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ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS; 



THIRTY-SEVEN VOLUMES. 



-w- 



ARMY; NAVY; ORDNANCE. 



Session 
19 January 23 July 1 847. 

VOL. XXXVI. 



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ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS 
1847. 



THIRTY-SEVEN VOLUMES:— CONTENTS OF THE 
THIRD VOLUME. 



N.B. — THE Figures at the beginning of the line, correspond with the N° at the 
foot of each Paper; and the Figures at the end of the line, refer to the MS. Paging 
of the Volumes arranged for The House of Commons. 



ARMY: 

Army and Militia : 

428. Account of the finally audited Receipt and Expenditure for Array and Militia 
Services, compared with the Sums estimated, for the year ended 31st March 
1846, &c. p, 1 

Commissariat : 

253.-II. Abstracts of the Account of the Receipts into and Payments from the several 
Commissariat Chests abroad, from 1st April 1845 to 31st March 1846 - 17 

253.-I. Receipt and Expenditure for Commissariat Services in the Year ended 
31st March 1846 .---------51 

Army: 

508. Copy of the Warrant, dated 1st May 1846, regulating the Grants of Unattached 
ray, Retired Full-pay, and Half-pay ; also, Return of the Number of Quarter- 
masters, Veterinary and Regimental Surgeons, and Paymasters, who have 
retired on Half-pay under that Warrant ------ 55 

Army Commissions : 

197. Return of the Number of Non-commissioned Officers appointed to Commissions 
in each Year, from 1st January 1836 to 31st December 1846, &c. - - 63 

Half-pay (Army) : 

371. Return of Officers who have been allowed to receive their Half-pay since 1st April 
1846, under the Provisions of the Act of 9 & 10 Vict., c. 116, s. 25 - 65 

Military Savings Banks : 

214. Account of the Amount due by the Public to Depositors in Military Savings 
Banks, on 31st March 1845, & c » * " "" - - - -67 

337. Return showing the Sums deposited in, and withdrawn from, Military Savings 
Banks during the Year ending 31st March 1846, and the Stations of the several 
Corps ............ 6q 

Army, Ordnance, and Marines : 

<?^- — HottimR Cif l?A/>riiita o+toato/1 Kofiwflfln 1 of Av\**i1 iQac an/1 oia+ HffAwtn 1Q.1*.. *.£ 



iv ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS: 1847. 



Yeomanry : 

494. Return of the Number of Troops, or Corps, or Regiments, of Effective Yeomanry, 
in Great Britain and Ireland, according to the Muster Rolls of 1842, 1843, 
1844, 1845 and 1846; &c. - - - - p. 81 

NAVY: 

Navy : 

35. Copy of an Account of the Naval Receipt and Expenditure, for the Year ended 
31st March 1846 ---------- 89 

103. Statement of Excess of Expenditure for Her Majesty's Navy, for the Year 

1845-46 95 

34. Copy of the Admiralty Minute restricting Naval Promotion to one Vacancy in 
Three; &c. -----------97 

55. Return of the Number of Commissioned Officers of all Grades on the Navy List, 
on the 1st January 1816 ---------59 

429. Return of all Vessels that have been purchased since 1830 into the Royal Navy, 

including those condemned under the Acts relative to the Slave Trade ; stating 
the Tonnage, and the Price paid for each - - - - - -101 

Navy Officers : 

104. Return of Navy Officers who have Died, been Dismissed, and been Promoted, 

between 27th February 1830 and 30th September 1846 - - - - 103 

Navy: 

212. Return of the Number of Boys of the First and Second Class for General Service 
received on Board the several Flag Ships at Portsmouth and Devonport, during 
the several Months of August, September, October, November and December 
1846- ------------ 10 5 

Boys (Navy) : 

430. Return of Boys entered on Board Her Majesty's Ships or Vessels of War, in 

1846 107 

Corporal Punishments (Navy) : 

69. Copy of the Order given by the Admiralty to Officers to submit to the Commander- 
in-Chief at the Ports, for his approval, Crimes that require Corporal 
Punishment - - - - - - - - - - -109 

Corporal Punishments (Army) : 

81. Return of Persons Flogged in the Army in Great Britain and Ireland in 1845 
and 1846, to the end of July; &c. - - - - - - -ill 

Corporal Punishment (Navy) : 

661. Return of the Number of Persons Flogged in the Navy in 1845 and 1846; and 
Abstract of the Total Number of Corporal Punishments, and Number of Lashes 
inflicted, in 1844, 1845 and 1846 - - - - - - -121 

Dock Yards : 

122. Copy of Circular to the Admirals and Captains superintending Her Majesty's 
Dock Yards ...---..---141 

Timber. 

\ x 158. Return of British Oak Timber, &c, delivered for each of Her Majesty's Dock 
\ Yards, under Contract of 19th December 1843 to 1845, Sec. - - - 151 

Lightning Conductors (Navy) : 

629. Returns relative to certain Ships of the Navy struck by Lightning since the 
Report of the Naval Commission on Lightning Conductors, &c. - _ - 157 ^ 

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Naval Construction : 



ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS: 1847. 



Paddle-box Boats : 

121. Extract from Commander Caffin'% Report relative to the advantage of Paddle- 
box Boats in the Surf, during the Operations for extricating the Sphynx p. 177 

381. Copy of Reports of Captains Austin and Coffin concerning the Paddle-box 
Safety Boats 179 

448. Copy of the Report and Recommendation to the Board of Trade from Captain 
Denham, respecting the Paddle-box Safety Boats - - - - - 183 

Paymasters and Pursers (Navy) : 

578. Copy of the Order in Council relative to the Reduction of the Sea Emoluments 
of Paymasters and Pursers of the Royal Navy, to be applied to an Increase 
of their Half-pay; the Annual Amount accruing; and Return of all Sums 
applied to such Increase of Half-pay since the passing of such Order in 
Council ------------ 185 

Peninsular and Oriental Steam Packet Company : 

117. Copies of the Contracts entered into between Her Majesty's Government and 
the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Packet Company - - - - 189 

Provisions (Navy) : # 

662. Return of all Sums that have annually accrued in the Victualling Department of 
the Navy by the Reduction in the Credit Prices of Provisions, under the 
Instructions from the Admiralty, dated 1st April 1844 (in continuation of Par- 
liamentary Paper, No. 578, Sess. 1847) " • - - " -213 

Seamen: 

279. Return of the Number of Seamen Afloat, above the Estimate, and the Number 
of Seamen that the Channel Squadron are short of Complement - - 215 

Sailing Ships and Steam Vessels : 

326. Return of the following Sailing Ships and Steam Vessels of War ; " Raleigh," " Con- 
stance," "Thetis," "Eurydice," "Spartan," "Terrible," "Retribution," 
" Trident," " Sidon," and " Odin ; " showing the various Particulars of their 
Construction, Sailing and Steaming Qualities, &c. - - - - - 217 

Steam Vessels (Navy) : 

52. Return of Screw Steam Vessels laid down and launched since 1st January 

1840; also, of Iron Steam Vessels laid down and launched from the same 

• time ; distinguishing those with Screw, their Tonnage, Horse-Power and 

Armament ------------ 221 

Ships " Eurydice " and " Spartan " : 

507. Copy of the Official Reports and Diagrams of Her Majesty's Ship "Eurydice," 
in August and September 1846 ; also, the Number of Men and Boys victualled, 
&c, on Board Her Majesty's Ships " Spartan " and " Eurydice," &c. - 225 

Ships " Powerful," &c. : 

432. Copies of the Logs of the "Powerful," "Rodney," "Ganges," "Vanguard," 
"Cambridge" and "Revenge," on 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th and 6th December 
1840 245 

Ship "Thetis": 

431. Copy of the Correspondence between the Board of Admiralty and the Officers 
Commanding on the Coast of Brazil ; and between Captain Dickinson, Com- 
manding Her Majesty's Ship "Lightning," and the Officers Commanding 
on the Coast of Brazil, *in the Years 1830, 1831 and 1832, respecting the 
Recovery of the Public Stores and Treasure sunk in Her Majesty's Ship 

" Thetis," at Cape Frio - 28; 

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vi ACCOUNTS AND PAPERS: 1847. 



s 



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ORDNANCE: 

Barracks : 

i6g. Return from each Barrack in the United Kingdom relative to the Date of Erection, 
Materials, &c. - - - - - - - - - - -p. 321 

Royal Arsenal (Woolwich) : 

166. Copies of Evidence taken on Charges preferred by Daniel Toner against William 
Jones, and Report thereon; and of Charges and Evidence against Daniel 
Toner, and Correspondence thereon ------- 407 

Shrapnel Shells: 

596. Return of the Number of Shrapnel Shells ordered to be manufactured for the 
British and East India Company's Armies, since the Period of this Shell having 
been adopted by Government for the Use of the National Forces - - 465. 

Trigonometrical Surveys : 

171. Abstract of the Amount paid since the Commencement up to January 1847; 
Number of Maps finished, Sheets sold, Rate per Sheet, Sec. - 467 

Mr. Warner's Invention : 

165. Copy of Report of Officers appointed to make a Trial of Mr. Warner's Long 
Range 473 

250. Copies of the Instruction given by the Board of Ordnance to the Officers 
appointed for the Examination of the Invention of Mr. Warner, called the 
Long Range, and of the Journal of the Proceedings of the Officers so 
appointed ------------ 475 

302. Account of Public Money placed at the Disposal of the Officers appointed by 
Her Majesty's Government to report upon the Trials to be made of Mr. 
Warner's Invention, called "Long Range/' to, enable him to exhibit its 
Powers, &c. ----------- 485 



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ARMY AND MILITIA SERVICES. 



AN ACCOUNT 



or THB 

FINALLY AUDITED RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE 

FOB 

ARMY AND MILITIA SERVICES, 

COMPABEP WITH THE SUMS ESTIMATED, 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED THE 31st DAY OF MARCH 1846: 

▲KD 

BALANCE SHEET, 

(Showing the Ledger Balances on the 31*/ March 1847, the Date on which 

the preceding Account was closed.) 



(PRESENTED BY HER MAJESTrS COMMAND.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
30 May 1847. 



428. 



AN ACCOUNT OF THE RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE FOR ARMY 



AN ACCOUNT of the RECEIPT and EXPENDITURE for ARMY and 




To Balance remaining on the Grants for Army and Militia Services forj 
1844-45 and prior Years, as shown in the Balance Sheet for 1844-45, to be 
appropriated as a Surplus in aid of "Ways and Means," when the Account of I 
the East India Company for the Advances made out of the Army Grants fori 
those Years, as shown on page 12, on account of Recruiting and other Expenses | 
for Regiments employed in India, shall have been adjusted ... 

To Amount granted for Army Services for the Year 1846-40, per Act 8 & Vict c 130 $ viz.- 

For Effective Services £,3,880,971 - 

For Non-Effective Services 2,148,301 - 

To Amount granted for Militia Services by the same Act ; vis.— 

For Effective Services £. 52,683 - 

For Non-Effective Services 93,611 - 



£. $. d. 



203,814 19 



To Amount received as Appropriations in aid of the Sums voted on the Army Estimates, 

for the Year 1846-46 ; viz.— 



In aid of" Land Forces :" 
Effects and Remittances 



of Officers and Soldiers, andl 



and"! 
Deserters' Balances (see Miscellaneous Charges, page 8) -J 

Purchased Discharges 

Smart Money ---.-.--- 

Proceeds of the Sale of Cast Horses 

Penalties for Offences under the Mutiny Act ... 

Anonymous Remittances 

Sums recovered on Old Accounts - 

Contribution from the Revenues of Ceylon in aid of Mili- 
tary Expenditure -------- 

Ditto ditto - - Ionian Islands, ditto - 

Ditto ditto - - Malta - - ditto • 

£. 
In aid of " Staff Officers :" 

Contribution from the Revenues of the Ionian Islands 

In aid of the " Royal Military College:" 

Subscriptions of the Gentlemen Cadets, &c. - 

In aid of the "Royal Military Asylum and Hibernian School:' 9 
Dividends on Stock, Sale of Old Materials, &c. 

In aid of "Half Pay :" 

Surplus on the Sales of Commissions of Officers, and Balances 
on Accounts of Lunatic Officers - 

In aid of " Widows' Pensions :" 

Dividends on Drouly Stock 



ACTUAL 
RECEIPTS. 



£. *. d. 

54,337 9 1 

38,594 6 3 

2,358 11 - 

5,008 3 8 

57 14 - 

19 - - 

818 5 - 

24,000 - - 

270 - - 



In aid of " Chelsea Hospital :" 

Dividends on Stock, Burmese Prize Money, &c. 

In aid of" Kilmaikham Hospital:" 
Interest on Debentures, &c. - 



In aid of " Superannuation Allowances :" 

Abatements from Salaries for the Superannuation Fund 



£. 



125,463 9 - 

4,769 16 3 

16,385 8 8 

390 - 4 

5,033 6 11 

324 - - 

9,609 8 4 

23 15 v 8 

476 8 6 



ESTIMATED 
RECEIPTS, 

P" 
Army Estimate. 



£. «. d. 

54,387 - - 

24,290 - - 

1,209 — - 

3,708 - - 

83 - - 

19 - - 

818 - - 

24,000 - - 

270 - - 

6,200 - - 



162,475 12 8 



114,934 - - 

4,770 - - 

17,918 - - 

848 - - 

6,791 - - 

824 - - 

9,836 - - 



5,979,272 - 



146,294 - - 



496 - - 



155,417 - - 

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182,475 12 8 



Google 



AND MILITIA SERVICES, FOR THE TEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 1846. 



MILITIA SERVICES, for the Financial Year ended 31 March 1846. 



EFFECTIVE SERVICES: 

By Land Forces 

- StaffOfficers 

- Public Departments 

- Royal Military College 

- Royal Military Asylum and Hibernian School 

- Volunteer Corps - - - - 

- Unprovided Services (former Years) - 

NON-EFFECTIVE SERVICES: 

By Rewards for distinguished Services - 

- Army Pay of General Officers 

- Full Pay of Retired Officers 

- Half Pay and Military Allowances - 

- Foreign Half Pay and Pensions - 

- Pensions to Foreign Widows and Children ... 

- Widows' Pensions 

- Compassionate List ------- 

- Royal Bounty 

- Pensions for Wounds - ..... 

- Chelsea Hospital, In and Out Pensions ... 

- Kilmainham Hospital 

- Superannuation Allowances - - - - 

MILITIA: 

By Pay and other Charges for Militia Effective Services - 

- Reduced Officers of Disembodied Militia - . . 

- Reduced Officers of Local Militia .... 

- Militia Out-Pensions - - 



By Amount of Expenditure on account of Supplies in kind' 
to the Troops at Hong Kong, between the 1st September 
1843 and the 81st March 1844, charged to the Grants of v 
Parliament for Army Services for the Year 1845-46, by ( 
direction of the Lords Commissioners of Her Majesty's 
Treasury 



£. 



EXPENDITURE, 


GRANTS, 




1845-46. 


including Appropriation* 
actually reearod. 




£. $. <L 

8,526,019 7 9 


£. s. d. 
3,555,962 9 - 


(See Explanatory 
\Paper (A.) 


161,519 1 8 


159,868 16 3 


ditto - (B.) 


90,801 7 10 


89,412 - - 


ditto - (CO 


16,798 12 8 


16,385 8 8 




18,525 6 1 


13,590 - 4 




82,182 7 8 


86,168 - - 




50,198 18 10 


56,593 - - 




13,807 2 10 


14,148 - - 




67,352 7 11 


78,000 - - 




59,941 15 1 


62,000 - - 


« 


432,639 16 1 


446,033 5 11 




41,314 6 5 


41,705 - - 




10,278 18 2 


10,547 - - 




181,527 1 9 


142,172 - - 




22,281 15 - 


1 




19,353 8 2 


> 105,000 - - 




62,794 - 4 






1,205,163 6 7 


1,221,017 8 4 


(See Explanatory 
\Paper (D.) 


9,192 9 5 


9,168 15 8 




37,854 7 7 


88,976 8 6 




45,090 6 2 


52,688 - - 




48,495 19 - 


46,307 - - 




6,750 4 4 


6,862 - -r 




39,569 17 8 


40,442 - - 




6,189,447 5 - 


6,288,041 12 8 




12,041 - 10 






6,201,488 5 10 


6,288,041 12 8 

Digitizec 


IbyGOOQl 



AN ACCOUNT OF THE RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE FOR ARMt 



Paper (A.)— Explanatory of the Charge of £.3,526,019. 7. 9. for "Land Forces.* 



I.- PAY: 



Pay of Officers, Cavalry * - 

Ditto - Infantry 

Pay of Non-commissioned Officers and Rank and File, Cavalry 
Ditto ditto - • Infantry 

Additional Pay of Officers, Cavalry ....... 

Ditto ... - Infantry ....... 

Additional Pay of Non-commissioned Officers and Rank and. File, Cavalry 
Ditto - - ditto - - Infantry 

Good Conduct Pay, including Cost of Badges ..... 



Beer Money ------..--. 

Allowance to Commanding Officers ....... 

Allowances to Acting Staff Officers and Non-commissioned Officers of Dep6ts,1 
Reserve Battalions, and Detachments of Infantry of the Line - J 

Pay of Officers supernumerary to the Establishments of the Royal Horse"! 
UuarcU and the Tliree Regiments of Foot Guards -J 

Compensation to Officers of the Royal Horse Guards for Reduction of Pay! 
of their present Rank .-.--...- -J 

Pay of Military Labourers, West Indies, Jamaica, Africa and the Mauritius 

Subsistence of Men in confinement ---.-«.. 



expenditure, 

1845-46. 



Allowance for paying the Three Regiments of Household Cavalry 

Allowance to Quartermasters of Foot Guards for making up Accounts 

Allowances to Acting Paymasters of the tliree West India Regiments 

Allowance to the acting Paymaster of the St* Helena Regiment 

Ditto • ditto - - Newfoundland Companies 

Allowances to Officers acting as Adjutants and Quartermasters of Colonial Corps,! 
and to Acting Non-com missioned Officers of Colonial Corps . . .j 

Allowances to Paymasters of Regiments abroad, absent at home on sick leave • 



II.— ANNUAL ALLOWANCES: — 

Non-effective Allowance to Field Officers ...... 

Contingent Allowance to Captains 

Allowance to Captains of Rifle Corps - • - • - - 
Allowance to Foot Guards in lieu of Stock Purse Fund* for Recruiting and! 



Hospital Expenditure 
Allowance to Officers of the Cape Corps for providing Horses 
Allowance to Riding Masters - • - 
Allowance for Farriery --.-.., 

Batta and other Indian Allowances to Regiments in China 

UL— AGENCY: 
Agency, as borne ota Establishment - 

1 Stationery 



£. s. 4. 

140,3*8 5 3 

639>399 »3 6 

194,635 * n 

1,628,291 2 7 

4,881 11 - 
17,110 13 11 

i»568 19 4 

28,469 1 1 

31,859 19 3 

75,043 15 10 

4,662 18 - 

9,363 4 3 

2,322 15 10 

430 10 3 

3*30 19 6 

13,533 14 5 

315 - - 

140 - - 

496 a 9 

109 10 - 

91 5 - 

548 10 5 

58 15 - 



ESTIMATE, 
1845-46. 



2,786,891 9 - 



5,602 1 - 

41,399 3 * 

4,033 14 8 

9»«57 u 6 

400 1 8 

3,182 16 - 

9,3*4 « 5 

31,013 13 5 



94.113 13 4 



36,736 17 5 

1.20Q IO Q 



£. s. <L 

140,779 15 - 
653,553 9 4 

195,396 8 11 
i,649>733 12 8 

4t964 - - 
21,014 17 6 

1,657 H 3 
36,985 13 4 

19,013 9 1 

76,500 - - 
4,873 15 - 

9>934 - - 

3,510 - - 

500 - - 

4,395 - - 
10,809 * - 

315 - - 
140 

839 10 - 

333 - - 
182 10 - 



M»44*8 8 - 



43,948 1 4 

4,252 10 - 

9>357 « 6 

410 16 8 

3,206 2 - 

9*505 4 * 

25,000 - - 



100,178 5 8 



37,317 17 1 



AND MILITIA 8EKTICBS, FOE THE YEA* IN DID SI MA RGB 1846. 



Papbr (A.) co mlmusd . 



IV_CLOTHING: 
Allowances to Colonels for providing Clothing .... 
Special Allowance to the Colonel of the Grenadier Guards 
Allowances to Colonels for providing Clothing for Supernumeraries - 

Cost of Patterns, marking Great Coats, &c. 

Allowance for Winter Clothing in North America - 



Allowances to Colonels of certain Cavalry Regiments, to cover Deficiencies in' 
their Emoluments •-.----••• -J 



£. 



V.— PROVISIONS: 
Allowances in aid of Regimental Mess • 



Table Allowance, Ac, for Officers on Guard at St James's and at Dublin Castle 

pedal and ' 
high price 



Special and Temporary Allowance to Officers at St. Helena, on account of the! 
i of Provisions *••-.---.-/ 



Vl_FORAGE : 

Money Allowances to Field and Staff Officers of Infantry at Home in lieu ofl 
Forage J 



£. 



VIL— LODGING: 
Lodging Money of Officers on leave of Absence from the West Coast of Africa - 
Lodging Money for Men quartered on the Inhabitants in Scotland and Ireland - 



Lodging Money of Men permitted, as an indulgence, to find their own Lodging 
when the Corps is in Barracks ....... 



Allowance for Men m Stationary Quarters 



VIII.-HOSPITAL EXPENSES, MEDICINES AND TREATMENT 

OF THE SICK : 
Charges of General and Regimental Hospitals at Home and Abroad - 
Cost of Medicines and Surgical instruments, including Charges for Carriage 
Payments to private Medical Practitioners and Medical Bills - 

Subscriptions to Royal Westminster Ophthalmic Hospital and to the Westminster' 
and St George's Hospitals - j 

Cost of Horse Medicines . 



Stoppages from the Pay of Soldiers and others in! £ ^ gg 
Contribution from Farriery Allowance for Horse\ ftrr to 



EXPENDITURE, 
1846-46. 



£. $. d. 
•67,717 9 " 
1,093 8 10 
4»o&> 11 5 
240 4 10 
£,684 16 11 

&850 - - 



279,646 11 11 



} 



17*454 * 9 
fr©04 5 6 

9«7 9 - 



ESTIMATE, 
1846-46. 



£. s. <L 

•71,163 7 10 

1,093 8 io 

3,000 - - 

589 

3,267 14 - 

3,833 6 8 



282,946 17 4 



23*445 17 3 



7,935 3 " 



17,177 

5&H 5 8 

994 - - 



*3,175 5 • 



152 15 - 

1,426 18 8 

120 15 11 

1,056 5 11 



«,756 15 6 



5*,5*5 ** 5 

10,611 16 3 

3,430 7 a 

60 10 - 

475 16 4 



67,104 i a 



5,359 - - 



105 
408 

307 

957 



1,777 



5M17 - 
10,032 - 

3,690 - 
60 10 
358 - 



66*57 



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AN ACCOUNT OF THE RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE FOR ARMY 



Paper (A.)— continued. 



IX.— DIVINE SERVICE : 

Payments to officiating Clergymen performing Dirine Service at Home and^ 
Abroad ------------- 



Cost and Carriage of Religious Books 



X, -MOVEMENT OF TROOPS: 
Hire of Carriages on Marches, including Conveyance of Invalids 

Allowance to Officers on a March by Route 

Marching Money for Men, including Allowance for hot Meal in England 
Travelling Expenses of Officers ---..-•- 



Passages of Officers and Men from one Port to another in the United Kingdom,! 
Charges for Conveyance by Railway or Canal, and for Ferries -J 



Allowances to Officers detained at Ports of Embarkation 



Conveyance of Wives and Children not allowed to embark with Soldiers ordered! 
to proceed on Service Abroad -.--.--- -j 



XL— ADMINISTRATION OF MARTIAL LAW: 

Salaries of Governors and Officers of District Military Prisons in Great Britain,! 
and Provost Prisons in Ireland, and Contingent Expenses - - - -J 

Allowances to Non-Commissioned Officers acting as Provost-Serjeants in Gar-" 
rison and Barrack Cells --.------ - 1 



Salary of the Inspector-General of Military Prisons 
Cost of Law Proceedings - 



Allowance to Acting Deputy Judge-Advocates, and Members and Witnesses! 
at Courts Martial, including Travelling Expenses -J 



Apprehension, Subsistence and Escort of Deserters ... 

Subsistence and Necessaries of Soldiers sentenced to Transportation, &c. 



XII.— LIBRARIES AND SCHOOLS: 
Purchase of Books for Barrack Libraries at Home and Abroad 



Deduct,— Amount of Subscriptions, &c. 



EXPENDITURE, 
1845-46. 



£. *. d. 

13>791 13 6 
88a 8 - 



14,674 1 6 



10,752 19 10 

4*47$ 5 6 

9,679 18 6 

1,606 4 6 

22,53* 5 - 

540 15 - 

308 14 7 



49,897 2 11 



5*399 l6 5 

9>5 7 3 

250 - - 

83 18 7 

2,175 19 10 

2,136 7 3 

102 4 9 



11,063 14 1 



2,169 3 9 
502 2 - 



1,667 1 9 

Digitized by 



ESTIMATE, 
1845-46. 



£. #• d. 

13,10O - - 
1,000 - - 



14,100 - - 



. 9>972 
4»4<>3 
9*342 
2,169 

21,998 
500 
170 



48,554 - - 



4,280 - - 

50a - - 

200 - - 

84 - - 

1,680 - - 

2,854 - - 

116 - - 



9*7H - - 



2,000 
500 



1,500 - - 



Google 



AND MILITIA SERVICES, FOR THR YRAR RNDRD 31 MARCH 1846. 



7 



Paper (A.) — continued. 



XIII.-ESTABLISHMENTS : 
Chatham Garrison ........ 

Invalid Dep6t, Chatham - 

Provisional Battalion, Chatham ...... 

Establishment at Portsmouth ...... 

Depdt Battalion, Isle of Wight 

Riding Establishment at Maidstone ..... 

Depots of Cavalry Regiments in the East Indies ... 

Superintendent of Sword Exercise, Pay and Travelling Expenses 

Inspector of Regimental Colours, Salary .... 

Drum-Major-general, Pay of* 

Medical Museum at Chatham ...... 



XIV.—RECRUITING: 
Charge for the Recruiting Department in London - 

Salary of the General Ag&it, Clerks, Office Rent, ozc. 



Charge for Recruiting Districts, Pay, Allowances, Clothing, and Contingent 1 
Expenses ........... -J 



Allowances and Expenses of Superintending Officers .... 

Levy Money of Recruits, and Allowances for Cavalry Equipments - 

x 
Levy Money of Recruits of Colonial Corps ...... 

Allowance lor the Purchase of Horses for the Household Cavalry - 

Purchase of Horses for the Cavalry of the Line, iucluding Expenses of the samel 
prior to joining Regiments ........ .j 



Purchase of Remount Horses for the Cape Corps - 
Travelling Expenses of Officers on the Recruiting Service 
Marching Allowance to Recruits, Escorts, ozc. 
Medical Attendance on Recruiting Parties and Recruits - 
Travelling Allowances to rejected Recruits ... 



XV.— DISCHARGES AND FAMILY ALLOWANCES: 

Allowances to Discharged Soldiers and their Families, to take them home (in- 
cluding Detention Pav), and to Widows and Children of deceased Soldiers, 
and Maintenance of Orphans ....... 



(in-1 
iersA 



Gratuities to discharged Soldiers, including the Cost of Silver Medals 



XVI.-.REGIMENTAL SAVINGS BANKS: 



£. 



EXPENDITURE, 
1845-46. 



£. *. d. 
1,293 8 3 

1,97* 6 4 

1,9*9 3 * 

180 l* li 

2,284 14 3 

>2i 10 - 

182 10 - 

354 14 3 
60 - - 
28 17 11 

246 15 7 



8^53 1* 8 



1,574 1 4 

1,381 17 - 

22,672 4 7 

5>534 5 9 

60,787 1 1 

2,650 17 6 

3,36o - - 

15,698 12 9 

1,638 15 - 

86 19 11 

5>656 13 - 

334 11 4 

266 15 2 



121,642 14 5 



ESTIMATE, 
1845-46. 



£. t. d. 

1,^93 15 5 

1,899 - 7 

1,822 - 2 

180 18 11 

2,252 7 6 

421 10 - 

182 10 - 

3«3 *5 - 

60 - - 

28 17 7 

250 - - 



8,7H *5 « 



1,611 - - 

1,350 

22,171 - 1 

5,334 7 6 

45,287 10 - 

4,000 - - 

3,36o - - 

20,125 - - 

1,000 - - 

160 - - 

2,860 * - 

393 - - 

213 - - 



107,864 i? 7 



6,362 10 3 
3,169 4 8 



5>559 - - 
3.H3 - - 



9^31 14 n 



Digitized 






8,672 - - 



AN ACCOUNT OF T«S RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE FOR ARMY 



Papse (AJ^conHnued. 



\ 



XVII— MISCELLANEOUS : 

Regimental Postagt and Stationery, Hire of Guard and Store Rooms, &c 

Allowance* to Officers and Hen for Loss of Baggage, and of Necessaries and 
Horses, and Compensation for Officers' Horses Shot for the Glanders, and for 
Appointments destroyed to prevent Infection - - - 

Field Allowances to Officers encamped - 

Barrel Bulk Allowance --.-..--. 

Hire of Ground for Exercise and Ball Practice 

Cost of Military Publications and Gazettes ------ 

Allowances to certain Soldiers of Cavalry in lieu of Boots, Spurs, &c. 

Allowances to First Majors of Foot Guards, in lieu of Apartments at the Horse! 
Guards, and of Coals and Candles --------j 

Compensation to First Majors of Foot Guards for loss of Rent of Suttling House! 
at"St. James's • -.-.-. J 

Allowance to Officers for the Hire of Black Male Servants on Tropical Stations 

Remittances and Effects of Officers and Soldiers (see Appropriations in Aid,l 
page a) -...-- J 

Various small Expenses --.------. 



XVUI.— GUERNSEY AND JERSEY MILITIA: 



Guernsey 
Jersey 



£. 



EXPENDITURE, 
1846-40. 



£. $. d. 

6,524 17 11 

5*6 7 8 

3,001 7 a 

593 * *° 

*55 15 - 

s8i 9 4 

484 13 1 

266 18 4 

50 10 7 

5,378 11 11 

64t447 7 5 

851 16 9 



72,562 18 - 



M»5 7 9 
1,677 10 11 



2,702 18 8 



RECAPITULATION: 

I. Pay 

II. Anitual Allowances -•--.-•- 

IIL Agency 

IV. Clothing 

T. Provisiohs -----•-•-- 

VI. Forage 

VII. Lodging ------ 

VIII; Hospital Expenses, Medicines, and Treatment of the Sick 

IX. Divine Service - 

X. Movement of Troops -.-----. 

XI. Administration of Martial Law - 
XII. Libraries and Schools •------. 

XIIL Estabushments ------... 

XIV. Recruiting ----<.--•... 

XV. Discharges and Family Allowances 

XVI. Regimental 8a vinos Banks •----.. 
XVIL Miscellaneous ---•--... 
XVIII. Guernsey and Jersey Militaa 



2,786,891 

94,113 

28,046 

279,646 

23,445 

7>935 

3,756 

4479 

*4,674 

49,897 

11,063 

5,9*9 

8,953 

121,642 

9,531 

1,755 

72^62 

2,702 



9 - 

13 4 
17 2 

11 11 

17 3 
3 11 

15 6 
10 - 

1 6 

2 11 

14 1 

" 5 

12 8 

H 5 

14 11 

- 1 

18 - 
18 8 



ESTIMATE, 
1845-46. 



6,734 - - 

1,000 - - 

51 - - 

507 - - 

350 - - 

272 - — 

610 - - 

266 18 4 

165 10 9 

5,855 - - 

54,447 7 5 

2,000 - - 



72,258 16 6 



1,035 *o 3 
1,628 6 - 



2,663 16 3 



3,5*6,019 

Digitized 



byVj 



3,834,318 8 

100,178 5 

«8.338 17 

388,946 17 

83,175 5 

5.359 

1,777 

338 10 - 

M,IO0 

48,55+ 

9»7»4 

5>835 - - 

8,7»4 15 « 

107,864 17 7 

8,673 - - 

750 - _ 

78,358 16 6 

3,663 16 3 



3 9 3 

oogie 



3.545*33 
30Ql( 



AND MILITIA SERVICES, FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 1846. 



Paper (B.)— .Explanatory of the Charge of £. 161,519. 1. 8. for " Staff Officers." 



Staff at Home 
(f . 69,681. 18. 9.) 



Pay of General Staff - 
Pay of Medical Staff - 
Additional Pay of General Staff 
Additional Pay of Medical Staff 
Forage Allowances 
Lodging Allowances 
Postage and Stationery - 
Travelling Expenses 
Pay of Clerks 

Office Rent .... 
Fuel and Candle Allowances - 
Miscellaneous Expenses 
kGarrison of the Tower of London 



Staff Abroad 
(£.91,937. 2. 11.) 



'Pay of General Staff 

Pay of Medical Staff ' 

Additional Pay of General Staff 

Additional Pay of Medical Staff, and Allowance to PrinO 
cipal Medical Officers -J 



Pay of Clerks, Boatmen, &c. 

Money Allowances and Contingent Expenses 



Add, — Fractions voted 



Totals for " Staff Officers ' 



• £. 



EXPENDITURE, 
1846-46. 



£. S. d. 
25,7122 6 8 
i*,384 5 6 



1.957 8 - 
6,361 14 a 

6,948 9 

797 4 
i,au 9 

5,«i8 4 

798 16 8 

357 i° « 
4,302 9 3 
3,632 - 8 



69,581 18 9 

28,468 6 3 

25*003 5 6 

157 19 - 

4,107 10 - 

16,922 10 6 

17,277 11 8 



161,519 1 8 



161,519 1 8 



ESTIMATE, 
1845*46. 



£. 

*5,859 
11,827 

118 
i,97i 
4»9«7 
6,330 

449 
1,153 
4,88* 

698 

337 
5,«i9 
3,9H 



$. a. 

4 5 

12 6 

12 6 

12 6 

7 11 

ID 1 

14 * 

18 1 

12 6 

17 3 

7 * 

10 8 



67,688 

28,647 

25,997 
118 

5,319 
15,168 
16,928 



- 1 

18 9 

2 6 

12 6 

17 6 

18 5 
1 7 



159,868 11 4, 
- 4 11 



159,868 16 3 



Paver (C.)— Explanatory of the Charge of £.90,801. 7. 10. for "Public Departments. 1 



MILITARY DEPARTMENTS. 



Commander-in-Chief - 

Adjutant-General • 



f Salaries and Contingencies 
"[Postage - 

f Salaries and Contingencies 
"(postage . . 



~ _ /Sakri^g ^d Contingencies 

0l7ARTERaiASTER-GENBRAL -< pw 



EXPENDITURE* 
1845-46. 




ESTIMATE, 
1845-46. 



£. 



d. 



15>741 19 lc > 
7*3 « ^ 

8,017 18 3 
4,820 19 * 

JbyC5<>7 18 ?|e 
»75 5 *o 



10 



AN ACCOUNT OF THE RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE FOR ARMY 



Paper (C.)— continued. 





EXPENDITURE, 
1845-46. 


ESTIMATE,, 
1845-46. 


Brought forward - - - 
* 

CIVIL DEPARTMENTS. 


£• $. d. 

35>6u 15 9 

30,423 4 5 
19,720 6 4 

5,029 8 - 
17 13 4 


£. *. A 

36,087 10 5 


("Salaries and Contingencies . 

SECRETARY AT WaE - -\ 

[Postage 

f Salaries and Contingencies - 
Judge Advocate General -^ 

[Postage ...---- 

Chelsea Hospital (See Paper (D.) ) 


30,650 6 9 
17.576 8 10 

5,047 14 - 
50 - - 


Totals for "Public Departments'* - - - £. 


90,801 7 10 


89*12 - - 



Paper (D.)— Explanatory of the Charge of £• 1,205,168. 6. 7. for * Chelsea Hospital." 



Salaries of the Governor and Officers - - - - - - 

Ditto - - Secretary's Department - 

Hew Establishment for Payment and Superintendence of Out-Pensioners • 

Allowances, &c, to Staff Officers of Pensioners - 

Rates and Taxes ...... 

Pay of In-Pensioners ---.--.-.. 

Provisions and Clothing ......... 

Household Disbursements --------- 

Gift to In-Pensioners, from Ranelagh Fund - - - - .- 

Expenses of Trusses, Law Expenses, &c - - - - - 

Postage of Letters 

Payments of Army Prize. Money, including Legal Expenses - 

Gift to In- Pensioners, Expenses of Pensioners' Library and Smoking Room,! 
and Purchase of Books, paid out of the Drouly Legacy -J 



Out-Pensioners, Regulars 

Expenses of Enrolment of Pensioners 



Totals for " Chelsea Hospital ' 



EXPENDITURE, 
1845-46. 



£. *. d. 

4*3*5 14 8 

8,985 15 7 

5,*97 6 3 

*3>36« - 9 

699 13 3 

1,434 i* - 

10,711 16 8 

1,819 l8 6 

67 4 - 

509 18 2 

187 12 2 

5*£ 5 - 

187 7 10 

M*9,703 7 3 

17,283 17 - 



1,205,163 6 

Digitized by 



ct 



ESTIMATE, 
1845-46. 



£. s. d. 

4,098 1 6 

6,000 - - 

3,000 

18,180 4 6 

700 - - 

11,886 1 11 

i,750 - - 

67 - - 

780 - - 

600 - - 

589 5 - 

187 7 10 

M48,7*9 7 8 

23,000 - - 



1,221,017 8 4 
O 



AMD MILITIA SERVICES, FOR THE TEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 1846* 



11 



Papir (E.)— BALANCE SHEET, showing the Ledger Balances on the 81st March 1847, the Date on which the 
preceding Account of Receipt and Expenditure was closed ; —also, the Proportion of the Available Balance 
remaining on that Day applicable to the still open Account of 1846-47, leaving the Unappropriated Balance of 
£.290,808. 0. 7. on the Grants for 1845-46 and prior Years. 



MA— To obriate the necessity of introducing into the following Statement the septrmte remits of sU the Accounts, the BsJsncoi on 
the Ledger are shown in Chutes, except in those instances in which it has been deemed adrisable to add special explanations, with the riew 
of iUnstrating the principle* open which the Account has been prepared, and the inal Balance struck. The Account of Receipt and 
Expenditure is one for the Year, and has been kept open for twelve months after the expiration of the Tear to which it refers, that all Pay- 
ments within that period, relating to the Service of the past Year, might be included in it, and the whole Expenditure on Imprests be finally 
audited before declaring the unappropriated Balance ; the Receipts and Payments comprised in that Account being therefore spread over a 
period of two complete years, the proof of the correctness of the unappropriated Surplus may be shown either by the Balances which 
remained on the Books at the Date to which die Account of Receipt and Expenditure extends (vis. 81 March 1846), or by thoss which 
remained at the date when it was definitively closed (via. 31 March 1847). The Balance Sheet of the latter date is given, as it exhibits a 
more complete statement of the Accounts. 



No. of 
Accounts. 



11 




Her Majesty's Exchequer: — 

For Balance of Army and Militia Grants unissued on the 31st' 
March 1847 ---------- 

Paymaster-General :— 
For Army Cash Balance on the 31st March 1847 ... 

COMMIS8ARIA,T CHEST ACCOUNT: — 

For Balance on Account of the Year 1846-47, for Repayments of 
Advances out of the Chests in the Colonies, for Army Services, 
beyond the Amount of Accounts for that Year, posted on the 
31st March 1847 - 

N.B. — The Account of the Advances from the Commissariat 
Chests Abroad, for Army Services, in the Year 1845-46, has 
been finally closed, as shown in subsequent Paper (F.) page 14. 

Admiralty Department : — 

For the following Balances : 

1st* — Balance of Stoppages for Rations, from the Pay ofTroopsI 

embarked on board Ships of War, Transports, &c.A 

passed to the credit of that Department, but not paid | 

over on the 31st March 1847 .... .J 

2d.— Balance due to the War Office, on the 31st March 1847,^ 
for Advances out of Army Funds, on Account of I 
Passage Allowances, &c, chargeable to the Naval | 
Department --------J 

3d. — For Repayments by the Admiralty for Advances on Account! 
of Out- Pensioners of Gieenwich Hospital beyond the I 
charge raised against that Department on the Books on | 
the 31st March 1847 J 

Ordnavcb Department : — 

For the following Balances ; viz. 

1st.— Balance on Account of 1846-47, for Repayments to the' 
Ordnance Department, for Supplies of Bread and Meat 
to the Troops in that Year, beyond the Amount of 
Stoppages from Fay, credited in Accounts posted on the 
3». st March 1847 ....... 



ad — Balance due to the War Office, on the 31st March 1 847/1 
for Advances out of the Army Funds, on Account of I 

Compensation in lieu of Plnthinflr. Coat of making nn. I 



£• t. d. 

500,404 15 - 

811,835 11 2 

181,89a 17 3 



5,986 2 11 



£. *• d. 



*3>9o6 13 10 



*73>339 13 ** 



43>7<>8 5 - 



o ftner Digitize! by 



Google 



12 



AM ACCOUNT OF THE RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE FOR ARMY 



Paper (E.) — continued. 



No. of 
Accooot*. 



16 

5 



26 




Brought forward • - - 

Property and Income Tax Accounts : — 

For Amount paid over to the Receiver-General of Stamps and"| 
Taxes beyond the Sum placed to his Credit on account of | 
Deductions from Military Pay, &c. included in Accounts posted [ 
on the 31st March 1847 J 

Receiver-General of Customs :— 

For Balance due on account of Advances in 1846-47, to Staff 
Officers of Pensioners by Collectors of Revenue, upon Orders 
issued from the War Office ------ 

Receiver-General op Excise: — 

For Balance due on account of Advances in 1846-47, to Staff] 
Officers of Pensioners by Collectors of Revenue, upon Orders > 
issued from the War Office -J 

East India Company : — 

For the following Balances :— 

1st. — Balance due on the Accounts of the Years 1841-43 to 
1844-45, for Advances out of Army Grants, on account 
of Regiments in India, as shown on page 12 of the 
Balance Sheet for 1844-45 - - £216,818 6 2 
Deduct, Amount repaid by the East India Com- 
pany in March 1847 ----- 100,000 - - 



2d.— Balance due on the final Account of the 
Year 1845-46, for Advances out of 
Army Grants, on account of Regiments 
in India, as shown in subsequent Paper 
(G.), page 15 



116,818 6 2 



63,330 4 l 



3d, 



-Balance on account of 1846-47 : 

For Repayments by the Company for Advances on "J 
account of Regiments in India, for the Year 1846-47, 1 
beyond the charge raised against it on the books on J 
the 31st March 1847 ----- -J 

Commissioners for the Reduction of the National Debt:— 

For Value of Stock in the 3 per Cent. Consols and 3 J per Cents."! 
belonging to the Fund for Military Savings Banks - - -J 

Regimental Savings Banks Investment Account : — 

For Amount of the above-mentioned Stock invested under the^ 
provisions of the Act 7 & 8 Vict., c. 83 - 



Regimental Savings Banks Deposit Accounts: — 

For Amount paid over to the Commissioners for the Reduction 01 
the National Debt, beyond the Sum passed to Credit from the 
Accounts posted on the 31st March 1847 - 



3 



Bank of England: — 

For Value of 10,848/. 2*. 71/., Stock in the 3 per Cent. Reduced] 
Annuities, standing in the Names of the Secretary at War and V 
the Paymaster-General .----- -J 

Drouly Pension Fund :— 

For Amount of the before-mentioned Stock vested in the Secre-" 
tary at War and Paymaster General, under the Will of the late , 
Colonel John Drouly, in trus£, to be applied to the payment of] 
certain Annuities (including also 5/. o*. 11 d. not invested) 

Warrants Payable: — 

P«»*. WomntQ nt> ClrAor* (t\w Potrmon* a laatiPfl An nr nrifir tn t\u*\ I 



£. $. d. 
946,632 15 - 



10,565 6 2 



£. $ . d. 
187,1146 7 9 



180,148 10 3 



23,760 - - 



i5>*7o 



45,84a 14 11 



421 8 8 



9>573 9 6 



*93f347 3 6 



45.84* 14 n 



Digitized by 



9>67B 10 5 

Google 



AND MILITIA BRRVICES, FOB THI TIAR ENDED 31 MARCH 1846. 



13 



Paper (E.)— continued. 



No. of 

Aooountt* 



• Brought forward - - - 

Defaulter Accountants: — 

Forbad and doubtful Debts on old Accounts from 1780, still 
kept on record in the Ledger .--.-- 

General Defaulter Account; — 

For the above Debts on old Accounts withdrawn from the! 

Amount of the arailable Balance - J 

Colonels, Agents, Paymasters and Acting Paymasters of 

Regiments and Dep6ts, General Agent and Paymasters of 

Recruiting Districts, Hospitals, dec. : — 

For Balances standing as Imprests against them on the 31st 1 

March 1847 ..------ -j 

Staff Accountants, for ditto ------ 

Commandants of Volunteer Corps, ditto - 
Colonels and Actino Paymasters of Militia, ditto - 
Staff Officers of Pensioners, ditto - .... 

Accountants tor Payment of Salaries and Contingencies, ditto 
Miscellaneous Accounts, ditto - 
The late Agent for Chelsea Pensions, ditto - 
Governors of Kilmainham Hospital, ditto • 

NET AVAILABLE BALANCE on the 31st March 1847 - 



£. 



Dn. 



£. $. d. 
M9&184 4 6 

233>°i9 16 1 



9,874,900 16 - 
*4.558 13 7 



44.518 

1.357,472 
30,750 
46,283 
44,116 
11*034 



a 7 
13 - 

6 10 
4 « 



5.859,833 - 8 



Cn. 



£• s. 
599.88o 7 



d. 

4 



233,019 16 1 



15*40 15 9 



5,ft»5 2 1 
5,005,871 19 5 



5,859,838 - 8 



Net Available Balance, brought down .--•---.£, 

As the foregoing Balances include the sums belonging to the Account of 1846*47, as 
well as those for preceding years, the following Reserves should be made before 
striking the Balance of Moneys granted for the service of 1845*46, and prior years, 
remaining unappropriated on the 31st March 1847 ; vis. — 

£ s. d. 
Grants of the Year 1846-47, per Act 9 & 10 Vict, c 1 16, 1. 13 - 6,337,839 - - 
Appropriations in aid received up to the 31st March 1847 - 1 33,71 111 5 



£. 



Deduct,— Net Expenditure for the Year 1846-47 passed to Account] 
prior to the 31st Murch 1847, the date when the preceding Ba- ! 
lances were struck ..----..J 

Net Sum to be received for the Account of 1 846-47 - 



6,361,550 11 5 
1,646,046 18 7 



" Unappropriated Balance" of Moneys granted for 1845-46, and prior years £. 



5,005,871 19 5 



4*7*5*503 12 10 



290,368 6 7 



The same result may be obtained from the Balance Account, ended 31st March 1 846; 

viz. — 
Net Available Balance for 1845-46 and prior years, on the books on the 3ist\ 

March 1846 j 

Appropriations in aid of the year 1845-46 placed to the Account of that year sub-1 

sequently to the 3"t March 1846 - „j 



£. 



Deduct, — 

ist. Net Expenditure for 1 845-46, passed to Account subsequently 
to the 31st March 1846, the date when the preceding Balance 
was struck, including the sum of 13,041 /. o#. 10 <L charged 
against the Army Grants, 1845-46, on Account of Supplies in 
kind to the Troops at Hong Kong, between the ' 1st September 
1843 an* * e 3ist March 1 844. (See page 3) -^ - - y 

ad. Appropriations in aid of the Grants for 1846-47, included in 
the Balance of 4*078,551 /. 34. sd. reserved for the Account 
of that year - 



i* I!iiiniA«iiiTtB Ririv/<ii ,t /*f Mnnovi crmm+Atfl far— 



£. 


s. 


d. 


3,804,330 


10 


6 


57*21 


4 


6 



4t<>78»55» 3 5 
73.558 »8 - 



4,15 V 10 l s 



,741 ». 



10 



Digitized by 



Google 



U 



AN ACCOUNT OP THE RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE FOR ARMY 



Paper (F.)— Statemewt of the Particulars of the Advance* out of the several Commissariat Chests in. tbt 
Co onies, for Army Services, between the 1st April 1845 and the 31st March 1846, together with the Repay- 
ments in Discharge thereof. 



STATIONS. 



Law* Fobces. 


&TAFT. 


TOTALS. 


£. *. d. 


£. #. rf. 


£. s. d. 


146»433 1 « 


19,334 5 3 


165,667 6 5 


50,496 5 3 


4,373 6 4 


54,869 11 7 


9.269 19 3 


398 3 1 


9.668 1 4 


89,646 3 9 


14,951 3 1 


104.597 5 10 


22,152 4 1 


608 7 6 


22,760 11 7 


46,592 14 3 


7.750 6 7 


54,343 - 10 


13t«>90 2 4 


317 15 1° 


13,407 18 a 


3,863 6 11 


443 4 3 


4,306 11 1 


59,668 9 2 


3.934 - 3 


63,593 9 5 


44,201 10 7 


2,741 it 1 


46,943 3 8 


50,138 *9 6 


3,884 15 5 


54,023 14 11 


6,595 19 5 


937 3 6 


7.533 1 11 


5,354 3 4 


880 12 6 


6,334 15 10 


3,882 6 6 


116-4 


3,998 6 10 


9,*30 3 10 


759 3 - 


9.989 5 10 


83,92 » * 7 


5.333 13 10 


89,253 16 5 


39»385 3 11 


3,549 * l 


41,934 6 - 


64*855 a 7 


3,023 14 9 


67,878 17 4 


63.979 19 7 


11,867 - 5 


75.847 


35,564 5 7 


1,684 18 8 


37.349 4 3 


14,991 2 8 


157 9 1 


15.H8 11 9 


52,119 10 4 


1,014 10 1 1 


53.134 * 3 


3,308 19 2 


106 16 7 


3*15 *5 9 


4»i56 13 5 


191 3 8 


4*347 17 l 


931,897 9 3 


86,247 -4 11 


1,008,144 14 1. 


REPAY 


MENTS. 




La wd Forces. 


Staff. 




£. *. d. 


£. ;. d. 




600,000 - - 


52,000 - - 




300,000 - - 


— 




31,897 9 2 


34.247 4 11 




93i,8y7 9 3 

v 


86,247 4 " 
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IooqIc 



Cy %a d# ....... 

Nova Scotia - - - - - 

Newfoundland --.--- 

West Indies 

Bermuda ....... 

Jamaica ------. 

Bahamas ....... 

Honduras 

Gibraltar - - - - . - 

Malta 

Ionian Islands - .... 

Sierra Leone ------- 

Gambia ....... 

Gold Coast (Account* only partially received) - 

Sc Helena 

Cape of Good Hope - 

Mauritius ------- 

Ceylon (Accounts only partially received) - 
Hong Kong ------- 

New South Wales 

New Zealand 

Van Diemen's Land - 

South Australia 

Western Australia 



By Quarterly Warrants of 150,000/. and 13,000/. each,! 
upon account - .j 

„ Further Warrant upon account ..... 

„ Warrants in payment of Balance . _ . . 



AND MILITIA SERVICES, FOR THE TEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 1846. 



15 



Paper (6.) — Explanatory of the Balance of £.03,830. 4. 1. shown in the preceding Balance Sheet as remaining 
due to the War Office by the East India Company, for Advances out of Army Grants for Pay of Regiments in 
India, and for other Services chargeable against the Company, on Account of the Service of the Year 1845-46. 



The Charges for the Year 1845-40, on account <f the 
under-mentioned Corps, &c. are as follows ; viz. — 



3d Dragoons - 

9th ditto 
14th ditto 
15th ditto 
16th ditto 

3d Foot 

3d ditto 

4th ditto 

9th ditto 
10th ditto 
13th ditto 
17th ditto 
a 1st ditto 
*2d ditto 
«5th ditto 
«8th ditto 
39th ditto 
3Ut ditto 
39th ditto 
40th ditto 
50th ditto 
51st ditto 
53d ditto 
57th ditto 

rjotn ditto - 1 Batt 
61st ditto 
6ad ditto 
63d ditto 
78th ditto 
80th ditto 
84th ditto 
86lh ditto 
94th ditto 



Bristol - - - Recruiting District 

North British - - -' ditto - 

Edinburgh Detachments ditto - 

Coventry ditto • 

Leeds ditto - 

Liverpool ----- ditto - 

London - - • • - ditto - 



Northern Recruiting District, Ireland 

Centre ditto - 

Southern ----- ditto - 



Carried forward 



- -£. 



*. d 



7*524 1 


5 


5.881 14 


9 


6,*59 9 


5 


6,040 14 


2 


8,371 18 


5 


7>507 19 


11 


080 8 
4.894 4 


9 


7 


5,100 11 


— 


5,016 8 


8 


6,163 12 


7 


6,«57 19 


6 


5.318 2 


- 


6,106 18 


4 


5,743 5 


7 


6,23a 6 


5 


4*975 H 


4 


6,637 11 


3 


5.121 3 


2 


8,689 19 


9 


5,066 19 


7 


12 8 


7 


4.6o5 9 


10 


5. 6 97 13 


9 


9.625 10 


7 


10,016 17 


7 


6,566 17 


10 


5.7H * 


2 


5* 6 3i 14 


8 


8.595 6 


9 


5.801 17 


10 


5.182 19 


10 


5,104 7 


8 


1,109 6 


- 


716 12 


11 


878 - 


- 


968 15 


9 


479 3 


1 


1,937 13 


11 


2,640 6 


- 


850 7 


11 


1,912 10 


4 


* 2,144 9 


4 



Brought forwn'd 



£. 



Cavalrv Dt*p6t, Maidstone 

Invalid De| 6t, Chatham - 

Depots of Regiments in the East Indies 



Pay of Medical Staff Officers advanced! 

Abroad J 

Cost of Religious Book 



Less,— 

Credit on account of the 18th Regi- 
ment, as explained below 



■} 



Total 



-£. 



The above Charge is divisible under the 
following Heads of Service: 

Pay 

Annual Allowances - 

Agency ------ 

Clothing ------ 

Provisions - 

Hospital Expenses, Medicines, andl 

Treutn ent of the Sick -J 

Divine Service - 

Adminirtiatiun of Martial Law - 
Libraries and Schools - - - 
Establishments at Chatham and MaidO 

stone - - - - - 
Recruiting Expenses 
Allowances to Discharged Soldiers andl 

Family Allowances - - -| 
Miscellaneous Expenses - 



£. 



Less, — 

Miscellaneous Credits for the Easfl 
India Establishments - . - -J 



Total 



- - £. 



Deduct, — 

The Amount of Four Quarterly Re-1 
payments of 50,000/. each,, by the I 
East India Company, on account of | 
the above-mentioned Advances - J 



204,080 14 11 
Balance due per " Balance Sheet" 



£. s. d. 

204,080 14 11 

13.698 3 9 

4,170 8 11 

4*,954 16 - 



150 18 - 
570 « 4 



265,625 3 11 



2,294 19 10 



263,330 4 1 



149*159 8 11 
1,804 7 8 
8,888 6 
92,812 17 
1,039 9 



10 



67 7 

595 12 

150 10 

87 16 



3,036 17 - 

n,935 1 - 
29 17 11 

'1.377 15 4 



$70,985 8 a 



*7fi55 4 1 



263,330 4 1 



200.000 - - 



63,330 



* Includes £.2,294. 19. 10. the Amount of four Payments into the Commissariat Chest, China, on account c*-£ 
Canton Batta and Balances due on Abstracts of the Accounts of Her Majesty's 18th Regiment, fur periods pric**; 
to the 1st August 1843. 



War Office, 1 
15 May 1847J 



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COMMISSARIAT. 
1845-6. 



ABSTRACTS 



OF THE 



ACCOUNT 



OV THE 



RECEIPTS INTO AND PAYMENTS FROM 



THS SSVEBAL 



COMMISSARIAT CHESTS ABROAD, 



FROM 



1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 



Audit Office, "I 
19 March 1847* J 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
31 March 1847. 



Digitized by 



Google 



Digitized by 



Google 



■# 



n~^ 

SERVI cfMAND. 

1 k 

c — 



f. rf. 



WESTERN 
AUSTRALIA. 

PtgeU. 



WE8T 
INDIES. 

PogeM. 



Balances on ltt April 1845 |6 * H 
1 9 



Bills drawn on the Lords of I . '• ® 

'4 



Profit on Money Transactions * 

Consignments of Specie from k a *" " 

Imprests from other Commissi ° * 

Commissariat Vote, Nos. 1 aAj' * 

Stamp Duties on Commissariat ;" " 
Effects of Deceased Commissi ' 



M 



Army Services 

Ordnance 8ervices 

Nary Services 

Customs ... 

Excise - 

Post Office - 

Stationery Office - 

Captured Slaving Vessels 

East India Company 

Convict Services - 

Civil Establishment of St Hel 

Settlement of Western Australi 

Indian Department 

Stipendiary Justices 

Liberated Africans 

Settlement of Hong Kong 

Militia and Volunteers - 

Widow and Orphan Fond 

Colonial Government - 

Contribution toward the Defen 

Relief of Sufferers by Fires at 

Local Banks 

Foreign Office 

Colonial Office 

Chinese Indemnity 

Caotoa Ransom - - * 



r 1 



8 3 



8,096 17 4 
7,969 18 7 
- I - 
•,009 - - 
4,995 - - 
1,656 14 11 



4 » 



7 8 

I 

7 9 



J4 11 



9 9 



1 5 



£• $. d. 

146,304 8 9j 

177,945 19 4 

506 15 7 

168 6 8 

•1,727 19 6f 

8 - - 



475 17 4 
7 5 9 



100 14 6 



1,989 8 II 

5,414 5 6 

198 9 10 

887 18 1 

8,699 18 10 



TOTAL 
OF SERVICES. 



£. #. d. 

704,602 2 5 
1,842,023 19 2 
10,986 - 9| 
882,870 - - 
188,086 18 8 
806,650 6 7} 
45 - - 
42 8 11 
19,453 2 7J 
67,198 10 11| 
8,761 15 6 



SERVICES. 



Balances on 1st April 1845. 

Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury. 

Profit on Money Transactions. 

Consignments of 8pecie from England. 

Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants. 

Commissariat Vote, Nos. 1 and 9. 

8tamp Duties on Commissariat Commission!, &c. 

Effects of deceased Commissariat Officers. 

Army Services. 

Ordoance Services. 

Navy Services. 



1,942 - 8 Customs. 



- - 7 

24,984 - 7 

73 9 1 

9,927 19 7 

8,554 10 1 

27,295 13 - 

15,237 18 8 

100 14 6 

129 14 8 

9 11 9 

1,910 - 6 

4,311 11 8 

1,412 4 - 

125 - - 

138,144 14 2j 

53,392 10 3 

259 2 8 

16,212 1 4 

229 7 9 

12 10 6 

256,136 14 6 

727 11 4 



io 10 fi t> 



Excise. 

Post Office. 

Stationery Office. 

Captured Slaving Vessels. 

But India Company. 

Convict Services. 

Civil Establishment of St. Helena. 

Settlement of Western Australia. 

Indian Department. 

Stipendiary Justices. 

Liberated Africans. 

Settlement of Hong Kong. 

Militia and Volunteers. 

Widow and Orphan Fund. 

Colonial Government. 

Contribution toward the Defence of the Colony. 

Relief of Sufferers by Fires at Quebec. 

Local Banks. 

Foreign Office. 

Colonial Office. 

Chinese Indemnity. 

Canton Ransom?^ 



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SOUTH 
AUSTRALIA 

Page SI. 



f. d. 



7,00© - 

1,401 9 ei 



8,040 16 - 

646 19 7 

96 18 6 



10 - - 
13 18 9 



VAN DIE- 
MEN'S LAND. 

Pnge SI. 



s. 4. 



706 8 - 



6,847 16 5 
117,325 12 3 



65,804 15 6 

15,790 9 11 

9,251 9 6 



172 17 6 
80,004 5 10 
- 9 6 



9 4 7 



100 



WESTERN 
AUSTRALIA. 

Page 33. 



i. 4. 



130 



118 15 10 



8,415 17 4 



4,702 1 11 
786 4 8 
772 18 4 



138 18 11 



7,510 19 3 



492 19 4 



76 1 6 



WEST 
INDIES. 

Page 33. 



«. d. 



81 12 6 



110 16 8} 



919 18 11 
81,861 14 2} 



110,302 14 Hi 
48,876 13 8 
7,752 6 2| 



23,955 9 8 
367 9 7 



11,639 1 5 



TOTAL 
OF SERVICES. 



£. s. d. 

120 4 9 

6,239 16 2 

106,207 3 10 

6,229 16 -J 

3,277 1 1 

181,947 16 3 

712,199 1 8} 

77 11 9 

1,094,724 19 4 J 

482,439 18 9} 

306,247 - -J 

386 8 8 

271 1 6 

174 4 4 

62,200 9 lj 

101,267 4 9 

30 16 8 

1,166 9 10 

946 - - 

21,875 16 2 

7,610 19 8 

8,876 18 9 

6,856 14 8 

6,335 14 6 

44,596 6 3 

13,959 10 9 

71,575 18 4 

16 - - 

9 4 7 
16,727 12 11 

242 18 4 

46,929 2 11 J 

568 17 9 

271 11 7 

533 - 8 

8 16 1 

6 S 6 

6,685 16 11 

62,085 18 - 

260 - - 

85 3 1 

492 19 4 

64,965 7 8 

488 1 8 

10 - - 



SERVICES. 



Balances on 1st April 1845. 

Outstanding Drafts of prior Years. 

Bills on the Treasury cancelled. 

Loss on Money Transactions. 

Consignments of Specie to England. 

Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants. 

Commissariat Vote, Nos. 1 fie 2. 

Effects of deceased Commissariat Officers. 

Army Services. 

Ordnance Services. 

Navy Services. 

Customs. 

Excise. 

Irish Constabulary Police. 

East India Company. 

Convict Services. 

Magnetic Observatories. 

Lighthouses. 

Civil Establishment of Western Coast of Africa. 

Civil Establishment of St. Helena. 

Settlement of Western Australia. 

Civil Establishment of New Zealand. 

Clergy in North America. 

Indian Department 

Stipendiary Justices. 

Liberated Africans. 

Settlement of Hong Kong. 

American Loyalists. 

Concordatum Fund. 

Militia and Volunteers. 

Slave Compensation. 

Colonial Government 

Military Secretary to Governor-general. 

Local Pensions. 

Surveys. 

Treasury Allowance. 

Irish Government 

French Government 

Relief of Sufferers by Fire at Quebec. 

Presents to Mosquito Chiefs. 

Foreign Seamen. 

Expedition for exploring Central Australia. 

Local Banks. 

Chinese Indemnity. 

Exchequer Pensions. 



ABSTRACTS. 



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Google 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMISSARIES' ACCOUNTS, 



BAHAMAS. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 ..---.--.... 

To Bills drawn on thb Lords of the Treasury -----••-- 

To Profit on Money Transactions; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bilk --.,. 

To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. £. s. d. 

H. J. Wild, Deputy Commissary General at Jamaica - - - 68 16 1 

W. C. Cuming, Deputy Assistant Commissary General at the Gambia • 8 2 4 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; viz. 
Provisions; viz. 

k Stoppages for rations ---- 8,917 1 5 

* Other receipts ---.-.-... 881 19 2 

To Ditto on account of Stamp Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions 

To Ditto on account of Army Services; viz. 

Effective* 22 8 10 

Chelsea pensions -----.-•-. -18 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Effectives -----.....-.-- 

To Ditto on account of Navy Services; viz. 

Effectives ...------..--- 

To Ditto on account of the Post Office • 

To „ Stationery Office --••--•-- 

To „ Stipendiary Justices - • 

To „ Colonial Office .... 



£. $. d. 
6,157 12 10 

21,940 18 8 
207 16 9 



66 18 5 



4,299 - 7 

1 10 - 



22 5 1 

288 12 8 

16 15 8 

405 18 2 

7 16 - 

9 11 9 

1 5 - 



33,375 16 2 



BERMUDA. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 ----.. 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury - 

To Profit on Money Transactions ; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills - 

To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants; viz. 

T. Stickney, Assistant Commissary General in Mexico 
Deficiencies on shipments of specie refunded 



£. 178 2 8 
- 1 9 2 



To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 
Contingencies --•---••--- 

Provisions; viz. 
Stoppages for rations £• 9,658 8 10 

Other receipts 448 7 8 

10,106 11 6 

Fuel and light -88 



8 8 



10,107 - 2 



To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 
Effectives - 



£. s. d. 
78,785 - 9 

78,482 15 11 
214 2 5 



174 11 5 



10,115 3 4 
572 8 1 



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FKOM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 



1845 to 31st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



BAHAMAS. 



Cr. 



By Bill drawn on the Lords of the Treasury, cancelled ---.-._ 
By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. 

H. J. Wild, Deputy Commissary General at Jamaica - 

By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services j viz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks - - - £.517 2 1 £. s. d. 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. - £. 248 19 7 

Contingencies - - • - - -73 195 

322 19 - 

Land and inked witter transport - - - - 119 16 2 

Provisions £.5,786 18 1 

Forage - 838 10 10 

Fuel and light ------ 370 3 2 

7 f 001 12 1 

7,961 9 4 

By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-effective Services - 08 - - 

By Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. ————_. 

Effectives 13,407 18 2 

Non-effectives ----------- 67 10 - 

Chelsea pensions ---------- 305 19 9 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services; viz. 

Effectives 3,566 15 1 

Non-effectives 101 5 - 

By Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. "~ 

Effectives - . . 1,911 15 1 

Non-effectives ----------- 18 18 - 

By Ditto on account of Lighthouses -.--.------ 

By „ Stipendiary Justices .---.--.. 

By „ Liberated Africans ---------- 

By Balances on 31st March 1846 ------------ 

£. 



£. s. d. 
61 8 5 

4 12 - 



8,029 9 4 



13,781 7 11 



3,688 - 1 



1,925 8 1 

1,165 9 10 

2,206 5 - 

350 16 9 

2,182 18 9 



33,375 16 2 



1845 to 31st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



BERMUDA. 



Cr. 



By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. 

W. Filder, Commissary General in Canada 
By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services j viz. 



Pay of officers and established clerks 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. £. 1,134 15 7 

Contingencies - - - - -182 36 



£.865 2 1 £. 



Land and inland water transport 
Provisions - 

Forage - 
Fuel and light - 



1,316 19 1 
323 15 11 



£. 13,493 10 10 

- 372 15 2 

- 350 7 3 



14,216 13 3 



By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-effective Services - 

By Ditto on account of Army Services; viz. 

Effectives --..--.-.---- 

Non-effectives ----------- 

Chelsea pensions -....-.--- 

By Ditto on account of Okdnance Services j viz. 

Effectives - ----- 

By Ditto on account of Navy Services; viz. 

Effectives .--.------- 

Non-effectives ----------- 

By Ditto on account of Convict Services ------- 



16,722 10 
151 16 



22,760 11 7 

40 - - 

151 13 11 



38,707 15 4 
595 11 10 



£. 
55,000 



d. 



16,874 7 - 



22,952 
13,418 



6 6 
16 1 



r^qgfc 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMISSARIES* ACCOUNTS, 



CANADA. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 ... 
To Bills drawn on thb Lords of the Treasury 

To Profit on Monet Transactions j viz. 
Premium on negotiation of bills 



To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants : viz. 

T. Stickney, Assistant Commissary General in Mexico 

W. H. Robinson, Deputy Commissary General in Nova Scotia - 

H. Clarke, Deputy Assistant Commissary General at Honduras 



£.54,908 15 - 
19 6 3 
80 - - 



To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks • - - £. 168 14 8 | 
Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c - £. - - 10 
Contingencies - - • - - 7 14 8^ 

r 7 15 6 J 

Land and inland water transport .... 69 6 7 

Provisions; via. « m , 

Stoppages for rations, 54,209 18 10 
Other receipts - - 2,509 6 6 J 



Forage - 
Fuel and light 



.56,719 - 4j 
-19- 
20S 1 7 



56,928 - 11| 



'67,178 19 9 J 
To Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-effective Services - - - 10 



To Ditto on account of St am* Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions and War- 
rants for Pensions --.-... 



To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 
Effectives .... 

Non-effectives • - 

Chelsea pensions ... 
Commuted pensions 



£. 2,708 18 7 £ 

43 10 3 

22 10 8 

1 17 10 



To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Effectives 

Non-effectives - 



25,487 13 9 i 
5 8 6 



To Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 
Effectives - 



To Ditto on account of the Customs ... 
To „ Excise - 

To „ Post Office ... 

To „ Indian Department 

To „ Militia and Volunteers 



To Ditto on account of the Colonial Government; viz. 
Repayment of advances - - - 

To Ditto on account of Relief of Sufferers by Fires at Quebec 



Digitized b\r 



£. *. d. 
89,181 11 5| 

868,540 10 - 



1,754 6 10 



55,048 1 8 



57,174 - 7 1 
12 - - 



2,771 12 4 i 



25,442 17 8 J 

22 19 10 

77 8 a 

- - 7 

10,838 6 8 

129 14 3 

1,412 4 - 



GcxSffle' 



J5 41 
259 2 8 



FROM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 



9 



1845 to 31st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



CANADA. 



Cr. 



By Payment of Drafts of Sub- Accountants outstanding on 81st March 1845 
By Loss on Monet Transactions ; viz. 



Discount on negotiation of Bills 
Fractions - 



£. 248 4 2 
- - 2 



By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. 

F. E. Knowles, Deputy Commissary General in the West Indies 
W. H. Robinson, Deputy Commissary General in Nova Scotia - 
H. Clarke, Deputy Assistant Commissary General at Honduras 

By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; 
viz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks ... £.9,844 8 8 
Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. £.0,433 11 2 
Allowances - - - - - 55 28 
Contingencies - 2,030 8 3 J 

■ ■ 8,519 2 14 

Land and inland water transport .... 13,782 13 9 J 
Provisions ..... 89,660 11 4 J 

Forage 3,823 13 1 

Fuel and light 18,249 3 4 J 

61,733 7 10 



£. 165 - - 

838 6 8 

30 - - 



98,879 7 5 
By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-Effective Services - 2,408 16 - 

By Ditto on account of Effects of Deceased Commissariat Officers ..... 

Dy Ditto on account of Army Services; viz. 

Effectives 165,669 19 8 

Non-effectives - - - 8,81458 

Chelsea pensions ---------- 22,645 12 8 J 

Commuted pensions .....---- 5,171 8 11 J 



By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services; viz. 

Effectives - 

Non-effectives - - - - 



110,211 9 8 
2,290 13 5 



By Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives - - - - « 
Non-effectives - 



5,168 14 11 
3,115 12 3 



By Ditto on account of the Customs - 
By „ Excise - 

By „ Irish Constabulary Police 



By 



Magnetic Observatories 



By Ditto on account of the Civil Establishment of St. Helena ; viz. 
St. Helena pensions -.--.-. 



By Ditto on account of the Clergy in North America - 
By „ the Indian Department - 

By „ Militia and Volunteers 

By Ditto on account of the Colonial Government \ viz. 
For lands ceded to the Crown by Indians - 



By Ditto on account of the salary of the Military Secretary to the Governor General 
By „ Local Pensions ■*- «---.. 

By „ Military and Naval Survey ------ 

By „ Treasury Allowance „.----- 

By „ Irish Government -------- 



£. s. d. 

982 15 4 



948 4 4 



1,028 6 8 



96,288 3 6 
77 11 9 



201,801 1 6* 



112,502 8 2 



8,284 7 2 

806 8 8 

261 16 10 

107 2 - 

22 9 8 



40 - - 

3,726 13 8 

6,385 14 6 

16,727 12 1,1 



2,877 8 6 \ 

558 17 9 

258 7 3 

533 - 8 

8 16 1 



Digitized I 



10 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMISSARIES' ACCOUNTS, 




CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. 

Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 ----- 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury --------- 

To Prc fit on Money Transactions; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills --.---.... 

To Consignments of Specie from England ---.-.---. 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; viz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks - - • - - - -£.1155 
Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. - - - - £.1159 
Contingencies - - - - - - - - 72101 

74 5 10 

Land and inland water transport - 443 7 3 

Provisions, viz. 

Stoppages for rations - - £.25,626 6 3 
Other receipts - 3,198 8 8£ 

28,824 14 11 J 

Forage 88 19 3 | 

Fuel and light -89 

28,914 3 - 

To Ditto on account of Stamp Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions and Warrants 
for Pensions --------------- 

To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives £. 2 ; 442 17 1 

Chelsea pensions --------- -1034 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services; viz. 

Effectives -.------..---. 

To Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives £.8 6- 

Non-effectives ------ 9146 

To Ditto on account of the Customs ----- . . 

To „ Post Office -----...... 

To 9 , Colonial Government; viz. 

Repayment on account of storm fund ..... -£.7,692 13 7 

Ditto of advance to Agent-general ------- 2,500 - - 

Ditto - ditto - on account of mission to Natal Territory - - - 2,382 7 - 

To Drafts of Sub- accountants drawn within the period of this account, remaining unpaid on 
31st March 1846. .---. 

£. 



£. s. d. 

35,155 7 10 £ 
204,072 10 8 

1 4 6 

30,000 - - 



29,433 11 6 

6 - - 

2,443 7 4 J 

2,602 13 8 



18-6 

247 7 2 

12 6 11 



12,575 - 7 
9,136 - 6 



325,703 11 2i 



CEYLON. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 



To Receipts on account of Army Services; viz. 
Effectives ----- 



To Ditto on account of the Colonial Government; viz. 

Loans from the Colonial chest ------- 

Valne of surgical instruments supplied from the Colonial stores - 
Stoppages for rations supplied to the troops - 



£.47,670 3 4 

25 8 m 

- 11,941 18 1 



£. 


*. 


d. 


3 


5 


2 


684 


18 


1U 


637 


10 


41 



Digitized by 



~4> 69,687 10 41 

Google 



PROM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 



IT 



1845 to 31st March 1846. 
issued from the Commissariat Chest* 



CAPE OF GOOD HOPE. 

Cr. 



By Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury, cancelled -----.. 
By Loss on Money Transactions; viz. 

Fractions -----.----.... 

By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks £. 3,506 8 3 £. #. d. 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. £. 6,451 17 3 
Allowances - - - - -211 19 2 
Contingencies . - - 1,880 6 - 

8,553 2 6 

Land and inland water transport .... 1 9,503 14 8 
Provisions - - - . - - 27,984 16 9 

Forage 28,309 7 4 J 

Fuel and light 8,063 1 - 

59,357 5 1J 

.90,920 10 5 J 

By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Noneffective Services 697 17 2 



By Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives 89,253 16 5 

Non-effectives -- 3,908 7 1 

Chelsea pensions - 2,272 8 1 } 



By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Effectives ^ 45,393 12 1 

Non-effectives ----------- 157 18 6 



By Ditto on account of Navy Services; viz. 

Effectives 80,480 12 10 

Non-effectives ----- 1,066 9 10 



By Ditto on account of the East India Company - 

By 
Bv 

?> 
By 



Magnetic Observations 

„ the Civil Establilhm ent of St. Helena - 

„ Stipendiary Justices ..... 

f , Liberated Africans ..... 

„ Slave Compensation ..... 

„ the Colonial Government ; viz. 

Expenses of the British Resident and clerk on north-eastern frontier 
By Ditto on account of Exchequer Pensions - 
By Remittances in Transit ,------.. 

By Balance on 31st March 1846 --.-..- 



£. $. d. 
3,050 - - 

- - 3* 



91,818 7 7j 



95,434 6 7J 



45,551 10 7 



31,547 2 8 

1,255 16 6 J 

8 3 6 

793 2 5 

1,765 - - 

3,904 18 2 

2(1 10 11 

180 11 5 

10 - - 

8,385 - - " 

41,958 - 6 J 



325,703 11 2J 



1845 to 81st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



By Payments on Account of Army Services ; viz. 
Effectives .--... 
Non-effectives • 

Chelsea pensions - 



By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 
Non-effectives - 



By Ditto on account of die Colonial Government; viz. 

For rations of provisions issued from the Colonial stores 



Cr. 



£. a. d. 

71,786 8 6 

660 14 6 

645 1 11 J 



CEYLON. 



£. s. d. 



73,092 4 11 i 
170 — - 

5,386 3 9 



Digitized by 



Google 



12 



ABSTRACT OF COMMISSARIES ACCOUNTS, 



GAMBIA. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st Apri 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 - 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury 

To Profit on Money Transactions ; viz. 
Premium on negotiation of bills 



To Imprests from other Commissiariat Accountants ; viz. 

T. Graham, Assistant Commissary General at Sierra Leone ..... 

To Receipts on Account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; viz. 

Pay of Officers and Established Clerks £.1812 

Provisions ; viz. 

Stoppages for rations ------ £.2,004 11 7 

Other receipts - 203 2 2 \ 

2,207 13 9$ 



To Ditto on account of Stamp Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions 

To Ditto on account of Army Services; viz. 

Effectives ----.---.--. 



To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 
Effectives ..... 



To Ditto on account of the Customs 

To „ Liberated Africans 



£. 



£. s. d. 
5,495 9 

3,025 19 8 



33 2 - 



8 - 



2,225 14 II J 
1 10 - 

121 15 10 

43 14 - 

85 - - 

1,000 - - 



11,990 6 2J 



GIBRALTAR. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
.ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 -------.-. .. 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury --..--.. 

To Profit on Money Transactions ; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills -£.813 2 9j 

Gain on coins - - - - 55 18 3 J 

Fractions - - - — 1 11 J 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Contingencies - ■- - - - £.2 1- 

Land and inland water transport 395 14 - 

Provisions; viz. 

Stoppages for rations - - -£.29,146 4 11 
Other receipts .... 1,320 18 9 

— 30^67 3 8 

Fuel and light 83 25 

30,550 6 1 

To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives .-..----..-... 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services; viz. 

Effectives ....---••---•- 

To Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives ..------.---•- 

To Ditto on account of the Post Office ---•------. 

To „ Widow aud Orphan Fund --.--••„ 

To y, Colonial Government ; viz. 

Surplus Revenue 

Digitized by V 



£. s. d. 
12,262 13 11 

123,363 17 3 



869 3 - 1 



30,948 1 1 

1,983 1 9 

1,872 2 3 

3 17 - 

1,310 - - 

125 - - 

1,000 - - 



173,237 16 3 J 



FROM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 



13 



1845 to 31st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



GAMBIA- 



Cr. 



By Loss ok Monby Transactions; viz. 

Fractions • ---»---- 

By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks - - - - - - £.463 10 - 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. - 
Allowances ------- 

Contingencies - 



£. 887 7 - 

48 4 - 
64 15 1 



Land and and inland water transport 
Freight of specie - 



2 8 2 
16 11 1 



500 6 1 



18 19 3 



£. #. d. 

- - 14 



Provisions 

Forage 

Fuel and light 



081 3 5 
448 13 
331 10 10 
— 1,761 17 - 



By Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 
Effectives - 

Chelsea pensions - 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Effectives 

By Ditto on account of Navy Services; viz. 

Effectives 

By Ditto on account of Liberated Africans 
By Balance on 81st March 1846 



6,192 13 10 
260 10 6} 



2,734 12 4 



6,462 4 4| 
1,606 13 



86 18 6 

48 13 2 

1,151 3 Hi 



11,990 6 24 



1845 to 81st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



GIBRALTAR. 



Cr. 



By Loss on Money Transactions ; viz. 
Discount on negotiation of bills - 



£.23 2 6 

1 18 4i 

Loss on coins .--- w- „___6| 

Fractions ----•--••'* -___—_ 



By Consignments of Specie to England -------- 

By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants; viz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks - - - £• *>' e 
Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. £. 8,868 9 5 

Contingencies "» 19 ** 3,530 8 9 4 

Land and inland water transport 4,469 1 7 

Provisions 27,045 " * 

Forage ------ 1,499 6 11 



£. 



25 1 5 

2,982 10 - 

60 - - 



Fuel and light 



478 9 2 



29,023 10 6 



38,640 4 10 J 
79 - - 



By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-effectiv* Service^ 

By Ditto on account of Army Services j viz. 62,592 9 5 

Effectives .------" * 132 _ ^ 

Non-effectives " l>080 16 6 j 

Chelsea pensions 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. . . . 89,266 19 9 

Effectives * " " * m .' 96 11 10 

Non-effectives " ; : 

■D,r TfcWfn em nctctmnt of NAVY SERVICES J viz. 



98,719 4 10 J 

63,80£ 5 11 1 
39,363 \\ 7 



an+i ia 



Digitized by 



Google 



*4 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMISSARIES ACCOUNTS, 



GOLD COAST. Period from 1st February 

Dr. ABSTRACT of Sums received into and issued from the Commissariat Chest (so far as 



To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury - - -- 

To Consignments of Specie from England ».--.-•.--- 

To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. 

T. Graham, Assistant Commissary General at Sierra Leone - 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 
Provisions; viz. 

Stoppages for rations - - - » £. 350 12 10 

Other receipts - - 115 3 10 

To Ditto on account of Stamp Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions 

To „ Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services; viz. 

Effectives - • - - - - -• - 

To Ditto on account of the Colonial Office ---------- 

£. 



£. *. d. 

5,484 7 4 

4,170 - - 

1,409 19 4 



465 1G 8 
3 - - 

88 14 7 

13 7 11 
11 5 6 



11,646 11 4 



HONDURAS. 



Dr. 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 ... 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Profit on Money Transactions; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills - 

To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. 

H. J. Wild, Deputy Commissary General at Jamaica 
W. Filder, Commissary General in Canada 



£.4,000 - - 
30 - - 



To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 
Provisions; viz. 



Stoppages for rations 
Other receipts 



£. 1,288 6 1 
29 10 6 



To Ditto on account of Army Services; viz. 
Effectives - 



To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 
Effectives - 



£. s. d. 
6,373 12 11 

5,877 15 10 



3 4 7 



4,030 - - 



1,317 16 7 
102 13 10 



122 10 10 



Digitized by 



Google 



FROM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 



15 



1844 to 31st March 1846. GOLD COAST. 

the same can be collected from the imperfect Vouchers obtained from D. A. C. O. Ross). Cr. 



By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. 

T. Graham, Assistant Commissary General at Sierra Leone • 

By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; viz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks ...... £.448 7 9 

Pav of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. - - - £.183 106 

Allowances ........ 27 1 - 

Contingencies • - - - - • • - 16116 



Land and inland water transport 
Provisions .... 
Forage - 
Fuel and light - 



£. 2,188 6 1 

2 17 6 

19 6 6 



176 3 - 
218 16 9 



2,210 10 - 



By Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 
Effectives • 



Chelsea pensions 



4,842 8 - 
18 14 2 



By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services; viz. 
Effectives - 



By Ditto on account of Navy Services; viz. 
Effectives - 



By Ditto on account of the Civil Establishment of the Western Coast of Africa 
By Balance on 81st March 1846 



£. 



£. #. d. 

167 19 8 



8,048 17 6 

4,860 17 2 

632 10 8 

67 13 8 

946 - - 

2,683 8 8 



11,646 11 4 



1845 to 81st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



HONDURAS. 



Cr. 



By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. 

H. J. Wild, Deputy Commissary General at Jamaica 
W. Filder, Commissary General in Canada 



£.7-6 
30 - - 



By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 



Pay of officers and established clerks 
Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. 
Allowances - 
Contingencies - 



£. 112 10 10 

110 17 - 

53 2 4 



Land and inland water transport 
Provisions - 
Forage - 
Fuel and light - 



£.1,480 2 9 
929 12 3 
135 5 1 



441 4 4 



276 10 2 
50 10 8 



2,551 - 1 



By Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 
Effectives • 

Non-effectives - - - • - 



4,306 11 1 
2,938 8 4 



By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 
Effectives • 



By Ditto on account of Navy Services; viz. 
Effective* .... 



By Ditto on account of Stipendiary Justices 

Br T>if*ft rtn ar.o.nnnt of P i n wuww tti Mnaamro Chiefs 



izecj I 



£. s. d. 



37-6 



3,319 5 3 

7,244 19 5 

1,950 14 9 

29 13 10 
141 



Digitized by 



i6 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMIttARISS' ACCOUNTS, 



HONG KONG. 



Dr. 



Period from 1* April 
ABSTRACT affiants received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 - 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury 



To Profit on Money Transactions ; vii. 

Premium on negotiation of bills on the Treasury 
Ditto on negotiation of bills on the Indian X3orernment 
Ditto on issue of Spanish dollars - 
Gain on drafts .----.- 
Fractions •--•--•- 



£. 1,241 7 7 

1,474 8 2 

777 6 2 

07 8 10 

- - II 



To Consignments of Specie from England 



To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1 } for Effective Services ; vix. 
Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. - - - - £.-152 
Contingencies -.--.-.- - «, 4 



Land and inland water transport 
Provisions; vis. 

Stoppages for rations 

Other receipts - 



- 15 6 
181 5 - 



£. 448 9 9 
8,840 18 7 



Fuel and light 



4*284 8 4 
670 - 11 



4,954 4 8 



To Ditto on account of Stamp Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions 

To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives -•-----.-.... 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services j vii. 

Effectives -•------.-•-. 

To Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives ---------.... 



To Ditto on account of the Post Office ... 
To „ East India Company 

To „ Settlement of Hono Kono 

To „ Foreign Office 



To Ditto on account of the Chinese Indemnity j viz. 

Bills on the Indian Government 72,803 7 10 

Specie from India ---.-..... 183,883 6 8 



To Ditto on account of the Canton Ransom j viz. # 

Prize agents --..-----... 

Balance of Messrs. Dent & Co.'s promissory note of 1st June 1841, with! 
interest thereon, under a decree of the Supreme Court of 10th March 1845 J 

To Ditto on account of the Corporation for the Relief of Distressed Seamen 



181 17 6 
545 18 10 



Digitized by 



94,095 14 1 
§4,4*6 2 11 



3,590 6 8 
!M>,000 - . 



5,088 4 9 

1 10 - 

2,729 19 5 

6,071 2 11 

816 - 6 

549 18 7 

8,554 10 1 

4,811 11 8 

229 7 9 



256,136 14 6 



727 11 4 
49 12 8 



Google 



MOM 1 APRIL 1846 TO 01 MARCH 1846. 



17 



1846 to 31st March 1846. 

utuod from the Comwiwwwit Chart. 



HONG KONG. 



Cr. 



By Payment of Drafts of Sub-Accountants, outstanding on 81st March 1846 

By Loss o* Money Transactions ; viz. 

Discount on negotiation of bills on the Indian Government 

Loss on ooins --.--.---.. 



By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; vis. 
Pay of officers and established clerks ....... 

Pay of extra clerks, Storekeepers, &c - £.2,672 11 6 

Allowances ........ 2,162 8 8 

Contingencies ........ 408 10 8 



£. 120 16 8 
2,901 6 11 



Land and inland water transport -------- 

Provisions -- 18,866 7 - 

Fuel and light - • - 1,894 17 - 



1,602 8 7 



6,288 10 - 
896 6 1 



20,760 4 - 



By Ditto on account of Army Services \ viz. 
Effectives - 



By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services* via. 
Effectives ••---- 



By Ditto on account of Navy Services j viz. 
Effectives - 



By Ditto on account of the East India Company .... 

By „ Settlement of Hong Kong - 

By Ditto on account of the Chinese Indemnity ; viz. 

Contingent expenses connected with the receipt of the Indemnity 

By Remittances in Transit -------- 

By Balance on 81st March 1846 ....... 



£. $. d. 
4,002 17 4 



8,022 8 7 



28,492 8 8 

76,620 14 2 

72,987 13 8 

88,687 13 2 

29,076 2 11 

71,575 13 4 



Digitized by 




oogle 



lS 



ABSTRACTS OP COMMISSARIES* ACCOUNTS, 



IONIAN ISLANDS. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sams received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 .. - » ------•■ " 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury . - - 

To Profit on Money Transactions ; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills .-.-------- 

To Consignments of Specie from England .--------- 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Contingencies - - - - - - * - * " " • 

Land and inland water transport owiv 

Provisions; viz. 
Other receipt g » 'i^ , WJ 

Fuel and Light - 1 -i 

20,980 7 11 

To Ditto on account of Army Services j viz. 

Effectives ------ 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Effectives .-----•" "" * •"" " 

To Ditto on account of Contribution towards the Defence of the Colony - - - 

£. 



£. s. d. 

17,185 18 2 J 

47,983 6 - 

874 15 4 

10,000 - - 



21,054 8 
581 12 



2,671 10 5 
28,192 10 3 



122,993 15 91 



JAMAICA. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 - - - - 

To" Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury 

To Profit on Money Transactions j viz. 
Premium on negotiation of bills 



To Consignments of Specie from England ------- 

To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants j viz. 

H. Clarke, Deputy-Assistant Commissary General at Honduras 

F. B. Archer, Assistant Commissary General at the Bahamas - - - 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 
Pay of officers and established clerks - - - - - - " 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. • - - - I \t Z * 
Contingencies. - - - • • " m m •12 3- 



£.7-6 
4 12 - 



8 7 



Land and inland water transport 
Provisions; viz. 

Stoppages for rations • 

Other receipts - 



- £.16,480 1 4 
2,258 - 5 



Fuel and light 



18,688 1 9 
22 9 10 



16 15 6 
202 9 2 



18,710 11 7 



£. *. d. 

88,004 6 - 

119,404 - 7 

667 7 1 

10,000 - - 



11 12 6 



To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------ 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Effectives .----- 



18,929 19 10 
1,097 10 10 

2,010 19 1 



Digitized by 



Cioogle 



FROM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 



'9 



1845 to 31st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



IONIAN ISLANDS. 

Cr. 



By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services j viz. 
Pay of officers and established clerks - - £. 1 ,590 1 1 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c £. 1,405 12 11 
Contingencies - - - - - 79 12 - 

• 1,545 4 11 

Land and inland water transport - - - - 481154 

Provisions - 15,486 12 1 

Forage 1,195 6 7 

Fuel and light 2,069 19 1 

■ 18,751 17 9 



By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No 2, for Non-effective Services 

By Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives --..-.---. 
Non effectives --.--.---- 
Chelsea pensions -.-.----- 



By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 
Effectives - 
Non effectives - 



By Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives • 

By Balance on 31st March 1846 - 



22,377 19 1 
650 9 10 



54,023 14 11 
415 14 - 
377 1 3 J 



23,906 17 5 
116 16 9 



£. 5. rf. 



23,028 8 11 



54,816 10 2 J 



24,023 14 2 



2,517 17 6 
18,607 4 11 | 



122,993 15 9 J 



1846 to 31st Maroh*1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



JAMAICA. 



Cr. 



By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. 

F. B. Archer, Assistant Commissary General at the Bahamas 
H. Clarke, Deputy Assistant Commissary General at Honduras • 
T. Graham, Assistant Commissary General at Sierra Leone 



£. s. d. 

43 2 1 

4,000 - - 

180 - - 



By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 
Pay of officers and established clerks ....... 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. • - - £. 1,886 6 2 

Allowances --•-.-.-. 250 11 - 

Contingencies -.-...-• 1,058 4 7 



Land and inland water transport .----••- 
Provisions ---...--- 40,425 4 9 

Forage 4,887 12 - 

Fuel and light 1,371 4 5 



2,403 17 11 

2,695 1 9 

4,939 12 5 

46^634 1 2 



By Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 
Effectives - 
Non-effectives - 
Chelsea pensions - 



54,343 - 10 

138 - - 

1,375 15 7 



By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 
Effectives .-.-•• 



By Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives -•-.--.--•-- 16^001 12 5 
Non-effectives .-..-.-.--- 37 _ - 



£. 



d. 



4,223 2 1 



56,672 13 3 

55,856 16 & 
21,827 13 « 

Digitized by LiOOQ IC 



20 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMISSARIES ACCOUNTS, 



MALTA. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Suns received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 -...--•-.--.. 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury -----.-.. 

To Profit on Monet Transactions ; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills - - - - - - - - £.181 11 1 

Surplus on a consignment of specie from England - * - - - ..5. 

To Consignments of Specie from England --..---•-- 
To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Land and inland water transport - - - - - - - - £.-88 

Provisions; viz. 
Stoppages for rations ... -£.14,906 17 10 

Other receipt* 1,683 2 7 

■ 16,500 - 6 

Forage 884 

——————— 16,503 8 9 

To Ditto on account of Stamp Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions ... 
To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives .......---.---- 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Effectives .-...------.--- 

To Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives --,------------- 

To Ditto on account of the Post Office - 

To Ditto on account of Contribution towards the Defence of the Colony - 

£. 



£. 8. d. 
19,486 12 ID J 
106,044 3 8 



131 16 1 
80,800 - - 



16,593 12 5 

3 - - 

49 18 5 

1,546 3 5 

3 - - 

2,178 4 1 

6,200 - - 



181,481 5 11| 



MAURITIUS. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1645 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury 

To Profit on Money Transactions j viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills - - « • • • - • £.1,010 6 7 
Surplus in the Commissariat Chest ------.. - 10 9| 



To Consignments of Specie from England 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 
Provisions; viz. 

Stoppages for rations ..... -£.12,622 11 9 

Other receipts ---.--.. 1,673 5 11 



Fuel and light 



14,295 17 8 
1 4 - 



To Ditto on account of Army Services j viz. 
Effectives ..... 



To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 
Effectives ...... 



To Ditto on account of Navy Services j viz. 
Effectives 



To Ditto on account of the Customs ---...-- 

To Ditto on account of the Colonial Government 5 viz. 

Repayment of colonial allowances to staff and regimental officers, depart- 



manta nnt\ nfViAva «xiH Anntincparinioa 



. I> 1Q AQ«7 1 a 



£. S. d. 

21,084 I 5 1 
49,112 9 6 



1,010 16 4} 
20,000 - - 



14,297 1 
418 12 



14,084 17 8} 



84 - 
126 16 



Digitized by 



Google 



MLOM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 



21 



1845 to 81st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



Cr. 



MALTA. 



By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; viz. £. $. d. 
Pay of officers and established clerks - £. 1,882 16 9 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. - £.1,631 12 9 
Contingencies - - - - - -56 19 11 

1,688 19 8 

Land and inland water transport - 819 1 8 

Provisions 14,017 6 -j 

Forage 768 16 1 J 

Fuel and light 1,758 10 6 

16,544 12 8 

20,885 3 4 

By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-effective Services - 347-2 

By Ditto on account of Army Services j viz. — — — 

Effectives 46,943 2 8 

Non-effectives ------.---- 1,319 3 6J 

Chelsea pensions ---------- 490 4 6 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services j viz. "'" 

Effectives 11,881 - 7 

Non-effectives 115 17 10 

By Ditto on account of Navy Services 5 viz. — — — 

Effectives 78,511 - - 

Non-effectives 898 - 4 

By Balance on 31st March 1846 -- 

£. 



£. s. d. 



20,732 3 6 

48,758 10 7) 
11,996 18 5 



79,409 - 4 
20,584 13 1 J 



181,481 5 112 



1845 to 81st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



MAURITIUS. 



Cr. 



By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz, 
Pay of officers and established clerks ... - £.1,513 10 10 
Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. - £. 992 12 6 
Contingencies - - - - - -96 161 



£. s. d. 



Land and inland water transport 
Provisions ... 

Forage - - - - 
Fuel and light - 



1,089 
648 



16,077 18 
M9 13 
840 8 



17,068 - 8 



By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-effective Services 

By Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives ----------- 

Non-effectives ---------- 

Chelsea pensions --------- 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services j viz. 

Effectives ----------- 

By Ditto on account of Navy Services j viz. 

Effectives ----------- 

Non-effectives ---------- 



20,319 2 
16 12 


9 
7 


41,935 14 
162 - 
703 18 


1 
3 
6J 



3,766 5 4 
10 14 - 



By Ditto on account of the Customs ----------- 

By Ditto on account of the Stipendiary Justices - 

By Ditto on account of the Colonial Government ; viz. 

Colonial allowances to staff and regimental officers, departments, and others, 

and contingencies ------- ... 15,634 

Prnvisiona. forftcra. fuel, and liirht for the civil services of *.1ia colonial 



£. $. d. 



Digitized by 



20,335 15 4 



42,801 12 10 J 
14,352 7 10 i 



3,776 19 4 
80 - - 
4,428 7 3 



Google 



22 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMISSARIES* ACCOUNTS, 



MEXICO. 



Dr. 



Period From 1st Apr* 
Abstract of Sums received into and 



To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services j via. 
Contingencies ------.... 



To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services j viz. 
Effectives -•---. 



£. 



£. 


s. 


d. 


41 


8 


11 


349 


10 


2 



390 19 1 



NEWFOUNDLAND. 

Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 - 

To Bills drawn ok the Lords of the Treasury ... 

To Profit on Money Transactions ; vii . 

Premium on negotiation of bflls 

To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants j viz. 

W. H. Robinson, Deputy Commissary General at Nova Scotia 



To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 
Contingencies --..---.-.. 

Provisions; viz. 

Stoppages for rations £. 3,039 4 3 

Other receipts - 102 10 2 



£.46 13 11 



3,141 14 5 



To Ditto on account of Stamp Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions 
To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 



Effectives 



To Ditto on account of Q&iulaxci; Services; viz. 
Effectives ------ 



To Ditto on account of the Customs - 
To „ „ Post Oxjice 

t^ Stationery Office - 



£. s. <L 
4,786 19 5 

7,604 - 1 



42-7 



9,000 - - , 



3,168 8 4 
3 - - 



16 12 11 

138 16 6 

m 15 6 
673 7 10 



"Digitized by 



G >egk l 






FROM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 



*3 



to 2d June 1845. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest Cr. 

By Balance on 1st April 1845 -.----.-.... 

By Loss ok Money Transactions; vis. 

Loss by exchange --------•---.. 

By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants; vis. 

T. Stickney, Assistant Commissary General at Bermuda -.--... 

By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; vis. 

Pay of officers and established clerks - - - - - - - £.62 610 

Contingencies ..--••-..-. -7 10 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; vis. 

Effectives ..--...-.--..-- 

£. 



MEXICO. 



£. $. d. 
120 4 9 



25 7 5 



178 2 8 



62 18 8 
9 11 - 



390 19 1 



1845 to 81st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



NEWFOUNDLAND. 

Dr. 



By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; vis. 

Pay of officers and established clerks - £. 681 9 4 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. - - - - £. 199 14 2 

Contingencies ........ 130 8 6 

829 17 8 



Land and inland water transport 
Freight of specie ... 



Provisions 
Forage - 
Fuel and light 



By Ditto on account of Army Services; viz. 

Effectives ..... 
Chelsea pensions .... 



By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; vis. 

Effectives ...... 

Non-effeotives ..... 



By Ditto on account of Navy Services ; vis. 

Effectives 

Non-effectives .... 



£.159 18 - 

12 10 - 



£.3,307 16 11 

360 10 6 

- 1,174 1 11 



172 8 - 



4,842 9 4 



£. 9,608 1 4 
674 4 11 



£.4,593 13 3 
65 - - 



£. s. d. 



5,925 19 4 



10,242 6 3 



4,648 13 S 



£.49\ A * 
200 - -' 



Digitized by 



r^ 691 4T2 

Google 



24 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMISSARIES ACCOUNTS, 



NEW SOUTH WALES. 

Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 -------.-«--- 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury --------- 

To Profit on Money Transactions ; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills - - - - - - - - £. 35 13 - 

Refund of an overcharge &r discount on bills ..... -2 10 

Anonymous payments into the Commissariat Chest ----- 42 - - 

To Consignments of Specie from England ---------. 

To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants j viz. 

6. Maclean, Deputy Commissary General in Van Diemen's Land - - - • - 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; viz. 

Contingencies - - - - - - - - - - - -2 19 11 

Land and inland water transport - - - - - - - - --66 

Provisions; viz.: 

Stoppages for rations £. 8,841 10 - 

Other receipts - - - 525 13 6 

0,367 3 6 

Forage 4 10- 

Juel and light 8 19 9 

9,375 18 8 

To Ditto on account of Stamp Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions - 

To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------ 290 12 11 

Non-effectives --------.-. -14 7 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services j viz* 

Effectives ----- 

To Ditto on account of Navy Services j viz. 

Effectives -----.--•-----. 

To Ditto on account of Convict Services ----- 

To Ditto on account of the Colonial Government .,.----.- 

To Ditto on Loan from the Bank of ^New South Wales ------- 



Digitized by^ 



£. s. d. 
66,049 4 5 

212,793 19 7 



77 15 10 
100,000 - - 

142 5 3 



9,378 19 8 
4 10 



291 7 6 

1,583 18 - 

942 14 6 

7,769 18 1 

10,402 16 1 

4,334 12 1 



Google 



FBOM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MABCH 1846. 



*5 



1845 to 3 1st March 1846. 

issued from the Commisshriat Chest. 



NEW SOUTH WALES. 

Cr. 



191 10 1 



By Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury, cancelled ------- 

By Loss on Money Transactions ; viz. 

Interest on loans from the Bank of New South Wales --•-£. 953 14 - 

Loss by exchange on bills upon the French Government remitted to Eng- 
land jn repayment of advances made in New South Wales - 

By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. 

G. Maclean, Deputy Commissary General in Van Diemen's Land - - 77,578 - 
P. Turner) Deputy Assistant Commissary General in New Zealand - - 19,862 15 

By payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 
Pay of officers and established clerks - • - - £. 3,420 10 7 
Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. - 1,209 - 6 

Contingencies ------ 243 4 4 



Land and inland water transport - 

Provisions ------ £.83,065 6 3 

Forage 1,290 7 7 

Fuel and light 2,186 8 1 



1,452 4 10 
298 5 8 



36,544 1 11 



By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-effective Services 

By Ditto on account of Army Services ; via. 

Effectives 

Non-effectives ---------- 

Chelsea pensions -••------ 

Commuted pensions ------- - - 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Effectives ---•--.---- 
Non-effectives ---------- 



41,715 2 7 
679 - 7 



37,249 4 3 

1,556 4 6 

4,550 15 9 

290 12 3 



10,913 16 6 
168 2 - 



By ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 
Effectives - - - - - 

Non-effectives - • - - 



7,590 16 3 
2,458 19 9 



By Ditto on account of the Excise ------- 

By Ditto on account of Irish Constabulary Police - 

By Ditto on account of the East India Company - - - - 

By Ditto on account of Convict Services ; viz. 

Salaries, allowances, and contingencies of convict establishments 
Disbursements by the Ordnance storekeeper for buildings, &c. - 
Transport and other Miscellaneous Disbursements - - - 



10,257 16 8 
1,192 17 3 
6,566 18 7 



By Ditto on account of the Colonial Government 
By Ditto on account of the French Government 



£. s. d 
103,095 15 5 



1,145 4 1 



97,440 15 - 



42,394 3 2 



43,646 16 9 



11,076 18 6 



10,049 16 - 

9 4 7 

45 11 6 

18,693 2 4 



Digitized by 



18,017 12 6 
209 1 6 

6,635 16 1\ 

Google 



96 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMISSARIES ACCOUNTS, 



NEW ZEALAND. 

Dr. 



Period from 1st April 1845 to 31st March 1846 (including the 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Tubas dry ---------- 

To Profit of Mobey Transaction s ; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of Bills -----------._ 

To Consignments of Specie from England -----------. 

To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. ~ , 

X* S» Urn 

The senior Commissariat Officer in New South Wales ------ 20,332 12 6 

O. Maclean, Deputy Commissary General in Van Diemen's Land ... 2,000 - - 
W. Maturin, Deputy Assistant Commissary General in South Australia - - 7,000 - - 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Provisions; viz. 

Stoppages for rations ------------ 3,035 5 - 

Other receipts 301 13 10 

To Ditto on account of Army Services; viz. 

Effectives ----------- . . ^ - - - - 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services; viz. 

Effectives - - - - - - - . - - - - - - - .#- 

To Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives - - - - - - - - - - - ? - - - - - . • 

To Ditto on Loan from the Provincial Bank of New Zealand -------- 

To Drafts of Sub-Accouhtants, drawn within the period of this Account, remaining unpaid on 31st 
March 1846 ------------------ 



907 15 lfr 
22^17 19 7 



108 16 3 
15,900 



29,832 12 6 



3^326 18 10 

205 19 8 

249 7 2 



123 3 1 
288 7 10 

709 1 7 



74,020 2 4 



NOVA SCOTIA. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 ------ 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury 

To Profit on Money Transactions ; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills - - - . 
Surplus on a consignment of specie from England 



£. 



747 18 - 
- 3 - 



To Consignments of Specie from England -.---.-..._ 

To Imprests from other Commisariat Accountants ; viz. 

W. Filder, Commissary General in Canada -------- 833 6 8 

F. E. Knowles, Deputy Commissary General in the West Indies - - - - 833 6 8 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; via. ~ "~ 

Pay of officers and established clerks --------- -86 

Provisions; viz. 
Stoppages for rations ----- £. 17,963 15 8 
Other receipts ------- 590 7 7| 

18,554 3 3} 

Forage ------------ -15 8 

Fuel and light - 90 18 4} 

18,645 12 4 



To Ditto on account of Stamp Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions - - - - 

To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives 2,048 - 8 

Non-effectives ----.-....... 11 5 - 



To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services; viz. 
Effectives -.---. 



To Ditto on account of Navy Services; viz. 

Effectives - - - - - 
To Ditto on account of the Customs - 
To Ditto „ Post Office - 



-Digitized by 1 



£. s. d. 
28^51 11 5 1 
97,670 3 9 



748 1 - 
10,000 - - 



1,666 13 4 



18,646 -10 
3 



2,059 5 8 
1,544 5 3 



Gbo 



22-9 

64 15 2 
467 11 2 



FROM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 



27 



Account for the month of December 1844, omitted in the last Return), 
issued from the Commissariat Chest, 



NEW ZEALAND. 



Cr. 



By Loss on Money Transactions j viz. 

Discount on negotiation of bills --------- 

Ditto on drafts drawn on the Senior Commissariat Officer in New South Wales 

By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; vis. 
Pay of officers and established clerks ----- £. 507 1 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. £. 160 8 2 

Allowances -------- 48 4 - 

Contingencies 179 26 



£. $. d. 
07 4 2 
18 10 11 



Land and inland water transport 
Provisions - 
Forage ----- 
Fuel and light - 



10,126 1 
185 19 
894 12 



5* 
9 



882 14 
1,841 18 



11,206 18 4 



By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-effective Services 

By Ditto on sccount of Army Services; viz. 

Effectives ------------ 

Non-effectives ----------- 

Chelsea pensions ----------- 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; vis. 

Effectives ------------ 

By Ditto on account of Navy Services; vis. 

Effectives ------------ 

Non-effectives ----------- 



18,488 8 3 
162 18 10 



15,420 15 8 

40 - - 

119 18 9 



18,158 14 
629 8 



By Ditto on account ofthe East India Company - - - - - 
By Ditto on account of the Civil Establishment of New Zealand 
By Ditto on account of the Colonial Government ; vis. 

Loan from Commissariat Chest ------- 

By Ditto on account of the Provincial Bane of New Zealand ; via : 

Repayment of loan to Commissariat Chest - 
By Remittances in transit --------- 

By Balance on 81st March 1846 - 



£. s. cU 
111 4 1 



18,601 2 1 



15,580 14 - 
4,894 2 8 



13,787 18 - 

09 17 2 

8,876 13 9 

8,000 - - 

288 10 7 

2,0J2 - - 

7,308 - 5 



74,020 2 4 



1845 to 31st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest 



NOVA SCOTIA. 



Cr. 



By payment of Drafts of Sub-Accocntants outstanding on 31st March 1845 

By Loss on Money Transactions; viz. 

Fractions ----------------- 

By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants; viz. 

W.Green, Assistant Commissary General at Newfoundland *>• »,uuu - - 

W. Filder, Commisary General in Canada - - - - - - - - m o » 

F. E. Knowles, Deputy Commissary General in the West Indies - - 

Bv Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks £.2,738 1 9 



25 



Pay< 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. 

Contingencies . - - - 



Land and inland water transport 
Provisions - - - - 
Forage - 
Fuel and light . - - 



£.1,205 8 
614 12 



1,720 
829 



1 1 

3 10 



13,679 15 9* 
871 2 4 
4,571 5 - 



19,122 3 1| 



By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-effective services - 
By Ditto on account of Army Services; viz. 

Effectives -----------« 

Non-effectives ----------- 

Chelsea pensions -.-------• 

Commuted pensions - - - -- 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services; viz. 

Effectives ...--------« 

Non-effectives ----------- 

By Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives ...----.-- 

Non-effectives _.--.----- 



24,409 9 94 
423 16 9 



54,869 11 

1,612 14 

5,736 14 

40 16 


7 
5 
9 
9 


29,455 9 
642 12 


4 
3 


10,781 16 
1,758 7 


4 
3 



By Ditto on account of Irish Constaburary Police - 

By Ditto „ the Clergy in North America 

Ry Ditto „ American Loyalists - 

By Ditto „ Local Pmnsioks - 

*» _ ** . 



Digitized 



A-...J. -&>r.~..~u ioi/> 



£. s. d. 

92 10 - 



9,041 6 3 



24,883 6 6} 

62,289 17 6 
80,098 1 7 



12,490 2 7 

11 10 10 

3,180 1 - 

18 I I 
19.270 2 7 + 



28 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMISSARIES' ACCOUNTS, 



ST. HELENA. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balanob on let April 1845 -------------- 

To Bills Drawn on the Loeps of thb Treasury ---------- 

To Pbopit on Monet Transactions ; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills -.--.---- £.264 11 7 
Proceeds of sale of Commissariat Clerk Blachford's effects, for " Robbery of 
Chest, per Contra " 17 15 - 

To Consignments of Spbcib from England ------ 

To Receipts on account of Coicmissabiat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Contingencies ----.-------* -66 

Land and inland water transport --------- .79 

Provisions; viz. 
Stoppages for rations ----- £.4,236 3 11 

Other receipts •-----• 744 62 

4,198 10 1 

Fuel and light 26-2 

6,006 10 3 

To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. — — — 

Effectives ----------------- 

To Ditto on account of Obdnance Services, viz. 

Effectives ------ ---------- 

To Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. , 

Effectives ----------------- 

To Ditto on account of the Customs ------------- 

To „ Captured Slaving Vessels ---------. 

To Ditto on account of the Civil Establishment op St. Helena ; viz. 

Revenue paid in by the Colonial Treasurer ---------- 

To Ditto on account of Liberated Africans ----------- 

£ 



6,472 6 8J 
22,309 1 9 



282 6 7 
10,000 - - 



5,007 4 6 

- 14 4 

286 9 8 

12 14 6 

144 11 - 

494 « 9 



15,237 18 8 
1 16 - 



60,249 10 5 J 



SIERRA LEONE. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 .... 
To Bills Drawn on thb Lords of thb Treasury 

To Pbopit on Monby Transactions ; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills - - - 

To Consignments op Spbcib pbom England 



To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants; viz. 

F. E. Knowles, Deputy Commissary General in the West Indies 

H. J. Wild, Deputy Commissary General at Jamaica 

The Senior Commissariat Officer at the Gold Coast - - - 



- £.275 

180 



6 11 
167 19 8 



To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Contingencies --------.---- 

Provisions; viz. 
Stoppages for rations ----- £.1,84717 3 

Other receipts -------- 170 4 3 

2,018 1 6 

Fuel and light -.-. 788 



1 12 7 



2,025 10 2 



To Ditto on account of the Effects op Deceased Commissariat Officers 

To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------------ 

Chelsea pensions ----------- 

To Ditto on account of Ordnancb Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------------ 

To Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------------ 

To Ditto on account of the Customs -------- 

To „ Captured Slaving Vessels - - - - 

To „ Liberated Africans ------ 



521 4 
4 10 



DigitizecJ by* 



£. s. d. 

5,885 18 3 

22,001 19 8 

1 - - 

8,000 



623 6 7 



(Eo 



2,027 2 9 
42 3 11 



525 15 1 

56 2 9 

980 10 11 

25 15 11 

9,433 12 10 

914 & 6 



FROM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 

f 



29 



1845 to 3 1st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Cheat. 



ST. HELENA. 



Cr. 



By Loss on Money Transactions: via. 

Discount on negotiation of bills - - - - - - - - * ~ £• ftl 10 -» 

Robbery of the chest by Commissariat Clerk Blachford 700 6 2} 

By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Strviea* \ via. ' 

Pay of officers and established clerks - ........ 250 18 4 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, Ace. ..... £.736 IS 4 

Allowances «4 IS - 

Contingencies ----••-.--• 51 18 ft 

882 1 

Land and inland water transport ---..---. 284 7 1 
Provisions .....-•..-. 4,882 4 7 

Forage -----. 800-9 

Fuel and light 59378 

— — — 4*75 18 ~ 

By Ditto on account of Army Sbr vices ; viz. 

Effectives - 9,989 g jo 

Chelsea pensions ............ 27 9 - 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; via. "" 

Effectives • •••..,»-, 

By Ditto on account of Navt Services : via. 

Effectives 5,556 11 6 

Non-effectives 88 11 9 

By Ditto on account of the East India Company ---.....-. 

By Ditto on account af the Civil Establishment op St. Helena ; via. 

Drafts of the Colonial Treasurer . - . 20,486 8 9 

St. Helena pensions .--------.-. 56 6 - 

By Ditto on account of Liberated Africans .--...-.-.- 
By Balance on 81st March 1846 

£. 



£. $. d. 
721 IS 91 



6,648 19 11 

10,016 14 10 
5,496 10 3 



5,645 3 3 
2,919 18 11 



20,542 13 9 
1,224 19 4 
7,032 14 - 



60,249 10 5i 



1845 to 31st March 1846' 

issued from the Commissariat Chest* 



By Loss on Monet Transactions ; vix. 
Fractions ..... 



SIERRA LEONE. 



Cr. 



By Consignments of Specie to England -- 

By Imprests to other Commissariat Acooustants ; via. 

R. Ross, Deputy Assistant Commissary General at the Gold Coast - 

By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; via. 

Pay of officers and established clerks - ........ £.7*911 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. ...... £.849 lft 10 

Allowances ------..... 90 17 - 

Contingencies .......... 22 14 11 



Land and inland water transport -----.... 

Provisions 2 438 - 9 

Forage 830 5 - 

Fuel and light ----...... 830 10 3 



463 4 

42 14 



3,598 16 



By Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives 7,333 1 n 

Chelsea pensions -••-.•....... 8,776 2 - 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services j viz. 

Effectives ---•---.-......... 

By Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives 

By Ditto on account of Liberated Africans ---..-..... 

By Ditto on account of the Colonial Government; viz. 

Repayment of loan ftom the Colonial Chest -*...»,.•.. 



By Ditto on account of Foreign Seamen Captured in Slaving Vessels; via. 
Maintenance and treatment in hospital ....... 

By Balance on 31st March 1846 -.--".* 



253— II. 



D4 



£ 

Di y i l i zuU 



294 11 


d. 

4 

1 


11 1 


6 



4,834 6 8 



11,309 


3 


11 


1,262 


17 


8 


18,358 

8,062 


6 
13 


7 

9 



6,000 - - 



35 
6,349 



3 1 

8 2 



>6,517 



12 9 



30 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMISSARIES ACCOUNTS, 



SOUTH AUSTRALIA. 

Dr. 



Period from 1st April 1845 to 31st March 1846 (including the Account 

ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 ------- 

To Bills drawn on the Lokds op thb Treasury ---------_ 

To Profit oxc Money Transactions ; viz. 

Interest on deposits in the Bans of Australia ---------- 

To Consignments of Specie from England ....------- 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; viz. 
Provisions; viz. 

Stoppages for rations - - - - - £. 763 1 8 

Other receipts ..---------- 6 - - 

To Ditto on account of Army Services; viz. 

Effectives ------------------ 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Non-effectives ---------------- 

To Ditto on Account of the Colonial Government; viz. 

Repayment of advance in England to the Agent General of South Australia on 

account of the Land Fund ---..-----£. 1,000 - - 

Ditto - - - - ditto - - - for Emigration Services ... - 5,000 - - 

Balance of debt due by the Local Government to the Commissariat Chest - - 1,790 19 3 

Loan from the Colonial Chest ---------- 400 - - 

£ 



915 11 11} 
968 15 - 



1 - 7 

2,000 



769 I 8 
3 6 8 

61 9 6 



8,190 19 3 



12,910 4 7J 



VAN DIEMEN'S LAND. 

Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance "on 1st April 1845 -.----.------- 

To Bills drawn ok thb Lords of the Treasury ---------- 

To Promt on Money Transactions; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of bills - --------- £.234 18 11 

Repayment of discount'on bills negotiated for tbe service of the Colonial Govern- 
ment ---*------ .-..- 76 2 10 



To Consignment of Specie from England 



To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants; viz. 

T. W. Ramsay, Deputy Commissary General in New South Wales 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services; viz. 
Pay of officers and established clerks -------- 

Land and inland water transport --------- 



Provisions; viz. 
Stoppages for rations 
Other receipts - 



£.18,466 2 4 
872 16 7 



-69 
-76 



18,838 18 11 



To Ditto on account of Stamp Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions 

To Ditto on account of Army Services; viz. 

Effectives ------------- 

Non-effectives ------------ 



018 8 8 
10 - - 



To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 
Effectives ------ 



To Ditto on account of Navy Services; viz. 
Effectives - - - - - 



To Ditto on account of the Customs - 
To „ Convict Service - 

To „ Colonial Government 

To „ Loan from Local B nks 



£. 



Digitized ft 



£. s. d. 
28,758 6 11 

93,072 1 8 



311 1 9 
100,000 - - 

77,879 6 5 



18,839 18 2 
3 



923 8 3 

776 4 2 

1,063 17 8 

143 17 2 

19,525 14 11 

1,828 19 9 

11,639 1 5 



354,264 13 3 



FROM 1 APRIL 1845 TO 31 MARCH 1846. 



3* 



for the Month of February 1845, omitted in the last Return), 
issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



SOUTH AUSTRALIA, 

Cr. 



By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. 

P. Turner, Deputy Assistant Commissary General in New Zealand - 

By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks -------- 

Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c - - - - - £. 117 10 8 

Contingencies ---------- 22-10 



£.228 17 11 



Land and inland water transport 

Provisions - 

Forage - - - - - 

Fuel and light - - - - 



756 16 11 

184 2 4} 
137 1 



By Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------- 

Non-effectives ------ 

Chelsea pensions - - - - - 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------- 

By Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------- 

Non-effectives ------ 



130 11 1 
4 12 2 



1,028 8 4i 



2,621 2 2 

70 14 6 

330 10 4 



33 14 6 

62 4 - 



By Ditto on account of the Irish Constabulary Polios - 

By „ East India Company ------ 

By „ Expedition for Exploring Central Australia 

By Balance on 31st March 1846 --------- 



£. 8. d. 
7,000 - - 



1,401 6( 



3,040 16 - 
646 10 7 



05 18 6 

10 - - 

18 13 

402 10 4 

208 7 11 



12,910 4 7\ 



1845 to 31st March 1846. 

issued from the Commissariat Chest. 



VAN DIEMEN'S LAND. 

Cr. 



By Loss on Money Transactions ; viz. 

Discount on negotiation of bills - - * - - - - - - - £.686 4 7 

Interest on loans from local banks --------- 10 18 5 

By Imprests to other Commissariat Accountants \ viz. ~"~ 

T. W. Ramsay, Deputy Commissary General in New South Wales - 601 10 3 

P. Turner, Deputy Assistant Commissary General in New Zealand - - - 2,036 6 6 

W. H. Drake, Deputy Assistant Commissary General in Western Australia - 4,000 - - 

F. E. Knowles, Deputy Commissary General in the West Indies ... 209 19 & 

By Payments on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. — — — 
Pay of officers and established clerks .... -£.4,05011 5 
Pay of extra clerks, storekeepers, &c. - - £. 3,023 7 11 
Contingencies ------- 227 18 

3,251 1 8 

Land and inland water transport ---... 730 6 5 

Provisions 101,688 8 4 

Forage 1,048 4 2 

Fuel and light 5,807 18 8 

108,134 1 2 

# 117,075 - 8 

By Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-effective Services - - 250 11 7 

By Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------------- 

Non-effectives ------------ 

Chelsea pensions -----..---. 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------------- 

Non-effectives ------------ 

By Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------------- 

Non-effectives ------....„. 

By Ditto on account of the East India Company ---------- 

By Ditto on account of Convict Services ; viz. 

Salaries, allowances, and contingencies of convict establishments ... 64,040 10 4 
Disbursements by Ordnance storekeeper, for buildings, &c. - - - - 6,485 7 - 
Transport and other miscellaneous disbursements ------ 0,478 8 6 

By Ditto on account of the Magnetic Observatory ---------- 

By „ CONCORDATUM FUND, IRELAND --------- 

By „ Colonial Government op Western Australia - - - - - 

Bv Dittn «vn ftr»r>onnt. of r>iA Tnn at. Raw-ci • rrW 



Digitized by 



53,184 1 

2,225 4 

445 


3 

8 

7 


15,527 10 
262 10 


4 
7 


1,447 15 
803 14 


1 
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£. s. d. 
706 3 - 

6,847 16 5 



117,325 12 3 

55,804 15 6 
15,700 11 



2,251 6 
172 17 6 



80,004 5 IO 

- 2 a 

9 4 7 

10O - «- 



Google 



32 



ABSTRACTS OF COMMISSARIES' ACCOUNTS, 



WESTERN AUSTRALIA. 

Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into tad 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 ----.---,-----. 

To Bills drawn on the Lords op the Treasury -------.-.. 

To Profit on Monet Transactions ; viz. 

Fractions -.-...--------.-.. 

To Consignments of Specie from England • -----•-... 

To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants ; viz. 

G. Maclean, Deputy Commissary General in Van Diemen's Land -«»---- 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks - - - - - - - - - £.3 18 2 

Contingences ---------- . % , 1 15 - 

Land and inland water transport ---------- _ io - 

Provisions; viz. 

Stoppages for ration^ £. 1J28 15 11 

Other receipts ---------- 526 15 10 

1,660 11 9 

To Ditto on account of Army Services ; viz. 

Effectives ------------ . ^ , . - 

To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 

Effectives ----------------- 

To Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives --*•-•-.----.---- 

To Ditto on account of the Settlement of Western Australia - ------- 

£. 



£. s. d. 
3,098 17 4 

7,982 13 7 



- 1 - 

3»000 - - 

4,025 - - 



1,656 14 11 

475 17 4 

7 3 2 

6fr - - 
109 14 6 



20,377 1 10 



WEST INDIES. 



Dr. 



Period from 1st April 
ABSTRACT of Sums received into and 



To Balance on 1st April 1845 --------,.,. 

To Bills drawn on the Lords of the Treasury ------ 

To Profit on Money Transactions ; viz. 

Premium on negotiation of Bills --------- 

To Imprests from other Commissariat Accountants; viz. 

W. Filder, Commissary General in Canada ------- 

T. Stickney, Assistant Commissary General in Mexico - - - - 

To Receipts on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 1, for Effective Services ; viz. 
Fay of officers and established clerks ------ £.- 



£. 85 - - 

83 6 8 



Allowances 
Contingencies 



£.-46 
16 3 - 



- 2 



Land and inland water transport - - - - 

Provisions; viz. 

Stoppages for rations - - £.28,447 7 5 

Other receipts - - - - 3,068 14 -i 



16 7 6 
156 15 11 



Forage 

Fuel and light 



31,516 1 5i 
13 16 11 
24 2 11* 



31,554 1 3f 



To Ditto on account of Commissariat Vote, No. 2, for Non-effective Services 

To Ditto on account of Stamp Duties paid in England on Commissariat Commissions - 

To Ditto on account of Army Services; viz. 

Effectives ---------..--• 

Chelsea pensions ----------.-. 



31,727 4 10t 

- 14 8 



1,207 7 11 
15 1 - 



To Ditto on account of Ordnance Services ; viz. 
Effectives ------ 



To Ditto on account of Navy Services ; viz. 

Effectives 

Tn Ditto on account of the Customs - 



£. «. d. 

146,204 8 9f 

177,045 12 4 

506 15 7 



168 6 8 



31,727 19 6 f 
3 - - 



1,282 8 11 
5,414 5 6 

128 9 10 
887 18 1 



Digitized by 



Google 



FROM 1 APstlL 1S43 TO SI MAJLCH l>4tL 






1845 fa 31* Mirrt. :>*£. 
issued frosn t** Ccn 



WESTERN AUSTRALIA, 

Cr. 






11) IS 19 



By Psyrost :£ Draft* :f ST^Aro-TxrAjrES* .**tt>SAi£-ir «*> 9I« March 1545 - 
By Loss 05 M>3rrrTmxy^krrr, , ' i «*r ia * J 

Diseou; ra iaec?c*£»:a. re' :*Ij* .•..-..-.«£„ US 15 - ■ 
Frsctkcs -~ - - - • - * * - * - - * • — — 10 • 

By Permeats « nrccaa* rf C^WRrssARiAY Vjtr* X«l 1, far Es V rtzre S c rcx e s ; Tit 

" Pay of jeScew a=»£ «scki -LiO^£ clerks -.-.-.-.. 530 14 4^ 

Pair of extra c>7ks. fc:«*«^ea, 4cr. -.---. £. 399 7 3 
Contafeaeaes --1. ...... 13? 10 1 

49S 17 9 

Lab* and rsUsi nut traa^rt .......... 9*4 17 C 

Prortnoas ....--••-.- 1j6S7 - 10 i 

Forage *4f * j 

FneTand Uskt W 4 11 j 

3J99 8 9 

By Ditto on aceonnt of Arrtt Sssnca* ; Tin. - 

Eneetrres 4,917 10 2 

> ca** i ulin B *S* 6 * 

Chelsea pmrinai «1 10 - ! 

By Ditto on aceommt of Orrxajpce Serttcrs; to. j 

Effectives ----..-..■.----..-. 

By Dhtooa aeeoent of Xatt Srrttcrs; viz. * 

Efiectrres .--------..--. 77 10 4. 

N on ^dsc uii tA MS 9 - 

By Ditto on account of Cotttct Serttcrs; tb. 

Jurenile esaigraats from Parkherst -•----..-..-• 

By Ditto on account of the SimoisT of Wrrtrev ArsrejLLiA ....... 

By „ Coiosiaa GoTmmxmmsr ---------- i 

By Balance on 91st Marc* 1&46 ..--.----.---.: 

£. 20,377 1 10 



MIS 17 4 

4>TV>i 1 11 

7S* 4 9 

773 19 4 

19S IS U 

7-910 19 9 

76 1 6 

2,730 9 * 



1845 to 31st March 1846. 

issued from die Comsmnsarist Chest. 



WEST INDIES. 



Cr. 



By Payment of D hafts of Sm-AccorsraSTS, outstanding on 91st March 1845 

By Loss oh Money Transactions ; Tiz. 

Discount on negotiation of bills ........ 

By Imprests to other Commissariat Acco un tants ; Tiz. 

W. H. Robinson, Deputy Coinuussssry General in XoTaSoatia - 

T. Graham, Assistant Commissary General at Sierra Leone ... 



£.899 6 8 
86 7 9 



By Payments on sccount of Commissariat Toy*, No* 1, for Effectrre Serrices ; Tiz. 

Pay of officers and established clerks £.8,578 8 5 

Pay of extra elerRZ,storefceepcFS, Ice. - • £» 5,899 10 8 

Allowances ........ 1,940 14 - 

Contingencies -----. 



Land and inland water tr a nspor t - 
Freight of i 



Prorisions 
Forage - 
Fuel and light 



1,190 Of 

4,700 18 
7 18 4 

48,460 9 5| 
6^969 - 10 
4,379 15 - 



8^(*7 14 9| 
4,706 16 10 

59,829 5 9} 



By Ditto on account of Commissariat Von, No. 2, for Xon-eftectrre Serrices 

By Ditto on account of Army Services ; Tiz. 

Effectives -----...-... 

Non-efFecttres ........... 

Chelsea pensions --------- 

By Ditto on account of Ordnance Srbticbs ; Tiz. 



81,418 4 9} 
449 9 5 



104,608 6 8 
149 14 2 
5,549 14 li 



Effectives .............. 43,553 9 1 

Non-effectives -.-...-...... 32942 



By Ditto on account of Natt Skryicbs ; Tiz. 
EffectiTes -----. 
Non-effectives - 



7,563 14 11 
188 11 3J 



By Ditto on account of Stipendiary Justices 
By „ Liberated Africans 

By Balance on 31st March 1846 - - . 



Digitized"!^ 
£ 



£> * «\ 

31 Id 6 
110 15 9, 



919 19 11 



81,861 14 3| 

110,302 14 111 
43,876 13 3 



7,750 6 2 1 
23,955 9 8 
^ 367 9 7 



368,670 7 7i 



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COMMISSARIAT. 

1845-6. 



RETURN to an Ordir of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 31 March 18472-^ftr, 



AN ACCOUNT « OP THE RECEIPT < AND EXPENDITURE FOR 

"COMMISSARIAT SERVICES, 
" IN THE YEAR ENDED THE 31st DAY OF MARCH 1846." 



(Mr. TufnelL) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
31 March 1847. 



Digitized by 



Google 



RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE FOR COMMISSARIAT SERVICES, 



ACCOUNT of the RECEIPT and EXPENDITURE for 



TO Amount of the Grants for Commissariat Effective Services for the Year 1845-6 



£. t. d. 
361,805 - - 



Less, Amount included therein to cover Excess of Expenditure for Effective Services 
beyond the Grants for 1843-4, and accounted for in the Balance Sheet of that Year - 16,718 16 - 



£. 345,086 4 - 

Add, Net Premium obtained in 1843-4 on the Negotiation of Bills drawn upon 
the Treasury, credited on the Estimates for 1845-6 in aid of the Grants - 41,460 2 7 

Applicable to Effective Services for the Year! m _____ _ 

1845-6, as detailed per Contra - - J 

To Amount of the Grant for Commissariat Non-effective Services for the Year 1845-6, as 
detailed per Contra --*-. - - 47,328 - - 

Less, Amount included therein to cover Excess of Expenditure for Non-effective Ser- 
vices, beyond the Grant for 1843-4, and accounted for in the Balance Sheet of that 
Year 1,472 2 2 



£. 



£. 



$. <L 



386,565 6 7 



45,855 17 10 



Note.— The sum of 4,706 J. 4#. 9<*. was realiznd in A* ™««u> ^ *u* „~. ,o,* - ^Digjtjzedjjy V 



432,411 4 5 



IN THE YEAH ENDED 31 MARCH 1846. 



Commissariat Services, in the Year ended 31 March 1846. 



BT Expenditure in the Year 1846-6, under the following Heads ; viz. 



1. — For Effbctiyb Services : 

Pay and Contingencies of the Com- 
missariat Branch at the Treasury - 

Pay of the Officers and established 
Clerks of the Commissariat abroad 

Pay of Extra Clerks, Storekeepers, 
Issuers, Conductors, Bakers, Artifi- 
cers, and others - 

Allowances for black servants, barrel 
bulk, &c - 

Contingencies, Miscellaneous Pur- 
chases, Postages, Advertisements, 
Printing, extra Labour, Travelling 
Expenses, and Miscellaneous Pay- 
ments ------ 

Land and Inland Water Transport - 

Freight of Specie - 

Cost of Provisions £.844,010 8 4 

Less, Stoppages 278,588 12 - 



Cost of Forage - 
Cost of Fuel and Light • 
Commutation of Hsjf Pay 

Totals for Effective Services - {. 

2. For Nwi-Efpictive Services : 
HalfPay 



Retired Full Pay, Compensation, and 
Superannuation Allowances - 

Widows 5 Pensions r 

Compassionate Allowances 

Totals for Effective and! - 
Non-Effective Services/ 



By Balance unexpended, to be declared 
available as " Ways and Means" 



£. 



EXPENDITURE. 



£. i. d. 

4,208 6 - 

62,728 6 1 

89,691 9 11 

4,388 11 .7 



9,442 4 1 


12,779 


68,026 17 11 


68,046 


6,444 4 2 


7,000 



65,480 ia 4 
57,583 18 8 
60,286 4 4 



342,078 19 ] 

30,878 6 1 

6,111 12 1 

6,136 8 1 

899 - - 



886,099 5 4 



46,311 19 1 



432,411 4 6 



GRANTS. 



£. 
4,242 

63,469 

36,618 
6,078 



1 - 

7 2 

18 2 

- 8 



88,773 

66,700 

67,900 

1,066 



396,556 6 7 

02^92 - - 

• 

6,373 7 10 

6,290 - - 

800 10 - 



482,411 4 6 



DIFFERENCES. 



LESS 
than Voted. 



£. $. d. 
38 16 - 

( l ) 741 1 1 



( ! ) 689 8 8 



3,336 15 11 



19 2 1 



1,656 16 10 



23,342 3 8 

9,166 1 4 

7,614 16 8 

1,055 - - 



47,558 19 3 

1,513 18 11 

261 16 9 
163 11 11 



MORE 
than Voted. 



£. $. d. 



0)8,077 11 9 



3,077 11 9 



98 10 - 



49,488 - 10 



3,176 1 9 



Cause* of Excess of 

Expenditure 

beyond the Sums 

Voted. 



(') Occasioned by the 
transfer of the boat esta- 
blishments (Tor transport) 
from the military depart- 
ments abroad to the Com- 
missariat, by which a con- 
siderable saving has been 
effected ; also, by the ne- 
cessity for employing ci- 
vilian issuers and labourers 
in lieu of military fatigue 
men ; aod by increase of 
bakery establishment at 
Bermuda for the supply 
of the navy. 



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1845-6. 


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ARMY. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Common*, 
dated 10 May 1847 ;-/or, 

A COPY " of the Warrant dated the 1st day of May 1846, by which an improved 
Retirement was granted to Quartermasters and Veterinary Surgeons." 

« RETURNS of the Number of Quartermasters and Veterinary Surgeons who had 
been placed on that Retired Improvement, specifying the Number of Years' Service, the 
Amount of their Full Pay at the time of Retirement, and the Amount of their Retired 
Pay." 

''Of Medical Officers and of Surgeons and Paymasters of Regiments whose Ser- 
vices exceed Thirty Years; specifying the Amount of their Full Pay and Allowances, 
and the Amount of Retired Pay awarded to these by the Warrant of May 1846." 



WARRANT regulating the Grants of Unattached Pay, Retired Full Pay, 

and Half Pay. 



Dated 1st May 1846. 



Victoria R. 

Whereas We have judged it expedient to revise, amend and consolidate the rules, 
orders and regulations which have from time to time been established for granting Unat- 
tached Pay and other rates of Pay to General Officers, and Retired Full Pay and Half Pay 
to Officers of Our Army : Our will and pleasure is, that from and after the date hereof this 
Our Warrant shall be considered the sole authority upon this subject. 



Unattached Pay and other Rates of Pay to General Officers. 

The number of General Officers, upon unattached pay of one pound five shillings a day, 
not being in command of regiments, is limited to an establishment of one hundred and 
twenty General Officers. 

The vacancies which may from time to time occur in this limited establishment will be 
filled up by the General Officers recommended to Us by the Commander in-Chief. 

General Officers, being Colonels of Regiments, in the event of their regiments being 
reduced, may be placed in the first instance as supernumeraries in the said establishment, 
but are to fall into the vacancies that may occur thereupon. 

All officers promoted to be General Officers shall, whether on full pay or half pay at the 
time of promotion, receive unattached pay, at the rate of four hundred pounds per annum, 
or if Lieutenant-colonels [of Cavalry, the net full pay of that rank, until elected to the 
establishment of unattached pay, at one pound five shillings a day, or appointed to be 
Colonels of Regiments, provided such officers shall have actually served upwards of six years 
with the rank of Regimental Major or Lieutenant-colonel, either with a regiment or in some 
other military capacity in the public service ; or, having obtained the rank of Regimental 
Field Officer, had been obliged to go upon half pay on account of reduction, or in conse- 
quence of ill health contracted in the service, as established by the report of a Board of 
Medical Officers, or in consequence of wounds received in action before he had served the 
six years above prescribed. 

To the limitations contained, in the preceding Article, the following exceptions only 
will be admitted. In these cases the insufficiency of service as Regimental Field Officer, 
above alluded to, will not render an officer ineligible for the 400 1, per annum :— r 

Appointment as Major-General on the staff. 
Previous selection for a distinguished service pension. 
Previous appointment to a military government. 

The deficient time of service as a Regimental Field Officer m*y be supplied by the com- 
pletion of the requisite period in the staff appointment of—* 
Assistant Adjutant-General ; 
Assistant Quartermaster-General : 



2 RETURN RELATIVE TO RETIRED PAY 

The benefit of this pay shall not be extended to any General Officer, who, when he last went 
upon half pay, had received the difference ; nor to any officer who went upon half pay at his 
own request in time of war, after having obtained the Brevet Rank of Lieutenant-colonel ; 
nor to any officer who went upon half pay at his own request in time of peace before he had 
served six years with the rank of Regimental Field Officer. 

Officers thus situated shall continue to receive the half pay only of which they were in the 
receipt at the time of their promotion to be General Officers. 

Officers removed from their commissions as Field Officers, in Regiments of Foot Guards, 
in consequence of being promoted to be General Officers, shall receive unattached pay, 
according to the following scale ; viz. — 

Lieutenant-Colonel - - - - £• 600 per annum. 
Major ------ 550 „ 



Retired Full Pay. 

A limited establishment of Retired Full Pay shall be formed and kept up according to the 
following scale : — 

20 Lieutenant-colonels, at 17 s. a day each. 
20 Majors - - 16*. „ 

115 Captains, whereof a number not exceeding 45, may be Brevet Field Officers at 
13 s. 7 d. a day each ; and the remainder, Captains, at 11 s. 7 d. a day each. Captains on 
the retired list, at a lower rate of pay, are not to be transferred to the new scale, except on 
the special recommendation of the Commander-in-Chief. 

The officers to be selected for this retired establishment shall be recommended to us by 
the Commander-in-Chief, and tbey shall be appointed thereto according to their regi- 
mental, and not according to their brevet rank, but they shall not thereby obtain any addi- 
tional rank, nor can they be further promoted. 

Officers hereafter appointed to Veteran Battalions shall not, on their retirement therefrom, 
acquire any claim Xofull retired pay, but, upon reduction, shall be liable to be placed upon 
half pay under the same regulations as officers reduced from Regiments of the Line. 



Temporary Allowance in the nature of Half Pay. 

An officer having served less than three years, will, if reduced, receive only a temporary 
allowance of half pay, according to the following scale : — 

Services on Foil Pay. Temporary Allowance. 

Under 1 year - - - - - for 1 year. 

1 and under 2 years - 2 „ 

2 n 3 „ - 3 „ 

The temporary allowance shall cease at the termination of the above-recited periods, or 
previously, if the officer shall have been previously replaced on full pay. 

But an officer on temporary half pay shall be eligible to be appointed to % a fall-pay com- 
mission, either by exchange or otherwise, provided his appointment shall take place within 
five years after he has ceased to receive temporary half pay, in which case his former service 
shall be allowed to reckon. 

The exchange to full pay, under the preceding article, may be made with a full-pay officer 
entitled to half pay. 

If an officer who has been reduced with only a temporary allowance shall have purchased 
his commission, he may receive the regulated price thereof from the public through the 
Secretary at War, the public shall be reimbursed by the sale of a first full-pay commission, 
which would otherwise have been conferred without purchase : but these sales shall not be 
required in any greater proportion than one for every two such reductions. 



HalfPay. 

The half pay of the army is a remuneration for past military services, and also an obli- 
gation on the part of the officer to return to his military duties whenever called upon j and 
any officer not obeying the call is liable to forfeit his halipay. 

An officer having actually done duty in some regiment or corps, or in some other military 
capacity in the public service for a period of at least three years, shall be entitled to be 
placed on the half-pay establishment on reduction from full pay. 

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OF OFFICERS IN THE ARMY. 



No garrison commission or appointment shall give an officer any claim to half pay on 
retirement. 

An officer who applies to retire upon half pay on the ground of ill health, must, if stationed 
in or near London or Dublin, be examined by the principal officers of the Army Medical 
Departments in those cities ; and if stationed elsewhere, by a Board of Medical Officers, 
agreeably to the provisions of the Articles of War ; the result of such examination to be 
forwarded to the Commander-in-Chief and Our Secretary at War. If such examination 
shall not take place, the officer will be considered to have retired upon half pay for his own 
convenience. 

The residence of the half-pay officer is to be stated every quarter in his declaration, whether 
bis half pay be received by an agent or by himself. 

No officer on half pay shall, of right, have a claim to sell or commute his half pay; the 
permission shall be governed by such a consideration of the individual case as the Com- 
mander-in-Chief and Secretary at War may think proper to recommend to Us. 

If a subaltern officer whose service confers a claim to half pay be desirous of retiring 
from the army by the sale of his commission, the following rules shall be observed : — 

1. If he purchased his commission the regulated price may be granted (whether he should 
be receiving half pay, or a temporary allowance of the nature of naif pay). 

2. If he did not purchase his commission, and had served, if a Lieutenant, seven years on 
full pay in the army, or an Ensign or Cornet six years on full pay, he may receive the new 
price of his commission in either rank. 

3. But if had served on full pay for a period between seven, or six and four years, he should 
be entitled to the old price only of his commission. 

4. If he should retire after a service of more than three and less than four years' duration, 
at his own request, and not on account of ill health or wounds, he shall be entitled to receive 
half the price of his commission at the new rate. 

5. If a non-commissioned officer shall have been promoted to the rank of an Ensign, or 
Cornet, or Adjutant, he shall not have a claim to retire, by the sale of his commission, unless 
he shall have served in the army, as an officer on full pay, upwards of one year, in which 
case he may be awarded the full price of the commission, which he shall have received with- 
out purchase, or such portion thereof as shall be deemed proper by the Commander-in-Chief 
and the Secretary at War. 

An officer of any of the under-mentioned ranks, having entered the service since the 
termination of the war in 1815, and having been permitted to exchange to half pay, not on 
account of ill health, but for his private convenience, before he had served seven years on 
full pay, shall be allowed only the old rate of half pay specified in the following Schedule: 



Colonel - - - - - 

Lieutenant-colonel - - - 

Major -------- 

Captain -----..-- 

Ditto of Infantry having superior Brevet rank, 
and provided he shall have served as Captain on 
full pay for at least two years immediately before 
retirement to half pay - 

Lieutenant -------- 

Ditto of Infantry, if commissioned seven years as a 
Lieutenant in the regular army, at the date of 
being placed upon half pay - 

Ditto of Cavalry of five years' standing, if entitled to 
reckon two years for the battle of Waterloo - - 

Cornet ---•-..-_ 

Second Lieutenant and Ensign * - - - 

Adjutant, if not commissioned as Lieutenant - 



Cavalry. 



New Rate. 



Per Diem. 

8. d. 
15 € 

12 6 

10 - 

7 6 



4 8 



6 2 

3 6 

4 - 



Old Rate. 



Per Diem. 

$. d. 
13 - 

10 - 

8 - 

5 6 



3 - 



2 6 



4 - 



Infantry. 



New Rate. 



Per Diem. 

s. d. 
14 6 

11 - 

9 6 

7 - 



8 - 
4 - 

4 6 



3 - 

4 - 



Old Rate. 



Per Diem. 

S. d. 
12 - 

8 6 

7 6 

5 - 



2 4 



1 lO 

4 — 



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4 RETURN RELATIVE TO RETIRED PAY 

be promoted to the unattached rank and half pay of a Lieutenant-colonel of Infantry; in 
like manner, for every three vacancies on the retired list, or on the British half pay, in the 
rank of Major, one Captain may be promoted from the full pay ; and for every three 
vacancies in the rank of Captain, one Lieutenant may be promoted from the full pay to the 
unattached rank and half pay of a Captain of Infantry. 

The officers so promoted under this regulation shall retain their claims to pensions for their 
widows at the rates accorded to their new ranks. 

The vacancies which these promotions will create on the full pay, shall be in all cases filled 
from the half-pay list. 

In order to make a better provision for officers of long and meritorious service, a limited 
number, twenty, Re<rimental Lieutenant-colonels shall receive an allowance of £.100 a year 
each, in addition to tne half pay assigned to them by the Schedule annexed to the 
Article. 

The officer to be selected for this special provision shall be recommended to Us by the 
General Commanding-in-Chief from those Lieutenant-colonels having the Brevet rank of 
Colonel, who have retired or may retire to half pay after thirty years' service upon full pay. 
But this additional rate will not be allowed to any officer who received the difference when 
he retired upon half pay, and the officer will cease to receive the allowance when he shall 
cease to receive half pay. 



Medical Officers. 

The rate of half pay for a Medical Officer of the Army, shall, in every case, be deter- 
mined by the service which he may have rendered upon full pay, and the circumstances 
under which he may be placed upon half pay. 

If a Medical Officer shall be placed upon half pay by reduction of establishment, he shall 
be allowed the half pay to which his services may entitle him, according to the following 
Schedule : 





Rates of Half Pay after a Service on Full Pay of 


Rank of 
Reduced Medical Officers. 


30 
Years. 


25, 

but under 

80 

Years. 


20, 

but under 

25 

Years. 


10, 

but under 

20 

Years. 


> 

Less than 

10 

Years. 


Inspector-General of Hospi- 
tals - 
Deputy Inspector-General of 

Hospitals - 
Staff ourgeon - 
Regimental Surgeon and Staff 

Surgeon, 2d Class - 
Assistant Surgeon 


Per Diem. 
£. $. d. 

1 10 - 

1 - - 

- 17 - 

- 15 - 

- 7 6 


Per Diem. 

£. *. d. 

15- 

- 17 *■ 

- 15 - 

- 13 - 

- 7 - 


Per Diem. 

£. s. <L 

1 - - 

- 14 - 

- 12 6 

- 11 - 

- 6 - 


Per Diem. 
£. 8. d. 

- 10 6 

- 10 - 

- 8 6 

- 5 - 


Per Diem. 
£. 8. d. 

- 8 - 

- 7 6 

- 6 i- 

- 4 - 



If a Medical Officer shall be placed upon half pay from any other cause than reduction 
of establishment, he shall be allowed the half pay to which his services may entitle him 
according to the following Schedule : — 



Rank of 
Retired Medical Officers. 



Inspector-General of Hospi- 
tals 



Deputy Inspector-General of 
Hofioitals- - 



Rates of Half Pay after a Service on Full Pay of 



30 
Years. 



Per Diem. 
£. «. d. 

1 - - 



- 18 - 



25, 

but under 

80 

Years. 



Per Diem. 

£. 8. d. 

- 15 - 



- 14 - 



20, 

but under 

25 

Years. 



Per Diem. 
£. s. d. 
- 12 - 



- 10 - 



10, 

but under 

20 

Years. 



Per Diem. 
£. *. rf. 



Less than 

10 

Years. 



Per Diem. 
£. *. d. 



- 8 - - 7 - 



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OF OFFICERS IN THE ARMY, • 5 

Every Medical Officer who may have served upon full pay for 25 years and upwards, 
shall have the right to retire upon half pay, and may be recommended for the rate assigned 
to his rank and service in the bchedule annexed to Art. 36, provided he shall have served 
three years in the rank from which he retires ; but if he shall not have served three years in 
such rank, he shall receive only the rate attached to the rank from which he was last promoted. 

If a Medical Officer shall nave served 30 years on full pay, including three in the rank 
from which he retires, or not having served such three years, shall have served ten in the 
colonies, or five with an army in the field, in any rank, he may be allowed the rate of half 
pay assigned to his rank in the Schedule annexed to Art. 35 ; but it is not to be understood 
that this clause is intended to convey any authority to place any officer in retirement imme- 
diately subsequent to any promotion he may obtain. 



Paymasters. 

Paymasters on first appointment being invariably officers either on full or half pay of 
the army, are in cases of future retirement from the situation of Paymaster, to be allowed 
half pay according to the following rules : — 

If of less than 5 years' actual service ("The half pay of his former regimental com- 
as Paymaster • -\ mission. 

If of more than 5 years' actual service (Os. a day, or the half pay of his former regi- 
as Paymaster -\ mental commission. 

If of more than 10 years' actual service! g j 



as Paymaster 
If of more than 15 years' actual service!. A ^ ,, , 
as Paymaster - - - ./">.. a day. 

If of more than 20 years' actual service!, tt , 
as Paymaster - - . .jl3,.aday. 

If of more than 30 years' actual service!, r m , 
as Paymaster - - - -j 16 *' a da y- 



Previous service on full pay in other ranks, as a Commissioned Officer, shall reckon as 
equivalent to that of Paymaster, according to the following scale : — 

5 years' service shall reckon as 2 years* 
10 - ditto - ditto - as 5 „ 
15 - ditto - ditto - as 7 „ 

Provided always, that Our Secretary at War shall be satisfied with the manner in 
which the Paymaster to be recommended to Us for such half pay shall have performed his 
duties. 

An officer on half pay who may have served less than five years as Paymaster, will be 
eligible for re-employment on full pay, either in that situation or in his former rank ; and if 
restored to full pay as Paymaster, his previous service will be allowed to reckon. 

An officer who may have served more than five years, and less than 20 years as Pay- 
master, and shall be receiving the half pay of that commission, viz., 6 s., 8*., or 10 5. a 
day, will be liable to be recalled to full pay in that appointment, if his health shall be 
found sufficiently good to enable him to resume his duties ; and in case he shall decline 
the appointment, he shall be liable to revert to the half pay of the commission which he 
held before he was appointed Paymaster. 

No Pavmaster shall be entitled to claim retirement on the ground of unfitness from ill 
health after any period of service under 30 years, unless such unfitness for service shall 
be supported by medical certificates, to the satisfaction of Our Secretary at War, 

Every Paymaster who shall have served in the army an aggregate period of 30 years, 
of which 25 years' service on full pay as Paymaster, may have an unqualified right to 
claim retirement. 

Chaplains to the Forces. 

Chaplains to the Forces appointed after the date of this Warrant shall be entitled to half 
pay agreeably to the terms laid down in the following articles. 

A Chaplain to the Forces, in case of reduction before he has completed six years' service, 
may be entitled to temporary half pay at Five Shillings a day for three years, and be subject, 
of course, to a recall to employment during that period. 

If a Chaplain to the Forces shall have served more than six years previously to reduction, 
his half pay shall be regulated as follows : — 

8enrieeonFuUPt)r. Rate of Half Pay per Dknm. 

' ~7 d. 

Under 15 years ----- 5 — 

Above 15 and under 20 years --76 Df jtjzed b V^OOgle 

„ 20 „ 30 „ - 10 - 

30 VAftfB - - - - - 16 — 



6 RETURN RELATIVE TO RETIRED PAY 

forfeit his half pay if he declines, unless a case of disability from ill health contracted in the 
service be clearly established ; but after 15 years' service on full pay, he shall have an un- 
qualified right to retire, under the terms specified in the preceding Article. 

Chaplains in garrisons or at certain stations, or at military establishments, having 
commissions from Us, shall have their retired pay regulated by the warrants for the govern- 
ment of those establishments, or by the rules established for civil superannuations, but not 
being liable to sudden orders to serve abroad, their claim to retired or half pay will in no case 
be an unqualified right. 

Qjartermasters. 

The rate of half pay for a Quartermaster shall in all cases be determined by the service 
which the officer may have rendered to the public as Quartermaster, or in any former military 
capacity. 

If a Quartermaster shall have previously served at least five years as a non-commissioned 
officer, be shall, in case of being placed upon half pay, receive rates according to the follow- 
ing scale; viz. — 

£. 8. d. 
If under 6 years' service as Quartermaster - - - - - - 3 -per diem. 

If above 5 years' ditto - - - - - - - - - 4 - , f 

If above 10 years' ditto - - - - - - - - - 5 - „ 

If above 15 years' total service, of which 10 years as a Quartermaster -56 „ 
If above 20 years' total service, of which 10 years as a Quartermaster - 6 - „ 
If above 25 years' total service, of which 10 years' as a Quartermaster - 7 - „ 
If above 30 years' total service, of which 10 years' as a Quartermaster- 8 - „ 

Every Quartermaster who shall have served for an aggregate period of 30 years, of which 
10 years as a Quartermaster, shall have an unqualified claim to retirement upon the highest 
rate of half pay fixed by this Our Warrant, provided such retirement shall be recommended 
to our Secretary at War by the Commander-in-Chief. 

No Quartermaster shall be entitled to claim retirement after any period of service under 
30 years 9 duration, upon the ground of ill health contracted in Our service, unless such unfit- 
ness for service shall be supported by medical certificates to the satisfaction of the Com- 
mander-in-Chief of Our forces, nor unless such retirement shall be recommended by him to 
Our Secretary at War. 

A Quartermaster appointed to this situation from another commission in the army, shall, 
in case of reduction or retirement to half pay before he shall have completed 10 years service 
as a Quartermaster, revert to the half pay of his former commission ; but, after 10 years' 
service as Quartermaster, his half pay shall be regulated according to the provisions of the 
Article, No. , for an officer of the same service as Quartermaster, unless his former half pay 
exceeded the rate attached to his service in that Article, in which case he shall revert to such 
former half pay. 



Veterinary Surgeons. 

The half pay to be granted to a Veterinary Surgeou shall be regulated by his service on 
full pay, according to the following scale ; viz. — 

If he shall be reduced before he has completed five years' service on full pay, he shall be 

J ranted a temporary rate for three years only, and be subject to a recall to employment 
uring that period - - - - - - - - - 3*. 6rf. per diem. 

If above 5 years' service, as a Veterinary Surgeon - - 6 - 
If above 10 years* service, ditto - - - - - 6 - 

If above 15 years' service, ditto - - • - - 7 - 
If above 20 years service, ditto - - - - - 8 - 

If above 25 years' service, ditto - - - --10- 

If above 30 years' service, ditto - - - --12- 

No Veterinary Surgeon shall be entitled to claim retirement after any period of service 
under 25 years' duration upon the ground of ill health contracted iu Our service, unless such 
unfitness be supported by medical certificates to the satisfaction of the Commander-in-Chief 
of Our Forces, nor unless such retirement shall be recommended by him to Our Secretary 
at War. 

Every Veterinary Surgeon who may have served upon fall pay for 25 years and upwards, 
or who may have served for 20 years, provided he have passed five years on foreign stations, 



99 
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ARMY COMMI^SK 



RETURN lo an Order of the Honourable The 
dated 36 February 1 847 \—ft 

A RETURN " of the Number of Non-Commission bd 0« 
in each Year, from the 1st day of January 1S86 to th< 
specifying those appointed to the Rank of Cornet an< 
the Rank of Comet or Ensign ; to the Rank of Quart* 
Return laid before the Commission on Military Punish 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Print 



A RETURN of the Number of Non-Commissioned Offu 
in each Year, from the 1st day of January 1836 to the 



YEAR. 


Comets. 


Ensigns. 


Adjutants 

with the Rank 

of Cornet 


Ad 
with 

of: 


1836 - 

1837 - 

1838 - 

1839 - 

1840 - 

1841 ... 

1842 ... 

1843 - 

1844 - 

1845 ..- 

1846 - 


1 
1 
1 

5 
6 


7 
14 
25 
18 
16 
21 
20 

8 
12 
13 
28 


2 
2 

2 

1 
5 

2 
1 

1 
4 


- 


TOTAL6 - - 


14 


182 


20 





Horse Guards, 10 March 1847. 



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MILITARY SAVINGS BANKS. 



ACCOUNT of the Amount due by the Public to Depositors in Military Savings 
Banks, on the 31st March 1845 (as reported to Parliament on the 27th March 1846); 
and of the Receipts, Interest and Disbursements in the said Military Savings Banks, 
during the Year ending the 31st March 1£46 ; together with the Number of Depositors 
therein on the said 31st March 1840 : — Also, an Account of the Sums paid over, and 
now about to be paid over, by the Secretary at War to the Commissioners for the 
Reduction of the National Debt, for Investment in Bank Annuities on Account of the 
Fund for Military Savings Banks ; and of the Dividends reported to the Secretary 
at War by the said Commissioners to have been received thereon, and invested in 
further Aid of the Fund for Military Savings Banks. 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 22 March 1847. 



Amount reported to Parliament on the 27th March 1840, as the 
Balance due by the Public on the 31st March 1845 - 

Add — Amount of Balances due to Depositors, transferred from one Corps 
to another, which had net been brought to Account on the 31st 
March 1845 

Total due by the Public on the 31st March 1845 - - - £. 
Amount of Deposits received during the year ending the 31st March 



1846 



Amount of Interest allowed during the year - 

£. 
Deduct — Amount of Sums withdrawn by Depositors during the Year 

Balance due by the Public on the 31st March 1846 . - £. 



£. s. d. 
34,683 12 - 

186 11 6 



34,870 3 6 

36,234 12 2 
1.508 6 1| 



72,613 1 9| 
24,674 7 1J 



47,938 14 8 



Number of Depositors on the 31st March 1846 



- 4,177. 



Amount paid over by the Secretary at War to the Commissioners for 
the Reduction of the National Debt, on Account of the Fund for 
Military Savings Banks, for the Years 1843-4 and 1844-5 

Further Sum which the Paymaster-General was authorized, on the 10th 
of this Month, to pay over to the said Commissioners - 

Total Amount payable to the Savings Bank Fund by the Secre- 
tary at War --.-----£. 

Add — Dividends received on the Savings Bank Fund Account, during 
the period from the 8th January 1846 to the 8th January 1847, and 
invested in further aid thereof ----.-. 

Total Amount of the Fund for Military Savings Banks, up to 
the Date of this Account ------£. 



£. s. d. 

34,683 12 - 

13,255 2 8 



47,938 14 8 



1,053 - 6 



48,991 15 2 



War-Offire. 1 



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■\M A f 7 



MILITARY SAVINGS BANKS. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 25 February 1 847 \—for, 

INT " of the Military Savings Banks, from the Date of the last Return, 
Total Sums Deposited and Withdrawn, for the Period comprehended 
rn, and the Stations in which the several Regiments were quartered." 



Ordered \ by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 3 May 1847. 



ring the Sums deposited in, and withdrawn from, Military Savings Banks 
Year ending the 31st March 1840, and the Stations of the several Corps. 



rn of Military Sayings Banki rendered to Parliament, wai for the Year ending the 91 tt March 1645, 
and wae dated the 27 th March 1846.] 



MILITARY SAVINGS BANKS FOR THE YEAR 1846-6. 





AmonDt 


Amount 






IPS. 


of Depodta, 


of Withdrawal*, 


STATION8. 




£. $. d. 


£. $. 


d. 




. 


+ Nol 


)ank - 


m 


England. 


- • • 


. Nol 


lank 


• 


England. 


- * . 


220 3 5| 


100 10 


3J 


England. 


rds 


22s 5 - 


- 




England. 


• 


93 10 - 


22 13 


2* 


Ireland. 


... 


8 17 - 


8 13 


5 


Ireland; Scotland. 


. 


408 6 8J 


240 1 


6* 


Scotland; England. 


- 


73 12 1$ 


- 12 


Si 


England. 


. 


269 - 6 


199 13 


4* 


England. 


- 


• Accounts n 


ot received 


» 


Cape of Good Hope. 


... 


60 - - 


78 7 


loj 


Ireland. 


- 


96 17 4 


»f 


Scotland; Ireland. 


ns - 








India. 


- 


68 18 8 


11 4 


5 


England. 


• ▼ • 


383 4 7 


135 -9 


nf 


England. 


• • • 


37 - - 


35 - 


- 


England. 


- 


145 9 H 


100 }3 


11 


Ireland. 


... 


... 


- 


- 


India. 


- 


149 »5 10 


90 10 


5 


Ireland; England. 


• 


138 8 10 


24 3 


-i 


Ireland. 




- No) 


w . 




England. 


pons 


1 - - 


• • 


• 


England; Ireland, 
India. 


•> 


... 


• 


• 


India. 


- 


... 


. 


. 


India. 


- 


188 16 - 


«9 9 


4i 


England. 


st Battalion 


3 13 « 


- 


- 


England. 


i „ * - 


433 * ti 


77 - 


7J 


England. 


1 „ 


22 10 - 


- 


- 


England. 


st Battalion 


10 - - 


10 3 


>i 


England. 


d „ 


77 13 - 


10 15 


-i 


England. 


st Battalion 


14 16 3 


. 


. 


England. 


I „ 


284 6 11 


38 17 


•i 


England. 


talion 


183 9 3 
22 18 - 


34* 3 


10J 


Gibraltar ; West Indies. 


• 


49 H 


-J 


Ireland. 


talion 


177 5 -J 


164 6 


4 


West Indies ; Scotland. 


. 


88 8 - 


23 18 


9i 


Ireland; Scotland. 


. 


29 - - 


- 




England. 


- 


430 19 5 


56 - 


-J 


England. 


... 


... 


- 




India. 


... 


339 la 6 


182 - 


1 


Ireland. 


. 


H3 10 l 


66 19 


31 


Ireland. 


/ears; 1844-45! 
1845-46 -J 


57* 11 5 


246 14 


10* 


Webt Indies. 




138 19 *h 


43 6 


»i 


England ; Ireland. 


- 


241 4 -J 


293 18 


4i 


England. 


- • 


• . • 


• 


. 


India. 


- 


" 


- 


- 


India. 



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SUMS DEPOSITED IN, AND WITHDRAWN FROM, MILITARY 



Military Savings Banks for the Year 1845-6— 


continued. 


CORPS. 


Amount 
of Deposits. 


Amount 
of Withdrawal*. 


STATIONS. 




£. *, 


d. 


£. $. d. 




13th Foot - 




No Bank - 


England. 


14th Foot - 


172 2 


9 


183 11 2 J 


Canada. 


„ Dep6t - 


64 13 


10 


26 5 8i 


England. 


15th Foot - 


26 13 


2] 


109 - 6J 


Ireland; Ceylon. 


„ Dep6t - 


115 12 


5} 


178 9 u J 


Ireland. 


16th Foot - - 


35 10 




107 13 9 


Ireland; Gibraltar. 


„ Depot - 


43 14 


51 


12 11 9I 


Ireland. 


17th Foot .... 


- 




- 


India. 


18th Foot - 


655 *5 


9 


223 19 7 J 


China. 


19th Foot - - * - 


173 2 


6 


191 1 -J 


Ionian Isles ; West Indies. 


„ Dep6t - - - 


109 6 


1 


126 11 3j 


Ireland. 


20th Foot - 


524 18 


9i 


131 u 7i 


Bermuda. 


„ Reserve • 


252 17 


2 


55 9 7 


Bermuda. 


21st Foot - 








India. 


sad Foot .... 


• 


. 


. . « 


India. 


33d Foot - - - 


288 12 


H 


103 8 4 J 


West Indies. 


„ Reserve . - - 


87 - 


5 


9 1 5i 


Canada. 


24th Foot - 


431 - 


>J 


308 5 -J 


Ireland. 


25th Foot - 








India. 


26th Foot - 


3,94* 7 


- 


4,085 8 10 1 


England ; Ireland. 


27th Foot .... 


- Accounts not received - 


Cape of Good Hope. 


„ Dep6t - 


116 3 


31 


202 12. 3 


Guernsey. 


28th Foot - - - - 








India. 


29th Foot .... 








India. 


30th Foot .... 


117 - 


- 


72 11 11 


Ireland. 


31st Foot .... 




. 


... 


India. 


32d Foot .... 


129 14 


10 


181 8 11} 


Ireland. 


33d Foot - 


139 - 


- 


7 3 it 


New Brunswick. 


„ Dep6t - 


12 10 


6 




Ireland. 


34th Foot - 


62 15 


6 


80 3 6 J 


Ireland ; Ionian Isles. 


„ Depot - 


101 12 


-i 


119 3 2| 


Ireland. 


35th Foot .... 


91 11 




- 


Mauritius. 


„ Depdt ... 


62 13 


10 


74 7 5i 


Ireland. 


36th Foot - - - - 


126 15 


9i 


166 10 11 i 


England. 


37th Foot - . - - 


79 12 


1 


109 2 4 1 


England, 


38th Foot - 


342 lG 


8} 


330 \6 3 


Gibraltar; Jamaica. 


„ Dep6t - - - 


60 10 




14 13 6f 


Ireland. 


39th Foot .... 








India. 


40th Foot - 


i%7 6 


8 


- 


India; England. 


41st Foot - . - - 


170 18 


10 


129 15 4 


England; Ireland. 


42d Foot - 


232 12 


5i 


89 3 - 


Malta. 


„ Reserve - 


301 3 


11 


162 11 6 


Malta. 


43d Foot - 


276 18 


1 


44 4 5 J 


Canada ; Nova Scotia. 


„ Depot ... 


203 6 


1 


64 16 l] 4 


England. 


44th Foot - 


3 10 


- 


- 


Ireland. 


45th Foot .... 


87 19 


4 


71 1 7 


Cape of Good Hope. 


„ Reserve - 


389 13 


2i 


44 9 i| 


Gibraltar; Cape. 


46th Foot .... 


264 11 


8 


182 16 2 J 


Nova Scotia; Canada. 


„ Dep6t • 


10 - 


- 


6 10 94 


Ireland. 


47th Foot .... 


81 11 


3 


63 6 10 £ 


England; Ireland. 


48th Foot - 


328 6 


4 


142 1 8 J 


Jamaica. 


„ Depot - 


"9 9 


6 


66 16 11 | 


England; Ireland. 


49th Foot - - - - 


3,*45 1 


2 


3,087 14 1 


England; Ireland. 


50th Foot - . . - 








India. 


51st Foot - 


• Accounts n 


ot received - 


Van Diemen's Land ; India. 


52d Foot - 


19° »3 


2 


149 14 6J 


Canada. 


„ Depdt . - - 


124 4 


- 


6 6 - 


England. 


53d Foot - 


• 


• 


... 


India. 


54U1 Foot .... 


63 18 


9i 


15 13 ioi 


Ireland; Gibraltar. 


„ Dep6t ... 


36 19 




3 12 io£ 


Ireland. 


55th Foot .... 


4,999 9 


91 




England. 


56th Foot .... 


267 4 


3 


157 13 3 


England. 


57th Foot .... 








India. 


58th Foot - 


- Accounts n 


ot received - 


New South Wales. 


59th Foot - - - - 


84 17 


4 


31 11 5i 


England; Ireland. 


60th Foot, 1st Battalion - 


45 10 


- 


71 *3 7i 


Ireland ; India. 


„ 2d Battaliori • 


202 4 


4i 


43 3 8 


Canada. 


„ Dep6t - 


186 17 


10 i 


29 14 4 J 


Scotland. 


6ist Foot .... 






5 15 5i 


Ireland; Indiazec 

Inrlifl 



8AV1NG8 BANKS, IN THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 1846. 



Military Sayings Banks for the Year 1845-6— 


continued. 


CORPS. 


Amount 
of Deposit*, 


Amount 
of Withdrawals. 


STATIONS. 




£. 3. d. 


£. s. 


d. 




66th Foot .... 


205 4 8| 


86 18 


«1 


Ireland; Gibraltar. 


* .»„ ^P 6 ' - * " 


11a 8 8 


so 6 


71 


Ireland. 


67th Foot .... 
68th Foot .... 


31 - - 


3t 1 


ii 


Ireland. 


40 13 - 


67 11 


10 f 


England. 


69th Foot - 


65 611 


161 9 


3 


Ireland; England. 


70th Foot .... 


17a 13 4 


165 1 


il 


Ireland. 


71st Foot . - . - 


692 7 «i 


640 - 


Hi 


West Indies. 


„ Reserve ... 


100 1 6| 


53 9 




Canada. 


73d Foot .... 


198 15 91 


38 14 


9 


Gibraltar. 


„ Dep6t - 


129 18 104 


30 18 




Ireland. 


73d Foot .... 


- Accounts not received 


- 


Ireland ; Cape of Good Hope. 


„ Dep&t - 


8 - - 


- 


- 


Ireland. 


74th Foot .... 


83 8 11 f 


178 19 


6i 


England. 


75th Foot - 


88 - 10 


66 18 


9i 


England ; Ireland. 


76th Foot - 


75 5 2 


118 9 


7i 


England. 


77th Foot .... 


331 15 4} 


88 1 


8J 


Jamaica ; Nova Scotia. 


„ Dep6t ... 


61 11 8 


24 5 


6i 


Ireland. 


78th Foot .... 








India. 


79th Foot .... 


764 19 a 


477 15 


- 


Gibraltar. 


DepAt - 


76 9 ioj 


49 13 


8 


Ireland. 


80th Foot .... 








India. 


81st Foot .... 


388 a 3 


65 17 


4i 


Canada. 


,, Dep6t - 


35 6 - 


15 19 


nl 


Ireland; Jersey. 


8sd Foot .... 


369 1 8 f 


141 11 


ui 


Canada 


„ Dep6t - - - 


141 19 - 


54 12 


-i 


Ireland. 


83d Foot .... 


15 10 - 


8 1 


— 


England ; Ireland. 
India. 


84th Foot .... 








85th Foot .... 


170 5 7 J 


76 8 


9 


West Indies. 


„ Dep6t - 


59 11 - 


. 




Ireland. 


86th Foot .... 








India. 
Scotland. 


vVHJ A Wv . . . 

87th Foot .... 


so - - 


8 - 


.. 


88th Foot .... 


116 5 1 


61 15 


7 


Malta. 


„ Dep6t - 


197 - 10 


328 15 


-* 


Scotland; Ireland. 


89th Foot .... 


73 9 10 


18 13 


1 


Canada. 


„ Depdt - . - 


131 18 7 


99 7 


• I 


Ireland; England. 


90th Foot .... 


878 9 6 


40 5 


6 


Ceylon. 


„ Dep6t - 


48 15 - 


24 13 


5* 


Ireland; England. 


91st Foot - . . . 




188 19 


9i 


Cape of Good Hope. 


„ Reserve - - - 


- Accounts not received 




Cape of Good Hope. 


93d Foot .... 


23 7 - 


1 17 


4 


Scotland. 


93d Foot .... 


175 18 41 


73 11 


7 


Canada. 


„ Dep6t ... 


341 - 10 


72 5 


"I 


Ireland. 


94th Foot - 








India. 


95th Foot - 


- No Bank - 


• 


Ceylon. 


„ Dep6t --. 


163 5 9 


69 9 


Hi 


Ireland. 


96th Foot - 


754 - -* 


290 15 


7i 


Van Diemen's Land. 


97th Foot - - - - 


153 7 »i 


135 13 




Ionian Isles. 


„ Reserve • 


310 16 5J 


137 6 


7 


Ionian Isles. 


98th Foot .... 


3*3 19 5 J 


70 19 


6 


China; Singapore. 
New South Wales. 


99th Foot .... 


- Accounts not received 


- 


[ 1st Battalion 




339 5 




Ionian Isles. 


Rifle 1 „ Dep6t 


60 - - 


134 15 


.71 


Ireland. 


Brigade] ad Battalion 


380 7 8 


333 8 


5i 


Nova Scotia. 


I „ Reserve - 


M5 3 10 


65 1 


** 


Nova Scotia. 


ist West India Regiment - 


• Accounts not received 


• 


Jamaica. 


«d West India Regiment - 


48 la ill | 2 4i 19 


6i 


Jamaica; Nassau; New Proridenc*. 


3d West India Regiment - 






Demerara. 


Canadian Rifle ... 


748 1a 10 J | 350 18 


51 


Canada. 


Cape Corps - - - - 


- No Bank - 




Cape of Good Hope. 


Ceylon Regiment - - - 


- No Bank - 


- 


Ceylon. 


Malta Fencibles - - - 


- No Bank 


• 


Malta. 


Newfoundland Corps 


119 7 1 


38 7 


9* 


Newfoundland. 


Saint Helena Corps ... 


55 5 Hi 


17 17 


2i 


Saint Helena. 


„ Dep6t Battalion - 


30 13 4 


303 7 


4 


Isle of Wight. 


Invalid Dep6t - 


- No I 


3ank - 




Chatham. 


Provisional Battalion 


78 la 6 


95 6 


7 


Chatham. 



Digitized by 



Google 



"C 



ARMY, ORDNANCE, AND MARINES. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 15 April 18475— /or, 



RETURNS "of the Recruits Attested between the 1st day of April 1845 and the 31st 
day of March 1846, and the 1st day of April 1846 and the 31st day of March 1847 :" 

" Of Non-Commtbsioned Officers and Men who have been Discharged the Service 
under Ten Years in the Infantry and Marines, and under Twelve Years in the 
Cavalry and Ordnance Corps, and the Number above those Periods in each 
Service ; specifying those Discharged at their own Request, and the Number through 
Disability, in the Years ending the 31st day of March 1846 and the 31st day of 
March 1847 :" 

" Of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men who have Died in each of the same 
Periods, specifying the Numbers under and above Ten Years' Service in the Infantry 
and Marines, and Twelve Years in the Cavalry and Ordnance Corps :" 

" Of Men Deserted in each of the same Periods, specifying the Number under Three 
Months' Service, between Three and Six Months, Six and Twelve Months, One 
Year and Two Years, Two Years and Three Years, Three and Four Years, Four and 
Five Years, and above Five Years' Service :" 

u Of Men Rejoined from Desertion in each of the same Periods :" 

** Of the Number of Men above Twenty-one Years' Service in the Infantry and 
Marines, and above Twenty-four Years in the Cavalry and Ordnance Corps, 
distinguishing Serjeants from other Ranks, on the 1st day of April 1 847; (the different 
Services to be kept distinct in their Details.)" 



(Colonel Lindsay.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
5 May, 20 & 22 July 1847, 



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Google 



RETURNS RELATIVE TO THE ARMY, ORDNANCE AND MARINES. 



REGULAR ARMY. 



RETURN of Recbuits Attested between 1st day of April 1846 and 81st day of March 1846 j 
and between the 1st day of April 1846 and 81st day of March 1847. 

Number attested for the Regular Army from 1st April 1845 to 81st March 1846 - 18,052 
Number attested for the Regular Army from 1st April 1846 to 81st March 1847 - 21,468 



Recruiting Department, Horse Guards, 1 
24 June 1847. J 



John Macdonaldj a.g. 



RETURN, showing the Number of Non- Commissioned Officers and Men who have been 
Discharged the Service under Ten Years and above Ten Years' Service ; specifying the Number 
Discharged at their own Request, and the Number through Disability, between the 1st day of 
April 1845 and the 1st day of April 1846 : — The Number of Non-Commissioned Officers and 
Men who have Died within the Bame period ; specifying the Number under and above Ten 
Years' Service: — The Number of Men Deserted within the same period; specifying the 
Number under Three Months' Service, between Three and Six Months, Six and Twelve Months, 
One Year and Two Years, Two Years and Three Years, Three Years and Four Years, Four 
Years and Five Years, and upwards of Five Years' Service. 



ill 
111 

Is* 

•gt? 

Hi 

if* 

Sis 



II* 

in 

'ft Mm 

.S*o to 

ill 
HI 

Sis 



Hi 



if 



11 



Hi 

•8-S? 

if* 

Sis 



Number of 

Non-Commissioned 

Officers and Men 

who have died. 



.§ 



I 

o 

i 



i 

o 

I 



Number of Men who hare Deserted. 



•* 



J 



822 



1,803 



163 



3,626 



1,350 



446 



96 



100 



374 364 



330 



209 



746 



War Office, June 1847. 



F.Mauk. 



RETURN of the Number of Men above Twenty-one Years' Service in the Infantry and above 
Twenty-four Years in the Cavalry, distinguishing Serjeants from other Ranks, on the 1st day 
of April 1847. 





Serjeant*. 


Trumpeters 

and 
Drummers. 


Corporals. 


Privates. 


TOTAL. 


In the Cavalry who have served above 24 years 


39 


6 > 


1 


67 


113 


In the Infantry who have served above 21 year 

Foot Guards ' 

Regiments of the Line - 

Colonial Corps 


s: — 
20 
439 
95 


11 
39 
11 


4 

131 

65 


249 

1,239 

577 


284 

1,848 

738 


Total Infantry - - - 


664 


16 


190 


2,065 


2,870 



*k 



RETURNS RELATIVE TO THE ARMY, ORDNANCE AND MARINES. 



ROYAL MARINES. 



RETURNS of Recruits Attested for the Royal Marines between the 1st day of April 1845 
and the 81st day of March 1846 ; and between the 1st day of April 1846 and the 31st day of 
March 1847. 

Number of Recruits Attested between 1st April 1845 and 31st March 1846 - - 1,127 
Number of Recruits Attested between 1st April 1846 and 31st March 1847 • - 964 



Royal Marine Office,! 
28 April 1847. J 



Jno. Owen, d.a.g. 



RETURN of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of the Royal Marines who have been 
Discharged the Service under Ten Years, and the Number above Ten Years' Service ; specifying 
those Discharged at their own Request, and the Number through Disability, in the Years ending 
the Sist March 1846 and the 31st day of March 1847. 

Number Discharged in the Year ending 31st March 1846 : 



, - - - - 


Under 10 Yean' Service. 


Above 10 Yean' Service. 


— *■ \ 




Own Request. 


Disability. 


Own Reqneet. 


Disability. 








Non-Commissioned Officers 


2 


5 


49 

6 

140 


14 
3 

86 




■L/ruiiiiiierB - - - - - 
Privates 


97 


223 




Totals - - - 


99 


228 


195 


103 





Number Discharged in the Year ending 31st March 1847 ; 



1 


Under 10 Yean' Service. 


Above 10 Yean' Service. 


\ 




Own Reqneet. 


Disability. 


Own Request. 


Disability. 








Non-Commissioned Officers 
Drummers - 
Privates - 


2 

2 

125 


5 

4 
212 


64 

2 

116 


10 

4 

80 




Totals - - - 


129 


221 


182 


94 





Royal Marine Office,"! 
28 April 1847. J 



Jno. Owen, d.a.g. 



RETURN of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of the Royal Marines who have Died in 
the Years ending the 31st day of March 1846 and the 31st day of March 1847 ; specifying the 
Numbers under and above Ten Years' Service. 

Numbers who have Died in the Year ending 31st March 1846 : 



r • 


Under. 
10 Yean' Service. 


Above 
10 Yean' Service. 




Non-Commissioned Officers 

Drummers - 

Privates ------ 


5 

2 

116 


8 

44 


Totals - - - 


123 


52 



Numbers who have Died in the Year ending 31st March 1847 : 







Under 
10 Yean' Service. 


Above 
10 Yean* Service. 




Non-Commissioned Officers 






1 


10 

1 
34 




Privates ------ 


95 




no 


Digitized by v: 



Google 



4 RETURNS RELATIVE TO THE ARMY, ORDNANCE AND MARINES. 

RETURN of Men of the Royal Marines Deserted in the Years ending 31 March 1846, 
and 31 March 1847; specifying the Number under Three Months' Service, between Three 
and Six Months, Six and Twelve Months, One Year and Two Years, Two Years and Three 
Years, Three and Four Years, Four and Five Years, and above Five Years' Service. 

Number Desebted in the Year ending 31 March 1846 : 

Under Three Months' Service 29 

Between Three and Six Months 8 

Between Six and Twelve Months 9 

Between One Year and Two Years 14 

Between Two and Three Years 9 

Between Three and Four Years II 

Between Four and Five Years 15 

Above Five Years' Service 26 

Total - - - 121 

Number Deserted in the Year ending 31 March 1847 : 

Under Three Months' Service 19 

Between Three and Six Months 20 

Between Six and Twelve Months - - - - - - 13 

Between One Year and Two Years 23 

Between Two and Three Years 6 

Between Three and Four Years ------- 5 

Between Four and Five Years 28 

Above Five Years' Service 49 

Total - - - 163 

Royal Marine Office,! Tm n*»~» *»> 

28 April 1847. J J* On** n. 



A. O. 



RETURN of the Number of Men of the Royal Marines rejoined from Desertion, in the 
Years ending the 31st day of March 1846 and the 31st day of March 1847 ; specifying the 
Number under Three Months' Service; between Three and Six Months; Six and Twelve 
Months ; One Year and Two Years ; Two Years and Three Years ; Three and Four Years ; 
Four and Five Years ; and above Five Years' Service. 

Rejoined from Desertion, in the Year ending 31 March 1846 : 

Under Three Months' Service ------- 9 

Between Three and Six Months - - - ... 1 

Between Six and Twelve Months 2 

Between One Year and Two Years 5 

Between Two Years and Three Years 3 

Between Three and Four Years 5 

Between Four and Five Years 2 

Above Five Years' Service 10 

Total - - - 37 

Rejoined from Desertion, in the Year ending 31 March 1847 : 

Under Three Months' Service ---*-.. 4 

Between Three and Six Months 7 

Between Six and IVelve Months 7 

Between One Year and Two Years 7 

Between Two Years and Three Years 1 

Between Three and Four Years 3 

Between Four and Five Years 6 

Above Five Years' Service 19 

Total - - - 54 

Royal Marine Office,! r ntM ^ _ . A 

28 April 1847. / Jn On*n,D.A.o. 

RETURN of the Number of Men of the Royal Marines above Twenty-one Years' Service, 
distinguishing Serjeants from other Ranks, on the 1st day of April 1847 : viz. — 

Staff Serjeants 9 

Serjeants 61 

Corporals -----------15 

Drummers 22 

Privates ^. - 92 

Digitiz ed hv 

Total - - - 189 



Google 



RETURNS RELATIVE TO THE ARMY, ORDNANCE AND^MARINBS. 



ORDNANCE. 



RETURN of Recruits Attested for the Royal Regiment of Artillery and Royal Sappers 
and Miners between the 1st day of April 1845 and the 31st day of March 1846, and the 1st 
day of April 1846 and the 31st March 1847. 





NUMBER. 


TOTAL. 




PERIOD& 


Royal 
Artillery. 


Sappers 
and Miners. 


REMARK8. 


Attested between 1st April 1845 and 31st 1 
March 1846 J 

Attested between 1st April 1846 and 3 1st! 
March 1847 J 


972 

2,478 


141 
354 


1,113 
2,832 




Total - - . . 


3,450 


405 


3,945 





Office of Ordnance, "1 
30 April 1847. J 



By Order of the Master-General and Board of Ordnance, 



R. Byham, 

Secy. 



RETURN of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of the Royal Regiment of Artillery 
and Royal Sappers and Miners who have been Discharged the Service under Twelve Years, 
and above Twelve Years' Service; specifying the Number Discharged at their own Request 
and the Number through Disability, in the Years ending the 31st day of March 1846 and the 
31st day of March 1847. 





I * 1 

Under 12 Yean' Service. 


Above IS Yean' Service. 




PERIODS. 


At their 
own Request 


Through 
Disability. 


At their 
own Request. 


Through 
Disability. 


TOTAL. 


Year ending 81st March 1846 : 
Royal Artillery (estimate of 1 
die Regiment, 7,091) -J 
Royal Sappers and Miners - 

Year ending 31st March 1847 : 
Royal Artillery (estimate of\ 
the Regiment, 8,530) -J 
Royal Sappers and Miners - 


91 
21 

141 
22 


86 
13 

137 
14 


7 

15 

15 


158 

35 

• 

211 
42 


342 

84 

504 

78 


Total - - - - 


275 


250 


37 


446 


1,008 



Office of Ordnance,! 
30 April 1847. J 



By Order of the Master-General and Board of Ordnance, 



R. Byhaniy 

Secy. 



RETURN of Non-Commissioned Officers and Men of the Royal Artillery and Royal 
Sappers and Miners who have Died in the Years ending the 31st day of March 1846, and the 
31st day of March 1847 ; specifying the Number under Twelve Years and above Twelve Years* 
Service. 





DIED. 




P E R I 1) 8. 


Under 12 
Years' Service. 


Abore 12 
Yean' Service. 


TOTAL. 


REMARKS. 


Year ending 31st March 1846 : 

Royal Artillery 

Royal Sappers and Miners - 

Year ending 31st March 1847 : 
Royal Artillery - 
Royal Sappers and Miners - 


84 
8 

83 
10 


80 


45 



114 
17 

128 
19 


r 


Total - - - - 


186 


93 


278 


)igitized by V- 



Google 



RETURNS RELATIVE TO THE ARMY, ORDNANCE AND MARINES. 



RETURN of Men of the Royal Regiment of Artillery who have Deserted in the Years 
ending the 3lst March 1840 and the 31st March 1847, specifying their different Periods of 
Service, from under Three Months to upwards of Five Years. 





DESERTIONS. 




"» 


■•O aj 




in 


CO 


-* 


o 










— - o 


T3 «C 


T3 i 


-a o 


T3 o> 


"2 ? 


M 




PERIODS. 


3 


c3 C 
CO tU 


a > 


a 3 

-I 


w 5 


co te 


d £ 


OJ 
>< 


TOTAL. 




n <u 




=3 ~*» 


C M 


d Cfi 


a M 


c <* 


^ o 






h. '-> 


- ~s 


41 _c 


cj - 


0) . 


4) - 


o> - 
cj in 


a u 






sS(S 


s a 






ffl ^ 


* g 


PC I* 


^1 




Year ending 31st March 184f>: 




















Roval Artillery (estimate of the Regiment! 


7 


3 


8 


3 


3 


7 


4 


16 


51 


7,091)- - J 




















Royal Sappers and Miners 


- 


1 


- 


o 


- 


2 


1 


1 


7 


Year ending 31st March 1847 : 




















Royal Artillery (estimate of the Regiment,"} 


37 


18 


27 


7 


3 


5 


2 


23 


JO-> 


8,530) J 




















Royal Sappers and Miners ... 


3 


- 


1 


1 


- 


- 


4 


6 


15 # 


Total - - - 


47 


22 


36 


13 


6 


14 


11 


46 


195 



* In the year ending 31st March 1847, eight of the desertions took place at Halifax, 

Nova Scotia. 



By Order of the Master-General and Board of Ordnance, 

Office of Ordnance,! JR. By ham, 

30 April 1847. J 



Seen 



RETURN of Men of the Royal Regiment of Artillery and Royal Sappers and Miners 
who have Rejoined from Desertion in the Years ending the 31st day of March 1846 and 
the 31st day of March 1847. 





NUMBER. 




PERIODS. 


Royal 
Artillery. 


Royal Sappers 
and Miners. 


TOTAL. 


REMARKS . 


Year ending 31st March 184G - 
Year ending 31st March 1847 


10 
24 


1 
4 


11 

28 




Total - - - 


34 


5 


3D 





Office of Ordnance,! 
30 April 1847. f 



By Order of the Master- Geueral and Board of Ordnance, 



R, Byham, 

Seer. 



RETURN of the Number of Men of the Royal Regiment of Artillery and Royal Sappers 
and Miners above Twenty-four Years' Service on the 1st day of April 1847, distinguishing 
Serjeants from other Ranks. 





Above 24 Years' Sen* ice. 




PERIODS. 


Serjeants- 


Rank and File, 

Artificers and 

Drummers 

and Trumpeters. 


TOTAL. 


REMARKS. 


On the 1st April 1847 : 

Royal Artillery 

Royal Sappers and Miners - 


28 
3 


10 
1 


38 
4 




Total - - - 


31 


11 


42 





Digitized by 1 
By Order of the Master-General and Board of Ordnance, 



CO 
10 









o.^ 


$? 


~ a 


13 O 


° I 


.** 


if 


oo S 


$«• 



r 



1 




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S 

o 

> 
as 
o 
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> 






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YEOMANRY. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The Houie of Commons, 
dated ai May 1847 i—f or i 



A RETURN " of the Number of Troops, or Corps, or Regiments, of Effective 
Yeomanry, in Great Britain and Ireland, according to the Muster Rolls of 
1842, 1843, 1844, 1845, and 1846 ; stating the Date of those Musters, and 
showing the Manner in which the Sums voted for Great Britain and Ireland, 
in those Years, were Expended." 



(Mr. Clive.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
Jl June 1847. 



Digitized by 



Google 



LIST OF CORPS OF YEOMANRY CAVALRY IN GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND. 



LIST of Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry in Great Britain, for the Year 1842. 








Number of Officers 












Number 


and Men. 


Date of 


Expense 




COUNTY. 


CORP8. 


of Troops in 
etch Corps. 






last Muster Roll 
or Return. 


of each Corp 
in 1842. 


s 




Officers. 


Men. 




Ayr ... 


Ayrshire - 


6 


27 


474 


26 April 1843 


£. s. 

4,481 4 


4 


Berks - 


Hungerford - 


1 


3 


56 


4 - 


224 - 




Bucks - 


2d Bucks - 
Taplow - 
Whittlesea .... 


8 


28 


447 


12 - 


2,796 5 


11 


Cambridge - 


1 


3 


65 


21 August - 


304 1 


4 


Chester - 


Kincfs Cheshire - 
Denbighshire ... 


10 


36 


593 


24 April - 


7,863 3 


3 


Denbigh 


8 


11 


134 


11 - 


922 - 


2 


Derby - 


Derby and Chaddesden - 


1 


3 


61 


22 - 


600 16 


7 




Radborne - 


1 


* 2 


90 


4 May 


617 17 


3 




Repton and Gresley 


— 












Devon - 


Royal 1st Devon - 


9 


32 


416 


28 April - 


2,693 16 


_ 




North Devon - 


8 


27 


360 


22 - 


2,404 6 


10 


Dorset - 


Dorsetshire - - - - 


8 


24 


386 


18 - 


2,367 18 


7 


Essex - 


West Essex - 


1 


4 


74 


10 May - : 


111 - 




Gloucester - 


Gloucestershire - 


8 


28 


428 


13 April - 


2,727 13 


5 


Hants - 


North Hants - 
Andover - 


4 


15 


158 


29 - 


989 13 


7 


Herts - 


Gilston (disbanded Nov. 1842) 


1 


4 


46 


18 Oct. 1841 


69 - 


_ 




Northern Herts • 


1 


2 


46 




184 - 


_ 




South Herts - 


4 


16 


164 


10 May 1843 


1,060 19 


_ 


Kent - 


East Kent - 


4 


14 


183 


12 April - 


1,016 1 


_ 




West Kent .... 


2 


8 


115 


20 - 


571 18 


_ 


Lanark - 


Upper Ward - 
Duke of Lancaster's 


4 


11 


223 


18 - 


3,150 14 


._ 


Lancaster 


3 


10 


150 


20 May - 
22 April - 


2,296 15 
3,630 6 


7 


Leicester 


Prince Albert's Own Leices- 
tershire. 


10 


33 


606 


8 


Lincoln 


North Lincoln - 


6 


18 


240 


12 - 


1,617 8 


10 


Lothian 


Royal Mid- Lothian 
Uxbridge " . * 


_ 










Middlesex 


2 


3 


76 


• - . 


295 6 


8 


Montgomery - 
Norfolk 


Montgomeryshire - 


4 


16 


272 


12 May 1843 


1,802 6 


6 


Prince Albert's Own - 


3 


11 


163 


8 April - 


1,059 12 


2 


Northampton 


Kettering - 


1 


4 


68 


11 - 


204 - 






Towcester - - - - 


1 


4 


69 


. m m 


220 10 




Northumberland - 


Northumberland and Newcastle 


7 


24 


411 


29 April 1843 
11 May - 


2,871 - 


8 


Nottingham - 


Southern Nottinghamshire - 


5 


19 


387 


2,484 9 


8 




Sherwood Rangers 


3 


12 . 


213 


26 April - 


1,380 6 


6 


Oxford - 


Queen's Royal Oxford - 


6 


11 


828 


8 August - 


2,102 8 


4 


Pembroke 


Castlemartin - - - - 


3 


11 


138 


16 April - 


1,259 8 


7 


Salop - - - 


North Salopian - 


8 


26 


445 


10 - 


2,921 4 


1 




South Salopian ... 


6 


21 


832 


24 - 


2,216 6 


4 


Somerset 


North Somerset - 


8 


26 


360 


21 - 


2,518 18 
3,486 2 






Weat Somerset ... 


8' 


31 


645 


1 - 






Ilminster - 


1 


4 


90 


. . • 


26 8 


9 


Stafford 


Queen's Own Royal Regiment 


9 


40 


659 


8 April 1848 


7,189 7 


11 


Suffolk - 


1st Loyal Suffolk - • - 
Suffolk Borderers - 
Long Melford - 


1 


3 


56 


1 - 


342 14 




Surrey • 


Surrey ..... 


4 


15 


143 


22 May - 


691 18 


6 


Sussex - 


Arundel and Bramber • 


3 


8 


137 


28 April - 


923 4 


5 


Warwick 


Warwickshire - 


6 


22 


410 


3,279 9 


1 


Westmorland 


Westmorland ... 


5 


18 


284 


18 April 1843 


2,377 13 


7 


Wilts - 


Royal Wiltshire - 


10 


32 


436 


26 - 


2,725 19 


4 


Worcester 


Queen's Own Worcestershire 


10 


40 


690 


12 - - 


9,458 18 


5 


York - - 


Yorkshire Hussars 


10 


86 


601 


1 May - 


2,977 12 


7 




South-West York - 


12 


42 


611 


1 April - 

airy 

GE - - - £. 


4,586 10 
312 1 






239 


846 


13,858 




Pay and All< 


>wances to the Field Officers for i 
. by Parliament in 1842 • 


inspecting 


the Yeom 
To 


anry Cav* 
tal Char 

- £ 


7 




101,704 17 


- 


Amount voted 


.82,468 - - 




\^ 


Ditto 


in 1843 (for the j 


rear 1842] 


- 


- 


19,00€^iti2ecH9y 


LiOOQ 


Le 



LIST OP CORPS OP YEOMANRY CAVALRY IN GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND. 



LIST of Corps of Yeomanbt Cavalry in Great Britain, for the Year 1848. 








Number of Office™ 










Number 


tod Men. 


Date of 


Expense 


COV NTY. 


CORPS. 


of Troop* in 
etch Corps. 






lest Muster Roll 
or Return. 


of each Corps 




Officers. 


lieu. 


in 1843. 














£. s. d. 


Ayr - - - 


Ayrshire - - - - 


6 


28 


473 


1 May 1844 


2,823 19 7 


Berks ... 


Hungerford - - - - 


1 


3 


56 


4 April - 


224 - - 


Bucks - 


2d Bucks - 


8 


25 


440 


13 - 


2,785 16 4 




Taplow .... 

Whittlesea - 


1 


3 


46 


14 May - 


255 2 4 


Cambridge - 


1 


3 


68 


6 April - 


899 18 2 


Chester - 


King's Cheshire ... 

Denbighshire - 


10 


29 


600 


10 - 


4,086 15 6 


Denbigh 


a 


9 


J 34 


5 - 


914 7 8 


Derby - 


Derby and Chaddesden 


i 


8 


58 


8 - 


417 18 6 




Radbome - 


l 


3 


90 


4 - 


613 17 10 




Repton and Oresley 


l 


4 


78 


25 - 


1,087 18 10 


Devon ... 


Royal 1st Devon - 


9 


33 


415 


. 


2,741 8 2 




North Devon . - - 


8 


26 


860 


15 - 


2,385 12 8 


Dorset - 


Dorsetshire • 


8 


26 


366 


20 - 


2,365 1 10 


Essex - 


West Essex - 


1 


4 


74 


10 - 


417 4 4 


Gloucester 


Gloucestershire - 


8 


30 


438 


18 - 


2,702 4 - 


Hants - 


North Hants ... 


4 


15 


158 


19 - 


1,025 3 8 




Andover - 


1 


3 


56 


6 May - 


173 6 8 




Lymington - - - - 


1 


4 


42 


6 April - 


127 10 - 


Herts - 


Northern Herts - 


1 


3 


44 


10 - 


184 - - 




South Herts - 


4 


16 


177 


26 - 


1,012 6 2 


Kent - 


East Kent - 


4 


11 


162 


5 July 


1,024 16 7 




West Kent - 


2 


8 


111 


13 May - 


569 11 9 


Lanark - 


Upper Ward - 
Duke of Lancaster's 


4 


13 


248 


10 April - 


1,440 15 4 


Lancaster 


8 


10 


148 


6 June - 


1,102 11 9 


Leicester 


Prince Albert's Own Leices- 
tershire. 


10 


85 


607 


20 April - 


3,373 12 1 


Lincoln 


North Lincoln 


5 


17 


229 


16 - 


1,490 3 - 


Lothian 


Royal Mid-Lothian 


8 


26 


379 


27 May - 


1,968 1 9 


Middlesex 


Uxbridge - - - - 


2 


4 


80 


. 


356 16 8 


Montgomery - 
Norfolk 


Montgomeryshire - 


4 


15 


271 


13 April - 


1,779 5 - 


Prince Albert's Own - 


8 


12 


165 


5 - 


1,020 16 6 


Northampton 
Northumberland - 


Kettering - 
Northumberland and Newcastle 


1 


3 


67 


3 - 


292 16 8 


7 


24 


410 


20 - 


2,387 7 - 


Nottingham - 


Southern Nottinghamshire - 


6 


15 


382 


9 May - 


2,617 16 - 




Sherwood Rangers 


8 


11 


222 


13 - 


1,413 14 4 


Oxford - 


Queen's Royal Oxford - 


6 


24 


366 


21 August - 


2,557 3 4 


Pembroke 


Castlemartin ... 


8 


11 


138 


13 April - 


5,831 18 9 


8alop - 


North Salopian - 


8 


28 


434 


6 - 


2,823 7 1 




South Salopian ... 


6 


20 


319 


17 - 


2,096 10 11 


Somerset 


North Somerset - 


8 


26 


393 


18 - 


2,496 15 8 




West Somerset ... 


8 


31 


614 


15 March 1845 


3,482 2 6 




Ilminster - 


1 


3 


51 


19 April 1844 


148 10 - 


Stafford 


Queen's Own Royal Regiment 


11 


48 


792 


15 - 


5^166 12 10 


Suffolk 


1st Loyal Suffolk - 


1 


3 


55 


1 - 


339 5 4 




Suffolk Borderers 


1 


3 


47 


15 - - - 


154 6 8 




LongMelford - 


1 


3 


73 


1 May - 


405 11 7 


Surrey - 


Surrey - 


4 


13 


111 


22 - 


468 1 - 


Sussex ... 


Arundel and Bramber - 


3 


10 


144 


31 - - 


916 6 8 


Warwick 


Warwickshire - 


6 


22 


413 


8 April - 


2,438 17 1 


Westmorland 


Westmorland - 


6 


22 


325 


15 - 


2,366 8 7 


Wilts - 


Royal Wiltshire - 


10 


30 


420 


8 May 


2,595 11 8 


Worcester 


Queen's Own Worcestershire • 


11 


40 


688 


12 April - 


4,457 19 9 


York - 


Yorkshire Hussars 


10 


36 


501 


20 - 


3,137 4 4 




South- West York 


12 


35 


612 


1 - 


3,917 6 - 




Morley and Agbrigg 


3 


11 


151 


6 - 

Jry - 

GrE - - - £• 


1,907 1 




259 


893 


14,311 




Pay and AlUr 


ivances to the Field Officers for n 


ispecting 


the Yeomi 


anry Cava 
riL Chaw 


281 19 - 




95,470 16 6 


Amount votec 


i bv Parliament - 








„ 
Digitized by v 





LIST OF CORPS OP YEOMANRY CAVALRY IN GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND. 



LIST of Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry in Great Britain, for the Year 1844. 






■ % 


Number 


Number of Officers 
and Men. 


Date of 


Expense 


COUNTY. 


CORPS. 


of Troops in 
etch Corps. 






last Muster Roll 
or Return. 


of each Corps 




Officers. 


Men. 


in 1844. 
















£. t. d. 


Ayr - - . 


Ayrshire - 
Hungerford - 


6 


28 


475 


21 April 


1845 


2,823 9 7 


Berks - 


1 


8 


56 


8 - 


- 


242 13 4 


Bucks ... 


2d Bucks - 


8 


27 


421 


16 - 


- 


3,630 7 5 




Taplow - 

Whittlesea - - 


1 


8 


46 


16 - 


mm 


272 16 - 


Cambridge - 


1 


8 


61 


18 - 


— 


283 13 4 


Chester 


King's Cheshire - 
Denbighshire - 


10 


26 


595 


23 - 


- 


3,977 19 8 


Denbigh 


3 


10 


185 


15 - 


- 


935 - 10 


Derby ... 


Derby and Chaddesden 


1 


8 


57 


8 - 


- 


292 8 6 




Radborne - 


1 


8 


90 


8 July 


- 


462 13 9 




Repton and Gresley 


1 


4 


77 


8 May 


- 


181 11 - 


Devon - 


Royal 1st Devon - 





82 


415 


26 April 


- 


2,669 14 2 




North Devon - 


8 


26 


869 


19 - 


- 


2,373 9 10 


Dorset - 


Dorsetshire - 


6 


28 


845 


25 - 


- 


2,275 3 - 


Essex - 


West Essex .... 


1 


4 


£8 


6 - 


- 


452 4 4 


Gloucester 


Gloucestershire - 


8 


29 


428 


12 - 


- 


2,688 13 - 


Hants - 


North Hants ... 


4 


14 


165 


22 - 


- 


694 9 2 




Andover - 


1 


8 


64 


12 - 


- 


195 - - 




Lymington - 


1 


4 


41 


7 - 


- 


162 - - 


Herts - 


Northern Herts - 


1 


8 


65 


14 - 


- 


184 - - 




South Herts 


4 


16 


180 


26 - 


— 


1,028 15 10 


Kent - 


East Kent .... 


4 





158 


6 Aug. 


- 


627 10 - 




West Kent - - - - 


2 


8 


95 


26 April 


- 


551 2 11 


Lanark 


Upper Ward - 
Duke of Lancaster's 


4 


18 


251 


9 - 


— 


1,365 12 10 


Lancaster 


4 


18 


198 


28 May 


— 


1,670 9 6 


Leicester 


Prince Albert's Own Leices- 
tershire. 


10 


84 


608 


26 April 


— 


3,111 4 11 


Lincoln 


North Lincoln - 


6 


17 


225 


15 - 


- 


1,473 9 6 


Lothian 


Royal Mid Lothian 


8 


26 


864 


17 - 


— 


1,978 18 - 


Middlesex 


Uxbridge - 


1 


4 


89 


- 


. 


858 18 4 


Montgomery 
Norfolk - - 


Montgomeryshire 


4 


16 


269 


26 April 


1845 


1,773 1 2 


Prince Albert's Own - 


8 


11 


153 


10 - 


— 


1,038 9 10 


Northampton 


Kettering .... 
Northumberland and Newcastle 


1 


8 


68 


5 - 


— 


816 - 2 


Northumberland • 


7 


26 


489 


29 - 


— , 


2,320 12 4 


Nottingham 


Southern Nottinghamshire 


5 


18 


884 


16 May 


- 


2,466 15 8 




Sherwood Rangers 
Queen's Royal Oxford - 


8 


18 


228 


18 - 


— 


1,436 3 6 


Oxford - 


6 


24 


866 


2 Juljr 


- 


2,114 12 1 


Pembroke 


Castlemartin * 


8 


10 


139 


5 April 


— 


952 18 - 


Salop - 


North Salopian *> 


8 


29 


422 


14 - 


- 


2,722 1 8 




South Salopian ... 


6 


20 


821 


25 - 


- 


2,051 9 7 


Somerset 


North Somerset - 


8 


26 


886 


18 - 


— 


2,44* 7 10 




West Somerset ... 


8 


81 


540 


11 - 


— 


3,613 15 8 




Ilminster - 




8 


54 


21 - 


— 


228 3 4 


Stafford 


Queen's Own Royal Regiment 


11 


49 


784 


12 - 


- 


6,181 4 7 


Suffolk - 


1st Loyal Suffolk - 




8 


65 


1 - 


— 


344 2 - 




Suffolk Borderers 




8 


57 


• 


• 


186 8 4 




Long Melford ... 




4 


79 


8 April 


1845 


424 9 8 


Surrey - 


Surrey (no duty performed) - 


— 












Sussex 


Arundel and Bramber - 


8 


10 


148 


17 April 


1845 


944 6 1 


Warwick 


Warwickshire ... 


6 


22 


403 


10 - 


- 


2,474 6 6 


Westmorland 


Westmorland - 


6 


22 


325 


22 - 


_ 


1,990 13 4 


Wilts - 


Royal Wiltshire - - - 


10 


81 


422 


24 - 


- 


2,628 7 1 


Worcester 


Queen's Own Worcestershire 


11 


48 


684 


12 - 


- 


4,429 1 9 


York - - - 


Yorkshire Hussars 


10 


86 


501 


18 - 


- 


3,177 18 8 




South- West York ( IstWestYork) 


12 


87 


612 


1 - 


— 


8,852 4 8 




Morley and Agbrigg (2d ditto) 


4 


16 


229 


8 - 


• £. 


1,482 18 - 




252 


878 


14,189 




Pay and Alloi 


ranees to the Field Officers for in 


ispectingt 


be Yeoma 


nry Cava] 


ry - 


281 15 10 




pal Charge - - - 


87,622 16 1 



Amount voted by Parliament 



Excess of Vote beyond the Expenditure 



88,077 - - 



Digitized i £# 466 8 n 



LIST OP CORPS OP YEOMANRY CAVALRY IN GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND. 



LIST of Corps of Yeomanbt Cavalry in Cheat Britain, for the Year 1845. 






Number 


Number of Offioers 
and Men. 


Date of 




Expense 


COUNTY. 


CORPS. 


of Troops in 
etch Corps. 






last Muster Roll 
or Return. 


of each Corps 




Officers, 


Men. 


in 1845. 
















£. «. d. 


Ayr - - - 


Ayrshire - 

Huucerford .... 


6 


28* 


475 


17 April 1846 


2,854 16 - 


Berks ... 


1 


8 


66 


6 - 


— 


242 18 4 


Bucks - 


2d Bucks .... 


8 


25 


410 


24 - 


— 


2,653 8 4 




Taplow .... 

Whittlesea - 


1 


8 


46 


6 - 


— 


273 3 - 


Cambridge - 


1 


8 


69 


1 - 


- 


270 17 4 


Chester 


King's Cheshire ... 
Denbighshire ... 


10 


88 


600 


16 - 


- 


3,925 9 1 


Denbigh 


8 


10 


185 


6 - 


- 


917 15 6 


Derby - 


Derby and Chaddesden 


1 


8 


60 


13 - 


- 


296 2 5 




Radborne .... 


1 


2 


90 


8 July 


— 


270 - - 




Repton and Greeley 


1 


4 


78 


7 April 


- 


172 8 6 


Devon - 


Royal 1st Devon ... 


9 


82 


415 


80 - 


- 


2,702 19 8 




North Devon - 


8 


26 


859 


20 - 


- 


2,468 6 11 


Dorset . - - 


Dorsetshire (Queen's Own) • 


5 


28 


882 


23 - 


— 


2,128 - - 


Essex - 


West Essex - 


1 


4 


99 


7 - 


- 


467 8 - 


Gloucester 


Gloucestershire - 


8 


27 


428 


18 - 


— 


2,633 15 1 


Hants - 


North Hants - 


4 


16 


210 


21 - 


• 


1,104 9 3 




Andover - - - - 


1 


8 


79 


11 - 


— 


233 16 8 




Lymington - - - - 
Northern Herts - - - 


1 


4 


40 


8 - 


— 


123 - - 


Herts - 


1 


8 


44 


29 - 


— 


182 10 - 




South Herts .... 


4 


16 


185 


20 - 


— 


1,046 14 2 


Kent - 


East Kent - 


2 


11 


188 


18 - 


— 


565 10 - 




West Kent - 


2 


8 


128 


13 - 


-. 


443 - - 


Lanark - 


Upper Ward ... 
Dulce of Lancaster's 


4 


18 


258 


21 - 


— 


1,379 12 6 


Lancaster 


4 


14 


196 


17 June 


- 


1,314 12 1 


Leicester 


Prince Albert's Own Leices- 
tershire. 


10 


86 


607 


21 April 


- 


8,074 18 10 


Lincoln 


North Lincoln ... 


6 


17 


284 


17 - 


— 


1,498 1 6 


Lothian 


Royal Mid-Lothian 
Uxbridge - 


8 


24 


864 


18 - 


- 


1,946 14 - 


Middlesex 


1 


4 


89 


17 - 


— 


383 6 8 


Montgomery - 
Norfolk 


Montgomeryshire - 


4 


17 


279 


9 - 


- 


1,729 9 4 


Prince Albert's Own - 


8 


12 


162 


18 - 


- 


1,036 14 5 


Northampton 
Northumberland - 


Kettering - - . - 


1 


8 


66 


1 


- 


265 16 8 


Northumberland and Newcastle 


7 


24 


437 


12 May 


- 


2,314 1 4 


Nottingham - 


Southern Nottinghamshire - 


6 


19 


378 


19 - 


- 


2,468 16 4 




Sherwood Rangers 


8 


12 


229 


2 April 


- 


1,405 19 11 


Oxford - 


Queen's Royal Oxford - 


6 


25 


364 


26 June 


- 


2,181 10 9 


Pembroke 


Castlemartin - - 


8 


11 


139 


4 April 


- 


966 6 11 


Salop - - - 


North Salopian - 


8 


28 


437 


11 - 


- 


2,749 6 4 




South Salopian ... 


6 


20 


326 


18 - 


- 


2,002 19 8 


Somerset 


North Somerset ... 


8 


26 


877 


17 - 


- 


2,288 15 3 




West Somerset ... 


8 


80 


545 


1 - 


— 


3,488 6 4 




Ilminster - - - - 




8 


, 54 


28 - 


_ 


227 3 4 


Stafford 


Queen's Own Royal Regiment 


11 


45 


785 


12 - 


- 


4,823 3 I 


Suffolk - 


1st Loyal Suffolk - 




8 


56 


6 - 


— 


344 2 - 




Suffolk Borderers - - . 




8 


55 


8 - 


— 


194 6 8 




Lon^Melford - . . 
Stirling (disbanded) 




4 


78 


6 - 


— 


455 5 4 


Stirling 












73 4 - 


Sussex . - - 


Arundel and Bramber • 


a 


10 


140 


14 May 


- 


920 7 7 


Warwick 


Warwickshire - 


6 


22 


416 


22 April 


- 


2,447 10 11 


Westmorland 


Westmorland - 


6 


22 


325 


13 - 


- 


2,452 5 1 


Wilts - 


Royal Wiltshire ... 


10 


82 


427 


11 - 


y 


2,637 1 4 


Worcester 


Queen's Own Worcestershire 


11 


44 


692 


9 - 


— 


4,472 11 7 


York - 


Yorkshire Hussars 


10 


86 


501 


22 - 


— 


1,649 - - 




South-West York(lst West York) 


12 


85 


618 


1 - 


— 


2,015 10 - 




Morley and Agbrigg (2d ditto) 


4 


16 


229 


9 - 


. £. 


790 19 2 




250 


896 


14,358 




Pay and Alloi 


ranees to the Field Officers for ii 

by Parliament ... 

Excess of 


ispecting 
Votb bey 


the Yeomi 
To 

ond the I 


inry Cava 


lry - ' - 


234 14 - 




tal Charge - - - 

Digitized 

iXPEKDITUBB - - 


82,182 7 8 


Amount voted 


by v 


86,168 - - 




3,985 12 4 



UBT OF CORPS OF YEOMANRY CAVALRY IN GREAT BRITAIN AND IRELAND. 



LIST of Corps of Yeomanry Cavalry in Great Britain, for the Year 1846. 







Number 


Number of Officers 
and Men. 


Date of 


Expense 


COUNTY. 


C ft P 8. 


of Troop* in 
each Corps. 






last Musler Roll 
or Return. 


of each Corps 




Officer*. 


Men. 


ia 1846. 














£. s. d. 


Ayr - 

Berks * 


Ayrshire - 
Hungerford ■» 
2d Bucks - 


6 


26 


475 


19 April 1847 
19 May 


2,838 13 - 


1 


4 


76 


446 10 - 


Bucks - 


8 


26 


403 


19 -April - 


2,561 - 4 




Taplow - 
Whittlesea * 


1 


8 


46 


8 - 


209 1 * 


Cambridge - 


1 


8 


62 


21 - 


286 16 8 


Chester - 


King's Cheshire - 
Denbighshire - 


10 


34 


594 


16 - 


3,947 14 4 


Denbigh 


3 





134 


11 - 


935 17 2 


Derby - 


Derby and Chaddesden 


1 


8 


60 


12 - 


301 4 2 




Radborfte - • 


1 


2 


92 


8 - 


324 16 8 




Repton and Gresley 


1 


4 


78 


5 - 


409 19 - 


Devon - 


Royal 1st Devon - 


9 


32 


415 


26 - 


2,721 2 2 




North Devon - 


8 


24 


359 


29 - 


2,338 7 * 


Dorset - 


Dorsetshire - 


5 


23 


356 


19 - 


2,209 8 9 


Essex - 


West Essex - 


1 


4 


93 


14 - 


476 8 8 


Gloucester - 


Gloucestershire - 


8 


29 


382 


15 - 


2,678 1 8 


Hants - 


North Hants 


4 


15 


208 


14 - 


1,324 2 2 




Andover - 


1 


3 


79 


- 


243 16 8 




Lymington - 
Northern Herts - 


1 


4 


46 


19 April 1847 


159 13 4 


Herts - 


1 


8 


41 


80 - 


172 - - 




South HertB - 


4 


15 


176 


20 - 


1,055 18 1 


Kent - 


East Kent - 


2 


11 


184 


26 - 


834 2 6 




West Kent - 


2 


8 


102 


20 - 


615 6 2 


Lanark - 


Upper Ward - 


4 


13 


253 


16 - 


1,385 2 10 


Lancaster 


Duke of Lancaster's 


4 


4 


196 


- 


1,889 19 8 


Leicester 


Prince Albert's Own Leices- 
tershire. 


10 


36 


603 


19 April 1847 


8,319 12 7 


Lincoln 


North Lincoln (disbanded 
Dec. 1846.) 










456 3 10 


Lothian 


Royal Mid-Lotbian 


8 


23 


357 


13 April 1847 


1,955 11 - 




East Lothian - 


2 


6 


98 


12 - 


1,181 2 - 


Middlesex - 


Uxbridge - 


1 


4 


87 


- 


380 6 8 


Montgomery - 
Norfolk 


Montgomeryshire - 


4 


17 


274 


9 April 1847 


1,816 7 ll 


Prince Albert's Own 


3 


10 


168 


17 - 


1,059 16 8 


Northampton 
Northumberland - 


Kettering - 
Northumberland and Newcastle 


1 


3 


66 


- 


266 6 6 


7 


24 


421 


17 April 1847 
19 May 


2,293 19 6 


Nottihgham - 


Southern Nottinghamshire 


5 


21 


367 


2,451 6 4 




Sherwood Rangers 


3 


12 


216 


22 April - 


1,395 10 8 


Oxford - 


Queen's Royal Oxford - 


6 


25 


364 


- 


2,300 8 a 


Pembroke 


Castlemartin - - 


3 


11 


139 


5 April 1847 


959-2 


Salop - 


North Salopian - 


8 


29 


437 


10 - 


2,804 14 8 




South Salopian - 


6 


19 


321 


21 - 


2,106 19 4 


Somerset 


North Somerset - 


8 


27 


868 


27 - 


2,347 2 1 




West Somerset 


8 


30 


545 


- 


3,466 4 4 


• 


Ilminster (disbanded) - 










227 10 - 


Stafford 


Queen's Own Roval Regiment 


11 


48 


784 


15 April 1847 


4,699 2 6 


Suffolk - 


1st Loyal Suffolk' - 


1 


2 


56 


2 - 


339 13 4 




Suffolk Borderers - 


I 


8 


59 


12 - 


200 13 4 


* 


Long Melford 


1 


4 


78 


6 - 


449 6 4 


Surrey • 


Surrey (not called out) * 


— 










Sussex - 


Arundel and Bramber - 


3 


It) 


127 


13 May 1847 


869 4 10 


Warwick - •■ 


Warwickshire - 


6 


22 


405 


14 April - 


2,488 19 2 


Westmorland 


Westmorland ... 


6 


21 


325 


14 - 


2,088 1 8 


Wilts - 


Royal Wiltshire - 


10 


81 


418 


12 - 


2,575 - 4 


Worcester 


Queen's Own Worcestershire 


11 


44 


691 


8 - 


4,532 18 6 


York - - 


Yorkshire Hussars 


10 


36 


498 


1 May 


3,153 3 4 




South-West York(lst West York) 


12 


39 


612 


1 April - 


3,885 9 4 




Morley and Agbngg (2d ditto) 


4 


15 


229 


6 - 


1,242 7 10 




246 


884 


13,818 

















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N A V Y. 



A COPY of an ACCOUNT of the Naval Receipt and Expenditure for 
the Year ended the 31st March 1846 ; prepared in pursuance of Act 
2 Will. IV. c. 40, s. 30, and laid before The House of Commons by the 
Commissioners for Auditing the Public Accounts, under the directions of 
the same Act ; with the Additions of the Commissioners for Auditing the 
Public Accounts. 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
l February 1847. 



35 

Under I ox* 



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FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 1 846. 



2 Will 4, c. 40, s. SO, tad laid before The House of Commons by the Commissioners for Auditing the Public Accounts, under the Directions of 
Accounts being included within Brackets, and set down on p. 6. 



The Excess of 44,4201. 61. 10d., shown on the Account of Natal Receipt and Expenditure for the Financial Year, ended the 31st March 1845, 
has been voted by Parliament, as per printed Paper, 11 February 1846, No. 52, agreeably with the Authority of the Lords of the Treasury, as 
signified by Mr. Trevelyao's Letter of 8 December 1845. 



10 



Navt Effective Services: 
BY Wages to Seamen and Marines - 
„ Victuals for ditto ------ 

„ Admiralty Office ------ 

„ General Register and Record Office of Seamen - 
„ Scientific Branch ------ 

„ Her Majesty's Establishments nt Home 
„ Her Majesty's Establishments Abroad 

„ Wages to Artificers, &c, employed in Her M»jes.*\ 
ty's Establishments at Home -/ 

„ Wages to Artificers, &c employed in Her Majes-\ 
ty's Establishments Abroad -J 

„ Naval Stores, 5tc. for the Building and Repair of! 
Ships, Docks, fcc. ----- -J 

„ New Works, Improvements, and Repairs in the") 
Yards, flee. J 

„ Medicines and Medical Stores 

„ Miscellaneous Services - - - - 



Navy Non-effective Services: 
By Half Pay to Officers of the Navy and Royal Marines 
„ Military Pensions and Allowances - 
„ Civil Pensions and Allowances - - - - 

Service of other Departments: 

By Army and Ordnance Departments (Conveyance ofi 
Troops) J 

n Heme Department (Convict Service) - 

„ Post Office Department (Contract Packet Service) 



By Balaoce of Votes for New Works, as per Contra (*) : vix. 

Unappropriated, no longer retained under the Regulations 
contained in the Treasury Minute of the 13th January 
1846. 

Balance of 1842-43 : £. ,. d. 

Erecting Timber Slieds - Plymouth 2,760 11 7 



Balance of 1843-44 : 
£. t 
Chatham 



Constructing ad-1 
ditional Her- 1 
cules, Sec. at f 
Smithery -J 

Constructing Ma-1 
chioery for I Portsmouth 
Saw Mill -J 

Cast-iron Doors,"] 
&c. for Store- I Plymouth 
bouses - -J 



1,586 14 



1,010 - 



425 11 7 



77 7 11 



3,099 IS 8 



£. 



EXPENDITURE, 
1845-46. 



£. s. d. 

1,303,786 16 6 

685,306 17 8 

139,169 19 - 

8,743 14 

52,428 15 

133,104 11 

[25,068 8 

727,775 11 



48,695 5 5 

1,439,390 7 3 

488,086 18 1 

19,142 3 11 

132,084 6 - 

714,030 10 1 

494,167 16 

151,554 3 - 



160,419 5 7 

94,536 14 4 
533,071 2 8 



7,344,363 6 9 



5,860 6 3 



7,350,223 12 - 



GRANTS, 

including 
Appropriation in 

Aid and 

Supplementary 

Estimate. 



d. 



£. s. 

1,828,053 - - 

656,795 - - 

129,092 - - 

11,608 - - 

42,011 - - 

132,353 - - 

22,957 - - 

690,630 - - 

41,995 - - 

1,273,789 - - 

486,346 - - 

23,500 - - 

122,947 - - 



737,168 - 
494,549 - 
160,866 ~ 



152,600 - 

106,050 - 
546,274 - 



7,159,083 



Vote No. 2. This excess has arisen from 
large supplies of provisions having been plated 
in depot for Army service in Ireland, which it 
became necessary to replace in the public store 
by the purchase of other provisions ; and pro- 
visions for the relief of distress in Ireland. 

Vote No. 3. This excess arises from the in- 
creased expense for law charges connected with 
the purchase of land for the extension of Wool- 
wich and Portsmouth Dock Yards. 

Vote No. 5. A far more extensive stock of 
magnetic and other instruments was required for 
the Polar Eipedition than was contemplated 
when the Estimates were framed, and the outfit 
for the Survey of the Coast of Africa had not 
been anticipated. Additi nal officers were also 
employed to hasten some of the surveys, and 
errear payments made for the China Survey. 
Arrear accounts from the Cape Observatory and 
Bay of Fuody were also received and posted to 
this year. These circumstances combined gave 
ri3e to this excess. 

Vote No. 6. This excess is merely the dif- 
ference between an actual expense and an esti- 
mated one. 

Vote No. 7. The excess under this bead is 
caused by bringing to account this year, expen- 
diture for the last year, the accounts oi which 
had not been received in time to be examiued 
and posted in the account for last year, viz., 
from Hong-Kong, Ascension, Valparaiso, and 
other distant stations. 

Vote No. 8. This excess arises from its hav- 
ing been found necessary to employ an increased 
number of workmen in the Dock Yards, in order 
to proceed with dispatch in the building and 
outfit of the Fleet 

Vote No. 9. The sums taken in the Estimates 
for labour at Malta, Ascension, and the Cape of 
Good Hope, and for extra pay to artificers, &c. 
of the Fleet, were less than the necessities of the 
service in the course of the year were found to 
require. 

Vote No. 10. The excess arises from the build- 
ing of iron steam-vessels by contract, and the 
completion of steam-engines for vessels building 
in the Dock Yards having been hastened; and 
also from larger supplies of East lndiun teak, 
African timber, and copper being required for 
the service of the Dock Yards than were antici- 
pated. 

Vote No. 11. This small excess is attribut- 
able to a greater progress being made in the 
construction of the New Dock at Malta, than 
was contemplated. - 

Vote No. 13. The cause of this excess is 
owing to the large amount paid as Head Money 
for the capture and destruction of pirates at 
Borneo, under the Act 6 Geo. 4, c. 49, and an 
increased expense in raising men for Her 
Majesty's fleet. 

Vote No. 17. This excess is owing to a 
greater number of troops having been conveyed 
than was estimated for. 



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ACCOUNT OF THE NAVAL RECEIPT AND EXPENDITURE 



Memorandum.— Tbe Old Store Moneys and Extra Receipts of the Year 1845-46, amounting to 210,592/. 19*. 6<£, 
and the Appropriation of them on the Estimates for the Years 1846-47, and 1847-48, are as follows: 





Sums received in the 

Three Quarters 

to 81st Dec. 1845, 

and Appropriated on 

the Estimates for 

1846-47. 


Sams receii 

Quarto 

tbe 31st Ma 

to be Appi 

on the Esti 

1847- 


red in the 

it to 

rch 1846, 




■opriated 
mates for 
48. 




£. $. 


d. 


£. 


s. cL 


Under Vote No. 1. Wages to Seamen and Marines - Old Store Moneys 


6,698 8 


4 


4,302 


19 4 


Ditto - Extra Receipts - 


18,694 4 


8 


7,041 


13 8 


2. Victuals for ditto - Old Store Moneys 


9,017 5 


1 


4,211 


6 1 


Ditto Extra Receipts - 


38,974 14 


9 


15,090 


19 11 


4. General Register and Record Office! TVtto 
of Seamen -J l 


5 - 


- 


15 


9 4 


5. Scientific Branch - Ditto - 


2,917 6 


8 


759 


3 1 


6. Her Majesty's Establishments at Home Ditto - 


1,276 1 


11 


819 


19 6 


10. Naval Stores, &c. - - - - Old Store Moneys 


27,642 14 


- 


8,823 


14 2 


Ditto - - - - Extra Receipts - 


18,474 14 


8 


2,596 


11 3 


12. Medicines and Medical Stores - Old Store Moneys 


92 11 


5 


21 


3 9 


i Ditto Extra Receipts - 


1,740 15 


11 


712 


3 11 


13. Miscellaneous Services - Ditto - 


2,984 19 


5 


844 


12 9 


15. Military Pensions and Allowances - Ditto - 


5,000 - 


- 






16. Civil Pensions and Allowances - Ditto - 


1,862 1 


2 


602 


15 7 


1 7. Army and Ordnance Departments - Old Store Moneys 


186 18 


8 


156 


2 5 


Ditto Extra Receipts - 


24,549 1 


9 


87 


14 3 


18. Home Department - - Old Store Moneys 


19 - 


- 


— 


17 2 


Ditto Extra Receipts - 


9,216 9 


8 


158 


5 8 


x 19. Post-Office Department - - - Ditto - 


500 - 


- 


500 


- - 


£. 


164,847 7 


8 


45,745 


11 10 



£.210,592 19 6 

(signed) John T. Brigas, 

Accountant- General of the Navy. 



Extract from Mr. Trevelyan's Letter, 15 December 1845, to Secretary of the Admiralty. 

" Although it may appear, as stated in y onr letter, to be a more simple course of proceeding, to appropriate the 
Balances of the Votes for Works and Repairs for the years 1841-42, and 1843-44, in aid of the Deficiency which has 
arisen in the General Amount of the Naval Votes for 1844-45, my Lords consider that as those Balances are not required 
for the services for which they were specially retained on the Accounts of those years, and the Accounts have in every 
other respect been finally closed, it will be proper that the surplus Balances in question should, in accordance with the 



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FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 MARCH 1 846. 



[ 



AMOUNTS BY WHICH THE EXPENDITURE HAS FALLEN SHORT OF OR 

EXCEEDED THE SUMS VOTED. 



Navy Effective Services: 
BY Wages to Seamen and Marines 
Victuals for ditto - 
Admiralty Office - 



Number 

of 
Head of 
Service, 



Expended 



General Register and Record Office ofl 
Seamen j 

Scientific Branch - 

Her Majesty's Establishments at Home - 

Her Majesty's Establishments Abroad - 

Wages to Artificers, &c. employed in Her"! 
Majesty's Establishments at Home •/ 

Wages to Artificers, &c. employed in Her! 
Majesty's Establishments Abroad -J 

Naval Stores, &c. for the Building and"! 
Repair of Ships, Docks, &c. - -J 

New Works, Improvements, and Repairs'! 
in the Yards, &c. • J 

Medicines and Medical Stores 

Miscellaneous Services - 



Navy Non-Effbctivb Services: 

Half-Pay to Officers of the Navy and! 
Royal Marines J 

Military Pensions and Allowances 

Civil Pensions and Allowances 

Service of other Departments: 

Army and Ordnance Departments (Con-1 
veyance of Troops) - j 

Home Department (Convict Service) 

Post-Office Department (Contract Packet! 
Service) J 



1 
2 
3 

4 

5 
6 

7 



10 

11 

12 
18 



14 

15 
16 

17 
18 
19 



( 

Less than Voted. 



t\ $. d. 
24,266 3 6 



2,864 5 11 



4,357 16 1 



23,137 9 


11 


381 3 


3 


8,811 17 


- 


- 


. 


11,513 5 


8 


13,202 17 


4 


88,534 18 


8 


^ 





More than Voted. 



£. s. d. 

28,411 17 8 

3,077 19 - 

10,417 15 1 

751 11 5 

2,111 8 6 

37,145 11 5 

6,700 5 5 

165,601 7 3 

2,640 18 1 

9,137 6 - 



7,819 5 7 



273,815 5 5 



Balance - - £. 185,280 6 9 



B ?£*l^ P? bHc . Accounts, do hereby certify that this Account 

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§ 2, 

oo 1 

% 



? 



5 



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£3 



2 

P 

i. 

M 

OO 

■fe 



i 



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EXC 



Require 
Nava 
en dec 
Acco 
Year, 



One I 



24 F 



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NAVY. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 19 January 1847 ;—for, 

A COPY " of the Treasury Minute restricting Naval Promotion to One Vacancy in 
Three; the Number of Officers on the List at the Date of the Minute, and the 
Number on the 30th day of September 1846." 



Admiralty, 1 
1 February 1847. / 



J. W. Innes, 

for the Chief Clerk. 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 1 February 1847. 



COPY of the Admiralty Minute [there is no Minute of the Treasury on this subject] 
restricting Naval Promotion to One Vacancy in Three ; the Number of Officers on 
the List at the Date of the Minute, and the Number on the 30th day of September 
1846. 

27 February 1830.— At the Board, 

Present, Viscount Melville, Sir George Cockburn, Sir Henry Hotham, Sir George Clerk, 

Viscount Castlereagh. 

Their Lordships having taken into consideration the state of the Half-Pay List, and 
being desirous of operating its gradual reduction in time of peace, 

Resolve, That from this date no promotion (except for special brilliant service) shall be 
made in any rank of commission officers (save flag officers), except in the proportion of 
one promotion for every three vacancies which may be made by the removal t>y death, 
dismissal, or other cause, of officers from the effective lists of each rank kept at this office ; 
death or court-martial vacancies, liable to be filled by commanders in chief abroad, not 
being reckoned. 

Promotion being thus limited, their Lordships deem it necessary that a control in some 
degree corresponding should be placed upon the original entry of young gentlemen into 
the service ; they therefore resolve, that in future all appointments of volunteers of the first 
class shall be made, directly by their Lordships. 

Their Lordships direct that these regulations be communicated to the commanders in chief 
on foreign stations, with an observation that they do not alter the authority vested in 
them of appointing by commissions to death or court-martial vacancies ; but tnat they do 
apply to the subsequent vacancies which may be occasioned by the promotion of an officer 
into an actual death or court-martial vacancy, and that such subsequent vacancies are to 
be filled up only by acting orders, as in the case of invaliding vacancies. 

(signed) J. W. Croker. 



NUMBER of Officers on the List of the Royal Navy, on the 27th February 1830, 

and on the 30th September 1846. 



Flag officers -------- 

Ditto, superannuated ------ 

Retired captains ------- 

Captains -------- 

Retired captains, under Order in Council of 1840 
Commanders -------- 

Retired commanders, under Order in Council of 1816 

Ditto ditto - - - - 1830 

Ditto ----- from the Masters' List 

Lieutenants ------- 

Masters .------* 

Inspectors of hospitals and fleets - 

Physicians -------- 

Deputy inspector of hospitals and fleets 

Surgeons -------- 



1830. 



171 
24 
14 

858 



918 
100 



3,550 
523 



12 
793 



1846. 



139 

2 

730 

48 

855 

100 

195 

41 

2,538 

437 

9 

2 

19 

644 

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NAVY. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 5 March 1847 i—for* 



A RETURN "of all Vessels that have been purchased since 1830 into the Royal Navy, 
including those condemned under the Acts relative to the Slave Trade, stating the Tonnage, and 
the Price paid for each, distinguishing the Amount paid for the Hull and for the Stores. 9 ' 



Date 






Amount Paid 




Total 


of 
Payment, 


NAME OP VESSEL. 


Tonnage. 


^ 




Paid fcr each 
Ymml 




For Hull 


For Stores. 


1830: 






£. s.'d. 


£. s. 


d. 


£. s. d. 


August 7 


Neptune (captured smuggling ves- 
sel). 


' 


(There are no means in 
office of furnishing 
this information.) 


137 17 - 




r George IV., steam-vessel (after- 
J wards " Hermes.") 


733 


. 


- 


- 


I 


• on 










>*4>977 9 4 


„ - au 


\ Duke of York, steam-vessel (after- 
I wards " Messenger.") 


733 


• 


• 


- 
















Sept - 8 


Cerus (afterwards " Ceres ") 


*5 


- 


- 


- 


43o - - 


1831 : 














Feb. - 22 


Dos Amigos, brigantine (afterwards 
" Fair Rosamond.") 


17a 


- 


- 


• 


609 - - 


Oct. - 25 


Courier (afterwards " Monkey") - 


68 


. 


- 


- 


818 - - 


Dec. - 5 


Pantaloon, yacht - - - 


333 


- 


- 


- 


8,790 - - 


1834: 














June - 17 


Marco fiazsaris, American steam- 
vessel (afterwards " Fairy.") 


13° 


- 


- 


- 


519 - *o 


Nov. - 15 


Water-Witch - 


319 


3»666 - - 


- 


- 


3*656 - - 


1835: 














June - so 


Violet 


46 


. 


- 


• 


369 12 2 


August 34 


Constitution, schooner 










207 19 2 


1837: 














July - 27 


Colonsay, steam-vessel (afterwards 
" Urgent.") 


563 


- 


- 


• 


26,000 - - 


August 7 


Belfast, steam-vessel (afterwards 
" Prosper©*") 


244 


- 


• 


• 


11,000 - - 


1838: 














Midsummer 


Bull Frog 


90 


- 


• 


- 


260 - - 


Quarter. 














July * 7 


Sir Charles Adam, steam-vessel 
(afterwards " Toronto/') 


34a a 


- 


- 


- 


5>4*o 9 * 


„ - 21 


Experiment, steam-vessel - 


220 


- 


- 


- 


3,665 3 2 


1839: 














April 30 


Traveller, steam-vessel 


335 


• 


• 


- 


7>363 1* 9 


Oct. - 18 


Montreal, schooner - 


H5 


- 


- 


- 


1,009 - - 


1840: 














May - 27 


Carolina, slave brigantine (after- 
wards " Fawn.") 


169 


- 


- 


- 


834 6 10 


1841: 














July -12 


Speedwell - 


73 


• 


. 


- 


900 - - 


» - 9 


Mary Gordon (afterwards " Roy- 
alist.") 


249 a 


- 


- 


- 


7,200 - - 


1840: 














Dec. - 93 


Emilia, Brazilian slave vessel 


1*3 


- 


- 


- 


. 332 a - 


1842 : 














Jan. • 22 


Josephina, slave vessel (afterwards 
" Prompt.") 


61 


- 


- 


• 


450 6 - 


1843: 












• 


June - 14 


Escorpiao, slave brig - 


280 


• 


. 


• 


4°° CfTf 


Aug. • 21 


Corina, Peruvian bark 




- 




. 


tize ^i<NaMit 


June - 22] 


Mermaid, steam- vessel {afterward* 


%f%A 


. . 






£.806 2 - 



VESSELS PURCHASED INTO THE ROYAL NAVY SINCE 1830. 



Date 

of 
Payment. 



1844: 
Jan. - 27 
April - 23 
Oct. - 11 

Dec. - 30 

18452 
July - 17 



Oct. 



22 



1846: 

March 12 
April - 3 
Dec. - 5 

1847: 
Feb. - 13 



NAME OF VESSEL. 



Princess Alice, steam-vessel 
Progresso, slave vessel 
Slave vessel, captured by H. M. S. 
" Madagascar" (name unknown). 
Pacific - 



Captured slave vessel, name un- 
known (afterwards «* Prompt") 

Delaware, brigantine (afterwards 
" Victoria.") 



Research - 
Castlereagh 
Kestrel, yacht 



Ondine, steam-vessel 



Tonnage. 



270 

140 

40 



130^*4 



40 

93 
202 



Amount Paid 



For HuIL 



£. s. d. 



For Stores. 



£. S. d. 



Total 

Paid for each 

Vessel. 



£• s. d. 

1^350 - - 

170 - - 

92 '5 - 

600 - - 



300 - - 
776 5 - 



35o - - 

640 12 6 

2,727 - - 



10,936 - - 



Admiralty, 1 
1847J 



10 May 



J. T. Briggs, 

Account 1 Gen 1 of the Navy. 






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NAVY OFFICERS. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable the House of Commons, 
dated 4 February 1847 ;—for, 

A RETURN " of Navy Officers who have Died, been Dismissed the Service, and Promoted, 
between the 27th day of February 1830 and the 30th day of September 1846 ; likewise a 
Return of Officers Promoted for Special Brilliant Services, and those Promoted to Death 
or Court Martial Vacancies, by Commanders-in-Chief Abroad." 



Admiralty, \ 
23 February 1847.J 



H. F. AMEDROZ, 

Chief Clerk. 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 34 February 1847. 



A RETURN of Navy Officers who have Died, been Dismissed the Service, and Promoted, between 
the 27th February 1830 and the 30th September 1846. 





DIED. 


Dismissed 

or Removed the 

Service. 


Removed 

by Promotion 

to higher 

Rank*. 


Total 
Removals. 


Promotion*. 






Flag Officers - 


246 






246 


189 


Captains - 


316 


4 


189 


509 


366 


Captains retired under 
0. C. 1840. 


24 






24 


24 


Commanders 


315 


6 


389 


710 


686 


Captains retired under 
O. C. 1816. 


161 








161 










Commanders retired under 
0. C. 1830. 


143 








&07 










Lieutenants - 


1,049 


65 


1,153 


2,267 


1,224 


Masters - 


800 


20 


. 


329 


234 


Surgeons - 


380 


10 


- 


390 


259 


Paymasters and Pursers - 


379 


2 


- 


881 


176 



A RETURN of Officers Promoted for Special Brilliant Services, and those Promoted to Death 
or Court Martial Vacancies, by Commanders-in-Chief Abroad, within the same Period. 





For Special 
Brilliant Services. 


Special by Board 

and 

General Promotions. 


In Death or Court Martial 




Vacai 


ides. 


Captains - 


47 


212 


8 


— 


Commanders - 


112 


376 


19 


— 


Lieutenants • 


127 


319 


115 


3 


Masters - 


28 


135 


14 


f~> 


Surcreons - 


16 


148 


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NAVY. 



RETURN to au Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 5 March 1847 \—for> 

A RETURN " of the Number of Boys of the First and Second Class for General Service received on Board the 
several Flag Ships at Portsmouth and Dexouport, during the several Months of August, September, October, 
November and December 1846 ; distinguishing those who have not been entered uuder the Regulation of the 
Admiralty Memorandum of the 25th day of May 1841, with the Number of such Boys so entered who have been 
supplied with Slop Clothing." 



RETURN of Boys of the First and Second Class for General Service received on Board the several Flag Ships 
at Portsmouth and Devonport, during the Months of August, September, October, November and December 1846. 





Boys, 1st Class. 


Boys, 2d Class. 


Number not entered under Regulation of the Admiralty 
Memorandum of 25 May 1841. 




1 Number to 
Number whom Slops 

received. 1 *»*• beea 
| issued. • 


Number 
received. 

3* 

85 


Number to 

whom Slope 

have been 

issued.* 


Boys 
of 1st Class. 


Number to 

whom Slope 

have been 

issued.* 


Boys 
of 2d Class. 


Number to 

whom Slops 

have been 

issued.* 


Ship « ST. VINCI 

August. 
September. 
October - 
November 
December 


NT," at Ponsmouth : 

11 | 9 
141 J 92 


11 
' 45 


93 


>5 

15 


H 


2 


Total Boys, 1st Class 


245 n6 ' 


117 


56 


93 


14 


2 


Total Boys, 'id Class 


131 


58 


St. Vincent, I'ortsm 
18 March 1847 


outh,l 
• J 


Alex. Milne, 


Grand Total - 


376 


174 


Captain. 


Ship " VICTORY, 

August ... 
September 
October - 
November. 
December 


" at Portsmc 

49 
30 

1 30 


>uth : 

5 
»5 

63 


44 
22 
12 

9 


4 
1 










Total Boys, 1st Class 


aot> 


83 


87 


19 










Total Boys, 2d Class 


87 


19 






John Pasco, 


Grand Total - 


396 


102 


Captain. 


Ship " QUEEN," 

August. 
September. 
October - 
November 
December 


at Devonpor 

5 
1 

75 


t: 

63 


lC 
25 


22 










Total Boys, 1st Class 


81 I 63 


41 


22 










Total Boys, 2d Class 


41 


22 


Captain. 
(On Admiralty leave.) 


L. B. Dickson, 


Grand Total - 


132 


85 


Senior Lieutenant. 


Ship « CALEDO> 

August - 
September 
October - 
November 
December 


IIA," at Dev 

27 

6 

35 

45 

164 


onport : 

21 

6 

3o 

*3 
86 


4« 

44 
58 


24 

1 

24 
34 
46 


10 
16 


2 






Total Boys, 1st Class 


277 


166 


171 


129 


26 


« 1 1 


Total Boys, 2d Class 


171 


129 






j|f anley H. Dixon, 


Grand Total - 


448 


295 






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BOYS (NAVY). 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commona, 
dated 31 March 1847 ;-;/&*-, 

A RETURN " of Boys Entered on board Her Majesty's Ships or Vessels of 
War, from the 1st day of January to the 31st day of December 1846/' 



Admiralty, 1 
13 May 1847. J 



H. F. AMEDROZ, 

Chief Clerk. 



BOYS Entered on board Her Majesty's Ships and Vessels of War, from the 
1st day of January to the 31st day of December 1846. 

First Class Boys, entered Navy for first time ... 2,521 

„ „ second time - - - 283 

Second Class Boys, entered Navy for first time - 1,972 

„ „ second time - - 140 

Total - - - 4,916 

From whence obtained : 

Greenwich Royal Naval Asylum .... 60 

Marine Society School 50 

Other sources - 4,806 

Total - - - 4,916 

Could write and read .------ 1,51 9 

write or read only ------- 804 

neither read nor write - J ,402 

Good scholars - - 259 

Doubtful 35Q 

Total - - - 4,334 

582 supernumerary, 
unknown. 

Total Boys - - - 4,916 

Petty Officers, Seamen or Boys, invalided - *228 

, f „ discharged - - - - *2,355 

„ „ desertea - 2,382 

„ „ deaths - - - 418 

Total - - - 5,383 

• These numbers are for the Home Ports only. 

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CORPORAL PUNISHMENTS (ARMY). 



RETURN to Two Orders of the Honourable the House of Commons, dated respectirely 
18 August 1846 and 20 January 1847 I—for, 



A RETURN " of Persons Flogged in the Army in Great Britain and Ireland, in the Years 1845 and 1846, to 
the end of July; specifying the Offence, the Regiment, the Place of Station, the Time, the Sentence, and the 
Number of Lashes inflicted." 

(Mr. Escott.) 

A RETURN "of the Number of Corporal Punishments which have been inflicted in the Army since the last 
Parliamentary Returns, up to the latest Period at which they can be furnished/' 

(Dr. Banning.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 19 February 1847. 



A RETURN of Persons Flogged in the Army in Great Britain and Ireland, in the Years 1845 and 1846, to the 
end of July; specifying the Offence, the Regiment, the Place of Station, the Time, the Sentence, and the Number 
of Lashes inflicted. 



REGIMENT8 


Numbers. 


OFFENCE. 


STATION. 


Period. 


Sentence. 


Number of 
Lashes 
inflicted. 


1st life Guards - 


None. 








Lashes. 




2d life Guards - 


None 






. 






Royal Horse Gds. 


None. 












1st Dragoon Gds.< 


1 
1 
1 

1 
1 


Insubordination - 

Making away with necessaries 

Drunk on the march - 

Drunk on the march - 

Insubordination .... 


Exeter - 

Exeter ... 

Birmingham - 

Birmingham 

Birmingham 


1845 
1846 
1846 
1846 
1846 


150 
100 
150 
150 
150 


100 
100 
150 
100 
150 


2d Dragoon Guards 


None. 












3d Dragoon Gds.j 


1 
1 


Making away with necessaries 
• - Insubordination, absence without 
leave, and making away with neces- 
saries. 


Ballincollig 
Edinburgh 


1845 
1846 


100 
150 


50 
100 


4th Dragoon Gds J 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


Violence to superiors - 
Violence to superiors - - - 
Disgraceful Conduct (theft) - 
Drunk on the march ... 
Insubordination - 
- - Drunk on duty and insubordi- 
nation. 

Insubordination .... 
Drunk on parade .... 
Drunk on the march ... 
Drunk on the march ... 


Cahir - - - 

Cahir - 

Cahir 

Dundalk 

Edinburgh 

Edinburgh 


1845 
1845 
1845 
1845 
1845 
1845 


150 
150 
150 
100 
100 
100 


150 
150 
130 
100 
100 
100 




1 
1 
1 
1 


Edinburgh * 
Nottingham 
Nottingham 
Nottingham 


1845 
1846 
1846 
1846 


100 
100 
100 
100 


10Q 
100 
100 
100 


5th Dragoon Gds. 


None. 












6th Dragoon Gds. 


1 


Drunkenness on duty ... 


Manchester • 


1845 


160 


50 


7th Dragoon Gds. 
Depot. 


None. 












1st Dragoons 


1 


Violence to superiors ... 


Dublin - 


1845 


150 


150 


f 


1 


Drunkenness on duty - 


Dundalk 


1845 


150 


39 



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2 RETURNS 


RELATIVE TO CORPORAL PUNISHMENTS IN THE ARMY. 
















Number of 


REGIMENTS. 


Numbers. 


OFFENCE. 


8TATION. 


Period. 


Sentence, 


Lashes 
inflicted. 












Lashes. 




f 


1 


- - Drunkenness and violence to 
superiors. 


Ipswich - - - 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination - 


Norwich - 


1845 


150 


150 . 






Violence to superiors - 


Hounslow 


1845 


150 


150 


4 th Dragoons - \ 




Disgraceful conduct (theft) 


Hounslow 


1846 


160 


160 






Insubordination - 


Hounslow 


1846 


150 


150 






Violence to superiors - 


Hounslow 


1846 


150 


150 






Insubordination - 


Hounslow 


1846 


100 


100 


I 




Violence to superiors - 


Newport - 


1845 


150 


150 


6th Dragoons -< 




Drunkenness on duty - 


Birmingham - 


1845 


100 


95 


I 




Disgraceful oonduct - 


Birmingham - 


1845 


100 


100 






- - Disgraceful conduct and making 


Norwich - 


1845 


150 


150 






away with necessaries. 










7th Dragoons -< 




Disgraceful conduct - 


Norwich - 


1846 


150 


150 






Violence to superiors - 


Hounslow 


1846 


150 


150 






Insubordination .... 


Hounslow 


1846 


100 


100 


8th Dragoons - 


None. 












9th Drgns. Dep6t 


None. 












10th Drgns. Dep&t 


None. 












1 1th Dragoons - 


1 


Disgraceful conduct (theft) - 


Dundalk 


1845 


150 


160 


12th Dragoons - 


None. 












18th Dragoons -J 


1 


Drunkenness on duty - 


Brecon - 


1845 


100 


100 


1 


Drunkenness on duty - 


Brecon - 


1845 


100 


100 


1 


1 


- - Making away with necessaries 
and disgraceful conduct. 


Cahir 


1846 


150 


150 


14th Drgns. Depdt 


None. 












15thDrgns. Dep6t 


None. 












1 6 th Drgns. Dep6t 


1 


Insubordination - 


Maidstone 


1846 


100 


100 


1 7th Dragoons - 


None. 












Grenadier Guards 


None. 












f 




Disgraceful conduct (theft) - 


Winchester 


1845 


150 


130 






- - Desertion, making . away with 


London ... 


1846 


150 


160 






necessaries, and disgraceful conduct. 










Coldstream Gds. < 




Violence to superiors - 


London - 


1846 


150 


150 






Disgraceful conduct - 


London - 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination - - 


Windsor - 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination - 


Windsor - 


1845 


100 


100 


Scots Fusilier Gds. 




Insubordination - 


Winchester 


1845 


100 


100 


1st Foot, 1st Bat- 




Disgraceful conduct ... 


Nenagh - 


1845 


150 


86 


talion Depftt* 














. 




Insubordination - 


Enniskillen 


1845 


150 


150 






Disgraceful conduct (theft) - 


Barbados* 


1845 


150 


125 






- - Violence to superiors and dis- 


Barbados* 


1845 


150 


150 






graceful conduct. 

Insubordination - - - - 










1st Foot, 2d Bat- 




Barbados* 


1845 


100 


100 


talion. * 




Insubordination - 


Barbados* 


1845 


150 


100 






Disgraceful conduct (theft) - 


Barbados* 


1845 


150 


150 






Insubordination - - - - 


Barbadoes 


1845 


100 


50 






Insubordination - 


Barbados* 


1845 


150 


150 






Disgraceful conduct - 


Edinburgh 


1846 


150 


50 






Drunkenness on duty - 


Bombay • 


1845 


150 


150 






Drunkenness on duty - 


Bombay — 


1845 


150 


150 


2d Foot - 




- - Violence to superiors and insubor- 
dination, &c. 


Winchester 


1846 


100 


100 






Violenoe to superiors - 


Winchester 


1846 


160 


150 


r 




Drunkenness on duty - 


Chichester 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination - 


Chichester 


1845 


150 


50 






Drunkenness on duty - 


Chichester 


1845 


100 


50 






Insubordination - 


Winchester 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination - 


Winchester 


1845 


100 


100 


3d Foot - 




Insubordination 


Winchester 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination - 


Winchester 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination - 


Winchester" 


1845 


150 


150 


k 




Disgraceful conduct - 

- - Insubordination and disgraceful 

conduct. 


Winchester 
Gosport - 


1845 
1846 


150 

edbiao 


oC 



RETURNS RELATIVE TO CORPORAL PUNISHMENTS IN THE ARMY. 















Number of 


REGIMENTS. 


Numbers. 


OFFENCE. 


STATION. 


Period. 


Sentence. 


Lashes 
inflicted. 












Lashes. 




f 




Disgraceful conduct (theft) - 


Belfast - 


1845 


150 


100 






Drunk on duty and insubordination 


Enniekillen 


1845 


150 


100 


5th Foot - - I 




Insubordination .... 


Enniskillen 


1846 


150 


150 




Violence to superiors - 


Enniekillen 


1845 


150 


150 


* 




Insubordination .... 


Enniskillen 


1845 


150 


150 


. 




Disgraceful conduct (theft) 


Templemore 


1846 


150 


150 






Violence to superiors 


Dublin - 


1845 


150 


150 






Drunkenness on duty - 


Mullingar 


1845 


150 


75 


6th Foot - 




- - Drunk on the march and insubor- 
dination. 


Mullingar 


1845 


150 


150 






Violence to superiors ... 


Mullingar 


1845 


150 


150 


7th Foot Dep6t - 


None. 












y 




Making away with necessaries 


Walroer - 


1845 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Walmer ... 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination .... 


Walmer - 


1845 


150 


150 






Disgraceful conduct ... 


Walmer ... 


1845 


150 


150 






Insubordination .... 


Walmer - 


1845 


150 


150 






Disgraceful conduct ... 


Walmer - 


1845 


150 


150 






Disgraceful conduct 


Walmer - - - 


1846 


150 


150 






Insubordination .... 


Walmer - 


1846 


150 


150 


1 3th Foot - - \ 




Making away with necessaries 


Walmer - - - 


1846 


100 


None* 


IvUJ A WV " 




Insubordination - 


Walmer - 


1846 


100 


100 






Insubordination .... 


Walmer - 


1846 


100 


* 100 






Making &**T with necessaries 


Walmer • 


1846 


100 


100 






- - Disgraceful conduct and making 


Walmer - 


1846 


150 


150 






away with necessaries. 














Insubordination .... 


Walmer - - - 


1846 


100 


None. 






Insubordination - - - 


Walmer ... 


1846 


150 


150 






Insubordination .... 


Walmer - 


1846 


150 


150 


V 




Insubordination .... 


Portsmouth 


1846 


150 


150 


14th FootDep5t- 




Insubordination .... 


Dover - - - 


1845 


150 


150 


15th Foot Dep6t- 


None. 












[ 




• - Habitual drunkenness and insub- 


Buttevant 


1845 


150 


150 


!6th Foot Dep5t { 




ordination. 










\ 




Violence to superiors ... 


Buttevant 


1846 


150 


150 


19th Foot Dep6t - 




Violence to superiors ... 


Boyle - - - 


1846 


150 


100 


r 




Drunk on the march ... 


Belfast ... 


1845 


100 


100 






Disgraceful conduct ... 


Belrast ... 


1845 


150 


150 






Violence to superiors - 


Belfast - 


1845 


150 


150 


26th Foot - -< 




Disgraceful conduct (theft) - 


Belfast - 


1845 


150 


150 






Drunk on the march ... 


Belfast - 


1846 


100 


100 






-Drunk on the march ... 


Belfast - 


1846 


100 


100 






Insubordination .... 


Enniskillen 


1846 


150 


160 


27th Foot Depot - 




Violence to superiors ... 


Guernsey 


1846 


100 


100 






Insubordination .... 


Limerick - 


1845 


150 


60 






Insubordination .... 


Limerick ... 


1845 


150 


160 






Drunk on the march ... 


Limerick - 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunk on the march ... 


Castlebar 


1845 


100 


75 






Drunk on the march ... 


Castlebar 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunk on the march ... 


Castlebar 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunk on the march ... 


Castlebar 


1845 


100 


100 


80th Foot - - ( 




Insubordination .... 


Castlebar 


1845 


100 


100 


* 




Insubordination .... 


Castlebar 


1845 


150 


100 






Insubordination .... 


Castlebar 


1845 


150 


150 






Drunk on the march ... 


Galway - 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunk on the march, - 


Galway - - - 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunk on the march ... 


Galway - 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunk on the march ... 


Castlebar 


1846 


100 


100 


i. 




Drunk on the march ... 


Castlebar 


1846 


150 


150 


33d Foot Depot - 




Violence to superiors ... 


Clonmel - - - 


1846 


150 


136 


34th Foot Depot - 




Drunk on the march ... 


Cashel - . - 


1845 


100 


75 


35th Foot Depot - 




Disgraceful conduct ... 


Kinsale - 


1846 


150 


150 


' 




Violence to superiors ... 


Charlemont 


1845 


150 


125 






Disgraceful conduct (theft) - 

- - Disgraceful conduct and making 


Newcastle-on-Tyne - 
Newoastle-on-Tyne •» 


1845 


1:50 


160 






1845 


150 


150 






away with necessaries. 










«**>.t n _* 


i 


IMnl^nn *,,,*,- —.Jj/L ~-i 


T» xl_ 


)igitized 


byV^rO 


ogle 



4 RETURNS 


RELATIVE TO CORPORAL PUNISHMENTS IN THE ARMY. 
















Number of 


REGIMENTS. 


Numbers. 


OFFENCE. 


STATION. 


Period. 


Sentence. 


Lashes 
inflicted. 












Lathes. 




f 




Insubordination * 


Gosport - 


1845 


100 


75 






Insubordination - 


Gosport - 


1845 


100 


100 






Violence to superiors - 


Gosport - 


1845 


150 


125 






Insubordination - 


Gosport - 


1845 


150 


150 






Violence to superiors - 


Gosport ... 


1845 


150 


ioe 






Violence to superiors - 


Carmarthen 


1845 


150 


150 






Insubordination - 


Gosport - 


1845 


100 


50 






Drunkenness on duty - 


Carmarthen 


1845 


100 


100 


87th Foot- -< 




Drunkenness on duty - 


Carmarthen 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunkenness on duty - 


Carmarthen 


1845 


100 


100 






Disgraceful conduct - 


Gosport - 


1845 


150 


150 






Disgraceful conduct - 


Gosport - 


1845 


150 


125 






Disgraceful conduct (theft) 


Gosport ... 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination - 


Newport - 


1846 


150 


150 






Disgraceful conduct - 


Newport - 


1846 


150 


150 






Making away with necessaries 


Newport - 


1846 


100 


100 






Disgraceful conduct - 


Newport • 


1846 


150 


14 


t 




Drunkenness on duty - 


Boyle - 


1845 


100 


100 


88th Foot Depot { 




Insubordination - 


Enniskillen 


1845 


100 


100 


I 




Making away with necessaries 


Londonderry - 


1845 


100 


100 


f 




Making away with necessaries 


Dover - - - 


1846 


150 


150 






Making away with necessaries 


Canterbury 


1846 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Canterbury 


1846 


100 


100 


40th Foot- -( 




Making away with necessaries 


Canterbury 


1846 


100 


100 






Disgraceful oonduct (theft) 


Canterbury 


1846 


150 


150 






Disgraceful conduct - 


Canterbury 


1846 


150 


50 






Disgraceful conduct ... 


Canterbury 


1846 


150 


13 


' 




Violence to superiors - 


Dublin - 


1845 


150 


102 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - - - 


1845 


100 


50 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 






Disgraceful conduct - 


Dublin - 


1845 


150 


150 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


150 


160 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin ~ 


1845 


100 


100 


4 1st Foot - -( 




Making away with necessaries 


Dublin . 


1845 


100 


100 




Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination - 


Dublin - 


1846 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin ... 


1846 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1846 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1846 


75 


75 


s. 




Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1846 


100 


100 


43d Foot - 




Disgraceful conduct (theft) - 


Dover - 


1846 


150 


150 


* 




Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


None. 






Disgraceful conduct - 


Dublin ... 


1846 


150 


150 


44th Foot - - ( 




Making away with necessaries 


Armagh - 


1846 


150 


150 


• 




- - Violence to superiors and making 


Newry - 


1846 


150 


150 






away with necessaries. 










* 




Disgraceful conduct ... 


Armagh - 


1846 


150 


150 


46th Foot Dep&t - 


None. 












f 




Insubordination - 


Stockport 


1845 


150 


100 


47th Foot - • I 




Disgraceful conduct, &c. 


Liverpool 


1845 


150 


150 




Insubordination - - - - 


Castletown, Isle of Man 


1845 


150 


150 


I 




Insubordination - 


Blackburn 


1845 


150 


150 


48th Depot- 


None. 












f 




Disgraceful conduct ... 


Devonport * 


1845 


150 


150 




Violence to superiors - 


Devonport 

T\ x 


1845 

i a Ate. 


150 


150 



Digitized by 



Google 



RETURNS RELATIVE TO CORPORAL PUNISHMENTS IN THE ARMY. 


5 


REGIMENTS. 


Numbers. 


OFFENCE 


STATION. 


Period, 


Sentence. 


Number of 

Lashes 
inflicted. 












Lashes. 




' 




Drunk on the march ... 


Athlone ... 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunk on the march - 


Athlone - . - 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunk on the march - 


Longford 


1845 


50 


50 


49th Foot (can- 
tinned. 




Drunk and riotous in billets - 


Longford 


1845 


100 


100 




Drunkenness on duty ... 


Mobill - 


1846 


100 


100 




Drunkenness on duty .... 


Castlebar 


1846 


100 


75 






Drunk on the march • 


Castlebar 


1846 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Galway - 


1846 


150 


160 


\ 




Making away with necessaries 


Castlebar 


1646 


100 


100 


62d Foot Depot - 


None. 












54th Foot Depot - 


None. 












r 




Making away with necessaries 


Chichester 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination 


Chichester 


1845 


150 


160 






Insubordination .... 


Chichester 


1845 


150 


60 






Making away with necessaries 


Winchester 


1845 


100 


60 






Insubordination, &c. ... 


Winchester 


1845 


150 


150 






- - Insubordination, and making 


Winchester 


1845 


150 


150 






away with necessaries. 














Insubordination .... 


Winchester 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination .... 


Winchester 


1845 


100 


100 






Violence to superiors • 


Winchester 


1845 


150 


150 






Making away with necessaries 


Winchester 


1845 


100 


100 


65th Foot - < 




Insubordinaton .... 


Winchester 


1845 


150 


125 






Making away with necessaries . . - 


Devonport 


1845 


100 


100 






Disgraceful oonduot - - - 


Devonport 


1845 


150 


150 






Making away with necessaries, &c. 


Devonport 


1845 


100 


100 






- - Insubordination, and making 


Devonport 


1845 


160 


150 






away with necessaries. 














Making away with necessaries, &c. 


Devonport 


1845 


150 


150 






Making away with necessaries 


Devonport 


1846 


100 


100 






Disgraceful conduct (theft) 


Devonport 


1846 


150 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Devonport 


1846 


100 


100 






- • Violence to superiors, and making 


Devonport 


1846 


200 


150 






away with necessaries, &c. 










S6th Foot - j 




Making away with necessaries 


Bury - 


1845 


150 


150 




Disgraceful conduct • 


Weedon ... 


1845 


150 


150 


f 




Disgraceful conduct ... 


Portsmouth 


1845 


150 


100 






Violence to superiors - - - 


Postsmouth 


1845 


150 


150 






Making away with necessaries 


Portsmouth 


1845 


150 


75 






Making away with necessaries 


Portsmouth 


1845 


150 


150 


69th Foot - ( 




Making away with necessaries 


Portsmouth 


1845 


150 


150 


< 




Making away with necessaries 


' Portsmouth 


1845 


150 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Portsmouth 


1845 


150 


150 






Making away with necessaries 


Portsmouth 


1845 


150 


125 






Disgraceful conduct - 


Portsmouth 


1845 


160 


150 


\ 




Disgraceful conduct ... 


Portsmouth 


1845 


150 


150 


60th Foot, 2d Bat- 




Insubordination *• 


Aberdeen 


1845 


100 


100 


talion Depot. 














r 




Insubordination .... 


Northampton - 


1845 


160 


150 






Insubordination, &c. ... 


Dublin - 


1846 


150 


160 


64th Foot - < 




Insubordination, &c. - 


Dublin - 


1846 


150 


150 


I 




Violence to superiors -* 


Kilkenny 


1846 


150 


150 


66th Foot Depot - 


None. 












• 




Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 


67th Foot 




Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Dublin - 


1845 


100 


100 






Insubordination - 


Cork ... 


1846 


150 


150 






- - Making away with necessaries, 


Deal 


1845 


150 


150 






and insubordination. 










68th Foot 




Drunkenness on duty, &c. 


Deal - . - 


1845 


150 


114 






Insubordination - - - - 


Portsmouth 


1845 


150 


150 






Insubordination - 


Portsmouth 


1845 


150 


125 


r 




•• - Drunk on the march, and insub- 


Maryborough - 


1845 


100 


100 


69th Foot - 1 




ordination. 

- - Insubordination and disgraceful 

conduct. 


Leeds - - - 


1846 


150 


150 


f 




Insubordination - 


Dublin - 


1845 


^ 150 


T 150 


70th Foot - 1 




Disgraceful conduct (theft) 


Dublin - - Di i ti 


1846 


150 


150 


1 




Making- away with necessaries 


Dublin y - 


1846 


^ 150 


3 150 


72d Foot Depot - 


None. 













6 RETURNS 1 


RELATIVE TO CORPORAL PUNISHMENTS IN THE ARMY. 
















Number of 


REGIMENTS. 


Numbers. 


OFFENCE. 


STATION. 


Perio*. 


Sentence 


Lashes 
inflicted. 












Lashes. 




f 




Disgraceful conduct (theft) 
Disgraceful conduct (theft) 


Cork ... 


1846 


100 ' 


100 


73d Toot Dep6t < 




Cork - . - 


1846 


150 


150 


1 




Insubordination .... 


Buttevant 


1846 


150 


150 






Disgraceful conduct (theft) - 


Canterbury - .- 


1845 


150 


150 






Insubordination .... 


Canterbury 


1846 


200 


200 


74th Foot - 




Insubordination .... 


Gosport - - - 


1845 


200 


200 






Violence to superiors ... 


Portsmouth 


1846 


150 


None. 






Insubordination - 


Portsmouth 


1846 


150 


150 


' 




Disgraceful conduct (theft) - 


Newport - - - 


1646 


100 


60 






Drunkenness on duty ... 


Newport - - - 


1845 


100 


50 






Drunkenness on duty - - - 


Newport - 


1845 


100 


50 






Making away with necessaries 


Newport - . - 


1845 


150 


150 






Drunk on the march ... 


Carmarthen 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunk on the march ... 


Pater ... 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunk on the march - 


Birr 


1845 


100 


63 






Drunkenness on duty - - - 


Birr - 


1845 


100 


75 






Drunk on the march ... 


Birr 


1845 


100 


50 


75th Foot - -< 




Drunkenness on duty ... 
Drunk on the march - - - 


Birr 
Birr 


1845 
1845 


100 
100 


45 
75 






Drunkenness on duty . - - 


Birr 


1845 


100 


75 






Drunk on the march ... 


Birr 


1845 


100 


75 






Drunk on the march - 


Birr ... 


1845 


100 


35 






Drunk on the march ... 


Birr 


1845 


100 


100 






Drunk on the march ... 


Sin- 


1845 


100 


60 






Insubordination - 


Bin- 


1845 


100 


75 






Drunkenness on duty - - - 


Birr ... 


1846 


100 


70 






Drunk on the march - - - 


Athlone - - - 


1846 


100 


70 


t 




Disgraceful conduct (theft) 


Athlone - - - 


1846 


150 


60 


76th Foot - -j 




Violence to a superior - - - 


Portsmouth 


1846 , 


150 


150 




Making away with necessaries 


Portsmouth 


1845 


100 


100 




Making away with necessaries 


Portsmouth 


1845 


100 


50 




Disgraceful conduct (theft) 


Portsmouth 


1845 ( 


150 


100 


• 




Insubordination . - - - 


Athlone - 


1845 


150 


150 






Insubordination .... 


Templemore 


1845 


100 


100 






Disgraceful conduct (theft} - 
Disgraceful conduct (tjieft) - 


Templemore 


1845 


160 


150 






Templemore 


1845 


150 


150 


77th Foot Depot , 




Disgraceful conduct - . - 


Templemore 


1846 


150 


160 






Disgraceful conduct (theft) - 


Templemore 


1846 


150 


75 






Insubordination .... 


Cork 


1846 


150 


156 






Making away with necessaries, &c. 


On board ship - 


1846 


150 


100 


* 




Making away with necessaries, &c. 


On board ship - 


1846 


150 


100 


79th Foot Depot - 




Violence to superiors - - - 


Belturbet 


1846 


150 


150 


81st Foot Dep6t \ 




Disgraceful conduct ... 
Violence to superiors . - - 


Jersey - - 
Jersey - 


1846 
1846 


100 
160 


100 
150 


82d Foot Depdt - 


None. 














r 


- - Disgraceful conduct and insub- 
ordination. 


Leeds - . - 


1845 


150 


160 






Insubordination - 


Leeds - 


1845 


150 


100 






Insubordination .... 


Manchester 


1845 


160 


160 






Insubordination .... 


On the march - 


1845 


.100 


100 


88d Foot - 




Insubordination - - - - 


Cahir 


1845 


150 


150 






Disgraceful conduct, &c. (theft) 


Cahir 


1845 


150 


150 






Drunk on the march - 


Limerick 


1846 


100 


100 






Making away with necessaries 


Limerick 


1846 


100 


100 






Insubordination .... 


Limerick 


1846 


150 


150 






Insubordination, &c. ... 


limerick 


1846 


150 


150 


86th Foot - \ 


r i 


Drunk on the march - 


Buttevant 


1846 


100 


100 


L 1 


Drunk on the march ... 


Buttevant 


1846 


100 


100 


87th Foot - 


None. 














r * 


- - Drunkenness on duty and insub- 


Boyle • 


1846 


100 


100 


88th Foot Depot \ 




ordination. 

Disgraceful conduct ... 

Disgraceful conduct ... 


Ballinrobe 
Ballinrobe - - 


1846 
1846 


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RETURNS RELATIVE TO CORPORAL PUNISHMENTS IN THE ARMY. 



RETURN of the Number of Corporal Punishments in the Army in Great Britain and Ireland^ from 1st August 
1846 to 81st December 1846; specifying the Offence, the Station, the Period, the Sentence, and the Number of Lashes 
inflicted. 



REGIMENTS. 



1st Life Guards - 

2d Life Guards - 

Royal Horse Guards 

1st Dragoon Guards 

2d 

3d 

4th 

5th 

6th 

7th 

1st Dragoons 

2d „ - 



99 
99 
99 



99 
99 



Depot 



w 

99 
99 
99 
99 
» 

9* 
99 

99 
99 
99 
99 
99 



Depot 



Depot 
Depot 



Depot 
Depdt 



3d 

4th 

6th 

7th 

8th 

9th 

10th 

11th 

12th 

13 th 

14th 

15th 

16th 

17 th 

Grenadier Guards 

Coldstream Guards 

Scots Fusilier Guards 

1st Foot, 1st Battalion 
Depot --. 

1st Foot, 2d Battalion 

2d 

3d 

5th „ - 

6th Foot Reserve Bat- 
talion - 

7th Foot Depdt - 

13th Foot - 

14th Foot Depot 

15th „ „ - 



99 

99 



16th 


99 


99 " * 


10th 


99 


99 " 


26th 


79 


- 


27th 


99 


Depot - 


30th 


99 


- 


31st 


99 


. 


33d 


n 


Depot - 


34th 


99 


99 • - 


35th 


99 


99 * 


38th 


99 


99 " 


40th 


99 




41st 


99 


... 


43d 


99 


... 


44th 


99 


... 


46th 


99 


Depot - , - 


47th 


99 


- 


48th 


99 


Depot - 


49th 


99 


- 


52d 


99 


Dep6t • 


54th 


99 


99 


55th 


99 


- 


56th 


99 


Reserve Bat* 


talion 


. 


57th Foot - 


59th 


99 


- 


60th 


»> 


2d Battalion 


De 


pot 


. 


64th 


Foot - 


66th 


99 


Depot 


67th 


99 


- 



Numbers. 



None 



> None 



OFFENCE. 



None 



None 



Making away with necessaries 



STATION. 



None 



None 



Newbridge « 



None 



None 



None 



Period. 



None 



None 
1846. 



None 



Sentence. 



None 



None 
50 lashes 



Number of 
Lashes 
inflicted. 



None. 



None. 
25 



None 



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None. 



RETURNS RELATIVE TO CORPORAL PUNISHMENTS IN THE ARMY. 













Number of 


REGIMENTS. 


Numbers. 


OFFENCE. 


STATION. 


Period. 


Sentence. 


Lashes 
inflicted. 










1846. 






68th Foot - 


■N 












69th „ - 














70th „ - 
72d „ Depot 


» None 


- None - 


None 


None 


None 


None. 


73d „ „ - 














74th „ - 
















' 1 


Drunk on the march 


Athlone 


4 Dec. 


100 lashes 


30 


75th Foot - 


1 


- - - ditto 


Athlone 


4 Doc. 


100 „ 


25 




1 


- - - ditto 


Athlone 


4 Dec. 


100 „ 


25 


76th Foot - 


" 












77th „ Depot 














79th „ „ - 


► None 


None - 


None 


None 


None 


None. 


81st „ „ - 














82d „ „ - 


i 












83d „ - 


i 


Disgraceful conduct (theft) 


Dublin 


2 Nov. 


50 lashes 


50 


85th j y • - 


« 












87th „ - 














88th „ Depot 














89th „ „ - 














90th „ „ - 
92d „ - 


i None 


None - 


None 


None 


None 


None. 


93d „ Depot 














95th „ „ - 














1st Battalion Rifle Bri- 














gade Depot • 


* 














r 12th Depot 


> 














20th „ - 

















23d „ - 














.2 


86th „ - 














1 


42d „ - - 
















45th „ - 


None 


None --- 


None 


None 


None 


None. 


7 1st „ - 














a. 


91st „ - 














Q 


97th „ - 
Rifle Brigade, 2d 
Battalion 

r 4th Foot - 
8th „ 
9th „ 
10th „ - 
11th „ - 
17th „ - 
18th „ - 
21st „ 
22d „ - 
24th „ - 


% 




• 










25th „ 














28th „ - 














a> 

Q 


29th „ - 














32d „ - 














© 


37th „ - 














g 


39th „ - 














% < 


50th „ - 


) None 


None - 


Non« 


None 


None 


None. 


C9 


51st „ - 














« 


53d „ - 














-3 


58th „ - 
















© 


60th „ 1st Bat. 














V 


61st „ 














2 


62d „ - 














Oh 


68d „ - 
65th „ - 
78th „ - 
80th „ 














84th „ - 














I 86th „ - 














1 94th „ - 














I 96th „ - 














»8th „ - 








i 






1 99th „ - 








, 


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T 










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RETURN OF THE NUMBER OF PERSONS FLOGGED 



RETURN of the Number of Persons Flogged in the British Navy in 184i> and 1846, 
specifying the Name of the Ship, the Offence, the Sentence, qnd Number of Lashes 
Inflicted. 



SHIP. 



1845: 
Actaeon - 



Acorn 



Marines 
Boys 

Ardent (1 Return in Office) - 

Acheron - 



Numbers. 



Seamen - 8 



Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 



Agincourt 

Aigle 
Alfred - 

Alligator - 
Apollo 
Atholl - 
Albatross - 
Albion 

Alecto 
Alban 
Avon 
Amazon - 

Beacon 
Belvidera - 
Bittern - 
Bonetta - 

Bloodhound (1 Return] 



Seamen 
Marines 
Boys 

Seamen 
Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 
Marines 
Boys 
Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 
Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 



6 

1 
4 

12 
5 

7 
3 


13 

6 
1 
2 


1 

1 

2 

1 


2 

1 

- 1 

- 22 

- 11 

- 1 

- 2 

- 

- 

- 1 

- 1 

- 

- 1 

- 

- 

- 27 

- 4 

- 17 

- 

- 

- 1 

- 

- 1 

- 2 

- 

- 

- 1 

- 1 

- 

- 2 

- 



OFFENCES. 



• - drunkenness, neglect of duty, 

leaving post, and insubordination. 

drunkenness - 

dirtiness, insubordination 

- • drunkenness, insubordination, 

and leaving post. 



leaving post, insubordination 
drunkenness .... 

- - leaving post, neglect of duty, 
drunkenness. 

leaving post, drunkenness 

- - leaving post, drunkenness, in- 
subordination, theft, 
drunkenness, dirtiness, theft - 
insubordination - - - - 



- - drunkenness, insubordination, 

insubordination, drunkenness 
theft - - ,- 
drunkenness, neglect of duty 



desertion - 

drunkenness and insubordination 
theft, dirtiness ... 
insubordination ... 



insubordination - - - - 

insubordination - 

insubordination - 

- - drunkenness, insubordination, 

desertion. 

theft, drunkenness, insubordination 

drunkenness .... 

leaving post - 




- - drunkenness, neglect of duty, 
desertion. 

insubordination, theft, drunkenness 

- - neglect of duty, drunkenness, 
insubordination, dirtiness. 



drunkenness • 



insubordination 
drunkenness 



insubordination - 
drunkenness 

drunkenness, theft 



Number of 

Lasbet 
Sentenced. 



252 

67 
108 
144 



132 


132 


86 


36 


108 


108 


482 


482 


228 


228 


276 


276 


80 


80 



342 

156 
18 
72 



36 
36 
60 
36 



66 

24 

24 

726 

363 
12 
72 



16 
24 



060 

180 
654 



36 

36 
72 



36 
48 



60 

Digitized by 



Number of 
Lube* 
Inflicted. 



252 

67 
108 
144 



325 

156 
18 
72 



36 
36 
60 
36 



66 

24 

24 

726 

363 
12 
72 



16 
24 

12 



960 

180 
654 



36 

36 
72 



48 



GSogk 



IN THE NAVY, IN THE YEARS 1845 AND 1846. 











Number of 


Number of 


SHIP. 


Number*. 




OFFENCES. 


Lathes 
Sentenced. 


Lushes 
Inflicted. 


1 845 — continued. 












Comet (3 Returns) - 


- 











Caledonia ... 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


2 




desertion, theft .... 


66 


66 


Carysfort - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


2 




insubordination, theft ... 


78 


78 


Ceylon - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 














Boys 


1 


theft 


24 


24 


Castor - 


Seamen - 


9 


- - neglect of duty, drunkenness, 
theft, insubordination. 


448 


448 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination .... 


36 


36 




Boys 


7 


theft, insubordination ... 


276 


276 


Comus (3 Returns) - 


. 











Crocodile - - - 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


2 


drunkenness and insubordination - 


66 


66 




Boys 











Calliope - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


3 



neglect of duty, insubordination - 


124 


124 




Boys 


4 


theft, insubordination, dirtiness 


84 


84 


Cambrian ... 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 




drunkenness .... 


30 


30 


Columbia - - - 


Seamen - 


1 


drunkenness .... 


24 


24 




Marines - 













Boys 











Calypso (l Return) - 


• 











Conway - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


4 





108 


108 




Boys 


4 




90 


90 


Cuckoo (3 Returns) - 


- 











Canopus - 


Seamen - 


8 


insubordination, theft, desertion - 


320 


282 




Marines - 


3 


insubordination, drunkenness 


108 


108 




Boys 











Crane ... 


Seamen - 
Marines - 












Curacoa - 


Boys 

Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 
4 




drunkenness .... 
drunkenness, insubordination 


12 
156 


12 

156 


Crescent - 


Seamen - 


1 


drunkenness and insubordination •• 


48 


48 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination .... 


48 


48 




Boys 


2 


theft, leaving post ... 


48 


48 


Cyclops - 


Seamen - 


1 


theft 


36 


36 




Marines - 


4 


drunkenness, insubordination 


182 


132 


Cleopatra (2 Returns) 


Boys 


1 




drunkenness .... 


12 


12 


Daedalus - 


Seamen - 


3 


desertion, insubordination 


98 


98 




Marines - 


5 


theft, insubordination, neglect 


164 


164 


Daring - 


Boys 

Seamen 


4 



theft, drunkenness, dirtiness - 


144 


144 




Marines - 


7 


drunkenness, theft, dirtiness - 


198 


198 


Devastation 


Boys 

Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 
1 



theft ...... 

drunkenness .... 


18 
36 


18 
36 


Dolphin - 


Boys 

Seamen - 
Marines - 

•u 


I 
3 



theft - - 
insubordination, desertion 


48 
96 


48 
96 



Digitized by 



Google 



RETURN OF THE NUMBER OF PERSONS FLOGGED 











Number of 


Number of 


SHIP. 


Numbers. 




OFFENCES. 


Lashm 
Sentenced. 


Lashes 
Inflicted. 


1 845 — continued. 












Dwarf - 


Seamen - 


2 


drunkenness, desertion - 


66 


ee 




Marines - 


2 


insubordination .... 


84 


84 




Boys 











Dee (4 Returns) 


. 











Dasher (2 Returns) - 


- 











Eagle - 


Seamen - 


15 


- - drunkenness, insubordination, 
theft, dirtiness. 


437 


437 




Marines - 


4 


insubordination, drunkenness 


87 


87 




Boys 


14 


- - neglect of duty, theft, drunken- 
ness, insubordination. 


504 


504 


Espiegle - 


Seamen - 


2 


drunkenness, theft ... 


48 


48 




Marines - 


2 


insubordination .... 


60 


60 




Boys 


1 


insubordination .... 


12 


12 


Express (4 Returns) - 


- 











Eurydice - 


Seamen - 


6 


- - drunkenness, insubordination, 
neglect of duty. 


234 


204 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination .... 


24 


24 




Boys 


3 


insubordination, dirtiness, neglect - 


115 


115 


Excellent - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 



leaving post - - - - - 


24 


24 




Boys 


6 


drunkenness, dirtiness, desertion - 


138 


138 


Endymion (1 Return) 


- 











Eclair (l Return) 


- 











Erebus (l Return) - 


- 











Experiment (l Return) 


- 











Fantome - 


Seamen - 


6 


- - theft, insubordination, drunken- 
ness, desertion. 


276 


276 




Marines - 


3 


drunkenness, theft, desertion 


108 


69 




Boys 


9 


- - insubordination, theft, neglect 
of duty. 


360 


360 


Firebrand • 


Seamen - 


4 


neglect of duty, drunkenness 


120 


120 




Marines - 


3 


theft, drunkenness - - 


84 


84 




Boys 


3 


- - insubordination, neglect of 
duty, drunkenness. 


60 


60 


Flamer - 


Seamen - 


1 


drunkenness .... 


30 


30 




Marines - 


1 


drunkenness .... 


48 


48 




Boys 


4 


insubordination, dirtiness 


120 


120 


Flying Fish 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


2 





drunkenness, desertion ... 


84 


84 


Formidable 


Seamen • 


10 


- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
theft, desertion. 


276 


276 




Marines - 


10 


insubordination, drunkenness 


330 


330 




Boys 


3 


smuggling, dirtiness ... 


48 


48 


Fox - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 




insubordination .... 


48 


48 


Ferret (l Return) - 


. 











Fearless (2 Returns) - 


. 











Geyser - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


o 




drunkenness, desertion ... 


48 


48 


Gorgon - 


Seamen - 

Marines - 
Boys 


5 





- - drunkenness, desertion, neglect 
of duty. 


168 


168 


Growler - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 














Boys 


1 


theft 


42 


42 


Grecian - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


3 



drunkenness .... 


108 


108 




Boys 


2 


theft, dirtiness .... 


72 


72 


Grampus (1 Return) - 


- 









r > 


Gladiator (1 Return) - 


- 





[ 


)igitized b 


V^rOO 



IN THE NAVY, IN THB YIARS 1845 AND 1846. 











Number of 


Number of 


SHIP. 


Numbers. 




OFFENCES. 


Laahet 

Sentenced. 


Lashes 
Inflicted. 


1845 —continued. 












Harpy (i Return) 


. 











Hecate ... 


Seamen - 


4 


drunkenness, theft, insubordination 


108 


108 




Marines - 


5 


- - dirtiness, insubordination, drun- 
kenness. 


228 


228 




Boys 


5 


insubordination, theft, dirtiness 


120 


120 


Hecla - 


Seamen - 





insubordination, theft, drunkenness 


336 


312 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination .... 


36 


36 




Boys 


6 


drunkenness, insubordination 


204 


204 


Helena ... 


Seamen - 


4 


insubordination, theft - - - 


144 


144 




Marines - 













Boys 











Hermes ... 


Seamen - 


1 


insubordination .... 


36 


36 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination .... 


36 


36 




Boys 


7 


insubordination and neglect - 


204 


204 


Herald - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


2 



theft, drunkenness • 


48 


48 




Boys 


1 


theft 


48 


48 


Hydra (1 Return) - 


. . - 











Heroine - 


Seamen - 


4 


insubordination, drunkenness 


132 


132 




Marines - 


3 


insubordination, drunkenness 


114 


114 




Boys - - 











Hyacinth • 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


17 



insubordination, drunkenness 


320 


320 




Boys 


6 


- - neglect of duty, drunkenness, 
desertion. 


150 


150 


Hibernia - 


Seamen - 


13 


insubordination, desertion, theft - 


442 


442 




Marines - 


3 


insubordination, drunkenness 


60 


60 




Boys 











Illustrious 


Seamen - 


1 


drunkenness - 


36 


36 




Marines - 


1 


theft 


36 


36 




fioys 











Juno ... 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


4 



insubordination, dirtiness 


120 


120 




Boys 


4 


insubordination, theft, &c. 


132 


132 


Imaum . - - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


5 



- - insubordination, desertion, drun- 
kenness. 


174 


174 




Boys 


6 


theft, insubordination, desertion - 


228 


228 


Iris ---. 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 



drunkenness .... 


48 


48 




Boys 


2 


drunkenness, theft ... 


48 


48 


Inconstant 


Seamen - 


18 


- - drunkenness, neglect, theft, in- 
subordination. 


576 


576 




Marines - 


2 


drunkenness, neglect of duty 


60 


60 




Boys 


1 


drunkenness .... 


36 


36 


Jackall - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 



drunkenness • - 


24 


24 




Boys 


1 


theft 


30 


30 


Kingfisher (l Return) 


- . 











Lily- 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


2 




insubordination, theft ... 


42 


42 




Boys 


5 


neglect of duty, insubordination - 


84 


78 


Lynx (4 Returns) 


. 











Locust ... 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


3 


insubordination, drunkenness 


96 


96 




Boys 


1 


insubordination .... 


24 


24 


Linnet (l Return) 


- 











Lark - - 


Seamen - 
Mrrines - 


2 



insubordination, drunkenness 


70 


64 




Boys 





• 






Lucifer (4 Returns) - 


- 











Lame 


Seamen * 













Marines - 


1 


bestiality - - - - - 


48 


48 




Boys 


1 


drunkenness .... 


24 


^ 24 


Lightning (4 Returns) 


- 







ligitized b) 


Goc 


66 1. 






A <* 


/ *. 


.»• n 



RETURN OF THE NUMBER OF PERSONS FLOGGED 











Number of 


Number of 


SHIP. 


Numbers. 




OFFENCES. 


Lashes 
Sentenced. 


Lashes 
Inflicted. 


1 845 — continued. 












Melampus 


Seamen - 


24 


- - insubordination, desertion, drun- 
kenness. 


782 


782 




Marines - 


2 


insubordination, neglect of duty - 


72 


72 




Boys 


2 


neglect of duty - 


37 


37 


Meteor - 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


3 


insubordination, desertion 


96 


96 




Boys 











Medea - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 




drunkenness - 


42 


42 


Minden (2 Returns) - 


- 











Modeste - 


Seamen - 


2 


desertion, drunkenness - 


84 


84 




Marines - 


1 


desertion 


48 


48 




Boys 











Mohawk - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 




insubordination - 


7 


7 


Mutine - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


2 




insubordination - 


36 


36 




Boys 


4 


theft, neglect of duty - 


54 


54 


Nautilus (4 Returns) - 


. 











North Star (1 Return) 


- 











Nimrod (1 Return) - 


- 











Ocean - 


Seamen - 


11 


theft, insubordination, drunkenness 


296 






Marines - 









296 




Boys 











Orestes - 


Seamen - 


3 


insubordination, drunkenness 


120 






Marines - 









120 




Boys 


1 


insubordination - 


12 


12 


Perseus - 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


1 


insubordination - 


37 


37 




Boys 


1 


insubordination - 


12 


12 


Pandora - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 





desertion - 


24 


24 


Penelope - 


Seamen - 


1 


insubordination - 


48 


48 




Marines - 


2 


- - neglect of duty, and breach of 
2d article of war. 


72 


72 




Boys 











Penguin (4 Returns) - 


. . 











Persian - 


Seamen - 


5 


- - drunkenness, insubordination, 
neglect of duty. 


125 


125 




Marines - 


1 


theft 


24 


24 




Boys 


3* 


theft, dirtiness, neglect of duty 


78 


78 


Perseus (3 Returns) - 


. 











Philomel. - 


Seamen - 


3 


insubordination, drunkenness 


108 


108 




Marines - 


3 


drunkenness - 


96 


96 




Boys 











Peterel - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 














Boys 


1 


drunkenness - 


30 


30 


Pickle - - - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 • 



drunkenness - 


64 


24 




Boys 


1 


insubordination - 


36 


36 


Pilot 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 




drunkenness - 


36 


36 




Boys 


1 


theft 


24 


24 


Pique r 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


2 




insubordination, drunkenness 


72 


72 


Pluto (4 Returns) - 


• • ? 











Poictiers ... 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


7 




desertion, theft, insubordination 


138 


138 




Boys 


*j 


theft, dirtiness - 


42 


HVn 


Plover (I Return) r 


- - 







Digitized 1 


)yVirO< 



IN THE NAVY, IN THE YEARS 1845 AND 1846. 











Number of 


Number of 


SHIP. 


Numbers. 




OFFENCES. 


Lashes 
Sentenced. 


Lashes 
Inflicted. 


1 845 — continued. 












Polyphemus 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


8 


insubordination, drunkenness 


182 


182 




Boys 











Porcupine (1 Return) 


. 











Prometheus 


Seamen - 


3 


drunkenness, insubordination 


90 


90 




Marines - 


8 


desertion, drunkenness ... 


06 


96 




Boys 











President - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 



drunkenness .... 


80 


30 




Boys 


1 


theft 


80 


36 


Queen ... 


Seamen - 


5 


drunkenness, insubordination, theft 


161 
06 


161 
96 




Marines • 


8 


insubordination, drunkenness 




Boys 









-. 


Redwing (l Return) - 


. 











Rattler - 


Seamen - 


8 


theft, drunkenness, insubordination 


72 


72 




Marines - 


2 


desertion, insubordination 


84 


84 




Boys 


1 


fighting - 


18 


18 


Retribution (l Return) 


- 











Rodney - 


Seamen - 


15 


- - desertion, drunkenness, theft, 
insubordination. 


676 


676 




Marines - 


5 


drunkenness, insubordination, theft 


180 


180 




Boys 


2 


dirtiness, insubordination 


72 


72 


Raven - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 



insubordination .... 


80 


24 




Boys 


8 


insubordination, desertion, theft - 


60 


60 


Rhadamanthus (4 Returns) - 











Racehorse 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


4 



insubordination, drunkenness 


96 


96 




Boys 


2 


smuggling, fighting ... 


42 


42 


Rapid (2 Returns) - 


. 









% 


Racer ... 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


1 


insubordination and neglect of duty 


48 


48 




Boys 


1 


insubordination - 


24 


24 


Ranger (4 Returns) - 


• 











Resistance 


Seamen - 


4 


- - drunkenness, smuggling, insu- 
bordination. 


102 


102 




Marines - 


1 


neglect of duty - - - - 


42 


42 




Boys 


2 


insubordination, neglect of duty 


72 


72 


Royalist - 


Seamen - 


2 


drunkenness and insubordination - 


64 


54 


Marines - 


1 


drunkenness and insubordination - 


24 


24 




Boys 


4 


drunkenness, desertion - 

gross insubordination - - - 


120 


120 


Romney - 


Seamen - 


1 


48 


48 




Marines - 













Boys 











Rose - 


Seamen - 


4 


insubordination, drunkenness 


144 


144 




Marines - 


8 


- - insubordination, drunkenness, 

neglect of duty. 

theft, insubordination, desertion 


108 


108 




Boys 


7 


284 


234 


Rolla 


Seamen - 


6 


drunkenuess, desertion - 


107 


107 




Marines - 


1 


desertion • 


24 


24 




Boys 


5 


neglect of duty, dirtiness 


90 


90 


8t. Vincent 


Seamen - 


8 


insubordination, theft, drunkenness 


884 


884 




Marines - 


8 


theft, insubordination, drunkenness 


144 


144 




Boys 


1 


desertion - 


24 


24 


Samarang - 


Seamen - 


5 


- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
desertion. 


216 


216 


j 


Marines - 


1 


drunkenness and theft - 


48 


48 




Boys 


5 


theft, insubordination, drunkenness 


192 


192 


Spiteful . - - 


Sguph - 
marines - 


1 



insubordination - 


24 


24 




Boys 


2 


drunkenness - 


36 


86 


Sampson (1 Return) - 


- 











San Josef - 


Seamen - 


1 


desertion - - - - - 


36 


36 




Marines - 
Boys 


1 
1 


desertion - 

theft - - - - - : 
* 


36 

>igitMd 1 


GtJogle 



8 RETURN OP THE NUMBER OF PERSONS FLOGGED 














Number of 


Number of 


SHIP. 


Numbert. 




OFFENCES. 


Lashes 
Sentenced. 


Lashes 
Inflicted. 


1 845 — continued. 












Sapphire - 


Seamen - 





- - drunkenness and theft, and 


48 


48 




Marines • 


2 


neglect of duty. 








Boys 











Seaflower (3 Returns) 


. 











Sappho 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


3 



insubordination, drunkenness 


108 


108 




Boys 


3 


drunkenness, insubordination 


72 


72 


Seagull (3 Returns) - 


. 











Scalark - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 




drunkenness * 


48 


48 




Boys 


2 


theft, insubordination - 


06 


06 


Styx 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


6 



- - drunkenness, theft, insubordi- 
nation. 


216 


216 




Boys 


7 


insubordination, theft, smuggling - 


312 


312 


Scourge (l Return) - 


. 











Scout - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


5 



drunkenness, desertion, theft 


132 


132 




Boys 


11 


- - desertion, insubordination, 
neglect, drunkenness. 


324 


324 


Star.(l Return) 


. 











Scylla 


Seamen - 


1 


desertion 


24 


24 




Marines - 


2 


insubordination - - - 


36 


36 




Boys 


1 


theft, &c. - 


6 


6 


Snipe (1 Return) 


. 











Superb - 


Seamen - 


10 


drunkenness - 


360 


354 




Marines - 


3 


drunkenness, theft ... 


126 


126 




Boys 











Stromboli ... 


Seamen - 


1 


drunkenness .... 


24 


24 





Marines - 
Boys 


2 



drunkenness .... 


35 


35 


Serpent - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 



insubordination • 


36 


36 




Boys 

Seamen - 


2 


dirtiness, insubordination 


72 


72 


Spider - 


2 


drunkenness, insubordination 


60 


60 




Marines - 













Boys 











Spartan - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


5 




insubordination, drunkenness 


144 


144 




Boys 


2 


insubordination, drunkenness 


38 


38 


Sparrow - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 



desertion 


36 


36 


Spiteful - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 



desertion and drunkenness - 


24 


24 




Boys 


2 


drunkenness .... 


36 


36 


Speedy - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


3 




desertion and drunkenness - 


06 


96 


Snake - 


Seamen - 


2 


drunkenness .... 


56 


56 




Marines - 


2 


insubordination, drunkenness 


66 


66 




Boys 


3 


insubordination, drunkenness, &c. - 


102 


102 


Swift (3 Returns) • 


- 











Sydenham 


Seamen - 


4 


desertion - 


144 


144 




Marines - 


1 


desertion • 


36 


36 




Boys 











Siren •» 


Seamen * 













Marines - 


1 


insubordination - 


86 


36 


• 


Boys 


1 


drunkenness - 


36 


36 


Spitfire , «. * 


Seamen * 


3 | - - insubordination, desertion, 


54 


54 








1 drunkenness. 







Digitized by 



Google 



IN 


TUB NAVY, IN THE YEAR8 1845 AND 1846. 




9 










Number of 


Number of 


8HIP. 


Numbers. 




OFFENCES. 


Lubes 
Sentenced. 


Lathes 
Inflicted. 


1 845 — continued. 












Skylark - - 


Seamen - 

Marines • 
Boys 


8 





insubordination, neglect of duty - 


64 


64 


Talbot - 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


1 


gross insubordination ... 


80 


86 




Boys 











Terrible (l Return) - 


. 











Trafalgar - 


Seamen - 


7 


insubordination, drunkenness 


228 


182 




Marines - 


6 


- - theft, insubordination, drunken- 
ness, neglect of duty. 

- - theft, dirtiness, drunkenness, in- 


220 


218 




Boys 


8 


180 


180 








subordination. 






Terror (1 Return) 


. 











Tartarus ... 


Seamen - 


1 


insubordination - 


24 


24 




Marines • 


1 


insubordination .... 


24 


24 




Boys 











Thunder - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


I 



desertion - 


24 


24 




Boys 


2 


theft, neglect of duty ... 
- - insubordination, drunkenness, 


42 


42 


Thunderbolt - 


Seamen - 


4 


162 


162 








desertion. 








Marines - 


1 


drunkenness «... 


24 


24 




Boys 


1 


insubordination .... 


86 


86 


Tortoise - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 




insubordination .... 


£6 


86 


Tyne - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


2 



insubordination, drunkenness 


72 


72 




Boys 


1 


drunkenness .... 


24 


24 


Victory * 


Seamen • 


4 


theft, drunkenness ... 


84 


84 




Marines - 


1 


theft and fighting .... 


86 


86 




Boys 


4 


theft, dirtiness .... 


90 


90 


Vanguard - 


Seamen - 


14 


- - desertion, drunkenness, theft, 
insubordination. 


429 


429 




Marines - 


7 


- - drunkenness, insubordination, 
theft, neglect of duty. 


216 


216 




Boys 


2 


neglect of duty, dirtiness 


48 


48 


Vulture - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


8 




insubordination, neglect of duty - 


66 


66 


• 


Boys 


6 


insubordination, theft, dirtiness 


90 


90 


Vindictive 


Seamen - 


2 


insubordination, desertion 


72 


72 




Marines - 


7 


drunkenness, insubordination 


800 


800 




Boys 


1 


theft 


24 


24 


Viper (2 Returns) 


• - - 











Vestal 


Seamen - 


11 


insubordination, drunkenness 


892 


892 




Marines - 


2 


insubordination, theft ... 


96 


96 




Boys 


4 


insubordination, drunkenness, theft 


144 


144 


Virago ... 


Seamen - 

Marines • 
Boys 


5 





- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
smuggling, &c. 


240 


240 


Vixen - 


Seamen - 


2 


insubordination, desertion 


84 


84 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination .... 


— 






Boys 











Victoria and Albert (4 


Returns) - 











Vesuvius - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


6 



insubordination, desertion, theft - 


180 


180 




Boys 


5 


insubordination, dirtiness, theft 


156 


166 


Volcano - 


Seamen • 


8 


insubordination, drunkenness 


182 


182 




Marines *- 


1 


drunkenness .... 


86 


86 




Boys 











Wolverene 


Seamen - 


6 


• - insubordination, drunkenness, 


| 184 


) 184 



Digitized by 



Google 



10 fclTURN OF THE 


NUMBER OF PERSONS FLOGGED 














Number of 


Number of 


SHIP. 


Numbers. 




0FFENCE8. 


Luhet 

Sentenced. 


Luhei 
Inflicted. 


1 845— continued. 












William and Mary (4 Returns) • 











Winchester 


Seamen - 


3 


insubordination, dirtiness 


94 


94 




Marines - 


8 


insubordination, drunkenness 


102 


102 




Boys 


3 


drunkenness, dirtiness, desertion - 


96 


96 


Wildfire (1 Return) - 


- 











Wasp 


Seamen - 


3 


theft, desertion, drunkenness - 


60 


60 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination - 


86 


86 




Boys 











Warspite - 


Seamen - 


14 


drunkenness, insubordination 


420 


420 




Marines • 


2 


insubordination .... 


42 


42 




Boys 


2 


theft, drunkenness 


54 


54 


Young Hebe (2 Returm 


- - 











1846: 












Ardent - - - 


Seamen - 

Marines - 
Boys 


4 





- - insubordination, desertion, 
drunkenness. 


108 


108 


-ZEolus (1 Return) - 


• 











Amazon - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 














Boys 


1 


drunkenness .... 


24 


24 


Acheron - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


8 



desertion - 


72 


72 




Boys 


8 


desertion, drunkenness - 


84 


84 


Acorn - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


4 



drunkenness, desertion - 


168 


138 




Boys 


3 


theft, drunkenness, desertion 


84 


84 


Alert 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


1 


insubordination .... 


48 


48 




Boys 











Atholl - 


Seamen - 


8 


insubordination, drunkenness 


72 


72 




Marines - 


1 


desertion 


24 


24 




Boys 











Alecto (8 Returns) - 


- 







. 




Agincourt 


Seamen - 


9 


- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
neglect of duty. 


852 


286 




Marines - 


5 


insubordination, neglect of duty - 


172 


166 




Boys 


2 


drunkenness .... 


84 


60 


Avenger (1 Return) - 


- 











Apollo - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 














Boys 


1 


neglect of duty .... 


24 


24 


Avon - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 




drunkenness - 


36 


86 


Albion - 


Seamen - 


16 


- - insubordination, theft, drunken- 
ness, desertion. 


482 


482 




Marines - 


18 


- - insubordination, theft, drunken- 
ness, desertion. 


361 


361 




Boys 


8 


- • desertion, drunkenness, dirti- 
ness. 


60 


60 


America - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys - 


8 




drunkenness and insubordination - 


90 


90 


Alban - 


Seamen • 





. 








Marines - 


2 

A 


drunkenness .... 


42 


42 



Digitized by 



Google 



IN THE NAVY, 


IN 


THB YEARS 1845 AND 1840. 




11 


8 HIP. 


Number* 


OFFENCES. 


Number of 

Leekee 
Sentenced, 


Number of 
Lathee 

Inflicted. 


1 846— continued. 












Brilliant - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys - - 


8 


1 


insubordination! desertion - 
insubordination - 


96 
86 


96 
86 


BeUeisle - - - 


Seamen - 

Marines - 
Boys 


6 


1 


- • insubordination, theft, drunken- 
ness, dirtiness, 

insubordination .... 


120 
24 


120 
24 


Blaxer (3 Returns) - 


- - .- 











Bittern - 
Belvidtra(l Return) - 


Seamen • 
Marines - 
Boys 


2 
2 
6 




insubordination - 
insubordination, drunkenness 
insubordination, theft, dirtiness 


54 

48 

144 


54 

48 

144 


Bonetta - 
Bulldog - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 
Seamen • 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 


2 




desertion ..... 
insubordination and drunkenness • 


86 
72 


86 
72 


Beacon (1 Return) - 


- 











Bloodhound 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 



1 



theft and drunkenness ... 


24 


24 


Birkenhead (1 Return) 


. 











Caledonia - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 



1 


desertion 

theft 


86 

18 


86 
18 


Cuckoo (4 returns) - 


Seamen - 


1 


disrespect - 


86 


86 


jGknopus - 
Crocodile - 
Cyclops ... 


Seamen - 

Marines - 
Boys - - 
Seamen ? 
Marines * 
Boys * 

Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


26 

6 

1 


5 

2 
8 



- - insubordination, theft, desertion, 
drunkenness, neglect of duty, 
insubordination, theft, dirtiness 
smuggling ..... 

• - insubordination, dirtiness, neglect 
of duty. 

insubordination .... 
theft, drunkenness - . . 


860 

216 

24 

54 

60 
48 


775 

216 
24 

54 

60 

48 


Cherokee (1 Return) - 


. . * 











Crescent - 

Calypso (1 Return) - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


6 

1 
8 




insubordination, drunkenness 
insubordination - - - <* 
drunkenness, desertion, smuggling 


162 
48 
64 


162 
48 

64 


Carysfort ... 


Seamen - 

Marines - 
Boys 


6 


2 


- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
smuggling. 

theft, dirtiness - 


114 
72 


114 
72 


Constance (1 Return) 


. • ▼ 











CranQ - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 




1 


neglect of duty .... 


18 


18 


Comet (2 Returns) •» 


. 











Curacoa - 

Cnjizf r ... 

Contest (2 Returns) - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 

Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys - - 


1 


1 
2 
8 




insubordination - 

drunkenness .... 

drunkenness, theft - 
drunkenness • 


86 

86 
72 

108 

Digitized 


86 

86 

by^C 



12 RETURN OF THR 


NUMBER OF PERSONS FLOGQRD 












Number of 


Number of 


8HIP. 


Numbers. 




OFFENCES. 


Lubes 


Lashes 










Sentenced. 


Inflicted. 


1 84 6 — continued. 












Ceylon - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 














Boys 


4 


desertion, theft - 


102 


102 


Columbine 













Conway (1 Return) - 


Seamen • 


7 


- - insubordination, desertion, drun- 
kenness. 


204 


204 




Marines - 


2 


insubordination, drunkenness 


48 


48 




Boys - - 


1 


theft, neglect of duty - 
insubordination, theft, drunkenness • 


24 


24 


Collingwood 


Seamen - 


5 


166 


166 


t 


Marines - 













Boys - - 


1 


theft 


24 


24 


Calliope - 
(1 Return). 























Childers - 


Seamen • 













Marines - 


1 


drunkenness - 


48 


48 




Boys 


2 


theft and neglect of duty 


84 


60 


Cygnet (1 Return) - 


. 











Cleopatra - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


6 



insubordination, smuggling, dirtiness 


198 


198 




Boys - - 


2 


insubordination, drunkenness 


48 


48 


Daedalus » 


Seamen - 


7 


desertion, theft, drunkenness 


129 


129 




Marines - 


2 


insubordination - 


84 


84 




Boys 


3 


insubordination, dirtiness, theft 


108 


108 


Dee (3 Returns) 


. 











Daring - 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


1 


- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
neglect of duty. 


48 


48 




Boys 


8 


insubordination, drunkenness 


48 


48 


Dido 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


2 



insubordination - 


44 


44 




Boys 









* 


Dolphin - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


8 




insubordination, drunkenness 


96 


96 


Dasher (2 Returns) - 


. 











Daphne ... 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys . 


1 




drunkenness .... 


14 


14 


Devastation (8 Returns) 


- 











Driver ... 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


6 



desertion, drunkenness - 


166 


166 




Boys 


1 


theft and dirtiness ... 


18 


18 


Espiegle - 


Seamen • 


8 


insubordination, drunkenness 


96 


96 




Marines - 


1 


desertion - 


86 


86 




Boys 











Espoir (1 Return) 


- . . 











Eurydice - 


Seamen - 


6 


insubordination, theft, drunkenness 


204 


204 


- 


Marines - 
Boys 












Express (4 Returns) - 


. 











Endymion 


Seamen - 


8 


- - insubordination, theft, drunken* 
ness, smuggling. 


284 


284 




Marines - 


2 


drunkenness, neglect of duty 


48 


48 




Boys 


1 


theft 


86 


86 


Excellent - 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


1 


theft 


24 


24 




Boys 


10 


insubordination, theft, desertion - 


114 


114 


Electra ... 


Seamen - 


1 


drunkenness 


24 


24 




Marines - 


8 


• • insubordination, drunkenness, 
theft, desertion. 


294 


294 




Boys 


2 


dirtiness - • - - 


42 


42 


Eagle - 


Seamen - 


20 


- - desertion, theft, drunkenness, in- 
subordination. 


661 


661 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination. ^ 


Tjtizdcrbv 


Goo 




Boys 


8 


- - insubordination, theft, drunken- 
ness* dirtiness. 


240 


210 



IN THB NAVY, IN THB YEARS 1845 AND 1846. 



»3 











Numbtr of 


Numbtr of 


8 HIP. 


Numbers. 




OFFEKCE& 


Ltd* 
Sentenced. 


Lathes 
Inflicted. 


1 846— continued. 












Farorite - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


2 




attempt to desert - 


60 


60 




Boys 


6 


- - theft, drunkenness, dirtiness, 
neglect of duty. 


111 


HI 


Ferret * 


Seamen - 


2 


insubordination - 


86 


86 




Marines • 


1 


drunkenness .... 


12 


12 




Boys 


1 


theft ...... 


12 


12 


Flamer - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


2 




insubordination, drunkenness 


60 


60 


Fox - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


8 



- - insubordination, desertion, drun- 
kenness, neglect of duty. 


274 


274 




Boys 


4 


insubordination, theft - 


188 


188 


Firebrand - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


3 




drunkenness, desertion - - - 


96 


96 




Boys 


2 


insubordination - - - - 


60 


60 


Fly (1 Return) - 













Flying Fish 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


1 



insubordination . - - - 


48 


48 




Boys 


8 


insubordination, smuggling * 
drunkenness and neglect of duty * 


80 


80 


Fantome - 


Seamen • 


1 


86 


86 




Marines - 


1 


desertion .... 


86 


86 




Boys 


1 


theft 


24 


24 


Gorgon - 


Seamen - 
Marines • 
Boys 


2 




drunkenness and desertion • 


• 72 


72 


Grecian - 


Seamen - 


7 


drunkenness, desertion • 


240 


228* 




Marines - 


2 


drunkenness .... 


72 


72 


Gladiator - 


Boys 
Seamen - 


4 



insubordination, dirtiness 


182 


182 




Marines - 


1 


desertion 


48 


48 


. 


Boys 











Geyser (1 Return) - 


- 











Griffon - 


Seamen - 


8 


- -insubordination, desertion, drunk* 
enness. 


84 


84 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination .... 


86 


86 




Boys 


1 


insubordination .... 


24 


24 


Haiard - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


4 



insubordination, drunkenness 


108 


108 




Boys 


1 


theft 


24 


24 


Harpy - - - 


Seamen - 

Marines - 
Boys - -t 


6 





- - insubordination, drunkenness, de- 
sertion. 


192 


19& 


Harlequin 


Seamen - 
Marines • 


8 




drunkenness .... 


84 


84 




Boys 


4 


drunkenness, theft, insubordination 


64 


64 


Hecate - 


Seamen • 
Marines - 


1 



insubordination and drunkenness - 


86 


86 




Boys 


2 


insubordination and neglect of duty 


48 


48 


Hermes - 


Seamen • 
Marines - 


1 



insubordination - 


86 


86 




Boys 


4 


- - insubordination, neglect of duty, 


120 


120 


Hyacinth - 


Seamen • 


4 


smuggling, 
insubordination, drunkenness 


174 


174 





Marines - 


8 


theft, insubordination, drunkenness 


182 


182 




Boys - • 











Heroine - 


8eamen - 
Marines - 


6 



insubordination, theft, drunkenness 


168 


168 




Boys 


2 


neglect of duty .... 


42 


42 


Hecla 


Seamen - 


4 


insubordination, drunkenness 


114 


114 




Marines - 


2 


insubordination - . - . 

i i ii ±: j» i 


60 

A A 


60 

4t» 



Digitized by 



Google 



14 RITURN OF THE 


NUMBER OF PERSONS FLOGGED 














Number of 


Number of 


SHIP. 


Numbers. 




OFFENCES. 


Lathes 
Sentenced. 


Lashes 
Inflicted. 


1 846 — continued. 












Hydra - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


4 



insubordination, drunkenness 


146 


146 




Boys 


2 


neglect of duty - - 


62 


62 


Hound ... 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys - - 


1 




insubordination and neglect - 






Helena ... 


Seamen - 


4 


insubordination, drunkenness 


168 


168 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination - - - - 


86 


36 




Boys 


8 


insubordination, theft - 


72 


72 


Jackall - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys - - 


2 




insubordination, drunkenness 


96 


96 


Inconstant 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


3 



insubordination, dirtiness - 


96 


96 




Boys 


2 


insubordination, theft ... 


60 


60 


Iris - 


Seamen - 


3 


- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
neglect of duty. 


108 


108 




Marines - 


4 


insubordination, drunkenness 


166 


166 




Boys 


1 


dirtiness ..... 


48 


48 


Imaum (3 Returns) - 


. . 











Inflexible ... 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 




neglect of duty - . - , 


24 


24 


Juno ... 


Seamen - 


4 


- - insubordination, neglect of duty, 
drunkenness. 


120 


120 




Marines - 


2 


insubordination, neglect of duty - 


96 


96 




Boys 


3 


insubordination, theft ... 


84 


84 


Kingfisher -r 


Seamen - 


6 


- - insubordination, drunkenness, 


218 


21a 


. 






theft, neglect of duty. 








Marines - 


1 


insubordination .... 


80 


80 




Boys 


8 


insubordination, dirtiness 


90 


90 


lizard (2 Returns) - 


. . 











lame - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


2 



insubordination - - , - 


84 


84 




Boys 


4 


insubordination, theft - - . 


114 


114 


Lark (3 Returns) 


. . 











Locust ... 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


2 


desertion, drunkenness - 


84 


8* 




Boys 











Lightning (4 Returns) 


. 











Lily- - - • 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


1 




insubordination - - - „ 


24 


24 


Lucifer (8 Returns) - 


. 











Melampus 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


13 



- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
desertion, theft. 


492 


492 




Boys 


8 


- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
dirtiness. 


60 


60 


Meteor (8 Returns) - 


. 











Myrmidon 


Seamen • 













Marines - 


1 


insubordination r 


12 


12 




Boys 









4** 


Montreal (l Return) - 


• V • 











Mastiff (4 Returns) - 


. 











<»» »• 


/•■ 


_ 


. _ 







Digitized by 



Google 



IN THE NAVY, IK THB YEARS 1845 AND 1846. 



15 



SHIP. 



Number* 



OFFENCES. 



Number of | Number of 
Lashee 
Inflicted. 



1846— continued. 
Mohawk (8 Returns) - 

Madagascar 

Naiad (1 Return) - 
North Star 

Nimrod - 

Nautilus - 
Ocean 
Osprey - 

Orestes (2 Returns) - 
Philomel - 

Pluto 

PloTer (1 Return) - 
Poictiers - 

Polyphemus 
Penelope - 

Pilot - - • 

Peterel (l Return) - 
Penguin - 

Pickle - - - 

Porcupine (4 Returns) 
President 



Persian - 



Perseus (4 Returns) - 
Phoenix - 



Seamen 
Marines 
Boys 



- 

- 

2 



Seamen 
Marines 
Boys 

Seamen 
Marines 
Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 



Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 



Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 
Marines 
Boys 

Seamen 
Marines 
Boys 



Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 



Seamen 
Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 
Boys 



8 




1 

2 

- 

- 

- 

- 

- 1 

- 
8 
2 

2 
8 


6 

1 
8 



- I Seamen 





8 

4 
2 



18 



drunkenness 

drunkenness 
desertion 



insubordination, drunkenness 
insubordination - - - - 
- - theft, drunkenness, neglect of 
duty. 

drunkenness .... 

theft, neglect of duty - 

theft 

insubordination - 

drunkenness .... 



insubordination, drunkenness 



insubordination - 
desertion 



drunkenness - 

insubordination, drunkenness 

- - insubordination, neglect of 
duty. 

insubordination, desertion 

- - insubordination, neglect of duty, 
desertion. 

insubordination, desertion, drunkenness 
insubordination - 
insubordination - 



desertion .... 
insubordination, drunkenness 
theft and brutality 



- - insubordination, theft, drunken- 
ness, desertion. 

- - insubordination, desertion, drunk- 
enness. 

theft, drunkenness - 

- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
desertion. 

insubordination, drunkenness 
theft, desertion - 



A V A •■ 



24 



76 

84 

240 

80 

72 



18 

144 

42 

24 

167 



84 



86 
72 



24 

96 
42 

96 
144 



120 
24 

48 



60 

108 

72 



704 

144 

64 
168 

144 

84 



24 



76 

84 

240 

80 

72 



13 

144 

42 

24 

167 



84 



88 
72 



24 

96 
42 

96 
144 



120 
24 

48 



60 

108 

72 



704 

144 

64 
168 

144 
84 



Digitized byf 
21 

1AQ 



iooQle 

21 



1 6 RETURN OF THR 


NUMBER OF PERSONS FLOGGED 














Number of 


Number of 


8HIP. 


Numbers. 




OFFENCES. 


La*het 
Sentenced. 


Lathes 
Inflicted. 


1 846 — continued. 












Prometheus 


Seamen - 


6 


insubordination, drunkenness 


168 


168 




Marines - 


1 


drunkenness - 


24 


24 




Boys 











Pantaloon - 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


1 


insubordination .... 


36 


86 




Boys 











Queen ... 


Seamen - 


2 


insubordination, drunkenness 


96 


96 




Marines - 


2 


theft, desertion - 


60 


60 




Boys 











Rodney - 


Seamen - 


21 


- - insubordination! drunkenness, 
desertion, theft 


718 


718 




Marines - 


9 


insubordination, drunkenness 


324 


324 




Boys 


9 


theft, drunkenness, dirtiness 


192 


192 


Raleigh - 


Seamen - 

Marines - 
Boys 


4 





- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
neglect of duty. 


86 


69 


Ranger (2 Returns) - 


. - . 











Rattler - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


2 



insubordination .... 


84 


84 




Boys 


2 


insubordination, neglect of duty - 


60 


60 


Retribution 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


4 




insubordination, drunkenness, theft 


114 


114 




Boys 


5 


insubordination, theft, desertion - 


144 


144 


Rolla - - - 


Seamen - 
Marines • 
Boys 


1 




insubordination - 


36 


86 


Racer . . # 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


8 



drunkenness .... 


132 


132 




Boys 


1 


theft 


18 


18 


Rhadamanthus (3 Retui 


•ns) - 











Royalist - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


4 



- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
neglect of duty. 


108 


108 




Boys 


2 


insubordination, desertion 


60 


60 


Rattlesnake (1 Return) 


- 











Resistance 


Seamen - 


1 


drunkenness and smuggling - 


36 


36 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination and dirtiness 


42 


42 




Boys 


1 


drunkenness .... 


86 


86 


Raven (4 Returns) - 


- 











Rose - 


Seamen - 


7 


insubordination, drunkenness 


246 


246 




Marines - 


1 


drunkenness - 


42 


42 




Boys 


3 


insubordination, drunkenness 


120 


120 


Rosamond (1 Return) 


^ 











Rapid . - - 


Seamen - 


2 


insubordination, theft - . - 


72 


72 




Marines • 


1 


insubordination .... 


86 


86 




Boys 


1 


theft 


24 


24 


Redwing (4 Returns) - 


- 











Recruit - 


Seaman - 













Marines • 


1 


insubordination • 


24 


24 




Boys 











Romney (1 Return) - 


. 











Ringdove - . - 


Seamen - 

Marines • 
Boys 


6 





• - insubordination, drunkenness, 
neglect of duty. 


172 


172 


Racehorse 


Seamen - 
Marines - 














Boys 


1 


theft ...... 


86 


36 


Royal Sovereign (2 Ret 


urns) - 











Styx 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


2 




desertion, drunkenness • 


72 


72 


Seaflower (3 Returns) 


- 







Digitized b 


/bO( 



IN THE NAVY, 


IN 


THE YEARS 1845 AND 1846. 




*7 










Number of 


Number of 


SHIP. 


Number*. 




OFFENCE& 


Lube* 
Sentenced* 


L»bes 
Inflicted. 


1 846 — continued. 












Spy- - - - 


Seamen - 


1 


insubordination - 


24 


24 




Marines - 


1 


desertion ..... 


86 


30 




Boys 


1 


theft 


36 


36 


Spitfire ... 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


4 



- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
desertion. 


150 


150 




Boys 


1 


desertion 


30 


30 


Siren ... 


Seamen - 


8 


insubordination, desertion 


132 


132 




Marines - 


8 


desertion 


120 


120 




Boys 


2 


insubordination .... 


48 


48 


Sappho w . . 


Seamen - 


4 


insubordination, drunkenness 


114 


114 




Marines - 


2 


drunkenness .... 


48 


48 




Boys - 











Spiteful - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


2 



insubordination, drunkenness 


84 


84 




Boys 


1 


theft 


24 


24 


Star (3 Returns) 


- 











Sapphire - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 
Boys 


8 




insubordination .... 


60 


60 


Samarang - 


Seamen - 


13 


- - insubordination, theft, neglect, 
drunkenness. 


528 


528 




Marines - 


1 


drunkenness .... 


48 


48 




Boys 


8 


insubordination, drunkenness 


120 


120 


Swift (4 Returns) 


- 











Stromboli ... 


Seamen - 


1 


insubordination .... 


36 


36 




Marines - 


2 


insubordination, desertion 


47 


47 




Boys 











Serpent (2 Returns; - 


. - 











Superb ... 


Seamen - 


2 


insubordination .... 


66 


66 




Marines - 


1 


drunkenness .... 


24 


24 




Boys 


1 


theft 


30 


6 


Seagull (1 Return) - 


. 











Scourge - 


Seamen - 


1 


drunkenness .... 


24 


24 




Marines - 


1 


theft ...... 


24 


24 




Boys 


1 


theft 


36 


36 


Sydenham (1 Return) 


- 











Sparrow - - - 


Seamen - 
Marines - 














Boys 


] 


drunkenness .... 


12 


12 


St Vincent 


Seamen - 


2 


insubordination - - - - 


24 


24 




Marines - 


4 


insubordination, theft ... 


150 


150 




Boys 











Sidon (2 Returns) 


. . 











Sealark ... 


Seamen - 













Marines - 


1 


drunkenness - . - *. 


48 


48 




Boys 











Scout - 


Seamen - 


6 


insubordination, theft, neglect 


165 


165 




Marines - 


4 


insubordination, drunkenness, theft 


120 


120 




Boys 


6 


insubordination, theft, neglect 


204 


204 


Sphynx (2 Returns) • 


- . 











Snake ... 


Seamen - 
Marines - 


4 



• - insubordination, drunkenness, 
smuggling. 


96 


96 




Boys 


3 


theft, neglect of duty - 
drunkenness, desertion - 


72 


72 


Sappho - 


Seamen - 


6 


162 


162 




Marines - 


1 


insubordination .... 


24 


24 




Boys 


1 


insubordination .... 


24 


24 


Speedy (l Return) - 


. 











Spartan - 


Seamen - 


1 


desertion - 


•***a 


fSjIT* 




•■• • 




- - 


- 


)yVjrvJ 



i8 



RETURN OF THE NUMBER OF PERSONS FLOGGED 



SHIP. 



1 846 — continued* 
Tartarus - 

Trafalgar - 

Terrible - 
Tyne 

Thunder - 
Thunderbolt - 

Tortoise - 
Talbot 
Thetis 
Trident - 

Vixen - 
Vulture - 

Vestal 

Vesuvius - 

Victoria and Albert (3 
Virago - 

Viper - 



Vengeance (1 Return) 
Vindictive 



Numben. 



Seamen 
Marines 
Boys 
Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 
Marines 
Boys 
Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

'. leturns) 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 



Victory - 
Vanguard - 

Wildfire - 
Winchester 



Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 



Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 

Seamen 

Marines 

Boys 



- 

- 1 

- 

- 8 

. 1 
6 
9 

■ 3 
3 
2 

■ 1 
1 


1 
6 

2 
2 
3 

2 
3 


3 



1 
I 



3 

1 

4 

11 

1 

5 

14 

3 
1 
8 
1 




OFFENCES. 



2 


6 


- 2 

- 

- 5 

2 

2 
3 

4 
17 



Marines - 14 



desertion 



- - insubordination, drunkenness, 

desertion. 

insubordination - 

theft, desertion - 

desertion, theft - 

insubordination, desertion 

theft, neglect of duty - 

insubordination, desertion 

drunkenness - 

theft - - - - - 



theft 

- - drunkenness, insubordination, 

desertion. 

drunkenness .... 

theft, drunkenness ... 

insubordination, dirtiness 

insubordination, theft ... 
insubordination, drunkenness 



Number of 

Lathes 
Sentenced. 



theft 



insubordination 
desertion 



desertion, drunkenness - 
drunkenness .... 

neglect of duty, drunkenness, theft 

- - insubordination, drunkenness, 
desertion, theft, neglect of duty, 
drunkenness - 
insubordination, dirtiness 

- - insubordination, desertion, theft, 
drunkenness. 

insubordination, drunkenness, theft 
insubordination and neglect - 
insubordination, theft, desertion - 
insubordination, drunkenness 



insubordination, drunkenness 

desertion, drunkenness 
desertion, drunkenness 



insubordination, drunkenness 
insubordination, theft - 

theft 

drunkenness, desertion, theft 



theft, desertion, dirtiness 

- - insubordination, theft, drunken- 
ness, desertion, dirtiness. 

- • insubordination, drunkenness, 
desertion, neglect of duty, 
drunkenness, dirtiness - 
desertion - 



insubordination - 



24 

121 

30 
108 
162 
60 
70 
72 
36 
30 



24 
204 

78 
84 
96 

36 
66 



84 



Number of 
Lashee 
Inflicted. 



24 


24 


24 


24 


96 


96 


36 


36 


168 


168 


342 


330 


24 


24 


90 


90 


450 


450 


114 


114 


48 


48 


324 


324 


36 


36 



72 

198 
48 



174 
84 
72 
96 

90 
424 

323 

35 

48 



54 

Digitized 



24 

121 

30 
108 
162 
60 
79 
72 
36 
30 



24 

204 

78 
84 
96 

36 
66 



84 



72 

198 

48 



174 
84 
72 
96 

90 
424 

323 

35 
36 






Google 



DOCK YARDS. 



RETURN to on Order of the Honourable Ttie House of Common*, 
dated 26 February 1847;—^, 

A " CX)PY of Circular to the Admirals and Captains Superintending 

Her Majesty's Dock Yards." 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 26 February 1 847. 



CIRCULAR TO THE ADMIRALS AND CAPTAINS SUPERINTENDING 
HER MAJESTY'S DOCK YARDS. 



Sir, 

I am directed by the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to inform you, 
that they have felt themselves compelled to take the condition of the Dock 
Yards under their most serious consideration. 

The subject is one of great magnitude. The vote for wages and salaries in 
Her Majesty's Establishments, at home and abroad, under Nos. 6, 7, 8, and 9, 
has averaged 8 1 0,664 /. during the last four years. It is a constantly increasing 
vote. The vote for 1843-4, was 779,386/. The vote for the current year 
is 951,886/. — The vote for stores (including steam machinery) for 1846-7, 
amounted to 1,694,152/. ; and that for buildings and new works, to 526,810/.— r 
The machinery already in existence in the dock and victualling yards is increas- 
ing annually in value ; and large additions must be made to it, as the steam 
factories at Portsmouth, Keyham, and Malta advance towards completion. No 
reduction in this branch of the establishment is probable, or possible, for the 
steam factories must keep pace with the growth of the steam navy, which, 
again, is determined by considerations of national policy. 

As yet, provision has been made only for the average annual repair of ma- 
chinery of 20,000 horse power, out of a total of 40,000 horse power ; and every 
succeeding Board of Admiralty has recognized the inconvenience, bad economy, 
and peril in the event of war, of allowing these repairs to be limited to the 
single factory at Woolwich. But the greater the extension, present and pros- 
pective, of the dock yards, and of the steam factories in connexion with them, 
the greater is the necessity of securing in them the most careful and efficient 
management. Upon such an expenditure the smallest savings are important ; 
and in spite of the improvements already engrafted upon the old system, by 
the appointment of engineers to take charge of the machinery in the yards, and 
to relieve the master shipwright from duties which did not come within the 
sphere of his ordinary avocations, — in spite of the large and useful changes con- 
nected with the department of the director of works, which have also relieved 
the yards from the maintenance of the buildings, — and the more , recent im- 
provements to which my Lords expect that the recommendations of the com- 
mittee of metals will give rise, by placing all matters connected with copper 
and iron under a special superintendence, and ensuring the early introduction 
into the Government yards of the best modes of working adopted in private 
establishments, — still much is left to be done before a satisfactory result can 
be arrived at. 

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2 CIRCULAR TO THE ADMIRALS AND CAPTAINS 

ments, and that there is great room for improvement in the application both of 
stores and labour. Their Lordships will not entertain any general charges of 
indifference to expense on the part of the officers, or of inertness on that of the 
men ; and they are equally unwilling to dwell upon representations made to 
them of the effect of political feeling, in some of the yards, upon the course of 
promotion, though they can conceive nothing more dangerous to their disci- 
pline, if true, or more detrimental to the public interest. They wish to look 
forward, not to look back, their object being to introduce a system that may 
inspire every man with the belief that his conduct will be known and appre- 
ciated by his superiors, and that, however humble his position originally, his 
future fate depends upon his own exertions. 

Their Lordships see too much reason to apprehend that such is not the 
present state of feeling in the dock yards, but that the rise from shipwright to 
leading man, and from leading man to inspector, is regarded rather as a matter 
of accident or favour, than as a reward due to merit, and to be dispensed 
upon plain and equitable principles.' They feel that wherever such an impres- 
sion prevails, subordination must be weakened ; and they have, consequently, 
resolved to lay down one fixed and intelligible rule of promotion for all classes, 
as the best foundation of that more vigilant and intelligent superintendence 
which they regard as indispensable. 

For the discipline of the yard, like the discipline of the ship, depends upon 
the petty officers, and no exertions of the admirals, or captains superintendent, 
or of the master shipwrights, can compensate for the want of a hearty co- 
operation on the part of the inspectors and leading men, to whom the care of 
the separate gangs is confided, and with whom it rests to enforce a proper 
economy in the use of the stores and materials issued for the work going oh 
under their superintendence. 

\ It is necessary, however, as the first step towards this extended responsibility, 
to remove all just causes of complaint amongst that class of officers from whose 
exertions benefit is anticipated. 

My Lords have therefore duly considered the petitions presented by the in- 
spectors of the different dock yards. They find by these, that with a salary of 
J 00/. a year, they are expected to maintain the station and authority of officers; 
that, in 1833, when the pay of the inspector was fixed, the workmen were only 
employed five days a week, whereas they are now employed six days, for which 
the working man receives one-sixth more wages, but no additional allowance 
has been made to the inspector. The men, too, have occasionally the privilege 
of working extra hours, when the inspector is bound to be in attendance without 
any remuneration whatsoever, although the wages earned by the men, when 
upon task-work, are fully equal to his pay, and the pay of the leading men 
exceeds it. The old quartermen, whom the inspectors replaced, received 180?. 
a year, with a gang of 25 men and boys under them. The inspectors, with 
only 100/. a year, have 40 men and boys to superintend, for all of whom they 
demand the stores and materials required for their daily labour. Their pensions, 
too, are regulated by the scale of 40ths., not of 12ths., like those of other 
salaried officers in the Customs, Excise, and Ordnance, by which they are con- 
siderable losers. Indeed, a leading man of long standing often refuses to be 
made an inspector, because his superannuation would be lessened by his pro- 
motion ; and, from a similar cause, the men who would be best qualified to un- 
dertake the duty (the head draughtsmen in the mould loft), decline it, because 
their pay being 7s. a day, they would necessarily lose by the transfer. 

The superintendents of the dock yards and the master shipwrights have, 
without one exception, recorded their opinion that justice and economy would 
be equally consulted by increasing the pay of the inspectors; and the late 
-Secretary of the Admiralty, Mr. Corry, in a Minute dated the 9th of July, ex- 
pressed his unqualified concurrence in this view, and recommended that the 
salary of the inspectors should be raised to 125/. a year, being half the amount 
given to the officers next to them in rank, — the foremen of the yard; Taking 
the number of inspectors at 108, whose annual pay amounts to 10,800/., this 
might be accomplished at a cost of 2,700/. But my Lords are unwilling to 
incur any additional charge, unless as a part of an improved system ; and with 
that improved system, they believe that it would be wise to be more liberal, 



SUPERINTENDING HER MAJESTY'S DOCK YARDS. 3 

motion may not be too long delayed, and that prompt reward may stimulate to 
constant exertion. 

They have therefore been pleased to sanction the following regulations, 
with the double view of introducing that fixed and intelligible principle of pro- 
motion amongst the men, and that more vigilant and intelligent superin- 
tendence, which they think essential to the proper administration of the dock 
yards ; and they do this under the belief that, in so large and complicated a 
system, it is only by an improved tone of feeling amongst all classes, and by 
teaching individuals to see that their own advancement depends upon a scru- 
pulous discharge of their duty to the public, that a substitute can be found for 
that personal and pecuniary interest, which is the mainspring of exertion in 
private establishments. 

Admissions to Yard* 

New Regulations for Admission and Promotion in Her Majesty s 

Dock Yards. 

Apprentices. — It is the intention of their Lordships to leave the admissions 
to the yard very nearly upon their present footing, taking in a certain number 
of apprentices annually, whose names are to be entered, by Board order, upon 
the superintendent's list, on the recommendation of the yard officers, — allowing 
the apprentices out of their time, whose conduct has been satisfactory, to fill 
the firet vacancies upon the establishment, — and reserving the rest for can- 
didates of their own selection, upon a proper report of the character and 
circumstances of those who present themselves. 

Educational Test — In the annual choice of apprentices, due regard will be 
shown to the recommendations of the superintendent and the yard officers, 
where they relate to the children of deserving artificers ; but, in addition to 
the physical tests already required, no boy is to be admitted after the 31st of 
March 1847, who is not able to read and write well, or who has not some 
knowledge of arithmetic. 

My Lords reserve to themselves the right of directing the children of persons, 
out of the yard, whom they may deem entitled to this privilege, to be entered 
upon the list from which the apprentices are to be selected ; but, in all cases, 
they will require the same educational test as a preparation for the advantages 
provided by the dock yard schools, for the more intelligent of the boys ad- 
mitted to them. 

The list of apprentices is to be made out by the superintendent, the master 
shipwright, and his assistants, in the month of January in every year ; and 
they are to state, in a written report to the Board, their reasons for every 
recommendation, — the services of the father ; the character given of hijp during 
the past year by his leading man and inspector ; the cause of his death, if, as 
sometimes happens, the candidate is the son of a widow ; and any other facts 
that may entitle the boy to their Lordships' favourable consideration. If 20 
apprentices are to be entered, 40 names must be sent up {and so in proportion 
for a larger or smaller number), and out of these their Lordships will select 
the proper individuals to be admitted. 

Board Wages for Apprentices. — Board wages for apprentices will be granted 
hereafter solely upon the recommendations of the superintendent and of the 
officers of the yard, who will take care to use them as an encouragement to 
merit, with a due regard to the circumstances of each family, which must be 
stated to their Lordships by the superintendent when he applies for their 
sanction. 

Schools. — The improvement of the dock yard schools has been long under 
the consideration of the Admiralty. The most intelligent officers frona the 
yards admit the good effects which they are already producing, but it is evident 
that more might be done, by additional encouragement and better organiza- 
tion. The circular issued by the late Board on the 27th of June 1846, hast 
given a stimulus to exertion, by ensuring to the best scholars in each school 
the means of completing their education free of expense, and of thus qualify- 
ing themselves for the higher branches of the public service. Eight boys 



4 CIRCULAR TO THE ADMIRALS AND CAPTAINS 

at the expiration of their time, be re-admitted as leading men into the yards, 
and favourably noted for promotion. 

But these are the exceptions. For the great majority of the boys who 
continue in the schools, the proper career is the mould loft, in which the 
master shipwright will take care that the most promising boys are tried suc- 
cessively, and in which those who show most talent for drawing, and most 
assiduity in cultivating it at home, should be fixed, ultimately, as draughtsmen, 
with the condition that, out of each three vacant inspectorships, one shall be 
given, in future, to the head draughtsman, provided his testimonials be satis- 
factory, and that he has worked at least one year at his tools at the ship's 
side. This will ensure in the mould loft a regular course of promotion, and 
give to the yard a succession of inspectors, well instructed both in the scientific 
and practical part of their duty. 

Apprentices out of their time. — No apprentice who has served his time is to 
be entered upon the establishment without a written report from the master 
shipwright, transmitted through the superintendent, as to his conduct and 
qualifications ; and this report is to refer specially to the character given of the 
apprentice, in the weekly returns by his leading man and inspector, to which 
the school report will, hereafter, be appended. His entry upon the yard 
books, when out of his time, cannot be claimed as a matter of right, but will 
not be withheld without just cause and proper investigation, 

Promotions. 

But whether men find their way into the dock yards as apprentices, or by 
Board order, it is their Lordships' determination, that, once there, they should 
learn to look to themselves alone for promotion. With this view, I am com- 
manded by their Lordships to desire, that, taking the existing staff of foremen, 
inspectors, and leading men, of shipwrights, joiners, caulkers, &c, as the 
medium through which the change must be wrought, (subject to certain modifi- 
cations, which I shall state afterwards,) you will immediately organize a system 
of weekly, monthly, and quarterly reports, upon which all future recommenda- 
tions are to be founded, 

System of Weekly and Monthly Returns, 

Weekly Returns. — Using the forms that will be transmitted to you for this 
purpose by the storekeeper-general, you will direct each leading man to pre- 
pare, in his own handwriting, a weekly return of the conduct of the men com^ 
posing his gang, which he will hand over, on the Monday morning, to his 
inspector^ stating in it, on the one hand, any causes of complaint that he may 
see reason to make against the men for waste of stores, neglect of work, insub- 
ordination, or insobriety, and, on the other, his opinion of their respective 
merits. 

Inspector's Report to Foreman, once a fortnight. — The inspector will trans- 
mit these returns, once a fortnight, to the foreman of the yard, under whom 
he is more immediately serving, accompanied by remarks, also in his own 
handwriting, and stating whether, in his judgment, the leading men have done 
their duty satisfactorily ; and the foremen, whose business it is to make them- 
selves personally acquainted with the character and conduct of all who work 
under them, will, in like manner, transmit the inspector's reports and returns 
on the 1st of every month to the master shipwright, stating how far their own 
opinion confirms the character given of the gangs by the leading meg and 
inspectors. 

Both the foremen and the inspectors will include in these returns the single 
station men placed under their orders, who, with the artificers, form the class 
out of which the leading men are to be selected. Other single station men 
pre to be reported upon in like manner by the officer under whose immediate 
orders they are serving. 

Care must be taken not to permit these returns to lapse into a matter of 
form. The superior shipwright officers must investigate them closely at the 



SUPERINTENDING HER MAJESTY'S DOCK! YARDS. 5 

Mode of Recommending for Promotion as Leading Man. 

It is their Lordships 9 intention that the weekly return, made originally by 
the leading man, should pass on to the master shipwright, with the remarks of 
the inspectors and foremen attached to it ; and whenever a vacancy for a lead- 
ing man occurs, the master shipwright, with his assistants, will lay before the 
superintendent the three names which they recommend for promotion, stating 
in writing the grounds of their recommendation, and producing the returns 
upon which it is founded. It is the duty of the superintendent to investigate 
closely these returns and recommendations, and if he see reason to suppose 
that they have not been prepared with perfect impartiality, to report the same 
to the Admiralty. 

Examination. — He will also direct the candidates to be examined in his pre- 
sence, by the master shipwright and his assistants, in those matters which are 
essential to the proper performance of their duties ; for my Lords are convinced, 
that no man can exercise a moral power over others, who is not superior to 
them in acquirements ; and they are consequently most desirous that officers, 
even of the lowest grade, should possess a professional knowledge above that of 
the workmen. 

Qualifications of a Leading Man. — To be a leading man, an artificer should, 
in addition to a thorough practical knowledge of his trade, be able to write a 
legible hand ; he should understand arithmetic, as far as vulgar and decimal 
fractions ; and he should be well acquainted with the details of forming and 
combining the different parts of a ship, and the various methods used in trim- 
ming and fastening them. Upon all these points the superintendent will draw 
up a report, which he will transmit to the Admiralty, with the original docu- 
ments annexed to it, submitted to him by the master shipwright ; and, having 
reduced the list of candidates to two, by omitting the one whom he thinks least 
qualified, one of the names thus sent up will be appointed by Board order to 
fill the vacancy. 

Promotion from Leading Man to Inspector. 

Monthly Report of Foremen on Conduct of Inspectors and Leading Men.^-My 
Lords regard it as the peculiar duty of the master shipwright, his assistants, 
and the foremen of the yard, to watch over the conduct of the leading men and 
the inspectors, and they desire that, on the 1st of every month, the foremen 
will prepare a report upon the efficiency or inefficiency of the officers serving 
under them, which is to be kept in the master shipwright's office, stating any 
grounds of complaint that they may have against them, and any particular 
cause of satisfaction, such as the increased efficiency of labour, a greater 
economy in the use of stores, or any other circumstance which they may think 
conducive to the better conduct of the work for which they are responsible. 

Reports of Foremen on Officers to be sent Quarterly to Admiralty, Originals, 
not Copies. — My Lords intend to see these reports themselves, which are to be 
sent up quarterly, with the remarks of the master shipwright attached to them ; 
and the promotion of the foremen to the rank of master shipwright's assistants 
will depend very much upon the impression thus given of their intelligence and 
capacity. 

Mode of recommending for an Inspectorship. — When a vacancy for an in- 
spector occurs, the master shipwright will select from the leading men, and 
from the mould loft, the names of the individuals whom he thinks most com- 
petent to fill it, and submit them to the superintendent, with the reports of the 
foremen upon which his recommendation is founded. The superintendent, in 
addition to these, will call for the reports made by the inspectors to the fore- 
men, and pay particular attention to the returns prepared by the leading men, 
as well as to the qualifications of the draughtsmen who are put in nomination, 

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6 CIRCULAR TO THE ADMIRALS AND CAPTAINS 

Qualification of an Inspector. — To be an inspector, a man should write well ; 
he should understand arithmetic as far as vulgar and decimal fractions, and be 
able to measure plane surfaces and cubes. He should likewise understand lay- 
ing off ships on die mould loft floor, and the details of forming and combining 
the different parts of ships, the various modes of fastening them, and the cor- 
rect methods of taking account of work. 

Report of Superintendent. — The superintendent will advert to all these point* 
in his report, stating his own opinion of the capacity of the candidates ; and 
having reduced the number to two, by striking off the name of that candidate 
whom he thinks least qualified, one of the two names thus sent up will be selected 
to fill the vacancy. 

Pay and Duties of Inspectors. — My Lords having taken into consideration the 
case of the inspectors, are of opinion that they have just ground of complaint in 
the smallness of their salary, and in the slowness and uncertainty of their pro- 
motion. They wish to see the inspectors take their proper place as a class of 
intelligent and independent officers, upon whose exertions the discipline of the 
yard mainly depends, and who have it in their power to repay the public a 
hundred fold, for any encouragement that may be given to them, by increased 
vigilance in the discharge of their duties. 

Increase of Salary for Year beginning 1st April 1847- — My Lords there- 
fore have determined to make provision, in the next Estimates, for increasing the 
salary of inspectors from 100/. to 125/. for the year beginning 1st of April 
1847 ; and they are also prepared to recommend that, on the 1st of April 1848, 
a first class of inspectors shall be formed, with a salary of 150/., which is to be 
composed of one-fourth of the inspectors in each yard, whose names they wiH 
themselves select, in the first week of April 1848, after a careful examination 
of the quarterly reports made during the preceding 12 months by the foremen 
and master shipwrights. My Lords reserve the right of satisfying themselves 
by personal inquiries, or in any other way that they may think proper, as to th£ 
intelligence and services of the individuals to be thus selected. . They will be 
guided principally by the proofs which their own reports to their superior offi- 
cers may afford of their zeal, firmness, and capacity ; but they will in all cases 
seek the advice and concurrence of the superintendent before their choice is 
finally notified. 

frew Shoaling of the Yards. 

Four Leading Men under each Inspector.— 12 Shipwrights under each Leading 
Man. — Sub-leading Men. — It is the intention of my Lords to place four leading 
men under each inspector, and to assign to eacn leading man a gang of 12 
artificers, with the proper proportion of apprentices. The leading man will 
himself select a sub-leading man, who will take charge of a portion of the 
gang, when employed upon separate service, and who will be answerable tp 
him for the expenditure of the stores and materials. This sub-leading man will 
receive no additional pay, and will continue to work as an ordinary artificer, but 
his conduct is to be specially noted in the weekly returns, and if satisfactory, it 
will be taken into account when his own time comes for promotion. 

The yards are to be " shoaled " afresh (no reserved gangs being on any account 
permitted), for the purpose of carrying out this plan ; and as the number of 
inspectors will be reduced by it, some of those least qualified by age, health, of 
other circumstances* for the discharge of their new duties, are to be recom- 
mended for superannuation. 

Casual Sickness, — absence on account of — As further evidence of their 
Lordships' desire to raise the conditions of those officers, from whom they look 
for more active co-operation, they are pleased to order the discontinuance of 
the abatement now made from their salaries when absent from sickness, under 
medical certificate. 

Re-establishment of" Measurer's" Office. — It is the intention of their LorcU 

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SUPERINTENDING HER MAJESTY'S DOCK YARDS. 7 

placing the office itself upon a more economical footing. They are convinced 
of the necessity of having in the dock-yards, where the works are so e\ f cr^'ve 
and the business so complicated, a system of keeping accurate ncrov :t-, .tvi oJ 
checking the issues of stores and materials; and they conceive tl.at iiu- :, ( .us 
of effecting this may be found by employing in each of tlu* larm-r yon!.- ! av 
measurers, who with four shipwright writers, will form, under tiie ina.-ur ship- 
wright, an office for the measurement of work done, the formation 01 estimates 
for repairs, and the statement of actual expenditure. Where any of the old 
" sub-measurers" remain in the yards they may be selected for this duty, with 
the pay of inspectors of the second class, and the permission to retain their 
pensions. Where there are no sub-measurers, intelligent and practical men will 
be appointed as " measurers," with the pay of inspectors of the first class ( 1 50 l.) 9 
and furnished with instructions, which will be given in a separate paper. 

Foremen of Yard. 

The foremen of the yard are to be selected from the whole body of inspectors, 
assistant timber converters, and measurers, giving a preference, under ordinary 
circumstances, to inspectors of the first class, but reserving the right to pro- 
mote from the second class, upon a special report, in cases of extraordinary 
services or merit. 

Vacancies how filled. — When a vacancy for a foreman occurs, the master 
shipwright is to submit three names to the superintendent, who will follow, in 
all respects, the rules laid down for the promotion of inspectors and leading 
men, taking care, however, that the examination is conducted with due refer- 
ence to the higher qualifications required in this class of officers. 

Qualification of Foreman. — To be a foreman, a man should have a competent 
knowledge of simple equations in algebra, and be able to work problems de- 
duced from the three first books of Euclid. He should also have a thorough 
knowledge of the mode of laying off ships upon the mould loft floor, and under- 
stand all the different methods of forming and combining them. These quali- 
fications are to be stated in the report made by the superintendent to the 
Admiralty, accompanied by his own remarks as to the manner in which the 
candidates have discharged their duties as inspectors, and by the reports which 
they have themselves drawn up as to the conduct of the leading men and arti- 
ficers working under them, during the preceding 12 months ; and my Lords will 
then select one of the two to fill the vacancy. 

Good Service Grant. 

Complaints of Foremen. — Slowness of Promotion. — My Lords are aware that, 
from the slowness of promotion amongst the foremen, owing to the very limited 
number of master shipwright's assistants, there is no class of officers amongst 
whom there are to be found harder cases of long service and unrequited merit. 
They cannot remove this disadvantage as regards promotion, for that necessarily 
depends upon vacancies in the grades immediately above them ; but they will 
recommend to Parliament that, in consideration of the important duties per- 
formed by the foremen, a gratuity of 50/. shall be given annually to one fore- 
man in each of the yards, who will be selected by their Lordships themselves, 
in April of each year, commencing in 1848, with due reference to length of 
service and general character, as well as to the intelligence and integrity with 
which, upon an examination of the quarterly reports, he may appear to have 
discharged the new duties with which the foremen are about to be entrusted. 
They regard this grant in the light of a good service reward, to be given up 
upon promotion. Its renewal to the same individual will depend upon his con- 
tinued vigilance and exertion. 

Master Shipwrighfs Assistant. 

Examination at Naval College and Yard. — When a vacancy for a master 
shipwright's assistant occurs, the master shipwright will select the three most 



8 CIRCULAR TO THE ADMIRALS AND CAFrAINS 

intendent, by the master shipwright, personalty, as to all other matters required 
of his subordinate officers ; and he will be expected to be able to give designs 
for the construction of ships, and to explain the principles by which it is 
regulated. 

The superintendent will then investigate carefully the manner in which each 
candidate has performed his duty as an officer of the yard, and he will transmit 
to the Admiralty the original reports sent in by him to the master shipwright, in 
order that their Lordships may judge of his fitness for higher duties. The 
decision of the Board will rest upon a full consideration of all these various 
circumstances ; but one of the three names sent up will be selected to fill 
the vacancy, unless an officer of still higher qualifications shall be recommended 
from some other yard, who will, however, have to pass an equally stringent 
examination. 

Other Promotions. 

Caulkers, Joiners — Qualifications as Inspector and Leading A fan, fyc. — The 
forms to be observed in recommending for promotion as inspectors and leading 
men of caulkers and joiners, are to be precisely similar, every recommendation 
being founded upon weekly and monthly reports, which are to be transmitted 
to the master shipwright. But as there is not the same scope or necessity for 
instruction amongst these classes of artificers, the examination required for a 
leading man of shipwrights will be sufficient for an inspector of caulkers or 
joiners ; and a man will be qualified to become a leading man, who can read 
and write well, and keep accounts correctly, provided the weekly reports bear 
testimony to his industry, sobriety, and good conduct in other respects. The 
same will be required of the foremen and leading men of painters, and of the 
master smith, who, with a salary of 250/. a year, ought to be a man of some 
education. His foreman should also be able to read and write, and to keep 
accounts correctly ; and my Lords intend to require this in all future appoint- 
ments, both in the smitheries and as leading men of labourers. 

Timber Converter. 

There is one other officer in the dock yard with whose position my Lords 
are not satisfied, his duties being badly defined, and his responsibility divided. 
The head timber converter is, or ought to be, a man of much experience and 
great integrity ; and a man thus qualified should have the entire superintend- 
ence of all matters connected with the receipt, preservation, and conversion of 
timber, and the timber accounts, reporting, through the superintendent, to the 
Board direct, upon the quality of the timber when first brought into the yard, 
a nd upon the stacking and other arrangements for preserving it, as well as upon 
a ny cases of improper conversion that he may discover. 

Timber Inspector, 400/. — Two Assistant Converters at 150/. and 125 /. — Two 
Attendants at bs. per day. — My Lords are pleased therefore to direct, that the 
head timber converter in each yard, if properly qualified, shall exercise hence- 
forward this general superintendence, with the rank of " Timber Inspector," 
and with a salary of 400 /. a year, in lieu of 350 /. He is to have, as at present, 
two sub-converters under him, to be called " Assistant Converters," who, with 
their two assistants, will be employed exclusively in conversions at the saw-pits, 
and have the salary of first and second class inspector. But the general super- 
intendence and conversion of the timber are to rest with the timber inspector, 
and no timber is to be received by the store receiver without his certificate. 
In case of any failure in the contracts, or attempt to introduce into the yard 
timber of an inferior quality, or not due, or not in accordance with the contract, 
the inspector is to report the same to the superintendent, and copies of the 
representations so made are to be sent to the Admiralty direct, in order that 
my Lords may have the means of judging of the causes and character of his 



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TIMBER. 



RF/TURN to an Order of tbe Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated a February 18465—^/01% 



A RETURN "of the Amount paid for British Oak Timber, Thickstuff, 
Plank, and Treenails, delivered for each of Her Majesty's Dockyards, 
under the Contract of the 19th day of December 1843 to 1845 ; distin- 
guishing the Quantity and Price of each Description of Timber, viz. 
Rough Oak Timber, Sided Oak, Thickstuff, Four-inch Plank, Three-and- 
a-Half, Three, Two-and-a-Half, and Two-inch Plank, with the Number of 
Treenails of each Length." 



(Mr. Haxoes.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
8 March 1847. 



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RETURN OF BRITISH OAK TIMBER, &C. DELIVERED FOR DOCKYARDS, 



A RETURN of the Amount Paid for British Oak Timber, Thickstuff, Plank, and Treenails, delivered for tach 
each Description of Timber, viz. Rough Oak Timber, Sided Oak, Thickstuff, Four-inch Plank, Thrae-and-a-Half, Three, 







DEPTFORD. 


WOOLWICH. 


CHATHAM. 






PRICE. 


















Quantity. 


Value. " 


Quantity. 


Value. 


Quantity. 


Value. 




British Oak Timber, Rough : 


£. s. 
per Load. 
7 18 


Lds. ft. 


£. s. d. 


z*. ft. 


£. s. d. 


Lds. ft. 


£. s. d. 




Contents above 150 feet 


46 5 


364 4 - 


67 5 


530 2 - 


28 23 


224 17 - 




149 to 130 „ - 


7 13 


30 19 


232 8 - 


28 11 


216 18 - 


14 1 


107 6 - 




129 to 110 „ - 


7 7 


56 49 


418 16 - 


54 33 


401 15 - 


39 48 


293 14 - 




109 to 100 „ - 


7 5 


37 23 


271 12 - 


37 19 


271 - - 


12 34 


91 19 - 




99 to 90 „ - 


6 18 


31 45 


220 2 - 


35 34 


246 4 - 


13 28 


93 11 - 




89 to 80 „ - 


6 10 


63 33 


413 16 - 


50 21 


327 15 - 


17 5 


111 3 - 




79 to 75 „ - 


6 7 


32 12 


204 14 - 


35 27 


225 14 - 


12 19 


78 12 - 




74 to 70 „ - 


6 5 


32 44 


206 10 - 


52 4 


325 10 - 


8 31 


53 18 - 




69 to 65 „ - 


6 4 


34 28 


214 5 - 


32 5 


199 - - 


13 22 


88 7 - 




64to60 „ - 


6 - 


27 14 


163 14 - 


49 28 


297 7 - 


9 47 


59 13 - 




69 to 55 „ - 


5 19 


17 14 


102 16 - 


26 11 


156 - - 


19 26 


116 3 - 




54 to 50 „ - 


5 14 


26 5 


148 15 - 


33 19 


190 5 - 


8 18 


47 13 - 




49 to 45 „ - 


5 8 


24 7 


130 7 - 


23 21 


126 - 


14 


75 12 - 




44 to 40 „ - 


6 6 


16 47 


84 10 - 


16 8 


85 13 - 


20 9 


106 19 - 




39 to 35 „ - 


5 4 


11 40 


61 7 - 


8 49 


46 14 - 


7 26 


89 2 - 




34 to 30 „ - 


4 13 


2 32 


12 6 - 


1 48 


9 2 - 


1 46 


8 19 - 




29 to 15 „ - 


4 - 


1 2 


4 3 - 






43 


8 9 - 




Under 16 „ - 


3 12 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 


— 






492 19 


3,253 6 - 


662 43 


3,654 8 - 


242 26 


1,595 16 - 




Additional for compass! 


















timber, 2 to 11 perl 


- 


- 


28 14 - 


- 


109 14 - 


• 


85 13 - 




cent. -J 




















8,281 19 - 


- 


3,764 2 - 


- 


1,631 9 - 




British Oak Timber, Sided : 


















Contents, 120 feet and upwards 


13 - 


3 2 


39 10 - 


38 44 


605 9 - 


45 21 


690 9 - 




119 to 100 feet 


12 10 


15 2 


188 - - 


13 14 


166 - - 


45 22 


668 - - 




99 to 80 „ - 


12 - 


36 23 


437 10 - 


62 30 


631 4 - 


144 7 


1,729 14 - 




79 to 60 „ - 


11 14 


79 3 


925 - - 


91 33 


1,072 8 - 


354 20 


4,146 10 - 




59 to 50 „ - 


11 7 


80 


908 - - 


111 41 


1,269 3 - 


239 7 


2,714 6 - 




49 to 40 „ - 


10 18 


138 33 


1,511 8 - 


153 11 


1,670 2 - 


878 5 


4,121 6 - 




39 to 30 „ - 


10 10 


263 23 


2,766 7 - 


171 31 


1,802 - - 


442 20 


4,646 4 - 




29 to 20 „ - 


9 15 


293 48 


2,866 2 - 


83 48 


818 12 - 


801 6 


2,936 19 - 




19 to 16 „ - 


9 - 


68 13 


614 7 - 


17 28 


168 1 - 


39 37 


867 13 - 




15 to 13 „ - 


8 10 


29 23 


250 8 - 


3 30 


30 12 - 


9 34 


82 6 - 




12 to 10 „ - 


7 18 


26 16 


207 19 - 


5 24 


43 6 - 


9 24 


74 18 - 




Under 10 „ - 


7 7 


7 14 


53 10 - 


1 7 


8 8 - 


4 16 


31 15 - 






1,041 


10,768 1 - 


744 41 


8,175 5 - 


2,013 19 


21,997 19 - 




Additional for compass! 


















timber, 3 to 16 perl 


- 


• 


71 19 - 


. 


62 11 - 


. 


198 12 - 




cent. -J 








. . 




. 








10,840 - - 


8,237 16 - 


22,196 11 - 




Abated for defects, &c. - 




m m 


409 10 - 


- 


268 12 - 


- 


626 8 - 






10,430 10 - 


7,969 4 - 


21,670 3 - 




British Oak Thickstuff: 


















Of 9 and 10 inches 


14 - 


m m 


• 


82 20 


1,163 12 - 


78 40 


1,033 4 - 




4Jto8 „ - - - 


13 - 


445 2 


5,785 10 - 


315 6 


4,096 11 - 


433 22 


5,634 14 - 






445 2 


6,785 10 - 


397 26 


6,250 3 - 


507 12 


6,667 18 - 




Abated for deviations'] 
from contract dimen-j 
sions, &c. -J 


























- 2 - 




11- 










- 




T • 








5,786 10 - 


6,250 1 - 


6,666 17 - 





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UNDER THE CONTRACT OF THE 19 DECEMBER 1843 TO 1845. 



of Her Majesty's Dockyards, under the Contract of the 19th December 1843 ; distinguishing the Quantity and Price of 
Two-and~a-Half, and Two-inch Plank, with the Number of Treenails of each Length. 



SHEERNESS. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



PORTSMOUTH. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



PLYMOUTH. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



PEMBROKE. 



Quantity. 



Value. 



TOTAL 

AMOUNT 

PAID. 



Lds. ft. 
3 11 



4 38 

15 
20 44 
10 3 

1 26 
588 
8 

14 41 
10 21 
12 20 

2 48 
4 2 
1 28 
34 



107 9 



6 9 
12 16 
48 35 
73 20 

105 44 

222 37 

129 10 

12 30 

7 
5 46 
1 29 



685 25 



119 31 



119 31 



£. s. 
25 9 



34 5 

45 14 

144 1 

65 8 

9 13 

36 - 

49 12 

88 18 

62 - 

70 14 

15 9 

21 8 

8 2 

3 8 



Lds. ft. 

21 26 
19 82 
18 37 
24 45 
32 8 
49 5 

16 45 
27 15 
27 45 
29 41 
44 9 
31 17 

17 83 

18 21 
10 27 

3 43 
28 



170 - 

150 5 

137 15 

180 11 

221 18 

319 3 

107 6 

170 13 

178 - 

178 18 

262 17 

178 18 

95 7 

97 13 

54 16 

17 19 

2 5 



Lds. ft. 

4 10 
2 46 
7 9 



3 40 

4 49 

1 29 

2 47 

5 15 

3 34 

2 13 

3 7 



£. s. d. 

33 4 - 

22 7 - 

52 15 - 

14 19 - 

26 4 - 

82 7 - 

10 1 - 

18 8 - 

82 17 - 

22 2 - 

13 9 - 

17 18 - 



1 14 



6 19 - 



Lds. ft, 

41 18 
58 8 
67 16 

49 49 

50 43 
71 23 
29 12 
28 29 
24 14 
22 27 
18 11 
11 17 

8 23 
5 47 
- 39 
1 13 
1 20 



i. d. 



325 19 

406 13 

494 16 

362 7 

350 19 

464 10 

185 13 

178 13 

150 11 

135 5 

108 8 

64 13 

45 14 

31 10 

4 1 

5 17 
5 12 



679 16 - 



3 - - 



894 27 



2,518 19 
50 7 



45 16 



802 10 



7 11 



486 4 



3,821 1 
66 13 



682 16 - 



2,669 6 - 



310 1 - 



8,887 14 - 



77 6 

147 12 

569 16 

833 2 

1,808 2 

2,388 15 

1,259 14 

113 8 

59 10 

46 15 

11 12 



24 47 

28 9 

70 28 

160 88 

129 31 

254 38 

340 8 

174 17 

17 9 

6 12 

8 8 

38 



824 4 

852 5 

846 14 

1,880 18 

1,471 4 

2,776 18 

3,671 14 

1,099 16 

154 12 

53 1 

24 3 

4 17 



72 49 

104 14 

167 46 

267 12 

221 48 

260 12 

826 40 

858 12 

48 18 

7 88 

1 10 

8 



948 15 

1,803 10 

2,016 1 

8,126 14 

2,519 5 

2,727 12 

8,481 8 

3,492 17 

390 5 

65 19 

9 10 

1 4 



7,265 11 



36 13 - 



1,210 23 



18,160 6 - 



110 10 



1,822 7 



20,082 



199 1 



7,302 4 
68 8 



13,270 16 
423 13 



20,231 1 
974 17 



7,288 16 - 



12,847 3 



19,256 4 



1,655 1 - 



57 4 
560 13 



1,555 1 - 



618 8 



1,565 .1 - 



810 12 
7,283 8 



8,094 - 
1 13 



8,092 7 - 



90 3 

241 88 



331 41 



1,260 17 
8,142 18 



124 10 

87 16 

268 12 

585 41 

404 14 

580 31 

601 28 

381 13 

54 40 

20 9 

14 13 

4 18 



8,076 45 



1,614 12 

1,091 10 

3,218 18 

6,854 2 

4,688 12 

5,783 16 

6,316 8 

3,717 6 

493 4 

171 11 

112 13 

32 1 



83,994 12 - 



275 16 



34,270 8 
857 4 



4,403 15 
6 3 



4,397 12 - 



126 13 
1,174 38 



1,301 1 



£. s. d. 



15,627 7 



33,413 4 - 



1,767 13 
15,271 18 



17,039 11 - 



14 19 



112,820 4 



17,024 12 - 48,772 



£. 



758. 



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- 



J77,219 1L - 




Hoi 

Sidi 

Thic 

Plan 

Treen 



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LIGHTNING CONDUCTORS (NAVY). 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 13 May 1847 \—for, 

RETURNS "relative to certain Ships of the Navy struck by Lightning, since the Report of 
the Naval Commission on Lightning Conductors, 24th January 1840 :" 

" Of Report and Log of H. M. Sloop Bittern, fitted with Wire-rope Lightning Conductors, at 
Portsmouth, in July 1841; struck by Lightning 23d January 1844, on the Coast of Africa; 
Commander Edmund Peel ; Royal-mast shivered; Eight Men struck down on the Deck, &o., as 
per Surgeon's Report of the Sick List ;" 

41 Of H. M. Sloop Hazard, fitted with Wire-rope Conductors, at Portsmouth, in 1844 ; struck by 
Lightning in China, on Two occasions, 1st May 1846 and 12th June 1846; Commander F. P. 
Egerton ; Report and Copy of Log, with any Correspondence on the subject ; Lightning divided 
upon the Mast, shivered Mast, Topmast, &o. :" 

" Of H. M. Surveying Ship Beagle, fitted with Permanent Conductors in her Masts, at Devonport, 
in 1881 ; Commander Stokes; struck by Lightning on more than one occasion whilst under his 
command on the Coast of South Australia, in 1844 :" 

4< Of H. M. Sloop Serpent, fitted with similar Conductors in Masts, &o. ; said by Commander 
Neville, in his Report on Sailing Qualities, to have had her Spars saved from damage on at least 
Three occasions ; Report from Captain Neville in May 1846, and Copy of Log:" 

" Of H. M. Sloop Scylla, fitted with Conductors in the Masts, &o. ; Commander Sharpe ; struck by 
a very heavy shock of Lightning in the West Indies, August 1848 ; stated by Captain Sharpe 
to have been saved by the Conductors ; Report from Captain Sharpe, with Copies of all Cor- 
respondence between Admiral Sir Charles Adam, the Board of Admiralty, Commander Sharpe, 
and Mr. Snow Harris (date ddJNovember and 6th November, 184 , and 7th August 184 ), rela- 
tive to this case ; as also, Copy of the Orders issued by the Surveyor's Department of the Navy 
to the various Dockyards, relative to Mr. Harris's Conductors, in September 1844, with reference 
to this case :" 

" Of H. M. Sloop Racer, having Conductors fixed in the Masts, &c. ; Commander Reed ; struck by 
Lightning at the Bucco, in the Rio de la Plata, 27th February 1844 ; a portion of Metal at the 
Mast-head fused ; Spars said to have been saved by the Conductors ; Report from Commander 
Reed, and Copy of Log :" 

" Of H. M. Steamer Sydenham, Lieutenant R. B. Mapleton commanding ; having Conductors 
fixed in the Masts, &c. ; struck by Lightning in the Mediterranean, 4th January 1845; Vessel 
said to have received complete protection from the Conductors :" 

" Of H. M. Sloop Daphne, Captain Onslow, having Fixed Conductors in the Masts ; struck by a 
discharge of Lightning 9th February 1848, off Monte Video ; reported to have escaped perfectly 
by the Conductors ; Captain's Report, &o. :" 

" Of H. M. Ship Minden, Captain Quin ; struck by Lightning at Hong Kong, 80th July 1843, in 
a very long and violent Thunder Storm, which damaged several Merchant Vessels near the 
Minden ; the Conductors fixed in the Masts said to have effectually protected the Ship ; Report 
from Captain Quin, and Ship's Log :" 

" Of H. M. Ship Fisgard, fitted with Fixed Conductors, Captain Duntae ; struck by Lightning In 
September 1846, in the Oregon; Spars reported to have been saved by the Conductors; Report 
from Captain Duntze and Officers of the Ship, together with Copies of Correspondence with the 
Board of Admiralty and Mr. Snow Harris, and all other Correspondence relative to this case/ 1 



Admiralty, \ H. F. AMEDROZ. 

2 July 1847. J Chief Clerk. 



(Sir Robert Peel) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 



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[ 2 ] 



SCHEDULE. 

Page 
H. M. Sloop « Bittern ": 

No. 1. — Extract of Log for 24th and 25th January 1844 3 

No. 2. — A Report of Men struck down by Lightning, as per Surgeon's Returns 4 

(No report from her Commander.) 

H. M. Sloop " Hazard": 
No. 3. — Extract of Log for 12 June 1846 - - - - - • •- - -4 

No. 4 Extract of Log for 1 May 1846 .-- 5 

(No Report or correspondence respecting her being struck by lightning.) 

H. M. Sloop "Scylla": 

No. 5.— Extract of Log for 6 August 1843 6 

No. 6. — Report from Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Adam .---.--7 

No. 7. — Report from Commander Sharpe to Vice- Admiral Sir Charles Adam 7 

No. 8. — Letter to Mr. Snow Harris from the Secretary of the Admiralty .... 7 

No. 9. — Letter from Mr. Snow Harris to the Secretary of the Admiralty 7 

No. 10. — Letter from the Secretary of the Admiralty to Vice- Admiral Sir Charles Adam - 8 

No. 1 1 Report from Commauder Sharpe, of H. M. S. " Scylla " 9 

No. 12— Letter from the Secretary of the Admiralty to Mr. Snow Harris 9 

No. 13.— Letter from Mr. Snow Harris to the Secretary of the Admiralty 9 

(No orders issued by Surveyor's department to the Dockyards with reference 
to this case.) 

H. M. Steam-Vessel " Sydenham ": 

No. 14.— Extract of Log For 4th January 1845 11 

No. 15. — Extract of Letter from Vice- Admiral Sir Edward Owen to the Secretary of the 

Admiralty ---• --.11 

H. M.S. "Daphne": 
No. 16. — Report of Captain Onslow, of her haying been struck by Lightning - - - n 
(Not reported in log.) 

H. M. S." Fisgard": 

No. 17. — Report of Captain Duntze, of her haying been struck by Lightning - - - 12 

No. 18 — Letter from the Secretary of the Admiralty to Mr. Snow Harris - - - - 12 

No. iOy — Letter from Mr. Snow Harris to the Secretary of the Admiralty - - - - 12 

No. 20.— Director-general, transmitting Extract of Surgeon's Report 17 

No. 21.— Extract of Surgeon's Report of H. M. S. " Fisgard " 17 

(Log of the Fisgard not yet received into Office.) 



jVote, — No information can be given for the following Ships, for the reasons stated against them 
respectively : 

H. M. S. " Beagle/* — Log not in Office, and no Report received from her Commander. 



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RETURNS RELATIVE TO SHIPS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. 



— No. 1. — 

EXTRACT from the Loo of Her Majesty's Sloop Bittern, 24 and 25 January 1846. 



H. 


K. 


F. 


Courses. 


Winds. 


Force 
Wind. 


State 
Weather. 


Lee 
Way. 


Sig. 


Remarks. Her Majesty's Sloop Bittern, 
Wednesday, 24 January 1844. 


1 


3 


4 


N.E. by E. 










HM 


A.M. 


2 


5 




E.N.E. 


N. by W. 


3 


cp 




CD 


1 h. down jib, set staysail ; in two reefs of 


3 


5 














c 


topsails, and lowered the boom mainsail. 


4 


4 


4 


E. by N. 




6 


qortl 




4^ 


10 h. A squall, down royal yards. 2 h. 30 m. 


5 


4 
















Up foresail. 5 h. Set the topsails and boom 


6 


4 




N.E. by E. 


N.N.W. 


5 


qorl 




•* 

o 


mainsail. 7 h. Furled boom mainsail. 8h.30m. 


7 


3 














c£ 


Set foresail and double-reefed boom mainsail. 


8 


3 




N.E. 








1 pb. 


c* 


Noon, in boom mainsail, up foresail and wore, 


9 


3 


6 


N.KJE. 




6 


qcp 




a 


set foresail. 


10 


4 


4 












*o 




11 


6 


2 


N.E. by E. 








ft 


I 




12 


5 


4 


E.N.E. 


Northerly. 














Distance, 


Latitude. 


Longitude. 








Coon 










Bearings and Distance. 


Water on Board. 


es. 


Miles. 










— current. 








Obs. 


Acct 


Chro. 


Acct 








N. 5. 


2E. 


104 


Cloudy. 


13°69'S. 


Cloudy. 


42°17'E. 


— 


Angozah River, 
S. 43. W. 194 m. 


* 41 i tons. 


1 


8 


6 


s.w. 


N. by W. 


5 









P.M. 


2 


8 


4 














3 h. Set lee clue of mainsail. 5 h. Mus- 


3 


8 


4 














tered at quarters ; in three reefs of topsails 


4 













cq 






courses. 6h. Down top-gallant yards. 


5 



















10 h. 20m. Up lee clue of mainsail; ship 


6 


9 








6 


q 






struck by lightning ; up foresails, and low- 


7 


8 


2 




N.W. by S. 


7 


qor 






ered the topsail on the cap. 


8 
9 


9 



2 






7 
7 


qortl 
qortl 






Midnight. 


10 


9 


6 


S-W.S. 














11 


9 


















12 


8 


4 




N.W.byW. 












H. 


K. 


F. 


Courses. 


Winds. 


Force 
Wind. 


State 
Weather. 


Lee 

Way. 


Sig. 


Remarks. Her Majesty's Sloop Bittern, 
25 Jan. 1844. 


1 


8 




s.s.w. 


N.N.W. 


7 


qortl 




b 

•« 


A. M. 


2 


8 














5 h. 30 m. Hoisted the topsails, set foresail 


3 


7 














s 


and lee clue of mainsail ; found lightning had 


4 


7 








7 


or 




CD 


shivered the main truck, and splintered the 


5 


5 


4 


S oW 










1 


royal mast. 7 h. Punished Edward Dorling, 


6 


5 


4 


s. | w. 




6 


00 






boy first-class, with 36 lashes for theft. 


7 


5 














§ 


9 h. 10 m. Set jib and double-reefed mainsail. 


8 


5 


2 


South. 




6 


car 




9 h. 40 m. In ditto to a squall. 1° Set ditto ; 


9 


6 














•8 


loosed small sails to dry. 


10 


6 




S.J E. 










8 

! 




11 


7 


2 


South. 


Westerly. 


6 


be 






12 


7 


2 












hJ 




Courses. 


Distance, 


Latitude. 


Longitude. 


Current 


Bearings and Distance. 


Water on Board. 


Miles. 


Obs. 


Acct. 


Chro. 


Acct 


The last 
46 miles, 


Quillinane, 
S. 88. W. 316 m. 


40 1 tons. 


















S.3 


E. 


233 


17° 62' S. 


16° 47* S. 


42° 29' E. 


42° 20' E. 


17E.66W. 






1 


4 


2 


South. 


w.s.w. 


4 


be 






P.M. 


2 


4 


4 


N.W.byN. 












1 h. Tacked out three reefs of topsails ; 


3 


3 




2 
















empk 


>yed as requisite. 1 


Sh. 15 m. Mustered 



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RETURNS RELATIVE TO CERTAIN SHIPS 



— No. 2.— 

EXTRACT from the Nosological Report of Mr. M. T. West, Surgeon of 
Her Majesty's Sloop Bittern, between 1st January and 31st March 1844. 



The weather, during the period of this Return, has been exceedingly stormy, with very 
heavy gales, and a great deal of rain and thunder ; during one of the thunder storms, the 
ship was struck by lightning, but which only shivered the main truck, and partially stunned 
four or five men ; the winds have been principally from the northward and westward. 



W. Burnett, Director-general. 



— No. 3. — 



EXTRACT from the Log of Her Majesty's Sloop Hazard, at Anchor, off Cape Fo, entrance of Morotaba River. 



Week Days. 


Date. 


Winds. 


Force. 


Weather. 

i 


Bar. 


Tier. 


REMABK8, June 1846. 








2 


CO 






A. M. 

4h. 5m. 80s. The lightning struck 
the ship, splitting and carrying 






N.W. 


2 


CO 






away main-top gallant and royal 
mast, the whole of the main top- 






Vble. 

f 


8 


cod 

1 






mast from the hounds to the lower 
cap, damaging the top spring, the 
after cross-tree split and carried 






N.W. 1 


5 


> cortl 






away starboard trussel tree, a splin- 
ter from main-top mast passing 
through starboard side quarter deck, 






N.N.W. 


3 
3 
8 


cod 
cop 
copd 


82 


88 


the electric fluid escaping over- 
board down conductor by main- 
rigging. 6 h. employed clearing the 
the deck. 8, 9 h. painted spare top- 
mast, employed as requisite, stoving 
booms and carpenters unbolting 






North 


3 
2 


CO 
CO 






maintop and cross trees. 
Noon, p. m. 
















Sent starboard half, of maintop on 


iFriday 


12 




2 


c 


62 


85 


deck; carpenters employed about 
top and crosstrees ; sent pinnace for 






2 


c 






water, 4 h. 6 m. Received 2 tons 




1 




. 1 


. 




1 


water per pinnace. 8h. opened 



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— No. 4. — 

EXTRACT from the Log of Her Majesty's Sloop Hazard. 



H. 


K. 


H. 


Courses. 


Lee 
Way. 


Winds. 


Force, 


Weather. 


Bar. 


Ther. 


Remarks, Ac. Friday, 1 Hay 1846. 


1 


3 




S. by W. 




Vble. 


2 


be 


• 




A. M« 




















8h. 35 m. In royals and flying 


2 


3 


















jib, up mainsail, lowered topgal- 
lant sails to a squall ; 4 h. 5 m., 


3 


2 


5 






Westx. 










set topgallant sail and mainsail ; 
6 b. less ditto, lowered driver and 


4 


4 


5 
















trimmed, as requisite to vole 
squalls; 7b., sbip struck by light- 


5 


4 


5 


W. JS. 




Vble. 


2to4 


coqtl 






ning, splitting masthead vane- 




















staff and truck, carried away 


6 


4 












coqtl 






conductor at main topgallant 
















29.90 


86 


masthead, damaged starboard, in 


7 


5 


5 






Vble. 


4 


coq tl r 






top-sail, sheet-bits passed by the 




















conductor outside, tearing the 


8 


3 


6 






N. E. 


4 


qtl 






copper off ship's side ; 8 h., gun- 




















boat in oo.; 9h., set topgallant 


9 


3 




W.toS.|S. 




Nro. 


3 


cmr 






sails, royals, and flying jib, trim- 
med as requisite ; 1 1 h. 45 m., up 


10 


2 




W. }S. 




Vble. 


3 


omr 






mainsail and driver, set starboard 












2 








Core-topmast and topgallant stud- 


11 


2 


5 






N.Er. 


2 


cr 






ding sails ; noon gun-boat in co.; 


12 


2 










2 


cr 


po 


86 


set east, 24. 








Latitude N. 




Longitude £. 




Coi 


11*86% 


Dis 








Bearings and Distance. 








Dr. 


Obs. 


... 


Dr. 


Chro. 


S. 7 


2W. 


49. 


6" 21' 


5° 2! 


r 


97° 31' 


97° 85' 


Diamond point, S. 77. W. 28. 


1 


2 




w. s. w. 




Vble. 


2 


em 






P. M. 

In all studding sails and trim- 


2 


2 




W. by S. 




N.E. 










med, set mainsail and driver, 
exercised small armed men, 4. 


3 


2 








Vble. 


i 


em 






5h. 30 m. Mustered at quarters* 


4 


1 


4 


W.byS.JS. 




N. N. W. 










6 he Gun-boat in co. 


5 


2 








• 


2 


bcm 


88 


85 


7 h. In 1st and 2d reefs, tacked. 


6 


3 


2 


















7 




5 


W. by W. 
S.W. 




N.W. 
Vble. 


4 


bcm 






8h. Midnight* 


8 













2 


N. N. W. 




Westlr. 












10 




5 


N.W.vble. 
















11 




4 






Vble. 










• 


12 




2 




1 












88 


85 





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RETURNS RELATIVE TO CERTAIN SHIPS 



— No. 5. — 
EXTRACT from the Log Book of Her Majesty's Sloop Scylla. 



H. 



K. 



F. 



Courses. 



Winds. 



Force. 



State of 
Weather. 



Remarks, &c., Her Majesty's Sloop Scylla, 
6th August 1843. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
& 
6 
7 
8 
9 

!?} 

12 



4 
8 
4 

3 

2 



2 
2 

1 



4 
4 

4 

4 



hard round. 



S.byW. 

s. s. w. 

S.W.JS. 

s.w. 

S.W.byW, 



S.W. 

N.W. 

W.byS. 

S.byE. 

N.W.byN. 

© 
South 



E.S.E. 



S. by E. 



North. 



3 uctl 



3 uc tlqr 



ca 

1 be 



A.M. 
4h. 

6h. 30 m., shortened sail to a heavy squall from 
south-west; 7h. 50m., during a squall from the 
northward and westward, accompanied with 
heavy rain, the ship was struck by lightning, 
taking its course from the main topgallant 
masthead, down the masts, starting the butts 
and nails of the conductors, especially where 
the lightning first struck ; it passed through the 
lower deck by the conductors, and various parts 
of the ship, such as chain cables, the coppers, 
&c. exhibited symptoms of the presence of 
electricity; 8h. 20m. made sail; 8h. 30m., 
taken aback, braced round on larboard tack ; 
lOh. mustered by open list, and read the articles 
of war; llh. 30m. trimmed to a light breeze 
from the northward ; noon current, N. 52, W. 1 5 
miles. 



Course. 



S. 26 W # 



Dis. 



75 



Latitude. 



Observation. 



24 # 3' 



D. R. 



28° 53* 



Longitude. 



Chron. 



96° 13* 



D. R. 



B. 30. 6. 



96° l'W. 



T. 84 



Water. 



Exd. j T. 
R. 22 J T. 



Bearings and Distance. 



St. Juan de Ulloa, south 
288'. 



1 


1 


i 


2 


8 




3 


6 




4 


7 


2 


6 


7 




6 


5 




7 


6 




8 


6 




9 


7 




10 


7 


2 

• 


11 


7 





South 
S. by E. 



N.E.byE, 



2 u cm lr 



3bc 



4bc 



P.M. 



12 h. 40 m. altered course to S. by E. 



1 h. 40 m. trimmed out 2d reefs. 



6 h. mustered at quarters. 



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OF THE NAVY STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. 



— No. 6.— 
REPORT from Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Adam. 

Sir, Illustrious, Halifax, 17 October 1843. 

I inclose, for the information of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, copy of a 
letter from Commander Sharpe, of H. M. sloop Scylla, with an extract from that sloop s log, 
relating to her having been struck by lightning, and I beg leave to call their Lordships' 
attention to the circumstance of the nails and plate fitted on Mr. Harris's plan having been 
removed by the electrical fluid, all of which does not appear to have been carried off by the 
conductors. 

I regret that the Scylla, from the circumstances explained by Commander Sharpe, will 
not have been able to leave the Gulf of Mexico before the beginning of this month, which 
will be too late in the season to admit of her proceeding to Quebec, in the event of specie 
having been shipped for that port. I have given notice of this to the Commissariat Depart- 
ment here, to enable them to make arrangements to meet any difficulty which might be 
caused by that sloop's detention in the Gulf of Mexico. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) Charles Adam, 

To the Right Hon. Vice-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief, 

Secretary of the Admiralty. 



— No. 7.— 
EXTRACT of a Letter from Commander Sharpe to Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Adam. 

Her Majesty's Sloop Scylla, Sacrificios, 19 August 1843. 

" On Sunday, 6th August, Her Majesty's sloop was struck by lightning, as noted in 
the log of Her Majesty's sloop, copy of which I herewith annex, and I cannot omit this 
opportunity of recording my high opinion of the utility of the lightning conductors, on 
Harris's plan, with which tne Scylla is fitted ; had we not had them, the mainmast must 
have been shivered, or perhaps a more serious disaster would have befallen us/' 



— No. 8.— 
LETTER to Mr. Snow Harris from the Secretary of the Admiralty. 

Sir, Admiralty, 31 October 1843. 

I am commanded by my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to send you herewith, Scylla : Extract 
for your information, an extract from the log of Her Majesty's sloop Scylla, reporting her from log, when 
having been struck by lightning, and the effect produced on it by the conductors. struck with light- 

I am, ftc. ning ' 

(signed) S. Herbert. 

W. S. Harris, Esq., Plymouth. 



— No. 9. — 

LETTER from Mr. Snow Harris to the Secretary of the Admiralty. 

6, Windsor Villas, Plymouth, 
Sir, 3 November 1843. 

I feel greatly obliged by your communication of the 31st of October, containing an 
extract from the log of Her Majesty's sloop Scylla, a nd beg permission, for the information 
of their Lordships, to offer the following remarks relative to it. 
It is of course highly gratifying to me to have this additional instance of the successful 



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8 RETURNS RELATIVE TO CERTAIN SHIPS 

nails of some of the conducting plates, is very likely to have arisen from some little defi- 
ciency in the method of securing the plates and butts at the time this vessel was fitted. 
The improved method of securing the plates, which has been generally adopted since their 
Lordships sanctioned my superintending the work in some of Her Majesty's dockyards, viz. 
by brazing the butts together, and by fixing the plates in a more regular and perfect way, 
renders such effects as tnose stated in the log very unlikely to occur generally. 

In the heavy shock of lightning which lately fell on Her Majesty's sloop Daphne, having 
conductors fitted in this manner, no effect of the kind was experienced, nor had it occurred 
in at least six of Her Majesty's ships upon which strokes of lightning have fallen. Hence 
I think I am justified in considering the circumstance as a casualty easily guarded against, 
and such as may not unreasonably be supposed to attend the progress of any mechanical 
contrivance whatever. 

I further respectfully submit to their Lordships, that the inconvenience attendant on the 
loosening of a few nails, which probably occurred only in the lofty spars, is of very minor 
importance, and easily remedied, as appears by the evidence of the Honourable Captain 
F. Grey, in the Report of the Admiralty Commission on Lightning Conductors, p. 30, line 9 
from the bottom. 

It would be very satisfactory to me if their Lordships would be good enough to call upon 
Captain Sharpe to state whether the conducting plates were examined previously to the 
lightning striking the ship, because a similar starting of the butts and nails has ensued in. 
some of the ships fitted on my plan, by the straining of the spars alone, and it would also 
be satisfactory to be informed of the particular spars most affected ; as if the starting was 
caused by lightning, I think it will appear that the loosening of the nails occurred in the 
upper spars, and that nothing of the kind will be found on the lower mast, or in the hull. 
I would further suggest to their Lordships the propriety of examining the plates on the 
foremast upon which the lightning did not strike, so as to be assured that no similar starting 
has occurred there. 

With respect to the chain cables, coppers, &c, which are said to have exhibited symp- 
toms of electricity, I am sure that I need not point out to their Lordships that such pheno- 
mena are very common in thunder storms, and are a necessary consequence of the presence 
of a thunder cloud, which places the whole mass of the ship, the air, and the surface of the 
sea, in a high electrical state. 

They have no reference whatever to the presence of a conductor on the mast, such as 
mine. It is not uncommon to find symptoms of electricity on the ropes and other parts of 
a ship, and the metal about mail-coaches often exhibits traces of electrical light in thunder 
storms. Her Majesty's ships Russell and Minerva, in 1795 and 1791, were so affected. 
Brilliant electrical sparks are said to have appeared on the decks, and even in the hold. 
Such phenomena are harmless ; it is the great body of the thunder stroke which we have to 
provide against, so as to rob it of its explosive force from the instant it strikes upon the 
conductor, and transmit the discharge, under the form of an electrical current, to the sea. 

And this, I think, their Lordships will admit has in the present case been fully accom- 
plished directly in the line of the conductors prepared for its reception, without any deviation 
whatever ; for the log states, " that the lightning took its course from the main topgallant 
mast-head down the masts, and passed through the lower deck by the conductors," and 
this without explosion in the ship, or any inconvenience whatever, since the usual duty of 
the ship went on as if nothing had happened. 

I have, &c. 

Sir John Barrow, Bart. &c. &c. (signed) W. Snow Harris. 

Admiralty. 



— No. 10. — 

LETTER from the Secretary of the Admiralty to Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Adam. 

Sir, Admiralty, 8 November 1843. 

Scvlla, struck by With reference to your letter of the 17th ultimo, No. 282, enclosing an extract from the 
lightning. Report log of the Scylla, recording the circumstance of her having been struck by lightning, I am 
called for. commanded by my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to signify their direction to you 

to call upon Commander Sharpe to state whether the conducting plates were examined pre- 
viously to the lightning striking the Scylla, because a similar starting to that reported of 
the butts and nails has ensued in some of the ships fitted with Harris's conductors ; and also 

*r» YGnr\T+ iha narti/»nlor anora mnat afTo/«iA/1 . q + iYti> an ma i imp PYflminincr thp nlfttPA Oil thft. 



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OF THE NAVY STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. 



— No- 11.— 

REPORT from Commander Sharpe, of Her Majesty's Sloop Scyila. 

Her Majesty's Sloop Scyila, Bermuda, 
Sir, 18 February 1844. 

Thb commander-in-chief having signified to me that the Lords Commissioners of the 
Admiralty haying desired a report to be made on the lightning conductor, &c, and in reply 
I beg leave to acquaint you that the conducting plates were examined every morning by 
the carpenter ; that the electric fluid struck the main royal mast head, passing down the 
conductors to the lower deck, thence by the conducting plates into the sea, without further 
injury than starting the butts and nails of the conductor ; also to state, that the foremast was 
examined and the butt nails found perfectly uninjured. 

I have 8cc. 
To the Secretary to the Admiralty, (signed) Robert Sharpe, Commander. 

&c. &c. &c. 



— No. 12.— 

LETTER from the Secretary of the Admiralty to Mr. Snow Harris. 

Sir, • Admiralty, 9 March 1844. 

I am commanded by my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to send you herewith a 
copy of a letter from Commander Sharpe, of the Scyila, in reply to the inquiries founded on 
your letter of the 3d November last 

I am, &c. 

W. Snow Harris, Esq. (signed) J. Barrow. 



— No. 13.— 

LETTER from Mr. Snow Harris to the Secretary of the Admiralty. 

Sir, Plymouth, 7 August 1844. 

In reference to the communication with which I was honoured by command of their 
Lordships, dated 31 October 1843, and enclosing an extract from the log of Her Majesty's 
sloop Scyila, reporting her having been struck by lightning, and the effects produced on 
my conductors, I respectfully submit, for my Lords' consideration, some very interesting 
and important information relative to this occurrence, and which has been kindly commu- 
nicated to me by Captain Sharpe, commanding the Scyila, and by Mr. Welsh, the car- 
penter of the ship, who had the immediate charge of the conductor; and I consider the 
facts they state of so much consequence, as to render it a duty on my part to communicate 
the same to their Lordships. 

I believe it will be found in the communications which I addressed to their Lordships, 
dated 3 November and 5 November 1843, that I expressed my conviction that the spars in 
which the conducting plates were said to have started by the force of the lightning, had 
not been fitted under my direction, and according to the methods now practised, and also 
that it was therefore probable that some of the fixings might have been loosened by the. 
straining of the spars. The following extracts from the communications I have mentioned, 
will, I am sure, satisfy their Lordships on these points, whilst at the same time they must 
fully prove the beneficial action of the conductors in rescuing this ship from a most awful 
stroke of lightning without inconvenience or damage, and which, under common circum- 
stances, would certainly have been productive of most serious mischief. 

Captain Sharpe states, " On the morning of the 6th August 1843, in lat. 24. 3. N., long. 
06. 12. W., the Scyila, at about 8 a. m. was struck by lightning, with a heavy clap of 
thunder, which shook the ship to her keelson. The greater part of the morning watch had 
been one continued heavy rain, sky overcast with dense clouds, winds unsteady, attended 
by heavy thunder and vivid lightning, both sheet and forked, and which very frequently 
exploded close to us." 

Captain Sharpe then goes on to say, that " Towards the close of the morning watch a 



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io RETURNS RELATIVE TO CERTAIN SHIPS 

mast for that purpose. The nails of the conductors on the topgallant mast were in many- 
places apparently wrenched out by the force of the shock, and many of the butts of the 
! dates started on that spar being curled up for many inches ; no other mast was touched or 
elt the least effect from the shock. There was one butt on the mainmast about three feet 
above the deck, which seemed to be a little moved, but not in my opinion so as to be of any 
consequence. 

I should tell you that the topgallant mast was not fitted with your conductors by the 
Dock in England, but was fitted at Port Royal, so that probably there may have been 
some defect in securing the butts; we have, especially after a little weather, had to use the 
hammer aloft. An improvement can be made in securing the plates, but to this I believe 
attention has been directed. 

u There can be little doubt (continues Captain Sharpe) that the conductors saved our 
spars. From the conductors being fixed, I consider them preferable to any others." 
The following is the statement made by the carpenter, Mr. Welsh : — 
" By permission of my captain I have to state, that on examining the conductor after being 
struck by the lightning, I found it started from a butt at the main royal mast-head about 
three feet below the truck ; on tracing the conductor down the mast, I only found one butt 
started a little, and several nails loose; but I set-to and renailed the plates instantly; 
the conductor was repaired in a few minutes. 

Neither the ship or the mast received the slightest damage from the flash or the fluid ; 
and it is my true opinion that but for the conductor the mast, if not the ship, must have 
sustained a serious injury." 

I am the more anxious to call their Lordships' attention to these facts ; because, when 
the log of the ship was forwarded to me, an order was sent to the different dockyards 
from the Admiralty, Somerset House, for an immediate return of all ships fitted with my 
conductors ; the ground of which, so far as any failure whatever of my plan in the Scylla is 
involved, I respectfully submit to my Lords is by no means tenable. Now there are three 
very great practical results in this case of the Scylla, which I hope I may be allowed to 
briefly point out, as being very well worth attention. 

First — The awkward and fearful position of the ship, in the focus of a tropical thunder- 
storm, and the heavy burst of thunder and lightning which fell immediately on the masts* 

Second — The fact of the lightning exploding frequently close to the vessel without being 
influenced, according to the common notion, by a specific attractive force, for the matter of 
lightning assumed to exist in the conductors. 

Thirdly — The instantaneous dispersion of the electrical charge, when it did strike on the 
masts, without any inconvenience or damage to the spars or hull of the ship. 

There is no instance on record, so far as I know, in which a ship similarly circumstanced 
and not having any conductors, has escaped without very considerable damage. 

I venture further to point out, with their Lordships' permission, that we have now incon- 
trovertible evidence of at least 10 sail of Her Majesty's ships saved from the destructive 
ravages of lightning by the method of defence I have suggested. They are as follows : — 

Actaeon, 20; Asia, 84; Beagle, 10; Druid, 44; Dryad, 44; Daphne, 18; Minden, 74; 
Racer, 18 ; Scylla, 18 ; Talbot, 20. How much money, and how many lives might have 
been sacrificed in these cases had they not been guarded by the conductor, I leave any 
candid person who has read the many terrible instances of damage by lightning, recorded 
in the logs of Her Majesty's ships, to determine. 

It may not perhaps be uninteresting to their Lordships to learn, that the instance of the 
Racer, 18, is a very recent case. This vessel was struck by lightning in the Rio de la 
Plata, in February last, as their Lordships will probably find recorded in the ship's log. 
The following, however, is Captain Keed's account, who commands the Racer : — 

" The vane staff at the fire had been broken, and was down for repair about 4. 30. a.m. 
during a heavy storm of thunder and lightning ; it (the lightning) was clearly seen to strike 
the foremast, and upon removing the truck (which I have still in my possession), it was 
quite evident, from a spot of the copper band round the smelt being melted, that it had* 
entered there, and passed by a bolt of one of the sheeves on to the conductor, by which it 
was carried safely off. Many persons have inspected the truck, all of whom speak highly 
in favour of the conductor." 

So that, as my Lords will perceive, here is a case of a ship rescued actually from the 
grasp of a burst of lightning in one of the most exposed climates, which, on falling on the 
mast, positively melted a portion of the metal on which it struck. 

I cannot but think that the history of such cases as these very fully proves, that the 



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OF THE NAVY STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. 



11 



I was very liberally authorized to examine. As a book of reference, and as containing useful 
facts connected with lightning in various climates, and the general effects thereof in our 
navy, I cannot but hope it may be worthy a place amongst the many valuable records of 
the Admiralty. 

I have, &c. 
Secretary of the Admiralty. (signed) W. Snow Harris. 

P. S. — It may not be unimportant to point out the fact to their Lordships, that Her 
Majesty's ship Racer, lately defended from lightning by my conductors in the way described 
by her captain, was struck m the year 1834, in a similar way, off Carthagena, in the same 

¥art of the world, and had both her topmasts knocked over the side, beside other damage, 
he case, as taken from the log, is given at page 85 of the pamphlet which I have done 
myself the honour to enclose for their Lordships acceptance. 



— No. 14. — 
EXTRACT from the Log of Her Majesty's Steam Vessel Sydenham, of the 4th January 1846. 



H. 


K. 


P. 


Come. 


Wind. 


SJg. 


Wsather. 


REMARKS, Saturday, 4tk Jao. 1846. 


1 








S.E. 


8 


cog. vble. 


A. M. 


2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
o 


At sty 


;le anchor 
Roads. 


in Corfu 








1 h. 30 m. veered, cable to 72 
fathoms ; 4h. struck by lightning; 
the conductor being up, lightning 
passed off without damage ; 8 h. 
80m. down lower yard and top- 
mast ; 9h. 80m. lit the fires ; lOh. 
shortened in cable ; llh. received 
the mails; lib. 80m. weighed and 
proceeded for Samoa; put over 
patent log. 


10 
















11 
















12 








S.E. 


5 


oh. 





— No. IS.— 

EXTRACT of a Lettbb from Vice-Admiral Sir E. Owen to the Secretary of the 
Admiralty; dated Her Majesty's Ship Formidable, at Malta, 7 January 1846. 

a I learn, by an after-statement from Lieutenant Mapleton, that the Sydenham was 
struck by lightning at Corfu on "the 4th instant. Her chain conductor was in its place, and 
it passed overboard with an explosion, but with no damage other than that of fusing its 
metallic point." 



— No. 16.— 

COPY of a LiiTBt from Captain J. J. Otubw, of Her Majesty's Sloop Daphne, to 
Commodore Purvis; dated Monte Video, 10 February 1843. 

Sir, 
I havb the honour to report, for your information and that of their Lordships, yesterday 



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12 RETURNS RELATIVE TO CERTAIN SHIPS 



— No. 17.— 

REPORT of Captain Duntze, of the Fisgard having been struck by Lightning. 

Her Majesty's Ship Fisgard, Nisgually, Puget's Sound, 
Sir, 30 September 1846. 

I have the honour to report to you, that on the 27th instant, at 7. 45. p. m., whilst at 
anchor at this place, the mainmast of the ship was struck by lightning during a very severe 
thunder storm. 

I was not aboard at the time, but the senior lieutenant who was standing immediately 
abaft the mast on the quarter deck, observed a very vivid flash, succeeded by a very loud 
report, which he compares to a broadside fired from each side of the ship ; he also noticed 
the fall of three or four splinters, which were found to have come from between the spider 
hoop of the awning and the deck. A boatswain's mate, who was standing near him on 
the starboard side of the mast, was knocked down, and one of the midshipmen, who was 
also on the starboard side on the main deck, near the mast, felt himself thrust away from 
it, but without falling. 

The main topgallant mast was got on deck the next morning, and on being examined it 
was found that the spindle was fused at the top and blackened about one-third of the way 
down. There were no marks on the conductor of the royal and topgallant mast, except at 
the lower part, which was covered by the cap, where it was blackened and the nails slightly 
fused. On the main topmast; there was no mark whatever, and on examining the main- 
mast the conductor was found to have been started from the mast in three places, one at 
the butt close to and just above the spider hoop, another at the next butt below, and the 
third, not at a butt, but separating the two strips of copper forming the conductor, about four 
inches in length, and an inch and a quarter at its greatest width, slightly splintering the wood 
immediately in contact with the conductor at each of the above places. 

1 he lightning having passed down the conductor on the mainmast, on reaching the lower 
deck took the direction of the two branches of the conductor, one leading out by the boat- 
swain's cabin* and the other through the midshipman's berth to the bends on the ship's 
side, which were started at the ends in contact with the copper, both which communicates 
the inside with the outside conductor, bulging the sheet of copper which covers the con- 
ductor. From the appearance of the copper conductor in the inside of the ship, I am led 
to suppose that more of the electric fluid escaped on the port than on the starboard 
side. 

Mr. Rodd, the senior lieutenant, gives it as his opinion, from the severity of the shock, 
had it not been from the efficiency of the conductor, the mainmast would have been totally 
destroyed and much other serious dfunage sustained, in which I fully coincide ; and as 
I consider the above is of sufficient importance to be communicated to the Admiralty 
sooner than it could through you, I have forwarded a copy of this letter to their Lordships 9 
secretary. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) J. A. Duntze, Captain. 

Rear Admiral Sir Geo. F. Seymour, o. b., o. c. h., 
Commander-in-Chief, &c. &c. 8tc. 



— No. 18.— 

LETTER from the Secretary of the Admiralty to Mr. Snow Harris. 

Sir, Admiralty, 10 February 1847. 

I am commanded by my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty to transmit to you the 
copy of a letter from Captain Duntze, of the Fisgard, dated 30th September last, rela- 
tive to the effect produced on the lightning conductors fitted to the mainmast of that ship, 
and which was struck by lightning during a severe storm; and I am to acquaint you that 
my Lords would be glad to be furnished with any remarks you may have to make on the 
insufficiency, to a certain degree, of the conductors to carry off the whole of the electric 
fluid. 

I am, &c. 
S. Harris, Esq. (signed) W. A. B. Hamilton. 

&c. &c. 



— No. 19. — 

LETTER from Mr. Snow Harris to the Secretary of the Admiralty. 

Sir, Plymouth, 13 February 1847. 

I have been duly favoured by yesterday's post with a copy of the letter from Captain 



OF THE NAVY STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. 13 

You will, I trust, do me the justice to believe that in any explanations or observations 
I may venture to submit for consideration, it is my earnest desire to bring a dispassionate 
and sober judgment to bear on so momentous a question, and I cannot but feel assured 
that my Lords will receive any statement I have to make with that degree of candour and 
unbiased reflection which they are in the habit of bestowing on every question affecting 
the welfare of the Royal Navy and the public interest. 

I have carefully considered the very explicit statement in Captain Duntze's letter, and 
I trust to prove, to my Lords' entire satisfaction, that the phenomena in question show no 
insufficiency in the conductor to transmit the charge, but only an insufficiency to transmit 
it without certain small disruptive effects arising either in the conductor, or from a want of 
close fitting in the joints of the conductor in which the appearances described arose; I am 
fully satisfied that the conductor did disperse upon the sea and carry off faithfully every 
atom of the electric matter which fell on it, and by which, as allowed by the officers of the 
ship, the masts were no doubt saved, probably many men's lives, and much serious damage 
besides. 

The points to which my Lord* more immediately direct my attention are, I presume, the 
appearances and effects on the conductor, the starting of several of the butts of the plates, 
with a slight splintering of the wood in contact with them, and the effect produced on two 
persons on the decks; leading, as I infer by your letter of the 10th instant, my Lords to 
conclude that the conductor had been " insufficient to a certain degree to carry off the whole 
of the charge." 

In explanation of this, I beg to state, that I consider the results in question as being 
purely mechanical results of a very simple character, and very easy of solution. 

It is requisite here to understand, that in all cases of electrical discharge, from the clouds 
and earth, the whole mass of the intermediate air is as it were broken down by an 
irresistibly expansive action, the particles are forcibly displaced, so that persons near the 
surface below are not unfrequently thrown down by this force alone, much in the same 
way as they would be affected by a somewhat distant explosion of gunpowder, and which 
we know has prostrated buildings by mere concussion and expansion of the surrounding 
air ; the gentleman on the lower deck who is described by Captain Duntze as *' having 
felt himself thrust away from the conductor, but without falling/ was evidently affected in 
this way, and I have no doubt but that the boatswain's mate on the deck above was thrown 
down from the same cause. This is by no means a rare occurrence in storms of lightning, 
so that we have to distinguish between such instances as this, and those instances in which 
persons are actually struck by lightning, or by the passage of the electric matter through 
them. 

In the case of Her Majesty's sloop Scylla, struck by lightning in the West Indies in 
August 1843, and saved by the conductors in precisely the same way as the Fisgard, I 
understand that Captain Sharpe, who was at the time in his cabin shaving, felt the razor 
forced as it were out of his hand. The whole fovce of a West India thunder cloud, and 
which rendered the sky awfully dark, fell on the mainmast of the ship ; the concussion was 
so great, that the vessel is said to have trembled by a species of vibration even to the 
keelson, yet no damage ensued, and the ship was under sail again in half an hour as if 
nothing had occurred. Such effects, as my Lords will see, are quite distinct from the pro- 
gression of the electrical agency itself. Thus Captain Sharpe was certainly not struck by 
the electrical discharge which fell on the ship, or by any portion of it ; it would be quite 
impossible to mistake the effects of that. The being subjected to the action of an expansive 
force, considered in the light of a mechanical force, is one thing, but the being struck down 
by the matter of lightning is another. 

It is, however, certainly possible, that considering the nature of a thunder storm, that it 
is an action set up between a vast mass of cloud, and the surface of the earth and sea ; 
certain minor electric actions may arise in the air contiguous to the earth, so that per* 
sons may, under certain circumstances, and in certain positions, be not only forced aside, 
but be what is usually called electrified. These, however, are all very secondary actions ; 
they are not the sources of danger attendant on the great discharge which occurs. It is 
quite impossible always to avoid them ; almost every object on the earth's surface is more 
or less affected electrically during the great excitement of a thunder storm, as my Lords will 
see in my work on Thunder Storms, p. 11, and which I did myself the honour to present to 
the library of the Admiralty. 

I think, therefore, it may be satisfactorily shown, that the force which operated on thet 
two persons on board the Fisgard, did not at all depend on any insufficiency of the con- 
ductor to transmit the whole of the charge. 

Having so far disposed of this question, we come now to consider the effects on the coiw 
ductor, viz., the starting of the. joints, the slight splintering of the wood in contact with. 
these joints, and the blackened appearance aloft, and fusion of the extremity of the vane. 
spindle. 

Here it will be requisite to further exDlain. that anv interval in the course of a metallic 



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14 RETURNS RELATIVE TO CERTAIN SHIPS 

111 the annexed Fig. 1, M is a femall mortar, turned out 
of boxwood or ivory, having a small chamber at c. 

B is a small ball of cork placed over the chamber ; 
n. A. are two small "wires passing air tight through the 
6ide of the mortar into the chamber c, so as to remain 
at a very small distance from each other. 

Under these circumstances let an electrical discharge 
be passed through the wires a. b., and the ball B. will 
be propelled with force out of the mortar. 

Now supposing a joint of the conductor not perfectly 
fitted, there would arise a small disruptive force of this 
kind, capable of starting the joint and slightly splinter- 
ing the wood to which the conductor is attached. 

Again. Let a long slip of tin leaf be closely laid down on a dry piece of mahogany, ; 
in the annexed Fig. 2. 




Fig. 2. y£^EE2J^— ^£L 






Let three or more very fine divisions be made in this slip by passing a thin sharp knife 
across it, as in the points a, b. c. 

If now an electrical discharge be passed across the slip as from A. to B., the metal will 
be thrown upward just at the joints, and exhibit an appearance such as seen in the fol- 
lowing Figure 3, thereby evincing disruptive action. 

Fig. 3. A 1 i 1 i i ( B 

a b c 

If some small wafers be placed over the cuts in Fig. 2, and other small wafers on the fair 
portions of the metal, then, on passing the shock from A. to B. all the wafers will be dis- 
persed which are on the divided parts, whilst those on the fair parts will remain quiescent 

Now this is again precisely the effect described by Captain Duntze as having occurred 
on board the Fisgard in certain portions of the conductor. 

In the above experiments it is quite clear that there is no insufficiency in the metals upon 
which these phenomena depend,, to carry the whole of the electricity thrown on them; there 
is only an insufficiency to transmit it without a certain degree of disruptive action, the 
amount of which may be always known. 

It is this kind of force by which chain halliards and other chains are frequently knocked 
in pieces by lightning, and come rattling down on deck, as in the case of Her Majesty's 
steam frigate Blazer, struck by lightning in the Mediterranean, 29th of March 1839, and 
as instanced in the chain lightning conductor of the ship New York, and of Her Majesty's 
ship Dublin. 

With a view of avoiding these minor expansive forces, and at the same time obtaining a 
conductor of sufficient flexibility to yield to any strain the mast is liable to, I have con- 
structed it of two layers of copper plates, placed one over the other in series, and in such 
way that the continuous portions of the one may fall under or over the jointed portions of 
the other, as represented in the following Figure 4. 



f g h i k 1 

Thus if a. b. c. d. &c. be the joints of the upper series, then f. g. h. i. &c. are the joints of 
the under series. In this arrangement there is no joint uncovered by continuous metal, so 
that if the joints be accurately fitted, and the plates set close, the expansive forces liable to 
occur in these points may become indefinitely small, and be for all practical purposes as of no 
value ; and this, I think, my Lords will see was the case in the Fisgard, all along the line 
of metal from the truck down the topgallant mast and topmast, &c. &c. 

This being understood, I have now to observe, that the order for carrying out my plan 
universally m the navy not having been promulgated until after the lower masts of many 
shins were completed and in place, it was not thought Drudent to disturb these masts, so 



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OF THE NAVV STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. 15 

to the safe operation of the conductor, being quite satisfied as to the limit of the expansive 
force liable to occur; the greatest damage likely to arise would be merely a starting of the 
plates, and which occurred aloft in a royal mast of the Scylla, fitted at Halifax, stated by 
the carpenter of the ship to have been set right with a hammer in ten minutes. 

Their Lordships will then perceive that since, as I have shown, a conductor may transmit 
a heavy shock of electricity, both with and without disruptive action of a trivial kind, such 
as that in the case under consideration, therefore the presence of such action does not show 
an insufficiency in the conductor to transmit the entire charge ; on the contrary, it is the 
best possible evidence that the conduction had proceeded, inasmuch as disruption is the 
immediate consequence of the electric charge. 

In the case of the Fisgard it would certainly be inadmissible to suppose that the conductor 
had transmitted a discharge of lightning capable of shivering the masts in pieces, minus a cer- 
tain small portion, evinced by the disruptive effects, and which had passed off in no traceable 
or assignable direction whatever. Besides, it being now a perfectly established law of 
electrical action, that in all discharges such as lightning, the course of the discharge is 
invariably in the resisting path, we cannot conceive it possible that any small portion 

of the charge had left the conductor without we could determine the position of some other 
equally non-resisting course. But the surrounding air and other matter intervening 
between the conductor and the precludes the possibility of such a division of the 

charge, and renders any supposition of the conductor not having really transmitted the 
whole of the charge quite inadmissible. 

With respect to the fusion of a portion of the vane spindle, &c. &c, that is a result fre- 
quently to be expected whenever intense lightning assails the conductor, and for this 
reason, that the immediate points of entrance or exit of the electric matter are always those 
in which the greatest heating effect is produced. It is, in fact, upon these points of a light- 
ning conductor that the electric matter is concentrated in passing from or towards a 
resisting medium, and through which it is forcing its way ; as the fusion takes place aloft, 
there is no danger to be apprehended from it, and would be always liable to occur, however 
capacious or perfect the conductor may happen to be. 

I respectfully submit that this recent instance of the protection afforded by my con- 
ductors to Her Majesty's Ship Fisgard is of a very peculiarly interesting and satisfactory 
kind, inasmuch as the disruptive eflects, together with the appearances aloft, leave no doubt 
whatever of the fact of the conductor having transmitted a very intense stroke of lightning, 
with but extremely small inconvenience. We trace the discharge even from the point on 
which the lightning first fell, along the whole course of the mast up to the very bolts, by 
which it was securely transmitted to the sea, and we find the ship unharmed amidst the 
blaze and crash of the most powerful and destructive element in nature. 

Before concluding this communication, I cannot avoid pointing 
out to my Lords the possibility of the lightning having fallen on 
the Fisgard, both aloft at the vane spindle, and low down above 
the deck. It is well known that a discharge of lightning will very 
frequently divide in two or more streams. Monsieur Arago, in 
" Notices Scientifiques," " Sur le Tonnerre," has given several 
instances of this; and in my work on Thunder Storms, already men- 
tioned, pages 33, 213, and 221, will be found other interesting _ 
instances; and of which I could adduce many in cases of ships of" 
the Royal Navy struck and damaged by lightning. Thus a dis- 
charge of lightning in falling on a ship, will sometimes proceed as 
in the annexed scheme, dividing, as it were, in some point (A.) into 
two or more branches. 

Now it is not improbable that the discharge of lightning which assailed the Fisgard, 
might, in coming obliquely toward the mainmast, have so divided as to cause a minor dis- 
charge to fall on the conductor very low down. In this case there would arise a violent 
concussion and expansion near the deck as well as at the mast-head, quite sufficient to 
account for the phenomenon observed. At all events, 1 feel satisfied that none of the 
effects described by Captain Duntze arose out of any insufficiency in the conductor to carry 
off the whole completely. 

I have now, sir, to express to you my grateful sense of their Lordships' courtesy, in 
having honoured me with a copy of Captain Duntze's most interesting letter, and beg per- 
mission to add that I shall be at all times ready to meet any suggestions or views my Lords 
may entertain relative to the fitting my conductors in Her Majesty's ships, and will, with 
the greatest pleasure, give immediate attention to any further communication on this ques- 
tion they may feel disposed to favour me with. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) W. Snow Harris. 

P.S. — Thinking it may not be unacceptable to my Lords to receive an account of what 
has happened in similar circumstances, I do myself the honour to enclose an extract of 
an official letter relative to the Phaeton ; being, as in the case of the Fisgard, a communi- 
cation from the captain of the ship ; the size of the ship about the same, and the circum- 
stances not unlike. 

T Kqva alert nr%n\na.&A a Viiaf/M*v /\f* +Via nna^a A f lirrk+rti*t«v mVkistK !«**•.<% st/*/turra/l in AthfiP 




16 RETURNS RELATIVE TO CERTAIN SHIPS 

EXTRACT of a Letter from Captain Sturt, of Her Majesty's Ship Phaeton, of 46 guns; 
dated Spithead, 21st October 1824, and addressed to Admiral Sir George Martin, g.c.b., 
Commander-in-Chief at Portsmouth ; describing a shock of Lightning which fell on the 
Mastsof the Phaeton at Gibraltar, on the previous 14th of September; inconsequence 
of which she was sent to England. 

From 7 to 8 p. m. it blew extremely hard, with severe squalls and vivid flashes of light- 
ning, which seemed to approach the ship. 

A few minutes before eight, there was observed a condensed cloud, charged evidently 
with the electric fluid, gliding along one side of the rock, and directing its course toward 
the ship, which it reached; about 10 minutes past 8, it exploded over the Phaeton, with a 
terrific crash, striking first the fore topgallant mast, and then descending down the topmast, 
passed down to the bitts, along the foremast; all these masts were shivered in pieces and 
set on fire, together with the small sails in the top, and the topmast studding sail on the 
larboard rigging. 

The electric matter likewise struck the main topgallant mast, came down the signal 
halliards, which were burned to a cinder, and then attracted, as I conjecture, by one of the 
guns, it escaped out of the port. 

The very hearts of the masts were torn out. Five of the iron hoops on the foremast 
melted and torn asunder. 

I am happy to add that no one was seriously hurt, although many were struck down and 
continued for some time insensible. 

N.B. — The foremast was obliged to be cut off; 16 feet above the deep they fitted a 
spare maintop mast for a jury foremast and returned to England. 



APPENDIX. 

In treating of the effects of expansion, as causing the disruptive effects described in the 
case of the Fisgard v. Conductor, I should have further explained that the expansive force 
of electricity, although the greatest upon bad conducting or resisting matter, such as the 
air, glass, resinous bodies, wood, &c. &c, is still very powerful on the particles of less resist- 
ing matter, such as the metals, especially if the metallic body be of small dimensions in 
respect of the passing charge. Thus, if a shock of electricity be transmitted along a small 
wire, A B, 

A_ B 

as, for instance, from A to B, it will frequently become as it were crippled, and assume the 
appearance shown below : 



In the case of the twisted wire rope, applied as a lightning conductor to the Hotel des 
Invalides at Paris, a portion of it became so crippled that it fairly broke into pieces of one 
such or more in length ; these were scattered in all directions, and some considerable 
damage ensued. This happened in June 1839; an account is seen in Comptes Rendus for 
17th June 1839. 

It is therefore very probable that, in addition to the force I have assigned, viz. the expan- 
sion of the air about the joints, there was exerted also some further expansion by the electric 
matter acting on the particles of the conductor, and which tended to wrench it as it were 
by a twist ; all such effects, however, in the very capacious conductor I employ, would at 
any time be small, and certainly of no moment in consideration of the general result, as is 
seen in the case of the Fisgard. The capacity of the conductor on the Fisgard's mainmast 
exceeds that of the common conductor, originally proposed for the navy, in the ratio of 
nearly 10 to 1, and is greater by far than any conductor usually applied to buildings on 
shore. I feel quite assured, however, that such conductors are requisite in all cases ; those 
in common use are much too limited to resist the expansive effects of lightning, as we see 
in many instances ; besides that no small conductors of great length, as in long small chains 
and wire ropes, in which the resistance becomes very great, the charge may really divide 
upon other portions of the rigging or ship. This happened in two French frigates having 
long wire ropes as conductors, viz. La Calypso and La Junon ; Arago, Sur les Tonnerre : it 
also occurred in the case of Her Majesty's sloop Bittern, here the royal-mast was shivered ; 
we see this also in the case of the Hotel des Invalides, above mentioned. 

When all these things are taken into the account, I think it will appear, from the many 
cases of protection from severe lightning afforded by my conductors, that by the system 
I have proposed, resting as it does upon far more general views in science than any which 
have been nitherto entertained, the Navy of England may be certainly placed beyond the 

rAn<»h of dftmncrA Kv the tprrihle element of licrhtnincr. ftnH"whir»h rannnt. nnt he of verv vital 



OF THE NAVY STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. 17 

History, that the Guerri6re went into action with her mainmast in a tottering state from 
lightning. — Vol. 6, p. 32. 

In 1828, the Thetis and Heron, two out of five of our Buenos Ayres squadron, had their 
masts shivered by lightning, so that convoys could not be granted for the protection of our 
trade, the object of the station at that time, nor could the Thetis get a foremast for some 
time. 

There is, then, every fair reason for perfecting my conductors to the last possible degree, 
as specified in my letter of the 4th of January last. It would, I think, be desirable to unite 
the branches below with the conducting bolts leading to the side by solder, and cut the 
copper plates passing under the beams into longer plates, 60 as to have fewer joints. 

The advantages obtained by such a system as I propose are these : the conductor is of 
great capacity, .much greater than can be possibly applied under any other form ; it is 
applied directly to the part required to be defended ; it forms an integral part of the ship, 
hence is always in place, always ready to meet the most unexpected danger. It does not 
in any way interfere with the standing or running rigging ; is not liable to damage by the 
many strains or forces acting on the ropes generally ; it admits of the motion of one part of 
the mast on the other; and in case of any portion being removed, either by accident or 
design, the remainder is in place, and competent to the required protection. 

Moreover, the conductor is totally independent of the crew 01 the ship, and gives them 
no trouble to place or replace, to watch or nandle, in times of difficulty. Thus, if in the case 
of the Fisgard, the men nad been handling a small wire rope about the truck, with a view 
of shortening it on, or providing for it, from a necessity of striking the topgallant-mast, they 
certainly must have suffered; now this casualty is met, as far as possible, by the conductor 
being of great capacity, and forming part of the mast 



— No. 20. — 

Dibbctob-gbn bral, transmitting Extract of Surgeon's Report. 

Admiralty, 6 May 1847. 
I bbg leave to lay before their Lordships the accompanying extract from the Medical 
Report of Dr. Thomas R. Dunn, Surgeon of Her Majesty's Ship Fisgard, in the Pacific, 
between the 1st July and 30th September 1846, showing the effects produced by a stroke 
of lightning on that ship, which has been fitted with lightning conductors on the plan of 
Sir Snow Harris. 

(signed) W. Burnett, 
The Secretary of the Admiralty. . Director-general, tec. 



— No. 21. — 

EXTRACT from the Medical Report of Dr. Thomas R. Dunn, as Surgeon of Her 
Majesty's Ship Fisgard, in the Pacific, between 1 July and 30 September 1846. 

Im general terms the weather may be described as fine during the quarter, and very 
much resembling the climate of England, during the corresponding period of the year, witp 
cooler nights, perhaps, and a smaller amount of rain. On the 26th instant, after a gloomy 
day, and heavy falls of rain, this ship was struck by the lightning at 8 p. m., during a 
heavy thunder storm. The electrical discharge is described by the officer on deck to have 
descended the mainmast with tremendous force on the lower deck ; it was also observed 
to pass along the lateral conductors, and to explode simultaneously on escaping from both 
sides of the ship, at the respective distances of 2 J, 7 J, and 12 j feet above the upper 
deck, the lower butts or ends of the external plates of the lightning conductor, as well as 
the copper nails by which they are secured to the mast, were observed to have been forced 
out of the groove to the extent of an inch ; two splinters of wood of 7 and 12 inches long 
were also picked up, which evidently had been torn off the edge of the groove, by the 
starting of the conducting plates. Several boarding pikes ranged round the mainmast, 
and pointed upwards, were also displaced, and the wooden stand slightly charred. The 
casing of the conductor, leading through the boatswain's cabin on the port side of the 
lower deck, was rent and splintered in several places. A partial explosion is also said to 
have taken place, within the midshipman's berth on the starboard side, which has since 
been ascribed to a slight displacement of the superior plate of the conductor, where it passes 
over the inner edge of the snelf piece ; on examining the conductor at this point, the upper 
plate was found partially fractured, and the edge of the shelf piece discoloured, as if from 
the explosion of gunpowder. On tracing the course of the electrical discharge on the 
following morning, the upper ends of the diagonal plates of copper on the ship's bends, 
which communicated with the lateral conductors by bolts, were also forced out on both 



i8 



RETURNS: -SHIPS STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. 



on both aides of the ship. It was at first conjectured that the lower mast had alone been 
struck by a concentrated discharge, but on lowering the copper spindle from aloft, it was 
discovered to be much fused, with a minute bright red shining globule formed at the very 
point of the rod. A boatswain's mate, who happened to be standing near the mainmast, 
when the electrical discharge took place, was struck down, and complained for some time 
afterwards of impaired vision from the vivid glare of the lightning. I am unable to state 
how far this man's fall be attributed to panic, or the influence of electricity ; not having 
paid much attention to this subject, I am only anxious to confine my statement to simple 
matters of fact " 






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NAVAL CONSTRUCTION. 



RETURN to tin Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 15 April 1847 ;- = /or, 



COPY " of the Instructions from the Board of Admiralty to the Board 
of Naval Construction, appointed to inquire into the State of Naval 
Architecture." 



Admiralty, \ H. F. AMEDROZ, 

16 April 1847. J Chief Clerk. 



COPY of Instructions given by the Admiralty to the Committee of Reference, on 
Questions relating to the Construction of Ships. 

Admiralty, 9th May 1846. 
My Lords having had under consideration the large amount which is annually expended 
in building Vessels of War, and the great importance of adopting such plans only as, after 
due examination by persons practically and theoretically acquainted with the science of 
Naval Architecture, snail appear to ensure the greatest possible degree of efficiency for the 
several objects for which such vessels are designed, and seeing that in many instances the 
objects wnich constructors have had in view have not been fulfilled by the performance of 
their vessels when tried at sea, and that in others expensive alterations have been required 
after they have been built; and being therefore of opinion that it is expedient to have recourse 
to greater precaution than has heretofore existed, before finally approving of the draught of 
any Vessel submitted, to them, are pleased to direct,—* 

1st. That in future every such draught shall be sent in, in duplicate, and shall be accom- 
panied by a Model on the scale of half an inch to the foot, in the case of Vessels of 150 
feet and under in length, between the perpendiculars, or of a quarter of an inch to the foot, 
in the case of Vessels of greater length, and shall in the first instance be submitted to the 
Board for inspection at one of their regular sittings. . 

2d. That if the Board shall consider it expedient to entertain the proposed design, one 
copy shall be referred, as has heretofore been the practice, to the Surveyor of the Navy, to be 
reported on bv him, and the other to a Committee to be composed of two of the most scientific 
Shipwright Officers, to be selected for this duty by the Board, and such other one or more 
competent persons, not officially connected with the Admiralty, as their Lordships may think 
proper to select, who are to report their opinions respecting it in writing, and (in case of dis- 
agreement) separately to the Board ; and in the event of any nautical difference of opinion 
between the Surveyor and the Committee thus constituted, the report of the Surveyor is to 
be referred to the Committee, and that of the Committee to the Surveyor, who are to state, 
after having duly weighed the arguments in favour of their respective views, whether or not 
they still adhere to their former opinions. 

3d. That a printed form, to be hereafter determined by the Admiralty with the assistance 
of the Surveyor and the above-mentioned " Committee of Reference/ shall be drawn up, 
containing questions with respect to the capacity of the proposed Vessel for carrying her 
weights, her probable qualities as a Man-of-war, and other points of importance to her 
efficiency, to which answers are to be inserted separately by the Surveyor, and by each of 
the members of the " Committee of Reference ;" but that their remarks are not to be con- 
fined to such answers, but are to extend to every point having relation to the design referred 
to them to which they may think it proper to draw the attention of the Board. 

4th. That the Surveyor and the Committee of Reference be desired to confer with the 
Chief Engineers of the Woolwich and Portsmouth steam factories, and to submit for the 
consideration of the Board, a plan for obtaining greater security than at present exists, that 
the Steam Vessels to be hereafter ordered to be built will float at the proper trim after their 
engines have been fixed on board, and that they will stow the requisite quantities of coal*, 
water, provisions, &c. at the proper immersion. 

Mh That the Rennrts of the Surveyor and of the " Committee of Reference" are to be 



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PADDLE BOX SAFETY BOATS. 



RETURN to an Ordir of the Honourable the Route of Commons, 
dated 39 April 1 847 ;-^or, 



A COPY " of the Reports of Captains Austin and Coffin, concerning the 

Paddle Box Safety Boats/ 9 



Admiralty. \ H. F. AMEDROZ, 

6 May 1847.J Chief Clerk. 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, U May 1847. 



A COPY of the Reports of Captains Austin and Cqffin, concerning the 

Paddle Box Safety Boats. 

Sir, Portsea, 23 March 1847. 

In concluding the duties I have been charged with, that of directing the 
operations of heaving the Sphynx off shore, it is my duty to report to you 
the great value and security that has been afforded throughout this service by 
the paddle-box boats which have been employed : namely, two of the first class, 
such as were fitted to Retribution, which has conveyed more than 8 & tons dead 
engine weight through a moderate roller ; two of the second class, sloop size, 
employed by the riggers laying out hawsers and other rough work, as well as 
conveying a large proportionate load of dead weight ; and two of the size as 
fitted to Porcupine, which were most handy and efficient. And had it not been 
for these boats, the weighty and valuable parts of the engines could not have 
been removed to the vessels in the offing, on account of the rollers they had to 
pass ; nor could the hawsers have been laid out, or the communication be kept 
up with the security it has been (for not one accident of any description has 
occurred in their use), but for them. 

Their lightness and buoyancy so particularly fits them for conveying weights 
over a topping sea, and taking a beach where there is a surf; and 1 desire much 
to impress upon you, sir, the efficiency that would be given to all vessels^y having 
such a description of boat, either steam or sailing vessels (the latter, if one could 
be conveniently placed), in addition to the established number of boats now car- 
ried. And further, in coast operations with the fleets, I am fully satisfied that 
such a description of light buoyant boat is well adapted to supersede the transport 
flat of the ola construction, used and carried for such operations. 

I am, &c. 
(signed) Horatio T. Austin, 

Additional Captain William & Mary. 

Admiral Sir Charles Ogle, Bart., &c. 
Portsmouth. 



H. M.'s Steam Sloop Scourge, Cove of Cork, 
Sir > m 13 February 1847. 

In obedience to your letter of the 22d January, conveying my Lords Commis- 

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a REPORTS OF CAPTAINS AUSTIN AND CAFFIN, 

respecting these boats, — I have the honour to state, for the information of their 
Lordships, that in the operations for the rescue of the Sphynx, I found these 
boats of the utmost value ; indeed I feel convinced that no other boats could 
have done the work of laying out anchors and cables, under similar circum- 
stances of surf, which they did. 

I went through the surf, shortly after my cutter was capsised, in one of the 
Porcupine's paddle-box boats (which as surf-boate are a most handy size and 
build), when the surf was so high that I did not deem it prudent to allow the 
other (and much larger) paddle-box boats with the cables in to venture, and 
was obliged to buoy them outside ; but which she floated over most beautifully. 

So persuaded am I of their usefulness, that it appears to me the strangest 
thing in the world that all steam- vessels have-not got them; and indeed I 
think they ought not to be limited to steamers, as I am sure one or more would 
be a very great acquisition to any man-of-war. 

My unfortunate cutter, when she got into the surf, was served as all such 
boats must be under similar circumstances ; the surf broke over her stern, and 
she went down stern foremost and rolled over. This cannot (or is not likely to) 
happen with these boats, from their build and great buoyancy. 

I had once to go through the surf to seaward from the Sphynx, when it was 
nearly low water, and each breaker, after passing, left the boat aground. No 
other but such a build of boat could have stood this ; an ordinary boat would have 
fallen over on her side, and filled with the next breaker. 

From the arrangement of the oars, that is, from being able to turn and face 
either end of the boat, and give way, there is no necessity of winding the boat, 
which in a surf is of the first consideration, as you may either stem the breaker 
or fece about, give way, and keep the boat on the top of it ; thus exercising your 
judgment for the safety of the boat. 

As for their stowage room for anchors and cables, you get a much greater 
quantity with a much less draught of water, as compared with the ordinary ship's 
launch. 

I found some difficulty in getting the Scourge's bower anchor, hung by Mr. 
Cow's plan, through the bottom of the boat, owing to the heavy rolling motion 
which we had at the time ; and I would recommend that all the paddle-box 
boats be fitted with a davit over the stern, as well as the trunks through the 
bottom of the boat. 

I would suggest that all paddle steamers, instead of having a pinnace amidships, 
should have a third paddle-box boat (of the same size exactly as her others) 
stowed there ; so in the event of losing one, or having it stove and finding it 
necessary to hoist it in for repairs, the spare one could take its place. 

The difficulty of hoisting them out and in seems to be the objection which 
most people have to offer against their usefulness : this ought not to operate in 
the least against their general adoption, as it can be readily shown this difficulty 
is much less than with the pinnace amidships. In smooth water it is little more 
than lowering a quarter boat, but in a heavy sea it is doubtless a difficult task 
lowering or hoisting them up ; however, under similar circumstances of weather, 
it would be infinitely less difficult lowering a paddle-box boat than getting the 
pinnace from off a steamer's booms into the water. 

In heavy rolling motion two spars or boat's masts must be put over, to keep 
the boat's gunwale from taking under the spring beam. 

On the 14th of April 1846, after having exercised at a target with the 24- 
pounder carronades which the Scourge's boats are fitted with, I was anxious to 
see how many men one of them would hold ; and everybody 1 had on board, 
amounting to 77 men, I put into one, the marines and boat's crew being armed ; 
and these, together with the 24-pounder, left her gunwale amidships 21 J inches 

out of water. 

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PADDLE-BOX SAFETY BOATS. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commoni, 
dated 39 April 1847 ;— for, 

COPY " of the Report and Recommendation to the Board of Trade from 
Captain Deiiham % respecting the P addle-Box Safety Boats." 



THAT the stipulation of " a Life Boat " which may never be satisfactorily 
constructed or disposed of, and to which all affrighted persons would rush in the 
moment of danger, should be rescinded, and those vessels who cannot carry 
paddle-box boats, by weakness of paddle-box structure or of crews to work their 
davits properly, even with the chance aid of passengers, should be compelled to 
carry two (or four, according to size of ship) flat-bottomed boats, of the propor- 
tions of paddle-box boats, upon canting davits, and slung in chain gear, so as to 
be eased out when wanted, or boused in snugly at other times, the master and 
mates alone having the key to unshackle them by. I append a corroborative 
suggestion of an experienced commander of steamers upon passenger traffic. 



To Captain Denham, r.n. 
Sir, 

In furtherance of the object I had in view during the conversation you did me 
the honour of holding with me on the 13th instant, namely, the better protecting 
of life in the coasting steamers, and the improvement of their boats, I take leave to 
lay before you my opinions, and to suggest such a remedy as appears to me most 
likely to be useful to the public, easy in its accomplishment, and least onerous 
to the proprietors of the vessels, premising that long experience in command, of 
steamers has given me sufficient insight to justify me at least in offering a 
qualified opinion. 

I am thoroughly convinced of the utter inability of the boats hitherto and at 
present employed on board these vessels to be effective in cases of wreck or fire, 
owing to their construction not adapting them for the only service for which they 
can be required in coasters, viz. the saving of life, or working an anchor when 
required. Their power of accommodation is far too limited ; they are much too, 
ticklish and too easily swamped by any rush of numbers, which is always to be 
expected from passengers where no discipline can exist. The late Act of Parlia- 
ment, to my mind, is but a poor remedy ; the life-boat is a humbug, or worse. 
From such boats as these has chiefly arisen the frightful waste of life in the 
" Pegasus," the iC Waterwitch," the " Sirius " and others ; and although it is not 
in the power of man to avert calamity, yet, as a seaman, you must be aware that 
a different class of boats would most likely have produced different results 

I do not think the crew of a coaster calculated to handle that most useful of 
all boats in a steamer, " Smith's Paddle-box Boat ;" but I would insist on all their 
boats being built on that plan, flat-floored, broad in the beam, carvell-built, alike 
at both ends, of sufficient strength, and to steer by an oar. Their number should 
be one to every hundred tons ; thus, a vessel of the size of the " Sirius " would 
have seven, two of which should be kept on the deck or on the cross boards, and 
two on the quarters at the davits ; these four boats should be secured in their 
places by gripes or lashings of metallic rope or small chain, which should be 
locked, and the keys kept in the possession of the captain and mates ; by which 
™~ona cnm» ftPrmritv would he nhteined. and the lowering or hoistinz out of 



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REPORT ON PADDLE-BOX SAFETY BOATS. 



The subject of the light required between Ardmore and Cork, I repeat my 
conviction that, for a coast light, Ballycotton is unquestionably the spot I would 
select. Cable Island may be supposed more useful for the benefit of Youghal 
individually ; but for the guidance and safety of the trade in general, it will not 
stand a comparison with Ballycotton : one winter station on this coast would 
satisfy any seaman on that point. I have already given you my reasons, and 
shall only add, that, to prevent the possibility of any mistake, I would have on the 
island two lights, vertical, in separate lighthouses ; one close down to the 
water's edge, the other above it, at a given height and bearing ; and if Cork 
Harbour Light be made flashing or revolving, the object required will be at once 
ensured. 

I have no doubt that in cases of wreck great benefit will arise from, purely 
professional investigations, held under competent and unbiassed authority ; such, 
m my opinion, is much wanted. If a foreigner has to appear before our courts, 
he is entitled to a certain number of foreigners on his jury. Nautical men and 
nautical matters require a similar privilege ; and should a merchant vessel be 
wrecked on a coast, and a coroner's inquest be assembled, it would be well to 
put a professional and responsible seaman (say, for instance, the senior officer of 
the Water-guard of the district) on the bench with the coroner, while a propor- 
tion of the jury should be seafaring men, in which case thq public might fancy 
that the object required would be better obtained, and their interests more 
attended to. 

lam, &c. 



Cork, 15 February 1847. 



(signed) Dom. Creagh Waters, 

L'R.N. 



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PAYMASTERS AND PURSERS (NAVY). 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 15 April 1847;—; for, 

A COPY " of the Order in Council of the Year 1834, relative to the Reduction of 
the Sea Emoluments of the Paymasters and Pursers of the Royal Navy, which 
they surrendered for the purpose of creating a Fund for the Benefit of those 
Officers of their Class who were on Half-pay ; with a Return of the Amount 
annually accruing since the passing of the said Order : — Also, the Annual 
Amount caused by any subsequent Reductions in the Sea Emoluments of the 
Paymasters and Pursers, with the Date when the same took effect." 

" RETURN of all Sums that have been applied to the Increase of the Half-pay, 
and to the Formation of a Retired List of the Paymasters and Pursers since 
the Order in Council of the Year 1834, with the Date when the same took effect." 



Admiralty, \ H. F. A M EDHOZ, 

28 May 1847. J Chief Clerk. 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 28 June 1847. 



At the Court at St. James's, the 3d of February 1834. 

Present, 
THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY IN COUNCIL. 

Whereas there was this day read at the Board a Memorial from the Right 
honourable the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, dated the 1st instant, in 
the words following ; viz. 

"Whereas by your Majesty's Orders in Council of 23 June 1824, and 12 October 
1832, the Pursers in your Majesty's Navy, on the passing of their accounts, as a 
full indemnity for waste and loss in the issuing of provisions, have credit for one- 
eighth part of the several species of provisions allowed for victualling the crews of 
your Majesty's ships and vessels, meat excepted; and having had under our con- 
sideration a Memorial from a large number of Pursers praying for an increase of 
Half-pay ; and considering the great disproportion which the amount of the above 
allowance bears to the emoluments of the Captains and other Commissioned 
Officers, as well as the great disproportion of the Pursers' own emoluments while 
serving afloat, as compared with the smallness of their Half-pay ; we would humbly 
propose that your Majesty would be graciously pleased to sanction and direct by 
your Order in Council, that an allowance for waste in issuing provisions on board 
your Majesty's ships, packets, troop ships, transports, convict ships, as well as in 
all other cases where Pursery accounts are to be passed, 6hall be reduced from the 
present rate of otie-eighth to that of one-tenth ; and we would further most humbly pro- 
pose that the saving accruing to the public from this alteration may be applied to the 



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2 RETURN relative to REDUCTION OP SEA EMOLUMENTS 

u And lastly, we would submit that this regulation take effect, with regard to all 
Pursers who shall be appointed to serve in any of your Majest/s ships, from and 
after the date of your Majesty's Order in Council." 

His Majesty, having taken the said Memorial into consideration, was pleased, by 
and with the advice of his Privy Council, to approve of what is therein proposed; 
and the Right honourable the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty are to give 
the necessary directions herein accordingly. 

(signed) Wm. L. Bathurst. 



A RETURN of the Amount annually accruing since the passing of the Order in Council 
of the Year 1834, by the Reduction of the Allowance for Waste granted to Pursers 
from an Eighth to a Tenth. 



On Pursery Accounts 



- < 



'1834 
1835 
1836 
1837 
1838 
1839 
1840 
J 841 
1842 
1843 
1844 
1845 

^1846 



On Transport Accounts - 
On Convict Ships 9 Accounts 



To 31 Dec. 1846 
To 31 Dec. 1846 



£• s. d. 
2,485 1 2 
3,397 6 7 



£. 
6 
1,654 
3,306 
4,458 
6,549 
5,854 
7,413 
5,345 
10,708 
9,639 
7,274 
8,398 
7,982 



s. d. 

16 6 

1 8 

10 8 

11 1 



19 
2 
9 



3 9 
2 5 



6 
5 



9 
3 



11 5 
18 - 



78,591 18 8 



5,882 7 9 



84,474 6 5 



In addition to the foregoing, there was, from the year 1836 or 1837 to the time of the New 
Instructions being acted upon, a small advantage accruing to the Crown, in consequence of 
the Pursers having been disallowed payment for their credits of Salt Meat. Of those credits, 
however, a large portion was afterwards allowed in reduction of the debts of Salt Meat 
appearing on subsequent accounts rendered by the same parties ; but as no record has been 
kept in office of the amounts actually disallowed, no correct statement can be furnished 
thereof. 

The result of the alteration of prices and allowances by the New Admiralty Instructions 
of the 1st April 1844, has been amply compensated for to the Pursers by increased Annual 
Allowance in certain classes of Ships, and other advantages, as shown below ; viz.— 

Profit Balances paid to Pursers under the Old and New Admiralty Instructions. 



Result of Accounts oassed on the Old Sys-*i 
tern, between 1 Oct. 1842 and 30 Sept. J 



1845 



Result of Accounts passed on the New Sys-" 
tern, between 2 June 1845 and 31 Dtec 
1846 

A proportionate result of Accounts on thel 

>v. /■/*. 1111 > 



;} 



Days' Victualling. 



Bays. 
41,993,60? 

13,116,973 



Profit Balance*. 



£. t. d. 

124,871 15 1 

38,439 10 10 



13.116.973 39.004 9 10 



Profit per Man 
per Annum. 



£. *. d. 

1 1 SJA, 



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PENINSULAR AND ORIENTAL STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commont, 
dated 10 February 1847,*— -for, 

A " COPY of the Charter granted to the Peninsular and Oriental Steam 
Packet Company:" 

A " COPY of the Contracts entered into between Her Majesty's Govern- 
ment and the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Packet Company." 



Admiralty, \ H. F. AMEDROZ, 

23 February 1847. J Chief Clerk. 



Note. — The Admiralty has no cognizance of any Charter granted to this Company. 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 26 February 1847. 



COPIES of the Contracts entered into between Her Majesty's Government 
and the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Packet Company. 



Articles of AGREEMENT made the 22d day of August, in the year of 
our Lord 1837, between the Commissioners for executing the Office of Lord 
High Admiral of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland (for and 
on behalf of the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty), of the one part, and 
Richard Bourne, of Sandy Mount, in the County of Dublin, Shipowner, of 
the other part. 

The said Richard Bourne, in consideration of the yearly sum hereinafter 
agreed to be paid, doth hereby for himself, his heirs, executors, and adminis- 
trators, agree with the said Commissioners for and on behalf of Her Majesty, 
as follows : * 

That he, the said Richard Bourne, his executors and administrators, shall 
and will, during the continuance of this contract, diligently, faithfully, and 
with all possible speed convey Her Majesty's mails and despatches from Fal- 
mouth to Vigo, Oporto, Lisbon, Cadiz, and Gibraltar, and from the five last- 
mentioned places and ports to Falmouth, by means of a sufficient number of 
good, substantial, and efficient steam-vessels, supplied and furnished with 
engines of not less than 140 horse power to each vessel, and with all necessary 
apparel, furniture, stores, tackle, and fuel, and manned with competent officers 
and engineers, and a sufficient crew of able seamen, to be in all respects, as to 
vessel, equipment, and crew, subject to the approval of the said Commissioners, 
and that one of such vessels so equipped and manned shall leave Falmouth 
once in every week, on such day and at such hour as the said Commissioners 
shall from time to time direct ; and if the said Richard Bourne, his execu- 
tors or administrators, shall, at any time during the continuance of this con- 
tract, fail to provide such steam-vessel so equipped and manned as aforesaid, 
ready to put to sea from Falmouth within 12 hours after the time fix:ed by the 
said Commissioners for her departure from Falmouth, then and so often as he 

or thfiv shall fail in this rpsnppt and nnrm A^wr ai*«V» ilpfanlt- D k^j^JjJl« said 



2 CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT 

500/. fbr each successive period of 12 hours which shall elapse until such steam- 
vessel so equipped and manned shall actually proceed to sea from Falmouth 
with the said mails and despatches ; but the payment of such sum or sums 
shall not be enforced, should it be proved to the satisfaction of the said, Com- 
missioners that the vessel which ought to have proceeded to sea from Falmouth 
started from her moorings in the river Thames 48 hours, during the months 
of April, May, June, July, August, and September, and 72 hours during the 
months of October, November, December, January, February, and March, 
before the time appointed by the said Commissioners for such vessel departing 
from Falmouth ; and also that such vesael was not unnecessarily delayed on the 
way from such moorings in the Thames to Falmouth. That the vessel so 
leaving Falmouth from time to time shall proceed to sea without delay as soon 
qs Her Majesty's mails and despatches shall have been put on board, and make 
the best of her way to Vigo, where she shall remain, for the purpose of deliver- 
ing and receiving the mails and despatches, and of embarking and disembark- 
ing passengers, not longer than three hours from the time of her arrival there, 
unless the naval officer to be appointed by the said Commissioners, as herein- 
after mentioned, shall otherwise direct, for the purpose of delivering and re- 
ceiving the same mails and despatches. That the same vessel shall then pro- 
ceed off Oporto, and, weather permitting, deliver and receive the mails and 
despatches which are there to be delivered and received ; but she shall not 
on any account whatsoever remain off Oporto longer than three hours, unless 
the said naval officer shall otherwise direct, for the purpose of delivering and 
receiving such mails and despatches. That the same vessel shall then proceed 
to Lisbon, where her stay shall not exceed two clear days. That from Lisbon 
she shall proceed to Cadiz, where she shall not remain longer than six hours, 
and shall thence go on to Gibraltar, where she shall arrive within 216 hours 
of her departure from Falmouth. That the said vessel shall remain at Gib- 
raltar until the expiration of 264 hours from the period of her departure from 
Falmouth, and shall after the said 264 hours proceed on her homeward voyage 
whenever required to do so by the said naval officer, who is to have the power 
to detain her at Gibraltar, even after the expiration of the said 264 hours, 
until the arrival of the Malta mail there, so that the said vessel be not detained 
at Gibraltar beyond 288 hours from the period of her departure from Fal- 
mouth : in case, however, the said vessel, owing to stress of weather or other 
unavoidable cause, shall not arrive at Gibraltar within the said 216 hours, she 
shall nevertheless depart thence on her homeward voyage at the expiration of 
264 hours, or so soon afterwards as the said naval officer shall determine, allow- 
ing a reasonable time, if necessary, not in any case however exceeding 24 hours, 
for incidental repair, and for landing and receiving cargo, coals, and passen- 
gers. It being expressly understood that the said Commissioners shall be at 
liberty, and have full power, from time to time, on giving three months' notice 
in writing, under their hands or the hand of their Secretary, to the said Richard 
Bourne, his executors or administrators, to direct that the said vessel shall pro- 
ceed on her homeward voyage from Gibraltar at the expiration of any period 
being not less than 240 hours, nor exceeding 288 hours from the time of her 
departure from Falmouth, instead of at the expiration of the said 264 hours ; 
and that whenever, and so often as any such alteration may be made, the said 
vessel shall start from Gibraltar, on her homeward voyage, as soon after the 
period fixed by the said Commissioners for that purpose as may be required 
by the said naval officer, who shall in every last-mentioned case have power to 
detain the said vessel at Gibraltar until the arrival of the Malta mail there, so 
that the said vessel be not detained at Gibraltar more than 24 hours beyond 
the period which may be so fixed by the said Commissioners for her leaving 
that place, and so that a reasonable time, if necessary, not in any case exceed- 
ing 24 hours from the time of her arrival at Gibraltar, be allowed for inci- 
dental repair, and fbr landing and receiving cargo, coals, and passengers. 

That the said vessel, after leaving Gibraltar, shall return to Falmouth, touch- 
ing successively at Cadiz, Lisbon, Oporto, and Vigo, delivering and receiving 
the mails and despatches at each of the four last-mentioned places, and remain- 
ing at each the same period of time only as is hereby agreed to be allowed on 
the outward voyage, and that the whole voyage from Gibraltar to Falmouth 



AND THE PENINSULAR, &c. STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 3 

the stipulated time of 216 hours, in default whereof, and so often as any such 
default shall happen, he, the said Richard Bourne, his executors or adminis- 
trators, shall pay unto Her Majesty, her heirs and successors, the sum of 500 /. 
for a delay of 12 hours beyond the expiration of 216 hours, and also a sum 
of 500/. for each and every successive period of 12 hours until her arrival 
st Falmouth or Gibraltar, as the case may be, unless the said naval officer shall 
certify by writing under his hand, to the said Commissioners, that the delay 
arose from unavoidable accident, stress of weather, regulations for carrying 
into effect the laws of quarantine, or other cause over which the said Richard 
Bourne, his agents and servants, had not, and could not have had, any control. 
That the said Richard Bourne shall receive and allow to remain on board 
each of the said vessels, while employed in the performance of this contract, 
an officer in Her Majesty's navy, to be appointed by the said Commissioners, 
and also a servant of the same officer, if required ; and that such officer shall 
be recognized and considered by the said Richard Bourne as the agent of the 
said Commissioners in charge of the said mails and despatches, and as having 
foil authority in all cases to require a due and strict execution of the conditions 
of this contract on the part of the said Richard Bourne or his servants, and to 
determine every question, whenever arising, relative to proceeding to sea, or 
putting into harbour, or to the necessity of stopping to assist any vessel in 
distress, or to save human life ; and that the report and decision of such officer 
shall in each and every of such cases be final and binding on the said Richard 
Bourne, his executors or administrators, unless the said Commissioners, on 
appeal from the said Richard Bourne, his executors or administrators, shall 
think proper to decide otherwise. That a suitable cabin, with bed, bedding, and 
furniture, shall be provided and appropriated by the said Richard Bourne to 
the exclusive use and for the sole accommodation of the said naval officer, and 
also a proper place of deposit, under lock and key, for the said mails and 
despatches, and that the said officer shall be victualled as a chief cabin 
passenger, without any charge being made either for his passage or victualling, 
and that should such naval officer require a servant, such servant shall be also 
provided with a proper berth and victualled without any charge being made 
for the same. 

That at Falmouth, and at each and every of the places (except Oporto) 
where the said mails and despatches are to be delivered and received, the said 
naval officer shall, whenever by him deemed practicable, be conveyed on shore, 
and back to the vessel, with the said mails and despatches, in a suitable boat, 
to be provided and properly manned and equipped by the said Richard Bourne, 
and that the directions of the said naval officer shall in all cases be obeyed, as 
to the mode of receipt and delivery of the said mails and despatches. That 
the said Richard Bourne, his executors and administrators, shall and will 
(weather permitting) convey in a competent boat, properly manned and 
equipped, from Oporto to the said vessel, when off that place, the mails and 
despatches from Oporto, with the person who may have the custody thereof, 
in order that such mails and despatches may be received on board, and shall 
and will convey back to Oporto, in such boat, the same person, with the mails 
and despatches for that place. 

That if any vessel having the said mails and despatches on board shall stop, 
linger, or deviate from the direct course on her voyage, except for the purpose 
of saving human life, or of assisting any vessel in distress, or shall delay starting 
contrary to the stipulations of this contract, or shall put back into port 
after starting, without the sanction in each case of such officer, then and in 
each and every of such cases, and as often as the same shall happen, the said 
Richard Bourne shall and will pay unto Her Majesty, her heirs and successors, 
the sum of 100 /. 

That the said Richard Bourne shall and will, at all times during the con- 
tinuance of this contract, at his own cost, provide and keep seaworthy and irx 
complete repair a sufficient number (not less than five) of good substantial 
and efficient steam -vessels, of not less than 140 horsepower each, for th^ 
service hereby contracted to be performed by him, and, at the like cost 3 
adequately provide and furnish each and every of the same vessels with all 
tackle, stores, oil, tallow," fuel, provisions, machinery, e?ngines, anchors, cables 3 



4 CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT 

necessary for equipping the said vessels, and rendering them constantly efficient 
for the said service. That the said naval officer shall have full power and 
authority, whenever he may deem it requisite, to examine and survey all and 
every the vessels to be employed in the performance of this contract, and the 
hulls, machinery, and equipments thereof; and if any defect or deficiency be 
ascertained, and notice thereof in writing be given to the master or commander 
of the vessel in which such defect or deficiency may be found, and the said 
master or commander shall not immediately, or as soon as possible thereupon, 
remedy, replace, or effectively repair the same, he, the said Richard Bourne, 
shall in every such case pay to Her Majesty, her heirs and successors, the sum 
of 100 /., but such payment shall not in anywise release or discharge the said 
Richard Bourne from remedying, replacing, or effectively repairing such defect 
or deficiency. 

And that the said Commissioners shall also be allowed to make a survey by 
any other of their officers or agents of all and every the said vessels, and of the 
hulls thereof, and of the engines, machinery, furniture, tackle, apparel, and 
stores of every such vessel ; and if any part of such vessels or engines, machinery, 
furniture, tackle, apparel, or stores shall on such survey be declared by the 
said officers or agents unseaworthy, or not adapted to the service of this con- 
tract, the vessel in which such deficiency shall appear shall be deemed ineffi- 
cient for the said service, and shall not be employed again in the conveyance of 
the said mails and despatches until such defect or deficiency be made good 
to the satisfaction of the said Commissioners; and if employed before such 
defect or deficiency be made good to the satisfaction of the said Commissioners, 
the said Richard Bourne, his executors or administrators, shall be liable to pay 
to Her Majesty, her heirs and successors, the same sum and sums of money 
as if he or they had neglected to provide and despatch a vessel according to 
the stipulations of this contract. 

That the said Richard Bourne and the officers in command of the said ves- 
sels shall at all times during the continuance of this contract punctually attend 
to the orders and directions of the said Commissioners, or any of their officers 
or agents, as to the conveyance, landing, delivering, and receiving the said 
mails and despatches. 

And it is hereby agreed by and between the parties hereto, that all and 
every the sums of money hereby stipulated to be paid by the said Richard 
Bourne, his executors or administrators, unto Her Majesty, her heirs and suc- 
cessors, shall be considered as stipulated or ascertained damages ; and should 
the same or any of them become payable and not discharged forthwith, each 
and every of such sums of money may be deducted and retained by the said 
Commissioners out of the monies payable by them to the said Richard Bourne, 
his executors or administrators, or the payment thereof enforced with full 
costs of suit, at the discretion of the said Commissioners. 

That the said Richard Bourne, his executors and administrators, shall and 
will, when in writing required so to do by the said Commissioners, or by such 
naval or other officers as may be authorized by them to act in that behalf (such 
writing to specify the rank or description of the person or persons to be con- 
veyed, and the accommodation to be provided for him or them), convey, pnK 
vide for, and victual on board each and every of the vessels to be employed in 
the performance of this contract, in addition to the naval officer in charge of 
the said mails and despatches, any number of officers in the navy, army, or 
civil service of Her Majesty, not exceeding two, as chief cabin passengers ; and 
any number, not exceeding two, as fore cabin passengers ; and any number o 
seamen or marines in Her Majesty's service, not exceeding two, as deck pas- 
sengers ; and shall and will allow all or any of the said passengers, after the 
termination of their respective passages, to remain on board, and shall and will 
provide for the same passengers during the stay at Lisbon or Gibraltar of the 
vessel in which they shall have been conveyed, charging for such passengers 
the following sums only : namely, for passage and victualling from London or 

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AND THE PENINSULAR, &c. STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 5 

remaining and being provided for on board after the termination of the pas- 
sengers' voyage at Lisbon or Gibraltar, for chief- cabin passengers, 6 s. per diem 
each ; for fore-cabin passengers, 4 s. per diem each ; and for deck passengers, 
2 s. per diem each. And that the said Richard Bourne, his executors and 
administrators, shall and will receive on board each and every of the said ves- 
sels so to be employed, any number of small packages containing astronomical 
instruments, charts, wearing apparel, or other articles, and convey the same to 
or from London or any of the other places specifically mentioned in this con- 
tract, when and as directed by the said Commissioners or their Secretary, free 
from all costs and charges ; and also shall and will receive on board each and 
every of the said vessels, and convey therein to or from London or any other 
of the places specifically mentioned in this contract, any naval or other stores, 
not exceeding five tons in weight at any one time, at the usual rate of freight 
charged by the said Richard Bourne for private goods, on receiving from the 
said Commissioners or their Secretary two days' previous notice of its being 
their intention to have such stores so conveyed. 

And in consideration of the said Richard Bourne, his executors and adminis- 
trators, fully performing this contract on his and their part, they, the said 
Commissioners, for and on behalf of Her Majesty, do hereby agree with the 
said Richard Bourne, his executors and administrators, that Her Majesty, her 
heirs or successors, shall and will, during the continuance of this contract, 
pay to the said Richard Bourne, his executors or administrators, by bills at 
sight payable by Her Majesty's Paymaster-general, at and after the rate of 
29,600 /. per annum, by equal quarterly payments, the first quarterly payment 
thereof to be made on the 4th day of December next. 

Provided always, that in case the port charges now payable in Spain and 
Portugal in respect of the said vessels shall be wholly remitted, there shall be 
abated from the said payment of 29,600 /. the sum of 3,500 /. per annum during 
the time of such remission ; and if and so long as the said port charges shall be 
wholly remitted only in one of those countries, the amount of any such 
remission shall in like manner be annually abated from the said annual sum of 
29,600 /. 

And it is hereby agreed that this contract shall continue in force for three 
years from the 4th day of September next (on which day the first vessel shall 
leave Falmouth in the performance of this contract), and shall at the expira- 
tion of such three years determine, if the said Commissioners shall have given 
to the said Richard Bourne, his executors or administrators, or the said Richard 
Bourne shall have given to the said Commissioners, six calendar months' pre- 
vious notice in writing of its being their or his intention that the same shall so 
determine ; but if any such notice shall not be so given, then this contract is to 
continue in full force after the said term of three years, until . six calendar 
months 9 notice in writing shall be given by the said Commissioners, or by their 
Secretary, to the said Richard Bourne, his executors or administrators, or by 
the said Richard Bourne, his executors or administrators, to the said Commis- 
sioners, of its being their or his intention that this contract shall determine; 
and at the expiration of the six calendar months mentioned in any such 
notice, this contract shall cease. 

And it is further agreed that the said Richard Bourne, his executors or 
administrators, shall not assign, underlet, or otherwise dispose of this contract, 
or any part thereof, during any period of the continuance thereof; and that in 
-case of any breach of this contract on the part of the said Richard Bourne, his 
executors or administrators, it shall be lawful for the said Commissioners, by 
writing under their hands, or under the hand of their Secretary, to determine 
this contract, without any previous notice to the said Richard Bourne, his 
-executors or administrators ; nor shall he or they be entitled to any compensa- 
tion in consequence of such determination as last aforesaid. 

Nevertheless, it is expressly agreed that if any sum or sums of money shall 
be due or payable at the determination of these presents, by virtue hereof, the 
same shall be paid or be recoverable as if this contract was still in force. 

And it is hereby agreed, that in case any one or more of the vessels to be 
employed in the performance of this contract should be detained by the laws* 
of quarantine during the said service (such detention not being occasioned 



6 CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT 

the circumstances appear to them to be required, and as in their opinion may 
be the least injurious to the interests of the public, and of the said Richard 
Bourne, his executors or administrators. 

And it is hereby further agreed, that the notices or directions which the said 
Commissioners, or their officer or agent, are or is hereby authorized to give to 
the said Richard Bourne, his executors or administrators, may at the option of 
the said Commissioners, their officer or agent, be either delivered to the master, 
commander, or any other officer or servant in the charge or management of 
any of the vessels which may be employed in the performance of this contract, 
or be left for the said Richard Bourne, his executors or administrators, at the 
Peninsular Steam Navigation Company's Office, No. 51, Saint Mary Axe, in the 
city of London, or at his or their last known place or places of business or 
abode ; and any notice or directions so given shall be considered as having 
been served personally upon the said Richard Bourne, his executors or adminis- 
trators. And in pursuance of the directions contained in a certain Act of 
Parliament made and passed in the 22d year of the reign of King George the 
Third, intituled, " An Act for restraining any person concerned in any Contract, 
Commission, or Agreement made for the Public Service from being elected or 
sitting and voting as a Member of the House of Commons," it is hereby ex- 
pressly declared and agreed, and these presents are upon this express condition, 
and the said Richard Bourne doth covenant for himself, his heirs, executors, 
and administrators, that no Member of the House of Commons shall be 
admitted to any share or part of this contract or agreement, or to any benefit 
to arise therefrom. 

In witness whereof the said parties to these presents have hereunto respec- 
tively set their hands and seals the day and year first above written. 

T. Troubridge. (l. s.) 
Dalmeny. (l. s.) 

Rich* Bourne, (l. s.) 

Signed, sealed, and delivered, in the presence of 

J no James. 



Articles of AGREEMENT made this 26th day of August, in the year of 
our Lord 1840, between Richard Bourne, of Blackheath, m the county of 
Kent, Esquire, Joseph Christopher Ewart, of Liverpool, in the county of 
Lancaster, Esquire, and Francis Carleton, of Norwood, in the county of 
Surrey, Esquire, three of the Directors of the "Peninsular and Oriental 
Steam Navigation Company," of the one part, and the Commissioners for 
Executing the Office of Lord High Admiral of the United Kingdom of 
Great Britain and Ireland (for and on behalf of Her Majesty), of the other 
part. 

Witness, that the said Richard Bourne, Joseph Christopher Ewart, and 
Francis Carleton (hereinafter designated as the contractors), in consideration of 
the payments hereinafter stipulated to be made, do, for and on behalf of the 
said Company, and separately for themselves, their heirs, executors, and admi- 
nistrators, and each and every of them doth, for himself, his heirs, executors, 
and administrators, hereby covenant, promise, and agree with the said Com- 
missioners that they, the contractors, shall and will at all times during the 
continuance of this contract provide, maintain, keep seaworthy, and in com- 
plete repair and readiness, for the purpose of conveying, as hereinafter provided, 
Her Majesty's mails (which term of Her Majesty's mails is intended and under- 
stood by the parties hereto to mean such of Her Majesty's mails and all such 
despatches and bags of letters as shall at any time and from time to time by 
the said Commissioners or Her Majesty's Postmaster- general, orantf~of the 



AND THE PENINSULAR, &c. STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 7 

steam-engines of not less than 400 collective horse power, and also a good, 
substantial, and efficient steam-vessel, to be employed between the island of 
Malta and the Ionian Islands, such last-mentioned vessel to be always supplied 
with first-rate appropriate steam-engines of not less than 140 collective horse 
power, and to be also always supplied and furnished with all necessary and 
proper machinery, engines, apparel, furniture, stores, tackle, boats, fuel, oil, 
tallow, provisions, anchors, cables, fire-pumps, and other proper means for 
extinguishing fire, and whatsoever else may be requisite and necessary for 
equipping the said vessels, and rendering them constantly efficient for the 
service hereby contracted to be performed, and also manned and provided with 
competent officers, including a medical officer, to be selected by the contractors 
from the unemployed surgeons or assistant surgeons of the Royal Navy or 
Army, and a sufficient crew of able seamen and other men, and to be, in all 
respects, as to vessels, engines, equipments, engineers, officers, and crew, subject 
in the first instance, and from time to time and at all times afterwards, to the 
approval of the said Commissioners, and of such other persons as shall at any 
time, or from time to time, have authority under the said Commissioners to 
inspect and examine the same. 

That every one of such vessels, with engines of not less than 400 horse 
power, shall be of such construction and strength, and their equipments so 
arranged as to be fit and able to carry and fire at least four guns of the largest 
calibre now used on board any of Her Majesty's steam- vessels of war. 

That the contractors shall and will, during the continuance of this contract* 
in every case diligently, faithfully, and to the satisfaction of the said Commis- 
sioners, and with all possible speed, convey Her Majesty's mails on board the 
said vessels respectively as hereinafter mentioned. 

That one of such vessels with engines of 400 collective horse power, so 
approved of and equipped and manned as aforesaid, and with Her Majesty's 
mails on board, shall, on the 2d day of September next, and on the second 
day of every succeeding calendar month, at such hour as shall at any time or 
from time to time be appointed by the said Commissioners, put to sea from 
Falmouth, or from such other port in the British Channel as the said Commis- 
sioners shall at any time or from time to time appoint, and proceed direct to 
Gibraltar, where she shall arrive within 120 hours from the time of her depar- 
ture from Falmouth, 

That such vessel shall remain at Gibraltar six hours, but not longer, unless a 
further stay of the vessel there shall be specially required by any officer duly 
authorized to have charge of Her Majesty's mails, whose direction is to be com* 
plied with, but in no case shall the stay at Gibraltar exceed 12 hours. 

That such vessel, after having delivered and received Her Majesty's mails at 
Gibraltar, shall proceed thence direct to the island of Malta, where she shall 
arrive within 116 hours from the time of her leaving Gibraltar. 

That within 26 hours after her arrival at Malta, Her Majesty's mails having 
been there delivered and received, such vessel shall proceed thence direct to 
Alexandria. It being agreed that any officer duly authorized to have charge 
of Her Majesty's mails shall have power and be at liberty specially to detain 
such vessel at Malta for any period not exceeding 48 hours from the time 
of her arrival, the vessel, when detained, proceeding direct to Alexandria 
from Malta immediately at the expiration of the period of her detention, 
That such vessel shall arrive at Alexandria within 96 hours from the time of 
her departure from Malta, delivering Her Majesty's mails at Alexandria im- 
mediately on her arrival there. 

That such vessel shall in ordinary cases remain at Alexandria 120 hours, 
unless Her Majesty's mails from India shall have previously arrived at Alex- 
andria, in which case she shall leave Alexandria with her Majesty's mails as 
soon as coals can be got on board, and the requisite repairs to the vessel and 
her machinery can be effected* 

If, however, Her Majesty's mails from India shall not have arrived at the 
expiration of such 120 hours, such vessel shall wait for the same at Alexandria 
beyond that period for such time as shall be necessary, not however exceeding 
two days in the month of February, four days in each of the months of April, 



S CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT 

said mails have been despatched across the Desert, or if the affirmative flag^ 
shall have given notice that the Bombay steamer is in sight at Suez, such vessel 
at Alexandria is to remain there until Her Majesty's mails from India are on 
board. 

That so soon as Her Majesty's mails shall have been received on board such 
vessel, she shall proceed from Alexandria direct to Malta, where she shaH 
arrive within 120 hours from the time of her departure from Alexandria. 

That after remaining 24 hours at Malta, and there delivering Her Majesty's 
mails, and receiving others on board, such vessel shall proceed thence direct to 
Gibraltar, where she shall arrive within 115 hours from the time of her depar- 
ture from Malta, 

That after remaining at Gibraltar on her homeward route not longer than 
12 hours, and there delivering Her Majesty's mails, and receiving others on 
board, such vessel shall proceed thence direct to Falmouth ; but if any other 
port in the British Channel shall have been appointed in pursuance of the power 
in that behalf hereinbefore contained, then to such other port ; and if to Fal- 
mouth, she shall arrive there within 120 hours from the time of her departure 
from Gibraltar, 

That in the event of any accident occurring, or of repairs being necessary to 
any of the vessels with engines of not less than 400 horse power employed in 
the performance of the service hereby contracted to be performed, which may 
temporarily prevent the employment of any such vessels, the contractors shall 
provide and employ in the same service, during the time any such vessel may 
be withdrawn or not employed, a steam- vessel with engines of not less than 
250 collective horse power, which substituted vessel, with her engines, officers, 
crew, and equipments, shall be subject to such approval and to all other con- 
ditions as the other vessels hereinbefore mentioned or referred to, and that 
neither of the said two larger vessels shall be withdrawn from the said service 
without the previous sanction and approbation of the said Commissioners, or 
their authorized agents, and when withdrawn, or temporarily prevented from 
being employed, such vessel shall be again employed in the same service 
without delay. 

That the said vessel, with engines of not less than 140 collective horse 
power, shall convey Her Majesty's mails to and from Malta and Corfu twice in 
every calendar month, and shall depart from those islands respectively on such 
days and at such hours as the said Commissioners shall at any time or times 
pr from time to time appoint ; it being understood, that no time is to be ap- 
pointed for the departure of such vessels, which will prevent the service from 
Malta to Corfu being performed by one such vessel. 
That the passage between Malta and Corfu shall not exceed 48 hours. 
That such vessel shall, once in every calendar month, or twice if found 
practicable and deemed expedient by the said Commissioners, carry on Her 
Majesty's mails from Corfu to Patras, Cephalonia, and Zante, and between 
those places, and bring back the return mails. 

That should it be deemed by the said Commissioners, or by any of their 
authorized agents, requisite for the public service that any vessel employed 
under this contract should delay her departure from any place beyond the latest 
time stipulated for such departure, the said Commissioners, or such authorized 
agents, shall have power and be at liberty to order such delay, not however 
exceeding 24 hours, by letter addressed to the master of any such vessel, or 
person acting as such, and which shall be deemed a sufficient authority for 
such detention, anything herein contained to the contrary thereof notwith- 
standing. 

That the contractors shall and will, from time to time, and at all times during 
the continuance of this contract, make such alterations or improvements in the 
construction, equipment, and machinery of the vessels which shall be used in 
the performance of this contract, as the advanced state of science may suggest, 
and the said Commissioners may direct. 

That the contractors shall receive and allow to remain on board each of the 
said vessels so to be and while employed in the performance of this contract, 
an officer in Her Majesty's Navy, to be appointed by the said Commissioners, 



AND THE PENINSULAR, &c. STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 9 

Commissioners in charge of Her Majesty's mails, and as having full authority 
in all cases to require a due and strict execution of this contract on the part of 
the said contractors, their officers, servants, and agents, and to determine every 
question, whenever arising, relative to proceeding to sea or putting into har- 
bour, or to the necessity of stopping to assist any vessel in distress, or to save 
human life ; and that the decision of such officer as aforesaid shall in each and 
every such cases be final and binding on the contractors, unless the said Com- 
missioners, on appeal by the contractors, shall think proper to decide otherwise. 
But it is understood that the above expression, " to determine " every question, 
shall not confer upon such officer the power of compulsion in such cases. 

That a suitable first-rate cabin, with appropriate bed, bedding, and furniture, 
shall,, at the cost of the contractors, be provided and appropriated by them for 
and to the exclusive use and for the sole accommodation of every such naval 
officer, and also a proper and convenient place of deposit on board, with secure 
lock and key, for Her Majesty's mails ; and that each and every of the said 
officers shall be victualled by the contractors as a chief cabin passenger, with- 
out any charge being made either for his passage or victualling ; and that 
should all or any of such officers require a servant, such servant shall be also 
provided with a proper and suitable berth, and be duly victualled by and at the 
cost of the contractors, without any charge being made for the same. 

That Her Majesty's mails shall be delivered and received at each of the places 
to which the said vessels are to proceed in the performance of this contract, 
and that at each port or place where the said mails are to be delivered and 
received, the said naval officer having charge of Her Majesty's mails shall, 
whenever and as often as by him deemed practicable or necessary, be conveyed 
on shore, and also from the shore to the vessel employed for the time being in 
the performance of this contract, together with or (if such officer consider 
requisite for the purposes of this contract) without Her Majesty's mails, in a 
suitable boat of not less than four oars, to be provided and properly manned 
and equipped by the contractors, and that the directions of the said naval 
officer shall in aU cases be obeyed as to the mode, time, and place of receiving 
and delivering Her Majesty's mails. 

That the contractors shall not receive or permit to be received on board any 
of the vessels employed under this contract, any letters for conveyance other 
than those duly in charge of the said naval officer, or which are or may be 
privileged by law. 

That the said naval officer, authorized to have charge of Her Majesty's mails, 
shall have authority to report any default in this respect, and that in case of 
any such default, the contractors shall be liable to be proceeded against for a 
breach of this contract. 

That if any vessel employed in the performance of this contract, having Her 
Majesty's mails on board, shall stop, linger, or deviate from the direct course 
on her voyage (except from stress of weather, accidents, or when authorized as 
aforesaid), or shall delay starting at the proper time, or shall put back into 
port after starting without the sanction, in each and every case, of the officer 
authorized to have the charge of the said mails, then, and in each and every 
of such cases, and as often as the same shall happen, the contractors shall and 
will forfeit and pay unto Her Majesty, her heirs and successors, the sum of 
200/. And that if any vessel which ought to leave the place which may be 
appointed for her departure from England, or from Gibraltar, Malta, Alex- 
andria, or Corfu, in the performance of this contract, shall not proceed direct 
on her voyage for 12 hours after the proper and appointed time (except as 
aforesaid), the contractors shall and will, so often as any such omission shall 
happen, forfeit and pay unto Her Majesty, her heirs and successors, the sum 
of 500/., and also the further sum of 500/. for every successive period of 
12 hours which shall elapse until such vessel shall proceed direct on her voy- 
age in the performance of this contract. And that if any vessel which ought 
to leave any other port or place in performance of this contract, shall not 
proceed direct on her voyage for 12 hours after the proper and appointed time 
(except as aforesaid), the contractors shall and will, so often as any such omis- 



io CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT 

be liable to any penalties under this contract for any matters arising from cir- 
cumstances over which they and their servants had not, and could not have 
Jhad, any control, and which shall be so proved to the satisfaction of the said 
Commissioners. 

That every naval officer authorized to have the charge of the said mails, 
shall, either alone or with such other persons as he may consider necessary, 
have full power and authority, as often as he may deem it requisite, to examine 
and survey, in such manner and with the assistance of such persons as he may 
think proper, any of the vessels employed, or to be employed, in the perform- 
ance of this contract, and the hulls, machinery, equipments, and crews thereof, 
on his giving reasonable notice in writing to the master for the time being of 
the vessel about to be examined, or to the person acting as such, of such his 
intention ; and if any defect or deficiency be ascertained, and notice thereof in 
writing be giving to such master or person, and if the said master shall not 
immediately, or as soon as possible thereupon, remedy, replace, or effectively 
repair or make good every such defect or deficiency, the contractors shall, in 
every such case, forfeit and pay to Her Majesty, her heirs and successors, the 
sum of 200/. But the payment of such penalty shall not in anywise release or 
discharge the contractors from remedying, replacing, or effectively repairing or 
making good such deficiency or defect, or from being considered not to have 
committed a breach of this contract. 

And that the said Commissioners shall also have full power, whenever and 
as often as they may deem it requisite, to survey by any other of their officers 
or agents, all and every the vessels employed, and to be employed, in the per- 
formance of this contract, and the hulls thereof, and the engines, machinery, 
furniture, tackle, apparel, stores, and equipment of every such vessel, the said 
vessels to be opened in their hulls whenever the said officers may require ; and 
if any such vessel, or any part thereof, or any engines, machinery, furniture, 
tackle, apparel, boats, stores, or equipments shall on any such survey be 
declared by any such officers or agents unseaworthy, or not adapted to the 
service hereby contracted to be performed, or if the said Commissioners shall 
deem it necessary or expedient that any alteration or improvement shall be 
made therein, or any part thereof, in order to keep pace with the more 
advanced state of science, every vessel which shall be disapproved of, or in 
which such deficiency, defect, or want of improvement shall appear, shall be 
deemed inefficient for any service hereby contracted to be performed, and shall 
not be employed again in the conveyance of Her Majesty's mails until such 
defect or deficiency shall have been repaired or supplied, or the alterations or 
improvements, as the case may be, shall have been made to the satisfaction 
of the said Commissioners ; and if employed before such defect or deficiency 
shall have been supplied, or such alterations or improvements, as the case may 
be, shall have been made to the satisfaction of the said Commissioners, the 
contractors shall forfeit and pay to Her Majesty, her heirs and successors, the 
sum of 500/. 

That the contractors and all commanding and other officers of the vessels to 
be employed in the performance of this contract, and all agents, seamen, and 
servants of the contractors, shall, at all times during the continuance of this 
contract, punctually attend to the orders and directions of the said Commis- 
sioners, or of any of their officers or agents, as to the landing, delivering, and 
receiving Her Majesty's mails. And that all and every the sums of money 
hereby stipulated to be forfeited and paid by the contractors unto Her Majesty, 
her heirs and successors, shall be considered as stipulated or ascertained 
damages, and shall and may be deducted and retained by the said Commis- 
sioners out of any monies payable, or which may thereafter be payable to the 
contractors, or the payment may be enforced with full costs of suit, at the dis- 
cretion of the said Commissioners. 

That the contractors shall and will, when and as often as, in writing, they or 

.the masters of their respective vessels shall be required so to do by the said 

Commissioners, or by such naval or other officers or agents acting under their 

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AND THE PENINSULAR, &c. STEAM PACKET COMPANY. n 

performance of this contract (in addition to the naval officer authorized to hare 
charge of the said mails), any number of naval officers, not exceeding four, 
and any number of civil officers in the service of Her Majesty, not exceeding 
two, as chief cabin passengers ; and any number, not exceeding four, as fore- 
cabin passengers ; and any number of seamen or marines in Her Majesty's 
service, not exceeding eight, as deck passengers j and that all such seamen and 
marines shall be adequately protected from rain, sun, and bad weather, and not 
exposed upon deck without such competent shelter* 

That the contractors shall in like manner, and whenever and as often as 
required as aforesaid, in addition to the passengers hereinbefore mentioned, 
also cause to be conveyed, provided for, and victualled on board, the said 
vessels, any number of military officers and soldiers, with their wives and chil- 
dren and servants, that shall be required, not exceeding, eight officers and 40 
men in each vessel. 

That each field officer shall be allowed 90 oubic feet of space in measure- 
ment for baggage, provided (except in the case of Royal Engineers) such allow- 
ance shall not exceed 18 cwt. in weight, and all other military officers 60 cubic 
feet each, provided (except in the case of Royal Engineers; such allowance 
shall not exceed 12 cwt. in weight. 

That officers of the Royal Engineers shall be allowed the same measure- 
ment, but to extend in weight to 27 cwt. for a field officer, and to 18 cwt. for 
every other officer of the Royal Engineers. 

That soldiers of the Royal Artillery and their wives shall be allowed six cubic 
feet each for baggage, and married officers, when accompanied by their wives 
or families, a further allowance, not exceeding one-half of that beforementioned, 
according to their rank and corps. 

That for every company of artillery embarked, the contractors shall convey 
on board the said vessels, free of all charge, the proper proportion of light field 
pieces, if required, and that any hammocks and bedding which may be sent out 
for the use of the said troops or persons embarked, shall be placed in charge of 
the officer authorized to have charge of Her Majesty's mails, and be brought 
back to England, if required, free from any charge for freight. 

That commissioned officers, with their wives and children, shall be considered 
as chief cabin passengers, non-commissioned officers as fore cabin passengers, 
and privates as deck passengers ; but two-thirds of the private soldiers, although 
termed " deck passengers,' 9 shall in. all cases be under cover, and all of them 
adequately protected from rain, sun, and bad weather, and not exposed upon 
deck without such competent shelter. 

That the following rates of passage money shall be paid for the said pas- 
sengers: * 



Between England and Gibraltar 
„ Gibraltar and Malta - 
„ Malta and Alexandria - 
„ Malta and Corfu - 



Chief Cabin* 



m 
o 



£. 
12 

S 

5 

4 



j 



£. 
12 

S 

6 

4 



Child. 



CO 



free 

99 









£. s. 
6 - 

4 - 

2 10 

2 - 



Fore Cabin. 



§ 

SS 



£. s. 

6 — 

4 - 
2 10 
2 - 



5 

s 



£. 8. 
6 - 

4 - 

2 10 

2 - 



Child. 



Or" 



free 



32 



-3* 



£. s. 

3 - 

2 - 

1 5 

1 - 



Deck. 



S 

SS- 



£. s. 
4 - 

2 16 

1 15 

1 - 



9. 

s 

o 



£. s. 
3 10 

2 10 

1 10 

- 15 



Child. 




That the said contractors shall and will receive on board each and every 
of the *aid vessels employed in the performance of this contract any number 



12 CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT 

any of the said ports or places to or from which the said mails are to be con- 
veyed in the performance of this contract, when and as often as directed by 
the said Commissioners or their Secretary, as respects articles leaving England, 
and as respects articles conveyed between foreign ports, when and as often as 
directed by the British naval officer in command of the station, free from dll 
costs and charges ; and also shall and will receive on board each and every of 
the said vessels, and convey and deliver to, from, and between all or any of the 
said ports or places, any naval or other stores, not exceeding 10 tons in weight 
at any one time, in any one vessel, at the rate of freight charged by the con- 
tractors for private goods, on receiving from the said Commissioners, or any of 
their officers or agents, two days' previous notice of its being their intention to 
have such stores so conveyed, and that the said contractors shall, in all cases, 
be strictly responsible for the due custody and safe delivery of the said packages, 
articles, and stores. 

That if at any time during the continuance of this contract the said Com- 
missioners shall deem it requisite to alter the particular days and hours of 
departure appointed for the departure of the said vessels from any of the places 
which the said vessels are to leave, they shall be at liberty at any time or times, 
or from time to time, to alter the days and hours of departure, on giving a 
notice, in writing, of three calendar months of such their intention to the con- 
tractors, provided that any such alteration in the time of departure shall not 
be such as to prevent the service from being performed by two vessels only 
between England and Alexandria, and by one vessel only between Malta and 
Corfu. 

And it is hereby declared and agreed that this contract shall commence on 
the 1st day of September 1840, and shall continue in force for five years, and 
thenceforward until the expiration of a written notice of 12 calendar months, 
which may, at the termination of such five years, or at any time afterwards, be 
given, either by the said Commissioners, under the hand of either of their 
Secretaries, to the contractors, or to the survivors or survivor of them, or the 
executors or administrators of such survivor, or by the contractors, or the 
survivors or survivor of them, or the executors or administrators of the said 
survivor, to the said Commissioners, for the discontinuance of the same. 

Provided always, nevertheless, that the said Commissioners shall, on giving 
a previous notice in writing, under the hand of either of their Secretaries, of 
six calendar months to the contractors, or to the survivors or survivor of them, 
or the executors or administrators of such survivor, of such their intention, 
have power and be at liberty to terminate this contract at the end of the first, 
second, third, or fourth year of the said term, the said Commissioners in that 
case, in addition to what may have become due and not paid of the annual 
sums hereinafter mentioned, causing payment to the said contractors of a fine, 
according to the following scale : namely, — 

If the contract be terminated at the end of the 1st year, 29,000 /. 

Ditto „ „ „ 2d year, 27,000 /. 

Ditto „ „ „ 3d year, 25,000/. 

Ditto „ „ „ 4th year, 23,000/. 

And it is hereby agreed, that the said Commissioners shall at any time during 
the continuance of this contract have power and be at liberty to purchase all 
or any of the said vessels at a valuation, or to charter the same exclusively for 
Her Majesty's service, at a rate of hire to be mutually at the time fixed and 
agreed on by them and the contractors. But if any difference should at any 
time or times arise as to the amount of valuation or hire so to be paid, such 
difference shall be referred to two arbitrators, one to be chosen from time to 
time by the said Commissioners, and the other by the contractors ; and if such 
arbitrators should at any time or times not agree in the matter or question 
eferred to them, then such Question in difference shall be referred bv them to 



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AND THE PENINSULAR, &c. STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 13 

lated to be paid by them in the event of this contract being terminated at or 
before the expiration of four years from the commencement thereof ; and also 
that in case of such purchase or hire, the service hereby contracted to be per- 
formed, shall either be continued to be performed by Her Majesty's vessels or 
by other vessels of the contractors, if they can in due and proper time furnish 
them. And in the event of the contractors being allowed by the said Commis- 
sioners to continue to perform only a portion of the service, there shall be paid 
to the contractors such annual sum of money as shall be agreed upon by the 
said Commissioners and the contractors ; and in case of their differing as to the 
amount, the difference to be settled by two arbitrators or an umpire, to be 
chosen respectively as aforesaid. And it is agreed that any submission which 
may be made to arbitration in pursuance of this contract shall be made a rule 
of Her Majesty's Court of Exchequer, pursuant to the statute in that case made 
and provided ; and that any witnesses examined upon any reference, may be 
examined upon oath. 

And it is hereby distinctly understood, that the contractors shall undertake 
for themselves all arrangements relative to quarantine, as connected with the 
due and regular performance of the conditions of this contract ; but in case of 
impediments arising from extraordinary quarantine, the contractors shall not 
be compelled to meet the exigency further than by the employment in the per- 
formance of the said service of an additional steam-vessel, with engines of not 
less than 250 horse power, to be subject in all respects, together with her 
officers, equipments, and crew, to the same approval as the said other vessels. 

And it is further agreed, that if any other port than Falmouth shall be 
appointed by the said Commissioners as the place of departure from England 
of the said vessels for Alexandria, an additional time shall be allowed for the 
voyage of the vessels between Gibraltar and England, according to the relative 
distance between Falmouth and the other port that shall be appointed as the 
place of such departure from England. 

And in consideration of the due and faithful performance by the contractors 
of all the services hereby contracted to be by them performed, the said Commis- 
sioners do hereby agree that there shall be paid to the contractors, so long as 
they perform the whole of the said services, by bills at sight, payable by Her 
Majesty's Paymaster-general, sums of money after the following rate, in equal 
quarterly payments ; that is to say, 

For the 1st year of the said contract - - 38,000 /. 
For the 2d year „ - - 36,000/. 
For the 3d year „ - - 35,000 /. 
For the 4th year „ - - 34,000/. 
For the 5th year, and annually during the remain- 
ing period of the contract continuing - - 33,000 /. 

The first of such quarterly payments to become due and be made on the 
1st day of December next. 

And it is hereby agreed, that if a charter of incorporation shall be obtained 
for the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company, there shall be an 
abatement made after the rate of 1,000 /. per annum from such of the said 
annual sums as shall thereafter become payable, the abatement being calculated 
from the date of the said charter ; but if the charter shall be obtained within 
six calendar months from the date of these presents, such abatement shall be 
calculated from the 1st day of September 1840, 

And it is hereby further agreed and provided, that without the consent of 
the said Commissioners, signified in writing, under the hand of one of their 
Secretaries, neither this contract, nor any part thereof, shall be assigned, under- 
let, or disposed of; and that in case of the same, or any part thereof, being 
assigned, underlet, or otherwise disposed of without such consent signified as 
aforesaid, or of any breach of this contract, on the part of the contractors, 



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i 4 CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT 

the payment of the sum of money hereinafter agreed to be made shall be 
enforced, should the same be not duly paid by the contractors. 

And it is also agreed, that the notices or directions which the same Commis- 
sioners, or their Secretary, officers, or other persons are hereby authorized and 
empowered to give to the said contractors, or to the survivors or survivor of 
them, or to the executors or administrators of such survivor, or to their or any 
of their officers, servants, or agents, may, at the option of such Commissioners, 
or of their Secretary, officers, or other persons, be either delivered to the master 
of any of the said vessels, or other officer, agent, or servant of the contractors in 
the charge or management of any vessel employed in the performance of this 
contract, or may be left at the last known office or house of business in London 
of the person or persons for whom any such notioe may be intended. 

And in pursuance of the directions contained in a certain Act of Parliament 
made and passed in the 22d year of the reign of King George the Third, 
intituled, " An Act for restraining any Person concerned in any Contract, Com- 
mission, or Agreement, made for the Public Service, from being elected, or 
sitting and voting as a Member of the House of Commons," it is hereby 
expressly declared and agreed, and these presents are upon this express 
condition ; and the said contractors do covenant for themselves, their heirs, 
executors, and administrators, that no Member of the House of Commons shall 
be admitted to any share or part of this contract, or to any benefit to arise 
therefrom. 

And lastly, for the due and faithful performance of all and singular the cove- 
nants, conditions, provisoes, clauses, articles, and agreements hereinbefore con- 
tained, which on the part and behalf of the contractors are or ought to be 
observed, performed, fulfilled, and kept, the contractors do hereby bind 
themselves, their heirs, executors, and administrators, and each and every 
of them, himself, his heirs, executors, and administrators, unto our Sovereign 
Lady the Queen, in the sum of 8,000 1. of lawful money of the United 
Kingdom, to be paid to our said Lady the Queen, her heirs and successors, 
by way of stipulated or ascertained damages hereby agreed upon between the 
same Commissioners and the contractors, in case of the failure on the part of 
the contractors in the due execution of this contract, or any part thereof. 

In witness whereof, the said parties to these presents have hereunto set their 
hands and seals, the day and year first above written. 

Richard Bourne (l. s.) 
J. C. Ewart (l. s.) 
Signed, sealed, and delivered Francis Car let mi (l. s.) 

(being first duly stamped) T. Trvubridge (l. s.) 

in the presence of S. J. B. Pechell (l. s.) 

John James. 



Auticlbs of AGREEMENT made this 26th day of December, in the year of 
our Lord 1844, between the " Peninsular Mid Oriental Steam Navigation 
Company " of the (me part, and tne Commissioners for executing the Office 
of Lord High Admiral of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland 
(for and on behalf of Her Majesty) of the other part. 

Witness, that the said Company (hereafter designated as the contractors), 
in consideration of the payments hereinafter stipulated to be made, do hereby 
eorenant, promise, and agree with the said Commissioners, that they the con- 
tractors shall and will at all times, during the continuance of this contract, 
provide, maintain, keep seaworthy, and in complete repair and readiness, for 
the purpose of conveying, as hereinafter provided, Her Majesty's mails (which 
term of Her Majesty's mails is intended and understood by the parties hereto 
to mean such of Her Majesty's mails, and all despatches and bags of letters, as 
shall at any time, and from time to time, by the said Commissioners, or Her 
Majesty's Postmaster-general, or any of the officers or agents of the said Com- 
missioners or Postmaster-general, be required to be conveyed, and whether 



AND THE PENINSULAR, &c. STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 15 

©umber, not less than three, of good, substantial, and efficient steam-vessels, 
to be employed between Calcutta in India, and Suez, in Egypt ; each and 
every of such vessels to be always supplied with first-rate appropriate steam- 
engines, of not less than 500 collective horse power ; and also a good, sub- 
stantial, and efficient steam vessel, to be employed as a reserve or subsidiary 
vessel in the said service, when any of the before-mentioned vessels may be 
disabled by accident, or require repairs ; such last-mentioned vessel to be always 
supplied with first-rate appropriate steam-engines, of not less than 250 collec- 
tive horse power. And likewise that the said Company shall and will at all 
times during the continuance of this contract, provide, maintain, keep sea- 
worthy, and in complete repair and readiness for the purpose of conveying Her 
Majesty's mails between the island of Ceylon and Hong Kong in China, a 
sufficient number of vessels, not less than two, each of them to be always 
supplied with first-rate appropriate steam-engines, of not less than 400 collec- 
tive horse power : and also another vessel, to be ahvays supplied with first-rate 
appropriate steam-engines, of no less than 250 collective horse power: and all the 
vessels hereinbefore mentioned or referred to shall be also always supplied and 
furnished with all necessary and proper machinery, engines, apparel, furniture, 
stores, tackle, boats, fuel, oil, tallow, provisions, fresh water, anchors, cables, 
fire-pumps, and other proper means for extinguishing fire, and whatsoever else 
may be requisite and necessary for equipping the said vessels, and rendering 
them constantly efficient for the service hereby contracted to be performed ; 
and also manned and provided with competent officers and engineers, and a 
sufficient crew of able seamen and other men ; and to be in all respects as to 
vessels, engines, equipments, engineers, officers, and crew, subject in the first 
instance, and from time to time, and at all times afterwards, to the approval 
of the said Commissioners, and of such other persons as shall at any time, or 
from time to time, have authority under the said Commissioners to inspect and 
examine the same. 

That every one of such vessels with engines of not less than 500 and 400 
horse power, shall be of such construction and strength, and their equipments 
so arranged as to be fit and able to carry and fire at least four guns of the 
largest calibre now used on board any of Her Majesty's steam-vessels of war. 

That the contractors shall and will during the continuance of this contract, 
in every case, diligently, faithfully, and to the satisfaction of the said Com- 
missioners, and with all possible speed, convey Her Majesty's mails on board 
the said vessels respectively as hereinafter mentioned. 

That one of such vessels, with engines of 500 collective horse power, so 
approved of and equipped and manned as aforesaid, and with Her Majesty's 
mails on board, shall on the 10th day of January next, and on the 10th day of 
every succeeding calendar month, except the months of May, June, or July, 
when she shall leave Calcutta on the 5th of the month, at such hour as shall at 
any time or from time to time be appointed by the said Commissioners, put to 
sea from the Sand Heads, off Calcutta, and proceed direct to Madras, where 
she shall arrive within 84 hours from the time of her departure from Calcutta. 

That such vessel shall remain at Madras 24 hours, but not longer, unless a 
further stay of the vessel there shall be specially required by any agent duly 
authorized to have charge of Her Majesty's mails, whose direction is to be 
complied with, but the stay at Madras shall not exceed 48 hours. 

That such vessel, after having delivered and received Her Majesty's mails 
at Madras, shall proceed thence direct to Point de Galle, in the Island of Ceylon, 
where she shall arrive within 60 hours from the time of her leaving Madras. 

That such vessel shall, when and so often as may be required by the said 
Commissioners or their authorized agent, call and deliver and receive Her 
Majesty's mails at Trincomalee either on the outward or homeward passage, or 
both, or in substitution of Point de Galle, on giving notice thereof; and that 
when such vessel shall have to call both at Point de Galle and Trincomalee on 
her voyage to Suez, such vessel shall arrive at Trincomalee, from Madras, 
within 35 hours ; and that within 12 hours after her arrival at Trincomalee, 
Her Majesty's mails having been there delivered and received, such vessel shall 
proceed thence direct to Point de Galle, and shall arrive there within 34 hours ; 



16 CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT 

mails having been there delivered and received, proceed thence direct to Aden, 
and shall arrive there in 282 hours from the time of her departure from 
Trincomalee. 

That when such vessel has to call at Point de Galle, she shall, within 48* 
hours after her arrival there, Her Majesty's mails having been there delivered 
and received, proceed thence direct to Aden, and there arrive within 247 hours, 
and immediately on her arrival deliver and receive Her Majesty's mails. It 
being agreed that any agent duly authorized to have charge of Her Majesty's 
mails, shall have power and be at liberty specially to detain such vessel at 
Point de Galle or Trincomalee, for any period not exceeding 72 hours from the 
time of her arrival ; but if the steamer with the mails from Hong Kong and 
Singapore shall not have arrived at Point de Galle or Trincomalee at the ter- 
mination of the 72 hours, in that case the steamer from Calcutta and Madras 
for Suez shall remain at Point de Galle or Trincomalee until the arrival of the 
steamer from Hong Kong, not exceeding however 120 hours, unless she be 
then in sight ; the vessel when so detained proceeding direct to Aden from 
Point de Galle or Trincomalee, as the case may be, immediately at the expira- 
tion of the period of her detention. 

That within 48 hours after her arrival at Aden, having delivered and received 
Her Majesty's mails, such vessel shall proceed thence direct to Suez, where 
she shall arrive within 152 hours from the time of her leaving Aden. 

That during the months of May, June, and July, 120 hours in addition to the 
above stipulated time shall be allowed on the whole passage from Calcutta to 
Suez, the intermediate stoppages not being longer than those agreed upon 
under this contract. 

That such vessel shall remain at Suez 120 hours, unless Her Majesty's mails 
from England shall have previously arrived at Suez, in which case she shall 
leave Suez with Her Majesty's mails on board as soon as coals, provisions, and 
necessary stores can be got on board, and the requisite repairs to the vessel 
and her machinery can be effected. 

If, however, Her Majesty's mails from England shall not have arrived at the 
expiration of such 120 hours, such vessel shall wait for the same at Suez 
beyond that period for such further time as shall be necessary, not however 
exceeding 48 hours ; unless at the expiration of such last-mentioned periods 
a telegraphic communication shall have reached Suez, to the effect that the 
said mails have been dispatched across the Desert, or if the affirmative flag 
shall have given notice that the steamer from England is in sight at Alexandria, 
in either of which cases such vessel at Suez is to remain there until Her 
Majesty's mails from England are on board. 

That so soon as Her Majesty's mails shall have been received on board such 
vessel, she shall proceed from Suez direct to Aden, where she shall arrive within 
144 hours from the time of her departure from Suez. 

That after remaining 48 hours at Aden, and there delivering Her Majesty's 
mails and receiving others on board, such vessel shall proceed thence to Point 
de Galle, where she shall arrive within 247 hours from the time of her depar- 
ture from Aden, unless she be required to proceed direct from Aden to Trin- 
comalee without calling at Point de Galle, in which case she shall arrive at 
Trincomalee from Aden within 282 hours of her departure from the latter 
place ; and after having delivered and received Her Majesty's mails at Trin- 
comalee, she shall within 48 hours of her arrival there proceed to Madras, where 
she shall arrive within 35 hours. 

That when having to proceed from Aden to Point de Galle, she shall, after 
remaining there not longer than 48 hours, and there delivering Her Majesty's 
mails and receiving others on board, proceed thence direct to Madras, wfyere 
she shall arrive in 60 hours, unless she be required also to call at Trincomalee, 
in which case she shall proceed from Point de Galle to Trincomalee, where she 
shall arrive within 34 hours, and there deliver and receive Her Majesty's 
mails, and shall proceed from Trincomalee within 12 hours of her arrival there 
to Madras, where she shall arrive within 35 hours. 

That in every case on her voyage from Suez, after remaining at Madras not 
longer than 12 hours, and there delivering and receiving Her Majesty's mails, 
such vessel shall proceed direct to Calcutta and there deliver Her Majesty's 



AND THE PENINSULAR, &c. STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 17 

That in the event of any accident occurring, or of repairs being necessary to 
any of the vessels with engines of not less than 500 horse power, employed in 
the performance of the service hereby contracted to be performed, which may 
temporarily prevent the employment of any such vessels, the contractors shall 
provide and employ in the same service, during thd time any such vessel may be 
withdrawn or not employed, a steam-vessel with engines of not less than 250 
collective horse power, and every substituted vessel, with her engines, officers, 
crew, and equipments, shall be subject to such approval, and to all other con- 
ditions as the other vessels hereinbefore mentioned or referred to ; and that 
none of the said larger vessels shall be withdrawn from the said service, or be 
disused for repairs, without the previous sanction and approbation of the said 
Commissioners or their authorized agents, and when withdrawn or temporarily 
prevented from being employed, such vessel shall be again employed in the 
same service without delay. 

That one of the said vessels, of not less than 400 horse power, shall be in 
readiness at Point de Galle, or if and whenever required by the said Commis- 
sioners at Trincomalee, to receive Her Majesty's mails for Penang, Singapore, 
and Hong Kong, on each of the said steam-vessels arriving from Suez ; and 
within 24 hours after the said* mails shall have been received on board one of 
such vessels of 400 horse power, such vessel shall put to sea and proceed direct 
to Penang, where she shall arrive within 140 hours from the time of her 
departure from Point de Galle, or within 137 hours in case of her departure 
from Trincomalee. 

That such vessel of 400 horse power, after delivering and receiving the 
mail at Penang, shall put to sea, and proceed direct to Singapore, where she 
shall arrive within 45 hours from the time of her departure from Penang. 

That such vessel, after remaining not exceeding 48 hours at Singapore, and 
having delivered and received Her Majesty's mails, shall proceed direct to 
Hong Kong, where she shall arrive within 170 hours after her departure from 
Singapore, and there deliver Her Majesty's mails. 

That on the 1st of every month, except for the months of May, June, July, 
and August, when the departures are to be five days earlier, one of such vessels 
shall, with Her Majesty's mails on board, proceed from Hong Kong direct to 
Singapore, where she shall arrive within 170 hours from her departure from 
Hong Kong. 

That within 48 hours after arriving at Singapore, and after having delivered 
and received Her Majesty's mails there, she shall proceed to Penang, where she" 
shall arrive within 45 hours after her departure from Singapore. 

That within six hours after arriving at Penang, and having delivered and 
received Her Majesty's mails there, she shall proceed to Point de Galle, where 
she shall arrive and deliver Her Majesty's mails within 140 hours after her 
departure from Penang ; or if Trincomalee shall be the appointed place for the 
junction of the mails, she shall proceed from Penang direct to Trincomalee, 
and there arrive and deliver Her Majesty's mails within 137 hours of her 
departure from Penang. 

That the contractors shall be at liberty to order the vessels to call at one or 
more other places on the direct route between Ceylon and Hong Kong ; the 
aggregate stoppages not to exceed 12 hours ; and the said Commissioners shall 
also have the option to order the vessels to call at one or more other places on 
the said direct route to deliver and receive Her Majesty's mails, the aggregate 
delay not to exceed 1 2 hours. 

That should it be deemed by the said Commissioners, or by any of their 
authorized agents, requisite for the public service that any vessel employed 
under this contract should delay her departure from any of the places herein 
mentioned or referred to, beyond the periods hereinbefore agreed upon, the 
said Commissioners or such authorized agents shall have power and be at 
liberty to order such delay, not however exceeding 24 hours, by letter ad- 
dressed to the master of any such vessel, or person acting as such, and which 
shall he deemed a sufficient authoritv for such detention 



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iS CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT 

and in such case it shall be lawful for the said Commissioners, or any of their 
authorized agents, to detain the vessels employed under thi3 contract at any 
such port or place for any period not exceeding 72 hours from the time of 
the vessel employed under this contract arriving at any such port or place, 
unless the vessel or vessels from the Mauritius, Australia, and New Zealand, 
shall not then have arrived at such port or place, in which case the vessel em- 
ployed under this contract shall remain at such port or place until the arrival 
of the vessel or vessels from the Mauritius, Australia, and New Zealand, not 
exceeding however 120 hours, unless such last-mentioned vessel or vessels be 
then in sight. 

That if at any time or times, oaring to stress of weather, or any other un- 
avoidable circumstance, any vessel employed in the performance of this contract 
shall not be able, in the opinion of the officer or person having charge of Her 
Majesty's mails, to reach, in due course, any of the places to which she ought 
to proceed, the same officer or person may and shall give such directions, and 
make such alterations for the particular case as shall seem most expedient to 
him for the performance of the service, and any directions or orders which he 
may give in such cases, shall be strictly obeyed by the master of every such 
vessel, who shall insert such alterations, and the reason thereof, in his log 
book, which shall, whenever required, be produced to the said Commissioners, 
or to any of their officers or agents. 

That the contractors shall and will, from time to time, and at all times during 
the continuance of this contract, make such alterations or improvements in the 
construction, equipments, and machinery of the vessels, which shall be used in 
the performance of this contract, as the advanced state of science may suggest, 
and the said Commissioners may direct. 

That the contractors shall receive, and allow to remain on board each of the 
said vessels so to be and while employed in the performance of this contract, 
an officer of Her Majesty's Navy, or any other person to be severally appointed 
by the said Commissioners to take charge of the said mails, and also a servant 
of the said officer or person, if required ; and that every such officer or person 
shall be recognized and considered by the contractors and their officers, agents, 
and seamen, as the agent of the said Commissioners, in charge of Her 
Majesty's mails, and as having full authority in all cases to require a due and 
strict execution of this contract on the part of the said contractors, their 
officers, servants, and agents, and to determine every question, whenever aris- 
ing, relative to proceeding to sea or putting into harbour, or to the necessity 
of stopping to assist any vessel in distress, or to save human life ; and that the 
decision of such officer or person as aforesaid shall, in each and every such 
case, be final and binding on the contractors, unless the said Commissioners, 
on appeal by the contractors, shall think proper to decide otherwise. But it is 
understood that the above expression, " to determine " every question, shall 
not confer upon such officer or person the power of compulsion in such 
cases. 

That a suitable first-rate cabin, with appropriate bed, bedding, and furniture, 
shall, at the cost of the contractors, be provided and appropriated by them for 
and to the exclusive use, and for the sole accommodation of such agent of the 
said Commissioners, and also a proper and convenient place of deposit on 
board, with secure lock and key, for Her Majesty's mails ; and that each and 
every of the said agents shall be victualled by the contractors as a chief- cabin 
passenger, and be provided with wines and other liquors, without any charge 
being made for the same, whilst Her Majesty's mails are on board ; and that 
should all or any of such agents require a servant, such servant shall also be 
provided with a proper and suitable berth, and be duly victualled whilst 
on board, by and at the cost of the contractors, without any charge being made 
for the same. 

That Her Majesty's mails shall be conveyed in the said vessels, and be deli- 
vered and received at each of the places to which the said vessels are to pro- 
ceed, in the performance of this contract, and that at each port or place, where 



• AND THE PENINSULAR, &c. STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 19 

Majesty's mails, in a suitable boat of not less than four oars, to be provided 
and properly manned and equipped by the contractors ; and that the directions 
of such agent shall in all cases be obeyed as to the mode, time, and place of 
receiving and delivering Her Majesty's mails. 

That the contractors shall not receive or permit to be received on board 
any of the vessels employed under this contract, any letters for conveyance, 
other than those duly in charge of the said agent, or which are or may be 
privileged by law. 

That if any vessel employed in the performance of this contract, having Her 
Majesty's mails on board, shall stop, linger, or deviate from the direct course 
on her voyage, (except from stress of weather, accidents, or when authorized 
as aforesaid,) or shall delay starting at the proper time, or shall put back into 
port after starting, without the sanction, in each and every case, of the agent 
authorized to have the charge of the said mails, or when so sanctioned to put 
back into port, shall not again start and proceed direct in performance of the 
service hereby contracted for, when and so soon as required by the said agent, 
then, and in every of such cases, and as often as the same shall happen, 
the contractors shall and will forfeit and pay unto Her Majesty, her heirs and 
successors, the sum of 200 /. ; and that if any vessel which ought to leave the 
place of her departure with mails in the performance of this contract, shall not 
proceed direct on her voyage for 12 hours after the proper and appointed time 
(except as aforesaid), the contractors shall and will, so often as any such 
omission shall happen, forfeit and pay unto Her Majesty, her heirs and suc- 
cessors, the sum of 500/., and also the further sum of 500/. for every suc- 
cessive period of 12 hours which shall elapse until such vessel shall proceed 
direct on her voyage in the performance of this contract. 

But the contractors are not to be liable to any penalties under this contract 
for any matters arising from circumstances over which they and their servants 
had not and could not have had any control, and which shall be so proved to 
the satisfaction of the said Commissioners. 

That every agent authorized to have the charge of the said mails shall, 
either alone, or with such other persons as he may consider necessary, have 
full power and authority, as often as he may deem it requisite, to examine and 
survey, in such manner and with the assistance of such persons as he may 
think proper, any of the vessels employed, or to be employed, in the perform- 
ance of this contract, and the hulls, machinery, equipments, and crews thereof, 
on his giving reasonable notice in writing to the master for the time being of 
the vessel about to be examined, or to the person acting as such, of such his 
intention ; and if any defect or deficiency be ascertained, and notice thereof in 
writing be given to such master or person, the said master shall immediately, 
or as soon as possible thereupon, remedy, replace, or effectively repair or make 
good every such defect or deficiency* 

And that the said Commissioners shall also have full power, whenever, and 
as often as they may deem it requisite, to survey, by any other of their officers 
or agents, all and every the vessels employed and to be employed in the 

Serformance of this contract, and the hull sthereof, and the engines, machinery, 
lrniture, tackle, apparel, stores, and equipment of every such vessel, the said 
vessels to be opened in their hulls whenever the said officers may require ; and 
if any such vessel, or any part thereof, or any engines, machinery, furniture, 
tackle, apparel, boats, stores or equipments shall on any such survey be 
declared by any of such officers or agents unseaworthy, or not adapted to the 
service hereby contracted to be performed, or if the said Commissioners shall 
deem it necessary or expedient that any alteration or improvement shall be 
made therein, or any part thereof, in order to keep pace with the more 
advanced state of science, every vessel which shall be disapproved of, or in 
which such deficiency, defect, or want of improvement shall appear, shall 
be deemed inefficient for any service hereby contracted to be performed, and 
shall not be employed again in the conveyance of Her Majesty's mails until 
such defect or deficiency shall have been repaired or supplied, or the alterations 
or improvements, as the case may be, shall have been made to the satisfaction 
of the said Commissioners. 
That the contractors and all commanding and other officers of the vessels 



20 CONTRACTS ENTERED INTO BETWEEN THE GOVERNMENT 

this contract, punctually attend to the orders and directions of the said Com- 
missioners, or of any of their officers or agents, as to the landing, delivering, 
and receiving Her Majesty's mails. That the said contractors shall and will, 
when and as often as in writing they or the masters of their respective vessels 
shall be required so to do by the said Commissioners, or by any naval or other 
officer or agent acting under their authority (such writing to specify the rank 
or description of the person or persons to be conveyed, and the accommodation 
to be provided for him or them), receive, provide for, victual, and convey on 
board each and every or any of the vessels to be employed in the performance 
of this contract, for the whole or any portion of the voyages of the said vessels 
(in addition to the naval officer or other person authorized to have the charge 
of the said mails), any naval, military, and civil officers in the service of Her 
Majesty, not exceeding 10, as chief cabin passengers, and any number of 
seamen, marines, or soldiers in Her Majesty's service; not exceeding 10, as deck 
passengers, to be effectually protected from sun, rain, and bad weather, charging 
for such chief cabin and deck passengers two-thirds only of the fares or rates 
charged by the said contractors for ordinary passengers of a similar description, 
20 days' notice being given, if practicable, to the agent of the contractors at the 
port of embarkation, in the event of more than two officers being required for 
embarkation at any one time. 

And that all and every the sums of money hereby stipulated to be forfeited 
and paid by the contractors unto Her Majesty, her heirs and successors, shall 
be considered as stipulated or ascertained damages, and shall and may be 
deducted and retained by the said Commissioners out of any monies payable, 
or which may thereafter be payable to the contractors, or the payment may be 
enforced as a debt due to Her Majesty, with full costs of suit, at the discretion 
of the said Commissioners. 

That in the event of any accident occurring to the hull or machinery of one 
or more of the said contract vessels, arising from circumstances over which the 
contractors and their servants had not and could not have had any control, and 
that in consequence thereof the mails should be carried on or conveyed by any 
of Her Majesty's or of the East India Company's vessels, a deduction or abate- 
ment is to be made from the contract service money, at the rate of 20 s. per 
nautical mile, if on the line between Calcutta and Suez, and 12$. per mile, if 
on the line between Hong Kong and Ceylon, for the distance which the mails 
may have been so conveyed, such distance to be ascertained and determined by 
the Hydrographer of the said Commissioners ; or such amount shall be recover- 
able as a debt due to Her Majesty, with full costs of suit. 

That the said contractors, shall and will receive on board each and every of 
the said vessels employed in the performance of this contract, any number of 
small packages, containing astronomical instruments, charts, wearing apparel, 
or other articles, and convey and deliver the same to, from, and between all 
or any of the said ports or places, to or from which the said mails are to be 
conveyed in the performance of this contract, whetf and as often as directed by 
the said Commissioners or their Secretary, as respects articles which may leave 
England, and as respects other articles conveyed, when and as often as directed 
by the British naval officer in command, at any port where the vessel may 
touch, free from all costs and charges. And also shall and will receive on 
board each and every of the said vessels, and convey and deliver to, from, and 
between all or any of the said ports or places, any naval or other stores, not 
exceeding five tons in weight at any one time in any one vessel, at the rate of 
freight charged by the contractors for private goods, on receiving from the 
said Commissioners, or any of their officers or agents, two days' previous notice 
of its being their intention to have such stores so conveyed ; and that the said 
contractors shall in all cases be strictly responsible for the due custody and 
safe delivery of the said packages, articles, and stores. 

That if at anv time during the continuance of this contract, the said Corn- 



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AND THE PENINSULAR, &c. STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 21 

prevent the service from being performed by three vessels only between 
Calcutta and Suez, and two vessels between Point de Galle, or Trincomalee and 
Hong Kong. 

And it is hereby declared and agreed, that this contract shall commence on 
the 1st day of January 1845, and shall continue in force for seven years, and 
thenceforward until the expiration of a written notice of 12 calendar months, 
which may, at the termination of such seven years, or at any period of any 
year afterwards, be given, either by the said Commissioners, under the hand of 
either of their Secretaries, to the said contractors, or their secretary, or by the 
contractors to the Commissioners, for the discontinuance of the same ; it being 
however understood, that the actual service for the conveyance of Her Majesty's 
mails from Ceylon to Hong Kong, and the said intermediate places, and from 
Hong Kong to Ceylon, and the said intermediate places, although not com- 
mencing on the said 1st day of January, shall commence not later than the 1st 
day of August next, and that the said Commissioners shall temporarily permit 
the contractors to use for such last-mentioned service vessels with steam- 
engines of not less than 250 collective horse power, until the 1st day of June 
1846, on or before which day such service is to be performed with the said 
vessels of not less than 400 horse power, as hereinbefore mentioned, such ves- 
sels of not less than 250 horse power to be subject as to officers, crew, and 
equipment, and in all other respects, to the approval of the said Commis- 
sioners, and to all the provisions herein contained with respect to the said 
vessels of not less than 400 horse power. 

And it is hereby agreed, that the said Commissioners shall, at any time during 
the continuance of this contract, have power and be at liberty to purchase all 
or any of the said vessels at a valuation, or to charter the same exclusively 
for Her Majesty's service, at a rate of hire to be mutually fixed and agreed on 
by them and the contractors* But if any difference should at any time or times 
arise as to the amount of valuation or hire so to be paid, such difference shall 
be referred to two arbitrators, one to be chosen from time to time by the said 
Commissioners, and the other by the contractors ; and if such arbitrators should 
at any time or times not agree in the matter or question referred to them, then 
such question in difference shall be referred by them to an umpire, to be 
chosen by such arbitrators before they proceed with the reference to them, and 
the joint and concurrent award of the said arbitrators, or the separate award of 
the said umpire, when the said arbitrators cannot agree, shall be binding and 
conclusive upon all parties. 

And it is further agreed, that in case of such purchase or hire, the service 
hereby contracted to be performed shall be performed by other vessels of the 
contractors, of a similar description to the vessel or vessels purchased or hired, 
if they can in due and proper time furnish them ; such other vessels, as to con- 
struction, machinery, equipment, and crew, to be subject to the same approval 
as other vessels employed under this contract. And in the event of the con- 
tractors being allowed by the said Commissioners to continue to perform only 
a portion of the service, there shall be paid to the contractors such annual sum 
of money as shall be agreed upon by the said Commissioners and the contrac- 
tors ; and in case of their differing as to the amount, the difference to be settled 
by two arbitrators, or an umpire, to be chosen respectively as aforesaid. 

And it is agreed, that any submission which may be made to arbitration in 
pursuance of this contract, shall be made a rule of Her Majesty's Court of 
Exchequer, pursuant to the statute in that case made and provided ; and that 
any witnesses examined upon any reference may be examined upon oath. 

And in consideration of the due and faithful performance by the contractors 
of all the services hereby contracted to be by them performed, the said 
Commissioners do hereby agree, that there shall be paid to the contractors, so 
long as they perform the whole of the said services, by bills at sight, payable 
by Her Majesty's Paymaster-general, the following sums, in equal quarterly 
payments ; that is to say, for the service between Calcutta and Suez, a suncx 
after the rate of 1 15,000 /. per annum ; and for the service between Ceylon and 

Honor Kcmcr a sum flffp-r th#» votA r\f AZ Cl(\(\ I npr annum. "* s^s^s^Js-* 

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22 CONTRACTS:— PENINSULAR, &c. STEAM PACKET COMPANY. 

Kong shall become due within three months from the time of the commence- 
ment of such serrice. 

And it is hereby further agreed and provided, that without the consent of 
the said Commissioners, signified in writing under the hand of one of their 
Secretaries, neither this contract nor any part thereof shall be assigned, under- 
let, or disposed of; and that in case of the same or any part thereof being 
assigned, under-let, or otherwise disposed of, without such consent signified as 
aforesaid, or of any breach of this contract on the part of the contractors, their 
officers, agents, or servants, it shall be lawful for the said Commissioners for 
executing the said office of Lord High Admiral (if they think fit, and notwith- 
standing there may or may not have been any former breach of this contract), 
by writing under the hand of one of their Secretaries for the time being, to 
determine this contract without any previous notice to the contractors or their 
agents, nor shall the contractors be entitled to any compensation in consequence 
of such determination ; but even if this contract be so determined, the pay- 
ment of the sum of money hereinafter agreed to be made shall be enforced, 
should the same be not duly paid by the contractors. 

And it is also agreed, that the notices or directions which the same Commis- 
sioners, or their Secretary, officers, or other persons, are hereby authorized and 
empowered to give to the said contractors, 1 or to their or any of their officers, 
servants, or agents, may at the option of such Commissioners, or of their Se- 
cretary, officers^ or other persons, be either delivered to the master of any of 
the said vessels, or other officer, agent, or servant of the contractors in the 
charge or management of any vessel employed in the performance of this con- 
tract, or may be left at the last known office or house of business of the said 
contractors in London. 

And lastly, for the due and faithful performance of all and singular the cove- 
nants, conditions, provis6es, clauses, articles, and agreements hereinbefore 
contained, which on the part and behalf of the contractors are or ought to 
be observed, performed, fulfilled and kept, the contractors do hereby bind 
themselves and their successors unto our Sovereign Lady the Queen in the 
sum of 35,000 I. of lawful money of the United Kingdom, to be paid to our said 
Lady the Queen, her heirs and successors, by way of stipulated or ascertained 
damages hereby agreed upon between the same Commissioners and the con- 
tractors, in case of the failure on the part of the contractors in the due exe- 
cution of this contract or any part thereof* 

In witness whereof, two of the Commissioners for executing the office of 
Lord High Admiral have hereunto set their hands and seals, and the said 
contractors have hereto set their corporate seal, the day and year first above 
written., 

JVm. Bowles, (l. s.) 
W. Gordon, (l. s.) 

Signed, sealed, and delivered by the said Commissioners 
in the presence of 

John James. 

The Corporate Seal of the abovenamed u Peninsular and Oriental 
Steam Navigation Company" was hereunto affixed, by order of the 
Court of Directors, in the presence of 

John James, 

and 
C. W. Howell. 



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SEAMEN. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated ao January 1847 ;—for f 

A RETURN " of the Number of Sbambn Afloat, above the Estimate, and the Number 
of Seamen that the Channel Squadron are Short of Complement" 



Admiralty, "1 
12 April 1847./ 



H. F. AMEDROZ, 

Chief Clerk. 



Ordered, ty The House of Commons, to be Printed, 14 April 1847. 

RETURN of the Number of Seamen and Boys Afloat, above the Estimate. 

Number of Seamen and Boys voted - - - - - | - - - 29,500 

Number of Seamen and Boys actually borne by the last 
returns received in office on the 1st April 184? 

Number of Boys borne above the 2,000 voted separately 4,016 

2 J Boys equal 1 Man ..... 1,606 

Able Seamen saved by the employment of Boys - 



Number of Seamen more borne than voted - - - 




2,258 



Admiralty Office,! 
12 April 1847. J 

JV*£. — 1,091 men are employed upon the relief service in Ireland and Scotland. 

H. O. Ward. 



A RETURN of the Number of Sbambn that the Channel Squadron are Short of 

Complement 



Seamen 
Boys 



198 
34 

232 



Supernumeraries in the Squadron at the same timet 

Seamen ----- ... .-.30 
Boys - ... ... 404 

494 



-Admiralty, *l 
* February 1847./ 



J. T. Briggt, 

Ace* General Navy. 

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SAILING SHIPS AND STEAM VESSELS. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated lg February i847;—/or, 



A RETURN " of the following Sailing Ships and Steam Vessels of War, 
— Raleigh, Constance, Thetis, Eurydice, Spartan, Terrible, Retribution, 
Trident, Sidon, Odin ; and showing, 

" 1. Total Cost of Hull and Engines ; from whose Plans and Drawings 
Built, and Displacement calculated, and Dimensions of Masts, Yards, and 
Sails were Designed : 

" 2. Difference between Calculations made, and actual Draught of Water, 
with all Ordnance Stores, Provisions, and Water, &c. under Hatches, and 
Coals, in the case of Steamers, stating for how many Men, and for what 
Number of Days, she has Provisions and Water on Board for the same ; and 
in Steamers, for how many Days the Coals are calculated to last at full 
Steam: 

" 3. Greatest Speed obtained ; and in Steamers, when under Canvas and 
Steam together, when under Canvas only, and when under Steam only : 

" 4. Greatest Amount of Inclination in Rolling, Pitching, and Sending, 
with the Number of Vibrations rolling in a Minute, or any given portion 
of Time: 

" 5. Number of Feet and Inches Centre of Gravity of Engine is above 
or below Load- water line : 

" 6. Expenses of all Descriptions, including Alterations, Pay, and Pro- 
visions of Officers and Men, from Date of Commission to the 1st day of 
January 1847, and Number of Days at Sea in the same Period : 

" 7. Constructors* Report of Her Majesty's Ship Thetis, dated Ports- 
mouth, the 7th day of January 1847." 



( Viscount Ingestre.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
28 April 1847. 



326 • 

Under 1 ox. 



RETURNS RELATIVE TO VARIOUS SAILING SHIPS 



A RETURN of the following Sailing Ships and Steam Vessels of War, — Raleigh, Constance, 

of their Construction, Sailing 



RALEIGH. 



CONSTANCE. 



THETIS. 



Total cost of hull (fitted complete for sea up to the time of sailing 
from the ports where they were fitted out) 



45;952 



£. 
44,231 



£. 
42,641 



Total cost of engines 



From whose plans and drawings built, and displacement calcu- 
lated, and dimensions of masts, yards, and sails were designed. 



- - Mr. John 
Fincham. 



-- Sir William 
Symonds. 



- Messrs. Read, 
Cruize & Chat* 
field. 



Difference between calculations made and actual draught of water, 
with all Ordnance stores, provisions, and water, &c. under* 
hatches, and coals in the case of steamers ... 



For. 
ft. in. 
so o 



20 10 



Stating for how many men 



Aft. 
ft. in. 
91 O 



22 3 





ConstrucWs line 


For. 


Aft. 


For. 


Aft. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


31 o 


21 9 


19 ° 


»9 9 



Actual Draught 



21 7 



22 9 



And for what number of days she has provisions and water on 
board for the same. 



And in steamers, for how many days the coals are calculated to 
last at full steam. 



- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 



500 No. 

196 days' salt; 
224 days all 

others. 
98 days' water, 



Greatest speed obtained 



- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 



I2kts. Sftns. 



And in steamers, when under canvas and steam together 



when under steam only 
when under canvas only 



Greatest amount of inclination in rolling, pitching, and sending, 
with the number of vibrations rolling in a minute, or any given 
portion of time. 

Number of feet and inches centre of gravity of engine is above or 
below load-water line. 



Expenses of all descriptions, including alterations ... 

Pay and provisions of officers and men from the date of commis- 
sion to the 1st day of January 1847. 

And the number of days at sea in the same period ... 



- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 



8° 
no time 
specified. 



£. 
17,872 

19,073 



£. 
16,578 



15,259 
Not known at Somerset House. 



19 0J 



20 4 



320 No. 

112 days' bread 
140 days all 
others. 



- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 



- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 



£. 
10,728 

2,534 



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AND STEAM VESSELS OF WAR. 



Thetis, Eurydice, Spartan, Terrible, Retribution, Trident, Sidon, Odin ; showing the various Particulars 
and Steaming Qualities, &c. 



EURYDICE. 



£. 

1st commies. 

19,328 
2d commiss. 
2,177 



Rear Admiral 
the Hon. Geo. 
Elliot. 



SPARTAN. 



1st commiss. 

22,777 
2d commiss. 
2,600 



SirW. Symonds 



TERRIBLE. 



£. 
51,810 

43,461 
Mr. O. Lang. 



RETRIBUTION. 



£. 

42,782 
42,290 



TRIDENTS. 



£. 

19,874 
17,925 



SirW. Symonds. Messrs. Ditch- 
burn & Mare. 



of Flotation, as follows, in small figures : 



For. 


Aft. 


For. 


Aft. 


For. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


16 o 


16 3 


16 o 


17 


18 



at Sea, as follows, with everything on board 



15 11 



16 7 



240 No. 

140 days, all 

descriptions. 

70 days' water. 



IZkts. Ofins. 



•1 



13° 
no time 
specified. 



£. 
11,875 

6,952 



16 9} 



17 11$ 



18 10 



240 No. 



90 days' salt; 
112 days all 

others. 
84 days' water. 



12*te. 4 fins. 

Maximum speed 
Mean speed 



15° 
no time 
specified. 



1 4,783 
6,952 



Aft. 


For. 


ft. in. 


ft- in. 


18 6 


18 


rd: 
19 4 


18 7 



Aft. 
ft. in. 
18 o 



18 9 



sidon. 



£. 



89,135 



33,391 

Rear Admiral 
Sir C. Napier. 



ODIN. 



For. 


Aft. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


10 9 


10 9 


11 3 


10 7 



- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 



7 J days. 



12 Ate. 5 fins. 
10 2 



10 * 



8 



- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 

not known. 



£. 
14,561 

14,516 



- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 



7 J days. 



12 kts. Ofins. 

9 

about IZkts. 

6 2 

- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 

not known. 



85 No. 

- - 63 days, all 
descriptions. 



5 1 days. 



10 kts. 4fins. 

7 4 

5 

- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 

not known. 



For. Aft. 
ft. in. ft. in. 
17 10 17 10 



no returns. 



- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 



1 2 days. 



9 kts, 2 fins. 

no returns. 

no returns, 

- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 



Not complete : 

fitted for a 

temporary 

service. 

Mr. John 
Fincham. 



For. 
ft. in. 
15 o 



Aft. 
ft. in. 
15 o 



no returns. 



- - no sailing 
qualities re* 
ceived. 



8 days. 



12 kts. Ofins. 

10 4 

no returns. 

no returns. 

- - no sailing 
qualities re- 
ceived. 



(Cannot be obtained from the Steam Department.) 



not known. | not known. 



£. 
11,562 

12,678 
to 16 October 
1846, paid off. 



£. 
6,470 

1,839 



£. 
11,688 

4,09$ 



not in ooinsiift- 
\ sion. 



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STEAM VESSELS (NAVY). 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 19 January 1847 ;—Jbr> 



RETURN " of Screw Steam Vessels Laid Down and Launched since the 
1st day of January 1840 ; also, of Iron Steam Vessels Laid Down and 
Launched from the same Time, distinguishing those with Screw, their 
Tonnage, Horse Power, and Armament." 



(Sir Charles Napier.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
9 February 1 847. 



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SCREW STEAM VESSELS LAID DOWN SINCE 1 JAN. 1840. 



A RETURN of Screw Steam Vessels Laid Down and Launched since the 1st day of January 
1840 ; showing their Tonnage, Horse Power, and Armament. 





When 














Ton- 


Horse 




Names. 


r 


" ^ 






Armament. 


. 


Laid down. 


Launched. 


nage. 


Power. 




Rattler ... 


April 1842 - 


April 1848- 


888 


200 


- - 1 No. 68 pr., 65 cwt, 4 No. 
32 pr., 25 cwt 


Niger ... 


May 1845 • 


Not. 1846 - 


1,014 


400 


- - No armament proposed in 
drawing for building, nor ordered 
since, but understood to be simi- 
lar to Conflict and Desperate. 


Termagant 


April 1845 - 


building - 


1,527 


620 


- - As per drawing; 12 No. 
42 pr., 84 cwt, 8 No. 32 pr., 56 
cwt., 2 No. 8 in., 1 12 cwt., 6 No, 
10 in., 84 cwt. 


Encounter 


June 1845 - 


Sept. 1846 - 


906 


860 


- - As per drawing ; 2 No. 56 pr., 
85 cwt., 4 No. 68 pr., 65 cwt, 
2 No. 32 pr., 25 cwt. 


Conflict 


July 1845 - 


Aug. 1846 - 


1,118 


400 


1 - - As per drawing; 2 No. 66 pr., 
^ 85 cwt, 6 No. 68* pr., 65 cwt, 
J 2 No. 82 pr., 25 cwt 












Desperate 


Oct. 1845 - 


building 


992 


400 


Arrogant 


Sept. 1845 - 


building - 


1,861 


300 


- - 22 No. 82 pr., 56 cwt., 16 
No. 32 pr., 32 cwt, 6 No. 8 in., 
65 cwt, 2 No. 56 pr., 85 cwt 


Dauntless 


Sept. 1845 - 


Jan. 1847 - 


1,496 


520 


- • As per drawing; 14 guns, 
85 cwt to 65 cwt, 12 No. 32 pr., 
50 cwt., 2 No. 8 in., 112 cwt. 
As ordered since ; 6 No. 68 pr., 
65 cwt, 12 No. 82 pr., 66 cwt., 
4 No. 84 pr., 85 owt, 2 No. 68 pr., 
95 owt. 


Teazer ... 


Aug. 1845 . 


June 1846 - 


296 


100 


(- • 1 gun, 66 cwt., 1 No. 6 pr. 












Boxer - . - 


May 1846 - 


building - 


801 


100 


[ howitzer, brass. 


Bee (wheels and 


June 1841 - 


Feb. 1842 - 


42 


10 


Tender. 


screw). 













The following Ships have been altered to Screw Steam Vessels. 



Ajax - 
Blenheim 
Edinburgh 
Hogue 
Euro tag 
Forth . 
Horatio 
Seahorse 



a 

00 off 

p.* 



<«1 



9 £ 

° s 

I 



Amphion (Admiralty 
Order, 18th June 
1844, to fit with 
auxiliary engines 
and screw). 



Aug. 1807 
Aug. 1808 
Nov. 1807 
April 1808 
Feb. 1827 
Nov. 1828 
July 1806 ■ 
Nov. 1826 • 
April 1880 



May 1809 - 
May 1818 - 
Jan. 1811 - 
Oct 1811 . 
Feb. 1829 - 
Aug. 1883 - 
April 1807 - 
July 1880 - 
Jan. 1846 - 



1,761 


450 


1,747 


450 


1,772 


450 


1,750 


450 


1,168 


850 


1,215 


350 


1,090 


350 


1,212 


850 


1,475 


300 



- 26 No. 42 pr., 66 owt, 26 
) No. 82 pr., 42 owt, 2 No. 66 pr., 
85 cwt, 2 No. 8 in., 65 owt 



- 20 No. 42 pr., 66 cwt, 2 
No. 66 pr., 85 owt., 2 No. 8 in., 
65 cwt. 



- • 14 No. 82 pr., 60 cwt, 8 No. 
82 pr., 25 cwt, 2 No. 66 pr., 
87 cwt., 6 No. 8 in., 65 owt. 



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IRON STEAM 



A RETURN of Iron Steam 


distinguish 


dng thoi 


Names. 




Laid I 


Dorer - 
Albert - 


- 


March 
Sept. 1 


Soudan - 
Wilberforce - 
Mohawk 


- 


Sept. 
Sept. ; 
July 1 


Rocket • 
Ruby - 


- 


Oct. 1 
Oct. 1 


Trident - 
Birkenhead - 


- 


April 
Sept. 


Bloodhound - 
Harpy - 


- 


Feb. 1 
Feb. 1 


Jackall - 
Lizard - 


• 


Feb. 1 
Feb. 1 


Myrmidon 
Torch - 


- 


Feb. 1 
Feb. 1 


Fairy (screw) - 
Grappler 


- 


Dec. 1 

Aug. ] 


Onyx - 
Megsera (screw) 


- 


May ] 
Aug. ] 


Sharpshooter - 


- 


Aug. ] 


Violet - 
Greenock (screw) 


- 


Aug. ] 
Sept : 


Minx (screw) 
Simoom (screw) 


- 


Sept : 
Oct 1 


Antelope 
Triton - 
Oberon - 


- 


Dec. 1 
Dec. I 
Jan. 1 


Vulcan (screw) 


- 


March 


Caradoc 

Llewellyn 

Columba 


- 


Dec. 1 
Jan. 1 
Jan. 1 


Dwarf (screw) 


- 


- (P<» 


Princess Alice 


- 


- (P UI 



Admiralty, Somer 
Surveyor of the Navy' s Offi 



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SHIPS " EURYDICE" AND "SPARTAN." 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 19 March 1847 %—for, 



A COPY " of the Official Reports and Diagrams respecting the Trials 
in Sailing of Her Majesty's Ship Eurydice, during the Months of August 
and September 1846:— Also, the Number of Men and Boys victualled, and 
the Quantities of Provisions and Water on Board Her Majesty's Ships 
Spartan and Eurydice, on the 9th day of August 1840." 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 15 June 1847. 



A COPY of the Official Reports and Diagrams respecting the Trials 
in Sailing of Her Majesty's Ship Eurydice, during the Months of August 
and September 1846 :— Also, the Number of Men and Boys victualled, and 
the Quantities of Provisions and Water on Board Her Majesty's Ships 
Spartan and Eurydice, on the 9th day of August 1846 ; to which is added a 
Statement of the Draught of Water of Her Majesty's Ships Spartan and 
Eurydice, in the Month of August 1846. 

Admiralty, J. H. Hay, 

10 June 1847. Acting Chief Clerk. 



(A.) 
Copy of a DESPATCH from Vice-Admiral Sir IF. Parker, g.c.b, to the 
Right honourable the Secretary of the Admiralty.— (Two Enclosures- 
Diagrams A. & B.) 

" Hibernia," off the Tagus, 
_ Sir \ . 20 August 1846. 

I have the honour to acquaint you, for the information of the Lords Commis- 
sioners of the Admiralty, that Her Majesty's ships named in the margin, joined mi** 
the squadron under my command, on the 18th instant, and, in obedience to their CoJiii* 
Lordships' directions, intimated in Mr. Ward's letter of the 6th instant, I trans J uiy ^ ce ' 
mit the reports of the trials of sailing of those ships, on their passage out from 
England. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) W. Parker, 
To the Right hon. Vice-Admiral. 

The Secretary of the Admiralty, 
&c. &c. &c. 



Enclosure 1 in (A.) 
Remarks on the Sailing of the Raleigh, Constance, Eurydice and Spartan* since 



leaving Plymouth. 

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2 COPY OF OFFICIAL REPORTS, &c. RESPECTING 

At 10 h. 45 m., the Eurydice had fore-reached considerably, but the Spartan 
had gone much to windward, and appeared to be, by angles and bearing, 1,213 
yards to windward of Eurydice. 

At 1 h. 0m., the Eurydice tacked per signal; at 1 h. 15 m., the Spartan passed 
a short distance to windward of her, apparently about 200 or 300 yards ; wind, a 
light breeze from W. N.W., going about 4 J knots. 

On the 10th August, a short trial took place between the Spartan and Eury- 
dice, the wind being about a point free. At 2 h. 30 ra., under all plain sail, 
royals and flying jib, the Eurydice was astern about 405 yards ; at 5 h. 30 m., 
Eurydice was about 1,360 yards ahead of Spartan, having gained 1,760 yards in 
three hours and ten minutes. During this trial there was a moderate breeze from 
the N. W., going about 7 knots. 

On the 11th August, with a 7-knot breeze from W. S. W., under all plain sail 
except royals, a trial took place between Eurydice and Spartan. At 9 h. 20m., 
the signal was made to try rate of sailing, the Eurydice being about 620 yards 
to windward of Spartan. At 1 1 h. 50 m., tacked for signal. At 1 h. 40 m., tacked. 
At 2 h. 15 m., when the trial terminated, the Eurydice was 1,540 yards to wind- 
ward, having gained about 900 yards to windward of Spartan in four hours. The 
Raleigh had gained during the trial 2,760 yards to windward of the Constance, 
both ships being under all plain sail except royals. 

On the 12th, light variable winds ; no trial took place. 

On the 13th, see Report. 

On the 14th, calm, with light airs. 

On the 1 5th, see Report. 

On the 16th, wind quarterly, going five and six knots under all plain sail, except 
weather clew of mainsail, distanced the Constance considerably, she having star- 
board studding-sails set ; at the same time, had a little advantage of the Eurydice, 
and the Spartan was far astern of all. 

There is a considerable discrepancy between the sailing reportB of Raleigh and 
Constance on the 15th, although the bearings and angles were taken precisely at 
the same time ; the angles subtended by Raleigh's mast-head are not shown in 
Constance's report ; and it appears the whole distances the vessels were apart 
have been made use of in arriving at results, instead of the distances ahead or 
astern ; making very material differences when the angles were great (as at 
starting) between the ship's course and line of bearing. In the trial of sailing by 
the wind with the Constance on the 13th, the same principle appears to have been 
adhered to, the vessels' distances apart being used in coming to a conclusion, 
without any regard to their relative positions with respect to the direction of the 
wind. 

(signed) Thomas Herbert, 

Captaia, 

Vice- Admiral Sir W. Parker, Bart, g. c. b„ 
. &c. &c. &c. 



Enclosure 2 in (A.) 



Her Majesty's Ship "Raleigh," off Lisbon, 
Sir, 18 August 1846, 

Agreeably to the directions of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, I 
Constance, have tried the ships named in the margin, during the passage from Plymouth 
Eurydice, Sound to this period ; and in forwarding reports of the trials of sailing, I beg to 
* n ' observe that the Eurydice has had (except on the day we left Plymouth) the 

advantage of the Spartan ; and that the Raleigh, both off and on the wind, has 
had the advantage of the Constance. 

(signed) Thomas Herbert, 

Captain, 
Vice- Admiral Sir W. Parker, Bart., g. c. b,, C^ r^r^r*\ 

&c, &c. &c. 



H. M. SHIPS "EURYDICE" AND "SPARTAN." 3 

(B) 

Copt of a DESPATCH from Vice-Admiral Sir W. Parker, Bart., o. c. b., to the 

Right honourable the Secretary of the Admiralty. — (One Enclosure— Diagrams 

C. D. E. F.) 

" Hibernia," off the Rock of Lisbon, 
Sir, 22 August 1846. 

My letter of the 18th inst., No. 216, will have informed their Lordships that 
the squadron under my command, named in the margin, sailed from the Tagus at Hiberma, 
8h. a. m. of that day, and on clearing the "Cachops" we were joined by the Queen^ 
Raleigh, Constance, Eurydice and Spartan. It blew too strong to admit of much Vanguard, 
communication, and the remainder of the day was employed in exercising the j^^ 
squadron in such evolutionary movements as were practicable. The following Albion, 
morning, the wind being strong from the northward, afforded a favourable oppor- Rattler, 
tunity for trying the rate of sailing, and the whole of the squadron, with the steam-sl^opi. 
exception of the Hibernia and St. Vincent, were directed to proceed in the wind's 
eye of the flag-ship. I had ordered the Polyphemus to take up a position in that 
direction for the purpose of noting the ships in succession as they passed to wind- 
ward of her, but the signal was misunderstood, and the expected observations 
from Commander M'Cleverty were consequently lost ; the weather also became so 
very hazy that we were unable to discern the positions of the different ships from 
the Hibernia ; but the accompanying summary of the reports received from the 
captains (which are also herewith enclosed) will, I believe, be found correct. On 
the 20th, the weather continuing favourable and the wind strong, I sent the 
Eurydice 15 miles dead to leeward, and at 1 1 h. 30 m., a. m., started the Vanguard, 
Canopus, Raleigh and Constance together, to pass round her stern, and the whole 
to beat back to the flag-ship. They passed the Eurydice successively in the order 
stated in the accompanying return, and rejoined the squadron in the order which 
is also stated therein. All the ships displayed excellent sailing qualities and 
stability, but the advantage was certainly with the Raleigh, followed closely by 
the Eurydice. It is, however, right to observe, that the Constance having run 
down before the wind with all her reefs out, lost ground considerably in reefing 
her topsails. The Vanguard also lost the use of her top-gallant sails for some 
time, from the check and sheet blocks being carried away and sails splitting ; but 
the race was well contested between that ship and the Canopus, the advantage in 
favour of the Vanguard not exceeding from one or two cables in length. As 
these line-of-battle ships drew in with the land, and got into smoother water, the 
superiority was decidedly with the Vanguard ; on the off-shore tack the Canopus 
excelled. The Spartan had been detached on the 19th to the assistance of a 
Portuguese merchant-brig in distress, which prevented her participating in the 
trial of the 20th. The Constance and Spartan have been occupied in the early 
part of this day, while the breeze lasted, in a trial, for the purpose of trimming 
those ships, and I shall, on the first favourable opportunity, direct another sailing 
match between them, the Raleigh and Eurydice, as well as with others of the 
ships which were not tried on the 20th, together with the Superb, which I am 
hourly expecting to join me from the Tagus. The reports received from the 
Captains of the trial on the 20th are likewise enclosed for their Lordships' infor- 
mation. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) W. Parker, 

The Right hon. the Secretary of the Admiralty, Vice- Admiral. 

&c. &c. &c. 

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COPY OF OFFICIAL REPORTS, &c. RESPECTING 



Vangu&rd, 
Canopus, 
Raleigb, 
Constance. 



Enclosure to (B.) 

" Hibernia," off the Rock of Lisbon, 
22 August 1846. 

Statement of the Order in which the Ships named in the Margin successively 
passed the Eurydice, when lying to, 15 miles to leeward of the Flag-ship, in the 
Trial of Sailing on the 20th instant. 



Raleigh, at - 
Constance - 
Vanguard - 
Canopus 
Eurydice, filled at 



(signed) 



H. 


m. s. 




1 


6 


P.M. 


1 


8 30 




1 


9 55 




1 


12 10 




1 


12 30 






W. Parker, 






Vice-Admiral. 



Order in which the under-mentioned Ships passed the Hibernia, with the Time 
and Distance of each, at the Termination of a Trial of Sailing off Lisbon, on 
the 20th August 1846. 

No. 1. Raleigh tacked under the stern of Hibernia at 5h. 3 m. p.m., being 
then one cable's length distant, and passed to windward. 

No, 2. Eurydice passed to windward of Hibernia, at 5 h. 30 m. p.m., half a 
cable's length distant. 

No. 3. Constance bad reached within one point of the lee-bow of the Hibernia, 
one mile distant, at 5 h. 50 m. p.m. She was then crossing to windward, when a 
man falling overboard obliged her to heave to ; the man was saved. . 

No. 4. Vanguard passed to leeward of Hibernia, at 6 h. 20 m. p.m., one cable's 
length distant. 

No. 5. Canopus passed to leeward of Hibernia, at 6h. 15 m. p.m., two and a 
half cable's length . 

(signed) W. Parker, 

Vice-Admiral. 



Hibernia, 

St. Vincent, 

Qoeen, 

Vanguard, 

Rodney, 

Albion, 

Superb, 

Eurydice, 

Spartan. 

Cyclops, 
Rattler, 
Polypbemus, 
Steam-vessels. 



(C) 

Copy of a DESPATCH from Vice-Admiral Sir W. Parker, Bart., g.c.b., to the 
Right honourable the Secretary of the Admiralty. — (One Enclosure.) 

Sir, " Hibernia,* at Sea, 9 September 1846. 

I request you will inform the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty that, on 

the passage between Lisbon and Cape St. Vincent, on the 3d instant, the weather 

being moderate and the wind nearly aft, the rate of sailing of the squadron (as 

per margin) was tried between noon and 5 p. m., under all possible canvas, the 

headmost ships averaging about 5£ knots an hour, when the Eurydice had a decided 

superiority over all the others, which followed in the order and with the advantage 

stated in the accompanying summary ; the reports from the different ships being 

also enclosed for their Lordships' information. 

I have, &c. 

Right hon. the Secretary of the Admiralty, (signed) W. Parker. 

&c. &c. &c. 

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H. M. SHIPS "EURYDICE" AND "SPARTAN." 

Enclosure to (C.) 
Summary of Reports of Sailing before the Wind, 3 September 1846. 

Eurydice beat Spartan - 4,409 yards. 

• - - 1,300 „ 

• - - 1,000 „ 

- - 83 „ 

- 1,500 „ 

- 1,600 „ 

- 2,236 „ 

- - 2,112 „ 

(signed) W, Parker, 

H.M.S. " Hibernia,* September 1846. Vice-Admiral. 



Superb „ 
Vanguard ,, 
Spartan „ 
Queen „ 


Vanguard 
Spartan - 
Queen - 
St. Vincent 


St. Vincent 


Albion - 


Albion „ 
Rodney „ 


Rodney - 
Hibernia 



(D.) 

Copy of a DESPATCH from Vice-Admiral Sir William Parker, Bart, g.c.b., to 
the Right honourable the Secretary of the Admiralty. 

u Hibernia/' off Cape Spartel, 
Sir, 20 September 1846. 

I request you will inform the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty that the 
squadron under my command left Cadiz on the morning of the 17th, and on the 
same evening I detached Commodore Sir F. Collier with the St. Vincent and 
Queen to England, directing the Commodore to keep the Queen in company until 
they were off Plymouth, for the purpose of making every possible further trial of 
the sailing qualities of the two ships. 

On the 18th and 19th instant trials of sailing were again Inade in the squadron. 
On the former day the Eurydice and Spartan tried for five hours ; the wind was 
light, the water smooth, and the former had a very decided advantage, having at 
the close weathered on the Spartan 1,520 yards. 

The steamers Retribution, Cyclops, Terrible and Rattler also started together 
about the same time, the whole having their floats unshipped. The Terrible bad 
a slight advantage over the Rattler, both beating the Cyclops considerably, and 
the Retribution very much. 

On the following day (the 19th\ the wind being fresh, and in the latter part of 
the day a head-sea also, the same vessels were again started, and in the afternoon Vanguard, 
the two-deckers named in the margin were likewise put on trial. Rod "* 

The superiority was again decidedly with the Eurydice, which in five hours beat Superb.' 
the Spartan 2,000 yards directly in the wind's eye. 

Of the steamers, the Rattler was gaining fast on the whole, until her top-masts 
were carried away. The Terrible was the next best, but she also lost ground by 
her chain topsail-tye giving way. The Cyclops showed good weatherly properties, 
without fore-reaching much, and the Retribution did better with the stronger 
breeze than before, though considerably beaten by all the other steam- vessels. Of 
the line-of-battle ships, the Vanguard was foremost, the Superb, Albion and 
Rodney following in succession. The summaries will show the amount of gain 
and loss, and the reports of the angles and distances from the respective ships are 
also forwarded, together with the average inclination by pendulum of each ship. 

In closing these reports, as regards the Eurydice (which will probably be sent to 
England to-morrow or the following day), I have no hesitation in saying she has 
proved herself decidedly the fastest, and a very clever little ship in all respects, 
and has been ably conducted bv Captain Elliot. The Spartan has also shown 



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6 REPORTS, &c: H. M. SHIPS "EURYDICE* AND « SPARTAN/ 5 

Captain Elliot notices in his report that the Eurydice had 20 tons more water 
on board than the Spartan (it was, in feet, 22 tons), the former having obtained & 
supply at Cadiz ; but it must also be stated that the Spartan, from some accidental 
causes, had 33 tons more dead-weight on board when she left England than the 
Eurydice, and consequently, in both these last trials, the Spartan had 11 tons more 
weight in her than her competitor. 

Their Lordships may be assured that they are both admirable ships. 

The squadron, in the course of this day, lying to, have been thrown into the 
hollow of a heavy swell, with the wind too light to render the ships manageable ; 
and I am bound to say, that the Albion, Vanguard and Superb have perceptibly 
rolled much deeper than the other ships. 

The Terrible, Cyclops and Rattler have rolled nearly alike ; the Retribution 
less than the others by one-half. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) W. Parker, 

The Right hon. the Secretary of the Admiralty, Vice-Admiral, 

&C.&C. &c. 



(E.) 

Admiralty, 81 March 1847. 

Statement showing the Total Number, including Boys, victualled on board Her Majesty's Ships 
" Eurydice " and "Spartan," on the 9th day of August 1846 ; also, the Quantities of Provisions 
and Water estimated to have remained on Board those Ships on that day ; viz. : — 





















Sdt 












SHIP. 


Number 
Victualled. 


Biscuit. 


Wine. 


Spirit*. 


Bee£ 
Pieces 

8 Pounds. 


Pork, 

Pieces 

4 Pounds. 


Flour. 


Suet 


Raisins. 


Eurydioe 
Spartan 


268 
246 


lbs. 
25,070 

25,557 


gall. 
26 

19 


gall. 
795 

818 


1,250 
1,284 


2,498 
2,484 


lbs. 
7,800 

7,788 


lbs. 
602 

1,027 


lbs. 
1,197 

627 


SHIP. 


Peat. 


OatmeaL 


Sugar. 


Choco- 
late. 


Tea. 


Vinegar. 


Tobacco. 


Soap. 


Preserved 


Salt 


Water 

in 




Meat. 


Soup. 


Tanks. 


Eurydice 
Spartan 


gall. 
800 

816 


gaU. 
160 

218 


lbs. 
2,176 

2,670 


lbs. 
1,655 

1,689 


lbs. 
485 

478 


gall. 
152 

197 


lbs. 
1,282 

1,299 


lbs. 
827 

698 


lbs. 
218 

240 


\pints. 
68 


lbs. 
28 


gall. 

17,810 
15,860 



James Mull, 
Comptroller of Victualling. 



(P.) 

Statement of the Draught of Water of Her Majesty's Ships " Spartan " and " Eurydice," 

in the Month of August 1846. 

Feet Inches. 



Spartan, on 6 August 1846 - Forward 

Aft - 



16 9$ 

17 llj 



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PAPER SHIPS EURYD1CE AND SPARTAN 



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DIAGRAM I). 





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SHIPS "POWERFUL;' &c. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Common*, 
dated 3 May 1847; —for, 



COPIES "of the Logs of the « Powerful,' 4 Rodney/ ' Ganges/ ' Vanguard/ 
'Cambridge' and c Revenge,' on the 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th and 6th days of 
December 1840." 



Admiralty, 1 H. F. A M E D R OZ, 

20 May 1847./ Chief Clerk. 



(Sir Char Us Napier.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
20 May 1847. 



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LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Powerful," Chfirhs tfapier, Commodore, between 

1st December and 6th December 1840. 



December 1st, 1840. 



Force 

of 
Wind. 



State 

of 

Weather. 



1 
2 
S 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 

10 

11 

12 



Courses. 



NNE 
NEbjN 
NNEJE 

NNE 

NkyE 

ssw 



NbyE 



Winds. 



Lee 
Wiy, 



8ignil$. 



NWlj 

Vble 

NW 
Vble 



SW 



REMARKS, &c 



A. M. 

4 Squadron in company. 

5 15 Down mizen trysail, oat reefs of courses, 
set jib and driver. 

6 Up top-gallant masts and yards ; out flying 
jib-boom and 3d reefs of topsails ; in main trysail 
and staysail. 

Daylight. Revenge, Rodney and Vanguard in com- 
pany j Cambridge and Ganges in sight to leeward. 

9 80 Mustered at quarters. 

10 Taken aback ; braced round on starboard 
tack; watch eastward, making points; corps caulk- 
ing main deck ; awkward squad at great guns. 



Course. 



Distance. 



Latitude 
D.R. 



Lat. 
O. 



Lat. 
D.R. 



Longitude 
Chro. 



Long. 
Lunar. 



BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 



CV 



cb 

g 

cb 



gbb 



1 

2 

8 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



SEbyS 
SE 

SEJS 
South 

SSE 

SJE 

SJW 

SSW 

SbyW 



SWly 



wsw 



SWly 



West 



Squadron in company. 

1 Up foresail ; in 2d and 3d reefs of flying and 
main topsails. 

4 80 Set main trysail. 

6 Close-reefed topsails, and one set of courses ; 
shortened sail to close-reefed topsails, and reefed 
foresail ; down top-gallant yards and masts. 

6 O Squadron in sight. 

7 Bent mizen trysail. 
9 45 Set mizen trysail. 

, f Beef, Nos. 90 and 144, 8-lb. pieces. 



[Suet, No. 58, 112 lbs. 



Midnight. 



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CAMBRIDGE AND RBVENGB, FROM THB 1ST TO 6TH DECEMBER 1840. 



Copt Loo of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Powerful n — continued. 



















December 2d, 1640. 


Force 

of 
Wind. 


State 

of 

Weather. 


H. 


K. 


F. 


Course*. 


Winds. 


Lee 

W»y. 


Signal*. 


REMARKS, &c 


b 

b 




qr. 


1 
2 
3 


8 
3 
8 


4 
4 


ssw 

SWbyS 
NbyJS 


West 






A. M. 

110 Up foresail ; set flying staysail ; observed a 
light on lee bow, supposed to be Vanguard. 

4 Three sail in sight to leeward, one on the 
west quarter. 


8 


g 


4 
6 
6 


8 
2 
2 


4 


sw 


NW 






6 Set foresails, and down main staysail ; wore 
foggle of main topsail sheet, came out, furled the 
sail, and set main staysail. 

8 Squadron in company. 






7 


1 




NbyE 


West 






9 15 Down main staysail. 


8 


* 


8 

9 

10 

11 


1 
2 
2 
8 


4 


NNE 

UpNbyE 

Off N E by N 








10 A sea struck the ship, carried away swing- 
ing boom, washed away fore-chains and forecastle 
netting. 

11 Set main staysail. 

Noon. Carried away main staysail sheet j hauled 
it down. Squadron in company. 


3 


g 


12 


3 














Coorw. 


Distance. 


Latitude 
D. R. 


Ut. 

o. 


Long. 
D.R. 


Loaptods 

On. 


Loo* 
Lanar. 


BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 
















Opened rum 218, 70 gallons ; pork 862, 866, 804 lbs. 
each. 


8 


g 


1 
2 






UpN 
Off NNE 


NWly 






P. M. 

1 10 Down flying top staysail ; employed getting 
preventive force shroud up. 


8 


ph 


8 
4 
6 


1 




UpN 








8 Set main staysail ; carried away part main 
topsail left, and preventive main topsail brace ; 
two sail in sight. 

6 20 Main staysail sheet carried away in ditto. 


8 


gpk 


6 
7 


1 




Off NE byN 








9 30 Set main staysail ; carried away starboard ; 
foretop stay supplied ditto j got preventive stay 
up; set up foretop stay. 


8 


g 


8 



10 

11 






NbyE 

Head 

NbyE 

UpNbyE 


NW 

NWly 


4* 
41 
41 




Midnight 


b 


g* 


12 




1 


OffNl 


EbyN 






41 







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LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copy Loo of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Powerful" — continued. 



















December 3d, 1840. 


Force 
of 

Wind. 


State 

of 

Weather, 


H. 


K. 


F. 


Course*. 


Winds. 


Lee 

Way. 


Signsls. 


REMARKS, kc 


6 

4 


b 


1 
2 
8 
6 




4 

4 
4 


NE 
UpNNE 


Westly 


4 
4 
4 




A. M. 

8 Set close-reefed main topsail. 

4 50 Carried away main staysail ; down the sail 
to splice the sheet. 

6 Set ditto; lost overboard block, 10 inch 
doable, one in No. 






6 




4 


OffNEbyN 




4 




Daylight. Observed (squadron) a part of, astern ; 
vanguard on lee beam. 






7 


2 












8 Squadron in sight 

8 50 Set close-reefed flying and main topsail. 






8 
9 


8 
3 




NEbyN 
NEJN 








9 16 Set reefed main sail ; down main staysail ; in 
flying and mizen topsails ; employed variously, 
and reefing new topsail lifts. 






10 
11 


4 

4 




NE 
NEJ 








Noon. Squadron in company ; wore ; split main- 
sail in setting up ditto. 


6 


b 


12 


4 




N 








• 


Course. 


Distance. 


Latitude 
D.R. 


Lat 
O. 


Long. 
D.R. 


Longitude 
Chro. 


Long. 
Lunar. 


BEARING8 AND D18TANCE. 


4 
1 




b 


1 
2 
8 
4 
5 
6 


2 
2 

8 
2 
2 


4 


Hoi 
Hd^ 

NE 


JW 

re to 

fSW 

byN 


N 


w 






P.M. 
Opened flour, No. 5, 21, 867 lbs. 

1 14 Out 3d and 4th reefs of topsails and reefs of 
courses. 

2 Up foresail, and hove to. 

3 Filled set courses, jib and spankers ; em- 
ployed setting up port fore rigging; carpenter 
about fore chains ; sailmakers as required. 

4 Squadron in company. 






7 


3 












5 Tacked, squadron in company. 


2 


b 


8 

9 

10 

11 




4 

4 
4 

4 


NEbyN 


WNW 






7 15 Up mainsail in driver. 

7 30 Set driver; insetting mainsail, split it ; up 
ditto to repair. 

11 Set mainsail. 

11 60 Up ditto; washed away swinging booms, 
one in No. 


2 


b 


12 




4 


NEbyN 








Midnight. A swell from westward. t 

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CAMBRIDGE AND REVENGE, FROM THE 1ST TO 6TH DECEMBER 1840. 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Powerful" — continued. 



December 4th, 1840. 



Force 

of 
Wind. 


State 

of 

Weather. 


H. 


K. 


F. 


Gram*. 


Winds. 


Lee 

W.JT. 


Signals. 


REMARKS, Ice. 


1 


1 




h 
b 

b 
b 


1 
2 
8 
4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 


1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 


6 

4 


HdNd 

HdtoNd 
and Ed 

Hd to Westd 


Vble 
Calm 

Eastly 
Calm 






A. M. 

4 Up foresail. 

4 16 Up top-gallant yards and masts. 

8 Light breexes N E ; wore ship ; squadron in 
company ; employed setting up fore and main rig- 
ging and topmast ditto ; got all the sails up to 
dry ; caulkers caulking poop. 

9 Down jib ; up spanker. 
Noon. Squadron in company. 


Coarte. 


Distance. 


Latitude 
D.R. 


Lat 
O. 


Long. 
D.R. 


Longitude 
Chro. 


Long. 
Lunar. 


BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 




















2 
2 

4 

10 

4 


b 

b 
c 
c 
c 


1 

2 

8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 



10 

11 

12 


1 
1 
2 
2 
8 
2 
4 
7 
8 
7 

i 


4 

2 

4 
4 


Head 
Wl 

N 


NW 
*W 

w 


VI 

s 

N 


)le 
£ 

E 






P.M. 

Opened beef, 125, 88, 8-lb. pieces ; employed set- 
ting up rigging ; getting up small sails to dry. 

4 Squadron in company. 

4 80 Shifted main course. 

5 Trimmed. 

5 15 Set top-gallant sails. 

5 80 Set mainsail. 

6 Squadron in company. 

6 20 Up mainsail and squared yards. 

7 80 Set mainsail and spanker. 

8 80 In top-gallant sails. 
11 15 Up mainsail. 
Midnight 

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LOGB OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copy Loo of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Powerful " — continued. 

















] 


[)ecei 


mber 


5th, 1840. 


Force 

of 

Wind 


State 

of 

Weather. 


H. 


K. 


F. 


Courses. 


Winds. 


Lee 
Way 


Signals. 


RE MARKS, && 


4 


b 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 


7 
8 
8 
8 
7 
6 
5 


4 


NW 


ENE 
Vble 






A. M. 

4 2 Ships in sight. 

6 Out «11 reefs of topsails; set mainsail and 
top-gallant sails ; crossed royal yards ; set royals 
and flying jib* 

Daylight. Observed land to the N E. 

7 Aired bedding. 

8 Squadron in company. Extremes of Cy- 
prus; EbyN JNandNEJN. 


2 





8 

9 

10 

11 


4 
2 
8 
2 


6 
4 










9 Wind. 

9 45 Up mainsail ; set head top-gallant studding 
sails. 

11 80 Punished D. Ahern with 48 lathes, for theft. 


2 


b 


12 


2 


4 










Noon. Squadron in company. 


Course. 


Diet 


ance. 


Latitude 
D.R. 


Lat. 

O. 


Lon. 
D.R. 


Lon, 
Chro. 


Lon. 
Lunar. 


BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 
















Night. Port of Cyprus N E nine leagues. 




b 

b 
b 


1 

2 

8 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 


1 


NW 


ESE 
Vble 

Hove to 

Hd . 

NE 

NWbjN 


ESE 

Vble 

ESE 

Vble 






P. M. 


1 

2 

1 


1 
2 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 
2 


N to by IN 

4 
4 

4 


12 30 Altered course to N W by N. Employed 
fitting spare f. course, and, as requisite, about the 
rigging ; caulkers caulking p»op. 

3 15 In studding sails and spanker; squared 
yards ; down head sails. 

4 Squadron in company ; one strange sail in 
sight to the eastward. 

5 Up foresail ; hauled to the wind, and hove to. 

5 80 Mustered at quarters; in first and second 
reefs. of topsails. 

6 Squadron in company. 

6 15 Set jib, foresail and lee clue of mainsail. 

7 Set royals ; trimmed up mainsail. 

7 46 In royals ; up foresail ; down jib, and hove 
to. 

7 50 Set jib. 

8 Squadron in company ; trimmed; made and 
shortened sail, as requisite. 

10 45 Set foresail. 


t 


K 


10 
11 


2 

1 

i 


A 






ESI 


1 







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CAMBRIDGE AND REVENGE, FROM THE 18T TO 6TH DECEMBER 1840. 



Copy Loo of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Powerful" — continued. 

















December 6th, 1840 


Fore 

of 

Wind 


e Sute 

of 
.Weather 


H. 


K. 


F. 


Courses. 


Wind*. 


Lee 
Way 


Signals. 


REMARKS, Ice. 


1 


b 


1 
2 
3 


1 
3 
3 


4 


NWbyWjTV 


' NorthJy 






A. M. 

1 A breeze from the northward. 

3 Up mainsail. Squadron in company* 


1 
1 




b 


4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 


2 
2 

1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 


4 
4 
4 

6 

4 


NW 
NWbyN 


Vble 

NE 

ENE 
SEd 

SWd 






6 30 Set mainsail. 

6 Out reefs ; set royals and fore-jib* 

8 Squadron in company. 

9 Trimmed. 

9 30 Trimmed; set lee clue of mainsail; mus- 
tered by divisions ; read the Articles of War, and 
mustered, per open list. 

11 O Trimmed; set mainsail. 

Noon. Squadron in company. 


1 


° 


12 


2 


4 












Course. 


Distance. 


Latitude 
D. R. 


L»t 
O. 


Lon. 
D. R. 


Lon. 
Chro. 


Lon. 
Lunar. 


BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 


2 





1 


2 


4 


NW 


byN 


WS 


w 






P. M. 






2 


1 


2 










Opened beef, Nos. 85,158, thirty-eight 8-lb. pieces. 


1 


c 


3 
4 






1 Hove to, 
V bead to the 


Calm 






1 Altered course to NW. 

2 In royals ; flying jib ; up mainsail, and 
hove to. 






5 


1 


4 


J Westd. 








4 Squadron in company. 






6 


1 


4 
4 


NW 


■ 






4 45 Mustered at quarters ; in second reefs. 
6 Squadron in company. 






7 


1 








7 Trimmed ; set lee-clue of mainsail. 






8 


2 












7 4 Up courses. 









1 




Calm 


Vble 






8 Squadron in company. 






10 


1 


4 










10 30 Trimmed. 






11 


2 




SE 








Midnight. Trimmed, as requisite. Squadron in 
company. 


1 


cq 1 


IS! 


3 


; 

















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LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copt Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship « Rodney," Robert Mansell, c. b., Captain, between 

1st December and Oth December 1840. 



Tuesday, December 1st, 1840. 



H. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



K. 



F. 



Course. 



N27E 



Course*. 



NNEjE 
NEJN 



NNE 
NbyE 

NSW 

South 



Distance. 



47 



] 


8 


4 


2 


4 




3 


8 




4 


8 




5 


8 




6 


4 




7 


5 




8 


4 







8 




10 


8 




11 


3 




12 


3 


4 



SbyEjE 
SEJE 

SEbyS 
SSE 
SbyE 
S JE 
SbyE 
SSW 



SbyWJW 



Winds. 



Force 

of 
Winds 



NWbjN 
NW 



NW 



Vble 



State 

of 

Weather. 



be 





cm 

c 
cm 
cm 



Latitude. 



D.R. 



33° 37' 



Obserration. 



SWbyW 



SWbySJS 



WSWJW 

wsw 

West 



om 



Sign»!a. 



9 „ 
Rodney 

to 
Powerful 

Int. 

645 



10 „ 

Powerful 

Gen. 

STM 

min 

OLQ 

BQN 

20 



1 23 
Powerful 

Gen. 
g g num. 



REMARKS, Sec 



A.M. 

1 60 
8 

2 50 

3 30 

4 



Latitude by Ononis, 35 20 N. 

Powerful N E by N. 

Set fore and mizen topsails. 

Up mainsail. 

Three of the squadron in company ; Com- 
me4ore, N E J N } mile. 
Daylight out-reefe of courses, and three reefs of top- 
sails ; fidded top-gallant masts, and crossed top- 
gallant yards ; trimmed, made and shortened sail 
as necessary ; Powerful N by E J mile ; Revenge, 
Vanguard, Cambridge and Ganges in sight. 

8 40 Carried away weather main topsail sheet; 
spliced ditto. 

9 30 Exercised at general quarters. 

10 30 Up mainsail ; tacked. 

11 45 Up foresail ; set fore topmast staysail. 

11 55 Set foresail j Powerful S S W 1 mile; 
water remaining, 334. 



Longitude. 



D. R. 



31° 17' 



Chronometer. 



G 



gq 



cqlq 



I 40 

Powerful 

Gen. 

63 



6 „ 
Powerful 

Gen. 

7 52 



BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 



Alexandria S 24 E, 154 miles. 



P. M. 

1 Down fore-topmast staysail. 

1 20 Treble-reefed the topsails. 

1 40 Set mainsail ; shortened and made sail as 
necessary; exercised a division at great guns. 

4 Commodore S E J E; Cambridge NW 
JW. 

6 Close-reefed topsails, and reefed courses; 
furled fore and mizen topsails ; down top-gallani 
yards and top-gallant masts ; set the foresail. 

6 Set mizen trysail; Powerful S J E; Cam- 
bridge NbyW. 

10 Powerful 8}Wil mile; Cambridge 

N by W, 1$ miles. 
Midnight. S by W, j W lj miles ; Cambridge 

NbyW. 



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CAMBRIDGE AND RfeVENGE, FROM THE 1ST TO 6TH DECEMBER 1840. 



Copy Loo of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship «< Rodney" — continued. 



Wednesday, December 2d, 1840. 



H. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



P. 



Comet. 



Courae. 



8 44E 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



SJ W 

SWbyW 

SWbyW 
SW 

UpNbyE 
OffNEbyN 



Wind!. 



West 



State 
of 
WindalWeather. 



Force 
of 



Distance. 



67. 



Up North 
OffNE 



NNEJE 
NNE 

Up North 
OffNEbyN 



NWbyW 



q&b 



Signal*. 



REMARKS, fitc. 



A.M. 

Set main trysail ; in ditto ; op foresail in a heavy 
squall, with lightning and hail from the N West- 
ward; set fore staysail. 
2 Commodore South ; down fore staysail ; 
set ditto. 

6 25 Down ditto. 

7 16 Set ditto; in main trysail ; in main topsail, 
and furled ; set main trysail. 

7 40 Set main trysail. 

8 Commodore N E $ E. 

8 45 Ship gave a heavy lee lurch, threw up 2d 
cutter in the mizen rigging, and falling again 
with violence, carried away after-davit, and hung 
a wreck by the fore ; being unable to save her, 
cut her adrift, 

10 Gale increasing; got up fore and main 
runners and extra lashings to booms and boats ; 
double-breeched lower-deck guns; hands va- 
riously employed securing every thing; carried 
away main topmast stav. 

Noon* Commodore NNE 2 or 3 miles; Re- 
venge S by W 2 miles; water remaining, 330 
tons. 



Latitude. 



D.R. 



32° 50' 



Observation. 



82° 57' 



WNW 



WNW 



N W 



11 

11 
11 
11 

11 

11 



Longitude. 



D.R. 



31° 5* 



C V 



Bo 
be 

Qg 
QG 



Chronometer. 



31° T 



Leeway 



Leeway 
5 



Leeway 
4 



BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 



Cape Garata N 24 E, 110 milee. 



P. M. 

Employed getting up preventer shrouds to lower 
rigging. 

3 Split main staysail, down ditto, and bent a 
new one. 

4 Commodore N E by E, a heavy sea run- 
ning. 

6 Employed as above. 

7 40 Set fore staysail. 

8 Down ditto. 

Revenge S S W. 

Lash overboard with the 2d cutter . sails (boats), 2 
in number ; slings, chain, 2 pair blocks, 5 inch, 
4 number ; boats mast, 2 in number ; boats yards, 
2 number ; 1 buntline ; boats oars, 18 in number; 
boat-hooks, 2 in number ; plancheon awning, 2 in 
number. 

Midnight. Revenge S E, the only ship in sight. 

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ID 



LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Rodney "—continued. 



Thursday, December 3d, 1840. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 



10 

11 

12 



K. 



2 
2 
2 
2 
8 
6 



F. 



CoOTMt. 



NEJE 



UpNEbyE 
OffNE 

NEJE 

NE 
NEJN 
NEJN 



Winds. 



Force 

of 
Winds 



NWbyW 



NWbyW 



State 

of 

Weather. 



be 



beq 



be 



Signals. 



9 45 

Powerful 
Gen. 
close. 



REMARKS, fcc 



A. M. 

4 Revenge E S E, the only ship in sight 

Daylight. More moderate ; set close-reefed courses, 
and furled mizen topsails; all the squadron in 
sight. 

7 Out-reefs of courses, 4th and 3d reefs of 
topsails ; set jib and reefed spanker, unbent main 
topsail, and bent a new one ; people employed as 
requisite* 

Found missing from the guns : tompeons, 32 pre., 
6 in number ; ditto, 68 prs., 2 in number* 

Noon. Powerful N E 5 or 6 miles; water re- 
maining, 326 tons. 



Course. 



Distance. 



Latitude. 



D. R. 



Observation. 



Longitude. 



D. R. Chronometer. 



BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 



N64E 



54. 



33° 14' 



33° 22* 



33° 6* 



33° 10' 



Cave Gavota N 84 E, 84 miles. 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



NEbyN 

SSW 

NEbyN 

NbyE 

NEbyN 

NNE 

NEbyN 



NWbyW 



Vble 

NWbyN 



be 



be 



be 



1 20 
Poweiful to 
Rodney 
QSD 
MTR 
TNK 
Geo. 
ANK 



1 35 

Powerful to 

Rodney 

KS 

DBF 

HYB 

DEN 

IM 

YPD 

YSK 

FSP 

TNO 

RCO 



Powerful to 

Rodney 

TQH 

YPC 

CH 

CET 

Gen. 

CFE 



out-reef of driver. 



p. M. 

In main trysail ', 

2 10 Wore. 

8 15 Wore. 

4 Commodore S W by S. 

4 50 Mustered at quarters. 
Sunset. Parted company with the squadron. 
10 Up mainsail. 
Midnight 



\ 





Signals— continued. 




DPT 
LMA 
JMS 
TOD 


V 10 
QAE 
KQE 




2 20 
Powerful to 
Rodney 
RHM 
YTK 
M 1 V 


J 


2 „ 
TQH 
YPC 
CH 
CET 

GeL 



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CAMBRIDGE AND REVENGE, FROM THE 1 ST TO 6TH DECEMBER 1840. 



11 



Copy Loo of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Rodney" — continued. 



Friday, December 4th, 1840. 



u. 


K. 


F. 


Coarse*. 


Windt. 


Force 

of 

Windt 


State 

of 

Weather. 


Leeway. 


REMARKS, tee. 


1 

2 
8 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 


1 

1 
1 

1 




Head round 
the compass 

ESE 

Head to the 
N Eastward 

Head to the 
Eastward 


Calm 


2 


4 





be 
be 

p.m. 


10 45 
Powerful 

to 

Rodney 

YTL 

MAV 

RHM 

10 55 

Rodney to 

Powerful 

SGE 

YKC 


A. H. 

Latitude by Polaris, 85 30 North. 

6 30 Up trysail, and down jib; observed the 
squadron bearing N NE; squared the yards; 
lowered the topsails to set up the rigging ; em- 
ployed staying the masts, setting up lower and 
topmast rigging and bobstays; sail-makers re- 
pairing main staysail. 

10 30 Lowered a boat. 


BTL 
QSF 


Noon. Commodore S by W ; remainder of the 
squadron in sight ; water remaining, 322 tons. 




Course* 


Diftanee. 


Latitude. 


Longitude. 


BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 


D. R. 


Observation. 


D.R. 


Chronometer. 


N. 44 E 


27. 


33° 31' 


33° 34' 


33° 34' 


33° 27' 


Gavata N 22 W, 64 miles. 


1 
2 
8 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
4 
8 
7 
7 


4 

4 

4 

4 
4 


Calm head 
round the 
compass. 

SWbyS 

WbyS 

WNW 

NWbyW 

NW 
NWJW 
NW JW 

NW 


ENE 


8 
3 

4 


be 
be 


4 7 
Rodney 

to 
Powerful 

YRS 


P. M. 

Employed setting up lower and topmast rigging. 

2 Up top-gallant masts and yards. 

3 Set single-reefed topsails and foresail ; set 
top-gallant sails. 


4 
5 


4 15 

Powerful 

Gen. 

close. 


4 Powerful S W 2 miles. 

4 30 Set larboard fore topmast, and top-gallant 

studding-sails ; up royal yards, and set the sails ; 

in 2d reef topsails; down royal yards , 


6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 


EbyS 




b< 
b< 


5 

3 


» 


6 

6 45 

7 20 

8 

8 45 

9 45 
mast i 
sails. 

11 35 

masts 
Midnigl 


xvejoinea uie pqu&arou , rowenui u vy oyii. 
Set jib and top-gallant studding-sails. 
Trimmed ; set weather clue of mainsail. 
Powerful N W. 

[n top-gallant studding-sails, trimmed. 
Reefed spanker, and set it ; set fore top- 
itaysail ; set larboard top-gallant studding- 

Out 2d reef of the topsails ; set fore top- 

tudding-sail. 

U Commodore N W 4 or 5 miles. 



432. 



B 2 



Digitized by 



(continued) 
O 



12 



LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Corv Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Rodney n — continued 



Saturday, December 5th, 1840. 



H. 


K. 


F. 


Courses. 


Winds. 


Fore* 

of 
Winds 


State 

of 

Weather. 


Signals. 


REMARKS, fcc. 


















A. M. 


1 


7 


4 


NW 




4 


be 




2 In studding-sails ; Powerful NWJW. 

3 15 Latitude by Ursa Minor 83. 88. N. 


2 


9 














4 Commodore N W; washed clothes; set fore- 
















topmast studding-sail. 


3 


9 


4 


NWJW 










6 In ditto fore topmast staysail and mainsail ; 
one strange sail in sight. 


4 


8 


4 


NWJN 


NEbyN 


4 


be 




Daylight. Observed the land N E ; out reefs of top- 
















sails and driver; set mainsail, top-gallant and fore- 
topmast studding-sails ; set flying-jib, crossed 


5 


7 


6 




























royal-yards, and set the sails. 
8 Powerful N W by W ; extremes of land 


6 


7 


4 






4 


be 


















ENEandNEbyE. 


7 


6 






NE 








9 Set lower studding-sails. 
10 40 In all studding-sails ; made and shortened 


8 


3 


6 












sail as necessary. 
11 Mustered at quarters. 





2 


4 






3 


be 




12 Powerful NW; Cambridge SE; extremes 
















of Cyprus E by N J N and N E by E | E; aired 


10 


2 














bedding. 
Noon. Water remaining, 319 tons. 


11 


2 
















12 


2 






ESE 


3 


be 












Latitude 


Longitude. 


HEARINGS AND DISTANC3L 


Course. 




Distance. 


















D.R. 


Obtemtion. 


D.R. 


Chronometer. 




N62W 


92. 


84° 17' 


34° 32' 


31° M 


31° 27' 


Cape Marmorioe N 29 W, 213 mike. 


1 


2 


4 


NbyWJW 








12 50 
Powerful 


P. M. 

2 In royals ; up foresail. 


2 














Gen. 
386 


3 45 Set royals and foresail. 








Head NNE 


Calm 





be 




4 Powerful NW by N. 


3 




4 














1 » 

Rodney to 
Powerful 


,4 30 Mustered at quarters. 

In 2d reef of the topsails. 


& 




4 










Lat. 31 30 








4 




Vble 


1 


be 




6 45 Trimmed. 


6 


Powerful 
Gen. 


6 Powerful ESE; Cambridge S S E. 


7 


1 
1 




NNW 




2 


be 


Lat. 31 31 


8 Powerful ESE. 


g 


446 


10 Powerful S E ; Cambridge S S E. 
















Powerful 


11 40 Latitude by a 81. 40. N. 


9 


2 






SEbyE 


2 


be 


Gen. 

disregard 


Midnight. Powerful S E ; Cambridge S E by S. 


10 


2 
2 


6 


NNWJW 


NE 


2 


be 


motion. 




11 


5 „ 


















Powerful 




12 


1 


2 










Gen. 
num. 299. 





Digitized by 



Google 



H. 

1 

2 

8 

4 

6 

6 

7 

8 



10 

11 

12 



Co 



N« 



3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 



10 

11 

12 



Digitized by 



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u 



LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copt Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Ganges," Barrington Reynolds, c. b., Captain, 

between 1st December and 6th December 1840. 













Tuesday, December 1st 


, 1840. 






H. 


K. 


F. 


Course. 


Wind. 


Force. 


Weather. 


Signals. 


REMARKS, &c 


i 


4 


4 


NNEJE 


N Westly 


7 


bem 




A. M. 

1 30 Set mainsail ; down main-staysail. 


2 


4 














Daylight. Squadron to windward. 


3 


3 














6 30 Fidded top-gallant masts; out 3d reef; set 
jib and driver. 


4 


2 


6 






4 


beq 




7 Crossed top-gallant yards. 


6 
6 
7 


1 
1 
1 


6 

4 


NNE 


WNW 




bv 
ov 




7 30 Set top-gallant sails. 

8 Squadron W by N 3 or 4 leagues. 

8 30 Braced up on larboard tack ; opened pork, 
Nos. 330 and 314, 80 ps. 


8 
9 


1 


6 


HdNd 

NW 


SSW 


2 


bv 




1130 In top-gallant sails, and up mainsail. 

11 40 Set ditto. 

12 Squadron S W 5 miles. 


10 


2 


4 


WNW 






ov 




Variation, 11° West. 


11 


2 


4 


NW 




2 








12 


2 




NNW 




2 


orm 






Course 




Latitude. 


Longitude. 


Bar. 30° 2'. 


Therm. 61°. 




N28E 


D R. 





D. R. 


T. K. 


Bearing and Distance. 


u Remg. 262} Tons. 

a 

£ Dif. 91 „ 


Distance. 












4*. 


33° 86'. 


Obscured. 


31° 6 / . 


81° 4'. 


Alexandria S 22. 22 W, 156 miles. 


1 


4 




WbyN 


Southly 


6 


cqp 




P. M. 

1 In top-gallant sails ; tacked ; down jib. 


2 


6 




SEbyS 


S Westly 








In 2d reefs ; set top-gallant staysail. 
3 45 Tacked. 


3 


6 


4 












4 Powerful S W by W 3' or 4'. 


4 


5 




WbyN 


SSW 


6 


cqm 




4 34 Up mainsail, and tacked ; in 3d reefs ; set 


1 




main-trysail. 


6 


2 


4 


SEbyS JS 










5 10 Close-reefed the topsails ; reefed the courses ; 
sent top-gallant yard and masts on deck ; furled 
fore and mizen-topsails. 


1 


4 


6 


4 






SWbyW 


7 


opwl 




6 Squadron South 2 or 3 miles. 


7 


2 




SbyE 




9 


opql 




7 Set fore topmast staysail. 


8 



1 
2 


4 
6 


South 
SbyW 


Westly 


7 


qlr 




8 Commodore N by W. 

9 Set main-staysail. 

10 Set fore-staysail and mizen-topsail. 


10 


2 


6 














11 


3 




SbyW J W 












12 


3 


4 


SbyW 




8 


brq 







Digitized by 



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CAMBRIDGE AND REVENGE, FROM THE 1ST TO 6TH DECEMBER 1840. 



»5 



Copt Loo of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Ganges "—continued. 




Wednesday, December 2d, 1840. 


H. 


K. 


F. 


Course. 


Wind. 


Force, Weathei 


r. Signals. 


REMARKS, &c. 


1 
2 


2 
1 


4 


Shy W 

ssw 


Westly 


10 


lqr 




A. M. 

1 Carried away tack lashing of main staysail : 
down ditto, and fore topmast staysail. 


3 






uptoSW 










Opened beef, Nos. 49, 26 and 384, 88 ps. each. 


4 






offSW 


N Westly 


10 


lqr 




Rum, No. 30, 54 galls. 


5 






upSWbyW 










7 30 Furled main topsail. 


6 










10 


cmq 

ip 




8 Squadron in sight 


7 
















9 45 Wore ; down fore staysail. 


8 






off SSW 




11 


cmqp 




11 In main trysail, and off bonnet: set main 
staysail. 


9 






upSWhyW 


NW 








Noon. Set main trysail with the bonnet off. 


10 






offSWbyS 




11 


qpm 




Two of the squadron in company. 


11 






up N by E 












12 






offNE 




11 


cq r 
pm 






Course. 


Latitude. 


Longitude. 


Bar. 29. 82. 


Therm. 60. 




S29E 


D. R. 


© 


D.R. 


T. K. 


Bearing and Distance. 


jj De£ 265} Tons. 


Distance. 


* Remg. S7J „ 


45'. 


32° Mf. 


82° 48'. 


31° 42'. 


31° 44'. 


Alexandria S 44 W 184 miles. 


1 






up S hy E 


WNW 


10 


qp 




P. M. 
Got fore and main runners on the masts. 


2 
3 

4 






off S E by N 


N Westly 


10 


qp 




4 Squadron in company. 

5 Four ships in sight, NNE, NE, ENE 
and S W. 


5 






ditto 










Mustered at quarters ; carried away fore topmast 
8ta y 7 £ ot th* en d of a hawser up. 


6 










9 


cmq 




6 Nearest ship N N E 2 or 8 miles. 


7 
















8 Nearest ship N by W 2 or 3 miles. 


8 






ditto 




11 






Midnight. Rodney N E by W. 


9 










10 


cmq 






10 








WNW 










11 


















12 


- 




ditto 




10 < 


obqm 
























Digitize 


d by Google 



i6 



LOGS OP THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Granges " — continued. 













Thursday, '. 


December 3d 


, 1840. 






H. 


K. 


F. 


Course. 


Wind. 


Force. 


Weather. 


Signals. 


REMARKS, fce. 


1 
2 






up N by E 


NNW 


8 


bcq 




A. M. 

Opened pork, No. 72, 80 ps. ; peas, No. 217, 
6 bush. 


8 

4 






off NEbyN 




8 


obqm 




Daylight 5 ships in sight 

7 Set fore and mizen-topsails, foresail, fore- 
topmast staysail, and driver. 


6 






upNNE 




7 






8 Revenge N E 2 or 8 miles. 


6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 






offNEbyE 










8 30 Set mainsail ; out 4th reef of topsails and 
reef of courses ; set reefed driver. 


3 
2 
3 

4 


2 


K E by N 

NEJN 




6 
4 


cqm 
bv 




10 Mustered by divisions. 

11 Out 3d reefs topsails. 

12 Powerful N E 5 or 6 miles. 
Squadron in company. 


12 


4 


2 


NEbyN 




4 


bv 








Course 




Latitude. 


Longitude. 


Bar. 30. 12. 


Therm. 61 1. 




N58E 


D. R. 





D.R. 


T. K. 


Bearings and Distance. 


tf Def. 276 Tom. 
* Remg. 84| n 


Distance. 


40*. 


33° 14'. 


33° 23'. 


32° 84V 


32° 44'. 


C. Delia Gatta, Cyprus, N 12° 6' E, 71$ mOet, 


1 


6 




NNE 


NW 


4 


bo v 




P. M. 

1 45 Tacked; up courses; in jib and driver. 


2 


3 


4 












3 Hove to ; shifted mainsail* 


3 

4 


3 




SWbyW 

hove to 
SW 




3 


bor 




4 Commodore S W by W 3 miles. 




1 




5 Set mainsail. 


5 


8 


4 


SWJW 










8 Powerful N N E } 3 or 4 miles. 


6 


3 


4 






2 






12 Commodore NNE 5 or 6 miles* 


7 


1 




WSW 

NE 


NWbyN 












1 






8 


2 








2 


bor 









1 


6 


NEbyN 












10 


1 


4 






2 








11 


1 


4 














12 


1 


4 






2 


bcv 







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CAMBRIDGE AND REVENGE, FROM THE 1ST TO 6TH DECEMBER 1840. 



17 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Ganges " — continued. 













Friday, December 4th, 


1840. 






H. 


K. 


F. 


Course. 


Wind 


Force. 


Weather. 


Signals. 


REMARKS, *c. 


1 






NE 


NNW 


1 


b C v 




A. M. 

Washed clothes. 


2 
3 

4 
5 
6 
7 




4 
4 
4 


NEJE 

NE 
East 


NW 


• 1 






6 30 Fidded top-gallant masts ; crossed top-gal- 
lant yards ; out 2d reefs ; set ib top-gallant sails 
and flying-jib. 

8 Commodore W by N 3 miles. 

8 80 Scrubbed hammock 5 discovered the shot- 
lockers amidships started from their fastenings ; 
employed clearing them, and scraping quaiter- 
deck guns. 


8 


2 




SEbyE 




1 


bcv 




Variation 11° West. 



10 


1 




SE 

NNW 


NNW 








Noon. Commodore N W 3 or 4 miles. 
Squadron in company. 














11 
12 






Hd to West 


calm 


1 


obom 






Course. 


Latil 


tode. 


Longitude. 


Bar. 30° 31'. 


Therm. 62. 




N31E. 


D R. 


£) 


D R. 


T K. 


Bearings and Distance. 


* Defc 77} Tons. 

J 

^ Rang. 279$ „ 


Distance. 












15'. 


33° Stf. 


33° 18'. 


32° 53*. 


33° 3' 30*. 


C Delia Gatta N 1 E, 75 miles. 


1 


1 




NWbyN 


ENE 


2 


bo 




P. M. 

Loosed small sails to dry. 


2 


1 














Washed decks. 


3 

4 


2 

1 


4 


NNW 
NbyW 


N Easily 


2 







3 Unbent fore and main-staysail. 

4 Powerful N by E £ E 2 or 3 miles. 

5 Mustered by divisions. 


6 


2 


4 


NbyE 










6 20 In 2d reefs ; up mainsail. 


6 


2 




NNW 










6 Powerful North 1} miles. 


7 
8 


2 
4 


4 
4 


NWJW 
IJW 


Eastly 


4 


bov 




6 80 Up foresail, and trimmed. 

7 40 Down jib ; in driver. 

8 Commodore N N W J W. 


9 


6 














8 30 Set courses. 


10 


7 


4 












11 80 Trimmed; set jib and spanker. 


11 


7 














Midnight Powerful N W by N 8'. 


12 


6 


4 




N Easily 








- 



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lS 



LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of He* Majesty's Ship "Ganges" — continued. 













Saturday, December, 5th 1840. 






H. 


K. 


F. 


Course. 


Wind. 


Force. 


Weather. 


Signals. 


REMARKS, &c. 


1 


6 


4 


NW 


N Eastly 


3 


bcm 




A. M. 

1 Trimmed. 


2 


9 














4 Powerful N W. 


3 


9 








5 


bcm 




Daylight. Made all plain sail. 


4 


9 








5 


bcm 




7 Extremes of the Island of Cyprus, N E 
byN, andENE. 


6 


8 


4 












Powerful N N W J W 3 or 4 miles. 


6 


8 














Employed as requisite. 

11 Trimmed and squared yards. 


7 
8 
9 


6 
6 

4 


6 
6 
4 




Eastly 


4 


bcm 




11 80 Punished William Gravener (M) with 24 
lashes, for skulking and insolence; Henry 
Martin (S), with 24 lashes, for skulking and dis- 
obedience ; also P. Holland (S), with 36 lashes, 
for drunkenness and mutinous conduct 


10 


4 


2 












12 Extremes of Cyprus NE|E to E byN. 


11 


4 




S. Eastly 












12 


3 
















Courts. 


Latitude. 


Longitude. 


Bar. 30° X. 


Therm. 63. 




] 


^54^ 


7 












£ Del 282} Tons. 


. 






D.R. 





DR. 


T. K. 


Bearing and Distance. 


^ Rem. 74* „ 


I 


Mstanc 


e. 




US' 


34° 27'. 


34° 2C 20* 


30° 7' 


81° ltf 


Marmorice Harbour, N 45 W, 208 miles. 


















P. M. 


1 


1 


2 


NW 


SE 


1 


bv 




Employed scrubbing masts and paint-work. 


2 


1 




NWbyN 










4 Powerful N } W 2 miles. 


3 


1 














5 Mustered at quarters. 


4 


1 








1 


bv 




5 20 Commodore Napier came on board ; in 2d 
reefs and royals. 


5 


1 


6 
6 












5 30 Trimmed. 

6 Powerful N by E J E } mile. 


6 




NNE 


ESE 


2 


bv 








6 


Trimmed occasionally. 


7 


3 




NWbyN 










Midnight Powerful N by W 1 mile. 


8 


2 


2 






2 


b m 









1 


6 




Eastly 










10 
11 


2 

1 




NNW 












1 


4 














12 


1 




NW 


N Eastly 


2 


bv 





























Digitized by 1 



CAMBRIDGE AND REVENGE, FROM 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of 1 



Sunday, £ 



H. 


K. 


F. 


Course. 


Wind. 


Force. 


Weather. 


1 


1 




NW 


NEastly 


2 


60 


2 


2 




WNW 








3 


2 




WbyN 








4 




4 




Northly 


2 


gem 


6 




4 


WNW 








6 




2 










7 














8 




2 


NW 


ENE 


1 


bm 


9 














10 




4 




South 






11 


2 


4 




SW 






12 


3 




NWbyN 


wsw 


2 


bv 


Coarse. 


Latitude. 


Longi 


N52W 


D. R, 





D.R. 


Distance. 


38i' 


54° 4tf. 


34° 52'. 


80° 47'. 


1 


3 




NWbyN 


S Westly 


2 


be v 


2 


2 


2 










3 


1 


6 










4 


1 


6 




sww 


2 


be 


6 


1 


4 


NW 








6 


1 


4 




Westly 


1 


be 


7 




4 










8 




4 




Vble 


1 


qpd 





1 












10 


1 












11 


1 












12 


1 


2 1 




S Westly 


1 


om 



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20 



LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES VANGUARD, 



Copy Loo of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Vanguard," Sir David Dunn, Knt., k. c. h., from 

1st December to 6th December 1840. 



Tuesday, December 1st, 1840. 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 

id 



F. 



Courses. 



Winds. 



NNEbyE 



NNE 
NbyE 

North 

NNW 

Southward 



NW 



Calm 
Westly 



SW 



Signals. 



State. 



No. 



Wr. 



051 
Genl 
SFM 

Num.10 

C&2 

RQN 

CO 

10 6 
to Power- 
ful 
VRS 



b cm 



bcv 



bcv 



be 



REMARKS, &c 



Conns. 



N48°E 



1 
S 
8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

^12 



Dis. 



50. 



8 

4 

2 
1 
1 
2 
8 
8 
8 
8 



Latitude. 



D. R> 



33. 3l£ 



SSEbyE 



Observation*. 



SWbyW 



A. M. 

1 80 Set foresail ; Revenge a-head ; up topsail. 
8 Set foresail. 

4 Commodore North l£ mile; Revenge 
N N E J E 1 J mile. 

6 Downmain staysail ; up main trysail ; set jib. 

7 Up top-gallant masts ; crossed top-gallant 
yards ; out reels of courses, and three-reefs of top- 
sails. 

8 Lowered topsails; down jib; up foresail. 
Commodore N and E ; Revenge N E by E. 

Hoisted topsails, set jib ; foresail and driver. 

9 80 Lowered main topsail ; to repair in main try- 
sail ; hoisted main topsail ; set fore and main top- 
gallant sails; made and shortened sail as requisite 
to clear Cambridge. 

11 Wore off. 

Noon. Powerful WSWlJ mile; Revenge Wert 

J mile. 
Water remaining, 178 tons. 



Longitude.' 



D. R. 



31° W S. 



SbyE 

SSE 

SbyE 

SSW 



Chre. 



West 



BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 
Alexandria S. 31 W 146 Miles. 



bqp 

bem 

boo 

oq 

oc q 



oqv 

be 
be 



P. M. 

1 10 In second and third reefs of the topsails, per 
signal. 

3 20 Set foresail to close. 

3 40 Up foresail, down ; in staysail, main topsail, 
and mizen ditto. . 

Some new main staysail lollards, old ones haying 
been carried away twice. 

4 Rodney SE by S£ mile; Powerful S by H. 

4 45 Close reefed the topsails, reefed the courses, 
furled fore and mizen topsails and mainsail ; sent 
top yards and masts on deck in fore jib-boom; 
set main and mizen trysail, and fore and main 
staysails. 

6 Commodore WSW; Revenge W by 9 
J mile ; made and shortened sail as required. 

8 Revenge South % mile ; Powerful S W by W 
2 miles. 

8 60 Set foresail. m „_ ^ ff . 

Midnight. Commodore Sby W 1 mile; Rerenge 

ssw ez e edbvGoode 



CAMBRIDGE AND REVENGE, PROM THE 1ST TO 6TH DECEMBER 1840. 



21 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Vanguard" — continued. 



Wednesday, December 2d, 1840. 





K. 


F. 


Courses. 


Winds. 






State. 




H. 


Signals. 


No. 


Wr. 


REMARKS, Jcc. 


1 

2 

8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 



10 

11 

12 


2 
2 
1 

1 
1 


6 

4 
4 

6 
6 

4 
6 
6 
6 
6 


ssw 

sw 
ssw 

NNE 


Westerly 
NW 

wsw 






10 


9 

9 
10 
9 


bey 

boq 

beq 
beq 


A. M. 

12 25 Up foresail ; set fore staysail. 
2 10 Furled foresail ; carried away strap of main 

trysail block. 
8 25 In hauling down main staysail, carried away 

down-haul, set it again ; took in the trysail and 

fore staysail. 
4 Commodore S S W 1 mile ; Rodney SW} 

mile. 

6 15 Carried away weather main topsail sheet, and 
split the sail ; all canvas lost from fourth reef j set 
main trysail. 

7 50 Wore ship. 

8 Powerful N N W 2 miles ; Revenge N E by 
E 2 miles. 

8 15 Split main staysail, unbent it, and bent 
another. 

9 Set fore staysail and mizen trysail. 

10 Split main staysail stay-block in setting the 

sail. 
Noon. Revenge S E by E ; Commodore North. 
Water remaining, 170 tons. 




Dirt. 


Latitude. 


Longitude. 




Gram. 


D. R. 


Observations. 


D. R. 


Chro. 


BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 








32° 4C 00* 






31° 65' 46*. E. 


Alexandria S 50 W, 136 miles. 


1 

2 

8 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 



10 

11 

12 




4 
6 
6 
4 

6 
6 


N by E i E 

NNE 
NbyEjE 


WNW 

NW 
WNW 






10 

9 
9 


50 

bvm 

vq 

beq 


P. M. 

2 Set main staysail ; down fore staysail. 

4 Commodore N by E 4 miles, 

5 Mustered at quarters. Powerful N by E 
8 miles. 

5 50 Revenge E S E 2 miles; Rodney West 
2 miles. 

Set fore staysail. 
Leeway five points. 

8 No ships in sight ; leeway E N E. 

11 80 Took in main staysail. 

Commodore N by E J E 1 mile. 



432- 



03 



Digitized by 



GoogJ&t^ 



22 



LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Vanguard" — continued. 













Thursday, December 3d, 


1840. 




K. 


F. 


Counes. 


Wind*. 


Signal*. 


State. 




H. 


No. 


Wr. 


REMARKS, to. 


1 




6 


NEbyN 


NW 










A. M. 

3 Set main staysail. 


2 




6 














Powerful 1$ mile. 


3 




6 










S 


pcq 


Found the main truss pendant carried away. 


4 















8 


horn 


6 40 Set inizen-topsail and foresail. 


6 
6 





6 










7 
7 


bo 
be 


7 55 Sent remnants of main topsail on deck. 

8 Commodore N W 2 miles, and 3 line-of" 
battle ships astern; found the soldering of Massey's 
pumps broke, caused by the working of the ship. 


8 


2 


2 








q vo 


6 


bom 


8 10 Set mainsail, and close-reefed fore-topsail. 
8 30 Bent new main trysail. 


9 


1 


6 








genl. 
close 


4 


bev 


10 Set ditto close reefed in main-trysail and 
main staysail. 


10 
11 
12 


1 
2 
3 


6 

4 














11 20 Out reefs of courses and 4th reef of main 
topsail ; set jib ; down top staysail. 














Noon. Commodore N by £ 2 or 3 miles. Water 
rem. 167 tons. 


Covne* 


Dm. 


Latitude. 


Longitude. 


BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 


D. R. 


ObmrttioiM. 


D.R. 


Chronometer. 








88° SS'N. 








83° 8* 45' E. 


Cape Gatte, Cyprus, N. 68 mile*. 


1 
2 


2 
2 




NEbyN 
SWbyW 


NWS 






3 


bev 


P. M. 

1 Wore ; made and shortened sail as requisite. 

2 Out 8d and 4th reefs of topsails ; squared 
mainyard ; found the teller ropes stranded j wove 
new ones. 


3 

4 


1 


4 


WSW 








4 


bov 


8 Filled ; set courses and jib. 
4 Powerful W by S 2 miles. 


5 


3 


2 


WSW 








8 


bom 
bo 


Revenge S W by W £ mile. 
Set spanker and foretop staysail. 


6 


2 












2 


5 40 Bent and set a new main trysail. 


7 
S 


1 
1 


4 


NNE 








2 

8 


bo 
bo 


5 50 Down foretop staysail ; up trysail, and 
tacked. 

6 Powerful N by E \ E 1 \ mile. 



10 
11 
12 




6 
6 

4 


NEbyN 
NE 


NWertly 






1 


bo 


8 Up courses. 
Commodore NNEJEl mile. 
Revenge N E by N. 

9 Set courses and jib. 
Midnight. Powerful NNE. 



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CAMBRIDGE AND REVENGE, FROM THE 1ST TO 6TH DECEMBER 1840. 



23 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship "Vanguard" — continued. 













Friday, December 4th 


, 1840. 














State. 




H. 


K. 


F. 


Courses. 


Winds. 


Signals. 














REMARKS, &c. 














No. 


Wr. 




1 


1 


4 


NEJE 


NWestly 






1 


be 


A.M. 

Shortened sail to topsails, to preserve our station. 


2 


1 


6 


NEbyE 














8 


1 


2 










2 


be 


4 Revenge E by N 4 cables. 










1 


be 


Commodore N J E 1 J mile. 


4 


1 
















6 Set courses ; 6 15 up top-gallant masts ; 


6 






NEbyN 


Calm 










crossed top-gallant yards ; out 2d reef of top- 


















sails ; made and shortened sail as requsite. 


6 


1 








/ 


8 85 
Pow- 






8 Commodore NEJN2 miles. 

8 40 Bent new fore and mizen topsails ; loosed 


7 






wsw 


• • • 


( 


erful 
575 






small sails to dry. 
Sailmakers fitting mats to fore and main topsails. 


* 
9 


► 


< 


Head to the 

Northward 

and 


f Vble ] 
[ N Eaatly J 


J 


11 15 

to 
Pow- 
erful 






Armourers repairing Massey's pumps. 

People employed mending the service of the rigging, 


10 


t 


^ 


Westward. 




576 


1 


be 


and setting up top-gallant rigging. 


11 


1 


{ 


From E to 


| Calm 










Noon. 






NW 









be 


Powerful N E by N 2 miles. 


12 


J 
















Revenge W N W 1 J mile. Water rem. 164 tons. 


Can 




TH«- 


Latitude. 


Longitude. 


BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 


\AfQ 


FMS* 


MJm* 


















D.R. 


Obaervations. 


D.R. 


Chro 


nometer. 








33° 21' N 








33° 1 


& 15* E 


Cape Gatte, Cyprus, North 9 W, 73 miles. 


1 






Head to 
Eastward 

NWbyN 


Vble 






1 


be 


P. M. 
Employed setting up lower rigging. 


2 




6 


NNE 






2 


bev 


115 Made sail to topsails, jib and spanker, and 
main trysail and sails on the starboard tack; 


8 


1 


2 














found the gooseneck of main trysail mast gone ; 














secured it with a lashing; shifted trysail sheets 


4 


1 


4 


NNW 


NEastly 






2 


be v 


end for end, and topsail braces. 
4 Commodore N E lj mile. 


#r 


1 


4 


NbyE 






4 20 






Revenge NW byW. 


9 






genl 






4 15 Set top-gallant sails. t 


6 


2 




NWbyW. 






close 






5 Mustered at quarters. 

6 10 Set foresail. 


7 


1 


6 














5 80 In 2d reefs of the topsails of foresail ; trim- 














med as requisite. 
Commodore N by E | mile. 
Altered course to N W ; made and shortened sail as 


8 


2 


4 


NW 








2 


be v 


9 


6 












4 


be 


requisite. 
8 Powerful N by W. 


10 


8 




NWJN 












Revenge N W 4 cables. 
8 16 Set top-gallant sails. 


n * 


8 














1 8 40 Set f oretop staysail and mainsaiL 


11 














I 10 80 Maintop-gallant sails; set spanker. 


12 


7 


4 


NW 








5 


u \ Midnight. Powerful N W J N 2 miles. 
b c v \ Revenge NW^Vl mile. 



432. 



C4 



Digitized by 



Googfe 



xxmtimed) 



24 



LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship "Vanguard" — continued. 













Saturday, 


December 5th, 1840. 














State. 




H. 


K. 


F 


Courses. 


Wind*. 


Signals. 












REMARKS, &e. 














No. 


Wr. 




1 


7 




NW 


NE 






5 


bcv 


A. M. 

Down foretop staysail ; in top-gallant sails ; up 


2 


7 
















courses. 
Made and shortened sail as necessary, to keep our 


8 


8 
















station. 
4 Commodore N W J N 1 mile. 


4 



















Revenge NWJ mile. 


5 


8 












4 


b c v 


Trimmed ; made and shortened sail as necessary. 
Daylight. Cyprus F N E by E. 


6 


6 


4 














6 30 Out all reefs ; set top-gallant sails j crossed 


7 


5 
















royal yards. 
8 Set royals. Powerful N W by N. 


8 


4 


4 










8 


be 


Revenge NWJ mile. 


9 


a 


4 














Cape Melanea N E J N 12 leagues. 


V 














Shortened sails to topsails and top-gallant sails. 


10 


3 
















Carpenters repairing hammock nettings. 


11 


2 


6 




ESE 






2 


bo v 


Employed aloft mending rattlings. 
11 55 Aired bedding. 


12 


2 
















Noon. Powerful N by E £ mile. Water rem. 161 
tons. 






Latitude. 


Longitude. 




CotlfSBS. 


Dis. 






BEARINGS AND DISTANCE. 






D. R. 


Observations. 


D.R. 


Chronometer. 




N55 W 


95 m. 


84° 21' 15* 


84° 25' C N. 


31° Stf E. 


31° 44' 15' E. 


Cape Marmorice N 50 W, 218 miles. 


1 


1 


2 


NNW 


S Eastly 






1 


be 




2 


1 
















P. M. 

1 30 Shifted top-sail lifts end for end. 


8 




6 


NWbyN 












2 Set royals. 


4 




4 














4 Commodore N by E $ Revenge N W by N. 
6 30 In 1st reefs of the topsail ; in top-gallant 


5 


1 




NW 












sails and royals. 


6 


1 




NWbyN 








1 


bcr 


6 Revenge E by E 2 cables. 


7 




6 


NW 












8 Revenge N W 4 cables. 

15 Set courses, top-gallant sails, jib and span- 


8 




6 










1 


bov 


ker. 
45 In top-gallant sails ; up courses, and trimmed 


9 




4 










1 




. as requisite. 


10 


1 


6 


NNW 








2 




1111 Latitude by a Ononis 37° 35' 49" N. 


11 


1 












2 




Midnight. Commodore N by E J E | mile. 
Revenge N by W. J mile. 


12 




6 


NWbyN 








1 







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60W 



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26 



LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Cambridge," Edward Barnard, Esquire, Captain, between the 

1st December and 6th December 1840. 



Tuesday, December 1st, 1840. 



H. 


K. 


F. 


Count*. 


Winds. 


Force. 


Weather. 


REMARKS, &c. 


1 


5 


2 


NEbyN 


NW 






A. M. 

4 Powerful N by N. 


2 


5 












4 30 Pointed top-gallant masts out; 3d reefs of 
courses. 


3 


5 












6 80 Out 1st and 2d reefs ; fidded top-gallant masts, 


4 


4 








6 


bv 


and crossed the yards; down fore-topmast staysail 
and mizen trysail ; up mainsail. 


5 


2 


4 


NNE 








8 Squadron in company ; made and shortened tail 


6 


1 


6 










as requisite. 


7 


1 


6 


NbyE 


\»NW 






9 Mustered at quarters. 


8 


1 




North 


5 


6 


10 40 Taken aback ; braced round. 


9 


1 


4 


WbyN 


NbyW 






Noon. Squadron in company. 


10 


8 




W}N 










11 


2 






WbyS 


4 


C V 






1 




SbyW 




12 


3 




SEbyS 


SWbyS 








Course* 


Distance. 


Lat D. R. 


D.R. 


Long. Chr. 


D R. 


Bearings and Distance. 


Rs. 

Water, 
102} tons. 


N85°E 


61. 


Jfo Obturation. 


33° 40' N 


31°24'E 


31° 10' E 


Pt Eunostot S 28 W, 167 miles. 
















P. M. 


1 


4 




SSEJE 


sw 






1 In jib and driver ; 2 and 3 reefs of topsails. 


2 


3 


6 


NWbyW 








2 Tacked. 

3 Tacked. 


3 


2 


6 










8 80 Up courses. 


4 


4 


4 


SE 








4 Squadron in company. 


5 


4 


2 


SSE 




5 


e 


5 Close-reefed main and furled fore and mizen 


6 


2 


6 


SbyE 




8 





topsails ; in reef of courses ; down top-gallant yards, 
and sent the masts on deck. 


7 


3 




SJE 






r 


6 40 Latitude observed 33° 28' N. 














7 30 Wind shifted to westward. 


8 


1 


4 




Wert 




q 


10 Set main staysail* 






4 


SSW 


9 


2 


4 










Midnight Rodney S S E J E j Powerful S J E. 


10 


2 


6 












11 


8 


6 


SbyW 


WNW 








12 


3 


6 






9 


qi 











Digitized by 



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CAMBRIDGE AND REVENUE, FBOM THE 1ST TO 6TH DECEMBER 1840, 



27 



<?opy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship "Cambridge" — continued. 



Wednesday, December 2d, 1840. 



H. 


K. 


F. 


CoarSSS. 


Winds. 


Force. 


Weather. 


REMARKS, &c 


1 
2 

3 

6 

6 

7 

8 


10 
11 
12 


3 
3 

2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 


4 
2 

6 
6 


ssw 

•SWestly 

SW JS 
NNE- 


WNW 


10 


2 
2 


A. M. 

12 10 Furled foresail. 

12 40 Set fore staysail, and down mainsail. 

2 20 Furled main topsail! and set main staysail. 

4 A light bearing S J E, supposed to be the Com- 
modore. 

8 Squadron in company. 

8 15 Wore ; set main staysail ; a heavy sea from the 
westward. 

Noon. Squadron in company; got the runners and 
tackles up to support the lower rigging, being very 
slack. 


Course*. 


Distanoe. 


LatD.R. 


D.R. 


Long. Chr. 


D.R. 


Bearings and Distance. 


Rs. 
Water, 
tons. 


S46°E 


59. 


32° 46' N 


32° 50' N 


NoObs. 


32°U'E 




1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 

1( > 
11 
12 




4 

4 


6 


NbyE 

NNE 

NbyE 


NNW 


10 


n 


P. M. 

4 Three of the Squadron in sight. 

6 Carried away the main topsail tye ; wove a new 
one. 

6 Ganges N E by E ; Rodney N E by N ; ship 
rolling much, with a heavy sea from the westward ; 
carried away the starboard main topsail tye and main 
topsail lifts. 



432< 



D 2~ 



Digitized by 



(continued) 



H. 



tar: 



1 
2 
3 
4 
6 
6 
7 
8 



10 
11 
12 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

11 

12 



Digitized by 



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30 



LOSS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEV, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty 7 * Ship " Cambridge " — continued. 



Saturday, December 5th, 1840. 



H. 


K. 


F. 


Courses. 


Winds. 


Force 

of 
Wind. 


Sute 

of 

Weather. 


R E M A R K S, &c 


1 


7 


4 


NW 


ENE 


6 


bv 


A. M. 

4 Squadron in company ; Commodore N W. 


2 


8 


6 




' 






4 15 Set top-gallant studding-sails. 


3 


9 


4 










6 In ditto. 

6 20 Latitude by Polaris 34° 12'. 


4 
6 

7 
8 


9 
9 

7 
5 
4 


4 
2 
4 




Eastward 


4 




Daylight Extremes of Cyprus Island from N N E J E 
to N E by E j E, about 10 leagues ; one strange brig 
in sight ; out all reefs of the topsails ; crossed royal 
yards, and set the sails ; employed squaring the rattlings 
of the rigging, cleaning lower deck ; caulker caulking 
the seams, being much opened by the late gales ; highest 
part of Cyprus ENE. 

Squadron in company. 


9 


4 


4 












10 


8 


4 






3 






11 


3 


4 












12 


3 


6 












Gourdes. 


Distance. 


Latitude observed. 


D. 


R. 


Lone* Chr. 


D. R. 


Bearings and Distance. 


Rs. 

Water 


N.61°W 


126 miles. 


34° 21' N 


34° I 


13' N 


31°33 / E 


31°29 , E 


Marmorice N 48° W 210 miles. 


91 J too*. 


1 


2 


6 


NWJN 


ESE 


2 


bv 


P.M. 

2 40 Up courses ; in studding-sails ; down jib. 


2 


1 


6 


NWbyN 








8 30 Set jibs; squared yards. 
4 Squadron in company. 


8 

4 


1 


4 


NEbyN 




1 





5 Mustered at quarters ; in second reefs of the top- 
sails, royals and jibs. 


5 


1 












6 Squadron in company. 

7 Set the courses and jibs. 


6 


1 








2 


bv 


7 45 Set royals and top gallant studding-sails. 


7 


1 












8 Squadron in company. 


8 



1 
2 


4 


NW 
NWbyN 


NEbyE 


8 





9 30 In royals, flying jib, and top-gallant studding- 
sails j up courses. 

Midnight Powerful E J N. 


10 


8 


2 












11 


1 


6 


NNWJW 


NE 


2 






12 


1 















Digitized by 



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CAMBRIDGE AND REVENGE, FHOM THE 1ST TO 6TH DECEMBER 1840. 



3* 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Cambridge "—continued. 











Sunday, December 6th, 1840. 






H. 


K. 


F. 


Courses. 


Winds- 


Force. 


Weather. 


R E M A R K S, Ice. 


1 
2 


1 
1 


4 


NWVVJW 


NE 


2 


C 


A. M. 

1 Taken aback j trimmed as requisite ; made and 
shortened sails. 

4 Squadron in company. 


3 

4 


2 
2 


2 
2 


N WbyW 

N by N i N 








6 30 Highest part of Cyprus Island E \ N 22 leagues ; 
latitude by Polaris 34°44'N; out all reefs; set st 
foie-topmast and top-gallant studding-sails* 


5 


2 






ENE 






8 Squadron in company. 


6 

7 


2 
2 


2 
6 


WNW 

NW 


SE 




• 


9 Squared yards up, made sail ; set larboard lower 
top-mast and top-gallant studding sails ; made all pos- 
sible sail, per signal, from Commodore. 


$ 


2 


4 










9 40 Mustered by divisions. 


9 


2 


4 


NWjW 








10 In lower studding-sails; performed Divine service. ~ 
Noon. Squadron in company. 


10 


2 


4 




SW 


8 






11 


3 


4 


NWbyN 










12 


4 














Courses. 


Distance. 


Latitude observed. 


D. R. 


Long. D. R. 


D. R. 


Bearings and Distance. 


Rs. 
Water 


N51°W 


42 miles. 


34°54'N 


34° 47' N 


30° 50' E 


30° b$ E 


MarmoriceN49° W 142 miles. 


66$ tons. 


1 


8 


4 


NWbyN 


SW 


2 


C 


P. M. 

Trimmed sails as requisite. 


2 


2 


2 










4 Squadron in company. 
4 45 Mustered at quarters. 


8 

4 




4 

4 










5 30 Up coursers ; in seoond reefs of the topsails ; in 
royals); down vards. 


5 
6 




4 


N W 

NWJW 


Vble 


1 




6 Squadron in company. 

7 30 Trimmed sails to a light air from the N. East- 
ward. 


7 














8 Squadron in company. 


8 




4 










8 30 Trimmed sails to a breeze from the westward; 
made and shortened sail as requisite. 


9 




4 


NW 








Scrubbed and washed clothes and hammocks. 


10 




4 










10 80 Trimmed sails; up and crossed royal yards, and set 
the sails. 


11 
12 


1 
1 












Midnight. Out reefs of the topsails ; set up top-gallant 
sails. 



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CAMBRIDGE AND REVENGE, FROM THE 1ST TO CTH DECEMBER 1840. 



33 



Copy Loo of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship a Revenge " — continued. 



December 2d, 1840. 



H. 


K. 


F. 


Coarse. 


Wind.. 


Force. 


Weather. 


REMARKS, fee. 


1 
2 


3 
3 




Sby W 
SWbyS 


West 
Vble 


8 


QLR 


A. M. 

1 30 Down fore top-mast staysail ; furled foresail and 
fore topsail ; set fore staysail. 


3 

4 
6 
6 


2 
3 
2 
2 


6 

4 


sw 

SWbyW 
SWbyS 

SW 




8 


Q 


7 Wore ; all the Squadron in sight, except 
" Ganges." 

8 A heavy sea running ; in main topsail ; employed 
securing anchors, booms and boats ; carpenter as most 
requisite ; found to be missing during the gale hand- 
spikes, 9 in number. 


7 


2 












Noon. Heavy sea from westward. 


8 






SJW 


WNW 


9 


Q 


* 









NbyE 










10 






NE 










11 
















12 










9 


Q 




Cot 


irae. 




Latitude. 


Longitude. 


Bearings and Distance. 






Observations. 


DR. 


Chronometer. 


D. R. 


S82°E 


55. 




38° 01' N 




31° 8^ N 


Cape Gatie N 3} E, 110 Miles. 


1 
2 


1 
1 




NbyE 

NNE 


WNW 


9 


QR 


P. M. 

1 30 Carried away scrook of main staysail sheet ; split 
the sail down ditto, and repaired it ; set fore staysail* 


a 


1 




NbyE 








5 Mustered at quarters. 


4 


1 








9 


QG 


6 A heavy sea running* 


5 


Up 


North 










8 30 Set main staysail. 


6 

7 


Off* 

1 


fNE 
4 


NbyE 








9 30 Down main staysail, and set close-reefed main 
topsail ; oarried away port waist netting. 


8 


1 








9 


Q 




9 


2 




NNE 










10 


2 


4. 












11 


2 


2 


NbyE 










12 


1 


4 


„ _ j 




8 


QR 





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34 



LOGS OF THE POWERFUL, RODNEY, GANGES, VANGUARD, 



Copy Log of the Proceedings of Her Majesty's Ship " Revenge" — continued. 



December 3d, 1840. 



H. 


K. 


F. 


Coarse. 


Winda. 


Force. 


Weather. 


REMARKS. &c 


1 
2 




4 


Up 
North 


NW 


8 


QR 


A. M. 

6 20 Set fore and mizen topsail and foresail ; down 
fore staysail. 


3 

4 




4 
4 


Off 

NbyE 




8 


C 


8 Squadron in company; sailmakers repairing 
main topsail j carpenter caulking poop, repairing waist 
netting, and main deck half port. 


5 




4 


N by E I E 








9 40 Out 4th reef top-sails, and reefs of courses. 


6 

7 






NWbyN 
NbyE 




7 


C 


10 Mustered at quarters ; out reef fore and mizen 
topsails ; Fidded fore and main top-gallant mast ; got 
flying jib-boom out, and crossed top-gallant yards. 


8 


3 


4 


NEbyN 










9 


3 








6 






10 


3 


4 












11 


4 


4 












12 


5 


2 






4 


BC 




Coo 


ne. 


Distance. 


Lati 


tilde. 


Longitude. 














Bearings and Distance. 








Observation*. 


D. R. 


Chronoineter. 


D. R. 




N6i 


>°E 


43. 


83° 24' N 


33° 28' N 


33° OtfE 


32° 41' E 


Cape Gatie N 66 Miles. 


I 
2 
3 


3 
2 


4 
4 


NE 
WbyN 


NW 


4 


BC 


P. M. 

12 10 Sprung fore top-gallant yard. 

1 Tacked up mainsail ; split main top-gallant saiL 


4 
5 


1 

4 


4 


wsw 




2 


BC 


2 30 Shortened sail, and hove to. Captain went on 
board Powerful ; Commodore made signal " In case of 
parting company, rendezvous at Marmorice ;" supplied 
Powerful with 10 pair shoes. 


6 


2 












3 80 Captain returned ; filled and made sail. 


1 




NNEJE 


7 


2 


4 


NEbyN 








4 Crossed fore top-gallant yard. 


8 


2 


4 


NEJN 


NNW 






6 15 Mustered at quarters; hoisted main trysail; set 
mainsail. 


9 
10 


1 
1 


4 
6 


NEbyN 








9 80 Up mainsail ; split spanker ; shifted ditto. 


11 


1 


4 


NEbyE 


Vble 






10 In top-gallant sails. 


*2 


1 


4 


ENE 




2 


BC 


11 Set spanker. 



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' up main 



TANCE. 



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nam ngg 
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SHIP "THETIS." 



RETURN te an Ordtr of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 27 April 1847 ; /or,— 



A COPY " of the Correspondence between the Board of Admiralty and the 
Officers commanding on the Coast of Brazil ; and between Captain Dickinson, 
commanding Her Majesty's Ship ' Lightning/ and the Officers commanding 
on the Coast of Brazil, in the Years 1830, 1831 and 1832, respecting the 
Recovery of the Public Stores and Treasure sunk in Her Majesty's Ship 
'Thetis/ at Cape Frio." 



Admiralty, \ H. F. AMEDROZ, 

80 May 1847. / Chief Clerk. 



— No. 1.— 

Extract of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker to the Secretary of the 
Admiralty; dated H. M. S. " Warspite," Rio de Janeiro, 5 January 1831. 

With respect to the treasure which was on board the " Thetis/' amounting to 
about $ 806,000, I am of opinion, from all I can hear, that it is still in the 
wreck, and as soon as the hull can be disencumbered, there are two men 
belonging to the Brazilian Schooner which has been placed at my disposal at 
Cape Frio, who offer to go down, and examine under water. 

Should the treasure prove to be still un dispersed, some plan may, I hope, be 
devised for raising it ; and in the meantime I have ordered a stop-net to be con- 
structed, which will, I think, prevent for a while its escape into deeper water. 

The net which I have now in preparation will be formed of a small chain- 
cable, having attached to it a netting, made of inch-and-a-half or two-inch rope, 
about a fathom and a half high, and of sufficient length to extend nearly across 
the entrance of the cove : the cable forming the base of this net will be laid 
down, after the whole is completed, upon a parallel with the wreck, at about a 
fathom's distance from it to seaward, and the edge rope will be buoyed up by 
lamards attached to buoys on the surface of the water, so as to maintain the net 
in a perpendicular position, upon the principle of the enclosed draft. 

Wnen I have once ascertained whether there is any possibility of recovering the 
treasure, I have some intention of forming a diving-bell, with two large tanks and 
an air-pump, which, upon inquiry, can, I believe, be made here ; but I shall avbid 
going to any great expense without a reasonable prospect of success. 



— No. 2.— 

Extract of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker to the Secretary of the 
Admiralty; dated H. M. S. "Warspite/' Rio de Janeiro, 4 February 1831. 



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2 CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

to recover the stores and treasure which are supposed to be still attached to the 
wreck. The " Lightning" has taken a diving-bell, made from two large tanks, and 
other apparatus ; and I feel confident, from the active perseverance of Commander 
Dickinson, that every thing possible will be done to carry his orders into complete 
execution. 



— No. 3. — 

Copy of an Order given by Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker to Commander 
Dickinson y dated on board the "Warspite/' Rio de Janeiro, 22 January 
1831. 

By Thomas Baker, k. c. b., Rear-Admiral of the Red, and Commander-in- 
Chief of his Majesty's Ships and Vessels employed and to be employed on 
the South American Station. 

You are hereby required and directed to put to sea to-morrow morning in his 
Majesty's Sloop under your command, and proceed to Cape Frio, for the purpose 
of relieving the " Algerine " in guarding the wreck of his Majesty's late ship 
"Thetis." After receiving from Captain Martin, of the " Algerine," every infor- 
mation he has to communicate relating to the position and present state of the 
wreck, you will lose no time in commencing operations with the diving-bell and 
other apparatus with which you are furnished, for recovering, as far as practicable, 
the public property and treasure sunk in the " Thetis," and which, it is believed, 
are still attached to the remains of that ship. 

I feel that it would be superfluous for me, after what I have seen of your 
persevering attention to this subject, to urge upon your zeal and ability, upon 
which I place entire reliance, the advantage of making localities subservient, as 
far as you possibly can, in forwarding the interesting duty upon which you are to 
be engaged ; but you will take every precaution to avert those unforeseen disasters 
and accidents to which your endeavours to accomplish so peculiar a service must 
be liable. 

You will keep me constantly acquainted with your proceedings, of which 
I would recommend you to form a distinct journal, and you will not fail to 
point out, whenever it may be advisable, any way by which I can afford you 
assistance. 

In the meantime, I have instructed Captain Martin to remain with you a few 
day 8, in the event of your requiring any assistance beyond what the " Adelaide " 
and the two launches can afford you, which vessels you are to employ as you 
may find necessary. 

An account is to be kept, in the annexed form, of the property which you may 
succeed in recovering, making separate reports of what may prove to belong to 
individuals from that belonging to the Crown, and you are to continue on this 
service until further orders. 

Given on boaid the " Warspite," Rio Janeiro, 22 January 1831. 

(signed) Tixomas Baker, 
Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 
Thomas Dickinson, Esq., 

Commander of H. M. Sloop " Lightning." 

By command of the Commander-in-Chief, 

(signed) Alexr Kant, See*. 



Ah Accoumt of Property recovered from the Wreck of H. M. late ship "Thetis," at 
Cape Frio, between and the 



When 
recovered. 



By whom. 



Description 
of the 



Number 
or 



Remarks 
as to 



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STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY S SHIP "THETIS/' 3 

-No. 4.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker to the Honourable 
Captain Elliot, R. N., Admiralty ; dated H.M, Ship €i Warspite," Rio Janeiro, 
21 February 183L 

Sir, 

I have the honour to transmit, for the information of my Lords Commis- 
sioners of the Admiralty, copy of a correspondence I have had, up to this date, 
with Commander Thomas Dickinson, of his Majesty's Sloop " Lightning," 
relating to the operations now going on at Cape Frio, for the recovery of the 
public stores and treasure sunk in his Majesty's late ship "Thetis." 

Since the construction and laying down of the stop-net, for preventing the 
escape of stores and treasure into deeper water, as described in my letter No. 2, 
of the 5th ultimo, my particular attention has been turned to devise means for 
raising and saving such articles of value as might still remain attached to the 
wreck ; and conceiving that, under all circumstances, a diving-bell offered the 
fairest prospect of success, I have had one constructed from two large tanks 
strongly riveted together, and bound by iron braces, round which a sufficient 
weight of chain cables was secured to sink it in the water. 

After considerable difficulty, a forcing air-pump of adequate power was made, 
which being fitted to a Truscott hose rendered air-tight, the diving-bell and its 
apparatus were completed ; the bell was then suspended to the cat-head of the 
u Warspite," in this harbour, and three persons were lowered down in it to the 
depth of six fathoms, where they remained for upwards of 20 minutes, without 
experiencing any inconvenience beyond what is always felt in diving-bells ; and 
as light was admitted by six deck illuminators through the top of the bell, the 
men say they could see every object about them with great ease. 

But as the cove where the wreck lies is exposed to the south-west winds, 
which come on very suddenly, and generally blow strong, a heavy surf is often 
thrown up, and there are very few intervals indeed in which the swell would 
permit the employment of lumps or launches for lowering the diving-bell, without 
imminent hazard to the lives of the divers, as well as to the safety of the machine 
itself; the principal difficulty, therefore, was to contrive a point of sufficient 
strength and steadiness whence the bell could be suspended over the wreck, 
without being materially affected by the motion of the water. 

Several plans were suggested for the accomplishment of this object ; but that 
which at first appeared to me to be the most simple and best adapted for the 
purpose, at the same time the most suitable to the resources we could command, 
uas the employment of suspension cables, of which the enclosed diagram will 
convey some idea ; and Commander Dickinson sailed in the " Lightning " with 
a design of carrying this plan into execution ; but it seems that when he came 
to examine the localities of the cove, they presented some unforeseen impediments, 
which induced him to commence in preference the formation of a derrick, as a 
method more easy of execution, and, he believes, quite as efficient for attaining 
the object in view in a much shorter period. 

This derrick, which the captain is now forming from parts of the masts, yards 
and other damaged spars of the " Thetis," is to be of sufficient length to extend from 
the shore, so as to plumb all parts of the wreck, a distance of 146 feet ; its inner 
end will be secured on shore to a shelf in a rock, about 10 feet above the level of 
the water ; and the outer end to which the bell is to be attached will be suspended 
by a cable-guy from the summit of the same rock, standing nearly 200 feet in 
perpendicular height. 

I have been exceedingly anxious to ascertain the actual state of the wreck, and 
whether the treasure still remained undispersed previous to proceeding in opera- 
tions of any magnitude or expense ; and have, therefore, been using every exer- 
tion to obtain the services of one or two experienced divers of the country; but, I 
am sorry to say, from the general apathy of the natives, and the promulgation, by 

influential and intprpfitoH nppfinns nf nhftiirH rnmrmrR ahnn* tnp. rianorers tn Vip sinnre- 



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4 CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

As I am desirous that their Lordships should be in full possession of every 
material point connected with the undertaking at Cape Frio, I beg leave to 
enclose a draft exhibiting the dimensions of the derrick, and the principle 
upon which it is constructed, together with a correct plan of the cove, the posi- 
tion of the wreck, and the stop-net to which I have already alluded. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Th(f Baker, 
Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



— No. 5.— 

Copy of a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, of H. M. Sloop 
11 Lightning, " to Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., H. M, S. 
"Warspite," Rio de Janeiro ; dated Cape Frio, 4 February 1831. 

Sir, 

I have the honour to state to you, that, in pursuance of your orders, I arrived 
here on the 30th ultimo. Throughout the whole of the passage we had to contend 
with a fresh north-easterly gale, in which the Brazilian launch towed so badly, 
that it was impossible to carry a press of sail without endangering her swamp* 
ing, and the progress of the ship was thereby much retarded. 

Immediately on my arrival, I proceeded, with Captain Martin, to examine and 
make myself acquainted with the wreck, and all the localities of her situation. It 
appears that the recent strong south-west wind has reduced her to a confused mass 
oi materials, of which those that are destructible are fast decaying, and will conse- 
quently be the more easily removed whenever the weather will admit of the 
launch working, though I doubt their ability (with the greatest exertions) to 
effect much until I get the diving-bell to work, with which I anticipate gteat 
success. 

On visiting the cove, it immediately occurred to me that the most eligible mode 
of proceeding would Ibe to erect a derrick, to be stepped on a very convenient flat 
rock which there is at the base of the cliff nearest the wreck ; to form three plat- 
forms, one above the other, on the face of the projecting cliff, each of which 
having a derrick of smaller dimensions to conduct to the top the various articles 
as they may be recovered, and thereby save all the danger, difficulty, labour and 
time of carrying them in boats. 

The main derrick must be 146 feet in length ; I am making it of the pieces of 
the lower masts saved from the wreck. This enormous spar must be suspended 
from a height of upwards of 200 feet, and will, of course, require a great quantity 
of rigging, a demand for which I beg to forward you (it is large, but indis- 
pensable), and send the " Adelaide " to bring, whenever it is your pleasure to send 
it. We are at work in full force, and I should be glad to have it as soon as con- 
venient. 

The net is completed and placed outside the wreck, of which nothing has 
appeared since my arrival, although until to-day there has always been a heavy 
swell in the cove. 

I feel that we have an immensely arduous and laborious undertaking in hand, 
but my confidence in success increases. 

The above plan will, I consider, not require more than one-fourth the time in 
the construction that a suspension cable bridge would ; however, I shall have the 
latter in progress, lest the former should fail, but which I do not at present see a 
chance of. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Tho* Dickinson* (B.) 

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STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP " THETIS." 



—No. 6.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., to Commander 
Thomas Dickinson, of the " Lightning j" dated, H. M. S. " Warspite," at 
Rio de Janeiro, 8 February 1831. 

Sir, 

I have received your letter of the 4th instant, detailing your proceedings up 
to that date, and transmitting a demand for certain stores which you conceive will 
be required for carrying into effect the plan you have been induced by a personal 
inspection to adopt as the most likely to accomplish the recovery of the public 
stores and treasure, believed to be still in the wreck of his Majesty's late ship 
"Thetis." 

Although the idea of a derrick for suspending and working the diving-bell on 
this occasion is not new to me, yet, as I was not altogether prepared to view it as 
preferable to the suspension cables, which are thought to be the most suitable 
under all circumstances when you sailed, I think it advisable that you should 
weigh, with your usual discrimination, the probabilities of its succeeding before 
you go to any material expense of the large supply of new and valuable stores 
which I have now sent you, agreeably to your demand. But while I think it 
very proper to pause before the commencement of a new project of this kind, 
which may ultimately be of the greatest moment to the service under your exe- 
cution, I cannot, at present, perceive any strong objection to it ; and, in fact, as 
I am aware that you had a previous knowledge of the plan by suspended cables, 
and that, of course, you must have compared its fitness to the localities of the 

Elace with that of a derrick before you gave a preference to the latter, I feel no 
esitation, after the most careful reflection, in giving my cordial sanction to your 
pursuing that which you may consider best 

I agree with your observation, that the work before you is of no ordinary 
magnitude, requiring much labour and perseverance, and it will, therefore, no 
doubt) occur to you how exceedingly desirable it would be to know, with some 
degree of certainty, whether the stores and treasure be really still about the 
wreck before we incur any considerable expense ; but that point once ascertained 
in the affirmative, no labour, time or reasonable expense ought to be spared, 
and I think the derrick likely to succeed in recovering them ; yet it is to 
be lamented that no minor or temporary plan can be devised for operating with 
the bell, so as to decide that interesting question. 

I must, however, repeat what I said to you in my directions in the first instance, 
that you will take every precaution to avert those unforeseen disasters and acci- 
dents to which your endeavours to accomplish so peculiar a service must be 
liable. Should the assistance of the master boatswain and carpenter of the 
" Warspite " be necessary to complete the derrick, you may keep them for that 
purpose; for although we wish to have them here for a short time, I should be 
exceedingly sorry to remove them from an undertaking which, I have no doubt, 
will do every one concerned in its completion great credit; you will send them in, 
therefore, as soon as you conveniently can by the " Adelaide," which I intend to 
employ in keeping up 4 communication, as well as in sending occasional supplies 
of provisions, and so on, when necessary. 

I am, &c 

(signed) Thct Baker* 
Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 

P.S. — Perhaps you may be enabled to obtain one or two divers, who could go 
down and bring you intelligence of the state of the wreck, and of the position of 
the stores and treasure. 



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6 CORRESPONDENCE REPECTING RECOVERY OF 

— No. 7.— 

Copy of a Letter from Commander Tfiomas Dickinson* (B.), to Rear-Admiral 
Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., H. M. S. " Warspite," Rio de Janeiro; dated 
H. M. Sloop, " Lightning/' Cape Frio, 8 February 1831. 

Sir, 
Since my last communication by the " Algerine " the launches have crept up 
a variety of rigging, part of the awnings, and several lengths of bower cable ; 
the two former all in shatters, and literally good for nothing, and the latter so cut 
by the rocks as to be fit only for junk, some of them being so little as four fathoms 
in length. The making of the derrick is rapidly advancing as to carpenter's 
work ; but, in consequence of the inefficiency of our forge to heavy work, our 
progress in that branch is more tardy : I have accepted the offer of Captain 
Thibault, of the French frigate ic Seine," and borrowed the forge of that ship, 
which, although not so effective as our own, yet will be very useful in small 
work. I beg to correct the date of my former letter to the 3d instant, instead of 
the 4th. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Th& Dickinson, (B.), 

Commander. 



— No. 8.— 

Copy of a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), to Rear- Admiral 
Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., at Rio de Janeiro ; dated H. M. Sloop " Lightning," 
at Cape Frio, 16 February 1831. 

Sir, 

I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 8th instant, 
and beg to offer my thanks for the prompt supply of the stores I demanded for 
the use of the derrick. Respecting their expenditure, I fear I have given you 
reason to believe that it will be very extensive ; but this is not at all likely to be 
the case as regards the hawsers, as they are to be used merely as guys and topping- 
lifts, and the large rope as purchase falls for them, in neither of which uses will 
there be much wear and tear, as the derrick, when once in its place, will be 
almost a fixture; they will, therefore, be available toother purposes when returned 
from this service. 

Although immediately on my inspecting the cove and situation of the 
wreck, it occurred to me that a derrick was a mode preferable to all others in 
our present undertaking, I did not determine on its adoption without mature 
deliberation as to what advantages it might possess over the suspension cables ; 
they will be seen by the following circumstances: the distance between the 
nearest points from which the cables could be suspended is 480 feet ; and as they 
could not be placed immediately over the wreck, to render them appropriate to 
the use of the bell and anchor, must be placed out seaward ; great labour would 
be required in excavating the rock to affix the ends, and a great deal of time in 
the removal of the bell from one part to another, and much inconvenience would 
be experienced from their elasticity, and, above all, it would require (with our 
means) several months to complete the structure ; the derrick, on the other hand, 
will be nearly as firm as a crane, susceptible of its head being with the bell ; and 
a commodious stage suspended to it, removed by guys and topping-lifts over any 
part of the wreck, will be easily accessible from the cliffs, and, I have reason to 
hope, will be in full operation in five weeks from the period of its commence- 
ment; under these considerations, I trust, sir, you will consider me justified in 
iWidinor on the derrick. 



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STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP " THETIS/' 7 

also, ever since my arrival here, been trying to find a diver, but hitherto have 
failed ; however, anticipating failure, I have devised a substitute in the construc- 
tion of a small diving-bell, to be worked by the launch, a rough sketch of which 
I beg to enclose ; it will be commodious for one man to work in, with any requi- 
site tools ; and should it be found that one launch has not sufficient stability, I 
can easily attach the other to her; a raft we cannot construct, as this huge 
derrick has consumed all our material. 

I do not intend to start a difficulty, for on this service I will admit of none ; 
but, considering the distance the ship is from the scene of action, and that 
the wind blows strong every day, with heavy breakers on the bar, and the con- 
sequent difficulty of obtaining medical aid, should it be required speedily, I beg 
to suggest whether an assistant-surgeon is not necessary. We have had several 
sudden and rather serious attacks of cholera, and from which I have not entirely 
escaped myself; we, however, are now generally healthy, and no accident has as 
yet occurred. 

As might be expected on this occasion, new obstacles sometimes present them- 
selves, but only to be subdued; they just take a peep, and are off; we keep our 
energies about us, and, in short, sir, are determined it shall be done. 

I beg to acknowledge the kind encouragement you afford us, and trust that our 
exertions will be such as to merit a continuance of your confidence. 

The launches obtain something on every day the weather will admit of their 
creeping ; but things are so decayed and cut up by the rocks and wreck, that they 
have recovered nothing of any value but several pieces of bower cable, which 
is good junk, and the chain stream cable, which we shall find applicable to our 
work. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Thtf Dickinson, (B.), 

Commander. 



— No. 9.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k . c. b., to the 
Honourable George Elliot, R. N., Admiralty ; dated H. M. Ship " Warspite," 
Rio de Janeiro, 14 March 1831. 

Sir, 

I have the honour to transmit, for the information of my Lords Commissioners 
of the Admiralty, a copy of a further correspondence with Commander Thomas 
Dickinson, of his Majesty's Sloop " Lightning," relating to the proceedings going 
on at Cape Frio under his superintendence, by which their Lordships will perceive 
that although there is good reason to look forward with hope to the success of 
this arduous enterprise, yet its accomplishment cannot be expected without great 
and persevering exertions and a considerable lapse of time. 

After much inquiry and delay, I have at length succeeded in obtaining several 
caboclos or divers, whom I have sent to Cape Frio, in order to go down at once and 
ascertain the state of the wreck ; and from their being accustomed to continue 
under water for a much longer time than our own people, they may probably be 
found of great service in sallying from the diving-bell at the bottom, and attaching 
the necessary tackling to objects for the purpose of drawing them up. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Tho 9 Baker > 
Rear- Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



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8 CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

— No. 10. — 

Extract of a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), of H. M. Sloop 
" Lightning," to Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., H. M. Ship 
" Warspite," Rio de Janeiro; dated Cape Frio, 5 March 1831. 

It is with much satisfaction that I am enabled to state to you that the small 
diving-bell is completed, and found to be available to the purpose for which 
it is intended. On the 2d instant a trial was made in the harbour at the 
depth of 4£ fathoms, with two persons in it. They remained at the bottom, 
allowing the launch to be removed from one place to another, for the space of 32 
minutes, and could have obtained any article within their reach ; but (as is 
generally the case in first experiments) some little defects were found, and it 
required the next day to make them good. 

It was again tried yesterday, in the cove, in 6} fathoms; the wind was light from 
the southward, and consequently a swell setting in ; Lieutenant Hathorn and one 
of the bell-men went down first; it was subsequently sent down a second time, 
and on each occasion the result of the trial was satisfactory, as several articles 
were distinctly seen, and certainly would have been brought up, but that the motion 
rendered it extremely dangerous to attempt to take hold of anything, lest those 
so doing might be jammed between the bell and the rocks. 

The disadvantages under which this attempt has been made will, doubtless, I 
trust, be apparent to you, sir ; and I have no hesitation in expressing my certitude, 
that, under favourable circumstances of wind and weather, it cannot fail to succeed 
as a searcher. For more detailed particulars, I beg to refer you to Lieutenant 
Hathorn. 



— No. 11.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., to Com- 
mander Thomas Dickinson, of H. M. Sloop 4C Lightning;" dated H. M. Ship 
the " Warspite," at Rio de Janeiro, 9 March 1831. 

Sir, 

I have received your letter of the 5th instant, containing the detail of your 
interesting proceedings, and derive much satisfaction from the favourable opinion 
you express as to the progress and ultimate success of your labours. 

I can easily conceive the great advantages which may be derived from the 
small diving-bell when it comes into actual operation, although, had it been con- 
structed earlier, its value would have been greatly enhanced by placing us in more 
exact acquaintance with the wreck before we proceeded to any great extent in 
plans of higher magnitude. However, it is probable that by this time you have 
succeeded in setting the question at rest, which has excited so much conjecture 
and anxiety. 

Regarding the derrick, it is, in my opinion, exceedingly important that it should 
be got ready with the utmost despatch, so as to commence operations whenever 
the different parts of the wreck have been ascertained by the divers or the small 
diving-bell, because the best season of the year will .soon be over, and we cannot, 
I fear, calculate upon finer weather than the present. 

You will clearly understand that all persons without exception, whom I may 
be induced to send with a view of assisting you in your present enterprise, are 
wholly under your control while they remain, and have anything whatever to do 
with your operations ; and the moment you shall deem their presence as no longer 
essential to the furtherance of the service, they are to be sent back to Rio de 
Janeiro. 

You are to victual no person at the public expense, without special orders 
from me, unless from unavoidable necessity, the particulars of which £re /to<be 
reported. 



STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP " THETIS." 9 

peculiar circumstances, it being my intention, as I have already informed you, to 
keep up through her a constant communication. I fear she will not be able to 
receive all the provisions demanded for the " Lightning ;" but in that case she 
will take a proportion of each article, and the remainder shall be reserved until 
her next return. 

I find that the reason why the whole of the slop clothing, to which you refer, 
was not forwarded according to the demand, was, that none of the sort required 
remained in store, although we are daily expecting a supply from England. 

I am, &c. 

(signed) Tho* Baker, 

Rear- Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



— No. 12. — . 

Copv of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., to the Honour- 
able George Elliot, R. N., Admiralty ; dated H. M. Ship " Warspite," Rio de 
Janeiro, 5 April 1831. 

Sir, 

In transmitting, for the information of my Lords Commissioners of the Admi- 
ralty, copy of a further correspondence with Commander Dickinson up to the 2d 
instant, relative to his proceedings at Cape Frio, it affords me great satisfaction 
to acquaint you, that they have at last succeeded in discovering the position of 
many valuable articles of stores, and that on the 31st ult., by means of the small 
diving-bell attached to the " WarspiteV launch, a bar of silver, a lump of gold, 
and upwards of $3,000 in coin were recovered from the sea. 

Having sent a party of 100 men to Cape Frio, for the purpose of transporting 
and suspending the derrick, I hope that in a very short time it will be in active 
operation; but the extraordinary length of 158 feet to which it has now been 
extended, and the consequent numerous difficulties which must be encountered 
before it can be brought round from Frio Harbour, where it was constructed, to 
its proper position in the cove, may, I fear, render the erection doubtful, in defiance 
of the utmost caution, and I am therefore not altogether sanguine of its success ; 
yet, admitting that it does not succeed, still, as the situations of the principal stores 
have been ascertained and buoyed, their ultimate recovery is, I think, secured 
even with our present means, independent of what other plans may be hereafter 
devised. 

At all events, when their Lordships take into view the progress and success 
already achieved, under the circumstances detailed in my different communica- 
tions on this subject, I trust they will be inclined to think as favourably as I do 
of the exertions made by Commander Dickinson and the people under his 
directions. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Thtf Baker, 

Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



— No. 13. — 

Copy of a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), of H. M. Sloop 
" Lightning," dated 19 March 1831, Cape Frio, to Rear- Admiral Sir 
Thomas Baker, k. c. b., H. M. Ship " Warspite," Rio de Janeiro. 

Sir, 

I beg leave to inform you, that, in continuance of our exertions, the small 

diving-bell came into active use on the 10th instant ; two men were down in it 

an indefinite length of time, during which, the launch was moved about to 

different parts, enabling them to search for the wreck: but the swell having 

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io CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

found the greater part of the bottom of the late " Thetis," of which I send you 
a rough sketch, which I believe to be as nearly correct as the limited angle of 
vision, from the small space within the bell, would admit. 

We were again enabled to work yesterday, but under the great disadvantages 
of a heavy swell ; we, however, continued our exertions the whole day, buoying 
the various articles as they were discovered ; but our success was not beyond 
guns, bolts, and various articles of stores. Not a particle of the treasure has yet 
been seen ; but it appears to me that the large heap is the after-part of the ship,, 
but so covered up with confused fragments of every description of stores, that 
the bottom cannot be seen. I am going to work again to-day, and shall commence 
clearing away to ascertain what is underneath ; and I think there is just reason 
to hope that my next letter will be more satisfactory. 

The bell certainly answers to admiration ; but, although I do not apprehend 
that our hoses will give out, yet, should such a thing happen, the service would 
be much retarded by being obliged to send for others at the moment. I therefore 
beg to suggest whether it would not be best to have another set of Truscot^ 
pump-hoses here, that I may make them air-tight, and prepared for emergency ; 
we also want two barrels of tar, one mineral, the other vegetable. 

Your wishes respecting the derrick were anticipated at the time of receiving 
your orders ; all our force w as employed thereon ; it is now in a state of forwardness, 
and will, I hope, be ready for erection by return of the " Adelaide," should the 
weather admit of our excavating the step for it in the cove, and of affixing 
securities for guys, &c. Having found it necessary to add to its length, it is now 
158 feet, and consequently of enormous weight ; and as it will require all the boats, 
well manned, to tow it to the cove, and, independently of which, my force must 
be divided into seven parts, at great distances from, and in some cases inaccessible 
to each other, 1 am very reluctantly under the necessity of requesting the 
assistance of about 100 men for this particular occasion. The ultimatum of our 
hopes much depending on this point being well executed, the uncertainty of the 
swell being such that at times it in one hour rises sufficiently to break the spar, 
and we have no means of replacing it, will, I trust, sir, be considered sufficient 
reason for my making the request ; and the men shall, with your permission, be 
sent back immediately the erection is accomplished. 

Colonel Guasque and the divers left me on the 14th, and I presume will have 
seen you before the receipt of this letter. 

On the 13th, while we were at work with the bell, and after we had ascertained 
a part of the bottom of the ship, I proposed to him, to prove the ability of his 
men, that they should go down to the bottom from a boat, or, if they preferred it, 
the rocks, and give their assistance to my people in the bell ; but this he declined, 
and was evidently chagrined at our having found the wreck without his assist- 
ance, and in the evening gave me notice that he should depart in the morning. 
I expressed my surprise at it, and told him that the time had arrived when the 
divers might be useful, as we had now discovered where the wreck was, and my 
arrangement was, that they should have the use of the bell on the morrow for the 
whole day ; he wished to have it entirely to himself and party, which 1 said he 
should, but that something might occur in the course of the day to render it 
necessary that one of my people acquainted with the formation of a ship should 
go down ; however, this would not do for him ; he evidently had an aversion to 
working in conjunction with us, and 1 cannot help thinking that there was a 
motive which was not expressed. 

I do not think it worth while to trouble you, sir, with a detail of conversations ; 
and, suffice it to say, that I do not think he has, in any way, fulfilled his engage- 
ment, and is, therefore, not entitled to the smallest remuneration. I enclose 
Colonel Guasque's letter, assigning his reasons for leaving, but, being in Portu- 
guese, 1 have not been able to read it 

II a.m. — I am just returned from the cove, after working the bell until, from 
a heavy swell setting in, it became dangerous to remain any longer ; but the result 



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STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP " THETIS.* u 



—No. 14.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., H. M. Ship 
" Warspite," Rio de Janeiro, to Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), H. M. 
Sloop "Lightning/' dated 26 March 1831. 

Sir, 
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter, dated the 19th instant, 
reporting your further proceedings in exploring the wreck of the " Thetis," and 
although I lament that the weather has been lately so unfavourable to your 
operations, it is still some satisfaction to observe, that the actual position of the 
wreck is so far ascertained ; and that, notwithstanding you have hitherto received 
no precise indication that the treasure remains undispersed in the cove, your hope 
continues undiminished, and that a portion, at least, of the public stores may now 
be considered as certainly recoverable. 

I am exceedingly disappointed by the total failure of Colonel Guasque's 
attempt to assist us by means of the caboclos, because I had placed reliance upon 
these divers being turned to some purpose for forwarding the success of the 
general enterprise ; but, however, as it appears they declined either to go down 
without the bell, or to remain, as I thought they would, at daily wages, for the 
purpose of going down in the bell, and sallying from beneath it at the bottom to 
fasten grapnels and other apparatus to objects which might be accessible, you 
were, of course, right in allowing them to depart. 

From inquiries which I have made, I find that the Island and Boccaron of 
Cape Frio are farmed by the Brazilian Government to some person as a fishing 
station ; it will, therefore, be proper for you to abstain from fishing there, without 
permission of the owner, and you will likewise avoid cutting wood on the Island 
without his sanction, or interfering in any manner with that property, beyond 
what is absolutely necessary for executing the service with which you are charged ; 
and I need not recommend to your prudence to endeavour, by conciliatory measures 
and general civility, to propitiate the favourable opinion of the inhabitants in your 
vicinity. 

As it is desirable that I should be aware of the distribution and employment 
of the people placed under your immediate directions, I wish you to acquaint 
me with the nature of the duties which you have assigned to the respective 
officers, both of the " Lightning" and " Warspite/ > and it will be necessary for 
you to transmit to me in future a current report of your proceedings, in the sub- 
joined form, so that I may form a judgment of the service under performance. 

I make no doubt that the natives, and perhaps even some of our own people, 
would be ready to seize the least opportunity which any relaxation of vigilance 
might afford them, to purloin small articles of value ; you will, therefore, inform 
me what arrangements you have made for the security of articles of public pro- 
perty and treasure which may be recovered from thesda. 

, I have sent as many men as the " Adelaide'' was capable of conveying with 
safety, together with the articles of stores which you demanded, and you may 
be perfectly assured that every possible assistance which may be required for the 
accomplishment of our present undertaking shall be most readily and cheerfully 
afforded, to the utmost of my power ; and I have merely further to observe at 
present, that while I feel convinced that, stimulated by the example of your inde- 
fatigable exertions, both officers and men will unite their best efforts to complete 
the objects of our general anxiety, they ought to be fully apprised that it will 
be from your report alone that I shall form my opinion of their merits on this 
occasion, 

I am, Sec. 

(signed) Mos. Balcer 9d byjGoOgle 



ia CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

— No. 15.— 

Copy of a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), of H. M. Sloop 
" Lightning," to Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., H. M. Ship " War- 
spite," Rio de Janeiro; dated Cape Frio, 31 March 1831. 

Sir, 
The state of the sea since my last communication has been such, that on one 
day only we have been able to pursue our exertions in the cove ; but it affords 
me much gratification to state to you, that the result of our endeavours was very 
satisfactory, inasmuch as that I believe it to be quite certain that the heap is that 
part of the wreck in which" the treasure was stowed, 

I devoted one part of the day to reviewing particularly those parts which had 
been visited before in lesb favourable weather, and the rest of it in examining 
other parts of the cove further outside, commencing about 30 feet a-head of the 
heap, moving in an irregular line seaward across the cove inward, and thence to 
the heap again, in the course of which, wreck of all descriptions was found strewed 
about, and several copper bolts picked up; but the most important discovery 
was a large part of the side of the ship, having five main-deck and four quarter- 
deck ports; it is situated in 1 1£ fathoms water, and is exactly opposite the heap, 
a little outside, and therefore inferred to have been that part immediately above 
it when the ship was perfect. 

I trust I have met your wishes in hitherto directing our efforts principally to 
discovery ; but as, since our last search, it appears that there is no considerable 
part of the wreck unexplored, it is my intention, whenever the sea will admit of 
our working, to direct our most strenuous efforts to the clearing away, to ascertain 
what is at the bottom of the heap, which I have very little doubt is the after-hold 
and spirit-room, and I should think still containing at least part of the treasure ; 
if it is there, we will have it : the guns and ballast can be got at any time. 

The subject of Colonel Guasque has caused me much uneasiness, because I am 
sure he deceived you, and equally so that he had an object in coming here other 
than affording gratuitous assistance. I studiously encouraged him and his 
caboclos by civility, and proffered assistance; but, although the party affected so 
much, I could not persuade them to effect any thing. 

In discovering the bottom of the wreck (judging from the single wretched 
attempt which they made), we did more in one day than he and his gang could 
have accomplished in a month : however, they are gone, and I can assure you, 
with the greatest confidence, that they are no loss to us j for, admitting their 
ability to sally from beneath the bell, it is more than compensated for by the 
removal of the launch, from which it is suspended, to any part which I wish to 
examine ; and with regard to the fishing and the cutting wood, neither has been 
done unadvisedly ; for when the people concerned were in my tent, I asked about 
the former, and it was thought so lightly of, that they even laughed at my making 
the request; and as to wood, I have repeatedly talked to the natives on the 
subject, and find that every one cuts whatever he pleases, and, in fact, that it is not 
at all considered property ; but that it would be rather desirable that the land was 
cleared of it ; independently of which, the heavy rains have been so severe, that, 
unless I had built huts for my men, disease, and consequent physical weakness, 
would have rendered our utmost exertions unavailing ; for after a long day's labour, 
and exposure to a scorching sun, a wet bed would have been more than the 
strongest constitution could bear. 

The restriction on fishing I regret, because of the men living so much on salt 
meat ; but I shall hope, sir, that you will feel, as I do, that, notwithstanding what 
the colonel has said on the subject, there is no objection whatever on the part of 
the natives to our catching as much fish as we choose ; and I am happy to have 
met vour wishes by conciliatory measures and general civility, propitiating their 



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STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP "THETIS." 13 

The only articles of consideration which have hitherto been recovered are 
some copper bolts ; they are placed close to the door of my hut, under the charge 
of a sentry; I keep an account of them myself; they are immediately under my 
own eye, and I therefore trust, sir, you will be assured that they never have been 
nor can be purloined in any way by anybody, and that no vigilance shall be 
wanting on that head ; it is my intention, so soon as I can spare hands from more 
urgent duties, to make a regular platform and covering for them, as well as for 
whatever stores may be recovered ; and should we recover any treasure, it will be 
immediately deposited on board the " Lightning,' 9 should this arrangement meet 
your approbation. 

11.20 a.m. Thus far I had written before I went to the cove with the bell, 
from which I have returned for a moment, to have the happiness of informing you 
that our efforts are crowned with success. 

We have taken up about $ 3,000, and are continuing to do so as fast as one 
man can separate them from the rubbish and between the rocks ; they are very 
much scattered, but at present the men do not see the termination of them. 

As the bell requires my incessant attention, I hope you will excuse my adding 
more : allow me to congratulate you, sir ; I have enclosed periodical returns, 
weekly accounts, sick report, and demand for provisions. 

I am, &c. 

(signed) Thomas Dickinson, (8.), 

Commander. 



— No. 16.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., to Commander 
Thomas Dickinson, of H. M. Sloop " Lightning ;" dated H.M. Ship " War- 
spite," Rio de Janeiro, 2 April 1831. 

Sir, 

The gratifying intelligence communicated at the close of your letter, dated the 
31st ultimo, has given me great satisfaction; and while I congratulate you on this 
favourable issue to your exertions, I have no doubt that an unremitting con- 
tinuance of them must lead to still further success, and I hope finally terminate 
in the complete accomplishment of the service under execution. 

With respect to fishing in the neighbourhood of Cape Frio, I shall be delighted 
to find you are enabled to carry it on without giving offence to the persons who 
claim the property ; and as I perfectly appreciate the advantage which the tents 
you have erected on shore must be to the health and comfort of the men, as well 
as the facility and despatch which their vicinity to the place of your operations 
will, of course, give to the service, I approve of your having erected them, even 
though the wood you cut to compose them should have to be paid for. 

I feel perfectly convinced that you will proceed with your usual zeal and spirit 
in the prosecution of your arduous duties, which daily become more interesting, 
and you may be assured that I shall continue to afford you every possible facility 
and assistance. 

I am, &c. 

(signed) Thtf Baker, 
Rear- Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



— No. 17.— 

Copt of a Letter from Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., to Captain the 
Honourable George Elliot, Admiralty ; dated H. M > Ship " Warspite," at Rio 

de Janeiro, 20 April 1831. 

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i 4 CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

$47,000 value of treasure had been recovered from the wreck, up to the 12th 
instant, by means of the small bell only, and that as the derrick so long in 
preparation has now fortunately, and almost beyond all expectation, been placed 
in its position, 1 look forward to the recovery of every thing valuable which 
remains at no very distant period. 

Their Lordships will see in my last letter to the captain my intentions relative 
to the removal of the treasure to England, and the measures I conceive to be 
necessary to give some degree of official authenticity to the proceedings con- 
nected with it, which is a point of some delicacy, because, although I feel the 
utmost reliance upon the vigilance and care of Commander Dickinson, yet, as it 
involves the property of absent parties, I am most anxious that every precaution 
should be observed, so as to satisfy the minds of even the most scrupulous as to 
prevent, as far as possible, the very chance of misconception. 

I have, &c. 

(signed") Tho* Baker, 
Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief* 



— No. 18.— 

Copy of a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), of H. M. Sloop 
<# Lightning/* to Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., H. M. Ship 
" Warspite," Rio de Janeiro; dated Cape Frio, 12 April 1831. 

Sir, 

On this occasion I address you with highly gratifying feelings, after three days 
the most harassing and fatiguing that ever I experienced, as well as to all 
employed : the derrick is in its place, and I have no doubt will be equal to our 
most sanguine expectations, and answer the purpose for which it is intended. The 
circumstances of its enormous weight, length and great pliability (it being com- 
posed of near 20 pieces), the great quantity of gear, and number of purchases in 
use, the swell in the cove rendering it difficult as well as dangerous for the 
boats to act, and, above all, the necessity of having from 60 to 70 men employed 
over the cliffs, some suspended by ropes, and others not so, and all exposed to 
the constantly falling of loose fragments of rock, render it truly astonishing that 
this work should have been accomplished without a loss of life, however great 
the precautions used ; but I am truly delighted to state, that not the slightest 
accident has occurred. 

It is with great reluctance that I request a further supply of rope ; but the spar 
being so pliant, and having to sustain so great a weight, render it necessary that 
it should be firmly supported in every part ; there is a considerable wear and 
tear of the smaller rope, but the hawsers will be all returnable after the service is 
completed. 

The north-easterly winds have much facilitated our operations, and I am happy 
to say, that the amount of treasure recovered up to this period is of the value of 
about $47,000; we are now obliged to dig several feet through a mass of decayed 

E revisions, powder, aud, in fact, confused materials of every description, the 
orrible stench from which distresses the diving-bell men very much indeed ; 
I am astonished that they hold oui so well ; howeveV, as 1 am training some of 
my own people, we shall soon have more reliefs ; and I hope, so soon as the 
derrick comes into operation, to work both bells at the same time. 

It would be very essential to me to know the amount of treasure lost in the late 
"Thetis," the quantity of each description, and where stowed, and particularly if 
there were any diamonds on board; if, sir, you will furnish me therewith, I 
shall feel much obliged. 

I send back the supply of officers and men which came last in the " Adelaide ;" 
they have worked very well ; and I am glad to state, that acting Lieutenant Codd 
has given me much satisfaction by his diligence and exertion during their short 
stay here. 



id nnt l^ifeGfd^Ve^O^)^ 



STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP "THETIS." 15 

see any occasion for him, yet, as it is possible there may be, I venture to detain 
him. 

Enclosed herewith I transmit demands for provisions and stores, an account 
of treasure recovered, report of proceedings going on, and journal. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) The? Dickinson, (B.), 

Commander. 

—No. 19.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Bakery k. c. b., dated 

H. M. Ship 4< Warspite," Rio de Janeiro, 17th April 1831, addressed to 

Commander Thomas Dickin$on>(&) 9 of H.M. Sloop "Lightning," at Cape Frio. 
Sir, 

I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letters, dated the 12th instant, and 
am much pleased to find you have at length succeeded in erecting the derrick, 
and that, even with your previous limited means, you have already been so 
fortunate in the recovery of treasure ; for I am perfectly aware of the difficul- 
ties with which you have had to contend, and appreciate the labours and anxiety, 
required to surmount them. 

Having received a letter from my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, 
directing me to use every means for the protection of the treasure sunk in the 
c< Thetis,** in consequence of an application from the committee at Lloyd's to 
that effect, I am desirous, by an early remittance of the recovered treasure, to 
show that their Lordships' directions have been fortunately anticipated, and to 
convince the committee that the interests of British merchants can never be over- 
looked by the Royal Navy. 

It is my intention, therefore, that as soon as treasure shall be recovered to the 
amount of $100,000, it should be remitted to the Bank of England in the name 
of the salvors, that, upon due security being given, it may be disposed of as soon 
as possible, and the proceeds placed at interest for the benefit of the owners, until 
the whole sum which can be recovered is finally ascertained, and the salvage 
decided ; you will cause the treasure recovered to be counted, weighed and packed 
up in proper cases in the presence of yourself, and the signing officers of the ship, 
marking the cases with the word " Thetis/' and numbering them in succession ; 
and you will cause a register of their actual contents, by number and weight, to 
be kept by some responsible person, sending an abstract of such register duly 
signed by the above-mentioned officers, with every shipment made for conveyance 
to England. 

It will also be necessary that an immediate correspondence commence, on the 
part of the salvors, with the special committee nominated by the committee of 
Lloyd s to act in all matters connected with the treasure sunk in the " Thetis," 
so that a regular system may be pursued, and the mutual interests of both owners 
and salvors of the property recovered be clearly defined and secured. 

I now send you a copy of the last return of treasure received from the 
" Thetis," which I have reason to believe contains an account of all that she had 
on board when she sailed from Rio Janeiro, with the exception of about $ 3,000, 
said to have been received here, and of which no account was rendered to me. 
The whole, without any exception, was stowed in the spirit-room. 

I am perfectly satisfied with the manner in which you have filled up the form 
which I gave you for reporting your proceedings, and will dispense with your 
sending detached extracts from your journal, as I only shall require a complete 
copy 01 it at the completion of the service. 

The master, boatswain, carpenter and carpenter's crew of the " Warspite," as 
well as the armourer, are to be sent in by the " Adelaide" immediately, as their 
presence on board their ship has become indispensable. 

You will receive the stores and provisions which you demanded in your last 
letter, and I rely upon your being guided, in your expense of the stores, by the 
most strict economy. 

1 am, &c. 



16 CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

— No. 20.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., to Captain the 
Honourable George Elliot, Admiralty ; dated H. M. Ship " Warspite," Rio de 
Janeiro, 22 April 1831. 

Sir, 

The "Adelaide'' tender having arrived last evening from Cape Frio, I have 
much pleasure in acquainting you, with reference to my letter, No. 38, that 
the treasure recovered from the wreck now amounts to the estimated value of 
$70,000. 

Captain Dickinson says, that the great bell will be suspended from the derrick, 
and in operation, in the course of a few days, and it is to be hoped that the 
progress in getting up the treasure and other articles will be accelerated in pro- 
portion. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Thcf Baker, 
Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



— No. 21.— 

Extract from a Letter of Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., dated 
H.M. Ship "Warspite," at Rio de Janeiro, 26 April 1831, addressed to 
Captain the Honourable George Elliot, r. n., Admiralty. 

Under all these circumstance^ I have deemed it proper to direct the 
"Eden" to be prepared for proceeding home as soon as possible, and she will sail 
in a few days; but as I am desirous, in the present reduced state of this 
squadron, to make every vessel available to the utmost, the " Eden" will call at 
Cape Frio, to receive from the "Lightning" such treasure as may be recovered 
from the wreck, which, in all probability, will exceed the value of $ 100,000. 



— No. 22.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., to the 
Honourable George Elliot, Admiralty ; dated H. M, Ship " Warspite," Rio 
de Janeiro, 19 May 1831. 

Sir, 

I have the honour to acquaint you, for the information of my Lords Commis- 
sioners of the Admiralty, that by Captain Dickinson's last report, up to the 16th 
instant, the large diving-bell was in full operation from the derrick, and the whole 
sum then recovered exceeded $93,000. 

Their proceedings under water appear to be retarded by large masses of loose 
rock, which they are employed in removing, after which there is good reason to 
expect, from several indications, that the principal part of the treasure will socn 
be recovered. 

The bell now goes down without much regard to the actual state of the winds 
or sea, and the only difference is, that in rough weather so much agitation is 
occasioned in the bottom, under water, as to prevent the men working, except at 
very short and irregular intervals while the bell remains stationary. 

Their Lordships, looking at the anxiety which the operations at Cape Frio have 
occasioned me, will easily conceive that I feel very much interested in tne favourable 
termination of the enterprise, as well as it regards the public stores, which are all 
buoyed, and will shortly be raised, as it does the private treasure ; and as, in my 

nnininn iiT»i f/-*mni trr r.f mooaiiFoc iq inriicnoncoKiP T fool ooonro^ tKaf onw intoi»i»nr\tinn 



STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP " THETIS." 17 

expectations ; I have, therefore, to request that their Lordships will be pleased to 
permit Commander Dickinson to continue on his present duties until they are 
completed, that officer being perfectly acquainted with my plans and intentions, 
and having hitherto carried them into execution to my satisfaction. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Tho Baker, 
Rear- Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



— No. 23.— 

Copt of a Letter from the Secretary of the Admiralty to Rear-Admiral 
Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b.; dated 8 August 1831. 
Sir, 
Having laid before my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty your letter of 
the 19th of May last, No. 55, relative to the proceedings of Commander Dickinson, 
for the recovery of the treasure on board the "Thetis " at the time that ship was 
wrecked, I am commanded by their Lordships to acquaint you, that they have 
no objection to that officer remaining on the service in question, as you have 
proposed. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) John Barrow. 



— No. 24.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., to the 
Honourable George Elliot, Admiralty; dated H. M. Ship " Warspite," Rio de 
Janeiro, 11 June 1831. 

Sir, 

I have the honour to transmit herewith, for the information of my Lords Com- 
missioners of the Admiralty, copy of a letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, 
of his Majesty's Sloop " Lightning," at Cape Frio, dated the 20th ultimo, 
reporting the total destruction of the immense derrick which had been erected 
for working the large diving-bell, by which, not only the bell, but the whole of 
the valuable apparatus attached to it, have been sunk, and in all probability 
destroyed. 

Their Lordships will observe, by the enclosed copy of my reply to Commander 
Dickinson, the sentiments I entertain upon the subject, as well as the measures I 
have directed to be pursued to remedy the disaster, and in the meantime the small 
diving-bell suspended from the launch will be constantly employed, when the 
weather permits, in carrying on the work of recovery. 

• Unfortunately the construction of the derrick, instead of getting the suspension 
cables across, as I had directed, has consumed the favourable period of the year 
for our operations, but still there is no doubt whatever, in my mind, of the ultimate 
success of the enterprise. 

The public stores are all buoyed off, and the treasure actually recovered 
amounted, by the last accounts, to about $ 140,000. 

I have, &c. 
(signed) Tho* Baker, 
Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



No. 25.— 



Copy of a Letter from the Secretary of the Admiralty, dated 11 August 1831, 
Sir, 



addressed to Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b. 

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i8 CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

the endeavours to save the treasure from the wreck of the " Thetis" beyond the 
attendance of the ship employed on that service, and the use of her crew, when the 
service will admit of it. 

I am, &c. 

(signed) John Barrow. 



— No. 26. — 

Copy of a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), dated Cape Frio, 
20 May 1831, addressed to Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b. 
H. M. Ship " Warspite," Rio de Janeiro. 

Sir, 

It is with deep regret that I inform you of the total destruction of the derrick, 
and the consequent stop, for the present, to our obtaining any more of the 
property sunk in his Majesty's late frigate " Thetis." 

On the 17th, after removing some rocks of large magnitude, we succeeded in 
getting a considerable quantity of the treasure, and on the morning of the 18th 
several thousand dollars, and with a prospect of a great many more ; but at about 
nine o'clock, the wind being from the south-westward, the sea set in so heavily 
and suddenly, that it was with difficulty the people got in from the stage, and 
by noon the waves were beating 70 or 80 feet up the cliff's. 

In the course of the night the wind increased to a gale, and at an early period 
of the morning the cove was in a state of indescribable agitation, the spray rising 
and flying over the cliffs to which the guys and topping-lifts were attached, and 
every wave which rolled in striking against the derrick with such violence, that 
nothing composed of wood, however secured, could withstand. From this moment 
I was convinced that it must give wav, if the gale continued, a conviction which, 
I lament to say, was too truly verified. 

At 10 a tremendous wave rolled in, and struck with such force against it, as to 
break it off within about 20 feet of the step, and since which it has separated into 
five parts, which are now beating about the cove. A great deal of the gear has 
been saved, but, unless we can be supplied with another pump for Fisher's 
watering apparatus, I fear our loss is irreparable in that of the one we were sup- 
plied with from the " Warspite," and I am under much apprehension that most 
of the blocks will be destroyed by friction against the rocks ; those of the greatest 
importance are the "WarspiteV jeer-blocks, which are attached to the diving- 
bell. The gear had just been completed for weighing the guns and other heavy 
articles, and had the weather continued favourable, I should, at an early period, 
have got some of them up. 

I am now using the utmost exertion in preparing to get a cable across to sus- 
pend the diving-bell to; and, if we can get an appropriate air-pump, I hope to 
have it working in a fortnight. I procured the fire-engine from the " Eden," 
and have sent Mr. Moore, the engineer, to Rio to get it adapted as an air-pump, 
but 1 fear it will not be of sufficient power for a large bell. 

I send Mr. Delations, the first lieutenant, with this, overland, who will describe 
all the particulars, and he has also my instructions for the purchase of various 
stores, which, should the " Adelaide" be coining here, I should be glad to have 
forwarded with him. 

I trust, sir, that this catastrophe, however much to be lamented, will not induce 
you to think that we shall not ultimately succeed to a great extent. I have great 
confidence in the plan I am adopting, although I am aware that it cannot answer 
so well as the derrick did ; and as I am also fitting the Brazilian launch for work- 
ing the small diving-bell, I have no doubt but, in a short time, we shall be in full 
operation in continuance of this duty. 

It affords me the highest satisfaction, that not a single accident of any moment, 
*t« reran)* the neonle. has occurred uo to this time. 



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STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP " THETIS." 19 

— No. 27.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker , k. c. b., on board 
H. M, Ship 4< Warspite," Rio de Janeiro, addressed to Commander Thomas 
Dickinson, (B.), of H. M. Sloop " Lightning," at Cape Frio; dated the 29th 
May 1831. 

Sir, 

I have received your letter, dated the 20th instant, reporting the total destruc- 
tion of the derrick which you had erected for working the diving-bell, and feel 
exceeding regret, but no surprise, at this unfortunate termination to a contrivance 
in which I never had much confidence, and upon which I am sorry to think so 
much valuable time and anxious labour has been expended. 

When I first despatched you upon your present duties, I particularly enjoined 
you to try the plan of the suspension cables, as the one which appeared to me 
best calculated for the purpose of the readiest application, and every way the 
most suitable to the limited means we possessed ; but unhappily you were by 
some means induced to abandon a plan which we both seemed to consider a good 
one, previous to your departure, and to adopt and proceed without instructions 
in another presenting innumerable difficulties and chances in its accomplishment, 
and entailing a serious expense, and certain loss of the very best time of the year, 
before it could possibly be brought into efficient operation, even if it should 
eventually succeed, which was doubtful from the beginning. 

It is proper that I should say thus much upon a project which I was prevailed 
upon to allow you to follow, by your assurance, that the plan of the suspension 
cables was extremely difficult, if not wholly impracticable ; and that the derrick 
was actually in considerable progress, and would be finished in a very short period. 

Having now, however, returned to the plan of the suspension cables, it is my 
direction that you go on with it with the utmost vigour, so as to redeem, if possible, 
the time we have lost; and as I am quite persuaded that, if judiciously arranged, 
it is not only practicable and simple in its execution, but every way adequate to 
the end proposed : you will on no account deviate to other theories and devices, 
with which your experience is not perfectly familiar; and as 1 fully detailed to you 
personally my ideas on the plan you are now pursuing, and particularly described 
the means for carrying it into execution, I conceive it would be superfluous at 
present to prolong my observations. 

As my anxiety to afford you every aid and encouragement in the prosecution of 
your arduous service remains unabated, I have attached the " Adelaide" tender 
to the " Lightning," while the latter continues employed at Cape Frio; but, 
if the " Lightning" should be removed to other duties, the " Adelaide " shall be 
transferred to the next ship of the squadron placed to guard the wreck until 
further orders. 

With a view to strengthen your force, I have directed 16 supernumerary boys 
to be sent, with several other persons, by the " Adelaide," whom you will bear on 
the supernumerary list, according to the directions you will receive on their 
respective cases. 

1 unexpectedly found Mr. Moore, the engineer, some days ago here engaged 
in making alterations in the apparatus of a fire-engine, and under instructions 
from you to perform certain affairs connected with the enterprise, without 
reference to me, and without your having apprised me of the circumstance ; it is 
therefore necessary that 1 should inform you, that in all cases when you may 
conceive it indispensable to detach any persons upon duties of a similar nature, 
you will in future give me a minute detail of the circumstances, and your reasons 
for so doing. 

An unexpected exigency of the public service having deprived you of the 
valuable aid of the " Warspite's " launch, I am desirous of rendering that 
occurrence as little prejudicial to your operations as possible, and have conse- 
quently attached that ship's second pinnace to the " Adelaide " in the meantime, 
and I have no doubt she will prove of essential service. _ 



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ao CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

—No. 28.— 

Copt of a Letter from Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., to the 
Honourable George Elliot, Admiralty; dated H. M. Ship " Warspite," 
Rio de Janeiro, 1 July 1831. 

Sir, 
I have the honour to acquaint you, for the information of my Lords Commis- 
sioners of the Admiralty, that by Captain Dickinson's last report from Cape Frio, 
up to the 22d ultimo, it appears that treasure to the amount of $280,000, equal 
to about 56,000/. sterling, had been recovered, and they were rapidly proceeding 
with the work. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Tho Baker, 
Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



—No. 29.— 

Extracts from a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), of H. M. Sloop 
" Lightning," dated Cape Frio, 17 September 1831, addressed to Captain 
G. W. Hamilton, c.b m H. M. S. " Druid," senior Officer at Rio de Janeiro. 

I have the honour to state to you, that, in compliance with your directions, 
I arrived here on the 25th ultimo, and so soon as the weather would admit re-com- 
menced operations, and have succeeded in taking up treasure to the value of 
about $ 58,000 dollars, which is now deposited on board the " Lightning" for 
safety, awaiting the arrival of some ship to carry it to England. I should think 
that two months from this time will accomplish every thing that is practicable. 
I do not send the treasure by the " Adelaide," for the following reason : my 
instructions from the Commander-iu-Chief state, that whatever vessels may be 
appointed from time to time for conveying it to England, shall call in at Cape 
Frio to receive it ; therefore to send it to Rio de Janeiro would be inconsistent with 
such instructions ; also, I do not think the schooner a description of vessel in which 
I could entrust so large a sum of money, and I have no means of insurance 
between Cape Frio and Rio de Janeiro. 1 am most anxious that the treasure 
should be forwarded to England as speedily as possible, and therefore request 
you will be pleased to apply to his Majesty's Charge d' Affaires to direct the packet 
to call here for it, or, if it is your pleasure, to forward this my request to him. 



—No. 30.— 

Copt of a Letter from Captain J. Towmhend, Captain of H. M.Ship " Dublin," 
and senior Officer at Rio de Janeiro, to Captain Honourable George Elliot, 
Admiralty; dated 15th October 1831. 

Sir, 

With reference to my letter of the 19th September (No. 2), I have now to 
acquaint my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, that the " Opossum" having 
failed in calling at Cape Frio, owing to the bad state of the weather, I applied to 
his Majesty's Charg6 d'Affaires to permit the " Lyra " packet to touch there for 
the treasure which it was intended to embark in her. 

That vessel sails to-morrow morning, and I expect that by the time she arrives, 
upwards of $100,000 will have been recovered. 

I enclose an extract from Commander Dickinson's letter, giving an account of 
his nrnraedincrs r and 



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STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP "THETIS." 21 

—No. 31. - 

Extract of a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), of H. M. Sloop 
" Lightning," dated Cape Frio, 8 October 1831, addressed to Rear- Admiral 
Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b,, or the senior Officer at Rio de Janeiro. 

In compliance with your orders of the 4th instant, I have the honour to state, 
that the " Opossum" has not called here for the treasure recovered, supposed to 
have sunk in his Majesty's late frigate " Thetis," which, by our continued exertions, 
now amounts to the value of $ 77,000 or thereabouts, which, in accordance with 
your wishes, shall be sent by the " Lyra " to England. 

The large diving-bell for the suspension cable is now ready for operation, and 
will be put in practice to-morrow, should the weather admit, which there is every 

{>rospect of ; the completion of the construction has been attended with immense 
abour ; I anticipated a great deal, as well as difficulty ; but the fastenings to the 
cliffs caused much greater obstacles than I could possibly foresee, the rocks being 
of that nature that (after a great deal of toil in excavating to get securities for the 
bolts, and having fixed them in their places), a short period of exposure to the 
atmospheric air split them to pieces, and of course new fastenings became neces- 
sary. It is now my intention to work both bells at once, and I hope in a short 
time to get up a good deal of public property. 



— No. 32.— 

Copt of a Letter from Captain J. Townshend, of H. M. Ship " Dublin," at 
Rio de Janeiro, dated 5 November 1831, and addressed to the Honourable 
George Elliot, Secretary Admiralty. 

Sir, 
I have the honour to transmit extracts from a letter I have received from 
Commander Dickinson, of his Majesty's Sloop " Lightning," dated the 27th of 
October, giving an account of his proceedings to that time ; and I beg to inform 
their Lordships, that, in consequence of their directions not to incur any expense 
on the part of the public in recovering the treasure lost in the " Thetis," I have 
refused to supply a 6^-inch hawser, which Commander Dickinson had demanded. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) J. Townshend, 

Captain and senior Officer. 



— No. 33. — 

Extract of a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), of H. M. 
Sloop "Lightning," dated Cape Frio, 27 October 1831, addressed to Rear- 
Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., Commander-in-Chief, or the senior 
Officer, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sir, 

The " Lyra*' sailed on the 2Gth instant, with treasure to the value of about 
$ 96,000. 

The large diving-bell has been several times used from the suspension cable, 
but the weather and sea have been so precarious, that my operations with it have 
not been so extensive as might have been expected at this period of the year. 

On the 12th instant, there were seven Brazilian gentlemen visited the island, 
I believe, for the purpose of general observation as to my situation here. They 
told me thev understood 1 had a fort inauired the mmntitv nf trpj»enr* nKtainorl 



22 CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

of them have gone to Rio de Janeiro to report, and that they are provincial 
deputies. 

We still see some treasure from the diving-bell, but it lies so amongst the rock*, 
that it will require great labour to obtain it. 

We have endeavoured to examine the net, but it appears that the repeated 
south-westerly winds have utterly destroyed it, and, indeed, I am convinced, that 
if it had been made of iron, that must have been the case ; it does not appear to 
have even been of the slightest use. I will, at some favourable opportunity, 
endeavour to recover the chain cable to which it was attached. 

(signed) Tho* Dickinson, (B.), 

Commander. 



— No. 34. — 

Copy of a Letter from Captain J. Townshend, of H. M. Ship "Dublin/' dated 
Rio de Janeiro, 19 November 1831, addressed to the Honourable George 
Elliot, Secretary Admiralty. 

Sir, 
Herewith I transmit " extracts" from a letter of Commander Thomas Dick- 
inson, of his Majesty's Sloop " Lightning," giving an account of the continuance 
of his operations for recovering the treasure, stores, &c, from his Majestv's 
late ship " Thetis/* 

I have, &c. 

(signed) J. Townshend, 

Captain and senior Officer. 



— No. 35.— 

Copt of a Letter from the Secretary of the Admiralty, dated 6 January 1832, 
addressed to Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b. 

Sir, 
Having laid before my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty a letter from 
Captain Lord James Townshend, enclosing the report addressed to that officer by 
Commander Dickinson, of the " Lightning," on the 16th November last, relative 
to his operations in the recovery of treasure and stores from his Majesty's late 
ship " Thetis," I am commanded by their Lordships to acquaint you, that on this 
representation they are pleased to direct that you should recall the " Lightning " to 
resume her station. 

I am, &c. 

(signed) John Barrow. 



— No. 36.— 

Extract of a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), of H. M. Sloop 
" Lightning, 9 " dated Cape Frio, 16 November 1831, addressed to Rear- Admiral 
Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., Commander-in-Chief, or the senior Officer at Rio 
de Janeiro. 

The very unfavourable state of the weather, as regards our operations, has 
retarded our progress, and since my last return the amount of treasure recovered 

i« Knf email • «♦ r\rt*at*nt wp arp Hninor nntliinar flip spft mntinilPH an ViirrVi nnr ic 



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STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP "THETIS." 23 

chain-cable, but the latter is so entangled, that unless it can be cleared, the weight, 
I fear, will be greater than we can purchase. 

The guns, I presume, will be quite ruined, and therefore not worth the work, 
and I beg to submit to you whether the recovery of the rest will be worth the 
occupation of the ship. 

(signed) Thomas Dickinson, (B.), 

Commander. 



—No. 37.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.cb, dated H. M.Ship 
" Warspite," Rio de Janeiro, 21 December 1831, addressed to Captain the 
Honourable George Elliot, R.N., Secretary Admiralty. 

Sir, 

Since my return here I have received a letter from Commander Thomas 
Dickinson, of the " Lightning," giving a short account of his proceedings, from 
which I am happy to acquaint you, ttiat they have succeeded in recovering a 
variety of public stores, such as shot, guns and ballast, together with upwards 
of $520,000 value of treasure from the wreck of the " Thetis." 

The large bell, which was completed a few days ago, is now suspended and 
wrought from the suspension cables, of which I have already givenyou some account; 
but you will observe, that the principal part of the great amount of treasure reco- 
vered, has been recovered by the small diving-bell suspended from the launch, to 
which I have so frequently alluded. For some time lately, until a few days ago, 
the quantity got up was so very small, as to induce a belief that little more could 
be saved ; but by the movement of some large rocks at the bottom of the cove, 
in about six fathoms water, a new mass of treasure was discovered, which they 
were busily engaged in fishing for when the " Adelaide" departed. 

The malicious reports which had been industriously spread by interested persons 
regarding our having taken permanent possession of the island of Cape Frio, and from 
which it was said the inhabitants were not only excluded, but their fisheries on its 
shores interrupted, have been recently proved to be wholly groundless, and a 
public declaration to that effect has been issued by the Government. 

This circumstance gives me great satisfaction ; for although previous tony recent 
departure I had produced the clearest evidence, the declarations of the mayor and 
inhabitants near Cape Frio, in writing, that the rumours against us were untrue, 
still, from the jealous nature of these people in all cases where foreigners are con- 
cerned, I apprehended much petty annoyance, if not a total interruption to the 
enterprise. 

Such part of the public property recovered as has been brought to Rio Janeiro 
by the " Adelaide " has now been shipped in the " Neva " transport for England, 
and as more articles are, from time to time, recovered, they shall be sent home by 
any proper conveyance that may offer. 

Since writing the foregoing paragraphs I have had a personal interview with 
Commander Dickinson, who informs me that they have now got up $ 544,000 
value of treasure, and that, although they have experienced much obstruction 
from the large rocks, some of which are estimated to exceed 15 tons weight, 
still he expects to go on some time longer with success. 

He says that the guns are completely useless, and so decomposed, that they 
may be penetrated by a nail to any depth, and that the two chain cables are so 
twisted on every side round the peaks of fixed rocks at the bottom, he despairs of 
their recovery. 

It is estimated that, with a continuance of the present favourable weather, all 
that can be done in the enterprise will be accomplished in about a month. 



I have, &c. 

n m t> J Digitized by VjOOQLC 

fsusmed ) Thmaas Baker. 



24 CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

— No. 38.— 

Copy of a ; Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker 9 k. c.b., H. M. Ship 
" Warspite," Rio de Janeiro; dated 15 March 1832, addressed to Captain 
the Honourable George Elliot, Secretary Admiralty. 

Sir, 

Referring to my letter, No. 19, dated the 26th of February last, relating to the 
proceedings going on at Cape Frio, I have the honour to acquaint you, that, in 
consequence of Mr. Barrow's letter, No. 1, of the 6th of January, I immediately 
issued orders for the return of the " Lightning " to this port; but as Mr. Barrows 
letter which directed the " Lightning's " recall to her station was evidently occa- 
sioned by the disheartening view taken by Commander Thomas Dickinson in his 
letter of the 16th November 1831, to Lord James Town sh end, and did not seem 
to me to imply that the enterprise of going on with daily increasing success, and 
thereby promising almost a certainty of saving nearly the whole of the stores and 
treasure should be abandoned, and as, in addition to what I had seen myself at 
Cape Frio, I had subsequently received a letter from Commander Dickinson, of 
which the enclosed is a copy, wherein it appears that ever since my departure 
from that place they had been unexpectedly successful in the recovery of his 
Majesty's stores, and also of a quantity of treasure, and that, consequently, their 
hopes had remarkably improved as to the favourable termination of the work, 
I felt I should best fulfil their Lordships' intentions, and benefit the public, by 
continuing and urging on the enterprise with vigour to the end, so I appointed 
the Honourable Commander de Roos, a spirited young officer, who was delighted 
with the particular service, and whose abilities I considered fully equal to carry 
it on, to proceed in the " Algerine," under his command, to relieve the " Lightning " 
at Cape Frio, and she sailed on the 4th instant. 

Yesterday the " Lightning " arrived, and I am happy at being enabled to 
acquaint you, for their Lordships' information, that she has on board upwards of 
$ 60,000 value of treasure recovered within the last few days, and it will be 
observed by the enclosed copies of letters and other papers from Commanders 
Dickinson and De Roos, that, besides a number of articles of public property 
saved by both vessels, the u Algerine" alone had picked up more than $30,000 
value, which is not on board the " Lightning," and when the latter sailed the 
weather was fine and every way favourable, and the satisfactory labours of recovery 
were proceeding with unabating success. 

Under these circumstances, I trust, sir, their Lordships will not see reason to 
disapprove of my proceedings in so peculiar a case, and I rely with confidence 
that at least the motives by which I have been actuated on this occasion will be 
deemed and accepted as a reasonable excuse. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Thomas Baker, 
Rear- Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



— No. 39.— 

Copt of a Letter from Commander Thomas Dickinson, (B.), of H. M. Sloop 
" Lightning/ 1 dated Cape Frio, 29 February 1832, and addressed to Rear- 
Admiral Sir Thomas Baker 9 k. c. b., H. M. Ship " Warspite," Commander- 
in-Chief, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sir, 
I have the honour to acknowledge the receipt of your despatch of the 21st 
instant. 

It affords me much pleasure to state, that the weather having of late been much 



STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP "THETIS." 25 

I have felt considerable anxiety to be able to state to you to what further extent 
we may be likely to succeed ; but the sea at the bottom has for some days past 
been so very thick, that it is impossible to speak with anything like certainty ; but 
we have to-day had an extensive observation of the bottom of the cove out to as 
great a depth of water as we can work in, and could find but two carronades, 
(and they are so buried in amongst the rocks that we carried away our gear in 
attempting to get them up) ; but I do not think this can be the extent of our 
prospects on this head, for I still believe there must be more guns within our 
reach, and this I shall ascertain the first day the water is sufficiently clear ; but as 
the " Adelaide " is loaded, and I am afraid she may be wanted, I could not detain 
her any longer. 

We have taken up a small quantity of treasure, and it is not unlikely that we 
may fall in with a little more occasionally ; there is also a good number of copper 
bolts, which we are daily taking up. 

Should it suit your pleasure, I should be glad to know if, when I feel certain 
that nothing more can be done here, I am at liberty to get the stores on board 
preparatory to leaving this place. 

1 have the honour to enclose a copy of the ship's log, report of proceedings, 
return of treasure recovered daily, list of stores sent by «• Adelaide," weekly 
accounts, and sick report ; trusting that thia report will be satisfactory, 

I have, &c 

(signed) Thomas Dickinson, (B.), 

Commander. 

P. 5. — Although I am unwilling to trouble you with a correspondence so purely 
private as that between myself and Messrs. Samuel Phillips & Co , I am induced 
to forward to you a copy of one from me to them of the 16th July 1831, and 
extract of one from me to them of the 23d .June 1831, in order that you may be 
acquainted with their conduct towards toe as regard* the vouchers. 

(signed) T. D. 



— No.40.~- 

Copy of a Letter from Commander J. F. F. de Roos, of H. M. Sloop 
" Algerine," dated Cape Frio, 12 March 1832, addressed to Rear- Admiral 
Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., Commander-in-Chief, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sir, 
In compliance with your order of the 2d instant, I sailed from Rio de Janeiro 
on the morning of the 4th, and arrived here on the afternoon of the 6th, when 
I communicated with Captain Dickinson, of bis Majesty's Sloop " Lightning." 

The weather was unfavourable on the following day, but on the 8th I sent my 
boats and people to assist in towing the bell-boat, to observe the progress of the 
operation going on, to survey sound, and perform other duties connected with 
the peculiar service on which I have the honour to be employed. The 9th was 
employed on the same duties, after which, Captain Dickinson resigned his charge, 
and foot me 20 men to assist the work. 

On the 10th I commenced operations, and I am happy to inform you, that <mr 
exertions were crowned with success, by the recovery of a large quantity of cop- 
per belonging to his Majesty, and other property of considerable value, as 
mentioned in the accompanying return. 

Yesterday we were fortunate enough to discover an I8-poutider gun, which, 
with the chain-cable, used as a net, and other valuable stores, we have not a 
doubt of recovering ; a large amount of private property was also added to that 
already obtained. 

This great and unexpected success has rendered myself, my officers and ship's 



26 CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

The conduct of Messrs. Pope & Smith, the master and purser of the 
" Lightning/' calls forth my warmest thanks for their readiness in affording me 
information. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) J. Fred k F. de Roos, 

Commander. 

P. S. — A few articles, agreeable to the enclosed list, I consider necessary for 
the enterprise, and I shall feel obliged to you by your causing them to be supplied 
to me. 



— No. 41.— 

Extract of a Letter from Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., dated 
H.M.Ship "Warspite," Rio de Janeiro, 30 March 1832, addressed to the 
Honourable George Elliot, Secretary Admiralty. 

Sir, 

No occurrence of any importance has arisen on this station, as far as I am aware, 
since my letter to you of the 17th instant. 

The •' Maidstone" sailed hence for England yesterday morning, with directions 
to call in at Cape Frio to receive the treasure which has been recovered by the 
" Algerine," and as Mr. Aston, his Majesty's Charg6 d' Affaires here, had trans- 
mitted to me the letter, of which I have the honour to enclose you a copy, 
expressing the request of the Brazilian Government to know when the operations 
at Cape Frio would positively cease, Commodore Schomberg is directed, in 
conjunction with Captain Talbot, of the " Warspite," and the Honourable Captain 
de Roos, of the " Algerine," to hold a minute and careful survey on the state and 
prospects of the work, aud to report their opinion as to the probable number of 
days of favourable weather which will still be necessary to bring the enterprise 
to a conclusion. 

From the last report sent by Captain de Roos up to the 24th instant, wherein 
he states that they had already recovered a gun and other articles of public stores, 
and upwards of 60,000 dollars since they commenced, and that he felt confident 
of still further success, lam very desirous to prosecute the undertaking, as far 
as prudence will allow, and I have therefore written a reply to Mr. Ashton, 
agreeably to the accompanying copy, and I trust that we shall be enabled, by 
urgent exertions, to finish the work of recovery in the course of a short time, 
without interruption. 



— No. 42.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Bakei\ k.c. b., dated H. M. 
Ship " Warspite," Rio de Janeiro, 18 May 1832, addressed to the Honourable 
Captain George Elliot, Secretary Admiralty. 

Sir, 
With reference to my letter to you, No. 23, of the 15th of March last, reporting 
upon the proceedings going on at Cape Frio, for the recovery of the public stores 
and treasure lost in his Majesty's late ship " Thetis," I have now the honour 
to transmit to you a copy of a general statement, which I directed Commander 
Dickinson, of his Majesty's sloop "Lightning," to prepare, when that sloop 
was recently removed from the enterprise, by which statement you will be 
enabled to observe, at one view, the actual estimated quantity of treasure recovered, 
with the manner of its disposal ; and the only remark which 1 deem it necessary 
to make on the present occasion, is, that the sum of eight doubloons, which 



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STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP «THETIS." 27 

unwillingly obliged to express to Commander Dickinson my extreme disappro- 
bation. 

By my last accounts from the Honourable Commander de Roos up to the 13th 
instant, I am informed that, for the last month the weather has beeu so unfavourable 
as only to admit of their working the bell during three days, in which time, 
however, about §14,000 were recovered, making the whole sum already 
recovered by the "Algerine" to amount to $80,000, which, with upwards of 
$588,000 recovered by the "Lightning," brings the total estimated amount of 
treasure recovered from the wreck to upwards of $668,000 value. 

With a view to pacify the Brazilian Government, who insisted upon a definite 
period being fixed for a total cessation of the enterprise, you are aware, sir, that 
I caused a survey to be held by Commodore Schomberg, c.B., Captain Talbot, and 
the Honourable Commander de Roos, who, by the enclosed report, gave it as their 
opinion that 30 days of favourable weather would be sufficient to finish the work. 
This opinion I communicated to the Brazilian authorities, but I have not yet 
received any reply ; and as there is little reliance to be placed in either their 
temper or forbearance, I am urging on the work continually, and I have sent 
down the "Adelaide" with additional men, as well to move the "Algerine" 
considerably closer to the scene of our operations, as to strengthen the working 
parties, and to assist to the utmost in bringing the whole concern as soon as possible 
to a successful termination. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Thomas Baker, 
Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



- No. 43.— 

Copy of a Letter from the Secretary of the Admiralty, dated 10 August 1832, 
addressed to Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b. 

Sir, 
Having laid before my Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty your letter of 
the 18th of May last, No. 53, and its enclosures, relative to the operations going 
on at Cape Frio for the recovery of public stores and treasure lost in his Majesty's 
late ship " Thetis,* I am commanded by their Lordships to acquaint you, that 
they wish the operations to be put a stop to. 

I am, &c. 

(signed) George Elliot. 



— No. 44.— 

Copy of a Report made by Commodore C. fV. Schomberg, Captain of H. M. Ship 
" Maidstone," Captain Charles Talbot, of H. M.Ship " Warspite," and Com- 
mander /. F. F. de Boos, of H. M. Sloop " Algerine," dated Cape Frio, 
11th April 1832, and addressed to Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., 
Commander-in-Chief, Rio de Janeiro. 

Pursuant to an order from Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., Rear-Admiral of the 
Red, Commander-in-Chief of his Majesty's ships and vessels employed on the 
South American station, bearing date the 28th ultimo, and to us directed, — 

We, whose names are hereunto subscribed, have taken a most strict and care- 
Mr. Wood, Master, H M. Ship « Warspite." Jf 1 survey of the operations going on at 
Mr. Thomas, ditto, H. M. Sloop u Algerine." Cape rno, for the recovery ot public stores 
~ T . iTT^i cc t . u* • » and treasure lost in his Majesty's late ship 

& l&ISohn- - "• t' P "aS"* " Thetis j- and having called before us anS 
?i* a8 ;, L ?? ;k • » .. & ti0 : ,. minutely examined the officers and seamen 



2* CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

Every measure seems to be adopted, within the reach of those employed upon 
the enterprise, for the recovery of the public stores and treasure, so as to lose no 
opportunity of profiting by the weather when it is such as to enable the diving 
machine to be worked with safety. 

Second. To ascertain, as near as we can judge, the number of days of 
favourable weather which would still be required to finish the work. 

We are of opinion, after having minutely examined the officers and seamen 
who have been employed on the submarine operations, that, ail things taken into 
consideration, a period of 30 entire working days may be found sufficient from 
this date to recover or ascertain what may be recovered of public stores and trea- 
sure which may appear fit for any useful purpose, provided such days are fine 
and uninterrupted from sunrise to sunset. This, however, only embraces the space 
immediately in the vicinity of the wreck, as pointed out in the submarine plan 
furnished by Commander the Honourable J. F. F. de Roos. There, of course, it 
must be expected that the material of the most value and importance will be 
found, as has hitherto been the case, with the exception of fragments of wreck 
that may be scattered along the rocks in too deep water to justify risking the 
people- 

** Third. To state reasons for whatever period we may assign. 

The reasons which authorize these opinions are founded on the distinct and 
clear manner in which the men employed, as already named per margin, have 
answered the necessary questions on the subject when separately interrogated in 
our presence ; they have been found to agree completely, with the exception of 
a few days (four or five), as to the precise period required in order to accomplish 
the already stated objects, ever keeping in mind the space alluded to which has 
been explored through the means of the diving machine, and from which the 
plan in question has been projected. 

Fourth. To state whether there are any other means besides those now in 

use by which the complete accomplishment of the undertaking could be 

facilitated. 

It appears to us that no other plan can be suggested by which the accomplish- 
ment of the undertaking can be facilitated, although there can be but little 
doubt that if his Majesty's Sloop " Algerine" were placed close to the encamp- 
ment in safe anchorage (a thing perfectly feasible), the communication with the 
uninhabited island, upon which the encampment is placed, would be almost 
unnecessary, as the remaining recovered stores would be equally well guarded by 
the vicinity of the sloop, and the machinery in use be equally well protected from 
injury or molestation by means of a sentinel if required. 

Given under our hands on board his Majesty's Ship " Maidstone, " at Cape 
Frio, 11 April 1832. 

(signed) C. W. Schomberg, 

Commodore and Captain of H. M. S. " Maidstone." 

Charles Talbot, 

Captain of H. M. S. " Warspite." 

J. Fredk F, de Root, 

Commander of H. M. Sloop u Algerine." 



—No. 45.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., dated H. M. Ship 
" Warspite," Rio de Janeiro, 26 June 1832, addressed to the Honourable 
George Elliot, Secretary Admiralty. 

Sir, 
I H avb the honour to transmit, for the information of my Lords Commissioners 
nf tliP Arimimltv. a coov of the last letter which I have received from the 



g ie 



STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP "THETIS." 29 

The whole of the treasure which has been recovered since the commencement 
of the undertaking now amounts to §694,000 in value, of which $160,000 have 
been recovered since my second visit of inspection in February last ; of that large 
sum S 106,000 have been recovered by the " Algerine," and I am glad to see that 
Commander de Roos justly attributes their more recent unexpected success to the 
security and facility with which the diving-bell is now employed from the sus- 
pension cables, thereby confirming my former assertion, that had that plan been 
carried into execution at the commencement, as I directed, the enterprise at Cape 
Frio would have been long ago concluded, and at least an equal extent of pro- 
perty been saved at less than half the present expense. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Thomas Baker, 
Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



—No, 46.— 

Extract of a Letter from Commander J. F. F. de Roos, dated H. M. Sloop* 
"Algerine," Cape Frio, 20 June 1832, addressed to Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas 
Baker y k.c b., H. M. Ship " Warspite," Rio de Janeiro* 

Sir, 

By the " Adelaide," which arrived here 6n the 16th instant, I had the honour of 
receiving your letter of the 13th, and I have to acquaint you, that the "Nurture" 
packet called in here on the 26th ultimo, at 1 p. m., received on board all the trea- 
sure then in my possession, and sailed again an hour afterwards. 

On the 30th last month I brought the * 4 Algerine" into the anchorage abreast 
of our encampment, within four cables lengths of the wreck, where she lays in 
safety, to the great convenience of the service. 

Our recent success, which you will observe by the returns to be great, I mainly 
attribute to the advantages which we have gained by working from the suspension 
cables, an invention as splendid in its conception as we have found it useful in its 
application. We have no more anxiety, delay or danger to dread from the use of 
the launch. The workmen are confined to the spot which we desire to clear. We 
work during westerly winds, and in the proportion of two days to one former one ; 
moreover, the steadiness acquired to the bell is such as to have greatly enhanced 
the services and resources of the divers. 

I consider that we have now (if I may use the expression) swept the space where 
we have principally worked clear to the solid bottom, but still we can distinctly 
trace the appearance of more treasure under the gun and clump rocks. Our 
energies will now, therefore, be directed to the removal of these huge impediments, 
and such is my confidence in the skill and determination of the officers and men 
under my command, that I do not at all despair of our immediate success. After 
the execution of this service, and the collection of some tons of copper strewed in 
various shapes about the cove, I am of opinion that the public and other property 
remaining at the bottom will be comparatively of little value. 

Our necessity for the rope demanded being pressing, I shall despatch the " Ade- 
laide" to Rio de Janeiro immediately after she shall have delivered the money on 
board the " Seringapatam." 



— No. 47.— 

Extract of a Letter from Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., dated 
H. M. Ship "Warspite/ 1 Rio de Janeiro, 16 July 1832, addressed to Captain 
the Honourable George Elliot, Secretary Admiralty. 



Rv the " Adelaide." whinh arrived here last nicrht from Can* Hi 



no. 



3 o CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

The contrivance of the suspension cables has enabled them to overturn the 
large masses of rock, of which you have heard so much, and quantities of stores 
and treasure have been saved from the hitherto inaccessible interstices between 
them ; the diving-bell has been employed with security and ease, during weather 
and swell, which would formerly have rendered its employment impossible, and 
the consequent progress of the undertaking has been rapid in proportion. 

For the last few days, however, the weather has been very stormy, and the sea 
unusually high, so that the operations have been partially suspended ; but, as we 
are now drawing near the conclusion of the period, which we requested from 
the Brazilian Government, to finish the enterprise, the most incessant efforts are 
making to sweep the cove entirely of every thing valuable, before we relinquish 
our establishment. 

I have good reason to be satisfied with the zealous and cheerful exertions of 
the Honourable Commander de Roos, and the deserving officers and crew of the 
" Algerine;" for while they accomplish with facility the duties formerly assigned 
to the "Lightning," the enterprise is happily relieved from that unfortunate 
despondency by which Commander Dickinson afflicted himself, and perplexed 
the whole proceedings. 

I have, &c. 

* (signed) Thomas Baker, 

Rear- Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



— No. 48. — 

Extract of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b., dated 
H. M. Ship " Warspite," Rio de Janeiro, 3d August 1832, addressed to the 
Honourable George Elliot, R. N., Secretary Admiralty. 

Commander de Roos reports that, having carefully examined along the bottom 
of the cove, and overturned every rock which had not previously been removed, 
without discovering anything of the least value, either of public or private 
property, he at length resolved, in pursuance of the instructions under which he 
was acting, to suspend the operations, break up the establishment, and quit the 
Brazilian territories. 

The early departure of the " Volage," after the " Algerine's " arrival, precludes 
me from entering more fully into the subject of the enterprise at present, than 
merely observing, that the total sum saved from the wreck of the " Thetis," out 
of her original freight of §810,000, amounts to about $ 760,000, a sum infinitely 
surpassing the most sanguine expectation. 

When Commander de Roos has had time to finish his returns, and the surveys 
on the stores from the enterprise have been completed, I shall embrace a very 
early opportunity of transmitting, for their Lordships' information, such intelligence 
and documents as may contribute to illustrate the result of that peculiar service. 



— No. 49.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear-Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k. c. b. ; dated H. M. 
Ship <c Warspite," Rio de Janeiro, 10 August 1832, addressed to the 
Honourable George Elliot, Secretary Admiralty. 

Sir, 
I have had the honour to receive Mr. Barrow's letter, No. 24, dated the 4th 
of June last, relating to the expenditure of public stores and the employment of 
his Majesty's Ships in saving treasure from the wreck of his Majesty late Ship 
" Thetis," and I beg leave to acquaint you, in reply, that the enterprise having 
been concluded on the 31st of July last, as referred to in my letter to you, No. 83, 

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STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP "THETrS." ji 

measures they adopted, yet I am inclined to regret that, under all circumstances, 
they did not defer their application until the accounts had been placed by me 
before their Lordships in the regular routine of service, so that all possible mis- 
conception, both as to the peculiar nature and to the actual extent of the expen- 
diture, might have been obviated. 

When the unfortunate and melancholy loss of the " Thetis" was made known 
to me in December 1830, I felt it to be my indispensable duty to pursue every 
means in my power, not only to recover all that was practicable belonging to the 
Crown, but also to save, if possible, the valuable property of British subjects' 
which had been lost by that event. 

Under this impression I devoted every resource of the squadron present to 
accomplish the work, and a system of vigorous operations immediately commenced, 
which, after many failures, delays and discouragements, as their Lordships are 
aware, has happily terminated in the most remarkable success. 

Public stores, to a large extent, as enumerated in the Enclosure (A.), have been 
recovered, and private treasure amounting to $ 760,000 value has been restored 
to the owners and the country, under circumstances of the most forbidding 
difficulty. 

To accomplish such important objects a considerable expense was necessarily 
incurred ; but my agents, in their anxiety to be secure, have, if I am not mistaken, 
greatly overrated the amount. 

[ determined, from the first, that a most strict and clear account should be kept 
of the expenditure of public stores on the enterprise entirely separate from the 
ordinary expenses of the respective ships employed, and from the expense of 
private materials, and I have now the honour to forward, for their Lordships' in- 
formation, in the Enclosure (B.), a statement of his Majesty's stores originally 
supplied to the " Lightning " for the enterprise, and a complete set of accounts, 
as enumerated in the Enclosure (C), of the receipt, expenditure and return 
of these stores in the boatswains' and carpenters' departments on board the 
"Lightning" and " Algerine.'' 

It will be perceived that the whole of these stores were supplied for this 
peculiar service a considerable time previous to Mr. Barrow's letter of the 11th 
August 1831, directing that the country should not be put to any expense in the 
salvage. I received that letter on my return from the Cape of Good Hope on 
the 9th of December 1831, since which time I have objected to any more public 
property being employed ; and, even comparatively small as the expenditure is, 
there can be no question that had Commander Dickinson carried my directions 
for suspending a cable across the cove whence the diving-bell might have been 
hung, instead of deviating into the construction and erection of the enormous, 
unwieldy and absurd derrick, not above one-third of these stores would have been 
required. 

By the destruction of the derrick a considerable quantity of its rigging was 
torn to pieces and lost, but, with that exception, it will be seen, on the official ex- 
amination of these accounts, that almost the whole of the articles first supplied for 
the work have been, from time to time, returned into store, some of them, of course, 
rendered unserviceable, others half worn, and a considerable number scarcely 
affected. 

Regarding the periods which his Majesty's ships and vessels were actually 
employed in forwarding the enterprise at Cape Frio, you will allow me to acquaint 
you, that the " Algerine " was, in the first instance, employed at Cape Frio in 
saving parts of the wreck, but no treasure, from the 16th day of December 1830 
to the 3d day of February 1831. The " Lightning " was employed recovering 
public stores and treasure from the 30th day of January 1831 to the 12th day of 
Mprch 1832, with the exception of the period between the 26th day of July and 
the 25th day of August 1831, when she was lying in the harbour of Rio de 
Janeiro, by order of the senior officer. 

The " Algerine " returned to Cape Frio, and was employed there from the 6th 
day of March 1832 in recovering public stores and treasure until the 31st ultimo, 
when the enterprise was concluded. 

The only other vessel, beside common boats, which was employed in aid of 
the work of recovery, was the " Adelaide," tender to the " Warspite/' The 
"Adelaide" was employed throughout the enterprise in running between Rio de 



32 CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OP 

day of September 1831, when she was sent by the senior officer on a cruise to 
Bahia and Pernambuco. 

Perhaps it may be proper to mention, that both the " Lightning" and " Alge- 
rine" lay at anchor in Frio harbour, at a considerable distance from the scene 
of operations ; their crews, except a few hands to watch, were encamped on the 
island ; and I should say, the ships suffered no extra wear or tear, either in their 
hulls, masts, yards, sails or rigging, on account of the enterprise ; but their boats 
were necessarily much employed, and, together wilh the " WarspiteV launch, 
•which was also employed from the 16th day of December 1830 to the 16th day 
of May 1831, were made available to the various duties of the service, assisted 
by a launch which we obtained as a favour from the Brazilian Government, and 
now returned. 

I sincerely hope, sir, that the accompanying papers and these explanations will 
prove satisfactory, or at least show that every attention has been paid, on my 
part, to preserve regularity and precision in all matters connected with the public 
property in this singular and complicated affair ; and as I am well aware of the 
anxiety which exists amongst the owners of the treasure recovered to bring the 
subject of expenses and salvage to a speedy issue, I beg you will more their 
Lordships to be pleased to cause these accounts to be examined, and the value of 
the stores expended or worn to be estimated, with a view to the result being 
made known to the numerous parties whose interests are concerned. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Thomas Baker, 
Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



— No. 50.— 

Copy of a Letter from Rear- Admiral Sir Thomas Baker, k.c.b., dated H. M. 
Ship " Warspite," Rio de Janeiro, 16 August 1832, addressed to the Honour- 
able George Elliot, Secretary Admiralty. 

Sir, 

I had the honour to acquaint you, in my letter No. 83, dated the 3d instant, 
that the enterprise at Cape Frio, for recovering public stores and treasure from 
the wreck of his Majesty's late ship "Thetis" was concluded on the 31st ultimo, 
and I now beg leave to enclose a copy of the narrative which has been trans- 
mitted to me by the Honourable Commander de Roos, regarding the proceedings 
on that service during the period it was tinder his superintendence. 

I think it will be sufficiently evident, from a perusal of that narrative and of 
the commander's letter, reporting his return from Cape Frio, a copy of which 
letter I also enclose, that no labour or contrivance has been spared to save all 
that was recoverable of both public and private property, while the cheerful 
activity and enterprising spirit which have throughout this affair distinguished 
Commander de Root, entitle him to claim, at least from me, implicit reliance 
upon his unpretending and satisfactory statement. 

In »y letter to you, No. 53, dated the 18th of May, I forwarded an account of 
the treasure recovered by the " Lightning," which was estimated at $588,621 ; 
and you will herewith receive la similar account of $161,590 saved by the 
" Algerine;** these sums together show the total quantity of treasure recovered 
from the wreck to be not less than $750,000 out of $810,000 originally sunk in 
the "Thetis." 

I believe, sir, you are aware that I have kept up a constant corresponded^ 
with the committee of Lloyd's respecting the progress made in saving the 
treasure ; that correspondence has now arrived at a great length, and as I have 
from time to time embraced those parts of it which f conceived might be inte- 
resting to their Lordships, in my various despatches to you, I deem it superfluous 
to trouble you with it further than to enclose, on this occasion, a copy of my last 
lAtfpr in Mr. Dewar. the chairman of the committee, which letter, aa it folroa a 



STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP " THETIS." 33 

intended to facilitate the just appreciation and reward of individual exertion, in 
saving the treasure ; but, independent of that, I wish to invite their Lordships' 
favourable notice to the exceedingly meritorious conduct of George Dewar and 
John Littlejohn, of whom every one speaks in terms of the highest praise. They 
have not only been of great value to the enterprise, but they are also decidedly 
good men and clever seamen. 

The Honourable Commander de Roos, in his letter on the subject of merit, 
writes particularly in favour of four smugglers, named Richard Kennett, Edward 
Lawrence, John Hancock and Francis Spriddle, and I willingly join in the Com T 
mander's recommendation of a relaxation or remission of their sentence of foreign 
service, should it meet with their Lordships' concurrence ; and as perhaps you 
would desire to see the two letters from Commander Dickinson and De Roos 
regarding the general merit of the officers and men employed under their command, 
I take leave to enclose you copies of them, so as to complete the series of papers 
connected with this affair. 

The protracted and harassing enterprise at Cape Frio having thus, at length, 
been brought to a highly successful conclusion, without accident or serious mis- 
fortune, although surrounded by very dangerous impediments, I cannot refrain 
from declaring my admiration at the personal exertion, perseverance and spirit 
so remarkably displayed by all parties in the course of that extraordinary under- 
taking, by which a new and peculiar distinction has been achieved for the noble 
service under their Lordships control. 

I have, &c. 

(signed) Thomas Baker, 
Rear-Admiral and Commander-in-Chief. 



— No. 51.— 

Copy of a Narrative of the Conclusion of the Enterprise at Cape Frio, by 

H. M. Sloop " Algerine." 

On the 6th March the " Algerine" arrived at Cape Frio, and on the following 
day the ship's company were employed in replacing the spars removed by the 
" Lightning " in making themselves acquainted, practically, with the work in the 
cove over the wreck. 

On the 10th we took charge of the undertaking, having left, to assist the 
Algerine's men, 15 supernumeraries from the " Lightning" and five from the 
" Warspite; " the diving-bell was at this time worked by means of a boat, and 
as, though any degree of swell instantly stopped our progress, we had plenty of 
opportunities to make such preparations for the health and comfort of our people 
as suggested themselves ; after, therefore, having freshened the nips of all the 
hawsers and cables in the cove, and examined and put in order all the air-pumps, 
&c, &c, it was our care to new thatch and whitewash the houses. 

On the 16th a minute survey was taken of the bottom, and a ground-plan 
made, when it was observed that the form of the spot where the spirit-room had 
discharged its valuable contents when the ship fell to pieces, was an ellipse, of 
which the major axis was 42 feet, and the minor 30 ; no treasure has ever been 
discovered beyond the limits of this place. It was found by us to be occupied by 
large boulders of granite, the interstices between which were filled up by guns 
and fragments of the wreck, mixed up with the precious metals, in most parts 
forming compact masses, which it was difficult and tedious to separate. All the 
northern portion of this space, or that nearest the rocks, we observed, had been 
removed, and the rest searched by our predecessors ; the greater part of the 
rocks, however, remained untouched ; and on these surveys and observations, found 
by constant subsequent visitations, we at once established a system of work, from 
which, to the end of our operations, we never deviated. 

It was this, that whether our labours nroved successful or the reverse, we would. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



34 CORRESPONDENCE RESPECTING RECOVERY OF 

on turning the last rock. On the 17th we got up an 18-pounder long gun ; on 
the 19th we experienced one of those mortifying checks, from a change of wind, 
which, till we altered the plan we found in operation of working the diving-bell, 
constantly interrupted our progress,, discouraged the men, and delayed the ope- 
rations. 

On the 24th Wm. Gorman, supernumerary, having done no duty since the 
" Lightning " left, was sent to Rio de Janeiro. 

On the 28th, under circumstances of considerable swell and great depth of 
jvater (10£ fathoms), we succeeded in recovering part of a chain cable, which, 
with a net attached, had been most judiciously thrown over the mouth of the 
cove to prevent the different articles of the Frigate's equipment being washed into 
deep water ; I happened to be in the bell on this occasion, and can testify to the 
quantity of heavy articles which had been arrested by this means. 

On the 29th we recovered the stream anchor from under a large rock. 

On the 31st we got up, by a heavy purchase, the remainder of the chain 
cable. 

Our attention now was particularly turned to selecting such spots on the sur- 
rounding cliffs as were judged best for fixing our purchases to, as it was our 
object to trust more to securities than either to the boats or suspension cables ; 
and it is to this plan that I mainly attribute the non-concurrence of any accidents 
in our subsequent operations ; when an eligible point had been chosen, an eye- 
bolt was immediately placed and leaded, and thus in all directions we had points 
to which we could direct the force of our main capstan. One of these was 
distant 312 feet from the object to be moved, and as much as 630 feet from the 
capstan. 

On the 8th of April, having, in the course of our work, cleared around a long 
gun which was situated beneath a large rock, after various applications of our 
power, and the removal of three rocks, we succeeded in disengaging and getting 
it up. The observations which we were enabled to make at the removal of this 
gun confirmed our determination not to touch the remaining rocks until all the 
space was thoroughly cleared around them. 

On the 13th the "Britomart" transport arrived, when we loaded her with all the 
anchors and long guns which we ourselves and our predecessors had got up, 
together with many tons of recovered iron. As the transport lay at the distance 
of two miles, and as these ponderous articles had to cross the bar, we considered 
ourselves fortunate in accomplishing this duty, and despatching the vessel by the 
morning of the 17th ; at this period we experienced considerable delay from the 
unfavourable state of the weather, an interval of 17 days elapsing, from the 11th 
to the 28th, without the boats being able to go out ; again, from the 4th of May 
to the 16th, though the weather was moderate, still the swell over the wreck was 
so great as to prevent the diving-bell from working. 

It was during these tedious and harassing periods that we determined to adopt 
a totally new system of work, and, instead of using the boats, to avail ourselves of 
the suspension cables which had hitherto been employed principally to get up 
guns and heavy articles from the bottom ; the small diving-bell had never been 
suspended to them. 

On the 16th we moved a large rock (11 feet by 5 feet 8 inches), and discovered 
beneath it a quantity of treasure. 

On the following day the bell was suspended to the cables, and left there, as a 
gale of wind was coming on from the south westward ; on the 18th we altered 
the point of suspension 25 feet, bringing it directly over the ground which we 
were desirous of clearing. 

The 22d was the first day on which we tried the effect of the cables, and in 
the afternoon, in a south-west wind and considerable swell, the divers succeeded 
in bringing up some treasure and bars of silver. 

Hefore this, even the probability of a south-west wind coming on would have . 

deterred us working from the boats ; the gain in time, the security, and, above all, 

the steadiness below the water obtained by the use of the cables, now every day 

became more apparent, and gave fresh spirits to all employed to go through with 

the remainder of the work, the removal of the large rocks, whose size was now 
i* ii i i \ 



STORES SUNK IN HER MAJESTY'S SHIP " THETIS." 35 

more than four cables lengths distance from the wreck itself; this much facilitated 
our operations. 

On the 10th June we experienced an alarm on the subject of the air-hoses, the 
old leather being destroyed, and the new not retaining the air ; by a pre- 
paration, however, of tar, oil and grease obtained from the bottom, in certain 
proportions we succeeded in overcoming this difficulty without arresting the pro- 
gress of the work. 

On the 15th we tried the bell in a heavy swell, and succeeded in recovering 
some treasure, but we found the wash very great at the bottom : in the event of 
our not succeeding by purchases in moving the large rocks, our attention was now 
occupied in experiments in blowing and rending the granite, and I have little 
doubt but that had the former method failed, we should have been able to effect 
our object by these means ; the skill and ingenuity of our men were never more 
conspicuous than on this occasion. 

On the 22d we succeeded in moving a large round rock of seven feet diameter 
the distance of about 40 feet, and discovered a large bed of treasure beneath it ; 
the stench of some decayed meat below was very distressing to the divers. 

A 32-pounder carronade was recovered on the 26th : on the 28th we made our 
first great effort in removing a rock called the clump rock ; from its shape it was 
difficult to calculate its dimensions, but it could not have been less than 40 tons 
in weight ; our first attempt failed ; on the second, when a slight change of direction 
in the purchase had been given, this ponderous mass started from its position, and 
rolled nearly 42 feet ; some treasure was found beneath it. 

On the 29th the supernumeraries (14 in number) belonging to the tl Lightning" 
left us; but as our own men had acquired a thorough knowledge of the work, we 
did not experience any delay from their loss. 

On the 1st of July we determined to move the gun-rock, which was the next 
in size greater than the clump, and after all was ready, by a great simultaneous 
effort, this huge impediment was dragged from its position ; the estimated weight 
of the stone was 50 tons. 

On the 4th we recovered the last long gun which was in sight. 

On the 5th, in consequence of five hours' attentive survey by myself, we deter- 
mined to move a large rock again which had been turned in the early days of 
our operations, before our system of work had been finally established, and the 
enormous sum of nearly $ 24,000 was found beneath it. 

By the 21st we had completely cleared down to the granite bottom all the 
space occupied by these rocks, and there only remained unexamined one place, 
which was occupied by a stone of vast dimensions; it was 17 feet long, 7 feet 
in average breadth, and 8 feet deep, which, allowing the cubic foot of granite 
at 183 pounds, would make its weight 63 tons; but the determination of the 
" Algerine " ship's company was not to be daunted even by such an obstacle, 
and, in order that we might leave no doubt or regret behind, it was determined, as 
a last effort, at all hazards to remove it ; every impediment having accordingly 
been taken away in its intended path, and the declivity of the ground properly 
ascertained, three Lewis irons were fixed in the in-shore extremity, and the tackles 
secured by pendents to them : to give an idea of the power required, it will be 
enough to describe our cable purchases ; a tackle was applied to the fall of a 
threefold purchase, and this was led to a capstan of great force, having 30 men 
upon it. 

Happily our first effort was successful, and on the diving-bell going down, this 
huge stone was found to have moved a considerable distance ; nothing was dis- 
covered beneath it, but we had the satisfaction of knowing that no exertion had 
been wanting on our parts to the satisfactory accomplishment of our duty. 

The three following days were spent in re-examining the bottom, and in getting 
up the last fragments of the Frigate's keelson, when finding that nothing was 
left of which the value or importance could warrant our remaining longer, having 
myself frequently and minutely searched the ground, and 15-16ths of the pro- 
perty having been recovered, on the 24th of July we left off work, and on the 
27th quitted the Brazilian territory. 

Digitized by VjOOQ IC 






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BARRACKS. 



RETURN to an Order of the Honourable The House of Commons, 
dated 14 August 1846;— /or, 



A RETURN " from each Barrack in the United Kingdom, stating, — 1. The Date 
of its Erection, if known; 2. The Materials of which it is Built; 3. The Number of 
Sleeping Rooms for the use of the Privates and Non-commissioned Officers; 4. The 
Dimensions, Length, Width, and Height of each Room ; 5. The Number of Windows 
in each Room, the Number of Fireplaces in each Room, and any other Means of 
Ventilation in each Room ; G. Number of Men each Room is regulated to hold ; 
7. Number of Men, Women, and Children usually occupying it; 8. How the Barrack 
is supplied with Water, and the Distance from the Buildings ; 9. .What Accommoda- 
tion each Barrack affords for Washing, for the Men, for their Clothes, and for 
Cooking." 



(Mr. Henley.) 



Ordered, by The House of Commons, to be Printed, 
10 March 1847. 



Digitized by 



Google 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



A RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. 



GREAT BRITAIN. 



DISTRICT. 


NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 


Date of 

iu 
Erection. 


Of 

what Materials 

Built 


Number of 

* Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non« 

Commissioned 

Officers. 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 

of 
Windows 

in 
each Room. 


Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

in 
each Room. 




Length. 


Width. 


Height. 














ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 








Doykb 


Drop Redoubt, Artillery - 


1808 - 


- Brick, with arched 
roofs, bomb proof. 


3 

I 


48 
48 


18 
18 


16 
16 


4 
4 


6 

2 






Western Heights, Infantry 


1804 - 


• 'Brick walls, with 
slated roof. 


14 

13 
5 


42 
42 
14 


21 
21 
14 


11 

11 

7 


6 
5 

1 


1 

1 
1 






Dover Castle Keep Yard, 
Infantry. 


Unknown 


- - Stone walls, with 
tiled and slated roof. 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 


47 
47 
47 
43 
71 
42 
35 
30 
30 


30 
30 
30 
29 
28 
18 
28 
21 
21 


10 4 

7 9 

8 9 
7 10 

7 7 

8 6 
8 8 
8 9 
8 6 


4 
4 
3 
4 
6 
4 
2 
2 
2 


2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 






Ditto, Spur Casemated 
Barracks, Infantry. 


1800 - 


Brick ... 


1 
2 
2 

1 
2 
2 

1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


59 
45 
45 
41 

40 

41 

42 
40 
40 
38 
44 
25 
11 6 


12 6 

13 4 
13 4 
13 4 
13 4 
13 4 
13 4 
13 4 
13 4 
13 4 

12 6 

13 4 
11 6 


12 

8 2 

9 8 

8 2 

9 8 

8 2 

9 8 

8 2 

9 8 
9 

12 

9 8 

12 


2 
2 
8 
2 
3 
2 
3 
2 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






Canterbury, Cavalry 


1793 • 


••Brick, with slated 
roofs. 


12 
3 

14 
16 


16 
16 
28 
28 


16 4 
16 4 
16 3 
16 3 


9 
9 
9 6 
8 11 


1 
2 

1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
1 






Ditto, Artillery 


1802 • 


Ditto - 


4 
1 
1 
3 

1 
1 
4 
1 
4 


13 

13 
12 

31 4 
23 2 
23 2 

32 
23 2 
32 


11 6 
11 6 
11 4 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 


8 6 
8 6 

8 6 
7 11 
7 11 

9 2 
9 2 

10 6 
10 6 


1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
I 
2 
1 
2 


1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






Ditto, Northgate, Infantry 


1803 - 


Ditto ... 


1 


28 


21 6 


9 10 


1 


i{ 












6 


43 6 


21 6 


9 10 


3 












9 


43 10 


21 10 


9 10 


2 












8 


43 10 


21 10 


11 


2 


1 






Ditto, Permanent, Infantry 


1806 - 


Ditto - 


22 

5 

41 


9 9 
16 
37 


8 
IS 
20 6 


10 4 
10 
10 


1 
1 

4 


1 
1 

1 






Hythe, Infantry 


1810 - 


Ditto - 


3 
2 
o 


13 
16 

1ft A 


if* 

11 Q 


O A 


1 







RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



A RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM. 



GREAT BRITAIN. 



Number 
of Ventilatort, 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



Number 

of Men each 

Boom 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



For their Clothes. 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



REMARKS. 



none 
none 
none 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 



none 

none 

noue 

none 

none 

none - • 

none 

none 

none 

none 

none 

none 

none 

• Luner frames 
in partitions, 
and ventilating 
slides in ceil- 
ings. 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

• • Ventilators 
in ceilings con- 
nected with air 
gratings in ex- 
ternal walls - 
-Foul-air shaft 
through roof. 

none 

none 

- - Ventilators 

jo ceilings. 



25 privates - 
9 ditto 



85 privates • 
23 ditto 
2 n. c. officers 



32 privates 

32 ditto 

32 ditto 

27 ditto 

48 ditto 

26 ditto 

26 ditto 

19 ditto 

19 ditto 



19 privates 
19 ditto 
19 ditto 
17 ditto 
17 ditto 
16 ditto 
16 ditto 
15 ditto 
15 ditto 

14 ditto 
11 ditto 

9 ditto 

6 ditto 

Inc. officer 
2 ditto 
9 privates 
9 ditto 

1 n. c. officer 
1 ditto 
1 ditto 

15 privates 
15 ditto 
15 ditto 
15 ditto 
15 ditto 
15 ditto 

!16 privates 
20 ditto 
20 ditto 

20 ditto 



Uc 
1 ditto 
20 privates 



25 
9 



25 

23 

2 



I none 
none 
none 



1 ik c. officer 

1 ditto 
- I 1 ditto 
• I 20 nrivate* 



32 

32 
82 
27 
48 
26 
26 
19 
19 



19 
19 
19 
17 
17 
16 
16 
15 
15 
14 
11 
9 
u 6 

2 

2 

10 

10 

2 
2 
2 
17 
12 
12 
17 
12 
1? 

16 
29 
20 
20 



2 

2 

20 



1 
1 

1 



- - From a tank 
of rain water, 20 
feet from the 
buUdings,holding 
18,457 gallons. 

- - From a well 
165 feet deep, 
100 feet from the 
buildings, and 5 
rain-water tanks 
contiguous to the 
buildings, holding 
12,464 gallons 
each. 

- • From a well 
360 feet deep, at 
a distance ot 200 
feet from the 
buildings ; and, 
also, from a tank, 
holding 33,300 
gallons, 50 feet 
from the build- 
ings. 

-•From the same 
source as the last 
barrack. 



• • From 4 wells, 
with pumps, 10 
feet from * k ~ 
building. 



the 



- - From 2 wells, 
with pumps, I at 
each end of the 
building. 



- - From 2 wells, 
with pumps, 38 
feet from the 
building. 



- - From 2 wells, 
with pumps, 209 
feet from the fur- 
thest building. 

- - From a spring 
conducted by lea- 
den pipes into the 



- - An arched re- 
cess, 13 ft 4 in. 
by 5 ft. 6 in., to 
accommodate 6 
men at a time* 

• - A room, 16ft. 
by 8 ft 9 ki., 
fitted with 9 
wooden troughs. 



• •A room, 22ft 
by 6 ft 2 in., 
fitted with 6 
wooden troughs. 



- - 2 rooms, each 
30 ft. by 8 6., 
fitted with wooden 
troughs. 



- - 1 room, 24 ft. 
by 14 ft., fitted 
with wooden 
troughs. 



- - 3 detached 
houses,each30ft 
by 9ft, fitted with 
wooden troughs. 



- - A washhouse, 
21ft by 16 ft, 
containing 4 boil- 



- - A washhouse, 
24 ft by 21 ft, 

containing 5 boil- 



• - In the same 
building as the 
last barrack. 



- - A washhouse, 
35 ft. by 11 ft., 
containing 2 cop- 
pers. 

- - A washhouse, 
28 ft by 17 ft., 
containing 2 cop- 
pers. 



- - A washhouse, 
22 ft by 16 ft., 
containing 2 cop- 
pers. 



• - A washhouse, 
30 ft. by 16 ft, 
eontatining 2 cop- 
per*. 



- A kitchen, 18 ft. 
by 14 ft. 8 in., 
with 7 boilers of 
18 gallons each. 



- 2 kitchens, each 
32 ft by 19 ft., 
containing 28 
boilers of 18 gal- 
lons each. 



- 4 kitchens, con- 
taining 5 boilers, 
each of 18 gal- 
lons. 



• 1 kitchen, 81 ft. 
by 18 ft, contain- 
ing 12 boilers of 
18 gallons each. 



- | none 



- 2 kitchens, each 
36 ft by H2 ft., 
with 20 boilers in 
each. 

• 2 kitchens, each 
28 ft by 17 ft., 
having 10 boilers 
in each. 



--» The men's pro- 
visions are cooked 
on the fires of 
their sleeping- 
rooms. 



2 kitchens, each 
29 ft. by 14 ft.. 
having 10 boiler* 
in each. 

• 1 kitchen, ftUed 
with 8 hotter* of 
16 gallons eacn. 



Dgle 



4 


RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN 


THE UNITED KINGDOM, 










NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 


Date of 

its 
Erection. 


Of 

what Materials 
Built. 


Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 

of 
Windows 

in 
each Room. 


Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

in 
each Room. 




DISTRICT. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height 




GREAT BR1' 

Dover 
continued. 


rAIN— continued. 
Shorncliff, Artillery 


1801 - 


• - Brick walls, with 
slated roofs. 


1 

1 
2 
8 


ft. -in. 

12 
12 
12 
24 


ft. in. 

12 

10 

8 6 

21 


ft. in. 

9 10 

9 10 

9 10 

II 


1 
1 

1 
2 


. 

1 

1 
I 






Walmer, Cavalry • 


1794 - 


ditto - 


1 
3 
6 
1 


15 3 

16 
28 
21 6 


16 10 
16 6 
16 6 
16 6 


9 
9 
9 
9 


1 

1 
1 
1 


1 
1 

1 
I 






North, Infantry 


1795 - 


ditto - 


4 

2 

8 
4 
8 
4 


20 
20 
7 6 
7 6 
62 
50 


14 4 
14 4 
5 
5 
20 4 
20 


14 2 
8 9 

14 2 
8 9 

12 

14 2 


4 

4 
1 

1 
7 
6 


1 

I 
none 
none 

1 
1 






South, Infantry 


1795 - 


ditto - 


8 

4 
8 
6 

8 
4 
1 


16 4 

16 
40 
40 
40 6 
48 6 
77 6 


9 
14 6 
22 
22 

22 4 

23 6 

24 8 


8 8 
10 
10 2 

9 3 
8 3 

10 3 
10 3 


1 
1 

4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


none 
1 
1 
1 
I 
1 

none 






No. 1 Tower - - - 


-- About 
1810. 


• * Brick, casemat* 
ed, bomb proof. 


1 


26 


26 


7 5» 


2. 


2 






No. 2 Tower - 


ditto 


ditto * 


1 


26 


diara. • 


7 5 


2 








No. 8 Tower - 


ditto 


ditto - 


1 


26 


'diam. - 


7 5 


2 








No. 4 Tower - 


ditto 


ditto ... 


1 


x 26 


diam. - 


7 5 


2 








No. 5 Tower ... 


ditto 


ditto ... 


1 


26 


diam. • 


7 5 


2 








Sandgate Castle 


- Rebuilt 
about 1780. 


ditto - 


1 

1 


80 
30 


diam. - 
diam. - 


8 0* 
8 


2 
2 








No. 6 Tower • 


- -About 
1810. 


ditto ... 


1 


26 


diam. * 


7 5 s 


2 








No. 7 Tower ► 

No. 8 Tower • 


ditto 
ditto 


ditto ... 
ditto ... 


I 
1 


26 9 
26 


diam. * 
diam. - 


7 5 
7 5 


2 
2 








No. 9 Tower - 
No. 10 Tower 


ditto 
ditto 


ditto - 

ditto ... 


1 

1 


26 
26 


diam. * 
diam. - 


7 5 
7 5 


2 
2 








FortTwiss ... 


- - 1792, 
or there* 
about. 


Brick, tiled roof . 


I 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
I 


14 3 
14 3 

14 
22 4 
10 6 
12 
10 9 
12 


13 

8 9 

10 6 

9 4 
9 8 

11 
11 
10 


9 4 
9 4 
9 4 
9 4 
9 4 
9 3 
9 8 
9 8 


2 4 
6 4 
7« 
1&6 4 
2« 
2 4 
2* 
4 4 


none 

none 

none 

none 
none 










Weather boarding, 
on brick foundation, 
with tiled roof. 


1 

I 

8 
3 

3 


15 
15 
10 
10 
10 


9 9 
11 6 
11 6 
11 6 

9 9 


11 
11 
11 
11 
11 




none 

none 
none 






*T- 1 t H*—~~. * 


. _ 1U«,« 


Rn/ilr j»**a«ma»- 


1 


26 


diam. - 


7 5* 


2 


2 





Digitized by 



Google 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 





Number 

of Ventilators, 

and 

other Means 

of 
VentilationJ 


Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 


Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it 


How the Barrack 

is 

Supplied with 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 




■ 


Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 


For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 


REMARKS. 




none 
none 
none 
nono 


1 n. c. officer - 
1 ditto - 
1 ditto - 
14 privates - 


1 

1 

1 

14 


- - From a well 
40 feet from the 
buildings, and a 
rain-water tank 
160 feet from 
ditto. 


none 


none 


• A kitchen, with 
range aad oven, 
and also 8 boil- 
ers of 15 gallons 
each. 




- 


• Sliding sash- 
es OTer doors, 
and holes in 
the ceiling. 


1 n.c. officer 
4 privates • 
10 ditto 
7 ditto 


1 

4 

10 

7 


- - Water is sup- 
plied to all parts 
of the barrack 
by pipes, from 
the reservoir of a 
water company. 


none 


- - A washhouse, 
10 ft. by 12 ft, 
containing one 
copper. 


- - 1 kitchen, 25 
ft by 20 ft, fitted 
with 13 boilers. 






none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 


1 n.c. officer 

1 ditto 

1 ditto 

1 ditto 
86 privates - 
28 ditto 


1 
1 
1 
I 
33 
28 


ditto 


none 


- - 2 washhouses, 
one 20 ft by 16 
ft, with two cop- 
pers ; the other 
16 ft. by 10 ft, 
with one copper. 


- - 2 kitchens, 29 
ft by 20ft., 1 fitted 
with 15 boilers, 
the other attach- 
ed to the hospital 
and containing 11 
boilers. 




« 


none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 


1 n. c officer • 
1 dhto - 
23 privates - 
23 ditto 
23 ditto 
20 ditto 
20 ditto 


1 
1 
23 
23 
23 
20 
20 


ditto 


- - 2 sheds, fitted 
with wooden 
troughs.] 


- -2 washhouses, 
one 21 ft. by 18 
ft, with 3 cop- 
pers; the other 
18 ft by 8 ft, 
with 1 copper. 


• - 2 kitchens, 
each 29 ft. by 29 
ft., fitted with 20 
boilers. 




" 


- - 2 air-holes 
in arch at win- 
dow through 
parapet 


24 


- - Occupied by 
the coast guard. 


- - From a spring 
100 yards from 
building. 


none 


none 


- • No accommo- 
dation except the 
fireplaces. 


1 This diracusion 
is up to the spring* 
ing, and 3 ft to 
apes. 




ditto » 


24 


- - Occupied by 
tower keeper. 


- - ditto, 300 
yards from the 
buildiug. 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto* 




ditto » 


24 


By coast guard - 


ditto 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




ditto 


24 


ditto 


- - ditto, quarter 
of a mile from 
ditto. 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




ditto - 


24 


ditto 


ditto 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




ditto • 
ditto - 


13 
13 


By tower keeper 
ditto 


- * ditto, 160 
yards from ditto. 

ditto 


none 
none 


none 
none 


ditto 
ditto. 


* This dimension 
is up to the spring- 
ing, and four feet 
to apex. 




ditto » 


24 


ditto 


- - ditto, quarter 
of a mile from 
ditto. 


none 


none 


ditto 


9 This dimension 
is up to the spring- 
ing, and three fees 
to apex. 




ditto - 


24 


Unoccupied 


ditto 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




ditto - 


24 


By coast guard - 


- - From a pomp 
300 yards from 
the building. 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




ditto - 


24 


Unoccupied 


ditto 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




ditto - 


24 


ditto 


»- ditto, quarter 
of a mile from 
ditto. 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




none 


















none • 


















none 


















none - 
none 
none - 
none •■ 
none 


* 


By coast guard - 


• - From pipes 
connected with a 
spiine quarter of 
a mile from the 
building. 


none 


none 


- • 1 room, 17 ft. 
by 13ft, with two 
18-gallon boilers, 
and small fire- 
place. 


4 Loop tioles fit- 
ted with a pane of 
glass, 12 in. by 8 
I in., in a sash hung 
with hinges. 




none 


1 
















none 

none - • 

none 


1 ■ 


ditto 


ditto 


none 


none - - 1 The above room. 






1 








1 i 






none 


J 












- • 2 air-boles 
in arcb at win- 
dow through 
parapet 

ditto 


24 
24 


ditto 
ditto 


ditto 
ditto 


none 
none 


- 1 none - • \ - - "No accommo- I * This ditnensio 
\ \ dation except the I is up to thesprin 
I \ firepUces. \ \ng, «nd thiee ft 
1 \ \ to *pe** 

- I «"» " Dfcfed by GOTrgle 


* 


ditto - 


24 


ditto 


- - ditto, 500 


none 


-I none - - U^to - ; 1 ditto. 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 





NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 


Date of 

its 
Erection. 


Of 

what Materials 
Built. 


Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 

of 
Windows 

in 
each Room. 


Ksmber 

a 

Fireplaces 

in 
each Room. 




DISTRICT. 


use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 




GREAT BRITAIN— continued. 








ft. in. 


ft* in. 


ft. in. 








Dover 
continued. 


Fort Sutherland 


-.1792, or 
thereabout 


- • Brick, with tiled 
roof. 


4 
4 
2 


15 
15 
35 4 


10 3 
10 3 
30 6 


9 
9 

8 6 


2 l 

2' 

88* 


1 

none 
2 










Weather boarding 
on brick founda- 
tion, with tiled 
roof. 


1 

1 
4 

2 
1 
1 
1 


9 10 
9 10 
10 
9 9 
9 9 
15 8 
15 3 


7 9 

7 9 

8 7 

9 8 
9 8 
9 9 
8 7 


10 6 
10 6 
10 6 
10 6 
10 6 
10 6 
10 6 


1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1 

none 
ditto 
ditto . 

1 

1 






No. 15 Tower 


- - About 
1810. 


- Brick, casemated, 
bomb proof. 


1 


26 


diam. * 


7 5> 


2 


2 






No. 16 Tower 


ditto 


ditto - 


1 


26 


diam. • 


7 5 


2 


2 






No. 17 Tower 


ditto 


ditto - 


1 


26 


diam. » 


7 5 


2 


2 






No. 18 Tower 


ditto 


ditto - 


1 


26 


diam. » 


7 5 


2 


2 






Fort Moncrief 


--1792, or 

thereabout. 


- - Brick, with tiled 
roof. 

Weather boarding,*] 
with brick founda* V 
tion, and tiled roof J 


4 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 


30 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 

17 6 

18 6 
9 10 


10 8 

11 6 
11 6 
15 
15 

9 9 
9 


8 6 
7 9 
7 6 
7 9 
7 9 

10 2 
10 2 


4 
1 3» 
1 6» 
1 8» 
1 4 s 

2 
1 


1 
1 

none 
ditto 
1 

1 

none 






No. 19 Tower 


- - About 
1810. 


- Brick, casemated, 
bomb proof. 


1 


26 


diam. - 


7 5« 


2 


* 






No. 20 Tower 


ditto 


ditto ... 


1 


26 


diam. - 


7 5 


2 


2 






No. 21 Tower 


ditto 


ditto - 


1 


26 


diam. - 


7 5 


2 


* 






Circular Redoubt - 


• -1804 or 
1805. 


- - Brick, parabolic 
arch, casemated. 


7 
2 

1 


89 6 
39 6 
39 6 


18 10 

13 11 

14 


7 3* 

7 3 
7 3 


2 
2 
2 


1 
1 
1 






No. 22 Tower 


- - About 
1810. 


- Brick, casemated, 
- bomb proof. 


1 


26 


diam. - 


7 5« 


♦ 2 


* 






No. 23 Tower 


ditto 


ditto - 


1 


26 


diam. - 


7 5 


2 


2 






No. 24 Tower 


ditto 


ditto - 


1 


26 


diam. - 


7 5 


2 


2 






No. 25 Tower 


ditto 


ditto - 


1 


26 


diam. - 


7 5 


2 


* 






No. 26 Tower 


ditto 


ditto - 


1 


26 


diam. - 


7 5 


2 


2 






No. 1 Battery, Dungeness 


• • About 
1792. 


Brick, tied roof - 


2 
2 
2 
1 
1 


13 10 

13 10 
10 6 

14 2 
14 2 


10 8 

11 9 
9 7 

14 

8 


8 
8 

8 

9 10 
9 10 


7' 
2' 

6' 
2 7 
6 7 


none 
1 

none 

1 
none 










Weather boarding 
on brick founda- 
tion, tiled roof. 


3 
3 
3 
1 

1 


11 2 
11 2 
10 
15 4 
15 4 


9 9 

9 9 

9 9 

11 2 

10 2 


11 
11 
U o 
11 
11 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


1 
none 
none 

1 
none 






No. 2 Battery, Dungeness 


ditto 


Brick, tiled reof - 


1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 


20 5 

14 2 
16 6 

15 10 
18 5 

14 3 
10 6 
18 5 

9 10 
13 10 
13 6 

15 
10 


13 10 

12 2 

13 11 
10 1 
13 10 
10 1 
10 1 
13 9 

9 10 
9 10 

rv T + - ° 

13 10 

7 


7 11 
7 11 
7 11 
7 11 
7 5 
7 5 
7 5 
7 11 
7 11 
7 11 

7 11 

1 byrV<p 

7 6 


1&6» 
1&6* 
1&5» 
1&5' 

7* 

7 9 

8* 

4* 

5» 

•• T 

6 8 

8 s 

5^ 


1 
none 

1 
none 

1 
none 
none 

1 
none 
none 
none 

1 











RELATIVE TO 


THE DATE OF ERECTION, 


MATERIALS, 


&C. 


7 




Number 
of Ventilators, 
and 
other Meant 

of 
Ventilation. 


Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 


Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it 


How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water. 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 






For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 


REMARKS. 




none - 


v ~ • 


• - Occupied by 


• - From pipes 


none 


none 


--The provision* 


1 Same as Fort 




none - 


r ** 


the coast guard* 


connected with a 






are cooked in the 


Twits, 




none • 


J 




spring three quar- 
ters of a mile from 






rooms occupied 
















by the men. 






none 


) 




buildings. 












none - . - 


















none 


















none • * 


12 


ditto 


ditto 


none 


none 


ditto. 






none - 


















none 


















none - 


J 
















• - 2 air-holes 


24 


ditto 


ditto 


none 


none 


- - No accommo- 


* Same as No. 1 




in arch at win- 












dation but the 


Tower. 




dow through 












fireplaces. 






parapet. 


















ditto - 






ditto 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




ditto • 


24 


ditto 


-ditto half a mile 
from buildings. 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




ditto • 


24 


ditto * - 


ditto 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




none - 


1 
















none * 


















none 
none * 


" 


ditto 


• -ditto one-third 
of a mile from 


none 


none 


f 2 kitchens, one 
16 ft 2 in. by 


'Same as Fort 
Twits. 




none - 


J 




buildings. 






1 16.ft 4 in., and 
lone 16 ft. 2 in. by 
12 ft. 2 in., with 
^fireplaces only. 






none 
none - 


} » 


ditto 


ditto 


none 


none 






- • 2 air-boles 


24 


ditto 


• ditto half a mile 


none 


none 


- - No accommo- 


4 Same as No. 1 




in arch at win- 






from buildings. 






dation except the 


Tower. 




dow through 








. 




fireplaces. 






parapet. 


















ditto • 


24 


ditto 


ditto 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




ditto - 


24 


ditto 


ditto 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




• - Bull's eye 


22 


• - Tower-keeper 


- - From 2 pumps 
close to building; 


none 


none 


- - 2 cooking- 


• This dimension 




over door ; open- 
ing 12 in. dia- 


32 


in charge. 






houses, 80 ft. by 


is up to the spring* 




32 




also rain-water 






6 ft, 18 ft. by 


Sng, and 7 feet up 




meter in scarp 






from 3 tanks un- 






11 ft., with six 


to apex. 




wall, & 2 open- 






der floor of rooms. 






square iron boil- 






ings 12 in. dia- 












ers, in each 20 






meter in arch. 












gallons. 






- - 2 air-holes 


24 


• - Occupied by 


• • From a spring 


none 


none 


- - No accommo- 


• Same as No. 1 




in arch at win- 




coast guard. 


250 ^ards from 






dation except in 


Tower. 




dow .through 






building. 






fireplaces. 






parapet 


















ditto - 


24 


ditto 


ditto 


none 


none 


ditto - „ - 


ditto. 




ditto - 


24 


ditto 


- ditto 300 yards 
from building. 


none 


none 


ditto 


ditto. 




ditto - 


24 


ditto 


ditto 


none 


none - • 


ditto - - J ditto. 




ditto - 


24 


ditto 


- ditto 500 yards 


none 


none 


ditto - •> 1 ditto. 










from building. 












none • 


^ • * • 


ditto 


- • From 2 wells, 


none - » 


none 


-- A room 22ft 


7 Same as Fort 




none 






one 18 yards from 






5 in. by 13 ft 


Twits. 




none 


64 




building, and one 






10 in., containing 






none 






300 yards from 






one 18-gallon cop- 






none • 


J 




the building, each 






per, oven, and 
fireplace. 












about 25 ft. deep. 










ditto 


}■ 
















ditto - 
















ditto - 


ditto 


ditto. 












ditto 
















ditto k 
















f ** 


64 


ditto 


- - From 2 wells, 
one 1 3 yards from 
the building and 
25 feet deep, and 


none 


none 


1 

ditto • • I • ditto. 










one 225 yards 


















from the building 












J 






27 feet deep. 












>nooe - 


12 

1 


*» . . 


ditto 


ditto 


none • 


Digitized by v_ 


^dOsIe 


1 














(eonttw 



8 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK. IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 











Number of 














NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 












Rooms for the 






of 


of 




DISTRICT. 


of 


its 


what Materials 






Windows 
in 


Fireplaces 
in 




and Non- 












BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Buiit. 


commissioned 


Length. 


Width. 


Height 


each Room. 


each Room.; 










Officers. 














GREAT BRITAIN— continued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. **. 








Simmy - 


Ipswich, Cavalry - 


- - 1792, 


Brick, tiled roof - 


14 


28 


16 


8 1 


I 










1793,1794, 




4 


28 


16 


8 1 


2 










and 1795. 




4 
8 


21 8 
16 


16 
16 


8 1 
8 1 


2 
1 














1 


16 


9 


8 1 


1 








Norwich Cavalry Barracks 


- 1793 and 


- • Brick built and 


6 


16 


15 


7 11 


1 










1794. 


slated roofs. 


6 
10 
10 


17 6 
28 
28 


16 
16 
16 


9 8 
7 II 
9 8 


1 
1 
1 














6 


28 


16 


8 4 


1 
The above 
windows 


•* 


' 


















are very 








■ 




' 










large. 




► 




Harwich Infantry Barracks 


- - 1809, 


• • Circular redoubt 


4 


40 


15 6 


12 


2 


1 


> 






1810, and 


casemated barrack, 


2 


40 


15 6 


12 


2 


1 








1811. 


brick built and stone 
base. 














r 




Landguard Fort Infantry 


Unknown 


• - Brick built and 




26 


14 10 


8 1 


3 








Barracks. 




plain tiled roofs. 




26 

26 

17 7 

15 4 

18 1 

27 8 
18 

28 4 
17 10 
17 9 
17 5 
17 11 
17 10 
30 1 
17 10 
30 10 

16 10 

17 8 
17 
17 10 


14 11 

14 11 
16 11 
11 9 
16 11 

15 5 

16 11 

15 5 

16 9 
16 10 
16 9 
16 1 

16 11 
15 6 

17 

15 5 
17 
17 1 

16 11 

17 


8 2 
8 2 
8 3 
8 4 
8 3 
8 1 

7 11 

8 2 
8 
8 2 
8 3 
8 2 
8 1 
7 10 

7 10 

8 3 
8 3 
8 3 
8 8 
7 10 


5 
£ 

2 
2 
2 
4 
2 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 


none 

none 
none 


. 












15 7 


12 7 


8 4 


2 


none 














17 10 


17 


8 2 


2 


1 














15 5 

16 11 


11 10 
17 11 


8 
8 1 


2 
2 


none 


' 












15 5 


11 10 


8 1 


2 


none 


* 


Ion do* 


Windsor Cavalrj - 


1800 


Brick ... 


24 

22 


28 3 
28 3 


»16 6 
16 6 


8 I 
10 1 


1 
1 














8 


16 6 


15 6 


10 I 


1 














8 


16 6 


15 6 


8 1 


1 








Windsor Infantry - 


1797 


Brick - 


21 


50 


22 


10 


5 


1 


> 










1 


50 


22 


10 


5 


1 












4 


50 


22 


10 


5 


1 












9 


21 


15 


10 


5 


1 






Hounslow ... 


1793 


Brick - 


29 


26 8 


16 6 


8 6 


1 


1 












14 


13 3 


16 G 


8 6 


1 


1 






Hampton Court, Old 


Unknown 


Brick ... 




99 10 
49 
28 
16 


23 
23 
17 
15 5 


8 3 
8 8 
8 3 

8 3 


14 
9 

2 
2 


J 






Hampton Court, New 


1812 


Brick ... 


6 


18 
28 3 


13 
16 7 


ertbviv 


loot. 


lei 












S 


16 6 


8 


10 1 







RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



Number 
of Wnti'aiors 

and 
other Mrans 

of 
Ventilation. 



Nnraber 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

bold. 



none 

1 



none 
none 



none 
none 
none 



1G 
15 



29 

29 

29 

4 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



12 

12 

9 

4 

4 



15 each 
14 each. 



7 


none 




7 


none. 




7 


none. 




4 


none. 




5 


none. 




4 
12 


} 


5 


4 


i 


A 


12 


/ 




5 


none 




5 


none. 




5 


none. 




4 


none. 




4 


none. 




16 


none. 




4 

16 


} 


6 


4 




2 


4 


none. 




4 




1 


4 

5 


i 


4 


4 

5 


> 


4 


4 


none. 




5 


none. 




9 




9 


8 




8 


2 




4 


2 




4 



26 

10 

8 

3 



How- the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



For their Clothes. 



- - From 4 wells, - - 4 rooms, 16 ft. - One, 24 ft. by 15 
two 20 feet and by 8 ft. 6 in. ft., with 2 coppers, 

two 171 feet from 
soldiers' barracks. 

These barracks have not an abundant sup- 
ply of water, the chief and only good 
spring being the property of Mr. Alex- 
ander. 



. - From 5 wells, 
one 20 feet from 
officers' quarters, 
two 20 feet from 
soldiers' barracks, 
one 60 feet from 
hospital, and one 
in washhouse for 
clothes. Supply 
ample. 



- - From a well in 
the centre, 45 feet 
from the front of 
the barrack rooms. 
Supply ample. 

- - From Walton 
Wells, a distance 
of upwards of a 
mile, and brought 
by a lead pipe into 
a well 20 feet from 
the rear of the 
barracks. The 
supply is ample. 



- From the water- 
works into 4 cis- 
terns attached to 
building ; also into 
1 cistern inside 
hospital, and by 2 
engine pumps 40 
feet from building. 

- From the water- 
works into 5 cis- 
terns attached to 
buildings ; also by 
1 pump 22 ft. from 
building, by 2 
ditto 12 ft. ditto, 
and by 2 pumps 
inside ditto. 

- - By 2 pumps 
18 ft. distant from, 
and by 2 pumps 
inside, buildings. 



- - No ablution 
rooms for men. 



No ablution room 



- - No ablution 
rooms for the men. 



- - 1 washhouse 
for clothes, 40 ft. 
long, 28 ft. broad, 
7 ft. 6 in. high, 
with 5 coppers. 



No washhouse 



- - 1 washhouse, 
15 ft. 6 in. long, 
15 ft. broad, 8 ft. 
4 in, high, with 1 
copper. 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



1 



• - 4 rooms, 24 ft. 
by 15 ft. and 10 ft. 
6 in. high, with 8 
boilers in each. 



- - 1 cooking room, 
27 ft. long, 20 ft. 
broad, 10 ft. high, 
with 16 boilers. 
1 cooking room, 
26 ft. 10 in. long, 
20 ft. broad, 10 ft. 
high, with 9 boil- 
ers. Serjeants' 
cooking room, 10 
fret long, 10 feet 
broud, 10 ft. high, 
with 2 boilers. 

• - 2 casemates for 
cooking, with 5 
boilers in each. 



- 1 cooking house, 
25 ft. long, 18 ft. 
6 in. broad, lift, 
high, containing 
18 boilers. 



REMARKS. 



- A washing room 
is now being erect- 
ed for the men. 



An ablutiot* 



Vo*« 
. iot " w 
Is provided ^ N^- 
the t»rracV ^v«5» 

1847-418. 



Digitized by 



toogI( 



io 


RETURN FROM EACH 


BARRACK IN 


THE UNITED KINGDOM, 
















Number of 
















NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 












Rooms for the 








of 


of 




DISTRICT. 


of 


its 


what Materials 


use of Privates 
and Non- 








Windows 
in 


Fireplaces 
in 














BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built. 


commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height 


each Room. 


each Room. 




GREAT BRITAIN— continue. 








ft. in. 


/*. in. 


ft. m. 








London 


Croydoo 


1706 


Wood - 


5 


19 8 


14 8 


8 • 


3 






continued. 








8 
3 
1 

2 

1 
2 
1 
1 


19 8 
41 
41 
41 
19 8 
56 5 
40 11 
56 5 


14 8 
26 1 
26 1 
26 1 
8 2 
28 8 
28 7 
28 8 


8 2 

9 9 
9 9 

10 
10 
IS 
18 
IS 


2 
5 
5 
5 
2 
4 
2 
4 








Wellington - 


1881 


Brick - - 


11 
12 
12 

2 
2 
1 
I 
I 
I 
1 
1 
1 
1 


33 2 
33 2 

83 2 
14 1 

14 1 
18 9 

15 8 
12 11 

12 10 

13 3 
18 
18 
18 9 


20 
20 
20 
9 
9 
12 11 
12 9 
10 5 
10 5 
12 9 
14 9 
14 11 
12 11 


12 2 

11 9 
11 1 
11 
11 9 

8 8 
8 8 
8 8 
8 1 
8 1 
8 1 
8 1 
8 1 


3 
3 

8 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 








St. George's * 


1826 


Brick - 


21 

10 

2 

1 

9 

19 


38 

88 
33 
38 
11 1 
10 8 


20 2 
20 
20 2 
20 2 
9 1 
9 


12 1 

11 2 

12 1 

11 2 

12 
8 11 


4 
4 
4 
4 

1 

1 








Buckingham Pake* 


• Boilt by 


! 

Brick - 


1 


78 


24 6 


11 8 


8 










Woods and 




I 


14 3 


10 10 


12 


1 










Forests. 




1 


14 3 


10 10 


11 9 


1 








Regent's Park 


1821 


Brick - 


30 
6 
3 

8 
1 
1 
2 


27 6 
24 6 
24 6 
13 
26 7 
40 6 
54 3 


24 6 

15 
7 

12 6 

16 6 
16 6 
16 6 


9 6 
9 6 
9 6 
8 4 
8 1 
8 1 
8 8 


1 

1 
1 
1 
2 
8 
4 








Portman-street 


About 1799 


Brick - 


24 

1 

13 


38 6 
46 6 
20 6 


20 

18 6 

19 


9 6 
9 6 
9 6 


2 
3 

1 








St. John's Wood - 


1885 


Brick - 


11 
6 
1 


35 
15 
20 


20 
18 
16 


10 9 

11 9 
11 9 


3 














1 
2 
2 


14 
14 
14 


« 9 

14 9 

9 


11 9 
9 9 
9 










Hyde Part, Cavalry 


1797 


Brick - 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

18 
3 
1 
1 

36 


58 
58 
56 
65 
51 
38 

36 

37 
36 
36 
33 
29 
17 
12 
12 
12 
12 


41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
41 
20 
41 
41 
20 
19 
18 
14 
9 
9 
8 


10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 9 

10 

8 9 

10 

10 

10 

8 

8 

8 

8 


6 
6 
6 
6 
6 


none 
none 
none 

none 
none 






Hyde Park, Infantry 


1797 


Brick ... 


1 
1 
1 
2 
1 


50 
49 
28 
14 
16 


23 
23 
17 6 

13 6 

14 


10 

10 

9 6 

9 6 

10 




2 

2 










: 


* 


16 


14 


10 










Kensington, Cavalry 


- 1727: a 

new bar- 
rack con- 
templated. 


Brick - 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


48 
35 
16 6 
15 
13 


21 
21 
14 6 
10 
14 6 


7 6 
7 6 
7 6 

7 6 

8 




T^** 












1 


13 


18 


:edfcy*s 


^obj 


;Ie. 





RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



11 





Number 
of Ventilators 


Number 
of Men each 


Number of 
Men, Women, 


How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 


Accommodation ft* Washing. 


Accommodation 






and 
other Meaus 

of 
Ventilation. 


Koum 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 


and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 






for 
Cooking. 


REMARKS. 




For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 




none 


2 


none 


- - By three cis- 


• - A stable fitted 


3 


2 






none 


2 


none. 


terns attached to 


fitted up for this 










2 


28 


32 


buildings, and by 


purpose. 










8 


28 


32 


three pumps about 












2 


28 


82 


28 feat from build- 












none 


2 


none. 


ing. 












none 


88 


42 














none 


24 


none. 














none 


38 


27 














9 


20 


20 


- - From Chelsea 


2 


nil - 


1 


- A washing room 




10 


20 


20 


Waterworks, con- 


• 






for the women is 




10 


20 


20 


veyed in pipes to 








provided in the 
barrack ; Annual 




none 




2 


the washiug-reoins. 










none 




2 


cooking-houses, 
occ. ; auo 4 pumps 
in barrack-yards, 
▼is. 1 attached to 








Estimate, 1847-8. 




none 




2 












none 




2 












none 




2 












none 




2 


officers' stable, I 












none 




2 


in cooking-house, 












none 




2 


and 2 about 8 feet 












none 




2 


from main build- 












none 




2 


ing. 












6 


20 


20 


- - From the arte- 


1 


1 


2 






6 


20 


20 


sian wells, Trafal- 












6 


1 


2 


gar-square, also 1 












6 


2 


4 


pump in the bar- 












none 


- - Two rooms 


- - Two rooms to 


rack-yard, about 












none. 


to one pay*ser- 
jeani. 


each pay-eerjeant, 
wist and family. 


9 feet from main 
building. 












7 


4* 


49 


- - From Chelsea 


none 


mm* 


1 






none 


- - Two rooms 


2 


Waterweffa. 












none. 


to one pay-ser- 
jeant. 
















9 


12 


11 


- - From the Wa- 


none 


1 




- - An ablution 




3 


4 


5 


terworks, into 9 cis- 








house is now be- 




none 


1 


2 


terns inside build- 








ing erected. 




1 


1 


1 


ings, and by three 












3 


1 


4 


pumps attached 












3 


2 


3 


to buildings. 












5 


1 


1 














4 


21 


21 


• - By 4 pumps 


none 


none - 


1 


- - An ablution 




5 


26 


23 


and 2 cisterns at- 








house is piovided 
in the Barrack; 




none 


1 


2 


tached to build- 
















ings. 








Ann. Est. 1847-8. 




6 


20 


20 


- - By 1 pomp in 


none 


- One small room 


1 


Ditto - ditto. 




none 


1 


2 


the canteen, 1 




is set apart for 








none 


1 


2 


pump (engine) 160 




this purpose. 








none 


1 


2 


feet, and I pump 












none 


1 


2 


about 40 feet from 












none 


1 


2 


building. 












2 


47 


35 


- - Eight pomps 


none 


none 


5 


- - An ablution 




2 


42 


82 


attached to build* 








house is now be- 




2 


47 


37 


ing, and 1 engine 








ing erected. 




2 


32 


27 


pump about 3 feet 
trum building. 












2 


32 


27 












2 


89 


27 














2 


9 


6 














1 


89 


26 














2 


31 


27 














2 


12 
12 

8 

29 

1 

1 


12 

12 

8 

67 

2 

2 














none 


I 


2 














none 


1 


2 














6 


29 


29 


- • One pump in 


1 


none 


* 


\ 




4 

none 


28 
14 


28 

14 


the Park to supply 
fire-engine, and 1 












none 


5 


4 


in the washing- 






\ 






none 


1 


2 


room. 






\ 


\ 




none 


1 


2 








\ M 


X 




4 
4 


24 

*! 1 


22 

10 


- - One pump, 
about 50 feet from 


none 


1 


\ Digitize* 


cy 



12 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 











Number of 
















NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Hoom. 


Number 


Number 




DISTRICT. 


of 




what Materials 


Rooms for the 
use of Privates 








of 
Windows 


of 
Fireplaces 




its 


















and Non- 








in 


ID 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built. 


Com missioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Htight 


each Room. 


each Room. 




GREVT BRITAIN— continue,!. 








ft. in. 


, jU ' 


ft* in. 








London 


Kensington Infantry 


- Unknown, 


Brick - 




33 6 


18 6 


12 6 


3 






continued. 




but a new 






33 6 


18 


9 


3 










barrack contemplated. 




33 6 


18 


9 


3 
















19 


17 


6 


1 
















15 


17 


6 


1 








Tower - 


--The con- 
struction of 


Brick - 




25 9 

78 9 


25 
25 


12 6 
12 6 


5 
11 










the present barracks not 




15 


23 6 


12 6 


9 










known ; but new barracks 




62 8 


25 6 


12 


9 










are now building, and when 




51 


25 6 


11 


6 










completed, the present will 




80 


25 6 


12 


13 










be con vetted to other pur- 




35 


25 6 


11 


6 










poses. 




44 


25 6 


11 6 


8 














17 


21 

21 

22 
22 
22 
46 6 


20 
20 
19 
19 

19 

20 4 


10 

8 

9 
10 

8 

9 6 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
5 
















38 6 
41 2 
37 3 
37 6 
37 
46 6 
45 


20 
20 
14 6 
14 
14 
14 6 
20 3 


10 6 
10 3 
9 6 
9 6 
9 6 
9 6 
9 3 


7 
10 
8 
8 
3 
4 
6 






Manchester 


Manchester Cavalry Bar- 


- - Officers' 


Brick t 


62 


26 2 


16 8 


11 8 


1 








rack. 


quarters re- 
built 1841 j 
soldiers' 
quarters re- 
built 1829. 






15 

15 

16 


16 8 
16 8 
14 7 


11 8 
11 8 

8 2 


1 

1 
1 








Manchester Infantry Bar- 


- - 1822 to 


Brick - - 


87 


84 3 


20 


10 










racks. 


1824. 






34 3 
84 8 

20 
15 6 


20 
20 
15 6 
12 4 


11 9 

11 9 

9 10 

7 9 










Preston - 


- - Com- 


- - Stone lined with 


108 


18 2 


16 1 


9 


2 










menced in 


brick. 




18 2 


16 1 


9 


2 










Aug. 1848. 




18 


18 
18 

17 10 
26 
84 
84 

18 11 

34 

35 
16 7 

84 

34 

35 
14 8 
14 2 

20 2 

85 
34 
13 11 
84 
29 
34 


16 
16 

14 1 
12 6 
30 8 
20 2 

9 
20 
20 

15 
15 
20 
20 

9 
9 

12 4 
20 6 
80 8 
9 
80 8 
20 6 
20 2 

Digitize 


12 6 
12 6 
10 

10 

11 
11 

11 

12 
12 
12 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 

11 
11 
11 8 
11 
11 
11 
11 

dby Vj 


2 
2 
2 
2 
6 
2 

6 

1 
6 
2 
2 

oogl 


e 





E DATE OF ERECTfON, MATERIALS, &C. 



»3 



the Barrack 

is 
>plied with 
W;.ter, 
(lie Distance 

from 
Buildings. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



Sy 5 taps io 
arrack rooms. 



y 6 cisterns 

t the build- 

and 1 about 

from build- 



y 7 wells, 1 
with filler, 
ining 16,000 
is, 2 tanks 
ut filters, 
ining 8,000 
is each ; a- 
e distance 
the build- 
10 feet 



y 6 wells, 
ks without 
, each con- 
g 18,500 
S, 4 tanks 
it filters, 

containing 

gallons ; 

re distance 

the build- 
10 feet 



wells and 
ks with fil- 
contaming 
DO gallons ; 
ks without 
containing 
) gallons ; 
;e distance 
the build- 
about 30 



fells and 2 
with filters, 
ling 50,500 
1; 1 tank 
t filters, 
ting 28,000 
<; averaee 
e from the 



For the IV! en. 



- - 1 ablution 
house, 43 ft. by 
21 ft., containing 
1 bath, 24 basins, 
6 footpans, and 
1 patent boiler. 



- - 8 ablution 
houses, 32 ft. by 
18 ft. in. each, 
containing 1 bath, 
4 footpans, 1 pa- 
tent boiler, and 
16 basins. 



- - 8 ablution 
houses, two of 
them 87 ft. 6 in. 
by 28ft. 1 in.; 
one of them 20 ft. 
1 in. by 17 ft. 
8 in., fitted up 
with slate benches 
and iron basins; 
29 iron basins in 
infantry, 6 in ca- 
valry wash-house. 



- - 1 ablution 
house, fitted up 
with slate benches 
and cut-iron ba- 
sins. 



For their Clothes. 



- - 1 wash-house, 
25 ft. 6 in. by 
22 ft., containing 
16 wooden troughs 
and 3 boilers 25 
gallons each. 



- - 2 wash-houses, 
each containing 
2 boilers, 1 of 
them is 83 ft. 
11 in. by 18 ft. 
610., and fitted 
with 16 wooden 
troughs; the other 
is 80 ft. by 16 ft. 
lin. 



- - 8 washing- 
houses, 2 of them 
33 ft. by 28 ft, 
each containing 
14 wooden troughs 
and 2 boilers, 25 
gallons each; 1 of 
them is 18 ft. by 
17 ft., containing 
4 wooden troughs 
and 1 25-gallon 
boiler. 



- - 1 wash-house, 
18 ft. by 17 ft, 
containing four 
wooden troughs 
and 1 25-gallon 
bouer. 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



REMARKS. 



It 



2 cooking- • - The servants' 
houses, each con- rooms in the ofli- 
Uining 10 boilers cers' quarters arc 
of 16 gals. each, included in the 
total number of 
sleeping rooms. 
The window in each of the 39 
soldieis' rooms is 8 It. 7 in. by 
5 ft. 4 in. Besides the accommo- 
dation shown in this return, there 
is a hospital for 40 patients, with 
hospital-Serjeant's room, and a room 
for 2 orderlies; also 1 garrison 
library. 



- 3 cooking- - - The servants' 
houses, each con- rooms in the effi- 
taining 12 boilers cers' quarters are 
of 16 gals. each. included in the 
total number of 
sleeping rooms. 
Besides the accommodation 
shown in this return, there is a 
hospital for 98 patients, with hos- 
pital-serjeant's room; also 1 gar- 
rison library, and I garrison school- 
room. 



2 cooking- 



- - The servants' 



- houses, each con- 1 rooms io the offi- 
taining 16 boilers cers' quarters are 
of 25 gals, each ; included in the 
1 cooking- house, total number of 
containing four sleeping- rooms, 
boi lers of 25 gals. Besides the accora- 
each. modation shown in 

this return, there 
is a hospital tor 80 patients, with 
hospital -Serjeant's room, and a 
room for 4 orderlies; also 2 read- 
ing rooms, 1 garrison school-room, 
and a room for Divine service, also 
a scijeants' mess-room. 



> 2 cooking- 
houses, each con- 
taining 3 boilers 
of 25 gals. each. 



- - This part of *%** 
barrack accouw* 10 * 
datioa has w>i i*) 
been autYumzi* \ 
but it is in\ftt>&^^ 
, to submit the t*\*^i- 
1 muned\ate\y & x *'\^ 
\ ptova\. 1 Unt*** 



by 



Google 



14 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT. 



NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 



Dtteof 

its 
Erection. 



Of 

what Materials 

Built. 



Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of I'rivates 

end Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 



Dimensions of each Room. 



Length. 



Width. 



Height. 



Number 

of 

Windows 

in 

each Room, 



Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

in 
each Kooaa 



GREAT BRITAIN— cMrtimMdL 

Manchester — Ashton-under-Lyne 
continued. 



1845 



• - Stone lined with 
brick. 



38 



83 10 

14 

34 

34 

14 

17 

10 

16 







4 


Iff 10 
15 
17 9 



ft. in. 

26 

9 

20 

20 

9 

12 

14 6 

15 
15 
15 
11 



J*, in. 

11 

11 

11 10 

11 2 

11 2 

11 

9 2 

9 3 

9 8 

9 2 

10 11 



1 
4 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 



Bury 
Chester 



1845 



- - Lower 
ward, 1809; 
upper ward, 
1825. 



• - 8 tone lined with 
brick. 

• • Stone lined with 
brick. 



The accommodation in this barrack is precisely similar in every re- 
spect to ihut of Asbton-under-Lvne, as shown above. 



27 



Burnley 



- - Sup- 
posed to 
have been 
built about 
1820. 



Stone 



36 



Stockport 



1821 



Brick - 



16 



Sheffield 



1794 



Brick and stane 



Castletown, Isle of Mas - 



1822 



Stane 



35 


22 





14 


51 2 


22 


2 


14 


61 


22 


2 


13 11 


23 9 


14 


2 


12 11 


23 6 


21 


9 


13 


14 9 


12 10 


12 11 


14 2 


6 


10 


12 10 


12 10 


11 


4 


18 • 


36 11 


18 


3 


14 6 


29 • 


28 


3 


14 6 


85 9 


18 


6 


14 O 


29 


28 


2 


13 9 


16 


8 





14 6 


15 


13 





14 


22 4 


17 


3 


8 10 


15 5 


17 


8 


8 10 


20 4 


22 


1 


9 6 


14 4 


10 


8 


9 2 


20 7 


20 


6 


9 


12 


9 





10 • 


33 8 


20 





10 6 


33 8 


20 





9 10 


83 8 


20 





9 10 


18 6 


17 


2 


10 6 


19 7 


12 


10 


10 6 


12 5 


9 


8 


7 10 


16 3 


9 


5 


7 10 


17 6 


15 





8 6 


18 


16 





8 6 


21 6 


16 





8 6 


23 6 


17 





8 6 


17 


15 





8 6 


22 6 


17 


9 


7 


20 6 


18 


O 


7 • 


18 


14 


9 


7 • 


22 6 


10 


6 


7 


16 6 


10 


9 


11 2 


16 6 


20 


2 


11 2 



3 
5 
6 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
4 
3 
6 
8 
1 
1 



Digitized by 



Google 









RELATIVE TO 


THE DATE OF ERECTION, 


MATERIALS, 


&C. 


15 




Number 
of Ventilators, 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 


Number 

of Men each 

lloora 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 


Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 


How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 


REMARKS. 




For the Men. 


For their Clothes 






2 


16 




- - 7 wells and 2 


- - 2 ablation 


- - 2 wash-houses 


- - 2 cook-houses, 


- - The servants' 




- 


- 


1 




tanks with filters, 


houses, one of 


19ft. 9 in. by 19 


12 ft. by 10 ft. 6 


rooms in the offi- 






2 


15 




each containing 


them for the ca- 


ft.; one for the 


in., one for the 


cers' quarters are 






2 


16 




12,000 gallons ; 1 
tank with filter. 


valry, 19 ft by 


cavalry, fitted up 


cavalry, contain- 


included in the to- 




none 


- 


1 




18 ft. 6 in., fitted 


with a 40-gallon 


ing 2 boilers of 


tal number of sleep- 




none 


- 


1 




containing 10,000 


with bath, 2 foot- 


boiler, and 4 wash- 


25 gallons each ; 


ing rooms. Besides 




none 


• 


2 




gallons, and 1 tank 


pans, patent boil- 


ing troughs ; the 
other for the in- 


the other for the 


the accommodation 




none 


- 


2 




with filter, con- 


er, and 4 metal 


infantry, contain- 


shown in this re- 




none 


• 


2 




taining 6,000 gal- 


basins ; the other 


fantry, fitted with 


ing 8 boilers of 


turn, there a hos- 
pital for 30 pa- 
tients, with hospi- 




none 


- 


2 




lons ; also 2 tanks 


for the infantry, 


2 30-gallon boil- 


25 gallons each. 




none 


• 


1 




on the parade, with- 


20 ft. by 19 ft., 


ers, and 8 wash- 














out pumps, for un- 


fitted with bath, 


ing troughs. 




tal-seijeant's room, 












filtered water, each 


8 (botpans, patent 






and 2 rooms for 1 












containing 15,000 


boiler, and 12 






orderly each, also 
1 reading, 2 school 












gals. ; average dis- 


metal basins. 
















tsnee from the 








rooms, and a Ser- 












buildings, about 2 
feet. 








jeants' mess-room. 




as above 


as above 


. 


as above - 


as above - 


as above - 


as above - 


as above. 




. 


. . 


20 




- There is a good 


• - No ablution 


- - 1 wash-house, 


- - 2 cooking- 


- - The servants' 




- 


- 


20 




well in the yard of 
each ward, and 


house ; but there 


21ft. 2 in. by 10 ft., 


houses, 9 boilers 


rooms in the offi- 




- 


- 


85 




are 8 cleaning 


containing 2 boil- 


in one, 8 in the 


cers' quarters are 




- 


- 


10 




the lower ward is 


rooms. 


ers of 16 gallons 


other, 25 gallons 


included in the to- 




- 


- 


IS 




provided with cast 




each. 


each. 


tal number of sleep- 




- 


- 


1 




iron cisterns, ca- 








ing-rooms. Besides 




• 


- 


1 


pable of containing 414 gallons, 
which are supplied through pipes 








the accommodation 




- 


• 


1 








shown in this re- 




- 


- 


10 


to the Chester Water Company. 
The upper ward is provided with 








turn, there is a 




- 


- 


20 








hospital for 28 pa- 




- 


• 


11 


a tank capable of containing 2,400 








tients, with hospi- 




- 


- 


20 


gallons, •applied in the same 








tal-serjeaot's room, 




- 


- 


1 


manner ; and there is also a tank 








also 1 room for 




- 


- 


2 


capable of containing 7,020 gal- 








school-room and 










lons, for rain i 


rater. 








library. 






3 


9 


. 


- - By 3 wells and 


- - No room spe- 


- - 1 wash-house, 


- - 2 cook-houses, 


- - The servants' 






3 


2 




3 tanks, contain- 


cifically set apart 


18 ft. by 14 ft„ 


one containing 4 


rooms inthe officers' 






2 


12 




ing in ail 34,000 


for this purpose- 


containing 2 boil- 


boilers, the other 5, 


quarters are includ- 






2 


1 




gallons, to receive 




ers, 16 gallons 


of 16 gals. each. 


ed in the total num- 




none 


- 


1 




the rain water from 




each. 




ber of sleeping- 




nooe 


• 


1 




the roofs. Average 
distance from the 








rooms. Besides 
the accommoda- 












building about 80 






tion shown in this return, there 












feet. 






is a hospital tor 16 patients, with 
hospital-serjeaut's room; also 1 


















reading room. 








2 


15 


- 


--By a wells and 


as above - 


- - 1 wash-house, 


- - 1 cook-house, 


- - The servants' 






2 


14 




1 tank for rain 




26 ft. by 16 ft., 


23 ft 3 in. by 17 


rooms in the officers 






2 


16 




water. Average 




fitted up with 1 


ft containing 6 


quartets are in- 




none 


- 


1 




distance from the 




15-galloo boiler 


15 -gal loo boilers. 


cluded in the total 




none 


- 


1 




buildiags,aboat 16 




and 8 waahiug 




number of sleep- 




none 


- 


2 




feet. 




troughs. 


ing-rooirs. Besides the accom- 




none 


* 


2 










modation bhown in this return, 
there is a bespit il for 32 patients, 
with hospilal-serjeant's room ; 


































there is also a room for library 


















and school-room. 






1 


2 


. 


- - By 4 wells; 


as above - 


- 1 wash<4iouse, 26 


! 
- - I cook-house, , 


- - The servants* 






1 


2 




water is supplied 
at three different 




ft. by 15 ft., fitted 


containing 10 boil- 


rooms iu the offi- 






2 


9 






up with 1 boiler, 


er* of 16 gallons' 


cers' quarters are 






2 


10 




parts of the bar- 




containing 16 gal- 


each. i 


included in the 








6 




rack by pipes, with 




loos. 




total number of 








2 




cocks from the 








sleeping rooms. 
Besides the ac- 








2 




Water Company's 






! 








2 




tank, which is 








commodation 








2 


about 200 yards from the bar- 








shown in this re- 










rack inclosune. The wells are 






turn, there is a hospital for 19 










about 18 feet J 


from the buildings. 






patients, with bospital-serjeant's 
room. 




none 


. 


4 


... 


- - There is an 


as above - 


•- 1 kitchen 16 


- - 1 cook-house, 






none 


- 


9 




excellent well .in 




ft. wy 10 fi., is 


containing 3 boil- 






nooe 


- 


21 




the barrack-yard, 




used as a wash- 


ers of 10 gallons 




, none 


- 


9 




about 18 fc from 




house. 


each. 




/ »«oae 


- 


3 




the building, the 








1 /^\/^\i^V 1 1 


( n«one 


• 


3 




water of which is 






Digitized b} 


k^OOQYk 


1 nxroe 


- 


4 




used for general 








o 


1 










Durnoneg. but th* 











l(i 



RETURN PROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 





1 1 


Number of 
















NAME Date of | Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


N umber 


Number 




D1STIUCT. 


of 




what Mateiials 


Rooms Cm the 








of 
Windows 


of 
Fireplaces 




its 


use of Privates 


















and Non- 








in 


in 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built. 


commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height 


each Room. 


each Room. 




GREAT BR1 


T A I N — continued. 








ft. in. 


ft* in. 


/t. in. 








Manchester — . 


Liverpool Perch Rock 


1829 - 


Stone - 


9 


20 


16 


10 


2 


1 




continued. 


Battery. 








fcl 
15 
20 6 


16 

15 

16 


10 
10 
7 6* 


2 
2 
2 


1 

1 
1 




ftlEDWAY - 


Chatham Barrack - 


1780 - 


- - Brickwork and 
slated roof. 


22 

14 

4 

12 

12 

4 

4 

4 

10 

10 

8 

4 

1 

2 

4 

4 

3 


28 2 
28 1 
28 
28 2 
28 2 
28 2 
28 2 
28 2 
28 1 
28 1 
28 2 
27 6 
20 1 
20 1 
20 1 
20 1 
30 


19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
16 3 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 3 


10 4 
8 5 
8 4 
8 5 
8 3 

10 8 
8 10 
8 2 

10 4 
8 4 

8 7 

7 6 

9 7 
10 4 

8 7 
8 5 

10 4 


2 
2 
2 
2 
3 














6 
2 
2 


30 
20 1 
19 3 
23 9 
23 9 
19 8 
23 9 
18 
26 6 
18 

18 
12 9 
15 2 

17 9 

19 

18 9 
14 9 


19 3 
13 6 

17 6 
19 3 
19 3 
13 6 
19 8 
19 4 
16 3 
19 4 
19 4 
10 
13 3 

9 3 

18 6 
13 9 
10 


8 7 
8 7 
8 7 

10 4 
8 7 
8 7 
8 6 

10 2 
6 6 
8 8 
8 2 

10 4 
8 7 
8 4 
8 4 
8 4 
8 4 


3 
2 
2 
8 
3 
1 
8 
2 
8 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 












Brickwork and 


8 


28 1 


19 6 


10 1 


8 












tiled roofs. 


8 
8 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


28 1 

29 
28 1 
28 1 
28 8 

30 7 
30 7 
81 1 
28 

28 
26 8 
24 8 
24 8 
24 
13 1 
19 6 

19 6 
16 9 
16 

15 6 

20 5 
19 6 

29 8 
29 8 
19 

16 2 


19 6 
16 1 
19 6 
19 6 
16 1 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
16 I 
19 6 
19 6 

16 
7 6 

14 3 
14 6 
13 2 
13 9 
10 6 
13 8 

17 9 
16 1 
16 1 
10 5 
16 1 


8 6 

6 6 
10 2 

8 7 

7 
10 4 

8 9 
8 9 

10 4 
8 7 

6 6 
10 4 

8 7 

7 6 
10 4 
10 4 

8 7 
8 7 
7 6 

7 6 

8 7 
8 8 
6 6 
6 6 
6 6 
6 6 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
3 
8 
8 
8 
3 
1 
8 
8 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
8 
3 
2 
2 








St. Mary's Casemates 


1808 - 


Brickwork - 


14 


61 6 


17 5 


10 4 


2 


1 












14 


60 


17 


9 6 


5 


1 





Digitized by 



Google 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



17 



Number 
of Ventilators, 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



Number 

of Men eacb 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

bold. 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and toe Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For tKe Men. 



For their Clothes. 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



REMARKS. 



none 
none 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 



Total - 



none 
none 



Total 



1 
18 

4 
13 



16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
13 
10 
10 
10 
10 
17 
17 
4 
9 
13 
18 
4 
18 

4 
4 
4 
2 

2 

1 
1 
1 
1 

16 

16 

2 

16 

16 

10 

16 

16 

16 

16 

16 

2 

18 

13 

13 

1 

1 

2 

2 

2 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

2 



2,833 



80 

30 



- - By 3 tanks, 
two of which ad- 
join the buildings, 
and one is distant 
about 30 feet. 



• - No room spe* 
cifically set apart 
for this purpose. 



- • No room spe- 
cifically set apart 
for this purpose. 



- 1 cook-house, 
containing 1 boiler 
of 16 gallons. 



- - Always oc- 
cupied to its full 
extent, 6 women 
to every 100 
men, agreeably 
to regulations, 
exclusive of Ser- 
jeants 1 wives ; 
and with respect 
to children, no 
limitation, de- 
pending 011 the 
number each sol- 
dier has. 



- - The barrack is 
well supplied with 
water by means of 
tanks, which are 
supplied from the 
Naval Reservoir, 
distant 350 yards 
from the barrack. 



- - 8 soldiers' 
washing-rooms. 



- 1 garrison wash* 
bouse. 



4 cookiog-homses 



840 



- - Supplied by an 
hydraulic engine 
on the spot 



1 washing-house 



This is not con- 
sidered as a per- 
manent barrack, 
and has never been 
occupied as socb ; 
a master gunner 
and 8 invalid ar- 
tillery men be- 
ing the only force 
quartered in this 
fort. 

Ventilation, ac- 
cording to a plan 
which has been 
tried at Brampton, 
is proposed for 20 
rooms in this bar- 
rack, in the Bar- 
rack Annual Esti- 
mate for 1847-8. 

The washiog- 
rooms fitted with 
benches and iron 
basins, and sup- 

Jriied with water 
rom the tanks. 
Each washing- 
room will accom- 
modate 60 men at 
once. 

The cooking- 
ltouses have 14 
boilers each. 



1 cooking-house. This barraclt 

solely set apart for 
the accommodation of the invalids, with their wives 
and children, and from May to the end of October 



18 


RETURN FROIt BACH 


BARRACK IN 


THE UNITED KINGDOM, 


► 
















Number of 
















NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 












Roosasforthe 








of 


of 




DISTRICT. 


of 


its 


wtrat materials 


use of Privates 

And Nan* 








Windows 


Fireplaces 














BARRACK. 


Erect ion. 


Built. 


Commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height 


in 
each Room. 


in 
each Room. 




GREAT BRYTMH— continued. 








ft* w. 


/* in. 


ft. mi. 








M*»WAT— - 


Brompttm Barracks 


• 1804*5, 


• • Brickwork and 


83 


29 10 


20 10 


10 10 


3 






continued. 


. 


and 1809 


slated reels. 


• ft 


29 10 


20 


10 9 


3 






- 




and 1810. 


• 


5 
10 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
2 


29 10 
29 7 

28 9 
25 11 

20 7 
14 6 

28 8 

29 10 


20 
19 8 

19 8 
17 8 

17 11 
8 11 

19 

20 10 


8 9 
8 5 

8 5 
8 5 

10 9 
8 5 

8 9 
10 10 


8 
3 

3 
2 

2 

1 

2 
8 












i 


1 

5 

1 
1 
3 


14 9 

20 7 
28 2 
26 

19 4 
14 
18 11 


9 S 

17 10 

20 10 

21 

20 8 
16 9 

18 6 


10 10 

9 1 

11 1 

11 1 

11 1 
11 1 
11 1 


1 

1 

1 
1 

1 
2 
2 








Upnor Barrack 


1780 - 


• - Brickwork and 


2 


18 


17 


8 7 


2 












tiled roof. 


2 
2 
1 
1 
1 


18 
18 
16 
16 
16 


17 V 
17 
12 6 
12 6 
14 7 


9 8 
8 

8 8 

9 8 

8 


2 
2 
2 
2 

2 








Maidstone Barracks 


1798 - 


- - Wood, weather- 
boarding, and slated 
roofs. 


10 

6 

2 


82 

82 
82 

28 
82 2 

32 2 

82 2 
32 2 


20 

20 
20 

20 
18 
18 

18 01 
18 

I 


9 10 

9 10 
9 10 

9 19 
9 « 
9 6 

8 11 
7 1 


3 

8 
3 

4 

2 
2 

2 
2 


1 






Gravesend New Tavern 


1822 


• - Bricks, flints, 




20 11 


j 
18 1 


7 9 


2 


j 






Fort 




and chalk walls, 




28 7 


17 6 1 


8 9 


2 








These buildings were first erected 


with tiled roofs. 




24 8 


16 9 1 


6 11 


2 








about the year 1322 by Ayroer <le 






21 4 


18 9| 


7 6 


2 








Valence, Earl of Pembroke, for a cha- 








1 a r ' 












pel and chantry, and founded then, 
but suppressed at the Reformation; 






25 II 


14 5 


8 9 


2 












31 5 


17 6 ' 


15 2 


8 








they then passed through various 
hands, and in 1780 were purchased 






26 6 


19 2 


9 2 


2 












21 3 


18 10 j 


7 10 


3 








bv the Ordnance under the Ordnance 
Vesting Order of 20 Geo. 8. c. 88, 
and then converted into barracks. 






26 7 


15 7 1 


9 


8 












24 8 


17 1 j 


9 6 


2 












19 3 


17 1 


7 1 


1 
















18 


15 8* 


8 6 


3 
















11 11 


9 1, 


8 ft 


2 






' 


Tilbury Fort - 


1683 - 


• • Brick walls and 


1 


S3 


I 

14 o! 


8 * 


2 


2 
2 
1 
1 
1 










tiled roof. 


8 


33 


14 0) 


8 * 


2 






These buildings were erected about 




10 


88 


14 0i 


9 A 


1 






the year 1683, When the Fort was en- 




1 


15 


14 


8 % 


1 






larged, and adtied to in 1772 and 




1 


16 


12 6 


8 6 


] 






1809. 










! 










Sheerness Barracks - 


Unknown 


- - Brickwork aod 


8 


19 


16 4 


9 


2 
2 












slated roofs. 


16 


18 6, 


16 


9 














2 


18 


16 


9 


8 














12 


18 


19 


T 0- 


2 














1 


16 


14 


7 <0 


2 














1 


16 


14 


9 


2 














2 


16 


14 0, 


8 


2 














1 


18 


7 


9 


1 


none 




1 


' 










Digitiz 


ed by V 


iOO£ 


le 











RELATIVE TO 


THE DATR OF ERECTION, 


MATERIALS, 


&C. 


*9 




Number 

of Ventilators, 

and 

other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 


Number 

of Men each 

Boom 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 


Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Cbfldren 

usually 

occupying it. 


How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 
the Buildings. 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 






For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 


REMARKS. 




- - Two rooms 
in the base- 
ments of houses 
D and K have 
been recently 
ventilated aa 
an experiment, 
on the plan 
proposed to the 
bon. Board by 
Col; Thomson, 
Royal Engi- 
neers. 

Total - • 

none 
none - 
none - 
none 
none - 
none - 

Total - - 

- • Two small 
ventilators in 
each room. 

1 ditto - 
1 ditto - 

none - 
none 
none - 

none - 
none 

Total - - 

none • 
none - 
none 
none - 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 

Total • - 

none - 

none 

none 

none 

none 

Total - - 

• - The rooms 
of the first and 
second floors 


18 
18 

12 

12 

18 
18 

10 

8 

6 

1 
1 

1 
16 
16 

9 
2 

2 


• - Always occu- 
pied to its full 
extent ; six women 
to every 100 men, 
agreeably to re- 
gulations, exclu- 
sive of Serjeants' 
wives ; and with 
respect to children 
no limitation, de- 
pending on the 
number each sol- 
dier has. 

ditto 
ditto 

5 
11 
10 
10 

13 
10 
4 
18 
12 

12 
11 

1 

3 

I 80 

1 " ' " 


--The barrack is 
well supplied with 
water by pipes 
from the Naval 
Reservoir, distant 
470 yards from 
the barrack. 

• • Sajpplied from 
a well in Upnor- 
street; distance, 
96 yards from the 
barrack. 

- • Supplied from 
wells 33 yards 
from the barrack. 

- • Supplied from 
a spring in the 
chalk, 15 1 feet 
from the surface, 
by means of a 
pump, and is 55 
feet from the build- 
ings. 

- - Supplied with 
water collected 
from the roofs of 
cisterns (brick lin 
together 28,200 ci 
tances from the o 








-• These are to 
washing houses tor 
men in this bar- 
rack, but the An- 
nual Estimate for 
1847-48 provides 
for fitting up nine 
rooms in the bar- 
rack for this pur- 
pose. 




2 washing sheds 
• - - - lwas 

- - - - 1 was 

the buildings in t 
ed with Roman ce 
i lions when full ; th 
arracks be\no 40. 9 


2 washing houses . 
l-house 

i-house 

hree underground 
ment), containing 
eir respective dis- 
8. and 100 vard*. 


r • ixioe oooming 
houses; eight cook* 
log houses with 
16 boilers each, 
and one with 12 
boilers. 

I cooking house 

1 cooking house 

2 cooking houses 

1 cooking house 

- Cooking kitchen 
24 feet by 13 feet 




1,402 






8 

7 
7 
T 
7 
8 


• • The cooking 
house has 'four 
boilers. 




66 






18 

18 
20 

16 
1 
8 

3 
8 


• - The cooking 
house has 10 boil- 
ers. 




394 






1 
11 
11 
10 

13 
17 
II 
13 
18 

12 

11 

1 

1 


-The wash-house 
has one boiler, and 
the cooking houses 
two in each. 




116 






2 
10 
14 

6 
6 


-The wash-house 
has one boiler, and 
the cooking house 
four boilers and 
one large one. 




180 


Also a well of brackish water, used for washing, 28 yards 
from the barracks. 






! 


- - Snpplied from 
the Ordnance well 
by pipes to a tank 


- 1 - - Washing room 
1 for clothes 24 feet 
I by 13 feet, and a 





Digitized by 



Google 



20 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 











Number of 




















NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 








its 


what Materials 


Rooms for the 
use of Privates 












of 
Windows 


of 
Fireplaces 




DISTRICT. 


of 






















and Non- 












in 


in 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built. 


commissioned 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room. 


each Room. 












Officers. 


















GREAT BRITAIN— continued. 








ft. w. 


ft- 


in. 


ft- 


in. 








Midland and 


Birmingham, Cavalry Bar- 


1798 - 


- • Brick walls, 


20 


88 S 


16 


8 


10 





- 26 rooms, 


1 




South Wales. 


rack. 




timber roofs, and 
covered with slates. 


7 


14 10 


16 


8 


10 





with one 
large win- 
dow te 
each ; one 
room, with 
2 windows. 








Coventry, Cavalry Barrack 


1792 - 


4 

- - Brick walls, 
timber roofs, and 


1 
4 


16 10 
19 


15 
15 






11 
11 


4 

4 


-5 rooms, 
with two 


1 






Built for an ion, date unknown, 


covered with slates. 


1 


19 3 


1& 


2 


11 


4 


windows 








and purchased^ and occupied, and 




1 


20 7 


18 


2 


11 





to each; 








covered for a barrack with slates, 




1 


25 9 


19 


1 


11 


2 


17 rooms, 








about 1792. 




11 


26 


20 


8 


10 


2 


with one 














2 


25 6 


24 


8 


9 


10 


window to 














1 


37 2 


20 


2 


10 


6 


each. 








Weedon, Artillery* Cavalry, 


























and Infantry : 


























Lower Barrack • 


1805 - 


- - Brick walls, 


6 


18 


10 


6 


11 





- 12 rooms, 


1 










timber roofs, and 


16 


24 


20 


7 


11 





with one 












covered with slates. 


2 


27 


21 





11 





window in 














7 


30 


20 


7 


11 





each; 16 














4 


35 


21 





11 


• 


rooms, with 














2 


43 


21 





11 





2 windows 
in each; 
9 rooms, 
with three 
windows in 
each. 








Upper Barrack 


- - Built 


- - Brick walls, 


4 


15 10 


16 


6 


10 


a 


-2 rooms, 


-6 rooms, 






in 1805, 


timber roofs, and 


2 


15 10 


16 


6 


7 





with one 


with one 








and con- 


covered with slates. 


8 


69 9 


35 


9 


15 


6 


window in 


fireplace in 








verted in- 
















each ; 4 


each; 8 








to bar- 
















rooms, with 


rooms, with 








racks 18*7. 






- 










2 windows 
in each ; 
8 rooms, 
with 12 
windows in 
each. 


two fire- 
places in 
each. 






Northampton, Cavalry and 


1797 - 


- - Stone walls, 


4 


16 8 


15 





8 


9 


-18 rooms, 








Infantry Barracks. 




timber roots, and 


12 


28 


16 


3 


8 


9 


with one 










covered with slates. 


2 


19 5 


16 


S 


8 


9 


window in 












■ 


2 


152 


14 


9 


12 





each ; two 
rooms, with 
5 windows 
in each. 


2 heated 
with stoves, 






Nottingham, Cavalry Bar- 


1791 -r 


• - Brick walls, 


4 


16 8 


12 11 


8 


a 


- 26rooms, 


I 






rack. 




timber roofs, and 


4 


16 8 


15 


4 


10 


4 


with one 












covered with slates. 


10 


26 2 


16 


8 


8 


a 


window in 














8 


26 20 


16 


8 


10 


8 


each. 








Brecon, Cavalry and In- 
fantry Barrack. 


— The old 


- - The walls of the 


2 


18 16 


12 





8 


4 


-9 rooms 


1 






part con- 


old part are brick 


9 


14 


8 


8 


10 


6 


with one 










structed in 


throughout ; the 


1 


80 


9 





10 





window in 










1806 for 


main part stone, 


1 


21 


17 


6 


10 





each ; five 










an armou- 


lined with brick ; 


4 


34 


30 


9 


10 


6 


rooms, with 










ry, and 


roofs timber, and 


1 


26 3 


22 


9 


10 





2 windows 










converted 


covered with slates. 


1 


30 


22 


6 


10 





in each ; 










into a bar- 




1 


37 6 


26 


6 


10 


a 


16 rooms, 








. 


rack in 




4 


S3 6 


19 





11 





with four 










1826 j the 




8 


36 


19 





10 





windows in 










new part 




2 


30 


22 


6 


16 


9 


each. 










built in 




1 


30 


27 


3 


16 


9 












1848 and 


























1845. 




r 




















Newport, Cavalry and In- 


• Between 


• Stone walls* lined 


6 


12 5 


8 


5 


10 10 


- 7 rooms, 


1 






fantrv Damirk 


1843 and 


with brick : roofs 


t 


14 7 


8 


5 


10 


10 


with one 







Digitized by 



Google 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



21 



Number 
of Ventilators,, 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



- - 1 ventilator 
over the door 
in each room. 



- - IS rooms, 
with 3 ventila- 
tors to each ; 
4 rooms, with 
2 ventilators to 
each ; 6 rooms, 
with 1 ventila- 
tor to each ; 
1 room, with no 
ventilator. 



* - The rooms 
have no other 
means of ven- 
tilation. 



- - The rooms 
have no other 
means of ven- 
tilation. 



• - 12 rooms, 
with 2 ventila- 
tors to each ; 
6 rooms, with 

1 ventilator to 
each ; 2 rooms, 
with 5 ventila- 
tors to each. 

- - 17 rooms, 
with 8 ventila- 
tors in each ; 
9 rooms, with 

2 ventilators in 
each. 

- - The rooms 
have no other 
means of ven- 
tilation. 



Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

bold. 



- - 20 rooms, 
men in each; 

1 room with 1 
oon - commis- 
sioned officer; 
6 rooms, with 

2 non-commis- 
sioned officers 
in each. 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it 



-- 196 men, 11 
women, 16 chil- 
dren. 



- - 170 men, 10 
women, 16 chil- 
dren. 



- 1 room, with 
1 serjeant; 4 
rooms, with 2 
Serjeants in I 
each ; 1 room, with 6 privates ; 
1 room, with 8 privates; 1 
room, with 10 privates; 11 
rooms, with 12 privates in 
each ; 2 rooms, with 13 pri- 
vates in each; 1 room, with 
16 privates. 



- - 240 men, 20 
women, 60 chil- 
dren. 



-6 rooms, with 
1 Serjeant in 
each; 10 rooms, 
with 12 privates 
in each ; 2 ditto, with 14 pri- 
vates in each; 7 rooms, with 
16 privates in each ; 4 rooms, 
with 18 privates in each; 2 
rooms, with 20 privates in each. 



- 6 rooms, with 
2 Serjeants in 
each; 8 rooms 
with - privates 
in each. 



104 men, 12 



women, 
dren. 



12 chil- 



- 4 rooms, with 
2 Serjeants in 
each; 12 rooms, 
with 9 privates 
in each ; 2 rooms, with 6 pri- 
vates in each ; 2 attics, with 46 
privates in each. 



- - 410 men, SO 
women, 60 chil- 
dren. 



- 8 rooms, with 
2 seijeants in 
each; 18 rooms, 
with 9 privates 
in each. 



- - 161 men, 12 
women, 21 chil- 
dren. 



• - 220 men, 9 
womeo, 16 chil- 
dren. 



- - 11 rooms, 
with 1 serjeant 
in each ;jl room 
with 7 privates; 
1 room, with 8 privates; 8 
rooms, whh 13 privates in 
each ; 2 rooms, with 14 pri- 
vates in each ; 1 room, with 16 
privates; 13 rooms, with 16 
privates in each ; 2 rooms, with 
18 privates in each; 1 room, 
with 19 privates. 



- 7 rooms, with 
1 serjeant in 
each; 17 rooms, 
with 15 pri- 
vates in each ; 
13 rooms, with 
16 privates in 
each ; 2 rooms, 
with 17 pri- 
vates in each. 



- - 438 men, 46 
women, 66 chil- 
dren. 



How the Barrack 

is 

Supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



- - With spring- 
water, from six 
pumps in the bar- 
rack yard, close 
to the buildings. 



- - With spring 
water, from three 
pumps in the bar- 
rack yard, close 
to the buildings. 



• * With spring 
water, from five 
pumps in the bar- 
rack yard, close 
to the buildings. 



• - With spring 
water, from two 
pumps in the bar- 
rack yard, close 
to the buildings. 



• - With spring 
water, from four 
pumps in the bar- 
rack yard, close 
to the buildings. 



- - Supplied with 
water, conveyed 
into the barracks 
in pipes from the 
town. 



- • With spring 
water, from seven 
pumps in the bar- 
rack yard, close 
to the buildings ; 
also with 2 tanks 
of rain water. 



- - With spring 
water, from four 
pumps ; also with 
four tanks of rain 
wates, close to 
the buildings. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



-"- No accommo- 
dation for men 
washing, except 
in the barrack 
rooms. 



- - No accommo- 
dation for men 
washing, except 
in the. barrack 



- - No accommo- 
dation for the men 
washing, except 
in the barrack 



- - No accommo- 
dation for the men 
washing, except 
in the barrack 



- - No accommo- 
dation for the men 
washing, except 
in the barrack 



- - No accommo- 
dation for the men 
washing, except 
in the barrack 
room. 



2 washing-houses 



2 washing Monies 



For their Clothes. 



- - 2 washing- 
houses for men s 
clothes. 



- - 1 washing- 
house for mens 
clothes. 



- - 2 washing- 
houses for men's 
clothes. 



- - 1 washing- 
house for men's 



• - 1 washing- 
bouse for men's 
clothes. 



- - 1 washing- 
house for men s 
clothes. 



2 washing-houses 



8 washing^fcouses 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



1 cooking*bottse. 



1 cooking-house. 



2 cooking-houses. 



2 cooking-bouses. 



2 cooking-bouses. 



2 cooking-houses. 



2 cooking-houses. 



REMARKS. 



3 cooking-houses. 



i fin. 



Digitized by d OOQ IC 

ST-***" 4 **) 



22 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT. 



NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 



GREAT BRITAIN— ctmfmu*/. 

Midland and Pembroke Infantry Barrack 
South Wales 
•-•contttiMtd, 



NOBTBBBM 



Newcastle-upon-Tyne 



Tynemouth Castle 



Sandciland 



Carlisle Castle 



Date of 

its 
Erection, 



- Between 
1841 tod 
1846. 



- In 1804. 
1805, and 
1806. 



Unknown 



1798 



Unknown 



Of 

what Materials 
Built. 



Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 



-•Walls stone, and 
lined with brick : 
roots timber, and 
covered with slates. 



- - Built with brick, 
and covered with 
slates. 



- - Stone, covered 
with slates. 



- - Brick, and co- 
vered with pantiles. 



• • Stone, and co- 
vered with lead. 

Brick, and covered 
with slates. 
Ditto - 
Ditto - 
Ditto - 
Ditto - 
Ditto - 
Ditto - 
Ditto • 
Ditto - 
Ditto - • 
Ditto • 
Ditto - 
Ditto - 

Stone, and covered 
with lead. 
Ditto - . - 



Stone, and covered 
with Bags. 
Ditto - 
Ditto - 




15 



I 
I 

15 
15 



2 
4 
1 
6 
1 

a 
s 

4 
5 
6 

T 
8 

1 



Dissensions of each Room. 



Length. 



ft. in. 

16 

16 

32 

82 

37 

37 



43 

13 6 

27 



59 6 
18 10 



27 7 



26 

89 4 

44 2 

48 6 

44 7 

88 



31 

41 7 
41 



38 

83 

38 2 

16 5 

15 9 

14 8 

82 8 J 

88 6 

16 3 
38 6 
30 10 
30 8 
80 8 
80 8 
80 10 

84 8 
35 2 
80 10 
21 2 

21 3 

42 9 

42 9 

14 1 



Width. 



ft. in 

11 4 

14 

20 

20 

20 

20 



27 

12 6 
21 6 



14 
12 



IS 



10 10 
22 8 
22 8 
22 2 
22 2 

28 6 



28 

27 2 

28 



26 11 

28 2 

22 9 

11 8 

15 5 

15 

19 8 

20 
14 11 



20 
14 
14 



14 8 

14 7 

15 5 
14 10 

14 10 

15 *< 
20 2 

18 2 



14 

Wigfti: 

7 ^0 



Height. 



10 

10 



11 6 

10 

11 6 
10 



8 

8 
U 6 



19 
10 



8 6 



11 6 
9 6 



11 6 



10 



10 9 

10 9 
10 



10 9 

10 

9 

9 

8 2 

10 4 

10 2 

10 4 

9 11 
9 11 

16 3 

16 5 

16 6 | 

16 6 



10 
10 
10 
10 
9 



11 



16 • 



16 

10 3 



Number 

of 

Windows 

in 

each Room, 



- 6 rooms, 
with 1 win< 
dowineacbj 
12 rooms, 
with 3 win- 
dows in 
each. 



-8 of these 
rooms have 
3 windows 
each, and 
the other 7 
2 each. 

2 

2 



Gcxwle 

8 1 O 1 



Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

in 
each Room. 









RELATIVE TO 


THE DATE OP ERECTION, 


MATERIALS, &C, 


2$ 




Number 
of Ventilators, 

and 
otber Means 

of 
Ventilation. 


Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 


Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 


H.w the Barrack 

is 

supoHed with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Beddings. 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 


REMARKS. 




For the Men. 


For their Clothes.; 




- - The rooms 


- 6 rooms, with 


- - 220 men, 6 


-- With spring 


- - No acoommo- • 


1 ajsoming-sMMse 


4 cooking hamm. 






are ventilated 


2 Serjeants in 


womoo, 18 chil- 


water in 6 tanks 


dation for men 










by loopholes. 


/each; 6 rooms, 
with 18 pri- 
vates in each; 
2 rooms, with 
20 privates in- 
each ; 4 roams, 
with 19 privates 
in each. 


dren. 


close to the build- 
ings, holding 87,000 
gallons, supplied 
by a force pump. 


washing, except 
in the barrack 
rooms. 










- • A sine ven- 


22 


- - 53© men, 80 


• - These barrack* 


- • Washing-room 


• - 1 wash-house ' 


- - 1 cooking- 




I 


tilator in the 




women, and 48 


occupy 11 acres 


No. 1, to accom- 


for the women, 


house, containing 




t 


back and front 




children, being 


of ground, aod 


modate 208 men. 


containing 8 boil- 


18 boilers. 




J 


waU. 




the average of the 


within the boun- 




ers. 






\ 


- - Only by the 


2 


last 9 years. 


dary wall there 


- - Washing-room 


ditto 


- - 1 cooking- 






windows. 






are 6 wells, 4 of 


No. 2, to accom- 




house, containing 






• - Only by the 


14 




which are unfit 


modate 208 men. 




16 boilers. 






windows, there 






for culinary pur- 












being a thorough 






poses. There ace 












draught from 






also 8 rain-water 












back to front. 






tanks; vis. 1 to 
contain 82,000 












ditto 


20 


. 


galloaa,one 18/000 


- • Washing-room 


none 


-- The men in 






ditto 


2 




gallons, and one 
10,000 gallons. 


No. 3, to accom- 
modate 60 men. 




these rooms cook 
in the cooking- 
houses. 






- - Only by the 


1 


• - 150 men, 9 


- - 2 wells within 


- - 2 washing- 


- • 1 wash-house 


• - 1 cooking- 






door aid 'win- 




women, and 17 


50 yards of the 


rooms now con- 


for the women, 


house, containing 






dows. 




children, being 


barracks, and 2 


structing and wUl 
be completed neat 


containing 4 boil- 


12 boilers. 






ditto 


1 


the average of the 


rain-water tanks ; 


ers. 








ditto 


22 


last 3 years. 


viz. 1 containing 


month, for the ac- 










dittD 


22 




17,000 gallons, 


commodation of 










ditto 


24 




and the other 


226 men. 










• - Ventilation 


24 




12,000 gallons. 












in ceiling. 


















- - Only by the 


22 
















door and win- 


















dows. 


















- - Ventilation 


22 
















in ceiling. 


















ditto 


27 
















- - Only by the 


23 
















door and win- 


















dows. 


















• - Ventilation 


22 
















in ceiling. 


















- - Only by the 


22 
















door and win- 


















dows. 


















! 

.-Only by the; 


20 


- - 280 men. 16 
women, and 20 


• - A_g<x>d tV pp|y 


• • 4 washing- 
rooms for the sol- 


- - 2 wash-houses 


- - 2 cooking- 






windows, there: 


i 


of water from -the 


for the women. 


houses,conta;ning 






being a thorough! 




children, being 


Sunderland Wa- 


diers, to accom- 




86 boilers. 






draft from back i 




the average of the 


ter Company, for 


modate 815 men. 










to front. i 


■ 


last 3 yearn. 


which the Board 












- By doors and : 


1 




pay 20/. per an- 












windows. ( 


i 




num. 












-- Only by the' 
door and win- , 


6 


- - 216 men, 27 


- - 2 wells within 


- - 2 washing- 
rooms for the sol- 


- - 1 wath-liouse 


- • 2 cooking- 








women, and 47 


50 yards of the 


for the women, 


houses; viz. one 






dows. 




children, being 


barracks; 2 rain- 


diers, to accom- 


containing 2 boil- 


containing 10 and 






ditto 


* 


(he average of the 
last 3 years. 


water tanks, viz. 
one containing 


modate 222 men. 


ers. 


the other 6 boilers. 






ditto 


18 




12,000 gallons, 












ditto 


IB 




and the other 


< 










ditto 


2 




10,000 gallons. 












ditto 


18 
















ditto - , - 


13 
















ditto 


IS 
















ditto 


n 








1 






ditto 


13 








II 




ditto 


12 








I 




ditto 


14 






1 1 11 




ditto 


15 












ditto 


14 








1 i 




-'fafttilatorin 


9 I 








A 


J 


ceilings 

•-Only by the/ 


9 1 








IDi 4C 


dm ^d win- 7 
window.. / 


J 








* 







144 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 











Number of 














NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number of 


DISTRICT. 


of 




what Materials 


Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non- 








of 

Windows 

in 


of 
Fireplaces 

1Q 


its 










BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built. 


commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room. 


each Room. 


GREAT BR] 


TAIN — continual. 








ft. m. 


ft* in. 


ft. in. 






No*TH BBJTAIN 


Edinburgh Castle, Old 


1566 - 


Stone and lime 




26 


22 


12 6 


1 






Barracks. 








81 

26 6 
24 6 
84 
89 

27 6 

20 

28 6 

21 
14 6 
18 6 


22 6 
24 
15 6 

18 

19 
21 8 
14 6 
19 
18 

9 6 
11 


18 
9 6 

14 6 
8 9 
8 9 
8 6 
8 9 
8 4 
8 2 
8 9 
8 6 


2 
2 

1 
6 
6 
6 
2 
4 
2 
1 
2 






North Barracks 


- - Some 


ditto - 




16 


15 6 


10 


1 








time du- 






16 


15 6 


9 6 


1 








ring the 
17th cen- 






16 


16 6 


9 9- 


1 


























tury. 


















Edinburgh Castle, New 


1799 - 


ditto - 


1 


28 6 


16 


7 6 








Barracks. 






1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
4 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
5 
1 
9 
12 
10 
1 
1 
1 
1 


25 6 
18 6 

26 
26 
29 
18 
20 
17 

20 
17 

21 
t9 
21 

20 

21 
21 
21 
21 
28 
24 
21 6 
21 6 


18 
16 6 
16 6 

16 6 

17 

17 

18 
17 
17 
17 

17 

18 
17 6 
17 9 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 

19 
21 
12 
12 


9 

9 



9 

9 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

12 

10 o 

10 

10 o 

9 9 

10 

11 
11 

11 

12 
12 








Piershill Barracks - 


1794 - 


Stone and lime 


40 

12 

2 

8 


27 
16 6 
16 6 
15 


10 6 
14 6 
14 6 
10 9 


8 9 
8 9 
8 9 
8 








Leith Fort 


1782 - 


Stone and lime 


2 


48 6 


15 


9 


3 












2 


44 6 


17 


9 9 


4 












1 


25 6 


15 


9 9 


2 












8 


26 


15 


9 9 


2 












8 


14 


17 


9 9 


1 












1 


31 


15 


9 9 


8 












1 


24 


15 


9 9 


2 












2 


38 


17 


9 9 


8 












1 


28 


15 


9 9 


2 












1 


32 


15 


9 9 


3 












1 


38 


15 


9 9 


4 












1 


26 6 


17 


9 9 


3 












1 


37 


15 


9 9 


4 






Blackness Castle - 


Unknown 


Stone and lime 


1 


27 6 


20 10 


10 2 


2 












1 


88 


26 10 


11 2 


4 












1 


80 8 


17 


10 9 


4 












1 


25 


19 8 


10 9 


4 












1 


24 9 


19 5 


10 8 


4 












1 


22 2 


17 7 


11 2 


I skylight 






Greenlaw Barracks 


1815 - 


- - Wood and plas- 


4 


25 


25 8 


10 


7 










ter, and roof slated. 


4 


25 


25 8 


11 


7 












4 


22 


20 4 


11 


8 





Digitized by 



Google 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



25 



Number 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



Number 

of Men eich 

Boom 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



For their Clothes. 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



REMARKS. 



.-Small open- 
ing windows 
over room-doors, 



--Small open- 
ing windows 
over room-doors 



none 



• 6 ventilations 
1 foot square, 
4 ditto in the 
ceiling. 



12 

18 

13 

10 

16 

18 

12 

6 

12 

8 

1 

2 



6 
6 
6 



12 
12 

7 
10 
12 
12 
7 
9 
9 
12 
8 
8 
7 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
9 
9 
2 
1 



8 
2 

1 
2 



19 
20 
10 
11 

5 
12 

9 
14 
12 
If 
15 
13 
If 



9 

14 
9 
9 
8 

7 



16 
16 
12 
12 



10 



100 to 130 



200 to 220 



400 to 500 



200 to 320 



150 



Coast-guard 



14 
14 

10 
10 



- • Supplied from 
the Edinburgh 
Water Company 
Works to a re- 
servoir, 350 yards 
from the build- 
ings. 



ditto 



- - Supplied from 
the Edinburgh 
Water Company's 
Works to a re- 
servoir, 250 yards 
from the build- 
ings. 



• By pump-wells, 
20 to 50 yards 
from the building, 
and by pipes from 
a spring, distant 
about half a mile. 



- - By a pump- 
well, 50 yards 
from the building. 



• •By 1 pump- 
well. 



• - By iron pipes 
from a reservoir, 
distant 40 feet 
from the building. 



.-By iron pipes, 
from a spring a 



2 kitchens. 



1 ditto. 



4 ditto 



2 washing-places 



none 



4 dittov 



1 ditto. 



none. 



none 



none 



- \ 2 bouse* 



Digitized by^ 



- - Tbe depot hos. 

¥ital, now the Mi- 
liary prison, was 
returned as accom- 
modation for 76 
in.^ 



26 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT. 


NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 


Date of 

its 
Erection. 


Of 

what Materials 
Buit. 


Nnmber of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 

of 

Windows 

in 

each Room. 


Number 

of 

Fireplaces 

nt 

each Room. 




and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 




GREAT BRITAIN— continued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft- in. 








North Britain— 
continued. 


Holy ItUnd Castle - 


Unknown 


Stone and lime 


1 
1 
1 

1 


28 
19 8} 
12 7 J 

11 3 


19 5 
15 2 } 
11 

6 


9 1* 
10 4 

8 6 

9 5} 


2 


1 

1 
-- Vent? 

stopped* 

1 






Dundee Infantry Barracks 


1796 - 


Freestone - 


No.l 

Turret 
No. 2 
Turret 
No. 8 
Turret 
No. 4 
Turret 
No. 5 
Turret 
No. 6 
Turret 
No. 7 
Turret 
No. 8 
Turret 
No. 9 

fNo. 10 • 
l {No.ll - 

LNo.12 • 


87 2 
9 4 

45 4 
9 

52 8 
9 7 

46 11 
12 6 
45 5 

11 5 
55 2 

9 10 

45 11 

12 
55 

9 10 

47 2 

46 7 
44 9 
46 3 


26 6 

9 11 J 

22 8 

11 10 

28 1 

8 11 

21 11 

10 11 1 

22 7 

11 5 
25 10 

8 10 

24 2 

12 

25 9 

9 6 
22 1 
22 
22 10 
22 1 


9 8 

7 8 

8 

6 8 
8 3 

7 3 

8 1 

6 8 

7 9 

9 9 
7 6 
7 

6 10 

7 8 

7 8 

8 8 
8 
8 I 

7 8} 
7 


11 

12 

11 

6 
6 


2 
1 
2 

none 
2 
1 
2 

none 
% 
1 
2 
1 
2 

none 
2 
1 
2 
2 
2 
2 






Perth Cavalry and Infantry 
Barracks. 


1795 n 


Soft freestone 


20 
6 


26 4 

40 


16 8 

28 


8 9 

9 6 


1 
2 


1 
1 






Glasgow Cavalry Barracks 


1821 • 


Stone and lime 


29 
6 
4 


27 
24 6 
24 6 


24 6 
16 6 
10 6 


10 
10 
10 


2 

1 
1 


1 
1 
1 






Glasgow Infantry Barracks 


1795 • 


Stone and lime 


68 

3 


26 
26 • 


20 
20 


9 4 
9 4 


1 
1 


1 
1 






Hamilton Cavalry Barracks 


-- About 
1794-95. 


Stone and lime 


19 
5 


26 7 
18 2 
18 2 

34 3 
34 3 

20 


16 8 
16 8 
16 8 


8 9 
8 9 
8 9 


1 
1 
1 


1 

I 
1 




' 


Paisley Infantry Barracks 


About 1830 


Stone and lime 


16 
1 

1 


20 3 

20 3 

21 


10 5 
10 5 
10 5 


2 
1 
1 


1 

1 
1 






Dunbarton Castle Infantry 
Barracks, 


1794 - 


Stone and lime 


6 


26 3 


17 2 

Digitized 


9 10 

DyG( 


• 4 in 2 of 
the rooms, 
and 2 in 
4 of tbe 
rooms. 

)Ogk 


t 





RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



37 



Number 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



--Only 2 win- 
dows in passage. 



• 24 rooms have 
4 ventilators in 
each ; 48 rooms 
have 8. 



- - 2 ventilators 
and 1 opening 
sash. 



Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 



1ft 
$ 

4 



22 
1 

2T 
1 

tft 

1 

30 

1 
2f 

1 
U 

1 
2T 

1 
IT 

1 
12 

8 
27 

2 

16 
24 



12 

2 
1 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



Coast-guard 



• The same num- 
ber when the bar- 
rack is fully occu- 
pied. Average 
occupation, 126* 



]2 
2 



1ft 
14 

1 



10 



• - The same num 
ber when the bar- 
rack is fully occu- 
pied. Average 
occupation, 6ft. 



How taeBanack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



12 or IS 
12 

1 



42 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



Citterns — 
No. 1, 7.0XI.0JXS.01; 
No. 2, 7. X 3. OJ X S. 0*j 
No. S, ft. X 2. 7 1 X 2. ft. 



- - A spriog* well, 
with pump about 
ftO yards from the 
soldiers' barracks, 
and a cistern with 
pump at the sol- 
diers' cook-hoese, 
iu rear of the 
barracks. 



- - 1 well at en- 
trance-gate, sup- 
plied from the 
city of Perth re- 
servoir. 

•-8 delivery pipes 
with brass cocks, 
constructed in the 
wall of the base- 
ment of soldiers 7 
barracks, on a le- 
vel with Barrack- 
square. Water 
supplied by water 
company. 

- 2 delivery pipes, 
with brass cocks, 
constructed in the 
boundary wall, in 
rear of soldiers' 
barracks and 10 
feet from them. 

- - Supplied by 2 
pump-wells imme- 
diately in front of 
the centre of east 
wing, and in rear 
of the centre of 
west wing. There 
is in the barrack 
an ample supply 
of good water. 

- - Supplied by a 
well and pump 90 
yards from sol- 
diers' barracks, 
and by a pipe and 
brass cocks at 16 
yards from ditto, 
the water of the 
last being sup- 
plied by water 
company. 

- - Byawell,with 
a pump 72 feet 
from the barracks. 



For their Clothes. 



1, with bailers 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



- - 1, with boilers 
for cooking. 



L l small washhouse 



none 



1, with 2 boilers 



REMARKS. 



1 These 
are divided by par- 
titions in the mid- 
dle. 



• 4 kitchens, over 
which are S clean- 
ing rooms. 



1, with 6 boilers. 



- 2, with 2 boilers 
in each. 



1, with 2 boilers 



-J, with 2 boilers 
and a kitchen 
grate. 



- ft with 5 boilers 
in each, and 1 
with S boilers. 



- 4, with 2 boilers 
in each. 



1 with 10 boilers 



- - In the officers' 
barracks there are 
4 servants' rooms 
for 2 each, and 2 
kitchens for 1 each, 
which makes the 
total accommode- 
tion of the barrack 
17ft men. 



- - 1 bath for the 
librarian and a 
room in the hospi- 
tal for the serjeant 
makes the total ac- 
commodation 258 
men. 



none 



K «i: A J V»«r 9 nnn#» 



-T\ieteaTe2gaT» 
i teto, on\y 6 \ feet 
\ Va height, with 

J^Vtb«w *tifc«m%to*4*o»v , V Mi u,were 

*°^A «u\j \* useA on tn»T%e\K^. 



. I . l.withl boiler 






fot\ 



Inert \& accom- 
modation, la, the 



28 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 











N nraber of 














NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 




DISTRICT 


of 




what Materials 


Rooms for the 






of 
Windows 


of 
Fireplaces 




its 


use of Privates 


















and Non- 








in 


in 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built 


commissioned 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room. 


each Room. 












Officers. 














GREAT BR1' 


r A I N — continued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 








North Biutiin— 


Stirling Castle Infantry 


- - About 


Stone and lime 




12 10 


14 7 


8 2 


1 






£ontinued. 


Barracks. 


1460, and 
converted 
into a bar- 
racks in 
1801-2. 






18 2 
14 9 
36 6 
36 6 
36 6 
36 6 
36 6 
36 6 
86 3 
53 
46 
36 


10 2 
10 
30 6 
22 

21 6 

22 6 

21 6 

22 
22 
25 
25 
25 


8 6 
8 9 
11 9 
11 6 
11 6 
11 6 
13 11 
18 11 
11 7 
11 6 
11 6 
13 10 


1 
1 
2 
2 
6 
2 
4 
2 
2 
5 
9 
2 








Stirling Castle Royal Pa- 






1 1 


37 6 


23 


9 1 


3 








lace Old Infantry Bar- 






I > 


37 6 


19 


10 


1 


none 






racks. 






1 1 

1 ! 

I i 

I I 

1 i 

2 l 
j i 


34 6 
34 6 
24 6 

24 6 
30 6 

39 6 
49 6 
49 6 
49 6 
49 6 

40 
46 
18 9 

25 


19 6 

18 
22 

22 6 
24 8 

20 
24 
24 

23 

19 
19 
19 
14 

8 6 


9 
9 9 
8 7 

8 9 

9 6 
10 2 

9 8 
9 3 
9 4 
9 
9 6 
9 3 
8 8 
8 8 


2 
1 

1 
2 
2 
2 
3 
5 
3 
3 
4 
3 
1 
2 


none 
none 

none 
none 
none 






Fort George Infantry and 


• - About 


Stoae aid lime - 


32 


17 


16 


10 6 


1 








Artillery Barracks. 


1757 to 




12 


17 


17 


10 6 


1 










1763. 




2 

47 
2 

8 


18 
17 
17 6 
17 6 


17 
1G 

16 

17 


10 6 
8 6 
8 6 

8 6 


2 
1 
1 

1 














2 


45 6 


17 6 


8 6 


2 




. 










2 


18 6 


17 6 


8 6 


2 














6 


18 6 


17 


8 6 


1 














47* 


18 


16 


9 


1 














1* 


18 


16 


9 


1 














2« 


47 6 


17 6 


9 


2 














8* 


19 


18 


9 


2 














8* 


19 


17 


9 


1 








Artillery ... 






1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
1 


35 
27 6 
27 
27 
27 
35 
27 
27 


15 
15 
24 
24 
15 
15 
24 6 
24 6 


9 6 
9 6 
9 6 
8 
8 
8 
8 
10 6 


8 
2 
3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
2 








Fort Augustus 


- - About 


Stone and lime 


14 


18 


17 


11 3 


1 










1780 to 




4 


18 


17 


11 8 


1 










1731. 




2 

2 
6 


18 
18 
18 


17 

16 

17 


7 6 
7 6 
7 


1 

1 
1 








Fort William - 




Stone and lime 


3 
4 

4 


15 
15 
14 9 


14 1 
14 1 
11 6 


8 10 

9 I 
7 


1 
1 
1 








Aberdeen Barracks • 


- 1794 to 


Stone and lime - 


4 


26 6 


20 


9 2 


1 


1 








1795. 




2 


26 6 


20 


9 2 


1 


1 












9 


26 6 


20 


9 2 


1 


1 












8 


26 6 


20 


9 2 


2 


1 












2 


26 6 


20 


9 2 


2 


1 












3 


26 6 


20 


9 2 


2 


1 












1 


26 6 


20 


9 2 


2 


1 












2 


26 6 


20 


9 2 


2 


1 






Fort Charlotte 


1782 - 


Stone and lime 


1 


18 3 


17 6 


8 6 


2 


1 












1 


18 3 


17 6 


8 6 


2 


1 












l 3 


21 6 


21 3 


14 5 


2 


1 












l 3 


21 6 


21 3 


14 5 


2 


1 












8 


44 3 


18 


8 


3 


2 













l 3 


21 6 


21 3 

Digitize 


14 5 

JbyV^J 


3 

OOgI 


1 

e ! 













RELATIVE TO 


THE DATE OF ERECTION, 


MATERIALS, 


&C. 


29 




Number 




Number 


Number of 


How the Barrack 
is 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 






of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 


of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 


Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 


supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 






for 
Cooking. 


REMARKS. ' 




For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 




none - 




1 


1 


- - The supply of 


- - One cleaning 


- - 1 wash-house, 


- - 2 cooking- 






none 


- 


I 


1 


water is from the 


room of 20 ft. 5 in. 


with 2 boilers, 


houses, 34 ft. 9 in. 






none 


• 


1 


1 


roofs of the build- 


by 10 ft 3 in. ; 


20 ft. 10 in. by 


by 20 ft. ; height, 






none 


. 


26 


• - The accommo- 


ings, collected in 


height, 12 ft. 4 in. 


10 ft. 7 in.; height, 


12 ft. 8 in. ; the 






none 


- 


18 


dation is 560. 


4 tanks, each 




13 ft. 7 in. 


one containing 






1 




27 


The average oc- 


capable of con- 






16, the other 12 






1 




22 


cupation for the 


taining 100,000 






boilers. 






1 




27 


last five years, 20 


gallons. One of 
the tanks has a 












1 




22 


men and 4 1 chil- 












none 


- 


14 


dren : the present 


small spring, and 












none 


- 


27 


occupation, 62 


each a pump at* 












1 




28 


men and 12 wo- 


tached to it at 












none 


- 


24 


men, 22 children ; 
and except when 


the following dis- 
tances from their 












none 


- 


16 


absolutely neces- 


respective bar- 








- - ■ The windows 




none 


- 


24 


sary, the rooms 


racks ; 100, 95, 








of every two of 




none 


- 


14 


are never occupied 


22, 7 yards. 








these rooms give 




none 


- 


16 


to the extent of 










light to both the 




none 


- 


18 


their construc- 










upper ones, being 




none 


- 


15 


tion by about one- 








rather galleries than rooras. 




none 


- 


21 


fourth. 








there being floors around 




none 


- 


25 










the walls and an open space 




none 


- 


22 










railed round in the centre of 


t 


none 


- 


26 










each. The upper rooms 




none 


- 


20 










have no fireplaces, receiving 




none 


- 


29 










warmth from those in the 




none 


- 


10 










lower. The rooms of the 




none 


- 


8 










new barracks have each a 




none 


- 


5 










stove. 




none 


- 


4 
















1 door - 


. 


5 


• • 


- • The barracks 


none 


3 


- • 8 kitchens, 


-•'Those ceilings 




ditto 


- 


5 




supplied by 2 






unprovided for 


have the ceiling 




ditto - 


- 


5 




pumps and wells, 






cooking. 


plastered against 
the backs of raf- 




ditto 


- 


5 




situated 140 










ditto - 


• 


5 


2 staff Serjeants. 


yards from the 








ters. The number 




ditto 


- 


5 




barrack buildings. 








of men each room 




2 doors - 


- 


13 












is calculated to 




1 door - 


• 


5 


4 ditto. 










hold is according to 




ditto 


- 


5 












the approved re- 




ditto - 


- 


7 












approbation of 509 
cubic feet per man. 




ditto 


- 


7 


2 ditto. 












2 doors - 


- 


10 












as sanctioned by 
the Honorable 




1 door - 


- 


8 














ditto - 


• 


7 












Board's Order, 
16th Nov. 1846. 




1 door - 


. 


10 
















ditto - 


. 


8 
















ditto - 


• 


12 
















ditto - 


• 


10 
















ditto - 


- 


6 


2 ditto. 














ditto 


. 


8 
















ditto - 


. 



















2 doors - 


- 


IS 
















1 door • 


« 


10 


- - 7 men and I 


• - By a pump 


none 


none 


none. 






ditto - 


- 


10 


woman occupy 2 


within the walls 












ditto 


- 


5 


rooms at present. 


of one of the 












ditto - 


• 


5 




buildings* 












ditto • 


• 


5 
















1 door - 


. 


6 


- - The barracks 


- - Supplied with 


none 


none 


none. 






ditto 


• 


6 


occupied by 22 


water by the 












ditto - 


- 


4 


men, 3 women, 


proof, who carry 
it a distance of 


















and 5 children. 




















a half mile. 












1 door - 


• 


12 


14 


- - From the City 


none 


- - 2 wash-houses, 


- - The messes 






ditto 


• 


12 


14 


Reservoir, con- 




with 2 twenty-five 


are cooked in 4 






ditto 


- 


12 


14 


veyed by pipes 




gallon boilers in 


kitchens, con- 






ditto 


- 


12 


14 


to within 50 yards 




each. 


taining 4 boilers. 






ditto 


- 


12 


14 


of the rear of the 












ditto 


* 


12 


- - 10 men, 1 Ser- 
jeant. 


barracks. 










ditto 


- 


12 


ditto. 






i \ 




ditto 


* 


2 


- - 2 staff Ser- 
jeants. 






\ \ 




- - No other 


1 Room, 1 • 


- • Not occupied 


- - From a tank 


•"- none, except 


[ noc^ 


"\ **^*e 


\%\% Va w\ utj 



Digitized by 



Google 



30 



RETURN FROM BACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT. 


NAME 

of 
BARRACK. 


Date of 

its 
Erection. 


Of 

what Materials 

Boift. 


Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 

of 
Windows 

in 
eaehRoom. 


Number 

of 
Fbeplaces 

in 
eaehRoom. 






Length. 


Width. 


Height. 




GREAT BRITAIN— continued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 








South West and 
Sussex. 


Portsmouth, Royal Artillery 


Unknown 


• - Brick, with tiled 
roofs and wood 
floors. 


1 
2 
1 
1 

a 

2 


82 
41 7 
81 10! 
88 
41 4 
12 


30 
81 1 
29 9 
29 10 

31 1 
10 3 


12 1 
12 1 

9 • 

9 t 

12 2 

9 t 










Colcwort - 


1788 - 


Ditto - 


15 

1 
1 
1 
5 


18 
18 6 

14 
9 7 

9 7 


34 4 

15 3 

15 • 

15 • 

7 8 


9 • 
9 
9 
9 t 
9 9 










Cambridge ... 


1825 - 


Ditto - 


1 
1 
2 

1 
2 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
5 
1 
9 
2 


29 9 
29 9 
29 9 
24 2 
88 
24 10 
23 3 
38 

21 10 
28 3 
31 5 

22 4 
9 

12 


24 2 

26 5 
80 7 

27 9 

27 9 

28 8 
31 2 

27 9 

28 3 
31 2 
31 10 
18 
13 
12 


11 9 
10 4 

10 • 
10 10 
10 10 
10 
10 
10 
10 • 

10 • 

11 

8 9 
10 9 

9 2 




2 






Fourbonse - 


1777 - 


Ditto - 


5 

8 

1 
1 
6 


21 7 
21 7 
11 6 
13 8 

7 7 


40 9 
40 9 
21 11 
16 6 
14 10 


18 4 
10 6 
10 
60 
10 6 










Fort Cumberland - 


- Between 
1800 and 
1815. 


• Stone and brick, 
with brick floors. 


3 

28 

5 


41 4 
37 4 

60 9 


16 
16 

28 


9 
9 
9 










Gosport, Forton 


ditto 


- Brick, with slated 
roof and wood 
floors. 


4 
6 
6 
2 
3 
1 
1 
1 


49 8 
62 8 
62 9 
80 8 
80 6 
11 8 
11 6 
29 10 


23 11 

24 6 
24 4 
15 8 
15 9 
10 
10 
19 10 


14 4 

13 11 
12 6 

14 
12 6 
11 10 
11 10 
14 4 










Haslar ■ 


ditto 


Ditto - 


6 
17 


38 
22 


22 
22 


14 
14 


6 

8 








Fort Monckton 


- - About 
1780. 


- • Stone and brick, 
with slated roots and 
wooden floors. 


11 
1 

1 

1 

16 

1 
1 


28 3 
34 
30 6 
17 3 
19 6 
8 6 
10 8 


12 3 
19 6 
19 6 
16 
15 9 
7 6 
9 


8 

9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 










Island of Portsea, Tipner 


1801 - 


• Brick, with slated 
roofs and wood 
floors. 


4 
4 
1 
2 
1 


27 
13 8 
20 9 
11 
20 


13 

12 

7 

6 

16 


12 

8 9 

11 6 

10 9 

11 




none 
1 






Isle of Wight, Albany 


1797 - 


- - Partly built of 
brick and: partly of 
wood framing, tiled 
roof and wood floors. 


1 
16 

1 
32 

6 

1 


40 
82 
86 6 
32 
25 9 
25 9 


25 
25 3 
19 
19 9 
21 3 
21 3 


12 6 
10 10 
15 I 
10 10 
15 
9 9 


6 

4 
5 














11 
22 

1 

28 

2 


27 
22 
22 

13 

14 


22 

22 
22 
14 

"Di|i| 


10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

9 

izeSb^ 


2do; 


$lei 









RELATIVE TO 


THE DATE OF 


ERECTION, : 


MATERIALS, &C. 


3* 




Number 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 


Number 
of Men each 

Room 
is regulated to 


Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 


How the Barrack 

is 

sapplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accetneaodation 
for 


REMARKS. 












bold. 


from 
the Buildings, 


For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 


Peeking. 








22 


26 


-- The barrack 




--1 room fitted 


- - 1 room fitted 






... 


2T 


30 


is supplied with 




with a large cop- 


up with 8 boilers, 






... 


2* 


25 


water by the 




per, bench, &c. 


benches, &c. 






... 


SO 


22 


Portsea Island 












- 


2f 
1 


29 

• - Staff serjeant 
and family. 


Water Company, 
which is sent 
into several parts 
of the barracks 
through pipes. 














16 


18 


ditto 


• - I room fitted 


- - 1 room with 


--lkitchen fitted 






• 


1 


S 




with boiler, bath, 


two coppers, &c. 


with 8 boilers, 






• 


1 


s 




foots***, wash- 
ing basins, &c. 




benches, &c. 






... 


1 
1 


s 

s 












. . . 


19 


21 


ditto 


ditto 


ditto 


- - 1 kitchen with 






... 


19 


21 








14 boilers and 






• 


SO 


22 








benches. 






... 


19 


21 














... 


at 


26 














... 


18 


19 














- 


19 


21 














. . . 


as 


25 














• 


18 


20 














... 


19 


21 














... 


SO 


22 














- 


1 


2 














• 


1 


2 














. 


1 


2 














- - • 


ss 


25 


ditto 


ditto 


ditto 


• - 1 kitchen fitted 






. 


22 


25 








up with 14 boilers. 






• 


2 


5 














... 


8 


4 














- 


1 


S 














• • • 


SO 


S3 


- • From a well 


none 


- • 1 room fitted 


• - 1 kitchen fitted 


bomb proof. 




... 


16 


19 


within the Fort, 




with four coppers. 


up with 19 boilers. 








28 


3S 


with 8 pumps at- 
tached. 












... 


SO 


30 


- - An abundant 


none 


- - 1 room fitted 


--1 kitchen fitted 






... 


38 


38 


supply of good wa- 


with coppers. 


up with boilers 






... 


38 


38 


ter is obtained from a spring well, 




and benches. 






... 




4 


from which it is thrown by means of 










- 




4 


a force-pump (worked by the men), 










• • - 




1 


into cisterns, and drawn off by cocks. 










- 




1 


The distance in rear of the building 










... 




1 


is only a few yards. 










» - • 


31 


SI 


• - Supplied from 


none 


ditto 


- - 1 kitchen fitted 








13 


13 


8 spring wells of 
gooa water in 
the barrack yard, 
worked by hand- 
pumps. 






with boilers and 
benches. 






... 


9 


• 


• - Supplied from 


none 


ditto 


--lkitchen fitted 


bomb proof. 




... 


SO 




a spring well of 
good water, worked 






with 9-jraIlon boil- 
ers and benches. 






... 


18 












. 


8 




by hand pumps 












• 


9 




in the barrack 












... 






yard. 












... 


IS 


15 


- - As much as 


none 


ditto 


--1 kitchen fitted 






• 




5 


can be collected 






with boilers and 






... 




4 


from rain, and 






benches. 






- 


1 


4 


the rest brought 














IS 


14 


by water-cart daily, 
from a spring 960 


















yards from the 
barracks. 




1 






- - 49 of the 


24 


25 


. . Supplied from 


none 


• - 2 rooms fitted 1 - 4 kitchens fitted 


l| 




largest rooms 


20 


21 


3 wells, drawn 


1 with coppers* 1 with boilers and 


1 




over the door 


20 


22 


by pumps near to 


I 1 benches. 


1 




from the roof, 


18 


19 


the men's room. 








► \ 



Digitized by 



Google 



32 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KIXGDOBI, 



DISTRICT. 



NAME 

of 
BARRACK. 



Date of 

its 
Erection. 



Of 

what Materials 
Built. 



Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 



Dimensions of each Room. 



Length. 



Width. 



Height. 



Number 

of 
Windows 

in 
each Room, 



Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

in 
each Room. 



GREAT BRITAIN— continutd. 



South West and 
Sussix— cent*. 



Marchwood (near South- 
ampton). 



Chichester 



Winchester 



1815 



1802 



1084 



- Brick, with wood- 
en floors and slate 
roofs. 



- - Wood framing, 
weather boarded, 
tiled roofs, and 
wooden floors. 

- - Brick, with 
slated roofs and 
wooden floors. 



4 
1 
1 

1 

44 
34 



ft. in. 

33 

17 

17 

19 9 



29 4 
11 6 



21 6 

21 8 
24 

22 

23 4 
22 9 
21 8 
21 9 



21 
21 
21 
16 
21 
17 



21 9 
14 
24 
21 10 
21 4 
16 9 

20 6 

21 3 

20 11 

22 

21 6 
21 8 



24 
24 
24 
20 
21 
21 
22 
22 



22 9 
22 
22 9 
22 11 
21 9 

21 7 

22 
20 3 
24 4 

20 11 

21 2 
20 6 



20 


8 


22 


4 


21 


9 


20 


9 


21 


7 


17 





16 


10 


22 





21 


9 


22 


3 


24 


8 


26 





22 





22 





14 





16 





14 


4 


22 


8 


21 


2 


SI 






ft- in. 

21 2 
13 8 

13 7 

14 10 

15 11 
11 10 



21 10 
21 10 



22 
21 
24 
24 



21 9 

21 9 

21 9 

10 

20 9 

9 10 

10 



9 
9 

8 
10 
10 
10 
10 



22 3 

22 3 

22 6 

22 2 

22 



22 
22 
22 
21 
22 
22 



21 10 

21 6 

22 
21 6 

21 9 
24 9 
24 6 

22 6 
22 3 
22 3 
22 4 

21 1 

22 3 
22 9 

21 9 

22 
22 2 
22 2 

21 8 

22 6 

9 11 

10 

10 1 

9 2 

9 11 

10 5 

10 2 

10 2 
9 11 

11 5 
8 
8 

20 6 

22 4 

22 9 



ft. in. 

10 9 

10 

9 2 

9 2 



10 
10 



)13 6 



6 
2 
2 
3 

6 
2 



2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
1 
2. 



)10 8 



2 ^ 
1 
S 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

3 J 



- 1 in each 
room. 



10 8 



Digitized by 



<y 



oogle 




1 in ea 



1 in each 



Digitized by 



Google 



34 


RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 
















Naiaterof 












NAME 


Dateef 


Of 

what Materials 


Sleeping 
Rooms for the 
ose of Privates 


Dimensions of etch Room. 


Number 

of 
Windows 


Number 

of 
Fireplaces 




DISTRICT. 


of 


ks 
















< 


and Noa- 








in 


m 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Bailt. 


Comaussioned 
Oncers* 


Length. 


Width. 


Height € 


lachRoom. 


each Room. 




GREAT BRITAIN— continued. 








ft. in. 


ft- in. 


ft. in. 








South West tod 


Winchester • 


• 


- I 1 


21 * 


21 9 


•\ 


f a 1 






Sussex— coitf*. 


(jtontitttum) 


" 




2 
* 


M 3 
22 2 
22 4 
22 9 

22 8 

23 2 
22 9 
21 9 

21 9 

20 3 

22 
22 4 

21 
20 7 
20 9 

20 6 

21 6 
20 6 
20 f 

20 6 

22 
22 

21 10 
14 11 

22 4 
14 

24 11 
26 2 


21 10 

21 9 

22 
21 9 

21 6 
25 
24 5 

22 10 
22 4 
22 3 
21 6 

21 10 

22 6 
22 

21 10 

22 4 
22 6 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 3 

9 2 

12 7 

9 7 

7 10 

10 6 

10 6 


)10 8 

,10 8 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

S 2 
2 

2 

2 

2 

2 

3 

2 

2 

2 

2 

I 2 J 

1 


1 














22 


10 4 


















22 


10 




















17 


10 




















14 > 


13 I 




















16 3 


8 6 


J 


1 
















22 


22 




f 2 1 
















21 6 


22 




2 
















22 10 


22 9 




2 
















22 10 


22 10 




2 
















21 6 


21 10 




2 
















21 8 


22 




2 
















21 


22 9 




2 
















21 


22 9 




3 
















21 


22 6 




1 
















22 4 


22 3 




2 
















22 11 


22 




2 
















2% 


22 10 




2 
















22 9 


25 4 




2 
















23 


2* 2 




2 
















21 4 


25 8 




2 
















21 3 


22 7 




2 
















22 3 


22 8 




2 
















21 5 


22 4 




2 
















22 9 


21 9 




2 
















23 
22 9 


22 2 
22 3 


) 9 9 


< I 


1 














22 9 


22 




2 
















23 3 


25 3 




2 
















22 9 


24 8 




2 
















21 6 


23 




2 
















21 7 


23 




2 
















21 9 


23 




2 
















20 1 


22 6 




2 
















22 4 


22 




2 
















22 8 


22 1 




2 
















21 


22 




2 
















20 9 


22 4 




2 
















21 8 


22 8 




3 
















20 3 


22 




2 
















20 9 


22 




2 
















20 8 


22 




2 
















22 6 


22 4 




2 
















22 


22 6 




2 
















21 3 


22 8 




2 
















20 6 


22 8 


J 


I 2 J 
















22 


9 2 


"j 


r i 
















14 10 


12 7 




i 
















22 4 


9 11 




2 














! 


25 1 

26 2 


10 6 
_ 10 6 

Digitized 


byV^ 


:»obl 


I \ 





RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF EilSCTIOK, MATEBIALS, &C. 



35 



Numbir 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 



Number of 

Men, Women, 
and 

Children 

usually 
occupying it. 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

ami the Distance 



the Buildings. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



For their Clothes. 



Accommodation 

for 

Ctehing. 



REMARKS. 



1 ia each room. 



14 in each room 



- 14 men in each 





Serjeants, &c: 


a 


2 


2 


2 


a 


2 


i 


1 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


I 



1 in each room 



14 in each room 



- 14 men in each 
room. 





Serjeants, &c 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 


2 / 


2 


3 


2 


3 / 


2 


1 l 


1 


I 1 


1 


s / 


2 



[Digitized by^ 



lfin 



looglfco 



36 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT. 



NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 



Date of 

its 
Erection. 



Of 

what Materials 

Built 



Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 



Dimensions of each Room. 



Length. 



Width. 



Height. 



Number 

of 

Windows 

in 

each Room. 



Number 

of 

Fireplaces 

in 

each Room. 



GREAT BRITAIN-«oittmiift*. 

South West and Christchurch 
Sussex— con*. 



1792 



• -Brick, with slated 
roofs and wooden 
Boors. 



Southsea Castle 



1814 



Woolwich 



Brighton 9 Cavalry Barracks 



Ditto, Infantry 



Circular Redoubt at East- 
bourne. 



Towers - 
Royal Artillery 



About 1796 



Ditto 



1805 



- Between 
the years 
1801 aid 
1809. 



Stone and brick 



• - Brick, with wood 
floors and slated roof. 



Ditto 



Stone and brick 



Stone - 

- - Brick, with fir 
roof aud slated. 



6 

39 
5 

17 
12 
1 
2 
1 
2 
11 

2 
1 
1 

2 



1 
2 
2 

20 
10 



9 
9 



10 



S3 



15 
27 11 



19 
15 
11 
86 
75 
11 
11 



16 8 

23 6 

23 6 

27 

26 

18 6 



18 6 

38 2 

38 2 

27 9 

17 



30 
80 



39 3 



24 6 
24 11 
24 11 
24 11 
24 6 
24 11 
24 11 
24 11 
24 6 
24 U 
24 11 
24 11 

24 6 
42 8 

25 
42 3 
25 
42 3 
25 

24 6 

25 
25 
25 

24 6 

25 
25 
25 
42 3 

24 9 
29 6 

11 

24 9 

29 10 

25 
23 10 
25 
11 8 

29 8 

36 2 

86 2 

80 6 

80 6 

11 8 



/*. in. 

16 11 
16 11 
16 11 
16 11 

16 II 
26 8 
26 8 
18 6 
13 6 

17 1 

16 

16 

16 

16 



16 



16 

16 

16 

17 
15 3 



20 
20 



14 



ft. in. 

9 6 

9 6 

9 6 



6 6 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 



9 

8 6 

9 

9 1 

9 1 



10 3 

10 



13 * 



19 

20 
20 



20 1 
19 9 



20 
20 
20 



19 9 

20 1 



20 
20 
19 



25 

20 

25 

20 



25 
20 
19 
20 
20 
20 



19 



20 
20 
20 
25 



23 9 

23 1 

9 9 

23 9 

28 4 

22 8 

29 6 

24 10 
10 2 

23 1 

25 4 
25 4 
23 9 
23 9 
10 



7 5 
10 11 
10 3 

8 1 

7 5 
10 11 
10 3 

8 1 
7 5 

10 11 



2 
2 
1 

2 

2 

12 

12 

2 
1 
1 

2 
1 
2 
2 



- - 2 and 
2 bulls' 
eyes. 



10 
8 
7 
11 
11 
10 
10 



7 11 

7 11 

7 1 

11 5 

10 5 
7 11 
7 I 

11 5 

10 5 

7 11 

11 5 

9 5 

9 5 

9 8 

11 8 

11 7 

8 3 

8 6 

8 

8 6 

9 6 
11 8 

9 8 

11 3 

9 2 

11 



) * 



} 



4 
3 



►ogk 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OP ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



37 



Number 
of Ventilators, 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 



2 

13 

6 

1 

6 

42 

34 

2 

2 

2 

11 
11 
12 
12 

12 



12 
16 
16 

8 
3 



16 
16 



20 



24 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



• - Average occu- 
pation last* 10 
years, 116. 



11 
11 
IS 
13 



17 
17 

11 
3 



17 
17 



- - Royal Artil- 
lery, 7 men, 5 
women, and 15 
children. 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



• - Supplied with 
water from three 
wells with pumps, 
contiguous to the 
buildings. 



- - By a rain- 
water tank within 
the Castle. 



12 



17 



12 



17 



- - By a pump 36 
feet from the 
building. 

- - By pumps 41 
feet from the 
building. 

- - By rain-water 
tanks, containing 
about 1,500 gal- 
lons. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



For their Clothes. 



- - 1 room fitted 
with coppers. 



-The Kent Water 
Company. 



none • 

6 washing houses 



• - 1 room fitted 
with 2 large cop- 
pers. 

none 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



. -1 kitchen fitted 
with boilers. 



none, 
none 



--1 kitchen fitted 
with 20 boilers. 



- - 1 kitchen fitted 
with 11 coppers. 



- - 2 kitchens with 
6 iron boilers in 
each, and benches. 



9 cooking houses. 



REMARKS. 



-- Two of these 
rooms were allot- 
ted to the lamp- 
lighter and master 
gunner, one each. 

- - These rooms 
were allotted, one 
as a barrack store, 
and the other to 
the Coast Guard. 

- - Allotted to the 
Coast Guard. 



- - These rooms 
•were originally con- 
structed for 40 men 
•each, but the pre- 
sent allotment is 
for 20. 



jitizedxby 



GoogI 




\11tattc3 ***** and 
Ytataa. 

(continue 



38 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT. 



NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 



GREAT BRITAIN— continued. 



Woolwich - 
contnhted. 



Royal Artillery 
continued. 



Sappers and Miners. 



Date of 

its 
Erection. 



• From tie 
Year 1801 
io 1809, 
and a por- 
tion built 
in 1814. 



Of 

what Materials 
Built. 



- - Brick, slate, and 
timber. 



Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Offieers. 



12 



8 

2 

- 1 

1 
2 

4 

4 
2 
I 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 

• 1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
9 
4 
2 
1 
1 
21 
10 



285 



I 
{ 
{ 

{ 



Dimensions of each Room. 



Length. 


Width. 


/'• 


in. 


ft. in. 


80 


6 


23 9 


SO 


6 


23 9 


11 


6 


9 6 


24 


9 


23 9 


24 


5 


24 6 


30 


6 


21 1 


30 


6 


23 9 


11 





10 


30 


6 


23 9 


80 


6 


24 1 


30 


6 


21 


16 





10 9 


30 


6 


21 


46 


9 


10 


30 


6 


21 8 


30 10 


30 2 


82 





31 10 


20 





30 


20 





30 


18 


9 


IS 9 


15 





13 


15 


6 


13 10 


29 


2 


15 6 


29 


2 


19 2 


19 





18 10 


19 


6 


13 7 


15 


10 


13 7 


41 


3 


IS 1 


12 





12 


12 





12 


12 





12 


12 





12 


28 





23 6 


23 


9 


30 6 


25 


9 


23 6 


23 


9 


23 6 


31 





21 


30 


6 


24 


30 


6 


21 


30 


1 


24 2 


30 


1 


24 2 


30 





24 4 


31 


6 


30 5 


31 


G 


30 5 


15 


4 


10 9 


12 





5 


11 


9 


10 9 


16 


8 


11 6 


12 





7 10 


16 


8 


11 6 


12 





7 10 


16 


6 


15 4 


16 





15 6 


33 


2 


31 



Height. 



ft. in. 

11 8 

8 8 

8 8 

8 1 



8 

9 

11 

11 

9 

12 



12 
9 3 



13 

13 

13 

9 9 

9 9 

11 9 

9 6 

9 10 

9 10 

8 6 

8 4 

8 6 

8 6 

8 6 

8 6 

8 6 

9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 



} 



11 
11 

8 
8 
8 
9 
11 
8 
8 
8 



9 6 
13 9 



7 10 
7 10 
7 10 



11 8 
with recesscrs. 

11 8 

11 8 



10 8 

10 8 

9 10 



19 


6 


5 6 


38 


8 


20 6 


88 
38 
38 
88 
88 


8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


20 6 
31 
20 6 

s « 



Number Number 

of of 

Windows Fireplaces 

in 
each Room. leach Room 



r 



2 
4 

1 

4 
- 1 room, 
4 windows 
8 rooms, 
3 windows 
2 rooms, 
2 windows 
each. 

3 

4 



} 






2 

2 



1 
1 



RELATIVE TO THE BATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



39 



Number 
of Ventilators, 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children, 

usually 

occupying it. 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



Accommodation lor Washing. 



For the Men. 



For their Clothes. 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



REMARKS. 



-The Kent Water 
Company. 



6 washing-houses 



9 cooking heuiec 



17 



17 



17 



17 



17 



17 



1 1 serj .-major 1 

}1 quarter-mas- 
ter-eetjeastf.' 

>1 bugle-major * 

1 



18 



18 
24 
18 
24 

18 



169. 



- 1 man and wife 
and 2 children. 

- • ditto. 



- 1 man and wife 
and 4 children. 

• 1 man and wife 
and 4 children. 

- 1 man and wife 
and 2 children. 

24 

•-Occupied as a 
mess-room and 
orderly room for 
non-commissioned 
officers. 

18 

24 

18 

24 

- - Occupied as 
a museum and 
library for the 
non-commissioned 
officers. 



• - Supplied by 
the Water Works 
Company, and a 
well and engine- 
pump very near 
to the barracks. 



An ablution 
with a bath 
and the necessary 
washing basins. 



- - none; their 
clothes are wash- 
ed outside the 
barrack. 



--2 good cook- 
ing houses. 



Tailors' shops. 



Tailors' shops. 
- Non-commission- 
ed officers' quar- 
ters. 

Barrack stores. 

Cadet stores. 



- Staff Serjeants' 
quarters. 



- Gymnasium and 
stores. 



1 The serjeant- 
major has a small 
kitchen and a 
wash-house. 

* The quarter- 
master - serieant 
has a small kit- 
chen. 

'The bugle roa- 

i'or has a small 
titchen. 

The whole of the 
rooms are venti- 
lated by the doors, 
windows, and fire- 
places, and have 

no other means oC 

ventilation. 



(Digitized by 



M 



^ob?l^ ti,w4ed > 



40 



R-ETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IX THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT. 



NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 



Date of 

its 
Erection. 



Of 

what Materials 

Built. 



Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 



Dimensions of each Room. 



Length. 



Width. 



Height. 



Number 

of 

Windows 

in 

each Room, 



Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

in 
each Room. 



GREAT BRITAIN— continued. 



Woolwich 
continued. 



ExETXft 



Purfleet, Royal Artillery 



1796 



Exeter, Cavalry Barracks • 



- Erected 
during the 

years 
1794-5. 



Exeter, Royal Artillery 
Barracks. 



Taunton, Cavalry Barracks 



- Erected 

during the 

years 

1805-6. 



- Erected 
during the 
year 1796. 



Dorchester, Cavalry Bar- 
racks. 



- Erected 

during the 

years 

1794-5. 



Weymouth, Cavalry and 
Infantry Barracks. 



Trowbridge, Cavalry and 
Infantry Barracks. 



Bristol, Cavalrv and In- 

fMdtrv Barracks. 



- Erected 
in the year 
1801. 



- - Con 
verted in 
to barracks 
in 1889 
from old 
buildings 
purchased 
fur that 
purpose. 



- - April 



• -Brick, witli fir 
roof, and slated. 



Brick and slated 



ft. in. ft. in. ft. in, 

Ground Floor : 
20 | 21 | 10 2 

First Floor: 
20 | 21 | 9 

Second Floor: 
20 8 21 8 8 5 



Brick and slated 



Brick and slated 



14 



2 
4 
1 
1 
1 
1 

• 6 

• 2 

• 1 

• 1 

• 1 

• 1 

15 

• 1 
13 

• 1 



28 



28 
28 
19 
19 
15 
15 
15 
12 



Brick and slated - 



Brick and slated 



- • Brick and stone 
buildings, with wood 
floors and roots, and 
slate covering. 



20 



16 
16 



17 
17 
17 
135 
13 



12 8 

12 6 

19 7 

15 8 

27 

27 

27 

27 



28 3 

28 3 



19 4 

16 8 
16 8 



27 8 



16 4 
16 3 
16 3 
16 8 



40 8 

40 8 

40 

40 



28 
28 



19 9 



- - Stone buildings, 

with wood floor* and 



15 6 
12 6 

28 



21 


8 


16 


9 


16 


9 


16 


9 


16 


9 


16 


9 


16 


9 


16 


9 


16 


*9 


16 


9 


16 


9 


16 


9 


16 


9 


16 


9 


20 





20 





20 





20 





16 


8 


16 


8 


16 


8 


15 





15 





16 


4 


15 


6 


10 


8 


14 


6 


14 


6 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


22 


2 


17 


3 


17 


3 


17 


3 


17 


3 


17 


3 


16 


3 


12 


1 


16 


3 


26 


7 


10 


11 


9 


8 


10 


10 


22 






9 



9 6 

9 6 

8 9 

8 9 



9 3 

9 3 



9 3 
9 3 

9 3 



9 



9, 
9 
9 
9 



10 2 
9 11 

10 2 
9 11 



9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

7 3 

7 3 

8 4 

11 



8fLl0ir* 
by 4 ft. Sin 

2 

3 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
I 

2 
2 
2 
2 



2 

1 
8 ft. 10 in* 
by 4 ft. 3 in. 

1 ditto 
I 

2 



8 ft. It in. 
by 4 ft. Sin 

I ditto 
1 ditto 
1 ditto 
1 ditto 



4 
4 

4 
4 



3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 

skylight, 14 
1 



1 
1 
I 
1 
1 
1 
1 
stoves, 3 
1 

1 
1 



Digitized by 



Google 







RELATIVE TO 


THE DATE OF ERECTION, 


MATERIALS, &C. 


41 




Number 


Number 


Number of 


How the Barrack 

is 


Accommodation for Washine. 


Accommod ation 






of Ventilators 
and 


of Men each 
Room 


Men, Women, 
and 


supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 






fOT 

Cooking. 


REMARKS. 




other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 


is 

regulated to 

hold. 


Children 

usually 

occupying it. 


For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 


• 


none 


11 


- - A company of 
artillery. 


- • Pump, from 
the natural springs 
100 yards dis- 
tant. 


none 


• - Washing shed 
for their clothes. 


- • A cookhouse, 
detached from 
the barracks. 


• 




- - A ventilator 


8 


8 


- - By 7 wells and 


none 


- - 1 washhonse 


• - Four cooking* 


- - When occupied 




in the ceiling of 






2 tanks, with 




in the barracks, 


bouses, fitted up 


by married men, it 




each room, and 






pumps, the latter 
supplied by tbe 




with 2 copper 


with 16 boilers in 


is usual to allow a 




a sliding sash 


8 
8 
8 
5 


8 
8 
8 
5 




boilers. 


each. 


bed for each wo- 




over each door. 


Exeter Water 








man, and one to 2 




- 


Company, all ad- 
joining tbe build- 








children. 
The rooms, mark- 




... 


5 


5 


ing. 








ed thus* are for 




... 


5 


5 










the use of non- 




... 


2 


2 










commissioned offi- 




... 


2 


2 










cers. 




... 


2 


2 














... 


2 


2 














. 


2 


2 














- 


1 


1 














none 


12 


12 


- . By 9 wells, 


none 


• - 2 wasihouses, 


none 


- The rooms, mark- 




... 


1 


1 


with pumps, all 




with a large cop- 
per boiler in each. 




ed thus * are for 




• 


12 


12 


situated within 7 




non-commissioned officers. 




. 


1 


1 


yards of the build- 
ings. 






W hen occupied by married men, 
it is usual to allow a bed for each 
woman, and 1 to 2 children. 




- - A ventilator 


8 


8 


- - By 2 wells, 


none • 


none 


- - One cooking- 


- - When occupied 




in the ceiling of 


8 


8 


with pumps, close 
to the buildings. 






house, fitted up 


by married men, it 




each room, and 










with 16 boilers. 


is usual to allow a 




a sliding sash 
over each door. 














bed for each wo- 




6 

1 
2 


6 
1 

2 










man, and 1 to 2 














children. 














The rooms, mark- 














ed thus * are for 


















the use of non- 


















commissioned offi- 


















cers. 




- -A ventilator 


8 


8 


- - By 5 wells, 


none 


- - 1 washhonse, 


- - Two cooking- 
houses, with boil* 


- - When occupied 




in the ceiling of 






with pumps, dis- 




fitted up with 


by married men, it 




each floor, con- 






tant 58 feet from 




boiler. 


era. 


is usual to allow a 




nected with the 


2 
2 
2 
1 


2 
2 
2 
1 


the buildings. 








bed for each wo- 




roof. 










man, and 1 to 2 














children. 














The rooms, mark- 




- 










ed thus * are for 


















the use of non- 


















commissioned offi- 


















cers. 




- - 3 ventilators 


15 


15 


. • By 2 wells, 


none 


-- 1 washhonse, 


- • One cooking- 


- - When occupied 
by married men, it 




in the ceiling of 


15 


15 


with pumps, dis- 




fitted up with a 


house, with boiler. 




each room,con- 


18 


18 


tant 25 feet from 




boiler. 




is usual to allow a 




nected with the 


18 


18 


the building. 








bed for each wo- 




roof. 














man, and 1 to 2 
children. 




- - 2 ventilators 


8 


8 


- - 4 wells, 2 with 


none • • 


-- 1, with S cop- 


- - 1 with 5 iron 


t This room is a 




in ceiling. 






cast iron and 2 




per boilers. 


boilers. 


mere attic in the 




2 ditto - 


8 


8 


with lead pomps ; 








roof of the cavalry 




1 ditto - 


5 


5 


2 rain - water 








barracks, and can 




1 ditto - 


6 


6 


tanks, without fil- 








only be considered 




1 ditto - 


5 


5 


ters, with cast- 








in the light of tem- 




1 ditto - 





6 


iron pumps; all 








porary barrack ac- 




1 ditto - 


5 


5 


disposed adjoin- 








commodation. 




1 ditto - 


5 


5 


ing the buildings. 








When occupied 




none 


68 


t Attic, unoccupied. 










by married men, it 




none 


2 


- Serjeants' room, 
unoccupied. 










is usual to allow a 
bed for each wo- 




none 


2 


ditto. 










man, and 1 to 2 




none 


1 


- - Serjeant-ma- 
jor's, unoccupied. 










children. 




- 2 internal win- 


12 


- - New barracks 


- - 5 wells with 


- - 1 with boiler, 


- • 1, with boiler 


1 with 5 boilers. 






dows between 




not yet occupied. 


cast-iron pumps, 


cistern, bath, and 


and washing 








each 2 rooms. 






4 rain-water tanks 


] 6 washhand ba- 


1 troughs.. 








none 


1 




with filters, 2 rain- 


sins. 










none 


1 




water tanks with- 






x--> 






none 
none 


2 
6 




out filters, all with 
cast-iron pumps, 




1 


taitized by VjC 


FS le 



42 


RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN 


THE UNITED KINGDOM, 














Number of 












NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 




Df STRICT. 


of 




what Materials 


Rooms for the 




of 


of 




its 


use of Privates 
and Non- 




1 


Windows 
in 


Fireplaces 

10 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Baih. 


commissioned 
Oficers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room. 


each Room. 




GREAT BRI' 


r AIN— 'continued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 






• 


Western - 


Plymouth Citadel - 


1670 - 


Limestone - 


84 


8 2 
34 
26 
25 10 


7 6 
11 JO 
16 
15 10 


9 1 
10 
10 

9 


4 

4 

a 
a 












f 




25 10 

26 
26 
25 10 
25 10 
25 10 

25 10 

26 
34 
33 9 
26 
25 10 
25 10 
25 10 

25 10 

26 
26 
25 10 

25 10 

26 
16 
15 6 

15 7 
15 10 
15 10 
15 7 
15 10 
15 10 
15 10 
15 9 

15 9 
26 
26 
31 
26 
26 
26 
26 

26 
26 
26 
26 
26 

26 

16 

15 9 

16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 10 
16 10 
16 10 

15 10 
15 10 
55 6 
19 
15 6 
55 6 

27 4 
15 4 

55 6 
27 4 

36 7 
36 7 
36 7 
36 7 
13 
36 7 
86 7 
13 
36 7 
36 7 
13 
86 7 


15 10 

16 
16 
15 10 
15 10 
15 10 

15 10 

16 

11 10 

12 
16 
15 10 
15 10 
15 10 

15 10 

16 
16 
15 10 

15 10 

16 
12 

*K 8 
10 
12 2 
10 6 
10 

10 6 
12 
12 

11 11 

11 11 
15 10 
15 10 

11 5 
15 10 
15 10 
15 10 
15 10 

15 10 
15 10 
15 10 
15 10 
15 10 
15 10 

12 

11 11 

12 
10 
10 
10 
12 
10 
10 
10 

10 3 
10 3 

17 9 
17 
15 3 
19 
17 4 
15 3 

19 
17 4 
19 * 
19 
19 
19 

8 
19 
19 

8 
19 

19 


9 
10 
10 

8 2 

8 a 

9 

9 
10 
10 

7 6 
10 

9 
9 

8 a 

8 2 
10 
10 

9 
9 

10 

7 9 

8 

8 

9 1 
9 1 

8 • 

9 1 
9 
9 
8 3 

10 6 

10 6 

8 8 

7 6 

8 8 
10 6 
10 6 

8 8 

8 8 
10 6 
10 6 

8 8 

8 8 
10 6 
10 6 

8 3 

10 6 
7 9 
7 9 
7 9 
7 9 
7 9 
7 9 

7 9 

8 6 

8 6 

9 5 

10 6 

11 
11 
11 
11 o 

16 

8 2 
11 8 
11 3 
10 6 
10 6 

10 6 

9 6 
9 6 
9 6 

11 *, 

10 6 


a 
a 

a 
a 
a 
a 

a 
a 

4 

3 

a 
a 
a 

3 
3 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
i 

a 
a 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 

4 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
l 
a 
a 
i 

a 


1 
none 









RELATIVE TO 


THE DATE OF 


ERECTION, 1 


MATERIALS, &C. 


43 




Number 


Number 


Number of 


How the Barrack 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 






of Ventilators 


of Men each 


Men, Women, 


supplied with 










and 


Room 


and 






REMARKS. 




other Means 
of 


is 
regulated to 


Children 
usually 


Water, 

and the Distance 

from 


For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 


for 
Cooking. 




Ventilation. 


hold. 


occupying it 


the Buildings. 








* 


none 




- - • The women, 


- - 12 tanks, con- 


2 ablution rooms 


- • 1 casemate, 


2 cook-houses - 


- - * So stated by 




none - 


10 


&c., are accom- 


taining 167,103 




fitting as a wash- 




the barrack-master. 




2 


12 


modated agreea* 


gallons of water, 




house. 








1 


12 


ably to the regu- 


supplied from the 
roots. 












1 


12 


lations ; women 












2 


12 


for 100 men; 4 


There is a tank 












2 


12 


women for 60men, 


in the Lower Fort 












1 
1 
1 


12 
12 
12 


exclusive of Ser- 
jeants. 


capable of con- 
taining 18,690 
gallons of water, 
supplied from the 










1 


1 
2 

none 

none 

2 
1 
1 


12 
12 
10 
10 
12 
12 
12 




waterworks of the 
town of Ply- 
mouth. 

The tanks are 
adjacent to the 
barrack, except 














the last, which is 












1 


12 




distant from the 












1 


12 




nearest barrack 












2 


12 




380 yards, and 












2 


12 




from the most 












1 


12 




remote 550 yards. 












1 


12 
















2 


12 
















none - 


4 
















none 


8 
















none 


8 
















none - 


8 
















none - 


8 




1 










none 


3 












none 


8 
















none 


2 
















none 


8 
















1 


S 
















1 


5 
















2 


12 
















1 


12 
















none 


10 
















none - 


12 
















2 


12 
















2 


12 
















1 


12 
















1 


12 
















2 


12 








i 






2 


12 












1 


12 
















1 


12 
















2 


12 
















1 


5 
















1 


5 


: 














none 


1 serjeant. 


, 














none 


1 ditto. 


► 


I 










none - • 


1 ditto. 


i 

! 


1 










none 


1 ditto. 














none 


1 ditto. 
















none - 


1 ditto. 
















none • 


1 ditta. 
















none 


1 ditto. 
















none 


3 
















none 


3 
















none 


28 








- 








none 


1 serjeant. 
















none 


6 
















none 


28 










* 






none 


12 
















4 


6 
















none 


28 
















6 


12 








i 






* 


20 








1 






3 


20 








I 


. 




2 


20 








i 






3 


20 








i 




none - 


1 serjeant. 








I 1 




3 


20 








\ 




2 


20 








1 \ 




none 


1 serjeant. 








\ I 




3 


20 




^ 




I l 




2 


20 








\ 




none 


1 serjeant. 








\ 




3 


120 








\ 




3 


20 








I 




none 


1 serjeant. 








1 1 




3 

3 


20 
20 




; 




Di 


3itiz^d by vj 


)gl (c„ 



160. 



F 2 



44 


RETURN FROM EACH 


BARRACK IN 


THE UNITED KINGDOM, 










NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Number of 
Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 












Rooms for the 






of 


of 




DISTRICT. 


of 


its 


what Materials 


use of Privates 
and Non- 






Windows 
in 


Fireplaces 
in 














BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built. 


Commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room. 


each Room. 




GREAT BRITAIN— continued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 








Western • 


Plymouth Citadel Case- 


1760 


Limestone - 


SO 


21 10 


15 10 


11 9 


1 


1 




continued. 


mates. 








22 
22 
21 9 

21 10 
19 10 

22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 

19 2 
22 
22 8 

24 
22 
26 9 
22 
22 

25 


15 10 

16 
25 
24 
19 10 
15 9 
15 6 
15 6 
15 6 
15 6 
15 6 
15 6 
15 6 

19 9 
14 9 
14 10 
23 

14 11 
2G 5 

15 
15 
21 


11 9 

11 9 

12 

13 9 
12 6 
11 
11 
11 
11 

11 

12 
12 

12 

13 6 
12 9 

12 4 

13 10 

12 5 

13 10 
12 6 

12 6 

13 6 


1 

none 

none 

none 
1 

none 
1 

none 
1 
1 
2 
2 

none 

2 
2 

1 
2 

1 
2 
1 

1 
3 


1 

none 

nooe 

none 
1 
1 

none 

none 
1 
1 
1 

none 

none 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
I 
1 
1 














28 3 
21 9 

21 9 

22 
22 
21 10 


21 3 
16 7 
16 7 
16 7 
16 6 
16 


11 
11 
11 9 
11 
11 9 
11 9 


1 
none 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 
nooe 
1 
1 
1 
I 














22 


10 


11 6 


none 


none 






St. Nicholas Island - 




Stone - 


20 


15 9 
15 8 
23 

15 9 
17 5 

16 10 

17 5 
17 5 
16 
16 
16 

15 9 

16 
2S 6 

17 5 
17 5 

8 2 

6 2 

15 2 

14 6 


15 9 
15 7 
15 6 

15 6 

16 
15 8 

15 6 

16 

15 9 

16 
15 9 

15 6 

16 
16 
16 
16 

7 2 

7 2 

14 7 

14 


9 10 
9 11 
8 10 

8 10 
10 

9 9 
9 10 
9 11 
8 10 
8 10 
8 10 
8 10 
8 10 

8 10 

9 9 
9 
9 10 

8 10 

9 10 
9 10 


2 
1 
8 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
I 
1 
1 
2 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
I 
I 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
I 
1 
I 
I 
1 






Maker Barrack 


1804 


• The lower rooms, 


9 


32 


19 10 


11 


2 


1 










stone ; the upper, 




34 7 


19 10 


17 


4 


none 










wood, weather slat- 




32 


19 10 


11 


2 


1 










ed. 




34 7 
32 
34 7 
32 
34 
22 


19 10 
19 10 
19 10 

18 2 

19 10 
14 10 


17 
11 
17 
11 
17 
11 


4 
2 
4 
2 
4 
2 


none 

1 
none 

1 
none 

I 






Staddon Point 


- In course 


limestone - 


11 


34 


16 


11 


5 


1 








of erection. 






8 
24 10 

9 3 
24 9 
35 9 
29 O 
16 
35 
29 
16 


8 
16 

6 6 
16 
16 
16 

6 6 
16 
16 

6 6 


11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 


none 
3 

none 
4 
4 
G 
2 
8 
6 
2 


none 
I 

nooe 
1 
I 
I 

nooe 
1 
1 

none 






Va a n<wi/i„k» 


lTOft 


C»— - 


- 


«, « 


Digitii 


ectby v 


jOQQ 


le- 





1 






RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION", 


MATERIALS, 


&C. 


45 


/ Number 
I • of Ventilators 
1 end 


Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

'regulated to 

hold. 


Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Childreu 

usually 

occupying it 


How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 


REMARKS. 




other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 


Far the Men. 


For their Clothes. 


l 


ion© 


10 














i 


lone 


10 














i 


lone - 


10 














i 


aone 


IS 














i 


lone 


9 














i 


lone 


8 














i 


none - 


10 


- 












i 


none 


10 














l 


none 


10 














J none 


10 














"1 none 


10 














J none 


10 














I none 


10 














1 none 


10 














1 1 


9 














1 1 


9 














1 1 


9 














i 2 


14 














J 1 


9 














I 2 


17 
















1 


9 
















1 


9 
















a 


15 














• 


none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 


14 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 










i 




1 




8 
8 


- • According to 
their coni traction. 


- 56,605 gallons 
in tank, supplied 


1 ablution room - 


none 


1 cooking-house. 








9 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
9 
1 serjeant. 




from the roof. 












none 
















none 


1 Serjeant. 
















none 


Barrack serj. 
















none. 








• 










none 


16 


• •> • 


. . 2 pumps j one 


none 


1 washing-house 


1 cook-house. 






1 


34 




from a spring, the 












- none 


16 




other from a tank; 












1 


24 




both in the centre 










t 


' none 


16 




of the barrack 












1 


24 




yird. 










i 


none 


16 
















I 


24 














i 


none 


2 Serjeants. 
















5 


12 


• • 


- • S tanks, con- 


1 ablution room - 


. 


1 cooking-house. 






2 


1 




taining 20,606 












S 


9 




gallons of water, 














2 


1 




supplied from 
roofc. 










\ 




5 


9 
















none 


IS 


















none • 


11 










i 


I 






none • 


1 












\ 


i 


none 
none 


12 

11 


• 


, 








\ 





none • j 1 












\ 






none » • f 


7 


- 


- From the roofs 


none • • 


none % .- 


^ife^y^ 


)©sle 



4 6 



RETURN FROK BACH BARRACK IN THX UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT. 



NAME 

of 
BARRACK. 



Date of 

its 
Erection. 



Of 

what Materials 
Brill 



Namtorof 

Sleeping 

Items for the 

use .of Privates 



UKlNon- 

Coinnmeioned 

Omoers. 



Dimensions of each Room. 



Length. 


Width. 


ft. 


in. 


ft. in. 


12 


9 


9 9 


12 


9 


9 9 


47 


4 


18 3 


47 


4 


18 3 


12 


9 


9 9 


18 


3 


18 2 


39 


3 


25 


39 


3 


25 


18 





18 


23 


10 


18 2 


23 10 


18 2 


18 





18 


47 


4 


18 3 


47 


4 


18 3 


12 


9 


9 9 


12 


9 


9 9 


23 10 


18 2 


84 


5 


18 2 


48 


8 


18 2 


34 


4 


18 2 


25 


3 


15 10 


25 


3 


J5 10 


25 


4 


15 10 


25 


4 


15 10 


25 


4 


15 10 


25 


4 


15 10 


25 


7 


15 10 


25 


7 


15 10 


25 


7 


15 10 


26 





15 10 


26 





15 10 


25 


5 


16 


25 


5 


18 


25 


5 


16 


26 


6 


16 


25 


6 


16 


25 


6 


16 


25 


7 


16 


25 


7 


16 


25 


7 


16 


25 


7 


16 


26 





16 


26 





16 


21 


5 


15 6 


26 





15 10 


26 





15 10 


26 





15 10 


26 





15 9 


26 





15 9 


96 





15 9 


26 





15 9 


26 


4 


15 9 


26 


4 


15 9 


26 


4 


15 9 


26 


4 


15 9 


26 


4 


15 9 


26 


4 


15 9 


26 


4 


15 9 


26 


4 


15 9 


26 


2 


15 8 


26 


2 


15 8 


18 





15 


21 





18 


18 





15 


21 





18 


21 





18 


21 





18 


21 





18 


21 





18 


18 





13 6 


18 





13 6 


21 





18 


26 


2 


15 10 


15 10 


11 6 


26 





15 10 


26 





15 10 


26 





15 10 


26 





15 10 


26 





15 10 


26 





15 10 


26 





15 10 


26 





15 10 


26 


3 


15 10 



Height. 



Number 

of 
Windows 

in 
each Room. 



Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

in 
each Room. 



GREAT BRITAIN— <xmtinu«L 



Western - 
continued. 



Deyonport Barracks : 
Mount Wise • 



1806 



Stone 



20 



GeorgeVsquare • 



1756 



• - Brick noggingj 
rough cast outside. 



24 



Cumberland Barrack 



1757 



Limestone • 



17 



Picquet Barrack 



1805 



Limestone 



II 



Ligonier-square 



1758 



Limestone 



17 



ft. in. 



9 

9 

10 

10 

9 

15 

11 

11 

15 

15 

15 

15 

10 

13 

9 

9 

15 

15 

15 

15 

9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 



9 10 
9 10 
9 1* 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 10 
9 10 
9 10 
9 10 
9 10 
9 19 
9 19 
9 19 
9 8 
9 8 



9 8 

9 8 

9 5 

9 8 

9 8 

9 8 

9 10 
9 10 
9 9 
9 9 
9 » 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 10 



1 
1 
6 
5 
1 
2 
5 
5 
2 
2 
8 
2 
6 
5 



"W 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



47 



Number 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



none 
none 
none 
none 

DODO 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 



169. 



Number 

of Men each 

Room 

it 

regulated to 

hold. 



1 

1 
23 
21 

1 

9 
25 
25 


12 
12 

9 
23 
21 

1 

1 
12 
16 
24 
16 

10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
1 serjeant. 

11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
1 serjeant. 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 

1 serjeant 
12 

1 serjeant. 

12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

11 

2 Serjeants. 

11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



- - According to 
their construction. 



- - According to 
their construction. 



-- According to 
their construction. 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distsnce 

ffotn 

the Buildings. 



- - By the Devon- 
port Water Com- 
pany ; brought in 
pipes into the 
barrack square* 



--Bythe Devon- 
port Water Com- 
pany, brought in 
pipes into the 
barrack, and 2 
pumps. 



- - By the Devon- 
port Water Com- 
pany, brought in 
Eipes into the 
arraeks, and 3 
pumps. 



- - According to 
their construction. 



- - By the Devon- 
port Water Com- 
pany, brought in 
pipes into the 
barrack. 



- - By the Devon- 
port Water Com- 
pany, brought in 
pipes into the 
barrack, and ,2 
pumps. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



1 ablution room 



none 



For their Clothes, 



Afpsamodation 

for 

Cooking. 



1 cook-house. 



REMARKS. 



none 



none 



none 



none. 



digitized by 



F4 



r(l)( gfem 



"*> 



4 8 


RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED 1 


KINGDOM. 
















Number of 
















NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 












Rooms for the 








of 


of 




DISTRICT. 


of 


its 


what Materials 


use of Privates 
and Non- 








Windows 
in 


Fireplaces- 
in 
















BARRACK. 


Erection* 


Built. 


commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room. 


each Room. 




GREAT BRITAU 


Y— continued. 




















Western • 


Devon port Barracks— •cent*. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 








continued* 


Ligonier-square— contd. 








26 > 
26 3 
26 8 
26 3 
26 3 
26 8 


15 10 
15 JO 
15 10 
15 10 
15 10 
15 10 


9 10 
9 10 
9 10 
9 10 
9 10 
9 10 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 








Frederick-square - 


1758 - 


Limestone - 


11 


26 4 
26 4 
26 4 
26 4 
26 4 
26 4 
15 8 
15 8 
15 8 
26 8 
26 8 


15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
14 9 
11 4 

14 10 

15 9 
15 9 


9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 9 
9 11 
9 11 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
*2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 








Granby Barrack - 


1817 - 


Limestone - 


6 


31 10 
31 10 
31 10 
26 8 
31 9 
31 8 


18 1 
18 1 
18 9 
18 9 
18 8 
18 5 


10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 


2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 








Pendennis Barrack 


1779 • 


• - Stone walls and 
weather-boarding. 


18 


14 3 
14 8 
14 3 
14 3 
14 8 
14 3 
14 8 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 
14 8 
14 8 
14 3 
14 3 


14 3 
14 8 
14 8 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 
14 8 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 
14 8 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 
14 3 


8 10 
8 10 
8 10 
8 10 
8 10 
8 10 
8 10 
8 10 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 . 


I 


. 




St. Mawes* Castle 


1543 - 


Stone of the country 


1 


30 4 


diameter 


9 4 


8 


1 






St. Mary'*, Scilly, Artillery 


1814 - 


- - Granite rubble 


8 


16 3 


12 


8 11 


1 


1 






Barracks, for invalid ar- 




work, with slate 




16 3 


12 


8 11 


1 


1 






tillery men. 




roof. 




16 3 
16 3 
16 3 
16 5 
16 4 
16 3 


12 
12 
11 10 
11 10 
11 11 
11 10 


8 11 
8 11 
8 11 
8 11 
8 11 
8 11 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


1 

I 
1 
I 
1 
I 






Infantry Barrack • 


-- 1798; 


- - Granite rubble 


6 


20 1 


16 2 


8 


3 


1 








was fitted 


work, with rustic 




20 2 


19 10 


8 


2 


1 








from a store- 


quoins and slate 




20 2 


16 1 


10 


3 


1 








bouse to a 


roof* 




24 


20 4 


10 


4 


1 








barrack. 






15 8 
15 10 


14 4 
14 4 


6 2 
6 2 


2 
2 


1 
1 






Dartmouth Castle - 


1660 - 


limestone - 


4 


13 

8 

13 6 

18 


12 6 
10 
10 
15 


8 6 

8 6 
6 6 

9 3 


2 

1 
1 
4 


1 
none 
1 
1 





Digitized by 



Google 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



49 





f Number 
I of Ventilators 
J and 


Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

bold. 


Number of. 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children, 

usually 

occupying it. 


Uow the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

Drum 

the Buildings. 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 


REMARKS. 


■ oiner ivieans 
J of 
/ Ventilation. 


For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 






none 


11 
















none 


11 
















none 


11 
















none 


11 
















none 


11 
















none 


11 
















none 


9 


• 


ditto 


1 ablution room. 


none 


none. 






none 





















none 




9 
















none 




, 9 
















none 




9 
















none 




9 
















none 




1 seneant. 
















none 




1 riuto. 
















none 




1 ditto. 










/ 




I none 




9 










\ 




I none *- 


9 














' none 


14 


• 


ditto 


none 


none 


none* 






none 


14 
















none 


14 
















none 


14 
















none 


14 
















none 


14 
















none 





- - 1 room for 


- - 2 tanks imme- 


none 


1 wash-house - 


none. 






none - * 


6 


women and chil- 


diately m front 












none 


(i 


dren of the de- 


of the barracks, 












none * * 


6 


tachment, and an- 


and S wells with* 












none 


6 


other for master 


in the fortifica- 












none 


6 


gunner 


tions. 












none 


6 
















none 


6 
















none 


6 
















none 



















none 


6 
















none - • 



















none 


O 
















none 


6 
















none 


6 
















none • 



















none 


G 














i none 


6 














none • - 


20 




- - Well under 


none 


none 


none. 












drawbridge, and 


















cistern within the 


















works. 












none 


1 


l i 


• - From a well 


none 


none 


none. 






none 


1 
1 


( 


45 feet deep, good 












none 


!> « 


sweet water and 












none 


1 

1 
1 


/ 


a never -failing 












none 
none 


I 4 


supply 95 yards 
distant. 












none 
none 


1 

1 


} 6 














none * 


7 




- From the above 


none 


none 


none 


- This barrack has 




none 


8 




well, distant 58 






1 not been occupied 




none 


7 




yards. 






1 since 1816. 




none 


8 














none 


6 














none 


6 














none 


6 


• - 


- - From a pump 


none 


none 


none. 1 




noire 


3 




about 20 yards 






I 




none 


5 




distant, on the out- 






\ 




none 


6 




side of the building. 






gitizedbyV^OP^iC 







. 1 


1 1 


- 


V~ m ~ J M «_ 


■inn* • 


none 


none 


. i -%^ »ui occuyu 



50 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT. 


NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 


Date of 

its 
Erection. 


Of 

what Materials 
Built. 


Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 

of 

Windows 

in 

each Room. 


Number 

of 

Fireplaces 

in 
each Room. 




Length. 


Width. 


Height. 




GREAT BRI 
Yorkshire • 


TAIN— continued. 
Hull Barracks 


- Erected 
in the reign 
of Queen 
Anne, be- 
tween 1702 
and 1714. 


Brick, tiled • 


South wing ; 
9, averaging 

2 ditto - 

5 ditto - 


ft. in. 
20 2 

26 2 

20 2 


ft. m. 
16 7 

16 7 

17 I 


ft. in. 
8 2 

8 3 

8 6 


2 


1 












2 ditto • 


26 8 


17 S 


8 8 


9 • 


- 












North wing: 
2, averaging 
11 ditto - 


26 2 
20 2 


16 6 

16 8 


9 

9 


2 


1 












2 ditto - 


26 9 


7 2 


8 8 


• 


- 












12 ditto • 


20 2 


17 2 


8 6 


• 


- 






York Barracks 


1795 - 


Brick and slates - 


8 


12 


16 8 


9 * 


2 


1 












6 


14 


16 8 


9 5 


2 


1 












26 


28 2 


16 8 


9 5 


2 


1 






Leeds Cavalry Barracks - 


- Between 
1820 and 
1821. 


Brick and slates • 


6 
24 


24 • 

27 


16 
24 6 


10 
10 


2 

2 


1 
1 






Leeds Temporary Barracks 


Unknown 


Stone ♦ 


1 


21 


17 8 


10 2 


2 


1 stove - 












1 
2 


26 
18 


21 4 
11 2 


10 4 

8 7 


3 
t 


1 stove - 
1 stove - 












1 


41 2 


24 5 


10 


4 


1 stove - 












1 
1 


21 
28 10 


17 1 
20 4 


10 
9 10 


2 
3 


1 stove - 
1 stove - 












1 

1 


18 6 
55 6 


12 
21 


8 5 
8 5 


1 

4 


1 stove - 
-. 1 and 1 

stove. 












1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


41 
21 
18 10 
15 

18 9 


24 4 

17 7 

17 5 
14 

18 2 


8 6 
8 3 
8 7 
6 7 
10 6 


4 
8 

1 

1 
2 


1 stove • 

1 
none 
1 

2 stoves - 






Bradford Barracks • 


- . About 
the year 
1800. 


Stone • 


3 
1 


18 4 
17 10 


13 
8 10 


8 10 
7 10 


1 
1 


1 
1 












1 


27 9 


14 5 


6 8* 


1 


1 












1 


34 6 


21 3 


7 «• 


2 


2 










• 


1 


29 10 


uptime 


lby 7 V^» 


OQgl 


1 


1 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C 



51 



Number 
of Ventilators 

. and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



Number 

of Men each 

Room 

ia 

regulated to 

hold. 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



For their Clothes. 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



REMARKS. 



- - No other 
"ventilation. 



- - Ventilation 
through parti- 
tion wal) > be* 
tween front and 
back rooms. 



- - 2 ventilators 
in ceiling. 



- - 2 ventilators 
in ceiling of 
each. 

- - 2 ventilators 
in ceiling of 
each. 



10 
13 
10 
12 



12 
10 



12 
10 

2 

3 
8 

3 
12 

14 



14 

6and7 

30 



9 
12 



8 
28 



80 

10 

8 

8 

9 



9 

18 



- - 10 men, 1 wo- 
man, and 2 chil- 
dren. 

- • 12 men, 1 wo- 
man, and 2 chil- 
dren. 

- - 10 men, 1 wo- 
man, and 2 chil- 
dren. 

- - 12 men, 1 wo- 
man, and 2 chil- 
dren. 

- ditto. 

- - 10 men, 1 wo- 
man, and 2 chil- 
dren* 

- - 12 men, 1 wo- 
man, and 2 chil- 
dren. 

- - 10 men, 1 wo- 
man, and 2 chil- 
dren. 

- • 2 men, 2 wo- 
men, and S chil- 
dren. 

- - 2 men, 2 wo- 
men, and S chil- 
dren. 

- • 8 men, 1 wo- 
man, and 3 chil- 
dren, in half the 
number of rooms. 



- - 2 men, 1 wo- 
man, and from 1 
to 4 children. 

- - 11 men, 1 wo- 
man, and from 1 
to 4 children. 



- - About 10 men, 

1 woman, and 2 
or S children in 
each. 

- ditto. 

- - About 4 men 
in each. 

• • About 20 men, 

2 women, and S 
or 4 children. 
About 6 men. 

- - About 8 men, 

1 woman, and 1 
or 2 children. 
About 6 men. 

- - About 20 men, 

2 women, and 3 
or 4 children. 

- ditto. 

"1 Occupied by 2 
j pay-serjeants. 
About 6 men. 

- - 1 man, 1 wo- 
man, and 1 or 2 
children. 

• - 1 man, 1 wo- 
man, and 1 or 2 
children. 

- - 8 men, 1 wo- 
man, and 2 or 3 
children. 

• • 16 men, 2 wo- 
men, and 4 or 5 
children. 

- - 8 men, 1 wo- 
man, and 2 or 3 
children. 



• - The barracks 
are supplied with 
water from 4 
pomps, 7 tanks, 
and 1 well. 

Distances from 
Barrack; 

feet. 
No. 1 tank - 620 

- 2 ditto - 326 

- 8 ditto - 404 

- 9 ditto - 404 

- 10 ditto • 663 

- 11 ditto - 563 
No. 4 pump be- 
tween barracks. 

- 5 ditto - 174 

- 6 ditto • 277 

- 7 ditto - 354 
Well - - 404 



- - By 4 pumps ; 
viz. two, 43 ft. 6 
in., and two, 47 ft. 
from the build- 
ings. 



- • By the Leeds 
Waterworks Com- 
pany, and within 
37 1 feet from the 
buildings ; also 
from 4 wells with 
pumps. 



- - By the Leeds 
Waterworks Com- 
pany, on the pre- 
mises. 



- - 2 wells and 2 
pumps (the latter 
almost adjoining 
the buildings). 



2 wash-houses 



2 cooking-houses. 



1 wash-house 



4 cooking-houses. 



1 wash-house 



2 cooking houses. 



none 



1 cook-house 



1 cook-house 



--This is a hired 
building, situate in 
the town of Leeds; 
it is at present un- 
occupied. 



- . These are old 
buildings ?utcW- 
ed ia lfc**« ««A 



pic 



,4 as \»nadtt% 



»T^ ese w®**** 






Die itized by 



Google 



52 


RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED 


KINGDOM. 










NAME 


Date of 1 Of 


Number of 
Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 




DISTRICT. 


of 


. 


what Materials 


Rooms for the 
use of Privates 




of 
Windows 


of 
Fireplaces 




its 


















and Non- 








in 


in 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built. 


commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room. 


each Room. 




GREAT BRITAIN— continued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 








Yorkshire 


Scarborough Castle Bar* 


Unknown 


Brick, and tiled 


1 


14 8 


11 


7 9 


1 






continued. 


racks. 






1 
2 

1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


14 4 

26 9 
26 6 

26 7 

27 
27 
27 6 

27 5 

28 
28 


13 9 
12 3 

14 4 
12 2 
18 7 
14 8 
16 7 
14 10 
14 4 
16 9 


7 9 

8 8 
8 8 
8 8 
8 5 
8 6 
7 9 
7 9 
7 9 
7 9 


1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 








Halifax Temporary Bar- 


Unknown. 


Stone ... 


1 


14 3 


12 6 


11 


2 








racks. 






1 
1 

1 
1 

1 
1 


18 

13 6 
20 8 

14 3 

13 7 

14 3 


15 6 
18 6 
18 7 
14 1 
13 6 
12 2 


10 
10 4 
13 6 
10 9 
10 5 
10 2 


3 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 














1 


13 8 


13 8 


6 


8 


none 












1 


17 11 


12 


6 


2 


none 












1 


13 10 


13 9 


6 


1 














1 


11 10 


10 11 


5 9 


1 














1 


19 8 


14 7 


6 


3 


none 












1 


16 6 


10 6 


6 


2 


none 






Guernsey: 




















Guernsey and 


In the Citadel, Fori George, 


1780 to 


Brick - 


30 


17 


16 5 


9 6 


1 


1 




Aldermt. 


3 ranges of Barracks, A, 
B,andC, for Infantry. 


1784. 




1 


17 


15 8 


9 6 


- 21 upper 












2 


18 6 


17 


9 6 


rooms, 4ft. 






















5 in. high, 






















27$ in. wide. 






















12 lower 






















rooms, 5ft 






















5 in. high, 






















27) in.wide, 








A barrack for Artillery 


About 1811. 


Stone • 


3 


81 


21 


10 8 


3 


1 






within the Lines of Fort 














6. 5. by 3.9. 








George. 






«1 


20 8 


21 


10 8 


2 ditto - 


1 












2 


16 


18 


10 8 


1 ditto - 


• 












a 2 


16 


10 


10 8 


1 ditto • 


1 












2 


81 


21 


10 7 


3 ditto - 


1 












*1 


15 


12 


10 7 


1 ditto - 


1 












2 


16 


10 


10 7 


2 ditto • 


1 






A range of Barracks for In* 


1813 


Brick ... 


4 


28 


19 


12 


2 








fan try, at Jerboarg, 2 














6. 6. by 4. 








miles from Fort George. 






1 


15 


13 


9 


1 

5. 6. by 8. 6. 








Two ranges of Barracks at 
Vale Castle, for Infantry, 


Unknown 


Stone ... 


2 


42 


16 9 


9 8 


5 




















4. 9. by 3. 4. 








4 J miles from Fort 






2 


42 


16 9 


9 7 


5 








George. 






1 

1 

1 

1 
2 


61 4 

61 4 

61 1 

60 6 
16 


17 

17 

16 

16 
12 


9 6 

9 6 

7 

7 
7 


8. 9. by 8. 

8 
4. 8. by 3. 

4. by 4. 4. 

8 
4. 8. by 8. 

7 

8. 9. by 3. 4. 

7 ditto • 

1 ditto - 








A range of Barracks at 
Castle Cornet, for Artil- 


1791 


Stone • 


1 


32 8 


17 


10 3 


4 




















5.3.by2.10. 








lery, 1 i mile from 






1 


32 3 


17 


10 8 


8 








Tort George. 






1 
1 


17 
17 


15 


10 3 

iH, 
by Veil 


5. 6. by 8. 8. 

2 
5.3. by 2. 10. 
-x^2 


















Digitized 


5. 6. by 3. 8. 







} 



ItELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



53 



Number 
of Ventilators 

tod 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



: 



- - The upper 
rooms have each 
an aperture 
through their 
ceilings. 



- - None exists 
at present, but 
it can be easily 
effected through 
the ceilings. 



Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 



- 2 air-flues in 

each. 

Not any 

1 in each 



--Not any ex- 
isting. 



2 
2 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



2 



6 

11 

7 
6 
6 
6 
7 
5 
S 
11 
6 



16 

14 
1 
1 

16 
1 
1 



14 

1 

21 
21 

28 

28 
IT 

17 

1 

14 
14 

1 
1 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



• - 10 men, 1 wo- 
man and 2 chil- 
dren, in some of 
the rooms. 



- • Total occupa- 
tion usually 75 
men. 14 women, 
15 children. 



• • All the rooms 
are fully .occu- 
pied. 



ditto 



ditto 



- - There are only 
2 men, 2 women, 
and 8 children in 
this barrack. 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 
the Buildings. 



• - This Barrack 
is occupied by 2 
raeo, 2 women, 
and IS children. 



— Jir*. 



• - The water is 
supplied by 1 well 
540 feet from the 
buildings. 



- - The water is 
supplied into a 
tank at the bar- 
racks, from a head 
of water about 
three-fourths of a 
mile from the 
buildings. 



- - The water in 
the well in the 
Barrack - square, 
not being fit for 
drinking, a supply 
is obtained at 330 
yds. distant, within 
the lines. 



- - From a spring 
constantly flowing, 
170 yards distant. 



- - Constant sup- 
ply from a well 
in the barrack 
yard. 

- - From 2 wells, 
1 in the barrack 
square, and one 
400 yds. distant, 
outside the Castle. 



- - From a tank, 
which receives the 
rain-water from 
the roof. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



- • None, except 
in their rooms. 



none 



• - Sea bathing 
close to the fort. 



- • Sea bathing 
near the barrack. 



Sea bathing near 



Sea bathing near 



Sea bathing near 



For their Clothes. 



- -None, except 
in their rooms. 



- - 1 small wash- 
house. 



none 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



1 cooking-place - 



- - For cooking, 
ample, in 2 case- 
mates, with 8 boil- 
ers in each, and a 
large oven for 
baking. 



• The accommo- 
dation for cooking, 
ample; 9 boilers 
and an oven for 
baking. 



REMARKS. 



- - This is a hired 
building situated 
in the town of Ha- 
lifax. 



- The greater por- 
tion of married 
women and their 
children are allow- 
ed to occupy a 
casemate, 72 feet 
long, 14 ft. wide, 
10 ft high. 



1 This 



room is 



temporarily occu* 

pied as a barrack 

office. 
9 One of these 

rooms is occupied 
by the librarian, under the Board's 
authority, 9th July 1845. J.G.F . 

515. 

9 This room is temporarily oc- 
cupied as a barrack office. 



2 boilers. 



13 boilers • 



- - None, except in 
barrack rooms. 



• - It is proposed 
to take down these 
barsacks. 



Digiti: 



ed by 



Gookle 



54 


RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN 


THE UNITED KINGDOM 


1 








DISTRICT. 


NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 


Date of 

its 
Erection. 


Of 

what Materials 

Built. 


Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 


(Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 

of 

Windows 

in 

each Room. 


Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

in 
each Room, 




and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 




GREAT BRITAIN— continued. 




















Guernsey and 


G UEitNSEY — continued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft* in. 








Aldirney— 
continued. 


A range of Barracks for 
Infantry at Grande Rocque, 
5 miles from Fort George. 

Alderney : 


1808 - 


Stone « • 


1 
1 


54 
14 


21 10 
10 


10 6 
10 6 


9 

5. 10. by 4.5. 

1 
5. 6. by 4.9. 


2 

1 






Butes Barracks, for Artillery 


1813 - 


Stone * 


2 


81 2 


16 10 


10 


1 
5.6. by 8.0. 

1 
1.6. by 1.3. 


1 
































2 


16 10 


It 2 


10 


1 
5. 6. by 8.0. 

1 
1.6. by 1.3. 


1 






Longy Barracks, for Infan- 
try. 


1801 - 


Stone • 


4 


22 

21 9 
21 9 
83 


18 

18 
18 
18 


9 10 

9 10 
9 10 
9 10 


1 
6.0. by 2. 6. 

3.0. by 2. 8. 

ditto 

ditto 
4 
6.0. by 2. 6. 


1 

1 

1 
1 






Corblets Barracks, for in- 
fantry. 


1801 - 


Stone * 


4 


21 10 


18 9 


10 6 


1 

6.0. by 2. 6. 
2 


1 












S 


21 10 
21 10 
83 

17 9 


18 9 
18 9 
18 9 

14 


10 6 
10 6 
10 6 

6 6 


2. 3. by 1.8. 
ditto 
ditto 
4 

6.0. by 2. 6. 
- - 1 in 
each room, 
4. 6. by 
1.8. 


1 
1 

1 

1 






Clonque Barracks, for In- 
fantry. 


1801 - 


Stone • 


1 


83 


18 


10 


3 
6.2.by2J0. 


1 




Jersey • 


Fort Regent - 


- - Foun- 
dation stone 
laid in 
1806, com- 
pleted in 
1816. 


- - Masonry and 
Brickwork. 


2 
14 

6 
9 1 
*1 


46 
46 
42 
20 
16 
22 


16 
16 
16 

12 

13 
5 


--71ft 
to spring 
of arch. 


2 
2 
2 
1 

1 
1 


1 

1 
1 
1 

1 
1 






Elizabeth Castle 


- - Reign 
of Queen 
Elizabeth, 
1560. 


ditto • 


*2 

1 

1 

1 

24 


43 6 

28 
24 6 
15 
20 


16 

19 
19 
11 6 
16 


10 


- - 3 in 

one, 5 in 
the oth'ef. 

2 

2 

2 

2 


1 

1 
1 
1 

1 












12 


17 9 


13 


• 


1 


1 






St. Peter's 


1812-18 


ditto • 


16 

8 


SO 
14 


17 9 
13 3 


10 6 


2 
1 


1 
1 






Greve de Lecq 


1811-12 


ditto • 


8 
4 


80 
14 


10 
13 


10 


2 
1 


1 
1 






Bonne Nuit • 


1811-12 


ditto - 


6 


29 6 


17 9 


10 2 


2 


1 






Rozel - 


1811-12 


ditto - 

1 


6 

2 


27 
15 


ftifc 


4$£ 


,o<pg 


e I 





I 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



il 



Number 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



- - Not any ex- 
isting. 



- • None, but it 
can be easily 
effected through 
the ceilings. 



- - None, but it 
can be easily 
effected through 
the ceilings. 



ditto 



ditto 



- • 1 ventilator 
in the roof of 
each casemate. 




Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 



SO 
1 

14 



10 



10 
10 
18 



10 



10 

10 
20 



w 



22 

20 

10 

6 

1 ftta&sarje&iit 
I ditto* 



IS 



17 

S 

s 

7 



IS 

2 



IS 



11 

1 



Number of 

Men, Women* 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



Unoccupied 



• - la oae room, 
1 non-commis- 
sioned officer, 1 
woman, 4 chil- 
dren ; in another, 
1 man, 1 woman, 
6 children. 
- - 1 maa, 1 wo- 
man, 1 child. 



Unoccupied 



ditto 



ditto. 



- • I man, 1 wo* 
man* S children. 

28 

40 

266 

36 

2 



Empty 



ditto, 
ditto., 
ditto. 

• - 11 only oc- 
cupied. 

6 iu each. Empty 

• - 16, in three 
rooms. 



Let 



Let. 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



• • Fiam a well 
40 yards distent 
from the barrack, 
but within the 
Ordnance pro- 
perty. 

• - From a tank 
in the barrack 
square, which re- 
ceives the rain 
water from the 
roofs. 



- • From a tank 
200 yards distant 



- - From a spring 
500 yards distant. 



• - From a spring 
200 yards distant. 

- - Well and 
pump on the 
premises. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



Sea bathing near 



• - Sea bathing 
300 yards distant. 



• • Sea bathing 
close to the bar- 
racks. 



• • Sea bathing 
close to the bar* 
racks. 



- • Sea bathing 
close to the bar* 
racks. 



- Pump; 2 tanks 
on the premises. 



- - 6 tanks, 1 well, 
and pump. 



- - 2 wells, one 
with pump and 
one with draw- 
bucket, on the 
premises. 

- - Cistern and 
pump ; rain water 
on the premises. 

• - Good stream 
of water 12 yards 
distance. 

- Well and pump 
on the premises. 



none 



none 



For their Clothes. 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



- • A washing 
room, with 2 iron 
boilers. 



- - A cook-house, 
with 4 boilers. 



• • Ample ; 2 
boilers. 



• • Ample; 3 
boilers and an 
iron oven. 



• • Ample ; 3 
boilers. 



- - 2 cooking* 
rooms, with IS 
iron boilers. 



* One of these rooms is at present 
larder ; the other is at one end of the w 
suggested to be discontinued as a sen* 
tion room suggested, per Board's ordle 



- Washing in bar- 
racks. 



- • Wash-house, 
with 2 coppers ; 
hospital, 1 ditto. 



noue 



- Cooking in cool 
houses. 






none 



gitized by 



- - 1 kitchen fo 
coookiog. 



^-> • \ none. 

GOO; 






56 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



IRELAND. 











Number of 














NAME 


Dale of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 




DISTRICT. 


of 




what Materials 


Rooms for the 






of 
Windows 


of 
Fireplaces 




its 


use of Privates 


















and Non- 








in 


in 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built 


commissioned 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room. 


each Room. 










Officers. 
















North Division: 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


/t. in. 








Dublin 


Aldborough House - 




Brick and stone - 




59 10 
24 6 
22 3 

35 10 
59 10 
40 7 
17 4 
63 
32 9 
13 3 
27 9 
22 7 

36 
38 


82 

17 
22 6 
22 6 
22 6 

18 6 
22 
80 3 
13 3 
11 
17 10 
13 
21 8 

19 


20 
20 
20 
20 
15 
15 
15 
20 4 
10 2 
10 2 
9 6 
7 6 
25 10 
10 


7 
8 
2 
4 
6 
5 
2 
6 
2 
2 
S 
2 
3 
4 


2 

9 












9 


17 4 


10 8 


18 


1 


none 






Royal Barracks 


- - Royal- 


• Rubble, masonry, 


16 


18 6 


16 


10 10 


1 










square in 


and cut stone. 


1 


13 9 


16 


10 10 


1 










1701,Pala- 




1 


14 10 


10 


10 10 


1 










tine-square 




7 


18 5 


16 


10 4 


1 










in 1767, 




2 


19 9 


16 


10 4 


1 










Cavalry-sq. 




2 


15 10 


16 


10 4 


1 










and hospital 




1 


14 9 


16 


10 4 


2 










in 1790; 




6 


38 2 


16 


10 4 


3 


2 








the remain* 






















ing build* 






















ings in 




1 


23 3 


16 


10 4 


2 


1 






- 


1825. 




1 

9 
3 
2 
6 
1 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 
2 
7 
2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 

18 
1 
2 

23 
6 

33 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
6 
1 
1 
1 
3 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 


14 10 

18 5 

19 8 

14 4 
38 2 

15 9 
9 11 

14 8 
34 8 
21 2 
14 3 

18 5 

16 8 

16 8 

17 

14 6 

15 10 
9 10 

14 3 

19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
80 6 
52 8 
23 6 

16 
23 6 
23 6 
16 
23 6 
23 6 
16 
16 
16 
23 6 
28 10 
23 10 
16 
28 10 
23 10 
16 


16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
16 
9 10 
14 2 
14 2 
14 2 
14 2 
14 2 
14 2 
14 2 

14 2 
22 6 

22 6 
16 2 

15 6 

16 
16 

15 6 

16 
16 
15 6 

15 6 

16 
16 

23 6 
16 
16 
23 6 
16 
16 


9 4 

9 4 
9 4 
9 4 
9 4 
9 4 
9 4 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
11 10 

11 10 
10 6 
10 6 
10 6 
10 6 

9 9 
9 9 
9 9 

12 
12 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

9 

9 

9 

9 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

9 

9 

9 


2 

2 

1 
2 
2 
10 
10 
. 2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 
2 
4 
2 
1 
4 
2 
-> 1 


T * 






V 






1 

1 


16 
23 6 


16 
16 


9, Of 

zecfrb^ 


ao< 


?lei 












1 

a 


78 6 

i in a. 


23 

OO A 


9 

o n 




2 

o 





RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &.C. 



57 



IRELAND. 



Number 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 



Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

bold. 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it 



} ■ , 




49 
15 
15 
26 

48 
88 

8 
66 

9 

4 
14 

7 
24 
22 

6 



8 
6 
7 
8 
8 
8 
8 
19 



11 




8 
8 
8 
19 
8 
6 
5 

19 

12 

5 

8 

8 

8 

11 

11 

11 

6 

6 

8 

5 

2 

8 

9 

8 

4 

8 

29 

29 

5 

2 

IS 

11 

9 

5 

12 

2 

9 

5 

6 

18 

10 

6 

19 

11 

8 

2 

2 

44 

41 

71 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



- - Supplied by 
the Pipe Water 
Company from 
Dublin,frora their 
reservoir about 
half a mile dis- 
tant from the bar- 
rack. 



- • Supplied from 
a pood in the 
ground attached 
to the Vice-regal 
Lodge, about a 
mile from the bar- 
racks. There are 
also five wells 
with pumps dis- 
tributed about the 
barracks. 



Accommodation for Washing* 



For the Men. 



For their Clothes. 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



S kitchens 



REMARKS. 



- - This is a hired 
building. 
These rooms were 
formerly school- 
rooms, and radiate 
from a centre. They 
are warmed by 
steam apparatus, 
with pipes passing 
under the floor. 
There is also a 
fireplace in the 
centre room, which 
is occupied as a 
kitchen. 



4 kitchens. 



\Digitized by 



Google 



** 


RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN 


THE UNITED KINGDOM, 
















Number of 














NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 




DISTRICT. 


of 




what Materials 


Rooms for the 






of 


of 
Fireplaces 




iti 


use of Privates 








Windows 












and Non- 








in 


in 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built 


commissioned 


Length. 


Width. 


Height 


each Room. 


each Room, 












Officers. 














IRELAND-* 


xnttmuei. 
















. 




Dtouh 


North Division—- continued. 






ft. in. 


ft. M. 


ft. in. 








conttftu$d» 


Pfogheda, Mill Mount • 


1709 - 


Rubble itone 




24 
24 
18 6 


18 6 
18 6 
18 1 


8 
8 
8 


















18 S 
18 4 
18 6 
18 4 
18 4 
24 
94 


17 8 
17 
17 9 

17 9 
16 10 

18 9 
18 9 


8 

8 

9 3 
9 8 
9 3 

8 

9 3 










Fiir Street - 


1796 - 


• - Rubble stone, 
cut itone, and brick. 




45 6 
99 
21 8 
29 
26 
21 8 


90 4 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 


9 3 
IS 6 
IS 6 
11 9 
19 3 
19 3 


j. 








Naran - 


1749 


Stone - 




17 10 
22 
21 S 
28 
26 S 
21 


15 
IS 6 

15 6 
25 11 
23 6 

16 


11 6 
11 6 
11 6 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 










Trim - 


18S0 - 


Stone - 




32 


23 


11 










South Division ; 








32 
32 
82 


23 
23 
23 


11 
11 
11 










Portobello 


- • 1810, 


- • Robbie masonry, 


19 


52 


25 3 


10 6 


6 










additions 


and part lined with 


9S 


SS 


18 


11 












built in 


briok. 


11 


21 4 


18 


10 11 












1840,1841, 






28 


18 


11 












and 1849. 




16 


12 11 
12 S 
95 1 


18 9 
10 
20 


10 10 
10 10 
10 11 










Ship Street - 




Brick ... 


4* 
19 


40 5 
18 10 
18 10 
18 7 
68 6 
10 6 
99 9 
18 7 
18 9 
IS S 


18 l{ 
16 2 
10 9 
16 10 
S3 

14 9 

18 4 
16 10 

15 6 

19 8 


12 
9 6 
9 6 

11 
9 6 

10 9 

10 9 

11 

8 8 

9 4 


10 








Pigeon Home Fort - 


1814 • 


. . Rubble masonry 
and brickwork. 




18 
16 4 

19 


16 

16 

7 


IS 8 
IS 8 
10 6 




none 














98 6 
98 6 

98 6 
67 
90 
32 S 

96 8 

99 6 
96 9 


99 
99 
99 

17 8 
17 
17 4 
90 9 
90 9 
90 


11 9 

10 8 

8 8 

9 8 
9 
9 4 

19 
10 6 
10 6 










Beggtrs Bash ... 


1897 • 


• • Rubble masonry, 
lined with brick. 


15 


14 S 
89 4 

99 


14 3 
99 

19 


19 
19 
19 










ArUow .... 


1780 - 


Rabble masonry - 


9 
6 


99 
99 


99 

17 6 


9 
9 










West Division; 






















Mountjoy • 


1897 • 


Rubble masonry • 




IS 7 
IS 10 

18 
9 9 

15 5 

19 1 


10 6 
IS 7 
19 10 
19 10 
14 S 
19 


8 10 
8 10 
10 3 
10 3 
8 3 
8 










_ . . 







_ 


_ - 


, 




_ . 







Digitized by 



Google 



f" 









RELATIVE TO 


THE DATE OF ERECTION, 


MATERIALS, 


8tc. 


59 




Number 


Number 


Number of 


How the Barrack 
is 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 






of Ventilators 


of Men each 


Men, Women, 


8upplind with 












and 


Room 


and 








REtfrAhKS. 




other Means 


is 


Children 


Water, 
and the Distance 






for 




of 
Ventilation. 


regulated to 
hold. 


usually 
occupying it 


from 
the Buildings. 


For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 


Cooking. 






none • 


19 


12 


- • A tank, which 


none 


none 


1 kitchen. 






none - 


19 


12 


is supplied by 












none 


6 





rain-water from 












none 


6 





the roof, not 50 












none 


8 


10 


Tarda from the 
building. 












none 


8 


10 












none 


8 


10 














none 


6 

















none 


18 


18 














none 


IS 


18 














none 


14 


\ • • • 


• - Well, with a 


none 


none 


none 


• • This is a hired 




none 


12 




pomp close to 








building. 




none 
none • 


12 
12 


* Seldom occupied. 


the barrack, in 
the rear. 












none - 


12 
















none • 


12 
















none 


1 


1 


--Water is taken 


none 


none 


none 


- - Stafeeerjeants' 




none - 


8 


8 


from the river. 








room. 




none 


9 


10 


which runs close 












none 


18 


18 


to the barrack 












none • 


16 


16 


wall. 












none • 


9 


8 














none - 


18 


IT 


- - By a pump, 
which is close to 


none 


none 


1 kitchen. 






none • 


18 


18 












none 


18 


18 


the men's bar- 












none - 


18 


IT 


rack in the square* 












none 


25 


25 


--13 wells, with 


none 


Swash-houses - 


2 kitchens - 


• - Two ablution 




none • - 


15 


IT 


pumps, distribut- 
ed about the bar- 








rooms ordered to 




none 


8 


4 








be estimated for. 




none • 


14 


13 


racks; two rain- 












none 


8 





water pumps; 8 












none - 


1 


6 


soft-water pumps, 












none - 


1 

16 
8 


1 

io 

16 


from canal. 

- - 1 well and 
pump in the bar- 








* These 4 rooms 




none • 
none " v * 








were formerly each 




none * * 


8 


16 


rack ; 6 cocks 








in 2 divisions, but 




none - • 


6 


14 


from City Water- 








the partitions have 




none • - 


60 


T6 


works in soldiers' 








, been lately re- 




none 


7 


16 


barracks. 








moved ; width 




none • 


10 


24 










given is. average, 




none - 


1 


10 










22ft. 6 ul and 13 




none - • 


1 


6 










ft 9 in. 




none • 


2 


5 










Extensive im- 
provements are in 




none • 


I 


T 


- - 4 water-tanks 


none 


- - 1 wash-house, 


- - 1 cook-house. 


contemplation. 




none 


1 


2 


about the bar- 




with 3 boilers. 


with 8 boilers. 






none 


2 





racks. 












none - 


IT 


18 














none • 


IT 


20 














none • 


IT 


10 














S ventilators - 


84 


32 














! none - 


8 


8 














. 8 loopholes - 

:, 4 ditto 


13 
16 


12 

io 














i io ditto 


IT 


16 














10 ditto 


16 


14 












/ 1 shatter open* 
/ 1 ditto - 


1 


6 


-- 1 pumps, with- 


none 


1 wash-house] - 


1 cook-house. 




20 


23 


in 100 ft of sol- 1 








/ joone . 


11 


11 


diets' barracks. 1 








/none m 


12 


8 


-• 1 pump, with- 1 none 


1 wash-house • 


none - 


-These barracks are 


ter. 


10 


4 


inlOOft. 1 


i 1 


at present occupied 
by the constabulary* 




* 


42 


- . 4 pomps, con- 1 uoue 
venienUyeitutted 1 


1 1 wuMxm* - 1 1 c«ok-boturi » 
) 


- - The principal 
part of this build- 


£ ' ^ l 


^Undefined. 




within the Vsr- 1 
racfcjojuau*, \ 


1 


1 ing is devoted to 
1 the wants of the 
1 Ordnance 8urvey 
l of Ireland, such as 


v, 


' # ^ 


Rooms. Men. 
36 for 16 


16 


»*a.«*f0'E»eB,cV 


«e\D0ne 


M iwuWl "^g 


ftiUfl&Q© 


l drawing rooms, 
1 engraving rooms, 



6o 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT. 



NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 



Date of 

its 
Erection. 



Of 

what Materials 

Built 



Number of 
Sleeping 
Rooms for the 
use of Privates 
! aod Non- 
commissioned 
I Officers. 



Dimensions of each Room. 



Length. 



Width. 



Height. 



Number 

of 

Windows 

in 

each Room. 



Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

in 
each Room. 



IRELAND— contimiaL 

West Division— &mtmu*L 
Island Bridge 



Dublin 
continual. 



MagaaineFort 



Royal Infirmary 

Athy - 

Baltinglass - 
Maryborough 

Naas - 

Newbridge 



Kilkenny Division : 
Carlow • 



Castlecomer - 



•n Fort 



Rubble masonry 



Rubble masonry 



1T87 



1710 



1834 



18S2 



1814 



1817 



1710 



1810 



New Ross 



Waterford„ Artillery 



Rubble stone 

Rubble masonry 

Rubble musonry 
Rubble masonry 

Rubble masonry 
Rubble masonry 



• - Walls of rubble 
masonry, roo' slated. 



• • Walls of ruuole 
masonry, roofs slated. 

- - Walls of rubble 
masonry, roofs slated. 



--Walls of rubble 
masonry, roofs slated. 



1701 - - - Walls of rubble 
masonry, roofs slated. 



1805 



Rubble masonry 



6 
17 



12 
24 

86 
62 



2 
5 

4 
1 

6 
4 

4 

1 
2 
8 



24 
12 



19 6 
51 



15 6 
53 



49 
22 
15 
49 
22 
44 



28 II 

24 8 

24 2 

18 

18 

16 

17 



82 



12 

82 

12 

88 



18 2 

25 6 

25 8 

16 4 

28 4 

28 4 

16 11 

29 

17 6 
17 



88 8 

12 



14 
20 



14 

15 



22 

22 

9 

22 

22 

80 

21 

17 

22 

18 6 
11 
11 

15 



20 



10 
18 

10 
18 



16 2 

18 5 

22 6 

18 7 

16 10 
16 10 
11 1 

15 6 
15 6 
15 6 



18 
10 



85 





17 


9 


22 





28 


4 


18 





28 





28 






28 

16 4 

17 10 
22 4 

18 

22 

22 



8 6 
10 



9 
9 



13 

18 

18 

13 
18 

14 

9 2 

9 2 

9 2 

9 5 

8 9 

8 9 

8 6 



11 



11 
11 

9 9 
10 11 



9 

9 

9 

10 



10 7 

8 10 

11 

9 4 

9 2 
9 2 



10 6 
10 6 



8 with 12 



11 
10 
6 
4 
9 
3 
7 
1 
2 



12 with 2 
11 .» 1 



9 6 

9 6 

9 6 

9 6 

9 6 

8 

10 



Digitized by 



Google 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OP ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



6l 



r 



Number 
of Ventilators 

und 
other Memos 

of 
Ventilation. 



none - 


5 for 36 


none 


1 ,. 34 


nooe 


• 1 „ M 


none 


1 „ M 


none 


S ,. 24 


none - 


1 „ 20 


none 


S „ 18 


none 


• 1 ., « 


none • 


• 4 „ 1 


none • 


• » ,. 2 


- - The room. 


i 1 


are loopholed. 


23 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 



none 
none 



none 
none 



none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 



none 
none. 



Number 


Number of 


of Men each 


Men, Women, 


Room 


and 


is 


Children 


regulated to 


usually 


hold. 


occupying it. 



Rooms. Men, 



16 

8 

4 
16 

8 
14 

14 
11 
14 

2 

6 

1 

- - 6 rooms 7 
men, and 1 room 
8 men. 



2 
16 

1 
16 



none 
nooe 
none 
none 

0000 

aoae 



• 




2 


- 




11 


- 




15 


- 




2 


• 




12 


• 




12 


- 




2 


. 




12 


- 




10 






8 






21 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


12 


- 


- 


13 




- 


2 




. 


SO 




• 


75 




- 


860 



27 

26 

26 

26 

18 

18 

17 



4 

4 

4 
15 



12 
6 
2 

12 
6 

12 

15 

11 

20 

4 

6 

S 

11 



25 



5 
IS 

4 
19 



4 
14 
16 

2 

10 

10 

6 

14 
11 
11 



2S 



21 

8 
12 
16 

8 

17 

18 



21 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 
the Buildings. 



- - 2 pumps close 
to the barracks. 
The River Liffy 
runs close by and 
supplies it with 
water. 



- - 1 tank for 
10,000 gallons, 
and S cisterns, 1 
fur 250 gallons, 
1 for 220 gal- 
lons, and 1 for 
210 gallons ; also 
a well and pump. 

- - Supplied by 
pipes from a pond 
in the Phcenii 
Park. 



- - By a pump in 
the barrack square 



- - 1 pump in the 
yard. 

- - 1 pump S7 
feet from the 
building. 



--5 pumps 21 
yards from the 
house. 

• - By 5 pumps 
within 5 yards of 
the building. 

• -2 pumps 20 
feet from build* 
ings. 

- - 1 iron pump 
about 10 yards 
from buildings. 

- - 2 cast-iron 
pumps about 40 
yards from build- 
ings. 

- - 4 cast-iron 
pumps and two 
underground tanks 
to receive rain 
water for use of 
fire engine, close 
to buildings. 

- - 1 pump 57 
feet from build* 
ing. 



- • 1 pump 100 
feet from build- 
ings, 1 ditto 45 
feet. 

- - S pumps 82 
feet from build- 
ings. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



none 



1 wash-house - 



none 



none 



none 



2 sheds - 



For their Clothes. 



1 wash-house 



1 laundry 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



1 cook-house. 



1 cook-bouse - 



1 cook-house. 



1 cook-house. 



REMARKS. 



-The men's clothes 
are washed in the 
cook-house. 



none 



none 



1 cook-house 

1 cook-house. 

2 houses. 



- 1 cook-house, 
with 4 boilers. 



2 cooking-houses. 



• 1 cook-house, 
with 3 boilers. 



- 4 cook-houses, 
with 4 boilers in 
each. 



1 cook-bouse. 



- 2 cook-houses. 



Digiti: 



- - 1 privates' and 
1 Serjeants' room 
occupied by pen- 
sioners, exclusive 
of the above. 



- There is a water 
tank in course of 
construction, cal- 
culated to hold 
10,000 gallons. 

- - A wash-house 
for the purpose of 
washing clothes io, 
is authorised to be 
erected, and for 
which a special 
contract is being 
prepared. 



6 cooking-houses I • - 2 new tanks 
I authorized io Bar- 
rack Annual Estimate 1846-47 to 

j~:_ 1 A AAA ~_11 iU- * '« 



63 


RETURN FROM BACH BARRACK IN 


THE UNI 


TED KINGDOM. 
















Number of 
















NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 










what Materials 


Rooms for the 








of 
Windows 


of 
Fireplaces 




DISTRICT, 


of 


its 


use of Privates 


















aod Non- 








in 


in 






BARRACK. 


Erection* 


Built. 


Commuisioned 


Length. 


Width. 


Height 


each Room. 


each Room. 










Officers. 














IRELAND^ 


continued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. m. 








Dublin 


Kilkenny Division— continued. 


















conttnutd* 


Wexford 


1824 - 


. - Walls of rabble 


4 


40 6 


28 6 


11 


4 












masonry, roof slated, 


1 

1 


20 8 
18 


16 8 
14 8 


10 
9 4 


2 
2 






Athlowb - 


Athlone, Artillery - 


1806 - 


Stone - 


8 


86 
86 
86 
86 
86 
20 
20 
29 


21 
21 
21 
21 
21 
12 
12 
18 10 


9 6 
9 6 
9 6 
9 6 
9 6 
10 
10 
8 7 


4 
5 
6 
5 
5 
2 
2 
1 








Ditto, Cavalry 


1806 • 


ditto - 


15 


88 4 
88 4 
88 4 
88 4 
12 
11 10 
17 9 
21 7 
17 8 
9 
9 
88 4 
88 4 
88 4 
88 4 


21 
21 
21 
21 
8 10 
11 7 
20 
20 

20 
8 6 
8 6 

21 
21 
21 
21 


10 9 

10 9 
12 
12 
12 
12 

11 
11 

11 
8 
8 

10 9 
10 9 

12 
12 


6 
6 
6 

6 
6 
6 








Ditto, Infantry 


1796 - 


ditto - 


54 


22 4 

50 
22 9 
12 
18 
41 
22 4 
54 
22 2 
41 
84 6 
IS 6 
22 8 
18 
50 6 


12 9 
22 4 

22 4 
12 6 
12 6 
22 4 
12 
22 4 
22 4 
22 4 
22 4 
12 6 
22 4 
22 4 
22 4 


10 6 
10 10 
10 6 

10 6 
8 4 

11 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 

10 9 
8 4 

11 
11 
11 


















84 9 

12 6 
89 8 
22 4 

22 4 

29 4 
29 4 
40 2 
52 
46 9 

46 9 
52 
48 

47 

47 

48 
20 
20 
20 
20 
28 
28 


22 4 

12 6 
22 4 
IS 
22 2 
18 8 
18 8 
21 8 
14 10 
14 10 
14 10 
14 10 
14 10 
14 10 
14 10 

14 10 

15 
15 
15 
15 

1 circu-J 
jlar.j 


11 

8 6 
11 
11 
11 
11 8 
11 8 
11 6 
11 6 
11 6 
11 
11 
11 6 
11 6 
11 
H 

9 8 
9 8 

10 

10 

9 6 

7 8 


6 
6 
6 
2 

2 
2 
2 

2 
2 
















85 6 


9 6 


1 
















76 


20 4 


12 


12 
















85 


20 4 


12 


6 
















11 


14 9 


12 


1 
















76 


21 


12 


12 
















12 8 


14 6 


12 


1 
















48 


16 2 


8 


6 
















16 


16 8 


8 


1 
















54 


16 8 


8 


6 
















41 


IS 6 


11 


6 
















48 


IS 6 


11 


6 
















89 


12 6 


11 


6 
















22 


25 6 


8 


2 
















52 


22 6 


7 


8 
















52 
61 8 
21 10 


22 6 

21 10 

8 10 


9 
11 
11 


r^ 8 
i$0 


§i<L 





RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



63 



Number 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



none 
none 



none 
none 



Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 



none 
none 
none 
none 



none 



none 
none 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 



none 
none 
none 
none 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 



88 



18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
S 

2 

2 



10 

10 

10 

10 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

10 
10 
10 
10 



6 

27 

It 

2 

2 

28 

7 

26 

It 

22 

20 

2 

It 

7 

26 

21 

2 

26 

2 

15 

16 

16 

22 

24 

21 

21 

21 

21 

21 

21 

21 

7 

7 

7 

7 



10 

16 

40 

20 

2 

40 

2 

24 

2 

24 

ia 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



17 

17 

16 

10 

17 

2 

2 

t 



16 



26 
10 
20 



f 
4 
4 

22 
t 

25 
t 

22 

20 
2 
2 
2 

25 

21 
2 

21 
4 

16 
16 
22 
22. 

21 

10 
10 
21 
21 

10 

17 

4 

6 

7 

8 

9 

10 

16 

21 

18 

2 

1 

S 

-4 

3. 

X45 



How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



. . 2 pumps, tank 
for fire - engine, 
close to buildings. 



• - 1 pump, 120 
feet from the 
building. 



- - 1 pump, in 
barrack square, 
180 feet from 
building. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



1 room 



For their Clothes. 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



1 room. 



1 cook-house* 



REMARKS. 



- - By $ pumps, 
one 160 net from 
the building, one 
51 feet from the 
building, one 57 
feet from the 
building. 



1 cook-house* 



4 cook-houses. 



Digitized by 



Google 



64 


RETURN FROM EACH 


BARRACK IN THE UNITED 


KINGDOM, 
















Number of 
















NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 


. 


DISTRICT. 


of 




what Materials 


Rooms for the 
use of Privates 








of 
Windows 


of 
Fireplaces 




its 


















and Nod- 








in 


in ' 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built 


Co m missioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room. 


each Room 




IRELAND— 


tmtinutd. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in* 






Athlone - 


Ballaghadereen, Infantry - 


1798 


Brick and stone - 


12 


12 2 


13 10 


10 3 


2 






continued. 








12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 


24 10 
12 2 
24 10 
12 2 

24 10 
2> 2 
12 1 
2» 2 
12 1 

25 2 
12 1 


18 3 

13 10 
18 3 

15 10 

16 3 
18 2 

# 14 2 
18 2 

14 2 
18 2 
14 2 


10 3 
9 10 
9 10 

11 9 
11 9 

9 6 
9 6 
9 11 
9 11 
11 9 
11 9 


4 

2 

4 
2 
4 
4 
2 
4 
2 
4 
2 








Ballinrobe, Infantry 


1798 


Limestone - 


12 


22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 


15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 6 


10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

9 8 

9 8 

9 8 

9 8 

9 8 

10 


2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 








Ditto, Cavalry 




m - • • 


IS 


20 8 
22 6 
22 6 

21 6 
17 6 

17 6 
28 

22 8 
22 6 
22 
22 

18 6 
90 


40 
17 4 
17 4 

17 4 

18 
12 
12 6 
12 
12 
17 4 
17 4 
16 
40 


9 
7 6 
7 6 
7 6 
6 6 
6 6 

6 6 
11 3 
11 3 

7 6 
7 6 

11 
16 


5 

8 
8 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
8 
8 
2 
8 


2 stofes - 






Banagher, Infantry - 


1750 


Limestone - 


7 


20 1 
20 1 
20 1 
20 2 

20 2 

21 
21 


16 1 
16 1 
16 1 
16 1 
16 1 
15 10 
15 10 


9 4 
9 4 
9 4 
9 3 
9 3 
9 3 
9 3 


1 

1 
1 
2 
2 

2 
2 


1 






Boyle, Infantry 


1786 


Brick and stone - 


12 


11 
15 10 
40 5 
38 4 
19 

17 6 
30 4 
30 

18 4 
11 7 
17 4 
15 10 


13 7 
15 6 
13 8 
20 1 
20 6 
20 4 
87 11 
38 3 
12 2 

12 4 

13 11 
20 4 


11 9 

11 9 

12 9 
16 
15 3 

15 3 
14 

11 3 

13 

12 10 
12 9 

16 7 


1 
2 
8 
2 
2 
2 
8 
4 
1 
1 
1 
2 








Carrick-on-Shannon, In- 


1791 


Brick and stone • 


6 


32 7 


18 4 


10 3 


4 








fantry. 








32 7 
32 7 
42 10 
42 10 
42 10 


18 4 
18 4 
18 
18 
18 


10 8 
10 3 
10 3 
10 3 
10 3 


4 
4 
4 

4 
4 








Castlebar, Artillery 




Brick and stone - 


5 


19 8 
19 9 
23 8 
19 9 
19 10 


15 3 

16 
19 10 
16 
15 9 


10 7 

8 9 

9 5 

8 9 

9 3 


1 

1 
2 
2 
2 








Ditto, Line - 


1828 


Limestone - <• 


43 


17 6 
17 6 


22 
22 


10 
10 


8 
8 















Digitized by 



Google 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C 



6-J 



Number 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 



Number 

of Men each 

ltoom 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
mono 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 

none 

none 

none 

none 

none 

cone 

none 

nouo 

none 

none 

none 



14 

2 
11 

3 
14 
14 

1 
14 

1 
14 

3 

10 

10 

10 

10 

8 

8 

8 

8 

8 

S 

1 

1 

SO 

10 

10 

2 

8 
8 

10 
7 
2 

10 
2 
7 

66 

9 




9 
9 

2 
4 

15 

20 

12 

1 

80 

SI 

2 

2 

2 

10 

18 
18 
18 
24 
24 
24 

10 
10 
IS 
10 
10 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



none 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none. 



IS 
9 

10 
IS 

8 
11 

8 
8 
8 
8 

1 
1 

4 

9 
7 
2 
6 
6 
7 
6 
2 
7 
2 
6 
42 

8 

8 
8 
8 
8 
8 
8 

S 

s 

17 

21 

11 

3 

32 

33 

3 

4 
3 
9 

19 
19 
20 
25 
25 
26 



none 
none, 
none, 
none, 
none. 



12 
13 
12 
13 
12 
12 
13 
12 
12 

13 

12 

12 



How the Barrack 

is m 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



- - Draw-well, 
140 feet from 
building. 



• • Pump in bar* 
ruck yard, and 
river 62 yards 
from building. 



- - A well, and 
the river 97 yards 
from building. 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



- - 1 pump in 
the barrack yard, 
72 feet from 
building. 



- - 1 pump, 36 
feet trom the 
building. 



- - A pump 50 
feet from build- 
ing. 



- - A pump 50 
feet from the 
building. 



--2 pumps, close 
to the buildings. 



For their Clothes. 



none 



Accommodation 

lor 

Cooking. 



1 cook-house. 



REMARKS. 



- - Occupied by 
constabulary since 
1830. 



1 cook-house. 



1 cook-house. 



1 cook-botse. 



2 cook-bosses. 



- - Occupied by 
constabulary since 
1838. 



Digitized by 



GqoqIc 

(ecntfo 



continued) 



66 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 











Number of 
















NAME 


Dale of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 












Rooms for the 








of 


of 




DISTRICT. 


of 


its 


what Materials 


use of Privates 








Windows 


Fireplaces 




















and Non- 








in 


in 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built. 


commissioned 
Oncers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room. 


each Room. 




IRELAND—* 


vntinued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 








A-niT.ovii - 


CasUebar, Line 


• 


• - . • 


• » 


17 6 


22 • 


10 








continued. 


continued. 








17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 


22 
22 
22 
22 • 
22 4 
22 • 
22 • 
22 
22 
22 4 
22 • 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 


10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 










Dunmore, Infantry » 


1791 


.Limestone • 


6 


54 
21 6 
21 6 
10 
21 
24 


18 10 
18 10 
18 10 
14 2 

18 10 

19 


10 6 
10 6 
10 6 
10 7 
10 10 
10 6 


5 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 








Foxfottf, Infantry ♦ 


1808 


Stone ... 


8 


21 10 
21 10 
21 10 
21 10 
21 10 
21 10 
21 10 
21 10 


16 9 
16 9 
16 9 
16 9 
16 9 
16 9 
16 9 
16 9 


11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 
11 


8 
8 
3 
8 
2 
3 
3 
3 








Galway Caatie, Infantry - 


1734 


Limestone - 


19 


19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 6 
19 2 
19 2 
19 2 
19 2 
19 2 
19 2 
19 2 
19 2 


19 10 
19 10 
19 10 
19 10 
19 10 
19 10 
19 10 
19 10 
19 10 
19 10 
19 10 
19 10 


8 
8 
8 

8 

9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 








Galway fihasnfcte, Infantry 


1749 


Limestone - 


28 


19 8 
19 8 
19 8 
19 8 
19 8 
19 8 
19 8 
19 8 


15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 9 
15 
15 9 
15 9 


9 S 
9 3 

9 8 
9 8 
9 8 
9 8 
9 8 
9 3 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
















19 8 


15 2 


9 8 


2 














19 8 


15 9 


9 3 


2 
















19 8 


15 9 


9 3 


2 
















19 8 


15 9 


9 8 


2 
















19 8 


15 9 


9 8 


2 
















19 8 


15 9 


9 3 


2 
















19 8 


15 9 


9 3 


2 


1 | 












19 8 


15 9 


9 3 


2 


1 












19 8 


15 9 


9 3 


2 


1 i 












19 8 
19 8 


15 9 
15 9 


9 3 
9 3 


iobc 


ei ! 












19 8 


15 9 


9 3 


2 


i ; 












19 8 


15 9 


9 3 


2 


l 





/ 









RELATIVE TO 


THE DATE OF ERECTION, 


MATERIALS, 


8cc. 


67 




Number 


Number 


Number of 


How the Barrack 
is 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 






of Ventilators 
and 


< f M-'ti each 
Koorn 


Men, Women, 
and 


supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 




for 


REMAKK& 




Other Means 


is 


Children 
usually 








of 


regulated to 


from 


For the Men. 


For their Clothes, 


Cooking. 






Ventilasion. 


hold. 


occupying it. 


the Buildings. 












none 


11 


13 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


13 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


13 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


12 














none - 


11 


12 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


13 














none - 


11 


12 








• 






none 


11 


12 














none - 


11 


13 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


IS 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


13 














none 


11 


12 














noce - 


11 


IS 














none 


11 


13 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


13 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


12 














none 


11 


12 














none - 


SO 


23 


- - By the river. 


none 


none 


none. 






none 


14 


10 


98 yards from the 












none 


13 


12 


buildings. 












none 


7 


8 














none 


3 


5 


, 












none 


2 


2 














none 
none 
none 


10 
10 
10 


- 


- - A pump, close 
to the buildings. 


none 


none 


2 


• - Occupied by 
constabulary since 
1637. 




none 


10 
















none - 


10 
















none 


10 
















none 


10 
















none - 


10 
















none 


10 


13 


- - A well and 


none 


none 


1 






none 


10 


13 


pump; also a tank 












none 


10 


13 


for rain water,ca- 












none 


10 


12 


pable of contain- 












none 


10 


13 


ing 9,550 gallons, 












none 


10 


13 


quite convenient 












none 


10 


14 


to the buildings. 












none 


10 


12 














none 


10 


12 














none 


10 


13 














none 


10 


13 














none 


10 


13 














- . ]2 upper 


a 


11 


- From the river ; 


none 


none 


1 






rooms, Venti- 


8 


8 


also a tank, capa- 












lated through 


8 


11 


ble of containing 












the ceiling. 


8 


8 


790 gallons, into 












. . . 


8 


8 


which the water 












- v 


8 


10 


is pumped from 












. 


8 


8 


the river every 










... 


8 


8 


evening. 


I I 




... 


8 


10 




1 




- 


8 


8 




\ 1 




- 


8 


10 




\ 




... 


8 


8 




\ 1 




... 


8 


11 




\ I 


. 


8 


8 




1 \ \ 


... 


8 


10 




1 \ \ 


... 


8 


8 




1 \ \ 


... 


8 


10 




\ \ \ 


. - - 


8 


8 




1 \ \ 




. 


8 


10 




1 \ \ 




. •• • 


8 


8 




1 \ \ 




m • • 


8 


8 




1 \ \ 




m 


8 


8 




1 V~ i\ 




m 


8 


8 




1 A /^v/-v/-vl/3 




m . . 


8 I 


8 j 




I Digitized by VjC Q 




• • 


8 1 


8 










\ \C0Ul 



68 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UXITED KINGDOM, 











Number of 
















NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 












Rooms for the 








of 


of 




DISTRICT. 


of 


its 


what Materials 


use of Privates 








Windows 


Fireplaces 




















and Non- 








in 


in 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built 


commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 

1 


each Room. 


each Room. 




IRELAND-* 


continued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft- in. , 








Atiiiavp * «- 


CiaIwav flhamhlp Infan* 








19 2 


19 10 
19 10 


9 O 
9 


2 
2 






III IILUpIj w 

continued. 


try— continued. 








19 2 
















19 2 


19 10 


9 


2 
















19 2 


19 10 


9 


2 
















19 8 


15 9 


10 10 


2 
















19 8 


15 9 


10 10 


1 
















19 8 


15 9 


10 10 


1 
















19 8 


15 9 


10 10 


1 








Gort, Cayalry 


1705 and 
1820. 


Limestone • 


9 


25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 
25 


22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
22 
18 
18 


9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 








Granard, Infantry - 


1810 - 


Stone - 


8 


22 1 
IG S 
15 8 
15 4 
15 5 
15 5 
15 5 
15 5 


16 4 
15 4 
11 9 
11 9 
10 10 

10 11 

11 5 
10 4 


11 3 
11 3 
9 G 
9 G 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 










Longford, Artillery - 


1808 - 


Stone - 


5 


22 

19 
41 
3G 

20 


18 
18 
18 
17 9 
IG 


10 G 
10 G 
10 G 
13 5 
13 2 


8 
5 
2 






« 


Ditto, Cavalry 


1820 - 


Stone - 


19 


30 
30 
30 
39 
30 
30 
30 
30 
15 G 
15 
15 G 
15 G 
17 
17 
37 G 
37 G 
19 
19 
17 


18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
18 

18 
11 
11 
11 
11 
14 
14 

19 4 
19 4 
19 
19 
14 


11 3 
11 3 
11 3 

11 3 

12 9 
12 9 
12 9 
12 9 
12 9 
12 9 
12 9 

12 9 
7 9 
7 8 

13 
13 

7 G 

7 6 

8 G 


3 
3 
3 
S 
3 
8 
S 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
8 
8 
2 
I 
1 








Loughrea, Infantry • 


1805 • 


Limestone - 


G 


24 9 
24 9 
24 9 
24 9 
22 
22 


22 4 
22 4 
22 4 
22 4 
18 4 
18 4 


9 
9 G 
9 G 
9 G 
10 
10 


3 
3 
2 
2 

2 
2 








Mullingar, Infantry 


1814 - 


Stone ... 


81 


30 


20 


11 




2 














80 

30 


20 
20 


11 
11 




2 
2 














30 
80 


20 
20 


11 
11 




2 
2 




* 










80 
30 


20 
20 


11 
11 




2 
2 














30 
SO 


20 
20 


11 
11 




2 
2 














30 
80 


20 
20 


11 
11 




2 
2 














30 
30 
30 
30 
SO 


20 
20 
20 
20 
20 


11 
11 
11 
11 
11 




2 
2 
2 
2 
2 




: 










30 


20 


11 




2 














30 


20 


11 




2 










- 




30 
30 
30 


20 
20 
20 


11 
11 
11 0. 


4 


2 
2 




. 








30 
30 


20 
20 


11 
11 


^qo; 




1 










30 


20 


11 


< 1 


* 





RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C 



69 





Number 


Number 


Number of 


How the Barrack 
is 


Accommodation 


for Washing. 


Accommodation 






of Ventilators 


of Men each 


Men, Women, 


supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 












and 


Room 


and 






for 
Cooking. 


REMARKS. 




other Means 
of 


is 
regulated to 


Children, 
usually 


For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 




Ventilation. 


hold. 


occupying it. 


the Buildings. 














8 


8 














- . - 


8 


8 














— . m 


8 


8 














m m m 


8 


8 














~ m 


8 


8 














— m » 


8 


8 














m • • 


8 


8 














• » " 


8 


8 














none 


12 


12 


- - A pump and 


none • 


none 


none. 






none - • 


12 


11 


the river, both 












none 


12 


10 


within the boun- 












none 


12 


9 


dary walls. 












none 


12 


10 














none 


12 

















none 


12 


10 














none 


3 

















nona - • 


3 

















none 


10 


10 


-Pump 110 yards 
from the building, 


none 


none 


2 






none 


6 















none 


4 


4 


and spring run- 












none 


4i 





ning through the 












none 


5 


4 


yard. 












none 


5 


6 














none 


5 


6 














none 


5 


5 














none 


9 


10 


- - A pump and 


none 


none 


1 






none * 


9 


12 


draw well 30 feet 












none 


22 


20 


fiom the building. 












none 


17 


18 














none - 


1 


4 














none - * 


13 


10 


- - Three pumps 


none - * 


none 


1 






none 
none 


13 
13 


10 
10 


and draw well 20 
feet from the 












none 


13 


10 


building, 












none 


13 


17 














none 


13 


17 














none 


13 


17 














none 


13 


17 














none 


1 


3 














none 


1 


3 














none 


1 


3 














none 


1 


3 














none 


1 


4 














none 


1 


5 














none 


18 


20 














none 


18 


20 














none 


8 


8 














none 


6 


6 














none 


1 


2 














none * * 


14 


17 


- - From a well 










none 
none 


14 
14 


17 
17 


and lake adjoin- 
ing the boundary wall for washing ; 








none * ~ 


14 


17 


the drinking water during summer 








none 
noue 


2 


2 


is obtained from a well a consider- 








2 


2 


able distance from the barracks. 


j 1 




none • 


ir 


10 


- Two draw wells, 


2 


none * 1 * I 




none * • 


17 




three pumps in 




\ 




none 


17 


19 


the barrack yard. 




\ 




none 


17 


19 






\ 




none 


17 


19 






\ 




none 


17 








\ 




none 


17 








\ 




none 


17 








\ 




none 


17 








\ 




none 


17 


19 






\ 




none 


17 


19 






\ 




none 


17 


19 






\ 




none 


17 


19 






\ 




none 


17 


19 
19 
19 










none 
none 
none 


17 
17 
17 






1 Di( 


litizedbyV^OOQlC 




none 


17 


J 






I 





7° 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 











Number of 




. 








NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimeus'iens of each Room. | jj um Uer 


Number 










what Materials i 


looms for the 






of 

Windows 

in 


of 
Fireplaces 

m 




DISTRICT. 


of 


its 


ise of Privates 
and Non- 












BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Built. 


commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room, 


each Room. 




IRELAND—* 


lontinutd. 








//. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 








Athlonb - 
continued. 


ATnllinnar Tnfuntr%r _ a 








30 


20 


11 




2 
2 




iMUIIIDgaiy IDIUUliy " * 

continued. 








30 


20 


11 








t 








30 


20 


11 




2 














30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
SO 
80 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
80 
30 
14 
14 
14 


20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
10 2 
10 t 
10 2 


11 
11 
11 
II 
11 
11 
11 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 o 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

10 

11 9 
11 9 
11 9 




2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 

2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 














14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

14 

9 6 

9 6 

9 6 

9 6 

9 6 

9 6 

9 6 

9 G 

9 G 


10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
10 2 
13 3 
10 3 
10 3 
10 3 
10 3 
10 3 
10 3 
10 3 
10 3 


11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

11 9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 










Oughterarrie, Infantry • 


17G0 - 


Limestone - 


15 


20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 


17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 
17 3 


9 8 

9 8 

9 8 

9 8 

9 8 

9 8 

9 8 

9 8 

13 

13 

13 

13 

13 

13 

13 


2 
2 

2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 








PnrsoDstown, Infantry 


1609 - 


Limestone - 


104 


30 


20 


10 9 


4 


1 





Digitized by 



Google 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OP ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



7« 





Number 


Number 


Number of 


How the Barrack 
is 


Accommodation for Washiog. 


Accommodation 






of Ventilator* 
and 


of Men each 
Room 


Men, Women, 
and 


supplied with 




for 
Cooking. 


REMARKS. 




other Means 
of 


is 
regulated to 


Children 
usually 


Water, 

and the Distance 

from 


For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 




Ventilation. 


hold. 


occupy iag it. 


the Buildings, 












none 


17 
















none 


17 
















none 


17 
















noue 


17 
















none 


17 


19 














none 


17 


10 










, 




none 


17 


19 










i 




none 


17 


19 














none 


17 


19 














none 


17 


19 










• 




none 


17 


19 














none 


17 


19 














none 


17 


19 














none 


17 


19 














none 


17 


19 














none 


17 


19 










j 




none. 


















none 


17 


19 










* 




none 


17 


none. 














none 


17 


none. 














none 


17 


1 














none 


17 


none. 














none 


17 


none. 














none 


17 


none. 














none 


17 


none. 














none • • 


17 


19 














none 


17 


19 














none 


17 


19 














none 


17 


19 














none 


17 


mane. 














none 


1 


4 














none 


1 


4 














none • • 


1 


4 














none 


1 


none. 














none 


1 


4 














anone 


1 


4 














mone 


1 


4 














none 


1 


none. 














none 


1 


none. 














none 


1 


none. 














none - • - 


1 


new. 














none 


1 


none. 














none 


1 


none. 














none 


I 


none. 














none 


1 
















none • • 


1 
















none 


1 
















none 


1 
















none 


1 
















none 


1 
















none 


1 
















none 


1 


none. 














none 


1 


none. 














none 


1 


none. 














none 


1 


none. 














none 


1 


none. 














none 


1 


4 














none 


10 


13 


• - From the river 


none 


none 


none. 






none 


10 


12 


165 yards from 












none 


10 


10 


the buildings, but 












none 


10 


IS 


in winter from a 












none 


10 


10 


well a consider- 


. 










none 


10 


13 


able distance'from 












none 


10 


14 


the barrack. 












none 


10 


13 














none 


10 


12 














none 


10 


12 












none 


10 


10 












none 


10 


10 










none 


10 


10 








none 


10 


10 








none 


2 


none. 








none 


17 


none 


- - 2 pumps and 1 none - - 1 none * \ * \ 




none 


17 


18 


2 draw-wells 40 1 I \ \ 




none 


17 


20 


feet from men's \ \ \ \ 




none 
none 
none 


17 
17 
17 


16 

none. 

16 


quarters ; 2 pumr 
70 feet from off! 
cers* quarters, an 


►si 
d| 


\ 


igitizeQl by vnC 


)ogIe 



72 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT, 



NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 



IRELAND— continued. 



Athlone - 
continued. 



Parsonstown, Infantry 
continued. 



Date of 

its 
Erection. 



Of 

what Material* 
Boilt. 



Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 



Dimensions of eacb Room. 



Length. 



/*. ««. 

SO 

90 

30 

30 

80 

30 

30 

30 

30 

30 



80 
30 



30 
30 



30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 

30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
80 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 
30 

30 
30 
13 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 

13 8 



Width, 



ft. in. 



20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 



20 
20 



20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 



20 
20 



20 
20 
20 

20 
20 
20 
20 
20 



20 
20 



20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 
20 



20 
20 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 U 
9 U 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 Jl 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 H 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 
9 11 



Height 



ft. in. 



10 
10 
10 



10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

10 9 

9 3 

9 3 

9 3 

9 3 

9 3 

9 3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

9 3 
10 9 
10 
10 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 
10 



9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 

9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 



9 
9 

10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 
10 9 



Number 

of 
Windows 

in 
each Room. 



GpogI 



Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

in 
each Room. 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE O? ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



73 







Number 

of Ventilators 

and 

other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 


Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 


Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 


How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 


REMARKS. 




For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 




none - . - 


17 


none. 














none 


17 


W 














none 


17 


18 














none 


17 


17 














none 


17 


14 














none 


17 


17 














none 


17 


SO 














none 


17 


16 














none 


17 


14 














none 


17 


13 














none 


17 


22 














none 


17 


17 














none 


17 


IS 














none 


17 


12 














none 


17 


17 














none 


17 


13 














none 


17 


13 














none 


17 


14 














none 


17 


2 














none 


17 


none. 














none 


17 


none. 














none 


17 , 


none. 














none 


17 


none. • 














none 


17 


10 














none 


17 


16 














none 


17 


3 














none 


17 


none. 














none 


17 


none. 














none 


17 


none. 














none - 


17 


4 














none 


17 


17 














none 


17 


21 














none 


17 


17 














none 


17 


20 














none 


17 


18 














none 


17 


10 














none 


17 


9 














none 


17 


10 










t 




none 


17 


15 














none 


17 


12 














none 


17 


4 














none 
none 
none 
none 


17 
17 
17 
17 


12 
11 
17 
13 












♦ 


none 
none 

none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 


17 
1? 

17 
17 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 


7 
10 

none, 
none, 
none. 












1 


none 
none 
none 


2 
2 
2 














\ 


none 
none 


2 
2 


2 
6 












I 

1 
1 


none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 


2 
2 
2 
2 


3 
2 

none. 

none. 

none. 

none. 














none 




none* 










1 


none 




none. 






i \ 




none 




none. 






\ \ 




none 




none. 







\ \ 




none 




none. 






\ \ 




none 




5 






\ \ 


'■ 


none 




none. 






\ \ 




none 










\ \ 




none 










\ \ 




none 










\ \ 






none 








1 \ \ 


, 




none 


2 






1 \ \ 


!, 




none 
none 
none 


2 
2 
2 


6 




| Digitize* by VjOOQlC 




i 


none 


2 


3 




1 I n 



74 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IK THE UNITED KINGDOM, 







1 




Number of 


\ 














NAME 


Date of 


Of 


Sleeping 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 


Number 




DlSTRIcf. 


of 




what Materials 


Rooms for the 
use of Privates 








of 
Windows 


of 
Fireplaces 




its 


















and Non- 








in 


in 






BARRACK. 


Erection. 


Boilt. 


commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 


each Room. 


each Koom. 




IRELAND- 


continued. 








ft- in. 


ft in. 


ft. m. 








Athloni - 
continued. 


T> * T t 








13 8 


9 11 


10 9 


1 






rtrsonstowo, infantry - 
continual. 








13 8 


9 11 


10 9 


1 
















13 8 


9 11 


10 9 


1 
















13 8 


9 11 


10 9 


1 
















30 


20 


10 9 


4 
















30 


20 


9 3 


4 








Philipstown, Infantry 


1776 


Limestone - 


10 


25 
25 
25 
25 
25 

24 6 

25 


19 8 
19 8 
19 8 
19 8 
19 8 
24 
14 


10 10 
10 10 

10 10 

11 2 
11 2 
10 10 
10 8 


3 

3 
3 
2 
2 
3 
2 
















24 6 
16 
11 8 


24' 
11 10 
11 


11 2 
10 8 
10 6 


3 

1 
1 








Portumna, Infantry 


not known 


Ditto - 


5 


24 9 
24 9 


22 4 
22 4 


11 
11 


2 
2 
















24 9 


22 4 


11 


2 


1 












21 


18 4 


10 


2 


1 












21 


18 4 


10 


2 


I 




Roscommon, Infantry 


1702 


Stone - 


6 


24 10 
24 10 

24 10 

25 1 
25 1 
22 6 


22 6 
22 6 
22 6 
22 6 
22 6 
18 


9 4 
9 4 
9 4 
9 
9 
9 


3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 








Shannon Bridge, Infantry 


1798 


Limestone and brick 


11 


45 10 
45 10 
45 10 
45 10 


17 6 
17 6 
17 6 
17 6 


10 8 
10 8 
10 8 
10 8 


2 
2 
2 
2 
















17 6 


15 8 


9 


2 


1 1 












17 6 


15 8 


9 


2 


1 1 


. 










17 6 


15 8 


8 2 


2 


1 I 












17 6 


15 8 


8 2 


2 


I 1 












19 8 


9 


9 


1 


I I 












19 8 


9 


9 


1 


1 1 












19 8 


9 


8 2 


1 


I 1 




Sligo, Infantry 


1824 


Stone - 


8 


51 7 


19 9 


9 8 


6 


2 1 












51 7 


19 9 


9 8 


6 


2 














26 2 


19 8 


9 8 


2 








Tullamore, Infantry 


1716 


Limestone - 


6 


25 
25 
25 3 
25 2 
25 3 
24 11 


22 6 
22 6 
22 5 
17 10 
22 5 
22 6 


10 7 
10 7 
10 7 
10 r 
9 3 
9 3 


3 
3 

3 
2 
2 
2 








Westport, Infantry - 


1794 


limestone - • 


15 


20 3 
20 3 
20 3 
20 3 


17 10 
17 10 
17 10 
17 10 


10 5 
10 5 
10 5 
10 5 


2 
2 
2 

2 
















20 8 
20 3 
20 8 
20 3 
20 3 
20 3 
20 3 
20 3 
20 3 
20 8 
14 11 


17 10 
17 10 
17 10 
17 10 
17 10 
17 10 
17 10 
17 10 
17 10 
17 10 
17 10 


10 5 
10 5 
10 5 

10 5 
10 5 
10 5 
10 
10 5 
10 5 
10 5 
10 5 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 






BXLFAST - 


Belfast, Infantry 


1798 


Brick - 


44 privates 
12 N. C. 0. 


84 

12 


22 
9 


11 
11 




1 
none 






Ditto, Artillery 






8 privates - 
6 N. C. O. - 


23 


18 


9 




2 












10 


18 


9 




1 






Armagh, Infantry - 


1778 


Limestone - 


2 


22 


18 


10 










i 






2 
2 

1 


22 
22 
27 3 


18 
18 
16 3 


10 6 


f~\S&i4~\ 


e \ 












1 


88 1 


15 3 


jbpvi: 


OQ52 












1 

i 


88 1 

AT • 


15 3 


9 11 

11 IT 


40 


m 





BELATIVB TO THE DATS OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



75 



< I 



' 00 He 
J 004. 
J no** 



Number 


Nomber 


Number of 


How the Barrack 
is 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 




of Ventilators 


of Men each 


Men, Women, 


supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 








and 

other Meant 

of 


Room 

is 

regulated to 


and 
Children 
usually 




for 
Cooking, 


REMARKS. 


For the Men* 


For their Clothes. 


Ventilation. 


hold. 


occupying it 


the Buildings. 










none * 


2 


2 












none 


2 


1 












none 


2 


6 












none 


2 


2 












none - » 


1 


10 












none 


I 


none. 












none 


14 


14 


- • A pump 80 ft. 


none * 


none • 


8 




none 


14 


12 


from the building, 
a draw-well 90 ft. 










none 


14 


14 










none 


14 


12 


from building. 










none 


14 


14 












none 


Iff 


15 












none • 


15 


15 












none 


10 


18 












none 


1 


1 












none 


1 


1 












none 


14 


14 


-- From a well 


none 


none 


- * Cooking-room 




none 


14 


15 


with . excellent 






with 8 boilers. 




none 


9 


12 


water, 60 yards 
from the building. 










none 


9 


18 










none 


,17 


19 








• 




none 


16 


18 


- • 1 pump, 20 ft. 
from officers' quar* 
ten, 40 ft. from 


none 


none » 


1 cook-house. 




none 


15 


18 










none 


15 


12 










none 


14 


12 


soldiers' quarters, 










none 


14 


18 


1 well 800 yards 










none 


12 


18 


from buildings. 










none 


21 


20 


. . Supplied by the 


uone - * 


none 


none. 




none 


21 


2 


River Shannon, 










none 


21 


19 


800 ft. from the 










none 


21 


20 


barracks, and a 










none 
none 


8 
8 


2 

none. 


pump, 77 ft. from 
building. 










none 


8 


none. 












none 


8 


none. 












none 


2 


none. 












none 


2 


8 






* 






none 


2 


2 












none 


28 


28 


- • 2 pumps close 
to the building!. 


none 


none 


1 cook-house. 




none 


28 


28 










none - r 


16 


19 












none 


15 


14 


- - 1 pump, 60 ft. 
from front build- 


nope 


none 


| cook-house. 




none 


15 


18 










none 


18 


18 


ing; 1 ditto in 










none 


12 


10 


rear, 42 feet from 










none 


18 


18 


it 










none • • 


15 


11 












none - 
none 


8 
8 


7 
7 


- - 1 pump close 
to building. 


none 


none - - 


none. 




none 


8 


8 












none 


8 


7 












none 


8 


r 












none 


8 


8 












none 


8 


7 












none 


8 


r 












none - 


8 


7 












none 


8 


8 












none 


8 


7 












none 


8 


7 












none 


8 


8 












none 


8 


7 












none • t 


S 


2 












none 


20 


30 


- r Pipe-water 


none 


none 


- - £ kitchens with 




none 


1 


2 


within about 6 
yards of buildings. 






24 boilers. 




none 


12 


10 


• 


none 


none 


- - 1 kitchen with 




none • 


2 


2 








4 boilers. 




2 


10 
10 


- 


• - A good supply 
from a draw well 


none 


none 


none. 




1 ' -\ 


10 




in front of the 










12 




building, about 










16 




100 feet; and a 










16 




pump in the rear. 










l l 




about 98 feet 










* 














- 1 


4 














- I 


11 










f^* 




' 1 


U 1 








u 


jitized by VjC 


1^ (eontinuid 



76 


RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN 


THE UNITED KINGDOM, 








DISTRICT. 


NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 


Date of 

its 
Erection. 


Of 

what Materials 
Built. 


Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 

of 

Windows 

in 

each Room. 


Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

in 
each Room 




Length. 


Width. 


Height. 




IRELAND— continued 








ft. in. 


ft* in. 


ft* in. 








Belfast - 
continued. 


Ballyshannon, Infantry - 




Stone - 


- - 5 privates 
and SN. O.O. 

1 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 


45 

30 4 
30 C 
SO 6 

12 9 
30 9 

13 6 
13 6 


12 

14 3 

14 6 

12 

10 9 

11 3 
10 61 

13 


11 5| 

9 

8 6 

11 7| 

11 7i 

10 

11 
7 2 


2 

3 
2 
2 

1 
3 
1 
2 


1 

1 
1 
I 
I 
1 
1 
1 






Bellick, Infantry - 


- Rebuilt 
in 1646. 


• - Stone and a por- 
tion of brick. 


IN. CO. - 

8 privates, viz. 

1 
1 

1 


10 4 

48 
44 

49 


10 7 

11 8J 
11 9 
11 10 


7 11 

12 6 
12 6 
12 6 


I 

5 

4 
5 


1 

1 
1 

1 






Belturbet, Cavalry - 


• In the reign 
of Queen 
Anne. 




10, viz. 3 

1 
4 
1 
1 


49 
22 
25 
21 4 
17 


22 
14 9 
22 7 
14 8 
14 11 



9 

8 10 
12 5 

9 


4 
2 

4 
1 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 
1 






Carrickfergus, Infantry - 


1802 


White stone - 


4 privates, viz. 

2 

2 
1 N.C.O. - 


60 
60 
19 


16 
22 
15 


9 

15 

8 


6 
2 
3 


2 
1 

1 






Cavan, Infantry 


1826 - 


Stone - 


5, viz. 3 

1 
1 


38 
46 9 
40 


18 
18 
18 


10 9 
10 9 
10 9 


4 
4 

4 


2 
2 






Charleraont, Artillery 


1602 - 


Stone - 


11, viz. 2 
2 
5 
2 


17 

18 

21 

22 


21 

22 

17 

18 


9 
10 

8 
10 


2 
2 

2 
2 


I 
1 
1 
1 






Ditto - ditto 


1806 - 


Stone and brick - 


7, viz. 4 


29 
20 
23 
12 


19 
10 
15 
15 


9 

9 

9 

10 


5 
2 

1 


2 
1 

1 






Downpatrick, Infantry 


1790 - 


Granite and brick - 


9, viz. 4 


Iff 6 
19 2 
27 
14 


15 6 

13 
19 

14 


9 2 
9 4 
9 4 
9 2 


1 
2 

4 
2 


1 
1 
I 
1 






Dnndalk, Cavalry - 


- Rebuilt 
in 1825-6. 


Stone and brick - 


It N. C. 0. 
24 privates - 


12 2 

29 10 


19 7 
19 6 


10 8 

11 4 

f 


1 
4 


1 
1 






Enniskillen Main, Infantry 


1778 - 


Stone - 


30 


24 1 


12 8 


10 1 


2 


1 






Enniskillen Castle, Infantry 
and Artillery. 


1828 - 


Stone - 


6, viz. 2 
1 
1 
2 


51 6 
49 8 
19 6 
21 


13 10 

15 3 

13 4 

9 8 


10 5 

10 5 

10 6 

9 6 


7 
7 
3 
4 


2 
2 
1 

1 






Ditto Redoubt, Infantry - 


1828 - 


Stone • 


4, viz. 2 
2 


21 3 
34 3 


27 5 
27 5 


11 1 
11 1 


4 
6 


1 
1 






Liffbrd, Infantry 


1827 - 


Stone and brick 


3, viz. 1 
1 

1 


86 
36 
16 9 


16 9 
16 9 


9 8 
9 11 
9 6 


4 

4 

1 


1 
1 

1 






Londonderry (Ebringtoi), 
Infantry* 


1841 - 


Stone and brick 


19, viz. 4 
5 
5 
2 
3 


35 8 

36 3 
36 4 
14 2 
13 8 


25 • 
25 1 
25 2 
10 1 
10 2 

Digitize 


10 11 

11 

10 

11 

10 SK 

dby V: 


4 
4 
4 
1 

rOOg 


1 
1 
1 

1 
I 






% 


1 












1 







RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



77 





Number 


Number 


Number of 


How the Barrack 
is 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 






of Ventilators 


of Men each 


Met, Women, 


supplied with 










and 


Room 


and 




for 


REMARKS. 




other Means 


is 


Children 


yv acer, 

and the Distance 












of 


regulated to 


usually 


from 


For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 


. Cooking. 






Ventilation. 


hold. 


occupying it. 


the Buildings. 












none • 


14 


14 


- Water supplied 
by contract, and 


none 


none 


none. 






3 


11 


11 


deposited in the 












2 


12 


12 


barracks for the 












none 


10 


10 


use of the troops. 












none 


1 serjeant 


remporary hospital 














none 


10 


10 














nons 


1 serjeant 


2 














2 


1 
















3 


1 


4 


- - A draw-well, 
about 13 yards 
from the building. 


none 


none 


A cook-house. 






3 
4 
















3 

none 


87 


127 


- - A good supply 


none 


none 


• - A good cook- 
house. 


' 




none 


2 Serjeants. 




of water, quite 










none - • 


15 




close to the bar- 












none 


1 serjeant. 




racks. 












none 


1 ditto. 
















none * 


30 


25 


- - Rain water, 


none 


none 


- - One kitchen 






none 


12 


6 


from a tank 8 






with 4 boilers. 






none 


2 


2 


yards from build- 
ing. A new tank 
in course of con- 
struction. 


• g 






* 




none 


21 


102 


- - Supplied by 


none 


A wash-house • 


A cook-house. 






none 


25 




contract, the wa- 












none 


23 




ter near the bar- 
rack being un- 
wholesome a new 
pump is about to 
be erected. 












none 


8 


85 


- - A well within 


none 


none 


1 cook-house. 






none 


12 




the barrack in- 












none 


7 




closure. 












none 


10 














1 DODO 


12 


58 


- - A pump on the 


none 


none 


1 cook-house. 




1 nonj 


10 




premises. 










I none 


2 














1 none. 


















none 


5 


• • - 


- - There are 3 


none 


none 


• - 1 cook-house 






none 


6 




draw-wells within 






with 4 boilers. 






none 


14 




the barrack inclo- 












none 


2 




sure which do not 
afford a sufficient 
supply when the 
barrack is occu- 
pied. 












none 


2 


. 


-- Agood supply 
of water from 


- - A good ablu- 


- - Two wash- 


2 cook-houses. 






none 


10 


16 


tion hou3e. 


houses in progress. 














wells and pumps 


• 
















about 40 yards 


















from the build- 


















ings. 












2 


10 


10 


- - Two pumps, 
30 yards from the 
buildings. 


- - - 


Two wash-houses. 


2 cook-houses. 






3 


20 


20 


- -A pump 20 
yards from the 


none * - 


none 


none. 






3 


28 


23 




t 






none 


3 


3 


building. 












none 


2 


2 














none 


14 


14 


- - A pump at the 


none 


none 


A cooking kitchei 


u 




6 loopholes 


20 


20 


door. 












/ none 


20 


20 


- - From water- 


none 


none 


1 cook-boose. 




/ " 9 


20 


20 


pipes 42 yards 
from the building, 










/ none _ 


I 


2 










/ 






and also from the 






I 


/ 






river adjoining the 








/ , 






premises. 






1 


/ . 


20 


22 


- • From tanks 


1 


2 


2 cook- house 3. 




/ ' 






constructed in rea 


r 








/ ' 






of the buildings, 










/^De it 






aUo from three 




I 




/ *V 






springs, two oi 
which have pump 


s 




^\ S~\fX 1 t~> 


1 

1* 








attached. 






Digitized by VJ 1 


3 I°8 1 ^ 



78 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 



DISTRICT. 



NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 



Date of 

its 
Erection. 



Of 

what Materials 
Built. 



Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 

use of Privates 

and Non< 

Commissioned 

Officers. 



Dimensions of escb Room. 



Length. 



Width. 



Height. 



Number 

of 
Windows 

in 
each. Room. 



Number 

of 
Fireplaces 

each Room. 



IRELAND— continued. 



BllFAlT - 

amtinu&i. 



Coas 



Lough to j le, Greencastle, 
Infantry aod Artillery. 



1819 



Stone and brick • 



15, vis. 2 
1 
1 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 



Ditto, MagilligaD, Artillery 



Loughswilly, Nedspoint, 
Artillery. 



Dunree, Artillery 



1812 



1812 



1812 



Stone and brick 



Stone and brick 



Stone and brick 



Rnockalla, Artillery 



18U 



Stone and brick 



4, via. 1 
I 
1 
1 



4, viz. 1 
1 

1 

1 



Maccamish, Artillery 



Rathmullen, Artillery 



Down of Inch, Artillery 



Monaghan, Cavalry 



Newty, Infantry 



Omagb, AitUlery • 



Cock 



1812 



1812 



1812 



1792 



Stone and brick 



Stone and brick - 



Stone and brick 



Stone 



1783 



1804 



1806 > 



Granite and brick • 



Stone and brick 



Stone 



2, Til. 1 
1 



4, vis. 1 
1 
1 
1 



6, via. 1 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 

S5 
Iff 

9 



3, viz. 2 
1 



16 

8 
76 
40 



20 4 
11 11 
18 11 

11 10 

12 8 
11 10 
11 10 
11 10 
11 10 
11 10 
11 10 

11 

12 

81 7 



28 4 



12 1 

27 2 

7 7 

38 11 



44 

21 

29 

39 8 



80 



28 
13 



11 10 
11 10 
11 7| 
26 



24 6 

17 

23 5 
28 5 

24 6 

17 

81 8 

18 10 
15 



37 7 
49 



24 

24 

80 

80 



ft. in. 

20 5 
11 10 
II 10 
11 
11 11 
10 10 
10 10 

10 10 

11 
9 10 
9 10 

10 
9 10 



18 4 



18 2 



12 5 

12 2 
10 9 

13 11 



16 

16 

12 

18 2 



18 



17 9 
10 



10 I* 

8 5 

10 1J 

17 4 



12 
12 
U 
11 
10 
10 



ft. in. 

13 9 
U 9 
4 
4 
6 
5 
1 


10 10 
6 8 
6 9 
6 
6 9 



14 11 



12 



8 6 
12 8 

10 

9 11 



10 5 

6 

12 1 

6 



14 



12 8 
9 7 



8 7J 
10 7 

9 2 
10 



16 
15 
16 
16 
16 
15 



15 
15 
10 



15 10 
17 8 



18 

18 

20 

20 



1 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 






9 8 
9 8 



9 6 
9 6 
9 * 



10 2 
10 6 



10 

8 

10 

8 



o4le 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



79 





Number 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 


Number 

of Hen each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 


Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it 


How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 


REMARKS. 




For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 




none 


14 


20 


- From tanks and 


none 


none 


none. 






none 


t 




iron cisterns con- 












none 


2 




structed to receive 












none 


2 




the rain - water 












■none 


2 




from the roofs of 












none 


2 




the buildings. 












none 


2 
















none 


2 
















none 


2 
















none 


2 


1 














none 


2 
















none 


2 
















none 


2 
















none - 


10 


8 


- - A spring, at 
bottom of tower. 


none 


none 


none. 






none - 


14 


13 


- - A well in the 
fort, and a spring 
100 yards from it 


none 


none 


none. 


• 




none 


2 


39 


- - An uncertain 


none 


none 


none. 






none 


7 




supply is at times 












none 


1 




received from a 












none - 


17 




small tank in the 
fort: the chief 
supply is from a 
well 200 yards 
outside. 












none 


| 26 


37 


. . From a tank at 


none 


none 


none. 






none 




bottom of tower, 












none 

G 


18 




water not good; 












20 




the supplyis from 
a well on the 


































mountain, 236 


















yards from the 
fort 












none 


19 


17 


• - Tank at bot- 
tom of tower, wa- 
ter bad; a supply 
200 yards outside. 


none 


none 


none. 






6 


10 


13 


• - A tank at bot- 


none 


none 


none. 






none 


1 




tom of tower, wa- 
ter bad ; the sup* 
ply is 100 yards 
outside. 












none • 


1 


20 


--Atank atbot- 


none 


none 


none. 






S 


2 




tom of tower, wa- 












none 


2 




ter not good ; the 












8 


22 




supply is 820 
yards outside. 












none 


11 


11 


• - A good supply 
of water afforded 


none 


none 


1 cook *house. 






none 


6 


1 Serjeant 












none 


10 


10 


from a draw-well, 












none 


10 


10 


7 feet from the 












none 


11 


11 


building. 












none - 


6 


6 














none 


14 


14 


- - Amply sup- 


none 


- • 1 large wash- 


• -2 cook-houses, 






none 


10 


10 


plied by 3 pumps 




homse, with two 


containing 17 






none - 


2 


2 


of spring water 
within the bar- 
rack yard. 




boilers. 


boilers. 






3 


15 


T« 


- - A well on the 


none - - 1 none 


1 

1 cook-house. 






3 


24 




premises, 6 yards 
from the building. 


\ 




\ 




none • 
none 


} • i 


10 


. - 8 tanks within 


none 


. | none 


"\ Digit^dby 


\ . -\ tuff «fi 



8o 



RETURN FROM EACH BAR 



DISTRICT. 



NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 



IRELAND— continued. 



Com - 
continued. 



Elisabeth Fort 



Ballincollig 



Date of 

its 
Erection. 



- - In the 
16th cen- 
tury. 



1809 



Bandon 



Bere Island: 

Tower, Nos. 1 and 2 
Tower, Nos. 3 and 4 
Tower, No. 5 



:} 



Barrack, No. 1 Tower - 
Ditto, 



what 1 
B 



Stone 



Stone 



- Reported Stone 
to have 
been built 
iu 1700. 



1804 



rack, No. 1 Tower -"| 
o, Nos. 3 and 4 -J 



Casemate - 
Barracks 



Bnttevant 



Camden Fort 



Carlisle Fort - 



Charles Fort 



Clonakilty 



1811 



1804 
1805 



1812 



:{ 



1806 



Stone 



Stone 



Dungarvan 

Fernioy : 
Old Barracks 



Cavalry Barracks 



New Barracks 



1774 



1804 



Stone 



Stone 



Stone 



Stone 



Stone 



Stone 



1804 - Stone 



1809 



Stone 

Digitized by 



Google 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



8l 



Number 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Meant 

of 
Ventilation. 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 



none 
none 
none 
none 



none 
none 



none 
none 



none 



none 
none 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 



Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 



Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it. 



none 
none 
none 
none 
none 

none 



none 
hone 



none 
none 



none 

none 
none 
uone 

none 
none 
none 
none 



10 
11 

4 
2 
4 
2 

10 
8 

14 
1 



8 
II 



16 
11 
10 

16 

16 

2 



1 

1 
10 
10 
13 
IS 
15 
15 
IS 
15 

14 

8 



10 
7 



8 
7 

7 
9 

1 

10 



16 
16 

2 
1 

10 
10 

2 

1 
16 
10 

1 



12 

24 

16 

4 



t 
14 



4 

4 

8 

8 

11 

13 

16 

15 

18 

13 

9 




12 

T 



8 
6 
6 
8 
2 

10 



10 




14 
14 

6 
8 

5 
5 

1 

4 
9 
9 

4 



How the Barrack 

is 

Supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 



• - 2 tanks ad- 
joining soldiers' 
quarters ; 1 well, 
20 yards from 
soldiers' quarters. 



- - 2 pumps, One 
within 40 feet of 
building, the se- 
cond within 10 
feet. 



• • Tank close to 
buildings. 



- - Tank within 
the Tower. 

- - A well 40 ft 
distant. 

- - A well 30 ft. 
distant. 

- - A well 40 ft. 
distant 

A tank inside • 

- - A well, distant 
50 feet 

- - 8 pumps, 40 
feet from build- 
ings. 



-- A draw-well, 
32 ft. from build- 
ing. 

- - 1 ditto, ditto, 
40 feet 



1 ditto, 50 yards 



- - By water- 
butts, and a 
stream of indiffe- 
rent water. 

- - A tank, 50 ft 
from buildings. 



- - 8 pumps, 30 
ft. frombuiidings. 



- - 3 pumps, 80 
feet from build- 
ings. 

- • A well, 200 
feet from build- 



Accommodation for Washing. 



For the Men. 



none 
none 
none 

none 

none 

none 
none 



For their Clothes. 



none 
none 
none 

none 

none 

none 
none 



Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 



1 



REMARKS. 



- - Occupied by 
police. 



-• 1 room for re* 
gimentai serjeant- 
major; 3 rooms for 
two staff Serjeants, 
each; 4 rooms for 
3 troop serjeant* 
majors. 



- - In this barrack 
the exact propor- 
tion of women and children cannot 
be given in integers. The average 
proportion is, 20 women to 200 
men, nearly. 



none, 
none, 
none. 

none 

none. 

none, 
none 



noue 



none 
none 



none 



none 



none 



Unoccupied. 



Barrack in rains. 



- - The average 
occupation for 8 
years is given of 
the whole of tl.e 
barracks. 

For women and 
children, the same 
remark as at Ban- 
don. 



- - This does not 
include the new 
rooms not yet u> 

1 k.k:««j 



- With regard to 
I women and chil- 
dren, vide remark 
to Bandon. 



1 - - Cooking-bouse 

I scarcely sufficient 
fat % depot. Same remark for wo* 
tneu and chtt&rai as at Bandon. 



none 
none 



none 



i none 



no** 4 



DO** 9 



- - Cooking and 
I wa&mai&YOTOTm- 
l ed va the rooms. 

. - kveraajb qcc*- 
-A • - Qractt$»& V| 



Digitized by Cr O ^leoo^frs; . 



7 *•»". • 



82 



RETURN FROM EACH BARRACK IN THE UNITED KINGDOM, 





NAME 

of 

BARRACK. 


Date of 

its 
Erection. 


Of 

what Materials 
Built. 


Number of 

Sleeping 

Rooms for the 


Dimensions of each Room. 


Number 

of 

Windows 

in 

each Room. 


Number 

of 
fireplaces 

in 
each Room 




DISTRICT. 


use of Privates 

and Non- 
commissioned 
Officers. 


Length. 


Width. 


Height. 




IRELAND— < 


vntinued. 








ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 








Cork 


Haulbowline Island : 
New Barracks 


1845 - 


Stone - 




32 
31 
31 
82 
9 
11 


23 
23 
23 4 
23 4 
9 
9 


11 8 
11 1 
10 10 

10 8 

11 8 
10 10 


4 
6 
6 
4 

1 
1 








Tower 




Stone and brick - 




- 


> • . 


. 


1 

1 








Kitisale - 


1797 - 


Stone - 


57 
2 


18 
18 
12 


20 

14 

9 


9 
9 
9 


2 
2 
2 








Mallow - 




Stone - - - 


2 
3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 


11 
16 

12 
16 
16 
20 
20 
20 
24 
26 


7 
7 

7 

8 

15 

16 
16 
16 
16 
16 


9 
9 

7 

8 

9 
9 
7 
9 
7 
7 


1 

1 
1 
1 
] 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


none 

none * 
none 






Millstreet ... 


1715 - 


Stone ... 


8 
6 


18 
20 


14 
18 


9 
9 


2 
2 








Mitcbelstown ... 


1820 - 


Stone - 


4 


32 6 


21 


11 


4 








Rocky Island, New Bar- 
racks. 


1845 - 


Brick and stone - 


I 
I 


27 
32 2 


14 8 

18 11 


8 
10 5 


2 

4 


i 






Spike Island - - - 


-- 1809 to 
1817. 


Brick and stone - 


8 
10 


47 10 
40 


8 
18 


10 
12 5 


6 
5 








Whiddy Island: 
Centre Redoubt - 
East Redoubt 
West Redoubt - 


1806 • 
1806 - 
1806 - 


Stone - 
ditto - 
ditto • 


6 
5 
6 


32 6 

26 

33 6 


14 
14 
12 


7 6 

7 

12 6 


4 

4 
1 


20 






Youghal ... 


1808 - 


Stone ... 


4 
2 

4 
4 


12 
32 

82 
32 


10 
18 
18 
18 


10 6 
10 6 
10 6 
10 6 


1 
6 

4 
4 






Limbics • 


Artillery 


1806 - 


Brick - 


6 
4 


48 
22 9 


19 7 
19 7 


10 4 
8 7 


4 

2 








Castle - 


1825 - 


Stone ... 


12 


87 6 


20 11 


8 10 


4 








New .... 


- 


Stone - 


29 
29 


29 11 
18 


18 
12 


9 8 
9 8 


6 

2 








John's Square 


- 


Stone - 


3 


42 4 


18 5 


11 6 


4 














1 
2 
2 


22 10 
20 4 
12 3 


18 2 

18 2 

9 11 


1) 6 
11 6 
11 6 


2 
2 
1 


none 






Strand, Temporary - 


- 


Stone ... 


1 


83 


21 6 


12 5 


8 


2 






Cahir, Cavalry 


- - About 
the year 
1811. 


Stone - 


19 

I 
14 


32 10 

21 10 
12 4 


18 

17 10 
9 10 


11 

10 2 
10 10 


-16 with V 
3 with 3. 

4 
•13 with l f 
1 with 2. 


2 

1 
1 






Carrick-on-Suir, Infantry - 


• 


Stone - - - 


2 
1 
1 


25 
88 

16 


22 6 
24 
19 


8 6 

10 

8 4 


2 
5 

1 


I 

I 
1 





Digitized by 



Google 



RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF ERECTION, MATERIALS, &C. 



83 





Number 
of Ventilators 

and 
other Means 

of 
Ventilation. 


Number 

of Men each 

Room 

is 

regulated to 

hold. 


Number of 

Men, Women, 

and 

Children 

usually 

occupying it 


How the Barrack 

is 

supplied with 

Water, 

and the Distance 

from 

the Buildings. 


Accommodation for Washing. 


Accommodation 

for 

Cooking. 


REMARKS. 




For the Men. 


For their Clothes. 




none 




20 


6 


--A tank 400ft. 


none 


none 


1 






none 


. 


21 


6 


from buildings. 












none 


- 


21 


6 














none 


• 


22 


6 














none 


- 


1 


1 














none 


- 


1 


1 














none 


. 


12 


4 














none 


- 


1 


1 














none 


. 


8 


8 


- - 1 pump and 


none 


none 


5 


- - Same remark 




none 


- 


7 


7 


draw-well in rear 








for women and 




none 


- 


1 


4 


of building. 








children as at Ban- 
don. 




none 




1 


1 


- - 1 pump 30 feet 


none 


1 


2 


- - Have not been 




none 


- 


3 


2 


from building. 








occupied by troops 




none 


- 


3 


2 










for several years, 




none 


- 


4 


2 










except ouce. 




none 


• 


8 


4 














none 


- 


8 


4 














none 


. 


8 


4 














none 


- 


9 


4 














none 


. 


10 


5 














none 


- 


12 


6 














none 


„ 


7 


4 


- - 1 pump 36 feet 


none 


none 


none 


- - Average occu- 




none 


- 


10 


6 


from building. 








pation for 3 years. 




none 


• 


18 


19 


- - 1 well 20 feet 
from building. 


none 


none 


none - • 


- - Average occu- 
pation for 3 yea ib. 




none 


. 


9 


10 


- - Tank 120 feet 


none 


none 


1 






none 


- 


20 


22 


fnm building. 












none 


m 


22 


22 


- - Draw-well 


none - 


•none 


1 


- Barracks incom- 




none 


• 


19 


18 


144 feet from 
buildings. 








plete. 




none 




20 


Unoccupied 


- - A well within 


none 


none 


none 


- - At the centre 




none 


. 


10 


- ditto. 


each of the re- 








and west redoubts 




none 


- 


20 


- diUo. 


doubts. 








the water is good, 
at the east ditto 




none 


- 


1 


1 


• - 3 pumps and 
1 well, from 20 


none 


none - 


1 


the water is bad. 




none 


• 


16 


17 












none - 


. 


10 


17 


to 40 feet distant. 












none 


- 


17 


18 














none 




20 


17 


--By 2 pumps in 


none 


1 wash-house - 


1 cookhouse. 






none 


- 


11 


11 


barrack yard. 












none 


- 


17 


18 


- - Tank in yard, 
supplied by water 
company. 


none 


1 wash-house - 


1 cookhouse. 






none 


. 


14 


14 


- - 2 tanks ditto 


none 


1 wash-house - 


2 cookhouse. 






none 


• 


15 


5 


ditto, and well 












• 








with pump. 












none • 


- 


- - 2 rooms 22, 
1 room 17 


22 
15 


- - Pump in bar- 
rack yard. 


none 


none 


1 cookhouse. 






none 


. 


11 


11 














none 


. 


9 


9 














none 


- 


2 


2 














none 


- 


47 


47 


- - By a water- 
cart. 


none 


none 


1 cookhouse. 






none 


- 


17 


28 


- - By 3 pumps 
and 2 tanks, dis- 


none - - 


1 wash-house - 


1 cookhouse 


- - 2 rooms, used 
as tailor's and sad- 




none 


• 


1 


1 


tant 40, 60, 70, 








dler's shop. 




none 


. 


1 


S 


1 50, and 230 yds., 




















and 2 wells. 






, 




none 


. 


15 


19 


- - 1 pump, dis- 


none 


- - 1 wash-house, 


1 cookhouse. 1 




none 


. 


20 


23 


tant 40 yards. 




without fireplace 


\ 




none 


- 


21 


5 






or boilers. 


\ 




none 


., 


IS 


9 


- - By 3 pumps, 


none 


none 


1 1 cookhouse. 1 


j noue 


- I 


• - 4 rooms 10; 


11 


distant 10, 50, 






\ 


I 


4 rooms 9. 


10 


and 200 feet 






\ 




none 


-J 


14 


18 


- - By a horse and 


none 


1 wash-house 


- 1 1 cookhouse. | 




none 


' 


- - 3 rooms 9, 
1 1 rooms 7, 


10 
10 


cart, from a dis-