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Full text of "Par excellence, a manual of cookery, containing choice recipes"

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DOREAUS I LAUNDRY 



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CHICAGO CORSET CO., Chicago, III., and N. Y. City. 

FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING DRY GOODS HOUSES. 



PAR EXCELLENCE 



MANUAL OF COOKERY, 

CONTAINING 

CHOICE RECIPES, 

contributed and 

approved by the 

best housekeepers 

skilled in cuisine, the 

whole carefyHy arranged and 

compiled for St. Agnes Guild of the 

J^^., Church of the Epiphany, 

by a committee. 



\\ 



"She riseth while it is yet night and giveth meat to her 
household, and a portion to her maidens." 

Proverbs Ji-iJ. 



CHICAGO: 
Published under the Auspices of the Guild. 



C 5^ 



Copyrighted 
By St. Agnes Guild. 



OBO T HALLA. PBIUTBR AND BIlftJER, 61. 63 & 66 DEARBORN ST. . OHJOAOO 



CONTENTS. 



(SEE INDEX AT THE END. ) 
SOUPS r — 12 

FISH 13—18 

OYSTERS 19- 22 

MEATS 23—30 

POULTRY 31—36 

ENTREES, ETC 37—44 

VEGETABLES 45—50 

SALADS 51—56 

PICKLES '. 57—64 

BREAD, ETC 65—78 

PASTRY, PIES, ETC 79—86 

PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC 87—106 

CAKES 107—122 

ICES, BLANC MANGE 123—129 

FRUIT JELLIES; PRESERVES 132—138 

BEVERAGES 139-141 

CANDY 142 — 145 

MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES 147—153 



i-i 



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fUfoitLifp, CurtaiD5 aod braperie^ 

EVER SHOUiH Ifl CHICAGO. 



"*"-^ *? ^ "♦" 



SPECIAL ATTENTION TO ORDERED WORK. 



PREFACE 



Much of value that relates to modern cuisine lives not on the 
pages of cook books, but rather in recipes, directions and sug- 
gestions, passed oftentimes from mouth to mouth, hand to 
hand, penciled on some fly leaf, sent in a letter, pinned up here 
and pasted there. Of late much attention has been bestowed 
upon domestic cookery; costly and valuable treatises have always 
been in the market, and new ones on the subject are constantly 
appearing, but all these more or less lack the originality and 
force imparted by the skill and experience of the frugal house- 
wife. The Guild has therefore sought to preserve the unwritten, 
legendary and traditional by obtaining, when possible, the 
original recipes from the most skillful and successful house- 
keepers, together with their suggestions and directions, added 
from experience. This publication has no pretension as a treatise? 
but is to be regarded rather as a sort of condiment, an appetizer, 
a delicacy in the art, so that by its use the action required of the 
housewife in preparing daily for the continual round of meals 
may not be confined to the cook-room, but legitimately trans- 
ferred to the table — to the appetites of those that gather 
round it. 

For the Guild by the Committee. 
Chicago, Easter. 1888. 



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SOUPS. 



'Wobie deeds are held in honor 
But this wide world sadly needs 

Hearts of patience to unravel this — 
The worth of common deeds." 

— Anon. 



STOCK FOR SOUPS. 



To every pound of meat and bone allow one quart of cold wa- 
ter, one even teaspoonf ul of salt, and half a saltspoon of pepper. 
Boil slowly but steadily, allowing one hour for each pound of 
meat. Skim carefully as often as any scum rises to the surface. 
Strain when done into a stone crock kept for the purpose, and 
when cold remove the cake of fat which will rise to the surface. 
If the stock is to be kept for several days leave the fat on until 
ready to use. Fresh and cooked meats may be used together. 
This stock will keep at least a week. Just before dinner each 
day it is only necessary to heat thoroughly, and by adding 
different flavorings and vegetables, you can have a new soup 
each day. 



AMBER SOUP. 



A large soup-bone boiled four hours with one chicken and 
small slice of ham. Then add one-half onion, one-half of a carroty 



2 SOUPS. 

one piece celery, two pieces parsley, two summer savory, one 
thyme, three cloves, pepper and salt. Let it boil one hour 
longer and strain into earthen bowl to stand over night. Take 
off the fat and take out the jelly Avithout disturbing the 
settlings. Add the well-beaten whites of two eggs and the 
shells. Boil one minute and skim well. Run the soup through 
a jelly bag. Color with burnt sugar and season with sherry 
wine when ready to serve. 

BEAN SOUP. 

Mrs. H. L. Hammond. 

One pint of picked beans ; wash and put on the fire with two 
quarts of cold water, a slice of salt pork, one very small red 
pepper, and a little salt. Boil two hours, or until beans are well 
cooked, strain through colander, and add milk or cream. 

BEAN SOUP. 

Mrs . Ryer. 

Two pounds of salt pork, one quart of beans. Par-boil, and 
chop three onions. Boil slowly about six hours. Strain 
through a sieve. Serve with cubes of toast. 

BEEF SOUP. 

Any beef steak or roast beef that is left from previous meals can 
be used in this manner. Cut all the lean meat in small dice 
and roast them lightly in butter. Put in your saucepan two 
sliced onions, two carrots, half a turnip, half a pound of butter 
or the drippings from the roast or soup will do, let it all brown 
thoroughly, add one teacupful of floor and mix well. Have 
two and one-half quarts of stock boiling in the meantime, and 
add to the above, also ad4ing one bay leaf, salt and pepper and 
a little celery, letting it all boil for two hours; during this time 
boil half a pound of barley well done in several waters, strain 
your soup, mix in the beef and the barley (off which the water 




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SOUPS, 6 

should be strained) allowing it to boil fifteen minutes, then 
season with a little Worcestershire sauce and sherry. 

CARROT SOUP. 

Cover the bones of any cold roast meat with two quarts of 
cold water; add one onion sliced and fried in butter, then one 
potatoe and one turnip, and six medium sized carrots, all pared 
and sliced. Simmer until the vegetables are tender, strain 
through a sieve, remove the bones and press the vegetables 
through. There should be about a quart and a pint. Put a 
spoonful of butter in a saucepan, stir in a spoonful of flour, and 
when smooth add the broth of puree, from which you have 
skimmed the fat. Season with salt and pepper, and add half a 
pint of hot cream. It should be as smooth as velvet and of the 
consistency of pea soup. 

CELERY CREAM SOUP. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

Add to a pint of milk, a tablespoonf ul of flour, one of butter, a 
head of celery, a large slice of onion and a small piece of mace. 
Boil celery in a pint of water from thirty to forty-five minutes; 
boil mace, onion and milk together. Mix flour with two table- 
spoonfuls of cold milk, and add to boiling milk. Add butter 
and season with salt and pepper to taste. Strain and serve 
immediately. This is improved by adding a cupful of whipped 
cream when soup is in tureen. 

CELERY CREAM SOUP. 

Mrs. C. S. McHenry. 

One quart milk with a cup of cream, one teaspoonf ul of celery 
extract. Let cream and milk come almost to a boil, then 
add the extract, and thicken a little with flour and water. ( In 
the meantime cut bread up in small pieces about the size of 
dice, and fry in butter to a nice brown. ) Place the fried bread 
in a dish that it is to be served in and pour soup over it. Season 



4 SOUPS. 

ivell., but not until it is ready to serve. To be eaten as soon as 
ready. 

CREAM OF CELERY. 

Put one quart of veal stock into the saucepan, with six stalks 
of celery cut into half-inch pieces, one onion quartered, one 
blade of mace, a few whole peppers, salt. Boil one hour. Rub 
though a sieve and add one quart more of veal stock. Boil ; 
then set on back of range to keep hot. Boil three pints of 
cream and strain into soup. Serve with small pieces of toast. 

CLAM BROTH. 

Chop up twenty-five small hard-shell clams. Then put them 
into a saucepan with their own liquor and a pint of water. 
Simmer fifteen minutes and strain. Add a dash of cayenne 
and a pea of butter. Just before serving add a gill of hot 
milk. Serve in thin tea or after-diner coffee cups. When the 
clams are purchased in the shell and home facilities for open- 
ing them are poor, wash them well. Cover them with hot water 
and let them cook until the shells open. When cool, re- 
move the shells, chop the clams fine and if the water has not 
been made too salty, use it. 

BISQUE OF CRABS. 

Twelve hardshell crabs, one half pound butter, one teacup- 
ful of cold boiled rice, one heaping teaspoonful of salt, one 
soup bunch, one dozen whole peppers, three quarts of stock, 
yolk of one egg^ one quart of warm boiled milk. Boil the 
crabs for one-half hour, then strain. When cold, break apart 
and pick out the meat. Put the under-shell and claws in the 
mortar, and pound as smooth as possible with the rice and but- 
ter. Put this in a saucepan and add the stock, herbs, salt and 
"peppers. Boil slowly for one hour, pour through a sieve, working 
as much of the pulp through as possible. Keep the soup warm 
but not boiling, and add the milk with the beaten yolk slowly 
stirred into it. The milk should be warm. Season to taste. 



SOUPS. o 

Heat the crab meat in, a little boiling water, drain, and put 
into a hot tureen and pour the soup in it. Serve. 

CREAM SOUP. 

Two quarLs of good stock (beef or veal), one cup of sago, and 
one soup bunch. Boil well and season with pepper and salt. 
Strain carefully, and add one pint of cream. 

CREAM OF CEREALINE. 

Into two quarts of veal -or chicken stock stir two cupfuls 
of "Cerealine;'^ boil for ten minutes; season with salt and pepper; 
rub through a sieve; return all to a soup kettle; add one cupful 
of milk, and bring it to a boil again; beat the yolks of two eggs 
very lightly, and put into a tureen; pour over them one cupful 
of boiling cream; stir well together, and follow with the hot 
soup, and serve with croutons of fried bread. 

CREAM OF RICE. 

Wash a half pound of rice, and put it into a saucepan with 
two quarts of stock. Boil slowly for an hour; then rub the 
rice through a sieve twice, return it to the stock. Salt and 
pepper to taste. Care must be taken that the rice does not 
stick to the bottom of the saucepan. Set on the back of stove 
until wanted. Beat up the yolk of two eggs; add them slow- 
ly to a quart of warm boiled milk. Pour the milk into the 
soup, which must not be too hot. Serve in hot tureen. 

JULIENNE SOUP. 

Time, one hour and a half. Three quarters of a pound 
of carrots, turnips, celery, onions, one large cabbage-lettuce, two 
ounces of butter, two lumps of sugar, five pints of clear soup, 
or medium stock. 

Weigh three-quarters of a pound of the above named vege- 
tables, and cut them into strips of about an inch and a half 
long, taking care they are all the same size; wash them in 



6 SOUPS, 

cold water, and drain them very dry; then put them into a stew- 
pan with the butter, and the sugar pounded. Set it over a quick 
fire for a few minutes, tossing them over frequently until they 
are covered with a thin glaze, but on no account allow the 
vegetables to burn; then add five pints of clear soup, or medium 
stock, cut the lettuce into pieces, and put it into the soup, and 
let it all stew gently for an hour or more, 

COOD FAMILY SOUP. 

Take two pounds of coarse lean beef and half a pound of 
lean bacon in thin slices, and fry them with three slices of 
onions and a small fresh cabbage chopped. Put all into a stew- 
pan with two pounds of potatoes, three ounces of rice, two car- 
rots, and one turnip, sliced, two teaspoonfuls of salt, and one of 
pepper. Pour over at first two quarts of water, and set the 
pan over a slow fire; skim carefully, and add by degrees two 
quarts more of water. Take out the potatoes when done, and 
mash them. After it has stewed three hours, take out the 
meat, and let the soup simmer another hour; then strain it 
and thicken it with the potatoes rubbed through a colander. 

MULLACATAWNEY SOUP. 

Brown an onion and turnip with a small slice of ham in 
a saucepan, mix in one cupful of flour, pour over it one-half 
gallon boiling stock, add two cans tomatoes and three large 
sour apples, cut up, and let it boil two hours, strain all through 
a fine sieve, cut in small pieces the meat of one-half a chicken, 
and add with one-half pound boiled rice to the above, season 
with two teaspoonfuls of curry powder, salt and pepper to 
taste. 

NOODLE SOUP. 

Break two eggs into a bowl; beat until light, adding a pinch 
of salt; then work in flour (with your hand) until you have 
a very stiff dough ; turn it on your moulding board, and work 
until it is as smooth as glass; pinch off a piece the size of a 



i. c. silliman, 
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House Plants and Fresh Cut Flowers, 
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Gentlemen's Garments Cleaned, Dyed, Repaired and Altered. 



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POSITIVELY WILL NOT CROCK. 

^ For Sale only by the 

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Gen-l Manager. Traffic Manager. Gewl Pass. Agcnt. 



SOUPS. 7 

walnut, and roll it as thin as paper; then with a sharp knife 
cut off very narrow strips; proceed in the same way until all 
your dough is cut. Have prepared some good veal, chicken, or 
any other kind of broth, well seasoned, one-half an hour before 
you serve dinner, drop in the noodles. Be sure the soup is boil- 
ing. Add a little parsley. If the noodles are made according 
to directions they will be found far superior to macaroni. 

OYSTER PLANT SOUP. 

Mrs. Graeme Stuart. 

To one quart of milk take three bunches of oyster plant, 
scrape and clean, cut into pieces of half an inch thickness, 
and let stand in salt water fifteen minutes. Put on to boil 
with enough water to cover. When tender, have ready one 
quart of milk (do not turn the water off ), a piece of butter, 
pepper and salt to taste, and let come to a boil; use cracker 
meal to thicken, if preferred. 

PEA SOUP WITHOUT MEAT. 

Time, three hours. One pint of split peas, three quarts of 
water, six large onions, outside sticks of two heads of celery, 
one bunch of sweet herbs, two carrots, a little dried mint, a 
handful of spinach, a few bones, or tiny pieces of bacon flavor it 
nicely; pepper and salt to your taste. 

Boil all these vegetables together till they are quite soft and 
tender, strain them through a hair sieve, pressing the carrot 
pulp through it. Then boil the soup well for an hour with the 
best part of the celery, and a teaspoonful of pepper, add a little 
dried mint and fried bread, with a little spinach. A few roast- 
beef bones, or a slice of bacon, will be an improvement. 

SPLIT PEA SOUP. 

Cut two slices of ham and one onion into small pieces and fry 
until slightly brown, in a little bacon fat. Cut up one tur- 
nip, one carrot and four stalks of celery and add to the ham 
and onion, letting them simmer for fifteen minutes, then pour 
over them three quarts of hot water, and add a pint of split peas. 



» SOUPS. 

which have been soaked over night in cold water. Boil gently 
until the peas are quite tender, stirring constantly to prevent 
burning, then add one teaspoon ful of brown sugar ; salt and 
pepper to taste. Rub through a sieve ; return to the fire and let 
it simmer for half an hour. Pour into a hot tureen and serve 
with fried bread cut into dice. 

POTATO SOUP. 

Mrs. II. H. Brown. 

A quart of milk, six large potatoes, one stalk of celery, an 
onion and a tablespoonful of butter. Put the milk to boil with 
onion and celery. Pare potatoes and boil thirty minutes. Turn 
off the water, mash fine and light. Add boiling milk and the 
butter, and pepper and salt to taste. Rub through strainer and 
serve immediately. A cupful of whipped cream added when in 
the tureen is a great improvement. This soup must not be 
allowed to stand, not even if kept hot. Serve immediately and 
it is excellent. 

POTATO SOUP.S 

Boil one quart of milk, when boiling stir in four large potatoes, 
boiled and mashed fine. Boil together a few minutes. Season 
with butter, pepper and salt. Put a well-beaten egg in the 
tureen and into it strain soup. 

RICH BRCWN GRAVY SOUP. 

Take four pounds of beef steak, quite lean, and fry it a light 
brown with three sliced onions; put into a stewpan four 
ounces of butte r, and when dissolved, shake it round the pan, 
and lay in the meat and onions with a carrot, a turnip, and a 
head of celery sliced, a blade of mace, two teaspoonsful of 
salt, and a little cayenne pepper. Pour over a quart of clear 
stock, and stew gently, adding by degrees two quarts of water, 
and carefully removing the scum as it rises. Let it simmer for 
six hours, then strain, and, when cool, clear it of the fat. When 
heated, add a glass of Madeira or sherry. This is a strong and 
rich soup. Serve with boiled macaroni cut in pieces in it. 



SOUPS. y 

TOMATO CREAM SOUP. 

Mrs. Graeme Stuart. 

To one can tomatoes, stewed and strained, take one quart 
of sweet milk, and let come to a boil, and before putting in 
tomatoes, put a pinch of soda in them, so as not to curdle the 
milk, season with salt, pepper, and a piece of butter, and a 
little flour to thicken. Serve with fried bread cut in small 
pieces. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

One quart can tomatoes, two heaping tablespoonsful of flour, 
one of butter, one teaspoonful of salt, one of sugar, and a pint 
of hot water. Let tomatoes and water come to a boil. Put flour, 
butter, and a tablespoonf ul of tomatoes together. Stir into boil- 
ing mixture, add seasoning, boil altogether fifteen minutes, rub 
through a sieve, and serve with toasted bread. This bread 
should first be cut in thin slices; should be buttered, cut into 
little squares, placed in a pan buttered side up, and browned in 
a quick oven, 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Mrs. Babcock, Cleveland. 

Proportion : To one cup of tomatoes add one cup of water, one 
cup of milk, one soda cracker rolled, pepper, salt and butter, 
soda the size of a pea put in with the tomatoes to prevent curd- 
ling the milk. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Mrs. W. A. Hammond. 

Three pints beef stock, one half can tomatoes, three good 
sized potatoes cut up fine, one soup bunch, pepper and salt 
to taste. Strain through colander before sending to the table. 

LOBSTER SOUP. 

Mrs, A. D. Smith. 

Wash and boil shells two or three hours, after picking out 
the meat, strain stock and add as much cream and milk 
as there is broth. Roll two small crackers and put in, season 
with cayenne pepper and salt. After simmering a few moments 



10 SOUPS. 

add meat of lobster picked very fine and two tablespoons of 
butter. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

Two quarts of tomatoes, peeled and sliced, add three pints 
of broth — veal or chicken is best; one tablespoonful minced 
parsley, and the same quantity of minced onion, one teaspoon- 
ful of sugar; pepper and salt to taste; browned flour for thick- 
ening; tablespoonful of butter, fried bread dice. Stew the to- 
matoes in the broth until they are broken all to pieces, add 
herbs and onion; stew twenty minutes, rub through a colander, 
season, thicken with a tablespoonful of browned flour, rubbed 
in one of butter; boil two minutes, and pour upon fried bread 
in the tureen. 

GREEN TURTLE SOUP. 

To make this soup canned turtle is generally used, unless you 
can get prepared turtle from your caterer, which is by far 
the best. One can of green turtle will make one gallon of soup. 
Cut the meat in dice pieces, add a little stock, and let it simmer 
for ten minutes in this liquor, put the vegetables sliced with 
one pound of butter, two slices of ham and a small veal bone 
in your pot, and let it all brown thoroughly, mixing a cup of flour 
after browning. Pour on this one gallon boiling stock, add 
celery, a few tomatoes whole peppers and allspice, and let it boil 
three hours, adding enough stock to keep the amount of soup 
wanted, strain and season to taste; add one cupful of sherry, 
half a cup of madeira, and the juice of a lemon, mix in your 
turtle, and the soup is ready to serve. 

MOCK TURTLE SOUP. 

Prepare your soup in the same manner as for green turtle, 
and when strained add meat off from a calf 's foot cut into dice 
shape pieces, also add a few quenelles prepared in following 
manner : Rub the yolks of two hard boiled eggs very fine, add 
the yolks of two raw eggs and one whole egg, seasou with salt, 
pepper and a little nutmeg, stiffen to a dough with flour, roll 



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Everjthing cooked in it is healthier and 
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any other method. 

It saves nearly one-third of the food that 
is lost by the ordinary methods. 

All the nutriment, richness and flavor of 
the food is retained. 

It saves the labor of watching. 

Burning, scorching, smoking or over- 
cooking is Impossible. 

It never boils over. 




The Arnold Cooker, which I use in my 
public lectures, as well as In my home, is 
certainly one of the important improve- 
ments in cookery. Experience enables me 
to give it the highest praise. 

Dr. Beardslet, N. Y. 

From the Principal of the Philadelphia 
Cooking School.— I have examined for the 
Franklin Institute the Arnold Autoslitic 
Steaju Cooker, and I think it superior In 
every respect to other steamers. 

S. T. RORER. 

Chicago, Feb. 24, 1888.— After 18 months' 

experience with the Arnold Cooker, will 

say that if cooks knew its merits they 

would have one. Alexander Testault, 

Butler for George M. Pullman. 

Chicago, Feb. 24, 1888.— We have used 
the Automatic Steaji Cooker constantly 
for more than three years. It is simply 
indispensable. Mrs. H. B. Moss, 

Mrs. M. a. Mitchell, 
Mrs. C. B. Sawyer, 
Mrs. a. W. Simpson. 

Chicago, May 11, 1887.— To Housekeep- 
ers: Ladies, it gives me pleasure to sub- 
scribe words of praise to the capital 
workings of the Arnold Steaji Cookeb. 
Mrs. Chas. Springer, 
Mrs. O. C. Wiedner, 
Mrs. G. J. Smith, 
Mrs. Geo. Rope. 



Each Cooker is accompanied by Explicit Directions, Vcdzuible Recipes, and Dr. B. F. 
Beardsley's Great Lecture, "Wfiat to Eat and How to Eat It." 

Our Agent will call and sTwto you the Cooker, or tve vxill mail you a circular with fuU 
infontvition. 

SOLD BY AUTHORIZED AGENTS ONLY. 

Address R. C. OWENS, 118 18th St., Agent for 



SOUPS. 11 

into little balls, the size of a large pea, boil in water twenty 
minutes, strain and mix in soup, use the same wine and a little 
Worcestershire sauce as for green turtle soup. 

VEAL SOUP. 

Mrs. W. A. Hammond. 

Two quarts good veal stock, one bunch celery, one tea- 
cup spaghuetti broken in pieces about an inch long. Cook 
spaghuetti in one quart of water until tender; into this strain 
the stock and add one bunch of celery. When it has boiled 
about five minutes take out the celery; add one teacup of cream, 
and season to taste. If you have no cream use milk and one 
tablespoonful butter. 

VEGETABLE SOUP. 

Time, four hours and a half. Three onions, six potatoes, six 
carrots, four turnips, half a pound of butter, four quarts of 
water, one head of celery, a spoonful of catsup, a bunch of 
sweet herbs. Peel, slice and fry the vegetables, etc., in half a 
pound of butter, and pour over them two quarts of boiling 
water; let them stew slowly for four hours, then strain through 
a coarse cloth or sieve; put the soup into the stewpan with the 
head of celery. Stew till tender. 



FRANK PYATT, 

438 W. Madison St., Chicago, III., 

Prescriptions Accurately Compounded 

At all Hours Day or Kight. 

DROGS, CH[MIGALS M PAIEIT MEDICINES, ETC. 



ALL LADIES SHOULD USE 



As it is the only article that will successfully keep the hair in curl in the 
warmest assembly or ball room, or in the dampest of weather. Mr. Pyatt 
is Sole Agent for the United States for this article. 

We will also respectfully call your attention to an article called 

c "CT IK ID El n^vi: , 

Manufactured by Mr. Pyatt, £or Chapped Face and Hands, Tan, Sunburn, 
Freckles, etc. It cannot be excelled. Sold by druggists generally, at 
twenty-five cents per bottle. 



FISH. 



PICKING OUT FISH. 

Salmon, pike, bluefisli, wliitefish, trout, carp, trench, gray- 
ling, carbel, chub, ruff, eel, whiting, smelt, shad, pickerel, etc., 
are known to be fresh or stale by the smell and color of their 
gills, the hanging or keeping up of the fins, and the standing 
out or sinking of the eyes. If sturgeon cuts without crumb- 
ling, the veins and gristles are a genuine blue and the flesh 
perfectly white, it is good. Cod and codling can be chosen by 
the thickness near the head and whiteness of the flesh when 
cut. Turbot should be chosen by the thickness and plumpness; 
if the flesh be thick and the belly of a cream color it will be 
palatable; if otherwise, it is not good. The gills of herring and 
mackerel should be of a bright red, the eyes full and the fish 
stiff; when dusky and faded, and the tails very pliable, they 
are stale. The best lobsters are the heaviest if there is no Avater 
in them; if fresh the tail will be full of hard or red-skinned 
meat. A cock lobster is known by narrow back part of the 
tail, and the two uppermost fins within his tail are stiff and 
hard; the hen is soft and the back of her tail broader. If the 
flesh of pickled salmon feels oily and the scales stiff and shi- 
ning, and it comes in flakes and parts without crumbling, it is 
fresh and good, but not otherwise, 

BAKED FISH. 

Scale, wash and wipe dry, inside and out, a 2 or 3 pound fish. 
Make a stuffing as follows: One pint grated bread; two 
tablespoonfuls melted butter, pepper and salt to taste, one 
raw egg, a little celery salt, one onion chopped fine, is, to my 



14 FISH. 

taste, an improvement, but can be omitted, if not liked. Care 
should be taken not to wet the bread-crumbs; the egg and 
melted butter will moisten sufficiently. Tie over the fish thin 
slices of salt pork, fill a dripping pan half full of hot water, 
then, if you have not a wire grate, place the gridiron on the 
pan, and after laying the fish on the gridiron cover all with 
another pan, bake in a hot oven till the pork is well shrivelled, 
then remove the upper tin, allowing your fish to brown. One 
and a half hours will cook thoroughly, if a steady fire is kept. 

BAKED BLUE FISH. 

Split the fish open, remove the bone, and lay it in pan, skin 
next to pan, which should be buttered beforehand, season 
with salt and pepper, sprinkle over the fish melted butter, and 
put in oven to bake, in the meantime strain the contents of a 
tomato can, and mix with a little cracker crumbs, season with 
salt, pepper, a little Worcestershire sauce and ground mace, 
pour this over the fish when half done, just enough to cover 
lightly, and bake to a finish, the rest of the sauce may be kept 
hot and sent to the table with fish. All fish baked in this 
manner will prove very delicious. 

BOILED FISH. 

Delmonico's Method. 

From a reliable source, the following is presented as Del- 
monico's method for boiling fish: The fish should be washed 
as little as possible, and whitefish, after being cleaned and 
wiped with a damp cloth, should have the stomach stuffed with 
salt for an hour or two before cooking. Fish should be put on 
in cold water, so that the inner part may be sufficiently done, 
and it is also less liable to break. This rule holds good, ex- 
cept for very small fish, or for salmon boiled in slices, when 
boiling water should be used. The time may be easily known 
when it is ready by drawing up the fish-plate and trying if it 
will separate from the bone. A little salt and vinegar should 



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FISH. 15 

always be put into the water. Some prefer their fish boiled in 
what is called a court bouillon, and this is how it is done: Lay 
the fish in the kettle with enough cold water to cover it, add a 
glass of wine or vinegar, some sliced carrot and onions, pepper, 
salt and a laurel leaf, a bunch of parsley, a fagot of sweet 
herbs, or some of the same tied up in a muslin bag. These 
seasonings impart a fine flavor to most boiled fish, excepting 
salmon, and for fresh-water fish it is considered very useful for 
getting rid of the muddy taste they often have. 

SALT CODFISH IN CREAM. 

Pick the fish very fine and let it soak for four hours, wash 
ofE this water and let it soak for one hour in boiling 
water, do not boil, put in a saucepan one-half cup good butter, 
when melted stir in one-halfcupful of flour and then one pint 
of boiling milk, let it come to a boil and strain; strain your 
codfish very dry and mix in the above sauce, when it is ready 
to serve. 

ESCALLOPED FISH. 

Mrs. Graeme Stewart. 

Boil a white fish; when cool, pick into small pieces, and but- 
ter some shells, or individual dishes. A layer of fish, then 
cracker meal, season with bits of butter, salt and pepper, and 
so on, till the dish is full. Have ready one-half pint cream, 
and same quantity of milk, with an egg beaten into it, pour 
over the fish just as much as possible, so that the fish will be 
very moist when done. Put the shells in a dripping pan with 
a little water in the bottom, so as not to burn, and brown 
nicely for fifteen minutes. Serve with drawn butter sauce, 
flavored with Worcestershire, or chopped parsley, as desired. 

FISH BALLS. 

Mrs. Babcock, Cleveland. 

One and a half cups of fish after it is prepared, three cups 
of potatoes mashed, whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth. 
Mix and fry as doughnuts. 



16 FISH. 

FISH BALLS NO. 2. 

Mrs. E.J. Hill. 

One and a half cups o£ fisli, two cups mashed potatoes, one 
egg, a small piece of butter (about a tablespoonful), and a 
small quantity of black pepper, mix well and fry in a spider 
with plenty of sweet lard. 

CODFISH CAKES. 

One pint of codfish picked up fine, one quart of potatoes, two 
eggs^ three tablespoonsful milk, a little pepper, and butter the 
size of an egg. Put the pared potatoes in a kettle, turn cod- 
fish over them, cover well with cold water. Boil till potatoes 
are cooked. Then drain through a colander, mash fine; put in 
the butter, pepper and milk. Beat well — the longer the better. 
Then add eggs well beaten. Have fat hot, as you would have 
for fried cakes. Drop it into the lard by the spoonful and fry 
until brown. To bake this codfish, grease a tin, put the codfish 
into it and bake until brown; then turn it out on a platter to 
serve with drawn butter over it. 

FISH BALLS. 

One pint of finely chopped cooked salt fish, six mediura- 
eized potatoes, one egg, one heaping tablespoonful of but- 
ter, pepper, two tablespoonfuls of cream, or four of milk. 
Pare the potatoes, and put on in boiling water. Boil half an 
hour. Drain off all the water, turn the potatoes into the tray 
with the fish, mash fine and light with vegetable masher. Add 
the butter, pepper, milk and eggs, and mix all thoroughly. 
Taste to see if salt enough. Shape into balls the size of an 
egg and fry brown in boiling fat enough to float them. They 
will cook in three minutes and be a beautiful brown if the fat 
is smoking hot. 

FRESH MACKEREL BROILED. 

Split the fish open, remove the backbone and broil over a quick 
fire, basting it freely with butter, season with salt and pepper, 
and serve it with parsley butter, and slice of lemon. 



FISH. 17 

SALT MACKEREL. 

These fish should be soaked in fresh cold water for twenty-four 
hours, when they are ready for use. 

BROILED SALT MACKEREL. 

Handle in the same manner as a fresh mackerel, only leave 
out salt and pepper and parsley butter, baste with butter while 
broiling. 

SALT MACKEREL BOILED. 

Boil about ten minutes and serve with melted butter poured 
on them. 

BOILED SALMON. 

Time, according to weight. One salmon, four ounces of salt 
to one gallon of water. 

Salmon is put into warm water instead of cold, in order to pre- 
serve its color and set the curd. It should be thoroughly well 
dressed to be wholesome. 

Scale it, empty and wash it with the greatest care. Do not 
leave any blood on the inside that you can remove. 

Boil the salt rapidly in the fishkettle for a minute or two, 
taking off the scum as it rises; put in the salmon, and let it 
boil gently till it is thoroughly done. Take it from the water 
on the fishplate, let it drain, put it on a hot folded fish-napkin, 
and garnish with slices of lemon. Sauce: shrimp or lobster. 

Send up dressed cucumber with salmon when in season. 

MIDDLE SLICE OF SALMON. 

Time, ten minutes to the pound. Middle piece or slice. 
Boil slowly in salt and water. Salmon should be put into 
warm water, which makes it eat firmer. Boil gently. Serve 
on a napkin. Sauce: lobster, shrimp, or plain melted butter 
and parsley. 

BROILED SALMON. 

Time, ten to fifteen minutes. Slices from the middle of a sal- 
mon, one tableepoonful of flour, a sheet or two of oiled letter 
paper, a little cayenne pepper. 



18 FISH, 



Cut slices of an inch or an incli and a half thick from the 
middle of a large salmon; dust a little cayenne pepper over 
them, wrap them in oiled or buttered paper, broil them over a 
clear fire, first rubbing the bars of the gridiron with suet. 

Broiled salmon is extremely rich and really requires no sauce; 
nevertheless, one especially intended for it will be found among 
the list of sauces. 

The slices may also be simply dried in a cloth, floured and 
boiled over a clear fire; but they require the greatest care then 
to prevent them from burning. The gridiron is always rubbed 
with suet first. 

Fresh, boiled salmon cold is a delicious fish course for a hot 
summer's day dinner. Great care must be taken in the boil- 
ing to keep the fish whole. When done it must be placed on 
the ice for two or three hours to insure its being not only cold, 
but very firm. Serve with a mayonnaise dressing in which 
there is a good deal of lemon juice or vinegar. 

BAKED SMELTS. 

Mrs. Dr. Leroy. 

Smelts should be seasoned well with salt and pepper, dipped 
in butter, then in flour, and baked ten minutes in a very hot 
oven. Serve on buttered soft toast. 

FRIED SMELTS. 

Open the smelts at the head, draw, wash, and wipe dry, roll 
in flour, dip in eg^ beaten with a little milk, season with salt 
and pepper, then roll in cracker crumbs and fry brown in hot 
lard. 

FISH TURBOT. 

Mrs, H. H. Brown. 

Boil five or six pounds of haddock or whitefish. Take out 
all bones, and shred fish fine. Let a quart of milk, a quarter 
of an onion, and a piece of parsley come to a boil, then stir in a 
scant cupful of flour, which has been mixed with a cup of cold 
milk and the yolks of two eggs. Season with half a teaspoonf ul of 
white pepper, the same quantity of thyme, half a cupful of but- 
ter, and well with salt. Butter a pan, and put in first a layer of 
sauce, then one of fish. Finish with sauce, and over it sprinkle 
cracker crumbs and a light grating of cheese. Bake an hour 
in a moderate oven. This quantity can of course be divided. 



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OYSTERS. 



BROILED OYSTERS. 

Select nice, fresh, large oysters, drain and have them dry, 
dip one by one into melted butter, and place them in a wire 
gridiron, broil over a clear fire. When brown on both sides, 
add salt and pepper and baste with plenty of good butter; serve 
on toast dipped in hot water and buttered. They must be served 
hot to be relished; they are also nice to be served on top of 
steaks. 

CREAMED OYSTERS. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

A pint of cream, one quart of oysters, a small piece of onion, 
a very small piece of mace, a tablespoonful of flour, and 
salt and pepper to taste. Let cream, with the onion and mace, 
come to a boil. Mix flour with cold milk and stir in boiling 
cream. Let oysters come to a boil in their own liquor; skim 
carefully. Drain off all the liquor and turn the oysters into 
the cream. Skim out mace and onion and serve. 

ESCALOPED OYSTERS. 

Mrs. H H. Brown. 

Two quarts of oysters, half-cupful of butter, half-cupful of 
cream or milk, four teaspoonfuls of salt, half a teaspoonful 
of pepper, two quarts of stale bread crumbs. Butter the 
escalop dishes and put in a layer of crumbs and then one of 
oysters. Dredge with salt and pepper, and put small pieces of 
butter here and there in the dish. Now have another layer of 
oysters, seasoning as before, then add milk, and, finally a 
thick layer of crumbs, which dot with butter. Bake twenty 



20 OYSTERS 



minutes in quick oven. The crumbs must be light and flakey. 
The quantity given is enough for two dishes. 

ESCALOPED OYSTERS. 

Mrs. C. S. McHenry. 

One quart oysters, one quart cracker crumbs, one coffee cup 
melted butter, thoroughly mixed through the crackers. But- 
ter a deep baking dish, cover the bottom with the crumbs, put 
in a layer of oysters, seasoned well with pepper, salt and bits 
of butter, then a layer of crumbs, then oysters, and so on 
until the dish is full, and pour over the whole one large coffee 
cup of cream and bake three-fourths of an hour. (Excellent.) 

LITTLE PICS IN BLANKETS. 

Select large sized oysters. Cut English breakfast bacon in 
thin smooth slices; wrap an oyster in each, fastening with a 
wooden toothpick. Season oysters with salt and pepper. Have 
frying pan hot, and let them cook long enough to crisp the 
bacon but not to burn. This is a nice dish for luncheon. 

FRIED OYSTERS. 

Roll in cracker crumbs and fry in equal quantities of butter 
and lard ; use large oysters ; pepper and salt to taste. .^ 

FRIED OYSTERS, NO. 2. 

Roll in corn meal and fry in hot lard. Serve on a napkin. 

OYSTER PATTIES. 

Line a deep pie plate or patty pan with a crust, fill with a 
fricassee of oysters, cover with a thin layer of good puff 
paste, and bake in hot oven.' 

FILLING FOR OYSTER PATTIES. 

Take two ounces butter, one-half pint sweet cream, pepper 
and salt, three tablespoonfuls flour, three dozen count oysters. 
Melt the butter, stir in the flour, boil the cream, and stir it in, 
cook the oysters in their own broth, till they are just cooked 
through, skim off the broth and add to the cream sauce, and fill 
the crust. 



OYSTERS. 21 



DELMONICO'S STEWS. 

The following is the formula used at the celebrated restaurants 
of Delmonico in New York, where, it is said, the finest oyster 
stews in the world are obtainable : 

Take one quart of liquid oysters, put the liquor (a teacupful 
for three persons) in a stewpan, and add one-half as much more 
water; salt, a good bit of pepper, a teaspoonful of butter for 
each person, and a teaspoonful of rolled cracker for each. Put 
on the stove and let it boil; have the oysters ready in a bowl. 
The moment the liquor begins to boil pour in all the oysters, 
say ten for each person. Now watch carefully, and as soon as 
it begins to boil count just thirty seconds, and take the oysters 
from the stove. Have a big dish ready with one and one-half 
tablespoonfuls of cold milk for each person. Pour the stew on 
this milk and serve immediately. Never boil an oyster if you 
wish it to be good. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

One-half ounce each of allspice, mace, cinnamon, cloves, one- 
half quart of vinegar, scald all together, then put in your 
oysters, let it cool, next day scald all together again, and let cool 
for use. 



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For excellence of cure and delicacy of flavor 
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MEATS. 

" We are shaped and fashioned by what ■we love." — Goethe. 



In roasting beef allow about twelve minutes to a pound; for 
mutton about fifteen minutes to a pound. 

For broiling always grease the griddle well and have it very 
hot before putting on the meat. It is well to cover the meat 
while cooking. Frying means cooking by immersion in hot 
lard, butter or oil — not, as is generally understood by this term: 
cooking in a spoonful of fat, first on one side then on the 
other. If the fat is hot enough, a brown crust is instantly 
formed on the outside of the article immersed, thereby keeping 
the inside perfectly free from grease. 

Poultry should never be eaten less than six or eight hours 
after it is killed, but should be picked and drawn as soon as 
possible. 

ROAST BEEF. 

A three rib roast weighing ten pounds should be roasted one 
and one-half hours in hot oven, so as to have rare. Put in 
pan one sliced onion and one carrot, place your roast on top of 
vegetables, salt it, put some fat skimmed o££ soups in pan, and 
put in oven. When vegetables and meat are brown add one pint 
hot water; do not turn the meat too often but baste frequently. 
If the sauce gets too low in pan add a little warm water, when 
the meat is done strain off the sauce, skim off all fat, season 
with salt and pepper and serve. 

BEEF A LA MODE. 

Buy a good roast — the tenderloin. Have the butcher put in 
a good piece of fat before he skewers it. Put in your ham 



24 MEATS. 

boiler, or a kettle that can be hermetically (air tight) closed, 
an inch-thick slice of salt pork cut in small pieces, a pound of 
veal, a piece of butter, some salt, two or three cloves, some 
whole pepper, one onion cut in quarters, and one carrot quar- 
tered lengthwise. Lay the roast in, pour over a spoonful of 
vinegar, close and set over the fire, not too hot. In about ten 
minutes add a cup of water, and turn the meat, in fifteen, 
another cup, and in twenty more, another. Turn occasionally, 
but keep closed. Simmer slowly four hours. When done, 
carefully place upon a platter, putting a piece of carrot on each 
side, top and bottom. Turn all the grease out of the kettle, 
pour two tablespoonfuls of water into the kettle, give another 
boil, and turn over the meat. 

BEEF STEW. 

In a stewpan place a large tablespoonful of butter, in which 
fry until quite brown two sliced onions, adding while cook- 
ing twelve whole cloves, ditto, allspice, one-half a teaspoonful 
of salt, and one-half that quantity of black pepper. Take 
from fire, pour in a pint of cold water, wherein lay two or three 
pounds of tender, lean beef cut in small, thick pieces. Cover 
closely, and let all stew gently two hours, adding just before 
serving a little flour thickening. A few sprigs of sweet basil is 
an improvement. 

BEEFSTEAK BROILED. 

Butter your steak and broil quickly over a clear fire, season 
with salt and pepper, put piece of good butter on plate and 
the steak on top and serve at once. 

CORNED BEEF. 

This meat should be boiled slow and when done take pot and 
all from the fire, leaving the corned beef in its stock until 
wanted to send to table. Any piece left over to be used 
as cold, should be put in this stock and left there until 
thoroughly cold, then put on plate in refrigerator. 




IT PAYS TO TRADE AT 

MCDONALD'S 

Popular Market Mouse 

466 West Van Buren St. 

LXJE carry a large stock of First-Class Goods, consisting of choice cuts of 
MEATS, FRUITS, VEGETABLES, CANNED GOODS, Etc. 

which we offer to the trade on a strictly cash basis, which means a saving 
to the consumer of from 10 to 25 cents on the dollar. 
YOUR PATRONAGE IS SOLICITED. 
We call for orders and deliver goods promptly, also make a specialty of 
Dressed Poultry and Pure Dairy and Creamery Butter. A trial of our 
goods is all we ask to make you a steady patron of our house. 

Respectfully, 

E. H. Mcdonald & co. 



LEONARD J. EASTLAND. GEO. DUDDLESTON 



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MEATS. 25 

CORNED BEEF HASH. 

Take cold lean corned beef and chop very fine, chop cold 
boiled potatoes, and take, of these half and half, mix with a 
little stock and season with a little salt and pepper; sometimes 
the corned beef is salty enough to omit the salt, and bake in 
oven or fry in pan like small omelets. 

TO PICKLE BEEF, HAMS, ETC. 

Mrs. Hammond. 

To four gallons of water add one and one-half pounds sugar, 
or one pint of molasses, two ounces of saltpetre, and nine 
pounds salt. Put the whole into a pot and let it boil, being 
careful to take off the scum as it rises. Then take it off to 
cool, after which cover the meat with it once in two minutes, 
boil the pickle, taking off the scum and adding two ounces of 
sugar, and one and one-half pounds of salt. The pickle will 
hold good for twelve months and is incomparable for ham, 
tongues and beef. 

BAKED HAM. 

Make a crust of water and flour, roll half an inch thick, soak 
your ham over night and scrape well, then cover nice and 
tight with the crust, so the juice cannot escape, and bake it 
till done. Then remove all the crust and serve. 

BOILED HAM. 

Clean thoroughly before cutting for any purpose. To boil, 
put in kettle of cold -water , boil slowly till tender, and, if in- 
tended to be eaten when cold, let it remain in the kettle just 
as it was cooked until cold. 

ESCALOPED HAM. 

Chop cold boiled ham until very fine. Scald one pint of 
milk and stir into it. Remove from the fire, and add one 
well beaten egg and pour into a well buttered dish. Strew a 
thick layer of cracker crumbs over the top, and put in pieces of 
butter as for escaloped oysters. Season with a little cayenne 
pepper. Bake. 



26 MEATS. 

NEW ENGLAND BOILED DINNER. 

Boil one piece of corned beef, brisket part if you can get it» 
and a piece of lean salt pork, boil two large carrots, a sweet 
turnip, two heads cabbage , two beets, a few onions and potatoes. 
Serve the meat and vegetables sliced. Beets should be cooked 
separately, also the onions and potatoes, but cook all vegetables, 
with exception of the beets, in some of the corned beef stock, to 
give them seasoning and flavor. 

STEWED KIDNEY. 

Cut the kidneys into small pieces. Wash thoroughly. Let 
them boil until tender; add to the water in which they are 
boiled; butter, pepper and salt, to taste. Stir a little flour in 
cold water, and add to thicken the gravy. This may be 
poured over buttered toast. 

ROAST LEO OF LAMB. 

Time, one hour and three-quarters for six pounds. When 
cooked, remove the lamb and thicken contents of the drip- 
ping pan with flour. Serve with mint sauce and a salad. 

LAMB ROAST, MINT SAUCE. 

Roast one-quarter lamb, in hot oven, for about forty-five min- 
utes. Prepare with sauce, to be served with lamb as follows; 
Chop one bunch of mint very fine, rub together with a cupful 
of fine sugar, dissolve in one pint wine vinegar, and keep cold. 
There are some cooks who will boil the mint sauce. Strain 
and serve either hot or cold. 

BOILED LEG OF MUTTON, CAPER SAUCE. 

Boil a leg of mutton slowly for several hours in salted water. 
Boil a few whole turnips with it and serve as a vegetable. 
Serve caper sauce as per recipe. 

Caper Sauce. — Mix in a pint of allemande sauce, one cupful 
of capers and serve. 



HOWARD PEARSE. FRED WELCHLI. 

530 W^. Van Buren Strekt, 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

mEATS and Pt^OVlSIOJ^S 

PERTAINING TO A FIRST-CLASS MARKET. 
Orders called for and promptly delivered. C H I C A G O . 

WALTER S. ALLEN. J. B. HURLBUT. 

WALTKR S. AIvLKN & CO., 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

FRESH, SMOKED and SALT MEATS, 

STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES, 

Fruits, Vegetables, Poultry and Game, Oysters, Fresh and Salt Water Fish. 
529-531 W. Van Buren St., CHICAGO. 

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- ^ ESTABLISHED 1862. INCORPORATED 1885. >- 



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1 93 & 1 95 South Water Street, 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 



MEATS. 27 

WHITE SAUCE OR ALLEMANDE. 

Put in a sauce pan a cupful of butter, a sliced onion and car- 
rot. When melted add a cupful of flour, stir in three quarts 
boiling white stock and let it boil one hour, season with salt 
and white pepper, strain, beat the yolks of two eggs with the 
juice of a lemon and stir into this sauce and keep hot for use. 

BAKED MEAT PIE. 

Take cold meat and chop finely; then take alternate layers 
of the meat and sliced or stewed tomatoes. Put in a buttered 
dish ; season with salt, pepper and lumps of butter, and one 
small onion chopped. Thicken with a handful of flour, cover 
with a rich crust and bake one hour. 

HASHED LAMB ON TOAST WITH POACHED ECO. 

Any pieces of cold lamb, left over from a dinner, can be use 
for the above dish. Chop the lamb very fine, boil two pota- 
toes, mash fine, add the lamb and enough Allemande sauce 
to make it the consistency of hash, season with salt, pepper and 
a little ground mace, have it hot. Serve on toast with a 
poached egg on top. 

PORK TENDERLOIN. 

Cut the tenderloin open ; stew in water till nearly done, then 
with a little butter hissing in a spider, fry to a light, brown — 
not too hard ; have a small piece of toast buttered for each piece 
of meat ; place the meat on the toast, pepper and salt and then 
throw a thin milk gravy over all. We call it " quail on toast," 
and think it a very good substitute. 

PORK CHOPS. 

Trim and dip in beaten egg, then in cracker crumbs seasoned 
with salt, pepper, onion and sage. Fry in hot lard twenty 
minutes, turning often. 

SCOTCH STEW. 

Mrs. H.J. Jones. 

Three pounds of lean beef passed through a sausage cutter, 
taking out all fat and skin, etc., one small onion chopped 
fine, salt and pepper to taste. Put in a deep vessel, with one 
cup boiling water, cover and stew slowly three hours, then add 
a large spoonful of butter. 



28 MEATS. 

LAMB CHOPS SAUTE, WITH PEAS. 

Trim about 12 lbs lamb chops, neat and evenly, place in fry- 
ing pan with a little butter, and fry to a brown color, season 
with salt and pepper and when done, place the chops on a dish 
in a circle, having between each chop a nicely browned piece of 
toast, strain the sugar off a can French peas, put the peas in 
pan with a piece of butter, salt and pepper, toast them until hot, 
put in middle of plate, the lamb chops around them. 

ROULADE OF SPRING LAMB. 

Obtain the loin of a lamb, bone it, roll and tie together. 
Roast the same in a hot oven for about fifteen or twenty min- 
utes. Serve the lamb on plate, garnish with milk sauce, and 
serve. 

PICS' FEET. 

Mrs. H. H. Jones. 

Take the feet that have not been pickled, boil them till per- 
fectly done, when cold, split, and roll in a thin batter of 
milk, egg and flour, and fry quickly in hot lard, and you will 
have a delicious breakfast or lunch dish. 

BROILED TRIPE. 

Cut the tripe in large, square pieces, baste with butter and 
broil over a quick fire. Season with salt and pepper, using 
butter freely to keep the tripe soft, 

FRIED TRIPE. 

Cut into squares, dip in corn meal, fry in hot lard to a nice 
brown. Put a small bit of butter on each piece and serve. 

TO COOK TONGUE. 

French receipt for cooking tongue: After boiling it as 
usual, until tender, cut into small pieces, and brown with 
flour and butter. Then add some of the stock, season highly, 
let it boil a few moments and serve hot. 

VEAL CUTLETS. 

A nice way to cook cutlets and chops is to bake them. Ihe 
great object is to have veal and mutton thoroughly cooked, 
and by baking you best accomplish that object. Take your 




GHARLES H. SLAGK, 



Importer, Jobber and Family Purveyor of 



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WINES, LIQUORS AND CIGARS. 



Madisori Street arid Wabasl) flVeriUe, 



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CHICAOO. 



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143 DEARBORN STREET, 

CHICAGO. 

SOLE OWNER 
CHICAGO PRESS CLU3 AND LASALLE CLUB BRANDS OF CIGARS. 



MEATS, 



29 



dripping-pan, rub a little butter over each cutlet, salt and pep- 
per and lay fiat in pans, place in hot oven, and cover with 
another pan of same size. When done, if you like, make a 
sauce called butter maitre cfhotel. Rub to a soft paste a small 
piece of butter with flour, pour over half a cup boiling hot 
water. It will then thicken, then add a teaspoonful of lemon- 
juice, pour over cutlets and serve. It's good for dinner. 

BREAST OF VEAL STUFFED. 

Obtain a breast of veal, boned and opened. For stuffing, pre- 
pare a good bread stuffing and fill your breast loosely , then 
sew up the opened end, braise in pan with vegetables, as for 
roasting, only keep your pan covered. Cook well done. Make 
sauce in roasting pan as for roast beef. 

VEAL ROAST. 

The loin of veal boned, rolled and roasted, makes a splendid 
dinner dish. Roast in pan with some sKced vegetables and to 
thicken gravy put a piece of bread in the pan which will cook 
to pieces and thicken the sauce, small pared potatoes baked with 
the meat in the same pan makes a good vegetable to serve with 
veal, both should be basted as often as possible. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Mrs. C. E. Elmes. 

Six pounds of veal, chopped fine, one half pound salt pork, 
chopped fine, six soda crackers rolled, three eggs well 
beaten, pepper, salt, and sage, to taste. Mix thoroughly and 
roll in flour. Bake three hours, basting frequently with 
melted butter. 

VEAL LOAF. 

Mary S. Shelton. 

Three pounds of raw veal, chopped fine, one half pound of 
salt pork chopped, three eggs, tablespoon melted butter, 
four Boston crackers, rolled fine, teaspoon black pepper, table- 
spoon salt, two teaspoons of the extract of celery, a little sage. 
Pack hard in a deep pan, sprinkle the top with rolled cracker, 
lay on bits of butter, baste while baking with water and a 



30 MEATS. 

little butter together. Cover with a pan and bake two hours, 
uncover and bake till nicely browned. 

VEAL POT PIE. 

Cut in pieces two pounds of veal and boil in water until ten- 
der, season and add six potatoes sliced, boil until done and 
pour in a deep pan. Stir in a spoonful of flour, and cover with 
a crust made like biscuit. Bake a light brown, but be sure to 
have plenty of gravy in the pie. 

POT PIE. 

Boil two or three pounds of nice, fat beef. When nearly 
done add some potatoes, turnips and a head of cabbage. 
Cut in eight or ten pieces. Season with pepper and salt, while 
cooking. Serve very hot with apple sauce. 

TO COOK VENISON. 

Boil till tender, with sufficient water to keep from burning, 
when done put in some butter, pepper and salt; let it 
brown in the kettle, it retains all the flavor of the meat. That 
is the best way to cook roasts of beef; you then have juicy, 
tender meat. 

BROWN GRAVY. 

Put into a stewpan four ounces of butter rolled in flour, 
and an onion sliced, let them brown a few minutes, then 
add half a teaspoonful of grated lemon-peel, two bruised cloves, 
a teaspoonful of salt, half as much pepper. Add to it by 
degrees half a pint of water. 



"NEW STORIES 

FROM AN OLD BOOK," 

B Y 

OF CHICAGO. 

Thirty-five Bible Characters 

described in modern language, in a way to awaken 
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POULTRY. 



SCIENCE OF CARVING. 

An expert carver can divide poultry without removing the 
fork from the breast-bone or turning the bird on the dish^ 
but a beginner will do well to have a small fork at hand for 
the purpose of laying cut portions aside as the carving pro- 
gresses. Turn the bird so that the carving fork can be held in 
the left hand and firmly fixed in the breast-bone, and use a very 
sharp knife with a small, flexible blade. First cut off both 
drumsticks at the knee joint, and then remove the second 
joints. With a tender bird this is not a difficult matter; but 
both strength and skill are needed to cope successfully with a 
tough or under-done turkey, because very strong sinews are 
plentiful about the leg joints. Next cut off the first joints o£ 
the wings and the pinions, and then the joints nearest the 
body. This method of cutting off the first joints of the legs 
and wings before separating them from the body saves that 
troublesome feat of holding these members while they are being 
disjointed. Frequently they slip about the platter and spatter 
the dish gravy. 

After the wings are removed cut off the merry-thought, or 
wishbone, and then the wing side bone which holds the breast 
to the backbone, then carve the breast in medium thin slices 
and serve the bird, giving gravy and stuffing on each plate. If 
the diners are numerous it may be necessary to cut off more of 
the flesh, and even to dismember the carcass, this can be done 
with more or less ease as the carver understands the anatomy of 
the bird. If a carver would study the location of the joints 



32 POULTKY. 

while carving and take the trouble to cut up several carcasses 
by striking the points where bones are joined together, subse- 
quent carving would be easy. The joints of all birds are 
similarly placed, so nearly identical in point of junction that 
one is a guide to all others. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Make the crust like baking-powder biscuit, only a trifle shorter. 
Roll half an inch thick and line a deep pudding dish with 
it. Have ready two small chickens, boiled till tender. Place 
the pieces of chicken smoothly in the pan; sprinkle salt and 
pepper, and a little flour over them; add a few pieces of butter, 
size of a hazelnut, about a large tablespoonful in all ; pour on 
a little of the liquor they were boiled in, then roll the top crust 
rather more than half inch thick ; cut large stars or air holes 
in it. Bake till crust is thoroughly done. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

Boil one chicken until tender; chop fine; season well with 
pepper, salt and butter; put into a cloth; put a weight upon 
it and press like head cheese. 

NO. 2. 

Boil fowls until tender. Remove the meat from the bones and 
chop very fine, keeping the dark and white meat separate. 
Boil the liquor down until it will jelly; place in a deep buttered 
dish a layer of the dark meat; season with salt and pepper and 
cover with liquor; then a layer of white meat seasoned and 
cover with the liquor. Use the liquor. When full put a weight 
on it and it will mould firmly. 

NO. 3. 

Boil chickens in very little water until tender, putting plenty 
of salt and pepper in the Avater. When done separate the 
meat from the bones, and put it into a dish. Put the bones 
back into the broth and boil it down, adding, if you like, a very 
litte ground cloves and cinnamon. Thicken if necessary, then 



POULTRY, 33 



pour it oyer the chicken and press. Do not keep too much of 
the liquor on, and have it as thick as possible that it may jelly 
when cold. When it is all thoroughly cold, slice. 

CHICKEN RAGOUT. 

Cut a chicken into four pieces. Put in a kettle, with one-half 
a lemon sliced, a laurel leaf and a little thyme, pepper, salt, 
a tablespoon of butter and a good cup of water. Cover slowly 
and cook until tender. Stir one tablespoon each of flour and 
butter together, add a little cold water, and stir until smooth. 
Strain the water the chicken was cooked in, and thicken with 
the flour and water. When smooth and thick enough put in 
the chicken again and cover tightly until served. 

CREAM CHICKEN WITH MUSHROOMS. 

Miss M. Baldwin, Cleveland, Ohio. 

One whole chicken boiled and meat cut in large squares. One- 
half can of mushrooms, boiled until tender. Put one-half 
pint of cream in sauce pan with a pinch of red pepper and one 
teaspoon of corn starch; then add chicken and then mushrooms 
after draining off the juice. Season with salt and pepper and 
a little butter. 

FRIED CHICKEN WITH OYSTERS. 

Take a nice tender chicken, open it down the back, and after 
cleaning- it well pound all the bones flat; wash, and wipe it 
dry on a clean towel; then season with pepper and salt, and 
fry slowly in sweet lard until tender and a fine brown on 
both sides. Then put it on a dish where it will keep warm. 
Pour off the lard in the pan and any brown particles that may 
remain; then add one-half pint of hot water and flour enough 
to make the gravy of the proper consistency. Have ready 
about twenty-five large oysters, which remove from their liquor 
and put into the pan with the gravy; let them simmer until 
their gills begin to shrivel, observing to stir them all of the 
time. When done, pour them over the chicken and send to 
the table hot. 



34 POULTEY. 

CHICKEN TERRAPIN. 

To one boiled chicken, take nearly a pint of new milk, butter 
the size of an egg. Rub with the butter a tablespoon of 
flour until smooth. Let milk come to a boil, then add butter. 
Have the chicken chopped fine, add two hard boiled eggs, and 
pour over this the hot milk. Mix all together and heat thor- 
oughly and add a good wine-glass of wine. Salt and pepper to 
taste. 

DUCK DRESSING. 

Stale bread, cut off all the crust; rub very fine; pour over it 
enough melted butter to make it crumble; salt and pepper, 
two small onions finely chopped. 

MOCK DUCK. 

Take a round of steak and spread with above dressing; roll and 
tie it; roast from one-half to three-quarters of an hour. 

ROAST WILD DUCK. 

Parboil ten minutes, putting a carrot or onion '_in each; re- 
move carrot or onion; lay in fresh water one-half hour; stuff 
with usual dressing; roast till brown and tender, basting with 
butter-water and drippings; to the gravy add tablespoon cur- 
rant jelly and thicken with browned flour. 

BOILED COOS£. 

Dress and singe, put into a deep dish, cover with boiling 
milk and leave over night. In the morning wash off the milk, 
and put the goose into cold water on the fire; when boiling hot 
take it off, wash it in warm water and dry with a cloth. This 
process takes out the oil. Fill the body with a dressing of 
bread crumbs seasoned with pepper, salt, butter and two chop- 
ped onions if relished, and a little sage. Put the goose into 
cold water and boil gently until tender. Serve with giblet 
sauce, and with pickles, or acid jellies. 

BONED TURKEY. 

First, make the stufiing to suit the family taste. I take ten- 
derloin, not too lean, chopped fine ; a teacup of cracker crumbs, 



What Do You Know About 
MILK? 

There is not a milk dealer in the 
world who can tell by looking at milk 
whether it has had a small portion of 
the cream removed from it or not. He 
must subject it to certain tests to be 
sure it is pure. 

There is not one person in five hun- 
dred who can tell by looking at or tast- 
ing of the milk they received, whether 
one-quarter of the cream has been re- 
moved from it or not. 

How can you be sure you are getting 
milk in its original richness and purity? 

Only by purchasing from reliable and 
responsible dealers. 

You are sure to get pure, sweet, 
FRESH MILK, if you deal with the 

JERSEY MILK CO. 

Their wagons go to all parts of the 
city. Orders can be sent to their 
offices — 

73 Loomis or 13 River Sts., 

OR TO 

Telephone 4678. 



THE MORNING NEWS. 



THE MORNING NEWS is the only two-cent paper in 
Chicago that has the service of the Associated Press. In ad- 
dition to this first essential to a complete news service, its 
special correspondents represent it at all the principal news 
centers in America and Europe. It publishes " all the news," 
fully yet concisely. It is a 4, 6, 8, 10, 12 page paper, as occa- 
sion demands — always large enough, never too large. 

THE MORNING NEWS is an independent paper. It 
recognizes the utility of political parties as means to the 
accomplishment of proper ends, but it declines to regard any 
mere party as a fit subject for unquestioning adoration. It is 
not an organ, and therefore escapes the temptation of defend- 
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allegiance. It is unbiased in its presentation of all political 
news. 

THE MORNING NEWS is a ''short and to the point'* 
paper. It believes that newspaper reading is but an incident 
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THE MORNING NEWS is a family newspaper. In all 
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will especially commend it to the liking of Chicago families. 

Delivered by carrier at twelve cents per week. 

Send orders to 

THE DAILY NEWS, 

Office, 123 Fifth Avenue. 



POULTRY. 35 



two eggs, a pint of oysters, some summer savory, pepper and 
salt; mix all well; have my large needle and stout thread handy, 
with some two-inch-wide, soft bleached old cotton cloth. Now 
for your turkey. It being well cleaned and singed, be careful 
not to break the outside skin. Cut off the legs so as to cut all 
the tendons where they join the drumstick. Cut the first joint 
from the wing; leave a good length of skin for the neck. 
Every bone must be taken out from the inside. Beginning 
with the legs, cut each ligament at the side bone joint, strip 
the knife close along the bone, so as to cut the flesh clean 
off, and draw the bone out; when both legs are boneless follow 
along the back, breast and wings. The neck is more difficult, 
but get it out nicely as you can. Now your turkey is one 
shapeless slump; but begin stuffing at the neck, from the inside; 
having tied securely the skin to prevent -escape, fill out the 
wings, breast, body and legs. Now sew up the skin; bandage 
it in a shapely manner with your strips, not too tight for fear 
of the stuffing swelling so as to burst the skin; salt and pepper 
the outside and steam until perfectly tender. If it's an old 
chap, steam four or five hours. When done, put a tin plate and 
a couple of flat-irons on top of it to press until cold. Then cut 
in nice thin slices. 

TURKEY STUFFED, CIBLET SAUCE. 

Boil the gizzard of the turkey well done, put the liver and 
heart in hot water, for a few minutes, then fry brown in a 
little butter, when this is done chop all finely and put on plate 
ready for use. Make a sauce in pan, in which turkey is roast- 
ing, strain, skim off all fat, mix with the chopped giblets, sea- 
son to taste, add a little chopped parsley, when it is ready to 
serve. 

RICE DRESSING FOR TURKEY. 

Boil rice until soft. Chop giblets fine and fry in hot but- 
ter, then add boiled rice and stir all together and put into turkey 
with any seasoning liked. 

(5) 



36 POULTKT, 

TURKEY CRAVY. 

Heart, liver, gizzard and neck slashed and dredged thickly 
with flour. Put in a sauce pan with a little salt, a few pep- 
percorns and allspice and a little mace, outside skin of three 
onions, lump of butter the size of a walnut. When well 
browned, add boiling water till of proper thinness; let it cook 
slowly on the back part of the stove all the morning. After 
removing the turkey from the dripping-pan and pouring off 
any grease, put the prepared gravy into the dripping-pan, and 
proceed to make gravy same as any. 

DRESSING FOR POULTRY. 

Rub fine the soft part of a loaf of bread, add one-half a pound 
of butter, the yolks of four eggs, one teacup full of thyme or 
sweet marjoram; one tablespoonful black pepper; same of salt. 

JELLY SAUCE FOR CAME. 

Put in a sauce pan a glass of Madeira ahd one-half cupful of 
jelly, let it dissolve, add one pint of dark sauce, as per recipe 
given for truffle sauce, let it come to a boil and serve. 



(Successor to Kellogg), 

Masquerade and Theatrical Costumer 

2IO State Street, CHICAGO. 



Wigs Made to Order. Special Rates on Country Orders and Masquerade Balls. 

IMPORTER OF 

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71 State Street, CHICAGO. 

(CENTRAL MUSIC HALL BUILDING.) 

CHAS. MACDONALD. L. HERBERT LITTLE. 



CHAS. MACDONALD & CO.'S 

PERIODICAL AGENCY, 

55 WASHINGTON ST., CHICAGO. 



Subscriptions taken for any Periodicals or Publications 
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BOOKBINDING A SPECIALTY. 




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Electric Lustre SiARCH Go. 



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Can be used with or without boiling. Will not stick to the iron. 

GIYES AH ELEGAHT GLOSS 



'"H!"' "^ 



Making Collars and Cuffs look like new. 



is also highly prized bj ladies as a TOILET POWDER. As a flesh 
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Don't try to get along without it. 

Order a package of your grocer to-da^'. 

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ENTREES, ETC. 



^^ Without good company all dainties lose their true relish, and, like painted 

grapes, are only seen, not tasted." 

— Massinger. 



DRESSING FOR CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. Ewing'. 

One-half pint of cream or broth, one dessert spoon heaping 
full of flour, and one of butter. Cook until thick as batter and 
add the yolks of two beaten eggs, salt and pepper. One pint of 
chopped chicken or veal; form into croquettes, dip into bread 
crumbs, then into the 3'olk of eggs beaten with a very little 
water, then again into bread crumbs, and fry. It is better to 
use a flat camel hair brush to brush the croquettes with eggs. 

CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

One plump chicken aud two pounds of veal cut from the 
round. Boil chicken and veal separately, in cold water, just 
enough to cover. Pick to pieces and chop. Cut up one-third 
of a loaf of stale bread and soak in the broth of the chicken 
while warm. Put all together, and season with salt, peppei', 
mace and nutmeg. Beat three eggs light and mix with above 
ingredients. Make in oblong balls, roll them in egg and 
cracker crumbs, aud fry brown in equal parts of butter and lard. 

NO. 2. 

One solid pint of finely-chopped chicken, one table-spoonful 
of salt, half teaspoonful of pepper, one cupful of cream or 
chicken stock, one tablespoonful of flour, four eggs, one table 



ENTREES, ETC. 



spoonful of lemon juice, one pint of crumbs, three tablespoons- 
f ul of butter. Put cream or stock on to boil. Mix flour and 
butter together, and stir into the boiling cream, then add 
chicken and seasoning. Boil for two minutes and add two of 
the eggs well beaten. Take from the fire and set away to cool. 
When cold, shape and fry. Many people like chopped parsely or 
a little nutmeg. 

ECC CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

Boil hard, remove the shells, roll in cracker crumbs and fry 
in butter until brown; make a gravy of butter, crumbs and 
cream and pour on them while hot. Eggs prepared in this way 
are a handsome dish for lunch or dinner. 

POTATO CROQUETTES. 

Eight potatoes mashed and beat up light, one tablespoon of 
butter, two eggs, and just enough milk to moisten the potatoes. 
Season highly with salt and pepper; flour board slightly; form 
potatoes in oblong shapes; roll in flour, egg and bread crumbs. 
Fry in lard until brown. 

RICE AND MEAT CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

One cupful of boiled rice, one cupful of finely-chopped 
cooked meat— any kind; one teaspoonful of salt, a little pepper, 
two tablespoonsful of butter, half a cupful of ^milk, one egg. 
Put milk on to boil and add the meat, rice and seasoning; ' 
when this boils, add the egg, well beaten; stir one minute. 
After cooling, shape, dip in egg and crumbs and fry in boiling 
fat. 

VEAL OR CHICKEN CROQUETTES-VERY EXCELLENT. 

One good-sized chicken or two slices of lean veal; half a pint 
of cream or milk; two eggs; tablespoonful of butter; small cup 
of flour. After cooking meat, chop fine and season with pep- 
per and salt; stir in first the flour, then eggs and butter; last, 
the milk. When well mixed, set on back part of fire and cook 



ENTREES, ETC. 39 



slowly half an hour, or until well stiffened. When cool, shape 
and roll in cracker crumbs, and fry. A small piece of onion 
size of walnut, and a piece of ham are an improvement. 
Should be mixed soft and cooked quickly. 

VEAL CROQUETTES. 

Mrs. Adams. 

Chop veal very fine, add a little chopped onion and some pars- 
ley, only a very little of each. Mix one-half a cup of milk with 
two teaspoons of flour and a piece of butter the size of a wal- 
nut. Cook this until it thickens, then stir into the meat. Roll 
into balls, dip in egg and then in bread crumbs and fry like 
doughnuts. 

LOBSTER CROQUETTES. 

Chop fine one can of lobster. Put two ounces of butter in 
a pan to melt, stir in two ounces of flour and one-half pint of 
cold water till it boils. Take from fire, add cayenne pepper, 
salt and juice of half a lemon; stir it well. When cool take 
a spoonful and roll it into shape. First roll it in flour, then in 
egg, then in bread crumbs. Fry in hot lard. 

CHICKEN CREAM. 

To the broth of one chicken add one pint of cream, and the 
chopped breast of chicken. Thicken with one large spoonful 
of butter and two of flour. A.dd salt and pepper to taste. 

BOILING ECCS. 

Put the eggs in some vessel which can be closely covered, 
and when the teakettle boils pour in water enough to cover 
them; close the vessel and place it on the back part of the stove, 
and let it remain ten minutes. If you wish to be very exact, 
use a thermometer and keep the water ten minutes at exactly 
the heat which is indicated after the water is poured in. By 
the ordinary method of letting the eggs boil from two to three 
minutes the white part is hardened and the yolk left uncooked, 



40 ENTREES, ETC, 



or if the yolk is cooked the white is too hard. By this method 
the heat penetrates so gradually that the yolk is nicely cooked, 
while the white is soft and tender and only just done enough to 
be opaque. 

CREAMED ECCS. 

Boil three or four eggs quite hard, cut them in halves or 
slices. Pour over them drawn butter, as follows : One large 
tablespoon of butter, one large tablespoon of flour, one cup of 
boiling water; salt and pepper to taste. 

ECC] BALLS. 

Boil four eggs for ten minutes, and put them into cold water 
When quite cold, pound them in a mortar with the beat yolk of 
one new egg, a teaspoonf ul of flour, one of chopped parsley, half 
a teaspoonful of salt, a quarter of a teaspoonful of cayenne, till 
perfectly smooth. Then form into small balls, boil them for two 
minutes, and add to the soup. 

ECC OMELET. 

Mrs. C. E. Elmes. 

Eight eggs, one-half cup of milk, one tablespoon of corn starch, 
one-half teaspoon of salt. Beat the yolks of the eggs, add the 
milk and corn starch, which has been mixed with a little of the 
milk, salt, and last, the well-beaten white of eggs. Pour in 
pans well buttered and bake until brow^n. This quantity will 
make two omelets. 

OMELET. 

Mrs. Hammond." 

Eight eggs, beaten separately, six tablespoons of milk, a little 
salt. Fry in butter, a piece the size of an English walnut. 

NO. 2. 

Beat well whites of three and yolks of six eggs separately. 
Mix together, a teacup new milk, or cream, one tablespoon ful 
flour; salt and pepper to taste. Pour this on yolks and whites 
which have been beaten together. Melt a piece of butter in a 
pan. "When it is hot, pour in the mixture and set the[pan in[a 



tf oKn • tf. • IiQicIi^K • f • ^ 

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528 West Van Buren Street. 



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E]SrTKEES,ETC. 41 



hot oven. When it thickens, pour in the whites of the other 
three eggs and return to the oven, and let it brown. Slip it on 
a dish so that the top remains. 

POACHED ECCS. 

Place a frying-pan of salted boiling water on the fire, filled 
with as many small mufiin-rings as it will hold; break the eggs 
singly in a cup and pour into the rings; boil them ,2^ or 3 
minutes; remove the rings and take ^^up the eggs singly in a 
strainer; serve on half slices of nicely browned and buttered 
toast; put a small piece of butter on each egg; pepper slightly, 
and garnish with sprigs of parseley. Serve hot. \ 

STUFFED.ECCS. 

A dozen eggs, boiled hard, cut in half. Take out the yolks 
without breaking the whites. Mash and add a huge spoonful of 
butter, pepper and salt, and half cup of cream. Mix well, and 
after setting the whites in a baking plate, fill each half with 
the mixture, putting the surplus in the plate, slightly brown. 

CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Mrs. C. E. Crandall. 

To one sinall bowlful of grated cheese add one large table- 
spoon of sweet cream, one tablespoon of melted butter and two 
tablespoons of Mayonnaise dressing or one teaspoon of made 
mustard, a little salt. Rub to a smooth cream and spread on thin 
slices of lightly-buttered bread or zephyr crackers if preferred. 

CHEESE STRAWS, NO. f. 

First make a nice crust and roll out to a thickness of half an 
inch. Sprinkle thickly with grated cheese, roll up and repeat 
the operation, then roll out to one-third of an inch thick. Cut 
out some small rounds and stamp inner rounds making rings 
of crust, then cut the remainder into strips about five inches 
long and a quarter of an inch wide. Bake rings and straws on 
buttered tins, and in dishing them up put three or four straws 
inside each ring. They should be eaten hot, but may be heated 
over like mince pies. ^ 



42 ENTREES, ETC, 



CHEESE STRAWS, NO. 2. 

Mary S. Shelton. 

Three tablespoons of grated cheese, three tablespoons of sifted 
flour, three tablespoons of melted butter, one-half teaspoon of 
salt, one-quarter saltspoon of cayenne pepper, one-quarter salt- 
spoon of white pepper, one yolk of egg, beaten, one tablespoon 
of milk. Mix the dry ingredients, then butter, milk and eggs. 
Roll very thin. Cut in narrow strips four inches long. Bake 
in slow oven fifteen minutes. Arrange in log-cabin fashion on 
the plate, 

SALTED ALMONDS. 

Blanch the nuts, but do not keep them in water any longer 
than necessary. To each cupful of nuts allow a teaspoonful of 
melted butter or salad oil. Stir well and let them stand for an 
hour; then sprinkle with one tablespoon of salt to a cup of nuts. 
Bake in moderate oven, occasionally stirring, until a delicate 
brown, from fifteen minutes to half an hour. Crisp when 
done. 

MACCARONI. 

Time, to boil the maccaroni, half an hour; to brown it, six or 
seven minutes. 

Half a pound of pipe maccaroni; seven ounces of Cheshire 
cheese; four ounces of butter; one pint of new milk; one quart 
of water, and some bread-crumbs; a pinch of salt. 

Flavor the milk and water with a pinch of salt, set it over 
the fire, and when boiling, drop in the maccaroni. When tender, 
drain it from the milk and water, put it into a deep dish, 
sprinkle the grated cheese among it with the butter. 

MACCARONI WITH CHEESE, A PLAIN RECEIPT. 

Boil as in the first receipt, and when drained, put into a sauce- 
pan with three tablespoonsful of grated cheese and an ounce 
of butter, for five minutes till well mixed; then turn it out 



E]SrTREES,ETC. 43 



into a dish, frost it over with grated cheese, and slightly brown 
the cheese in an oven, without browning the maccaroni, or it 
would be tough, or oiling the cheese. 

WELSH RAREBIT. 

Time, ten minutes. Half a pound of cheese; three table- 
spoonsful of ale; a thin slice of toast. 

Grate the cheese fine, put to it the ale, and work it in a 
small saucepan over a slow fire till it is melted. Spread it on 
toast, and send it up boiling hot. 



WILLOUGHBY, HILL & CO., 

flmEt^ICfl'S Gf^EflTEST CIiOXHlEl^S, 

WISH THEIR ADVERTISEMENT IN THE 

PAR EXCELLENCE COOK BOOK 

TO BE PUT OPPOSITE THE 

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A LA "BOSTON." 



PLEASE REMEMBER THAT 



There are many ways to advertise judiciously, but 

the best way to reach all the people is 

through the columns of the 

WEST END ADVOGflTL 

THE GREAT LOCAL PAPER OF THE WEST DIVISION. 

Rates }4 less than daily papers. 

• • • JOB pi^I|^JI)Nl(i • • • 

OF EVKRY KIND A.T LO>?VK;ST PRICES. 

Send Postal and our agent will call. 

CHAS. E. CRANDALL, Proprietor. 



VEGETABLES. 



Nearly all vegetables require to be cooked in boiling water. 
Oreen peas, asparagus, string beans, and those things that 
should retain their fresh color, should be kept uncovered while 
cooking. Put cabbage, cauliflower and spinach in cold water, 
with a little salt, for an hour before cooking. This takes out 
all worms or vermin, 

ASPARAGUS. 

Scrape, Put in water and salt, and at first boil; drop in the 
asparagus; boil till tender. Sauce: one yolk of egg mixed with a 
teaspoonful of water; a piece of butter added, and when hot, 
stir in two tablespoonsful of milk; pour over the drained 
asparagus. 

BOSTON BAKED BEANS. 

Mrs. Burgess. 

Soak the beans over night. Put in a covered stone jar, add 
one-half pound salt pork streaked with lean, two tablespoons of 
molasses. Cover with water and cook in a slow oven a day and 
a night. Good for breakfast Sunday morning. 

TO BOIL CARROTS. 

Carrots which are stored for use are rarely out of the market, 
and are useful for their own quality, and much valued for 
ornamenting many dishes. They must be well washed for boil- 
ing, and brushed, but not peeled or scraped. If very large, cut 
in two parts, put them into boiling water a little salted. Boil 
gently till tender, usually from half an hour to an hour and a 
half. When boiled, rub off the skin, and slice or send them in, 
cut in lengths, with good melted butter. 



46 VEGETABLES 



CAULIFLOWER. 

This universally-liked summer vegetable may be liad from 
June to October, when its successor, brocoli, follows to supply 
the winter season. Cauliflower should be cut in the early morn- 
ing while the dew hangs upon it; if this be suffered to evaporate 
the vegetable becomes tough and vapid. Trim the outer leaves, 
cut the stem away close, and plunge the vegetable into cold 
water salted, for an hour before it is dressed. Put a large table- 
spoonful of salt into boiling water and skim till the water be 
quite clear, or the color and appearance of the vegetable will be 
injured; then put the cauliflowers in, and boil slowly till they are 
tender, that is from fifteen to twenty-five minutes, according to 
size; but not one minute longer than necessary, or they will be 
spoiled. Drain, and serve them immediately with melted butter. 

CORN PUDDING. 

Split twelve ears of corn down the center of the grains, 
and with the back of knife scoop out the pulp. Put in a ba- 
king dish with enough cream to make the consistency of pud- 
ding, a spoonful of butter and salt to taste. Bake slowly. 

GREEN CORN PUDDING. 

Mrs. C. E; Crandall. 

Six good sized ears green corn grated, one cup milk, three 
eggs, butter size of egg, salt and pepper, teaspoonful of corn 
starch. Bake half an hour; serve hot. 

EGG PLANT. 

To cook egg-plant, slice the plant one-quarter inch thick; 
sprinkle with salt; place layer upon layer, and let stand fifteen 
minutes; dip in a batter and fry in butter and lard. Another 
good way is to dip in egg and roll in crushed cracker and fry 
same way. 

EGG PLANT FRIED. 

Peel and slice an egg plant, roll in flour, dip in beaten eggs, 
(seasoned with salt and pepper) roll afterwards in cracker 
crumbs and fry brown in hot butter. Serve at once. 



ii 



BATAVIA" 



I3I=?A.I^j:D cdf~ 



CANNED FRU1TS»*°VEGETJIBLES 

BataYla, in Westeiq |lew M, 

THE — 

Section Famous for Finest Flavor, 

AND 

Perfection in Quality Generally. 



ASK TOUE GROCER FOR 



ii 




BRAND AND TAKE NO OTHER. 

FANCY 



PRESERVED 
Strawberries, 
Raspberries, 
Peaches, 
Pears, 
Quince, 
Pine Apple, 
Etc., Etc. 

(6) 




Corn, 
Tomatoes, 
Peas, 
Beans, 

Asparag-us, 
Etc., Etc. 



James Reillv. Alkked Barker. 

Reilly & Barker, 

^^P a i i^ t eFi, . ^^ 

INTERIOR DECORATORS, 

WALL PAPERS, 

Y/indow Shades, 

527 & 529 W. MADISON ST. 

Telephone 7191. CHICAGO. 

St. Margaret's School, 

604 and 606 WEST ADAMS STREET. 



FOR YeaNG t2ABlES AND CHILBREN. 



Children Admitted to Kindergarten 
from Three to Seven Years. 



THE NUMBER OF BOARDING PUPILS LIMITED TO TWELVE. 
Address VIRGINIA SAYRE, Principal. 



REV. T. N. MORRISON, Jr., Visitor and Instriictor in Bible History. 



VEGETABLES. 47 



ONIONS A LA CREME. 

Peel and boil some middle-sized onions in salt and water till 
quite tender, drain them, and throw them into a stewpan with 
two ounces of butter, rolled in flour; shake them round till the 
butter is quite dissolved, add a teaspoonful each of salt and 
white pepper, and then stir in by degrees as much cream as 
will nearly cover them. Shake the pan round, till it is on the 
point of boiling, then serve. 

ONIONS A L'lTALIENNE. 

Peel and parboil six middle-sized onions, then drain and leave 
them to cool. Make a small opening at the top, and scoop out 
a part oE the inside, supplying the place with a mixture of two 
ounces of grated cheese, the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs 
chopped small, and as much grated breadcrumbs steeped in boil- 
ing cream as will suffice to fill the onions. Season with salt 
and pepper, and when well mixed fill the onions; dip them in 
beaten yolk of egg and fine breadcrumbs, and fry them a light 
brown. Serve them with tomato sauce. 

POTATOES. 

To boil old potatoes, peel thinly with a sharp knife, cut out 
all spots, and let them lie in cold water some hours before using. 
It is more economical to boil before peeling as the best part of 
the potato lies next to the skin. Put on in boiling water. A 
teaspoon of salt to every quart of water. Medium-sized potatoes 
will boil in half an hour. When done pour off every drop of 
water, cover with a clean towel and set on the back of the stove 
to dry for a few minutes. New potatoes require no peeling, but 
should merely be well washed and rubbed. 

POTATOES A LA CREME. 

Put into a saucepan two ounces butter, a desert spoonful of 
flour, some parsley and scallions (both chopped small), salt and 
pepper. Stir tbem together; add a wineglass of i cream, and set 
on the stove, stirring constantly until it boils. Cut some boiled 
potatoes into slices and put into the pan with the mixture and 
boil all together and serve very hot. 



48 VEGETABLES 



POTATOES IN CREAM. 

Boil potatoes and let them become cold, cut with a knife about 
the size of a pea, make a cream sauce, put the two together and 
season with salt, put on the stove till the whole is hot, then 
serve. 

FANCY MASHED POTATOES. 

Peel two quarts of potatoes, and when they are cooked, turn 
off every drop of water, put in a little salt, pepper and butter; 
then take a carving-fork and break them up a little; next add a 
little more butter, say, in the whole, a piece as large as an egg, 
and nearly a cup of nice milk or cream. Now take a silver 
fork, or three-pronged one, and beat them briskly for five min- 
utes, or until light and creamy. They must be carried imme- 
diately to the table, or they will become heavy and clammy. If 
once tried this way you will never again resort to the old 
"masher." Remember they must be served immediately. 

FRENCH FRIED POTATOES. 

Pare small uncooked potatoes. Divide them in halves, and 
each half in three pieces. Put in the frying basket and cook 
in boiling fat for ten minutes. Drain, and dredge with salt. 
Serve hot with chops or beefsteak. Two dozen pieces can be 
fried at one time. 

POTATO PUFFS. 

Prepare the potatoes as for mashed potato. While hot, shape 
in balls about the size of an egg. Have a tin sheet well but- 
tered, and place the balls on it. As soon as all are done, brush 
over with beaten egg. Brown in the oven. When done, slip 
a knife under them and slide them upon a hot platter. Garnish 
with parsley, and serve immediately. 

POTATO RIBBONS. 

Time, ten minutes, Wash and remove any specks from 
some nice large potatoes, and when peeled, lay them in cold 
water for a short time; then pare them round like an apple; 



VEGETABLES. 49 



but do not cut the curls too thiu, or they are likely to break. 
Fry them very slowly in butter a light color, and drain them 
from grease. Pile the ribbons up on a hot dish and serve. 

TEXAS BAKED POTATOES. 

Mrs. C. S. McHenry. 

After baking medium-sized potatoes, cut lengthwise. Scrape 
the potatoes into a dish, being careful to reserve the half skins. 
Mash the potatoes. Season with pepper, salt, butter and an 
onion grated fine. Add a little cream or milk, and beat well. 
Fill the skins you have reserved, put in the oven and brown 

^^^^^ ^ • SUCCOTASH. 

Take one quart Lima beans, one-half pound pork, one and 
one-half dozen ears sweet corn (green); boil the pork one and 
one-half hours in three quarts of water, putting in the beans 
when the pork has boiled one-half an hour. Cut the corn off, 
putting it in one dish; into another scrape the milk from the 
cobs. When the beans are nearly done, put in the corn, and 
boil fifteen minutes; then add the milk from the cobs, boil- 
ing all ten minutes longer. It should be a little thicker than 
gruel. Stir all the time after adding the milk, or it will burn. 
If not sweet enough, add sugar. 

TOMATOES BAKED. 

Take large, smooth tomatoes, and wash all grit or sand off of 
them; then put them in a pan whole and place them inside of 
stove; let them remain in the stove just long enough to get hot 
through and until the skin on them cracks; then take them oat, 
peel and cut in halves; then place in a dish and put a layer of 
tomatoes and sprinkle salt and pepper enough to season over 
them, and a teaspoonful of butter; continue in layers as above 
until the dish is full. Carry to the table and serve while hot. 

FRIED TOMATOES. 

Select the largest specimens; peel and cut in halves; have a 
batter made of flour, eggs and sweet milk (if you haven't the 
milk, water will answer as well ) ; dip the tomatoes in this batter 
and fry in lard or butter; have the lard or butter hot before 
putting in the tomatoes. Carry to the table and serve hot. 



50 VEGETABLES. 



RAW TOMATOES WITH SUGAR. 

Take nice, -large, smooth tomatoes; peel and cut in three 
slices; si^rinkle sugar over them and serve before the sugar 
dissolves. 

BROILED TOMATOES. ^ 

Cut the tomatoes in halv^es. Sprinkle the inside of the slices 
with. Jine bread crumbs; salt and pepper. Place them in the 
double broiler, and broil over the fire for ten minutes, having 
the outside next the fire. Caref ally slip them on a hot dish 
(stone china), and put bits of butter here and there on each 
slice. Put the dish in the oven for ten minutes, and then serve, 
or, if you have a range or gas stove, brown before the fire or 
under the gas. 

STUFFED TOMATOES. 

Twelve large, smooth tomatoes, one teaspoon of salt, a 
little pepper, one tablespoon of butter, one of sugar, one 
cup of bread crumbs, one teaspoon onion juice. Arrange 
the tomatoes in a baking pan. Cut a thin slice from the 
smooth end of each. With a small spoon, scoop out as much 
of the pulp and juice as possible without injuring the shape. 
When all have been treated in this way, mix the pulp and 
juice with the other ingredients, and fill the tomatoes with this 
mixture. Put on the tops, and bake slowly three-quarters of 
an hour. Slide the cake turner under the tomatoes, and lift 
gently onto a flat dish. Garnish with parsley, and serve. 

TURNIPS IN GRAVY. 

Slice the turnips and put them, with two ounces of butter, 
into a stewpan, shaking it round till they are browned. Season 
with salt, pepper, a teaspoon of sugar,- and a little mace. 
Pour over them a quarter of a pint of good brown gravy, and 
when quite hot serve them in it. 

GREEN VEGETABLES. 

Boil green vegetables in salted water until done, and then 
put in cold water. You can keep green vegetables fresh this way 
for several days. Use them afterward in a like manner as 



canned vegeabtles. 



JAMES H. WALI^EI^ ^ 60. 



IMPORTERS AND RETAILERS- 



fmeirijIoodsfloYGlties 

CAKPETS, UPHOLSTERY, 

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Is a Sublime Virg^in Oil of excellent flavor, pressed from selected olives. Palatable and 
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MANUFACTURER OF 

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567 W. Madison St., K. E. Cor. Ogden Ave. 



SALADS. 



CREAM DRESSING FOR SALADS. 

Mrs. J. R. Lyons. 

One cup sweet cream, it must be perfectly fresh; one table- 
spoonful corn starch, or very fine flour; whites of two eggs, 
beaten stiff; three tablespoonfuls vinegar, two tablespoonfuls 
best salad oil (four tablespoonfuls melted butter is better), two 
teaspoonfuls powdered sugar, one teaspoonful (scant) of salt, 
half a teaspoonful pepper, one teaspoonful made mustard. 
Heat cream almost to boiling; stir in the flour, previously wet 
with cold milk; boil two minutes, stirring all the time; add 
the sugar, and take from fire. When half cold beat in whipped 
whites of eggs. Set aside to cool. When quite cold, whip 
in the oil, pepper, mustard and salt, and if salad is ready add 
the vinegar, and pour at once over it; especially nice for let- 
tuce. If for chickens, use only white meat. 

CREAM SALAD DRESSING. 

Mr. De L. B. 

Half a cupful of vinegar, two teaspoonsful of mustard, three 
eggs, one cupful of cream. Scald the vinegar and mustard, 
and let it cool a little, then add the eggs beaten very light, 
lastly add the cream. Cook in a farina kettle until it is the 
consistenc}^ of boiled custard. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Mrs. D. R. B. 

Yolks of four eggs, five tablespoons of Lucca oil (sweet oil), 
one cup of new cold milk, one half cup of vinegar, salt, 
mustard and pepper. Beat the eggs and oil slowly together, 
add milk and vinegar. Set the saucepan on the fire until the 
mixture becomes thick, stirring all the time. Set away to 
cool. When cold, season with the salt, mustard and pepper. 



52 SALADS. 

SALAD DRESSING. 

Yolks of four eggs, two-thirds cup vinegar, one teaspoouful 
salt, one and a half teaspoonfuls made mustard. Mix the 
vinegar, mustard and salt well together and add "the yolks, 
well beaten, just before putting on the fire. Boil and stir 
rapidly. When done it should be smooth and thick. When 
cool add four tablespoonsful salad oil, and one half cup of 
cream. 

CELERY SAUCE. 

Cut the tender parts of a head of celery very fine. Pour on 
water enough to cover them and no more. Cover the sauce- 
pan and set where it will simmer an hour. Mix together two 
tablespoonsful of flour and four of butter, When the celery 
has been boiling one hour, add to it the butter and flour, one 
pint of milk or cream, and salt and pepper.. Boil up once, and 
serve. 

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE. 

Half a teacupful of butter, the juice of half a lemon, the 
yolks of two eggs, a speck of cayenne, half a cupful of boiling 
water, half a teaspoonful of salt. Beat the butter to a cream ; 
then add the yolks, one by one, the lemon-juice, pepper and 
salt. Place the bowl in which these are mixed in a sauce- 
pan of boiling water. Beat with an egg-beater until the 
sauce begins to thicken (about a minute), and add the boiling 
water, beating all the time. When like soft custard it is done. 
This sauce is nice for meat or fish. 

MAYONAISE SAUCE. 

Take the yolks of three raw eggs, one e^en tablespoon of mus- 
tard, one of sugar, one teaspoon of salt, and pepper to taste. 
Break the yolks into a bowl; beat a few strokes, and add grad - 
ually the mustard, sugar, salt and pepper. Take one-half of a 
pint bottle of the best olive oil and stir in a few drops at a time. 
The sauce will become firm like jelly. When one-half of the 
half pint is used add the juice of one lemon by degrees with the 




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Orders by Mail receive prompt attention. Price and 
Color List mailed on application. 



SALADS. 53^ 

remainder of the oil, then add a quarter of a 'cup of good vin- 
egar. This is good with chicken, salmon or vegetable salad, and 
will keep for weeks. 

MUSTARD SAUCE. 

Mustard is considered to be one of the most wholesome of 
condiments. It is always best to prepare it in small quantities^ 
and send it up quite fresh. It should be smoothly blended with 
milk or cream, to which a small portion of salt may be added, 
till reduced to the proper consistency. If required piquant,, 
vinegar or horseradish vinegar may be substituted for the milk» 

CABBAGE DRESSING, 

M.J. Hodge. 

Teacup vinegar, tablespoon butter, same of flour, two tea- 
spoons of sugar, pepper and salt to taste. Cook and place over 
cabbage hot, cover close, and eat cold. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

One quart of canned tomatoes, two tablespoons of butter, two 
of flour, eight cloves and a small slice of onion. Cook tomato, 
onion and cloves ten minutes. Heat the butter in a small fry- 
ing-pan, and add the flour. Stir over the fire until smooth and 
brown, and then stir into the tomatoes. Cook two minutes. 
Season to taste with salt and pepper, and rub through a strainer 
fine enough to keep back the seeds. This sauce is nice for fish, 
meat and maccaroni. 

SAUCE OF TOMATOES. 

Mrs. H. S. Clay. 

One gallon tomatoes peeled; add two tablespoons mustard 
seed, one teaspoon cayenne pepper, one teaspoon allspice, one 
teaspoon cloves, one gill salt, four or five onions chopped fine, 
one pint brown sugar, one quart vinegar. Boil, stirring till of 
the consistency of marmalade. Bottle and seal. 



54 SALADS 



CHICKEN CURRY. 

One chicken, weighing three pounds, three-fourths of a cup- 
ful of butter, two large onions, one heaping tablespoonful of 
curry powder; three tomatoes, or one cupful of the canned arti- 
cle, enough cayenne to cover a silver three-cent piece, salt, one 
cupful of milk. Put the butter and the onions, cut fine, on to 
cook. Stir until brown; then put in the chicken, which has 
been cut in small pieces, the curry, tomatoes, salt and pepper. 
Stir well, cover tightly, and let simmer one hour, stirring occa- 
sionally, then add the milk. Boil up once and serve with boiled 
rice. This makes a very rich and hot curry. 

CHICKEN SALAD. 

The white meat of a chicken, the weight in celery, the yolk 
of one raw egg and one hard-boiled, a teaspoonful of salt, the 
same of pepper, half a teaspoonful of mustard, a tablespoon- 
ful of salad oil, one of white wine vinegar, one teaspoonful 
of extract of celery. 

Take the white meat of a chicken, boiled, cut it small, or 
mince it fine; take the same quantity, or more^ of white tender 
celery cut small, and mix the celery and chicken together an 
hour or two before it is wanted, then add the dressing made 
thus: Break the yolk of a hard-boiled Qgg very fine with a sil- 
ver fork, add to it the yolk of a raw egg, and the pepper and 
salt, with half a tablespoonful of made mustard: work all 
smoothly together, adding gradually a tablespoonful of salad 
oil, and the same of white wine vinegar. Mix the chicken with 
the dressing, pile it up in the dish, and spread some of the 
dressing over the outside. Garnish with the delicate leaves of 
the celery, the white of the egg cut into rings, green pickles 
cut in slices, pickled beet root in slices and stars, and placed 
alternately with the rings of egg and the leaves. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

A lobster, yolks of two eggs, a spoonful of made mustard, 
three tablespoons of salad oil, a taste of vinegar, a little 
salt, some fresh lettuces or celery. 



SALADS. 55 

Pick all the meat out of the lobster, thoroughly beat the yolks 
of two new-laid eggs, beat in made mustard to taste, and contin- 
uing to beat them, drop in three tablespoonfuls of salad oil; 
add whatever flavoring maybe preferred, a taste of vinegar, and 
some salt. Mix in six tablespoonsf ul of vinegar, and the soft part 
of the lobster. Moisten the remainder of the lobster with this, 
and lay it at the bottom of the bowl; cut up the lettuce, take 
care that it is well rolled over in the dressing, and put it over 
the lobster. Mustard c?in be left out if it is not liked. The 
above quantity is given for the proportions, and can be increased 
according to the lobster employed. 

SHRIMP SALAD. 

Open a can of shrimps some hours before you want to use 
them and turn upon a dish. Set on ice until needed. Line a 
salad bowl or a bread salver with leaves of cool, crisp lettuce; 
lay the shrimps on them and pour mayonaise dressing on the 
fish, or send it around with the salad. A popular dish in hot 
weather. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Three or four cold boiled potatoes sliced in small squares or 
pieces, quarter of small onion chopped very fine; mix both 
together. Dressing, three eggs beaten light, one half teaspoon 
black pepper, one half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon made 
mustard, shake of red pepper, one tablespoon melted butter and 
two tablespoons sweet oil, a quarter cup of cream, one large 
half cup vinegar. Make this in farina kettle, beat well together 
and stir constantly until it thickens. 

STUFFED OLIVES. 

Remove the pit carefully and fill with sardines minced 
fine. 



56 SALADS. 

COMBINATIONS FOR SALADS. 

1. Lettuce with water cresses or pepper grass mixed, and 
small radishes placed around for garnish. Clear dressing. 

2. Lettuce with celery mixed. Cut the celery into pieces an 
inch and a half long, then slice these lengthwise into four or 
five pieces. Mix with lettuce. Mayonaise dressing. 

3. Lettuce and slices of cold boiled potatoes and cold boiled 
beets. Potatoes piled in the center, beets next and lettuce 
around the outside of the dish. Potato salad dressing. 

4. Celery cut into small pieces. Mayonaise dressing. 

Packages. 10 els. Trunks, 25 cts. BRINKS' CHICAGO CITY EXPRESS CO., 
Telephones 1754 & 1764. General Office, 88 Washington Street. 




THE LURE SHORE BOUTE 



BETWEEN 

CH ICAGO 

AND 

JMEW YOF^K, BOSTOJM 

AND THK EAST, 

COMPOSED OF THE 

Lake Shore, New York Central & Boston 
and Albany Railroads, 

is recognized as embodying in its equip- 
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essential to comfort, convenience and 
luxury in railway transportation. It is 
the only double track route to New York 
and Boston; carries passengers into the 
city of New York to the Grand Central Depot without subjecting them to 
the annoyance of a transfer, and is the only route possessing that advantage. 
Wagner Palace Sleeping Cars are run through without change to New 
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The celebrated "Chicago and New York Limited" trains run via the 
Lake Shore Route. These trains are certainly the easiest riding and hand- 
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new and beautiful Sleeping, Drawing Room, Dining and Buffet Smoking 
Cars, constructed with that best of modern railway contrivances, the 
enclosed vestibule on the platforms, and heated by steam from the locomo- 
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the hitherto hazardous undertaking of moving from car to car. By it a 
train is practically converted into one long car of several compartments, 
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The steam heating apparatus is admirable, the temperature in the cars 
being maintained at a uniform comfortable degree throughout. These 
facts should be remembered when a trip is to be made, and tickets pur- 
chased via the 

IvAKK SHORK ROUXK. 



(7) 



ASK YOUR GROCER FOR 

R. W. STAFFORD'S 

PICKLES. 

White Wine p.^^ Pure Cider vinegar, 

White Silver Onions, Horse Radish, Sweet Cider, Saur Kraut, 

Mustards, Salad Oils, Sauces, Chow Chow, 

and Pure Tomato Catsup. 

698 & 700 AUSTIN AVE. 

( Bet. Robey St. and Hoyne Ave.) 

Telephone 7164. CHICAQO, Ilvlv. 

Shourds, Storey i Kasper, 

STATE AND RANDOLPH STS. 

CHICAGO, ILL. 



LEADERS OF LOW PRICES IN 



®iamoiicl§ and ^^itct^es 

AND STERLING SILVERWARE. 



ESfABblSHED 1560. 



PICKLES. 



CABBAGE PICKLE. 

Mrs. G. Cunning-ham. 

Scald the quartered heads in a strong brine, and squeeze per- 
fectly dry in a towel, put in a jar and pour cold vinegar over, 
put a quantity of white mustard seed and pod pepper with it, 
color the brine deeply with turmeric. 

PICKLED CABBAGE. 

No. 2. 

Select a nice^ firm head of cabbage; take off all the outside 
leaves and shave it exceedingly fine (not chop it, remember); 
place it in the jar you intend to keep it in, sprinkle salt and 
pepper on it to your taste, then cut a couple of red peppers 
very fine; add two tablespoonsful celery seed (or it is a great 
improvement, if you can get it, to chop up fine two heads of 
nice celery), two tablespoons white mustard seed; pour over 
cold vinegar enough to cover, 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Mrs. Boyles. 

Wash the cucumbers, put in a jar and cover with water. For 
every one hundred pickles allow one pint of salt. Let them 
stand twenty-four hours. Then drain off the brine and wipe 
dry. Take the same quantity of vinegar there was of brine. 
Scald it, then pour over the pickles; let them stand twenty- 
four hours. Take the same vinegar and scald again, and pour 
over the pickles. Let them stand twenty-four hours longer. 
The last day dry each pickle, and lay them in the jar they are 



58 PICKLES. 

to be kept in. Take-fresh vinegar the same quantity and boil 
together with one half pound of sugar, ounce of whole pepper, 
an ounce of whole allspice, an ounce of whole cloves and a 
lump of alum half as big as an hen's egg (alum is to harden 
the pickle). Pour over the pickles and cover tight. In a few 
days they will be ready to eat. 

CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Make a brine of rock salt strong enough to bear an egg. 
When boiling hot pour it on six hundred cucumbers. Let 
stand twenty-four hours; then wash in clear, cold water and 
dry. Scald vinegar and pour over them; let stand twenty-four 
hours, then throw that off, take fresh vinegar, one quart brown 
sugar, two green peppers, half pint mustard seed, six cents worth 
ginger root, one tablespoon celery seed, cinnamon, cloves, all- 
spice each, piece of alum size of a nut powdered fine. Scald 
altogether, pour over boiling water. 

SWEET CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Take small crock of pickled cucumbers and make a good 
rich syrup of New Orleans molasses, and cider vinegar, and 
whole cloves; heat together and turn over them, and in two 
days you will have a most delicious, brittle, hard, sweet pickle. 

RIPE CUCUMBER PICKLES. 

Remove the seeds and rinds; slice them an inch thick; soak 
them jn cold vinegar over night; drain off the vinegar and 
throw it away. Take one gallon of vinegar, four pounds of 
sugar, a few sticks of cinnamon bark, and in this mixture boil 
the pieces of cucumbers, removing each piece as it becomes 
clear, without being broken — some pieces will be done before 
others, and place them in a jar; when all are removed to the 
jar pour the boiling vinegar over them, and keep them under 
the surface. 



PICKLES. 59 



MIXED PICKLES. 

Mrs. Boyles. 

Two heads of cabbage sliced fine and cut into inch pieces, two 
heads of cauliflower torn into inch pieces, slice fifty 
cucumbers about three inches long, some grated and 
some in round pieces about one quarter inch in thickness, 
four quarts of string beans, boiled until tender in 
salted water, eight large green peppers with the seeds 
taken out cut up into small pieces, one quart of small 
white onions. Pour over all, excepting string beans, a strong 
brine and let stand twenty-four hours. Drain or squeeze well. 
For a three-gallon jar take six quarts of vinegar, one teaspoon 
cayenne pepper, quarter pound white pepper ground, one 
tablespoon turmeric powder, quarter pound whole mustard 
seed, a piece of alum half size of an egg. Pour vinegar and 
spices hot over all. When cold, add a pint of made mustard. 
Stir thoroughly. 

OLIVE OIL PICKLES. 

Mrs. J. E. Montrose. 

One hundred small cucumbers sliced, three pints small onions 
sliced, three ounces celery seed, four ounces white mustard seed, 
two ounces whole white pepper, one pint olive oil, a piece of 
alum dissolved in the vinegar. Lay the cucumbers in soft water 
three hours, drain and mix with the onions, then add oil, mix 
thoroughly, then add seeds; mix well together and pour cold 
vinega;- over all. The directions mvist be followed explicitly, 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Take two quarts of ripe tomatoes, four large onions and four 
red peppers. Chop them together; then add four cups of vine- 
gar, three tablespoons of salt, two teaspoons each of cloves, 
ground cinnamon, ginger, allspice and nutmeg. Boil all to- 
gether for one hour, and bottle for use after straining through 
a sieve or coarse netting. Is equal to famous Worcestershire. 



60 P J C K L E S . 

PICCALILLI. 

Mrs. George Cunningham, Nashville, Tenn. 

First pickle the articles you wish to use — cucumbers, cauli- 
flower, cottage onions and string beans, if desired. In the 
dressing take a gallon of the vinegar which has been on the 
cabbage already spiced, equal quantities, about a teacupful of 
the best English mustard, flour and sugar, and nearly as much 
turmeric. Mix in a smooth paste with some of the vinegar. 
Let the vinegar come to a boil, and stir this mixture in, on the 
fire, and cook till a smooth cream. Slice the different pickles, 
leaving the small onions while putting them in a crock with a 
good deal of celery seed (pounded) and white mustard seed. 
Pour the dressing over while hot and cover closely. 

PICCALILLI. 

Mrs. Boyles. 

Slice one peck of green tomatoes; salt them in layers; let 
them drain over night, then take three teaspoons of ground 
mustard, one teaspoon of ground pepper, two teaspoons of 
ground cloves, two teaspoons of ground cinnamon, four peppers 
chopped fine. Mix with one-fourth pint whole mustard, one 
cup sugar, two quarts of vinegar. Put into a porcelain kettle, 
let come to a boil; add tomatoes; let boil one-half hour or 
more. 

CHOW CHOW. 

Two quarts of small white onions, two quarts of gherkins, two 
quarts of string beans, two small cauliflowers, one-half a dozen 
ripe red peppers, one half pound mustard seed, one-half pound 
of whole pepper, one pound ground mustard and, as there is 
nothing so adulterated as ground mustard, it's better to get it 
at the druggist's; twenty or thirty bay leaves, and two quarts of 
good cider or wine vinegar. Peel the onions, halve the cucum- 
bers, string the beans, and cut in pieces the cauliflower. Put all 
in a wooden tray, and sprinkle well with salt. In the morning 





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. (^opdar^ W ©o., 



UNDKRTAKERS, 

14 & 16 E. Madison St.. 

TELEPHONE 5417 * * * ©mGaQO. 



PICKLES. 61 

"wash and drain thoroughly, and put all into the cold vinegar, 
except the red peppers. Let boil twenty minutes slowly, fre- 
quently turning over. Have wax melted in a deep dish, and, as 
you fill and cork up, dip into the wax. The peppers you can 
put in to show to the best advantage. 

GREEN TOMATO PICKLE. 

Mrs. C. Stearns. 

One peck of green tomatoes, and six large onions, sliced. 
Sprinkle with one cupful of salt, and let stand over night. In 
the morning drain. Add to the tomatoes two quarts of water 
and one quart of vinegar. Boil fifteen minutes, then drain 
again and throw this vinegar and water away. Add to the 
pickle two pounds of sugar, two quarts of vinegar two table- 
spoonfuls each of clove, allspice, ginger, mustard, cinnamon. 
Boil fifteen minutes. 

TOMATO PICKLES. 

Mrs. Andrews. 

Half peck green peppers, two and a half pecks green toma- 
toes, five large onions, chopped, two and a half cups of salt. 
Let stand over night and drain; in the morning add five quarts 
vinegar and boil fifteen minutes. Then add three and a half 
pounds of brown sugar, three-quarters of a pound of mustard 
seed, five tablespoons cinnamon, two and a half tablespoons 
allspice, two tablespoons cloves, three tablespoons ginger, three 
tablespoons celery seed. After all is prepared, boil twenty 
minutes. 

PICKLED EGGS. 

Select nine fresh ones, boil tliera hard, lift them directly 
from the hot water into cold. When cool, remove the shell, 
stick cloves into them, and drop in cold vinegar. 

PICKLED PEACHES. 

Mrs. Ryer. 

Seven pounds of peaches, three and half pounds of sugar, 
one half pint of vinegar, one ounce of cinnamon, one ounce of 
cloves. Make syrup, and pour over peaches. Let stand for 
twenty-four hours, and boil together. 



62 PICKLES. 



FRENCH CATSUP. 

Mrs. C. E. Elmes. 



One peck of tomatoes, six onions, chopped very fine, two 
tablespoonsful each of allspice, cloves, black pepper, two ounces 
of celery and one quarter of a pound of salt, one half pound of 
brown sugar, one quart of strong vinegar. Boil all together 
until thick enough. 



OYSTER CATSUP. 

Select eighteen or twenty large fresh oysters, drain off the 
liquor and pound them in a mortar; then put them in a stew- 
pan together with their liquor, adding a tumbler of sherry, 
four ounces of anchovies, the rind of half a lemon pared very 
thin, half a saltspoon of pounded mace and half a dozen pep- 
percorns. Place the pan on the fire and let the contents simmer 
gently for half an hour, then remove it, and when cold bottle 
for use. 

Large green peppers are relished prepared in this way: Re- 
move all the seeds and fill the pepper with cooked tomato pulp 
and minced mushrooms, seasoning with salt and butter. Bake 
in a hot oven and serve. 



ITOMATO CATSUP. 

Mrs. West. 

One half , bushel tomatoes, twelve onions, one teacup salt, 
one teacup white pepper, one teacup mustard, one quarter tea- 
cup red pepper, one pound brown sugar. Put tomatoes and 
onions sliced to boil. When soft strain and add the seasoning. 
When it has boiled down to one third it is done. When cool 
add sufficient to taste and make thin enough to pour in bottles. 
Very fine. 



PICKLES. 63 

TOMATO CATSUP. 

Wash the tomatoes and break them open unpared. Put them 
in a large tin and let them boil, then drain them through 
a sieve dry as possible, getting all the pulp and leaving only the 
skin and seeds. To every gallon put two tablespoonfuls of 
salt, four tablespoonfuls of pepper, two of mustard, one of all- 
spice, one and one half of cloves, four of cinnamon, a little 
sugar and a pint of vinegar. Boil two or three hours and bottle 
tight. 

MUSTARD FOR MEAT. 

The yolk of one egg, well beaten, one half teaspoonful salt, 
one teaspoonful butter, one tablespoonful mustard, and enough 
vinegar to make it the proper consistency. 



I 



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£ o a 
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BREAD, ETC. 



"He is crowned with all achieving who perceivvs and then performs." 

— Goethe. 



YEAST. 



One quart boiling water poured upon a cup of grated raw 
potatoes, with a small infusion of hops. Add one half tea- 
cup of salt, one half teacup of sugar and a little yeast to raise 
it. Keep it warm until it raises. Brewer's yeast is the best 
unless you have some of the same yeast. 

YEAST. 

Twelve good sized potatoes, one gallon water when done, two. 
handfuls hops in a bag, one tablespoon ginger, two teacups 
sugar, one of salt. Boil potatoes and hops, strain, then add the 
other ingredients and scald well. Put into a jug and cork 
tight. One cupful makes four loaves. 

YEAST. 

Grate ten large potatoes raw; have ready six quarts of 
strong hop tea boiling; pour over the potatoes, stirring con- 
stantly, and let it boil a moment or two; add one coffee cup of 
salt and sugar each. When milk-warm raise with a pint of 
baker's or home-made yeast. Set in a warm place until done 
working. This is an excellent recipe, and will keep a long; 
time in a cool place. 



66 BEE AD, ETC, 



BREAD MADE EASY. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

Three quarts flour, small tablespoon salt. Mix with quite 
hot water. Stirring quickly, dissolve the yeast in a little warm 
water, and stir in when suiBciently cool. Beat hard and long. 
Let it stand one night when warm. In the morning mold and 
put into pans. Let it stand awhile before putting into oven. 

LIGHT BREAD. 

Two quarts of scalded "Cerealine,'" eight tablespoonfuls of 
lard, six ounces of Fleischmann^s yeast, eight quarts of flour, 
four teaspoonfuls of salt. 

Mix the wheat flour and "Cerealine" together; dissolve the 
salt in water, and dissolve six ounces of Fleischmann's yeast in 
a little cold water, and make into a stiff dough. Allow this 
mixture to raise about three hours, and then take out and 
make into six loaves of bread, and set in a pan until it raises 
again, then bake about an hour in a hot oven. 

POTATO BREAD. 

Time to bake, one and a half to two hours. 

Two and a half pounds of mealy potatoes, seven pounds of 
flour, a quarter of a pint of yeast, two ounces of salt. 

Boil two pounds and a half of nice mealy potatoes till 
floury; rub and mash them smooth; then mix them with suf- 
ficient cold water to let them pass through a coarse sieve, and 
any lump that remains must be again mashed and pressed 
through. Mix this paste with the yeast, and then add it to 
the flour. Set it to rise, well knead it, and make it into a stiff, 
tough dough. 

BREAD FOR DYSPEPTICS. 

Fcr one loaf: one pint attrition flour, one pint wheat flour; 
prepare with Horsford's Bread Preparation according to direc- 
tions which come with it, adding salt, mixing soft, with sweet 
milk, with the hands, and bake quickly. To be used when a 
day old. 










N. B. — None Genuine without the letters ''A. B. C." on 
top of the loaf. 

This Bread is Guaranteed the Best that can be made. 



KENNEDY BISCUIT WORKS. 



I=^.A.C::'rCDF=?I]E:^ : 

Cambridgeport Mass., . . . 498, 500, 502 Main St, 
Chicago, 111., ... 44, 46, 48, 50 S. Desplaines St. 

For generations the name of KENNEDY has stood as a synonym of all 
that is purest and best in the manufacture of 

pine Biscuit, Ci^aeketi^s and Cakes 

We manufacture more than two hundred varieties. Among the choicest, 
which are admitted to be unequaled, are the Zephyr, Albert, Zephyrette, 
Beatrice, Jockey Club, Oswego, Thin Water, French Roll Wafer, Cold 
Water, Sugar Wafers, Cream Biscuit, Graham Wafers, Cambridge Tea, 
Oatmeal Wafers. All of these varieties are ver)' desirable for luncheons, 
receptions, etc. We also manufacture a large variety of cheaper goods for 
more general use. Quality always guaranteed. Respectfully, 

f. /c. KENNEDY ©OMPANY. 

E. A. &: W. HOVSTELL, 

^Practical Upholsterers^ 

Repairers, Manufacturers and Renovators 

OF ALL KINDS OF 

Furniture and Bedding. 

And all kinds of Household Goods 

PACKED and SHIPPED by Experienced Men. 

551 MADISON STREET. 

Near Ogden Avenue. 



BREAD, ETC. 67 



SALT YEAST BREAD. 

Mrs. H. J. Jones. 

One teacup sweet milk, boil and stir in two tablespoons meal 
while hot at night. Next morning add one cup hot water, one 
full cup of flour, one tablespoon sugar, one teaspoon salt to 
ihe milk; mix well. Put in a vessel in a warm place; when 
light, take three quarts sifted flour; large spoonful of lard, a 
little more salt ; mix as soft as you can kneed, which do thorough- 
ly until it thickens. Let it rise and bake in quick oven. 

BROWN BREAD. 

One quart oatmeal scalded, one quart ryemeal or graham 
flour; one cup yeast, one cup molasses, large teaspoonful salt, 
small teaspoonful soda. Put in pan, let it rise; bake five hours. 

CORN BREAD. 

Mrs. Hammond. 

Two cups corn meal, one cup flour, one teaspoonful salt, 
one tablespoonful sugar, two eggs, two cups milk, one heaping 
spoonful baking powder; and half as much more, dry in flour. 

CORN BREAD. 

One cup of "Cerealine," one and a half pints of corn meal,, 
one teaspoon of salt, three eggs, one and one-fourth pints 
of milk, one tablespoon of sugar, one-half pint of flour, two- 
teaspoons of baking powder; two tablespoons of lard. Sift 
the corn meal, flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder togeth- 
er; rub in the lard cold; add eggs, well beaten, milk, and! 
"Cerealine"; mix into a moderately stiff batter; pour it from the; 
bowl into a shallow cake pan, and bake in a rather hot oven, 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. Hill. 

Two coffee cups cornmeal, two coffee cups graham flour, two- 
thirds coffee cup New Orleans molasses, two eggs, small spoon 
salt, one teaspoon soda stirred into the molasses until it is all 
foam, and milk to form a soft batter. Steam three hours. 

(8) 



6o BREAD, ETC. 

BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. Raymond, Boston. 

One quart milk, two cups of ryemeal, three cups of Indian 
meal, one cup of molasses, one tablespoon of salt, one table- 
spoon of soda. Steam or bake two and a half hours. 



BROWN BREAD. 

Mrs. L.'ison. 

One-half teaspoon soda dissolved in a little warm water, one 
cup sour milk, put soda in one-half cup molasses, little salt, 
one egg or two yolks and one white, graham flour (and a little 
wheat flour); don't put too much flour in, mix lightly. Steam 
one and a half hoars. Keep water boiling constantly. 



BREAKFAST COFFEE CAKES. 

Three cups bread sponge, one-half cup butter, little sugar, 
one egg. Roll thin as baking powder biscuit. Cut out with 
tumbler or cake-cutter; sprinkle over a little sugar, cinnamon, 
and little bits of butter. As our family is small, I only use one- 
half the recipe. 

ALBANY BREAKFAST CAKES. 

Time, half an hour. Six eggs, one quart of milk, a tea- 
spoonful of salt; a piece of saleratus the size of two peas, and 
sufficient flour to make a thick batter. 

Beat the eggs very light, and stir them into a quart of milk. 
Add the salt and salaratus, dissolved in a little hot water. Stir 
in sufiicient flour to make a thick batter, rub some small tins 
the size of a tea-saucer with butter, and half fill them with the 
batter. Bake them in a quick oven. 



BREAD, ETC. 69 

" JOHNNY CAKE" 

A Recipe by Bishop Williams, of Connecticutt. 

A forgetful old Bishop, all broken to pieces, 

Neglected to dish up for one of his nieces 

A recipe for "corn-pone," the best ever known. 

So he hastes to repair his sin of omission. 

And hopes that in view of his shattered condition 

His suit for forgiveness, he humbly may urge. 

So here's the recipe — and it comes from Lake George. 

Take a cup of corn meal, and the meal should be yellow, 
Add a cup of wheat flour, for to make the corn mellow; 
Of sugar a cup, white or brown, at your pleasure, 
(The color is nothing, the point is the measure.) 

And now comes the troublesome thing to indite. 

For the rhyme and the reason they trouble me quite, 

For after the sugar, the flour and the meal — 

Comes a cup of sour cream, but, unless you should steal — 

From your neighbors I fear you will never be able — 

This item to put upon your cooks' table. 

For sure and indeed in all towns I remember. 
Sour cream is as scarce as June bugs in December. 
So here an alternative nicely contrived. 
Is suggested at once your mind to relieve. 
And showing how you without stealing at all, 
The ground that seemed lost, may retrieve. 
Instead of sour cream, take one cup of milk, 
"Sweet railk,^' what a sweet phrase to utter. 
And to make it cream like, put into the cup 
Just three tablespoonsful of butter. 
Cream of tartar, one teaspoonful, rule dietetic, . 
How nearly I wrote it down, "tartar emetic." 
But no: cream of tartar it is without doubt, 
And so the alternative makes itself out. 



70 BKEAD,ETC. 

Of soda, the half of a teaspoonful add — 
Or else your poor corn cake will go to the bad. 
Two eggs must be broken without being beat, 
Then of salt a teaspoonful, your work will complete. 
Twenty minutes of baking are needful to bring 
To the point of perfection this "awful good thing." 

To eat at the best, this remarkable cake — 

You should fish all day long on the royal named lake, 

With the bright water-glancing in glorious light, 

And beauties unnumbered bewildering your sight. 

On mountain and lake, in water and sky, 

And then when the shadow falls down from on high. 

"Seek Sabbath Day Point" as light fades away — 

And end with this feast the angels long day. 

Then, then you will find without any question 

That an appetite honest waits on digestion. 

ENGLISH BREAKFAST CAKE. 

One cup milk, one tablespoonful of butter^ one tablespoonful 
sugar, one egg, one pint flour, one teaspoonful cream tartar, 
one-half teaspoonful soda. 

BREAD GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Mrs. LeRoy. 

Put three slices of dried bread to soak over night in some milk. 
In the morning add two eggs well beaten, one teaspoon of soda, 
a good cup of flour and a little salt. 

SOUR MILK GRIDDLE CAKES. 

One quart of sour milk, one large teaspoonful soda, one tea- 
spoonful salt, two eggs, flour enough to make a thin batter. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Mrs. Hayes. 

One quart warm water, one-third teacup syrup, one teaspoon- 
ful salt, one half cup yeast. Make as thick with graham flour 
as can be stirred with a spoon. 



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Chicago. 



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All our Goods are Home Made. Wedding and Party orders a Specialty. 



BREAD, ETC. 71 



GRAHAM BREAD. 

One pint yeast, same as nsed for Avhite bread, stir in a pint of 
warm water and a little salt, then add graham flour unil you 
have a thick batter. Bake fifteen minutes longer than the same 
size loaf of white bread. It will not rise as much as other bread. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Take the "sponge'"' of white bread when light, enough for one 
loaf or two, as you wish, and mix in "enough graham flour to 
make a moderately stiff loaf; place in a pan, and, when light, 
bake. You can add a little sugar or molasses if you like. Can 
also make very nice rye bread in the same way. 

GRAHAM BREAD. 

Grraham three quarts, two quarts warm water, one half pint 
yeast, one teaspoonful soda, one half pint sugar. Mix with a 
spoon. Pour into deep tins, well greased, and set in a warm 
place till quite light. Bake with a steady moderate heat two 
hours. This recipe makes three good loaves. 

GRAHAM PUFFS. 

One egg, one pint sweet milk, one pint graham flour and a 
pinch of salt; beat the egg thoroughly; add the milk, then the 
flour gradually; l)eat the whble mixture briskly with an egg 
beater; pour into cast-iron gem pans, well greased and piping 
hot; bake in a very hot oven. This mixture is just sufficient 
foE twelve gems. 

GRAHAM PUFFS. 

Sift together one and one half pints of graham flour, one 
teaspoonful of salt and three teaspoonfuls of baking powder. 
Mix with this one pint of milk and two well-beaten eggs until 
a smooth batter is obtained. Fill cold, well greased gem pans 
half full with the batter, and bake in a hot oven for ten 
minutes. 

GRAHAM CAKES. 

Mrs. Raymond, Boston. 

One cup graham, one cup flour, one egg, one cup of milk, 
a little salt and sugar. 



72 BREAD, ETC. 



GRAHAM OR RYE MUSH. 

Stir graham or rye meal into boiling water, with a little salt, 
till quite thick; cook a few minutes. This is very nice either 
with poached eggs or butter and sugar. 

OATMEAL MUSH. 

Soak the oatmeal over night in enough water to wet it, in 
the morning stir into boiling water. Cook a few minutes. 

CRACKED WHEAT. 

Stir five large heaping spoonfuls of the crushed white wheat 
sold by grocers into a quart of boiling water, and set the tin 
pail holding it into a pan of boiling water to cook twenty 
minutes. This prevents it burning, and is a cheap and easy 
substitute for a farina kettle. Salt well, and when the kernels 
have swelled and burst like popcorn it is done. Serve it plain 
to eat with meat and gravy like rice, or add half a teaspoonful 
of cinnamon, a pinch of ground cloves, a handful of raisins or 
currants, and a half cup of sugar while boiling, and you have 
a savory breakfast dish. Sometimes we serve it plain in saucers, 
with a dust of cinnamon on the top, and sugar and utter or 
cream, as German pancake is eaten. 

GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Three cupfuls of "Cerealine," one teaspoonful salt, one egg, 
two cupfuls of milk, one teaspoonful baking powder. 

Mix the salt and bakiug powder thoroughly with the 
"Cerealine;'' add the well-beaten egg to the milk, and pour on 
to the Cerealine Flake; stir all together until well mixed; fry 
on a well gi'eased griddle, over a good fire; fry to a nice brown 
on one side, and then turn and fry as before and serve hot with 
maple syrup. 

HOMINY BALLS. 

One cup of fine hominy, boil until thoroughly cooked. 
When cold, add one beaten egg and a small piece of butter, 
a little salt. Make into balls by flouring the hands. Drop into 
a kettle of hot lard. To be eaten with maple syrup. 



BREAD, ETC. 73 



HOMINY BREAD. 

Mrs. H. J. Jones. 

Take cold boiled hominy (grits) and add one egg, teaspoon of 
butter, salt to taste, and milk to make like pudding batter. 
Bake in a baking dish for breakfast. 

BAKED HOMINY GRITS. 

Miss Lovejoy. 

One quart milk, one cup grits, two eggs and salt. When 
the milk and salt boil, stir in grits and boil one half hour. 
When cool beat the eggs, and beat them well into hominy. 
Bake one half hour. 

MUFFINS. 

One pint of milk, three tablespoonsful of yeast, make a thin 
batter. In the morning add one egg and one spoonful of sugar. 
Bake in cups. 

MUFFINS. 

Mrs. H. L. Hammond. 

Three-quarters pint milk, one pint flour, one heaping tea- 
spoonful baking powdef, one-half teaspoonful salt, two eggs, 
butter size of an egg. 

EGOLESS MUFFINS. 

Mrs. Oakley. 

Half a cupful of butter, two cupsful of sweet milk, three tea- 
spoonsful of baking powder, one scant quart of flour, a pinch of 
salt, a quarter of a cupful of sugar. 

MUFFINS ENGLISH STYLE. 

One pint of "Cerealine," a little salt, two and one half tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder, one and three-fourths pints of flour, 
one tablespoonful sugar, one and one-fourth pints of light 
cream. Sift the flour, salt, sugar and baking powder together; 
add the milk and "Cerealine," and mix into a smooth batter, a 
little stiffer than for griddle cakes; have the griddle heated 
evenly all over; grease it and lay the muffin rings on the grid- 
dle; fill them half full, and when risen well up to the top of 



74 BREAD, ETC 



the rings, turn them over gently with a cake turner; they 
should not bake brown, but of a nice buff color; when all are 
cooked, pull each one open in half, and toast delicately; butter 
well, and serve on folded napkin, piled high and very hot. 

QUICK MUFFINS. 

One cup milk, one cup flour, one egg, well beaten, salt. Have 
your gem-irons very hot; fill one-half full and bake quickly. 
These are delicious with good butter and maple syrup. 

RAISED MUFFINS. 

Two large tablespoons of sugar, one tablespoon of butter, 
beat together, add two eggs, well beaten, a good pinch of salt, 
dissolve one-half cake yeast in one pint of warm milk, stir all 
together, add enough flour to make a stiff batter. Make up the 
muffins as late as possible in the evening, let rise over night. 
About an hour before breakfast, put in well greased muffin 
rings; let rise about half an hour; bake twenty minutes in a 
quick oven. Fill the rings about half full. 

SWISS MUFFINS. 

One quart flour, two eggs, one teaspoon sugar, one tablespoon, 
lard, one tablespoon butter, one-half cup yeast; mix well with 
one cup milk. Let it rise, work and roll out about half an inch 
thick. Cut one larger than the other, place small one on top, 
with melted butter between. Let rise and bake. 

OATMEAL CAKES. 

One cup rather fine oat-meal; three cups water, stirred 
together and allowed to swell. Butter a pie-tin, and turn the 
batter in, and bake half an hour, or until a rich brown. Salt, 
of course. 



BREAD, ETC. 75 

OATMEAL GEMS. 

Take one cup of oat-meal and soak it over niglit in one cup 
of water; in the morning add one cup of sour milk, one tea- 
spoon of saleratus, one cup of flour, a little salt. They are 
baked in irons as other gems and muffins. If on first trial you 
find them moist and sticky, add a little more flour, as some 
flour thickens more than others. 

ROLLS. 

Mrs. Hammond. 

At noon, take two quarts of flour, and put into it one large 
tablespoonful of lard. Make a hole in the center and set it 
away. At night, take one cup of yeast, one half cup white 
sugar, and mix thoroughly with a pint of cold boiled milk. 
Add a little salt, and pour into the hole in the flour, and set 
away until morning, without stirring. Then with a stiff knife 
work in the flour, but do not knead. Let it set until it rises, 
then knead and roll out thin as doughnuts; cut out and fold 
together and set away to rise. Do not let the rolls touch when 
in the pan. 

CINNAMON ROLLS. 

Take a piece of pie crust, roll it out, cut it in narrow strips, 
sprinkle cinnamon over it, roll it up tight, put it in a clean tin 
pan, which has been well oiled with butter, brown nicely and 
bake.- Then serve on the table. 

FRENCH ROLLS. 

Into one pound of flour rub two ounces of butter and the 
whites of three eggs, well beaten ; add a tablespoonful of good 
yeast, a little salt, and milk enough to make a stiff dough; cover 
it and set it in a warm place till light, which will be an hour or 
more, according to the strength of the yeast. Cut into rolls, 
dip the edges into melted butter to keep them from sticking to- 
gether, and bake in a quick oven. 



76 BREAD, ETC. 



OSCAR WILDE ROLLS. 

Mrs. W. A. Hammond. 

Two teacups raised dough, one-half teacup sugar, two table- 
spoonfuls butter, one egg. Mix thoroughly and roll out about 
an inch thick. Cut in strips about an inch wide. Commence at 
one end of a strip aud wind the strip round the center like a 
mat. Set them in a warm place for twenty minutes. Bake in 
a hot oven. About five minutes before they are done brush over 
the tips with sugar and water. Very good. 

PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

One pint scalded milk. Let it cool, and add two tablespoons 
sugar, two of lard, two of yeast, a little salt. In winter mix in 
batter over night, in morning knead; set to rise again, and at 
noon roll out very thin, cut in large rounds, put on a piece of 
butter and lay the dough over. Let it rise again, and bake for 
tea. In summer mix early in the morning instead of at night. 

TEA ROLLS. 

One tablespoon butter, one quart flour, two teaspoonsf ul bak- 
ing powder, one-half teaspoon salt; milk to make a soft dough. 
Warm the butter, mix the baking powder into the flour, mix 
well together, and then turn out on the board aud knead to 
make it smooth; roll out one-half inch thick and cut with a 
large round cutter, then fold each one over to form a half-round, 
wetting a little between the folds to make them stick together; 
place them apart on the buttered pans, wash them over with 
milk so as to give them a gloss, and bake immediately in a hot 
oven twenty minutes. 

RYE TEA CAKES. 

One pint sweet milk, two eggs well beaten, one tablespoonful 
brown sugar, one-half a teaspoonful of salt; stir into this suf- 
ficient rye flour to make it stifE as common griddle-cake batter. 
Bake in gem pans one-half an hour. Serve hot. 



BBEAD,ETC. .77 

TEA BISCUITS. 

Two and one-half pounds flour, three ounces butter, two tea- 
spoonsful baking powder, one pint milk, a pinch of salt. Rub 
butter, flour and baking powder; then add the milk, roll it out 
one inch thick, cut out, bake in hot oven. 

HUCKLEBERRY CAKE. 

Mrs. C. C. Fisher. 

Two-thirds cup of sugar, one tablespoon of butter; cream the 
two together; two-thirds cup of milk, two cups of flour, one egg, 
two and one-half teaspoons of Horsford's baking powder, one 
pint of huckleberries (dry); rub the berries in flour to prevent 
settling. 

RYE CAKES. 

Mrs. Raymond, Boston. 

1 cup of milk, one quarter cup of sugar, one half cup of 
butter (small), one egg^ one pint rye meal, one teaspoonful of 
cream tartar, one half of soda. 

RUSKS. 

Take enough of light dough and work in a teacup of sugar 
and nearly as much shortening, mould out same as for light 
biscuit. Or, take a cupful of yeast, half a cup of lard or but- 
ter, a little soda; knead together, and when it rises mould out, 
a ad raise again before baking. 

RUSKS. 

Rusks require a longer time for rising than ordinary rolls or 
biscuits. If wished for tea one evening, begin them the day 
before. In cold weather, to make up two and a half quarts of 
flour, mix into a paste with one pint of boiling water, two 
tablespoonfuls of sugar, three of flour, and two large Irish po- 
tatoes, boiled and mashed smooth. In the evening make up 
dough with this sponge, adding three well-beaten eggs, three- 
quarters of a pound of sugar, and half a pint of fresh milk. 
Set it away in a covered vessel, leaving plenty of room for it to 



78 BREAD, ETC 



swell. Next morning work into tlie risen dough, whicli should 
not be stiff, a quarter of a pound of butter and lard mixed. 
Make into rolls or biscuits, and let the dough rise for the 
second time. Flavor with two grated nutmegs or half an ounce 
of pounded stick cinnamon. When very light, bake in a 
quick, steady oven till of a pretty brown color; glaze with the 
yolk of an egg, and sprinkle lightly with powdered white 
sugar, 

FRENCH TOAST. 

Two-thirds of a pint of milk; one egg well beaten; a little 
salt. Take six slices of bread, dip into custard (uncooked) one 
by one; then fry in a little butter till a delicate brown. For 
sauce, melted sugar with a little cinnamon added. This is very 
nice, and a good way to use up stale bread. A good lunch dish. 

CHEESE TOAST. 

Melt new cheese in a buttered pan in a hot oven; when 
melted stir in mustard and cayenne pepper; pour over fried 
toast and serve. 

RICH WAFFLES. 

Make a thin paste with eight ounces of flour, six of pulver- 
ized sugar, two eggs, a few drops of essence to flavor, one-half 
a liquor glass of brandy or rum, and milk. Warm and butter 
both sides of the mold, put some of the paste into it; close it 
gently, set it on the fire, turn it over to heat both sides equally, 
dust them with sugar when done, and serve either warm or cold. 
It takes hardly a minute for each, Avith a good fire. 

WAFFLES. 

One pint of milk, three eggs beaten separately, two teaspoons 
baking powder, one tablespoon melted butter, a little salt, flour 
enough for a pretty stiff batter. 



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PASTRY, PIES. 



^'■For nothing lovelier can he found in woman than to study household good, 
and good luorks in her husband to promote-'''' — Milton. 



One pound of sifted flour, one pound of fresh butter, two tea- 
spoonfuls of cream of tartar, one teaspoonful of soda, a little 
water. 

Work one-fourth of the butter into the flour until it is like 
sand; measure the cream of tartar and the soda, rub it through 
a sieve, put it to the flour, add enough cold water to bind it, and 
work it smooth; dredge flour over the pasteslab or board, rub a 
little flour over the rolling-pin, and roll the paste into about 
half an inch thickness, spread over the whole surface one-third 
of the remaining butter, then fold it up; dredge flour over the 
pasteslab and rolling-pin, and roll it out again, then put another 
portion of butter, and fold and roll again, and spread on the 
remaining butter, and fold and roll for the last time. 

A LIGHT PUFF PASTE. 

One pound butter, one p lund flour, mix the flour with one- 
quarter of the butter, by rubbing it together and add enough 
cold water to make it the consistency of bread dough, roll this 
out to the thickness of one-half inch, put the balance of the 
butter on this in one lump and fold the four corners of the 
dough over the butter, entirely covering it, then roll it out to 
the thickness of one-quarter inch as nearly oblong as possible ; 
then fold the ends over to the center until the sheet is about 
four inches wide; then roll it out again. Let it rest one-half 
hour each time and roll it out four times. 
(9) 



80 PASTRY, PIES 



PUFF PASTE. 

One cup cerealine, two cups butter, one teaspoon baking 
powder, one large cup of ice-water, three cups sifted flour, 
yolk of one egg, a little salt. 

Sift tlie flour witli the baking powder ; place it on a pastry- 
slab or moulding-board, then add the cerealine, and mix 
thoroughly ; form the w^hole into a ring, place the egg-yolk and 
salt in the center. 

Adda little ice-water, and from the inside of the ring gradu- 
ally take flour, and adding ice-water every time until you have 
a smooth, firm paste, very tenacious and lithe. Place it on ice 
for fifteen or twenty minutes, then roll out to the size of a 
dinner plate. Work the salt and buttermilk all out of the 
butter, and cut the butter in small pieces, and place on the 
dough. Work the edges of dough over the butter, carefully 
covering it. Turn it upside down, and roll it very thin ; turn it 
back again, aijd fold into a three square. Repeat the rolling 
and folding three times. 

Between each turn or operation of folding and rolling, put 
the dough on a thin tin on ice. As soon as it chills it will roll 
easily. 

CHERRY PIE. 

Choose fair ripe cherries, the large black English being the 
best for this purpose ; wash and look them over carefully, fill 
the pie-plate evenly full, strew sugar over the top, dredge in 
plenty of flour, cover with a moderately thick upper crust, and 
bake one hour. 

COCOANUT PIE. 

Put a cup of cocoanut to soak in sweet milk as early in the 
morning as convenient. Take a teacup of the cocoanut and 
put it into a coffeecup, and fill up with milk. When ready to 
bake take two tablespoons of flour, mix with milk, and stir 
in three-fourths of a cup of milk (or water), place on the 
stove, and stir until it thickens. Add butter the size of a 



PASTRY, PIES. 81 

walnut while warm. When cool add a little salt, two eggs, 
saving out the white of one for the top. Sweeten to taste. 
Add the cocoanut, beating well. Fill the crust and bake. 
When done, b.ave the extra white beaten ready to spread over 
the top. Return to the oven and brown lightly. 

NO. 2. 

Open the eyes of a cocoanut with a pointed knife or a gimlet, 
pour out the milk into a cup, then break the shell and take out 
the meat and grate it fine. Take the same weight of sugar and 
the grated nut and stir together ; beat four eggs, the whites and 
yolks separately, to a stiff foam, mix one cup of cream and the 
milk of the cocoanut with the sugar and nut, then add the 
eggs and a few drops of orange or lemon extract. Line deep 
pie-tins with a nice crust, fill them with the custard, and bake 
carefully one-half an hour. 

CUSTARD PIE. 

Line your plate with pie crust, and fill it with a mixture of 
three eggs, one pint milk, one-half teacup of sugar, bake it in a 
medium hot oven, flavor with mace. For cocoanut pie, use the 
same custard as for custard pie, but put cocoanut in the plate 
before you pour the custard on it. 

FRUIT PIE. 

Line a soup plate with a rich paste, and spread with a layer 
of strawberry or raspberry preserves, over which sprinkle two 
tablespoons of finely chopped almonds (blanched of course), 
and one-half ounce of candied lemon peel cut into shreds. Then 
mix the following ingredients: One-half pound white sugar, 
one-fourth pound butter, melted, four yolks and two whites of 
eggs and a few drops of almond essence. Beat well together 
and pour the mixture into the soup plate over the preserves, 
etc. Bake in a moderately-warm oven. When cold sprinkle 
or sift a little powdered sugar over the top. A little cream 
eaten with it is a great addition. 



82 PASTE Y, PIES. 



LEMON PIE. 

Mrs. McHcnry. 

Two lemons, rind of one grated, two tablespoons melted 
butter, four eggs, one and one-half cups sugar, three-fourths 
cup water, two tablespoons corn starch. Reserve for frost- 
ing whites of two eggs, three tablespoons sugar. 

LEMON PIE. 

Mrs. C. E. Elmes. 

Yolks of two eggs, one cup of sugar, one and a half cups of 
water, one large lemon, three and one half tablespoons of 
flour. Line the pie-pan with crust and bake. Mix the flour 
with water, then add the other ingredients with it and boil it 
until it thickens, stirring constantly. Pour this mixture into 
the crust. Beat the whites of the eggs with half of the sugar 
and put on the top and brown in the oven. 

LEMON CUSTARD PIE. 

Mrs. J. R. Lyons. 

One and one half cups water, two tablespoons cornstarch 
dissolved in a little cold water, and stirred into the water while 
boiling. The grated rind and juice of one large, or two small 
lemons; three eggs, save out whites of two for frosting, beat 
the remainder, with one cup of sugar, to a light cream ; mix all 
thoroughly together, and when cold put into a crust, pieviously 
baked. Beat whites with a small tablespoon of sugar to each 
white, and spread over top. Brown in the oven. 

ORANGE PIE. 

Take the juice and rind of one orange; one small cup of 
sugar, yolks of three eggs, one tablespoon of corn-starch, made 
smooth with milk; piece of butter as large as a chestnut, and 
one cup of milk. Beat the whites of the three eggs with sugar, 
and place on the top after the pie is baked — leaving in the oven 
until browned. 



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PASTRY, PIES. 83 



ORANGE PIE, No. 2. 

Take four good-sized oranges, peel, seed, and cut in very small 
pieces; add a cup of sugar and let stand; into a quart of nearly 
boiling milk stir two tablespoons of corn-starch mixed with 
a little water, and the yolks of three eggs. When this is done, 
let it cool, then mix with the oranges. Put it in simply a lower 
crust. Make a frosting of the whites of the eggs and one-half 
cup sugar. Spread it over top of pies, and place for a few 
seconds in the oven to brown. 

ORANGE PIE No. 3. 

Grate the rind of a large, sweet orange; squeeze the juice and 
press off the pulp, picking out the seeds. Cream one-fourth of 
a cup (or butter), one-half cup sugar, one egg beaten light, one 
tablespoon of flour rubbed smooth in one-half cup of water. 
Stir in the orange, and bake with two crusts. In this, as indeed 
in all cooking, judgment must be used, as oranges vary in size 
and sweetness ; but these are the usual proportions, and are suf- 
ficienl; for an ordinary-sized pie. 

PEACH AND APRICOT PIES. 

Line your plate with pie crust, pare the fruit and lay it in the 
plate nicely sliced, fill the pie well, cover it with a piece of well 
greased paper and bake it. When done, put enough sugar on it 
to suit your taste. This pie will be nice if you beat four whites 
of eggs stiff and mix one-half cup powdered sugar in it; put 
this on top and bake it in a hot oven until it gets a little color. 

LEMON PIE. 

Juice and grated rind of one lemon, one cup of water, two 
tablespoons of corn-starch, one cup of sugar, one egg, a small 
piece of butter; boil the water, wet the corn-starch with a little 
cold water and stir it in ; when it boils pour it over the sugar 
and butter; when cold, add the egg and lemon. Bake with two 
crusts. 



84 PASTE Y, PIES, 



MINCE MEAT. 

Mrs. Wiswall. 

Five and one-half pounds of meat before boiling, two and one- 
quarter pounds suet, two and one-half pounds stoned raisins, 
one and one-half pound currants, three-quarters of a pound of 
citron, small, thin pieces, two pounds brown sugar, one-half 
pint good molasses, one pint brandy (nearly a quart), one pint 
white Avine (Madeira), one-quarter cup each of salt, cinnamon, 
allspice; one and one-half nutmeg, one-half tablespoon mace. 

MINCE fViEAT. 

Three pounds meat (after it is boiled), four pounds suet, 
three and one-half pounds raisins, one and one-half pounds 
currants, one-half pound dried cherries, and mace to your taste. 
Four pints of white wine, one pint brandy, four pounds brown 
sugar. 

MINCE MEAT. 

Six cupfuls beef, twelve cupfuls apples, three cupfuls sugar, 
two cupfuls molasses, two cupfuls butter, two pounds raisins, 
one quart cider, three tablespoons cinnamon, two tablespoons all- 
spice. 

CREAM RASPBERRY PIE, 

Puff paste, one quart of raspberries, sugar to taste, a good 
teacup of milk, a pinch of soda, half a teaspoon of corn 
flour, one tablespoon of white pounded sugar, whites of two 
eggs. Line a pie-dish with puff paste, and fill with raspberries, 
sweetened to taste. Cover with pastry, but do not press this 
down at the edges ; also rub the edge of the lower crust to pre- 
vent adhesion, and bake in a brisk oven. While it is cooking 
heat a small teacup of milk, with a pinch of soda in it, and stir 
into it the corn flour, which should be previously wetted with a 
little cold milk, add the white sugar, and cook for three minutes, 
pour the mixture into a small basin, and beat in the frothed 
whites of two eggs, whip to a cream, and let it get cold. When 



PASTRY, PIES. 85 



the pie is taken from the oven, lift the top crust and pour in 
the cream you have made, replace the crust and set aside to 
cool. Sprinkle a little sugar over the top before serving 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

Mrs. E. J. Hill. 

Select a pumpkin that has a deep rich color, and firm, close 
texture. Stew and sift it. . One large pumpkin will make 
fifteen pies. Allow two eggs to a pie, and three or four quarts 
of milk. To this quantity, two teaspoons ginger, four of cinna- 
mon, twelve of allspice, two of cloves, and one nutmeg. Bake 
without cover in a good paste, quite slowly. 

RHUBARB PIE. 

Pare the rhubarb and cut it in small pieces, put in a sauce pan 
and cook it, applying a little sugar and sherry wine, for about 
ten minutes ; after it gets cold put it into the pie-dish and bake 
it. It will make a delicate pie if you just pare the rhubarb, cut 
it up, put it in the pie-dish, after being lined with pie crust, a 
good cup of sugar and cover it up with pie crust. 

RHUBARB PIE. 

Mrs. Ryer. 

Cut the plant in small pieces, scald in boiling water about 
five minutes, and then take the pan off. 

Add two cups of sugar, yolks of three eggs. Boil same as 
corn starch. Bake with one crust ; then cover tops with the 
whites of eggs well beaten. Bake again in hot oven about five 
minutes. 



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HOW TO COOK 

Meats, vegetables and everything edible in a most healthful and appetiz- 
ing style is an Art that all who pretend or aspire to be good housekeepers 
ought to acquire some knowledge of, if not become proficient in. It was 
the boast of Dumas (Senior), not that he could write most attractive works 
of fiction, but that he could beat any professional in Paris preparing 
maccaroni and many other dishes for the table. It is likewise an Art to 
know how to travel in the speediest, safest and most comfortable manner. 
Those only have acquired it who take the 

"GREAT ROCK ISLAND ROUTE," 

When journeying to any destination west, southwest or northwest from 
Chicago, or returning thereto in corresponding opposite directions. Its 
Fast Limited Express Trains (daily each way), save Five Hours on 
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Atchison, Leavenworth, and Kansas City, connecting at all those points 
(in Union depots) with fast trains through to California and Pacific Coast 
points. The Rock Island Passenger Equipment consisting of comfort- 
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rates) is unsurpassed by that of any other line in America. 

The CHICAGO, KANSAS & NEBRASKA R'Y, 

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and Kansas to the Indian Territory and beyond. This road is doing a 
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California Round Trip Excusions also daily. 

For tickets at lowest prices, sleeping car berths, maps, folders, copies 
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E. ST. JOHN. E. A. HOLBROOK, 

Geti'l Manager, Gen' I Ticket and Passenger Agent 

CZ:I-IICZ:A.<3^CD. 



PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, 
CREAMS, ETC. 



GENUINE APPLE'DUMPLINCS. 

The dumplings of our forefathers has been one of the neglected 
dishes of late years. The best way to make them, indeed the 
only old-fashioned " sure enough " way, is to pare and core very 
large apples, fill the hollow where the core is taken out with a 
little butter and sugar beaten together and flavored with nut- 
meg. Have ready some dough blankets made in the same Avay 
as tea biscuits, roll each apple in a blanket and join the edges 
by pinching them together. Then drop them into boiling 
water, cover them closely and boil steadily and uninterruptedly 
for about twenty minutes. The water must not stop boiling 
nor must the cover be removed uutil the dumplings are done. 
They should be served hot with hard sauce. 

STEAMED APPLE DUMPLING. 

Pare, core and slice thin four apples; make the paste of one 
tablespoon of butter, mixed in one pint of flour; two table- 
spoons baking powder, a little salt, and milk to form paste. 
Roll out and put the apples over the paste; roll up and steam 
two and one-half hours; eat with vanilla sauce. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Four eggs, two quarts of flour, two cups of sugar, one pint of 
currants, two teaspoons baking powder, three pints of milk, one 
teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon allspice, two quarts chopped 
apples; make in cone shapes, and fry in lard. 



88 PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 

APPLE FRITTERS. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

Pare and core the apples, and cut in slices about one-third of 
an inch thick; dip in the batter, and fry six minutes in boiling 
fat. Serve on a hot dish. Apples may be sprinkled with a little 
nutmeg, and let stand an hour before fried. Peaches, pears, 
pineapples, bannanas, etc., either fresh or canned, may be used 
for fritters. 

FRITTER BATTER. 

Mrs. H.H.Brown. 

One pint of flour, half pint milk, one tuljlespoon of butter, 
one teaspoon of salt, two eggs. Beat the eggs light; 
add the milk and salt to them; pour half of this mixture 
on the flour, and when beaten light and smooth add the remain- 
der of the butter; fry in boiling fat; sprinkle with sugar, and 
serve on hot dish. You can add two tablespoons of sugar to 
this batter when used with fruit. 

BOILED APPLE TAPIOCA. 

Mrs. Newell. 

Wash and soak over night one large cup of tapioca; boil in a 
farina kettle until very clear, with just enough water to cover 
it. Before you put the tapioca on to boil, pare six large apples 
and slice into a stewpan, put on top of apples two lemons 
sliced, removing the seeds; put on this one large cup of sugar, 
and just enough water to keep the apples from burning; set pan 
on the back of the stove, cook slowly until very brown. When 
tapioca is good and clean, mix both apples and tapioca together 
and mash through a colander. 

APPLE PUDDING. 

Mrs. D. W. Coan. 

Pare and slice enough sour apples to fill a round pudding dish 
holding a quart or little over; put two tablespoons of water 
into the dish with the apples; take two teaspoons sifted flour, 



PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 89 

two teaspoons baking powder, butter size of an egg; one egg 
beaten light, and enough sweet milk to mix the ingredients 
together into a very stiff batter; spread this over the apples 
evenly with a knife; bake in a moderate oven from one-half to 
three-fourths of an hour, and serve hot with cream and sugar, 
or any kind of sauce -which is preferred. It may be steamed. 

ENGLISH APPLE PUDDING. 

Paste, take twelve or fourteen apples, peeled, cored and sliced, 
and one and one-half cups of sugar. Line an earthenware dish 
with the paste, pack in the apples, sugar and extract, wet the 
edges; cover, pinch the edges closely together; place in a sauce- 
pan half full of boiling water; flavor to suit your taste. 

APPLE PLUIM PUDDING. 

Mrs. Ryer. 

Five large apples, chopped ; two cups of raisins, two cups of 
sugar, one cup of sweet milk, two cups of flour, two teaspoons 
baking powder, one-half cup butter, two eggs, pinch of salt; 
bake one hour. Serve with hard silver sauce. 

APPLE SNOW PUDDING. 

Take one-half pound of the pulp of soaked apples (seven or 
eight good sized), oue-half pound granulated sugar, and the 
whites of two eggs; beat the latter to a stiff froth; then add a 
little of the sugar, then apple alternately, until the whole is 
mixed; continue the beating until light like a sponge. Make 
a rich custard, put into a dish and pile the snow on top. This 
makes a beautiful dish and is very palatable. One quart of 
milk will make enough for twelve persons. 

BATTER PUDDING, BOILED. 

Two cups of "cerealine," one cup of flour, one-half teasj>oonof 
salt, one tablespoon of baking powder, two tablespoons of butter, 
one-half teaspoon of extract of lemon, three eggs, one pint of 



90' PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 

milk. Sift the flour, salt and baking powder together, add 
"cerealine;'' eggs, well beaten; extract and milk; mix into the 
batter as for mufiins; pour into a well-buttered mould; set in 
a saucepan with boiling water two-thirds up the sides of mould; 
steam one hour and serve Math brandy sauce. 

BARONESS PUDDING. 

Three-quarters of a pound of suet, three-quarters of a pound 
of raisins, weighed after stoned, three-quarters of a pound of 
flour, one-half pint of milk, one-quarter saltspoon of salt. 
Prepare the suet by carefully freeing it from the skin, and chop 
it finely; stone the raisins, and cut them in halves, and mix both 
these ingredients with salt and flour; moisten the whole with 
the above proportion of milk, stir the mixture well, and tie the 
pudding in a floured cloth which has been previously wrung out 
in boiling water; put the pudding into a saucepan of boiling 
water, and boil it for four hours. Serve with sweet sauce. 

BROWN BETTY. 

A layer of bread crumbs in a pudding dish, then a layer of 
tart apples pared and cut in pieces half an inch thick, sprinkle 
over them a tablespoon of sugar and small pieces of butter (not 
too much). Continue this until the dish is full, having the 
bread crumbs on the top. Pour in half a teacup of water, and 
bake one hour. Serve with butter and sugar sauce, or eat with 
sugar and cream — nutmeg if you like. 

CABINET PUDDING. 

Mrs. H. L. H. 

Use a perfectly smooth, plain mould. First butter the mould 
thickly with cold butter so that the fruit will stick. Arrange 
the fruit in wreaths, stars, leaves or any figures. Use rather 
dry fruit. French dried fruit make a nice pudding. Use half a 
pound of raisins, currants and citron for three pints. After the 
fruit is arranged, put on slices of cake, about quarter of an 



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PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 91 

inch thick, fitting it to the sides and bottom. Fill the mould 
with alternate layers of cake and frnit ; pour in slowly a plain 
custard made of six eggs, four tablespoons of sugar, one tea- 
spoon of lemon or vanilla extract. Mix the eggs and sugar, and 
add a pint of milk by heating two or three minutes. Steam the 
pudding by putting it in a pan half full of water and setting it 
in the oven. It will take about three-quarters of an hour to 
cook. 

CHERRY PUDDING. 

Mrs. H. H. Gregg. 

One quart pitted cherries and juice, three-fourth box Cox's 
Gelatine, seven tablespoons of granulated sugar. Put all on 
the range and bring to a boil. Take off and cool a little. Add 
a wineglass of cherry or juice c-f one lemon ; pour into a mould. 
When cold turn out on a plate, pour over all whipped cream. 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Lovejoy. 

One quart of milk, three tablespoons corn starch, one cup 
sugar, yolk of three eggs, three tablespoons grated chocolate, a 
little vanilla. Steam until stiff, then put on the meringue and 
brown slightly. Eat cold with cream and sugar. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

Soak one cup of cocoanut in milk. Rub one-half cup of 
butter with one cup of sugar, add three eggs, one cup of flour, 
a pinch of baking powder, and the cocoanut. Put this in a mould; 
set it in a pan of Avater ; put both in an oven three to four 
hours. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

Mrs. C. C. Fisher. 

One cup of sugar, butter the size of an egg, one-half cup of 
milk, two cups of flour, two teaspoons of baking powder, two 
eggs, vanilla flavoring. Sauce: One egg, one-half cup of sugar, 
one heaping teaspoon of corn starch, one pint of milk, flavor 
with vanilla. 

(10) 



92 PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 

DATE OR ANY FRUIT PUDDING. 

Mrs. Lovejo}'. 

One-half pound dates, one-half pound bread crumbs, five 
ounces of suet, six ounces of white sugar, two eggs, a little salt, 
and nutmeg to taste. Steam three hours. If dates are used, 
make a warm sauce, and flavor with vanilla. 

DELICATE PUDDING. 

One cup granulated sugar, one cup sweet milk, one egg, 
butter size of an egg, one cup raisins, two teaspoons baking 
powder, flour to make consistency of cake, steam in greased 
basin one hour. 

DELMONICO'S PUDDING. 

Heat a quart of milk to nearly boiling, reserve a little to wet 
three tablespoons corn starch, beat up the yolk of five eggs, 
with six tablespoons sugar, stir these into the corn starch after 
being dissolved in the milk, then add to the hot milk, and boil 
three minutes; then add one teaspoon milk. Turn this into a 
buttered dish and bake ten minutes. Beat up whites, add three 
tablespoons white sugar, and one-half teaspoon vanilla. Spread 
on pudding and brown. Eat cold with cream sauce. 

FAMILY STYLE PUDDING. 

Line a mould with stale bread, put some layer raisins in and 
bread on top, and fill the mould this way. After the mould is 
filled, pour a little custard on it and let it soak one hour, then 
cover it up and set it in a slow oven about two or three hours. 

ENGLISH PUDDING. 

Mrs. F. M. Chisholm. 

Three cups of flour, one cup of chopped suet, one cup of 
chopped raisins, one cup of milk, one cup of molasses, in which 
dissolve one teaspoon of soda, spice to taste. Steam four hours. 



PUDDINGS, CUSTAEDS, CREAMS, ETC. 93 

FIC PUDDING. 

One-half pound of butter, one-half pound of figs cut small, 
one-half pound of bread crumbs, one-half pound of sugar, four 
eggs, a little grated nutmeg. Put the butter and figs in a sauce- 
pan, and simmer fifteen minutes; crumb the bread fine and mix 
it with the sugar, eggs and nutmeg in a basin, and pour the 
butter and figs over them; when lukewarm, mix all together. 
Butter a pudding mould and steam three hours. Serve with 
any nice hot sauce. 

FIG PUDDING. 

Mrs. H. H. Gregs:. 

One pound of figs soaked until soft and then chopped 
fine, two coffee cups of bread crumbs, one cup of brown sugar, 
three-fourths pound chopped suet, two eggs, and a little salt. 
Steam two hours. 

FRITTERS. 

Five cups of "Cerealine,'' one pint of milk, two tablespoons of 
sugar, a little mace, a little lemon extract, one tablespoon of 
butter, one-half teaspoon of salt. Mix thoroughly and cook for 
five minutes; set in a cold pan; when cold cut in pieces; dip 
into batter and fry, and serve with powdered sugar. 

GRAHAM PUDDING. 

Take a pint of water and allow it to boil thoroughly — not 
simmer — then salt, and stir in very slowly Graham flour — which 
must be fresh and sweet — until quite thick; after doing so, 
remove to the back part of the stove, and let it boil slowly for 
fifteen minutes or more; it must be stirred at intervals to pre- 
vent burning. Serve nearly cold, with syrup or sugar and 
cream. 

INDIAN PUDDING. 

Into a quart of boiling milk stir Indian meal enough to make 
a thick batter, with a tablespoon of butter; when cold add four 
eggs well beaten, a tablespoon of ginger, a teaspoon of salt, and 
one-half cup of syrup; mix well and bake three hours in a brown 
earthen dish, buttered. 



94 PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 



BAKED INDIAN PUDDING. 

For a two-quart pudding use two teacups meal; moisten the 
meal with cold water; then pour over it one pint of boiling 
water; add one tablespoon of butter, two teacups of sugar, one 
cup of raisins, three eggs well beaten before adding, and fill up 
with sweet milk; season with whatever spice is preferred; bake 
slowly one-half an hour or more. 

BOILED INDIAN PUDDING. 

One and one-half cups sour milk, iwo eggs well beaten, one 
small teaspoon saleratus dissolved in the milk; then sift in dry 
corn meal until of the consistency as if for griddle cakes (per- 
haps a little thicker) ; stir in a teacup of dried fruit — cherries 
are the best; put in a bag and boil one hour. For sauce, 
sweetened cream flavored with nutmeg. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

Mrs . Lovejoy. 

One quart milk, two cups bread crumbs, one-half cup butter, 
one cup sugar, four eggs, one large lemon, juice and half the 
rind, grated; soak the bread in the milk, add the beaten yolks 
with the butter and sugar, rubbed to a cream, also the lemon. 
Bake in a buttered dish until firm, and slightly brown. Cover 
with the whites, a little sugar, and lemon juice. Brown slightly. 
Eat cold. An orange pudding may be made in the same way. 

MOLASSES PUDDING. 

Mrs. Willis Blackman. 

Three cups of flour, one each of molasses, melted butter and 
hot water, one teaspoon of soda; steam three hours, serve with 
a sauce of butter and sugar worked to a cream, with hot water 
to make it the proper consistency, and flavor with vanilla. You 
can make a fruit pudding of it by adding a teacup of raisins and 
one of currants. 



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PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS^ CREAMS, ETC. 95 

ORANGE PUDDING. 

Cut after peeling, and put into a pudding dish, six juicy 
oranges, if small use seven, put on them one cup of sugar, make 
a smooth, thick custard with one pint of milk, the yolk of three 
eggs, and one tablespoon of corn starch. This should be stirred 
constantly while boiling, when done pour it on the oranges. 
Beat the whites to a stiff froth, add one tablespoon sugar and 
put on top of all. Put the dish in a pan of water in the oven 
long enough for it to brown on top. To be eaten cold. Can 
be made the day before it is wanted. 

ENGLISH PLUM PUDDING. 

Nine eggs beaten to a froth, add flour sujfficient to make a 
thick batter free from lumps, add one pint new milk and beat 
well ; add two pounds of raisins stoned, and two pounds cur- 
rants washed and dried, one pound of citron sliced, one-fourth 
pound bitter almonds divided, three-fourths of a pound of 
brown sugar, one nutmeg, one teaspoon of allspice, mace and 
cinnamon, three-fourths of a pound beef suet, chopped fine; mix 
three days before cooking, and beat well again, add more miik 
if recjuired. If made into two puddings boil four hours. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

One quart of flour, one coffee cup chopped raisins, one teacup 
of currants, one teacup chopped suet, one-half cup candied 
lemon finely shred, one cup brown sugar, one teaspoon of salt, 
two of baking powder, and two cups of sweet milk. Sift 
the flour, put in the baking powder and salt, mixing thoroughly. 
Next add the raisins, currants and candied lemons, and incor- 
porate Avell with the flour, so they will not sink to the bottom, 
as they will always do unless mixed first with the flour. Then 
put in suet and sugar, and lastly the milk, and, after stirring 
well, put in a bag Avhich has been dipped in boiling water, and 
boil three hours. Do not let the fire get low so the pudding 



96 PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 

will stop boiling, and replenish always from a boiling teakettle. 
When done, put on a large platter, remove the strings, and 
turn the bagwi'ong side out — that is, pull it gently back and it 
will come off smoothly, if the bag is well scalded. Omit the 
lemon if you do not care for it so rich. Sauce: One cup 
sugar, one-half cup butter, one tablespoon of flour, and one 
egg ; melt the butter in the sauce-pan and stir in the flour until 
the whole is smooth, then stir in the egg, and pour upon this 
one pint of boiling water. By adding three tablespoons of 
brandy it becomes brandy sauce, or the juice and grated rind of 
a lemon, it is called lemon sauce. 

PLUM PUDDING. # 

Mrs. Austin Wiswall. 

Take ten soft crackers, ])ound them, put them iuto a quart of 
milk and let them stand over night. In the morning rub them 
through a colander. Beat up eight epgs, one pound of sugar, 
one cup molasses, one cup brandy, one pound suet, one table- 
spoon salt, one tablespoon nutmeg, one tablespoon mace, one- 
quarter pound citron cut in very small pieces, one pound 
currants, one and one-half pound stoned raisins, and half 
teaspoon cream of tartar, and one-fourth teaspoon soda, sifted 
into a scant tablespoon flour. Boil in a mould or cloth for five 
hours. Serve with a rich wine sauce. Sauce: Three cups 
sugar, one cup butter, and one-half tumbler wine, Madeira, 
poured hot over one egg, white and yolk beaten separately. 

BAKED PLUM PUDDING. 

Mix well in a large pan, half a pound of seedless fine raisins, 
the same quantity of currants, half a pound of bread crumb?, 
half a pint of boiling milk, half a pound of finely chopped suet, 
the yolks and whites of three well beaten eggs, a quarter of a 
pound of moist white sugar, an ounce of candied lemon, the 
same of orange and citron, half a grated nutmeg, with a small 
glass of brandy. Bake for one hour in a slow oven in a well 
buttered mould or dish. 



PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 97 

PRUNE PUDDING. 

Mrs. Boyles. 

One pound prunes soaked over night, and stewed soft in a 
very little water. Take the stones out, and chop a little with a 
spoon, add two tablespoons of sugar, and the whites of four 
eggs, beattn very stiff, stir well together. Bake fifteen minutes. 
Sauce: One-half pint sweet whipped cream, and the white of one 
egg beaten stiff. 

PRUNE PUDDING. 

Miss K. A. Bishop. 

Wash one pound of prunes, and soak over night with water 
enough to cover them; cook in the same water until very soft, 
take out the stones and rub through the colander to remove the 
large pieces of skin; heat again and when very thick add half a 
box of gelatine previously soaked in a little water, and a small 
teacup of sugar; take from the stove and add the well beaten 
whites of from three to five eggs (five making a much more 
delicious pudding). Serve cold wi h cream. It makes a very 
pretty dessert to put it in a glass dish, and put whipped cream 
upon it. 

RAILROAD PUDDING. 

One cup of molasses, one cup sweet milk, one cup suet, four 
caps of flour, one cup raisins, one cup currants (or all raisins); 
warm the molasses and stir in one teaspoon of soda; steam four 
hours. Flavor the sauce with nutmeg or currant jelly. If 
there is any left, it is just as good steamed over. 

DELICIOUS RICE PUDDING. 

Five pints of milk, one-half cup rice; put rice raw in the five 
pints of milk; sugar one and one-half cups, or to taste. Bake 
in an oven three or four hours. 



98 PUDDIKGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 



TAPIOCA CREAM PUDDING. 

Mrs. Lovejoy. 

Cover three tablespoons of tapioca with water and let it stand 
over night. In the morning boil until clear in one quart of 
milk with a little salt; beat the yolks of three eggs, stir them 
in with one cup of sugar, and half a cocoanut grated; let it just 
boil, stirring all the time; put in a dish, spread the beaten 
whites and a little sugar on top, and brown it. Eat cold. 

BOILED TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Soak until quite soft one cup of tapioca, then boil in milk enough 
to make it like jelly — perhaps fifteen minutes will suffice of 
steady boiling, constantly stirring; salt when put to soak. Pour 
out in moulds and eat with cream, sugar and currant jelly. 

BAKED TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

Soak eight tablespoons of tapioca in a quart of warm water or 
milk till soft; then add two tablespoons melted butter, five 
eggs well beaten, spice, sugar and wine to taste. Bake in but- 
tered dish and without lining. 

TAPIOCA PUDDING. 

One cup of tapioca, one quart of milk, soak three hours on 
the back side of the stove; when soft, and if too thick, add more 
milk, then one-half cup of white sugar, the yolks of two eggs, 
small spoon of butter, a little salt and nutmeg. Bake slowly for 
an hour. Beat the whites of the eggs as frosting, and serve 
with pudding when done, or to be eaten as sauce, which I think 
is nicer than putting it on top of the pudding. 

SACO PUDDING. 

Soak one cup of sago in warm water until it is swelled alike; 
add water as it thickens, keeping it warm on the back side of 
the stove; when all swelled peel six sour apples, core them, put 
them in the sago, sprinkle some sugar on top, bake until the 
apples are soft — say one-half an hour. To be eaten with cream 
and sugar. 



PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 99 

SPONGE CAKE PUDDING. 

Take three or four stale sponge biscuits, or as much stale 
sponge cake, and lay at the bottom of a well-buttered dish; beat 
well six eggs, and stir into them by degrees a pint and a half of 
boiling milk, three ounces of sugar, and a dessertspoon of grated 
lemon-peel; then add a tablespoon of brandy, pour the mixture 
over the cake, and let the pudding stand an hour. Then pour 
a little clarified butter over the top, cover it with sifted sugar^ 
and bake three-quarters of an hour. 

TRANSPARENT PUDDING. 

Beat eight eggs very we'll, put them into a stew-pan with half 
a pound of fine-powdered sugar, half a pound of fresh butter, 
the grated outer rind of one lemon, and the juice of three. Stir 
it over the fire till it thickens, then pour it into a basin to cool. 
Line the edge of a buttered pudding-dish with thin pufE-paste^ 
pour in the pudding, and bake for three-quarters of an hour in 
a moderate oven. It is a clear, light pudding, very good cold or 
hot. 

APPLE SAUCE. 

Mrs. Jas. Sm;'.le. 

Cook apples with very little water, and rub through a seive, 
then beat with an egg-beater, and when light, to pint and a 
half of sauce, add beaten whites of two eggs; put on ice. (Very 
good. ) 

DAINTY DESSERT. 

Mrs. C. E. Crandall. 

Grate a fresh cocoanut, beat whites of five eggs to stiff froth, 
add one pint thick sweet cream, and sweeten to taste. Beat 
together very light. Serve with cake and berries. 

LEMON TARTS. 

Line patty-pans with a rich crust, and bake (prick the bottom 
of the crust in each pan to let out the air), when done, fill with 
the recipe for lemon fiUinsr. and return to the oven for a few 
mmutes. 



100 PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 

CREAM TARTS. 

Line patty-pans with a rich pie crust, prick them and bake, 
set them away until serving time. Just before you wish to eat 
them, whip some rich cream, have the bowl set on ice while 
whipping the cream, add a little powdered sugar and vanilla, 
and serve. 

ALMOND CUSTARD. 

Mrs. J. Anderson. 

One pint of cream, oue-fourth pound almonds (pounded to a 
paste), three eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, one cup 
granulated sugar. 

Scald the milk, add the yolk, the sugar, the almond paste, 
and finally the whites, and boil, stirring constantly till it 
thickens. When almost cold, pour into cups, make a meringue 
of the whites of three eggs, and three tablespoons jDOwdered 
sugar, add any preferred extract, and heap upon each cup. 

"Make custards and blanc manges in the Arnold Steam 
€ooker." 

CONCORD CUSTARD. 

One quart of milk, yolks of four eggs, three heaping table- 
spoons corn starch, half a cup of sugar, half teaspoon salt, 
small piece of butter, flavor to taste. Boil, and turn into a 
pudding dish. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stiff froth, add 
one tablespoon sugar, spread over the top, and brown in the 
oven. Serve cold with jelly or preserves. 

RASPBERRY OR CURRANT CUSTARD. 

Make a rich syrup of a pint of raspberry or currant juice, 
poured over eight ounces of loaf sugar. Skim it, and stir 
gradually into it, over a very slow fire, the well-beaten yolks of 
six eggs, and continue to stir for five or six minutes, then pour 
it out, and as it cools, stir in by degrees half a pint of cream, 
and a tablespoon of lemon juice. Serve in cups. 



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PUDDIN'GS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 101 

LEMON CUSTARD. 

Beat the yolks of eight eggs for half an hour to froth, and 
strain them, pour over them a pint of boiling water, and the 
outer rind of two lemons grated. Make the juice of two lemons 
into a syrup, with three ounces of sugar, and stir into the 
custard. Then set it over the fire, adding a glass of Madeira, 
and half a glass of brandy, and stir till it thickens. Pour it out 
and stir till cold, then serve in cups. 

ORANGE CUSTARD. 

Pour over six ounces of sugar in a pan, the juice of six 
oranges, and let it simmer to a syrup, then pour it out to cool. 
Beat up very well the yolks of six eggs, and mix with a pint 
of good cream. Set them over a slow fire, and stir continually 
till the cvistard thickens and begins to simmer. Mix the 
syrup gradually, and stir a few minutes longer, then turn out 
and stir till cold, when it can be transferred to the custard-dish 
or cups. 

GOOD CUSTARD. 

Put into a sauce-pan a pint of milk and a pint of cream, with 
a stick of cinnamon, two peach-leaves, and the thin rind of half 
a lemon, and let it simmer half an hour. Then strain and put 
on again with three ounces of sugar. Beat very well the yolks 
of six eggs, and mix gradually with the milk, stirring continu- 
ally over the fire with a wooden spoon till it thickens, but 
do not allow it to boil. Pour it out and add a glass of 
brandy, continuing to stir it till cool ; then fill the custard cups 
and serve. 

A FLOATING ISLAND. 

Half fill a dish with rich custard; then place in the center a 
round slice of stale sponge cake, covered with any red jelly, 
then a smaller round of cake, each smaller than the last, and 
sweetmeats of varied colors, till you form a pyramid. Whip 
sweetened cream for the summit. 



102 PUDDINGS, CUSTAKDS, CREAMS, ETC. 

IRISH MOSS. 

Soak a scant handful of Irish moss in strong soda-water 
until it swells, then spueeze the moss until it is free from water, 
and put it in a tin bucket which contains six pints of sweet 
milk. Set the bucket in a large iron pot which holds several 
pints of hot water; stir seldom, and let it remain until it will 
jell slightly by dropping on a cold plate. Strain through a 
sieve, sweeten and flavor to taste. Rinse a mould or a crock with 
tepid water, pour in the mixture, and set it away to cool. In a 
few hours it will be palatable. Eat with cream and sugar — 
some add jelly. 

ARROW ROOT JELLY. 

Mrs. Brown. 

One pint water, one lemon, three spoons arrow root; slice 
the lemon in the water, let it scald; then strain, braid the 
arrow root with cold water, then stir in, adding a little salt; 
let it boil five minutes. This is especially nice in sickness. 

LEMON JELLY. 

Miss Bishop. 

Pour on one-half a box of Cox's gelatine two-thirds of a pint 
of cold water, and let it stand about one-half an hour; then add 
two cups of sugar, three of boiling water; the juice and rind of 
four lemons. Strain and set upon ice. Use this same recipe 
for wine jelly, with one cup of wine, and leaving out the lemon 
if desired. 

WINE JELLY. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

One box of gelatine, one quart of boiling water; let it stand 
until dissolved, stirring occasionally. One pint of sugar, ^one 
pint of wine (Sherry), juice of three fresh lemons, and rind of 
two; mix well, and strain through a sieve. This will keep 
several days. 

WINE JELLY, No. 2. 

One box of gelatine one pint cold water; let it stand twenty 
minutes; juice and rind of two lemons, two cups of sugar, one 
pint of cider (hard is preferred), strain through a muslin bag. 
This makes three pints of jelly. 



PUDDIN"GS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 103 

WINE SAUCE. 

One-half pound butter, yolks of two eggs, beaten well and 
creamed with butter; nine tablespoons nice brown sugar, two 
glasses of wine. Let it simmer on the fire a short time. 

FRENCH SAUCE. 

Cream half a pound of butter, and stir in half a pound of 
sugar; then add the yolk of an egg and a gill of wine. Put it 
on the fire, stir till it simmers. 

A NICE SAUCE FOR PUDDINGS. 

Half a pound of butter, eight tablespoons brown sugar, and 
the white of one egg. The butter must be creamed and the 
sugar beaten into it, then the eg^s; the wine poured gently in 
and stirred till the sauce is cold, then add the extract of nutmeg, 
Make it in a common sauce tureen, stirring all the while. Do 
not let it boil. Flavor with lemon or vanilla. 

PUDDINC SAUCE. 

Mrs. C. E. Ci-andall. 

One cup white sugar, one-half cup batter, beat together to 
cream, add one egg beaten very light. Beat together with egg- 
beater five minutes. Flavor, 

A DELICIOUS BROWN SAUCE. 

One-half pint of milk, one tablespoon of butter, two table- 
spoons of fiour, and two tablespoons of molasses. Boil ten 
minutes. 

A FINE FLAVORING. 

Miss Lovcjov. 

Orange rind grated and covered with alcohol, and set aside 
for some months. 

LEMON MERINGUE. 

Take one large sponge cake sliced, one quart of milk, three 
eggs, whites and yolks separate, five large tablespoons of 
pounded white sugar, two tablespoons of extract of lemon, and 
one-quarter of the rind of a lemon finely grated. Slice the cake 
and arrange it in a deep glass dish, then pour upon it a teacup 
(11) 



104 PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 

of hot milk to soak it. Beat the yolks of the eggs, and stir with 
them four tablespoons of sugar; heat the rest of the milk, and 
pour it upon the eggs by degrees, stirring all the time; return 
it to the saucepan, and continue stirring until it thickens; let 
it cool a little, add the flavoring and pour over the sponge cake. 
When perfectly cool, heap upon it a meringue made of the 
whites of the eggs, whipped to a stiff froth, sweetened with the 
other tablespoon of sugar, and flavored with extract of lemon 
and rind. The meringue should be made just before serving. 

MERiNCUES. 

One cup of granulated sugar to the whites of three eggs. Beat 
the eggs very stiff, mix a few drops of vanilla in the sugar, mix 
the sugar and eggs together as lightly as possible, then drop on 
buttered paper; cool oven so that they will dry before they will 
brown, and leave in the oven until they are dried. Then open 
the drafts to make the oven hotter so they will brown a little. 
Take one pint of cream, beat until stiff, put two meringues 
together like lady fingers with whipped cream between. Makes 
a delicious dessert. 

A BEAUTIFUL DESSERT. 

Five small tablespoons of corn starch, four tablespoons of 
sugar, four tablespoons of grated chocolate, one quart of milk. 
Put the milk on the stove and while it is heating mix the rest 
■of the ingredients in a bowl with a little cold milk; then pour 
into the hot milk and boil a few minutes until it thickens; pour 
into a mould and set aside to cool. Make a boiled custard of 
one quart of milk, five eggs, leaving out the whites of two; two 
tablespoons of sugar. When the pudding is cold turn it into a 
shallow glass dish or platter, and pour the custard, which must 
be cold, around it, leaving the pudding two or three inches out 
of the custard. Take the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff 
froth with two tablespoons of pulverized sugar, drop from a 
spoon about the size of kisses over the pudding and custard. 
Part of the eggs can be colored with cochineal syrup, and a 
small drop put on each kiss. 



PTDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 106 

LEMON HONEYCOMB. 

Put into a dish the juice of a good-sized lemon with two 
ounces of powdered sugar; whisk the white of one egg, a pint 
of cream, and an ounce of sifted sugar into stiff froth; skim it 
ofE as it foams, and lay it upon the lemon-juice till all of the 
cream is exhausted. Let it stand a day before you serve it. 
This is a cheap and pretty dish. 

MARYLAND FLOAT. 

Mrs. W. A. H. 

Whites of four eggs beaten to a stiff froth, half a tumbler of 
jelly or jam, one cup of fine white sugar. Stir the sugar and 
jelly together thoroughly, and then add the whites of the eggs 
gradually, beating all together. Eaten with cream. Apple 
sauce will do. 

BANANNA SOUFFLE. 

Cut fine banannas into slices lengthwise, as thick as a dollar; 
arrange them on a dish so that the ends of the long semi-circle 
slices meet and form a hollow centre. Pour over them a gill of 
sherry made very sweet with sugar and with which you have 
put one teaspoon of lemon juice; let them get ice cold, then fill 
the centre with whipped cream, piled high. This is delicious. 

OMELET SOUFFLE. 

Six whites and the yolks of three eggs, three ounces of pul- 
verized sugar, and a flavoring of lemon or vanilla. First beat 
the yolks and sugar to a light cream, and add a few drops of 
flavoring, then beat the whites to the stiffest possible froth. 
Have the yolks in a deep bowl, turn the whites over them and 
mix them carefully with a rotary motion. Turn them into a 
baking dish two or three inches deep, slightly buttered; smooth 
over the top, sprinkle over sugar, and put into a moderate oven. 
When it has risen well and is of a fine yellow color, it is ready 
to be served. It should be eaten at once, or it will fall. 



106 PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS, ETC. 

LEMON BUTTER. 

Juice of six fine lemons, rind of two beaten with the yolk of 
three eggs, one tablespoon butter, three cups sugar. Boil in a 
dish set in hot water until it thickens, 



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CAKES, ETC. 



*^Open thy mind to that which I reveal, and fix it there within; for 'tis not 
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— Dante, 



MEASURES AND WEIGHTS. 

One pint of sifted flour is one pound. 
One pint of white sugar is one pound. 
One tablespoon dry material is one ounce. 
Two tablespoons liquid is one ounce. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Miss Helen Hill. 

The whites of twelve eggs, one tumbler of flour, one and one- 
half tumblers of sugar, one small spoon of cream tartar, pinch 
of salt. Sift flour and sugar separately and together five times. 
Beat eggs to a stiff froth. Bake forty minutes in moderate 
oven. Make thin lemon icing for the top. No flavoring in 
cake. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

Mrs. Raymond . 

The whites of eleven eggs, one and one-half cups of granu- 
lated sugar sifted, one cup of flour sifted three times; then add 
one teaspoon of cream tartar to flour and sift again; one small 
teaspoon of vanilla. 

ANGEL CAKE. 

From Horsford's Cook Book. 

Take one cup flour and put into it one heaping teaspoon 
Horsford's baking powder, sift the whole four times. Beat the 
whites of eleven eggs to a stiff froth, and then beat in one and 
one-half cups sugar and a teaspoon vanilla. Add the flour and 



108 CAKES, ETC. 

beat lightly but thoroughly. Bake iu an ungreased pan, slowly, 
forty minutes. When done turn it over to cool; place some- 
thing under the corner of the pan so that the air will circulate 
underneath and assist the cooling. Cut it out when cool. 

ALMOND CAKE. 

Horsford's Cook Book. 

Blanch and pound in a mortar eight ounces of sweet and one 
ounce of bitter almonds ; add a few drops of rose-water or white 
of egg every few minutes to prevent oiling, add six tablespoons 
of sifted sugar and eight beaten eggs, sift in six tablespoons of 
flour, and work it thoroughly with the mixture. Gradually add 
a quarter of a pound of creamed butter, beat the mixture con- 
stantly while preparing the cake or it will be heavy, add two 
teaspoons Horsford's baking powder. Put a buttered paper 
inside of a buttered tin, pour in the mixture, and bake in a quick 
oven. Cover the cake with paper if the oven is too hot. 

MRS. ECKAROT'S ALMOND CAKE. 

Ten eggs, one and one-half pounds sugar, one-fourth pound 
grated chocolate, one-fourth pound choppel almonds, five 
ounces citron, one teaspoon cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one 
soup-plate grated white bread. Beat the yolks very light with 
the sugar half an hour, then add almonds and other ingredients. 
At last beat whites to a very stiff froth, and then bread 
crumbs, three tablespoons of brandy. Bake in medium oven. 
When baked spread jelly between layers. Ice with almond 
icing. 

BLACK CAKE. 

One pint molasses, one pint brown sugar, one pint of butter, 
one pint sour milk, three eggs, two teaspoons soda, cloves, nut- 
meg, cinnamon, one pound raisins. Make it very stiff, and bake 
in a slow oven. This will make two large cakes. 



CAKES, ETC. 109 



BLACK FRUIT CAKE. 

Mrs. E. J. Hill 

One pound brown flour, one pound brown sugar, one pound 
citron, two pounds currants, three pounds stoned raisins, three- 
fourths pound of butter, one teacup of molasses, two teaspoons 
mace, two teaspoons cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, one teaspoon 
soda, twelve eggs. This is an excellent recipe, and will make 
two large loaves. It will keep a year (if locked up.) 

CARAMEL CAKE. 

Mrs. A. D. Smith. 

One and one-half cups of sugar, one-half cup of butter, one cup 
of milk, two cups of flour, three eggs beaten separately, one and 
one-half teaspoons of Horsford's baking powder, one teaspoon 
vanilla. Frosting: Two-thirds cup of milk, two cups of sugar, 
piece of butter size of an egg. Boil ten minutes and beat until 
cold. Flavor with vanilla. The cake makes three layers on a 
good-sized jelly tin, put the frosting between the layers, and 
on top. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Mrs. C. L. Gould. 

Beat one cup sugar and one-half cup butter to a cream, add 
one cup milk, and add two cups of flour with three teaspoons of 
Horsford's baking powder mixed in the flour. Mix well, flavor 
and add whites of four eggs, beaten stiff. This is good for any 
large cake. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTING. 

One-fourth cake Baker's chocolate grated; melt it and add 
three tablespoons of milk, yolks of two eggs; thicken with con- 
fectioner's sugar; flavor with vanilla. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Mrs. O. L. Fox. 

Two cups sugar, one cup butter, one cup sour milk, five eggs, 
three cups flour, one teaspoon soda, two teaspoons of vanilla, 
one-fourth cake of chocolate grated. Beat butter and sugar to 
cream, add the yolks of eggs beaten. Heat the milk and choco- 
late enough to melt it, add soda and beat with the butter and 
sugar; add the flour and vanilla, and last the whites beaten stiff. 



110 CAKES, ETC. 



CITRON CAKE. 

Four eggs well beaten, one and one-half pounds sugar, three- 
fourths pound butter, one pint sweet milk, one and one-half 
pounds of flour, one-half pound citron. Cut in thin pieces well 
floured; two teaspoons Horsford's baking powder. 

CREAM CAKE. 

Three eggs, one cup of sugar, one-half cup of boiling water, 
two cups of flour, two teaspoons of Horsford's baking powder. 
Beat the sugar and eggs well together, then add the boiling 
water, and then the flour, to which has been added the baking 
powder; bake in three layers for about twenty minutes. Vanilla 
flavoring. 

CREAM FOR FILLING. 

One tablespoon of corn starch wet in a little milk, one cup of 
milk, one egg, sugar to taste. Put the milk in a basin to boil ; 
as soon as it boils pour in the corn starch which has been dis- 
solved in a little milk, let it boil about two minutes; then 
remove it from the stove, sweeten to taste with sugar, and flavor 
with vanilla. 

CREAM CAKES. 

One pint of milk, a little salt. Let it come to a scald, then 
stir in flour (which has been sifted three times) slowly until 
thick enough to mould; six eggs stirred in without beating, one 
by one, then drop into hot lard, fry brown; sand with pulver- 
ized sugar, to be sprinkled on while hot. A little spice if you 
like, mixed with the sugar. 

CREAM CAKE. 

Two tablespoons butter, two teacups sugar, three eggs, one- 
half teacup sweet milk, two tablespoons cold water, two teacups 
flour, two teaspoons of Horsford's baking powder; bake quickly 
on three or four round tins. The "cream" for same is one-half 
pint milk, one-half teacup sugar, small piece of butter, one egg, 




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STYLE AND CHARACTER OF THE WORK 
THE VERY BEST. 

Correspondence • Stationery. 

UNEXCELLED BY ANY STOCK 
IN CHICAGO. 

S. H. KIMBALL & CO.. 

5^2 West Madison Street, near Ashland Avenue. 

MOULT ON & CO., 

Fine • Groceries • and • Choice • Meats, 

Cop. Og*den Ave., Adams and Paulina Sts., 

CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 



CAKES, ETC. Ill 

one tablespoon of corn starch. Boil until very thick; when 
nearly cold flavor with vanilla. When the cakes are cool, put 
them together with it. 

CUP CAKES. 

One-half pound butter, three-quarters pound sugar, five eggs, 
one cup of milk, one-half pound flour, one spoonful Horsford's 
baking powder. Rub the sugar and butter well, then add eggs^ 
milk and flour last; fill this in small round mould and bake quick. 

DELICATE CAKE. 

Whites of four eggs, one cup of milk — very full, one-half 
cup butter, two cups sugar, two and one-half cups flour, heaping 
teaspoon Horsford's baking powder. This makes two loaves. 
If you want it eery nice, use one cup of corn starch in place of 
one of flour. 

COMMON DARK CAKE. 

Mrs. Rayniond, Boston. 

One heaping cup butter, two cups of sugar, one cup molasses, 
one large cup of milk, five eggs, teaspoon of soda, one teaspoon 
of each kind of spice, four and one-half cups of flour, currants, 
raisins and citron. 

DROP CAKES. 

One pint flour, one cup butter, one cup of sugar, four eggs, 
one-half cup of milk, one teaspoon of soda, two teaspoons 
cream tartar. Drop in tins. They are very nice if eaten when 
fresh. 

EXCELSIOR SUGAR GINGERBREAD. 

One and one-half cups of butter, three cups of sugar, one-half 
cup of sweet milk, with two-thirds teaspoon of soda, three tea- 
spoons of yellow ginger, two eggs, flour enough to roll out very 
thin. Cut in sc^uares, and bake twenty minutes. Sprinkle a 
little sugar over before baking. 



112 CAKES, ETC 



FIC CAKE. 

Mrs. Dr. Leroy. 

One cup of butter, two cups of sugar, three and one-half cups 
of flour, one-half cup of milk, whites of two eggs, two teaspoons 
Horsford's baking powder. Bake in layers. 

Filling. One pound of figs chopped fine, put in a stew-pan, 
pour over it one teacup of water; add one-half cup of sugar. 
Cook until soft and smooth. Let it cool and spread between 
the layers. 

FIC CAKE. 

Mrs. Willis Blackman. 

Silver part. Two cups of sugar, two-thirds of a cup of 
butter, two-thirds of a cup of sweet milk, white of eight eggs, 
three heaping teaspoons of Horsford's baking powder, 
thoroughly sifted with three cups of flour, stir sugar and butter 
to a cream, add milk, flour, and, lastly, whites of eggs. Bake 
in two layer cake pans. 

Gold part. One cup of sugar, three-fourths cup of butter, 
half cup of sour milk, one and one-half teaspoons of baking 
powder sifted in a little more than one and a half cups of flour, 
yolks of seven, and one whole egg thoroughly beaten, one 
teaspoon allspice and cinnamon. Put half of the cake in a layer 
cake pan, and lay on one pound halved figs (sifted over vi ith flour) 
so that they will just touch each other; put on the rest of the 
gold part and bake. Put the cakes together with frosting 
while warm, the gold between the white ones, and cover with 
frosting. 

FRENCH LOAF. 

One pound of flour, one pound of sugar, three-quarters of a 
pound of butter, one pound of raisins, one-half pound of cur- 
rants, eight eggs, one-half teaspoon of baking powder, one 
lemon juice and rind, one wine glass of wine, one nutmeg. Stir 
butter and sugar together, then add the lemon, the yolks, fruit, 
wine, nutmeg, and the whites beaten very light. Lastly add 
the flour. Stir as little as possible after it is all together. 



CAKES, ETC. 113 



SOFT GINGER CAKE. 

Mrs. Dr. Leroy. 

One cup sugar, two-thirds cup butter, one cup New Orleans 
molasses, heaping teaspoon soda put into the molasses, one tea- 
spoon ginger, three and a half cups of flour, cup of milk, two 
eggs, pinch of salt. Stir well ten minutes. 

COLD AND SILVER CAKE. 

One teacup white sugar, one-half teacup butter, whites of 
four eggs, two-thirds teacup sweet milk, two teacups flour, two 
teaspoons Horsford's baking powder; flavor. 

Gold Cake. — Same as above, using the yolks of the four eggs, 
and adding one whole egg. 

ICELAND WHITE FRUIT LOAF. 

Horsford's Cook Book. 

The whites of twelve eggs, two cups powdered sugar, one cup 
sweet cream, one-fourth cup brandy, one quart flour, two table- 
spoons Horsford's baking powder, two pounds chopped almonds, 
two cups of cut citron, two cups grated cocoanut, two teaspoons 
lemon extract. Bake until thoroughly done, in a moderately 
hot oven. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

Mrs. J. E Montrose. 

This is an elegant cake. One cup butter, two cups sugar, 
two cups flour, one cup corn starch, one cup sweet milk, whites 
of eight eggs, two large teaspoons Horsford's baking powder. 

Frosting. — Four cups sugar, one pint boiling water, cook 
until it looks like candy; beat whites of four eggs, pour the 
sugar over all, stirring all of the time; dissolve a lump of citric 
acid in a little cold water, then put a teaspoon of acid in icing. 

JELLY CAKE. 

One pound powdered sugar, one pound flour, twelve eggs, 
separate the white from the yolk and beat the whites to a stiff 
foam, then put the sugar in and stir it a little, put in the yolks 



114 CAKES, ETC, 



and the flour, mix lightly, put it in a pieplate and bake it; then 
fill the sheets with jelly aud ice the top of the cake with a mix- 
ture of ornamenting sugar and water. 

ROLL JELLY CAKE. 

Mrs. Dr. Leroy. 

One-half cup sugar, one and one-half cups flour, five eggs, 
whites and yolks beaten separately, three-fourths teaspoon of 
Horsford's baking powder, pinch of salt. This makes three 
thin cakes baked on long biscuit tins. While warm put jelly 
on under side and roll. Roll in clean wrapping paper and tie 
with a string to keep it in shape. 

LOAF CAKE. 

Mrs. D. W. Coan. 

Four pounds flour, two and one-half pounds sugar, two 
pounds shortening, two-thirds butter and one-third lard; one 
quart milk, five eggs, one-half ounce nutmeg, one-half goblet 
wine, one cake yeast, two and one-half pounds raisins. Mix 
butter and sugar to cream. Take half of this and mix with the 
flour and milk warmed, and yeast and let it stand until light. 
'Then mix in the rest of the ingredients, let it rise and bake. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

Light part: One cup butter, three cups of sugar, one-half 
cup of cream or milk, whites of seven eggs, two teaspoons of 
cream tartar, one of soda, and three and one-half cups of flour. 

Dark part: One cup of butter, two of brown sugar, one of 
molasses, two tablespoons of cinnamon, one of cloves and allspice, 
one of nutmeg, one-half cup of cream or milk, one-half tea- 
spoon of soda, yolks of seven eggs, five cups of flour. Butter 
your pan and put in a layer of dark, then a tablespoon of lights 
and alternate until all is used. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

Mrs. C. E. Crandall. 

White part: One cup pulverized sugar, one-half cup butter^ 
one-half cup sweet milk, whites of four eggs beaten stiff, two 
and one-half cups flour, two heaping teaspoons baking powder. 
Flavor. 



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Meats; cooking them as thoroughly as 
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President. 2ncl Vice-President. 

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1st Vice-President. A. Cashier. 

Paid in Capital, $200,000. Aythorized Capital, $1,000,000. 



PARK+NATIONAL^BANK, 



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498 West Ivladison Street, 

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ORDER WORK OUR SPECIALTY. 



C AKEa, ETC. 115 

Dark part: One cup brown sugar, one-half cup molasses, 
one-half cup sour milk, two and one-half cups flour, one tea- 
spoon soda in milk and molasses; yolks of four eggs, one-half 
cup butter rubbed with the sugar, one-half teaspoon cinnamon, 
allspice and cloves. 

MARBLE CAKE. 

Horsford's Cook Book. 

For the White portion: Take one cup of butter, three of 
white sugar, one of sweet milk, five of flour, one and one-half 
teaspoons Horsford's baking powder and the whites of eight 
eggs; mix properly, flavoring with lemon. 

For the colored portion: One cup butter, three of brown 
sugar, one of molasses, one of sweet milk, four of flour, three 
teaspoons Horsford's baking powder, the yolks of eight eggs 
and one whole egg; mix properly and flavor with cinnamon, 
nutmegs and cloves. Put into the pans first a layer of the dark 
part, and then a layer of the white part, and alternate thus until 
the pans are as full as you may desire. Let the last layer be 
dark. This is a very nice and good-looking cake. 

MOCK LADY CAKE. 

Mrs. Dr. Leroy. 

One-half cup of butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk, whites 
of four eggs, one-half teaspoon of soda, one teaspoon cream of 
tartar, three cups of flour, flavor as you please. 

MOLASSES DROP CAKE. 

One cup of molasses, three cups of flour, half a cup of butter, 
two teaspoons of extract of lemon, and one teaspoon of soda. 
Beat the ingredients togelher thoroughly, and drop in spoon- 
fuls upon a buttered tin. Bake five or six minutes. 

MOONSHINES. 

One quart of flour, one tablespoon of butter, one teaspoon of 
salt, one tumbler of ice water. Mix all together with a knife. 
Place on a moulding board as for paste, beat with the rolling- 
pin until perfectly smooth and flexible. Roll thin as a wafer, 
cut in rounds and bake in a flat tin. 



116 CAKES, ETC. 

ORANCE CAKE. 

Mrs. Raymond. 

The yolk of five eggs beaten well, two cups of sugar, one-half 
cup of cold water, the juice and rind of one orange, one tea- 
spoon of soda, two of cream tartar, two cups of flour, last of all 
the whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff froth. 

Frosting: The whites of two eggs and three cups of 
powdered sugar, the juice and rind of two oranges. Do not 
beat the whites for frosting. Split the cake and put between 
as well as on top. Bake in two sheets. (Very nice). 

NUT CAKE. 

Two cups of sugar, one of butter, three of flour, one of cold 
water, four eggs, three teaspoons of Horsford's baking powder, 
one and one-half cups kernels of hickory or white walnuts. 

NUT CAKE. 

One cup butter, two of white sugar, four of flour, four of 
sweet -milk, the whites of eight eggs, three teaspoons of Hors- 
ford's baking powder, two cups, hickory nuts picked out of the 
shell and cut up with a clean knife. 

POUND CAKE. 

One pound butter, one pound sugar, one pound flour, nine 
eggs beaten separately, one tablespoon of cream, one small glass 
brandy, a little nutmeg. Use either stoned raisins or currants. 

RAISIN CAKE. 

Cup of sugar, half cup of butter; add two eggs, two and a 
third cups of flour, one teaspoon of cream of tartar, one-half 
teaspoon of soda dissolved in a half cup of water, cup of 
chopped raisins, teaspoon of extract of lemon. 



CAKES, ETC. 117 



RIBBON CAKE. 

Horsford's Cook Book. 

Two and one-half cups of sugar, two and one-half cups of 
flour into which has been sifted two heaping teaspoons Hors- 
ford's baking powder, one cup butter, one cup sweet milk, and 
four eggs; divide into three parts. To one part add one cup 
raisins and one cup currants, spice to taste and bake. Then put 
the part with the fruit between the other two, spreading a very 
thin layer of jelly between. Frosting may be added if desired. 

SPiCE CAKE. 

Mrs. Rugg. 

One cup molasses, one cup sugar, two-thirds cup butter, one 
cup sour milk, three eggs, one teaspoon soda, one teaspoon nut- 
meg, one and one-half teaspoons cinnamon, one teaspoon cloves, 
three cups flour. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Mrs Raynionil . 

One-half pound sugar, five eggs, one-fourth pound flour, 
lemon juice. 

ENGLISH WALNUT CAKE. 

One cup butter, two cups sugar, one cup milk with one-half 
teaspoon soda, one teaspoon cream tartar, three and one-half 
cups flour, five eggs, one pound walnuts, leaving out a few to 
put on the frosting with the whites of two eggs. 

WALNUT CAKE. 

Mrs. S. M. Calig-ar. 

Three eggs; beat them two minutes; one-half cup sugar, beat 
five minutes; one cup cold water, two teaspoons Horsford's 
baking powder, two and one-half cups flour. 

Filling: Three cups sugar, three-fourths cup boiling water, 
— boil till crystalized, add whites of three eggs, beat to a froth. 
Beat until stone cold; then add one spoonful vanilhi. Bake in 
layers, spread frosting on each layer, sprinkle each with the 
broken nuts, decorate the top with half nuts. 



118 CAKES, ETC. 

WASHINGTON AMBROSIA. 

Mrs. Mortimer. 

Two cups sugar, one-half cup butter, three cups flour, seven 
eggs beaten separately, one-half cup sweet milk, three teaspoons 
Horsford's baking powder. Make in layers. 

Filling: Make a whiting of four or five eggs, and add the 
juice and pulp of two oranges, and one-half the grated pulp of 
one, beat or mix with the whiting and spread between layers. 
The above will make two cakes of three layers each. 

A VERY NICE WEDDING CAKE. 

Mrs. Raymond, Boston, 

One-fourth pound butter, one and one-half pounds of flour, 
one and one-half dozen eggs, leaving out one-half of the whites 
for frosting. One cup molasses, one dessert spoon of soda, two 
large tablespoons of nutmeg, two also of allspice, two and one- 
half of iloves, three and three-fourths of cinnamon, not quite a 
heaping one of mace, two wine glasses of brandy, one of wine, 
currants four and one-half pounds, also of raisins, citron, one 
pound. This makes two very large, or four small ones. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Mrs. Mortimer. 

One cup sugar, one-half cup butter, one-half cup sweet milk, 
whites of five eggs, two and one-half cups flour, two small 
Bpoons of Horsford's baking powder, extract of lemon. Can be 
baked plain or in layers with custard, cocoanut or anything 
between. For the custard take yolk's of four eggs, one table- 
spoon sugar, one-half pint milk; flavor with vanilla. 

WHITE AND FRUIT CAKE. 

Mrs. Mortimer. 

Whites of six eggs, three cups flour, one cup butter, one cup 
sweet milk, two cups sugar, tv^'o tenspoon.s of Horsford's baking 
powder; mix and divide into two parts; bake one-half in two 
pans; add to the other half one teaspoon ground cinnamon, one- 



CAKES, ETC. 119 

half teaspoon ground cloves, one tablespoon molasses, two table- 
spoons whisky, one small cup cut raisins, and a little citron. 
Bake in two layers and pile alternately with the white cake, 
spreading jelly between. 

COOKIES. 

Mrs. A. D. Smith. 

One cup butter, one cup sugar, three eggs well beaten, one 
teaspoon very full of Horsford's baking powder, flour enough to 
roll out. Flavor to taste. 

SOFT CINCER COOKIES. 

Two teacups New Orleans molasses, one teacup of melted 
lard, one teacup of boiling water, four teaspoons of soda bought 
in bulk, one teaspoon of ginger. Pour the boiling water on the 
soda. Do not knead too stiff. Bake with steady heat. 

CINCER COOKIES. 

Mrs. Xewell. 

One cup molasses, one cup sugar, one cup butter, one tea- 
spoon soda dissolved in boiling water, one tablespoon ginger. 
Flour to make stiff, roll thin and bake quickly. 

CINCER COOKIES. 

Mrs. Nathan Farwell. 

One cup sugar, one cup molasses, one cup butter, one cup 
sour milk, two eggs, two teaspoons scda, cinnamon and ginger. 
Wash the tops with beaten eggs. Roll, as soft as possible, half 
an inch thick. 

SUGAR COOKIES. 

Mrs. Ryer. 

Two cups of sugar, one cup of butter, one-half cup of sour 
cream, one-half nutmeg, three eggs, one scant teaspoon soda. 
Mix as soft as possible. 



120 CAKES, ETC. 

CREAM PUFFS. 

Mrs. Dr. Leroy. 

liloil together one pint of milk, three-fourths cup of butter. 
When boiling add two even cups dry flour. When cool add 
six eggs well beaten. Drop on a buttered tin from a spoon. 
Bake about one-half hour in a hot oven. It is necessary to have 
a bright tin. Make them small. 

(Jream for filling. Boil one pint of milk (add two eggs, one 
cup of sugar, one cup of flour beaten together), one teaspoon 
vanilla and a little butter. Cut a hole in the side of each puff 
and fill with the cream. 

CRULLERS. 

Mrs. D. N. Coan. 

One cup milk, two eggs, one and one-half cups sugar, two 
tablespoons butter, nutmeg, a little salt, two teaspoons Horsford's 
baking powder. Stir in flour till it is stiff enough to roll. Fry 
in lard. 

CRULLERS. 

One pint milk, one pint sugar, four eggs, one-half cup butter, 
two quarts flour, salt, three teaspoons Horsford's baking 
powder Flavor to taste. Fry in lard. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Mrs. Lovejoy. 

One quart milk, one and one-half pound sugar, one pound 
butter, four eggs, one nutmeg, one cup yeast. Set the sponge 
with the milk and butter. When light add the sugar, nutmeg 
and eggs, then raise again and fry. 

CINCERSNAPS. 

One coffee cup New Orleans molasses, one cup butter, one 
cup sugar; place them on the stove and let it come to a boil. 
Then take off immediately, and add teaspoon of soda, and a 
teaspoon of ginger. Roll thin and bake quickly. 



CAKES, ETC. 121 

JUMBLES. 

Mrs. H. L. Hammond. 

One-half pound butter, one-half pound sugar, half a nutmeg; 
then quarter of a pound flour and two eggs. Roll thin and 
bake. 

LADY FINGERS. 

Four ounces of sugar, four yolks of eggs, mix well; three 
ounces of flour, a little salt. Beat the four whites to a stiff 
froth, stir the whites into the mixture, a little at a time until 
all is in. Butter a shallow pan. Squirt through a confection- 
er's syringe or a little piece of paper rolled up. Dust with 
sugar and bake in a not too hot oven. 

MACCAROONS. 

One-half pound almonds, blanched; pound fine with one 
tablespoon of lemon extract (Col ton's), one pound of pow- 
dered sugar, whites of three eggs. Roll out, cut in small rounds 
and bake on a buttered paper on a thin board. 

MOLASSES COOKIES. 

One pint of molasses, one-half pint of lard and butter mixed. 
Boil these; add one teaspoon of soda, one tablespoon of extract 
of lemon. When cold add flour and roll thin. 

YANKEE PUFFS. 

Two ounces of butter, three tablespoons of sugar, three eggs 
(whites and yolks separate), three teacups of milk, three tea- 
cups of flour, one saltspoon of salt, one teaspoon of vanilla. 
Beat the butter to a cream, add the sugar and well -beaten yolks, 
then the milk, which should be salted, dredge in the flour by 
degrees, and when these are well mixed add the flavoring and 
whites of eggs, previously beaten to a stiff froth. Bake in well- 
buttered teacups, about fifteen or twenty minutes, till of a 
light brown. As these puffs rise very much, the cups must not 
be filled. Serve as soon as done with sweet sauce. 



122 CAKES, ETC. 

CHOCOLATE FROSTSNC FOR CAKES. 

One aud one-lialf pounds of sugar, half a pint of milk, a piece 
of butter the size of a nutmeg, two tablespoons of plain choco- 
late, scraped and mixed to a paste with boiling water. Boil the 
sugar, milk and butter seven minutes, then place in a bowl, 
add the chocolate paste, stir until the mixture becomes thick, 
then spread; should it become too hard to spread smoothly stir 
in a little boiling water. The above can be used for layer cake, 
and is sufficient for three layers. 

ICINC. 

Two and one-half cups sugar, two-thirds cup water; boil to- 
gether until it candies; then add the whites of three eggs, 
slightly beaten, stirring briskly for fifteen minutes, or until it 
seems perfectly smooth and white; then add the juice of one 
lemon. This is sufficient for one large Avhite mountain cake of 
eight or nine layers, covering also top and sides. , 

CHOCOLATE ICINC. 

Take the whites of two eggs, one and one-half cups powdered 
sugar and six large tablespoons of chocolate. 

CHOCOLATE FILLING. 

Whites of three eggs, one and one-half teacups of sugar, 
three tablespoons grated chocolate, one teaspoon vanilla. Beat 
the whites of the eggs well and add the other ingredients; then 
beat all together and spread between the layers and on top of 
the cake. 

ICINC. 

Miss K. A. Bishop. 

Cook one cup of sugar with water enough to cover it until it 
thickens, in cold water. Stir this into the well beaten white 
of one egg. This is sufficient for one large cake. 

m^ Packages, 10 cts. Trunks, 25 cts. BRINKS' CHICAGO CITY EXPRESS 
CO., Telephones 1754 & 1764. General Office, 88 Washington Street. "^S^ 



FAIRY SOAP 

Supepiof to any Imported Castile Soap 



FOR 



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MADE ONLY BY 

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Prescriptions Compounded 



WITH GREAT CARE AT 



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NEW DRUG STORE, 

(LYNEMAN'S OLD STAND.) 

660 Jackson St,, Corner Ogden Ave., 
Telephone 7075. CHICAGO. 



SANDS' PATENT TRIPLE (3) MOTION 

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H MOST PERFECT ICE CREAM FREEZER EVER MIDE. |i— 

It will thoroughly MIX AND BEAT THE CREAM during the Freezing 

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The Cream does not come in contact with any Galvanized surface; 
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The Beaters are Malleable Iron and Tinned. The Cans are made of 
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Warranted to freeze Cream in one-half the time of any other freezer in existence. 

For sale by The Chicago Stamping Co., 

10 TO 14 LAKE ST., CHICAGO. 



ICES, BLANC MANGE, ETC. 



" The full soul loafheth an honey-comb, but to the hungry soul every bitter 
thing is sweety 

— Proverbs 27-7. 



tCE CREAM. 

Georgie Hill. 

One quart of cream, whites of three egg?,, one coffeeciip of 
sugar; flavor to taste; one-half cup of milk; whip the cream 
and beat the eggs. Freeze in a White Mountain Triple Freezer 
one-half hour, or more if necessar}^ 

PEACH :CE CREAM. 

Georgie Hill. 

Use the above recipe with eight large peaches mashed and 
strained through a sieve. Put in a teacup of sugar, and add to 
the above recipe. Use no other flavoring but the peaches. 

ITALIAN CREAM. 

Rub the zest of two lemons upon three or lour lumps of 
loaf sugar ;^ stir these into a pint of rich cream and add 
enough sugar to sweeten. Whip the cream with the juice of 
one lemon, straining in one ounce of gelatine that has been 
dissolved in a little water. When thoroughly light flavor to 
taste and pour into a mould and freeze. When served garnish 
with preserved fruit. 



124 ICES, BLANC MANGE. ETC 



MACCAROON CLACE. . 

Mrs. A. D. Smith. 

Whip one quart of cream, roll one-half pound of maccaroona 
very fine, flavor with vanilla, sweeten to taste and freeze in a 
White Mountain Triple Freezer, in twenty minutes. 

NESSELRODE PUDDSNC. 

Mrs. A. D. Smith. 

One-half cup of milk, two eggs, one cup granulated sugar; 
beat the eggs very light, put all together and boil until it 
becomes like cream; when cool, add one cup strong coffee, one 
cup cream, forty-cent box of figs chopped fine, one teaspoon 
burnt sugar. Freeze. This makes two quarts. 

NEW YORK ICE CREAM. 

Mrs. A. D. Smith. 

Boil one pint of milk, stir in yolks of four eggs, beaten with 
one-half cup of sugar; let it get cold; one pint of cream stirred 
into custard, sweeten to taste, flavor with vanilla and freeze in 
a White Mountain Freezer. The best in the market. 

ORANGE ICE. 

Georgie Hill. 

Five large oranges, two lemons — squeeze well. Dissolve one- 
half pound of sugar in a quart of water; when cool add the 
juice of the oranges and lemon, and freeze. 

ORANGE SOUFFLE. 

Georgie Hill. 

The juice of four oranges, one quart of cream and the whites 
cf three eggs, one and one-half cups of sugar and more, if nec- 
essary. Freeze as in ice cream recipes. 

FAIRY BUTTER. 

Beat in a mortar the yolks of four hard-boiled eggs, three 
ounces of fine sugar, three ounces of butter, two ounces of 
blanched almonds, and a tablespoon of orange-flower water. 
When reduced to a paste, mould and freeze it, and serve with 
sweet biscuits round. 



ICES, BLANC MANGE, ETC. 125 

SHERBET. 

Mrs. H. H. Gregg 

To one quart of strong lemonade add white of one egg; use 
any fruit chopped fine, always using one quart water for every 
quart of sherbet desired, and adding the white of egg not beaten. 
Freeze in a White Mountain Freezer from twenty to thirty 
minutes. 

PINEAPPLE SHERBET. 

Mrs. D. Le Bettee. 

One quart pineapple, one pint sugar, one pint water, two 
tablespoons of gelatine in half the pint of water (hot), add 
sugar to juice of pineapple. Freeze twenty minutes. 

TUTTI FRUTTI ICE CREAM. 

Mrs. A. D. Smith. 

When a plain cream of any kind is partly frozen, crystalized 
fruit of any kind chopped fine may be added, having the same 
quantity of fruit as you have ice cream. Chopped citron, 
raisins, English currants, or any candied fruit may be used. 
Put into a mould and pack in ice and salt. It may be served 
with a whipped cream around it. 

CHOCOLATE BLANC MANGE. 

One quart milk, one ounce Cooper s gelatine soaked in a cup 
of the milk one hour, four heaping spoons grated chocolate 
rubbed up with a little milk, three eggs, white and yolks beaten 
separately, three-fourths cup sugar, two teaspoons vanilla. Heat 
the milk to boiling, pour in the gelatine and milk, and stir until 
it is dissolved, add the sugar to the beaten yolks, and stir until 
smooth ; beat the chocolate into this, and pour in spoon by 
spoon the scalding milk upon the mixture, stirring all the time 
until all is in. Return to the inner sauce pan and heat gradually, 
stirring faithfully until it almost boils. Remove from the fire, 
turn into a bowl, and whip in briskly and lightly the beaten 
whites with the vanilla. Set to form in moulds wet with cold 
water. Eat with whipped cream. 



126 ICES, BLANC MANGE, ETC. 



COFFEE BLANC MANGE. 

One quart of cream (part milk can be used), one-half pack- 
age of gelatine, one-half cup of strong coffee, one cup of sugar. 
Soak the gelatine one hour in one-half cup of cold water, add 
the coffee hot, then the sugar. Set it on the range until the 
gelatine is thoroughly dissolved, then set aside until partly cold, 
whip the cream and pour it gradually into the mixture. Pour 
it into a mould and set aside to harden. 

DELICIOUS BLANC MANGE. 

Put an ounce of gelatine in a little warm water and keep it 
on the stove until dissolved, then sweeten one quart of cream, 
add extract of lemon or vanilla and whip it. Strain the gela- 
tine on the cream. Wet your moulds in cold water, fill them 
and set them away to congeal. 

GELATINE BLANC MANGE. 

Mrs. D. W. Coan. 

Soak one-half box gelatine in one and one-half pints of milk 
for one hour; put it over a kettle of boiling water, and when it 
comes to a boil add the beaten yolks of three eggs, and six 
tablespoons of sugar. Stir briskly for a few minutes. When 
plenty cool add the whites of the eggs beaten very light. Flavor 
with vanilla. Cool in a mould, and serve with sugar and cream. 

GELATINE BLANC MANGE. 

Mrs. C. E. Cr.indall. 

One-half box of gelatine (Cox's), one and a half pints milk; 
put on kettle boiling water, and when it comes to boil add well 
beaten yolks of three eggs, and four tablespoons of sugar. Stir 
briskly for few minutes. Let partly cool, and add whites of 
three eggs beaten very light, flavor; pour in mould. Serve 
with cream and sugar. Must stand five or six hours. 



ICES, BLANC MANGE, ETC. 127 

NEAPOLITAN BLANC MANGE. 

Mrs. J. Anderson. 

One quart milk, one box gelatine (soaked one hour), one cup 
sugar. Heat the milk to boiling, add the gelatine and stir ten 
minutes before adding the sugar. Strain through a cheesecloth 
bag, and separate the mixture into four parts. Leave one part 
uncolored. Color No. 2 with a tablespoon of chocolate rubbed 
to a paste. No. 3 with the yolk of an egg. No. 4 with a table- 
spoon of currant jelly. Stir parts two and three over the fire 
till very hot. When quite cold, pour into a wet mould the 
white paste first, then the yellow, then the pink, and finally the 
chocolate. Set in a cool place. 

VELVET BLANC MANGE. 

Two cups sweet cream, one-half ounce Cooper's gelatine soaked" 
in a very little cold water one hour, one-half cup white powdered 
sugar, one' teaspoon extract of bitter almond, one glass of white 
wine. Heat the cream to boiling, stir in the gelatine and 
sugar, and as soon as they are dissolved take from the fire, 
beat ten minutes until very light, flavor and add the wine by 
degrees, mixing it well. Put into moulds wet with clear water.. 

ROMAN CREAM. 

One-half box of gelatine, one-half glass of milk, three tabfe- 
spoons of granulated sugar, one gill of wane, one pint of cream, 
whites of two eggs, vanilla to taste; soak the gelatine in the 
milk half an hour, then put the dish in which it has been 
soaked in a basin of hot water on the stove until the gelatine 
is entirely dissolved. Whip the cream light, add the sugar and 
vanilla, then the w^hites beaten to a stiff froth. Stir the gela- 
tine into the cream, sugar, etc., slowly and beat it w^ell. Pour 
it into a mould and set it on the ice to harden. 

(13) 



128 ICE8, BLANC MANGE, ETC. 



SNOW CREAM. 

One-half box of gelatine, the whites of three eggs, a teacup 
of white sugar. Flavor with extract of vanilla. Beat the 
whites of the eggs to a stiff froth; pour a pint of boiling water 
on the gelatine. Let it cool, but do not let it get stiff. Beat 
it into the eggs and sugar. 

SPANISH CREAM. 

Mrs. W. A. Hammond. 

One quart milk, one cup sugar, one package gelatine, one- 
half teaspoon salt, one teaspoon vanilla, yolks of four eggs. 
Beat eggs to a froth. Heat milk and stir in other ingredients. 
Use Avhites for meringues or cake. 

WHIPPED CREAM. 

One pint of sweet cream, sweetened to taste; one teaspoon of 
vanilla. Put the cream in a bowl and beat with a wheel egg- 
beater until thick, then sweeten and flavor. The cream will 
beat better if cold (the whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff 
froth may be added). 

Different jellies or fruits may be served with it. This is a 
delicious dessert. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Mrs. J. Anderson. 

Two dozen lady-fingers, one quart rich cream, one cup pow- 
'dered sugar, two teaspoons vanilla extract. Split the cakes 
and fit nicely around the sides of a deep dish or small glasses; 
sweeten and flavor the cream, beat to a stiff froth; pour the 
mixture into the dish and set upon the ice to cool. Or take a 
sponge cake, cut the top evenly off, scoop out the middle of the 
cake very carefully, wet the inside crust with wine, pour in the 
mixture and replace the top. 



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Mcs-S.f A-WjvxIod, 



■^ — r=j^F=?i^, F=^F=?.A.rvici:E:- — ^^ 



MLLE. S. MAXTON, 

Instruction, in Fren^ch, Parisian Accent. 

MODERATE PRICES. 

MLLE. M. MAXTON, 

Instrviction in Vocal and Instrumental IVItasic, 

PARIS CONSERVATOIRE METHOD. 

^iKgiHg m Re.e&p\ions, ^©Glabfes, CS^areieg, 
ife., at (P©(^e:reite: FriGGS. 

Address, 105 WINCHESTER AvENUE. 



ICES. BLANC MANGE, ETC. 129 



CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Mrs. Dr. Leroy. 

N. B. — The cake must be one day old. 

Cake: Four eg^s, one cup sugar, one cup flour, pincli of 
salt; flavor witli vanilla. Filling: Five eggs, one-lialf coifee 
cup sugar, tablespoon of vanilla, one-half package of gelrtine 
(Coxe). two-thirds cup of milk, one-half cupoE very thick cream 
made cold on the ice. Soak the gelatine in half of the milk. 
Beat the yolks of the eggs and sugar together, and put in dou- 
ble boiler with the remaining milk. Stir until the mixture be- 
gins to thicken, then add the gelatine; when cold add the 
whites of eggs well beaten. Whip the cream and mix with the 
flavoring all together, and pour into a mould lined with cake. 
Elegant. 

CHARLOTTE RUSSE. 

Mary S. Shelton. 

Select a pan or mould the size jou wish to line, then bake 
spono"c cake iu thin cakes, the sizes according to your mould; 
also bake a thin cake large enough to cover the top. Whip a 
quart of thick cream ; put an ounce of Coxe's gelatine in a pint 
of warm milk, and set on the back of the stove until dissolved, 
then strain it. To one-half pint of pale sherry wine add a cup 
of sugar and a teaspoon of vanilla; add this to the gelatine. W' hen 
almost cold, but not congealed, pour this into the whipped 
cream, stir well and sweeten nio:e if desired. Put on the cover 
of cake and let it stand in a cold place till firm, then turn out 
and cover v.iili a thin frosting. 

BAKED MILK FOR INVALIDS. 

Put two quarts of fresh milk into a jar and bake eight or ten 
hours. When done sufficiently it will be as thick as cream, 
and can be eaten by very delicate persons. 

1^, Packages, 10 cts. Trunks, 25 cts. BRINKS' CHICAGO CITY EXPRESS 
CO., Telephones 1754 & 1764. General Office, 88 Washington Street, '^s. 



*Tlie T. A. Snider Preserve Company's* 
SPEC 

SNiDER'S PRESERVES. 

IN GI.ASS.— We desire to call special attention to our new stjle of PRK- 
SKItVES in GLASS BOXTLES, prei^ared by a method which is our own secret, 
and which are equal to the best iini>orted brands. The fruits for these are 
selected with the utmost care possible, and are packed with transparent syrup In hand- 
some bottles, and retain their natural color, flavor and shape to a greater degree than by 
any other known process. 

SNIDER'S MEXICAN CHILI SAUCE. 

This is the most delicious ax>petizer ever produced. It has the highest en- 
dorsements from leading caterers, cooks, the trade and the public generally, In the 
United State-s and Europe. It is alike .savorv and healthful. 

TRY IT on Cold Meats. 

SNIDER'S HOME-MADE TOMATO CATSUP. 

Manufactured from only Fresh, Kipe Tomatoes, celebrated for retaining: tbe 
nataral flavor combined with a delicious piquancy of spice, found In no 
other brand. Packed In handsome screw-top bottles, with non-corrosive caps, tboa 
overcoming the great annoyance and bad appearance of the old-fashioned cork-stoppei*. 

THOMPSON'S RELISH 

l6 a healthful aid to digestion. TRY it. 

SNIDER'S BORDEAUX SAUCE. 

It speaks for Itself. 

SNIDER'S GRAPE SAUCE. 

A delicious dressing for all kinds of Fowl and Wild Game. 

SNIDER'S SALAD DRESSING. 

CONTAINS NO OIL. 

Will not disagree with the most delicate stomach. Is especially adapted as a dress- 
ing lor Lettuce, Cabbage, SUced Tomatoes, Cold Meats and Fish. This is an entirely 
new and (Uffeient dressing t« any other oilered for sale. AVill not becoine rancid. 
Give it a trial. 

WORCESTERSHIRE SAUCE. 

This sauce (of which we are exclusive agents for America) we guarantee is ejual to 
anything on the market; Is prepared by Messrs. Harvey o: Rich, of London, and bottled 
by us. We ask a trial. 



MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

THE T. A. SNIDER PRESERVE CO., 

crir-4c:::i]Sji^j\,-ri, CDh-iiCD^ 

AND FOR SALE BY 

THE LEADING WHOLESALE AND RETAIL GROCERS EVERYWHERE. ■ 



FRUIT JELLIES, PRESERVES. 



APPLE JELLY. 

Cut two pounds of sweet apples into quarters, without peel- 
ing, throwing them into cold water as you cut them. Then 
put them into a preserving-pan, with a quart of fresh, cold 
water, and boil until they become a pulp, adding as the apple 
boils one pound of loaf sugar, and a little vanilla. Then run it 
through a jelly bag; it must stand some hours to allow it to 
pass through completely. It must then be simmered over the 
fire twenty minutes, to jelly, and poured into the mould. 

APPLE OR PEAR JELLY. 

Pare and quarter ripe, juicy apples or pears, and boil them at 
a great distance from the fire till they become a jam. Have 
ready a rich syrup, and add in proportion of one pint of syrup 
to three pounds of fruit, and boil for a quarter of an hour. 
Turn out into pots. 

APPLE COMPOTE. 

Mrs. Willis Blackman. 

Take one quart of water and one pint of sugar, six tart apples, 
core and pare them and stew in syrup until tender. Take out 
without breaking and lay them in a glass dish. Add a box of 
gelatine and three or four sticks of cinnamon to the syrup when 
thoroughly dissolved, pour over the apples. 

COMPOTE OF APPLES. 

Compotes of fruits of all kinds are either used for entremets 
garnished with biscuits or pastry, or for dessert. They are 
usually served in deep glass dishes, known in the dessert service 



132 FRUIT jellies; PRESERVBjS. 

as comjjotiers. Pare a pound of golden pippins or any good 
apples, and core without breaking them; make a syrup of ten 
ounces of loaf sugar, with half a pint of water; let it boil ten 
minutes to thicken; put in the apples and simmer them for 
twenty minutes, or till soft without being broken; then turn it 
out into the compciier to grow cool, with the syrup round. 

COWIPOTE OF PEARS. 

Make a syrup of ten onncesof sugar, half a pint of water, and 
two cloves; when boiled thick take out the cloves, and add a 
glass of port wine; put one pound of good baking pears on the 
fire for a few minutes in boiling water till you can draw off the 
skin; core them and put into the syrup; boil gently for twenty 
minutes, or, if the pears be large, half an hour, till they are 
tender; then turn out with the syrup. 

BLACKBERRY JAM. 

The berries are ripe and plentiful in September, and merely 
require nice picking, half the weight of any kind of sugar, and 
three-qunrters of an hour boiling. The single objection to the 
jcim is the quantity of seeds; but the jelly made from this fruit 
is perfect. 

CRANBERRY JELLY. 

Dissolve one ounce of isinglass in three-quarters of a pint of 
water; then draw out over the fire and press the cranberries, and 
add the isinglass jelly to a pint and a half of the juice, a dessert- 
spoon of lemon juice, six ounces of sugar, and the whites and 
crushed shells of four eggs. Simmer ten minutes; then strain 
through muslin till clear, and fill the mould. 

POTTED PEARS. • 

Take ripe pears, wipe them carefully; place a layer, stem up- 
wards, in a stone jar, sprinkle over sugar, then set in another 
layer of pears, more sugar, and so on, until the jar is filled. To 
every gallon put in a pint and a half of water. Cover the jar 
close, and set in a slow oven two hours. It is a nice dish for 
the tea table, with or without cream. 



\A^^ ESTABLISHED 1847. '-'^^ ^^"^H| 




ALL OF OUR i 

BEAR THIS i 
TRADEMARK. 

WILL 

ALL 

IMITATIONSa 
INFRINGEMENTS 
OFTHESAME 




OVER 100 

^oiviesnc 

acFOREIGN 
FRUITS & 

TRANSMUTED 

INTO 

TABLE 
DELICACIES 




PRICESoM PRESERVES REDUCED OEC.I?J 1885. 




uuiirnii:>LriVii»:> (5c jlLLIES 

HAVE LED THE MARKET FOR 40 YEARS 

OURMINCE MEAT &PLUM PUDDING 

ARE SIMPLY INCOMPARABLE. 

OUR SALAD DRESSINGS NEW PROCESS CATSUPI 

GIVE TONE TO THE MOST MODEST REPAST 
WHILE OUR 

OLIVES CAPERS AND BRANDY FRUITS 

ADDED THERETO. TRANSFORM IT INTO A FEAST. 



FOR SALE BY THE LEADING GROCERS ON THE AMERICAN CONTINENT. 

SEE OTHER SIDE 



FRUIT jellies; preserves. 133 



ORANGE JAM. 

Weigh the oranges before peeling, and put a pound of sugar 
to a pound of fruit. Take the peel from half the oranges, grate 
it, and add the sugar. Open the oranges, and be very particular 
to get out the seeds and white strings. Add to the sugar and 
peel, with a little water, and boil twenty minutes. 

RASPBERRY, CURRANT, OR GOOSEBERRY JAM . 

These jams all require three-quarters of their weight in sugar; 
but the fruit must be boiled first till broken. The raspberries 
and currants will not require more than half an hours previous 
boiling, the gooseberries nearly an hour, before the sugar is 
added, when they must boil twenty-five to thirty minutes more. 
Be careful to stir, and to remove the scum. Gooseberry jam is 
much improved by the addition of a small quantity of red or 
black currant juice. 



IW^ T. A. Snidep's preserves and jellies are superior. 



BRANDIED CHERRIES. 

Mrs. J. Anderson. 

Make a syrup of one pound sugar, and one wine glass water 
to two pounds fruit. Heat to boiling, stirring to prevent 
burning, pour over the cherries, and let stand fully one hour. 
Then put all into the preserving kettle, heat slowly and boil 
five minutes. Take out the fruit with a perforated skimmer 
and fill the bottle two-thirds full. Boil the syrup twenty 
minutes, adding one pint best brandy to five pounds fruit, pour 
over the cherries scalding hot and seal. 



134 FRUIT JELLIES: PKESEKVES 



BRANDY PEACHES. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

Pare the peaches after rubbing the outside off — an easy way 
is to put them in boiling water when the skin comes off with 
rubbing. Boil in water enough to cover them until clear and 
tender, then place on a platter, weigh, and to one pound of 
fruit use one pound of granulated sugar, using the water the 
peaches were boiled in for the syrup. When sufficiently boiled 
to become thick, drop the peaches in one by one lest they break; 
let them cook a little when done. The same recipe will do for 
plums and pears. 

PICKLED PEACHES OR PEARS. 

Mrs. J. Anderson. 

Prick the fruit with a fork to prevent bursting and stick a 
few whole cloves in each peach or pear. Heat in just enough 
water to cover them, then remove the fruit and add to the 
water three and one-half pounds sugar to seven pounds fruit. 
Boil twenty minutes, add two quarts cider vinegar (or three 
pints vinegar and one pint water), one tablespoon allspice, one 
tablespoon mace tied in a bag, some stick cinnamon, and whole 
cloves, and boil together ten minutes. Drop in the fruit a few 
at a time and boil until they can be pierced with a straw. 
Take out the fruit, pack in glass jars or air-tight crocks, boil 
the syrup until thick and pour over the fruit scalding hot. 

PICKLED WATERMELON OR CITRON RIND. 

Mrs. J. Anderson. 

Cut the rind into narrow strips or fancy cuttings and lay in 
brine for a few days, then steam over a clear fire until the rinds 
are clear and soft. Prepare a syrup, allowing same quantity of 
sugar as you have rind, one cup water to one pouud sugar, and 
one-half ounce root ginger (tied in a bag). When the syrup 
is almost boiling drop in the rinds and simmer until they are 
perfectly clear. Then take them out, add to the s^rup one pint 



FRUIT jellies; preserves. 135 

cider vinegar to one pound sugar, and mace, cloves, and cinna- 
mon to taste. Boil up once, throw in some stick cinnamon and 
whole cloves, and pour over the rinds scalding hot. Keep in 
stone crocks with perfectly fitting covers. 

PICKLED RAISINS. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

Two cups of vinegar well spiced with cinnamon and cloves^ 
one and a third cups of sugar, set it on the fire, have ready 
bunches of table raisins, and when hot put them in. This 
makes a handsome dish for the table. The syrup must boil 
and the raisins left until they swell and look full like grapes. 

PRESERVED PEACHES. 

Twelve pounds of large peaches, eight pounds of sugar, one 
pint of vinegar; pare and steam fruit till tender, steaming a few 
at a time. Put vinegar and sugar together, when boiling put 
in the steamed peaches and let them boil up. Take the peaches 
out with a skimmer. 

STRAWBERRIES PRESERVED WHOLE. 

Take equal weights of strawberries and loaf sugar, put the 
sugar into a pan with merely sufficient water to dissolve it, and 
let it boil till the surface is covered with small bubbles; this will 
probably be in about twenty minutes; then put the fruit, with 
one pint of red currant juice to each pound of strawberries, 
which improves the color. Allow it to boil five minutes, then 
put into small jars. It is not necessary to use more sugar for 
the currant juice, the strawberries being of themselves so sweet. 
Red currants or raspberries, with the addition of white currant 
juice, black currant, apricot or other jams, may be made in thi& 
way. 



S^" Try T. A. Snider's Preserves and Jellies.,^| 



136 FRUIT jellies; preserves. 

SPICED CITRON. 

Prepare the fruit, cover with vinegar and let it stand over 
night, in the morning pour off, and to every seven pounds of 
fruit allow three and one-half pounds of white sugar and a pint 
of vinegar; tie in a muslin bag a tablespoon of each of the 
different spices; make a syrup of the sugar, put in the fruit and 
<jook for one-half hour. When all the fruit is done, add the 
vinegar, and let the sypup boil thick, pour it over the fruit, 
and let it get cold before sealing up the jars. 

SPICED CURRANTS. 

Make a syrup of three pounds )f sugar, one pint of vinegar, 
two tablespoons of cinnamon, two tablespoons of cloves, and 
half a teaspoon of salt. Add six pounds of currants, and boil 
half an hour. 

SPICED GOOSEBERRIES. 

Mrs. Hammond. 

To one pound of gooseberries take three quarters of a pound 
of sugar, and one pint of vinegar to ten pints of this mixture 
when boiling. No water; cinnamon, allspice, cloves, and nut- 
meg to taste. Let it cook three or four hours. 

SPICED PLUMS. 

Seven quarts of plums, three and one-half pounds sugar, one 
ounce ground cloves, one ounce cinnamon, one quart vinegar. 
Boil one-half hour. 

BAKED QUINCES. 

The quince eaten hot, with either cream or a dot of butter 
■on top, is a revelation to most people. The quince should be 
wrell sprinkled with sugar before putting the dish in the oven. 
Neither core nor pare them, as the baked seeds add to their jelly 
richness. They are highly esteemed for dessert. 



FRUIT JELLIKS: PRESERVES. 137 

QUINCE JELLY. 

Cover the fruit with water and boil until the goodness is all 
out (it will require one-half or three-fourths of an hour). Then 
strain through flannel or crash,without much squeezing. Strain 
twice if not clear; add equal quantities of juice and sugar, and 
boil steadily about twenty minutes. It is better to leave the 
glasses several days before sealing, even if not quite hard, as 
your jelly will be much more delicate than if boiled too long. 



1^" Use T. A. Snider' s Preserves and Jellies.^^^j 



QUINCE JELLY. 

Wash the fruit, save all the nice parings and seeds; cook for 
an hour or more in more water than will cover them, then run 
them through the colander and let them stand until next day, or 
until the fruit substance has settled: now throw off the clear 
juice through a thin muslin bag and place on the fire. When 
boiling well add one pint of sugar to each pint of juice, and boil 
until it rolls off the spoon; fill the jelly cups, and let them sit 
by the stove or any warm place a couple of days without 
covers, so as to evaporate any water if the jelly is not stiff 
enough. 

Any jelly is better to be taken from the fire before quite 
done as it will finish by setting on the heater or near a warm 
stove, and if it boils one minute too long it will never be any- 
thing but a sticky, good-for-nothing kind of syrup. 

Apple or any fruit jelly can be made by boiling the fruit 
(not skins and seeds ) and treated in the same way. 

To prevent mould on glasses of jelly, lay a lump of parafine on 
top of the hot jelly, letting melt and spread over it, or melt it 
first and pour over the jelly when cold. 



138 FRUIT JELLIES; PilE SERVES 



STRAWBERRY JELLY. 

Equal weight of sugar and strawberry juice. Press some 
ripe strawberries througli a delicately clean cloth, then strain 
the juice very clean, and stir into it an equal weight of sugar. 
When the sugar is dissolved put into a double boiler over a 
clear fire, and let it boil for half an hour, skimming it carefully 
as the scum rises. Put into glass jars or pots, and when cold 
cover it over as above directed. 

RHUBARB AND ORANGE PRESERVES. 

Six oranges, two pounds of rhubarb stalks, one pound and a 
lialf of sugar. Peel the oranges carefully, take away the white 
rind and pulps, slice the pulps into a double boiler with the peel 
cut very small, add the rhubarb cut very fine, and sugar. Boil 
the whole down in the usual way for preserves. 

PUNCH JELLY. 

One pint cold water, one pint boiling water, one box Cox's 
gelatine, one wine glass wine, one wine glass brandy, juice of 
two lemons, one pound granulated sugar. Soak the gelatine in 
the cold water one hour; add the boiling water, the lemon juice, 
the sugar, and stir till the gelatine is dissolved. Strain, addtbe 
wine and brandy, and pour into a mould. 



>SS,. Packages, 10 cts. Trunks, 25 cts. BRINKS' CHICAGO CITY EXPRESS 
CO., Telephones 1754 & 1764. General Office, 88 V/ashington Street. "^^ 



A BUDGET 

Of well digested and interesting gossip in regard to matters of social, 
literary, dratnatic and musical import is always acceptable to persons 
of intelligence^ particularly when it emanates from a source which is 
regarded as authority on such matters. Letters from friends at a 
distance arc always doubly eritertaining when they drift away from 
ihe mere formalities and inchide a running account of the leading 
gossip of the day. Friends who can and will write such letters are 
always in demand, and when found are properly encouraged and 
cultivated. A well conducted weekly paper resembles the budget of 
news and fiotes which one friend sends to another, only on a much 
more extended scale. Each nufnber contains more matter than 
could be crozvded into a hundred letters, and yet the price is so Sfnall 
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interesting and reliable. It will not cost you much to ascertain 
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E^== BEWARE OF IMITATIONS. 



BEVERAGES. 



Note: — In making tea, coffee or chocolate, always see that 
the water in the kettle is freshlij boiled; never use water that 
has been standing. 



TEA. 



Pour boiling water into the teapot, and let stand till it is 
heated through; pour off the water, add the tea, allowing one 
teaspoon of tea to each cup water, pour over it the boiling water 
and serve in five minutes. 

"For making good tea and coffee use the Automatic Tea and 
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COFFEE. 

Three pints boiling water, one cup freshly ground coffee, one 
egg. Mix the egg and dry coffee together, pour the boiling 
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If the French coffee pot is used put the coffee into the top- 
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water has passed through the treble set of strainers. 

CHOCOLATE. 

One pint boiling water, one pint milk or cream, one teacup 
Baker's chocolate rubbed to a paste, stir the chocolate into the 
water and boil twenty minutes, add the milk and boil ten 
minutes longer, stirring frequently. Sweeten to taste. 

(14) 



140 BEVERAGES. 



BLACKBERRY CORDIAl.. 

To one peck of berries well mashed, add one ounce of cinna- 
mon, one ounce cloves, one ounce allspice, and one nutmeg, all 
ground, mix and boil slowly half an hour, then strain, and to 
each pint of juice add one-half pound loaf sugar. Boil half an 
hour longer, when cool, add one quart best brandy and seal. 

GINGER WINE. 

Mrs. Evans. 

Take five gallons of water, fifteen pounds white sugar, ten 
ounces of ginger, the riud of six lemons pealed very thin. Boil 
one hour, let it stand until evening, then put into a cask with 
the juice of the lemons, four pounds raisins chopped, four 
spoons yeast. Stir once every day, then add one-half ounce of 
isinglass, and one pint of brandy. Stop it close, and in three 
months it will be fit to bottle. 

GRAPE WINE. 

Mrs. II. H. Brown. 

Put one gallon of water to one gallon of bruised grapes. Let 
it stand one week without stirring, then drain off the liquor, 
and to each gallon of straining add three pounds of sugar. Put 
in a barrel or cask loosly corked until fermented, then cork 
tightly for two months, v^^hen it will be clear and ready to 
bottle. Must be kept in a dry cellar. Care must be taken in 
pulling the fruit to save the juice. Put into jars. Let the 
syrup cool, then stir in the Brandy, mixing thoroughly, then 
pour over the fruit. To half a peck of grapes use a quart of 
the best brandy. 

RHUBARB WINE. 

To every gallon of water add five pounds ot ripe rhubarb cut 
in thin slices as for preserves. Let it stand nine days, fre- 
quently stirring it, and keeping the cask covered to exclude 
the air. Strain and squeeze through a coarse cloth or flannel 



THE IDEAL 



WAUKESHA WATER 



-A.ND- 



The Ideal Ginger Ale. 

natural mineral waters of all kinds. 

O. W. HINCILLEY, 

TELEPHONE 80^. 74 MARKET STREET, CHICAGO. 




EVERYONE SHOULD KNOW 

That if we wish to keep the human form In perfect 
eymmetry, we must teach ourselves to carry the 
arms and shoulders In such a way that their weight 
will fall behind the chest, instead of forward on it. 
Many people attribute the bent condition and 
round shoulders to nature. This is a mistake. 
Children seldom show indications of round 
shoulders until they are sent to school or put to 
manual labor, when they rapidly acquire the habit 
cf contracting the chest and rounding tlie 
shoulders. Ihe habit may be acquired at a very 
early age, and with scarcely a thought of its conse- 
Quences the parents will allow the habit to become 
firmly seated in their children. If allowed to con- 
tinue the stooping, with compression on the lungs, 
he.trt and stomach, may bring on diseases, such as 
curvature of the spine, pulmonary consumption, 
heart disease, etc. 

The way to prevent this and keep back the 
shoulders and develop a full, fine chest, is to wear 
one of my shoulder braces, such as seen in above 
tut They can be sent by mail. Price, $2.50. 
Give age of patient and address 

DR. liE ROY, 

130 Dearborq Street, Rooms II and 12, 
CHICAGO, ILI.. 



(S'^/(dLISH^^' l^^3 




^T^'^^V^b.^j/^^S. 



We still lead in DIAMONDS, and Exhibit the Largest 
and Finest Stock of Gems in the West. 

Oup WATCHES are Marked at very Attractive Prices, 
and should be seen. 

There is nothing in SILVERWARE for Presentation 
or household use, that we cannot furnish you. 




eter Br 



FOOT-FORM 



S, 



COR, STATE Wi MADISON STREETS, 

CHICAGO. 



BEVERAGES. 141 



strainer. To every gallou of liquor add four pounds lump 
sugur, the juice of two lemons and rind of one. — To clear it, 
dissolve one ounce of isinglass in a pint of the wine and let it 
be quite cold before pouring into the wine; that quantity of 
isinglass is sufficient for- nine gallons. When fermentation is 
over close tightly. In three months it will be fit for use. 

SHRUB. 

Mrs. H. Gregrg. 

Five quarts raspberries, one quart vinegar, two teaspoons tar 
taric acid. Cover raspberries over night, press through jelly 
bag carefully. To one quart juice add one pound sugar, scald, 
skim and bottle. Keep in dark place. 

STRAWBERRY SHERBET. 

One quart strawberries, three pints water, juice of two lemons, 
one pound white sugar. Crush the berries, add water and 
lemon juice, and let stand three hours. Strain over the s igar 
(squeezing hard), and stir till sugar is dissolved. Strain again 
and set on ice two hours before using it. 



^^Horsford's Acid Phosphate is an agreeable and healthy Substitute for 
Lemons and Lime Juice in the preparation of "lemonade" or "punch.""^i 




WEST MADISON AND HALSTED STS. 

p. Jl7orou($}7ly first-QIass family Tl?eatr(? ar>d tf?e fr\05t ^le(?aQt, 

.F^oomy apd ^omfortabli? piae(? of .^/nuse/neQl: 

ir> Ql?iea($o. 



Popular Prices Always and i 
the Best Attractions. ' 



WILL J. DAVIS, Manager. 



CANDY 



A new receipt is given for making nut candy, that has been 
tested. To two cups of granulated sugar and one of boiling 
water, add one large tablespoon of butter. Boil till it readily 
candies when dropped in cold water. Then remove from the 
fire and stir in nearly tAvo cups of Brazil nuts, cut up small, 
and one tablespoon of lemon flavoring. Pour out upon four 
large buttered plates to cool. Always use a silver spoon in stir- 
ring candy. Home-made candy is a very desirable adjunct to 
the dessert, and consoles the children when deprived of the 
pastrys or puddings that prove so attractive to them. 

SUGARED ALMONDS. 

Make a syrup of one pint of water to a pound of sugar, and 
when boiling, stir in blanched Jordan almonds for ten minutes; 
take them out, and dry, and reduce the syrup one-half; then 
dip the almonds in again for a minute, and with the thick syrup 
adhering to them, dry them on an inverted sieve in a warm 
place, and store in a tin box. 

CHOCOLATE CREAM CANDY. 

Georgie Hill. 

Three cups sugar, one-half cup water, one-half tablespoon of 
vinegar, one-half of a hen's egg of butter, one teaspoon of 
vanilla, one square of Baker's chocolate, grated ; stir all together, 
then put on the stove, try it in a cup of cold water; when done 
j)ut on buttered tins; cut in squares when cold enough. Do 
not stir while on the stove. 



144 CANDY. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

One quart of New Orleans molasses, two pounds brown sugar; 
boil from an hour and a half to two hours. No butter for 
hands necessary. 

MOLASSES CREAM CANDY. 

Miss A. K. Boyden. 

Two cups molasses, one small cup sugar, one tablespoon vin- 
egar, butter size of a walnut; boil until it hardens when dropped 
into cold water, and then pour in a cup of cream. Let the 
mixture continue cooking until it becomes brittle, when again 
try in w.iter. While cooking stir constantly, and when done 
pour in buttered pans; cool and pull. 

OPERA CREAM CARAMELS. 

Two cups of granulated sugar, one cup of milk, two even 
tablespoons of butter, one teaspoon of vanilla; boil the sugar 
and milk together for ten minutes, then add the butter and 
flavoring, and boil until it will grain. 

BRAZIL NUT CANDY. 

Two pounds of confectioner's sugar, half a cup of milk, half 
a cup of water, butter the size of a walnut; boil together until 
the candy will grain, then add one pound before cracking of 
Brazil nuts sliced in fine pieces, and stir until well grained, 
then add a teaspoonful of .vanilla, cool it a little, and cut in 
squares. 

HICKORY NUT CANDY. 

Two cups golden syrup, one cup sugar, one tablespoon of 
vinei^ar, small piece of butter — about one-half tablespoon; boil 
about twenty minutes or until it hardens slightly when dropped 
in water ; prepare hickory, pecan or almond nu ts together or sepa- 
rately, spread on a large buttered platter, and pour candy over 
them; cut in squares when partly cold. 



CANDY. 145 



VANILLA CREAM CANDY. 

Georgie Hill. 

Three cups sugar, oue-half cup water, one tablespoon of vine- 
gar, one-half of a large hen's egg of butter, one teaspoon 
vanilla; stir all together before placing on the stove, then don't 
stir; take off when done (can tell by testing in a cup of water), 
and pour on buttered plates; pull when cool. Delicious. 

POP CORN BALLS. 

Put the popcorn on a platter and pour over it the vanilla 
cream candy before quite done, and make into balls before it is 
cool. 

FRENCH CREAM CANDY. 

Take two cups of granulated sugar, one of cold water, one 
and one-half tablespoons arrowroot, dissolve this in cold water 
and pour on sugar; boilfron ten to twenty minutes, stirring all 
the time; boil until the syrup thickens and drops heavily from 
tiie spoon, then take from the fire and put the pan into cold 
water, beating the contents to a smooth, white cream. Before 
it is cool add a tablespoon of vanilla, take the cream, a little at 
a time, and mould into an}^ desired shape. It should be about 
the consistency of putty, and work easily. If it is dry and 
crumbles it is cooked too much, and you must add a little water 
and boil again. When the cream is moulded take a cake of 
Biiier's chocolate, scrape fine, put into a bowl, set this in a ket- 
tle of boiling water until the chocolate is melted, then add two 
tablespoons pulverized sugar, and b?at until smooth. Into this 
drop the cream balls, one at a time'; take out and place on but- 
tered paper until cold. 

BUTTER SCOTCH, 

Seven tablespoons molasses, two tablespoons of water, two 
tablespoons of sugar, two tablespoons of butter. Boil until it 
will work easily when dropped in cold water. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

One cup of brown sugar, one-half cup of water, one teaspoon 
of vinegar, piece of butter size of a walnut. Boil about twenty 
minutes. Flavor if desired. 



^yX Do Your Own Dyeing at Home. 

^'^5^V^ THEY WILL COLOR EVERYTHING, 

^^?^ 40 COLORS! 



THEY DO NOT CROCK OR SiVlUT. 



-FOR- ^^^|^\ PACKAGE 

Fane y Deeopat ing. ^^^ \^ wm make a 

CONFECTIONERS' PINK^PJ"*"- 

FOR CANDIES AND CAKES. >^ -#^kV ^ 

INK POW^DERS, (6 Colors.) 



10 CENTS A PACKAGE. 



Sold by aU DRUGGISTS Everywhere. 



^J. J. WILSON PICKLE C0> 



-MANUFATIRERS OF THE- 



Pickles and TTable Condin-ients. 
cz:n[ I cz: A.^cz3, ii_i 



:. 1=?. r=5- ^I-iL_J 

66 l^flNDOliPH STt^EET, 



(CENTRAL MUSIC HALL.) 



Watcher aM DiaiDODd^ a Specialtij 

FIJ^E WATSH F^EPAIRIJM©. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 



CLEANSING CREAM. 

Mrs. H. H. Brown. 

Four ounces castile soap, four ounces aqua ammonia, one 
ounce sulphuric ether, one ounce alcohol. Cut the soap fine, 
dissolve in one quart of water; add the ingredients; lastly five 
quarts of soft water. If you wish to remove spots, rub a little 
on with a sponge, but to clean a large surface, add a little warm 
water and sponge off with it. This can be used on any fabric. 

POT POURRI. 

Mrs. Glbbs, Rochester, N. Y. 

One and a half peck rose leaves, place in a deep bowl in thin 
layers, with a handful of salt sprinkled on each layer. Let it 
remain five days, turning twice a day. This should appear 
moist. Add three ounces of bruised allspice, one ounce stick 
cinnamon crushed. This forms the stock. Allow it to remain 
a week, turning daily from bottom to top. Then put into per- 
manent jars one ounce of allspice, adding the stock layer by 
layer. Sprinkle between the layers the following mixture:. 
One ounce cloves, one ounce cinnamon, two nutmegs, coarsely 
powdered, two ounces ginger root sliced thin, half an ounce 
anise seed bruised, ten grains finest musk, two ounces sliced 
orris root, half pound dried lavender leaves. Then add the fol- 
lowing essential oils at pleasure, some perfer one, some another: 
lemon, verbena, geranium, jessamine, cologne water tripple 
extract, or any freshly dried flowers that are fragrant. Shake 
and stir the jar once or twice a week. Open only during the 
daily odorizing. This will last a long time. 



148 MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 

THE ECONOMICAL FRUIT PRESERVATIVE. 

Take the fruit as soon after being picked as possible, see that 
it is sound and clean, pack tightly in a jar or crock, then pour 
on the following composition: Dissolve thoroughly salicylic 
acid thirty-five grains, sugar eight ounces, to one quart of water 
a]id one gallon of fruit. 

FOR GREEN CORN. 

Acid three and one-half drains, salt four ounces, one gallon of 
water. Always dissolve acid in hot water. 

TO SWEEP CARPETS. 

Wash dry and chop potatoes, spread them on one side of the 
room and sweep across the carpet, 

TO REMOVE IRON RUST. 

The juice of lemon and salt placed on the spot, and the fabric 
put in the su,n, will remove rust. Shining through glass its 
rays are stronger. I hang mine in a window. 

TO CLEAN ZINC. 

Wet the zinc all over with muriatic acid, sprinkle over it 
Tery fine sand or ashes, then scour, wash and dry. Or rub with 
kerosene. 

RECIPE FOR BRONZING. 

Use Peerless Bronze Paints and follow directions on package. 

TO TAKE SPOTS OF PAINT OFF WOOD. 

Lay a thick coating of lime and soda mixed together over it, 
letting it stay twenty-four hours, then wash off with warm 
water, and the spot will have disappeared. 

LAUNDRY POLISH. 

One ounce gum arable, one ounce borax to two pints of 
water (dissolved). Use two tablespoons to a quart of starch. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 149 

TO REMOVE FRUIT STAINS. 

Place your muslin over a tub, hold it firml}^ and pour hot 
water through the spot stained, and it will soon disappear. 
This must be done before putting the muslin in soapsuds. 

TO POLISH FURNITURE. 

Mix sufficient vinegar in linseed oil to cut it; with this satu- 
rate raw cotton, over which place soft muslin; rub lightly over 
the article. 

To wash silk handkerchiefs soak them first in cold salt water for 
ten minutes, or longer, then wash out in the same water and 
iron it immediately. Carpets may be greatly brightened by first 
sweeping thoroughly and then going over them with a clean 
cloth and clear salt and water. Use a cup of coarse salt to a 
basin of water. Salt in the whitewash will make it stick better. 
Wash the mica of the stove doors with salt and vinegar. Brass 
work can be kept beautifully bright by occasionally ru!)bing 
with salt and vinegar. To clean willow furniture use salt and 
water. Apply it with a nail brush, scrub well and dry thor- 
oughly. 

TO PREVENT JARS BREAKING. 

When putting in the fruit set the cold jar ou a folded cloth 
wet with cold water; then fill with the boiling hot fruit. I 
have never known a jar to break when thus treated. 



S^" Use Peerless Dyes for coloring'. ^ 



Cold biscuits left over from tea may be made better than 
when first baked by dipping them into hot water and placing 
them singly on the hot grate in the oven long enough to let 
them get well warmed through. 



150 M IbCELL ANEOUS RECIPES. 

Remove the cover from the pot after pouring off the water 
from boiled potatoes and leave them on the back part of the 
stove, thus allowing the steam to escape. This will leave them 
mealy. 

Vinegar is better than ice for keeping fish. By putting a 
little vinegar on the fish it will keep perfectly well even in hot 
weather. Fish is often improved in flavor under this treatment. 

A small bag of sulphur kept in a drawer or closet that is 
infested with red ants will quickly disperse them. 

TO DESTROY COCKROACHES. 

Mrs. E. J. H. 

I have been successful in driving away, if not exterminating, 
cockroaches by scattering powdered borax in their haunts, 

Chinese gloss starch is made of two tablespoons of raw starch, 
one t ;blespoon of borax, dissolved in one and one-half cups of 
cold water. Dip the thoroughly dry unstarched cuffs, collars 
and bosoms of shirts in this, then roll them up tight and let 
them remain a few hours in a a dry cloth, then rub off andiron. 

Ink stains may be removed from white goods by saturating 
the spot with water and then covering with pounded salts of 
lemon. Put in the sun for five minutes, wash with soap and 
rinse. A paste of chloride of lime and water well rubbed in 
will take ink stains from silver and plated ware. Wash and 
wipe as usual. 

Stains from tea or coffee will come out at once if they be 
taken immediately and held over a pail while boiling water is 
turned over them. 

Put tea and coffee away in air-tight receptacles as soon as 
they are brought to the house. They lose much of their flavor 
by standing uncovered. 

FRUIT STAINS. 

To remove fruit stains from hands, wash in clear water, dry 
slightly, and hold hand to the flames of a lighted match. 



MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. 151 



FOR BURNS. 

Use a paste made of baking soda and water. 

FOR SORES. 

One patfc carbolic acid, ten parts glycerine, forms a prepa- 
ration for healing sores quickly. 

DRY CLEANBNC. 

Clean all flannels, knit and crocheted yarns with flour. Rub 
the articles in a pan of flour until clean, and shake thoroughly. 

FOR CLEANING CARPETS AND WOOL GOODS. 

One bar white ivory soap cut in fine shavings and boil in one 
gallon of hot water until dissolved; then add four ounces of 
borax, eight ounces of salsoda, stir until melted: four ounces of 
Fuller's earth; stir in slowly nine gallons of cold water, one-half 
pint alcohol. 

RENOVATING FURS. 

Take a large tin pan, put a pint of wheat flour in it, put the 
cloak in it, rub in thoroughly witn the hands until the flour 
looks dark; then if the fur is not white enough, rub it agahi 
with more clean flour; then rub it with pulverized chalk — 5 
cents worth is enough. This gives it a pearly-white look. It 
is also good to clean knit nubias. 

SOAP FOR FLANNELS. 

Two gallons of water, six bars of soap, one pint of ammonia, 
one of turpentine. 

TO CLEAN THE INSIDE OF A TEA POT. 

If the inside of your tea or coffee pot is black from long 
use, fill it with water, throw in a piece of hard soap; set upon 
the stove and let it boil from half an hour to an hour. It will 
clean as bright as a new dollar, and cost no work. 



152 MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES. ' 

SOAP. 

Mrs. Graham. 

One box or ball of Babbitts' potash, four pounds of grease, 
two gallons of water. Put the potash in water, and when dis- 
solved put in the grease, and boil four or five hours in an iron 
boiler; then throw in a small handful of salt, and pour into a 
washtub to cool. Then cut in any shape you care to. 

TOILET SOAP. 

The folowing soap is quite as good as any sold, and costs but 
little: Take two ounces of glycerine, an ounce of oil of sweet 
almonds, two ounces of florentine orris root, and melt with four 
ounces of mutton tallow, and a pound of English white castile 
soap. Before the soap sets it can be cut with a knife in any 
shape the fancy dictates. There is no soap superior to it, as a 
trial will prove. 

DIRECTIONS FOR DYEING OVER OTHER COLORS. 

Most goods to be colored are dyed over other colors. It is 
desirable to discharge as much of the old color as possible. 
This may be very well done by boiling in strong soapsuds and 
rinsing as long as any color is discharged. In all cases goods 
must be clean or dye will not take evenly. And it is best to 
wash v^ell with soap, soda or borax. Rinse perfectly in clean 
water, then dye. For colors on cotton use stronger liquors than 
the same dye on wool. For fine colors follow directions on 
packages of Peerless Dyes very carefully, and do not use an 
iron or old tin vessel. 

The cheapest and best way to black stockings, that will 
neither fade nor color the skin or clothing, is to buy them 
white or light colors of either silk, wool or cotton, and dye them 
with Peerless Dye. No other colors will stand the washing that 
stockings get. 



MISCELLANEOUS KECIPES. 153 



TAR WATER CURE FOR FALLING HAIR. 

I am a woman possessed with a little more than the allotted share 
of the crowning glory given to my sex, and when my beauty 
was seized with a freak to fall out and leave me, it is not sur- 
prising that I became alarmed. After trying everything (with 
no success), I chanced to see the tar water remedy prescribed 
in The Home. Prepared the water according to directions, 
used it faithfully, and now my head is covered with a soft down 
of neAv hair. I did not apply the tar to the scalp, however. I 
applied it ta the water thusly : To a pint of boiling soft water, 
two tablespoons of the tar; after stirring thoroughly set away 
to cool; when ready strain through a thin cloth into a bottle^ 
and the tar water is ready for use" 



(15) 



T. a. 



Plumber AND Gas Fitter, 



AND DEALER IK- 



^GAS FIXTURES-!^ 



T53 W^est Adadison Street, = CHICA^GO. 



SEWER BUILDING A SPECIALTY. 



Henry Wood & Co. 

ANTHRACITE^ COAL B'TUMINOUS . 
16 6l 18 WEST POLK STREET, 



Telephone 4.801. CHICAGO. 



ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Abbott, A. H. & Co i 

Aldrich Baker}- 66 

Allen, Walter S. & Co 26 

Arend's Drug Store 162 

Armour & Co 22 

Arnold Automatic Steam Cooker 11 

Baggot E I 

Ball's Corsets i 

Bank, National of Illinois 14 

Batavia Preserving Co " 46 

Berry, J 25 

Betts, George 70 

Blake, Shaw & Co 3 

Borland, M 138 

Bremner, D. F. Baking Co 70 

Brink's Chicago City Express Co 85, 106, 122, 129, 138, 141 

Burley & Company 2 

Burnham, Ed .... 36 

Carson, Pirie & Co 53 

Centemeri, P. & Co 53 

Cerealine Flakes 64 

Chambers, J. B. & Co 106 

Chicago & Atlantic R. R. Co 129 

Chicago Carpet Co 95 

Chicago Corset Co .• i 

Chicago & Eastern R. R. Co 128 

Chicago Gas Range Co 114 

Chicago Hansom Cab Co loi 

Chicago Herald 90 

Chicago & N. W. R. R. Co 19 

Chicago, Rock Island & P. R. R. Co 85 

Clancy, C. L 18 

Cleanf ast Hosiery Co 6 



ADVEETISEMENTS, 



Colton's Select Flavors 52 

Cook & McLain 6 

Crandall, Chas. E : 45 

Croker, Fred 114 

Curtice Bros. Co 52 

Daily Herald 90 

Daily News 35 

Dake Bakery 3 

Doremus Laundry i 

Eastland & Duddleston 24 

Eckardt 14 

Electric Lustre Starch Co 37 

Elkin, Michael .. 115 

Elmes, Charles F 18 

Fairbank, N. K 122 

Gale & Block 26 

Gaygen 3^ 

Gilmore, F. E i 

Gordon & Dilworth 132, 133 

Gossage, Charles & Co i 

Griffin, G. W "4 

Hamlin's Wizard Oil Co 79 

Hammond, Rev. H. L 3° 

Hansom Cab Co loi 

Hathaway, J. L 95 

Haymarket Theater 142 

Herald, Chicago 9° 

Herald, Saturday Evening 13S 

Hill, E. J. & Son 60 

Hinckley, O. W 140 

Horsford's Baking Powder 107 

Horsford's Phosphate ^39 

Hotchkin, C. M & Co 94 

Howell, E^A. & W 6? 

Huckin's Soups * 

Hyman 141 

Illinois Central Railroad Co : - • - 7 

Illinois Club Stables 100 

Jersey Milk Co 34 

Jevne, C. & Co S^ 

Johnson's Home Bakeries 7^^ 



A D V E p. T I S E M E N" T S . Ill 



Jordan, C. H. & Co 6i 

Kankakee Line 9^ 

Kennedy Biscuit Works 67 

Kimball, S. H. & Co m 

Kirk, Jas. S. & Co 40 

.'Lake Shore & Michigan Southern R. R. Co 56 

Lee, John P i57 

Leidigh, John J. & Co 4° 

LeRoy, Dr 14° 

Lyon & Healy . no 

MacDonald, Chas. & Co 36 

Magill, J. C. & Co 29 

Maxton, Miles 129 

McChesney, A. C 122 

McDonald, E. H. & Co 24 

McPherson's Pharmacy 94 

Merrick Thread Co i57 

Monroe, W. F 29 

Moody & Waters 83 

Moore, E. R. & Co 78 

Morning News 35 

Morse, E. D 25 

Moulton & Co Ill 

Mulford's Railroad Ticket Agency 71 

National Bank of Illinois 15 

Old Staten Island Dyeing Establishment 82 

Oliphant & Liddell 41 

O vington Bros 28 

Packer, C. W 115 

Parisian Suit Co i 

Park National Bank 115 

Peacock, C. D 14 

Pearse & Welchli 26 

Peerless Dyes 147 

Pillsbury,.Chas. A. & Co 82 

Proby, Tuttle & Co '. i 

Pyatt, Frank ". 13 

Reidy , Miss Sara 60 

Reilly & Barker 47 

Richardson & Boynton Co i 

Ridge's Food 26 



ADV ERTI SE M EN T S 



Safford & Sons. 



50 



Saturday Evening Herald 13S 

Sayre, Virginia 47 

Schlesinger & Mayer 66 

Scott's Electric Curler 60 

Selleck, A. C go 

Shourds, Storey & Kasper 57 

Shurley 147 

Silliman, J. C 5 

Slack, Charles H 28 

Smith's Cash Grocery g^ 

Snider, T. A 130 

Spalding, A. G. & Co 26 

Squair, Francis 51 

Stafford, R. W 57 

Stanton & Co 106 

Staten Island Dye Works 82 

Stearns, Perry & Co no 

St. Benedictus Olive Oil 51 

St. Margaret's School • 47 

Streeter 141 

Stumer 6 

Tobey Furniture Co i 

Tremont House 83 

Vick, James 100 

Walker, James H. & Co 50 

Warder, B. & Co 10 

Washington Ice Co 31 

Weare, P. B. & Co 27 

Weare Commission Co 27 

West End Advocate 44 

Wheeler & Wilson Sewing Machine Co 41 

White Mountain Freezer 123 

Willoughby, Hill & Co 55 

Wilson, J.J 147 

Wood, Henry & Co 154 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

ALBANY BREAKFAST CAKES (see 

Bread) 68 

ALLEMANDE, OR WHITE SAUCE 

(see Meats) 27 

ALMONDS, SALTED (see Entrees) . . 42 

AMBER SOUP (see Soups) 1 

ANGEL CAKE (see Cakes) 87 

APPLE DUMPLINGS (see Pudd- 
ings) 87 

APPLE FRITTERS {.see Puddings) . 87-88 

APPLE PUDDINGS (see Puddings) 89 

APPLE SAUCE (see Puddings) 99 

ASPARAGUS (see Vegetables) 45 

BEANS, BAKED (see Vegetables) .... 45 

BEEF (.see Meat's) 23-24 

BEVERAGES 139-141 

Blackberry Cordial 140 

Chocolate 139 

Coffee 139 

Ginger Wine 140 

Grape 140 

Rhubarb 140, 141 

Shrub 141 

Straberry Sherbet 141 

Tea 139 

BLANC MANGE (.see Zee.s) 124-129 

BREAD, ETC 65-78 

Albany Breakfast Cakes 68 

Breaktast Coffee Cakes 68 

Brown Bread 67-68 

Steamed 67-68 \ 

Biscuits, Tea 77 ; 

Cheese Toast 78 

Cinnamon Rolls 75 

Corn Bread 67 

Cracked Wheat 72 

English Breakfa.st Cakes 70 

Eggless Muffins 73 

English Mlfflns 73 



PAGE. 
BREAD, ETC.— CONTiNlTiD. 

For Dyspeptics 66 

French Toast 78 

French Rolls 75 

Graham Bread 70, 71 

Graham Cakes 71 

Graham or Rye Mush 72 

Graham Puffs 71 

Griddle Cakes 72 

Bread 70 

Sour Milk 70 

Hominy Bread 73 

Balls 72 

Grits 73 

Huckleberry Cake 77 

.Johnny Cake 69, 70 

Light Bread 66 

Made Easy 66 

Muffins 73, 74 

Eggless 73 

English Style 73 

Quick 74 

Raised 74 

Swiss 74 

Oatmeal 74,75 

Cakes 74 

(iems 75 

Mush 72 

Potato Bread 66 

Rolls 75,76 

Cinnamon '. 75 

French 75 

Oscar Wilde 76 

Parker House 76 

Tea 76 

Rye Cakes 77 

Tea 76 

Rusks 77 

Salt Yea.st 67 



Lee's Drug Stores, 

COR. HALSTED and HARRISON STREETS, 
COR, VAN BUREN and LAFLIN STREETS, 

ESTABLISHED A. D. ISOe. 

For the compounding of Physicians' and Surgeons' Prescrip- 
tions and the sale of 

GeQuiqe Diogs aim pietiiies. 

Drugs, Medicines and Medical Appliances retailed at Wholsale Prices. 



USE MERRICK'S SPOOL COTTON 




—IT IS— 
*.IX COKD, SOFT FINISH, 
FULL MEASITRE, 

11(1 Is equally well adapted for 
MACHINE or HAND SEWING. 

Merrick's Spool Cotton is ac- 
knowledged by tlie largest con- 
sumers of thread in this country 
to be Superior to all others, and 
it vou win favor us with a lest of 
the same we are confident you will 
use no other. 



Merrick's Ready-Y/ound Bobbins for Sewing Macbines. 



The latter are put up in packages 
of 200 yards each, as shown in cut. 
By their use time and labor are 
SAVED, and a more perfect stitch ob- 
tained. Tliese Bobbins are put up for 
all the standard machines, and are for 
sale by leading; dry goods houses and 
sewing m:\cliiiie agencies. 



Feacl/ Wound Bobbins /, 
WARRANTED 200 YARDS/ 
For Sewing Mdchinci /, 



%0 ^Rm.,i.T , 




General Western Agency, 205 Fifth Avenue, Chicago. 



INDEX. 



157 



PAGE. 

BREAD, ETC.— CONTIKUED. 

steamed Brown 67,68 

Swiss Yeast 67 

Tea Biscuits 77 

Toast. Cheese 78 

French 78 

Waffles 78 

Yeast 65 

CAKES 107-122 

Almond 108 

Almond. Mrs. Eckardt's ........ 108 

Angel 107 

Black 108 

Black Fruit lfJ9 

Caramel 109 

Chocolate 109 

Icing 122 

Filling 122 

Citron 110 

Cookies 119 

Ginger. Molasses, Sugar. 119 

Cream 110,111 

For filling 110 

Puffs 120 

Crullers 120 

Cup Ill 

Dark Ill 

Delicate Ill 

Doughnuts 120 

Drop Ill 

English Walnut 117 

Excelsior Sugar Gingerbread . . Ill 

Fig 112 

French Loaf 112 

Frosting, Chocolate 109 .122 

Gingersnaps 120 

Ginger. Soft 113 

Gold and Silver 113 

Ice Cream 113 

Icing 122 

Iceland White Fruit 113 

JeUy 113,114 

Jelly Roll 114 

Jumbles 120 

Lady Finger.s 121 

Loaf 114 

Maccaroons 121 

Marble 114,115 

Measures and Weights 107 

Mock Lady 115 



P.A.GE. 

CAKES.— Continued. 

Molasses 115 

Moonshines 115 

Nut 116 

Orange 116 

Pound 116 

Puffs, Yankee 121 

Raisin 116 

Ribbon 117 

Spice 117 

Sponge 117 

Walnut 117 

English 117 

Washington Ambrosia 118 

Wedding 118 

White 118 

And Fruit 118,119 

CANDY : . . 143-145 

Almonds Sugared 143 

Butterscotch 145 

Cream 143 

Chocolate 143 

French.. 145 

Molasses 144 

Opera 144 

Vanilla 145 

Molasses 144 

Nut 144 

Brazil 144 

Hickory 144 

Pop Corn Balls 145 

BREAKFAST COFFEE CAKES 68 

BROWN BREAD 67,68 

BROWN GRAVY 30 

CABBAGE {see New England Boiled 

Dinner) 62 

CABBAGE [nee Saladx) 53 

(see Pickles) 57 

CAKES 107-122 

CANDY 143-145 

CARVING 31-32 

CATSUP {see Pickles) 62 

CHEESE SANDWICHES 41 

CHICKEN {see Poultry) 34 

{see Saladx) 

CONDIMENTS 'see Pickles) 57-63 

CRACKED WHEAT {see Bread) 72 

CROQUETTES [see Entrees) 37-39 

CUSTARDS {see Puddings) 100-101 

DRESSING 



158 



INDEX 



pa(;e. 

UBESSING.— CONTINITSD. 

For Poultry 36 

For Salads 51, 52 

DUCKS (:<ee P<mltry) 34 

DYSPEPTICS (see BreaO. for) 66 

EdGS (see Entree.'^) 39-41 

ENGLISH BREAKFAST CAKES [see 

Bread) 70 

ENTP.EES, ETC 37-48 

Almonds. Salted 42 

Cheese Sandwiches 41 

Straws 41-42 

Chicken Cream 39 

Croquettes 37-39 

Chicken 37 

Dressing tor 37 

Egg 38 

Lobster 30 

Potato 39 

Rice and Meat 38 

Veal or Chicken 38-39 

Eggs 39-42 

Balls 40 

Boiled 39 

Creamed 50 

Omelette 40-41 

Poached 41 

Stuffed 41 

Maccaroni 42 

With Cheese 42,43 

FISH 13-18 

Balls 15,16 

Baked 13.14 

Boiled 14 

Cod 15 

Codfish Cakes 16 

Escaloped 15 

Mackerel .._ 16,17 

FreshBoiled 16 

Salt Boiled 17 

Salt Broiled 17 

Oysters 19-21 

Picking Out. Directions for 13 

Salmon 17 

Boiled 17 

Broiled 17 

Middle Slice of 17 

Salt Cod in Cream 15 

Smelts 18 

Baked 18 



PAGE. 

FISH.— CoNTiNi-rED.— Smelts. 

Fried 18 

Turbot 18 

FLOATING ISLAND (see Buddings) 101 

FRENCH TOAST (.vee CreM) 78 

FRITTERS (see Puddinrja) 93 

FRUIT JELLIES, PRESERVES, 
ETC 131-138 

Apple 131 

Compote 131 

Jam 132 

Jelly '. , . 131 

Blackberry Jam 132 

Chenif-s 133 

Brandieu 133 

Citron 134 

Pickled 134 

Spiced 136 

Cranberry 132 

Jam 132 

Jelly 132 

Currant 136 

Jam 133 

Spiced 136 

Gooseberries 133 

Jam 133 

Spiced 136 

Orange Preserves 138 

Jam 138 

Peaches 135 

Brandied 135 

Pickled 135 

Preserver' 135 

rears 131 

Coni!.ote 132 

Jelly 131 

Pickled 134 

Potted 132 

Plums 136 

Preserved 138 

Spiced 136 

Punch Jelly 138 

Quinces 136.137 

Baked 136 

Jelly 137 

Raisins Pickled 135 

Raspberry 133 

Jam 133 

Rhubarb 138 

Preserved 138 



INDEX, 



159* 



PAGE. 

FRUIT JELLIES, PRESERVES, ETC.— 
Continued. 

Strawberries, preserved 135 

Jelly 138 

Watermelon 138 

Pickled 134 

GAME (see Poultry) 36 

Jelly Sauce for 36 

GOOSE, BOILED (see Pmdtry) 34 

GRAHAM BREAD 70-72 

GRIDDLE CAKES (.see Bread) 70-72 

HAM (Hw MmU) 25 

HOLLANDAISE SAUCE (see Salads) 52 

HOMINY 72,73 

ICES. BLANC MANGE. ETC 123-125 

Blanc Mange 125-126 

Chocolate 125 

Coffee 126 

Delicious 126 

Gelatine 126 

Fairy Butter 124 

Ice Cream 123-125 

Italian 123 

New York 124 

Peach 123 

TuttiFrutti 125 

Maccaroon Glace 124 

Nesselrode Pudding 124 

Orange Ice 124 

Orange Souffle 124 

Hneapple Sherbet 125 

Sherbet 125 

JOHNNY CAKE 69-70 

KIDNEY. STEWED 26 

LAMB {nee Meats) 26-27 

MACCARONI (see Entrees) 42, 43 

MACKEREL (.tee Fish) 16. 17 

MAYONAISE SAUCE 52 

MEATPIE 27 

MEATS (see Entrees, Pcniltry, etc.). . 23-36 

Beef 23, 24 

AlaMode 23 

Corned 24 

Corned Beef Hash 25 

New England Boiled Din- 
ner 26 

Pickle for Beef, etc 25 

Roast 23 

Steak, Broiled 24 

Stewed 24 



PAGE. 
MEATS.— CONTINTED. 

Ham 25 

Baked 25 

Boiled 25 

Escaloped 25 

Pickle for 25 

Kidney, Stewed 27 

Lamb 26-28 

Boiled with Caper Sauce . . 26 

Chops with Peas 28" 

Hashed, on Toast 27 

Roast Leg 26 

Roast, with Mint Sauce ... 26" 

Roulade of 28 

Meat Pie. Baked 27 

Pigs Feet 28 

Pork 27 

Chops 27 

Tenderloin Fried 27 

Sauces 2&-30 

Allemande or White 27 

Brown Gravy 30' 

Caper 26 

Scotch Stew 2T 

Tongue 28^ 

Tripe 2ff 

Broiled 28 

Fried 38 

Veal 28-30 

Cutlets.. 28 

Loaf 29- 

Pot Pie 30 

Roast 29 

Stuffed. 29- 

Venison . 30' 

MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES 147-153 

Bronzing 148 

Bm-ns 151 

Cleaning Carpets and Wool 

Goods 151 

Cleansing Cream 147' 

Clean Inside of Tea or Coffee Pot 151 

Destroy Cockroaches 150 

Dry Cleaning 151 

Dyeing 152 

Economical Fruit Preservative. 148 

For Green Corn 148 

Fruit Stains 150 

Furniture Polish 149 

Furs, Renovating 151 



160 



INDEX, 



PAGE. 

MISCELLANEOUS RECIPES.-CONTINUED. 

Iron Rust 148 

Jars jBreaklng 149 

Laundry Polish 148 

Paint From Wood, to Remove . . 148 

Pot Pourrl 147 - 

Soap 15L152 

For Flannel 151 

Toilet : 152 

Sores 151 

Sweep Carpets 148 

Tar Water for Falling Hair. ... 153 

Wash Silk Handkerchiefs 149 

MLTF'FINS 73, 74 

JIUSTARD 53 

NEW ENGLAND BOILED DINNER 26 

OAT MEAL tsee bread) 72. 74, 75 

OYSTERS (see fish) 19-21 

Broiled 19 

Creamed 19 

Escaloped 19, 20 

Fried 20 

Little Pigs in Blankets 20 

Patties 20 

Filling for 20 

Pickled 21 

Stews, Delmonico's 21 

PASTRY 79-85 

Puff Paste 79. 80 

PIES • 80-85 

Cherry 80 

Cocoanut.....: 80. 81 

Custard 81 

Fruit 81 

Lemon 82. 83 

Lemon Custard 82 

Mince Meat 84 

Orange 82, 83 

Peach and Apricot 83 

Pumpkin 85 

Raspberry, Cream 84 

Rhubarb 85 

PICKING OUT FISH 13 

PICKLES 57-63 

Cabbage 57 

Cucumber 57, 58 

Sweet 58 

Ripe 58 

Mixed 59 

OliveOil 59 



PAGE. 

PICKLES. —Continued. 

Chili Sauce :..'' 59 

Piccalilli 60 

Chow Chow 60 

Tomato 61 

Green 61 

Fggs ' 61 

Peaches 61 

Catsup 62 

French 62 

Oyster 62 

Tomato 62, 63 

Mustard for meat 63 

PICKLE BEEF, HAMS ETC 25 

PIG'S FEET '28 

PLUM PUDDIN(t 95-96 

PORK {see Mea1x\ 27 

POTATO BREAD 66 

POULTRY 31-26 

Carving. Science of 31-32 

Chicken 32-34 

Creamed, with Mushrooms 33 

Fried v^.lth Oysters 33 

Fire 32 

Pressed 32 

Raquet 33 

Terrapin 34 

Dressing for Poultry 36 

Duck 34 

Dressing 34 

Mock 34 

Roast Wild 34 

Goose, Boiled 34 

Jelly Sauce for Game 36 

Turkey 34-36 

Boned.... 34,35 

Dressing 35 

Gravy ■■ 36 

Stuffed, with Glblet Sauce 35 
PUDDINGS, CUSTARDS, CREAMS. 

ETC 87 

Apple Dumplings • • . 87 

Genuine 87 

Steamed - 87 

Apple Fritters 87,88 

Fritter Batter 88 

Apple Pudding 88. 89 

Apple Sauce 99 

Apple Snow 89 

Apple Tapioca, Boiled 88 



Il^DE X 



161 



PAGE. 

PUDDINGS, CUSTAEDS, CREAMS, ETC.— 

CONTINXTED. 

Bananua Souffle 105 

Baroness 90 

Batters, Boiled 89. 90 

Beautiful Dessert 104 

Brown Betty 90 

Cabinet 90,91 

Cherry 91 

Chocolate 91 

Cocoanut 91 

Cottage 91 

Custard 100, 101 

Almond 100 

Concord 100 

Currant or Raspberry 100 

Lemon 101 

Orange 101 

Dainty Dessert 99 

Date or Fruit 92 

Delicate 92 

Delmonico's 92 

English 92 

Family Style 92 

Fig 93 

Floating Island. . .......' 101 

Fritters 93 

Graham 93 

Indian 93 

Baked 94 

Boiled 94 

Irish Moss 102 

Jelly 102 

Arrow Root 102 

Lemon 102 

Wine 102 

Lemon 94 

Lemon Butter 106 

Lemon Honeycomb 105 

Maryland Float 105 

Meringues 104 

Lemon 103,104 

Molasses 94 

Omelet Souffle 105 

Orange 95 

Plum 95 

Baked 95, 96 

English 95 

Prune 97 

Railroad 97 



PAGE. 

PUDDINGS. CUSTARDS. CREAMS, ETC.— 

COKTINTTED. 

Rice. Delicious 97 

Tapioca 98 

Baked 98 

Cream 98 

Sago 98 

Sauces 103 

Delicious Brown 103 

Fine Flavoring 103. 

Tarts 99. 100 

French 103 

Nice 103 

Wine 103 

Sponge Cake 99 

Cream loo 

Lemon 99 

Transparent 99 

ROLLS (see Bread) 75, 76 

RUSKS (see Brecul) 77 

RYE TEA CAKES (see Bread) 76 

SALADS 5L56 

Chicken 54 

Combination for 56 

Lobster 54 

Potato 55 

Shrimp 55 

Dressings. Sauces, etc 51. 53 

Cabbage 53 

Celery 52 

Chicken Curry 54 

Cream 51 

HoUandaise 52 

Mayonaise 52 

Mustard 53 

Tomato 53 

SALMON [see Fish) 17 

SANDWICHES, CHEESE 41 

SCOTCH STEW 27 

SMELTS (seeFish) 18 

SOUPS 1,11 

Amber 1 

Bean 2 

Beef 2 

Bisque of Crabs 4 

Brown Gravy 8 

Carrot 3 

Celery Cream 3 

Clam Broth 4 

Crabs. Bisque of 4 



162 



INDEX. 



PAGE. 

.SOUPS.— Continued. 

Cream 5 

Cream of Celery 4 

Cream of Cerealine 5 

Cream of Rice 5 

Good Family 6 

Green Turtle 10 

Julienne 5 

Lobster 9 

Mock Turtle 10 

Mulligatawny 6 

Noodle 6 

Oyster Plant 7 

Pea 7 

Without Meat 7 

Split 7 

Potato 8 

Rich Brown Gravy 8 

Tomato 9,10 

Cream 9 

Turtle 

Green 10 

Mock 10 

Veal 11 

Vegetable 11 

STEAMED BROWN BREAD 67, 68 

STUFFED OLIVES 55 

TARTS 99, 100 

TOMATO SAUCE 53 

TONGUE (See Meats) 28 

TRIPE 28 

TURBOT (.See Fish) 18 

TURKEY : . . . . 34-36 



PAGE. 

VEAL {Sec Meats) 28-30 

VEGETABLES 45-50 

Asparagus 45 

Beans, a la Bo.ston 45 

Carrots, Boiled 45 

Cauliflower 46 

Corn Pudding 46 

Egg Plant 46 

Fried 46 

Onions 47 

a la Creme 47 

a ritalienne 47 

Potatoes ■. 47-49 

a la Creme 47. 48 

Fancy Mashed 48 

French Fried 48 

Puffs 48 

Ribbons ". 48 

Texas Baked 49 

Succotash 49 

Tomatoes 49, 50 

Baked 49 

Broiled 50 

Fried 49 

Raw with Sugar 50 

Stuffed 50 

Turnips in Gravy 50 

Vegetables, Green ' 50 

VENISON 30 

WAFFLES 78 

WELSH RAREBIT 43 

YEAST... 65 



Healthy Digestion, 

A Clear Complexion, 

Bright £yes, 

A round form, an elastic step, and last, but not least, 
a happy state of mind, is the dearest wish of Dyspeptics 
and the Debilitated g-enerally. No other Tonic is so 
well calculated to bring- about these results as 

AREND S 

BEEF, IRON AND WINE, 

WITH PHOSPHATES, 

The Most Successful Tonic of the Age. 

// promptly Invigorates the bra'ui and nervous svste/n. It is a superior liver 
and kidney re/iu'Jy as well as a blood purifier. It cures Rheuinatism and Ma- 
laria, lliotisands sing its praises. 

Being skillfully made from the best materials, it is as pleasant to the 
taste as rich and fruity wine, adapting it especially to those delicate organ- 
izations which revolt at the ordinary nauseous tonics. 

Pint Bottles $1.00 

Quart Bottles $1.50 

Discount on One-Half Doz. and One Doz. Orders. 

One Gallon Jugs $5.00 

Sent promptly by express upon receipt of price. Beware of Imitations. 
No other preparation of same or similar name is of the same composition 
or possesses the same medicinal properties. 

AREND S DRUG STORE, 

Hadison Street, Cor. Fiftii Avenue, Cbicago. 



LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 



011 791 771 A 



-^'»#%; 






4^