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Full text of "Partridge"

Duxbury Room 



371.397 
D987 




SPIRIT OF % 

Dux HIGH. SCHOOL 

Class of % 



Duxhury Free Libra 



Spirit of 76 



Put aside the coats and arms! The Spirit of 76 is a celebration of our people; our 
own special strength, the strength we have found in diversity. We are separate 
wholes, not a cohesive unit. Each of us is searching for an intangible realm where in 
we can find the feeling of personal accomplishment and fulfillment. 

Our theme section focuses upon individuals in our class who have shown a 
desire to learn. These people have something special whether you know it or not. 
They find the process of mastering their arts enjoyable, and their self-motivation is 
made visible. 



Personal Education Experiences 



For me and many others of my age, the past four years of 
our lives have been spent receiving an education. During my 
high school career I have been taught theorems, irregular 
verbs, battle strategies and grammer in addition to numerous 
other things. Yet, in spite of all the tests I've taken, all the 
term papers I've written and all of the hours I've spent in 
classrooms, my most valuable educational experience has 
been the learning not in school, but in my home. 

Two years ago, when I was a sophmore, a change took 
place in my home that altered my life and my family's lives 
forever — my mother gave birth to a baby boy. My brothers, 
Alan (now 15) and Jeff (age 11) and I were unquestionably 
suprised when we learned of my mother's pregnancy. We 
reacted selfishly at first — the idea of an addition to our 
previously completed family was difficult to accept. Our lives 
and schedules didn't have the time for baby-sitting, and 
bottle-feeding and diaper-changing. The age difference of 
nine years between even Jeff, seemed too large a gap for any 
of us to overcome and become close to the child. I think the 
thing that scared us most was the amount of added 
responsibility we knew we would all share 

As the end of the nine months drew near, my whole family 
found themselves involved in preparations for the newcomer. 
When Anthony Alfred was born on May 23, 1974, it was one 
of the greatest things that ever happened to us. Little by little, 
as "Tony" grew from a small, helpless baby to a larger, more 
independent two-year old, our family bonds strengthened and 
stretched to include even our youngest member. 

All children are demanding and time-consuming and Tony is 
no different from his peers in that respect. He is sometimes 
very exasperating because his needs are constant, but I have 
tried to learn to adjust my temperament so that I can live in the 
same house with him and not develop ulcers or nervous 
disorders. The amount of patience that a person must have 
when dealing with children is astronomical, and patience is a 
gift that I wasn't born with. I also have a difficult time 
controlling my temper, but I believe that I have developed 
more patience and self-control. Although babysitting used to 
be distasteful to me, I have come to enjoy Tony's company 
and am much more willing to give of myself than before his 
birth. After all, the time I devote to Tony is little compared to 
what I receive from him as a result. 

Tony is a very special person to all of us. He has provided us 
with a form of education that few people find easily 
obtainable - the ability to love. I think that my brothers and I 
have been especially fortunate in being able to open our 
hearts and to lose some of the selfishness that lies within 
everyone. Many people don't find the same opportunities 
until later in their lives; others never do. 

Trish Mastendino 



Some people think that education begins at 7:45 A.M. and 
ends at 2:00 P.M. I don't 

Self-education (as it is called by the yearbook staff) doesn't 
really require any effort. It sneaks up on me in the most 
unlikely places. I can generally find it lurking in books. 

I have no preference for any particular type of book. What I 
read reflects the interests I have at the time. When I read I 
tend to form a chain from one subject to another related 
subject. For example, reading the Horatio Hornblower series 
led me to several biographies of the Duke of Wellington (the 
Mick Jagger of his time, complete with groupies), and from 
there, to the Napoleonic Wars in general. A desire to discover 
what was behind a factual incident in a fictional story has 
pushed me into learning things I normally wouldn't have 
bothered with. This quirk of mine has helped me with my 
school work. I usually have an interesting and appropriate 
subject already stored in mind, with the basic research 
finished, when a teacher gives an assignment. 

Learning something on your own is always easier then 
having a teacher "make" you do it. Then when it comes 
around to using that information, your experience the most 
delicious feeling of having sandbagged the whole assignment 
Kim Carson 



3 




Cindy 
Patch 



For as long as I can remember, I have always been fond of art. When I was very young I would always 
ask people to draw for me. I would then take their pictures and try to do it myself. By doing this I started 
learning about drawing and acquired an interest for art that I will never lose. 

That was a long time ago, but today I'm still drawing. I like drawing people in particular. I have done a 
lot of portraits of people I've known and drawings of places I've been. 

Another form of art which I often do is scrimshaw. I have been doing it for about three years now, 
after being taught by a friend. I started doing it as a hobby and ended up selling many pieces of 
scrimshaw jewelry. 

Although creating scrimshaw and drawing people is what I do most, I have also made items out of 
cornhusks, such as husk wreathes decorated for Christmas. I've also done a little pottery and enjoy 
working with clay. I would like to start sculpting with it. 

Art is a very special thing to me. I like being able to put things on paper or whalestooth whenever I 
want to. I think it's a very good thing to use your hands in this manner, to create something new. 



4 



Art is an important means of expression 
that can be viewed collectively as minor 
creations surpassed only by the original one. 
Art reflects history, common life, and the 
ideas of the artist. 

Hugh O'Mara 




5 




Sewing is something that means a great deal 
to me. Sewing takes a lot of time and patience 
but if you like to sew it pays off in the long 
run. My sewing ability enables me, along with 
Pat Sullivan, to be a part of the Jordan Marsh 
Creative Fashion Council. Sewing is a pleasant 
way of earning and saving money, but I do not 
intend to make a career of it. 




Norma 
Tirrel 




Craig Bloodgood 

Running is one of the few sports where a person is totally on 
his own and can control how much and how hard to train. 
Because of this, running gives better discipline and more individ- 
uality. I feel a sense of freedom while running, and from this i 
feel better when I do well, or worse when I do poorly. 

Running has given me a chance to meet people and to do 
some traveling. I have raced in Pennsylvania and Connecticut as 
well as in New York and New jersey. I have also been able to 
meet world class athletes and high school runners. I think there 
are many more rewards to running than just winning races. 




I 




Rich's greatest interest now is in the 
field of music. For nine years he has 
played classical piano and has played 
bass guitar for six years. His piano train- 
ing has led him to compose original mu- 
sic. Rich has been in a number of differ- 
ent bands over the past four years. This 
summer he toured several cities with one 
band. Recently, Rich has become inter- 
ested in electronic music and so bought a 
synthesizer. Rich says that because he has 
found so much enjoyment in each field 
of music, his interests have moved into 
many different musical fields. Richard 
hopes to someday combine the teaching 
of music with studio and band playing. 



)ohn Whittier 

I have been interested in cars for a long time 
now. I received my first VW when I was fourteen 
and have had more than a dozen since then. The 
majority were old and worn out; many of them had 
no engine, so their owners gave them to me. Since 
they were too far gone to fix, I took them apart. By 
doing this I learned how they were put together and 
why they were built the way they were. In the end I 
came to appreciate the engineering that goes into 
designing a car. 

Presently I am driving a '58 bug, although it is 
nothing to look at, I've done a lot of work on the 
mechanical parts that you don't see. I have also 
learned a lot by doing this. I plan to study mechani- 
cal engineering and after that I will probably pursue 
a career in the automotive field. 




10 



Magda Roberts 

All my life I have been interested in art. 
My main interests are jewelry making, 
sewing, and designing clothes. I took all 
the courses available at the high school 
pertaining to these subjects and decided 
to venture out on my own. 

My home economics teacher, Mrs. 
Weidman, was aware of mv interest in 
:>ewing, so she contacted a woman who 
was looking for someone who could sew 
well. Mrs. Weidman gave her my name. I 
have found this to be one of the most 
exciting jobs I have ever held. I work for a 
clothing designer, w ho is also a teacher at 
the Rhode Island School of Design. 

Sewing has always been my major in- 
terest, but last year I took an enameling 
course offered at school by Miss Davis. I 
became very interested in enameling and 
decided to pursue jewelry making. Also, 
this past fall I took a course from a 
woman in Marshfield who taught me a 
great deal. I plan to take further courses. 

After graduating from college, should 
jobs be hard to find, I plan to have my 
own small business selling clothes and 
jewelry. 



ng tioine 



<4 



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A 






Mark J. Pixley 

The world around us is in troubled times. The institutions of government and business are 
quickly becoming obsolete and useless. These institutions must be changed so they can face 
the future. Change however, does not come easily. Only through the involvement of people 
in politics can needed reforms be made. 

I have tried to do my part by working in several political campaigns including: 

1972: George McGovern for President 

1974: Ruth Rowley for Selectwoman 
Gerry Studds for Congressman 

1975: Constance Pye for School Committee 

I have also participated in the West Virginia Democratic Youth Conference at Charleston, 
West Virginia in May 1975 and the Northeast Democratic Conference at Springfield, Mas- 
sachusetts in September 1975. Presently I am working for "Mo" Udall for President. 

I have enjoyed what I have done and gained a lot from it. I would like to close by 
reminding you that the government is "for the people and by the people." 

12 



Julie Franke 



"To me the major difference in the per- 
forming arts and, say, being a painter is that a 
painter does a painting, and he does a paint- 
ing. That's it. He has the joy of creating it and 
somebody buys it, or maybe nobody buys it 
and it sits in an attic until he dies. But no one 
ever said to Van Gogh: "Paint another Starry 
Night again, man." 

— Joni Mitchell 




loan Connors 



loan ' onnors is .1 person you iind once In .1 purple 

moon She li truly an outstanding person, an asset to 
1 1 v i >i 1 r \ High and oui community loan win be 
remembered foi hei luperb academit achievement and 
leadership Where would we i»- without loan's guidance 
and genuine Interest In <>ut student body? 11 a studem Is 
suddenly plagued with 1 studem injustice)" loan will 
lump m and solve the mess with .1 snap <>i hei fingers She 
is nevei Intimidated by the thoughi ol speaking out on 
wiwi she believes Is rlghl 01 wrong So do nol despair, 
young student, loan often appears magical loan has 
mastered the an ol publli speaking 

i"i the pail Foui years loan has worked diligently on the 
Studenl « oum II to provide students wiih various at tlvitlesj 
resources and ways In which to Improve upon studenl 



Pn senth 



edui atlon .uu I gov mment. 
oi the < oum ii 

in addition) loan was the Instlgatoi 
successful Seminar Day this was such a 
student < oum ii 'ii i ided i" hold one 1 

began to work on the ilay by hen 

continued to work through the Pall with th 



the 



ii 



i 11 ■ 



hl.nl 



the highly 

si 11 1 ess 1 hat the 

ear h yeat loan 

lasi Spring and 

help 1 'I many I rr 

.I thi 

'Hull 

Somehow she fits in time to be .1 Pig Sistei lasi but 
well as oiiifi people People often come i" loan foi 



Senior Prefects 

I aily in ( )i tober isu h lac 1 1 1 1 \ member was requested lo i noose 
two or three seniors whom they believed would be the best 
recipients Of the Senior Prefer! Award they were to choose 
these people pnmarly on the basis ol how well they had 

developed theli education and Lfesiyies m the most meaningful 
and original mode possible rheli academic achievement, 

leadership sc hool and ( ommunily a< livilies and personality were 
also to be taken into < onsideration 

lod.u the word "prefect" has an entirely different connotation 
from that of ancient limes A prefect in Ancient Rome was a 
person appointed to the position ol < hiel magistrate This person 
fulfilled a position requiring various i omrnands and authorities of 

.1 high status law nature 

I hixbury High's three Prefer ts are persons who never take 
something at face value but instead, constantly delve further into 
the subject and ask \\\\\' I hey choose to tackle challenges lhal 
will bung inlellei lw.il rewards lo others as well as (or themselves 
l>uil>iii\ High cdlers then lhanks and c ongratulatir)ns lo Robin 

Blackford Patrick Carroll and loan Connors, three outstanding 

Individuals who have been a valuable .issei io our school anrl 
c c immunil v 




i 



loan s other ,u tivltles have mi luded being the Edltoi 

Staff has been indebted lo her peisislent and timeless 



Ycaibook, a Pig Sisler ,i lec loi and a c onfidanle I he Yearbook 
Wlthoiil hei guidance tin- Yearbook would have been a Hop 
rlainly not least loan has an extrordinary ability to relate lo young as 
Ivlce knowing she will always be there tO listen In tins icspec I she 



has been a Confidante tO main people < ,<>t a problem'' Dial loan Hut please. No numbers 

loan will always .how a deep 1 oni em fOI hei friends I ven il you do nol know her, she will listen Above all, her < aring is 

e* erlastlngi II nevei dies 
fhere Is no end to the praise thai 1 an be given to loan She has pit ked us up brushed ui 

fineness", 



and PR I MO, mstanl "jusl 



Robin Blackford 



Pat Carroll 



Patrick Carroll is a poised, accomplished individual in all 
facets of his life. He is an outstanding academic student 
and his number one rank in class only begins to 
substantiate this. Patrick is a dedicated, hardworking 
student who constantly strives for perfection, yet always 
has time to help uncomprehending friends. Patrick is a 
well-rounded competitor in athletics consistently 
performing stronglv in three sports: cross-country, 
basketball, and track. He is also the secretary of the Key 
Club and a member of Bov's State. 

Patrick has the strong qualities of a leader by example. 
His classmates respects his opinions and achievements. 
Since Pat is an o\erachie\er, everyone around him is 
influenced to work that much harder. Pat possesses a fine 
sense of humor and a steady, strong sense of personality. 
All of the above plus Patrick's commitment to his ideals 
have combined to create a model student he is today. 





Robin Blackford has proved to be one of the most talented and 
saluable individuals in the Senior Class. She has consistently 
excelled in her academics, athletics and other school and 
community activities. All these experiences have required Robin 
to think at optimum level as well as to exhibit her tremendous 
patience. In addition to her course load at Duxbury High. Robin 
has taken advantage of the WI T. High School Studies Program. 
Duxburv High School takes pride in saying that Robin was our 
representative at Student Government Day last year. 

\thetically, Robin has excelled in a variety of sports. She has 
participated on the Varsity Field Hockey, Basketball and Softball 
teams. She also enjoys mountain climbing, sailing and hopes to 
take part in crew in the future. One of her most rewarding 
experiences took place last summer when she attended the 
Outward Bound Program at Mount Desert, Maine. This was a test 
of her physical as well as mental ability. 

Robin's two greatest attributes are found in her warmth of 
personality and patience with all people. Much of her free time 
has been devoted to participating in the Big Sister and Tutoring 
Programs. Watching Robin work with these children is pure 
delight. She has an uncanny ability to bring our all the wonderful 
characteristics, hidden to most people. 

Robin also tutors two math students in the high school. 
Recently one of the students passed their first Geometry test. 
Robin's happiness over her accomplishment was indescribable. 

The Senior Class is proud to have Robin, a person never afraid 
to give a part of herself for the benefit of others In the future 
should you ever be visiting Fiji and suddenly spot a flash of 
flaming red hair, do not be surprised it will be Robin in her 
sailboat. 







f 




The class of 1976 dedicates its yearbook to a truely devoted 
couple, A team, Harry and Helen Gunnerson. They work 
together and separately and their devotion is obvious to all 
who encounter them. As janitor, Harry has shared his sense of 
humor with us and he has always been willing to go out of his 
way to help us in whatever way he could. We appreciate his 
sensitivity and the pride he has in his work. As our traffic 
director, Helen shows real concern for our safety. She demon- 
strates sincere firmness for which we respect her. Harry and 
Helen Gunnerson are a truely amazing couple who have given 
a great deal of their time to us, the students. And so, this year's 

dedication goes to 
Harry and Helen for 
whom we are more 
than grateful. 




Seniors 



///; i 




v 



Our past four years at Duxbury High are 
difficult to explain in a short space. We are all 
sharing the "High School Experience" collec- 
tively, yet each person's impression of these 
past years is entirely different from his peers'. 
Everyday one can hear complaints from seniors 
either about a particular teacher or work that 
must be completed. Some feel Duxbury High 
has been rewarding, while others maintain that 
it has merely been a necessary stepping stone 
towards their future plans. 

Each day we are bombarded with the "facts" 
of the outside world. We read newspapers, 
magazine articles, and other sources which tell 
us that the economy is deep inside a black pit 
and there appears to be no immediate relief in 
sight. We are confronted with the perpetual 
problems of what to do, and where to go from 
here. 

Someone once told us, in the beginning of 
our Freshman year that the transition from 

Middle School to High School might be a bit difficult, but that we really should start thinking about 
college. We were impressionable young Freshmen. Our dreams were of that day, far in the future, our 
graduation, June 1976. Now it is a reality, whether or not we find relief in graduating or fear of becoming 
an adult. 



\ 



Juniors 



Seniors are everywhere. We as Juniors, are in contact with many of them in every aspect of school life. 
They have shown us leadership and maturity while, at the same time, they have given us free advice and 
guidance. They taught us the "ropes" of the school. There will be a void in our school life when they 
leave. Juniors will feel this emptiness the most. We wish the Seniors good luck and best wishes in their 
future endeavors. 



Sophomores 



The Sophomore Class has watched the Seniors grow and work, always with a unique sense of spirit, 
which has seemed to spread through out the school in the past, and is somehow what has made the 
seniors a special group of people. They have been ambitious and motivated students. They always had a 
special way of organizing, while at the same time making it fun. 

The Seniors were warm and understanding when it came to accepting underclassmen into the High 
School. Now we are watching as they help the new Freshmen. The Sophomore Class of 1978 wishes the 
graduating Seniors much success and happiness. 



Freshmen 



The yearbook Staff asked us what we Freshmen students thought of the Seniors. The replies were as 
follows; "I think they are much more sophisticated.", "They are not as big and tough as we had 
expected, thank God!" and "They are just what we expected." 



17 




To the Z . Lemon Bros . . . GOSH . . Didn't get 
a feather . . . Nice . . . Snow Goose ... I think 
we're stuck . . No Star . . . "Fish for no 
compliments; they are generally caught in 
shallow waters" . . . 



Hello, I must be going . . . Bobby ... #5 ... 
COORS . . . B.O.W.D.S.S. . . . Freddie Lynn and 
the Boston Red Sox . . . LOO-IE . . . Vaiduct . . . 
Harv . . . Aersmith . . . Left, Right Wing, Second 
Base . . . Soccer #1 . . . Ya me voy . . . 




"True success is overcoming the fear of being 
unsuccessful" . . . Three M's . . . It's useless . . . 
The Mighty Mav . . . sign warfare ... Vh DOZ . . 
HOYT . . . Penalty Kick? . . . 6/29/75 . . . Summer 
75 . . . CYO . . . Down South . . . rumor has it . . 



18 





"57" VW . . . 7/7/75 . . . She dreams of love and 
happiness, her strength and desire will conquer 
all (Merry) ... Monday Morning Blues ... 



Munchees . Green Death . 442 . . . Summer 
"75" . . . DYNOMITE! . . . Aerosmith . . . Spaced 





Show me the way to go home . . . Go for a blind 
one . . . False credentials . Bagged . . . Go for it 
. .. BTSPRBRFIR's ... Soccer's better ... 
Kugamungaflu . . . Chinesegoogies . . . The "jack" 
. . . yumyum . . . Bad News . . . Brook Brothers . . . 




927 . . . Hurricane's from Pat O'Brein's . . . 
Bourbon St . . . Minor Buyer II . . . beach . . . The 
Garden's . . . 63 Founder of S.O.V. . . . Lawns or 
Landscaping? . . . "Gotta put on my travelin's 
shoes" . . . Elvin Bishop . . . Ya me voy 195 . . . 



We can't return, We can only look Behind from 
where we came And go round and round And 
round in the circle game. - )oni Mitchel 




1/26/74 . . . Berts . . . Stowe 74-75 . . . OOP'S . . . 
505 apiece B f The Bogs . . Maine 74 . . . 
Bear's Jimmy . Zonning juniors . . . G . . . S.Y.F 
... 141 Ib's . . . The Garden Ramming it ... 
Tennis Courts . . . P.W . . . Club 58 by the Sea . . . 




Do not follow where the path may lead. Go 
instead where there is no path and leave a trail. 



P&thl&Q- pU-A,<JL {^M-CLsh. 




"The tragedy of life is what dies inside a man 
while he lives." ... BB/CC ... 6/29/75 ... 
ABDBJC|H)HDTKW ... Flash Brown C.M.B ... 
10/12/74 ... Pink M.G ... Ellis gone? ... 
|ibber|ashaua . . . Arizona Dry, Indiana Sky 
Allright! 



A 



Allright' - £ ^ P 





What is it Russ, Cavity? . . Mola Mola . . . Theme 
Song . . . Ozzie's . B. B. M. . . . Line . . . Peter P 
... T.) ... No Desire Leo . . . Bagger Blair . . . 
Mouse O'Malley . . . BoneHead . . Washington 
. . . Opel . . Tekenink . Flag Poles Be Good 



"Oh Boy, This is it!" . . . Another two-four years 
. Track . . . Forestry . Turkey Race . . . Fred 
and Ned . . . Poor Fred . . . pheasants . . . 
agriculture . . Frosty and Shannon . . horses. 
Alright' . . Max and Charlie . . . dogs . . . soccer 



24 




To my pals: )o-Ann and Bob, Richie, jimmy and 
Robin, Ronny and )eni . . . Life's goal is to be 
happy without hurting other people . . . Goodbye 
School 





It you would have things come your way, go 
after them . . . because a man will never stumble 
into success if he is always sitting . . . Hey, Slow 
down Paul 




"I'll discuss anything. I like to go perhaps-ing 
around on all sublets." . . . Wimsecal . . . Audrey 
. . . Ashdod . . Shamu . . . "Gimmee a "J"\" . . . 
ERA ... P. Q. & E.Q . . Raspberry Turnovers, 
Mrs. Kendrew . . . White Paint . . . "who's on 
First?" 



26 




"Carnivals and Cottoncandy Carousels and 
calleopes. Fortune-tellers in glasscases! We will 
always remember these. Merry-go-rounds quickly 
turning for you and for me, And the whold world 
madly turning till you can't see." 
lacques Brel 






^jfyzhx^ £a*e_ _ 



John, 5/16, 17/75 ... St. Sebastions . . . "spur" 
phonebills . . . Amarelto Prudential . B.B./C.C 
a vampire attacked you! . . . Why is there no blue 
food? . . . Sheraton . . . Boomer . . . R.M . . . Dec. 27, 
1974 . . . Cheryl, which |ohn is mine? . . . 



What's Plan two basketball baseball 
Burgers and Fries . . . Guy's with Lynne, as usual 
3/8/75 . . . L.N.S.G.B . . . Celtics #1 . . . #6 . . . #20 
. . . Starsky and Hutch,, . . . We have all the 
competion . . . Restaurant management . . . college? 



V 



We're the partners of secrets, forever holding words 
We never talk, just look with envy. For the 
unending sea, is me, Foggies . Prill . . Tiquila and 
Haylofs . . . Midnite Sails P P D.'SHG . . . 





(l^JlSL Jo. GLjfe^ 



"Hail To The Redskins" . . . #66 . . . Curti Bros 
225 V-S The Sat . . . Murph B.O.M.F.? . . . Theme 
song . . Black eye in )ungle |eep . . . The wing 
"Aye Fidel" . . . unobstructed regions . . . 
"You did wrong Rusty." 



Rod . . . 6/19/75 . . . Smile! ... I don't remember 
. . . Ya I know it ... in the yard . . . Chevy Nova 
jason . . Life is a mystery to be lived and not 
a problem to be solved. 




"I prefer the challenge of life to the guaranteed 
existence . . . I want to take the calculated rish; 
to dream and to build, to fail and to succeed" 
Dean Alfange 




28 





. . . I celebrate a meal equally set . . . Whatever you 
want to be. you'll be in the end and I love you . . 
Spread your light like blazes across the sky! 



&rlM flU feidtc 



"True happiness consists not in the multitude of 
friends, but in the worth and choice." . . . Labor Day 
72 . . . Shipyard . . Surplus St . . B.U. Soccer . . . Mrs 
B . . . puns . . . NF's . . . P.P.P.P . Bunny . . . CC-BF 
... CSCDHVEK ... T.J. ... D.B ... 11/2/74 ... 
Freebird . . . 




f 1 




mm 

laboa ... 5/17/75 ... 7/3/75 ... he B's ... 
Pembroke . . . "You mad at me baby?" . . . Shut 
up, you jerk! . . . Come on baby' . Grounded 
again? . . . Aerosmith . . . Sombreros . . "Time 
waits for no one, and it won't wait for me." 






School . . . What is it? ... Fudge . . . ST-102 . . . 
Snow . . . Never enough . . . X-C . . . You can do it 
. . . Excellent the doctor will come . . . "Skill to do 
comes of doing." . . . negative infinity . . thank 

you . . . 



He who bends to himself a joy, Does the winged 
life destroy; But he who kisses the joy as it flies 
Lives in eternity's sunrise. 



"^Ztfx^t^ ^aXcZcZei^ iiJa^L^t^. 

Mikey . . M.J.C . . . summers in Deer Isle, Maine 
. . . Tennis . . . Ballet . . . X-Country skiing . . . 
Drama . . . Memories . . . "The music in my heart 
I bore. Long after it was heard no more." Vivian 
Mercier 



30 





1 



Saturday night screwing around I'll miss all 
those Sunday mornings ... '57 Chevy City . . . 
Billy, I'm stuck, go fry ice ... Chipper . . the 
engine jobs we've gone through . . . Misty ... I 
won't miss school . . . 



"We never know what we have until we're 
without it." . . . Dallas, Texas . . . My ankle! . . . 
F.H.B. 44 . . . Sticksville . . . toilet seat cover . . . 
indecision's decision . . . spelling . . . Moody 
Blues . . . Good things come in small packages. 






Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run 
over if you just sit there . . . Lenny's guard dogs 
. . . Billy the pig . . . What's what? . . . Nobody 
sleeps tonight! . . . 




- - 



1f\ 



Dancing and to Plymouth again ... a vampire 
attacked you! . . . You guys 1 . . . parties . . . going 
out . Fantastic . . . Hey Jules . . . DWK - crazy 
. . . I'll call you up , . . I forgot again . . . 
Majorettes 3 - 4 . . Capricorn . . . 



Norwell! . . . Hello . . . Walnut! . . . What? . . . 
Middleboro . . N.E.S.C . . . Party . . Pushbutton 
. . . What's that noise? . . . parking lot . . 22 
gallons . . Hadock broke again . . . What's new 
. . . Southwich? . . . Slee-Z broke too? . . . later 
yachties! . . . 



"My interest is in the future, because I am going 
to spend the rest of my life there." . . . Three m's 
. . Duffy . . . 5/16/75 . . . Sign warfare . . C.Y.O. 
ski trip . . . many donuts . . . Mav . . . 





We're late again, lules . . . 5 — min. dash . . . 
labwork . . . "mal enfont" . . . slow motion rider 
. . . pots and pans . . Goofa . . . Bluebirds . . . 
Manion. Mirimar & Mountains . . . Chestnut St. 
60-80? . . . Friendly's . . . Powder Phantom . . . Brat 
Pit . . . What next? . . . 



OH. O.K. ... The Indispensable Inn ... 
Sugarbush . . spam and eggs . . . Nantucket . . . 
Contribute to A.Y.H.? . . . Igor . . Kenny Rich 
Grannys? . . . Simon Le Gree . . snares . . . Ney 
. . Tupelo Honey . . . Tenll . . . Rossi . . . 




How does it feel to be on your own, with no 
direction known, like a complete unknown, just 
like a rolling stone? . . . 



',4 





IAS 



Live life the way you want to live, even if it's 
wrong and illegal . . Stench, Pogo . . . Husband 
Hill S M . Golf . . . Marlboro Men . . . Parties 
. . . Summer of 74 ... . North Hill . . . 




m 



.f / V 




There is gold and a multitude of jewels, but the 
lips of knowledge are a precious vessel . . . 
Pumpkin . . . Merestead ... T.J ... Kunga Munga 
Crotched . . . CM P . . . Gook ...HP... B.B.B . . . 
101275 . . . Tenny, you're wierd! . . . 



lesus still remains the same. As in the days of old 
He came; As my Brother by my side. Still He 
seeks my steps to guide . . God bless you all! . . . 





Any man's death diminishes me. Because I am 
involved in mankind. And therefore never send 
to know For whom the beli tolls; It tolls for thee. 



"It's in forgiving that we shall be forgiven ..." 
. . . Liz. we're late again . . . Memories . . . 
Godfather . . . ' Poopsies" . . champagne . . |uly 
4th . . . Narcissus ... 2 — tries . . . Goofa . . . roses 
. . . Momma . . . nudgies . . . 3M'sBPP . . . 
"Miracles . . . II AF affair! . . . traveling . . . You 
can't buv happiness! . . . 



For the things that are seen are transient, but the 
things that are unseen are eternal. 2 Cor 4 18 . . . 
S.Y.F . . . 5/30/75 . . . WaWa? . . . W.M.N.F . . . 
Coffee House . . . Dirt, Rocks, and Roots ... So 
be it . . . 




i 




"A friend is a person with whom you dare to be 
yourself." . . . Martha's Vineyard . . . oldies . . . 
S.N.C . . . Where to next? . . . 45's . . . nursie . . . 
bobbin' in the lake . . . Mitch . . . Mt. Snow . . . B. 
U. Soccer . . . f.n.d. . . . 



Southie . . . Brian Peacock, alais Sonny . . . Mary, 
we got bagged . . Charger loyrides . States . . . 
D.H.S. many D.T.'s . . . Rejected Comet . . . 
PBBBBBBBB Barn #16Hoover . . . Moose 
. leaping houses . . cheerleaders . . . Southie 
here I come . . . 




"At summer's end I walked the sea and dreamt 
of seasons past ." Byron . . . NPV)TDPB)L . . . How 
about Nantucket, Sandy? . . . misfit . . . oranges?! 

. Chestnut St., 60 - 80 . . . Well, where to next? 
. . . Mattakeesett . . . 



J8 




> « « » • * 
• « \ % • » I * 



6/15/75 . . . M.V . . . Play pool . . cruising . . . call 
a town . . . Chevy before 2:07 . . gotta work 
tonight . . moving? . . . John's V.W. . . . Sweetsers 



Carla, calm down . . . Meadow Lane . . . Ferring 
"74" ... U. Mass . . . Mondays . . . mashed 
potatoes . . . V.W. — 6 . . . breed . . . Thursday 
walks . . empty beer cans . . . you don't match 
today . . . pickles! . . . group "discussions'' . . . 
Farmington . . . BB/CC . . . bridges . . . 
D.K.A.V.C.D.P./D.Q . . . 



D.R.F . . Monkey Pokers . . . Captain Midnight 
. . . Monument Young Hitler Band . . Uncle |unk 
and Turtle Camp . . . Odysseys and Ricks . . . Mad 
Lumberman . . . Jack's Taxi . . . Close to the edge 
. . . 5 of 4 . . . Journey to Melbaland . . . 



40 







/(at -It A^j&Jtd 



1/26/74 ... B.B.B ... Kung-Munga-crotched ... 
The Purple Blanket ... B.F ... Big Ten ... 
Summer '75 ... T.B. . . . Cutie . . . A.N.T ... S.C 
. . . The Golden Rooster . . . CM. P. . . . 




4ev 




"Oft hope is born, When ail is forlorn." — 
Tolkien O.S.H ... The Scout ... The VOICE . . . 
wrestling ... The Pond Sears ... V.C.'S ... 
cruising . . . one hurtin' unit . . . Fred F . . . flying 
. . . Monkey . . . TMELBMIBCPABKCLJBSSJNS 





C.W. Cover the mens room . . Stoneybrook 
Munchies . . . tack 9 . . . Maximus Super . . . The 
place is flooding, John . . . Hyannis . . Pandoras 
blow your cookies on green death . . Station 
19 . BYOB in more ways than one . . . 



6 



The cabin ... . Hit A-P ... Lunns 3 days ... 
Liveliner . . . tuna fishin' . . . B.M.C . . . Hockey 2, 
3, 4 . . . Gooky, HUH . Blastin' ducks . . |eep 
. . . M.B . . . Great Barrmgton . back river . . . 
pole in 74 . . . mutes boat . . MI.G. . . . N.M.F.S. 




Clapp Lab . . Tennis . . . 388 German 
headquarters . . . Aerosmith . . . Betty eating 
again, hard boiled eggs . Hanover Mall ... '76 
. . . white power . Free Library . . . Barnes . . . 
Sept. 11 . . . Starsky and Hutch . Pierce's office 




42 




"Your friend is your needs answered." . . Hev. 
McGee, What's happening . . . N.P.A . . . Hev. 
Susie. Que Pasa? . . . "Hey man' - . . . Cordeiri . . . 
Bath, Me . . . 8/22/75 . . . Patty, Pizza? . . . Toot' 
. . . Mo. need need any ... F — F — Flanagan . . . 
Vinya . .. l.K.L . . . 



"In much wisdom is much grief; and he that 
increases knowledge increases sorrow." ... Ho 
|o's . . . Solitaire . . . theatre . . . 



m 





7^ 




Knowledge comes but wisdom lingers . . solitare 
. . Gossiptable . . . 





This song is over; it's all behind me now . . . bus 
. . . erk-erk . . . look who's red . . . SO . . . Miramar 
. . . stereomania . . . hg .'. . NASTY! ... ski at 
Cunstock . . . N.F.'s . . . you buried the WHAT' 
Fogvo . . . escape artist . . . 




Every sunrise is a new message from Cod, and 
every sunset his signature. CL E . . . 2/22/75 . . . 
Eric, Bolten Valley? ... #1 Bench in Mass ... 
Pope Murphy . . . Woodsie . . . Precious and Few 



I would gladly give you my hand, give you it so 
we could understand . . . 10/ 12/75 



•■Aw. 



WW 



BP 




Mad dog 20 - 20 . . 
. . . Stone\ brook . 
ripping off my car . 

Bowl . . . F.U.K . . . 



Green death Mac's sink 
Ashcroft . . . someone's 
B.Y.O.B. - Blow Your Own 



Mways keep smiling . . . 
What's Haps . . . 7/15/75 
(Thanks Peter) . . Harold 
Hill . . . Bong Blistex . . . 
R\mie) . . . Helmsmann . . 



Gregg 7/15/73 
S95.50 plus tips 
. . 10/31/73 . . . Great 
Chello . (Rudi & 
T.G.I.F . . . Watch it. 



bo\s ahead . . . Golden Dream 




"I can still do it." ... 4'11" - 5' ... C B. 
"Shrimp" . . . M & B . . . Shut up, Greg Call 
me down ... 10 Tiles . . . Sweetsers O.S.H.F. 

The Camp . . . Tack 9 ... chas bone what's 
up? . . . 






The creek . . . Drink Frosties . . . Smashed car . . . 
wrestling . Co animal Shirley! - . . Saquish . . . 
Get Fired up . . . Friday night cruisin' . . . Bailey's 
Field . Broken leg 73 . . . Remember \eedham, 
good 4 years of school . . . Adios . . . 



Life is like a ladder, each step we take is either 
up or down . . Pamanelba . . . Mac's . . . 9/20 . . . 
it will all come out in the wash . . . twins . . . 
Liser . . Bennetti . . vegetables . . dizzy . . . 



Stickshift Party . . . just good friends . . . B/con 
Danny . 2 A.M. pool games . . . blick walks . . . 
sombreros . . cm. /sec. 13 . . . trolls under the 
bridge . . . Mick's house . . . U. Mass . . . moods 
. . . giggle gang ... I'm late . . . Woodie?! . . . 
make it exist! . . . 



48 




It 




Senior year. I Like it . . . BNB . . . Where do v\e go 
from here? ... Mike, the Human Sponge ... Who 
me? . . Work is N.F . . . Mean Bettv )ean . . . 





)ohn . . . 9/3/75 . . . Bermuda '75, Sonesta . . . 
B.I.P.W.H . . . "Spur" . . . Chivas . . . Fort . . . Julie, 
which John is mine? . . . Rich, 9 o'clock . . . Butch 
. . . )ulie, I saw the neatest Vega ... I hope life 
lasts forever ... No George . . . 



You mav break, you may shatter the vase if you will. 
But the scent of roses will hang round it still . . . 
Nantucket ... Goliath ... 11/19/74 ... L.C.F ... 
Soccer . . . Teddy . . Svargaloka . . . 




"We are for the most part more lonely when we 
go abroad men than when we stay in our 
chambers " — Thoreau . . . Chivas . . . Nantucket 
. . . Amherst . . . Blood is thicker than water . . . 
"Anth" 



Taunton Ctr. hysteria and the |. Giels Band . . . 
Jimmy's trash can blues . . Spur's . . . Grunts . . . 
Must you be caged . . . Demon Alcohol . . . The 
8ohemian . . . Automatic 24 . . . Golden years are 
passing by . . . 



It was morning and the new sun sparkled gold 
across the ripples of a gentle sea. We fly now at 
the peak of the Great Mountain Wind. — Richard 
Bach 



50 









Kevin D. McCarthv 



Meuser means money ... Hi over Duxbur\ beach 
A day will come at last when I shall take the hidden 
path that runs, west of the moon and east of the 
sun. B.B. 



fit y 



Among wise men. the wisest knows that he knows 
least; among fools the most foolish thinks he knows 
most." Cuervara 




To all those people who want to take their lives in their 
own hands; good luck!!! Babababling Brook ... 
Stinkston Center . . . U.S.C.G.R . . . Wild Wood, New 
Jersey . . . 






9/8/72 . . . No Comprendo . . . 6/23/73 ... The 
Elms . . . 10/21/74 ... The Croups (s) . . . The War 
(s) ... 12/16/74 ... The first "DANCE" ... 
Tinkertown? 4/23/75 . . . Mirimar Disaster . . . 
6/17/75 ... No insurance, yet ... NHC? ... 
5/?/76 . . . "As Tinkertown Turns" . . . 



Oldies . . Rosey . Alp-Hof . . . BU Soccer . . . 
Sunday Night Crusie . . C.C. Bigs . . nursie . . 
Wicked Hill . . Form . . . Movin' Along . . . Maine 
. . Bobbin' in the lake . . . Shev . . 45's . . . Mrs. 
B . . . Nothing could be simpler . . . Mt Snow Bus 



52 





Co for it . . . Many )oy Rides . . . "All Nighters" 
. . . Shloany . . . Cone . . . S.F.C.O . . . C.F. & R.C.) 
. . . Smacky . . . She finally got it wet . . . Soccer's 
Best . . . Grins . . . Kungamunga Flu . . Key to 
Happiness . . . Save a Tree . . Brook Bros . . . 




jury 




Those who bring sunshine to the lives of others 
cannot keep it from themselves (Ronnie . . Vt.) 



Midnight Sign Co! ... W.W ... "Hold on" ... 
Hello tree! . . . P.E.#1 . . . Xcellent: ... 33, 34, & 
42 Fords . . . Silver Cloud . . . The l-Scream truck! 
. . . Goose cruisin! . . . Much Party ... I don't 
understan 1 . . Catch me later! . . . 



Let a smile brighten up the day, let a smile 
brighten up you way . . . P.P.P.P . . . Sunday . . . 
Football . . . 11/18/74 . . . T. T. & Mamfred . . 
Cscd & crazy bill . . . Shipyard . . . Summer 75 . . . 
8. U. Soccer . . . Zonker . . . 





^1 c2>OJ^pXv A'\ JLa ^_l > ^ 



Rumor has it . BBM Line . . . T| ... The Bump 
"OA Murph" . . . The Michs . . . Harbor Lights 
Quin-zeee ... my time has come, I shall 
move on 



Camaro Dune Buggy . . No Nene . . . NASTY! 
Fudge factor . . Stereomania . . . My Keys?! 
SKI . . . Mirimar . . . Crazy Mark . . . U. Mass 
The good guys . . Heft . . SKI MORE 
another job . . . Esso Station . . . 




Stowe 75-76 . Baggy Knees . . . Burbon St . . . 
927 ... Pat O'brians . . . Taunton Ctr ... 
S.F.C.O . . . Grave Decision . . . See no evil . . . 
Colorado Summer ... I sopropyl . Trash 
Barrel Blues . . . Madd dog . . . Spur of the 
moment Baaaa Brook Bros . . . 




54 




Searobin . . . 747 . . . Killer Snowplow . . . Was 
B.C. hanged? . . . f.d.p . . Splash Drive I'll try 
anything once . . . viking . . . Big Blue . . . Mac's 
. . Beer Forest . . . Benetti 



"GOODBYE DUXBURY HIGH" ... "ALKIES" ... 
N.H . . . Soccer . . . Joy ride Timmy? . . D B . 
Barnes . . . Kungmungaflu . . . Brook Bros . . . 
Bongs . . . lohngirl go nuts' . . Duxbury High is a 
Fantastic Dream, a dream that will never come 
true. 




m 

i 




HP 




Ozzie's run, B.B.? . .. Studio ... . Track 3-4 . 
Dem's big boys, Reg . . . Where ya live? — West 
of the Rockies . . . Sure bet, right Russ? . . "Hard 
to the right and kick it" . . . Reptile Roof . . . 



What cute sayings? . .. D.R.F ... 5 of 4 ... 
Monkey Pokers . . . Miramar ... Es - 335 . . . 
Mahavishnu . . . Guru . . . Giant Hurricane H- 
68 . . . What number are you?! . . . Thornhil! . . . 
Covea . . . Living: My Sole Quandry . . 



56 




"T'was brillig, and the slithy toves, Did give and 
gimble in the wabe: All mimsy were the 
borogoves, And the mome vaths out grave." 




I 





Remember the past, yet think about the future 
. . . Bill, let's blast )imi $100 haircut . . $600 
. . . smoking bet . Bena, 5A at the library . . . 
Cooler Coldies . . . Many bones . . Lee's truck . . . 
Any Parties??? . . . 



Thunderbird, Carol . . Bike Shop . . . 10/10/75, 
Omni 1. Bagged! ... 3 Stooges . . . The group . . . 
T. towne . . . Spanish I . . . Cheryl . . Boston . . . 
The Elms ... 70 Chevelle, much cruisin' . . . 
Southern Comfort, GO\ZO'! . . . (ammin' with 
Z.Z. Top . . . 




9> 



At the little window is the tiny hand, at the big 
window is the giant hand, both are open . . . 
Canada . . . Koo . . . SKI . . Miramar . VS.H.G 
. . . Fogvo . . . bus . . . which way . . . Wakartmasu 
Ka? . . . 







"Thoughts too deep to be expressed and too 
strong to be supressed." . . . Olympics 72, '76 . . . 
Maine . . . New York . . . Pot's 'n Pan's . . . the 
cupboard? . . . Millie campaigning . . . Anton's . . . 
Bluebirds . . . Ay, yi, yi! . . . Utopiak . . . 



A little learning is a dangerous thing . . . Drink 
deep or trade not the Pierian spring . . . There 
shallow droughts intoxicate the brain And 
drinking largely sobers us again . . . Hoop 
anyone? . . . 



Cheerup, the worst is yet to come . . . Springfield 
Ms. Udall . . . WVOYC . . . CO, 4 . . . No RaR . . . 
The Green R . . . Orange and Black . . . SHS . . . 
Gold, water . . . country Fort is air ... Edsel . . . 
The Garden . . . I.I . . . Michelob . . . 





Today, well lived, makes every yesterday a dream 
of happiness, and every tomorrow a vision of 
hope. Look well therefore to this day 



If words were able to express the things the 
heart can hold, the faith and hope and peace I 
know could easily be told . . . H.I.S.H.Y.B 
summer of 73 . . . Butchy . . . SST . 



60 



Am 



The years have passed so quickly, One thing I've 
understood, I'm only learning to tell the trees 
from wood — |ohn Lennon 





jfy^y J. /few 

"When in doubt. FUDGE" .... Loo-es ... 
Pandamonium has broken loose . . . Get those 
powder-puffs! . . . "Stupid Fish" . . . FrankK and 
the boys . . . Crazy . . See-See . . Doctor P .... 
Hello I must be going 



It's PLEASURE ... "Doc" Surgeon ... 10/12/75 
. . . Wanting . . . Loving \ou ... COLETRAIN ... 
J/1/75 . . . 3/9/75 . . . Patty time, every time . 
B.U . .. U.B ... Gang . . . Vettos . . . C.P.A . . . 
Santos . . . Vineyard ... SB ... Lopes . . . 
Annmarie . . . Chuck . . . Millet . . . Power ... Ill 
Floor . . . 




Dandelion . . . Napolian . . . Yazlestremski . . . 
cocoa . . . Mrs. Weidmann . . . sewing . . . Beatles 
. . . Teddy Bear (11 ) . . . P. & B. Bus . . . Helen . . . 
Ragtime . . . Beach Bovs . . . Amsterdam Mr. 
Taussig . . . Pool . . . Miss Frame . . . Santucket . . . 
Mr. Hayes — Whale? . . . my friends . . . 



DuxLury Free LiLrary 





Tuxbury . . "68" . . . Hard Times ... 42 Dana . . . 
Do it myself . . . Tennis . . Mono . . Chevy . . . 
The Stooges . . Certainly . . P-Town . Beach 
. . . Iraliano I don't know . . Remember 
Weymouth . . . Teachers . . . Looking Back on it 
all Duxbury "76". 






May you be in Heaven a half hour before the 
devil knows you're dead! . . . "The Fonze" . . . 
Sunday, Monday, Hey, Hey, Hey! . . . Wrestling 
. . . Saturday Night's the Night I like . . . later . . . 



Smoke Shack . . . Thursday night Cruising . . . 
Kingston Drive-In . , . Back Door Action . . . 
Sebago Lake . . . "G. B." . . . "The Fonze" . . . B. W 
. . Kingston Pizza . . . Mary . . . Football ... 51 
Brain Collision . . . Fri-Night Films . . . I'm out a 
here . . . Heavyweight . T E C. II ... 5 A.M. 



"Those who bring sunshine to the lives of others 
cannot keep it from themselves." . . . Surplus St. 
74 . . . TICKS . . Only a movie . . . Cape 9/26 and 
28/75 ... Is that the truth? . . . P.P.P.P . . . Bug . . . 




"Looking back it seemed a dream, Only now was 
real to me. The depth and feeling of its force 
Moving me beyond myself." . . . Dee . . . Miracles 
. . Sailing on the Tern . . footsteps . . . 



UM (iu ti 



Every individual has a place to fill in th world, 
and is important in some respect whether he 
chooses to be or not . . . Dickie . . . July 4, 1975 





J, (A. 



-/-ft. 



Neal . . . Let's Boogie!! . . . Much Biking . . . '57 
Chevy ... '55 Plymouth . . . Chris & Doug . . . 
2/6/43 . . . The Yokahama Bavwater Special . . Hi 
Paul! . . . The Orange Blossom Special . . peeved 
by Neal gritting his teeth . . . I'm outa HERE! . . . 



I saw a star. I reached for it I missed; so I 
accepted the sky . . . T.C.A. 6/15/74 . . phone 
bills . . . Benettie ... SST ... I'd like to think the 
best has yet to come. 



A smile goes deeper than words . . . Red Roses 
. . . crazy . . . Sunshine Daydream . . . Dizzy . . . 
Pamanelba . . . Searobin . . . Benetti . . Five is a 
crowd . . . The Valiant . . . 85 . . . Anna, Pizza? . . . 
Vegetables ... I'm thinking . . . Are you 




s{j2sUlA^ ftyuUtu 'Ux^nsrxJLA^ 



Puppy dog . . . condominium . . notches . . . 
P.P.P.P . . . honest and for true . . . tea parties . . . 
morp . . . valentine invitation . . . 3B-highway 
attack . . . Sunday football . . . sandcastle . . . 
muchos ochos . . . dither . . . W.A.Y.L? 



The key of life opens the door to success . . . 
Soccer Goalie . . . 1974 E. Mass. Champs . . . 
Creely . . . Backyard Soccer? . . . 6/23/75 . . . 
voulez-vous danser avec moi si'l vous plait? . . . 
Frank , Mother Nature called . . 



68 



t 




dzduZc /ft&cfrU C^t*cx*ru 

Only a life lived for others is a life worth while 
Nantucket . . . skiing . . . B.B.B . . . 
Kungamunga-Crotchet . , . C.M.P . . . Mrs. B . . . 
Niagra ... HP.. Woody, G C. &P . . . Pumpkin 
. . . N.F. again? . . . Mutation . . . B.F . . . 






4* 



It is a good thing to be rich, and a good thing to 
be strong. But, it is a better thing to be loved bv 
many friends. 



Truth, it's there if we just stop to look long 
enough to find it . . one of the guys . . . 4AN'S 
. . . beach . . . devils . . gogue . . . BFOREST . . . 
have a good time while you can 



ELHS . . . Pennsylvania . . . New York . . . The Race 
... Lobstering . . . Niantic . . . "To the hunters 
who hunt the endless game, the streams and 
woods belong." . . . When you're number two 
you try harder . Red Sox 75 . . . 





Soccer . . . Track . . . girls . . . Gail . . . Love . . . 
Peace . . . school . . . good luck monkey . . . 
Nestle . . . Mr Cass . . . Mr. Clark . . . Mr. Russo 
. . Black Power . . Spirit of "76" 




'58 VW . . . Beauty is in the eye of the beholder 
. . . Sweetser's . . . pain in the drain . . . Craig . . . 
If something's worth doing, it's worth doing right 
. . . American Pie . . . lust a 40-horse . . . 




i 




£Z3T 



For yesterday is but a dream and tomorrow is 
only a vision. But today well lived makes 
yesterday a dream of happiness and every 
tomorrow a vision of hope 




Deb . . . Fun Van Man . . . "69" Prix . . . 
Revocation Rescinded . . . STOWE . . . Student 
"O" . . . Paddy Wagon . . . Serious Kungamunga 
. . . Skippy . . . Beach Mirramar and Gardens . . . 
McCarrett Five "O" . . . SFCO, C), BF, RBRF and B 
75 . . . Home's Closed . . . Brook . . . 



72 





Tab?Tenney! . . . Bonnie and Clyde . . . Chickaboom 
. . . H.P . . . Merestead . . . Superstitious' Ace-Faced 
Crone?!? . . . Wellmmph-N P.T.j . Sweetie . . . 
Darlin' . . . You're soooO Cute! ... M & M's . . . 
1/1/75 ... Hun-ya ... O.D.Y.L.A.T. ... Rottin in 
Denmark . . . Bertha . . CAI?! . . . Mexico . . . 
A.V.C.D . . . Hasta la byebye . . . 




" . . . Thou shalt remain ... a friend to man, to 
whom thou sayst, Beauty is truth, truth beauty, - 
that is all ye know on earth, and all ye need to 
know. John Keats 




Mint! ... 6/18/75 ... group "discussions" ... 
Chicago 75 . . . ]ohn . . . Concert 73 . . . Terry . . . 
67 Chevy . . . Slowginfizz . . Margolis . . Dukes 
. . . lightening bug . . . |azz . . Badoop . . Bob . . . 
Let's blow this popsicle stand ... 7 plus . . . 
DJDCBBPV . . crushes . . . Let's dance . . . Hasta 
la mucho 1 . . 




J 



The surest measure under the sun is what you've 
done for others in your lifetime . . . H.G. . . . 
Cracked Mushroom ... 26 Straight hours ... 12 
oz. curls . . . Little Ganders . . . Fischer #1 Stowe 
. . . Bolton Valley . . . C.B.M. . . . 




D.F.R. . . . Southern Comfort . Led Zeppelin 
DT's S U CC . . The best gold is mined in 
Columbia . . . Stones Tour 75 . . . I.H.R A. . . . Surf 
. . . Housecalls by Dr Safiva . . . It's a definite 
bitch Eniacoc . . Styx . . . Already Gone . . . 



"It's not what you know, it's who you know." . . . 
Ridn' the Pine . . Columbo ... A friend of the 
devil is a friend of mine . . . GOLD I.H.D.S. . . . 
"SICKS." 

Ship of Fools ... All that does not sink or swim is 
left there just to float . . . 

MT Pooh . . . Pandoras ... 442 ... Aloha . . . 
Howdy Ben . . . C.W. . Hit the bathroom . . 
Truckin' . Honda . Blue Flame to White 
Lightning ... Station 19 . . . D.P.D.N.D. Quiet 
study again? . The Strip . . . Ann . . . Babes . . . 
60056 . . . Hey love. 



Liquidlife . . . The maddog bit me ... RABS . . . 
A.L.K. . . . )oy Ride? . . . S.F.C.O. . . . "All Nighters" 
. . . "Grins" . . Kungamungaflu . . . Home to 
office and back again . . . Stowe . . . Baggy Knees 
. Brook Bros . . Go for it 



Artie . . . The ARDINA gang A new gang' 
Do your own thing in life, no matter what it is. 




Duxbury Buzz Patrol . . . Somerville . . Golfcarts 
. . . I.H.R.W . . . Kenpo . . Peace Love and a 
Sucker Punch . . . Rowdy times are fun times . . . 
Busted again 1 . . Rednecks! . . . 



^4 



Miss Ducharme . . . 3/13/72 . . . Mr. Orth's bubble 
. . . Freida Face . . . 3rd period . . . Millers . . . 
Thanks Hughbert . Commies . . . Gagliardi . . . 
NO . . . Chris . . . ZE . . . potato chips . . . Bella . . . 
Dodge Truck BMW . . . Triumph . . . pups . . . 
and, of course, Rym. 



T A S K S. .64 Vettes . . . The Drags . . Led 
Zeppelin ... "Peacock, wanna get blitzed?" ... 
Class mettings at the ranch . . . U.S.M.C. . . The 
Dance, "F" that . . . Break Heads . . . The Sticks 
Dobes are best . . . REDNECKS'" 



Truth, it's there if v\e just stop to look long 
enough to find it . . . one of the gu\s ? 4AN's 
. . . beach . . . devils gogue B Forest . 
have a good time while you can 




It. 




I 




77 



a 





Most Likelv to Succeed 
loan Connors and Ernie Freeburg 




79 



Senior Class Officers 




President, Terri Powers, Secretary, julie Haffey, Treasurer, Maureen Sullivan, and Vice- 
President, Peter Barlow. 



Underclassmen 



Underclassmen? of course! Have you ever 
heard a freshman giggle? Have you ever tried to 
wade through a wave of Freshmen? Freshmen 
look strong. There seems to be so many of them, 
but how can anybody expect unity in a freshmen 
class when each member is testing and exploring 
every aspect of the school? Each Freshman Class 
has a genuine excitement about it, being a mem- 
ber of the youngest group in a new school with 
new social and academic demands. 

Ever feel lost? Somewhere in the limbo land 
between Freshman and junior year are the Soph- 
omores, struggling onward. Sophomore year is a 
wilderland before the new excitement of up- 
perclassman status. There are doubts and fears 
unique to sophomore year and who knows why 
they exist or how to pin them down. Is it Biolo- 
gy? Is it Society? A combination of both? "I'm a sopnomore ana rm tnmking. 
sophomores, because junior year is BIZARRE! junior year; countdown, juniors are very special people to 
seniors and many close friendships are formed over these class lines. Because of the relative security that 
a junior can feel, having finally made it so far, junior year gives you a chance to really excel (if you are 
so inclined). Sure there is pressure (remember the outside world) but because the reality of decision 
making is a whole year off, the pressure is indirect and sometimes even feels good! Oh, the fun, the 
turbulence, the excitement, the confusement, the friends, the antagonists — its all here! 

P S. Got your Prom date? 

Juniors 

The class of 1977 have a variety of interests and talents. They are heavily involved in almost every 
activity in the school, contributing to the success of the athletic teams, the music and drama programs. 
As is always true of a large number of students, the junior class is divided amongst different groups, but 
the Class has united to work on class projects such as homecoming activities which proves the Juniors 
have school and class spirit. 

Sophomores 

The Greek meaning of Sophomore is "A wise fool." But if you ask any of the sophomores, you will 
find we are a class with a wide variety of talents. You will also get an answer saying we are a class of 
inbetweens. In between what you may ask? We are in between the freshmen, the prom going juniors 
and, of course the high and mighty seniors. Nothing but a sophomore. This is a year of growing pains. 
We all struggle, explore, learn and when we reach the top, it will not be all that bad. 

Freshmen 

The Yearbook Staff also asked us, "How does the Freshmen Class feel about themselves as a class?" 
The majority replied, "I am upset with the students of the Class. We can not join together. There are too 
many little cliques who do not confer with each other." 




81 




82 




83 




85 




86 




87 




89 



90 




93 




94 





95 




9- 



Underclass Officers 




Sophomore Class Officers: President Karen Heneghan, Vice President Leslie Wiedman, Secretary 
Terry Mcintosh, Treasurer Andrea Miller 

Freshman Class Officers: President Carol Milke, Vice President Debby Donahue, Secretary Richard 
Murphy, Treasurer Stacy Bruce. 

junior Class Officers: President Beth Marconi, Vice President Mary Vienneau, Secretary Lori Wirt, 
Treasurer Rod Hoel (missing) 




I 



98 



junior Class Officers: Pres. Beth Marconi, Vice Pres. Mary Vienneau, Sec Lori Wirt, Treas. Rod 
Hoel (missing) 



Underclassmen officers 



Sophomore Class Officers: Pres. Karen Heneghan, 
\ ice Pres. Leslie Wiedman, Treas. Terry Mcintosh, 
Sec. Andrea Miller 



Freshman Class Officers: Pres. Carol Milke, Vice Pres. 
Debbie Donahue, Treas Stace\ Bruce, Sec Richard 
Murphy 




A major influence in our lives revolves around our interactioYi with the faculty, 
but, how often do we think of them as individuals? Frequently we make myopic 
judgements about these people from what we see in the classroom. We realize 
that they enjoy singing professionally, writing, playing golf, flying, mountain 
climbing, as well as bowling, to name just a few interests. The teachers have 
given us an appreciation for the value of learning. They have provided us with 
the basics and now it is our responsibility to carry on. 




102 




103 




104 




108 




Ill 




112 



Athletics 




Sports involves both the mind and the body. The athlete learns that excellence in anything is 
accomplished by long hours of toilsome work, and to stay on top one must work even more 
diligentlv. Throughout competition, the mind and the body function as a unit. 

The greatest educational factor that sports offers is not winning or losing but the act of 
participation. It may be the self-satisfaction of an individual's achievement or the thrill of working 
as a team. The act of participation usually does not give a materialistic award, but it gives the desire 
for perfection. In ways other than academic, people are able to make their school proud of them 
through their achievement in sports. A person's personality may be developed by athletics because 
the player may learn to express himself better and ma\ therefore acquire self-confidence. 

Sports extends the opportunitv for friendship with new people. Through the spirit of com- 
petitiveness one is able to meet people who share similar interests. 

The following section is dedicated to those who have worked hard for the success of Duxbury's 
sports. 



Baseball 1975 

Although last year's team 
suffered by losing many close 
games, its desire and optimism 
did not surrender, and its spirit 
will be even higher in 1976. The 
pitching staff will be highly 
experienced with their seasoned 
veterans Tim Barclay, ]ohn 
Peacock, Dr. |., and Peter 
Sinnott. The hot hitting seniors 
will be Steve Andrews, George 
Arnold, Jeff Bailey, Guy Brown, 
Steve Case, and Tod Desmarais. 
They will make use of the many 
ducks in the pond. Mr. Murphy 
and his two captains, Steve 
Andrews and Jeff Bailey, will 
give out both hitting and 
fielding tips to the youngsters. 
Last year might have been a year 
to forget, except for the 
numerous memories, but this 
year the crop is ripe and ready 
for picking. 



1975 Softball Team 

Under the fine coaching of Pat 
Shea, the bubble gum - tootsie 
pop kid, the 1975 softball team 
had a very successful season. Led 
by co-captains Penny "Mouth" 
Herrick and Cindy "Mario" Pratt, 
the team finished second in the 
South Shore League with a 12-4 
record 

For the first time, the D.H.S. 
Softball team made the 
Massachusetts State 
Tournament. Although the girls 
played valiantly, they were none 
the less defeated 12-6 by King 
Phillip Regional High School 

Some of the girls' more 
memorable moments were 
beating Hull in a tight 6-5 game; 
Kim and Gail McCallum making 
the All-Star team; Gail 
McCallum's election as Most 
Valuable Player and Cindy Pratt's 
4-0 no hitter As with all teams 
there are humourous moments 
and the softball team had many. 
Some of these were: |ill 
Willingham's Prom black eye, 
Coach Shea's three pounds of 
tootsie pops, practice at the 
beach, learning to catch pop 
flies with the head, and Gayle 
Sander's famous base crookin'. 

Last year's seniors will be 
missed, but this year's team will 
be experienced with ten 
returning players. 



1 14 








Girls' Tennis 

For the last three seasons the 
Varsity Tennis Team has been 
the League Champions under 
the leadership of lane Corliss. 

Last year's team will be missed 
because more than four of the 
top starters graduated. 

This year will be coached by 
Mrs. Faith Heneghan and will 
hopefully be a rebuilding year. 
They should do quite well and 
will undoubtedly capture 
another championship. 

Boys' Tennis 

With an 11-1 record, the boys' 
tennis team was South Shore 
League Champs in 75. Coach 
Randall Look's last year proved 
to be his most successful. After 
nine consecutive years of 
finishing in second place behind 
Cohasset, Duxbury came out on 
top finishing the season with an 
unprecedented 5-0 victory over 
Cohasset. 

The Duxbury team is 
characterized by depth and 
strength in doubles. This year's 
prospects are even brighter since 
one two starters, Scott Rich and 
Col in Dahlin have left. 
"Backboard Bob" Hutchinson 
will provide strength in singles 
as he has done since his 
freshman year Greg Sbraccia 
and last year's captain, Ernie 
Freeberg, will also return for 
their fourth year on the team 
Other seniors include Mike 
Picardi and Mark Cywinski. 



Golf 



The 1975 Duxbury High School 
golf team, coached by Bob 
Hayes, came up with another 
undefeated record in league play 
winding up with a 10-0 overall 
record. It was Duxbury's 
thirteenth straight South Shore 
League Championship. Duxbury 
had no problems winning any of 
its matches. Over the past four 
years the team has compiled an 
overall 73-3 record and proved 
to the state finals all four years. 
The team qualified for the state 
tournament and finished eighth 
in the state finals at Taconic 
Country Club in Williamstown. 
Mass. 







1 16 




117 



1975 DUXBURY TRACK 



I 



The 1975 Duxbury High Track 
Team's season could be 
appropriately termed "The year 
of the individual performer." 
Under the guidance of coaches 
Reggie Clark and Bill Barges, 
several Duxbury Track men 
turned in outstanding 
performances. 

In the two mile, Craig 
Bloodgood shattered all Duxbury 
High distance records, while 
proving one of the top two 
milers in the state. Not to be 
outdone, Andy Bolster was 
outstanding in the discus throw, 
capturing the league 
championship in this event. )im 
Button and Dave O'Malley in 
the javelin throw and in the mile 
broke school records in their 
respective events. 

Despite these feats the team 
could manage but two wins in 
eight meets. However, with such 
consistant scorers as Mark Pixley, 
Brian Heneghan, Pat Carroll, 
Dave Creely, Paul Bloodgood 
and Kent Bolster returning, the 
1976 Duxbury High track season 
should be interesting 

The Duxbury High School girls 
track team, under the coaching 
of Paul Francis had a record last 
year of two wins and four losses. 
At the break of the season, after 
a humiliating defeat by 
Middleboro, the team gained 
confidence and experience, 
bouncing back to beat the 
Cohasset team, rivaling all the 
way. With the return of all but 
three members, girls' track 
promises to be a strong sport 
here this Spring 





fUJJ 

» \ \ \ \ vi 

—J— 




l 18 





119 



Duxbury 
Field 

Hockey Team 



The Duxbury High 
School Field Hockey 
Team, under the coaching 
of Deborah Brooks and 
led by Senior Tri-captains, 
Phipsie Chandler, Melinda 
Severson, and Lederle 
Tenney, had a very suc- 
cessful season. They 
finished second in the 
South Shore League with 
a record of 12 wins and 4 
loses. 

The Tie Breaker and the 
Flick-Off were introduced 
as new rules for this year's 
competition. Although 
the Flick-Off is consid- 
ered individualized com- 
petion, the Dragon Ladies 
voted to continue the 
Flick-Offs next year. 

For the first time in 
Duxbury Field Hockey 
History, the Ladies 
qualified for the Eastern 
Mass Tournament. They 
played their best game of 
the season against Fram- 
ingham South and lost 1- 
0. 

Juniors Charlene 
Woods and Liz Ham- 
mond were both out- 
standing players on this 
year's team. Charlene was 
elected most valuable 
player. Both Charlene and 
Liz Hammond were voted 
to participate on the All- 
Stars Team. 

Next year's team should 
be in likely contention for 
first place in the South 
Shore League, although 
Seniors Robin Blackford, 
Kathy Grealy and Connie 
Wilson will be missed. 
The Seniors wish the 
team good luck in the fol- 
lowing years. 







IS 



D.H.S. 

Football 

Team 

The D.H.S. Football 
team experienced one of 
the most rainy and injury 
ridden seasons in Dux- 
bury History. The pride 
and desire of the players 
enabled them to hold on 
to a 5,5 record, surpassed 
by only one team (5,4) in 
the past. 

The captains this year 
were Peter Barlow and 
David Shirley, who 
showed great leadership 
ability. Unfortunatly Da- 
vid was hurt early in the 
season. Tod Desmaris re- 
placed him. Charles Ab- 
bott, Jeffrey Bailey, Mi- 
chael Doherty, Bruce Lil- 
lie, Kevin M. McCarthy 
and brothers Christopher 
and Kevin McCarthy were 
seniors who contributed 
greatly to the team's suc- 
cessful season. Juniors 
Christopher Brady and 
David Greenburg and An- 
drew Bolster played ex- 
cellenty throughout the 
year. Eric Arnold, Kent 
Bolster and Michael Cocl- 
ough were sophomores 
who will contribute great- 
ly to the team's future 
success. 

Coaches Pagnano, Del- 
locco and Jagutz should 
also be commended for 
their superb coaching this 
year. 








123 




Soccer 



i 



The Duxbury High School 
Varsity Soccer Team has another 
fine season under the coaching 
of Foster Cass. Co-captains, Tim 
Barclay and Brian McEvoy led 
the team to a 16-0-0 undefeated 
season clinching the South Shore 
League Championship. The high 
scoring seniors for the Dragons 
included Brian McEvoy, George 
Arnold, Steve Andrews and Sean 
O'Neil. The defensive unit of 
the team was led by Tim Barclay, 
who scored his first varsity goal 
this year. The defensive players 
included Scott Brown, Mark 
Landers, Robert Wesley, Peter 
Locke, Andy MacDonald and 
Mike Kennedy. A fine 
performance by Peter Theroux in 
goal helped to keep the score 
against down to five. The loss of 
these seniors will be felt next 
year, but Duxbury's Tradition 
will undoubtedly be upheld. 



Cross 
Country 

This years Cross Country team, 
under the leadership of Coach 
Clark, enjoyed their best season 
ever. Their 6-2 record gave them 
a third place standing in the 
South Shore league with their 
only losses going to Hanover 
and Middleboro. Senior Captain 
Craig Bloodgood led the 
Dragons with 7 victories in 8 
tries. He was pushea constantly 
by |unior jimmy Button. This was 
jimmy's first year of Cross 
Country and he showed the 
makings of an excellant runner. 
Senior, Pat Carroll and 
Sophomore Paul Bloodgood 
could always be counted on to 
finish in the top along with 
Dave Bourget and Keith Patton, 
a freshman Other runners who 
won places on the varsity team 
were, junior Peter Sinnott and 
Senior newcomer, Mark 
Cywinski. Mark Pixley, also a 
senior, made his presence 
known as he also finished high 
in the race standings 

Possibly the greatest reason 
for the teams success was the 
leadership ot Mr. Clark who 
summed up the season with 
these words, "We were all 
wonderful'" 






^1 VI «i ■ ■ - 

• Ml Bl LI J[ £ 
■ I Bl Bl Bl B ■ 
III II Bl Bl B 

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. .« .<lJl »A al^v^»*^v . ■» < ' ^ * * ^ 




125 



r 



BASKETBALL 

The 1975-1976 Duxbury High 
School varsity basketball team 
reversed Its losing trend that had 
developed in the sport over the 
previous two years. Coached by 
Foster Cass, the Duxbury team 
compiled a 6-2 league record by 
the half-way mark in the season. 
Among these six victories were 
exciting upsets by the strong 
Middleboro and Hull squads. 

The Duxbury team was made 
up of six seniors: Mike Picardi, 
Greg Wolfe, Bill Wilcox, Scott 
Browne, Pat Carroll, Steve Case, 
and five juniors: Chris Brady, 
Manny Fernandes, Robbie 
Andrews, Walter Kusins, Dave 
Greenburg, and one sophomore, 
Paul Bloodgood. 

With a nucleus of 
underclassmen returning next 
year, the basketball team should 
be tournament bound. 




The 75-76 Girls Basketball 
team was a young developing 
team Under the experienced 
supervision of Coach )ane Corliss 
the team played with 
enthusiasm and desire. The 
Dragons were led by junior Gail 
MacCallum and Senior high 
scorer, Gale Sanders. It was a 
very close team, with everyone 
contributing an all out effort. 
The Seniors included Deanna 
Henderson and Gale Sanders 
who were supported by luniors 
Donna Doane, Sheree Heap, 
Gail MacCallum, Donna Pullin, 
and Sue Schaffer, and 
Sophomores Theresa Grealy, 
Nicki Noel, and Lauren Tenny. 





J 



126 





127 



WRESTLING 

The 1975-76 wrestling season 
proved to ■ be very productive. 
The relatively young team, 
having only four seniors, under 
the leadership of Coach William 
Barges and Assistant Coach Mike 
Russo, amassed an impressive 
12-3 record over some very stiff 
competition. Led by co-captains 
Bryce Blair and Tom Whalen, the 
team came through with some 
key wins over such teams as 
Durfee, North Quincy and 
Weymouth North. Although the 
team will be losing four valuable 
seniors, Bryce Blair, Dave Shirley, 
Peter Locke and Walter 
Sheehan, the team's future looks 
very promising with such 
strapping juniors as Tom Whalen 
and Dan Kates and first year 
surprise Eric Arnold. 




Girls Gymnastics 

The 1975 season under coach 
Penny Patenaude was a year of 
great improvement Beginning in 
early December the girls worked 
long and hard hours improving 
form and trying new moves on 
the four pieces; the balance 
beam, uneven parallel bars, 
vaulting horse, and floor 
exercise. Gymnastics is a very 
individual sport but you can not 
achieve this unless you have a 
team that will work together 
through spotting and helping 
others. Throughout the year, this 
is what our team had and in one 
way, perhaps this was our 
greatest achievement. 

Leading the team into twelve 
meets were Capt. Phipsie 
Chandler, and Co-capt. Maura 
Mastrogiovanni All the girls 
improved steadily, which 
brought our average score up to 
15 pts. over last year's average. 
Unfortunately, we lost a few 
girls through the year, but we 
ended up the year with the girls. 
Only two seniors will be leaving: 
Phipsie Chandler and Suzanne 
Duffy. We will still have a strong 
and spirited team ready for next 
season. 




| 

m 




"1 

* 


■WlUlf... 


1 

-4* 






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128 





129 




Hockey 

The 75-76 D.H.S. varsity ice hockey 
team enjoyed an exciting and 
successful season Despite the loss of 
eight seniors, the team apparently has 
a strong record of 7-4-2 and is looking 
forward to winning its three remaining 
games. The season was a total team 
effort wwith Duxbury being the only 
squad in the league to skate three lines 
consistently. The team was well 
supported by students and parents 
throughout the year This led to their 
inspired victory over Cohasset 4-3, in 
their homecoming game and a 
stunning upset over the previously 
undefeated and perennial league 
champs, Hanover The team will miss 
the service of eight more seniors led by 
tri-captains Brian Heneghan, Gerry 
White and Stephen Leonard. The 
forwards Chris McCarthy, Tod 
Desmarias and George Arnold, and the 
defenseman Frank Haugh and Arthur 
Donahue. Yet the future looks bright 
with the return of Terry Heneghan, 
Dave Hallowell, Tim Costello, |ohn 
Dowd. Andy and Kent Bolster. 





30 




"You study, you learn, but you guard the original naivete. 
Henri Matisse 



THE CLASS OF NINTEEN SEVENTY SIX 

We gather together memories of four years . . . the backlogs of souvenirs 
serving as experience for new situations. Through tests and quizzes, 
Homecoming and our Prom, plays, parties and sports. — We have made it 
together! It is now time we start our separate ways. Go now in peace, my 
friends For we are climbers, and the way is steep. Life may have weary 
paths and lonely journeys, but let us hold our heads up high and stand up 
for what we believe is right and true. Live with love in your soul, and you 
will bring happiness to everyone you touch. We are a class considered a 
unit. Our approach to the future will be individual, but it will bear the 
spirit of 76. Each one of us will succeed in our own special way. 

Julie Haffey 



The Dunes 

The dunes, the grass, the half gray sky, 
a boy plays alone with the wind at his 
side, 

We climb the dunes, you and I 
Our marks in the sand are like a 
good bye 

My child, you'll see the golden sand 
Come walk with me, take my hand, 
At the top of the dune we'll stop 
and stand, 

And see the beauty of another's hand 

Mark Landers 




3* 1 • J3> 



In the Marsh 

In the marsh 

My body surrenders 

To touch, to smell 

To hear, to taste, to see 

To observe. 

It touches the colors 

And becomes a tree of autumn 

It smells the water 

And swims with the fishes. 

It hears a gull 

And soars to the sun. 

It tastes the air 

And becomes a cool breeze. 

It sees the sand 

And burrows like a clam 

It observes 

And is the marsh. 

To touch, to smell 

To hear, to taste, to see 

To observe. 

It touches beauty 

And is beautiful. 

It smells cleanliness 

And is clean 

It hears a song 

And sings. 

It tastes kindness 

And is kind. 

It sees perfection 

And is perfect 

It observes 

And is revitalized. 

Jane Pentheny 



The mother told her daughter to dream of castles 

She dreams of 
lolly pops 

Wen orange and \ellow 
as thev slip through 
fingers and 
land on the floor 
bare 

They lie still as corpses 

smiles etched 

on colored backgrounds 

waiting 

She sees lolKpop women 
dance over 
men's bodies 
laughing 

The men's figures erect 
move closer and 
touch the smiles 

The smiles quiver 

the lolKpop women jump 

and flee 

to hide behind a wall 

She closes the book and falls to sleep, after reading 
the fain, tale 

\ iveca Carroll 



A failure grade in a course re\eals: 

A) knowing more than the teacher 

B) too much time in the bathroom 

C) paving attention to the teacher 

D) marked computer answer sheet with Bic Banana 

E) insufficient cramming during commercials 




THE ROOM 



Wink of an Ev e 



Dusty desk top 
Unmade beds 
Oothes pile 
Untaken care of 
about the floor 
Albums piled on top 
Of one another 
Ashtravs filled to the brim 
Stuffy 

Light that is not bright enough 
Oiris BraoS 



Relentless Time, who can be your master. 

Is there no barrier to halt your tide? 

I am your servant and your prisoner. 

My wish for immortality denied. 

To you I am but the wink of an eye, 

Nothing at all to the eons that flow; 

Someone whose born once, and gone b\ and bv. 

Existing today , and gone tomorrow. 

Set afloat on the sea of centuries 

To make my mark and quickly disappear. 

Drifting about, being blov\n in the breeze 

Living life noy\ y\ith onlv death to fear. 

My hope is that this shailoyv artistry. 

Can endure throughout ail eternity. 



135 




Old man, 

how long have you stood in that spot 
the people pass you by 
hurried to their buses 
leaving you unnoticed 
in the shadows 

Your worn eyes and face 
speak of experience 

and anguish 
yet they are gentle still 
I watch them gaze, 

expressionless, 
out the frosted depot window 

Yes, I watch you carefully old man 
and hear you sigh 
as you leave. 

Outside, 
the bitter winter winds 
blow your thin, thin coat 

from your back. 

With head bent low 
you walk slowly 

disappearing 
into the swirling snow alone 

Gone. 
I also, hurry to my bus 
and head for home 
remembering your loneliness 

Cindy Patch 



If all that was done and said 
acted upon by heart's intent, 
If wishes were reality's command 
and dreams within the grasp; 
My earth would turn to heaven 
And hell diminish 
At the last. 

Trish Mastindino 




136 




Play for me a melody 

Please, won't you? 

A ballard, soft and beautiful 

Silk, smoothing over this harsh reality; 

My lovely dream, 

Perhaps just a smile, 

But play for me a melody, 

In which for a little while, 

I can take shelter, 

Drive away my troubles, 

And shed this cloak of sadness; 

Melodies, 

Whisper - strands, fingering through the 
dark stretches of my mind. 

Val Raszka 



I looked around the room, 
Filled with people vibrantly 
Like 

There was a lady standing at the blackboard, 

Writing crazy numbers and letters and formulas 

It looked like a jigsaw puzzle. 

Her mouth was moving very rapidly, 

But nothing was coming out. 

Once in a while I'd hear a word or two, 

But it really didn't matter anyway. 

Her voice seemed to die away after a while 

And became a sort of soft monotonous song. 

I looked again around the room 

No one seemed to be listening to the number lady 

Maybe they too couldn't understand her 

I felt sorry for the lady with numbers 

She seemed to be trying so hard 

I wanted to ask her what she was doing it all for, 

But it didn't seem appropriate at the time 

Debby Caleskie 




137 




Office At Night 

I'm sorry dear but not to-night 
I'm too occupied on this page 
And outside it's getting very late 
Even though you're twice my age 

Well dear I'll never forget you 

And remember what I've said to you 

I hired ya 

And I can fire ya 

So dear before you go 
I just wanted you to know 
You've just lost the battle again 

Nancy Larson 



An empty room 

An empty chair 

The clock upon the wall 

Where I once fixed my stare 

The marks on the board 
The room without speech 
Shouts the absence of the man 
Who gathered us to teach 

The classmate beside me 
Whom I really didn't know 
Tomorrow I'll wonder 
Where did he go? 



Tarnished memories, 
old, brass door-knobs, 
Shattered dreams, 
Splinters of glass 
lie behind on a road 
I have long since 
passed 

Tattered masks 
of people I once 
thought I knew 
flap slightly in the 
ghost of a wind. 

Trish Mastendino 



Turning to go 

This door closes for me. 

I'll use what I know 

To open another door with this key. 



Darlene Brigandi 



Infinity 

Many a time in peaceful solitude 
I look to the stars and stare in wonder, 
Nature displaying Divine pulchritude; 
On this infinite cosmos I ponder. 
Countless galaxies whirling onward to 
Destinations unknown, provoking thought; 
Suns die and then others are born anew 
From absolute zero to fiery hot. 
An endless firmament I can't perceive: 
Celestial space without any boundaries, 
These and other questions I can not leave, 
Answers would my mental hunger appease. 
1 38 My sole comfort in seeking the unknown 

Is that in my search I am not alone. 




Activities 



In twenty years, what will you remember of our high school years? Will you 
smile, perhaps even laugh a little in memory of some small activity that we were all 
so earnestly working for? Even when I think about it now, I realize that we all 
learned alot by each of these "small activities". Although these activities will seem 
small to us while looking back at them in twenty years, they each seem very 
important and very real to us now. We will remember how we learned to share our 
talents and our time, our hearts and our homes. We will remember how we learned 
to be responsible, not only for ourselves, our own work and actions, but for each 
other, our work as a combined effort and our actions as a unified team. Academi- 
cally, in the past four years, we have learned to read faster, to write well, and to 
think with both logic and imagination, but in working together, we have really 
learned, for we have applied these basic skills to a common goal. 





A.F.S. Activities 



Last summer I observed the alpine culture of the Camonican Valley in Northern Italy with a group of European students. We 
became aware of many problems which the Camonican inhabitants face. The central conflict is between the traditional agrarian 
way of life and the negative influence of industry on the community. 

Since the ancient Camuans settled in the valley, the mountain people have developed a unique way of life. The Camonican 
people have always depended on the resources of the land for food, timber, and water power. Mountains on all sides of the land 
made it necessary to develop an independant community. Mountain people are noticeably different from other Italians. They are 
short, tanned, and wrinkled, before they are thirty. Their dialect is rich in words with German, French, Latin or local origin and 
cannot be understood by other Italians. The mountain diet consists chiefly of cheese, wine, and polenta, a cornmeal dish. This 
limited diet accounts for the small size of the people. Dwellings are scaled to the people and the need to conserve heat The area 
also has its own folk legends and art 

The valley has always been one of the poorer regions of Italy. During the fifties the Italian government made efforts to develop 
the region. Compulsory schools were established throughout the Valley. When children enter the schools, they are forced to learn 
the standard Italian language, often from outside teachers who do not understand the mountain dialect. In this process, a child is 
drawn out of his or her home environment into a foreign one As education progresses, children learn of technically more advanced 
areas. Instead of feeling pride for their way of life, they begin to regret it and try to change it. Many parents have been forced to 
industrial centers such as Brescia or Milan by the economic situation. The population of the villages is divided between the oldest 
and the youngest Children are left with their grandmothers who live on farms. These women are called "white widows" in dialect. 
The old women cannot take care of the entire work of the farm by themselves. When children grow old enough to manage the 
farm they must go to the factories to make money for the family. As a result, the farms are neglected Quite often the entire family 
migrates to the South Unable to sell their houses, families abandon them. Some of the smaller villages are completely abandoned 
The problem of people migrating to industrial centers, leaving behind their cultural heritage, is world-wide. Industry based on 
natural products and skills of the region, such as cooperative dairy centers, canneries, lumber yards, and modern meat packing 
plants would produce a more positive economic situation without forcing abandoning of the agricultural base and destruction of 
local cultures. 






Greg Wolfe 
Editor-in-Chief 



Literary 



Literature (fr. Literatus): writings in 
prose or verse, especially writings 
having excellence of form or 
expression and expressing ideas of 
permanent or universal interest. 

Pegasus is known as the flying horse 
of Greek mythology In later years it 
became known as the steed which 
carried the poet into the realm of 
imagination The staff of the 75-76 
literary magazine hopes that Pegasus 
carried you into your own special 
realm. 

Editor-in-chief. Greg Wolfe, Editors 
— Steve Ward, Sally Wyman, Beverly 
Briggs, )erry Bayer, Valerie Razka, And 
Craig Bloodgood. 



Magazine 



Gerry Byer 





Val Raska 




Steve Ward 
Business Editors 




Donna Coffin and )ane Pen- 
theny 




Sports Editors 
George Arnold and Jeff Baily 



I 



The Key Club is an organization which serves the community in 
a variety of ways, including beach clean-ups, raking leaves for the 
elderly and delivering Christmas baskets. These are just a few of 
the activities that the Key Club was involved with in the past 

year. 

As a branch of the Kiwanis, the Duxbury Key Club is a Chapter 
of an international organization consisting of hundreds of clubs 
all across the nation. The Duxbury Club consists of over thirty 
members from the high school who meet every Monday night. 

Under the leadership of President, Peter Barlow; Vice 
President, )im Myrick; Treasurer, Earnie Freeburg; and Secretary, 
Pat Carroll the 1975-1976 Key Club has been living up to its 
motto; "Helping Others — A Way of Life." 






Club 





The Duxbury High School Outing Club was 
officially recognized this year Founded three 
vears ago. it has served to educate voung adults 
about our natural resources. Our activities 
include biking and non-technical mountain 
climbing, hiking, and cross-country skiing. All of 
our trips point out the need for conservation 
and the proper management of recreation areas 
We also build individual responsibility by 
delegating duties and decisions. Most 
importantly we learn when self-reliance is 
necessary, and when we must rely on each other. 

The organizer and sponsor of the Outing Club 
is Mr. Richard Miller. Our officers this year were 
Augie Hess, president; Mark Hammond, Vice 
president; Julie Franke, Secretary; and Tod 
Blackmore, treasurer. Through their efforts we 
enioved a successful, active year, and are looking 
forward to manv more. 





145 



I 




[ 




Tournament of Plays 

Never in the history of the Fall Tournament of Plays has the 
competion been so close. All three entries were separated in the 
final judging by only five points and each one deserves recognition 

In first place was the Sophomore play, "Three on a Bench" It was 
the story of an old lady who makes it her business to reunite 
quarreling lovers Valerie Raszka as the old lady and Missy Hughes as 
the young girl, Betty, won the acting awards for this play. Also in the 
cast were lay Hamilton as Betty's boyfriend, Robert Rudeman as a 
friendly Irish cop, and Lisa Hundley as the femme fatale 
"Three on a Bench 
was directed by 
Mrs. Susan Cook 
and Kimberly 
Carson. 

The Junior entry, 
directed by Richard 
Giragosian and 
Deborah Hagen 
was entitled, "The 
Ugly Duckling'' 
The acting awards 
in this tale of 
mixed identities 
were given to 
Anthony Kelso as 
the King and Mary 
Vienneau as the 
Princess. 

The Freshmen 
put on a play called 
"Shut and Bar the 
Door", in which an 
argument between 
a Middle Ages 
farmer and his wife 
leads to vows of 
silence that remain 
unbroken even 
when they are 
threatend by the 
Evil Robber This 
play was directed 
by Mr Ronald 
Pomroy and the 
acting awards were 
won by Susan 
Buechler and Mary 
Chapdelaine 






i ; 'fin? ! I?! , , 





Auntie Mame was probably the most successful Senior Class Play ever produced in Duxbury High School. 
There were many reasons for this, but the most important ones were the least obvious. 

What the sellout audiences saw was only the proverbial tip of the iceburg. The most impressive portion 
was below the surface. 

The largest number of the students to ever participate in a Senior Class Play took part in Auntie Mame. 
The cast and crew numbered over fifty. We were warned beforehand that Auntie Mame was a tremendous 
undertaking But no one knew exactly how tremendous until the problems began to rear their heads. And it 
wasn't long until everyone discovered that the hands were attached to the bodies of brontosauruses. 

As the deadline approached nervous exhaustion began to set in and the realization that large chunks of 
the play were incomplete scared everyone into fits. We realized we had a monster on our hands. 

Dress rehearsal came and went, leaving us with two days to create a peacock out of a massive turkey. 

Somehow we pulled it off. The dress rehearsal for the Senior Citizens helped to give the inexperienced 
cast a test under fire. Now that we 
knew what to expect Friday night, the 
curious disease called stagefright no 
longer paralyzed limbs and larnyxes. 

If audience reaction accounted for 
anything, Auntie Mame was a success. 
But where it really counted was in our 
own minds; and after Saturday night 
we were ready to hit Broadway. 

We managed to satify ourselves and 
our audiences and had a lot of fun in 
the process. All the suffering seems 
worth it now. We knew Auntie Mame 
was good. And we all know that by the 
time our tenth reunion rolls around, it 
will have improved with age. 






DHS CHOIR 



In everyone's life, music plays an encour- 
aging and enlightening part. Music is a part 
of life which we can all share together, no 
matter who we are, no matter how different 
we are. 

The Choir, under the outstanding direc- 
tion of Mr. Roger Jarvis, is an organization 
directed toward this goal. In a very special 
union, the Choir of D.H.S. has performed a 
great variety of music from Handel's Hal- 
lelujah Chorus to Weber and Rice's Jesus 
Christ Superstar. No matter what the occa- 
sion, the Choir continues to perform with 
joy and excellence. 







149 




I 



The 1975-76 Student Council 

This year's Student Council has been and will continue to be a 
productive part of the student body. Mr. Buechler has been the 
advisor of the Student Council and we greatly appreciate his time 
and effort. Student Council meetings are held one evening a week 
and meetings are run utilizing parlimentary procedure. 

The Student Council has accomplished some things this year that 
we hope have been a help to students. The Student Council 
Bulletin has been passed out once a month and a large calendar has 
been posted in the cafeteria; both have served to inform students of 
the activities going on during the month. 

An Assembly Committee was set up to bring some new and 
enjoyable programs to the school. Also, some of the activities 
which have been enjoyed in the past will be seen again, such as the 
Craft Fair and International Day. Seminar Day, which was coordi- 
nated by )oan Connors, 
will be put on again next 
year. 

During the spring, the 
Student Council will be 
sponsoring three field 
trips to Boston to visit the 
theatre, a mime group, 
and a musical event. 

Members of the 1975-76 
Student Council were: 
Seniors: Barbara Costello, 
loan Connors (president), 
Julie Haffey (secretary), 
and Mark Pixley. Juniors: 
Janet Driscoll, Kathy 
Knight, Christine Leonard 
(treasurer), and Laurie 
Richard. Sophomores: 
Carol Emerson (vice-presi- 
dent), Lisa Hundley, Nan- 
cy Tellin, and Amy Thor- 
kilson. Freshman: Susan 
Buechler, Chuck Heidenr- 
eich, Kathy Pynn, and 
Laurie Schoula. 

We would like to see 
more students interested 
in student government 
and hope that there will 
be many new candidates 
running in the next Stu- 
dent Council elections. 






Precious and 
Few 



The evening of May 16, 
1975 has made a mark in 
the memories of those 
students and faculty 
members who attended 
the Junior Prom at Rid- 
ders' Country Club. Hard 
work and determination 
on the part of the class of 
76 made possible the 
final breath-taking results. 

The grand march high- 
lighted the evening when 
the elegantly dressed 
couples paraded around 
the dance floor accom- 
panied by the fantastic 
sound of Spur. Everyone 
watched as Kim Carson 
was crowned Queen with 
her escort Paul Ashcroft 
beside her. Those elected 
to the court were Pat Sul- 
livan, escorted by Dave 
Kennison, and Julie Haf- 
fey, escorted by Kevin M. 
McCarthy. 

The class of 1976 is 
proud to have presented 
such a memorable eve- 
ning. 









153 




The Duxbury Dragon High School Band and 
Majorettes is a musical organization made up of 
eighty-five students. The duties and responsi- 
bilities of the organization are as varied as the 
backgrounds of the students themselves. We are 
proud of the work and dedication shown contin- 
ually by the band and the majorettes and sincere- 
ly hope to see them expand and improve in the 
future. 

The band, under the direction of Arthur John- 
son, participated in this year's Christmas Concert, 
"Gifts of Music", which presented their medly 
from the Broadway musical "Godspell". They 
have also played at pep rallies and football 
games, and several members have taken part in 
the major audition festivals, including 
S.E.M.S.B.A., South East District and All-State. 




D.H.S. Band 
and 

Majorettes 





155 



Homecomin 
1975 



The events of Home- 
coming were all a great 
success topped off by a 
spectacular football vic- 
tory over Cohasset. The 
pep rally helped to get 
the entire into the spirit 
of the football game. Each 
class contributed their en- 
thusiasm and hard work 
to the parade in spite of 
the pouring rain and then 
went on to cheer the 
football team to victory. 
The week-end closed 
with the Steamers enter- 
taining at the victory 
dance. 




Sponsors 



Shirley Anastasi 

Barnes Liquor Mart 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Billia 

Mr. and Mrs. John M. Birdsall Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul Blackford 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Boli 

Mr. and Mrs. F. Bowes 

Mr. W. H. Brackett 

Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Campbell 

Captain Hills Nursery School 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Carroll 

Dr. Richard J. Clark 

S. Class 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Classon 

The Donald Coffins 

The Connors Family 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Coughlin 

Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Dewire 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul R. Drummy 

Michele Duffy 

Mr. Howard Ehrenzeller 

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Emerson 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Emery 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Fallon 

Mr. and Mrs. John Fasolino 

Mr. and Edgar Gilbert 

Mr. and Mrs. George Ghiorse 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Grealy 

Dr. Hackenbusch for his patience 

Mr. and Mrs. Paul C. Haffey 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Hamilton Jr. 

Mr. and H. P. Hanson 

Sylvia Harnon 

Harry and Pam Herckner 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Heidenreich 

Mr. and Mrs. John Hixon 

Janet Hobbs 

Lloyd A. Hobbs 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter W. Holden 

Brad Howard 

Mr. and Mrs. William Hovey 
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Kearney 



Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence King 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard T. Locke 

Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Loring Jr. 

David J. and Jaqueline Lowery 

Mr. and Mrs. George Lougas 

John Maguire 

Mr. and Mrs. McPhuison 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Moran 

Mr. and Mrs. Davey Norwood 

David A. Norwood 

Nana Norwood 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward C. Noon 

Priscillia H. Noyes 

Chris and Pam O'Brien 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Otsuki 

Mrs. Palmer 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Pentheny Jr. 
Robert and Jane Palmisano 
Duxbury Planter 
Mr. Ronald Pomroy 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Poturnicki 
Mr. and Mrs. Barry Pratt 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert L. Ryan 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Roe 
Duxbury Children's Shoppe 
Mr. and Mrs. Donald Short 
Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Sontag 
Mrs. F. L. Southwick 
E. B. Stenberg 
Jimmy Tassinari 
Eleanor Taylor 
John B. Taussig 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tenney Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Trayser 

Mr. and Mrs. B. Turrell 

The Vautrains 

Elizabeth B. Vinal 

K. D. Wakefield 

George B. Watson 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Whiton 

Mr. and Mrs. Tom Wilcox 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles B. Wyman 



158 



<rjj SINCE 1 103 

tlOl/gLC 


LuncAecn ^ Dinner /yes, 

Sunday J3runch // _5<^ 


thru. Sat & ux 

00 ?3 t /-A5 i /? 






AID 

■ — . ,., 


CONGRATULATIONS 
TO THE 




CLASS OF 76 


Ren's 

Variety 

Hall's Corner 
934-51% 


BENNETT'S STORE 



159 




*" 1 " " ' 




Duxbum Fixit 
5hop, Inc. 

\br*tf Cute vj 

Salci- Service Rental 
°l*/e 5ervite VihaV V/e>ll" 



B 




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BERGS 



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161 




Greengate 
congratulates 
the class of 76 

Jean & Hayden Mason 

Greengate Farm and Kennels 

Route 14 
Duxbury 




McDonald's 

I 



"WE DO IT ALL FOR YOU" 

MARSHFIELD AND 
PLYMOUTH 





BARNEV5 



Duxbuny Travel Service 

— Complcfc Trave.) Reserva \\ on S - 



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Duxborj.rtass. 

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162 



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163 



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ARTS 




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22 depot street duxburv. 




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YEAR You TRVLY 
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LTD 

i5P«p*i*. REALTORS fours Oner 





The Bicycle Center 
Duxbury, Ma. 





53 ITlouO St 

Plymouth 



164 



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ConpLi nenis o-f 








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Ocean s-t Rre 131 




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165 




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DUXBURY, MA 02332 



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934-5529 



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PLYWOOD JiANCH A 

No. Pembroke, I^Oglss. 




PANELLING 





an 



Kingston 




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Kin^or\ 



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166 



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INSURANCE 

AGENCY 


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Howcrds flolOerS 

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169 



The "Spirit of 76" is here; 
As you Seniors complete 
Your final year. 

The "Spirit of 76" is your theme; 
May your pursuits be real 
And not just a dream. 

May the future hold increased success; 
In resolving the problems 
Of our energy mess. 



ED New England Insulation 

155 Will Drive, Canton, Mass. 02021, Phone: 617/828-6600 
381 Hubbard St., Glastonbury, Conn. 06033, Phone: 203/633-3514 
85 St. James St., Portland, Maine 041 1 1 , Phone: 207/772-7481 



170 



% BRIDGEWATER • COHASSET • DUXBURY • HALIFAX • HANOVER 
HANOVER MALL • HANSON • HINGHAM • HULL • MARSHFIELD 
m NORWELL • PEMBROKE • PLYMOUTH • SCITUATE 




TRUST 



K L ASM C 

COMPANY 




MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION! 







Duxbury Travel Service 






Inc. 






Complete Travel 




Reservations 




Snug Harbor 




Duxbury, Mass 02332 






934-5633 


Best Wishes 


ENGINEERED PROTECTION 


M & M 


SYSTEMS INC 


Sporting Goods Co. Inc. 






P.O. Box 1546 • TIB Standish Street • 


35 Main Street 


Duxbury, Massachusetts 02332 


Plymouth Mass. 





171 



Creative Photography By 

J. David Congalton 

Photographer 

11 Washington St. 934-2887 
Duxbury, Mass. 


PHONE: 934-6348 
585-3639 
746-8707 

LaGRFCA BROTHFRS INC 

Appliance Sales & Service 

364 Summer St. 16 Court St. 
Duxbury, Mass. 02332 Plymouth, Mass. 02360 


Pilgrim Answering Service" 

"We Never Close" 
Bill & Jo-Ann )ohnson 

46 Hall St. Business Office 
Plymouth Mass. 746-7400 
Covering 
Kingston — Plymouth — Manomet 


Duxbury 
Children's Shoppe 

Duxbury, Mass. 

Distinctive Clothing For Children 
Infants - Size 14 


//££?TM CL/^F /A/AS 


STANDISH TRAVEL 

PO Rnx 1?30 • 1 S Washineton Street • So 
Duxbury, Mass. 02332 

MARJORIE F. LEONARD 


South Duxbury Pharmacy 
Inc. 

Edward Koplovsky B.S. Reg. Ph. 
Carl Leighton B.S. Reg. Ph. 

Prescription Specialists 

Hall's Corner Tel. 934-5431 
So. Duxbury Ma. 

"Cosmetics of Destinction" 



172 



Tel. 585-3406 



The Country Lane Pine Shop 



Pine Crafters 
Designers & Builders of Pine Furniture 



David ). Sullivan, Jr. 



41 Summer Street 
Kingston, Mass. 02364 



WESTWINDS BOOKSHOP 

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Duxbury, Mass. 934-2128 



Tel. 746-1440 

SHERMAN'S 
Ethan Allen Gallery 

We can help you have the home you want. 

310 Court Street 
Plymouth, Mass. 02360 

All Travel ArrangementsTelephone (617) 934- 

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bank where 
it counts ! 

Throughout Plymouth County 



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at Duxbury Plaza 
Member F.D.I.C. 



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173 





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44 Main Street, Plymouth 
Park Avenue, Plymouth 
Duxbury Plaza, Duxbury 
72 Summer Street, Kingston 
Marshfield Plaza, Marshfield 



(617) 746-3958 

CG Pool Service Co. 



Swimming Pools 



CLEM GEDUTIS 



19 MT. PLEASANT ST. 
PLYMOUTH, MA. 02360 







The 

VILLAGE 
PHARMACY 

F. Brant B.S. Reg. Pharm. 



WASHINGTON ST., DUXBURY, MASS. 
Telephone WE 4-2241 



174