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Full text of "Parliamentary Papers"

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ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS 



THIRTY-SIX VOLUMES. 



--(25.)- 



SHIPPING AND TRADE. 



Session 
5 February 6 August 1861. 



VOL. LVIII. 



1861. 



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ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS: 
1861. 



THIRTY-SIX VOLUMES:— CONTENTS OF THE 
TWENTY-FIFTH VOLUME. 



D'.B. — THE Figures at the beginning of the line, correspond with the N® at the 
foot of each Paper; and the Figures at the end of the line, refer to the MS. Paging 
of the Volumes arranged for The House of Commons. 



Shipping : 

261. Return of the Number and Tonnage of Sailing Vessels Registered at each of the 
Ports of Great Britain and Ireland, including the Isle of Man and the Channel 
Islands, distinguishing those under and those above Fifty Tons Register, on the 
31st day of December 1860 : — Similar Return of Steam Vessels and their Ton- 
nage: — Return of the Number and Tonnage of Vessels that entered and cleared 
Coastwise in the Colonies and Ports of Great Britaiuy 1860 : — Number and 
Tonnage of Sailing Vessels and Steam Vessels Registered at each of the Ports 
of the Colonies of the United Kingdom respectively, on the 81st day of December 
1860 : — Number and Tonnage of New Vessels built in the United Kingdom, 
and at each of the British Possessions respectively, in the Year 1860, &c. : — 
Return of the Number of Foreign-built Vessels and their Tonnage Registered, 
1860 : — Return of the Shipping employed in the Trade of the United Kingdom, 
exhibiting the Number and Tonnage of Vessels that entered Inwards and cleared 
Outwards (including their repeated Voyages), separating British from Foreign 
Vessels, also Steam from Sailing Vessels, and distinguishing the Trade with 
each Country, in the Year 1860 (in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, 
No. 334, of Session 1860) - - - - - - - • -p. i 

Apprentices (Merchant Service) : 

170. Return of the Number of Apprentices bound as Mariners in the Merchant Service, 
in each Year, from 1836 to 1860, both inclusive, distinguishing the Number 
Bound under 16 Years of Age, from 16 to 18 Years of Age, both inclusive, and 
the Number above 18 Years of Age; also, showing the Number Bound for a 
Period not exceeding Four Years, and the Number Bound for any longer Period, 
or until 21 Years of A^e, and the Total Number in each Year, and the Total 
Number of each Class m the whole Period, and the whole Number - 21 

British Registered Vessels : 

649. Returns of the Number and Tonnage of British Registered Vessels, exclusive of 
River Steamars emjdoyed in the Home and Foreign Trade of the United King- 
dom in the Years 1858, 1859 and 1860 (not including repeated Voyages), with 
the Number of Men employed, classified according to capacity, and including 
the Masters (in continuation of the Return, Appendix No. 48, of the Commission 
for Manning the Navy) : — And, of the Number of Apprentices registered as 
existing in the several Years from 1835 to 1860 inclusive (in continuation of the 
Return, Appendix No. 49, of the Commission for Manning the Navy) - 23 

Crookhaven Lighthouse^ ?cc. : 

64* Copy of aU Correspondence between the Board of Trade, the Trinity House, and 
the Port of Dublin Corporation respectively, relative to the original Erection 
upon Roch Island of the present Li^thouse for Crookhaven Harbour, or to the 
proposed Erection either of a new LighUiouse, or of a Beacon Tower upon the 
Alaerman Rock : — AncI, similar Return as to the placing of a new Coast light 
betweai Ae Fastnets and the Old Head of Ki^sale - - - - 25 

Vol. LVIII* — Sese. i86i, a 2 {continued) 

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iv ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS: 1861. 



Dublin Ballast Corporation : 

542. Return of the Total Receipts of the Dublin Ballast Corporation for Tonna^ and 
Quay Wall Dues levied on all Vessels entering the Port in the Year endms: the 
31st day of December 1B60 ; and stating separately the Amount of such Dues 
received from — 1st. Steam Vessels; 2d. Vc^seU Laden with Coal ; dd. Vessds 
Laden with Timber ; 4th. Vessels Laden with Corn, and other Descriptions of 
Cargo .-----.---- p. 65 

Dublin Port : 

541. Accounts of Receipts and Disbursements by the Corporation for Preserving and 
Improving the Port of Dublin, from the dlst day of December 1868 to the latest 
Period to which the same have been made up : — And, of Monies borrowed, 
stating the Annual Amount of Interest payable thereon, and surplus Receipt 
above Dbbursements, &c. (in continuation of Parliamentary Papers, No. 57 of 
Session 1861, No. 105 of Session 1853, No. 271 of Session 1855, No. 469 of 
Session 1858, and No. 115 of Sesuon 1860) 67 

Foreign Shipping : 

123. Returns of the Compensation for Differential Dues on Foreign Ships, received 
under the Acts relating to Reciprocity Treaties in each Year since 1820 by the 
several Bodies now in receipt of such Compensation, with the Aggregate Amount 
received by each, the Average Annual Amount received by each for the Five 
Years from 1824 to 1828 inclusive, and the Average Annual Amount received 
by each for the Five Years from 1856 to 1860 inclusive:— -And, of the Claims 
for Compensation for Differential Dues on Foreign Ships, which have ceased, 
with the Causes or Presumed Causes of their Cessation - . - 71 

Lighthouses Abroad : 

513. Statement of the Amount expended in the Construction, Repair and Maintenance 
of Lighthouses in British Possessions Abroad, for which Tolls are levied under 
the Merchant Shipping Act Amendment Act (18 k 19 VtcL c. 91), and the 
Amount of Tolls received from the Year 1856 to the 31st March 1861 - 83 

Mercantile Marine Fund : 

387. Account of the Mercantile Marine Fund, under the Act 17 & 18 Vict. c. 104, 
s. 429, showing the Income and Expenditure for the Year 1860 - - 85 

Merchant Seamen's Fund : 

385. Account of the Receipt and Expenditure under the Seamen's Fund Winding-up 
Act, from 1st January to 81st December 1860 ; with an Account of the Sums 
Received and Paid for the Wages and Effects of deceased Seamen in the Year 
1860 93 

Pilotage : 

243. Return of all Bye-Laws, Regulations, Orders, or Ordinances relating to Pilots or 
Pilotage for the time being in force, issued by the respective Pilotage Authorities 
in the United Kingdom : — 2. Of the Names and Ages of the Pilots or Appren- 
tices licensed or authorised to act by the respective Pilotage Authorities, and of 
all Pilots or Apprentices acting either mediately or immediately under such 
Authorities, whether so licensed or authorised or not : — 8. Of the Service for 
which each Pilot or Apprentice is licensed, &c. - - - - -101 

Quarantine : 

544. Copy of the Papers relating to Quarantine communicated to the Board of Trade 
on the 30th day of July 1861 ..--..-. 225 

Steam Vessels : 

371. Return, in a Tabular Form, with Consecutive Numbers, of the whole of the Steam 
Vessels Registered in the United Kingdom on or bdbre the 1st day of January 
1860 ; stating various Particulars ; with an Index, giving the Names of the 
Vessels in Alphabetical Order, with Numbers to each, corresponding with the 
Consecutive Numbers in the Return (in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, 
No. 449, of Session 1860) 275 



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ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS: 1861- 



Vessels and Tonnage, tec. : 

334, Return showing the Number of Vessels and Tonnage entered Inwards and cleared 
Outwards at each of the Twelve Principal Ports of the United Kingdom ; also, 
the Official and Declared Value of Imports and Exports for each of the said 
Ports, during the Year 1B60 (in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 450^ 
of S^ion 1860) .----.... p. 33J 

Wrecks and Casualties : 

[281 1.] Abstract of the Returns to the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade» 
of Wrecks and Casualties which occurred on and near the Coasts of the United 
Kingdom from 1st January to the Slst December 1860; with a Statement of 
the Number of Lives lost and saved, of the Amounts granted as Rewards for the 
Salvage of Life, &c, ----.-.-•- 335 

TRADE: 

Bacon, A:c. (Ireland) : 

655. Return, for each of the last Eight Years, of the Exports from each Port in Irelamd 
to Foreign Countries, and to British Possessions Abroad, of Bacon in Bales^ 
Hams in Casks, Pork in Tierces or Casks, and Butter in Firkins - - 44s 

Beer Licences : 

215. Returns of the Number of Persons who have taken out Licences to brew Beer 
in England^ Wales, Scotland and Ireland, in the Year ending the dlst day of 
December 1860 : — And, of the Number of such Licences, the Gross Amount 
charged for, and the Net Revenue derived from the same ; showing the Gross 
Amount charged for a Licence according to the Number of Barrels of Beer to 
be brewed, the Number of Licences issu^ at each different Rate of Charge, and 
the Revenue derived therefrom ------- - 445 

Brewers, kc : 

162. Account of the Number of Persons in each of the several Collections of the United 
Kingdom Licensed as Brewers, Victuallers, to sell Beer to be drunk on the 
Premises, and to sell Beer not to be drunk on the Premises ; stating the Number 
of each Class who brew their own Beer, and the Quantity of Malt consumed by 
them, particularising each Class in each Collection: — And, Number of Barrels 
of Beer Exported mm the United Kingdom, and the Declared Value thereof,, 
and where Exported to, from the Ist day of October 1859 to the 1st day of 
October 1860 ; distinguishing England^ Scotland and Ireland (in continuation of 
Parliamentary Paper, No. 242, of Session i860) - * - - . ^^j 

Coals, Cinders, and Culm, &c. : 

154. Quantities of Coals, Cinders and Culm, and Patent Fuel, Shipned at the several 
Ports of England^ Scotland and Ireland, Coastways, to otW Ports of the 
United Kingdom, in the Year 1869 ; distinguishing the Quantity Shipped at 
each of the said Ports, as compared with the Year 1868 : — Quantities and 
Declared Value of Coals, Cinders and Culm, and Patent Fuel, Exported from 
the several Ports of England, Scotland and Ireland, to Foreign Countries, and 
the British Settlements Abroad, in the Year 1869; distinguiiihiug the Countries 
to which the same were sent, and comparing the same with the Year 1868 ; 
also distinguishing the Ports of the united Kingdom from which the same 
were Shipped : — ^Quantities of Coals, Cinders and Culm, and Patent Fuel, 
Exported from the United Kingdom, in the Year 1869, with the Rate and 
Amount of Duty thereon : — And, Quantities of Coals and Patent Fuel brought 
Coastways and by Inland Navigation into the Port of London, during the Year 
1869, comparing the same with the Quantities brought during the Year 
1868 46a 

Copper, &c. : 

235. Return of all Exports and Imports of Copper and Copper Ore, and Regulus ; Tin 
and Tin Ore, Lead and Lead Ore, and Spelter, lor Twelve Months* to the Slst 
day of December 1860 - - - - - - - - -461 

Exportation (France): 

254. Return of the Principal Articles Entered for Expoitation to France from the 
various Ports of the United Kingdom, together with the Value of the same^ 
from the 1st day of April 1860 to the Slst day of March 1861, both inclusive : 
—And, similar Return for the san^ Period in the previous Year - - 475 

Vol. LVIIL— Sess. 1861 . A3 (continued) 



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a ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS: 1861. 



Foreign Wine : 

473. Account of the Quantity of Foreign Wine Cleared for Consumption, and the 
Number of Testa made for ascertainment of the Duty^ in the Quarter ended 
the dOth day of June 18((1 (in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 193, 
of the present Session) - -- - - - -- P»479 

Hops: 

151. Returns of the Total Number of Acres of Land in the United Kingdom under the 
Cultivation of flops in the Year 1860 ; distinguishing the Number of Acres in 
eadi Parish : — Of the Amount of Duty charged on Hops in each Collection of 
the Growth of the Year 1860 : — Of the Quantity of JSritish Hops Exported 
from the United Kingdom to Foreign Countries, 1860^ distinguishing the 
Countries to which the same have been Exported : — Of the Quantity of Foreign 
Hops Exported from the United Kingdom to Foreign Countries, 1860, distin- 
guishing the Countries to which the same have been Exported : — Of the Quantity 
of Foreign Hops Imported into the United Kingdom, 1860 : — Of the Total 
Number of Pounds Weight of Foreign Hops charged with Duties for Home 
CoQsiunption, 1860: — And, of the Quantity of Foreign Hops in Bond on the 
1st day of January 1860 - - - - - - - - -481 

530. Returns of the Quantity of British Hops Exported from the United Kingdom to 
Foreign Countries, from the 1st January to the 30th June 1861, distinguishing 
the Countries; to which the same have been Exported, Sic.; the Quantity of 
Foreign Hops Exported from the UniteJ Kingdom to Foreign Countries, from 
January to June 1861, disdnguishing the Countries to Avhich tlie same have 
been Exported ; the Quantity of Foreign Hops Imported into the United King- 
dom, from January to June 1863 ; the Total Number of Pounds Weight of 
Foreign Hops charged with Duties for Home Consumption, from January to 
June 1861 : — And, the Quantity of Foreign Hops in Bond, July 1861, stating 
the Ports at which they are Bonded (in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, 
No. 161, of Session 1861) -.------- 495 

146. Returns of the Total Amount of Hop Duty Charge d in the last Two Years, 1859 
and 1860, respectively: — Of the Amount of Duty for 1859 Due and Unpaid 
on the 1st day of March 1861, and on the 1st day of April 1861 : — And, of 
the Amount of Duty for 1660 Due and Unpaid on the same Days respec* 
tively, arranged in <»ach instance according to their different Collections - 501 

Tlhcit Distillation (Irefcind): 

256, Return of all Detections oT, and Commitments for, the Offence of Illicit Distilla- 
tion in Ireland, from the 1st day of January to the 31st day of March 1861 : 
— And, similar Return for the^ame Period m 1860 - - - - 503 

Malt: 

42. Return of Malt made in Bond, or allowed a Drawback of Duty for Distillation and 
for Exportation, in the Year ending: the 80th day of September 1860 (in con- 
tinuation of Pariiamentary Paper, No, 445, of Session 1860) - - - 505 

318. Return of the Total Number of Quarters of Malt made in the United Kingdom, 
from the 1st day of October 1859 to the 1st day of October 1860 ; distinguishing 
the Quantity made, and the Quantity used by Brewers, by Victuallers, and by 
Retail Brewers, in each Country (in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, 
No. 243, of Session 1860^ - - - 507 

221. Return lowing the Amount of Malt Duty charged, and the Amount collected, in 
catch Quarter of the Years ending the 3ist day of March 1858, 1859, 1860, 
and 1861 ; distinguishing the Rounds in which these AmoantB wtve charged 
and collected respectively (in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 101, of 
the present ^'^ession) ---------- 509 

Paper Duty : 

268. Return showing, in parallel Columns, the Amount of Papei* Duty charged, and 
the Amount collected, in each Quarter o*' the Years ending the dlst day of 
March 1859, 1860, and 1861 ; distinguishing the Rounds in which these 
Amounts weie charged and collected respectively (in the form of Parliamentary 
Paper, No. 101, of the present Session) - - - - - -513 

Paper Mills : 

256. Betum of the Number of Paper Mills at Work in England, Wales, Scotland, and 
Ireland respectively, in each Year from 18SS to 1856 (in continuation, to the 
present day, of Parliamentary Paper, No. 109, of Session 1, 1867) - 6*6 



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ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS: 1861. vii 



Rags: 

97e. Retuni of tbe Names of those Countries in Ettrofe which pennit of the Fk«e 
Export of Rags ; and of those other Countries that prohibit such Export, or 
impose a Duty thereon ; with the Amount per Ton of such Duty m each 
case ----.--..--- p. giy 

Spirits : 

144. Returns showing tbe Total Number of Grallons of Proof Spirits Distilled in 
England^ Scotland, and Ireland respectively^ for the Year ending the 3 1st day 
of December 1860 :— Of the Number of Gallons of. Proof Spirits on which 
Duty was Paid for Home Consumption in each of the Three Kingdoms : — 
Number of Gallons of Proof Spirits Imported into each Kingdom from each of 
the others respectively : — Number of Gallons of Proof Spirits Permitted out of 
Distillers' Stocks in Englandf 8cc. : — Number of Proof Gallons of Spirits 
Distilled in Englandj Scotland, and Ireland^ &c. :— Number of Proof Gallons 
of British Compounds and Spirits of Wine Permitted from Rectifiers* Stocks 
for Exportation, 1855 to 1800 : — Number of Gallons of Spirits in Bonded 
Stores :-^Number of Gallons of Proof Spirits Permitted out from Distillers' 
Stocks for Exportation, 1860 : — Number of Gallons of Methylic Alcohol Sold 
by the Excise, &c (in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 209, of Ses- 
sion 1860) -.-.-.-.--. gig 

479. Returns showing the Rate of Doty charged upan Homenaaade Spirits in Enalandj 
Sootland, and Ireland respectively, for each Year from 1814 down to the 1st 
day of April 1861 ; the Number of Gallons Distilled in each Year during the 
same Period in Englofid, Scotland, and Ireland respectively, distinguishing the 
Quantity used for Home Consumption from the Quantity Exported or used 
oUierwise ; the Number of Distillers, and the Number of Rectifiers in each 
Year during the same Period in England, Scotland, and Ireland respectively : 
—And, of the Spirits Exported from England, Scotland, and Ireland respec- 
tively to Foreign Ports, from 1850 to 1860, and to the Slst day of March 
1861, &c. ------------ 525 

Spirits and Malt : 

512. Return of the Consumption of Spirits, British, Foreign, and Colonial, in the 
United Kingdom, from 1856 to 1861 : — And, Account of the Number of 
Bushels of Malt charged with Duty, from 1856 to 1861 ; the Rate of Dut^, 
and the Amount charicM, with Aferaee Price^^f Barlej^ per Bushel, Sec. &c. (m 
continuation of Parliamentary Paper, *No. 25, of Session 2, 1857) - - 531 

Spirits, Wine, and Malt : 

534. Return of the Quantities of Home-made and Foreign Spirits, Wine, and Malt 
chained with Duty, and entered for Consumption in the United Kingdom, for 
the Six Months ending the SOth day of June 1861 .... 535 

Spirits (Ireland) : 

146. Return of all Spirit Duties paid in Ireland during each Year, from the 1st day of 
January 1850 to the 1st day of January 1861, distinguishing each Quarter in 
each Year, with the Rate of Duty in each Quarter - - - - 537 

Sugar, &C. : 

281. Return of the Quantities of Sugar Imported and retained for Home Consump- 

tion ; with the Rate of Duty : — Account of the Imports into the United King- 
dom of Sugar, Molasses, iCum, Coffee, Cocoa and Cotton, &c., from the West 
Indies and the British Possessions, &c. : — And also, an Account of the Quan- 
tity of Refined Sugar and Sugar Candy Imported into the United Kingdom, 
for the Years 180o\o 1859 541 

282. Return of the Quantity of Foreign Sugar Ent^ed for Home Consumption during 

each Year, from 1844 to 1860 inclusive; dbtinguishing Refined from Unre- 
fined ; and also the several Places from whence such Sugar was Imported (in 
continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 895, of Session 1860) - - 567 

Sugar and iMolasses : 

41. Return of the Quantities of Sugar and Molasses used in Brewing Beer and Dis- 
tilling Spirits, for the Year ending the SOth day of September 1860 (in conti- 
nuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 408, of Session 1860) - - - 573 

Vol. LVIIL— Sess. 1861. a 4 [^miIzIT^^'GoOqIc 

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Mii ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS: 1861. 



Tariffs (France) : 
£2876.] Supplemental Return relating to Foreign Tariffs for France - - p. 575 

Tariffs : 

[2779.] Return of the New and Old Rates of Duty upon the several Articles (so &r as the 
same can be given) levied by the Tariffs of Foreign Countries, in which Altera- 
tions have bein made, and showing the Per-centage Increase and Decrease of 
Duties, and the Date of their Alteration, from the dlst December 1859 to 25th 
February 1801, including the List of Countries - - - - - 581 

Tea: 

246* Account showing the Quantity of Tea annually Consumed in the United King- 
dom, with tne Average Kate and Aggregate Amount of Duty Collected 
thereon ; also, the Average Price, inclusive and exclusive of the Duty, and the 
Average Quantity Consumed by each Individual of the Population, from 1801 
to 1860, inclusive •---. ••.«. 627 

Wine: 

]9S« Account of the Quantity of Foreign Wine Cleared for Home Consumption, 
between the Ist day of Jdiiuary and the 81st day of March 1861, both in- 
clnsive ---•--••--•- 629 



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SHIPPING. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commont^ 
dated 21 February 1861 y—fory 

RETURN " of the Number and Tonnage of Sailing Vessels Registered at each of the Ports of Great 
Britain and Ireland^ including the hie of Man and the Channel Islands, distmguishing those under and 
those above Fifty Tons Register, on the 31st day of December 1860 :" 

^ Similar RETURN of Steam Vesseus and their Tonnage :" 

"RETURN of the Number and Tonnage of Vessels that entered and cleared Coastwise, at each of the 
Ports of Great Britain and Ireland, Isle of Man, and Channel Islands (including their repeated Voyages)* 
distinguishing British from Foreign Vessels, and Steam from Sailing Vessels, between the 31st day of 
December 1869 and the 31st day of December 1860 :" 

*' Like RETURN from and to the Colonies; further distinguishing British from Foreign Vessels; also, 
from and to Foreign Ports, also distinguishing British from Foreign Vessels :'* 

*' Aggregate RETURN of the Number and Tonnage of Vessels entered and cleared at each of the Portg 
of Cheat Britain and Ireland, Isle of Man, and Channel Islands (including their repeated Voyages)^ 
in the Coasting, Colonial, and Foreign Trades, in the Year 1860; distinguishing British from Foreign 
Vessels : *' 

** RETURN of the Number and Tonnage of Sailing Vessels Registered at each of the Ports of the 
Colonies of the United Kingdom respectively, distinguishing those under and those above Fifty Toni 
Raster, on the 31st day of December 1860 :" 

" Similar RETURN of Steam Vessels and their Tonnage :" 

'' RETURTfS of the Number and Tonnage of New Vessels Built in the United Kingdom, and at each 
of the British Possessions respectively (distinguishing Timber from Iron and Steam from Sailing Vessels)| 
and Registered as British Ships in the Year I860:" 

'* Of the Number of Vessels, with their Tonnage (distinguishing Timber from Iron and Steam from Sail- 
ing Vessels), that were Registered in the United Kingdom as New Ships ; similar Return of VBSSELf 
Sold and Transferred ; similar Return of Vessels Wrecked ; and, similar Return of Vessels Broken 
up, in the Year 1860 :" 

" Of the Number of Colonial-built Vessels, and their Tonnagb, Registered at each of the Ports of 
the United Kingdom, in the Year 1860; distinguishing the Number and Tonnage of each Colony 
respectively :" 

'* Similar RETURN of the Number of Foreign-built Vessels and their Tonnage :" 

*' And, RETURN of the Shipping employed in the Trade of the United Kingdom, exhibiting thd 
Number and Tonnage of Vessels that entered Inwards and cleared Outwards ("including their 
repeated Voyages), separating British from Foreign Vessels, also Steam from Sailing Vessels, and 
distinguishing the Trade with each Country, in the Year 1860 (in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, 
No. 334, of Session I860)." 



{Mr. Ingham.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
15 May 1861. 



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RETURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 



RETURN of the Numbbb and Tonnaob of Sailing Ybssels Registered at eack of the Ports of Oreat Britain 9ni 
Irelandj including the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands, distinguishing those under and those above Fifty Tons 
Register, on the 81st day of December 1860: — ^Also, a Similar Returk of Stram Vessels and thext Tokicagb. 





Sailiitg Vbbsbls 
Of and under 60 Tons, t Above 50 Tons. 


Steam Vessbls 




Of and under 50 Tons. 


Above 60 Tons. 




Yesaels. 


Tods. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessds. 


Tom. 


ENGLAND : 

Aberystwith 


















118 


8,969 


252 


27,304 




. 


1 


59 


Arundel - - - 


44 


],208 


50 


7,055 


1 


32 


_ 


—., 


Barnstaple 


40 


1,591 


82 


8,178 


— 


.i.. 


1 


... 


Beaumaris 


186 


4,861 


162 


16,029 


_ 


«. 


..^ 


... . 


Berwick - - - 


16 


621 


16 


1,673 


1 


11 


_^ 


«.. 


Bideford . • - 


62 


1,982 


67 


8,482 




• • 


1 


74 


Boston . - - 


03 


3,391 


44 


8,200 


8 


61 


m^m. 




Bridgwater 


74 


2,791 


62 


11,569 


2 


21 


I 


98 


Bridport - - - 


1 


26 


12 


1,240 


_ 


— 


,-^ 


-. 


Bristol 


IM 


6,573 


204 


60,657 


16 


626 


1» 


8,885 


Caernarvon 


176 


6,842 


824 


32,424 


1 


11 


1 


88 


Cardiflf - - - 


21 


609 


56 


18,516 


16 


818 


2 


164 


Cardifi;an - - - 
Carlisle . - - 


118 


8«622 


7S 


7,486 


... 


_. 


^^^ 


... 


12 


444 


12 


1,448 


1 


88 


8 


467 


Chepstow - - - 


41 


1,124 


14 


1,096 


- 


• 


1 


116 


Chester - 


60 


2,186 


62 


3,745 


8 


87 


10 


2,866 


Colchester 


196 


8,680 


90 


11,780 


.— 


—* 


_ 


..« 


Cowes . - - 


168 


8,966 


60 


6,041 


1 


83 


1 


76 


Dartmouth 


ITS 


6,647 


278 


37,661 


6 


142 






Deal - - - 


18 


220 


1 


106 > 


..*. 


_. 


«^ 


...» 


Dover - - - 


27 


799 


23 


2,872. 


1 


26 


2 


188 


Exeter 


80 


766 


120 


17,780 


1 


87 


.-.- 


... 


Falmouth - 


47 


1,560 


96 


12,401 


a 


82. 


..i^ 


— *4 


Faversham 


206 


6,167 


186 


17,924 


1 


9 


.... 


... 


Fleetwood ► 


4%r 


1,221 


4ft 


10,858 


1 


26 


8 


980 


Folkestone 


8 


188 


19 


2,080 


— 


.— 


..^ 


... 


Fowey . . - 


40 


1,446 


126 


12,018 


• 


• 


1 


62 


Oainsborovgh -> 


7* 


268 


2 


171 


4 


128 


4 


804 


GHouoester 


269 


7,607 


78. 


9,121 


2 


74 


««• 


._ 


Qoole 


219 


9,111 


320 


26y548 


6 


110 


10 


1,568 


Grimsby - - - 


123 


3,006 


22 


2,074 


7 


102 


8 


2,628 


Hartlepool 


9 


171 


166 


36,807 


- 


- 


6 


1,968 


Ditto, West - 


2 


66 


16 


8,367 


8 


42 


8 


8,126 


Harwich - - - 


72 


2,214 


49 


5,886 


-— 


— 


^.. 


— 


Hall . - - 


841 


12,780 


172 


38,837 


11 


187 


60 


20,111 


Ipswich . - - 


67 


1,918 


122 


13,603 


6 


262 


1 


77 


liincaster - - - 


89 


1,811 


94 


11,376 


4 


109 


6 


744 


Liverpool - - - 


2«8 


10,008 


1,946 


923,716 


87 


1,403 


186 


66,482 


Llanelly - - - 


Z4. 


969 


46 


4,968 


2 


86 


1 


113 


Lowestoft - - - 


Ill 


2,496 


40 


3,988 


4 


70 


8 


876 


Lyme . - - 


6 


167 


18 


1,260 


— - 


— 


•«. 


.^ 


Lynn • - - 
MaldGR - - - 


01 


2,048 


96 


18,878 


_ 


-.- 


■ 


.^ 


89 


2,789 


68 


6,227 


-» 


.. 


.^ 


.^_ 


Maryport - - - 


12 


287 


102 


18,228 


4 


99 


^.. 


... 


Milford . 


80 


2,206 


71 


9,483 


1 


28 


... 


_ 


Newcastle 


188 


8,688 


878 


113,856 


92 


1,877 


80 


11,826 


Newhaven 


11 


• 212 


18 


2,516 


«— 


— 


._ 


.^ 


Newport - - - 


16 


678 


69 


18,082 


2 


66 


1 


272 


Padstow - - - 


62 


2,892 


70 


10,166 


— 


— 


«_ 


m^ 


Penzance . - - 


14 


481 


66 


7,060 


1 


20 


.» 


.^ 


Plymouth . - - 


280 


6,976 


204 


88,180 


8 


288 


8 


347 


Poole 


46 


1,202 


69 


18,010 


1 


22 


^m^ 





Portsmouth 


166 


8,931 


99 


11,942 


4 


104 


4 


246 


Preston . - - 


66 


2,569 


42 


2,992 


2 


60 


1 


279 


Ramsgate . - - 


67 


1,767 


82 


3,548 


1 


10 


-. 


_ 


Rochester - - - 


881 


12,532 


68 


8,147 


6 


262 


-I-. 





Rye - - - - 


66 


1,491 


61 


6,016 


1 


21 


... 


.1. 


Saint Ives 


69 


1,240 


108 


12,179 


- 


- 


8 


639 


Scarborough 


96 


3,228 


132 


84,561 


I 


44 


1 


117 


Scilly 


17 


603 


83 


5,669 


- 


- 


1 


67 


Shields, North - 


26 


694 


699 


194,993 


182 


2,228 


6 


686 


Ditto, South - 


2 


61 


276 


74,604 


12 


177 


m^m 




Shoreham - - • 


81 


612 


97 


18,062 


1 


16 


.^ 


._ 


Southampton 


141 


8,882 


111 


15,111 


18 


349 


20 


4,920 


Stockton - 


13 


850 


107 


23,729 


20 


872 


10 


2,489 


Sunderland 


117 


3,446 


849 


228,092 


51 


667 


20 


8,085 


Swansea - - - 


87 


1,156 


102 


17,003 


12 


303 


6 


688 


Teij^nmouth 


9 


213 


62 


6,581 


1 


19 


— . 




Truro 


10 


329 


68 


5,369 




Digitized by V 


'Zooq] 


e 



RXTUSl^ RELATING TO SHIFPIN6. 







Saiuxo YsSBXIiS 






Stkam Vasms 






Of and under 60 Tonfi. 


AboTe 50 Tons. 


Of and under 50 Tons. 


Above 50 Tons. 




Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Ekoland — eoni*. 


















Wctis - 


t9 


«,004 


82 


8,366 


2 


29 


_ 




Weymouth 


26 


722 


64 


6,820 


4 


91 


6 


653 


Wlfltby - 
IHutehayen 


64 


2,166 


390 


71,271 


3 


60 






10 


218 


177 


27,719 


1 


37 


1 


243 


Wisbeftflb - 


VB 


766 


48 


8,005 


1 


18 


8 


1,071 


Woodbridge 


34 


1,128 . 


39 


2,784 


... 






Workington 


8 


76 


89 


20,182 


1 


17 


, 




T««outh 


800 


IM69 


244 


M,896 


6 


141 


2 


341 


Iioadon - 


670 


23,174 


1,787 


^7^8 


159 


4,745 


Be8 


184,454 


Total, Ekoulnd - 


7,X)64 


219,022 


12,437 


8,161,671 


684 


15,613 


822 


828,509 


SCOTLAND: 


















Aberdeen - - - 


10 


892 


260 


72,266 


4 


83 


11 


3,775 


aL' - - ^ 


19 
19 


698 
619 


23 
37 


4,672 
12,821 


2 


20 


2 
3 


204 
21.1 


Arbroath ... 


8 


324 


86 


12,996 


•» 


.^B. 






Baiff . . . 


28 


878 


108 


14,478 


.iM 


... 


^„^ 




BorrowstonesB - 


21 


646 


47 


6,077 


1 


19 


1 


68 


Campbeltown - 


89 


1,294 


4 


231 


. 




2 


279 


Bnmfriea ... 


64 


1,680 


71 


13,606 


.« 


._ 






Dundee - 


12 


420 


213 


41,961 


2 


69 


14 


4,128 


Glasgow - 


166 


6,646 


342 


168,998 


31 


946 


132 


46,539 


GnageuMnth - 


11 


366 


28 


6,209 


4 


77 


6 


1,866 


Greenock 


206 


6,046 


182 


72,822 


16 


306 


15 


2,600 


loTemeas 


171 


4,072 


100 


8,620 


2 


26 


1 


242 


Irrine ... 


42 


1,295 


76 


18,744 


2 


29 


1 


91 


Eitkaldj - 
Kifkwall . 


48 


1,329 


39 


6,948 


1 


36 


1 


W 


26 


679 


25 


2,877 


1 


26 






Ldth 


68 


2,064 


68 


20,188 


13 


246 


33 


8,596 


Lerwick . - - 


67 


1,687 


16 


1,119 


.M. 


__ 




Montrose - , - 


7 


227 


97 


16,861 


-m^ 


^^ 


^^_ 


.^^ 


Perth - - • 


8 


203 


51 


4,626 


. 


• • 


2 ' 


116 


Petefhead 


11 


384 


69 


13,303 


— ^ 


«^ 






Port Glasgow - 


31 


1,127 


9 


1,981 


4 


122 


6 


412 


Stomoway 


83 


821 


17 


2,677 


.— 


.-^ 






8traBraer - - - 


27 


888 


7 


531 


... 


«i_ 


^_^ 


_ 


Wick . . . 


21 


682 


82 


2,668 


. 


. • 


1 ' 


95 


Wigtown - * - 


42 


1,383 


8 


1,050 


- 


- 


1 


284 


ToTALy SconjiifD - 


1,167 


36,538 


2,005 


516,674 


83 


2,003 


231 ' 


69,676 


IRELAND: 


















Ballina - 


2 


36 


3 


350 


1 


37 


■ ■ 




Bdiast . 


)65 


6,761 


327 


66,567 


6 


102 


7 


1,667 


Cokraine . - . 


6 


160 


1 


71 


... 


^__ 






Cork - - - 


183 


4,446 


194 


32,890 


18 


396 


20 


6,092 


Drocheda 

Dublin ... 


3 
816 


96 
9,809 


41 

168 


3.936 
26,274 


9 


266 


6 
44 


1,828 
11,619 


Daedalk - 


4 


151 


23 


1,836 


. 


. 


6 


1,645 


Gabray - - - 


15 


407 


4 


592 


1 


36 






Limerick . - - 


27 


809 


21 


5,938 


1 


16 


4 


1,172 


Londonderry - 


8 


269 


25 


•8,326 


. 




6 


1,685 


Newry - 


73 


2,303 


42 


6,826 


1 


8 


4 


457 


Robs - - - 


3 


61 


13 


4,544 


.. 


.._ 


«.. 




Skibbereen 


74 


1,808 


2 


102 


... 


^. 


- 


^^^^ 


Sligo - . - 


10 


306 


24 


4,213 


2 


78 


1 


191 


utrangford 


31 


1,000 


29 


2,495 


— . 


^.. 







Traiee - 


14 


393 


2 


164 


— 


_ 


... 


^^^ 


Watcrford 


66 


1,387 


95 


10,929 


. 


• 


35 ' 


14,646 


Wertport - 


4 


90 


— 


... 


— 


^. 


... 




Wexford - 


26 


868 


72 


7,392 


1 


16 


2 


594 


Total, Ireland - 


1,017 


30,160 


1,086 


181,435 


35 


955 


133 


40,796 


ISLBofMAK - 


297 


7,187 


50 


3,600 


^ ^ 


. 


6 


1,204 


Chahhel Islands 


216 


5,564 


324 


53,619 


2 


25 


6 


746 



General 



261. 



iT and Record Office of Seamen,! 
>ndon, 14 May 1861. J 



Begistrar-Oeneral of Shipping and S«amen. 



A 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



RETURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 



RETURN of the Number and Tonnage of Vessels that entered and cleared Coastwise at each of the Ports of Oreat 
Britain and Ireland, Isle of Many and Channel Islands (including their repeated Vojages), distinguishing Britisk 
from Foreign Vessels, and Steam from Sailing Vessels, between the 81st day of December 1859 and the Slst day of 
December 1860. 







SAILING 


VESSE 


LS. 










Inwards. 


Outwards. 




British. 


Foreign. 


British. 


FoRBiaN. 


ENGLAND: 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


VesseU. 


Tons. 


Vessel. 


Tou. 


















Aberystwith 


594 


24,318 


. 


- 


326 


14,601 


— 


— 


Arundel - - - 


359 


38,326 


- 


• 


159 


8,587 


— 


— 


Barnstaple 


861 


34,492 


1 


57 


174 


6,446 


— 


— 


Beaumaris 


1,577 


75,511 


. 


- 


827 


15,796 


8 


980 


Berwick - - - 


420 


21,375 


. 


. 


268 


14,058 


2 


102 


Bideford - - - 
jBoston - - - 


811 


84,783 


. 


. 


132 


6,065 


— 


— 


720 


32,691 


- 


- 


181 


9,017 


1 


53 


Bridgwater 


8,258 


141,134 


. 


- 


1,073 


45,362 


— 


— 


Bridport - - - 


138 


10,321 


. 


- 


45 


2,795 


— 


•~" 


Bristol - 
Caernarvon * 


5,093 


208,733 


. 


- 


2,518 


99,373 


— 


-^ 


1,338 


57,645 


- 


- 


245 


9,929 


— 


— 


C^diff - . 


1^875 


115,608 


18 


2,851 


6,500 


440,508 


2 


237 


pardi^n - - - 
Carlisle - - - 
Chepstow - - - 


572 


15,227 


. 


. 


51 


1,736 


— 


— 


67 


4,433 


1 


72 


341 


20,864 


— 


— 


605 


19,109 


. . 


. 


386 


15,432 


— 


— 


Chester . - - 


1,261 


63,914 


. . 


- 


1,385 


65,168 


1 


186 


polcbester 


684 


48,794 


- 


- 


275 


12,592 


-^ 


— " 


Cowes - - - 


1,066 


46,878 


. 


• 


412 


8,248 


— 


— 


Dartmouth 


614 


37,611 




. 


258 


10,429 


— 


— 


Deal ... 


181 


13,910 




- 


54 


3,348 


•— 


— 


Dover ... 
Exeter 


474 


88,000 


1 


83 


151 


7,130 


— 


— 


539 


56,299 


. 


- 


161 


8,416 


— 


— 


Falmouth - • - 


675 


40,329 


. 


• 


200 


9,116 


1 


74 


Faversham • 
Fleetwood 


1,640 


122,881 


. 


- 


1,065 


39,471 


— 


— 


540 


42,156 


. 


- 


272 


18,448 


5 


2,490 


Folkestone 

Fowey - - . 


290 


32,448 


. 


- 


. . 


• 


— 


•— 


984 


60,486 


3 


140 


669 


44,578 


— 


— 


Gainsborough - 


153 


6,998 


- 


- 


322 


14,403 


•^ 


— 


ploucester 


1,072 


51,685 


. 


. 


3,518 


141,365 


14 


1,548 


Ooole 


1,271 


70,939 


. 


• 


1,411 


66,198 


5 


560 


\ Jrimsby ... 


109 


5,664 


. 


. 


310 


48,202 


— 


— 


] lartlepool 

! larwich ... 


328 


24,796 


7 


652 


6,462 


814,440 


— 


— 


601 


37,503 


. 


. 


311 


13,488 


2 


184 


Hull . . 


533 


35,426 


8 


400 


747 


77,095 


313 


55,325 


Ipswich - - - 


1,176 


90,512 


. 


- 


710 


33,954 


4 


801 


Lancaster - - - 


946 


54,623 


. 


- 


364 


24,140 


2 


722 


Liverpool ... 
Llanelly . 


5.235 


4^5,204 


112 


17,191 


7,028 


449,498 


8 


2,820 


1,331 


71,789 


. 


- 


2,763 


187,499 


2 


154 


Lowestoft - . - 


865 


73,476 


. 


- 


244 


13,685 


— 


— 


Lyme ... 


140 


9,400 


. 


- 


40 


2,655 


— 


— 


Lynn 

Maldon . - . 


1,281 


114,107 


. 


• 


353 


21,679 


9 


532 


1,278 


81,899 


. 


. 


919 


37,508 


— 


— 


Maryport - • - 
Milford . 


326 


23,495 


. 


- 


2,961 


243,728 


1 


225 


82S 


31,643 


. 


- 


1,103 


40,676 


— 


— 


Newcastle 


1,895 


142,499 


278 


42,378 


0,776 


1,375,374 


1 


540 


Newhaven 


250 


31,336 


. 


- 


37 


2,608 


— 


— 


Newport ... 


1,530 


94,0-24 


11 


1,090 


7,107 


450,391 


•— 


— 


Padstciw ... 


669 


39,359 


. 


- 


368 


15,426 


— 


— 


Penzance - - - 


1,563 


120,054 


1 


219 


550 


40,318 


— 


— 


Plymouth 


2,735 


222,294 


. 


- 


1,312 


82,023 


— 


— 


Poole 


580 


45,650 


3 


236 


326 


14,562 


— — 


•— 


Portsmouth 


1,421 


138,820 


. 


. 


839 


24,179 


— 


— 


Preston . . - 


546 


28,407 


. 


- 


509 


27,224 


— 


— 


Kamsgate ... 


358 


29,472 


. 


- 


49 


3,840 


— 


— 


Rochester - - - 


2,739 


2515,124 


. 


- 


998 


39,080 


— 


— 


Rye .... 


498 


38,954 


. 


- 


49 


.2,844 


•^ 


— 


Saint Ives 


667 


55,175 


. 


- 


332 


29,665 


— — 


•— • 


Scarborough 


366 


19,914 


- 


- 


32 


1,596 


— 


— " 


Scilly . - . 
Shields . - - 


51 


2,480 


I 


138 


36 


1,073 


— 


— 


356 


50,685 


96 


23,197 


795 


83,575 


— " 


— 


Shoreham ... 


680 


101,138 


- 


- 


104 


6,073 


— 


^ 


Southampton . 


1,708 


23y,S68 


. 


• 


717 


34,537 


— 


— 


Stockton ... 


301 


16,844 


12 


708 


1,988 


175,774 


5 


828 



Digitized by 



Google 







RETURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 






5 




SAILENG YESSELS^continued. 




Inwards. 


Outwards. 




British. 


Foreign. 


British. 


Foreign. 


Sunderland 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


1,288 


99,987 


25 


4,736 


11,144 


1,845,488 


2 


194 


Swansea - - • 


8,525 


253,179 


- 


• 


5,411 


891,948 


— 


— 


Teignmouth 


569 


49,457 


• 


. 


124 


8,251 


— 


— 


Truro 


779 


59,959 


1 


93 


677 


55,761 


— 


— 


Wells 


465 


24,869 


• 


. 


203 


10,480 


.— 


— 


Weymouth 


280 


21,648 


• 


« 


86 


3,836 


— 


— 


Whitbv - 
Wbiteharen 


752 


30,785 


. 


• 


121 


5,830 


— 


— 


822 


33,333 


• 


• 


8,682 


262,714 


1 


230 


Wisbeach - 


462 


34,495 


- 


. 


168 


7,889 


— 


— 


MVoodbridge - 


492 


28,646 


. 


• 


293 


14,429 


.— . 


— 


Workington 


125 


7,098 


- 


• 


1,266 


109,178 


— 


— 


Yarmouth - - - 


1,496 


120,849 


1 


71 


511 


82,063 


2 


899 


Xondon ... 


15,514 


2,151,544 


19 


1,708 


6,915 


471,183 


10 


2,862 


Total, England - 


90,171 


7,227,577 


594 


96,020 


103,714 


8,298,783 


896 


71,086 


SCOTLAND: 


















Aberdeen • . - 


1,357 


128,480 


9 


668 


599 


42,227 


23 


1,706 


Ayr. . . . 
Alloa 


254 


12,179 


- 


- 


050 


65,475 


« 1 


88 


41 


1,982 


- 


• 


197 


12,434 




— 


Arbroath - . - 


489 


28,836 


- 


• 


196 


12,291 


•.- 


— . 


Banff 


427 


26,167 


8 


169 


206 


10,207 


3 


189 


Borrowstoness - 


68 


3,504 


1 


99 


610 


87,073 


10 


961 


Campbeltown - 


420 


15,870 


- 


- 


157 


6,106 




— . 


Dnmfiriea . • • 


642 


20,582 


- 


. 


217 


7,744 




.— 


Dundee • . - 


1,624 


184,749 


2 


143 


891 


28,125 


2 


118 


Glasgow - - - 


1,042 


103,279 


- 


- 


2,557 


165,842 


— 


— . 


Grangeroouth - 


210 


16,894 


1 


67 


132 


9,386 


1 


63 


^Greenock - - - 


762 


44,609 


• 


- 


440 


27,881 


3 


925 


Inyemeaa - - - 


1,993 


97,564 


6 


488 


1,554 


85,251 


14 


1,027 


Irrine . - - 


191 


12,081 


1 


77 


4,490 


823,058 


-— 


— 


Kirkaldy - 


365 


17,335 


2 


186 


936 


50,425 


7 


871 


Kirkwall . . - 


217 


13,507 


- 


- 


200 


11,475 


— 


— 


leith 


861 


48,942 


20 


1,888 


584 


87,042 


12 


1,671 


Lerwick - - - 


118 


8,618 


1 


81 


86 


6,579 


— 


_ 


Montrose • • • 


523 


40,975 




• 


840 


28,077 


1 


35 


Perth 


234 


15,364 




• 


235 


16,948 


2 


134 


Peterhead - - - 


523 


26,078 




- 


378 


16,199 


.— 


.M 


Port Glasgow - 


18 


2,645 




• 


14 


626 


— 


_ 


Stomoway 


114 


5,991 




. . 


37 


1,778 


— 


.^. 


Stranraer . - - 


498 


19,724 




. 


158 


6,106 


~^ 


.... 


Wick 


458 


24,582 


16 


1,076 


294 


12,585 


5 


832 


Wigtown - • - 


654 


21,094 


- 


- 


343 


11,448 


— 


— 


Total, Scotland - 


14,048 


890,591 


62 


4,887 


16,301 


1,015,988 


84 


7,620 


IRELAND: 


















Ballina - 


60 


4,137 


• 


. 


97 


7,416 


1 


74 


Bel&st - 


4,745 


841,763 


2 


874 


776 


45,503 


60 


7,142 


Coleraine - - - 


170 


9,618 


. 


- 


26 


1,073 


_« 


«i«. 


Cork 


1,798 


163,800 


- 


• 


1,254 


80,859 


8 


1,315 


Drogheda - - - 


544 


43,582 


- 


• 


185 


12,568 


.. 


.» 


Dublin - 


5,744 


490,296 


1 


80 


2,278 


123,366 


64 


8,068 


Dundalk . 


592 


41,662 


• 


. 


108 


7,519 


2 


892 


<3alway - 


114 


10,740 


- 


. 


102 


8,750 


^^ 


... 


Limerick - • • 


364 


37,153 


- 


- 


222 


19,159 


1 


208 


Londonderry • 


841 


64,321 


- 


- 


286 


16,195 


11 


1,468 


Newry . 


990 


65,212 


1 


114 


326 


17,576 


19 


1,758 


Ross 


291 


21,424 


• 


. 


55 


8,9U9 


__ 




Skibbereen 


274 


12,868 


. . 


• 


126 


7,049 


1 1 


_ 


Sligo ... 


258 


17,882 


2 


70 


160 


8,334 


2 


70 


Strangford 


470 


21,601 


- 


• 


236 


9,925 






Tralee - * - 


176 


11,023 


- 


. 


72 


4,159 


1 


118 


Waterford- 


1,144 


90,917 


- 


. 


593 


36,178 


1 


111 


Westport ... 
Wexford - 


85 


5,925 


• 


• 


98 


6,736 






578 


34,073 


- 


- 


316 


17,499 


— 


— 


Total, Ireland - 


19,288 


1,487,997 


6 


635 


7,316 


433,733 


160 


20,709 


IsLB OP Man - 


. 1,881 


73,776 


. 




790 


48,775 






Channbl Islands 


Nil. 


•■" 


""• 


— 






— 


— 



261 



A3 



Digitized by 



Google 



RETURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 



STEAM VESSELS. 



ENGLAND: 

Aberjstwith 

Arimdel - 

Barnstaple 

Beaumaris * 

Berwick - 

Bideford • « 

Boston 

Bridgwater 

Bridport - 

Bristol - 

Caernarvon 

Cardiff - 

Cardi^n - 

CerlisYo 

Chepstow - 

Chester 

Colchester 

Oowes 

Dartmouth 

Deal - . 

Dorer 

Exeter 

Ealmouth - 

Fayersham 

Fleetwood 

Folkestone 

Fowej 

Gainsborough - 

Gloucester 

Goole 

Grimsbj - 

Hartlepool 

Harwich - 

Hull 

Ipswich - 

Ijancastei - 

Lirerpool - 

Llanelly - 

Lowestoft - 

Lyme 

Lynn 

Maldon 

Maryport - 

Milford . 

Newcastle 

Newhaven 

Newport - 

Padstow - 

Penzance - 

Plymouth - 

Poole 

Portsmouth 

Preston - 

Ramsgate - 

Rochester - 

Rye - 

St. Ives - 

Scarborough 

Scillv 

Shields - 

Shoreham - 

Southampton - 

Stockton - 

Sunderland 

Swansea - 

Teignmouth 

Truro 



IirWARBS. 



British. 



Vessels. 



.1 



48 

104 

794 

103 

1,75« 

66 

508 

294 

85 

86 



Tons. 



61 



6,104 

Ufi4B 
104,027 

7,014 

18,982 

f64,988 
12,715 
65,504 

85,232 

5,195 

8,786 ; 



FOREIGR. 



Vessels. 



125 


48,673 


—»» 


— 


485 ; 


128,156 


— 


— - 


43 


11,231 


•i^ 


.— 


5 


250 


116 


18,875 


o 


058 


18 


1,784 


... 


— 


482 


90,248 


18 


2,093 


868 


88,601 


8,551 


1,050,672 


28 


5.640 


41 


10,701 



5)661 



614 


184,013 


523 


123,023 


474 


46,084 


60 


4,736 


266 


46,330 


547 


195,836 


2 


126 


1 


444 



58 


12,623 


8 


98 


141 


9,306 


15 


140 


95 


85,835 


120 


27/733 


94 


17,816 


850 


57,639 


17 


8,064 


7 


875 



Tons. 



OlTTWARDS. 



British. 



187 



167 



Vessels. 



44 

117 
662 

103 

IM 

1,907 
14 

879 

804 
51 

88 



Tons. 



19 


2,850 


481 


128,711 


— . 


— 


2 


148 


11 


550 


188 


21,056 


155 


81,048 


522 


94,925 


— . 


— 


853 


80,713 


8,520 


1,008,582 


24 


5,017 



41 

2 
491 
847 

372 

50 

184 

505 

94 



55 

1 

189 

20 

6 

181 

721 

365 

21 

10 



6,706 

12,186 
1701,509 

7,014 

14,073 

266,882 

2,788 

159,656 

85,886 

2,960 

8,748 



4>ddl 

118 
150,532 
268,037 

48,808 

4,736 

19,822 

176,298 

40,890 



Foreign. 



11,968 

44 

9,170 

215 

1,610 

42,959 

256,953 

56,048 

8,160 

1,250 



Digitized by 



Vessels. 



Ton. 



190 



77 



Google 



RBTURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 





STEAM VESSELS— conftnw^d. 




Inwahds. 






1 
1 




British. 


FOREION. 


British. 


Foreign. 




Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Ekol^rd — colli'. 
















^ 


Weib 


_ 


-^ 


^^ 


_^ 


^^ 


-. 


_ 


-^ 


Weymoufli 


16 


8,288 


- 


- 


6 


950 





•■■" 


Whitby - - 
Whitehaven - 


49 
242 


980 
46,600 


: : 


• 


2 
268 


40 
66,483 


«» 


... 


Wiftbeach . - - 


6 


1,098 


— 


— 


— 


— 





— 


Woodbridge 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Workington 


1 


108 


• 


- 


8 


937 


2 


874 


Yannonth 


204 


89,282 


- 


-_ 


208 


89,806 


— 


— 


Lcmdon ... 


2,832 


1,001,300 


- 


• 


1,898 


608,009 


— 


— 


Total, Ekoi^nd - 


16,088 


8,925,404 


3 


364 


16,042 


3,889,647 


4 


641 


SCOTLAND: 


















Aherdaen • 


611 


161,047 


. 


• 


627 


166,212 


— 


— 


iJL 


229 


19,879 


. 


- 


283 


20,180 


— 


-— 


10 


1,320 


- 


- 


10 


1,820 


— 


— 


Arbwath . 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Banff 


— 


— 


— 


-^ 


— 


.— . 


^^ 


m^^ 


BorrowBtoness 


1 


182 


. • 


- 


1 


182 


— 


... 


Campbeltown - 


286 


29,609 


- 


- 


288 


29,729 


— 


.— 


Damfriea - - - 


222 


22,287 


- 


- 


216 


21,717 


— 


-i* 


Dundee - . - 


162 


46,378 


- 


- 


149 


44,616 


— 





Glaigow . 


1,766 


429,728 


- 


- 


1,789 


442,764 


— 


— 


Ono^emoath - 


109 


27,810 


- 


- 


109 


27,903 


— 


— 


Greenock . - - 


729 


188;,691 


1 


824 


422 


67,888 


— 


— 


Lrrameaa - - - 


628 


80,784 


- 


- 


682 


81,646 


— 


— . 


Inrine - - - 


221 


86^793 


- 


- 


228 


87,986 


— 


.— 


Kirkaldy - - - 
Kkkwail • 


177 


16,177 


• 


- 


168 


13,928 


— 


.» 


210 


26^670 


- 


- 


218 


26,026 


_ 


■^ 


Leith 


614 


194,381 


- 


- 


648 


198,666 


— 


^ 


Lerwick . - - 


42 


16,267 


- 


- 


42 


16,267 


— 


-^ 


Montrose - 


— 


— 


— 


-* 


-» 


— 


-.- 


m^ 


Perth 


■*- 


•^ 


•.— 


— 


». 


— 


««-. 


■ 


Peterhead 


87 


6,326 


- 


. . 


87 


6,826 


.^ 


.._ 


Port Glasgow - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


14 


— 


... 


Stonioway 


88 


19,878 


- 


- 


88 


19,878 


— 


^^ 


Stranraer - - - 


249 


24,156 


- 


- 


251 


22,881 


— 


... 


Wick - . - 


408 


78,017 


- 


- 


897 


78,239 


— 


... 


Wigtown - 


67 


16,880 


- 


- 


66 


17,923 


— 


— 


ToTALy ScOTUkHD - 


6,690 


1,886,464 


1 


824 


6,863 


1,329,614 


— 


— 


IRELAND: 


















Ballina - 


82 


8,284 


. 




28 


2,986 


. 


■ 


Bdfcst . 


1,664 


446,628 


- 




1,649 


444,162 


_ 


_j. 


Coleraine - - - 


179 


88,298 


. 




90 


18,092 


^^ 


_^ 


Cork ... 


612 


210,646 


- 




606 


207,473 


- 




Drogheda - . - 


248 


69,961 


- 




839 


98,662 


_ 


■ 


Dublin . 


1,807 


616,996 


- 




1,980 


673,640 


... 


... 


Dundalk - 


208 


86,614 


- 




209 


87,139 


i~ 


_ 


Qalway . - - 


81 


10,887 


- 




19 


6,942 


_ 


.., 


limerick . - . 


89 


29,348 


• • 




87 


28,478 


.._ 




Londonderry - 


660 


140,806 


- 




642 


138,152 




_^ 


Newry - - 


270 


62,946 


- 




266 


49,969 


, 


. 


Boss ... 


820 


26,880 


• 




820 


26,880 


^^ 




Skibbercen 
Sligo 


164 


86,060 


- 




169 


86,397 


— 




— • 


— 


«— 




.^te 


«__ 


^ 




Stiiiigford 


— 


— 


— 


.» 


^^ 


«_ 




, 


Tralee 


74 


24,298 


.» 


... 


«^ 


«_ 


^ 




Waterford - 


771 


240,090 


- 


. 


781 


232,154 







Westport - 
Werford . 


26 


6,098 


- 


. 


26 


6,098 








191 


46,642 


- 


- 


189 


45,689 







Total, Ireland - 


7,036 


1,983,166 


- 


" 


7,039 


1,996,788 


— 





IsLB OP Man - 
Chakkbl Islands 


70 
Nil. 


13,160 

_ 


— 


— 


77 
# 


14,476 


— 


— 



General Register and Record Office of Seamen,! 
London, 14 May 1861. j 



261. 



Registrar-General of Shipping and Seamen. 



A4 



Digitizid by 



Google 



& 



RETURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 



A RETURN of the Number and Tonnage of Vessels that entered and cleared from and to the Colonies, at each of the 
Ports of Great Britain and Ireland^ Isle of Many and Channd Islands' {includiBg their repeated Voyages), distinguishkg 
Steam from Sailing Vessels, between the Slst day of December 1850 and the dlst day of December 1860 ; further distinguishiDg 
British from Foreign Vessels, 



ENGLAND: 



Aberystwith 
Anindel 
Barnstaple - 
Beaumaris - 
Berwick 
Bideford 
Boston - 
Bridgwater - 
Bridport 
Bristol 
Caernarvon - 
Cardiff 
Cardigan 
Carli:»le 
Chepstow 
Chester 
Colchester - 
Cowes 

Dartmouth - 
Deal - 
Dover - 
Exeter 
Falmouth - 
Faversham - 
Fleetwood - 
Folkestone • 
Fowey - 
Gainsborough 
Gloucester - 
Goole - 
Grimsby 
Uartlepool - 
Harwich 
HuU . . 
Ipswich 
Liemcastex 
Liverpool 
Llanelly 
Lowestoft 
Lyme - 
Lvnn - 
Maldon 
Mary port 
Milford 
Newcastle - 
Newhaven - 
Newport 
Padstow 
Penzance 
Plymouth - 
Poole - 
Portsmouth - 
Preston 
Riun>gate 
Rochester - 
Bye - 

Sd^nt Iv88 - 
Scarborough 
SciUy - - 
Shields 
Shoreham - 
Southampton 
Stockton 
Sunderland - 
Swansea 
Teignmouth - 
Truro - 
Wells - . 
Weymouth - 
Whitbv 
Whitehaven 
Wisbeach 
Woodbridge - 
Workington - 
Yarmoutn 
London 



SAILING VESSELS. 



Inwards. 



British. 

Vessels. Tons. 



11 



ToTAL^ England - - 



3 
13 

3 
11 



Foreign. 



Vessels. 



2,605 



1,199 

1,163 
3,837 

2,228 



160 

18 

74 

4 

8 

2 



28 
33 

11 
5 

15 

6 

30 

20 

44 



10 
46 



59 

2 

25 

813 

33 

23 



1 

14 
17 
47 

2 
24 

5 

17 

170 

19 

75 

1 

26 

1 

1 

1 
21 
28 
44 
12 
88 
88 
34 

8 

41 

1 

16 

5 

3 

1,889 



4,217 



62,344 
5,033 

18,553 
1,049 
2,003 

361 



1,549 
3,868 

835 
1,374 
2,390 

345 
16,159 

2,577 

19,246 



3,937 
10,484 



24,046 

287 

8,551 

531,688 

5,064 

949 



12 
3.721 
6.717 

10,956 

315 

5,002 

1,478 

4,200 

31,040 
1,920 

14,742 

98 

11,435 

32 

53 

102 
8,341 
1,822 
4,012 
3,238 
19,688 
15,038 
4,587 
3,319 

2,767 
306 

4,598 
210 

1,035 

764 

731,677 



3 
13 
33" 



3 

"~7 
16 



14 
11 



50 

2 

87 

4 



5 
17 



3 

2 

6 

19 



273 



1,631,764 



583 



Tons. 



Outwards. 



British. 



1,028 
6,173 
6,018 



1,128 
1,161 
5,732 



5,162 
4,213 



21,936 

768 

67,989 

228 



320 



2,063 
3,018 

1,252 



975 
300 
371 



774 



655 

1,048 

94 

1,997 

3,369 



411 



132,821 



Vesiels. 



8 
1 

10 



3 

4 

92 

24 

270 

8 

1 

1 

17 

30 



4 
19 

"22 

3 

19 
1 
8 

62 
5 

46 
1 

14 
1,090 

18 

28 



21 

6 

270 

5 

71 
2 

12 
169 

42 

15 



42 

3 

46 

2 

220 

112 

15 

4 

30 

"ll2 



7 

1 

1,183 



271,004 I 4,119 



Tons. 



1,986 
488 

3,013 

2,ia'l 

824 
285 

27,912 
4,303 

83,117 

1,967 

222 

146 

633 

2,173 

567 
4,347 

11,350 

843 

7,369 

127 

3,019 

13,861 

337 

12,051 

212 

5,883 

674,919 

2,646 

1,467 

""47 
5,570 
2,714 

54,837 
211 

23,298 

723 

2,346 

28,213 
6,718 
4,712 



2,557 

32 

»29 

293 

16,610 

105 

3,884 

450 

70,125 

22,354 

1,562 

194 

957 

3,666 



1,457 

254 

600,427 



Foreign. 



Vessels. 



1,718,815 795 



1 

263 



2 

1 

2 

2 

3 
6 

13 



171 
1 



2 
41 

43 



32 
64 

3 

2 
1 



135 



Tons. 



598 
121,889^ 



309 

649 

750 

501 

1,510 
2,579 

7,314 
116,963 



1,030 
15,743 

21,800> 
944 



1,591 

16,803 
21,495 

911 

300 

411 



78,690 



413,515 



Digitized by 



Google 



RETURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 



SCOTLAND: 



Aberdeen 

aFoa - 
Arbroath 
Banff - 
BorrowstonesB 
Campbeltown 
Dumfries ' 
Dundee 
Glasgow 
Grangemouth 
Greenock 
Inremess 
Irvine 

Kirkaldy - 
Kirkw^ - 
Leith - 
Lerwick 
Montrose 
Perth - - 
Peterhead - 
Port Glaaccow 
Stomoway - 
Stianiaer 
Wick - 
Wigtown 



ToTAIiy SOOTLAND - - - 



IRELAND : 



Ballina 
Belfast 
Coleraine 
Cork - 
Drogheda 
Dublin 
Doitdalk 
Galway 
Limerick 
Londonderry 
Newry 
Ross - 
Skibbereen - 
Sligo - . 
Stiang£>rd - 
Tfalee - 
Waterford - 
Westport - 
Wexford - 



TOTAIi^ Irblani) 



Isle op Man 
CHAioiBL Islands 



Cardiff 

Hartlepool • 
Liverpool 
Newcastle 
Newbaven - 
Plvmonth - 
Sluelds- 
Sonthampton 
Swansea 
Weymouth - 
London 
Gla^ow 
Greenock 
Leith - . 
Port Glasgow 
Dublin- . 
Londondenry - 



Total - 



Isu OF Man 
Channel Islands 



SAILING VESSELS— con^mtiedL 



Inwards. 



Bbitibh. 



Vessels. 



11 

7 



11 
19 
76 

6 
177 

2 
24 

1 

23 

8 

2 

2 

32 

4 
2 
2 
2 



412 



2 

56 

6 

76 

4 

76 

10 

10 

22 

15 

15 

6 

2 

8 

3 

3 

27 

2 

5 



348 



3 
37 



Tons. 



3,634 
1,724 



442 



2,379 

5,636 

29,724 

3,488 

84,355 

280 

10,370 

25 

10,170 

2,269 
293 
573 
22,037 
184 
734 
50 
666 



179,033 



445 

23,495 

1,890 

19,395 

916 

36,506 

2,259 

2,339 

10,391 

8,093 

7,262 

2,067 

551 

2,540 

882 

1,521 

6,095 

612 

1,331 



128,590 



576 
5,306 



FOBEION. 



Vessels. 



2 
1 
8 

1 
2 
1 



17 



13 
1 

4 

11 
1 

1 
' 8 

4 



47 



Tons. 



214 



701 

260 

2,764 

329 

1,017 

222 

325 



5,832 



5,475 

359 

1,279 

4,614 
249 

664 
2,865 
1,309 



117 

97 
857 



17,885 



Outwards. 



British. 



Vessels. 



18 
3 
5 



1 

10 

213 

6 

124 

2 

55 



18 

4 

1 
19 



476 



33 
3 

57 

44 

11 

26 

10 

4 

5 

2 

4 

3 

2 

28 

1 

1 



234 



2 
61 



Tons. 



4,489 


__ 


755 


_ 


2,080 


1 


— 


** 


— 


^ 


235 


.- 


— 


... 


253 


__ 


3,583 


... 


00,695 


15 


3,488 


... 


58,895 


5 


678 




21,066 


8 


— 


— 


— 


^ 


10,012 


5 


— 


^. 


2,115 


— 



44 
12,744 



90 



221,222 



14,243 

943 

15,706 

26,847 

2,609 

12,108 

5,239 

2,232 

1,936 

551 

1,510 

882 

586 

6,481 

314 

251 



92,438 



362 
7,805 



Foreign. 



Vessels. 



STEAM VESSELS. 



62 
34 



160 

66 

8 



694 



45,396 



5,270 
5,100 



55,326 



22,649 

28,368 

8,186 



1,069 
239 



171,603 



NiL 
NiL 



6 

1 

52 

1 

59 

43 

1 

326 

1 

151 

63 

17 

2 

2 

1 

2 



728 



4,697 

353 

53,596 

1,020 

4,953 

6,450 

15 

60,444 

417 

22,873 

26,511 

8,638 

539 

724 

98 

1,069 



192,397 



34 



Tons. 



126 



7,493 
2,063 
2,615 

1,861 



14,158 



3 

9 

10 



2 
2 



30 



1,300 
2,517 
3,666 



1,024 
723 



901 
607 



10,738 



266 



266 



Geneial Register and Record Office of Seamen,) 
London, 14 May 1861. / 

261. 



J. IT, Brown^ 
Registrar-General of Shipping and Seamcp. 



B 



uigiiizea oy x^jv^v^^ 



ae 



AO 



RETURNS REXATIN6 TO SHIPPING. 



RETURN of the Numbbr and Toknaos of Vessels that entered and cleared from and to Foreign Ports, at each 
of the Ports of Great Britain and Ireland^ Isle of Man^ and Channel Islands (including their repeated Voyages), 
distingnishiBg Steam from Sailing Vesseb^ and British from Foreign Vessels, between the 3 1st day of December 1869 
and the 81st day of December I860. 



SAILING VESSELS. 





Inwards. 


Outwards. 




British. 


FORBIQH. 


British. 


FORBIOK. 




ENGLAND: 

Aberystwith 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


VesMls. 


TonB. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


2 


286 


1 


76 




__ 


^^ 


,^_ 


Aruudel * - . 


7 


864 


80 


8,166 


. 


- 


20 


3,334 


Barnstaple 


• 


. 


8 


891 


m^ 


-— 


— 


— 


Beaumaris 


7 


725 


15 


8,758 


11 


1,682 


2 


1,866 


Berwick ... 


15 


1,801 


62 


7,067 


2 


102 


18 


1,766 


Bideford - 


3 


616 


- 


. 


2 


168 


— 


— 


Boston - - . 


16 


2,206 


49 


6,444 


8 


190 


16 


1,601 


Bridgwater 


8 


1,832 


16 


1,784 


10 


724 


2 


898 


Bridport - - - 


10 


1,112 


11 


1,573 


1 


188 


11 


1,673 


Bristol . - . 


360 


67,842 


359 


96,421 


106 


22,407 


86 


80,545 


Caemarvon 


4 


1,113 


1 


67 


124 


12,643 


6 


600 


Cardiff . 


196 


40,085 


917 


232,250 


984 


216,378 


1,068 


468,668 


Cardigan - - - 


1 


134 


— 


... 


•. 


_ 


— 


— — 


Carlisle 


3 


608 


2 


400 


2 


790 


3 


700 


Chepstow - 


1 


87 


2 


210 


• 2 


441 


— 


— 


Chester - 


• 2 


284 


4 


710 


• 


. 


2 


BIS 


Colchester 


16 


920 


21 


2,181 


21 


674 





1,121 


Cowes • - - 


24 


987 


7 


1,285 


46 


2,030 





1,001 


Dartmouth 


Id 


1,264 


10 


1,332 


26 


2,766 


3 


504 


Deal 


- 


. 


9 


831 


* • 


- 


2 


178 


Dover - . - 


86 


2,468 


88 


6,792 


18 


402 


6 


1,008 


Exeter ... 


38 


4,698 


29 


4,321 


4 


565 





1,087 


Falmouth - • • 


77 


4,382 


60 


6,279 


82 


4,000 


17 


8,013 


Faversham 


33 


1,038 


8 


278 


88 


1,162 


1 


30 


Fleetwood 


19 


7,160 


20 


8,411 


12 


6,900 


16 


4,660 


Folkestone 


4 


442 


3 


246 


. 


. 


1 


200 


Fowey ... 


67 


4,461 


67 


6,641 


148 


11,650 


125 


11,764 


Gainsborough - 


7 


484 


18 


1,762 


24 


1,686 


6 


618 


Gloucester 


114 


20,620 


361 


65,077 


18 


1,643 


72 


15,384 


Goole ... 


86 


7,573 


108 


10,652 


67 


4,470 


78 


7,007 


Grimsby - . . 


114 


22,626 


329 


65,536 


6Q 


10,281 


298 


58,279 


Hartlepool 


736 


132,195 


1,119 


131,625 


884 


159,561 


1,716 


200,050 


Harwich ... 


68 


5,968 


64 


6,430 


4 


209 


116 


7,666 


Hull - - . 


508 


93,387 


1,498 


211,787 


280 


40,248 


1,037 


150,468 


Ipswich . . - 


64 


6,983 


96 


12,709 


19 


2,221 


46 


4,669 


Lancaster 


12 


1,718 


15 


2,751 


6 


1,483 


1 


198 


Liverpool ... 
Llanelly - 


1,555 


518,027 


1,822 


1,185,005 


1,514 


468,428 


1,960 , 


1,161,8^2 


*J0*> 


23,466 


268 


20,888 


265 


29,250 


276 


20,890 


Lowestoft * m - 


37 


5,359 


70 


11,824 


18 


1,617 


31 


6,627 


Lyme ... 


4 


199 


— 


.^ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Lynn ... 


69 


6,553 


83 


8,590 


8 


648 


6 


860 


Maldon ... 


46 


2,082 


17 


1,203 


16 


464 


6 


632 


Maryport . . - 
Miiford . - - 


3 


719 


6 


1,248 


8 


669 


1 


169 


10 


1,786 


12 


3,037 


2 


1,004 


5 


1,761 


Newcastle . - - 


1,674 


288,097 


2,567 


886,251 


3,813 


682,478 


4,885 


674,076 


Newhaven 


41 


3,152 


12 


1,680 


11 


483 


3 


648 


Newport . . - 


119 


17,862 


160 


46,141 


256 


61,520 


266 


86,882 


Padstow - 


7 


365 


4 


758 


7 


360 


8 


641 


Penzance • . - 


17 


1,839 


72 


10,364 


10 


1,526 


46 


7,676 


Plymouth 


307 


26,102 


226 


85,376 


166 


14,662 


61 


12,622 


Poole ... 


70 


6,288 


48 


6,830 


17 


1,628 


29 


4,669 


Portsmouth 


86 


6,972 


101 


16,406 


6 


873 


12 


9,692 


Preston ... 


4 


305 


6 


784 


9 


1,074 


4 


498 


Ramsgate . - - 


14 


721 


4 


823 


6 


402 


1 


460 


Rochester ... 


69 


4,334 


66 


10,790 


68 


3,037 


41 


7,884 


Rye- - - - 


16 


600 


16 


1,422 


" " 


^ 


6 


660 



Digitized by 



Google 



RVTURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 



11 





SAILING VESSELS— con^tn^. 




IirWARDS. 


Outwards. 




Britisb. 


FORSION. 


British. 


Fori 






SIGN. 




Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Englahd— C(m^« 


















Sthit Ires 


4 


792 


10 


1,530 


. . 


. . 


7 


1,163 


Scarborough 


21 


3,063 


9 


923 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Sdlly . . . 


6 


594 


5 


1,138 


— 


— 


: — 


— 


Shields - - . 


1,034 


212,276 


447 


50,511 


663 


103,861 


870 


• 81,788 


Shorebam ... 


26 


2,136 


266 


14,476 


19 


1,546 


247 


12,148 


Soatbampton 


76 


6,999 


244 


23,951 


15 


2,024 


188 


14,974 


Stockton ... 


342 


46,586 


466 


89,950 


876 


64,064 


605 


52,741 


Sunderland 


1,214 


228,031 


1,185 


174,287 


1,694 


859,130 


1,471 


222,017 


Swansea - . . 


313 


66,119 


657 


71,688 


732 


125,614 


852 


100,116 


Teigmmouth 


25 


2,045 


11 


1,357 


13 


1,026 


4 


607 


TniTo - .' » . 


16 


1,462 


61 


12,941 


6 


205 


83 


8,891 


Welli . - '. . 


36 


2,652 


10 


491 


— 


— 






Wejmouth -.^^l- 


72 


4,643 


84 


5,658 


16 


2,297 


20 


2,668 


Wbiiby . 
Whitehaven 


68 


7,417 


5 


566 


— 


-. 


— 


.. 


3 


433 


4 


677 


4 


310 


2 


337 


Wisbeach - - - 


65 


11,780 


41 


6,287 


2 


334 


21 


3,175 


Woodbridge - -a^ 
Workington - -1 


2 


263 


9 


904 


1 


100 


9 


904 


- 


^ 


. 


- 


6 


500 


— 


— 


Yarmoath- 


V ^24 
H,2,687 


13,963 


88 


12,297 


24 


3,486 


48 


6,349 


London . - - 


488,46Q 


4,122 


876,790 


1,296 


230,796 


3,707 


767,037 


Total, Englakd • 


l2j^8 , 


2,45^9 


18,535 


3,943,349 


13,417 


2,661,180 


20,469 


4,203,557 


SCOTLAND : 


















Aberdeen - . - 


102 


15,160 


181 


20,158 


67 


9,725 


33 


4,320 


Ayr. . . . 


4 


604 


• 9 


981 


9 


1,009 


9 


1,052 


Alloa - . . 


9 


1,747 


130 


15,242 


81 


3,826 


371 


37,220 


Arbroath - 


17 


2,693 


26 


2,779 


16 


2,796 


4 


586 


Banff 


9 


642 


78 


5,415 


41 


3,214 


47 


3,128 


BoiTowfetoneflB - 


22 


2,577 


101 


10,549 


207 


28,316 


710 


73,692 


Campbeltown . 


.^ 


.-« 


— 


— 


^^ 


— 


— 


— . 


Dumfries ... 


2 


16S 


2 


215 


-^ 


^^ 


_ 


.. 


Dandee ... 


180 


36,077 


272 


38,12]^ 


139 


27,996 


172 


25,599 


Glasgow - - - 


245 


59,818 


176 


66,491 


313 


58,969 


196 


61,021 


Grangemouth - 


63 


6,939 


372 


46,466 


107 


12,177 


365 


47,505 


Greenock . . - 


78 


17,696 


59 


15,215 


31 


11,284 


21 


5,705 


Inyemess ... 


20 


3,317 


41 


4,912 


32 


2,596 


82 


3,424 


Irvine . . - 


3 


326 


8 


970 


244 


64,309 


251 


51,763 


KirkaWy - 


34 


6,649 


167 


14,192 


76 


10,425 


522 


46,785 


Kirkwall • 


1 


82 


9 


532 


2 


90 


7 


339 


Ldth - - . 


262 


40,125 


1,094 


120,416 


50 


8,176 


206 


24,742 


Lerwick ... 


3 


202 


19 


1,400 


11 


970 


20 


1,412 


Mootrose - . - 


40 


5,638 


116 


17,638 


44 


8,598 


110 


17,031 


Perth 


10 


1,001 


40 


3,697 


1 


97 


— 


__ 


Peterhead- 


68 


10,538 


65 


8,894 


98 


18,215 


6 


380 


Port Glasgow - 


12 


4,259 


5 


2,878 


6 


5,197 


— 


— 


Stomoway 


10 


824 


2 


214 


51 


2,698 


2 


214 


Stranraer ... 


.— 


-. 


... 


— . 


m^ 


— 


«« 


_ 


Wick - . . 


17 


1,057 


63 


3,694 


102 


7,633 


119 


- 8,816 


Wigtown - 


1 


98 


— 


— 


— 


■ — 


— 


— 


Total, Scotland - 


1,182 


218,136 


3,014 


386,064 


1,661 


273,315 


3,201 


414,183 


IRELAND: 


















Bilfina - . - 


6 


916 


2 


274 


.^ 


..-. 


- 




Bel^ . 


120 


17,899 


247 


42,047 


16 


4,047 


36 


8,211 


Colerame - 


1 


306 


6 


796 


- 


. 


1 


359 


Cork . - - 


107 


26,805 


204 


55,320 


14 


2,866 


28 


5,845 


Drogheda • - • 


22 


2,826 


18 


2,822 


r 


. 


3 


476 


Dublin . 


197 


29,478 


249 


53,121 


46 


10,068 


111 


31,555 


DondaDc - 


18 


8,317 


16 


2,940 


1 


276 


2 


556 


Qalway . - - 


11 


8,073 


36 


8,206 


. 


- 


8 


2,076 


limerick - - - 


29 


7)936 


78 


20,619 


.4 


606 


4 


1,118 


Londonderry 


56 


12,260 


98 


20,616 


10 


6,691 


It) 


2,783 


Newry - 


22 


3,834 


71 


9,513 


2 


1,096 


4 


1,367 


Roes . . . 


20 


4,497 


27 


6,817 


2 


569 


«. 


.i_ 


Skibbereen 


8 


583 


1 


273 


• 


. 


1 


273 


Sligo . . - 


17 


3,372 


18 


3,167 


- 


• 


2 


294 


Stnmgford 


- 


• 


1 


168 


- 


- 


1 


163 


261. 














^( 


)OfUinu€di 



Digitized by x^vyv^^^lC 



\1 



RETUBNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 









SAILING VESSELS continued.. 








Inwards. 


Outwards. 






British. 


FoRRiaN. 


British. 


FORBIOK. 




Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Ireland — coni^. 
Tralee 


















13 


2,683 


20 


4,248 


1 


82 


2 


327 


Waterford 


86 


10,094 


89 


22,694 


2 


607 


10 


2,661 


Westport ... 
Wexford •- 


4 


1,135 


3 


' 919 


. 


. 


1 


201 


20 


3,099 


3 


1,417 


3 


852 


— 


— 


Total, Ireland - 


701 


134,102 


1,180 


255,467 


101 


27,060 


224 


67,764 


Isle op Man 


10 


1,422 


29 


3,260 


2 


296 


28 


2,588 


Channel Islands 


822 


44,816 


214 


14,615 


743 


27,742 


140 


8,504 








STEAM 


V^ESSELS. 




Bristol ... 


• 


- 


16: 


8,128 


. 


• 


15 


2,577 


Cardiff • 


24 


9,339 


8 


1,214 


41 


17,258 


12 


2,586 


Cowes . . - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1,451 


Dover - . - 


340 


84,010 


222 


22,864 


64 


6,931 


1 


73 


Falmouth - - - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


• 


- 


1 


300 


Fleetwood 


1 


180 


— 


— . 


.— 


— 


— 


— . 


Folkestone 


640 


100,195 


• 


- 


612 


92,511 




_ 


Goole 


170 


81,671 


• 




171 


81,963 


.— 


... 


Grimsby . - - 


89 


31,309 


32 


17,201 


97 


87,830 


38 


20,101 


Hartlepool 


281 


96,225 


- 


- 


281 


96,086 


1 


332 


Hull "^ . . . 


820 


260,392 


362 


100,330 


828 


260,776 


368 


99,514 


Liverpool - - - 
Llanelly - . - 


544 


407,315 


43 


17,119 


526 


405,728 


45 


17,958 


9 


3,220 • 


- 


- 


9 


8,220 


— 


-^ 


Lowestoft - - - 


17 


4,349 


- 


* - 


2 


590 


— 


— 


LyDU • - - 


1 


216 


- 


- 


1 


216 


— . 


.— 


Milford . 


2 


13,703 


4 


6,616 


1 


1,985 


8 


4,932 


Newcastle 


126 


39,452 


2 


696 


127 


41,898 


11 


2,955 


Newhaven 


392 


55,833 


- 


- 


881 


54,127 


— 


-» 


Newport - - - 


2 


804 


1 


176 


6 


2,880 


— 


— 


Shields - 


1 


444 


- 


- 


2 


489 


1 


136 


Southampton 


358 


180,973 


41 


54,426 


361 


198,500 


40 


63,511 


Stockton - - - 


1 


161 


- 


- 


18 


7,058 


•— 


% 


Sunderland 


8 


3,356 


51 


19,540 


19 


8,762 


62 


19,584 


Swansea - - - 


4 


731 


1 


99 


19 


4,190 


1 


120 


Truro 


5 


626 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


London • - - 


1,778 


580,406 


462 


142,888 


1,619 


456,618 


488 


134,560 


Alloa 


2 


746 


. 


. 


6 


1,689 


.— 


— 


Borrowstoness - 


• 


- 


- 


- 


1 


199 


2 


294 


Dundee - - - 


9 


3,324 


2 


757 


7 


2,702 


— 


— 


Glasgow - . - 


26 


7,720 


- 


• 


65 


15,746 


— 


— 


Grangemouth - 


47 


14,254 


81 


7,506 


58 


15,624 


83 


7,988 


Greenock - - - 


21 


6,109 


4 


2,534 


6 


4,518 


8 


2,866 


Irvine . - - 


. 


- 


- 


- 


8 


648 


— 


— 


Kirkaldy - 


1 


179 


— 


— 


— 


... 


— 


— 


Leith ... 


181 


58,545 


15 


3,668 


176 


57,658 


11 


8,006 


Lerwick - - - 


1 


437 


- 


- ■ 


1 


437 


— 


— 


Port Glasgow - 


• 


- 


• 


• 


1 


588 


2 


478 


Belfast . 


• 


. 


1 


409 


— . 


— 


— 


— 


Cork 


6 


3,452 


3 


1,333 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Dublin - 


17 


8,069 


- 


- 


1 


177 


— 


— 


Galway . • • 
Waterford 


13 


19,384 


1 


1,650 


18 


19,960 


1 


1,650 


1 


1,006 


1 


526 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Total - - - 


5,037 


1,973,133 


1,298 


404,175 


5,418 


1,849,487 


1,075 


376,412 


isLR OP Man - •• 


- Nil. 




— 


— 


— 


^- 


— 


«. 


Channel Islands - 


280 


21,313 


106 


4,876 


274 


20,849 


106 


4,876 



General Register and Record Office of Seamen,! 
London, 14 May 1861. J 



«7l J7. BroTvny 
Registrar-General of Shipping and Seamen, 



Digitized by 



Google 



J3 



AGGREGATE RETURN of dudinjj iheir repeated Voyages), in the Coasting, Colonial, and Foreign Trades, 



Total Inwards. 



ENGLAND: 

Aberystwith 
Arundel - 
Barnstaple 
Beanmari? 
Berwick - 
Bideford 
Boston 
Bridgwater 
Bridport - 
Bristol - 
Caernarvon 
Cardiff - 
Cardigan - 
Cariisle - 
Chepstow - 
Chester - 



.1 



British. 



Sailing Ve»Be|siUing and Steam Vessels. 



Vessels. 



I Colchester 

j Cowcs 

I Dartmouth 
Deal . - 

: Dover 
Exeter - 
F^outh - 
Faversham 
Reetwood 

■ Folkestone 

: Fowey 
Gain^rough 

; Glonaester 

[ Goole 
Grimsby - 
Hartlepool 
Harwich - 
Hull - 
Ipswich - 
Laocaster - 
Liverpool - 



ly - 
Lowestoft - 
Lyme 
Lynn 

Maldon - 
Maryport - 
Milford - 
Newcastle - 
Newhaven 
Newport - 
Padiow - 
Penzance - 
Plymouth 
Poole 

Portsmouth 
Preston 



I 



Rochester - 
Rye- 
Saintlves 
Scarboroneh 
Scillv - 
Shields • 
Shoreham- 
Boathampton 
Stockton - 
Sunderland 
Swansea - 
Teignmouth 
Truro - 

261. 



607 
366 
864 
1,697 
433 
826 
785 
3,268 
148 
6,603 
1,356 
2,144 
677 
78 
606 
1,266 
700 
1,118 
660 
181 
621 
682 
767 
1,679 
689 
294 
1,061 
160 
1,230 
1,357 
233 
1,109 
669 
1,100 
1,242 
988 
7,603 
1,666 
902 
167 
1,340 
1,324 
343 
856 
3,616 
293 
1,673 
681 
1,697 
3,212 
669 
1,582 
650 
373 
2,844 
614 
672 
387 
67 
1,411 
733 
1,828 
656 
2,540 
3,926 
628 
803 



ToiVessels. 






27i 
844 
35| 

J'' 

3 

3 
14 

11 
338: 

63} 
174| 

16» 

49 

4^ 

1^ 
41i 
62i 
47< 
124| 

32j 

67, 

7, 

9lj 

78^ 

32 

167 

43 

162i 

97, 

64, 

l,474j 

IOO3 

78, 

10, 

120, 

83| 

274 

40, 

44I9 

34,1 

116; 

41 

126 
279 

534 
160, 

28, 

80j 
268 

39j 

22; 

271: 

105j 

250j 

06 

847 

334 

66, 

64, 



665 
866 
968 

2,391 
438 
928 
735 

3,418 
148 

7,859 

1,421 

2,671 
577 
372 
606 

1,860 
700 

1,118 
746 
181 
861 
582 
892 

1,679 

1,076 
934 

1,104 
160 

1,236 

1,643 

324 

,403 



Tons. 



669 

2,402 

1,265 

1,351 

11,786 

1,603 

960 

167 

1,392 

1,324 

343 

1,471 

4,264 

747 

2,149 

731 

1,863 

3,793 

671 

1,683 

660 

373 

2,844 

514 

730 

390 

198 

1,427 

733 

2,604 

776 

2,642 

4,280 

646 

816 



33,213 

34,190 

46,734 

275,588 

24,339 

46,149 

34,897 

158,676 

11,433 

603,852 

76,506 

249,039 

16.410 

42,266 

19,190 

69,704 

49,714 

49,414 

46,019 

13,910 

75,313 

62,371 

90,774 

124,264 

188,811 

133,085 

78,766 

7,482 

91,801 

128,558 

64,494 

265,434 

48,471 

503,494 

99,876 

148,493 

2,978,302 

109,179 

93,886 

10,648 

126,637 

83,993 

27,936 

237,862 

604,027 

96,906 

163,856 

46,928 

172,423 

480,372 

63,984 

160,978 

28,772 

30,291 

268,893 

39,486 

68,643 

23,065 

12,482 

271,886 

105,096 

523,013 

94,561 

368,877 

392,606 

69,153 

66,240 



FoREIGir. 



Total Outwards. 



Sailing and Steam Vesiels. 



Vessels. 



1 

30 

4 

16 

62 

49 
18 
11 

388 

1 

971 



2 

6 

21 

7 

10 

9 

261 

29 

60 

3 

23 

3 

67 

18 

377 

108 

376 

1,139 

64 

1,913 

96 

17 

2,064 

272 

70 

84 

17 

6 

21 

2,864 

12 

175 

4 

73 

228 

48 

102 

6 

4 

58 

16 

10 

9 

6 

646 

266 

288 

470 

1,267 

677 

11 

62 



Tons. 



76 

3,156 

448 

3,768 

7,067 

6,444 

2,812 
1,673 

106,722 
67 

242,333 

472 

.210 

906 

2,181 

1,235 

1,332 

831 

29,239 

■4,321 

6,279 

273 

9,539 

240 

7,942 

1,762 

70,809 

10,662' 

87,899 

136,657 

6,430 

334,403 

12,709 

3,519 

1,288,204 

21,116 

11,324 

8,910 

1,293 

1,248 

11,716 

432,343 

1,589 

48,659 

758 

10,583 

36,850 

6,866 

16,777 

784 

?22 

11,564 

1,422 

1,530 

923 

1,271 

74,363 

14,475 

79,425 

40,762 

200,660 

75,156 

1,357 

13,034 



British. 



Sailing and Steam Vesaeli 



Vessels. 



378 
160 
291 

1,010 
265 
242 
184 

1,250 
60 

4,622 
407 

8,680 

61 

655 

388 

1,437 
297 
475 
402 
64 
233 
169 
320 

1,103 
787 
612 
822 
346 

3,561 

1,773 
481 

7,796 
320 

2,373 

730 

737 

13,730 

3,079 

269 

68 

408 

937 

2,987 

1,603 

14,834 

493 

7,812 
427 
766 

2,185 

385 

953 

618 

54 

1,067 

60 

390 

38 

178 

1,623 

. 126 

1,471 

2,564 
13,798 

6,640 
173 
696 



Tons. 



22,293 

0,075 

18,G32 

191,600 

14,160 

15,346 

9,207 

61,883 

3,268 

406,574 
29,668 

920,514 

1,736 

69,466 

16,873 

68,350 

13,312 

10,911 

19,106 

3,348 

14,653 

9,648 

21,222 

40,633 

169,404 
92,51 1 
67,119 
16,039 

150,937 

123,814 

94,332 

1,115,344 

14,034 

486,990 
36,387 

112,219 
3,060,701 

227,682 

15,892 

4,122 

28,104 

38,019 

249,986 

196,961 

2,424,539 

62,382 

676,406 
21,244 
69,512 

302,641 

22,803 

70,164 

28,298 

4,332 

44,944 

2,876 

42,662 

1,640 

10,636 

204,716 
7,724 

300,999 

280,306 
2,040,468 

600,571 
18,799 
67,410 



Foreign. 



Sailing and Steam Vessels. 



Vessels. 



20 

6 
16 

17 

2 

11 

101 

6 

2,235 



3 

9 

10 

3 

2 

7 

9 

21 

1 

22 

1 

127 

6 

88 

78 

339 

1,726 

118 

1,726 

60 

3 

2,184 

279 

31 

14 

6 

2 

10 

4,438 

3 

308 

3 

46 

63 

29 

72 

6 

1 

42 

5 

7 



381 

247 

228 

610 

1,567 

917 

4 

36 



Tons. 



2,234 

2,285 
1,948 

1,744 

398 

1,673 

33,720 

609 

693,376 

700 

499 

1,121 

2,462 

604 

178 

1,076 

1,987 

3,696 

30 

7,808 

209 

12,504 

618 

17,433 

7,567 

79,890 

204,317 

7,840 

312,621 

4,970 

920 

1^299^623 

21,386 

6,527 

1,382 
632 
394 

7,713 

693,313 

648 

108,132 

641 

7,576 
13,666 

4,669 

9,692 
676 
460 

8,217 
660 

1,168 



33,615 

12,148 

68,485 

63,069 

258,548 

121,731 

607 

9,802 



(^ ^continued) 
Digitized by V^r^iJ'Ly'^iw 



-t 






r 




Total I: 


EfWABDS. 








FTWARS8. 


~ 






XOTAL UC 




FOSSION. 


British. 


FoRBIGlf. 


British. 


FOREIGK. 




Vessels. 


Steam Vessels. 1 


Sailiogp and Steam Vessels. S 


Sailing and Steam Vessels. Sailing and Steam Vessels. . 


Sailing and Steam Vessels. 




Tons, 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vewels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


England 


























• 


-* 


— 


§21 


27,521 


10 


491 


208 


10,480 


— 


... 


Wellfl 


8,02S 


- 


- 


660 


64,096 


84 


6,668 


288 


80,913 


22 


3,0-28 


Weymouth 


- _ 


- 


- 


870 


89,488 


6 


666 


123 


6,870 


— 


— 


Whitbv - 
Whitehaven 


978 


- 


- 


1,088 


83,964 


6 


1,088 


3,961 


823,178 


4 


978 


8,176 


-. 


mm 


628 


48,178 


41 


6,287 


170 


8,228 


21 


3,175 


Wisbeach - 


004 


mm 


- 


494 


28,800 


9 


904 


294 


14,629 


9 


904 


Woodbridge 


• 


2 


374 


131 


8,241 


-. 


• 


1,287 


112,072 


2 


374 


Workington 


6,748 


- 


- 


1,827 


174,858 


89 


12,368 


739 


76,109 


60 


6,741 


Yarmouth 


848,580 


438 


134,6fi0 


24,666 


4,081,764 


4,876 


1,154,207 


12,869 


2,888,488 


4,290 


M3,14| 


Iiondon * . 


















1 






Total, E| 


4,688,168 


1,028 


861,647 


129,710 


17,264,411 


20,966 


4,696,624 


148,081 !l8,419,810 


22,688 


5,049^701 


8C0TI 


6,026 






1,061 


308,321 


190 


20,826 


1,196 


222,668 


66 


6,02«' 


Aberdeen - 


1,140 


- 


— 


404 


34,886 


9 


981 


1,195 


77,30© 


10 


1,140 


aIL' - 


87,846 


- 


- 


62 


6,796 


131 


15,456 


249 


21,349 


872 


37,31^ 


636 


— 


- 


468 


31,471 


26 


2,779 


211 


15,086 


4 


m 


Arbroath - 


8,317 


- 


- 


486 


26,800 


81 


6,584 


247 


13,421 


60 


3,317 


Banff 


74,668 


2 


204 


01 


6,21.3 


102 


10,648 


820 


66,956 


722 


74,947 


Borrowstont 


. 


— 


— 


666 


46,470 


- 


. 


896 


86,896 


-» 


— 


Campbelto^ 


• 


-. 


- 


877 


46,416 


2 


216 


438 


29,714 


-^ 


— 


Dumfries - 


26,717 


- 


- 


J, 084 


226,160 


276 


89,021 


696 


107,022 


174 


25,717 


Dundee - 


68,614 


- 


- 


8,162 


638,465 


177 


67,192 


4,964 


792,144 


211 


6^514, 


Glasgow - 


47,668 


88 


7,988 


426 


68,886 


406 


64,299 


407 


68,678 


^99 


55,556! 


Grangemou 


8,603 


8 


2,866 


1,767 


201,610 


72 


20,837 


1,026 


160,996 


82 


11,049 


Greenock - 


4,461 


- 


- 


2,538 


181,896 


47 


6,395 


2420 


170,071 


46 


4,451 


Inverness - 


64,378 


- 


- 


480 


69,669 


10 


1,376 


6,020 


437,017 


269 


54,878 


Irvine 


47,166 


. 


- 


678 


39,266 


159 


14,378 


1,174 


74,778 


629 


47,156 


Kirkaldy - 


839 


- 


- 


428 


89,159 


9 


632 


420 


87,691 


7 


339 


Kirkwall - 


28,274 


11 


8,006 


1,081 


352,118 


1,181 


126,934 


. 1^78 


812,267 


283 


31,230 


Leith 


1,412 


- 


- 


160 


24,624 


20 


1,481 


140 


88^53 


20 


Vid 


Lerwick - 


17,066 


- 


- 


671 


48,882 


116 


17,688 


888 


88,790 


111 


17,066 


Montrose - 


184 


- 


- 


246 


16,668 


41 


3,919 


236 


16,046 


2 


134 


Perth 


880 


- 


- 


620 


42,614 


66 


8,894 


509 


84,788 


6 


380 


Peterhead 


. • 


2 


478 


62 


28,941 


6 


2,873 


42 


19,267 


2 


478 


Port Glasg 


214 


- 


- 


216 


26,277 


2 


214 


176 


23,854 


2 


214 


Stomoway 


• • 


- 


- 


740 


44,614 


1 


326 


409 


28,987 


mm^ 


— 


Stranraer -« 


8,648 


-p 


- 


880 


103,706 


79 


4,770 


794 


98,547 


124 


8,048 


Wick 


• 


- 


- 


714 


87,688 


- 


• 


408 


29,371 


»— 


_ 


Wigtown * 
























486,961 


61 


14,122 


22,628 


2,778,718 


8,146 


411,567 


26,142 


2,949,742 


8,370 


450,883 


Total, S 
























IREI 


74 




, 


100 


8,782 


2 


274 


126 


10,.402 


1 


74 


Ballina * 


16,668 


- 


- 


6,485 


828,686 


263 


48,305 


2,374 


607*956 


89 


16,653 


Belfast < 


860 


- 


- 


866 


60,107 


6 


1,166 


119 


20,108 


1 


350 


Coleraine * 


0,177 


- 


- 


2,400 


424,087 


211 


67,932 


. 1,880 


306,904 


45 


9,177 


Cork 


476 


— 


- 


818 


117,274 


18 


2,322 


624 


106,120 


8 


476 


Droffheda 
Dublin 


48,289 


- 


- 


7,843 


1,076,414 


261 


67,815 


4,361 


735,167 


185 


48,289 


048 


- 


- 


828 


133,852 


17 


3,189 


818 


94,934 


4 


948 


Dundalk 


2,076 


1 


1,660 


170 


46,428 


86 


9,856 


146 


38,261 


9 


8,725 


Galway 


2,346 


- 


- 


604 


84,828 


74 


21,283 


339 


60|846 


7 


2,345 


liimerick 


4,060 


- 


- 


1,462 


225,718 


306 


23,481 


848 


166,177 


23 


4,969 


Londondel 


8,126 


- 


- 


1,207 


129,254 


76 


10,936 


688 


70,868 


23 


3,125 


Newry 


• 


- 


- 


687 


64,868 


27 


6,817 


882 


38,294 


— 


— 


Boss 


278 


- 


- 


443 


60,062 


1 


273 


297 


43,997 


1 


273 


Skibbereei 


864 


- 


- 


283 


23,794 


21 


3,364 


164 


9,844 


4 


364 


SKgo 


168 


- 


- 


478 


22,488 


1 


168 


289 


10.807 


1 


168 


Strangforc 


1,841 


- 


- 


266 


89,426 


21 


4,340 


76 


4,827 


6 


1,841 


Tralee 


8,870 


— 


- 


1,070 


348,202 


92 


24,077 


1,864 


275.320 


13 


3,879 


Waterford 


201 


— 


- 


117 


12,770 


8 


919 


126 


12,148 


1 


201 


Westport 
Wexford 


. ^ 


— 


_ 


704 


85,046 


8 


1,417 


609 


63,741 


... 


— 
























80,211 


1 


1,660 


27,863 


8,762,078 


1,239 


277,908 


14,706 


2,571,206 


415 


90,861 


Total, 






















Islb of 1 


2,686 


. 


— 


1,464 


88,934 


29 


3,260 


871 


63,909 


23 


2,581 


8,604 


106 


4,876 


1,130 


71,486 


820 


19,491 


l/)78 


66,396 


246 


13,380 


Chahnei- 

























Cteneral 



Registrar General of Shipping and Setmen. 



Digitized by 



Google 



RSTURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 



15 



A RETURN of the Number and Tonnaqb of Sailing Vbsbbls Registered at each of the Ports of the Colonies of 
die United Kingdom respectively, distbguishing those under and those above Fifty Tons Regbter, on the 31st day 
of December 1860 : — A similar Return of Steam Vessels and their Tonnagb. 





Sailing Ybssbls. 


Stbam Ybbsbls. 




Of and under 50 Tons. 


Above 50 Tons. 


Of and under 50 Tons. 


Above fi 


»0 Tons. 








YessdB. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessds. 


Tons, 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


AnoCA: 


















Sierra Leone 


28 


481 


15 


1,668 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Batharst ... 


52 


810 


15 


1,463 


— 


— 


— 


^ 


Cape of Good Hope - 


n 


386 


89 


6,906 


■ . 


- 


8 


283 


Hairitins - - - 


70 


2,221 


66 


12,669 


- 


. * 


2 


154 


Australia : 


















Sydney - - - 


187 


4,774 


288 


86,688 


19 


469 


36 


7,569 


Mdboume 


148 


8,858 


315 


51,713 


11 


829 


12 


1,120 


Hobart Town - 


90 


2,483 


92 


15,909 


1 


29 


5 


900 


Lannceston 


22 


583 


14 


2,121 


8 


• 110 


4 


567 


Adelaide - 


82 


780 


39 


5,818 


1 


42 


6 


667 


Fremande 


17 


872 


5 


1,025 


2 


85 


— 


— 


IfewZeiaand - 


218 


4,656 


26 


3,711 


• • 


- 


4 


850 


Ambrica (BmniSB 


I NORTHBRN 


CoLOiriBs): 














Newfoundland - 


784 


22,780 


658 


69,864 


9 


45 


— 


— 


Canada • 


862 


12,181 


568 


78,528 


38 


1,166 


89 


20,664 


New Bronswick 


876 


9,866 


418 


185,258 


18 


287 


18 


2,172 


Nova Scotia and Cape 


1,956 


55,222 


1,513 


208,550 


4 


144 


5 


951 


Breton. 


















Prince Edward Island 


114 


8,257 


158 


24,209 


- 


- 


1 


68 


British Wbst Ihj 


dibs: 
















Antigua - - - 


49 


698 


7 


441 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Barbadoes • - 


11 


410 


9 


619 


* . 


* • 


1 


89 


Domuiica • . - 


9 


151 


1 


^ 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Grenada . . . 


84 


406 


— 


— ' 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Jamaica • . • 


82 


1,975 


8 


885 


— 


— 


«— 


— - 


Hontaerrat 


- 


. 


8 


171 


— 


.. 


.— 


— 


Nevis .. . 


« 


29 


— 


— 


— 


.» 


— 


_ 


StChristopher - 


16 


288 


8 


220 


— 


— 


— 


— 


StLacia. • - 


12 


298 


1 


264 


— 


— 


' — 


^mm 


StTincent 


89 


571 


7 


797 


— 


— 


— 


— . 


Tobago - 


2 


46 


1 


57 


— 


— 


— 


— 


Tortok - . . 


18 


128 


4 


376 


-* 


— 


.» 


-.. 


Trmidad ... 


40 


728 


4 


475 


• 


• 


2 


243 


BaimM • . . 


17t> 


8,979 


89 


2,847 


«.« 


.... 


^,.. 


.^ 


Bermuda ... 


8 


82 


29 


8,803 


..» 


^^ 


^^ 


_ 


Bemerara - - . 


86 


987 


11 


978 


.— 


.«. 


»• 


... 


Berbice - 


17 


300 


2 


133 


— 


— 


— 


— 



General Register and Record Office of Seamen,! 
London, 14 May 1861. J 



X JJ. Srowfij 
Registrar Oeneral of Shipping and. Seamen, 



261. 



Digitized by 



Google 



A^ 



RETURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 



A RETURN of the Number and Tonnaob of New Vessels Built in the United Kingdom, and at each of the 
British Possessions respectively (distinguishing Timber from Iron, and Steam from Sailing Vessels), and Registered 
as British Ships, in the Year 1860. 





Sailing Vessels. 


Steam Vessels. 


• 


Timber. 


Iron. 


Timber. 


Iron. 




Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Ukited Kingdom: 
England - - - 
Scotland - 
Ireland - 


658 

118 

15 


85,095 

24,402 

2,600 


24 
7 

1 


7,150 

5,481 

958 


41 
4 
1 


1,766 
538 

87 


81 
62 

8 


24,581 

21,962 

4,870 


Total for Unitedl 
Kingdom -/ 


686 


112,097 


82 


18,584 


46 


2,891 


151 


51,868 


British Possessions : 

Channel Islands 

Malta - . . 

North American Pro-1 
vinces - - -J 

West Indies - 

Australia and New"! 
Zealand - -J 

East Indies and Singa-1 
pore - - -J 

Ceylon - - - 

Mauritius - - - 

Cape of Good Hope - 

West Coast of Africa - 


29 
4 

586 

16 

41 

6 

6 
8 
1 


2,082 

980 

9p,286 

277 

1,067 

1,185 

218 
197 
148 
124 


ill III 1 


III 1 1 1 1 ' 
• 1 1 


2 
1 


185 
85 


1 


9 


Total for Britishl 
Possessions -J 


647 


105,554 


- 


• • 


8 


220 


1 


9 


Total for United 1 
Kingdom and Bri- > 
tish Possessions -J 


1,888 


217,651 


82 


18,584 


49 


2,611 


152 


51,872 



General Register and Record OflSce of Seamen, 1 
London, 14 May 1861. J 



Regbtrar General of Shipping and Seamen. 



Digitized by 



Google 



RETURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 



17 



A RETURN of the Numbbr of Vessels, with their Tonnage (distinguishing Timher from Iron, and Steam from 
Sailing Vessels), that were Registered in the United Kingdom as new ships in the Year 1860. 





TlMBBU. 


Iron. 




Total - - - 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Vessels. 


Tons. 


Sailing Vessels - . . 
Steam Vessels . - . 


786 
49 


144,688 
2,681 


32 
149 


13,684 
61,115 




835 


147,269 


181 


64,699 



General Register and Record Office of Seamen,! 
London, 14 May 1861. J 



/. jff. Brorvrtf 
Registrar-General of Shipping and Seamen. 



A RETURN of Vessels Sold and Transferred in the United Kingdom, in the Year 1860, distinguishing Steam 

from Sailing Vessels. 







Vessels. 


Tons. 






Sailiner Vessels ---.... 


1,391 
173 




Steim Vessels 

General Register and Record CMHce of Seamen,! 
London, 14 May 1861. / 


Total - - - 


291,968 
53,609 


1,564 


846,577 


J. H. Brown, 
Registrar-General of Shipping and Seamen. 


A RETURN of Vessels Wrecked in 


1 
the Year 1^60, belonging to the United Kingdom. 




Vessels. 


Tons. 


Sailing Vessels •---.... 


718 
26 




Steam Vessels ---.-.. 


160,893 


General Register and Record Office of Seamen«l 
London, 14 May 1861. J 


Total - - - 


11,891 


744 


172,784 


J. H, Bromn^ 
Registrar-General of Shipping and Seamen. 


A RETURN of Vessels Broken up in 


the Year 1860, belonging to the United Kingdom. 






Vessels. 


Tons. 


Sailing Vessels 




67 

8 




Steam Vessels 


12,134 


General R<^ster and Record Office of Seftmwi>\ 
London, 14 May 1861. J 


Total - - - 


234 


76 


12,668 


J. H. Browfiy 
Registrar-General of Shipping and Seamen. 



a6i. 



E 



Digitized by 



Google 



i8 



RETURNS RELATING TO SHIPPING. 



A RETURN of the Numbeb of Coloxiaj^built VesselS) and their Tonnage^ Registered at each of the Ports of the 
United Kingdom, in the Year 1860; distinguishing the Number and Tonnage of each Colony respectively. 





Newfoundland. 


Canada. 


Nbw Brunswick. 


NoYA Scotia and 
Cape Breton. 


Prince Edwaid 
Island. 




Vessels. 


Tonnage. 


Vessels. 


Tonnage. 


Vessels. 


Tonnage. 


Vessek. 


Tonnage. 


Vesseb. 


Tonnage. 


London 


1 


46 


1 


223 


8 


1,245 


1 


176 


1 


249 


Liverpool 


- 


- 


1 


805 


7 


6,070 


1 


480 


- 


- 


Plymouth 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


861 


Poole - 


2 


70 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Limerick 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


159 


Londonderry 


- 


- 


■i 


- 


1 


1,127 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Total - - - 


8 


116 


2 


618 


11 


0,842 


2 


666 


6 


959 



General Register and Record Office of Seamen,\ 
London, 14 May 1861. J 



Registrar-General of Shipping and Seamen. 



A RETURN of the Number of Foreion-built Vessels, and their Tonnage, Re^tered at each of the Ports tS the 

United Kingdom, in the Year 1800. 



London 
Bristol 
Cardiff 
Deal - 
Falmouth - 
Faversham - 
Hull - 
Liverpool - 
Newcastle - 
Plymouth - 
Preston 



Vessels. 



16 




2 
8 

1 



TONNAO^ , 



6,618 
148 



184 

106 

64 

267 

468 

6,118 

1,622 

710 

89 



Shields, South - 

Sunderland - 
Aberdeen - 

Irvine (Troon) - 
Wick . 
Belfast 
Dublin 

Total 



Vessels. 



4 
2 

8 
1 

1 
1 
2 

1 



64 



Tonnage. 



770 
1,U0 

914 
67 

164 

68 

882 

92 



19,271 



General Register and Record Office of Seamen,1 
London, 14 May 1861. / 



Registrar*General of Shipping and Seamen. 



Digitized by 



Google 



RBTURN8 RELATING TO SHIPPING. 



J9 



A BETURN of the Shipping employed in the Trade of the United Kingdom, eidiibiting the Number and Tonnage 
of Vessels that entered Inwards and cleared Outwards (including their repeated Voyages), separating British from 
Foreign Vessels, also Steam from Sailing Vessels, and distinguishing the Trade with each Country, in the Year I860. 







Inwabds. 




Outwards. 




COUNTRIES, 


British. 


FORBIQIC. 


British. 


FORBION. 




Ships. 


Tons. 


Ships. 


Tons. 


Ships. 


Tons. 


Ships. 


Tons. 


Rnana • - - - 


fSteam 


192 


101,972 


48 


22,841 


187 


99,033 


47 


20,486 


"ISailing 


1,587 


369,695 


2,074 


467,664 


1,135 


242,778 


1,242 


227,562 


Sweden - - - 


jSteam 


54 


19,766 


29 


6,892 


55 


20,987 


29 


6,587 


"ISailing 


287 


40,497 


2,035 


357,306 


200 


35,606 


1,619 


266,351 


Norway - - - - 


jSteam 


18 


5,814 


18 


8,853 


20 


7,127 


34 


12,528 


"\Sailing 


66 


4,389 


1,738 


307,698 


62 


10,119 


1,960 


345,779 


Denmark . . - 


JSteam 


125 


51,982 


53 


11,776 


48 


14,199 


72 


16,687 


'ISailing 


127 


20,783 


1,740 


148,261 


368 


59,973 


4,869 


680,379 


PniflBia • . . - 


JSteam 
"1 Sailing 


119 
758 


45,484 
104,742 


81 
2,395 


21,036 
436,655 


109 
645 


43,093 
91,630 


58 
1,870 


14,706 
387,398 


Germany - - - - 


J Steam 


695 


234,086 


380 


170,790 


680 


228,203 


339 


121,061 


*\Sailing 


1,406 


284,160 


2,104 


267,998 


1,409 


277,351 


2,224 


222,298 


Holland .... 


JSteam 


1,059 


307,512 


263 


58,978 


963 


260,672 


256 


56,943 


*1 Sailing 


1,88» 


221,713 


1,618 


226,699 


1,261 


198,764 


642 


55,284 


Belgium . . - - 


JSteam 


500 


125,451 


137 


83,276 


423 


117,478 


75 


24,474 


*\ Sailing 


746 


87,389 


927 


140,667 


607 


54,658 


163 


24,411 


Channel Islands 


Steam 
*\ Sailing 


593 
1,259 


89,708 
115,937 


64 


6,725 


687 
876 


90,717 
66,844 


1 


39 


France . - - - 


JSteam 


2,469 


489,954 


214 


31,009 


2,222 


463,496 


49 


14,801 


"1 Sailing 


4,448 


547,584 


4,941 


543,076 


4,668 


691,486 


4,020 


336,886 


Portugal - - - . 


JSteam 


147 


61,304 


4 


2,568 


157 


65,563 


3 


924 


"t Sailing 


687 


82,225 


176 


27,534 


618 


79,587 


394 


67,817 


Spain - . ^ . 


JSteam 
\ Sailing 


50 


19,958 


57 


18,210 


51 


17,811 


54 


16,815 


818 


124,323 


278 


54,680 


1,303 


241,141 


863 


168,485 


Gibraltar 


fSteam 
"ISailing 


35 
28 


18,878 
5,384 


12 


2,891 


56 
223 


27,644 
37,268 


1 
69 


266 
17,278 


Italian States - 


JSteam 
*1Sailing 


94 
395 


62,311 
68,077 


1 
281 


388 
52,620 


113 
690 


73,796 
126,246 


6 
1,027 


1,379 
260,385 


Malta - . - - 


JSteam 


1 


42\$ 


- 


• 


14 


11,761 


— 


. 


'ISailing 


20 


4,794 


8 


1,617 


186 


52,872 


121 


37,926 


Ionian Islands • • - 


^fSteam 
'ISailing 


8 
39 


2,898 
5,797 


4 


414 


1 
43 


918 
10,338 


43 


14,145 


Greece . • . - 


/Steam 


26 


12,316- 


- 


• • 


14 


6,189 


3 


1,304 


"ISailing 


72 


11,593 


3 


768 


62 


14,209 


52 


16,493 


Turkey . - - . 


'Steam 


45 


38,658 


2 


903 


42 


35,708 


8 


1,937 


"^ Sailing 


166 


35,320 


188 


48,134 


216 


61,104 


327 


94,489 


WaUadua and MddaTia • 


Steam 
*1Sailing 


4 
148 


1,036 
29,284 


279 


69,683 


9 
38 


2,434 
6,876 


26 


4,060 


Syria .... 


/Steam 


1 


418 


— 


— 


. 


-. 


« 


_ 


*1 Sailing 


7 


_l*iifi- 


- 


. 


36 


8,814 


16 


4,063 


AKca - . . - 


JSteam 


139 


119,421 


- 


- 


124 


104,000 


1 


678 


*1 Sailing 


556 


169,444 


178 


46,465 


663 


212,923 


320 


85,899 


Ana ... . 


JSteam 


4 


4,862 


- 


. 


19 


11,512 


_ 


__ 


"\Sailing 


1,052 


740,429 


122 


81,905 


1,388 


1,006,278 


524 


361,470 


America: 




















British Northern Colonies 


j'Steam 
"\Sailing 


38 
1,737 


46,711 
841,163 


403 


200,905 


36 
1,369 


43,231 
664,378 


117 


50,550 


British West Indies 


fSteam 
'ISailing 


1 
758 


1,798 
233,738 


56 


14,960 


4 
590 


1,202 
182,177 


52 


15,45^1 


Foreign West Indies - 


JSteam 
"\ Sailing 


25 
199 


42,663 
56,596 


3 

280 


2,324 
75,216 


30 
198 


47,827 
57,808 


1 
483 


687 
149,438 


United StatM 


Steam 


156 


212,583 


2 


3,026 


166 


223,152 


38 


63,531 


\/lUWU i;7MIM7D " " 


'ISailing 


459 


290,661 


1,317 


1,232,841 


463 


299,526 


1,33d 


1,227,837 


Central and Sonthem States 


jSteam 


21 


^2,93? 


8 


11,306 


16 


20,206 


10 


10,894 




\Saiung 


675 


238,649 


254 


86,661 


810 


282,060 


371 


141,844 


Falkland Islands - 


JSteam 


— 


— 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


~ 




* I Sailing 


1 


267 


— 


• 


1 


310 


— 


. 


The Whale Fishmes - 


J'Steam 
"^Sailing 

L • - - 


12 


3,846 


- 


- 


11 


4,032 


- 


- 




49 


13,504 


~* 


• 


60 


13,608 


3 


998 


TOTA 


26,489 


6,889,009 


24,674 


5,283,776 


26,154 


7,025,914 


25,829 


5,490,593 



General Raster and Record Office of Seamen,! 
London,.14 May 1861. J 



J. H, Bronmy 
Reg^istrar-General of Shipping and Seamen* 



261. 



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APPRENTICES (MERCHANT SERVICE). 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The Houfe of Comnion8, 
dated 6 March 1861 \^fary 



A RETURN ^* of the Number of Appbentices Bound as Mabinebs in the Merchant Service, in 
each Year, from 1836 to 1860, both inclusiye, distinguishing the Number Bound under 16 Years of Age, 
from 16 to 18 Years of Age, both inclusive, and the Number above 18 Years of Age ; also, showing 
the Number Bound for a period not exceeding Four Years, and the Nimiber Bound for any longer 
Period, or until 21 Years of Age, and the Total Number in each Year, and the Total Number of each 
Class in the whole Period, and the whole Number." 



RETURN of the Number of Apprkntices Bound and Registered as Mariners in the Merchant Service, in each 
Year, from 1836 to 1860, both indusiye, distinguishing the Number Bound under 16 Years of Age, from 16 to 18 Years 
of Age, both inclusive, and the Number above 18 Years of Age ; -also, showing the Number Bound for a period not 
exceeding Four Years, and the Number Bound for any longer Period, or until 21 Years of Age, and the Total Number 
in each Year, and the Total Number of each Class in the whole Period, and the whole Number. 







A G 


^ E. 


1 


Term.* 


Year. 


Under 


16 to 18 Years 


Oyer 


Total. 


Not exceeding 


Over 


Total. 




16 Years. 


indusiye. 


18 Years. 


4 Years. 


4 Years. 


1836 . - 


4,408 


2,815 


i A'S'S f 


7,223 


3,648 


3,575 


7,223 


1887 . 


8,119 


2,403 




5,522 


2,920 


2,602 


5,522 


1838 . 


2,768 


2,273 


5,041 


2,821 


2,220 


5,041 


1889 - 


2,942 


2,563 


5,505 


3,222 


2,-283 


5,505 


1840 . - 


8,420 


2,885 


6,305 


4,100 


2,205 


6,305 


1841 - - 


8,451 


2,942 


6,393 


4,209 


2,1^4 


6,393 


1842 . 


2,660 


2,638 


5 S 2 ® 


6,093 


3,143 


1,960 


5,098 


1843 ... 

1844 . 


2,168 
2,996 


2,286 
3,263 




4,454 
6,259 


2,851 
3,885 


1,603 
2,874 


4,454 
6,259 


1846 -r - . 


7,456 


8,248 


15,704 


9,962 


5,752 


15,704 


1846 . 


5,254 


5,122 


t'^l^^ 


10,376 


6,470 


3,906 


10,376 


1847 - 


5,618 


5,903 


P.§| org 


11,521 


7,279 


4,242 


11,521 


1848 - 


6,910 


5,530 


11,440 


7,447 


3,993 


11,440 


1849 - - 


5,072 


4,587 


9,659 


6,335 


3,324 


9,669 


1860 . 


2,691 


2,357 


7 


5,055 


2,903 


2,152 


5,055 


1861 . 


2,564 


2,693 


18 


5,275 


3,158 


2,117 


5,275 


1862 . 


2,834 


2,947 


64 


5,845 


3,522 


2,323 


5,845 


1863 - - 


3,149 


3,585 


94 


6,828 


4,436 


2,392 


6,828 


1864 - - . 


3,482 


4,302 


151 


7,936 


5,312 


2.623 


7,935 


1866 - 


8,217 


. 4,080 


164 


7,461 


4,929 


2,532 


7,461 


1866 - 


3,145 


4,110 


155 


7,410 


5,021 


2,389 


7,410 


1867 ^ - 


3/)06 


3,689 


155 


6,850 


4,690 


2,160 


6,850 


1868 - 


2,478 


2,978 


122 


5,578 


8,836 


1,742 


5,578 


1869 . 


2,044 


2,971 


158 


5,773 


3,785 


1,988 


5,778 


1860 • - 


2,572 


2,877 


167 


5,616 


3,789 


1,827 


5,616 


Total - - 


88,924 


89,942 


1,256 


180,121 


113,663 


66,458 


180,121 



JVb(e. — ^The law obliging shipowners to maintain apprentioes in proportion to the tonnage of their ships (5 & 6 Will. 4, 
c 19), came into operation on tiie 31st July 1836, and was gradually enforced as vessels returned from foreign yoyages, 
|U)d cleared again. 

Cobnial yesseky and all yessels unemployed, or under 80 tons, were exempted from carrying apprentices. 

In the year 1849, the above-'inentioned law, enacted in 5 & 6 Will. 4, c. 19, and continued in subsequent Acts, was 
repealed. 



General Raster and Record Office of Seamen,! 
15 April 1861. J 



/. H. Broton^ 
Registrar General of Seamen and Shipping, 



170. 



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BRITISH REGISTERED VESSELS. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 14 June 1861;— /or, 

RETURNS " of the Number and Tonnage of British Registered Vessels, exclusive of River 
Steamers, employed in the Home and Foreign Trade of the United Kingdom in the Years 1858, 
1859, and 1860 (not including repeated Voyages), with the Number of Men employed, classified accord- 
ing to Capacity, and including the Masters (in continuation of the Return, Appendix No. 48, of the 
Commission for Manning the Navy) :" 

" And, of the Number of Apprentices Registered as existing in the several Years from 1835 to 1860 in- 
durive (in continuation of the Return, Appendix, No. 49, of the Commission for M«^"TiiTig the Navy)." 



1. — RETURN of the Number and Tonnage of British Rbgiste'rbd Vessels, exclusive of River Steamers, employed 
in the Home and Foreign Trade of the United Kingdom in the Years 1868, 1869, and 1860 (not including 
repeated Voyages), with the Number of Men employed, classified according to capacity, and including the 
Masters (in continuation of the Return, Appendix No. 48, of the Commission for Manning the Navy). 

This Return embraces Vessels belonging to the Channel Islands, but not Vessels belonging to the Colonies. 





Shipt. 


Toils. 


Tolal 

Crewt, 

including 

Masteri. 






CLASSIFICATION OF CREWS. 






Yens. 


i^ 


i 




■1 


4 

6r^ 


-4 
if 

< a 




1 


a 


! 


1 


I8S8 


ao,()7i 


4,815,242 


199,050 


21,218 


21,294 


14,882 


66,106 


17.601 


24,594 


18,887 


1,942 


6,624 


11,458 


1,044 


1850 


19^7© 


4,269,109 


198,545 


21,080 


21,088 


14,241 


62,206 


17,520 


28,905 


12,814 


1,926 


6,582 


12,296 


1,088 


1860 


20,019 


4.261,789 


191.888 


20,296 


21,060 


18,264 


62,787 


17,614 


23,041 


12,059 


2,012 


6,240 


14,280 


885 



Note — Home-trade shipt arc ships trading on the coasts of the United Kingdom, or to Pons within the limits of the Hirer Elbe and Brest. Foreign- 
going ships aie shipt trading beyond those limits. 

• 
No ship is included which has not been reported as a foreign going ship within four years, or as a home*trade ship 
within one year. 
Many apprentices are serTing in the capacity of mates* 
Masters were not included in previous returns. 



General Begister and Record Office of Seaaaen and Shipping,! 
Addiaide Place^ London Bridge, d August 1861. J 



J. H. BrowHj 

Registrar General. 



2.— RETURN of the Number of App&bnticbs Registered as existing in die seyeral Years from 1836 to 1860 inclusive, 
(in contination of the Return, Appendix No. 49, of the Commisiion for Manning the Navy), 





Apprentices 




Apprentices 




Apprentices 




Apprentices 


Tetr. 


Registered as 


Yetr. 


Registen^ as 


Year. 


Registered m 


Year. 


Registered as 




existing. 




existing. 




existing. 




existing. 


1835 


8,002 


1842 


23,683 


tl849 


31,636 


1856 


24,847 


♦1836 


11,298 


1843 


23,064 


1850 


24,394 


1867 


25,096 


1837 


18,611 


1844 


22,443 


1851 


17,411 




1838 


21,680 


1846 


30,132 


1852 


11,106 


1858 


23,831 


1839 


22,464 


1846 


31,079 


1863 


13,826 


1859 


21,815 


1840 


26,760 


1847 


33,766 


1864 


18,423 




1841 


26,077 


1848 


34,858 


1866 


22,082 


1860 


20,183 



* The law obliging shipowners to maintain I4)prentice8 in proportion to the tonnage of the ships (6 & 6 Will. 4, c. 19), 
came mto operation 31 July 1835, and was gradually enforced as vessels relumed from foreign voyages, and cleared 
again. 

tin this year the law enacted in 6 & 6 Will 4, c. 19, and continued in subsequent Acts, obliging shipowners to 
maintain apprentices in proportion to the tonnage of the ships, was repealed. 



General Register and Record Office of Seamen and Shipping,! 
Adelaide Place, London Bridge, 2 August 1861. J 



J. H, Brown, 

Registrar General. 



549- 



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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 



RETURN 10 an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 15 February 1861 i—for. 



A COPY "of all Correspondence between the Board of Trade, the Trinity 
House, and the Port of Dublin Corporation respectively, relative to the 
original Erection upon Rock Island of the present Lighthouse for Crook- 
haven Harbour, or to the proposed Erection either of a new Lighthouse, 
or of a Beacon Tower upon the Alderman Rock : *' 

^ And, similar Return as to the placing of a new Coast Light between the 
Fastncts and the Old Head of Kinsale.'' 



Board of Trade, ) E DG A R A, B O W R I N G, 

26 February ISOl. J Registrar. 



— No. 1.— 

Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 21 October 1838. 

A MEMORIAL from the inhabitants and others connected with Crookhaven, 
together with a letter from the agents at Lloyd^s at that port, having been 
received through the Inspector General of the Coast Guard, has been under con- 
sideration of this Board. I have now the honour to transmit, for the information 
of the Elder Brethren, copy of these documents, and of a Report of the Inspector 
of Lighthouses on examination of the harbour, with reference to the object sought 
by the memorialists. 

In bringing the subject under consideration of the Elder Brethren, have the 
goodness to mention, that it appears a small lighthouse, at the northern entrance 
of the harbour, would be of great advantage to the many vessels which frequently 
seek shelter there ; and with this view the corporation are willing to comply with 
the prayer of the memorial, should the Elder Brethren concur in this opinion. 

I have, &c. 
J. Herbert, Esq* (signed) H. VerekeVj Secretary. 



Enclosure 1, in No. 1. 

To Richard B. Hmgford, Esq., Chief Officer of Coast Guard, Rock Island, 

CrookhavetL 

Sir, 

You will please forward, through the Department of Coast Guard, the views we, the under- 
rigned persons, beii^ inhabitants of Crookhaven, entertain, relative to the very great 
necessity there is, and always has been, of having a light established at the entrance or this 
very valuable and safe harbour. 

llie resort of several of Her Majesty's ships of war, and to which large fleets of merchant 
diips and the coasting trade, and also the vessels employed in this fishery, frequently, and 
we may say always, continually have occasion to seek safety and shelter in. 

Now we, the undersigned, assert that this fine and safe harbour of Crookhaven is most 
difficult to be seen, approaching it running in from sea, in consequence of the high lands 
about it. 

64. A We, 

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2 CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 

We, the undersigned, respectfully pray, that Her Majesty's Goverament, or the Trinity 
House, or any others that liave the care and erection of hghthouses, may be humanely 
pleased to erect, at the entrance of Crookhaven Harbour, a lighthouse for the safety of life and 
property of Her Majesty's subjects. 

And we, the underfeigned, further beg leave to state that nothing but a strong feeling of 
humanity urges us to make this application. 

And we further know that ships and vessels are frequently obliged to haul off to sea at 
nighi in stormy weather, for want of a Kght at the entrance of this harbour, and we respect- 
fully state at foot the &;reat number of ships and vessels that have been lost or totally 
wrecked, for want of a lighthouse at the entrance of said harbour. 

Crookhaven, 10 January isas. 

[Here follow 43 signatures.] 
Ships and vessels lost at and ntar the entrance to Crookhaven, 16 in number. 



Enclosure 2, in No. 1. 

Sir, ' Crookhaven, 6 January M38* ^ 

Having considered the subject we talked of yesterday, respecting the utilitv of erecting 
a lighthouse or beacon at the entrance of this harbour, I take leave to say that humanity, as 
well as the mercantile public good of the United Kingdom, much require a light or beacon 
at the entrance of this port, which, if placed there lone since, would have saved many lives 
and valuable property. Indeed, many men of rank in the navy with whom I often conversed 
on this subject, said it was a shame that a lighthouse was not long since placed there. 
Annexed is the statement of shipwreck and loss of lives that occurr^ in my own perfect 
recollection near this harbour. 

I remain, &c. 
(signed) Daniel Coghlan, Agent for Lloyd's. 

[Here follows a list of several shipwrecks with loss of life, &c., amounting to 20 vessels, 
with many.hves.] 



Enclosure 3, in No. 1. 

Sir, 26 October 18M. 

In compliance with the Board's order I have visited Crookhaven, and made the requisite 
investigation as to the utility o( placing a lighthouse near its entrance. 

Crookhaven, a good harbour in roost winds, is much resorted to in easterly gales, and a 
small lighthouse there would be very useful, and, as has been urged in the memorial 
submitted to the Board, would in many cases be the means of saving valuable lives and 
property. 

The outer point of the Alderman Rocks, which are eastward of Crookhaven entraBoe^ 
would probably have been the site for a lighthouse, had it been practicable to have erected it 
at a reasonable cost, and with a certainty that it would be durable; but from the slaty^ 
unsound structure of the rock, and its extreme exposure to the heavy stroke of the sea, even 
open work framing would there be hazardous. 

I would, therefore, recomtnend that a small harbour light should be built on the outer 
point of the land, on the north or starboard side of the entrance, which will thereby be 
sufficiently marked. 

A light so placed cannot be mistaken in thick weather for that of C^pe Clear. . 

I have, &c. 
Henry Vereker, Esq., (signed) George Halpin. 

&c. &c. &c. 



_No.2.— 

Trinity House, London, 
Sir, 31 October 1838. 

I BEG to acknowledge the reoeipt of your letter oi the 2l8t ijostant, with its 
various enclosures, relating to the suggested establishm^it of a light at the 
entrance of the harbour of Crookhaven^ and signifying that the Corporation for 
preserving and improving the Port of Dublin are willing to comply with the 
representations which have been received upon that subject, should this Corpora- 
tion concur in the opinion which is entertamed, that the accomplishment of this 
measure would prove of advantage to shipping. 

And 



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CROOK HAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, fttr. 3 

And having brought the same under the consideration of the Elder Brethren, 
I am directed to acquaint you, for the information of the Corporation for 
preserving and improving the Port of Dublio, that they are of opinion that the 
estabKshment of a light for that harbour would be of advantage as repredented. 

Ib considering the situation in which the light might most beneficially be 
piMed, the Elder Brethren are disposed to concur in the opinion escpres^d by 
Mr. Halpin, the Inspector of I^glithouses^ that the outer point of the Alderman 
Rocks^ which are eastward of Crookhaven entrance, presents the most eligible 
position for a lighthouse, had its erection in that situation been practicabie; but 
under the great difficulties which ptesent themselves to the adoption of that site, 
the Board approves the erection of a small harbonr lightbonse (to be madntained 
by a toll upon vessels resorting to the place) on the onter ponit of the land cm 
the north or starboard side of the entrance. 



Henry Vereker, Esq. 



I am, &c. 
(signed) J. Herbert. 



— .N0.3.— 

Ballast Office, Dublin, 
Sir, 9 May 1843. 

X BBG to acquaint you that I have forwarded to your address, a parcel contain- 
ing notices relating to the exhibition of a Ught at the newly erected Ugbthoiise of 
Crookhaven. 

Will you have the goodness to distribute these notices to such ports of 
England, &c., and as the Elder Brethren may see fit to direct ? 

I am, &CC. 
(signed) H. Vereker, 
J. Herbert, Esq., &c. Secretary. 



Enclosure in No. 3. 

NonOB TO MaSDI IRS. 

Crookharren Lighthouse, Soath Coast of Ireland. 

The Corporation for preserving and improving the Port of Dublin, Jbe., hereby give 
aotiee, that a ligbtlioiise ms been erected at the entnmee to Crookhaven^ from which a light 
will be shown at sunset on the 1st of August 1843, and which will tb^eafter be exfaiUted 
every night from sunset to sunrise. 

Specification given of the position of the tower and appearance of the light, by Mr. Hat- 
pin, the Inspector of Lighthouses. 

The lighthouse is erected on Rock Island Point, at the northern side of the entrance to 
Crookhaven, in laU 61* 28' 36" N. and long. 9* 42' 31 " W., and bears 

Prom Cape Clear Lighthouse N. W. J N. distant 8 \ sea miles. 

„ Cane Clear Island. (S. W. end) N. N. W. f W. „ 8 ditto. 

„ Alaerman Rocks, (outer point) N. W. | N. „ \ ditto. 

„ Fastnet Rock N.JE. „a ditto. 

The light will be a fixed white light. The lantern is open to seaward and to the haven,, 
iron £. by S. to W. by N., and is elevated 67 feet above the level of the sea. 

The bearings stated are magnetic. 

By order, 
Ballast Office^ Dublin, 30 March 1843. H. Vereher, Sec. 



64* A 2 

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CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 



— No. 4..— 

Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 8 January 1850. 

By direction of the Corporation for preserving and improving the Fort of 
Dublin^ I beg to enclose herewith copies of memorials and letters with reference 
to the erection of an additional light on the south coast of Ireland, and pointing 
out Galley Head as the most desirable position for such light. I also enclose 
copies of reports made to the Board on the subject. 

In submitting these documents for consideration, T am directed to observe 
that the Board have approved of Galley Head as an eligible position for a light, 
and iaire disposed to accede to the prayer of the memorialists, if the Elder 
Brethren shall see fit to sanction their so doing. 

I have, &c. 
J. Herbert, Esq. (signed) . H. Vereker, Secretary. 



Enclosure 1, in No. 4. 



Sir, Castle Bernard, Bandon, 10 September 1849. 

I HAVB observed with much pleasure that the Commissioners for improving the Port 
of Dublin, &c., have decided upon erecting lighthouses at Kinsale and Bearnaven. I venture 
to ask you to bring under their notice the importance of a lighthouse on the Gralley Head, 
between the Fastnet light and the Old Head of Kinsale, as recommended by Captain 
Wolfe, Second Report Tidal Harbours, Appendix B. The wrecks in the neighbourhood 
were numerous last year. 

I have, &c. 
H. Vereker, IB.^. ' (signed) Bernard. 



Enclosure 2, in No. 4. 



Sir, Castle Bernard, 6 October 1849. 

I HAVE observed that some of the Commissioners have been at Kinsale last week, and 
I venture to trouble you vnth a line to express a hope that the subject of the lighthouse at 
Galley Head has not escaped their notice. 

I have, &c. 
H. Vereker, Esq. (signed) Bernard. 



Enclosure 3, in No. 4. 



Castle Bernard, 17 October 1849. 
Lord Bernard presents his compliments to Mr. Vereker, and has the honour to forward 
to him a memorial, numerously and respectably signed in favour of a lighthouse on the 
Galley Head. Lord B. eamesfly hopes that the subject may occupy the serious attention 
of the Ballast Board. 



To the Chairman and Members of the Ballast Board for Ireland. 

The Memorial of the undersigned Landowners, Clergymen, Merchants, Ratepayers, 
and Persons interested in the Sea Coast Districts of the Baronies of Ibare and Barryroe, 
and the Carberies : 

Humbly showeth. 
That the numerous and fittal shipwrecks, and great sacrifice of life, and property on this 
coast have long called for an increase of lighthouse accommodation. 

That the report of Captain Wolfe has recently set forth that the distance between the 
Fastnet and the Old Head of Kinsale being 45 miles, a light on the Galley Head is very 
desirable, as the practice of the transatlantic steamers of making the coast of Ireland, and 
runninc^ along its shores, both outward and homeward bound, render it necessary that they 
8houldl)e well lighted. , .. , , , j 

Memorialists therefore humbly implore that a lighthouse may immediately be erected oa 
the Galley Head. And memorialists will ever pray. 

[Here follow 87 Signatures.] 



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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 



Enclosure 4, in No. 4. 

Sir, Castle Bernard, 12 November 1840. 

I REQU B8T you wiU be so good as to lay before the Ballast Board the memorial which 
Ihave the honour to transmit from the inhabitants of Durrus Kilcrohane, and I beg of you 
-to direct the attention of the Board to the important subject to which it refers. 

I am, kc. 
A. Vereker, Esq. (signed) Bandoh. 



At a Meetnig called by Public Advertisement, and held at Carrigbree, 

Sth November 1849, 

Viscount Bernard, m.p., in the Chair, the following Memorial was adopted. 

To the Ballast Board of Dublin. 

The inhabitants of the parish of Durrus Kilcrohane, have observed with much satisfaction 
that your honourable Board has adopted (with the exception of the Galley Head lighthouse, 
which they hope may not long be delayed), the leading suggestions made in the admirable 
letter of Captain Wolfe for the better lighting of the coast, and pre8e];yiug the lives and 
property of those trading on the south-west coast of Ireland. 

We beg to represent that the bay of Dunmanus presents every qualification as an 
excellent harbour for the refuge of ships along the coast, were there some beacons placed 
upon the Sheeps Head, and a small lighthouse on Carberry Island, nearer the entrance of 
jILc bay. 

The coast affords the greatest facilities for carrying on all fisheries on an extensive scale, 
with a large description of boats, and a more expensive kind of fishing nets ; it is scarcely, 
however, to be expected, that any capitalists will embark their money, so long as from the 
. absence of ligbthou:>es and the necessary beacons their property is liable to be lost 

We are fullyaware we cannot support the claims of our neglected bay by the powerful 
influence available in other places ; but we earnestly hope that the simple statement of our 
case will not, on that account, receive the less attention from your honourable Board. 

(signed) Bernard, Chairman. 



Enclosure 5, in No. 4. 



Admiralty, Harbour Department, 
'16, Duke*«treet, Westminster, 
Sir, 27 November 1869. 

I AM commanded by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to acquaint you that two 
^memorials have been received at the Admiralty, one from the justices of the peace of Clon- 
akiltyand its neighbourhood, and the other from the inhabitants of Durrus Kilcrohane, 
calling their Lordships' attention to the number of wrecks which have^ lately taken place at 
the coast between the Galley Head and the Old Head of Kinsale (including Clonakilty 
Bay), and complaining of (he want of buoys and beacons in Dunmanus Bay, and also 
rmresenting that a lighthouse is required on the Galley Head, the shipping, from the want 
of such a light, being now exposed to danger and risk. 

And I am further commanaed to request that you will bring this subject under the notice 
of the Board, as it is, in their Lordships' opinion, one of considerable importance, and 
connected with the interests of the trading community, not only of the south*west coast ok' 
Ireland, but of the United Kingdom. 

I am, &c. 
To the Secretary, Ballast Board. (signed) J. Penrker. 



Enclosure 6, in No. 4. 

Relatiye to Lights on the South Coast of Ireland. 

Sir, Ballast Office, G Decembier 1849. 

Having examined the various papers relative to additional sea works proposed to be 
placed on the south coast of Irelana, I now beg leave to report on that part of the subject 
to which two recent memorials bear reference ; the one from persons interested in the shore 
districts of Ibane Barryroe and the Carberies, and the other from the inhabitants of Durrus 
Kilcrohane, containing suggestions, which have also engaged the attention of the Lords 

64, A 3 Commissioners 



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CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 



Commissioners of the Admiralty, as expressed in Captain Parker*s letter of the 27tb 
ultimo. 

The statements in those documents refer to the line of coast between Dunmanus Bay and 
the OM Head of Kineale, they chiefly urge the importance of placing a light on Galley 
Head ; and T may at once proceed to consideralion of that propoaitiMi. ; ' 

From the Cape Clear light to the Old Head light the distance it S7 sea miles, and their 
ranges meet near to Galley Head. On the transference of' the li^hft, ae intended, from Cape 
Clear to the lower and more western position on the Fastnet Rock, the ranges would not be 
in contact, and there would be, especially in thick weather, an intervening space unlic^hted. 
It is, however, to be observed, that as the lan^es of the lights would extend so far southward 
that the intervening span would be embayed, &s it were, the necessity for an intermediate 
light would then be less than might be inferred from the distance. Galley Head is 26 miles 
from the Fastnet, and 10 J miles from the Old Head; a light on it would, it is obvious, 
more fully light tl)i^ part of the coast, and would at times be useful, pvarided that effectual 
precaution were taken to prevent the probability of one light being mistaken for another. 
This is of great importance in all localities, but particularly on such a coast as the south-west 
of Ireland, so frequent a landfall for vessels from the Atlantic. It may seem easy to resort 
to the well-known modes of distiBguisbing lights, yet experience in all countries, and up to 
the most recent periods, proves that differences, unless broadly marked, do occasionally fail 
in affording sure means of disorimination, and increasing the number of lights increases' the 
difficulty of giving a facile and unerring means of recognising eaeh light by its distinctive 
appearance. Cape Clear is a revolving light, and the Fustnet Rock light, it is propoBed^ 
should be the same) not only as preserving; the established appearance of the most southern 
fiea mark on the Irish coast; but inasmuch as a stronger volume of li^t can thereby be 
projected from this important position than could be well had from fixed apparatus. 

Kinsale, the next to the eastward, is a fixed li^ht; the diffS&rence is strongly nwrked; itj; 
continuing those same appearances, any coast Itglft between those pomrti^ nhoald be inter^^ 
mittent or flashing, and, as the motion of the Cape Clear revolving frame is slow, the inters 
mission, or the flash of a light on Galley Head, might be made markedly disshmlan* and rvpid. 
This diittinction would in clear weather, and in ordinary sUtes of the atmosphere, be amply' 
sUfBcient^ but during thick snow, showers, and fogs, would be less certain. It becomes neeee^ 
sary, therefore, to review the chain of lights from the Fastnet to the Tuskar, and carefully 
to determine whether the characteristic appearances of the established lights- can be 
retain^di and y«t addiftional ones placed * without risk of confusion ; or whether any sm^ 
what changes of the established lights would be advisable. 

To aid in bringing this under review, I give, iif tabulated form, two modes of arrangement; 
the first retaining the present appearances of established lights. 



• 




latsrvftl 

of 
Revolution or Flash. 


Colour of Light. 








Cape Clear 


Revolving - 


every two minutes - 


Bright or white. 


Galley Head - 


Flashiog 


every 10 seconds. 


\ , 


Kinsak . 


Fixed . 




Bright. 


Bally cotton Island - 


IntermittMit - 


every 45 seconds. 




Mine Head 


Fixed. 


— 




Tuskar Rock - 


Revolving - 


every two minates - 


Bright and red. 



A second arrangement, involvmg changee of established lighU, might be as follows 

every two minutes - - Bright. 

every 10 seoondi. 



Cape Clear 


- 


Revolving 


Galley H«ad - 


- 


Fixed. 


Kinsale 


- 


Flashing 


Ballycotton Island 


- 


Fixed. 


Mine Head 


- 


Intermittent 


Tuskar Rock - 


- 


Revolving 



eyetj 46 seconds, 
every two minutes 



Bright and red. 



This latter anangement, possessing the advantage of placing fixed and varying lights 
alternately, is open to the serious objection of changing the appearance of established 
lights. 

Those remarks have been confined to positions from and eastward of the Fastnet Rock ; if 
extending the review to the north-westward, and looking to the possibility of placing a light 
off the western end of Dursey Island, or on the Bull Rock, there does not appear any neces- 

sftv 



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<7R00KHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 7 

^h^ tor altering that arrangaoient of the distinctive appearances of the toath coast liglMs 
i<betwa«i the Tuskar and Fastoet), which would be most suitable to extension of the chain of 
lights along the south-west coast (between the Fastnet and Loop Head). 

The sifcond memorial alludes to the want of buoys and beacons in Dunmanus Bay, and 
suggests Ibe placing a light on Carbery Island. I am not a^i'are that any application 
respecting this bay has previously been made to the Lighthouse Board, who have not over- 
looked that part of the south-west coast. They have placed lights in two safe harbours 
near at hand (Bearhaven northward and Crookbaven southward), both within a few miles 
of the mouth of Donmaaas Bay. With those asylums so close, 1 do not think there would 
be mich resort to Dunmanus Bay for shelter, exposed as it is to winds from the westward, 
as would induce the placing a light there for that sole purpose ; nor is there as yet that 
extent of trade which would warrant the maintaining a light for its guidance. I would, how- 
ever, recommend that a few beacons should be placed to mark the rocks of this bay. 

The memorials mentioned have the support of noblemen whose exertions for the benefit of 
the south of Ireland are most praiseworthy, and also of many highly respectable and intelli- 
gent gentlemen ; but apparently bear the signatures of few, if any, shipowners or shipmasters. 
This omission, as it in no way affects the merits of the recommendations which they convey, 
is mentioned only in connexion with the circumstance that the general mercantile and 
shipping community have not applied for additional lights on the south-west coast, nor 
expressed an opinion tliat they were necessary. 

From the approaching completion of the Mine Head and Ballycotton Island lighthouses, 
from the arrangements now in progress for erecting a new lighthouse on the southern point 
of the Old Head of Kinsale, and for the transference of the most southern of the coast light 
positions from the Cape Clear to the Fastnet Rock, as from the suggestions for additional 
liahts, it is highly desirable that the whole subject of light<^ for the south and south-west 
coasts of Ireland should now be finally re-examined, and such comprehensive general plan 
adopled as will be most satisfactory and most useful to the public. 

It is perhaps not disadvantageous, in commenting on the positions of the coast lights, to 
divide the subject into sections, as herem, from the Fastnet to Tuskar Rock. On next 
Tbnraday I propose subnTitting to the Board a report relative to positions of lights for the 
south-west coast, from the Fastnet Rock to the Loop Head. 

I have, &c., 
(signed) George Hatpin. 

Henry Vereker, Esq. 



EHclosure 7, in No. 4. 

Relative to Lights on the South- West Coast of Ireland* 

Sir, Ballast Office, 13 December 1849. 

HATING on last Thursday reported on subject of southern coast lights of Ireland, situate 
between the positions of the Fastnet and Tuskar Kocks, I have now the honour to submit a 
few observations respecting the lights on the south-west coast, from Fastnet Rock to Loop 
Head. 

Between those two last-named points are the Skelligs coast lights, and the harbour 
lights of Crookbaven, Bearhaven, and Valentia (with oqe building in Iralee Bay) ; within the 
last few years, it has been suggested th^t the distances from Cape Clear to the Skelligs 
Rocks, and from the Skelligs to Loop Head, should have additional seamarks, and that lights 
should be placed on the Bull Rock and on the Foze Rock, and, as advised by some, that 
the Skelligs lights should be discontinued. 

The distance from the Fastnet to the Skelligs is nearly forty-one sea miles. It is urged 
that the Skelligs is so far northward that to beacon that space sufficiently there should be a 
light on the Bull Rock, which is twenty-nine miles from the Fastnet. and thirteen and a half 
mm the Skelligs; the Fastnet is more than five miles westward of Cape Clear lighthouse, 
and the light on that ro<:k will range to the entrance of Bantry Bay. The Skelligs lights 
also are seen to the entrance of that bay ; both stand prominently outside of the general 
'ceast line, and any vessel having inadvertently passed into the narrow unlighted space 
which there would be between the ranges of those two lights, would meet the Bearhaven 
light, extending to the entrance of Bantry Bay, and thus be guided to the best asylum 
harbour on that coast ; and it is to be remarked, that although the Fastnet and Skellies 
lights would not overlap, as it were, in one direction, yet the southern range of ue 
Skelligs light would project southward of the northern circuit of the Fastnet light The 
double lights afford a strong distinctive mark, and are so placed as to lead past the 
projecting points northward and southward of them ; moreover, the range of the Skelligs 
lights stretches some miles further westward than could that of a light if placed on the 
Bull Rock. 

The position of the Bull and Foze Rocks were of course noticed when it was first proposed 
to pay lighthouses on the south-west coast of Ireland, but at that time it was held sufficient 
to select such single positions far apart, it may be, as marking the most prominent parts of 
the coast would, without multiplicity of lights, be the most generally useful, and chosen with 
that aim, the position of the Skelligs was well selected. Moie recently the suggestions to 
place lights on the Bull and Foze Kocks was repeated by Captain Wolfe, in his letter dated 
10th March 1846 ; yet in ppepostng that tliose lights should be erected, if necessary, at the 
64. A 4 sacrifice 

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8 CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 

sacrifice of that on the Skelligs, he observed, that as a means of distinction the Skelligs 
lights might still be retained. He had evidently doubted the propriety of removing thein^ 
and this should not be done without every clear conviction of decided advantage. 

In alluding to the proposition for placing a light on Galley Head, I adverted to the only 
difficulty which would attend such a measure, namely, the marking the light so that it could, 
not be mistaken for any of the other lights on that coast, and the effecting this without 
altering the distinctive characters of the established coast lights; the same necessity for 
caution would arise in placing additional coast lights northward and westward of the Fastnet. 
If it should be determined to discontinue the Skelligs lights, and to place a light on the 
Bull Rock, then obviously one would also be required on the most suitable of tiie islets 
westward of the Blaskets ; and in the event of those additional lights being decided on, the 
following distinctive appearances might be adopted : 

Fastnet Rock - - Revolving light. 

Bull Rock ... Fixed (double light). 

Viciiiity of Blaskets - Intermittent light. 

Loop Head - - - Fixed light 

From the Skelligs Rocks to Loop Head the distance is fifty-three sea miles, and the ran^ 
of the lights on those points are several miles apart : so far there is a deficiency; but coastmg 
vessels having passed the Skelligs experience little difficulty in clearing the Foze, and vessels 
from America, bound for the English Channel, could not pass northward of the range of the 
Skelligs lights without a greater error as to position than that alleged to have occurred - 
through mistakino^ the Crookhaven light for one on the Old Head of Kinsale. I hare 
already stated my opinion that if the Skelligs lights should be discontinued, then a light 
would be absolutely requisite in the vicinity of the Blaskets. In obedience to the Board's- 
direction, J carefully examined the Foze Rock, which is the most western outlayer (having 
during many years had freouent opportunities of viewing it indifferent states of weather), 
and found it to be so limitea in size and top, with such constant .swell and run of the sea 
around it, even in moderate weather, with a heavy wash over it during storms, that although 
it would be possible to build an iron lighthouse on it, the hazard and uncertainty of commu- 
nication with it would be so great as to more than counterbalance its advantage of position;, 
added to this, though of minor importance, the expenses of its maintenance would be large. 
I would therefore recommend that, in the event of the suggested change being decided on,- 
the light should be placed on the Icarragh Island, which is more than three miles westward 
of the Ghreat Blasket 

The general mercantile and shipping interests have not applied for additional coast lights - 
to be placed between the Fastnet und Loop Head, nevertheless it is right to take into consider- 
ation whether such lights would be useful or necessary, so that even, if not immediately, 
undertaken, provision may be made for their future systematic introduction in now laying 
down the basis for the characteristic appearances by which it may be most judicious to 
distinguish the principal lights on the south and south-west coasts. The foregoing remarks, 
as well as those submitted on last Thursday, have been written with reference to the recent 
memorials and letters addressed to the Board, with endeavour to avoid entering into minute 
details, and, as far as practicable, confined to the subject matter of the memonals. 

It will be perceived that I have not advanced an opinion in opposition to the introduction 
of the additional lis^hts on the south and south-west coasts, and that I have noted some of 
the arrangements available for marking the distinctive appearance of the different points, irir 
the event of additional lights being introduced. Yet I do feel that serious responsibility will 
attach to those who will adjudicate on the large general arrans;enients to be observed, for 
those additional lights cuniiot be taken as isolated cases, or as mere filling of spaces, but 
with reference to the other lights on the same coast ; and I would be anxious to express 
more fully my opinion of the necessity for caution in those arrangements, were I not aware 
that the whole subject l^as received and will meet from the Board the deliberate considera-' 
tion which it merits. 

In conclusion, a few words may be relevant from the opinions of one who has given much 
thought to the proper placing of sea marks: 

^' fhe most prominent pomts of a line of coast, or those first made on over-sea voyages> 
should be first lighted. 

^'Lightsof precisely identical character should not, if possible, occur within a less distance 
than one hundred miles of each other on the same line of coast which is made by over-sea 
vessels. 

** It may be held as u i^eneral maxim, that the fewer lights that can be employed in the 
illumination of a coast the better, not only on the score of economy, but also of real 
efficiency." 

Those are general propositions, and it is not sought here to use them farther than as^ 
bearing on the prudence of observing a reasonable caution. 

To this, as to the preceding Repoit, is attached an outline map, showing the ranges of the 
established and of the suggested lights. 

I am, &c., 
(signed) George Hatpin, 
Henry Vereker, Esq. 



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CROOKHAVEN UGHTHOUSE, &c. 9 

— No. 5.— 

Trinity House, London, E. C, 
Sir, 23 January 1850. 

I HAVE brought under the Board's consideration the letter, which, by direction 
of the corporation for preserving and improving the Port of Dublin, you addressed 
to me on the 8th instant, together with copies of memorials and other papers by 
which it was accompanied, having reference to the erection of an additiotial 
lighthouse on the south-west coast of Ireland, and pointing out Galley Head as 
the most desirable position for such an establishment ; and I have it in com- 
mand to acquaint you, for the information of your Board, that having attentively 
weighed the various considerations which have been brought under their notice 
in the documents referred to, the Elder Brethren have been unable to satisfy their 
minds that an additional general coast light is necessary upon the south-west 
coast of Ireland, between Qiat now in progress upon the Fastnet Rock, and that 
on the Old Head of Kinsale. 

The Elder Brethren observe that the memorials in which the erection of a light- 
house on Galley Head is solicited, proceed alone from the parties interested in the 
trade of the small ports in the immediate vicinity of that Head, and they notice 
a remark in Mr. Halpin's report of the 6th ultimo, that these memorials (two in 
number) ** apparently bear the signature of few, if any, shipowners or ship- 
masters,*' and *' that the general mercantile and shipping communit}'^ have not 
applied for additional lights on the south-west coast, nor expressed an opinion 
that they are necessary.'* 

If the proposed light were established as a general coast light, the parties above 
referred to would contribute but a small proportion of the charge of its erection 
and maintenance, while the larger amount would be supplied by those, who at 
present have not expressed any desire for its erection. 

In establishing new lights in this country, it is the invariable usage to ascertain 
whether the parties who are interested in the contemplated measure concur in its 
utility, and are willing to contribute the toll requisite for its accomplishment. 

If, however, it is intended that the proposed lighthouse on Galley Head shall 
be regarded as of a local character only, and its cost and maintenance defrayed 
by a toll leviable only on shipping trading to its neighbouring ports, to which it 
would be unquestionably useful, this corporation has no objection to offer to its 
erection. 

But if, on the contrary, it is proposed that the general trade of St. George's 
Channel shall be charged for its maintenance, the Elder Brethren beg to suggest 
that before any further steps be taken in this matter, measures be adopted in 
order to ascertain whether the shipping interests of Liverpool, Dublin, Glasgow, 
Belfast, and others of the principal ports are desirous for the establishment of a 
light on Galley Head ; and here the Elder Brethren direct me to remark that in 
the consideration of suggestions for establishing new general coast lights, it is 
their endeavour to avoid the imposition of charges upon shipping beyond those 
which are clearly requisite for providing those guides for navigation the utility of 
which is evident and unquestionable, and thus on a previous occasion respecting 
lights on the south coast of Ireland, this view of the subject had presented itseU 
among others, to induce the Elder Brethren to consider that one light on Cable 
Island, while it would have provided the additional guide required upon that 
coast, would have rendered the doable charge for the two-light establishments 
now in progress at Ballycotton and Minehead unnecessary. 

I have, &c. 
Henry Vereker, Esq. (signed) J. Herbert. 



— No.e.— 



Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, Whitehall, 
Sir, 6 January 1857. 

With reference to your letter of the 9th April 1 853, containing a statement of 
the sums proposed to be expended for new lighthouses, I am directed by the 
I-ords of the Committee of Privy Council for trade to request you will inform my 
^4- B ^ ^ Lori 



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,Q CORRESPONDENCE BXLATING TO 

Lords with regard to the following proposed lights, viz., '' Galley Head," ** BtiU 
Rock," " Foze Rock," and '* Black Rock," what is the exact position of each, 
and what were the reasoBS whidi induced the Port of DubUn Corporation to 
consider them necessary or expedient. 

I am, &c* 
The Secretary, (agwd) T. H. Fmrrer. 

Port of Dublin Corporation, DabHn. 



— No.7.~ 

gi,^ Ballast Office, DubUa, 8 January 1857. 

I AM directed by the Port of Dublin Corporatioa to acknowledge the receipt of 
your letter of the 6th instant, on the subject of the proposed lights on Galley 
Head, BuU Rock, Foze Rock, and Black Rock, and to state that the same shaU 
receive the early cosistderatioQ of the Board* 

I am, &c. 
(signed) James M. ffReiUy. 

The Secretary, AsaistaBt Secretary. 

Marine Department, Board of Trade. 



— No. 8. — 

Sir, Ballast Ofltoe, Dublin, 31 January 18&7. 

I AM directed by the Port of DobUn Corporation to acknowledge the receipt 
of your letter of the 6th instant, requesting to be iofojrmed as to th^ reasons 
which induced the Board to consider lights necessary or expedient on the " Gal- 
ley Head,'' « Bull Rock," '' Foze Rock," and " Black Rock," and the subjects of 
your communication having been referred to the committee who usually proceed 
on the annual inspection of the lights, &c. around the coast, I am to forward 
their report for the informatiim of their Lordsliips, and to state the Board approve 
of same* 

1 mn^ kc 
The Secretary, (signed) TT. Lees, Secretary. 

&c. &C. 
Marine Department. 



Enclosure in No. 8. 

Wb, the Committee, to whom the Board have been pleased to refer the letter from the 
Lords of the Privy Council for Trade, upon the subject of placii^ additional Lights on 
certain parts of the Coast of Irelamd, therein named, and requesting us to offer such 
Observations as may have occurred to us on our four several Laspections of Light- 
houses, &c., under the Jurisdiction €f this Board, have to Report, — 

That the subject ha^ on each occasion engaged our serious attention, and we now feel no 
diflSculty in entering fully into the subject, and placing our views before the Board for their 
consideration. 

We shall iake up the matter in the order in which it has been placed in the letter from 
the Board of Trade, and commence with the proposed light at ** Galley Head." 

This headland is situated in latitude 61^ 31' 40'' north, loi^tude 6^ 57' west, is distant 
16 i miles west by north from the « Old Head of Kinsale," and 26 i miles east, f south, 
from the " Fastnet Rock ;'' a very dangerous ledge of rocks lay off the *' Galley Head, called 
the '* Bhiligs," about one mile from the shcM. Vessels homeward bound either from the 
Mediterranean, Africa or West IndieB,, if met by easterly winds, generally endeavour to 
make the land in this vicinity, and upon a change of wind more to the southward* nave 
found themselves on a dead " lee shore," from which they have found it impossible to haul 
off, and numerous wrecks have occurred in consequence ; and a meimorial, after the loss of 
two fine vepsels wrecked on that coast in the winter of 1848, was presented to the B oard, 
xoffmg the ntceiwwty of a l%lt on thin headland. Since that time, the space between tite 



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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. ii 

lighte tt "^ Ok) UetA of KhmJe" and the fbnner ^ Cape Clear " light has been increased 
ahoot fire miles, by extiagaighing the ** Cape Clear ** light, and by lighting that on the 
"Fastnet" 

^ Bull Rock" is situated in latitude 61*" 86' north, and longitude 10*» 17' 36" west, lies 
two miles north-west } west from " Dursey Island " off the south entrance of the *' Ken- 
mare* River, and north entrance of ** Bantry Bay," and is 14 miles from the present 
^ SkeMigs '' lights, and 29 miles from the *^ Pastnet" This is the first land generally made, 
and iha last from which a departure is taken by all vessels to or from America, and it 
therefore becomes a sulject of great importance of so marking it as to give every possible 
facility to the very great and increasing traffic between the two countries. 

The •• Skelligs ** are too far north, and vessels cannot, with any confidence, run down to 
make them in strong westerly winds, because if caught between the ** Bull " and " Foze ** they 
have no place to run for but " Valentia," a most dangerous entrance, the " Kenmare 
liver bein? little known, and the ^ Blaskets " too outlying to enable them to weather them. 
Whereas, if a light were placed on the " Bull Rock," it would be a great turning point, and 
any vessel making it would be enabled (if forced to run for shelter from any cause either 
with a south-west or a north-west wind) to make either the *^ Shannon,'' ** Bearhaven,'* or 
other anchorages in ^' Bantry Bay." 

Foze Rock. — The committee, at the request of the late Admiral Beechy, reported as to 
placing a light on this rock ; it was carefully examined by them when on their inspection in 
1854, and it was their opinion that the rock itself was not of a character that would well 
sustain a heavy building, but they considered that one of the outer *^ Blaskets " islands 
^n)uld be admirably suited to the purpose, 

"The Foze Rock" is off the coast of Kerry in lat. 62* 1/ N., and in long. 10* 39' 25" W., 
is 4 J miles W. by S. J S. of west end of Great Blasket, and 15 miles K, by E. of " Skelligs 
Lights." There is not at present any light between the "Skelligs" and Loophead, a dis- 
^ce of 59 miles. 

The want of a light on this part of the coast has long been felt, particularly by vessels 
trading to any part of the west coast of Ireland, and especially the Shannon. The great 
^Itiimde of the lights on the ** Skelligs,** more particularly the upper, being 372 feet above 
^igh-water mark, often causes it to be obscured by heavy mists, and vessels have no means 
^ knowing their positioB off this dangerous coast. 

^BJack Rock" is off the coast of 3layo, and is m latitude 54" 4' 30" N.; longitude 
lO* 21' 20'' W. ; is six miles north of " Achil Island" (south entrance of " Blacksod Bay"), 
^dUi miles S. W. by W. | W. of " Eagle Island.* 
The coast in the vicinity of this rock, and the rocks lying immediately about it, render it 
^ dao^^rous, if not the most dangerous, on the coast of Ireland. 

Ti^ Xo^ isfaindB of ^ Inniskea," ** Devlin," and in fact all the coast in their vicinity, are full 
of cfao^ers, and yet this is the land generally sought to be made by all vessels from the 
^es^jvard bound north about ; and a hght here would be an admirable guide for the fine 
aociorag^ in « Blacksod Bay." 

*"^^ numerous wrecks which have taken place on this coast, during the last 20 years, frilly 
attest its dangers. The masts, spars, broken timbers, &c., which annually wash m on those 
sl|ore8, s\ifficiently prove how numerous must be the vsrecks which are constantly occurring, 
withoxit. even the names being known ; for such is the violence of the sea, that if a vessel 
once t.oviches, a few minutes are sufficient to cause her utter destruction. 

The Ocmmittee have on each occasion of their inspection paid most particular attention 
to these subjects, and the more they have weighed and considered the matter, the more 
have 'they become impressed with the great importance of placing these additional lights on 
ibeooaet. 

1^ Estimates, however, given at the time are very much below what would be necessary, 
9/iA It Would require a careful survey to be made, acid approximate estimates duly prepared, 
if^^^^^ any oalculatioflL can be made of the coast 

Meath^ ChairmaB, 
J. DombrauL, 
(signed) < Robert CaUweU. 
Henry Thompscn. 

^^ I Dmid Tio$. La Tamche. 

^^^fiast Oflfee, Dublin, SI January 186 7. 



— No. 9.— 

OflSce of Conunittee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, Whitehall, 
Sir, 16 February 1857. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Coondl for Trade to 
acknovdedge the receipt of your letter of the Slst uhimo, transmitting a report 
from the Committee of Annual Inspection of Lights, &c. around the Coast, on the 
subject of placing additional lights at Galley Head, Bull Rock, Foze Rock, and 
Bhek Rock. 
^4. B 2 My 



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12 CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 

My Lords direct me to request that the Port of Dublin Corporation will state, 
for the information of their Lordships, which of these lights they consider the 
most important to commence with ; also, how far a light on the north-west point 
of Achil Island would answer the purpose instead of on the Black Rock. 

My Lords direct me further to request that the Port of Dublin Corporation 
will furnish their Lordships with a statement, showing the comparative expenses 
for the erection and maintenance of a lighthouse in these two places. 

My Lords also request to be informed whether the Corporation intend that the 
lights on Foze Rock and Bull Rock should, when completed, be in addition to 
the Skelligs Lights, or whether it is proposed to discontinue those lights after the 
others are erected. 

My Lords request that the opinions of the Corporation on these heads may, in 
accordance with the 405th section of the Merchant Shipping Act, be forwarded 
with the correspondence to the Trinity House, by whom they will be forwarded 
to the Board of Trade. 

My Lords are anxious to obtain information, but wish to guard themselves 
from being supposed, by the inquiries they are making, to have resolved upon 
the expediency of at present undertaking the works referred to. 

The Secretary, (signed) T. H. Farrer. 

Port of Dublin Corporatidn, Dublin. 



— No. 10.— 

Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 10 March 1857. 

I AM directed by the Port of Dublin Corporation to acknowledge the receipt 
of your letter of the 16th ultimo, and am to forward herewith copy of a report 
from a Committee of this Board, affording further information on the subject 
of establishing lights on the southern and western coast of Ireland. 

1 am to state, in accordance with the provisions of the Merchant Shipping Act, 
and as alluded to by their Lordships, copies of the correspondence which has 
taken place have been already forwarded to the Trinity House for the consideration 
and opinion of the Elder Brethren. 

I am, &c. 
The Secretary, (signed) W. Lees. 

Marine Department. 

Enclosure in No. 10. 

Thb Commitiee having had under their consideration the letter of the Lords of the Com- 
mittee of Privy Council for Trade, under date the 16th instant, which the Board have 
hcen pleased to refer to them, beg now to report, — 

With reference to the 1st Query, " as to which of the proposed lights they consider the 
most important," they have no hesitation in stating that the most essential is the "Black 
Rock," off the coast of Mayo; this rock is placed in the vicinity of a number of most 
insidious and dangerous reefs, on which numberless vessels are wrecked year by year, many 
of whose names are never even ascertained, and to which they are unknowingly drawn by 
the strong indraught which always exists on this particular point. 

With respect to the north-west point of ** Achil Island " being selected in preference to the 
** Black Rock" as the position for a light, the Committee are convinced that, even if the great 
altitude and precipitous nature of that headland did not render it ill suited for the purpose, 
the fact of the " Black Rock'* being situated eight miles off the coast, outside all the dangers 
above alluded to, occupying a position which will enable the seaman on sighting it to shape 
a safe course, either north or south about, before he gets too much in with the shore, besides 
serving as a much more certain guide for the fine anchorage in " Blacksod Bay," are 
important reasons which niaik out this rock as by far the more eligible point on which to 
erect a lighthouse. Under these circumstances the Committee ihink that their Lordships 
may not require the corporation to give a statement of the relative expense of the con- 
' siruction and maintenance of the two lights, more especially as such would involve the cost 
of a survey. 

Next in importance and very nearly as important points to be lighted are the " Bull 
Rock," off the coast of Cork, and the ** Outer Blasket," off the coast of Kerry ; the first 
is the land usually made by all vessels coming from the westward and going south about, 
as the *^ Black Rock " is for all those from the westward going north about, whilst the 
'* Outer Blasket" will be a most essential beacon to warn vessels off the dangers of the 
'' Foze," and the circumadjacent rocks, besides at the same time it will serve as the 
guiding light into the mouth of the Shannon. 

The 



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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c- 



^3 



The Committee do not at present anticipate the propriety of extinguishing the '^ Skelligs 
Lights," They feel it a more judicious course to defer the expression of their opinion until 
after the establishment of the other two lights they have recommended, when an oppor- 
tunity will be afforded them, and the trade generally^ to judge whether any or what alter- 
ation it might be advantageous to make with regard to the "Skelligs Lights." 

The Committee, in compliance with the suggestion of the Board, have conferred with 
their superintendent, who substantially concurs in the advantages likely to be derived by the 
trade in general from th% establishment of the proposed lights. 



(signed) 



Ballast Office, Dublin, 
6 March 1857. 



{Meath, Chairman. 
J. Domhrain. 
R. CallwelL 
H. Thompson. 



— No. 11.— 

Trinity House, London, E. C, 
Sir, 4 April 1857. 

Referring to your letter of the 2d instant, stating the course which the 
Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade consider shquld be followed 
in respect of communications between the several lighthouse authorities and 
their Lordships, on the subject of new lighthouses, &c., I am directed by the 
Elder Brethren to transmit, for their Lordships* information, the accompanying 
copies of a letter from the Port of Dublin Corporation in reference to certain 
new lights proposed to be erected on the coast of Ireland, together with a Report 
thereon from the Committee of that Corporation, and of the reply, which has 
been this day sent by the Elder Brethren thereto. 

I have, &c. 
The Secretary, Marine Department, (signed) P. H. Berthon. 

Board of Trade. 



Enclosure 1, in No. 11. 

Ballast Office, Dublin, 
^ Sir, 10 March 1857. 

V A.M directed by the Port of Dublin Corporation to forward herewith copies of corres- 
Wiudence which has taken place between the Lords of the Committee of* Privy Council for 
i]^de and this Board, on the subject of the establishment of certain lights on the coast of 
Ireland therein named, and will feel obliged by your submitting the same to the Elder 
Brethren of the Trinity House for their consideration and opinion. 



P. H. Berthon, Esq., 
&c. &:c. 8ic. 



I am, &c. 
(signed) W. Lees, 

Secretary. 



[Enclosure 2, in No. 11, same as Enclosure in No. 10.] 



Enclosure 3, in No. 1 1 . 

Trinity House, London, E. C, 
Sir, 4 April 1857. 

Having brought under the consideration of the Elder Brethren your letter of the 10th 
ultimo, forwarding copies of correspondence which hasj taken place between the Port of 
Dublin Corporation and the Board of Trade, on the subject of the establishment of certain 
new lights on the coast of Ireland, and signifying the request of that corporation to be 
apprized of the opinion of the Elder Brethren thereon, I am directed to acquaint you that 
having given attentive consideration to the several propositions submitted by them, the Elder 
Brethren have come to the? following conclusions, viz. : — 

Firstly, As respects the erection of a lighthouse on Galley Head, I am to refer to the 
letter from this Board addressed to your predecessor, under date 23d January 1850, in which 
the opinion of the Elder Brethren on a like proposal was communicated to the corporation. 

The Elder Brethren have carefully reviewed the whole of their proceedings on that 
occasion, and also the additional papers now submitted for their consideration, and have 
instructed me to state that they do not feel justified in departing from the decision commu- 
nicated in Mr. Herbert's letter above adverted to. 



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JL4 CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 

They are of opinion, that having regard to the moderate distance intervenmg between fhe 

spheres illuminated respectively by uie light on the Head of Kinsale, and that on the 

, Fastnet Rock, and also to the general outline of the coast between the two, there does not 

appear, on the ground of the general navigation of passing vessels, to be any necessity for 

a coast light on Galley Head. 

If it be intended ihat the proposed liffht should be altr>gether of a local character, and be 
maintained by a local rate, the Elder Brethren would, of course, offer no objection to its 
establishment, but assuming that the proposal contemplates a general coast light, to be 
chargeable on all passing vessels, they feel bound to be guided in their opinion by the general 
principle which they have hitherto observed in such cases, and not to agree to increase the 
burthen on shipping by the miuiti plication of lighthouses, unless those already existing in 
the locality are found to be so inadequate that ordinary skill and prudence on the part of 
mariners are considered insufficient for its safe navioration. 



"e*' 



They are of opinion that were they to disregard altogether the question of expense, and 
"be guided solely by the consideration of what may tend to improve and render the navi- 
gation of our coasts more easy to indifferent or incompetent navigators, they might be led 
to multiply the number of lighthouses on almost every portion of the coasts of the United 
Kingdom. 

As an illustration of this remark, and of the principles by which the Elder Brethren have 
hitherto been guided, I am directed to observe that the practice formerly adopted by them 
was to require, previoasly to the erection of any new lighthouse, that a requisition should 
be presented to them from the mastei^ and owners of ships employed in the particular trade 
most interested in the proposed new establishment, and that thej lutve lately declined to 
entertain applications made by two individuals for the erection of a light on St. Alban's 
Head in the English Channel, and also, but with some doubt and considerable reluctance^ 
a similar request for one in Cardigan Bay on the coast of Wales. 

Secondly. With regard to the proposed lighthouses on the Bull and Foze, or one of 
the Blaskett Rocks, the Elder Brethren are of opinion that to a certain extent the same 
objections apply to those proposals as have been stated in the case of that on Galley 
Head. 

The sphere illuminated by the existing lights on the Skelligs extends to the southward far 
within the range of the proposed light on the Bull Kock, and indeed reaches to that of 
the Fastnet, and to the northward within the sphere which would be illuminated by a light 
on the F(»ze Rock. The Elder Brethren admit however that the two lights proposed, viz., 
one on the Bull and another on the Foze, or its immediate vicinity, would illuminate that 
portion of the coast much more efficiently than it is at present through the medium of the 
Skelligs, and would afford useful guides to vessels entering Bantry Bay and the River 
Shannon respectively. 

On these grounds, therefore, and notwithstanding the large outlay which will be required 
for effecting this improvement, the Elder Brethren are induced to give their approval of the 
erection of ihe proposed lighthouses in those positions, but they consider that they should 
be in substitution for those now on the Skelligs, which latter they have reason to believe 
will then be found to be no longer required. 

Thirdly. As regards the proposed light on the Black Rock, the Elder Brethren direct me 
to state, I hat looking to the numerous dangers in that locality, to the extent of coast to the 
southward of it, at present without sufficient lights, and to the great advantage which 
vessels in search of refuge would derive from such a guide to the anchorage in Black Sod 
Bay, they are prepared to approve of the establishment of a light in that locality, reserving 
their opinion as to the preference which should be given to its being placed on the Black 
Rock or on the N. W. point of Achfll Island, until they shall have had an opportunity of 
carefully inspecting both those positions. 

I am, &c. 
W. Lees, Esq., Ballast Office, Dublin. (signed) P. H. Berthon. 



— No. 12.~ 

Office of Coniniittee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Departmenki Whitehall, 
Sir, llAprU1857. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Gonomittee of Privy Council for Trade to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 4th instant, transmitting copy of 
correspondence which has taJcen place between the Trinity House and the Port 
of Dublin Corporation, relating to certain new lighthouses proposed to be erected 
on the coast of Ireland. 

My 



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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, fee. 15 

My Lords direct me to request that you will inform the Elder Brethren that, 
inderstanding from your letter the Etder Brethren intend to make an inspection 
ef the positions proposed fot these lighthouses, their Lordships think it wBl 
be better to defer grving their decision until after such inspection has taken 

place* 

I am^ &e., 
(signed) T. H. Farrer. 

The Secretary to the Trimty House. 



— NoL 13. — 

Sr, BaBast Office, Dublin, 11 Aprfl 1857. 

With refercnoe toprerious correspondence on the subject of establishing Kghts 
to mark the south and sontk-weetcm coasts of Ireland, I am to forward herewidi 
coj^ of a commnnication from the Elder Brethren of the Trinity House, to whom 
the correqwrndence had been referred, in which their opinion is expressed. 

I son to request yon will be so good as to snbmit this communicatioB for the 
infonEBation and farther consideration of their Lordships. 

I am^ &c. 
The Secretary, &c» &€., (signed) fT. Lee$, 

Marine Department. Secretary. 



[Enclosure same as Enclosure No. 3, in No. 11.] 



— No. 14. — 

Trinity House» London, KC, 
ffir, 10 June 1857. 

Referring to my letter of 4th April last, transmitting copy of a letter of the 
same date which had been addressed to the Port of Dublin Corporation, relative 
to the proposed establishment of certain new lighthouses on the coast of Ireland, 
I am now directed to acquaint you, for the information of the Lords of the G>m- 
mittee of Privy Council for Trade, that a Committee of the Elder Brethren has 
recently returned firom inspecting the Bull, Foze, and Black Rocks, on each of 
whidi it was proposed to erect a lighthouse, and that the following are the 
opinions which their examination of those sites has enabled them to form. 

1. With respect to the Bull, the Elder Brethren consider that being the outer- 
most, and north-western rock of the group, it would at first sight appear to be 
the most eligible position for a lighthouse, particularly should it be ultimately 
determined to discontinue those on the Skelligs, and to place others on it (the 
Bull) and the Foze. In the event, however, of the decision being in favour of 
continuing the Skelligs Lights, the Elder Brethren are of opinion that tbe ''Calf" 
rock would be the better position for the new light. In the latter position a 
light would divide the distance better between the Skelligs and the Fast nets, and 
be an excellent guide to vessels running for refuge into Bantry Bay. Tlie ** Calf** 
is of moderate elevation, very suitable for a light. The Bull is 280 feet high, 
and very steep. To erect a lighthouse on it at a more moderate elevation, it 
would be necessary to scarp or cut away a considerable portion of the existing 
rock. The Elder Brethren consider, therefore, that the preference to be given to 
either of these rocks as a site mainly depends upon the retention or otherwise 
of the Skelligs Lights. 

In deciding this question it ought to be remembered that the Lights on the 
Skelligs are not both visible to the southward, the lower light only being shown 
in that direction. 

2. With respect to the Foze Rock, it is apparently composed of large roeki^ 
some of which appear almost detached by deep fissures on several sides, paiticn* 
larly to the southward. On the north side it appeared more solid and substan- 
tial, and about fifty or sixty feet high. This is the most desirable site for a 
lighthouse, being the extreme and outermost danger of the group of rocks which 
extend three miles seaward from the '' Blaskets." 

64. B 4 The 



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i6 CORRESPONDExVCE RELA^TING TO 

The erection of a tower Id this position is a question for an engineer to decide; 
but the Elder Brethren, judging of its practicability by what has been already 
done, do not entertain doubt as to its accomplishment, and although the expense 
would be much greater than that of a similar structure on one of the '' Blaskets/' 
they do not hesitate to recommend that considerations of economy should not be 
allowed to induce a preference being given to either of the latter, as the object in 
view, viz., the safe guidance of passing vessels, could not be efficiently accom- 
plished by a light situated three miles inshore of the outlymg danger. The Elder 
Brethren, therefore, recommend the Foze Rock for adoption, as being in their 
estimation the only proper site for a lighthouse in that locality. 

3. With respect to the Black Rock, this the Elder Brethren consider to be 
decidedly the most eligible site for a lighthouse, excepting always a rock which 
lies on the westward of it, at a distance of about one mile, and which appears to 
be about twenty or thirty feet above the level of the sea, and apparently solid. 
It would, however, require a very large expenditure to erect a tower on this 
position ; and seeing that its distance seaward is not more than a mile from 
the Black Rock, the Elder Brethren recommend the site on the latter as suffi* 
ciently good to justify its adoption on the ground of economy. A light on the 
Black Rock will also be most useful, if properly screened, for leading vessels into 
Black Sod Bay. 

The Elder brethren are of opinion that Achill Head, to which their Lordships 
allude in their letter of the 16th February last, to the Port of Dublin Corpora- 
tion, and which is a high conical peaked saddle hill, sloping down to a moderate 
elevation seaward, is too far to the eastward for a lighthouse intended to guide 
vessels coming from the northward clear of the numerous rocks and islets to the 
north-east of it. 

The attention of the Inspecting Committee having on the occasion above 
adverted to been directed to the question submitted by your letter to the Port of 
Dublin Corporation of 28th March last, relative to the necessity for placing a 
beacon or buoy on the Kay Rock, in the northern entrance of Valencia Harbour, 
and to a report made thereon to that Corporation by Commander Roberts, copy 
of which is herewith sent, I am directed to acquaint you, for their Lordships' 
information, that the Elder Brethren concur in the opinion that if a buoy were 
placed to mark the rock in question, it would be useful to shipping passing that 
part of the coast, and using the anchorage in the vicinity as a harbour of refuge, 
and they recommend its being placed accordingly. 

I have, &c« 
The Secretary, Marine Department, (signed) P. H. Berthon. 

Board of Trade. 



Enclosure in No. 14. 

Sir, Ballast Office, 16 April 1867. 

I HATE to report for the information of the Board, my return from Valencia, county 
Kerry, to which place I proceeded agreeably with the Board's directions, in oider that I 
might be the better able to form an opinion as to the necessity of buoying the'' Kay Rock,*' 
in the northern enti*ance of that harbour, and for which an application has been received 
from the Knight of Kerry. 

The principal harbour of Valencia is often made use of by vessels as a harbour of refuge, 
but with a south-west gale and an ebb tide, the entrance being so narrow, it would be dan- 
gerous for a sailing vessel to attempt to work into it ; besides, the heavy ocean swell that 
accompanies soutn-west gales breaks right across the harbour's mouth, the appearance 
of which is sufficient to intimidate strangers ; under these circumstances a vessel has no 
alternative but to run for the northern entrance, called '' Lough Kay," which, though not a 
good harbour, is more desirable for a vessel to ride out a gale of wind in, than to attempt 
to keep the sea during a winter's night, with the dangerous bay of *' Dingle" under her lee. 

The northern entrance is also generally used by vessels trading to " Cahercineen,'' which, 
though only a small town, imports a great deal of Indian com, and if a buoy were placed to 
mark the ^^Kay" rock, it would no doubt prove of essential service to shipping, and be 
perhaps the means of preventing casualties. 

I am, &c. 
W. Lees, Esq., Secretary. (signed) E. F. Roberts. 



No. 

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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 17 



— No. 15. -^ 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall, 19 June 1867. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th instant, giving the opinion of 
the Elder Brethren on the expediency of erecting lighthouses upon the Bull, Foze, 
and Black Rocks, and also on the expediency of placing a beacon or buoy on the 
Kay Rock, in the northern entrance of Valencia Harbour. 

My Lords direct me to inform the Elder Brethren that they concur in the views 
expressed in your letter. 

They have embodied their own opinions in a letter addressed to the Port of 
Dublin Corporation on the subject, a copy of which is enclosed.* 

My Lords desire me to call the attention of the Elder Brethren to that portion 
of the letter which relates to doing away with, or retaining the Skelligs lights ; 
and request the opinion of the Elder Brethren on that subject. 

1 am, &c. 
The Secretary, Trinity House. (signed) T. H. Farrer. 



— No. 16.— 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Sir, Whitehall, 19 June 1857. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade to 
transmit to you, for the information of the Port of Dublin Corporation, the 
enclosed copy of a communication which their Lordships have received from the 
Trinity House,! giving the opinion of the Elder Brethren on the proposals to 
erect lights on the Bull Rock, the Foze Rock, and the lUack Rock ; and also 
upon the proposal to place a beacon or buoy on the Kay Rock, in the northern 
entrance of Valencia Harbour. These opinions are founded on the report of a 
committee which has recently visited the sites in question. My Lords concur 
in the opinions expressed by the Elder Brethren, but they desire me to add the 
following observations. It appears to them that it will not be desirable to dis- 
continue the lights on the Skelligs, for, even if the lights on the Foze and Bull 
Rocks are established, they will, in thick weather, or in weather not very clear, 
leave a dark space in u position very dangerous for homeward-bound ships. 
One light (m the Skelligs would, however, be sufficient ; and as it is said, that 
when the weather is at all thick, the high light is rarely seen, it will on that 
account be better to keep the low light. 

The position of the high light would be the best for a single light, were it not 
for its height,, as it lights a larger arc. The low light would n6t be seen to the 
northward ; but when there is a light on the Foze, that will not be of much 
importance. Supposing one light at least to be retained on the Skelligs, their 
Lordships quite agree with the Elder Brethren that the Calf Rock is a better 
I)osition for a light than the Bull Rock. 

With respect to the erection of a lighthouse on the Foze Rock, my Lords 
cannot give a decided opinion until the rock has been examined by the engineer 
of the Corporation ; but there can be no doubt, if a lijjht is to be placed near 
the Blaskets, as to the expediency of putting it on the Foze Rock. If, however, 
the Foze Rock is not sound enough to bear a lighthouse, my Lords think it 
doubtful whether it would be safe to put a light on the Great Blasket, which is 
three miles inside the dangers ; as it might cause vessels to try to make it, and 
so lead them into danger, if the weather was too thick for them to see it four or 
five miles off. 

As regards the Black Rock, my Lords think that a light in that position is 
desirable, and request that the Corporation will cause plans and estimates to be 
prepared for the purpose. 

Before 

♦ See No. 16. t ^^ No. 14. 

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1 8 CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 

Before sanctioning any of the proposed works, my Lords would be glad to 
have the opinion of the Corporation on the observations of the Elder Brethrea 
and of this Board. They would also be glad to have a report on the feasibility 
of erecting a light on the Foze Rock from the engineer, and a statement of what 
the erection and maintenance of the three lights proposed are likely to cost, and 
what the income from tolls is likely to be. 

My Lords also direct me to request that you will inform the Corporation that 
they approve of a small buoy being placed on the Kay Rock, in the northern 
entrance of Valencia Harbour. 

I have, &c. 

The Secretary to the Port of Dublin (signed) T. B. Faner. 

Corporation. 



— No. 17.— 

Trinity House, London, E. C, 
Sir, 22 March 1859. 

I AM directed by the Elder Brethren to submit for the consideration erf the 
Lords of the Committee -of Privy Council for Trade, the accompanying corre- 
spondence which has passed between them and the Fort of Dublin Corporation 
relative to a proposal for colouring the light at Crookhaven Red over an arc 
passing across the Alderman Rocks, and for erecting a beacon on those rocks. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) P. H. Berthon. 
The Secretary, 
Marine Department, Board of Trade. 



Enclosure 1, in No. 17. 



Trinity House, LondoQ, E. C, 
Sir, 23 Maroh 1859. 

Haviiig brought under the Board's consideration the communicatioa made by ICr. 
O'Reilly's letter of the 16th instant, together with its several enclosures, lu relation to the 
position of the Crookhaven Lighthouse, and in which he states that the Port of Dublin 
Corporation concur in opinion with Mr. Halpin, that colouring the light shown at Crookhaven 
red over an arc passing across Alderman Rocks and erectmg a beacon on those rocks, 
would meet all the requirements of the case. 

I am directed to acquaint you that the Elder Brethren agree with the Port of Dublin Cor-* 
poration in opinion as to the propriety of colouring the Crookhaven light as proposed, aod 
of erecting a beacon on the Alderman Rocks, and have this day communicated their approval 
thereof to the Loids of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade, in terms of the Merchant 
Shipping Act, 1854. 

I am, &c. 

William Lees, Esq. (signed) P. H. Berthon. 



Enclosure 2 in No. 17. 

Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 16 March 1859. 

1 AM directed by the Port of Dublin Corporation to forward herewith copy of a Letter 
from the Earl of Bandon, on the subiect of the position of the Crookhaven Lighthouse, toge- 
ther with a report and chart from the Superiutt^ndent of Lighthouses (Mr. Halpin) on the 
subject, and to state to you, for the infonuation of the Elder Brethren, that this Corporation 
concurs in opinion with the Superintendent that colouring the Lighthouse at Crookhaven 
red over an arc passing across the Alderman Hocks, and erecting a beacon on those rocks, 
would meet all the requirements of the case ; and I am to request you will move the Elder 
Brethren (in cose they approve of the proposition) to take the necessary steps for its being 
carried out. 

I am, Sec. 
(signed) James M. 0. Beilltff 
P. H. Berlhon, Esq. Assistant Secretary. 



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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 19 



Sub-Enclosure in No. 2. ^ 

Sir, The Gresham Hotel, I March 1859. 

I HAVE the honour to request you to call the attention of the Ballast Board to the 
necessity of changing the Lighthouse at Crookbaveii to the opposite side of the Harbour, 
and also to the importance of a fog bell on the Fastiiet Rock for the protection of vessels in 
foggy i^eather. 

I am, &c. 
W. Lees, Jlsq. (signed) Bandon. 

&c. &c. &c. 



Enclosure 3, in No. 17. 
^Crookhavbn Lighthouse.' 



Sir, . Ballast OflSice, 10 March 1869. 

The position of the Crookhaven Light having recently engaged the attention of the 
Board, I beg leave to report tliat explanation has on different occasions been given as to the 
reasons v^hich led to the selection of that position instead of the Alderman Rocks. 

From the exposure of these rocks the erection of a lighthouse on the largest of them 
would have been much more costly than on Rock Inland. Shore dwellings would have been 
requisite, and an additional keeper ; also boat attendance, which is not required at the pre- 
sent lighthouse, and altogether the charge for maintenance considerably higher than that at 
present incurred. 

The position selected, and afterwards approved of by the Trinity Board, was considered 
to mark sufficiently the approach to and entrance into Crookhaven. 

Subsequently, question having been raised as to the propriety of the position, a com- 
mittee of the Board suggested that a beacon should be erected on the Alderman Rocks. 
Considering that, for guidance by night, a colouring of the light would be more efficacious, 
I recommended that the present Crookhaven Light should be coloured red over an arc 
passing across the Alderman Rocks, as shown on the annexed charts The light being dis- 
tant less than half a mile from the rocks, the distinction of colour would 1^ visible, and 
guidance had from it, unless in dense fogs, which would obseure either light or beacon. 

A beacon on the Alderman Rocks might occasionally prove useful, and I beg leave to 
submit estimates for colouring the Crookhaven Light and tor the beacon. 

I am, kc. 
William Lees, Esq., (signed) Owm Haipin^ 

Secretary. * Superinteodent 

Annexed are — One estimate for colouring arc of light. 

One estimate for beacon on Alderman Rocks. 



Enclosure 4, in No. 17. 

Estimate of the probable Cost of Colouring the Crookhaven Light Red in the direction 

of the Alderman Rocks. 

(Catoptric Light.) 

Red Panes to define Eastern Limit of Red Light, Ruby Cylinders, Expense of 
Lamp-fitter, &c. - - - - - - - - - - -£.26 

About twenty-five pounds. 

Ballast Office, Dublin, ^(signed) George Halpin, 

March 1859. Superintendent. J 



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2p CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 



Enclosure 5, in No. 17. 

Estimate of the probable Cost of erecting a Beacon on the Alderman Rocks, 

Crookhaven. 



Rock cutting 
Metal casing, freight 
Masonry, erection, &c. 



Contingencies at 10 per cent. 



£. s. d. 

46 - - 

160 - - 

80 ^ - 



276 - 

27 10 



302 10 - 



(Three hundred and two pounds ten shillings.) 
Metal casing proposed, in consequence of the rock being a slaty rock. 

(signed) George Hatpin, 
Ballast 0£Sce, Dublin, Superintendent. 

March 1869. 



— No.18.— 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall, 25 March 1859. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy C!ouncil for Trade to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 22d instant, transmitting copy of 
correspondence which has passed between the Trinity House and the Port of 
Dublin Corporation, relating to a proposal for colouring the light at Crook- 
haven red, over an arc passing across the Alderman Rocks, and for erecting a 
beacon on those rocks. * 

In reply, I am to acquaint you, for the information of the Elder Brethren, 
that my Lords consider the alteration in the light as well as the erection of a 
beacon are required for the local trade only, but that as the light is under the 
Port of Dublin Corporation, and the proposed alteration in its character is so 
trifling, their Lordships approve of that portion of the proposed works ; but as 
regards the erection of a beacon on the Alderman Rocks, 1 am to state that as 
the work will only benefit the local trade, my Lords do not consider that they 
would be justified \m allowing the charge for its erection to be paid out of the 
Mercantile Marine Fund, and they cannot therefore sanction it. 

The original documents transmitted by you are returned herewith. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) T. H. Father. 
The Secretary to the Trinity House. 



— No. 19.— 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall. 25 March 1859. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade ta 
acquaint you, that the proposal of the J^ort of Dublin Corporation for colouringr 
the light at Crookhaven red, over an arc passing across the Alderman Rocks» 

and 

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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 21 

and for erecting a beacon on those rocks, has been received through the Trinity 
House, and that the Elder Brethren have been informed that their Lordships 
approve of the alteration in the character of the light ; but that as the beacon is 
only required for local purposes, they do not consider that they would be 
justified in sanctioning the charge for its erection to be paid out of the Mercan- 
tile Marine Fund. 

With reference to the estimates for these works M'hich have been forwarded to 
the Trinity House, I am to observe that whilst all proposals for new works or 
alterations should be sent through the Trinity House, it is not necessary to send 
estimates to that Board. When proposals for new works or alterations hare 
been sanctioned by the Trinity House and Board of Trade, the plans and esti- 
mates should be forwarded direct to this department for their Lordships' approval. 

I have, &c. 
The SecretaiT to (signed) T. H. Farrer. 

The Port of Dublin Corporation. 



— No.20.— 

Ballast Office, Dublin, 
Sir, 11 April 1859. 

With reference to that portion of your letter of the 25th ultimo, No. 3281, in 
"which you convey the opinion of the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council 
for Trade, that the expense of the erection of a beacon on the Alderman Rock 
in Crookhaven, should not be charged against the Mercantile Marine Fund, — ^I 
am to forward herewith copy of a Report from the Committee of Inspection to 
whom the subject was referred, and to express the approval by this Board of the 
views taken by the Committee, and to recommend the erection of the beacon in 
question. 

I am, &c. 
The Secretary, Marine Department, (signed) W. Lees, 

Board of Trade. Secretary. 



Enclosure in No. 20. 

With reference to the letter of the Right Honourable the Lords oF the Committee of 
Privy Council for Trade upon the subject of placing a beacon on the Alderman Rock, 
referred to us by the Board for our conBideration and report, we have the honour to state, 
that being fully aware of the general principles laid down by their Lordships in respect to 
the erection of marks for local purposes, the Committee would not have recommended the 
beacon in this case did they view it in that light; but their Lordships are probably not 
aware that it not unfrequently occurs that, durino: the prevalence of easterly winds, the 
harbour of Crookhaven is thronged with vessels from foreign countries, frequently more 
than 100 sail being there at the same time, and that it is in fact the principal port in 
Ireland for the resort of vessels under such circumstances. The Committee, therefore^ 
made the suggestion more especially for general purposes, and they submit that the matter 
should again be brought under their Lordships' notice. 

(J, Dombrain. 
5 April. (signed) <Iiobt. CallwelL 



[H. Thampi 



>san^ 



— No. 2L — 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall, 28 AprU 1859. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter and enclosure of the 11th instant, relative 
to the proposal to erect a beacon on the Alderman Rock, Crookhaven. 

In reply, my Lords direct me to acquaint you, for the information of the Port 

of Dublin Corporation, that as it appears from the report of the Committee of 

64. 03 Inspection 



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22 CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 

Inspection that the harbour of Crookhaven is frequently used by homeward-bound 
vessels as a place of shelter during tlie prevalence of easterly winds, and as the 
proposed heacon may consequently be considered as advantageous to the passing 
trade of the country generally, my Lords consider that they will be justified in 
allowing the cost of the beacon to be defrayed out of the Mercantile Marine 
Fund ; and they request, therefore, that you will move the Corporation to take 
the necessary stei)S towards its erection. The probable cost of the beacon, 
Mr. Halpin estimates, will amount to 302/. 10^., but my Lords request that a 
plan may be forwarded, and that, in preparing the plan, the object of providing 
a refuge for wrecked men may be kept in view, as alluded to in the letter from 
this department of the 5th instant.* 

I am, &c. 
The Secretary, (signed) T. H. Farrer. 

Port of Dublin Corporation, Dublin, 



— No. 22.— 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall, 28 April 1859. 

With reference to that part of my letter of the 25th ultimo, in which it is 
stated that my Lords did not consider that they would be justified in sanctioning 
the charge for the proposed beacon on the Alderman Rock, Crookhaven, being 
defrayed out of the Mercantile Marine Fund, I am directed by the Lords of the 
Committee of Privy Council for Trade to acquaint you, for the information of 
the Elder Brethren of the Trinity House, that the Port of Dublin Corporation 
have forwarded to this department a copy of the report of the Committee of 
Inspection, from which it appears that the harbour of Crookhaven is frequently 
used by a large number of homeward-bound vessels as a place of shelter during 
the prevalence of easterly winds. As the beacon may, therefore, be considered of 
advantage to the passing trade of the country generally, my Lords think that 
they will be justified in sanctioning its erection, and have accordingly requested 
the corporation to proceed with the work. 

I am, &c. 
The Secretary, Trinity House. (signed) T. H. Farrer. 



— No. 23. — 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall, 24 February I860- 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade to 
call your attention to the letter from this department of the 28th April 1859, 
sanctioning the erection of a beacon on the Alderman Rock, Crookhaven, and 
to request that you will move the Port of Dublin Corporation to inform my 
Lords what steps have been taken towards its erection. 

I am to add, that in a return of wreck made to this department in respect of 
the stranding of the *' Irish Lily'* of Limerick, on the 10th instant, in the 
entrance of Crookhaven Harbour, close inside the Alderman Bock, it is stated 
that '*had a buoy, perch, or beacon been on the rock, the casualty would have 
been avoided," and the Inspecting Commander of the Coast Guard remarks that 
he knows *'no place on the coast which requires a buoy or perch to be placed 
on it more than the rock on which this casualty occurred ; it is called the * Black 
Horse,' is just inside and runs parallel with the Alderman Rock, and is 
generally under water." 

I am, &c. 
The Secretary to the (signed) T. H. Farrer. 

Port of Dublin Corporation. 



* This letter has no connexion with the question of the Crookhaven Beacon. 

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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 33 



— No. 24. — 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall, 24 February 1860. 

Referring to the return of wreck in respect of the stranding of the ** Irish 
Lily" of Limerick on ihe 10th irtstant in the entrance of Crookhaven JJarbour, 
dose inside the Alderman Rock, and your remarks rekiting to the want of a buoy 
or perch on the Black Horse Rock, cm which the casualty .occurred : 

1 am directed by the Lords of the Committee qf >Pfivy Coud-ciiiQr Trade to 
inform you that so far back as April last my Lords approved of the erection of 
a beacon on the Alderman Rock by the Port of Dublin Corporation, and have 
now again called their attention to the subject. ' , . 

, ,1 am, &c. • , 

The Inspecting Commander,, (signed) T^ H. Farrer. 

Coast Guard, Skibbereen, Iretend. 



— No. 25. — 

Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 3 March 1860. 

With reference to your letter of the 24th ultimo, requesting to be informed ag 
to what steps have been taken towards the erection of a beacon on the Alder- 
man Rock, and referring to your letter of 28lh April 1859, I am directed to 
forward a report from the superintendent on the subject, and to request you will 
submit same to the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade. 

I am, &c. 
(signed) W. Lees, 
The Secretary, Marine Department. Secretary. 



Enclosure 1, in No. 25. 
" Alderman Rocks, Crookhaven^ 



Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 29 February 1860. 

With reference to the inquiry made bv direction of the Lords of the Privy Council for 
Trade, in Mr. Faner's letter dated 24th t'ebruary instant, 1 beg leave lo report that the 
beacon proposed to be erected on the Alderman Kf>cks has not as yet been built, but 
that the colouring of the Crookhaven light, so as to lead clear of these rocks during night- 
time, has been fully eflfected. 

The position first selected for the intended beacon was on the outer point of a ledge or 
reef of tidal rocks extending eastward from the Alderman Rocks ; as the erection of a 
beacon, the Black Horse Rock would have been very costly, and its permanence question- 
able, from the exposure and slaty nature of the rock. Subsequently, last year, after visiting 
the harbour, a Committee of the Board wt-re of opinion that it might be preferable to erect 
the beacon on the higher part of the Alderman Rock, and to construct it so as to be 
capable at any ^uture time ol being fitted up as a harbour light Plans and estimate for 
this latter tower were directed to be prepared, and were submitted to the Board on 1st 
December ultimo, together with an amended draft for a metal eased beacon suited fur outer 
end of the reef. On consideration of the whole subject, it was judged advisable that a mark 
on the outer or eastern position would be preferable, and should be carried into effect. The 
work on that low-water reef is such as should be undertaken and completed during the 
summer, and there would be disadvantage as regards cost in seeking tenders during 
the winter months. 

Advertisements have now been issued fixing date for receiving tenders on 26th April next, 
which will admit of the beacon being completed before next autumn. 

I am, &c. 
William Lees, Esq., (signed) George Halpin^ 

Secretary. Superintendent. 



64. C4 

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^4 CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 



Enclosure 2, in No. 25. 

Notice to Mariners. 

Ireland — South Coast — Crookhaven Light. 

The Port of Dublin Corporation hereby give notice, that on and after the 1st day of 
February next, 1860, the li2:ht of the Crookhaven Lighthouse will be coloured red in the 
direction of the Alderman Rocks. 

Specification given of the Position and Appearance of the Light by Mr. Halpin, 

Superintendent of Lighthouses. 

Crookhaven Lighthouse is situate on Rock Island Point, on the north side of the 
entrance of the haven, in lat. 61** 28' 35" N., and long. 9** 42' 30'' west of Greenwich, 
and bears from the Blackhorses Rocks (north side of Kocky Shoal), N. W. distant 3| 
cables' lengths from Cape Clear Island (Bream Point) N. W. | N. distant 7} miles ; 
from the Fastnet Rock (revolving light) N. | W. distant 6J miles. 

The li^ht is a fixed light, and will continue to be shown, of the natural appearance, white, 
towards Long Island Soutid and towards the inner portion of Crookhaven, and will be 
coloured red (over an arc across the Alderman Rocks to Streek Head) as seen from 
between the bearings of N. W. J W. round by the southward, and N. by E. 

I'he catoptric illuminating apparatus is as yet retained ; its focal plane 72 feet above the 
mean level of the sea, and the coloured light should be visible, in clear weather, from a 
distance of about 10 miles. 1'he tower is circular, coloured white, and is 45 feet in 
height from its base to top of the lantern. 

Veseels about to enter Crookhaven, in order to keep clear of the Alderman Rocks 
and Blackhorses Rocks, should in passing them keep northward of the limits of the red 
light 

Note. — A beacon will be erected on the outer eastern point of the Alderman Rocks, of 
which notice will be given in due course. 

Bearings stated are magnetic. Variation 264'' ^^^ i^ 1859. 

By Order, 

Wm. LeeSf 

Ballast Office, Dublin, 17 November 1850. Secretary. 



— No. 26.— 

OflSce of Commiltee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Sir, Marine Department, Whitehall, 8 March 1860. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Comniittee of Privy Council for Trade to 
acknov^ledge the receipt of your letter of the 3d instant, transmitting copy of a 
report from the superintendent on the subject of the beacon to be erected on the 
Alderman Rocks. 

In reply, I am to point out to you that the plan of the proposed beacon has 
not been sent as requested in the letter from this department of the 28th April 
1859, and I am, therefore, to request that it may be forwarded for their Lordships' 
consideration. 

I am, &c. 
The Secretary to the (signed) T. H. Farrer. 

Port of Dublin Corporation. 



— No. 27. — 

Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 21 March 1860. 

As requested in your letter of the 8th instant, I am now to forward plan of 
proposed beacon for marking the Alderman Rock, Crookhaven, which I aiw 
to request you will lay before their Lordships. 

I am, &c. 
(signed) IV. Lees^ 
The Secretary. &c. &c. Secretary. 

Marine Department. 



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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 25 

— No. 28. — 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall, 28 March 1860. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade 
to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 2l8t instant, transmitting a 
plan of the proposed beacon for the Alderman Rock, Crookhaven. 

In reply, I am to state that as the tenders have been asked for, my Lords do 
not make any objection to the plan proposed. 

My Lords would, however, suggest for the consideration of the Port of 
Dublin Corporation, whether it would not bl better that future beacons of the 
same description should be wider in proportion at the base, as from the plan of 
the beacon in question the base appears very narrow in proportion to the 
height. 

My Lords would also be glad to be informed whether any plan has been pro- 
vided for shifting the plates at the base of the beacon in question, should they 
be injured by the action of the water, lliis subject was remarked on in the 
letter from this department of the 17th January last, with reference to the pro« 
posed beacon on the Storks Rocks, at the entrance of Skerries Harbour. 

I am, &c. 
The Secretary to the (signed) T. H. Farter. 

Port of Dublin Corporation, Dublin. 



— No. 29. — 

Sir, Castle Bernard, Bandon, 20 October 1860. 

Having observed that the Ballast Board of Dublin are about to receive 
tenders for the erection of a beacon on the Alderman Rocks, at the entrance of 
Crookhaven Harbour, in the county of Cork, I have the honour to call your 
attention to the great advantage it would be to the shipping interest if, instead 
of the proposed beacon being erected, the present lighthouse was removed from 
Bock Island to the Alderman Rocks. 

The only expense would be the substitution of a tower for the proposed 
beacon, and the removal of the present lighthouse apparatus, &c., which could 
be easily done at a trifling cost, from one place to the other. 

I beUeve that there is no second opinion as to the in)portance of the removal, 
among naval men. Crookhaven is much frequented by wind-bound vessels, 
and the proposed change would be of the greatest advantage. I have the honour 
to urge upon the Board of Trade the importance of referring the matter to the 
Ballast Board. 

I have, &c. 

The Right Hon. T. M. Gibson, m.p. (signed) Bandon. 



— No. 30. — 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
My Lord, Marine Department, 

Whiteliall, 3 November 1860. 
I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Tmde 
to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 20th ultimo, addressed to the 
President of this Board, calling attention to the great advantage it would be to 
the shipping interest if, instead of the proposed beacon being erected on the 
Alderman Rocks at the entrance of Crookhaven Harbour, the present lighthouse 
was removed from Rock Island to the Alderman Rocks. 

In reply, uiy Lords direct me lo observe, that the removal of the present 
lighthouse to Alderman Rocks would be a very expensive work, as it would 
have to be erected on a detached tidal rock. 

64. D /^ T 

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96 CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 

In addition to the cost of erection, the annual cost of maintenance of the 
lighthouse would be greatly increased, in consequence of its becoming a ** Rock 
Station,*' requiring extra keepers for the necessary relief of those on duty oa 
the rock, who would also require dwellings on the mainland. 

The present light, with a beacon on the Alderman Rocks, will, my Lords 
think, answer every purpose, and they would not feel themselves justified under 
the circumstances of the case in sanctioning the outlay necessary for the 
remoTal of the lighthouse as propoded by your Lordship. 

I am, &c. 
The Earl of Bandon, (signed) Jamei Booth. 

Castle Bernard, Bandon, Ireland. 



_No. 31.— 

Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 22 November 1860. 

I AM to forward herewith a letter from Lord Bandon soliciting the Corporation 
to postpone accepting any tender for the erection of a beacon on the Aldcrmaa 
Rock, until a reply has been received to a communication addressed by him to 
the Board of Trade, on subject of the removal of the Crookhaven Lighthouse 
to the Alderman Rock ; and I am to state that the Corporation, waiting their 
Lordships' decision, have suspended acting on the tenders which were this day- 
submitted to the Board. 

I am, &c. 
(signed) W. Lees, 
The Secretary, Marine Department. Secretary. 



Enclosure in No. 31. 



Sir, Castle Bernard, 16 November 1860. 

I HAVB the honour to request that you will mention the following circumstances to the 
Commissioners : — 

In accordance with a generally expressed feeling, I have addressed a letter to the 
President of the Bourd of Trade,* urging the removal of the lighthouse at Crookhaven from 
Rock Island to the Alderman Rock. The only objection urged by the Board of Trade 
was made under the impression that the Alderman Rock was a tidal rock, and I there- 
fore hope, when the Board find that the olgection was founded in error, no difficulty may 
lie raised. 

May I take the liberty of urging upon the Commissioners the importance of not 
accepting any tender till the answer of the Board of Trade is received 

I have, &c. 

To the Secretary of the Ballast Board. (signed) Bandon. 



— No. 32. — 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Sir, Marine Department, 

Whitehall, 27 November 1860. 
I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 22d instant, transmitting a letter 
from Lord Bandon requesting the Port of Dublin Corporation to postpone 
accepting any tender for the erection of a beacon on the Alderman Rock» until 
a reply has been received to a letter addressed by his Lordship to the Board of 
Trade on the subject of the removal of the Crookhaven Lighthouse. 

In reply, I am to state to you for the information of the Corporation that the 
Board of Trade have no intention of proposing or approving any alteration in 
the arrangements for erecting a beacon on the Alderman Rock, and for lighting 
Crookhaven Harbour, which are already in progress ; and Lord Bandon has 
been informed accordingly. 

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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c* ty 

The fact that the Alderman Rocks are, in some parts at any rate, tidal rocks, 
is only one of the grounds on which this Board have formed their opinion. 

There can, my Lords consider, be no reason for further delaying the erection of 
the beacon. 

I am, &c. 
The Secretary to the (signed) T. H. Farrer. 

Port of Dublin Corporation, Dublin. 



— No. 33. — 

Sir, Castle Bernard, 23 Nchrember 1860. 

I HAVB the honour to enclose a tnemotial, signed by the Major of Cork, and 
tlie leading traders of the Port of Cork, in favour of the reraoral of Crookhaven 
Lighthoiise, and the erection of a lighthouse on the Galley Head (as recom- 
n^nded in the report of the late Capt. Wolfe). I earnestly hope that the Lorfis 
of the Council of Trade may be persuaded to direct an inquiry on the subject. 

I have, &C. 
The Right Hon. T. M, Gibson, m.p. (sigped) Bmnden. 



Enclosure in No. 33. 

To the Lords of the Privy CouDcii of Trade. 

The Memorial of the undersigned merchants, traders and masters, and owners of vessels 

trading to the Port of Cork, sheweth — 

That the great want of a light on the coast» between the Faatnet and Old Head of Kinsale, 
18 so necessary, that they request the Lords of the Con.mittee of Privy Council for Trade 
will take the subject into their early consideration. 

The light formerly at Cape CKar having been removed eight miles further to the west- 
ward, and the light on the Old Head of Kinsale having been so much lowered, leave s a lar^re 
Httce of coast unlighted, namely, about 45 miles, and within that space many and rreat ^ 
dangers exist, such as the Stags of Castleltaven, and the Dulig Reef, off the Galley Head ; 
your memorialists, therefore, urge upon your Lordships to cause inquiry to be made into- 
these circumstances, when they are convinced ii will be apparent that a li^ht in the vicinity 
of Galley Head is absolutely and hwlrspensably necessary. 

Your memorialists would beg also to bring before your LordaWips' notice the great import- 
ance of removing the figbthouse at Crookhaven from Bock Island to the Alderman 
Rock. 

[Here follow 75 Signatures.] 



— No. 84.— 

Sir, Castle Bernard, 27 November 1860. 

I HAVE the honour to forward a Paper signed by captains of vessels 
detained by stress of weather in Crookhaven Harbour. 

I have, &c. 
The Right. Hon. T. M, Gibson, m.p. (signed) Bandon. 



Enclosure in No. 34. 

Having been competled by stress of weather to take refuge in the Harbour of Crook- 
haven, we give it as onr decided opinion that the site of the present lighthouse^ on the 
northern tide of the harbour, has been improperly selected, and that it would be highly 
expedient for the safety of shipping obliged to avail themselves of this port as a harbour of 
refuge, to have the present Ught removed from where ii ittuids to the Alderman Rock, at 
the entrance of the harbour, on the south side. 

[Here foHow 29 s^natnrcs.] 



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— No. 35. — 

OflSce of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
My Lord, Marine Department, 

Whitehall, 4 December 1860. 

1 AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 23d ultimo, transmitting a memorial 
from merchants, traders, and masters and owners of vessels trading to the Port of 
Cork, setting forth the want of a liglit in the vicinity of Galley Head, between the 
Fastnets and Kinsale Head lights, and also in favour of the removal of the Crook- 
haven light from Rock Island to the Alderman Rock. 

My Lords direct me to state to your Lordship, for the information of the 
memorialists, that in 1857 the Elder Brethren of the Trinity House and a Com- 
mittee of the Port of Dublin Corporation, accompanied by Captain Sulivan, 
visited the coasts, and after inspection of the existing lighthouses, came to the 
conclusion that no additional coast light was required between the Fastnets and 
Kinsale Head. 

As regards the proposed removal of the Crookhaven Light to the Alderman 
Rock, I am to observe that your Lordship is already acquainted with the reasons 
why the Board of Trade declines to sanction the expenditure for such a purpose. 

I am, &c. 
The Earl of fiandon, Castle Bernard, (signed) T. H. Farter. 

BandoD, Ireland. 



— No. 36. — 

Sur, Ballast Office, Dublin, 1 December 1860. 

In connexion with the subject matter contained in your letter of 27th instant 
(No. 12570), I am directed to forward the accompanying tenders for the erection 
of a beacon on the *' Alderman ** Rock, Crookhaven, west coast of the county 
of Cork, and to state, that as the tender of Messrs. Head, Ashby & Co. is the 
lowest, the Board would recommend its acceptance for the erection of the beacon 
for the sum of Nine hundred and ninety-five pounds. 

I am to add, the Corporation know nothing of the parties or their securities. 

The Secretary, I am, &c. 

&c. &c. &c. (signed) IV. Lees, 

Marine Department. Secretary. 



_ No. 37. — 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall, 8 December I860. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 1st instant, transmitting tenders 
foF the erection of a beacon on the Alderman Rock, Crookhaven. 

In reply, I am to request that you will move the Port of Dublin Corporation 
to favour my Lords with some explanation why these tenders are so much in 
excess of the estimate of Mr. Halpin, the lowest tender being 995 /., while Mr. 
Halpin's estimate is 302 /. 10 «., or one-third only of the amount tendered. 

My Lords would suggest that Mr. Halpin should carefully re-consider his 
estimate, and should ascertain whether he could make arrangements for execut- 
ing the work under his own superintendence, obtaining the ironwork only either 
at Dublin or from England. It seems to be possible that the very large amounts 
named in the tenders may be intended to cover improbable contingencies in 



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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 2^ 

carrying the work into execution ; and it would further appear that if Mr. Halpin 
is at all correct in his estimates, he ought to be able to get the beacon constructed 
at a much less cost than the lowest tender offered. 

I am, &c. 
The Secretary to the (signed) T. H. Farter. 

Port of Dublin Corporation, Dublin. 



— No. 38. — 

The Farm, Bandon, County of Cork, 
Sir, 29 November I860, 

1 HAVE been requested as one of the Members connected with the County 
of Cork to urge upon you the importance of removing the lighthouse fipom Rock 
Island to the Alderman Rock, and of referring the subject to the Ballast Board* 
1 understand that the colouring of the arc and the erection of a beacon is not 
likely to prove sufficient, as Crookhaven is not like an ordinary harbour, being 
the resort of vessels of all nations detained by easterly winds in the chops of the 
Channel, as many as 130 having been there at one time ; a general interest is 
felt on the subject there. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) Wm. S. Bernard^ 
The Right Hon. T. M* Gibson^ m.p. Lieutenant Colonel. 

&c. &c. &c. • 



— No. 39. — 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, WhitehaU, 12 December 1860. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 29th ultimo, addressed to the 
President of this Board, urging the importance of removing the present Ught- 
faouse from Rock Island to the Alderman Rock, at the entrance of Crookhaven 
harbour* 

Li reply I am to state that the removal of the present lighthouse to the 
Alderman Rock would be a very expensive work, as the proper site for its 
erection would be on a tidal rock. 

In addition the cost of the annual maintenance of the lighthouse would be 
greatly increased in consequence of its becoming a " rock station," requiring 
extra keepers and dwellings. 

The present light with a beacon on the Alderman Rock will, my Lords think, 
answer every purpose, and they would not feel justified under the circumstances 
of the case in sanctioning the outlay consequent on the removal of the light- 
house. It is to be remembered that the light is only required as a harbour light, 
the Fastnets light bemg immediately seaward of it. 

I am, &c. 
Lieut. Colonel Bernard, m. p., (signed) T. H. Farrer. 

The Farm, Bandon, County of Cork. 



— No. 40. — 

Sir, 33, Merrion Square, S., Dublin, 7 December 1860. 

I HAVE been solicited on behalf of many parties interested in the shipping 
frequenting the port of Crookhaven, in the south-west of the county of Cork, to 
bring under your notice the position of the lighthouse at the entrance of that 
. harbour. 

Its position is indicated with sufficient correctness in the rough chart I send 
64. D 3 herewith t 

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30 COERESPONDENCE RELATING TO 

herewith, and from which you can readilj perceive that it is purely a harbour 
lights and of little utility as such. 

The removal to the site (also shown on the chart), on the Alderman Rock, 
would make the light much more useful to the large number of ships which now 
regularly frequent or temporarily use the well-sheltered harbour of Crookhaven. 

The Ballast Board has, I believe, not viewed with favour this project, but 
I feel some confidence that if the Board were to reconsider their decision, the 
nearly unanimous concurrence of opinion on the part of the neighbouring; landed 
proprietors, and of those in the shipping interest, would induce the Board to 
approve of the suggested transfer of the light to the Alderman Rock. May I, 
therefore, respectfully request of you as President of the Board of Trade to com- 
municate with the Ballast Board, with a view to that body sanctioning' the 
removal of the Crookhaven light from its present comparatively useless site, to 
that suggested and desired on the Alderman Rock. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) Robert Singfield. 

Right Honourable Milner Gibson, 

President of the Board of Trade. 

[The President of the Board of Trade informed the writer, in reply, that the 
subject had been fully considered by the Board of Trade, and that they could 
not sanction the expenditure necessary for the purpose.] 



— No.41.— 

13, Merrion-square South, Dublin, 
Sir, 8 December 1860. 

Some leading constituents connected with the western districts of the county 
(^ork have called on me, as their representative, to impress on the Board of 
Trade the great public advantage of having a light placed on the Alderman Rock, 
at the entrance to Crookhaven harbour. 

Their moderate request is that the proposal to remove the present light from 
Rock Island to the Alderman Rock, shall be carefully reconsidered before the 
acceptance of any tender for the new beacon tower, which they understand that 
the Board of Trade have sanctioned. Their belief is that the Irish Ballast Board, 
if referred to, would be favourable to the proposed removal ; and that the sole 
obstacle on the part of the Board of Trade, is the trifling extra expense of sub- 
stituting a lighthouse for a beacon. Upon applying to the Ballast Board here, I 
was given to understand that all information must be derived through the Board 
of Trade, who have exclusive control of the matter. 

Accordingly 1 have written to tlie Ballast Board, in order that my letter may 
be submitted to the Board of Trade; and have also taken the liberty to direct 
attention to the necessity for a light near Gallyhead, between Cape Clear and the 
Old Head of Kinsale. 

I beg now to know, will the Board of Trade comply with the reasonable request 
I have ventured to put forward, and reconsider the proposal to remove the light 
from Rock Island to the Alderman Rock ? 

I am also anxious for information as to whether it is contemplated to place a 
light at or near Gallyhead ; and I should be glad of an early opportunity to 
confer personally with the Board of Trade in London upon these two matters, 
each of which is of great local as well as general interest. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) Vincent Scully, 
To the Secretary of the Board of Trade, &c. 



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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 31 

— No. 42, — 

Merrion Square, Dublin, 

^ Sir, 14 December I860. 

Enclosbd 19 an important memorial confided to me for presentation to the 
Lords of the Privy Ck)uncil for Trade- It bears about 250 signatures, comprising 
those of the Earl of Shannon, and of many merchants, traders, gentry, and 
clergy, connected with ihe south-west of Cork county. Their memorial strongly 
sustains the very moderate request conveyed in my fetter of 8th instant, that the 
proposal to transfer the present light*^ from Rock Island shall be carefully 
reconsidered, before any final approval of an unlighted beacon on the Alderman 
Rock. 

It also confirms the opinion of those who have already urged the nec(?ssity for 
placing a light near Gaily head, between Kinsale Head and the Fastnets. 

On this latter subject I am now aware that in a letter of 4th instant to the 
Earl of Bandon, Mr. T. H. Farrer, of the Board of Trade, wrote that, — '^ In 
1857 the Elder Brethren of the Trinity House, and a Committee of the Port of 
Dublin Corporation^ accompanied by Captain Sulivan, visited the coasts, and 
after inspection of the existing lighthouses, came to the conclusion that no addi- 
tional coast light was required between the Fastnets and Kinsale Head." 

It would surprise me to find that this conclusion was deliberately come to, 
especially by the intelligent committee of the Port of Dublin Corporation ; and I 
shall feel obliged if the Board of Trade will let me have a copy of the Report of 
1857, or permit me to refer to it either here or in London ; otherwise it may 
become my duty to move for its production on the re-assembling of Parliament. 

Were there 46 miles of uninhabited rock along the great highway between 
England and America, it would certainly be a great public object to have it 
properly lighted ; and I feel assured that the Board of Trade will not regard it as 
any valid reason for leaving unlighted this dangerous line of coast, that a light- 
house on it would'also confer some local benetit on an inhabited island ; more 
especially as the large local funds, formerly applicable to such local purposes here, 
were some years since transferred from the Irish Ballast Board in Dublin to the 
Board of Trade and its Marine Board in London. 

Awaiting the favour of a reply to this and to my previous communication, 



To the Secretary of the Board of Trade, &c. 



I have, &c. 
(signed) Vincent Scully. 



Enclosure in No. 42. 
To the Lords of the Privy Comicil of Trade. 



The Mbmorial of the undersigned Merchants, Traders, and Masters and Owners of Vessels 

Trading to the Ports of 
Showetb, 

That the great want of a light on the coast between the Fastnet and the Old Head of 
Kinsale is so necessary, that they request the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council of 
Trade will take the subject into their early consideration. The light formerly at Cape Clear 
having been removed eight miles further westward, and the light on the Old Head of 
Kinsale having been so much lowered, leaves a large space of coast unlighted, namely, aboat 
45 miles, and within that space many and sreat .dangers exists such as the Stags of Castle- 
haven, aod the Dnlig Reef off the mlley Head. Memoriahsts, therefore, urge upon yoar 
Lordships to caose inquiry to be made into these circumstances, when they are convinced 
it will be a^^rent that a light in the vicinity of Galley Head is absolutely and indispensably 
necessary. 

Tbey would b^ also to urge on your Lordships the great importance of removing the 
lighthouse at Crookhaven from Rock Island ta the Alderman Rock. 

[Here follow 250 signatures.] 



64. D 4 

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32 CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 



— No. 43. — 

Vincent Scully, Esq., m. p., to the Secretary of the Board of Trade. 

Sir, Merrion Square, Dublin, 22 December I860. 

I HAVB to request an acknowledgment of my letters, addressed through you 
to the Board of Trade on 8th and 14th instant ; also of those of 4th and 7tL 
instant, to the Secretary of the Dublin Ballast Board (Port of Dublin Corpora- 
tion), forwarded by that Board to the Board of Trade. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) Vincent Scully. 
To the Secretary of the Board of Trade, &c. 



— No.44. — 

The Secretary of the Board of Trade to V. Scully^ Esq., m. p. 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, Whitehall, 
Sir, 24 December 1860. 

1 AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade; 
to acknowledge the receipt of your letters of the 8th, 14th, and 22d instant ^ 
and in reply I am to state that my Lords will cause a letter to be sent to you on 
the subject on an early date. 

I am, &c. 
V. Scully, Esq., m. p. (signed) T. H. Farrer. 



_ No. 45. — 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall, 27 December 1860. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letters of the 8th and 14th instant, respecting 
the proposal to remove the present lighthouse from Rock Island to the Alderman 
Rock, and calling attention to the necessity for a light near Gaily Head, between 
Cape Clear and Old Kinsale Head. 

In reply I am to state, that the removal of the present lighthouse to the 
Alderman Rock would be a very expensive work, as the proper site for its erec- 
tion would be on a tidal rock. In addition the cost of the annual maintenance 
of the lighthouse would be greatly increased in consequence of its becoming a 
" rock station,'* requiring extra keepers and dwellings. 

The present light, with a beacon on the Alderman Rock, will answer every 
purpose, and my Lords would not feel justified, under the circumstances of the 
case, in sanctioning the outlay consequent on the removal of the lighthouse. It 
is to be remembered that the light is only required as a harbour light, the Fast- 
nets light being immediately seaward of it. 

This question has been most carefully considered by the Port of Dublin Cor- 
poration, the Trinity House, and the Board of Trade, and has been finally decided 
by them upon the grounds mentioned above. 

With respect to a light on Galley Head, my Lords desire me to state that the 
Trinity House considered this subject carefully in 1850, and decided against the 
necessity for any such light. The subject was necessarily again under considera-^ 
tion in 1857,* when it was under discussion whether any and what points on the 
coasts of Ireland required new lights. The Trinity House stated, as regards 
Galley Head, that they remained of the same opinion as before, and consequently 
in their final report, after inspection of the coast, they made no mention of Gaily 
Head. 



♦ See Nos. 6, 7, 8, 9, and 11, where Galley Head is specially referred to. 

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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 33 

la this opinion of the Elder Brethren, Captain Sulivan, who accompanied 
them on their tour of inspection, entirely concurred. 

The approval of this Board to the expenditure necessary for any new light 
can, as you are probably aware, only be given when such light is applied for 
by the Port of Dublin CJorporation through the Trinity House ; and all proposals 
of the kind should therefore be made to the Port of Dublin Corporation, who will, 
if they consider the light necessary, apply for it in the regular manner. 

I am to state at the same time that my Lords concurred, and still concur, in 
the opinion, that no new light on Ghdley Head is wanted. 

I am, &c. 
Vincent Scully, Esq., m. p., (signed) T. H. Farter. 

13, Merrion Square South, Dublin* 



— No. 46. — 

Removal of Crookhaven Light to ^' Alderman Rock.'* 

Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 17 December I860. 

I AM directed by the Port of Dublin Corporation to forward herewith copies 
of letters which have been addressed by Mr. Vincent Scully, m.p., to this Board, 
agreeably with that gentleman's request, and will thank you to submit same to 
the Lords of the Committee of the Privy Council for Trade. 

I am, &;c. 
The Secretary, Marine Department, (signed) W. Lees^ 

Board of Trade. Secretary. 



Enclosure 1, in No. 46. 

13, Merrion Square South, 
Sir, 4 December 1860. 

I HAVE recently received letters from influential constituents urging me to remonstrate 
with the Board of Trade, respecting their refusal to remove the present lighthouse from 
Rock Island to Alderman Rock. 

Before doing so I would be anxious to ascertain the views of your Board, and whether 
they would favour the proposed removal ; or do they consider it is open to any valid objec- 
tion beyond the small extra cost of substituting a lighthouse for the intended beacon. 

Lord Charles Pelham Clinton, who owns most of the land at Crookhaven, writes : 

^* The object of my letter is to ask you, as our representative, to aid in inducing the Board 
of Trade to allow the matter to go before the Ballast Board ; whom I believe to be in favour 
of removing the lighthouse from its present useless, and I may say mischievous position." 

His Lordship adds, '^ I must request you to urge this matter most strongly on the Board 
of Trade, in order that it may be properly and fairly reconsidered. Should they, in the face 
of reason and expediency, still reluse to reconsider it, I hope you will bring it before the 
House of Commons." 

Yoar Board is, I believe, already aware that the Earl of Bandon (who also writes to aie) 
strongly supports the proposed removal. 

Should your Board think proper to favour me with a personal interview, I shall be happy 
to attend their meeting next Thursday, at one o'clock, p. m., or any other time they may 
please to appoint. 

I am, &c. 

To the Secretary of the Ballast Board, &c. (signed) Vincent Scully. 



Enclosure 2, in No. 46. 

Merrion Square, Dublin, 
Sir, 7 December 1860. 

Advebting to my former letter, and to my interview on yesterday with your Board, I 
beg respectfully to repeat those two questions : 

l)oes the Ballast Board approve of the proposal to remove the present light at Crookhaven, 
from Rock Island to Alderman Rock ? 

Does the Ballast Board regard such removal as being open to any valid objection, beyond 
the extra expense of substituting a lighthouse for the intended beacon tower? 

Should your Board still feel an official delicacy about answering these simple inquiries, 
64. E I beg 



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34 CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 

I hee they will kiodly forward my correspondence to the Board of Trade, with a recom* 
mendation that the matter shall be carefully reconsidered, and in the meantime all action 
suspended towards erecting the beacon tower, which the Board of Trade have sanctioned. 

I hare also to request that your Board will impress on the Board of Trade the necessity 
that exists for having a light near Gralley Head, between Cape Clear, and the Old Head of 
Kinsale. 

The great and increasing traffic between Cork Harbour and America renders it the more 
important not to leave «nhgh(ed 45 miles of dangerous coast along the main highways of 
ocean navigation. 

I am, Sbc 

To the Secretary of the Dublin Ballast Board. (signed) Vincent Scully. 



— No. 47. — 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall 27 December 1860. 

I EM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 1 7tli instant, transmitting copies 
of letters which have been addressed by Mr. Vincent ScuUy, m.p., to the Port 
of Dublin Corporation, relating to the proposal to remove the present lighthouae 
from Rock Island to the Alderman Kock^ and to necessity said to exist for a 
light near Galley Head. 

My Lords direct me to observe, that as Mr. Scully in his letters requests the 
opinion of the Corporation, on the above proposals, they do not understand what 
is the object of the Corporation in forwarding these letters to this Board. 

I am to state that Mr. Scully has addressed two letters* on the same subjects 
to their Lordships, copies of which I enclose, together with my Lords' reply, for 
the information of the Corporation. 

I am, &c. 
The Secretary to the , (signed) T. H. Farrer. 

Port of Dublin Corporation, Dublin. 



— No. 48. — 

Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 27 December 1860. 

In reply to your letter of the 8th instant, with reference to the estimates for a 
beacon on the Alderman Rock, Crookhaven, I am to inform you the Board 
referred the subject to their superintendent of lighthouses, Mr. Halpin, who is 
absent from ill health, and unable to attend to any business, and that they are 
apprehensive that he did not calculate the cost with his usual accuracy, and they 
are therefore induced to recommend that the lowest tender be accepted, as they 
are of opinion it would not be desirable this department should undertake the 
work. 

I am, &c. 
(signed) W. Zees, 
The Secretary, &c. &c. &cc. Secretary. 

Marine Department. 



— No. 49. — 

Office of Committee of Privy Council for Trade, 
Marine Department, 
Sir, Whitehall, 31 December 1860. 

I AM directed by the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade to 
acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 27th instant, on the subject of 
Mr. Halpin*s estimate for a beacon on the Alderman Rock, and stating that the 

Port 

^ See Nos. 41, 42, and 45* 

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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, kc. 55 

Port of Dublin Corporation are induced to recommend that the lowest tender 
be accepted, as they are of opinion that it would not be desirable that they 
should undertake the work themselves. 

In reply, I am to state to you for the information of the Corporation, that my 
Lords approve of the acceptance of the tender of Messrs. Head, Ashby & Co. 
for the erection of the beacon in question for the sum of 995 /. 

The tenders transmitted in your letter of the 1st instant are returned here- 
with. 

I am^ Sec. 
(signed) T. H. Farrer. 
The Secretary to the 
Port of Dublin Corporation. 



— No. 50. — 

The Secretary of the Dublin Ballast Board to V. Scully, Esq., m. p. 

Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 5 December 1860. 

I BEG to acknowledge your letter of the 4th instant,* this day received, on sub- 
ject of the removal of the present lighthouse from Rock Island to the Alderman 
Rock ; and in reply beg to state the Corporation will be happy to confer with you 
on the above subject on to-morrow, the 6th instant, at 1.30 p. m. 

I am, &c. 
Vincent Scully, Esq., u. p. (signed) W. Lees, Secretary. 



— No. 51. — 

The Secretary of the DubUn Ballast Board to V. Scully , Esq., m. p. 
Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 15 December 1860. 

I AM directed by the Port of Dublin Corporation to acknowledge the receipt of 
your letter of the 7th in8tant,t putting certain questions as to the Crookhaven 
light, &c. ; and in reply I am to state, that this Board, having in their interview 
with you explained their views, must decline replying to the questions put by 
you, but have iustructed me to forward your letter to the Board of Trade, agree- 
ably with your request. 

I am, &c. 
Vincent Scully, Esq., m. p. (signed) W. Lees, Secretary. 



— No. 62. — 

Vincent Scully, Esq., m.p., to the Secretary of the Dublin Ballast Board. 

Sir, Merrion Square, Dublin, 17 December 1860. 

I HAVE to thank your Board for submitting my letters to the Board of Trade; 
but must be allowed to observe that, at my interview on the 6th instant, your 
Board did not favour me with any of their views. On the contrary, they civilly 
declined to answer any questions, unless through the Board of Trade ; whereupon 
some mutual pleasantries passed respecting Circumlocution and Red Tapeism^ 
Garibaldi and Cavour. 

At this moment I am quite ignorant of the views of your Board ; and have 
not the least idea whether they favour a continuance of the present light at 
Rock Island, or its removal to the Alderman Rock, or the erection there of an 
unhghted tower. 

I am, &c. 
(signed) Vincent Sully. 

To the Secretary of the Dublin Ballast Board, &c. 

* See EBdoture No. 1, in 46. \8€€ Endomre No. S^ in 4a. 

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3F CORRESPONDENCE RELATING TO 



— No. 53. — 

Sir, Ballast Office, Dublin, 12 January 1861. 

I HAVE the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 27th ultimo, 
with respect to an application from Mr. Vincent Scully to remove the present 
lighthouse at Crookhaven to the Alderman Rock, and also as to the necessity 
said to exist for a lighthouse at the Galley Head, and further stating that their 
Lordships do not understand the objects of the Corporation in forwarding Mr. 
Scully's letters to them. 

I am directed by this Board to state that Mr. Scully having, in an interview 
which he requested of this Board, stated the object he had in view was to ascer- 
tain 'the opinions of this Board upon these subjects, which, however, they 
declined to give, and referred hira to the Board of Trade. 

I am, &c. 
(signed) FT. Lees^ 
The Secretary, Marine Department. Secretary. 



— No. 54.— 

Reform Club, London, 
Dear Sir, 1 January 1861. 

I HAVE to lay before you, as President of the Board of Trade, a recent cor- 
respondence as to removing the Crookhaven Harbour Light from Rock Island to 
the Alderman Rock, and as to placing a coast light near Galley Head in the 
county of Cork. 

It now appears, from the letter to me of 27th ultimo, that an apprehension of 
great expense constitutes the sole objection to a new lighthouse at Crookhaven ; 
but well-informed parties assure me thai the present staflF of keepers will suffice, 
and that 400 L would cover the entire extra cost of having an useful lighthouse 
on the Alderman Rock, instead of an almost useless beacon. They state also 
that the present light on Rock Island is in effect a mischievous decoy to ship- 
wreck stray vessels, and their only demand through me was for a satisfactory 
inquiry. 

As to a coast light near Galley Head, I collect now, from the same letter of 

27th ultimo, that the Port of Dublin Corporation made no report of any sort 

in 1857, and that the Report of the Trinity House made no mention whatever 

• See^ however, of Galley Head ; * thus fortifying the representations that upon the tour of inspec- 

papers referred to i\q^ jn 1857, the question of a light at Galley Head was not the subject of any 

No"! 4I '^^ '^ special investigation. 

T. H. F. It is almost superfluous to notice to you, that since 1850, and even since 1857, 
the vast and increasing intercourse with America has considerably altered the 
aspects of both questions ; by greatly augmenting the importance of having the 
south-west coast of Ireland properly lighted for ocean-going, ships, and of 
rendering Crookhaven (close to Cape Clear) a secure harbour of refuge. 

Having fulfilled every duty which I have hitherto been called upon to dis- 
charge respecting those two matters, my simple object in this letter is to ascer- 
tain from you, as representing the Board of Trade in the House of Commons — 
shall I be allowed when Parliament meets to obtain, as unopposed returns, 
whatever oflBcial reports or papers my constituents may require, connected 
either with the harbour light at Crookhaven, or with placing a coast light near 
Galley Head ? As to this, I shall now feel obliged for your official answer. 

In the absence of those Returns, the scant information already afforded must 
remain in its present incomplete state ; but should their production disclose that 
the Dublin gentlemen who compose the Port of Dublin Corporation, have at all 
disregarded the legitimate requirements of the county of Cork, it will then be 
for the county of Cork to consider how it can best have its local interests duly 
represented at the Board of Trade and Trinity House. 

You will not fail to observe the ludicrous system of mysterious circumlocu- 
tion, under which I was referred by the intelligent gentlemen of the Ballast 
Board in Dublin, to the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade in 
London, whence I am now directed back to the Dublin Ballast Board, and 

thence j 

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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 37 

thence to the Elder Brethren of Trinity House ; in order, through those round- 
about courses to return to the Board of Trade, and be there again informed of 
*• the way not to do it." 

The greatest of Irish constituencies might well complain, were I to suffer 
their representative to be thus battledored between Ballast Boards and Boards 
of Trade,/ or to be civilly see-sawed among intelligent gentlemen, and Elder 
Brethren, and Lords Committee-men, in the two countries. 

But for the sake of the public service, and of that helpless tribe of patient 
expectants, who, " with many a weary sigh and many a groan,*' daily revolve 
through official antechambers, in endless rounds of fruitless attendances, I may 
be permitted to urge on you, as one of cur most prominent and earnest reformers, 
to mark the period of your Presidency over an important public department, by 
cutting that gordian knot of red tape which it is impossible to disentangle. 

I am, &c. 
(signed) Vincent Scully. 

The Right Hon. Thomas Milner Gibson, m.p., 
President of the Board of Trade, &c. 



~ No. 55. — 

The President of the Board of Trade to Vincent Scully , Esq., m.p. 

Theberton House, Saxmundham, Suffolk, 
Dear Sir, 9 January 1861. 

I HAVE to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, and also of the printed cor- 
respondence which you have been good enough to forward to me relative te 
the Crookhaven Harbour Light, and the proposal of a coast light near Galley 
Head. 

Both these questions have received very full consideration. With regard to 
the first, having carefully read and weighed what has been said by competent 
authorities, I am unable to come to the conclusion that the Board of Trade 
would be justified in sanctioning the expenditure which would be incurred by 
the removal of the Crookhaven Light to the Alderman Rock. The band of red 
light, already sanctioned in the Crookhaven Lighthouse, illuminating an arc 
which passes over the Alderman Rock, wiih a beacon on the rock itself, will, it 
is thought, supply all that is requisite, and be sufficient to render the approach 
to Crookhaven Harbour as safe as that of most of the harbours of the United 
Kingdom. 

In respect to placing a new coast light at or near Galley Head, if this pioposal 
is now to be made it should come from the Port of Dublin Corporation, through 
the Trinity House, to the Board of Trade. It appears, however, that when the 
question of putting a light on Galley Head was mooted some time since, the 
Trinity House were of opinion that an additional coast light, between that on, 
the Fastnet Rock and the old Head of Kinsale, was not required. The unlighted 
space, intervening between the areas illuminated by the Fastnet Rock Light and 
the Head of Kinsale Rock Light, is moderate : and it did not seem right to place 
a new charge upon all passing ships, for an additional coast light not clearly 
necessary for the safety of the ships which navigate St. George's Channel. 

You ask me whether there will be any objection to grant, as unopposed 
returns, whatever official reports or papers your constituents may require, con- 
nected either with the harbour light at Crookhaven, or with placing a coast light 
near Galley Head? My reply is, that there can be no other desire but that your 
constituents and yourself should have every information upon these questions, in 
which they naturally take a deep interest. So far as I am concerned, 1 shall 
be ready to assent to the production of any papers you may think fit to move 
for, which, consistently with the public interest, can with propriety be laid 
before Parliament. 

Yours, &c. 

Vincent ScuUy, Esq., m.p. (signed) Thomas Milner Gibson. 



64. B 3 r^ T 

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3« COERESPONDBNCE RELATING TO 



— No.56.— 

Viftcent Scully ^ Esq., m.p., to the President of the Board of Trade. 

The Ferns, Grove End Road, London, 
Dear Sir, 10 January 1861 . 

Not having yet heard in reply to my letter of Ist instant, addressed to you at 
the office of the Board of Trade, I take the liberty to address this to your country 
remdence, and to send you a copy of my former letter, with the previous corre- 
spondence referred to in it. 

I forward also a memorial from more than 50 shipowners, shopkeepers and 
inhabitants of the town and neighbourhood of Crookbaven, containing statements 
well deserving of an impartial consideration ; and requesting that a competent 
Commission may report as to the expediency of changing the site of the present 
light from the north to the south side of Crookbaven Harbour. To the like 
effect is the enclosed memorial from some masters of vessels, chiefly English 
or Welsh, who were compelled to seek shelter at Crookbaven by stress of 
weather. 

As I must return soon to Ireland, I should wish before then to know from you, 
as President of the Board of Trade, shall I be allowed, when Parliament meets, 
to obtain, as unopposed returns, copies of any official reports or papers which my 
constituents may require, connected either with the harbour light at Crookbaven, 
or with placing a new light near Galley Head, in the county of Cork ? 

I am, &c. 
(signed) Vincent Scully. 

The Right Hon. Thomas Milner Gibson, m.p., &a, 
Tliebarton House, Saxmundham, Suffolk. 



Enclosure 1, in No. 56. 



The Memorial of the undersigned Ship Agents, Shopkeepers, Inhabitants of the town and 
townland of Crookbaven, Ballynaule, Bailyvoge, Malavogue, and others interested in the 

Harbour of Crookhaven, 

« 
Sheweth, — 

That your memorialists are deeply interested in the prosperity and future prospects of the 
district surrounding and contiguous to the Harbour of Crookhaven, situate on the southern 
shore of the county of Cork, in Ireland. 

That the Harbour of Crookhaven, from its position, is much resorted to by home-bound 
vessels, especially during the prevalence of easterly winds. As many as 60 and 80 
vessels have been at several times anchored within its shelter, being most securely protected 
on the north-west and south sides by high lands. 

That your memorialists have reason to know that a contract has been entered into for the 
construction of a railway from Bandon to Skibbereen, which latter town lies within 26 miles 
of said Harbour of Crookhaven. 

That so soon as this railroad is completed, the Harbour of Crookhaven will be connected 
with the city of Cork by telegraph wire, for the greater convenience of homeward bound 
ships, who will receive their orders in Crookhaven, and, owing to which, your memorialists 
anticipate a very large increase to the numbers now availing themselves of this harbour. 

That in the year 1843 a Light and Lighthouse was built on the north side of the Harbour 
of Crookhaven, and that in the selection of the site for said light your memorialists have 
reason to believe sufficient consideration was not given as to whether it was the best site 
that could be selected for affording to the shipping interests the advantages intended. 

That the universal opinion of all captains and owners of vessels that have from time to 
time entered the harbour, is that the site whereon the Light now stands, on the north of the 
harbour, is not where it should have been placed. 

That the proper site for the Lightis on the rocks known as the Aldern or Alderman Rocks, 
situate on the south-east entrance of the harbour, the vimnt of a light on which rocks n 
generally admitted. 

That your memorialists would therefore pray that the matter may be referred to a com- 

g stent commission to report as to the expediency of changing the site of the present light 
om the north to the south side of the liarbour. 
And your memorialists will pray. 

[Here follow 55 signatures.] 



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CROOKHAVEN LIGHTHOUSE, &c. 39 



Enclosure 2, in No. 56. 

To the Corporation for Preserving and Improving the Port of Dublin. 

Wb, the undersigned, being compelled by stress of weather to take refuge in the Harbour 
of Crookhaven,beg to state that it would bie highly expedient for the safety of the shipping 
obliged to avail themselves of this port as a harbour of refuge, to have the present light- 
house removed from where it now stands to the Alderman Hock, at the entrance of the 
harbour on the south side. 

[Here follow 19 signatures.] 



_No.57.— 

Vincent Scully y Esq., m.p., to the President of the Board of Trade. 

The Ferns, Grove End Road, London, 
Dear Sir, 11 January 1861. 

It was not until 10 o clock last evening, and after posting my letter of yester- 
day's date, that yours of 9th instant reached me here ; and with a simple ac- 
knowledgment of it, I shall now close this correspondence, which I propose to 
submit at once to those interested in it. 

I am, &c. 
(signed) Vincent Scully. 

The Right Hon. Thomas Milner Gibson, m. p., &c., 
Theberton House, Saxmundham, Suffolk. 



64- E4 

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DUBUN BALLAST CORPORATION. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons^ 
dated 18 June 1861;— /or^ 



A KETURN "of the Total Receipts of the Dublin Ballast Cobpobation for 
Tonnage and Quay Wall Dues levied on all Vessels entering the Port in the 
Year ending the 3l8t day of December 1860; and stating separately the Amount of 
such Dues received from — 

Ist Steam Vessels ; 

2d. Vessels laden with Coal ; 

3d. Vessels laden with Timber; 

4th. Veissels laden with Com, and other descriptions of Cargo.'* 



Steam Vessels ------ 

Vessels laden with Coals - - - - 

Vessels laden with Timber - - - - 

Vessels laden with Com and other descriptions 
of Cargo ------- 



Tonnage 
Dues. 



£. 5. d. 

11,495 - 4 

7,677 9 3 

1,797 2 6 

4,196 7 3 



25,165 19 4 



Quay Wall 
Dues. 



£. s, d, 

1,915 16 8 

1^79 11 6 

1,880 2 2 

846 18 9 



5,922 9 1 



Balket Office, Dublin, I 
1861. J 



J. Hanks, 
Accountant of the Corporation. 



By order of the Board, 



James M. CfReiHy, 

Aesistant Secretary. 



542» 



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DUBLIN PORT. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The Hoitae of CommoDs, 
dated 25 April 1861 ^^for^ 



ACCOUNTS " of Receipts and Disbursbmbnts by the Corpobation 
for Preserving and Improving the Port of Dublin, from the 
31 St day of December 1858 to the latest Period to which the same have 
been made up : " 

** And, of Monies Borrowed, stating the Annual Amount of Interest 
payable thereon, and Surplus Receipt above Disbursements, &c- 
(in continuation of Parliamentary Papers, No. 57, of Session 1861 ; 
No. 105, of Session 1853 ; No. 2Y1, of Session 1855 ; No. 469, of Session 
1858; and No. 115, of Session 1860).'' 



(Mr. Joseph Ewart.) 



Ordered^ by The House of Commons, to he Printtd, 
6 August 1 86 1 . 



541- 

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RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS BY THE CORPORATION FOR PRESERVING AND 



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IMPROVING THE PORT OP DUBLIN ; MONIES BORROWED, &C. 



ACCOUNT of Monies Borrowed^ Annual Amount of Interest payable thereon^ and 
Surplus Receipts above Disbursements. 



1859, 1860. 

Monies borrowed by debentures or otherwise underl 
the authority of the Act 26 Geo. 3, c. 35, or of > 
any other Act J 

51 Crea 3, a 66, s. 12, with sanction of Lord 
Lieutenant ------- 


£. s. d. 
87,876 18 6 
20,000 - - 

30,000 - - 


£. s. d. 
137,876 18 6 

25,323 1 7 


Bates of Interest at which the same was borrowed : 
£. 87,876. 18. 6. at 6 per cent, now 4 per cent 
£.20,000. at 4 per cent 
£. 30,000. at 4 per cent 

What part of same has been paid off: 

To 31 December 1859 - . - . 
To 31 December 1860 - - . - 


22,323 1 7 
3,000 - - 




3,302 3 1 
1,200 - - 


Annual Amount of interest payable on subsisting 


112,653 16 11 


Debt or Debts : 

On £.82,553. 16, 11. 

On £.30,000 


4,502 3 1 






Statement of Surplus Receipts above Disburse* 
ments : 


51,094 18 3 
53,743 7 10 


xi^ceipvo, loou • - - - - - 
IfiftO ------ 








Disbursements, 1859 

1860 


49,579 18 8 
50,486 5 1 



Ballast Office, Dublin, 1861. 



By order of the Board, 



«/. Hanks, 
Accountant of the Corporation. 



James M. O'ReUly, 

Assistant Secretary. 



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FOREIGN SHIPPING. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commoosy 
dated 9 April 1861 ;— >r, 



RETURNS *'of the Compensation for Diffbrbntlal Dubs ohForbign 
Ships, received under the Acts relating to Reciprocity Treaties 
in each Year since 1820 by the several Bodies now in receipt of such 
Compensation^ vvith the Aggregate Amount received by each, the Average 
Annual Amount received by each for the Five Years from 1824 to 1828 
inclusive, and the Average Annual Amount received by each for the Five 
Years from 1866 to 1860 inclusive :" 

" And, of the Claims for Compensation for Differential Dubs on 
FoRBiGN Ships, which have ceased, with the Causes or Presumed Causes of 
their Cessation/* 



(^Mr. Milner Gibson.) 



Ordered^ by The House of CommoDs, to be Printed^ 
9 April ]86i. 



123. 

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COMPENSATION FOR DIFFERENTIAL DUES ON FOREIGN SHIPS RECEIVED 



RETURN of the Compensation for Difpebential Dues on Foreign Ships, received under the 
of such Compensation, with the Aggregate Amount received "by each, the Average Annual Amount 
by each for the Five Years from 1856 to 1860, inclusive. 



YEAR. 


Berwick 
Harbour Dues. 


Berwick 
Pilots. 

Pilotage. 


Blacknej 
Harbour 
Directors. 

Harbour Dues. 


Blacknej 

and CUj 

Pilots. 

PUotage. 


Boston 
Corporation. 

Tonnage Dues. 


Boston 
Pilots. 

Pilotage. 


Caemarron 
Trustees. 

Harbour Dues. 




1820 


nil 


d. 


£. 8. d, 
. nil - 


£. s. d. 
- ml - 


£. *. d. 
. nil . 


£. z. d. 

- nil . 


£. s. d. 
- nil . 


£. s. d. 
. nil . 


' 


1821 
1823 
1823 


99 

99 


- 


' *9 ' 


' 99 ' 




' 99 ' 


" 99 ' 
99 


f9 




1824 
182fi 
1826 
18^7 

1828 


9f 
99 

18 - 

02 9 

8 7 


2 
1 


1 li 10 J 
•2 12 7 i 
26 14 - 




" 99 ' 


' f9 ' 
"99" 
" -»> * 

99 

f9 - I 


" » *" 


" 99 ' 
' 99 ' 




18S9 - 

1830 

1831 


- -nil 
21 1 

- nil 


11 


- nn . 

8 1 6i 
- nil 










- n - 




1832 
1833 
1834 


127 1 
61 4 
73 9 


n 

9 


16 8 2i 
10 10 9i 
15 14 B 1 




"" w '" 










1835 

1836 
1697 


30 19 
. nil 


5 


11-7 
16 18 9i 
10 4 5 


' 99 ' 
99 


99 






"99' 
99 

2-4 




1838 
1839 
1840 


19 16 

82 2 

109 17 


4 
5 
8 


16 19 11 
22 9 8 
25 17 6 


' 99 ' 




9>* 
" 99 ' 


" 1> • 






1»41 
1842 
1843 


88 7 
80 18 
80 2 


8 
5 
9 


19 18 - 
17 4 2 
16 2 10 














1844 

1845 
1846 


34 16 
66 16 

88 6 


8 
8 
7 


8 15 1 
15 - 11 
19 15 5 


1 16 6 
8 11 9 
1 6 7 


5 10 - 

18 16 9 

4 2- 




5 11 10 


2 18 2 




1947 

1848 
1849 


32 17 
47 14 
21 11 


2 

7 
8 


9 19 1 

18 8 5 

6 2 8 


- 12 10 

- nil - 

8-8 


2 7 6 

. nil - 

2 8 4 




22 4 - 
49 16 2 
19 11 2 


4 4- 

8 18 - 

. nil - 




1850 
1851 
1652 


35 18 
58 4 
39 18 


7 
2 
8 


8 19 - 

10 14 8 

6 16 10 


2 5 5 

1 8 1 

2 18 


8 5 9 
5 18 9 
7 14 8 




1 - - 
6 12 6 
• nil - 


1 8 10 
. nil . 




1853 
1854 
1856 


49 8 
78 12 

55 7 


1 
4 
9 


11 9 2 

16 8 8 

9 12 2 


1 2 7 

2 9 8 
4 15 5 


8 14 6 
12 1 - 
18 17 8 




82 18 7 
22 4 6 






1866 
1867 
1668 
1869 
1860 


59 14 

102 6 

91 16 

94 11 

124 18 


6 

2 

4 


18 8 6 

20 16 2 
%i 6 10 
16 7 8 

21 9 10 


8 . 2 

■• 18 11 
1 « 6 
1 17 3 
1 4 11 


12 7 9 
2 18 9 
4 16 9 
6 9- 
4 7- 


1 *' * 

*865 7 6 
61 1 - 
40 5 6 
50 5 6 


17 4 10 
50 10 11 
41 19 11 
82 17 9 
84 7 10 


8 17 4 
- 15 10 
. nil . 
1 4 6 
8 3 6 




Total - £. 


1^800 9 


1 


472 12 10 i 


32 18 8 


115 7 4 


606 19 6 


887 - - 


28 5 6 




Average annual 
receipt, from 
Vd24 to 1 828 J 

incksive 


^ 10 15 


8 


6 4 4 


- nil - 


. nil . 


. nil . 


- nU . 


- nil . 




Average annual 
receipt, from 
IgStJ to 1860, 
iDclusiN^e 


I 94 18 


2 


18 18 10 


1 18 11 


6 4 8 


47 4 - 
For last three 
years only. 


85 8 8 


1 16 8 




* TMs fcinOTHjt bm 
ie&7 ittBtead of thii i 


ng obTiouily the aggt 
















Digiti2 


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)Qle 





UNDBR Mcm VBiATrmit TO HBCSPftocrrr trba.tibs, nr each year bijscb 1820, &c. 



Acts relating to Recipbocitt Treaties in eacH Tear since 1820 by the several Bodies now in Receipt 
received by each for the Five Years from 1824 to 1828, inclusive, and the Average Annual Amount received 





C&mbne- i 
Light TniilaM. | 

light Dna. 


DrogMa 
PUoti. 

PUotige. 


BubHn 
Ballast Corporation. 

Tonnage Dtiet. 


i 
Dnblin 1 

BaUaat Ditea. 


l>abUn 
Pilotage. 


Dandee» 

Lights. 

Light Does.. 


Y BAR. 




. nU 


£. s. d. 
- nU : 


£. s. 
nU' 


d. 


£. S. 

. nil 


d. 


£. s. 
nil 


d. 


£. S. d. 

nil 


1820. 








99 
99 
f9 


- 


99 


- 




- 


" 99 " 


1821. 
1822. 
1828. 




122 12 8 
8 18 2 
102 8 9| 
48 e - 


' >9 " 


99 

99 

268 18 


9 


99 

99 

99 

91 - 


10 


>* 
69 11 


6 


" 9* ' 

6 10 - 
24 11 - 

4 8 8 
12 13 8 


1^24. 
1825. 
1826. 
1827. 

1^28. 




18 16^ 6 
11 5 5 

- ml 




nil 

466 5 

ml 


1 


nil 
154 - 
nil 


9 

• 


nil 
109 11 
nU 


1 

• 


3 U H 
28 7 6 
80 2 4i 


1829. 
1830. 
1831. 




9 18 8 

156 2 - 

13 10 - 




254 8 

268 18 

nil 


8 
6 


96 10 
91 8 
nil 


10 

1 


68 19 
71 - 
nil 


10 
7 


29 16r lOj 
87 8 9 
47 7 6 


1832. 
1838. 
1834. 




45 2 -} 
86 1 6 
42r 4 n 


>1 


592 19 
182 11 


4 
6 


" 99 

280 7 
62 2 


9 

4 


145 16 
36 7 


1 


na . 

151 8 4ti 
55-9 


1835. 
1836. 
1837. 




66 5 Tl 

87 8 6 

4 9 2 


" If " 


74 19 

nil 

99 


7 


38 16 
nil 

99 


11 


21 12 
ml 


8 


39 15 6^ 
59 7 1 
54 17 10 


1838. 
1839. 
1840. 




89 IT II 
17-6 
18 - 10 




960 3 


8 


460 11 


6 


99 

305 7 


9 


87 13 - 
68 11 11 
73 17 11 


1841. 
1842. 
1843. 




. nil 

11 19 - 
. nil 




168 1 
150 4 
206 4 


4 

8 

10 


57 18 
66 10 
93 9 


11 
9 
8 


42 4 
51 6 
56 16 


2 
8 

I 


62r 18 8 
87 12 - 
87 4 10 


1844. 
1845; 
1846. 




8 la - 
• 65 17 10 




586 1 
901 18 
701 14 


9 

11 

5 


244 4 
356 8 
278 5 


8 
1 
5 


188 7 
245 6 
182 14 


8 
8 
5 


93 19 8 
90 6 7 
60 10 6 


1847. 
1848. 
1849. 




10 2 10 

34 14 1 

l,7ir 11 2 


11 'er 6 


1,000 13 
1,318 - 
1,626 10 


4 
7 
2 


420 15 
546 3 
702 17 


5 

1 
9 


278 7 
819 2 
877 10 


4 
6 

1 


88 8 7 
188 17 11 
137 5 4 


1850. 
1851. 
1852. 




391 13 3 
445 15 4 
850 8 3 


19 2 e 

10 19 - 

2 2- 


916 8 

1,280 - 

821 1 


10 
10 

7 


882 2 
548 5 
253 18 


4 
4 

I 


254 7 
358 9 
215 18 


5 
6 
4 


179 10 7 
257 5 - 
198 4 1 


1863. 
1854. 
1855. 




366 8 - 

542 6 8 
528 - 2 
621 7 11 

543 2 7 


2 8- 

4 19 - 

15 15 9 

6 16 

• nil . 


700 8 

776 18 

968 16 

1,719 4 

1,686 8 


10 

4 
4 
2 


207 6 
272 2 
826 10 
680 15 
606 10 


2 

4 

10 

5 

9 


192 18 
202 8 
258 - 
482 14 
467 6 


6 

2 

7 

11 


218 1 7 
229 15 4 
191 8 - 
211 8 8 
197 5 5 


1856. 
1857. 
1868. 
1859. 
1860. 




6,415 15 2 


72 14 8 


18,476 16 


7 


7,258 3 


7 


4,982 - 


1 


3,319 a 6i 

f 


Total. 




55 8 I 


- na . 


58 14 


9 


18 4 


2 


18 18 


4 


9 11 el 


Average annual 
receipt, firom 
1824 to 1828, 
inclusive. 




520 4 1 


5 16 10 


1,170 5 


2 


418 18 


1 


819 12 


8 


208 10 9 ^ 


Average annual 
receipt, firom 
1856 to I860, 
inclusive. 



die end of tiie TkUe, O. wttnfp amraal noeipt by tiie Botton Corporation in the last tliree yean (47 /. 4«.) lias been added in 1866 and 
'23- A 2 Digitized by Google 



COHPBNSATION FOR DIFFERENTIAL DUBS ON FOREION SHIPS RECEIVED 



YEAR. 



Graenock 
Trustees. 



Harboar Dues. 



HnU 
Corpontion. 

Harbour Daes. 



Hall 
Trinity House. 

Harboar Daes. 



HaU 
Dock Company. 

Dock Daes. 



LiTerpool 
Mersey Docks 

and 
Harboar Board. ' 

Anchorage. 



LiTerpool 
Pilots. 



PUotage. 



1820 

lesi 

1822 

1823 

1824 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1828 

1820 
1830 
1881 

1832 
1838 
1804 

1835 
1836 

1837 

1838 
183§ 
1840 

1841 
1842 
1843 

1S44 

1845 
184G 

1647 
1848 
1841* 

1830 
1851 

1862 

1853 

1854 
1855 

1855 

1857 
1858 
1859 
1860 



TOTIL - £. 



£. $. 
206 16 
856 10 
462 11 
145 18 



d. 
7 
3 
3 



142 19 10 
229 -Hi 

649 17 7^ 

S09 10 8 i 

223 6 8 1 

163 - 3 

148 - 11 J 

357 15 - 

192 7 11 J 

216 13 6 

235 6 1 

318 12 - 

240 9 6 

504 8 11 

294 16 6 

109 14 6 

81 2 5 

130 3 6 

74 11 8 

281 4 9 

7 16 8 

43 14 4 
nil 

191 3 1 

47 2 11 

123 1 10 

196 14 1 
301 - 6 

381 13 8 

345 6 4 

1,113 16 8 

582 3 6 

485 8 2 
526 12 4 

759 13 8 

1,094 19 11 

958 14 9 



13,128 15 5j| 



£. s. 
4 17 
nil 



d. 
6 



9f 

161 6 6 

1,454 19 3 

1,331 6 8 

922 9 10 

885 18 - 

1,426 10 8 

817 14 10 
1,169 6 6 

818 4 2 
957 19 8 
950 13 2 

1,067 13 - 

1,309 13 4 

988 1 8 

1,914 1 6 

2,436 7 4 

2,648 - - 

1,080 10 4 

2,527 8 7 

1,407 18 10 

2,342 10 7 

2,100 13 2 

2,609 17 6 

3,050 4 8 

2,617 2 2 

2,701 7 8 

2,616 19 10 

3,153 - 2 

2,804 8 2 

4,462 - 8 

6,441 18 4 

3,609 16 6 

3,804 18 6 

8,766 10 2 

8,356 3 11 

4,279 7 11 

4,686 19 8 



82,743 18 4 



£. $. 
1 18 
nil 

23 14 
nil 

28 17 

1,747 2 

1,706 10 

1,348 14 

1,260 10 



d. 
8 



1,877 - 8 

1,656 16 10 

2,230 6 2 

1,620 8 6 

2,874 3 - 

1,602 19 2 

1,864 12 4 

2,071 6 10 

1,823 10 - 

2,942 3 6 

4,617 9 - 

6,658 3 8 

4,216 18 6 

4,633 19 6 

4,431 11 2 

6,768 8 - 

6,629 18 4 

6,993 6 8 

6,944 13 - 

6,916 13 10 

7,006 16 10 

6,967 14 10 

7,898 18 - 

8,363 6 8 

9,798 11 - 

10,688 9 2 

8,016 2 6 

9,724 18 2 

11,607 17 6 

11,747 7 8 

12,278 1 6 

13,076 16 10 



^ £. 8. d. 

26 7 6 

13 18 3 

77 6 3 

86 6 8 

1,443 9 6 

4,340 14 8 

3,487 16 2 

3,486 4 - 

2,610 12 1 

3,287 4 1 

2,498 1 - 

8,627 18 10 

1,913 10 - 

3,328 11 4 

2,702 11 4 

8,616 6 ~ 

4,672 12 2 

4,069 9 11 

6,469 6 8 

8,069 14 11 

7,323 16 7 

6,467 19 6 

6,803 13 8 

6,421 10 1 

6,482 6 9 

6,333 17 6 

6,833 17 6 

7,917 6 8 

6,333 17 4 

4,760 8 - 

6,838 17 4 

6,333 17 4 

7,917 6 8 

6,833 17 4 

6,338 17 4 

4,760 8 - 



6,333 17 
6,333 17 
6,333 17 
6,338 17 
6,338 17 



198,529 16 - 



192,807 - 11 



£. 9. d. 

nil . 



f9 



9f 



9} 

n 

99 

99 
99 

99 

» 

99 



11 10 6 

13 11 - 

16 13 8 

13 9 3 

16 17 6 

13 12 6 

16. 3 8 

16 6 

24 8 6 

26 7 - 

19 1 6 



19 13 
21 17 

21 19 

22 19 

23 6 



294 17 - 



£. s. i 

1,249 6 9 

1,269 16 6 

1,689 7 - 

1,648 8 9 



7,766 10 
7,646 16 
8,510 3 
8,662 8 
9,031 7 



1,691 18 
1,628 1 
8,907 19 
2,774 - 
2,076 8 



2,187 19 6 

1,939 13 - 

3,148 17 9 

2,381 16 3 

2,272 10 9 

2,769 8 6 

2,274 6 9 

2,866 8 6 

8,370 18 - 

8,635 8 6 

3,644 6 - 

4,840 8 9 

8,607 16 - 

8,214 13 - 

8,798 - - 

8,008 1 6 

3,972 - 9 

4,339 - 3 

6,070 1 9 

4,648 15 - 

6,866 7 6 

4,377 18 - 

6,648 6 3 

6,431 12 3 

7,782 11 3 

8,689 18 3 

7,129 18 6 



171,775 18 - 



ATorafire annual 
receipt, from 
1824 to 1828> 
incluBive 



Average annual 
receipt, from 
1850 to I860, 
kolasive 



1 



200 19 2 



949 3 10 



766 1 9 



3,876 11 



1,216 7 



11,666 16 4 



8,063 11 3 



6,388 17 4 



nil 



21 19 2 



2.894 9 8 



8,828 6 3 



Digitized by 



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UNDBR ACTS HELATINO TO RECIPROCITT TREATIES, IN BACH YEAR SINCE 1820, &C* 



Lortwithiel | L jmi 

(Fowej) Corponitioo. 
Corponitiao. 

HariioarDves. Town Duet. 



- nU - 



19 

it 



if 
if 
if 

if 
a 
f* 

ff 

fi 

f9 

if 
if 



f* 

if 



if 
9> 



2 2- 

1 18 8 

3 13 8 

1 2 8 

2 4- 
2 Id 4 
1 4 - 
6 4 8 
8 - - 



. nil . 

fi 
if 

6 11 10 
88-6 

84 12 8} 

84 18 11 

10 7 8 

11 - - 
81-9 

20 9 2 

16 12 1 

19 9 11 

19 6 11 

36 12 6 
66-8 

40 8 2 
64 8 - 
71 16 - 

82 7 2 

. nil . 

181 9 8 

38 8 8 

110 16 1 

- nil - 

224 10 - 

130 12 2 

69 8 7 

. nU . . 

98 17 1 

41 10 4 

88-8 

47 2 9 

68 6 7 

88 11 7 

46 6 7 

66 17 11 
69-7 

60 6 8 



LTnn 
Commiatiooen. 



Mooring Does. 



Lynn 
PUoto. 

Pilotiige. 



NewcMtle 
Corpontioo. 

Toim Dnet. 



Newcastle, 

Dnkeof 

Northnmberland. 



Neweaitle, 
Free Uoetmen* 



YEAR. 



Ancbor^e. Hottmen'e Dnet. 



£. t. d. 

nil . 



f* 

ff 



I 16 11 
. nil 

21^0 4} 

12 9 8 
7 4 3 

24 1 1 

II 10 8 

13 19 - 
18 19 10 

12 8 2 
23-6 

38 7 8 

26 17 8 

42 6 10 

41 10 7 

6S 14 9 

. nil - 

169 4 1 

64 6 6 

140 16 - 
. nil . 

260 16 1 

146 16 9 

78 8 4 

- nil . 

141 9 2 
60 13 4 

38 10 1 

32 18 10 

41 16 1 

28 2 8 

22 6 8 

80 13 - 

22 7 3 
nil 



23 2 - 1,893 - 6} 1,603 18 9} 



nU . 

fi 

8 16 9 

84 2 8 

96 18 6 

63 4 - 



38 - 7i 
21 17 6 
68 10 7} 

88 19 6 
38 17 lOi 
48 19 - 

84 7 9 
67 4 lOi 

89 2 - 

74 2 1 
125 1 1 
124 4 - 

168 8 - 

. nil - 

264 10 11 

84 13 7 

186 14 3 

. nil . 

828 10 6 
188 8 4 

92 16 1 

- nU . 
181 4 3 
122 12 10 

118 19 9 
116 4 3 
136 14 - 

93 8 3 
109 11 6 
146 - 10 

128 2 9 

129 11 7 



3,641 



- 



£. t. 
nil 



668 11 8 

1,139 9 2 

1,026 1 8 

777 16 8 

1,1&9 6 8 

668 1 - 

1,271 19 - 

1,030 6 6 

1,298 14 - 

1,166 - 8 

1,463 14 2 

1,823 6 6 

2,290 11 - 

3,026 7 8 

3,473 17 8 

3,289 7 6 

3,756 8 6 

4,011 - 2 

3,624 6 10 

4,395 14 10 

5,462 - 

7,221 3 6 

2,787 17 4 

8,389 13 6 

3,120 2 - 

3,431 2 10 

3,793 3 - 

3,478 - 6 

4,334 1 6 

5,891 3 10 

6,806 12 4 



6,368 4 
6,804 12 
6,222 18 
10,445 17 
7,817 6 



10 

4 
8 
6 



126,703 3 6 



nil 



d. 



fi 
fi 

if 

7 16 - 

22 9 - 

19 15 - 

25 8 - 

19 8 - 

25 10 - 
28 8 - 

24 19 - 

21 12 - 

26 16 - 

24 16 - 

84 19 - 

43 - - 

61 3 - 

61 12 - 

04 19 - 

67 6 - 

73 12 - 

66 12 - 

72 1 - 

nil - 



289 10 
108 13 
103 6 

96 18 
112 2 
- nil 

if 
245 3 

188 8 

•310 9 
164 14 

189 12 
192 13 
204 18 



2,982 



£. $. 


d. 




nil 


- 


1820. 


fi 


• 


1821. 


fi 


• 


1822. 


if 


- 


1823. 


fi 


- 


1824. 


7 9 


4 


1826. 


26 10 


- 


1826. 


19 16 


- 


1827. 


25 8 


4 


1828. 


19 8 


. 


1829. 


28 8 


« 


1880. 


31 13 


4 


1831. 


34 11 


4 


1832. 


20 3 


4 


1833. 


26 1 


8 


1834. 


27 6 


4 


1835. 


34 7 


8 


1836. 


42 18 


8 


1887. 


26 10 


«. 


1838. 


28 11 


4 


1839. 


38 9 


4 


1840. 


80 12 


8 


1841. 


36 1 


- 


1842. 


33 16 


- 


1843. 


48 3 


^ 


1844. 


32 11 


4 


1846. 


44 8 


4 


1846. 


41 19 


4 


1847- 


37 4 


8 


1848. 


29 6 

9 


- 


1849. 


27 4 


_ 


1860. 


SI 16 


8 


1851. 


nil 


• 


1852. 



1863. 
58 15 - 1854. 
nU - 1856. 



t98 8 8 

80 7 4 

23 ff 8 

21 2 - 

38 13 8 



1856. 
1867. 
1858. 
18^9. 
1860. 



1,100 1 - Total. 



• nil 



2 17 2 



81 16 9 



63 16 6 



4 18 3 



40 12 1 



20 13 9 



121 3 - 



722 3 10 



7,331 15 8 



15 1 7 



184 3 - 



16 12 9 



28 18 10 



Average annual 
receipt, from 
1824 to 1828, 
inclusive. 



Average annual 
receipt, from 
1866 to 1860, 
inclusive. 



* Of tide sum, 141 iL 6 •• was for the yetr 1854, and has therefore been exefaided in taking the aTerage. 

t Of this nan, 661. 18 «. was fbr the yean 1863 and 1854, and has therefore been exdnded in taking the average. 



123. 



A3 



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1 
6 COMPENSATION FOR DIFFERENTIAL DUES ON FOHEIGN SHIPS 


RECEIVED 


-| 


YEAR. 




NewCBtotle 
Trinity House. 


1 Ncwrcaaile 
Truiitj House* 


Stockton 
Pilota. 


Port Glasgow 
CommisBiouera. 


BochesUir 
CorpoFatioDir 


Coqforatioa^ 








Lifhta. 


Pilotage, 


Pilotage. 


HarbDur Doe?. 


Anchorage. 


Ao^enge. 




1820 
1821 
1822 
1823 


- 


- 9 8 

nil 

" 9 1 


nil 

ft 
ft 


£. *, d. 

nil 

' tf ^ 


je. Jf. d. 

nil 


£- s, d. 

- nil ^ 

^t 
~ y* ' 

^ tt ' 


- nil - 
tt 

~ It " 

ti 


1824 
1825 
1826 
1827 
1828 




22-4 

lOT tl 3 

69 15 8 
52 7 1 


if 
31 5 1 
319 6 6 

407 - 3 
301 14 3 


40 "5 4| 
30 10 6 
25 6 ' 

27 2 - 


~ ft ' 
266" 6 6 


' tt ' 
n 


' 3t * 
h 

ft * 1 
rt 




1829 
1830 

1831 

■ 




71 3 2 
38 18 5 
83 18 8 


437 7 ft 
256 8 9 

634 7 9 


19 15 3 

14 5 - 
28 14 - 


65 12 " 

48 9 
nil 


86 14 - 

15 8 ^ 

16 18 - 


* ft * 




1832 
1833 
1834 




05 13 6 
m 15 10 
71 17 10 


444 7 9 

489 17 3 
484 Ifl -- 


38 6 - 
17 16 - 
27 3 9 


42 13 9 
47 7 9 
- nil 


11 2 - 
1 16 ^ 

4 12 - 


ft * 
ft 




1835 
1836 
1837 




78-7 

93 13 10 

117 10 1 


693 7 6 
717 8 3 
873 18 9 


16 1 3 
23 3 ' 

84 1 6 


44 18 - 

nil 
44 4 - 


7 16 - 
15 2 - 

- nil - 


14 7 - 

2 14 - 
2 13 - 




1838 
1839 

1840 




160 10 10 
190 17 3 

204 6 1 


1,218 2 6 
1,431 7 3 
i,485 ]S - 


154 11 - 

606 2 6 

410 15 - 


nil 

61 10 9 

nil 


16 12 - 

- nil - 
10 8 - 


1 7 - 

2 4- 
8 1^ 




1841 
1842 

1843 

1844 
1846 
1840 




198 18 10 
189 - 11 
1G3 12 4 

168 18 11 
197 18 JO 
289 18 3 


1,615 13 3 
1,036 8 6 

1,082 2 9 

1,784 6 9 
2,390 U 1 
3,6G3 14 3 


221 9 - 
Asanmed to hafe 
been hericefor^ 
ward iududed id 
" PLJotage^' paid 
to the Newcastle 
TfiniEy H(#^ae. 


103 6 3 
nil 

70 "3 4 
nil 


^ nil - 
6 2- 

- nil ^ 

9 14 - 

^ nil > 
18 « - 


4 2^ 

7 8- 

5 11 - 

3 2- 

S » - 

- nil - 




1847 

1848 
1849 




241 17 1 

274 ] 11 

193 16 11 

p 


3,140 3 10 
3^620 14 3 
2,403 5 9 




19 16 - 
nil 
' ft ' 


. nil - 
13 14 - 


11 ^ - 
6 IS - 
9 10 - 




1850 
1851 
1862 




321 B 3 
231 18 7 
261 6 10 


6,179 13 10 
5,78.j \ii 2 
6,982 14 7 


t9 


- 

■ 8 10 7 


3 6- 

^ nil - 
S 14 - 


14 10 - 
14 ^ - 

16 1:^ - 




1863 

1854 
1855 




321 8 5 
437 1 7 
347 4 2 


7,021 a a 

8,987 2 * 
8,742 17 4 


'1 


26 3 1 

103 1 2 

2*^ 4 " 


- nil - 

10 IS - 

- nil ^ 


37 S - 

19 n - 

- nil * 




1856 
1857 

1858 
1859 
1S60 




364 2 9 
369 14 1 
41G 14 9 
426 2 10 
410 9 2 


7,610 10 3 
7,490 3 3 
8,818 10 3 
8,977 19 I 
8,683 6 7 


7p 
if 

3f 

1 


8 18 - 

20 2 8 

46 13 10 

174 8 8 

92 16 9 


7 ^ ~ 

- nil ^ 

8 18 - 

- ni[ . 
12 8 


36 19 - 
17 1* ^ 
15 8 - 
26 3 * 
J9 15 ^ 




Total - £. 


7,311 4 7 


116,028 


8 11| 


1,319 16 7 


291 2 - 


301 5 ^ 


Averaj^e annual 
recetptj from 
1824 to 1828 


^ 


60 5 6 


336 : 


12 » 


51 5 4 


^ nil . 


- ml - 


Average annual 
receipt, from 
1860 to 1860 
in elusive 


1 


397 4 9 


8»296 

• 


1 11 


68 12 - 


6 13 2 1 


23 S 10 


♦ In calcuUting the ftTerage total reodpt f 
be«ti added J in 1857, 365/, 7 m. 6rf, (Bustoii 


or tlie last five jeare, the 
CorfKiratioa, Tounsge I! 


totals for 1B56 and 1857 ha^e bteo varied ae follows; v»a,, in 1856, Ul 1. 6f- 
uea) bta b»ea dtsdueted, and 47 L 4 1, (on the ume account) haa been added i 


N6i€. — The sumi piid to the bodici men 

whole annual chum would not aow be less 


doned in the subie^^nent 
tJmi 140,000 Jl, atid tl 


part of tbia Return amounted in or abont 1826 to 16,000 f. or apmrds, m 
le aggregate amount which would have been paid would bare been betw«i» 








Digitized by Google • 












f 


J 



UNDER ACTS ReiATINO TO RECIPROCITY TRZATTES, IN XACH Yl^AJt SINCE 1820, &C. 





Shorebtm 
CoqKjrttioD. 


Soutbmmptoa 


SoQthwold 
harbour 


Stockton 
Corpontion. 


Wisbeach 
Corpontioii. 


TOTAL. 


YEAR. 




Harbour Does. 


HarbMirBMt. 


Dmm. 


Town/DMi. 


HokNirDi 


WM. 










9f 


d. 


£. s. d. 
. ml . 


£. s. d. 
. ml . 


£. s. 
- nil 

99 


d. 


£. S. 

- ml 


d. 


£. s. 
1,488 15 
1,640 5 
2,103 '» 
1,730 8 


d. 

» 

8 
8 


1820. 
1821. 
1822. 
1823. 




127 ''5 

60 15 

102 10 


7 


17 8 4 

18 16 4 
51 19 - 
22 15 4 


2 4 4 

8 17 6 

. nil . 


3 5 
2 12 
2 - 
2 10 


6 


4 - 
22 13 
• nil 
99 


3 
8 


8,458 10 
10,243 16 
13,017 - 
10,748 4 

^4.79 18 


8 
2 

6i 
1 I 
^1 


1824. 
1825. 
1826. 
1827. 
1828. 




96 2 

108 J 4 

80 12 


a 

6J 


50 17 4 
16 6 10 
84 15 2 


1 18 - 

- nil . 

6 5 5 


1 12 

1 2 

2 5 


6 
6 


82 16 

- nil 


6 


11,078 7 

9,042 9 

12,702 16 


41 
10 J 


1829. 
1830. 
1881. 




183 2 
116 9 


5i 

Hi 
10 


TO - 4 
13 4 « 
18 18 10 


- nil . 
99 


8 2 
1 5 

1 17 


6 


24 6 
17 18 
'9 18 


3 
3 


9,492 10 
12,034 2 
10,320 10 


8J 

If 
10 i 


1832. 
1833. 
1834. 




159 7 
188 8 
169 12 


5| 

7 j 

10 1 


50 4 - 
31 8 4 
35 16 - 


- 17 - 

- 10 4 
4 17 8 


1 5 

2 2 
8 15 


6 


8 18 

8 2 

10 10 


8 
8 


11,755 6 
15,324 15 
15,012 2 


5i 
104 

1« 


1885. 
1836. 
1837. 




104 6 
103 17 
121 9 


1 


96 18 10 
56 19 a 
42-10 


. nil . 

8 6 10 

14 18 - 


11 12 
49 5 

ai 5 


6 


17 19 
8 6 
6 14 


9 


19,384 18 
25,393 - 
26»212 .6 


9| 
6 

1 


1838. 
1839. 
1840. 




162 14 
99 9 
96 7 


8 
9 

4 


117 6 6 

196 18 4 

39 18 8 


5 13 1 

6 12 - 

- nil . 


18 7 
nil 


6 


18 5 

14 14 

9 1 


9 


22,158 11 
22,824 -8 
24,409 19 


1 

1 


1841. 
1842. 
1843. 




105 15 
218 16 
278 4 


4 
7 
J 


14 5 2 
61 17 10 
22 7 8 


" 99 ' 

6 ^ .6 

. ml . 


24 12 
A9 10 
49 7 


6 
6 


8 5 
39 8 
34 14 


8 
>9 
3 


25,787 19 
27,481 6 
82,275 4 


8 


1844. 
1845. 
1846. 




484 6 
264 8 
459 10 


8 
6 
6 


59 6 8 

57 15 8 

237 4i 10 


19 4 8 

7 18 6 

. vSL . 


58 17 
55 12 
98 10 


6 
6 


49 - 

138 12 

16 4 


8 
8 


32,284 18 
29,611 - 
28,129 7 


2 

11 

9 


1847. 
1848. 
1849. 


J 


339 7 
508 1 
504 9 


4 
1 


183 12 4 

laa 9 - 

161 19 6 


^9 


18 12 
70 12 
58 - 


6 
6 


43 18 
51 7 
74 2 


6 
9 
9 


Al<855 16 
88,014 2 
41,310 9 


:6 
10 

1 


1850. 
1851. 
1852- 


I 


409 4 
463 10 
378 ^ 


4 



120 15 6 
826 18 B 
227 17 i^ 


' 99 " 

^ f9 ' 
' 99 ' 


45 7 
70 16 
44 12 


6 
6 


66 19 
88 11 


9 
•9 
8 


43,605 13 
592,019 - 
39,998 16 


3 
•5 

7 


1853. 
1854- 
1855* 




286 6 
819 2 
358 19 
454 18 
308 8 


6 
4 
2 
5 



172 9 4 

500 9 7 

208 1 8 

- nil - 

f9 — 


9-10 
- nil - 


56 12 
' 71 2 
77 2 
66 17 
YO - 


6 
6 
6 
6 


74 11 

106 14 

63 16 

93 7 

145 1 


8 
9 
3 
9 


• 44,883 8 

•48,448 i4 

48,917 4 

57,679 13 

55,906 2 


10 

11 

8 


1856. 
1857. 
1858. 
1859. 
1860. 


' 


8,439 - 


83 


8,288 9 4 


96 17 8 


1,045 10 


- 


1,372 11 


- 


978,914 6 


J6i 


Total. 




58 2 


JS 


.22 8 10 


1 4 4 


2 1 


6 


5 6 


8 


9,329 9 


■■ 


Average annual 
receipt, from 
1824 to 1828, 
inclusive. 




857 16 


— 


176 4 - 


1 16 f 


68 7 


- 


96 U 


2 


•61/)71 2 


- 


Average annual 
receipt, from 
1850 to 1860, 
inclusive. 



(Kewcwtle ADcliorage),aiid 66/. 18 «. (IQewoutle, Hottaen'i D«m)» bare been dedacted, and 47/. 4«. (Botton Corporation, Tonnage Dnet) has 
the leaions will be fouMi fartbe notes to the dmet in qnettion. 



IfiOOfiOai «id3,060,)aD(U. 



to the present time, and hid 



in Ike mam -proportion as those giren in the above Tables, the 



123. 



A4 



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s 



CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION FOR DIFFERENTIAL DUES 



RETURN of the Claims for Compensation for Differential Dues on Foreign Ships, 
ceased, with the Causes or Presumed Causes of their Cessation. 



Port or Place, 



Aberdcea * 

Belfast 
Belfast 

Belfast 

Bristol 

Burnham - 
Cinque Port 

Clyde 

Colchester - 
Dntidea 

iEyeoioutli - 

Fern - 

Flatholra - 
Forelands - 
Galway 



Grangemonth 

Harwich - 
HuU - - 



D<*cfiptioii of Dotf * 



il 



Harbour Dues - 

Ballast Dues - 

Harbour Dues - 

Pilotage Dues • 

Pllotaga - 
Light 
Pilotage * 

Pilotage - 

Channel Dues 
Harbour Dues 



': 



In whom Vested, 



Harbour Dues 

Lights • 
Ligbt 
Light 
Pilotage - 



Forth and Clyde 
Navigation Dues, 



Lights 



Pilotage 



Proprietor 
Pilots - 



Date of 

Vim 

PajmeDt. 



Commission era 



Corporation for pre- 
servingand improv- 
ing ihe Port and 
Harbour of Belfast. 

Corporation for pre- 
ser V in g an d i m pro v- 
inj^ the Port and 
Harbourof Belfast, 

Corporation for pre- 
serving and improv- 
ing the Port and 
Harbour of Belfast 

Pilots - 



Lessee - - - 
Pilots - 

Pilots * * - 

Commissioners 

Trustees - - - 

Harbour Trustees - 

Lessee - - - 



The Company of Pro- 
prietors of the Forth 
and Clyde Naviga- 
tion. 

Proprietor 

Commissioners for 
executing Act 2 & 
a Will, 4, c, 105, 



D&leof 
Lait 

Pafmeat, 




1826 

1831 
1831 

1831 

1820 

Ig^O 
1820 

18^0 

1824 

I 

183S 

I 

1820 
1320 

1820 
18S9 



1844 



1831 



1831 



1831 

1820 

1822 



1838 
1829 

1826 

1859 

1832 

1830 

1840 

1825 
1S27 
1833 

1841 



CaaMS or Presumed Caiutt of their Cemtioit, 



1851 

1837 

1832 



Treasury Letter, 31st March 1819, 
Act V%k7 Vict, c* 72j s.a50 (oil Act 
for imprOTing and maintaining the 
Harbour), 

Act 1 & 2 Will, 4, c. 5o, s. 131 (an M 

for the further improvement of the 
Port). 

Act 1 & 2 Will, 4, c, 55, s* 13 1 (an An 
for ti>e further improvement of the 
Port). 



1831 Act l&O Will, 4, c. ^5, s. 131 (an Art 
for the further improvement of tLe 
Port). 



Volimtarilr dbcon tinned, 39th Septem* 
ber 1837p 

Purchased by Trinity Corporation^ Au- 
gust 1M29. 

Abolished ; see 6 Geo. 4^ c. 125 (Put, 
lie General Act for (he ameufbnml 
of the law respecting Pilotage, &c*)^ 
B. 25, and Schedule A. 

Differejitial Pllotaj^e Dues at Portl 
in the Clyde, ceased from and aAv 
11 April' 1859, as per Bye-law« q| 
Clyde Pilot Board, 

No claim for payment since 1832^ rea^ 
son unknown, 

11 Geo. 4, c, 119, s. 52 (an Act for 

more effectually maintaining, improv* 
ing and extending the Harbour of 

Dundee). 

2 Vict. c. 36, s. 28 (an Act for mom 

cfiFectually repairing, improTing and 
mainfaining the Harbour of Eye- 
mouth). 

Purchased by Trinity Corporation, De- 
cember 1824, 

Purchased by Trinily Cori>oratioD| 

xMarch 1823. 

Transfernid to Trinity Corporation, 1*1 
July 1832, 

Uncertain] but* as regards the pvmesi 
lirocj the Act 18 & 17 Vict, c- 207 
('< The Galway Harbour and Port 
Act, 1853*'), s, 4j incorporates tha 
Harbours Clauses Act, 1847 (10 & 
11 Vict c, 27, Public General )l 

4 & 5 Vict. c. 66, s. 205 (Con soli datioii 
of Act^ relating to the Fortl* aal 
Clyde Navigation), 

Purchased by Trinity Corporation^ Ul 
January 1837, 

2 & 3 WilL 4, c- 106, Schedule (an AH 
for better regulating the Pilotage oi 
the Port of HuU and of the ftrrrt 



Humber). 



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ON FOREIGN SHIPS WHICH HAVE CEASED. 





DcMriptfon of Daty. 


In whom Veited. 


Date of 

Pint 

Payment. 


Date of 
Last 

Fa]rment. 


Causes or Presnmed Causes of their CesMitioii. 


Hull. 


Dock Dues 


Hull Dock Company, 
composition effected 
in 1847. 


1820 


1846 


A^eement effected with the Treasury, 
m consequence of Dock CompanyV 
refusal to make a new Dock, much 
wanted, if their Differential Dues 
were taken from them. 


HuMtanton 


light . - 


Lessees - - - 


1825 


1837 


Purchased by Trinity Corporation, 
1 January 1887. 


Ip0wi<^ 


Local Dues, pre- 
sumed to be 
anchorage. 


Water Bailiff - 


1826 


1844 


See Report of Shipping Dues Com- 
mission, England, Appendix B., 
page 269. 


Ipswich 


Pilotage • 


Pilots . 


1826 


1844 


Act 1 Vict c. 74, s. 47 (Repealing 
former Act, and appointing Dock 
Commissioners, &c.). 


Ipswich 


River Dues 


Ipswich Dock Com- 
missioners, 


1826 


1887 


Act 1 Vict. c. 74, s. 47 (Repealimj 
former Act, and appointing Dock 
Commissioners, &;c.). 


Irish - 


Lights 


Port of Dublin Cor- 
poration. 


1820 


1837 


Act 6 & 7 Will. 4, c. 79, s. 41 (Public 
General Act for making provisions 
respecting Lighthouses, &a, and 
Lighthouse Tolls). 


Leith . 


Dock and Har- 
bour Dues. 


Lord Provost - 


1820 


1848 


Treasury Letter, 81st March 1849. 

The Act 10 Vict, c 25, to abolish, re- 
duce, equalize, and consolidate the 
rates and duties leviable at Leith, 
incorporates the Harbours Clauses 
Act, 1847. 


Leith. 


Anchorage 




1821 


1821 


Uncertain J but in the year 1820 was 
passed an Act for ehe regulation of 
the Corporation of the Trinity House 
of Leith, 1 Geo. 4, c. 87. 


Lundondeny 


Harbour Dues - 


Ballast Committee - 


1828 


1856 


Act 17 & 18 Vict 0. 177 (Lbndonderry 
Port and Harbour Act, 1854). 


Jiondondeny 


Quay Dues 


Corporation • 


1828 


1844 


Ceased 11th June 1844. Seethe Act 
2 & 8 Will. 4, c. 107 (to make 
more effectual provision for lighting, 
cleansing, and watching the City of 
Londonderry), s. 62. The Act 17 & 
1 8 Vict. c. 1 77 (Londonderry Port and 
Harbour Act, 1854), incorporates the 
Harbours Clauses Act, 1847. 


Londonderry 


Pilotage • 


Pilots - - - 


1830 


1856 


Abolished; Act 17 & 18 Vict c. 177 
(Consolidation of Acts relating to 
Londonderry). 


Longships • 


Light 


Lessee - - - 


1820 


1837 


Purchased by Trinity Corporation, 
26 March 1886. 


Mumbles - 


Light 


Lessees - - . 


1825 


1829 


No claim for payment since 1829 ; rea- 
son unknown. 


Northern - 


Lights . . 


Commissioners of 
Northern Light- 
houses. 


1820 


1837 


Act 6 & 7 Will. 4, c. 79, s. 41 (Public 
General Act for making provisions 
respecting Lighthouses, &c and 
Lighthouse Tolls). 


Penzance - 


Harbour Dues - 


Mayor, &c. 


1883 


1843 


Abolished by Order in Council, 25 
February 1841. See 3 Vict. c. 72, 
s. 47 (an Act amendinjr a former 
Act imposing Rates and Dues). 


Plymonth - 


Harbour Dues - 


Sutton Pool Corpora- 
tion. 


1826 


1861 


Abolished. See Act 10 & n Vict. 
c. 297 (for improving the Harbour 
of Sutton Pool), which incorporates 
the Harbours Clauses Act, 1847. 


Plymouth - 


Citadel Dues - 


Governor 


1827 


1885 


No claim for payment since 1885. 


Portsmonth 


Local Dues 


Governor 


1825 


1836 


Abolished by Treasury Order, 9th Fo 
bruary 1836. 


Portsmouth 


Harbour Dues • 


Corporation - 


1825 


1840 


Act 2 & 8 Vict. c. 72, s. 69 (An A<. 
for enlarging the Town Quay ai . 
improving part of the Harbour o: 
Portsmouth). 



123. 



B 



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CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION FOR DIFFERENTIAL DUBS WHICH HAVB CEASED, 



Port or Pkce, 



Ramsgate - 
Skerriea - 

Sligo- 

BUgo- 

Bmdlfl 
Spurn 
Stoclctoa • 

Tinniouth - 
Tinmoutb - 
Triiiitj House 
Trinity Hotue 

Trinitj Hoase 

Trinity House 

W&teribrd - 
Waterford - 
Waterford - 
Wisbeach - 



Yarmouth 



Descriptktn of Dutj, 



Harbour Dues - 

Light 

Harbour Dues * 

Pilotage - 

Light 

Light 

Tees Navigation 
Dues. 

Light 

Local Diiee 
Ballast - 
Lights 

Pilotage - 

Trinity Dues - 



In whoEn Veated, 



Date of 

First 



Date of 

Lost 
Pajmeat. 



Trastees - 

Proprietor 
Com in issi oners 

Commissioners 

Leasees * 

Proprietors 
Commissioners 



Proprietor 

Castle Governor 

Corporation of Trinity 
House J London* 

Corporation of Trinity 
House, London. 

Corporation of Trinity 
House, London. 



Corporation of Trimly 
liouse, London- 



Ballast Dues - Commissioners 



1920 
1820 

1828 

ir2S 

1820 
1821 
1&25 



Harbour Dues 



Pilotage 



Commisflionera 



Commissioners 



Pilotage 



Harbour Duef 



Pilots 



Commissioners 



1820 
182G 

1620 
1820 

IS30 

1830 

18*29 
1829 
1820 
1825 



1842 



1846 



1846 



1837 



1841 



1834 



1825 



1B41 



1840 



1823 



1823 



1823 



1823 



184G 



1847 



1847 



1861 



1848 



Board ofTrude^ 

10 April 1861. 



CaoBei or Presumed Caoiefl of tbctf Cetttlka. 



1 



1823 Helinquished in 1823. 



Purchased by Trinity Corporation, Ut 
October 1841. 

Act Vict, c- 24, s, 16 (for improvinEr 
and maintaining the Harbonr of 
Sligo). 

Act Vict. c. 24 J s, 16 (for irnprovm^ 
and maintaining the Harbour of 
Sligo). 

Purchased by Trinitv Corporation, 2M 
March 1835. 

Purchased bv Trinity Corporation, 1st 
April 184]'. 

AbolishedlBt January 1834; 9 Geo, 4, 
c. 97 (An Act to enable the Tees 
Navip^rion Company to make a Na- 
vigable Cut into tht* River Tees, near 
Newport), 

Purchased by Trinity Corporation, lit 
January 1841. 

Purchased by Trinity CorporatioUj U\ 
January 1641. 

Voluntarily relinquished in 18S3. 

Voluntarily relinquiHhed in 1825* 8m 
subsequent Act 6 k 7^WilL 4 (Public 
General), c, 79, s, 31. 

Voluntarily relinquished in 1823. Bu 
subsequent Act 6 & 7 Will 4 (Public 
General), c* 79j s. 31, 

Voluntarily relinquished in 1823. 84^ 
subisequenl Act 6 & 7 Will. 4 (Public 
General), c. 79, 8.31, 

Act 9 &; 10 Vict c, 292, 9. 58 (for im- 
proving, maintaining, better regii- 
bting, &c. the Port and Harbour of 
Waterford), 

Act 9 &, 10 Vict, c- 292, s. 58 (for im- 
proving, maintaining, better regu- 
lating, &c. the Port and Harbour of 
Waterford), 

Act 9 & 10 Vict. c. 292, s. 58 (for Im- 
pfoving, mafntaming, better re- 
lating, &c. the Port and Harbour of 
Waterford), 

The grounds of the cessation of dita 
claim are not apparent j but as tbf 
Wisbeach pilotage is under tb^ jnris- 
diction of the Trinily House of Hull, 
the cessation may* perhaps, be in 
connexion with the '* Hull Dues Act, 
1852" (15 & 16 Vict^ c- 136\ of the 
Act for the improvement of the River 
Nene (15 & 16 Vict, c 128). 

Bee the Act 5 & 6 Will 4, c, 49, i. Ih 
(for improving Great Yarmouth Hi* 
ven), and the Act 12 & 13 Vict, c 48, 
which incorporates the Harbaur* 
Clauses Act, 1847. 



Edgar A* Bownng, 

Eegistrar- 



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LIGHTHOUSES. ABROAD, 



STATEMENT of the Amount expended in the Construction, Repair, and Maintenance 
of Lighthouses in British Possessions Abboad, for which Tolls are levied 
under the Merchant Shipping Act Amendment Act (18 & 19 Vict c 91), and the 
Amount of Tolls received from the Year 1856 to the Slet March 1861. 



CAPE RACE LIGHTHOUSE. 



Constbuction : 














For cost of Construction of Lighthouse 

TVarAllincra . . . . _ 


and Erection of Lightkeepers' 


£. 
7,358 


s, 
18 


d. 

7 












Maintenance: 










1 
For Cost of Maintenance from the date of the Exhibition 
of Light to the 3. let March 1858 - . - - 


£. s. d. 
893 3 - 








Ditto - - ditto - - 1859 


- 


1 


487 10 1 








Ditto . - ditto . - 1860 


- 


- 


337 2 11 








Ditto - - ditto • . 1861 






545 3 5 


2,262 


19 








u 


Tolls Receivep : 










For Tolb received to 3l8t March 1858 - 


- 


- 


249 12 4 








Ditto . . ditto - - 1859 - 


- 


- 


565 5 3 








Ditto - - ditto - - 1860 - 


- 


- 


485 8 8 








Ditto - - ditto - - 1861 - 


- 


- 


1^60 13 8 


2,560 


19 


11 



The Light waa exhibited on Ist December 1856, aild a toll of l-16th of a penny per 

ton is levied. 



Board of Trade,! 
28 June 1861. J 



(signed) H. R. Williams, Accountant 



513- 



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MERCANTILE MARINE FUND. 



18 6 0. 



AN ACCOUNT of the Mercantile Marine Fund, under the Act 
17 & 18 Vict. cap. 104, sec. 429, showing the Income and Expendituee 
for the Year 1860. 



(PRESENTED PURSUANT TO ACT OF PARLIAMENT.) 



Ordered^ by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
28 June 1861. 



387. 

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INCOME AND EXPENDITURE OF THE MERCANTILE MARINE FUND, I860. 



AN ACCOUNT of the MERCANTILE MARINE FUND,amder the Act 17 & 18 Vict. c. 104, showing 

of Net Income since Received, and how the same 



RECEIPTS. 



For Balances on hand 1st January 1860, as shown in preceding Aeeonnt 



For Interest received on Exchequer Bills and on Shipping Masters' Accounts 
at Local Banks .--.. 



For Excess of Income over Working Expenditure for the Year ending 31st 
December 1860, as shown in Account (A.) in the Appendix, page 4 - 



£. 



EXCHEaUBB BILLS. 



£. «. d. 

820,000 - - 



820,000 - - 



CASH. 



£. s. d. 

56,750 15 9 

7,012 15 11 

90,021 1 1 



158,798 12 9 



SEAMEN'S MONEY ORDERS. 



STATEMENT of the Money Orders issued to Seamen, and paid to them and their Families at the 
Shipping Offices, under the 177th Section of the Merchant Shipping Act, from the Year 1855 to 1860, 
both Years inclusive. 





ISSUED. 


PAID. 




Numbez* 


AnoaaU 


Number. 


Amount; 






£. s. d. 




£. ^ ^ 


From 1 May to 81 December 1855 - - - - 


4,640 


76,952 4 4 


4,461 


74,664 12 6 


In - - 1856 ... - 


12,072 


139,495 - 4 


12,095 


140,417 - 10 


In . - 1857 . - . - 


15,606 


188,661 8 5 


15,549 


188,045 19 2 


In - - 1858 - - - - 


21,298 


154,001 18 IQ 


21,251 


153,945 1 - 


In - - 1859 - . - - 

• 


25,119 


160,649 12 11 


25,088 


160,240 - - 


In . . 1860 . - • . 


98»M1 


I >Mv925 11 8 


28,424 


170,485 16 9 




101,1 U 


884,685 16 1 
^ 8i^798 10 8 


106,818 


832,798 10 8 




Outstanding 81 Dec, 1860. 




298 


1,887 5 10 



Board of Traded 
26 June 1861. J 



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INCOMB AND mPSNDITURB OF THX MIKCANTILB MARINS FUND, 1860. 



the Balance of Cash and the Amount of Exohbquer Bills held on 1st January 1860, with the Amount 
has been appropriated^ Viade up to the 3 1st December I860. 



PAYMENTS. 



BXOHSaUBE BILLS. 



CASH. 



Paid three Instahnents of Debt, due from the Port of Dublin Corporation^ 
to the Treasury -*-------.- 



5. d 



Paid Pensions granted by the Trinity House Corporation before the 
Ist October 1868, for 4 Quarters *-- 



Paid for New Works in Building lighthouses, Jcc, as shown in Statement (B.) 
in the Appendix, page 5--------- 



Paid Expenses of Investigations into the conduct of Masters and Mates 

Paid Expenses of Life Boats, Apparatus for saying Life, and Gratuities &r 
saving Lives during the year 1860 -- 

By Balance unappropriated ..•..----- 



820,000 - - 



£. f. d. 

11,076 18 6 

9,626 2 7 

40,630 9 8 

380 19 3 

6,861 17 6 

86,308 6 4 



320,000 - - 



168,793 12 9 



PASTictJLABS of the abovc Balakcb: 
In the hands of the Paymaster- General ... 



320,000 - - 



Shipping Masters 



„ Trinity Hovse Corporation - - - - 

„ Port of Dublin Corporation . - - 

„ Commissioners of Northern Lights 

Advanced on account of Vote for Relief of distressed Seamen 
Abroad ---------- 

Advanced on account of Wages, &c. of deceased Seamen 

„ „ Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve 

„ „ Surveys of Mail Packets 

Dbduct, 

For Amount to be repaid for Nautical Schools - • - 

„ „ to Merchant Seamen's Fund - 

„ „ to Commissioners of Inland Revenue 

„ „ to Receiver of Fines for the Crown - 

„ „ on account of unclaimed Wreck and 

Salvage - . . . - 

„ „ for Seamen's Money Orders unpaid, 

see Statement on the other side 

„ „ for Seamen's Savings Banks - 

„ ,9 Army Services, for Trinity House 

Pensions - . - . . 

. „ 99 Seamen's Wages and sundry Com- 

pensations received - - . 

ji „ Receivers of Wreck - . . 



£. s. d. 

26,094 4 - 

4,438 1 6 

7,734 9 8 

1,213 18 4 

601 19 7 

6,604 10 6 

3 4 6 



1,141 13 10 
637 16 8 
690 16 - 
132 6 2 

11,466 9 - 

1,887 6 10 
220 13 11 

9,626 2 7 

146 11 11 
176 6 4 



£. 



320,000 - - 



69,088 16 5 
8,794 1 2 



44,490 8 ~ 



112,323 6 7 



26,016 - 3 



86,308 6 4 



387. 



A 2 



H. R. WURanu, 

Accountant 



James Booth. 



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4 INCOME AND EXPENDITURE OF THE MERCANTILE MARINE FUND, 1860. 








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INCOME AND EXPENDITURE OF TAB MERCANTILE MARINE FUND, I860. 5 



STATEMENT (B.), referred to at page 8. 



STATEMENT of the Suns expended for New Works in Buildiko Liohthousss, kc., in the 
United Kingdom, from 1 January 1860 to 81 December I860* 



Natusb of Work. 



ENGLAND : 

Bishops Rock Lighthouse • • . . . 

GodrcTj -- 

Needles ........ 

Smalls •-...... 

Whitby 

Hanois 

Anquette -------- 

Harwich -------. 

Nejland (Storehonse) 

Langoard Fort ------- 

Yame Shoal, Light Ship 

Cardigan Baj, light Ship - • - 

IRELAND : 

Black Rock 

Calf Rock 

Newcastle -------- 

Arranmore - -.- - - - • 

Rock a Bill 

SCOTLAND : 
Corran - - - Lighthouse .... 
Mac Arthur^s Head „.--•- 

Saint Abb's Head ^ 

Phladda . - ^ - - - - - 
Butt of Lewis - „----- 

Holbom Head 

Monarch Isles ------- 

Expenses connected with proposed New Lighthouses 



£. #. d. 

106 8 6 

878 10 6 

42 12 2 

8,484 6 6 

191 - - 

6,806 2 7 

98 7 10 

20 16 6 

29 2 8 

286 4 6 

4,782 18 9 

5,088 4 8 



2,968 12 - 

812 1 11 

18 12 9 

47 - - 

6,097 12 - 



1,888 4 - 

1,089 16 4 

1,446 6 10 

1,019 8 4 

1,201 9 7 

100 - - 

108 2 6 

8 14 8 



£. 



£. 



d. 



26,299 9 8 



8,488 18 8 



6,801 1 9 



40,689 9 8 



387. 



A3 



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INCOHB AND BXPBNDITUBE OF THR MBRGANTILB MABINB FUND, I860- 



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MERCHANT SEAMEN^S FUND. 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure under the Seamen's Fund 
Winding-up Act, from 1st January to 31st December 1860; with an 
Account of the Sums Received and Paid for the Wages and Effects of 
deceased Seamen in the Year 1860. 



{FUrsuant to Acts 14 §• 15 Vict. c. 102, *. 59, and 17 ^ 18 Vict, c 104, s. 202.) 



I 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed^ 
28 June i86i. 



\ 



385. 

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ACCOUNT RELATING TO RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE 



AN ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure under the Seamek's 



RECEIPTS. 



To Bakne^ ia tiand on 1st January 1860, as shown in the preceding Account^ to 3 1st December^ 
ie59 ^.- J 



To C^h received from J« Goddard for Balance of Debt 



I'o AiKioutit reoeiTed ior V'oliintary Coatrihationa from Masters and Seamen 



To AinauDt of the Vote of Parliament for the year ending Slst March 1861 



£. s. d. 
38,406 12 3 



15 14 9 



3,00-2 7 1 



68,700 - 




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OF THE MERCHANT SEAMEN'S FUND, 1860. 



Fund Windikg-up Act, from Ist January to 3l8t December 1860. 



PAYMENTS. 



By Amonnt paid for Pensions, including the sum of 532 L 10 5., granted by way"! 
of Annuity to the late Officers of the Trustees, whose offices were abolished/ 



By Amonnt paid for Commutation of Pensions 



By AmomU paid for Salariea aad Charges of Management 



By Amoont paid into Her Majesty's Exchequer, being for amoamt 
for the Voluntary Contributions in the year 1850, horn Masters and 
8,306/. lg.6d.; and Goddard's Debt, 20 /. - 



md1| 
sen, p 



By Balance in hand 31 st December 1860 



£. 5. (L 
58,974 15 1 

078 2 10 



Particulars or the above Balavcb. 



Cash in the bands of Her Majesty's Paymaster-General 



Amount due from the Mercantile Marine Fond for Voluntary Contrihutions 



45,528 5 11 



637 16 8 



£• 



Less, Balance owing to the War Department for Amount paid for Pensional 
to 31st December 1860 --------- 



46,166 2 7 



9,420 7 11 



36,745 14 8 



£. «. 4l 



m,^a2 17 II 
100 - - 

3,326 1 G 
£tC,74& U t 



100,124 14 1- 



Board of Trade, 26 June 1861. 



Jama Booth, 



Accoujitui^ 



I 



385. 



A 2 



Digitize^y»@6^5§fe 



ACCOUNT RELATING TO RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT of the Number nnd Amount of the whole of the pEirsiONS| and of ea4!h 
Class of Pensions, Granted in the Yewra 1859 and 1860, 



of 



6 16 

a 8 

4 8 

3 4 

2 4 

1 3 



CLASS OF PENSIONERS* 



i 



1860. 



Xumlier. 



Masters - 

Seamen 

Widows of Masters 

Widows of Seanien 

Children of Masters 

Children of Seamen 



163 

158 

170 

140 

60 



913 



ATDoaut. 



j455 4 
550 16 
695 4 
393 16 

308 " 
66 - 



C,400 - ^ 



18 59. 



Number. 



AmomiL 





£, *. rf. 


338 


1,618 8 ^ 


2S7 


771 16 - 


161 


708 8 " 


190 


41S - - 


141 


310 4 > 


87 


95 14 - 


1^044 


3,922 10 - 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT of the Number and Amount of ihe whole of the Fejjsions, and of eseti 
Class of Pensions, Expired in the Yeare 1859 and 1800- 



CLASS OF PENSIOKERS, 



M&sten - 

Seunen - - - 

Widows of Mastert - 
Widows of Seamen < 
Children of Masters 
Children of Seamen 



Number. 



144 
831» 
2*28 
507 
392 
619 



2/339 



1 8 ti 0, 



Amouai. 



841 1ft - 
1,037 1 !& 

861 3 - 

1,035 ^ 4 

761 7 8 

6SS 3 6 



1 8 6 9. 



Nttrober., 



5,314 14 4 



151 

309 
196 

460 
341 
611 



Aggregate Amount 
of PenfelDitE, 



2,068 



890 14 - 
904 10 6 
638 3 9 
923 1 
509 3 e 
601 18 10 



4,045 11 3 



COMPARATIVE STATEMENT of the Number of Pessiot^eus tipon the Fund on the aist Deccmher 1359 
and 31st December 1860 ; dktinguishing between Men, Womeiij and Children, tind between different Scales of 
PcDsiong, and the Total Amount of Pensiona of each Ciajssi. 



CLASS OF PENSIONERS, 



Mastera 

Seamen - * - 

Widows of Mu&tera 
Widows of Seamen 
Chlltireii of MasterB 
Children of Seamen 



18 6 0. 



Number* 



3,015 
3,674 
3,471 
6,974 
1,619 
2,537 



30,090 



1859. 



AmDuQt^ 



12,441 14 2 

11,701 13 6 

12,584 11 6 

14,481 - 1 

3,860 5 6 

2,816 I 8 



56,885 6 5 



N amber. 



1,945 
3,751 
8,541 
7,302 
1,771 
3,096 



21,406 



Aggn?gftte AuKTual 



t, s, d. 

11,B28 3 

13,177 19 4 

ie,750 9 6 

15,lf^2 4 5 

3,318 13 2 

3,438 5 3 



58,031 



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OF THE MERCHANT SEAMEN'S FUND, 1860. 



.t 



AN ACCOUNT of the Property and Monies held by the Trustees of the Merchant 
Seamen's Fund, at the under-mentioned Ports, for Special Purposes distinct from rho 
General Purposes of the Fund, and the Recoipt and Expenditure for the same, for the 
Year 1860. 



Sunderland 



Rye 



Boston • 



Scarborough 



Wlii% 



LiTorpool 



Freehold Ground in Assembly Garth, whereon are built several 
Houses and a Seamen's Hall; also 13 Houses in Trafalgar-squtirey 
Sunderland, subject to a ground-rent of 5 /. per annum. 

Cash received for Rent of 12 s, per annum from the lomateat 
and sundry other Receipts (including^ last yearns balance of 
122/. 55. 0^.), 242/. \s.9d. 

Cash paid for Ground-rent, Insurance, Repairs, Water-rate, and 
Sundries, 61/. 25. 0<f. 

Leaving a Balance in the hands of the Trustees of 180/. lOi. 

Three Leasehold Cottages, subject to a Ground-rent of 18 #. 4 ^, per 
annum. 

Cash received for Rent of 405. per annum from the Inmates 
(including lust year's balance of 6/. 18 5. 6(/.), 12 /. 18 5> Qd^ 

Cash paid for two years' Ground-rent and Repairs, 5L 1m* 6 d. 

Balance in the hands of the Trustees, 7 /. 17 5. 

Nine Almshouses. 

Cash received for Rent from Inmates (including 155. for last 
year's Balance), 8 /. 15 5. 

Cash paid for Insurance, Water-rate, Repairs, 7 L 14 5. 

Balance in the hands of the Trustees, 1 /. 1 5. 



Sixty-seven DweUings, or Buildings, called the Seamen's HoFpita! 
and Trinity House. 

Bequest of 837 /., 8 per Cent Annuities. 

Cash received for Dividends, and a Donation of 30 L from tho 
Trustees of the late Richard Wilson, Esq., 66l,2s.Sd. 

Cash paid to Inmates of the Houses, 16/. 165.; Repairs, In- 
surance, and Expenses, 3d /. 55. 4 </. ; Balance due to tlieTrunreei 
last year, 53/. 14 5. 10^.; together, 103/. 16s, 2d, 

Balance due to the Trustees, 48 /. 18 5. 6 c/. 

Fifty Tenements, called Seamen's Hospital Houses. 
Bequest of 800 /., 8 per Cent Consols. 
Also, 180 /. 1 5. 2 c/., 3 per Cent Annuities. 

Cash received for Rent and Dividends, including 6 /. 16 5. 2d. 
last year's balance, 241, 6 s. 7 d. 

Cash paid, Insurance, Repairs, Coals distributed to Inmates, and 

Sundries, 20/. 7 5. 7 c/. 
Balance in the hands of the Trustees, 8 /. 185. 

1,600 /. Bonds of the Corporation of the Town of Liverpool received 
from the Committee of the Nelson Fund. 

Cash received for Interest on Bonds, including 87 /; 8 s. 11 ef. for 

last year's Balance, 100 /. 3 5. 9 (/. 
Cash paid to 18 Masters and 18 Widows, including 9s, Bd. ibr 

a Receipt Book, 73 /. 10 5. 8 d. 
Balance in the hands of the Trustees, 35 /. 4 5. 1 c/. 



385. 



^3 



WAGES^ , 

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- i 



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6 ACCOUNT RELATING TO MERCHANT SEAMEN'S FUND, 1860. 



WAGES AND EFFECTS OF DECEASED SEAMEN. 



ACCOUNT of the Sums received from the 1st January to the 3l8t December 18d0, for tha Wages 
and Effects of Deceased Seamen, and of the Payments made for the same Period. 



Bttt&Qce iu hand on 31st December 1859, as shown in the preceding Account - 

Amount reeeiTed in 1860 from the Masters of Vessels, and from the Collectors 
of Custom ft in the Colonies, and from Her Majesty's Consuls abroad, for 
Wug^ tiud Effects of 3,053 deceased Seamen ---.-- 



£. s. d. 
Amount p£^td in I860 to the Relatives and Representatives I 

«f 2,272 deceased Seamen / 20,751 18 4 

I 
Atnount uDckimed received prior to 1 January 1854, to be ' 

paid into Her Majesty's Exchequer j 6,221 3 11 



Balance unolaimed on 31st December 1860 - - £. 



£. s. d. 
60,662 18 5 



27,889 - 2 



88,661 18 7 



26,97^ 2 3 



62,678 16 4 



Particulurs of Balance, viz. : 
For Cash in the hands of Her Majesty's Paymaster General - 

For Cost of CO,000?. Exchequer Bills, 51,473/. 185. j less In- 
terest received, 1,094 Z. 14 s. 10 c/. 



For Advance, to be repaid from the Vote for the Relief of 
Disiressed Seamen -------- 

£, 



Less Amount due to the Mercantile Marine 
Fund 

Leas Amount due to Her Majesty's Exchequer, 
paid in Rliirch 1861 



£• «- d. 
601 19 7 

5^21 3 11 
£. 



£. s. d. 

16,466 6 10 

60,379 3 2 

1,486 10 10 



68,801 19 10 



6,723 3 6 



62,578 16 4 



Board of Trade. 
^^Anm 1861 



:•} 



James Booth. 



H. R. WiUiamSj 

Accountant. 



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PILOTAGE. 



A RETURN, 

(For the Year ending 31 December 1860 :) 

— 1. — 

*^ Of all Bye-Laws, Regulations, Orders, or Ordinakobs relating to Pilots or 
Pilotage for the Time being in force, issued by the respectiye Pilotage Authorities 
in the United Elingdom : ^ 

— 2. — 

'* Of the Names and Aoes of the Pilots or Apprentices licensed or authorised to act 
by the respective Pilotage Authorities, and of all Pilots or Apprbntigbs acting 
either mediately or immediately imder such Authorities, whether so licensed or 
authorised or not : ^ 

— 3. — 

** Of the Service for which each Pilot or Apprentice is licensed : ^ 

— 4. — 

" Of the Rates of Pilotage for the Time being in force at the Ports under the 
Jurisdiction of the respective Pilotage Authorities, including therein the Rates and 
Descriptions of all Charges upon Shipping made for or in respect of Pilots or 
Pilotage : "" 

— 5. — 

** Of the Total Amount received for Pilotage at the respective Ports aforesaid ; 
distinguishing the several Amounts received from British Ships and from Foreign 
Ships respectively, and the several Amounts received in respect of different Classes 
of Ships paying different Rates of Pilotage, according to the Scale of such Rates 
for the Time being in force, and the several Amounts received for the several 
Classes of Service rendered by Pilots ; and also the Amoimt paid by such Ships 
(if any) as have, before reaching the Outer Limits of Pilotage Water if Outward 
bound, or their Port of Destination if Liward bound, to take or pay fof Two or more 
Pilots, whether licensed by the same or by different Pilotage Authorities; together 
with the Numbers of the Ships of each of the several Classes paying such several 
Amounts as aforesaid : '' . 

— 6. — 

'^ Of the Receipt and Expenditure of all Monies (if any) received by or on behalf 
of the respective Pilotage Authorities aforesaid, or by or on behalf of any Sub- 
Commissioners appointed by them, in respect of Pilots or Pilotage.^ 

J» continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 287 of\%60* 



(PRBSSNTSD PURSUANT TO ACT OF PABLIAMENT.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to b$ Printed, 
13 May i86i. 



243- 

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t ii ] 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Hie Acts of Parliament and Charten which confer Pilotage Jurisdiction on the respectiTC Authorities, are spedfied, 
throQghont this Retorn, immediatsly nnder the Names of the Ports. 



ENGLAND AND WALES. 



TRINITY HOUSE OF DEPTFORD STROND 

SUMMABT ------- 



Post vw Jjaxmem • 

OtJTPOBTBt 

Abbbdotet 



bsaumabis - - - - - 
Bbidgwatbb - . - - - 
Bbidpobt- - - - . - 
Caebkabyon . - - - - 
Cabusle --...- 

COLOHEBTEB - - - • - 

Cowss AND FosmncouTK 
Dajoxoiitk - - - - • 

EXETEB ------ 

Falmottth - - - - - 

Fleetwood - - - - - 

FOWBT -•--.- 
Qlouobstbb - - - - . 

Gbsat Tabmouth.. See Yabmouth. 
Habwioh ------ 

Holyhead - - . • . 



Ivswzox 



LomsnoR 



Maldon • • - - 

MiLFOBD - - - - 

Neath - - - - 

Newhaven - - - 

Newpobt - - - - 

PADiTOiW - - • • 

PurzAKCE - . - 

Plymouth - . • 

Poole - - - - 

pobthadoo - . - 

PoBTBuoTms. See Cowas. 

Roohesteb . . - 



IlYE 



SOILLY 

Shobehak 
Southahfton 



Teigkuouth 



Wells 
Weymouth 
Woodbbidgb 
Tabmouth 



r General Regulationa 

\General Accomrt - 

fAggregate Number of Pilots 
^Aggregate Receipts 

fNames of Pilots - 

< Rates of Piloteg* - 

LPilotage Receipts - 

{Names of Pilots 

Rates of Pilotage - 

Pilotage Receipts - 

- ditto . - - 

- ditto • - - . 

- ditto - - . 

- ditto - - . 

- ditto - - - . 

- ditto - - . . 

- ditto . . - . 

- ditfto • • ., , 

- ditto - . . . 

- ditto - - - 

- ditto - - - . 

- ditto « . . < 

- ditto - - • . 



} 



ditto 
ditto 



rNames of Pilots - - - 
i Rates ef Pilotag* and BagobtiflM 
LPilotage Receipts 

fNames of Pilots - 
< Rates of Pilotage « 
LPilotage Recei^ - 

- ditto 

- ditto 

- ditto 

- ditto 

- ditto 

- ditto - 

- ditto - 

- ditto 

- ditto - 

- ditto 



rNames of Pilots 
LPilotage Receipts - 

fNames of Piloto - 
^ Bates of Pilotage • 
LPilotage Receipts - 

- ditto 

- ditto - 



/Names of Pilots - - - 

< Rotes of Pilotage and Regulations 
i Pilotage Receipts - . - 

fNames of Pilots - - - 

< Rates of Pilotage - - . 
LPilotage Receipts - - - 

- ditto - - . - 

- ditto - . . . 



ditto 
ditto 



VAGB8 

1 

2,3 
42 

4-7 

7 
8-11 



} 



12 

12,13 
18,14 
14,15 

15 

16 

17 
17-19 
19,20 

20 
21,22 
22,23 

38 

24 

24,25 
25,26 

26 



27 

27,28 

28 

29 
29,80 
80,81 
81^82 

82 
82,83 
38,34 

84 

85 
86,86 

86 
37 

87,88 

88,89 

89 

40 

40,41 



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C iii 1 



TRINITY HOUSE OF KINGSTON-UPON-HULL 
Easef Coaot. 

sub-coxkissioicbba : 

Hull ..... 
FOBT OF Hull 

and 
Rrr BB HumbbbI Nbw Hollajid - 



COVHISBIONBBS. 



Gbimsbt 



POBT OW GaIKSBOBOUOH 



,, GOOSB 



y, BfjkJumfB 



Wisbbch 



TRINITY HOUSE OF NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE 



Pqbt or Nbwoastlb 



Shiblds 



SUNDBBLAKD 



NOBTH SUNDBRLAIVD i« - - 
„ Sbakak --..«.. 
„ HiLBTLEPOOL . • . • . 

West Habtlbpool Habboub juxd 
Books --.... 

„ Stooktok • ' - . « 

„ Whitbt - ^ - - . . . 



Wabkwobth 



5I43- 



{Bye-lawB - - • , 
Names of Pilots 

Rates of Pilotage . 

Pilotage Receipts - 

Account . . . . 

i Bye-laws - - » , 

Names of Pilots - 

Rates of Pilotage - 

Pilotage Receipts - 

Account - - - . 

/Names of Pilots \._tt n 
IRates of Pilotage/*^ ^^^' 

rNames of Pilots 1 
< Rates of Pilotage }see Hull. 
LPilotage ReceiptsJ 

{Bye-laws - - - - 
Names of Pilots 
Rates of Pilotage - 
Pilotage Receipts - - « 
Account . - . . 

^Bye-laws - - - - 
Names of Pilots 

Rates of Pilotage - 

Pilotage Receipts - 

^Account . . • , 

r Bye-laws - - . . 

Names of Pilots 

Rates of Pilotage 

Pilotage Receipts 
^Account - . - 

'Bye-laws - « - - 
Names of Pilots 

Rates of Pilotage - - - 

Pilotage Receipts - - . 

^Account - - - . 

General Regulations 
List of Masters holdii^ Pi- 
lotage Certificates 
General Pilotage Receipts 
Aggregate Number of Pilots 

{Names of Pilots 
Rates of Pilotage - 
Pilotage Receipts - 
Account 

{Names of Pilots . 

Rates of Pilotage - 

Pilotage Receipts - 
Account 

Names of Pilots 
I Rates of Pilotage - 
I Pilotage Receipts - 
lAccount 

{Names of Pilots 
Rates of Pilotage - 
Pilotage Receipts - 
Account 

{Names of Pilots - 

Rates of Pilotage - 

Pilotage Receipts - 
Account 

1 Names of Pilots . 

Rates of Pilotage - 

Pilotage Receipts * 
Account 

{Names of Pilots - 

Rates of Pilotage - 

Pilotage Receipts - 
Account 

rNames of Pilots - 

I Rates of Pilotage - 

J Pilotage Receipts -^ 
LAccount 

{Names of Pilots - 

Rates of Pilotage - 

Pilotage Receipts - 
Account 

{Names of Pilots 
Rates of Pilotage - 
Pilotage Receipts . 
Account 

(Names of Pilots 
Rates of Pilotage - 
Pilotage Receipts - 
Account 



PAOBS 

48 

43-45 

46 

46 



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} « 

52 



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47 

48,49 
50 



53 



54 



55 



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59 


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60 


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59 


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56 


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59 


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60 


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61 


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55 


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59 


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60 


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61 


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60 


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61 


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60 


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61 


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57 


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59 


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62 


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tized by 



Google 



[ iy ] 



TRINITY HOUSE OF NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE- 
NoBTH Sba AND East Coast OF Enoiahd - 



Holt Island 
M1DDLB8BB0' 

Alnmouth 



Habtlby 

S baton Sluiob 

PORT OF ARUNDEL 



, , BERWICK-UPON-TWEED 



BOSTON 



BRISTOL 



Cabdiff 



CHESTER 



CLAY 



„ DOUGLAS, ISLE OF MAN - 



„ KING'S LYNN 



LANCASTER 



„ LIVERPOOL 



LLANELLY 



„ PORTH CAWL 



SWANSEA 



continued, 

{Names of Pilots 
Rates of Pilot^e 
Pilotage Receipts 

rNames of Pilots 
< Pilotage Receipts 
^Account 

Pilotage Receipts 

{Names of Pilots 
Rates of Pilotage 
Pilotage Receipts 
Account - 



ILegu] 
Pilotage 

Names ot* Pilots - - - 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

r Bye-laws and Rates of Pilotage 

I Names of Pilots - - - 

I Pilotage Receipts - - - 

LAccount - - - . 



La 



Names of Pilots 
Pilotage Receipts 



Rates of 



rByo-lawB and Rates of Pilotage 
I Names of Pilots - - - 
Pilotage Receipts - - - 
'ccount - - - - 



rBye^laws and Rates of Pilotage 
< Names of Pilots, &c, 

LPilotage Receipts - • - 

{Bye-laws and Rates of Pilotage 

Names of Pilots - - - 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

(Bye-laws . - - • 

Names of Pilots . . . 

Rates of Pilotage - - . 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

Account - - - - 

rBye-laws - - - - 

I Names of Pilots - - - 

j Rates of Pilotage - - . 

LPilotage Receipts - - - 

i Bye-laws - - - . 

Names of Pilots - - - 

Rates of Pilotage - - - 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

(Bye-laws - - - -w 

Names of Pilots - . . 

Rates of Pilotage - - - 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

Account • - - - 

{Bye-laws and Rates of Pilotage 

Names of Pilots . - . 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

.Bye-laws - - - - 

Names of Pilots - - - 

Rates of Pilotage - - - 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

^Account . - . - 

rBye-laws and Rates of Pilotage 

J Names of Pilots - - - 

I Pilotage Receipts - - - 

LAccount - - - - 

{Bye-laws and Rates of Pilotage 

Names of Pilots - - - 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

Account - - - - - 



} 

} 

} 
} 

} 



pagbs 

60 
60 

60 
60 
63 

60 

69 
60 
60 
68 

68 

60 

68 
64 

64 
66 

66 



1 
1 
1 
1 



66 
67 

68 



60 



70 



70 



71 



71 



72 
72-74 

74 

76 



76-78 
78 

79 



} 

} 79 
80 



[Regulations and Rates of Pilotage 
Names of Pilots - - - 
Pilotage Receipts - - - 
Account - - - - • 



} 
} 



80-88 



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Google 



[ V ] 



SCOTLAND, 



PORT OF ABERBROTHWICK 



ABERDEEN 



AYR 



DUNDEE . 



GLASGOW 



GREENOCK 



IRVINE 



KIRKCALDY 



TEINITY HOUSE OP LEITH 



BARBOUR AND DOCKS OF LEITH 



PORT OF LOSSIEMOUTH 



MACDUFF 



» PETERHEAD 



„ WICK 



Regulations - . - - 

Names of Pilots - - - 

Rates of Pilotage - . - 

Pilotage Receipts . - «• 

Account - - - - 

fReffulations and Rates of 

I Pilotage - - - - 

] Names of Pilots . • . 

iPilotage Receipts . . - 

rRagnlttloiis and Rates of Pilotage 

I Names of Pilots - . « 

I Pilotage Receipts - - - 

lAccount- - - - - 

{BegnlatioDS and Rates of Pilotage 

Names of Pilots . . - 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

Account- . - - - 

r Bye-laws - - .. • 

Names of Pilots - - - 

Rates of Pilotage - - . 

Pilotage Receipts . - - 

^Accounts - - . . 

rRejralations and Rates of 

I Pilotage - - - - 

I Names of Pilots . * . 

iPilotage Receipts - - - 

^Reeulations and Rates of 

Pilotage . - . - 

Names of Pilots ... 

Pilotage Receipts • . * 

^Account - - - - 

i Regulation 8 and Rates of 

Pilotage . - - - 

Names^ Pilots - - - 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

pBye-laws • . . . 

Names of Pilots • . . 

Rates of Pilotage • . - 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

"Account - - - . 

rRegulations and Rates of 

Pilotage . . . . 

Names of Pilots . . . 

Pilotage Receipts - • • 

'Account - . - . 



{Regulations - 
Names of Pilots 
Rates of Pilotage 
Pilotage Receipts 

rBye-laws 
I Names of Pilots 
I Rates of Pilotage 
IPilotage Receipts 



Regulations • 
Names of Pilots 
Rates of Pilotage 
Pilotage Receipts 
Account - 



PAOB. 



84 



85 



86 



87 



88 



89 



90 



\ 00 
91 

91 
91-98 

98 
94,95 

95 

} 96 
96,97 



-:}" 



rRegulations - 

I Names of Pilots - 

Rates of Pilotage - 

Pilotage Receipts - 

"Account • • • 



98 



98 



99 



100 



243- 



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Google 



[ vi ] 



IRELAND, 



PORT OP BALLINA 



BELPAST 



n COLERAINE AND PORTRUSH 



CORK 



„ DROGHEDA 



n DUBLIN 



„ DUNDALK 



n OALWAY - 
«, LIMERICK 



LONDONDERRY 



NEW ROSS 



NEWRY 



SLIGO 



TEALEE 



WATERFORD 



WESTPORT 



WEXPORD 



iBye-law8 - . - . 

Names of Piloto - - . 

Rates of Pilotage . . - 

Pilotage Receipts . - • 

^Regulations - - - - 

' Names of Pilots - - i 

I Rates of Pilotage - . . 
I Pilotage Receipts ... 

^Account . «. . • 

{Bye-lawt . • . - 

Names of Pilots - . . 

Rates of Pilotage - « . 

Pilotage Receipts *- . • 

rBve-laws and Rates of Pilotage 

^ Names of Pilots . * • 

tPilotage Receipts - • . 

! Bye-laws . . - - 

Names of Pilots . - - 

Rates of Pilotage - * . 

Pilotage Receipts - - - 

{Orders and Rates of Pilotage - 

Names of Pilots . - - 

Pilotage Receipts - « • 

Account - - - - 

rBye-laws - . - - 

J Names of Pilots - - - 

1 Rates of Pilotage . - . 

LEHlotage Receipts . . - 

rRegnlatloDS and Rates of Pilotage 

< Names of Pilots . . . 

LPilotage Receipts • - . 



^Bye-laws - - - . 

Names of Pilots ... 

Rates of Pilotage - . * 

Pilotage Receipts - . « 

^Account - - - - 

{Regulations and Rates of 

Pilotage • - • . 

Names of Pilots - . . 

Pilotage Receipts - • . 

Account . . , . 

rBye-lawB - - . • 

^ Names of Pflots • ^ . 

^ Rates of Pilotoge « • . 

.Pilotage Receipts - • • 

/^Regulations - • ^ • 

Names of Pilots • . • 

{ Rates of Pilotage - • . • 

I Pilotage Receipts . . . 

vAcoount . . • • 

'Bye-laws - - - . 
Names of Pilots ... 
Rates of Pilotage . • • 
Pilotage Receipts • • . 
.Account .... 

rBye-lawB and Rates of Pilotage 
I Names of Pilots - . . 
I Pilotage Receipts - • . 
lAccount - . - • 

^Bye-laws .... 

Names of Pilots - . . 

Rates of Pilotage - . . 

Pilotage Receipts - . • 
^Account .... 

/'Regulations and Rates of 

Pilotage .... 

< Names of Pilots . . . 

Pilotage Receipts ... 

^Account .... 



1 
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} 

} 

} 
} 

} 
} 

} 



101 



I 



102 

103 

103,104 
105 

106 
100 

100 
107 

108 

108 
109 
109 
110 

n\ 
112 

112 

113 

114 
116 

115 
116 

116 



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[ 1 ] 



ABSTRACT 



OF THB 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



BBNDERED BT THB BBSPECTIVB 



PILOTAGE AUTHORITIES IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 

In pursuance of tbe Merchant Shipping Act, 1854. 



For the Year ending 31 December 1860. 



ENGLAND AND WALES. 



CORPORATION OF TRINITY HOUSE OF DEPTFORD STROND. 



Acts cokpbrbihg*^, 
ju-bisdiotiov -j 



In the LoDdoo Diitrlet By 5 Geo. 2, c 81. 

„ Bridgwater „ By 8 & 9 Vict c. 89. ss. 70 to 74. 

„ Ipewidi ^ BylVict.c74,«ulSltol80. 

,, N^th ,, By6&7yict.c71,8e.l83tol87. 

„ Newport „ By 6 WIIL 4, c 66, M. 100 to 108. 

At ell the other Ports under thejoriedlctionof the \By the Merchant Shipping Act, 1854, 
Trinity House, and generaUy ... -/ 17 & 18 Vict c 104, Part V. 



GENERAli REGULATION& 



See iParl. Paper, No. 244 of 1859, p. 1. The reguktions there referred to are still 

in force. 



-243. A Gbnbraj^ 

Digiiizea oyVjOOQlC 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



CoBPORATioir OP Trinity House op Deptpord STno^D— continued. 



GENERAL 

Showing the Receipt and Expenditure of all Monies received by or on behalf of 

(Prepared in pursuance of seet 837 

RECEIPT. 



Dividends : 

One year's diyidend on 89,660/. 18«. I cL, capital, New 8 per Cent. Annuities^ 
(less Income Tax) -..----.-•- 



Dues and Rates : 

Amount receiyed on annual renewal of licenses to pilots in districts not under the 
superintendence of Sub-Commissioners --..-.•• 

Poundage on pilots' earnings collected at London and the Outports • . - 

Surplus rates of pilotage from'riiips not hrang British registers, nor being privileged 
by any Act or Convention, or Order in Council, to be charged with the British 
rates only, or not being within the terms thereof ....-• 

Dues on turns of pilotage paid by pilots at the Cinque Ports «... 



Annual payments in lieu of death^money by the pilots at the Cinque Ports licensed prior 
to 1st October 1868 .--.-- •- 



Miscellaneous : 

Amount of Balances proceeding from the receipt and payment of pilotage of foreign 
vessels in the Port of London •---•--^- 

Balance of fees received on the issue and renewal of pilotage certificates, and on 
grant of new licenses and extended qualifications for the Port of London send 
Channels leading thereto, and at the Outports, after deducting charges 

Fines and penalties ------------ 

One year's rent of cliff land at Dover (less Income Tax) • - - . - 
One year's rent of meadow ..••--•--- 
Balance of fees on choice letters .•••-..•• 



£• i. d. 



028 17 8 

8,278 1 6 

116 8 6 

1,611 19 - 



237 10 7 

268 10 8 

80 10 11 

9 12 6 

16 - - 

66 2 6 



Total Rbtbnub 



£. 



Trinity House, London,! 
4 July 1861. J 



£. s. I 



2,606 16 8 



6,886 6 2 



727 10 - 



608 7 2 



9,776 18 7 



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FOK THB TEAR INBINQ 81 DBCBMBER 186a. 



CoBPOftAnov OF Trinity House of DBFrromD Strouiv— amemv^fl 



ACCOUNT. 

the Trinity House, in respect of Pilots or Pilotage, in the Tear ending 31 st December 1860. 
of the Act 17 & 18 Vict c 104.) 



EXPENDITURE. 



Expenses of carrying the Act into execution : 

Salaries and allowtnoea lo officers in London end at Ae Cinqae Ports 



Stationery, stamps, printing^ and incidental ezpensea 
Law charges -------- 



ion OB mutplmB pilotage collected at th* Ootports 



PensioDS and Allowances : 

To soperannaated pilots, their wires, widows, and children, and occasional relief 
to ditto during ibe year, at London and the Ootports (except the Cinque 
Ports) .-•-. 

To ditto at the Cinqae Ports^ including superannuation allowance to James Wood, 
formerly derk in the pilotage station at Dorer «.-... 



ihndiooBe Establishment : 

Pensions and allowanoes to superanooated pilots, their wives or widows, inhabiting 
thiitaen almshouses at Mile End ---•-••-• 



Cost of repair and maintenance of the said houses 



£. a. d. 

1,602 * - 

244 17 2 

27 2 11 



8,075 6 9 



2,066 4 10 



624 1 2 
65 6 



Pilot Stations : 

OosI of repair and maintenance of those at Deal, Dover, and the Isle of Thanet - . • - 

Pi J wills to iq>pointees of Cinqup Port pilots on their decease -------- 

Total Expenditube - - - 

Deficiency on dlst December 1859 - - - 

Surplus carried to next Accoant - - - 

Total - - - £. 



£. s. d. 



1,774 ~ 1 



** 15 2 



6,041 n 7 



579 7 8 



164 17 4 



143 ^ -- 



8,708 11 10 
108 16 10 
969 9 11 



9,776 18 7 



(E.E.) 



^3. 



A 2 



P. jr. Berthon, Secretary, 
John Ingliiy Accoantant. 



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ftETlTRNS RELATINd TO PILOTS AN0 PILOTAGE^ 



COBPOEATION OF TbINITY HoUSE OP DePTPOED SteOND. 



LONDON DISTRICT. 



NAMES and AGES of PILOTS licensed for the London District. 




Batchart George - 
Dumlin, Edward T. 
Hindhaugh, William - 
Irvine, James (1) - 
Irvine, James (2) - 
Loweiy, Thomas - 
Moore, Wm. Coates 
Reed, Henry 
Storey, John Ogilvie - 
Strachan, Robert - 

Aston, Edward Onslow - 
Blyth, George 
Brack, George 
Daines, William - 
Glandfield, F. W. 
Harrison, Ralph - 
Jones, Thomas 
Johnson, John 
Leigh, Thomas 
Martin, Mark 
Martin, Thomas - 
Murray, Ralph 
Paton, James 
Pidgeon, Edward W. - 
Smalh, John - - - 
Thompson, George James 
Thompson, Charles 
Wheeler, Richard - 



Gray, James 
Poison, Peter 



49 
69 
67 
60 
47 
46 
41 
48 
42 
68 

46 
47 
48 
89 
47 
69 
49 
40 
89 
89 
88 
88 
46 
64 
68 
67 
47 
48 



47 
42 



Prom London Bridge down 
the Rirer Themes, and the 
North, Soath, and Queen's Chan- 
nels, and roand the Long Sand 
Head mto the Downs, and in 
and out of Harwich Harbour ; 
also for the narigation at the 
back of the Goodwin Sands, 
round the South Sand Head into 
the Downs, and in and out of 
Bamsgate Harbour, and from 
the Downs to the westward as 
far as the Isle of Wight, and 
from the Isle of Wight up to 
London Bridge ; also from Or- 
fordness across the North Sea, 
and up the Baltic and Golf of 
inland to Cronstadt. 



From London Bridge down 
the River Thames, and the 
North, Southland Queen's Chiui- 
nels, and round the Long Sand 
Head into the Downs, and in 
and out of Harwich Harbour ; 
also for the navigation at the 
back of the Goodwin Sands, 
round the South Sand Head into 
the Downs, and in and out of 
Ramsgate Harbour, and from 
the Downs to the westward as 
far as the Isle of Wight, and 
from the Isle of Wight up to 
London Bridge. 



From London Bridge down 
the River Thames, and the 
North, South, and Queen's 
Channels, and round the Long 
Sand Head into the Downs, and 
into and out of Harwich Har- 
bour ; also for the navigation at 
the back of the Goodwin Sands, 
round the South Sand Head into 
the Downs, and in and out of 
Ramsgate Harbour; also from 
Orfordness across the North Sea, 
and up the Baltic and Golf of 
^Finland to Cronstadt 



Bishop, Thomas Charles 
Boxer, Michael - 
Carter, John 
Davie, William - 
Davison, John 
Daff, John Thomas 
Emerson, Thomas - 
Fairburn, W. T. - 
Garrick, Thomas - 
Grove, Joseph Tatton - 
Hambletoni J. W. 
Hardy, James 
Hughes, Robert - 
Haniley, Charles - 
Kendriek, G. £. - 
Lewis, Ralph 
Pen tin, J. Dodds - 
Smith, Joseph Alexander 
Speeding, William 
Stocksi Thomas - 



Atkinson, Wm. Francis « 
Bebrouth, John - 
Bramston, James - 
Bramston, George 
Grant, Andrew 
Mumford, Henry B. 
Spence, Wm. Alex« 
Spargin, William - 
Thomas, John 



Beach, Thomas Carter • 
Bradley, William - 
Brown, George West • 
Cooper, Gerwl - 
Duck, Richard - 
Maxwell, J. F. - 
Minter, Thomas - 
Mowbray, W. Whitby • 
Mather, Robert - 
Pentin, Philip Michael - 
Roxberry, Henry - 
Smith, Alex. Joseph 
Smith, John George 



Milbum, Thomas 



Chaters, James Smith 



44 
69 
67 
86 
61 
89 
72 
68 
48 
48 
66 
67 
66 
41 
87 
66 
48 
60 
42 
64 



64 
44 

41 
40 
48 
62 
44 
41 
40 



47 

88 
60 
40 
62 
48 
49 
46 
40 
48 
89 
69 
48 



66 



64 



From London Bridge don 
the RiTer Thames, and At 
North, Sondi, and Qneea't 
Channeli, and round the Loo; 
. Sand Head into the Downs, tad 
ia and oat of Harwich Harbov; 
alao for the narifatioa at the 
back of the Goodwin Sndi, 
round the Soath Sand Headend 
in and oat of Bam^gate Harboar. 



From London Bridge don 
the Riyer Thames and Soafii 
Channel into the Downs ; w 
for the nafigation at the btd 
of the Goodwin Sands, roaad 
the Sooth Sand Head into tk 
Downs, and into Ramagate Hac^ 
boar ; and from the Downs to 
the weatward as fiur as the Idt 
of Wight, and from the Isled 
Wight np to liondon Bridge. 



From London Bridge dosj 
the River Thames and Soalj 
Channel hito the Downs; 
for the nayigatioB at the ^ 
'of the Goodwin Suds, n 
the Sonth Sand Head into| 
Downs, and into Ramsgate I 
boor* 



From London Bridge del 
Uie Rirer Thames and Nd 
Channd to Orfordness, vuL 
and ont of Harwich Harbo 
also from Orfordness acr 
North Sea, and np the Bi 
and Golf of Finland to CroiMfe 



From London Bridge da| 
the RiTer Tliames and Nd 
Channel to Orfordness, and 
and ont of Harwidi Haihoarj 



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FOE THE TEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



Corporation op Trinity House op Deptpord STROND—cwirinuerf. 



KAMBS. 



AQSS. 



London DrexRicT— «>»<**. 



Barfield, W. J. - 
Bennett, John 
Butler, M. J. 
Banks, Thomas F. A. 

Clarke Edward OUison 

Dodds, William B. 

Fairbnniy J- - 
Bddeman, Henry - 

Gray, Daxid 
Gray, Joseph 

Miller, William - 

Bobson* WiUiam - 
Romley, R. S. 

Smith, W. J. 
Snelling, W. 

Rashley, R. G. - 

Thomas, James Evans 
Tracey, Edward - 
Tianf John • 



Barton^ Richard Henry 

Crofter, C. D. - 

Parmer, Greoi^e - 

Lewis, W. J. - - 
Lyle, Edmund 

Smith, John - - - 
Smith, Alfred 



Gfliet^ Francis 



87 
37 
87 
88 

88 

88 

82 
88 

36 
82 

36 

B6 
88 

20 
84 

27 

88 
87 
86 



26 

34 

58 

88 
88 

27 
24 



Couch, E. - 

Dames, Oswald Theo. 

Harrison, William 
Hamilton, J. T. - 

Lodge, Thomas F. 
Lowery, Alice, o&a Amos 



Atkinson, R. Christopher 

Brown, John 
Brownfield, James 
Kownfield, James, jnn. 
Brownfield, William - 
Brownfield, George 
BrOToley , John Tnomas - 
ll Bradley, J. - 

E Constant, Amos - 
^ Chapman, Edward 

243. 



UMITS or LICENSE. 



84 



From Gravesend down the 
Riyer Thames and North and 
South Channels, and round the 
Long Sand Head into the 
Downs, and into and out of 
. Harwich Harbour; also for the 
navieation at the back of the 
Goodwin Sands, round the South 
Sand Head into the Downs, and 
into Ramsgate Harbour ; and 
also from Dungeness through 
the South Channels to Grayesend. 



86 

84 

86 
84 

86 
35 



62 

60 
63 
86 
66 
41 
42 



44 
89 



NAMES. 



▲OBS. 



London Disthict — coni^. 



From Gravesend down the 
River Thames uid South Chan- 
nels to Dungeness, and viceveraA ; 
also for the navigation at the 
back of the Goodwin Sands, 
round the South Sand Head into 
the Downs, and into Ramsgate 
Harbour. 



From Grayesend down the 
River Thames and the North 
and South Channels, and round 
the Long Sand Head into the 
Downs, and into and out of 
Harwich Harbour ; also for the 
navigation at the back of the 
Goodwin Sands, round the South 
Sand Head into the Downs, and 
into Ramsgate Harbour; also 
from the Downs westward as 
far as the Isle of Wight, and 
from the Isle of Wight to 
Gravesend. 



From Grayesend down the 
River Thames and the North 
Channel to Orfordness, and in 
and out of Harwidi Harbour. 



From London Bridge down 
I the River Thames to Gravesend, 
and bacV to London Bridge. 



Daff, Thomas Allen 
Deane, James 
Denton, John 
Dix, Charles 

Elliott, George - 

Ferguson, Charles Thos. 
Forrest, Richard William 
Fotliergill, William 
Fothergill, William T. - 
Freeman, William 

Gillett, Alfred - 

Hallsey, Daniel - 
Hallsey, George - 
Hallsey, Thomas - 
Hedley, John 
Henderson, William 
Ilobson, James William 
Hollinjum, T. J. - 
Houghton, Edmund 
Humphreys, Wm. Hart 

Ives, William Henry - 
Ives, Thomas Charles - 

Jackson, David - 
Jameson, Henry - 
Joel, William 

Kindred, James - 

Lamder, George Ralph - 
Lawson, James 
Lygo, Richard 

Martin, John Berdo 
Martin, Joseph (l) 
Martin, Joseph (2) 
Mee, Alfred Thomas - 

Pascoe, William Williams 
Pattison, John 
Pattison, FredericTt 
Posgate, Richard Bonner 

Rae, Thomas Wotten - 
Rarashaw, G^eo. Prissick 
Ross, Richard Vamey - 
Ross, Alexander Douglas 
Roxberry, Thomas 

Sandford, William 
Speedy, John 
Spiers, Stephen Joseph - 
Stratford, Charles - 
Stibbs, Edward J. 

Tongc, G. W. B. - 

Walker, James Coombe 
Walker, John 
Warner, Charles - 
Warner, John 
West, Thomas 
Williairs, William 
Williams, T. J. - 
Williams, Edwin - 
Williams, Henry - 
Walden, Joseph - 



A3 



UMITS OF LICENSE. 



60 
66 

44 
48 

54 

44 

60 
65 
81 
46 

88 

49 
48 
40 
47 
51 
51 
88 
51 
48 

42 
45 

59 
47 
48 

40 

84 
46 
41 

86 
48 
84 
81 

51 
51 
39 

47 

45 
52 
46 
40 
48 

42 
55 
50 
48 
87 

89 

55 
51 
62 
87 
51 
47 
45 
45 
40 
84 



From London Bridge down 
^ the River Thames to Gravesend, 
and back to London Bridge. 



Digitized by 



Google 



RBTURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AlfD PILOTAaE, 



CosFOKATioflT o* TauiiTT HouBE OF Deptpokd STBOin> — eonHnued. 



MAUWM. 



AO»w 



London Distkict— coiiK 



LIMITS %W LICENSE. 



Allen, Benjamin - 
Allen, W. George 
Allen, Edward J . - 

Coe, William Henry 

Doust, John Charles - 

Evans, John 

Evans, William Edmund 

Ferguson, John P. 

Hambleton, James 

Liley, Edmund - 

McDonald, Edward 

Petrie, George Alexander 

Rodway, Richard - 

Smith, Charles Thomas - 
Smith, John Thomas - 
Swettenham, George - 

Turner, Richard - 

Voss, James - - - 

Wall, Francis 
Watson, Frederick 

Voss, John Edward 

Anderson, W. Redman - 

Apps, J. E. - 

Arnold, John William - 

Arnold, R. J- 
Atkin8> James 
Atkins, Robert - - 
Apps, James Htclwyrd - 

Baker, John 
Barber, William - 
Ben, William Thomas - 
Bell, George William - 
Birch, Thomas 
Bingham, H. V. - 
Blown, Thomas Cartle - 
Bowles, W. J. - 
Bristow, H. J. S. 
Burton, Aaron 
Burden, John 
Bingham, T. J. - 
Bingham, J, H, - 

Canney, T. Thompson - 
Clark, Werter 
Collard, W. R. - 
Charrosin, William 

Dair, Thomas 
Dane, Samuel 
Decent, Peter 

Elgar, William Spratt - 
Empson, Thomas - 

Finnis, J. S. 
Finnis, Robert 
Finnis, W. J. 
Foster, Henry - 
Foreman, Richard 
Fuller, William - 

Gasson, James 
Gillman, C. Brown 
Godden, J. Astell - 



43 
83 

27 

57 

55 

65 
36 

50 

48 

39 

55 

87 

41 

44 

57 
3d 

47 

5S 

64 
46 

56 



34 
34 
31 
26 
56 
61 
35 

46 
87 
86 
35 
55 
32 
58 
40 
48 
54 
31 
88 
40 

42 
68 
51 
36 

57 
47 
52 

43 
38 

88 
39 
29 
84 
34 
58 

48 
48 
44 



From London Bridge down 
the River Thames to Gravesend, 
and back to London Bridge. 
Licenaed for Home TnMb Fks- 
•enger Shipe oolf « 



Prom Dnngeness up the RWer 
Thames to GraTesend, and up 
the Biyer Medwiy to Stangate 
Oeek* and fimn the South ^toy 
of the Brake to the westward as 
far as the west end of the Owers, 
and into and out of raimsgate, 
Dover, Suidwick, and Msgate 
Harbours. 



HAlffSS. 



▲o«i» 



London District — cont^^ 



Goldsack, D. McDonald 
Gopley, J. Morehouse - 
Gravener, Thomas H. - 
Gutsole^ John 

Hambrook, Joseph 
Hart, John - - - 
Hartley, Joseph Henry - 
Hay wardy William 
Hill, Andrew 
Hinds, Chwles Claymm 
Hinds, Henry 
Hobday, StejAen - 
H(dmes, James - 
HouH, Alfred 
Habbard, Jimres Little - 
Howgego, John - 

Iron, Richard 

Jeffrey, Thomas - 
Jones, James Crowhurst 
Jones, Thomas W. 

Keys, Daniel Peake 
Keys, Samuel H. - 
Knocker, William 

Langford, Robert - 
Larkins, Joseph Alex. - 
Larkins, Richard - 
Lucas» Charles Kidman - 

Mackie, Thomas Pile - 
Mackie, W. B., jun. 
Mallett, J. C. 
Marsh, R. N, 
Marsh, W. A. Y. - 
Marshall, John 
May, Robert Formage - 
Millen, J. Bullock 
MiUen, H. K 
Mills, Bemamin - 
Monger, WilKam - 
Moon, Richard 
Moon, George W. 
MoalloB, Morris - 
Mowll, Riohwrd (8) 
Mowle, Thomas Ralph - 
Myhfll, Valentine C. - 

Newton, James - 
Norris, James 
Norris, Stephen - 
Norris, Thomas Dixon - 
Norris, Tom - - - 

OlifentyJohnEIwin - 

Pain, John - - - 
Palmer, George - 
Paul, Thomas W. - 
Peake, Allen Marsh 
Peake, Robert 
Pembroke, J, Silvester - 
Pett, H. Calton - 
Popkiss, William - 
Popkiw, H. Peter 
Popkiss, H. Paul - 
Pordige, Robert - 
Pott, William S. - 
Pott, John James 
Prescott, Wm. George - 






88 

46 

69 

48 
34 
83 
52 
69 
48 
31 
66 
38 
37 
48 
29 

42 

48 
46 
48 

41 
44 
34 

36 
42 

89 

47 

44 

29 
44 
84 
82 
89 
48 
84 
32 
42 
36 
67 
84 
61 
46 
62 
38 

44 
40 
42 
62 
60 

88 

69 
48 
49 
48 
60 
87 
45 
62 
88 
28 
68 
54 
28 
48 



LIMITS OF LKEKSE. 



From Dangeness up ^ Rifer 
Thames to GimvcMod, nd ^ 
the Ri?«r Mdmmj to Stnp* 
Creek, tnd from the SoathBaoj 
of the Brake to the westward as 
far at the west end of the Owfn, 
and into and oat of Raois^ 
Dorer, Sandwidi, and Ma^;ite 
Harbours. 



Digitized by 



Google 



POR THE TEAR ENDING 31 IKECXMBBR 1^60* 



7 



CoKPOiSATiON OP TBiNirr HoxTSE OP DEPrFOBD Strobtd — oomtinued. 



KAMBS. 



AO£S. 



Lo5DOK District — cont^. 



lalph, George 
Salph, I^omM - 
Sandall, John 
fianeom, William - 
Koose, Thomas B. 

Sackett, Benjamin W. - 
Sdaler, H. Valentine - 
Smith, John Valentine 

Weflard 
Spouse^ William - 
Stanton, William Heniy 
Stanton, William - 

Thornton, William 
TnttyAithor 

Usher, James Waller - 

Warman, W. Bay ley - 
Waters, Alfred John - 
Watson, Alexander 
West, George Barrow - 
Weston, Franklin A. 
WeUard, Moms - 
Warner, Frederidc 
Wiake, James H. 



Urkms, S. N. 
Howll, Richard (3) 
Bogers, Richavd - 

Britten, Daniel B. 



Batcher, John 
Canham, James - 
Ebbs, John . - - 
Keigwin, Thos. Williams 

Chatten, Charles - 
Clodd, Edward - 
Gibson, Jas. Stebbings - 
Whajman^ Dawid 

IChatten, William J. - 
*Cable, William - 
ll*Cowan, Robert Wm. - 
Efinej, George 
Bich^rdson, William 



Catmore, Daniel 
'Se«der, Joseph 



40 
47 
56 

a4 



64 
48 
82 

86 
56 
84 

87 
48 

48 

45 
40 
41 
87 
51 
61 
29 
S6 



62 
69 

68 

57 



27 
48 
85 
82 



68 
51 
49 
69 



40 
50 
41 
48 
49 

68 
70 
54 



LIBnTS OF LICBWST.. 



NAMES. 



From Dangenets «p the Ri?er 
lliames to Gravesend, and up 
the River Medway to Stangate 
Creek, and from the Socrth Bsoy 
of the Brake to the westward as 
far as the west end of the Owtrs, 
and into and out of Ramagate, 
Dover, Sandwich, and Margate 
Harbours. 



From Dnngeness np the Rlrer 
Thames to London Bridge, and 
up the River Medway to Stan- 
gate Creek, and from te Sonth 
Baoy of the Brake to the west- 
ward « far M the wait end of: 
the Owers, and into uid out of 
Ramsgate, Dover, Sandwich, and 
, Margate Harbours. 

, From Orfordness up the North 
I Channel and the River Thames 
, to London Bridge, and in and 
oDt of Haowich Harbour. 



Fivm Orfordness up the Nartli 

Channel snd the Hiver Thames 

' to Gravesond, and in and out of 

Harwich Harbour. 



From l4>westoft or its parallel 

I of latitude to Orfordness, thence 

up the North Channel and Hfver 

I Thames to London Bridge, and 

I in and out of Harwich Harbour. 



From l4>we8tofk or its parallel 
of latitude to Orfordness, thence 
up the North Channel and River 
Thames to Gravesend, and in 
and out of. Harwleh Hwboor. 



From Southwold or its parallel 

of latitudd to OrfovAoess, IbeMel 

' up the North Channel and Bivfir 

I Thames to London Bridge, and 

Lin and out of Harwich Harbour. 



AGES. 



London District — cotd^. 



Dale, William - 
Hnn^ Geoi^e 

Disney, Henry Beverley 
Ferratt, William - 



Lowsey, John 
Rogers, John 

Black, John - 
Boult, James Clark 
Bowell, John 

Dcvereux, Edward 

Fleming, Samuel - 
Fulcher, James 

Hobson, Thomas - 

Leggett, Henry - 

Fleming, William - 

JenBer,-CharlQB - 

Legget^ JEdward - 
Leggett, Thomas - 
Lindsey, Thomas - 
Lindsey, Samuel - 
Lit tie wood, M. Foster 

RVeder, William - 
Rising, Thomas - 
Rouse, Royal 

Stanford, Joseph - 

Taniley, Isaiah 

Woods, William - 

Rust, William 
Aust, Burnham - 

Aldrich, William, jun. 

Bokenham, John - 
Button, George 

Girling, W. Andrew 

Land, William 

May, W. DL 

JElaevo Xbiunaa -* 

Simpson^ WiUiam 

Taylor, Edward - 

Wames, William - 



40 
84 

78 
61 

02 
7# 



60 
50 

58 

56 

58 
54 

84 

84 

45 

54 

50 
40 
54 
50 
66 

57 
54 
56 

89 

48 

58 

84 
29 



51 

49 
88 

88 

51 
81 
49 
58 
49 
89 



limits of license. 



From Southwold or its parallel 
of latitude to Orfordness, thence 
up the North Channel and River 
Thames to Gravesend, and in 
and out of Harwidi Harbour. 

From Yarmouth to and from 
the Dudgeon Light Vessel, and 
from Yarmouth to and from 
Orfordness, thence across the 
Kentish Knock to and from the 
Downs, and up the North Chitn- 
nel and River Thames to' London 
Bridge, and into and out of Har- 
wich HMrhonr. 

From Smith'* Knowl or its 
parallel of latitude to Orford- 
ness, IhflAoe up tke North Chan- 
nel and Rifver ThMaes to London 
Bridfe, and into and out of Har- 
wich Harbour. 



From Yarmouth to and from 
the Dadgeon Light Vessel, and 
from Yarmouth to and from 
Orfordness, tkenoe across the 
> B^aiUish Kno«k to and from the 
Downs, and up the North 
Channel and River Thames to 
Gravesend, and into and out of 
Harwich Harbonr. 



From Smith's Knowl or its 
parallel of latitude to Orford- 
ness, thence up the North 
Channel and River Thames to 
Gravesend, and into and out of 
Harwidi Harbonr. 



RATES of PILOTAGE for the London District. 
The Hates remain the same as prhited at pp. 141-7 orPart. Taper, No. 516 of 1855. 



243. 



A4 



Digitized by 



Google 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



Corporation of Trinity House op Deptpord Stronb— con^u^dl 



TOTAL AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vemiu 







(1.)- 


INWARDS. . 


- 


• 


- 


• • • 






BRITISH VESSELS. 






COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 1 




distances for which piloted. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by Steam. 


Tbwed by Steaa. 






No. Amount 


No. Amount 


No. 


Amooot 


No. 1 ABont 




From Sea, Orfordness, or Downs, to 

Nore or Warps. 
From Sea, Orfordness, Downs, or 

Hoseley Bay, to Gravesend, Chatham, 

Stangate Creek, or Blackstakes. 
From Sea, Orfordness, Downs, or 

Hoselej Bay, to Woolwich or Bkck- 

wall. 
From Sea, Orfordness, Downs, or 

Hoseley Bay, to Moorings, London 

Docks, City Canal, or St Kathe- 

rine's Docks. 
From Sheerness, Chatham, Stangate 

Creek, or Blackstakes, to Graves- 
end Reach. 
From the Nore or Warps to Gravesend, 

Stangate Creek, or Blackstakes. 
From the Nore or Warps to Long 

Reach, or Chatham. 
From Gravesend Reach to Lon^ Reach 
From Gravesend Reach to Woolwich 

or Blackwall. 
From Gravesend Reach to Moorings, 

London Docks, City Canal, or St, 

Katherine's Docks. 
From Long Reach to Woolwich or 

Blackwall. 
From Woolwich or Blackwall to 

Moorings, London Docks, City 

Canal, &c. 
From off Dongeness to Downs - 
From off Folkstone and Dover to Downs 
From off South Foreland and Deal 

Shore to Downs. 
From Dudgeon Parallel and Lemon 

to Orfor&ess. 
From Yarmouth, Lowestoft, or Smith's 

Know], to Orfordness. 
From Southwold to Orfordness - 
From Isle of Wight to Downs - 
From Plymouth to Isle of Wight 
In and out of Ramsgate Harbour 
From Sea to Dover Harbour 
Lay days, Docking, and Shifting Berth 
Distance Money .... 


6 

4 
4 

8 
2 
2 

1 
1 


£. s. d. 
49 10 9 

7 16 - 
S 18 6 

9 9- 

8 12 - 
2 9 6 

8 16 - 
11 14 - 


10 

19 
1,0S9 

8 

1 


£. i. d, 
74 19 8 

4S 15 4 
1,S52 9 2 

12 12 - 
2 5 - 

• . . 
. • . 


568 

2 

47 

129 

1,668 
876 

ess 

8 

6 

5 
8 

1 
1 

28 


£. 9. d. 

4,168 14 S 

2 8- 
118 7 8 

841 17 2 

6,699 6 6 
763 17 6 
880 5 6 

21 5 - 

12 10 - 

S 2 6 
32 6 - 
12 - - 

8 15 - 

88 8 6 


2,046 
8 

6 
1 

957 
2,219 

60 
^1 
21 

1 
2 

5 


£. t. I 

16,792 4 i 

88 6 7 

17 18 1 

8 4 e 

. • ■ 

2,680 10 8 
5,152 18 6 

M > ■ 

222 7 » 
58 4 6 
36 8 - 

1 17 6 

2 10 - 

8 8 6 




Total - - - 


- 


96 19 9 


- - 


1,991 - 9 


- • 


11,687 18 7 


. .. 


25,01818 - 





Vessels Chanoino at Oraybsbnd 



Amount paid by Vessels which have to take or pay for two or more f 
Pilots 4 



Number 
ofVcMcb. 



5,198 
6,498 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER I860. 



- Corporation of Trinity House of Deptford Strond— con/sisuec?. 



Into and Oat of the Port of Londony in 1860. 



(l.)-IN WARDS. 



FOREIGN VESSELS. 



PRIVILEGED. 



Not Towed by Steam. 



No. 



Amount. 



Towed by Steam. 



No. 



Amoont 



UNPRIVILEGED. 



Not To%»ed by Steam. 



No. 



Amoont. 



TOwed by Steam. 



No. 



Amount. 



TOTALS. 



No. 



Amount. 



4 
1,716 



£. s. d. 
88 17 - 

16,807 12 6 



2 IS 10 4 



9 18 8 



1 

1 

1 
840 



707 
196 
193 

11 

685 

308 



10 

4 



8 5- 

•2 2- 

18- 
804 14 6 

8^6 10 1 



- 12 9 



2,875 15 - 

448 5 6 

288 7 - 

72 10 - 



1,762 7 - 



452 2 1 



1,140 



5 
894 

1,664 



18 

6 

21 



.24 
14 



£• «• d. 



£. s. d. 



9,885 5 6 



12 10 6 



29 4 - 



10 9 8 



10 



86 18 - 



10 16 - 
1,081 4 4 

4,899 19 9 



8 6 6 



2 
11 



5 15 - 
89-1 



72 18 
17 18 
21 19 



9 

5 

10 



82 12 6 
12 7 6 
15 9 6 



56 5 - 
17 12 6 



1 10 - 

2 15 - 



18 7 - 
29 4 9 



24^54 18 9 



16,121 8 4 



192 2 7 



19 



6 
11 



£. i. d. 



174 8 8 



14 16 8 
88 9 - 



8 2 6 
1 11 8 



8 15 - 



4 
5,510 



10 

2 

1 

8 
1,777 

6,151 

1 
1 

2,468 
607 
585 

14 

618 

228 

4 
1 
8 
1 
48 
4 



£. s. d. 
88 17 - 

46^534 8 .6 



69 6 ,5 

88 17 .5 

28 2 4 

6 9 6 

2 2- 

14 2 - 

4,757 4 10 

15,557 17 3 

8 6 6 
- 12 9 

8,425 - 6 

1,806 6 - 

738 18 6 

93 15 - 

1,889 17 - 

481 18 4 

44 - - 

le - - 

9 - - 

2 15 - 

54 19 - 

29 4 9 



280 17 8 



80,088 19 5 





- 


- Vbssbls Chanoino at Gbaybbend. 




AMOUNT. 


■ 


For Pilotage 
bdow GiBfcsend. 


*For PUotage 
above Gravesend. 


TOTAL. 


£. S. d. 
65,324 6 8 


£. s. d. 

16,268 2 10 


£. s. d. 

1 71,592 9 1 



243- 



B 



Digitized by 



Google 



\0 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



Corporation oj* Trinity House op Deptpord Strond — continued 



(2.>-0 U T W A R D 8, 



DISTANCES FOR WHICH PILOTED. 



BRITISH vessels. 



coasters. 



Not Towed by 
Steam. 



No. 



Towed by Steam. 



Na 



Am o uat . 



OVERSEA. 



Not Towed by Steam. 



No. 



Anoast 



Tf fwed by Steam. 



N«. 



Amonal. 



Prom Gmve^end, Chatham, Stangate 

Creek, or Bluckstakes to SeA, Orford- 

ness, the downs, or Hoseley Bay. 
Prom Lon^ Reach to Sea, Orfordness, 

the Dovvri?;^ or Hoseley Bay 
From Woolwich or Blackwall to Sea, 

Orfordness, Downs, or Hoseley Bay. 
Prom Moorings, London Docks, City 

Canalj and St. Katherine's Docks to 

Sea, Orfordnesat Downs, or Hoseley 

Bay, 
Prorn'Oravesend lo Nore or Warps - 
Prom Woolwich or Blackwall to Nore 

or Warps. 
Prom London Docks, &c. to Nore or 

Warps. 
From Lon^ Reach to Gravesend Reach 
Prom Woolwich or Blackwall to Gravfes- 

cnd Reach* 
Prom Moorings, London Docks, City 

Canal, or St. Katherine's Docks to 

Gravesend Reach. 
Prom London Docks, &c. to Woolwich 

or Blackwall. 
From Swin Middle to Sunk 
From Do^v^ls to Dnngeness - • 
Prom Downs to Beachey Head 
From Downs to Isle of Wight - 

Prnm Isle of Wight to Portland 
Prorw L^je of Wight to Start 
From Isle of Wight to Plymouth 

Distance Money - - - - 
Total - - - 



186 

6 
4 



£. s. d, 
1^140 2 6 



17 



£. 9. d. 
106 18 4 



87 8 - 
29 16 6 

4 



20 
15 



145 18 9 
106 7 1 



267 

2 
86 
18 



9 19 9 



7 18 2 - 



1 
29 

1,017 



18 8 
52 18 1 

1,712 6 9 



48 
21 



1,234 17 8 



2,126 6 3 



I 

1 

185 

I 
2 
8 



£. s. d. 

1,921 16 9 

17 12 - 

839 - 5 

146 4 2 



4 7- 



84 6 - 
60 16 4 



6 - - 

6 - -. 

1,998 - - 



7 - - 

20 - - 

34 - - 

52 6 4 



4,680 6 - 



261 

2 

701 
762 



143 
964 



£. s. d, 

2,060 12 2 

11 18 6 

7,774 10 - 

7,144 6 5 



4 lU - 



879 3 10 
1,608 4 ] 



1 



9 



72 15 - 



I 



- 19,052 - 9 



L 



Ybssels changing at Gravesend. 



Amount paid by Vessels which have to take or pay for two or morel 
Pilots - - - - - -J 



Number 
«f VefiMlB. 



1,410 
1,793 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOR TOE YEAR BNDINe 31 IMSCfiMBSR 1860. 



It 



CORFOSATION OF TbINITY H0U8B OF DbPTFOBO StB0NI>~C9»^III««|^. 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 







FOREIGN 


VESSELS. 


T 




( 




PRIYILBOBD. 


UNPRIYILBGED. 


OTALS. 


i 


Kot Towed by Steam. 


Towed by Stetm. 


Not Towed by Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 






No. Amoant. 


Na 1 Amouot 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 




£. S. d. 




£. f. d. 




. £. *. d. 




£. s. d. 




£. t. d.i 




944 6,154 12 6 


370 


2,108 14 2 


1 


8 10 - 


- - 


- - - 


2,045 


13,501 1 4 




1! 7 - - 


- - 


. 


- - 


- 


- - 


- 


5 


36 10 6 




80 1 699 18 7 


85 


861 14 6 


- - 


• 


t 


7 4 8 


938 


9,865 14 11 




179 1,638 10 4 

a 8 4- 


445 

1 


4,856 3 9 

1 
4 3 8 




r ' ' 


2 


23 12 2 


1,415 
6 


13,445 6 5 

16 16 8 
4 10 - 




- - 


. 


- - 


... 




. J . 


- - 


- 


- - 


. 


- - 


- 




4 7- 




57 . 46 18 - 

317 558 11 9 

1 

207 489 Id - 


8 
188 

557 


4 2 3 
228 8 - 

1,089 14 5 


- - 


- 


- - 


. 


41 
676 

2,774 


51 8 6 
1,818 1 5 

4,911 17 I 




1 


3 2 6 


- - 


. 




. i . • - 
1 


- - 


- 


- - 


. . - 


- - 


- 




1-9 




1 

71 

• • 
1 


4 11 - 
18 - - 

824 14 6 
11 - - 


2 


8 8 6 


- - 


« M • 




• - • 


266 

8 
8 


4 11 - 
18 - - 

5 - - 
2,898 13 - 

7 - - 
81 - - 
84 - - 




- - 


. 


- - 


- 




2 


40 - - 


• m 


- 


- - 


. 


- - 


- 


5 


92 5 4 




• » 


10,495 19 8 




8,610 18 10 


- - 


11 12 6 


- - 


30 16 10 


- 


46,241 18 6 



Vessels chanqinq at GRAVsasNO* 



A IT O U N T. 



For Pflotage 
•bore Grave send. 



For Pilotage 
below Gravesend. 



3,075 5 6 



£. S. d. 
11,981 - 10 



TOT A L. 



£. s. d. 

\ 
J 



Note. — In the above Return 
the number of vessels has not been 
totalled, because in veiy many in* 
stances pilotage service has been 
rendered to the same vessel for more 
than one of the distances specified 
and provided for in the ocde of 
Rates. 



243- 



B 2 



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12 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



Corporation op Trinity House op Deptford STROwD—cafOinued. 



OUTPORT DISTRICTS, 



General Eem4srL,—ln referenoe to the returns of the amounts received for Pilotage at the Trinity Honse Ontports, it is to be observed that the Nomber 
of VeaaolA lia» not| ia all cases, been totalled, becanse in many instances Pilotage Service has been rendered to the same Vessel Ibr mote than one of Oe 
DUtanceti Bpecifledj and provided for in the Scale of Rates. 



ABERDOVEY. 



Lewis Lewis 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
- aged 40 | Peter Daniel 



aged 71. 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 22, of Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1855. 



TOTAL AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


ERSEA. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 


TOTALS. 

J 


DISTAKCES 

for which 

PILOTED. 


COASTERS. 


OV 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVI- 
LEGED. 


Not Towed by Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by Steam. 




No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amoont. 


No. 


Amount* 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


'1 
Amoiait.J 


From Sea to Harbonr - 


117 


£. 8, d. 
60 2 6 


1 


£. s. d. 
1 - - 


1 


£. s. d. 

7 - - 


1 


£. «. d. 
4 10 - 


' nU 


120 


£. t. dL 
72 IS B 


• 


(2.)— U T W A R D S. 




From Harbonr to Sea - 


122 


62 5 6 


3 


2 2 6 


" 


- 


2 


2 8- 


nU 


127 


66 16 - 



BEAUMARIS. 

NAMES of PILOTS. 
The^ilots mentioned at p. 14 of Pari. Paper, No. 174 of 1868, are still aoting. 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at pp. 28 and 24 «f Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1656. 



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FOR THE TEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



13 



Corporation of Trinity House of Deptford Strond— Beaumaris — continued. 

TOTAL AMOUNT receiyed for PiLOtAOB of Vessels in 1860. 
(l.)--I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 




H 

s 


TOTALS. 


fonrbich 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amoont. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 1 Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


I^Sea(oatside the 
Soanl)toBeaninarIs 
Baj, Cooway and 
fiiagor. 

Ttm Sea (inside the 
SoaBd)toBe8iiBari8 
Bay, Conway and 
fiaogor. 

FroB Port Dioorwic 
toCadnaat 

fton Caaoarron to 
Cadnant. 


2 
3 

1 


£. s. d, 

1 15 - 

2 5- 

146-6 
- 11 - 


19 

1 
8 


£. #. d. 
13 6 9 

- 4 - 

1 II - 


14 
6 


£. «. d. 
34 17 6 

12 14 - 


12 

1 
1 


£. s. d. 
64 4 - 

17 6 

- 9 4 


3 


£. s. d. 
7 10 6 


1 


£. s. d. 
1 5 - 


nil . 


51 
10 

592 

4 


£. 9. d. 
122 18 9 

16 6 6 

146 13 10 
22- 


TbTiL - - - 


- 


150 11 6 


- 


15 1 9 


- 


47 11 6 


- 


66-10 


- 


7 10 6 


- 


1 5 - 


- 


667 


288 1 1 


(2.)— U T W A R D S. 


Fmn Beanmaria Bay, 
CoQwayaod Bangor, 

to Sea. 

PnACtdoanttoPoit 
Uaanrie. 

IramCbiDanttoCaer- 

oamo. 


1 

583 
8 


- 13 - 

157 7 - 
1 9 - 


IS 

4 
10 


10 1 - 

1 13 3 
5 2- 


20 


33 19 6 


10 


24 18 3 


2 


3 18 - 


2 


4 10 - 


nU - 


53 

587 
13 


77 19 9 

159-3 
6 11 - 


Total - - - 


- 


169 9 - 


- 


16 16 3 


- 


33 19 6 


- 


24 18 3 


- 


3 18 - 


- 


4 10 - 


- 


^3 


243 11 - 



^IhomisBale - 

ChttksBde - 

t Robert Cridland 
[lliQisasLee 
' John Oldmaa - 
' £dwia Press 



243- 



BRIDGWATER. 



aged 76 
62 
60 
69 
59 
66 
89 



NAMES of PILOTS. 




James Press, sen. 






aged 65 


Charles Djer - 






40 


George Lewis - 






89 


Henry Press 






36 


Thomas Griffiths 






31 


Thomas Lee, jun. 






81 


Robert Dyer - 






84 



Xtmi^tf </ XI<;enM.-»Wlthin ao mneh of the 
Bay of Bridgwater and the RiTer Parrett as is 
coloured blue on a map of the aaid bay and rirer, 
authenticated by the aignatore of Henry Broad- 
wood, Eaq., ii.p., and deposited at the offioe of 
the town derk of Bridgwater. 



RATES. 
T^ Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 26 of ParL Paper, No. 616 of 1865. 



B3 



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\^ 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



Corporation of Trij^ity House of Dbptford Strond— Bridgwater— conft'wi^^. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


Not 


PRIVILEGED. 


PS 


TOTALS. 


ibr wbicb 
P I L T E D^ 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. Amount 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


AboooL 


From Limits or Gore to 

Bridgwater. 
Fh>m Limits or Gore to 

Highbridge. 
From LimiU to Bnmbam 

From linits to Comb- 
wicb. 

From Bunibam to Dnn- 
ball. 

From Bnnibam to Higb- 
bridge. 

From Bumbam to PIm- 
lett 

Froui Banbam to Comb- 
wicb. 

From fiurobam to Bridg- 
water. 

From Combwicb to Bridg- 
water. 

From Black Rock to 
Bridgwater. 

Tides* Work 


89 
6 

12 

4 
3 

81 

9 

1 
1 
1,039 
1 
76 
1 


£. s. d, 
67 19 6 

2 12 6 

7 1 - 
1 18 6 
1 14 - 

9 1 - 

8 11 - 

- 6 6 

- 6 6 
306-2 

- 5 6 
21 7 6 

1 - - 


21 

10 

I 

2 
327 


£. 8. d. 
11 6 10 

6 17 - 

- 10 - 

- 9 - 
81 10 9 


4 
1 

3 

1 


£. #. d. 
6 2- 

2 11 - 

12 3 - 

• • 

1 6 - 

• • 


6 
2 


£. #. rf. 
11 11 9 

6 16 


8 
2 


£.8. d. 

1 18 - 

s" 2 1 


9 


£, 8. d, 
11 16 6 


oU 


131 
6 

22 

6 

10 

9 

1 

1 

1,867 

1 
76 

1 


£. 1. d. 
100 8 6 

6 3 6 

M18 . 

2 8 6 
8S . 6 

910 > 

3 11 - 

- 5 6 

- 5 6 
887 Mil 

- 5 6 
21 7 6 

1 - - 


Total - - - 


- 


412 1 8 


- 


99 13 7 j - 


22 2 - 




17 13 3 


- 


9 16 - 


- 


11 15 6 1 - 


- 


573 -11 



(2.)— OUT W A RDS. 



to 



to 



to 



to 



to 



From Bridgwater 
Black Rock. 

From Bridgwater 
Dunball. 

From Bridgwater 
Puulett. 

From Bridgwater 
Burnham. 

From Bridgwater 
Limits or Oore. 

From DuobttU to Barn- 
ham. 

From Combwicb to Limits 

From Dunball to Limits 

From Pttulett to Burn- 
ham. 

From Biirnltam to Limits 

From Combwicb to Burn- 
ham. 

From Highbridge to 
Limits. 

Total - - - 



21 
1 



243 
48 

a 

4 
3 



6-6 
- 6 6 



72 16 10 136 



16 
2 



39 16 - 

2 6- 

13 8 - 
1 8 6 
- 13 - 



4 11 



34 8 8 



9-9 
- 12 - 



2 6 



- 148 12 1 



23 .14 3 9 
3 I - 13 10 

1 ; - 7 6 



4 2 2 6 



1 6 



4 1 - 



62 1 2 j - 



6 7 



17 4 



3 IB 1 



4 10 1 8 



10 1 8 



6 6 7 



3-0 



9 9 4 



21 

1 

I 

380 

81 

11 

7 

4 
2 



6 - e 

- 6 6 
^411 

108 II 6 

71 6 4 

2W10 

23 10 tf 
1 J6 - 

- 18 - 



19 11 3 3. 

2 ' U ^i 

3 ^ ^ A 

- Lw9 9~1 



B R I D P O R T. 



John Pester 
Edward S. Boucher 
Thomas Cole 
John Mannel 



NAMES of PILOTS. 

aged 541 

81 I LimiU of Licen8€, — From Sea into the Harboor 
34 I of Bridport, and from the said Harbour to Sea. 
59J 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 26 of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1855. 



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VOR THB TEAR ENDING 31 I>BC£HBER I860* 



15 



CoBPORATioir OF T»naTT House of Dbptfobd Steond*— Beibpobt*— con^wtterf. 

TOTAL AMOUNT receiyed for Pilotaob of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— IN WARD, S. 





BRITISH 


VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 

for which 

PILOTED. 


COASTERS, 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


TOTALS. 


Not Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by Steam. 






No. 


Attionmt 


No. 


Amoant. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


From Set to Harixmr - 


123 


£. s. d. 
61 13 10 


6 


£. #. d. 
9 5 6 


9 

• 


£. #. d. 
12 10 - 


- nU - - 


137 


£. f. d. 
83 9 4 



(2.)_0 U T W A R D S. 



From Harboor to Sem 



121 



43 19 - 



8 4 6 



6 14 11 



dU 



135 



58 18 5 



Hagii Williams 
John Jones - 
Hugh Jones - 
tVilliam Jones 



CAERNARVON. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



aged 58 Griffith Griffiths ... aged 67 

- 49 William Jones - - - - 60 

- 47 Mark Jones - . - - - 88 

- 88 John Jones 83 



Limit* of Lieenge. — From the Outermost 
Buoy on the Bar of Caemarron to Port Dinorwic, 
Bloel-y-don, and vice vend, and into and out 
all ports and places within those limits. 



J5 



RATES. 

The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 27 of Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1855. 



TOTAL AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


o 

i 


TOTALS. 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not 
Towed by Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Towed'SrSteam.TowBdbySteam. 

1 


Not 
Towed by Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 






No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


hm Outer Buoy or Bar 

to Caemarroo. 
&«om Port Dmorwic to 

Oater Buoy and to 

CieniarToo. 
^rom Holyhead to Port 

KeoTwic* 
Lay Baji, Tide Work, &c 


36 
19 


£. ». d. 

19 9 - 

20 19 - 


5 


£. ». d, 

2 19 - 


2 


i. 9. d. 

4 10 ^ 

2 8- 


6 


£. t. A 
4 4- 


1 
1 

1 


£. s. d, 
1 11 3 

- 5 - 
1 10 - 


1 


£. #. rf. 


nil 


44 
28 

1 

1 


£. a. d. 
28 9 3 

27 16 - 

1 - - 
1 10 - 


Total - - - 


- 


40 8 - 


-- 


2 19 - 




6 18 - 


- 


4 4- 


- 


3 6 3 


- 


1 - - 


- 


74 


58 15 3 



|taiC 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



Caenmrron to Bar 
or Outer Buoy. 

Caeniarvon to Port 




182 



14 



137 1 - 



9 17 



146 18 



2 12 - 
- 5 - 
1 - - 



3 17 - - 



4 10 6 



4 10 6 



3 2 6 
- 6 - 



3 15 6 



3 8 6 



3 15 6 



nU 



197 

2 

15 



214 



151 1 6 

- 11 --P 

10 17 - 



162 9 6 



B4 



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RBTUKNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



COBPOBATION OF TrINITT H0U8B OP DePTPORD STUOTSTD—cmtitUted. 



CARLISLE. 



NAME of PILOT. 
George Rale ...... aged 48. 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 28 of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1865. 



TOTAL AMOUNT receiTod for Pilotage of Vessels in 1800. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 



• 


BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSEC& 






DISTANCES 
forwhiek 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 




TOTALS. 


PILOTED. 


Not 
Towed by Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not 
Towed by Steam. 


Not 
Towed by Steam. 






No. 


Amouit. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amoa 


from MBryport to SiJOoth - 
?rom Maryport to Gorliale - 
From Maryport to Annan - 


18 
5 
6 


£. #. d. 
11 8 1 

7 8 9 

7 19 8 


1 


£. «. d. 
- 15 9 


6 
2 


£. #. d, 
6 18 1 

4 19 9 


1 


£. #. d. 
- 19 8 


ml 


21 
5 

7 


19 le 

7 8 
U19 


Total - - - 


- 


S6 11 1 


- 


-16 9 


- 


11 17 10 


- 


- 19 3 




38 


40 3 









(2.)— U T W A R D S. 










\ 


Prom Silloth to Mai7p<Mrt - 
Trom Carlifilft to Maryport - 


1 


1 5 4 


2 


1 11 6 


4 


4 17 - 


1 
1 


1 9 9 
18- 


nil 


8 

1 

9 


9 3 
I « 


Total - - - 




15 4 


- 


1 11 6 


- 


4 17 - 


- 


2 17 9 


- 


10 11 



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FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



17 



CoBPORATiON of.Tkinitt House OP Deptpobd Stbond— confe'nued. 



COLCHESTER. 



John Howard 



NAME of PILOT. 

r Umii* ^f lAeenn : — From a line drawn firom the 
• aged 47< Naxe Tower to the Baoj of the Ganfleet up the Cohie 
I^RiTer to Colchester. 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 29 of Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1865. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(I.)— I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH 


VESSELS. 


FOREIGN 


VESSELS. 


1 




DISTANCES 
for which ^ 
PILOTED. 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 




OTALS. 


Not Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by Steam. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 






No. 


Amonot 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amooot. 


No. 


Amoont. 






£. *. rf. 




£. #. d. 




£. 9. d. 






£. #. d. 


fVoin Pyefleet to Tf iveohoe - 


1 


- 18 - 


2 


1 14 6 


7 


5 17 - 


- - nil - 


10 


8 9 6 


From Pyefleet to Colchester - 


2 


2 17 - 


- 


. 


2 


3 3 3 


- 


4 


6-8 


From £aitne»s to Colchester - 


- 


. 


- 


.- 


1 


2 2 6 


- - 


1 


2 2 6 


Fran Eastness to WWenhoe - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


6 10 - 


- 


4 


6 10 - 


l^tance Honey - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


23 17 3 


- 


3 


23 17 8 


1 Total - . - 


- 


3 15 - 


- 


1 14 6 


- 


41 10 - 


- 


- 


46 19 6 


1 

i 




(2.)— U T W 


A R D S. 








Rom Wireuhoe to Pyefleet - 


1 


- 12 - 


- 


. 


2 


1 10 - 


. . nil - 


3 


2 2- 


FroB Wif enhoe to Eastness - 


- 


. 


- 


- 


5 


8 11 8 


. 


5 


8 11 8 


Fnm Colchester to Eastness - 


- 


- 


- 


. 


3 


5 10 3 


. . 


3 


5 10 9 


From Eastiiess to Sank - 


- 


- 


- 


. 


1 


2 9- 


- 


1 


2 9 • 


From Wif enhoe to Sunk - 


- 


- 


2 


7 15 6 


5 


Ip 12 - 


- 


7 


24 7 6 


Dblance Money 


- 


■ a » 


- 


. 


1 


6 - - 


- 


I 


6 


Total - - - 


- 


- 12 - 


- 1 7 15 6 


- 


40 12 11 


• « • • 


^ 


49-6 



COWES AND PORTSMOUTH DISTRICTS. 



I 



NAMES of PILOTS. 

COWES. 

See the list printed at p. 18 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860. With the exception of Edward Mitchell, jun., the 

Persons there mentioned are still acting. 

G Greenham, R. Newman, John Wallis, T. Hanrey, and G. Greenham, Jan., are further licensed from the meridian 

of the Start 



243. 



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RBTUBNS RBLAllNG TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGB, 



Corporation op Trinity House op Deptpobi> Strohd— Cowbb and PosseofOUTH — continued^ 



PORTSMOUTH. 



S^ p. 18 of Pari, Paper, No. 244 of 1859. The Persons there mentioned are still acting,, with the addition of 

Charles H. Hardy, aged 49. 



RATES. 

The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at pp. 31 and 32 of Pari. Paper, No.. 616 of 1865. 



AMOUNT reoeiTed for Pilotaob of Vbssblb in 1860. 
(l.)_IN WARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






^ DISTAWCE3 


COASTBR& 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


s 

> 


TOTALS. 


for which 
PILOTED* 


Not Tewed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Toirad l^ 
Steam. 


Towed by 
St«am. 


1 




No, 


Amomit. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amoaat 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


Prom Sea to Portsmouth 

llarhtjur. 
Prom Sufi to Spithaud 
Prom SpUhcail to Ports- 

ujotith Harbour- 
Prom Sea to Cowei - 
From fic'a to Motherbafflk - 
Proro ^«a to Leap - 
Froiti Sea to St. RtkEi's - 
Prom Scji to Brpmbles 
Fh)m Ss^a to Easjjle llorst - 
Fftitn Sea to Stokci Bay - 
Ffotii Sea to Calsbot 
Fwm Sim to Lyiiiin^n - 
From Seftto Yarmouth HomU 
FroMj Se* to Jack id the 

Bucket. 
Ptoin Pf rpdles to Leap 
Fi^m Pfet<ilie» to Cowe» - 
From St. Holt'ji'ft to Mother- 
bank. 
Pfom St. Helea'ft ti Porti- 
mouth, 
Trom Nab to Spithead - 
From Nab to i'ortsmootk 

Harbonr. 
From Motherlmnkto Portt- 

iTioutli Harbour. 
From Jack in the Basket 

to Lymint^tOD. 
From *Cowea lUals to 

Cowt'9 Harbour. 
Fi^fim Yafffloutti EuadA ta 

yurmoutU Hm bour. 
From Sea to Cliidse?ter aad 

IjttWffltmie Harbour. 
Bemovbig ^utisin Coww 

Dntrict. 
Xay Dayft, TMe Work, &c» 
Tnini[»orting In Portamonlh 

Ilarboor* 
Di»tance Money 


4 

1 
7 1 

1 
S 

20 
7 
3 

8& 
G 
9 


£. #. d, 
18 14 6 

3 - - 
5 16 - 

2 - - 

2 8- 

Sl 3 10 
5 6 6 
1 IB - 

96 8 - 

4 - - 
I - 3 


20 

1 
7 

2 

7 

1 
1 

1 


£. #. d. 
86 14 - 

2 13 - 
18 16 - 

5 16 - 

24 17 - 

2 9 6 

3 4 6 

1 19 - 


22 

58 
6 

30 
43 
12 
21 
4 

1 

1 

1 
1 

3 

1 
2 

10 
12 

7 


£. «. d. 
97 IS 6 

208 4 1 
8 16 8 

99 1 - 

136 19 4 

48 15 6 

30 16 - 

7 15 

3 10 - 
2 12 6 

4 - - 
1 1 7 

10 4 - 

1 14 - 

2 7- 

10 10 - 
12 12 - 

16 14 - 


18 

45 
5 

6 
3 

81 

1 
3 

1 
1 
4 

6 
1 

1 


£. #. d. 
56 C 6 

77 9 9 
9 3- 

24 B - 
12 4 7 
343 19 6 
3 5- 
710 - 
5 8- 
3 - - 

14 - - 

15 11 - 

2 18 4 

2 - - 


29 

57 
7 

90 

104 

11 

16 

3 

10 
2 
2 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
2 
13 
3 
1 

6 
11 

13 


£. *. d. 
130 11 6 

194 13 7 
8 18 - 

292-6 

267 - 7 

36 5 - 

24-9 

8 4 6 

2) 16 - 
7 10 - 
2 14 - 

1 2 6 

- 18 9 

2 12 6 

- 16 11 

3 - - 
18- 

2 8- 
13 18 9 

3 4 6 

2 6 - 

» • 

6 14 - 
13 8 - 

29 17 - 


5 

28 
2 

70 
6 

7 

I 

_ 

3 

1 
1 


£. s. d, 
18 14 - 

13§ 5 - 

2 11 4 

350 8 4 
20 19 1 
25 - - 

18 10 6 

18 1 '- 

■ • 
- 15 - 

3 3- 


nil 


93 

190 
34 

198 

157 

118 

38 

13 

1 

15 

6 

8 

8 

1 

6 
2 
2 

1 

3 
3 

1 
23 
23 

6 
90 

5 

19 
23 

22 


£. 1. d. 
408 14 - 

616 5 5 

48 1 - 

771 8 9 

410 8 7 

478 17 - 

56 1 » 

87-6 

5 8- 

49 6 - 
21 10 - 

5 6 6 
3 10 6 
- 18 9 

15 11 - 

6 IS 6 

1 18 6 

2 9 6 

10 4 - 

9 3 10 

18- 

25 5 10 
23 11 3 

5 2 6 

98 18 - 

4 - - 

17 19 8 

26 - - 

51 14 - 


Total -. - - 


- 161 15 1 


- 


141 9 - 


- 


703 6 8 


677 3 8 


- 


1,082 7 3 


- 


578 2 3 


- 


- 


3,244 3 11 



Yessbls Changing at a Line from Eagle Hurst Point to North-west Bramble Buoy. 



Amouat paid by Vessels which have to take or pay for two or more Pilots 




For Pilotage 
below the Line. 



£. *. d. 
144 18 9 



Digitized by 



Google 



fOa THE YSAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



19 



CoRPORAXiOK OF Tmhitt Hou8£ OP Deptfobd Stbokd— Cowes aud 'Poutbuovtu-- Continued. 



3.— O U T W A R D S. 



DISTANCES 

ilirwMck 

PILOTED. 



Pram PortinKHith Harbour 
to8«a. 

JjooSpitiMtdtoSaa 

PkMi Porfeaonth Hmrtour 
toSpitheMl. 

Aoa XoOerbaak to Sea - 
Aom Covet to Sea - 
Pnm St Helen's to Sea - 
From YarmoBth Boads to 



Fnm Lyniq^ to Sea - 

Pram Bnablee to Sea 

Fnm LjmiDgtaD to Nab - 

From Lymio^oo to Needles 

Irani Lyidngton to Jack- 
is-the-Basket. 

Proa Portsmoath to St. 
HeleB'a. 



Pnn PorUmontb to Bram- 

bio. 



Pram Cowes Harbour to 
Cowei Roads. 

From Laoirstone and Chi- 
dMter Harbours to Sea. 

From Iile of Wight to SUrt 
Mtmce Money • • 



Total 



COASTERS. 



BRITISH VESSELS. 

OVERSEA. 



Not Towed bj 
Steam. 



No. 



70 



Amonnt 



9 7- 



2 10 



- 16 - 
7 17 - 



87 16 



Towed by 
Steam. 



No. 



68 6 - 



Amount 



£. #. d, 

41 18 6 

2 13 - 

80 4 - 

2 16 8 

2 10 - 



Not Towed by 
Steim. 



No. 



2 9 6 



72 11 8 



Amount 



£. #. d. 
68 11 11 

127 16 8 
2 9 4 

107 14 8 

90-6 

26 6 11 

9-10 



1 18 9 

2 14 6 



18 



Towed by 
Steam. 



No. 



£. *. d. 

167 2 - 

60 3 8 

8 10 - 

12 4 8 

11 - - 

2 16 3 



442 8 8 



Amount 



256 10 2 



FOREIGN VESSELS. 



PRIVILEGED. 



Not Towed by 
Steam. 



No. 



£. s. d. 
180 16 6 

81-9 
- 8 - 

191 4 7 

277 11 6 

9 12 6 

12 6 

2 6- 



Amount. 



16 



1 8 - 

11 4 3 

1 11 6 



8 10 



767 11 



Towed by 
Steam. 



No. Amount 



£. J. d, 
83 1 8 

16 - - 



6 12 - 
281 1 6 



nU 



8 16 



838 16 8 



TOTALS. 



No. 



Amount. 



126 

104 
18 

112 

166 

21 

8 

9 
1 
1 
4 
9 

1 

1 

12 

71 

2 
8 



£. «. d. 
490 17 7 

286 13 8 
29 1 4 

820 11 

662 3 6 

36 16 7 

10 3 4 

2 6-- 
1 - - 

1 18 9 
8 10 6 
8 18 - 

2 9 6 
1 8 '- 

14 6 9 

89 7 6 

18 

8 10 - 



9 9 



243- 



DARTMOUTH. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
The Persons mentioned at p. 22 of Pari. Paper, No. 174 of 1868, are still aeting. 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 21 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of I860.. 



C 3 



Digitized by 



Google 



CO 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE^ 



CoRPOEATiON OF Trinitt House OF Deptford Strond— DARTMOUTH — continued. 



TOTAL AMOUNT receiyed for Pilotage of Vessbls in 1860. 
(l.)_I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS 








DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


Q 

H 

% 

M 

s 

to 


TOTALS. 


for wfaich 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 




No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Aroonnt. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amonit 


'Harbour. 

Prom Sea to Torbay 

VwBk Sea to Brixham 

Phmi Sea to Torquay 

]Ph>m Torbay to Dartmouth 
Harbour. 

^Prorn Torbay to Torquay - 


3 

1 


£. #. d. 

4 2 6 

• • 
12 6 


1 


£. s, d, 
2 5 6 


44 

2 


£. #. d. 

01 14 9 

4 - - 


22 

1 
1 


£. f. d. 
50 2 6 

2 16 - 
4 2 6 


60 
3 

1 


£. s. d, 
126 9 9 

12 - - 
1 12 6 


20 
2 


£. «. d 
44 6 - 

8 2 6 


dU 


150 

5 

I 
i 
3 

1 


£. ad 
819 l- 

16 -- 
2 16- 
112 6 

12 5- 

I 26 


Total - - - 


4 


5 5- 


1 


2 5 6 


46 


95 14 


24 


57 1 - 


64 


140 2 3 


22 


52 8 6 


- 


161 


852 17- 



(2.)-0 U T W A R D S. 



Prom Dartmouth Harbour 
to Sea. 

Rpom Torbay to Sea - 

From Brixham to Sea 


- 


- 


1 
1 


1 10 4 
- 13 4 


43 


59 2 - 


13 


26 16 4 


49 

2 
2 


G5 8 10 

2 16 - 
1 9 4 


21 

1 


28 18 - 
- 10 4 


nU 


127 

3 
3 


181 15 6 

3 «4 
2 8 


TOTAl - - - 


- 


- 


2 


2 3 8 


43 


69 2 - 


13 


26 16 4 


53 


69 14 2 


22 


29 8 4 


- 


133 


187 4 6 



EXETER. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
The Persons mentioned at p. 21 of Pari. Paper, No. 6, Sess. 2 of 1857, are still acting. 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed in the Pari. Paper, Mo. 174 of 1868, pp. 28, 24. 



TOTAL AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessrls in 1860. 
(1.)— 1 N W A R D S. 





BBITISH VESSELS. 





FOBEIQN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 

for which 

PILOTED. 


C0A8TEBS. 


OVERSEA. 


PBIVILEQED. 


UNPRIVI- 
LEGED. 


TOTALS. 


Not Towed bjr 
Steam. 


Towed bx 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amoont. 


No. 


Amoant 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


AntmL 


Prom Sm to Axmouth 

from 86ft to Bight at Ezmouth - 

from Bight ftt Bzmoath to Turf . 

Prom Bight at Ezmouth to Top- 
iham. 


28 
842 
282 

88 


£. : d. 
15 14 - 

508 12 10 

102 8 3 

19 14 6 


2 
3 
8 


£. #. d. 

8 1 10 
1 14 8 
1 13 4 


2 
32 
21 


£. «. d. 
12 

74 5 

10 13 - 


1 
4 


£. #. a, 

3 19 1 
2 3 2 


29 

10 


£, ; d, 

76 7 11 
4 14 5 


2 
2 


£. «. d. 

6 15 2 
1 9 9 


1 


. e. d. 

1 10 10 


80 

409 

272 

86 


£,$,£. 

MM 6 

671 IS 2 

ItiU 3 
21 Tit 


Total - - - 


635 


647 4 7 


7 


9 10 


55 


80 1 - 


5 


2 8 


38 


81 2 4 


4 


8 4 11 


1 


1 10 10 


- 


6J8 15 9 









(2.)- 


■OUTWARDS. 


















From Topeham to Eimouth 
From Turf to Ezmouth - - 
from Bight at Ezmouth to Sea - 


40 28 18 7 
168 76 2 8 

188 84 4 7 


1 
2 


15- 
1 - 1 


2 
30 


- 17 8 
24 U 4 


1 


-10 - 


28 


23 16 10 


1 
1 


- 16 5 

- 16 11 


— 


- 


41 
173 
194 


2«18 T 
78 14 4 
183 19 8 


Total - - - 


847 1 184 - 5 


3 


2 5 1 


82 


25 9 - 


1 


-10 - 


23 


28 16 10 


2 


1 18 4 


- 




- 


237M 8 



uigiiizea oy 



oogle 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER I860. 



21 



Corporation op Trinity House op Deptpord Strond — continued. 



FALMOUTH. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 

Stt Uie Li3t printed at p. 22 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860. Joseph J. Vincent, aged 2d, has been appointed in the place of 

Joseph Sharrock. No other alteration has been made. 



RATES. 





P B 


B T. 








8 
and 


8 to 10. 


11. 


12. 


13. 


14. 


15. 


10. 


17. 


18. 


10. 


20. 


21. 


22. 




under. 




























rram inUt u faittffaiary Use drawn Arom the Llcht^ 
HmoD St ABthooy't Point, to the Block Hooae 
oaPadcBBbPoliittoSM 


f. d. 


#. d. 


s. d. 


s. d. 


«. d. 


s. d. 


: d. 


#. tf. 


f . d. 


: d. 


$. d,^ 9. d. 


«. d. 


«. d. 


noB OBHUe u imagtmiy line drawn firom the 
Jfuiada to tlie Dodmui to within an inmsinary 
Ihw dmvB Aon the Liglit Honw on St. Antliony't 
Poiit to tbe Bloeic Honra on PendennU Point 


»1 - 


M - 


31 - 


»7 - 


40 - 


44 - 


48 - 


58 - 


59 - 


00 - 


74 - 


88 - 


02 - 


105 - 


Thm iuide u ima^nnrr Une drawn from tbe^ 
IhMdcs to tbo Dodman to within an imaginary I 
liM dkwa ftom tbe Light Honn on St. Anthony's ( 
Potet to the Block Hoiuo on Pendennis Point J 


14 - 


17 6 


10 6 


24 


to 6 


"• 


82 - 


88 6 


30 6 


44 - 


49 


55 6 


01 


70 - 


7jm iaiide u imtiriDary Ifaie drawn from th« Lights 
Hook on St. Anthony's Point to the Blodi Bourn 
<n Peodemit Point to Carrick Bonds, Faimouth 
iBOcr Huixm, St. Mown Harbonr, and St. Just 


10 6 


18 - 


15 e 


18 6 


20 - 


IS - 


24 - 


20 


29 6 


33 - 


87 - 


41 e 


48 - 




1 TUKl broogbt to an anchor, or taken from her an- 
etenge bfs pilot, outside an iroaghiary line drawn 
iniD the Ugbt House on St Anthony's Point to f 


52 


inMI, the master of which employs a pilot, within 
tk dtoiet tnl not anchoring or coming within an 
iUKiBuy line drawn from tbe Light House on St 

Poii^ ii to pay, hiwanb or outwards . - J 






























naaesaadtieererstfto HelfordHarboor . . 


18 - 


81 - 


24 - 


90 - 


80 - 


as - 


87 - 


41 - 


46 - 


53 - 










InaCKTltk Roads and vice vtrad to FUmonth Inner 
Hfltair. 8t Mawcs Harbour, and St. Just Pool, 
l<.tl l« foot of the draught of water. 






























Pnm Cuiiek Boads and vUe versd to Bettronguet, 
U pw tot of tbe draught of water. 






























^f>inC^mekBoadsandvte9r«rsdtoMalpas,ts. Ad. 
iw flw of the draught of water. 































Theieroii ntei above specified are to be snltfect to a reduction of one-fourth part in respect to the pilotage of yeseels towed by steam-Tessels, prorided that, if the assistance of « 
"^■■-^Ml is rendered for a part only of the distance for which any sooh rate Is payable, the said reduction of one-fourth shall be made on such part only of such rate as shaU he 
l«V«Kttie 10 the distance towed. 

d^7{ ^ ^ ^ brou^t to an anchor outside an imaginary line drawn from the Light House on St. Anthony's Point to the Block House on Pendennis Point, unless at the ezpcesa 
«nn of Ike aaster, of which the pilot is to procure a certificate to entitle him to the pilotage ; and no Teasel Is to be broi^t to an anchor between an imaginary line drawn from the 
fc£L. ?f °" ^^ Anthoor's Point to the Block House on Pendennia Point, and an imaginary line drawn llrom the Block House on Pendennis Point to Carrick North Point, or 
**«««• tiie Booyt of the Narrows, unless under circumstances of unaToldaUe necessity. 

^ k^ **^ on board at aea, shaU be entitled to the following additional pay, prorlded a perfect imderstandhig shall have been come to between him and the master of tbe veaael 
an niBTiecs are accepted, and that he is to recciTe such additional pay, and the same shall haTe been recorded in the log book of his pilot cutter, as well as in that of the veasak 
«d a CertiAeale thereof ShaU haTe beeii given him by the master, vis.:— 





On Vessels under 
200 Tom. 


On Vessels of 

200T^»s 
and under 500. 


i 
On Vessels or 

500 Tons 
and upwards. 




If taken on board oiT the Lisard. or in the paraOel thmof, or meeting a vessel there and 
running before her, not being able to be put on board - 


£. s. d. 
1 1 - 


£. f. d. 
2 2- 


£, s. d. 
3 8 - 



^^^^M having British registers are to pay one-fourth more than ships having British Registers, except when such first-mentioned ships shall, by any order of Her ITi^eety's Moat 
™|^>*Ue Privy Council, be privileged to enter the ports of this kingdom, upon paying the same duties of tonnage as are iMiid by British ships, In which case such ships and veaeehi 
wt Imiof British registers shall pay the like rates of pilotage only as are payable by ships having British Reglstera ; the said surplus rate, chargeable on unprivileged f(»eign vessski> 
'sto be pdd to the collector of thiii Corporation's light dues at the custom-houso, Falmouth. ' 

^l^~No aUovaoce for a pilot going on board a ship in the harbour to take her out, except in extremely bad weather, or when ships are on shore, or making signals of distress^ in 
wi caies a nesonaUe compensation is to be made. 

^iP Tends bdomring to the Port of Truro, bound to or from foreign parts, including Guernsey, Jersey, Aldemey or Bark, are to pay no mora than one-half the above rates of piloCafe» 
^ oavvBtisg within the limiu of tbe Falmouth district on their passage to or Ihwn "" — ^ - - - . - . - . 



Trtaitj House, London, 
1 March 1800. 



^43. 



r firom Truro. The rate of 2s. d. per foot for subsequent removal remaining unaltered. 



P. J7. Berthon, Secrelarf . 



C3 



Digitized by 



Google 



22 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTArtE, 



CoBPORATiOH OF Tbintty House OF Deptfobd Strond— Falmouth — ccntintied. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in I860. 



(l.)-IN WARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 




1 


DISTANCES 
for which 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILFX3ED. 

Not Towed by 
Steam. 


T0T118. 


PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
bteam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amonnt. 


No. Amonnt. 


No. 


Amtnmt. 


No. iiBoat. 


YroB off the Lizard and the 
pjtmlleltherodf to Falmouth 
and places within an Ima- 
ginary line drawn from St. 
Antlinny'k Point to Pen- 
dennis Point. 

From Sea oattide an Imagi. 
narr liae from the Manacles 
to the Dodman te FUmouth 
and ptaMM within ttaa Une 
•hoTe Mated. 

From dea Intide an imaginary 
line firom the Manacles to 
the Dodman to Falmouth 
and places wliUn the line 
aboTe stated. 

From Sea ta Aachoragee 
oatslde the imaglnaiy Une 
above stated. 

From Csrrick Roads to FItl- 
mouth Harbour. 

From off the Dodloan to FW- 
mouth. 

Transporting within the Har- 
boor. 


5 

1 


£, s. d. 
13 - 

I 


5 
2 

- 


£. s. d. 

12 14 - 

I 

2 1 - 


87 

615 
68 
5 

1 
1 


£. •. d. 
379 16 6 

1,408 7 9 
87 6 6 
3 2 6 

2 7- 
1 7 - 


7 
3 


£. : d. 
6 9- 

12 12 - 
2 17 6 


300 

041 

58 

14 

S 
3 
2 


£. 9, d. 
1^0 1 6 

2,321 - 1 
74 8 3 

14 3 - 

2 6- 
12 14 - 
9 15 6 


4 

11 

1 

1 


£, 9. d. 
18 16 - 

22U - 

14 6 

1 I " 




23 

1 


£, «. d. 

SO 18 6 

41 17 - 
1 1 10 

• * ■ 


1 

1 

t 
401 

MOT; 

128 

20 

2 
4 
4 


£. ei 
1^5 1 i 

M«1I«U 
l«10 \ 

30 < 

1 6 

15 I 

5 S 


TOCA.L - - - 


" 


10 13 - 


- 


14 15 - 


- 


1,880 7 8 


- 


21 18 6 


- 


3,066 8 4 


- 


38 12 6 




w n 4 


- «;8S8U 



(2.)— OUTWARDS. 



From Falmouth and places 
vKhin an imaginary Ihw 
firom St. Anthony's Point 
to Pendeunis Point to Sea. 

Fkom outside St. Anthony's 
Point to Sea. 


10 


41 W - 


10 


SB 19 - 

- 


•00 

3 


1,330 OM 
8 r» - 


108 215 11 

1 

1 
1 


i;W2 
12 


2,639 1 2 
IS 6 


124 


257 10 8 


20 


45 18 2 


2,002 
15 


4,550 11 
15 13 


TOTAIr - - - 


- 


41 14 - 


- 


10 18 - 




1.342 10 10 


! 

- 215 11 

1 


- 


2,651 10 8 




257 10 8 


- 


45 18 2 


f 

- J4,5fi U 

1 



FLEETWOOD-ON-WYRE. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
The Peraoni mentioned st p. 23 of PgrL Paper, No. 244 of 1859, are still acting, wUh the addition of John Hesketh, aged si 



RATES- 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as piinted at p. 41, of Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1855. 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOR THE YBAR BNDINO 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



23 



Corporation op Trinity Housb op Deptford Strond — Flebtwood-on-Wyre— c<>»ftwMcrf. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels id 1860. 
(l.)-IN WARDS. 





-- 




BRITISH 


VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 




TOTALS. 


firwki^li 






















Not Towed by 


Towed by 


Not Towed by 


Towed by 


Not Towed by 


Towed by 


M 




PILOTED. 




Steam. 


Steam. 


Steam. 


Steam. 


Steam. 




Steam. 


► 
M 

S3 






No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Axnonnt. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. ! Amount. 






£. s. d. 




£. #. d. 




£. #. d. 




£, t. d. 




£. .. d. 




£. •. d. 






£. *. d. 


from First Distaoee off 


18 


17 10 - 


2 


2 6- 


23 


87 15 - 


15 


54 19^8 


10 


29 12 


8 


23 7 1 


nil . 


76 


215 10 3 


BosMUPointyioaliae 
































vith Pfle k Foodre, to 
































Fleetwood Haitoar. 
































?Tom SecoBd and Third 


29 


21 2 - 


2 


19 3 


9 


18 10 - 


7 


19 8 8 


5 


9 13 - 


3 


5 15 - 


- 


55 


75 17 U , 


Distaoces (from the 
































lig^thouie mod one 
































nuleoiitude) to Fleets < 






























wood Harbour. 1 






























Yom Foorth Distance 103 


53 5 6 


1 


- 9 - 


1 


1 7 6 


1 


1 12 7 


1 


1 - - 


1 


I 1 5 


- 


107 


58 16 - 


(inside tbe Lighthouse) 
































to Fleetwood Harbour. 
































Stance Money - 


- 


- 


- 


- . , 13 


24 3 - 


- 


- 


6 


8 8- 


_ 


- 


- 


19 32 11 - 


TOKkl. - - - 


- 


91 17 6 


-1*** 


- 131 15 6 


- 


76 - 11 


- 


48 13 6 


- 


30 3 6 


- 


- 


S82 16 ft 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



hnnFleeiafood Harbour 
to Sea. 



64 



30 3 6 



-1 6 



8 17 9 



40 



56 3 9 



6 19 6 



19 



22 15 8 



- Il36 



126 - ft 



F O W E Y. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
Tha Peroons mentioned at p. 23 of Pari. Paper^ No. 244 of 1859, are atill acting. 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 48 of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866. 



AMOUNT reoMTed for Pilotage of Vessels ia 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 

































BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELa 






DISTAN CE8 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


M 

► 
M 


TOTALS. 


^ fiir which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 

- 




i 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amonnt. 


r 

1 

tmi Sea to Harbours 
wn Roads to Harbours - 
aosporting within the 
■Met and Lay Days. 


4 

291 

2 


£. f. If. 

4 9- 

104 19 8 

1 6 9 


1 


£. #. d. 
2 - - 


1 
10 

1 


£. #. d. 

5 - - 
18 7 9 

- 9 4 


1ft 

41 
8 


£. #. d. 

37 3 6 

48 8 9 

5 9 6 


1 


£. s. d. 
- 17 '6 


nU - 


19 

342 

12 


£. s. d. 

48 12 6 

171 16 ft 

8 3 1 


- TOTAI^ - - - 


- |110 15 5 


- 


2 - - 


- 


23 17 1 


- 


91 1 9 


- 


- 17 6 


- 


- 


228 11 9 



(2.)— U T W A R D S. 



f. 

Nn Harbours to Roads - 
Mn Harbours to Sea 
^■ee Mooey 


244 
2 


84 18 9 
3 6 6 


- 


- 


7 
2 


8-8 
2 10 - 


25 
11 


26 15 11 

16 11 8 

4 - - 


- ! - 


- 


276 119 15 4 

15 22 8 2 

1 4 - - 


1 Total - - - 


- 


88 5 3 


- 


- 


- 


10 10 8 


- 


47 7 7 


1 


- 


- 


146 3 6 



M3. 



C4 



Digitized by 



Google 



24 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



Corporation of Trinity House of Deptford STUo^jy-— continued. 



GLOUCESTER. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
The Pilots mentioned at p. 26 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting, with the addition of William Smith, aged 26. 



RATES. 

The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at pp. 44 and 45, of Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1856. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 



distances 

for which 
PILOTED. 



BRITISH VESSELS. 



COASTERS. 



OVERSEA. 



Not Towed by 
Steam. 



No. 



From King Road to Lydney ' 67 

i 

3 

1 



From King Road to Chep- 
stow. 



From King Road to Gat- > 
combe. I 

From King Road to Sharp- 403 
neas Point. 



Distance Money - 
Total 



Amount. 



£. $. d. 
31 2 3 

2 10 

- 18 - 

471 4 11 



Towed by I Not Towed by 
Steam. i Steam. 



Towed by 
Steam. 



No. 



Amoant. No. Amount. ' No. 



£ 9. d, \ £.9. d. 



I 



10 1 1« 



1 1 4 

3 4 19 3 , 



Amount. 



£. s. d. 



74 142 1 3 1 108 ' 275 17 



- I 14-3 



275 17 - 



FOREIGN VESSELS. 



PRIVILEGED. 



Not Towed by 
Steam. 



No. Amoant. 



176 



£. s. d. 



Towed by 
Steam. 



No. Amount. 



^. 15 



297 9 6 



173 

1 



290 4 6 



£. 9. d. 



4a0 4 7 
3 10 - 



409 14 7 



UNPRIVI- 
LEGED. 



Not Towed by 
Steam. 



No. 



Amount. 



£. s. d. 



8 10 2 



TOTALS. 



No. 



1 
l»47 



£. Li, 

n s t 

fi 5 - 

I 
-18 ■ 

1,873 l« 1 

3 II 



i;^t9 IS 1^ 















(2.)— U T VV A R D S. 














1 


From Sharpness to King 
Road. 

From Lydney to King Road 

From Chepstow to King 
Road. 

Distance Money ... 


368 
80 


414 18 11 
66 15 10 


30 
4 


29 18 3 
3 7 5 


34 

1 
1 
1 


47 14 7 
1 IB 6 
I 7 - 
1 4 6 


U3 

- 


137 18 7 


100 

1 


105 8 6 

- ■ - 
- 15 - 


224 

1 


259 9 11 
- 17 6 


- 


. • . 


868 
85 

2 
2 


095 « f 
71 I , 

1 J 


Total - - - 


- 


481 14 


- 


33 5 S 


- 


52 4 7 


- 


137 18 7 


- 


100 3 6 


- 


260 7 5 


- 




- 


l^U 



HARWICH. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
The Pilots mentioned at p. 25 of Pari. Paper, No. 244 of 1859, are still acting. 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 46 of Pari. Paper, No. 510 of 1865. 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOE THE YE Alt ENDING 31 DECEMOEIR 1860, 



35 



Corporation of Teikitt House of Deptford Stronb — Harwich — continued. 



AMOUNT re^seired for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860- 
(K)_IN WARDS. 



DISTANCES 
P U T E D, 


BElTiSM VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






COASTERS, 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


1 

> 

cm 
p 


TOTALS. 


Not Towf rj ^y 


Towed by 


Not Towed by 
Steam* 


Not Towed by 
SleoOT. 


Towed by 
Steam, 




No. 


Amount. 


No- 


Amonnh 


ITo. 


AmodDt, ' 


No, 


AmotioL 


Ko. 


Amount* 


No. 


Amount. 


Ffoa Bflliing Onniod« to 
^EVQ Wntnwt to Mtti- 

iRHi UjttTTich to Wrabaaas 

|!ltraiS«mtfiw*jld to Orfbrd- 

TOTAI* - - - 


I 
3 

10 
6 
9 


4 4- 

5 5 - 

158 I 11 
4 % 6 

I 2 9 

1 1 5 


1 
1 


I II 6 

to a to 


1 
! 

4 


G G - 
^ 2 - 

- 9 S 

3 12 G 

• — 


51 

5 

7 

7 

11 

8 


173 7 2 
10 10 - 

4 5 10 

]9 G 1 
4 IB 

aa 13 - 

9 G - 


I 

1 


1 11 6 

^ 19 10 


nit 


54 

It 

312 1 
10 

8 

30 

5 

1 
11 

B 


£. #- rf. 

1B3 17 % 

21 - - 

163 17 6 

4 3 6 

1 2 9 

23 19 II 

5 18 - 
10 S 10 

22 13 - 

9 6. 


- 


173 17 7 


- 


U 17 4 


1 


- 


344 3 


' 


2 11 4 


- 


- 


44d 2 8 


(2.)— U T \V A R D S. 


Pto l|ttaiiittgiiT« to Mljt^ 

|ta,. 

ft^sai MaEmng tree to Wiab- 
ttm U^tkv to Wnbnesi 

^Ifcra^mbticMtQ Harxvich 
Hirwfeli to Rotllo^ 

boQ) Hanrich to Sea 
pa Hinrlch to Dowoi - 
Total - * - 


10 

304 
3 

1 
I 


- IS 3 
4 2 a 

I5d 1 11 

1 1 4 

1 I ^ 
1 11 6 


I 
1 


I 11 
10 5 10 


1 
4 


- 9 9 
$ H 4 


7 

24 

7 

1 




4 5 9 

10 6 - 

4 18 3 

1 1 - 

32 10 1 
SO 11 5 


1 

4 


* * 

* 19 9 
5 16 6 


an 


2 
10 

30 

a 
7 

10 
3 


- 12 3 

4 2 G 

162 17 & 
23 19 S 

5 17 n 
9 9- 

34 10 7 
30 17 4 


- 


166 10 e 


- 


11 17 4 


- J 4 9 1 


- 


83 1 6 


- 


15 3 


- 




272 G 8 


H 


L Y H E J! 


L D- 


1 

^"Ut Pilou tnenHcyii^ at p. 


NAM 

27 of Pari- Paper, No- 287 < 
Robe 


ES of PIL( 

>f 18C0, are still 
ri; Roberta, H^ed 


3TS. 

uctiag'j with the 
35. 


addition of Robert Jonca^ aged 32^ a nd 

, No. 016 of 1865. 

Digitized byVjOOQlC 


^K The He 


RATES- 
itea of Pilotage are the same as printed at p, 47 of Pari, Paper 


1 












B 







26 



REI^UENS BJIULTIKO TO PILOTS AND PILOTAOS, 



COBPOKATION OF TfilKITT HOUSS OF DePTFOSB STB01CD-rH0LXHEAJ>-^^»tift'inigdf, 



AMOUNT reoeired for Pilotage of VfiSSBLS in 1860, 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


3 

M 
M 

g, 

Hi 


TOTALS. 


for wUch 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amoant. 


No. 


Amoant. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amoant 


No, 


Amoant 


No. 


Amoant 


No. 


Anioimt 


Prom Sea to Old Harbour - 
From Sea to New Harbonr 
LayDayi . - - 


2 


£. s. d. 
1 14 2 


2 


£. 4. d. 

1 8 11 


7 
103 

1 


£. #. d. 

6 7 7 
89 9 9 

2 12 6 


20 


£. M. d. 
19 14 9 


6 

88 


JE. #. d. 

3 13 7 

71 8 8 


4 


£. f. d. 
3 8- 


nil 


12 
S19 

1 


£. <. d. 
9 1 2 

mi9 3 

212 6 


Total • - - 


- 


1 14 2 


- 


1 8 11 


- 


97 9 10 


- 


19 14 9 


- 


76 2 3 


- 


8 8- 


- 


- 


M8I2U 



(2.)-0 U T W A R D S. 



From Old Harboor to Sea - '- 
From New Harboor to Sea , 
From Off Holyhead to Point; 

Lynas. '. 
From Off Hdlyhead to Car- 

nanron. 

Total - - - 


2 


1 14 1 


1 


I 8 10 


6 

103 

2 

1 


6 7 8 
89 9 9 
10 10 - 

3 3- 


20 


19 14 6 


6 

88 
2 


3 13 6 

71 8 7 
6 6- 


4 


3 8- 


nfl 


II 

218 

4 

1 


9 11 

186 IS 9 

16 16 - 

3 3- 


- 


1 14 1 ' - 


1 8 10 


" 


108 10 6 


- 1 19 14 6 


" 


81 8 - 


- 


3 8- 


- 


- 


216 IS 10 



I P S W I c ». 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
The Pilots oientioned at p. 27 ef Pari. Paper, No. 287 of I860, are still acting. 



R AT E S. 

The Rates of Pilotage and Regulations are the same as printed at pp. 49, 60 of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1856. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


8 

o 

s 

E 

(3 


TOTALS. 


ibr which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
StMun. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 




No. 


Amoant 


No. 


Amoant 


No. 


Amoant. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amoant 


No. 


Amoant. 


No. 


AmoooL 


From Harwich toJUmn- 

ham Reach. 
From Levington Credc to 

Downham -Reach 
From Downham Reach to 

Ipswich. 
From Levington Creek to 

Ipswich. 
From Harwich to Ipswich 


47 

102 
606 

6 


£. s. d. 
19 4 10 

31 11 4 

263 11 6 

6 7 6 


3 

18 

379 

6 

3 


£. s. d. 

1 13 7 

6 18 6 

177 - 4 

4 2 9 

2 18 - 


18 

3 

31 

1 

1 


£. #. A 
10 9 . 

- 18 6 

17 5 7 

1 3 8 

1 - 3 


6 

2 

21 


£. «. d. 
2 18 3 

- 9 7 

10 6 5 


67 

3 

60 

6 


£' •> d. 

27 8 - 

- 13 9 

28 3 2 

4 6 6 


16 

34 

3 


£. J. d. 
8 4 3 

16 19 4 

3 10 9 


nil 


147 

128 

1,020 

6 

18 


69 17 11 

^ 11 \ 

603 6 : 

6 6 \ 

If 2 I] 


Total - - - 


- 


309 15 1 


- 


191 13 1 


- 


80 17 - 


■■ 


18 13 3 


- 


60 11 4 


- 


28 14 4 


- 


- 


636 4 ] 


(2,)— OUTWARDS, 


From Ipswich to Down- 
ham Keach. 

From Ipswich to Leving- 
ton Creek. 

From Ipswich to Harwich 


463 
66 
44 


183 7 7 
46 17 1 
43 8 9 


227 
80 
60 


80 14 11 
42 3 1 
37 12 7 


9 

1 
2 


3 8 7 
-12 3 
1 19 4 


1 
2 

1 


- 7 6. 
1 4 6 

- 14 3 


3 

28 


13 9 
23 14 6 


4 
36 


16 4 
26 17 10 


nU 


697 
148 
160 


270 8 i 

89 16 11 

133 ? ! 


Total - - - 


- 


272 13 6 


- 


160 10 7 


- 


6-2 


-12 6 3 


- 


24 18 3 


- 


27 4 2 


- 


- 


483 13 1 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOK THX TKAB BltDnfS 31 DBCBMBIB: I960. 



n 



CoKFesATioJf <NP TBimrr Hocrsx of Dstttobd STBOtm — coHUmuA, 



LOWESTOFT. 



NAMES of PrtOTS. 
Tbe RIelB mentioned at p. dO of Pari. Paper, No. 174 of 1858, are adll acting. 



BATES. 
Tke Rates •£ Pilotage aie the same aa printed at p. dd ef Park Paper, No. 84i of 18A6«. 



AMOUNT reoeired for Pilotage of Vessels in 1&60. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 



DISTANCES 
PILOTED. 



BRITISH VESSELS. 



COASTERS. 



Not Towed l>y 
Steftm. 



No. 



Amovnt. 



TV)wed by 
Steam. 



No. 



Amount. 



OTERSEA. 



Not Towed by 
Steam. 



No. 



Amoont. 



Towed by 
Steam. 



No. 



Amount. 



FOREIGN VESSELS. 



PRIVILEGED. 



Not Towed by 
Steam. 



No. 



Amount. 



Towed by 
Steam. 



No. 



Amount. 



o 

M 
O 
M 



% 



TOTALS. 



No. 



Amount. 



From Sea to Roads 
Ihn Boads to Harbour 
IHstmee Money - 



1 16 1 
60 2 6 



Wt 



£. #. d. 



I2»16 10 



£. #. d, 
»16- - 

10 a 7 



£. #. d, 

a 4 - 

24 16 2 



£. #. d. 

66 6 - 

19 2 7 

2 - - 



£. f. rf. 
2 4- 

38 1 1 



Total - 



61 18 7 



139 15 10 



17 4 7 



27-2 



77 8 7 



40 6 1 



(2;)— O U T W A R D S. 



ntn HariMJurtD Roads 
Inm loads to Sea 

Total - - - 



14 17 3 
17 6 



16 4 9 



58 19 4 
6 18 9 



65 18 I 



4 12 7 
27 1 3 



31 13 10 



14 11 11 
& la - 



20 1 11 



17 6 8 
73-6 



90 7 21 



21 9 A 
2 16 - 



24 4 5 



M A L D O N. 



nil 



29 
1357 



£. f. d. 

69 6 1 

282 6 9 

2 - - 



353 12 10 



nil 



189 
84 



131 17 
116 13 



248 10 2 



Wiffiam Handlej 
WiDiam Clark 
VaiUin Morris 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



aged 40 

- 33 

.. 70 



Joseph Handlej - 
Abraham Handlej 
Giles Austin 



aged 25 

- 68 

- 66 



r lAmiU of Zicerue — From a line drawn from the 
J Naze Tower to the Booy of the Ganfleet, up the 
I River Blackwater and Cfielmer to Maldon Brid'^e, 
Und vice ««rf^ ° 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 62 of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866. 



' 243. 



Tf 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



as 



RflTtTRNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



CoRPdRATiON OP Trinity House of Deptford Strokd — ^Maldon^ — continued. 



AMOUNT receiyed for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— 1 N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELa 




■" 


DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 1 OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


TOTALS. 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed hy 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


AmooDt. No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


AnoBBt 


From Stansgattt to Maiden 


294 


£. #. d. 

186 16 9 


9 


£. 9. d. 

4 8- 


10 


£. 9. d. 

6 13 9 


nil 


318 


10717 6 



(2.)— O U T W A R D 8. 



From Maldon to Stansgate 



284 



126 12 - 



18 9 



7 4 8 



295 



135 5 - 



M I L F O R D. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
The Pilots mentioned at page 29 of Pari. Paper, No. 244 of 1859^ are still acting. 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at pp. 53, 54 of ParL Paper, No. 516 of 1856. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— IN WARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


8 

s 

s 


TOTAIS: 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by Towed by 
Steam. Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 




No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


1 
Amount. No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Aipoimt 


From Sea to Milford Har- 
bour, below a line from 
Newton Noyse Point to 
Martin's Haven. 

From Sea to Milford Har- 
bour, above the said 
Une. 

From Sea to Pembroke 
Dock. 

From Thorn Island to 
Milford Harbour. 

Transporting within the 
district and lay days. 


1 
5 


£. #. d. 
2 16 - 

4 3- 


3 

1 
2 

3 


£. 9. d. 

3 18 6 

1 2 - 

4 4- 

2 17 9 


31 

7 
1 
3 


£. «. d, 
60 7 3 

39 6 6 
1 15 # 
3 3- 


16 

3 

2 

1 


£. #. d. 
36-9 

16 8 9 
9 18 - 

- 15 9 


20 

7 
6 


£. 9. d. 
37 9 6 

37 16 - 
6 19 3 


1 
3 


£. #. A 
1 12 6 

3 11 6 


nil 


71 

4 

18 

1 
20 


£. 1. 

Itt 4 

16 10 

91 i 

1 15 

20 10 


Total - - . 


- 


6 19 - 


- 


12 2 8 


- 


104 11 9 


- 


61 3 3| - 


81 4 9 1 - 


6 4- 


- 


- 


271 5 



«i 










(2.)— U T W A R D S. 










% 




J 


From Milford Harbour, 
above a line drawn from 
Newton Noyse Point 
to Martin's Haven, to 
Sea. 

From Milford Harbour, 
below the said lino to 
Sea. 

From Pembroke Dock to 
Sea. 


3 
6 


4 14 6 
14 3 6 


9 

4 
4 


20 17 - 

5 16 - 
9 2 3 


4 

35 
2 


14 17 e 

70 2 - 
6 4 6 


2 

11 
2 


8 12 6 

27 12 6 
6 8 6 


3 

9 
8 


6 8- 

14 4 3 
18 4 6 


4 

1 
1 


22 4 - 

1 13 6 

4 16 - 


- 


25 

60 
23 


77 W 

119 6 

57 14 

j 


Total - - - 


- 


18 18 - 


- 


36 14 3 


- 


91 4 - 


- 


41 8 6 


- 


38 16 9 


- 


28 12 6 


- 


- 


254 14 



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FOK THB TEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



29. 



Corporation op Trinitt House op Deptpord &tnosi>— continued. 



NEATH. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



Thomas Emanuel 


aged 48 


Tboma« Jones - 


60 


Daniel Perkins - 


43 


William Phillips 


46 


Lewis Roynolds 
Edward Vimgluui 


40 


68 


Charles Williams 


49 


Daniel Williams 


68 


Griffith Williams 


87 


Lewis Williams (I) - 


67 


William WiUiams (2) 


60 


William Williams (8) 


87 


William Williams (4) 


36 



Jobn Emanuel • 
Thomas White - 
Henrj Perrett - 
John Evans 
James Williama 
Daniel Erans - 
Thomas Gi^ffitha 
Thomas Jones - 
Jeremiah Gilbert 
William Phillips 
Greorge Phillips 
James Vaughan 



aged 42 
84 
68 
87 
27 
82 
24 
28 
40 
26 
24 
28 



Limiti of Xlceftte.— From the ontside of Neath 
Bar into the Port and Harbour of Neath, and vke- 
ver$d. 



RATES, 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at pp. 66^ 66 of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866. 



AMOUNT reoeired for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 





BRITISH YBS8ELB. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






SISTAVCEtf 


COJlSTERS. 


OVERSBi 


wedbjr 
toam. 


PBIVILEOBD. 


i 

5 


TOTALS. 


totmMA 
PILOTED. 


NotToiredb7 
StMm. 


Towadlir 
Steom. 


Not Towed by 
SteuL 


To 
S 


NotTowodbf 
Stoum. 


Towed by 
Stenm/ 






Mo. 


Amoont. 


No. 


Amount. 


Mo. 


Amount. | No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


Im S«B or Oster Boor to 

flmstitkn. 

Itaa Set or Oat«r Buoy to 
Roa Sco or Oater B«oy to 
HmUotoPortheftwl. - 


800 

as 

6 


175 U 11 
15 18 

3 8 

- 


1/>18 
170 
35 


£» 9. d. 

464 a 5 

00 11 11 
Sl 17 1 


1 
1 


- 7 - 
1 5 . 


1 


£.s. d. 

1 18 - 

- 8 - 


4 
4 


£. $, d. 

ass 

1 15 


t 
4 


£. ». d. 
-14 - 

t r - 


. nil . 

• • 


1^ 

880 
41 

1 


£.«. d. 
044 11 10 

120 1 6 

25 5 10 

15- 


TOTA& - - - 


- 


105-5 


- 


585 11 5 


- 


1 la - 


- 


2 1 - 


- 


8 18 3 


- 


3 1 - 


- - 


1^5 


701 4 1 



(2.)— OUTWARDS. 



hwVlntStitiontoBon - 


306 


100-3 


1.060 


628 15 8 


- 


- 


2 


1 10 - 


3 


2 - - 


2 


13- 


- nil . 


1,441 


827 8 11 


fnm Second StatloD to Sen 


17 


11 18 3 


150 


112 2 4 


1 


-15 


- 


- • 


3 


1 18 6 


7 


4 8 


- 


184 


181 8 4 


IhnlkkdStatkmtoSen - 


3 


1 11 I 


25 


15 7 8 


- 


- - 


- 


- - 


- 


• • • 


- 


- - . 


- - 


28 


10 18 8 


r Total - - - 


- 


218 8 7 


- 


751 5 8 


- 


- 15 


- 


1 10 - 


- 


3 18 6 


- 


5 11 




1.603 


075 11 - 



f 243. 



NEWHAVEN. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
The Peraona mentioned at p. 31 of ParL Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still aoting. 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 67 of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866. 



»3 



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3^ 



RETIOtNB RSULXnm TO PILOTS AND PltOTAOS, 



CoBPORAiiaii: OF Tbufiodt EEousb oi* Deptfobd STBOjffD— Newh^ybk — aatdinued. 



AMOUNT reoeired fiar PiLoffiiGZ of Vessels in 1860. 
(l.)-INWARDS. 





BRITISH TEI7SELS& 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 

• 


s 

s 

M 

t3 


? WTAL& 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not To wed by 
Steam. 


Towed 
by Steam: 


No t Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed 
by Steam. 


.Not Towed by 
^ Steam. 


Towed 
by Steam. 




.Mo^ 


Amornvt 


No. 


Amovnt 


No. 


Amoont. 


No. 


Amoaat. 


|N<H. 


Amoaot. 


No. 


AmoanL 


No. 


imi. 


From Sea to Harbonr - 


i " ' 
309 


£. 9. d, 
249 16 - 


8 


£. #. d. 
8 8 9 


10 


£. 9. d. 
11 14 - 


- 


£: 9. d: 


> 
80 


£. 9. d. 

SO 6 3 


3 


£. 9. d. 
8 4 6 


nil 


J 
'2SQ 

4 


SB 8 5 



(2.)— OUTWARDS 



From Harbour to Sea - 



206 



116 17 9 



4 12 9 



4 10 9 



19 



11 8 3 



4 12 - 



nO. 



S4r5 



Ul 1 6 



NEWPORT. 



Definition of Limits: — From Romney River to Redwiok Pill, and into and out of all Ports and Places withta diose Ilmiti; 
and across the Bristol Channel in a South East direction, within the said Rumnej Riyer and Redwick Pill as far as an imaginuj 
Line drawn from tha Flat and Stoap Holmea Islands to Anst in the Countj af Gloaoeater. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



See the list printad at p. 92 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 af 1860. John Williams has oeasad to act» and Thomas Shepherd Wieka^i^ 
aged 26, and Edward Small, aged 25, have been since licensed. 



RATES. 



From Newport or Pilgwenly to the Month of the River J 
Usk, and vice vend ----- -| 



From Newport or Pilgwenly to Rumney River or Red- f 
wick PiU, or any. place ontaide of the Rives Usk, J 
within the distriat, and vtce verfd - - - - 1 



Vcsecb nnder 9 feet of water 



„ dhiwaig 9 „ 

»» »f 12 It 

Vesseb nnder 9 feet water 
„ drawing 9 „ 

»i »» 12 ,f 

»t ti 15 ■« 



and. nnder 12 feet 

»» 1^ If 
and npwarda - 



and nnder 12 feet 

» 16 « 
and upwards - 



Coasting Vetsek 
per Foot 



9, d. 

- 9 

1 - 

1 8 

1 6 



Overset TVsdos 
perFbot 



I - 
I 3 



Ships not having British registers are to pay one-fonrth more than ships having British registers » except when snch first mentioned ships shall by any arte 
of Her Majesty's most honourable Privy Council, be priviteged bo enter the ports of this kingdom, npon paying the same duties of tonnage as are paid by 
British ships, in which case such ships and- vessels not having British registers, shall pay the lika sates of pilotage only as are payable by ships haviss 
British registers ; the said surplus rate, chargeable on nnprivUeged foreign vesseb, is to bepaid to the collector of this corporation's light duties at the CutflO 









9, d. 


lOOtons- 


- 


- 


2 6 per tide. 


100 and under 150 tons - 


• 


- 


3 - „ 


150 „ 200 „ . 


- 


- 


4 - „ 


200 „ 300 „ . 


- 


- 


5 - „ 


300 „ 500 „ - 


- 


- 


7 6 „ 


500 ., 1,000 „ - 


- 


- 


10 - „ 


1,600 and upwards - 


- 


- 


12 6 „ 



Pilots employed on tides' work on board vessels under 



Every Newport pilot who mof hmed a.^ip inward' bound in any pari of the BHstol Channel not wMini tha ttmiti ezpnsied in his license, whether hetih 
the charge of her or not, shall immediately reqnire the master to display the cuitomary signal for a Bristol pilot, and to keep the same displayed lo long is 
he, the Newport pilot, shall remain on board anysoeh ship e ^ t of the- liaw ls fei ' w h i uh ha-ia-lis ro ssdi 

Every Newport pilot on board a ship outward-bound, on reaching the limits of his district, shall, whether in charge or not, cauae a like signal to be 
displayed. 

Every Newport pilot shall, before leaving port in charge of any ship outward-bound, make arrangement dther for his boat to be towed down by soohddpi 
or to be in attendance at the Hmifes^f tha district to await hit amvaL 



Trinity House, London, April 1860. 



P. ff, Berihon, Secretary. 



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FMi TKB YB^B XHIMCKQ SI imOBXBER 18«t)U 



3i 



CoHMttAaoMr ov T^ikxtt Boubs op Dsptposd Stbostd— N£w;pa&T — cmtimmL 

AMOUNT reoeifad £ar Pujotaqe of Vessels in I860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 





BBITI8H VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






PI8T1.HCE8 


COA8TEE8. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


TTNPRIVILEGED. 


TOTALS. 


PILOTED. 


NotTow«lby 
StMon. 


Ttnndbf 


Not Towed by 
8te«m. 


Towed by 
Staem. 


Not ftowed by 
Steem. 


TWedby 
Stettn. 


Hot Towed by 
Steam. 


Itowedby 
Stemn. 






Ko. 


Imoaot. 


No. 


AiDoaat. 


No. 


Amoaot. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. I Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount.' 


Ho. 


Amount 


JnaPcBtfilk loKewport 
rm^^jma^ Hirer to 

Itowfort* 
PrtmHcliMtoHwrport- 
ifljttaatf, IJ7 Bif% Tide 


23 


19 
10 


28 12 1 
4 2 11 

11 4 - 

2 17 - 


20 

3 



1 


29 2 1 
2 10 - 

8-8 


69 
88 

9 

20 

10 


£. «. d, 
0116 

80 2 11 
6 9 8 

31 7 - 

32 7 - 


60 

90 

3 

1 


£. $. d, 
77 1 

98 6 11 
1 19 9 

- 8 - 


42 

28 

10 

1 
16 




42 17 4 
28 7 7 

4 14 8 

1 

16 14 

84J0 - 


88 

162 

6 

1 


£. s. d. 
180 8 3 

lOB 10 8 
6 10 - 
1 

• • » 


7 



£,9,4. 
8 17 11 

7 10 1 

• • 

■ ■ 

• • 


1 


£.9. d, 

1 18 301 

813 

62 

2 
40 

17 


•7111 9 
821 10 1 

32 3 11 

2 - - 
88 -0 

69 2 - 


TOZAX - - - 


- 


40 10 - 


- 


38 18 4 


- 


167 1 8 


- 


172 19 9 


- 'ill 9 1 


- 


289 14 11 


- 


10 8 - 




1 12 


- 


887-8 



(3.)— O U T W A E D 8. 



item Newport to MoBth of 
AeUik. 

RicB Sevpofft to Bliymi^ 
Stret. 

Att Newport fto PMivtti 

rrvm Newport to Botane 


119 
10 

17 

1 


84 11 8 
11 4 - 
21 JO .0 

319 - 


3 



V 
1 


2U 1 
7 10 - 

40 If - 

10- 


6 
98 

48 




8 
HI 4 8 
70110 

21 17 - 


114 


• M • 

218 11 
40 18 7 


03 
M 

9 


71 8 9 
14 11 3 

88 10 - 


193 

17 


877 17 

28 18 18 

■ ■• • 

M • ■ 


19 


88 10 

• • 

• 


9 
3 


19-7 
7 18 M 

T 


128 

600 

103 

1 
16 


92 12 7 
839 11 8 

238 8 

10- 
09 - 


Tor A& - - - 


- 


121 - 9 


- 


60 4 1 


- 


209 8 6 


- 


808 10 


- 119 4 - 

1 


- 


400 18 4 


- 


88 10 


- 


28 14 6 


- 


li2S0 19 4 



PAD STOW. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
The Penons mantioned at p. 88 of Pftrl. Paper, .No. 267 of 1860, are still acting. 



RATES. 
The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at pp. 60, 61, of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 18W. 



343- 



J>^ 



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■32 



KSTURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE^ 



CoEPOEATiOK OF Trinitt House OF Deptford Strond — Padstow — contintud. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTAKGBS 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRI. 
VILEGED. 


TOTALS. 


ibr which 
PILOTED. 


Not 
Towed by Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not 
Towed by Steam. 


Not 
Towed by Steam. 






No. 


Amount. 


Na 


Amonnt. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Aiaooat 


•Ftdiii Stepper Point to 

Padstow. 
Prom outside Stepper Point 

to Hawker's Cove. 


379 


£. «. d. 
163 14 4 


1 


£. i. d. 
- 6 - 


1 
2 


£. t. d. 

8 

6 17 6 


4 


£. t. d. 
8 10 - 


- - nil - . 


386 
2 


£. #. If. 

16510 4 

6 17 6 


Total - - - 


• 


163.14 4 


- 


- 6 - 


*" 


9 17 6 


- 


8 10 - 


- 


387 


172 7 10 



^.)-0 U T W A R D S. 



From Padstow to Stepper 
Point. 



160 



28 13 8 



4 7 2 



163 



83 SIO 



PENZANCE. 



Names of Pilots. — ^The Pilots mentioned at p. 88 of ParL Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting. 
Rates. — The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at p. 62 of ParL Paper, No. 516 of 1865. 



"AMOITNT re^eiyied for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(l.)-IN WARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 




TOTALS. 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Tewed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed i)y 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amount. 


No. 


» 

Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Anooat 


From Sea to either of the 

Roadsteads or Piers in 

Mount's Bay. 
From Roads to either of 

the Piers in Mount's 

Bay. 
Distance Money - 


6 
8 


£. «. d. 
2 10 6 

- 16 - 


112 


£. t. d. 

40 18 - 

— • 


34 
30 


£. i. d, 
40 13 - 

21 18 9 


1 


£. «. d. 
- 16 - 


60 
10 
41 


£. #. A 
73 7 6 

9 7- 

88 18 6 


1 
2 


£. *. A 

1 16 - 

2 2- 


nil 


208 
10 

76 


£. ..iL 

189 -- 

9 7- 
63 9t 


Total - - - 


- 


8 6 6 


- 


49 18 - 


- 


62 6 9 


- 


- 16 - 


- 


121 13 - 


- 


8 17 - 


- 


- 


241 16 1 



(2.)-0 U T W A R D S. 



From Roadsteads and 
Piers in Mount's Bay 
to Sea. 

Distance Money - 


- 


- 


114 


49 8 - 


18 

1 


16 10 - 
- 6 - 


- 


- 


29 

1 


26 18 - 

1 1 " 


1 


1 16 - 


nil 


167 
2 


92 11 - 
1 6 - 


.Total - - - 


- 


- 


- 


49 8 - 




16 16 - 


- . 


- 


26 19 - 


- 


1 16 - 


- 


- 


95 17 - 


P 


L Y M U T H. 




Names of Pilots.— Th 


B Pilots na 


med 


at p. 84 of Pari. Paper, 


No. 


287 of 18 


60, are still acting. 



RATB8.^-The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed at pp. 63, 64, of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866. 

Digitized byVrrOOQlC 



FOR THK YEAE ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1800* 



33 



CoBPORATioN or Teinitt House of DErrFOBD Strond— Plt3iouth — continued. 



AMOUNT receiTed for Pilotage of Vessels in I860, 
(K)— INWARDS. 



HriSTAKCES 

1 ...... 




BRITISH 


V E S S E 


L 3. 




FOREIGN VESSELS, 






COASTERS, 


OV 


E H 5 E A* 




PRIVILEGED, 


E 


TOTALS, 


Kot Towed by 


Towed bj 

Steam. 


Not Towed 1 
Stoain. 


■y 


ToW{nJ by 
Steam. 


NotTowLid by 
Steam. 


Towfti ?]y 
Steam. 




Ho, 


Atnomit, 


So. 


AtnonTtt. 


Ko. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 1 


^0. 


Amount, 


Fo. 


Amount* 


No. 


Amount. 


1 




£. I. d. 




£. f. ii. 




£. *^ 


1^. 




£, i. 


d. 




£. *. 4t 




£. #. If. 






£. .. 4, 


ffSiaiS^ to Sound - 


1 


2 2 - 


- 


- 


108 


431 1 


3 


24 


45 - 


3 


[43 


271 - 6 


12 


28 7 


uil 378 


771 11 e 


^miftitjCatWBter 


- ■ 




- 


- 


31 


71 13 


- 


2 


7 10 


- 


50 


(30 6 - 


- 


- 


- 


02 


209 - 


fnmiSahjSatton Pool - 


5 


It 15 - 


- 


• 


14 


36 18 


- 


I 


2 - 


- 


25 


55 14 - 


- 


., 


- 


45 


106 7 ^ 


fr^nLBmumnmr - 


I 


2 8- 


9 


^4 2 - 


U 


41 14 


6 


20 


60 14 


- 





21 3 - 


8 


23 10 - 


- 


5d 


106 11 e 


fi^Bi S«a to Stcmefioaic 


* 1 


* 


- 


• 


6 


14 17 


* 


- 


* 


- 


5 


10 IQ - 


2 


7 - - 


- 


13 


41 7 - 


. Jfroo S«ft to HunoiiiEef 


" 


- 


2 


5 15 6 


7 


26 13 


3 


5 


21 6 


3 


16 


45 8 - 


1 


1 12 - 


- 


31 


loo 14 a 


ij^Saond 1)0 Cutwater - 


- 


- 




_ 


10 


23 


& 


11 


32 4 


3 


3 


6 S 3 


5 


11 5 


- 


29 


75 S - 


1^ Somd to Sutton Pool 


1 


I 3 D 




- 


10 


17 10 





1 


1 7 





15 


27 3 


1 


17 


- 


28 


48 18 a 


to«tt Somtd to Mill Bay - 


1 


1 12 6 


1 


I 12 6 


6 


n 14 


- 


8 


11 7 


- 


n 


IS I 


8 


20 3 3 


- 


33 


65 10 9 




- 


- 


- 


- 


5 


G 15 


- 


a 


U 7 





3 


4 5- 


3 


7 I 


' 


17 


32 9 - 


IIbid Sotmd to Slonehoii»e 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


22 14 





1 


1 10 - 


2 


4 13 3 


- 


10 


28 17 9 


«i»pofttif wttJ^in the 
Hifboor, 


- 


- 


— 


» 


4 


4 1 


- 


5 


6 7 


6 


5 


5 10 -^ 


5 


10 - 


- 


19 


22 17 6 


L Total • - - 


I 


2 2- 


- 


- 


21 


33 17 


10 


2 


7 1 


- 


13 


W 17 ft 


1 


1 - - 


- 


43 


68 18 6 


- 


21 3 a 


i ' 


31 10 - 


- 


7ai 11 


4 


- 


224 18 





- 


632 It 5 


- 


112 10 


- 


1,744 14 6 



W 

f^$mitdtiiSe& - 
tetttiswiterto S«* 
^rom SdtKni pool to Sea - 
PNulIIDEiir to Sea * , 
hn Staaehotise Po<il U 

|b HftEDoaie to Sea 
*w r^twattJ to Sound • 
Im Mill B«j to Sound - 
^ H4mfi«c to Sonxid - 
Nm *et£oo Pool to Sound 
ba Stoodloas* Pool to 

^m Total - ^ * 


1 
2 

2 
4 

1 

1 


3 14 6 

4 16 ^ 
7 16 ^ 

1 12 G 


38 
1 


( 

05 1 - 

- 

2 - - 


2->- 

173 
35 
22 
14 

4 

1 
2 
3 
1 

5 


352 7 

70 13 - 

43 11 ^ 
30 U 3 

8 - - 
2 12 6 

4 2^ 

5 17 - 

2 12 6 

I - 


Al 

sd 

5 
22 

3 

13 

2 

3 

1 
3 


IDS. 

70 2 6 
11 10 - 

60 10 6 

7 14 - 

25 !4 - 

2 18 

5 5 -' 
1 10 - 
S 15 3 


101 
20 
27 
12 

4 

7 

1 
5 


188 13 4 
58 11 - 
51 10 - 
2S 4 - 
8 - ^ 

16 8 - 
7 10 - 

■ • 

1 5 - 

2 6 



2 
2 
15 
3 

3 
2 

2 


20 - C 
6 17 6 
4 7- 

31 W - 

6 6- 

6 12 - 
I 7 6 ' 
4 8- 

6 14 - 


nil 


3i3 
71 
53 

105 
7 

18 
18 
6 
6 
4 
3 

12 


652 18 7 

155 17 ff 
104 4 ^ 
260 11 - 

14 - 

40 14 - 
33 16 6 
U 8 9 
11 2 - 

6 7 e 

5 15 3 
21 17 6 


* 


18 10 - 


- 


07 1 - 


■ - 


538 11 3 





20O 15 - 


, 


360 3 10 


- 


DO 8 6 




- 'V^S3 IS 7 

1 



POOLE. 



H AMES of PiLors.— ITie Pilots named at p. 36 of Pari, Paper, No, 287 of 1800^ are itUl aeting. 



Ratis.— Hie Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed in ParL Paper, No, 515 of 1856, p» 66, 



Digitized by 



Google 



34 



RBTURNS RELATING TO PILOT8 AND PILOTAOX^ 



Corporation of Trinity House of Deptford Strond— Pools— *con<onMdl 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of ViSiRLS in 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH YESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES. 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


1 

M 

s 


T0U18. 


fiw which ^ 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amoant 


No. 


Anoont. 


No. 


Amoirat. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amomit. 


No. 


Amoont. 


ITo. 


ixmot 


From Sea (betw^een 6t Al- 
ban*8 and Cbiigtchiireh 
Heads) to Pode. 

From St Albon's to Poole 

Prom Stiidland Bay and 
Bar to Poole. 

From Dulatooa Head and 
Sea to Swanage. 

Fhna Saa to Stiidland Bay 

FimnStadiand Bay to 

Froni Swanage to Poole - 


1 

200 


1 

1 


£.9. d. 
1 - - 

195 6 6 

7 - - 

-18 -- 
1 


70 


£.s. d. 
76 17 - 


3 

1 
89 

1 


£.s. d, 
5 5- 

2 4- 
55 13 3 

1 - - 


2 

1 

14 


£.s. d. 
4 4- 

8 12 ^ 
25 4 - 

• m 


6 

1 
12 


£.#. d. 
18 9 6 

8 8- 
14 8 9 


5 

4 
7 


£.$. d. 
7 18 - 

11 4 - 
13 4 - 


aQ. 


17 

7 
S51 

9 

I 

1 

1 


9010 6 

18 8 - 
no 18 6 

7 - - 

1 - - 
-B - 

I - - 


Total - - - 


- 


804 18 6 


- 


76 17 - 


•- 


64 2 3 


- 


32 - - 


- 


29 6 3 


- 88 6 - 


- 


- 


mvi " 











(2.)_0 U T W 


A R D S. 
















Ftom Poole to Bar and 
Stn^andBay. 


202 


186 14 - 


37 


35 7 3 


10 


23 11 6 


24 


40 8 5 


17 


21 7 6 


5 


6 3 9 


nU- 


901 


91813 k 


StodlandBay. 


1 


- 12 - 


- 


- 


- 


• • 


- 


• 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


-IS - 


Total - - - 


- 


187 6.- 


" 


35 7 3 


- 


23 11 6 


- 


40 8 5 


- 


21 7 6 


- 


6 3 9 


- 


- 


814 4 6 



PORTMADOC. 



Nameb of Pilots. — ^Tlie Pilots named at p. 39 of Pari. Paper, No. 174 of 1858, vt stili acting. 



Rates. — ^The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed in Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1855, pp. 66, 67. 



AMOUNT recelred for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 





BRITISH, VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


s 

1 

2 


TOTALS. 


forwhlch 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Steam. 






No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amonnt 


No. 


Amonnt 


No. 


imotnt 


Firom Sea to Harboar 


423 


£. i. d. 
175 14 3 


13 


£. i. d. 

13 6 6 

(2.)- 


106 

1 


£. 9. d. 

76 16 - 
FTWAI 


1 
ID 


£. #. d. 

- 18 6 

S. 


4 


£.*. d. 
2 14 10 


nil. 


546 


MIO 1 



From Haxbour to Sea 



408 



170 5 1 



12 



13 6 6 



106 



78 1 11 



3 13 3 



nfl 



531 



885 6 9 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOE THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER I860, 



35 



COBFORATION OF TeINITT HoUSE OF DePTFOED StEONB— COaftltWtfi 



ROCHESTER. 



Names of Pilots,— The Pilott Dftmed at p. 39 of Pari, Papefj Ko. 174 of 1858, are atill aoting- 



AMOUNT reooired far Pilotage of Y Efl9£LS ia 1860. 
(L)-! N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS, 


FOREIGX VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS, 


OVEBSEA. 


PRrVlLEriED. 


M 

pa 

M 

PS 

U 


TOTALS, 


tor whkh 
PlLaXBDL 


T<>wed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
St«im, 


Not Towed by 
Ste«ro- 


Towed by ' 






No. 


AmouDt. 


No, 


Amciuat. 


No. 


Amounts 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


AmonDt. 


No. 


Am^rnat, 


ram the Korc to SlieoxufiM - 

asd Eodiestef 1^ 

rcan Sli^emctt to ChAthAm 
■od llocbtiter. 


_ 


£. #. rf* 


4 


17 4 9 


U 


41 6 9 


2 
4 

4 


£. jr. d, 

4 4 

16 17 - 

10 10 - 


2 

9 


£, #. d. 

8 * - 
24-0 


Oil . 


23 


6 4 4 

24 17 - 

03 10 - 


Total - • - 


- 


- 


- 


17 i 9 


- 


41 5 9 


- 


34 ^ 4 


- 


3* - 


- 


- 


124 11 4 



(3.)-0 U T W A R D S. 



rom Clmthain to Sea 

rom SbeenjESS to Sea 

lom Cbatliam to Sheeraess 


- 
1 


* 
2 15 6 


4 

2 


28 10 - 
10 9 - 


1 


8 8 9 


14 


95 8 - 
12 13 6 


1 


6 10 - 
1 13 ' 


Hil - 


20 

4 
1 
1 


1^ 2 9 
29 2 6 

1 12 - 

2 15 6 


TOTAl* - - - 


- 


2 15 6 


- 


44 IQ " 


" 


8 8 9 


- 


108 1 6 


- 


8 8- 


- 


- 173 12 9 

1 



James Curd * 
James Smith 



K Y E. 



NAMES of PHOTS. 



r ZimUi i^ Ztevnte.- — Into and oot of tba 

aced 50 ^^^^ ^^^ Harbour of Rye* wid along tlie Coaat 
7^ 1 ^„ j betweeti Dcuig^neiv jmd Be^cbey Head^ and to 
ag'ecL ^a ^^^ ^^^^^ ^ andioragea snd placet within tboac 
LUmltE. 



Rat^,— The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed io PatL Pap<ir, No, 516 of 1855, p, 85, 



243- 



E 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



36 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



Corporation of Trinitt House op Deptpord Strots(j>— Rye— contiuMed. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vbsselb in 1860. 
(l.)-IN WARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS 






distances 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


g 


TOTAlg. 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Stpam. 


Not Towed by 
Stem. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


. 




No. 


AmoaDt 


No. 


AmoDDt 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


immL . 


Ph>in Sea to Pier - 
Prom Sea to Towa • 


26 
8 


£. #. d. 
31 16 2 

6 10 1 


24 
2 


£. «. d. 
24 2 7 

2 6 6 


1 

2 


£. s. d. 
1 16 - 

17- 


6 

7 


£.s. d. 
7 17 10 

6 18 3 


1 


£. t. rf. 
-10 - 


nfl 


68 
20 


£i. L 
65 IS 7 

17 10 


Total - - - 


- 


38 6 8 


- 


26 8 - 


- 


8 3- 


- 


14 16 1 


- 


- 10 - 


- 


78 


68 3 4 



(2.)-0UT WARDS. 



Prom Town to Sea 
Trom Pier to Sea - 


3 
12 


2 14 6 
9 8 8 


4 
14 


1 19 
6 14 7 


1 


- 7 - 


3 
6 


2 8 6 
4 6 9 


- 


- 


nO 


10 
33 


7 ) a 

S0 16 - 


Total - - - 


- 


12 3 2 


_^ 


8 14 4 


- 


- 7 - 


- 


6 14 2 


— 


- 


-1" 


i7lB 8 



S C I L L Y. 



Names of Pilots. — The Persons named at p. 88 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting. 



H^TEs. — The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed in Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866, pp. 70, 71. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


I 


TOTALS. 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


AOHMBt 


Prom Sea to Scmy - 

Lay Days, Tide Work, 
and sbiftiog Berth. 

Total - - 


66 
2 


£. #. d. 
66 17 8 

2 6 


4 


£.«. d. 
4 16 8 


96 
2 


£. 1. d. 
210 6 6 

318 - 


1 


£.s. d. 
2 10 4 


94 

4 


£. M. d. 

171 1 11 
4 4- 


nil 


249 
8 


£ A^ 

445 13 
10 11 


- 


69 7 2 


- 


4 16 8 


- 


214 4 6 


- 


2 10 4 


- 


176 6 11 


- 


- 


4^ 4 



(2.)— OUTWARDS. 



ScUlytoSe* 



49 



48 17 1 



4 16 8 



93 



207 16 4 



2 10 4 



92 



167 2 8 



nil 



431 1 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOR THB YSAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



37 



Corporation of Trinitt Hoijsb op Deptpord Strond— caw^iinferf. 



SHORE HAM. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



John Merrix - 
John Bartlcy 
William Paiisli 
George CoorteDey - 
James Page - 



aged 56 
61 
68 
61 
60 



Francis Child 
William Courteney 
Robert Brazier 
William Brazier - 
Walter Richards - 



aged 62 
60 
43 
33 
39 



Zimiti ofZicente .--From Sea into the Port 
of ShorehaiDy and from the Port of Shoreham 
to Set, aad btckward and forward within the 
laid. Port, and on the Coast from Bri^thelm- 
Btone exclosiTe westward to the Owers, and 
from the Owers eastward to Brighthelmstone 
ezclosire, and into and ont of ali anchorages 
within diose Umits, except the Port of Arnndel. 



Cornelias Perrin - 

Jamee Lawrence - 

Philip Lawrence - 
William Legg 



aged 61 
48 
52 
87 



JJmUs of Licint§ .—From Selsea Bill to the west end of 
the Owefi, and for the neighbourhood of the Owers within 
and without the Sands near the same and the Ptek ; and to 
continne in charge from the Owers into Spithead of ali ships 
and Teasels that hare sailed from the Park, or which he may 
have had diarge of when in distress in the neighbonriiood of 
the Owers, the Commanders consenting thereto. 



Ratbs.— The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed in Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1866, p. 72. 



AMOUNT reoeired for Pilotagb of Vessels in 1860. 
(l.)-IN WARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DlSTANCBSr 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 





TOTALS. 


te which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






Na 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


fhnSaatoHarboar- 


84 


22 19 3 


473 


£. «. d. 
679 16 2 


2 


£. i. d. 
1 15 - 


10 


£. t. d. 
8 8- 


8 


£. 9. d. 

5 13 - 


49 


£. s. d. 

49 13 1 


nil- 


666 


£. s. d. 
668 3 6 















2.)— OU' 


rw 


ARDS. 
















Jha Harbour to Sea- 


17 


9-8 


461 


184 18 10 


1 


- 17 6 


10 


4 4- 


6 


2 10 - 


41 


19 3 ^0 


nil - 


636 


220 14 10 


Dirtaaee tfoiiey'(Sel. 
lesDistriet). 


6 


9 10 - 


- 


- 


2 


7 6- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


16 16 - 


Tdtax» - - - 


- 


18 10 8 


- 


184 18 10 


■ 


8 2 6 


- 


4 4- 


- 


2 10 - 


19 3 10 


- 


643 


237 9 10 



SOUTHAMPTON. 



|XicB8rd Bowen 
|Wm Fanlkener - 

jBAto Waters 

JnoAsLebbiim 

Kathaniel Robertson 

Robert Hunt 

Bobert Pearce 

^iUimm Groodridge 

Juoes Oekelford - 
. J«aesBowjer 

John Nicholls 



DftTid Wild - 9iged 43 



aged 60 
66 
39 
53 
47 
60 
45 
46 
66 
46 
46 



NAMES of PILOTS. 

W. J. Hurst - 
William Sejmour - 
William Bui more - 
Edward Jurd 
George Tubbs 
James Penny 
William Waters - 
Henry Nicholls 
Robert Penny 
William Nicholls - 
Alfred Hurst 



aged 24 
66 
40 
47 
45 
32 
39 
60 
36 
28 



John Dibden • aged 37 



Charles Wild - aged 23 



Limiti qf License .-—From Cowes Roads^ 
Stokes Bay, the Motherbank, or St Hden's to 
Southampton, and from Southampton through 
the several channels and passages to Sea. 



LimUt qf License: — From a line drawn 
from Eagle Hurst to the North-west Buoy of 
the Brambles, to all ports and places within 
the Southampton Water, and vice versS, 



243. 



Rates. — The Rates of Pilotage and Regulations are the same as printed in Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1866, p. 74* 

B 3 Digitized by VjOOQIC 



3* 



RETXTBHa BBUUIHO TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGB^ 



CoBPOBATiON (MP Tbinitt Houss OF Deptfobd Stbond— Southamptoh — eautinued. 



AMOUNT receired for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 





BB.ITISH VESSELS. 


POREION VESSELS. 




^ 


DISTANCES 


COASTEBS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


Q 
H 
CD 

S 
t 


TOTALS. 


forwblfib 

piloted. 


NotlVwedby 
Steam. 


Towed bgr 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Tawed by 

Steam. 


NotTow«iby 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amonaft, 


No. 


Amosnt. 


Na 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


AwwBt. 


From Sea to Southampton - 

From Spithead to Southamp- 
ton. 

From Leap to Soatbampton - 

From Calshot to Southampton 

From Stoke't Bay to South- 
ampton. 

From Cowes to Southampton 

From St. Helen*s to South- 
ampton. 

From Nab to Southampton - 

From Brambles to Sonthamp* 
ton. 

From Motherbank te South- 
ampton. 

From Needles to Southampton 

Into and oat of places within 
the District, and Dockiag. 


2 
17 

8 

5 

2 
3 

432 


£. 9. d. 

7 - - 
22-6 

4 14 - 

3 16 2 
2 5- 

2 4- 

4 9- 

259 12 2 


8 

1 

7 

8 
13 


£. 9. d. 

54 9 6 

1 

12 1 - 

2 18 6 
10 8 6 

7 3 6 


7 
11 

10 
1 
3 

2 

9 


£. 9. d. 
29 17 6 
18 6 - 

15 

1 - - 
5 8- 

3 4 6 

15 4 - 


4 
5 

98 
1 

2 

1 

10 

1 
2 


£. 9. d. 

18 5 - 
12 10 6 

171 11 - 

1 12 - 

5 5- 
12 8 - 

17 16 6 

2 3 9 
1 8 - 


14 
8 

20 
6 
2 

1 
21 

1 
14 


£. «. A 
60 14 - 
12 4 6 

82 7 - 

6 11 - 
2 2- 

2 5- 
30 9 6 

4 4- 

7 9- 


5 
32 

3 

1 
1 

1 

6 

1 

3 


£. 9. d. 
19 14 6 
59 3 6 

4 9- 

- 16 8 

- 16 - 

1 4 - 

10 1 - 
1 10 - 

19 - - 


nil 


40 
74 

141 

14 

7 

5 

4 

1 
67 

1 

2 
464 


£. Li, 

190 - 6 
Its S - 

240 % - 
18 15 10 
10 U - 

8 18 - 
18 « - 

« 5 - 
88 8 6 

110 . 

6 7 9 
»iU 8 


Total - - - 


- 


306-10 


- 


B8 1 - 


- 


88 


- 


242 14 9 


- 


158 6 - 


- 


116 14 8 


- 


- 


990 17 3 



From Southampton to Sea - 

From Southampton to Leap - 

From Soatbampton to Bram* 
bles. 

From Southampton to Scoke's 
Bay. 

From Soatbampton to Needles 

From Southampton to Ly« 
mington. 

From Southampton to Nab - 

From Southampton to Spit- 
head. . 

From Southampton to Calshot 

From Yarmouth Beads to Sea 


26 

1 

-2 

1 

2 
3 


77 1 - 
12- 
2 - - 

2 15 - 

5 6- 

3 5 6 


15 

1 
2 

1 


( 

78 

4 1- 
2 4- 

- 

12- 

— • 


2.)- 
15 

1 

4 


-OUTW 

54 18 - 
1 - - 

16 19 - 


AI 

132 

1 

1 

1 
24 

1 


IDS. 

772 11 - 
1 16 - 

1 2 - 

2 11 - 
96 6 - 

4 1 - 

• • 


36 

2 

1 

5 

1 

1 

1 


108 7 6 

2 3- 

- 16 - 

12 15 - 
2 

2 8- 
17 6 


46 

1 

1 


212 3 6 

1 4 - 

4 10 - 


nfl 


270 
3 
9 

2 

29 
2 

6 
3 

4 
1 


i;j05 1 - 
619 - 
913 - 

9 7- 

100 I - 

41& - 

28 17 - 
9 6- 

4 7 8 
1 7 6 


Total - - - 


- 


91 8 6 


- 


85 7 - 


- 


72 17 - 


- 


878 7 - 


- 


129 17 - 


- 


217 17 6 


- 


- 


1,476 14 J 



TEIGNMOUTH, 



Names of Pilots. — ^The Persons named at p. 41 of ParL Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting. 



Rates.— The Rates of Pilotage we tbe sMit aa printed in ParL Paper, N<w 616 of 1855^ p. 76. 



Digitized byVrrOOQlC 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 DSCBMBSR 1660. 



39 



CoRPORATiGN OF Trinitt Hoube OF Deptford Sxronb— -TEiaNHOUTH-^^^cmdntfecf. 



AMOUNT reo«iT0d ior Pujotaox of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D 8. 





BBITI8H TBSBELS. 




FOBBIOH YESSBLS. 






DISTAKCBS 


COASTERS. 


OYBBSBA. 


FRIYILEOED. 


Umpsitilboxd. TOTALS. 


tevhldi 
PILOTED. 


NotTttwodby 
StMm. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Sleuii. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by 
byBteun. 


Towed by aiMm. 


ToweAtar Steam. 








No. 


▲moaot. 


No. 1 Amoant 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount. 


Na 


Imoant 


No. 


Amoant. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amoont. 


ntBSMtoHariNwr . - 


190 


£. t. d. 
110 If 8 


118 


£, #. d. 

Itl 10 8 





£,i. d, 
8 - If 


8 


£,*, d. 
810 8 





£. •, d. 
7-8 


8 


£.9. d. 
7 18 8 


1 


£. : d, 
I 14 S 


805 


£. M. d. 
808-7 



{Ji.)-0 U T W A R D S. 



7MB Birtotf to Sea 



108 



8f 8 8 



41 8 , 8 



1 8 8 



18 



11 IC^ 



-|i«r 



80 8 8 



W E L L S. 



BafbeiKdd 
Riflliard amxlh 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



aged 60 



60 



Matthew Wright 
Joseph Monej 



^rfid 67 I r ^^^^'v ^f ^ceni€. — From Bnrnham Ororj 
^ MezdagiTe) westward to Morton Sluice (ezdhi- 

. 03 I rive) eastward, and tnct verstf ; and into and out 
I i.of the Harbour of Wells. 



Ratbs. — ^The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed in ParL Papery No. 616 of 1866, p. 77. 



AMOUNT reoeiYedior Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(l.)—! N W A R D S. 





BRITISH 


y B 8 S B L S. 


FOREIGN YESSEIA. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


i 


TOTALS. 


ferwUch 
r PILOTBD. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Kot Towed by 
Steam. 




i 


No. 


Amouit. 


No. 


Amoont. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


I 

XtoDiflM to Harbour 


68 


£. s. d. 
34 3 3 


19 


£. *. d. 
11 17 6 


1 


£.t. d. 
- 13 - 


3 


£.s. d. 
1 18 3 


4 


£. i. d. 
3 16 - 


nU 


89 


£. $. d. 
51 6 - 



(2.)-.0 U T W A R D S. 



! FroB Baiboiir to Sea 



48 



38 11 3 



89 



13 18 9 



1 1 6 



nil 



74 



37 6 6 



243. 



B4 



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RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE^ 



Corporation of Trinity House of Deptpord Strond— c(m/int<e<2. 



WEYMOUTH. 



Names of Pilots. — ^The Persons named at p. 43 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting. 



Rates.— The Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed in Pari Paper, No. 287 of 1860, p. 43. 



f'. 







AMOUNT receiyed for Pilotage of Vessels in 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 


1860. 














BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 


TOTAia 


DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


Q 
H 

P 


for wliich 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amoont. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


AmonnL 


No. 


1 

iMUL 


ProiQ Sea to Woyinqnth 
Bay. 

From Wejrmouth and Port- 
laad Eoadft to Harbotir. 

From Sat to Ljmt - 

Dlataace Money 


68 
33 


£. 9. d. 
- 10 - 

78 10 3 
24 17 6 


2 


£. #. d. 

2 10 - 


27 

4 
3 


£. «. d. 
36 10 - 

17 1 6 

2 10 - 
4 4- 


2 

4 


£. #. d. 
3 3- 

9 16 6 


36 
26 

1 


£. «. d. 
41 18 6 

39 19 9 
2 2- 


3 
2 


£.•. d. 
4 2- 

3 9- 


nil 


69 

106 

87 
8 


86 9 6 

151 16 • 

S7 7 6 
6 6 - 


TaxAL - - - 


- 


104 6 9 


- 


2 10 - 


- 


60 6 6 


- 


12 19 6 


- 


84-3 


- 


7 11 - 


- 


- 


mis - 



(3.)— O U T W A R D S. 



Jjoffl WeymoQth atict Port- 
land Rc»adB to Sea* 

Ffom Weymouth Harbour 
to TVeymouth afld Port- 
land Roadfl, 

From Lyme to Sea - 

Distance Money 


2 
13 

39 


3 3- 
13 17 6 

29 6 6 


3 


3 4 6 


28 
2 

1 
2 


27 16 - 
2 8- 

1 2 6 
4 4- 


3 
3 


6 2- 
3 11 6 


28 
19 

1 


88 1 6 
16 11 - 

1 1 - 


2 
2 


2 3- 
2 6- 


nU 


69 
48 

40 
8 


68 4 a 
4118 6' 

80 9 -, 
5 5 - 


Total - - - 


- 


46 7 - 


- 


3 4 6 


- 


36 9 6 


- 


8 13 6 


- 


45 13 6 


- 


4 9- 


- 


- 


14817 • 



WOODBRIDGE. 



Naues of Pilots. — The Persons named at p. 41 of Pari. Paper, No. 244 of 1859 are still acting. 



Rates.— The Rates of Pilotage are the same as stated in Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1866, p. 80. 



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FOR THB TEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



41 



Corporation op Trinity House op Deptpord Strond— Woodbridge— cwirtnt^rf. 



AMOUNT reoeired &r Pilotaob of Vissels in 1860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRI. 
VILEGED. 


TOTALS. 


fcr which 
PILOTED. 


Not 
Towed by Steam. 


Not 
Towed by Steam. 








No. 


Amonnt 


No, 


Amonnt 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


rom Sea to Harbour 
rofm Sea to Kingston • 
rom Sea to Upper Quays 
nm Bovshipa to Lower Qoays 
rom Bowships to Upper Qoays 
rom Bowabips to Melton 
rom Bow^pa to Waldingfield 


331 

92 

130 

67 

1 


£. «. A 
95 9 7 

* 29 18 9 

48 17 7 

27 4 10 

- 6 3 


. nil • 


6 
1 

1 

4 


£. «. d. 

2 13 6 

1 - - 
- 11 11 

2 2 11 


1 


£. $. d. 


. nU . 


338 
1 
1 

96 

130 

67 

1 


£. i. d. 

98 17 1 
1 - - 

- 11 11 
32 1 8 
48 17 7 
27 4 10 

- 6 3 


- 


. . . 




Total • • . 


- 


201 17 - 


- 


- 


6 8 4 


- 


- 14 - 


- 


634 


208 19 4 



•Dm Melton to BoweMps 
Tm Upper Qnay to Bowihlps 
•om Lover Qnay to Bowsbipa 

■nm TlnrtMinr tn Sfiik m m 


65 
129 

95 
844 


27 6 8 
41 12 8 
23 11 8 
88 7 2 


(2.)-C 

,. nil . 

s • • 


)UT 

1 
4 

5 

1 


WARDS 

- 5 6* 
1 5 4 
1 7 11 

- 18 4 


w 




- oil 


65 
130 

99 

349 

1 


27 6 8 
41 17 8 
24 17 - 
80 15 I 
- 18 4 


- 


- . . 


. 


Pom H;irt>onr to Kingston 














TOTAX. . . * 


- 


180 17 9 


« • • 


- j 3 17 - 


- 


- 


. 


644 


184 14 



YARMOUTH. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



bel King 

enry Ltggett^ }uiu 

iward Shaol • 

larka Leggett^ jnn. 

enrj L^gett - 

mries King • 

bn Canham • 

hn Salmon 

hn Fnnne^ King 

njamin Bensley 

nes H. S. Leggett 
ac J. Shanl •. 
Iicrt Wood, Jan. 
^Td Leggett (Ij 
bmd Leggett (2) 
Aot Woods • 
injiunin Holt • 
chard G. Garwood 

omas Ellis • 
Djamin King^ Jan. 
ofge Wames • 



aged 68 
68 
70 
66 
64 
68 
68 
60 
49 
69 

aged 48 
66 
46 
62 
66 
70 
70 
42 



aged 60 

68 

* 64 



Richard Salmon 




aged 61 


Charles Leggett King 




48 


Richard Woods - 




64 


Robert Moss . 




68 


Robert Newson - 




62 


John Whiley - 
James Shaal Calver - 




67 




68 


Samuel R. J. Mackerel! 




61 


James Salmon - 




89 


Edward King - 




42 


James Fish Wood 




eged43 


James Shaal 




68 


Robert J. W. Halfknight 




45 


Charles Leggett 




66 


W. C. Turner - 




46 


Richard Leggett 




62 


James Halfknight 




71 


Jeremiah King • 




86 


Barzilai Thompson- • 


m 


aged 60 


Stephen Steel • 


• 


60 



lAmiii of License. — In and Out of Yarmouth 

^ Harbour to the Roads, and through the different 

Gatways to Sea, and to and from Sea through 

the Gatways into Yarmouth Roads and Harbour. 



Limiie of Licenie.^ln and Out of Yarmouth 
Harbour to the Roads, and from Yarmouth 
Roads into the Harbour. 



r ZimiU of License, — From Sea throngh the 
] different Gatways and Channels into Yarmouth 
I Roads, and firom Yarmouth Roads tbrongh the 
L different Gatways and Channels to Sea. 



RATES.^Tbe Rates of Pilotage are the same as printed in ParL Paper, No. 616 of 1866| p. 82. 



243. 



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42- 



RETtJBNS ^ELATINa t6 PILOTS AKD PILOTAQB^ : 



COEPOBATION OP TbiNITT HoUSE OF DePTPORI> StBON1>— YAEMdUTH-^-CWKllllwrf. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotaob of Vessels in 1860. . 
(1.)— INWARDS. 





• 

BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


»4 


TO TALg. 


for wlilch 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


.Towed br 
8team.r 






No. 


Amoimt. 


No. 


Amoont. 


No. 


Amoimt. 


No. 


Amount 


No. ! Amomit. 


No. 


Amoant. 


No. 


AnoBiit. 


From Sea or Orfordness 
to Roads. 

From Hoads to Harbour 


1 
143 


£. #. d. 
2 4- 

118 18 10 


3 
73 


£. «. A 
12 8 - 

81 2 2 


28 
24 


£. <. d 
73 7 9 

29 19 2 


6 
46 


£. #. d. 
12 2 - 

80 8 6 


91 
26 


£. «. d. 
237 14 ^ 

27 6 9 


4 

69 


£- tf d. 
8 11 - 

92 7 n 


nil 


132 
871 


346 6 9 
430 3 3 


Total - - - 


- 


121 2 10 


- 


93 10 2 


- 


103 6 11 


- 


92 10 5 




266-9 


- 


100 18 11 


- 


603 


77610 . 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



From Roads to Sea 


6 


6 18 6 


6 


7 14 4 


61 


98 16 11 


11 


16 10 - 


44 


62 1 - 


16 


28-3 


nfl 


143 115 • - 


From Harbonf to Roads 


23 


16 19 - 


69 


68 10 - 


3 


3 10 10 


36 


46 6 - 


9 


7 11 9 


49 


44 18 1 


- 


188 


170 U 8 


Distance Money - 


1 


10 - - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


• • 


^ 


1 


10 - - 


Total - - - 


- 


32 17 6 


- 


61 4 4 


- 


102 6 9 


- 


61 16 - 


- 


69 12 9 


- 


67 18 4 


- 


338 


»5 14 8 



SUMMARY OF THE TRINITY HOUSE RETURNS FOR 1860. 



As ta the PILOTS. 



Number of Pilots in the. London District 
Number of Pilots in the Outpprts * 



Aggregate Number 



879 
679 

966 



As to the RECEIPTS for PILOTAGE. 



• 


£. 


Inwaeds. 


Outwards* ' 


Amount receiyed in London District for Pilotage 
Amount receiyed at the Outports • - . - 


80,088 19 
24,757 8 


d. 
6 

8 


£. s. d. 
46,241 18 6 

18,296 16 10 




104,846 2 


8 


64,638 16 4 



Aggregate Receipts 



- £.169,884 18. 



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FOS THB TEAR EKDINO 3l DECEMBER 1860. 



43 



CORPORATION OF THE TRINITY HOUSE, KINGSTON-UPON-HULL. 



Ottteiiind Act! eonferniig Joriadktion • 



rCharter of Hb Majesty King Cbarlai the Second, dated the 18th November 1660. 
. <{ Act of 2 & 3 Wm. 4» c. 105. 
(.And Tarionfl other Acts of Parliament and Charters of more andent data, and by prescriptioiL 



BTE-LAWS and REGULATIONS. 
The Regulations printed at pp. 44 to 46 of Pari. Paper, No. 244 of 1859, are still in force. 



Armstrong} Joseph 

: Abiwtt, William - 
Edmonds, Airdioiij 
BindsQO, Thomas 
Smith, Thomas • 

^Sihenrood, Walter 

Btrton, Robert Acrid 



Brown, Dale 



NAMES of PILOTS, 

Toanger Brethren who are Branch Pilots : 

CLimitt : From the Hnmber, southward, through Tarmonth Roads, the Swin, and up to the Nore ; sonthward, 
aged 60 < through Yarmouth Roads, and into the Downs ; and eastward, to the Naze of Norway, the Soiw, through 
I. the Cattegat, and up to the Sound. 



Boneh, John 



^BeQ, John Biehard 

SrodrM^ Hearj Walker 
l^roadhead, George Henry 
I Ward, Samuel ■ - 

TStrtett, Robert - 

Brown, William - 

Cooldrej, William Stanley 
QrariD, John 
tiierai, Samael - 
SeatoD, George - 

Qierry, Joshna - 
Majen^ Thomas Orton 

jCroes, John 



CoapUnd, William 
243- 



45 
85 

89 
79 
40 



lAwdtM : From the Hnmber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to 
' Leith Roads ; eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; and southward^ through Tarmonth 
Roads, and into the Downs. 



{LhmU : From the Humber, southward, through Tarmoudi Roads, and into the Downs ; southward, through 
Yarmouth Roads, the Swin, and up to the Nore ; and eastward, to the Naze of Norway, the Scaw, through 
the Cattegat, and up to the Sound. 

flAmiU : From the Humber, eastward, to the Naze of Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the 
51 < Sound ; northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the FriUi of Forth, up to Leith Roads ; and 
t southward, through Yarmouth Roads, and into the Downs. 



Broadbead, John 


64 


Bell, John- 


60 


Brown MatAew - 


89 


CammeD, Henry 


59 


<Qiambers, William - 


54 


.AiTey, George - 


53 


Dickinson, Isaac 


60 


Frankisb, George 


bQ 


Eeighley, Robert 


59 


-Kelsey, Joseph - 


61 


Ptrker, John 


58 


Sutton, George Fowler 


64 


SSiepherd, William - 


60 


Tajlor, George - 


48 


Wharton, John - 


• 49 


Wells, William - 


45 



Limiti : From the Humber, northward, to Flamborough Head, l^month Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to 
Leith Roads ; eastward, to the Naze of Norway, the Scaw, through the Qittegat, and up to the Sound ; and 
eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe. . 



(LimiU: From the Humber, eastward, to Heligdand, and the Red Buoy' in the Elbe; southward, through 
60 < Yarmouth Roads, and into the Downs ; and southward, through Yarmouth Roads, the Swin, and up to the 
L Nore. 

f Limit* : From the Humber, eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; eastward, to the Naze of 
54 < Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the Sound ; dnd southward, through Yarmouth Roads, 
^ and into the Downs. 

^^ I Limits : From the Humber, eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; eastward, to the Naze of 
40 ^ Norway, the Scaw, throu^^ the Cattegat, and up to the Sound ; and northward, to l^amborough Head, 
65 J Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to Leith Roads. 

CLimiU •' From the Humber, eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; northward, to Flam- 
50 < borough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to Leith Roods; and southward, through 
(. Yarmouth Roads, and into the Downs. 

{lamits : From the Humber, eastward, to the Naze of Norway, f^e Scaw, through the Cattegat, the Sound, the 
Baltic, and Gulf of Finland, to Cronstadt ; eastward, to Hdigoland, and the Red Bu^ in the Elbe ; and 
northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the FriSi of Forth, up to Leith Roads* 

63 T 

^j Limits : From the Humber, northward, to Fhunborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, into 
\> Leith Roads; eastward, to the Naze of Norway, the Soaw, thlongh the Catt^, and up to the Sound ; and 
^1 eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe. 



84 
54 



fidmits : From the Humber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tmmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, into 
Leith Roads ; eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; and eastward, to the Naze of Norway, 
^ the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the Sound. 



f Limits I From the Humber, southward, through Yarmouth Roads, and into the Downs ; eastward, to Heligo- 
46 s land, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; and eastward, to the Naze of Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, 
(. the Sound, and the Baltic, to Riga. 

C Limits : From the Humber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tlnn^outh Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to 
53 i Leith Roads : eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; and eastward, to the Naze of Norway, 
L the Scaw, throu^ the Cattegat, the Sound, and Baltic, to Riga. 

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44 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGB, 



Corporation of Trinity House op Kingston-upon-Hull — continued 



Younger Brethren— -con^iire^. 

Dayidson, Charles - - 64 ^ 

Hantefy William - • 61 

Johnson/ John •> - • 66 

. Knight, Charles Soott - - 44 

Murraj, James - • - 71 

Martin, John - - • 64 

Parker, WilHam Bilbie • 60 / 

Pearson, Zaohariah Charles • 38 

Kaisbeck, William • • 67 

Rajner, Richard • - 42 

Smith, Thomas - * - 62 

Day, Robert - • - 64 ^ 

Lancaster, Robert • • 66 

Newby, John Hudson • • 61 

Sadler, Thomas - • • 47 

Schofield, Wm. West • • 60 

Tonge> William - - • 66 J 



Limiis : From the Hamber» northward, to Flamborough Head, Unmoath Bar, and the Frith of Fortii, vp to 
Leith Roads ; eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; and eastward, to the Naze of Norwij, 
the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the Sound* 



Elder, Robert < 
Roberts, Robert 



Pairbum, Daniel 



Frank, James 



Fowler George • » 
Hurst, John • ♦ 



Grubj, Thomas 



Oatgens, John Adolphus 
Highlcj, George 
Sutton, William Fowler 



Harrison, George ¥ • 

Hopkinson, Joseph « ♦ 

Johnson, Thomas * • 

Keetly, Thomas ♦ ♦ ♦ 

Knowles, Richard Jordan « 

Kroger, Henry Raines ♦ 

Kruger, John Frederick t 

Xeaper^ Thomas ♦ » ♦ 
Marshall, Richard 



LimiU : From the Hnmber, southward, through Yarmouth Roads, and into the Downs ; southward, through 
Yarmouth Roads, the Swin, and up to the Nore ; and eastward, to Heligoland, aud the Red Boor ia ^ 
Elbe. 



From the^Humber, southward, through Yarmouth Roads, and into the Downs ; eastward to Che Km 

I eastward, to Hdigoland, and the Bed 



fwul RH fldmits ; From the Humber, southward, through Yarmouth Roads, and in 
^S^ ^^ ^ of Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the Sound ; and < 
68 [ Buoy in the Elbe. 



f Limits : From the Humber, southward, through Yarmouth Roads, the Swin, and up to the Nore; eastwir^ 
60 •{ to the Naze of Norway, the Scaw, through the Cdtt^gat, and up to the Sound ; and eastward, to ffftigphnd, 
[ and the Red fiuoy in the Elbe. 

fZAmiii : From the Humber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Fridi of Forft, ip to 
Leith Roads ; eastward, to the Naze of Norway, tbe Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the Sound ; 
eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; and southinird, throug^i Yarmouth Rosds, andmto 
the Downs. 

42 {Limits : From the Humber, southward, through Yarmouth Roads, the Swin, and up to the Nore; southvir^ 
.^ < through Yarmouth Roads, and into the Downs ; and eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Boot m the 
^® I Elbe. 

f Limits: From the Humber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Foc^ into 
49 i Leith ; eastward, to the Naze of Noiway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the Sound ; aodeastwii 
[ to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe. 

40 1 Limits : From the Humber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmoutii Bar, and the Fridi of Forth, up to 
87 > Leith Roads ; eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; and eastward, to tbe K«» of Nor- 
4x1 way, the S<mw, through the Cattegat, the Sound^ and Baltic, to Stockholm. 

{Limits : From the Humber, eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe s northward^ to Pfaa> 

41 '{ borough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to Leith Roads; and eastward, to the 5aseof 
[ Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, the Sound, and Baltic, to Riga. 

{Limits : From the Hnmber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth* up to 
60 i Leith Roads ; eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; and eastward, to the Nue of N'oc- 
[ way, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, the Sound, and Baltic, to Dantsic 

{Limits : From the Humber, southward, through Yarmouth Roads, and Into the Downs ; eastward, to Hdif 
land, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; and eastward, to the Naze of Norway, the Scaw, through the Catteg 
and up to the Sound. 

{Limits : From the Humber, eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; eastward, to tiie Naia^ 
65 \ Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the Sound ; soutiiward, through Yarmou^ Roads, 
[ into the Downs ; and southward, through Yarmouth Roads, the Swin, and up to tl^ Nore. 

{Limits ; From the Humber, eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; eastward, to the yr 

47 { Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the Sound ; and northward, to Plamborou^ Head, 1 
[ mouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to Leith Roads. 

{Limits : From the Humber, eastward, to tbe Naze of Norway, the Scaw, durougfa die Cattegat^ and mp to I 

48 i Sound ; northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to Leidi Bom ; ai 
I eastward to Heligoland, and the Ked Buoy in the Elbe. 

. {Limits; From the Humber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up' 

49 \ Leith Roads ; eastward, to the Naze of Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, the Sound, and Baltifi^ 
[ Cronstadt and Riga ; and eastward, to Heligolsind, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe. 

rXtfftt^s; From the Humber, eastward, to the Naze of Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up (0 
56 < Sound ; eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy hi the Elbe ; and northward, to FUmboioagh Has 
[ Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to Leith Roads. 

{Limits : From the Humber, eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy hi the Elbe ; eaitwaid, to the Kas 
70 { Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the Sound ; and northward, to Fbonlxnoa^ H( 
I Thimonth Bar, and the Frith of Forth. 



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FOR THB TEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER. 1860. 



45 



Corporation of Trinity House of Kingston-upon-Hull— con<i»w«rf. 



ToDDger Brethren— con/tnurdL 



HartiDy Richard Hick 
Wool^ James Haxwell 


40 
62 


MOThaD, Thomas 


88 


Maycock, Joseph 


42 



rzimiti : From the Humber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tmmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to 
•{ Leith Roadi ; eattward to Heligoland, and the Red Bnoy in the Elbe ; and eastward, to the Naze of Nor« 
[ way, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, the Sound, and Baltic, to Cronatadt 

r Umits : From the Humber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to 
i Leith Roadi ; eastward, to the Naze bf Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, the Sound, the Baltic, and 
[ Gulf of Finland, to Cronstadt ; and eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe. 

fLimiU : From the Humber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to 
i Leith Roads; eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; and sonthwardi through Yarmouth 
[ Roads, the Swin, and up to the Nore. 



[LimUt : From the Humber, eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; northward, to Flam* 
MeHon, William Townend - 88 J borough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up to Leith Roads ; and eastward, to the Naze of 

[ Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, the Sound, the Baltic, and Gulf of Finland, to Cronstadt. 

f Limits: From the Humber, southward, through Yarmouth Roads, and into the Downs ; eastward, to the Naze 
FroodbTe, Joseph - ftffsd 54 \ ^^ Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattent, and up to the Sound ; eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red 
^ '^ I Buoy in the Elbe ; and southward, through Yarmouth Roads, the Swin, and up to the Nore. 



Pepper, Demiia • 



riAmiU: From the Humber, southward, through Yarmouth Roads, the Swin, and un to the Nore ; eastward, 
65 V ^ ^ Vbxc of Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the Sound ; and eastward, to Heligoland, 
[ and the Red Buoy in the Elbe. 



BapeT; Jolm Thcrlej 



63 



IldmU*: From the Humber, southward, through Yarmouth Roads, the Swin, and up to the Nore ; eastward^ 
to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; and eastward, to the Naze of Norway, the Scaw, through the 
Cattegat, and up to the Sound; and northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of 
Forth, up to Leith Roads. 



Too^ood, James 



fLimii9 : From the Humber, eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe ; southward, through 
57 i Yarmouth Roads, and into the Downs; and northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and we 
[ Frith of Forth, up to Leith Roads. 



Toogood, James, jan. 



82 



{LimiU : From the Humber, northward, to Flamborough Head, Tinmouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, up tty 
Leith Roads; eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe; and eastward, to the Naze of 
Norway, the Scaw, throu^ the Cattegat, and up to the Sound, and from the Sound through the Baltio, 
to Cronstadt. 



WtCj Thomas 



r LimiU : From the Humber, eastward, to the Naze of Norway, the Scaw, through the Cattegat, and up to the 
50 i Sound ; eastward, to Heligoland, and the Red Buoy in the Elbe i and southwud, through Yarmouth Roads, 
[ and into the Downs. 



EAST COAST. 



Along the Ead Coasts between the Northness of Dimlington, on 
She Coast of Yorkshire, and St. EdmuruTs Ness, on the Coast 
of Norfolk: 

(Limitfi From St. Edmund's Ness, 
on the Coast of Norfolk, from the 



Goodsoo, Joseph 
Newby, Isaac 
. Snid), John 



aged 81 



40 



High Horn Beacon, from Wisbech 
Eye, and from the Lower Roads of 
Lynn, southward, to Winterton- 
ness; and northward, to the River 
Humber, or the Northness of Dim* 
Ungton, bearing west, and vice 
versd. 



Along the East Coast to the Southward of the Huniber: 



Zimit$; Along the East Coasts 
southward, between the entrance of 
the River Humber and the North-, 
ness of Dimlington, bearing west 
through Boston and Lynn Deeps, 
as far aa Blakeney. 



Boyce, Elvin 


aged 88 


Dobson, Joseph, sen. 


78 


Dobson, Joseph, jun. 


48 


Dobson, Charles 


86 


Gumey, Mark - 


41 


Keall, John 


- . 82 


Upton, George - 


27 



AJbmg ike East Coast between Tinmouth Bar and the Downs : 
Isjle, Francis Brown, aged 471 



UmiiM: From the Humber, north- 
ward, to Flamborough Head and 
Tinmouth Bar; and southward, 

' through Yarmouth Roads, and into 
the Downs. 



iwni, James - 


57 


Dwnell, George 


66 


Gotmhomas * 


44 


I«rter, James Francis 


45 


"txightJohn -. 


48, 



Along the East Coast between Leith Roads and the Downs : 



Cook, Sidney 
Heckenberg, John 



TLimUsi From the Humber, north- 
ftfffid 50 I ^''ard, to Flamborough Head, Tin- 
^^ J mouth Bar, and the Frith of Forth, 

I up to Leith Roads, and southward, 
80 1 through Yarmouth Roads, and into 

I the Downs, 



Rates of Pilotage— The Rates printed at pp. 128 and 129 of Pari. Paper, No, 616 of 1853, are still in force. 



243- 



rs 



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46 



lUtTURN RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGB, 



CoBFOBATiON OT Tbinitt House OF KiNdsTOK-uPOK-HuLL — contmuicL 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 

To THE HUMBER AND ALONG THE £a8T CoaST. 



BISTANCBS 


BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






for which 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


TOTALS. 


PILOTED. 


No. 


Amonnt 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amounts 


Prom Downs to the Humber - 

From Boston Deeps to the Hum- 
ber, or the Noithness of Dim- 
lington bearing west - 

From Lynn Deeps to the Hum- 
ber, or the Northness of Dlm- 
lington bearing west - 

From Lynn Deeps to Skegness 

From Winterton Ness to Lower 

"n^t^Am rxf T vnti 


» • 


£. t. d. 


1 

1 


£. t. d. 
18 7 4 

8 18 - 


1 

8 
8 

1 


£. t. d. 

8 8- 

7 4- 
6 6- 

6 


nil - 




18 7 4 

8 8- 

7 4- 
918 - 


From Intermediate distances 
within the limits menUoned - 


- 




8 


6 


6 - - 
6 - - 






" * * 


Total • - - 


- 


- 


4 


27 19 4 


6 


22 18 - 




10 


50 17 4 



From the Humber and along the East Coast. 



From the Hnmber to Downs 



Vtom the Hnmber to Nore 

From the Humber, or the North- 
ness of Dimlington bearing 
west, to Boston Deeps • 

From the Humber, or the North- 
ness of Dimliogton bearing 
west, to Lynn Deeps • 



From the Hnmber to Sunderland 

From the Humber to Shields - 

From Sutton to Boston Deeps - 

From Sutton to Lynn Deeps - 

Ph>m Ske^ess to Boston Deeps 

From Skegness to Lynn Deeps 

Fh>» intermediate distances 
witliin the limits mentioned - 

Total - - - 



4 4 6 



2 8 



2 7 6 



11 
6 



1 
8 

1 
9 

13 



9 - 



51 



94-4 
82 4 - 

9 18 - 

28 16 - 



3 17 - 

15 7 - 

3 18 - 

33 19 6 

34 2 - 



255 15 10 



85 

1 

81 

53 
2 

15 
3 

4 
8 
9 

22 



291 - 
9 - 

187 4 



nfl 



238 2 - 

6 10 - 

47 19 - 

12 8 - 

16 14 - 

9 11 6 

23 18 - 



178 



60 4 



852 5 6 



46 
6 

88 

59 

8 

15 

4 

7 

4 

19 

36 



885-4 
42 4 - 

146 16 - 

266 18 - 

10 14 6 

47 19 - 

16 - - 

98 I - 

18 9 6 

GO 5 6 

96 18 6 



232 



1,117 1 4 



Receipt and Exfenditube of Monies received in respect of Pilots or Pilotage. 



To pilotV poundage^ being 5 per cent, on the 
earnings of such pilots as are younger 
brethren of the corporation, and of the extra 
coasting pilots ------ 

To income tax -----. 



£. 



£. s. d. 



61 19 - 
- 10 10 



62 9 10 



Cr. 
Bj income tax 

Bj balance 



£. 



£. «. i 
2-10 

60 9 . 



62 10 



Note, — The abo re amount is carried to the general account of this Corporation. 
25 February 1861. Robert GUly Warden's CleA, 



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FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1S60« 



47 



PORT OF HULL AND RIVER HUMBER. 



fiT£-LAWS.— The Bye-Laws printed at pp. 107-109 of Pari. Paper^ No. 516 of 1855, still remain in force. 



Pilots licensed far the River Hvmber under 
theAa^^S WiU. 4, c. 105. 

5ee the List of Names printed at 
pp. 50,61 of ParL Paper, No. 287 of 1860. 
jPenwick, Thomas, has ceased to act ; and 
the following have since been licensed, 
Tiz.: 

Calvert, Riehard - • - aged 22 

Melby, William Morley - - 84 

Smilh, John - - - - 24 

Simpson, John - - - - 24 

Wilkinson, Frederick GeOrge - 24 

Ward, Hugh, the younger - - 28 

Wilkin, John « - - * 25 

Ptfote Hctnsedfor ike River Humber, 
under the Acts 2 4-8 Witt. 4, e. 105, 
andn^lZ Vict.cBl. 

The penoDs mentioned at p. 51 of Pari. 
Paper; No. 287 of 1 860, are still acting. 

Apf&ektices to the JIumber Pilotage 
Serrioe. 



WilliMiCarr - 


• 


aged 18 


Thomas Crackles 


• 


. 15 


Edmund Rogers Frost 


. 


- 17 


William Johnson 


- • 


- 18 


Tom Morrell 


• 


- 19 


Idward Rea - - 


• 


. 18 


William Sampson • 


• 


- 16 


Thomas Walker - 


• 


- 19 


William Wallace 


• 


• 19 



PUoti licensed for New HoBand, in the 
County of Ijincoin. 

The Port of Hull and River Humber 
Pilots are also licensed for New Holland* 



NAMES of PILOTS, &c. 

Masters and Mates holding Pilotage 
Certificates. 

Qrantedfor the River Humber, under 
the Acts 2^8 fViU. 4, c. 105, and 
17 8f 18 Vict. c. 104. 

Amery, John . . *. aged 40 

Abbott, William . - - - 45 

Bartlett, Robert .... 50 

Beaumont, Benjamin Parker - 48 

Bennington, Charles • - - 47 

Brown, John Heugh - - - 57 

Brown, Matthew ... 89 

Bollands, Thomas ... 40 

Bowes, John .... 34 

Chew, Richard .... 40 

Cross, John .... 46 

Curtis, John • ... 44 

Clark, William .... 48 

Croft; Thomas - ' - - - 50 

Dunipace, Robert • - - 84 

Dyson, John - . - - 81 

Dawson, Thomas - - - 51 

Dossor, Frederick - - * 25 

Elder, Robert - ... 58 
Elliott, William - - - .47 

Fairbum, Daniel ... 69 

Farr, Thomas - - - - 41 

Forth, James - - - - 40 

Foster, George - - - - 48 

Fowler, George - - - - 42 

Gardner, John - - - - 42 

Haigh, Joseph - - - • 82 

Hedgecock, William George - 88 

Heron, Samuel - • - - 41 

Hindson, Thomas - - - 89 

Holdridge, John - - - « 46 

Honlton, WHliam - - - 41 

Jewett, Thomas - - - - 28 



Illingworth, Henry Calev 


aged 04 


Kelsey, William - 


- 45 


Knowles, Richard Jordan 


- 47 


Kruger, John Frederick 


- 49 


Lamplough, William - 


- 48 


Leetham, Edward 


- 28 


Leetham, James . - . 


* 06 


Lewis, Charles . - . 


. 49 


Lewis, Thomas ... 


• 45 


Lidermore, Greorge 


- 60 


Marshall, Thomas 


- 39 


Martin, Richard Hick - 


- 40 


Maycock, Joseph 


^ 42 


Mellon, William TowDOAd * 


- 38 


Moor, Benjamin • * . 


- 32 


Mortier, George • - 


- 44 


Mason, William Sample 


- 33 


Newton, James . . - 


- 40 


North, William George 


- 87 


Pearson, William 


• 41 


Remmington, John 


- 46 


R utter, James . . - 


- m 


Hayner, Richard 


' 42 


Riches, Mitchel Bloye 


- 3S 


Sawyer, Robert Morley 


- 47 


Soulsby, Henry - - - 


- 84 


Soulsby, George . - - 


- U 


Storr, James » . 


• 35 


Sharp, William - 


* 43 


Thomlam, Jesse - 


- 27 


Wharton, John . - - 


- .49 


Walkinson, William Henry - 


- 30 


Whitton, James . - - 


- 41 



Limits: The limits are precisely the 
same as those for which the Pilou are 
licensed. See the particulars at p. 51 of 
Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 18D0. 



Masters holding Pihtage Certificates far New Hollai^d. 

Lister, Joseph - - aged 241 JUmi^t : Into and oat of New Holland, in ike county of L^noola, and apon any part of the llunibcri between 
Pepper, Henry - • • 45 > New Holland aforeiaid and the Port of Kingston-upon-Hall, and idao into and out of the laid Fort of 

Sxmth,John . - - 89 J King8ton.iipon-HuU. 

Masters holding Pilotage Certificates for the Port of Grimsby. 

'Limiii: Into and oat of the Port of Great Grrimiby, fai the county of Lincoln, and upon any pirt of the Rhw 

Ifl BrooQ Franois - • 86 Humber, below the said port, and so far out at sea, as to bring the Northness of DimllDjj^a, on the coasi of 

^' " " 1 Holdemtsa, to bear or be seen a lafficiant distaaoe dear or open of the land to the sonthwArd thercoft so aj 

«. * to pass dear of a certain sand or shoal called the New Sand, and also so far alonfi; the ix^aat ta the north wiu^ 

'Myner, George - - « 45 thoeof, as the said Northness of Dimlington, and to the southward thereof, as a certam pobt or heakland 

I on tho coast of Lincolnahire, commonly called or known by the name of Donna Nook, 



Master holding a Pilotage Certificate for the Port of Kjngston-upon-Hull and of Great Grimsby. 



LeYi 



{Limits : Into and out of the Port of Kiagston-apoD^Hull, and of the Port of Great Grimsby, In lh« county of 
Lincoln, and upon any part of the River Humber, between the said Port' of Kingiton-^pon-nnll and the 
said Port of Great Qrimsl^. 



HULL 



RATES of PILOTAGE. * 

NEW ^HOLLAND - 1*^® Rates printed at pp. 129, 180 of ParL Paper, No. 516 of 1855, are still in force. 
GREAT GRIMS6T - The Kates printed at p. 45 of Pari. Paper, No. 854 of 1856, are still in force. 



243. 



¥4 



Port of Hull and River Uvu^s^sL^^emtinm^ 
uigiiizea oy v^jOOV IC 



48 



UBTURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



Corporation op Trinity House op EIingston-upon-Hull — continued. 



Port of Hull — continued* 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in I860. 
PORT OF HULL.— (1.) INWARDS. 



distances 

ftv which 
PILOTED. 



From tM dlsteoce at Sea where the NorthiMM ") 
oi DimDngton bean weM-eoath-weit to the I 
northwmrd of Kilnwa North Clifl; to Hawke f 
Boadf or Griouby Boads . - . • J 

From ditto to the Port of Kingtton-iipon-) 
BoU j 

From ditto to New HoUaad • • • • 



From the distance at Sea when 
North Cliff bears weft-oorth-west to the 1 
northward of the New Sand Buoy* or the I 
Floating Light Vessel at the entrance of j 
the Rlrer Humber, to Hawka Boads or 
Orlmsby Roads . • • . 



From ditto to the Port of Bkingston-upon- ) 
HuU -- i 



Fkom the Spurn High Lighthouse bearing] 
north-east to the Port (^ Klngston-upon- 
HuU J 



From the Hawke Roads, the Bnoy of Jhe] 
Bureome, 'or Orimsbj Roads, 
of Kingstoo-apon-Hnll 



the Bnoy of the") 
«ds» to the Port > 



From Wbitebooth Boads to the Port of King.) 
ston-upon-Holl - • • • • -) 



From New Holland to Hott 



Tidesworks, Attendances, Ice 



Total 



BBITI8H VESSELS. 



COABTEBS. 



Vessels Laden. 



No. 



16 



25 



Amomit. 



£. 9. d. 



SS 13 10 



6 17 - 



S 1 8 



1 13 7 



83 1 



Vessels in 



No. 



Amoont. 



£. 9. d. 



S15 - 



• 11 e 



5 7 



OVEBSEl. 



. Vessels Laden. 



No. 



883 



108 



70 



017 



Amount. 



£. «. J. 

e 11 e 

1,170 6 1 



140 18 - 

ISO 18 6 

00 1 8 

-18 - 

17 



hfii9 I 10 



Vessels in 
Ballast. 



No, 



16 



Imoont. 



£. «. d. 

-18 - 



13 10 S 
1 8 4 



6 11 



-11 10 



18 10 2 



FOBEIGN VESSELS. 



PBIVILEGED. 



Vessels lAden. 



No. 



1,487 



138 



184 



123 



2/>63 



Amount. 



30 8 8 
4,060 1 - 



118 



520 7 



844 8 8 



180 11 5 



5,155 11 



Vessels hi 
Ballast. 



Na 



Amount. 



£. «. d. 
1 - 

10 14 1 
15- 

-13 6 

4 17 8 
4 3 



85 14 8 



nU 



TOTALS. 



No. 



1,800 

1 



858 



171 

e 
1 



8,755 



£. $,i. 
48 10 f 

6»i08 8 S 
18 4 

115 

nils t 

514 - - 

140 19 9 

4 Oil 
1 7 
If 4 - 



6jm t 9 



Vessels changing at Hull fbr Ports and Places abore HnU. 



Amount paid bj Vessels which haye to take or pay ibr Two or more Pilots 



Number of 
Vessels. 



102 



Amount of Pilotage 
below HuU. 



£. 9, d. 
430 11 9 



PORT OF GRIMSBY.— (1.) INWARDS. 



From the distance at Sea where the North.-^ 
ness of DimlioTton bears weeteouth-west 1 
to the northward of Kihtsea North Clifi; to ( 
the Grimsby Docks J 

From the distance at Sea where Kihlsea^ 
North Cliff bears west-north-west to the 
northward of tlio New Sand Buoy, or the . 
Floating Light Vessel at the entrance of the f 
River Humber, to the Grimsby Docks - J 

From the New Sand Buoy, or flie Floatfaig- 
Light Vessel at the entrance of the Birer 
Humber, to the eastward of the Point where . 
Che Spurn High Lighthouse bears north- [ 
eas^ ta the Grimsby Docks - • -j 


7 

1 
6 


8 10 11) 
1 8 4 

4 1 


4 
8 


6 17 8 

• • 

1 4 


76 
17 

15 


174 14 3 

28 10 4 

11 15 6 


11 
8 




!4 8 
116 11 

8 4 


183 

48 

40 


500 15 - 
77 IG 6 

58 8 4 


24 
6 

7 


20 1 6 
6 14 

5 15 1 


nU 


405 

75 
70 


830 8 6| 
118 4 
05 14 l| 


Total • • - 


18 


14 - 5i 


7 


8 8 H 


108 


215 


28 


26 8 


371 


727 10 


37 


41 - - 


- 


509 


l»04tlt 






















Digitized 


by 


Go< 


og 


le 


* 



FOB THX TBAB SNDINO 31 DBCBMBER 1860. 



49 



COBPpBATtON OF TbINITY HoUSE OP KiNGSTON-UPON-HuLL — COfltinuecL 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
PORT OP HULL.— (2.) OUTWARDS. 





BBITI8H TESSELS. 


FOBEIGN VESSELS. 






OI8TA NOBS 
fbrvhieh 


C0A8TBBS. 


OVEBSEA. 


PBIVILEGED. 


S 


tota];b. 


PILOTED. 


YesBels Laden. 


Vessels in 
Ballast. 


Vessels Laden. 


Vessels in 
Ballast. 


Veewds Laden. 


Vewdsin 
Ballast. 






No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No.1 Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


AuMmnu 


From Hnrle So«b, or Grimsbr Boads, to*! 
ttefinoee at Sm where the NortlmeM of 1 
IMmilngtoii bears weet-wrath-wett to the f 
BOrthmd or Kilneea North CUff . -J 

lYonNevHoOnid to ditto- - . - 

dinanee at Sea where KUiuea North Cliff 
beuB vMt-north-woat to the northward of > 
the New Sand Boof, or the Floating Light ( 
ToKl St the entnoce of the Hirer Uamber j 

From the i>ort of Kfngston-upon-Hall to the ) 
Span Higb Ughtbouse bearing north^iast ) 

Usvlie Boad<» the Booj of the Buraome, \ 
or GfJBtby Bonds . - . - ./ 

TUmvaria» Attendances, &e. ... 
TOTAZ. - • 


1 
82 


£. «. d. 
t a 

67 14 - 


68 

1 


£. 9. d. 

70 4 
-14 . 


6 

1 

SIS 

1 

1 


je. s. <k 
8 11 - 

t 7 8 
74t 3 4 

11- 
1 4 - 


106 


1 


2S8 14 10 

8 8 t 

I 8 6 


19 
I 

1,201 

4 
4 


10 16 8 
8 18 - 

1,702 7 • 

8 15 8 
6 18 - 


1 
613 

13 

r 


£. #. A 

1 6 3 
560 15 8 

1118 8 
6 5 8 


nil 


ai 

7 
2^465 

*7 
14 


18 e 8 
10 9 ;i 

4,»5 10 7 

17 U 1 

14 10 2 

3i 5 ^ 


04 


60 17 


60 


70 18 


834 


rw 7 7 


206 


283 6 6 


1,816 VSr 8 6 


546 


001 1 3 


- 


a.534 


4JP7 5 4 


Yessels tnax Ports and Places abore Hull changing at HuU. 


Number of 

Vessels. 


Amount of PflatagK^ 
below Hull. 




Amount paid bjrYesieis which hare to take or paj for Two or more Pilots . . . - 

; _ ; 


148 


£, •. d. 
178 11 4 











PORT OF GRIMSBY— (2.) OUTWARDS 


• 












L 




1 
































il|BthcGffinisb7 DocIes to the distance at^ 
1 fia vhert the Northness of Dimlington I 

BhwaUorthCliff J 


- 


- • 




- - 


4 


7 1 4 


- 


- - 


8 


14 8 


- 


• 


nil 


12 


11 10 1 


te tbeGHmsby Docks to the distance at^ 
iMvhere Kitavea North Cliff bears west- 

JhBd Baor, or the Floating Light Vessel f 
ttfti entfuee of the Birer Homber -J 


7 


5 10 8 


6 


5 1 8 


00 


173 5 6 


48 


47 7 


840 


417 11.11 


157 


157 7 


- 


5Aa 


eoa B e 


i|B the Grimfbf Docks to the New Sand i 
igof, or the Floating Light Vessel at the 
EjWnKeof am Hirer Homber to the east- V 
|7»d of the Point where the Spurn High 

£ Total • . . 


- 


- - 


- 


- - 


1 


-14 - 


- 


- - 


4 


4 0- 


1 


1 11 - 


- 


7 


!I14 ^ 


7 


5 10 8 


6 


5 18 


05 


180 - 10 


43 


47 7 


161 


436 10 8 


150 


150-7. 


- 


ii7i 


as3 n 7 



243- 



G 



Port of Hull and River Uvui^zvi^-cim^mued* 

uigitized by ' 



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5f> 



RITUR^S BBLATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTA&S» 



COBPOBATION OF TbJNITY HoUSE OF E[lKGSTON-UPOK-HlJLI«--«0|l<»tlCadl 



ACCOUNT of Monies received for Pilotage by the Commissioners acting under the Humber Pilot Act 



J}r. 

To balance from last annual account - 

To balance reoeived from applicants for 
licenses •--•-- 

To amount received in oontribations to the 
Superannuated Pilots' Fund . - - 

To amount received in fines, awards, &c. - 

To gross amount of inward pilotage - 

To gross amount of outward pilotage 



£. 



474 Id 2 

289 6 - 

216 16 6 

26 17 - 

7,964*16 - 

5,830 16 11 



14,262 7 7 



Cr. 
By amount paid to pilots - . • . 

By amount of salaries for clerk and commo- 
dore ---.-.- 

By amount paid for incidentals; such as books, 
stationery, s<^citor, taxes, tradesmen's bills, 
&c. &o. -.-..-. 

By amount paid in respect of pilot cutters 



By amoant paid for pensions to the 
nuated pilots - - . - 



By amount paid in weekly relief to pilots' 
widows ------. 

By amount paid, as deducted from outward 
pilotage, tor apprentices' wages, victuals, 
turpentine, oil, fares, boatmen, tugs, hook- 
ing vessels, receipt stamps, &c • • . 

By balance to be carried to next account 



£. 



£. i.d. 
10,429 8 II 

270 - - 

216 - 2 
1,689 19 S 

816 7 6 

182 15 - 



646 5 7 
663 15 II 



14,262 7 7 



Pilot Office, Hull, 14 Januay 1861. 



Charles SmitK 
Clerk to the Commisdonerk 



PORT OF GAINSBURGH. 



Bye-Laws. — ^The Bye-Laws printed at j.p. 110-112, of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866, are still in force. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



The persons mentioned at p. 62 of Pari. Paper, No. 244 of 
1869, are still acting. 



MASTERS holding Pilotage Certificates, under the 
Act 17 and 18 Vict. c. 104, s. 340. 



Clough, John 


aged 34 


Gledhill, William * 


21 


Whitton, James * 


41 



Xtimi»^-Ths i 
ffor the Pilate. 



Rates.— /&e p. 64 of Pari. Paper, No. 287, of 1860. The Rates there referred to are still in force. 



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FOR THE YEAR E9DIKG 31 DISCEMBBR 1860. 



5t 



CoBPOSJLTioN or Trinitt House of Bjekoston-ufow-Hull — GAiv&vxrRQB.—e(mtinued. 

AMOUNT received for Pilotaob of Ybssels in 1S60. 
(1.>-INWABD8. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 


TC 




DISTAKCES 


COASTER& 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


i 
I 


»TALS. 


for which 
PILOTED, 


Not Towed hj 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed'by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amoimt. 


No. 


AmoQDt. 


No. 


Amoimt. 


No. 




No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


ftom Hun Roftdt to Gains- 

FroD Hon RoadB to Placet 
aboreKeadby. 


2 


£.#. d. 
2 10 


7 


£. t. A 
8 6 2 


7 


£- 9. d. 

8 2- 


.4 


£.1. d. 
6 18 - 


14 
8 


£. f. d. 
21 17 10 

4 IS 4 


nU - 


84 
3 


£. «. d. 
46 13 

4 12 4 


TOTAI. . - • 


2 


2 10 9 


7 


8 6 2 


7 


8 2- 


4 


6 18 - 


17 


S6 10 3 


- 


37 


61 6 1 



(2.)-0UTWARDS. 



Prom Gaivbor^ to HnU 

Fhxn Pfatcea ab<we Keadby 
to Hon Roadie 


1 


IS- 


3 


2 6 8 


11 


16 10 10 


4 
1 


4 17 - 
- 16 - 


17 


19 16 3 


na - 


36 

1 


44 17 9 
- 16 - 


Total - . - 


1 


IS- 


3 


2 6 8 


11 


16 10 10 


6 


6 12 - 


17 


19 16 3 


- 


37 


46 12 9 



ACCOUNT of Monies received by the Sub-Commissioners of Pilotage. 



Dr. 
Gross amount received for inward pilotage - 

GhrosB amount received for outward pilotage - 



£. 



£. s. d. 
61 6 1 

46 12 9 



96 18 10 



Cr. 

Commission to pilot master - 
Boats for the year . - - 
Letters, &c. . - - - - 
Pilots' expenses to Keadby - 
Commission at Keadby out of fund 
Paid pilots - - - - - 



£. s. d. 

7 8 4 

2 - - 

- - 10 

- 7 - 

- 7 - 
87-8 



96 18 10 



Jno. SehqfiMf Headsman. 



PORT OF GOOLE. 

Byb-Laws.— The Bye-Laws printed at pp. 112-114 of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1856, are still in force. 



NAMES of PILOTS, &c. 

See the list printed at p. 66 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860. — Clark, William, aged 68, has been since appointed in the 
ihce cf Henry Bell. 

Masters and Mates holding Pilotage Certificates. 
LimUi. — Same as thoae for whidi the Pilots are Licensed— SIm p. 55 Pari. Paper, No. 287 of I86O.1 



A]«>p, James - 
Abbey, Thomas 
AtlmHOD, Thomas - 
Bahnfortb, William - 
JBroadhead, John 
Brown, William 
Brown^ Thomas 
Bollands^ Thomas - 
QsAbod, WilliMn - 



^3- 



aged 33 
88 
37 
38 
81 
46 
38 
40 
44 



Cherry, Peter* - 
Eckles, Leonard 

Field, John . - - 
Frank, Edward 

Hailstone, Greorge - 
Holdridge, John 
Hunter, Joseph 
Hibbard, John - - - 


aged 


183 

48 

66 
46 

67 
46 
45 
29 


Hnmdahl, John - . aged 42 
Jewitt, Thomas - - - 28 
Ingleby, Christopher - - 28 
Leetham, James ... 35 
Bamsey, Thomas - - - 46 
Buddings, Thomas - - - 47 
Wadsworth, Gregory Brook - 44 
Walker, Charles - - - 42 
Woodhead, Bobert ... 33 


G 2 






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m 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE^ 



CORPOHATION OP TRINITY HoUSE OP KINGSTON- UPON-HuLL — GOOLE — continued. 



Il4T£3 or PiLOTAGs. — Scc p. 66, of Pari, Paper, No. 287, of I860. The Rates there referred to are still in force. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 



(l.)-INWARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELa 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


M 

S 

► 

M 

s 

5 


TOTALS. 


for whkh 
PILOTED, 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






Ko, 


Amoant 


No. 1 Amotmt. 


No. 


Amoant 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amoant. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


AmooiL 


Trom UtiJI Road« to Goole 


n 


£. t. <L 

21 1 - 


£. t. d. 
25 20 11 3 


9 


£. t. A 
11 8 - 


70 


£. t. d, 

105 12 6 


18 


£. f. d. 
18 18 6 


107 


£. t. d. 
176 18 2 


nil 


246 


JLuL 
35S19 4 



(2.)-0UTWARDS. 



from. Goole to EuH Roadi tO 

I 



28 10 6 



35 82 1 6 



1 18 8 



60 



100 8 7 



81 



44-11 



54 



70 18 5 



nU 



210 



i8S18 S 



ACCOUNT of Monies Received and Expended bj Suh-Commtssioners. 



KBCEIPTS. 



r In ward piTofage 
T& amount of -i 

^ Outward pilotage 



Pilot Office, Goole, Jannaiy 1861. 



£. 



£. s. d. 
368 19 4 

283 18 2 



687 17 6 



EXPENDITURE. 



By commission paid to pilot master - 
Amoant of pilotage paid to the pilots - 
Boating expenses .... 

Oyercharge in October • • • 
Office rent for the year • • • 
Poor-rate ------ 

Stamps ---.-. 
Telegraphing • - - - - 

Sundry expenses^ extra men, &e. 



63 15 9 

554 16 S 

9 12 S 

-17 ft 

4 4- 

- 9 9 

- 18 - 

- 19 6 
2 9 1 



687 17 6 



Henry Oale, Pilot Master. 



1 



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FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



53 



Corporation op Trinity House op Kingston-upon-Hull — continued. 



SPALDING- 



Bys-Laws. — The Bye-Laws printed at pp. 114-116 of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1865, are stQl in force. 



Names of Pilots. — The Pilots mentioned at p. 68 of Pari. Paper, No. 174 of 1868, are still acting, 



Rates of Pilotage. — The Rates printed at p. 68 of Pari. Paper, No. 174, of 1858, are still in force. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860, 
(1.)— INWARDS. 





BRITISH 


VESSELS. 




FOREIGN VESSELS. 




DISTANCES 
























TOTALS, 


forwhkh 
PILOTED. 


C0A8TERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


















UNPRIVILEGED.- 








No. 


Amoant 


No. 


AmoDDt 


No. 


Amount. 




No. 


1 AmotokL 






£. t. d. 




£. ». d. 




£. t. d. 




£. /. d. 


From WeOand Setway to Spdd- 
htg H%li Bridge. 


- 


• 


1 


1 - 7i 


3 


2 14 - 


. . nil . 


4 ' 


3 U 7i 


Ditto to Fotdyke Bridge - 


248 


118 - 


- 


. 


13 


12 10 - 


- . . 


361 


130 19 _ 


Total - - • 


248 


118 9 - 


1 


1 - 7J 


10 


15 4 - 


- 


265 


134 13 7J 



(2.)— OUTWARDS, 



'ran Fosdyka Bridge to Wel- 
laadSctwaj. 



207 



54 16 5) 



16 



9 18 - 



nil . 



223 



04 14 5| 



ACCOUNT of Monies received by the Sub-Commissioners of Pilotage. 



BSCSIPTS. 


EXPBKDITUBB. 


rogn« amount received P^'^^P^^*^^ - 
ii wii . - - - \outward pUotage - 


£. #. d. 

184 18 7i 

64 14 6i 


By amount paid for commission to pilot 
master. 

By amount paid for renewal of licenses^ 
tidesworks, and other expenses. 

By amount paid to pilots 

£. 


£- t. d. 

10 ^ - 

nj 

182 18 IJ 


£. 


190 8 1 


109 8 1 



JoJm Kingston, Receiver. 



343. 



G3 



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i 



54 



■CnmNS BSL&TINO TO PILOra AKD PILOTAGE, 



CoBPOBATioN or Teinitt Hot7B£ OF KiwGWTOjr-UPOK-HiTLL — eonHmud. 



PORT OF WISBECH. 



BtbpLaws.— The Bye-laws printed in ParL Paper, No. 616, of 1855, p. 116-119, still remain in force. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



Burrows, John 


aged 60 


Burton J James 


67 


Butler, John - 


38 



Harvey, Riobard 
Laws, Samuel 
Pilkington, Peter 



aged 63 
39 
42 



LimiU. — Into and Oat of the Port and Hubonr of 
Wisbech, and the waters thereof; and from the Ibwo 
of Wisbech, through the Cross Keys Bridge, to the 
Lower Roads at Sea, Outwards ; and from the aaid 
Lower Roads at Sea, through the Cross Keyi Bridge, 
to the said Town of Wisbech, Inwards; and AitiD and to 
all hitermediate phices between the said town and tlie 
said Lower Roads. 



Hatbs of Pilotage. — ^The Rates printed in Pari. Paper, No. 616, of 1856, p. 130, still remain in force. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotaob of Ve8SbL8 in I860. 
(l.)_I N W A R D S. 



DISTANCES 

for which 

PILOTED. 



From tho Lower Roads at Sea to the 

Crop* Keys BHdtr©. 
From the Lower Roads at Sea to 

Wiftliech. 
For fjttra Pilotage below Lower 

Rouda. 
For Dxtta Pilotage above the Cross 

KfljTS liriilse. 
For extra atteiiilAncea - - - 

Total - - - 



From Wiflbtch to the Croaa Keys 

Froui Xha Croas Keys Bridge to the 

LoTver Roiidfl at Sea. 
Fioiu Wiflbech to the Lower Roads 

at Ses, 
VoT c^tTtt Pilotage beyond the I^wer 

Ro&<!s at Sea. 
For )ififlii*iiiig Sb[ps through Cross 

Key* Bridge, 

Total - - - 



BRITISH VESSELS. 



No. 



159 

45 

3 

8 

1 



216 



2 

134 

26 

1 

1 



Amount. 



108 2 - 

79 15 8 

2 5- 

6 11 S 

- 10 - 



196 3 10 



FOREIGN VESSELS. 



PRIVILEGED. 



No 



17 

23 

1 

3 

3 



47 



Amount. 



£. t. d. 
18 7 11 

34 19 5 

- 10 - 

2 6 4 

1 16 - 



67 17 8 



UNPRIVILEGED. 



nil - 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



164 



- 18 - 
69 4 9 
28 12 8 

- 10 - 

- 2 6 



99 7 11 



16 
20 

4 
1 



10 13 9 

22 2 4 

2 8 2 

- 2 6 



41 



35 6 9 



nil 



TOTALS. 



No. 



176 
68 

4 
11 

4 



263 



2 

150 

46 

5 

2 



205 



Amosnt 



£. $.d. 
126 911 

114 15 1 

SU • 

7 16 6 

2 5- 



254 1 6 




134 14 8 



ACCOUNT of Monies received by the Sub-Commissioners of Pilotage. 



Receipt. 



To gross amouDt received for inward pilotage - 
To ^rofls amount reoeived for outward pilotage - 



Wisbeoli, 17 January 1861. 



jt. s, a. 

264 1 6 
134 14 8 



888 16 2 



EXPBNDITUBB. 

By amount of pilotage paid to pilots 



£. s. i 

388 16 2 



388 16 2 



Fra, Jcu:kson, 
Secretary to the Sub-Commiasioners of Pilotage. 



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FOK TBU YKAB KHUKO 81 DSCXMBEB 1800. 



55 



TRINITY HOUSE, NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE. 



Charter and Act eonfeiring Jariadiction 



{Charter of the third year of the reignj^of King Jamei the Second : 
Act 41 Geo. 8, c. 80. Also under 'seyeral priijr Charterft and 
by PraaosiptioB. 



Gbnibai. RiouLATXOxs.— The Regulations printed in Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1865, p. 166, are still m foruQ. 



PILOTS Kccnied by the Trimitt House for the respective Ports under its Jurisdiotloo. 



Uceiued to conduct VesseU into and out 
of Shields Harbour. 



Kobert Pearson 
rhomasYoaiig(]st) 
Fohn Harrison (1st) - 
[ohn Wright (Ist) - 
Facob Bone 
3eorgeTindle(l9t) 
lobertTiilly(l8t) - 
iemael Steivart 
Facob Harrison 
hdrew Purris 
^hn Donkin - 
fdm Marshall (1st) - 
hmes Coates - 
WmMilbiuii(l8t) - 
■•cob Bum 
amesBom - 
[ames Morrison 
oseph Smith - 
Slias Stepbeoson 
homas Yoang (2d) 
niliam Thnrlbeck - 
bhn M. Koulsbj - 
btin Stephenson - 
labh Barn 
Scbard Parris 
Schard Holsby 
Rniam F. Chambers 
Hliam Young (Ist)- 



komas Young (8d) - 
*Di7 Stephenson 
pbert Tinmouth 
itthew L Lawson - 
^ Stephenson 
hn Ramsay • 
fcn Harrison (2d) • 
fci Morrison 
tui Chambers 
b Peel 
iDiam Wright 

te« Purvis - 
)b Martin - 
tea Fife . 
obert Grieres 
^as Wright 
pnry Young (ist) - 
lexandBr Bone 
Hliam Young (2d') • 
fert Pun^. ^ . 
M PhilKps . 
^rgeBum - 
»bert Young - 
>tertTully(2d) . 

Stlr/^!'^ : 

a Marshall (2d) - 
Aard Harrison 
•fles Pearson 
^ Young (2d) - 

343. 



aged 80 
80 
76 
71 
72 
71 
72 
67 
66 
66 
66 
65 
64 
63 
61 
61 
60 
60 
69 
69 
69 
69 
68 
68 
67 
69 
66 
66 
62 
62 
62 
52 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
62 
69 
62 
60 
66 
69 
69 
48 
47 
47 
47 
47 
47 
47 
47 
47 
46 
46 
44 
66 
44 



SHIELDS. 

John Bone ... 

George Phillips 

James Chambers 

James Blair (2d) 

Andrew Harrison 

John 8. Tindle 

Wm. Young (8d) 

Edward Grieves 

John Young - - - 

Andrew Purvis 

Joseph Marshall 

George Grieves 

Richard Stephenson (1st) - 

John Grieves (Ist) - 

Benjamin Wright 

Robert Blair - - . 

James Tindle - . . 

Ralph Harrison 

John Grieves (2d) - 

James Stephenson 

John Wright ... 

John HarrisoB 

Robert Milbum 

Jacob Harrison (2d) 

William Blair - 

John Hutchinson (1st) 

George H. Thurlbeck 

John JE. Young 

Robert Stephenson • 

WDliam C. Stephenson 
William Chambers - 

George Young 
Robert Wright 
George Tindle - - - 
Henry Hart TuUy - 
Matthew Harrison - 
Michael Purvis 
John Hutchinson (2d) 
Thomas Chambers - 
Thomas Young 
Robert W. Stephenson 
John Wright - - • 
James £. Coates 
John Peel - - . 

Lancelot Bum (2d) - 
Richard Purvis 
W. H. Thurlbeck - 
Ralph Shotton - - . 
Michael D. Donkin - 
George Tindle - - . 
Ralph Tindle - 
Robert Anisley Harrison - 
Thomas H. Holsby - 
Wm. Purvis - - - 
Robert Bone - • . 
John Nevins - . - 
Martin Purvis - - • 
Heniy Bum - - - 
Charles Pearson 
Ralph Bum (2d) 
Thomas Tindle 
James Stephenson (2d) 
William Purvis 



G4 



aged 43 


John Taylor Tully • 




i^ed 31 


43 


Charles Cleet - 




. 


29 


43 


James Stewart - 




- 


40 


43 


Joseph T. H. A. Coats 




^ 


39 


43 


Wm. Chambers 




.. 


St 


43 


WMUiam Purvis 




* 


W 


43 


Charles Burn - 




^ 


m 


43 


Anthony Ram^jij 




, 


26 


43 
43 
41 


William Tinmouth - 




- 


25 


Pilots at CuUercoats Ikemed to condud 


41 


Vessels into Shields Harbour, 




40 


Andrew Scott - 


. 


aged 77 


42 


Robert Taylor (1st} - 


- 




80 


41 


Francis Story (1st) - 


. 




71 


40 


Robert Story ^ 


. 




6£ 


40 


James Pearson 


. 




81 


39 


Andrew Taj lor 
James Robinson 


_ 




66 


42 


- 




66 


39 


John Story 


_ 




65 


39 


Robert Nicholson 


» 




63 


38 


Wm. Story 


- 




60 


39 


John Redf'ord - 


* 




63 


88 


John Clark - 


- 




42 


89 


Francis Story (2d) - 


. 




50 


42 


William Stocks 


* 




40 


38 
40 


John Taylor 


- 




46 


39 


Licensed wUh Acting Orders to 


con 


duct 


89 

36 


Vessels into and out 0/ Shields Hi 


irh 


mr. 


88 


John Purvis 




aged 39 


88 


William YouDf]^ 






32 


85 


John Stephenson 
George Marshall 






81 


36 






32 


42 


George Ayre - 






36 


40 


George Stephenson - 






48 


49 


Henry Burn - 






80 


37 


James Purvis - 






32 


37 


James Purvis - 






33 


35 


Gilbert Purvis - 






33 


34 


Richard Purvis 






28 


86 


Lancelot Burn - 






29 


34 


Wm. Purvis 






29 


84 


Benjamin Hall Peel 






30 


84 


Thomas Marshall 






20 


32 


Matthew Forstor Burn 






27 


84 


James Christ ophtir Morrison 




25 


82 


Thomas Purvis 


- 




26 


82 


William Marshall - 


* 




26 


34 


Thomas Stewart 


- 




26 


82 


John Harrison 


- 




24 


84 


George Smith - 


. 




24 


84 


Samuel Holsby 


- 




29 


86 


John Purvis - 


- 




24 


81 


Thomas Nevans 


- 




24 


38 


Thomas Tinmouth - 


. 




23 


29 


John Purvis - 


m _ 




24 


29 


Joseph Chambers 


'X 




23 


82 


Edward Ramsay 


• 




23 


33 


Jacob Bone 


* 




23 


31 


John liander Burn - 


- 




23 


38 


.Edward Tindle 


- 




24 




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5fi 



RETURNS EELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



Tkikitx House, Xewcastle-upon-Ttne — continued. 



Licenced to coiuiuct Vessels up the Mivcr 
Tyne, 



Jolin Bruce 




aged 73 


John Hall 




65 


Bobert Davison 




67 


Alexander Donkin • 




67 


Jo^C'ph Freeman (1st) 




69 


Williani Wilson 




68 


Cljarles Stolt - 




67 


James Watson 




53 


William Graham 




6S 


John a Watson 




53 


William Bedlin^on - 
John H, Ktiowles - 




49 




42 


Timothy Brawn 




63 


John Heron (1st) 




68 


WiOiam Stott * 




33 


John Freeman - 




33 


Charles Stott - 




33 


Thomas Stott * 




33 


George Emerson 




29 


.Joseph Freeman {3d) 




29 


Francis Freeman 




30 


WilUam Freeinan 




215 


John Heron (2d) 




32 


Geor*>e AV^ilson 




23 


Benjamin Heron 




23 



BIVER TTNE. 

Licensed to coTiduct VesseU down the River 
Tyne, 

John Caverliill - - aged 71 

Robert Harrison - * - 76 

Thomas Forster - - - 69 

George RohBon • - , 67 

Moses Campbell - - - 66 

Thomas Brown * - - 57 

William Blactett - * - 64 

William Maxwell - - - 53 

Wiiiiam Story - - - - 52 

Henry Coates - - * - 52 

Roger Lumsdon - - - 68 

George Redhead - - - 42 

John Young - - . - 52 

Leonard Brown - - * 44 

WilUam Elakey - - - 79 

Thomas Wheldon - - - 61 

Martin S. Wheldon - - - 61 

Thomas Forster - * _ 62 

Allan Strachan - - - 52 

John Morrison • - - 40 

Robert Donkin - - - 57 

Matthew Routledge - ^ - 38 

Joseph P* Morton - - - 40 

George Morrison *- - ~ 61 

James Morton - _ - 39 

John Dixon * - - - 43 

Samael Routledge - - - SI 



Matthew B. Morton 
John Hotter 
Anthonv Redhead - 
Henry Straehan 
William Thomas Tambull 
Michael Wheldon 
Joseph Blair - 
Joseph Blackett 
Peter Cree 

Richard Bonner Young 
Thomas Freeman 
Thomas Matiison 
Isaac Blakey - 
Robert Hogg - 
Edward Lumsdon 
George Forster 
Thomas Maxwell 
Thomas Ogle Hardy- 
Thomas Cowan 
Geo- Wm. Morrison 
James Gibson - 
William Brown 
James Wheldon 
William Smith 
Thomas Dawson 
William Daylish 
Rob4?rt Charlton Wheldon 
Peter Lawson Wheldon 
Moses Campbell 
Matthew Brown 



SUNDERLAND, 



Licensed ta conduct Ves$eb into and out 
of Sunderland Harbour. 



Richard Dobson 
Robert Campbell 
Thorn ns Potts - 
Jacob Wake - 
William Campbell - 
Thomas Scolt (1st) - 
George Welch 
George Hopper (1st) 
Francis Welch 
Thomas S. Brown - 
Jamef! Potts 
Charles Donkin 
William Alder 
Geori^e Hall 
WilUam Patterson * 
Gcore^e Brown 
Michael Tlmrlbeck (let) 
Thomas Watson 
Richard Taylor 
John Thiirlbeck ^ 
Ricliard H, Jobling 
WilUam Jones 
Henderson Brown - 
Robinson Carter 
Wm, J, Atkinson 
Eduard Jobling 
Edwjiril Row n tree - 
John Mefcalf - 
James Campbell 
John Dodds - 
Thomas Welch 
Henry Rash - 
Edward Brown 
Charles Alder - 
Thomas BroTvn 
Henry Dodds - 
WilUam Allison 
Micliuel Brass * 



age 81 
73 
72 
68 
68 
69 
71 
60 
65 
69 
60 
61 
67 
65 
53 
61 
51 
61 
66 
61 
66 
60 
56 
65 
66 
51 
60 
53 
63 
56 
44 
48 
63 
61 
56 
50 
47 
40 



Joseph Henry - 
WiUiam Watson (1st) 
John Wayman 
Thomas Donkin 
Michael Thurlbeck (2d) 
John Lindsay - 
George Thurlbeck 
William Jemison 
John Alder 
Guy Potts 
Thomas Rowell 
William Gills - 
Thomas Potta - 
James Johnson 
WilUam Hall - 
Henry Kidney 
Michael Thurlbeck (3d) 
John Brown 
Michael Hall - 
Matthew Rush 
Robert Thurlbeck - 
Thomas Scott - 
John Scott 
Edward M or ley 
Francis Taylor 
WilUam Wake 
William Scott - 
John Carter 
George Scott 
George Gibbons 
John Smitii 
William Young 
John Jackson - 
Robert Parkef - 
Thomas Sutton 
William Potts - 
AVilliam Davison 
Dixon Hall 
Henry Jones - 
Thomas Bambro' 
Thomas Wibon 



aged 49 
51 
62 
63 
45 
54 
43 
63 
60 
65 
62 
50 
47 
62 
67 
60 
44 
42 
44 
44 
43 
43 
43 
40 
49 
42 
41 
42 
43 
65 
48 
47 
49 
61 
48 
43 
64 
59 
43 
60 
66 



William Milbum 
George Meicalf 
John Sanderson 
William Watson 
Jolm Dobson - 
John Morley 
William Rowell 
WilUam Welch 
George Hopper 
Fairley Downs 
Thomas Donktn 
Francis Appleby 
Thomas Wilson 
Edward Brown 
Thorn a? Potts ^ 
Jobn Meteaif - 
Edward Brown 
James Liddle - 
Jobn Donkin * 
Robert Lindsay 
George R. Dodds 
Matthew Wake 
Edward Henry 
George Wilson 
James Dixon - 
Thomas Potts - 
Shadworth Brown 
Robert Brown - 
Edward H. Scott 
Alexttnder Campbell 
John Henry 
Robert Young * 
Geort^e Hunter 
William NeU - 
Jcseph Parkin - 
Ralph Stafford 
Richard Pallas 
Storm Thompson 
WilUam Henry, Jan. 
George Dodds ~ 
William Brown 



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FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 BECBMBER 1800. 



57 



Teinitt House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne— co^/inw^rf. 



Pilots— conhntiedL 

Richardson Gibbons - - aged 31 

Xdward Brown - - - 88 

Robert Noble - - - - 31 

"WilKam Wilson - - - . 31 

Edward Mordey • • - 39 

Paul Wayman - - - - 31 

Thomas Williamson Wilson - 33 

William Davison - - - 35 

"William Hopper - - - 32 

Heniy Brown - - ' - - 31 

Mward Brown - - - 32 

G«orge Hopper - - - 43 

William Brown - - - 38 

Charles Alder .... 36 

John Gills - - - . 29 

Oeorge Gibbons - - - 30 

William Alder - - . 36 

William Rash .... 28 

Thomas Brown Pattison • - 26 

William Brown - - - 28 

James Morley - - - - 27 

Matthew Metcalf ... 27 

William Hunter - - - 48 

James X. Atkinson • • - 45 



William Brown - - aged 36 

Edward Brown (2d) • - - 34 

George Thompson - - - 41 

John Shotton .... 86 

William Brown - - - 25 

Henry Metcalf ... 80 

Richardson Donkin - - - 30 

Thomas Scott - - - - 28 

John Brown Pattison - - 24 

Jacob Wake - - • - 23 

Atchison Scott ... 25 

Featherston Moore - - - 25 

William Thurlbeck - - - 30 

James Davison ... 80 

John Cuthbertson Scott - - 24 

Nathan Thompson • - • 50 

Matthew Brown - - - 27 

Thomas Thurlbeck ... 46 

Matthew Donkin ... 25 

James Elliott • - • • 32 

Thomas Hopper • - - 25 

Robert Alder .... 29 

William Brown - • - 27 

Matthew Metcalf - • . 27 



fViih Acting Orders for Sunderland. 

Thomas Carter - . aged 34 

Matthew Metcalf - - . 27 

William Willing - • - 31 

Thomas Donkin • * • 26 

Simon Williamson Dixon - . 32 

George Lindsay - • - 30 

Thomas Wrightson ... 80 

Harrison Thurlbeck ... 80 

John Sanderson - - - 22 

William EUemore - - . 26 

Robert Henry Thompson - - 27 

James Mcintosh - - . 31 

William Patterson - • - 21 

John Munday Wako - - 21 

John Tindle Dodds ... 21 

Thomas Sutton - . * 25 

Thomas Donkin - - - 24 

William Elliott - - - 30 

Fairley Downs - - - 20 

Thomas Brown . . - 21 

John Welsh .... 29 

William Watson • - - 20 



Lteensed to conduct Vessels into and out 
of Seaham Harbour^ 



Thomas EUemore 
Taylor Ellemore 
Thomas Thurlbeck 
John Scott 
William Dobson 
FGeorge Scott . 
Uohn Harrison 
Thomas Rush - 
John Dobson - 
"John Henry 
^Xionel Henry . 
John Marshall . 
."William Bruce 
William Watson 
Thomas Ellemore 
I Walker Henry 



aged 64 
61 
75 
54 
66 
70 
65 
54 
50 
65 
65 
48 
49 
42 
40 
39 



I Licensed to conduct Veuds into and out 
I of Hartlepool Harbour. 



Thomas Watt (Ist) . 
iobert Hodgson (1st) 
Richard Pounder (ist) 
Bobert Hantcr 
Kichard Hodgson 
ffhomas Pounder (1st) 
|9ohn Brown 
[lokn H. Robinson - 
iobert Founder (ist) 
John Horsley (Ist) - 
■Tliomaf Pounder (2d) 
Jfichael Denton 
"William Spence 
^Rohert Pounder (2d) 
Joieph Snowdon 
Thorns Watt (2d) - 
George Horsley 
Richard Sharp 
ftladdison Horsley • 
ihonuki Cooper 
[ohnD. Watt - 
Jrt Spence - 
kston Boagey 
mton Bulmer 
fichael Snowdon 



aged 81 
66 
76 
62 
61 
66 
58 
53 
00 
64 
63 
61 
57 
53 
61 
49 
57 
56 
50 
45 

«!> 45 
53 
54 
53 
44 



SEAHAM. 

Morley Scott . . ., aged 38 

Robert Harrison ... 40 

Robert Mould - - . . 68 

John Hudson .... 50 

James William Ellsmore * • 35 

George Hay .... 40 

John Harrison - . - 32 

Robert Morrington - • - 54 

Frederick Quilter - . - 48 

Thomas Miller ... 45 

Thomas Revely . - . 34 

John Thurlbeck - - - 36 

Michael Scott - * - - - 29 

James Mason Scott - . - 30 

John Bruce .... so 

Ralph Revely .... 30 

Lionel Henry .... 29 

Ralph Appleby - - - 27 

HARTLEPOOL. 



Thomas Pounder (3d) 
James Pounder (1st) 
Robert Hodgson (2d) 
William Hodgson (1st) 
William Watt 
Francis Boagey 
William Hodgson (2d) 
Robert Hunter 
Francis Watt - 
Archibald Hunter 
Thomas Horsley (1st) 
Cuthbert Snowdon - 
John Hodgson 
Peter Watt 
Thomas Horsley (2d') 
Thomas Pounder (4th) 
Thomas Hodgson 
Matthew Lamb 
Cuthbert Coulson 
William Pounder 
Richard Robinson - 
Thomas Pounder (4th) 
William Coulson 
Matthew Hunter 
William Homsby 
Robert Boagey 
John Snowdon Robson 
James Harrison 

H 



aged 46 
42 
39 
40 
40 
43 
37 
39 
38 
50 
61 
45 
87 
34 
36 
35 
35 
35 
36 
36 
82 
39 
34 
42 
32 
32 
34 
36 



William Henry . - aged 32 

Thomas Scott - - - - 28 

John Dobson .... 27 

John Scott - - - . 25 

Churlton Dobson - - - 24 

William Scott (1st) - - - 24 

Michael Scott - • - . 26 

William Scott (2d) - - - 23 

Moses Appleby - - - 22 

Ralph DoDson - • • - 22 



fVith Acting Orders for Seaham 
Harbour. 



Robert Scott - 
John Dobson • 
Francis Appleby 



aged 28 
26 
25 



John Horsley ... aged 30 

Selvey Boagey • • - 30 

Richard Hunter ... 30 

Thomas Watt - ... 40 

Bartholomew Huntridge - - 35 

Thomas Horsley - • • 32 

Cuthbert Hodgson - . . 29 

John Horsley .... 29 

George Horsley (1st) - - 29 

George Horsley (2d) - - 80 

Andrew Robson - . . _ 

Thomas Pounder - . - 24 

Robert Pounder - . - 26 

Eden Heron Pounder • - 25 

Robinson Carter . - - 24 

William Snowdon . - - 26 

John Boacey - - - • 26 

William Horsley - - - 27 

John Hunter Robinson - - 26 

Samuel Hodgson - . - 24 

With Acting Orders for Hartlepool 
Harbour. 



Henry Hood - 
Hunter Boagey 
David Spence • 
Richard Pounder 

uigiiized by 



aged 30 
24 
25 
26 



Google 



.'iS 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAOB, 



Trinity House, Newcastle-upon-Tyne — contmmd. 



Idcensed to conduct Vessels into and 

out of West Hartlepool Harbour and 
Docks. 

John Appleby . - - aged 89 

William Hood . - - - 87 

Henry Rowntree . - . 46 

Cuthbert Coidson . - - 88 

Thomas Hood .... 68 

John Rowntree - - - 61 

Cuthbert Pounder - - - 60 

Michael Coulson - - - 48 

Jacob Hood .... 48 

Richard Coulson (2d) - - 68 

Robert Bum - - • - 41 

William Hastings ... 44 

Robert Horsley ... 40 

David Moor • - • - 61 

John Ansen - - - - 49 

Robert Davison - - - 41 



Sea Pilots licensed to conduct Vessels into 
and out of the Tees. 

George Robinson - - aged 69 

John Denny - - - • 68 

John Hall .... 67 

Henry Guy .... 78 

George Allen - . - - 68 

Slater Potts ... - 66 

William Bumicle (1st) - - 68 

Andrew Ditchbum - . - 66 

Robert Sheldon . . - 66 

Joseph Carter ... - 66 

Henry Sheldon - - - 62 

George Clark ... - 64 

John Dixon ... - 66 

Matthew E. Clark . . - 88 

William Burnicle (2d) . . 33 

William Dixon ... 36 

Robert Cass ... - 84 

Kobert Shieldon . - - 86 



Licensed to conduct Vessels into and out 
of tf Uthy Haxhwr. 

aged 63 
67 
63 
67 



WEST HARTLEPOOL. 

Joseph Robinson 
John Coulson - 
Henry C. Hood 
John C. Hood - 
Thomas Hodgson 
Robert Storrow 
John Marshall 
Matthew Pounder - 
Eden Harrison 
Robert Hodgson 
John Pounder - 
John Wood 
Jonathan Pounder - 
Robert Horsley 
James Pounder 
John Pounder - 
William Hood - 
Robert Booth - 
Jonathan Moore 



Henry Hodgson 
Thomas Douglas 
John Walker - 
Robert Wilson 



Licensed to conduct Vessels into and out 
. qfBlyih Sarbour. 



Thomas Pattison 
John Stevenson 
James Bedford 
Robert Burn - 
William Short 
Cuthbert Short 



aged 78 
67 
66 
66 

60 



aged 68 
68 
47 
47 
84 
64 
86 
84 
84 
84 
80 
40 
88 
82 
40 
87 
80 
27 



Joseph Robinson 
Coulson Hood - 
Shepherd Hastings 
Robert Hood - 
John Harrison 
Henry Hood - 
Edward Pounder 
Michael Coulson 



STOCKTON. 



John Wilson - 
John Spurr Dixon 
Anthony Davison 
Robert Clarke - 
James Carter - 
John Lister 
William Hood - 
James Lithgo - 
William Brown 
Robert Bulmer 
Joseph Bumicle 
William Guy - 



aged 36 
82 
31 
80 
31 
67 
66 
67 
68 
48 
86 



Sea Pilot with Acting Order for the Tees. 
Matthew Lamb - - aged 41 

Licensed to conduct Vessels up and doxon 
the River Tees. 



John Lister 



aged 66 



WHITBY HAEBOUR. 

William Bilton 
William Potts - - 
Thomas Hodgson 
Matthew Gales 
John Douglass 
John Cass 



aged 64 
64 
61 
64 
42 
44 



BLYTH HAEBOUR. 

Matthew Bum - - aged 65 

John Bum .... 42 

JohnTwizell - - - - 47 

Marshall Davis ... 46 

William Bedford ... 40 

Jasper Tate - ... 62 

John Brown - - - - 62 

William Chambers . - - 67 

William Armstrong - - - 42 



aged 38 
M 
27 

3d 
% 

25 
25 
25 



With Acting Orders for West Hartlepool 
and Docks. 

Matthew Scott Coulson - aged 31 

William Henry Anson - - 24 

William Hastings - - - 28 

Robert Comer - - - • 28 

George Robinson - - - 23 

Hemy Revely - - - -. 25 



John Duncan . - - agedSd 

John Muirhead - - - 63 

William Brown - - - 67 

George Donkin - - - 64 

William Bumicle - - . 54 

Richard Haddock ... 57 

William Davison - - - 47 

Alexander Donkin - - • 42 

Mark Davison - - • • 41 

Joseph Wass . . - - 44 

John Dalkin - . - - K 

Thomas Sheraton - - - 61 

William Allison ... 70 

Robert Lister - - - - 5* 

Wniiam Donkin - . - 35 

Charles C. Duncan - - . 35 

James Finlay . - - - 

Thomas Lister . - - - 35 



Thomas Thompson - - aged 44 
John PickOTiog . . • 41 

Robert Leadley - - - « 

With Acting Orderefor Whithf. 
Jackson Noble - - - ^^ 



Thomas Redford (1st) 
Thomas Short - 
James Redford 
John Hogg 
William Dmsdale 
William Dalmahoy - 
John Redford - 
Robert Anderson 



ftgedS 



HARTLEY HAEBOUR. 



Licensed to conditct Vessels irdoandoui of Hartley Harbour. 

aged 67 

62 

66 



Matthew Harrison 
Thomas Winship 
Matthew Fowler 



WARKWORTH HAEBOTTR. 
Licensed tocondud Vesselsinto andout of WarhBoortk Harim 

John Matthews (1st) ^] 

William TumbuU " ^ 

George Robinson ----.-• 
John Matthews (2d) ..----• 
Robert Matthews 



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FOR THE TSAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



Trinity House, NBwcASTLE-upoN-TrNB — canHnued. 



59 



ALNMOUTH. 

Ucauedio conduct Vessels into and out 
ofAlnmouth* 

Himter Taylor . - - aged 64 

George Robingon - - - 68 

William Stephenson - - - 62 

William Stanton . . - 61 



Ucensed to conduct Vessels into and out 
of Holy Island. 

Thomas Shell (Ist) - - aged 71 

Adam Shell ... - 66 

John Beadnell (Ist) - - - 64 

Ralph Allison . ... 70 

Thomas Cromarty ... 60 

George Smith - - - - 62 

Mat&w Cromarty • • . 61 

William Walker (Ist) - - 60 

Thomas Allan - ... 68 

Alexander Rankin - - - 67 

Peter Smith - ... 66 



NORTH SUNDERLAND. 



Licensed to conduct Vessels into and out 
of North Sunderland* 

William Walker - - aged 66 

Thomas Walker (l6t) - . 66 

Thomas Walker (2d) - - ' 69 

George Cuthbertson - - - 62 

HOLY ISLAND. 

John Cromarty - - aged 67 

Ralph Wilson .... 62 

Robert Smith - - - . 66 

James Wilson .... 60 

William Smith - - - - 61 

Bartholomew Stephenson - • 60 

James Allen - - - - 41 

William Walker (2d) • - 49 

George Allison - - - 46 

Thomas Walker - - - 46 

John Beadnell (2d) ... 87 

George Markwell (2d) - - 89 

George Markwell (1st) - • 60 



NORTH SEA AND EAST COAST. 



Licensed to conduct Vessels in the North 
Sea and East Coast of England. 

Andrew Moore - - aged 66 

James S. MofiFatt ... 60 

Ralph Wrigbtson ... 61 

James Crate - - - - 60 

JohnCorbett - ... 68 

Edward Temperley - - - 61 

Edward Watson Gray - - 46 

JobnMM)onald ... 60 

Edward Kirkup - - • 64 

Janes Leath • • - . 44 

Robert Storey - - - - 66 

DaTidReed - . - - 68 

John Hnnter - - - - 66 

John Cook .... 60 

JohnNeedham- • • - 64 



Richard Fishwick - - aged 61 

John Meldrum - - - 46 

Robert Wilson .... 68 

Ainthony Moffitt - - - 62 

James Wintrim - - - 62 

George Marshall - - - 64 

John Frederick - - - 67 

Emanuel S pence - - . 64 

James Smith • - - . 61 

George Telford ... 48 

John Wilson - * - - 46 

James Errington Ritchie - - 47 

Johti Scott - - - - 48 

Isaac Wallis • • - . 86 

George Donkin - - - 66 

William Skipsey - - - 66 

Ralph Jackson - - - - 41 



William Robson 


« 


aged 67 


Michael Robson 




57 


George Norris - - - 


_ 


55 


Robert Cuthbertson - 


« 


42 


James Robson - - - 


. 


39 


JohnHaU - - - 


- 


61 


Thomas Shell (2d) - 


aged 85 


James Lilbum . - - 


- 


84 


Benjamin Kyle 


_ 


S6 


George Lilbum 


- 


. 


Z6 


Thomas Kyle - 


> 


* 


29 


William Beadnell - 


» 


. 


28 


Matthew Kyle - 


p 


, 


27 


John Stevenson 


. 


- 


30 


William Wilson 


. 


- 


34 


Joseph Shell - 


. 


- 


26 


Thomas Cromarty 


. 


. 


26 


Thomas Beadnell - 


* 


26 


George Elliott - 


aged 42 


Richard 0. G. Leighton - 


- 


59 


Joshua Stephens 


^ 


45 


Henry Purvis . - - 


. 


38 


William Tully - - - 
T. R. B. EmbletoTi - 


« 


49 


. 




George Stephenson - 
John Bell Logan 


- 


46 

50 


Thomas Spencer 


_ 


61 


William Allen - 


. 


62 


Robert Pike - - • 


- 


80 


John Cunningham - 


- 


44 


William Robinson Thornton 


- 


45 


Samuel Pethey 


. 


60 


Edward Lowes 


- 


44 


Thomas Bainbridge - 


_ 


68 


William Pearson 


• 


• 


4fi 



Masters of Hohe Tbade Passeicgbr Ships Licensed to pilot their own Vessels. 

William Elliott 
Joseph Pratt - 
Robert CoUedge - 
Andrew Minto 
Jeremiah Hudson - 

James Swallow 

Goorge R. Hodgson 



^Limits /"-Into and out of Shields Harbour. 



- Limits: —Into and out of Shields Harbour^ and into and out of Whitby, 

- Limits : — Into and out of Whitby. 



SUMMARY of the foregoing Return of Pilots, 



Into and out of Shields Harbour ... No. 182 

Into Shields Harbour --.--- 16 

IniD and out of Shields Harbour ... - a2 

For the River Tyne upwards .... 23 

Ditto ... ditto - - . - . — 

For the River Tyne downwards • . . - 62 

Ditto - - - ditto 6 

Into and out of Sunderland Harbour - - • 168 

Ktto - - - ditto 22 

Into and out of Seaham Harbour ... 44 

Ditto ... ditto 8 

Into and out of Hartlepool Harbour ... 73 

Ditto ... ditto 4 

Into and out of West Hartlepool Harbour and Docks 43 

Ditto ... ditto 6 



Into and out of the Tees - - . - 

Ditto ... ditto . . - ^ 

Up and down the Tees - - - , 

Into and out of Whitby Harbour - - - 

Ditto ... ditto - - - - 

Into and out of Blyth Harbour . - - 
Into and out of Hartley Harbour ... 
Into and out of Wark worth Harbour • 
Into and out of Alnmouth Harbour 
Into and out of North Sunderland 

Into and out of Holy Island - . - 
North Sea and East Coast of England 

Masters of Home Trade Passenger Shipd 



No. 30 
1 

10 

13 

1 

28 

a 

i 

10 
36 
49 



BZ3 



r Rates of Pilotage.— The Rates (or the respective Ports still remain the same as printed in Pari. Paper, No. 516, of 1S56, 
t P- ^71. 

243. H 2 

Google 



Digitized by ' 



Go 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



Trinity House, Newcastle-lt»on-Tyne— conftni^rf. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels into the respectiye Ports in I860. 

(l.y_I N W A R D S. 



distances 




BRITISH 


VESSELS. 




FOREIGN 


VESSELS. 
























for which 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


Tut A LB. 


PILOTED. 
























No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amonnt. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Aran 






£. 1. d. 




£. #. A 




£. *. d. 




£. #. d. 




£. i.d. 


From Sea to Shields 


8,731 


2,217 8 7 


1,096 


677 3 8 


•3,684 


2,209 1 8 


27 


19 16 - 


8,638 


5,123 8 6 


From Sea to Bill Point - 


884 


213 11 6 


118 


181 19 - 


2,249 


1,019 1 6 


- 


. 


2,746 


1,414 12 - 


From Sea to Newcastle - 


814 


198 19 - 


49 


41 6 - 


858 


599 6 - 


1 


11- 


1,222 


840 11 - 


From Sea to Sunderland - 


1,611 


838 19 - 


181 


77 18 - 


989 


659-10 


4 


2 14 - 


2,635 


1,478 U 10 


From Sea to Hartlepool - 


2,430 


1,334 10 9 


136 


81 4 - 


1,108 


650 9 - 


2 


1 8 - 


3,675 


2,067 11 9 


From Sea to West Hartlepool - 


1,811 


944 19 6 


696 


431 9 9 


696 


878 18 6 


82 


18 10 8 


3,184 


1,778 18 - 


From Sea to Seaham 


2,847 


2,141 11 1 


36 


28 14 6 


144 


102 1 6 


- 


. 


8,026 


2,272 7 1 


From Sea to Stockton - 


61 


36 4 3 


16 


8 2- 


176 


146 17 8 


- 


. 


252 


19010 & 


From Sea to Middlesbro' - 


119 


89 19 8 


10 


9 11 7 


103 


114 8 8 


- 


. 


282 


218 19 n 


From Sea to Whitby 


776 


290 9 3 


60 


24 - 10 


6 


2 18 9 


- 


- 


831 


317 810 


From Sea to Shields (brought in 
by Cullercoats PUots). 


110 


73 3 9 


21 


14 13 - 


822 


199 10 11 


- 


. 


453 


287 7 8 


From North Sea Pilots - 


4 


22 10 - 


1 


6 10 - 


- 


- 


- 


. 


6 


29 - - 


From Sea to Hartley and Seaton 

Sluice. 


40 


18 2 9 


- 


- 


- 


. 


- 


- 


40 


18 2 


From Sea to Blyth - . - 


635 


305 7 9 


165 


83 18 9 


260 


122 12 6 


- 


- - - 


1,060 


511 18 11 


From Sea to Warkworth - 


101 


41 13 6 


100 


48 12 6 


47 


18 12 9 


. 


. - 


248 


108 18 9 


From Sea to Alnmouth - 


21 


13 1 6 


2 


1 17 6 


4 


2 11 - 


- 


... 


27 


17 10 - 


From Sea to Holy Island 


189 


89 2. 6 


- 


... 


- 


. 


- 


... 


189 


89 2 e 


From Sea to North Sunderland 


82 


16 10 4 


1 


- 10 - 


- 


. 


- 


- 


83 


17 - 4 


1 


16,116 


8,886 11 7 


2,621 


1,717 11 1 


10,543 


6,124 10 4 


66 


43 7 8 


28,846 


16,772 - 3 



(2.)— U T W A R D S 



From Shields to Sea 


4,610 


4,153 17 1 


2,308 


2,070 2 8 


8,408 


2,768 9 1 


81 


83 


10,307 


9/)70 8 5 


From Newcastle to Sea - 


629 


380 11 4 


199 


166 6 4 


440 


288 14 6 


6 


6 4- 


1,174 


829 15 1 


From Bill Point to Sea - 


1,210 


713 14 8 


698 


329 8 6 


2,486 


1,147 6 7 


64 


89 6 - 


4.347 


2,229 - 4 


From Sunderland to Sea - 


2,663 


2,096 19 - 


669 


410 16 8 


097 


786 9 8 


10 


7 14 1 


4,229 


3,200 18 7 


From Hartlepool to Sea - 


2,027 


1,758 8 8 


187 


168 11 11 


962 


784 6 11 


6 


4 6 6 


8,181 


2,710 12 7 


From West Hartlepool to Sea - 


1,488 


1,266 14 1 


660 


669 14 4 


861 


306 8 - 


2 


1 10 - 


2,611 


2,141 6 5 


From Seaham to Sea 


2,813 


1,897 11 - 


67 


27 2 8 


163 


78 15 - 


- 


- 


3,028 


1,603 8 3 


From Stockton to Sea 


98 


82 6 4 


18 


11 17 9 


119 


82 17 7 


- 


- - - 


230 


177 1 8 


From Middlesbro* to Sea - 


314 


823 6 8 


128 


139 9 4 


168 


160 11 4 


- 


- 


606 


6Sd 6 11 


From Whitby to Sea 


677 


256 13 9 


61 


28 6 10 


4 


2 10 - 


- 


... 


782 


282 9 7 


From North Sea to Sea - 


90 


606 2 - 


64 


896 10 - 


- 


. 


- 


. 


164 


1,000 12 - 


From Hartley and Seaton Sluice 
to Sea. 


36 


19 11 9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


. 


86 


19 11 9 


From Blyth to Sea - 


665 


414 10 8 


264 


216 18 - 


257 


178 16 4 


2 


2-8 


1,078 


806 4 10 


From Warkworth to Sea - 


119 


18 14 6 


177 


139 12 6 


42 


26 1 3 


- 


- 


888 


179 8 8 


From Alnmouth to Sea - 


8 


4 9 6 


- 


• • •* 


3 


1 14 6 


- 


... 


11 


6 4 - 


From Holy Island to Sea 


189 


89 14 6 


- 


. 


- 


. 


- 


- 


189 


89 14 6 


From North Sunderland to Sea 


30 


12 11 6 


1 


- 11 8 


- 


. 


- 


- 


31 


13 i 9 




17,356 


13.588 15 4 


6,261 


4,652 - 6 


9,399 


6,601 19 8 


160 


143 - 10 


52,176 


24,965 15 11 
















Digiti2 


!edbyL:rO< 


oqI 


e 



FOR THE TEAR EHPING 31 DECEMBER I860. 



6l 



Trinity House, Newcastle-upon-Ttne— con<mw«f. 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received in respect of Pilots and Pilotage. 

NEWCASTLE. 



Dr. 

To balance brought from last account - 

To amount of fees received from applicants 
for licenses and certificates ... 

To amount received as contribution to super- 
annuation or widows' fund ... 

To amoont received for fines and forfeitures 

£. 



£. i. d. 

1,626 18 10 

1,827 4 6 

1 5 - 



2,988 12 4 



Cr. 

By amount paid for salaries of secretaiji 
clerk, and other officers • - . - 

Bj amount paid for rent of offices, &c. - 

By amount paid for pensions or superannua- 
tions - - - . - 



By balance carried to next account 



£. 



£. 9. d 

217 10 - 

23 12 - 

202 6 - 

2,646 6 4 



2,088 12 4 



SHIELDS. 



Dr. 


£. s. d. 


Cr. 


£. *. d. 


To balance brought from last account - 

To amonnt of fees received from applicai^ts 
for licenses and certificates -* - 


19 18 11 
12 16 - 


By amount paid for salaries of secretary, 
clerk, and other officers • . . - 

By amount paid for rent of offices, &c. - 


217 - - 
'18-6 


To amount received as contribution to super- 
annaaticm or widows' fund ... 


906 11 10 


By amount paid for pensions or superannua- 
tions -.--.-- 


682 4 - 


To amonnt received for fines and forfeitures - 


11 4 - 


By balance carried to next account 

£. 


132 6 4 


£. 


949 10 9 


949 10 9 



SUNDERLAND. 



Dr. 


£. s. d. 


Cr. 


£. ». d. 


To amount of fees received from applicants 




By amount of balance brought forward - 


254 13 10 


for licenses and certificates ... 


18 10 - 


By amount paid for salaries of secretary, 




To amonnt received as contribution to super- 




clerk, and other officers .... 


197 18 6 


annuation at widows' fund ... 


62 12 6 










By amount paid for rent of offices, &c. - 


10 - - 


To amount received for fines and forfeitures - 


1 - - 






To amount of balance carried forward - 


407 4 4 


By amount paid for pensions or superannua- 
tions -....-- 

£. 


16 14 6 


£. 


479 6 9 


479 6 9 



NORTH SUNDERLAND. 



Dr. 

To amount of fees received from applicants 
&r licenses and certificates ... 

To amoimt of balance carried forward - 



£. X. d. 

1 16 - 

82 4 7 



83 19 7 



Cr. 

By amount of balance brought forward 
By amount paid for salaries of officers 
By amount paid for rent of offices, &c. 



£. s. d. 

62 6 - 

20 - - 

1 13 7 



83 19 



243. 



H3 



Accounts — continued. 
Digitizea oy vjOOQIC 



62 



RETURNS RBLATIKO TO PILOTI» AND PILOTAGE^ 



Tbusoxt Housb, Nbwcabtuc-upon-Tthb — amtmmd. 



Accounts — continued. 



S E A H A M. 



Dr. 

To balance brought from last aooount - 

To amount of fees receiTed from applicants 
for licenses and certificatM ... 

To amount received as contribution to super- 
annuaticm or widows' fund ... 



£. s. d, 
160 2 3 

2e 10 - 

3 18 



189 18 11 



Cfr. 

By amount paid for salaries of officers 

By amount paid for rent of Offices, &c 
By balance carried to next aoooont 





£. «. I 


- 


20 - . 


- 


-16 . 


- 


169 18 11 


£. 


IBSf 18 11 



HARTLEPOOL. 



Dr. 

To balance brought from last account - 

To amount of fees received from applicants 
for licenses and certificates . - • 

To amount received as contribution to super- 
annuation or widows' fund - - - 



£. 8. d. 

233 18 5 

18 10 - 

10 17 4 



263 5 9 



Cr. 

By amount paid for salaries of officers - 

By amount paid for rent of offices, &c. - 

By amount paid for pensions or superannua- 
tions -...••• 

By balance carried te next account 



£. I. d. 

20 - . 

- 8 3 

6 - 9 

236 16 9 



263 5 9 



WEST HABTLEPOOL. 




Dr. 


£. s. d. 


Cr. 


£. i. d. 


To balance brought from last account - 


56 13 6 


By amount paid for salaries of officers - 


20 - . 


To amount of fees received from appb'cants 
for licenses and certificates - - - 


32 15 - 


By amount paid for pensions or superannua- 
tions .--.-.- 


1 12 . 






By balance carried to next account 

£. 


67 16 6 


£. 


89 8 6 


69 8 6 



STOCKTON. 



Dr. 

Top)alance brought from last account - 
To amount of {oes received from applicants 
for licenses and certificates ... 
To amount received as contribution to super- 
annuation or widows* fiind . . • 



£. s. d. 

13 3 1 

20 10 - 

25 16 5 



59 9 6 



Cr. 

By amount paid for salaries of officers - 

By amount paid for rent of offices, &o. - 

By amount paid for pensions or superannua- 
tions .------ 

By balance carried to next account 



£. I. d. 

20 

1 1 3 

22 12 - 
16 16 3 



59 9 6 



WHITBY. 



Dr. 

To amount of fees received from applicants 
ioT licenses and certificates - . . 

To amount of balance carried to nextacoount 



£. 



£. €. d. 

20 1 5 
71 15 2 



91 16 7 



Cr. 

By amount of balance brought forward 

By amount paid to officers - 

By amount paid for pensions or 
tions - - - - 




AccouKcSi— coR^xiiiiei 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOR VfiX TBAB nn>fNa 31 DSCSKBBB I860. 




63 


Trinity Housb, NBWCiflTUB-UFON-TnsrE— conrtnwerf. 


AccouHW— «>itfim««i. 


B li T T H. 






Dr. 

To uDoimt of fees reoeired from applioanta 

ibfJioeDaeB and certificates - - - 

To WMQOt of balance carried to ntzt account 


£. i. d. 

2 - - 
24 10 2 


Cr. 

By balance brought forward fit>m last account 

By amount paid for rent of offices, &c. 

£. 


£. t. d. 
25 18 11 

• 16 8 


£. 


26 10 9 


26 10 2 


WAKKWORTH. 


Dr. 

To amoont of fees received from applicants 
fOT fioflDses and certificates . • - 
To amoont of balance carried forward - 


£m 8. d. 

1 10 • 
55 14 6 


Cr. 

By amount brought forward 

By amount paid for salaries of officers 


£. 


£. 8. d. 
87 4 6 

20, - - 


£. 


57 4 6 


57 4 6 




HOLY : 


ISLAND. 






Dr. 
To amoont of balance oarried forward - 


£. $. d. 
86 17 10 


Cr. 

By balance brought forward 

By amount paid for salaries of offieers 

By amount paid for rent of offices, Ice. 


£. 


£. «. d. 

14 7 10 

20 - - 

2 10 - 


^• 


86 17 10 


^^ 17 10 


ALNMOUTH. 


Dr. 
To amonnt carried to next account 


£. 8. d. 

- 10 9 


Cr. 

By amount paid to officers 


- 


£. 8. d. 
- 10 9 


22 January 1861. 




Jame8 Gordon^ Und 


er Secretary. 



PORT OF ARUNDEL. 



Act confaning Jorisdictioo, 88 Geo. 8, c. 100, s. 41. 
REGULATIONS issued by the Commissionebs of the Port. 

That the pilots of this port, not engaged on the steamer, shall keep watch at the pilot house by turns day and night for 
iiz houn each watch ; and that during such watch no pilot shall engage in any trade or work whateyer, or in fishing; the pilot 
an wateh shall not leaye his duty to go to a vessel showing a signal, but shall call ^e pilot or pilots whose turn is next in rotation 
Id take charge of such yesseL 

I Tbat the appearance book be kept and signed agreeably to the several headings by each pilot before he leayes his watch ; and 
Ihftt the pilot hoase be kept tidy, and not incumbered at any time with articles not belonging to the Commissioners. 

Tbat the pilot boats be moored at all times opposite the gas house, except that one pilot boat shall be kept constantly at the 
JBsrbetd. 

TW the preemit or any future steam-boat committee shall have power to suspend until the next meeting of the Commissioners 
any pilot who is guilty of misconduct 

That if at any time any pilot shall be guilty of misconduct whilst in charge of any vessel, or shall act contrary to the Rules, 
(Men, and Reflations for the time being in force, he shall be dismissed, suspended| or fined (not exceeding 5 Z.), as the Com- 
toiaionerB at any of their meetings may det^mine. 



^3. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



John Grant 
John Harris 
Edward Winter 



aged 641 

69 > "^^^^^^^^ ^ P"^^ vessels into and out of the Port of 



Rates of Pilotaoe:— The Rates are the same as printed at p. 70. of ParL Paper, No. 174 of 18^8. 

H 4 Digitized by 



Google 



64 



KETUBNS RELAllNO TO PILOTS AND PII^OTAGE, 



Poet op ABxrjsrDEL^-conttjiued. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRI- 
VILEGED. 


TOTALS, 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amonnt. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amonnt 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amoont 


Prom Sea to Harbonr (Lit- 

Prom Sea to Ford and be- 
yond Ford. 


88 
13 


£. s. d. 
67 7 7 

8 18 11 


66 
37 


£• *. d. 
61 6 8 

54 10 7 


- nU 


18 


19*7 - 


10 

1 


£. *. d. 
9 16 9 

1 8 1 


nU 


181 
60 


£. 1. I 
18117 - 

64 17 7 


Total - - - 


100 


66 6 6 


102 


105 16 8 


- 


18 


13 7 - 


11 


11 4 10 


- 


231 


196 14 7 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



From Harbour (Little- 
hampton) to Sea. 

to Sea. 


91 
13 


28 18 8 
5 2 7 


61 
36 


26 7 I 
26 17 9 


- nil 


17 


6 7 6 


11 

1 


5 4 I 

- 14 - 


- nil 


180 
60 


6617 3 
3SU 4 


Total - - - 


104 


34 1 3 


97 


63 4 10 


- 


17 


6 7 5 1 12 


5 18 1 


. 


230 


69 11 7 



9 January 1861. 



^o<«.— -The Pilots receive their own fees. 



Richard Holme$y ClerL 



PORT OF BERWICK. 



Aeteonferring jurisdiction, 48 Geo. 8, c. 104, intituled, "An Act for re-building the Pier and ImproTing the Harbonr of Berwick-upon-Tweed." 

BYE-LAWS and RATES of PILOTAGE issued by the Harbour Commissioners. 

The Bye-Laws printed at p. 86, and the Rates at p. 87, of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866^ are still in force. 



* NAMES of PILOTS. 
The pilots mentioned at p. 66 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting, with the addition of Prideaux £m^| aged 56. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(l.)_I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS 


[. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


s 


TOTALS. 


for wiiich 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
8t«am. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 




No. 


Amonnt. 


No. 


Amount 


No, 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


.Amount 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


1D0BB( 


From Sea into the Har- 
bour. 


113 


£. ». d. 
67 17 1 


192 


£. *. d. 
113 14 1 


1 


£. .. d. 

- 14 8 


5 


£. «. di 
5 3 8 
There 


9 

were 

1 


£. «. d, 

8 18 - 
also 19 tide 


45 

sworij 


£. •. A 

47 16 7i 

s within the 


nil 
harboQ 


365 

p - 

365 


£. «. 
S84 3 
7 % 1 




1 


241 i ' 



From the Trumpet Wharft 
to Sea. 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



1 3 



19 



12 16 4 



10 



6 17 10 



25 



22 10 11 



nfl I 66 



Digitized byVrrOOQlC 



FOE THE TEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



65 



Poet op Beewick — continued. 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Mohies received in respect of Pilots or Pilotage. 



Dr. 

To amoont of fees receired from applicants for 
licenses and certificates • - . >^ • 

rinward pilotage - 
To gross amount receiyed fbr< 

[Oatward pilotage 



£. 



£. s. d. 

1 5 * 

%il 6 7i 

43 8 1 



286 18 8i 



Cr. 

B J amount paid to officers ... 

Amount, as per contra, reoeired bj the pilots 
themselres •.•••• 



11 January 1861. 



£. <• d. 
1 5 - 

384 18 %i 



285 18 %l 



R. Home, Clerk. 



PORT OF BOSTON. 



Aett conferring jarisdietion 



16 Geo. 3 and 32 Geo. 3. 



BTE-LAWS and RATES of PILOTAGE issued bj the Pilot Commissioners. 
The Bye-Laws and Rates printed at pp. 88^ 80, of Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1855, are still in force. 



Names of Pilots. — ^The Persons mentioned at p. 67 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 



BISTANCES 


BEITISH'YESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 


*r 


/\ m 4 T a 


forwhieh 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


1 \j X jx Aj a» 


PILOTED. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amonnt 


No. 


Amonnt 


No. 


Amonnt 


'Rram High Horn to Boston 
(Unilefl). 


210 


£• i. d. 

Abont 
144 3 8 


IS 


£. i. d. 

Aboot 
13 16 - 


. . nU - . 


34 


£. «. d. 

Abont 
39 3 7 


256 


Abont 
107 3 3 



2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



fimi Boston to High Horn 

(llBflM). 



S06 



Abont 
181 1 9 



Abont 
7 17 6 



. aa 



34 



About 
28 10 3 



248 



Abont 
157 8 11 



» ttBonnt paid for towage by steam eannot be ascertained, tbat being In the hands of a company, who render no acconnt to this trost. 



a43. 



Digitized by 



Google 



66 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND FILOTACTl, 



Poet of Bonxoi^^congnned. 



ACCOUNT of the Reeeipt and Expenditure of If oiri£8 receiTed bj Pilot Gornmianaiiin. 



Dr. 

To balance brought from last account - 

f Inward pilotage - 
To gross amount reoeir^d for< 

[^Outward pilotage 

To amount received from the duty of a penny 
per ton on coab and merchandise 



£. 



£. s. (L 

48 12 10 

197 8 8 

167 8 11 

182 6 2 



586 11 2 



Cr. 

Bj amount paid for Mdanes of aeoretaiyt 
clerk, and other officers • • - - 

By amount paid for or in respect of pilot 
boats, &c., and tradesmen's hUls 

By amount paid for pensions or superannua- 
tions -••.... 

By interest on 21 2. IBs. 6d., advanced by 
treasurer - - - - - '- 

By amount received by pilots for piloting 
ships trading to this port, for the year 
1860 

By balance carried to next yearns account - 

£. 






£. i. d. 

48 - - 

79 14 7 

62 - - 

1 1 S 



864 12 2 
60 '2 9 



686 11 2 



1 March 1861. 



Oeorge Yorl^ Clerk. 



PORT OF BRISTOL. 



Act confendng Jurisdiction - • • •47 Geo. 8, c. 88. 
BTE-LAWS and RATES of PILOTAGE issued by the Town Council o{ BristoL 
The Bye-Laws printed at pp. 90-04, and the Rates at pp. 91, 92, of Pari. Paper, No. 616 o£ 1866, are still in force. 



William Cox - 
Charles Marshall 
Charles Adams - 
William Dickens 
James £. Dickens 
William Rowland 
William Comerford « 
Edward Conby - 
Charles Case 
JoLq Percival - 
James D. Hall - 
Joho S» Bailey - 
Thomas B. Httzell 
Joseph S, Tippelt 
John Puins 
Jfltnes Buck 
William Reed, sen* ■ 
John a. Heed - 
Edwfird Comerford • 
WilJiitm IL Gilraore - 
Alfred C. Builey 
Geoj-f^e Riimmej, jun. 
William Mansfitild 
Georjre Craildy 
Alfretl Chcawell 
William Ruy, jun. 



Jamefl Ware 
John Smith 
James liowland 

Jumea Callaway 
Jnmes Htmt 
Fnmk lliomos - 
Geurge F. Dickens 



aged 56 
46 
47 
52 
27 
88 
42 
82 
81 
89 
89 
88 
44 
88 
84 
86 
63 
81 
84 
81 
27 
88 
85 
89 
26 
32 



aged 18 
17 
16 
17 
15 
17 
19 



NAMES of PILOTS. 

James G. Ray - . - aged 83 

Samnel HtRnpfariea • • . - 48 

Joseph Brown - - - - 54 

John Carey .... 20 

Thomas Vowles - - - ' 37 

James Rowland - - - 56 

John Parfitt .... 65 

Samuel Buck • - . . 85 

John Smith .... 86 

William Ray, sen. ... 64 

George Somers ... • 37 

Samuel S. Bailey ... 27 

Richard Case - - - -* 81 

George Buck ... - 44 

John G. Gilmore - - - 48 

Edward Craddy • - - 47 

Joseph Rowles - - • - 44 

John ThomaSy sen. - - - 50 

John Dickens - ... 48 

Charles Porter - ... 84 

Thomas Ellis .... 27 

James Shephard - - - 56 

Samuel Shephard - • - 27 

James W. Buck - - - 40 

George Carey, jun. - - • 38 

NAMES df APPRENTICES. 



William Hunt - 
James E. Craddy 

George Gilmore 
Edward Craddy 

Samuel Carey - 
Stephen Anstice 



aged 18 
16 

19 
19 

10 
18 



George Carey, sen. - 
Edward S. Callaway - 
Alfred Ray 
James Mitchell - 
lliomas Carey - 
John Scarrett - 
George Reed 

John Thomas, jnn. - 
William G. Bailey - 
.John Adams 
William Reed, jun. - 
George Rummey, sen. 
William Preston 
William Selway 
William Thomas^ sen. 

Edward Bulk>ak 
Charles Rumney 
Robert Stenner - 
WilUam Poole - 
John Gilmore, joa. • 
William Thomas, jun. 
John Ray 
Edwin Carey - 
Thomas Rowland 
Joseph H. Buck 



John Green • 
George Craddy 

William G. Coomhs 
Thomas Hint - 

Thomas Tliayer - 
William Rowlwid 



aged 59 
S4 
28 
88 
85 
44 
41 

45 
81 
85 
87 
47 
88 
85 
42 

48 
44 
88 
48 
4S 
83 
68 
29 
4S 
40 



aged^ 
. It 

- 14 

- 16 



II 
16 



Digitized by 



Google 



Itn IBS TXAE BRSOVO 31 DICUtBER 1860. 



67 



Poet of Bristol — carUimucL 



AMOUNT received for Pilotagb of Tbssblb in I860. 
(1.)— IirWARDS. 



DISVAHCE8 

for which 

PILOTED. 



BBITI8S TSS9SL& 



COASTEBa* 



OYBBSBA. 



Ho» 



Amonnti 



VOBBION VflSUBLS* 



Ko. 



Amoimt 



TOTALS. 



Bo. 



Amount. 



£. s. d. 



£. 9. d. 



£. t. <«. 



From Ifflidy to Swamea Dittriet 
lihnD Londy to Bridgwater Diftrict • 
Ihm laody to Cardiff District - 
PNn Luidj to Newport Dlttrtet 
IVoB Londy to Kiogroad • - . 
PiromLiiidytoCai^rland BaiiB - 
FroB Coombe to Oudiff District 
Prom Coonbe to Newport District 
Fh)f& Coomte to CbigToad • 
From CooBiki to Cnmharland Basin « 
From MindMid to Cardiff District « 
ftomJCoabeMi to Newport District - 
From UkdMsd to Kin^tMtd 
ftm Mto et esd to Comberlspd Basfai 
Rom ifdrnei to Kingroad 
hom Hofasef to Cumberland Basin - 
FhHD Ctediff to Comberland Basin 
fnm Kingtosd to Cmnberland Basin 



BU 



16 

2 

184 

%i 

66 

S88 



s 

8 

99 

1 

I 

6 

18 

8 

26 

8 

124 



76 

10 

744 

M6 

406 

2,202 

84 

7 

14 

108 

1 



48 

4 

66 

26 

180 



8 - 

17 - 
12 6 
1» - 
11 6 

4 8 

11 - 
6 - 

It - 

8 9 

4 - 

16 - 

12 6 
8 8 
2 - 
4 
6 - 

18 8 



TUAL - 



746 



4,086 7 



8 
467 

78 
137 
260 

12 
2 
7 

11 

1 
4 

10 
6 

26 
2 

00 



140 

16 

5^668 

490 

780 

2,101 

86 

8 

20 

66 

10 

1 

8 

68 

6 

62 

6 

186 



6 - 

4 * 

2 6 

6 - 

6 - 

7 10 
16 6 
14 - 

2 - 

4 6 

6 - 

10 - 
- 6 

16 9 

6 - 

16 8, 

11 
10 8 



58 

6 

601 

94 

202 

688 

21 

4 

10 

88 

10 

2 



87 

8 

60 

10 

228 



226 

27 

3,407 

686 

1,186 

4,808 

70 

16 

48 

168 

11 

2 

17 

117 



110 

31 

826 



18 - 

1 - 

16 - 
10 - 

17 6 
12 1 

6 6 

12 - 

18 3 
10 -* 

6 - 

18 - 

6 - 

8 - 

1 - 

16 

3 6 



1,1W 



6,620 4 10 






(2.)— OUTHf AED8. 



■roB Comberiand Barin to Kiogroad . « - . 

^ramCumbaland Basin to Newport District 

^ Comberlasd Basin to Cardiff District 

^ CemberiaDd Basin to Bvidgwalw District - 

mm dmiberiaiid Basin to Swansea District 

horn Csfflberiand Basin to Lnnd j .... 

^wn KiBgiosd to Newport District - . - - 
IkmKingrosd to Cardiff District . . - . 
^ IQogroad to Laniy ------ 

'Rb Newport District to Lmdr . . . . 

?h»CiidlffDlstriattoLmidy. - - - • 
^ CtaBberiand Bnain to Bldeftrd - • - - 



ItoTAL - 



Mfl 



16 
87 

100 

1 

11 

160 



1 

32 

16 

301 

1 



774 



20 12 

106 6 

666 16 

2 1 

68 17 

1,261 16 



1 - 

206 2 

120 4 

1,676 - 

10 6 



6 



4,120 1 



1 

12 
170 



8 

07 

2 

1 

81 

II 

632 



860 



116 

82 16 

646 6 



18 4 

840 10 

a 7 

1 4 

184 4 

82 17 

2,906 10 



4^16 18 1 



1,910 



16. 

40 

360 

1 

14 

266 

2 

2 

68 

27 



1,648 



MU14 12 7 



21 18 



3 
6 
6 

77 2 S 
2,111 6 



130 

1,203 

2 



8 
2 

300 6 

212 1 

4,672 10 

10 6 



8,846 14 10 



^1%e OmGng aodlrlsh TVade are free firom PIIotBge ; and, with ressels nnder 80 tons, it is optionaL 

^^''B^^'-^AIl y essela are towed by steam from Cnmbsriand Basin to Kiagraad; and theraasenadadnctions for pilotage in consequence. 



Qroaa Axnonnt recdred for Pilotage 



{Inwards - 
Outwards 



£. i. d. 

- 10,714 12 7 

- 8,846 14 10 



paid by POita in Wagn and AisistanU 



{ 



Grose Beoeipta - - - £. 
Inwaidii- - . 4^ 11 8 

Ontwafdi • - 8^426 8 3 



Bet Bece^ta* 



£. 



IBIiireiiampton, Port of Bristol,! 
18 Jamiaiy 1861. J 



£. «. d. 



10^560 7 6 



7,680 14 11 



11,870 12 6 



John Drew, Hayen Master. 



^3. 



I^ 



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68 



RETURNS RELATXNQ TO PILOTS AND PILOTAQB, 



PORT OF CARDIFF. 



Act conferring Jurisdiction .... 47 Geo. 3^ c^ 83. 

BYE-LAWS and RATES of PILOTAGE issued by Hie Town Council of BrUtoL 
The Bye-laws and Rates printed at pp. 98-100 of Pari. Paper^ No. 516 of 1865, still remain in foroe. 



Names of Pilots. —The Pilots mentioned at p. 70 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting. 

NAMES of APPRENTICES. 



John Soudamore • 
D. Williams 



aged 17 I A. Cope 

17 William Coats 



aged 19 
18 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 



DISTANCES 


BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 


TOTALS, 


for which 


COASTERS.* 


OVERSEA. 


PILOTED. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amomt 


Ph>m Pennarth Roads to Bate Docks • . • 


Nil 


926 


£. *. d. 

778 7 6 


1,640 


£. s. d. 
1,434 13 8 


2,566 


£. i.d. 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



From Bute Docks to Pennarth Roads 



NU 



961 



1,443 1 7 I 1,( 



2,488 6 6 I 2,577 



3,871 7 1 



* The Coasting and Irish Trade are free from pilotage, and with Tessels under 80 tons it is optionaL 

JVb/6.— All vessels towed by steam from Pennarth Roads to Bute Docks, no deduction of pilotage in consequence. 



£. », d. 



Gross Amount 



^^p.,^x.^/Inwards 2,213 1 2 

of Pdotagej^^^j^ 3^371 7 ^ , 



Gross Receipts - - - £. 

£. s. d. 

Deduct, Expenses paid by Pilots in Wages {J>"J[^. ' I I I I I l,i2? ^8 1 

Net Receipts . 



- £. 



£. «. d. 



6,084 8 3 



1,500 7 7 



4,584 - 8 



Shirehampton, Port of Bristol, 
18 January 1861. 



John Drew, Haven Master. 



Benjamin Bennett, jun. 
Benjamin Bennett, sailor 
John Bennett • 
Edward Bennett 
John Hewitt 
Thomas Hewitt - 
Hugh Hewitt - 
John Edwards - 
Stephen Hewitt 
William Jones - 
John Latham • 
Jonathan Bennett 



PORT OF CHESTER. 



Act conferring Jurisdiction .... 16 Geo. 8, c. 61. 
Bye-Laws.»— Nil. 





NAMES 


of 


PILOTS. 






aged 82 


John Jones 






aged 41 


George Hewitt - • . - 


48 


Richard Jones - 








58 


John Foulkes, jun. • - . 


88 


William Jones - 








84 


John Bennion . - - - 


25 


William Bithell 








40 


John Jones - - . - 


42 


John Bithell - 








38 


Captain David Uoyd 


24 


WUUam BitheU 








40 




87 

84 


Thomas Bithell 
William Hewitt 








63 
82 


Certificates. 


42 


John Price 








59 


John William Firth . . . 


41 


William Price - 








82 


William WiUiams • 


86 


John Evans 








50 


Hugh Leach - • . • 


29 


Charles Sconce • 








89 





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FOE THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 18C0. 



69 



Port of Chester — continued. 





RATES of 


PILOTAGE, 






Per Foot for Briti*b Foreign Vc»eU, 


Winter. 


Summefii 


Per Foot for Bntiah Forei^ Yetfteb* 


Winter. 


Sammer. 


INWARDS. 

Fmn Sea or HojUke to Wild Houcb or Mo sty a 
Jiioni Wild Roada or Mostjn to BagiU or Flint 
from Bd|ilt or Flint lo Con^i«b'« Qtiaj - 


4 6 
1 G 
1 e 

1 6 


3 e 

1 ' 
I - 

1 fi 


OutWARDS- 

From ChesE^r to Sand jcr oft, Aitoor or Coniuh'i 
Quay --__._., 
From Connttb'* Qu&^ to Flint or Bi|;iJt 
Frum Flint Of B^^ilt to Wild Roada or Moityn - 
From Wild Roada or Moatyn to Sea or Hoy Jake - 

From Sea to Llandudno or Hhj], or frotn Uui- 
duduo or Hhyl to Sell - - , - - 
From Flint or Bagitt to Dawpool or Pfirkgate 


I - 
1 " 
1 - 
3 ^ 


*. if. 

1 ^ 

1 -- 

1 - 

2 - 


fhmi CoQQ&h'i Qaaj to Aston, Sandfcroft^ 


6 - 


5 - 


SattMj, or Chester 


4 - 

2 ' 


3 - 

1 ^ 




9 - 


7 - 



A^,J*-^Wmtfr ojiiiiii^nc** 1st of October and en da 31»t Marchk 

Coutrrs and Imb Traders to pay ooe-half of the ahove respf^otivc rarei according to the season of the yfttt. 
Ko tTiscl to pa J for le$» than eight ft-et draught of water » nor to pay for odd inchea under or over half a foot. 
Mm h 4^ per daj for each day the pHot is kept en board at the rf quest of the M alter. 

Any jfCiot taking or agreeing to take lesa than the above rate, bhnil, on proof htfore fiTe or nsore of the tfufltees, have hb licenae recalled^ and be det^mcd 
bcapabk of ever bdng liceused again. AUo any pilot not making a full retiirt:) ot hb earnings maj he deprived of \m Ucenie. 
1^0 additional pilot to be licensed except at a general quartet I j inectiiig of the trustees. 



Amoukt received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1800^— Inwards und Outwurdj, 966?. 13x, No details giteH- 



ACCOUNT of the Disposal AfosiEs received in respect of Pilots or Pilotage. 



To amount of fees reeeiirecl from applicants for 
licenies and €«rtiiicatea - * - . 



11 Mflfeh laoi. 




By UrTnount paid to seereturyj including inci- 
deotul expenses ^ , , . ^ 



16 ^ - 



Denis Smseji^^ Clerk, 



PORT OF CLAY. 



I. 



iki eonfcffiag Jmifdlction, 67 Geo, 3, entitled, An Act for iniprovinff the Harhoor of Blakeney within the Port of Blakeney and Clay, 

in the County of Korfolk. 

BYE-Liiws.^-Nil, 



Wella Pentoa 
J«hn JoLoson 
Bkut Dew - 
Frederick Wamea 



NAMES of PILOTS Licensed by the Blukeney Harbour Company. 



n^ed 67 

as 

38 
49 



Edward IloIIiday - - * aged 50 

Henry Custnnee Mann - - - 40 

William Henry Hooka - * - 37 

WilJiam Hollidaj - > * 30 



I Lieenaed to pilot vessels in aud otit of 
I Blikcnej and Clay Harhour. 



Rate of PitoxAoa.— The Rates printed at p. 104 of ParK Pupor, No, 516 of 1856, are sHll in force. 



AMOUNT received lor Pilotage of VEaazLs in 1860* 
(l.)-IN WARDS. 



DISTANCES 

for wUch 

PILOTED* 



l^om Seft to Harbour > 



I 



BRITISH VESSEL 



CO ASTEES, 



Not Towed by Steam. 



Towed hT Steam. 



Ifo. 



Barboarto Sea 



26 Januarj 1861. 



142 



lOB 



Amount* 



No- 



£* M. d, 

75 19 6 



47 13 3 



t22 



Amount, 



£. g. d. 

II 19 a 



OTERSEA^ 



nil 



FOREIGN VESSELS, 



PRIVILEGED* 



Not Towed by St^m* 



No. 



Amount, 



UNPfilVI- 

LEGED* 



(2.)— OUTWARDS 



13 



r* ID 6 



nil 



£* f, d. 

2 15 - 



2 6 3 



oil 



qU 



Note* — The receipts were divided between the pilots. 



TOTALS* 



No. 



160 



127 



Amount* 



£. *. d, 

UO 13 



17 - 



Thm, W^* BacoJtj Clerk. 



^3- 



I3 



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70 



• RETURKS RBJLATIXQ TO PILOTS AND PILOTAOB, 



Josepli Hogg 
William Proctor - 
William Quirk - 
WiffiamCowell - 
William Bridson - 
Thomas Cannen - 
Robert Kemley - 
, Charles Skelly - 



PORT OF DOUGLAS, ISLE OF MAN. 



Act coafieniiig JorUdiction - - - - 54 Qeo. S, c 143,^ i» 4. 
Bye-Laws.— NiL 



aged 46 
44 
84 
32 
63 
63 
68 
48 



NAMBS of PILOTS. 

John Skell^ - - . aged 62 

John Costain - - - - 41 

Joseph Kemlej - - - - 42 

Robert Bridson - - - - 60 

George Brooks - - - . 73 

J.J. R.JeUy - . • . 44 

John Newgent • « - • 41 

Robert Marlow • • • - 28 



lioentad for thfi port of Dooglai. 



Rates of Pilotaob. — The Rates are the same as printed at p. 106 of ParL Paper, No, 616 of 1856. 

AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 



BRITISH TESSBL8. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


TOTALS. 


No. 


AmooDt. 


No. 


Amoimt. 


No. 


Aaoant 


17 


£. *. d. 
10 18 - 


- NU - '. 


- . NU - - - 


26 


£. i. d. 
28 12 - 


43 


£. 1. i 

34 10 . 



2 11 



(2.)-0UTWARDS. 



so 



14 12 



27 



17 8 



26 January 1861. 



John C%»^ Harbour Mnler. 



PORT OF KING'S LYNN. 



Aets conftrHog Jarbdiction - - - -13 Geo. 3, c. 30, amended by 4 Viet e. 47. 

BYE-LAWS issued by the Pilot Committee. 

The Bye-Laws are the same as printed at pp. 138, 139 of ParL Paper, No. 616 of 1866. 

NAMES OF PILOTS. 
The persons mentioned at p. 73 of Pari. Pitper, No. 287 of 1856, are still actiiig, with the exception of 

Thomas Sbaitoe and John Bajes. 



Rates of Pii.oTAaB.— The Rates printed at p. 140 of ParL Paper, No. 616 tf 1866, are still in force. 

AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in I860. 
(I.)— INWARDa 



DISTANCES 


BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 


nt /\ 


m ■ « a 


ibrwUdi 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGBD. 


T A' A. A« O. 


PILOTED. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amoant 


No. 


A»>at 


From Lynn Roadf to Lynn 
Hacbonr .... 


1,264 


£. «. d, 

977 Id H 


44 


£. #. d. 

41 3 101 


82. 


£. 4. <L 
. 66 4 a 


,. . ail . . 


uao 


£. ft « 



(2.)— OUTWARDS. 



nom Lynn Hsfbonr to Lynn 
Roadf . - - - 



1,162 



642 16 10} 



26 - 



81 



46 16 3 



nil . 



1,282 



716 1 1| 



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FOR THE TIAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1660, 



Poet of Kii^g*b Ltnn — continued- 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received in respect of Pilots or Pilotaob* 



To tiiance broaght from last &4HM>imt * 

[Inward pilotage 
To grC0 amoniit received for i 

i Outward pilotage 

To amomit received for foreign claims - 



- a 8 

IjOM 7 9 

715 1 1| 

129 6 



1,030 1 lli 



Bj amount divided among the working and 
superannuated pilots, including the heads- 
man's share for nse of the aloops, &c. 
Wapes , - - - ^ » , 
Coals, stationery, &c. - . • , 

Mending net ------ 

By balance carried to next account > 



£, «« d. 




1,030 1 Hi 



± 



IS Janmiy 186K 



/, O. Smwtham^ Clerk. 



PORT OF LANCASTER. 



Act eoDfeirbg Jttri«dictioQ 



GeoTgt 3, c. 37, lecL 15* 



BYE-LAWS and RATES of PILOTAGE issued by the Pilotage Commissioners. 
TIeSye-laws printed at pp. 142^ 143| and the Rates at pp. 143, 144 of ParL Paper^ No, 516 of 1855, stiU remain in foree^ 



NAMES of PILOTS and APPRENTICES. 

The persons mentioned at p, 75 of Pari. Paper, No. 244 of 1869, are stiU acting. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vissbls in 1860. 
(h)— IN WARDS, 



J 


BRITISH TEgSELS, - 


FOREIGN YES3£La 






DISTAKCES 


C0A8TEES. 


OVERSEA, 


PRIVILEGED. 




TOTALS. 


forirhkh 












PILOTED. 


Not Towed hj 
Steam. 


Not Towed hj 
Bteam. 


Towed by 


Towed by 
Stoam. 


UKPHIVI- 
LEOED. 






N<K 


AmoanL 


No. 


Ainoant. 


Ko. 


Amount* 


No, 


AbsoodL 


No, ' 


Amount. 






£. f, ^. 




£»*. d. 




£< i^ d^ 




£, M. d. 






£* ud. 


F^na Bea to GIbspod Dock 


20 


19 14 - 


7 


K> - 


17 


50 5 - 


5 


17 1 - 


- nU - 


49 


110 9 - 




(SL)-^0 U T W A E B S, 




1^«» GkiBOB Bock te S«a 


% 


1 Ifl - 


5 


11 10 - 


17 


40 10 - 


5 


11" 1 
10 8 - , - nH • 


30 


64 4 - 


I&Janoary 1861. 










* 


John T 


Valker 


, Clerk. 



343. 



I4 



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72 



XBTURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



PORT OF LIVERPOOL. 

Act conferring Jurisdiction :-— 21 & 22 Vict, Part 6, •. 118-164. Mersey Docks and Harbour, (Consolidation of Acts). 



Bte-Laws.— The Bjf)*Law8 iBsaed bj the Pilot Committee, printed at pp. 78-82 of ParL Paper, No. 5, Session 2, of 1857, 

are still in foree. 







NAMES and AGES of PILOTS and APPRENTICES. 






Name. 


Agb. 


Rank. 


License. 


Name. 


Age. 


Rank. 


License. 


No. 1 BoA' 


r. Schooner "Queen 


n 


No. 8 Boat. 


1 1 1 
Schooner "The Duke." 


William Hughes 


58 


let Master - 


Full. 


John Williams - 


45 


1st Master • 


FulL 


Robert Taggart - 


49 


2d ditto 


ditto. 


Thomas Parry - 


42 


2d ditto 


ditto. 


Edward F. Callister - 


46 


8d ditto 


ditto. 


John Sawell 


46 


3d ditto 


ditto. 


John Scott ' - 


48 


Pilot - . 


ditto. 


William Jones - 


89 


Pilot . . 


ditto. 


Henry Lancaster 


41 


- ditto 


ditto. 


Francis C. Beckett - 


28 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Hughes 
Edward Ledder • 


40 


- ditto 


ditto. 


Septimus Dixon - 


82 


ditto - 


ditto. 


-88 


• ditto 


ditto. 


James Higgin - 


84 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Gkorge H. Rogers 


82 


- ditto 


ditto. 


Richard Blundell 


82 


ditto . 


ditto. 


Griffith Edwards 


85 


- ditto 


ditto. 


Thomas Smith - 


84 


ditto - 


ditto. 


George K. Dixon 


88 


- ditto • - 


ditto. 


James Porter 


45 


ditto • 


ditto. 


Joseph Holt - ' . 


82 


- ditto 


ditto. 


John Williams - 


40 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Alfred M. Rogers 


80 


- ditto 


ditto. 


Cornelius Lancaster - 


37 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Edward Jones - 


80 


- ditto 


ditto. 


Richard Rowlands 


28 


ditto - 


ditto. 


^ohn Simpson - 


28 


- ditto 


ditto. 


Thorley Lester (a) 


44 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Robert Richardson 


48 


. ditto 


ditto. 


WiUiam Roberts 


30 


ditto • 


ditto. 


James Barber - 


27 


- ditto 


ditto. 


Michael Thomas 


29 


ditto • 


ditto. 


George Haswell - 


26 


" ditto 


ditto. 


William Hughes 


37 


ditto - 


200 tons 


Frederick Simpson 


27 


- ditto 


ditto. 








(onatuched). 


John B. Prior • 


87 


- ditto 


ditto. 


Richard Shaw - 


30 


ditto - 


500 tons. 


WilUamJervis • 


24 


. ditto 


ditto. 


Isaac Williams - 


25 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Peter White 


26 


Apprentice - 


500 tons. 


Anthony Little - 


25 


Apprentice - 


ditto. 


John Wissett - 


26 


- ditto 


ditto. 


John M'Namee - 


22 


ditto • 


ditto. 


John Barber 


28 


. ditto 


200 tons. 


Hugh Jones 


21 


ditto - 


dittow 


Thomas Lewis - 


24 


- ditto 


ditto. 


Thomas Edwards 


22 


ditto - 


200 tons. 


Greorge Parkinson 


22 


- ditto 


ditto. 


George Wilkin - 


23 


ditto . 


ditto. 


John Sumner 


. , 


- ditto 


None. 


Thorley Lester (b) 
JohnWiUiams - 


• 


ditto - 


None. 


Joseph Sumner - 


. 


- ditto 


None. 


. 


ditto - 


None. 


Charles Jones • 


- - 


- ditto 


None. 


John Casement • 


- 


ditto - 


None. 


No. 2 Boat 


. SCH< 


30NiR "Leadei 


t." 










Joseph Powell • 


41 


1st Master - 


FulL 


No. 4 Boat 


Cun 


•ER "AUSPICIOU! 


!.•• 


John Corrin 
"Samuel Jones - 


48 
44 


2d ditto 
8d ditto 


ditto, 
ditto. 


John Shepherd - 
Charles ChrUtie - 


57 
46 


1st Master • 
2d ditto 


FnlL 
ditto. 


Humphrey Jones 


48 


Pilot . 


ditto. 


John J. Ellison - 


50 


8d ditto 


ditto. 


Mark N. Bridge 


80 


ditto - 


ditto. 










John Williams - 


40 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomas H. Eddleston - 


42 


Pilot - 


ditto. 


Richard Spencer 


84 


ditto - 


ditto. 


George Bond 


36 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Joseph Davies - 


88 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Hughes 


58 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Lawrenson 


81 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Charles Long 


82 


ditto . 


ditto. 


Richard Jones - 


44 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomas W. Quirk 


81 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Christian - 


81 


ditto - 


ditto. 


George Dean 


46 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomas Parry - 


29 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomas J. Shepherd - 


26 


ditto • 


ditto. 


James Atherton - 


28 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Joseph Harrison 


29 


ditto . 


ditto. 


James Casement 


82 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomas Martin - 


85 


ditto - 


ditto* 


Thomas Bryoe - 


28 


ditto - 


ditto. 


James Ward 


31 


ditto - 


ditto. 


James Clayton - 


26 


ditto - 


ditto. 


William Driver - 


28 


ditto - 


ditto. 


James Hudson - 


28 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Robert M. Raleigh - 


27 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomas Cockram 


27 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Dayid Owen 


25 


ditto - 


ditto. 


William Cain - 


27 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Edward Owens • 


89 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Owep 


81 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomas S. Williams - 


28 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Benjamin Llewellyn - 


26 


ditto . 


ditto. 










John Williams - 


89 


ditto - 


500 tons. 


James M'Clean - 


23 


Apprentice - 


500 tons. 


George Thompson 


28 


Apprentice - 


ditto. 


Henry Davies - 


27 


ditto - 


200 tons. 


Samuel Jones - 


25 


ditto - 


200 tons. 


William Owen - 


28 


ditto - 


600 tons. 


Joseph Brewer - 


25 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Robert D. Cosgrove - 


22 


ditto - 


200I0IM. 


Thomas Cornell - 


21 


ditto • 


ditto. 


John Henderson 


20 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Frederick Allen - 


. 


ditto - 


None. 


Owen Griffiths - 


22 


ditto - 


ditto. 


William R. Owen 


. 


ditto • 


None. 


John Roberts 


• 


ditto - 


Nono. 


Edward Hill - 


- - 


ditto - 


None. 


WilUam M'Cnlloch - 


- - 


ditto - 


None. 










C 


)igitized 


byGoOQ 


e 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER J 860. 



73 



Port of Liverpool — continued- 



Name. 


Acs. 


Rank. 


License. 


Name. 


Age. 


Rakk. 


License. 


No. 5 Boat. Sc 


aOONSR 


" VicTOBiA and Albert." 


No. 7 Boat. Cutter 


^* George Ca^wiko/' 


Isaac Williams - 


42 


I8t Master - 


Pull. 


William Rowlands - 


49 


1st MaBtor 


Full. 


Hugh Jones 


46 


2d ditto 


ditto. 


Thomas Thompson 


69 


2d ditto 


ditto. 


Peter Dickinson 


50 


8d ditto 


ditto. 


John Williams - 


47 


dd ditto 


ditto. 


IJobert Buddie - 


87 


Pilot . 


ditto. 


William Jones - 


43 


Pilot * 


ditto* 


Ellis Husrhes - 


60 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Richard Edwards 


40 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Edward Pritchard 


42 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Duniels 


42 


ditto - 


ilitto. 


James Rooghsedge 


46 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Pritchard - 


40 


ditto - 


Hitto« 


John Price 
JohuB.Tjrrer - 
Samuel D6an 
Richard Williams 
Brereton P. Evans 


86 
88 
86 
28 
27 


ditto - 
ditto . 
ditto - 
ditto - 
ditto - 


ditto, 
ditto, 
ditto, 
ditto. 
. ditto. 


Owen Jones 
John Williams - 
George Pennington - 
Henry Madrell - 
Thomaa Buckley 
William Taylor - 


87 
37 
29 
29 
BB 
80 


ditto - 
ditto - - , 
ditto - 
ditto - 
ditto - 
ditto - 


ditto* 
ditto, 
ditio 
ditto, 
ditto* 
dino. 


Francis Parrj - 


27 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Edward CuUwood 


80 


ditto • 


ditto. 


Charles Bochanan 


26 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomns Owen - 


32 


ditto - 


ditto* 


Robert M'Lachlin 


80 


ditto - 


ditto; 


Hugh Jones 


83 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Joseph Hyslop - 


89 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Samuel Dawson - 


28 


ditto - 


ditto. 


ieuTj Jones 


20 


ditto - 


ditto. 










Robert Williams 


80 


ditto . 


500 tons. 


Owen Owen 


28 


Apprentico 


500 tons. 


fhomai Miller - 


28 


ditto - 


600 tons. 


William Parry - 
Robert Jones 


24 
28 


ditto - 
ditto - 


ditto. 
2U0 tons. 


Lobert Shannon 


28 


Apprentice - 


ditto. 


John Beattie 
Richard Owens - 


24 
22 


ditto - 
ditto - 


ditto* 
ditto. 


ohn Roberts 
^van Jones 
(TilliamETans • 


28 
22 
26 


ditto - 
ditto • 
ditto - 


200 tons, 
ditto, 
ditto. 


William Jones - 
Samuel Major - 
William German 


- 


ditto - - i 
ditto - 
ditto - 


None. 

ditto* 
ditto. 


ohn Bainbridge 


- 


ditto - 


None. 










[eniy Erans 
eniT Holden - 


: 


ditto - 
ditto - 


ditto, 
ditto. 


No. 8 Boat. Cutter * 


* Albert Edward, Prince of Wali:s.' 


bomas Eyaos • 


- 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Bark 


60 


1st Master - 


Full. 










John Black ley - 


47 


2d ditto 


ditto. 


No. 6 Boat. 


SCHO 


OIJER "PlOKEEB 


ir 


William T. MCracken 


41 


8d ditto 


ditto. 


lomas Parry - 


64 


Ist Master - 


Fall. 


















Richard Owen • 


61 


Pilot - 


ditto. 


lomas Daries - 


42 


2d ditto 


ditto. 


William Christie 


48 


ditto - 


ditto. 


lomas Hudson 


62 


dd ditto 


ditto. 


William Evans - 


61 


ditto - 


ditto. 










John C. Malbon 


84 


ditto - 


ditto. 


>ter Evans 


62 


Pilot . 


ditto. 


George Wilson - 


80 


ditto - 


ditto. 


iiliam Jones 


84 


ditto - 


ditto. 


William Wilson 


25 


ditto - 


ditto. 


orge F. Borrows 


40 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Bark 


81 


ditto - 


ditto. 










William P. Owen 


81 


ditto - 


ditto. 


m Jones • 


42 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Kirkman • 


81 


ditto - 


ditto. 


flip Pouter 


47 


ditto . 


ditto. 


Richard Pritchard 


80 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Uiam Pinnington - 
m Fieldhouse 


B7 
86 


ditto - 
ditto - 


ditto, 
ditto. 


Hugh Williams - 
James Thomas - 


81 
81 


ditto - 
ditto - 


ditto, 

ditto. 


m C. Jones - 


42 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomas B. Bark 


27 


ditto - 


ditto. 


tn W. Jones - 


42 


ditto • 


ditto. 


Joseph Martin - 


26 


ditto - 


ditto. 


:iTge Nowell - 


42 


ditto - 


ditto. 


James H Hully 


27 


ditto - 


ditto. 










Charles Musker •• 


23 


ditto - 


ditto. 


lliam Brown - 


80 


ditto - 


ditto. 










niani Brewer - 


27 


ditto - 


ditto. 


William Hurrell 


24 


Apprentice - 


500 tons* 


nes W. Wilson - - 


85 


ditto - 


ditto. 


James Horner - 


21 


ditto • 


ditto. 


m Hugbes 


88 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Edward Jones - 


22 


ditto - 


ditto* 


orge Ledder - 


80 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Charles A. Taylor 
William Edwards 


19 


ditto ' 


200 tons, 


bert Corrin - 


28 


ditto - 


ditto. 


21 


ditto - 


ditto. 


ideric Ashworth 


24 


ditto - 


ditto. 


















Henry Holliday- 


.^ 


ditto - - 1 


None, 


orge G. Bark • 


22 


ditto - 


600 tons. 


William Long - 


«» 


ditto - 


ditto. 










Robert Clark * 


^^ 


ditto - 


ditto. 


[»mas Hnghes 


28 


Apprentice - 


ditto. 










is Roberts 


20 


ditto - 


200 tons. 


No. 9 Bo 


AT. C 


[jtter ''Liver." 




m Williams - 
ics H. Inrine • 


26 
24 


ditto - 
ditto . 


ditto, 
ditto. 


Thomas Crane - 


62 


let Master - \ 


FuIL 


in Jones (a) - 


- 


ditto - 


None. 


William Lancaster 


60 


2d ditto 


ditto. 


m Jones (6) - 


- 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Pritchard - 


47 


8d ditto 


ditto. 




- 


ditto - 


ditto. 










nrj Dean 


' 


ditto • 


ditto. 


John Pepper 


50 


Pilot - 


ditto. 



243- 



Digitized 



S^OC^gfe 



74 



RETURNS RELAHXG TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



Port of Liverpool — continued. 



Name. 


AOB. 


Rakk. 


License. 


Nawe. 


A0B. 


Rakk. 


LlCEVSE. 


No. 9 Bout. 


Cutter 


*' Liver ^^^ontinued. 


1 i ' 1 
No. 11 Boat. Cutter "Mebsey, 


n 


Richard Pany • 


d5 


Pilot . 


Fnll. 


Richard Parry - 


64 


1st Kaster - 


FnO. 


Owen Pritchard 


Si 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Robert Williams 


41 


2d ditto 


dit<». 


Richard Pritchard 


30 


ditto - 


ditto. 


William Harris - 


45 


3d ditto 


ditto. 


Jonathan Hodgson 


84 


ditto - 


ditto. 










William Crane - 


29 


ditto - 


ditto. 


William Parry - 


35 


Pilot . . 


ditto. 


William Jones - 


dd 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Richard Williams 


40 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Noscoe 


37 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Morris 


40 


ditto - . 


ditto. 


Robert Searchwell 


34 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Robert Nevin - 


37 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Samuel Porter - 


30 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Griffith Hughes - 


44 


ditto - 


ditto. 


George Brooks - 


34 


ditto - 


ditto. 


George Bridge - 


36 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Richard H. Whitford - 


24 


ditto - 


ditto. 


James Durant - 


37 


ditto - 


ditto* 


Edward R. Musker - 


26 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomas Frith • 


36 


ditto - 


ditto. 










James Scarisbriok 


30 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Bentley 


26 


Apprentice - 


500 tons. 


John Walters - 


27 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Robert Silcock - 


22 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Owen Lloyd 


26 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Roberts 


26 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Richard Williams 


27 


ditto - 


ditto* 


Robert Bispham 


24 


ditto - 


200 tons. 


John Thomas 


35 


ditto • 


ditto. 










William Peters - 


34 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Bichard Richmond - 


21 


ditto • 


ditto. 










WilHam Taggart 


24 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Joseph Pass 


30 


Apprentice 


500 tons. 


Thomas Deacon 


— 


ditto - 


None. 


Thomas Lewis - 


27 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Richard Scott - 


- 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Thomas 


22 


cEitto - 


200 tons. 


John Roan 


— 


ditto - 


ditto. 


George R. Thompson - 


21 


ditto - 


ditto. 










Horatio Hawkins 


20 


ditto - 


ditto. 


No. 10 Boat 


. SCHO 


ON»R " Criteri 


o^r 


Riofcard WiUiams 


_ 


ditto - . - 


None. 


Jamtes Wilson 


58 


1st Master - 


Full. 


WiUium Leach - 


- 


ditto - * - 


ditto. 










Thomas Reason - 


» 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Hugh Williams - 


61 


2d ditto 


ditto. 










William Parry - 


48 


3d ditto 


ditto. 


No. 12 Boat. 


School 


lER " PeRSBVERANCB." 


Richard £4wards ■ - 


87 


Pilot . 


ditto. 


Hi^h Woodward 


67 


1st Mastef - 


FuEL 


Henry Parry 


29 


ditto - 


ditto. 


George Bark 


56 


2d ditto 


diUo. 


Lawrence Woodward - 
Thomas M. Parry 


48 
26 


ditto - ' - 
ditto - 


ditto, 
ditto. 


John Tunstall - 


42 


8d ditto 


ditto. 


John Christie • 


87 


ditto - 


dil3taL 


John Brown 


36 


Pilot . 


ditto. 


James Crossky - - 


37 


ditto - 


ditco. 


William Edwards 


40 


ditto - 


. ditto. 


William GriflSths 


55 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Edward Viokers - 


35 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Evans 


61 


ditto - 


ditto. 


William Corrin - 


38 


ditto - 


ditto. 


James Christie - 
William Williams 


29 

44 


ditto . 
ditto . 


ditto, 
ditto. 


William Thomas 
David Davies - 


83 

40 


ditto - 
ditto - 


ditto, 
ditto. 


Thomas Crane - 
Hugh Woodward 


37 

27 


ditto - 
ditto - 


ditto, 
ditto. 


Henry Ennis 

Peter Bennett - 
John Garner 


33 

80 
28 


ditto - 
ditto - 
ditto - 


ditto. 

ditto. 

. ditto. 


David Hayes - 


38 


ditto - 


ditto. 


William Jevons - 


29 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Frederick Thornton - 


31 


ditto - 


ditto. 


William Whittle 


29 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Edwin Pickles - , - 


26 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomas D. Worrall - 


29 


ditto - 


ditto. 


Thomas Bird - 


24 


ditto - 


200 tons. 


Daniel O'Neil - 


21 


Apprentice -• 


500 tons. 


John Ennis 


26 


Apprentice - 


500 tons. 


William Coventry 


28 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Gould 

Chailes S. Daniels - 


27 
24 


ditto - 
ditto - 


ditto, 
ditto. 


James Smith 
Daniel Hughes - 
John Hughes - 


21 
22 


ditto - 
ditto . . - 
ditto - 


200 tons, 
dittos 
ditto. 


Henrj- Davies - 


26 


ditto - 


200 tons. 


Charles Dunnege 


24 


ditto - 


ditto. 


William Cornell 


19 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Hogan • 
William Jenks - 


_ 


ditto - 


Nona. 


John Morton 


«. 


ditto - 


None. 


.- 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Stainclifie - 


- 


ditto - 


ditto. 


John Hughes - 


— 


ditto - 


ditto. 



Rates of Pilotage.— The Rates printed at p. 87 of Pari. Paper, No. 5, Session 2 of 1857, are still in force. 



Digitized by 



Google 



FOR TilE YEAR EKDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



t 



' 75 



Port of LivERrooL— tow/wiwrf. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotagb of Vessels in 1860. 



BRIT I R tt Y ESS ELS. 



OVERSEA. 



ijnrARD. 



OiTWAirD. 



I- 



* Western, 



No* Hoykke, ' 5n, 



Amount, 



COASTERS. 



TOTAL. 



IlfWARD. 



Kr.»J Western. 



No. 



Hovlak^. 



Outward. 



No» Amouut. 



Inwabd&Outwakd, 



No. Amount, 



mi 



17,00] 10 - 



m& 3|377 17 6 3,360 



Il/»18 13 6 



159 



40D 10 - 



3^8 



£- #. J. 
3^10 15 2 



*2m 



£. -. J- 

377 17 I0,64fi 



36,550 la 10 



FOREIGN VESSELS. 



PRIVILEGED, 



IXWABD. 



OrrwAHD, 



UNPRIVILEGED- 



LWARD. 



OUTWABD. 



TOTAL. 



1 3* WARD & OlTTWAltfi, 



ir&^ Wert em. 



im 



£, *. W. 
Wjm2 11 9 



Ko. Hoyliike. 



*288 



No. Amoudt. 



£. *. ^ 

%,7m 16 3 



2,130 



No. 



10,8G<3 3 - 



Amotint. 



No. Amount, 



£, !• d. 

I£f7 3 



3D 



No, Ainuunt* 



£. 9. d. 
172 3 



4,384 



T^AL Aiior!?T of British ftsrf Poiieigii Vessels, luwttnfi and Outward i 



£. *. rf. 

22,eii 18 3 



Not of VcBsels. 



15^030 



AacouAT* 



£. s. d. 

m,i9i 17 1 



Erroir» md omitiioiis excepted j 
John Ze^ee, 



Cash Statb-Ment of the Pilotage Annuity Fund for 1 860. 



RECBIPTSp 



Wlftii«>e brooght from last acootint 

n&onut of fees reeeirad for liceoiies * 

> ftmoDDt received as contribution to super^ 
[ttmoaiioD or widows' fund - - - 

tflniOQitt received for fines and forfeitures 

Fount r^eived for interest on dock boiida, 
in bank account '»-•-- 

10 amoaiit receiTed for income tax returned - 



Wu 



7j4S2 U n 

1,149 15 - 

973 18 2 

63 14 - 

2S3 7 5 

16 9 11 



9j068 19 5 



luce broug"bt doWB 



LiVerpcK*!, 
[llFebromrr 18S1, 



EXPEWDITUEK. 



Cr, 

Bj amount paid for jsaluriea of secretary, 
superintendent and office boy - 

By amount paid for rent of office at Old 
Churchyard - - - - ^ - 

Bj aniount paid fox pensions and Buperannua- 
tions ^ - -^ - -. „ _ 

By amount paid for miscellaneouB disburse- 
ment -*--*,_ 

By balance carried down - - ^ . 



663 6 7 

76 6 6 

1,151 6 3 

321 9 7 

7,856 11 6 



9^963 19 5 



7,856 XI 6 



Geo, J, Jefferson, 

Treasurer* 



K 2 



Digitized by 



Google 



76 



EETUENS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



PORT OF LLANELLY. 



Act conferring Jurisdiction :— Tlie Bony Navigation and Llanelly Harbour Act, 1858 - 



- 21 & 22 Vict. 



BYE-LAWS used bj the Llanelly Harboua Commissioners. 
Inter alia^ — 

1. All Tessels with cargoes, and all yossels above 60 tons register^ in ballast, bound over th& Bar of Buny inwards, shall heaTeta 
and receive on board the first licensed pilot who shall o£fer on the sea* side of the said bar, or within the same ; and all TesseUof 
30 tons register and upwards, outward bound, if laden, or of 50 tons and upwards, if in ballast, shall employ the first licensed pilot 
who shull offer to pilot her out ; and the master of any vessel refusing or neglecting to do so in either event, shall paj the " 
as though such pilot had been taken on board^ and be subject to a penalty not exceeding 61, 

2, Pilots shall take charge of all vessels under 50 tons register, if required bj signal or otherwise. 

8. All vessels bound in over Burry Bar shall hoist a pilot signal, when within a line drawn from the Helwick Light Ship to 
Caldy Light. 

4. All vessels of 200 tons register, bound for the Port of Llanelly, and boarded by a pilot to the westward of the Helwiek light 
Ship, while Old Castle Head on the coast of Pembrokeshire is open to the southward of Caldy Island, shall pay as distaoce-moQej 
an additional pilotage of 5^. ; and 1 s, in addition for every 20 tons register above 200. 

5. Masters of vessels requiring assistance shall employ a licensed pilot, if one shall offer, in transporting their ships within the 
port, for which they shall pay according to the rates hereinafter specified. 

6. Masters of vessels shall, on arrival, give a certificate to the pilot, stating the vessel's name, register tonnage, where hoarded bj 
the pilot, the draught of water the vessel then draws, and the draught of water when loaded ; and, when he proceeds to sea, sbiJl 
give another certificate stating that his vessel has been properly taken out over the Bar, or otherwise ; and any roaster of a Tssel 
refusing to give the certificates required, or giving a false one, shall be subject to a fine not exceeding 5/. 

7. Any master of a vessel who may be unable to procure a pilot to take his vessel out shall have the outward pilotage repaid^ * 

8. In case any ship or vessel shall be in distress, and pilots shall run imminent risk in going to the relief of such ship or vessel, 
the pilots shall be entitled to such additional pilotage from the owner, master, or person in charge of such vessel, beyond the regalar 
rate of pilotage, as the Commissioners shall determine and order. 

9. Any person not licensed as a pilot, who shall act as such, (except where no licensed pilot can be obtained), shall he subject to 
a penalty not exceeding 5/. 

10. All masters of vessels and pilots to keep clear of the quays, jetties, shipping-places, and other erections within die Bar of 
Bnrry, by bringing their vessels to anchor at proper distances therefrom. 

12. In case of any dispute arising between masters of vessels, touching any damage done to their respectLve ships, irithin tin 
Bar of Burry, the same shall be settled by reference to two indifferent masters of vessels, one to be named by each partj; andia 
case they should disagree, or o^' arbitrators not being appointed, to the umpirage and final determination of the general harboor- 
master of the port ; and all disputes between masters of vessels and pilots shall be settled by the pilots' committee. 

Id. Masters of vessels having any complaint against a pilot shall state the same in writing, and hand it to the harbour-master. 

21. No master of a vessel shall leave the port without paying all the tolls, dues, and additional pilotage ordered, under a penalty 
of5Z. 

22. All pilotage and hobbles shall be paid direct to the commissioners' collector at the harbour-office, or to the sab-colleetors al 
the creeks. 

23. Every pilot shall remain in charge until his vessel is properly moored. 

24. Pilots detained on board, whether in port or lying outside, shall be paid fls, 6cU per tide. 

25. Any master or other person refusing or neglecting to make any of the payments required by, and to conform to, ^ roles an 
bye-laws for the time being in force, shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding 5 Z. for every such offence, subject to mitigatioa a 
the discretion of the justice before whom the case may be heard. 



That the following Rates be paid by Vessels 
Station No. 1. Station No. 2. Station No. 3. 



Tons Register. 




V^est of Helwick ^ J ^ ^'^ 
^«^^ ofWormshead. 


East 
ofWormsbaad. 






s. 


d. 


s. 


d. 




s. d. 


Under 100 


• 


1 


6 


- 1 


- - 


. 


1 - 


Under 125 


« 


2 


6 


- 2 


mm m 


• 


1 6 


Under 150 


• 


8 


6 


- 2 


- 


. 


2 - 


Under 175 


•- 


4 


6 


- . 8 


6 - 


. 


2 6 


Under 200 


• 


5 


6 


- 4 


a . 


• 


8 6 


Under 225 


• 


6 


6 


- - 5 


6 - 


• 


4 6 


Under 250 


• 


7 


6 


- . 6 


6 - 


- 


5 6 


Under 275 


. 


8 


6 


- . 7 


6 - 


• 


6 6 


Under 300 


- 


9 


6 


. 8 


6 . 


- 


7 6 


And Is.ia addition for every 


25 tons beyond 80C 


K 










PILOTAGE. 









when boailled by or from either of the Cutters. 

Limit No. 1. 

If a pilot be taken on board as far to the westward as tobrisj 
Rhossilly Church open to the westward of the Holmes, he b t( 
be paid for every foot of water the vessel may draw* 



Rules for the payment of pilots and hobblers taking charge 
of ships or vessels trading over the Bar of Burry, and bound to 
Llanelly, Pembrey, Burry Port, and upwards as far as Llan- 
genneoh. 

LllfIT l(o. J. 



99 
9t 



Under 50 - tons register 

From 50 to 75 

From 75 to 100 

From 100 to 125 

From 125 to 150 

From 150 to 175 

From 175 to 200 

From 200 to 225 



1 
1 
3 
2 



8 
8 



6 per foot 
« 



8 
6 
9 



ft 
p 



With an advance of 8<Z. per foot on every additional 25 too 
register. 

Limit No. J 



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FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



Port or Llakellt — continued. 



Limit No. 3. 

If taken on board within No. 1, but to tbe westward of No. 4 
Buoy for Pembrej, or No. 6 for Llanellj. 

Under 60 
From 60 to 75 
From 75 to 100 
From 100 to 125 
From 126 to 160 
From 160 to 176 
From 176 to 200 
From 200 lo 226 
And 3(2. per foot for ererj additional 26 tons register. 

Pilots taken on board inside buoj No. 6, when bound for 
Llanelly, or inside No. 4, when bound for Pembrey, to be paid 
ls,^d. each for a hobble. 

If any vessel' shall evade being boarded by a pilot in Limit 
No. 1, abe shall pay for Limit No. 1, although boarded above 
that Ihnity besides the penalty for refusing a pilot. 







s. 


d. 




register 


- 


- 


9 


per foot* 


iy 


- 


1 


- 


» 


99 


- 


1 


8 


» 


99 


- 


1 


6 


fi 


W 


- 


1 





99 


99 


- 


2 


- 


>f 


>> 


- 


2 


8 


w 


99 


- 


2 


6 


99 



Under 6Q - 


Outwards : 
tons register 




S. 


d. 
9 


per foot 


From 60 to 76 


>> 






I 


- 


99 


From 75 to 100 


99 






1 


8 


99 


From 100 to 125 


» 






1 


6 


9f 


From 125 to 150 


>> 






1 


9 


l> 


From 150 to 176 


9> 






2 


- 


?> 


From 176 to 200 


W 




- 


2 


8 


» 


From 200 to 225 


» 




- 


2 


6 


» 



Lnd 3i/. for every additional 26 tons register. 

Every Tessel paying 2 s, per foot^ and upwards, shall be 
iken by the pilot clear of the Holmes, if required. 

Each vessel to pay 1 s. for the boat. 

That the pilots outwards shall not quit the vessels under their 
hargCy until the Wormshead be open from Burry Holmes, with- 
at the captain's consent. 

That when any vessel not exceeding 125 tons register shall 
ive the assistance of a steam tug in taking her out to sea, 
reduction of 10 per cent, shall be made on her outward 
ilotage. 

That 



That all vessels proceeding above Llanellj fihall pny m 
follows, in addition to the rates inwards aod' out^ ards fiont 
Llanelly : — 

From Llanelly to Penolawdd. 

*. d. 

Under 50 - tons register - 2 6 each vesseL 

From 60 to 100 „ - 8 „ 

From 100 to 160 ,, - 4 S 

From 150 to 200 „ - 6 - 



if 



Under 60 
From 50 to 100 
From 100 to 160 
From 150 to 200 



To Spitty and vice versB. 
tons reg^ter 






- A 

- e 

- 8 

- 9 



d, 

- each vesseL 



G 



And from Penclawdd to Spitty, and vice vend, ua folluwi : — 

s. d. 

Under 60 • tons register - 2 6 each ^'esai^L 

From 50 to 100 ^ - 8 (3 

From 100 to 150 „ - 4 

From 150 to 200 „ - - 



'1 



Under 75 
Under 100 



That the following rates of harbour pilotage shall be paid 
whenever a pilot is in charge :— 

s. d. 
By all vessels under 60 tons register 2 - each Tessel. 

99 99 7^ « W 2 ^ J3 

>> 99 1^^ w w 8 ~ n 

And OdL for every additional 26 tons register. 

For removing vessels from or to Llanelly and Pembrey, 

*. d. 

Under 60 tons register - - ^ - 3 tl 
j> », ....46 

„ „ ... - 5 G 

And 1 s, for every additional 25 tons register. 

For removing vessels from Pembrey Harbour to Burry Port^ 
and vice vend : — 

s. d* 

Under 50 tons register - • - - 3 ft 
Under 76 „ „ - - - - 4 — 

Under 100 „ „ - - - - 4 

And 6(/. extra for every additional 26 tons. 

Vessels sailing from the port, and putting- baok after having 
discharged their pilots, to pay half pilotage ia mxd out. 

Three shillings and sixpence to be the rate oliarged for a Bar 
hobble. 



Pilots and Harbour. 

!• No person shall be allowed to act as pilot without first obtaining a license under the hands of five or more oommissioners in 
tnenl or pilots' committee meetings assembled; for which he shall pay 6#. to the clerk, except such pilots as have hitherto h^Qu 
tensed ; and who, in the event of re-appointment, shall be entitled to new licenses, given in manner aforesaid, on payiiitint of 1 s^ 
ch. 

2. Everj person applying to be appointed a pilot, shall prodnoe satisfactory testimonials of seven years' service at sea, sobriety, 
id of good character, and capability; and also a certificate from the harbour-master that such candidate for a license has been 
nmined by him, and is, in his opinion, eligible for the situation. 

8, That in all future appointments of pilots, masters of cutters, and apprentices, it shall be indispensable that t}\Gj read 
d write. 

4. That the maximum age for the admission of a pilot shall be 86 years. 

6. Everj pilot shall pay 1 s. in the pound from his earnings towards the sick and superannuation fund, subjeat to tba rules made 

r the commissioners for the management thereof. 

9. That the present contribution by the pilots of 1 s. per week each towards the wages of the masters of the cutters to which they 
f attached, be continued. 

if, ETery pilot leaving his employ, or declining or neglecting to act as pilot, without the consent of the commissiouera, the 
punittee, or harbour-master, shall be subject to a penalty not exceeding 6 /., and be rendered incapable of again acting' as pilot. 
IL Ereiy licensed pilot must consider himself bound at all times to fulfil his duties as a pilot, and to proceed to the Bssistaiice 
jieaeels ooming in or going out of the river whenever directed by signal or the harbour-master, under a penalty not exceeding 
and the loss of his license. 



^3. 



K3 



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{cmUinucd) 

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78 EETUENS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 

Post of Llakelly— cwi^iittMrf; 

9. If any pilot shall wiliiilly deceive anj master of a vesael in any information he may give in regard to the port, he shall forfeit 
and pay any sum not exceeding^ 5 Z. 

10. No pilot shall reoeire any money on account of pilotage &om the master of any vessel, under a penalty not ezoeeding 5Z. 

11. A list of the pilots, after each renewal of licenses, shall he stuck up at the Custom House. 

12. No pilot or other person in the service of the commissioners is permitted to demand anything for allowance for drink. 

18. That in all licenses given to pilots, a dause be inserted to the e£Fect, that in cases of drunkenness, either on or off duty, 
the pilot so found intoxicated be fined a sum not less than 1 /; ^ and in ease of repeated drunkenness, or under aggravated 
circumstances, the pilot so offending shall be dismissed. 

14. That a pilot being twice convicted before the committee for drunkenness on duty, he shall be irrevocably diamisaed. 

16. That no pilot shall be allowed to keep, or he concerned in any public-hquse or beer-shop. 

16. When any pilot who ia engaged to pilot a ship to sea, shall refuse to start the ship on the ground that the lisk i& too great, 
no other pilot is to assume. the charge without the previous consent of the harbour-maeten 

17. Pilots shall keep the lead going from the time the ship is uuder weigh on leaving the harbour; and from the time of 
hoarding until the dropping of the anchor. The penalty finr any breach of thisTule shall not be less than 1 /• 

18. That all outward pilotage#be subject to the same deductions for working and maintenanoe of ^e cutten, boats, &b., as Ae 
inward pilotage. 

19. That each pilot shall contribute 7 } per centum on his earnings, towards the maintenance of the boat» and cutters. 

20. All licensed pilots shall be subject to these and such other rules, aa from time to time shall be made by the commisaioDen, 
as well as the orders of the harbour-master ; and they shall be liable to a penalty not exoeeding 5 L for drunkennesi, eztortioB, 
misbehaviour to masters of vessels, the harbour or dock-masters ; for refusing or neglecting to do their dnty^ either peraonaUy or 
with their boats, when required ; or for laying the vessel they have charge of in an improper or dangerous place ; and if it shall be 
necessary, he or they shall be su^pendeil irom acting as pilots altogether, or for so long a time as the oommissioners mi^ tiiink 
proper. 

Boats and Cutters. 

1. The pilot-boats and cutters to be all painted with black sides. Each boat ix) be marked with the number appointed for her, 
from one progressively, in white paint on the bow, and in black paint on the sails above the reefs ; the figures on the bow to be at 
least nine inches in length, and those on the sails not less than 2 J feet. 

2. The letter ^' L " to be placed on the bow and sails before and in a line with the number ; and the numbers and letters on the 
sails to be a foot apart. 

3. The pilot boats and cutters shall be kept at all times in proper repair, and sufficiently found with oars, sails,' and oilier 
requisite stores and tackle, and to be fitted and painted as above ; and no pilot shall ply for pilotage in any boat or vessel not so 
appointed and registered at the harbour-ofiice, under a penalty not exceeding 5 /. 

4. Every pilot is to be provided with a red flag, four feet by three feet six inches, with a white square in ib^ centre, which flt^ 
he is to hoist at one of the mast heads directly he boards a vessel to pilot her inwards ; and any pilot neglecting to show the above 
signal will be liable to a penalty not exceeding '20 s. for every such offence. 

5. Any pilot acting contrary to the rules and bye-laws will be liable to forfeit his license. 

6. That a stout lad be appointed as an apprentice to each cutter, and be paid out of the earnings of the skiff. 

7. That the age of the apprentices shall not be under 17 years, and they shall not have been less than one year at sea. I 

8. That pilot-skiffs* moorings be laid down at Caldy. 

9. That skiff No. 1^ having the western station, shall make Caldy her rendezvous in stress of weether. 

'< Ceres" Pilot Ship. 

That a charge of 2 s. 6d, per 100 tons register be made upon every vessel taking a pilot boarded from the *' Ceres," for the 
maintenance of that pilot ship. 

Pilots to report themselves to the harbour-master immediately on their arrival at Llanelly. 

The pilots stationed on hoard the ^^ Ceres " to obey the orders of the master, and to assist in all the requisite duties of the vessel. 

That the harbour-master be empowered to send down pilots by land to join their skiffii, if not possible by-the ordinMy mode of 
returning to their stations, at the expense of ^tte oommissioners. 



Names of Pilots.— The Persons mentioned at p. 84 of Pari. Paper, No. 244 of 1869, are still acting, with the exception o£ 
Robert Lewis. John Griffiths, who is there included amongst the Pilots, is now acting as an Auxiliary Pilot. 



Rates of Pilotage* — ^The Rates are included in ^be ByiB-Laws. 



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FOK TRK TEAR £HD1M<} 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



79 



Poet o* ItLXT^TKLLr— continued. 



From Uanelly to Sea 



AMOUNT rooeire* for Pilot AGfc of Vessels in 1860. 
(l.)_INWARDS. 



DISTANCES 


BRITISH VESSELS. 








•' 


for which 


COASTERS. i OVERSEA. 


FOREIGn vjeasiSiLss. 


TOTALS. 


PILOTED. 


No. 


ATDOnnt. No. 


Attioatit, 


]Vt». 


Aioottot. 


No. 


AmoanL 


Tram Saa to Llanelly . • - 


1^86 


1,606 12 10 191 


£. #. J. 

$06 14 6 S16 


107 10 n 2^300 


2,040 18 3 



(3.)^0 U T W A R D a. 



2,043 



1^440 7 2 



261 



2oa - 2 



S6d 



136 14 5 



2,667 



1,850 I 



JV()^^ ^AQ VesseU arc equally privileged. The rates are th^^ Aainti whetlicr thij vts^^^U ore towed Ly a team or not. 



ACCOUNT of thd Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received ift respact of Pilots or Pilotage. 



Dr. 


£. *. i ^ 


Cr. 




£. s. d. ) 




832 3 11 


B^ amount paid for pilotage 


- 


3,80S 7 10 


To amount reoeived for pilots' dootor 


16 17 - 


Bj amount paid owners of pilot cutters 


* 


667 IS 5 1. 


To amount received for snperaiiuuatioa ind 
siekAind 


262 12 5 


By amount paid for superannuation and aipk 
j fund *------ 


t>l 14 - 


To amouAt reoeived hr pilots' boats mnd outtora 


674 9 7 


By amount paid for pilots' dootor- 


* 


14 * 


[Inward pilotage 
To amount received for < . ._ 

[Outward pilotage - 


2,040 18 2 
l>8a6 1 9 


By balanee curried to nejtt Uiooount 


£. 


1,D30 1 7 , 


£. 


5,662 7 10 


5,66S 7 10 



31 January 1861. 



B^ JoneSj Cler)^. 



FORTH CAWL 

Aet eonferrlni^ Jorisdlction . > - . 



6 Qeo, 4^ 0, 104| s, 106, 



BYE-LAWS and RATES of PILOTAGE issued hj the Llynvi Valley Railway Company, 
The Bye-Laws and Rates printed at pp. 88^ 89 of Pari, Paper, No. 174 of 1S57| an still in foroe. 



Names of Pilots,— The Persons mentioned st p. 82 of Pari, Paper, No, 287 of 1860, are still ftctin^. 



^43- 



K4 



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8o 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



PoRTH Cawl — continued. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— 1 N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


TOTALS. 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


AmoDot 


From Bay of Popth Cawl into Perth 
Cawl Harbonr. 


461 


£. f. d, 
84 16 9 


- 


£.«. d. 


- . Nil . . 


2 


£.#. d, 
- 16 6 


463 


85 IS S 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



From Bay of Porth Cawl Into Porth 
Cawl Harbour, j 



450 



70 17 9 



11 



4 19 - 



Nfl 



16 6 



463 85 IS 3 



ACCOUNT of Monies received in respect of Pilots and Pilotage. 



I>r. 



[Inward pilotage 



Gross amount received for{ 

(^Oatward pilotage - 

Amount received from other sources 



£. s. cL 

86 9 

86 

26 5 - 



Cr. 

Amount paid for or in respect of pilot boats, 
bnojSy &c. ---.-. 



40 11 - 



23 January 1861. 



Oeo. P. Saunden^ Secretaiy. 



PORT OF SWANSEA. 



Act conferriDg Jurisdiction 



17 & 18 Vict c. 126. 



REGULATIONS issued by the Harbour Trustees. 

[The Swansea Harbonr Trustees, by virtue of the powers vested in them by the '* Swansea Harbour Act, 1854/' and sll other powers 
«nabliog, do hereby make the following orders, rules, and regulations for the government and direction of the pilots of the port and harbour of Swansea, i 
for punishing any breach of such orders, rules, and regulations ; and do hereby fix and determine the rates of pilotage hereafter specified to be paid to the 
pilots appointed by the said trustees, under the powers and profisions of the said " Swansea Harbour Act, 1854."] 

1. No person sball be licensed to act as a pilot before he is 21 years of age^ and has served for six years at sea, of which two 
years shall have been in a coasting vessel trading to and from the port of Swansea, and shall pass a sutisfieu;tory examination before 
the harbour master, and produce certificates of good conduct and sobriety to the executive committee prior to his appointment 
under the common seal o^the trustees, 

2. Every pilot boat other than the present pilot boats now licensed must be of the burthen of IS tons or upwards, new measorei 
menty under the provisions of The Merchant Shipping Act, 1854," and must be kept in good repair, and well found with mastij 
rigging, sails, anchors, cables, and every other necessary material, to the satisfaction of the harbour master, together wiUi s^ 
approved chart of the Bristol Channel, a copy of the Swansea tide-table for the current year, and a good telescope and lantern. 

8. Every pilot boat shall be painted outside entirely black, with the exception of the letter S and the number of her liceoM vol 
white on each bow, and shall have the letter S and her number on her sails, above the reef; such letter and number to be 2} fee^ 
in length for the boats now licensed, and four feet in length for cutters. 

4. Each pilot boat shall have at least four pilots belonging to her, who shall be appointed to their respective boots by ^ 
harbour master, so and in such manner that each boat may carry a proportionate number, or as nearly so as is practicable. 

5. The names of the pilots belonging to each boat shall be painted at full length, within the stem of the boat to which thej 
4>elong, in black letters, two inches in length, on a white ground. 

6. The pilots' licenses shall be renewed annually, on the 1st Monday in July, and shall expire on the 31st day of Julj in the 
following year. Each pilot shall pay for his license two guineas, and for each renewal two guineas. 

7. Each pilot shall pay a poundage of sixpence in the pound on his earnings, which shall go to the pilots' superannuation fond 
and widows fund. 

8. Each pilot shall at the expiration of every calendar month deliver to the harbour master, at the harbour offices (on one of Umj 
forms provided him for that purpose), a correct account of all vessels piloted by him in that month, together with particulars of aB 
expenses paid by him, and in such account shall distinguish the several amounts received from British and from foreign Tcsselfl 

^ T respectively \ 

Digitized by LifOOQlC 



FOR THB TEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



81 



Port or Swah^s^a— continued. 



respeotiyely ; and such acoonnt shall indnde sach information and particulars as the trustees maj from time to time require and 
direct, to enable them to comply with the proyisions and requirements of the ^ Merchant Shipping Act, 1854/' And he shall then 
ptj the amount due for poundage thereon, to be applied to the purposes of the pilots' superannuation fund; and until such poundage 
is paid, such pilot's license shall be deemed to be suspended. 

9. Such superannuation fund shall be dispensed to sick^ aged^ infirm^ and disabled pilots, and their widows and children, in such 
manner as the executiTe committee shall direct. 

10. No pilot shall carry to sea in the boat to which he belongs any person whose license as a pilot shall have been suspended or 
withdrawn by the harbour master or executiTe committee, or any pilot who shall be at any time drunk or otherwise unfit ^r duty. 

11. Each pilot boat shall in turn proceed to sea, and at least three pilot boats, having four or more pilots on board, shall leave 
^e harbour each tide with the pilots belonging to them as soon as the boats are afloat ; but any pilot is at liberty to proceed to sea 
as early after his return as he pleases, and no pilot shall be required to proceed to sea the same tide as he returns, unless the harbour 
master shall in case of emei^ncy direct him to do so. 

12. In case any boat shall be at sea when its turn shall come for going out, and any pilots belonging to such boats shall be on 
shore, the harbour master may require such pilots to proceed to sea in another boat. 

18. The duty of every boat is to offer the services of and furnish pilots to all vessels bound to Swansea, and for that purpose the 
pilots shall use their best endeavours to speak all vessels bound to Swansea, without respect to their tonnage being large or small, 
or being from a foreign voyage or otherwise ; but no pilot boat shall go beyond the limits of the Swansea pilotage, as hereinafter 
defined, in search of employment, under a penalty of forfeiting the pilotage, and any vessel boarded outside these limits shall be 
exempt from the additional pilotage. Every pilot immediately on boarding a vessel bound to Swansea, shall, whether requested to 
do so or not, produce his license to the master of any vessel, or other person to whom he tenders his services as a pilot, and if such 
pilot neglect to do so, he shall for each offence be liable to be suspended by the harbour master. 

14. Every pilot boat shall be distinguished by the following characteristics, that is to say, — 
By day. A flag at the mainmast bead or gaff, such flag to be the regular pilot flag, red and white, horizontal ; the size of the 

flag to be four feet six inches by three feet. 
By night By a white light only at the mast-head, and by the exhibition of a flare-up light every 15 minutes. 

154 Each pilot shall carry with him a small pilot flag, red and white horizontal, with his number on it, and when in charge of 
vessels, shall make the following signals, for the purpose of showing that he is on board : 

By day. The pilot flag to be hoisted on board the vessel, in such a situation as to be best seen. 
By night. A light to be hoisted and lowered when a pilot boat is in chase. 

16. All pilots shall obey the bye- laws made by the trustees for the regulation of the Swansea Harbour and the Docks, as well as 
all orders and directions that may be given to them by the harbour master or lock keeper or their assistants, relative to the docking, 
berthing, or transporting vessels under their charge. 

17. CompuUoTy Pi^fo^tf.— Henceforth there shall be paid and payable to every pilot duly licensed, employed in navigating or 
assisting any vessel into or out of Swansea Harbour ; viz. 



Register Tonnage. 


Inwards. 


Outwards. 


Total. 


Register Tonnage. 


Inwards. 


Outwards. 


Total, 




Vessels exceeding 


£. i. d. 


£. s. d. 


£. #. 


d. 


Vessels exceeding 


£. *. d 


£. i. d. 


£. #. d. 


^ 60 and under 75 tons 


- 10 - 


- 6 - 


- 16 


. 


450 and under 500 tons 


3 5- 


1 7 - 


4 12 - 


L^^ 


100 „ . . 


- 11 - 


- 7 - 


- 18 


- 


500 „ 550 „- 


a 10 - 


1 12 - 


5 2- 


koo 


» 125 „ - - 


- 12 - 


- 8 - 


1 - 


- 


550 „ 600 „. 


a 15 - 


1 17 - 


5 12 - 


bs 


150 „ - . 


- 14 - 


- 8 - 


1 2 


- 


600 „ 650 „- 


4 - - 


2 2- 


6 2- 


150 


175 „ - - 


- 17 - 


- 8 - 


1 5 


- 


650 „ 700 „- 


4 5-27- 


6 12 - 


176 


„ 200 „ . . 


- 19 - 


- 8 - 


1 7 


- 


700 „ 750 „- 


4 10 - 1 2 12 - 


7 2- 


too 


„ 250 „ - - 


16- 


- 10 - 


1 16 


- 


760 „ 800 „. 


4 15 - 


2 17 - 


7 12 - 


100 


n 800 „ . . 


1 12 - 


- 12 - 


2 4 


- 


800 „ 850 „. 


5 - - 


8 2- 


8 2- 


100 


„ 850 „ . 


2 8- 


- 14 6 


2 17 


6 


850 „ 900 „. 


5 5- 


8 7 .- 


8 12 - 


160 


„ 400 „ . . 


2 10 - 


- 17 - 


3 7 


- 


900 „ 950 „- 


5 10 - 


3 12 - 


9 2- 


100 


450 „ . . 


2 17 6 


1 2 - 


8 10 


6 


950 „ 1,000 „- 


5 15 - 


8 17 - 


9 12 - 



j^ether with an additional sum of 5«. in respect of eyerj 50 tons above 950 tons on the inward pilotage, and an additional sum of 
\ 5. in respect of every 50 tons above 950 tons on the outward pilotage. 

Pilots will take vessels over 500 tons register, outward bound, clear of the Green Grounds, on to the Mumbles Roads ; and the 
iMTve ebarge includes landing the pilot in all cases. 

One-half the above rates o^j to be paid and payable to every pilot navigating or assisting any vessel ^not entering Swansea 
laiboiir), within any part of Swansea Bay, or within the limits of the pilotage ground hereinafter mentioned. 

Yessela of 200 tons and upwards, if boarded beyond the following bearings, shall pay additional pilotage, as under:— 



^343- 





West of 

Pwlldy Point, 

bearing N.K.E. 


West of 

Oxwich Point, 

bearing N.N.E. 

South of 8ker Buoy, 

bearing EN.E. 

or W.S.W. 


West of • 
Worm's Head, 




bearing N.N.E. 


200 and under 800 tons - . • - 
800 „ 400 „ . . . . 
400 „ 500 „ - 
500 « 600 „ - - - - 
600 „ 700 „ - . . . 
700 tons and upwards - • • • 


£. 5. dL 

- 4 - 

- 5 6 

- 7 6 

- 10 - 

- 12 6 

- 15 - 


£. s. d. 

- 5 - 

- 7 6 

- 10 - 

- 12 6 

- 15 - 

- 18 6 


£. s. d. 

- 6 - 

- 10 - 

- 15 - 
1 - - 

• 1 5 - 
1 10 - 



18. Optional 



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82 



RSXURirS RSLATING TO PILOTS ANB PXLOTAOS^ 



Post oe SwxsBEAr-^cmUmscL 



18. Optional Pilotage^^MMBtBTs of vessels under 600 tons regpister, requiring pilots to take tkek Tesaels to the Mumbles Roadi, 
or clear of the Green Grounds, to pay^ in addition to the outward pilotage rates, the following additional rates, innln^ng landing : 



Vessels under 100 tons - 

100 tons and under 200 
200 ,, 800 



£. s* d. 

- 4 - 

- 7 6 



Vessels 300 tons and under 400 
400 ^ 600 



£. s. d. 

- ft 6 

- 11 - 



Masters of vessels requiring pilots to take their vessels to the eastern or western limits^ to pay, in addition to the outward rates 
the following additional rates, including landing :— 



Vessels of 300 tons and under 600 tons - 
600 „ 700 „ - 



£• $. d. 

8 - - 

4 - - 



Vessels of 700 tons and under 900 tras 
,y 900 tons and upwards 



£. s. d, 
6 - - 
6 - - 



The following shall be deemed to be the limits of the pilotage ground of pilots appointed and licensed by the Swansea Harbour 
Trustees, viz. : — '' North of the line of the Nash Lights in one ; *' and '^ east of an imaginary line running north and soutli of a 
point four miles westward of the Helwick Light Vessel, placed off the Helwick Shoal, near the Worm's Head, in the ooui^ of 
Glamorgan*" 

19. Every pilot required to remain on board a vessel, whether inward or outward bound, to be paid by the master of such reasel, 
at the rate of 4 s, iot every 12 hours, or broken portion of 12 hours, in which such pilot shall not have earned pilotage or distaoee- 
money, in the same vessel. 

20. The harbour master may nominate such superannuated pilots as he shall think proper, to be harbour pilots, who rindl onlj 
aet as pilots in transporting or removing vessels within the harbour. 

21. Masters of vessels requiring to move vessels within the harbour (other than from one part of the float to another), shall 
employ a pilot for that purpose, and shall pay such pilot at the following rate : — 



Vessels under 100 tons'- 

100 tons and under 200 tons 
200 ^ 400 „ 






£. t. 



d. 

-26 
-86 
- 6 - 



Vessels 400 tons and under 600 tons 
„ 600 tons and upwards 



- 7 6 

- 12 - 



22. If the master of any vessel shall require any pilot to go on board and take his vessel out of die harbour, transport or more 
her, and such vessel be not ready to be taken out or moved, half the rates last mentioned shall be paid to the pilots 

23. Masters of vessels requiring hobblers or boats, to assist in removing vessels within the harbour, shall pay each hobbler 
employed 2 s., and for each boat 2 #. 6d. 

24. One-third of the gross receipts of each pilot from all vessels not exceeding 200 tons, and one quarter of the gross receipts of 
each pilot from all other vessels exceeding 200 tons, after deducting therefrom the allowance for landing in the following scale, 
shall be paid by him to the boat and hobblers, and shall be divided into equal shares between the boat and hobblers according to their 
number. 

Each pilot shall pay to the boat and men who shall land him from any vessel the sums in the undermentioned scale : — 



From any vessel under 76 tons register - 



iO w 


la uiiu 


er i\jM 


>» 


100 


ff 


126 


99 


126 


}f 


160 


» 


160 


»> 


176 


97 


176 . 


» 


200 


f> 


200 


w 


250 


9y 



8, 


d. 


2 


- 


2 


- 


2 


— 


2 


6 


2 


6 


3 


. 



From any vessel 260 and under 300 tons register 
300 ,, 360 ,, 



860 

400 

460 



9> 



400 
460 

600 



ft 



600 and upwards 



£. *. d 

- 4 - 

- 4 - 

- 5 - 

- 6 - 

- 6 - 

- 6 - 



26. The harbour master may, for any cause which he may deem sufficient, suspend any pilot, and in case of so doing, shall 
immediately enter in his report book the cause of his doing so, and shall lay such complaint before the executive committee at their 
next weekly meeting, or at a special meeting to be called for the purpose ; and the committee, at their meetings, may suspend any 
pilot until the following general meeting of the trustees, who may further suspend or dismiss such pilot. 

26. Any pilot while suspended by the executive committee, and if afterwards dismissed, shall forfeit any claim to the snpfir^ 
annuation fund. 

27. All complaints against pilots shall be entered in the ^ complaint book,** kept in the harbour master's office, within (where 
possible) 24 hours of the cause of complaint arising, and the complainant shall sign his name to every such complaint. 

28. All pilots shall wear a black silk ribbon with words in gold letters, '' Swansea Pilot/* to be supplied annually at the licensing 
day, at the expense of the trustees ; such ribbon to be worn while the pilots are on or off duty, except while off duty on Sundays. 

20. No boat belonging to any person who himself keeps or is interested in keeping, by any agent, servant, or other person, any 
public-house, or place of public entertainment, or is interested in selling any wine or spirituous liquors, shall be licensed as a pilot 
boat. 

30. Before obtaining a license, the owners of each pilot boat shall cause the same to be valued, and shall pay to the harbour 
master a deposit of 6/. per cent, on such valuation, and an additional sum of 10«. percent, per month, such sums to be paid into the 
Glamorganshire Bank, m the joint names of the harbour master and treasurer, to accumulate at interest until a sum of 300 L is 
made up, when subscriptions shall cease until again required. 

The above sums ^all form a mutual insurance fund against loss or damage of any pilot boat. In the event of to^ loss of any - 
pilot boat, the owners shall receive from the fund one«ha]f the valuation of such boat, (unless suoh boat has been wilfully lost or 
destroyed by the owner) ; or in case of damage, five to 10 per oent. on valuation, the amount to be determined by a oonunittee of 
owners (one for each boat), the harbour master to act as umpire in case of dispute. 

In the event of a boat being withdrawn from the list of pUot boats, the owners shall be entitled to reoeive back {sqfoi the fond^ such 
proportion of their deposit and subscriptions as shall not have been expended, but without any interest thereon* 



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FOE THE YEAR EKDTNO SI DECEMBER 1800, 



«3 



Port of Swansea — continued. 



The owners of anj n^w pilot boat shall not be entitled to reoeiTe from tlie fund, ia respect of nuj loss or injury, until they shflll 
bare subscribed and paid io the fuud^ an amount equal to the anioitnt then paid, and unexpended, bj tbe owners of tbe then 
lig^sed boata. 

Upon the insurance fund being induced belo^v 300 L^ the montblj'- aubaoj-iptionfi aball re-o^tnaieace, and be pi^id until tbe ium of 
300 L is ag^iu accumulated. ^ 

The boats ahall be re-valued aiinuallj on the first Monday in JuIt. 

By order of the Tr^istee^?* 
Harbour Qf^cm^ Swaniea, 13 August I860- Lewis Thomas^ Clerk. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



John Austin, jun. 
VTiiliam TJioropfioa 
[JptvTgiB Morgans 
PiLuiel Owens - 
rhotnofl Johnson 
John Meihuish - 
lames Mi t^ hell 
lohu \\ ithera 
rhoQia* Kneath 
rboQitts Rees 
DaTid Gronow - 
^«ary Hee« 
fobn Scares 
fames George - 
Pfcouias* George 
f ' Wilkins - 
AS DaTies 

^ame$ Black mo re 
Uckard Mitchell 



aged 31 
- ♦ 42 

40 
40 
41 
3fi 
55 
4J 
40 
41 
56 
30 
42 
54 



William Fox 

Philip Thomas - 
Willi am Pruflt - 
W^illiam Thomas 

John Fender 

David Hunfhes - 
John BUokwore 
John Natjh 
John Austin, sen. 
Alexander Austin 

Eran Da vies 
liiebard Gordon 
Richard Beynon 
Ell win Burton - 
George Bibby - 
John Hancome - 



aged 57 \ William Burman 
67 I 



%ged 41 
4S 

66 
«4 

43 

45 

49 
52 

4^ 

59 
64 
37 

35 
42 

aged 51 



LimiU. — LiceDHid to aH ti» pilots la e<ni- 
d acting v^^ibJi buiiDd ifi or fraru St^unBCu Hnr* 
bouT Tiithlo t!]C following limits: All timt part 
of Swaiis(.'a Bay uad the Bristol Chan net, and 
all crcL'kBt biioys^ atid heveus »Jtuate withio and 
adjoining the «ald Chennd a« ii situate to tlie 
nortli of aa lniai;liiary line drawn pamHel with 
tbe two Nass Li£:]ithoD«pfl eToctnA on tbi^ Nan 
Point| in tbe connty fif Gtamorg an,» bounded on 
tlie west by another iuia^rmary Iiu6 running due 
nortli and sriucb of a point Bituate two miiei to 
tbe weat^vcrd of the IftlwkkB Ligbt Ve.^ftcl, 
situate off the Wwnn'a Head, in the couatj of 
Glamorgan. 



1 LitniU — To aet as harbour pilots In motiag 
f yemeh tvltbin the harboar. 



There are no Appreaticee. 



Bates of Pilotage, —Are included in tbe Bje-laws. See above. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of VeasELS in 1860* 



(l.)^IN WARDS. 


(2.)— U T W A R D a 


Distances 
^ £ir which Piloted. 


Number 
of Vessels. 


Amount* 


DlSTAMCES 

for which Piloted. 


Number . 


L„s_ 


3,419 


£. J. d. 
2,743 19 - 


From Siit'an&ea to Bea 


£* *. d 

3,213 1,347 11 7 

1 



SfLtiib and forelgti vcAsela arc churgod Lb^ i^Eime ratcB ; and no diffGrunct^ ii n]lad<^ wbetiior veM4^1ii aro towed by atcaoi or uot. 



ACCOUNT of the Reocslpt and Eiponditure of Mohihs reeei¥ed for Pilotag^e. 



pl^iaijkiice in baud 31 Dfceober ISSfi 
I amount of fees received from applicants 
for iieeuses and oeitificatea • « . 
» «irjauui i^cei?ed na contribution in super- 
■tmuatioxi fund - - - - - 
jjTOi*5 zimoiint re^^eired f Tmrard [.filorage - 
for - - - 'l^ Out ward pilotagte 

^ atoBtiiit reoeiVtid ior tntarest 4in niuzkey 



£. s. d, 

407 15 6 

86 13 

92 19 1 

2,743 19 - 

1^47 11 7 

19 3 9 



4j698 1 5 



By amount paid to pilote - - . . 

By amount paid for or in respect of pilot 
boatS} bobblerA| &c, - «. . - 

By amount paid for pensions or super- 
annuatiooa . - . - ^ ^ 



Balaaoe ^affied to ne^t account 



£. &. d. 

3^243 U 6 

647 11 I 

91 3 G 

515 7 4 



4,698 1 5 



Lewis Thomas, Clerk, 



243- 



L 2 



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RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



SCOTLAND. 



PORT OF ABERBROTHWICK, OR ARBROATH. 



Act conferring Jorisdiction 



2 Vict c 16, 8. 47. 



Hequlations iBEUed by the HarbQur Trustees. — ^The Regulations printed in Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1865, pp. 176, 177, are 

still in force. 



Namss of Pilots* — See the list printed at p. 87 of Pari. Paper, No. 244 of 1869. Peter Smith, aged 66, has been 

appointed in the place of Alexander Swankie, juu. 



Hates of Pilotagb. — The Bates printed at p. 77 of Pari. Paper, No. 364 of 1866, are still in force. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 



RATES 

of 

PILOTAGE. 



BRITISH VESSELS. 



COASTERS. 



No. 



Amount. 



OVERSEA. 



FOREIGN VESSELS. 



No. 



Amount. 



No. 



Amonnt. 



TOTALS. 



No. 



1- At IJif. per ton 
PUot MftBter'B Foes 

2- At 3 d. per ton - 
Pilot Haster'i Feet 

3^ At SJrf. per ton 
Pilot Ma!ittr*a Fees 

4. At 3i d. per ton 
Pilot Mafltcr't Fees 

5, At 31 d. per ton 
Pilot Maftter'a Feoa 

C. At 3 A per ton - 
PUot &la«t€r^0 Fees 



Total - 



,£. f. d. 

-13 4n 

. 1 6 I 

9 3 3 1 
-11-1 

3 8 10 t 
- 6 6 J 



£. i. d. 



£. #. d. 



38 



61 17 U 
3 1 



i'} 



21 



61 14 7 
3 6- 



403 



406 6 3 
27-6 



1 

4 

8 

32 

21 

498 



447 10 2) 



66-7 



64 IS H 



- 18 10^ 

9 14 8 

3 16 4 

64 18 1\ 

66 

483 6 9 



' 



667 8 II 



JlTo^e.— Only one charge is made at this Port for both Outward and Inward PUotas^e. 



ACCOUNT of Monies received for Pilotage. 



Br, 

To gross amonnt received for Inward and 
Ontward pilotage 

To anionnt received f<ir pilot master^s &es • 



16 Jannarr 1861« 



£. 9. d. 

628 2 6 
84 6 6 



667 8 11 



Cr. 

B J amount paid for or in respect of pilot 
boats, baoys, &c. ..... 

By amonnt paid collector, commission for 
collecting pilotage, 2| per cent. - . - 

By amount paid to 19 pilots in equal shares 

By amount retained dt Harbour Trustees 
towards payment of salary allowed by them 
to pilot master and assistant pilot master • 

£. 



£. #. iL 

28 9 8 

13 1 6 
481 11 6 

84 6 6 



567 8 II 



John Maodonald, ClerL 



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nald, ClaL I 



POR THE YEAR ENDING SI DECEMBER 1860, 



85 



PORT OF ABERDEEN. 



Act tonferring Juriidlctfoii 



6 & 7 Ylct. c. 73, i. S0£, ke. 



I 



REGtrtATiONS lind Rates of Pilotage issued by the Harbour Comtni^sionera,— The RegTilntions printed at pp. 1 7^181 , and 
the Raiei printed &t pp, 181, 182, of Pari, Paper, No. 516 of 1855, mil remain in force. 



JgmeB Rohertson 
Chiuhs Smitli * 

Geaige A J Ian 
Geoife Baxter * 

llamder Fowler 
Georg* Fowler - 

AtdftDder Paterson 
r Andrei' Smitli - 

AIeiMid«r Allan 
Jaiut^ Morris 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



aged 41 
51 


Alexander Nob]@ 
John Morrice 


aged 90 
36 


56 

50 


Alexander Main 
William Gujan 


68 
37 


46 

40 


Akxander Morrice 
Pearson Morrice 


48 
29 


26 
Gl 


William Smith - 
Alexander Morrice 


57 
55 


37 
28 


Alejcander Smith 
, William Smith, Jan. - 


34 
26 



Names of AsHstants employed htf the 
Li^e^tsed I^itoti : 



Kenneth Robertson 


aged 53 


John Gujan 


20 


Andrew Fowlor 


42 


Anthonj^ Baxter 


44 


John Main 


26 


WilUam Allan - 


61 


John Cafe 


40 


William Morrice 


41 


John Caie 


S5 


John Mitchell - 


- ' ' 28 



AMOUNT racetred for Pilotage of Vessels in 1660, 
(l.)-IN WARDS. 



DISTA TICKS 


BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS, 






fo7 which 
PILOTED. 


COASTSHS, 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED* 


UNPRIVI- 
LEGED. 


TUTALH. 


No. 


A moa nt. 


No. 


Amount. 


Xo. 


Amaunt. 


No. 


AmouDt. 


ffm SfiA to Aberdeen Harbour Mid 


2,186 


940 4 


107 


£. ». d. 
38 10 - 1 


IBS 


£. #. d. 

104 13 - 


nil 


a,487 


£^ *. tL 

1/m 7 6 



(2.)"0UTWARDS. 



L Abeideeti Harbour and Dock 



£,355 



572 14 C 



58 



47 10 



m 



30 G 6 



oil 



2,481 



650 11 ^ 



Noti. — Totftl Hceelpta IJSQ L 18 1. 6 d. TbJa amount waa paid to the pilota, who collect the fees thetoBelTes. 
t0 March 1861- AUxandgr Goulds Captain Pilot of the Port of Aberdeen, 



^3- 



1-3 



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S6 



SBTURNS KBLATING TO PIUMS JOIV PII<OTA<3B, 



PORT OF AYR. 



Act conferring Jurisdiction, 18 & 19 Vict., the Ayr Harbonr Act, 1855, eeotions 46, 47. 

RsamLATXONS and Rates of Pilotage isroed by tlie Harbour Trustees. — The Beigulations printed at jp« 95, ^6, and the 
Sates at p. 96 of Pad. Paper, No. 5, Seas. 2 of 1867, are still in ibrce. 



NAMES of PILOTS- 

Wniiom Stewart - . - . aged 32 j Thomas Cameron 
Arthur Hedmont - - - - -6o|xi^i>j 
James M^CaUum 62 I ^^^^^7^ ' 



aged 82 
- 32 



From the Htrbotir to the Bay 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 



DISTANCES 


BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSEL*. 


TOTALS. 


for wMct 
PILOTED. 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


Unpriyilbged. 


Wo. 


Amount 


N». 


iU«-. 


Ke. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


Pram thn Baj to the naTbotir 


781 


171 1 4 


90 


£. f. A 
14 14 8 


16 


7 1 


- nfl 


817 


19S 4 10i 



(2.)--0UT WARDS. 



787 



172 5 7^ 



80 



14 14 8 



16 



7 1 



nfl 



823 



104 9 4 



yote, — ^The charge is the same whether towed by steam or otherwise. 



ACCOUNT of Monies received for Pilotage. 



m 

^ . flnward Pilotage 

To gross amount re- J ° 

edvedfor - -[outward Pilotage 



£. 



£. s. d. 

103 4 lOi 

104 4} 



387 14 3 



Cr. 

By amount paid to Pilots - 

By amount paid for or in respect of pilot boats, 
baojrg, fee. ---•-.• 

By Balance carried to next account 



£. t. d. 

244 10 6 

18 

125 8 



387 14 a 



7 January 1861. 



JVb^6.-*The balance is expended in maintaining and improving the harbour. 



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FOa TEE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1850. 



87 



PORT OF DUNDEE. 



Aot «OEifemiig JurisdictMn^ 6 & 7 Tkt c. 83, neCloDi I(}5— f48 indmife, 

RBontATiOTis feeued by the Joint Committee on Pilotage. — The RecniJatioiis printed at pp, 61-85 of Pari Paoer 

No. 364 of 1 856, are still in force. ^ ' 



James Watson - 
Job Hoffg 
John Chambers 
David Cranmiond 
Jolin ilartin 
David Kjdti - 
David Henderson 

"William Dorward 



aged 54 

- 45 

- 54 

- 54 
' 32 

- 32 

- 5fl 



NAMES of PILOTS- 

- aged 41 



James Boyack 
David Sime 
Willi am Ferrier 
George Kni^bt 
Robert NicoTl 
J. Cory Duncan 
William J ares 



46 I Kobert Ferrier 



30 

37 
47 



liecnicd to cnndutt aad pilot ship a and vei&eU 
f* into and out of the River TiyiWMl uOo Mid out 
of cha lutrboiir of Duudect 



SuperaomenurkB not lioeased. 



Eat^> — The Eates of Pilotage are the same as printed at pp» 187, 188, and 189 of Pari. Paper, No. 518 of 1855, 



AMO PNT received for Pilotage of YfigsELS in I860, 
OO-INWABDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN TES9EL8. 






DISTANCES FOR WHICH PILOT ED< 


CoA&TBltA, 


OVERSEA. 


Priyi- 


tTNPRIVlLEQED. 


TOTALS, 






Noi 


AraonaL 


No, 


AEdomil. 


No, 


Amount 


Trm Boo? of Thy to Dundee Do^^ts, at 4*. Of if. per foot - 
From Boot ^ '^J to Dundee Dock ft, at 3 1. 6 rf, pf^r foot * 
PpQfli Buoy of Tay £0 Dandle Dockfl, at 3 #, per foot - 
Fnro Buoy of Tay to Carolina Roads, at 3 #* OJ tt. per fi>ot 
rrom Baaj of Tay to Carolioa Roads, at 2 s. H^d. per faot - 
Pmd Bnoy of Tay to Carolina Road*, at SE*, 3 d, pet foot - 
Fitm Boo 3? of Tay to CaixjUon Roads, at 2 s. per foot 
Run Cbfoika Hoada to Dundee Docks, at 1 *. 3fL per foot - 
Fnm CaToUim Roada to Dundee Docks, at 1 «. per fuot 


- nil ^ 


3S 
34 

a 

6 

J) 
9 
1 

6 


81 16 

317 n D 

64 3 3 

4 12 5 

5 13 Q 
4 2- 

3 11 

3 5 8 


- nil - 


ol 

304 

4 

4 

3^ 

4 


£, *> d. 

lt>9 3 - 
3^ 18 7 

4 4- 

5 5 I 

39 8 6 
^ 14 4 


83 

35S 

38 

7 

r> 

41£ 

y 

11 ! 
5 


£- *, if. 

190 18 9 

C77 3 4 

58 7 3 

17 

5 10 9 

4a 10 e 

8 rj t2 

7 18 3 
3 5 8 


TOTAI. - - - 




263 


484 13 8 


- 


aoe 


520 13 e 


650 


i;)05 C S£ 



(2,)— OUTWARDS. 



From Dnndee Docks to Bnoy of l^y, at 4 j, 0| d. per foot 
From Bondee Docks to Buoy of Tay, at 3 1, d, per ft>ot 
ftmn Dnndt^e Dfjckfl to Buoy ofTay^ at 3#. per foot - 
Fiom Feny Roads to Buoy of Tay, at 2 *. 8d. per foot 
PjtJm Dundee Docks to Tay Porl, at 2 jr. per foot 
horn Dundee DiHikfl to FeWy Roa^lft, at 1 s, 3 d. per foot 
fmm Dnnd*^ Docki to Ferry Roadd, at 1 s, per ftwt - 
Jiim CutdiJia ELoads to Baoj of Tay, at 2#* 3 ^ per foot 

IVtAJt - - 



- nil - 


13 


- 


103 


- 


31 


- 


4 


- 


4 


- 


I 


- 


S 


- 


I 




158 



31 16 - 


- nil ^ I 


37 


193-5 


- 


103 


43 18 9 


• 


dO 


4 13 3 


_ 


3 


3 10 - 


* 


.6 


- 11 3 


- 




- 17 - 


_ 


^ 


1 10 II 


' 


a 


277 17 7 


- 


207 



78 18 10 

177 la 7 
£iO 12 6 

3 9 8 

4 12 8 



7 15 3 



330 



50 
305 

61 
7 

10 
1 
2 
9 



^Gd 



110 14 10 

m} 17 - 

y9 6 3 

8 1 9 

8 8 

- 11 a 

- 17 - 

9 



3 



007 



L Revenue: 
The Receipts for the year ending 31&t December lS60j aa given above, amount to 1,612/, 8*. 11 A 

II* Expe\ditube: 

TTie Pilotage acconnti arc made op in March annadly, and the following U m acconut of the eipenditure for 

the year ending 1st March 1860. 

My wages ^*--,_ -.»^_, 
B J bonus --^*_--«_,^, 
By salaries -----,-__*., 
Bj aecounti for provisions^ k(u ------_, 



781 14 7 

439 3 4 

35 - - 

370 - 2 



1,625 18 I 



I<J January ISfll. 

f- 



/flip M^Evacnj Secretary. 



^^ 



14 



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88 



RBTURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



PORT OF GLASGOW. 



Act conferring JoriBdiction 



- 21 & 22 Vict. c. 140. 



Bye-Laws and Rates of Pilotage issued by the Clyde Pilot Board. — ^The Bje-laws printed at pp. 88-90, and the Rates at 

p. 90 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still in force. 



Pilots taking charge of Vessels going 
from Glasgow to Greenock. 

Thomas Driver - - aged 64 

James MTarlane - . • 60 

John Barrie - - - - 44 

James Murray * - - 47 

James Johnston - - - 74 

Pilots taking charge of Vessels going 
from Greenock to Glasgow. 

James M'Chleary - 
Hugh Campbell • 



Walter Hooks 
James High am 



aged 42 
43 

39 
39 



NAMES of PILOTS. 

Magnus Park - - aged 47 
Robert Sommeryille - - 60 
James Morrison - - - 48 

John Campbell - - - 60 

Colin Campbell - - - 79 

Luke Skelly - ... 48 

Duncan M'lntyre - - - 63 

James Martin - - aged 43 

John Wyllie ... 47 

Robert Crooks - - - 46 

John M'Kelvie - - - 44 

James Park - - - . 43 

Alexander Alexander * - 46 

Daniel Mowat - * - 36 



JAmUs.—To pilot Yeuels on the Riyer Clyde betweeo 
Glasgow and Greenock. 



Limiii. ^-To pilot vesselt on the River Clyde between 
Glasgow and Greenock. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






BISTAJTCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


TOTALS. 


Ibr which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed hy 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
SteauL 


Towed by 
Steam. 






Ifo. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amomt 


Fram Greenock to 
Bowling, 

From Qreenock to 
Glasgow. 


34 

70 


£. i. d. 
12 2 4 

66 8 4 


38 
849 


£. i. d. 
20 1 2 

642 4 6 


32 


£. i. d. 

29 4 2 


338 


£. #. A 
444 4 4 


18 


£. «. d. 
16 6 2 


171 


£. ».d. 
206 6 3 


68 
1,478 


£. •.L 
Si S 6 

1,903 12 9 


Total - - 


91 


68 10 8 


887 


662 6 8 


82 


29 4 2 


338 


444 4 4 


18 


16 6 2 


171 


206 6 3 


1,640 


1^16 3 



(2.)-0 U T W A R D S. 



From Glasgow to 
Bmfllcg. 

Fhsm GlflBgow to 
Greenock, 


9 
40 


6 16 
22 4 3 


14 

764 


9 2 6 
620 14 - 


46 


40 


607 


747 19 6 


19 


20 6 1 


191 


228 6 1 


83 
1,566 


IS 4 - 
1,679 7 10 


Total - - 


4D 


28 6 9 


768 


629 16 6 


46 


40 


607 747 19 6 


19 


20 5 1 


191 


228 6 1 


1,679 


1,094 11 10 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received for Pilotage. 



Dr. 

To surplus revenue, as per account, ending 31 
December 1869 . - - - - 

To amount of fees received from applicants! 

for licenses and certificates^ - - - 1 
To amount received as contribution to super- [ 

annuation or widows' fund - - -J 
To amount received for fines and forfeitures - 

To gross ™ount received for|JJJ*^^JpaJj^ 

Tointereat ------- 



£. 



£. s. d. 

2,008 1 6 

114 9 - 

1 13 - 

1,426 16 3 

1,694 11 10 

79 15 7 



5,324 7 1 



Cr. 

By amount paid for salaries of secretary, clerk, 
and other officers ..... 



By general charges - .. . . 
By allowances to pilots and families 
By sum lodged in Clyde Trustees' hands 
By amount paid to pilots . • • 
By pilotage still unpaid . . • 
By balance in bank on 31 December 1860 



£. s.d, 

184 6 10 

44 8 10 

122 2 6 

1,900 - -i 



2,808 
139 
126 



7 9 
6 8 

- 6 



5,324 7 1 



s February 1861. 



A* Turner J Secretary. 



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JPOB THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER I860. 



89 



PORT OF GREENOCK. 



Act conferring Jurisdiction - 



. 21&22Victc.l49, t. 188. 



Bti-Iiws and Rates of Pilotage. — The Bye-Laws and Rates are the same as those in force at the Port of Glasgow. See 

pp. 88-90 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860. 









NAMES of PILOTS 


(Deep Sea). 






l^OlIam Adams 


^ed 


42 


Donald M'Kinlay - 


« 


aged 50 


Hugh Turner - 


aged 46 


Ilobert Grant - 


- 


52 


John Foster 


. 


55 


Archibald M<Bride - 


63 


Pavid Guthrie - 
AlezaDder Jamieson - 
John Galbraith 


- 


52 
41 
53 


William Howieson - 
Robert I^e 


. 


51 
36 


John Turner • 
Alexander Daw 


40 
43 


William Clank 


- 


70 


• Hugh Cameron 


- 


39 


John Maclean - 


68 


John M'Kenzie 


" " 


41 


John M'Corquodale - 


" 


47 


Colin Turner - 


37 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTTERa 


OVERSEA. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


TOTALS. 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. Amount. 


No. 


Amoant. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


From places ontside of Com- 
bne to Greenock or Port 
Glasgow. 

Vnm pJaoes betwixt Cnmbrae 
ud Cloch Lights to Greenock 
or Port Glasgow. 

Prom a Une drawn between the 
Ckich Lights and Danoon 
Pier to Port Glasgow, or to 
any intermediatA place, or 
fiom any intemied iate place, to 
«ny other intermediate place. 


nU 


16 

1 
2 


£. t. d. 
61 19 9 

1 1 - 

4 10 - 


49 
23 


£. i. d. 
138 2 6 

30 - 8i 


9 


26 9 6 


16 
6 


68 3 
3 16 8 


90 

1 
30 


£. #. d. 
269 15 6 

1 1 - 

38 7 4) 


TOTAX - - - 


. 


19 


67 10 


72 


168 3 2i 


9 


26 9 6 


21 


67-5 


121 


309 3 10} 



(2.)-0UTWARDS. 



f^om Greenock or Port Glas- 
gow to places outtfide of 
Cumbrae. 

From Greenock or Port Glas- 
gow to places betwixt Cum- 
brae and Cloch Lights. 

ProB Port Glasgow or any io- 
tennediate place to a line 
dnwn between the Cloch 
Li^ht and Dunoon Pier, or 
from any intermediate place to 
tty other intermediate place. 


nil 


25 

1 
1 


99 4 5 
11- 
2 3- 


78 
2 
6 


270 4 Si 
2 7- 
4 12 4 


20 


63 16 7 


28 
3 


91 

6 6- 


151 
3 
9 


524 5 H 

3 8- 

13-4 


Total - - - 


* 


27 


102 8 5 


85 


277 4 -i 


20 


63 16 7 


31 


97 6 - 


163 


540 14 -i 



Note.— The Deep Sea Pilots licensed by the Clyde Pilot Board collect their own Pilotages. 
27 May 1861. John K. Gray, Joint Secretary. 



343- 



M 



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n 



90 



BBTUBNS KBLATfNG TO PILOTB AMD PILOTAGB, 



PORT OF IRVINE. 



Act conferring JnriBdlction 



7 Geo. 4, c. 107, ••80. 



Reoulations issued bj the Pilotage Committee. — The Regulations printed in Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866, pp. 199, 200 are 

stQl in force. ' 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



Alexander Murraj • 
Hugh Young • 



aged 36 
67 



I Licensed to act as pilots to pilot ?eae]s inwards 
r* and outwards over the Bw. 



RATES of PILOTAGE. 
On aU vessels arriTing with cargo and sailing with oargo 
On all vessels arriving in ballast and sailing with oargo - - . 



1} d per ton register. 
Hd. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in I860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 



DISTANCES tor whick PILOTED. 


BRITISH VESSELS 
(COaSTBRS). 


FOEEIGN VESSKTA 


TOTALS. 




No. 


Amoant. 


B<k 


MmL 


From Bar into the Harbour 


66 


£. s. d. 

2 14 4i 


- Nil . 


66 


Li.iL 
2 14 H 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



From Harbour over the Bar 



395 



167 11 7 



- NU 



3 96 



1«7 U 7 



ACCOUNT of Monies received for Pilotage. 



Dr. 



To balance brought from last account - 

To Gross Amount received I *^ ^ 

"^Outward pilotage 



for 



6 1 6 
2 14 4} 
167 11 7 



166 7 4^ 



Cr. 

By amount paid to officers - 

By amount paid for or in respect of pilot- 
boats, buoys, &c. 

By amount paid pilots 

By balance paid to steam-tug 





£. i. I 


*1^x 


8 19 11 


pilot- 


111 3 


- 


126 18 6 


- 


36 2 %i 


£. 


166 7 4^ 



David Gray, Secretuy. 



PORT OF KIRCKALDY. 



Act conferring Jurisdiction, 12 & 13 Vict, c. 80 and 31 ; the Kirkcaldy Harbonr and Petty Costoms Act, 1848. 

Regulations and Rates of Pilotage issued by the Harbour Commissioners. — ^The Regulations printed at pp. 201, 202, and Atf 

Rates at p. 202 of Purl. Paper, No. 616 of 1856, are still in force. 



James Walker 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
• aged 54 | John Walker 



- aged do 



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FOR THB YEAR BNDINO 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



91 



Port or Eirkcaldt— cm^'nttfcf. 



AMOUNT reoeired for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(L)JNWARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIG 


-EG 


rSSSELE 


;. 






DISTANCES 
ibr which 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVIl 


ED. 




TOTALS. 


PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steun. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






Wo. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


AmooDt. 


No. 


Amomt. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amonnt. 


Pion Prith of Forth 
toXinualdy. 


20 


£. 9. d. 
12 


7 


£. *. d. 
2 10 - 


20 


£. 9. d. 
1ft 10 - 


14 


£. *. d. 
9 - - 


40 


£. ». d. 
26 10 - 


12 


£. f. d. 
7 11 - 


nil 


113 


£. 9.d. 
78 1 - 



(2.)— OUTWARDS 



from Kirkcaldy to 
JPleztb of Forth. 



- 


- 


- 


- 


14 


7 10 - 


- 


- 


7 


3 


4 


1 10 - 


nil 


25 



12 - - 



N^Ur^Tht pilots employed by Teasels recdye the dnes for pilotage, and do not account for then. They receire no remuneration from the CommissionerB. 
16 January 1861. James Russell, Secretary. 



THE TRINITY HOUSE OF LEITH. 



Act conferring Jurisdiction 



1 Geo. 4, c. 37^ sb 33. 



Btb-Laws issued by the Trinity House. — The Bye-Laws printed in ParL Paper, No. 6, Sees. 2 of 1857, pp. 104-106, are 

still in force. 



243- 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



KAME8 OF PILOTS. 

ft- 


▲as. 


SERVICE FOB WHICH LICENSED. 


t 

bcUbaUL Blair, sen. 






• 
55 




pcbibald Blair, jun. 


- 


- 


dS 




prew Blair 


- 


- 


28 




ibaiezer Bruce 


. 


- 


52 




Biomas Camie 


- 


. 


46 




Fohu Comb - 


- 


- 


52 


^ 


Uexaoder Henderson 


- 


• 


51 




borffe Linton 


- 


- 


80 




imd M'Kenzie - 
)avid M*Qaat 
luMt Maxwell, jnn. 


- 


- 


63 
41 
4^ 


From Red Head on the north; and St. Abb's Head on the south of Frith 
of Forth, up to AUoa. 


ames Morris 


- 


- 


48 




rilliam Noble 


- 


- 


50 




leorge Sorlie 


- 


- 


49 




ndrew Stevenson 


- 


- 


42 




Isvid Steyenson - 


- 


- 


80 




Jexaader Watson 


- 


• 


40 




bomas Wilson, sen. 


- 


- 


73 




[b^ Smith - 


" 


* " 


57 





M 2 



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92 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAOB, 



Trinity House op Leith — cantinusd. 



KAMB8 OF PILOTg, 



John Dryburgh 
Thomas Paterson - 
John Robertson - 

Alexander Beaton - 
Alexander Comb - 
George Crombie - 
Thomas Hume 
William Lawson - 
John Linton - 
James Paterson Kin 
James Paterson 
Peter Swanson 
William Morrison - 
Neil Sutherland 

James Ainslie 
Robert Bryce 

John Finlay - 
John Gilmour 

James Beaton 
Hugh Campbell - 
George Carlaw 
George Donaldson - 
David Jamieson 
Peter Fotheringham 
James Maxwell, sen. 
John Rintoul 

John Ainslie 

Andrew Bain 
John Martin - 

Edward Rodger - 
Andrew Rae - 
John Hoggin 
John Allan - 

David Anderson - 

John Anderson 
Thomas Bain 
Alexander Brodie - 
George Banks 

John Buick - 
John Boddo - 
Joseph Barlow 

John Cook - 
Robert Comb 
George W. Craig - 
Thomas F. Colston 



AGS. 



80 
47 
66 

35 
63 
66 
48 
68 
67 
48 
60 
4d 
31 
85 

88 
66 

46 

46 

48 
60 
89 
88 
44 

48 
69 
41 

60 

88 
50 

65 
26 
64 
87 

35 

60 
78 
44 
67 

60 
62 
44 

46 
51 
84 
54 



} 



8EBVICE FOR WHICH LICENSED. 



From St Abb's Head and the Red Head to Alloa, et vice vend. 
From St. Abb's Head and the Red Head to Grangemoittb. 



, From Red Head, in the Frith of Forth, and St. Abb's Head, to Carron 
RoadS; et vice versd. 



From Fifeness and St Abb's Head, in Frith of Forth, to Alloa, et vice veni 

From Fifeness and St Abb's Head, in Frith of Forth, to Grangwnouth, «t 
vice versd. 

f From Fifeness and Bass Rock, in Frith of Forth, to Grangemovtli, d vice 
versd. 



I From Inchkeith, in Frith of Forth, to Alloa, et vice versd. 

From Inchkeith, in Frith of Forth, to Kincardine, et vice versd. 
From Inchkeith, in Frith of Forth, to Alloa, et vice versd. 

I From Inchkeith, in Frith of Forth, to Stirling, et vice versd. 

f From May Island to Stirling, including all safe harbours within these limiti^ 
\^ et vice versd. 

}From the Red Head, on the north side, and St Abb's Head on the soadi 
side of Frith of Forth, to Stirling. 

J From Fifeness, May Island, and St Abb's Head, to Grangemouth and Stir- 

1^ ling, including harbours of Stirling, Alloa and Grangemouth. 

J From May Island to Alloa, including all safe harbours within these limits, 

\ and vice versd. 

[From Leith Roads to St. Abb's Head on the south side, and Red Headoa 

1 the north side of Frith of Forth, and Harbours. 

|From the Roads of Dysart, in the Frith of Forth, into the harboan of 

\ Dysart and Kirkcaldy, et vice versd. 

fFrom Leith Roads to Shields Bar, and along the coast of Scodand, to 
\ Duncansbay Head. 

In the Frith of Forth. 

From Alloa, in the Frith of Forth, to Stromness and St Abb's Head. 

In and out of Ardrossan. 

From Stromness to Duncansbay Head, and Orkney Islands. 
fFrom Arbroath round north of Scotland to Mull of Galloway, and ftod 
\ Arbroath to the Nore, et vice xcrsd. 

fFrom Buoy of Tay to the Nore, and from Buoy of Tay to Mull of Galhmfj 
\ et vice versd. 

fFrom Ferry-port-on-Craig to Perth, from Buoy of Tay and Grangemoid^ 
\ and from Grangemouth to Shieldjs Bar. I 

In the Frith of Forth and River Tay. ' 

From St Abb's Head to Carron Roads, and from Shields to Stomoway. 
From Ferry-port- on-Craig to the Nore, et vice versd. 
From Duncansbay Head to the Nore, et vice versd. 



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FOR THE TEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER I860. 



93 



Trinity House op Leith — continued* 



VAMES OF PILOTS. 



Robert Dryburgh - 
William Chisholm - 
James Graham 
William Gardner - 
David Gardiner 
John Hall - 



James Hay - 

George Jamieson - 
Henry Ed ward, jun. 
Robert Kilpatrick - 
Robert Marr, Jan. - 

Bojd Meiklereid - 
Jobn Menziea 
Colin M*Artliiir - 
James Mcintosh - 
Robert Nicolson 

William Parker - 

Dayid Paterson 
Alexander Ross 

Alexander S. Salter 
Thomas Raison 
Robert C.Hossack 

Charles Stnrrock - 
John Harrower 
Henry Bell - 
John M'Vinish 

JohnWilsoD - 

Thomas Wilson, jnn. 

William Wilson - 

Eobert W.Wilson 
David Galloway - 
James G. Robertson 

Walter Paterson 

John R. Wilson - 



AGE. 



86 
49 
41 
88 
65 
56 

40 

42 
41 
58 
56 

45 
56 
27 
89 
61 

86 

42 
54 

88 
87 
85 
88 
63 
57 
41 

54 

54 

42 

48 
44 
87 

42 

44 



From St. Abb's Head to Carron Roads. 

From St. Andrew's to Grangemouth. 

From the Red Head and St Abb*s Head to Alloa. 

From Alloa to Fifeness and St Abb's Head. 

To and from St Andrew's Harboar. 

From Leith Roads to the Nore. 

f From Ferry-port-on Craig to Perth, from Buoy of Tay and Grangemoiith^ 
\ and from GraDgemouth to Shields Bar. 



SERVICE FOR WHICH LICENSED. 



From St. Abb's Head and Red Head to Alloa, et vice versa. 



i 

From Leith Roads to London, and also to Pentland Frith. 

{From the Red Head on the north and St. Abb's Head on the south of 
Frith of Forth to St Margaret's Hope. 

From Leith Roads to Cape Wrath, and from Leith Roads to the Nore« 

From I^ith Roads to Scrabster, north, and to the Nore, t^oacb. 

From Red Head to Grangemouth and Alloa. 

From Fcrry-port-oii-Craig to Perth, et vice versd. 

In and out of Leven. 

fFrom St Abb's Head on the south to Red Head on the north, tbence to 
\ Grangemouth. 

In the Frith of Forth. 

From Tarbet Ness to Bonar Bridge, in and out the Moray Frith. 



From Leith Roads to the Nore, et vice versd. 

From Ferry-port-on-Craig to Perth. 
From Broughty Castle to Perth. 



/ 

From two miles outside of Cromarty to Dingwall. 

(From Fifeness to the Red Head, and to St Andrew's, and to Dtiiidte Roads?, 
\ all creeks and inlets included. 

From Alloa, in the Frith of Forth, round the North of Scotland- 

{From St. Abb's Head north to Red Head, and from Red Head, tJience to 
Alloa. 

From Leith Roads to the Nore. 

From Stirling to luchkeith, et vice versd. 

From Leith Roads to Stromness, et vice versB. 

JFrom May Island to Alloa, including all safe harbours within these limitSf 
\ et vice versd. 
In and out of Ardrossan. 



}f(^^ Several of the pilots, besides their Trinity House licenses, hold also harbour licenses under other pilotage autho^ 

rities, soch as tlie Commissioners for the Harbour and Docks of Leith. No assistant pilots or apprentices are recognised by 
the Trinity House. 



Rates of Pilotage.— The Rates printed at p. 106 of Pari. Paper, No. 5, Sess. 2 of 1857, still remain in force- 



243- 



M3 



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94 



REJUBNB BSLATINO TO PILOTS AND PItOTAQB, 



Tkihitt Housx OF LsiTH— contnraaj. 



AMOUNT noeired for Pilotage of Ybssels ia 1860. 
(l.)_IN WARDS. 





•BRITISH TESSELS. 


•FOREIGN TESSELS. 


TOTALS. 




DISTANCES 
ibr which 


Not Towed by 
StaauL 


Towed by 
Sceui. 


Not Towed by 
SUam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


EBICABKS. 


PILOTED. 




























No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amonat 


No. 


Amoint. 


No. 


Amoont. 


No. 


Amonnt 






V 




£. V. If. 




£. 9. d. 




£. #. d. 




£. a. d. 




X. «. rf. 1 




From Leith Roads to loTerkdth- 
ing or from Leith to the Hope. 


16 


16 18 6 


4 


2 15 - 


4 


8 17 - 


- 


- 


24 


23 10 


6 




From Leith Roads to Carron 
Roads. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 


10 4 - 


- 


- 


4 


10 4 


- 




Fh>m Leith Roads and upwards 


1 


17- 


- 


- 


4 


10 17 - 


- 


- 


5 


12 4 


- 




From Island of May or Bass 
Rock to Carron Roads. 

From Island of May or Bass 
Rock to Leith Roads. 


14 


46 5 6 


- 


- 


1 

28 


1 15 - 
65 9 - 


2 
1 


11 11 - 
3 3- 


3 
43 


13 6 
113 17 


6 


lliepiloliieiftr 

thediitaoeeiberdi 

y meatiooedcoBpfft. 

hend also iateno^ 


From St Abb's Head or Bell 
Rock to Leith Roads. 


3 


10 3 6 


- 


- 


1 


1 15 - 


I 


3 13 6 


5 


15 12 


- 




From the Nore to Leith - 


1 


11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


11 - 


- 




Channel 


1 


8 - - 


- 


- 


- 


. . 


1 


8 


2 


16 - 


- 




Into Alloa .... 


15 


24 16 6 


- 


- 


32 


75 19 6 


- 


- 


47 


100 10 


- 




Into Grangemonth - - . 


63 


64 15 6 


5 


8 14 6 


90 


153 13 - 


3 


4 17 6 


161 


232 - 


6 




Into Kincardine . . - 


1 


-15 e 


- 


- 


9 


5 2 6 


- 


- 


3 


5 18 


- 




Into Bo'ness .... 


81 


58 18 6 


- 


- 


37 


31 9 6 


- 


- 


118 


90 8 


- 




Into Charleston - . . 


6 


11 2 - 


- 


- 


22 


84 10 6 


- 


- 


28 


45 12 


6 




Into Limekilns 


1 


1 11 6 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 11 


6 




Into St. Dayid's ... 


- 


. 


- 


• 


7 


6 10 - 


1 


1 10 - 


8 


8 - 


- 




Into Qaeensftrry ... 


- 


. 


- 


- 


2 


15- 


- 


- 


2 


1 5 


- 




Into Aberdonr ... 


- 


. 


- 


- 


2 


3-6 


- 


- 


2 


3 - 


6 




Into Burntisland - . - 


3 


2 11 - 


- 


- 


25 


30 8 6 


- 


- 


28 


32 14 


6 




Into Anstrather - - - 


41 


20 5 6 


- 


- 


- 


. 


- 


- 


41 


20 5 


6 




IntoElie - . - - 


10 


3-9 


- 


- 


- 


. . . 


- 




10 


3 - 


9 




Into Kirkcaldy 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


2 10 - 


- 


- 


1 


2 10 


- 


NoraiMixedbf 


Into Pittenweem - . - 


31 


17 5 - 


- 


- 


6 


3 4- 


- 


- 


37 


20 9 


- 


Trinity Hoose. 


Into Dysart - - - - 


- 


. 


- 


- 


3 


4 6- 


- 


- 


3 


4 6 


- 




Into Leven - - - . 


60 


30 18 - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


60 


30 IS 


- 




Into St. Andrews ... 


71 


42 7 - 


1 


- 10 - 


5 


4 13 - 


- 


- 


77 


47 10 


- 




Into Ferry-port-on-Craig 


1 


- 8 6 


- 


- 


- 


. 


- 


.. 


1 


- 8 


6 




Into Dandea .... 


- 


- 


- 


. . 


' 1 


8 12 - 


- 


- 


1 


8 12 


- 




Into Newbnrgh . - - 


4 


3 2 6 


- 


- 


1 


2 4- 


- 


- 


5 


5 6 


6 




Into Perth . - . - 


10 


17 2 3 


- 


- 


11 


13 1 - 


- 


• 


21 


30 3 


3 




Into Dingwall ... 


- 


. 


- 


- 


35 


42 12 4 


- 


- 


35 


42 12 


4 




Into Preatonpans - . . 


2 


2 1- 


- 


- 


- 


. 


- 


- 


• t 


2 1 


- 




Into Granton .... 


3 


2 2- 


- 


- 


2 


3 12 - 


- 


• 


5 


5 14 


- 




Into Peitycur - - - - 


2 


2 2- 


• 


■ - 


■ - 


. . - 


- 


• 


2 


2 2 


- 




From Sea orTarbet Ness to Tain, 
Portmahomack, Bonar Bridge, 
and the Domock Frith. 


160 


130 - - 


"" 


" 


3 


3 - - 


— 


• 


163 


133 - 


~ 




Total - - - 


601 


527 19 6 


10 


11 19 6 


329 


517 19 4 


9 


32 15 - 


949 


1,090 13 


4 





• No dbtinction is made between the different classes of British and Foreign yessels, either in the rates of pilotage or in the retoms of the pQota 

uigiiizea oy v^T^OOv IC 



FOft THB TBAU SITDrKG 31 DBCSMBER 1860. 



Tbinitt House, Leith— o<mftnKf£f. 



95 



(2.)-OUT WARDS. 



DISTANCES 

for which 
PILOTED. 



Ihm Gnraa Bffids to Leifli 



Bra liiUi Bonis to Ukadef 

my. 

Prom Ldth to Downs 
A<om Jicifh to LhrerpocA - 
Prom Ldth to Shields - 
from Ldth to Sonderlaod 
TromLdth to Scnbster - 
From Ldth to Thnrao - 
bom Ldth to Lowertsft - 



OittofADaa . - - - 

Oat of GrugeBiQtk 

Ont of Newcastle . - - 

OBtofBo'oess . . - 

OitofKiiicadiDe - . . 

(htofCharlestoii • • - 

Out of 8t David's - - - 

OatofloTerkeithlng 

OstofQieeosferry- 

OvtofBanitisland - • - 

OstsfD^sart . . . 

9atof£iikoa]4y - - - 

Ootof Anttnither . • • 

OntofLevsn • • • - 

OotofDiMidee . . . 

Oat of Arbroath . - . 

OotofNewbuiigh - - - 

)ntafrcrth - - . - 

)at of Clackmannttn * 

)QtofLoodoii • • . 

Imtan Roads to Hoy Sound - 

km Hoy Sound to Kerstoa 
Boads. 

hom Hoy Sound to Hohn 

Sound. 

^tm Ldth to Rothsay, and fai- 

tennediate Stations on ths 
West Coast of Scotland. 

TOTAI. - - - 



•BRITISH VESSELS. 



B«tTswiedl»y 
Steam. 



No. 



{,s 

81 
2 

26 
1 
4 

SB 
4 
8 

18 
7 



42 
42 

7 
2 



827 



Anioant 



6 2 6 



02 
12 

4 



54 
10 



2 

22 



6 6 



;} 



66 11 
1 4 

19 
1 - 
4 19 

12 18 
3 7 
8 10 
8 19 
8 12 
- 11 



20 ^ 6 

23 18 - 

4 18 6 

1 10 - 

- 15 - 



- 14 - 

4 10 - 
2 14 - 

5 8 6 
4 4- 



5 
110 



487 



6 



Tawed bgr 
•Steam. 



No. 



12 



Amonnt. 



£. 4. d. 
- 17 6 



8 18 - 
7 16 - 

- 15 - 



13 6 6 



• FOREIGN VESSELS. 



NotiyDwedhy 

Steam. 



Vawed by 
Steam. 



No. 



1 
51 

94 

16 



6i 

12 

8 

2 

82 

67 



18 



43 
1 



Amonnt. No. Amount. 



£. s. d. 
4 5- 

8 12 - 



40 
18 



16 - - 

49 18 - 

130 16 10 



11 



6 



77 15 6 

10 - - 

8 8 6 

2 15 - 

18 18 - 

25 18 6 



7 13 6 



1 10 - 



85 17 
1 6 



427 I 467 4 4 



12 



£. s. d. 



4 12 - 
10 2 6 



14 14 6 



TOTALa 



Na. 



14 



11 

2 
1 
1 

2 
1 

1 

78 

192 

2 

43 

1 

72 

40 

12 

5 

45 

74 

1 

60 
42 
7 
4 
1 
1 
47 
2 
6 
4 



778 



Amonnt* 



£. $. d. 
11 5 - 

8 12 - 

IQi 

24 

4 - - 

5 - - 
54 - * 
10 

16 - - 

82 17 6 

214 6 10 
14- 

81 5 - 

1 - - 

82 14 6 

22 18 - 

11 15 « 

11 5 - 

27 12 - 

29 5 6 

- 11 - 

27 19 - 

28 18 - 
4 18 6 

8 - - 

- 15 - 

- 14 - 
40 7 - 

2 14 - 

6 14 6 

4 4- 

5 - - 

110 - r- 



982 5 10 



REMARKS. 



, No ratif aaad by 

Trinity Hoata. 



* No diftjnction is made betweea the different classes of British and Foreign vei^sels, either In the rates of pilotage or in the returns of the pilots. 

Noee.— With the exception of Teasels hound to and from Leith, Kirkcaldy, and such other liarboars as are reuulated by special Acts of Parliament and 
ieoM their own pilots, no change of pilots is compulsory within the Trinity House limits. No Return of these harbour pilotages can be given by tbs 
^ty HooMy as tlie harbour piloU are not under their authority, but under that of several harbour anthoxities. 



ACCOUNT of the disposal of Monies reomved ia respect of Pilotage. 



Dr. 

amount of fees reoeived from applicants 
for iiceoses and oerd&cates ... 



£. s. d. 
121 16 - 



Cr. 

By amount paid lor pensions or superannua- 
tions ------- 



£. $. d. 
191 16 - 



12 March IWl. 



Thomas Boberisan, Secretaiy. 



^43- 



M 4 



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96 



MtTURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AKD PILOTAGE, 



HARBOUR AND DOCKS OF LEITH. 



Act confisrring Jurisdiction 



28 Geo. 3, e. 68, sec. 88, &: 1 & 2 Vict c. 66, s. 10. 



REGULATIONS and RATES of PILOTAGE issued by the Harbour Commissioners. 

See the Regulations printed at pp. 109, 110 of Pari. Paper, No. 6, Sess. 2 of 1867. Those Regulations are still in fbree, 
subject to the following alterations^ approved by Her MdjfSty in Council, 80 June 1860. 

The Commissioners for the Harbour and Docks of Leith do hereby, pursuant to the d82d and 838d sections of the Merdbaiit 
Shipping Act, 1854, enact that, from and after the expiration of 10 days from the publication in the Lcmdon Grazette, of tbe 
order signifying ihe consent of Her Majesty in Conncil to this bve-law, the regulations in regard to the i>iloting of vessels at tlie 
Port of Leith, approved by Her Majesty m Council on the 28tii day of July 1856, and enacted nnd declared to take efiect on 
the 8th day of September 1856, shall be amended and altered in manner following; that is to say, — ^The second article of the 
said regulations is repealed, and in lieu of the said article, the following is substituted : — 

II. No shipmaster or other person shall be bound to employ a pilot, either inwards or outwards. 

The rates of pilotage referred to in the 12th Article of the said regulations shall be those specified in the Table hereonto 
annexed ; which Table is substituted for the table of rates of pilotage annexed to the suid regulations. 



Rates of Pilotage referred to in the preceding Alterations. 



(Inwards.) 

For a vessel drawing not more than seven feet of 
water .-.--.-- 

Above 7 and not above 8 feet - - - - 



8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



V 
*9 



10 „ 

11 „ 

12 „ 
18 „ 



s. 


d. 


5 


10 


8 


- 


9 


9 


11 


8 


18 


9 


16 


- 


19 


6 



And for every foot or part of a foot above 18, an additional 
charge of 1 <• 6 d. 

Extra Attendance. 

For each 24 hours extra attendance on board, when 
requested by the master, to the master pilot 8 «., and to each of 
the boatmen Is, Qd. 



PUot Boats and Crews. 

For vessels from foreign ports, under 70 tons - 

For vessels from foreign ports, of 70 and not exceed- 
ing 120 tons 

For vessels from foreign ports, exceeding 120 arid 
not exceeding 250 tons - - - 

For vessels from foreign ports, exceeding 250 tons - 



$. d. 

4 - 

6 - 

6 - 

9 - 



Coasting vessels of any size which require to take a pilot 
boat, or employ such, to be charged only 2 s. 6 d fiir boats and 
men's attendance, besides the pilotage. 

(Outwards.) 

The rates of pilotage, &c., outwards are one-half of those 
inwards. 

The inward pilotage is payable only to the collector of Am 
dues, for behoof of the pilots, and is in no case to be paid 
directly to the pilots themselves. 

The order signifying the consent of Her Majesty in Council to the preceding alterations, was published in the Londa 
Grazette of the 3d day of July 1860 ; and the said alterations are declared to take efiect from and after the expiration of 10 daj! 
from that date. 

By order of the Commissioners, 

John Phuh Clerk. 



James Allison - - - aged 62 

William Amos - - - - 52 

William Bisset - ... 46 

Robert Cairnie - - - - 74 

Listen Camie, No. 1 - - - 52 

Robert Camie, No. 1 - - 47 

Robert Carnie, jun. No. 2 - «- 54 

William Carnie - - - 46 

Robert Comb - - - - 50 

John Cook - ... 45 

John Carnie - - - - 88 

Liston Carnie, No. 2- - - 41 

Thomas Comb - - . - 40 

Robert Camie, No. 3 - - 88 

John Comb, No. 1 - - - 51 

Andrew Carnie ... — 

William Clark - - - - 45 

Thomas Carnie - - - - 46 

Richard Corson - - - 85 

John Combe, No. 2 - - - 34 

John Cavins - - - - — 

Jonathan Robert Cooper - - 51 

Ruthurfurd Durham - - - 50 

Robert Drybrough - - - 59 

Robert Drybrough, No. 2 - - 85 

David Flucker - ... 76 

George Flucker, No. 2 - - 51 

James Flucker, No. 1 - - 57 



NAMES of PILOTS. 

James Flucker, No. 2 * aged 60 

Philip Flucker ... - 43 

George Flucker, No. 3 - - 45 

John Finlay - - - - 40 

James Graham - - - - 40 

John Gardner • - - - 46 

Thomas Hume - - - - 44 

Daniel Hall - - - - 40 

Archihald Hall ... 34 

John Hall . . . . _ 

George Jarvie - - - - 70 

Philip Jarvie - - - - 39 

Alexander Linton - - - 48 

Thomas Linton, sen. - - - 61 

Robert Linton - - - - 48 

Alexander Liston - - - 55 

Andrew Liston ... - 53 

John Liston, No. 1 • - - 60 

Archibald Logon - - - 54 

William Linton - ^ - 40 

John Logan • ... 58 

Waller Linton - - - - 86 

John Liston, No. 2 - - - 37 

John Linton, No. 1 - - - 38 

William Liddle ... 87 

George Linton - - - - 40 

Thomas Linton, No. 2 - * 84 

Henry Liddell •• - - - 41 



David Lyle - - - aged 

John Linton No. 2 - - 

David Main • - - - 

Matthew Main - - • - 

Thomas Latta Main • - • 

John Mills - - - - 

Thomas M*Laren - - • 

Alexander Noble . • . 
Jacob Noble .... 
John Noble, No. 1 - 

Robert Noble - . - - 

William Noble . . - . 

John Noble, No. 2 - • 

James Paterson - - . 

William Paterson, No. 1 - 

Thomas Paterson - • . 

William Paterson, No. 2 - 
John Pratt .... 

William Paulin - - . 

David Ramsay - - . - 

James Ramsay - - • • 

William Ramsay, No. i . 

Adam Rutherford - • . 

William Rutherford - - . 

William Ramsay, jun.. No. 2 • 

Martin Ramsay - • • 
Alexander Rutherford 

John Ramsay - - • . 



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FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



97 



Harbour and Docks of Leith — continued. 



Alexander Smith Salter 
William Tough, jun. 
James Watson - - - 
William Watson 
David Wilson, No. 1 
David Wilson, No. 2 
John Wilson - - - 
Thomas Wilson, No. 1 

iwii^ .'—Extending from a point at Seafield Toll Bar, on the eastward of Leith, to Wardie Brow or Brae, to the westward 
of Newhaven, and half way across the Forth, 1 & 2 Vict. c. 55, s. 10. But these limits tre extended for pilotage puiposes by 
article 8 of the Regulations. 



Pilots — continued. 




George Stewart 


aged — 


Peter Swanson - - - 


48 


Robert Stevenson 


44 


Andrew Stevenson - 


40 


Hugh Smith - 


53 


David Stevenson 


38 


George Stark - 
Neil Sutherland 


46 


— 



aged — 


Thomas Wilson, No. 2 


aged 53 


64 


William Wilson 


40 


46 


Andrew Wilson 


39 


51 


John White - 


54 


64 


William WeddeU - 


37 


43 


John Young - - • 


47 


55 


Robert Young, No. 1 


53 


72 


Robert Young, No. 2 


39 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.) — Iawirds. — The amount received was 1,241 /. 7 s. No details can be given. 
(^) — Outwards.— The pilotage outwards is paid to the pilots direct; and the amount received by them is not known. 



ACCOUNT of the disposal of Mokibs received in respect of Pilotage. 



Cr. 

To amount of fees received firom applicants 
for licenses and certificates . . • 

To amomit received for fines and forfeitures 

To gro8B amount received for inward pilotage 



£. s. d. 

1 16 6 

8 13 9 

1,241 7 - 



1,251 17 3 



Dr. 
By amount paid to pilots .... 

By amount paid to Pilots' Widows' Fund 

By amount applied to cover expense of col- 
lection .--.--- 

By amount applied to cover expense con- 
nected with licenses - - - - . 



£. s. d. 
1,148 5 7 

29 5 11 
63 15 6 
10 10 3 



1,251 17 3 



Reference is made to explanatory note at foot of p. 211 of Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1855. 
12 February 1861. John Phm, Clerk. 



PORT OF LOSSIEMOUTH. 



Act .conferring Jorisdictioa 



19 at 20 Vict, c 67, w. 57, 58. 



RB0i7i.ATioirs issued by the Harbour Company.— The Regulations printed at pp. 212, 218 of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1865, 
■re still in force. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



Alexander Reid - 
William H'Donald 
William Sauter - 



aged 38 
26 
25 



John Reid - 
John Edward 



Rates of Pilotage. — Bd. per ton register on all vessels above 20 tons. 



aged 27 
35 



243- 



N 



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98 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1,)— INWARDS. 



DISTANCES 


BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






for which 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


TOTALS, 


PILOTED. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amowt 


From Sea to Harbour 


308 


£. *. d. 
263 2 9 


18 


£. «. d. 
18 6 - 


- - . NU . - . 


226 


£. 1. i 

281 8 9 



(2.)-OUTWARDS. 



From Harbour to Sea 



308 



263 2 9 18 



18 6 



Nil 



226 



281 8 9 



11 March 1861. 



Fiff Duff Uoherttan, Aoaitftant Secretary. 



PORT OF MACDUFF. 



Act conferring Jiirisdiction - - - 10 &: 1 1 Vict. c. 127. Macduff Harboar ImprovemcBt Act. 



Bye-laws.— Nil. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



William Paterson. 
George Wilson. 
Andrew Watt. 
John West, sen. 
John West, jun. 
James West. 



James Wilson. 
Alexander Watt. 
Andrew Wilson. 
James Wilson. 
James West. 
William Ljall, sen. 



William Ly all, jun. 
William Lyall. 
James LyalL 
George Ljall. 
A. Lyall. 
James West. 



George Lyall. 
Andrew Wilson. 
James Paterson. 
Andrew Lyall. 
WiUiam West. 
WilUam Lyall 



All these persons have been in the habit this year past of piloting vessels, bat under no authority. 



RATES of PILOTAGE. x. d. 

Pilotage inwards, per registered ton -- ~^i 

Pilotage oaiwards, per registered ton --..- "^J 

For laying out a warp and kedge to assist a vessel to sea -.-----5 — 





.♦ lr«/l.*« 




1 




i:\3r t;iu;u uiaii uauiiu^ 


» wi»i|i ic»ob av ikcvi^c _._____- 






AMOUNT received for Pilotage in 1860. 




Ikwards. 


Outwards. 




Number 


Amount. 




Number 
of Vessels. 


Amount 




of Vessels. 




British vessels - - - - 
Oversea - - - - - 


176 
41 


£. s. d. 

60 12 4.J 
14 - - 


British vessels - . - . 
Oversea - - - - . 

Kedging and other attendance - 


176 
41 


£. i. d. 

69 12 4i 
14 - - 


F.edging and other attendance - 


217 


217 


TeTAL - - - 


83 12 4^ 


Total - • - 


83 12 4J 


18 January 1861. 






James Fcarguharson. 






Digitized b 


y Google 



FOR THE YBAK ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



99 



PORT OF PETERHEAD. 



Act coDferring Jnrudiction 



6 Geo. 4, c. 34. 



REOCfLATiONS issaed bj the Trustees of the Harbours of Pet0rhead.~^The Regulations printed in Pari. Paper ,No. 616 of 

1866, p. 216-218, are sdll in force. 



AJeiukder Robertson, sen. 

John Robertson 

Alez&oder Robertson, jun 

Robert Taylor 

Charles Alexander 

George Stracban - 

Alexander Geddes 

William Mackie - 

Matthew Nicol 

John Groat - - - 
Alexander Soutter 
John Watt - 
Andrew Watt 
Andrew Milne 
Robert Slessor 
John M'Lean 
John Bucban 

Alexander Stracban, sen. 
Alexander Stracban, jun. 
James Herd - - • 

Robert Stracban 



aged 70 
32 
44 
26 
39 
34 
27 
44 
49 
86 
66 
60 
62 
49 
46 
39 
22 
38 
34 
37 
24 



NAMES of PILOTS. 

Alexander Bucban - ^ aged 29 

Andrew Bucban ... « 27 

James Don ----- 62 

James lliain - ... 30 

Robert Ritchie ... - 32 

John Coul 42 

Alexander Leask - - - - 52 

John Leask ... - • 68 

James Cordiner . ... 32 

William Alexander • - • 45 

William Bucban • - - - 37 

Thomas Youll - - . . 36 

Alexander Alexander - - - 38 

Robert Milne .... 59 

Darid Stephen - • - • 62 

David Bucban - - - - 48 

Alexander Watt - - . - 36 

William Thain - . - - 66 

John Geddes - - - - 31 

William Watt ... - 30 

George Ritchie - - - - 28 



I Licensed to pilot veisela oat of and into 
the Harbours of Peterliead. 



Ratbs of Pilotage.— The Rates printed at p. 113 of Pari. Pfl^)6r, No. 6^ Sess. 2 of 1867, still remain in force. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— IN WARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 










DISTANCES FOR WHICH PILOTBD. 


Coasters vnd OrerMs. 


FOREluw vjsbsj&us. 


T A A. JL D« 




No. 


Anoaiit. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount 


to the Harbours of Peterhead - . - 


693 


£. 8. d. 
207 13 10 


39 


£. s. d. 
13 12 2 


732 


£. s. d. 
221 6 - 



(2.)-.0 U T W A R D S. 



It of the Harbours of Peterhead • 



693 



207 13 10 



39 



13 12 2 



732 



221 6 - 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received bj the Trustees. 



Dr. 
UDoant of fees received from applicants for 
ieeneee and certificates ' ' ' ' 

rw amount received forjl^^^^j Pj',^^* 

amount provided from the revenue derived 
>7 the Trustees of the Harbours of Peterhead 


£. 9. d 

3 3- 
221 6 - 
221 6 - 

69 8 - 


Or. 
By amount paid for salary of secretary 

By amount paid for rent of offices, &c. 

By amount paid for salary of captain pilot - 

Bj amount paid to pilots - - . - 

£. 


£. $. d. 
B B ^ 

6 - - 

90 ~ - 

406 - - 


£. 


505 3 - 


606 3 - 



30 Janaarj 1S61. 



WUliam Boyd^ Clerk. 



H3' 



N 2 



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100 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



PORT OF WICK. 



Aet confeiTiDg Jurisdiction - - 30 & 21 Vict i. 62. The Pultcney Harbour Aet^ 1867. 



REGULATIONS issued by the British Fishery Socie^. 
The Segalations printed in ParL Paper, No. 516 of 1855> p. 220, still remain in foroe. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 
The Persons mentioned at p. 101 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting. 



RATES of PILOTAGE. 

For every vessel above 20 tons entering and leaving the Harbour, per tons register 
For each tide's work within the Harbour ..--.•- 
For laying out kedge or warp to assist vessels •...-• 



s. d. 

- 3 

7 6 

5 - 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 



DISTANCES 

for wliich 

PILOTED. 



From a line drawn from 
North Head to South Head 
of Wick Bay 



BRITISH VESSELS. 



COASTERS. 



No. 



160 






Amount. 



£. s. d. 

80 - - 



OVERSEA, 



No. 



218 



Amount. 



£. s. d, 
190 15 - 



FOREIGN VESSELS. 



PRIVILEGED. 



UNPRIVILEGED. 



No. 



107 



Amount. 



£. «. d. 

78 15 - 



Nil 



TOTALS. 



No. Amount 



485 



£. s. 



349 10 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received in respect of Pilots or Pilotage. 



Dr. 



To gross amount received for/^^^^^ ^^ ^ ^® 

I outward pilotage 



To amount received from other sources - 



£. 



10 January 1860. 



£. s. il. 

174 15 - 

174 15 - 

40 - - 



389 10 



Cr. 

By amount paid to officers . - - 

By amount paid for in respect of pilot boats, 
buoys, &c. - - - - - 

Balance divided weekly betweftn the pilots - 



£. s. d. 

8 17 - 

4 10 - 
38! 3 



389 10 



John Tudor, Acrent. 



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FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



101 



IRELAND. 



PORT OF BALLINA. 



Act eonftrring Jaritdietlon 



83 & 24 Vict. c. 166, g. 30. The Moy Novigation AmendmeDt Act, 1860. 



Bte-Law8. — Nil. 



WiSkm Patterson 
Joha Patterson 

Patrick Cowley 
Francis Morrow 
Patrick Longhnej 



aged 40 I Thomas Patterson 
42 I Henry Hennigan 



aged 63 
38 

50 



NAMES of PILOTS. 

} 



Michael Longhney - 
Martin Ea^ii - 
Matthew Madden 



aged 32 
60 
69 



J»Sea PiloU Inwards. 



BATES of PILOTAGE. 

All coastwise or British ships, 2 JV.1 r * j l* r 

All foreign vessels - - P s ,.]v^^ ^^^^ on drangbt o{ waiter. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotaob of Vrssels in 1860. 
(l.)-IN WARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


TOTALg. 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 






No. 


A meant. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amovat. 


Prom Sea to Ballinal 
Quay . . -j 


- 


£. s. d. 


127 


£. s. d. 
96 10 - 


. Nil . . 


- - Nil . 


127 


£. #. d. 

96 10 - 



(2.)-0UTWARDS. 



From Quay of Ballioal 
to Sea - . -J 



89 



69 14 6 



35 



17 10 - 



Nil 



Nil . 



124 



77 4 « 



ACCOUNT of Monies 


received for Pilotage. 




Dr. 

I 


£. s. d. 

96 10 - 
77 4 6 


Cr. 
By amount paid to pilots ... 

£. 


£. $. d. 
173 14 6 


173 14 6 


173 14 6 



30 April 1861- 



John M'Cullochy Secretary* 



243. 



N 3 



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102 



RETURNS REJLATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE^ 



PORT OF BELFAST. 



Act oonferriiig JorisdlclioB 



10 dell Vict, c 52, s. 98. 



Rbgulations issued by the Harbour Commissloneni. — llie Regulations priuted at pp. 100-108^ of Pari. Paper, 

No. 364 of 1856, sdll remain in force. 



NAMES of PILOTS. 

See the list printed at p. 103 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860. Those persons are stiii acting, subject to the following 
changes : — 

As to the Pilots : James Hill is dead. 

As to the Apprentices : D. M'Lean and J. Brvant have left the senrice ; and Peter McCartney, itged 17, and Samuel 
McLean, aged 18, have been appointed in their place. 



Ratbs of PiLOTAQB. — ^Thc Ratcs printed at pp. 108 and 104 of Pari. Paper, No. 864 of 1866, are still in force. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vbssels in 1360. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 



BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVI- 
LEGED. 


TOTALS. 


Not 
Towed by Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Steam. 




No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 1 Amount. 


No. 


AmoonL 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


ABMIlt 


«,382 


£. f. d. 
086 2 6 


1,457 


£. ». d. 
686 14 6 


68 


£. s. d. 
42 1 6 


£. f. d. 
104 il04 15 3 

1 
1 


108 


£, 9. d. 

79 10 . 


135 


£. 9. d. 

108 9 11 


NU - 


4,944 


£, t. (L 
%(M 7 8 



(2.)-0 U T W A R D S. 



411 



168 6 6 633 284 2 3 



2 12 6 7 



9 2 3 



13 



8 12 8 



3 3 9 



Nil 



076 



475 19 II 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received in respect of Pilotage. 



Dr. 

To amount of fees received from applicants 

for licenses and certificates ... 

Tog-samonntreceivedfor{j;.^^j>ij3t^«,e^. 

To amount received from other sources, in- 
cluding 20 ^r cent of their wages con- 
trihuted hy pilots 

To balance ------- 



' £. s. d. 

2 17 - 

2,004 15 10 

474 17 11 



606 13 4 
676 15 - 



£. 



3,666 19 1 



21 May 1861. 



Cr. 

Bj amount paid for or in respect of pilot 
boats, &c., including wages of masters, 
mates, and boatmen • • . - 

By amount paid for pensions or super- 
annuations .--.-. 



By pilots' wages 



£. t. d, 

1,162 6 4 

24 

M79 IS d 



3,666 19 1 



William Thornpsofij Secretary. 



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FOR THK YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



103 



PORT OF COLERAINE. 



Bye-La wrs issued bj the Portrush Harbour Company.— Tbe Bjre-Laws are the same as printed in Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1866, 

pp. 280, 281. 



Names of Pilots. — Rates of Pilotage.— i&e Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866, p. 282. No alteration has been made. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Yesssls in 1860. 
(1.)— 1 N W A R D S. 



BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


TOTALS. 


No. Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


1 

£. 9. d. 
483 ' 176 8 6 


8 


£. #. d. 
16 13 9 


3 


£.1. rf. 

4 18 6 


Nil 


494 


£. f. A 
197-7 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



483 



137-6 



8 6 10 



2 19 2 



Na 



494 



148 6 6 



UMay 1861. 



Girai 8f Co., Agents. 



PORT OF CORK. 



1 Geo. 4, entitled An Act for erecting a Ballast OfBct, and fbr regulating Pilots within the 
Port and Harbour of Cork, &c &c. 



Act c<iai a iiag Jnrisdictioo - 

BYE-LAWS and RATES of PILOTAGE issued by the Harbour Commissioners. 

Inter alia, — 
XXXII. The pilotage limits are the port, harbour and river of Cork, and seawards, as for as a line from, dotage limits, 
and between Poor Head on the east and Cork Head on the west, with a look-out from the Old Head of 
Kinsale to BaUyootton Island for vessels coming in. 

Pilotage rates. 



XXXIII. The pilotage rates shall be as folio wa : — 
For Coasters akd Colliers Inwards. 



VESSELS OB LIGHTERS. 



Under 80 tons 
From 80 to 120 tons 
From 130 to 200 tons 
From 300 to 360 tons 
From 250 to 300 tons 
From 300 to 360 tons 
From 350 to 400 tons 
From 400 to 450 tons 
From 450 to 500 tons 



To 
Qaeenstown. 



£, 9. d, 

- 5 - 

- 6 - 

- 8 - 

- 10 - 

- 12 - 

- 14 - 

- 16 - 

- 18 - 
1 - - 



To Passage. 



£, s, d. 

- 7 6 

- 8 - 

- 10 - 

- 12 - 

- 14 - 

- 16 - 

- 18 - 
1 - - 
1 2 - 



To Cork. 



£. f . d, 

- 10 - 

- 12 - 

- 10 - 

- 18 - 
I - - 
1 2 - 
1 4 - 
16- 
1 8 - 



With an increase of 6 *. for every 100 tons over 500 tons. 



For ALL OTHER British Vbssbls or Lighters. 



vessels 

OR 

LIGHTERS, 



l-oderSOtoos - 
From 80 to 120 
From 120 to 160 
From 160 to 220 
From 220 to 300 
From 300 to 400 
From 400 to 500 



To 

Qoeeos- 

town 
Inwards. 



£. #. d, 

- 7 6 

- 12 6 

- 18 9 
16- 

1 17 6 

2 3 9 
2 10 - 



£. f. d.^£. s. d. 



From 

Queens- 

town 



To 
Passage 



From t To 
Passage | Cork 



Q^l,,,g^ Inwards. Outwards. Inwards. 



6 



- 10 

- 15 
1 6 

1 11 

2 10 

2 16 

3 2 



£. f. rf. £. f. d. 



- 6 
7 - 9 

- 15 

- 18 
1 10 
1 13 
1 17 



-'- 16 
4 1 2 
- 1 11 
9 1 17 
-3 2 
9 3 8 
6,3 16 



From 

Cork 

Outwards 



£. *. d. 

- 12 - 

- 13 6 

- 18 9 
1 2 6 

1 17 6 

2 1 3 
2 5- 



With an increase of 6f. 3 d, for every 100 over 500 tons. 



The Rates of Pilotage for Vessels or Lighters taking Pilots 
within the Harbour, to be as follows : — 

For Coasters and Colliers. 



vessels or LIGHTENS. 



Under 80 tons - - . - 
From 80 to 120 tons - .. - 
From 120 to 200 tons and upwards 



Qaeenstown to 
Passage, 

or 
Passage 

to Qaeenstown. 



£, s. d. 

- 3 4 

- 4 2 

- 6 - 



Passage to Cork, 

or 
Cork to Passage. 



£. «. d. 

- 5 - 

- 7 6 

- 8 4 



For all othbr British Vessels or Lighters. 



VESSELS or lighters. 



Qaeenstown to 
Passage, 

or 
Passage 

to Qaeenstown. 



I 



Under 80 tons - - - - 
From 80 to 120 tons ... 
From 120 to 160 tons - - - 
From 160 to 220 tons - . - 
From 220 to 300 tons . - - 
From 300 to 400 tons - - - 
From 400 to 600 tons and upwards 



£. «. rf. 

- 3 4 

- 4 2 
-76 

- 9 - 

- 15 - 

- 17 6 
1 - - 



Passage to Cork, 

or 
Cork to Passage. 



£. a. d. 

• 7 6 

- 8 4 

- 12 6 

- 16 - 
1 - - 
1 6 - 
1 10 - 



ALB.— Foreign vessels or lighters, not privileged, to pay one-fourth in addition to the above rates, and 6«. 3 d* for every 100 tons over. 

243. N 4 

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104 



RBTURNS BELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



The tonnage to be ascertained by register. 



No pilot shall mike 
hb own terms. 

Licensed to supersede 
imlicensed pilot. 

Licensed pilot being 
competent mtj act as 
coast pilot 

Pilots to show licenses 
and these laws. 



The rates to and from Monkstown, and to and from the East Ferry, to be the same as those to Passage ; 
and the rates to and from Ballinacurra to be the same as those to Cork. 

Vessels or lighters stopping to unload at Blackrock to pay the same rates as to Cork. 

Pilots remaining on board vessels or lighters waiting south of the southern lighthouse for orders for 24 
hours, shall receive as pilotage rate a sum equal to what would be the inward and outward pilotage of the 
vessel or lighter, and 5 #. for every 24 hours, or fractional part of 24 hours, after the expiration of the first 
24 hours. 

The rates of pQotage inwards only, from the 1st of October to the 1st of April in every year, to be an 
increase of one-fourth of the rates specified in the foregoing schedules. 

Pilot, in case of extra detention by the master of the vessel or lighter, to be paid 5 s. per day in addition to 
)iis pilotage. 

Pilots, before leaving the vessel or lighter, to moor her, for which they shall be entitled to 5 1. in addition 
to their pilotage. 

Any pilot placing a vessel or lighter in any berth to which the harbour-master objects, shall remove her 
without charge. 

When the vessel or lighter is towed by a steamer, the pilot's charge is one-fourth less than the above. 

XXXIV. No pilot allowed to make terms for himself. 

XXXV. Vessels or lighters having coast pilots on board, such pilots (unless furnished with license) shall 
be superseded by licensed pilots at and within the limits hereby established. 

XXXVI. Licensed pilots being competent to act as coast pUots, allowed to do so. 

XXXVII. Pilots to show their licenses on boarding vessels or lighters, and to be frunished with a copy of 
these regulations, which they are directed to show the captain at the same time. 



Forfeiture of license. XXXVIII. Any pilot declared by the Commissioners guilty of misconduct shall forfeit his license. 



Pilots to moor vessels 
before leaving. 

License suspended, 
if pilot passes a vessel 
signalling for a pilot. 

License suspended 
if Teasel gives or 
reoeiTes damage. 

Pilot to hoist his flag 
onboard. 

Pibt boats to be 
licensed, &c 

PUots to report to 
deputy barboor- 
naster. 



XXXIX. Pilots not to leave vessels or lighters given them in charge until moored at the place of loading 
or unloading such vessels or lighters, unless discharged by the captain. 

XL. Any pilot passing a vessel or lighter with a signal for a pilot up, without going on board, to be 
suspended, and to deposit his license with the Commissioners. 

^ XLI. When any vessel or lighter in chaive of a pilot does or receives any damage he shall not act as a 
pilot, and shall deposit his license with the Conmiissioners until the case is investigated. 

XLII. Every pilot, whilst in chaive of a vessel or lighter, shall exhibit in a conspicuous part of the vessel 
or lighter a flag with the number of his license upon it. 

XLII I. Every pilot shall have his pilot boat or vessel duly approved of, and licensed as required by the 
345th section of the Merchant Shipping Act, 1854, and distinguished by the characteristics set forth in the 
d46th section of same Act. 

XLIV. Every pilot, on bringing a vessel or lighter into port, shall immediately on her arrival in port« and 
every pilot taking a vessel or lighter out of port, shall immediately on his return into port, deliver and i^ye 
at the office of the deputy harbour-master at Queenstown, in the form set forth at foot of this bye-law, a 
statement signed by him of the name and nation of such vessel or lighter, her master's name, her tonnage, the 
nature of her cargo, to what port die belongs, and where bound. 



Ship's Name aod 
Nation. 



To>hat Port 
Belonging. 



Master's Name. 



Where from. 



Where bound 



Tonnige. 



Cargo. 



Owners and masters 
shall be bound by 
every bye-law. 



Penalty. 



Commencement of 
bye-laws. 



LXXXI. Every owner and every master of every vessel, raft, boat or lighter, so fiir as lies in his powafer, 
whether tiie master or owner be named or referred to in the bye-law itself or not, shall be bound to obey^ 
fulfil and carry out, or cause and procure to be obeyed, fulfilled and carried out, all and every the farmnjug 
bye-lawB in every particular ; ana the owner or master failing therein, or any other person in ohaige oi any 
vessel or lighter, boat or raft, or any person actually violating any of the said bye-laws, shaU be liable to be 
dealt with as an offender. 

LXXXI I. Every offender agdnst any of the foregoing bye-laws and regulations shall be liable to a penalty 
not exceeding 4/. 12 s.Qd. for each offence. 

LXXXIII. These bye-laws shall come into operation on the 2d day of October 1800« 



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FOR THB YEAR ENDING 31 DECJRMBER 1860. 



105 



Port op Cork — continued. 



Rmdent at Queenstown. 



John Murphy - 
James BraiuyEeld 
John Olden 
Hugh White - 
Jolm Butler 
John Cavanagh • 
John Cotter 
Dayid Walsh - 
William Cotter - 
John Walsh 
John Whelan • 
John Horrigan • 
Daniel Allen 
Edward Cotter - 
James Nash 
Patrick Saunders 
Patriek Whelan 
John Flynn 
William Downey 
William Hartnett 
Michael Connor 
William Barry • 
Dadd Mnloahy 
Thomas Saunders 
Edward Smith • 
John McCarthy • 
Thomas Ahem - 
Joseph Butt 
Michael Lamb - 

; John Cotter 

'- William Dunn - 

' James Kirby 

I Peter Ahern 

I Edward Dunn - 
Patrick Burke - 



aged 48 
49 
65 
62 
60 
69 
60 
43 
42 
44 
66 
46 
61 
46 
43 
44 
64 
66 
65 
49 
47 
42 
69 
88 
47 
38 
64 
69 
43 
60 
48 
46 
36 
33 
49 



NAMES of BRANCH PILOTS. 

Patrick Murphy - - aged 36 

Peter Walsh .... 36 

John Barry - - - - 36 

John Lynch - ... 38 

David Dorgan - - - - 39 

John Lynch - - - - 34 

Richard Cotter .... 34 

John Halaran ... - 39 

John Smith .... 30 

Edward Cotter - - - - 36 

James Saunders . • - 30 

Thomas Barry ... - 27 

John Terry .... 37 

Edward Sweeney - - - 28 

Maurice Crottv - . - - 37 

Martin Webb ... - 35 

Resident at Carrigaloe. 

Daniel Butler ... aged 68 
Thomas Harris - . - - 42 
John O'Neile .... 44 
Thomas Sweeney ... 33 
Michael Geary - - - • 27 

Resident at Passage. 
Daniel Gorman - . - aged 66 



Resident at Poorhead. 




William Dunn . • - 


aged 49 


Resident at Kinsale* 




Michael Nugent 


aged 42 


John Hurly ... 


35 


John Drinan . . - 


44 


Edward McCarthy - 


63 


John Fleming - . - 


49 


John Leary - - - 


72 


Timothy Harrington - 


46 


Patrick McCarthy 


60 


Daniel Brien - - . 


62 


Robert Nugent - - - 


41 


Timothy Hayes ... 


40 


Bartholomew Hurley - 


61 



Resident at Ballinacurra. 



John Cunningham 
Daniel Leary - 



aged 49 
60 



Resident at BaUycotton. 



John Riordan - 
Dayid Sullivan - 



aged 61 
42 



Resident at OaUyhead. 



John Lombard 



aged 46 



Resident at Crookhaven. 



Denis Mahony - 
George Ellis 
John Mahony - 
Thomas Downey 
Thomas Ellis - 
Daniel Mahony 
Jeremiah Mahony 
Denis Mahony . 



aged 66 
69 
46 
60 
86 
46 
36 
32 



Resident at Cape Clear. 



William Cadogan 
Michael Cadogan 
Daniel Cadogan 

Total - 



aged 60 
34 
24 



- 86 Pilots. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage. 

No information in the possession of the authorities. 

Note. — No monies are received by the Harbour Commissioners in respect of Pilotage. 
28 February 1861. Joseph F. Spearing^ Secretary. 



PORT OF DROGHEDA. 



Act conferring Jorisdlctlon 



5 Vict c. 66, 8. 2. 



Bte-Laws issued^by the Harbour Commissioners. — See ParL Paper, No. 616 of 1866, pp. 236, 237. 



Nambs of PiLOTS.-^The Persons mentioned at pp. 106, 107 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting. 



Bates of Pilotagb.— The Rates printed at p. 288 of Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866^ are still in force. 



243. 



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io6 



RBTUBNS mBLATiNGl TO PILOTS AN]> PILOTASB, 



PoBX OF DBOaHi>A — continusd. 



AMOUNT nceiTed for PtLOTiiGX of Ybsbsls ia 1860. 
(1.)— INWARDS. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


s 
s 

M 

s 


TOTALS. 


forwhkh 
PILOTED. 


Kotlbwed by 
Staim. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towadby 
Steam. 






No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amoant. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


imoant 


From the Bay to the Qnty! 
ofDrogheda - - -/ 


254 


£. 9. d. 

159 8 - 


287 


£. «. d, 

120 3 - 


- m - 


11 


£. #. d. 
21 9 - 


93 


£. f. rf. 
48 5 3 


NU 


585 


£. «. ^ 

351 5 3 



(2.)— OUTWARDS. 



From the Quay of Drogheda) 
to the Bay - - -/ 



418 



954 16 - 



167 



75 3 



NU 



33 



32 3 6 



11 



8 5 10} 



NU 



SO ft H 



The above amounts paid to pilots, less 2) per cent 



12 February 1861. 



John M^NamarcLf SeoraUry. 



PORT OF DUBLIN. 



Act conferring Jurisdiction - - 36 Geo. 8, c. 19; 321 Geo. 3t e. 35; 40 Geo. 3, c. 47. 



Orders and Rates of Pilotaob issued bj the Port of Dublin Corporation. — The Orders printed at pp. 289, 240, and the Rates 

printed at p. 242 of Pari. Paper^ No. 516 of 1855, are still in force. 



Denis Mooney (master of boat, 

No. 1) - - - - aged 63 
Thomas Raath (master of boat, 

No. 2) 53 

Patrick Doyle (master of boat, 

No. 3) 51 

John Hammond - - - 52 

John Archbold - - - - 63 

JohnKeUy .... 63 

John Byrne (mate of boat, No. 1) 58 

James Langan (mate of boat, No. 4) 51 

Michael Swords - - • 52 

Samuel Connor - - - - 51 

Christopher Gallagher • - 55 



Patrick Doyle - 
Joseph Warren - 
William M^Guinneis < 



aged 22 
27 
22 



NAMES of PILOTS- 

Christopher Tallant (mate of boat, 

No. 2) - . . . • aged 50 

49 
42 
43 
50 
49 
43 
40 
89 
41 



John Murphy - 
James Doyle (mate of boat, No. 8) 
Joseph Keams - . . • 
John Baxter - . • . 
Matthew Shannon • . - 
George Arehbold . - . 
James Warren - - - - 
John Irwin . - - . 
Richard Baxter - • - . 
George Warren (msster of boat^ 

No. 4) 

George Stone • • • • 



41 
41 



Names of Boatkeepers. 



Janes Lawler •» 
John Archbold - 
Thomas Roch - 



aged 20 
22 
18 



Hugh Tallant - 
James Kelly 
Patrick Archbold 
Bartholomew Tallant - 

James Murphy - 
Patrick Murphy 
Michael Doyle • 
James Sharkey - 
Patrick Byrne - 

Christopher Tallant, junior 
J. Archbold . - - 
Christopher Archbold 
Peter TaUant - 



Wmiam M'Keon 
George Archbold 
J. Archbold 



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137 
40 
37 
37 

43 
41 
41 
3 



^l 



9mi THB TSAR nVBINO 81 DBCBKBEK 18t*» 



107 



Poet op Dublin — continued. 



AMOUFT FBoeiyed for Pilotaot of Ybbbbu in 180«. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 



DISTANCES 


BEITISH 


VESSELS. 


FOREIGN 


VESSELa 






€OASTEBS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


T T A ij a. 


PILOTED. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amoont. 


No. 


Amount. 


From Ootside the Banks to the Pigeon) 
flonw or Quays - - - - -j 

From Inside the Banks to the Pigeon) 
HouMor Quays - - . ./ 

Trom Ontdde tiie Bonks to the Doctai or\ 


1,678 
1480 

126 

84 

2 


£. «. d. 
2,078 16 3 
l,e78 9 10 

138-9 
43 13 6 

1 18 - 


125 
140 

20 


£. t. d. 

338 10 7 
217 4 6 

32 2 5 


- 


£. #. d. 


- - NU - - 


1,678 
1,480 
125 
140 
180 
93 
126 

84 

20 
2 
2 


£. s. d, 
2,078 16 3 
1,078 2 10 
338 10 7 
217 4 6 
466 13 2 
158 4 
138 - 9 

43 13 6 

32 2 5 
1 14 - 
1 12 - 


Qoays .,.--.) 
From loBide the Banks to the Docks or) 

Qoayi J 

FromOBti»ethe Banks to 4Ir Bocks <^) 

From Inside the Ba]te«to fte Decks or) 
Qoayg ----../ 

ftm Oittdde the Banks into Kingstown) 
brboar - - - - - -/ 

Tpm imiov uba IwiiiiLB ioto Klugiwini 
Harbour -«..-./ 






180 
98 


466 13 id 
158 9 4 


. 


ytfua Sea ioto KingBtown Harbour - 
Prom Sea mto Kingstown Harbour - 
foreign Coastew - - - - - 


2 


1 14 - 

• - - 


- 


Total - - - 


3,370 


3,335 ^ 4 


285 


587 17 6 


275 


626 16 6 


• 


3,990 


4,549 19 4 








4,199 19 4i 
(British). 



(2.)— OUTWARDS 



Prom Doeks and Qnays to Poolbeg Light-\ 


- 


- 


729 


268 3 - 


102 


41 9 - 


T " " " 


729 
102 


268 3 - 
41 9 1 


rwm UlllO w uino -••--- 


" 










TOTAI. - - - 


- 


- 


729 


268 3 - 


102 


41 9 - 


- 


831 


309 12 - 



JVoto— Theie is no separate •eoaant.kc^t of Teisels Towed, as tlie chaxge Js the same whether towed or not. 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt aad Expe*4itai« «f MoNifls n te iwi i* vaspect of Pilots or Pilotage. 



Dr. 

~ [OntKAid pilotage 

'0 amount reoerved fivm oftiw 
soapces; 

Conmicited polotage - 

difference on foreign vessels, 1869, 
pririleged aa Britisb - inwards 



Ditto • ditto 



outwards 



7 amoant received by sale of old 
stores • • • • . 



3 balance • 



31 January 1861. 



£• s. d. 
4,190 19 4i 

309 12 - 



176 - - 

434 12 6 
20 19 11 

66 12 10 
2,016 18 6^ 



7^13 10 2 



Bj ezpenditore beyond receipts, 1869 * - . . 

By amount paid for salaries of pilot master, clerk, and 

other officers ------- 

By amount ]^aid for or in respect of pilot boats, buoys, &c. 
By amoun^ paid for pensions or superannuations - 



]^ gross amoant of inward pilotage from 

merchant yesaels • • « • 
By deduction of masters' and j£. s. d. 

mates' salaries - - 120 — - 
By deduction of one-fifth part 

for expense of maintain* 

ing the efficiency of four 

pilot boats - - - 816 19 10 



£. s. 
4,199 19 



936 19 10 



By amount of outward pilotage paid to river pilots free of 
•deduction -•--.--- 

By amount paid sea pilots for difference on 

foreign veasels - • « • * 434 12 6 

Bydedwition^ene-fiftii* • - - 86 18 6 



By amount of ditto, outward pilotage, paid river pilots 



£. s. d. 

1,286 - - 

200 11 - 

1,666 19 4 

119 14 5 



3,263 19 6 
309 12 - 



347 14 - 
20 19 11 



7,218 10 2 



Wm. Hutchison, Pilot Master. 



243. 



O2 



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io8 



BBTDRNS RBLATINO TO PILOTS AND PILOTAQK» 



PORT OF DUNDALK. 

Aet confenring Jurisdiction - . . 



18 & 19 Viet c. 18^1. 91. 



Bt»-Law8,— Nil. 



NaM£8 of Pilots. — ^The Pilots mentioned in Pari. Paper, No. 174 of 1858, p. lid, are still acting. 



Rates of Pilotage. — The Rates printed in Pari. Paper, No. 616 of 1866, p. 244, and in ParL Paper, No. 6, Seas. 2 of 1867, 

p. 121, are still in force. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 





BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN 
VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


TOTALS. 


for which 
PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by Steam. 






No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amoont 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amoont 


No. 


Anoot 


Inwards . - • - 
Outwards - - - 


441 
414 


£, 9. d, 

216 7 8 
189 6 - 


83 
110 


£. 9. d. 
42 6 9 

13 9 6 


24 
36 


£. t. d, 

61 3 6 

59 6 3 


21 
9 


£. s. d. 
36 8 6 

17 19 9 


. . nil . - 
. . nU - - 


669 
569 


346 ( \ 
£80 I 1 


Total Inwards and V 
Oatwards - -/ 


855 


405 13 8 


193 


66 16 3 


60 


110 9 9 


30 64 8 8 


. 


1,138 


096 7U 








P( 


3RT 


F C 


lALW 


A.Y. 











Act conferring Joriadiction 



16 Vict c. 22, s. 62. 



Regulations and Rates of Pilotage issued by the Harbour Commissioners.— The Regulations and Rates mentioned at 

p. 246 of Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1855, are still in force. 



Names of Pilots.— The Persons mentioned at p. 110 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting. 



AMOUNT receired for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 



DISTANCES 

for which 

PILOTED. 



BRITISH VESSELS. 



COASTERS. 



No. 



Amount. 



OVERSEA. 



No. 



Amonnt. 



FOREIGN VESSELS. 



PRIVILEGED. 



No. 



Amoont 



UNPRIVILEGED. 



TOTALS. 



No. Amooot 



From Roadstead to Floating 
Dock. 



166 



£. s. d. 
89 10 1 



£. 8. d. 
7 12 6 



21 



£. «. d, 
23 16 9 



•> nH 



186 



25 of the above ressels took pilots from Arran Island and Blackhead Inwards ; amoont paid to them 
onder the pilotage schedule, Galway Harbour Act ...--•-. 



} 



Total 



18019 



SI 12 t 
SOSUl 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



From Floating Dock to Road- 
stead. 



166 



80 10 1 



7 12 6 



21 



23 16 9 



. nil 



186 



Four of ihe abore vessels took pilots fh)m Roadstead to Arran Island outwards ; amoont paid to them) 
jmder the pilotage schedule, Galway Harbour Act--- ------ -J 

TOTAZ. - - £. 



12019 
10 10 



131 



Total Receipts .... 
Lass Commission • 

Paid to Pifots • . . 



894 1 
1614 

317 7 



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VOR THE TEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



109 



PORT OF LIMERICK. 



No Returns received from the authorities at this Port* 



PORT OF LONDONDERRY. 



Act MnfoTing JurisdieUoD - - - . . 17 & 18 Vict, c 177, I8. 68, 69. 



Btb-Laws.— The Bje-Laws printed at p. 112 of Pari. Paper, No. 244 of 1869, are still in force* 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



James M'Daid - 
James O'Donnell, sen. 
OwenM<Daid * 
Philip M'Daid - 
Hugh O'Donnell 
Jobn Loughrej - 
Patrick #Gonigall - 
Neil Gillespie, sen. - 
WiUism Loaghrej 
Patrick M'Lang^blin - 
Edward M'GonigaU - 
Roger MH^ann - 

Bernard Gillespie 

William Stewart . - 

James O'Donnell 
laoghlin M^ann 
.Neil Gillespie, jun. - 

Patrick O'Donnell - 
Daniel Gillespie, jun. 
Neil M'Laughlin 
Patrick McLaughlin - 
Edward Harkin 
Neil Gillespie, sen. 



aged 



62 
72 
66 
48 
41 
69 
49 
69 
62 
64 
62 
64 



Miohael Harkin 
Daniel M<Daid - 
Patrick Rudden 
Daniel McLaughlin 
John Gillespie, sen. 
Daniel McCann 
Neil Loughrej - 
Daniel M^Carron 
Hugh McLaughlin 
John Gillespie, jun. 
William Bradley 
Neil Gillespie, jun. 



aged 



aged 67 | 



say 40 | - 



60 
68 
48 
88 
43 
37 
82 
38 
47 
86 
40 



aged 


87 


Patrick O'Donnell 


• 


81 


James Smith 


- 


87 


John Smith 


aged 


88 


Charles M'Daid 


. 


86 


John O'Donnell 


- 


86 


Daniel Gillespie, jun 


- 


38 


Philip McDaid - 


« 


86 


Thomas Holland 


- 


88 


James M^Gonigall 



aged 



aged 



To pilot Teasels drawing any drea^hi of -water 
'within thejlimits of the putt and Imrbanr. 



I To pilot ressels drawing 10 feot tvatcr only. 



i{ 



61 
61 
26 

33 
28 
82 
24 
40 
26 



To pilot the Monti^nl Ocean Mail Steamers 
when bound outwards, to^aat] from Moyillc onty. 

I Supernumerary Pi!ota ;— To pilot veasola draw- 
Ling any draught of wat^^r^witbla the limits of 
I this port and^harbour. 



Apprentices : — ^^AQtljoriaed to pHot ^res^eU 
'drawing nine feet^waier when n Ucen&ed pilot 
cannot be procured. 



RATES of PILOTAGE. 
Ships or vessels, of every description, or steam-boats, according to the draught of water hereinafter mentioned : — 



7 feet, and 

7 feet, and 

8 feet, and 

9 feet, and 

10 feet, and 

11 feet, and 

12 feet, and 

13 feet, and 

14 feet, and 
16 feet, and 



Inwards. 

under, to pay 14t. 
under 8, to pay at the rate of 
under 0, to pay at the rate of 
under 10, to pay at the rate of 
under 11, to pay at the rate of 
under 12, to pay at the rate of 
under 13, to pay at the rate of 
under 14, to pay at the rate of 
under 16, to pay at the rate of 
upwards, at the rate of 



Per foot and inches 


in proportion. 


8. 


d. 


. 2 


— 


- 2 


2 


- 2 


4 


- 2 


8 


- 8 


- 


- 3 


4 


- 3 


8 


- 4 


— 


• 4 


4 



Outwards. 

7 feet, and under, to pay 105. 6 J. 

7 feet, and under 8, to pay at the rata oi^ 

8 feet, and under 9, to pay at the rate of 

9 feet, and under 10, to pay at the rate of 

10 feet, and under 11, to pay at the rate of 

11 feet, and under 12, to pay at the rate of 

12 feet, and under 13, to pay at the rate af 

13 feet, and under 14, to pay at the rate of 

14 feet, and under 16, to pay at the rate of 
16 feet, and upwards, at tiie rate of 



Per foot and ische^ 
in proiiorliori* 



6 
9 

3 

B 
D 

3 

6 



Vessels of 20 tons register and under, when sailing outwards in ballast, shall be free of pilotiige. 



Vessels of 80 tons burthen per register, and under, shall pay 10 s, inward pilotage, and 6 s. outward pilotage ; above 30 tons, and 
not exceeding 40 tons, if bound ooastways and sailing in ballast, only 6s. outwards; wind-bound vessels half pilotage in, and 
hslf pilotage out, to or from Moville or Quigle/s Point. Vessels towed by steamers the entire distance between Morllle and the 
present quays at Deny, to pay two-thirds rates ; if towed the entire distance between Quigley's Point and the quays, three-fourths 
rates ; if towed the entire distance between Culmore and the quays, four-fifths rates. 

All vessels laden with bark, under 120 tons, to pay 6 J. per foot extra ; 120 tons, and not exceeding 150 tons^ 9d* i e^cceeding' 
150 tons, 1 s. per foot extra. All ships from foreign ports, or, if bound to foreign ports, having on board half their registered 
tonnage of cargo, or with passengers, to pay 4 d. per foot extra, in addition to the above charges. 

Vessels trading to and from this port a^d harbour, and not proceeding further up the river than Carrickarory pierp or Moville^ to pay 
one-half pilotag^e inwards and one-half pilotage outwards; not proceeding further than Quigley's Point, two-thirds pilotage inwards 
and two-thirda pilotage outwards. Supernumerary pilots have the same qualifications to pilot vessels as the ordinary branch pilots. 

Vessels which have cleared the Lough, and by stress of weather obliged to return, shall pay but one-third in and one- third out, of 
^ amount of their outward pilotage, provided thev do not anchor above Quigley's Point. If above that, or at the Shi pq nay, half 
pilotage. Pilots detained on board vessels, or in Derry, are entitled to receive the sum of 2t. 6d. per day. Lighters or steam- 
boats employed in the Longb or river, discharging or loading, if fonnd within one mile of the public quays, shall pay 1 1, per annum 
Beense duty, and open row boats or cots, free. Pilot licenses, 2 <. 6d. Masters' or mates' pilotage cenificates, 1 L 



243. 



03 



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ABTCmNS JIBLATING TO PILOTS AND PfLOTAGEEy 



Port op Londonderbt — continued. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotag-e oFTessels in 1860. 
(I.^-INIV'ATIDS. 





BRITISH TS6SELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS. 






DISTANCES 
for which 


C0A8TSBS. 


OVEBSEA. 


PBIVILBGfiO. 


PRIVILBGED 

(Trading 

Coastways). 


TOTALS. 


PILOTED. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed br 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Steam. 


Not Towed by 
Steam. 


Towed by 
Stem. 


Towed by 
Stan. 






No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


.AmomL 


or Morille to Londonderrr, 
Including steamen sailing 
coastwayi, the masters or 
mates of which hold pilot- 
age certificates under the 
Merchant Shipping Act, 
1854, and are therefore 
exempt from pilotage - j 

From Sea, Greeneattle. to) 
MoTlUe - . - -) 

Canadian mail steamers^ 
calling in this Harbour to V 
MoTille - - - -J 


M04 



£. t. d. 

9H 17 10 

8 13 2 


85 


£. t. d. 
118 9 3 


17 
27 


£.t. d. 
32 10 

50 11 10 


48 


110 f > 


38 


£. «. d. 

81 8 7 


66 


£. t. 4. 
144 2 10 


2 


£. s. d. 
3 S f M<0 

- - - 9 

- - - JJ 


£. i, i. 

SOUlf 


TOTAI. - - - 


1,313 


028 11 - 


85 


198 9 3 


44 


02 1 8 


48 


116 5 - 


38 


81 8 7 


66 


144 8 10 


2 


3 5 6 1,986 
1 


I^4M 3 11 



(2.)— O U T W A R D S. 



Ing steameia, to Sea < j 

From MoTiUe to Sea - 

From MoWlle to Sea, beings 
theCanadian mall steamen 

and sailing again for Li- 1 
Terpool; pay no outward 
• pilotage - - - -J 

arrired ocastways, but > 


1|M8 



408 4 11 

2 2 11 


3 


3 8 1 

« . ■ 


40 
27 


54 1 - 


15 
3 


81 15 1 

• — - 
6 8 5 


87 


84 10 5 


20 


28 16 


8 


4ir 8 

1 



3 


ttf 8 < 

t 2U 

« 8 ; 


Total - - - 


l,t7T 


Ml 7 10 


3 


3 8 1 


78 


64 1 - 


18 


28 3 6 


87 


84 n 5 


40 


18 16 9 


2 


417 « 


I,SB3 


99f 14 4 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received in respeot of Pilotage. 



Dr. 

To amount of fees received from applicants for 
licenses and certificates - - • - 

To amount received as contribution to super* 
annuation or widows* fund - - - - 

To amount received for fines and forfeitures - 

finwaord pilotaffe • 
To gross amount received for^ 

(.outward pilotage - 



£. s. d. 

12 12 6 

31 12 3 

10 2 6 

1^494 3 10 

704 14 4 



2,258 5 4 



Cr. 

Bj amount paid for salaries of secretaiy^ 
clerk, and other officers - • • 

By amount paid £Dr pensions or superaiiinH 
ations ..-..« 

By amount of fines and forfeitures paid 
Harbour Commissiottera ... 

By amount of £m8 for pilots' Uoonns and 
certificates paid Harkrar CcanmionoBeiB - 

By amount of inward and outward pflotage 
paid --...•• 



24 May 18GL 



Seoretary to the LomdondBrry Port aad Hmrixmr 



109 18 6 

31 12 3 

lO ft 5 

i5i IS e 

2,088 19 8 



2^253 5 4 



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FQA TJiB YEAR ENDINO ai DECBHBER 1860* 



111 



PORT OF NEW ROSS. 



Act Moftffiiig JnriicDetioB - 



11 & 12 Yiot c lae, B^ 17. 



Regulations and Rates of Pilotagb issued by the Commissioners of the Port and Harbour. — The Regulations printed 
at p. 259, and the Rates at p. 260, of Pari. Paper, No. 516 of 1855, are still in foree^ 



NAMES of PILOTS. 



f ichael Dunn - 


- 


aged 66 


Patrick Toll - 


)amel Eustace - 
iojDBs Kehoe - 


: 


68 
63 


John TiOarj 


)aniel Carroll - 


- 


47 


John Spillecy - 



aged 65 



37 



40 



To pilot Teasels within the limftj irom the 
Junction of River Barrow with tb^ River Suir up 
to tlie entrance of tlie Canal sit Bu MuUin^^ on 
the River Barrow, and to the Loek Qua^ of 
Innistiogne, on the River Nare. 



AMOUNT reoMved for Pilotagb of Vesssla ul 1860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 



DISTANCES 


BRITISH 


VESSELS. 


FOREIGN 


VESSEL& 






for which 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


T T A 1. ». 


PILOTED. 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amoimt. 


No. 


Amount. 


No* 


AiQonnL 


Offl Cheekpoint to New Boos - 


890 


151 15 7 


27 


£. i. d. 
67 12 - 


21 


£. «. A 
44 15 6 


- - irfl . . 


;J6S 


£* t. d. 
2^1 a i 



(2.)->0 U T W A R D S. 



ntt Clieekpoint to New Ross - 



320 



148 - 



27 



45 12 



21 



43 8 6 



nil • 



nos 



237 1 3 



Vessels coming to this Port are obliged to take pilots of the Port and Harbonr of Waterfbrd, from the entrance of that Harbonr to thcj Junction of 
he Biver Suir and Barrow, called Cheekpoint, where the Port of New Ross commences. The amount of pilotage paid to the Wattrfoi-d HiiTbaur 
^ODunissioiierB 10 unknown to the Commissioners of this Port. 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received in respect of Pilotage. 



2>r. 

balance broaght from last account - 

finward pilotage • 
gross amonnt received for I 

[outward pilotage 

amonnt received for income tax 



£. 



£. *. d. 

64 6 11 

254 3 1 

237 1 3 

7 10 6 



568 1 



Cr. 

B7 amount paid to officers, pilot master^ 
and watchmen - - - - - 

By amount paid for rent of offices, &c. 

By amount paid for or in respect of pilot 
boats, buoys, &c. - - • > « 

Rate ooUeetor's per^-e^tage .. • . 

Treasurer's per-centage - • - - 

Amount paid pilots - . - - 

By balance to CommiBsioners - - - 



£. 



£. s, d. 

83 8 " 

13 5 - 

G 11 8 

12 5 4 

10 S 3 

324 1 II 

114 1 7 



503 1 9 



21 January 1861. 



Jamet Kearns^ Clerk. 



43. 



O4 



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112 



RETURNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



PORT OF NEWRY. 



Act conferring Jurisdiction - - - 10 Geo. 4, c. 126, s. 185. 



Bye-Laws issued by the Newry Navigatioa Company.— Nil. 



Bar PiloU i 



Henry Coflfee 
John Chesnut 
Mathew Rogers - 
Patrick Rogers - 
Edward Morgan - 
William Cunningham - 
Andrew Miller 
Edward George - 
Peter Mills - - • 
William M'Bride - 
Robert Miller 
Henry Townley - 
John M*Aver 
William Magenis - 
James Campbell - 



aged 64 
44 
67 
46 
48 
88 
68 
63 
46 
60 
23 
34 
86 
48 
66 



NAMES of PILOTS. 

Siver Pilots : 
Joseph Morton . - - • aged 61 
Thomas Quinn • .... 49 
John Toombs - - ... 47 
Patrick Cassily - - - - • 54 

- . - 71 
88 
40 
68 
69 
67 
65 
41 
21 
86 
42 



William M^Ateer 
John Parks . . . 
William Morton - 
Christopher M*Garry - 
Samuel M'Ateer - 
James M'Ateer - 
James Morton 
James O'Neill - 
Edward Toombs - 
James Anderson - 
James Irwin 



Licensed £» two yesn. 



Rat£S or PiLOTAOB.— The Rates printed at p. 114 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still in force. 



Amount received for Pilotage. — See the Statement at p. 114 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860. 
17 January 1861. Eobert A. Plunkett, Secretary. 

PORT OF SLIGO. 



Acta conferring JuriBdiction - - • 43 Qeo. 3, c. 60 ; & 10 Vict, entitled An Act to improre and maintain the Harbour or Port of SligOy &c 



Regulations issued by the Commissioners of the Port and Harbour. — The Regulations printed at p. 264 of Pari. Paper, No. 516 

of 1856, are still in force. 



Nambs op Pilots.— The persons mentioned at p. 114 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting. 



Rates of Pilotage. — ^The Rates printed at p. 115 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still in force. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.)— IN WARDS. 



DISTANCES 

for which 

PILOTED. 



bbitish vessels. 



coasters. 



No. 



Affloont. 



oversea- 



No. 



Amount. 



FOREIGN VESSELS. 



PRIVILEGED. 



No. 



Amount. 



UNPRIVILEGED. 



TOTALS. 



No. 



From Wheaten Rock (in Sligo 
Bay) to Sligo Quays. 



From Sligo Quays to Sea 



2d9 



429 8 11 



270 17 8 



£. s. d. 
11 18 6 



10 



(2.)— OUTWARDS. 



8 3 4 



19 



£. 9. d. 
28 19 6 



80 8 9 



- nil 



- nU . 



925 



885 



470 6 II 



809 3 9 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received in respect of Pilotage. 



Br. 

Amount received as contribution to Superan- 
nuation or Widows' Fund ... 

Gross amount received ^oJ't^^^^ 



£. 



£. #. d. 

68 - - 

470 6 11 

299 8 



882 10 8 



Cr. 
Amount paid to officers - - • • 
Amount paid for pensions or supenumua- 
tions ------- 

Balance paid to pilots . - - - 



25 18 4 

6B - • 
743 17 4 



SaS 10 8 



16 January 1861. 



Moiei Mand, Seorscuj. 



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FOR THE TEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER 1860. 



"3 



PORT OF TRALEE. 



Act conferring Jurisdiction 



9 Ooo. 4, c 118, 88. 70—76. 



BYE-LAWS and REGULATIONS iuued by the Publio Works Loan Commissioners. 

XXII. Masters or ovmers of yessels having complaints against the pilots are desired to state them immediately, in writing 
to the harbour-master or seoretarj, that the same maj be laid oefore the commissioners. 

XXIII. That masters of vessds frequenting the port be directed not to employ any pilot bot such as can produce regular 
lieense £rom tiie commissioners. 

XXIV. That any person acting as a pilot not having a regular license from the commissionersy shall be subject to a penal^ for 
each offence, not exceeding 6 /. 

XXV. All persons guilty of assaulting, striking, resisting, obstructing or molesting the harbour* master, lock -master, or his or 
their assistants, the collector of dues, or any other officer in the execution of his duty, and all masters, pilots and other persons 
having the command of any sailing or steam-vessel, acting contrary to the directions of the harbour- master, or neglecting his 
gignals, in relation to placing or shifting their vessels in the harbour or canal, or in any way hindering them in the execution of 
tl^ datj, shall be liable to a penalty not exceeding 5 /., and the harbour-master, together with his assistants, are hereby stricjtly 
enjoined to see that the whole of the foregoing regulations shall be punctually observed by the parties concerned, or in default 
thereof, to be dealt with by the commissioners as they shall deem fit, pursuant to the provisions of the Tralee Harbour Acts. 

XXVL That all pilots be particularly desired to aid and assist the harbour-master in enforcing the harbour regulations ; penalty 
for neglect of saoae 2 /. for each offence. 

Mnnm of the Committee of Management. — The committee having taken into their consideration the advantage it would be. 
to masters or owners of foreign or other vessels bound for this port, that such vessels should meet with the pilots of this port far 
oat at sea, it was resolved, '^ That the harbour-master be directed to inform those pilots that the committee consider the following 
ebaigei hr pilotage of vessels outside the harbour reasonable, in addition to those already provided for by Act of Parliament, 
Tiz. :— For boarding a vessel and piloting the same from outside the Hog Islands to the anchorage at the Samphires, 1 /. For 
like services from between those Islands and the Rock of Muckdough to the said anchorage. 15 «• ; and for such services from tli& 
Rock of Mookclongh to the anchorage aforesaid, 10 #• And in cases where the weather shall be tempestuous or otherwise specially 
dangerous, then any further increased rate of payment for such services shall be according to the award of the harbour-maste;,^!-^^ 

' / 

Names o? PiL0T8.«-The persons mentioned at p. 116 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still acting, with the exception Of 

Jeremiah Crowley. 

Ratbs op Pilotage.— The Rates printed at p. 116 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still in force. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in I860. 
(1.)— I N W A R D S. 



DISTANCES 


BRITISH 


VESSELS. 


FOREIGN 


VESSELS. 


TO 




for which 


COASTERS. 


OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


TALS. 


PILOTBD. 


No. 


Amoont 


No. 


Amount 


No. 


Amount. 


No. 


Amount* 


Fran outside the harbour tol 
the anchorite at the Sam- 1 
ptdre Islands, and to the f 
BaiiaatTralee - - -J 


50 


£. s. d. 
56 14 8 





£. i. d. 
SO 3 4 


10 


£. s. d. 
87 18 - 


- nil - 


69 


£. «. d, 
124 16 - 



ftom the Basin at Tralee, and^j 
tbe mchomge at the Sam- 1 
pfaire Islands, to outside the r 
limits of the harbour • -J 



61 



35 2 d 



(2.)-.0 U T W A R D S. 



12 



nU 



35 14 3 



Tkese partienlara are taken from the pilots* returns, the pQotage being paid to them by the masters of vessels, and not through the harbour commissioners. 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received in respect of Pilotage. 



Dr. 

^onnt of &eB received from applicants for 
HeeDsea and certificates • . . . 

Sross amount received byl flnward pilotage - 
the pilots for - -M Outward pilotage 

Baianoe paid by Public Works Loan Commis- 
sioners - ...... 



£. 



17 Janoarj 1861. 



£, 8. d. 

1 10 - 

124 16 - 

35 14 3 

- 9 8 



162 9 11 



Cr. 

Amount paid for or in respect of pilot boats, 
buoys, &c. ------ 

Gross amount paid by masters of vessels to 
pilots for inwards and outwards pilotage - 



£. 



£. s. d. 
1 19 8 

160 10 8 



162 9 11 



WilHam HilUardy Secretary. 



243- 



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114 



RETtJRNS RELATING TO PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, 



PORT OF WATKRFORD. 



Aot cca&rriiig Juisdietkm 



9 & 10 Viet e. 29S, m. 80, and following. 



Bt£*Law8 ftDd Rates of Pilotage issued by the Harbour Commissioners. — ^The Bje-Laws and Rates printed at pp. 269| 270 of 

Pari, raper, No. 616 of 1866, still remain in force. 





■ 


NAMES of 


PILOTS. 






• • 


aged 64 


Thomas Baston - 


aged 62 


Patrick Power ... ^g^ g] 


• 


64 


James Phelan - 


. . 60 


William Kennedy - . . 


m 


• 


66 


John Fowler 


88 


Patrick Barry .... 


w 


• 


68 


John Kelly 


86 


James Barry • • • . 
Oswald Robinson 


ai 


• 


68 


John Robinson - 


84 


S6 


- 


46 


Edward Fitzgerald - 


48 






- 


61 


John Dingley - 


66 






- 


66 


John Galgy 


66 


Assistants: 




- 


61 


Robert Butler - 


46 






• 


48 


John Diggins - 


47 


Isaac Ryan - - - ftfced 20 


- 


48 


Thomas Glody - 


46 




• 21 


- 


48 


John Butler 


60 


Christopher Cheny « 


• 21 


« 


42 


Patrick Donnelly 


88 


John Glody - - . , 


• 20 


- 


41 


John Maokay - 


88 


John Kennedy • . . 


• 19 


- 


47 


Edward Delany 


86 


John Rogers • - ^ - 


• W 



John Murray • 
Matthew Burke - 
John Legge 
Thomas Kennedy 
Thomas Kelly - 
Edward Rogers- 
John PioknoU - 
Michael Connors 
Patrick Kelly - 
Thomas Heniy « 
James Baston * 
William Walsh - 
Thomas Power - 
Edward KeUy • 
Benjamin Conn - 

These pilots are all licensed by the Corporation of Trinity House of Deptford Strond» and are also under the control of tlie 

Waterford Harbour Commissioners. 



AMOUNT received for Pilotage of Vessels in 1860. 
(1.>-I N W A R D S. 



distances. 



BRITISH VESSELS. 



coasters. 



No. 



Amoont. 



oversea. 



No. 



Amount. 



FOREIGN vessels. 



No. 



Amoant. 



TOTALS. 



No. 



Amoint 



£. #. rf. 



Tjrom Stltees eastward, orrToPaiaage - 
Great Newtown Head, west- 1 To Cheekpoint 
ward - - - - LTo Waterford - 



From Bagenbnn eastward, or, 
FoilsUrt westward - 



I 



To Passaj^e - 
To Cheekpoint 
To Waterford- 



From Hook T^er (Harbour's f?!^ ^^^^^^ 
Mouth) - . . "iToWaterferd- 



From Passage 



From Waterford < 



{To Cheekpoint 
To Waterford • 

Total - - - 



I To Chaekpolnt 
I To Passage • 
I To Hook Tower 
t (Harbour's Month) 



150 

218 

1,673 

1 

17 



105 10 2 

182 11 3 

2,341 13 8 

- 3 - 
11 1 10 



15 
18 
30 

7 

4 

12 

20 
7 
7 



£, $. d. 

28-6 
37 16 4 
95 5 11 

12 8 10 

8 I 8 

29 12 8 

24 5 1 
11 6 6 
18 3 3 




11 
70 

8 

3 

21 

11 

2 

20 



£. i. d. 

13 - - 
24 3 4 

211 1 9 

12 3 - 

6 2- 

60 1 3 

14 1 3 
2 18 6 

50 16 7 



24 

29 

100 

15 

7 

3d 

181 

227 

1,600 

1 
17 



£. t.i 

41 - 6 

61 19 8 

906 7 8 

94 1110 
14 8 8 
88 18 11 

143 16 5 

196 16 8 

2,410 12 6 

- 3 - 
]\ 110 



From Passage to Hook Tower 



Total - - - 



1,959 



3 
1,670 

35 

8 



2,640 19 11 



120 



265-9 



155 



394 6 7 



(2.)-.0 U T W A R D S. 



1,716 



1 6 6 

1,025 8 1 

44 6 - 

5 15 1 



1,076 15 8 



22 

40 



82 1 7 
33-11 



66 2 6 



15 
80 
25 



120 



8 5- 

102 3 11 

19 13 11 



130 2 10 



2,234 



3 
1^686 

187 

73 



1,898 



3,300 7 3 



16 6 
\fiS» IS I 

17811 6 

6S 9 11 



1,272 1 - 



Of the above, 256 of those entering, and 15 of those leavinfr this port, it is believed bad to pay pilotage to the New Ross Harboar 

but the amount is not known. 

Noie» — In the port of Waterford, foreign and BrltiBh vessels pay alike; and vessels towed by steam pay the same as those not towed. 



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FOR THE YEAR ENDING 31 DECEMBER I860, 



115 



POBT OF Wateefokb — continued. 



P ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of MoHiss receiTed in respect of Pilotage, 






I Receipt, 


£- 5, 


d. 


ExpSKDITrRE. 


£. 


s. d. 


P r Inward pilot&ge - 


3,300 7 


3 


Pilots' proportion of pilotage earned 


3,315 


2 3 


Gtoib amount for - -< 






Salaries of pilot officers at Dunmore, Passage, 






Y [Outward pilotage - 


1,275 1 


- 


and Waterford - - - _ , 


240 


_ _ 


i 






Retired allowance of late pilot master * - \ 
Supplying boat and crew at Passage pilot 


75 


^ ^. 


1 








P 


4,572 8 


3 


station - - - . . ip . 
Trans miss LOD of daily retiira from Passage 


120 


— — 


Intefeflt on bank aoootint to 31 Marcli i860 - 


20 2 


-- 


pilot station - ^ 'i - . ^ 


18 


6 ^ 


^— 




/ 


Office eipenses at Dunmore and Passage 


17 


10 ^ 


F^ 




/ 


Ofltce e:ipenBes, &nd otber general charges at 






1 






"Waterford, including incidental expenses - 
Salaries of m waters and ugsiatants, and other 


247 


18 11 


w 






current expenses of pilot cutters 


667 


10 4 


K 






Graruitj to rimster and crew of a pilot cutter, 






■ 






for during and dexterity id saving life 


16 


16 - 


^L 






1 Lifeboat aiibacription - - - * - 


5 


^ _ 


H 






Pilotage, buoys, and beacon (including I2G ^. 






^^ 






for three patent keel buoys) - * - 


221 


17 7 


^m 






Allowances to five superannuated pilots 


105 


_ _ 


H 






Pensions to on orphan and seventeen widows 






1 






of deceased pilots * - - _ - 
Expenditure - - - 


103 


15 - 


H Receipt - * - 


4,502 10 


3 


4,203 


16 1 


hlioee due lo Waterford Harbour Commia- 






Balance stated on last account as due to Water- 






1 ffiOUfirs, 31st December 1860 ^ ^ - 


1,945 - 


3 


ford Harbour Commissioners, 31 st X)eo. 1650 


2,333 


14 G 


1 


e,507 10 





6,537 


10 6 



9 February I86h 



John Far Tell J Secretary. 



PORT OF WESTPORT 

Act oon&iriag JiMidietion . - - ^ . 



16 k 11 Vict, c. lee. 



B Y E' L A w s,— Nil - 



Names of PiLOTS.^^The Pilots mentioned at p> 272 of Pari. Paper, Ko, 516 of 1855, are Rtill actingi 



Rates of Pilotage. — ^Tbe Rates printed at p. 272 of Pari. Paper, No* 516 of 1866, ara still in force. 



AMOUNT received for Pixotaoe of Veshils in 1860. 
(1.)— 1 N W A R D S. 



DISTANCES 


BRITISH VESSELS. 


FOREIGN VESSELS- 






fbr wUich 


COASTERS, j OVERSEA. 


PRIVILEGED. 


UNPRIVILEGED. 


TO AA L». 


FILOTBD. 


No. 


Amoimt. 


Ko. 


Amount. 


No. AmoanL 


No. 


Amount 


I 

Ib the L%htliDUse of Innii^ 

nrt to any pftft withm the 

r 


73 


£, ^, d. 
61 10 6 


4 


£, *, d. 

IS - 


5 


£. : d, 
U - , 


• ml - - 


82 


£. «. d. 

IDS 10 - 



(2,)— O U T W A R D S. 



wi^ pari of tbe HarhoQr 
iff Weitport to InniAgort 

[l4ghllioiii« ^ ^ ^ ^ 



73 



BI 10 9i 



^ IS 



11 - 6 



nil - 



B2 



103 IB 3 



l343- 



Q 



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It6 RETURNS RELATING TO FILOTm AND PILOTAQiB, FOB THE YXAR ENDING 31 DECBMBER 1660. 

Post of W£8TPOBT~o(mtt9me£ 



ACCOUNT of Uie Receipt ud £zp«ndUare •£ Momxa received in letpeet of Pn«tv or Piktage. 



Dr. 

To amount receiyed for fines and forfeitures 

rinwani pilotage - 
To gross amount reocived iotl 

I Outward pilotage 



£. 



£. s. d. 

» - - 

ia2 18 - 

102 18 8 



208 10 8 



Cr. 

Bj ainount paid to p3ots ... 

By 10 per cent, dedmotsd £dodi Ae gross 
amount of pilotage receiredy carried to 
the credit of the Harbour Commissioners 

Bj fine inilicted on pilot for dereliction of 
dutjy carried to credit of Harbour Com* 
missioners -..•»- 



£. 



£. 


<« 


d. 


185 


4 11 


20 


11 


i 



% ^ ^ 



208 16 8 



14 January 1861. 



Peter ffMaUey^ Secretary. 



PORT OF WEXFORD. 

Act eoafc r rl ng Juriidiction 6&7yiet.o.«U 

Regulations and Ratbs of Pilotage issued by the Harbour Commissioners. 

The Regulations printed at p. 120 of Pari. Paper, No. 244 of 1859, are still in force, subject to the following alteration in 

Article 3, which now stands aa follows, yir. :^ 

That the nett proceeds cf pilot receipts, after deducting receiTer's fees, pilot pensions, and half payment of haitoar boil care- 
taker, be divided into 22 shares, to be apportioned as follows, that is — 

Master pilot ---------8 shares. 

1st Class, 12 pilots 12 J „ 

2d Class, five harbour pilorts . * - - • - 2J „ 

Boy at Roslare 4>» 

Commissioners for use of boats " ' ^ ' ' ^i n 

22 „ 



Names of Pilots. — ^The persons mentioned at p. 119 of Pari. Paper, No. 287 of 1860, are still actin^^. 



Amount received for Pilotage of Vessels.— -The amount is stated in the following account. 



ACCOUNT of the Receipt and Expenditure of Monies received in respect of Pilotage. 



Dr. 

To balance brought from last account 

To gross amount deceived for pilotage of 776 
vessels, of 83,471 tons, in which is included 
only one foreign vessri of 270 ^ons 

By balance due to the credit side of this ac- 
count, and to the next .... 



£. 



2 18 8 



1,218 18 4 



826 16 7 



1,548 8 2 



28 February i860. 



Cr. 

By amount paid to 12 first-class or sea pilots, 
and 5 second-class or harbour pilots, for 
the year ending 81 Dece mb e r 1860 

By amount paid for or in respect of pilo^ 
boats, buoys, Ac., including 816 i. for a 
new boat along with ontfit, and other 
expenses - . ^ - - - 

By amount paid for pensions or on yeg annn r 
ations ------ 



£. s. i 



979 19 9 



£88 8 5 



ao -* 



1,548 8 2 



JoAn XfeAardK AaeMaiy. 



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PILOTAGE. 



ABSTRACT 

OF 

RETURNS 

BBLATINO TO 

PILOTS AND PILOTAGE, , 

nr TBB 

UNITED KINGDOM, 

(Year ending 31 December 1660). 

In continuation of Parliamentary Paper, No. 287 of laOd 
(PraetUed fumumt to Act qf ParlUtment,) 



Ordtnd, by The House of Commons, to ht FrhUd, 
13 May 1861. 



[Price 1 *. 4 rf.] 



5^43- 



Under 12 w. 



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QUARANTINE. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honoarable The House of Commons, 
dated 5 Aagust 1861 \—forj 



COPY " of the Papers relating to Quarantine, commuaicated to the Board 
of Trade on the 30th day of July 1861." 



Board of Trade, \ EDGAR A. BOWllING, 

6 August 1861. J RcgistTflr- 



Su-, 3, Waterloo-place, 30 July 186L 

I HAVE the honour, in the name of the Quarantine Committee of the National 
Association for the Promotion of Social Science, to transmit for the consideration 
of the Lords of the Committee of Privy Council for Trade the accompanying 
document relating to quarantine, and which foims the complement to the two 
papers communicated last year to the Board and ordered, by the House of Com- 
mons, 22d May and 18th August 1860, to be printed. 

It contains, — 

L Additional abstracts of information from the Despatches of Her Ma- Vidt^^z. 
jesty's Consuls, and from the Governors of British Colonies, addressed to 
the Foreign and Colonial Principal Secretaries of State. 

II. A detailed Report on Quarantine, founded on the extensive infomia- *^itfep. %^ 
tion derived from official sources, with an Appendix. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Gavin Milroy^ m, d.. 

Honorary Secretary of the 
Quarantine Committee^ 
The Secretary, Board of Trade. 



544- A n A 

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a PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 



— I.— 



Additional Abstracts of Retuns of Information respecting Quaranti^b, 
communicated to the Board of Trade. 



MARSEILLES. 



Mar«€iIIefi, Consul E. Mark states, that " Quarantine is never imposed here unless a vessel brimra 

— a foul biU of health." 

The duration of quarantine, when the plague is apprehended, is firom 10 to 15 days ; in 
the case of yellow fever, from three to seven days ; and in the case of cholera, the quaran- 
tine is optional or discretional, and varies from three to five days, allowance being made 
for the length of the voyage. 

In t^e event of ^' smallpox, typhus, or any other disease supposed to be transmisdble, 
quarantine is applicable only to the vessel, and not to the country whence she comes. The 
duration of the quarantine in such cases would be regulated by the persistance of the 
malady on board, or amongst the passengers landed at the lazaret." 

In some exceptional cases, steam packets, arriving from the Levant with no medical man 
on board, might be subjected to eight days' quarantine. 

No difference is made in the treatment of vessels of war or of merchant ships. On 
leaving French ports, the former are exempted from health visits on board Persons of all 
ranks are subjected alike to the sanitary regulations. 

The cessation of quarantine occurs upon the receipt of an authentic declaration, stating 
the disappearance of the malady after 30 days for the plague, 20 days for the yellow fever^ 
and 10 days for the cholera. 

The lazaret consists of establishments on an island two and a half miles distant from 
the port, and from which the public is entirely excluded. 

The following is the tariff of the sanitary fees : — 

1st. Fees connected with the ordinary movements of ships : 

frs. ct$. 
r French ships from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic coast, 
Coasting \ or vice versa - - - - - - • - -005 p«r to>n% 

L Foreign ships ditto - ditto - - - - - -0 10 p^ toiu 

Long voyages *----- ----.-0 16 per ton. 

Packet ships arriving on fixed days from ] 
an European port at an Atlantic port, or 
coming from a foreign port to a French 
Mediterranean port, provided the habitual i lu^atxn f;/%lro*/^""^^ - 50 per ton. 
length of the voyage does not exceed 12 P®^®^^^^*^®^lhalf yearly 25 per ton. 



an European port at an Atlantic port, or ^each voyage - - - 15 per ton. 
from a foreign port to a Fre 



hours 



J' 



2d. Quarantine Dues : 
Anchorage, per day ---------- 003 per ton. 

Each person at the lazaret, per day - - - - - - -2 00 per ton. 

3d. Dues on the Fumigation of Merchandise at the Lazaret : 

frs. cts. 

Bale goods - - -O50perl00k8. 

Hides . ^ lOOperlOO hhds. 

Small ekm ^ 50 per 100. 

'' Merchandise is landed at the lazaret for purification by various means, such as exposing^ 
it to the dew, ventilation, immersion, and chloruretted fumigations, according to the nature 
of each case. The opening out of the goods, the washing of the effects, the cleaning o€ 
the ship, the incineration or the immersion of the infected substances are likewise practised. 
The goods subjected to tiiese processes are clothes, drills, hides, feathers, wool, silk, horee^ 
hair^ and remains of animals. Quarantine is discretional for articles made of cotton, flax^ 
or hemp." 

Invalids in quarantine are landed and attended by the lazaret doctor. The invalids not 
indigent have only to pay for any extraordinary expenses, but nothing on account of the 
sanitary service. 

A medical visit is made on the arrival of every suspected vessel. The 45th Article of the 
international regulations defines the means to be used for the purification thereof. 

The state of every ship is registered. 

On the leaving of all vessels from the port, " an examination is prescribed by tlie 
regulations ; the results thereof are stated in the bill of health." 

" Only one case of the evasion of quarantine has been found at the port of Marseilles. 
and that was in 1843, and it led to a condemnation of five years imprisonment" 

"Since 



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I^APERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 3 

^ Siiiee 17S0 sanitary cordona kave not ba^ti adopted, uidesa in a few rare eaaee where Marseillea. 

tfie isolation dT shipwrecked seamen or deaerters, on their way to the lazaret, has been 

ordered.'' 

In 1855 - . - - - 55 resaela were quarantined. 

In 1856 72 „ 

In 1857 108 „ 

In 1858 60 „ 

In 1859 50 „ 

345 



Of these, 384 were from foul bills of health against yellow fever, three for suspicion of 
plague, five for suspicion of cholera, one for suspicion of smallpox, one owing to the vessel 
anmng fJrom a Country supposed to be infected, and without a bill of health, and one for 
not having the French consul's visa on a Spanish bill of health. 

(Details aUuded to, but not received.) 

'^ Yellow fever, as well aa typhus, often makes its appearance in ships during the paaaage 
firom the countries where Aey prevail." 

During the last five years, 1,372 persons were received into the lazaret, viz. : — 

In 1856 4 admitted. 

In 1856 711 „ 

In 1857 5 „ 

In 1858 468 „ 

In 1859 . - - • - - - - 184 „ 

1,372 



In 1856, 709 sick persons, of whom 413 were cases of typhus, were received into the 
lazaret. The number of deaths was 102, of which 90 were from typhus, and the rest from 
other diseases. 

In 1858, 15 cases of smallpox were received, eight of which proved fatal. 

In 1856 the persons in attendance on the sick in the lazaret, who were attacked with 
typhus, were five health officers, two Sisters of Charity, one clerk, 39 male nurses ; also 
one soldier of the garrison on the island. 

Of the foregoing 12 died, as follows : — Two head doctors, one chief chemist, and nine 
male nurses. Two or three other persons attacked with typhus resided on the island^ but 
Ihey had not been in absolute contact with the sick. 

No specific mention is made of any case of cholera having occured in the lazaret^ or of 
any case of yellow fever since 1821. 



VIGO (additional). 

In a valuable paper on quarantine, communicated by Consul Congreve Brackenbury, of y| 

the date of 5th May 1860, the following illustrations of the existing practice of the system J^ 

at this great quarantine station of Spain are given. 

On the 24th June 1859, Her Majesty's steamship ^'Firebrand" arrived here from 
Plymouth, after being 12 days at sea, without a bill of health. A quarantine of 10 days 
was imposed. The ^^ Firebrand," ti^erefore, left on the 27th, leaving a mail for England, 
which was opened on board, the letters pierced and dipped in vinegar before the Board of 
Health would allow them to be put into their boat, although the mails arriving here from 
the Havannah in the Spanish packet during the period ot interdiction were at that time 
only opened on board, the letters pierced, and then put i^ again into the boxes, and 
landed and fumigated in the town, but not dipped in vinegar. 

Ccmsul Brackenbury aj^ed to the Board of Health for the release from quarantine of 
ibe shi^, on the grounds that Captain Dayman was not aware of the necessity of having 
a bill ot health, and the medical officer on board was prepared to certify that not a single 
case of sickness had occurred during the voyage. The application was unavailing, and 
fxxt these reasons: ^^ This vessel, it is said, comes from Plymouth, but not having a bill of 
health, she cannot prove whether at the time of her departure from that port any of those 
diseases were prevalent which, according to the health regulations, entail the perfoimance 
of quarantine ; nor, on the other hand, if precautionary measures are taken at Plymouth 
as regards ports where such diseaaes r^ign,^circumstances comprised in every bill of 
health, which at the same time states the number of persons on board, also indispensable 

544- A 2 to 



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4 PAPERS RBLATIN6 TO QUARANTINE. 

Vigo. to enable a jud^ent to be made of the hygienic and saaitary state of the vessel during 

the voyage ; ana in case of its not being good^ the vessel is subjected to extra quarao^ 

tine." 

2. On the 17th July 1859, the United States schooner "Republican** arrived at Cadiz 
from Huron, in the State of Ohio, with a cargo of staves fo^ Candia, but ha\'ing no bill of 
health, she was ordered to Vigo or Port Mcuion to perform quarantine before she could 
enter the port The master was advised by some person at Cadiz to go to Tangier, as 
arrivals therefrom were only subject to three days' quarantine. He did so, and reached 
Tangier on the 20th ; but on the circumstance being known there, he was ordered away, 
and he then proceeded to Vigo, where he arrived on the 9th of August. A quarantine of 
only three days was imposed, and this he rode out in the bay. 

3. On the 23d September 1859, the English schooner ''Aeorian" arrived herefrom 
Teneriffe, having sailed from London for that port with a general cargo ; she was seat 
from Teneriffe to Vigo to perform quarantine, on a report mat the cholera prevailed in 
London. 

4. On the 10th October 1859, the English ship « Golden Ajge," from Old Calabar for 
Liverpool, with a cargo of palm oil, put into this port with 10 wet water in her hold, and 
the crew exhausted. Although she had been 56 qslj& at sea, having no bill of health, she 
was ordered to the lazaret to perform 10 days' quarantine. The master was obliged to 
embark 40 men to work her pumps. 

5. On the 20th October 1859, two English vessels the " Estremadura" and the 
'* Georgiana," put in here in consequence of heavy gales. Both were from Glasgow, the 
one bound for Oporto and the other for Seville, and they had clean bills of health duly 
certified by the Portuguese and the Spanish consuls. The former was at once admitted to 
pratique, out the latter was put in quarantine for three days in consequence of the Spanish 
consul having annexed to his certificate this note : ^^ The cholera has disappeared from this 
port, and from others comprised in an area of 90 miles, and all vessels are admitted to free 
pratique, although coming from infected ports, provided there be no sickness on board*" 

6. On the 10th November 1859, the Peninsular mail ship ** EUora*' arrived here from 
Southampton, whence she sailed on the 7th with a clean bill of health, on which the 
Spanish consul had made a note that the steamer " La Plata *• had arrived at South- 
ampton from St. Thomas, and that, although there had been two deaths on board frcmi 
yellow fever on the passage, she had been admitted to free pratique." The "EUora" was 
therefore considered as having a foul bill of health, and was not allowed to communicate. 
The same measures were adopted towards the steamer "Euxine," which left South- 
ampton on the 17th November, and arrived here on the 21st; and towards the steamer 
**Tagus," which left Southampton on the 27th, and arrived here on the 2d December; 
although tibis vessel brought a certificate from the Spanish consul that Southampton was 
free from all contagious or epidemic diseases, and that precautionary measures were 
adopted at Southampton as regarded infected ports. 

AH these steamers were admitted to free pratique at Lisbon, and brought clean bills of 
health duly and favourably countersigned by the Spanish Consul General at Lisbon ; but 
were nevertheless, and contrary to the health regulations, refused pratique here, on the 
dhea that they came from Southampton, and had not performed quarantine at Lisbon. 
The ** Tagus," vhich arrived here from Lisbon on the 8th December, and the ** Sultan "* 
on the 16th, were both refused pratique, even contrary to express orders sent from 
Madrid by the Spanish Government. 

During the wnole of the above-mentioned period, the Vigo Board of Health was 
admitting to free pratique [the French steamers from Lisbon furnished with bills of health 
similar to those brou^t by the Peninsular steam packets, and knew that our steam 
packets were in free communication at Lisbon, but they kept our steamers in quarantine 
during their short stay here, and obliged the workmen sent on board to perform quarantine 
at the lazaret. 

In contrast to the practice adopted towards healthy British steamers, Mr. Brackenbury 
cites the case of a Spanish steamer which arrived at Viffo on the 29th of April 1860 direct 
from Ceuta, with a battalion of Spanish infantry ; and although it was publicly known that 
the cholera was then prevalent in Africa, yet she was admitted to pratique immediately 
on her arrival 

During the whole of the winter of 1859-60, while the cholera was Higing in Afirica, 
and it was well-known that the Spanish army suffered severely from the distemper, having 
lost, according to public report, as many as 10,214 of its number, vet all vessels arriving 
from Ceuta or Tetuan with sick and wounded on board have been freely admitted to 

?)ratique in the ports of Spain, whilst at some, as at Malaga and Alicante, English arrivals 
i-om England have been subjected to three days' quarantine. 

Mr. Brackenbury alludes to the circumstance that the length of the voyage is not 
taken into consideration as regards the imposal of quarantine : a steamer arriving from the 
Havanna in 17 days, and a sailing vessel in 53 days, are each subjected under like circum- 
stances to an equal quarantine. 

" With respect to the lazaret, I will only say, that such is the conduct of the officiale, 
that Spaniards themselves have made repeated complaints to the Grovemment at 

Madrid." 

So 



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PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 5 

So recently as April 1860, a quarantine of three days was imposed on a vessel from Vigo. 

Ola^ow, with a clean bill of hetddi, on the alleged ^nnd '^ to prevent vessels leaving 

A port infected with cholera from receiving pratique m Spain until 10 days had elapsed 
from the date of their departure from the infected port; for instance, that a vessel from 
a continental port where cholera prevailed, should not be able to obtain pratique in Spain 
by touching at an English port, and taking a clearance from thence.'^ 

The Vigo Board of Health, however, did not impose any quarantine whatever on vessels 
coming from Cadiz, or ports in the Mediterranean, which were not only in free communica- 
tion with Ceuta and Tetuan where the cholera was prevalent, but which vessels were actually 
conveying convalescents from cholera to those ports ; whilst the same Board imposed a qua- 
rantine of three days on the schooner ** Wavre" from Glasgow, which port the Spanish 
Vice Consul certified was free from all contagious or epidemic diseases, — ^thus placing 
Glasgow as a clean port in a less favourable condition than Cadiz and Alicante, which 
might justly be considered, according to the Spanish health r^ulations, as at least suspected 
ports. 

The expenses incurred by the " Wavre,** notwithstanding that the quarantine imposed 
on the vessel was at once cancelled by the Minister of the Interior at Madrid when the 
case was made known to him, amounted to reals vella 390, or about 4/., viz,, health guard, 
30 reals ; fumigation, 48 reals ; expenses of ship for three days, 312 reals. 



CADIZ. 

From Consul W. Brackenbury's replies, it appears that the quarantine regulations here Cadi*. 

^respectii^ tiie yeUow fever and the plague are the same as in other ports of Spain, no 

suspected or infected vessels being admissible until after they have performed the required 
quarantine either at Vigo or at Fort MaJion.* 

Vessels arriving without a bill of health are inadmissible, and all bills of health must be 
endorsed by the Spanish Consul in the port of departure. 

With respect to the cholera, " arrivals from a country where the disease exists are, if 

: any of the crew have died on the passage or be ill on arrival, liable to a quarantine of 10 

days in tlie harbour of Cadiz; and of five days, should there be no sickness on board. 

Arrivals from ports adjoining to those where cholera ejdsts, are liable to a quarantine of 

three days in the harbour." 

" Typhus, small-pox, dysentery, or any infectious disorder, render vessels liable to 
quarantine of from tnree to 15 days, according to circumstances," 

No remission of quarantine is ever made m favour of any class of vessels, or of any 
-persons whatever. A period of 30, 20, or 10 days must have elapsed after the cessation of 
the plague, yellow fever, or cholera, in a place, before free pratique is granted 

There is no lazaret at or near to the town or port of Cadiz. 

In the event of dckness on board a vessel, a medical officer is sent alongside the vessel; 
but should the gravity of the case require it, the medical officer would be put on board at 
-the ship's expense, to remain during the period of quarantine, or to accompany her to Vigo 
or Mahon. 

No sanitary inspection is required previous to granting a clean bill of health to a vessel 
• <m leaving the port. 

No sanitary cordon or quarantine measures by land have been adopted at Cadiz. 

'^ No disease for which quarantine is liable to be imposed has occurred in Cadiz within 
ihe last 20 years, with the exception of the cholera, which appeared in the summer of 1854, 
and in the neighbouring towns m the summers of 1855 and 1856. 

In 1855 - • • - - -164 vessels were put in quarantine. 

In 1856 40 „ 

In 1857 - 58 „ 

In 1858 196 „ 

In 1859 138 „ 

Besides these 138 vessels which performed quarantine of observation at Cadiz last year 
(1859), 27 were sent off to a foul lazaret Of these 27 vessels, nine were Spanish andl8 were 

foreign. 

* From '' London Gazette,"" 29 June I860. 
A Spanish Royal Decree reyises the Quarantine Regulations hitherto in force at the ports of 
Spain, and provides that — 

1. All yesstU arriving with foul bills of health, or proceeding from ports infected with the plague 
- or tbe yellow fever j 

2. Those which may have had or have on board dead bodies, or persons suffering from typhus, 
scurvy, smallpox, or other contagious maladies j 

3. Those that have no bill of health, and cannot satisfactorily account for the want of it ; 

4. And those which are in a bad state of health, shall perform quarantine in the lazarets of San 
Simon and Mahon. Also that ships having a foul bill of health for cholera shall be sent to one 
of the lazarets of observation, established in the first-class ports, and will undergo the quarantine 
which the 36th Article of the law imposes. 

Ships proceeding from foreign ports, and not having a bill of health countersigned by tbe Spanish 
x^nsolar agents, whenever there are such at the port of clearance, will be sent to the same quaiantine 
stations. 

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CacJia. fofoign, No mformatioii is given as to their porte of departure, cause of quarantine, &c. 

Of the above 138 vesaeK 74 were Spanish, ana 64 were foreign. 

During the year, the entire number of arrivals in the port, including coasting vessels 
and men of war, was 5,067. Of 1,488 merchant vessels from abroad, 499 were Spanish, 
and 9X9 were foreign, of which last number, 362 were British, 227 were French, and the 
rest were from Sweden, Russia, and America, &o. 



PIR^US. 

Piraaus. Mr. Consul Neale states in his replies to the Queries of the National Associatioai 
that— 

'^ Syria, Alexandria, and Barbarj are ordinarily in quarantine, as well as other port» 
communicating with the above places, when, perhaps, the suspicion of sickness exists.^ 

^^ The diseases for which quarantine is imposed, are cholera, plague, smallpox, and 
scarlet (yellow ?) fever. The quarantines for permms are five, 12 or 21 days, and for 
good»y eight, 15 or 28 days. 

^^ By a Royal decree of March 1856, very stringent regulations were issued respecting 
vessels infected with typhus, or arriving from a place where that fever prevailed on 
departure. 

" No difference is made between men-of-war and merchantmen ; but the former, as well 
as yachts, have this advantage, that having no merchandise on board, the quarantine can 
only date from the time of arrival, and not as with merchantmen only from me time of the 
landing of the cargo. 

** No exception is ever made in favour of any passengers, and even his Majestv the Elng 
of Greece has had to conform to the laws. But during the late Russian war, mere being 
a military occupation here, the French authorities forced the health officer to give pratique 
to Prince Napoleon. 

" There is no doubt also that the health office can do what they like. Thus, in 1850, 
when Admiral Parker's squadron hove in sight, the Quarantine Board suddenly came to a 
decision, and put the Pineus into quarantine. It is a general opinion in the Levant that 
political motives are often at the bottom of the measures taken in respect of quarantine," 

It must be eight days after the date of the official declaration of the ceasing of a malady 
before clean bills are given here, and the same number of days after a disease is declared 
to have ceased at a foreign port, before arrivals from such port are admitted to pratique. 
The Greek authorities are much regulated on this subject by the reports of their consuls. 

Formerly, and until 1854, there was a stone building adjoining the Custom-house, which 
was used as a lazaret, and the parlatorio is still there. But during the occupation of 
the Piraeus by the English and French, the latter having taken the building for bar- 
racks, it was and hns since been abatidoned by the Government as a lazaret In 1854, 
eight wooden huts were erected on the side of the port opposite the town, and about a mile 
distant. Tents would be a luxury to such habitations ; the situation is most desolate, and 
the place altogether so unfit for a civilised being, that I have known several instances of 
English families, who, rather than subject themselves to this uncomfortable durance, have 
abandoned their visit to Athens, and proceeded on their voyage. A large lazaret is in 
course of construction. Cargoes are landed at the lazaret ; they are opened and aired. 
Copper and lead are immersed in water, and coins in vinegar. Letters are fumigated. 
Non^usceptible goods are grain, iron, coals, oil, paints, wood, barrels and staves, liquids, 
and wines and spirits, bottles without labels, &c. The spofflio is abolished. 

There is a Government medical officer who charges for attendance on the sick aocording 
to a moderate tariff. There is also a priest belonging to the lazaret ; but oth» doctors 
and priests would, on application, be allowed to attend. 

Before a vessel receives a clean bill on leaving, the medical officer rarely inspects the 
vessel, but always the crew. 

** The sanitary penal laws breathe nothing but death or perpetual banishment, and terms 
of imprisonment, for infractions of the quarantine laws ; out in practice fines have been 
substituted, and these are very laxly inflicted." 

The existix^ sanitary law of Greece appears to be of the date of 1845; but various new 
regulations have been introduced from time to time. 

** Excepting in the case of the cholera in 1854, Athens has not been directly cut off from 
communication with other places ; and when this was the case, it proved quite ineffectual 
by the fact of the cholera, nevertheless, breaking out afterwards. There is a perpetual 
cordon on the northern frontier of Greece ; but it is worse than useless, as it is quite 
impossible to guard this extent of frontier." 

^^ Begisters are kept of vessels that are quarantined, but I have not been able to 
ascertain that any tabular results have been framed* 

" In 1858 the number of vessels quarantined was 148, coming from Syria, Barbary,^ 
Alexandria, Malta, and Constantinople ; the two latter places bein^ in quarantine on 
account of their free intercourse with the former places, despite of their local quarantines. 
One nation in tiie Levant puts no faith in the quarantines ot another. The quarantiBe od 
arrivals from Constantinople was for two days, from Malta for three days, andfinom Effypt^ 
Syria, and Barbary for six davs. The cause of detention in all cases was a susDectea bill 
of health, or the suspicion of smallpox. No case of sickness occurred during toe voyage 
or in quarantine. 

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PilPSBS RBULTINQ TO CIUARANTINS* 7 

" The munber of pereons receWed into the lazsret in 1858 wms 2,000 ; this has been the PimiML 

ftTCinge for eome years. Not a single case of sickness occurred among ^ese persons. No 

deaths have taken pkce for several years either amonff the officials or the persons received, 
except in 1859, when of 30 seamen landed from uie French frigate ^^Pomone" with 
gmallpoz, eight died in the lazaret. 

^' i can learn of no instance of the spreading of disease from the lazaret. 

" On ihe i6ik Mav 1854, 4,000 French troops, under General Forey, landed at the 
Pineus and encamped on the rising ground rounct the small peninsula on which the Pirteus 
is built. The troops were exposed to the heat of the sun, having only small ^psy tents, 
without any kind of bedding, and it was the general opinion diat they could not pass 
through llie simmier with impunity ; and this opinion was based on the approaching hot 
northerly winds with clouds of dust, chilly nights, and also from the scarcity of water. 

*' On the 4th June, the British 97th Regiment landed 1,100 strong. They encamped 
for the time, but towards the end of June moved into quarters. During July the atmos- 
phere was unusually lurid, and the air was charged with sickly odours ; the season was 
unusually warm, hot northerly winds blew with violence, bringing clouds of dust, and the 
scarcity of water was such as had not been experienced in former years. The vine disease 
was at its height, and a general epizootic had prevailed among animals in Greece." 

In the first week of July, the French troops had begun to suffer from fever and bowel 
complaints. On the 17th of the month, cholera was declared to exist among them and 
among the inhabitants. Thirjy cases had occurred among the latter, and one case had 
also appeared in the barracks of the 97th Regiment. The cholera suddenly ceased on the 
4th of August 

The mortality among the 4,000 French troops was stated to be 800, and among the 
British regiment there were 113 deaths. Out of the population of Piraeus, estimated at 
0,000, 60O perished. No English officer died ; and the disease did not appear on board 
the Frencb frigate " Gomer." The Greek authorities had recourse to quarantine restrictions 
with the view of protecting Athens. The city, which is not above a few miles from 
Piraeus, remained exempt until the 28th of October following, when it broke out there, 
and more than 10,000 of the inhabitants left for all parts of Greece ; but " 1 have not 
heard," says Consul Neale, ** that a single case of cholera was thereby occasioned.** The 
mortality at Athens amounted to 3,000 deaths out of a population of 30,000. 

" A considerable mortality has existed in the towns of Greece, owing to the crowded 
state of the houses in the old Turkish quarters and the marsh lands in the vicinity. Thus, 
in Athens, in 1852, there were 500 births, 90 marriages, and 900 deaths. 

'^ In 1834-35, a pernicious fever existed in the Pirasus in consequence of no outlet for 
the waters of the Cephisus ; and so late as 1855, 1 had to draw the attention of the autho- 
rities to the state of the town and harbour. But a very favourable change has taken place 
since ; the port has been cleaned and is kept so, the roads have been reconstructed and are 
well kept, trees planted, and larger and more commodious houses constructed, so as to 
leave little to be desired, and the public health has, in consequence, much benefited. In 
Athens the same good measures are in progress, and a whole new quarter has been 
constructed, covering a large space, whiai ms relieved the cramped Turkish quarters. 
Altogether it may be stated that the authorities are fully alive to the duty of adopting all 
measures calculated to promote the public health. . In 1858, brick- making was prohibited 
near Athens as injurious to health. 

" Slight intermittent fevers and pulmonary complaints are the general diseases that 
prevail among the inhabitants.'' 

Respecting the state of the mercantile ship^ng. Consul Neale remarks, that '^ Although 
we have very few cases of sickness on boara ships in this port, the vessels of all nations, 
other than steamers, still admit of much improvement as regards space and ventilation of 
the fbre^-cabin appropriated to seamen, and 1 think that sufficient attention has not yet been 
paid to the more frequent change of their clothing." 

^* As regards the imposition of quarantine, I find within the last two years that the autho- 
rities are more accessible in regard to their acts, and a timely remark has not been lost upon 
them. Thus, in 1859, a vessel arriving here in August, the authorities were disposed to put 
her in quarantine on the ground of suspicion of uie plague at Bengazi ; but I appesJed 
to the popular belief that that disease was not known to exist after St John's day, 24th 
June^ ana I ffot the Quarantine removed. 

** Were all cases of abuse, as respects quarantine, reported to some medical officer in 
England, I believe that his remarks thereupon, if necessary, being transmitted through 
Her Majesty's representative to the Government, would have the best effect." 

The average annual number of arrivals is 7,578 of 267,753 tons. The average annual 
amount of dues on vessels in quarantine is 12,000 dollars, or 421/. 8^. 7d. 

Appended to Consul Keale's remarks is the following document : — 

" Piraus, 21 April 1860. 

** The undersigned residents of long standing in Piraeus of Athens consider that the 
general health and sanitary condition is good, and that the Government is fully alive to 
sanitary improvements; and that any observations on any particular abuses that may 
happen womd be represented through official channels and be duly considered ; that much of 
^e abuses that ma^ have existed have resulted from the institution itself, and the example 
of quarantines being enforced through all the Mediterranean, the Ionian Islands not 
excepted; and they hope that time and better examples, and useAil information on the 

544* A 4 subject. 

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PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 



PiraBus. subject^ and temperate remonstrances made in cases of unnecessary quarantines^ will have 

the effect of gradually abating this source of durance to individuals and impediments to 

commerce. 

" The quarantines now existing in the Levant ori^nated in false principles, then coun- 
tenanced by Europe, and are maintained as an institution of Government and by medical 
authorities, who here find a means for the exercise of authority without appeal, and are 
supported by the prejudices of the people; but, on the other hand, the haitiships which 
have resulted are so great, and the objects have so much of a political colour, aiui looked 
upon as an engine of Government, that the intervention of other Governments, whose 
subjects are inconvenienced, might be justified either in the form of counsel, example, 
information, or remonstrance. 

" It is, perhaps, by a well-directed attack on a striking or flagrant case that this and. 
other evils are to be abated in the Levant. 

*^ James Blacky 
" J. D. Dianatari, 

'' JJ. S. Consul" 



NEW BRUNSWICK. 



New Brunswick. 



[The following particulars were communicated in a Despatch of the Governor to the 

Colonial Office, dated April 1861.] 

St. John's. 

DuKiNG the six years, 1855-1860, there were 31 vessels put in quarantine ; but, in the- 
majority of instances, the detention did not exceed a few hours, or at most one day, and 
this merely for the purpose of cleansing and fumigating the vessel. The longest periods 
were four and five days : in the one instance, on account of typhus fever, during the 
voyage from Liverpool and upon arrival ; and in the other instance, on account of yellow 
fever during the voyage from Havanna. The crews were landed, and the vessels cleared 
out and purified, bix of the vessels were detained in consequence of one or more cases of 
smallpox having occurred among the crews or passengers ; four in consequence of yellow 
fever, and all the remainder in consequence of typhus or typhoid fever. No detailed par- 
ticulars are given respecting the cases, nor any other information afforded than the state- 
ment, that " in the month of April 1858, the ship * David ' arrived from Europe during the 
absence of the quarantine months (? ), having smallpox on the voyage ; and on arrival, the vessel 
came up to the wharf. The captain landed, and carried the diseased parties clandestinely to 
Quaco. One person, from going on board, was taken with the disease, and came near infecting 
the city in consequence. On oiscovery, the vessel was cleansed and fumigated, and the per- 
sons with the disease placed under surveillance, and the case reported to the Govemment" 

MlBAMICHI. 

*^ One vessel was placed in quarantine in 1856, viz. the * Algiers,* for three days ; she had^ 
29 of a crew, but no passengers. One vessel, in 1858, viz. the ^ Freemad,' was in quarantine 
14 days; crew 16, passengers none. No vessels were placed in quarantine in the year»- 
1855, 1857, 1859 or 1860." 

In the odier parts of the province, no vessels have been detained for several years past 



NAVIGATOR ISLANDS. 



Navigator Island*. Mr. Williams, British Consul at Apia Upolu, states that " there are no quarantine^ 

reflations at this port- The chiefs of the port would apply to the consuls for advice and 

assistance in case a vessel should arrive here with any malignant disease on board, and all^ 
would trust to the consuls, for they are the only parties who can or do exercise any authority 
over vessels visiting this port ; the chiefs not being willing to interfere, and afndd lest 
they should get into trouble with any foreign port 

" In 1853, an American vessel called here, on her way to Sydney, with smallpox on 
board ; and Mr. J. Pritchard, then Her Majesty's Consul, was called upon by the chiefs 
and foreign residents of Apia to prevent any intercourse between the vessel and the shore ; 
the smallpox being of a mild kind, no banefiil effects resulted. 

" The port of Apia is considered healthy, and so are the whole of these islands. Measles^ 
smallpox, cholera, have not been known amongst them. Diarrhoea and dysentery, low and^ 
intermittent fevers, are the prevailing diseases. Influenza visits these islands in the spring 
a^d autumn. Elephantiasis is common, and aiFects the arms, legs, and breasts of females, 
and the scrotum in men ; I have found quinine of great service in warding off its attacks. 
Scrofula, in all its forms, is very prevalent. Syphihs was first introduced into these islnnda 



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in 1847. Ophthalmia is frequent, arising, I believe, from tibe constant cxpoatire of infants Navigator tslaniln, 

to a vertical sim without any covering whatever on their heads. Phmisis h common ., 

among the natives, arising from exposure to damps and heavy dews, after sleeping in 
the open air. Hooping cough was introduced in 1848, and proved fatal in many instances ; 
but smce that period very few cases have been heard of. 

" The number of vessels from foreign ports whioh arrived in 1868, was 43, and 38 up to 
the present date (November 18) in 1859." 



TAHITI. 



Port op Papeete. 

Mb. Consul Miller states, that ^^ vessels arriving at this port are not alIow<^d to have Tphku 

any intercourse either with the shore or the shipping until they have first been visited or ^ 

questioned by the port authorities, and free pratique has been granted to them. 

** K there should be any disease on board of a vessel arriving, or should she be siiBpected, 
she is liable to such quarantine and sanitary measures as may be deemed necesf^ar}' by tlie 
health authorities ; but no special law for regidating the performance of quftrantinc has 
hitherto been enacted; and it appears that, since the French occupation in 1843, no actual 
quarantine has been imposed at TahitL 

^ The average annual number of vessels arriving from abroad is about 150. 

** The general sanitary state of the town and port of Papeete is good. Altlir^uj^h ener- 
vating to the European constitution, and especially so during the high temperature and 
humid atmosphere of the rainy season, the climate is, for a tropical one, decidedly good : 
and in its favour it may be stated, that no cases either of Asiatic cholera or of yellow fever 
have hitherto been known in the country. 

" Fevers of a bilious or typhoid character occasionally appear, but they are rarely 
marked by any unusual fatality. During the rainy season, sunple intermittent fevers at 
times become epidemic; they are, however, unattended with anymore serious consequence 
than a few days' confinement. 

'' Syphilis is very widely difiused throughout the native population ; and phthisis, com- 
monly resalting from syphilitic affections and excesses, is the most prevalent cause of death 
among the natives.'' 



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10 PAPSRS BSLATING TO QUARANTINE. 

— 11. — 

REPORT on Quarantine by the Committee of the National Association for 
the Promotion of Social Sciencb, with Appendix. 



NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE PROMOTION OF SOCIAL 

SCIENCE. 



Department op Public Health. 

Preeident— The Right Hoa the Earl of Shaftesbury. 
Sub-Committee on Quarantine. 

fi. G* Babin^n^ m.d.^ p.r.8.^ President of the Epidemiological Society. 

Thomas Bazley, Esq., M.P. 

Walter Buchanan, Esq.^ m.p. 

A. Bryson, m.d.« f.r.8.. Inspector of Hospitals and Fleets. 

Sir James Clark^ Bart^ M.i>., f.r.8.^ Physician to the Queen, &c. 

John Davy, M.i>; F.R.S.L. & £., Inspector Greneral of Ajmy Hospitals, &c. 

W. Farr, M.D., F.R.8., Rb^trar General Departtnent. 

J. Gibfl<m, M.i>«, CB., Director General Army Medical Department. 

T. B. Horsfall, Esq., M.P. 

Sir John Ldddell, M.D., f.r.8^ Director G-eneral Navy Medical Department 

Sir J. Ranald Martin, C.B., F.R.a, Physician to the Secretary c£ State for Insdia m 

Council. 
J. 0. M^William, M.D., an., F.R.S., Medical Inspector Hon. Board of Customs. 
Gavin Milroy, M.D., F.R.C.P., late Medical Commissioner in the West Indies, and in the 

Crimea. 
Richard Owen^ F.&.8., M^nber of the laatitttte of Fmee, late President of the Britisb 

Association of Science, &c. 
Sir William Pym, M.D., Superinteoodent General erf* Quarantine. 
T. Southwood Smith, M.D., F.R.C.P., Member of kte General Board of Health, &c. 
T, Spencer Wells, F.R.G.S., late Surgeon Civil Hospital at Smyrna and RenUoi, &c. 
John WiUin, F.R.C.8., Medical Superintendent of Quarantiiie at Southampton. 



To the President and Council of the National Association for the 
Promotion of Social Scibncb. 

We — the Sub-committee appointed in consequence of a Resolution which was 
voted by the Public Health Department in 1858, presided over by the Earl of 
Shaftesbury, and which was afterwards approved by the Council, and adopted by 
the Association at large on the last day of the Annual Meeting held that year at 
Liverpool, under the Presidency of Lord John Russell — beg now to present the 
detailed report of our inquiries. 

A statement of the successive proceedings, and of the various steps taken to 
carry out the work entrusted to our charge, was made by the Honorary 
Secretary at the Annual Meetings of the Association at Bradford in 1859, and 
at Glasgow in 1860. 

The present Report is based on the evidence contained in the two Parliamen- 
tary Papers, entitled, " Abstract of Regulations in force in Foreign Countries 
respecting Quarantine ;" and *' Abstracts of Returns of Information on the Laws 
of Quarantine.'* These papers contain a digest of the numerous replies received 
to the queries which were prepared by the Sub-committee at the commencement 
of their inquiries, and which were transmitted to Her Majesty's Consuls, the 
Governors of Colonies, and the principal Medical Officers of the Army and Navy 
on foreign stations, through their respective departments. 

They were communicated to the Board of Trade, and subsequently ordered by 
the House of Commons to be printed on the motion of the Right Honourable 
W. Cowper, who was President of the Public Health Department at Bradford 
in 1859.* 

Each of the queries is illustrated in the order in which they stand, and occa- 
sionally explanatorv remarks are prefixed. 

The 

* Since the papers have been printedi replies hare been received from Her Majesty^s Consuls at 
Marfeilles, Vigo (additional), Cadix, Piroas, Tahiti^ and the Navigator Idandt. 



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The general conclusions which we consider to be clearly deducible from the 
evidence submitted to us are then stated ; and, with fhe view of giving a direct 
practical character to the Report, a few simple recommendations on certain point;s 
of practice most easy of adoption, and whose general adoption would, in our 
opinion, insure immediate advantage, are added. • 

We have to lament the recent loss of one of our number, the late Sir William 
Pym. 

In conclusion, we would record our grateful obligations to the Earl of Shaftes- 
bury and to Mr. Cowper, for their efficient aid in bringing the subject at first 
under the fiavourable attention of the Foreign and Colonial Ministers of the 
Crown, and afterwards before the House of Commons. 



TABLEOF CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

ExplanatoiyObservations on Queries I^ II., III. 11 

mustratkniB of Query I. .... 12 

lUustntioiu of Query II. - - - - 13 

Jlufltnitions of Query III. . . . . I6 
Practice of Quarantine in the Northern Ports 

of Europe --.-..-I6 

Illustrations of Query IV. - - - - 18 

Blustrations of Query y. - - - - 21 

mustrationsofQuer}' VI. .... 22 

Illustrations of Query VII. - • . . - 23 

mustrations of Queries VIII., IX., X. - - 25 

Dlustrationsof Query XL - - - . 26 

Blustrations of Query XII. .... 27 



PAOB 

Illustrations of Queries XIII., XIV. - - 27 
lUustrations of Query XV. .... 29 

Illustrations of Query XVI 29 

lUustrations of Query XVIL . . . 31 

Illustrations of Query XVIII. ... 31 

Illustrationsof the ^'Observations'' - - 32 
Illustrations of sanitary state of Merchant 
Shipping -------33 

lUustratioBs of Expenses of Qnaranriae - - 34 
General Conclusions ----- 34 

Recommendations ...... 36 

Appendix .-..--.39 



EXPLANATOEY OBSERVATIONS ON QUERIES L, II., IIL 

Queries^ fte.^ drawn up by the Sub-committee, for Transmianon to GbTemors of Colonies, 
Bntiim Conaols in Foreign Countries, and others. 

I. What, if any, are the countries or porta from which arrivals in the port of 
are at all times, or in certain seasons of the year, subject to quarantine, whether the 
bill of health from tiiie place of departure be dlean or foul ? 

^ II. What are the diseases which render all arrivals, without exception, whether 
sick or well, from a place or coimtry where such diseases are existing, subject to 
quarantine in the port of? 

And what are the quarantines imposed ? 

m. What are the other diseases which, from having occurred during the voyage 
or transit, render individual arrivals only subject to quarantine, irrespective of uie 
bill of health from the last ji^ce of departure ? 

And Trfiat are the quarantines imposed ? 

These three questions are designed to ascertain the '^ why " and the ^^ when** quarantine Explanatory 
18 imposed on arrivals in a port, and also the kind and the duration of the quarantine Observatioiia on 
imposed . ^ ^ Queries L, II., III. 

Their wording may be thought to be somewhat obscure, and not very clearly to indicate .—-..._. 
llie information that is sought for ; but the obscurity arises rather from the complexity and 
intricacy ci the subject thui from the language employed. 

Many pcsisons imagine that quarantine is a very simple affinr, and that all which is 
meant or occasioned by it is the detention for aHmited time, and the purification of infected 
or BuepecUd vessels, with their crews and cargoes, in consequoice of the actual or the very 
recent existence of a dangerous contagious disease, either oa board the vessel, or in the port 
firom whence she sailed. But this, it will be seen, is fisur from the reality. In a large 
prcqportion of the cases where Quarantine is stall imposed in many countries, not only no 
sickn^s of any sort has existed m the vessel during the whole of the voyage, but no instance 
of the disease, on account of which she is subjected to quarantine on arrival, was known to 
have existed for a length of time in her port of departure. 

Query I. seeks to elicit information respecting such cases. 

In the majority, however, of cases in which quarantine is imposed, its alleged necessity 
3rests upon not a merely gratuitous apprehenidon, but upon the ascertained or the rumour^ 
existence of a dangerous transmissible disease in the port or country from which the vessel 
bas last come. 

All on board, indeed, may have been healthy during the voyage, and may be so on arrival, 
but the fact of the vessel having come from an infected or suspected locality, is held suffi- 
cient 



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Explanatory 
Observations on 
Queries I., II.> III. 



cient to require that she and every person and thiM on board should undergo a specified 
detention^ for the protection ^ the public health. The quarantine is directed agamst the 
lieu de provenance y or port of aeparture; and this is the reason why it involves dl arrival 
therefrom without exception, whether sick or well; although when sickness has also occurred 
on board, the quarantine is usually more stringent than when the vessel has remidned quite 
healthy^during the voyage. 

These remarks refer to Query IL, and the diseases on account of which such quaran- 
tine is generally imposed will be seen to be the plague, yellow fever, and the Asiatic 
cholera. 

Query III. seeks for information respecting such diseases as having occurred in a vessel 
previous to arrival, subject her and all on board to detention and other precautionary mea- 
sures, at the discretion of the local authorities; but without involving other arrivals from 
the same port, provided they have had no sickness during the voyage. 

The quarantine in this case is directed not against the lieu de provenance, but against 
individual infected vessels. 



Illustrations op Query L 

Illustrations of Arrivals from any port in the Ottoman dominions, including Turkey in Europe and 

Query I. Asia, Egypt, and Barbary, are subject to quarantine throughout me year in almost every 

■ Christian port in the Black Sea and in the Mediterranean, and also in all the oceanic 

ports of Spain as well as in those of Portugal, irrespective of the actual existence of the 

pWue or other disease in the lieu de provenance or place of departure, or of any sickness 

on board the vessel during the voyage. 

This permanent quarantine was fixed by the International Conference of Paris in 
1851-52, at from eight to ten days (inclusive of the length of the voyage), according as 
there is, or is not, a medical oflScer on board the vesseL 

The governments of France and Sardinia, whose existing quarantine codes are based on 
the recommendations of the Conference, reserve to themselves the power of modifying or 
dispensing with any particular regulations when they see fit, and compatible with all due 
res^ard to the interests of the pubhc health. 

in all the oceanic ports of France, as Bourdeaux, Havre, &c., the quarantines have for 
several years been very mild in all cases ; and even at Marseilles the system appears to be 
carried on with as little rigour as possible. The mail steamers from Alexandria land their 
postage bags at once, however short the voyage may be, and the Minister of Commerce 
may at all times exercise his ample discretionary powers respecting passengers, cargoes, &c 

At Genoa and other Sardinian ports a like state of things prevails ; " it rests entirely 
with the Minister of Marine to carry tiie regulations Tof the existing quarantine code) into 
efiect, upon the advice of the directors of public health at Genoa and at Cagliari^ the one 
being superintendent of quarantine on the mainland, and the other on the island of Sctfdinia.'' 

It is otherwise in the ports of Spain and Portugal, in which all the quarantine regula- 
tions are much more stringent and more regularly enforced, and in which the local quaran- 
tine Boards, or a central Board of Quarantine, exercise the control in such matters inde- 
pendentiy, in a great measure, of the general government of the country. 

The same has hitherto been the case in all Neapolitan ports, the rigour of whose quaran* 
tine svstem has for many ]^ears exceeded that of eveiy other nation ; its enforcement rests 
entirely witii the sanitary Board at Naples, which, uke that of Lisbon, is independent of 
the government. 

At Malta ^' tiiere is no country now subject to a permanent quarantine, all arrivals 
carrying a clean bill of health being admitted to free pratique;" and at Corfu '^all 
arrivals from places where perfect health is generally enjoyed, and when furnished with 
clean bills of health, are freefy admitted to pratique." 

At the JPircBus, ^^ Syria, Alexandria^ and Barbary are ordinarily in quarantine^ as well 
as other ports communicating with the above places, when perhaps the suspicion of sickness 
exists." 

Besides the permanent quarantine throughout the year in the ports of Spain and of 
Portugal, and of the Two Sicilies upon all arrivals from the Levant and otiier portions of 
the Ottoman Empire, these countries impose a quarantine upon all arrivals without excep- 
tion from Brazil, the Mexican Gulf, West Indies^ and the southern portions of the United 
States during the hot weatiier, generally from the beginning of May to the end of 
September, on account of the apprehended risk from the actual or the suspected existence 
of yellow fever in tiie place of aeparture. 

This quarantine is irrespective of the length of the voyage, however protracted, and of 
the continued health of the crew. 

At Gibraltar, according to the regulations in force, *^ vessels from the West Coast of 
Afirica between lat. 30o N., lat 20** S., and from the adjacent islands (the Canary Islands 
only excepted), are not allowed to enter the port, or admitted to free pratique throughout 
the year, without performing quarantine. 

-AJso vessels from the West Indies, the Brazils, or continent of America between the 
Equator and lat. 34*» N., and arriving between the 1st July and 30th November^ shall be 

ordered 



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13 



ordered to quit the harbour and roadstead, whether their bills be foul or clean, so that the lUustrafiont of 
communication between Gibraltar and these countries is cut off during the summer Query I4 
months." , 

It is to be observed that the ^^ quarantines at Gibraltar are necessarily regulated by 
those of Spain, as, if we did not impose nearly similar restrictions, the consequence would 
be their closing the communication with us, as happened in 1853. 

^ Were Spam to modify her sanitary restrictions, it would confer a ereat benefit on 
Gibraltar.^ 

In most of the large commercial ports of the United States, a nominal quarantine is 
imposed on all arrivals from the West Indies and other yellow fever regions, between the 
beginning of May and the end of October, — the quarantine in question consisting apparently 
in the liiAility of all such arrivals during this interval to be examined by the healm officer 
of the port before they can receive pratique, and be allowed to proceed up to the wharves 
of the city. During the rest of the year, such arrivals are not of necessity subjected to 
this visit, unless actmd sickness has been or is on board. 

In addition to the above two cases of permanent or periodic quarantine being imposed 
in the ports of Sp&in, " arrivals from ports adjacent to those already mentioned, or from 
intermediate ports where strict quarantine measures, as in Spain, are not duly enforced at 
all limes, have to undergo a quarantine of observation all the year round. 

" Great Britain and the Northern United States are in this category." 

Consul Barrie states that " of 622 arrivals from abroad in the port of Alicante during 
1858, and paying health dues, about one-third are firom England; and the three days' 
observation imposed on them would seem to be more for the purpose of obtaining the 
quarantine fees than as a sanitary precaution." 

The British consuls at Malaga, Vigo, &c., have repeatedly remonstrated against this 
procedure. Mr. Consul Mark, at the former port, says, "Arrivals from Egypt with 
raw cotton are admitted to pratique after eight or ten dajrs' voyage, while arrivals from 
^England with a cargo of coals, and after a passage of from 25 to 40 or 50 days, are all 
quarantined for three davs." 

At the beginninff of the present year (1860), the whole coast of Brazil was declared, by 
the Board of Health at Lisbon, to be infected with yellow fever in consequence of its 
ascertained existence at Para, and the result was that all arrivals from every port in that 
country would be subjected to a foul*bill quarantine. 

The declaration in question was at once contradicted by the Brazilian Minister in 
Xiondon« 



Illustbations of Qusbt II. 

The diseases, against the importation of which from countries where they exist, or are 
alleged to exist, quarantine is chiefly directed in European ports are, the plague, yellow 
fever, and Asiatic cholera ; and wherever the quarantine system is vigoroumy maintained, 
as in Spain, Portugal, Na|des, Greece, &c, all arrivals, without exception, and whether 
any sickness has occurred during the voyage or not, are then liable to detention before 
pratique is granted. 

The periods of detention recommended by the International Conference of Paris, and 
generally adopted by the above nations, are. these: — 

From 10 to 15 days in the case of the plague. 
„ 5 to 15 „ „ yeflow fever. 

,, 3 to 5 „ „ cholera. 

In Neapolitan ports, the quarantine on account of the plague is from 15 to 20 days, and 
that on account of yellow fever, and the cholera, from 10 to 15 days. These lengthened 
periods have, of recent years, been enforced in other Mediterranean and also in some 
oceanic ports, as in those of Portugal and her colonies, &c. 



Illustrations of 
Query II. 



(a) Plague. 

In tho summer of 1858, on the first public announcement of the existence of the plague 
in the district of Bengazi on the Barbary coast, (the disease had been existing for months 
before its real nature was recognised,) resti'ictive measures of extraordinary rigour were at 
once put in force throughout the whole of the Mediterranean and Black Seas, and in all 
the ports of Spain and Portugal, not only upon arrivals from the infected locality and 
other parts of the African coast, but upon contiguous countries and other places which 
might be supposed to have direct communication with the seat of the fever, however 
healthy these places might continue to be. 

Malta, from its position and its trade with Tunis, &c, was exposed to especial suspicion ; 
and accordingly the most stringent quarantine was enforced, even in various Ottoman 
ports, upon vessels arriving from or communicating with it ; although, at the^ time, a 

auarantine of from 5 to 15 days was kept up by Malta upon all arrivals from the infected 
istrict in Barbary. 
544. B3 GibraltdT^ 

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14 PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 

TttmtTBtia^ of Gibraltar abo was similarly treated, " A quarantine of 21 days* duration was imposed 

Query fl, in the ports of Nicies, Greece, Portural, &c*, upon all vessels coming firom or whichb^ 

touched at Gibraltar. Not that any disease existed there, or that the Sealth of the * Rock' 

was bad ; but merely because it continued to hold cmnmunication with Morocco, which was 
also at the time in a healthy state, and quite free from any pestilential malady.'' 

However unwillingly obliged to act in accordance with die rules and practice of o&er 
Mediterranean ports mxn the fear of retaliatory measures, Malta and Gibraltar had actually 
to put each other into quarantine ; — Malta, because Gibraltar had intercourse with Taogiecs, 
ftc, and Gibraltar, because Malta had intercourse witii Tunis and Bengazi, bo4h British 
Colonies being all tiie while in perfect health. 

On the rumoured occurrence of a deatii from plague at Alexandria, and subsequently ol 
a like occurreiice at Beyrout daring the autunm of that year (1858), a fbul bill qoarantw 
was established in dil tM ports of the Mediterranean States agunst arrivals from these twd 
places, and was rigorously maintained for many wedcs, when at lengtli it was ascertained 
that there was no just ground for the rumours in qneetion. 

No case of the disease was observed beyond the disbnct aroond Bengasi, where it first 
speared. * 

(b) Yellow Feveb. 

For no disease have more stringent and lengthened quarantines been adopted, of recent 
years, in some European j^rts tlmn for this tropical fever. More than two-thirds of the 
vessels detained at Lisbon in 1858 were quarantmed on this account; and the quarantines 
varied from 4 to 25 days, even after protracted vovages of 30, 40, 50 days and upwards, 
without any case of the disease having occurred on Doard. 

^' A vessel with a clean bill, 38 days out from Bahia, a suspected port, was quarantined 
for 20 days ; and another vessel with a clean bill from Pemambuco, and after a voyage of 
two months, was detained 10 days before receiving pratique." 

In four only out of 136 vessels quarantined tms year at Lisbon, had deaths from the 
£ever occurred during the voya^. No case of the disease occurred in any of the 136 
vessels while they pemrmed meur quarantine, nor among any of the passengers sent to th^ 
lazaret 

At Madeira also, and at the Azores, the apprehension of the importation of yeUow fever 
by arrivals from infected or from sucnpected ports is the most fi^uent cause of quarantine. 

In the autumn of 1857, the health authorities refused to allow tiie landing of any pas* 
sengers from the Boyal mail steamers, if any person had been taken on board at Lisoon 
where the yellow fever then existed, although the vessel had remained quite free from 
sickness. The result was, that all the passengers bound for the island (chiefly invalids 
who intended wintering there) were obliged to go on to Brazil, and thus return to England 
as best tiiey could. 

'^ No regard at Madeira is paid to the bills of health of vessels ; the quarantines are 
ordered not on account of the bill of healtii, but according to the classification given to ilie 
port of departure by the General Board of Healtii at Lisbon.'' 

In t^e ports o£ Spam also, the most frequentcause of quarantine is the apprdiension of 
yellow fever being unported. ^t the large quarantine station in Vigo harbour^ the deten- 
tion imposed on this account has usually varied from 7 to 15 days. The most frequent 
period has be^i 10 days, irrespective of tne length of the voyage, whidi often extended to 
between one and two montiis, and occanonally to 80 or 90 days and upwards. 

In the majority of instances, no case of sickness had occurred on board. 

In the ports of France and of Sardinia, tiie quarantines on account of yeUow fever are 
much less rigorous than in those of Portugal and Spain. 

At Marseilles the detention appears to be usually from 3 to 7 days, even on vessels 
with foul bills of health, or coming frt>m places actually infected with tiie disease. 

At Baurdeauz the system is equally or still more mild ; recentiy '^ in the case of two 
vessels which had had yellow fever during the voyage, pratique was granted after measures 
of purification had been adopted. 

" One vessel which had a foul biU from Lisbon, where yellow fever was prevailing, was 
quarantined for three days." 

At the great naval port of Brest, out of 15 vessels put in quarantine during the eight 
years from 1851 to 1859, 11 or 12 were on account of the ydlow fever, which in sev^^al 
instances had prevailed with more or less severity during the voyage fr<»n the West Indies, 
and continued to exist on board upon arrival. 

The quarantines imposed on tne vessels before they were admitted to free pratique, 
varied from 3 to 35 days, apparently after the landing of their crews and passengers. 

At Genoa the quarantine on foul-bill arrivals has generally, of late years, been for tliree 
or five days ; in a few instances, it has been from 8 to 15 days. 

In Neapolitan ports the quarantine on all arrivals from infected or suspected places has 
been, of recent years, for 10 days, irrespective of the length of the voyage and the healtlu- 
ness of the vessel. At Media, the detention on arrivak from infected places is for five 
days. 

From the diversity and the discrepancy ct the quarantine measures nominally or actually 
adopted in different ports of the American continent, and in different West India Islaads, on 

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account of yellow fever, whether the disease merely exists in the port of departure, or has lllaitration uf 
appeared on board the vessel during the voyage, it is not poaeible to give an intelligible Query II. 

account of the practice. 

In some places, as at Carthagena on the Spanish Main, and at the Island of St Thomas^ 
&c^ it has been formally abolished of recent years. 

At Rio Janeiro and other ports in Brazil, it seems to be merely nominal. Among the 
vessels quarantined during the last three or four years, the longest detention was for 96 
hours HI the ease of a vessel from Lisbon, in December 1857, with a foul bill, in conse- 
quence of yellow fever in that city. Generally, it <£d not exceed 48 hours, and sometimes 
it was shorter sdll. One-half of the veasels had foul bills, and they were all from Lisbon, 
Ae voyage therefrom varying from 30 to 40 days. 

(c) Cholera. 

Lisbon. — Arrivals from places infected with or suspected of the cholera have, of recent 
years, been quarantined for from 5 to 10 days, although no case of the disease had occurred 
daring a lengthened voyage. 

Viao. — Healthy arrivals from infected or suspected places are usually quarantined for 
five days before being admitted to pratique. 

Ttneriffe. — Healthy arrivals from such places are quarantined for 3, 6, or 10 days. 

Naples. — In 1869 it was notified that "arrivals from Spain, Holland, Belgium, and 
Prussia, which had had any case of cholera duiing the voyage, should be refused admie- 
son, and that all other arrivala from these countries were lifUMC to a rigorous quarantine of 
10 dqra." 

In September 1853, the traffic of vessels from Newcastle, which was then the seat of a 
severe outbreak of the disease, was directed to be provisionally suspended. 

Turkey. — At Rhodes a quarantine of 5 days is imposed (m account of the cholera, if no 
case of the disease has occurred during the voyage; otherwise, the detention is for 10 
days ; and all the passengers must be landed, and the sick be separted from the well. 

At the Ghreek Island of Syra^ a quarantine of 10 days is imposed on arrivals if there has 
been any sickness during the voyage. 

At AlexmniriOy the same as at Shodes. 

Malta, — A quarantine of 5 days is imposed on all arrivals fr<xn an infected port, 
whether the arrivaLs be sick or not. 

The quarantines imposed on account of the cholera in scHue of the British and Foreign 
West India islands, and in other distant colonies, have much exceeded in length and 
stringency the detentive measures resorted to in almost any European port 

At Demerara^ in 1851, and again in 1854, arrivals from ports infected with the dnea^e 
were ordered to be subjected to a quarantine of 40 days ; and the existing regulations in 
the Mauritius require that 20 davs shall have elapsed since leaving an infected port, or 
from the date of the last case ci cholera or of small-pox on board a vessel, before she i^ 
admitted to pratique. ^ 

In 1850, tne munidpd authorities of Cojfu wished the Gh)venior to impose a 25 days' 
quarantine upon all arrivals from Trieste or Malta, and to order that all vessels firom 
Cephalonia be rigorously prevented from approaching the shore, and that some uninhabited 
so^ be assigned to any of the inhabitants of Cephalonia who sought to leave the island 
during the prevalence of the chcdera. 

In the Dutch, settlements of Surinam and Cura^oa, a quarantine of 40 days may be 
imposed on account of that disease ; in the Danish island of St Thomas^ a quarantine of 
£ve days is imposed on account of the cholera, while all quarantine on account of yellow 
fever has, withm the last few years, been entirely abolished. At the great Spanish port of the 
JSavannay a quarantine of from 7 to 20 days mav be required to be undergone by arrivals 
from a place infected with the cholera ; and this stringent measure has been enforced 
even when the disease was actually present in the port at the very time. 

In the other Spanish island of Porto Rico, a quarantine of from 15 to 20 days is imposed 
on account of the disease, even when there has been no sickness during the voyage. 

The utmost diversity of regulations exists in other ports in the West Indies, and on the 
Spanish Main. 

In 1854, the Brazilian Government issued various restrictive regulations upon arrii^tj 
firom ports infected with cholera ; but it was soon found that they could not be carried 
ixito torce, and, ^' after subjecting seTcral vessels to considerable detention and incon- 
wenience, they were gradually relaxed, and on the appearance of the cholera weri^ 
Abandoned." 



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Illustrations of Query III. 

Iliustrations of The other diseases besides the plague, yellow fever, and the cholera, which are apt to 

Query IH. become the motive for the imposal of quarantine on arrivals in certain ports or countries, 

are chiefly the smallpox and typhus fever, more especially when cases of these diseases have 

occurred during the voyage, or exist on board at the time of arrivaL But besides these 
fevers, the other exanthemata, viz., scarlatina, measles, and also ^^ other infectious or con- 
tains ^' diseases are often added thereto. 

The recommendation of the International Conference of Paris was to this effect:— 
** That the occurrence of other transmissible diseases, as typhus, smallpox, &c., on board a 
vessel, shall warrant the imposal of such quarantine as the local authorities (in ihe port of 
arrival) may determine upon the infected vessel herself, but not upon the country whence 
she came, nor upon other vessels arriving therefrom ; in other words, the quarantine shall 
be individual, not general, on the sick ship, but not on the port of departure." 

Occasionally, and in some places, the quarantine on account of these diseases is quite 
as rigorous as against the others already mentioned. 

T&s is apt to be the case in various Spanish ports. 

At Teneriffey a steamer from Sierra Leone was recently refused pratique, merely because 
the smallpox was in that colony at her time of departure, and although the disease was 
actually known to be in the island at the time. 

At Madeira, all vessels from places infected with yellow fever, cholera, smallpox, and 
measles, are subject to quarantine until orders have been received from Lisbon to grant 

pratique. 

• 

New Fork. — When cases of cholera, smallpox, or typhus, exist on board a vessel on 
arrival, the vessel is detained at the quarantine station, and the following measures 
taken : — 

Cholera. Immediate discharge of passengers, &c., and detention of the same on the 
quarantine ground until five days after the last case of the disease among them ; the 
ship being moroughly cleansed, fumigated, and ventilated before she is pemutted to pro- 
ceed to the city. 

Smallpox. Vaccination of the passengers and crew, and detention of the same for five 
days after the occurrence of the last case on board. 

Typhus. Discharge of the passengers ; fumigation and ventilation of the vessel 

West India Islands. — In most of these colonies, whether British or foreign, the occur- 
rence, or the suspicion of the occurrence, of smallpox during the voyage has been one of 
the most frequent causes of lengthened and rigorous quarantme measures on arrival. The 
vaccination of unprotected persons seems rare^ to have been one of the measures ever 
resorted to. 

Mauritius, — The same stringent precautions are enforced on account of smallpox as on 
account of cholera, whether in the port of departure, or on board the vessel during the 
voyage. 

"Persons landed at the lazaret are detained there for 21 days from the death or perfect 
desquamation of the last case of smallpox ; and for 15 days from the death or perfect 
recovery of the last case of typhus or yellow fever, and " other contagious or infectious 
diseases." 

Sydney. — The diseases which render vessels liable to quarantine are smallpox, and other 
infectious or contagious diseases; the duration of the quarantine depends on the date at 
which the disease had ceased to exist on board at the tune of arrival. 



Practice of Qua* PRACTICE of QUARANTINE in the Northern Ports of El-rope. 

rantine in the 

Northern ports of QUERIES L, IE., III. 

Europe. 

, — In almost all the great ports in the north of Europe, the quarantine regulations have, 

QuenesL, IL,III» of recent years, undergone a marked change in the way of relaxation and of diminished 
rigour. 

In Sioeden up to 1844, the first year of the Russian war, a most stringent and vexatious 
quarantine was imposed on account of the presence or the suspicion ot cholera, not only 
in arrivals themselves, but also in their ports of departure. 

In 1855 it was formally abolished on the latter account; and this too in the case of 
yellow fever as well as of cholera. 

No vessel has been quarantined at Stockholm for several years past. Cargoes are 
landed only on account of the plague. 

^<^ Denmark. 
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Denmark, — In 1852, quarantine, on account of yellow fever or cholera existing^ in the Practice of Qua- 
port of departure, was no longer enforced in Danish harbours. Our consul at Elsinore rantine in the 
remarks, that " the desire exists to make the intercourse with other ports as free as pos- Northern Ports of 
sible, and that in any reform which the Danish Government may make in the existing Europe, 
quarantine regulations, it will be much influenced by the measures taken in other countries, . *;; \ 
' and especially in England.'* Q"«"«8 1., II., IIL 

In the great Prussian ports of Dantziff and Stettin, where the average annual number 
of arrivals is not less than 2,000, not a single vessel has been quarantined during the last 
five years. 

At Hamburg, in 1856, all the former stringent regulations, which had been long held 
unnecessary by the leading medical authorities of the State, were repealed, and in lieu of 
them, all vessels arriAdng irom infected or suspected ports, or on board of which sickness 
had occurred, were directed to be examined at Cuxhaven (the outport of Hamburg) by 
an appointed medical officer, who should possess large discretionary power as to the 
measures to be enforced for the preservation of the public health. 

Amsterdam and Rotterdam. — In no country have quarantine restrictions been so slight 
since the beginning of the present century as in Holland, and Dutch vessels long con- 
tinued to enjoy the benefits of greater freedom in this respect, when the commerce of 
other countries was hampered by self-imposed restraints. " The quarantine regulations, " 
says our consul, at Amsterdam, *^ may be considered almost a dead letter." In the Dutch 
West India Colonies, however, of Curagoa and Surinam, the existing regulations appear to 
be of extreme rigour, 

Antwerp. — Since 1851 "all vessels, from whatever countrv they have come, shall be 
immediately admitted to pratique, provided they are furnished with a bill, certifying the 
health of the crew and passengers at the time of departure, and that no contagious disease 
has occurred during the voyage." 

In doubtful or suspicious cases, reference is made by the quarantine physician to the 
Board of Health : practically, a quarantine of more than from tnree to five days appears to 
be seldom, if ever, imposed under any circiunstances. For several years past, no vessels 
have been detained. 

Great Britain. — The existing Act of Parliament and Orders in Council have long been, 
for all practical purposes, obsolete. 

For the last 12 years or so, no quarantine has been imposed on arrivals from the Levant 
or elsewhere on account of the plague ; nor has a single vessel been detained for a day on 
this account, except in a very few instances, where the irregularity or the want of a bill of 
health may have caused a delay of 24 hours, or so, before free pratique was obtained. 

Long prior to the period mentioned, a great reduction woula have been made in the qua- 
rantines usually imposed for the plague, had it not been for the vigilant jealousy of the 
consuls of different nations resident in this country, who immediately reported any alterar- 
tion in our quarantine practice to their respective Governments, which eagerly seized every 
opportunity as an excuse for putting all arrivals from this country in quarantine. 

Of recent years it has been almost exclusively on account of yellow fever, when the 
disease has actually existed in vessels during the voyage, that quarantine has been exercised ; 
and this has been chiefly at Southampton, in the case of the West India mail steamers. 

The established period of detention for yellow fever is six days from the date of the latest 
attack on board. 

In no instance, however, has the detention exceeded two days after arrival, nor has any 
special purification of the cargo been deemed necessary. 

The quarantine measures now adopted on account of cholera are limited to the removal 
of the sick, when this can be done with safety, from on board an infected vessel, and the 
thorough cleansing and purification of the ship, together with the general hygienic super- 
vision of the crew, so as to arrest or prevent all premonitory or suspicious sickness. 

Infected vessels are, as far as possible, kept apart from other vessels, and all unnecessary 
intercommunication forbidden ; but no compulsory measures are resorted to. 
There is no lazaret on shore at any port in Great Britain. 

The only lazarets are three men-of-war hulks : one in Stangate Creek at the mouth of 
the Medway another at the Motherbank off Ryde, Isle of Wight, and the third in the 
Mersey, at Liverpool. 

During the last five years, no person has been received into any of these lazarets. 
Nothing like uniformity exists in the quarantine regulations and practice of the numeroua 
colonies of Great Britain, in different parts of the world. 

Gibraltar^ Malta, and Corfu are compelled, by the dread of retaliatory measures i)f 
increased rigour on the part of adjoining countries, to adopt the general system pursued in 
most of the Mediterranean States. 

In Canada and in Australia, the practice of quarantine is confined to the detention of 
T^essels with actual disease or sickness on board upon arrival, quite irrespective of the place 
or country from which they come, for the purpose of landing the sick, the recovery of the 
convalescent, and the purification of the ship nefore she is permitted to proceed up to her 
destination. 

No specific periods are assigned on account of particular diseases ; but, as remarked by 
544. C the 

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PAPBR8 BXLATIKO TO QUARANTINS. 



Praedee of Qiui* 
nntina in ths 
northern Porte of 
Europe. 

Qaerie8l.,II.,m. 



the health officer at Sydney ^ ^* every case of quarantine is dealt with on its own meritB, 
without reference to any claseification of disease, or of ports frcHn whence the vessel may 
have sailed." 

By this oourse of procedure nuch vexatious dela^ and unnecessary expenses are avoided, 
and every vessel is admitted to pratique at the earhest possible period compatible with due 
regard to the public health. 

Among our West Indian Colonies the greatest diversity of practice prevails, and some- 
times, too, in Colonies close to each other. Thus at Barbadoes quarantine has of late years 
** been all but discontinued,'* while measures of extreme rigour have been adopted at 
Trinidad, and still more so at Guiana, on account of the same diseases. 

Within the last few years, the practice pursued in Jamaica appears to be much relaxed. 



Illustrations of 
Query IV. 



Illustrations of Query IV. 

IV. Can you procure a tabulated list of all the vessels put in quarantine in the 
port of during the last three or five years, (or, if not for so long a 

period, during the last 12 months), specifying— 

(a) Whence the vessel came, the length of voyage, and date of arrival. 

lb) The bill of health, whether clean, suspected, or foul. 

(c) The cause of detention in quarantine. 

id) The length of quarantine imposed. 

U) The number of crew and passengers on board. 

(f) Cargo, the nature of. 

(ff) Whether any, and how many cases of disease, and of what nature, had 

occurred aurinff the voyage ? 
(h) Whether any, and what, disease occurred on board during the detention in 

quarantine. 

The object and scope of this query are obvious, as it is only by exact statistical informa- 
tion upon the points noted therein, and over a sufficient period, that the real working of the 
system in different countries can be ascertained. Unfortunately, the replies received from 
some of the most important places are meagre or null. 

It would have been highly useful to have had as full information from Constantinople, 
Port Mahon, Marseilles, Trieste, and Leghorn, as has been obtained from Alexanwa, 
Lisbon, and Vigo, so as to compare the results of the practice in these great quarantine 
, arbours under similar circumstances. 

Botirdeaux, — During the 5 J years from the beginning of 1854 to the middle of 1859, 
132 vessels in all were put in quarantine. This is an average of 24 or 25 a year, while 
the annual average number of arrivals from foreign parts is about 1,700. The quarantine 
usually imposed was from three to five days ; but even this short period was in several 
instances reduced by order of the Government, which exercises a discretionary j)ow«' in 
all cases. 

In the case of two vessels which had had cases of yellow fever on board during the 
voyage, pratique was granted after measures of purification had been adopted. 

One vessel having a foul bill from Lisbon, when yellow fever was raging there, was 
quarantined for three days. 

Brest — Before December 1850 quarantine measures were frequent and vigorous here. 
Ships from all quarters then underwent long and expensive c[uarantines on slight grounds. 
Since the reorganization of the service on its present footing, only 15 ships oi sundry 
nations and from divers places have been put in quarantine. 

Marseilles. — In 1855, 55 vesseU were quarantined, 
„ 1856, 72 
„ 1857, 108 

„ 1858, 60 „ 

„ 1859, 50 „ 

Of these 345 vessels quarantined during five years at this great quarantine station of 
France, 334 were from having foul bills on account of yellow fever, three for suspicion of 
the plague, five for suspicion of the cholera, one for suspicion of smallpox, one for the want 
of a bifi of health, and one for not having the French consul's visa on a Spanish bill of 
health. Further particulars have not been communicated. 

" Yellow fever and typhus often make their appearance in ships during the passage from 
the countries where they prevail." 

Lisbon. — In 1858, the only year of which a record has been received, the number of 
vessels which performed quarantine was 179, a large number of other detained vessels 
having left the Tagus during their period of quarantine. The length, of the qi ianwi ta m a 
imposed on the above 179 vessels varied from 4 to 25 days. 

More than two-thirds of these vessels had clean bills ; in a few the bills were informal, 
or were wanting. The motive or cause of the quarantine in 161 out of the 179 cases was 

the 



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PAPSIU3 BBLATIKG TO QUAHANTINB. I9 

the aflc^rtaiaeds or the suspected^ existence ^ther of yellow fever or of ckolera in the porta Illustrations of 
of departure. ... Query IV. 

In most of the remaining instances, a death from some casual disease, or from an — — 

accident during ihe voyage, was the assigned cause. In one case the quarantine imposed 
was because the vessel from Gibraltar, with a cargo of leeches, had communicated with a 
steamer arrived from Alexandria then (erroneously) suspected of the plague. 

In four only of the 136 vessels quarantined on account of yettow fever, had any deaths 
from the disease occurred on board. 

Two of these were the Royal mail steamers, the " Tyne " and the " Medway," both 
from Rio Janeira They both left the Ta^us in quarantine, and proceeded on to South- 
unpton. The other two vessels were arrivals, after voyages of 30 or of 50 days, from 
Para and from Rio Janeiro, each having lost one of her crew since leaving her port of 
departure : the one was kept in quarantine for 21 days, and the other for 16 days. 

But a still longer detention was imposed on many of the vessels in which ^ere had been 
no sickness whatever during the voyage, but which had merely come from infected or 
suspected ports, 

A vessel 30 days out from Xew Orleans was, under such circumstances, quarantined for 
24 days. 

Arrivals from ports declared by the Lisbon Board of Health to be infected with the 
cholera were quarantined for a period of 10 days, even when no case of sickness had 
occurred on board during a lengthened voyage. 

Wlien a death from a casual sickness had occurred on board, a shorter quarantine was 
imposed. Thus a vessel from Sunderland^ and one from Hamburg, both with dean bills, 
were detained for four and six days respectively in consequence of a death from apoplexy 
during the voyage. 

The only instance where sickness occurred in any of the 179 vessels, while undergoing 
quarantine, was in one 57 days out from Rio Janeiro, during which time she had lost one 
man from chronic diarrhoea; she was detained for 19 days before pratique was granted. * 
The case was one of dysentery, and it proved fatal. 

Viffo. — In 1857 the number of vessels put in quarantine was 216, having 3,145 marinera, 
and 1,951 passengers on board. The average quarantine was about 10 davs; the motive 
or cause was very generally the existence, or suspicion, of yellow fever m the ports of 
departure in the West Indies or South America. The voyages varied from 30 to 100 days 
and more. The number of deaths on board the above 226 vessels while at sea was 61, of 
which 13 were from yellow fever in seven different vessels, all the rest being from chronic 
diseases, principally consumption. 

Eight vessels were quarantined for five days on account of the presence, or suspicion, of 
cholera in the port of departure, and after voyages of from 30 to 40 days without any 
sickness. 

The numbers of vessels detained in quarantine in the years 1858 and 1859 were 
respectively 271 and 162, and nearly under the same or similar conditions and circum- 
stances as in 1857. 

The want of a duly formal bill of health, certified by the Spanish consul in the port of 
departure, was on several occasions the motive for rigorous treatment In June 1859 
Her Majesty's ship *' Firebrand" out 12 days direct from Plymouth, all well on board, had 
a quarantine of 10 days imposed on this account. 

She sailed from Vigo in quarantine, leaving a mail from England, which had been pre- 
▼iously opened on boanl, and the letters pierced and dipped in vinegar before the authorities 
would receive them into their boat for landing. 

On the 23d September 1859 the English schooner " Azorian" arrived at Vigo from 
Teneriffe, having left London for that island with a general cargo on board, and from 
which she was ordered to proceed to Vigo to perform quarantine there, in consequence of 
a report that the cholera prevailed in London at the date of her sailing. 

In October 1859 two English vessels from Gl isgow, both having clean bills of health, 
the one bound for Oporto, and the other for Seville, put into Vigo from stress of weather. 
The first, having the Portuguese consul's certificate, was at once admitted to pratique ; but 
the second was quarantined for three days, in consequence of the Spanish consul at Glas- 
gow having annexed to his certificate this note : ** The cholera has disappeared from this 
port, and from others comprised in an area of 90 miles, and all vessels are admitted to 
pratique, although coming from infected ports, provided there be no sickness on board." 

At the same time several of the Peninsular and Oriented mail stetuners frtnn South- 
ampton were refused pratique, although having clean bills of heidlh, in consequenoe of the 
alleged laxity of the quarantine measures adopted in that port towards arrivals from the 
West Indies and the Brazils. 

Genoa. — In 1858, 147 vessels performed quarantine out of an annual average of between 
3,000 and 4,000 foreign arrivals. All had foul bills, and with the exception of a very few 
from Alexandria, Tunis, Algiers, and Malta, had come from some port in the New World 
between Buenos Ayres and Charleston, with cargoes of sugar, coffee, and tobacco. 

The quarantine imposed was ^nerally from three to five daj^s ; in 12 instances only it 
was from 8 to 15 days. In one instance a vessel from St. Domingo, with a cargo of wood 
and hides, had lost four of her crew from fever during the voyage. As free pratique had 
iMBen granted her at Marseilles, she was quarantined for five days only. 

In another instance, a vessel from Buenos Ayres, with hides and wood, was kept in 
544. C 2 quarantine 



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20 PAPKR8 RELATING TO QUABAKTINE. 

IlliMtratioDs of quarantine for four days, having been previously detiuned two days at Man^lleg^ while 
Query lY. the goods underwent purification in the quarantine ground for 15 days. 

Naples. — Of 52 vessels quarantined from 1856 to 1858, and all of which were provided 
with clean bills, except one which had no bill whatever, nine were arrivals from ports 
infected, or suspected to be infected, with yellow fever ; nine from a port (Malta) infected 
with typhus ; 27 from Pqjts infected with cholera, and four from ports suspected of the 
plague (?), viz., Marseilles, Nantes, Almeira, and Leghorn, The quarantine varied from 
5 to 10 days. No sickness had occurred in any of the vessels during their voyages. 

Malta. — In the eight months from the end of April to the end of December 1858, there 
were 194 vessels put in quarantine. The number of arrivals during that period was about 
2,600. 

With the exception of two vessels from Brazil, then suspected of yellow fever, after long 
voyages, and which were admitted the day after arrival, every instance of quarantine was 
due to the alarm occasioned by the malignant fever which had appeared in Bengazi, on the 
Barbary coast. At first the fever was considered and called typhus, and the quarantine 
imposed on arrivals from the place was for five days. About the end of July, when it was 
declared to be the plague, the quarantine was raised to 21 days on vessels direct from 
Bengazi, and to 15 days on arrivals from other places on the coast which were suspected, 
although clean bills of health were still issued by them. The longer detention was also 
imposed for the infraction of the quarantine regulations at any suspected port, as at Alex- 
andria, where it was rumoured that a suspicious case or two of bad fever had occurred there. 
After a month's continuance of this rigorous system, the penalty for the ofiencc was 
reduced, first to a detention for 10 days, and then to one of seven days. It does not seem 
that the presence or not of pilgrims on board, sometimes between 100 and 200 in number, 
nor the nature or quality oi the cargo, nor the length of the voyage, affected the quarantine 
imposed. 

Arrivals also from Gibraltar were suspected, although it was ^rfectly well known that 
the Bock was quite healthy all the time, but only from *^ the suspicion of pla^e existing in 
Morocco.** The quarantine was at first for 10 days, afterwards for seven days, and then 
for five days. 

Of the 192 vessels quarantined on account of the plague at Bengazi, six only arrived 
with foul bills ; all these came direct from Bengazi ; but there had been no sickness either 
during the vovage, which varied from 9 to 15 days, nor was there any during their detention. 
The same holas true of all the other vessels which were quarantined during the eight 
months. No sickness whatever occurred during their detention ; and all that we learn 
respecting the state of their health during their voyages is, that three deaths in all had 
occurred. One man had died two days after leaving Rio Janeiro ; another on board a vessel 
also from Brazil, from scurvy ; and the third fatal case was in a ship from Alexandria, and 
was occasioned by diarrhoea. 

The entire number of the crews of the above 194 vessels amounted to 5,459, and that of 
thepassengers on board to 2,524. 

From the preceding statement it will be seen that, had it not been for the pestilential 
fever among the squiuid inhabitants of a filthy Moorish town in the early part of the year, 
there would have been no quarantine imposed, and no impediments to perfect freedom of 
intercommunication with every part of the world. 

From the Parliamentary Return of the 22d February 1858, it appears that during the 
10 yean from 1845 to 1854 the number of vessels quarantined at Malta was 9,415. The 
aggregate number of days spent by these vessels in quarantine was 47,430 ; and the longest 
period of detention of any vessel auring each year varied from 10 days in 1854 to 29 cutys 
m 1845. No particulars are given as to the cause of quarantine being imposed in the 
different arrivals. 

During the three years ending 30th April 1859, there were 1,513 persons received into 
the lazaret 

PirtBus. — In 1858 the number of vessels Quarantined was 148, arriving from Syria, 
Barbary, Alexandria, Malta, and Constantinople, the two latter places being in quarantine, 
on account of their free intercourse with the former places. ^' One nation in die Levant 
puts no futh in the quarantines of another. The cause of detention in all cases was a 
suspected bill of healdi, or ^e suspicion of smallpox. No case of sickness occurred in 
the vessels during their voyage, or while in quarantine.'' 

Constantinople. — ^During 1858 only 23 vessels were put in quarantine; two-thirds of 
them were arrivals from the Danube, or fr*om Russian ports in the Black Sea, with cargoes 
of grain. The quarantine varied from 5 to 17 days; the cause of the difference is not 
stated. Two vessels from England were quarantined for 10 days each. 

Galatz. — No vessels have been quarantined for the last five or six years, either here or 
at the other ports on the Danube. Previous to the war in the East, the number of vessels 
detained in quarantine by the Russian authorities was very large. 

Rhodes. — In 1858 no fewer than 280 sailing vessels, and 19 steamers, were put in qua- 
rantine. The cause of this great and sudden increase over the preceding two years was 
the plague at Bengazi, and the rumoured occurrence of a case of the disease at Alexandria. 
In 1855 the number of vessels quarantined had been also very large, on account of the 
existence of cholera in the Mediterranean. 

AlexandrUu 

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Alexandria. — The number of vessels put in quanuitine from 14th June 1858 to 5th lUastrations of 
June 1859 was 149. The great majorhy of these were Ottoman vessels from Barbary and Query IV. 
other parts of the African coast. There were also a good many English and French — 

steamers, and a few Austrian. 

The cause of the quarantine In every instance was the plague at Benghazi, first announced 
in the summer of 1858. 

For the first two months or so the quarantine imposed, more especially on arrivals 
directly fix)m the Barbary coast, was strict, and for a period of 10, 20, 30 days and upwards. 
Towards the end of August its rigour was materially relaxed, a quarantine of observation 
of from five to three days being then substituted on all arrivals except from the Barbary 
coast and firom Malta. Malta was declared a suspected port about the beginning of 
August, in consequence of the death of one of the crew of the " Pactolus," in the hospital 
at Alexandria, from what was alleged to be the true plague. This case had such important 
bearings on the restrictions imposed on Malta by almost all the Mediterranean States, that 
it requires to be noted as far as the particulars have been made known. The steamer had 
arrived on the 2d of August from Tanrier, Gibraltar, and Malta, with a crew of 36, and 
21o passengers, and a general cargo. Ifo other case of sickness appears to have occurred 
on board. She left Alexandria while in detention (a quarantine of 30 days had been im- 
posed), and having landed her passengers, proceeded to Beyrout, from whence she returned 
in ballast, and with the same number of crew, on the 30th of August. Her bill of health 
being foul, a quarantine of nine days was imposed ; but she left in quarantine not only 
without paying the dues levied for the health guardians, but forcibly getting rid of them. 

Previous to this date, English vessels from Malta had been admitted to pratique par 
disposition superieure, or, in other words, by orders firom Constantinople. 

The Alexandrian case was afterwards admitted by the professional men on the spot to 
have been one not of plague. 

No other case of sickness is mentioned as having occurred on board any of the 149 vessels 
that were quarantined during the twelvemonth, with the exception of the death (cause not 
stated) of tne cajptain of an Ottoman vessel just before entering the port, but without ex- 
citing any suspicion of infection. 

The last four cases enumerated in the list will show the character of the quarantine 
.restrictions at Alexandria in the months of May and June of the present year (1859) : 

" Arcadia," English steamer from Malta, with clean bill - - 9 days. 
" Simois," French steamer from Malta, with clean bill - - 2 „ 
** Nassand," Ottoman brig from Benghazi, with foul bill - - 15 „ 
** Meandre,** French steamer, from Malta, with clean bill - - 2 „ 
At Alexandria, in 1856, 1,818 persons were received into the lazaret. 

„ in 1857, none. 

„ in 1858, 574 persons were received into the lazaret. 



Illustbations op Query V. Illustrations of 

Query V. 
V. Is any difference, as to the quarantines imposed, made in favour of vessels 
having a medical officer on board ? 

Is any difference made between men-of-war or private yachts, and merchant 
vessels? 

And is any exception in the performanee of quarantine made on the arrival of 
Koyal personages, ambassadors, or nigh military and naval authorities, couriers, &c. ? 

TsAT the first clause of this query was not uncalled for will appear from the fact, that 
the presence of a medical officer on board a vessel may act in its favour, or to its prejudice, 
in regard to the imposal of quarantine, according as the health authorities of the place of 
arriival may please to decide. It is obvious that, when there is no medical officer on 
board, the nature of any case of sickness during the voyage can often not be determined, or 
• may be wilfully falsified for the purpose of escaping the dreaded detention ; and this is 
known to be frequentlv done. 

In consequence of the recommendation of the Paris International Conference, there has 
been, of recent years, a slight abatement made in the periods of quarantine in favour of * 
vessels having a medical man on board. 

The foUowmg replies to the other clauses will explain themselves. 

At Malaga, "on two very recent occasions, certain authorities and persons of rank 
arriving here from places infected with the cholera were admitted immediately. A Koyal 
Ordinance has been issued, commanding that troops and military stores coming from infected 
places shall not be subject to quarantine." 

At Viffo, ** during the whole of the winter 1859-60, while the cholera was raging in 
Africa, and it was well known that the Spanish army suffered severely from the distemper, 
having lost, according to public report, as many as 10,214 of its members, yet all vessels 
arriving from Ceuta or Tetuan with sick and wounded on board have been freely admitted 
to prataque in the ports of Spain." 

At Genoa, " in ordinary seasons, ships of war of all nations are not subject to the same 
544. C 3 questioning 

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PAPBR6 RELATING TO QUARANTINK. 



IIlfistrationB of 
Query V. 



questioning and to the same discipline as merchantmen. It suffices that the sucge^a on 
board, or me captain, certify^ on his word of honour, the condition of the crew and poMA^ 
gers, as well as all circumstances of the voyage." 

At Naples, " ships of war, unprovided with bills of health, are not treated as having 
foul bills, the parole of Ihe officer in command being, since February 1857, accepted 
instead. Even when they arrive from an infected or suspected port, the usual restrictions 
may not be imposed if the sanitary authorities are satisfied." 

At Mahay ^' in ike case of a nuin-of-war, &c., the voyage is sometimes reckoned as part ef 
the quarantine ; at other times it is not." 

At Gibraltar y " a medical certificate generally facilitates pratique. In the case of ships 
of war, the voyage from the date of leaving the last port is generally reckoned as part of 
the quarantine." 

At the Pirceus ** no difference is made between men-of-war and merdiantmen ; but the 
former, as well as yachts, have this advantage, that they have no merchandise on board, 
and the quarantine can only date from the time of landing the cargo. No exception is ever 
made in favour of any personages, and even his Majesty the King of Greece has bad to 
conform to the laws. But during t^e late Russian war, there being a military occupation 
here, the French authorities forced the health office to give pratique to Prince Napcdeon. 
There is no doubt also that the health office can do what they like. Thus, when in 1850 
Admiral Parker's squadron hove in sight, the Board suddenly came to a dedwion to put the 
Pirasus into quarantine. It is a general opinion in the Levant that political motives are 
often at the bottom of the measures taken in respect of quarantine." 

Turkey, — *^ in most Turkish ports, the quarantine on men-of-war, yachts, &c., is Sorter 
and less stringent than on merchant vessels. A quarantine officer," remarks Consul 
Sandison, " would be verj- cautious of interfering with the pleasure or convenience of any 
Royal personages, or high Turkish functionaries ; and mucli or all might depend on tie 
respect voluntarily paid to the regulations by any person of conspicuous rank, and coming 
in a yacht'" 

At Rhodes, " no difference is made in favour of high personages, unless special instruc- 
tions from Constantinople have been received, as recently, on the e:q)ected visit of Prince 
Alfred." 



lllastrations of 
Query VI. 



Illustrations of Query VL 

VI. When a disease, which renders all arrivals from an Infected or suspected place 
liable to quarantine, has been officially certified to have ceased, and when clean bills 
of health are issued by the local authorities, what period, if any, must elapse before free 
pratique is granted to arrivals from the place in the port of ? 

It may not be generally known that, after the existence of a disease in a place has been 
officially declared oy the local authorities to have ceased, and when clean bUls of health are 
issued by them, arrivals therefrom are often not admitted to free pratique in several 
coimtrles for some time afterwards, in order to provide, as is believed, still more effi^ctually 
against the risk of importation. 

In the countries which have adopted the recommendations of the International Conference 
as the basis of their quarantine coae, the following periods must elapse after the official 
declaration by the local authorities of the cessation oi a disease in the infected place^ before 
free pratique is granted to arrivals therefrom : — 

30 days in the case of the plague. 

20 „ „ „ yellow fever. 

10 „ „ „ cholera. 

In some Spanish ports, as at Vigr^, the length of the period required to have dapsed 
appears to be still greater. ** In the instance of the cholera in GralHcia, four years ago, 46 
days was fixed on after the official date of its having ceased." 

The same period of 40 days is stated to be the interval required at Genoa, 

At Lisbon, the recommendationB of the International Conferenoe are acted upon. 

At Naples " it is enacted by the quarantine code that, when the plague has been 
declared to have ceased in a place, a period of from SO to 45 days is reqmired to have elapsed 
after the latest ascertained case, wheAer of death or of recovery, before clean bills can be 
received from It In the case of yellow fever, a clear interval of from 20 to 30 days, and 
in that of cholera an interval of 20 days, must have elapsed. Even after these precautionary 
intervals have elapsed, a ouarantlne of observation of from seven to ten days f(»r the p^gne» 
and of from five to seven aays for the yellow fever and the cholera* is imposed upon arrivals 
from the suspected countries before free pratique is granted.'' 

At the Pir(Bus, " it must be eight days after the date of the declaration of the ceasing^ 
of a malady before clean bills are glven^ and the same number of days after a disease is 

declared 



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PAPBRS RBLATINO TO QXJARANTINB. 23 

declared to have ceaaed in a foreign port that arrivaU fiom such port are admitted to lUastrations of 
pratique. Q^^ery VI. 

" Tbe Greek authorities are much regulated on this subject by the reports of their — 

consuls." 

At CorfvL^ " when the cessation of a disease in the port of departure has been officially 
eertified^ the arrivals from such place are admitted to free pratique after a medical virit, a 
few days after the total disappearance of any sickness of a contagious nature." 

At Malta, " a bill of health is considered as suspected after the expiration of 40 days 
after the la^t case of plague, and as clean after the expiration of one year from the last 
case." 

At Gibraltar, ** when the cessation of a disease in an infected or suspected place is 
notified by the British consul, or on receipt of clean bills of health therefrom, immediate 
pratique is given.'* 



Illustrations of Queby VIL Ilhistratlong of 

VII. Is there a lazaret at or near to the town or port of ? Query VIL 

Is it floating or on shore? Please to describe its position — distance from the nearest 
inhalnted dwellings — construction tmd accommodation — ^its sanitary condition, and tliat 
of its environs — ^means of exercise for the inmates — means of supply of food and other 
necessary requirements. 

Is there a tariff of charges for accommodation, food, &c. ? 

As lazaret establishments are designed and profess to afford safe quarters for the healthy, 
and suitable accommodation for the sick and convalescent detained against their will, the 
public have a right to expect that they should be model dwellings in respect of their sani- 
tary arrangements . 

There is no regular or permanent lazaret establishment at many of the principal mercan- 
tile porta of northern Europe. At Hamburg there is none. 

The lazarets in the Zuyder See and at Flushing, for the great ports of Amsterdam and 
MotterdaMy have not been in use for many years. There is no lazaret at or near Antwerp ; 
vesseb are, when it is deemed necessary, detained in the Scheldt, about 12 miles bcluw the 
city. 

At Havre there is no lazaret on shore, but only a quarantine station, to which ve^els 
liable to quarantine there, and at Calais also and other northern ports of France are s^ent. 

The lazaret establishment at the busy port of Bourdeaux appears to be very incomplete. 
^' There is talk of a new one being constructed." 

It is otherwise at the great naval port of Brest, where there is an excellent stone-built 
lazaret, capable of accommodating easily more than 200 inmates, on the island of Treberon, 
about five miles distant from the town. 

The extensive lazaret establishment at Marseilles is situated on an island about 2| miles 
from the shore, and from which the public is entirely excluded. 

'^ Merchandise is landed at the lazaret for purification by various means, such as exposing 
it to the dew, ventilation, immersion, chloruretted fumigations, according to the nature of 
each case. 

^* The opening out of the goods, the washing of the effects, the cleansing of the ship, the 
inimmeration or the immersion of infected substances are likewise practised. The goods 
subjected to these processes are clothes, hides, feathers, wool, silk, horse-hair, and remains 
of animals. 

** Quarantine is discretional for articles made of cotton, flax, or hemp." 

Lisbon. — The condition of the lazaret for the reception of passengers is thus described 
by Dr. Donnet, of the Royal Naval Hospital: 

** It consists of two buildings, separated from each other by a court-yard. The one is 
fitted up as a dormitory, and is badly furnished, badly ventilated, with the beds too eloae to 
each other, without either chimney or stove, and able to accommodate about 50 pert^ons, 
although frequently it receives many more. • * ♦ The grounds around the lascaret are 
insufficient for exercise. 1 here is no infirmary, no resident medical man or clergyman ; no 
water-closets, but in their stead small night-stools placed in the dormitory, a curtnin alone 
shutting out the occupant. The dormitory is frequently tenanted by both nmles and 
females." Complaints have frequently been made by passengers of the extremely bad 
accommodation m this lazaret. ^^ The floating lazaret is an old hulk at the quarantine 
ground, and is able to receive about 70 persons closely packed." 

The lazaret at Madeira (it was abolished in 1858, and no substitute has been provided) 
was very unsuitable, as often " eight or ten persons were obliged to sleep together in one 
room, and others in a loft over a cow-house, or wherever they could find an unoccupied 
spot, while the thermometer stood at 80**. The charges made for the accommodation wei-e 
as high as in a first-rate hotel." 

544. C4 in 

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24 PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 

Illustrations of ^^ Spain^ the only regular lazaret establishments for the admission of foul arrivals are at 

Query VII. ^^ff^ *^^ *^ ^^^^ Ma/ion^ such arrivals not being admissible into Cadiz, Barcelona, &c 

' ' That at Vigo has been in use since 1842, and is on a l^rge scale, with all the required 

arrangements for the reception of sick and suspected passengers, and also for the landing and. 

purification of cargoes. 

At Santa Criiz^ Teneriffey the lazaret on shore " is quite unfurnished, and without any 
accommodation." At Havannahy ^^ the only lazaret is a floating hulk, anchored off the 
quarantine ground." 

In the Neapolitan States^ although there is an extensive lazaret establishment on the 
island of Nisida, in the Bay of Naples, it has not been regarded by the quarantine authorities 
as being sufficiently complete m its arrangements for the purification of all foul-bill 
arrivals ; and hence, under certain circumstances of apprehended danger, arrivals are still 
liable at times, under the decree of 1819, to be refused admission into Neapolitan ports, and 
obliged to leave at once." In the autumn of 1859, arrivals from Spain, Holland, &c., 
having had any case of cholera on board during the voyage, were not permitted entrance* 
until they had performed the necessary quarantine in a foreign accredited lazaret 

Most of the Turkish lazarets appear to be utterly unsuitable for the safety, not to speak 
of the comfort, of detenus. Persons are more likely to catch disease than to recover from it 
in such places as have been described. 

The lazaret at Galatz has become quite dilapidated since the war in 1854, and that at 
Ibraila is also in the same condition. The great Kussian establishment in the Black Sea 
at Kertch was likewise dismantled during me war in the Crimea. 

At Alexandria the lazaret is stated to be able to accommodate 1,000 persons. 

That at Tripoli, in Barbary, is described as being " in a very damp situation ; the apart- 
ments are quite unfurnished, and the inmates must procure and cook their own food." 

At the PircBus the former lazaret has been abolished since 1854, when it was occupied 
as a barrack by the French troops. ** In that year eight wooden huts were erected on the 
side o^hc, port opposite the town, and about a mile distant. Tents would be a luxury to 
such habitations ; the situation is most desolate, and the place altogether so unfit for a 
civilised being, that I have known several instances of English families who^ rather than 
subject themselves to this uncomfortable durance, haveabandoned their iisit to Athens, and 
proceeded on tiieir voyage. A large lazaret is in course of construction." 

The lazai'ct establishments in most of the seaports of the United StateshB,Ye the character 
rather of detached and partially isolated marine hospitals for the reception of all sick per*- 
eons on arrival, with occasionally superadded stores for the airing of foul cargoes, than of 
the secluded and strictly guarded establishments in the old world. No accommodation is 
provided for persons in health on arrival, nor are such persons almost ever detained. The 
extensive lazaret buildings on Staten Island in the harbour of New York were, in open day, 
set fire to and destroyed oy tiie inhabitants of the neighbourhood in 1858, after the sick 
(there were many yellow fever patients in the hospital at the time) had been removed, in 
order to compel the transference of the establishment to a station further down the harbour. 

The use of the warehouses for the reception of goods had been discontinued for some 
time previously, and barges moored about 1,000 yards from the hospital had been sub8ti<>> 
tuted for the buildings on shore. But the removal of cargoes for purification appears to 
be rarely carried out at any of the lazarets of the Union. Cargoes are never landed at the 
well-conducted quarantine establishment atGrosse Isle, in the River St. Lawrence, where 
the sick on board are detained before vessels can proceed up to Quebec. 

Bermuda is provided with two lazarets, one for merchantmen and the other for the use 
of the Navy. 'ITiere is no regular lazaret at Nova Scotia, nor apparentiy in any of oux 
West India Colonies, except at Nassau, in the Bahamas, where ^V there is a small lazaret 
erected within the last 12 months on an island about three miles distant ; there is a resident 
quarantine officer." 

In the Spanish and other foreign West India islands, the only lazarets are floating hulks,. 
to which cargoes are, it is said, sent when necessary. 

Consid Westwood states, that at Rio Janeiro ^^ there is no regular lazaret or quarantine 
establishment.'' At Monte Video " there is a small lazaret, the accommodation is small and 
bad, and there is no resident medical officer.'* 

The permanent quarantine establishments on shore in the MavriHus, and in the principal 
ports of Australia, are among the most complete of any in the colonies, and appear to be 
similar in most respects to the Canadian lazaret at Grosse Isle. They are intended only 
for the reception of persons, no cargoes being ever landed. 



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PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 2.5 

Illustrations of Queries VIII., IX., X. Illustrations of 

Queries 

VIII. State the number of persons received into the lazaret durinp; the last three VIII., IX., X. 
or five years at least — ^ 

IX. Have any diseases occurred among the persons received ? If so, what diseases? 
How many cases, and when ? 

X. What number of deaths, if any, have occurred in the lazaret among the persons 
received into it, or among the officials of the quarantine establishment, during the 
last three or five years ; or, if possible, for a much longer period, say 20 or 30 years ? 

And from what diseases, ana when ? 

It is only by the possession of such details as those sought for, that the utility of lazarets, 
las a defence against the introduction of spreading diseases by persons or goods, can be 
ascertained. 

Lisbon. — The number of persons sent into the different lazarets, from the beginnin^j of 
1856 to the end of April 1859, was 4,420, independently of many hundreds who were kept 
in quarantine on board their respective vessels. 

In 1857-58-59 the number sent into the lazaret was considerably more than double the 
number in 1856 ; in 1857 it was nearly three times as great The average detention appears 
Ao have, been about 10 days. 

Dr. Lyons states that " the inspector of the lazaret, who has resided there for 42 years, 
aflSrmed m the most positive manner that there has never been a single person of those 
ondeigoing quarantine who was attacked with an epidemic disease ;" a statement confirmed 
by the inquiries of Dr. Donnet, R. n, 

Madeira. — During the five years before 1858, when the lazaret was closed, the number of 
persons sent to it was 1,899. The only instances of disease occurring in the lazaret during 
this period were four cases of cholera, which appear to have all recovered, as but one death 
is stated to have occurred among all the persons detained, and that was from consumption. 

Vigo. — The number of persons who underwent quarantine at the lazaret establishment, 
reckoning the crews of vessels as well as their passengers, during the last three years, was 
20,157 — viz. : 1 1,134 of the former, and 9,023 of the latter. The average detention seems 
to have been about 10 days. 

In 1857 the number of deaths among the crews and passengers detained in quarantine 
was 21, of which seven were from yellow fever (there were 31 cases), and all the rest from 
xJbronic diseases, chiefly dysentery and phthisis. 

In 1858 there were three deaths from yellow fever, and 39 deaths from chronic diseases, 
in the lazaret; and in*1859 all the deaths, 12 in number, were from chronic diseases. 

Genoa. — In 1868 the total number of persons sent to the lazaret was under 40. Ordi- 
narily, all who have to perform quarantine remain on board their vessels. No deaths have 
X)0curred in the lazaret during the last six years. 

Piraus. — The number of persons received into the lazaret in 1858 was 2,000 ; this has 
been the average for some years. Not a single case of sickness occurred among these 
persons. 

With the exception of eight deaths from smallpox, out of 30 cases landed from the French 
frigate " Pomone," in 1859, no death has been known for several years in this establishment. 

Constantinople. — In 1858 no persons were received into the lazaret. No register is kept. 

lifiodes. — During the five years from 1854 to 1858, the number of persons received into 
"the lazaret was 1,755 ; the detention varied from 5 to 15 days. Not a single instance of 
sickness occurred, and the only deaths were four from dysentery and consumption in 
"poor pilgrims from Mecca. 

Alexandria. — In 1856 the number of persons sent to the lazaret was 1,818; in 1857 there 
-were none ; and in 1858 the number was 574. 

Among the 1,818 admissions in 1856, there were 56 cases of illness, of which 24 were 
Jatiguea de voyage^ 26 from abdominal complaints, two from Asiatic cholera, and three or 
-lour from common fevers. Of 24 deaths among these invalids, seven were from exhaustion, 
14 from marasmus, &c., two from cholera, and one from peritonitis. In 1858, of two deaths 
'ifhich occurred in the lazaret, one was from typhus, ana the other was at first said to be 
-£rom saupfon de peste, but it was afterwards stated to be from delirium tremens with fever. 

No instance of the spreading of any disease was observed during these three years. 

Corfu.— Dunug the last five years, 1,883 passengers have performed quarantine in the 
Xazaret. The only cases of sickness mentioned are two of yellow (?) lever in 1845, in 
passengers from Malta, and three of cholera in September 1850, in persons arrived from 
Cephalonia where the disease then prevailed. During the 16 years, from 1844 to 1860, 
15 deaths have occurred in the lazaret, viz., 11 from fever, one from yellow (?) fever, one 

'f5rom smallpox, and one from cholera. No instance of the spreading oi diseases from persons 

jor goods undergoing quarantine has been known of late years. 



54-tt^ D ' Malta, 

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PAPERS RIXATING TO QUARANTINE. 



Illustrations of Malta, — During the three years ending April 1859, there were 1,513 persons received 

Queries into the lazaret. No case of fresh sickness originated among them. Five deaths occurred 

VIII., IX^ X. among the persons received, viz., four from fever, and one from cholera. 

— ^— The particulars are not stated; nor is anj instance of disease spreading alluded to. 

Marseilles. — During the last five years 1,372 persons were sent to the lazaret; viz : 

4 in 1855 
711 „ 1856 

5 „ 1857 
468 „ 1858 
184 „ 1859 

Of the number sent in 1856, no fewer than 413 were cases of tyrfius fever, of which 90 
proved fatal. There were 12 other deaths in the lazaret that year from divers diseases. 

In 1858, 15 cases of small-pox were received ; eight of these proved fatal. 

No specific mention is made of any cases of cholera having occurred of late years within 
the lazaret, or of any case of yellow fever since 1821. 



Illustrations op Query XL 

Illustrations of XI, Have any instances occurred in recent years of the spreading of a disease from. 

Query XI. persons, or from goods, undergoing quarantine, to other inmates of the lazaret, or to 

the officials of the establishment, or to the inhabitants of die nearoct dwellings ? 
If so, please to give the dates 4md other partieiilani briefly. 

The answers received to this question are almost uniformly in the iiegative. The Sew 
exceptions^ real or apparent, in the mass of evidence ohtained are the following : — 

Lisbon, — ^In July 1856 three deaths oo(»trred among persons employed in the lazaret 
from cholera, whidb was then raging in the city, and where the disease seems to have been 
caught. 

Tne presumption that the first cases of yellow fev^ in 1857 were caused by the manqpu- 
lation of infected luggage, which had been landed in the lazaret, is admitted to be sinajdy 
conjectural. The fever was in the city in the previous year. 

Malta. — " During the 21 years from 1819 to 1841, 12 vessels havhiff, or having faad^ 
during the voyage cases of plague on board, were put in quarantine. In all, 46 cases of tim 
disease were treated in the lazaret, and of these cases 22 were fatal. The only instance in 
which the disease seems to have occurred among the employes of the quarantine establish- 
ment were in four health guards, two of whom had been put on hoard infected vessels, azHl 
the other two had been shut up in the lazaret to attend upon the sick. One of the latter 
died ; the other three recovered." 

No instance has been known of ill-effects from manipulating any description of goods 
received into the lazaret. 

Southampton. — ^^ Several suspicious cases have occurred. 

** One man, an engineer, who landed from a West India steamer, was attacked widi 
yellow fever some days afterwards, and died. A female in the same Jiouse was attacked 
with fever of apparently the same nature, but in a very mild fornL 

" Several other suspicious cases which put on the appearance of a modified typhus, it is 
supposed on account of the climate, occurred, but did not spread. 

" In the case of Her Majesty's ship * Eclair,' which was ordered to move from the Mother- 
bank to the quarantine station at Stangate Creek, a pilot embarked to take her in charge 
was taken ill with yellow fever three or four days after, and died. 

" Two medical men were placed on board of her after she anchored at Stangate Creek ^ 
they were both attacked, but recovered." 

Marseilles. — ^In 1856 the persons, in attendance on the sick in the lazaret, wlio were 
attacked with typhus fever were, five health-oflSoers, two sisters of charity, one dark, 
39 male nurses, and one soldier of the garrison; 12 of these persons died. 

Groise Isle, Canada. — ^^ Almost every year, a certain number of the attendants, whcpee 
duties bring them into contact with the sick, fall ill, and several have died in those jewarB 
when fever (typhus) has prevailed. This was signallv the case in the disastrous year o£ 
1847, when many nurses, clergymen, and others fell victims in the dischaige rf iikdr 
duties." 

Baltimore. — " In 1652 an asristant physician and two nurses died fioom typhus fever, 
caught from sick emigrants. In 1857 one of the boatmen belongii^ to the hospital died 
of yellow fever, caught from contact with cotton landed from an infected Aip." 

New ForA.— In 1856, " many of the stevedores, and others employed in unloading tfae 
sick vessels, were attacked with the (yellow) fever, and died. The disease spread to the 
shore, attacking first some dwellings on the beach near the hospital, tmd siibseqaeiitly 
extending in different directions. Large quantities of refuse matter, decaying fruits, old 

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PAPERS RBLAT1N6 TO QUARANTINE. 2^ 

bedding, &c^ and all such materials as floated were carried in directions^ and to localities JHustratMme of 
which were subsequently the lurking places of the pestilence. Qdeiy XI. 

** There can be no doubt," says the physician of the Marine Hospital, *' that the most 
actiye cause of the pestilence in this locality was from the accumulation of infected mate* 
rials floated from the vessels in quarantine." 

MamrUius. — ^ Nosft of the officials or police force at the lazarets eyer caught either 
cholera or smallpox from the emigraats ; but the wife of the l^hthouse keeper at Flat 
Xskyid died of the cholera during its preyatenee there, and oiie oi the crew of a steamer, 
Gxtployed in carrying si^plies to the lazaret on Flai Ishmd in 1856, took the disease, and 
died on board," 



iLLUSTEATTOlfS OF QUERT XEF. 



XII. Are cargoes sent to the lazaret? If so, what cargoes or articles of merchan- Illustrations of 
dBse are eoneodesed to be '^ susceptible" ? And what means are used for their purifi- Query XII. 
cation? 

The replies to this question are, in the great majority of instances, meagre ; and it may 
therefore be inferred that the practice of discharging cargoes into lazarets, for the alleged 
purpose of purification, is very much less frequently resorted to than it was formerly. 

In none of the great commercial ports in the north of Europe, or on the Atlantic coast 
«f France, does the pnctice seem to haye been adopted of recent years when the cargoes 
were sound and free from all decomposition and decay. That it is otherwise, however, in 
«Qme ports, will appetur from the followii^ examples : — 

• At Vigoy *^ all cargoes of ships subjected to (strict) quarantine are sent to the lazaret, 
except mails and lettets in cases or boxes, which are received at the port and distributed, 
after being cut and fumigated. The articles considered as ' susceptible,* are hides, skins, 
raw cotton, flax and rilk, yam and wool, which undergo a scrupulous purification and 
ventilation in the sheds and warehouses of the lazaret, 

^^ The puxification lasts as long as the period assigned to the vesseL" 

At Lisbon^ " susceptible articles are cotton and hemp, raw or manufactured ; hair, manu- 
&ctured or otherwise ; letter parcels and other correspondence ; hides, fresh, dried, or 
manufactured ; remains or portions of animals in a fresh state ; wool, linen, and silk, raw 
car m anufactured^ &c« Fumigation with chlorine i^ employed in the disinfection of goods. 
Whitewash,, chloride of lime, and peroxide of manganese with sulphuric acid, are used in 
the purification of infected ships«" 

At Marseilles, ** merchandize is landed at the lazaret for purification by various means, 
each as exposing it to the dew, ventilation, immersion and chlorutted fumigations, accord- 
ing to the nature of each case. The opening out of the goods, the washing of the effects, 
the cleansing of the ship, the incineration or the immersion of infected substances, are 
Hkewise practised. 

** The goods subjected to these processes are clothes, drills, hides, feathers, wool, rilk, 
horsehair and remains of animals. Quarantine is discretional for articles made of cotton, 
flax or hemp." 

Alt the PirceuSy ^* cargoes are landed at the lazaret ; they are opened and aired. Copper 
and lead are immersed in water, and coins in vinegar ; letters are fumigated. Non-sus- 
eeptible goods are grain, iron, coal, oil, paint, wood, barrels and staves, wines and spirits, 
bottles without labels, &c." 



Illustbations of Queries XIII. and XIV. 

XIII. When sickness occurs in a vessel while undergoing quarantine, and there is Illustrations of 
no medical officer on board, how is medical assistance provided, or to be obtained ? Queries XIII. 
Is medical assistance provided at the public cost? and XIV. 

XIY. When a vessel arrives &om a suspected port, or in a sickly condition, r^ider- 
ing her subject to quarantine^ is any inspection then made of her state as regrarda 
cleanliness and ventilation ? And, if found filthy or badly ventilated, what means are 
taken to remedy such defects ? Is any record kept of the sanitary condition of vessels 
put in quarantine ? 

The first of these queries was deemed necessary, as It was well known to many of the 
snembers of the sub-committee, fr<nn personal observation, that the sick in merchant vessels 
^triiieb. have bo medical officer on board are often much neglected ; and the liability to 
0iich select would be of course increased by any interruption of free intercourse with the 
fAore y auod with other yeesels in the port. 

VVith respect to Query XIV. it may be fairly gathered from the eyidence that such in- 
spection as fliat referred to is very rarely made. 

K^^^ D 2 Elsinore, 

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28 PAPERS RELATING TO CtUARANTINE. 

llIustrationB of Elsinore. — " When there is sickness on board a vessel in quarantine^ the quarantine phy- 

Queries XIII. and siclan would visit the sick but without going on board, and he would provide the necessary 
X^V* medicines at the expense of the ship." 

St. Thomas. — As at Elsinore. 

Hamburg. — " When sickness occurs on board a vessel in quarantine^ the regularly 
appointed medical otiScer will visit her. About 9 s, are paid by the ship for each visit 

'^ The medical of&cer orders such means as he may consider necessary to remedy any 
defects in the ventilation or cleanliness of the ship, and he sends in a report to the Grovem* 
ment." It seems, therefore, that he goes on board, and not merely alongside, the vessel 

Bordeaux, — " The sanitary physician is obliged to visit the sick in quarantine, whether 
on board ship or in the lazaret, and he is liable to be put in quarantine himself if the case 
requires it. When disease has rendered (Quarantine necessary, the attendance is gratui- 
tous ; under other circumstances a charge is made." 

No inspection is required to ascertain the sanitary state of a vessel before giving her 
pratique. 

Marseilles. — " Invalids in quarantine are landed and attended by the lazaret doctor. 
A medical visit is made on the arrival of every suspected vessel. 

^^ The 45th article of the International Begulations defines the means to be used for the 
purification thereof. The state of every ship is registered." 

, Malaga^ Alicante y &c. — ^* When sickness occurs in a vessel under quarantine, the visitine 

medical officer has the man brought on deck if possible, and prescribes from the health 
boat, and the medicines are sent. If the man cannot be brought on deck, the doctor 
prescribes according to the report of the master and crew." 

But, although the instructions require a practitioner to be put on board, ** I have not 
seen this," says Mr. Consul Barrie, " carried into effect." All expenses are paid by^ 
the masters of vessels. 

The health guard, who is placed on board every vessel in quarantine is charged with 
the inspection of her sanitarv condition. It is also his duty to fimiigate the ship ; " but 
these matters," Mr. Consul Mark observes, " are very badly attended to." 

Havannah. — " Foul vessels are required to be inspected and fumigated ; but the 
authorities are very remiss on this point" 

Lisbon. — ^^ The sick on board a vessel in quarantine^ when there is no medical ofiicer on 
board, are sent to the lazaret 

" The ship defrays all expenses. The health officer inspects all vessels from suspected 
ports ; if found filthy, they are required to be cleansed and purified. A record of the 
sanitary condition oi vessels put in quarantine is kept at the health office." 

Genoa. — " When sickness occurs in a vessel in quarantine, a medical man is sent from 
the shore at the expense of the ship. The authorities may require him to shut himself up 
with the patient in the lazaret" 

Corfu. — *^ When sickness occurs in a vessel in quarantine, the proto-medico and hid 
assistant are bound to render medical assistance in their capacity of public medical officers, 
for which they receive a yearly salary from the Government" 

Malta. — The patient is landed at the lazaret, and treated at the public expense. 

Gibraltar. — The inspector of health visits the vessel, and a civilian medical officer ^^P^ 
alongside and renders the required assistance, but not at the public expense. When 
vessels arrive in a foul or sickly condition, no inspection is made, as, arriving under those 
circumstances, they are ordered to quit the port 

United States. — The practice in all the principal ports appears to be that the health 
physician at once boards and personally inspects every such vessel on arrival, and removes 
the sick to the hospital on shore, or treats them on tiie spot. Sidlors and emigrants are 
gratuitously attended. 

Foul and unwholesome vessels must be thoroughly cleansed and purified before they pro- 
ceed on to the wharves. 

At Philadelphioy every vessel is required to have her bilge-water pumped out, and fr*esh 
water puinped in until the bilge is made sweet, before she is permitted to go up to her 
mooring. The hold, cabin and forecastle are directed to be ventdated, and all artidea of an 
offensive nature on board to be taken out 

At Charleston^ " sick persons are attended by the lazaret physician at the public cost 
All vessels are inspected on arrival, the bilge-water is pumped out, and all needful means 
used for cleansing and ventilation." 

Canada and Australia. — At Grosse Isle in the St Lawrence, and in the difiTerent 
ports of the Australian continent, all vessels on arrival are boarded by the health oflScer and 
carefully inspected ; the sick and convalescent are at once sent to the hospitid on shore ; 
the rest of the crew and passengers are also landed, if necessary, at tiie quarantine station, 
and the vessels are thoroughly cleansed, purified and ventilated. 



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PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 39 

Jamaica. — " No investigation of the filthy condition of a vessel can be ascertained, IDustrations of 
unless the health officer enters the ship and examines her ; and such a condition can Queries XIII. and 
scarcely be surmised, unless the crew are first ascertained to be unhealthy. Eifectual XIV. 
ventilation and purification of a vessel," adds the health officer, " would not be possible in — — 

loaded vessels, unless some means were available to discharge at least a portion of the 
cargo." 

Medical assistance is procurable for the sick, but not at the public expense. 

Mauritius. — Special instructions are given as to the side of the vessel, whether to 
leeward or to windward, by which the medical officer is to approach an emigrant vessel on 
arrival ; and very severe penalties, including the authoritv to fire upon persons attempting 
to escape from a vessel in quarantine, are affixed to breaches of the law. 

When sickness occurs on board other than emigrant ships in quarantine, medical advice 
18 given alongside by the health officer, who cannot, however, go on board* 



Illustrations of Query XV. 



XV. When a clean bill of health is given to a vesssel on leaving the port of Illustrations of 
, is she previously inspectea by any officer to ascertain her sanitary Query XV. 
condition, and that of tne crew and passengers ? And is any certificate of such inspec- 
tion given to the captain ? 

^ The replies to this query are almost uniformly in the negative. The bill of health 
given to a ship, — whether the bill be called clean, suspected, or foul, — does not profess to take 
any notice of the condition of the ship herself, or of the persons or things on board, but 
merely of the ascertained or rumoured health of the port from which she sailed. 

Bordeaux. — " There is no special officer for visiting ships before granting clean bills of 
health. The Controller of the Customs, charged with the delivery of them, generally con 
tents himself with the assertions of the captain." 

Brest. — ^^ Although required by the instructions, no previous inspection ever takes place, 
although the sanitary condition of the ship, crew and passengers, quality of provisions, 
'water, &c, are specified in the bill of healtn." 

Naples. — ^^ No inspection is made of a vessel before granting a bill of health." 

-Krcpta.— " Before a vessel receives a clean bill of health, the medical officer rarely 
inspects the vessel, but always the crew." 

Malaga. — No inspection is made of a vessel previous to granting bills of health. 

Gibraltar. — Before a clean bill of health is granted to a vessel, no medical inspection of 
her state is made, and no certificate given, the bill of health being only applicable to the 
state of health of the fortress. 

The only apparent alleged exceptions to this omission of the inspection of vessels, before 
the granting of clean bills of health on leaving a port, are the following : — 

Genoa. — " No vessel going beyond the Straits of Gibraltar can clear from a Sardinian 
port, without having been previously inspected by a sanitary officer. The result of the 
inspection, which is especially strict when the vessel carries passengers, is stated in the bill 
of health.'* 

Malta. — Before a vessel receives a clean bill of health, she is inspected. 



Illustbations of Query XVI. 



XVI. Have any of tiie diseases for which quarantine is liable to be imposed in the Illustrations of 
port or town of occurred among the inhabitants of tiie place or of the Query XVI. 

neighbourhood during the last 10, 15, or 20 years ? If so, tmder what circmnstances ? 

It is very desirable that the exact dates of the earliest cases, and other authentic 
particulars respecting the origin or development of the disease, should be stated in a 
narrative of the circumstances. 

The following illustrations, out of many others which might have been given, appear to 
show that the existing practice of quarantine, in the countries where it is most strictiv 
enforced, has not succeeded in preventing the occurrence of those diseases against which 
the system is specially directed. 

It is to be regretted that the replies to this query from many of the principal ports in the 
Mediterranean have been so incomplete ; in some, no information whatever has been given. 
Whereas the Board of Health at Alexandria transmitted a full and instructive report on 
the subject, the reply from Constantinople was nil. 

544. D 3 Portugal— 

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30 PikPSRS RKI.ATING TO CIUA.RANTIMB. 

lllustrati«oftef PortuffaL — Withm the last fire or six years^ Lisbon has siifiered twice, ia ISS^ and 

Quay XVI* 1856, from cholera; and twice, in 1&56 and 1857, from jellow fever. In 1851, there was a 

— Kouited appearance of yellow fever at Oporto. 

Madeira was visited by the cholera in 1856 ; and some of the Cape de Verde Islands 
in 1855 and 1856. 

Spain. — Sii^e 1853, most of the principal ports have suffered mope than once firom 
visitations of cholera. In 1854, Ferroly Corunnay Cadiz , Malaga, Alicante^ &c. were 
affected ; and the disease has reappeared repeatedly in some of these towns since. In 1857, 
the yellow fever existed at Corunna, Ferrol and oliier places in Galicia. 

Gibraltar had a sK^t visitstMn of diolera in 1854, and again in 1855; on bodi 
oecaiioiuK, it waa prevailing in the a^acent districts of Spain* The flgrlipM vimfahdon 
occurred in 1834.. 

Malta suffered from the cholera In 1837, and again the summer of 1850. During the 
whole period of the Russian war, from 1854 to 1856, the disease never prevailed epidemically, 
notwithstanding the incessant arrival of infected vessels from the seat of war, &c. Small- 
pox has, on more than one occasion of recent years, proved very destructive. 

The Two Sicilies. — At Naples the cholera appeared first in 1836, and again in 1837, 
whan, it was veiy severe^ In 1854 it broke out with great violence^ and again slightly in 
1855. In 18*37 cholera appeared in Palermoy while vessels firom Naples were performing 
quarantine on account of the disease. In 1856, Messina snfferea dreadfiilly icom, the 
pestilence. 

Athens. — During the prevalence of the cholera among the French and British troops at 
the Piraeus in July 1854, the Greek government estabGsiied a strict quarantine with a view 
of protecting the capitaL The city, which is not above six miles from Piraeus, remained 
exempt untu the end of October, when the disease broke out. More than 10,000 of 
Ike idbabitants left for all parts of Greece ; ^^ but I have not heard," says Mr. Censnl IfieU, 
'^ tfaat a siaglje case of cholera waa thereby oecasioned." The mortality aft Athens amounted 
to 3,000 out of a population of 30,000. 

Corfu. — In October 1855, the cholera appeared ; the disease eontinued till the end of the 
year, and caused 500 deaths. In 185^, there was a fi&tal epidemic of somBpox ; ten 
years before, it had prevailed extensively. 

Cephalonia sufiered severely ficom cholera in 1850 ; muk in 1852 the emal^x exratecl in 
this island as well as in Paxo* 

Alexandria. — Since 1843, no case of the plague has>been seen tiuronghovit Egypt. Hie 
cholera prevailed more or less severely in 1844, L848, 1850 and 1855. ^I^irtial out- 
breaks had occurred in 1835 and again in 1837. 



"O" 



Bermudas, — These islands have been repeatedly the seat of yellow fever epidemics. 
The most recent visitations were in 1843, 1853 and 1856. ISo information has been 
received respecting other epidemic diseases. Isolated cases of spasmodic cholera have 
occurred, but the mseaee has not spread. 

Jamaica was visited for the first time by epidemic cholera in 1850-51 ; there have been 
several partial returns of the disease since. Smallpoat prevailed epidemicaUj in 1832 and 
again in 1851. Few of the coloured population were protected by pseioons vaccixaiion* 
In 1^56, the yellow fever prevailed for the first time in the moontaia cantomB^ifc of 
Newcastle. 

" Havannah is never entirely free," says Consul General Crawford, " boat scaallpar and 
typhoid fevers." The cholera was very prevalent in 1852, and committed great ravages, 
chiefly among the natives. 

The most prevalent diseases here are smallpox, yellow feveif, dysentery and typhoid 
fevers. The most destructive among the shipping is yellow fever. 

Guiana. — Yellow fever has prevailed on several occasions, with epidemic force, during 
the hfit 10* years. The cholera appeared towards the end of 1856> and committed great 
ravages both in Deitterara and in tne surrounding country. 

The snallpox prevailed in 1859 y ^' the lower olasaea, bring totally unprotected by 
vaccination, soon became a prey to the disease." 

Rio Janeiro. — ^Yellow fever appeared for the first time in 1849, and has continued to 
recur very frequently ever since. 

Great mortality has taken place among the merchant shipping in several seasons. The 
first visitation of the cholera in Rio was in 1855. Other parts of Brazil have suffered 
subsequently. 

Mauritius was first visited by the cholera in 1819 ; the second aittaek was in 18^, smA 
this was followed by another visitation in 1856. A fresh outbreak took flsKse in the latter 
part of 1859. In 1831-2, in 1840, and in 1855-6^ onallpox prevaikd ainoi^ the coloncced 
population. 



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PAF£116 UELATT^G TO QUARA^JTI«B. 



3t 



Illustratioks of Quekt XVn, 

XVll. Have instances of the evasion or infraction of quarantine in the town or IllustratioDs of 
port of come to your knowledge ? Have they been of frequent occurrence ? Query XVII. 

And what penalties have been inflicted for the offence ? 

It was not, of course, expected that many affirmative replies to this query would be 

E'ven ; still it was deemed proper to make the inquiry, as it is notorious to all who have 
5en much abroad, that such irregularities are of common occurrence. The introduction 
of certain epidemic diseases into seaports has often been ascribed to the evasion or breach 
of quarantine regulations; but the imperfection of the evidence and want of accurate 
details, recorded at the time, have very generally left the matter in doubt, and thus occa- 
noBed much differcmoe of opmioB. 

The following instance, which excited much interest at the time, deserves to lye quoted : — 

Oporto. — In ibe autumsn of 185 1^ two vessek i&om Pernambuco, wbene yellow fever 
then existed, were, in consequence of the &lse reppeseutations of their obtains, admitted 
to pratique on arrival. It was afterwards discovered that some casualties had occurred 
during the voyage ; hut no details were given. The health guards and custom-house 
officers who went on board were attacked with a bad form of fever, the nature of which 
was not at first recognised, but which was afterwards declared to be genuine yellow fever. 
Setween 20 and 30 cases of the disease oocurced flurbsequemily to the arrival, all being 
among persons who had gone on hoard the vessel. After the first week ^of October, all 
tacafies of th£ disease cea^d. 



iLLUfiTKATIONS OF QUEBX XVIII. 

XVIIL What, if any, quarantine measures by land, such as sanitary cordons, &c., niugtrations of 
have been adopted, or are considered advisable, in the town or port of against Query XVIII. 

the introduction of pestilential diseases, or for arresting their progress ? 

J£ such measures have been of recent years employed, what have been the results ? 

On the first visitation of Asiatic cholera in Eurqpe in 1830-31, almost all the continental 
states had recourse to sanitary cordons, and other like measures by land, to prevent the 
extension of the disease. From their inefficacy on that occasion, they were not subse- 
quently resorted to in most of those countries. That the practice, however, in reference 
to this as well as to other diseases, is still adopted in some of the southern oountries of 
fkipope, will appear from the following examples: — 

France. — The principle of quarantine measures by land is recognised in t!he International 
Sanitary Convention ; but, for many years past, it does not seem to have been adopted in 
any part of the country. 

Jhilaffo.— " On the outbreak of the cholera in this j>rovince in 1854 and 185S, «aniitary 
cordons were established in the outskirts, to intercept communication with infected places. 
They were discountenanced by the Government, and do not appear to have had the 
slightefit effect in preventing the extension of ^the disease.^' 

Carthoffena. — ^In 1854 and 1855, the plan (a sanitary cordon) was adopted against the 
cholera ; and whether it was from the cordon, or from any other cause, only one case of the 
disease was publicly declared to have occurred in the city. During the continuance of the 
cordon, the municipal authorities were known to leave, and to return to, the town without 
being placed under observation. 

Teneriffe, — Sanitary cordons by land have been adopted on several occasions here, and 
are considered to be decidedly advisable. 

JLUhon. — =** While the cholera in 1855 was advamoing alon^ <he oonrse of Ae Tagus 
towards the cily, a sanitary cordon was esti^blished to prevent aS persons wi& «ny ailmemt 
-whatever, and coming from any infected place, from entering the town. The disease made 
its appearance notwithstanding." 

jiiexandria. — Several cordons have been eatabHshed sinoe IJB3I, to pcevent the ^ureadiqg 
ef tthe plague and the cholera, but they were unsuccessful. Last year (1858) when the 
plague appeared at Bengazi, the sanitary board liere attempted ,to establish a military 
oordon, from Aboukir to the Lybian desert, and *aroimd the city. Jifumerous infractions 
tCM^ place. The pestilence did not reach the city. Thevcaravans from the desert pre£earxed 
to iFetum from whence they came, jstther than fittbmit to the quarantine which would have 
been imposed on them. 



S44- 



D4 



PircBHs. — 

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PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 



Illustrations of PirtBus. — ^* Excepting in the case of the cholera in 1854, Athens has not been directly cut 

Query XVIII. off frQu^ communication with other places ; and when this was the case, it proved quite 

"""" ineffectual, by the fact of the cholera nevertheless breaking out afterwards. There is a 

perpetual cordon in the northern frontier of Greece ; but it is worse than useless, as it is 

quite impossible to guard this extent of frontier." 



Illustrations of the " Observations." 



Observations. 

Observations. Please to append a copy of the Quarantine Act and Begulations at present in 

force in the town or port of 

Also of any annual or other reports illustrative of the working and results of 
quarantine there, or containing evidence elucidatory of the importation or non-im- 
portation of the diseases for which quarantine is imposed. 

And to add any remarks thereon from yourself, and from any resident medical 
oflScer or other gentleman acquainted with the subject, with suggestions for the amend- 
ment of quarantine regulations and practice in general. 

Information is likewise very desirable on the following points : — 

(a.) The general sanitary state of the town, and of the port or harbour, docks, &c, 
of and of the diseases mostly prevalent on shore, and 

among the shipping. 

(&) The general sanitary state of the vessels frequenting the port of 

ana the hygienic condition of the crews, as to their accommodation on 
board, their food and drink, &c. 

(c.) The average annual number of vessels arriving from abroad in the port 
of 

(rf.) The average amount of dues or fines levied on vessels and individuals while 
in quarantine, and the estimated annual amount of charges imposed. 



General want of 
annual, &c. 
reports. 



Suggestions of 
consuls. 



Copies of the Quarantine Acts and Regulations of many Countries, including France 
and -41geria, Portugal, Sardinia, the Two Sicilies, Greece, Turkey, the States of New 
York, Irennsylvania, &c., &c., have been received. 

In no European country or port, is an annual report of the working and results of 
quarantine practice published, nor does it appear that any periodic statement of the sort is 
prepared for the information of the local or Governmental authorities. 

Ill some of the States of the American Union, and also in Canada, annual reports, more 
or less complete, are made by the quarantine physicians and oflficers of health; but 
no series of these reports has been received by the sub-committee. 

The most complete and systematic are those transmitted from Sydney and Melbourne 
(printed), and from the Mauritius (in manuscript). 

A few occasional official reports on severe visitations of epidemic disease, in certain years, 
have been obtained, — as of the cholera epidemics in Norway in 1850 and 1853, of the 
cholera epidemic at Vigo in 1848, of the cholera epidemics in the Mauritius in 1854 and 
1856, of the yellow fever epidemics at Bermuda in 1853 and 1856, of several outbreaks of 
the same fever in some of inc seaport towns of the United States, of successive visitations 
of smallpox in Ceylon, &c. 

Many of the consular replies contain strongly expressed opinions of the inconvenience 
and injury inflicted by the operation of the quarantine regulations in force, while no real 
security is afforded to the public health of the port or country. There appears to be a 
general distrust and disbelief in the utility of the system as at present pursued. 

A wish is expressed that the inquiries now being made by the National Association may 
be circulated in foreign countries ; and several of Her Majesty's consuls state their belitf 
that the temperate and well-considered opinions of experienced physicians in this country 
would have much weight in influencing the practice otother nations. 

In Constantinople, an association has been recently formed among the British andforei^ 
merchants, shipowners, &c. for local inquiry into the operation of the quarantine practice m 
Turkish ports. The correspondence between this association and the British Ambassador 
to the Porte, and subsequently between Sir Henry Bulwer and Lord John Russell, is 
contained in the ** Paper respecting Quarantine in the Mediterranean," presented to the 
House of Commons by command of Her Majesty last year, and which gives the unabridged 
replies of the British consuls throughout the Turkish dominions to the queries of the sub- 
committee. 

Some 



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PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 



33 



Some highly inatrQctive details are given in a few of the replies on the sanitary state of 
the towns and ports, from which the replies have been received. They very generally 
indicate the prevalence, more especially in the neighbourhood of the shipping in harbour, 
of nuisances which often engender and always aggravate disease. Nownere, is this bad 
state of things seemingly more marked than in some of the British Colonies. 



Observatiohf. 

Sanitary state of 

icapori towu&fAMm 



Sanitary State of Mebchant Shipping. 

With respect to the other kindred point on which information was sought for ; viz., Sanitary state of 
*' the general sanitary state of the vessels frequenting the port, the hygienic condition of merchant ebipping^ 
their crews, their accommodation on board, their food and drink, &c.,'^ the Btatcment^ 
received are generally meagre and only hearsay, and are then usually favourable* In ectme 
of the replies, the statements are more detailed, and the report is then unfavourable. A 
few examples may be given. 

Carthagena. — ^Dr. Dalgaims says that the most common diseases amon^ the crews are 
venereal and rheumatic, chronic bronchitis, and phthisis in the first and second stage. 
Scorbutic affections are rare. 

The accommodation on board in sickness is generally bad, and the mediciDe chests 
badly supplied. They usually contain the DrSscribed number of bottles, but the coDtent:; 
are often sadly deficient, and the master ana mates ignorant of their use. 

PirtBus. — Consul Neill says, that ^^ although we have few cases of sickness on board 
ships in this port, the vessels of all nations other than steamers still admit of much improve- 
ment, as regards space and ventilation of the forecastle appropriated to seamen ; and I 
think that sufiicient attention has not been paid to the more frequent change of their 
clothing." 

Marseilles. — The statement that " yellow fever as well as typhus often makes its appear- 
ance on board ships, arriving at this port, during the passage from the countries \v here tlie 
diseases prevail" is very significant in reference to the present subject. 

The Board of Health of Canada remark, that " vessels arrive from sea often in a filthy 
condition, having had cargoes of a putrefactive tendency, whereby the ship and bijge 
water have been contaminated. Numbers of these vessels are congregated side by side at 
wharves and mooring places, and their crews, generally indulging in every conceivable 
excess soon become 3ie subjects of any prevalent disease." The Board lay much stre&a on 
the importance of a systematic inspection of vessels in the port of Quebec, more especially 
in epidemic seasons. ^ 

Surgeon-Major Odell observes, in reference to the shipping at Quebec, " German 
and Norw^an ships are said to be the cleanest. Of those 1 visited, a Norwegian vessel 
jufit arrived with emigrants was clean and well ventilated; the sailors' berths, bedding and 
blankets were cleaner and in better condition than British ones, with one exception." 

Trinidad. — Dr. Anderson, health inspector of Port of Spain, says : " The accommoda- 
tions are not so good as they ought to be on board most Bntish ships, and are inferior in 
general to foreign vessels in this respect, especially the Americans." 

Dr. Johnson, health officer at Demerara, says : — " The general sanitary state of vessels , 

frequenting this port is very bad indeed. The forecastles (except in American ehip?) are 
generally £irk, dirtv and badlv ventilated, so much so that, as a rule, sailors sleep on deck, 
to their great detrunent. They are kept too much on salt provisions ; and, whenever 
they have a chance of getting to a grog-shop, they are poisoned with new and inferior 
rum." 

During the prevalence of yellow fever at Demerara in 1851-2, a systematic inspection of 
the shipping in the port was established, on the recommendation of the late Dr. Gavin, then 
one of the Medical Commissioners in the West Indies ; and the practice was continued for 
a length of time, to the marked improvement in the condition oi the men's berthe^ and of 
the ships generally. 

Dr. Smith of Port'^u^Prince, St. Domingo, states, that in his long experience he has 
generally found the French and German vessels more cleanly and of a better claiss than 
Siose under British or American flags. The French and German sailors also are, on the wbole^ 
more cleanly in their persons, and less intemperate than the latter. British vesgela fre- 

anenting the port, are, with rare exceptions, very filthy and hygienicaUy bad in respect of 
leir internal sanitary arrangements. The forecastles, where the men are berthed^ are 
generally unwholesome, and the bed, bedding, &c. dirty and unaired. Reckless and 
mtemperate in their habits, the men are often exposed to the sun and rain while landing or 
shipping &e cargo ; and then they resort to tne immoderate use of the cheap ardent 
spirit oi the coimtry to keep up strength and to ward off, as they imagine, attacks of the 
indigenous fever. Dr. Smith has seen instances of vessels losing half their cre^v irom 
sickness, and the other half by desertion, while in harbour. 

He points to the mischievous effects of the masters of vessels taking upon themselves 

to drug their men when sick, instead of at once applying for proper professional advice- 

«' In many instances, a medical man is resorted to omy when it is feared thsit death 

544. ' E may 



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PAPERS RELATIKG TO aUAKANTlNli. 



Observations. 



Expenses of 
quarantine. 



may oconr on board, in wbioh erent, according to the law, the fihip would be liable to a 
penalty of 500 dollars, if no professional assistance had beoi ofatbaiiied." 

Eespecting the sanitary condition of the merchant shipping at Rio Janeiro, Dr. 
Macleod, of Her Majesty's ship " Madagascar/ mentions, as the result c(f his inqniries, 
that the ships in general are dirty, and that little attention is paid to the comforts of 
the men, the chief object seemingly being to provide room for the cargo, and for 
passengers if carried. 

Mr. Bowman, Her Majesty's consul at San Francisco, says : ** The accommodation on 
board ships, especially British, might be greatly improved. In thn particular the 
Americans are far before us ; for while their seamen are generally provided with roomy, 
dry and airy berths in houses on deck, our sailors are placed in the forecastle below, 
in which there is little light or fresh air, and often more or less damp. I attribute to 
this cause, as well as to the insufficiency of warm clothing, the number of Tiiiigliffh 
seamen arriving here suffering from rheumatism and diseases of tiie chest." 

Consul Foote, of Salvador, attributes to the intemperate habits of our merchant seamen, 
coupled with the want of comfort in their acconmiodation on board their vessels, their 
low and sickly state as compared with the merchant seamen of some other countries, 
especially the French. 

Expenses or Quabantine. 

As to the money bearings of the subject of quarantine, in reference to the probable 
expenees incurred by shipping, direct and indirect, in consequence of the detention, loss of 
time, &c. therefrom resulting, the sub-committee have obtained but little information. In 
December 1859, a letter was addressed to the Chidrmen of the Chambers of Commerce of 
Liverpool, Bristol, Southampton, Hull, Belfast, Dublin and Glasgow, directing thek 
attention to this p^rt of the inquiry, and requesting their co-operatien ; but, with the 
exception of the Liverpool Chamber, which promised through its secretary its assistance, 
but n'om which no information has yet been received, these commercial bodies did not 
acknowledge the communication. 

As an instance of the charges now made in Spanish ports, in oases of mere quaranfine 
of observation on a vessel with a clean bill of health. Consul Brackenbury mentions Ifaat 
the expenses which the ship '^ Wavre" from Glasgow had to pay in April of last year, in 
consequence of an unnecessary detention — forthe quarantine imposed was at once canoelled 
by order of the Government, when the particulars were made Jcnown at Madrid by teto- 
graph — amounted to 390 reals vella, or about 4 /. ; viz., health guard, 30 reals ; fumig»> 
tion, 48 reals ; expenses of ship for three days, 312 reals. 

[It would appear, from a statement made in Dr. W. H. Borrell's Rmort on the 
Flc^ne of Malta in 1813, that the extraordinary expenses incurred at that time ia 
enforcing quarantine measures, &c., connected witai the attempts to confine the 
disease ^as he considered of local origin), amounted to the enormous sum of 
232,531 /. 13 8.— J. Davy.] 



General Conclusions. 

General eooelu- From ihe preceding evidence, the following general conclusions appear to be fair^ 

s»ons. deducible, viz., that — 

1. Great diversity and discrepancy exist in the system of quarantine pursued in different 
countries; sometimes even in countries which are adjoming to each other, and ond^ 
precisely similar conditions. 

Within the last eight or ten vears, a great relaxation of the system has been made in 
some European countries, and likewise in certain colonies, while in other countries luid 
colonies the system appears to be more rigorous than it was before. Much of the practice 
still in force is certainly uncalled for as regards the public health, and seems to be retained 
on fiscal rather than on sanitary grounds. ' 

Quarantine restrictions appear to have been sometimes resorted to from merely pcditical 
motives, and to have been used a^ a pretext for the annoyance and detriment of other 
countries. 

All unnecessary interruptions to international intercourse cause not only great personai 
inconvenience, but serious commercial loss. 

[It appears to be admitted that the preventitive measures adopted by the govectt- 
ments of different states to exclude a contraband trade have been more alaboratey 
and organized with greater care, with a view to efficiency, than any system of 
quarantine hitherto in use, and yet with only partial success ; and this univen»llyr— 
J. Davy.l 

[Instead of No. 1, 1 submit the following : — 

It is much to be regretted tiiat any relaxation of quarantine should have beam 

naade> 



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PAPEBS RELATING TO QUAKANTINE. 35 

made> but more especially in regard of yellow fever and cholera morbus, because, in General conclu- 
consequence of the want of proper precautions, these diseases within the last 30 sions. 
years have been introduced into countries where they were unknown before. — — - 

The commercial loss occasioned by the detention of a few vessels off a healthy 
port is unimportant, compared with the loss occasioned by the imposition of quaran- 
tine on vessels arriving from infected ports in other ports wnere quarantine is 
exacted* — A. BTytonJ\ 

2. The general wmd of accurately detailed records of the practice and results of 
quarantine from year to year, in different ports, prevents that fiill examination of the subjei5t 
in its various bearings, which it is obviously the interest of all countries to possess. 

The want also of faithful official reports of the rise and progress of destructive epidemics 
in different countries, and more especially in British and other Colonies, is for many reasona 
much to be regretted. 

3. The different forms of bills of health which are obligatory on vessels before leaviK^ 
a port, and which profess to certify the state of public health in the port of departure and 
the surrounding country, are, as now given, obviously fallacious and often erroneous ; and 
they can afford little or no reliable guarantee for the defence of the public health in the 
port of arrivaL 

They are in reality rather passports to facilitate the admission of vessels on arrival, than 
trustworthy vouchers of an ascertained medical truth. 

4« Even in those countries where quarantine is most rigorously observed, it is made to 
yield not only to the exigencies of war, but often also to the conunands of superior govern- 
mental authorities in favour of particular arrivals, while other arrivals in a more healthy 
condition are subjected to detention. 

5. The state of many existing lazarets is extremely faulty, and must inflict iK)t only 
discomfort, but injury, on persons in health confined therein, while often no suitable 
accommodation is provided for the sick. To make use of a vessel placed in quarantine as 
a lazaret for the detention of her own crew and passengers^ whether well or sick, is at 
Tariaoce with the teaching of modem medical science. 

The arrangements in most ports for providing mediccd assistance to the sick on board 
such vessels appear to be generally imsi^isfactory. 

[And the same renun^, in the majority of inetonces, applies to the providing 
medical aid to those who are undergoing quarantine in lazarets* — J. DavyJ] 

[Vessels or hidks are uncomfortable places to live in ; but as they are readily 
moved into isolated positions, they are, and necessarily must be used occasionally 
for the detention of persons infected with communicable diseases, where there are 
no better means of acconunodating them. They are well adapted for maintaining 
a strict segregation of the sick from the healthy. — A. Bryson.'] 

6. The experience of recent years appears, to show that the spreading of a pestilential 
disease from persons or caraoes underffoing quarantine in lazarets is scarcely known. 
Persons, however, going on board a foiu and infected vessel on arrival, suck as pilots, 
health guards, custom house oflicers, and others, have repeatedly been attacked with some 
dangerous disease soon afterwards. 

On several occasions, the disease for which quarantine was imposed has brok^i out on 
board, after the vessel has undergone the prescribed detention and been admitted to 
pratique. 

[It appears to me that, from the experience of past years, we may assume that 
pestilential or spreading diseases seldom or never break out in ships in consequence 
of the fold condition of their holds or cargoes ; consequently, the necessity of 
placii^ a vessel in quarantine merely because she is unclean may be questioned ; 
but if a conmiunicable disease has made its appearance amongst her crew. It will 
then be proper, whether she be in a clean or foul state, to quarantine both the 
crew and the vessel until the infecting poison has been removed or become effete. 

It is clearly evident that a disease may break out in a vessel after she has been, 
relieved of quarantine, provided the term of detention does not exceed the incuba- 
tive period of the disease for which she was quarantined. — A, BrysonJ] 

7. The classification of cargoes into susceptible or non-susceptible, retained in many of 
the Mediterranean and other southern European ports, rests on a mere hypothesis unwar- 
ranted by experience ; and the measures often adopted ior the dleged purification and 
difliBfeetion of ordinary cargoes in a sound and undecayed condition are quite illusory. 

[And tiie same remark applies to* the quarantine classification of substances 
generally. — J. Davy.'] 

Xo fumigate, cut, or immerse letters, book-parcels, &c., is simply absurd. 

[The whole doctrine of fomites requires careful re-consideration, especially now 
that so much importance is attached to fomites by sanitary reformers in the United 
States. — X Davy.J 
544. »2 I agree 

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36 PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 

General conclu- [I agree in thinking that infectious diseases are seldom communicated by the 

dent. cargoes of vessels, but parcels should never be allowed to be landed from any vessel 

—— in quarantine until they have been opened and exposed to the external air and beat 

for several days. — A. Brt/son.'] 

8. It does pot appear that those countries, in which quarantine restrictions are most 
rigorous and most strictly enforced, have hitherto been more exempt from the visitations 
of the diseases against which quarantine is chiefly imposed, than other countries where 
the regulations are more simple and less burdensome. 

[And some countries, certain islands in the Archipelago under Ottoman rule, 
most exposed, have entirely escaped these visitations. — J. 2>ary.] 

It is highly important that sound views respecting quarantine be held and acted on, as 
all unnecessarv or erroneous measures of sanitary police not only cause annoyance or 
positive mischief, but serve to withdraw public attention from the surest measures for 
protection and prevention. Thus, in respect of smallpox, the attempt to exclude it by 
quarantine (a) appears generally to have had the effect of causing the neglect of the only 
sure preservative, viz., the vaccination of the community. Such has been the case in 
many of the West India and other Colonies of this country. 

[(a^ And yet the strictest quarantine has not excluded the smallpox and other 
exantnemata, as witness Malta. — J. Davt/,"] 

It should also be borne m mind that oppressive quarantine is very apt to defeat its own 
purpose by its very stringency, and by making it the interest of shipmasters and others 
to conceal the trutn, with the view of evading the annoyance and expense of a lengthened 
detention. 

[I submit that we have no means of forming a just opinion with respect to the 
advantages of a strict or loosely enforced quarantine ; but- as there is no evi- 
dence on record that cholera morbus or yellow fever have ever, eitiier in this 
country or on the continent of America, developed themselves and spread epi- 
demically, and as we have abundant proof that both these diseases have invariably 
broken out after communication with infected places or persons, or after the one 
or the other of these diseases has been brought into the neighbourhood, we are 
bound strongly to recommend that all vessels arriving in a healthy port with either 
malady on board should be kept strictly in quarantme, and that as the crime is 
great the penalty against infraction be severe, equal at least to that for man- 
slaughter. This mignt deter shipmasters and others from attempting, by false 
means, to evade quarantine. — A. Brysan.'l 

9. The sanitary and hygienic state of merchant shipping is often very faulty ; and there 
is good reason to believe mat there is at all times a large amount of sickness, damaged 
health, and premature disablement among the merchant seamen, which might be easily 
prevented by simple precautionary measures. 

The sanitary condition, too, of most seaport totons, and more especially of those parts 
near which the shipping is lying, is generally reported to be extremely unwholesome, and 
calculated, if not to engender, inevitably to aggravate many of the diseases against which, 
quarantine is directed. 

[This applies, I think, more particularly to the smaller seaports. — T. B. HorsfalL'] 



Recommendations. 



Recommendations* With the view of rendering the practice of quarantine, in different countries, a means 
^ of better defence against the introduction of dangerous diseases from abroad, and at the 

same time of improving the condition of merchant ships and the health of their crews, 
without any unnecessary interruption of international intercourse, We, fully recognizing 
the great importance oi an efficient sanitary supervision in all great seaports, would sub- 
mit the following recommendations ; — Our object is to amend ana utilise, not to discontinue 
or to abolish the existing machinery of action. 

[I concur with the conclusions, &c. of the Report, except that I am unable to 
assume that " the introduction of dangerous diseases can be prevented by any quar- 
rantine regulations." — fV. Farr."] 

1. As a general rule, vessels from abroad which have remained free from sickness 
during their voyage, and on board of which no malignant zymotic disease (chronic mala- 
dies not included) exists on arrival, and which are found on examination to be clean, and 
to have no putrescent] or offensive cargo on board, may be at once admitted to pratique 
without respect to the country from whence they come. 

[Ist. I would recommend that all vessels coming from a port which has been free 
from infectious diseases for 21 days, be at once admitted to pratique, provided no 
infectious disease has made its appearance in the vessel during the voyage. And, 
2d. That vessels coming from a port infected with cholera morbus orjellow fever 

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PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 37 

be admitted to pratique 21 days after their departure, provided they have held no ReoommendatioiB. 
communication with any other vessel or port on the passage ; and that the crew has — — 

been entirely free from infectious diseases during the voyage. Vessels infected 
with yellow fever may be admitted to pratique on their arrival in all ports and 
places where the heat does not exceed 60**. — A. BrysonJl 

2. When quarantine detention is deemed necessary, whether from the actual or recent 

.existence of a malignant disease on board, or from the foul and unwholesome state of the 

vessel, a careful examination should be made of her, and of all persons on board, by the 

quarantine medical officer, who should have the power and be charged with the respon- 

jBibility of adopting such measures as each case demands. 

The healthy on board need not generally be detained, and the sooner the sick are 
temoved out of the infected vessel to a suitable locality (a), the better. In cases where 
smallpox is, or has been, on board (i), all unnrotected persons, whether among the crew or 
.passengers, should be vaccinated (c) before they are permitted to disperse. 

[(a) Where separation from the healthy on shore could be efficiently main- 
tainea.— -B. G. BabiTifftan.'] 

Ub) All persons without exception should be examined by the general medical 
officer, and those, whether among the crew or passengers, who hi^, in his judg- 
ment, either not been vaccinated at all, or not been efficiently vaccinated so as 
to afford them protection, should be vaccinated before obtaining permission to 
disperse. — B. G. Babington.'] 

Uc) Wherever this is practioable. — W. Farr.l 

[I am of the same opimon* There is often a want of lymph, and the hot season 
is unfavourable. — /. Davy."] 

[Ought there not to be some one on the quarantine staff who especially is conr 
nected with the Marine, and understands the construction of ships, their holds, 
bilges, &c to act in conjunction with the general medical officer, who, thouj^h a 
competent judge of the state of the human frame, may not be equally so of the 
state of a ship, and might therefore be easily deceived by an artful master of a ship 
interested in making out a good case in order to avoid detention ? — B. G. BcdfingtonA 
[Ought not every quarantine station, and indeed ought not every great commercial 
port to have an hospital for the reception of sick sulors, and be under medical 
mspection ? — J. Davy.'] 

[Would it not be more consonant with the teaching of sound sanitary science, and 
the laws of causation and propagation of infectious diseases, to transfer the sick to 
a well-aired and properly fitted-up hulk, moored off our several ports or harbours 
in England, than to remove persons labouring under infectious disorders to an 
hospital on shore, and thus endanger the public health, a signal and fatal instance 
of which has been so recentiy recorded, after the arriml of an Egyptian vessel in 
the DOTt of Liverpool ?— J. Wiblin.] 

[When quarantine is deemed necessary, whether from actual or the recent 
existence of an infectious disease on board, a careful examination of the 
ship and of all persons on board should be made by the Government medical 
officer, who should have the power of placing her in quarantine in accordance 
with the regulations adopted by his Government. The healthy part of the crew 
and passengers should then be landed or transferred to another ship or hulk, and 
kept in strict quarantine until a period equal to tiie incubative period of the disease 
for which the ship is quarantined has expired, or if cases subsequentiy occur 
amongst them, until at least 14 days after we termination of the last case. The 
sick £ould also be kept in strict quarantine, either in the vessel or on shore, imtil 
the disease has become entirely extinct The vessel herself should be quarantined, 
and all the stores, clothing, and bedding which had been exposed to the emanations 
from the sick should be thoroughly punfied and ventilated. — A. Brysoru] 

3. Vessels arriving from abroad should be required to pump out their bilge-water, and 
to have their bilges thoroughly waslied out before tiiey are admitted into any crowded 
~ harbour or into docks, &c. 

The hatches also should have been occasionally kept open, and the hold aired as far 
-as possible before arrival and admission. 

t Weather and the nature of tiie cafgo permitting. — B. 6r. Babinyton.'] 
Is the pumping out of the bilge-water of so much importance ? Are there not 
many instances of ships remaining unhealthy after all common precautions have 
been taken to cleanse them ? The " Eclair^' for instance. Dampness, or mouldy 
state of the timber, seems an element of insalubrity. — J. Davy.] 

[Instead of No. 3, 1 would submit that the crews of vessels with putrescent or 
offensive cargoes on board be admitted to pratique on their arrival, and unless some 
infectious disease has made its appearance on board, that the vessel be dealt with 
as a nuisance. — A. Bryson,] 

4. Before bills of health are given to a vessel on leaving a port, an examination should 
,/bemade by a competent person to ascertain her sanitary state, and the health of her 
<5rew and all on board (a) ; and the particulars should be mentioned in the bill. 

[(a) And also the quality and quantity of water and provisions, and the clothes 
of the seamen, medicines and medical comforts. — J. Davy.] 

[No person should be deemed competent to grant a bill of health unless ^^^y^^^^T^ 
5^4, B 3 l;'9"^! qualifiedOOQlC 



38 PAPSBS RELATING TO QUARANTINE^ 

^coouBdndations. qualified to practise medicine. He should make himself well acquainted with the 

— ^ health, concution of the population in the town and neighbourhood in which he 

resides, and should ascertain by personal inspection, whether the crew and pas- 
sengers are healthy, and whether any of them have recently come from a distance, 
or received clothes or luggage from a distance. — A. BryB(mJ\ 

5. Medieal quarantine officers should be required to keep accurate records of all 
matters relating^ to quarantine, and to the condition and circimistaaceB of the diipfnag^ 
(particularly of emigrant and immi^nt vessels) arriving in and leaving their porta ; ana 
to prepare an annual report from the data so procured, tor the information of tlie local 
authorities ; and in this report, mention should be made of any epidemic viatation whi<& 
may have occurred in the place during the year. 

[A similar report might be required from medical officers in charge of troops o4 
long voyages, given with some minuteness of detail in case of unusual sicloiessi, 
to be addressed to the Director General, and by him to the General Board of 
Health. — J. Dary.] 

E[edical officers of merchant ships should be obliged to keep a record of the 
ess on board theb ships, and they should be called upon to state Aeir opinions 
as to the origin and spread of such sickness. — J. If i6/tn.] 

This plan might at once be adopted in all our own colonies with advantage, and foreign 
Grovemmentfr might be invited to follow the example. 
From the very complete statistics which appear to be kept at the great quarantine 

S)rts of Lisbon, Vigo, and Alexandria, ana which were readily communicated to the 
ritish consuls for the use of the Committee, it may be inferred that the Qt)vemment8 of 
Portugal, Spain, and Egypt, would at once agree to give effect to such a proposal 

Such annual reports would be extremely useful not only to each country «ad to each 
colony, but to all other countries, and also to the mother country of the Colonies. 

It behoves Great Britain,— which is so deeply interested in all that concerns die freedom 
of commercial and general intercourse, as well as in maintaining in the utmost possible 
health a robust and efficient mercantile marine in all parts of the world, no less than in 
affording useful guidance to her numelrous Colonies in matters relating to public health, — 
to take the initiative in a work of this natiure. Her example woidd be speedily followed 
by other countries. 

6. It would materially conduce to a thorough knowledge of the subject, and probably 
to the speedy adoption of a more rational and uniform practice generally, if the Govern- 
ment of this country instituted an investigation into the results of quarantine, and the 
working of quarantme establishments^ in the chief ports of the south of Europe and ot 
the Mediterranean where the system is still in greatest force, in oixler to asoertain the 
actual truth by personal observation on the fspot. 

[And also in the principal ports of Ae United States, and of the Danish, T'rench, 
ana Spanish colonies in the West Indies, in all of which the existing quarantine 
system is so irregulariy conducted. — J. ^axnf.l 

t Instead of 6, 1 propose, — 
t would materially advance a' thorough knowledge of the subject, and con- 
duce to the adoption of a more rational and uniform practice, if the Grovemment 
of this coimtry would institute, an. investigation into the nature of infectious and 
epidemic diseases* 

1st With the view of determining, on evidence, what diseases are and what 
are not infectious or comnjiunicable. 

2d. On the best mode of lyrestinc the spread of infectious diseases. 
3d. On the retention of the infecting poison by clothing, bedding, or other 
articles exposed to morbid e manations from the sick. 

4th. On the length of time the poison may remain latent in the human system. 
5th. On the probable distance it may be borne by the ordinary atmosphcLTtc 
currents. — A. BrysonJ] 

B. G. Babtngton. Thomas B. HortfalL 

Thos. Bazley. John Liddell 

Walter Buchanan. J. IL Martin. 
A. Bryson. Gavin MUray. 

James Clark. Richard Owen, 

John Davy. Southwood Smith. 

W. Farr. T. Spencer tVells. 

J* B. Gibson* John WibUm. 

G* W^ HasHngSy Hon; Gen. Sec. 

Having been recently employed by the Government, in a confidential inquiry into some 
ouestionB connected with quarantine, I feel precluded from expressing any opinion* ^jpon 
me report of the Committee, as I could not enter upon a discussion of the vamyna 
points it embraces wiih sufficient freedom. to render my remarks of any value. 

July 186L J O. Jff William^ 



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PAIPBR8 aXLATn^G TO QUAKANTINK, 39 



APPENDIX. 



HiBTOBiCAL Sk£TCH of QuARANTiNfi Lecssultion mn^ PsACTIOE in Great BritahL 
By Gwhi Milray, M. D., F. R ColL Pbys. &c. 

TjOi earliest le^elatiye enactment cm -die subject of extrmeic quarantine, with the Appendix. 
Tiew (yf preventing Ae importation rftbe plague by arrivals from abroad, was in the early — ""^ 

part of last centnry* Before that time, whenever it was thought by the Government 
necessary to impose quarantine restrictions on vessels coming from infected countries, the 
Teqoifflte orders had been issued by die King in Council, or by municipal authorities acting 
tmder a Boyal proclamation. 

These orders were of conrse only temporary, and ceased with the occasion. They were 
moreover, rarely had reoonrse to; — for, not to go further back than tihe 17th century, it 
■appears that the successive visitationB of the plague in 1603, 1625, 1636, and 1665, in this 
country were not generally, and certainly not by the best informed persons, attributed to a 
^direct or traceable introduction of the disease from abroad;* nor does it seem that any 
special restrictions upon forei^ arrivals had been adopted by the Government prior to the 
-oocurrenee of any of lihese epidemics. The orders issued were directed rather against the 
flpreading of the disease in a locality wli^e it diould appear, or had already appeared, dum 
jigainst its i^ifMreheaded impcMtation from without ; and tney related therefore not so much te 
.extrinsie as to intrinde qnarantine. Such, for example, was the caae with the Act mssed 
Jm 1604 to give leffislative foree to the orders which had been issued by tiie Frivy 
•Coucil in the |nreoe£ng year a^^ainst tiie infection of the plague, and the chief provision of 
^whidi was empowering the justices of the peace to shut up infected houses [the doois 
liffving been nndced witii a red cross] with aU their inmates, the well and the sick togetiier, 
caaoA to prohibit, «nder severe penalties, the ^egress or entrance of any person for a prescribed 
period, which was usually of 40 di^ or une-guarantame. Penalties were also inflicted upon 
iall persons gosi^ abroad with any susincious symptom or nmrk of the disease upon them ; 
in fluid cases the offisnden were to oe treated as vacrabonds, and whipped; but if aii 
axifectioiis swdlingor sore was foond on 'tiieir bodies, tbey were to be punished as felons, 
and mi^t be put to destii. To the credit of the then House of Lords, this arbitrary and 
imitional enactment did not pass witiiout ertvong opposition from man^ of tiie peers. Not- 
Tridistanding tl» reppgnance of an enlightened few in the ccnnmunity, similar measures 
^oontinned to be resortM to for loi^ afberwards, in seasons of public alarm. t 

But ere long, a remarkable chas^ took place in the natural history of -^e pestilence, as 
x^axds this conoitry at least 

After the ^eat visitation €£ 106j, tiie pdiague ceased to re-appear in its epidemic form 
jnaiang ns. Oidy scottered cases, or greupes of cases, continued to occnr botii m the nvstro- 
polifi and elsewhere for a good many years after, as had always been the case after previous 
.«ndemics. The London bilk of merlalitjr diow that, frem 1603 down to 1679, deaths from 
jttague todE place in every year, with the exception of four or five years at the most. 
After 1679, no deaths from this disease were recorded. 

The Bubsidenoe and tdtimate cessation of the pl^ue in England took place, notwith** 
iBTtanding the continuance of e|>idemic outbreaks of the pestilence in various countries xm 
the CdntineoFt, and tiie non-existence, at the same time, ot any system of regular quarantitie 
Jigainst arrivals from abroad. 

The Levant Company, established in the reign of Charles the First, and in whose hands 
-was all the British trade with the eastern shores of the Mediterranean, always affirmed, in 
^AexT printed orders to tiieir factories abroad, that not a single instance could be addnoed 
of the plapie having ever been brought to England through the medium of their commer(» ; 
-aaid they b<^dly challenged a oontm^ctionof the statement. Moreover, Sir James Porter^ 
lon^ British .Ajnbassador at the Porte in the early part of last century, and whose opinion 
may be thoi^ht to be more thoroughly disinterestea than tiiat of the Company, went stiU 
farther, for he asserted that the plague had never been shown to have been introduced^ 
either into our country, or into Holland (where it had repeatedly prevailed witii great 
fatality during the 17th century) directly from any part of Turkey.J 

It was not until 1710 that the first quarantine legislative enactment., entitied, ^^ An Act 
to oblige Ships coming from Places infected, more CTpectnally to perform their Quarantine," 
was passed in the ninm year of the reign of Queen Anne* The Bill had been hastily pre- 

psied, 

^ Sydenham, and other eminent physicians of his dav, althouc^h of opinion that the plague waB not 
bred, or strictly speaking indigenous in England, but that it had found its way into our couutry either 
directly by the atmosphere, or through the interTention of fomites ; «. 0. substances believed to be ' 
chmr^ed with the poisonous g«rms of the disease, did not attempt to trace any immediate oonnexioa as 
of cause and effect between indiTidaal arrivals and ^e outbreak of epidemic invasions. Neither was 
the belief in personal contagion, or the commum'oation of the disease from the sick to the healthy^ at all 
generally recognised. 

■f- The above statute of 1 James 1, c.31, was only repealed by the 7 Will. 4, and 1 Vict. 

:f, Obsei-vations on the Laws, Religion, &c., of the Turks. London. 1772. 

544- E4 n ^ 

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40 PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 

Appendix. pared, and was hurried through the Legislature in consequence of the alarm occasioned by 
-"" the prevalence of the plague m various parts of Poland, at Dantzic, and other ports of the 

Baltic, The Act was soon found to be very imperfect, and remained in force for only a 
few years. 

But before long, ^public attention was again drawn to the subject. The great outbreak 
in 1720-21, of the pestilence in the South of France, and more especially in Marseilles^ . 
excited consternation in many countries of Europe. Throughout Provence its ravages 
were frightful. The four towns of Marseilles, Aries, Aix and Toulon, alone lost 79,500 of 
their inhabitants. 

Dr. Mead, then the leading physician in London, was consulted by the Government, and 
at their desire drew up his weU known Treatise on Pestilential Contagion, dedicated to 
Mr. Secretary Craggs. Upon the views and reconmiendalions therein set forth, a Bill 
** For the better preventing the Plague being brought from Foreign Ports into Grc^tt 
Britain and Ireland, or the Isles of Guernsey, &c., and to hinder the Spreading of 
Infection," was brought into Parliament, and speedily became law ; it was introduced 
into the House of Commons, 17th December 1720, and received the Royal assent on the 
25th JanuaiT 1721. Several supplements were ailerwards added, one of which was " to 
enable his Majesty effectually to prohibit commerce for the space of one year, with any 
country that is or shall be infected with the plague." 

Dr. Mead does not appear to have ever seen any cases of the genuine plague himself, or 
even to have visited the countries where it usually prevailed ; nor had he, moreover, any 
practical acquaintance with the existing lazarets and quarantine establishments on the Con*-^ 
tinent. His opinions were formed from what he was told by others, or what he had read of 
the disease, taken in connexion with his actual knowledge of the bad malignant fevers then 
common in the metropolis and other places in this country. The nearest approach to the 
true plague he considered to be the '^ jail fever ** of his day. Their mode of development, 
symptoms, usual habitat as to the nature of local conditions, and their destructive malig<» 
nancy among the poor and neglected were much alike, if not identical ; — ^their main difler* 
ence consisted, he thought, in the one being essentially and eminently contagious, and tbfe 
other being but feebly so, and therefore far less formi(mble. Thus it has always been with 
dreaded but unexperienced evils ; omne ignotum pro terribilu 

This opinion dia not prevent him from arriving at the conclusion that the same measures^ 
which he knew from experience were best fitted for arresting the progress and mitigating 
the ravages of the home pestilence, should be equally suitable agamst the pestilence of the 
East in any place where it existed. He strongly reprobated the conmion usage, esta- 
blished by "rarliament, of shutting up infected houses and forcibly confining the inmates 
in these '' seminaries of contagion," as ne calls them. The healthy, he maintained, should 
at once be separated from the sick, the latter removed (by compulsion, if necessary) frona 
their dwellings to lazarets or pest-houses, and the former sent off to a distance and dia* 
persed, while the houses thus emptied were cleansed and purified. The experience of our 
own, as well is of foreign countries, was decidedly in favour of this practice. 

In the epidemic of 1636, for example, we find that ^^ not one in 20 of the well persons 
sent away from infected dwellings was subsequently attacked, and not one in ten of the 
sick themselves who were removed died." The cleansing of streets and thoroughfares, the 
free aeration of close confined districts, and other like measures of local purification should 
also, he said, be enforced. 

Attendance upon the sick in clean and airy chambers. Dr. Mead di^ not consider to be 
accompanied with much risk. Nevertheless, he strangely thought that, in some instances^ 
a military cordon should be drawn around a district to prevent the diffusion of the poison. 
As to the quarantine or extrinsic restrictive measures for preventing the introduction of 
the disease by arrivals from infected or suspected countries abroad. Dr. Mead was guided 
altogether by the statements and reports of others, and chiefly of foreign, French and 
Italian, writers, without referring to the opinions and experience of our own physicians 
during the preceding century, when the disease was endemic in the country. 

The poison of the plague, as of the smallpox, might spread, he thought, in three dif^ 
ferent ways ; viz. directly from the bodies of the sick, tnrough the medium of fomites 
or substances impregnated with the venomous particles, or by atmospheric currents 
charged with these particles and wafted to a distance. He attached most importance 
to the second of these modes, namely, to the transmission of infected goods ; and thereby 
he was led to lay chief stress on their purification and (supposed) disinfection by prolonge«| 
detention and aeration as the object to be especially aimed at in quarantine. The crew and 
passengers of a ship might be landed, he thought, at once upon arrival, if there had beeit 
no sickness during the voyage from the Levant, with the simple precautions of a thorough 
washing of their persons and airing of their clothes in the lazaret But if any case haxl 
occurred on board, or if the cargo should prove to be infected by giving the disease to any 
one who handled it, no precautionary measures could be too summary or severe, even to the" 
burning or sinking of the ship and its cargo, while the crew were strictly detained for a 
length of time in a lazaret. 

The Bill, founded on Dr. Mead.'s views, did not pass the Legislature without consider-- 
able opposition in Parliament and elsewhere, as well as sharp criticism by the profession.- 
Medical writers argued that, as it was admitted that " the plague may be brought and pro- 
pagated by the air, what defence can leper and pest-houses prove in keeping the disease 
out of the country ? We may as well build a wall to keep out larks as barracks to keep 



out plague." 



The 

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PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 4I 

The City of London denounced the employment offeree and compnlsioii in removing the Appendix, 
eiek from their dwellings, and in driving out and dispersing the unattacked inmates ; and '— 

^e Levant Company protested against the excessive n^our of the threatened interruptions 
to commerce ana intercourse upon most insufficient evidence. 

But the mo0t important remonstrance was that from the House of Peers ; and, as this 
document is noteworthy in a social as well as in a public health point of view, I give it in 
full 

Twenty peers recorded their protest a^nst the powers given in this Act (1721), " to 
remove from their dwellings to a lazaret, sick or healthy persons of an infected family,'' and, 
also, ^^ for the drawing of lines or trenches around any city, town, or place infected.'' 

*' 1. Because the powers seem to us such as can never wisely or usefully be put in execu- 
tion, and because the verv apprehension of a sanitary cordon round a city ujKm the least 
rumour of a plague woula disperse the rich, and by that means (as well as by hinderiufi: the 
free access of provisions) starve the poor, ruin trade, and destroy all the remains of private 
and public credit" 

" 2. Because such powers as these ar eutterly unknownto our constitution, and repugnant 
w« conceive to the lenity of our mild and free Grovemment, &c." 



€€ < 



^ 3. Because we take it, these methods were copied from France, a kingdom whose pattern 
in such cases Great Britwi should not follow ; tne Government there being conducted by 
arbitrary power and supported by standing armies ; and yet, even in that kingdom, the 
powers thus exercised of late have been as imsuccessful as they have been unprecedented, 
80 that no neighbouring state has anv encouragement from them to follow so fatal an ex- 
ample. In the last plague with which wis were visited, a.d. 1665, though none of these 
methods were made use of, much less authorised by Parliament, yet the infection however 
great was kept from spreading itself into the remote parts of the kingdom ; nor did the 
Uity of London, where it first appeared and chiefly raged, suffer so long, or so much, in 
proportion to the number of its mhabitants as other cities and towns in France have suffered > 
where these cruel experiments have been tried." 

*'4. Because the great argument urged for continuing these powers specified in the 
question, that they would probably never be put in execution in the cases objected to, 
seems to us a clear reason wny they should not be continued ; for we cannot ima^ne why 
they should stand enacted unless they are intended to be executed, or of what use it will be 
to tiie public to keep the minds of the people perpetually alarmed with those apprehensions 
under which they now labour, as appears by the petition from tiie City of London, lately 
rejected.*^ 

"Within six months of the passing of this Act, two vessels from Cyprus (then infected), 
^ having cotton and other goods on board which are dangerous to spread the infection," 
but without having had any disease during the voyage or wter arrival, were oraered by the 
I*rivy Council to be burned and destroyed with their cargoes, at an expense of 23,935 /. as 
satisfaction to the owners. 

The same summary mode of getting rid of all imaginable risk seems to have been resorted 
to £rom time to time. 

From the silence of Pr. Mead, it may be presumed that it was only against the Oriental 
plague that quarantine was in his opinion necessary. He makes no mention of any other 
disease, not even the small-pox, as requiring this mode of prophylaxis against its introduc- 
tion. The Act of 1720-21, like that of 1710, being limited to a few years, had to be renewed 
-with slight modifications from time to time, as in 1733, — ^in consequence of the i»revalence of 
plague on the Continent, and again in 1743, when the pestilence was raging at Messina. 
In the latter year, Stangate Creek was appointed to be the only station in the kingdom 
w^here vessels from tiie Mediterranean could perform their quarantine. 

In 1752, a Bill having been introduced into Parliament for enlarging and regulating our 
trade with the Levant, the subject of quarantine was again brought under the attention of the 
XfCgislature, and a new Act was passed in the following Session. One clause of this new Act 
denotes the tendency to the adojptioiM>f a more rigorous system. '^ No goods or merchandize 
li&ble to retain the infection of^the plague, and commg from the Levant, without a clean 
bill of health, shall be landed in any port of Great Britain or Ireland, unless it shall appear 
to the satisfaction of his Majesty or of his Privy Council, that the said goods or merchandize 
hssve been sufficientiy opened and aired in the lazaretto of Malta, Venice, Messina, Leghorn, 
Oenoa, and Marseilles, or in one of them." By this enactment, no vessel leaving any port 
in the Levant for this country with a foul bill, or, in other words, when the plague ex- 
isted or was alleged to exist in the port of departure, could proceed directly to England ; 
she T^as obliged to go to a foreign lazaret, and there undergo a more or less lengthened 
detentJbn, whetiier there were any traces of sickness on board or not. It immediately 
became the policy, of course, of the foreign Consuls in tiie Levantine ports to allege a per- 
siaten't presence of the disease, for the profit and gain of the quarantine establishments of 
their respective countries, or other mercenary motive. The Dutch, especially, are said to 
hAve benefited so largely^ bj[ the arrangement, in consequence of tiie all but total absence 
of quajrantine all the while in Holland, that British bound vessels found it convenient to 
cleajr out at Sm)rma or other port in the Levant for Amsterdam or Kotterdam, and there 
obtain clean bills on their way to this country. 

544. F In 



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42 PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 

Appendix. In 1754, a yesdel from Algiers was sunk, by order of the Privy Council, off the Mother 

.— — Bank. 

It was about the year 1755, that separate hulks were first used as floating lazarets in this 
country. Previous to that time, when quarantine had been enforced in consequence eillier 
of fedcknees durii^ liie voyage, or of any suspkaon of the ^oods on board a veaael being in 
any measure infected, all the means for purification and dismfection had to be performed 
on the decks of the vessel itself. The necessity of having a proper lazaret establishment on 
shore had often been cadvassed in and out of Parliament, and pressed on the Grovermnent of 
the day. Chetnev HiU at Stangate Creek was the situation generally reocmunended ; thia 
it will be presently seen, was eventually chosen, and afterwards abandoned. 

In 1757, when me plague had broken out with great severity in Portugal, Dr. Alexander 
Bussell, who had long resided at AUeppo as physician to the Levant Company's factory th^re^ 
on being consulted by Lord Chatham as to the existing quarantine practice of the coimtry, 
gave it as his opinion that *^ it afforded no security against infection ;'* — ^in consequence, he 
said, mainly of the ignorance of those in whose hands its execution was left, tiiey being 
custom-house officers utterly unacquainted with the laws affecting the development ana 
q>read of pe^ental diseases, and also of the want of any fixed or uniform mode of pro- 
cedure in the different ports of the kingdom. There was no Board of H^th, or memcal 
superintendant of quarantine, to advise the Government on such matters. Altogether, the 
practice was of the rudest and most mechanical nature ; and, upon any sudden alarm of 
danger to the public health from abroad, all was irregularity and confusion. 

Thus in 1770, when in omsequenee of the plague then raging in Wallachia, Podolia 
and oilier parts of Poland, special regulations were issued aff^tm^ all arrivals from the 
Baltic, and the custom-house authorities were directed to provide suitable stations for 
vessels to perform their quarantine, no provision was made for any visitation of them ex- 
cept by the ordinary officer of customs, even when sickness was on board a vessel on 
arrival. 

Ten years later, when the pestilence had again broken out as a destructive e[ndemic in 
different parts of Poland, and when special restrictions were again imposed by die Privy 
Coimcil on the Baltic commerce, the custom-house officers were left to themselves, and wi A- 
out any medical guidance, to carry out the orders that had been issued as best tihey mighL 

All vessels from Dantzig and other ports in Prussia or Pomerania had to perfcMrm a 
quarantine of 40 days, before they could land their cargoes. No exception was now made 
in favour even of grain, although this article had not been considered on tiie previous occa- 
sion, in 1770, as succeptible of conveying the infection. Much public discontent ensued. A 
sharp remonstrance was addressed to the Prime Minister, Lord North, by the Provost and 
Mamstrates of Edinburgh praying for an immediate relaxation of the order as far as vessels 
with grain were concerned, as there was a ver^ insufficient supply in the granaries at Leith ^ 
and^the remonstrance was backed by the opinion of two of tne leading physicians in the 
Scottish met|Dpolis tiiat com was not a susceptible article. Thereupon, not only was the 
order revokea, but free and full permission was granted that all grain vessels might dis- 
charge their cargoes at once, and without the delay of impacking on board, opening and 
airing the bags or sacks, which had always been considered as among the most susceptible 
of g(K)ds, or any other quarantine precaution whatever. 

Notwithstanding the acknowle(^ed worthlessness of tiie system as hitherto pursued, aa a 
means of defence against foreign invasion, the enemy had not found its way into the land 
for a century at least, nt>r does thepublio health seem to have been ever imperilled. And 
yet, curious to note, there was a disposition about this period to aggravate rather than to 
relax the rigour of tiie quarantine regulations, both in this and in most continental countries. 
This was owing to the strange dc^ma, which how took full possession of the medical pro- 
fession, as to the mode in which me infection of the plague was supposed to be propagated 
imd to be conveyed from place to place. More and more importance bad, for some time, come 
to be attached to its transmission by fomites or substances fancied to be impregnated with the 
poison, and correspondingly less importance was attached to the influence of effluvial 
exhalations immediately from tiie bodies of the sick, or arising from atmospheric ccmtami- 
nation. The direct and absolute contact with a person, well or sick, or with a substance 
presumed to be infected, was at length r^arded as tiie principal, if not the only, way in 
which the disease was conveyed from one individual or place to another. 

And thus it came to pass that the mode of spreading of the plague was assimilated, not 
so much to that of typhus or of smallpox, as Dr. Mead had done, as to that of gon<Mrhcea or 
of the itch ; l^e poisonous matter of the fever being supposed to be generaUy absorbed 
by the skin, and scarcely, if at all, imbibed by the lungs. 

The new opinions— which, it will be observed, indirectiy recognised the absence of 
any risk of healthy crews introducing the disease, and consequentiv showed the needleaa- 
. ness of their lengthened detention after arrival — soon bore their Intimate fruit; for w« 
find that the Quarantine Act of 1788 was in several respects more stringent and oppres- 
sive than its predecessors, especially in reference to cargoes. 

Still more summary powers were granted to the Privy Council for the issuing of sudk 
Orders as they saw fit, and a provision was now made that " every ship liable to quaran- 
tine was required, in case of meeting any vessel at sea or within four leagues of the coast 
of Great Britain or Ireland, to hoist a yellow flag in the day time, and a light at tlie 
maintopmast head at night, under a penalty of 200 /. for neglect ;*' f o that due warning 
might be given against any communication with her. 

Not 



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PAPERS RBLATINO TO QUARANTINE. 43 

Not only the merowtile community, but also medical men who had had any practical Appendix, 
knowledge of the plague in the Levant, loudly complained of such extravagant regula- ■— 

tions. Dr. Patrick Buasell, who, like his brother, had long resided at Aleppo, writes in 
1791, — *^ It is not to be denied that, as matters stand at present, quarantines without being 
00 secure a defence as is commonly imagined, are a certainly heavy tax upon commerce. 
The benefit they procure to the State is very precarious ; the detriment to the merchant 
is real." 

In 1800, the quarantine laws underwent a revision by a Parliamentary Committee, and 
a new Act, founded upon their Report, was passed. This Act put an end to the system 
which had hitherto prevailed, that all arrivals from Turkey with a foul or suspected bill 
must puiffe their quarantine in one of the lazarets in the Mediterranean (Malta, Leehom, 
or Marseules), before proceeding to England ; a practice most onerous and expensive to 
otu: commeroe, and only for the profit of foreigners. This absurdity at length ceased, and 
our ships could now come directly to England, and perform all the required quarantine on 
our own shores, usually at Stangate Creek. 

This year, two vessels from Mogadore having suspected cargoes (hides) on board, but 
which had had no sickness during the voyage, were ordered by the Privy Coimcil to be 
sunk, with their cargoes, at the ^ore, at an expense to the public of 15,000 /. 

The long-entertained project of building an extensive lazaret on Chetney Hill, near Chat- 
ham, was now adopted; and a sum first of 65,000/., and then other sums amounting to 106,000/, 
making in all 170,000 /• were expended on the works. Before they were completed, the 
site was ascertained to be a bad one, the ground being so marshy that the foimdation of 
the buildings was discovered to be insecure, and the wnole scheme was abandoned, and dl 
the materials of the buildings were sold ofi^for 15,000 /. The use of floating lazarets haa 
been continued ever since. 

In 1805, anew Act regulated more definitively than hitherto the duration of quarantines 
to be performed, more especially as related to articles cf merchandise on board, according 
to the nature of the bills of health of the vessels on arrival from abroad. * Of the character 
of the restrictions then in force, one instance will suffice : — ^^ Should susceptible goods 
arrive in a vessel with a foul — or what is the same thing, without a clean — biU, they must 
undergo first a probationary airing, on board the vessel, of six days for each portion con- 
risthig of as much as can at one time be brought on deck (21 days being employed * 

or more if necessary, to air the whole cargo), and are then transported to the lazaret, 
where the goods are opened and aired 40 days more ; — and the ship itself, after performing 
a long voyage without any circumstance of sickness on board, is subject to a deten- 
tion, including the time of discharging and receiving back the cargo, of from 60 to 65 
days, added to the expense of maintaining the crew, a pilot, and two officers of the 
establishment, as well as the heavy chai^ of 16 *. per ton." 

Hitherto, the efforts of quarantine in European ports had been directed mainly, if not 
exclusively, against the plague. A vessel arriving with typhus fever, smallpox, or other like 
contagious disease on board, was liable to be detained apart from others, and obliged to 
hoist a yellow flag to prevent communication with other vessels or with the shore, and 
her crew and cargo might be subjected to some process of purification ; but these pre- 
cautionary measures Ivere limited to the infected vessel alone, and their adoption did not 
carry with it the simultaneous suspicion of all other arrivals from the same port of 
departure, and their consequent liability to quarantine detention, irrespective of their 
fireedom from all disease throughout their voyage. 

But about this period, another foreign pestilence began to excite more apprehension 
than it had done before, lest it might be mtroduced into Europe by shipping from some 
tropical countries. This was the yellow fever of the African coast, and of the West 
Inaies and Mexican Gulf. Towards the close of last century, it prevailed with great 
malignancy in these regions. It broke out, for the first time it was alleged, in some of 
the southern ports of Spain, and in our own colony of Gibraltar, in 1803 or 1804 ; and, 
notwithstanding every effort at exclusion, it recurrea in these places on several successive 
occasions within the next nine or ten years, causing not only great alarm but serious loss 
of life among the population, civil and military. 

iEyer since then, yellow fever has been regarded by most quarantine authorities as 
demanding, for the protection of the public health, almost as vigilant a restrictive surveil- 
lance over infected and suspected vessels as the plague itself. 

- Sesides the successive invasions of this disease at Gibraltar, the outbreak of the plague 
at Malta in 1813 in spite of the quarantine police there, and its terrible consequences, 
both immediate and eventual, to that important colony, served to awaken from time to 
time the public mind in this country to these disastrous visitations of pestilence, and to the 
apparent powerlessness of all tried means for their prevention or restraint. But amid the 
universal stir and din of mighty war throughout Europe at that period, the lesser judg- 
ments were known but to the few, and were soon forgotten. 

Two years after the visitation of the plague at Malta, Corfu, the principal island of 
the Ionian group, was also attacked with the disease, notwithstanding the utmost vigilance 
of the authorities, the eoast of Albania being suspected at the time. 

Xn 1819, a Select Committee was appointed by the House of Commons " to consider the 
validity of the doctrine of contagion in the plague, and to report their observations thereon, 
together with the Minutes of E^ddence taken before them." 

Xhis was chiefly in consequence of the views put forth by Dr. Maclean in his recent 
^^ork, " Besults of an investigation respecting epidemic and pestilential diseases, including 
^44. G researches ^^ 

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44 PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 

researches in the Levant oonceming ihe pla^e." From a very imperfect acquaintance 
with the disease — ^for his only opportunities of observation were during two or three weeks 
in the Greek Pest Hospital at Constantinople in 1815 — Dr. Maclean had proclaimed that 
it was not contagious. 

More than 20 medical men were examined by the Committee^ but of that number not 
above three or four had ever seen a single case of plague, and one only had witnessed it in 
the epidemic form, and that was at Malta in 1813. 

^ The opinions of all the medical men examined," states the Committee, ^^ with the 
exception of two (Dr. Maclean and Dr. Mitchell, who had never seen the disease), are in 
favour of the received doctrine that the plague is communicable by contact only, and dif- 
fers in tills respect from epidemic fever." * 

The Committee acquiesced in this opinion, and added, that they ^^ abstained from eiving 
any opinion on the nature and application of the quarantine regulations as not udling 
within the scope of their inquiry, but they see no reason to question the validity of the 
principles on which such regulations appear to have been adopted." 

From the returns frt)m the diflferent quarantine stations in England — Bochester, Ports- 
mouth, Falmouth, Milford, Bristol, Liverpool, and Hull — orde^ by the Conunittee, it 
appears that, in none of them, had ever a single case of plague been heard of among 
ail the arrivals. 

The usual detention in quarantine of pilots on board the convalescent ship at Stangate 
Creek was, at that time, for 15 days. No instance, however, of a pilot having been lU in 
consequence seems to have been known. 

From a communication in the Appendix of the Committee's Report from Sir James 
Gambier, Her Majesty's consul at the Hague, it appears that there was seldom or ever 
any quarantine imposed in the Netherlands upon arrivals from the Levant Holland was 
the only country which had acted independently of othen, and which had extricated itself 
fit>m what was felt to be an unnecessary restriction ; nor does it appear that she had 
suffered in any way from her contumacy. 

In 1824, the Select Committee, appointed by the House of Commons to consider the 
means of improving the foreign traae of the country, presented their Second Report^ 
which was devoted to the subject of quarantine. The Right Honourable Charles Grant 
was the Chairman. Strong evidence was adduced, by several gentlemen engaged in or 
connected with the ccnnmerce of the Mediterranean, of the serious detriment to trade 
from the heavy expenses and unnecessanr delays inflicted upon arrivals. 

An example or two will better show the working of the system than aay general state- 
ments. 

In May 1823, the ship '^ William Parker" was dispatched from Egypt for London at 
the same time as the Danish ships '^ Nicolino " and '' Vigilentia,'' for Amsterdam ; all were 
laden with linseed, and all had foid biUs of health. The quarantine charges at Amsterdam 
have not exceeded 51. for each ship and cargo, while for the ^^ William Parker* we have 
paid 188 Z. 16^., being at the rate of 5| per cent, on the whole cai^. 

In December 1820 the ^ Asia," 763 tons, with linseed, arrived from Alexandria with a 
foul bill. The quarantine dues amounted to 610Z., the freight to 1,4752. 

In the same month, the ^^Pilato," 495 tons, arrived fitmi the sanle pent with Ae same 
cargo, but with a clean biU. The quarantine dues were 200iL, the freight amounted to 
1,060?. 

During the prevalence of the yellow fever at Gibraltar in 1813, a vessel, 226 tons, was 
taken up by one of the merchants there who wished to escape the fever, and who brought 
a few goods, such as he could get on board himself. Hie quarantine duty that had to be 
paid before she was released from quarantine at Stangate Creek, where she had beea 
detained for a length of time, amounted to 124 f. ; and her fr*eight was onl^ 75/. 

In none of the aoove cases had thare been any sickness on board, either during the 
voyage or on avival. 

So oppressive were the charges, imposed up(m the arrival of goods 1^ ship^w frtxa 
some 01 the Mediterranean ports, that it was found dieaper to have alk and such like 
goods sent over by land from Italy than to incur the delay and expense of carriage by sea. 

In those days, a traveller with his portmanteau, from Naples or Leghoniy might reach 
England in 10 or 12 days; but his mavy luggage, sent round by sea, woidd not reach 
him for a month or six weeks later. 

The medical witnesses examined bv the Committee were all df opinion that ^^ the rela- 
tions of quarantine, as applicable to this country, are more than suffident for its protectKXi 
from the danger contemplated. *• 

By far the most important evidence was that of Sir William Pym^ who spoke from 

extensive 



• Tke Privy Comncil had, the year before, taken the opinion of the Royal College of Physicians 




or pernicious. We are persaaded on the contrary, firom the consideration of the expeiience of all sees, 
and some of us from personal obsenration, that the disease is communicable from one indiyidaal to 

another The doctrine of contagion appears to us to be wholly unshaken by any aiguiiieiit 

which Dr. Maclean has adduced ; at the same time we think it probable that some of the persotsml 
restrictions enforced in the establishments for quarantine might be modified without riik to the public 
health.'* 



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PAPSR8 BBLATING TO QUARANTINE. 45 

extensive experience, having been many years quarantine officer at Gibrakar and Malta, Appendix . 
and subsequently the superintendent general of quarantine in this country, and who was <— — 

thoroughly acquainted with the practice of foreign lazarets. The general tenor of his testi- 
mony was strongly in favour of a great relaxation in the existing regulations, as carried out 
in this country. He would dispense with all quarantine detention of vessels with clean bills 
of health from any port in the Mediterranean, Turkey and the African coast alone 
excepted. And in respect of clean bill arrivals from these labt-named coimtries, he consi- 
dered that passengers might safelv be landed at once, and the vessel itself be admitted to 
pratique, it the cargo consisted of other articles than hides, and one or two other (then 
^nenilly deemed^ highly susceptible substances. Even in the case of foul bill arrivak 
Srom Turkey or tne A&ican coast, but where no dckness had occurred during the voyage, 
a very short .detention, he thought, was all that was needful, more especially if the bedding 
and clothing on board had been frequently and fi*eely air^ on the passage. He would 
much reduce the number of enumerated susceptible articles, and greatly abridge the period 
assigned for their purification. He had never known, during his large experience, a single 
instance of a case of plague occurring in a vessel from the Levant to England, and did not 
hesitate to express his b^ef that^ wim due'attention to ventilation, all risk of the sj^eading 
c^ the disease mi^ht be prevented ; ^^ it was found that the medical men and nurses in 
hospitals escaped it with proper precautions.'' This was a great step in advance of the 
doctrine of the aga 

With respect to quarantine against yellow fever, Sir William Pym considered that 
arrivals from even foul-bill ports need never be subjected to quarantine detention in this 
countiy, except during the not months of the year, and then only when the disease had 
existea on board during the voyage. 

Acting upon these views and suggestions of Sir William Pym, the Parliamentary Com- 
mittee in tneir Kepcnrt recommended various important changes, all in the way of relaxa- 
tion, in the regulations and practice hitherto pursued, to the great relief and benefit of trade 
and international intercourse, and without the slightest compromise of tiie public health. 
Hor was this endai^red by the proposed mitigation ci the penalties, including even capital 
punishment, for any evasion or breach of the quarantine laws. 

The C(»nmittee were of o|miion that large discretionary powers should continue to be 
Tested in the Privy Council, in applying quarantine regulations to ships or goods arriving 
from any port or place whatever, whenever it shall appear expedient for the public 
safety. 

They recommended the repeal of the existing laws, and " the incorporation into a single 
Act of all the legislative provisions by which it may be thought expedient that the Britidi 
quarantine ^ouM be hereafter regulated.'' 

The Appendix to the Report contains a tabulated list of all vessels which performed 
quarantine in England, Scotland, and Ireland during the years 1821, 1822, and 1823, 
«pecifying the places whence they came, and whether mey had clean or foul bills. At the 
dmerent stations on the English coast, 1,728 vessels had been detained for longer or shorter 
periods, not stated. Of that number, 49 only arrived with foul bills. 

In Scotch ports (the firths of Clyde and Forth) 55 had been put in quarantine, all with 
dean bills. 

In Irish ports (Dublin, Baltimore, Crookhaven, Beerhaven, Belfast, Cove of Cork, 
Drogheda, ELilrush, Kinsale, Londonderry, Carlingford, Sligo, Waterford) 380 had been 
pot in quarantine, all with clean bills. 

The gross receipt of quarantine dues in Great Britain in 1823, amounted to a trifle 
over 22,000 /. ; in the previous year it was 14,419 /• Not above 900 /. of these sums each 
year was paid on account of foul bill arrivals, principally on vessels coming from Egypt ; 
the whole of the rest was on clean bill arrivals. 

The expenses of the quarantine service during these two years were respectively 
26,090/. and 23,704 7. 

The rea»nmendation of the Committee was given effect to by the 6 Geo. 4, c. 78, 
wherein power is granted to the Crown, on the advice of the Privy Council, to adopt and 
enforce such measures as they may deem necessary in respect of vessels coming from 
infected places, or having any infectious disease on board, or arriving under any suspicious 
circumstances as to infection. A similar power is likewise committed to them (the Lords 
-of the Privy Council or any two of them) in the case of any infectious disease breaking 
out in the United Kingdom, and for cutting off communication between persons affect^ 
therewith, and the rest of the subjects of the realm. 

This Act also authorises the Privy Council, as often as they see reason to apprehend 
that the yellow fever, or other highly infectious disorder, prevdls on the continent of 
America or in the West Indies, to require that every vessel coining from, or having 
touched at, tiiese parts shall come to an anchor at certain places to be appointed from time 
to time by the Commissioners of Customs, for the purpose of having the state of health 
of the crew examined, before sudii vessel can enter any port of the United Kingdom. 
But such vessel shall not be liable to quarantine, unless it be so specially ordered. 

In 1825, when Mr. Huskisson was at the Board of Trade, some vessels having foul 
bills were admitted to pratique bv order of the minister. Thereupon, the whole United 
Kingdom was put in quarantine by the Mediterranean powers, and every arrival from 
Great Britain was subjected to a lengthened detention. 

The re-appearance of yellow fever at Gibraltar in 1828, after an absence of 14 years, 

was the occasion of a Government Commission being appointed, under the Presidency of 

544. G 2 Si 



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40 PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 

Appendix. Sir W. Pym,»to inquire on the spot into the circumstances attending the outbreak, and 
■ — whether it was connected with any breach of quarantine. In the opinion of the president 

and of the majority of the members^ no such connexion could be traced. 

In 1831, the steady approach of the Asiatic cholera for the first time from the Eastern 
confines of Europe, and its onward course by the shores of the Baltic and the German 
Ocean towards our coast, caused strict quarantine measures, both extrinsic and intrinsic, 
to be resorted to in this country as in most other countries of Europe. By 2 WilL 4, c. 10, 
the Privy Council were empowered to issue orders such as might appear expedient, with 
the view of preventing the spread of this disease, &c. ; and by the 3 & 4 wllL 4, c 75, 
this Act was continued until the end of the next Session of Parliament. 

The accession of this new pestilence to the list of quarantine diseases has added immensely, 
during the last 30 years, to the extension of the system as a whole, notwithstanding the 
mitigation of its restrictions as respects the one pestilence against which it was originally 
established ; viz. the plague. 

The southern coimtries of Europe, which had entirely escaped the cholera while the 
Baltic Provinces, Germany, and our own country were suffering in 1831-32, naturally 
enough at first ascribed their immunity to the more rigorous quarantine they had adopteo. 
Their escape, however, proved but temporary. From 1834 to 1837, Spain, Italy, &c. 
were successively invaded in spite of every effort to exclude the disease. 

Nowhere was rigorous quarantine, both by sea and land, kept up so pertinaciously to 
the last moment as m the Neapolitan dominions, and few countnes were eventually more' 
severely visited. Lord Palmerston, in a Despatch to our ambassador at Naples in 
December 1836, uses these words: — " It might have been expected that the experience of 
the last few years would have satisfied all Governments that quarantine regulations have 
everywhere proved ineffectual to arrest the progress of the cholera, and that consequently 
such regulations impose useless and unnecessary, and therefore unjustifiable, restrictions 
upon tiie commercial intercourse of nations." 

The signal failure of quarantine as respects the cholera had served still further to shake 
public confidence in its general efficiency, and had awakened the attention of our own 
Government and that of Prance to the necessity of considering the existing practice of 
it in reference to the plague more especially as complaints were being made continually 
both by ships of war and merchant shipping, of the intolerable obstructions they encoun- 
tered in most of the ports in the Mediterranean, to the detriment of the public service as 
well as of commerce and international communication. Moreover the careful researches 
on the eiK)t by various European physicians resident in Egypt, during the terrible epi* 
demic of plague there in 1835-36, had convinced them of the fallacy of the doctrines then 
in vogue respecting the usual mode of the origin and propagation of the disease, as well as 
of the uselessness of the complex and oppressive regulations generally directed against its 
apprehended importation by shipping into other countries. 

In 1838, a proposal was made by France to the British Government to promote the 
formation of a Congress of Delegates from the different European States having ports in the 
Mediterranean, for the purpose of adopting some uniform and more simjue system o£ 
quarantine in lieu of the intricate and discordant practice then in force, for in scarcely any 
two countries did the regulations agree. Lord Palmerston, then our Foreign Secretary, 
at once acceded to the proposal ; but, in consequence of difficulties interposed by Prince 
Mettemich on the part of the Austrian Government, the scheme dropped for the time. 

In 1839, the British Government instituted some independent inquiries in consequence 
mainly of a statement, in the able report of the Crown Commissioners who had been 
appointed to inquire into the affairs of Malta, that ^^ it is notorious that the mode or modes 
in which plague is commimicated are very imperfectiy known, and that some of the 
maxims upon which the most important quarantine regulations rest are littie better than 
gratuitous hypotheses." It was suggested that two or more medical men should be sent out 
by our Government to visit all those ports in the Levant where tiie plague most frequentiy 
exists, with the view of collecting ample and authentic information upon the manner in 
which it is propagated or liable to be communicated. 

Sir William JPym, to whom the subiect was referred by the Government, wisely recom- 
mended that a series of queries, which he drew out, respecting the alleged contagious or 
communicable properties of the plague, the usual period of its incubation, &c., should be 
forwarded to the consuls of different nations in the East, more especially to those at Alex- 
andria, for the purpose of obtaining from the resident medical men there, and from other 
competent persons, the most reliable information on the subject. 

It was to this judicious advice, happily acted upon by the Government, that we owe the 
large amount of important evidence of the many able French and Italian physicians, and 
also of our own countrymen, Drs. LaidlaW' and Abbott, published in tne voluminous 
" Correspondence relative to the contagion of Plague, and the Quarantine Regulations of 
Foreign Countries, 1836-1843," presented to the House of Commons by conunand of 
Her Majesty. This bulky Blue Book contains also the interesting re^rts of Dr. John 
Davy, who had been sent by Lord Palmerston to Constantinople to examine " the question 
whether it (the plague) is contagious or not," and to " give the Turkish Government your 
opinion as to the expediency of the quarantine arrangements which they intend to establish 
in Turkey." 

In a Despatch addressed to Lord Ponsonby the British Ambassador, in February 1839, 
Lord Palmerston says with great truth, — ^'^I have to instruct your Excellency to endeavour 
strongly to impress upon tiie Turkish Government that they would more effectually prevent 

the 



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PAPBKS RBLATING TO QUARANTINE. 47 

the breakinff out and spreading of the plague, by introducing cleanliness and ventilation in Appendix 
the city and suburbs of Constantinople, than by any such violent interference as is pro- --^* 

posed with the domestic arrangement of families. 

*^ It is quite certain that the plague is much aggravated, if it is not absolutely generated^ 
by the want of cleanliness in streets, by the want of sufficient ventilation in houses, and by 
the want of proper drainage in places contiguous to habitations; and if the Turkish 
Grovemment would, in the first instance, apply vigorous measures to correct these evils^ 
they would strike at once at the causes of me disease ; whereas the schemes which they 
have now in contemplation will only be productive of inconvenience and suffering to 
numerous individuals. 

In 1843, the Earl of Aberdeen, who was then Foreign Secretary, renewed the attempt 
in coiicurrence witii France to bring about a meeting of delegates ; but again the effort was 
marred by the dilatory policy of Austria. 

Foiled in direct action, France, through her Royal Academy of Medicine, now appointed 
a commission to examine minutelv into all the various questions in dilute respecting the 
plague, and the quarantines usually exercised against its introduction. 

The results of that inquiry, which extended over more than 12 months, are embodied in 
an elaborate and able report published in 1846. 

It is a work of the highest authority, and taken in connexion witii the evidence in our 
Parliamentary correspondence of 1836-43, it exploded, it is to be hoped for ever, the absurd 
doctrines respecting the properties of the plague which had so long been held, alike to the 
discredit of common sense and of science, and to the serious interruption of international in- 
tercourse. Plague was shown to be similar, in almost every respect, to the typhus and 
typhoid fevers of our own country, favoured by the like circumstances, and controllable 
by the same means. 

In the meantime, this country had not been altogether inactive. In the Session 'of 1844^ 
the House of Commons resolved that, *' This House approves of the various relaxations of 
ihe laws and regulations which have from time to time been introduced, and desires that 
such further relaxations may be urged upon the attention of foreign Governments and 
adopted at home, as may be found compatible with a due regard to the public health and 
the commercial interests of the community." And in October of the same year. Sir William 
Pym, the superintendent of quarantine, was directed to visit and report on all the stations 
in the Mediterranean where lazarets and quarantine establishments existed. His inquiries 
resulted in the recommendation of several very useful changes, all tending to the mitigation 
or the abolition of existing quarantine regulations and practice. He established beyond all 
dispute or contradiction this most important position among others, viz. tiiat there was no 
evidence whatever to show that a single case of plajgue, or of sickness at all like it, had ever 
been known to occur, in any country, from the manipulation of suspected or (declared to be) 
infected merchandise landed in a lazaxet If such were really the iact, where then, it was 
naturally asked, Ae necessity for the cumbrous and expensive procedures that were taken 
for preventing an evil which had in trutii no existence ? The records of lazarets also proved 
that diseases had seldom or never spread from even the sick to any other of the inmates or 
to the officials of these establishments.** 

In 1845, jpublic attention was strongly excited by the case of Her Majesty ^s Ship 
^* Eclair." On arri\'ing at the Motherbank from the coast of Africa, after a dreadful loss of 
life during the voyage from yellow fever, she was detained in strict quarantine for several 
days before any of the crew were permitted to be landed, and with the unfortunate result 
of some fresh attacks and deaths occurring on board subsequent to her reaching this country jl 
The circumstances gave rise to an official controversial correspondence between the Director 
of tiie Medical Department of the Navy and the medical officer of the Privy Council, as to 
the expediency or necessity of the practice that had been pursued on the occasion. 

In 1847, by successive Orders in Council, the quarantine restrictions upon all clean bill 
arrivals, first from the Black Sea and from ports of Turkey in Europe, and subsequentiy 
from those of Syria and Egypt, were abolished, and they were admitted at once to free 

?ratique with their cargoes, provided no case of sickness had occurred during the voyage, 
'he distinction hitiierto observed between what were termed susceptible and non-sus- 
ceptible articles of merchandise was, at the same time, done away with. Previous to these 
Orders, the quarantines imposed upon all arrivals from the Levant varied from 5 to 15 
days, according to the nature of the cargoes, &c. 

Towards the close of that year, the alarm caused by the apprehended return of the 
Asiatic cholera to Europe had given rise to very stringent measures in most of the 
Mediterranean ports, British as well a^s foreign. At Malta it was resolved, ^^ tiiat vessels 
arriving from ports where the disease then prevailed, and having on board cases of sick^ 
ness or death, or having had either the one or the other within 12 days previous to arrival 
at Malta, should not be permitted to enter even the quarantine harbour, out were to remain 
cruising in and off the harbour's mouth for such a number of days as the Board of Health 
decided." In December the French steamer " Pericles," having had a fatal case of cholera 
on board during her passage from Smyrna, was ordered, in consequence, to leave Malta 
forthwith. 

la 



* Correspondence respecting the Quarantine Laws, since the Correspondence lost presented to 
Parliament. May, 1846. 

544. 03 n J 

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48 PAPERS RELATING TO QUARANTINE. 

Appendix. In the summer of 1848^ in consequence of the continued advance of the peatilence towaid» 

— — the shores of Great Britain from the Continent, some precautionary r^ulations of a loM 

natnre were issued by the Privy Council on arrivab in this country frcmi infected porta. 
The General Board of Health instituted soon afterwards, having declared their opinion 
that the disease was not contagious, recommended the abolition of all quarantine restrict 
taons in respect of the cholera, and the substitution of sanitary measures in thie ports of 
arrival and departure, l^e first Beport on Quarantine by the Board was issued m 1849. 
This was followed bv a second Beport on Quarantine in rdTerence to yellow fever in 1862. 
In 1851, the British Gt)vemment sent two delegates, one consular and the other medkd, 
to the International Sanituy Conference then held in Paris in coneert with all the other 
Mediterranean Powers, witii the view of adopting, if nosnble, some unifiann mbem of 

Suarantine. A summary of the proceedii^s of ue Conference will be £Miiid im the 
Lppendix to the Parliamentary Paper — ^^ Copy of Abstract of Regulations in Foreign 
Countries respecting Quarantine " — prepared for the Quarantine Committee of the NalMal 
Association for the promotion of Sooal Scienoe ; it was ako printed in the Trummrtioi of 
the Association for the year 1859. 



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QUARANTINE. 



COPY of the Papebs relating to QuABiSTun^ 
communicated to the Board of Trade on tk 
dOthdajof JaljlSei. 



(Mr. Cave.) 



6 Aygiut 1861. 



[PHceQd.] 



544. 



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STEAM VESSELS. 



BETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commoni, 
dated 5 March 1861 ;-^y 



A RETURN, ^* ia a Tabular Form, with Consecutive Numbers, of the whole 
of the Stbam Vbssbls Registered in the United Kingdom on or before 
the Ist daj of January 1861 ; stating, in separate Colunms, the following 
Particulars :^-Official Number of Vessel ; Vessel's Name ; Port of Registry ; 
Date of Registry ; Date of Build ; Registered Owners ; Dimensions of 
Vessels in Length and Breadth, and Depth of Hold; Tonnage (exclusive 
of Engine Room) ; and Gross Tonnage, distinguishing Vessels built of Iron, 
and Vessels having Screw Propellers; also distinguishing Vessels measured 
under the Merchant Shipping Act of 1854 from those measured under 
previous Acts; and Estimated Horse Power of their Engines, and giving 
the Aggregate Number of Vessels and Amount of Tonnage ; vnth an Indbx 
for easy reference attached to it, giving the Names of the Vessels in 
Alphabetical Order, with Numbers to each, corresponding vnth the Con- 
secutive Numbers in the Return (in continuation of Parliamentary Paper, 
No. 449, of Session 1860)/* 



(xHr. Baring.) 



Ordered, hy The House of Commons, to be Primed, 
24 June i85i. 



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NUMBER AND NAMES OF REGISTRRBD STEAM VESSBLS 











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David Hart 

Royal Mail Packet Company 
Woolwich Steam Packet Company 
Richard Davies and another - . - 
Peninsular and Oriental Company 

David Hart 

Peninsular and Oriental Company 
Stephanos Xenos ..... 
W. S. Lindsay and another ... 
R. M. Philipps & Co. .... 
Hugh Taylor and others - - - - 
James Letten and others .... 
W. & J. Watkins 

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Stephanos Xeuos 

John Hoiich -..--. 

T. B. Morton 

J. S. Russell and another .... 
Henry Lee & Son ..... 
Royal Mail Packet Company ... 
Peninsular and Oriental Company 

R. S. Walker and others .... 
Stephanie Xenos - * . - . 

Alexander Perceval 

General Steam Navigation Company - 

- - - ditto 

William Corry, jun., and others - - - 
Peninsular and Oriental Company 

Z. C. Pearson 

Stephanos Xenos - - - - - 

Western Wood - - - 

Stephanos Xenos - - - - - 

Henry Hindmarsh 

Richard Green --•--. 

T.E. Smith 

K. B. Durham and another ... 

Peninsular and Oriental Company 

A Littlewood -..--- 


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