their foreign trade. Address 
Box 702, Pan Pacific. 

HAVANA, CUBA — Commission merchant is de- 
sirous of communicating with canners of sar- 
dines who desire to be represented in Havana. 
Address Box 703, Pan Pacific. 

BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA — Party would like to 
get in touch with manufacturers desiring an 
agent, in Australia. Address Box 704, Pan 
Pacific. 



PADANG, SUMATRA— Firm in Padang would 
like to get in touch with importers and ex- 
porters. Exports: Coffee, rattans, cassia, 
hides, spices, etc. Imports: Corrugated roof 
iron, wire nails, piece goods, flour, canned 
goods, estate requisites, agricultural machin- 
ery, etc., and are desirous of considering 
agencies in other lines. Address Box 705, Pan 
Pacific. 

EDMONTON, ALBERTA— Firm would like to 
get in touch with dealers in Prime California 
Redwood — 3x5 and 3x9. Desires quotations by 
wire, also date when delivery could be made. 
Address Box 706, Pan Pacific. 

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA— Well established Aus- 
tralian firm desires to get in touch with im- 
porters of wool, sheep skins, rabbit skins, 
butter and copra. Address Box 707, Pan Pa- 
cific. 

SAN SALVADOR, SALVADOR— Firm desires to 
get in touch with exporters of flour, corru- 
gated, stamped and plain iron sheeting and 
other metals such as expanded metals for 
building purposes. Oregon Pine and Redwood 
matched and plain lumber; cement, paints and 
hardware. Address Box 708, Pan Pacific. 

NAGOYA, JAPAN — Firm desires to get in touch 
with exporters of skin, leather, feather, cot- 
ton goods, paper, cedar, iron and steel, fancy 
goods, toilet goods, watches and clocks. Ad- 
dress Box 709, Pan Pacific. 

CZECHO, SLOVONAC REPUBLIC— San Fran- 
cisco merchant leaving for these countries 
shortly and would like to get in touch with 
houses wishing to export goods to that and 
neighboring countries. Address Box 710, Pan 
Pacific. 

HABANA, CUBA — Party is desirous of getting 
in touch with exporters and dealers in canned 
fruits and groceries. Address Box 711, Pan 
Pacific. 

KOBE, JAPAN— Firms desires to get in touch 
with dealers and importers in sparterie, silk 
and piece goods. Address Box 712 Pan Pacific. 

OSAKA, JAPAN — Importing and exporting con- 
cern desirous of getting in touch with gas 
company that is producing sulphate of am- 
monia. They wish to purchase in large quan- 
tities. Bank references furnished. Address 
Box 713, Pan Pacific. 

SHANGHAI, CHINA— An importing and ex- 
porting concern is sending a representative 
to Shanghai and expects to open sample rooms 
and have an exhibit in that city. For further 
information address Box L714, Pan Pacific. 

NEW ZEALAND — Importer is in the market 
for plumbers' requisites, copper sheets, brass 
tubing and globe valves. Address Box L715, 
Pan Pacific. 

GUAYAQUIL, ECUADOR— Firm wishes to buy 
dry goods, especially cheap cotton goods and 
hardware. Address Box L716 Pan Pacific. 

PERU — Party from Peru now in New York de- 
sires agencies for Peru in agricultural ma- 
chinery, food products, electrical goods, wear- 
ing apparel and general merchandise. Address 
Box L717, Pan Pacific. 

DUTCH EAST INDIES— American trading com- 
pany with offices in Holland, Belgium and 
Dutch East Indies, desires to secure agencies 
for the sale in these countries of foodstuffs, 
provisions, chemicals and general merchan- 
dise. Address Box L718 Pan Pacific. 



AUSTRALIA — Importer from Australia now in 
United States desires connection with export- 
ers with view toward securing agencies for 
the sale of notions, novelties, stationery, 
toilet goods and small goods usually sold in 
department stores. Add