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Full text of "Partridge"

Duxbury 
Massachusetts 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/partridge1945duxb 



THE PARTRIDGE 

■ -p LOG 

of 
the 

BUXBURY HIGH SCHOOL 



194 



DnxiHuy Free Lihrury 



Hi 



371 .897 
D987 




We have conceived of education as 
a high sea on which we are all afloat. 
With its stalwart skipper and able crew, 
the good ship Duxbury High School 
bears its passengers safely on toward 
the shores of adulthood. 



LOG KEEPERS 



Chosen mainly from the senior class and Partridge staff 



Editor-in-Chief Virginia Schwab 

Associate Editors Nancy Soule 

Patricia Shaw 

Literary Editors James Mobbs 

Richard Washburn 

Business Manager Dorothy Randall 

Business Staff Stanley Nightingale 

Marcia Eckersley 
Lawrence Lovell 
John Randall 

Art Editors Barbara Brown 

Norman Schaffer 

Photographic Editor Stanley Nightingale 

Circulation Staff Sally Carlson 

Barbara Nathan 
Carol Allen 
Bernard Mullaney 
Guild Rosengren 
Irene Damon 
Robert White 
Marie Short 



Faculty Adviser 



Mrs. Eleanor F. McKey 



Dedication 

To Mr. George E. Green, who has given 
more than twenty years of faithful service 
to the schools of Duxbury. the sen "or class 
dedicates this hook. Superintendent, prin- 
cipal, teacher, friend, he will he long re- 
membered by the students of Duxbury. 



THE LOG 



I. THE CREW 

II. THE PASSENGERS 

III. ACTIVITY LOG 

IV. GAME DECK 

V. DISEMBARKATION 

VI. IMPRESSIONS 

VII. ROLL OF SPONSORS 




"And all I ask is a tall ship and a star 
to steer her by." 

John Masefield 



Faculty 




Seated: Mrs. McKey, Miss Downey, Mrs. Delano, Miss Carter 

Standing: Mr. Warfleld, Mr. Gesiak, Mrs. Philbrick, Mrs. O'Neil, Mr. Scott, Miss 

Collins, Miss Cornish, Mr. Dunkle, Mr. Sewall 
Not Shown: Mrs. Suitor, Miss Elliott, Mrs. McCloskey, Mrs. Couillard, Mrs. Hebbard 



Mr. Walter E. Scott, Principal 
American Citizenship 

Mr. Charles Sewall, Ass't Principal 
American History 
Physical Education 
Business Training 
Bookkeeping 

Miss Genevieve M. Collins 
Commercial Subjects 

Mrs. Rose B. Delano 
Fifth Grade 

Mr. William M. Dunkle 
Manual Arts 

Mrs. Eleanor F. McKey 
Languages 

Mrs. Helen L. Philbrick 
Opportunity Class 

Mrs. Elvira Suitor 
Geometry 
Algebra 
Biology 
Physics 

Girls' Athletics 



Miss Hazel M. Cornish 
Home Economics 
General Science 

Mr. Edmond B. Gesiak 
Science 

Social Science 

Mr. Robert Warfield 
English 

Mrs. May Blair McCloskey 
Supervisor of Music 

Mrs. Dorothy Harris Couillard 
Piano 

Miss Ellen W. Downey 

Junior High School Subjects 

Mrs. Alice O'Neil 
Sixth Grade 

Mrs. Ella B. Hubbard 
Art 

Miss Margaret K. Elliot 

Educational and Vocational Adviser 



The Passeegers 




"7 dreamed a dream in sailor town, a 
foolish dream and vain, 

Of ships and men departed, of old days 
come again — 

And an old song in sailor town, an old 
song to sing 

When shipmate meets with shipmate 
in the evening." 

Cicely Fox Smith 



Senior Off icers 



LAWRENCE LOVELL "LARRY' 
President 
"Action is the proper fruit 
of knowledge." 

Student Council President, 4 
Myles Standish Club Pres. 4 
Student Council, 2, 3, 4 
Class President, 2. 3, 4 
Vice President, 1 
Senior Class Play, 4 
Year Book Staff, 4 
Drama Club, 4 
Basketball, 3. 4 
Baseball, 1 




RICHARD WASHBURN "WASH" 
Vice President 
"As pert as a frog on a 
washing block." 
Myles Standish Club, 3, 4 
Vice President, 2, 3, 4 
Senior Class Play, 4 
Year Book Staff, 4 
Drama Club, 3, 4 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Baseball, 2, 3, 4 



DOROTHY RANDALL "DOT" 
Secretary 
"True as the needle to the pole 
or as the dial to the sun." 



Ice Cream Sales Committee, 2, 
Year Book Staff, 4 
Secretary, 3, 4 
Senior Class Play, 4 
Partridge Staff, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Defense Stamp Committee, 4 
Basketball, 2 



3, 4 





GEORGE DAMON "DAMIE' 
Treasurer 
"A wise head hath a close 
mouth to it." 

Senior Class Play, 4 
Treasurer, 1, 3, 4 
Myles Standish Club, 3, 4 
Assembly Committee, 4 
Student Council, 3 
Drama Club, 4 
Partridge Staff, 3 
Baseball, 3, 4 



WILLIAM MOSHER "BILL 
AS-V6-U.S.N. 

"Creeping like snail unwill- 
ingly to school." 

Basketball. 1. 2. 3. 4 
Partridge Staff, 1, 2 
Baseball. 1, 2. 3, 4 
Senior Class Play. 4 
Myles Standish Club, 3, 4 





MARIE SHORT "PALEFACE' 
"For she is wise, if I can judge 
of her; and fair she is if 
that mine eyes be true." 

Student Council. 4 

Partridge Staff, 1, 2, 4 

Pasketball. 2; Manager. 3 

Senior Class Play, 4 

Senior Reception Committee, 3 

Year Book Staff. 4 



WILLIAM SOULE "BILL - 
"As much wit as three folks, 
two focls, and a madman." 

Senior Class Play, 4 
Red Cross Committee,4 
Basketball Manager, 4 
Drama Club, 4 
Year Book Staff, 4 
Myles Standish Club 3, 4 




VIRGINIA SCHWAB "GINNY" 
"Woman, wind, and fortune 
are ever changing ." 

I Transferred from Weymouth High • 

Editor of Partridge, 4 

Year Book Editor, 4 

Drama Club President. 4 

D.A.R. Good Citizen Award 

Senior Class Play, 4 

Defense Stamp Committee. 3 

Asst. Manager of Basketball, 3 

Myles Standish Club, 4 



ROEERT WHITE "BOB' 
"In faith he is a worthy gentle- 
man; exceedingly well read 
and profited in strange 
concealments." 
Class Secretary, 1 
Senior Class Play. 4 
Student Council, 4 
Year Book Staff, 4 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Drama Club, 4 

Myles Standish Club Treasurer, 3 
Baseball, 2, 3, 4 

Student Council Vice President, 4 
A. A. Treasurer, 4 




LEWIS RANDALL "LEWY - 
"Though he be blunt, I know 
him passing wise." 

Class President, 1 
Class Secretary, 2 
Student Council, 2, 4 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Drama Club, 4 
Myles Standish, 3, 4 




JAMES MOBBS "JA-JA - 

"Speech is silver; silence 
is golden." 
Year Book Staff, 4 
Baseball, 4 

Myles Standish Club, 4 



JOHN RANDALL "JACK' 

"Come, and trip it as you go 
On the light, fantastic toe." 
Basketball Manager, 1, 2, 3 
Senior Class Play, 4 
Myles Standish Club 3, 4 
Partridge Staff, 3 
Year Book Staff, 4 



STANLEY NIGHTINGALE "STAN' 

"To eat, drink, and to be 
merry." 
Basketball, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Music Class Play, 1 
Senior Class Play, 4 
Partridge Staff, 1, 2, 3, 4 
Year Book Photographic Editor, 4 
Drama Club, 4 



NORMAN SCHAFPER "NORM" 
AS-V6-U.S.Navy 
"Full of wise saws and modern 
instances." 
Basketball Manager, 1 
Orchestra, 2, 3, 4 
Senior Class Play, 4 
Myles Standish Club, 4 
Year Book Staff, 4 




First Row: Frances Walker. Jean Barclay. Elizabeth Mosher, Irene Damon. Philip 
Delano. Elizabeth Schafler, Willard Barclay. Virginia Glass. Barbara Brown. 
Lena Parkman 

Second Row: George Taylor. Josephine Peterson. Virginia Murphy, Dorothy Black. 
Ann Peterson. Patricia Murphy, Theresa Sheehan, Marcia Eckersley, Donald 
Washburn. Mr. Sewall 
Not Shown: Lillian Randall 

Officers: President: Willard Barclay 

Vice President: Elizabeth Schaffer 
Secretary: Philip Delano 
Treasurer: Irene Damon 




First Row: William Pierson, Marilyn Bolton, Gertrude Phillips, Bernard Mullaney. 
Stuart Lovell. Nancy Soule. Robert Green, Patricia Shaw. Elizabeth Hughes. 
Frances IvanofT. Doris Parkman. Helen Parkman 
Second Row: Mr. Warfield, Carlton Torrey. Robert Merry, Roger Clayton. Guild 
Rosengren, George Nathan. Shirley Brown. Elizabeth Glass, Joan Higgins, 
Barbara King. Faith Bolton 
Not Shown: Elsie Haller. Howard Blanchard. Robert Byrne. Avery Nickerson 
Officers: President: Robert Green 

Vice President: Shirley Brown 
Secretary: Nancy Soule 
Treasurer: Patricia Shaw 




First Row: Carol Allen, Dorothy Dobson, Louise Marr, Norman White, Roberta 
White, Eveline Starkweather, Arlene Torrey, James Johnson. Elaine Randall. 
Second Row: Mr. Gesiak. Prank Eennett, Richard SchafTer, LeRoy Randall, Wil- 
liam Dunkle, Edwin Baker, John Shea, Winston Bolton, Patricia Loring 
Not Shown: John Harvey 

Officers: President: Norman White 

Vice President: Winston Bolton 
Secretary: Richard SchafTer 
Treasurer: LeRoy Randall 




First Row: Martin Delano, Gilbert Carlson, Merritt Ferrell, Bruce MacGibbon, 
Nancy Hazelhurst, Grace Martin, Leo King, Richard Marshall, Ann Brown, 
Ann Noyes, Winifred Washburn, Marjorie Peterson, Florence Taylor 

Second Row: Marilyn Starkweather, Elinor Glass, Barbara Nathan, Mary Ann 
Barclay, Everett Dunn, Anne Garside, Barbara O'Neil, Betty Merry, Lorraine 
April, Helen Randall 

Third Row: Ruth Washburn, Lillian Sheehan, Anna Glass, Elizabeth Griswold, 
Frances Halunen, Walter Churchill, William LeFleur, William Whitehouse, 
Philip Randall, George Ivanoff 
Not Shown: Russell Shirley, Russell Sprague, Donald Cornwell, Elizabeth Cotton 
Officers: President: Leo King 

Vice President: Grace Martin 
Secretary: Frances Halunen 
Treasurer: Richard Marshall 




First Row: Priscilla Wentworth. Nancy Glass, Barbara Peterson, Eva Caron, Mary 

Taylor, Norman Dunn. John Wadsworth, Carolyn Dunkle, Jeanette Ferrell, 

Carlton Peacock. Roland Washburn 
Second Row: Miss Cornish. Robert Olson, Albert Van Winkle. Bernice Johnson. 

Richard Woodsum. Evelyn Ford, Edward Drake. Edward IvanorT, Robert Barker. 

Otis Randall 

Third Row: George Bunten, Sally Carlson, Anne Martin, Lawrence Barboza, Robert 

Nathan. Leon Barclay. Earbara Irwin. Eugene Whitehouse. Charles Schwab 
Not Shown: Robert Holmes 

Officers: President: Norman Dunn 

Vice President: Mary Taylor 
Secretary: Eva Caron 
Treasurer: John Wadsworth 




First Row: George Martin. Reynolds Cushing, Judith Wirt. Janet Glass. Jacqueline 

Marr. Alpheus Walker, Cynthia Lovell, Edward Randall, Richard King 
Second Row: Carl Linds. William Merry. Patricia Higgins, Gail Wilson. Nelia Hal- 
unen, Dorothy Couillard. Natalie Mosher, Mary Lou Washburn. Robert Sheehan. 
William Butler. Marshall Brown 
Third Row: Harry Glass, Harold Chase. Frances Hagbourne. James Murphy, Walter 
Ford. Edward April, Richard Higgins, Edward Hans Strom, Everett Borghesani, 
Thomas Barclay. Daniel White. Roger Freeman 
Not Shown: Carl Carlson, Wilfred De Meule, Harold Randall. Gerald Torrey, 
William Wadsworth 

Officers: President: George Martin 

Vice President: Everett Borghesani 
Secretary: Thomas Barclay 
Treasurer: Jacqueline Marr 



Seated: Barbara Glass, John Allen, Patricia Bridgham, Peter 

Drake, Nancy Wadsworth, Edwin Loring, Inez Rose 
First row standing: Janice Healey, Bradlee Terry, Faith Olsen, 

Lewis Swift, Barbara Gallagher, David Carver, Gillian Harvey 
Second row standing: Shirley Torrey, Richard McAuiiffe, Ruth 

Parks, William Thayer, Avis Murray, Edward O'Neil 
Third row standing: Jane Ripley, Russell Randall, Sandra Hig- 

gins, Joseph De Lorenzo, Eleanor Tronjeau 
Fourth row standing: Yvonne De Meule, Ronald Everett, Elizabeth 

Garside, Loring Tripp, Jeanne King 

Officers: President: David Carver 

Vice President: Gillian Harvey 
Secretary: Edwin Loring 
Treasurer: Peter Noyes 



O 



T 
U 
N 
I 




Y 



Russell Mendes, Robert Glover, Robert Perry, Donald Mendes 
Elmer Mendes, George Bulu 
This class was discontinued after April 1 



Senior Class Census 



Most Mysterious JAMES MOBBS 

Best Pals f LAWRENCE LOVELL 

[RICHARD WASHBURN 
Most Popular Boy ROBERT WHITE 

Most Popular Girl VIRGINIA SCHWAB 



LAWRENCE LOVELL 
NORMAN SCHAFFER 
WILLIAM SOULE 
GEORGE DAMON 
DOROTHY RANDALL 
LAWRENCE LOVELL 
ROBERT WHITE 



Best Sport 

Naughtiest 

Wittiest 

Hardest Worker 

Most Businesslike 

Best School Spirit 

Best Looking Boy 

Eest Looking Girl . . . MARIE SHORT 

Most Studious GEORGE DAMON 

Most Active LAWRENCE LOVELL 

Most Artistic NORMAN SCHAFFER 

Most Mischievous . . RICHARD WASHBURN 

Class Woman Hater ... GEORGE DAMON 

Most Ambitious LEWIS RANDALL 

Most Sophisticated MARIE SHORT 

Best Dressed Boy WILLIAM MOSHER 

Best Dressed Girl VIRGINIA SCHWAB 

Most Nonchalant JAMES MOBBS 

Boys Most Likely To Succeed [LEWIS RANDALL 

[LAWRENCE LOVELL 

Girl Most Likely To Succeed MARIE SHORT 

Most Charming VIRGINIA SCHWAB 

Class Coquette VIRGINIA SCHWAB 

Boy With Best Line STANLEY NIGHTINGALE 

Girl With Best Line VIRGINIA SCHWAB 

Most Sincere (DOROTHY RANDALL 

"iLAWRENCE LOVELL 

Most Courteous GEORGE DAMON 

Most Absent-Minded [WILLIAM MOSHER 

Imarie SHORT 

Class Actors /LAWRENCE LOVELL 

[RICHARD WASHBURN 

Class Actress MARIE SHORT 

Boy With Best Physique ROBERT WHITE 

Best Sense of Humor JOHN RANDALL 

Most Agreeable GEORGE DAMON 




1. Digging out in '45 

2. Recess is so short! 

3. Yummy! Duxbury clams! 

4. Six-days out for this 

5. Pals 



6. Too soon he left us 

7. Ginny in sophisticated pose 

8. Impudence 

9. Irene! Such antics! 
10. Time out for practice 



11. Ridin' rough 

12. Junior misses 

13. Come on! The bell! 

14. Miss 1946 



Heave and a-weigh, my very famous 
men! 



Herbert French 



Student Council 




First Row: Lawrence Lovell, president; Jean Barclay, secretary; Robert White, 

vice-president and A. A. treasurer 
Second Row: Jane Ripley, Edward O'Neil, Marie Short, Marcia Eckersley, Faith 

Bolton, Patricia Loring, Carl Carlson 
Third Row: Ann Peterson, Mr. Warfield, Frances Hagbourne, Bernard Mullaney, 

Lewis Randall, Willard Barclay, Philip Delano, Miss Collins 
Not Shown: Grace Martin, Anne Garside, John Harvey, Robert Nathan, Nancy 

Glass 

The officers of the Student Council for this year are as follows: presi- 
dent, Lawrence Lovell; vice-president, Robert White; secretary, Jean 
Barclay, and treasurer, Ann Peterson. 

One of the most important tasks which this student council has accom- 
plished is that of revising the constitution. 

At the beginning of the year the council put on an assembly for the 
purpose of discussing and explaining the duties and aims of a council. 

It has also taken charge of such important duties as selling war stamps, 
caring for the service flag, and keeping the honor roll up-to-date. 

For the first time in its history, this year the Duxbury High School 
Student Council became a member of the National Association of Student 
Councils. The purpose of this organization is to provide ideas and sug- 
gestions for a successful student council. 

They also helped the Parent Teachers' Association with a supper meet- 
ing, which was very successful. 

The Athletic Association, which is also part of the Student Council, 
held a sports night in April, when letters were awarded to the players. 



Jean Barclay '46 



The Partridge 




First Row: Mary Richardson, business manager; Virginia Schwab, editor; Patricia 
Shaw, assistant editor. 

Second Row: Ann Peterson, junior representative; Carol Allen, Patricia Loring, 
reporters; Roberta White, joke editor; Louise Marr, reporter; Eva Caron, 
seventh grade representative; Barbara Brown, art and gossip editor 

Third Row: Dorothy Randall, business manager; Marcia Eckersley. literary editor; 
Marie Short, typist; Norman Schaffer, art editor; Nancy Soule, circulation 
manager; Shirley Brown, news editor; Stanley Nightingale, photographer 



During this year the Partridge has been issued eight times, once a 
month from October to May. Its June edition is this year book. 

The monthly copies were duplicated at the high school by the students 
with the assistance of Miss Collins and Mrs. McKey. Starting with the 
December issue, printed covers were used, which added to the attractive- 
ness of the magazine. 

Some of the features have been Mrs. Anthony's "Advice to the Love- 
lorn," a monthly write-up of a college, "Meet Your Teachers" interviews, 
and a comic strip, "Sandy the Sea Gull," drawn by "Starr Fish." 

Mary Richardson was replaced in February by Dorothy Randall as 
business manager. 

The year book subscription and advertising drive was held in March. 
It was highly successful and was followed by a record hop at which Vir- 
ginia Schwab and Willard Barclay were crowned Queen and King, re- 
spectively, of the popularity contest held in connection with the drive. 

At an assembly following the drive, prizes were awarded to Stanley 
Nightingale, who sold the most advertisements, to Marcia Eckersley and 
Lawrence Lovell, the runners-up, to Barbara Nathan for selling the most 
subscriptions, and boxes of chocolates to the ninth and twelfth grades for 
being one hundred per cent in subscriptions to the year book. 



Science Club 




First Row: Richard Marshall, Grace Martin, Anne Garside, Barbara O'Neil, 

Frances Halunen, Nancy Hazlehurst, Leo King 
Second Row: Barbara Nathan, Elizabeth Griswold, Mr. Gesiak, William Dunkle, 

John Shea, Edwin Baker, Winston Bolton 



The Science Club, which was limited to fifteen members from grades 
eight and nine, met every week under the direction of Mr. Gesiak. The 
following members served as officers: 

President William Dunkle 

Vice President Leo King 

Secretary Anne Garside 

Treasurer Winston Bolton 

During the meetings simple experiments were conducted, such as 
making a wet cell, analyzing coal, and stretching glass. Sometimes movies 
were shown. Many of the boys interested in photography did work in 
the dark room, and two of the girls made a relief map of Duxbury, using 
modeling clay. 



Anne Garside '49 



Orchestra 




Ann Peterson. Norman Schaffer, Mr. Sewall. Robert Green, Merritt Ferrell. 

George Ivanoff. John Shea 



Assembly Committee 

w 




Seated: Theresa Sheehan, George Damon. Chairman; 
Louise Marr 

Standing: Miss Downey. Anne Garside. Sally Carlson. 

Miss Cornish 
Not Shown: Guild Rosengren 



Who could forget hours spent in study hall, when one tried frantically to get 
the next period's assignment completed before the bell rang? 




Room 12 was always a hive of activity when each month's Partridge was ready 
for the assembly line. Here Editor Virginia Schwab checks the issue for errors while 
the rest of the staff assemble, punch, cover, and tie the pages together. Barbara 
can't resist a moment's pause to chuckle over a humorous item. Many students not 
on the staff assisted with assembling. In this picture, Richard, Lawrence, Josephine 
and Virginia Murphy represent the non-staff helpers. 



A GROUP OF SEVENTH GRADE BOYS AT WORK IN THE SHOP 

Manual arts is part of the regular seventh grade program of studies 




A CLOTHING CLASS IN ACTION 

Seated: Mary Taylor, Barbara Erwin, Sally Carlson, Carolyn Dunkle 
Standing: Bernice Johnson, Evelyn Ford, Jeanette Ferrell. Barbara 
Peterson, Eva Caron, Anne Martin 



Sceior Play 




First Row: Robert White, Virginia Schwab, Marie Short, Stanley Nightingale, 
Second Row: Richard Washburn, Dorothy Randall, Larry Lovell, Mary Richard- 
son, George Damon 

Third Row: Tech. Director, Mr. Dunkle, William Mosher, Norman Schaffer, Wil- 
liam Soule. William Dunkle, Virginia Glass, John Randall, Mr. Warfleld, 
Director 

On December 15, 1944 "The Ghost Train" roared into Duxbury High 
School, and from it descended, suit cases in hand, Marie Short and Stanley 
Nightingale, a couple on the verge of divorce, Virginia Schwab and Bob 
White, amorous newlyweds, Mary Richardson, a flustered spinster, weighed 
clown by a bird cage, and Larry Lovell, a nonchalant young Englishman. 
Richard Washburn, station master, thoroughly frightened the passengers 
by telling them that they would have to spend the night in a deserted 
station through which a ghost train was destined to pass at midnight. 

During the course of a hectic evening, Mrs. Warfield took the part 
for Dorothy Randall, who was ill, of a half-crazed, terror-stricken girl, 
and exclaimed that she was fated to see the ghost train. 

After a score of breathtaking episodes, the play drew to a climax with 
Bill Soule and Norman Schaffer revealed as criminals in league with the 
so-called nervous young lady, smuggling dope via The Ghost Train. 

Bill Mosher, George Damon, Jack Randall, and Larry Lovell had 
cleverly detected the ruse and captured the smugglers, much to the de- 
light of an enthusiastic audience. 

The realistic sound of the ghost train was accomplished with the aid 
of an efficient stage crew under the direction of Mr. Dunkle. 

Virginia Glass served as prompter. 

Much credit for the fine performance is due to the director, Mr. 
Warfield. 



'"And all I ask is a windy day with the 

white clouds flying 
And the blown spume and the flung 

spray and the seagulls crying." 



John Masefield 



Girls' Basketball 




First Row: Cheerleaders, Ann Peterson, Nancy Soule, Betty Hughes 

Second Row: Jean Barclay, Louise Marr, Josephine Peterson, Betty Mosher, Captain; 

Lena Parkman, Doris Parkman, Virginia Glass 
Third Row: Theresa Sheehan, Patricia Murphy, Coach Sewall, Betty SchafTer, 

Marcia Eckersley 



The Duxbury High School girls' basketball team this year placed 
sixth in the South Shore League, Scituate taking first place. This was a 
somewhat better record than last year and was probably due to the help 
given the girls by Coach Sewall. A total of three games out of fourteen 
were won. 

Doris Parkman was high scorer of the season, with Betty Mosher 
next in line. 

The list of schools played is the same as that listed under Boys' Bas- 
ketball. 

Our cheerleaders, Ann Peterson, Nancy Soule, and Betty Hughes, 
helped to enliven the games with their enthusiastic conducting of the 
cheers. 

Nancy Soule, '47 



Boys 9 Basketball 




First Row: V/. Mosher, R. White. Capt. W. Barclay. R. Green. L. Randall 
Second Row: R. Washburn. N. White. L. Lovell. Mgr. W. Soule. S. Nightingale 
Coach Mr. Sewall, R. Schaffer, P. Delano. G. Taylor. 



The boys' basketball squad enjoyed a rather successful season this 
year, when they completed their schedule with a record of nine wins 
against five losses to take third place in a league of eight teams. 

Much of the credit for this greatly improved showing over last year's 
team should be given Coach Sewall, who voluntarily devoted his time to 
help produce a winning combination. 

The second team also enjoyed a successful season, having a record of 
eleven wins against only three losses. 

The season's scores are as follows: 





Opponent 


Duxbury 


Scituate 


20 


24 


Norwell 


25 


23 


Pembroke 


16 


28 


Hanover 


57 


15 


Cohasset 


. 29 


39 


Kingston 


v. ... 20 


27 


Marshfield 


40 


48 


Scituate 


40 


24 


Norwell 


30 


46 


Pembroke 


28 


34 


Hanover 


48 


25 


Cohasset 


30 


54 


Kingston 


34 


19 


Marshfield 


28 


27 






Richard Washburn 



Duxbury Free Library 



Baseball Team 



The boys' baseball team this year was under the management of Mr. 
Sewall. 

Usually the boys on the team are in the high school, but this year we 
had a first baseman from the eighth grade, William LaFleur. 

The boys did not have many practices, as it was impossible for Mr. 
Sewall, with all his other tasks, to devote a great deal of time to this sport. 

The team as a whole did not play any one position. There were at 
least two boys to one position, so that a change could be made if necessary. 
The team comprised: 

Pitchers: Lewis Randall, Robert White, Robert Green. 
Catchers: Stanley Nightingale, George Damon, 
First base: William LaFleur, Richard Washburn. 
Second base: George Damon, Norman White. 
Short stop: Willard Barclay, Richard Washburn. 
Third base: Philip Delano. 

Outfield: Richard Schaffer, James Mobbs, LeRoy Randall, Avery 
Nickerson. 

Managers — Donald Washburn, George Taylor. 
Assistant Manager — Everett Dunn. 

THE SCHEDULE 

April 24 Duxbury at Scituate May 17 

April 26 Norwell at Duxbury May 22 

May 1 Duxbury at Pembroke May 24 

May 3 Duxbury at Hanover May 29 

May 8 Cohasset at Duxbury May 31 

May 10 Duxbury at Kingston June 5 

May 15 Marshfield at Duxbury June 7 



Scituate at Duxbury 
Duxbury at Norwell 
Pembroke at Duxbury 
Hanover at Duxbury 
Duxbury at Cohasset 
Kingston at Duxbury 
Duxbury at Marshfield 



Girls 9 Softball Team 

A softball team was organized this year for the girls by Mrs. Suitor, 
assisted by Mr. Herrick. 

The team consisted of 14 girls: 
Betty Schaffer — field Frances Ivanoff — outfield 

Virginia Glass — third base Eveline Starkweather — third base 

Helen Parkman — catcher Betty Mosher — short stop 

Lillian Randall — first base Shirley Brown — second base 

Barbara King — second base Louise Marr — pitcher 

Lena Parkman — field Doris Parkman — pitcher 

Trudy Phillips — third base Theresa Sheehan — field 

The girls elected Doris Parkman for their captain. 
The year's schedule follows: 

May 2 — Duxbury vs. Norwell at Norwell 
May 9 — Duxbury vs. Pembroke at Duxbury 
May 16 — Duxbury vs. Hanover at Hanover 
May 18 — Duxbury vs. Cohasset at Cohasset 
May 23 — Duxbury vs. Kingston at Duxbury 
May 28— Duxbury vs. Marshfield at Marshfield 

Patricia Shaw '47 



"O to have life henceforth a poem of 
new joys! 

To dance, clap hands, exult, shout, leap, 

roll on, float on! 
To be a sailor of the world, bound for 

all ports, 

A ship itself (see indeed these sails I 
spread to the sun and air) , 

A swift and swelling ship full of rich 
words, full of joys." 

Walt Whitman 



Honor Essay 



HOW CAN WE HAVE A LASTING PEACE? 

by Lewis Randall 

Unless we take full advantage of our present opportunity to establish 
the conditions of an enduring peace, the price that is being paid in hu- 
man lives and material wealth will have been a total loss. First, we must 
know what the conditions or requirements of a peaceful world are; and 
second, how we can establish or create these conditions in our lifetime. 
Perhaps the public attitude towards these problems will have a greater 
effect on us, the class of '45, than anything else in our lives. We are the 
ones who will either benefit or suffer by the decisions of our leaders. 

The formation of an international organization similar to the League 
of Nations, but having more power, seems to be the way in which we will 
be able to establish peace. It may be felt that another world organization 
would not be any more successful now than it was after World War I. But 
we should have been able to profit from the mistakes that were made last 
time. The League of Nations had no way in which to enforce or carry out 
the recommendations that were made. Also, there was nothing that com- 
pelled a country to belong to the League. If they were dissatisfied with 
the way things were done, they merely dropped out. If we can correct 
the mistakes that were made before, we should be able to create lasting 
peace. 

An international organization will probably be sufficient to keep the 
peace, provided we establish a peace worth keeping. If we are unable to 
construct a peace that will be satisfactory to each country, it will not be 
a lasting peace. There should be no secret treaties or agreements between 
nations for special advantage. If such a situation existed, it would only 
tend to cause grievances and jealousy of other countries, and we would 
be no further ahead than we were before. 

The problems that arise as the result of proposing a peace plan are 
many. 

Full employment will undoubtedly be one of our basic needs. If we 
are to have full employment in America, we will have to have full em- 
ployment all over the world. If we continue to produce goods for trade, 
we must provide markets for these goods. If we expect to market our goods 
in foreign lands, the people of these lands must have employment so that 
they will have the purchasing power necessary to buy our goods. It is just 
as true of a person in some other part of the world as it is of a citizen of 
the United States, that, "You can't buy unless you are able to sell." The 
dependence of one group of persons on another for employment is not 
limited by national boundaries. If we are going to have customers in other 
countries, we must be good customers of theirs. 

Purchasing power raises the problem of free trade. Reciprocal or 
mutual trade agreements should exist with and between all nations. There 
should be no discrimination against any one nation. Each one should have 
an equal opportunity to share in the commerce of the world. 

Another condition of a peaceful world is that of racial democracy. We 



say that the only way to keep the peace is to have unity between all na- 
tions. If we want to have unity, we must have cooperation and under- 
standing between those involved. There cannot be cooperation between 
the countries if we are not willing to appreciate the common people of 
these countries regardless of their race, creed, or color. There should be 
no prejudice against any person, group, or race of people if we expect to 
even come close to our goal. Equality of opportunity is the basic principle 
of democracy, and we have to think of it as such on a world scale before 
we can have a world that is free and united. 

We can continue to try to solve the problems of trade, employment, 
education, and such that confront us. We can say that we must achieve 
lasting peace. But, until we decide that every person, regardless of his 
race, creed, or color, regardless of his ways and ideals, has as much right 
to live as the next fellow; until we believe in equality of opportunity for 
all, we will not have a world free from hate and wars, one that is free and 
united. 



Class Ode 

by Virginia Schwab 

FAREWELL, DEAR DUXBURY 

Tune of "Vilia" 

1. 

Farewell, dear Duxbury, your praises we sing 
To classmates and teachers our tributes we bring; 
Our days together too quickly have passed, 
But treasured memories will last. 

2. 

While our school stands mid its carpet of green, 
We'll always remember the joys we have seen. 
Friendship will linger as we depart, 
Cherishing thee in our hearts. 

3. 

Farewell, dear Duxbury, we leave thee today, 
Bearing fond memories of thee on our way, 
Pleasures you've brought us. sorrow sometimes 
Yet ever will we be thine. 

4. 

Loyal we stand ever friendly and true, 
Heads held on high, our hearts loyal to you. 
Thoughts of the past and the bright future too 
Lead us, dear Duxbury, to you. 



Class Prophecy 

by 

Richard Washburn 
and 

Virginia Schwab 

Ginny: Well, for goodness sake — Richard Washburn! What are you doing 

on this cruise ? Tell me all. 
Wash: Well, hello Ginny. I'm on my way to Europe to get some ideas for 

a new show. I'm the second Eddie Cantor, you know. 
Ginny: Still blowing your own horn, I see. 

Wash: Tell me, Ginny, where have you been keeping yourself all these 

long years, and what brings you on this trip? 
Ginny: Well, right now I'm on my way to Paris to help model the latest 

fashions. Some fun! 
Wash: I should say so. Tell me — have you heard anything about our 

fellow classmates? 

Ginny: You can't imagine whom I saw in New York when I went to the 

tourist agency for my tickets. 
Wash: Anybody I know? 

Ginny: Dorothy Randall — you remember Dot? 

Wash: Of course, who could forget Dot? What is she doing for excite- 
ment? 

Ginny: She is working at the agency, helping people with poor feeble 

minds like mine to plan their trips abroad. 
Wash: For heaven's sake! Say, Ginny, guess whom I just bumped into? 
Ginny: Goodness only knows. Who? 

Wash: N. J. Schaffer in person. He is a big shot oil magnate now, you 
know. 

Ginny: What's he doing on board? 

Wash: Well, you know Norm was the boy with big ideas. He has been 
beating the skins in the orchestra on board, and is now on his way 
to Paris to sell some of the paintings he did in his spare time. 

Ginny: Well, I see he hasn't forgotten his good old days at D. H. S. when 
he was our one and only drummer and also an excellent artist. 

Wash: I should say so. (Picks up newspaper) Say, Ginny, get a load of 
this. 

Ginny: What? 

Wash: "Pleasure Town, U. S. A., June 14, 1955. It was announced today 
by the Associated Press that James Arthur Mobbs, prominent 
Middle West business man, has purchased outright the airport of 
Elmer Fudd in Fuddville, U. S. A. When interviewed on the sub- 
ject, Mr. Mobbs confirmed the statement and stated that he hasn't 
forgotten his old home town of Duxbury, Mass., and will pitch in 
and give Selectman Delano of that town a lift on the mail route. 

Ginny: Well, I see J. J. got his wish to own an airport. That reminds me — 
did Norm tell you whose orchestra is playing on board? 

Wash: He must have forgotten it. He told me that he played the drums 
once in a while, but he neglected to tell me whose band he played 
in 



Ginny: The band on board is none other than Bing Damon's. 

Wash: Good grief — I never would have imagined Bing's being an orches- 
tra leader. What's the name of the band? 

Ginny: Porky's Corny Eingadeers — Whew! What a mouthful! 

Wash: I read about his being elected President of the Hollywood Bache- 
lor's Club, but I never thought he was a band leader too. I guess 
I'll have to look him up before we dock, but if I don't see him. I'll 
certainly hear him. 

Ginny: Have you heard from any of the rest of our classmates? 

Wash: Yes, I understand Bill Mosher is a big shot now. 

Ginny: You don't say! What's he doing for excitement? 

Wash: Well, you know that old car of his? 

Ginny: You mean that old truck he fixed up into a chassis — I mean, that 
old chassis he fixed up into a truck. 

Wash: That gave him a start — he now owns a chain of garages on the 
East Coast, a fleet of planes on the West Coast, and is sole owner 
of three taxi cab companies in the South. And on top of all this, 
he lives in Switzerland, where he controls his businesses by re- 
mote control. 

Ginny: He certainly has come up in the world. I guess raking leaves for 

Tony Barriault started him on his career, don't you? 
Wash: Yes, I guess it did. 

Ginny: Say, Washie, you remember Larry Lovell, our class president? 
Wash: Sure, I remember Larry. What about him? 

Ginny: He is now president of the steamship lines on which we are sail- 
ing. He's just been offered $50,000 for his antique jaloppy he 
bought while at D. H. S. It's wanted for the French Exposition 
of 1960. 

Wash: I knew that Larry would be president of something. He was pres- 
ident of just about everything at good old D. H. S. But $50,000 
for that old jaloppy! Whew! 

Ginny: Lewie Randall is also on board. He is on his way to Europe to 
try to locate some talent for his moving picture business. He owns 
the Flashy Eyeful Pictures, Inc., you know. 

Wash: Well, good for Lewie. That reminds me of Stanley Nightingale. 
You remember Stan? 

Ginny: Why, of course, he was the Casanova of the class. Tell me, what's 
Stan been doing all these long years. 

Wash: I understand that he is a famous Hollywood actor. Oh, I almost 
forgot — Bob White is star vocalist for Bing's Corny Bingadeers. 
It won't be long before all the bobby-socks will be swooning over 
Droolatra White. I almost forgot to tell you Marie Short is on 
board. She's on her way to Paris to buy clothes for her swank 
New York shoppe. Maybe you'll model some for her. 

Ginny: Maybe I will. Who knows? 

Wash: Oh, guess whom I bumped into a little while ago — Bill Soule. 
Ginny: Really? What has he been doing lately? 

Wash: Well, believe it or not, Bill's on a pleasure trip here. He said that 
he is trying to escape the turmoil of his motorcycle business. 

Ginny: Say, I read something about a new motorcycle named "Soulemo- 
bile," or something like that. 



Wash: Yes, that's Bill's latest invention. It's streamlined for speed or 
pleasure. 

Ginny: Washie, doesn't it seem to you that we have neglected someone? 
Wash: Why, of course. We almost forgot John Randall — you remember 

Johnny? 
Ginny: Why, of course. 

Wash: He is now working in New York — cooking hard-boiled eggs in a 

soft-boiled egg factory. 
Ginny: Wouldn't that boil you over! 

Wash: It most certainly would. Well, Ginny, I guess our classmates 

didn't do so badly after all. 
Ginny: No, and I hope that they continue to do well in the future. Let's 

have the gang get together on board before we dock. 
Wash: That's a good idea. So long for now, and I'll see what I can do 

about getting the crowd together. 



Class History 

by William Soule and Dorothy Randall 

September 8, 1941 was a great day for the Class of '45, who were to 
embark on the good ship Class of '45 of D. H. S. 

Roll call was taken, and as there were no crew members, we set sail 
on the Freshmen Sea. Our ship's officers for that year were as follows: 

President Lewis Randall 

Vice President Lawrence Lovell 

Secretary ... Robert White 

Treasurer George Damon 

Our activities for that year were very limited because of conditions 
brought on by the war. 

The first year was spent mostly learning rules and regulations of 
D. H. S. and preparing ourselves for the voyages that were to come. 

In June of 1942 the good ship Class of '45 put into Duxbury harbor. 
During the summer months, while the crew were on leave, the ship was 
put into shape from stem to stern. 

After the leave was over, last call was given to all those who wanted 
to sail the Sophomore Ocean. 

With last year's crew intact and two new members, Edward Hinckley 
and Francis Pictan of Boston, we weighed anchor on schedule. 

Realizing that the ship would be our home for the next nine months, 
we spent the first day getting acquainted with our new quarters and ob- 
taining equipment for our voyage. 

Our ship's captain, Mr. Arthur Lee Homan, called a meeting to vote 
for officers for the ensuing year. 

The following people were elected: 

President Lawrence Lovell 

Vice President Richard Washburn 

Secretary Lewis Randall 

Treasurer Janice Dyer 



We did not have any dance or party that year because of more im- 
portant wartime activities. 

About half-way across the ocean, a steamer headed for Boston came 
along-side. Immediately Edward Hinckley and Francis Pictan said that 
they were leaving us to return to their home town to work. 

After two more weeks of sailing, Richard Olsen and Robert Chandler 
left us to go aboard ships of the U. S. Navy. 

We had many storms on the Sophomore Ocean, but we all came 
through with flying colors by winning our own individual battles. 

We were now ready to sail on the Junior Sea, but first we were given 
liberty for two months. 

It was the fifth day of September, 1943, when we all boarded the good 
ship Class of '45 and set sail on the Junior Sea. 

In checking over our crew, we found we had a new shipmate, Virginia 
Schwab. She was transferred from the ship "Weymouth" to the "Dux- 
bury" to continue her smooth sailing through high school. 

As soon as we had found our quarters and acquired our "sea legs," 
our captain, Miss Beals, advised us to select good ship's officers if we were 
to continue safely on our course. 

The crew selected the following officers: 



We made plans for a class dance May 12, but unfortunately we had 
to call it off. I wonder if it was because some of us didn't know the kind 
of dancing that we call "Jitterbug" today, or did the rough weather cause 
us to lose our "sea legs"? 

Many of the boys of our crew went out for the most outstanding sport 
known to us in Duxbury — basketball. The team consisted of the following 
junior boys: "Bill" Mosher, "Bob" White, "Dick" Washburn," "Larry" 
Lovell, and "Lewey" Randall. 

We sailed on, and before we knew it, it was time for the seniors to 
disembark at the next port, which meant a senior reception to be held on 
the ship's deck June 17. Everyone lent a helping hand, and the seniors 
were very proud of us. 

As we walked solemnly to the bulletin board, we found that our last 
order had been the senior reception. We were now on leave for two 
months. We went home to our parents and friends once more, realizing 
that we had only one more year to sail on our own little ship. We knew 
when we came back there would be only twelve of us to continue our sail 
together. 

Soon our leave was up and we found ourselves at the senior pier, ready 
to sail on for our last trip. We found old shipmates gone and new ones 
about to sail on with us. Among our missing was Betty Muirhead. That 
left only three girls, Marie Short, Dorothy Randall, and Virginia Schwab. 

With happy and eager faces we started our senior voyage at once. As 
we walked along the deck, we found Mrs. Eleanor McKey at the helm to 
help us keep our sailing as smooth as ever. 



President 
Vice President 



Lawrence Lovell 
Richard Washburn 
Dorothy Randall 
George Damon 



Secretary 
Treasurer 



Everyone must have liked our ship's officers during the junior trip, 
for the same officers were elected. 



President 
Vice President 



Lawrence Lovell 
Richard Washburn 

Dorothy Randall 
. . George Damon 



Secretary 
Treasurer 



It wasn't long after the officers had been elected that they noticed 
walking down the main deck a new passenger aboard their ship. Mary 
Richardson had been transferred from the "Charlestown, N. H." to the 
"Duxbury" in hopes of continuing her sail through high school. Stanley 
Nightingale, a former passenger, had also returned to the ship. 

The members of our crew again participated in the popular sport 
basketball, having a successful season. 

For many nights during November and December everyone gave up 
precious evenings to practice the senior class play, "The Ghost Train," 
under the direction of Mr. Robert Warfield. Mr. William Dunkle man- 
aged the sound effects, and we appreciated very much the work he did. 

It was the fifteenth of December that the "Ghost Train" stopped at 
Duxbury, and what a relief! Oh yes, something happened at one of the 
rehearsals. Dorothy Randall had to report below deck for "Sick Call." 
We turned our sail and went to Mrs. Warfield to take Dorothy's part, so 
that the "Ghost Train" could continue to its destination. 

Before we knew it, it was time to order our senior caps and gowns 
and have our pictures taken for our year book. 

When Mary Richardson boarded our ship in October, all of us thought 
that she would continue her sail with us, but in March she asked for a 
transfer back to her own ship "The Charlestown, N. H." 

Our crew keeps getting smaller. Norman Schaffer left us in March 
to board a larger ship belonging to Uncle Sam's Navy. We want to wish 
him oceans of luck. He is not the only one, because "Bill" Mosher did like- 
wise. We now have twelve to carry on, but we hope that all of those that 
have left will always remember the good ship Class of '45 from the Dux- 
bury High School. 



Home is the place where peace and comfort 

Make their way to all; 

Home is the place where joy resounds 

From each and every wall. 

Home is the place where mother's hand 

Comforts the weary and sad; 

Home is the place that echoes with 

The shouts of a merry lad. 

Home is the place where mirth reigns king. 

Where children's happy voices sing. 

Home is the place where all is blessed. 

Home is the castle of happiness. 



Home 



Nancy Soule '47 



Class Will 



by George Damon 
and 

Robert White 

WE. the Class of 1945 of Duxbury High School, of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts, being of sound mind and body (we 
think) do make, publish, and declare that this is our last will 
and testament. We bequeath our most prized possessions to 
the following: 

Richard Washburn, who dashed off his shorthand in five minutes, leaves 
this ability to Frances Walker, who should profit by it. 

Robert White, our dashing young Romeo, bequeaths his charm to any 
blushing and bashful backwoods boy in the sophomore class. 

James Mobbs leaves his quietness to Betty Schaffer. the noisy junior. With 
Jay's quietness Betty should be a little easier on the teaching staff 
next year. 

Virginia Schwab leaves a small portion of her pep and inclination for mis- 
chief to Irene Damon and Virginia Glass. We know they don't need 
either, but you remember the old saying, "To him that hath shall be 
given." 

Stanley Nightingale leaves his brain, preserved in alcohol, to be kept in 
Mrs. Suitor's laboratory for the juniors to study in their senior year. 

William Mosher leaves his record for being tardy to his sister Betty, 
who won't find it difficult to break it. 

Marie Short, whose temper gets the best of her at various times, bequeaths 
said temper to Dot Black, who never seems to get riled. 

Lawrence Lovell leaves to pick up more girls in his old Ford. 

Lewis Randall leaves his extra gray matter to Bob Green and we hope 
that Bob will attain Lewis' record as class genius. 

Dorothy Randall leaves her typing and letter writing ability to any soph- 
omore girl who wants it. With Dot's ability the sophomore should 
really get somewhere, especially with her servicemen's correspondence. 

John Randall, the alibi artist, leaves his abilities to George Taylor, who 
should be able to profit by them. 

Tall, lanky Norman Schaffer leaves a foot and a half to Willard Barclay, 
which Norman will never miss, and which should enable "Bare" to 
throw the ball down through the basket instead of up and then down. 



William Soule leaves his mechanical ability to Dick Schaffer. With Bill's 
ability Dick should be able to repair his so-called car. 

George Damon leaves his low-slung weight to Bill Dunkle. With George's 
weight Bill may be able to cast a shadow. 

To Mr. Scott, our principal, we leave the classes to come, hoping that each 
will be better than the last. 

To Miss Collins we leave a chauffer to drive to the Post Office to get war 
stamps each week. 

To Mrs. Suitor we leave a larger room for her after school classes. 

To Mr. Sewall we leave the memory of a perfect history class. We know 
he will never find our equal. 

To Miss Downey we leave an automatic foot to keep the straggling lines 
in step going to and from assemblies. 

To Mr. Warfield the Class of '45 leaves a private office for his use. In 
this he may store the innumerable papers his students write. 

To Mrs. McKey we leave a motor scooter on which she may get more speed 
going up and down the corridors on foot. It also ought to save a little 
shoe leather. 

To Mr. Dunkle we leave a new set of springs for his car. Those basket- 
ball trips with ten or fifteen players were very hard on them. With 
these new springs he should be ready for more trips next year. 

To Mr. Gesiak we leave a microphone so that he will bs able to out-talk 
his history class. If this fails, we leave a sum of money to provide 
gags for them. 

On this fourteenth day of June in the year of our Lord one thousand 
nine hundred and forty-five, we, the Class of 1945, do sign, seal and declare 
in the presence of witnesses, who at our request have subscribed their 
names, that this is our last will and testament. 

The Class of 1945 

George Damon 
Robert White 

Attorney s-at-law 

Witnesses: 

General Patton 
General MacArthur 
General Eisenhower 



"Often I think of the beautiful town 

That is seated by the sea; 
Often in thought go up and down 
The pleasant streets of that dear old 
town, 

And my youth comes back to me. 
And the verse of a Lapland song 
Is haunting my memory still; 
'A boy's will is the wind's will, 
And the thought of youth are long, long 
thoughts' ." 

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 



Memories 



In a little while twelve boys and girls will leave Duxbury High School, 
never to return again except for visits. Most of these pupils have had 
the whole or the biggest part of their education in Duxbury. From these 
years will come many pleasant memories that the passing of time will 
make only more precious. 

I doubt if many remember very much about their first eight years of 
school, even though the first day at school is a vivid memory. But until 
a person has entered high school, the fun of education hasn't even started. 

When the proud little class of '45 entered the ninth grade room for a 
stay of forty or so weeks, they had great plans for their high school years. 
All the dances and parties they were going to have! Of these only a few 
materialized, but these few will linger long in the memories of our de- 
parting class. 

There were, of course, basketball games, which were a lot of fun for 
the teams and spectators. Remember those rides to and from games? The 
so-called singing was enough to make even Frank Sinatra seem good. 

In 1944 the juniors (now our graduating class) gave a splendid re- 
ception for their departing seniors. For weeks in advance they were plan- 
ning their decorations and refreshments, and the girls were discussing 
gowns, hair-do's and evening slippers. And when that big night came, 
everyone was decked out in his best finery, all ready for a grand time. 
They weren't to be disappointed. Remember that beautiful grand march 
that they slaved over for many days and weeks before? It was certainly 
worth all the effort put into it. 

At the beginning of their senior year they started to plan for the 
senior class play, the best for many a year. I know that not only the cast, 
but even the crew whose fun consisted in making the train whistle and 
crash at the right time, will never forget the rehearsals and the excite- 
ment of the final performance. 

And now that graduation time has arrived, there is, of course, the 
thrill of getting a diploma, delivering the class gifts and speeches, and 
having the reception planned and given in their honor. Memories of these 
will be vivid indeed. 

But perhaps the most precious memories of all will be the friendships 
made in school. Years from now, the friends who shared these exper- 
iences with them will seem closer than ever. The ties made in high school 
can never be broken. 

Yes, seniors, your high school career is finished, but in your memories 
it will live forever. 

Irene Damon '46 



To the Juniors 



What say there, you who will be seniors? 

This year you have had more fun and notoriety than many a junior 
class. Your basketball players and your jitterbugs top the list. Your 
class spirit bubbles over, and so do you when you should be boning away. 
That's just one of the things we want to talk about. 

A school is "made" or spoiled by the pupils who attend it. That we 
know. But aside from spirit and sportsmanship there is the main purpose 
we all have in attending school — education. That is, without doubt, the 
most essential thing in future living. How can you be as smooth as your 
post war world if you aren't sent through something that will buff off 
the rough corners? The broader your understanding of human nature 
and world affairs the more likely you are to succeed in your chosen voca- 
tion or career. 

The step from junior to senior is more than the passage of a summer 
vacation. It is one of the most serious changes in an adolescent's life, 
particularly in these days when becoming a citizen means that we are not 
only citizens of our own great country but potential citizens of a narrow- 
ing world. 

The seniors are usually aloof and extraordinarily silent on matters even 
of little importance, for they are just beginning to realize that tomorrow is 
theirs and perhaps the result of their actions will alter their lives. It is 
in school that we must learn to apply common sense to any situation and 
evaluate people, incidents and material goods in comparison with our own 
education. 

Next year you juniors will head the student government of your 
school. There may in the future be a statesman or politician among you 
who may have got his taste for the legislative through that student body. 

School is the place to test out your ability to adapt yourself to changes, 
to other people's wants and plans, and to prepare yourself for the ventures 
into which you will enter when free from the ties of compulsory education. 

But remember, education never stops. That is, it never stops broad- 
ening the way for those who want it. And who doesn't? 

So — let's make school the proving ground of our capacities and use 
those capacities to build in the future a better world. 

Frances Walker '46 



Roll of Sponsors 




''And promise you calm seas, auspicious 
gales 

And sail so expeditious, that shall 
catch 

Your royal fleet afar off " 



Shakespeare 



TO THE TEACHERS AND PUPILS 
BEST WISHES TO YOU ALL 
AND TO THOSE ENTERING THE ARMED FORCES, 
MAY YOU RETURN SAFELY 



» 




ARTHUR MURPHY, Manager 



EBEN N. BRIGGS 



DUXBURY 
COAL AND LUMBER 



Distributor of 
FUEL OILS 



Duxbury, Massachusetts 



Com plimcnts of 



ALVES' SHOE STORE 

For Better Quality Shoes 



Tel. 441 

303 Court Street 



Plymouth 



ERNEST BOTIERI 

JEWELER 

290 A Court Street 
North Plymouth 



BOAT YARD 



LUMBER 



OIL SERVICE 



Tel. Dux. 81 



GEORGE V. BUTTNER STORE 

19-21 Court Street 
Tel. Plymouth 290 - 250 



Com plimcnts 
of 

A. F. Douglas 
D. D. S. 



Com plimcnts 
of 

A Friend 





Compliments of 


B. F. GOODRICH 


the 


Dealer in 


SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM 


OIL SERVICE 




HAY — GRAIN — COAL 




Poultry Supplies 


HOME SCIENCE BREAD 


LUMBER — ROOFING 


WASHBURN'S BAKFRY Tnr 


CEMENT, Etc. 


S07 Pleasant Street Brockton 
Tel. 5401 


L. G. BALFOUR COMPANY 


Compliments of 


Attleboro, Mass. 




CLASS RINGS and PINS 


WILFRED J. OHLSON 


COMMENCEMENT INVITATIONS 


Island Creek, Mass. 


DIPLOMAS 




PERSONAL CARDS 


PAINTER — PAPERHANGER 
DECORATOR 


Represented by Gene Manchester 




93 High Street, 
North Attleboro, Mass. 


Tel. Dux. 2 5 3-J 



Compliments of 


George McSherry 
73 Summer St. Kingston, Mass. 


NATIONAL FIREWORKS, Inc. 




WEST HANOVER, 


Compliments of 


MASS. 


BROCCOLI'S MARKET 

304 Court Street 
North Plymouth, Mass. 
Tel. 8 37 


MITCHELL-THOMAS CO. 




COMPLETE 


THE SOPHOMORES 


HOME FURNISHINGS 


extend 


66 Court St. Plymouth 


BEST WISHES 




and 




BEST WISHES 




from 


to the 


SANDY THE SEAGULL 


SENORS OF 1945 


and 




STARR FISH 





*S 1 I i . 1 i ■ I i 1 1 t f » 1 " 




Graduation and Sportswear 


Compliments of 


CLOTHING . . . 




SPORTSWEAR . . . 


SHIFF'S STORE 


SLACKS . . . 


Jacob Shut, Proprietor 


MORSE AND SHERMAN 




fm. J. Sharkey 




Plymouth, Mass. 




KAY'S CUT RATE 




Complete Line of 


ZANELLO FURNITURE CO. 


Elizabeth Arden loilet and 


UPHOLSTERING 


Beauty Preparations 
Harriet H. Ayer, Manufactures 


Bedding Repaired and Made to Order 


Hudnut's and Yardley's 


Tel. 1485 


Main Cor. North St. Plymouth 


84 Court Street Plymouth 


SIBLEY'S SHOE STORE 

Court St., Plymouth 


Compliments of 


Air-Step Shoes for Women 


STEIN'S FURNITURE CO. 


Buster Brown for Children 




Roblee Shoes for Men 


Tel. 679 291-29 5 Court Street 


"If it's new, it's at Sibley's 


North Plymouth 



VOLTA'S RECORD SHOP 

3 S Main Street 
Plymouth, Mass. 

Popular Dance Records 
Classcal 
Sheet Music 


E. CAVICCHI & SONS 

FRUIT and PRODUCE 

296 Court Street 
Tel. 1190 Plymouth, Mass. 


YE OLDE PRISCILLA GRILLE 

301 5^2 Court Street 
Plymouth, Mass. 


Glenwood Lowe Bros, 
and Perfection Modene B.P.S. 
Ranges Paints 

JORDAN'S 
THE JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 
"Trade Here with Confidence" 
Tel. 2 83 
Plymouth, Mass. 

"Standard" Plumbing Fixtures 
American Radiators, Heaters 



HERRICK'S AUTO SALES 

Tremont Street 
South Duxbury, Massachusetts 
Phone 9 5 

There's a Ford in your future 

Thirty-one years continuous 
Ford Service 


FREEMAN'S VARIETY STORE 

Is the place to find TOP TUNES 
of the day in sheet music 
or recordings. 

Tel. 684 Duxbury 


Help Keep America Strong 
DRINK MILK FOR HEALTH 

WHITE BROS. BAY FARM 

Edwin S. White Allan R. White 
Pres. Treas. 


1898 1945 

JOSSELYN'S 

GROCERIES — PERIODICALS 

Frosted Foods - Fruits - Vegetables 
Tobacco 
General Merchandise 

Tel. Conn. 
Duxbury, Massachusetts 



Compliments of 




ART JEWELRY CO. 


R. M. BRADLEY & CO., Inc. 


Plymouth 


REAL ESTATE 


Compliments of 


Joseph Lund 
8 Newbury Street Boston, Mass. 


WALTER SMITH 


Constance l oung 
St. George Street Duxbury, Mass. 
1 el. JJux. 1 1 


CORSAGES AND FLOWERS 




FOR COMMENCEMENT 


• 




We wish to thank the people 
of Duxbury for their kindness 




at our time of sorrow. 

Bill Murphy's Family 


J wiliNowlN DivLJ 1 rlcivo 




Elm Street Duxbury 




Phone Dux. 48 





CUSHING BROS. 

HHTYT in/1 PI YMOITTI-T 

ljkJljkj n, anti 11,1 mi^u i m 
SALES — SERVICE 

Tel. S South Duxbury 


Compliments of 

MacFARLANE MOTORS 

Tel. 5 34 Kingston, Mass. 


Com pi iii/cnts of 

PLYMOUTH & BROCKTON 
STREET RAILWAY 


Compliments of 

GOVI S TAILOR SHOP 


Compliments of 

FIENBERG'S 
DEPARTMENT STORE 

Tel. 64 Marshfield 


KAY 

HAIR DRESSER 

Specializing in 
PERMANENT WAVING 

Tel. Duxbury 494 



SUCCESS TO THE 
CLASS of '45 

BROWNIE'S DEPT. STORE 

Standish Street So. Duxbury 


MRS. WARD FOOTE 

REAL ESTATE 

Shipyard Lane South Duxbury 
Tel. Dux. 639 


OIL BURNER SERVICE 
PLUMBING and AIR CONDITIONING 

WIRT BROS. CO. 

South Duxbury 


Compliments of 

THE JUNIOR CLASS 



BEST WISHES TO THE CLASS OF '45 


BUTTNER 


COMPANY 


BEST WISHES 


BEST WISHES 


to the 


to the 


CLASS OF '45 


CLASS OF '45 


PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 


LORING'S 


"Modern Store for Men and Boys" 


JEWELERS 


56 Main Street 


28 Main Street 


Plymouth, Mass. 


Plymouth, Mass. 



Good Quality at Just Prices 




KNIFES 


Compliments of 


GROCERIES 




MEATS — VEGETABLES 


Dorothy Harris Couillard 


FRUITS 




i/O y^ij UK 1 3 1 Ktt I 1 LlMUUlrl 




Expert Operators Phone 24 S 




FT T7 A RFTT-T \A FOQTFR 


HAY, GRAIN and FLOUR 


BEAUTY SHOPS 




Beauty Culture in all its Branches 




L. KNIFE & SON 


Room 10 — Buttner Bldg. 




Plymouth, Mass. 




Compliments of 




i 


RAND PORTRAITS 


THE WINSOR HOUSE 


CLASS PHOTOGRAPHER 




Plymouth, Mass. 



Compliments of 

A. CECCARELLI & SONS 

North Plymouth, Mass. 
Tel. 941 


MILLBROOK POST OFFICE 

CANDY — CIGARETTES 
TOBACCO 

Lucy A. Freeman, Prop. 


Compliments of 

BANDER'S 

Plymouth's most popular shop for 
misses and women 

54 Main Street Plymouth 


GAMBINI'S 

52 Main Street 
Plymouth, Mass. 


WESTERN AUTO 
ASSOCIATE STORE 

6 Main Street 
Plymouth, Mass. 

C. F. Fowler, 

Owner. Tel. 627 


PERCY L. WALKER 

REAL ESTATE 
Duxbury Massachusetts 


DEXTER'S SHOE STORE 

The store of values, styles 

A Hill flJItllitv 

16 Court Street Plymouth 
Tel. 165W 


Compliments of 

MURRAY ELECTRICAL CO. 

Duxbury, Mass. 





Compliments, of 


SHERMAN'S FURNITURE CO. 


EDDIE'S SHOE STORE 




THE ENNA JETTICK 




SHOE STORE 


5 Court St., Plymouth 




310 Court St., North Plymouth 


IS Mmn Street Plymouth 




Tel. 158 


BEST WISHES 


MANHATTAN MALLORY 


to the 


SHIRTS HATS 


CLASS OF '45 






PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 


PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 


18 Main Street 


39 Court Street 


BRENTWOOD SPORTSWEAR 


Plymouth, Mass. 


HOLEPROOF HOSE 


THE ROGERS PRINT 


PRINTERS, PUBLISHERS and PRODUCERS OF 


PREFERRED PRINTING 


20 Middle Street Phone 


165 -M Plymouth, Mass. 





BEST WISHES 




to the 




CLASS OF '45 


EATMOR 




CRANBERRIES 


HOMESTEAD 




RESTAURANT 


K. G. GARSIDE 




Co )ii pit hi cuts of 


\ /111} /)/ 1 111 /' II f C CIT 
V_ - \J III j/l I III v it I J \ 


DUXBURY HARDWARE 






WALTER PRINCE 


YOUR HARDWARE STORE 




at HALL'S CORNER 




Tel. 5 50 Duxbury 





V CHECK YOUR NEEDS 



Paper is scarce; labor is scarce; we're busy but we have thus far been able 
to supply all the needs of our customers in our modern printing plant. 
We would like to do business with you. Look over this list and then call 
Plymouth 77 for prompt service. 



Billheads 

Letterheads 

Envelopes 

Office Forms 

Copy Writing Service 

Engraving Service 

Booklets 

Programs 

Reports 

Window Cards 



Wedding Invitations 
Business Cards 
Blotters 
Books 

Newspapers 
Circular Letters 
Tags 

Factory Forms 
Labels 

Financial Statements 



Envelope Enclosures 

Laundry Lists 

Menus 

Posters 

Binding 

Year Books 

Direct Mail Pieces 

Designing Service 

Catalogues 

Price Lists 



and any printed material you may need. 
Printers of this Year-book 

THE MEMORIAL PRESS 

PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 



BEST WISHES 

to 

OUR SENIORS 

THE FRESHMAN CLASS 



THE STAFF OF 

THE PARTRIDGE 

THANKS 
OUR ADVERTISERS 
WHO HAVE 
MADE THIS BOOK POSSIBLE 



J^utograpAs 



Duxbury Room 
Duxbury Free Library 



DUXBURY FREE LIBRARY 



3 1633 



00091 5570